Skip to main content

Full text of "Ontario Sessional Papers, 1900, No.26-32"

See other formats


fSP]SS10NAL PAPERS. 



VOL. XXXII.-PART VIII. 



THIRD I SESSION, NLNTH LEGISLATURE 



OF THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



SESSION lilOO. 




jj ' ^ 



TORONTO ; 

Printed and Published by L. K. CAMERON. 

Printer to the (Queen's Most E.xcellent Majesty. 
1900. 







WARWICK RRO'S & RUTTKK, Pkinters. 
T R N T 0. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



Presented to the House During the Session. 



Title. 



Accounts {Bom. (ind the Provinces), Awards ... 

Financial Commission 

" Report of Commission 

Public 

Agricultural Colleoe, Report 

" and Experimental Union, Report . 

" and Horticultural Societies, Report 

Amherstl->urof, Audit of Accounts 

Asylums, Report 



Barron, Judge, 0. in C 

Bee Keepers' Association, Report . . . . 

Binder Twine sold in 1899 

Births, Marria<jes and Deaths, Report 

Blanche River Pulp Company 

Blind Institute, Report 

Bonuses and Exemptions, Municipal. , 
Boys and Grirls reprieved 



Cheese and Butter Associations, Report. 

Children Neglected, Report 

Courts, moneys in 

Courts, Sittings of the 

Crown Lands, Report 



Deaf and Dumb Institute, Report, 

Divi.sion Courts, Report 

Doyle, Judge, O. in C 



Education. Rerort 

Elections, Returns 

Elgin West, Commission 

Entomological Societ3^ Report 
Estimates 



Factories, Report 

Factories, Employes in 

Farmers' Institutes, Report 

Financial Commission, Report . . . . 
Fruit Experiment Stations, Report 
Fruit Growers' Association, Report 
Fumigation Appliances, Report. . . . 



No. 



51 
47 
4 
1 
14 
15 
65 
59 
84 

64 
20 
72 
9 
49 
37 
69 
71 

22 
89 
55 
81 
3 

38 
29 

58 

12 

42 

46 

19 

2 



77 
24 
4 
17 
16 
44 



Remarks. 



PrinUif. 



Not printed. 

Printed. 

Not printed. 
Printed. 
Not prir) ted. 
Printed. 

Not printed. 

Printed^. 
Not printed. 
Printed. 
Printed. 
Not printed. 
Printed. 



Printed. 
Not printed. 
Printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



[ 1900 



Title. 



Game and Fish, Report . . 
Gaols, Prisons, etc., Report. 
Guarantee Policies , 



Health, Report 

Hoskin, John, salarj^ 

Hospitals and Charities, Report 



Immigration, Report 

Imperial Institute, Canadian Section . . . 

Infants, Moneys of", in Court 

Industries, Report 

Insurance, Report 

Insurance Company's, Guarantee Policies 



of 



Judicature Act, Judges fees under 

Judicature, Court of, money in, or under control of 



Legal Offices, Report .... 
Leeds and Grenville, claim 

Library, Report on 

License Inspectors, names of, etc. 

Liquor Licenses, Report 

Live Stock Associations, Report 
Live Stock, Registrar of. Report 
Loan Corporations, Report 



McNiven, Donald, appointment of . . . 
Manufacturing Industries, Bonuses to 

M avor's Report , 

Mines, Report . 

Mines Act, regulations 

Moneys in the Courts 

Morson, Judge, O. in C 

Municipal Auditor, Report 

Municipal Bonuses and Exemptions . . 



No. 



27 
3o 
63 

82 
75 

36 

28 
74 
53 
26 
10 
63 

58, 61, 

62. 64 

55 

30 
82 
45 
67 
40 
23 
73 
11 

54 
69 
40 
5 
56 
55 
61 
41 
69 



Remarks. 



Nepigon Pulp Company 80 

North Augusta License , 60 

Ontario Power Company, agreement 79 

Poultry Associations, Report 21 

Printing and Binding, Tenders 57 

Prisons and Reformatories, Report 35 

Provincial Municipal Auditor, Report 41 

Public Accounts 1 

' Commission 47 

" Report of Commission 1 4 

Public Works, Report I 7 



Printed. 

Not printed. 

Printed. 
Not printed. 
Printed. 

Printed. 
Not printed. 

Printed. 

Not printed. 

Not printed. 

{{ 

Printed. 
Not printed. 

Printed. 



Not printed. 
Printed. 

cc 

IC 

Not printed. 

Printed. 

Not printed. 

Printed. 
Not jorinted. 

Not printed. 

Printed. 



1900 ] 



LIST OF SESSIOHAL PAPERS. 



Title. 



Pulp Company, Spanish River 

" Blanche River 

" Nepigon River 

Queen vs. Bole and Cahill 

Queen Victoria Niagara Falls Park, Report 

agreement with On 
tario Power Company , 

Registry Offices, Report of Inspector 

Revenue received in 1899 

Road-making, Report 

San Jose Scale, Report 

Secretary and Registrar, Report 

Spanish River Pulp Company 

Spraying, Report of Superintendent 

Statutes, distribution, correspondence , 

" distribution , 

Tavern and Shop Licenses Act, Report 

Thedf ord License 

Titles, Report of Master . , 

Toronto University, Reports , 

Upper Canada College, Report 

Warren, Frederick, appointment of , 

West Elgin Commission 

Workmen's Compensation, Mavor's Report 



No. 


Remarks. 


50 
49 

80 


Printed. 


70 
6 


Not 'printed 
Printed. 


79 


Not printed. 


31 

76 
25 


Printed. 
Not printed. 
Printed. 


43 
38 

50 

18 
78 
52 


Printed. 

C( 

(( 

(( 

Not printed. 


40 
84 
68 
13 


Printed. 
Not printed. 

Printed. 


83 


Printed. 


66 
46 
40 


Not printed 
Printed, 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



Arranged in Numerical Order with their titles at fidl length ; the dates when 
Ordered and lulien presented lo the Legislature ; the name of the Member 
ivho moved the same, and. whether Ordered to he Printed or not. 



No. 1 



No. 3. 



No. 4.. 



No. 6, 



No. 7 



No. 8. 



No. 9, 



No. 10.. 



No. 11 



CONTENTS PART I. 



Public Accounts of the Province for the year 
Legislature, 6th March, 1900. Printed. 



1899. Presented to the 



Estimates (Vote of Credit) for the year 1900 Presented to the Legis- 
lature, Irith February, 1900. Not Printed. Estimates for the 
year 1900. Presented to the Legislature, 6th March, 19O0. 
Printed. Estimates (Supplementary). Presented to the Legisla- 
ture, 25th April, 1900. Printed. 



Report of the Commissioner of Crown Lands for the year 1899. 
sented to the Legislature, 29th March, 1900. Printed. 



Pre- 



Report of the Royal Commission, on the Financial position of the 
Province. Presented to the Legislature, 6th March, 1900. Printed. 



CONTENTS PART IL 



Report of the Bureau of Mines for the year 
Legislature, 25th April, 1900. Printed. 



1899. Presented to the 



Report of the Commissioners for the Queen Victoria Niagara Falls 
Park for the year 1899. Presented to the Legislature. 23rd April, 
1900. Printed. 

Report of the Commis-ionpr of Public "Works for the year 1899. Pre- 
sente<l to the Legislature, 13th March, 1900. Printed. 



Report of the Inspectors of Factcn'ies for the year 1899. 
the Legislature, 6th April, 1900. Printed. 



Presented to 



Report upon the Registration of Births, Marriages and Deaths in the 
Province for the year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 9th 
March, 1900. Printed. 

CONTENTS PART III. 

Report of the Inspector of Insurance and Registrar of Friendly Societies 
for the year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 6th April, 1900. 
Printed. 

CONTENTS PART IV. 

Report of the Financial Stat«^ments made by Loan Corporations for the 
year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 6th April, 1900. Printed. 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



[ 1900 



CONTENTS PART V. 

Report of the Minister of Education for the year 1899, with the Statis- 
tics of 189c->. Pre8<5nted to the Legislature, 8th Mar^-h, 19uO. 
Printed. 

Reports of Auditor and Standing Committee on Finance for 1899-1900' 
)f the University of Toronto. Presented to the Legislature, 10th Aprih 
1900. Printed. 

Report of the Ontario Agricultural College and Experimental Farm for 
the year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 17th April, 190;). 
Printed. 

CONTENTS PART VI. 

Report of the Agricultural and Experimental Union of Ontario for the 
year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 26th March, 1900. 
Priyited. 

Report of the Fruit Growers' Association of Ontario for the year 1899 
Presented to the Legislature, 2.*ird April, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Fruit Experiment Stations of Ontario for the year 1899. 
Presented to the Legislature, 28rd April, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Superintendent of Sprajdng for the year 1899. Presented 
to the Legislature, 12th March, 19uO. Printed 

Report of the Entomological Society of Ontario for the year 1899. 
Presented to the Le;^islature, 2Lst March, 1900. Printed,. 

Report of the Bee Keepers' Association for the Province for the year 
1899. Presented to the Legislature, 6th April, 19i)0. Printed. 

Report of the Poultry Associations of the Province for the year 1899. 
Presented to the Legislature, 23rd April, I'JOO. Printed. 



CONTENTS PART VII. 

Report of the Cheese and Butter Associations of the Province for the 
year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 23rd April, 1900 
Printed. 

Report of the Live Stock Associations of the Province for the year 1899,- 
Presented to the Legislature, 23rd April, 19uO. Printed. 

Report of the Superintendent of Farmers' Institutes of the Province for 
the year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 23rd April, 1900. 
Printed. 

Report of the Provincial Instructor in Road Making in Ontario for the 
year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 23rd April, 1900. 
Printed. 



1900 ] 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



No. 


26.. 


ISo. 


27.. 


No. 


28.. 


No. 


2:>.. 


No. 


30.. 


No, 


31.. 


No. 


32.. 



No. 


33 . . 


No. 


34.. 


No. 


35.. 


No. 


36.. 


No. 


37.. 


No. 


38.. 


Nu. 


39.. 



OON'i'EiNTiS PART YLiL 

Report of the Bureau of Industries for the year 1899. Presented to the 
Legislature, 23rd April, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Ontario Game and Fish Commissioners for the year 1899. 
Presented to the Legislature, (Jth April, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Department of Immigration for the year 1899. Presented 
to the Legislature, 28th March, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Inspector of Division Courts for the year 1899. Presented 
to the Legislature, 12th March, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Inspector of Legal Offices for the year 1899. Presented 
to the Legislature, 9th March, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Inspector of Registry Offices for the year 1899 with state- 
ment of fees and emoluments of Registrars. Presented to the Legisla- 
ture, 23rd April, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Provincial Board of Health for the year 1899. Presented 
to the Legislature, 25th April, 1900. Printed. 



CONTENTS PART IX. 

Report of the Secretary and Registrar of the Province for the year 
I8'c»y. Presented to the Legislature, 25th April, 1900. Printed. 

Report upon the Lunatic and Idiot Asylums for the Province for the 
yuar ending 30th September, 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 
Gth March, 1900. Printed. 

Report upon the Common Gaols, Prisons and Reformatories of the Pro- 
vince for the year ending 30th September, 1899. Presented to the 
Legislature, 13th March, 1900. Printed. 

Report upoQ the Hospitals of the Province for the year ending the 30th 
September, 1899, Presented to the Legislature, 28th March, 1900. 
Printed. 

Report upon the Institution for the Education of the Blind, Brantford, 
for the year ending 30th September, 1899. Presented to the 
Legislature, 13th March, 1900. Printed. 

Report upon the Institution for the Education of the Deaf and Dumb, 
Belleville, for the year ending 30th September, 1899. Presented 
to the Legislature, 6th March, 1900. Printed. 



CONTENTS PART X. 

Report of the Work under the Children's Protection Act for the year 
189 '. Presented to th- Legislature, 15th March, 1900. Printed. 



10 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



[ 1900 



No. 40. 
No. 41, 
No. 42, 



No. 43. 

No. 44. 
No. 45, 

No. 46, 



Report on the working of the Tavern and Shop Licenses Acts for the 
year 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 6th March, 1900. Printed. 



Report of the Provincial Municipal Au'Iitor for the year 1899. 
sented to the Legislature, 18th March, 1900. Privted. 



Pre- 



Return from the Record of the several Elections o' the Legislative As- 
sembly in the Electoral Divisions of West Peterborough, South Ren- 
frew, East Elgin, West Elgin, South Brant, and East Middlesex, 
since the General Election of March 1st, 189>>, shewing: — (1) The 
number of Votes polled for each Candidate in the Electoral District 
in which there was a contest. (2) The majority whereby each 
successful Candidate was returned. (H) The total immber of Votes 
polled in each District. (4) The number of Votes remaining 
unpolled. (5) The number of names on the Voters' Lists in each 
District. (6) The population of each District as shewn by the last 
Census. Piesented to the Legislature, 20th February, 1900. Printed. 

Report of the Commission of Enquiry, concerning the operation of the 
Snn Jose Scale Act, 1899. Presented to the Legislature, 12th March, 
1900. Printed. 

Report of the Inspector of FumigMtion Appliances for the year 1899. 
Presented to the Legislature, 12th March, 1900. Printed. 



Report of the Librarian on the state of the Library. 
Legislature, 14th February, 1900. Not printed. 



Presented to the 



No. 47. 

No. 48, 
No. 49 



No. 50 
No. 51 



Copy of an Order-in-Council, approved by His Honour the Lieutenant- 
Governor the thirty-first day of January, 1900, directing that a 
Commission be appointed to enquire into matters connected with 
the election for the West Riding of Elgin, and also a copy of the 
Commission issued thereunder. Presented to the Legislature, 15th 
February, 1900. Printed. 

Copy of a Commission appointing Messieurs Hoskin, Walker and Kirk- 
land, Commis-ioners to enquire into the Financial affairs of the 
Province of Ontario. Presented to tbe Legislatute, 19th February, 
1900. Printed. 

Report by Prof. James Mavor on Workmen's Compensation for Injuries. 
Presented to the Legislature, 25th April, 1900. Printed. 

Copy of Agreement between Her Majesty, represented by the Honour- 
able the Commissioner of Crown Lands, of the one part, and the 
Blanche River Pulp and Paper Company, Limited, of the other 
l^art, and bearinij date on the 14th April, 1900. Presented to the 
Legislature, 23rd April, 1900. Printed. 

Copy of Agreement with the Spanish River Pulp and Paper Company 
Limited. Presented to the Legislature, 18th March, 1900. Printed. 

Awards of the Arbitrators on the Unsettled Accounts between the 
Dominion of Canada and the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. 
Presented to the Legislature, 13th March, 1900. Printed. 



1900 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



11 



No. 



No. 53. 



No. .54 



No. 



O J 



No. 56.. 



No 57 



No. 58 



No. 59 



jStatement as to distribution of the Statutes, Revised and Sessional, 
I for the year, 1899. Pre.sented to the Legislature, 7th March, 1900.' 
Not Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the Seventeenth day of March, 
].r^99, for a Return shewing specificially the nature and amount of 
each investment now outstanding of the moneys or funds of infants 
and others iu Court, the date when each such investment was 
made, the rate of interest the same bears, when and how payable, 
and the security held for each of such investments. Presented to 
the Legislature, 7Lh March, 1900. Mr. Carscalien. Not Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the Sixth day of March, 1900, for 
a Return of copies of all cot respondence in connection with the 
apponitment of Donald McNiven, as a fishery officer for Lake 
Snncoe, together with copies of all reports made by him. Pre- 
sented to the Legislature, 7th March, 1900. Mr. Thompson 
Not Printed. ^ 

Return to an Order of the House of the Seventeenth day of March, 
1899, for a Return shewing the total amount of moneys now on 
deposit in, or subject to the control and distribution of the 
Supreme Court of Judicature for Ontario, or either division there- 
of ; the style of cause of each action or proceeding in which such 
moneys have been so paid in, and the County in which each action 
or proceedings was commenced, as far as practicable, together with 
the axjount now standing to the credit of each such action or pro- 
ceeding ; the names of the p,'rsons by whom such payments were 
respectively made, and on what account, where practicable ; the 
names of and last known addresses of the persons entitled tliereto, 
m_ all cases in which no payment out of Court has been made 
within the last ten years, so far as appears by the books and papers 
m the office of the Accountant of the Supreme Court of Judicature 
for Ontario, and the amounts due to such persons respectively, so 
far as appears by the said books. Presented to the Legislature 
9th March, 1900. Mr. Carscallen. Not printed. 

Regulations in re Staking out ;Locations under Mines Act, in the 
unsurveyed territory of Ontario. Presented to the Lesrislature 
12th March, 1900. Printed. * 

Reported ion ^Tenders for Departmental and Legislative Printing and 
Binding, and Contraqt with Warwick Bro's^& Rutter. Pres'ented 
to the Legislature, 15th March, 1900. Printed. 

Copy of Order in Council directing the payment of Surplus Surrogate 
tees to His Honour Judge Doyle. Presented to the Lec^islature 
16th March, 1900. Not Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the twenty-second day of March, 
1899, for a Return of copies of all pipers and correspondence 
between any member of the Government and any individual with 
respect to the audit asked for by citizens of the Town of Amherst- 
burg, of the accounts of the local collector. Presented to the Legis- 
lature, 21st March, 1900. Mr. Reid, (Addington.) Not Printed 



12 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



[ 1900 



No. 60, 



No. 61 



No. 62, 



No. 63. 



No. 64. 



No 65, 



No. 66, 



No. 67, 



No. 68, 
No. 69, 



Return to an Order of the Hous.; of the twenty-tirst day of March, 
1900, for a Return of copies of all instructions issued by tiie 
Department to the inspector or commissioners of the County of 
Grenville, referring to application for hotel licenses in the Vill- 
age of North Augusta in the County of Grenville, for the last 
four years, and all reports from the commissioners and inspector 
in relation thereto. Presented to the Legislature, 22nd March, 
1900. Mr. Joynt Not Printed. 

Copy of an Order-in-Council commuting the Surrogate Court fees pay- 
able to His Honour Judge Morson. Presented to the Legislature., 
22nd March, 1900. Not Printed. 

Copy of an Order-in-Council respecting the payment to certain Judges 
mentioned therein of surplus Surrogate fees. Presented to the 
Legislature, 22nd March, 1900. Not Printed. 

Copy of an Order-in-Council directing that the bonds or guarantee 
policies of certain insurance companies mentioned therein may be 
given and accepted as security under the Statutes of Ontario. 
Presented to the Legislature, 22nd March, 1900. Not Printed. 

Copy of an Order-in-Council commuting the fees of His Honour Judge 
Barron as Local Master at Stratford. Presented to the Legislature, 
22nd March, 1900. Not Printed. 

Analysis of Reports of District, Township, Agricultural and Horticul- 
tural Societies for the years 1887, 1888 and 1889. Presented to 
the Legislature, 28th March, 1900. Not Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the sixteenth day of March, 1900 
for a Return of copies of all correspondence in connection with the 
appointment of Frederick Warren as Division Court Clerk in the 
Township of Osnabruck in the County of Stormont. Presented to 
the Legislature, 28th March, 1900. Mr. McLaughlin.' Not 
Printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the sixth day of March, 1900, for 
a Return shewing : — 

1st. The name and salary of each License Inspector in the 
Province for the year 1899, and the County for which he was 
appointed. 

2nd. The amount allowed, each such Inspector for expenses. 

8rd. The names of License Commissioners in each License 
District and the amount of expenses allowed to each in the year 
1899. Presented to the Legislature, 29th March, 1900. Mr. Marter. 
Not printed. 

Report of the Master of Titles for the year 1899. Presented to the 
Legislature, 4th April, 1900. Not 'printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the first day of March, 1899, for a 
Return giving information under the following heads, respecting 
bonuses and exemptions to manufacturing industries granted by 
each municipality in the Province since the year 1870: — 1. Amount 



1900 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



13 



^o. 70. 



No. 71. 



No. 72 



No.. 73, 



No. 74.. 



No. 75.. 



of aid by way of absolute bonus and the names of firms or com- 
panies receiving same. 2. Amount of aid by way of loan, with 
names of firms or companies receiving same Mud the amount of 
such loan or loans repaid to each municipality. 3. Number of 
factories which have been granted exemptions from taxation in 
whole or in part, and approximately the amount of such exemp- 
tion based on municipal a-sessors' estimate of the rateable property 
of each industry. 4. Number of firms or companies which have 
received municipal aid in any form, more than once 5. Number 
of such firms or companies which have failed or removed from the 
municipalities which gave them aid by way of bonus, loan or 
exemption. Presented to the Legislature, 4th April, 1900. Mr. 
i'attullo. Not printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the seventh day of March, 190O, 
for a Return of copies of all correspondence between the Govern- 
ment or any member thereof, or any official of the Government 
and the County Crown Attorney of Elgin, or any other person, in 
connection with the cases of Queen vs. Bole, and Queen vs. Cahill. 
Presented to the Legislature, 4th April, 1900. Mr. McDiarmid. 
Not printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the twenty sixth day of March, 
1900, for a Return shewing names, or the official numbers, of Boys 
reprieved from the Penetanguishene Reformatory, and of Girls 
reprieved from the Industrial Refuge for Girls, Toronto, during 
the two years previous to the first February, 1900. The date wh»n 
the reprieve was recommended by the Warden or Superintendent. 
The date when the reprieve was finally granted. Presented to the 
Legislature, 4th April, 1900. Mr. Pyne. i\ ot printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the .sixth day of April, 1900, for a 
Return, shewing the quantity of binder twine sold during the sea- 
son of l?i99. To whom sold, with names of purchasers and price 
per pound received. Shewing as well, the names of persons still 
indebted to the Government, and to what amount, in each case. 
Presented to the Legislature, 6th April, 1900. Mr. Duf. Not 
printed. 



Report of the Registrar of Live Stock for tbeyear 1899. 
the Legislature, 9th April, 1900. Printed. 



Presented to 



Commercial Report of the Canadian Section of the Imperial Institute. 
Presented to the Legislature, 10th April, 1900. Not printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the seventh day of March, 1900, 
for a Return shewing the salary paid to Mr. John Hoskin as Official 
Guardian. The number and names of the clerks in his office with 
dates of appointment, and the salary paid by Government to each. 
Also shev^ring what other emoluments are received by Mr. Hoskin 
as such Official Guardian each year, and what aoiount of other 
emoulment, if any, was so received or earned by Mr. Ho.skin for 
the year 1899 in his capacity as such official guardian. Presented 
to the Legislature, 10th April, 1900. Mr. Whitney. Not 
Printed. 



14 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



[ 1900 



ISIo. 76. .iKeturn to an Order of the House of the second day of April, 1900, for 
a Return shewing amount of Kevenue received during the year 

1899, by each of the Departments of Government as audited and 
pa'jsed by the Commission appointed to investigate and report asto- 
the Finances of the Province. Presented to the Legislature, lOtb 
April, 1900. My. Miscamphdl. Nut prinied. 

No. 77. . Return to an Order of the House of the sixteenth day of March, 1900^ 
for a Return stjiting the number of hours female e7vploye>i in fac- 
tories have to work each day. Also the minimum amount of 
wages paid per day to an\- female empioyp- under the Factory Act, 
Also, whether separate sanitary conveniences are supplied where 
male and female emyloyes are working, under the Factory Act. 
And shewing as well what system of Government inspection the 
factories are now under. Presented to the Legislature, 11th April, 

1900. Mr. Pyne. Not 'printed. 

!No. 78. .Return to an Order of the House of the nineteenth day of TV^arch, 1900, 
for a Return of copies of all correspondence between any member 
of the Government and any official theieof relating to the distribu- 
tion of the Statutes. Presented to the Legislature, 18th April, 
1900. Mr. Carnegie. Not Printed. 

No. 79. . Agreement between the Commissioners of the Queen Victoria Niagara 
Falls Park and the Ontario Power Company of Niagara Falls, 
dated llth day of April, 1900. Presented to the Legislature, 17th 
April, 1900. Not printed. 

No. 80. . Agreement between Her Majesty, represented by the Honourable the 
Commissioner of Crown Lands of the fiist part and The Nepigon 
Pulp, Paper and Manufacturing Company, Limited, of the other 
part, bearing date on the 18th April, 1900. Presented to the 
Legislature, 20th April, 1900. Printed. 



No. 81 



No. 82. 



Return to an Order of the House of the fourteenth day of March, 19 OO 
for a Return shewing the number of dates and places of sittings o£ 
the County and Districts Courts, and Courts of General Sessions- 
of the Peace, Oyer and Terminer and General Gaol delivery and of 
the High Court of Justice, respectively, held in the various county 
and district towns of the Province, during the years 1895 to 1899, 
both inclusive : — 

(a) At which there has been no business to be tried before th& 
petit jury,— 

(h) At which there has been no action, matter or other pro- 
ceedings to be tried by a judge without a jury, — 

(c) At which there have been no indictments laid before the 
Grand Jury, Presented to the Legislature, 23rd April, 1900. Mr, 
Hoyle. Not printed. 

Return to an Order of the House of the fourth day of April, 1900, for 
a Return of copies of all correspondence and papers, between any 
member of the Government, or any official thereof, or any other 
person or persons, in reference to a claim made by the Counties ot 



1900 ] 



LIST OF SESSIONAL PAPERS. 



15' 



No. 8-S.. 



No. 84.. 



Leeds and Grenville against the Government re Criminal Justice 
Account shewing as well, the balance due the Counties. Presented 
to the Legislature, 23rd April, 1900. Mr. Joynt. Not printed. 

Report of Upper Canada College and Bursars Statement, for the year 
1899. Presented to the Legislature, 26th April, 1900. Printed. 

Return to an Older of the House of the ninth day of April, 1900, for 
a Return of copies of all correspondence between the License Com- 
missioners or License Inspector for the East Riding of the County 
of Lambton, or any person, relating to the issuing of a Liquor 
License in the Village of Thedford for the year 1900. Presented 
to the Legislature, 26th April, 1900. Mr. Marter. Not Printed. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 

1899. 

PART I.-AGRI CULTURAL STATISTICS. 

PART II.-CHATTEL MORTGAGES, 



{PUBLISHED BY THE ONTARIO DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, TORONTO. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE 

LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 




TORONTO: 

Printed and Published by L. K. CAMERON. 

Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty. 
1900. 




WARWICK BRO'.S & RUTTER, PiiiNTEKS. 
TO BOX TO. 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES 



PARTS I. AND II 



1899. 



To THB Honorable the Minister of Agriculture : 

, Sir, — I have the honor to present herewith Part I. of the Eighteenth Aunual 
Report of the Bureau of Industries, being the Agricultural Statistics of Ontario for 
the year 1899 ; also Part II. relating to Chattel Mortgages. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient Servant, 

C. C JAMES, 

Secretary. 
Toronto, August 28th, 1900. 



3] 



CONTENTS. 



PART I.-AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 

PA6E 

The Weather : Reneral review, showing the monthly temperature, rainfall and sunshine for the ten 

y e^rs 1890-9 T 

The Rrain Crop : General description as to condition and harvest : 

Fall Wheat » 

Spring Wheat 11 

Barley 11 

Oats 11 

Peas 11 

Beans 12 

Rye 12 

Buckwheat 1^ 

Corn 12 

Field Roots : General description. 

Potatoes 13 

Carrots 13 

Mangels * 13 

Turnips 13 

Sugar Beets 13 

Hat and Clover : General description 13 

Clover seed 14 

Fboit and Fruit Trees : General description 14 

Miscellaneous : 

Flax 15 

Tobacco 15 

Hops 15 

Lucerne 15 

Rape '. 15 

Farm supplies 15 

Fall Plowing 16 

Threshing and Marketing 16 

Farm Improvements 16 

Live Stock and the Dairy : General review as to condition in 1899. 

Live Stock *. Iti 

Average value per head 17 

Poultry 17 

The Apiary 17 

The Dairy 18 

Cheese Factories 18 

Creameries , .• 18 

Labor and Wages : General condition, with statistics of average wages of farm laborers and domestic 

servants for ten year.s 10 

Statistics of the Weather : Showing details by months and stations or districts. 

Temperature, 1899 20 

Temperature 1882-99 21 

Rain and Snow 22, 23 

Sunshine 2-^ 

[5] 



CONTENTS. 



PACK 

Toronto Observatory. 24 

Eegister at Lake Temiscamingue 25 

RcRAL Abea Assessed : Showing by counties as taken by municipal assessors for 1899, the total area, 
acres deared, acres in woodland and'acres in sivatrip or ivaste lands ; also totals for the Province 

for the ten years 1890-9 , 26 

Statistics of Field Crops ; Showing by counties the area, produce and market values for the year 
1899, together with totals for the Province for the past ten years and the averages for the 
period 1882-99 ; also the averages per acre. 

Fall Wheat 27 

Spring wheat 27 

Barley 28 

Oats 28 

Peas ■ 29 

Beans 29 

Eye.. 30 

Buckwheat ^^ 

Corn 31 

Potatoes ' 32 

Carrots 32 

Mangel-wurzels 33 

Turnips • • 33 

Hay and clover 34 

All field crops, as above 34 

Ratios of areas dnder each Crop in 1899 per 1,000 acres of cleared land 35 

Pasture— Orchard— Vineyard— Apples 36 

Statistics of Live Stock : Showing by counties the number and value of stock on hand July 1, 1899, 
together with the number and value of those sold or slaughtered during the year ending June 
30, 1899 ; also comparative totals for the Province. 

Horses 37 

Cattle 38 

Sheep 39 

Hogs •♦O 

Poultry 41 

Wool : Showing by counties the clip in 1899 . 42 

Bkes : Showing by counties the number of colonies and value (including outfit) 42 

Values of Farm Property : Showing by counties the value of farm land, farm buildings, implements 

and live stock 43 

Farm values per acre occupied 44 

Value of buildings, implements and live stock per acre cleared 44 

Rentals of leased farms 44 

Market Prices : Showing for the leading markets of Ontario the average prices of agricultural pro- 
ducts for the last six months of 1899, with comparative averages for the Province for ten years. 45 

Cheese Factories : Showing by counties the number of cheese factories in operation in 1899, the 
quantity and value of cheese made, the number of patrons and the amount paid to patrons, 

together with the totals for the Province for ten years 46 

PART II.— CHATTEL MORTGAGES. 

Chattel Mortgages on Record : Showing by counties the number and amount of chattel mortgages 
on record and undischarged on December 31, 1^99, against (1) all occupations, (2) farmers ; also 

totals for the Province for ten years , . . 47 



Inoex 48 



ONTARIO BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



PART I.-AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS. 



THE WEATHER. 



While the nature of the soil and the method of tillage are important factors in the 
raising of crops, much also depends upon temperature, precipitation and sunshine. Un- 
timely frosts may do great injury, and a too heavy precipitation, or the absence of rain 
for too long a period, may alter the prospects of the growing crops. Sunshine, too, has 
an important bearing upon the proper maturing of both grain and fruit. In the light of 
these facts the following weather tables will be found both interesting and instructive. 

Temperature, The following table gives the average temperature of the Province 
for the calendar year and for the six months from April to September inclusive — 
practically the growing season — for the past ten years, and also the average for the 
eighteen years, 1882-99 : 



Months. 



January . . . 
February. . 
March . . . . 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August . . . . 
September. 
October . . . 
November 



1899. 



18.7 
15.2 
25.8 
44.5 
55.7 
6t.8 
67.5 
68.5 
56.2 
50.0 
.S8.0 



December 25 . 1 



Annual mean 

Mean for six month.^; 
April-September. . 



44.2 
1-59.5 



1898. 


1897. 


1896. 


1895. 


1894. 


1893. 


1892. 


1891. 


1890. 


1882- 
99. 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


20.2 


19 5 


18.4 


17.3 


23.1 


10.3 


17.0 


20.9 


24.9 


17.4 


22.0 


21.8 


19.2 


14.5 


16.9 


14.7 


21.9 


23 4 


24.1 


18.3 


35.6 


29.0 


21.2 


21.5 


34.9 


26.4 


25.2 


26.2 


24.7 


25.6 


42.1 


42.7 


46.3 


43 3 


44.3 


38.7 


40.3 


43.0 


41.5 


41.6 


55.5 


52.9 


60.1 


56 9 


53.7 


.52.2 


52.2 


51.9 


50.0 


53.6 


65.6 


60.9 


64.8 


68.0 


66.1 


67.6 


65.4 


65.4 


65.6 


64.3 


70.2 


71.9 


68 8 


65.5 


69.1 


68.3 


68.3 


63.7 


67.2 


67.7 


67.7 


64.2 


67 2 


65 3 


64 


66 1 


66 6 


64 8 


63.1 


65.5 


61.8 


60.8 


.56.8 


60.5 


61.1 


56.0 


58 8 


61.5 


56.5 


58.3 


48.7 


50.1 


4.3 4 


41 4 


48.8 


48 2 


46 6 


46.1 


46.8 


46.1 


34.9 


34.9 


37.8 


31 5 


31.6 


35.1 


33.1 


35.1 


35.2 


34.9 


22.8 


24 6 


24.1 


25 8 


27.7 


20.7 


21.8 


31.5 


18.8 


24.3 


45.6 


44 4 


44.0 


42.9 


45.1 


42.0 


43.1 


44.5 


43.2 


43.1 


60.5 


8.9 


60.7 


59.9 


59.7 


58.2 


58.6 


58.4 


57.3 


58 5 



The ten stations from which the above averages are derived are situated at Saugeen 
(Biuce Co.), Birnam (Lambton), London (Middlesex), Woodstock (Oxford), Sfeoney Creek 
(Wentworth), Toronto (York), Lindsay (Victoria), Gravenhurst (Muskoka), Ottawa 
(Oarleton) and Rockliflfe (Renfrew). The details will be found in Tables I and II (pages 
20 and 21) The mean temperature for the six months, was one degree below the average 
of the preceding year, but was one degree above the average of the past eighteen years. 
The mean temperature for the whole year shows similar results, ranging from 38.4 at 
Rockliffe to 48.5 at Stoney Creek. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 26 



Precipitation. The fall of rain and snow in the winter months is given in the 
following table for ten years, together with the average for the eighteen years. An inok 
of rain is estimated to be the equivalent of ten inches of snow : 



Year. 


November. 


1 i 




Rain. 


Snow. 


- 


in. 


in. 


1899 


1.67 


9.6 


1898 


3.40 


8.9 


1897 


2 51 


6.2 


1896 


2.47 


7.7 


1895 


0.78 


11.4 


1894 


1.97 


9.9 


1893 


2 09 


10,8 


1892 


3 91 


7.4 


1891 


2.46 


4.3 


1890 


2.37 


11.0 


1882-99.... 


2.18 


8.8 



















Total for 


December. 


January. 


February. 


March. 


five months. 


Rain. 


Snow. 


Rain. 


Snow. 


Ram. 


Snow. 


Rain. 


Snow. 


Rain. 


1 
Snow. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


0.74 


24 6 


1.50 


13.2 


0.76 


8 


1.78 


22.1 


6.45 


77.5 


1.73 


17 5 


1 47 


18.2 


60 


18 9 


2.42 


1,0 


9 62 


64.5 


0.37 


9.6 


1.15 


17.3 


0.89 


14.1 


1.52 


12.7 


6 44 


59.9 


2.22 


13.2 


0.65 


17.1 


0.46 


24.5 


74 


11.4 


6,.')4 


73.9 


1.49 


6.6 


0.77 


31.3 


0,08 


12.0 


41 


10,8 


3.63 


72.1 


1.85 


26 2 


0.91 


14.0 


0.59 


15.1 


1.15 


4 8 


6 47 


70 


0.68 


11.6 


0.43 


25.5 


0.73 


24.3 


1,19 


5.4 


5,12 


77 6 


1.84 


6 4 


0.44 


21 7 


0,66 


16.7 


50 


7.7 


7 35 


5V>.9 


0.35 


20.1 


1.37 


13.9 


1.77 


13 3 


1,46 


19.7 


7.41 


71.3 


3.20 


6 3 


2.69 


12.9 


1.60 


12.9 


0.81 


13.1 


10.57 


56.2 


1.31 


15.4 


1.07 


20.5 


0.92 


16.2 


1.10 


11,5 


6.58 


72.4 



The rainfall for the Province for the five months comprising the table was 6.4& 
inches, being slightly less than the average for the years 1882 99 ; bub the snowfall 
amounted to 77.5 inches, or 5.1 inches more than the average for the eighteen years. 
November and December were marked by light rainfalls and heavy precipitations of 
snow, while January and February were characterized by an unusually light fall of snow. 
The total precipitation for March was nearly double of the average of that month. The 
precipitation for the whole year by districts will be found in Tables III and IV 
(pages 22 and 23). 

The growing season, however, is limited mainly to the six months, April September, 
and the rainfall during the month cf that important period is shown in the following 
table for ten years, together with the averages derived for the eighteen years, 1882-99 : 



Months. 



A pril 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

Total for the six^ 
months April- > 
September j 



1899. 


in, 


1.10 


3.43 


2.46 


2,78 


0.81 


3.72 


14.30 



1898. 



ID. 

1.45 
2.43 
2.83 
1.11 
2.64 
2.94 



13.40 



1897. 


1896. 


1895. 


1894. 


1893. 


1892. 


1891. 


1890. 


1882- 
99. 


in. 


in. 


in 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


2,52 


1.26 


1.49 


0.99 


2.61 


1.15 


1.77 


2.07 


1.53 


3.38 


2.10 


2.36 


5.72 


3.35 


3,64 


1.07 


3.24 


2 89 


2 83 


2.39 


1.37 


2,32 


3.15 


4,54 


1 84 


3.75 


2 80 


5.36 


2.79 


2.02 


1.72 


2,44 


2 73 


3.50 


2 79 


2 66 


2.62 


2 ^6 


2.81 


0.84 


2.67 


4.5i6 


3 93 


3.22 


2.52 


0,83 


4.47 


2.67 


3.73 


1.94 


3.84 


2.03 


2.03 


2.61 


17.54 


15.87 


12.72 


15.32 


16.16 


20,16 


14.14 


17 10 


14.91 



The total rainfall for the Province for the six months was 14.30 inches, or .61 inch- 
below the average for 1882-99. The north- west and north district had the heaviest 
precipitation, 16.80 inches being rfgistered for the six months, while the rainfall in the 
west and south-west was five inches below the average. August was one of the driest 
months on record, an average of only .81 inch of rain having fallen, compared with 
2.52 for the eighteen years. 



Sunshine. The following table gives an annual comparison by months for the 
past ten years of the average hours of sunshine in the Province as derived from the 
records of the stations at Woodstock, Toronto, Barrie, Lindsay and Kingston. The 



1899 J 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



averages for the eighteen years 1882 99, are also given as well as the totals for the calendar 
year and for the six months, April to September : 





















1 




Month?. 


above 
horizon. 


1899. 


1898 


1897. 


1896. 


1895. 


1894. 


1893. 


1892. 


1891. 1890. 


1882- 
99. 




Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hrs. : Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hrs. 


Hre. 


Hrs. Hrs. 


Hrs. 


January. . . 


285 7 


90.8, 76.2 70 4 


52 3, 73 


74.6 


64.0 


72 8 


62.6 50 5 


68.8 


February . . 


*291.4 


112.8 


69.3 93 7, 104.0 


110.2 


124.2 


93.8 


93 6 


89.8 69 


92.8 


March. . . 


S69 9 133.2 


157 5 148.3 188.1 


179 6 


127.5 


150.4 


174.9 


139 142.1 


1.51.0 


April 


406.4 2i3.2 


2H0.2 174.21 18T.3 


195.1 


212.9 


148.5 


215 2 


190 7 210 


194 1 


May 


461.1, 210 9 


196.3 196.91 262.1 


2.52.1 


181.7 


211.1 


166.4 


229.6 174.5 


211 2 


June 


465.7 


278.2 


2;-t7 1| 219 8 302.1 


286.3 


244 6 


247 8 


201.4 


245 5 2 ••4. 7 


2t9 


July, 


470.9 


302.2 307.8 258. 7| 2i7 .8 


232.4 


276.2 


V84 2 


315.1 


249 21 280.4 


273.3 


August 


4S4.5 


262.1 225.2 262 4 262.6 


22s, 


207.3 


259.0 


231 6 


217. 3| 234.6 


240.9 


September. 


376.3 


164.4 202 4 237.1' 168 01 194 2 


156 4 


175 8 


218 2 


231 


19. 2 


19.J.2 


October 


340.2 


141.7 118.2, 161. 0| 135 5 149.0 


129 4 


150.0 


145.6 


160.1 


85 1 


131 6 


November . 


286 9 


78.6 89.0 


60.8; 69.8 79.3 


64.7 


81.3 


35 1 


69 3 


93 8 


66.6 


December . 


274.3 


60.2 56.6 


40.61 80.8 57.1 

1 


65 5 


55.8 


56.6 


89.7 


77.9 


57.0 


Totals for 

the year. 

Totals for 


1 4463.3 


2058.3 1965.8 


1923.9 


1 
2043.4 2036. 3 '1864. 9 


1921.7 


1925.5 


1973.8 


1867.8 


1929.5 


) 


1 




1 












April- 


V 2614. 9 


1441.01399.011349.1 


1412.9 1388,11279.1 


1326.4 


1346.9 


1363.311349.4 


1361.7 


to8ept... 


J 


1 










1 





=^302. 6 in 1892 and 1896. 



The sunshine in 1899 exceeded the records of the past eightepn years, the total for 
the six months in the growing period exceeding the average by 79 hours, or over 55 per 
cent of the possible. The details of the five stations will be found in Table V (page 23). 
The Meteorological register for Toronto will be found in Table VI (page 24), and the 
summary for the Lake Temiscamingue district in Table VII (page 25). 



THE GRAIN OROPS. 

Fall Wheat. An enlarged area of fall wheat was reported by correspondents 
writing in November, 1898, the increase being placed at from ten per cent, up, a few 
claiming to have actually doubled their acreage. Sowing ranged from the last week of 
August to the first week of October, but the bulk of the work was done between the 
lOih and 20th of September. Conditions were favorable to seeding, and as correspond- 
ents wrote most of the fields looked very promising, although in some cases the crop was 
so heavy in the top that cattle and sheep were turned in to pasture upon it. The 
Hessian fly was reported in several of the western counties, and as a result some of the 
fields were more or less yellow in appearance. The general outlook, however, was 
described as encouraging so tar as the new crop of fall wheat was concerned. Dawson's 
Golden Chrtff, Clawson, Genesee Giant, Manchester, Democrat and Surprise were regarded 
as the favorites, the first two named having a large lead, while torty other sorts also were 
named as being in favor. 

The May bulletin contained the following regarding fall wheat : "The weather during 
the winter and the early spring has been exceedingly unfavorable for fall wheat, and as a 
consequence the crop, which promised well before the snowfall, has been greatly injured 
by the inclemency of the season, and is practically a failure in many localities. The 
want of snow in most places left the ground fxposed to unusually severe and protracted 
frostp, and the heavy rains formed pools of water which froze and killed the young 
plants in the hollows and flooded lands. The dry weather which has prevailed in some 
neighborhoods since the opening of the growing season has also wrought some injury. A 
conbiderable percentage of the area sown to fall wheat is being plowed up. It must be 
borne in mind, however, that the winter just past has been an exceptionally trying one, 
for it has been the rule for years for fall wheat to come through the winter with compar- 



10 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 26 



atively little loss in area, and usually in a very promising condition. The peculiarity of 
the past winter, and an explanation of its effect upon fall wheat, will be clearly under 
stood by referring to the weather table?. Contrary to usual experience the heavy enow 
fall came in December. This had disappeared over a large area of Ontario when the 
week ot low temperature occurred in February. In January and February, the two 
coldest months, there is usually found plenty of snow upon the ground to protect vegeta- 
tion. As a rule this crop appears to have wintered better on clay or heavy land than on 
light soils, although the experience of correspondents is by no means unanimous on this 
point. The situation of the land, and the degree of shelter afforded from wind and frost 
by its location, appear to have been considerably more influential factors in deciding its 
suitability for fall wheat growing than the character of the soil. In many cases it has 
been observed that the partial protection afforded by accumulations of snow near the 
fences, the rest of the field being bare, has saved the wheat plants thus protected. It is 
worthy also of note that the reports from Algoma, where there was a good covering of 
snow during the winter, are more favorable than those from the older settled counties. 
There are slight losses from insect pests reported, wire worms and the Hessian fly having 
appeared last fall in a few localities in the western part of Province. At the time corres- 
pondents wrote rain was urgently needed at several points to insure the remaining 
crop." 

The following summary of reports appeared in the August bulletin : " This crop 
came through the winter in poor condition, much of it having been killed owing to the 
lack of shelter and the formation of ice, and a considerable acreage was plowed up. With 
the exception of Algoma, and a few other sections where there was plenty of snow, the 
yield has turned out to be a very small one — in fact the lowest for a number of years. 
The quality of the grain ranges from plump and hard to small and shrunken, even in the 
same localities, and sometimes in the same fields. Along the fences and in sheltered 
spots, as pointed out by a number of correspondents, the beet fall wheat has been found, 
which fact fchows the importance of wind-breaks. Rust has been more common than 
usual tlis year. The Hessian fly was complained of* in a few of the western counties, 
but insect injury was light compared to the damage done to the crop by the trying 
weather of Febiuary. The time of cutting ranged from the beginning of July to the 
clofee of the month, according to location and date of sowing. The weather at harvesting 
was on the whole favorable, and the crop was got in an good condition." 

November reports thus summed up the condition : " The extent to which fall wheat 
suflered from winter-killicg entailed a considerable decrease in the yield, and, later, 
unfavorable conditions have made the falling off greater than was anticipated. The crop 
has been a poor one in many parts, more especially in the west, the grain being light and 
shrunken, owing to over-rapid ripening. Eust and chess have occasioned injury in some 
directions, but there has been a notable absence of insect pests. Reports from the eastern 
counties are slightly more favorable, although some less is indicated to grain on low lying 
lands from heavy summer rain storms. In the northern and north-western portions of 
the Province the fall wheat has yielded well " 

The acreage, yield and value by counties for 1899, together with the totals for the 
Province for ten years, will be found in Table IX (page 27). 

The New Fall Wheat. The November bulletin said: "Owing, no doubt, to 
the unsatisfactory experience of this season the acreage devoted to fall wheat 
has been, if anything, somewhat reduced. Reports from many of the western 
counties indicate a decrease which will be hardly counterbalanced by some 
increase in the Lake Ontario counties. The time of seeding covers a wider range than 
usual, owing to the dryness of the ground, which induces many farmers to postpone 
sowing until late in the season in the hope of rain. As usual, most of the work appears 
to have been done in the earlier half of September, the ground in most localities being in 
good condition, apart from the lack of moisture. The young plants are generally looking 
well, having received the benefit of later rains, and, although somewhat backward in 
places seem promising and cover the ground well, having a heavy top. There are few 
complaints of insect pests, except that Hessian fly, joint worm and wire worm have done 
some damage. There is little change in the varieties sown, Dawson's Golden Ohaff and 
Red Clawson retaining their popularity, while the Manchester, Genesee Giant and 
Democrat come next on the list." 



1899 ] BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 11 



Spking Wheat TL«iuilowiu^ leiiniiig lotpriag wiieikc w^s ojutAiued lu the Au^uat 
bulletin : "This variety of wheat is more largely grown in the e*8tern half of the Province. 
The yield is above the average, and the quality of the grain is on the whole satisfactory. The 
grea'est drawback to the crop was the wet weather prevailing at seeding-time, thu gronnd 
being so moist and heavy in many quarters that sowing had to ba delayed. Heivy 
rains have also occurred a few weeks before harvesting, and from various localities 
reports are made of the straw lodging. Complaints of rast have also been received. 
While some had harvested their spring wheat by the end of July, a large acreage was 
still left standing uncut at that date." 

According to correspondents writing in November, the same causes which had 
injuriously affected the fall wheat, more especially the dryness of the season and the 
prevalence of rust, were felt by the spring wheat crop. In some localities the grain was 
light, but the general tenor of the reports from those neighborhoods where the crop is 
still grown was encouraging, and indicates a fair output. 

The acreage, yield, and valae by counties, together with the totals for the Province 
for ten years, will be found in Table IX (page 27). 

Barley. The August reports regarding barley were on the whole favorable, as will 
be seen from the following, which appeared in the bulletin published in that month : 
" This has been a highly successful crop, both as regards yield and quality, and at the 
time our correspondents wrote had been secured in excellent condition in the Like Erie 
and Lake Ontario counties, while harvesting was progressing favorably in other sf^r^-tioas. 
The falling off in the demand for barley for malting purposes some time since caust d con- 
siderable reduction in the acreage devoted to it^ cultivation, but latterly the Iar,:t'ly in- 
creased requirements for this grain for stock feeding purposes have brought it again into 
"favor, and this season the area sown to barley has been increased. Much of it grown for 
feed is sown mixed with peas and oats. The principal cause of injury has been the 
drouth, which in some cases has resulted in short straw and small kernels, though the 
grain is for the most part plump and bright. Kust has affected the later varieties in some 
•eastern localities, and slight damage is reported from smut in two western counties, bat 
as a whole the crop has sustained remarkably little injury from pests or parasites." 

The foregoing estimate of the barley crop was confirmed by the following 
statement in the November bulletin : " There has been an exceedingly good crop of b jrley 
in all parts of the Province. The yield is large and excellent in quality, the berry b-ing 
usually plump and bright, though in some instances discolored. The crop has suffered 
but little from parasites, though a few cases of smut and rust are mentioned by corres- 
pondents." 

The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together with the totals for the 
Province for ten years, will be found in Table X (page 28). 

Oats. The August bulletin had the following regarding oats : " This crop is rather 
backward in many parts, so that correspondents could not speak positively as to the yield, 
butthe reports areas a rule highly satisfactory, and the estimates yields sent in, average high. 
The crop bids fair to be a large one, with fine straw and plump grain in those neighbor- 
hoods where the drouth has not interfered with its growth, In a number of instances, 
however, the long continued dry weather has resulted in short straw and light kernels. 
But little damage has been inflicted by insects, although there has been considerable loss 
by rust and smut, more especially in the western counties. The late sown oats appear to 
have flourished better than the earlier crop where they have had a fair supply of 
moisture." Following is a summary of the November reports concerning the crop : " Oats 
have been a particularlj> fine crop in all localities, the grain being generally full and heavy, 
and the production per acre in excess of the average. Grasshoppers and smut have 
wrought some injury in a few neighborhoods, but the principal and mosb widespread 
drawback has been rust. The late sown crops have been specially subject to its attacks, 
and have also been lighter than those planted early in the season. 

The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together with the totals for the 
Province for ten years, will be found in Table X (page 28). 

Peas. The following reference to peas was contained in i,he August bulletin : " Re- 
ports as to the condition of the pea crop are somewhat variable, but as far as can be 
judged by present indications there will be above an average yield. A good deal of injury 



12 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 26 



was causf d by excessive rains early In the season, more especially to low-lying fields, and 
in many localities losses have been sustained bj' the ravages of the '* bug." In some parts 
the area sown to peas has been decreased owing to the prevalence of this peat. Grass 
peas are being substituted for the more common kinds in some cases. The late sown crops 
being not yet ripe, much depends upon the weather in the interval before harvesting." 

The November bulletin said : " The pea weevil or ' bug,' as it is popularly termed, 
has wrought much havoc with this crop, but for which the crop would have been above the 
average, as reports from localities which are free from the pest are mainly favorable. 
There has also been some damage from excessive rains. Peas appear to have done consid- 
erably better in the eastern counties than elsflwhere." 

The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together with the totals for the 
Province for ten years, will be found in Table XI (page 29). 

Beans. August reports concerning beans were thus summarized : ** The area devoted 
to this crop has considerably diminished, owing to low prices. Beans are grown only in 
a few localitiep, more especially in the western Lake Erie counties and the extreme eastern 
section. Appearances point to a large yield per acre, but the drouth is an unfavorable 
condition, and if continued the result may be difierent. Some correspondents aote that 
the harvest is later than usual." 

According to the November bulletin the bean crop had felt the effects of drouth 
severely, and the returns were very variable. Where produced in eastern localities it 
appeared to have yielded better than in the western counties. 

The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together with the totals of the 
Province for ten years, will be found in Table XI (page 29). 

Rye. There is very little rye grown, and what is raised in some parts is mainly used 
as feed. According to August reports a considerable percentage of the crop was winter- 
killed, but the remainder had thriven and yielded well, both as regards straw and grain. 

The reports of correspondents in November were on the whole favorable, and indicat- 
ed a return slightly above the average. 

The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together with the totals for the 
Province for ten years, will be found in Table XII (page 30). 

Buckwheat. This crop is not largely grown. The November bulletin said : " This 
will be a light output, owing to the injury occasioned by the dryness of the weather and 
losses sustained by frost. The grain is frequently small, while the yield has been fairly 
good." 

The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together with the totals of the 
Province for ten years, will be found in Table XII (page 30). 

Corn. Regarding this crop the August bulletin said : " The cold and wet weather 
prevailing at the time corn should have been planted delayed that work considerably, and 
the consequence is that at the time of reporting the crop is hardly as far advanced as 
usual. A good deal of poor seed was also used tbroughout the Province, and this neces- 
sitated some replanting. Notwithstanding these drawbacks reports come from some 
counties of a most promising crop, the favorable weather of the latter part of July having 
brought the crop along with a bound. Of course there are also a number of poor pros- 
pects. In some western counties crows and blackbirds did injury, and cut-worms and 
grubs were also spoken of in several sections of the Province. However, taking all the 
reports received, the crop is likely to turn out to be a fair one should the lateness of the 
season not bring it into frosty weather. Several correspondents report the erection of 
new silos this year. 

The November reports were to the following effect: "This has been a bad year for 
corn. Much of it matured too early, the ears being small and light, and there were serious 
losses from frost and floods, so that there will be consideraVJe shortage in the crop. There 
will bp a fair yield for silage in the west and the Lake Ontario counties, but further east 
and north the crop is decidedly poor. There is but little mention of insect pests, the only 
noteworthy cause of loss under this head being the destructive attacks of grasshoppers in 
one or two neighborhoods." 

The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together with the totals for th©» 
Province for eight years, will be found in Table XIII (page 31). 



1899 ] BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 13 



FIELD ROOTS. 

The acreas;e, yield and value of the root crop by counties, for 1899. together with the 
tables for the Province for ten years, will be found in Tables XIV and XV (pages 32 and 
33). 

Potatoes. The August bulletin had the following : *' There promises to be a good 
yield of potatoes, though in many quarters rain is badly needed, and in conspqaence of 
long continued drouth the early potatoes have been somewhat email in size. Reports as 
to the present appearance of late potatoes are generally favorable, one especially encour*g- 
ing feature being the decrease in the numbers and destructiveness of the potato bug, 
caused by the severe frosts of last winter. In some neighborhoods, however, this pest is 
still as active and iDJurious as ever, and on low-lying lands a good deal of damage was 
occasioned by excessive wet in the early part of the season." 

The folio wring was contained in the November bulletin : " The potato crop is, for the 
most part, of excellent quality, having been housed in sound condition and free from dis- 
ease, except in a few localities where rot has appeared, which in some cases attacked the 
crop after it was taken up. The plant has been remarkably free from injury from insect 
pests. The effdct of the drouth in numprou? neighborhoods has been to serioudy diminish 
the yield. The comparative effect of early and late planting has been very variable. In 
the western section the liter planted seem generally to have yielded bettei than the earlier 
varieties, while in the eastern counties the reverse was the case in some instani e?. The 
exceptionally fine fall weather was specially favorable to the securing of the crop " 

Carrots, This crop suffered at seeding time on account of the weather being too wet. 
As the season progressed, however, the prospects of the crop improved, and the November 
bulletin had the following ♦^^o say of canots : " R'^ports as to the carrot crop indicate a 
fair production, probably somewhat below the aver-ige because of the droatb, owing to 
\\hich the development of all root crops has been unfavorably affcjcted. In some of the 
western counties considerable damage by grasshoppers is noted." 

Mangels. Like other root crops, mangels suffered from too much moisture at the 
time of seeding. However, when correspondents reported in August the crop was looking 
well. The November bulletion thus described the condition of the crop : " The yield of 
mangels has been on the whole satisfactory more especially in the Lake Erie counties, 
though the effect of the dry weather in many localities is noticeable in light yields and 
small roots. The quality of the crop, as a rule, is tirst-class, and the great bulk of it has 
been safely got under cover." 

Turnips. According to August reports turnips at that time presented a poor 
appearance in many cases, especially where late sown, and therefore more liable to feel 
the tff-cts of the drouth. Some damage from the » ffects of the grasshopper, turnip fly, 
and other insect pests was noted. The November bulletin, describing the crop, sai l : 
" The drouth has seriously injured the turnips, in common with other crops, and the 
yield, as a rule, has been light in all sections. The best returns have come from those 
sown early in the season. Insect ravages are reported from many quarters, some damage 
having been done by cabbage worms and grasshoppers. The crop has been nearly all in 
good condition," 

Sugar Beets, The November bulletin contaiupd- the following reference to sugar 
beets : " This crop is confined to comparatively few localities, and has thriven con- 
sidering the want of moisture at a critical season, owing to which the roots vere frequent- 
ly small. It had, practically, been all housed at the time the returns were received." 



HAY AND CLOVER. 

May reports were not encourafing. The bulletin published in that month said : "A 
large proportion of the c'over crop in every section of the Province has been winter-killed, 
owing to the scarcity of snow, the plants being either heaved or frozen in the ground by 
exposure to the severity of the weaiher The thinness of the old growth by leason of 
the drouth of last reason, and the poor catch on newly seeded are^s, contributed to this 
reeult. The damage appears to have been greatest in the Lake Erie and Lake Ontario 



14 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 2« 



groups, while the most favorable showing is made by northerly localities, where the snow- 
remained on the ground to a later date. "Where the crop survived the winter the fields 
are generally in a healthy and flourishing cordition, and promise well, although in some 
quarters clover is beginning to sufier for lack of moisture." 

The August bulletin contained a more cheering report regarding the crop. It said : 
" The production of hay and clover is just abouc the average for the seventeen years 
1882 98, the principal cause of the shortage being the heavy frost of last winter, which in 
the absence of snow killed a great deal of the clover in every part of the Province. Drouth 
has been another, though a minor factor, in decreasing the yield. The quality of the crop 
is generally very highly estimated, it having been got in as a rule in excellent condition, 
though in some of the western counties rain interfered a good deal with the haying, and 
caused some injury, more particularly to that cut early in the season. On the whole, 
however, the loss from this cause has been but trifling. Some correspondents anticipate 
a scarcity of clover seed." The acreage, yield and value by counties, for 1899, together 
with the totals for ten years, will be found in Table XVI (page 34). 

Clover Seed. The following was the November report regarding clover seed : " A 
large proportion of the clover crop was winter-killed, and consequently the yield ot seed 
under any circumstances would have been much below the average. Correspondents are 
almost unanimous in stating that the drouth has so injured the second crop that very little 
seed has been secured. The midge has also proved destructive in many neighborhoods. 
The few favorable reports received are mostly from the eastern section of the Province." 

The area in red clover seed is estimated at 64,937 acres, and in alsike 21,463 acres 



FRUIT AND FRUIT TREES. ' 

According to May reports fruit trees and shrubs were in leaf at an earlier date than 
usual. The bulletin then published went on to say : " Reports as to the condition of 
fruit trees vary in diff"erent sections, and sometimes in the same locality. In the peach- 
growing region known as ♦^^he Essex district many peaches have died during the winter, 
while in the Niagara District the loss reported is small, particularly near the lake shore. 
In the Lake Erie group some plums and pears have also sustained injury during the 
winter, but, generally speaking, there has not been serious injury to fruit trees other than 
peaches. A majority of correspondents speak of an abundant bloom on orchard trees, and 
some fear that the blossoms are out so early that the late spring frosts may attack them. 
There are some references to black-knot on the plum, but the chief trouble complained of 
is the appearance in large numbers of the tent caterpillar. Several correspondents express 
their confidence in spraying as a means of checking this and other insects and fungous pests. 
In the western part of the Province a number of correspondents state that small fruits, 
particularly raspberries, have sufi'ered from the trying winter." 

The following appeared in the August bulletin : "There is likely to be a scarcity of 
fruit this season owing to various causes. The severe winter destroyed a large proportion 
of the fruit trees in some sections, and appears to have injured many which survived. 
Heavy rain during the blossoming season greatly interfered with fertilization, as did frost 
in some neighborhoods. The tent caterpillar, curculio, codling moth and other injurious 
insects have also made great havoc among the orchards, except where they have been kept 
in check by systematic spraying. The apple cr«p is very light, but as a rule the quality is 
good, and the fruit fairly free from scab. The winter varieties promise batter than the 
earlier kinds. Plums have done rather better than apples, though greatly subject to 
attacks of the curculio. The yield in most localities where they are grown is poor, but 
they will be abundant in some places. The peach crop is practically a failure owing to 
the general destruction of the trees, which sufiertd more severely from the winter than 
did the other varieties. Those which remain have born fairly well in some neighborhoods, 
but the total product is small. Pear trees have not been so prolific as usual, and the supply 
will be light. There was about an average crop of cherries, though some damage from 
worms and black-knot is specified. Reports concerning the vineyards are highly encourag- 
ing, the vines being healthy and well laden, promising an abundant supply of grapes. 
Berries and small fruits have been generally plentiful and good, though in many localities 
they have run^rather^small^in consequence of the drouth. "j-gbu.«uiii 



1899 ] BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 15 



The November bulletin had the following regarding fruit: "The condition of fruit 
trees and vines, as a rule, is excellent, the principal drawbacks being the effects of the 
drouth in a few localities, injuries from winds and recent snow storms, and more especially 
the damage inflicted by tent and forest cskterpillars, which has been severe where spraying 
has been neglected. These and other insects — notably the codling moth — have seriously 
affected the apple crop, much ot the fruit being wormy and inferior. Another cause of 
shortage was the heavy rain while the trees were in blossom, which interfered with fertili- 
zation. In most fruit -producing sections there was, however, a considerable surplus, 
especially of apples, over local demands, and many heavy shipments are noted, though 
the crop on the whole was much below the average. The quality was very variable. 
Pears, plums and grapes in excess of home requirements were also produced in some 
parts, although the early frosts spoiled the grapes in some instances. Owing to the 
wholesale destruction of peach trees last winter the output of this fruit was very limited. 
There was an abundance of small fruits, as well as a plentiful growth of the wild varieties 
in the back townships. But little mention is made of the San Jose scale, and curcalio 
and black knot are hardly as much in evidence as formerly." 

The areas in orchard and vineyard and the yield of apples by counties for 1899 will 
be found in Table XVIII (page 36). 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Flax. This crop is not now largely grown, as a number of the mills in Western 
Ontario have been closed for Eome time. Where raised it has been a fair crop this season. 
The area was 7,103 acres, as against 10,720 in 1898, and 16,240 in 1897. 

Tobacco. August reports were to the following effect : '* Correspondents in Essex 
and Kent, where tobacco raising has been chiefly tried in this Province, report that the 
area in leaf Is very much smaller this year than in the previous season, owing to the poor 
market. The plant is regarded as being a little late this year, but with the exception of 
reports of injury from ' cut- worms ' and grasshoppers, it is generally regarded as being in 
good condition." 

The following was contained in the November bulletin : " There has been a great 
falling off in the cultivation of tobacco, and there are but few reports concerning this pro- 
duct by our correspondents. It appears to have been generally successful where grown." 

The yield of tobacco is estimated at 2,241,562 pounds from 2,206 acres, or 1,016 
pounds per acre Of this amount the County of Essex produced 1,636,760 pounds from 
1,411 acres. The production in 1898 was 10,560,590 pounds from 7,871 acres, of which 
Essex contributed 7,095,970 pounds from 5,086 acres. 

Hops, The acreage in hops is placed at 1,146, of which about five-sixths is grown 
in the Counties of Northumberland, Prince Edward, Lennox and Addington, and 
Grenville. 

Lucerne. Correspondents have referred to lucerne more frequently of late, and it 
appears to be steadily growing in favor. 

Rape. Rape is coming into general use, more especially for turning off sheep and 
cattle in the fall. As a rapid finisher for lambs it is in great favor, especially in the 
western half of the Province. The area in this crop was 33,762 acres against 36,651 in 
1898. 

Farm Supplies in the Spring. The May bulletin thus summed up the situation : 
" A considerable quantity of hay beyond that necessary for home requirements remains 
in the hands of farmers in most localities, the low prices prevailing having been insufficient 
to bring it to the market. In many places, however, the extra demands of the late 
spring have left them with little, if any, available surplus. Oats are much scarcer, and 
the remaining supply will mainly be required for stock feeding. A large proportion of 
the wheat harvest is yet retained by those who can afford to do so in the hope of an in- 
crease in price. The great demand for cattle at good figures has resulted in the sale and 
shipment of an unusually large number of fat and store animals, so that there is almost 
a universal scarcity, especially of the former, some places being left with an insufficient 
sapply f©r local slaughtering demands. Several correspondents note that farmers are be 



16 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 26 



ginning to realize that it is more profitable — at least when feed is selling at a low price — 
to fatten their own stock for market instead of selling them as store cattle. This 
tendency of course somewhat reduces the supply both of coarse grain and of stockers for 
export. Its permanency will naturally depend upon the relative prices of feed, and of fat 
as compared with lean cattle." 

Fall Plowing. The following appeared in the November bulletin: "The fine 
autumnal weather has enabled farmers to make good progress with their fall plowing, as 
the ground, for the most part, was in splendid condition, excepting in a few localities where 
operations were delayed somewhat by drouth. Late harvests is another reason a^sifi;ned by 
some correspondents /or backwardness. Generally, however, conditions have been highly 
favorable, and advantage has been taken of thtm to get the work done early. In some 
instances the ground has been plowed over more than once to kill out weeds and to in- 
crease fertility." 

Threshing and Marketing. When correspondents wrote early in November the 
progress in threshing and marketing was thus reported: " Threshing has been finished 
except in a few localities, the work being lighter than usual by reason of the shortage in 
the wheat crop, A comparatively small portion of the product has as yet been marketed, as 
farmers are not disposed to let their wheat go at the prevailing prices where they can 
aflTord to hold it. Barley, oats and peas have been sold freely where a surplus was avail- 
able, but an increasingly laige percentage of the coarse grains is retained for stock 
feeding." 

Farm Improvements. The following reference to farm improvements appeared in 
the November bulletin : " There has been fair progress made in underdraining, the work 
being chiefly done by hand, tile drain machines not having given satisfaction as a rule. 
A great deal of fencing has been done, principally of wire. Barbed wire has gone out of 
vogue, and plain and woven wire fences, with iron posts, appear to be most in favor, 
although some appear to pn fer a combination of wood and wire An unusual amount of 
improvement has been made in farm buildings, more especially in bank barns, etc." 



LIVE STOCK AND THE DAIRY. 

Live Stock. — Correspondents in May reported to the following efiect : " As a rule 
live stock have wintered well and are in good condition, fodder being abundant, thoagh 
some correspondents note a scarcity, especially in the east and on the Lake Erie frontier. 
Many of the cattle are reported rather thin in flesh, though healthy. The market for 
both horses and horned cattle is brisk and prices good. Horses have suffered in some 
places from inflaenza and distemper. Sheep have been remarkably prolific, and the young 
lambs are mostly strong and healthy, though in a few localities considerable los.ses h*ve 
taken place. The most serious disease affecting live stock has been an ailment described 
as crippling or rheumatism, which has destroyed very large numbers of pigs, especially the 
younger animals, in almost every part of the Province. The cause of this disorder is 
supposed by some to be overfeeding with grain during the long confinement of the winter 
months." 

The August bulletin said : " Reports as to the condition of pastures, and the effect 
upon the supply of fodder and dairy produce, vary greatly according to locality. In the 
Lake Erie and Lake Ontario Counties and some other parts the pastures are generally 
dried up and bare, resulting in a considerab e falling off" in the supply of milk and a Hhort- 
age in dairy produce, with discouraging prospects for the keep of cattle during fall and 
winter. The latter diffijuliy, however, has been largely met by the more general planting 
of corn and the storage of ensilage, so that no scarcity is apprehended unless in excep 
tional cases. In the northern and eastern parts of the Province, where more rain has 
fallen, the pasturage has remained good, with abundant supplies ot milk for dairying pur- 
pose?, »nd prospects of a pleatiful supply of feed for stock. In addition to drouth another 
cause which has resulted in a decrease of the milk supply is that more calves are being 
raised than usual in some parts. Live stock as a rule are in good condition, with a 
marked absence of anything like serious disease, the principal drawback being the pieval- 
ence of the horse- fly, which has been very troublesome in many cases." 



1899 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



The condition of live stock was thus commented upon in the bulletin issupd in 
November : " Fall pasturage, as a rule, has not been good, the fields in most localities 
being dry and bare until a comparatively l*te period in the season, when they were 
revived to some extent by the heavy rains. Live stock are reported in a healthy condi- 
tion, though thin for the most part in consequence of short pasture, but there is no 
allusion to any form of animal disease by any of our correspondents. Very little has been 
done in any part towards fattening stojk for market, and a great many cattle have been 
sold off as stockers at good prices, so that there is a decided scarcity of saleable cattle in 
many parts, more especially in eastern Ontario. The practice of stall feeding appears to 
be falling off to some extent. Sheep where kept, have generally done well, and, in some 
instances, farmers find it profitable to fatten sheep and lambs on rape. Hogs are plenti- 
ful, and are being continually shipped to market ; but present prices are low, and if con- 
tinued will have a tendency to discourage hog-raiiing. There is plenty of fodder in nearly 
all localities for the winter's supply, especially of corn and coarse feed, but the hay crop 
has been light and it commands a high price in many places. Some correspondents also 
notice a shortage in roots. Corn has been very largely grown for fodder purposes, both 
as ensilage and dry feed. The use of the silo is steadily increasing, though ihe partial 
failure of the corn crop in some neighborhoods has operated against the movement. The 
almost universal silage ma'^erial is corn, the leading varieties being the Leaming, Mammoth 
Southern, Compton's Early and Yellow D?nt." 

The statistics of live stock will be found on pages 37 43. The following table gives 
the average value per head of stock on hand for the past eight years : 



Classes of Live Stock. 



Horses : 
Working horses 
Breeding mares 

Colts 

Stallions 

Cattle : 
Working oxen . 

Milch cows 

Store cattle 

Other cattle . . . 

Sheep : 
Over one year . 
Under one year 

Hogs : 
Over one year , 
Under one year 

Poultry : 

Turkeys 

G^ese 

Ducks 

Other fowls .... 



1899 


1898 


1897 


1896 


1895 


S 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


72 


65 


61 


63 


66 


74 


68 


64 


64 


68 


49 


44 


41 


41 


44 


.S32 


303 


283 


263 


265 


46 


43 


42 


43 


45 


S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


S c 


$ c. 


30 .SI 


28 28 


26 13 


27 6'-> 


29 74 


29 27 


26 49 


2.$ 811 


'24 


25 36 


13 09 


11 9) 


10 62 


11 19 


12 14 


5 01 


4 76 


4 37 


4 41 


4 62 


3 15 


2 9] 


2 62 


2 6.;. 


2 85 


12 2.S 


12 63 


11 4C 


11 13 


11 87 


3 92 


3 9J 


3 67 


3 70 


3 98 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


65 


63 


64 


65 


P 


57 


65 


56 


56 


56 


29 

22 










22 


21 


22 


22 



1894 



74 

76 

48 

328 



46 

$ c. 
.^1 02 
26 75 
12 91 



5 14 
3 26 



13 08 
4 30 

ct«. 
67 
57 



1893 



23 



SO 

83 

52 

356 



47 
$ c. 
31 6? 
27 45 
13 40 



5 62 
3 t.6 



13 97 

4 48 

cts. 
69 

58 



25 



1892 



$ 
89 
93 
55 
407 



48 
$ c 
29 95 
27 41' 
13 37 



5 58 
3 56 



10 59 
3 96 

cts. 

m 

67 
24 



Poultry. The November bulletin had the following : " The returns regarding the 
poultry industry are generally of a highly encouraging character, indiciting that farmers 
in all parts are devoting more care and attention to this department, and engJigiu" in 
poultry raising more extensively than hitherto. The profits hive been good wherever 
fowls have received proper treatment. The egg production has been above the average 
and prices have been remunerative. A large number of turkeys are ready for the market 
in some parts, though the season was not too favorable for raising them successfully. 
Poult»-y, generally, are in fine condition, and there has been but little disease of any 
kind." ^ 

The Apiary. — It was difficult to sum up the condition of bees in August, judging 

by the bulletin issued in that month, which said : " Reports vary considerably concerninff 

2 B.I. (1-2) ^ 



18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 26 



Some correspondents regard swarming as being satisfactory, while others state that 
there was very little increase in the number of colonies, and that the winter was a trying 
one. Clover blossoms were not abundant, and in some sections basswood was injured by 
caterpillars. A few correspondents report as high a? seventy-five pounds surplus honey 
per hive, but a number go as low as ten and even five pounds per hive. The average 
will be about twenty-five pounds. The buckwheat crop will in many instances decide 
whether the bees will have to be fed back or not." 

The November bulletin thus reported regarding the apiary : •' Bees wintered badly^ 
many hives having been lost. The season has been very unfavorable for honey produc- 
tion, there being little nectar available, and the supply of honey will be a good deal short 
of the average ; and the quality is frequently inferior. There have been but few swarms. 
The bees, as a rule, are in a healthy condition, there being but little mention made of 
foul brood. Owing to the light yield of honey it will be necessary in many cases to 
supply colonies with winter food. 

The Dairy. The August reports pointed out the fact that owing to drouth the 
milk supply was rather less than ordinary in nearly every part of the Province excepting 
the northern and eastern sections. It was also reported that more calves than usual were 
being raised, which also in some degree affected the output of milk. 

The November bulletin contained the following : " The dairy industry, though 
injured to some extent by the dryness of the season, has, on the whole, been flourishing 
under the stimulus of good prices. In many parts, more particularly in the west, the 
manufacture of butter is gaining upon that of cheese, though the latter still generally 
maintains the lead as a factory product. The movement for the manufacture of butter 
in cheese factories in the winter season has become general. There is a noticeable im- 
provement in the quality of the butter output, and the price is universally higher than 
last season. There is but little change in the breeds of cattle kept for milk. The Dur- 
ham grade retains its old-time predominence as a general-purpose cow, but in the eastern 
counties, where cheese-making is a specialty and beef qualities less regarded, the Ayrshire 
and Holstein strains are much in favor." 

Cheese Factories. The statistics of the cheese industry are given by counties in 
Table XXVII [ (page 46), together with totals for the Provinces for ten years. There was a 
slight increase in the number of factories in operation, but the make of cheese fell off five 
million pounds from the preceding year. The value of the cheese, however, is the highest 
in seventeen years, the nearest approach being 1897, when $400,000 less was received for 
the cheese output. The increased market prices has put $10,682,193 (being an increase 
over 1898 of $2,264,658) into the hands of the patrons for milk supplied, delivered at the 
factory. 

Creameries. The following comparative table gives the statistics of the creameries 
operated in Ontario for the seven years 1893-9, showing the quantity and value of butter 
made, the average number of patrons, the average price of butter per pound and the 
amount paid to the patrons for milk or cream supplied. 



Year. 



1899 
1898 
1897 
1896 
1895 
1894 
1893 







1 


Ju 


Butter Made. 


a> p 




a;) c^ 






^ o 


Quantity. 


Value. 


'A 








lb. 


% 


323 


9,113,964 


1,746,362 


282 


9,008,992 


1,632,234 


214 


7,708,265 


1,403,609 


170 


6,033,241 


1,101,232 


135 


4,553,708 


868,382 


115 


3,162,550 


662,297 


74 


2,707,570 


574,156 






22,090 

22,741 

18,909 

12,245 

9,664 

8,298 

7,852 



o 




«Js 


Average price 
butter per 
pound. 


Milk to make 
one pound 
of butter. 


Amount paid 
the patrons 
milk or crei 


cts. 
19.16 
18.12 
18.21 
18.25 
19.07 
20.94 
21.21 


lb. 

23.75 

23.99 

23.97 

24.13 

24.75 

23.79 

23.58 


% 
1,448,411 
1,294,220 
1,139,463 











The number of creameries operated inclades the skimming stations. 



1899 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



19 



The amount received by the patrons in 1899 was equivalent to 66.9 cents per 100 
pounds of milk as compared with 60.6 cents in 1898 and 63.1 in 1897. 

The patrons of many creameries also get the buttermilk free of charge. 



LABOE AND WAGES. 



The following are the opinions of correspondents as summarized in the August bul- 
letin : ''The demand for farm labor is still decreasing, owing to the now frequent 
practice of doing all the ordinary form work without other assistance than that furnished 
by the family, or the exchange of work among neighbors. The falling off in the extenc 
to which the hiring system has been adopted renders the supply of help in most localitioH 
fully adequate, except during the temporary pressure of the harvest. Complaints of 
of scarcity come from many quarters, owing to the laborers leaving for Manitoba and the 
Northwest, or entering upan other employments in the Province. Great difficulty has 
consequently been experienced in obtaining extra men for the harvest season in some 
neighborhoods. The variation in the rate of wages paid is so great, even within the limits 
of the same county, that it is difficult to indicate average figures that will not be either 
misleading or present so wide a margin that will be of little utility. As a general thing 
wages appear to be somewhat higher in the west than in the east, with a slightly upward 
tendency. About $1 or $1.24 per day with board seems to be about the standard or 
average wages for harvest hands, though as low as sixty or seventy cents is quoted as the 
figure in some cases ; while on the other hand the scarcity of help in some neighborhoods 
has raised the figure to $1 50 and even $2. The rate for monthly engagements with 
board usually ranges between $15 and $20, anything over this limit being for a short 
engagement covering the summer season, while arrangements for a long term are frequ- 
ently made at considerably lower figures." 

The November bulletin said : " Except at harvest time, when there was a scarcity 
of help in many quarters, the supply of farm laborers has been sufficient for the demand. 
Correspondents report the exodus of a large number of young men from Ontario farms to 
the Northwest, and some are of opinion that this will mean an increase in farm wages 
in this Province in the near future. Others claim that the rate of wages now paid is as 
high as employers of agricultural labor can afford to give, and that improved machinery 
is rendering farmers more and more independent of outside help. Domestic servants on 
the farm are reported scarce, as usual." 



The following table gives the average rates of wages paid farm laborers by the year 
and by the month, with and without board, for ten years, together with the average for 
eighteen years ; also the monthly wages paid domestic servants on the farm : 



Farm Laborers. 



Per year in yearly 
engagements : 

With board , 

Without board. . . 
Per month for work 

intf season : 

With board 

Without board . , 
Domestic servants 

per month . . 



1899 


1898 


1897 


1896 


1895 


1894 


1893 


1892 


1891 


1890 


'82-99 


$ 
149 
243 


$ 
148 
246 


144 

236 


144 
243 


$ 
150 
246 


$ 
156 
247 


$ 
160 
255 


$ 
156 
253 


$ 
158 
257 


$ 

157 
253 


$ 
157 
250 


$ c. 
16 38 
24 93 


$ e. 
15 31 
25 44 


$ c. 
14 29 
24 47 


$ c. 
14 57 
24 11 


$ c. 
15 38 
25 45 


$ c. 
16 55 
25 61 


$ c. 
17 13 
25 97 


$ c. 
16 52 
25 92 


$ c. 
16 66 
25 81 


$ c. 

16 88 
26 56 


$ c. 
16 74 
2616 


6 19 


6 09 


5 97 


6 11 


6 07 


6 23 


6 47 


6 21 


6 25 


6 23 


6 21 



20 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 2 6 



TEMPERATURES OF 189 9. 

Tab e I. Showing for each month the highest, lowest, mean highest, mean lowest and mean tempera- 
ture at the principi,! stations in Outario in 1899 ; also the annual mean for each station. 






a 
a> 

to 

m 


a 

a 

u 

M 

o 
48.0 
-15.0 
28.0 
16.2 
22.1 

52 
•24.3 
23 8 
7.6 
15.7 

53.4 
5.0 
33.1 
21 4 
27.3 

84.9 
19 
58.1 
38.4 
48.2 

83.8 
.35.0 
67 8 
48 2 
58.0 

89.8 
42.0 
77.9 
55.4 
66.6 

96.0 
46.1 
80.4 
57.9 
69.1 

95 3 
42 1 
82.9 
57 9 
70.4 

90.5 
o6 
66 7 

60 7 
58.7 

78.1 
27.5 

61 7 
45 
53.3 

60.3 
27.9 
45.9 
35 6 
40.7 

56.4 
-1.9 
31 8 
23.0 
27.4 

46.46 


§ 

o 


-a a 




B 

a 

2 


a 


Of 2 


OS 


ID 

■A 

u 


•January . . 


fHighPst 

1 Lowest. 

.-j M^an highest 

1 vJean lovvesD 


o 
45 8 
-7.3 
28.4 
13.8 
21.1 

45.3 
-19.6 
23.9 
7.6 
15.8 

50 4 
5 
33 1 
16 3 
33.1 

81.0 
13 6 
53 2 
32.1 
43.2 

79.5 
33 3 

62 8 

41 
53.4 

86. 9 
38.6 
72 7 
f)1.3 
62.0 

84 
45 2 
73.2 
55.1 
64.2 

89.0 

42 1 
7^.8 
56.2 
66.0 

82.9 
27 6 

63 6 
47.6 
56 7 

79 
27 6 
59.3 
42.4 
50 8 

51.8 
25.1 
45.4 
34.1 
39.7 

54.3 
-3.6 
33.8 
21 7 
27.8 

41 39 


o 
49.5 
-15 
30.1 
14.1 
22.6 

50 
-25 
24 8 
6 8 
17.4 

57 
4 5 
34.3 
20 6 
28.4 

82 
16.0 
5S.1 
.36.8 
47.4 

82 
33.5 

68 8 
46 5 
57 6 

90.5 
40.5 
79 6 
64.1 
66.8 

96 
43 5 
82.0 

m.i 

68.9 

95 
37.5 

84 4 
5^4 

69 4 

85 5 
32.5 
68.5 
48.0 
58.3 

75 
21.0 
62,4 
41.3 
61.9 

60 
23.5 
46 6 
33 5 
40.0 

56.0 
•5 5 
33.1 
20.2 
26 6 

46.27 


o 
49.0 
-9.5 
28.9 
13 3 
21 3 

49 
-20 
23 7 
7 7 
16 7 

53.4 
0.0 
33 7 
19 6 
26 8 

81 
15 
55.8 

31 3 
45.5 

79.0 
32.5 
65.3 
4t.9 
56.3 

87.0 

42 
77.4 
52 4 
64.9 

90.5 
45 
80.3 
55.7 
68.0 

91 
4-.^.0 
80 7 
51.9 
67.8 

83.0 

32 
65.2 
45 4 
55.3 

74 
24.0 
60.2 
41 5 
50.8 

57.0 
23 

43 9 
32.2 
39.1 

51.0 
-9.0 
32.2 
19.1 
26.4 

44.91 


o 
56.0 
-4.0 
33.0 
17.9 
24.7 

50 
-12.0 
28 2 
13.3 
20 6 

63.0 
6.0 
36.8 
21.0 
30 5 

79.0 
24.0 
54.3 
37.5 
45.9 

81 
36.0 
66.5 
46.2 
65.7 

95 
44 

80 7 
55.6 
68.2 

95 
55.0 
83.4 
61.0 

72.2 

101 
46 
85.4 
60 7 
73.4 

92 
35 
72.0 
61.3 
61.7 

83.0 
26.0 
63.9 
45.2 
54.6 

65.0 

24 
48.9 
35.6 
42.3 

61.0 
-3.0 
.39.4 

25 4 
32.4 

48 52 


o 
50.8 
-8 
29.6 
15 1 
22.5 

46.2 
-12.0 
25 5 
11.9 
19 3 

57.8 
4 3 
34 3 
21.5 
28.0 

78.7 
22 
53 7 
36.2 
15 

80.0 
33.0 
64.1 
46.6 
55 1 

87.7 
44.3 
76.6 
54.7 
65.3 

87 5 
,50.4 
79.8 
57.7 
68.8 

92.1 
46.3 

81.5 
58.1 
69.3 

84.6 
31.4 
65.1 
48.8 
56.8 

73 7 
24 7 
69.6 
42.4 
£0.4 

61.8 
21.6 
47.0 

34 5 
40.6 

52.7 
5.6 

35 2 
23.0 

28.9 

45 S-? 


o 
45.6 
-16.2 
25.5 
8.8 
17.1 

40 6 
-'.^0 6 
22.8 
5.2 
14.2 

46.7 
-2.5 
31 8 
15.7 
24.1 

78.7 
17.2 
55 8 
33 5 
44.6 

77.7 

29 9 
66.2 
44 7 
55.4 

88.6 
41.8 
76.3 
52 4 
64.4 

87.0 
48.9 
79 5 
56.3 
67.9 

93.9 
43.1 
82.3 
55.5 
68.9 

83.6 

30 
64 1 
45.0 
54.6 

73.9 
23.8 
57.2 

;-:9 7 

48.4 

58.1 
15.6 
42.9 
30.1 
36 5 

61 9 
-18.0 
30 6 
16.2 
23.4 

43.29 


o 
44.0 
-.32 5 
25.0 
4 5 
14.0 

40 
-38 
22.6 
-0.2 
11.9 

47 5 
-13.0 
31 3 
11 8 
22.0 

83 
9 
63 8 
30.2 
42.0 

78.0 
31.0 
65.6 
41.9 
53.7 

86.0 
37.0 

74.7 
50 
62 4 

87 

41 
76.1 
54.1 
65.1 

95 
39.0 
SO 7 
53.1 
66.9 

84.0 
25.0 
6J.6 
44.7 
54.2 

74 
21 
.56.7 
38 3 

47.5 

65.0 
18.0 
41.9 
29.7 
35.8 

62.0 

-17.5 
30.9 

15.^1 
23.1 

41 . 55 


o 
46.0 
-22 9 
24.7 

2 4 
13.5 

41.0 
-24.1 
21 3 
3.6 
12.4 

41 
■8.6 
30.2 
13.6 

21 8 

81 
15.7 
52.2 
32 2 
42.2 

82.0 
37 
68 6 
46.1 

57 4 

86.0 
4J 
76 5 
55 6 
66 

86 3 
40.5 
76.8 

58 
67.4 

91.8 
46.0 
80.7 
68 2 
69.4 

81.8 
32 
6».8 
46 3 
55.6 

70 9 

27 
55.5 
39 4 
47.5 

51.0 
17.0 
38.9 

28 4 
33.7 

48.4 
-10 
28 4 
15 6 
22.2 

4*? 4'^ 


o 
42.0 
-38.0 
20.7 
-4.4 


February . 


L Monthly mean 

r Highest 

1 Lowest 

. -{ Mean highest 


8.2 

47.0 
-a9.0 
21 7 


1 Mertn lowest 


-5.1 




1^ Monthly mean 

f Highest 


8.3 
40.0 




1 Lowest 


-30.0 




. -{ Mean highest 


27.6 




1 Mean lowest 


3 9 




L Monthly mean 

f Highest , 

1 Lowest 


15.8 

82 
3 


April .... 


. -{ Mean highest 


53 5 




1 Mean lowest 


27.8 




L Monthly mean 

f Highest 


40.6 
82 




1 Lowest 


26.0 


May 


, ■[ VI ean highest 


68.1 


1 M-an lowest 

L Monthly mean ...... . . 

f Hii?hest 


39.9 
64.0 

90.0 


June 


1 Lowest 

.-{ Mean highest 

Mean L iwest 


33 
75.5 
47.8 




L Monthly mean 

f Highest 


61.6 
81.0 




1 Lowest 


36 


July 


, -{ Meaa highest 

1 Mean lowest 

I, Monthly mean 

f Highest 


75.5 
50.6 
63.0 

95.0 


August. ... 


1 Lowest 

. ■{ Mean highest 


31.0 
79.8 


1 Mean lowe-it 


46 4 




t, Monthly mean 

f Hitjhest 

I Lowest 


63.1 

79.0 
20 


September. 


. -{ M^an highest 


02.3 


1 Mean lowest 


39.7 




L Monthly mean 

f Highest 


51.0 
75.0 




1 Lowe-t 


15.0 


October . . . 


. ., Mean highest ......... 


55.6 




Mean liiwe-t 


38.3 




^Monthly mean 

f Highest 


41.5 
52 




1 Lowest 


8.0 


November . 


. -{ Me'in highest 


39.3 


December . 


1 Mean lowe.-^t 

L Monthly mean 

f Highest 

1 Lowest) 

, ■{ Me^n highest 


24.6 
31 9 

46.0 
-30.0 

28.3 




1 Mean lowest 


10 3 




I^Mouthly mean 

Annual mean 


19.3 
^8 44 



1899] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



21 



AVERAGES OF TEMPERATURES FOR EIGHTEEN YEARS. 

Table II. Showicpr for each month the annual average of the highest, lowest, mean highest, mean 
lowest and mean temperat-re at the principal stations in Ontario, derived from the eighteen years 
1882-1899 ; also the annual mean at each station for the same period. 



March 



f Highest 

I Lowest 

January -{ Mean highpst . . 

i Mean lowest . . 
L Monthly mean . 

( Highest 

I Lowest 

February . . . -{ Mean highest . . 
I Mean lowest. .. 
L Monthly mean. 

C Highest 

I Lowest 

, -{ Me-m highest.. 
I Mean lowest . . 
L Monthly mean. 

f Highest 

I Lowest 

. -{ Mean highest . . 
I Mean lowest. . . 
L Monthly mean . 

f Highest 

I Lowest 

. -{ Mean highest. . 
I Mean lowest . . . 
L Monthly mean. 

r Highest 

I Lowest 

. ■{ Mean highest. . 
I Mean lowest . . . 
L Monthly mean. 

f Highest 

I Lowest 

, -I, Mean highest . . , 
I Mean lowest . . . , 
t Monthly mean. 

( Highest 

I Lowest , 

, -{ Mean highf st . . 
I Mean lowest . . , 
L Monthly mean. , 

f Highest , 

1 Lowest 

-{ Mean highest . . 
I Mean lowest. . . , 
C Monthly mean . . 



April 



May. 



June. 



July 



August. 



September: 



October 



r Highest 

I Lowef't 

, ■{ Mean highest . . 
I Mean lowest. . . 
t Monthly mean . 

( Highest 

1 Lowest . 

November . . -{ Mean highest . . 
j Mean lowest. . . 
l Monthly mean. 

f Highest 

I Lowest 

December . . ■{ Mean highest . . 

Mean lowest. . . 

, Monthly mean. 



n 



44.9 
-7.8 
27.6 
12.8 
20.3 

44.9 
-11.2 
27. 9 
11.6 
19.4 

52 1 
-4 6 
34.0 
17 
25.3 

73.6 
13 6 
49.5 
31 
39.5 

79.6 
28.9 
60 8 
41.1 
50.3 

85.3 
37.5 
71.1 
50 8 
60 7 

87.2 
42.3 
78 
65.0 
64.5 

86.4 
41.1 
73 6 
54.4 
66.0 

85.0 
32.5 
68.1 
48.9 
57.4 

73.8 
24 3 
55 6 
38 8 
46.1 

61.3 
13.4 
43.0 
29 9 
35 7 



50 6 
-1 
33.5 
20.8 
27.0 



Annual mean ' 42 68 44. 7o 



46.8 
-10.3 
26.6 
14.0 
20.3 

47.5 
-13.1 
27.6 
13 5 
20.6 

56 6 
-4.2 
35.1 
19 8 
27.1 

77.4 
16.7 
53.0 
33.7 
43 4 

82.4 
29 3 
6.5.6 
43.8 
64.7 

88.4 
37.3 
76.6 
53.4 
65.0 

92 5 
41 6 

80 2 
56 
68.2 

91.0 
40.4 
77.1 
54.7 
65.7 

87.6 
32.7 
70.7 
49.9 
60.4 

76 2 
24.0 
56 6 
39.8 
48.2 

63.4 
13 1 
42.7 
30.7 
36 7 

50 
-2.4 
32.3 
21.1 
26.7 



47.0 
-9 8 
22.2 
13.4 
21.8 

46.7 
-1L7 
29 
12.9 

21.8 

56 6 
-2.7 
36.3 
19.2 
28.6 

76.3 
17 9 

52 8 
32.3 
44.6 

81.8 
30.5 
66.0 
44.1 
56.3 

88 
38 9 
76.6 

53 8 
66.5 

91 8 
43 8 
79.9 

56 7 
69.8 

90.0 
39.7 
77 4 
53 9 
67.0 

86.4 
31 6 
70.8 
49.2 
60.6 

74.7 
23 5 
56.8 
37 9 
47.8 

62.2 
12.1 
43 8 
29.3 
36.9 

57 2 
•2.9 
33 6 
20.2 
27.6 

45 77 



46.9 
-12.5 

27 6 
11.1 
20.4 

45 9 
-12 4 

28 7 
10.8 
21.2 

55 3 
•4.2 
35 5 
17 6 
27.3 

75.8 
16.3 
53.1 
31 6 

42 9 

80 8 
29. H 
64.5 
42.1 

54.2 

87.7 
38.6 
76 4 
52.0 
65 1 

90 7 

43 4 
79 8 
54.8 
68.2 

89. S 
40.6 
77.5 
60.8 
65.4 

86.6 
30 7 
70.2 
46.5 
58 9 

74.4 
22.8 
55.9 
36 2 
46.6 

61.8 
10 2 
42.7 
27.5 
35.8 

49 4 
-4 7 
32.6 
18 
26.2 



SO 

CO 



52.0 
-4.6 

32 8 
18 8 
22.7 

48 3 
-6.6 
32.6 
17.4 
23.8 

58.6 
4 6 
39 7 
24.9 
30.7 

77 6 
23 2 
54.2 
36.7 
44.9 

83.6 
35.1 
(15.9 
45.9 
54.9 

91.8 
44.2 

78.9 
57.4 
66.7 

95.2 

49 5 
83.2 
60 8 
71.2 

93.4 
46.6 
81.2 
59.0 
69 6 

90 7 

36 2 
74 1 
52 9 
62.1 

76 4 
26.9 
60.3 
41.6 
49.5 

65.7 
14.9 
47.0 
32 8 
39.4 

54.9 
0.7 

37 2 
24.0 
30.5 



44.36) 47 17 



44.9 

-8.4 
28 3 
13 6 
21.5 

44.4 
-6.8 
29.1 
13.6 
21.9 

52.7 
2 9 
35 1 
20 6 
28.0 

70 9 
20.5 

50 5 
33.5 
41.9 

77.6 
.32.5 
62.3 
43.8 
52 9 

86 5 
42 8 
74.0 
.54.0 
63.8 

89.7 
47 6 
78.1 
68.0 
67.9 

87.7 
45 8 
76.0 

51 
6f5.0 

84.3 
36.3 
68.5 
50.1 
59.2 

71.7 
26.2 
55.1 
39.5 
47.4 

59.2 
14.0 
43.2 
30.4 
37.0 

48.0 
■2.4 
33 8 
20.9 
27.8 

44.61 



2.C 



41.8 
-21.6 
2.S.8 
6.1 
15.3 

42 5 
-18.2 
25.9 
6.2 
16 4 

49 2 
-8.3 
33.1 
14.8 
23.7 

74.4 
12 5 
51 8 
30 1 
40.5 

81.8 
28.8 
65 4 
41.8 
53.3 

89.0 
38 7 
76.5 
51.6 
63.9 

91.7 
42 8 
80 
54 5 
66.9 

90 3 
39.0 
77 6 
52.7 
64.4 

86.5 
30 1 
69.3 
45 9 
56.8 

73 5 
20.6 
54 5 
35.5 
44 2 

59.6 
4.7 
40 5 
25.8 
32.9 

45.3 
-14 3 
29.4 
13.7 
22 

41.69i 41.37 



41.9 
■28.0 
23.6 
3.6 
14.3 

42.9 

-25.4 

25.7 

4.4 

15.7 

48.6 
-14.8 
33 
11 9 
22 9 

70 7 
10 1 

49 7 
28.5 
39 2 

80 9 
28.3 
63 8 
41.7 
52.6 

87.7 
37 2 
75.1 
51 6 
63 4 

89.5 
42.8 
78 4 
55.3 
66.8 

88 6 
39 8 
76.0 
53 2 
64.1 

84 

50 5 
68 6 
46.6 
67.0 



33.2 

45.4 
-14.1 
,29 7 
13 7 
22.3 



40.4 
-22.9 
19.4 
1.0 
10.7 

40 2 
-22.5 
22.0 

3 
13.0 

45.7 
-10.1 
31.5 
13 4 

22.7 

73 7 
12 7 
50.5 
30 4 
40.9 

82.8 
31.4 
66.2 
44.1 
55.5 

88.4 

41 6 
76 2 
64.2 

65 7 

91.0 
46.6 

7H.8 
67 4 
68.4 

88.9 
41.6 
76.1 
54.7 
65.6 

84.5 
31.9 
68.2 
47.0 
57.6 

70.3 
23.1 
53.0 
35.7 
44 6 

57.6 
5.5 
38.5 
25.0 
32.1 

42.8 
-16.8 
25.3 
9 3 
17.8 

41.22 



37.7 
-33 8 
18.1 
-6.0 
6.2 

42.3 

-34.2 

22.1 

1.7 

8.9 

49.4 
-24.5 
32.1 
6.0 
19.2 

74 4 
4.9 
50.7 
25 7 
37.7 

85.1 
25.1 
65.6 
38 7 
61.8 

89.8 
34.3 
75.9 
48.0 
61.8 

91.0 
40.6 
78.1 
52.8 
64.7 

88.8 
37.7 
75.0 
50.6 
61.2 

84.4 
29.0 
67 5 
43.3 
53.4 



56.5 
1.6 
37.1 
22.1 
29.1 

42.2 
-24 3 
24.8 
6.6 
15.0 

37.55 



22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



r No. 26 



RAIN AND SNOW. 

Tablk III, Summary of the total fall of rain and snow, and the number of days on which rain or 
snow fell in Ontario, during the year 1899 at stations reporting for the whole year, and the average for 
the Province. 



Station. 


Rain. 


Snow. 












Inches. 


Days. 


Inches. 


Days. 


Essex : 










Cottam 


29.20 
25.08 


95 
98 


31.1 

31.8 


19 
20 


Windsor 


Kent : 


Ridgetown 


21.95 


85 


47.0 


33 


Uealtown 


26.28 


87 


10.3 


10 


Chatham 


23.16 


79 


28.8 


18 


Elgin : 










owal 


23.34 
26.81 


j6 
114 


17.5 
38.0 


10 
52 


Port Stanley 


Norfolk : 










Port L over 


23.91 


97 


36.5 


37 


Wellant) : 










Welland 


28.91 


88 


79.5 


26 


Lambton : 


Sarnia 


13.60 
25.97 
22.49 


33 

88 
61 


37.5 
39.8 
35.0 


13 

32 
9 


Birnam 


Wyoming 


Huron : 










Goderich L.H.... 


18.67 


44 


53.0 


18 ' 


Sunshine 


27.70 


85 


70.0 


50 


Brdce : 










Lucknow 


29.88 


93 


94.5 


59 


N . Bruce 


24.57 


99 


87.3 


55 


Point Clark 


24.45 


45 


72.0 


26 


Saugeen 


21.23 


104 


108.2 


83 


Grey : 


Bognor 


25.14 

28.57 


58 
109 


112.5 

189.8 


44 
70 


Owen Sound 


Durham 


22.83 


81 


161.0 


49 


SiMCOE : 


Harrie 


25.68 


117 


93.8 


74 


Coldwater 


28.71 


92 


104.3 


50 


Orillia 


28.88 


90 


92.7 


51 


Middlesex : 


Cold.stream 


26.37 


81 


50.8 


.-^8 


London . 


29.34 
25.43 


92 

74 


46 9 
30.0 


43 

11 


Hubrey 


Oxford : 


Princeton 


21.07 


53 


38.0 


28 


Woodstock 


23.03 


78 


21.8 


19 


Brant ; 










Paris 


24.15 
18.95 


79 
53 


25.8 
24 8 


14 

15 


St. George 


Brantford 


24.23 


53 


19.0 


11 


Perth : 










St. Marys 


• 21.12 


58 


64.0 


30 


Stratford 


25.66 


90 


52.2 


28 


Wellington : 










Erasmus 


25.39 


108 


95.8 


61 


Dufferin : 


Orangeville 


29.20 


69 


90.9 


46 


Wentwokth : 










Stoney Creek . . , . 


27.54 


71 


22.0 


14 


Hamilton 


22.81 


99 


27.4 


16 


Halton : 










Georgetown 


25.18 


117 


64.6 


47 



Station. 



York : 

Aurora . . . 
Scarboro' . 
Deer Park 
Toronto . . 
Stouffville. 



Peel : 

Alton 

Frontenac : 

King.ston 

Arden 

Carleton : 

Ottawa 

Renfrew : 

Clontarf 

Rockliffe 

Lanark : 

Oliver's Ferry . 

Smith's Falls . 
Victoria : 

Lindsay 

Prince Edward : 

Bloomfield . . . . 

Roblin's Mills. 
Peterborough : 

Ennismore . . . 

Peterborough . 

Lakefield .. , . 
Haliburton : 

Haliburton . . . 
HastiN(js : 

Bancroft 

Deseronto .... 
Durham : 

Port Hope 

Addington : 

Croydon 

Leeds : 

Lansdowne . . 
MUSKOKA : 

Bala 

Beatrice , 

Gravenhurst . , 

Huntsville 
Parhy Sound : 

Pairy Sound . 

Sprucedale . . 

Uplands 

Algoma ; 

Port Arthur . . , 

Savanne 

White River . 

Thompson . . . 



Rain. 



Inches. 



22.21 

24.89 
26.01 
25.79 
31.30 



22,58 

21.91 
29.06 

30.47 

19.53 
22.30 

23.38 

27.68 

29.97 

24.15 
31.12 

25.74 
28.49 
25.17 

30.70 

30.75 
32.41 

28.23 

25.56 

18.19 

30.16 
27.84 
26.90 
30.71 

27.31 
26.26 
19.86 

24.65 
13.64 
18.09 
26.54 



Average for the 
Province . , 



Days. 



Snow. 



Inches. Days 



25.28 



73 

91 

76 

105 

83 



92 

105 
118 

77 

86 
98 

65 
46 

121 

86 
60 

52 

106 

79 

100 

69 
96 

81 

56 

55 

84 
80 
85 
62 

107 
81 
93 

90 

34 

77 
55 



81 



43.9 
21.9 
18.8 
31.8 
58.1 



60.7 

56.0 
53.5 

75.8 

97.8 
76.5 

41.5 
32.0 

78.3 

42.9 
52.0 

46.5 
60.5 
46.9 

74.1 

79.2 
49.7 

55.9 

41.5 

44.0 

130.3 

159.8 

90.0 

103.0 

16fi.8 
157.0 
145.6 

18.8 
.58.0 
75.8 
52.0 



64.6 



1899] 



BUREAU OF INDTTSTRIES. 



23 



RAIN AND SNOW. 

Table IV. Monthly summary of inches of rain and snow precipitation in the several districts of 
Ontario in 1899 ; also the average derived from the eighteen years 1882-1899. 



West and South-west : 

p . (1899.... 

^^^^ \ 1882-99. 

Q (1899.... 

Snow il882-99. 

Iforthtvcst and North : 

T, . (1899..., 

^*'" t 1882-99. 

Q /1899 ... 

^^^^ (.1882-99. 

Centre : 

T, . ri899... 

^*'° \ 1882-99. 

o (1899. .. 

S°o^ il882-99. 

East and Northeast : 

jf ■ fl899..., 

"*"^ 11882 99. 

a /1899..., 

S°°^ U882.99. 

The Province : 

Tj . /1899.'. ., 

^^'° 11882-99. 

o /1899... 

^°o^ 11882-99. 



in. 

1.80 
1.23 
7.0 
15.8 

0.87 
0.90 
28.1 

27.7 

1.79 
1.20 
7.2 
17.5 

1.54 
0.94 
10.6 
21.0 

1.50 
1.07 
13.2 
20.5 



in. 

1.30 
1.41 
4.4 
11.9 

0..39 
0.56 
11.5 
20.6 

0.86 
1.07 
8.7 
14.2 

0.51 
0.65 
7.5 
18.0 

0.76 
0.92 
8.0 
16,2 



in, m. 

2.10|0,79 
1.2911.79 
17.2:0.3 
9.3 :2.6 

0,74il.37 
0.871.45 

33.5 1.9 
14.4 i3.7 

2.211.31 
1.231.56 

20.8 1.8 
9.6 |2.9 

2.060.94 
1.0l!l.32 

16.9 12.6 

12.6 3.7 



1.78 
1.10 
22.1 
11.5 



1.10 
1.53 
1.7 
3.2 



3,4811.09 
3.383.05 



0.1 



3.26 
2.63 



0.4 



1.73 
2.50 



3.60 3.81 
2.79 2.65 



3.461.56 

2.852.73 



0.1 



0.53 
2.50 



1.19 
2.79 



2.30 
2.34 



3.53 3.00;3.27 
2.68 2.63 2.74 



0.2 



3.43 2.46 2.78 
2.88 2.80 2.56 



0.2 



2.62 
2,59 



3.57 
2.96 



0.44 4 53 
2.23 2.46 



1.07 

2.57 



0.81 
2.52 



4.15 
2.45 



3.72 
2.62 



3.49 

2.84 



0.:? 



3.42 

2.97 



1.7 



3.80 
2.44 



0.5 



3.12 
2.24 



0.6 



3.51 
2.62 



0.8 



(D 

a 

> 




<D 

a 
§ 


in. 


in. 


1.65 


2.03 


2.46 


1.60 


* 


8.8 


6.5 


13.1 


0.93 


1.86 


1.97 


1.13 


2.5 


24.8 


13.2 


21.9 


0.86 


1.85 


2 21 


1.44 


1.0 


8.4 


5.8 


11.9 


1.09 


2.86 


1.87 


1.22 


0.5 


15.9 


8.1 


14.4 


1.13 


2.15 


2.13 


1.35 


1.0 


14.5 


8.4 


15.3 



23,41 
26.64 
37.7 
59.6 

25.01 
23.67 
102.3 
103.6 

24.97 
23.76 
47.9 
62.5 

27.14 
22.32 
64 

78,6 

25.13 
24.10 
60.5 
76.1 



SUNSHINE, 

7 ABLE V. Monthly summary of bright sunshine at the principal stations in Ontario in 1899, showing 
the number of hours the sun was above the horizon, the hours of regi.stered sunshine, the total for 
the year, and the average derived from the eighteen years 1882-99, 



Stations, 



Hours of sun above horizon. 

,„ , . , / 1899 . . 

Woodstock 1 1882 -99 

rr <. 11899 .. 

Toronto 11882-99 

Barrie ^^^^^ • 

^*"^® U882-99 

^i^^e^y {l882.99 

^'"f?^*^" { 1882 -99 



Average of five 
stations 



( 1899 . . 
< 1898 . . 
i 1882-99 



bre 

285.7 

84.0 
61.0 

98,0 
77.3 

64.5 
53.8 

108,0 
75.7 

99.4 
76.0 

90.8 
76.2 
68.8 



hrs, 
291.4 

101.6 
83.0 

140.3 
101,1 

57.5 
74.5 

127.7 
99.5 

137.0 
105.5 

112,8 
69.3 
92.8 



hrs. hrs, 
369.9 406.4 



80.2 

128.2 



hrs. 
461.1 



hrs. ! hrs. | hrs. 
465.7 470.9 434.5 



196.4 199.5 308.9 300.4 265.5 158.5 158.0 
181.8 203.71243.5 274.5,235.61184.11131.3 



hrs. I hrs. 
376.3 340.2 



128.4 227.8I2I6.4 291.11319.9 264.2 
157. 7 200. 2, 219. 0,261. 3,284. 7, 252,1 



167.7 
142.0 

143.8 
163,2 

146.0 
164.1 



246.8 203.2 241.6 314.8 
184.0 199.5,233.4 264.0 

I I I 

221.9 213.2 276.0 279.4 

206.0 215.6 256.0 271.3 

223.1222.0 273.6296.4 
198.3 218.1 250.61271.9 



133.2 223.2 
157.5 230,2 
151,0194.1 



210.9 
196.3 
211.2 



278.2 302.2 
237.1|307.8 
249.0 273.3 



242.1 
223.4 

284.6 
247.7 

254.3 

245.8 

262,1 

225.2 
240.9 



156.1154.1 
212.9144.7 

205.0 99.4 
175.0 110.9 



148.4 
199.7 

153.8 
194.3 

164.4 
202.4 
193.2 



141.2 
134.5 



155.9 
136,4 



hrs. hrs, 
286.9 274.3 



74.7 
66.7 



84.4 
76.4 



81.8, 
49.5, 



65.2 
55.0 



67.5 
61.2 



42.6 
41.7 



hrs. 
1463.3 

1992.9 
1849.0 

2148.2 
2048.6 

1967.0 
1751.7 



71.6 58.22074.0 
66.5 57.0 1992.7 



80.3 
74.1 



67. 5 12109.3 
70.3,2005.4 



141.7 78.6 60.22058.3 

118.2 89.0 56.611965.8 

131.6 66.6' 57 0ll929.5 

I I I 



24 



THE REPORT OF TBE 



[ No. 26 



TORONTO OBSERVATORY. 

Table VI. Comparative Meteorological Register for the seven years 1893-99 at Toronto Observatory in 
Latitude 4^" 39 4' N,, and Longitude 5h. 17m. 34.65 s. W. Height abjve the sea 350 feet. 



Average temcerature 

Difference from average (59 years) 

Thermic anomaly (lat. 43'' 40') 

Highest temperature 

Lowf'st temperature 

Annual ranges 

Average daily range 

Greatest daily range 

Average height of barometer at 32° Fahr 
Difffrence from average (58 years) .... 

HiKhe-»t barometer 

Ijowest barometer 

Annual ranges 

Average humidity of the air 

Difference from average 

Average elasticity of aqueous vapor .... 
Average temperature of dew point 

Average of cloudiness 

Difference from average (45 years) 

Resultant direction of wind 

Resultant velocity of wind 

Average velocity (miles per hour) . . 

Highest velocity in month and year . . 

Total amount of rain in inches 

Difference from average (59 years) 

I*lumber of days of rain 

Total amount of snow in inches 

Diffrrence from average (59 years) 

Number of days of snow 

Number of fair days 

Number of days completely clouded . . . . 

Number of auroras observed 

Possible to see aurora (No. of nights). . 

Number of thunderstorms 

Number of fogs 

Number of hours of bright sunshine 

Number of hours of possible sunshine . . 



1899. 



45 83 
+ 1.53 

— 5 19 
92 1 

-12 
104.1 

17 51 

35.1 

29 6368 

+ .0172 

30 403 

28.657 

1.746 

76 


0.279 
S9.9 

0.f6 

— .05 



S 77 W 

2.66 
10.14 
50.0 

25.795 



1898. 



47 15 
+ 2 85 

— 3.87 
97.1 

-15 
112.1 
17 48 
34.4 

29.6216 

+ 0020 

30.218 

28.732 
1.486 

76 


289 
44.1 

0.58 

- .03 



N65 W 

1.78 
10 12 
55.0 

23 800 
- 1.343— 3.338 



105 

31.8 

—36.3 

40 

185 

44 

10 
226 

29 

31 

2148.2 
4463.3 



98 

71.3 
+ 3.24 
53 

196 

56 

7 
210 

34 

26 

2128.9 
4163.3 



1897. 



45.93 
+ 1 63 

— 5 09 
93 3 

— 72 
100 5 

16 21 
36.0 

29 6319 

+ .0123 

30 353 

28.779 

1.574 

76 


0.274 
42.7 

0.61 
.00 



N89 W 

2.42 
12.33 
51.0 

27.737 
+ 599 
110 

47.4 
—20 66 
43 

173 

58 

3 
179 

19 

28 

1987.6 
4463.3 



1896. 


1895. 


^ 


^ 


45.36 


44.28 


+ 1.06 


— 0.02 


- 5 66 


— 6.74 


91.3 


93.4 


-17 9 


—21.2 


109.2 


114 6 


17.58 


17 26 


38.9 


36.9 


29.6382 


29.6171 


+ .0186 


— .0025 


30 422 


30.240 


28.734 


28.746 


1.688 


1.494 



1894. 



46 75 
+ 2.45 

— 4 27 
90 7 

— 9.9 
100 6 

16 27 
34.3 



1893. 



43.53 

— 77 

— 7 49 
93.3 

-17.8 
111 1 
17.15 
36.3 



75 
1 



0.254 
38.9 



0.60 
.01 



N88 W 

0.75. 
8.44 
50.0 

21.770 
— 5.368 
104 

73 3 
+ 5.24 
43 

174 

55 

18 
194 

25 

30 

2146.7 
4474.4 



29.6246 29 5996 

+ .0050— .0200 

30.616| 30.407 

29 035 28 227 

1.481 2.240 



75 
1 



253 
41.3 



0.57 
.04 



76 


0.277 
42.9 

0.60 
— .01 



S78W 

1.36 
5 60 
60.0 

22.532 

- 4.606 

101 

54.8 
—13.26 
48 

196 

48 

11 
195 

23 

33 

2159.7 
4463.3 



N78 W 

1.10 
5 67 
58.0 

25.785 
~ 1.353 
114 

37.8 
-30 26 
32 

179 

43 

23 
199 

36 

30 

2017. 7 
4463.3 



77 
+ 1 

0.262 
41.0 

0.59 
— .02 



N66 W 

1 95 
8.59 
60.0 

31.145 
+ 4.007 
105 

85.7 
+ 17 64 
64 

156 

50 

18 
208 

41 

31 

2052.4 
4463.3 



1899] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



25 





•SBJoany 


00 





lO 


00 


IM 


U> CO 


t- 


»o 


N 


IM 


N 


IM 
1^ 


CC CO 
t- CO 


CO 

_00 

~io 









© 


CO 


»o 


\c. 


CO 


■V 


rH 


j-< 


© 


© 


N 


t- rt< 


•soijo^s japunqj, 


























IM 


(M rH 


rH 









c 


.-1 


CO 


CO 





© 





C^ 


C<1 


© 


CO 


■* 


® rH 


00 




•sSo^ 


























7-1 


r-l 1-1 








(M 


»-H 


CO 


r^ 


© 


IM 


10 





CO 


rH 


CO 


CO 


■*! 


t^ CO 


(M 




■saiBf) 


























(M 


1*1 1-1 


(M 






CO 


«r 


CO 


■* 


f_^ 








CO 


(M 


OS 


t- 


» 


10 10 


t- 




•S^BQ 


I-H 


"" 


tH 


















I-H 


00 


OS t- 


00 


o 




































t- 


"* 


CO 


1- 


* 








t^ * 


r-< 





CO 


CO 10 


CO 


a 
m 


janoniy 


.2 oi 


tc 


•<»< 


c 















© 


CO 


■* 


00 t- 


t~ 




'"' 




•<f 


















7-i 


00 


00 © 


00 

l-< 




I0-0.I3AO 


(N 


N 





CO 




■* 


10 

rH 





1-1 


rH 


00 


in 


CD 




■* CO 

1-^ « 




^s^«a 


t- 


"0 


0' 


~r~ 


















rH 




rH 




00 


Tf 


^^ 


TT 


•V 


t- 


<N 


10 


OS 


CO CO 


© 




C-T 


c^ 





0- 





Tl 


00 


rH 


^ 


rH 


I*" 


I- 


l>- 


10 OS 


•* 


;anoniy 


.2 d 











'T 


Tf 


N 


rH 


CO 


rH 





w 


© 


10 CO 


CO 






























M 


IM IM 


N 






t- 


cc 


(N 


r~ 


CO 


t- l-H 


CC 


»o 


!>. 


CO 


CO 


Tfl 


§ s 


© 


S " 


•ra-dg 


^ »o 













CO 




t- 


b- 


CO 


00 


CO 


CO 
CO 




00 


in 


00 


05 


•* 


IM 


© 


© 


^^ 


t- 


(M 


I-H 


CO 


b- 10 




5^ «c> 














CO 




CO 


00 


00 





CD CO 


CO 


«M 




1-1 


ir: 


«o 


c 


I-H 


CC 


t- 


(N 


c 


t> 


10 


10 -^ 


la 


. 


•oidg 


i-i 


- 


l-H 


- 


1-H 


- 


l-H 




(^ 


- 


1- 


r-l 


rH 


rH rH 


-H 




»*■ 


«r: 


t^ 


(N 


•^ 


(M 


00 


C: 


I-H 


rH 


t- © 


t^ 


t— CO 


t~ 


ta'^ 


•m-Bg 


i-H 




»H 




l-H 


C5 


T-H 


^ 


« 


7-i 


rH 


« 


iH 


I-H I-H 


r-l 






CO 


r« 


CO 


cc 


10 


C 


05 




cc 


■T 


oc 


o- 


10 


IM b- 


OS 











l-H 




















CO 




rH 




























I-H 


l-H rH 


rH 




C<5 


t- CO 


cc 


00 


Tt 


CO 


t^ C5 


CC 


oc 


OC 


10 


CO 10 


b- 




M N 


iH 




l-H 












I-H 






© 
I-H 


CO 
rH rH 


C4 

T-l 




05 


(C 





ir^ 


(M 


© rH 


N e^ 


c 


(M CC 


CO 


OS 00 


2 


M 




^" 




1-1 T-H 


iH rH 












© 
l-H 


OS 

rH 


rH 




(» 


tc 


(M 


^ 


1-1 


t~ t^ 


cr 


C^ 


cc 




« 





lO © 


00 


B 


'AiS 


























IC 


00 CD 


CD 


.2 




































■*! 


X 


t- 


or 


C73 


C 


00 


CO 


IC 


oc 




00 


OS 


00 CO 


e« 




•s 


T-l 






















I- 


IM 




OS 


-3 


























rH 


1-1 r-t 






CO 


e<- 


t~ 


CO 


1-H 


C9 


I-H 


-9 





CO 


<M 


■* 


OS 


CO OS 


b- 


73 

a 


a "s 


























CO 


Tjl Tjl 


t- 




C<l 


f. 


N 


« 


(N 


^. 


C4 




^ 


CO 


(M 


c 


c. 


10 © 


f^ 


•a 




























rH IM 


eo 




l-H 





■^ 


rH 


CQ 


cc 


10 




IM 


■^ 


CO 


T»< 


CO 


■* CO 


rH 




•a-N 


























CO 


•H' CO 


IM 






•* 


■* 


05 


oc 


N 





CO 


CO 


O" 


cc 




r^ 


CO 


IC IQ 


t>. 




•N 










I-H 


T^ 




rH 


I^ 




I-H 








b- 




•aaaea 


iO 


t- 


(N 


\a 


CO 


»o 


10 


ea 


t 


c^ 


CO 


OS 


OS 


•»»< 


t- 




^|i^p 








■^ 


CO 


■!J< 


CO 


(N 


•^ 


00 


OS 


CO 


IQ 





© © 









c^ 












Cv 


I- 


I- 


I- 






(M <M 


04 




•u'capj 


































fH 


10 


eo 


iH 


»-H 


>a 





OS 


rH 


(M 


CO 


04 


l-H 


N © 


<M 




•OIW 


TJI 


CO 


£- 


« 


00 


(N 


^, 


in 


•* 


00 


IM 


lO 


•^ 


CO -^ 





« 


CO 


1 


(N 




e>) 


CO 


•* 


CO 




I-H 

c 




C<1 

1 


CO 

1 


CO CO 

1 1 


■<K 




t- 


0- 


05 


00 00 


OD l-H 


cc 


CO 


00 


CO 


00 in 


t- 


1 


L-x«pi 


05 





t- 


00 OS 


ir 


t^ 


<T 


IC 


IC 




cc 


OS 


OS 


C4 


CO 


■q- 


CO 


t~ b- 


oc 


00 


OC 


t- t^ ir: 


TT 


oo 


00 OS 


OS 




ov 


(N 


IM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




CO 


(M 


•* 


OS 


eo 


•>*i CO 


A 




t^ 


t£ 


10 


CO 


CO 


l-- 


00 





e^ 





•>*< 


ce 


00 


CO t- 


t^ 


s 


•n'Baj\[ 


■<*< 


00 


CO 


05 


»H 





-^ 


>n 





in 


CO 


m 


l» 


OS f- 


» 


H 








I-H 


CO 




CO 


CO 


CO 




rr 


CO 


rH 


CO 


CO CO 


CO 




CO 


0: 


•«1< 


(M 


10 


^^ 


rH 


CO 


O! 






(M 


OS OS 


•* 






•^ 




•>!J< 


a 


•* 


<T 


c« 


oc 


oc 


a 


OS 


c 


00 


IM t- 


1-1 




•ra-dg 


iO 


00 


CO 


OS 


l-H 





eo 


Tt< 


00 


•»>< 


C4 


CO 


t>. 


OS t— 


CO 
















CL. 


CO 


as 


■* 


'J" 




t-l 


rj 


CO CO 


CO 







^ 


© 


Tf 


CO 


CC 


irt 


cc 


,_ 


oc 


es 


in 


in © 


^_l 


















■^ 






oc 


t~ in 


CO 


© rH 


CO 




•ra-«g 





^ 


CO 


e<i 


CO 


oc 


CO 


e<i 


t- c 


c 


iM 


CO 


CO to 


1»< 














Tf 








•<t 


TT 




l-H 


CO 


CO en 


eo 






























OS 


00 t^ 


CD 






























OS 


OS OS 


OS 






























00 


00 00 


00 






























r-l 


rH rH 


rH 






























^ 


OS 


' 




a 




























<u 






A 




























t>% 






a 




























« 









































:^. 


1 

c« 


I 

t 


■> 

.a 


1 

< 




a 

c 
c 


>> 

3 


■p 
a 

5 

•< 


s- 
9 

a 
CC 


1- 

a 

X. 
c 

' 1 


u 
d 

B 

> 

c 


i 




u 



"08 
"0 
H 





26 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 26 



RURAL AREAS ASSESSED. 

Table VIII. Showing by County Municipalities the rural area of Ontario as returned by municipal 
assessors for 1899 ; also the comparative totals for the Province for the ten years 1890-9. 



Counties 
and districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elg-in 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry' , 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent....: 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox & Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Thunder Bay . 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899.. 

1898.. 

1897.. 

1896.. 

1895.. 

1894 . . 

1893.. 

1892.. 

1891.. 

1890.. 



Acres of assessed land. 



Resident. 



338,522 
212,656 
892,057 
562.513 
354,443 
232,252 
,%6,65l 
434,610 
428,264 
627,941 
285,730 
267,089 
1,053,177 
278,935 
543,212 
224,320 
940,160 
797,521 
561,334 
654,545 
647,999 
461,765 
425,572 
185,313 
190,163 
755,886 
493,.529 
248,751 
397,150 
434,464 
498,438 
470.570 
514,105 
284,541 
514,875 
550,441 
272,165 
220,748 
22,382 
925,223 
233,802 
925,866 
243,635 
159,176 
590,253 
302,260 
221,746 
627,010 
264,918 
532,280 

22,670,958 
22,492,838 
22,403,060 
22,174,899 
22,131,895 
22,032,799 
21,940 726 
21,923,424 
21,589,562 
21,455,126 



Non- 
resident. 



Total. 



69,838 
2,609 

12,952 
5,285 
2,277 
4,875 
3,568 
476 
1,187 

56,641 



4,133 

7,597 

1,059 

18,337 

343 

85,174 

2,046 

5,546 

4,518 

23,640 

6,343 

8,813 

5,881 

21,376 

810 

41,029 

48,612 

3,464 

1,938 

7,540 

1,337 

45,084 

4,135 

3,913 

22,849 

14,567 

10,622 

5,749 

38,536 

17,719 

37,483 

1,966 

90,419 

6,090 

4,566 

5,554 

712 

7,332 

3,595 

780,134 
899,746 
957,368 
997,509 
981,420 
1,006,175 
1,818,554 
962,040 
946,421 
963,155 



408,360 
215,265 
906,009 
567,798 
356,720 
237,127 
370,219 
436,085 
429,451 
684,582 
285,730 
271,222 

], 060, 774 
279,994 
561,549 
224,663 

1,025,334 
799,567 
5(56,880 
659,063 
671,639 
468,108 
434,385 
191,194 
211,539 
750,696 
534,558 
297,363 
400,614 
436,402 
505,978 
471,907 
559,189 
288,676 
518,788 
573,290 
286,732 
231,370 
28,131 
963,759 
251,521 
963,349 
245,601 
249,595 
596,343 
306,826 
227,300 
627,722 
272,250 
535,875 

23,451,092 
23,392,584 
23,360,428 
23,172 408 
23,113,815 
23,038,974 
22,959,280 
22,885,464 
22,535,983 
22,418,281 



Acres 
cleared. 



35,846 
176,314 
519,235 
309,203 
235,645 
150,446 
289.104 
333,979 
274,777 
255,735 
178,470 
169,631 
636,957 
228,740 

35,163 
169,420 
391,317 
615,942 
408,378 
392,788 
311,010 
276.074 
262,143 
161,984 

39,418 
.590,438 

59,294 

24,237 
257,718 
334,061 
358,618 
374,416 

62,138 
248,839 
417,255 
248,985 
163,018 
193,400 
1,325 
3f)2,740 

97,498 
570,641 
136,181 
4,348 
271,222 
247,566 
176,584 
471,853 
215,744 
426,424 

13,111,292 
12,993,614 
12,853,081 
12,671,851 
12,426,992 
12.292,610 
12,131,-564 
11,990,140 
11,802,487 
11,658,699 



Acres 

woodland. 



Acres 

in swamp, 

marsh or 

waste land. 



325,794 

16,904 

239,333 

88,436 

49,100 

39,775 

36,410 

93,6.35 

142,797 

225,536 

86,495 

37,952 

220,883 

45,947 

477,793 

31,430 

450,630 

96,743 

137,732 

246,593 

199,924 

121,886 

107,454 

28,483 

103,586 

156,241 

375,583 

219,545 

112,384 

59,688 

42,8.37 

68,539 

409,732 

26,206 

58,434 

199,981 

113,893 

22,559 

24,946 

471,159 

152,964 

291,366 

100,127 

245,247 

117,507 

38,282 

38,417 

72,576 

34,823 

46,111 

7,149,404 

7,198.905 
7,294,020 
7,264,167 
7,777,451 
7,859,714 
8,133,229 
8,264,881 
8,376,762 
8,343,447 



46,720 
22,047 

146,441 

170,159 
71,975 
46,906 
44,699 
7,471 
11,877 

203,311 
21,765 
63,639 

202,934 

5,307 

48,-593 

23,813 

183,387 
86,882 
20,770 
19,682 

160 675 
71,148 
64,788 
727 
68,535 
10,017 
99,681 
53,581 
30,512 
42,653 

1«4,523 
28,9-52 
87,319 
13,631 
43,099 

124,324 

9,821 

15,411 

1,860 

189,860 
1,059 

101,342 
9,293 



207,614 
20,978 
12,299 
83,293 
21,683 
63,340 

3,190,396 
3,200,065 
3,21.3,321 
3,236,390 
2,908.872 
2,886,660 
2,694,487 
2,630,443 
2,356,734 
2,416,135 



a £ 



81.9 
57.4 
54.5 
66.1 
63.4 
78.1 
76.8 
64.0 
37.4 
62.5 
62.5 
60.0 
81.7 

6.3 
75.4 
.38.2 
77.0 
72.0 
59.6 
46 3 
58.8 
60 3 
84 7 
18.6 
78.0 
11.1 

8.2 
64.3 
76.5 
70.9 
79.3 
11.1 
86.2 
80.4 
43.4 
56.9 
83.6 

1.7 
31.4 
38.8 
59.2 
55.4 

4.7 
45.5 
80.7 
77.7 
75.2 
79.2 
79.6 

56.9 
55.5 
55.0 
54.7 
53.8- 
53.4 
52.8 
62.4 
52.4 
52.0 



1899 ] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



27 



FALL WHEAT AND SPRING WHEAT. 

Table IX. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the area, produce and market value of Fall 
Wheat and Spring Wheat for the year 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the past ten 
years and the average lor the period 1882-99 ; also the averages per acre. 





Fall wheat. 


Spring wheat. 


Counties 










*' m ® 










-" „ ® 


and 

districts. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Yield 
per 


Market 
value. 


(U £ fci 

.5 > C 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Yield 
per 


Market 
value. 


Marke 

value 

peracr 








"acre. 




3 a 






acre. 












.1 


$ c. 








$ 


$ c. 


• Algonia 


462 


12,566 


27.2 


8,382 


18 14 


2,393 


49,535 


20.7 


32,941 


13 77 


Brant 


32,300 


329,460 


10.2 


219,750 


6 80 


548 


6,466 


11.8 


4,300 


7 85 


Bruce 


49,816 


841,890 


16.9 


561,511 


11 27 


4,383 


67,060 


15.3 


44,595 


10 17 


Carleton 


87 


2,262 


26.0 


1,509 


17 34 


18,572 


351,011 


18.9 


233,422 


12 o7 


DufFerin 


8,000 


97,600 


12.2 


65,099 


8 14 


13,723 


240,153 


17.5 


159,702 


11 64 


Dundas . . 


385 


5,352 


13.9 


3,570 


9 27 


2,384 


47,203 


19.8 


31,390 


13 17 


Durham 


6,772 


117,156 


17.3 


78,143 


11 54 


23,779 


423,266 


17.8 


281,472 


11 84 


Elgin 


43,297 


368,025 


8.5 


245,473 


5 67 


198 


2,732 


13.8 


1,817 


9 18 


Essex 


32,207 


283,422 


8.8 


189,042 


5 87 


686 


8,790 


15.0 


5,845 


9 97 


Frontenac 


333 


5,528 


16.6 


3,687 


11 07 


9,740 


• 177,268 


18.2 


117,883 


12 10 


Glengarry , . . 


40 


552 


13.8 


368 


9 20 


6,046 


116,083 


19.2 


77,195 


12 77 


Grenville .... 


310 


4,030 


13.0 


2,688 


8 67 


2,035 


40,090 


19.7 


26,660 


13 10 


Grey 


42,630 


703,395 


16.5 


469,164 


11 01 


9,879 


164,979 


16.7 


109,711 


11 11 


Haldimand . . . 


38,877 


636,503 


13.8 


357,848 


9 20 


1,422 


19,481 


13.7 


12.9.55 


9 11 


Haliburton... . 


347 


6,107 


17.6 


4,073 


11 74 


1,328 


18,592 


14.0 


12,364 


9 31 


Halton 


27,786 


352,882 


12.7 


235,372 


8 47 


3,C99 


45,865 


14.8 


30, .-o 


9 84 


Hastings 


7,130 


120,497 


16.9 


80,371 


11 27 


18,645 


346,797 


18.6 


230,620 


12 37 


Huron 


74,859 


1,220,202 


16.3 


813,875 


10 87 


3,150 


46,620 


14.8 


31,002 


9 84 


Kent 


73,568 


912,243 


12.4 


608,466 


8 27 


2,236 


28,621 


12.8 


19,033 


8 61 


Lambton 


58,092 


731,959 


12.6 


488,217 


8 40 


1,448 


16,797 


11.6 


11.170 


7 71 


Lanark 


1,828 


21,388 


11.7 


14,266 


7 80 


15,054 


287,531 


19.1 


191,208 


12 70 


Leeds . . 


2,437 


18,278 


7.5 


12,191 


6 00 


6,106 


120,899 


19 8 


80,398 


13 17 


Lennox & Ad. 


2,457 


38,821 


15 8 


25,894 


10 54 


11,019 


191,731 


17.4 


127,501 


11 67 


Lincoln 


22,277 


349,749 


15.7 


233.283 


10 47 


392 


4,469 


11.4 


2,972 


7 58 


Manitoulin . . . 


1.764 


33,340 


18.9 


22,238 


12 61 


2,073 


38,143 


18.4 


25,365 


12 24 


Middlesex 


90,957 


1,346.164 


14.8 


897,891 


9 87 


1,491 


18,339 


12.3 


12,195 


8 18 


Muskoka .... 


184 


3,717 


20.2 


2,479 


13 47 


929 


14,864 


16.0 


9,885 


10 64 


Nipifsing 


34 


510 


15.0 


340 


10 00 


878 


13,170 


15.0 


8,758 


9 98 


Norfolk 


44,914 


467,106 


10.4 


.311,560 


6 94 


251 


3,012 


12.0 


2,003 


7 98 


Northumblnd 


10,475 


157,125 


15.0 


104,802 


10 01 


30,511 


606,483 


16.6 


336,811 


11 04 


Ontario 


14,146 


257,457 


18.2 


171,724 


12 14 


27,865 


512,716 


18.4 


340,956 


12 24 


Oxford 


53,237 


761,289 


14.3 


507,780 


9 54 


333 


5,361 


16.1 


3,565 


10 71 


Parry Sound. . 


71 


959 


13.5 


640 


9 01 


1,367 


21,189 


15.5 


14,091 


10 31 


Peel 


27,928 


290,451 

574,889 


10 4 


193,731 


6 94 


14,421 
2,206 


246,599 


17.1 


163,988 


11 37 


Perth 


46,362 


12 4 


383,461 


8 27 


34,193 


15 5 


22,738 


10 31 


Peterborough . 


6,664 


106,624 


16 


71,118 


10 67 


16,837 


245,820 


U.6 


163,470 


9 71 


Prescott 


48 


480 


10.0 


320 6 67 


6,969 


124,048 


17.8 


82,492 


11 84 


Prince Edw'rd 


5,808 


95,251 


16.4 


63,532 10 94 


14,855 


237,680 


16.0 


168,057 


10 64 


Renfrew 


651 


11,067 


17.0 


7,382 11 34 


31,254 


596,941 


19.1 


396,966 


12 70 


Russell 


115 


1,725 


15.0 


1,150 10 00 


3,360 


62,4Pf; 


18.6 


41,560 


12 37 


Simcoe 


55,910 


928.106 


16.6 


619,047 11 07 


20,000 


S.^'l fsa 


17.8 


236,740 


11 84 


Stormont . . . 


222 


2,886 


13 


1,925 8 67 


3,011 


^i,198 


18.0 


36,042 


11 97 


Victoria 


4,858 


8-A586 


17.0 


55,085' 11 34 


23,754 


382,439 


16.1 


254,322 


10 71 


Waterloo 


40,572 


478,750 


11 8 


319,326 


7 87 


487 


6,234 


12.8 


4,146 


8 51 


Welland 


21,073 


375,099 


17.8 


250,191 


11 87 


418 


6,267 


12.6 


3,502 


8 38 


Wellington . . 


25,528 


349,734 


13.7 


233,273 9 14 


6,-589 


124,632 


18.9 


82,814 


12 57 


Wentworth . . . 


34.30:^ 


418,497 


12.2 


279,137 


8 14 


1,145 


15,458 


13.5 


10,280 


8 98 


York 


37,570 


616,148 


16.4 


410,971 


10.94 


29,557 


594,096 


20.1 


395,074 


13 37 


The Province : 






















1899... 


1,049,691 


14,439,827 


13.8 


9,631,365 


9 18 


398,726 


7,041,317 


17.7 


4,682,476 


11 74 


1898. . . 


1,04^,182 


25,158,713 


24.0 


17,460,147 


16 66 


389,205 


6,873,785 


17.7 


4,756,659 


12 22 


1897. . . 


950,222 


23,988,051 


25.2 


18,758,656 


19 74 


323,305 


4,868,101 


15.1 


3,826,327 


11 84 


1896. . . 


876,955 


15,078,441 


17.2 


10,705,693 12 21 


255,361 


3,519,322 


13.3 


2,484,641 


9 73 


1895. . . 


743,199 


14,155,282 


19.0 


9,809,610 


13 20 


233,957 


3,472,543 


15.6 


2,423,835 


10.82 


1894... 


778,992 


16,512,106 


21.2 


9,081,658 


11 66 


230.016 


3,367,864 


14.6 


1,869,159 


8 13 


1893... 


913,954 


17,545,248 


19.2 


10,509,604 


11 50 


356,721 


4,186,063 


11.7 


2,486,521 


6 97 


1892. . . 


966,522 


20,492,497 


21.2 


14,488,195 


14 99 


651,302 


8,290,395 


12.7 


5,620,888 


8 63 


1891. . . 


849,956 


21,872,488 


25.7 


20,800,736 


24 47 


510,634 


10,711,538 


21.0 


9,951,019 


19 49 


1890. . . 


720,101 


14,267,383 


19.8 


13,439,875 


18 66 


601,753 


7,683,906 


12.8 


7,016,405 


11 66 


1882-99 


908,677 


18,220,140 


20.1 


14,608,542 


16 08 


470,226 


7,247,187 


16.4 


5,986,754 


12 73 



Including Thutjder Bay and Rainy River in this and succeeding tables. 



28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 26 



BARLEY AND OATS. 

Table X. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario, the area, prorluce and market value of the- 
crops of Barley and Oats for the year 1899, towother with the totals for the Province for the past ten 
years and the average for the eighteen years, 1882-99 ; also the averages per acre. 





Barley. 




Oats. 




Counties and 


















1 
1 


1 ^ 


Districts. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Yield 
per 
acre. 


Market 
value. 


Market 
value 
acre. 


Acres. 


Bushels. 


Yield 
per 
acre. 


Market 
value. 


Market 
value 
acre. 










9; 


$ c. 






$ 


« c. 


Algoma 


823 


23,867 


29 


9,427 


11 45 


8,225 


318. .308 


38 7 


88,171 


10 72 


Brant 


8,057 


179,671 


22 3 


70,970 


8 81 


21, .580 


673,296 


31.2 


186,50;^ 


8 64- 


Bruce 


l.S,900 


462,870 


33 3 


182,8.S4 


13 15 


95,262 


3.762,S49 


39 5 


1,042 309 


10 94 


Carleton .... 


7,56S 


230,824 


30 5 


91,17- 


12 05 


77,692 


2,835,758 


36.5 


785,50.5 


10 11 


Dafferin 


12,349 


391,463 


31.7 


154,6:^8 


12 52 


63,6ii8 


2,^75.316 


42.0 


741 062 


11 63 


Dundas 


2 643 


79,819 


30 2 


31.529 


11 93 


35,8-7 


1,338,585 


37.3 


370,788 
473,527 


10 33 


Durham 


21,164 


617.989 


29 2 


244,106 


11 53 


44,634 


1,709 4'-2 


38 3 


10 61 


Elgin 


6,874 


206,907 


,30 1 


81.728 


11 89 


41,009 


1,677.268 


40.9 


464 603 


11 3»- 


Essex 


7,314 


233,317 


31 9 


92,16' ■ 


12 60 


45,588 


2,014,990 


44.2 


558.1.52 


12 24 


Frontenac .... 


6,451 


163,855 


25 4 


64,723 


10 03 


40 402 


1.. 309.0. '5 


32 4 


362,600 


8 97 


Glengarry 


3,S27 


116,7-'4 


30 5 


46.106 


12 05 


39,843 


1,601.689 


40.2 


443.668 


11 14 


Grenville .... 


2,287 


65,408 


28 6 


25,83(; 


11 30 


33,763 


1.147.942 


34 


317 980 


9 42 


Grey 


18,609 


580,601 


31.2 


229,^37 


12 32 


140.481 


6,268,038 


37.5 


1,459.246 


10 39 


Haldimand . . 


6,1:- 6 


133 76.'^. 


21 8 


52,8?7 


8 61 


30.425 


924,920 


30 4 


256.203 


8 42 


Haliburton . . 


230 


5,45' 


23 7 


2,153 


9 36 


6,035 


177429 


29.4 


49,148 


8 14 


Halt..n ... 


5,285 


149,037 


28.2 


58,87" 


11 14 


24,780 


8?0, 1 30 


33 5 


229.946 


9 28 


Hastings 


16,494 


428.844 


26.0 


169,393 


10 27 


58,887 


2.031 6 '2 


34 6 


562.754 


9 56 


Huron 


23,460 


762,4.^0 


32 6 


301,168 


12 84 


122,249 


4,975,534 


40.7 


1,378.223 


11 27 


Kent 


18,464 


60.5,619 


32 8 


239,220 


12 96 


50,423 


2,:S85 008 


47.3 


660,647 


13 10 


Lambton 


16.840 


510,252 


.30.3 


201.550 


11 97 


6^729 


2,6 -'5. 448 


.38.2 


727,249 


10 58 


Lanark 


3,110 


97.P54 


31.4 


38.573 


12 40 


48,613 


1,7.50.06s 


36 


484,769 


9 97 


Leeds 


5,179 


147 602 


28.5 


58.303 


11 26 


49,765 


1,74^,762 


35.1 


483,850 


9 72 


Lennox &Add 


15,540 


438.228 


28.2 


173,100 


11 14 


35,781 


1,2.34 445 


34.5 


341,94' 


9 56- 


Lincoln 


2,213 


49 350 


22 3 


19,493 


8 81 


21,767 


692,192 


31 8 


191 ,737 


8 81 


ManitouHn . . 


711 


20, 9o;^ 


29 4 


8,257 


11 61 


4,782 


171.196 


35.8 


47,421 


9 92 


Middlesex 


17,628 


524,0S7 


29 9 


207,014 


11 81 


86,6H0 


3, .501, 064 


40.4 


969,79.- 


11 19 


Mu!-koka 


639 


14.889 


23 3 


5,881 


9 20 


11,431 


346.359 


30.3 


96,942 


8 39- 


Nipissing 


268 


7.02/ 


26 2 


2.774 


10 35 


3,885 


11 ',277 


28.9 


31,101 


8 01 


Noifok ... 


4,013 


105,141 


26 2 


41,,53I 


10 35 


30,405 


827.016 


27.2 


229,084 


7 53 


Northumb'rl'd 


10,960 


292,36.5 


26 7 


115,484 


10 55 


42.357 


1.3^7.781 


33.0 


387,185 


9 14 


Ontaiio 


21,311 


677,690 


31.8 


207.688 


12 66 


68 2 4 


2,810.005 


41.2 


778,371 


11 41 


Oxford . 


14,694 


405. 55^ 


27.6 


160,194 


10 90 


67,597 


2,4)7.011 


36 2 


677,822 


10 03 


Parry Sound.. 


785 


17,584 


22 4 


6 946 


8 85 


12,970 


4f'9.852 


31.6 


113,529 


8 75 


Peel 


19.309 


594.717 


30 8 


234,913 


12 17 


43.678 


1.642,293 


37.6 


454,915 


10 42; 


Perth 


20,977 


717,413 


34.2 


283 378 


13 51 


92,942 


4,117,331 


44 3 


1,140.50' 


12 27 


Peterborough . 


5,841 


157.707 


27 


62,294 


10 67 


41,682 


1,321.319 


31.7 


366,005' 8 78 


Prescott 


3,429 


88,811 


25 9 


35,080 


10 23 


38,003 


1,314904 


.34.6 


364,229 9 .58. 


Prince Edward 


9,895 


254,302 


25.7 


100,449 


10 15 


17,4.55 


493,977 


28 3 


136.832 7 84 


Renfrew ... 


1,177 


28,013 


23.8 


11,065 


9 40 


50,0.5f 


1,834,380 


36 


508,123 9 97 


Russell 


3,246 


82,448 


25.4 


32,567 


10 03 


24,361 


918.410 


37.7 


254,400 10 44 


Simcoe 


30,019 


981,621 


32.7 


387,740 


12 92 


101,941 


4,271.328 


41.9 


1,183,1.58 11 61 


Stormont 


3,089 


87 419 


28 3 


3 4,. 5.31 


11 18 


29,057 


1,127,412 


38 8 


312,293 10 75 


Victiiria 


14,753 


386,529 


26.2 


152.679 


10 35 


60,664 


2,238,502 


.36.9 


620,065 


10 22- 


Waterloo .... 


16,706 


509.533 


30 5 


201; 26.5 


12 05 


55,350 


1,9H1,630 


35 8 


648,884 


9 92 


Welland 


2,188 


50, .324 


23 


19,878 


9 09 


2.5,198 


758,460 


30.1 


210,093 


8 34 


Wellington . 


28.094 


983.290 


35 


388,400 


13 83 


127,696 


5, 324, 923 


41.7 


1,475.004 


11 55 


Wentworth. . . 


6 421 


179, 14(^ 


27.9 


70,763 


11 02 


35,713 


1.242,812 


34 8 


344,259 


9 64 


York 


29,514 


982,816 


33.3 


388,212 


13 15 


85,274 


3,581,608 


42.0 


992,078 


11 63 


The Province : 






















1899.... 


490.374 


14,8.30.891 


30 2 


6,858,2^2 


11 95 


2,363,778 


89,897,724 


38 


24,901,670 


10 53 


18H8.... 


438,784 


12,663,668 


28 9 


4.812,194 


10 97 


2,376,360 


86,858,293 


36.6 


22,409,440 


9 43: 


1897 .. 


451.515 


12,021,779 


26 6 


3,245,880 


7 19 


2,432,491 


86, .31 8. 128 


35.5 


19,502,897 


8 02 


1896. . 


462 792 


12,669.744 


27 4 


4,003,639 


8 65 


2,425,107 


82,979 992 


.34.2 


16,595,998 


6 84 


1895.... 


47H,016 


12,090,507 


25.3 


4,884 565 


10 22 


2. 373. .309 


84,697.56H 


35.7 


24,646,992 


10 39^ 


1894.... 


486.261 


10.980.404 


22.6 


4,447,064 


9 15 


2,342,766 


70,172,516 


30 


21,613,136 


9 23 


1893.... 


167,315 


9,806,088 


21.0 


3,932,241 


8 41 


1,936,644 


58, .584,529 


20 3 


19.450,064 


10 04 


1892.... 


499,226 


12,274,318 


24 6 


6 069,293 


10 15 


1,861,469 


64,758,0.53 


34.8 


19,946.480 


10 71 


3891.... 


563,166 


16,141,904 


29.2 


7.92.5,675 


14 33 


1,840 636 


75 009.542 


40.8 


17,378,483 


14 8T 


1890... 


701,326 


15,600,169 


22.2 


7,831,285 


11 17 


1,882,366 


52,768,207 


28.0 


21,687,734 


11 52 


1882-99. 


622,598 


16,157,273 


26.0 


7,873,655 


12 65 


1,930,221 


Q7,131,824 


34.8 


21,069,200 


10 91 



1899 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



29 



PEAS AND BEANS. 

Table XI. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario, tho area, produce and market value of the 
crops of Peas and Beans for the year 1899, togrether with the totals for the Province for the past tea 
years and the average for ihe eighteen years, 1882-99 ; also the averages per acre. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

BrUvie 

Carleton 

Dufferia 

Dunda* 

Durham 

Elj?in ... 

Essex 

Froutenac , 

Glengarry 

Grenville ,. 

Grey 

Haldimand .... 

Ha) i burton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

LiDnox & Add. . 

Lioc'iln 

Manit >ulin 

Midrilfs^-x- 

Mu-koka 

Nipis-ing 

TJ rfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peei 

Perth 

Peterborough . . 

Pres-cott 

Prince Kdward. . 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stiirmont 

Victoria 

Waterloo .... 

Welland 

Wellington . .. 
Wentworth . . 

York 

The Province : 
1899 ... 
1^98 ... 
1897.... 
1896 .... 
l>-95.... 
1894.... 
1893 .... 

1892 

1J<91 

1890 



1882-99. 



Peas. 



Acreg. 



3,3^9 
8,9.o0 
54,709 
6.0.-i8 
16,031 
l,.5fi2 
28,221 
7,172 
1,887 
7,217 
4,19t 
1.085 
56.1(18 
18,lf;9 
1,749 
14 219 
22,724! 
44,400l 
3,618 
7.449 
9.746 
3,3241 
]2,9<8 
6,777f 
5.4.^1 
lo,8S9 
3,1.33 
1,431 
10 300 
28,858 
27.027 
13,54;^ 
3,9 2 
20,021 
26,794 
19.85-2 
4,1(;6 
15,999 
24,117 
2,i;-0 
53.877 
1,451 
20,238 
16.0f.fi 
5 907 
35. 6.^6 1 
1.3,954 
31,656 



Bushels. 



743, 
865, 
896. 
8 9 
799, 
785, 
738, 
774, 
7.52, 
781, 



139 

9-^1 

7."<5 

fiOl 

96 

007 

74 

732 

45:h 

206 



729,083 



75 913 

106.505 

1,291,13' 

107,325 

33.S,44"' 

32,646 
572 xm 
131.965 

35,s5:-i 
140,010 

84.299 

2i,26fi 

1,312 927 

223,479 

33,056 

274,427 

420,394 

1.043,4 (' 

66 2 9 
137,061 
228, 05»; 

67 477 
251.879 
1 0,46.=. 
100,. •-1.54 
317.180 

58,.5S7 

30 051 

119 -ISO 

50.5.<15 

567,567 

24W, 191 

70,741 

370 389 

672,5 9 

4:^2 774 

77,071 

26 ',984 

508,sfi9 

37,062 

1,212.2,33 

31.777 

410,8.1 

274,55><| 

9i,-59i 

837.916 

213 .527 

582,470 



Yie:d 

per 

ajre. 



140,790 
?.2 1 6 ! 
>67.09;< 
49<.Hh 
5t8, 103 
( '22,8-8 
168,955 
491,4 
323 459 
389,313 



14,297,958 



22.6 
11.9 
2 5 6 
17.6 
20.8 
20 9 
20 3 
18.4 
'9.0 
19.4 
20 1 
19.6 
23.4 
12 3 
IX 9 
19.3 

18 5 
23.5 
18.3 
18.4 
23 4 
20.3 

19 7 
16 3 
18 4 
20.0 
18.7 
21 
11 6 
17.5 
21.0 
18 4 
17.9 
18.5 
25 1 

21 8 
IS. 5 
16.5 
21.1 
17.4 

22 5 
21,9 
20.3 
17.1 
15 5 

23 5 
15 3 
18.4 



20.4 
15 6 
15.5 
21 1 



19.6 



Market 
value. 



c. 



43,498 

61.027 
739,819 

61 497 
191,064 

18,7' 6 
328.26 J 

75,H16 

20.514 

80, 2. 'H 

48.303 

12.185 
752,307 
128 :-< 

1«,941 
157,247 
240. ^8fi 
597,868 

37,93K 

78, .^36 

130 676 

38.664 

I46,04fi 

63,29H 

57.f0< 

181 744 

33.r.70 

17.219 

68.462 
289,3V:-< 
32.5,216 
142,7^7 

40,535 
212 2(3 
385 .359 
247,980 12 49 

44,162 10 60 
151,263 9 4=> 
291, 5K2 12 09 

21,2371 9 97 
694.610 

18,208 
235,406, 
lo7,:i22 



12 9i 

6 82 

13 52 

10 08 

11 92 
11 98 
11 63 
10 54 

10 89 

11 12 
11 52 
11 23 
13 41 

7 05 

10 83 

11 06 
10 60 
13 47 
10 49 

10 54 

13 41 

11 63 
11 29 

9 34 

10 54 

11 46 
10 71 

12 03 
6 65 

10 03 
12 03 
10 54 
10 2fi 
II) fiO 

14 38 



Beans. 



.52,4H3 
480,126 
122,351 
333,755 



8,675, 
7.058 
5 838. 
7,696. 
8,531, 
7,51«, 

7 651. 

8 551, 
11,690. 

9,279, 



673 
099 
046 

985 
320 
268 
2'!fi 
714 
3t;7 
766 



8,180,797 



12 89 

12 55 
11 63 

9 80 
8 88 

13 47 
8 77 

10 64 

11 67 

8 15 
6 51 

9 28 
10 66 

9 57 

10 ;-6 

11 04 

15 .54 
11 88 

11 22 



Acres. 



30 
24h 
137 
313 
144 
131 
292 
3,0B3 
6^7 
317 
156 
120 
231 
78 
26 
43 
441 
250 
25,119 
804 
251 
333 
371 
197 
104 
553 
37 
42 
568 
732 
3'7j 
1741 
68 
73 
31 3 1 
126 
26S 
668 
403 
117 
292 
124 
266 
26 
919 
64 
66 
417 

40,485 
45 2-JO 
50,f9i 
68.. 3(9 
72.747 
59,V81 
48,858 
33,249 
41,4?s| 
39,456 

37,822 



Bushels, 



600 

4,157 
2,192 
6,573 
2.160 
1,965 
5,840 
49,(521 
13,140 
5,072 
2,340 
1,88) 
3,4fi5 
1,420 
416 
645 
6.615 
4,375 
399,392 
11,6.58 
5,196 
6,6(0 
5,'<25 
2.91t; 
2,080 
11,060 
740 
630 
8 634 
11,492 
4,75?. 
3,20 
1,020 
1,095 
4.695 
1,638 
4,7K^ 
8,016 
5.521 
2,457 
4,31-0 
2,232 
4,522| 
390 
14,704 
960 
9.^0 
6,h81 



Yield 
per 
acre. 



651,009 
7^9,657 
981,340 
1,197.535 
1,494,179 
827,514 
6*^4.310 
53.5,931 
769, too 
761,341 

655,856 



20 
16 9 
16 
21.0 
15.0 
15.0 
20.0 
16 2 
20.0 

16 
15.0 
15 7 
15 
18 2 
16.0 
15 
15.0 

17 5 
15.9 
14.5 
20.7 
20.0 
15.7 
14.8 
20 
20 
20.0 
15.0 
15.2 
15 7 
15.0 
18.4 
15 
15.0 
15 
13 
18 
12.0 
13.7 
21 
15.0 
18.0 
17 
15 
16.0 
15 
15 
16.5 



16.1 

16.8 
19.4 
17 5 
20 5 
14.0 
14.6 
16 1 
18.6 
19.3 

17.3 



Market 
value. 



648 

4,4^9 

2,3H7 

7,(91^ 

2,333 

2.122 

6 307 

53 591 

14.191 

5,478 

2, ".27 

2,03-. 

3,74' 

- 1,534 

449 

t97 

7,H4 

4,72r. 

431, 43 

12,-591 

6,til-| 

7.193 
6,29 
3,149 
2,2)7 
11,945 
799 
6«(i 
9 32.- 
12 411 
5,13.^ 
3,4.58 
1.102 
1.183 
5.071 
1,769 
5,171 
8 657 
P,96' 
2,6 3 
4.731] 
2,410 
4,884| 
421 
15,8m. 
1,037 
1,0!>9 
7,432 



-^.5 2 

^ C5 o 



703.090 
631,760 
6^9,^34 
819.114 
1,414 9«8 
9 3,.^75 
78:-(,^3H 
629.5(0 
816..54fi 
978,323 

654,812 



$ c. 

21 60 
18 25 
17 28 

22 68 
16 20 

16 20 
21 60 

17 50 

21 60 
17 28 
16 20 
16 96 

16 20 
19 67 

17 28 
16 21 

16 20 

18 90 

17 17 

15 66 

22 36 
21 60 

16 96 

15 98 
21 61 
21 60 
21 f/J 

16 19 
16 42 
16 95 
16 20 
19 87 
16 21 
16 21 
16 20 
14 04 
19 44 
12 96 
14 80 
22 68 
16 20 
19 44 
18 36 

16 20 

17 28 
16 20 

16 20 

17 82 



17 37 

11 76 

12 65 
11 98 
19 45 

15 41 

16 04 
15 93 
19 70 
24 80 

17 31 



30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 26 



RYE AND BUJKWHEAT. 

Table XII. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario, the area, produce and market value of 
the crops of Rye and Buckwheat for the year 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the 
past ten years and the average for the eighteen years, 1882-99 ; also the averages per acre. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas ^ 

Durham 

Elgin .., 

Essex ; 

Frontenac I 

Glengarry j 

Grenville 

Grey | 

Haldim.'ind 

HaliburtoD 

Halton ' 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Lesds I 

Lennox and i 
AddingtoD., 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex ' 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk [ 

Northumberl'd. 

Ontario.. 

Oxford 

Parry Sound. . . 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough . 
Prpf cott . 
Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington .... 

Wentworth 

York 



Rye. 



Acres. 



The Province : 

1899 

1898 

1897 

1896 

1895 

1894 , 

1893 

1892 

1891 

1890 



1882-99. 



102 

2,758 

1,865 

2,03() 

4,413 

1,536 

10,680 

1,127' 

563 

4,712 

107 

1,850 

3,007 

1,148 

499 

745 

13,562 

778 

608 

25R 

1,721 

1,764 

4,764 
1,030 

380 
1,018 

322 

69 

.5,916 

12,949 

7,687 

1,626 

534 
3,368 

228 
6,167 

101 

9,142 

5,958 

27 

4,949 

406 
5,335 
1,080 
1,646 

98 
1,233 
5,070 



137,824 

165.089 

187,785 

148,680 

120,350 

90,144 

68,486 

73,073 

67,865 

103,061 

112,655 



I Yield 

Bushels per 

I acre. 



Market 
value. 



2,040 
41,370 

2!»,840 
30,947 
87.819 
27,648, 
166,6081 
18,4831 
11,823 
74,9211 

1.9261 
24,975 
56,532 
17,564 

9,182 

11.846 

248,185 

14,160 

8,694 

4.429 
31,666 
27,166 

90,516 
15,244 

6,726 
19,342 

4,766 

1.035 

76,316 

186,466 

135,291 

24.553 

9,7)9 
60,287 

3.876 
93,738 

1.394 

138,958 

119,756 

540 

84,628 

7,795 
90,162 
15,660 
26,007 
19,247 
20,838 
84,162 



2,284,846 
2,673.234 
3,382,005 
2.230,873 
1.900,117 
1,386,006 
994,771 
1,132,504 
1,134,630 
1,563,346 



20.0 
15.0 
16.0 
15.2 
19.9 
18.0 
15.6 
16.4 
21.0 
16 9 
18.0 

13 5 
18.8 
15.3 
18 4 
15.9 

18 3 
18.2 
14.3 
17.3 
184 
15.4 

19 
148 
17.7 
19.0 

14 8 

15 
12.9 
14.4 
17.6 
15.1 
18.2 
17.9 
17.0 
15.2 
13.8 

15 2 
20.1 
20.0 
17.1 
19 2 
16.9 
14.5 
15.8 
19 6 

16 9 
16.6 



1,020 

20,686 

14,920 

15,474 

43.910 

13,824 

83,304 

9,242 

5.911 

37,461 

963 

12,487 

28,266 

8,782 

4,(^91 

5 923 

124.093 

7,080 

4,347 

2,214 

15,833 

13,583 

45,25b 

7,622 

3,363 

9,671 

2,383 

517 

38,158 

93,233 

67,646 

12,276 

4,880 

30,143 

1,938 

46,869 

697 

69,479 

59,878 

270 

42,314 

3,897 

45,081 

7,830 

13,004 

9,623 

10,419 

42,081 



I Market 
I value 
per acre 



16.6 1,142,423 
16.2 1,162.857 
1,275,016 
816,500 
866,453 
612 880 
472,616 
631,937 
820,337 
823,883 



18.0 
15.0 
1.5.8 
15.4 
14.5 
15.5 
16.7 
15.2 



l,823,170l 16.2 



948.963 



10 00 

7 

8 00 
7 60 

9 95 
9 00 

7 80 

8 20 
10 50 

7 95 

9 00 
6 75 
9 40 



Buckwheat. 



8 65 

9 20 
7 70 

9 50 

7 40 

8 85 

9 50 
7 40 
7 50 

6 4>5 

7 20 

8 80 

7 55 

9 10 

8 95 
8 60 
7 60 

6 90 

7 60 
10 05 
10 00 

8 65 

9 60 

8 45 
7 25 

7 90 

9 80 

8 45 
8 30 



8 29 
7 04 

6 79 

5 49 

7 20 

6 80 
6.90 

8 65 
12 09 

7 99 

8 42 



I I Yield 

Acres. Bushels I per 
I acre. 



170 

634 

1,901 

5,993 

1,442 

2,848 

4.902 

3,110 

468' 

2,900 

1,451 

4,614 

4,824 

748 

854 

133 

7,526 

1,243 

679 

831 

5,673 

4.405 

6,0651 

2651 

250 

■960 

305 1 

1731 

7,078] 

11,305 

4, 016 1 

1.416 

414 

1,028 

342 

3,438 

1,600 

8,483 

3,330 

1,147 

8,451 

2,662 

3,820 

656 

2,068 

2,288 

1,042 

2,231 



132,082 
150,394 
151,669 
145,606 
135,262 
145,268 
133,828 
125,104 
107,879 
90,111 

100,640 



3,400 

8,877 

34,218 

104,278 
28,840 
.58,669 
98,040 
36,387 
6,458 
51,620 
33,373 

109,813 

106,128 

12,866 

16,055 

1,995 

105.364 
23,9.W 
12,222 
16,620 

102,114 
91.624 

75,206 

2,650 

5,000 

20,160 

5,795 

2,595 

109,001 

151,487 

67,067 

28,320 

6,210 

20,560 

6,840 

53.289 

30,080 

62,774 

67,599 

13,764 

169,865 

56,364 

61,884 

9,840 

24,196 

45,302 

15,943 

28,557 



2,203,299 
2.373,645 
3,464,186 
2,603,669 
2,791,749 
2,534,335 
1,380,466 
2,521,214 
2,608,142 
2,053,720 

1,945,086 



Market 
value. 



I Market 
j value 
per acre. 



20.0 
14.0 
18.0 
17.4 
20.0 
20.6 
20.0 
11.7 
13.8 
17.8 
23 
23 8 
22.0 
17.2 
18.8 
15.0 
14.0 
193] 
18.0 
20.0, 
18,0 
20.8 

12.4 
10.0 
20.0 
21.0 
19.0 

15 
15.4 
13.4 
16.7 
20.0 
15.0] 
20.0 
20.0 
15.5 
18.81 

7.4! 
20.3 
12.0 
20.11 
22.0 

16 2 
16.0 
11.7 
19.81 
15 31 
12.8' 

I 

16.7. 1,002,501 
16.81 906,732 
228) 1,039,256 
17.9, 794,119 
20.6, 1,027,364 
17.4 993,450 

17 8' 995.031 
20 2 1,063,952 
24.2 1,150,191 
22.8 883,100 



1,547 

4,039 

16,569 

47,446 

13,122 

26,694 

44,608 

16,556 

2,938 

23,487 

15,185 

49,965 

48,288 

5,854 

7,303 

90S 

47,941 

10,916 

5,561 

7,562 

46,462 

41,689 

34,219 

1,206 

2,275 

9,173 

2,637 

1,181 

49,596 

68,927 

30,615 

12,886 

2,825 

9,355 

3,112 

24,246 

13,686 

28,562 

30.767 

6,263 

77,289 

25,646 

28,167 

4,477 

11,009 

20,613 

7,264 

12,993 



? c. 
9 10 
6 37 
8 19 
92 
10 
37 
10 
32 
28. 



7 

9 

9 

9 

•5 

6 

8 10 
10 47 
10 S3 
10 01 

7 83 

8 65 
6 83 

6 37 
8 78 

8 19 

9 10 

8 19 

9 46 

5 64 

4 55 
9 10 
9 56 

8 65 
83 
01 
10 
60 
10 
82 

9 10 
9 10 

7 05 

8 55 
3 37 

9 24 

5 46 
9 15 

10 01 
7 37 

6 82 

5 32 
9.01 

6 96 
5 82 



7 69 
6 03 



1.93 



760,396 



8 50 
10 66 

9 8a 

7 66 



1899] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



31 



CORN. 

Table XIII. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the area, produce, and market value of 
the crops of Corn for husking and for fodder for the year 1899, together wit! the totals for the Province 
for the past eight years, and the average for the eight years 1S92-99 ; also the averages per acre. 



Counties and 
Districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham . . .c- 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand. . . 
Hali burton .. . 

HaUon 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and 
Addington. 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin . . . 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissiug 

Norfolk 

Xorthumberl'd 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound. . 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough . 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew I 

Ru-spU j 

Simcoe i 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo . . , 
Welland ... 
Wellington . 
Wentworth . 
Yo.k 



The Province 

1899 

1898 

1897 

1896 

1895.... 

1894 

1893 

1892 



1892-99 , 



Cam for Husking. 



Corn for Silo and Fodder. 



Acres. 



67 

7,575 

960 

2,662 

69 

5.400 

2,670 

26,551 

60,032 

4,501 

1,656 

5,143 

857 

3,889 

193 i 

1,1221 

9, 026 1 

1,730 

52,231 

19,980 

3,086 

9,791 

6,079 

8.167 

128 

18,630 

330 

73 

20.905 

5,420 

3,142! 

11,895 

2221 

422 

464 

704 

3,635 

8,593 

1,114 

1,187 

2,530 

3,320 

438 

1,486 

9,497 

335 

4,319 

1,355 



333,590 
330,748 
335,030 
317,667 
302,929 
267,348 
217,294 
181,463 

285,759 



I Yield 

Bushels I per 

I acre. 



2,010 

469,650 

48,000 

117,128 

2,760: 

361,8001 

186,900] 

l,77s,917 

4,862,592 

243.054 

101,016 

370.296 

34,280 

194,450 

7,720 

86,394 

415,196 

104,340 

3,969,556 

1,118.880 

104,924 

518,296 

316,108 

490,020 

4,736 

1,248,210 

21,780 

2,920 

1,045,250 

271,000 

150,816 

713.700 

11,100 

25,320 

18,560 

28,IG0 

250,815 

343.720 

44,560 

52,228 

113,850 

249,000 

21,900 

72,814 

664,790 

14,400 

289,373 

79,945 



21,673,234 
23,442,593 
24,663,998] 
24,071,364 
24,819.899 
H;,275,352 
14,072,961 
11,229,498 

20,031,112 



30. 
62. 
50. 
44. 
40. 
67. 
70. 
67. 
81. 
54. 
61. 
72. 
40. 
50. 
40. 
77. 
46. 
60. 
76. 
56. 
34. 
56. 

52. 
60. 
37. 
67. 
66. 
40. 
50. 
50. 
48. 
60. 
50. 
60. 
40. 
40. 
69. 
40, 
40. 
44. 
45. 
75. 
50. 
49. 
70. 
40. 
67. 
59. 



65 
70.9 
73.6 
75 8 
81.9 
60 9 
64.8 
61.9 

70.1 



Market 
value. 



I Market 
I value 
!per acre. 



Acres. 



398 

92,991 1 

9.504! 

23,1911 

546; 

71,636 

37,006 

352,226 

962,793 

48,125 

20,001 

73.319 

6,788 

38,501 

1,528 

17,106 

82.209 

20,659 

785,972 

221,538 

20,775 

108,563 

62,589 

97,024 

938 

247,146 

4,312 

578 

206,960 

53,658 

29,862 

141,313 

2,198 

5,01S 

3,675 

5,576 

49,661 

68,057 

8,823 

10,341 

22,542 

49,;i02 

4,336 

14,417 

131,628 

2,851 

57,296 

15,829 



4,291,300 
4,711,961 
4,858,808 
4,717,987 
5,609,296 
4,247,867 
3,729,335 
2,953,358 

4,389,989 



s c. 
5 94 

12 28 
9 90 

5 71 
7 91 

U 27 

13 86 

13 27, 
16 04 

10 69 

12 08' 

14 26' 
7 92; 
9 90, 
7 921 

15 25 
9 11 

11 88 
15 05 
11 09 

6 73 
11 09 

10 30 

11 38 

7 33 

13 27 
13 07 

7 92 
9 90 
9 90 
9 50 

11 88 
9 90i 

11 88 
7 92 
7 92 

13 66 
7 92 

7 92 

8 71| 

8 91 

14 85 

9 90 
9 70 

13 86 

8 51 

13 27 

11 68 



12 86 
14 26 
14 50 

14 85 
18 52 

15 89 
17 16 

16 28 



60 
2,252 
4,056 
8,062 

814 
5,543 
3,625 
2,493 
1,642 
4,095 
5.7731 
5,638 
4,316 
1,666 

176 
2.586 
7,505 
6,028 
2,521 
2,853 
6,316 
6,965 

1,762 
1,119 

394 
7,679 

254 
56 
3,242 
4,196 
4.702 
7,188 

191 1 
3,154 
6,998 
2.211 
2,514 
3,194 
4,043 
2.485 
4,226 
4,703 
2,632 
3,384 
1,185 
3,9.55 
3,704 
7,779 



Tons 
(green) 



Tons 
per 

acre. 



360 

19, .592 

49,037 

110,208 

7,326 
54,321 
24,868 
20,168 

9.376' 
39,476' 
67,8331 
69,066 
40,268 
11,662 

1,232 
20,326 
71,298 
64,680 
16,311 
20,855 
62,718 
89,013 

.13,656 
10,161 

3,152 
67,806 

2,032 
448 
2.5,547 
37,260 
49,183 
66,130 

1,910 
29,742 
53,6751 
20,7831 
28,157 
23,955 
42,856' 
28,578 
43,486 
50,181 
32,900 
31,065 

8,5561 
44,4941 
33,558 
78, 490 1 



171,935 
189,948 
209,005 
178,962 
149,899 
111,361 
95,8'>5 
91,403 



15 361 149,787 



1,697,755 
2,128,073 
2,669,822 
1,948,780 
1,775.654 
1,019,765 
1,049,524 
948,907 

1,658,535 



600 

8.70 

12.09 

13.67 

9.00 

9.80 

6.86 

8.09 

5.71 

9.64 

11.75' 

12.25; 

9.33 

7.00 

7.00 

7.86' 

9.50 

10.73 

6.47 

7.31 

9.93 

12.78 

7.75 

9.08 

8.00 

8.83 

8.00 

8.00 

7.88 

8.88 

10.-16 

9.20 

10.00 

9.43 

7.67 

9 40 

11.20 

7.50 

10.60 

11.50| 

10.29 

10 67 

12.50 

9.18 

7.22 

11.25 

9.06 

10.09 



Market 
value. 



720 

39, 184 1 

98,074 

220,416 

14,652 

108,6421 

49,736' 

40,3.361 

18.752 

78,952 

135,666 

138,132| 

80,536 

23,3241 

2,464' 

40,652; 

142,5961 

129 360! 

32,622 

41,710| 

125,4361 

178, 026 1 

27,312 

20,322 

6,30i 

135,612 

4,064 

896 

.51,094 

74,520 

98,366 

132,260 

3,820 

59,484 

107,350, 

41,566! 

56,3141 

47,910 

85,712 

57,156 

86,972 

100,362 

65,800 

62,130 

17,112 

88,988 

67,116 

156,980 



9.87 3,395,510 
11.20' 4,256,146 
12.77 5,339,6J4 



Market 
value 
I per acre. 

■^ c. 
12 00 

17 40 
24 18- 
27 34 

18 OO 

19 60 
J3 72 
16 18 

11 42 
19 28 

23 50' 

24 50' 

18 66 
14 00 

14 00 

15 72 

19 00 

21 46 

12 94 

14 62 

19 86 

25 56 

15 50 
18 16 

16 00 

17 66 
16 CO 

16 OO 
15 76 

17 76 

20 92 

18 40 

20 00 
18 86 
15 34 
18 80 

22 40 
15 00 

21 20 

23 00 

20 58 

21 34 
25 00 
18 36 
14 44 

22 50 
18 12 
20 18 



10.89 
11.85 
9.43 
10.95 
1C.38 

11.07 



3,897,560 
3,5.51,308 
2,099,5301 
2,099,048] 
1,897,8141 



19 75 

22 41 
25 55 
21 78 

23 69 
18 85 
21 90 

20 76 



3,317,070 22 14 



32 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 26 



POTATOES AND CARROTS. 

Table XIV. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario, the area, produce and market value of 
the cropc of Potatoes and Carn'ts for the year ]89;-t, together with the totals for the Province for the 
past tea years and the average for the eighteen years, 18S2-99 ; also the averages per acre. 



Counties 
and Districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Curleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

1 >urham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Gleogarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds . 

Lennox & Adding 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk . . 
Northumberland . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Soimd .... 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough . . . 

PresC'iit 

Prince Edward . . 

Renfrew 

Rus-ell 

Simcoe 

Storniont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

WeDand 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1809 

1898 

1897 

1896 

1895 

1.^94 

1893 

1892 

1891 

18ii0 

1882-99.... 



Potatoes. 



Acres. 



1,018 
2,321 
4.316 
5,838 
4,106 
2,476 
3,361 
2,f-Sl 
3,724 
4,213 
2 776 
3,048 
6,4i'6 
1,622 

585 
1,703 
5,673 
4,780 
3,631 
3.766 
3,1''69 
3,631 
3.882 
2,21.S 

539 
5,ii91 
1,291 

3,246 

5,007 

6 209 

3,187 

l,:^9 

4,571 

3,5'^2 

3,016 

2,786 

2,195 

4,183 

1.621 

8513 

2,090 

3,425 

3,^96 

2,619 

6,^44 

3,648 

8,612 

168,148 
16M,9^6 
1K9,333 
1 78 96.5 
184 6471 
167,V53l 
142 6011 
145,703 
160. 'n8 
158,0941 



Bushels. 



Yield 
per 



133 358 
259,952 
64M,084 
683,046 
525,568 
277,:-<12 
386,515 
316,910 
28:-<,024 
505,560 
4.52,488 
393.11.2 
871,560 
141.114 

76,635 
18.3,924 
629 70 ' 
712,220 
406,67'.^ 
387. H98 
398,818 
479,292 
349, .380 
201.3!-3 

42 042 
€65 329 
182,031 
114,.S07 
233,712 
615,721 
567,781 
341.009 
191,9.58 
447.968 
482,514 
365,888 
364 966 
127,310 
506.143 
259.360 
1,123.716 
317,680 
397, .300 
38 '.3:^6 
280,533 
9:'!5,:9i 
4.52, H52 
947.320 



131. 
112. 
149. 
117. 
128. 
112. 
115. 
110. 

76. 
1?0. 
163. 
129. 
135. 

87. 
131. 
108. 
111. 
149. 
112. 
103. 
122. 
132. 

90. 

91. 

78. 
119. 
141. 
1.51. 

72. 
103. 
109. 
107. 
1.38. 

98. 
157. 
118. 
1.31. 

58. 
121. 
160. 
132. 
152. 
116. 
116. 
107. 
143. 
124. 
110. 



119. 
84. 
95. 



19,933,366 

i4,;s68,625 

16,100,797 

21.305,4771 1'9 

29,390,8841 1.59 

17,163.130 

12,911,212 

12,2s9,sl7 

24,065,886 

17,561.117 



103. 

91. 

84. 
1.50. 
111. 



160,060 18,436,674 115. 



Market 

value. 



=4 cS !- 



43,741 

86, •.64 

210,t^32 

2'4,(i39 

172,3S6 

90,968 

126,777 

103,947 

92 832, 

165,824 

148,416 

128,967 

285.872, 

46.286 

2.5,136 

60,327, 

206.543 

2:^3,608 

133,:- 88! 

127,2301 

130,812 

157,208 

114.597 

66,054 

13,790 

2 18. '.'28 

59,706 

37,493 

76,Kf8 

169, 167 1 

186.2.32 

111,8511 

62 962 

1-16 9: 

1^S,265I 

116,731 

119,709! 

41,758! 

16^0 5 

85,0701 

368, .579 

104,199 

1.30,314 

12.5,406 

91.916 

306,940 

148.871 

310,721 

I 

6,538,144 

6.332,164 

6.424,V18 

5,682.0.35 

5.936 959 

6 075,748, 

5,099 929! 

6.194,0i.8| 

7.('.42 2I9| 

7,779,576 



42 97 
36 74 
48 87 

38 38 

41 98 

36 74 

37 72 
36 08 
V4 93 

39 36 
53 46 

42 31 

44 28 

28 54 

42 97 

35 42 

36 41 

48 87 
36 74 
33 73 

40 02 

43 30 

29 52 
29 85 
25 68 
39 03 
46 26 

49 63 
23 62 
.53 78 
36 75 
35 10 

45 26 
32 14 

44 94 

38 70 

42 97 
19 02 

39 69 
52 48 

43 .30 
49 86 
38 05 
38 05 

35 10 

46 90 

40 67 

36 08 

38 88 

37 26 
37 94 

31 19 

32 15 
36 .^3 
35 76 
42 51 

48 95 

49 21 



7,385,828 46 14 



Carrots. 



Acres. 



93 
134 
327 
460 

61 
241 
V72 
222 
133 
294 
167 
235 
474 
113 

60 

80 
325 
322 
221 
340 
324 
274 
106 
223 

55 
589 
128 

28 
388 
457 
2H9 
201 

95 
295 
212 
474 
195 
138 
234 
194 
617 
141 
1.59 
304 

92 
224 
313 
588 

11,891 

12,418 

12,025 

12,333 

1:^,002 

11,186 

9,288 

9,941 

9.868 

11,977 

10,906 



Bushels. 



27,435 
4 3, .5.50 
146,169 
13. ',940 
15,555 
60,250 
77,248' 
76,H68 
28,861 
66,150 
61,436 



Yield 
per 



295. 
325. 
447. 
289. 
255. 
250. 
284. 
344. 
217. 
225. 
308. 



105,750 4fi0. 



154,524 

31.301 

18.000 

24,000 
124,4751 

98,2l0l 

60,333 
108,800 
105.300 

68.500 

31,800 

65,785 

13,750 
183,768, 

31,104! 
8,400 

86,136 
123.8471 

98,992 

54,672 

22,2;-:o 

95,8751 

63,812 
166,374! 

41,635! 

32, 164 1 

87,6.50, 375 

58,200, 300 
186,95l| 303 

58,938 

5H,3.53 

99.104 

25,676 

66,976 
105,7114 
181,104 



326. 
277. 
300. 
300. 
383. 
305. 
273. 
320. 
325. 
250. 
300. 
295. 
2.50. 
312. 
243. 
300. 
222. 
271. 
368. 
272. 
234. 
325. 
301. 
3.51. 
213. 
2.33. 



3,674 

4 31.3, 
4,433, 
4,618, 
4,.581, 
.3,716, 
2,971, 
3,827. 
3,814. 
4,210, 



418. 
£67. 
326. 
278. 
299. 
338. 
308. 



035 309. 
861 347. 
628 369. 
4411 374. 
>73' 3.52. 
140 .332. 
450 320. 
361 386. 
016 387. 
542 362. 



Market 
value. 



3,818,3201 350. 



3,429 

5,4431 

18,2711 

16,618 

1,944 

7,531 

9.656 

9,546 

3.607 

8,269 

6,429 

13,219 

19,315 

3,913 

2,250 

3,0 

15,569 

12,276 

7.642 

13,600 

13,163 

8.562 

3,975 

8,223 

1.719 

22.971 

3,888 

1,0.50 

10,767 

1.5,481 

12,374 

6,835 

2,779 

11 985 

7.977 

20 797 

5,192 

4,019 

10,9,'^6 

7,275 

2.3, .^69 

7 367 

7,294 

12.38"< 

3,197 

8,;^72 

13,224 

22,638 

459.254' 
539,233 
554,204 
577. .305 
672,672 
464,518 
371.431 
478 420 
476.752 
526,318, 



95 c. 
36 87 
40 62 
55 87 

36 13 
31 87 
31 25 

35 50 
43 00 

27 12 

28 13 
38 50 
66 25 
40 75 
34 63 

37 50 

37 50 

47 87 

38 12 
34 13 
40 00 
40 63 
31 25 
37 60 

36 87 
31 25 

39 00 
iiO 38 
;-i7 50 
27 75 

33 88 
46 CO 

34 00 

29 25 

40 63 

37 63 
43 88 
26 63 
29 12 
46 82 
37 50 

37 88 
52 25 

45 87 

40 75 
34 75 
;i7 38 

42 25 

38 50 

38 62 

43 42 

46 09 
46 81 

44 04 

41 53 

39 99 

48 13 
48 36 
43 94 



477,290 43 76 



1899 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



MANGEL-WURZELS AND TURNIPS. 

T ^ B L K XV. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario, the area, produce and market value of the 
crops of Mangel- Wurzels and Turnips for the year 1899, together with the totals for the Province for 
the past ten years and the average for the eighteen years, 1882-99 ; also the averages per acre. - 



Countiea. 
and Districts. 



Mangel- Wurzels. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham . 

Elgin 

Essex 

FroQtenac , 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand . . . . , 

Haliburton 

Halton , 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox & Adding 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . 

Ontario . 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward . . . 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentwortli 

York 

The Province : 

1899 

1898 

1897 

1896 

1895 

1894 :.. 

1893 

1892 

1891 

1890 



1882-92. 



Acres. 



Bushels. 



55 
1,429 

1,882 

1,018 

.S88 

273 

1,373 

1,047 

478 

444 

293 

416 

1,765 

499 

27 

1,193 

738 

4,380 

967 

l,fiI5 

.529 

731 

240 

414 

59, 

3,194 

66 

41 

851 

972 

1,886 

3,202 

39 

1,067 

4,308 

695 

168 

307 

478 

356 

1,509 

218 

1,484 

1,481 

312 

3,151 

1.712 

3,651 

53,401 
47,923 
41,175 
36,101 
34,383 
27,670 
21,519 
22,026 
22,961 
25,953 

26,648 



1(5,060 
551,594 
882,6.58 
344,084 
121,832 

67,431 
516,248 
476,385 
1.51,526 
120,324 
1.33,901 
179,296 

723, eeo 

151,197 

8,100 

4.34,252 



Yield 
per 



292. 

386. 
469. 
338. 
314. 
247. 
376. 
4.55. 
317. 
271. 
457. 
431. 
410. 
303. 
300. 
.364. 



383. 
406. 
326. 
401. 
S51. 
380. 
404. 



282,654 

1,778,280 

315,242 

647,615 

185,679 

277,780 

96.960 

154,4221 373 

2.3,600 400 

1,312,734 

16,170 

. 16,400 

276. .075 

346,032 

826,068 

1,261,-588 

13,143 

421,465 

1,921,368 

193,210 

55,944 

88,416 

. 186,420 

100,748 

660,942 

92,650 

500,108 

570,185 

130,416 

1,26^,702 

777,248 

1,223,085 



20,898,387 
21,957,564 
18,103,387 
16,849,401 
15.961,502 
11,5.32.127 
8,P82,568 
10,350,474 
11,779,448 
11,594,518 



11,645,354 437. 



411. 
245. 
400. 
325. 
356. 
438. 
394. 
337 . 
395. 
446. 
278. 
.333. 
288. 
390. 
283. 
438. 
425. 
337. 
385. 
418. 
402. 
454. 
335. 



391. 
458. 
440. 
467. 
464. 
417. 
.^99. 
470. 
513. 
447. 



Market 
value 



i 1.285 

44,127 

70,613 

27,-527 

9,747 

5,394 

41,300 

38.111 

12,122 

9,626 

. 10,712 

14,344 

.57,892 

12,096 

618 

34,740 

22,612 

142,262 

2-5,219 

51,809 

14,8.i4 

22,222 

' 7.7-57 

! 12,354 

I 1,888 

: 105,019 

1,294 

1,312 

22,126 

27,683 

66,085 

100,9.^7 

1,051 

33,717 

153,709 

15,4-57 

4,476 

7,073 

14,914 

8,060 

.52.875 

7,412 

40,009 

45,615 

10,433 

101.3-30 

62,l)-0 

97,847 

1,671.871 

1,756,605 

1,448,271 

1,347.952 

1,270,920 

922,570 

686,605 

828,0-^^8 

942.356 

927,561 

931,628 



© --1 &.< 



$ C. 

23 36 

30 88 
37 52 

27 04 
25 12 
19 76 
30 08 
36 40 

25 36 

21 68 
36 56 
.34 48 
32 80 

24 24 
24 00 

29 12 
.30 64 
32 48 

26 08, 
32 OS, 

28 08 

30 40 
32 32 

29 84 
32 00 
32 88 
19 61 i 

32 OOi 
26 OOl 
28 48 
35 04 

31 52 
26 95 
31 00 
35 68 

22 24 
26 61 

23 04 

31 20 
22 64 

35 04 

34 00 
26 96 

30 80 

33 44 

32 16 

36 32 
26 80 

31 31 

36 65 

35 17 

37 3» 
37 14 

33 34 
31 91 
37 59 
41 04 
35 74 

34 96 



Turnips. 



Acres. 



644 

3, .569 

8,747 

2,117 

5,268 

268 

6,928 

590 

138 

747 

288 

213 

12,103 

251 

290 

1,958 

2,393 

9,161 

.317 

416 

1,424 

664 

189 

470 

302 

2,875 

735 

302 

1,227 

5,652 

12,894 

7,296 

1,025 

2,521 

-5,893 

2,545 

327 

221 

1,198 

1,127 

9,767 

191 

5,733 

-5,616 

171 

14,970 

3,188 

8,505 

15.3,440 
151,601 
149,336 
148 2.34 
151,806 
147,657 
1.36,604 
129,6'i7 
126,075 
111,055 

123,207 



Bushels. 



Yield} 

per I 



329. 
428, 
414. 
375. 
377. 
273- 
375. 
357. 
262. 
317. 
395. 



211,876 
1,-527 532 
3,621,258 

793,875 

1,986,036 

73,164 

2,598,000 

210,630 
.36,156 

236,799 

11.3,760 

115,0201 540 

4,599,140 380 

79,0651 315 

103,6001 3-^0 

659,846 

744,223 
3,.'->63,629 

103,976 

153,920 

t)40,800 

282,200 
68,418 

132,540 

100,566 
1,13^500 

232.260 

10,5,700 

417,180 
2,204,280 
-5,467,056 
2,947,584 

.316,725 

942,854 
2,127,373 

804,220 
98,100 
66,300 

377,370 

389.942 



337. 
311. 
389. 
328. 
.370. 
450. 
425. 
302. 
282. 



.396. 
316. 
350. 
340. 
390. 
424. 
404. 
309. 
374. 
361. 
316. 
300. 
.300. 
315. 
.346. 



3,5\5.188' 364. 

80,220 
1,840,293 
1,886,976 

61,731 
6,212,5.50 
1,268.824 
2,781,135 



.58,078, 
64.727. 
68.297, 
69 814. 
63,496, 
61,694, 
56,97.5, 
63,-541, 
68,853, 
47,040, 



52,024,403 



420. 
321. 
336. 
361. 
415. 
398. 
.327. 

379. 
427. 
4.57. 
471. 
418. 
418. 
417. 
490. 
546. 
424. 

422. 



Market 
\falue. 



21,188 

152,753 

362,126 

79,388 

,198,604 

* 7,316 

259,800 

21,063 

3,616 

23,680 

11, .376 

11,502 

459,914 

7,906 

10,360 

65,985 

74,422 

356,303 

10,398 

15,392 

64,080 

28,220 

6,842 

13,254 

10 057 

11.3,850 

23,226 

10,570 

41,718 

220,428 

540,706 

294,758 

31,672 

94,285 

212,7.37 

80,422 

9,810 

6,630 

37,737 

38.994 

355,519 

8,022 

184,029 

188,698 

6,173 

621,255 

126,882 

278,113 

-5,807,839 
6,472,788 
6,829,715 
6,981.4S4 
6.349,670 
6.169,449 
5.697,535 
6.354 164 
6,885,345 
4,704,056 

5,202,440 



3 B.L (1-2) 



34 



THE REPORT OF THE 



L No. 26 



HAY AND CLOVER-ALL FIELD CROPS. 

Table XVI, Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the area, produce and market value of the 
crop of Hay and Clover for the year 1899. together with the totals for the Province for the past ten years 
and the averages for the eighteen years 1882-99; also the averages per acre. It also shows the aggregate 
area and market value of all the field crops enumerated in Tables ix-xvi. 



Counties 

aud 
districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Uufferin a 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox &Addingt'n 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland .... 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Pre scott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Weiland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899.... 

1898.. . 

1897.... 

1896.... 

1895.... 

1894 .... 

1893.... 

1892.... 

1891.... 

1890.... 

1882-99. 



Hay and clover. 



Acres. 



13,804 
29,282 

101,289 
65,890 
37,862 
36,878 
45,991 
60,095 
44,747 
66,279 
44,89b 
38,971 

126,013 
56,863 
11,872 
30,429 
74,082 

111,8C0 
66,901 
70,851 
68,128 
60,215 
68,366 
40,325 
13,080 
97,245 
24,171 
9,316 
41,230 
64,607 
69,074 
64,714 
23,412 
36,676 
73,966 
35,656 
44,898 
29,588 
70,955 
25,385 
85,462 
32,550 
42,089 
40,937 
52,364 
86,533 
42,798 
69,882 

2,505,422 
2,453,503 
2,341,488 
2,426,711 
2,537,674 
2,576,943 
2,766 894 
2,515,367 
2,549,975 
2,462,002 

2,390,497 





Yield 


Tons. 


per 




acre. 




tons. 


24,847 


1.80 


38,652 


1.32 


150.921 


1.49 


102,788 


1.56 


59,443 


1.57 


55,252 


1.54 


70,371 


1.53 


87,138 


1.45 


65,331 


1.46 


89,477 


1.35 


78,572 


1.75 


51,052 


1.31 


197,840 


1.57 


58,569 


1.03 


13,178 


1.11 


30,429 


1.00 


109,641 


1.48 


155,402 


1.39 


92,261 


1.40 


80,770 


1.14 


77,892 


1.34 


73,462 


1.22 


77,043 


1.32 


49,197 


1.22 


21,461 


1.64 


143,923 


1.48 


34,565 


1.43 


13.974 


1.50 


47,002 


1.14 


76,450 


1.40 


88,611 


1.50 


91,247 


1.41 


36,623 


1.56 


41,741 


1.17 


110,209 


1.49 


60,988 


1.43 


59,265 


1.32 


45,861 


1.56 


106,433 


1.50 


34,270 


1.35 


115,374 


1.35 


42,641 


1,31 


66,922 


1.59 


63,218 


1.30 


52,888 


1.01 


130,666 


1.61 


49,218 


1.15 


95,738 


1.37 


3,498,705 


1.40 


4,399,063 


1.79 


3,811,518 


1.63 


2,260,240 


.93 


1,849,914 


.73 


3,575,200 


1.39 


4,963,557 


1.79 


4,384,838 


1.74 


2,392,798 


.94 


4,20-5,915 


1.75 


3,320,576 


1.39 



Market 
value. 



191,819 
298,393 

1,165,110 
793,523 
458,900 
426,545 
643,264 
672,705 
504,355 
690,763 
606,576 
394,121 

1,527,325 
452,153 
101,734 
234,912 
846,429 

1,199,704 
712,255 
623,544 
601,326 
567,127 
594,772 
379,801 
165,602 

1,111,086 
266.842 
107,879 
362,856 
690,194 
684,077 
704,427 
281,957 
322,241 
8.50,813 
393,627 
467,526 
354,047 
821,663 
264,564 
890,687 
329,189 
516,638 
410.843 
408,295 

1,008,734 
379,963 
739,097 

27,010.003 
27,362,172 
27,366,699 
21,879.123 
22,753,942 
27.028,512 
37,921,575 
35,955,372 
28,498,224 
34,232,024 

30,462,342 



Market 

value 

per 

acre. 



$ c. 
13 90 

10 19 

11 50 

12 04 

12 12 
11 89 
11 81 
11 19 

11 27 
10 42 

13 51 

10 11 

12 12 

7 95 

8 57 

7 72 

11 43 
10 73 
10 81 

8 80 
10 34 

9 42 

10 19 
9 42 

12 66 

11 43 
11 04 
11 58 

8 80 

10 81 

11 68 

10 89 

12 04 

9 03 

11 50 
11 04 

10 19 

11 97 

11 58 
10 42 
10 42 
10 11 

12 27 

10 04 

7 80 

11 66 

8 88 
10 58 

10 78 

11 15 
11 69 

9 02 
8 97 

10 49 

13 71 

14 29 

11 18 
13 90 

12 74 



All field crops. 



Acres. 



31,305 
121,635 
343,550 
204,406 
168,368 

97,455 
204,667 
199,729 
200,164 
152,645 
. 111,515 

99,728 
427,753 
161,906 

24,277 
115,161 
245,151 
408,599 
300,504 
264,270 
159,072 
165,584 
159,.559 
107,849 

30,076 
360,829 

43,955 

17,353 
174,534 
224,448 
257,749 
250,303 

46,636 
177,532 
285,527 
145,908 
109.105 
126,541 
.200,050 

66,858 
388,063 

83,135 
189,648 
187,437 
125,657 
342,609 
153,661 
321,661 

8,753,926 
8,835,272 
8,701,705 
8,611,444 
8,321,173 
8,227,153 
8,054,612 
8,080,206 
7,834,213 
7,912,297 

7,926,641 



Market 
value. 



448,214 
1,289,918 
4,538,584 
2,627,829 
2,227,699 
1,216,645 
2.607,270 
2,186,560 
2,486,860 
1,720,784 
1,573,491 
1,223,440 
5,537,703 
1,408,244 

243,144 
1,176,185 
2,853,572 
5,239,089 
3,713,951 
2,623,912 
1,897,845 
1,805,799 
1,718,094 
1,119,790 

368,967 
4,253,340 

516,908 

222,348 
1,521,898 
2,669,347 
3,610,953 
3,013,139 

570,967 
1,974,116 
3,720,074 
1,657,927 
1,24^525 
1,246,325 
2,467,536 

831,560 
.5,046,172 
1,040,806 
2,344,099 
2,103,168 
1,244,774 
4,829,366 
1,700,564 
4,203,821 

105,771,321 

110,528,947 

106,952,471 

88,900,135 

99,656.895 

94,055,392 

101,886,557 

110,662,493 

130,866,023 

114,382,305 

110,016,016 



Value 
per 



•5? c. 
14 32 

10 60 
13 21 

12 86 

13 23 
12 48 
12 74 
lu 95 
12 42 

11 27 

14 11 

12 27 
12 95 

8 70 
10 02 

10 21 

11 64 

12 82 
12 36 

10 32 

11 93 

11 61 
10,77 

10 38 

12 27 
12 12 

11 76 

12 81 

8 72 

11 40 
14 01 

12 04 

12 27 
11 12 

13 03 
11 36 

11 44 

9 85 

12 28 

12 44 

13 00 
12 52 

12 36 
11 22 

9 91 

14 10 

11 07 

13 07 

12 08 
12 51 
12 29 

10 44 

11 98 

11 43 

12 65 

13 68 
IG 70 

15 42 

13 88 



1899] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



35 



RATIOS OF AREAS UNDER CROP. 

Table XVII. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the number of acres under the various crops 
in 1899 per 1,000 acres of cleared land ; together with the average for the Province for the past ten 
years and the average of the eighteen years 1882-99. 



CountieB and districts. 



Al^oma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

DufFerin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox & Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899 

1898 

1897 

1896 

1895 

1894 

1893 

1892 

1891 

1890 

1882-99. . . 



11. 

183, 
95, 

34' 

2. 

23, 

129 

117, 

1, 

1! 

66. 

170. 

9, 

164 

18, 

121 

180. 

147 



9 

137 

44 

154 

3 

1 

174 

31 

39 

142 

1 

112 

111 

26 

30 
2 

98 
1 

17 
163 
119 

54 
169 



77.5 



57.6 

3.1 

8.4 
60.0 
58 2 
15.8 
82 3 
.6 

2.1 
38.1 
33.9 
12.0 
15.5 

6.2 
37.8 
18.3 
47 

6 

5 

3 
48 
22.2 
42.0 

2.4 
52.6 

2.6 
15.7 
36.2 

1.0 
91.3 
77 

.9 
22.0 
67.9 

6.3 
67 6 
42. S 
76.8 
103.2 
34.5 
35.0 
22.1 
87.6 

2.0 

2.4 
14.0 

6.3 
69.3 

30.4 
30.0 
25.2 
20 2 
18 
18.7 
29 4 
54.3 
43.3 
51.6 



198,2 
122.4 
183 5 
251.3 
270 3 
238.6 
154.4 
122.8 
165.9 
158.0 
223 3 



5,199.0 
220.6 
133.0 
171.6 
146.3 
150.5 
198 5 
123.5 
175^0 
156.3 
180.9 
136.6 
134.4 
121.3 
146.8 
192.8 
160.3 
118 
126.8 
190.2 
180.6 
208.7 
175.5 
222.7 



167.4 
233.1 
90 3 
168.3 
249.9 
178.6 
213 
223 
223 
142 
270 
165 
200.0 



PS 



80. 
60. 
105. 
19. 
68, 
10 
97, 
21, 

6. 
28 
23 

6 
88, 
7J 
49 
83 
58 
72 

8 
19 
31 
12 
49 
41 
138 
26 
52 
69 
40 
86 
75 
36 
63 
80 
64 
79 
26 
82 
79 
21 
94 
10 
74 
64 
33 
75 
64 
74 



O 



3. 
55. 

9. 
34 

3. 
72. 
21. 
86 
221. 
33. 
41. 
63. 

8, 
24, 
10. 
21. 
42. 
12 
134 
68 
30. 
60 
29 
57 
13 
44 

9 

5 
93 
28 
21 
51 

6 

.5' 14 
.2 17 



4.1 
3.6 
3.7 

19.4 
6.1 

18.9 

17.0 
9.3 
1.7 

11.3 
8.1 

27.2 
7.6 
3.3 

24.3 



19.2 
2.0 
1.6 
2.1 

18.2 
.9i16.0 



180.3 10.5 
182.9,12.7 
189 314.6 
191.411 7 



51191.0 
6190 6| 
6|159.9 
71165.3 
9; 156.0 
2161.5 



9.7 
7.3 
5.6 
6.1 
6.7 



40.153.1164.6 9.6 



56.7 
66.6 
G9.8 
65,5 
64 4 
63.9 
61.0 
64,6 
63.8 
67.0 

62^2 



.38,6 
40 1 
42.3 
39.2 
36,4 
30.8 
25.9 
22.8 
20.4 
19.2 

25.8 



23.1 

1.6 

6.3 

1.6 

5.1 

7.1 

27.4 

33.8 

11.2 

3.8 

6.7 

4.1 

.8 

13.8 

9.8 

43.9 

11. 

11.8 

14 8 

18.8 

14.1 

2.6 

11.7 

4 

4 

5.2 

10.1 
11.5 
11.8 
11.5 
10 9 
11.8 
11.0 
10.4 
9 1 
7.7 

8 6 



24.6 
13.2 

8.3 
18.9 
17.4 
16.6 
11.6 

8.6 
13.6 
16.5 
15.6 
18.0 
10.1 

7.1 
16.6 



.210.0 



14.5 

7 

8.9 

9.6 
10.5 
13.2 
14.8 
13.7 
13 7 

9.5 
21.8 
31.2 
12.6 
15.0 
14.5 

8.5 
22.4 
18.4 

8.4 
12.1 
17.1 
11.3 
13.8 
16.6 
14.9 
16.4 
12.6 
13.3 
14.8 
13.9 
.3'1«.9 
.0120.2 



^ ^ 



1.3 
8.1 
3.6 
3.3 
1.6 
1.8 
4.7 
3.1 
1.7 
1.8 
1.6 
2.5 
2 8 
2.2 
.8 
7.0 
1.9 
7.1 
2.4 
4.1 
1, 
2, 



3.112.S 
3.4113.1 
3.9:13.2 
6.414 1 
6.8114.9 



4.8 
4.0 
2 8 
3.5 
3.4 



13.6 
11.8 
12,2 
13.6 
13.6 



3 213.6 



7 

7 

.9 

2.6 

1.5 

5.4 

1.1 

1.7 

3.3 

2.9 

5.3 

8.6 

.6 

4.3 

10.3 

2 

1.0 
1.6 
1.6 
3.6 
2.6 
1.6 
5.5 
6.0 
1 

6.7 
7.9 
8.6 

4.0 

3.7 

3.2 

2 

2 

2.3 

1 

1.8 

1 9 

2.2 

2.3 



O 



2.2 

.8 

.6 

1.5 

.3 

1.6 

.9 

.7 

.5 

1.2 

.9 

1.4 

.7 

.6 

1.7 

.5 

.8 

.5 

.5 

.9 

1.1 

1.0 

.4 

1.4 

1.4 

1.0 

2.2 

1.2) 

1.5] 

1.4 

.7 

.5 

1.5 

1.2 

.5 

1.9 

1.2 

.7 

.8 

2.0 

1.1 

1.0 

.6 

1.2 

.5 

.5 

1.5 

1.4 



5 332 
2166 
8195 
8 213 
4 160 

8 238 
0169 
8179 
5162 

9 259 

6 251 

3 229 
1197 
1248 

4 337 
6179 
l!l89 
9181 
8:161 
OjlSO 
6186 
4218 
7222 
9!248 
7i331 
9164 
4407 
5384 



5'376 
.1143 

1|177 
2143 
.0 275 



.9 

1.0 

.9 

.9 

1.0 



.1155 
.7165 
01296 
7183 
.8198 
.01163 



1.0 



11.71191. 

11.7188. 

11.6182. 

11.7191. 

12.2 204. 
9,12.0209. 
8(11 3 228. 

10.8 209 

10.7216. 
9.5 211. 



7.53.9 
689.9 
661.6 
661.1 
714.5 
617.8 
707.9 
598.0 
728.5 
596.9 
624.8 
587.9 
671 6 
707.9 
690.4 
679.7 
626.5 
B63.4 
735 8 
647.3 
511.4 
565.6 
608.7 
665.8 
763 
594.2 
741.3 
716.0 
677.2 
671.9 
718.7 
668.5 
748.9 
4 713.4 

3 684.3 
2 586.0 

4 669.3 
.0 6.14.3 
.4 660.8 
.4^685. 7 
.8 680.0 
.0;610.5 

2 699.2 
.3 757.1 

6 711.6 
.4 726.1 

4711.8 
.8 754.3 

1667.7 
8680. 
2 677.0 

5 671.6 
2 669.6 

6 669.3 
4C65.0 
8 674.0 
1663.8 
2,678.7 



.9 10.5 203.8 675 

\ 



36 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. .26 



P A S T U R E— R C H A R D— V I N E Y A R D— A P P L E S . 

Table XVIII. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the area in pastuie (cleared land), 
orchard and garden, and vineyard, tor the year 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the 
past ten years ; also the number of apple trees and the yield. 





Pasture. 


Orchard 

and 
Garden. 


Vine- 
yard. 


Apple Trees, 


Counties 


15 years and over. 


No. of trees 
under 15 

years. 


Districts. 


No. of 
trees. 


Bushels. 


Bush, 
per 
tree. 


Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 


Acres. 
5,530 
25,024 

117,231 
81,771 
36,439 
40,400 
46,876 
71,865 
39,611 
72,911 
53,402 
54,973 

135.533 

34,053 

7,887 

28,544 

97,332 

147,919 
55,243 
87,454 

113,712 

90,003 

61,965 

21,258 

5,908 

171,046 
10,882 
3,551 
36.818 
64,521 
53,027 
85,084 
11,192 
33.434 
83,328 
59.341 
41,616 
36,167 
78,025 
23,553 
87,117 
44,213 
45,700 
26,411 
26,214 
74,022 
30,990 
51,172 

2,710,268 
2,708.043 
2,658,245 
2,669,744 
2,728,655 
2,703,241 
1,682,180 
2,562,040 
2,721,281 
2,542,092 


Acres. 

597 

6,439 

9,864 

3,600 

3,355 

2,750 

7,680 

10,419 

10.917 

4,549 

2,170 

2,967 

14,835 

6,669 

479 

8,894 

10,002 

14,411 

17,336 

11,839 

2.886 

4,235 

5,475 

16,747 

555 

16,974 

1,030 

210 

10.101 

13,091 

8,725 

10,611 

661 

6,174 

7,599 

3,861 

1,720 

9,362 

2,574 

897 

11,118 

2,391 

3.948 

5,88S 

9,337 

7,446 

12,788 

ll,9t3 

338,073 
335,420 
326,341 

*320,122 
*312,787 


Acres. 
9 

103 
62 
38 
48 
26 
25 

133 

1,060 

24 

51 

53 

274 

209 
12 

262 
67 

245 

408 

226 
28 
43 
30 
3,072 
16 

187 

16 

4 

85 

123 
87 
99 
8 
41 
85 
31 
34 
82 
50 
28 

132 
32 
37 
20 
1,382 
74 
1,617 
34 

10,802 
10,118 
11,100 


1,934 

109,022 

225,521 

48,130 

60,934 

63,127 

159,962 

189,730 

168.780 

84,729 

41,992 

50,066 

296,770 

152,870 

2,831 

189,159 

163,004 

331,056 

319,600 

236,089 

47,505 

75,804 

82.609 

225,500 

3,105 

300,4110 

5,C67 

327 

180,730 

336,886 

181,909 

195,380 

2,012 

108,137 

152,948 

58,731 

32,416 

217,078 

20,905 

10,815 

185.064 

58,003 

04,652 

lll,.S70 

196,529 

152,8H2 

211,478 

221,234 

6,324,842 
6,221,324 
5,102,399 
5,913,906 
5,835,915 


4,468 
430.637 
843,449 

48,1.30 
152,802 
118.679 
427,099 
629,904 
562,037 
250,798 

68,447 

112,649 

1,160,371 

487,655 

5.662 

627,754 

471,082 

1,221,597 

939,624 

781,455 

79,808 

119,770 

268,479 

671,990 

9,946 

1.036,449 

15,353 
981 
672,914 
798,420 
549,365 
715,091 
5,0.30 
295,214 
590.379 
205,559 
129,664 
672,942 

30,103 

21,630 
714,347 

65,611 
226,282 
208,402 
290,863 
460,115 
551,958 
515,475 

19,126,439 

"I's 343,720 

55,895,755 


2.31 
3.95 
3.74 
1.00 
3.00 
1.88 
2.67 
3.32 
3.33 
2.96 
1.63 
2.25 
3.91 
3.19 
2.00 
2 79 
2.89 
3.69 
2.94 
3.31 
1.68 
1.58 
3.25 
2.98 
3.20 
3.45 
3.03 
3.00 
3.17 
2.37 
3.02 
3.60 
2.50 
2.73 
3.86 
3.50 
4.00 
3.10 
1.44 
2.00 
3.86 
1.13 
3.50 
2.41 
1.48 
3.01 
2.61 
2.33 

3.02 

'2!i9 
9.45 


14,326 
39,189 
92,431 
62,671 


Dufferin 


45,840 
40,618 




123,661 


Elgin 


98,036 
90,172 


Frontenac 


62,656 

33,687 




41,186 


Grey 

Haldimand .. 

Haliburton 


200,147 
32,955 
11,820 


Halton 


.52,160 




151,101 




133,970 


Kent 


190,993 


Lambton 


141,556 


Lanark 


48,982 




68,047 


Lennox & Addington . . . 
Lincoln 


86,145 
31,360 




15,406 


Middlesex 


149,776 


Muskoka 


23,506 


Nipissing 


2,768 
42,666 


Northumberland 


244,758 
118,331 


Oxford 

Peel 


44,466 
11,723 
39,944 

47,835 


Peterbourough 


54,253 


Preseott 


36,2»1 
117,869 




45,103 


Russell 

Stoimont 


19,290 
181,8.56 
34,373 
55,414 
40,811 


Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 


29,181 

58,113 

44,459 

104,244 


The Province : 

1899.... 
1898.... 
1897.... 
1896.... 
1895.... 


3,445,13.5 
3,458,820 
3,435,018 
3,548,0.58 
3,362,401 


1894.... 








1893 














1892... . 














1891.... 






























Inc'.uding vineyard. 



1899] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



37 



HORSES. 

Table XIX. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the number and value of horses on hand 
on July 1, 1899, to},'ether with the totals for the Province for the past ten years ; also the number and 
value of horses sold durino^ the year ending June 30. 



Counties 

and 
districts. 



On hand July 1 . 



Working 
horses. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufterin 

Dundas . . . 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey_ 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox & Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex . . , 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk ; 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough . , . 

Prescott 

Prince Edward . 

Renfrew , 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormonb , 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wen worth 

York 

The Province : 

1899.. 

1898.. 

1897.. 

1896.. 

1895.. 

1894 . . 

1893 , 

1892.. 

1891.. 

1890. . 



1,422 

6,568 

13,688 

9,700 

6,743 

5,691 

9,019 

11,049 

10,983 

7,114 

5,827 

5,027 

18,17(u 

7,438 

1,153 

6,340 

12,354 

16,808 

15,482 

11,698 

7,362 

8.152 

7,703 

6,548 

1,312 

18,465 

2,371 

852 

9,446 

11,054 

11,634 

12,395 

2,039 

8,096 

12,688 

6,827 

4,484 

6,713 

9,047 

3,305 

18,494 

4,919 

7,990 

9,169 

6,724 

14,399 

8,847 

15,175 

418,490 
430,504 
436,921 
434,384 
423,673 
395,686 
373,615 
358,668 
328,736 
318,460 



Breeding 
mare3. • 



315 
1,057 
3,677 
1,979 
1,487 

975 
1,900 
1,811 
2,044 
1,124 
1,889 

752 
4,159 
1,602 

174 

893 
1,902 
4,991 
3,012 
2,887 
1,312 
1,120 
1,278 

863 

230 
4,380 

394 

166 
1,661 
1,685 
3,007 
2,510 

380 
1,819 
3,673 
1,112 
1,312 
1,161 
1,816 
1,078 
4,160 

935 
1,900 
1,477 

899 
3,230 
1,224 
3,202 

86,614 

77,886 

69,940 

66.883 

72,156 

88,962 

100,553 

109,865 

127,188 

131,153 



Other 
horses. 



342 
1,423 
4,242 
1,932 
1,848 
1,066 
2,792 
2,916 
2,418 
1,153 
1,713 

570 
4,763 
1,923 

273 
1,207 
2,272 
6,763 
5,258 
3,769 
1,529 
1,370 
2,036 
1,097 

391 
6,392 

435 

211 
2,221 
2,601 
3.440 
3,235 

457 
2,581 
4,146 
1,653 
1,571 
1,334 
1,901 
1,186 
5,520 
1,233 
2,481 
1,719 
1,344 
3,968 
2,033 
3,692 



Totals. 



No. 



2,079 

9,048 

21,607 

13,611 

10,078 

7.732 

13,711 

15,776 

15,445 

9,391 

9,429 

6,349 

27,098 

10,963 

1,600 

8,440 

16,528 

28,562 

23,752 

18,354 

10,203 

10,642 

11,017 

8,508 

1,933 

29,237 

3,200 

1,229 

13,328 

15,340 

18,081 

18,140 

2,876 

12,496 

20,507 

9,592 

7,367 

9,208 

12,764 

5,569 

28,174 

7,087 

12,371 

12,365 

8,967 

21,597 

12,104 

22,069 



Value. 



110,420 


615,524 


102,851 


611,241 


106,809 


813,670 


12.% 482 


624,749 


151,867 


647.696 


190,129 


674,777 


211,019 


685,187 


220,281 


688,814 


222,5''5 


678,459 


210,023 


659,636 



167,655 

615,264 

1,599,811 

1,003,165 

646,197 

468,608 

939,278 

1,100,996 

1,036,683 

562,364 

639,142 

373,193 

1,821,012 

723,852 

93,131 

604,445 

1,033,412 

2,227,903 

1,645,135 

1,298,213 

703,751 

639,148 

663,945 

583,604 

125,138 

2,161,375 

226,511 

91,120 

889,346 

971,234 

1,344,307 

1,286,270 

208,453 

937,657 

1,683,924 

626,245 

501,603 

557,626 

854,918 

359,034 

2,009.875 

431,718 

821,778 

855,636 

580,966 

1,449,758 

869,045 

1,780,113 

42,713,557 
38,659,896 
36,111,805 
37,185,693 
40,283,754 
46,245,614 
50,527,472 
55,812,920 



Sold in year. 



No. 



164 

375 

2,052 

1,404 

693 

524 

1,055 

1,242 

938 

420 

953 

329 

1,955 

784 

133 

394 

835 

3,148 

1,491 

1,413 

951 

578 

920 

452 

194 

2,733 

226 

139 

925 

875 

1,368 

1,308 

292 

928 

1,510 

705 

517 

499 

1,001 

390 

1,813 

594 

968 

735 

527 

1,584 

708 

1,625 

45,367 
44,404 
43,511 
44,458 
40,346 
41,916 
47,g97 
46,955 



Value. 



$ 

12,300 

25,875 

149,796 

103,896 

45,045 

30,916 

79,125 

86,940 

62,846 

22,680 

61,945 

18,753 

117,300 

54,880 

6,916 

25,216 

44,255 

261,284 

105.861 

101,736 

68,472 

35,836 

51,520 

33,448 

10,088 

218,640 

12,204 

8,06£ 

66,600 

57,750 

109,440 

100,716 

18,396 

73,312 

126,840 

44,415 

32,571 

32 435 

60,060 

27,300 

123,284 

36,231 

^4,856 

50,715 

35,309 

112,464 

55,224 

120,250 

3,204,006 
2,884,107 
2 700,479 
2,712,888 
2,616,391 
3,222,500 
4,004,524 
4,280,132 



38 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 26 



CATTLE. 

Table XX. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the number and value of cattle on hand on 
July 1, 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the past ten years ; also the number and value 
of cattle sold or slaughtered during the year ending June 30. 



Counti&s and districts. 



Algoma . 

Brant 

Bruce , 

Carleton 

DuSerin 

Dundas . 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Haltoa 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

LennoK and Addington . 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo . .f 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899.. 

1898.. 

1897.. 

1896.. 

1895 . 

1894 . . 

1893 . 

1892.. 

1891.. 

1890 . , 



On hand July 1. 



Milch 
cows. 



2,770 
12,579 
28,966 
32,939 
11,869 
24,340 
16,082 
23,092 
16,140 
24,882 
28,580 
21,023 
37,087 
13,592 

3,114 
10,793 
44,270 
34,081 
21,165 
21,831 
25,978 
35,136 
20,818 

9,328 

2,756 
39,566 

5,734 

1.820 
17,831 
25,062 
20,960 
38,961 

5,116 
14,060 
33,676 
18,166 
19,488 
13,890 
24,531 
11,812 
32,426 
21,733 
15,286 
14,920 

9 987 
26,193 
15,022 
25,023 

i574,474 
965,021 
940,236 
920.346 

888,228 
834,237 
803,P98 
787,836 
773 234 
777,838 



Store 

cattle 

over 

2 years, 



1,023 
2,668 

20,323 

10,910 
6,359 
2,781 
6,298 

11,040 
6,26ii 
4,310 
2,812 
2,261 

19,769 
3,479 
1,012 
4,483 
5,252 

28,190 

14,854 

18,518 
8,347 
5,366 
4,823 
1,893 
1.394 

29,944 
1,662 
743 
2,968 
4,335 
8,929 

12,201 
1,926 
4,935 

14,467 
3,213 
2,996 
1,191 

11,134 
2,514 

14,052 
2.886 
7,994 
4,548 
2,520 

15,593 
3.049 
8,278 

356,505 
34?i,695 
365,406 
370,409 
365.644 
376,809 
378 '4 
366,705 
359,318 
347,640 



Young 

and 

other 

cattle. 



4,297 
12,794 
43,955 
24,248 
17,166 
12,438 
19,260 
27,199 
18,298 
17,009 
14,865 
10,178 
54,811 
14,367 

4,740 
11,443 
25,699 
52,667 
29,655 
33,474 
22,264 
18,752 
14,029 

8,257 

4,886 
49,417 

7,406 

2,431 
16,473 
21,898 
27,834 
30,226 

7,358 
13,494 
42,490, 
17,030 
11,390 

9,441 
25,996 

8,189 
42,182 

10,704; 

22,756 
17,543 
10,913 
39,979 
14,125 
21,350 

987,376 
905,227 
876,684 
891,203 
896.231 
888,255 
876,270 
8 74, .599 
846,263 
760,234 



Total. 



No. 



8,090 
28,041 
93,244 
68,097 
35,394 
39,559 
41,640 
61,331 
40,700 
46,201 
46,247 
33,462 
111,667 
31,438 

8,866 
26,719 
75,221 
114.938 
65,674 
73,823 
56,689 
59,254 
39,670 
19,478 

9,036 

118,927 

14,802 

4,994 
37,272 
51,295 
57,723 
81,388 
14,400 
32,489 
90,633 
38,409 
33,874 
24,522 
61,661 
22,515 
88,660 
35,323 
46,036 
37,011 
23,420 
81.765 
32,196 
54,661 

2,318,355 
2,21.5,943 
2.182,326 
2,181,958 
2,150,1031 
2,099.301 
2.057,882 
2 029,140 
1,978,815 
1,894,712 



Value. 



Sold or slaughtered in 
year. 



No. 



172,644 

687,262 

2,209,505 

1,432,234 

766,304 

883,880 

973,780 

1,581,936 

893,625 

887,244 

951,045 

743,162 

2,443,511 

741,277 

148,652 

675,540 

1,570,670 

2,831,124 

1,548,739 

1,751,600 

1,165,378 

1,241,430 

802,231 

470,761 

164,267 

3,357,350 

276,394 

88,515 

786,561 

1,099,896 

1,378,133 

2,142,935 

264,8851 

826,802: 

2,192,756 

755,607' 

669,950 

473,140 

1,168,901 

466,595 

1,899,544 

761,039 

953 487 

880,388 

530,099 

1.998,222 

784,670 

1,444,930 

52,938.500 
47,286,254 
42,683,557 
44,383,638 
46.708.017 
47,577,587 
47,718,025 
45,548,476 



1,516 

6,947 

26,041 

13,327 

8,878 

3,986 

11,557 

14,606 

10,910 

6,844 

7,772 

4,425 

26,638 

8,047 

2,818 

5,961 

11,379 

31,656 

16,991 

21,162 

11,994 

7,520 

7,402 

5,120 

2,348 

40,968 

3,560 

786 

6,926 

9,792 

15,190 

21,781 

3,084 

7,907 

22,523 

7,988 

4,689 

3,751 

12,564 

3,812 

26,073 

3,695 

11,473 

15,619 

6,298 

24,967 

7.722 

19,571 

555,583 
552,485 
503,007 
436,451 
418,131 
441,698 
461,501 
436,352 



Value. 



37,239 
229,043 
934,872 
369,958 
279,835 

91,718 
373,176 
515,592 
277,441 
139,754 
144,559 
110,006 
787,952 
207,774 

45,595 
193,554 
243,966 
1,161,775 
549,829 
689,458 
301,169 
151,002 
165,139 
157,491 

49,402 
1,549,819 

74,297 

15,618 
152,026 
273,393 
505,675 
800,670 

61,742 
274,926 
824,342 
170,224 

91,013 

76,858 
293,244 

90,268 
740,473 

73,974 
349,927 
618,669 
151,046 
1,011,164 
234,672 
662,087 

17,303,426 
16,121,569 
13,350,223 
12,381,248 
13,272,127 
15,219,256 
16,671.021 
15,979,136 



Value 

per 
head. 



$ c. 

24 58 
32 97 
35 90 
27 76 

31 52 

23 01 

32 29 

35 30 

25 43 

20 42 

18 60 

24 86 

29 58 

25 82 
le 18 
32 47 

21 44 

36 70 
32 36 

32 58 

25 11 

20 08 

22 31 

30 76 

21 04 

37 83 

20 87 

19 87 

21 96 

27 92 

33 29 
36 76 

20 02 
.34 77 
36 60 

21 31 

19 41 

20 49 

23 34 
23 68 

28 40 
20 02 
30 50 

39 61 

28 61 

40 50 

30 39 

33 83 

31 14 

29 18 

26 54 
28 37 
31 74 

34 46 
36 12 
36 62 



1899 ] 



BUREA.U OF INDUSTRIES. 



39 



, SHEEP. 

Table XXI. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the number and value of .sheep on hand on 
July 1, 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the past tea years; also the number and value 
of sheep sold or slaughtered during the year ending June 30. 





On hand July 1. 


Sold 01 


- slaughtered in 
year. 


Counties and districts. 


Over 
1 year. 


Under 
1 year. 


Total. 


No. 


Value. 


Value 




No. 


Value. 


head. 


Algoma 


5,178 
11,402 
52,078 
20,175 
20,403 

5,828 
23,428 
27,333 
15,372 
12,598 
11,647 

7,030 
63,105 
15,470 

5,172 
11,070 
21,466 
44,507 
26,241 
26,506 
28,552 
10,646 
12.751 

9,037 

8,831 
35,977 
11,258 

1,178 
16,342 
17,525 
27,035 
11,843 
11,113 
11,564 
22,858 
14,296 

8,640 

5,777 
40,504 

7,083 
55,146 

5,083 
27,972 
14,061 

9,447 
45,056 
12,037 
22,693 

930,314 

8 J 7,872 

897,685 

995,616 

1,095,995 

1,086,635 

1,032,069 

979.962 

935,713 

795.263 


4,010 
10,106 
50,951 
18.833 
19,517 

6,081 
20,939 
24,103 
12,489 
11,821 

9,958 

7,791 
59,470 
14,206 

4,288 

9,966 
19,264 
42,815 
22,787 
25,170 
26,413 
10,815 
11,722 

8,970 

7,518 
32,690 

8,987 
841 
14,087 
15,388 
23,047 
10,920 

9,790 
10,272 
22,018 
12,887 

8.282 

5,143 
33,562 

6,353 
45,816 

4,252 
23,372 
12,349 

8,601 
42,536 
10,426 
20,668 

842,290 
799.142 
792,665 
853,732 
926,740 
929,170 
903,869 
870,511 
758,038 
544,432 


9,188 
21,608 
103,029 
39,008 
39,920 
11,909 
44,367 
51,436 
27,861 
24,419 
21,605 
14,821 
122,575 
29,676 

9,460 
21,036 
40.730 
87,322 
49,028 
51,676 
54,965 
21,461 
24,473 
18.007 
16,349 
68,667 
20,245 

2,019 
30,429 
32,913 
50,082 
22,763 
20,903 
21,836 
44,876 
27,183 
16,922 
10,920 
74,066 
13,436 
100 962 

9,335 
51,344 
26,410 
18.048 
87,592 
22,463 
43,361 

1,772,604 
1,677,014 
1,690,350 
1,849,348 
2,022,735 
2,015,805 
1,935,938 
1,850,473 
1,693,751 
1,339.695 


37,115 

104,921 

460,648 

150,904 

161,541 

45,667 

189,044 

220,226 

95,121 

92,832 

80,625 

55,631 

510,696 

133,284 

31,948 

97,261 

139,639 

393,819 

198,882 

223,714 

195,353 

74,995 

93,393 

77,125 

59,681 

323,178 

76,769 

7,247 

104,994 

130,079 

234,711 

101,101 

73,312 

102,649 

193.782 

• 110.985 

57,037 

41,997 

2.56, .533 

45,703 

400,053 

36,170 

205,777 

107,273 

69.672 

405,046 

105,816 

201,890 

7,315,729 
6,499,695 
6,003,194 
6,652,202 
7,708,442 
8,606,671 
9,016,118 
8,669,557 


2.543 

7,091 

35,109 

16,201 

12,992 

4,933 

14,879 

20,498 

11,666 

9,526 

8,180 

5,230 

38,565 

11,452 

3,360 

8,169 

12,776 

33,145 

17,902 

19,239 

20,798 

7,852 

7,589 

8,513 

4,796 

28,868 

8,032 

630 

11,162 

11,823 

15,431 

8,745 

6,346 

8,642 

17,225 

9,711 

7,323 

5,107 

23,485 

7,270 

39,839 

3,662 

16,273 

14,579 

7,776 

36,966 

8,530 

24,916 

665,238 
664,239 
732,872 
766,896 
632.315 
616,446 
616,237 
575,934 


% 

9.231 
33,399 

144.298 
56,704 
53,007 
17,068 
59,218 
88,651 
40,598 
30,385 
27,996 
20,397 

154,260 
48,327 
10,147 
33,248 
44,58a 

139 872 
71,966 
81,958 
75,081 
27,718 
26,258 
3.3,116 
14,052 

133,659 
27,309 
1,659 
41,820 
45.400 
73,606 
39,003 
20,688 
38,803 
70,795 
35,446 
20,368 
17,108 
76,326 
21,810 

142,225 
12,854 
60,373 
62,690 
31,100 

167,821 
37,276 

109,030 

2,629,201 
2,400,379 
2,538,171 
2,046,709 
2,484,612 
2,652,267 
2,784,288 
2,640,190 


3 63 




4 71 


Bruce 

Carleton 


4 11 

3 50 

4 08 


Dundas . . . . 

Durham 


3 46 
3 98 


Elgin 


4 32 


Easex 


3 48 


Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 


3 19 

3 42 

3 90 

4 00 

4 22 


Haliburton . « 

Halton 


3 02 

4 07 


Hnst.ingR 


3 49 


Huron 


4 22 


Kent 

Lambton 


4 02 
4 26 
3 61 


Leeds . . 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 


3.63 
3 46 

3 89 


Mftnitoulin , 


2 93 


Middlesex 


4 63 


Muskoka 

Nipissing 


3 40 
3 13 


Norfolk 


3 76 


Ontario 


3 84 

4 77 




4 46 


Parry Sound . 


3 26 


Peel 

Perth 


4 49 
4 11 


Prescott 


3 65 

2 78 


Renfrew 


3 35 
3 25 




3 00 


Simcoe ... . 


3 57 




3 51 


Victoria 


3 71 

4 30 


Welland 

Wentworth 


4 00 
4 54 
4 37 


York 

The Province : 

1899 

. 1898 

1897 

1896 .... 

1895 

1894 

1893. 

1892 

1891 


4 40 

3 95 

3 70 
3 40 
3 45 

3 64 

4 14 
4 52 
4 58 


1890 





















40 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 26 



HOGS. 

Table XXII. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the nunaber and value of Hogs on hand 
July 1, 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the past tea years ; also, the number and 
value of Hogs sold or slaughtered during the year ending June 30. 



Counties 

and 
disfericts. 



On hand July 1. 



Over 
1 year. 



Algoina . 
Brant . . . 
Bruce... 
Carleton . 
Dufferin. 
Dundas . 
Durham . 
Elgin. .. 
Esisex . . . 



Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville , . , 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Lfeeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulm 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Preecott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899.... 

1898 ... 

1897.... 

1896.... 

1895.... 

1894.... 

1893 . . . 

1892.... 

1891.... 

1890.... 



1,039 
4,310 
8,733 
6,181 
5,171 
4,115 
4,764 
9,547 

17,188 
4,047 
4,609 
^,083 

n,25a 

3,817 

834 

2,672 

10,230 
9,693 

17,334 
8,450 
4,749 
6,141 
4,105 
3,404 
1,205 

12,428 
1,133 
623 
7,230 
6,164 
8,001 
9,627 
1,338 
4,896 
9,190 
4,062 
4,096 
3,580 
8,180 
'.^764 

14,670 
3,212 
5,059 
5,249 
2,934 

10,265 
4,262 
8,710 

295,349 
265.048 
235,479 
243,756 
244,185 
227,878 
220,396 
231,320 
224,125 
232,194 



Under 
1 year. 



3,307 
28,395 
52,701 
27,325 
32,480 
22,197 
30,885 
67,081 
88,043 
16,626 
16,561 
17,449 
67,307 
27,460 

2,288 
20,130 
40,899 
69,115 
110,435 
.57,748 
19,790 
28,737 
21,805 
18,905 

4,168 
74,934 

3,103 
954 
43,593 
36,956 
49,828 
66,585 

3,568 
30,578 
- 54,890 
22.154 
10,745 
14,553 
19,296 

8,028 
89,676 
12,579 
29,806 
38,606 
15,475 
67,552 
30,578 
59,787 

1,675,721 

1,375,739 

1,049,484 

1,025,875 

1,054,887 

914,255 

791,626 

765,654 

932,191 

908,365 



Totals. 



No. 



4.346 
32,705 
61,434 
33.506 
37,651 
26,312 
35,649 
76,628 
105,231 
20,673 
21,170 
21,532 
78,562 
31,277 

3,122 
22,802 
51,129 
78,808 
127.769 
66,198 
24.539 
34,878 
25,910 
22,309 

5,373 
87,362 

4,236 

1,577 
50,823 
43,120 
57,829 
76,212 

4,906 
35,474 
64,080 
26,216 
14,841 
18,133 
27,476 
10,792 
104,346 
15,791 
34,865 
43,915 
18,409 
77,817 
34,840 
68,497 

1,971,070 
1,610,787 
1,284,963 
1,269,631 
1,299,072 
1,142,133 
1,012,022 
996,974 
1,156,316 
1,140,559 



Value. 



S 

22,064 
163,368 
324,637 
173,278 
174,911 
136,884 
180,494 
389,857 
527,781 
114,598 
129,1.55 
118,759 
409,448 
160,497 

15,534 
113,555 
271,114 
411.020 
649,525 
322,548 
119.9G0 
176,.330 
146,285 
114.836 

26,942 
476,027 

2.5,196 
9,170 
231,451 
221,425 
269,-107 
399,121 

31.684 
180,803 
369,806 
136,735 

90,646 
108,099 
149,112 

61,567 
500.1.32 

92,591 
169,355 
219,228 

96,615 
431,184 
184,759 
332,945 

10,180,338 
8,720,242 
6,533,210 
6,505,227 
7,101,211 
6,909,262 
6,622,129 
5,479,093 



Sold or slaughtered in year. 



No. 



3,438 
32,533 
63,001 
25,755 
35,804 
20,013 
35,267 
71,540 
75,661 
18,290 
16,237 
14,737 
72,125 
30,429 

2,863 
24,400 
40,923 
86,154 
108,446 
65,225 
19,458 
28,841 
30,466 
21,106 

4,163 
94,496 

4,668 

1,078 
46 618 
43.053 
56,618 
81,901 

4,656 
39,237 
72,396 
26,772 

9,289 
17,751 
17,065 

8,370 
99,210 
12,342 
31,884 
47,820 
19,230 
79,277 
37,778 
77,082 

1,875,466 
1,592,697 
1,399,967 
1,304,359 
1,159,992 
1,0S0,567 
975,358 
978,791 



Value. 



28,742 
259,613 
454,237 
•257,292 
210,961 
154,901 
270,851 
525,104 
587,129 
136,992 
139,313 
122,022 
512.809 
222,132 

19,440 
176,412 
319,199 
637,540 
874,075 
463,098 
166,171 
221,499 
240,072 
159,139 

28,267 
67.3,756 

32,116 
8,484 
320,266 
322,036 
424,635 
638,828 

36,363 
266,-119 
568,309 
213,373 
105,337 
129,760 
156,145 

73,907 
707,367 
105,401 
251,884 
370,605 
141,917 
598,541 
275,402 
519,533 

14,157,394 
11,852,535 
10,080,812 
10,022,525 
10,067,667 
10,158,978 
10,296,828 
8,775,852 



> ^ 



y c 

8.36 
7.98 
7.21 
9.99 
6.73 
7.74 
7.68 
7.34 
7.76 
7.49 
8.58 
8.28 
7.11 
7.30 
6.79 
7.23 
7.80 
7.40 
8.06 
7.10 
8.54 
7.68 
7.88 
7.54 
6.79 
7.13 
6.88 
7.87 
6.87 
7.48 
7.50 
7.80 
7.81 
6.79 
7.85 
7.97 
11.34 
7.31 
9.15 
8 83 
7.13 
8.54 
7.90 
7.75 
7.38 
7.55 
7.29 
6.74 

7.55 
7.44 
7. "20 
7.68 
8.68 
9.86 
10.56 
8.97 



1899 ] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



41 



POULTRY. 

Table XXIII. Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario, the number and value of Poultry 
on hand July 1, 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the past ten years ; also, the number 
and value of Poultry sold or killed daring the year ending June 30. 



Counties 

and 
districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce ; 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glenearry 

Grenville 

Grey . .' 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Hal ton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

^Iiddlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland.. 

Wellington 

Wentworth .... 

York 

The Province : 

1899,... 

1898..., 

1897.... 

1896.... 

1895 . . . . 

1894.... 

1893.... 

1892 . . 

1891.... 

1890.... 



On hand July 1. 



Turkeys. 



2,655 
10,657 
27,756 
33,097 
16,660 
25,580 
17,055 
30,389 
22,431 
14,862 
11,651 
19,489 
41,848 
14,400 

3,181 
12,685 
21,650 
42,672 
25,621 
38,262 
20,522 
28,528 
13,908 

9,163 

2,124 
6^,824 

3,789 

1,341 
23,464 
20,455 
20,249 
25,297 

4,722 
17,308 
23,472 
21,543 
15,198 
10,754 
17,690 

7,743 
30,153 
12,850 
20,971 

9,187 
11,675 
26,632 

9,952 
19,341 

927,456 
1,024,285 
890,228 
715,770 
696,604 
689,205 
638,527 
628,504 
507,907 
466,742 



Geese. 



1,574 
5,154 

16,702 

15,163 

11,767 
6,595 

14,084 
8,343 

13,290 
7,113 
5,122 
4,635 

21,320 
5,956 
1,311 
6,162 
8,825 

21,. 540 

12,123 

10,278 
9,104 
6,857 
7,56:) 
2,636 
1,493 

17,184 

1,432 

320 

5,256 

9,651 

14,431 
6,953 
2,319 
9,295 

16,711 
9,924 
3,602 
2,809 

11,310 
3,660 

24,913 
4,201 

10,407 
4,630 
2,578 

19,012 
4,905 

11,017 

421,830 
454, .335 
409,715 
391,547 
420,022 
438,208 
439,482 
445,154 
458,290 
438,722 



Ducks. 



Othei 
fowls. 



984 

5,053 

17,707 

12,847 

6,076 

7,387 

9,445 

12,208 

13,210 

8,996 

1,951 

7,426 

25,178 

7,285 

126 

2,846 

10,060 

26,972 

23,742 

21,146 

4,424 

7,997 

8,724 

4,558 

949 

28,784 

1,253 

403 

8,050 

7,037 

12,373 

10,578 

536 

10,651 

18,211 

5,977 

6,895 

5,095 

6,120 

1,701 

16,349 

3,300 

7,7!2 

5,491 

9,240 

1?,835 

9,480 

18,129 



26,136 
102,433 

223,780 
197,096 
114,670 
124,780 
164,918 
206.649 
235,384 
101,826 
119,235 

95,598 
298,240 
121,761 

16,294 

94,208 
210,117 
319 809 
290,945 
263, 148 
132,923 
143,801 
122,560 
104,309 

20,248 
398,270 

36,045 

14,792 
170,122 
196,614 
221,802 
229,068 

33,536 
151,810 
247,937 
130,944 

97,781 
106,498 
116,444 

58,179 
320,790 
102,679 
146,736 
146,196 
125,287 
239,762 
131,286 
232,795 



458,497 I 7,536,241 



7,605,653 
7,135,398 
6,626,850 
6,636,214 
6,425,249 
6,036,427 
6,005,315 
6,039,893 
5,949,400 



Totals. 



No. 



31,349 
123,297 

285,945 
258,203 
149,173 
164,342 
205,502 
257,589 
284,315 
132,797 
137,959 
127,148 
386,686 
149,402 

20,912 
115 901 
250,652 
440,993 
352,434 
332,834 
166,973 
187,183 
152.752 
120,666 

24,814 
511,062 

42,519 

16,856 
206,892 
233,757 
268,855 
271,896 

41,113 
189,064 
306,331 
168,388 
123,476 
125,156 
151,564 

71,283 
392,205 
123,030 
185,826 
165,504 
148,780 
303,241 
155,623 
281,882 

9,344,024 
9,084,273 
8,435,341 
7,734,167 
7,752,840 
7,552,662 
7,114,436 
7,078,973 
7,006,090 
6,854,864 



Value. 



9,101 
34,985 
81,695 
84,573 
42,734 
51,243 
62,535 
69,818 
77,665 
38,618 
38,493 
39,377 

108,774 

42, .343 

0,290 

33,334 

71,027 

117,222 
93,247 
93,737 
52,351 
58,803 
42,297 
33,298 
6,935 

148,794 
12,040 
5,000 
55,205 
64,248 
75,121 
76,154 
12,286 
57,308 
80,643 
50,685 
35,423 
34,116 
46.191 
21,528 

104,275 
36,027 
54,560 
42,440 
41,362 
87,742 
44,260 
82,518 

2,658,321 
2,578,136 
2,318,038 
2,130,807 
2,1.56,623 
2,208,518 
2.187,158 
2,091,450 



Sold or killed 
in year. 



No. 



9,051 
49,606 
81,972 
90,608 
44,296 
45.658 i 
58,232 ! 

103,580 

115,537 ' 
62,438 
40,793 
35,524 ' 

111,727 i 

62,219 

6,953 ; 

55,690 

79,893 t 

113,248 ! 

115,789 

100,424 
51,627 I 
52,861 1 
54,349 
64,401 
8,620 

175,663 
15,883 
6,396 
64,371 
74,519 
82,048 
82,662 I 
11,013 I 
97,311 I 
70,513 ! 
48,880 I 
41,142 
31,944 
46,132 
26,000 

122,089 
32.192 
51,905 
52,517 
76,692 I 
95,157 I 
79,144 ! 

103,342 

3,102,614 

3,072,767 
2,965,221 
2,711,771 
2,392,458 
2,131,222 
2,017,507 
1,966,409 



Value. 



3,077 
19,842 
32,789 
38,055 
17.275 
18,720 
22,710 
37,289 
35,816 
19,980 
14,278 
11,012 
40,222 
19,288 

1,808 
23,3!'0 
27,963 
41,902 
37,052 
38,161 
21,683 
21,144 
19.566 

25, ns 

2,672 
72,022 

5,083 

2,558 
19,311 
29,808 
28,717 
33,891 

3,855 
39,898 
28,205 
21,018 
17.280 
12,458 
19,375 
10,400 
42,731 
12,233 
21,281 
16,805 
25.308 
39,014 
31,658 
39,270 

1,162,991 
1,131,923 
1,083,914 
985,629 
860,334 
782,588 
75:-!, 695 
778,308 



42 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 26 



WOOL.-BEES. 

Table XXIV. Showing by County Municipalities rf Ontario the number, weight and value of fleeces 
of the wool clip in 1899, toj;ether with the totals for the Province for the past ten yeara ; also, the 
number of colonies of bees and the value of apiaries. 



Counties 

and 
districts. 



Clip of Wool. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Duflferin . 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

H^ldimand 

Hiiliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk . 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Pretcott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899 

1898 

1897 

1896... . 

1895 

1894 

1893 

1892.. .. 

1891 

1890 

1882-99 



No. 



4,990 
10,917 
52,155 
19,871 
19,893 

5,956 
23,362 
27,502 
14,564 
12,268 
11,367 

7,011 
64,591 
15,307 

5,039 
11,076 
21,807 
44,239 
26,198 
26,166 
28,355 
11,452 
13,201 

9,090 

9,362 
35,793 
10,970 

1,144 
16,182 
18,186 
27,565 
11,970 
10,906 
12,040 
22,751 
14,768 

8,772 

5,674 
40,159 

7,025 
55,452 

4,885 
27,106 
14,277 

9,223 
44,931 
11,845 
21,841 



928,184 

865,179 

887,003 

991,371 

1,109,140 

1,092,467 

1,015,497 

961,160 

954,522 

807,486, 

987,4581 





Lb. 


Pounds. 


per 




fleece. 


29,505 


5.91 


68,090 


6.24 


323,463 


6 20 


106,845 


5.33 


119,316 


6.00 


32,943 


5.53 


159,324 


6.82 


172,062 


6.26 


88,844 


6.10 


67,160 


5.48 


61,605 


5.42 


36,772 


5.24 


384,308 


5.95 


99.971 


6 53 


24.849 


4.93 


75,365 


6.80 


113,914 


5.22 


259,806 


5.87 


164,003 


6.51 


159,590 


6.10 


142,950 


6.04 


61,390 


5.40 


73,120 


5.54 


46,627 


5.13 


53,877 


5.75 


232,348 


6.49 


55,419 


5.05 


6,106 


5.34 


89,114 


5.51 


112,214 


6.17 


200,239 


7.26 


74,313 


6.21 


61,024 


5 60 


79,401 


6.59 


132,394 


5.82 


85,154 


5.77 


49,571 


5.65 


32,660 


5.76 


188,693 


4.70 


39,261 


5.59 


340,361 


6.14 


28,847 


6.91 


167,801 


6.82 


78,204 


5.48 


50,423 


6.47 


290,469 


6.46 


73,624 


6.22 


142,293 


6.51 


5,525,122 


5.95 


5,104,686 


5.90 


5,139,984 


5.79 


5,581,387 


5.63 


6,214,811 


5.60 


6,235,036 


6.71 


5,89fi,891 


5.81 


5,643,706 


5.87 


5,498,141 


5.76 


4,574,700 


5.67 


5,547,438 


5.62 



Value. 



Colonies of Bees. 



No. 



4,219 

9,737 
46,255 
15,136 
17,062 

4,711 
22,783 
24,605 
12,706 

9,604 

8,809 

6,268 
54,956 
14,296 

3,553 
10,777 
16,290 
37,152 
23,452 
22,822 
20,442 

8.850 
10,456 

6,668 

7,704 
33,226 

7,925 
873 
12,743 
16,047 
28,634 
10,627 

8,727 
11,354 
18,932 
12,177 

7,089 

4,671 
26,983 

5,613 
48,672 

4,125 
22,566 
11,183 

7,210 
41,537 
10,528 
20,348 



790,092 

847,378 

945,757 

1,026,975 

1,242.962 

1,053,721 

1,073,234 

1,027,154 

1,066,639 

937.8141 

1,017,438 



227 

5,877 
4,691 
4,831 
2,586 
4,924 
3,212 
5,357 
7,257 
2,718 
8,840 
4,892 
5,802 
4,971 
165 
1,566 
6,308 
6,170 
7,648 
8,005 
5,538 
9,898 
4,864 
1,984 
713 

11,968 

389 

18 

7,088 

7,167 

2,882 

4,292 

126 

2,538 

. 3,686 
1,375 
5,196 
2,263 
4,819 
2,038 
4,076 
1,759 
2,416 
1,291 
5,119 
2,241 
3,780 
7,892 



203,343 
190,080 
166,811 
160,076 
173,173 
200,094 
205,168 
195,822 



Value 

(including 

outfit.) 



1,362 
28,210 
26,682 
22,851 
14,482 
22,356 
16,638 
26,571 
31,786 
13,590 
38,277 
23,824 
36,495 
27,738 
825 

8,159 
30,972 
36,909 
38,852 
43,647 
23,924 
49,490 
26,217 

9,781 

3,380 
59,670 

1,933 
90 
40,139 
33,398 
16,082 
26,911 
660 
15,863 
19,130 

6,078 
24,629 
10,667 
23,66f 
11,087 
24,374 

8,162 
13,288 

7,539 
26,977 
11,922 
25,931 
43,406 



1,053,464 
998,049 
885,196 
854,408 
938,658 
1,051,574 
1,162,915 



Value 



1899] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



43 



FARM PROPERTY, IMPLEMENTS AND LIVE STOCK. 

Table XXV, Showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the values of farm lands, buildings, imple- 
ments and live stock for the year 1899, together with the totals for the Province for the past ten years ; 
also, the aggregate value of live stock sold or slaughtered a& determined from Tables xix-xxiii. 



Counties 

and 
districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

DufFerin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Orey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox andJAddington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Ruseell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899 

1898 

1897 

1896 

1895 

1894 

1893 

1892 

1891 

1890 



Value of Farm Property. 



Land. 



$ 

2,077,306 

9,016,236 

19,912,795 

15,628,879 

8,579,103 

6,842,677 

12,332,964 

15,917,676 

15,501,842 

8,276,945 

6,797,397 

6,433,616 

20,543,665 

7,768,223 

953,694 

9,262,330 

13,952,371 

27,292,843 

21,625,463 

18,014,953 

9,910,922 

10,373,041 

8,366,633 

9,624,200 

918,216 

28,965,649 

1,971,338 

975,536 

10,800,799 

12,111,869 

15,855,809 

19,949,255 

1,731,109 

11,008,939 

20,081,546 

9,489,202 

6,406,727 

6,733,699 

9,542,532 

4,891,851 

23,140,555 

5,657,967 

9,993,671 

11,765,700 

8,159,415 

19,070,472 

12,849,209 

26,204,938 



563,271,777 
556,246,569 
554,054,552 
557,468,270 
572,9:^8,472 
587,246,117 
602, 664,. 361 
615,828,471 
621,245,223 
622,886,000 



Buildings. 



Implements. 



$ 

538,684 
3,834,758 
7,00.5,558 
5,207,050 
2,873,070 
2,874,857 
4.723,181 
5,907,297 
4,944,435 
3,094,747 
3,368,268 
2,833,913 
8,107,374 
3,647,304 

295,464 
3,811,574 
5,291,688 
9,818,874 
6,681,243 
5,928,746 
3,697,465 
4,207,778 
3,462,927 
4,160,302 

331,495 
10,672,378 

798,992 

263,641 
4,636,963 
5,134,591 
6,141,270 
7,726,542 

633,417 
4,611,474 
7,594,697 
2,914,622 
2,537,463 
3,211,779 
3,698,760 
1,340,741 
8,258,082 
2,650,287 
3,428,291 
5,264,166 
3,629,451 
7,446,053 
4,920,801 
9,278,868 



213,440,281 
210,054,396 
206,090,159 
206,235,429 
204,148,670 
204,071,566 
200,189,888 
195,644,258 
191,268,327 
193,438,826 



179,613 

782.667 

1,899,389 

1,540,708 

785,038 

755,495 

1,087,011 

1,541,908 

1,460,205 

902,254 

897,434 

703,656 

2,417,493 

999,383 

109,240 

814,128 

1,501,892 

2,489,518 

1,917,262 

1,700,899 

912,693 

1,011,517 

915,623 

945,630 

123,461 

2,509,446 

271,128 

101,733 

1, 147,960 

1,234,655 

1,443,066 

1,670.984 

210,796 

997,191 

1,958,507 

818,200 

776,383 

830,109 

1,158,970 

507,327 

2,346,593 

635,396 

921,688 

1,236,573 

813,120 

1,797,429 

1,185,416 

2,038,180 



54,994,867 
52,977.232 
51,299,098 
50,730.358 
50,944,385 
51,530,172 
51,435,919 
51,003,020 
50,651,442 
50,515,683 



Live Stock. 



% 

408,679 
1,606,800 
4,676,296 
2,844,154 
1,791,687 
1,586,172 
2,345,131 
3,362,833 
2,630,875 
1,695,556 
1,838,460 
1,330,122 
5,293,441 
1,801,253 

295,665 
1,.524.136 
3,085,862 
5,981,088 
4,135,528 
3,689,812 
2,236,793 
2,190,706 
1,748,151 
1,279,624 

382,963 
6,466,724 

616,910 

201,052 
2,067,557 
2,486,882 
3,301,679 
4,006,-581 

590,620 
2,105,219 
4,420,911 
1,680,157 
1,354,659 
1,214,978 
2,475,656 

954,427 
4,913,879 
1,357,545 
2,204,967 
2,104,965 
1,318,714 
4,371,952 
1,988,550 
3,842,396 



115,806,445 
103,744,22s 
93,649,804 
96,857,566 
103,958,0471 
111,647,652| 
116,070.902 
117,-501,495 
108,721,076 
104,086,626 



Total. 



Value of 

Live Stock 

sold. 



3.204,182 
1.5,239,461 
33,494,038 
25,220,791 
14,028,898 
12,059,201 
20,488,287 
26,729.714 
24,627,367 
13,969,-502 
12,901,559 
11,301,307 
36,361,973 
14,206,163 

1,653,953 
15,412,167 
23,831,813 
45,582,323 
34,359,496 
29,-334,410 
16,767,873 
17,783,042 
14,493,234 
16,009,756 

1,756,135 
48,614,197 

3.658,368 

1,541,962 
18,653,269 
20,967,997 
26,741,824 
33,352,362 

3,166,942 
18,722,823 
34,055.561 
14,902,181 
11,075,132 
11,990,566 
16,876,917 

7,694,346 
38,659,109 
10,301.195 
16,548,607 
20,371,404 
1.3,920,700 
32,684,906 
20.943,976 
41,364,382 



947,513,360 
923,022.420 
90.5.093,613 
910,291.623 
931,989,574 
954,395,507 
970,361,070 
979,977,244 
971,886,068 
970,927,035 



90,589 
667,772 

1,716.992 
826,906 
636.123 
313,323 
805,080 

1.253,476 

1,003,830 
349,791 
388.091 
282,190 

1,612,543 

552,401 

83,906 

451,820 

679,971 

2,242,373 

1,638,783 

1,374,411 
632,576 
457.199 
502,655 
408,312 
104,481 

2,647,896 

161.009 

36,381 

600,023 

728,387 

1,142,073 

1,613,108 
141,044 
693,358 

1,618,491 
484,475 
266,559 
268,619 
605,150 
223,685 

1,756,080 
240,696 
748,321 

1,119,484 
384,680 

1,929,004 
634,232 

1,450,770 



38,457,018 
34. 4f 0.583 
29.753,599 
28,748,995 
29,301,131 
31,936,589 
34,610.366 
32,453,617 



44 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 26 



FARM VALUES AND RENTALS. 

Table XXVI. Showing by county Municipalities of Ontario, average values per acre of farm property 
and rentals of leased farms based upon (1) the total acreage occupied and (2) the area cleared. 





Farm values— a 


verage pe 


sr acre, occupied. 


Value build- 
ings, imple- 
ments and 
live stock 
per acre 
cleared. 


Rent pe 
la 

Occu- 
pied. 


r acre on 
nd- 


Counties and Districts. 


Land. 


Build- 
ings. 


Imple- 
ments. 


Live 
stock . 


Total. 


Cleared^ 


Algoma 


•S c. 

3 o:i 

41 88 

22 00 

27 53 
24 05 

28 86 

33 31 
36 58 
36 09 

12 09 

23 79 

23 72 
19 37 
27 71 

1 70 

41 23 

13 61 

34 14 
38 15 
27 33 

14 76 
22 16 
19 26 
50 34 

4 34 
.SS 28 

3 69 
3 28 

26 96 

27 75 
31 34 

42 27 
3 09 

38 14 
38 71 
16 55 

22 34 

29 10 
9 90 

19 45 

24 02 

23 00 
16 76 
38 35 

35 89 

30 38 

47 20 

48 90 

24 02 
23 78 

23 72 

24 06 

24 79 

25 49 

26 25 

26 91 

27 57 
27 79 


$ c. 

78 
17 81 

7 74 
9 17 

8 06 
12 12 

12 76 

13 58 
11 51 

4 52 

11 79 

10 45 

7 64 

13 03 
53 

16 97 

5 16 

12 28 

11 79 

9 00 
5 50 

8 99 

7 97 
21 76 

1 57 

14 10 
1 49 

89 
11 57 

11 77 

12 14 

16 37 
1 13 

15 98 

14 64 
5 08 

8 85 

13 88 
3 84 
5 33 

8 57 

10 83 
5 75 

17 16 

15 97 

11 86 

18 08 
17 32 

9 10 

8 98 
8 82 
8 85 
8 83 
8 86 
8 72 
8 55 
8 49 
8 63 


S c. 

26 
3 64 
2 10 
2 71 

2 20 

3 19 

2 94 

3 54 
3 38 

1 32 
3 14 

2 59 

2 28 

3 57 
19 

3 62 

1 46 
3 n 

3 38 

2 58 

1 36 

2 16 

2 11 

4 95 
68 

3 32 
51 
34 

2 87 
2 83 

2 85 

3 55 
38 

3 45 
3 77 

1 43 

2 71 

3 59 

1 20 

2 02 
2 44 

2 58 

1 55 

4 03 

3 58 

2 86 

4 35 

3 SO 

2 34 
2 26 
2 20 
2 19 
2 20 
2 23 
2 24 
2 23 
2 25 
2 25 


§ c. 

60 
7 46 
5 17 
5 01 

5 02 

6 69 

6 33 

7 73 
6 IS 

2 48 
6 43 
4 91 

4 99 
6 43 

53 

6 78 

3 01 

7 48 

7 29 

5 60 

3 33 

4 68 

4 02 

6 69 
1 81 

8 55 
1 15 

68 

5 16 

5 70 

6 52 
8 49 

1 06 

7 29 

8 54 

2 93 

4 73 

5 25 

2 57 

3 79 
5 10 

5 53 

3 70 

6 86 

5 80 

6 97 

7 30 
7 17 

4 94 
4 44 
4 01 
4 18 
4 50 

4 84 

5 05 
5 13 
4 82 
4 64 


5 c. 

4 67 
70 79 
37 01 

44 42 

39 33 
50 80 
55 34 
61 43 
57 11 
20 41 

45 15 
41 67 
34 28 

50 74 
2 95 

68 60 

23 24 
57 01 

60 61 
44 51 

24 95 

37 99 
33 3G 
83 74 

8 30 
64 25 

6 84 

5 19 

46 .56 
48 05 
52 85 
70 68 

5 6(; 

64 86 

65 66 

25 99 

38 63 

51 82 
17 51 
30 59 

40 13 

41 94 
27 76 

66 40 

61 24 

52 07 

76 93 

77 19 

40 40 

39 46 

38 75 

39 28 

40 32 

41 42 

42 26 

42 82 

43 13 
43 31 


§ c. 

27 14 

35 30 
26 16 

31 02 

23 13 
34 67 

28 21 

32 37 

32 85 
22 26 

34 20 
28 70 

24 83 

28 19 
19 91 

36 30 

25 25 

29 69 
31 18 
28 82 

22 01 

26 94 

23 37 
39 42 
21 26 

33 28 
28 45 
23 37 

30 47 

26 51 

30 36 

35 80 

23 09 

31 00 

33 49 
21 74 
28 64 

27 18 

24 22 

28 74 

27 19 

34 10 
24 17 

34 76 

32 63 

28 85 

37 52 

35 55 

29 31 
28 23 
27 31 

27 84 

28 89 

29 86 

30 31 
30 38 

29 71 

30 47 


$ c. 

54 
2 89 
1 62 
1 85 

1 70 

2 03 
2 17 
2 34 
2 38 

89 
1 55 
1 55 
1 35 

1 68 
39 

2 31 

1 18 

2 19 
2 66 
1 86 
1 06 
1 49 

1 68 

2 80 
45 

2 44 
23 
68 

1 89 

1 85 

2 16 
2 63 

32 
2 57 
2 47 
1 IS 
1 46 
1 95 

96 
1 62 
1 84 
1 61 

1 39 

2 33 
1 86 

1 97 

2 90 
2 95 

1 77 
1 76 
1 73 
1 88 
1 87 

1 88 

2 00 
1 98 
1 95 
1 98 


8 c. 

2 07 

3 34 


Brant 


Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 


2 12 
2 55 
2 20 
2 62 


Durham 


2 62 


Elgm 


2 87 


Essex 


2 97 


Frontenac 

Glengarry . . 


1 69 

2 23 


Grenville 


2 03 


Grey 

Haldimand 

Halibarton 

Halton 1 


1 83 

2 12 

1 12 

2 97 


Hastings 


1 95 


Huron 


2 61 


Kent 


3 36 


Lambton 

Lanark 


2 4S 
1 64 


Leeds 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 


2 17 

2 22 

3 33 


Manitoulin 


1 18 


Middlesex 


2 93 


Muskoka 

Nipissing 


1 75 

2 66 


Norfolk 


2 39 


Northumberland 


2 26 




2 65 


Oxford 


3 15 


Parry Sound 


1 42 


Peel 


2 92 


Perth 


2 94 


Peterborough 


1 89 


Presco'.t , 

Prince Edward 


2 27 
2 30 


Russell 


1 91 

2 48 
2 41 


Storraont 


2 44 




2 24 


Waterloo 


2 76- 


Welland 


2 25 


Wellington 

Wentworth 


2 41 

3 53 


York 


3 46 


1899 


2 51 


1898 


2 50 


1897 

1896 


2 44 
2 54 


1895 


2 59 




2 65 


1893 


2 72 


1892 


2 74 


1891 


2 70 




2 72 







1899] 



BUREAU OF INDUSTRIES. 



45 



MARKET PEICES. 

Table XXVII. The followine: table is compiled from twenty-nine well distributed market points. The 
figures for the six monohs, July-December, are albo given, together with the average price for the 
past ten year?, and the average for eighteen j-ears. 



Markets. 


a. 


a> 

u. 

OS 

<u 
be 

'u 


J3 

S 

u 
a> 

ft 

>, 

1 


ft 

o 


1 

0) 

ft 

e3 


.5 
ft 
a 

cS 

0) 


U 
05 
ft 


Si 

m 

P 

U 

% 

0) 

A 

A 
o 

M 


.a 

Si 
u 

ft 

eS 
0) 

a 

h 
O 

O 


d 
o 

ft 

a 


s 

Si 

u 
<o 

ft 

oT 
a; 

<a 
o 


^ 

b 
£ 

"o 

1 




cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


cts. 


8 c. 


cts. 


cts. 


Barrie 


63.8 
65.5 
68.1 
67.9 
65.7 
70.8 




65.8 
69.7 


42.5 
41.5 
34.9 
38.6 
38.1 
48.3 


28.6 
28.2 
25.7 
26.8 
29.6 
29.2 


60.5 
56.8 
59.6 
56.3 
52.6 
60.8 




47 1 
51.0 
51.4 


46.2 
49.0 
45.2 


22^5 
20.6 


7.65 
7.43 
5.58 
5 43 

9 00 

7.82 


24.6 
45.0 
22.7 

27.8 
46.7 
38.8 


14.9 


Belleville 


13.0 


Bowmanville 




Brampton 




Brantf ord 


67.5 


48.2 
50.3 


44.6 
45.5 


16.0 


Brockville . ... 


13.0 


Chatham 


66 3 
65.0 
64.8 




33.1 
41.9 
40.0 


24.7 
27.0 
24 4 


'59!9' 
54.0 


110.5 


65.8 
.^10 
47.9 


45.0 
48.9 


14.9 


7.47 
5.50 
9.00 


45.8 
26.4 


13.7 


Cobourg 




Essf X 


13.5 


Ooderich 


64.1 
67.1 
69.0 




38.3 
40 9 
38.9 


26.1 

27.7 
30.4 


55 7 
59.2 
59.4 




45 
48.5 
51.7 


45.0 




6 51 

7.88 
9.72 


34.6 
26.3 
46 




Guelph 


13.6 


Hamilton 




Kingston 


68.9 
66,5 
66.9 


68.3 
64.7 
67.2 


41.0 
37.8 
40.1 


26.7 
26.6 
29.8 


58 7 
58.7 
58.8 


140.6 
113!4' 


49 3 

48.7 
56.5 


46.8 
43.2 
38.0 






43.8 
27.0 
37.2 


13.0 


Lindsay 


2i!9" 


6.78 

8.84 


13.5 


London 


14.9 


OrangeviUe 


65.9 


64.9 


38.0 


25.1 


55.9 




49.7 


40.1 




6.51 


18.5 


14.0 


Owen Sound 


65.3 
67.5 
70.0 
63.9 
68.1 
67.2 
65.0 
65.. 5 
69 9 


62 7 
67.5 
70.0 
65.3 


44.6 
35.0 
40.0 
39.6 
38.4 
39.1 
37.5 
35.2 
43 3 


27.3 

28.1 
25 8 
26.6 
28.0 
28.5 
28 3 
27.0 
31.2 


59.6 
54.2 
54.3 
60.1 

55!6' 
42.1 
60.0 
60.4 






44.5 

45!7' 
42.9 




6.71 
6 60 
8.50 


28.5 
28.3 
25.4 
35.0 
37.1 
4t.2 
35.9 


14.2 


Pembroke 


112.8 
ii.5!4' 


45. i 
43.3 
50.2 


16.6 


Perth 


14.8 


Peterborough 

Ridgetown 


13.5 


17.5 
23.2 
19.9 


"8*69 
8.25 
6 96 

10.70 


12.4 


St. Thomas 


56 8 
43.2 


45!2' 


14.4 


Simcoe 




Stratford 




Toronto 




54.3 


50.0 




29.5 


18.0 


Walkerton 


63.7 
66.6 
65.6 


62.9 
'65;2' 


35.4 
39.4 
38.3 


25.5 
29.7 
26.2 


56.3 
59.8 
58 6 


. . .,. 


56!6' 
50.1 






6.. 38 
8.89 
5.90 


24.4 
30.0 
26.3 


12.5 


Waterloo 




Whitby 


50.0 




15.4 


Woodstock 


67.5 




39.5 


29.2 


58.7 




47.5 




21.7 


9.01 


43.4 


13.2 


The Province : 




Julv 


68. 8 
67 1 
66.6 


68.0 
66.5 
66. 4 


42.1 
39 6 
38 


31.4 
29.1 
25 7 


GO. 5 
58.0 
55.7 




49.3 
48 

48.7 






7.17 
7.11 
7.72 




14.1 


August 






14.1 


September 






13.9 


October 


66 5 


66.5 


39 7 


2r..4 


58 1 


91.2 


52 3 


45.9 


20.0 


7 98 


34.6 


14.4 


November 


65.9 


66.3 


.39.2 


26.8 


f.6.3 


108.6 


51.6 


45.8 


19.7 


8..^0 


32.5 


14.6 


December 


65.2 


65.3 


38.7 


26.7 


55.8 


117.6 


50.1 


45.0 


19.7 


8.10 


32.3 


15.2 


Average for 


























six months : 
















» 










1899 


66.7 
69.4 


66.5 
69.2 


?9.5 
38 


27.7 
25.8 


57.3 
52.2 


108.0 
70.0 


50.0 
43.5 


45.5 
38.2 


19.8 
20.1 


7.7-2 
6.22 


32 S 
44 1 


14.3 


1898 


16.6 


1897 


78.2 


78.6 


27 


22.6 


42.1 


65.2 


37.7 


30.0 


19.7 


7.18 


39 9 


18.4 


189fi 


71.0 
69 3 


70.6 
69.8 


31.6 
40.0 


20 
29.1 


44.0 

54.8 


68.4 
94.7 


36.6 
45 6 


30 5 
36.8 


19.6 
22.6 


9.68 
12.30 


26 2 
20.2 


18 4 


1895 


20.0 


1894 


55.0 
59.9 
70.7 


.55.5 
59.4 
67.8 


40.5 
40.1 
41.3 


.30.8 
33. f 
.30.8 


53 6 
54.0 
59.0 


110.4 

IIS.O 

98 8 


44 2 

47.5 
55.8 


39.2 
41 8 
42.2 


26.1 
26.5 
26.3 


7.56 
7.64 
8.20 


35 4 

39.5 
50.4 


16 9 


1893 


18 2 


1892 


18.2 


1891 


95.1 


92.9 


49.1 


36.5 


63 8 


106.1 


72.3 


44.1 


31.1 


11.91 


32.6 


19.4 


1890 


94.2 


91.3 


50.2 


41.1 


60.3 


128.5 


52.7 


43.0 


30 5 


7.95 


44.3 


20.5 


1882-99 


80.2 


82.6 


48.7 


31.4 


.57.2 


99 8 


52 


39.1 


27.9 


9.18 


40.1 


18.3 



46 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 26 



CHEESE FACTORIES. 

Table XXVIII. Showing by county Municipalities of Ontario the number of cheese factoricB in opera- 
tioD, the quantity and value of cheese made, the number of patrons and the amount paid to patrons for 
milk delivered at the factories in 1899, together with the totals tor the Province for the past ten years. 



Counties 
and districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham 

Elgin 

Essexi 

Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton (estimated). . 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent • 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds 

Lennox & Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Norfolk 

Northumberland . . . . 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound and 

Nipissing . . 

Peel 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo , 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth . . 

York 



.2 a 



The Province ; 
1899 . . 
1898., 
1897. 
1896 . 
1895 
1894. 
1893 
1892. 
1891. 
1890. 



•-Is 

O 0) 






Quantity of — 



Milk used. 



2 

9 

18 
60 

3 
52 
13 
24 
10 
72 
67 
41 
10 
12 

5 

2 
94 
16 

6 
18 
45 
85 
31 

3 

1 
34 

3 
23 
44 

6 
44 

6 
5 
25 
36 
70 
22 
27 
46 
13 
46 
18 



1,203 

1,187 

1,161 

1,147 

1,164 

1,011 

897 

85fi 

838 

817 



9. 
IR 
57. 

3, 
72, 
12, 
40, 

2 
54, 
43, 
54, 

5, 
11, 

2, 

1, 

105, 

13. 

3, 
10 
49, 
110 
52. 

3 

47 

22 

61 

1 

104 



lb. 

503,064 
,768,705 
,535,904 
,205,605 
,111,136 
,770,750 
318.895 
,894,888 
.623,072 
,222.846 

094,851 
,905,355 

551,203 
,645,301 
,257,295 
,080,000 
,008,904 
,233,306 
216,210 

499,392 

063,726 
1,241,335 

830,765 
i, 650, 050 

199,799 
',952,286 

857,796 
;,825,016 
.146,212 
.,387,300 
,966,607 



Cheese made 



1,012,616 

2,016,10,0 

46,269,045 

41,984,588 

49,188,636 

30,526,714 

18,410,109 

39 069,612 

5,584,298 

53,221,905 

15,030,148 

6,662,616 

3,080,749 

1^.960,667 

5,998,040 

2,948,505 



311,530,927 
374,899.482 
455,937,148 
108,124,659 
174,008,592 
027..577,831 
911,791,204 
984,356.444 
865,453.-574 
836,387,516 



Gross 

value of 

cheese. 



lb. 

48,547 

879,448 
1,724,814 
5,429,516 

286,889 
6,983,346 
1,137,810 
3,709,044 

237.832 
5,161,350 
4,095,413 
5,172,857 

512,471 
1,077,678 

217,385 

100,000 

10,084,170 

1,206,272 

296,346 

951,451 

4,614,027 

10,412,270 

5,083,058 

335,615 

19,057 

4,353.995 

79,785 

2,088,816 

5,641,997 

127.043 
9,530,522 

96,908 

192,098 

4,207,898 

3846.460 

4,846,488 

2,908,307 

1,761,214 

3,846,384 

521,816 

5,178,586 

1,424,890 

616,064 

290,471 

1,176,430 

543.152 

267,933 



123,323,923 

128,116,924 

137,362,916 

104,393,985 

109,230,340 

97,284,-547 

86,166,719 

93,848,948 

81,929,042 

79,-364,743 



Average 

No. of 

patrons. 



4,239 

85,203 
171,944 
541,765 

26,912 
700,946 
113,826 
3.55,789 

23,186 
495,291 
406.1-51 
510,498 

50,202 
105,849 

20,955 

9,500 

975,141 

122,049 

27,041 

93,086 

460,f)76 

1,018,796 

487,039 

32,471 

1,664 

431.. 596 

7,597 

204,226 

555,524 

12,489 
932,409 

9,768 

18,361 

419,525 

382,076 

475,443] 

282,524 

173,9.38 

380,942 

51,436 

513,044 

14.3,863 

60.850 

29.185 

117,019 

53,129 

25,824 



12,120,887 
10,262,240 
11,719,468 
8,646,7.35 
8.607,389 
9,441,247 
8,338,709 
8.9.=)9,939 
7,6.56,484 
7,189,957 



74 

512 
1,374 
2,427 

264 
1,836 

917 
2,164 

444 
2,27.^ 
1,582 
1,893 

540 
1,101 

110 

87 

4,002 

1,051 

328 
3,240 
2,306 
3,li2 
2,561 

400 

24 

2,146 

86 

1,826 

2,835 

172 
3,542 

124 

63' 

2.368 

1,916| 

2,160 

1,7.30 

1,170 

1,764 

546 

1,876| 

1.128 

500 ' 

262 

840 

475 

292 






lb. 

10.36 
11.10 
10.74 
10 53 
10.84 
10.42 
10.82 
11.02 
11.02 
10.50 
10.52 
10.61 
10 83 
10.80 
10.38 
10.80 
10.41 
10.97 
10.85 
11.03 
10.63 
10.58 
10.39 
18.87 
10.48 
11.01 
10.75 
10.92 
10.83 
10.92 
11.01 

10.44 
10.49 
10.99 
10.91 
10.14 

10 49 
10.45 
10.16 
10.70 
10.27 
10.54 
10.81 
10.60 
11.01 

11 04 
11.00 



wis 
* ft 



60,443 
65,121 
66,104 
57,635 
65,661 
54,839 
50.870 
48.601 
45.066 
44,838 



10.63 
10.73 
10.60 
10.62 
10 75 
10.56 
10.58 
10.49 
10.56 
10.54 



$ c. 

8 73 

9 68 
9 96 
9 97 
9 38 

10 03 
10 CO 
9 59 
9 72 
9 59 
9 91 
9 86 
9 79 
9 82 
9 18 
9 50 
9 67 
10 11 
9 12 
9 78 
9 98 
3 78 
9 58 
9 67 

8 73 

9 9 
9 5; 
9 T 
9 8 
9 8: 
9 7 



Amount paid to 

patrons 
for milk at the 

factory. 



Total. 



10 08 
9 55 
9 96 



9 90 


10 09 


9 87 


10 04 


9 94 


9 78 


9 60 


9 83 


8 00 


8 53 


8 28 


7 88 


9 70 


9 68 


9 55 


9 35 


9 06 



Per 
100 lb. 
of milk 



3,598 

74,964 

152,343 

474,485 

22,510 

619,680 

99,085 

317,660 

21,251 

442,344 

368,823 

448,770 

44,0-33 

92,608 

17.829 

8,600 

870,496 

108,225 

23,543 

82,760 

401,284 

903,621 

418,138 

28,955 

1,180 

386,-559 

6,261 

18-3,073 

479,790 

10,298 

835,601 

7,531 

15,905 

370,637 

333,883 

413,025 

244,770 

145,440 

334,994 

44,202 

455,145 

123,548 

54,347 

26,182 

104,996 

46,950 

22,421 



10,682,193 
8.417,6^5 
9,709,004 
7,040,927 
6,922,962 
7,931,022 



PART II-CHATTEL MORTGAGES. 



Table showing by County Municipalities of Ontario the total number and amount of Chattel 
Mortgages on record and undischarged on December 31st, 1899, against (1) all occupations; (2) farmers ; 
together with totals for the Province for the past ten years. 



Counties and Districts. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipipsing 

Noifolk 

Northumberland and Durham 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth = 

Peterborough 

Prescott and Russell 

Prince Edward 

Kainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wen tworth 

York 

The Province : 

1899 

189*? 

1897 

1896 

1895 

1894 

1893 

1892 

1891 

1890 



Chattel Mortgages Against 
ALL Occupations. 



To secure 
existing debt. 



For future 
indorsation. 



No. 



123 
339 
714 
666 
236 
399 
343 
425 
930 
179 

71 
132 
684 
374 
1,140 
513 
181 
393 
236 
305 

99 
625 
225 
249 
313 
594 
383 
299 
193 
166 
196 
305 
197 
189 

48 
.306 
622 
288 

45 
289 
244 
264 
382 
788 
2,627 

18,216 
19,526 
21,144 
21,402 
22,018 
21,276 
19, .342 
18,927 
18,902 
17,271 



Amount. 



No. 



396,182 
263,429 
217,903 
.433,378 

78,056 
161,797 
108,772 
206,636 
247,008 

43,923 
249,248 

67,050 
235,051 
231,782 
234, 120 
218,088 
124,330 
147,231 

79,526 
181,618 

59,097 
261,944 
132,821 
918,710 

63,361 
338,350 
244,034 
255,360 
748,949 

78,049 
143,97rt 
445,606 

99,160 
120,622 

52,260 
124,544 
353,092 
105, 75y 

42,981 
368,154 
190,906 
103,731 
192,653 
368,784 
1,328,433 



31 



11,067 

12.001, 

13,004, 

13,180, 

10, .555, 

10,603,; 

8,973,] 

9,215,^ 

8,59.5,^ 

8,121,5 



6641 291 
0751 283 
3421 382 
205 387 
922 373 



Amount 



483 
380 
455 
516 
632 



2,128 

13,100 

4,.338 

2,900 



91,865 



13,500 



3,000 



7,014 

5,683 



9,398 
6,400 
7,713 
473 
5,210 
3,500 



23,009 
10,000 



2,370 
3,750 
6,472 



1,239 
708 



51;! 



11,430 



22,993 
3,416 

25,000 
7,096 
2,500 



Chattel Moktgages Against 
Fabmees. 



To secure 
existing debt. 



6,658 
21,250 

324,6281 
281,142 
377,853 
381,511 
456,398 
616,812 
360,267 
829,724 
908,971 
857,542 



No. 



80 
117 
512 
103 
183 
212 
221 
256 
742 
135 

62 

56 
527 
219 
898 
335 

86 

250 

147 

. 122 

45 
216 
142 
123 
225 
386 
264 
135 
106 
108 

91 
161 
1.50 
147 
6 
196 
423 
172 

11 
230 

75 

91 
166 
161 
299 

9,392 
10,514 
11,902 
11,638 
12,121 
11,447 
10.489 
10,5761 
10,7481 
10,1631 



Amount 



For future 
indorsation. 



No. 



12,795 

71,290 

131,066 

31,245 

56,714 

72,426 

35,135 

121,604 

172, 90 i 

30,513 

7,388 

35,985 

125,094 

108,320 

125,092 

78,575 

5,512 

70,770 

56,074 

46,040 

18,492 

89,832 

16,312 

20,985 

42,309 

168,125 

157,584 

64,649 

11,569 

51,463 

53,861 

53,935 

36,752 

64,638 

1,264 

53,916 

167,162 

48,866 

3,374 

100,523 

51,055 

16,599 

84,171 

72,627| 

154,248 



12 



13 



2,988, 
3,547, 
3,889, 
3,826, 
3,711, 
3,378, 
3,003, 
3,062, 
3,035, 
3,0C0, 



853 124 
654 117 
1901 201 
5821 206 
338 167 
079; 240 
109 195 



Amount 



198 
241 
398 



1,500 

1,100 

60 

4C0 



1,702 



3,014 
250 



7,019 
448 

4,351 
173 
300 



3,000 
1,222 



1,010 
500 



515 
"266 
3,729 



4,305 



34,798 
32,943 
44,410 
51,416 
56,258 
68,806 
56,748 
55,628 
62,259 
132,633 



INDEX. 



Acreage : Total assessed, 26— Crops, 3i. 
Apples : 14, 36. 

Barley : Description, 11— Statistics, 28, 
Beans : Description, 12 — Statistics, 29. 
Bees : Review, 17 — Colonies, 42. 
Buckwheat : Description, 12— Statistics, 30. 
Buildings : 16, 42, 43. 

Carrots : Description, 13 — Statistics, 32, 
Cattle : Review, 16— Statistics, 38. 
Chattel mortgages : 47. 
Cheese factories : 18, 46. 
Cleared lands : 26. 
Clover seed : 14. 

Corn : Description, 12— Statistics, 31. 
Creameries : 18. 

Crops: Area, 34 — Ratio per 1,000 acres cleared, 
35— Value, 34. 

Dairy : Review, 18 — Cheese factories, 40— Cream- 
eries, is. 
Domestic servants : 19. 

Flax: 15. 

Fruit and Fruit Trees : Review, 14. 

Hay : Description, 13 — Statistics, 34. 
Hogs: 40. 
Hops : 15. 
Horses: 37. 

Implements : 42, 43. 

Labor and wages : 19. 

Lands : Areas, 26— Values, 42, 43. 

Live Stock : Condition of, 16— Values, 17, 42. 



Lucerne : 15. 

Mangel- Wurzels : Description, 13— Statistics, 33. 
Market prices : 44. 

Oats : Description, 11 — Statistics, 28, 
Orchard and Garden : 14, 36. 

Pasture lands : 36. 

Peas : Description, 11 — Statistics, 29. 
Potatoes: Description, 13— Statistics, 32. 
Poultry: Review, 17— Statistics, 41. 

Rape : 15, 
Roots: 13. 
Rye : Description, 12— Statistics, 30. 

Sheep : 39. 
Sugar Beets : 13. 
Swine (see Hogs). 

Temiscamingue : 25. 

Tobacco : Description, 15— Area and produce, 15. 

Turnips : Description, 13— Statistics, 33. 

Values : Farm property, 42 — Live Stock, 42 — 

Crops, 34, 44. 
Vineyard : 36. 

Waste lands (swamp, raareb, etc.) : 26. 

Weather : Temperature, 7. 20— Sunshine. 8, 23— 

Rain and Snow, 8, 22, 23 — Temiscamingue, 25 — 

Toronto, 24. 
Wheat, Fall : Description, 9— Statistics, 27. 
Wheat, Spring: Description, 11— Statistics, 27. 
Woodland : 26. 
Wool : 42, 



REPORT 



OF THE 



ONTARIO 



GAME AND FISH COMMISSIONERS 



B^OE. TUB "X'E.j^ja 



1898. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




TORONTO : 

WARWICK BRO'S & RUTTER, Printkks and Bindess. 68 and 70 Front St. West, 

1900. 



KEPORT OF THE ONTARIO GAME AND FISH 
COMMISSIONERS. 

His Honour the Lieutp.nant-Governor of Ontario : 

Sir. — In presenting this the eighth annual Report of the Game and Fish Oommiasion 
we do so with fail confidence that in some respects we have made good progress during the 
past year, but in others we have retrograded. 

We are glad to say that many of the changes for the further p'-otection of game which 
we had the honour last year to suggest to your Government were incorporated in the law 
and for these concessions we are confident that all sportsmen and others interested in the 
subject are truly grateful. Of course, we urged a great many other changes or additions 
to the Act, but perhaps it was asking too much to expect that all would be adopted by 
your Government without further thought by those who do not give game matters much 
thought as a rule. However, we are glad to see that the mi mbers of your -Legislature are 
to a certain extent forced by improved public opinion to take an interest in the preatrva- 
tion of the birds and animals of our country, 

A much greater interest among the agricultural classes is being engendered by teaching 
in various ways, not the least perhaps by the very wise suggestion that at the Farmers' 
Institutes, which are so extensively attended by the farming community throughout the 
Province, certain lectures were delivered last year upon the benefit derived by agricul- 
turists from bird life. The publicity of pamphlets or bulletins on the same subject, 
together with the work of your Commissioners and Game Wardens, all tend to draw 
attention to the subject and to educate those interested therein. We are happy to say that 
this process of education is going on in the neighboring States as well, and we are con- 
fident that it is only necessary to get the public to recognize the benefits of bird life to 
make them demand that our Legislatures shall take the most efficient steps to preserve the 
fauna which we have, and to encourage the introduction of other species which will in the 
future take the place of some of the species of our native birds which we cannot propagate, 
and which are rapidly becoming extinct. 

Some may, even yet, thoughtlessly ask, after all, what is the use of preserving our 
game birds and animals. To answer this question properly would, perhaps, take up more 
room than would be warranted in a report such as this ; but, in short, we would suggest, 
first, that the pursuit of game tends to make men of endurance in whom has been culti- 
vated all those attributes which go to make a manly man, one capable of not only thinking 
vigorously, but also of acting vigorously, and what better education could a man have to 
enable him to help make a nation capable of taking a first place among the nations of the 
world 1 A nation of hunters who have spent a portion of their time in the chase, endur- 
ing the necessary hardships in the open air, is sure to consist of men with vigorous bodies 
and minds, and capable of taking care of their country in time of peace or war. Again, 
if we look at the question from a financial point of view, we find that it p^ys to husband 
the game resources of a country; for, independent of the pleasure and healthful exercise it 
gives the nation, other people than our own, as in our case, are only too glad to be allowed 
the opportunity of hunting in our country, and to pay well for the privilege, thus enhancing 
the revenue directly to the Government and also enriching the people in the districts where 
the game is found. In Ontario there is an ever-increasing number of hunting,'fishing and 
pleasure-seeking parties making their way to our country from the country to the south of 
us, and also from abroad, and if we had the facilities for acquiring the statistics as *o the 
amount spent in our country each season we would be amazed at the sum. Last year the 
State of Maine reported offioi*lly through its Game and Fish Commission that at least 
four million of dollars were spent in the State in the pursuit of game and fish and 
pleasure during the year. The State of Maine has a system of licensed guides who help 
the commissioners to get at proper statistics. 

[3] 



THE REPORT ON [27 



Now, while we contend that the Province of Ontario is a greater game and fish 
territory than the State of Maine, we have as yet no definite facilities for acquiring a 
knowledge of the approximate value of the game and sporting fish interests of the 
province. It was in consideration of this deficiency and with a view to afibrding better 
protection to those interests that induced us last year to suggest that we adopt the very 
valuable system of having registered licensed guides which the State of Maine baa 
adopted with such success. It has a force of 1,780 licensed guides who were employed 
last year in their business 75,600 days, and each one of these men makes a report of 
their year's work and observations, thus making it possible to arrive at some definite 
ideas as to the game and fish resources of the country, and also enables the commissioners 
to suggest intelligently better means for their protection and preservation. 

We, your commissioners, last year were fully impressed with the great value and 
possibilities of such a system for Ontario, and we asked that it be adopted by the Gov- 
erment, for we felt that it would not only give us valuable information, but it would 
also be a means of better protecting the interests they had in charge as well as yielding 
something of a revenue to help bear the nee ^-ssa y expenses of game and fiah protection, 
fpr each guide should pay an annual f^e of at least $1.00 for the privilege of gaiding as 
a registered licensed guide. However, the Government saw fit to emasculate the 
measure by making the licensing and registration of guides optional with them ; of course 
as a result not one guide as far as we know sought to be registered. The plan to be of 
any use must be compulsory, and we owe this much to our own as well as to foreign 
sportsmen who take out the license to hunt in Ontario that the guides whom they 
employ shall be steady and capable men, fit to be trusted in every way as a guide in the 
somewhat dangerous positions in which hunters occasionally find themselves. We trust 
that in order to get the full benefit of this measure your Government will see fit to make 
the licensing of guides compulsory. Another reason is that the public has a right to have 
gome protection from the number of men who enter upon their property to hunt that the 
said property will be properly safeguarded, that dangerous fires are not started and 
immense quantities of valuable timber destroyed, and that not more than the authorized 
quantity of game be taken. It does not seem yet to be quite realized by the general 
public what a valuable heritage the game of the Province is if properly taken care of and 
husbanded. There can not be the least doubt but if properly managed the stock of fish 
and game should be worth millions of dollars each year to the Province. 

Your commissioners regret that although the Province has now full control of its 
waters little or nothing is being done to restock them with valuable food fish, and 
especially those waters which are frequented so much by summer visitors and reported to 
be nearly barren of fish life. We think that those visitors (having spent so much money 
in our province) have a right to expect a reasonable amount of sport in angling, and we 
respectfully suggest that something be done toward restocking those waters so as to make 
them more attractive to summer tourists and visitors, A policy of merely issuing licenses 
to fifchermen to fish in the wafers of the province until they are exhausted without any 
attempt to replenish the stock by intelligent and modern plans of fish culture is in the 
opinion cf your commissioners a wasteful and shortsighted policy. We trust that at an 
early date some steps will be taken to study scientifically the condition of the fish life in 
the great waters of the Province, and before it be too late scientific methods adopted to 
re-stock srme at least of those waters which are well known to be nearly depleted of the 
fish life which in former times was so abundant. 

To a certain extent the same thing may be said of our forests and covers in the 
more settled districts. The birds and animals are gradually but surely vanishing and do 
not now exist as they did a few years ago. This is of course owing to the clearing up of 
covers and the greater tendency to engage in the pursuit of game and with better guns. 
We understand that the same precise and scientific means cannot be taken toward 
re-stocking our covers as there can be of re-stocking our waters, yet very much may be 
done. 

Your Commissioners have made some attempts along these lines by urging that some 
of the best game birds which have for so many years been successfully raised in European 



18991 GAME AND FISHERIES. 



and other countries, should be introduced here. As a result your Government has been 
good enough to engage a man at Rondeau Park to do what he can in the way of raising 
for re-stocking some of these birds. A number of Mongolian and English pheasants were 
purchased some years ago and they did fairly well for some time since the flock numbered 
about seven hundred, and we had great hopes of the next year being able to plant a 
number of them, but vermin made great havoc among them, and besides, many of the 
birds became afiected with tuberculosis, and from this cause a number were lost since it 
is very infectious when it once appears in a flock of confined birds. An incubator has 
been furnished Mr. H. Gardiner with which to hatch ihe pheasant eggs, but that does 
not seem to have been managed successfully, although better results may be expected 
next year now that it is better understood. Mr. H. Gardiner, who has charge of the 
pheasantry at Rondeau Park, makes the following report : — 

Dr. G. a. McCallum, 

Chairman, Game and Fish Gom,missioner . 

Dear Sir, — In answer to you letter of Dec. 23rd I would say that we have succeeded 
in getting more of the young pheasants into captivity this season than heretofore, for the 
natural reason that we have more covered-in space to keep them in. We caught them 
up just as soon as they were old enough to stand confinement. 

The plot that we have covered in with wire netting is about 38x75 feet, divided into 
4 pens. One pen of 4 Mongolians acquired the habit of plucking feathers from each 
other. In the cold weather several died from loss of blood when the tail feathers were 
palled. I saw an article in a paper saying that to hang raw meat in the pens would stop 
the habit. I did this with good result, but a number of them are left with short tails. 

We had not a very satisfactory season with the incubator, only a few pheasants and 
chickens were hatched in it. I think the incubator is all right only we had it in a 
small building too much exposed to the sun, making it almost impossible to regulate the 
heat- We have an underground cellar for it now and I think will have better success 
with it next season. I find that it takes time and experience to handle pheasants success- 
fully. We now have about 70 birds, but am sorry to say more than half of them are 
cocks. 

There are 27 Mongolian hens, 6 English hens and 3 English cocks, and if we have 
have no further loss during the winter, I think we might spare 12 or 15 Mongolian hens 
and cocks enough to go with them for breeding. Thos. W. Gibson, Secretary for Parks, 
wants to send 3 or 4 pair to Algonquin Park in the spring to give them another trial 
there. We want to keep enough here to run the incubator and brooder constantly, some 
sitting hens also. I think a dozen Mongolian hens and the six English hens will be 
sufficient for our work. As to the birds wintering in the bush, there is no doubt of 
their standing the weather and getting their own living, if they were not molested by 
the vermin (foxes, racoons, skunks, minks, etc.) We know that there are some pheasants 
in the bush in the Park, but cannot say if they are numerous. 

There are so many coverts and thickets that the partridge, quail and pheasants 
shelter in, it is next to impogsible to know if they are plentiful. The black squirrels and 
rabbits are increasing rapidly. Hie six red deer in the enclosure and the three wild in the 
bush are doing well. The one remaining moose is rather thin. We lost the female 
moose. In a combat, the young bull moose drove two points of his antlers through 
between her ribs and in about a week she died of blood poisoning. 

I am going to work hard to have a large number of birds to put down at the end of 
next season. 

Your obedient servant, 

HERBERT GARDINER. 

PS. — Will write you again concerning plans for the coming season. 

H. G. 

As will be seen, there will be but few birds to put down in the covers in the 
spring ; still there will be some, and they should be given in charge of certain persons 



THE REPORT ON [27 



along the southern borders of the Province. The chances are much against these birds 
succeeding in the Algonquin Park or the north on account of the snow. The birds must 
reach the ground during the winter much as quail do, and there is no reason whatever 
why Mongolian pheasants should not live and prosper in any of the counties where quail 
thrive. If this proves true, these birds will take the place of the much hunted and de- 
stroyed Ruffed Grouse — the bird of all others which sportsmen so love to hunt It seems 
to your Commissioners a somewhat strange policy, such as was adopted last year, of 
allowing the sale of partridge. As every sportsman well knows it has been a great strug- 
gle for this noble bird to put in an appearance in any numbers in the southern half of 
Ontario, and hundreds of sportsmen were holding their hands from destroying it and 
saving it whenever possible, four Commission had not a single complaint during late 
years against our suggestion that no inducement to destroy it should be held out by 
allowing it to be sold, yet we regret to say that last year a clause was inserted allowing 
its sale in alternate years. This policy of almost annihilating in many counties this our 
best native game bird while we are spending each year a good deal of money in an en- 
deavour to raise and introduce foreign birds, was such a shock to sportsmen and others 
interested that they nearly gave up in despair. We trust that your Government will at 
its earliest opportunity correct this mistake. 

MOOSE. 

Reports from the northern districts say that the moose have increased and are there 
in fair numbers. If the Government decides to allow them to be hunted next autnma 
your Commissioners would suggest that a special license costing say from $5 or $10 should 
be charged each hunter who wants to hunt moose, and further that only one bull be allowed 
to each hunter — cows and calves not to be killed on any consideration. The same pro- 
visions should be made for caribou. We would also urge that your Government appoint 
a few detectives to look after the lumber camps during the winter, for we have reason to 
fear that many illegally killed moose and deer find a market at these places. 

DEER. 

The deer season just closed has been a most successful one, the game was fairly plen- 
tiful and an ever increasing number of hunters enjoyed their outing. A prominent rail- 
way official reports as follows of the deer hunting of the season just closed : — 

" The Canadian Express Company carried 1,939 carcases of deer, weighing 196,524 
pounds. The Dominion Express Co. carried 93 carcases, making a total of 2,032 carried 
by these companies. Returns are not all in from License and Permit Issuers, but so far 
they show that 3,559 deer hunting licenses and 2,065 Settlers Permits have been issued. 
These figures being largely in excess of those of 1898. The returns to date show that 
more than 5,600 deer hunters were in the woods during the fifteen days in which deer 
could be legally killed in Ontario. You will understand the number of deer carried by 
the express companies, large as these numbers are, cannot be taken as a criterion of the 
total number killed. Those killed by the settlers are not shipped, and a large number of 
hunters from inland towns and villages adjacent to the hunting grounds have the deer 
killed by them taken to their respective homes by teams. So we will be well within the 
actual number killed in stating that fully 6,500 were taken during the open season of 
1899." 

DUCK. 

We have to admit at this the end of another year that as reported last year duck 
are not so plentiful as they were last year, and we fear that this will be the story each 
year unless some steps are taken to give the birds a chance. Even at such a wonderful 
resort as Long Point Marsh none of the members this season bagged many more than half 
the number allowed by their own rules, viz: — 500 to each gun. In the opinion of your 
Oommissioners the time has arrived when measures should be taken to protect them in 



1899] GAME AND FISHERIES. 



some way either by stopping the sale or by shortening the shooting season. As these 
birds cannot be produced artificially so as to re-stock the marshes and waters, we are 
confident that the great majority of sportsmen would gladly submit to some such restric- 
tion for a few years if by so doing the number of birds would thereby be increased. 
If, however, the present persistent hunting, sometimes by unfair means, continues in 
our own country as well as in the country to the south of us, we cannot expect the 
birds to thrive. American sportsmen seem never to think of sparing the birds, since 
from the time they leave this country in the autumn until the next April they are 
relentlessly pursued by them, even in the spring when the birds are mated and often con- 
tain eggs ready to lay. Although we do not shoot duck in the spring, yet we have 
often urged that unfair advantage should not be taken of the birds, such as shooting 
them before sunrise and after sunset, hunting them in sailboats, steamers and skegs, 
and placing decoys at a greater distance from the shore or bed of rushes than one hun- 
dred yards ; these are things which our sportsmen do and they should be strictly 
forbidden by law. 

WOODCOCK. 

This grand and gamy little bird is fast becoming extipct. A few may still be taken 
each year but they are becoming so scarce that many think it should be protected for a 
term of years. • 

INSECTIVOROUS BIRDS. 

We regret that year after year we have in the strongest terms warned your Govern- 
ment that in extravagantly granting as many as fifty or sixty licenses to men to destroy 
all the most beautiful and useful birds, they wanting to make large collections of skins, is 
simply sanctioning oflGicially one of the most detrimental acts possible for the agriculturist. 
In saying this your commissioners merely assert what is admitted by everyone interested 
except perhaps the professional bird skinner and egg collector. These men would, and 
do no doubt, kill thousands of birds and destroy thousands of eggs of the farmer's beat 
friend. We trust that the members of the Legislature representing rural constituencies 
will demand that something be done to stop this wholesale slaughter of one of the most 
useful forms of living creatures. It is their duty to do so, 

RBCOMMENDATIONS. 

We have usually placed before the Government a number of recommendations which 
we have thought desirable, but this year it is understood that your Government have in 
hand a thorough revision and consolidation of the game laws, therefore until we see how 
far the new law will reach, we will refrain from making any recommendations other 
than what has been argued in the body of this report, all of which is respectfully 
submitted. 

G. A. MaoCALLUM, 

Chairman Ontario Game and Fish Commission. 
Dunnville, Dec. Slst, 1899. 



THE REPORT ON [27 



REPORT OF CHIEF GAME WARDEN. 

Toronto, January, 1900. 
G, A. MacOallum, Esq., M.D., 

ChairTnan of the Ontario U^anie Commission. 

Sir, — I have the honor of submitting for your approval the work of the commission 
for the year ending December 31st, 1899. 

In my report for 1898 I had the honor of drawing your attention to the necessity of 
having the Game Laws revised and condensed as far as practical with efficiency ; this I 
am glad to say is being done. Copies of the Orders-in Council having reference to the 
Commission with other matters appear in this report, which I trust will meet your 
approval. 

In the discharge of my duties as Chief Game Warden of the Province, I have been 
ably assisted by the officers of the Railroad and Express Companies, who are doing their 
full share in the good work of game protection. I am also indebted to the press of the 
Province, who have inserted in their respective papers anything having a tendency to 
assist in the work we are engaged in. • 

• Wardens. 

The wardens in charge of districts have discharged their increasing duties in the most 
satisfactory manner, with credit to themselves and in the interest of the public at large. 

Inspectors J. E. Rogers and W. Greer have rendered the Commission valuable 
service, the former being instrumental in ending the illegal traffic in Moose Meat that 
prevailed at Sturgeon Falls and vicinity. 

Deputy Wardens. 

There is a slight increase in the number of deputy wardens, (527) being on the list, 
an increase of (20) for the year. Many have done good work under very difficult cir- 
cumstances. Many have been deterred from prosecuting offenders by the fear of having 
to pay the costs when unable to secure conviction. A remedy for this should be devised 
to make the present system of deputy wardens more effective. 

Sportsmen. 

I should be remiss in failing to express my warmest thanks to the sportsmen of the 
Province, not only for the interest they have taken in the propagation and protection of 
game, and also for the assistance rendered in bringing offenders to justice. 

Game in Ontario. 

Returns made show that 3,917 Deer Hunters' Licenses and 2,615 Settlers' Permits 
were issued, the returns not yet being complete. 

These figures show that 6,532 Deer Hunters were in the woods during the 15 
days of the open season, each of these men being entitled to kill 2 deer, a large pro- 
portion of them doing so. This fact will justify the statement that more than 6,500 
deer were killed during the late open season, assuming the very low average of one deer 
to each resident hunter. 

Hunters report a falling off in the number of deer found in localities hunted over for 
many years past, while from other localities deer are reported more numerous than ever. 
Another season no doubt will demonstrate the advisability of more stringent protective 
measures being adopted. 



1899] GAME AND FISHERIES. 



If Moose are allowed to be killed during the present year, males only should be 
killed, and heavy fines imposed for killing cow moose. Many hunters express regret at 
the retrogressive action permitting deer to be killed in the water. 

Judging from the immense number of Ruffed Grouse or Partridge sent to the cities and 
towns during the past season, and the large number at present in cold storage, baa con- 
vinced me that another season of similar slaughter would necessitate a continuous close 
season of several years. The non-sale of our native game birds is a factor that cannot 
with impunity be ignored. 

The combined eff'jrts of the Giivernment and Sportsmen resulting in abundance of 
quail in the western counties, should be satisfactory to all concerned, and should be an 
object lesson in preventing a recurrence of the methods that so nearly depleted the 
Province of this grand and useful little game bird. 

Duck Shooting — The fine weather prevailing during the entire open season, enabling 
the ducks to stay out in the open waters of the lakes and bays, prevented large bags being 
made, and so far as 1 am able to learn, with a few exceptions, has not been as satisfactory 
as in past seasons. In consequence of the exceedingly mild weather prevailing during 
the months of September and October for several years past, the opinion prevails that the 
open season should be from October 1st, instead of September Ist as at present. Boats 
and decoys should not be allowed to anchor, or structures of any kind erected for the 
purpose of taking wild fowl, at a greater distance than 100 yards from shore or well 
defined rush line. 

No doubt the unprecedented storms in the southern wintar quarters of the Wood- 
cock and Snipe has in a large measure been the cause of so few being found in their 
usual resorts in Ontario during the past season. 

WiLB Turkeys. 

If any Wild Turkeys in their wild state are still to be found in the Province, efforts 
should be made to have some captured and placed in the care of the superintendent of 
Rondeau Park, for the purpose of re stocking that very suitable locality. Strong 
measures should be taken to prevent interbreeding with the domestic species. 

I regret our failure with the imported eggs of the Capercaillie. I am not sanguine 
as to the result of batching the eggs after crossing the Atlantic. I think an eff'ort 
should be made to procure a few adult birds of the Black Game as well as Capercaillie, 
feeling sure that both would thrive and increase in our western counties. 

Insectivorous Birds. 

The same number of permits to take insectivorous birds were issued as last year, 56, 
more than double this number being applied for. I am pleased to report that very few 
complaints reached me of these privileges having been abused. 

NoN Resident Licenses. 

Eighty Non- Resident Licenses have been issued, an increase of 28 over last year. 
The Dominion regulations permitting Non- Resident Sportsmen to take from the Province 
two Deer, resulting in this increase, 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

By your obedient servant, 

E. TINSLEY, 

Chief Game Warden. 



10 THE REPORT ON [27 



Beaumaris, December, 1899. 
E. TiNSLBT, Esq., 

Chief Game Warden, 

Toronto. 

Sir, — I have the honor of submitting my annual report relating to game in that 
portion of the Province under my charge. 

Deer. — These animals in many places are reported to be as plentiful as ever, whilst 
in other sections which have been steadily hunted for years, there is a decided falling off. 
The decrease is not so noticeable when comparing one year's supply with another, but 
when comparisons are made with that of 10 or 15 years ago, the diminution is apparent. 
The march of settlement of our northern country has been, as is always the case in the 
settlement of new territory, a factor in the destruction of game. On the whole, consid- 
ering what the game has to contend against, including the thousands of sportsmen who 
now take their annual hunt, I consider that the supply has been kept up wonderfully. 

The Game Laws, which as a whole are well observed, have no doubt been the cause 
of this satisfactory state of affairs. 

There has been a great falling off in the number taken from the neighborhood of the 
Muskoka Lakes, the number being fully one hundred less than that of last year. A 
diversity of opinion exists as to water shooting, but the majority are unquestionably 
against it. 

Moose. — As the close season expires in 1900, most stringent measures should be 
adopted to prevent a wholesale slaughter. I would recommend that one season at least 
should be left open for hunting. That no individual should be allowed to kill more than 
one, also that the killing of cows be prohibited. 

These animals are undoubtedly on the increase, and are found farther south than 
formerly. I may mention that I have sent a young buck (deer) to Mr. Bartlett, Superin- 
tendent of the Algonquin Park ; this animal I had occasion to confiscate. 

Partridges. — These birds have been reported plentiful in the more unsettled portions 
of the northern districts ; in the older and more settled portions shooting is carried on 
to such an extent that scarcely a good breeding stock is left over. 

This, and unfavorable nesting seasons, no doubt keep the supply at a low ebb. 
During the earlier portion of the year I had a number of prosecutions, but there have 
been comparatively few lately. There are, however, several cases to attend to in 
January. 

The efforts of the Fish and Game Oommission are evidently bearing fruit, and it is 
most gratifying to see their actions endorsed by hundreds of sportsmen. 

I am, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN A. WILLMOTT, 

Game Warden. 



Belleville, Dec. 30th, 1899. 
E. Tinsley, Esq., Chief Game Warden : 

Sir, — Herewith I beg to submit my annual report respecting the condition of Game 
in this district. 

Deer seem to have been as plentiful as usual in most of the localities, according to the 
report of the hunters. From my observations, however, I do not think the number taken 
per man has been as large as usual, averaging probably one and one quarter ; but, consid- 
ering the increase in the number of hunters this season, the total number of deer killed 
will probably be as large as in any previous year. 

Partridge, I am pleased to state, have been very plentiful this season, more so than 
expected, considering how scarce they have been the last two years, and, with favorable 
conditions and the non sale claiise in force this coming season, we may look for a large 
increase in the quantity of this favorite game. 



1899] GAME AND FISHERIES. 11 



Dacks have been fairly plentiful in some localities during the latter part of the 
season, but the number seems to be gradually decreasing, due, no doubt, to the incessant 
pursuit of them while south during the winter months. 

Regarding fur-bearing animals, Beaver may be considered as almost extinct in this 
district, but Otter are reported as being quite numerous on many of the streams, while 
muskrats apparently are as numerous as they have been of late years. 

Violations of the law are still of very frequent occurrence, but the complaints are 
investigated and the offenders brought to trial as promptly as possible. 

Regarding the issuing of Settlers' Permits, it is pleasing to note that some of the 
To«^nship Clerks are exercising more care in the distribution, but there is still great room 
for improvement. 

I have the honor to be, sir. 

Your obedient servant, 

H. K. Smith. 



Windsor, Deo. Slst, 1899. 
E. Tinsley, Esq., Chief Game Warden : 

Sir, — I have the honor of submitting to you my report as Warden of the Western 
District, comprised of LambtoD, Essex, Kent, Middlesex and Elgin oounties, for the year 
ending the Slst Dec. 1899. 

The Game Laws are becoming more popular and respected by all classes, and this 
satisfactory result is, in a large measure, due to the good example of the members of the 
various Sportsmen's Clubs and the associations in my district, from whom I have received 
most valuable assistance. 

Quail shooting has been excellent in Essex and Kent, and a great many hunters 
from London, St. Catharines and various other places have had the pleasure of enjoying 
good sport. Quail are increasing in spite of so much hunting. This is, no doubt, owing 
to the good care the Quail receives during the hard winters that "Bob White" is yet 
plentlfnl. It is a well known fact that Kent county spends a great deal of money yearly 
for feeding and protecting game birds, also hiring men to attend to it every winter. I 
know of no other county doing that in my district. 

Partridge and Snipe have so far held their own in these parts. In some locations 
they are plentiful, while in others very scarce. 

Duck Hunting. — In the early part of the season duck shooting was good on Lake St. 
Clair and Horseshoe Bay Marsh, but the birds departed early this year in large numbers. 
In the Detroit River district and the many islands, more ducks have been killed this 
year than any previous year since 1893 The weather has been very mild ; that is the 
reason why river ducks have been late in coming. 

I regret to inform you that the Governor of Michigan vetoed the Spring shooting 
law, and Michiganders can shoot and slaughter ducks all winter, up to April of the follow- 
ing year. 

Df er in Essex are doing well. The people of Colchester take great interest in them, 
as they are the only deer of any account in the western district. There is occasionally 
one seen at " Dawn ", in Kent County. Deer have also been seen near Petrolea, in 
Lambton County. 

I may mention that a great many swans have been seen in the bays of Lake St. 
Clair this fell. 

Fur-bearing animals are increasing in the marshes of Fighting Island, Grassy and 
Canard, especially Muskrat. 

In closing my report, I feel it my duty to speak highly of the work of Deputy 
Warden Lindsay, of Comber, who has always given what help he could, and proved 
himself a good officer ; and the same can be said of Constable Wilson, of Sandwich, who 
has devoted a great deal of time in looking after poachers and Sunday hunters. 

Your obedient servant, 

Charles F. Quallins. 



12 THE REPORT ON [27 



DuNNviLLE, December 31st, 1899. 



E. TiNSLEY, Esq., 

Chief Warden. 



Sir, — I herewith have the honor to submit to you my annual report for number 
three district. 

The increase in game has not been so visible during the past year, one reason being 
the very noticeable increase in younger sportsmen who are coming to the front each 
year, the game Act being responsible to some extent. They reason, and rightly, that 
the close season must result in an increased supply of game up to the time when all have 
their season's gunning on equal terms according to their abilities. Another reason is 
that many boys who can get hold of guns may be seen roaming the woods in couples at 
all seasons with the excuse of hunting the cottontail and blackbirds : their real object 
being to shoot anything they can find and to practice with their guns. 

f would recommend a gun license for all sportsmen and others who might desire to 
use it ofi thei? own premises for the purpose of hunting any kind of birds or animals. 
The revenue from which should be applied to the propagation of game birds suitable to 
the climate of Ontario. 

Black and grey duck appeared to be quite numerous during the summer, judging 
from the number seen by myself and many others around their hatching haunts, but 
proved to be very scarce again when the open season arrived. 

Migrating ducks were unusually scarce and remained but a short time with us in 
comparison with other years. Some say the season was too warm, others that spring 
shooting by the Americans was the cause. 

The smaller birds were about the same as last year. Partridge and quail about 
held their own. Squirrels, grey, having become quite numerous in some parts of my dis- 
tricts, while the black ones shewed a corresponding decrease. 

Wild geese were in fairly good sized flocks in both spring and fall migrations. 

On the whole the game law has been more than respected, many lending what 
assistance they could towards its support that in the past did not .take kindly to its 
restrictions. 

As I have reported before, I should like to see the open season shortened by open- 
ing on September 15th in place of the 1st. It is the general opinion that the season for 
all water fowl should open on the same date ; the first half of September is too hot, 
the birds spoil quickly, while the northern duck do not arrive before October. Skunk 
and mink should be placed on the protected list for one reason among many others to 
stop the taking of muskrats at the same time and in the same traps at all times, 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. A. GILL, 

Warden. 



OoPY OF AN Order iN-CouNCiL approved by His Honour the Lieutenant-Govbrnor, 
THE 28th day of June, A.D. 1899. 

Upon the recommendation of the Honourable the Commissioner of Crown Lands, 
the Committee of Council advise that Dr. G. A McOallum of Dnnnville, be reappointed 
as a member of the Game Commission from the first day of April last, when his time 
expired, and that he be appointed Chairman of the said Board of Commissioners, at the 
honorarium heretofore annually paid him. 

Certified. 

J. LONSDALE CAPRlfeOL, 

Assistant Clerk, Executive Council. 



1890] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



13 



Li&T OF Issuers of Deek hunting Licenses, 1899. 



J. H. Willmott, Beaumaris. 

William Kirk, Bracebridge. 

J. Sharp, Burk's P'alls. 

J. A.Ellis, Fenelon Falls. 

J. A. Johnson, Parry Sound. 

H. R. Shaw, Rosseau. 

S. A. Huntington, North Bay. 

John Regan, Orillia. 

W. H. Lawson, Park Head. 

W. Climie, Listowel. 

P. M. Shannon, Port Carling. 

J. B. McWilliams, Peterborough. 

J. H. Brick wood, Kingston. 

C. A Richards, Tara. 

John Nott, Port Perry. 

William Fielding, Minden. 

J. Walmsley, Wiarton. 

George Eady, Renfrew, 

William Mathieson, Havelock. 

William Carmichael, Collingwood. 

S. M. Johnston, Arnprior. 

C. S. Gillespie, Campbelli'ord. 

F. J. Moore, Lakefield. 

A. H. Taylor, Ottawa. 
Thomas Beasley, Hamilton. 
James Dougherty, Stouft villa. 
T. Fraser, Norwood. 

B. O'Hara, Madoc. 
W. Prust, Haliburton. 

R. Cockburn, Sturgeon Falls. 
R. Rush, Sault Ste. Marie. 
J. J. Bampfield, Niagara Falls. 
William Carmichael Powassan. 

G. A. McCallum, M.D. Dunnville. 
J. T. Robinson, Bobcaygeon. 

B. J. Gilligan, Mattawa. 

Major T. H. Lloyd, Newmarket. 

T. G. Eastland, Apsley. 

W. A. Field, Lanark. 

Austin Moran, Dacre. 

Peter Munshaw, Eugenia. 

William Long, Kalapore. 

F. C. QuaUins, Windsor. 

Charles Knapp, Lion's Head. 

Edward Mosgrove. Kirkfield. 

W. J. Leatherdale, Coldwater. 

J. D. Rowe, Trenton. 

John H. Ramer, Markham. 

Stephen Lake, West Lake. 

William Lynn, Penatanguishene. 

B. C. Hubbell, Marmora. 

W. J. Gallagher, Frankford. 

H. W. Huff, Napauee. 

M. Maybee, Madoc. 

J. Cleak, Bancn)ft. 

A. R. Carmichael, Sudbury. 

Charles Hnrt, Barrie. 

F. J. Stewart. Stayner. 

Benjamin Bryan, Lindsay. 

A. R. Ewing Waterford. 

A. D. Carley, King. 

J. Y. Hammond, St. Thomas. 



George I'ackham, Alliston. 
W. P. McEwen, Almonte. 
Ksli Terrell, Wooler. 
Henry M ithen, Brockville. 
J. F. Gillespie, Pictou. 

D. Woodward, Cannington. 
Duncan McMillan, Beaverton. 
J, E. Gould, Uxbridge. 
George Southeran, Millbrook. 

E. .J. Breen, Uxbridge. 

H. B. Harrison, Owen Sound. 

Henry Taylor, Perth. 

O. Bascom, Kemptville. 

G. A. Pollock, Aurora. 

John Wright, Flesherton. 

N. D. McCallum, Carleton Place. 

A. E. Sarvis, Samia. 

James Martin, Hillsdale, 

David Williams, Gooderham. 

G. A. St odd art, Bradford. 

Duncan McFarlane. Red Bay. 

A. H. Brandon, Gelert. 

J. H. Anderson, Tory Hill. 

James Scoit, Gooderham. 

J. Austin, Kinmount. 

James Reeves. Eganville. 

H. K. Smith, Belleville. 

R. K. Johns, Gravenhurst. 

Peter Stewart, Grant. 

John Carter. Sundridge. 

J. B. Sanche. Mayerville. 

H. Rankin, Prescotf. 

John Chanonhouse, Eganville. 

Robert Watt, Brussels. 

John P. Evans, London. 

T. Upton, Sprucedale. 

A. McDonald, Sundridge. 
Andrew Hunter, Moorewood. 
W. R. Craig, Russell. 

John Elkington, M.D., Lavant. 

B. B. Miller, Wiarton. 

F. Iveson, Metcalf. 
Richard C le. South River, 

F. N. MacFie, Dunchurch. 
Thomas Kennedy, Parry Sound. 
William Campbell, Restful, 

J. P. LaBrash, Maple Island. 
W. Clearwater, Huntsviile. 

G. G. Thrasher, Stirling. 
William Dafoe, Avnn. 
James Packham, Brampton. 
George Bilton, Newboro. 
James Tedford, Dundalk. 
John Scheich, Trout Creek. 
Andrew Morton, Brantford. 
George B. Holmes, Maikdale. 
Donald A. McNiven, Barrie. 
W. H. Blair, Arthur. 

P. K Newton, Tweed. 

C. E. Clancy. Enterprise. 
S. G. Best, Magnetawau, 
Charles Mills, Warkworth. 



14 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



List of Issuers of' Deer-hunting Licenses, 1899 — Continued. 



John Brown, Rockdale. 

Peter D. McKercher, L'Orignal. 

John M. Collins, Ormsby. 

D. McFarlane, Midland. 

S. L. Doolittle, IngeT-soll. 

T. W. Jackson, Orono. 

H. B. Preston, Marmora. 

William Harris, Jr., Day Mills. 

George W. Savage. Novar. 

J. B. Shrigley, Dorset. 

Andrew Pattullo, Woodstock. 

Robert McConkey, Kearnej-. 

Joseph E. Rogers, Toronto. 

George Morrison. Callender. 

William Franklin. Riceville. 

Chris. Nixon. Elmvale. 

Karl Hartung, Berlin. 

William Robertson, Winghani. 

J. R. Gibson, Mallorytown. 

Benjamin Dixon, Unionville. 

J. C. Gilchrist, Woodville. 

W. H. O'Neil, Dorchester Station. 

Nap. Longtin, The Brook. 

William Marty n, Mitchell. 

Harvey Rogers. Cambray. 

F. A. Watson, Creeniore. 

F. W. Dunn. Barry's Bay. 

C. C. Gilbert, Seeley's Bay. 



George Rutherford. Rosseau. 

E. R. Emery, Eden Grove. 

F. Atkinson, Ailsa Craig. 
Alex. Eraser, New Hamburg. 
W. C. Vanloan, Hagersville. 
John Devitt, Waterloo. 
Fred. Dupius, Embrun. 

W. G. Otto, Vars. 

A. W. Fisher, Stratford. 
Walker Unwin, Bannockburn. 
E. A. Garnham, Staftbrdville. 

B. S. O'Laughlin, Yarker. 
John Hines, Barrie. 

A. E. Sliter, Morton. 

E. W. Kitchen, Lovering. 

A. W. Wood, Plevna. 

S. W. Davey, Harrowsmith. 

.John Stark, Hespeler. 

Alex. Montgomery. Sebright. 

C. W. Davidson, Mount Albert. 
H. E. Snell, Toronto Junction. 
H. P. Dwight, Toronto. 

M. W. Price, Sharbot Lake. 
William Waffle, Coboconk. 
Harry Johnston. Coe Hill Mines. 
Janifs A. Orr, Sudbury. 
John Critchlev, Harlowe. 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



15 



Shooting Licknses Issued to FoREiotf Sportsmen, 1899. 



Horace White, Syracuse, N. Y. 
F. C. Todd, Baltimore, Md. 
H. C. Haggerty, Rochester, N. Y. 
F. S. Wanklyn, Montreal, P. Q. 
Charles Meredith, Montreal, Que. 
Peter McKenzie, Montreal, Que. 
A. J. Dawes, Lachine, Que. 
John Nichols, Montreal, Que. 
D. Robertson, Montreal, Que. 
H. B. Arnold, N. S. 



C. T. Nelson, -- 



-N.S. 



Lewis Derium, Alexandria Bay, N. Y. 
J. E. Tracey, New York. 
A. E Brush, Detroit. Mich. 
T. S. Hathaway, New Bedford, Mass. 
Geo. N. Smalley, Boston, Mass. 
Charles Campbell, Detroit, Mich, 
W. J. Higham, " 

M. M. Stanton, " 

F. W. Eddy, 

H. W. Williams, Chippewa Bay. 

H. W. Cannon, New York 

W. B. Dickerman, New York. 

Dean Sage, Albany, N.Y. 

J. T. Fuller, Alexandria Bay, N.Y. 

S. B. Corby. Plainfield, N.J. 

John O'Leary, New York. 

G. C. Hartman. Pittsburg, Pa. 

T. Mercier, 

Charles Tousley, ....... 

H. G. Barker, 

Louis Cabot, Boston, Mass. 

Geo. W. McKay, Detroit, Mich 

S. Baugh, " 

P. Hutchins, " 

A. Anderson, " 

Z. H. Bishop, Wyandott, Mich. 

Gus Baunler, " 

F. H. Walker. Detroit, Mich. 

Donad McLean, " 



J. H. McMulhan, Detroit, Mich. 

H. G. Meredith, 

W. J. Beclore, St. Clair Fiats, Mich. 

J. L. Rhodes, Lockport, N.Y. 

J. M Moon, New York. 

William Nichols, New York. 

Maurice B. Seargent, New Y''ork. 

F. W. Sackett, Cape Vincent N.Y. 

E. Wilbur U.S. 

William Thompson, Detroit, Mich. 
Rev. W. J. Finley, Boston, Mass. 
John T. Lord, New York. 
Walter Abbott, Boston, Mass. 

P. V. B. Ely, 

G. Y. Hammond, " 
Strathearn Hendrie, Detroit, Mich. 
G. H. Richards, Boston, Mass, 

D. Isaacs, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 
Thos. MacConnell, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
M. M. Zellers, Cleveland, Ohio. 

F. D. Lawrence, " 
W. M. Healy, New York. 
Andrew Mills, " 

B. F. Dutton. Boston, Mass. 
J. H. Smedler, Detroit, Mich. 

G. N. Ralston, Denver, Col. 
A. T. Cabot. Boston, Mass. 
J. A. McAfee, Pittsburg, Pa. 
A. W. Pollock, 

S. H. McKee, 

D. W. McNaugher, Pittsburg, Pa, 

G. A. Farmer, Montreal, Que. 

A. T. Bowker, New York. 

.'Aubrey Smith, Alexandria Bay, N.Y 

W. E. Warner, Detroit, Mich. 

Walter Hinkiel, Baltimore Bay. 

Edmond Hayes, Buffalo, N.Y. 

David Gray, De'roit, Mich. 

W. F. Blake, 

S. J. Bowling, " 



16 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



List of Deputy Wardens by Counties. 



Algoma. 

Anderson, Alexander, Pearl River, C.P.R. 

Brown, Frank, Port Arthur. 

Bole, Duncan, Sault Ste. Marie 

Black, Andrew, Richaid's Landing. 

Congrave, Geo. [care H.Munroj Port Arthur 

Emmons, John. Rat Portage. 

Eraser, D., " " 

Geddes, Thomas R., Jack Fish Bay. 

Gilmour. William, Sault Ste. Marie. 

Harris, John, " " 

HigQ;ins, Wm., Thessalon. 

McKewen, S. R., Tekkummah. 

McKirdy. Wm. Nepigon. 

Patterson, M. J., Webbwood. 

Riley, Edward, Port Arthur. 

Rush, Robert, Sault Ste. Marie. 

Reid. W. D., Thompson. 

Smith, Alfred Bird, Schreiber. 

Whalen, Joseph, Port Arthur. 

Woods, J. M., Thessalon. 

Kemp, L., Silver Lake, Manitoulin Island. 

Harkness M., Vavasour. 

Hymer, G., Beaver Mine. 

Curran, T., Murilla. 

Hyman, G.. " 

Piper, D. , Slate River. 

Wentlield, H., Kaministiquia. 

Morton, E. A., I'ort William. 

Lalonde, E , Port Arthur. 

Grattan, H., " 

Mcll wraith, J., Nepigon. 

Walker, J., Schreiber. 

Norquay, T., Manitowaning. 

Tennant, D., Uplands. 

Carmichael, A. R., Sudbury. 

Harris, W. J., Day Mids. 

Allard, John, Sault. Ste. Marie. 

Addington. 

Donaldson, William J., Donaldson's Mills. 
Clancy, C. E., Enterprise. 

Bruce. 

Armstrong, Joseph, Kinloss. 
Barley, Edward, Lion's Head. 
Farquharson, John, Teeswater. 
Gardiner, John H., Luck now. 
Grey, Wesley, Che-ley. 
Henry, George, Port Elgin. 
Henderson, James, Kincardine. 
Heffernan, Patrick, Walkerton. 
Hogg, Wm. W., Paisley. 
Lawson, W. H., Park Head. 
M llions, Robert, Walkerton. 
Manly, David, Riversdale. 
McKillop, Hugh, Hepworth. 
Mclvor, John, Mclvor. 
McFarlane, Duncan, Red Bay. 
McDonald, Donald, Ripley. 



Bruce. — Contiued. 

Pratt, John, Kincardine. 
Richards, Chas. A., Tara. 
Curry, John, Goderich. 
Wiginton, J., Clinton. 

Brant. 

Montgomery, C A., Brantford. 
McGlaughlin, Geo- W., Brantford. 
Irving, Robt. P., Glenmorris. 
Willett, B. P., St. George. 
Telfer, W.. Paris. 

Caritioii. 

St. George, George, Ottawa. 
Taylor, A. H., Ottawa. 
Portt, Robt. L. , South March. 

Dufferin 

Durkin, Wm., Bowling Green. 
Gordon, James, Monticello. 
Aubbard, James J., Orangeville. 

Durham. 

Carson, J., Durham. 
Jackson, T. W. Orono. 

Dundas. 

Cameron, Lachlin, Iroquois. 
Price, James, Inkerman. 

Elgin. 

Fail brother, Wm., St. Thomas. 
Fowler, Jacob, Fingal. 
Hannen, Isaac, Union. 
Hopkins, John, St. Thomas. 
Huffman, Jeremiah, Aylmer. 
Hammond, John, Aylmer. 
Kirkpatrick. Donald, West Lome. 
Miller, Robert, Lawrence Station. 
Neeley, John R., Fingal. 
Philpott, Wm., lona. 
Thornton, Henry, fSt. Thomas. 
Gardiner, H., Morpeth. 
Chute, Ernest A., Lakeview. 
Goodall, James, Wallacetown. 

Essex. 

Ontago, Daniel, Sandwich. 
Banks, Anthony, Harrow. 
Cornette, Chas. F., Belle River. 
Teller, Wolfe, Walkerville. 
Gigntj, Horace, Gordon. 
Gormley, John, Essex. 
Holland, Hugh, Comber. 
Hillman, Jonas, Hillman. 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



17 



List of Deputy Wardens by Counties. — Con. 



Essex. — Con. 

Ives, Arthur, Leamington. 
King, George, Ruthven. 
Lindsay, William, Comber. 
Lemaitre, Seraphim, Tecumseth. 
Marters, Allios, Sandwich. 
Meloche, Joseph, Sandwich. 
Robert, Joseph, Sandwich. 
Smiley, C, Windsor. 
White, Jesse. Cott;im. 
Rivard, Napoleon, Tecumseth. 
Soulliere, Stephen, Tecumseth. 
White, James H. Pelee Island. 
Walker, Noll, St. Joachim. 
Louchereau, Stephen, St. Clair Siding. 
Mills, Chas., Wheatley. 
Hugill, W., Staples 
Solmone, C, Amherstburg. 
Fontine, W. Fighting Island. 

FronteriMc. 

Albertscm George, Verona. 

Brickwood, Jame> H., Kingston. 

Clark, Norman, Mississippi. 

Darcy, Sydney W., Murvale. 

Dermott, J. A., Tichborne. 

Dowker, Wm. S., Harrowsmith. 

Gilbert, Robert, Ompah. 

Gates, George, Westbrook. 

Greenwood, George, Wolfe Island. 

Pallier, Alexander, Wilmur. 

Smoke, Edward H., Desert Lake. 

Smith, David .John, Parham. 

Sly, Henry, Verona. 

Tryon, Levi, Sharbot Lake. 

Tallon, James, Arden. 

Walker, NeLson, Cataraijui. 

Woods, J. M. Arden. 

Woodman, W. G. , Allen (Wolfe Island). 

York, E. M. , Bellrock. 

Grey. 

McKnight, Thomas, Pornaoh. 
Campbell, Malcolm, Hanover. 
Holmes, Geo. B. Markdale. 
Long, William, Kolapore. 
Simmons, M. H. Oxenden. 
Leiyman, Ludwig, Neustadt. 
Wilson, William H. , Shouldice. 
Myers. J., Orchard. 
Munshaw, P., Eugenia. 
Webb, J., Vandeleur. 
Hickling, J.. Maxwell. 
PetersMH, W. H. Dundalk. 
Tedford, J., Dundalk. 

OleiKjcirrg. 

Clark, James, Domiiiionville. 
2 G.F. 



Glengarry. — Contmued. 

Dickson, Daniel, Williamstown. 
Dunn, Ambrose, South Lancaster. 
McGiihvray, Donald W., Dalkeith. 
McNaughton, J. P., Laggan. 
McRae, Donald C, North Lancaster. 
Stewart, M. W., Greenfield. 
Pepin, E., Bainsville. 
Sutherland, Hugh, Bainsville. 

Hastings. 

Barr, Peter, Maynooth. 
Brinklow, Henry, Ormsby. 
Birrell, James, Glanmire. 
Bowel, W J., Tweed 
Fauldner, Dr. D. W., Foxboro. 
Faulkner, Dr. G. W., Stirling. 
Foster, Alexander, Egan Creek. 
Rupert, Thomas, Springbrook. 
Sweet, ■'\ . H., Bancroft. 
Sweet, W. James, Bancroft. 
Tivy. Richard S., Coe Hill. 
Unwin, Walker, Bannockburn. 
Hubell, B. C, Marmora. 
Taylor, J., Murchison. 

Halton. 

Bradley, Stinson, Milton. 
Brown, Robert M., Campbellville. 
Crawford, Murray, Camp hell ville. 
Johnston, Walter N., Milton. 
Lawson, John. Acton. 
Racey, C. S., Milton. 
Saunders, Edward G., Agerson. 
Wilson, James, Bronte. 
Hewson, G., Milton. 

Huron. 

Creech, James, Exeter. 
Dalton Morgan, Kingsbriage. 
Gill, John, Exeter. 
Horton, (leorgf', Gorrie. 
Naftal. Chas. J, S., Goderich. 
Rider, .7., Clinton. 
Ross, John M., Blyth. 
Sands, John, Salt ford. 
Seager, Charles, Goderich. 
Scott, Alex., Westtie:d. 
Watt, R., Brussells. 
Anrlerson. J. A., Seaf(n-th. 
McKay. Peter, Chisel hurst. 
Foster, Byron, Holmesville. 

Halihurton. 

Day, Joseph, Essonville. 
Hamilton, W. J,, Dorset. 



18 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



List of Deputy Wardens by Counties. — Con. 



Haldimand. 

Chrysler, Robert, North Cayuga. 
Everingham, Wm., Canfield. 
Farrell, John, Cayuga. 
Winslow, Martin, Dunnville. 

Kent. 

Boles, Gordon, Chatham. 
Crouch, Samuel, Ridgetown. 
Eberts, Frank G. , Chatham. 
Johnson, W. J., Fargo. 
Gardiner, Isaac, Morpeth. 
Kime, George, I'ig Point. 
Smith, W, D., Tilbury. 
Cosgrove, M., Selton. 
Dewar, G., Mitchal's Bay. 
Robertson, Victor, Chatham. 
Southgate, R. M. , Wallaceburg. 
Thomas, Joseph, Williams. 
Fisher, B,, Wallaceburi;. 
McGregor, J. D., Chatham. 
Dagnean, David, Chatham. 
Waffle, Noah, Dresden. 
(Jrieves, L. D., Rond Eau. 

Lamhton. 

Bell, John, Port Frank. 
Deans, James, In wood. 
Everest, G. M., Arkona. 
Kennedy, Joseph, Port Lambton. 
Miller, Frank, Port Franks. 
Mott, Edwin L., Alvinston. 
Myers, S., Port Lambton. 
Taylor, S. P., Watford. 
Mountain, H., Walpole Island 
Sarvis, A. E., Sarnia. 
Burley, S., Port Franks. 
Hales, Hiram, Brigden. 

Lanark. 

Deacon, Ephraim, Bolingbroke. 

Farnall, M illiam. Smith's Falls. 

Mair, David, Lanark. 

Millford, R., Carp. 

Patterson, J. R., Christie Lake. 

Gardner, W., McDonald's Corners. 

Leeds. 

Bilton, George, Newboro. 
Gibson, John R., Mallorytown. 
Lappin, J. J., Westport. 
Murchie, Robert, Wilstead. 
Smith, Justus, Charleston. 
Sly, Lester, Monon. 
Sliter, A. E , Morton. 
Stone, W , Gananoque. 
Mathen,H., Brock ville. 
Brown, H. W., Gananoque. 



Lennox. 
HufiF. Hiram W., Napanee. 

Lincohi. 

McPherson, James, St. Ann's 
Kennedy, C. A., Smithville. 
Randall, N. L. , Grimsby. 

Middlesex. 

McCann, Peter, London. 
Beverly, John, Dorchester Station. 
O'Neil, W. H., Dorchester. 
Ralph, Thos. J., Ballymute. 
Ward, R. W., London West. 
Williams, Alfred M., Lobo. 
Forman, J., Dorchester Station. 
Heney, J., London West. 
Atkinson, F., Ailsa Craig. 
Dafoe, W., Avon. 

Monck. 

Moore, Daniel, Perry Station. 

M'^iskoka. 

Kerr, J., Bala. 
Butler, C. F., Point Kaye. 
Brooks, Edgar, Jr., Huntsville. 
Berry, William, Walker's Point. 
Bradley, Enos, Beaumaris. 
Stromberg, N., Torrance. 
Crompton, W. B.. Aspdin. 
Dart, Stephen, Dorset. 
Davidson, E. M., Brackenrig. 
Foreman, Walter. Port Carling. 
Gouldie, E. J., D wight. 
Gohm, William, Bracebridge. 

Grenke, Gustav, Rosseau. 

Henderson. Charles, Bracebridge. 

Harbour, Joseph, Whiteside. 

Paget. George, Huntsville. 

Stephens, George, Shannon Hall. 

Shannon, Peter. Port Carling. 

Traves, Elias H.. Fraserburg. 

Silk, C, Torrance. 

Thornton, Richard, Huntsville. 

Wood, Michael, Cleveland. 

Warne, Francis P., Bracebridge. 

Wardell. John, Bracebridge. 

Easton, R. T., Whit.-ff. 

Hays, J., Parry Sound. 

Harrison, J., Whitstone. 

Smith, R., Golden Valley. 

Traves, T., Fraserburg. 

Hollingshead, Walter M., Bracebridge. 

Parleit, Geo., Bracebridge. 

Torrance, W., Muskoka Mills. 

Weir, James, Utterson. 



1899J 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



19 



List of Deputy Wardens by Counties. — Coi 



Muskoka. — Con. 

McLean, Neil, Morrison Lake. 
Laforce, Muskoka Mills. 

Norfolk. 

Baker, Huit, Windham Centre. 
Brown, Isaiah, Port Rowan. 
Barrett, A. P., Port Royal. 
Dowswell, John, Lynedoch. 
Ewing, Alex. B., Waterford. 
Fick, Jerome B., Port Dover. 
Hanibley, William E., Rockwood. 
Kramer, Conrad, Delhi. 
Randall, Robert, Bookton. 

Northiimherlaiul. 

Diamond, T., Cobourg. 
Field, Cyrus W., 
Fairbanks, Chas. S., " 
Merrian, H. N., Harwood. 
Row, George, Murray P. O. 
Weblock, James, Bensfi)Ot. 
Wallace, Thomas, Gore's Landing. 
Hicks, E. C, Baltimore. 
Terrill, Eli, Wooler. 
Mills, C, Warkworth. 
Davis, C. D.. Murray. 
Cook, Louis, Campbellford. 

Nipissuuj. 

Armstrong, John, Thornloe. 
Bailey, John. North Bay. 
Garrow, E., Nipissing Junction. 
Huntington, S. A., North Bay. 
Jessup, Robert, Nipissing. 
Smith, E., Whitney. 
Perant, I., Bon field. 
Hill, W., Rutherglen. 
Rowland, J. S., Sturgeon Falls. 
Stoddart, T., Copper Cliff. 
Maloney. Theo., Sudbury. 
Avery, G., Copper Cliff. 

Oxford. 

Cuthbert, George, Woodstock. 
Huntingford, Henry, Woodstock. 
Martin, Richard, Woodstock. 
Tisdale, J. E., Woodstock. 
Thornton, J. B., Woodstock. 
Edwards, W., Jr., Sweaburg. 
Watters, W. , Drumbo. 

Ontario. 

Woodworth. Daniel, Cannington. 
Bagshaw, Abed E., Vroomanton. 
Frankish, F. M., Uxbridge. 



Hall, Maxwell, Longford Mills. 
Sniber, James, Longford Mills. 
Gordon, John, Pickering. 
Miller, Arthur, Seagrave. 
McGrath, Michael, Beaverton. 
McDermott, 'ieorge, Port Perry. 
Pettir, George, Pore Perry. 
Sutcliffe, James, Prince Albert. 
Williams, Charles, Glen Major. 
Remey, J. W., Dorset. 
Crandall, M. L., Port Perry. 
Steele, J., Uptergrove. 
Pringle, J. H., Cooper's Falls. 
Goodman, C, Gshawa. 

Prince Edtvard. 

Lake, Stephen, West Lake. 
Rorabeck. Athol, Crofton. 
Sprague, George G., Demorestville. 

Feterborovqh. 

Moore, F. J , Lakefield. 
Mdore, D. H., Peterborough. 
McWilliams, J. B. . Peterborough. 
Smith, J. W,, Peterborough. 
Wedlock, Wm., Keene. 
Crow, C, Stoney Lake. 
King, Noah, Havelock. 
Lundy, R. B., Stoney Lake. 

Parry Sound. 

Burns, C. W., Trout Creek. 
Butler. Clarence, Trout Creek. 
Carmichael, William. Powassan. 
Welsh, C. H., Sundridge. 
Doupe, Sidney, Lawrence Mills. 
Draycott, F. W., Ashdown. 
Fry, Arthur, Seguin Falls. 
French. Benjamin, Dunchurch. 
Groom, Henry, Kearney. 
Hall, Wm. H., Sprucedale. 
Johnson, John A., Parry Sound. 
Le Brash, James P., Maple Island. 
Mainprize, N., Golden Valley, 
Mitchell, Robert, Cecebe. 
McDonald, Arch., Sundridge. 
McDermott, G. Benj., Sundridge. 
McGowan, Wm.. Parry Sound. 
McAmmond Wm., Dunchurch. 
Ricker, David, Commanda. 
King, J., Parry Sound. 
Brown, Duncan, Starrat. 
McGee.R., Whitestone. 
Labrash, W., Maple Island. 
Taylor, E., Parry Sound. 

PrescoU. 

Bonville, Leon, St. Isidore de Prescotfc. 
Barrett, John, Turnier. 



20 



THE REPORT ON 



2T 



List of DEi-UTY Wardens by Counties. — Con. 



Freseott. — Co7i. 

Cunningham, A., Wendover. 
James, Richard, Alfred. 
La Belle, Leonce, Curran. 
LeHoy, Ralph, Barb. 
La Faivre, Hercule, Le Faivre. 
Marston, Lewis F., L'Orional. 
Martipeau, Joseph, Alfred. 
McKercher, Peter, L'Orignal. 
St. Pierre, Pierre, St. Eugene. 
Taneck, Sonis, Riceville. 

Feel. 

Rayburn, John, Caledon 
Walterhouse, Edward, (ooKSville. 

Ferth. 

Climie, W., Listowel. 
Wilson, R.. Stratford. 
Fisher, A. W., Stratford. 

Renfreic. 

Brady, John, Renfrew. 
Biggs, William E., Pembroke. 
Briggs, Aaron, Pembroke. 
Cofiey, Wm., Pembroke. 
Halliday, James, Springtown. 
Johnson, S. M., Amprior. 
Kennedy. Johw, Pembroke. 
M cCaghei'ty, P., Pembroke. 
McDonald, Alex., Pembroke. 
McFarlane, A., Calabogie. 
Planut, Xavier, Renfrew. 
Smith, Robert R. , Eganville. 
McLaren, J., Smoke River. 
Yull, Walter. Calabogie. 
George, W., Barry's Bay. 

Russell . 

Stewart, Peter, Grant. 
McCallum, D., Cumberland. 
Dupius, A., Embrun. 
Longtin, N., The Brook. 

Simcoe. 

Bathie, Edward, Cookstown. 
Beardsley, Alfred W., Barrie. 
Coombs, John, Lovering. 
Chapman, James, Cookstown. 
Fidley, George, Cookstown. 
Hines, John, Barrie. 
Kearns, George, Ivy. 
Kitchen, Joseph, Lovering. 
Muir, John, Cookstown. 
McLaughlin, James, Anten Mills. 
Primrose, Alex., Apto. 
Pollock, Thomas, Cookstown. 



Semcoe. — Con. 

Ross, Joseph, Cookstown. 
Regan, John, Orillia. 
Rawson, Wm., Cold water. 
Somerville, David, Stayner. 
Upton, George, Nicholston. 
Wilson, J. J., Fesserton. 
Staunton, T., Hamlet. 
Laughlin, '1'., New Lowell. 
Reid, E., Everett. 
Campbell, J., Ragged Rapid. 
Peckman, G. C, Alliston. 
Cheesman, B. C, Stayner. 
Wood, P. v., Port Severn. 
Lynn, Wm., Penetanguishene. 
Pratt, W., Midland. 
Watson, T. A., Creemore. 
Nixon, Chris., Elmvale. 
Davidson, J., Brentwood. 
Loudnii, H., Penetanguishene. 
McNiven, D. A., Barrie. 
Doner, J. B., Creemore. 
Labatt, F., Port Severn. 
McFarline, D., Midland. 

Victoria. 

Bov/ins, Charles, Coboconk. 
Crowe, Nathaniel, Bobcaygeon. 
Dewdney, Arthur, Bobcaygeon. 
Daniel, John, Balsam. 
Ellis, .f. A., Fenelon Falls. 
Galloway. David, Moore's Falls. 
Harris, Noxon, Bobcaygeon. 
Junkin, James, Fenelon Falls. 
Lysh, Wm., Bobcaygeon. 
McArthur, Donald, Manilla. 
Silverthorn, George, Balsam. 
Ray, John, Kirkfield. 
Arnberg, Claes, Bo' caygeon. 
Bryan, Beiij., Lindsay. 

Wetland. 

Augnstine, Elias, Stonebridge. 
Barkhart, George, Sherkston. 
Beam, Horace H., Black Bteek. 
Griffin, Richard, Fort Erie. 
Hersley, Mil ford. Garrison Road. 
Miller, Chas. A., Black Creek. 
Michener, Cyrenus, Ridgeway. 
Neif, Peter, Marshville. 
Nixon, J. C, Welland. 
Rose, Chas., Jr., Garrison Road. 
Risley, E. E., International Bridge. 

PFentworth. 

Gallin, Warren, Waterdown. 
Raspberry, Wm., West Flamboro'. 
Graham, H., Hamilton. 
Hazell, J., Hamilton Beach. 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



21 



List of Deputy Wardens by Counties. — Con. 



Anderson, H. J., Bartonville. 


Wellington. — Con. 


DUls, Wm. W., Attercliffe. 




Morden, E. L., Greensville. 


Lang, George, Hillsburg. 


Randal, R. W., Hamilton. 


Robertson, Thomas, Kilean. 




Stewart, Donald, Crieff. 


Waterloo. 


Smith, George, Eden Mills. 




Stovel, Thomas, Mount Forest. 


Bulmer, George, Elmira. 


Williams, Henry M., Guelph. 


Devitt, John, Waterloo. 


Landoni, L., Dracon. 


Eraser, Alex., New Hamburg. 


Robertson, C., Hillsburg. 


Gillier, Peter, Gait. 


Black, T., Elora. 


Grass, Philip, Blair. 


Ireland, Dr., Harriston. 


Hall, James, Hawksville. 


McNamara, M., Arthur. 


Mengers, William, St. Jacobs. 


Mereweather, H. D., Guelph. 


Mayers, Frederick. Bridgeport. 




Mickers, Joseph, Heidleberg. 


York. 


McMaster, Thomas, Hespeler. 




Stark, John, Hespeler. 


Hope, W. B., Toronto. 


Springess Joseph, Kossuth. 


Tidsberry, James L., Coleman. 


Gammon, W. E., Ayr. 


Kennedy, James, Toronto. 


Riddell, W., Ayr. 


Blea, D., Humber Bay, 


McCruden, Robt., Gait. 


Sanderson, W. H., Toronto. 


Hartung, Karl, Berlin. 


Humphrey P., Toronto. 


Wellington. 


Province of Quebec. 


Gilchrist, John W., Gillean. 


*Crowley, E. B., Montreal. 


Hull, Wellington, Erin. 


*Finnie, Dr. J. T. , Montreal. 


Love, James, Guelph. 





*These officers have been especially appointed to enforce the Game Laws on Lake St. 
Frances, which is partly in Ontario and partly in Quebec. 



22 



THE REPORT ON 



[2r 



Report on Cases 



District 

or 
county. 



Simcoe 



Frontenac. 
Waterloo . . 

Leeds 

Lanark 

Frontenac. 



Prince 
Edward. 

Elgin 

Peterboro' . 

Lanark . . . 
Hastings . . 

Carleton . . 
Victoria . . . 



Name of prosecutor. 



John Hines 



do 
do 



Geo. Gates 
do 



KarlHarttung. 
Geo. Bilton . . . 



David Mair 
do 



J. H. Brickwood. 
do 
do 

do 



do 
do 

do 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
dc 
do 

do 
do 
do 

Stephen Lake 



Wm. Wedlock, 
do 



J. W. Kirkwood. 

Walker Unwin 
do 

Robert L. Port . 
do 
do 



Date, 
1898. 



Name of offender. 



March 9 . . 



do 11. 
April 5. 



do 
do 



do 



20. 
20. 



July 29. 



Oct. 8.. 

do 8.. 

Jan. 22.. 
Mch. 21.. 
Feb. 19.. 

April 1 . . 

do 18.. 
do 11.. 

Maj' 17.. 

do 19.. 

April 7 . . 



Address. 



John Theobold 
— Stewart .... 



Karl Muller, 



Joseph McDonald . 



William Kingston 
Henry Raycrof t . . 



Ghas. Potter. 
D. Larush . . . 
A. Seers 



H. Amery. 



Kingston 
do 



Berlin , . . 

Portland 



Tatlock Hunting deer 



Offence charged. 



Trespass 

Running hares . 



Shooting duck out of 
season. 



Shooting duck. 



do 



Cataraqui . 
Wolf Island 
Perth Road 

do 



do 

Killing black squirrel 
Breaking rat houses . 
Deer in possession . . 



i Hunting deer with- 

! out license. 
D. Namey |Wilmar Killing deer in water 



Wm. Shales 



Geo. Woodruff 
D. McQuade 
Sol Cronk 



May 7 

do 7 

do 7 

do 7 
do 

do 20 



April 20. 
do 20. 
Aug. 1 . 



Allen Wager . . . 
J. M. Wager . 

G. Cronk 

Dan. McLeod . 
John Brouce. . . 
Wm. Nancourt 



A. Gibson .... 
A. Mahood . . 
Allen Wallace 



J. M. Huffman May 20. . j George House . 



Aug. 15. . Chas. Parks 
Oct. 8.. 



Perth Road I Hunting without 

[ license. 
Sydenham . ' do 

Wilmur j Shooting on Sunday. 

Parham Hunting deer with- 
out license. 

do ( do 

do ' do 

do I do 

do do 

Kingston Killing deer in water 

Perth Road Killing deer in close 

season. 
Kingston Shooting fish 

do do 

New York . Sunday fishing 



Aylmer 

Brooklyn, N.Y.. 



do 20. 



Dec. 20.. 
do 20.. 



Feb. 13. 

do 28. 
Nov. 26. 



Benjamin Bryan i Aug. 12 . . 

do I do 12.. 



D. Thompson 
Wm. Whittle 



Bridgewater . . . . 
do 



Catching undersized 
trout. 

Attempting to shoot. 



Killing deer 
do 



D. V. Wait 
A. H. Wait 



Lindsay . 
do . 



Killing wild duck 
out of season. 



1899] 



GAME ANB FISHERIES. 



23 



FOE Year 1898. 



Was offender 
arrested or 
summoned. 


Where tried. 


Name of 
magistrate. 


Result of case. 


Nets, traps or illegal appliances 
seized during season of 1898. 










Two small gill-nets and confiscated 
same ; seized a quantity of spears 
and have same still in my posses- 
sion. 


















Seized one small gill net in Notta- 
wasaga river and confiscated same. 


Summoned . . 


Cataraqui 


Jno. Simpson .... 


Dismissed 








Summoned . . 


Berlin 


J. A. Mackie 

H. K. Smith .... 

Jno. McLean 

do 

D. J. Walker .... 
do 
do 


Fined $5 




Paid without 


do 15 




trial. 
Summoned . . 


Lanark 

do 

Kingston 

do 

do 

Sydenham 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Parham 

do 

do 

do 

Kingston 

do 

Cataraqui 

do 

Wolf Island.... 


Dismissed with 
costs. 

do 

Fined $5 and costs 
do 10 do 




do 




do 




do 
Sear<ih war- 




rant. 
Summoned . . 


H. K. Smith .... 

do 
do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
D. J. Walker .... 
H. K. Smith .... 

John Simpson 

do 
Phillip Vaners. . . . 


Fined $20 and costs 

do 20 do 
do 20 do 

do 20 do 
do 5 do 
do 20 do 

do 20 do 
do 20 do 
do 20 do 
do 20 do 
do 20 do 
do 20 do 

do 5 do 
do 5 do 
do 10 do 




do 
do 

do 
do 
do 

do 


Admitted. 

do 
do 


do 




do 




do 




do 
Admitted 

do 


Suspended sentence, 
do 


do 






Seized decoy ducks and destroyed 
them. 

Seized one gun. 
Seized nine traps. 

Two nets, destroyed them. 


Summoned . . 
No 


Aylmer 




H. H. McDiarmid 


Fined 25c and costs 


















Caught 


Queensboro' 

do 


H. K. Smith .... 
do 


Fined $80 


do 


do 40 


















do 










do 


Summoned . . 


Lindsay 




J. Deacon 


Fined $10 and costs 




do 





24 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



Rbport on Cases 



District 

or 
County. 



Lennox . 

Victoria . 
Muskoka . . 



Lanark 

Algoma . . 

Simcoe 

Grey 



Nipiasing . 
Algoma . 
York ... 



Renfrew 



Prince 

Edward. 



Name of prosecutor. 



Date, 

1898. 



Wesley Hufif. 
do 



A. McArthur 



Jos Hey. 



do 
do 
do 
do 



J. E,. Patterson 
Wm. T. Harris 



D. Somerville 



Geo. B. Holmes 
do 
do 

do 

do 

do 
do 
do 



Joseph Perron . . . 
Thomas Norquaj' 
E.Tinsley 



do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do 



Walter Yuill 
do 



Name of oflFender. 



Dec. 12 . . iSampson King . 
do 12. . I Carl Bombough 



Jan. 23 . 



do 23.. 

do 23.. 

do 23. 

do 23.. 



Dec. 31. 
Oct. 4. 

Mch. 20. 



G. Brown 



G. Walton . . . . 

H. Brown 

W. Armstrong. 
T. Gohn 



Address. 



Enterprise 
do 



Bracebridge 



do 

do 
Stoneleigh . 
Bracebridge 



Jan. 5. .IJohn Pilkey 

Mch. 10. . Robert English 
May 11. . I Samuel Morrow 



Jan. 18. 
May 21. 



do 
do 



H.Noble . ... 
Angus Pickett 



21.. I Ed ward Walter 
21 . . Peter Hamilton 



Oct. 8. 

April 14. 

do 16. 
Jan. 21 . 



Mch. 17.. 

May 12.. 

do 20. . 

Sept. 1 . . 

Oct. 28. . 

Nov. 25.. 

I do 25.. 

do 25.. 

!Oct. 26.. 

Nov. 25.. 



Markdale 
Glascot . . 
Markdale 

do 

Berkley . . 



do 
do 



Offence charged. 



Killing one moose . . 
do 



Shooting deer in 
water or immedi- 
ately after leaving 
the water . 

do 
do 
do 



Setting out poison . . 

do 
Catching over .50 

speckled trout. 
Shooting hares out of 

season. 
Fishing on the Sab- 
bath day. 
do 
do 



Renfrew & Co 



I Toronto 



Lemon lOwen Sound . , 

Anderson Redditt . , Conger 



Samuel Waubb . 
Sam. Stewart . . . 
W. M. Campbell 

A. E. Hunter . . 

R. Brettnah 



J. Cughill.... 
Dave Cughill 



Arthur Crogan 



Jan. 29. 



Adam McGonigal . 
James Green 



French River 
Parry Sound 
South River . . 

Parry Sound 

do 

do 
do 



Illegal possession of 

furs. 

do 
Killing deer in close 

season. 



Illegal furs - . 
Spearing fish 
Killing moose 



Killing deer In close 

season. 
Hunting without 

license. 
Hunting, close season 



Parry Sound . . ' Hunting without 
i license. 



ICalabogie 
do 



Geo. Bolter 



Information laid 

Killing deer out of 
season. 



Demorestville .. Spearing muskrats 
I through ice and 
I houses. 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



FOR Year 1898. — Continued. 



Was offender 
arrested or 
summoned. 


Where tried. 


Name of 
magistrate. 


Result of case. 


Nets, traps or illegal appliances 
seized during season of 1898. 




Enterprise 

do 


Jas. Daly 

do 


Fined $20 




do 


do 20 


Seized two boats. 




Bracebridge . . s . 
do 


James Boyer 


Lost the case 
through the mag- 
istrate not mak- 
ing out the sum- 
mons right. 




do 




do 


do 








do 


do 








do 


do 

















Seized 1 otter trap. 










Seized and burnt 100 yards of 1^ 
mesh net. 

Seized one punt and two gill nets ; 


Stunmoned 


Markdale 

do 

do 

Left country be 


R. S. Rae 

do 

do 

ore trial came off. 

R. S. Rae 

do 

do 


Fined $5 and costs 
do 7.50 do 
do 10.00 do 


sunk punt, sold the nets to defray 
expenses. 


do 




do 




do 




do 


Fined $1 and costs 

do .3 do 
do 3 do 




do 




do 









Seized seven traps, four snares set for 










hares and minks ; destroyed trap. 
Seized 2 beaver traps and 2 nets. 
Seized and burned 250 yds. gill net. 












Toronto 

Saulo Ste. Marie 
Parry Sound 


E. Tinsley and J. 

E. Rogers. 
J. E. R'gers . . . 
J. H. Willmott. . 


Fined $275 

do 90 






Summoned . . 


do 100 


One net destroyed. 


Summoned . . 


do 
do 

do 

do 
do 
do 


J. Farrer 

G. R. Steele 

J. H. Willmott . . 

J. Farrer 

do 


do 5 




do 


do 1 




do 


Fined $37.50 and 

costs. 
Fined $20 




do 




do 


do 20 






Dismissed 






do 










do 










do 


J. H. Willmott... 
J. Farrer 


Fined $20 


Three beaver traps. 






Renfrew 

do 


G. M. Eady 






• ■ 


do 


Witness left the 
coiintry. 















26 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



Report on Casks 



District 

or 
county. 



Algoma . . 



Simcoe . 



Parry 



Sound 



Lambton . , 

Leeds 

Prescott . 

Algoma . . 

Hastings . 

Kent.. .. 
Norfolk . . 

Ontario .. 
Algoma . . 



Name of prosecutor. 



Geo. E. Hymers. 



Michael Woods 
do 
do 
do 

do 

J. B. La Brash 

do 

do 

do 

do 

Jos. Kennedy . . 



J. B. Smith . . 
Louis Janeck 



W. D. Reid 

do 

do 



Grey 

Hastings . 



Date, 

1898. 



Sept 



Nov. 28. 

do 28. 

do 28. 

do 26. 

Mar. 24. 

Aug. 6 . 

do 6. 

do 29. 

do 29. 

Dec. 5. 

Nov. 29 . 



B. C. Hubbell . . 

do 
F. Mundey 



Feb. 9. 

March . . 
Dec. 5 . 
April 28 . 

Oct. 4. 

do 4. 

Nov. 18. 



Name of offender. 



Address. 



R. Cunningham 

J. Brown 

F. P. Tuds . . . 
Wm. McLellan 



Robt. Farr 



Wm. Tracey . . 
A. V. Tracey 
Capt. Earley 



Mr. Blane . . . 
H. Andrews.. 
A. Oattanach 



Orillia 

do 

do 
Conger Tnp 



Humphrey Tup. 



U. S. A.. 

do .. 

Kentucky 



do 
Dunchurch . 
Marine City , 



Killing a deer 

do 

do 



Killing deer and 

partridges. 
Killing a deer . . 

Shooting without 
license. 



Patrick Lynch Fournier 



A.. P. Barrett | April . 



do 
do 



J. W. Remey 

R. Rush Feb. 17 



do ... 
do ... 

1897 
Dec. 25. 



do 

do 
do 
do 



James Carson 

Dougald Campbell. 

do 

do 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Mar. 1 . 

do 3. 

do 3. 

Dec. 27. 



June 6 . 
May 10. 

do 18. 
do 5. 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Walter Steenbury . . 
John McGinnis 



Geo. Schram 



Artley Osborne . . 
Chas. Brown 



John Collins. 
Neil McKay . 



Peter Digest . 
William Bell 
Abe Prenlow 



Havelock 
do 



Port Royal 

do 
do 



Sault Ste. Marie 

do 

Garden River 

do 
Sault Ste. Marie 



John Jones 

Wm. Vancoughnet. . 

Bert Martin 

S. Sunstrum 



Markdale . 

Loughboro' 

do 



Wm.McIntyre 
Wm. Griffin.... 

Jno. Emo 

Fred Layman . . 
L' Amble Seraza 



Offence charged. 



Sunday hunting . 
do 
do 
Hunting without 

license. 
Spearing fish . . . 



Hunting without 

license. 



Killing deer 

do 



Trespass and shoot- 
ing muskrats. 
do 
do 



Shipping a moose 

bead. 
Killing deer 



do 

do 

Illegal possession of 
muskrat skins. 

Trespass and fishing. 

Hunting without 

license. 
Hunting on Sunday . 



Killing moose 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



27 



FOR Year 1898. — Continved. 



Was offender 
arrested or 
summoned. 


Where tried. 


Name of 
magistrate. 


Result of case. 


Nets, traps or illegal appliances 
seized during season 1898. 










Found net set for speckled trout^ 


Summoned . . 
do 


Orillia 

do 

do 

Parry Sound 

Medora Tnp 

Dunchurch 

do 


J. H. Willmott . . 
do 
do 
do 

W.D.McNaughton 

Wm. Robertson . . 

do 
Mr. Hunter 

do 

Wm. Robertson . . 


$5 and costs 

5 do 
Dismissed 


cut ropes from buoys and let net 
sink to bottom. 


do 




do 


.*;20 and costs 

$10 


Seized his decoys and gave them to 

the magistrate. 
One whitefish and one herring net. 




Fined -$20 


do 


do 20 




do 


Settled by Chief 
Warden, .§25. 
do 

Fined S20 




do 








Dunchurch 






Pending 


Seized boat, value $2b. 










Two gill nets and rat traps. 




Riceville 


•J no. Moffatt 


Fined $20 
















Two snares for deer destroyed. 
One punt. 










Summoned . . 


Haveloek 


H. K. Smith .... 


Defendant swore 

himself clear. 
Dismissed 


Warrant .... 














Summoned . . 




.Jas. Newkirk 

do 


Settled with costs, 
do 




do 






do 
















Summoned . . 


Sault Ste. Marie 

do 
Echo River 


P. C. Campbell . . 

do 
Alex. Findley 


Fined $20 

Reprimanded and 
let go. 

do 




do 





do 








Summoned . . 




P. C. Campbell . . 

Wm. Calder 

H. K. Smith .... 

do 

H. K. Smith and 
J. E. Rogers 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


Fined $25 and costs 

Fined $1 and costs 

Fined and fine re- 
mitted. 
Fine remitted on 
account of youth. 
Allowed to go on 
suspended sen- 
tence . 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 




do 
Admitted 


Durham 

Sydenham 

do 
Golden Lake. . . . 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 




do 






























2g 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



Report on Oases 



District 

or 
county. 



Hastings 



Name of prosecutor. 



Nipissing. 



Dougald Campbell . 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
K. Smith. 



H. K. Smith, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



S. A. Huntington. 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Date, 

1898 



May 5 



Name of offender. 



Jumbo Quinsco. 



do .5 . Angus Vassow 

do 5 . . Michael Whiteduck 

do 5 . . Benoit Whiteduck 

do 5 . . Frank Baptiste 

do 5 . . Joseph Partridge 

do 5 . . uSemo Ewass .... 

do 5 iNarcisse Vassow 

do 5 . .[Alex Layman 

Aug. 17 . . I Henry Smith. . . , 



Address. 



Offence charged. 



Killing moose. 



do 27 . 

do 27 . 

Oct. 4... 

Dec. 14. 

Sep. 21. 

do 21. 

do 21. 

Dec. 12. 

do 12. 

do 12. 

do 12. 

Jan. 7 . 

do 7. 

do 7. 

do 12. 

do 12. 

do 12. 

do 20. 



James Stratford. 
Henry Stratford. 
Walter Stanberg. 



Chester Oakel 

Willard Conley 

John Kellar, Jr 

Cyrene Robbins 

Samuel King 

Gideon King. .. . 
Charles Rombrough 
Stanley Wager 



do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 



Jos. Larvier 

Jo8. Beancage. 



Michael Beaucage 
Louis Beaucage . . . 
Alex Comandeaw. 

Joe Restool 

Moses Rubenstein. 



Having game birds 

in possession. 
Killing game birds. . 

do 
Hunting deer in the 
water 

do 

Madoc I Killing deer 

do I do 

i do 

Sheffield Tp i Killing moose 

do I do 

Enterprise | do ..... 

do I do 



Indian Reserve. 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
Montreal 



Killing deer out of 
season. 

do 



do 

do ... . 

do 

do 

Having deer horns 
in possession. 



1899] 




GAME AND FISHERIES 


2< 


FOR THE Year 1898 — Concluded. 


Wa8 offender 
arrested or 
summoned. 


Where tried. '^ 


Name of 
Magistrate. Result of case. 


Nets, traps or illegal appliances 
seized during season of 1898. 




Golden Lake 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Kingston 


H. K. Smith and 
J. E. Rogers. 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
H. K. Smith 


1 

'Allowed to go on 
suspended sen- 
tence. 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
Dismissed on pay- 
ment of costs. 















......'..'..'.'.'.'...'..". ' 


















































Summoned . . 


Madoc 

do 

do 

Enterprise 


j. j. B. Flint 


Dismissed 




do 


do 


do 




do 


do 
James Daly 


00 




do 


do 




do 


Fined $20 and costs 
Fined $20 and costs 
Dismissed . . 




do 








do 








Arrested . . j 

do ... 1 


North Bay 

do 

do 
do 

do 
do 
do 

1 


VVm. Doran 

do 

■ 

do 

do 1 

do 1 

do 1 

do 


Let go on suspend- 
ed tenteuce. 
do 

do 
do 
do 
Jo 
Fined $5 and costs 




do ... 




do .... 




do .... 1 
do . . . . i 





do .... I 









Report of Cases for 1899 will appear in report for 1900. 



FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



1899 ] THE REPORT ON GAME AND FISHERIES. 33 



To the Honorable F. R. Latch ford, 

Commissioner of Fisheries for Ontario : 

The undersigned has the honor to present the first Annual Report upon the workings 
of the Fisheries Branch for the year ending 31st December, 1899. 

Introductory. 

For the information of the readers of this Report, it may be considered fitting that 
a brief statement of the reasons for the establishment of a Fisheries Branch, and for a 
more active and extensive supervision of the Fisheries of the Province, should be here 
set forth. 

In consequence of the Government of the Dominion of Canada having; assumed that 
Fisheries and Fishing rights, and the property therein throughout the Dominion were 
vested in the Dominion generally, and under such assumption of right had collected 
revenues in respect of such Fisheries and Fishing rights, notwithstanding a continued 
and vigorous protest on the part of this Province — and probably by other Provinces — 
and private litigation having arisen, and the inconveniences of two claimants to the pro- 
perty having been realized, it was ultimately, on pressure by Ontario, deemed necessary 
and expedient to obtain the decision of the Supreme Oourt of Canada, with appeal to 
the Judicial Committee of Her Majesty's Privy Council, not only as to the respective 
rights of the Dominion and the Provinces as to Seacoast and Inland Fisheries, but also 
as to the proprietorship of the ungranted public lands within Canada (whether h were 
Dominion or Provincial property), in respect of which proprietorship Ontario contended 
that the question of fishery rights was largely afi'ected. With respect to Fisheries the 
Dominion claimed that under the B. N". A. Act authority was vested in the Dominion 
Parliament to legislate respecting Seacoast and Inland Fisheries, and that consequently 
Parliament could enact laws with respect to Fisheries without reference to either Domin- 
ion or Provincial ownership of the bed of the lake or river itself ; and that the right of 
control, including the issue of licenses for fishing privileges in the waters mentioned, 
so far as they were within Canadian territory, was therefore vested in the Dominion Gov- 
ernment ; and in respect of waters flowing over ungranted public lands, the Dominion 
claimed absolute title, including the lakes and rivers, navigable and unnavigable. The 
Supreme Court, however, and subsequently Her Majesty's Privy Council, swept away 
the greater part of these contentions — which Ontario had opposed, except always admit- 
ting to the Dominion the right to legislate respecting close seasons and the implements 
of capture, and the general right of the Dominion for the purposes of revenue to tax 
fishing, as it could by legislation impose a tax upon any business. 

The Judicial Committee by their advice to Her Majesty held : ^ 

That the beds of all rivers and lakes (which had not been granted) were the property of 
the Provmce in which they were situated ; 

That the waters of such rivers and lakes, and the fish therein, were also provincial pro- 
perty ; 

That the sole right to issue fishery leases, licenses and permits to fish, and to receive fees 

for such leases, licenses and permits, was vested in the Provinces exclusively ; 

That a Provincial Legislature is not empowered to enact fishery regulations and restrictions, 
either genei'ally or unless and until the Dominion Parliament sees fit to deal with the subject ; 

That a Provincial Legislature is empowered to deal with fisheries in so far as they fall within 
the description of property and civil rights, or within the description of any other subject 
assigned to Provincial Legislatures ; and 

That a Provincial Legislature may impose a license duty on fishing in order to raise a 
revenue for provincial purposes. 

Soon after the receipt of the Privy Council judgment, this Government declared to 
the Federal Government its readiness to assume the duties which the Judgment had 
determined to devolve upon the Province, and several conferences between the Honourable 
the Minister of Marine and Fisheries (the Hon. Sir Louis Davies), and the Honourable 
the then Premier of this Province (the Hon. Mr. Hardy), were held at Ottawa and 
Toronto. At one of these conferences the various provisions of the Judgment, so far as 
they referred to fisheries, were taken up and discussed seriatim. Though there may have 
been a slight difference of opinion as to their Lordships' meaning on some points, it was 
3 G.F. 



34 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



on the ■whole considered by the representatives of the two Governments that the preroga- 
tives of the respective Governments had been so clearly defined by their Lordships that 
there need be no serious apprehension of any conflict of authority in the exercise of their 
several functions ; and it is believed that there is such a unity of opinion on the part of 
both Governments as to the desirability of protecting and fostering the Fisheries, that 
no friction will arise to prevent the accomplishment of that great object, but that every 
facility will be afforded by the officers of each Government to the other to enable this 
very desirable result to be attained. 

In 1897 the Legislature of the Province passed an Act respecting Fisheries, to be 
brought into force on such day as the Lieutenant Go vernor-in-Council by a proclamation 
might appoint. The Act had, however, 5 been framed in accordance with the decision of 
the Supreme Oourt, and before the appeal to the Privy Council had been disposed of, 
and it was therefore deemed necessary that some amendments should be made before the 
Act could be put into operation. An early session was convered for the purpose, among 
others of passing the needed legislation to bring the Act into operation, to provide for the 
establishment of a Fisheries Branch, the taking over of Dominion records and documents^ 
the granting of leases, licenses, etc., etc., as first steps towards developing this recently 
recovered valuable property, and exercising a wise and vigilant oversight over the same 
for its perpetual preservation, by the establishment of such a policy as would commend 
itself to the fishermen whose livelihood depends upon its preservation, and the community 
at large, and by requiring a strict observance of the laws and regulations enacted for 
that purpose. 

Establishment of a Branch. 

The undersigned was charged with the organization of the Branch, and was 
despatched to Ottawa to take over the necessary documents, records, etc., and to obtain 
an insight into the working of the Department there. The Branch was organized (at 
first attached to the Department of the Attorney-General under the commissionership of 
the Honourable Mr. Haidy), and it consists of a Deputy Commissioner and five assist- 
ants. The chief clerk (Mr. Webster) having been for a number of years employed in the 
Fisheries Department at Ottawa, his experience was of mnch value during the process 
of organization. 

Protbction Service. 

Ninety-four overseers have been^appointed at salaries ranging from |25 to $300. The 
plan of protection is in the main that adopted by the Federal Government, except that 
in that portion of the Province where the duty of the overseers is chiefly one of supervi- 
sion five district overseers have also been appointed at salaries ranging from $300 to 
$G0O per annum, whose whole time is expected to be devoted to the duties. With per- 
haps a few exceptions, the overseers have been exceedingly vigilant and faithful, taking 
into consideration the very small allowance which a majority of them receive and the 
large area of territory which each has to supervise. They were selected expressly to 
discharge the duties pertaining to their office, and they have been distinctly informed that 
their retention in office shall be determined by the faithfulness manifested in the proper 
exercise of those duties. In addition to the salary provided by the Order-in-Oouncil, 
such travelling expenses as may be considered reasonable and proper are allowed, vouchers 
being required for all expenditures of $1 and upwards, and an affidavit that the statement 
of the duties performed, the distances travelled and the amounts charged is correct. The 
overseer is required to report on the first of each month the nature of the duties perform- 
ed during the previous month. A bond that he will faithfully fulfil, perform and dis- 
charge all the duties of his office and account for all moneys received, is required of him. 
Haven taken the oath prescribed in the statute, he is clothed with the powers of a Justice 
of the Peace for all the purposes of the Fisheries Act, thus enabling justice to be speedily 
and more economically administered, and a miscarriage thereof frequently prevented. 
The salaries in the main are of necetsity siiiall, but it has been found that where a salary 
is paid, there U much greater incentive to apprehend violators and to lay an information, 
than where a moiety of the fine is the only inducement ; it removes the stigma of being an 
informer. The overseer feels in accepting a salary that he is morally bound to discharge 



1899 J GAME AND FISHERIES. 35 



the duty expected of him, and that he is in no way compromised in discharging this duty. 
Each overseer is furnished with a metal badge, which he is required to wear and exhibit 
when requested. 

Purchase of a Protection Vessel. 

During the major portion of the year our patrol service, especially on the inner 
channels of the Georgian Bay, was much crippled for the want of a cruiser. Any person 
familiar with theae waters will know how absolutely impossible it would be to prevent, 
with men in open boats, the wide-spread poaching which is carried on there. 
An appropriation for the purchase of a steamer was therefore voted by the ' 
Legislature at its last session, and efforts were at once made to procure a boat. 
Oflers of boats were received from many parts of the Province, ard from Detroit and 
Buffalo, at prices ranging from SICO to $10,000, and some twelve or fifteen boats were 
examined by capable agents of the Government with a view to a purchase. Much diffi- 
culty, however, was expcrfenced in finding just the boat required, the majority being either 
too large or too small, and others not having the necessary equipments ; and it was not 
until the month cf October that one obtainable at a price at all near the appropriation 
was found which, after due trial and examination, was considered to be adapted for the 
service. This was the steamer " Gilphie," owned by Mr. A. F. Bowman of Southampton. 
The price paid was $3,250. The boat had originally cost $7,500. She is, practically, 
a new boat, having been rebuilt in 1896. The "Gilphie" is about 80 ft. in length, 15 
ft, 6 beam, has a hull of white oak, steel boiler, high and low pressure engine, cabins fore 
and aft, a speed of ten or twelve miles an hour, and is most economical in fuel. She has 
also proved herself to be staunch and sea-worthy, having experienced some extremely 
rough weather on her initial trip. She did excellent service on the Georgian Bay during 
the remainder of the season in inspecting fishing territory and preventing illegal fishing, 
A large number of trap nets were destroyed by her crew. 

Implements of Capture. 

The principal implements of capture authorized in Ontario are the pound net, the 
gill net, the hocp or fjke net, and the seine. The pound net preserves the fish alive, 
and is set at right angles to the shore, from which runs out a leader until water 
suflSciently deep in which to set the pound is found, varying from 25 to 40 feet, according 
to the lenglh of the stakes used. The fish, in passing up and down the shore, encounter- 
ing the leader, are turned in their course and work along the leader until they pass into 
the heart and thence into the pound, from >vhich the net derives its name. Not more 
than three nets in a string are permitted to be set, atd an open or disconnected space 
must be left between each net. They are placed at various distances apart, care being 
exercised to prevent crowding or overfishing. On the American side, where the water is 
very much shallower, as many as 25 or 30 nets are set in a string, and as closely together 
as the fishermen may desire. The fisherman with small capital has, therefore, no chance, 
pocketed between lorg strings of these nets, and is forced out of the business, while on 
this side all are put upon an equal footing. 

The hoop or fyke net, though differently constructed, operates similarly to the pound 
net, the fish being found alive in the bag or purse. It is set in marshy inshore waters, 
and is licensed to take coarse fish only. 

The gill net bangs like a wall in the water, suspended by buoys and floats, and is 
kept taut by sinkers. It may be set in shallow or deep water. The fish are gilled in 
attempting to pass through the mefhes, ard soon die. The occupation of gill net fishing 
on the great lek* s is attended with many dangers and hardships. The fishermen must 
be on the water in all kinds of weather, the best lifts being, it is said, sometimes made 
when the lakes are the roughest. 

The seine or sweep net is probably the oldest device for taking fish, and is a most 
effective one. To it, however, is attributed the depletion of many waters once teeming 
with fish, and its use, therefore, has been for seme years discouraged. It varies in length 
according to the distance to be swept, one end being attached to the shore. All fish, 
irnspective of size, within the circle described in its operation are taken. 



36 THE REPORT ON [No. 27 



Observance op the Law, 

It has been very gratifying to receive assurances that there has this season been a very 
general disposition on the part of licensed fishermen to comply with the law, notwith- 
standing that the impending changes and transfer of authority from the Federal to the 
Provincial Government probably led to some relaxation of vigilance on the part of 
Dominion oflScials during the last year of Dominion administration. It must be borne in 
mind that nearly all of the overseers were new appointees, and unfamiliar with their 
duties ; that the force is in an initiatory stage, and that much confusion was created 
among the fishermen by the transfer. In some parts advantage was, no doubt, taken of 
these conditions to refrain from making application for license and to evade the payment 
of the re,quired license fee j but that few escaped or were desirous of escaping this obliga- 
tion is evident from a comparison of the operations of this year with those of other years. 
Many alleged violations of the license law were, upon investigation, found to be merely 
irregularities arising out of the conditions aforesaid. In a few instances parsons were 
found taking fish illegally, but for the sole purpose of sustaining their families ; and in 
auch cases a reprimand was thought to be sufficient, as arrest would only have entailed 
additional suffering and hardship. A number of anonymous reports of illegal fishing 
were received, and, though these were investigated as promptly as any, the investigation 
proved the inadvisability of acting always upon information transmitted in that way. 

The Commercial Fisheries. 

" As a national possession they are inestimable, and as a field for industry and en- 
terprise they are inexhaustible." They are perhaps unsurpassed in any country on the 
globe, not only in extent, but for their great economic value. Practically no attention 
has asyei been directed to our great north west and northern waters, which teem with the 
finer qualities of fish. These fisheries are destined in the near future to afford a liveli- 
hood for thousands of our population, and become an important and continuous source of 
food supply and revenue. In the older portions of the province, under a judicious 
licensing system, a vigorous policy of supervision, and the requirement of a strict com- 
pliance with the laws and regulations enacted for the protection of the fisheries, there 
may soon be expected to be a large increase in the supply of fish and a perceptible im- 
provement in the fishing industry, a matter which concerns not the present generation 
only but which is of vital importance to succeeding generations also. Any other course 
will result in their complete extinction. 'Propagation may plant and generous nature 
may water, but a reasonable protection must be added to give permanent increase " The 
fishermen for a consideration, are granted the privilege of netting in the public waters, but 
this privilege must not be abused, nor the public's interests in the fisheries prejudiced 
thereby. The history of commercial fishing in the great lakes of this province, until 
within very recent years, has been one of wholesale destruction. Not many years ago 
Lake Ontario teemed with whitefish and there are well authenticated instances of as 
many as forty, fifty, and even ninety thousand having been taken in one night at Bur- 
lington Beach. No thought was then had of saving the immature and unmarketable por- 
tion of the catch, aud no thought was had of the morrow, but they were thrown upon the 
beach to die, rot and be carted away as manure, and as a result of this improvidence 
there are now but few whitefish in that lake ; aad, as in Lake Ontario, so in most of the 
large bodies of fresh water where fishing has been engaged in to excess. The urgent 
necessity of some decisive action to prevent the continued destruction of the immature 
fish led to the introduction into our licenses, and subsequently into the Fisheries Act, of 
the clause prohibiting the taking of any trout or whitefish under two pounds in weight^ — 
in other words, the taking of these fish before they have arrived at the age of reproduc- 
tion. It was suggested that the object desired could be accomplished by requiring the 
mesh of the pot of the pound net to be sufficiently large to permit the escape of all fish 
under that size ; and while this might have been a remedy in some places, in others — 
such, for instance, as in Lake Erie, where a variety of kinds and sizes of fish inhabits the 
lake, and where the bulk of the catch is of herring and a small kind of pickerel— such a 
condition would have resulted in the bankrupting of the fishermen, and was therefore 
impracticable. Could a size have been stipulated, it would have been admittedly prefer- 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. 37 



able, but it was found that a length which would in some waters meet the case, in others 
would represent a fish of a much greater weight ; so that a weight limit was ultimately 
decided upon. It will be satisfactory to know that before the adoption of the condition 
the views of as many fishermen and purchasers offish as possible were ascertained by per- 
sonal visits to difff rent points in the Province and otherwise, and that no objection was 
made to it, but the contrary, many remarking that if the condition were observed it would 
do more to replenish and secure the perpetuation of the trout and whitefish than any other 
means that could be adopted, not excepting the strict observance of the close season. To 
the credit of the fishermen it may be said that the restriction has been uniformly well 
observed during the past season. The significance of this condition will be apparent to 
every one when he recognizes that a whitefish or trout does not spawn before she has 
attained a weight of two pounds, and that the taking of a fish below that weight means 
that there has been eliminated from the supply not only a fish that has not contributed 
her quota to the perpetuation of her species, but that one has been placed upon the 
market of practically no commercial value. The fishermen cannot be so shortsighted as 
not to see that in taking the immature fish they are destroying the " goose that lays the 
golden egg." 

The Protection op Our Game Fish. 

Our inland lakes and rivers afford the highest class of sport for the disciple of Isaac 
Walton. In them may be found the gamey black bass, speckled trout, and maskinonge. 
The world affords no better speckled trout fishing than can be obtained in the great Nipigon 
and tributary streams, specimens having bef n hooked of nine pounds in weight. Year 
after year increased numbers of tourists visit our country from near and far to participate 
in our fishing. Except in the famous Nipigon, no fee is charged for an angler's permit 
where the person is temporarily domiciled at one of our hotels or boarding-houses and 
engages our boats and boatmen. In the Nipigon district the fee for a permit good for 
two weeks has been ten dollars to non-residents of Canada, and five dollars to Canadians. 

It is the bounden duty of the Department to jealously guard the waters of these 
inland lakes and rivers to prevent their depletion and to make them a fruitful and per- 
petual source of pleasure and profit ; and it is to be hoped that our people will become 
every year 'more and more alive to the importance of their preservation, and begin to 
recognize them as one of the most valuable of their heritages. To this end, therefore, 
our machinery should be perfected in every possible way. Information has been received 
from all over the Province during the past year indicating a diminution of these fish in 
almost every locality. This is chiefly attributed to three causes : (1) overfishing on the 
part of tourists, (2) depredations of poachers and pot-hunters, (3) illegal netting. If our 
game fish are not to be entirely exterminated, more potent means of protection 
and preservation must be adopted than are afforded by existing regulations, or than can be 
accomplished by our overseers, in view of the large area of territory each has to supervise. 
Probably nr> remedy so effective could be suggested for theii preservation as to prohibit 
their sale ; and prudence and the best interests of the community at large point to the 
adoption of this measure as the proper one. The importance of this is emphasized when 
it is borne in mind that residents in localities where good angling is to be had derive 
therefrom not only an important and wholesome addition to their food supply, but that 
they are directly pecuniarily benefited by the considerable sums of money which are 
necessarily expended for board, supplies, guides, boats, boatmen, etc., by the tourists 
visiting these localities. The prohibition of the sale of the ruffed grouse or partridge was 
most acceptable to the people generally, and its benefits were immediately perceptible in 
the increase of this bird in all parts of the Province. 

The undersigned would, therefore, respectfully recommend that the sale and export 
of all game fish — speckled trout, small and largp-mouthed bass ani maskinonge — be 
prohibited for a period of not less than three years. 

Stocking op Depleted Waters. 

In some places where by improvident fishing or from other cause the waters have 
been depleted, assistance has been given those interested in re-stocking these waters with 
parent fish. In this way a sure result is obtained ; and while it is generally admittecB 



38 THE REPORT ON [No, 27 

that depleted waters should be re-stoiked with such fish as were indigenous to them, 
and while a greater amount of success may be assured in that way than in attempts to 
introduce other varieties, it has been found that the bass transplanted into Fairy Lake, 
Muskoka, where bass were not indigenous, are increasing rapidly and accustoming them- 
selves to their new surroundings. And so it is believed that the land-locked salmon, 
that "king of game fishes," maybe euccessfully transplanted into some of our waters. 
It is said that it will stand a much higher temperature of water than ordinary brook 
trout, and that its eggs and fry are quite hardy. It is one of the gamiest fish that 
swims, having been known to rise out ot the water as many as twelve times after being 
hooked. Its introduction into our lakes, where these are suitable, is most desirable, and 
should receive every encouragement. 

Leasing of Lakes. 

There are hundreds of lakes of surpassing beauty and picturesqueness in the unsettled 
portions of the Province still belonging to the Crown, the land in the immediate vicinity 
of which is suited neither for agricultural purposes nor other settlement. Many of these 
lakes are outside the great tourist belt, and it is respectfully suggested that they might 
therefore be utilized as a source of revenue to the Province. The policy in Qaebec and 
New Brunswick respecting similar lakes is to lease, with certain public reservations, the 
fishing rights therein to individuals and clubs. Not only has this been found to be an 
important source of revenue to these Provinces, but it has attracted to them a class of 
persons who spend money freely and who give employment to hundreds of guides and 
Tjoatmen, and the erection and care of cottages and club houses, and in many cases 
hatcheries, have furnished employment to many others. While it is most desirable that 
there shall be reserved for the public, lakes to which pleasure seekers may at all times 
resort, and in which free fishing may be enjoyed, it is believed that there are a large 
number of lakes in the sparsely settled portions of the Province which might be leased 
without in any way interfering with the public's privileges, and to the very great advan- 
tage, not only of the Province, but of the settlers in these newer districts. A few of the 
benefits might be instanced : a ready market at good prices would be opened ■ up for the 
settlers' produce ; profitable employment would be obtainable by them as guides, boat- 
men, caretakers, etc. ; a demand would be created for building material ; and artisans 
would find work. Further, it is believed that such a policy would be the means of 
introducing emigration into portions of our Province that would otherwise retain their 
primitive condition for many years, and that a better agency for advertising our great 
resources — comparatively speaking without expense — could scarcely be inaugurated. 

Legislation. 

It is most essential that our Fishery Laws should be well defined, and made as 
stringent as possible without being obnoxious. To that end it is important that the law 
should be further amended, revised and consolidated and published in convenient form 
for distribution for the guidance and information of our overseers, magistrates and the 
public generally. The Provincial administration finds that the Dominion regulations in 
some respects are not calculated to secure the best preservation of our fishery property, 
and may be driven to secure the preservation deemed necessary by limiting the period of 
the rights and manner of fishing granted in various ways. This recourse will probably 
become unnecessary, if the Provincial Government can induce the Honourable the Minis- 
ter of Marine and Fisheries to revise and consolidate the Dominion regulations which 
have been promulgated at various times and under circumstances differing trom those 
which now exist, and is afl[orded an opportunity of proposing for incorporation in such 
revision suggestions which this Government may favor. The absolute necessity for the 
preparation of such a code for the information of Provincial authorities was expressed 
in the report of the Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries for the year 1898, but, 
so far as this Department is aware, no compilation has yet been prepared. 

It is most important, too, that an assimilation of the fishery laws and regulations 
of the United States and Canada should, if possible, be obtained. 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. 39 



Close Season for Salmon Trout and Whitefish. 

Representations from many parts of the Province have been received that the 
present close season for salmon trout and whitefish is entirely inapplicable, and that 
consequently little, if any, protection is afforded to the gravid fish ready to spawn. 
Especially is this the case in Lake Superior, where, it is said, the trout and whitefish are 
all through spawning by the end of October. These representations have from time to 
time been communicated to the Federal Government, to which belongs the exclusive right 
of regulating the close seasons. 

Public Sentiment, 

It is to be regretted that much apathy has been manifested in respect of the observance 
of the fishery laws by those who derive so much benefit from the preservation of the 
fisheries. In some cases even our magistrates have refused to convict on evidence 
which appeared to the department most conclusive. It is desirable to encourage the 
formation of clubs and protective associations, and enlist the co-operation of the press 
to aid the government in the great work of protection by creating and fostering a 
proper sentiment in the community. The simple fact that such an organization existed 
in each fishing locality would be a potent influence for good. 

Frogs. 

The increasing demand in the American market for this " delicacy " has been 
engaging the attention of a considerable number of our people in localities where the frog 
abounds with a view to establishing froggeries for the cultivation and propagation of 
frogs for market. Applications for leases have been received, and the Department has 
been considering what steps may be necessary in order to give encouragement to an 
industry which will no doubt be one of considerable profit to those engaging in it, and 
likewise an additional source of revenue to the Province. 

Carp and Suckers. 

These fish are so destructive of the spawn of the more valuable fish that it is res- 
pectfully suggested a dispensation should be granted to fishermen to take them by 
any legitimate means, under, of course, the supervision of the Department. It is gener- 
ally conceded that the promiscuous introduction of carp on this continent has been 
attended with nothing but evil results. It multiplies like vermin, as it reproduces at a 
very early age and is believed to spawn at different periods of the year. It is so tenacious 
of life that it will survive under almost incredibly unfavorable conditions — it has been 
known to exist a whole summer in field ponds, in water which has overflowed the banks 
of streams and not more than six inches in depth, and almost boiling hot from the torrid 
heat of the sun ; on the other hand, instances are recorded of its having been frozen solid 
and come to life again on being thawed out. It is not only a predaceous feeder upon *he 
spawn of other fishes, but also upon the tender sprouts of plants upon which the wild duck 
feed, such as rice and celery, and it is said that owing to the destruction of these beds in 
the Eau, the duck there are becoming less plentiful year by year. Its habits are akin to 
those of the hog, in that it is fond of burrowing in muddy bottoms, and its repulsive tastes 
have also been compared to those of that quadruped, in that it will feed on offil and other- 
filth. It is believed to be the only fish which will drive that gamey fish, the black bass- 
from its spawning beds. It was thought that the pure cold waters of our northern lakes 
would be a safeguard against its intrusion there, but a number were taken by the fishert 
men at Southampton and at points further north during the past summer, evidencing that it 
is gradually but surely spreading. There is practically no market for it, and it is fre- 
quently buried by the fishermen as the most convenient means of disposing of it. Numer- 
ous enquiries have been received as to where carp for stocking purposes could be obtained, 
but upon ascertaining the habits and characteristics of the fish, the app'icants immedi- 
ately abandoned their intention of stocking with it. As a food fiah it is very inferior, its 
flc3h being coarse in texture and insipid in flavor. 



40 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



The sucker, while admittedly a superior edible fiah to the carp, is only in demand 
and acceptable as food in the spring when it is running. It, too, is a most voracious 
feeder on the spawn of other fish, chiefly upon that of the trout and whitefish, on whose 
spawning beds fishermen 8 ay it can be found in millions as soon as the trout and white^ 
fish have left. A correspondent estimates that over one thousand millions of fish eggs 
are consumed annually in Lake Superior by this " more than worthless fish " — a modes 
estimate. Many remedies have been suggested for its extermination, one being to 
dam the mouths of streams up which it goes to spawn, prevent its return to deep 
water, and wage a wholesale slaughter upon it. 

Exportation of Logs. 

The fishermen on the Georgian Bay and Lake Huron had long complained that they 
every year sustained great loss from the towing of logs to American ports, by the bark 
and fibre which were ground from the logs clinging to their nets in such a manner as to 
make them almost useless. They also represented that the same substance settling on the 
feeding and breeding grounds of the fish destroyed those grounds and forced the fish to 
leave their accustomed haunts, and that if the towing continued it would ultimately ruin 
the industry. These large rafts in rough weather would sometimes be anchored on the 
fishing grounds for three or four days, or a week at a time, and the deposit would no 
doubt be considerable. Whether their fears were well founded or not, the Ontario Regu- 
lation requiring the manufacture of saw logs into lumber in the Province has removed the 
grievance, and the action is heartily commended by the fishermen. 

Sawdust and Fishways. 

Many complaints have during the year been made that mill owners were permitting 
sawdust and mill refuse to be dumped into the water, and that fishways had not been 
provided in dams. The attention of the offending parties was immediately directed 
to the law on the subject. If fishways were put in when dams were being erected, 
the work could be done with greater facility and at much less expense. There can 
be nothing more destructive of fish life than the depositing of sawdust in the rivers 
and lakes. It is said to absolutely kill all vegetation, and it is well known that in 
waters where there is no vegetation fish life is noticeably absent. Minute crustacea 
of various kinds feed upon the juices of the plants which are to be found at the 
bottom. These afford food for the smaller fish, and again these furnish food for others 
of larger size. Both subjects appear to come within the jurisdiction of the Dominion, 
Government. 

Official Visits. 

During the year the undersigned paid official visits to the Counties of Essex,. 
Simcoe, Grey, Lincoln and Bruce and the Districts of Muskoka and Parry Sound and 
Nipissing ; and in August attended the International Anglers' Association at Ganan- 
oque upon the joint invitation of the American and Canadian Secretaries. The meeting 
was called for the purpose of further considering the matter of the desirability of estab- 
lishing an International Park on the St. Lawrence River ; the enactment of uniform close 
seasons for bass; and the prohibition of all netting in the river between Snake Light, west 
of Kingston, and the Town of Prescott. The undersigned, in addressing the meeting, 
explained that the fee of the Islands being in the Dominion and not in the Province, the 
establishment of the park was a matter for arrangement between the Federal Govern- 
ment and the United States Government ; that there was divided jurisdiction between 
the Dominion and Province in respect of fishery matters, and that the regulating of close 
seasons was a matter with which the Dominion could alone deal ; the policy of this 
Government with respect to licensing netting near Wolfe Island and east of Snake 
Island ; and that, while gill netting might be objectionable, no objection could be urged 
against the licensing of hoop nets, as it had been demonstrated beyond doubt that, where 
those nets were fished in strict accordance with the conditions of the license, they were a 
benefit rather than a detriment to the game fish, removing from the waters only the 
coarse and spawn-devouring kinds. 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. 41 



There seemed, after considerable argument, to be a consensus of opinion that a close 
season on the St. Lawrence for bass from the 15th of April to the 15th of June, the sea- 
son at present in force on both sides of the river, was the proper one, and that a shorten- 
ing thereof, as had been suggested, to the 9th of June would be to the prejudice of the 
fisheries, while its only advantage would be to the hotel men. 

There will be in the opinion of the undernigned in the near future a means of earn- 
ing a livelihood on the River St. Lawrence which will be more remunerative to our fish- 
ermen than fishing, namely, as guides and boatmen, in case netting is prohibited. There 
are said to be fully four hundred men who obtain employment on the other side of the 
river in this capacity and who earn from 02.50 to ^5 per day. The flood of traffic must, 
it is believed, soon be directed to the Canadian side, as the capacity of American hotels, 
etc., has been more than taxed during the last two years. 

Licenses. 

During the year licenses to fish with 1,644,393 fathoms of gill net, 405 pound nets, 
492 hoop or fyke nets, 68 seines, 87 dip nets, 4 machines and several thousand baited 
hooks were issued. Each licence contains various conditions applicable to the fishing 
for which it is obtained, and the policy of the department is to issue licenses only to 
Biitish subjects. 

Despite the fact that the same policy had for some years been adopted by the Federal 
Government, this department found upon assuming the administration of the Fisheries 
that the fishing industry of the great lakes was practically controlled by American com- 
panies, which have established supply houses, agencies for the purchase of fish, etc., at 
different points on the lakes. This control, which had been acquired through the in- 
ability of the fishermen to discharge liabilities incurred for nets, supplies, etc., furnished 
by the companies, still continues to some extent. The licenses are applied for and issued 
in the names of the fishermen, but there is reason to believe that most of the substantial 
profits pass to the companies, while the fishermen themselves in many cases occupy to 
the companies positions little better than those of day laborers. 

Receipts and Expenditure. 

The net revenue from all sources for the year amounted to $30,940.79. The expen- 
diture for all purposes was $22,041. 

The Season's Catch. 

The fishermen's returns show that the season's operations have in nearly all parts of 
the province been most gratifying. The aggregate catch amounts to 28,755,721 lbs., (an 
increase of 2,189,298 lbs over the catch of 1898), the estimated value of which is 
$1,590,447.07 ; 2,430 men, 109 tugs and 1,033 boats were engaged in the industry, 
representing an estimated capital of $782,504. 

Statistics. 

Appended hereto is a list of the overseers and the districts for which they were ap- 
pointed ; a synopsis of their reports so far as obtained ; and a table showing the number 
and value of tugs, boats, etc., employed in fishing, and of the quantity and value of fish, 
etc., taken. Every eflfort has been made that the returns should be as full and accurate 
as possible, these having been required to be made on oath where it was practicable for 
the fishermen to make declaration. 

The year's operations must under all the circumstances be considered to have been 
very satisfactory. 

Respectfully submitted, 

S. T. Bastedo, 
30th December, 18&9. Deputy Commissioner. 



42 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



SYNOPSES OF THE FISHERY OVEESEERS' REPORTS IN THE PROVINCE 
OF ONTARIO FOR THE YEAR 1899. 

^' District Overseer Judd reports : 

rsW'U'That since his appointment as District Fishery Overseer for Eastern Ontario he has 
endeavored to acquaint himself with the territory over which he has supervision, its con- 
ditions, its necessities, the administration of the laws and the revenue which may pro- 
perly be derived therefrom. 

Extent of Territory. 

This territory, which embraces that part of Ontario lying east of a certain line run- 
ning north through Addington and Renfrew, with the exception of the St. Lawrence 
River, consists of a net- work of lakes which may be classified into four branches, viz.: 

Those which form the head- waters of the Tay River, consisting of some thirteen lakes 
situate in the counties of Addington and Frontenac ; 

Those which form the head-waters of the Fall River, and which consist of ten lying 
in Addington and Frontenac ; 

Those which form the head- waters of the Mississippi River, consisting of six or 
more situate in Addington and Lanark ; 

Those lying directly upon or tributary to the Rideau waters, of which there are 
over thirty within Frontenac, Leeds and Lanark. 

This territory has been richly endowed with picturesque lakes running from four to 
twenty miles in length, with every facility for pleasure and profit. As a resort for tourists 
it is equal to any in the Dominion. 

Quality op Fish. 

It is inhabited by coarse and game fish, and in many of its lakes salmon-trout, 
pickerel and whitefish are found. It is capable of famishing a large supply of fish to our 
markets and, as a source of revenue, may be productive to a much greater extent. 

Most of these waters are in touch with railway and navigation to the St. Lawrence, 
and hence afford easy transportation. 

Depletion. 

It is a fact, however, that these lakes are greatly depleted of fish, possibly in con- 
sequence of such easy transportation to the markets. 

Opinion as to Fishery Laws. 

Hitherto there seemed to be a prevailing opinion that the fishery laws and regula- 
tions were for the rich and not for the poor. They were attributed to class legislation, 
assuming that protection was for the sportsmen and to deprive the poor man of his fish. 
Happily this idea is beginning to fade away, and it is being more and more understood 
that it is in the interests of all that our fishery laws should be strictly enforced. 

Co-operation. 

Happily, also, the officers are meeting with better co-operation and moral support on 
the part of the citizens in their endeavor to do their duty. 

The question of a cheap and nourishing food supply from our lakes is now considered 
of so much importance as to cause the displeasure of the people when the executive fail 
to do their duty in protecting the same. 

The fact is being better understood that if there were no fishery laws and no protec- 
tion against netters, fish would soon become the dearest article in our markets. 

The angler can disport himself unmolested beyond civilization, because he has the 
means so to do, but the people not so fortunate in circumstances and not having the means 
for luxury, do not wish to be deprived of that food which nature provides so abundantly 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. ' 43 



hence no class of people should be more interested in the protection of our waters than 
the working classes. 

The poacher and the netter have neither conscience, pity nor consideration for the 
poor man. They care not if the waters be stripped of food which supplies the many, if 
in 80 doing they benefit themselves. To let them alone with their merciless nets means 
•to rob the people of their inheritence. 

Object of Protection. 

Fish hatcheries, fish protectors and fish commissioners are not made and paid for the 
aake of selfish netters or of sporting anglers (however much an acqaisition they may be 
financially to the residents of the shores of the neighborhood of their operations), but to 
keep up and replenish and protect the food supply for the millions. 

Protection to Licensee. 

Anere is, nowever, anoiner phase to be considered. It is that of the honest fisher- 
man, who, amid storms and perils, desires an honest livelihood and seeks the protection of 
the Government in bis daily toil. 

Revenue. 

There is still another important question to be considered, that is. the revenue from 
<oar fisheries. 

Tn the reports from local overseers over that part of the territory not including the 
Bideau waters, there appear to have been issued so far for this year but 17 licenses for 
lioop nets, while during the last six months 260 yds. of gill nets and one hoop net have 
been seized. 

Upon the Eideau waters there have been 16 licenses issued, with 500 yds. of gill nets 
seized. 

Thus it will be seen that in this vast volume of water, embracing a territory of pro- 
bably 100 by 120 miles and numbering upwards of 100 lakes, the revenue derived there- 
from is not one-third of what it ought to be. 

Vigorous Policy Required. 

We must have a government and we must have a revenue, so as to protect our great 
lakes and streams will necessarily entail a large expenditure. To make the supply of fish 
abundant and cheap and fishing a means of livelihood for hundreds of honest men, in 
other words, to spread a shield over the rights of all, is one of the chit f functions of civil 
government, and now that the certainty of rights as between our federal and local govern- 
ments has become known, a vigorous policy in the protection of our fisheries in our inland 
lakes is earnestly looked for, 

The Rideau Waters. 

These waters, now under the supervision of three local overseers, and lying between 
Kingston and Ottawa, contain a series of over thirty lakes, each ranging from three to 
twenty miles in length and from two to five miles in width, and having a direct distance 
on steamboat navigation of 126 miles and of several hundred miles of coast line. They 
are far-famed for their beautiful lakes and islands, in which respect they are the rival of 
the St. Lawrence, and are a popular resort for tourists They may be made a source of 
wealth to the country through which they pass, as well as revenue to the Province. 

Illegal Fishing. 

Probably there is no chain of lakes in the Province which has suffered from all 
«.orms and devices of illegal fishing and whose waters have been so ruthlessly depleted of 
£sh as the Rideau. Five hundred yards of nets have been seized, 27 convictions for 



44 . THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



illegal fishing, mostly that of netting, and all within a radius of fifteen miles, have beeii 
recorded within the last four months, and informations are still pouring in. 

The custom for fishermen to take a license for a certain number of nets, and m 
reality use a much greater, is believed to exist, yet this offence is small when compared 
with those who fish with nets and without a license. The waters are so large and the 
distances so great that the present staff of officers, with the unsuitable facilities at their 
command for covering these distances, are unable to detect and control this illegal net 
fishing. 

EoD Fishing. 

What is true in the ease of net fishing is also true of rod fishing. 

In Cranberry Lake, which is about four miles long by two miles wide, there were 
thirteen fishermen nearly the entire summer fishing for the market. And in nearly all; 
the lakes adjacent to lines of transportation, where shipments to markets could be made 
every day, and especially where the best bass fishing was found, the number of fishermen 
was correspondingly large. 

The overseer who kept watch of the lines of transportation was powerless, because 
the fishermen would be fortified in having a rod to every dozen allowed by law. He has' 
personally made several invpstigations upon complaints of excessive catch, and invariably" 
found the number of rods overbalanced the legal quantity allowed. 

Recommends Licensing Rod Fishing. 

He wishes particularly to call attention to this important fact, which is a great and 
growing evil, destructive to our best fish and resorted to by a class of men who are 
thriftless and worthless, and which can only be overcome by enforcing a license upon rod' 
fishing for market. Legislation in this respect will also greatly facilitate the overseers, 
who can then have some check over licensed or unlicensed vendors. 

He is pleased to observe that the restrictions by " law " and " orders- in-council " in 
reference to the catch in close season, and especially through the ice, is, and will be^ 
approved of by the people, and will be of incalculable benefit to our waters. This is 
already perceptible in the absence of shipments on the lines of stages hitherto resorted to. 

Overseers. 

In reference to overseers and their duties, he submits that the system of their 
appointment over a large territory for a small salary carries with it two charac- 
teristics, viz.: 

1st. They figure about the time they spend for the amount they get. 

2nd. After they serve what they think is sufficient for their remuneration, then 
wait until informations come to them, and simply put in motion legal machinery. 

The first stage is a little activity ; the second a passive consent to act as a conduit 
pipe if gome other person works up a case for them. 

He has found in several instances where he has called to duty an overseer, he 
invariably claims that he has already spent considerable time, and that it is impossible 
for him to neglect the work he may be at, but if any person will send in informations he 
will be pleased to prosecute. 

What People Expect of Overseers. 

That the people living even in the vicinity of fishing operations do not and can 
know of but little of the violations, and they therefore expect the officers, not only ta 
ascertain for themselves what violations are being perpetrated, but that a vigilant search 
for nets shall be made regularly and that action shall be taken without delay, in order 
that such protection may be had before the waters are depleted of fish. 

Remuneration. 
You will please observe that there is no remuneration for the overseers beyond their 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. 45 



flmall salary, except by way of a fine which latter remuneration, as a special inducement 
for his vigilance, is probably the best that can be devised ; while, on the other hand, the 
detection of a class of men crafty and watchful in their calling, who operate in the night, 
is of rare occurrence, and hence the remuneration to overseers by way of fines is very 
small. That he may not be misunderstood, he wishes to repeat that he thinks the salaries 
to local overseers are ample, if too much territory be not given them. 

Steam Patrol Necessary. 

He therefore begs to submit that the only way to successfully confront the diffi- 
culties br-fore us, in this large and long water stretch of the Rideau, is for the officers to 
spend their entire time in patrolling said waters between Kingston and Ottawa, and in so 
doing suggests that two men b3 appointed by the year for that purpose, and that by 
reason of the number of lakes, with their many miles of coast line, and to facilitate their 
speedy transport from lake to lake, that a small steam launch of light draught be supplied. 

Proper Equipment Necessary. 

A suitable boa^ as suggested can be had for $1,000 or $1,200, and perhaps less, 
but knowing the winds and waves, and what will be reqaired, he would certainly 
saggest a boat not less than 45 or 50 feet in length and 10 feet beam. Two men will 
be all that will be required. The overseers already appointed can be used in their 
immediate locality, or called upon if required upon the line. 

This equipment will not be expensive, but will, in his opinion, repay the expen- 
diture by the increased revenue which will go to the Province. Two men thus 
equipped, with their entire time devoted, can do more in protecting this particular 
chain of lakes than ten men under the present system, while in the winter season their 
services will be of great value in checking the transportation of bass. 

He observes that he is every day meeting with a marked change in public sentiment. 
Indifference and antagonism are giving way to approval. Efforts to form anglers asso- 
ciations are being made with the view of creating a stronger sentiment and interest. 
Many fisherman are themselves in harmony with the enforcement of the laws. Undoubt- 
edly a vigorous efiort on the part of the Overseers will beget co-operation, the revenue 
will be increased, and our waters restored to their former status. 

District Overseer McOargar reports : 

That the yield of fish in the Bay of Quinte and the small lakes and rivers in this 
district has been larger this season than for some time past, especially in bass and mask- 
nionge fishing. With a plentiful supply of fry furnished in the future as in the past there 
will be a good yield of these fish for many years to come. 

At Ox-point on the north shore of the Bay of Qainte, Mr. Thomas McDonald has 
a small hatchery which now supplies the adjacent waters with a large quantity of bass 
fjy, and with a small expenditure it could be so improved as to supply this whole district 
with bass fry, and he would respectfully recommend that a small grant be made for this 
purpose in the near future. 

The mill owners in this district have faithfully observed the law respecting sawdust 
and refuse getting into the streams. 

It has been very difficult to get anything like correct returns from many of the 
licensed fishermen this year, but he looks forward to a great improvement in this respect 
in the near future. 

On the whole the law respecting fishing in this district has been well observed. In 
the early part of the season a few had to be cautioned and after that no complaints were 
received which proved to be well founded. 

During the past year the regulation regarding numbering the nets, etc., has not been 
well observed in some parts of this district, but steps will be taken during the coming 
season to see that the license in this respect is strictly complied with. 

District Overseer Thwaite repDrts : 

That he is glad to be able to state that during his several tours of inspection through- 
ont his district during the past year, very few instances of illegal fishing came to his 
knowledge ; the overseers appear to be alive to their responsibilities, and that they have 



46 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



been, on the whole, fairly active in the discharsie of their daties, and that there appears 
to be no diminution in the quantity of fish in the various lakes ; and he further reports 
that in the opinion of the overseers in his division the sale of bass should be prohibited, 
and that the close season for trout should be extended to the 10th of Octobe" ; and that 
the close season for maskinong^ should be the same as for bass, from 15th of April to^ 
15th of June. 

District Overseer Pratt reports : 

That the season has been a profitable one both to the fishermen and the dealers ;. 
that a smaller number than in former years have been engaged in fishing ; that prices 
have ruled higher, and that with the exception of a few particular localities in Georgian 
Bay, fish are decidedly on the increase. He is of the opinion that the causes of the 
non-increase of fish in some localities are : (1) That in former years, saw dust had been 
allowed to enter several streams and thereby became deposited over a considerable area 
at river mouths ; (2; that the towing of large rafts of logs is detrimental to both fish, 
life and fishing operations ; and (3) a fermentation process takes place when fresh bark 
is deposited in the water, which causes the fish to avoid such places. 

The fishermen, he says, complain that tugmen are not careful to avoid unnecessary 
damage to nets, but frequently tow their rafts over net buoys, often getting foul of th 
buoy line, dragging and tearing valuable property. He is of the opinion that the preser 
vation line, inside of which net fishing is not allowed, is too far from shore from off 
Moose Point north, and that there does not appear to be any good reason for shutting oflS 
so many acres of water. 

Speaking of the Gilphie he says : " The purchase of the Gilphie was a moat excellent 
one, the boat being an ideal one in every respect for the purpose intended, and her pres- 
ence in these waters had a beneficial efiect." 

Lake op the Woods Division. 

Overseer M. Kyle reports : 

That the catch of whitefish and pickerel in the division aggregates the same as last 
year ; that trout shows an increase of over 150 per cent.; that tullibee is six times greater j 
but that bullheads do not appear at all in this year's returns, as, owing to the extraordi- 
narily open winter, no fishing could be done on the ice during December. 

He calls attention to the fact of the great difierence to be noticed in sturgeon, which 
shows a decrease of more than fifty per cent, and states that fishermen claim this to he 
largely due to the east winds which prevailed during the greater part of the early summer 
fishing, and that consequently they had only about one half of the season. He believes this 
theory to be strengthened by the fact that the American fishermen, situated on the west 
side of the lake, report an abnormally heavy catch, in fact the heaviest in years, and that 
this was attributed to the same cause, namely, the easterly winds. 

As formerly, the great bulk of the catch was exported to the American markets by 
the C. P. R., via Port Arthur, those caught on the American side being shipped in bond. 
He says the close seasons were well observed, and that attention was called to these 
by posting up notices in the different fishing centres ; that no violation of the fishery reg - 
olations came under his notice, and that the mill-owners took precautions to prevent saw 
dust getting into the water. 

He reports only one fishway in his district, namely, that belonging to the Keewatin 
Power Co., in their dam on the Winnipeg River ; that it is in good order, having been 
examined by him several times during the season, and especially just before the close sea 
son ; that, on the whole, the season of 1899 may be classed as a fairly satif factory one ; 
that prices, all round, were better than in former years ; that a better market has been 
found for trout, as well as some of the coarser varieties, while in former years whitefish 
and pickerel were practically the only marketable fish, which resulted often, to his know- 
ledge, in large quantities of pike etc. being thrown away as valueless, or else spoiling on 
the fishermen's hands for want of a market. 

Lake Superior. 
Overseer McComber reports : 

That the fishing in his district was better last year in some parts and about the 
same in other places as the year before. 



1899] GAME A^D FISHERIES. 47 



About one third of the fish caught last year was shipped to the United States and 
the balance through Canada. 

No abuses came to his knowledge from the time he took charge till the end of the 
year. He heard of one casa of fishing during the close season. The parties were warned 
that if he heard any more complaints he would have no mercy on them, and they would 
have to suffer the consequences. This was the last and only time he heard of any illegal 
fishing. There are no sawmills in his division and no fishways. 

Overseer Van Morman reports : 

That the catch of all kinds of fish will be about the same as that of last year ; that all 
kinds of fish are reported plentiful ; about 95 per cent, of the fish taken from this divis- 
ion were exported to the United States ; that the balance was used for home consump- 
tion ; that the close seasons have been well observed ; that no mill refuse has entered the 
the water ; and that no illegal fishing or violation of the fishery laws has come to his 
knowledge. 

Georgian Bay. 

Overseer Labatt reports : 

That there was a decrease in the catch of the different kinds of fish as compared with 
last year, owing to the prohibition that no fish should be caught east of a line drawn from 
Sturgeon Point to French River ; that he is not aware of any abuses existing, and that as 
far as could be ascertained the close season for whitefish and trout was strictly observed. 
He further reports that illegal fishing was carried on to some extent, and that he cap- 
tured two trap nets and one hoop net ; that the former, being illegal, were destroyed, and 
the latter stored ; that the act respecting the protection of the navigable waters was well 
observed by the mill owners, and that no injury was done to the fisheries of this division 
thereby. 

Overseer Payette reports : 

That the close season for trout and whitefish was strictly observed, that he seized 
two trap nets and one hoop net, which were being fished without license, and that the 
former nets, being illegal, were destroyed. He farther reports a decrease in the catch of 
fish in this division owing to the action of this department in curtailing the area for net 
fishing. 

Lake Huron. 

Overseer McAulay reports : 

That the trout are plentiful but owing to the calm weather prevailing the fish fre- 
quented the shallow waters which with the lateness of the season helped to mitigate 
against the fishermen, the catch in consequence being light. 

He also states that although the herring fishing is not prosecuted in his division, 
there were millions of young herring along the shore and in the bays and rivers during 
the fall. ^ ^ 

The fishery laws were well observed by the fishermen in his district. '^ •* 

Overseer Neil Stewart reports : '.'"": 

That about two thirds of the fish caught in his division are exported and the balance 
sold in Canada for home consumption ; that the close seasons were well observed, as was 
also the law respecting the pollution of rivers, all sawdust and other mill refuse from 
the mills being carted away. 

Overseer Yates reports : 

That there was a large decrease in the catch of trout. The tugs stopped fishing 
some time before the close of the season on account of the scarcity of fish. They were 
not able to catch enough to pay expenses. 

The percentage of fish exported from this district was large. The fish sold was'only 
for local use. ij^ ' 

No abuses were reported to him. The several close seasons were very well observed. 

There were no fines for illegal fishing, and no complaints against mill owners for 
dumping mill refuse into the waters. 

There are three fishways in his division. Regarding these only one complaint was 
made and that received attention. 

Overseer Steed reports : 

That the catch has on the whole been above the average the past season. Pickerel 



48 THE EEPORT ON [ No. 27 



has been on the increase, but trout and whitefish have fallen off. Local causes may 
account for this, as heavy weather greatly affects the beach. 

Nearly all the fish is exported, only about five per cent, being used for home con- 
sumption. 

The close seasons have been fairly well kept, through personal inspection of the nets. 

A quantity of net being fished illegally was confiscated in May, and the fish given to 
charitable institutions. 

All the mills in his division burn their refuse, and none is dumped into the water. 

There is one fishway in this division, namely, on the river Sydenham at Florence, and 
it was all right when last inspected. 

Thames River. 

Overseer Benson reports : 

That the only fishing carried on in his district is by residents with rod and line, in 
the spring, and that many coarse fish are then taken, that there are numerous ponds 
which could easily be stocked with bass and other game fish, and that no violations of 
the fishery laws were brought to his notice. 

Overseer McRitchie reports : 

That the fishing in that portion of the river Thames between Louisville and Wards- 
-ville was almost a failure, owing to the ice remaining in the river till after the fishing 
season was over, the principal time for fishing being early in the spring, while in the 
other portions of the river below Louisville, the fishing was much better than in the 
previous season. 

Most of the fish, he says, were exported to the United States. 

Overseer McQueen reports : 

That the fishery laws generally were well observed during the season; that the mill own- 
ers were utilizing the sawdust and mill rubbish for fuel, none passing into the river, and 
ihat he has no complaints to make. 

Lake St. Olair. 

Overseer Allen reports : 

That he has no statistics of the catch of fish in his district for the year 1898, but he 
has been informed by the fishermen that the quantity caught in the two years was about 
the same. Nearly all of the fiah caught in his district for commercial purposes during 
the last year was exported to the United States. Scarcely any was sold in Canada as 
far as he can ascertain. 

No abuses exist as far as he knows, and several close seasons were very generally 
observed. 

No illegil fishing came to his personal knowledge, and no prosecutions were insti- 
tuted. It was reported to him that citizens of the United States were angling in Can- 
adian waters without a license, but if this were true he was unable to obtain any 
evidence that would warrant him in taking any legal proceedings. 

There are so few saw-mills in that vicinity that if all the waste from all of the mills 
were put into a very small stream it would probably do no harm to the fish. But as 
a fact he believes that all the sais^-mill waste in his district is burned or disposed of 
otherwise than by putting it ipto the water. 

There are no fishways in his district and there is no necessity for any as there are 
no dams, rapids or other obstructions in any of the streams. The country is low and 
flit, and the streams are all b\ow and sluggish, and with very litble current. 
Overseer Coasineau reports : 

That the past fishing season has been satisfactory in his district, though the fisher- 
men were somewhat late in starting their operations ; that fish have been more plentiful 
than for some years past, notably the sturgeon and coarse fish, which include German 
carp; that the latter fi^h are very plentiful and are increasing yearly: that prices, 
especially for the fall catch, were better than last year ; that if fi3hing for white fish had 
been allowed for the first twenty days of November the catch would have certainly 
raised the value of the total catch by at least $40,000. He further reports that the fish 
sold to Canadian buyers will be less than 10 per cent of the catch, our principal 
market being Buff*lo or New York. 



1899 1 GAME AND FISHERIES. 49 



He is not aware of any abuses ; all the fishermen seeming disposed to obey the 
regulations. As far aa his obser orations go, the close seasons were well observed, and 
mo illegal fishing came to his knowledge, nor were there any complaints laid. 

Lake Erie. 

Overseer William Stewart reports : 

That while his district (Pelee Island) should be one of the best in Lake Erie owing 
to the quantity of fish, there is now very little fishing carried on, on account of the 
disadvantage under which the fishermen are placed as compared with those in other 
districts. 

They complain, he says, that owing to the high wages demanded by the employees, 
the expense of keeping up the pound nets and boats, and the small price paid by the 
dealers for the fiah, it is impossible to pay expenses ; that the scarcity of stakes for the 
pound nets, and the absence of a home market also tend to mitigate against those 
fishermen ; that they now dispose of their fish to United States fish dealers, and that 
not having any other market they are entirely at the mercy of American buyers. 

The fishery laws have been well observed, not a single case of illegal fishing coming 
under his notice. He further reports that the vigilance displayed by Captain Dunn, of the 
Dominion Government steamer " Petrel," has done much to prevent poaching by United 
States fishermen. 

Overseer Lamarsh reports : 

That there has been a gratifying increase in the catch in his district over that of 
1898 of all kinds of fish caught, except sturgeon, which shows a decrease of 3,914 
pounds, but that the value of sturgeon caught was greater than that of last year owing 
to the increase in price ; that there was an increase in the catch of herring of 
65,344 pounds, and of whitefish 11,321 pounds j that pickerel shows a great increase over 
1898, the total catch being 161,262 pounds, an increase of no less than 120,425 pounds ; 
that perch shows an increase of 21,460 pounds, and that the quantity of catfish taken 
was nearly double that of last year. 

The close season was well observed, only a couple of cases of illegal fishing coming 
under his notice. The offenders were duly punished by the infliction of a fine and con- 
fiscation of the nets. 

Nearly all the fish from his division are exported to the United Spates. 

Overseer Laird reports : 

That the fishing began in earnest about the 1st of May ; that it has been the best 
season for a number of years, certainly the best since he has been overseer on the Like 
Erie shore of Kent County ; that the fish were on the shore all season, there being no 
gales to drive them to the other shore. He calls attention to the large increase in the 
number of fish taken this year, especially of herring and whitefish, and states that these 
were of a greater size than in former years. He urges the importance of the Government 
boat " Petrel " being wintered on Lake Erie, representing that being tied up for the 
winter at a northern port she is too far away from her beat ; that it is late in the fall 
and early in the spring that the Americans do the poaching ; and that if the ** Petrel " 
were to winter at some port at the west end of Lake Erie they would not be able to 
carry on poaching to so great an extent, as she could be kept in commission for a much 
longer period. He is of the opinion that some means will have to be adopted to get the 
carp out of Rond Ef»u Bay, as he does not think they can be caught during the winter 
months with hoop nets for which a license has been issued. He thinks it will have to 
be done in warm weather as he is sure they do not run in cold weather, though in the 
summer it is difficult to get any one to undertake this work, as the fish then are entirely 
unmarketable. He thinks some radical steps should be taken to exterminate them, or 
our finer qualities of fish will be all driven out of the bay. 

Overseer Sullivan reports : 

That the fishing season has been most satisfactory ; that there has been an increase 
in the catch of herring, whitefish, pickerel and pike, while there was a decrease in that of 
sturgeon ; that the quantity of fish sold in Canada was about 25 per cent., and of that used 
for home consumption five per cent. 

No abuses of any kind came to his notice, and the close seasons were, he believes, 
well observed. 
4 G.F. 



50 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



Overseer McCall reports : 

That on the whole, the fishing in his district for the year 1899 has been a prosperoas 
one, though there has been a diminished catch of herring and perch, which he attributes 
to natural causes, their place being taken by other species. There has, he says, been a 
gain in whitefish, and in every other kind, more particularly in bass. There was a very 
large catch by anglers in Port Rowan Bay, probably the largest in the last ten years. 
In the Normandale division there has been a great falling off in the quantity of fish 
caught, supposed to be caused by the growth of weeds and moss, which loosen after a 
heavy wind and fill the nets, and which it is impossible to get out until the nets are 
thoroughly dried and brushed out. 

He does not think the amount of fish sold in Canada would exceed five per cent. 
He says that the fact that Long Point reaches from the main land to a point twenty- 
one miles in length and nineteen miles from the shore at the eastern extremity, makes 
it an extremely difficult place to guard against illegal fishing ; that no fines were inflicted 
but a seizure of two senies was made in May last ; that there are no saw mills on 
streams in the district ; that there is one fishway in a dam on Manticoke creek, and 
that only one stream is dammed so that fish cannot ascend it, namely, Patterson's 
creek at Port Dover ; that this dam is built of solid masonry and on the rock bottom, 
so that it would be almost impossible to put in a fishway. He does not think it neces- 
sary in this case, as Black creek empties into Patterson's creek below Jonathan Ellis" 
dam and is a much larger stream and better adapted for fish to ascend for breeding 
purposes. 

Overseer Farrell reports : 

That there was an increase in the catch of fish in his division in 1899. 

There was no fish exported from this district ; 270,000 lbs. were sold in Canada and 
12,000 lbs. used for home consumption. 

No abuses exist in his division. The close season has been strictly observed owing 
to the constant attention of the overseer. 

Two dip nets were seized on the 8th of April, 1899, and the seizure reported to 
the department. He received instructions not to prosecute. 

The mill owners in his division observe the law, and rubbish and sawdust are not 
allowed to get into the waters. Particular attention is paid to this. There are only two 
fish slides in his division ; one, which is at Dunville, is in bad repair. He reported the 
matter to Mr. John Scott, the Dominion Superintendent of Works, who said he was 
waiting an appropriation from the Government in order to do the work. 

The fish slide at Caledonia is in good condition. 

Overseer Garner of Welland reports : 

That all the fish taken in his district are sold to the Buffalo Fish Company ; that 
the German carp are becoming very numerous, and he recommends that some steps be 
taken for their extermination ; that no cases of illegal fishing came to his knowledge, and 
that the close seasons were strictly observed. 

« 
Lake Ontario. 

Overseer Charles Ogg reports : 

That the catch of whitefish has increased both in number and size, and the general 
is that the fisheries are improving, especially the herring. 

The inshore fishery on Burlington Beach was impeded somewhat owing to the pre- 
vailing east winds, but notwithstanding this the catch was so large that the prices of 
the local market were low. 

Being his first year in office he was unable to compare the figures of the season's 
catch with those of previous ones, but from what information he could gather the fisheries 
are improving considerably. 

The figures given in his statistical report are, he believes, under the actual catch, 
as many fishermen state that they kept no account of the fish disposed of to campers and 
cottagers on the beach as they were purchased in small quantities. 

All the fish caught in his district were sold in Hamilton and immediate neighbor- 
hood. 

He has found no abuses existing. The close seasons have been strictly observed. 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. 51 

He has repeatedly visited the fishing grounds without any warning, to see that th& 
laws were observed. 

He has not found any illegal fishing. Eespecting the Dominion Fisheries Act, 
nothing has come under his notice excepting the foul condition and appearance of 
what is known as Coal Oil Inlet in Burlington Bay, but this is of long standing. 

There are no fishways in his district. 

Kespecting coarse fish, that is cat-fish, and also with reference to perch, sun-fish^ 
bass, pike, etc., he has no way of making an accurate estimate as the greater number 
are taken by angling and trolling and by spearing through the ice. He believes that 
he would not be astray in putting the quantity taken in this way during the past 
season at 15 tons. 

Overseer Sargant reports : 

That the herring is increasing in his division and says had the fishermen 
realizeed the same price this year ^as formerly quite an increase would have been 
shown in the value of their catch. The reason they did not get the same price as 
usual is owing to the mildness of the winter, which caused smoked herring to be in less 
demand. 

He notices in the catch a new species which he thinks is a cross between the blue 
backed herring and the ciscoe. They are larger than the herring and are a most palat- 
able food. He reports the ciscoe herring to be fast disappearing, hardly any being now 
caught, and thinks it a matter oi regret that such a fine fiah should disappear from our 
lakes. He has noticed that when ciscoes are plentiful, herring are very scarce. He has 
learned from old fishermen that twenty-five years ago herrings were plentiful and ciscoes 
scarce and that in a few years this order of things was reversed. He believes that when 
one species comes the other goes, so has every reason to believe that in a few years ciscoes 
will be just as plentiful as ever. 

The fishermen, he says, do not fish for trout to any great extent, but some very nice 
species were caught. He reports that no fishways are needed in his division. 

Overseer Walker states : 

That the fisherman did not fish a full season owing to the absence of some them 
during a portion of the year ; that therefore the catch was less than the previous season ; 
that all the fish taken in his district are used for home consumption ; that no cases 
of illegal fishing came under his notice, and that the close seasons were well observed. 

Overseer Wood reports : 

That the season just closed shows a gratifying increase in the catch of herring,, 
but that he is sorry to report a decrease of white fish. This, he thinks is accounted 
for by the prevalent east winds which continued during the whole season. He 
aslo reports a slight decrease in the quantity of trout taken ; that the coarse fish 
remain practically the same, and that there is an increase in the aggregate value of the 
fish taken. 

He is satisfied that the close season has been well observed as no violations came to 
his knowledge ; rumors of breaches of the law could not be verified on investigation. 

Four nets set in prohibited waters were found by grappling for them. The ofienderSj 
he believes, were not licensed fishermen, but simply parties who own a skifi" and a few 
yards of net, and who do not engage in any regular occupation. 

Overseer James Willis states : 

That the catch was about the same as in 1898, with the exception of a slight increase 
in herring. The whole catch, he says, was used for home consumption. " There were 
no cases of illegal fishing and the close seasons were well obeerved." 

Overseer Freeman reports ; 

The catch of fish to have been a little above the average, with the exception of 
trout and white fish. The decrease in these two kinds of fish, he believes, is due to the 
fishermen not attending properly to their work. " In fact quite a number of them are 
getting old and are not able to carry on the fishing as it should be conducted," 

He thinks that about seventy- five per cent, of the fish caught in Canada are exported 
to the United States. 

The close seasons, he says, have been strictly observed and that he always warns the 
fishermen with regard to this , that no illegal fishing came to his knowledge, and that 



52 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



consequently no fines were imposed ; that no confiscations were made, and that no injury 
was done by the dumping of mill refuse in the water. That there are no fishways in the 
district, and that nearly all the streams are inhabited by speckled trout, the ponds being 
owned by private individuals. He further states that one of the greatest fishing indus 
tries in the waters of Lake Ontario is kipper or bloater fishing. The fish, he says, are 
found in large quantities about fifteen miles from shore and when cured are very delicious 
and sell readily, and believes if the fishermen could be persuaded to take it up it would 
become the greatest fishery industry in our Province. 

He is opposed to seine fishing unless in the lake early in the spring or late in the fall ; 
but he considers the hauling of seiae3 in summer weather very injurious to small fish, as 
during the warm weather the young fish remain along the shore in shallow water and 
by hauling seines over them large numbers of them are destroyed. 

He thinks better results would be obtained in the propagation of fish if more care 
were taken to put them in water of alike temperature to that in which they were hitched ; 
that when young fish are taken out in the lake and dropped into cold water where they can 
get no food not one per cent of them live ; that if put in our bays they could get plenty 
of nourishment and that the greater number of them would come to maturity. 

Overseer Clark, of Prince Edward County, states : 

That he discovered several cases of illegal fishing which resulted in the seizure of 
three hoop nets and about five hundred and fifty yards of gill nets. 

The close seasons were well observed. 

Overseer W. D. Rohlin states : 

That the, catch was slightly in excess of last season of which about 95 per cent, were 
exported. 

No abuses of any kind came under his notice and the close seasons were strictly 
adhered to. 

Several reports of illegal fishing were made, none of which were confirmed on inves- 
tigation . 

MusKOKA, Parry Sound and Nipissing. 

Overseer Wilmott reports : 

That during the earlier portion of the past summer, anglers complained of a scarcity 
of fish, but that the supply improved later on ; and on the whole, the season compared 
favorably with other seasons in regard to the numbers taken though the catches were of 
a smaller line of fish than usual. 

With respect to bass he observes that in almost every case the Muskoka waters are 
connected with rivers and tributaries of the Georgian Bay, which would lead him to believe 
that it was from this source the stock had first come. He is of opinion that fish can sur- 
mount almost any natural obstruction in the shape of rspids, falls, etc., (except sheer falls), 
but that when they come to an artifical dam their ingress is totally stopped ; that it is 
therefore most important that fish ways should be erected in dams where none now exist ; 
that to his knowledge there are many lakes in which, previous to the erection of dams, the 
waters were well stocked with fish, but that since their erection the fishing has fallen off 
to such an extent that fishermen do not consider it worth while to waste their time in en- 
deavoring to procure a catch. 

The laws have been fairly well observed during the year ; though poaching no doubt 
exists to a small extent. He recommends the issuing of one license for netting in each 
lake for whitefish and herring, it being impossible to take these fish by other means ; 
by adopting this means the licensee would be a protector, as he assuredly would never 
countenance any one illegally netting while he alone was paying for the privilege ; the 
licensee should be strictly bound under a heavy penalty not to catch or have in his posses- 
sion any other classes of fish, and his premises should be required to be open to inspection 
at any time. He further reports that mill men are, as a rule, most particular in the dis- 
position of rubbish, and that very little trouble is experienced on this head. 

Overseer Huntington reports : 

That the only netting done in his district this year was done in a small way by the 
Indians, which is permitted by treaty rights with the crown. 

There were no violations of the Fisheries Act in netting, but there were in grappling, 
for which the ofienders were duly fined and returns made to the department. 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. 53 



The lakes in his territory were thoroughly patrolled by him on several occasions. 
The only persons found fishing were tourists and local anglers, using rod and line and all 
keeping witbin the limits of the law. 

All the lakes in the vicinity abound with fish of all kinds, which is a good thing for 
the settlers and Indians. But should licensing be allowed for netting all kinds of fish, 
the waters would soon be depleted of this source of sustenance to the above named parties, 
and would also injure the traffic of the merchants and hotel men who cater to tourists who 
come here to fish in the summer months. 

He would suggest that the use of hoop nets be licensed to catch suckers, pike, sheep- 
heads, ling and other destructive fish. The numbers of pike taken would easily pay for 
the catching and destroying of lings, sheepheads, etc. By eo doing pickerel, bass, white- 
fish and herring would have a much better chance to multiply. 

The smaller inland lakes and streams are well supplied with brook, speckled and grey 
trout. A large number of foreign tourists avail themselves every season of the opportun- 
ity to fish in these waters. So far he has had little trouble with these people as they keep 
well within the limits of the law. 

In some instances several different parties of tourists and anglers have taken catches 
of fish in different places and have amalgamated the catches and had the whole photogra- 
phed with different parties standing behind the fish each time a picture was taken. This 
was done several times. 

He knows this was for the purpose of advertising. These pictures look like a great 
slaughter of fish when only two or three people are standing behind the catch. But when 
the number of groups that have taken part in this fishing, and that have been photo- 
graphed behind the same lot of fish s taken into consideration, it will be readily under- 
stood that there has been no slaughter. 

Lake Simcoe District. 

Overseer Terry reports : 

That the Holland river and its branches are the principal spawning grounds in his 
division of the Maskinonge. " This river, he says is navigable for small boats for about 
twenty miles from its mouth ; flowing as it does through a wide marsh it has many tribu- 
taries, which are, like it, slow and muddy. These find their way to the main stream by 
very circuitous routes and thus greatly increase the total mileage of the stream. In these 
small branch streams the maskinonge are found during the spawning season. It is here 
that it is so difficult to protect them from poachers, for it is quite impossible for a few 
guardians to protect the fish perfectly over such an extended river system. However, the 
large measure of protection given them is already showing its effects in the greater num- 
ber of maskinonge taken by trolling during the past season. These fish range in weight 
from three to eight pounds there being but few large fish caught." He believes the in- 
creased number of young fish to be the result of increased protection and hopes that as 
the trolling improves, more persons will be found anxious to assist in every way in the 
proper protection of their interests. 

He further reports that " great numbers of carp have made their appearance in 
the Holland river and in marshy portions of Cook's bay. These it is believed were first 
introduced into mill ponds on the upper branches of the Holland river and by the break- 
ing of dams found their way to the river where they have increased during the past three 
years with amazing rapidity. What the effect of their presence will be remains to be 
seen, but it is feared they will be found very destructive to the spawn of the maskinonge." 

The salmon trout he believes to be decreasing in numbers. He says that in lake 
Simcoe these fish spawn earlier than they do in the great lakes, that the spawning begins 
there about the first of October and is entirely over by the first of November, when the 
present close season begins. He would strongly recommend that a change be made in the 
law and that October be made the prohibited season. 

The past season has been an average one for bass fishing, some very good catches 
being made. 

Overseer Myers reports : 

That the chief fish in his division are speckled trout. He cannot say that there is 
any decrease in the trout, but the catch was not so good this year. The reason of this 



54 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



lie attributes to the very low water aud the hot weather in Jane and Jaly causing the 
trout to hide more in low water. 

The fish taken were used for home consumptioo. 

No abuses came under his notice. The fisheries are watched very closely here at 
all times. 

The chief close season i<» the trout season, and it is watched very closely. The 
farmers have given a helping hand by forbidding trespassing on their lands or fishing on 
their places 

There was no illegal fishing to his knowledge. 

In years past, he says, sawdust and mill refuse have been dumped into the rivers in 
his district, but none this year. The sawdust is a great injury to the fish, especially 
trout. There are five fish ways in his division, four of which are in good order and one 
in only fair order. Two of these have been repaired by the owners. 

Overseer Olunis states : 

That the fishing in his district was light ; that a'l the fish were caught by means of 
angling and were used for home consumption ; that the close seasons were well observed, 
and that no violations of the fishery laws came to his notice. 

Lake Scuqog. 

Overseer Bowerman reports an increase in the catch of maskinonge, but a decrease 
in the catch of bass, owing perhaps to the large catch through the ice during the winter. 
Seventy five per cent, of the fish taken in these waters is used for home consumption. 

To the head waters of Lake Scugog, known as the Scugog Game Preserve, the fish 
go to spawn and before maturity suffer much and are in fact to a great extent destroyed 
owiug to low water. He would suggest that screens be placed in the three culverts 
early in the spring to prevent the fish from entering the preserve. Nothing has been 
left undone to see that the laws were observed. The most rigid inspection has been 
exercised. 

There has been no illegal fishing. One tine of S3.00 was imposed and the parapher- 
nalia confiscated. The law with regard to the depositing of saw-dust is well observed. 

There are no fishways in this district and none are considered necessary. 

Peterboro County. 

Overseer Yellands reports : 

That he is not in a position to submit any statistics, owing to the fact thit no leases 
or licenses are issued in his division, and that fishing is not followed as a calling by any- 
one, although a quantity of fish are caught by the Indians and sold to agents, who in 
turn sell them to the local dealers. 

From information received from the tish dealers he is of the opinion there was a 
very large catch of fish during the year. Of course the dealers have bought from other 
divisions as well, but he does not suppose the other overseers would use those figures but 
would leave it to him to report for his own district. 

" There are four fish dealers in Peterborough; and it will be seen by the returns that 
they have handled fish caught in this division, to the amount of 18,300 lbs. of bass, 
24,800 lbs. maskinonge, 300 lbs. catfish, 200 lbs. perch, making a total value of $2964. 
This amount is obtained only from the dealers and it will be safe to estimate that tourists 
and private individuals caught one-third of the whole amount, which, if added, would 
make the catch so much greater in proportion. He believes the catch has been larger 
than last years', owing to the fact that extra precautions were taken. Thanks to the 
Department for their protection during the spawning season." 

About 40 per cent, of the fish was used for home consumption, and the remaining 60 
per cent, shipped to other points in Canada, chiefly in Ontario. 

No abuses l isted. The close seasons were extremely well observed. He had only 
two convictions which fines of $5.00 were imposed in each case. He confiscated three 
nets that were t in the water for the purpose of catching fish, and these nets he destroyed 
at once. He has no complaint to make against the mill owners with regard to saw-dust, 
as he beli ves they have done their best to prevent any refuse getting into the water. 



1899 ] GAME AND FISHERIES. 55 



There are a number of fishways in the dams in the rivers but he thinks it would be 
advisable to put in more as there are some dams which are deficient in this respect. 

Overseer Moore reports : 

That the several close seasons have been well observed ; that there was some attempt 
to fifih with nets, which he stopped by seizing the nets, but that he was unable to catch 
the owners. That the large number of tourists and others visiting the lakes in his dis- 
trict had good success catching bass and masknionge. 

He would suggest that fishways be put in the dams on the Otonabee River, and at 
Young's Point, and that Stoney Lake and Clear Lake should be stocked with bass and 
masknionge fry so as to keep up the supply. 

He visited the lakes in his district several times each month between April and 
December. During the summer some dynamite was used to kill fish, but he was unable 
to oatch the parties. 

The report of Overseer Mclntyre shows that the fishing in his division was good, 
much better than in 1898 ; that the only fishing carried on was by angling and trolling, 
and that there were no infractions of the fishery laws brought to his notice. 

Overseer Oock reports : 

That in 1898 the returns of fish caught from the Trent waters were 88,794 lbs. 
of coarse fish, valued at $2,823 05. In 1899 there were 121,807 lbs. of coarse fish, 
valued at $4,177.07. The difference in lbs. was 33,013, and difference in value, $1,354.02 ; 
so therefore there was a slight increase, and in his opinion it was caused by the fisher- 
men knowing better how to set their nets. 

There seems no end to coarse fish if the close seasons are properly observed and 
they are given a chance to breed. 

More than nine-tenths of these fish are shipped and sold in theUnited States. 

He has no recommendations to make. The close seasons were observed fairly well, 
especially by licensed fishermen. Several persons were convicted of illegal fishing and 
the nets confiscated. 

There are saw mills all along the waters, but mill owners are very careful and he has 
no complaints of dumping refuse. 

There are four mill dams and one natural falls on which there are no fishways. He 
finds for the want of these fishways, the fish are graded, and he would recommend that 
some steps be taken to provide fishways. 

Frontbnac, Leeds, Oarleton, Prescott and Renfrew Division. 

Overseer Clyde reports : 

That as nearly as he can ascertain after careful enquiry about one third 
of the catch in his division is consumed in Canada and the balance shipped to 
the American markets ; that the close seasons have been strictly observed, that two cases 
of illegal fishing came to his notice during the year, that he brought the offenders before 
a Justice of the Peace and they were fined; that there are no saw-mills in his division 
that affect the streams ; that he would suggest some action to induce or compel the des- 
truction of all dog-fish caught by fishermen as they are very destructive to the spawn of 
other fish, and that they are very numerous in the Rideau River. 

Overseer Craig reports : 

That the catch this year is a great deal larger than that of the previous year, al- 
though the waters in some of the fishing districts were very low ; that there does not 
seem to be any scarcity of fish, and that the fishermen have done very well, but in some 
of the lakes suckers and ling are proving injurious to the game fish by eating their 
spawn, and he would recommend that permits be granted, to those who will strictly 
obey the law, to catch suckers with gill nets in the spring when they are running. 

Herring are very plentiful in the back lakes. 

The close season for salmon trout in his district he believes to be as nearly correct, 
comparing one season with another, as it could possibly be made. 

Foreign anglers made some very good catches of bass last season. 

Overseer Goulette reports : 

That on the St Lawrence River black biss are plentiful but below the usual size and 
that pike have been plentiful in the deep channels and of the usual size, but in the marsh 



56 THE REPORT ON [ No. 27 



lands and shallow waters they are a good deal smaller than usual, owing no doabt to 
illegal fishing with gill-nets. Dore has been very scarce here for the last few years. 
Maskinonge are few and small in size. Snnfish and perch are very plentiful and larger 
than usual: 

The close season has been strictly observed. 

During the season he seized between four and five hundred pounds of pike illegally 
taken with nets which he gave away on the market square to poor people and others. 
Overseer Donaldson reports : 

That in making a tour of inspection of the lakes in his division in the latter part of 
October he seized one gill net about sixty feet long, and one night line, on Gull Lake in 
the township of Palmerston. 

The fishery laws were however fairly well observed in his division. He is of 
opinion that the fisheries are improving owing to the vigilance of overseers, and to the 
disposition of the people generally to have the fishery laws strictly observed. 
Overseer Flynn reports : 

That the fish caught in his division are chiefly taken by anglers who fish for hom& 
consumption. He estimates that as many as two hundred and thirty families obtain food 
in this way and that over 70,000 lbs. were in the aggregate taken doring the season. He 
does not think the amount taken exceeds the yearly increase. There are some 35,000' 
acres of fishing territory in the division, and on an average not more than 2 lbs. of fish were 
taken to the acre. 

Overseer Smith reports : 

That the fish in his division are mostly taken by the tourists at the two summer 
hotels. 

The catch of trout and bass was less than other seasons for two reasons. First, the 
summer visitors have been limited to certain numbers, ten trout and twelve bass, which 
gives general satisfaction. 

Second, the little shad and manhadden have come in from the Sb Lawrence in millions. 
These furnish all the food required, but notwithstanding this, the catch by angling has 
been very satisfactory. 

The close season has been well observed but a change in the close season for trout 
should be made. It should be earlier in the season so as to protect the fish in their 
spawning season. 

There are no fishways in his division, but one is needed near Charleston. 
There has been some illegal fishing done by poachers netting during the night He 
has fined two parties ten dollars each, and has seized and taken out of the water twenty 
eight gill-nets and two night lines, which are now in his possession. 

Overseer Loveday reports : That fishing in his district has been far better during the 
past summer than for a number of years ; that he has seen some very fine specimens of 
bass and pickerel taken within three miles of the city, some of the bass as much as 4 lbs. 
each in weight and the pickerel much heavier. One afternoon in September in the Otta- 
wa River only two and a half milts from the city he caught eleven very fine fish, five 
bass and six pickerel. The bass were all over 2| lbs. and the largest 4^ ; that the pick- 
erel were about the same, the largest weighing 6f lbs. This he attributes to the abolition 
©f netting. 

Below the falls a few miles down the river the fishing has not been so good as it was 
a few years ago ; that he believes this is caused by the constant increase of sawdust and 
mill refuse that is thrown into the river ; that one of the favorite spots where formerly 
he would never fail to land a few nice pickerel is now covered with sawdust so that there 
is scarcely a foot of water .• that on the Rideau River fishing has been very fair, but no- 
thing like it was a few years ago ; that this, he believes, has been caused to some extent 
by the capture in past years of small fish, and by the cultivation of land along the river 
front which was formerly drowned lands ; that before cultivation these lands 
were covered with water for the greater part of the year, and that it was here that the 
fish usually spawned ; that now the land is only covered during the high water ; that the 
fibh as usual run up over these places to deposit their spawn, but that when the water 
falls the spawn, being left on dry ground, is lost ; that in some cases as the water falls 
the fish gradually swarm toward the deeper parts, and when the water goes down they 
are left to perish and die in large numbers and are used for manure. He would suggest 



1899 ] GAME AND FIS SERIES. 67 



that some steps be taken as soon aa possible to prevent the depositing of sawdust, <fec., in 
the rivers. He thinks the close season for salmon-trout should be changed so as to 
include not only the month of November but also October, or at least the latter half of 
October, as he believes that in Ontario lakes the trout have nearly if not all spawned 
before the first of November, He recommends that the Quebec Government be requested 
to do away with the granting of licenses for net fishing in Lake Deschenes and all the 
river between Ottawa and Lake Deschenes ; also to have their officers enforce the law in 
regard to spearing, especially during the high water in the spring. 

He states that he has visited the markets and fish stores frequently and found every- 
thing all right ; that the fish offered for sale in Ottawa are a far better class than before 
the law in regard to size and weight was enforced ; that he has not in a single case seen 
bass of less than ten inches offered for sale, and a very small per cent, of pickerel below 
the legal size. He believes that the coming year will see no small fish offered for sale. 

Overseer Argue reports : 

That most of the fishing carried on in his division is done by local fishermen with rod 
and line, and the catch used for home consumption. 

He reports having seized several nets and spears during the year, but that in other 
respects the fishery laws were well observed. 

Suckers are very abundant in Spark's Creek and mouth of the Carp River, and he 
would recommend their capture by nets, in the spring, before the bass and pickerel com- 
mence running. 

Overseer Barr reports : 

That there was a decrease in the catch owing to a less vigorous prosecution of the 
fishery, the cause being that the law was put in force daring the close season ; that the 
fish exported from the district was 7,728 lbs., and for home consumption, as nearly as can be 
estimated, about 2,000 lbs ; that the close seasons were well observed, especially that for 
trout ; that considerable illegal fishing came to his knowledge, and that seven fines were 
imposed, six of which were for $10.00 each, with costs ; that the Act respecting the pro- 
tection of navigable waters has not been well observed by mill owners, sawdust having 
been damped into the waters in some cases, to the great injury of the fish therein. 

Overseer L. P. Yilleneuve, of Plantagenet, reports : 

That there were only five licenses granted in his division during the year, and about 
80 per cent, of their catch was used for home consumption ; that the close seasons were 
well obaerved, and only two cases of illegal fishing came under his notice. 



REPORT OF COMMANDER OF CRUISER «' GILPHIE." 

S. T. Bastedo, Eeq , Owen Sound, 15th December, 1899. 

Toronto. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit my report in brief of the work performed by the 
" Gilphie " during those portions of the months of October, November and December, 
1899, just closed. 

The " Gilphie " was placed in commission on the 16th October, 1899, leaving South- 
ampton at 10 a. m. on her initial trip, cruising along the eastern shore of Lake Huron, 
and touching at various places between Sjuthampton and the Great Manitoulin. She 
experienced rough weather during the trip, the sea running heavily most of the time, and 
the wind blowing a severe gale. The boat behaved splendidly, and proved herself to be 
very sea- worthy. 

According to your instructions I patroled the waters around the Manitoulin for 
several days in order to see that no parties were fishing without a license, and that the 
pound net men were fishing the stations discribed in their licenses. I also called at the 
different stations to see if any parties were delivering fish who had not licenses. The 
water continued to be very rough. 

On the 24th I left Little Current for Killarney and the Bustards, where I arrived 
at 5 30 p. m. same day. The wind continued very high, and a big beam sea was rolling, 
which made it impossible to lower the small boat and do any patrolling in this neigh- 
borhood. 



58 THE REPORT OIn [ No. 27 

On the 25th I ran into French river, where I took on wood, and returned to the 
Bustards the same day. Here I found that the fish buyers were closing up for the season, 
and that the licensed fishermen were leaving for home. 

On the 26th I left the Bustards for Point au Baril. Most of the fishermen here 
had already ceased operations for the season. 

I left Point au Baril on the 27th, patrolling between there and Parry Sound. Here 
I obtained information that illegal fishing with trap nets was going on at points between 
Parry Sound and Midland. 

I left Parry Sound on the 28th, weather continuing very rough, and patrolled the 
waters between there and Midland, keeping a lookout for nets and suspicious looking 
craft. 

I arrived at Midland on Monday the 30th, where I took on coal. The services of 
two boatmen were engaged to assist in patrolling the waters in the neighborhood of the 
Watchers, where I was informed trap nets were set. District Overseer Pratt also came 
aboard here. We were successful in finding a number of trap nets, which were almost 
filled with fish. These were liberated, and ' the nets taken on board. We returned as 
far as Penetang and destroyed the nets, and then left in the afternoon for Christian 
Islands. We took on fuel at Christian Islands, and grappled for nets near there and 
aroand Beck with Islands. The wind, however, was so high that it was impossible to do 
this successfully. On the Ist of Nevember I cruised between the Islands and Penetang, 
and took on coal. 

On the 2nd I left Penetanguishene for Moon River, where it was reported illegal 
fishing was being practiced. The reports, however, proved to be misleading, as no nets 
were found. I then left for the neighborhood of Sans Souci, wind continuing high, 
weather cold and bay rough. 

On Friday, the 3rd, I captured one illegal net near Copperhead Islands, also one 
near Jubilee Island, which were burned. I patrolled the waters in the neighborhood of 
Split Rock, but found nothing there, although there was good reason to believe that 
illegal fiehiug had been going on in that neighborhood. 

On the 4th I again visited Christian Islands, wind continuing very high, blowing a 
gale ; also snowing. I patrolled the neighborhood of Christian Islands, and left for Mea- 
ford, heavy sea running, but failed to secure any nets. 

I left Meaford on the 6th, at 7.30 a. m., giving chase to several fishing boats near 
Vail's Point, which, observing my approach, made for shallow water and thus escaped. 
The wind continued to blow very hard, and I therefore cruised along under the lee shore 
as far as Wiarton, arriving there during the afternoon. 

On the 7th I left Wiarton at 7 a. m. for Cape Croker, Hay Islands, Griffith and 
White Cloud Islands. I detected no illegal fishing, and saw no evidence of any. I then 
sailed for Owen Sound, weather clearing. I interviewed fishermen with regard to re- 
turns of fish caught during the season. I took on nine tons of hard coal at Owen Sound, 
and had some necessary repairs made to the condenser. 

I left Owen Sound at 7 a. m, oa the 9th for Vail's Point, wind blowing a gale. I kept a 
close watchout for any signs of illegal fishing, but no boats were sighted nor any evidence of 
fishing. I arrived at Meaford st 3 p. m , where I interviewed several of the fishermen, 
furnishing them with forms on which to make out their returns, having mislaid those 
already sent them, and instructed them to forward these at the end of the season to the 
fishery overseer for the district- 

I left for Collingwoid on the 10 th. The wind was blowing from the north east — 
weather very cold and snowing, and was obliged to return to Meaford. 

I left for Colling wood at 1 p.m. the next day. See running very high, snowing and 
blowing and very cold. I saw no signs of illegal fishing. 

I left Oollingwood at 8 a.m. on the 13th for Christian Islands, where I secured the 
services of two Indians and an additional boat, and went grappling for trap nets in the 
vicinity of Christian and Beck with Islands. The wind, however, was blowing so high 
that it made grappling impossible. 

I left Christian Islands at 2 a.m. on the 14th cruising along main land till daylight 
making my pay into Thunder Bay, where I tied up to a small dock. I grappled for trap 
nets in the vicinity, but found none. I sighted a tug in the afternoon near Giant's Tomb, 
and gave chase, overhauling her. but nothing of consequence was found upon her. 



1899 J GAME AND FISHERIES. 59 



On the 15th and 16 th I patroled the waters in the vicinity of Honey Harbor in 
search of trap nets. If nets had been fished, the parties had removed them on learning 
of the approach of tho cruiser, as no nets were found. 

On the 17 th and 18bh I laid up at Penetanguisnene. Wind blowing hard, weather 
cold and water very rough. I spent the time in cleaning up the boat and fixing up things 
generally, over-hauling, repairing and cleaning life preservers. 

Completed necessary repairs to life preservers, took on coal and made other arrange- 
ments for leaving next day for Killarney. 

Raining very heavily. Overseer detained at court ; could not leave for Killarney 
till next day. 

I left for Killarney at 7.30 am. on the 22nd. Wind northtwest, blowing a gale. 
I arrived at Hope Island at 10.30. Wind and sea increasing, and had to run for Chris- 
tian Islands for shelter, and abandon the trip to Killarney. 

I patroled ths waters around Hope and Beckwith Islands, and inspected several 
boats in the neighborhood, but found no nets and saw no evidences of any fishing. 

I patrolled in the vicinity of Gin Rock and Beausley Islands for trap nets next day, 
and on the 25th left for Muskoka Mills and Minicognishene Islands in search of trap 
nets. Wind blowing very hard, and grappling impossible with small boats. Sea very 
high. Went to Penetanguishene, arriving at 6 p.m. and remained over Sunday. 

Left Penetanguishene Monday am. for Muskoka and Gohome Rivers via Giant's 
Tomb, grappling for illegal nets on the way. 

I left for Moon River at 11 a.m. on the 28 oh, where I arrived at 6 p.m. Saw no 
signs of illegal fishing on the way. Weather cold and snowing. 

On the 29 th grappled for nets on Moon River, and found two in the forenoon and 
one in the afternoon. There was a small quantity of fish in each net, which I let go. 
The nets had evidently been set for some time, as the leaders contained fish which had 
been gilled and which were in a rotton condition. 

Continued grappling on the 30th until dark in the vicinity of ilit Rock. Found 
one net in the forenoon and one in the afternoon ; also learned tuttt parties had been 
working all night raising nets, having got word of our approach. 

Continued patroling in the vicinity of Split Rock and Honey Harbour, I, however, 
found no nets, and left for Penetanguishene in the evening, where I received your tele- 
gram to take boat to Owen Sound for the winter ♦ also your message that you would be 
in Penetanguishene on Monday evening. In accordance with your instructions I next 
day, after coaling up, left at 12.30, p.m., for Owen Sound. We ran for Gin Rock for 
shelter, and continued in our course as far as Christian Islands. Finding, however, that 
we could not get harbor there, we returned to Thunder Bay, where we arrived a 6, p. m. 
The wind blew a gale and it snowed all night. Continued to snow and blow all next day. 
I returned in the afternoon to the Christian Islands, and left there at 4, a.m., on the 7th, 
wind still blowing a gale and snowing ana freezing. I arrived at Owen Sound at 1.30, 
p.m., after a very stormy passage, the boat having the appearance of an iceburg when I 
brought her in. Weather having somewhat moderated, and wind having fallen, I left 
for Wiarton to inspect the fish which had come down from the northern stations. 

I returned to Owen Sound on the 9th and made arrangements with Messrs. Abbey 
Bros, to look after the boat during the winter months. Engaged with crew in taking 
down engine, storing equipments and putting the boat in shape to be left for the winter. 
All arrangements completed on the 15th, and left for home that day, crew being dis- 
charged. 

The presence of the steamer upon the bay no doubt had a very salutory effect, and it 
is believed little illegal fishing was in consequence done. I find, however, that in one or 
two instances what is called a floating seine is used, so constructed that it may be oper- 
ated free from rocks and stones, and which will prove very destructive as an engine of 
capture, especially when the fish are on the spawning beds. I would most respectfully 
point out the utter impossibility of efficient service being rendered with a crew of less 
than seven or eight. And this statement will be emphasized when it is said that trap 
nets are usually set near the shore, at the mouths of rivers, and among the islands, where 
it is often impossible for the steamer, on account of the shallow water, to go. In such 
cases the patrolling must be done with men in boats, not only during the day, but often 
at night, while it may be thought expedient for the steamer to leave for another locality 



60 



THE REPORT ON 



[No. 27 



for a time. In this connection I would recommend the purchase of another row boat, one 
somewhat larger than that at present on the steamer, that two crews may patrol at the 
same time, if necessary. 

1 have the honor to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

A. Macaulay, 

Commanding " Gilphie." 



SCHEDULE OF FISHERY OVERSEERS IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 



Name. 



J. K. McCargar 



Hy. Mathen. 



J. C. Judd 



M. Thwaite . . . 

Wm. Pratt .... 

A. B. Messecar 

J. K. Laird . , . 
G. D. McCoU . 

Henry Johnson 



Residence. 



Belleville 



Brockville 



Morton 



J. McRitchie Bothwell 

I 



Oshawa . . 

Penetang. 

Burford . 

Guilds . . 
Vittoria . 

Brantford 



District. 



S. Freeman 



John Farrell 



Brighton 



Cayuga 



Counties of Hastings, Lennox, Addington and Prince 
Edward and the Electoral District of East Nor- 
thumberland. 

That portion of Co. of Frontenac lying south of the 
Tps. of Portland and Storrington ; for the Tps. of 
Leeds, Lansdowne, front of Escott, front of Yonge, 
rear of Escott and Yonge and Elizabethtown, Co. 
of Leeds, and for those portions of the Cos. of 
Dundas and Stormont lying south of the 0. P. R. 

That part of the Co. of Frontenac lying north of the 
Tps. of Kingston and Pittsburg ; the Tps. of North 
and South Crosby, Bastard, South Elmsley and 
Kitley in the Co. of Leeds, the Countieb of Lan- 
ark, Carlton, Russell, Prescott, Glengarry and 
Stormont, and for those portions of Dund<iB and 
Grenville lying north of the C. P. R. 

Counties of Ontario, Durham, Victoria, Peterborough, 
Provisional County of Haliburton and Electoral 
District of West Northumberland. 

County of Simcoe and Districts of Muekoka and Parry 
Sound, and all waters and islands in Georgian Bay- 
fronting said counties. 

County of Brant, comprising Townships of Burford, 
Oakland and Brantford west of Grand River, but 
exclusive of said river. 

Lake Erie fronting Co. Kent together with inland 
waters of said Co. tributary to Lake Erie. 

County of Norfolk, and Townships of Walpole and 
Rainham in County of Haldimand, also waters of 
Lake Erie in front of said Co. and Tps. 

That part of Grand River lying between the southerly 
boundary of Town of Gait and the boundary line 
between Tuscarora and Onondaga Tps. in Co. 
Brant and the Tps. of Seneca and Oneida in 
Haldimand Co. ; also concurrent jurisdiction with 
Overseer Messecar over tributaries to the Grand 
River in Burford, Oakland and Brantford Tps. 
west of the Grand River. 

River Thames lying between the Villages of Louis- 
ville and Wardsville, also over any waters flowing- 
into the River Thames between the said villages. 

Lake Ontario frontinp Counties of Northumberland 
and Durham, also inland waters tributary to said 
lake in the above counties, 

Grand River from division line between Tuscarora 
and Onondaga Tps. and Oneida and Seneca Tps. 
to its mouth and waters tributary thereto, also 
for Tps. of Dun and South Cayuga. 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



61 



ScHEDULB OP Fishery Overseers in the Province of Ontario. 



Name. 



Arch. Oouper . . 
R. J. Walker . . 
Henry Barr .... 
William Sargent 
N, Stewart .... 

Jaa. Stephens . . 
Peter Lamarsh . 

L. P. Villeneuve 

M. A. McAulay. 

James Steed ..,._, 

John Sullivan . . , 
O. V. Goulette . . 

D. Cattanach . . . 



Thos. Nicholls Hall's Bridge 



F. G. Moore . 



John DriscoU 
Jos. Yellands 

L. V. Garner 



Residence. 



Dunnville . 
Port Credit. 
Douglass . . 
Bronte .... 
Gillie's Hill 



Wiarton . 
Wheatley 



J. B, Cousineau Windsor 



Lakefield . 



D'Arcy. . . . 
Peterboro' 



Welland 



District. 



Alfred 

Southampton 

Sarnia 

St. Thomas.. 
Gananoque. . 

Wolfe Island 



Tps. of Moulton, Sherbrooke and Wainfleet in the 
District of Monck, and Lake Erie. 

Lake Ontario fronting Co. Peel and for Rivers Credit 
and Etobicoke tributary to said lake. 

County Renfrew and Tps. of Nip'ssing District lying 
east and south of Algonquin Park. 

County of Halton, also Co. of Wentworth north of the 
Canal, and Lake Ontario. 

That portion of County Bruce lying south of Indian 
Reserve and Tp. of Amabel, with jurisdiction over 
Lake Huron in front of said Co. south of South- 
ampton. 

Co. Bruce fronting on Georgian Bay, lying east and 
south of Tobermory Harbour and Georgian Bay. 

Tps. of Anderdon, Maiden, N. Colchester, S. Col- 
chester, N. Gosfield, S. Gosfield and Mersea, in 
the Co. of Essex, with jurisdiction over so much 
of the waters of the Detroit River and Lake Erie 
as lies in front of said Tps. 

Counties Prescott, Russell, Stormont and Glengarry, 
with jurisdiction over so much of the Rivers 
Ottawa and St. Lawrence as lies in front of said 
counties. 

Co. Bruce fronting Lake Huron lying between South- 
ampton and Tobermory Harbour. 

Co. Lambton exclusive of Walpole and St. Ann's 
Islands, 



County of Elgin exclusive of the River Thames 

Gananoque River and for that part of the River St. 
Lawrence lying between Wolfe Island and Rock- 
portj. 

Township of Wolfe Island and for the islands of Sim- 
coe, Gardeo and Horseshoe, and any other islands 
comprised in the Tp. of Wolte Island, with juris- 
diction over the waters of the River St. Lawrence 
and Lake Ontario surrounding the said Tp. of 
Wolfe Island and the islands comprising the same. 

West half of Tp. of Smith, Tp. of Ennismore, west 
half Tp. of rfarvey, Tps. of Galway and Caven- 
dish, Co. Peterboro'. 

For Tps. of Sandwich West, Sandwich East, Sand- 
wich, Maidstone, Rochester and Tilbury West, 
Co. Essex. 

Tps. of Douro, Dummer, east part of Smith, Tp. Bur- 
leigh and east half of Harvey, Co. Peterboro'. 

The waters of 
Island. 



St. Lawrence River around Howe 



River Otonabee and tributaries lying between Lake- 
field and Rice Lake Co. Peterb ro", also the 
waters of Rice Lake in front of South Monoshan 
Tp. 

In and for the Electoral District of Welland, with 
jurisdiction over so much of the waters of Lake 
Erie and the Niagara River, exclusive of the 
waters of the said river north of the Niagara Falls, 
as lies in front of the said Electoral District. 



62 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 27 



Schedule of Fishery Overseers in the Province of Ontario. 



Name. 



P. W. C. Shewen 
James Yates .... 
George Clyde . . . 
T. McQueen .... 

Louis Cock 

John Crotty 

Wm. Mitchell... 

O. Allan 

Chas. Ogg 

John BrowD 

F. Terry 

J. A. Johnson . . . 

A. Mclntyre .... 
J. Bowerman . . . 

M.Clark 

John Veale 

F. Labatt 

J. M. Willis 

J. R. Gibson . . . 

J, B. Smith 

Thos. Payette . . . 

W. A. Root 

W. McNeil 



Residence. 



District. 



Apsley . . . 
Goderich . 
Cataraqui 
Chatham 



Campbellford . 
Bothwell 



Grimsby 



Wallaceburg 



Hamilton . . . 

Rockdale 

Queensville , . 

Parry Sound 



Keene 

Port Perry 



Picton ... 
Nestleton 



Port Severn 

Port Whitby 

Mallorytown 

Charleston . . 
Penetang .... 



Rockport 
Leith . . . . 



Tps. of Anstruther and Chandos, Co. Peterboro'. 

County of Huron. • 

Tps. of Pittsburgh and Kingston, Co. Frontenac. 

River Thames from Lewisville to its mouth, also the 
tributaries of said river between these points. 
Also the Tp. of Dover West, Co. Kent. 

For the River Trent and its tributaries. 

River Thames and waters tributary thereto lying 
between the Village of Wardsville and the bound- 
ary line between the Tps. of Delaware and West- 
minster. 

County of Lincoln and over so much of the waters of 
Lake Ontario as lies in front of the said county, 
and with jurisdiction over the Niagara River 
between its mouth and the Falls. 

County of Kent, exclusive of Dover West Tp., also 
Walpole atd St. Anne's Islands, County Lambton. 

County of Wentworth. 

Tps. of Belmont and Methuen, County Peterboro'. 

North York, with jurisdiction over Holland River 
and that portion of Lake Simcoe lying in front of 
North Gwillimbury and Gcorgina Tps. 

For the Tps. of Shawanaga, Burpee,. Hagerman, Fer- 
guson, Carling, McDougall, McKellar, Christie, 
Foley, Parry Island, Cowper and Conger in the 
District of Parry Sound. 

Tps. of Otonabee and Asphodel in Co. of Peterboro'. 

Tp. of Reach, Co. Ontario, and Tp. of Mariposa, Co, 
Victoria, also River Scugog, and joint jurisdiction 
over Lake Scugog. 

Co. of P. E. Island, exclusive of the Tps. of Amelias- 
burg and Sophiasburg. 

Tps. of Cartwright and Manvers, Co. Durham, also 
River Scugog, and joint jurisdiction over Lake 
Scugog. 

Tps. of Freeman, Gibson, Baxter, Wood and Morrison, 
in Dist. of Muskoka ; also over Severn River. 

Electoral District of South Ontario, exclusive of the 
Tp. of Reach. 

River St. Lawrence, lying between Mallorytown Land- 
ing and Brock ville. 

Charleston Lake and tributaries, Co. Leeds. 

Tps. of Matchedasb, Tay, Medonte, Tiny, Flos, Sun- 
nidale and Nottawasaga, County Simcoe, and over 
Christian Bethwick and Giant's Tomb Islands. 

In and for the River St. Lawrence lying between 
Jackstraw Light and Mallorytown Landing. 

Co. of Grey, exclusive of Tps. of Proton, Egremont 
and Normandy. 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



63 



Schedule of Fishery Overseers in the Province of Ontario. 



Name. 



J. Massales . . . 
E. T. Loveday . 



John Steele .: 

H, Humphries 



A. Clunis 

D. A. McNiven 

% 
Jas. Meyers..., 

W. D. Benson . . 



D. McNabb . . 
John Argue . . 
W. D. Roblin 

Jno. Kennie.. 



Residence. 



F. Johnstone 
A. Skeen .... 
P. Howard . . 



J. R. Graham 



B. B.Miller.. 
W. R. Wood'. 



A. Guerord 



M.Kyle..../. 



District. 



Haliburton . . . 
Ottawa , 

Uptergrove. . 
Hastings 

Claude 

Barrie 

Orchard 

London 

Orillia 

Carp 

Adolphustown 

Napanee 

Harwood 

Harwood . .., 
CoUingwood .. 

Fenelon Falls . 

Wiarton 

Toronto 

Bonheur 

Rat Portage... 



Pro. Co. of Haliburton, exclusive of Lutterworth Tp. 

In and for the Tps. of Nepean, Gloucester, North 
Gower and Osgoode, in the Co. of Carleton, with 
jurisdiction over so much of the River Ottawa and 
the River Rideau and Rideau Canal as lies in 
front or within the said tps , and over the tribu- 
taries to the said rivers and canal. 

Tps. of Thorah, Mara and Rama, Co. of Ontario. 

That part of Trent River and tributaries lying between 
Rice Lake and Trent Bridge, Co. Peterboro'. 

In and for the Tps. of Chinguacousy, Caledon and 
Albion in the County of Peel. 

Tps. of Vespra, Innisfil, Essa and West Gwillimbury, 
Co. of Simcoe, including Holland River. 

Tps. of Proton, Egremont and Normandy, Co. Grey, 
and Minto, Arthur and West Luther, Co. Wel- 
lington. 

River Thames and tributaries thereto in Co Middlese x 
lying east of the boundary line between the Tps 
of Delaware and Westminster. 

Tps. of Orillia and Oro, Co. Simcoe, also over River 
Severn and Lakes Simcoe and Couchiching, 

Tps. Tarbolton, Fitzroy, Huntley, March and Goul- 
bourn. Co. Carletous 

Tps. of Adolphustown, South Fredericksburg, Ernes- 
town and Amherst Island, Co. Lennox and Al- 
dington. 

Tps. of Richmond, Adolphustown, North and South 
Fredericksburg, with jurisdiction over Hay Bay 
and Bay of Quinte, in Co. Lennox and Addington. 

Tps. of Hamilton and Alnwick, Co. Northumberland, 
and over Rice Lake.j 

Tps. of Hamilton and Alnwick, Co. Northumberland, 
and over Rice Lake. 

Tps. of CoUingwood and Osprey, Co. Grey, and Tps. 
of Nottawasaga and Sunnidale, Co. Simcoe, and 
Georgian Bay. 

Tps. of Verulam, Fenelon, Eldon, Bexley, Somerville, 
Laxton, Digby, Dalton and Longford, Co. Vic- 
toria, and Tp. of Lutterworth, Co. Haliburton. 

North Bruce Peninsula. 

Tps. of Etobicoke, York and Bcarboro, and City of 
Toronto, Co. York. 

Provisional Judicial District of Rainy River whith lies 
east of the 5th meridian line, and for so much of 
the said district as lies between the 5th and 7th 
meridian lines south of a line running due east 
from One Side Lake to White Fish Lake. 

District of Rainy River lying west of the 7th meridian 
line, and for that portion of the Rainy River Dis- 
trict between the 5th and 7th meridian, north of a 
line drawn from Silver Lake through Sakwite 
Lake, Cedar Rapids and Loon Lake to One Side 
Lake. 



64 



THE REPORT ON 



[No. 27 



Schedule of Fishery Overseers in the Province of Ontario. 



Name. 




Geo. Bilton 



S. A. Huntington. 



Wm. Stewart. 



E. Burns 

R, M. VanNorman 



K. Oliver. 



J. W. Wilmott 
S. R. McEwen.. 



North Bay 



Pelee Island 



Lindsay 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Little Current . . 



Beaumaris . , 
Tehlaumah 



Wm. McKirdy I Nipigon 



J. Emmons . . 
J. Armstrong 
Jas. Whalen . . 



Rat Portage 
Liskeard .... 
Port Arthur 



District. 



Rainy Lake and adjacent waters. 

Tps. of Storrington, Loughboro, Portland and Bed- 
ford, Co. Frontenac. 

Cos. Stormont and Glengarry and St. Lawrence River. 

Tps. of Camden East, Sheffield, Kaladar, Anglesea, 
Effingham, Ashby, Denbigh and Albinger in elec- 
toral district of Addington. 

Tps. of Palmerston, Clarendon, Barrie, Miller, North 
Cdnonto, and South Canonto, electoral district of 
Addington. 

Tps. of Hinchinbrooke, Oso, Olden and Kennebec, 
district of Addington. 

Tps. of Lount, Machar, Laurier, Croft, Chapman, 
Strong, Joly, Spence, Ryerson, Armour, Proud- 
foot, Monteith, McMurrich, Perry and Bethune, 
District of Parry Sound. 

Tps. of Harrison, Burton, McKenzie, Ferrie, Wall- 
bridge, Brown, Wilson. Mills, Pringle, Gurd, 
Himsworth, Nipissing, Paterson, Hardy, McCon- 
key, Hlair and Mowat, District of Parry Sound ; 
also the waters and islands in front of the Tps. of 
Harrison and Wallbridge in said district. 

Tp. of Bastard, in which lie Upper Beverly Lake and 
Lower Beverly Lake ; Tp. of South Crosby in 
which lie Opinieon Lake (as well as that portion 
of it which lies in the Co. of Frontenac), Sand 
Lake, Troy Lake, Cranberry Lake as far as the 
Tp. of Storrington in the Co. of Frontenac and 
the Morton River to Lower Beverly Lake, as well 
as all the waters in the rear of Leeds and Lans- 
downe. (Since curtailed.) 

Tps. of North Crosby, South Burgess, South Elmsley 
and over the Rideau waters as far as Smith's Falls. 

Lake Nipissing and tributaries thereto in District of 
Nipissing. 

For Pelee Island and the other islands in Lake Erie 
south of the Co. of Essex, and over the fisheries 
connected therewith. 

Tps. of Emily, Ops and Mariposa. 

District of Algoma lying west of Algoma Mills, ex- 
clusive of Cockburn and Manitoulin Islands, 

District of Algoma lying east of Algoma Mills, includ- 
ing Cockburn and Manitoulin Islands. 

District of Muskoka. 

Manitoulin Islands. 

River and Lake Nipigon. 

Rainy River. 

Temiscamingue and tributaries. 

Rivers and streams emptying into Thunder Bay and 
Lake Superior between Thunder Bay and Peigeon 
River. 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



65 



Schedule op Fishery Ovebseers in the Province op Ontario, 



Name. 


Residence. 


District. 


TThos. Norquay 


Manitowaning 

Brockville 

Belleville 

Port Arthur 


Lake Maniton, Manitou Island. 


Hy. Mathen 


River St. Lawrence lying between Brockville and the 


■J. K . McCargar 

A, McOomber 


Village of Aultsville, Co. Stormont. 

Co. Hastings and Tps. Ameliasburg, and Sophiasburg 
in the Co. of Prince Edward. 

Acting Overseer for the District of Thunder Bay. 









F.G. 



66 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 27 



ONTARIO FISHERIES. 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the quantity 

during the 





Difetricts. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets- 


a 


No. 


a 
a 


. a? 
> 


d 

2 


No. 


3> 

> 


a 


No. 


eS 




1 
1 


Lake of the Woods and Rainy River 
\District. 

Lake of the Woods . , 

Rainy Lake 


3 
1 


38 
15 


4,500 
1,500 


10 
4 


20 

2 
1 

1 
1 
1 


$ 

950 
250 
50 
50 
50 
50 


49 

8 
3 
2 
2 
7 




10,000 
1,350 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
2,500 


$ 

955 
420 


3 


Butler Lake 


102 


4 


Eagle Lake 










160 


5 


Lake WabigooD 










100 


6 


Lake Minnitakie 


.... 


.... 






250 




4 


53 


6,000 


14 


23 


1,400 


71 


16,850 


1,927 













Lake oi 


the Woods and 


Rainy 


i 

St 
1 


Districts. 


■73 

<o 

50 

'E 
It 

a 

brls. 


Herringf, fresh. 


1 


o 




"1 
o 
Q 

o 




1 


Lake of the Woods and Rainy River 
District. • 
Lake of the Woods 


lbs. 


lbs, 

253,894 

36,978 

450 

2,500 

13,615 

1,601 


lbs. 
23,469 


lbs. 


lbs. 

132,100 
l:i,962 


lb?. 

56,200 


?! 


Kainy Lake 








8 


Butler Lake ... 






1,900 

2,000 

12,990 

592 




200 


4 


Eagle Lake 








1,900 

83,500 

300 




5 


Lake Wabigoon 






2,500 


6 


Lake Minnitakie , . 






1,028 




Totals 














309,038 


40,951 


230,762 


59,928 




Values $ 












24,723 


I 4,095 10 





11,538 10 


2,397 12 















Lake 


Superior 


District. 
















Districts. 


Fishiag material. 




Tugs or 


vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


a 


No. 

9 
6 
2 

1 
1 
1 


a 
a 
o 


4) 

s 


d 

32 

40 

20 

8 

5 

5 


No. 


3 
I 


d 
IP 


No. 




> 


1 

2 
3 
4 


Lake Superior, 

Thunder Bay 

Lower portion Lake Superior 

Michipicoten Island 

Lizard Islands 

Batchewana Bay 

Point Mamanse 


168 
70 

"'36'" 
34 


9,650 
15,100 
8.000 
3,000 
2,000 
2,000 


30 
11 

1 
6 
2 


$ 

1,870 
1,850 

150 
1,200 

300 


46 
24 

2 
12 

4 




288,900 
236,600 
109,000 
100,000 


$ 

8,035 

11,110 

4,390 

4,000 


6 




27,000 


2,020 


7 


Goulais Bay and Parisian Island 


2 


200 


6 






8 


Sault Ste . Marie 


1 
21 




ioo' 2 




600 


700 






112 














308 


39,850 


52 


5,570 


94 


762,100 30,255 



1899 ] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



67 



ONTARIO FISHERIES. 

and value of all fishing materials ; also the kinds and quantities of fish caught 
year 1899. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishf 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Hoop-nets. 


Night-lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 




6 
> 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


Value. 


No. 
hooks. 


2 
1 


No. 


IS 

> 

8,500 
700 


No, 


s 

"cS 


8 

3 








34 


$ 
3..'S00 








14 

3 






1 




4 800 














9 




















\i 








' 


















4 


























5 


























6 






















9,200 






♦ ^ 








38 4,300 

1 








17 









River District, — Continued. 



to 
tc 

a 
o 

a 

1 


a 

o 

s 

a: 




P4 


1 


.a 

3 


Mixed and coarse 
fish. 


6 

o 


a 

li 




S 

3 


lbs. 


lbs. 

135,948 
11,960 


lbs. 


lbs. 


bs. 
14,394 


bs. 


lbs. 
220 


bs. 

10,674 
600 


lbs. 

380 
68 


$ cts. 

44,042 54 

4,558 34 

234 00 

525 00 

6,906 20 

323 40 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 




















500 
























100 


4,666 


















4,000 
4,220 













100 


18,394 





500 


147,908 


11,274 


448 


56,589 48 




30 


8,874 48 




3 


1,103 64 




84 40 


3,382 2 


358 40 















Lake 


Superior District. — 


■Continued. 










Fishing material. 




Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Hoop-nets. 


Night-lines, 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


1 


6 

3 
> 


No. 


6 

_3 

> 


No. 


6 

3 

> 


No. 
hooks. 


"eS 

> 


No. 


3 
> 


No. 


6 
s 

> 


e 

a 
3 









26 


2.290 










12 


8,600 

35,820 

3,000 






1 




10 5.000 










.... 




2 






















3 








16,000 
8,800 






4 








5 
5 


2,500 



2,500 
















5 










4,520 

2,700 

800 






6 










7 




















8 
































46 


12,290 








12 


80,240 




1 



















68 



THE REPORT OIS 



[ No. 27 



ONTARIO 
Return of the nnmber of fishermen, tonnage and valae of tugs. 

Lake Superior 



1 

1 


Districts. 


1 

be 

'S 

w 

brls 


J3 

£ 

a 
« 


■i 

la 


o 


00 

c8 

03 


Pickerel or Dore. 




1 


Lake Superior. 
Thunder Bay 


lbs. 
138,226 


lbs. 

243,991 

189,619 

13,744 

57,487 

58,832 

7,456 

44,100 

8,000 

623,229 


lbs. 

652,504 

765,047 

449,790 

211,839 

8,904 

64,062 

24,152 

6,300 


lbs. 


lbs. 

33,319 
1,514 


lbs. 

5,333 
3,119 


? 


Lower portion Lake Superior 




3 


Michipicoten Island 








4' 


Lizard Islands 










5 


Batuhewana Bay 








914 


175 


6 


Point Mamaine 








7 


Goulais Bay and Parisian Island . 
Sault Ste. Marie 






600 


2,944 


8 










Totals 














138,226 


2,182,598 


36,347 


11,571 




Values . . $ 






2,764 52 


49,858 32 

1 


218 259 80 




1,817 35 


462 84 













Lake Huron Division, 





Districts. 






Fishing material. 




Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


u 

3 

s 


No. 

2 
1 
1 


ID 

s 
s 


> 


a 
2 


No. 


2 
> 


a 


No. 




IS 

> 


1 


Lake Huron Division. 
North Channel. 

Tenby Bay 


""""i5 


150 
100 




$ 






700 

100 

12,000 


800 


9, 


Hilton 










100 


3 
4 


Markas'ille 

Thessalon 


2,500 


6 


2 
3 


300 
300 


6 
5 


.::. 


2,500 


5 


Cockburn Island 

Grant Island 


2 
2 


23 
15 




2,500 
2,300 


9 
14 








fi 


3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


300 
150 
100 
150 
250 
250 
100 
50 
125 






12,000 


1,000 


7 


French Islands 


3 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 




8 


Algoma Mills 










3,740 
6,000 


230 


9 


John's Island 











400 


>0 


New Port 












11 


Aird Island 


1 


i9 


2,500 


4 




1^ 


Spanish River 








13 


Cape Roberts 












i.ooo 

16,000 
10.000 


50 


14 


Gore Bay 


1 
1 
4 


18 
"80 


1,500 

500 

6,000 


6 
112 


1,000 


15 


Kagawong 


16 


Little Current 













17 


Killarney 


1 
21 

1 


200 

2,285 

125 


3 

33 

2 




6,000 
43,800 
26,000 


400 


18 


Squaw Island 


6 
2 

23 


72 

18 


9,800 
2,000 


4,900 
1,000 


19 


Beaverstone 




260 


29,850 


41 


4,685 


69 




137,340 


12,400 



1899 ] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



6» 



FI8KERIES.— Continued. 

veesels and boatp, fishing material, etc., for 1899. — Continued. 

District. — Continued. 



i 


3 
5 


lbs.' 


2 
lbs. 


'5 
lbs. 


f Catfish. 


i 

u 

C 

lbs. 

678 
500 


J 
la 




S 

s 


lbs. 


lbs. 

6.240 
2,772 


bbls. . 


$ c. 

89,801 43 

92,054 00 

46,078 52 

2-5,782 86 

5,742 30 

7,002 68 

6,164 64 

1,270 00 


1 






100 






2 








3 


















4 




1,544 














5 

















6 




1,228 


. 












7 




... .. 












8 




11,784| 


100 






1,178 










273,896 48 






707 04 




3 00 






23 56 























North Channel. 



Fishing material. 



Seines. 



No. 



Pound-nets. 



No. 



Value. 



Hoop-nets. Night-lines. 



No. 



2,250 
1,600 
2,600 
3,500 
2,000 



50 

1,800 

800 



750 



Other fixtures used in fishing. 



No. 
hooks. 



Freezers and 
ice houses. 



No. 



Piers and 
wharves. 



950 
500 
100 



100 
600 



No. 



100 
100 



1 
2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
16 
16 
17 
18 
19 



51 
3 

108 



14,600 
750 

20,700 



1,000 



12 



3,450 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 27 



ONTARIO 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, 

Lake Huron Division, 



s 


Districts. 


m 

a 

"5 

<D 

w 


4' 

£ 

tab 
a 

h 

w 


.a 

9 

lbs. 

45 

500 

6,000 

6,406 

24,440 

58,020 

44,300 

6,285 

8,297 

55,735 


Trout. 


pa 


a 

(B 
M 
a 




1 


Lake Huron Division. 

North Channel. 

Tenby Bav 


bbls 


lbs. 


lbs. 

30 

700 

•22.300 

3,448 

27,679 

18,620 

1,000 

41,247 

7,396 


lbs. 


lbs. 
150 


lbs. 
6,800 


^ 


Hrlton 







1,500 


s 


Marksville 








12,000 

53,590 

105,366 

43,970 

2,600 
38,183 

3,114 


4 


Thessalon 

Oockburn Island 

Grant Islands 


5 




4,131 
3,744 


R 




B 




325 


7 
8 


French Islande . 

Algoma Mills 




16 


" " i",6i3 

6,000 


6,000 
.3,851 


q 






10 


New Port 






11 


Aird Island 

Spanish River 






23.822 








1'' 










116,933 




IS 


Cape Roberts 










227 


15,073 


14 


Gore Bay 














TS 


















16 




28h 


7,013 


585,638 


700,346 


227 


400,406 


247,699 


17 






18 


Squaw Island 






16,000 
21,000 


120,000 
10,000 








19 

















Totals 

Values $ 












54 


14,026 


832,666 


976,588 


454 


776,312 


289,123 




216. 


280 52 


66,613 28 


97,658 80 


36 32 


38,815 60 11,564 92 

1 



Georgian Bay 





Districts. 










Fishing material. 










Tugs or 


vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


<D 

a 

55 


No. 


8 


s 

> 


a 


No. 


a5 

a 

> 


d 


No. 


OQ 


<D 

s 

I 


1 


Georgian Bay Division. 
Pointe au Baril 


3 
1 




8,000 


17 
6 


13 
4 
1 
1 
4 
2 
5 
2 
1 

20 

15 

20 

7 

16 

1 

1 

15 


"ioo 
100 

'256 

380 

65 

50 

3,000 

2,250 

1,285 

850 

1,250 

150 

25 

500 


41 
8 

1 

9 
4 

7 




96,660 


$ 

11.000 


?. 


Mink Island 


4,800' 3,000 
2,-500 225 


3 


Shawanaga 


4 


McOow Island 










2,000 


200 


5 


Midland 












6 


Victoria Harbor 






1^200 


"2 




11,000 

10,200 

6,325 

6,000 

96,000 

81,000 

82,460 

33,000 

78,000 

3,000 

"97,786 




7 


Waubaushene 


1 




1,028 


8 


Laf ontaine 


4 .... 

21.... 
60 ... . 
45 .... 
40i.... 


100 


9 


Thunder Bay 












10 
11 


Duck Island 

South Bay 


3 
3 

2 
1 
3 
1 




12,000 

12,000 

6,000 

4,000 

10,500 

3,000 


18 
18 
12 

6 
18 

6 


19,000 
9,500 


1^ 


Collingwood 


3,075 


13 


Burnt Island 


16 

32 

2 

2 

29 




6,600 


14 


Fitzwilliam 


16,600 


15 


Spragge 


600 


16 


Meaf ord 




17 


Owen Soiand 


4 




3,000 


20 
133 


6,845 




22 


420 


59,700 


128 


10,255 


305 




610,731 


77,773 



1899 ] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



71 



FISHERIES.— Cowfinwed. 

vessels and boats, fishing materials, etc., for 1899. — Continued. 
North Channel. — Continued. 



1) 
be 


a 
o 

hi 
172 


"3 


J5 


1 


.£3 

ZD 


Mixed and coaree 
fish. 


Trout. 


Value. 


1 

a 

B 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
100 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
500 


bbls. 


$ c. 

299 10 
170 00 
3,850 00 
4,153 92 
10,913 98 
8,874 10 
4,074 00 
7,654 81 

1.679 06 
4,458 SO 
2,382 20 
5,846 65 

645 98 

96 68 

297 60 

152,367 55 

144 00 

13,280 00 

2.680 00 


1 














2 




9,000 
7,065 

11,931 
2,650 
1,000 

13,484 














3 










500 

1,848 






4 














5 














6 
















7 










3,541 






8 














9 


















10 


















11 


















12 




415 














13 


654 








188 


2,684 
14,880 
26,277 

7,200 




14 














15 


654 


73,921 




993 




12,570 


9 


16 
17 














18 


















19 




















1,308 


119,466 




1,093 


18,647 


51,54] 


9 


223,958 43 




78 48 


7,167 96 




32 79 




372 94 


1,030 82 


90 













Division. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Hoop-nets. 


Night-lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


T3 
eS 


a5 

a 
"3 
> 


No. 


Value . 


N. 


1 Value. 
1 


No. 


a 


No. 


1 
> 


No. 


> 


u 

S 






s 




$ 






$ 


1 


$ 




$ 


1 
















, 










2 



























3 






























4 




















i 




2 




5 




















6 




.... 




""26 




4 


40 






3 

1 


1,500 






7 














8 
























9 
















10 




























n 




















1 


100 






12 
























13 


























14 








5 


2,000 


















15 
























16 


























17 


































31 


2,000 


4 


40 






8 


1 600' ' 






. 

















72 



THE REPORT ON 



ONTARIO 



Betarn of the namber of fishermen, tounage and value of tags, 



Georgian Bay 



u 


Districts. 


i 

•E 

w 

bbis 
16 


a 
'u 

w 


Whitefish. 


5 


P3 






1 


Georgian Bay Division. 

Ponite au Baril 

Mink Island 


lbs. 


bs. 

106,169 

38,000 

7,800 

3,000 

L'9,560 

43,200 

4,071 

2,850 

550 

107,000 

17,000 

'.»5,820 

5,000 

24,000 

210,000 

50,000 

66,200 

810,220 


lbs. 

129,872 
38,000 
2.300 
.4,000 
76,500 
89,900 

:3^66o 

9,000 
432,000 
626,000 
145,538 
247,000 
219,000 
206,000 
170,000 
539,484 

2, 897, .194 


lbs. 



lbs. 

31,636 

4,000 

1,850 

1,000 

42,800 

68,500 

76,925 


lbs. 
8, TOO' 


2 






^ 


Shawanaga 






4 


McCow Island 






2,000 


5 


Midland 






3,ooa 


8 


Victoria Harbor 






800 


7 
8 


Waubaushene 

Lafontaine 


72 


3,000 


10,465 


q 


Thunder Bay 










1,000 


10 


Duck Island 






'"" 410 


41,666 

10,000 
29,600 


42,000 


n 


South Bay 








1? 


Collingwood 


39 


37,100 


2,400 


18 


Burnt Island 




14 


Fitzwilliam 












15 


SDraerere 






1 277.200 


23,000 


1A 


Meaf ord 


14 
14 

155 






90,000 
20,000 


14,000 


17 


Owen Sound 


154,200 


10,000 




Totals 






194,300 


410 


694,511 


117,365 




Values $ 






620. 


3,886 


64,817 60 289,759 40 

1 


32 80 


34,725 55 


4,694 60' 



Lake Huron 





Districts, 


Fishing Material. 




Tugs or Vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill-Nets, 


a 
1 


No. 

7 
1 
3 

1 

12 


?* 
be 
cs 

a 
§ 

175 
12 
87 

274 


ID 
> 


a 

a> 

42 

5 
19 


No. 

24 
6 

in 


d 

a 

> 

S 

1,925 

565 

1,165 

1,793 

5,448 


a 


No. 

1576 

3 

33 

6 

1618 


235,620 
9,755 

88,800 
18,730 


c 

> 


1 

2 

3 


Lake Huron {Preper). 

Cape Hurd to Southampton 

Southampton to Goderich 

Goderich to Blue Point 


$ 

21,000 

200 

8,000 

4,000 

33,200 


56 
13 
23 

81 

173 


22,505 
1,300 
7,380 


4 


B?ue Point to Point Edward 


41 42 


839 




70 


82 


352,905 


32,024 



1899 ] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



FISHERIES.— Cowiinwed 

vessels and boats, fishing materials, etc., for 1899. — Continued 

Division. — C&nt inued. 



93 

be 

a 
o 


a 
o 


Tj 
H 


o 


6 


J3 


Mixed and coarse 

fish. 


no 


i 




.2 

> 

6 


<6 

> 


S 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
8,000 


bbls. 


bbls. 




$ c. 

23,570 52 

7,104 00 

946 50 

771 10 

12,314 80 
19,654 00 
5,645 19 
1,058 00 
"1,284 00 
56,610 00 
54,460 00 
27,566 58 
25,118 00 
23,820 00 
61,220 00 
26,536 00 
65,059 40 


1 




















2 






















3 












55 


'2^666 
63,750 
13,655 








4 












5 




41,100 
524 








500 
1,406 


22 
10 

8 


""lb 
43 
22 




6 










7 










8 

















9 




11,000 








5,000 


18,000 


10 










11 




25,576 
300 




1,700 






5,501 






3,816 


12 








13 




















14 




48,000 
1,000 




2,666 

1,000 




5,000 













15 








33 

126^ 


16 










1 


17 




127,500 




4,700 




11,961 








111,106 


41 


239^ 


3,816 


412,738 09 




7,650 




141 




239,22 


2,222 12 


410 


2,.S95 


1,144 8 
















(Proper.) 



■ 

Fishing Material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound Nets. 


Hoop-nets. 


fNight-lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


4 


6 
s 

> 


No. 


Value. 


No. 


6 

> 


No. 
. hocks. 


6 

> 


No. 


6 

IS 
> 


No. 


"cS 


u 

a 






s 




■? 




% 




% 


5 
2 

5 

7 

19 


$ 

530 
300 
550 
830 

2,210 




1 






















9, 








7 
42 

49 


1,025 
6.965 

7,990 














3 




'-l^'l 


_:l 




llL'l 


4 






































74 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 27 



ONTAKIO 
Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tuga, 

Lake Huron 



a 


Districts. 


•6 


J3 

0) 

w 


Is 


Trout. 


i 

lbs. 


o 
Q 

o 
u 




1 


Lake Huron (Proper). 

Cape Hurd to Southampton 

Southampton to Goderich 


bis. 
241i 


lbs. 

6,750 

2,800 

18,291 

197,901 


lbs. 

2,000 

13,600 

1,083 

4,391 


lbs. 

745,497 

158,32.5 

216,645 

31,760 


lbs. 


lbs. 


9. 




28,584 
183,070 




8 


Goderich to Blue Point 






Blue Point to Point Edward 

Totals 


29 
331i 






225,742 


21,074 


1,152,227 




211,654 






Values $ 






1326 


4,514 84 


1,685 92 


115,222 70 




10,582 70 





Lake St. Clair 





Districts 


Fishing material. 




Tugs 


or vessels. 


Boats. 


Gill nets. 


a> 

S 

a 


No. 


be 

a 

§ 






No. 






No. 


u 


> 


1 


Lake St. Clair. 
River St. Clair 




$ 




14 
26 
52 

92 


$ 

245 

354 

1,676 


34 

95 
97 


1 


300 


$ 

30 


2 


Thames River 












3 


Lake St. Clair and Detroit River . . 


1 


20 


600 


2 

2 


















1 


20 


600 


2,275 


226 


1 


300 


30 



Lake St. Clair 



s 


Districts. 


<B 

M 

tic 

a 

"S 

w 

brls 
50 


£ 

be 

a 

u 


m 


o 




Pickerel or dore. 


6 

5 


1 


Lake St. Clair. 

River St. Clair 

Thames River 


lbs. 
400 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
108,903 


lbs. 

1.000 


2 






'2,666 

1,619 
3,619 


58, 931 i 5,780 


3 


Lake St. Clair and Detroit River. . 

Totals 

Values $ 


50 

200 


250 


9,126 




44,028 20.402 








' 




6.^0 
13 


9,126 




211,862 


27.182 










730 08 




289 52 


10,593 10 


1,087 28 



1899 ] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



75 



FISHERIES.— Cew^iwMed 

^quantity and value of all fishing materials, etc., for 1899. — Continued. 

((Proper). — Continued. 



a 
o 


s 

o 

*> 







lbs. 


J3 
11 

lbs. 


~ Mixed and coarse 

¥^ fish. 


« 
IS 

brls. 
35 


2 

EH 

brls. 

449i 

288" 


"3 
t> 

i$ c. 

80,709 70 
20,100 50 
24,150 52 
22,788 12 


XI 

a 


lbs. 


lbs. 
900 


lbs. 


lbs. 


1 














2 




5,340! 


2,058 




ii 


11,160 

36,427 

47,527 




3 




86,413 




1 


35 


12 
749^ 


4 







2,058' 

1 




11 

.22 






92,653 


147,748 84 










5,559 18 




61 74 


950 54 


350 


7,495 

















District. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Dip-nets. 


Night-lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
Wharves. 




0. 




6 

H 
> 


No. 


t6 


No. 


03 
> 


No. 
hooks. 


ID 
> 


No. 


$ 
230 


No. 


> 

$ 
250 


u 
to 

s 


11 


755 

615 

3,329 


545 

805 

1,815 




$ 




$ 






1 


1 


25 






16 

28 


24 
1,545 








2 


25 


9 


2,575 


11,425 


535 


4 


375 






3 


61 


4,699 


3,165 


9 


2,575 


44 


1,569 


11,425 


535 


4 


605 


1 


250 





D is trio t. — Continued. 



a 

s 

'.S 


a 

<u 

bD 
h 

s 


1 
lbs. 


J3 

lbs. 


lbs. 


-a 

Is 
D 

lbs. 



£ 




T3 

a 

(S 

1" 

lbs. 

28,772 
219,968 
216,177 

464,917 

9,298 34 


m 

la 





07 

"08 
> 


ID 

a 


lbs. 


lbs. 

3,996 

787 

74,314 


lbs. 


lbs. 


$ c. 

6,508 35 

7,881 62 

14,012 13 


1 






1,215 
33,145 

34,360 

1,030 80 




3,042 

9,872 

12,914 







2 


2,598 






3 










2,598 


■ 79,097 






28,402 10 












155 88 


4,745 82 





258 28 



















76 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 27 



ONTARIO 



Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs. 



Lake Erie 





Districts. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs or veesels. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


J 

a 

a 


No. 

1 
1 
2 
6 
5 


? 

be 

a 
a 

20 

98 

102 

76 

89 


> 

1,500 
10,000 
17,000 
14,900 
14,500 


® 

1 8 
7 

16 
16 
15 


No. 

5 
44 
62 
25 

7 
26 
14 
11 

9 

2 

4 

16 

225 


a 

> 

1,100 

4,510 

6,700 

2,255 

750 

785 

510 

801 

805 
106 
200 
650 


a 


No. 
126 


-5 

u 

a- 
9,500 


a,' 
> 


1 

9 


Lake Erie. 

Pelee Island 

County of Essex 


15 
59 
83 
40 
12 
63 
23 
21 

18 
4 
6 

20 


o20- 


3 


County of Kent 

County of Elgin 








4 


5 

2 

3 

10 

7 

'2 
5 
6 


900 

17,500 

1,500 

7,700 

27,200 

62,990 
6,200 

1,850 
20,000 


75 


5 


Houghton and Long Point . . 

Port Rowan Bay 


2,000 
130 


7 


Normandale 








ii 

17 


410 


8 
9 

10 


East of Port Dover 

Cavuga to Moulton's Bay, including 

Grand River, Low Banks 

Port Col borne 


2 
6 


58 


3,500 
' 7,025 


1,358 

2,850" 
380 


n 


Ridgeway 







1.295 


^'> 


Fort Erie 






1,250 






23 


499 


68,425 


90 






19, 172 


364 


166 


155,340 


10.26F 



Lake Erie 



1 

.a 

£ 


Districts. 


1 

m 

t£ 

a 

u 
0) 

bris 


43 

U 

s 


4 

•J3 

IS 


s 


u 

H 


CO 

a 


Pickerel or Dore, 




1 


Lake Erie. 
Pelee Island 


lbs. 

218,746 

788,616 

3,664,130 

1,145,106 

166,025 

2,300 

21,373 

18.5,881 

74,938 

300 

2,150 


lbs. 
13,780 


lbs 


lbs. 


lbs. 

8,975 

161,262 

159,833 

582,509 

59,981 

53,207 

7,677 

141,847 

77,388 

525 

8,642 

8,850 


lbs. 
4^495 





County of Essex . , 


.58,814 
68,030 
96,911 
66,120 






292,682 


3 


County of Kent 








273,238 


4 


County of Elgin 




1,365 

144 

17,691 

2,421 

9,168 

6,511 


91,811 


5 


Houghton and Long Point 






89,774 


6 


Port Rowan Bay . . 








41,261 


7 


Normandale 








2,652 


9 
10 


East of Port Dover 

Cayuga to Moulton's Bay, including 

Grand River, Low Banks 

Port Colborne .... 


9 


41,773 

83,733 

1,690 

171 


240 

25 


3,50 
4,641> 


n 


Ridgeway 






162 
16,100 


1,950 


1^ 


Fort Erie 






16,360 




Totals 

Values S 


9 
36 




431,022 








6,269,565 


265 


53,502 


1,270,696 


864,203^ 




125,391 30 


34,481 76 26 50 

1 


4,280 16 


63,534 80 34,568 12 

1 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



77 



FISaERlES.— Continued. 



quantity and value of all fishing materials, etc., for 1899. — Continued. 



District. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Hoop-nets. 


Night-lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


hi 
ci 

>< 


a 
> 


No. 


> 


No. 


£ 

la 
> 


No. 
hooks. 


6 

s 
"3 
> 


No. 


9} 

> 


No. 


"2 
1 


s 






S 


10 
44 
73 
52 


3,000 
15,700 
28,170 
18 780 




S 


1,000 
400 


10 
3 


4 

13 

31 

16 

3 

4 

8 

5 

9 


s 

1,000 

2,840 

13,950 

6.625 

4,600 

260 

210 

925 

1,150 




$ 


1 


4 


240 


140 


2 


"160 


2 




1 


600 


3 




5,632 


l'641 


4 




22 7! 200 








5 


16 










800 
2,000 


12 
30 






6 




"'l4 


" " ' 2^515 











7 








8 












9 
























10 








1 


400 


1 














11 










5,500 
9,700 


100 






• 




12 
























26 


5,872 


1,781 


216 


75,765 


2 


100 


155 


88 


31,560 


1 


600 





District. — Continued. 



9> 

u 

a 

a 


a 

3 


"3 


J3 
u 

P-i 


lbs. 

7^506 
46 


"S 



lbs. 

3,155 

10,528 

735 

2,001 

784 

10,990 

3,571 

890 

500 


c 

£ 

cS 

c 
u 

1 

lbs. 

1,100 

90,221 

192,962 

59,696 

21,424 

138,840 

4,.539 

63,549 

15,600 
1,380 1 
7,453 1 
2,400 

599,164 


£ 
.2 
"> 
a 



- 

lbs. 
1,700 

""4;49i 
i33 

6,324 


a 
"3 
> 




lbs. 


lbs. 

12,794 
20,873 
22,456 
16.442 
23,931 


lbs. j lbs. 


$ c. 

9,433 01 
45,882 69 
105,461 27 
66,930 23 
18,732 53 
11,691 66 

1,850 17 
18,205 59 

14,242 58 

318 05 

883 39 

3,995 50 


1 






78,917 
86,460 
38,256 
9,786 
82,433 
19,138 
28,702 

34,700 
3,500 
2,335 
1,400 

391,107 


2 




3 
4 




5 




6 






7 




18,210 

530 

300 

1,489 

25,350 




s 


600 


9 
10 




11 




12 




7,546 


33,154 
663 08 




600 


142,375 


297,626 67 


36 


8,542 50 




11,733 21 


452 76 


11,983 28 


1,897 20 













78 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 27 



ONTARIO 
Rethrn of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs. 

Lake Ontario 





Districts. 


Fishing material. 




Tugs 


or vesselg. 


Boats. 


Gill-nets. 


£ 


No. 


"a 
a 
o 
Eh 


a3 

3 

> 


a 


No. 

2 
10 
6 
2 
3 


s 
> 


a 


No. 


27,600 
30,100 

2,100 

4,300 
13,500 
46,600 
78,000 

6,500 
33,200 

5,800 
34,000 


6 

s 

> 


1 


Lake Ontario and Tributaries. 
Queenston 


$ 

10 
540 
225 

21 
100 




$ 
60' 


? 


Niagara 










22 276 


1.614 


3 

4 


Port Dalhousie 

Louth 


1 


6 


2,000 


3 


9 
4 
6 
6 
31 


301 
4.5(1 


94& 
70 


5 


Clinton 










140" 


8 


Grimsby 










3| 300 
19, 1,022 
17 12. 600 


450 


7 


Burlington Beach 










2,355 


8 


Halton Coiinty ... 










46 1 750 
9 


5,300 


q 


Peel County 










3 
18 

7 
18 
26 


275 
1,500 
250 
525 
304 


295 


10 


County of York 










24 
16 
30 

50 
99 
75 
28 
31 
24 


"26 


1,985 


11 


County of Ontario 










485 


^?, 


Co. of Durham & Northumberland . 
Rice Lake and Trent River 










1,155 


13 












14 


County of Prince Edward 


2 
1 


16 
30 


2,000 


fi 


571 1-211 


40 
10 

1859 


32,130 

9,000 

8,100 

560 

4,820 

336,310 


1,090 


15 


Bay of Ouinte ■. . 


oOO 4 
1 ' ' ' ' 


35 
20 

18 
18 


900 
420 
394 
400 


1,000 


16 
17 


Lennox County and Napanee River 
Amherst Island and vicinity 


186 
9,850 


18 


Wolfe Island and vicinity 






1 


650 






4 


52 








4,300 


13 


282 


20, 997 


517 


27,630 



*3 machines. 



Lake Ontario 



Districts. 



Lake Ontario and Trihutaries. 



Queenston 

Niagara 

Port Dalhousie 

Louth 

Clinton 

Grimsby 

Burlington Beach 

Halton County 

Peel County . . 

County of York 

County of Ontario 

Co. of Durham & Northumberland. 

Rice Lake and Trent River 

County of Prince Edward 

Bay of Quinte 

Lennox County and Napanee River 
Amherst Island and vicinity . . . 
Wolfe Island and vicinity 



U 



brls 



lbs. 

9,000 

675 

170,094 

25,300 

51,250 

105,000 

261,331 

443,000 

500 

149,800 

16,000 

15,400 



lbs. 

300 

31,105 

12,150 

500 

1,000 

3,200 

51,500 

600 



Totals 



Values $ 



16,391 

20,100 

15,570 

6,500 

300 



48 1,306,211 



192 



26,124 22 



22,450 
3,000 
9,130 

63;526 
26,350 

1,900 
31,010 

2,100 



lbs. 



lbs. 
5,000 



19,000 
5,230 
3,600 
7,040 
4,810 
50 
4,650 

50'i42 
500 



4,555 
4,600 



259,815 104,177 17,925 



100 

700 

2,200 



lbs. 

5,300 

108,667 

740 



lbs. 



1,000 



200 



500 
3,425 

750 

50 

5,200 



20785 20 10,417 70 1,434 



4,600 

10,250 

2,275 

2,200 



200 

1,000 

150 

1.150 

225 

22,900 

7,62C 

115,000 

114,529 

30,120 

9,905 

1.5,503 



135,232 318,302 



6,76160 12,732 08 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



79 



FISHERIES.— (7on<inMe}</. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials, etc., for 1899. — Continued 

and Tributaries. 



Fishing material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Dip-nets. 


Night-lines. 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


m 
u 


> 


No. 


1 
> 


No. 


> 


No. 
hooks. 


CD 

> 


No. 


<D 

s 

> 


No. 


> 


a 
3 
Z 






.s 




!< 




■■^ 




■S 


1 


8 

50 




1 
























2 




























.3 




















4 




























6 


3 


















20 465 


32 


320 


7 


















g 














4 










133 


9 




275 


105 






3 475 




10 
















11 












27 


.'^on 






li 9nn 






12 












85 1.477 






19 


415 


13 












40 
64 
36 
4 
30 


660 
1,150 

520 

80 

. 530 










14 


5 


250 


750 










3 

2 


375 
7,000 






15 
















16 












17 
























18 


















8,980 






453 


8 


525 


S55 






287 


4,721 




49 













and Tributaries. — Continued. 



Maskinonge. 


c 
o 

D 
P 


"S 

lbs. 
1,400 
100 


u 

Ch 

lbs. 

18,000 

17,357 
6,689 

12,000 

5,000 

5,000 

6,183 

900 

1,000 

500 

50 

12.000 
2,822 
7,130 

90,667 
4,994 

30,827 

20,058 

241,177 
7,235 31 


(D 

03 

lbs. 


3 


£ 

c3 



a 

es 

lbs. 


6 

.2 
'> 

8 

lbs. 





Value. 


ID 
S 


lbs. 


lbs. 

3,070 
18,339 


lbs. 


Ib.s. 


S c. 

1,677 20 
9,556 30 
4 617 81 


1 














2 






"566 


is 






a 






600 






1,088 00 4 

1,298 00: 5 

4,406 00 6 

10 265 51 7 




450 














;:::::: : 






2,340 


""466 
100 






200 
12,000 

4,800 
9 000 








1,666 
100 

150 






9,675 00 8 
1,034 80 9 
5 521 62 10 




80 
77 
















575 50 11 










7,700 
.59,065 
10,000 
64,700 
3i,761 

3,900 
19,824 

198,700 

3,974 


........ ........ 




2,943 40 12 

2,814 18 13 

16,890 46 14 


600 


s^ioo 


556 

.3,666 

25,730 

* "3^357 

35,309 

2,118 54 


56,703 
20,000 
90,500 
15,350 
3,050 
9,175 

221,391 

4,427 82 






383 






1.50 







15,090 47 
2,893 99 
5 223 91 


15 




2"866 
1,000 


........ ... .... 


16 








17 


1,500 






2,787 26 18 












2,633 


33,316 


98,359 41 












157 98 


1,998 96 



















80 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



ONTARIO 

Return of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, vessels and boats, the 

during the 





Districts. 


Fishing 




Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 


Oill-nets. 


s 

s 
25 


No. 


a 
a 
o 
H 


1 


i 


No. 


2 

> 


a 


No. 


02 


> 


1 


Frontenac county 






$ 




71 
24 

10 
1 


$ 

489 
245 

59 
10 


32 
30 

9 
1 


■■■■34 

7 


2,300 
1,020 

250 


$ 

205 


9, 


Leeds county 










465 


3 


Prescott, Russell and Carlton 
counties 










26 


4 


Renfrew county 












5 


Hastings and Peterborongh coun- 
ties, including Otonabee river . , 












H 


Lake Scugog and Victoria county. 






















































106 


803 


72 


41 


3,570 


696 

















District. 



Frontenac county 

Leeds county 

Prescott, Russell and Carleton 

counties 

Renfrew county 

Hastings and Peterborough counties, 

including Otonabee river 

Lake Scugog and Victoria county 

Totals 

Values 



brls. 



_w 

lbs. 

5,190 

1,000 



1,000 

7,190 

143 80 



M 






Trout. 


lbs. 


lbs. ' 


100 


900 


'1,700 


8,400 



n 



500 
800 14,320 



2,600 24,120 
2081 2,412 



lbs. 
5,000 
3,779 

240 



18,9001 
196,750 



224,669 
17,973 52 



lbs. 
11,500 



1,050 



200 



12,750 
637 50 



lbs. 
81,016 

79,374 

1,300 
250 



160 



162,100 

6,484 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



81 



FISKERIES.— Concluded. 

quantity and value of all fishing materials, also the kinds and quantities of fish caught 
year 1899. 



material. 




1 




» 






-lines. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Hoop-nets. 


Night 


Freezers and 
ice houses. 


Piers and 
wharves. 




No. 


05 


6 

> 


No. 


6 

> 


No. 


0^ 

> 


No. 
hooks. 


> 

$ 
3 
35 

10 

2 


No. 


2 
"* 

> 


No. 


6 

3 
> 


S 






$ 




$ 


57 
53 

3 
5 


$ 

1,050 


100 




$ 




$ 














1,060 650 


■ 






? 




60 
100 


600 
100 


3 


56 






3 












4 












5 




























g 












118 


2,270 


1,450 


50 






















3 


56 





















Maskinonge. 


Sturgeon. 


CD 


.a 


.-2 

ei ■ 


Catfish. 


Mixed and 

coarse fish. 


Bull heads. 


Value. 


XI 

S 
s 


lbs. 


lbs. 


lbs. 
700 
900 

2,400 
150 


lbs. 
3,275 
300 

700 

75 

200 
1,920 

6,470 

194 10 


lbs. 






lbs. 
69,375 
56,740 

2,610 
7,040 

300 
10,510 

146,575 


lbs. 
45,995 
6,500 

4,400 
175 


lbs. 


$ c. 
6,865 09 
6,136 84 

478 70 
197 83 

3,062 00 
34,387 16 


I 


110 


465 

830 

538 


15,063 


2 

3 
4 

Pi 




24,800 


272,050 




1,286 
.5,436 


22,340 
79,410 




6 


. 


296,96o| 1,833 


15,063 


51,127 62 




17,817 601 109 98 


326 16 




2,931 50 


1,588 20 


.301 26 










|--- 



6 G.F. 



82 



THE REPORT ON 



[27 



ONTARIO 

Recapitulation of the number of fishermen, tonnage and value of tugs, veBsels and 

of fish caught during 





Districts. 
Province of Ontario. 




















Fishing 




Tugs or vessels. 


Boats. 






Gill-netB. 




1 

s 


No. 


<D 

etc 

(« 

s 
a 
o 
H 


<6 

> 


a 


No. 


_3 

;> 




No. 




1 
> 


1 


Lake of the Woods and Rainy 


4 
21 
23 
22 
12 


53 
308 
260 
420 
274 


6,000 
39,850 
29,850 
.59,700 
33,200 


14 
112 
112 
133 

70 


26 
52 
41 
128 
82 
14 

52 

26 

225 

282 

106 


$ 

1,400 
.5,570 
4,685 
10,255 
5,448 
245 

1,676 

354 

19,172 

20,997 

803 


71 
94 
69 
505 
173 
34 

97 

95 

364 

517 

72 


1^618 
1 


16,850 
762,100 
137,340 
610,731 
352,905 
300 


$ 
1,927 


2 
3 
4 

5 


Tjake Superior 

Lake Huron North Channel . . 
fi^eorgian Bay 


30,255 
12,400 
77,773 
32,024 


6 


River St Clair 


30 


7 


Lake St. Clair and Detroit 


1 


20 

499 
52 


600 


2 




8 










9 
10 


Lake Erie and Grand river . . 


23 


68,425 
4,300 


90 
13 


1,859 
41 


155,340 
336,310 

3,570 


10,268 
27,630 


11 


Frontenac, Leeds, Carleton, 
Prescott and Renfrew di- 


696 


12 


Peterborough, Victoria and 














Totals 


109 






















1,886 


238,925 


541 


1,033 


70.305 


1,889 


3,685 


2,373,446 


192,803 




1 


1 





District . 



Lake of the Woods and Rainy 

River 

Lake Superior 

Lake Huron North Channel .... 

Georgian Bay 

Lake Huron 

River St. Clair 

Lake St. Clair and Detroit 

river 

Thames river 

Lake Erie and Grand river 

Lake Ontario 

Frontenac, Leeds, Carleton, Pres 

cott and Renfrew division 

Peterborough, Victoria and 

other inland counties 



brls. 



54 
155 
33Pg 

50 



lbs. 



138,226 

14,026 

194,300 

225,742 

400 

250 



Totals. 



647J 



6,269,565 
1,306,211 

6,190 

1,000 



8,155,910 



^ 



lbs. 

309,038 
623,229 
832,666 
810,220 
21,074 



lbs. 



40,951 
2,182,598 

976,588 454 
2,897,594 410 
1,152,227 



9,126 



431,022 
259,815 

1,801); 

I 

800 



266 
104,177 

9,300 

14,820 



3,298,790 7,378,520 



lbs. 



1,619 
2,000 

53,502 
17,925 

9,019 

215,650 

300,579 



lbs. 

230,762 

36,347 

776,312 

694,511 

211,654 

108,903 

I 

44,028 

58,931 

1,270 696 

135,232 

12,550 

200 



3,580,126 



lbs. 

59,928 

11,571 

289,123 

117,368 



1,000 

20,402 

5,780 

864,203 

318,302 

161,940 

160 



1,849,774 



1899] 



GAME AND FISHERIES. 



83 



FISHERIES.— Conitnweo?. 

boats, the quantity and value of all fishing materials, also the kinds and quantities 
the year 1899. 



material. 


Other fixtures used in fishing. 




Seines. 


Pound-nets. 


Hoop-nets. 


Night lines. 


Freezers and Piers and 
ice bouses. wharves. 




No. 




> 


No. 


i 
"« 
> 


No. 


> 


No. 
hooks. 


> 


No. 


(D 

_3 

> 

9,200 
80,240 
3,450 
1,600 
2,210 
230 

376 


No. 




5 






$ 


38 
46 
108 
31 
49 


s 

4,300 

12,290 

20,700 

2,000 

7,990 




s 


s 


17 
12 
12 
8 
19 

4 




$ 


1 












.. . .^ .. . . 


2 












.-? 








4 


40 






2 


4 
















.5 


11 


755 

3,329 
615 

5,872 
525 


545 

1,815 

805 

1,781 

855 










1 


250 


6 


25 


9 


2,575 


* 28 


* 1 R4R 


11,425 


535 


7 


25 


* 161 * 9A 






8 


20 

8 


216 


75,765 


2 

287 

118 


100 
4,721 

2,270 


9,700 


155 


88 
49 

3 


31,. 560 
8,980 

56 


1 


600 
453 


9 
10 








1,450 


50 


11 
















la 




















337,901 








89 


11 ,097 


5,801 


497 


125,820 


411 


7,137 


22,575 


740 


211 


4 


1,303 





Dip nets. 



a 
o 

a 


a 
1 

s 

CO 


'^ 

H 


o 

S 

lbs. 

100 

100 

1,093 

4 700 

2,058 


<» 

.a 

H 


J3 

o 






3 
o 

brls. 

*448 


£ 
.2 
'> 

J_ 

lbs. 

11,274 


Val e. 

$ c. 

56,-589 48 
273,896 43 
223,958 43 
399,558 09 
147,748 84 
6,508 35 

14,012 13 

7,881 62 

297.626 67 

98.359 41 

13,678 46 

.37,449 16 

1,590,447 07 


g 
1 


lbs. 
500 


lbs. 

147,908 

11,784 

119,466 

127,500 

92,653 

3,996 

74,314 

787 

142,375 

33,316 

1,833 


lbs. 

■ • 


lbs. 
18,.394 


lbs. 


lbs. 

4,220 

1,178 

51, .^41 

111,106 

47, .^.27 
28,772 

216,177 


brls 

41 

35 


1 
2 


1,308 




18,647 

11,961 

11 


9 1 

239^ 3,816 
749^ 


3 
4 




6 


2,598 


4,1.50 

1,286 

40,745 


33,145 

l,iSl5 

391,107 

241,177 

4,350 

2,120 

681,165 


7^.546 
25,940 


9,872 

.■},042 

33,154 

198,700 

13.5,765 

10,810 

421,962 






7 




219,968 
.^99,164 
221,391 

72,133 

22,340 








s 


600 






6,324 


9 


2,633 
110 


. .. 




IP 

n 


296,850 








12 














304,599 


755,932 


1,595,517 76 


998 


21,414 





Sturgeon bladders. 



84 



THE REPORT ON GAME AND FISHERIES. 



[ No. 27 



RECAPITULATION 

Of the yield of the Fisheries of the Province for the year 1899. 



Kinds of fish. 


Quantity. 

76 

3,298,790 

647i 

8,155,910 

998 

7,378,-520 

300,579 

3,580,126 

1,849,774 

304,599 

755,932 

21,414 

448 

40,745 

681,165 

421,962 

1,595,517 

25,940 


Price. 


Value. 


Whitefish . 


hrls. 


$ c. 

10 00 

08 

4 00 

02 

10 00 
10 
08 
05 
04 
06 
06 
30 
80 
06 
03 
02 
02 
06 


$ c. 
760 00 


" Ihs. 


263,903 20 
2,590 00 


Uerring 


brls. 


*' fresh 

Trout 

Bass 


lbs. 

brls. 

lbs. 


163,118 20 

9,980 00 

737,852 00 

24.046 32 


Pickerel " 

Pike " 

Maskinonpe " 


179,006 30 
73,990 96 
18,275 94 


Sturgeon •' 

Caviare " 

Bladders 

Eels ... " 


45,355 92 

6,424 20 

368 40 

2,444 70 


Perch " 

Catfish " 

Coarse fish " 


20,434 95 
8,439 24 

31,910 34 
1,556 40 


TuUibee 




_ _ 




Total 1899 


1,590,447 07 
1,433,631 72 


" 1898 














Increase 


156,815 35 











RECAPITULATION 

Of all fishing tags, boats and nets, etc, employed in Province for the year 1899. 



Articles. 



109 tugs (1,886 tonnage, 541 men 

1,033 boats (1,889 men) 

2,373,446 yards gill-nets 

89 seines ( 1 1,097 yards) 

497 pound nets 

411 hoop-nets . 

44 dip-nets 

22,675 night lines 

211 freezers and ice houses . . 
4 piers and wharfs 



Total 



Total value. 



238,925 

70,505 

192,80.? 

5,801 
125,820 

7,137 

1,569 

740 

137,901 

1,303 

782,504 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

Annual Report, Chairman Game and Fish Commission 3 

Chief Game Warden 8 

Game Wardens 10-12 

Issuers of Deer-hunting Licenses, 1899 13 

Shooting Licenses issued to foreignei's, 1899 16 

Deputy Game Wardens 16 

List of prosecutions for infraction of the Game Laws, 1898 22 

Report of Deputy Commissioner 32 

Introductory 33 

Establishment of a Branch 34 

Protection service 34 

Purchase of a protection vessel 35 

Implements of capture 35 

Observance of the law 36 

The Commercial Fisheries 36 

Protection of our Game Fish 37 

Stocking of depleted waters 37 

I^easing of lakes 38 

Legislation . . 38 

Close season for salmon troub and whitefish 38 

Public sentiment 39 

Frogs 39 

Carp and suckers 39 

Exportation of logs 40 

Sawdust and fishways 40 

Official visits 40 

Licenses 41 

Receipts and expenditure 41 

The season's catch 41 

Statistics 41 

Synopsis of Overseers' Reports 42-57 

Report of Commander of Steamer " Gilphie " 57 

Fishery Overseers of the Province 60-65 

Statistical information 66-84 

Recapitulation! 82-84 

• [85] 



REPORT 



DEPARTMENT OF IMMIGRATION 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



FOB THE YEAR 



1899. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




TORONTO : 
WARWICK BRO'S & RUTTER, Printers, Etc., 68 and 70 Front Street West. 

1900. 



To His Honor the Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario : 

The undersigned has the honor to present to Your Honor the Annual Report of 
the Department of Immigration for the year ending December Slst, 1899. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN DRYDEN, 

Commissioner of Immigration. 



[3] 



CONTENTS. 



Page 

Secretary's Report 7 

Appendix No. 1 — Report of Peter Byrne, Ontario Agent, Liverpool, England 13 

•' 2— Report of F. W. Anwand, Halifax 16 

" 3— Report of S. Gardener, St. John, N. B 21 

" 4— Report of P. Doyle, Quebec 24 

" 5 — Report of John Hoolahan, Montreal 2& 



[oj 



REPORT 



OF THE 



IMMIGRATION DEPARTMENT 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31ST DECEMBER, 



I 899. 



To the Honourable John Dryden, M.P.P., 

Commissioner of Imm,igration. « 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report on Immigration to this 
Province during the twelve months ending SUt December, 1899. 

The total number of steerage passengers reported as settled in the Province of 
Ontario daring 1899 was 4,015 as against 3,358 in the previous year, an increase of 657. 

These figures, as pointed out in pre/ious reports, take no account of arrivals from 
the United States, excepting at the port of Montreal, nor of the cabin passengers settling 
in the Province But as there has been a decline every yeir from 1888 to 1898 in the 
number of immigrants arriving, it is satisfactory to observe that the tide has again turned 
and that 1899 shows an increase of nearly twenty per cent, over the previous year. The 
improvement has not been confined to numbers merely, but extends also to the general 
condition of the immigrating clasae?, for among the arrivals there were none of the 
physically incapable assisted by charitable societies as too often happened in former 
years. During 1899 all who came in search of employment were in a fairly healthy con- 
dition, and being fitted for work were readily placed in situations with little delay. 

I am indebted to the courtesy of the Department of the Interior at Ottawa, and the 
Dominion Agents at Halifax, St. John, N.B., Quebec and Montreal, for the reports 
appended, and for co-operation generally in promoting the interests of immigration. 
From these reports the accompanying statement A his been compiled, giving the parti- 
culars as to number, nationality and occupations of those immigrants only who arrived 
at these ports with the declared intention of settling in Ontario, and omitting the details 
of monthly arrivals, and of the arrivals destined for other places in the Dominion and for 
the United States. 

Farm Labourers. 

As usual, skilled farm labourers were in dtmaud far in excess of the supply, and 
wages advanced considerably over former rates. For good plowmen the prevailins; rate 
was $16.00 to $18.00 per month for season of six or eight months, and for the year $160.00 
to $200, with board and washing in each case. Partly-traiied farm hands were readily 
engaged at lower rates, according to their capacity and experience, and young men of 
eighteen years of age or upwards, who desired to learn farming were engaged for the first 
year at rates varying from $50 00 to $80.00, with board and washing. There was some 

[7] 



THE REPORT ON [ No. 28 



demand for yooihs at lower rates, but very few boys from 14 to 18 were among those 
■who applied for employment. All these classes are very desirable immigrants, for they 
not only supply the immediate wants of the agricultural labour market and thereby con- 
tribute to the success of the staple industry of the Province, but they also in very many 
instances become the owners or tillers of farms on their own account and in their turn 
give employment to others. 

Female Domestic Servants. 

The immigration of this class has very much fallen off during recent years, conse" 
quent mainly upon the advance in wages in the British Isles, and though within the past 
two years there has been an increase in their rato of wages in this country, especially in 
the cities, it is probable that it has not yet advanced to a point which will induce any 
great increase in the number immigrating. 

General Labourers. 

The demand for railway labourers in the north western part of the Province atsorbed 
a large number of this class, and the general iudustriai activity prevailing rendered it 
easy for them to find employment. 

Juvenile Immigration. 

The juvenile immigration returns from the several homes throughout the Province^ 
under the management of philanthropic individuals or societies, show a total of 717 for 
1899, being an increase of 118 over 1898, and a decrease of 207 as compared with 1897, 
the year when the '' Act to regulate the Immigration into Ontario of certain classes of 
Children" was passed. In the year 1896 the number was 1,293, and for the previous 
decade — 1886-95 — the yearly average was 1,524. In view of these figures there can 
be no doubt that this Act has been of signal advantage in preventing the indiscriminate 
importation of children without due regard to their adaptation to t>he conditions of in- 
dustrial life in this country. 

Prospects for 1900. 

In view of the high rates of ocean passage, the uawonted activity in all branches of 
industry in the United Kingdom, and other causes which obviously suggest themselves^ 
it would seem to be a mistake to anticipate much of an increase of immigration to Ontario 
during the approaching season, so that employers may fairly look forward to the full 
maintenance of, or probable advance on, the rate of wages prevailing in 1899. But a 
reaction is likely to follow the present exceptional activity in many fields of employment, 
as a consequence of wbich a very largely increased volume of immigration to Canada may 
be expected in 1901 and following years, in which, doubtless, Ontario will participate to 
a very considerable extent, especially as by the time indicated the attractions for settlers 
in the north-western portions of the Province will then have become moje widely known 
and the facilities for reaching desirable locations will have been very much improved. 



1899] 



IMMIGRATION. 



Statement A. — Showing the number, nationalities and occupatiouF, so far as ascertained, 
of the immigrants arriving at the ports of Halifax, St. John, N.B., Qaebec and 
Montreal for the Province of Ontario, during the year 1899. 





0! 

> 
1- 

'^ 
O 

H 


Nationalities. 


Occupations, so far as ascertaiaed . 




m 

p 


.2 
1— < 

55 

19i 
17 


A 

2> 
o 
o 

60 

10 

310 

97 


a 

© 

3 

"l6 
7fi 


d 
'> 

a 
'•5 
a 

b 

m 

"58 
16 

74 
124 

"50 


C! 
a) 

i 

ti 

a 
9 

2 

"13 
4 

19 
13 

6 


'3 

c 

63 

228 
9 

300 

.... 

300 


"S 
a 



u 


DQ 

a 


2 

OI 

S-4 



1 

s 

14 


u 

m 


1 


CO 

'a 

.a 


48 


2 

1 

S 
OS 




to 


s 


-a 

,2 

S 
Em 


•0 
tg 


Halifax 


.599 

47 

2,918 

451 


377 

25 

2,033 

275 


1 

391 115 

12.... 
66 128 
27 35 

144 1 278 
230 174 


21 17 


264 


St. John, N.B 

Quebec 


7| 20 
]48i 739 


.... 3.... 

159 98 265 


17 
1,381 




42 76' 15 

1 


24 28 


231 








Total, 1899 

Total, 1898 


4,015 
3,358 


2,710 
2,452 


266 
198 


407' 95 
292] 49 


211 

307 


955 222 

792 196 
1631 26 


146 
94 

52 


310 
303 

7 


1,893 
1,492 


Increase 


657 


258 68 115 

1 


46 


"86 


104 


401 




j 1 



















The following is a statement of th« nuiaber of immigrants settled in the Province of 
Ontario, with their nationalities, for ea^h year from 1878 to 1899, inclusive : 



Year. 



English. 



Scotch 



1878 
1879 
1880 
1881 
1882 
1883 
1884 
1885 
1886 
1887 
1888 
1889 
1890 
1891 
1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 



124 
169 
980 
704 
873 
954 
020 
261 
344 
758 
984 
023 
44?. 
140 
339 
743 
283 
752 
019 
404 
452 
710 



1,785 

2,894 

3,0;7 

3 070 

3,173 

2,658 

2,623 

2,131 

2.S68 

3,277 

3,598 

2,347 

1,613 

1,368 

1,188 

545 

584 

559 

645 

459 

292 

407 



Irish. 



1.561 

2,993 

4,518 

4,521 

6,322 

8,993 

3,783 

2,105 

2.497 

3,;-«30 

2,801 

2,26.S 

1,630 

1,256 

1,048 

466 

347 

358 

226 

238 

198 

266 



German. 



Other 
countries. 



620 

1,4.50 

1,197 

1,274 

1,033 

1,384 

1,716 

1,098 

936 

1,032 

993 

779 

699 

649 

602 

380 

177 

139 

58 

66 

49 

95 



2,975 

3,901 

2,-569 

1,664 

1,290 

2,130 

3,136 

1.378 

1,243 

1,326 

1,156 

965 

1,042 

922 

594 

437 

577 

578 

593 

551 

.^67 

537 



Total. 



13,055 

24,407 

19,297 

18,233 

22,691 

27,119 

22,277 

13 973 

15 288 

19,723 

20,532 

15,387 

11,462 

10,3H5 

7,771 

6,571 

5,968 

5,386 

4,441 

3,718 

3,358 

4,015 



10 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 28 



The following statement shows the number of immigrants who left the British 
Islands for places out of Europe, and the percentage settled in Ontario each year since 
1874: 



Year. 


Number left. 


Settled in 
Ontario. 


Percentage. 


1874 

1875 


241,014 
173,809 
138,322 
119,971 
147,663 
217,163 
322,291 
392,514 
413,288 
397,157 
304,074 
264,986 
330,881 
396,494 
398,494 
342,641 
315,980 
334.543 
321,397 
307,633 
226,827 
271,772 
241,9.52 
lil3,C80 
205,171 


25,254 

17,655 

11,4.32 

11,654 

13,055 

24,407 

19,291 

18, -233 

22,691 

27,119 

22 277 

13,973 

15,288 

19,723 

20,532 

15,387 

11,426 

13.335 

7,771 

6,571 

5,968 

5,386 

4,441 

3,718 

3,358 

4,015 


10.55 
10 16 


1876 

1877 


8.27 
9.77 


1878 


8 84 


1879 


11 23 


1880 

1881 


5.80 
4 64 


1882 


5.49 


1883 

1884 

1885 

1886 


6.83 
7.32 
5 27 
4.62 


1887 

1888 ... 


4.97 
5.16 


1889 


4.49 
3.61 


1891 

1892 


3.09 
2.42 


1893 


2.13 


1894 .... 


2.63 


1895 


1.98 


1896 

1897 

1898 

1899 


1.83 
2.74 
1.63 







The following statement shows the aggregate number of children settled in this 
provinc since 1868 by the undermentioned parties. 









.a 








60 










a 


60 


s 






g 






Year. 




"3. 


o 

S-i 


u 


3 

73 


a 


d 
a 


-6C 

oc J C 


a 

a . 

es CO 








tf 


S 


w=s 


k 


Q . 


e8 

CO 




.2^ 


3 






.2 


CO 


£^ 


u 


> 2 


. 


S^i-^ 






eS 




^ 


1,013 


^ 


s 


c2 


Q 


1. 





% 


H 


1868-72 


907 














1,920 
594 


1873 


134 
193 

""■gi 

42 
96 
68 


358 
279 
184 
163 
115 
68 
95 
114 


■■79 
126 
129 


102 
50 
78 
71 
83 
86 
57 
41 












1874 


81 
43 










603 


1875 










305 


1876 










234 


1877 


28 
32 
23 
22 










317 


1878 










307 


1879 










398 


1880 




11 


22 


407 


1881 


117 


90 


158 


60 


46 




49 


45 




562 


1882 


118 


183 


153 


70 


41 


51 


24 


139 




779 


1883 


170 


193 


194 


125 


53 


172 


43 


183 




1,133 


1884..... 


165 


165 


254 


145 


75 


252 


39 


283 




1,378 


1885 


125 

no 


183 
215 


351 
274 


115 
129 


87 
91 


395 
615 


32 
33 


323 
301 




1,611 
1,768 


1886 


1887 


120 


212 


316 


202 


75 


4C6 




77 





1,408 


1888 


300 


270 


271 


279 


101 


484 


104 


30 




1,839 


1889 


160 
151 


249 
156 


295 
204 


85 


86 
71 


481 
257 


92 
96 






1,448 


1890 






250 


1,185 


1891 


135 


230 


282 




66 


369 


108 




233 


1,423 


1892 


90 


237 


204 




62 


614 


95 




250 


1,552 


1893 


140 


120 


242 




59 


770 


123 




268 


1,722 


1894 


136 


122 


222 




56 


632 


86 




257 


1,511 


1895 


75 


58 


230 




39 


633 


92 




262 


1,389 


1896 


10 


155 


202 




45 


548 


77 





256 


1,293 


1897 


34 
21 
45 


37 
43 
61 


100 
48 
59 





34 

22 
41 


407 


77 




235 


924 


1898 


423 42 
^63 48 


599 


1899 






717 




7.972 










Total 


3,753 


5,368 


4.393 


1,778 


1.377 


1.271 


1,403 


2,011 


29,326 



1899 ] 



IMMIGRATION. 



11 



OS 

00 



a 
a 

CO 
Oi 
00 






00 



OS 
00 



00 



w 


OS 

oo 


rt 


t— 1 


p 




H 


? 


»— I 


(U 


Q 


p-. 


{?^ 


tt) 


W 


■ii 


Pli 


60 


M 


a 


w 







TS 




fl 




o 








-♦3 




eS 




fr4 




U) 








a 




s 



''So 

Cm eg 

« z 

a, so 

© b; 

<U 

a, 





O 


-J i-HOO lO lO 




© ti 




o -r ■3" iO iM 




t^ CD 


§ 




lOlO IM "^ l^ 




CO rH 


CO 


9^ 


!M O iO C5 ■<*< 




(M 


rH 




00 »^ 




5D_ 






•^"r-T 




CO~ 




«3 


© o o ©o 




© rH 




0©05 IMiO 




CO y-< 


00 




1(5 © u3 •-< ;o 




00 C<l 


^ 


c<i o o: o iM 




© 


rH 




b-05 1-1 IM 




1-1 






•"a^r^" 




t>r 




c5 


lO O IM imO O 


CO T-l 




•T5 O C» a: 1-1 i-H 


c 


lO 


00 

l-H 




»o © © O --I t>. 


CD IM 


9^ 


CO <=> Oi r^ -^ o 


© 




05 05 (M Tf< O 


t^ 






■*~r-r CS 


©" 






05 O © © 00 




t~ CO 




o 


C3 © l^ -*l IW 




■^ 


CD 






-r © f M Tt< 




t~ r-i 1 


00 
I-H 


^ 


<N O Ci (M "M 




CO 




t^?D <M ^D 




(M 


- 






TfTrH 




"^ 1 




c5 


iO © ©05<M 




ec 


m 




00© ti- lO CO 




oc 


f 


i5 




■* © -J ,-i CO 




"» 


rH 


^ 


i-H O a5 rt IT<1 








GO 




<D^CC_r-. Tf © 




oc 




l-H 
















Tirr-r rn' 




t~ 1 




o 


©t-t^oo l^5 




■* 


CO 




© ro t^ c<; rt 




a- 


CO 






in CO ?o h-io 




© rH 1 


5d 


^ 


N CO T 05 © 




-t 








CO cs iM ^-I CO 




OC 






o 


in © -f © iM 






CO 




© lO •* -^ (M 






o 


25 




•<!j< (rq 00 © 00 




-* 


y-{ 


00 


n© 


<_• c5 oc © in 




f- 1 


I-l 


C<5 ■*! i-i i-H 00 




a- 








■^■"r-T 




CO 








CO© rH © 00 00 •* 


cc 


t— 




" 


CO o i-H in CO © c 


oc 


O 


oo 




© © © <M -^ t~-J 


i ■* 


rH 


m 


00 © t- © CO 00 (M 


cr 






© CO 1-1 (M t- © Tf 


CO 








'i^" (M" 


i=^ 






6 


t-© ■* © 30 


IC 


-rf 


■* 




© O CO lO Tj< 


IM 


© 


1^ 


o» 




© CO -* in -H 


© 


oc 




00 


۩ 


© ^ -^ CO CO 


oc 


CM 




i-H 


rfi lO 1-1 CO © 


(M 


cc 








•^'" 




cc 








© O © CO CO © 


oc 


00 




o 


lO O -^ © CO © 


© 


-3< 


i 




© © ■* CO t^t- 


IT 




00 


^ 


fc- © 1-1 Cr. t^ C<1 


oc 




t-H 




00 CD rH 1-1 t~ 


ir 

ir 












J3 • 




















60 






















P 






















O 






















(I 






















^ 






















-W 






















TS 






















<o 












































S 












































« 






















CO 












































O 










■ «' ?. 








2 










o g 






be 

a 










a 




a 










: - -S 'o 














: o-w o 




be 










.— « c3 




_g 










l^** -^ 




'S 










: o S ^.w 




^ 








Europe 
Canada 
mmigra 
nd medi 


as 

a^ 

ftp 


1 


13 

T) 








fl aiZ =* m O « 




1.2 






.2.iS.IS2S 




o 
S 53 






gene 
gene 
arria 
rovis 
icide 
nmig 
ainv 




ft ho 








o 






< 


<JC 


an 


1— ( 


tH 


tf 




O 


1 



12 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 28 



The following statement, condensed from the reports of the Commissioner of 
Crown Land, shows the progress of the settlement of the free grants districts since 
1868: 



Year. 


Number of town- 
ships set apart. 


a 


Oi 

a 


u 


li 


si, 

ft 

u u 
S 


m 

(V 

u 

cS 

u 
a; . 

[2; 


Number of lots the 
locution of which 
have been can- 
celled. 


go 

a 

it 

1.2 


1868 


15 
24 
14 

1 
18 

6 
10 

1 


511 

1,200 

1,113 

875 

757 

919 

1,387 

4(53 

1,914 

2,115 

1,506 

1.292 

1,077 

932 

985 

1,157 

1,231 

1,149 

902 

842 

858 

610 

579 

461 

446 

736 

754 

725 

669 

780 

633 


46,336 

56,3il 

155,427i 

153,105i 

115.065"' 

100, 603^ 

119,070"" 

186,807 

192,858 

260,801 

274,238 

199,600 

181,745 

153,764 

129,585 

134,594 

161,964 

17;\351 

162,734 

122.772 

109 002 

114,050 

83,273 

79,948 

59,733 

57,440 

99,435 

1 00,010 

95,496 

90,037 

102,947 

85,194 


82 

52 

148 

139 

97 

79 

57 

89 

110 

149 

188 

123 

110 

1S5 

150 

143 

125 

140 

133 

109 

74 

84 

■ 53 

49 

62 

52 

55 

62 

50 

49 

109 

59 


2,120 
956 
4,585i 
3,452^ 
2,268| 
6,038 
2,141 
3,896 
2,261 
5,534 
6,637 
4.911 
3,621 
8,870 
5,562 
8,927 
5,809 
5,998 
5,474 
5,694 
2,797 
3,708 
2,345 
1,389 
3,354 
1,900 
3,079 
1,796 
1,781 
2,197 
4,449 
2,379 






1869 






1870 




1871 


148 
381 
453 
381 
462 
691 
1,118 
1,018 
876 
781 
624 
587 
635 
563 
607 
612 
556 
657 
575 
350 
366 
356 
437 
466 
470 
432 
459 
278 




1872 




1873 

1874 


755 


1875 


670 


1876 


64& 


1877 

1878 


4 

1 


542 
472 


1879 


513 


1880 

1881 


23 
5 
1 
1 
3 
2 

4" 


488 
487 


1882 


502 


1883 


790 


1884 

1885 


609 
581 


1886 

1887 


706 
559 


1888 


523 


1889 


20 

1 


380 


1890 


456 


1891 


473 


1892 




352 


1893 


1 
3 


322 


1894 


322 


1895 


302 


1896 

1897 


3 


271 

26S 




2 


254 


1899 


291 








Total 


163 


30,149 


4,158,856 


3,145 


123,932 


15,373 


12,339 





All of which is respectfully submitted, 



Toronto, January, 1900. 



DAVID SPENCE, 

Secretary , 



1899 ] IMMIGRATION, 13 



APPENDICES 



No. 1. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF PETER BRYNE, ESQ,, IMMIGRATION AGENT, 

LIVERPOOL, ELS GLAND. 

Ontario Government Agency, 

9 Jambs Street, 

Liverpool, January let, 1900. 
David Spence, Esq , 

Secretary, Immigration Department, 

Toronto. 

Sir — I have the honour to submit the following report of the operations of thia 
Agency during the year 1899. 

It has been my endeavour, as heretofore, to keep the British public as fully informed 
as possible regarding the great and varied natural resources of the Province and the 
inducements at d opportunities it offers to intending immigrants, especially those possessed 
of independent incomes or of capital to invest in agriculture, manufactures, mining and 
other industrial enterprise. 

The usual means have bf en employed in the pursuance of this end, namely : — News- 
paper advertising, occasional public lectures and communications to the press, distribution 
of hand books, pamphlets, leaflets, official reports, correspondence, etc. 

The offije advertisement appeared in several hundred different newspapers during 
a considerable portion of the year ; particularly in the leading agricultural journals and 
others which are largely circulated in the country districts. While endeavouring to 
make the advertisement as attractive and effL^ccive as possible, I find it absolutely neces- 
sary to keep it brief in oi-der to prevent the appropriation for this purpose being too 
quickly swallowed up, advertising in papers of large circulation being very expensive. 

The distribution of hani-books, pamphlets, etc., has also been carefully attended 
to during the year. In addition to those sent by mail and handed to inquirers at 
the office, I have, at intervals, continued to supply copies to public reading rooms 
connected with Mechanics' Institutes, Free Libraries and Village Clubs all over the 
country. 

In the course of the year I had fifteen thousand four-page leaflets prepared and 
princed for use chiefly by the principal passenger agents of the steamship companies, 
who find them convenient for enclosing in letters to their clients without extra postage 
and with their own addresses stamped upon them. 

Besides persons possessed of more or less capital, I have also constantly 
endeavoured to influence such working class emigrants as would be likely to make 
useful and desirable settlers, namely, farm labourers, practical miners and female 
domestics. Young single men desirous of leardng farming and who are strong and will- 
ing and of good character, I also regard as a desirable class to send out and advise them 
accordingly. 

There have been fewer applications of late from the various classes of persons not 
wanted in Canada. This is doubtless partly owing to its having become more generally 
known than formerly that we do not coutenanca indiscriminate emigration ; and partly 
to the continued prosperity of the mother country, Rscent labour returns show that 
during the past year work of nearly ail kinds has been more plentiful than at any period 
since 1884. Another cause will now operate in the same direction, namely, the drain 
of men rendered necessary by the war in Sou<h Africa. 

A number of inquiries have been received during the year from merchants and 
manufacturers interested in the trade and commerce of Canada regarding the demand 
for, and the supply of, the products of the Province. The principal of these inquiries 
related to Ontario grown tobacco, furniture woods, packing cases and wood-pulp. Need- 



14 THE REPORT ON [ No. 28 



less to say, to all persons making such inquiries, I am careful to give the best and latest 
information in my possession. 

A gentleman was deputed by the Ontario Tobacco Grower's Association early in the 
year to find a market here for a large stock of tobacco. I gave him every assistance in 
my power and sent a communication to the press drawing attention to the subject and 
giving some facts regarding the cultivation of tobacco in the Province. A leading ex- 
pert in the tobacco trade and a member of one of the largest firms in Liverpool, gave a 
very favorable opinion of the samples of Ontario tobacco submitted to him and said that 
all that was necessary to secure for it a steady and profitable demand in this country 
was for the growers to learn the proper method of curing and preparing and packing it, 
I have also been consulted by a good many perspns on the prospects and conditions 
of mining and the mineral wealth of the Province. Supplies of the latest reports ot the 
Bureau of Mines are regularly received and distributed to the best advantage. Copies 
are sent to the leading mining and financial papers and also to the public libraries of the 
principal cities. 

Since my visit to Ontario this autumn I have been enabled to speak from actual 
observation and consequently with increased confidence on the present state of the 
Province and the prospects it holds out for the proper kind of emigrants. 

In the course of my travels through the length and breadth of the Province I every- 
where observed the most gratifying evidences of progress and prosperity. In the agricul- 
tural districts I noticed a marked improvement in the methods of farming, the land being 
better tilled, the fences and outhouses more trim aad substantial and the farm houses 
handsomer and more comfortable than was the case a few years ago. These improve- 
ments were doubtless only the outward and visible signs of increasing prosperity and well- 
being among the farming community. 

As for the cities and towns I visited, I was equally struck by the indications of pro- 
gress and betterment which they presented. It seemed as if a great wave of zeal for 
social reform and public improvements had passed over them, placing them, in sooae 
respects, in advance of similar communities in tho mother country. 

I also brought back with me vivid impressions of the wonders and delights of the 
great agricultural shows at Toronto and London. The magnificent series of object 
lessons »hey presented, were deeply impressive and instructive. Another feeling they 
gave rise to, especially the fruits and farm products, was one of profound regret thit it was 
not possible to transfer them as they stood, for exhibition in the mother country. 

The fine collection of roots, ttc, which was sent from the Guelph College Farm by 
direction of the Honourable Mr. Dryden for exhibition in this country, excited much 
interest and curiosity at the several places where it was shown by Mr. Jary. 

I would respectfully advise that when the next consignment of exhibits is sent, it 
should include some good samples of Indian corn. Seeing that this product cannot be 
successfully grown in Britain, it naturally attracts a good deal of attention and excites 
much interest among British agriculturists Hence an ear of Indian corn is at once a 
symbol and a proof of the superiority of the Canadian soil and climate. It haa also this 
advantage as an exhibit, that it is durable as well as interesting and beautiful. 

In my capacity as ' Examiner " of child-emigrants I have, during the year, inspected 
16 parties of emigrant children sent out for settlement in Ontario, from the following 
Homes, namely : — 

Dr. Barnardo's Boys' Home, Stepney Causeway, London. 

Dr. Barnardo's Girls' Home, Barkingside Essex. 

Southwark Catholic Emigration Society's Home, London. 

Mr. Shaw's Children's Homes, Strangeways, Manchester. 

Mrs. Birt's Sheltering Homes, Liverpool. 

Dr. Srephenson's Children's Homes, Bonner Road, London. 

Dr. Stephenson's Children's Homes, Edgworth, Lancashire. 

Miss Macpherson's Homes, London. 

Mr. Fegan's Homes, Southwark, London. 

Mr. J. Galloway's Girls' Home, Ardrossan. 

*' Waifs and Strays " Society's Home, London. 

Royal Albert Orphan Asylum, Worcester. 



1899 ] IMMIGRATION. 15 



The total number of children in the several parties was 1,009, consistins; of 666 boys 
and 343 girls. The total in 1898 was 818 consiacing of 461 boys and 357 girls. The 
year 1899 therefore shows an increase of 205 boys and a decrease of 14 girls as compared 
with 1898. 

It may be that the number as given above of children inspected will not correspond 
exactly with the number actually arriving at the Homes in Ontario, because some of 
them may have been left at distributing Homes in the Province of Qiebec to be retained 
there or subsequently sent forward to Ontario at the discretion of those responsible for 
them. 

The children were examined at their respective Institutions except a few parties 
which were made up of small contingents from several widely separated branch Homes 
and could not be assembled together for inspection before the time for embarkation. In 
those cases I enjoined upon those responsible for the children, the importance of exercis- 
ing the greatest care in their selection so as to avoid the risk of having any of them 
rejected on examination and returned upon their hands. I am glad to say that this 
extreme course was not found necessary in a single instance, all proving thoroughly fit 
for emigration. 

I ought to say that two of the parties were examined by Mr. G. H. Mitchell of the 
Dominion Agency here, with the consent of the High Commissioner, during my absence 
in Canada. 

In my visits to the various Homes during the present year I observed nothing 
calling for special remark, save that the favourable impressions I received during my 
first visits, were confirmed and strengthened. 

The Board of Trade emigration returns for the year will not be published for some 
time. As soon as they are issued I will send you a copy. 

I have the honor to be 

Your obedient servant, 

P. BYRNE, 

Agent for Ontario. 



No. 2. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF F. W. ANNAND, ESQ., DOMINION IMMIGRATION 

AGENT, HALIFAX, N.S. 

Dominion of Canada, 

Government Immigration Agency, 

Halifax, N.S., January 1st, 1900. 
D. Spence, Esq , 

Secretary Ontario Immigration Department, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honor to submit for your information a report of the arrival of 
passengers at this port for the year ending September 31, 1899. 
The total arrivals have been 

Oabin , 7,006 

Steerage 1 1,284 

Total 18,290 

Their destination being as follows : 

Cabin, Canada 6,954 

States 52 

Steerage, Canada , 9,043 

States , 2,241 



16 THE REPORT ON [ No. 28 



While they were divided into sexes as shown below : 

Oabin, Canada, Males 3,383 

Females 3,134 

Children .... , , 437 

Cabin, States, Males 26 

Females 21 

Children 5 

Steerage, Canada, Males 3,760 

Females 2,218 

Children 3,065 

Steerage, States, Males 1,840 

Females 563 

Children 338 

As compared with the previous year the arrivals for 1899 show an increase in cabin 
passeogers of 3,508, and in steerage of 1,581, or a total increase of 5,089. 

The increase in arrivals of steerage was divided as follows : Canada, 894, United 
States, 687. 

The number entering the Province of Ontario during the year was as follows : 
Oabin, 57, steerage, 599 ; total, 656, which shows an increase in cabin of 16, and in 
steerage of 46, or a total increase of 62 over the previous year. 

The nationalities of the steerage passengers entering Ontario during 1899 were as 
follows: English, 377; Irish. 55; Scotch, 60; Hebrew, 5; French, 2; Galicians, 1; 
Finnish, 63 ; Germans, 3 ; Norwegians, 9 ; Russiaios, 6 ; Swedish, 14 ; Hungarians, 4. 

Dr. Stephenson's party of 38, for Hamilton, were the only children passing through 
this agency for your Province during the year. 

As a whole, the arrivals for the year were of an excellent class, but those for Ontario 
were particularly so, and in a large sense superior to those of the previous year. 

For your furoher information I attach statements showing the monthly arrivals of 
cabin and steerage passengers for Canada, as well as a statement showing the sexes, 
occupations and destinations of the different nationalities remaining in Canada. 

I have the honor to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

F. W. ANNAND, 

Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 



1899 



IMMIGRATION. 



17 



, Statement showing monthly arrivals 



Months. 



January . . 
February . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August. 
September . 
October . . . 
November . 
December 



Totals. 



Sexes. 



Adults. 



102 

247 

594 

902 

965 

420 

145 

45 

20 

41 

130 

149 



3760 



Children 



51 

63 

151 

471 



20 

27 

58 

334 



7511 630: 
357 303 
121 1 751 

45| 9| 

21 

47 

54 

86 



2218 



24 197 

3J| 369 

64 897 

326 203? 

654 3000 

292,1372 

831 424 

10 i 109 

5 51 

13 108 

26 227 

24 286 











Nationalities. 










1 






^ 






TJ 






a 
















a 






CS 
















OS 
















3 










'O 










P 




a 


a 






s 










13 

a 




.2 


. o 






eS 
O 


'at 


03 


M 


J3 
o 

o 
t) 

m 


a 
hi 


-g i 

is 


a 

CI 

(fl 


3 O 


£ 

Si 

w 


.5 
'5 


a 

u 

P3 


96 




9 


11 


17 


2 


6 


16 


n 


7 


18 


222 


4 


14 


48 


2 


3 


6 


33 


3 




201 


510 


8 


59 


117 


5 


28 


30 


66 


1 


ii 33l 


609 


3 


45 


19 


24 


23 


25 


17 


2 


1195 


30 


226 







2 


4 






69 




2676 


13 


196 






1 


5 






4 


37 


1114 


9 


45 
90 
4^ 




i 


1 
2 


16 






63 


.... 


269 


18 

11 

1 

10 

28 


1 






2 




4 


94 












86 




3 


15 


5 


8 


6 


48 


2 




129 .. . 


5 


13 


3 


14 


3 


27 


16 


12 


16 


2345 15 


136 


229 


81 


79 


76 


345 


72 5278 


207 



Halifax, N.S., December 31st, 1899. 



of Steerage Passengers for Canada. 

















Occupations. 














Destinations. 
















OD 


!0 








a 
















.2 

13 




a 

1 














<V 


o 








cS 


t: 




a 










a 




a 
















.o 










<D 




•^ 










3 




cS 






•c 

3 


09 


00 

3 


XI 
Si 

a 

Si 


a 


C8 
Si 

® 
a 


"a 

a 


Si 


ID 

a 


IB 
IB 

a 




4 


o 

Si 

Ph 
u 
IB 




_2 
'S 





Si 





J3 
m 


a 





a 

3 


1 

u 
3 




o 
H 


O 


O 


fM 


Ph 


O 


§ 


O 


§ 


ft* 


^ 


^ 




c 





§ 




Si 

03 


>^ 


rt 




H 







4 


197 


11 




50 


6 


19 


3 


16 


92 


197 


24 


39 


43 


46 


8 


17 


2 


18 




197 


1 


13 


369 


64 


7 


79 


29 


43 


10 


17 


120 


369 


26 


38 


92 


119 17 


56 




20 


1 


.Sfi9 


3 


6 


887 


153 1 


262 


45 


88 


16 


49 


253 


867 


47 


85 


192 


337 1 104 


61 


5 


33 


3 


867 




41 '2033 


421' 39 


299 


48 


62 


11 


50 


1103 


2033 


85 


126 


151 


956 


623 


62 




.30 




2033 




10i3u00 


633 .... 


300 


16 


11 


.... 


31 


2009 


3000 


223 3 


2 


1738 


1021 






1.S 




.3000 


2 


4 1372 


269 






135 


6 


3 




24 


935 


1372 


195 { 7 


3 


460 


696 







9 


2 1372 




12! 424 


78 






46 


3 


3 


... 


4 


290 


424 


.50 ' 3 


3 


234 


116 






18 


.... 


424 


1 


3 109 

2] 51 
41 108 








29 
17 
21 


6 
2 
6 


2 


1 


18 

8 

16 


53 
24 

58 


109 

51 

108 


92 3 


2 
6 


.... 








11 1 

1 .... 

10 ... . 


109 




37 
94 


■■■3 




1 




51 




1 








1 


108 


i 


25 227 


6 






81 


10 


13 




10 


107 


227 


35 


29 


64 


54 


6 


io 




28' 1 


227 


21 


27 1 286 

1 


25 






76 


16 


16 


3 


26 


124 


286 


47 


76 


41 


41 


13 28 

i 


3 


16 21 


286 


29 


151 9043 

1 


1661 


47 


1395 


193 


266 


44 


269 


5168 

1 


9043 


955j 412 


599 


3991 2605' 235 

1 1 


10 


207 29 


9043 



2 IM. 



F. W. ANNAND, 

Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 



18 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 28i 



Statement showing sexes, occupations and destinations of the 









Sexes. 












Occu- 


Nationalities. 


Adults. 


Children. 


1 
o 


t 

a 


m 

<D 
Si 

P 
_, O 




«• 




05 


S 




a 


a 


English 


1,446 

15 

82 

125 

37 

6 

17 

29 

9 

33 

16 

74 

83 

7 

15 

28 

1,518 

4 

2 

3 

2 

6 

29 

4 

3 

5 

3 

5 

141 

13 


526 

'"32 
53 
19 

1 

10 
2 

8 
9 

55 

19 
5 
2 

19 
1,362 
3 
1 
2 
1 
3 

21 
1 
1 


208 

7 

29 
6 


165 

'""is 

22 
11 


2,345 

15 

136 

229 

73 

8 

19 

44 

13 

41 

38 

206 

117 

22 

22 

60 

5,278 

13 

6 

8 

3 

14 

72 

5 

4 

5 

3 

8 

207 

29 

9,043 


309 
6 
22 
31 
9 
4 
2 
5 


43 
3 

i 


708 

3 
43 
53 
17 

1 
15 
22 

9 
22 

9 
51 
82 

2 

9 

10 

294 

2 


148 


Welsh 


i 


Irish 


4 


Scotch 


17 
2 


Dutch 


1 










Swedish 


4 

1 

" " 5 

36 

6 

3 

\ 

1,175 
2 
1 

1 


i 

1 

8 

41 
9 
7 
2 
9 
1,223 
4 
2 
2 




1 






French 


1 

6 

'\ 
\ 

17 

1,217 

2 

2 





2 








6 


Finnish 




Doukhobors 


4 


Hungarians 




Galicians 


4 














1 

4 
20 




Polish 








Syrians 


2 

8 


3 
14 


2 
6 

1 









2 




1 

I 

3 

2 






























3 
47 
10 










1 




io 
1 


9 
5 






























3,760 


2,218 


1.512 


1,563 


1,661 


47 


1,395 


193 







Halifax, N.S., December 31st, 1899. 



1899] 



IMMIGRATION. 



19 



different nationalities remaining in Canada for 1899. 



patioDi 


i. 
















Destinations. 










1 

5 


2 

a 


10 





00 


a 


a 


.2 

a 



i 


'a 




.2 

-sl 

•SO 


a 





a; 15 
C 5 
b C 
S eS 

P3 


1 


m 

Is 




210 


28 
"12 


199 


700 


2,345 

15 

136 

229 

73 

8 

19 

44 

13 

41 

38 

206 

117 

22 

22 

60 

5,278 

13 

6 

8 

3 

14 

72 

5 

4 

5 

3 

8 

207 

29 


888 

i 

21 

7 


246 

1 

21 

£1 

5 


377 

""55 

60 

3 


486 
11 
39 
62 


174 
2 


173 

1 


1 






2,345 
15 


2 






10 


15 

17 

9 

1 
1 
4 


39 

87 

27 

1 

1 

11 

4 

7 

20 

127 

24 

15 

7 

31 

3,760 

I 

5 

1 

7 

40 

1 
1 


8 12 








136 


12 


35 


28 


2 






229 


8 


58 
8 








73 














8 










9 
14 


9 
20 

4 

3 

23 

147 

32 

22 

3 
20 


3 

3 


1 
2 
3 








19 


1 




1 

3 

11 


' 








44 
13 


8 




1 

2 

5 

10 

i 


23 


2 


2 




41 


1 


14 
39 

2 

i 

34 


1 






38 


2 




5 


1 






206 




12 


3 






117 












22 


4 


2 


18 

5 

5 


?9 


1 










60 


3 


3,0181 2.254 











5,278 
13 








8 
6 
6 




















6 








i 

6 

2 

5 
2 
5 


2 
2 
14 
20 
3 
1 














8 




















3 






3 















14 


1 




5 


6 


35 


1 






72 


2 


2 









5 








1 


4 




















5 










1 
1 

















3 


1 


1 




3 

207 

29 










2 






8 












207 


" "29 


207 






















29 














599 














266 


44 


269 


5,168 


9,043 


955 


412 


3,991 


2,605 


235 


10 


207 


29 


9,043 



F. W. ANNAND, 

Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 



^0 



THE REPORT ON 



No. 28 



OS 
00 



eS 



euo 

CO 

OD 






03 
O 

a 

euD 

a 

o 
ja 

ED 

Eh 
IZl 

a 
< 

H 



•Si'B^OX 



lO-^Oit— ecc'3ot~co'^l^^5•i■ 
l-lr^!NIM(^^OOCO■*OIMt-l(^J 



•stsiinoj, 



•suBipBaBQ 
paaarns'jj 



rHi-llO(MIM'»l-(i-(i-H 



•nojinj^ 






cq t-eo o 



•S9U0!)IJJ8J, 



i-H CC «C Tj< 



•eqo;in'(?j\[ 



•ouB^ao I SSS' 



•oaqgn^ 



l>.00 ■* »0 -i-l 



^ ■* cc 



•890niAOJJ 

jaAvoTf 



•s^^oj, 



iO-<riO00(M00t--— 1'^ -fTt<t- 
i-li-l(NC^{M0000Tl<OC3i-ICq 



•S!)sunoj, 



CQ CO i-H iO 



•Sn'Bip'BUBQ 

paiuni^a'jj 
•saazniQ "S'n 



lOt~-tlO«005T^•»f<OtCT-lr-t 
r-l.-!»OC^MT}-i-(i-,i-( 



•i-i N ecN 



rH t-l i-l e<5 i-H • -^ iH "-I 00 



•sa'BiA'Bajpn'BOg 



•qoijoos i 



•qsui 



•qsjaAX, 



• M lO • -Ji-i 



-.*< rH ■ t-H « 



f-l CC I to 



-^ : I 



•qsqSaa 



•BI«!»ox 



I— (I— i5^(Me<iooooTtior^r-(c<) 



•saj'Bnia^ 



COlON-^Oi-fOt^COCCr-ICO 

—(,-1 e(:»(MiM,H th 



•S9I'BJ\[ 



rH ■-( « O -^ IM 



•sa^'Braa^ 



O500OlCTSCDC'5O5tt'00'>3O>«O 

e'5"*'lQ00— ItDOJr-IOOiOO 

rH tT O CD Tfl t-l rH 



•W9I'BJ,\[ 



^<^00l^t^<M0;^0-HOC5C0 
I-H T-H 1— I CCc-t-COrH i-H 



>.tj- ^ ^-Jl 

J5 2..C • • ' "S a ^ a a 



ft 
<1 



d 

o 



. o 

O 

'3 

'a 

o 



OS 

00 



a 



13^ 



1899 1 IMMIGRATION. 21 



No 3. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF S. GARDNER, ESQ, DOMINION IMMIGRATION 

AGENT, ST. JOHN, N.B. 

St. John, N.B., December Slat, 1899. 

David Spence, Esq,, 

Secretary Dept. of Immigration, 

Toronto, Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit a report showing the operatioas of this Agency 
during the year ended 31st December, 1899. 

Immigrant Arrivals. 

The immigrants passing through this Agency and other inlets the past year and not 
reported at Halifax or Quebec were 3,021, bringing cash $53,533 ; effects, $70,386. The 
Customs entries at this port show 232 entries, with the lowest estimate would- be 700 
souls ; effects, $168,463. 

The number of 3,021 and by the Beaver and other lines 3,930, a total of 6,931. 

I have the honour to be, 

Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

S. GARDNER. 



22 



THE REPORT ON 



[No. 2 



05 
OS 

00 



eS 
no 

CB 

a 

OS 



<D 
60 
fl 
CI 
02 
BD 
08 

<D 

eS 



CQ 





'moj. 


t:~i-l»0i-li-lt-Ot-Tt(O 
«0 O 00 CO iH C5 »0 r-l iH 


to 
to 


o 
'43 
a 

o 


•ISIJUOJ, 1 


• • -03 

■ • • i-l • 

• • • iH - 

• • • t-l • 


o 
1-1 

"i-l 


05 • • 1 00 
- • 1 CO 

to • • CO 

• • 1-1 


•SU'Bip'Bn'BQ 

penjiiqa'jj 


•no}[nj^ 1 :'"':'"' 


rH 


: : : 1=^ 


■ 'srq omioQ ec « w n 
qsiipg 


•1-1 • • t^ 


^ 




2,024 

1,919 

21 

227 






o 
1-1 


•OIJ'B^UO 1 ^'^Jh'^ 




: :<^ 1^ 


•oaqan^ | "^jSJlj^ 




: : : 15 


aaMorj "-I 


m'^x 


O to 00 CO 1-1 CClO r-l r-l 
C Ci CO 


ID 


to 

a 

& 
s 
o 
u 

o 


•ss^lO ojsi 


CO 1-1 O CO ■<*< ■*! — 1 • ■ ZO 
(M -J CO r~ 1-1 (M • • 
■*_^CO_ T-l • - 

i-Ti-T ' '. 


00 

im" 


•8!»ai8AJ9g 


• . • f • lO M • • 1 


.H 


•gjgpBJx 


CO -ooo • • -co • • t- 


•soiniBqo9j\r 


1-1 (N ^ 


CO 


•(tstiiBjnqinDijSY 


03 O 1— to 
CI CO •«< ^ 
tD » iH 


CO -* • •>«< 


i-T 


■moj. 


r- ^lOi-i—'t^ot^-^O 

«D «C 00 iH iH »0 lO -H iH 
O CO CO 


to 
to 


o 
o 

■^ 
2h 


•n'Bissn'jj 


t^O 05 00 

o c; 

(M~i-r 


•O 

•1-1 




eo" 


•sqsunox 


• • -o 


• CS) . . 


§g 


Sn'Bip'BU'BQ 

pauan;9'}j 


. . . ,_( 
• • ■ 1-1 


•iH 


• to • • 


00 

1-1 

... .1 


•S9iJ!)anoo i9T\%o 


CO 1-1 lOlM 
i-l IM IM 


.^ 


- ■ -OS f 

. . . t- 


•OS puis OS 1 : : : : 




•N ■ 1 IM 


•nBouaQ 1 t-o-* ; 




: : :-- IS 


•qo^oOR 1 T-t -.aa 


• in 


. .CO . 13 


•qsijjl : :'^'-' 


•N 


: : : : IS 


■qsnSna 


CO O »0 lO rH lO O • 1— 1 • 

CO CO CO -r 1-1 .-. lO • 


o 

(M 


•^ox 


t^-Jin— 'i-it^Ot-.-*© 

CC to 00 CO 1-1 CO lO rH r-l 
O Oi CO 

im'i-T 


to 
to 


i 

en 


1 CO t^ 00 t- •<f 1-1 ?D • •■*! 


CO 

'to 


•sXog 


— i -^ OOIO 
COCO iH 


• (MOO • 1-1 

I-l • 


• gi^raa^ 


C3 (M ti O 
to CM rH C<) 

too 


• OO IM • -1-1 


to 

(M 

eo_ 

i-n" 


Tf< lO iC t- (N N 1-1 


1 1—1 
1-1 

**« 

i-T 




5 
^ 


January 

February 

March- 

April 




August 

September 

October 

November . . . 





a 

a 

u 

> 
o 

03 o 

H 2 

525 a 
o 

m 



1899] 



IMMIGRATION. 



23 



eS 

Q 



a 

CQ 

SQ 

cB 
O 



a 

.2 

.g 

to 


•F^ox 




iH 

o 


•s^sunox 


- • lO 


■O lO o 
■ (M « cq 

< CC CO Tt> ;; 
1-1 


IN 


: 123 


•sn'BipBa'BQ paaan^ay 


l>. lO »o -^ 


•<1< 




: iS 


■uo}(n^ 




•r-l IM 




■ CO 
1 


■BiqmnjoQ i^si^iag 


(MOO --0 T) 
rH 
•1-1 ■* M 








: IS 


•satao^ijjax qsa^-i{4J0|sj 


^ • 








: 15^ 


•Bqo^iu«j/V[ 




3 ■ 
■1 • 


•I-l 






: i^ 


•ou«!jnO 


•> • 


(N C<1 ■ 




: IS 


•oaqeu^ 


-« -iO • 


• iH lO iH 


IS 


3S ■* .-1 05 . 

•saouiAOJt j; aaMcj i-h -m •* . 


• tDQO •^^ 




iH 
I-l 


a 
s 
o 
o 

o 


•IB!)0J, 


T-IC<JiCOOOCO-tit~lOr-l'* 
i-H 


l^ 

% 




C5 
CD 
1-1 


•s^siJtiox 1 : : . : : g? • : : : 


IJ§ 


•suBtpBaBQ panjn^ay; 1 '.'.'.. '.'^ '.'.'. '. 


12 


1 OS -^ 05 o oi 00 ic t- 1^ ec 
•saap'BJX pnB sjjjafo (m (m r-i ,-i 




00 

I-l 
1 1-1 


•sj8aij\[ 1 : :^'~' : 






•80iuBqoaj\[ 1 ^ 


CO » • • 


CDiH ; 






IM 




•aarninoiaay | "^ 


iH • • 






^ 


a 
o 

es 


•pijox 


i-((M105000CO-*it>.»0.-l'^ 
■*10t-IT(N'tl(MrHi-ll-l 

1—1 


O 


•sapaAvg 1 ;:'*::::;:: 


1^ 


■qsiu'Bci 1 


lO CO -"f CO CO TJH 1-1 N ■* 

1—1 .-( 


IS 

IS 


•satJip'Ba^Q panjn^ajj | °~ 


•saBuiaaf) i ^ 


W !N • 






IS 


•samanoD Jamo 1 : 




(M ; 




• W 


|0 


•saipui ?8aA\. 1 <^ 








(N (M 


|« 


•qopAV 1 :<^ 


1-1 








|C0 


■qo^oog 1 i-iiMiOr-. . 








IS 


•qsiJi 1 


iH CO CI- 

~co osV 


■ 








I-- 




• 
• 


• -OCO 
• i-< I-l 






00 

Oi 
r-( 


EO 

m 


•l^iox 


^IMiOCOCX,00-*t^lftrH-* 
Tt<mOO'^Mr)iC4r-(T-(r-l 

I-l 


I-l 

o 


•qaijcj 1 i-irHccTt<ccnOT}<(M(NiH ;|j^ 1 


'Z\ -lapan sz£og | « 


CO as lO 

CD O OC 
1-1 !N 


■ 00 1-1 ec 


CO • • 1 CO 
• • 1 CO 


•sai'Buia^ 


IT 


C1(M 1-1 


CO CO ^ Ci 


•sai^j^ 


(MCi(NC5»:O00C<lt~t-»O 
(M CM t- (M i-l 1-1 I-l 


00 




Is 


C 


3 


J3 
o 


D 




i-s<J 


II 


s 

ID 

Q 




a 

'o 





24 



THE REPORT ON 



[ No. 28 



No. 4. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF P. DOYLE, ESQ., DOMINION IMMIGRATION 

AGENT, QUEBEC. 

Department of the Interior, 

Ottawa, 19th January, 1900. 
David Spence, Esq., 

Secretary, Department of Immigration, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Sir, — Referring to your Istter of the 4'.h inst., addressed to Mr. P. Doyle, Dominion 
Immigration Agent at Quebec, I beg herewith to enclose three statements giving the 
information asked for. 

Your obedient servant, 

FRA.NK PEDLEY. 
Superintendent of Immigration. 

Table giving the number of married and single men and women and the sexes of 
children and infants of each nationality arrived in 1899, destined for the Province 
of Ontario. 







Adults. 


Children. 


00 

"S 

a 

M 






1 


,2 
462 

""is" 

11 

1 
1 


6 

g 

S 

Ph 

288 
1 
16 
6 
1 
1 
1 


Total. 






■ ^ 

765 

9 

168 

98 

9 

20 

17 

6 

6 

2 

7 
12 
143 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 

1,272 


a 

i 

487 

6 

104 

78 
5 
8 
4 


Gieat Britain- 


-English 


15 

4 

1 


2,017 
16 


do 


Welsh 


do 


Scotch 


310 


do 


Irish 


194 


Germans 




16 


Scandinavians- 


—Swedes 


30 


do 
do 


Norwegians 

Danes 




22 
(> 


French ... . 


5 








11 


Belgians . . . 








2 


Russians 


4 

9 

64 


3 
4 
6 


4 
3 
9 


1 
1 
6 


19 


Hebrew 


29 


Fins 





228 


Austrians 


1 


Dutch 


I 
2 


1 
2 






3 


Syrian 


2 




12 


Arabs 


1 


Swiss 












1 




777 


509 


332 


28 


2,918 



Government Immigration Office, 

Quebec, Slst December, 1899 



P DOYLE. 



Agent. 



1899] 



IMMIGRATION. 



25 



(D 



e3 

O 



o 


m 


a 


05 


0.' 


00 


<5 






>• 


n 


<u 


o 


XI 


• 1-4 
+3 


a 


trt 


a/ 


b 


o 


&f 


OJ 


a 


tt 


a 


■s 


»— I 


1—1 




CO 


o 




QJ 


6f) 


^ 


a 


a) 







ns 


G? 


a 



eS 



eS 



<1 



QQ 







•lB!)Oi 


00 


00 




•pagissBp ^0^ 




^. 


00 

§ 


•0I^89niO(J 


10 in 

to to 


1s 
& 

S 
o 
o 

o 


•8^310 1 g 1 ^ 1 


•80ini8qoaj\[ 


C2 05 
tH i-H 


•sjdjoq'eq^ 


CO 


OS 




•8J9J0q'E1 Un'BjT 


CO 

-*• 
1-1 


00 




•8J3UIJB^ 


00 


00 




•SSIMg 1 '"' 


1-1 




•sqBJV 1 '-' 1 --^ 




•SUBU^g 1 S 1 2 




•qo^na 1 =^ i '^ 




•suBU^sny | ■-' 


r-l 




•sni^ 


00 


CO 
IN 




•Ai9aq9H 1 S 







•iJU'BieiSn'JJ 1 S 


2 




•sn'Bjapa 1 <M 1 ff' 




■qaaaj^ | ;d 1 ^1 


a 


fi.S § 

03 


•sanBQ 1 --o 1 » 1 


'■5 


•BUBlSgMJO^ 1 c5 


CO 




•S9P3AVS 1 g 


g 




•snBinj9Q 1 J5 


s 




£ 

C5 


•q&ui 




1*1 

OS 


•qo^oog 5; 

•q«i8A\ 1 S 



1-1 
CO 


•qsT^Saa 








S 
_o 
*3 

eg 
_S 
'3 

® 


•^oiJ!)8!(i o^nojox 



CO 


CO 
I-H 


•^]0 o!jnoiox 


C5 Oi 
l-^ i-T 


•^ojusiQ no^sSni^ 




10 


•ii^IQ U0^-^°^I3^ 


10 

© 


in 

i-i 


•^0U!>8IQ 'BM'GI^'JO 


e<5 

I-H 


CO 


•iC?iO isMB^^O 1 i 


to 

r-l 


•sinog iB!»ox fl 


00 
5<f 


CO 

Ol 


•riijaejai pa's uajpjiqQ 


1 "^ 

CO 


50 


•9pra9^ 


t- 




•ai'BH 




(M 




t3 _„ 
o) 3 1 




u 

s 


'ea 




be 

d 
o 



O 2 
01 



o 

o 

a 
o 



^ 


a 


> 





0) 


Q 


DO 




-4J 




.iTg 




czj JS 




» © 




© ^ 




^ 





o 



> 
OS 



a 

DO 

'3 



o 
H 










<35 




00 




i-H 


Kl 


^ 




fa 




fa 


a 


f > 


(V 
















H 


+3 


■< 


OS 


Oi 


»-^ 





CS 















s 


H 


1— 1 


M 




H 


H 


t) 


^ 

H 


c? 


H 




;z; 




6? 




Ed 




> 















26 



THE REPORT ON 



[No. 28 



Statement of the number of Oabin and Steerage Passengers arrived during the year 
1899, with destinations for Canada and the United States. 



Returned Canadians.. 

Tourists 

Lower Provinces , 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

North West Territories 
British Columbia . ... 

Yukon . . 

United States 



Cabin. 


Steerage. 


667 


372 


484 


126 


90 


90 


1,899 


3,012 


468 


2,918 


91 


4,949 


96 


2,100 


171 


633 


5 


4 


237 


11,020 


4,198 


25,224 



Total. 



1,029 

610 

180 

4,911 

3,386 

5,040 

2,196 

S04 

9 

11,267 



29,422 



Government Immigration Office, 

Quebec, 31st December, 1899. 



P. DOYLE, 

Immigration Agent. 



1899 ] IMMIGRATION. 27 



No. 5. 

ANNUAL REPORT OF JOHN aOOLAH.\N, ESQ, DOMINION IMMIGRA- 
TION AGENT, MONTREAL. 

Dominion Government Immigration Agency, 

Montreal, December Slat, 1899. 
David Spence, Esq., 

Secretary Department of Immigration for Ontario, 

Toronto, Ont. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your information the annual report of this 
agency for the year ending 31st December, 1899, together with the statistical statements 
A. and B. in connection with immigration. 

Immigration Statistics. 

The return at this agency of the number of immigrant arrivals at Montreal from the 
United States will be found in the statements A. and B. with full particulars. 

Those steerage passengers who arrive from Europe by the various steamships at the 
ports of Quebec, Halifax, N.S., and St. John, N.B., and who are compelled to disembark 
there are accounted lor at those ports, being transferred to the different railways there. 

The first and second class passengers, as a general rule during the season of the St. 
Lawrence river navigation, remain aboard until the steamships reach Montreal and dis- 
embark there. 

The total number of immigrant arrivals at Montreal per ocean travel via ports of 
New York, Boston and Portland as per statement A. during the year 1899, 
was 2,682 

The total number of immigrant arrivals at Montreal from United States as per 

statement B. for the year 1899, was , , 2,059 

Grand total 4,741 

The total number of immigrant arrivals at Montre.il from United States and per 

ocean travel via ports in United States during the year 1898, was 3,637 

An increase of 1,104 

in 1899 as compared with 1898. 

The Labour Market. 

Employment for general labourers in the city and district of Montreal during the 
open season was good, especially on canal construction, the wharves and shipping, street 
railway construction, buildings, etc. There was a large amount of railway construction 
work in western Canada and also in other parts of the Dominion. Railway contractors 
experienced considerable difficulty in securing sufficient men to fill the demand. 

The abundant harvest in Manitoba called for over 6000 men from the eastern prov- 
inces to whom the Canadian Pacific Railway gave a special rate from Montreal to 
Winnipeg of $10.00 in order to secure harvest labourers. 

Mechanics and Bookkeepers. 

For the matter of mechanics and bookkeeper?, clerks and others whose habits unfit 
them for manual labour, I wish to say that there was no demand for those people, the 
local supply being more than sufficient to meet the requirements. People of this vocation 
desiring to emigrate to Canada should ascertain that a position has been secured for 
them on their arrival, or else have with them sufficient funds to enable them to await a 
suitable opportunity of securing employment at their special trade or calling. 



28 THE REPORT ON [ No. 28 



Female Labour. 

The difficulty of obtaining well trained, respectable domestics in sufficient numbers- 
to meet the demand remains as hard to solve as ever, and the scarcity of this kind of 
help continues on the increase This is owing no doubt to the numerous commercial and 
industrial establishments wlioh furnish employment for young women and girls, which 
they prefer to that of domestic service. 

There was no difficulty experienced by the new arrivals in obtaining situations with 
respectable citizens as servants. Those emigrants should bring with them testimonials 
as to character from former employers. 

There is little or no demand for governesses, milliners or dressmakers. These latter 
should be careful about migrating to Canada unless they come to join friends or to fill 
positions already secured for them. 

Agricultural Servants. 

The demand for farm servants, both male and female, continues to increase as I 
pointed out last year. This class of labour can always meet with employment in Canada 
and in the district of Montreal. I have experienced no difficulty in securing positions 
for men and women anxious to hire and work in the country. These should arrive in 
the spring and early autumn months. 

Gardeners and Florists. 

Gardeners and florists can secure work in the city and district of Montreal, pro- 
vided they come in the spring and are capable, sober, and not afraid of work. 

A Suitable Glass of Immigrants. 

I am pleased to be able to state that the immigrants of the present year are of a 
suitable class, just the kind the country needs. All, or nearly all, had sufficient money 
with them to settle themselves comfortably in the land of their adoption. They were 
principally of the farming class. The large majority went west, to Manitoba, the North- 
West Territories and British Columbia. The remainder of them were distributed 
throughout the Provinces of Ontario and Quebec. Those remaining in this Province 
went to the Eastern and Northern townships and to the Lake St. John District, 

The Health op Immigrants. 

lb is with great satisfaction I am able to report that the immigrant arrivals here 
have been exceptionally healthy, and there has been no instance where contagious disease 
has broken out among them. This no doubt is due in great part to the excellent work 
of the Medical Staff at Gross Isle quarantine station. 

Transportation. 

The steamship and railway companies deserve credit for their handling and treat- 
ment of immigrant passengers. The^e have been no complaints under this head, and 
I can only say that all the immigrants I have met have spoken in the highest terms of 
the treatment they have received both while on shipboard and on the railways. The 
food was satisfactory and the sleeping accommodation equally so. On the cars the same 
story was told : The Canadian Pacific, Grand Trunk and Government Railway systems 
doing everything in their power to satisfy the new arrivals ard see them safely landed at 
their respective destinations. 

Juvenile Immigrants. 

In this connection I may say that there is an unfair and uncharitable prejudice and 
opposition among certain people in regard to the juvenile immigrants who come to this 
country to get a start in life. Because one or two make a slip or misconduct themselves 
is no reason why the whole should be condemned ; and while newspapers gloat over the 
misdeeds of one or two, they should not forget the small but sturdy army of little toilers 
who, far from the land of their birth, are trying silently but pluckily to build themselves 
homes among us. 



1899 1 IMMIGRATION. 29 



Mr. Regimbal of this agency has made special visits to 52 javenile immigrants sent 
out by the various philanthropic societies in the British Isles. Ha found all with few- 
exceptions pleased with the tieatmeut received a: the hands of their employers, and the 
employers expressed satisfaction at the progress of the children in the various duties in 
which they are engaged. 

Immigration Literature. 

In the matter of immigration literature care has been taken to supply the immi- 
grar ts arriving in Montreal, whether remaining in Canada or passing through to the 
United Btates, with the pamphlets and maps, issued by the Department of the Interior, 
descriptive of the lands open for settlempnt in the Dominion, and calling attention to the 
advantagts of Manitoba and the North- West Territories for intending settlers. 

In addition to this, all persons applying at this cfl&ce for such pamphlets have been 
supplied, either personally or by mail. 

Conclusion. 

In conclusion I desire to tender you my hearty thanks for the valuable co-operation 
and assistance rendered in promoting the interests of immigration. 

The whole respectfully submitted. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

JOHN HOOLAHAN, 
Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 



30 



THE REPORT ON 



i: No. 28. 



STATE 
Immigration Arrivals and Departures at the Montreal Agency by Ocean 



Months. 



January. . 
February 
March , , . 

April 

May 

June . . . 

July 

August . . 
September 
October . 
November, 
December 

Total. 





Souls. 




























Nation 


Adults. 


Children 


















Great 
































Britain. 








00 


0! 

s 


"a 


a 

CD 


4 


.1 


D 


43 

m 

'a 

a 


c 


c 

.2 
'5 

"5 


a 

s 






j: 


43 


tH 


1 


.1 


s 


h 


1^ 


N 


< 


< 
1 


M, ^ 


f=^ 



41 




13 


1-^ 


02 

1 


4 


£ 


I-H 


38 


17 


n 


14 


6 




... 7 


1 


59 


16 
55 


3 
41 


3 ... 
36 ... 


9 

7 


1 
2 


3 4 
6 21 


33 
50 


3 .. 
101 .. 


11 
13 








3 
53 


11 


173 


5 


12 




27 


221 


77 


62 


54 3 


7 


2 


19 33 169 


33, . . 


17 


5 


7 




23 


61 


312 

135 


93 

58 


75 

27 


72 
29 








8 55 123 
15 3 101 


161 ! 2 
16 .. 


2 1 

6 1 






24 

7 


145 


4 




1 


62 


100 


57 


39 


37 2 


1 




4' 2 147 


3 .. 


48 2 






1 


20 


51 


25 


16 


13 . . . 








8 


51 


2 . 


1 ... 




6 


1 


25 


40 


30 


20 


18 ., 






1 


4 


63 


5 


1 


5 ... 


i 




14 


4 


50 


39 


20 


22 4 






4 


11 


80 






2 








10 


6 


90 


36 


11 


11 


9 


i 




6 


6 


31 


7 




q 




4 


5 


1 


12 


139 


74 
577 


S3 
358 


30 
339 


28 


4 




75 




64 


32 
357 


3 


29 
153 


14 


5 



30 


9 
24 


5 
142 


10 


1,408 


30, 6140154 953 

i ' 1 1 


384 



STATE 
Immigration Arrivals and Departures at the Montreal Agency 





Souls. 


Nation 




Adults. 


Children 


c 

OS 














Great 






























Britain. 




















Months. 












.2 
Is 

27 
6:i 


a 


a; 


"3 

a 

a* 




-a 
d 

1 




a 
.£ 

'5 

< 


.2 
< 

1 


J5 
S 




s 


a 

a 

0) 


'4 


i 


.2 

M 


J3 
u 

1 

3 

7 




.1 


.1 


January 


14 
33 


17 
28 


11 
25 


48 
89 


12 2 
10 11 




Febi uary 


6 


1 


4 


March , 


122 
203 


45 


41 


33 

44 


169 

187 








io 


1 


7 
2 


15' 5 
12i ... 








43 


April 


60 49 


2 


11 




92 


May 


127 


61 64 


66 


246 








5 




2 


141 8 


4 






34 




81 
46 
66 


49 38 


37 
25 
20 


111 
80 
64 






'4 


9 




7 
1 
1 


13 .1 


7 




i2 


40 


July 


28 
33 


23 
10 


'4 "5 


2 
5 




17 


August 


.. 9 


2 





9 




17 


September 


50 


30 


59 


40 


118 






13 




4 


4j 2 




5 




6 


October 


47 


32' 17 


19 


71 


5 .. 




2 




5 


sL... 




4 


1 




November 


47 


3l| 26 


20 


79 


..' 7 




10 


3 




3, 6 


5 






5 


December 


38 


25 


9 


10 


55 








6 






1 




4 


2 


IS 






! 






Total ..... 


907 


441 


361 


350 


1,317 


9 


12 


5 


63 


4 .^.'^ 


93 SQ 


28 


39 


16 


271 













Dominion Government Immigration Agency, 

Montreal, 31st December, 1899. 



1899] 



IMMIGRATION. 



31 



MENT A. 

Travel via United States for the year ended 31st December, 1899. 



alities. 


Occupations. 


Destinations. 






£ 
e 

J 

a 
o 

« 


J5 


S 


Scandina- 
vian. 


J 
a 


>• 


CO 

■fe 

02 


d 


1 


a 




i 


a> 

S-l 



« 

s 

5 

6 

53 

82 


a 

'a 

C3 

JS 



£ 
•a 




£ 
s 


06 

"S 

> 

u 

OJ 
JD 

a 


(S 


39 


m 
a> 
a 

a 

'> 


^^ 

Pui 
<1 




a 
<D 

S> 

03 

s 

(y 

13 

9 
30 
55 
134 
57 
43 
29 


'S 

CS 

a 


7 
7 
27 
48 
30 
16 
13 
3 


e« 


'a 

47 

39 

130 

2.56 

326 

121 

120 

53 

70 

95 

50 

97 

1,404 


"2 


"E 

c 


IS 

a 

"o 



-C 

PQ 

"4 


"3 



03 


i 

i 


'a 
Q 


c5 

la 



1— 1 


'Sib 

& 

1 
"3 

6 
2 


® 

CO 

1 

"6 
14 
11 

1 
1 
3 


S 

s 
s 




1 

15| 4 
271 17 
66 38 
67: 59 
74' 73 
35 26 


2I ^ 


i 

1 

61 4 

1 8 
8 18 
3 22 

2 28 
12 24 


sn 


2 


1 


' 


is 


"'2 
2 

1 
1 




"i 

8 
6 


"i 


"i 


'4 


6 
3 
4 


2 
5 
6 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 


14... 
114 ... 
1711... 
212.. . 

90, . . . 
114 1 15 

46,... 

56 ... 

7li. . 


13 13 81 
74 44, 30o 
26 29 414 




9 
12 

... 




2 
1 


151 16 
56 4 


33 29, 552 
18 37] 249 




2 










45 
23 
18 
25 
12 
29 


281 19 ... 

4 22 ... 
11 8 -. 


5 


19 
8 


33 9 5!.^3 




4 
6 
1 


4 






2 








18 
25 

8 

7 

28 


2] 105 














. .1 12 


71 3 

5 11 

67 1 14 

64 65 


3' 108 




16 3 










14 10 
13 57 






11 


12! 131 




::: 


8 
7 

21 




2 






50 




3 


3 9 


17, 4ll 


13 148 




1 
33 


4 
14 


1 


_1 
23 


30 -- 


10 79 4 


44 


6 33 104 . . . 


22 276 








1 


81 




297 


J 




2 


22 


42 


17 


* 


436 


548 


36 


45 204 


1,072 


. 


513 244 

1 


289 417 2,682 



MENT B. 

from United States for the year ended December 31st, 1899. 



alities. 


•Occupations. 


Destinations. 






Scandi- 
navian. 


d 

"u 
'9 


c 

_N 

■5 

X 

M 

'c 

"i 

"3 
1 


to 

a 
1 

7 

18 

41 

42 

43 

2 

10 

2 

3 

12 


£ 

a 

1 
5 

6 
33 

?4 
1 
2 

"1 


03 

£ 



u 

01 

a 

& 

71 
118 
51 
37 
11 
28 
16 
5 
16 
14 

401 


i 
1 

'5 
« 

u 

5 
8 

4 
7 
5 

.1 

3 

2 
2 

46 


IV 

2 

m 
1- 




t4 
03 
P 


1 

> 

b 
03 

!» 

03 

a 

03 


eg 




CO 

□ 

'> 


u 
PLh 

b 
S> 

1 

■:'^ 



19 




03 
X! 
<D 

3 

*? 
2 

2 
31 
45 
89 
33 


_2 
'S 

c3 

a 


13 
25 
23 
26 
19 


1 
"a 

"2 

4 
1 

'"4 
7. 
4 
2 
3 
1 

28 


•2 

b 


'S 

b 
0) 

J: 


;5 


.2 

IS 

a 

'0 


*b 


a 
.2 

cS 
i 

T! 

<D 

a 

b 
S 

-e 

03 



00 


i 
1 


i 

a 

c3 

Q 

1 



.a 
'5 

v 

m 

4 
3 

'"29 


b 
03 

.a 

B 

a 
a 

'eg 

1 


'3 

6 


"'3 

"3 
'"2 


6 
"3 

?l 

1 

1, 

"2 


"i 

21' 

7 


42 

81 

116 

132 

183 


"2 

2 

19 
1 

"17 
4 

"17 

'"i 


6 
2 

'si 

6 
8 
1 
4 
7 
61 
1 
1 


48 

89 

169 

187 

246 

111 

80 

64 

118 

711 

79; 

55 


69 
149 
241 
356 
318 




"i 


3 

7 

21 

2 

3 


9 146 

3 95 

91 74 

4 11^5 
8 84 
8 94 
6' 57 


50 36 
171 3 
24 16 
15, 15 
10 9 
21 20 
15 9 


205 
122 
119 
159 
115 


3 




2 2 


124 








3 
11 


19 


82 




18 


5 


182 


. 


1 

86' 

1 




352 


207 




12 


' 


92 


1,2.39 


63 

1 


73! 1,317| 


2,059 



JOHN HOOLAHAN, 
Dominion Government Immigration Agent. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS 



FOR THE 



PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



FOR THE YEAR 



1899. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




TORONTO : 

WARWICK BRO'S. & RUTTER, PRINTERS. 

1900. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS 

FOR THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO. 

FOR THE YEAR 1899. 



Office op the Inspector of Division Courts, 

Parliament Buildings, Toronto, Dec, 31st., 1899. 

To His Bonor 

The Hon. Sir Oliver Mowat, K.C.M.G., 

Ldeutenant Governor of Ontario. 

May it please Your Honor: 

I have the honor to submit the following report upon the Division Courts of the 
Province, for the year ending 31st December, 1899.* 

Particulars of Returns. 

The number of suits entered, in eaih court, the amount of claims, total amount of 
suitors' moneys paid into court, total paid out, and other information will be found 
fully set forth under properly tabulated heads in Table A, 

It will be seen from these returns that the suits entered numbered 40,363, exclusive 
of transcripts of judgment and judgment summonses. 

The total of claims aggregated — $1,384,943. Total moneys paid into court, $436,268 • 
total paid out, $432,202. 

Inasmuch as a large proportion of the suits entered are invariably settled out of 
court, and of which there are therefore no official returns, the figures just given must 
necessarily fall far short of adequately representing the full collecting powers of these 
courts. 

Jury Fund. 

The amount paid County Treasurers towards Division Courts jury fund was $1,175, - 
97. Total of trials by juries summoned 228 ; amount paid to jurors summoned, $1,975.10. 
The figures continue to support the assurance of the sufficiency of the fund to meet the 
demand upon it. 

*Change8 in the appointment of officers are printed up to the date on which ' copy ' is being sent to press 

[3] 

I- 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



Note, — Copies of this report are mailed to all County Treasnrerp, who should com- 
pare the figures of the returns with the entries in their books. 

Vacancies — Appointments. 

During the past year there were 26 appointments of Olerks. Of these, there were 
three new appointments, viz. : — one in Nipissing and two in Rainy River districts. There 
were 7 deaths, 19 resignations, and one reported for removal for cause. There were 32 
appointments of bailiffs, to fill a like number of vacanies. 

The preceding year the numbers stood — Seventeen appointments of clerks and 21 
appointments of bailiffs to fill vacancies. 

Leave op Absence. 

Leave of absence, for thort periods, varying from ten days to two months, was granted 
to 35 clerks and 25 baliffs, whose appointments of deputies were approved. 

Complaints Against Officers. — Inspection. 

Complaints of withholding suitors' moneys, paid into court, charging excessive fees, 
non payment of foreign fees, collecting accounts on commission and without suit entered, 
failing to renew covenants, non-payment of jury fees, not answering suitors' letters, neglect 
in notifying suitors as required by law and delaying returns, are amongst the more 
serious of the charges that are being daily made, all calling for immediate investigation. 
Last year the total complaints numbered some 237. Prompt enquiry followed in every 
case. And the numerous letters of thanks received from suitors and solicitors testify to 
the usefulness and efficiency of this branch of the public service in securing the best and 
most speedy results. 

Special investigations into alleged off'ences, of a more or less serious character, also 
demand considerable time and attention. 

The duties of inspection have of late years been considerably increased — travel now 
having to be made over so much greater an extent of territory than heretofore. In the 
older counties and new districts there are altogether now 324 offices, with 324 clerks and 
365 bailiffs — so that the travel from point to point must be constant and unceasing — 
the remoteness of so many of the offices taking up much time, and visiting them being 
necessarily expensive. 

Withholding Suitors' Moneys. 

As intimated in my report of last year, the withholding suitors' moneys has been 
amongst the worst complaints heretofore made against officers of the courts. It is grati- 
fying to be able to report that the oflTences under this head are faat diminishing in num- 
ber more especially since it has been made known that instant dismissal would be the 

penalty that would follow conviction of the offence. I have also much pleasure in 
reporting that clerks have become more attentive in giving immediate notice, as they are 
required to do by the Act and the rules, to the parties entitled, of moneys paid into 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 5 

court, and th»t, generally, I find both clerks and bailiffs exercising greater promptitude 
and diligence in the discharge of their respective duties. 

Foreign Fbbs. 

The remarks under this head made in last year's report will be entirely applicable. 
Complaints are constantly being received as to the non-payment of foreign fees. And I 
res;ret to have to say that in several cases those fees have been lost to the clerks who 
performed the services — besides having also had to pay their bailiffs for their share of 
the work done by them. This has happened where defaulting clerks have been forced to 
resign or have been removed from ofl&ce. The matter has been from time to time made 
the subject of comment in these pages and should receive more strict attention from the 
officers of the courts. It cannot be too strongly impressed upon them that there is no 
liability on sureties in such cases. The fees are payable in advance, and if a clerk 
chooses to give credit he may do so of course, but it must be at his own risk. The obli- 
gation thus created is therefore simply a personal one between the home and foreign 
clerks. Like a * debt of honor,' it should be held all the more sacred on this account, 
and I am^well pleased to be able to bear testimony that such is the case amongst the 
greater majority of the clerks, whom I find most scrupulous in making prompt payment 
of those fees when notified. There are others, however, I regret to have to add, who 
fail most lamentably in this duty, and although notified again and again allow their 
indebtedness to drag on, sometimes for years, until complaint has to be made to this 
department, and then, perhaps, too late to b3 effective. Whether arising from mere 
neglect or indifference, or otherwise, the defaulter in this respect cannot be too strongly 
condemed. The habitual offender brings the court into disrepute, as he will not be 
trusted, and this may lead into the more serious question of the consequences of delaying 
process of th^:, court. And in this connection it should always be borne in mind that 
once a step is taken by a clerk on process sent to him, he would not be justified in after- 
wards delaying the same in order to secure payment of his fees. While a clerk need not 
act until his fees are paid, the rule is that, having acted, it is his duty to make an 
immediate return. And should a suitor suffer through his neglect or hindrance in this 
respect, the offending clerk and his sureties would be liable in an action for damages on 
their covenant. 

SUBETIBS. 

The security of approved guarantee companies is favored by the Government as in 
every way more desirable than that of private parties, and should be furnished by clerks 
and bailiffs wherever possible. The low rate of 40c. per $100, per annum, to which the 
premium has now been reduced, brings this class of security within the easy reach of all. 
And what officer respecting his own independence is there who would not pay the small 
fee required for premium in preference to placing himself under personal obligation to 
friends by asking them to join him in the liability of a covenant — which would neces- 
sarily carry with it at least some personal inconvenience, even if resulting in no more 
serious consequences 1 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



OOLLECTION OF InTKREST ON JUDGMENTS. 

Again 1 would take occasion to call attention to a duty, which so many clerks and 
bailiffs appear to overlook, and the neglect of which is the cause of many complaints — 
that is, the failure to collect interest upon judgments. In previous reports this matter 
has been referred to, and the duty of officers of the courts pointed out. But, notwith- 
standing all the warnings and directions given, there are still officers who continue to 
give trouble, with the result also of loss to themselves. In every case the calculation 
and addition of interest should be made with the same carefulness as in giving the figures 
of the amount of debt and costs. Interest should be computed at the rate of six per 
cent, in the first place, by the clerk up to the date of issuing the execution, and after- 
wards added up to the date of payment by the bailiff. Where this is not done, and 
the officers charged with the duty are found in fault, they will personally be held 
responsible to make good the loss. Clerks should especially see to this, and should so 
instruct their bailiffs. 

Entering Insurance Oertificatbs. 

This ia a new duty imposed upon clerks by the Insurance Act, cap. 203, R. S. 0. 
1897. The certificate when received should be entered in the same way as a transcript^ 
and then becomes a judgment of the court. The ordinary schedule of fees will apply> 
except in cases not exceeding $10, and then the fees specially made applicable to $10 suits 
must govern. See sees. 135, 138, 193. 

Judgment Debtors. 

There is a notable decrease observable in the number of judgment summonses issued 
during the year. Quite an item in itself to be taken into account in shewing the falling 
off in the emoluments ot clerks and bailiffs. The returns shew a total of 4,868 issued 
for 1899, as against 5,290 in the preceding year. Out of a total of 1.193 judgment debtors 
ordered to be committed, the returns shew that the number of such debtors actually 
committed was 59, only. 

Division Oourt Costs. 

Division Court costs form a subject upon which there would appear to be, to say the 
least, a good deal of misapprehension in some quarters. A fair examination of the fees 
allowed by the tariff, and the figures given in the returns, could not fail to dissipate much 
erroneous opinion upon this head. 

Taking the number of suite, 40,363, and adding the suits in replevin, 118, and the 
number of judgment summonses 4,858, we have a grand total of suits of 45, 339, accord- 
ing to the returns. Dividing the number of suits into the total emoluments of clerks and 
bailiffs, and we find an average amount of $3.25 as the costs in each suit. 

In suits not exceeding $10 there is a special provision aa to the fees to be charged. 
For all services, from entering action, up to and including the entering of final judgment, 
or final order on any such judgment, or suing out a judgment or interpleader summons, 
up to and including the entering of final judgment, or final order on any such judgment ; 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 7 

or interpleader sammons, in case the action proceeds to jndgment or final order, the clerk 
gets $1.25, and the fee to the bailiff for all services, exclusive of mileage, is reduced to 
40 cents. 

A comparison of these figures, with the fees chargeable in the English County Courts, 
or with the fees allowed in any other courts, either at home or abroad, will be found to 
be largely in favor of the Division Courts of this Province, 

The results, in the speedy realization of claims, will also be found to be most favor- 
able to the Division Courts of Ontario. So that for cheapness, as to costs of proceedings 
and quick returns under process, these courts would appear to best serve the public 
interest to the extent of their jurisdiction. 

I have the honor to be your Honor's obedient servant, 

J. DICKEY, 

Inspector. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



TABLE 
Return of Division Court business, from the first day of January 





(1) 


(2) 
tic 


(3) 


(4) 

u 


(5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 






o 


o 


o 

a 




a 

a 




































a 


o 




n3 






^ 








o< 








s 




eS 


t^ 




■ti 




t) 


a 


-^ 




"o 




(D 


3 
O 


o 


a 




a 


2 












o 


o 
























■'3 
u 
o 






O (D 
00 

11 


£ 

to 
a 

s 




i 


s 




>, 


3 

o 
'a 

Da 


d 




aS 


« S 


•n 




>> 

X! 


a 
o 


a 


a 


a> 
a 


1 




!i 




3 




T3 


a 
a 


o 


a 


o 

a 


•73 

'a 


d 


Si a 


la's 

0) 3 


O 




s 


3 

a 


3 
O 
o 


o 
'5 


o 




o 


<D bo 


22_ 






m (1 


a 


a 




s 


>• 


'.S 


no's 


a^ 


no 

C 




.§§ 




"o 






> 




o3 c3 


eg 




es O 
































o 
u 




■si 


og 


•s 




"4-4 _e? 


■o 




a 

3 
o 


o 


ti 


Ut 


*^ QQ 


°l 


S-i 


m 


*J o 


d 




a 








(I> 4^ 












c« 


01 


^ 


Si a 


S^ 


^ 


•^ 


s S 


^ 












ia 


a-2> 


a 


o 


o o 

a^ 


a 

3 




if 


o 


"^ 


^ 


^ 


<3 


^ 




< 


•^ 


Oi 


H 


, H 








$ 






$ c 




$ C. 


■$ c. 


$ c. 


Algoma 


1 


96 


3,992 71 
1,870 29 




9 


215 66 


2 




839 00 


839 00 


2 


45 




8 


458 70 




9 80 


499 88 


499 88 




3 


96 


1,901 97 




10 


164 75 


3 


89 77 


577 14 


623 43 




4 


97 


2,484 U 




5 


518 48 


1 


21 70 


1,062 91 


972 75 




R 


128 


2,706 22 
803 41 




6 


458 71 


1 




1,222 88 
159 95 


1,204 06 




6 


25 




5 


237 40 


5 


1 78 


154 45 


Brant 


1 


456 


15,896 96 




23 


1,145 40 


30 


70 52 


3,368 73 


3,285 88 




2 


95 


3,247 52 




6 


395 60 


8 


, 10 03 


1,410 60 


1,406 44 




3 
4 


47 
45 


1,855 04 
1,677 34 




3 

8 


38 99 
387 03 


2 

5 




263 85 
659 57 


263 85 




2 00 


660 57 




5 
1 


28 
166 


821 17 




1 


66 58 




50 


398 02 


398 52 


Bruce 


6,677 18 




8 


240 69 


10 


408 78 


1,468 81 


1,513 52 




2 
3 


40 
111 


1,435 89 
3,177 54 




3 
6 


224 05 
159 65 


2 
16 




652 32 

474 86 


652 32 




65 74 


479 90 




4 


39 


1,281 65 




5 


131 11 


2 


65 16 


441 53 


487 70 




5 


69 


2,330 62 




5 


220 14 


8 


43 51 


376 77 


333 90 




6 


24 


1,508 81 




5 


188 11 




17 59 


167 03 


150 10 




7 
8 


38 
291 


1,796 93 
8,086 83 




6 
14 


173 12 
597 56 


3 

7 




376 04 

2,175 91 


364 39 




20 00 


2,019 84 




9 
10 


52 
22 


2,345 00 
889 36 




3 

4 


82 54 
123 93 


2 

1 




673 82 
274 14 


671 82 




25 42 


215 26 




11 


73 


2,563 46 




8 


457 24 


2 




425 82 


410 03 




12 


122 


2,584 89 




3 


168 73 


3 




625 64 


613 64 


Carleton 


1 


1,806 


67,611 52 




25 


1,682 19 


597 


385 23 


12,982 99 


12,999 45 




2 


55 


1,927 92 




11 


996 48 


6 


287 47 


1,320 41 


1,572 88 




3 
4 


28 
37 


825 10 
77rf 21 




4 
4 


114 00 
159 03 


1 
4 




472 81 
454 83 


472 81 




53 83 


463 08 




5 


34 


883 35 




4 


69 25 


3 


12 25 


549 91 


497 43 




6 

7 


56 
55 


1,466 58 
1,579 87 




1 
2 








557 47 
350 40 


545 47 




224 22 


5 


87 61 


319 56 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



to the Slat day of December, A.D. 1899 inclusive, shewing 



(10) 

>.< 

s 
o 
u 

_g 

M 

c§ 
o 

«4-l 

o 

s 
J 

"^ 


Number of suits entered, where the amount claimed »- 
exceeds $100, exclusive of transcripts of judgments -^ 
from other courts. 


(12) 

-a 
S 

'M 

"3 

a 

3 

o 

a 

(D 
It 

(D 

o 
o 

4-1 

m 

a 
o 

"l| 

**-! 

O w 

t.'a 

^ (D 

3 CD 


Number of actions of replevin, where the value ot the "P 
goods or other property or effects distrained, taken -^ 
or detained, exceeds $40. 


(14) 

o 

&c 
a 

a> 

<D 

o 

X 
<0 

o 

c 

1 
3 

u 

o 

(D 

1 
IS 

1 

O 

3 


(15) 

t5 

n 

o 

a 
a 

3 

IS 
CD 
3 

00 

is 

3 

"o 

bi 

a 

3 


(16) 
■6 

<D 

a 
o 

a 

a 

3 

£ 
o 

u 

3 

o 
■w 

a 

a 

3 
O 

a 


(17) 

o 

<D 

a 

i 

3 
t« 

3 

_g 
tT 

u 

aa 

2 

3 

lo 

^a 
|| 

3 M 


(18) 

a 
o 

'> 

s 

S-i 

•2 

u 

(D 
li 

3 
m 

>. 

a 

3 

a"£ 

§§ 

ao 

< 


(19) 

o 
a 
o 

M a 

SI 

^ <!> 

»^ 

S 2 

a o 
a> 
^ «j 

T) <D 

a h 
S£ 

:nH 

o a> 
a-" 

3 1) 

B 


(20) 

ID 00 

&'^ 

o a 

S ID 
ID -g 

1^ 

P c 

.2 2 

a ID 

II 



!^ ■" 

03 at 

ii 


(21) 

<D 
X 
CS 


m 

1 



a 

3 


1 

0] 

JS 

H 


(22) 

■6 

a 
1 

(B 


4:1 

"O 
<u 

u 

ID 

-H 


£ 


-4^ 

ID 
T3 

1 

a 

b£ 

1 

a 

1 


(28 

1 

'a 
a 



1 



ID 

"o 

3 

X 


bi 

a 

3 

a 

IS 

.a 


$ c. 


4 
4 
3 
3 

2 


1 





13 
17 
23 

8 

42 

8 




$ c. 




$ c. 


$ c. 




$ c. 






9 80 
43 48 
90 66 

18 82 
7 i!8 


1 


6 00 
















1 








3 

2 


15 00 
10 00 
























1 


i 
















1 


6 00 


1 


























82 85 
14 19 


26 
6 
3 
4 


10 
3 


1 
1 


112 
38 

7 
14 

6 


2 
2 


20 00 

21 00 




13 76 
2 94 

1 74 

1 78 

63 




1 
1 


10 00 
10 00 


4 





1 
1 


1 


1 00 


1 




4 


47 00 












































364 07 


13 
1 
6 
4 
5 
6 
4 

15 
5 
3 
5 
8 


1 
1 
2 

i 

1 
1 


i 


27 
7 

31 
9 

15 
8 
4 

77 
8 
4 

25 

47 


1 


9 00 


1 


6 43 

1 09 

2 88 

1 60 

2 36 
1 83 

1 84 
8 25 

2 18 
1 14 
1 11 

3 81 








4 












60 70 










1 


10 00 


1 




18 99 
42 87 


















2 
3 


10 00 
18 00 


2 


2 


34 52 










11 65 
156 07 


1 


8 00 










3 


20 00 


4 




2 00 
84 30 




1 


























15 79 






1 


11 00 















12 00 






































368 77 


121 
4 


7 


2 


373 
13 

2 
13 

7 
15 
12 








62 62 

1 90 

69 

60 

95 

1 16 

1 05 


1,552 55 


14 


111 50 


231 


7 


35 00 




























45 58 














i 




64 73 


2 
2 




















12 00 


















118 45 












1 





















10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



Return of Division 



County. 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


1 
(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 


Dufferin 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

1 
2 
3 
4 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


196 

183 

31 

23 

50 


$ c. 

7,748 73 

6,859 37 

844 35 

753 91 

1,660 92 


8 

22 
3 

1 
5 


$ c, 

464 61 

1,362 25 

148 45 

13 72 

211 01 


8 

30 

3 

1 
6 


$ c. 

69 42 

5 89 

32 70 

47 63 


$ c. 

1,184 86 

1,601 60 

285 50 

169 46 

1,134 95 


$ c. 

1,223 96 

1,601 60 

310 68 

174 45 

1,134 95 






Elgin 


177 

27 
467 
156 


6,245 82 

1,364 74 

17,921 82 

6,224 92 


18 
6 

17 
15 


1,038 96 
242 05 
686 48 

1,174 98 


16 

1 

46 

14 


218 41 


4,263 86 

539 98 

6,226 77 

1,232 18 


3,949 67 

651 94 

5,071 97 




16 46 


1,226 91 




62 

94 

84 

82 

166 

70 

510 

200 

71 


1,822 27 
3,422 94 
3,170 33 
2,470 20 
8,416 98 
1,795 56 
18,735 00 
6,714 23 
2,077 03 


3 
6 

7 
3 
8 
2 
16 
7 


98 62 
206 72 

32 99 

89 10 
492 98 

49 56 
667 23 
272 61 


17 
30 
17 

3 
32 

1 

126 

16 

11 




888 02 
1,035 84 
1,486 58 

956 41 
2,047 84 

674 44 
5,327 67 
2,217 36 
3,207 62 


888 02 




57 06 
77 86 
468 66 
164 65 
29 69 
40 71 
62 25 


1,041 92 
1,481 73 

985 39 
2,151 27 

661 02 
5,368 28 
2,069 53 
3,207 62 








Frontenac 


1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 


776 

no 
21 
61 
29 
79 


25,324 71 
Ousiness 

651 21 

1,118 30 

898 50 

3,083 41 


19 

2 
3 


1,459 96 

35 80 
95 55 


178 

1 
12 


779 44 


7,890 05 

267 63 

461 03 

189 29 

1,087 65 


8,468 73 
227 53 




7 04 


438 94 
163 29 




4 


389 93 


4 


16 26 


1,026 17 


Grey 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


570 
79 
76 
70 

134 
45 
91 
74 


14,535 57 
2,605 75 
3,149 12 
2,084 83 
4,653 51 
1,394 40 
3,372 35 
2,807 81 


12 

8 
5 

10 
7 
5 
4 
4 


742 29 
460 09 
216 93 
392 37 
713 60 
148 64 
130 52 
402 59 


72 
8 

10 
7 

13 
4 
7 

32 




4,865 93 
1,523 99 

545 64 

791 23 
1,974 61 

856 40 
1,296 66 

924 31 

1 


4,866 93 

1,537 70 
546 64 
786 71 

1,938 05 
873 14 

1,296 66 


15 15 

29 97 
5 48 

16 10 

17 74 






924 31 








Haldimand . . 


68 
18 
71 
8 
8 
71 


2,476 51 
506 31 

1,977 13 
208 08 
111 05 

2,145 00 


12 

2 
8 
1 
6 
10 


476 61 
97 47 

388 06 
47 08 
69 38 

468 00 


8 
1 
6 


le'oo 

60 15 


966 47 
171 23 
602 69 
134 44 
68 26 
866 70 


966 47 
169 71 
638 09 
134 44 




1 
6 


""49'4i 


68 25 
867 04 




1 
2 
3 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


36 
20 
24 


1,309 01 

355 21 

1,003 88 


2 


241 32 


3 
3 

8 




436 52 
216 04 
454 06 


435 62 






206 04 




2 


43 05 


33 68 


487 73 


Halton 


79 
151 
46 
71 
11 
59 


3,049 03 
5,656 01 
1,759 21 
1,713 86 
261 01 
2,675 87 


12 
6 
3 

17 


697 02 

127 43 

41 76 

891 60 


16 
21 

7 
9 


55 09 
84 55 


1,276 51 

1,657 35 

957 39 

668 11 

39 40 

1,057 83 


1,255 31 

1,517 28 

957 39 






668 11 






39 40 




5 


289 77 


7 


1 50 


1,064 58 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



11 



Court Business. — Continued, 



(10) 


(11) 


(12) 


(13) 


(14) (15) 


(16) 


;(i7) 


(18) 

$ 0. 

7 82 

5 61 

67 

73 

1 31 


(19) 


(20) 


(21) 


(22) 


(23) 


$ c. 
30 32 


18 

12 

1 






41 

58 

9 

4 

12 


1 
1 
2 


$ c. 

10 00 
12 00 
17 00 




$ c. 


1 


$ c. 
5 00 


3 

1 

"l 




5 89 








8 52 














42 64 










2 






































314 28 


11 
3 

28 
14 






51 

2 

83 

30 








1 

5 96 
1 35 

14 02 

6 44 














2 
2 
4 


3 


















197 72 
21 73 


"2 


24"66 


1 


1 68 


2 

1 


20 00 
5 00 


8 
2 


3 

1 




3 
3 
4 
3 

13 

2 

38 

12 

3 


1 
1 

2 


"""i4 

1 


23 








1 53 

2 33 
2 71 

2 55 
6 25 
1 25 

16 69 
6 06 
1 71 

22 55 

36 

54 
82 

3 11 








3 
3 
3 




50 98 
















81 71 


12 

18 
35 
20 
123 
50 
14 










2 


10 00 


.... 


439 57 


2 


24 00 






61 22 




2 


8 00 


5 


i 


43 11 


1 

6 3 












1 


22 00 




22 99 






46 
5 
3 


1 


147 83 


3 


1 

4 


1 


3 66 












1 


















200 76 
40 00 


44 


10 
1 





270 

6 
24 

7 
14 


1 


11 00 




145 19 


1 


10 00 


113 


.... 


29 13 















4 




26 00 


1 
9 


1 

1 


















78 64 































18 
4 

8 
5 

8 
1 
5 
6 


4 
3 

i 

1 
1 

i 


i 

1 
1 

i 


235 
18 
23 
19 
39 
9 

26 
17 








10 59 

2 41 

3 02 
2 72 

4 22 

1 09 

2 96 
2 76 


35 44 


3 

2 


15 00 
10 00 


14 
1 

1 




1 44 








. • « • 


29 97 










10 00 
















51 66 






























■ 1 






1 


12 00 
















1 


3 00 


3 












t 






4 
1 

3 

1 


4 


2 


14 

7 

23 






2 17 
43 

1 68 
34 
03 

1 49 












2 02 












24 7S 


3 




1 


12 00 






1 


n on 






1 












2 
19 


1 


1 00 






1 






49 07 


2 


1 
































1 






6 
2 

g 








94 

24 

1 14 








1 
1 
1 




10 0( 






















' 


J 




1 


12 OC 


.. ... 




2 


10 00 


.... 










73 7< 
124 6 


I 1^ 
5 J 


1 1 
I .. . 
$ 


L 

] 


18 

L 26 

14 

22 

2 

c 

-1 


1 


10 OC 
20 OC 







2 71 
5 7S 
1 3S 
1 6C 

36 

3 21 



















2 
1 


15 OC 
5 OC 


1 
) 1 

] 


1 




,. 






.... 




1 
I .... 


.... 


5 














3 2 


! ""22'6( 


) 




- 


! 10 0( 


) 













12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



Return of Division 



County. 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 








$ c. 




$ c. 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Hastings 


1 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

9 

10 

11 

12 


410 
21 

113 
93 
92 
84 

147 
97 
56 
77 


14,077 17 
583 44 
2,749 00 
3,138 30 
4,249 81 
1,490 30 
6,135 87 
2,863 95 
2,096 45 
2,837 13 


24 
3 

13 
4 

11 
5 

14 
3 
5 

11 


664 00 
77 10 
574 80 
36 10 
267 51 
207 14 
692 66 
119 62 
238 76 
499 81 


10 

1 

20 

2 

8 

1 


184 38 


3,020 04 
357 62 

1,063 56 
918 91 

2,716 60 
755 80 
613 72 
785 16 
875 53 

1,434 16 


3,101 29 

332 63 

1,165 23 




18 52 

3i'56 

17 49 
193 10 
129 30 


918 91 
2,716 60 
733 82 
521 18 
930 49 
681 83 
1,434 16 










Huron 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


221 

127 
130 
36 
66 
13 
20 
96 
48 
59 
25 
40 


6,017 56 
4,364 69 
4,439 52 

972 16 
2,061 96 

665 27 

574 91 
3,654 37 
1,623 85 
1,765 40 

647 15 
1,309 31 


13 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


376 09 
90 85 
197 15 
294 33 
367 30 
211 66 


13 
41 
20 
2 
5 
2 
1 
8 
3 
1 
2 
1 


104 41 
139 35 


1,866 00 

1,759 31 

1,961 06 

267 47 

1,028 48 

423 19 

255 36 

1,250 13 

986 78 

889 91 

177 86 

391 92 


1,923 43 
1,876 41 
1,961 06 






259 47 






1,028 48 




1 39 

" 88*86 

81 82 

7 02 

7 00 

18 09 


418 85 
255 36 




8 
6 
5 
1 
3 


225 06 
295 26 
380 64 
5 00 
137 23 


1,303 77 
969 56 
888 41 
166 86 
391 92 


Kent 


1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


363 

83 

158 

[164 

116 

185 


15,160 39 

2,744 01 
5,840 38 
4,463 60 
5,190 70 
6,085 95 


16 

Office 

8 

1 

12 

12 

11 


862 82 
burned dow 
380 60 
73 75 
680 80 
682 83 
356 75 


43 
n.— N 
4 
40 
21 
13 
14 


1,075 87 
returns. 

7 27 
147 23 
237 37 


4,946 64 

1,775 47 
2,057 48 
1,559 09 
2,002 49 
2,264 70 


5,092 74 

1,662 15 
2,038 34 
1,751 53 
2,002 49 




196 39 


2,017 80 


Lambton .... 


479 
80 
91 
52 
79 
24 
38 
200 
100 


12,970 71 
1,819 89 
2,407 72 
2,361 02 
1,772 54 
506 73 
1,102 94 
6,979 35 
2,450 83 


11 

8 
16 
9 
2 
2 
3 
15 


440 74 
159 32 
642 17 
178 66 
176 39 
117 95 
62 72 
565 37 


58 
3 
1 
5 
1 
2 
2 

25 
6 


111 48 
44 22 


4,830 01 
547 50 

1,578 67 
779 92 

1,258. 94 
249 29 
496 41 

2,876 31 

1,418 82 


4,862 80 
576 09 

1,555 06 
779 72 




55"61 

57 82 

133 74 

19 22 


1,258 94 

286 81 

513 17 

2,765 33 

1,425 37 


Lanark 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


129 
28 
94 

264 
10 
64 

332 
158 
101 
212 
217 
84 
63 


3,524 90 
1,118 97 
3,478 84 
7,661 31 
290 80 
1,657 75 

9,673 44 
4,706 77 
3,031 54 
6,250 52 
4,249 97 
2,279 85 
1,684 19 


8 
3 
4 
1 
2 
3 


687 51 
115 36 
144 21 

90 62 
104 74 

76 97 


12 

3 

24 

47 

1 

7 


154 61 
143 48 


1,038 88 

421 40 

1,043 01 

2,837 30 

100 85 

796 84 


1,193 49 

456 09 

1,043 01 




80 00 


2,876 77 
100 85 
796 84 








Leeds and 
Grenville.. . 


27 
20 
12 
5 
7 
3 
2 


776 80 
691 96 
294 37 
147 88 
91 44 
37 03 
220 72 


23 
8 
4 
55 
10 
3 
1 


92 18 
108 79 

91 70 
174 43 


4,524 72 
2,088 23 
1,016 18 
1,533 55 
1,038 98 
636 28 
514 65 


4,549 13 
2,038 37 
964 76 
1,435 78 
1,038 98 






621 28 




iis 55 


535 73 



1899 1 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



13 



Court Basinfsa. — Continued. 



(10) 


(11) 


(12) 


(13) 


(14) 


(15) 


(16) 


(17) 


(18) 


(19) 


(20) 


(21) 


(22) 


(23 


% c. 
91 13 


26 






141 




$ c. 


1 


$ c. 

12 74 


$ c. 




$ c. 


1 

1 


1 


24 99 












42 










"*i8'52 


3 

2 
7 
1 
12 
5 
5 
2 





1 


36 
24 


1 
2 


9 00 
19 00 




2 13 

2 30 

3 70 
94 




1 


5 00, 




.... 




.."::: ::::':i 










53 48 






46 
51 
26 
12 

7 










1 
5 


io 66 

30 00 






110 03 


4 


3 


3 


28 00 1 


4 89 1 






47 77 






2 45 
2 18 








223 00 




















1 










2 21 





1 


8 00 








4 
3 


70 20 
36 00 








46 98 
22 26 


10 
11 
10 

1 

3 
3 


""5 




82 

38 

26 

35 

17 

3 

4 

16 

12 

18 

4 

14 




5 53 
4 94 
4 81 

76 
1 95 
1 11 

39 
3 10 
1 40 
1 40 

48 
1 48 




2 


10 00 


2 
14 









2 


10 00 


4 


8 00 


2 
1 

1 


21 00 
12 00 
12 00 


















i' 


5 73 


























i ... 


35 16 


4 
2 
2 

4 


1 




1 


10 00 










1 
1 




109 04 










8 52 


1 




12 00 












12 00 




















































929 77 


29 






42 


3 


27 00 




14 63 









15 












113 32 


5 
11 

9 
8 
7 






15 

38 








2 45 
5 27 
4 74 

4 52 

5 05 




1 


10 00 






166 37 


1 

i 

1 


3 

1 
1 


1 


12 00 
11 00 





18 

11 

6 
2 


1 


44 93 
"443 26 


53 
13 
46 


1 




1 
1 
1 


8 00 
10 00 
10 00 














78 69 


18 
1 
6 
5 
2 




1 


177 

14 

11 

6 

23 

8 

6 

55 

33 

45 
6 








10 05 

1 24 

2 52 
2 09 
1 97 








22 

1 
1 

4 




16 63 
















23 61 













' 1 


"*i6"66 






2 










1 




3 


12 00 






19 09 


27 

88 

5 95 

2 06 








1 
2 
3 

1 




41 16 


1 
10 

2 


1 




1 
1 
1 


12 00 
12 00 
11 00 













110 98 








3 


15 00 




12 67 



























5 
4 
6 

18 




2 84 








1 




108 79 








1 30 
3 33 
7 62 
21 
1 05 








\'.'.'.'.'.. 




21 

92 

3 


1 . . , . 












11 

5 


1 


40 53 










1 


10 00 


















1 




21 
138 




























7 71 

4 22 
2 61 

5 22 
2 01 
1 80 
1 54 




1 


1 5 00 


2 
2 




67 77 


15 

« 
; 

S 
3 

;^ 
4 


1 

2 

2 


1 
2 




158 65 


64 
24 

1 57 








143 12 








1 




L... 


272 2C 










3 


is 66 


2 








114 
24 








15 OC 


1 



















97 47 






















14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



Return of Division 



County. 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


4 


(5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 


Leeds and 
Grenville- Con 


c 
IC 
11 
12 


! 51 
38 

> 47 
29 
14 


$ c. 
1,654 51 
1,725 76 
1,245 53 
1,044 99 

355 43 

1 


c 

1 
2 


$ c. 

270 6E 

7 5C 

53 26 


2 
2 
2 


« c 

60 00 

5 40 

33 75 


1 

$ c 
651 21 
337 57 
584 57 
295 47 
80 57 


$ c. 
665 21 
331 87 
542 46 
291 46 








1 


22 63 


68 17 










Lennox and 
Addington . 


1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 
7 


181 
16 
6 
52 
43 
25 
65 


5,022 02 
390 66 
144 32 

1,227 61 

2,164 20 
593 83 

2,175 99 


19 

1 


427 04 
8 91 


32 

4 


37 00 


1,425 63 

219 47 

26 55 

311 68 

1,126 32 
187 71 
536 32 


1,322 97 
219 47 




13 62 


40 27 




2 
3 
2 

3 


64 65 
144 84 

i63'23 


6 

8 

i 

7 
17 


269 54 




12 07 
28 02 
25 37 


1.128 12 
215 73 
554 6» 


Lincoln 


1 
2 

3 
4 

1 
2 
3 


63 

346 

96 

71 


2,890 02 

13,239 90 

2,647 OS 

2,835 65 


3 

30 
16 

8 


52 17 

1,350 06 

668 66 

370 42 


98 92 
1,401 76 

444 


771 94 
4,320 16 

897 80 
1,225 27 


729 06 
3,883 37 

897 80 
1,150 60 


Manitoulin . . . 


81 
31 
57 


3,362 14 
1,166 64 
2,725 71 


7 
5 
5 


326 68 
211 35 
349 10 


1 

1 

142 

7 
14 


39 05 

9 88 

126 00 

1,684 03 
69 92 
43 73 


867 92 

629 04 

1,140 62 


8 00 

636 32 

1.241 62 


Middlesex 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


1359 

78 

67 

35 

116 

138 

33 

10 

623 


46,345 18 
3,567 34 
2,256 00 
1,848 43 
4,578 98 
5,273 21 
643 96 
214 77 
7,857 37 


22 

10 

4 

5 

10 

12 

8 

3 

9 


1,152 40 

273 27 
333 54 

274 63 
291 43 
438 32 
533 83 
264 05 
378 28 


12,997 23 

650 54 

879 91 

1,173 30 

1,303 93 

2,557 77 

513 15 

144 59 

2,982 21 


13,076 12 

687 68 

836 18 

1,153 30 




6 

15 

5 

" '46 


258 35 
54 37 
77 85 

2814 


1,167 94 

2,532 .53 

550 15 

113 39 

2,844 60 


Musk oka 


1 
2 
3 

4 


94 
102 
114 

34 


3,202 58 

3,253 78 

3,361 35 

873 65 


45 
18 
16 

4 


509 00 
872 22 
743 55 
108 50 


6 

15 

3 

3 


49*59 

29 83 
43 50 


1.035 27 

1,105 98 

1,457 16 

976 92 


942 27 
1,038 91 
1,461 99 
1,017 48 


Nipiseing 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


60 
125 
153 

277 
53 
10 


1,912 20 
4,234 66 
6,787 63 
8,113 43 
1.646 05 
319 91 


4 

4 

13 

8 
5 
9 


92 63 
57 59 
73i 12 
282 06 
160 98 
210 37 




79 40 


616 22 

1,195 12 

2,599 37 

3,492 46 

439 09 

119 77 


578 32 
1,195 12 




4 
3 


8 25 
219 93 


2,546 58 

3,346 05 

439 09 






119 77 




























Norfolk 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


124 
105 
29 
45 
49 
70 
33 
33 


4,822 23 
2,711 65 
682 48 
1,089 06 
1,152 32 


4 

6 
2 
8 

1 


157 98 
304 34 
20 83 
252 92 
153 28 
351 83 
414 64 
317 07 


42 
8 

■■■■4 
14 
16 

1 


60 11 

113 10 

11 90 

51 49 


583 68 
956 44 
178 051 

560 73 
352 85 1 


633 10 
984 04 
179 05 
517 13 
352 85 




2,056 25 11 
524 51 10 
904 60 5 




908 62 908 62 






160 79 160 79 






677 93 677 93 








— — — 










1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



15 



Oourt BosinesB. — Continued. 



(10) 


(11) 


(12) 


(13) 


(14) 


(15) 


(16) 


(17) 


(18) 


(19) 


(20) 


(21) 


(22) 


(23) 


$ c. 
46 00 


3 
4 

1 
3 


2 




14 

5 

12 

14 

5 




$ c. 




$ c. 
1 47 
1 69 


$ c. 


1 


$ c. 
5 00 






5 70 










.... 


42 11 










1 


1 09 

1 02 

24 









2 


1 


4 01 








2 


10 00 




35 13 














- • • • 




I 

















6 
1 




102 66 


6 


3 


1 


57 
6 
2 
19 
10 
12 
15 


1 


10 GO 


3 84 
24 
09 
82 

2 72 
52 

1 85 

2 85 
11 05 

2 60 

3 20 




1 


5 00 


























42 14 


2 

8 
1 
2 




















• • • • 


10 27 










1 


5 00 


4 
1 
1 


. . • • 














• • • • 


7 00 


2 




1 


10 00 










• . • • 








6 00 
18 00 






6 

19 

4 

8 






9 
88 
31 
13 










1 
3 




1,838 65 




1 








10 


2 




1 
2 


12 00 
11 30 




79 11 








1 


6 00 


2 


1 










1 
2 5 
















2 60 


2 

8 






6 
6 

376 
19 
15 






:::::i :;:;■ 










• • • • 


25 00 


2 








1 










.... 


1,605 14 
42 50 


82 
9 
6 
6 
6 

13 
3 

""5 


4 




3 
1 
2 

1 
1 


61 00 

11 00 
24 00 

12 00 
12 00 
12 00 
26 00 
12 00 
10 00 




43 04 
3 45 
2 46 

2 22 

3 96 

4 59 
1 47 

15 
4 49 


517 48 


7 
1 

1 


60 00 
10 00 
10 00 


58 
2 
3 


6 


43 73 






• • • • 


20 00 






. - . • 


394 34 


3 

1 
1 


i 


6 








3 
4 

1 




79 61 
40 85 


35 1 
8 3 




1 


5 00 




31 20 


2 
336 


1 
1 










165 75 




1 


8 00 


18 

3 
3 

1 


1 








93 00 


10 






10 

26 

34 

7 




19 00 








2 


10 00 




116 66 6 


1 

1 


1 










5 00. 7 


















2 94 


















1 






















117 30 1 


""i 


13 












4 

16 

3 

"l 


29 
29 






'""2 










1 


• • * • 


61 04 








366 34 


52 

11 

4 
















.... 








































' ' ' • 






























1 
10 69 14 
85 60 2\ 


2 


1 
3 

\ 


1 
35 
36 


4 
3 


2t 00 




4 94 

1 94 

65 

78 
69 
1 74 
58 
98 




3 
1 


15 00 
6 00 


7 
1 


1 


10 90 l| ll 


1. ll 


6 00 
11 00 


1 




85 09 


.... 1 .... 1 


13 
14 
20 
15 
10 


1 








1 .... 




3 1 

11 














2 














1 


ll 





... 1 


21 


24 66 


i 




i 


5 00 


" i 


.... 



16 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



Return of Division 



County. 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


(9) 


Northumber- 
land and 
Durham 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 


237 

77 

144 

126 

278 

25 

145 

85 

76 

40 

111 


$ c. 

5,037 21 
2,431 13 
5,295 00 
5,993 51 
9,312 61 
734 61 
5,690 82 
3,338 00 
2,642 96 
1,044 22 
3,817 54 


5 

3 

26 
5 
5 
12 
3 
8 
3 
6 


$ c. 

236 19 

104 72 

864 10 

237 64 
194 43 
639 10 
123 00 
511 97 
231 07 
289 14 


15 

5 

2 

11 

33 

25 

11 

5 

9 


$ c. 

57 79 

39 07 

15 84 

2 00 


$ c. 

2,415 99 

456 11 

2,166 47 

2,122 76 

1,300 91 

146 64 

1,364 01 

317 00 

914 12 

369 21 

1,196 45 


S c. 

2,416 15 
439 96 
2,147 16 
2,079 61 
1,300 91 




3 67 
117 43 

'334'9i 
23 00 


146 64 
1,352 10 
317 00 
873 42 
385 26 
1,196 45 










1 
2 

3 
4 
5 
6 

7 


181 
64 
85 

107 
85 
47 
38 


6,379 20 
1,907 89 
2,277 42 
4,634 63 
3,845 40 
1,892 92 
2,033 65 


9 
9 
6 

10 
11 

I 


595 25 
175 52 
362 16 
540 35 
684 95 
188 38 
260 73 


4 

1 
7 
7 
3 
1 
9 




1,029 84 
808 81 
663 62 
1,090 87 
2,719 57 
844 26 
695 30 


958 55 






808 81 




ii 00 

22 48 

5 16 

13 00 


641 92 

1,083 39 

2,680 67 

836 10 

695 63 


Oxford 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 

1 
2 
3 
4 


337 
152 

52 

84 

426 

134 


13,166 14 
4,407 21 
2,159 10 
2,630 63 

13,690 19 
4,999 14 


20 
6 
3 

12 

19 
8 


797 01 
368 18 
109 81 
431 50 
681 12 
433 63 


93 
15 
5 
10 
19 
14 


383 78 
124 00 
10 52 
45 16 
194 50 
112 75 


4,894 05 
2,580 87 
602 9L 
684 06 
3,755 30 
1,222 34 

1,794 17 

197 43 

51 53 

1,792 40 
447 74 
876 82 

1,053 02 


5,919 65 
2,535 84 
597 66 
679 96 
3,724 22 
1,194 02 


Parry Sound . . 


187 

£6 

9 

122 
26 
64 
73 

118 
52 
56 
29 


5,890 00 
883 66 
250 67 

3.752 79 
776 65 

2,276 57 

1,321 94 

5,809 43 
2,233 49 
2,028 56 
1,350 78 


16 
1 
1 

26 
4 
7 

13 


1,037 75 
32 10 
65 95 
939 61 
232 78 
183 14 
606 14 


7 

"l 

11 

3 




1,794 17 


4'29 

68 28 
22 46 
47 50 
35 21 


197 43 
51 53 

1,701 54 
424 11 
867 86 

1,034 91 


Peel 


5 
22 
12 

4 


421 44 

1.109 17 

605 61 

125 89 


34 
4 
9 
3 




1,462 51 
854 30 
466 48 
226 63 


1,444 71 






840 30 






456 48 






211 63 








Perth 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 


480 

153 

99 

50 

65 

144 


14,802 98 
4,737 81 
3,053 17 
1,531 48 
3,284 25 
6,173 01 


16 
9 

7 

i 

17 


869 17 
356 18 
245 68 
7 22 
121 96 
1,083 28 


38 

21 

8 

6 

3 

20 


176 49 
46 64 

1775 

13 00 


4,342 66 
2,274 89 
1,200 72 
555 69 
1,815 68 
2,808 12 


4,145 16 
2,276 73 
1,200 72 
573 44 
1,786 25 
2,808 12 








Peterborough . 


440 

71 

6 

76 

9 


16,179 66 
2,513 72 

310 02 
3,293 23 

243 68 


20 
9 

4 

1 


1,248 73 
861 91 

las'si 

21 60 

97 65 
202 87 


64 
3 

3 




4,847 79 
708 42 

57 08 
802 56 

82 94 


4,847 79 


82 71 


770 98 
57 08 




152 41 


839 47 
82 94 










Prescott and 


1 
2 
3 


28 
61 
38 


894 00 

1,748 99 

845 70 


3 
5 


5 
6 




234 00 
595 97 

720 85 


234 00 




149 61 


394 37 
720 85 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



17 



Court Business. — Continued. 



(10) 


(11) 


(12) 


(13) 


(14) 


(15) 


(16) 


(IT) 


(18) 


(19) 


(20) 


(21) 


(22) 


(23) 


$ c. 
57 63 


14 
5 

\t 

22 

1 

19 
6 
4 
2 
5 

6 

... 

3 

13 

S 

4 

24 
2 
7 
4 

17 
9 






84 1 
23 1 


i c. 

10 00 




§ c. 

U 41 
2 54 
50 


•S c. 




8 c. 


5 

1 




55 22 


12 00 i 










35 15 


1 


2 


15 

15 

101 

8 
47 










1 


5 00 




45 15 


...... 


5 12 


7 
11 

2 
19 

5 






1 


io 50 

1 


9 07 
52 
6 70 
3 00 
2 23 
89 




5 


40 00 


1 


3 67 








129 34 






?. 


23 00 




3 

3 


15 00 
15 00 






2 
1 


2 


39 
16 
18 
31 










375 58 


1 


11 00 




3 .... 


6 95 
















4 


41 00 

12 00 
10 00 





3 23 








3 




1 



] 
2 
2 





1 


5 40 
1 23 












71 29 


44 


1 

1 


3 
1 


15 

3 









21 70 




15 
25 


2 13 
4 93 

3 77 
1 78 

1 78 

12 36 
3 23 

2 35 








7 48 




2 00 
12 00 






.■..;:.;;::;.; 






39 00 


13 i 

10 1 

3 1 

67 7 
36 1 
10 2 
20, - ■ 




1 






8 16 












12 67 


5 
1 
... 


1 

1 

1 


11 00 












258 18 
76 27 


41 00 
12 00 
12 00 

49 06 


1 
■'1 




1 


5 


20 


2 


5 25 












50 26 


ll 2 29 





""2 


"iooo 


3 

1 




225 58 






79 
26 


7 




12 14 
4 53 






141 07 


1 


2 






















6 






38 
















1 


1 
























4 29 


1 

2 
2 






1 

2 

3 


'26 


















159 14 














2 ---- 


46 09 


















56 40 






13 
19 




















15 11 




























.. . 
1 


















17 80 
14 00 


14 

I 

2 


.;: 


1 


14 
12 


1100 





5 65 
2 97 




2 
2 


13 00 
18 00 


8 






9 






1 80 


2 

2 




15 00 






7 


1 


12 00 


























" 5'66 

15 00 




373 99 


24 

12 

3 

1 

11 
16 


2 
4 




149 
66 
21 
13 








13 65 
4 62 
2 04 
1 66 
4 35 


2 15 


i 
2 


8 2 


44 80 








2,.... 










2 1 




2 


2 

""i 








1 .... 


29 43 


12 














1 




32 


.... 




1 


6 55 


;;;■;;;; 


4 


26 66 

17 00 


6 




"20 15 


28 
3 
1 
6 


4 

1 


1 


84 
8 
1 

20 
2 


2 
4 


20 00 
36 00 




15 94 
2 04 

40 
2 75 

15 


60 


2 


16 


2 














115 50 


2 




1 


10 00 









1 


3 00 




































1 
1 
2 






4 
13 








79 








2 




201 60 












1 18 
1 64 












i 




19 

















.... 



2 D.C. 



18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



Return of Division 



County. 


i 

(1) 

1 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 

1 
6 
6 
4 


(5) 


(6) 


(7) 


(8) 


m 


Prescott and 
Russell, -Con. 


50 
66 
31 
79 
17 
48 
128 
73 


8 c. 

1,691 97 
2,625 37 
1.154 36 
1.536 80 
415 28 
1,241 07 
1,989 17 
2,476 91 


$ c. 

41 34 

293 78 
193 6i 
244 27 


4 

7 

1 

10 

1 


•■? c. 
38 96 

""*265 il 

1 26 24 


8 c. 

540 23 
733 07 
439 09 
628 59 
200 40 
736 67 
1,064 07 
735 06 


S c. 

521 91 
733 07 
439 09 
504 62 
221 64 




2 

4 

7 


32 00 

98 78 
358 76 

832 10 


2 
10 

5 




1 736 67 




[ 


1,064 07 
(i56 23 










Prince 
Edward 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


131 
35 
1 
13 
15 
17 
14 


4.419 63 
1,468 78 
94 67 
298 51 
520 34 
217 72 
420 4.S 


14 


18 
3 




1,651 96 

401 69 

27 26 

112 00 

79 64 

54 00 

347 26 


1,584 04 
253 54 




1 
2 
5 

""2 


,16 99 
60 00 
77 15 

19464 






27 66 








112 00 








79 64 








26 43 

347 26 




2 no 94 
















415 54 










Rainy River. . 


1 
2 
3 
4 

1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
6 
7 

8 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

fi 
7 
8 
9 
10 

1 
2 
3 
4 



6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


461 
30 

1-New c 


16,970 82 
1,251 70 

ourts. 


5 


61 


173 43 


5,251 55 
237 25 


!5,024 78 
215 35 


Renfrew 


263 

50 

207 

174 

18 
88 
75 
74 

281 

75 
117 
169 

591 
210 

32 
116 
225 

82 

87 
153 
364 
154 

72 
164 

27 
126 

34 
120 

58 
136 

1 


11,061 99 
1,416 35 
7,087 44 
5,003 65 
674 78 
3,220 96 
2.999 35 
2,798 76 


5 
1 
9 
7 
2 
4 
9 
9 


257 51 
91 30 
403 97 
191 .'.5 
108 (;2 
274 36 
384 02 
520 90 


10 
1 
9 

7 

l 


30 75 

31 75 
65 21 
61 61 
22 97 
29 68 

113 96 


2,342 04 

675 15 
1,932 92 
2,972 70 

200 51 
1,516 61 
1,306 01 
1,286 22 


2,372 79 
656 28 
1,866 07 
2,927 79 
177 47 
1,531 29 
1,351 65 
1,150 60 








Simcoe 

Stormont, 
Dundas and 
Glengarry. . 


10,286 68 
2,391 32 
4,253 83 
7,194 89 
2,292 40 

10,821 .56 
1,478 48 
5,300 12 
7,895 11 
2,138 23 


13 
3 

10 
28 
25 
11 

6 
20 
16 

9 


409 93 
138 31 
482 42 
1,210 00 
889 34 
S4S 44 
292 85 
805 62 
327 50 
210 18 


1 

6 

18 
2 
18 
1 
12 
43 
10 


191 04 

30 72 

152 31 
65 27 

203 83 

457 39 

57 42 

42'57 


3,359 03 

948 25 
1,136 01 
2, .509 17 

804 05 
1,612 75 

459 71 
2,365 94! 
3,976 SO 

737 71 


3,520 07 

913 80 
1,145 85 
2,647 59 

818 66 
1,643 50 

4&3 10 
2,142 91 
3; 976 30 

730 67 


2,431 15 
4,226 H7 
8 985 45 
4,321 60 
2, .577 18 
4,082 61 
676 45 
3,575 86 
1,30S 75 
4,719 48 
1,883 27 
2,840 00 


2 

2 

6 

3 

19 

18 

7 

3 

3 

13 

2 


72 62 

94 01 
197 19 
142 80 
251 85 
369 98 
309 65 
150 43 

99 30 
211 40 

90 63 


10 

6 
39 

i' 

6 

8 

2 

5 

11 

11 


155 56 

138 61 

112 09 

31 20 

■■■■■52'28 

178 10 

12 77 

'■■' i7'37 
63 62 


1,421 62 
1,200 85 
2,960 23 1 
1.895 761 
1,194 58 
1,605 67 

883 35 
1,279 96 

599 02 
1,660 80 

529 871 
1,601 21 


1,524 00 
1,163 79 
2,953 94 
1,899 46 
1,133 37 
1.605 67 

906 59 
1,260 96 

604 14 
1.660 80 

489 87 
1,393 58 



1899] 



INSPECTOR (3F DIVISION COURTS. 



19 



Conrt Business. — Continued. 



(10) 


(11) 


(12) 


(13) 


(14) 


(15) 
.... 


(16) 


(17) 


(18) 


(19) 


(20) 


(21) 


(22) 


(23) 


$ c. 
57 28 


3 
6 



1 






16 

7 


•S c 




■S c. 

1 56 

2 75 
95 

1 00 
24 
90 

2 63 
2 19 


•^ c. 




« c. 


1 
1 









' ' 1 


6 
39 




. . .. 








389 08 














2 




5 00 


















13 




. . 




1 
1 






5 
3 

9 
5 


29 




1 


5 66 
00 




78 83 


1 


■ 1 


19 










9, 










67 92 


40 


27 30 


1 


3 84 

1 85 

6 

18 

33 

15 

18 

9 






2 






9 1 


12 001 ... . 
1 












"7 
5 

10 
3 











.... 












28 00 




1 

2 


.... 


12 00 1 














18 43 


1 


10 00 



















400 20 


11 


1 




71 
3 










2 


*"6'66 


6 




21 90 

















































30 00 
5 00 






92 10 


32 

"""ie 

7 
1 
6 
1 
6 


""2 
"2 

i 












12 OS 
99 


3 
1 


4 

1 
2 

1 




5u 62 


1 


13 

45 

37 

2 

21 
10 
15 










132 06 






1 


G 85 

4 42 

64 

2 91 

1 96 

2 79 






106 52 




2 


4 00 




46 04 










15 00 










""3 


""26'66 




68 32 
135 62 








1 


1 






















30 00 
34 45 


23 
3 
6 

16 
5 

24 
5 

13 

17 
4 


"i 

1 
1 
3 

■ 3 




"3 

" i 


61 
18 
34 
26 


2 


23 00 





9 64 

, 2 22 

3 72 

7 57 
2 39 

10 92 

1 91 
5 35 

8 24 

2 35 




2 


16 00 


3 1 

11 1 


"*i4 89 


4 


45 CO 

'"3506 !!!!;. 
43 go; 

12 00| 

15 00 

25 00 

12 00 1 




4 


23 00 


1 


50 66 


9 3 

20; 10 

2, 1 
23 2 
82 7 
18' 1 




3 
2 

3 

1 


is 66 
10 00 

""i6'6c 
10 00 






173 08 
464 00 
223 03 

7 04 


6 

1 

6 


1 






















53 18 


1 
9 

10 
8 
4 
7 
1 
4 

12 
4 

1 


""2 

'" 1 


'" 2 


28 
49 
126 
29 
19 






1 84 
4 32 
6 91 
4 07 








4 

9 


1 


135 39 










1 


""3'66 




118 38 








3 


27 50 








6 2 


61 21 


2 29 

3 15 
55 

2 98 
1 26 









1 


1 




69 










29 04 


7 

36 

3 






.... 












197 10 


1 


2 
















7 15 




















27 
14 








5 01 
1 99 
1 75 










57 37 








2 




271 35 


63 



























20 



THE REPORT UF THE 



[ No. 29 



Return of Division 



County. 


(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 

6 

8 


(7) 


(8) 


CJ) 


Thunder Bay. 


1 
3 

1 

2 

3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


91 
181 


.■^ c. 
4,143 76 
8,215 12 


6 

5 


S c. 
436 44 
145 12 


S 0. 
■■'i4S'37 


$ c. 
1,359 42 
2,035 72 


•S 0. 
1,303 90 
2,158 84 




85 
96 
44 
26 
411 
73 
49 

322 
162 
278 
50 
70 
69 
2J 


2,390 59 
3,059 76 
1,003 91 
■ 470 60 
15,403 83 
2,164 56 
1,915 99 


4 
2 
2 

1 

14 

1 


122 88 
134 27 
130 78 
174 58 
996 92 
66 13 


9 
4 
7 
4 
56 
14 
1 




898 31 
927 13 
497 03 
241 88 
3,913 33 
811 31 
645 31 


-898 31 




■ l6"37 

3500 

33 98 


927 13 

466 33 

241 88 

3,820 61 

791 74 
037 34 










Waterloo 


12,514 83 
3,793 80 
7,212 77 
1,610 29 
1,163 12 
1,666 41 
817 05 


11 
13 

8 

I 

1" 
3 


578 11 
507 34 
422 44 
217 61 
141 46 
11 87 
217 96 


16 

9 

20 

? 

5 
2 


84 82 

237 

64 38 
4 13 


3.481 62 

1,522 20 

2,918 39 

799 74 

1,022 72 

848 84 

209 64 


3,417 81 
1,522 20 
2,904 39 

819 81 
1,026 85 

820 84 




71 00 


290 64 


Welland 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

IT 
1 

8 
10 
11 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
7 
8 
9 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 

324 


275 
46 
110 
227 
100 
48 

No retu 
41 
17 
49 
62 
54 
98 
96 
116 
77 

680 
63 
20 
31 
20 
15 
9 

329 

1,621 
92 
54 
215 
42 
70 
41 
180 
41 

1,574 

40,363 


9,946 00 
1,411 97 

2,878 56 
6,600 88 
3,532 76 
1,231 12 


8 
2 
8 
13 
5 
1 


127 03 
94 38 
153 19 
498 49 
252 51 
17 19 


48 
5 
12 
20 
18 
3 


67 00 

4 93 

29 52 

669 48 

7 15 

88 36 


4,429 65 
326 39 
1,661 93 
2,4.53 39 
1,288 64 
496 63 


4,470 30 
326 32 
1.675 77 
2,401 25 
1,265 64 
529 14 


Wellington. . . 


rns received. 
1,312 32 
457 35 
1.908 23 
1,765 16 
1,790 35 
3,170 55 
3.871 95 
3, .588 68 
3,656 22 


3 
1 

13 
8 
3 
8 
4 

12 
9 


221 74 
25 58 

656 14 

222 12 
145 35 
382 81 
215 87 
501 73 
421 84 

901 39 
150 25 
59 31 
12 87 
77 03 
79 55 


1 

1 

7 

2 

2 

14 

11 

18 

14 




185 89 

110 00 

1,018 99 

835 23 

797 95 

1,279 31 

1,395 95 

1,839 51 

973 53 


185 89 




1 00 
76 20 

sob 

12 68 

78 75 

475 87 

63 75 


111 00 
1,079 42 

835 23 

770 '20 
1,286 9 J 
1,285 07 
1,903 37 

944 03 


Wentworth . . . 


24,428 50 
2,418 45 
549 74 
935 71 
601 43 
407 60 
680 43 

13,345 75 


25 
9 
3 
1 
1 
1 


100 
10 
3 
2 
2 
2 
1 
42 


196 36 


6,431 80 
731 66 
126 97 
588 11 
157 49 
272 05 
177 25 

2,738 37 


6,196 25 
731 66 
126 97 




19 00 


594 31 
157 49 

272 05 




"'"70.5"28 


177 25 




8 


481 49 


2,979 48 


York 


75,239 06 
4,797 22 
2,107 31 
9,646 03 
2,011 82 
3,180 40 
1,911 89 
5,341 13 
2,124 48 

72,543 76 

1,384,943 11 


42 

17 
6 

11 
3 

I 

25 
2 

42 


2,205 48 
780 82 
171 62 

386 95 
180 76 

387 02 
125 35 
944 93 

26 02 
2,354 87 

105,547 00 


309 

7 

4 

18 

1 

10 

12 

18 

6 

323 


878 96 


13,516 53 

801 91 
1,032 55 
1,686 58 

177 78 
1,021 90 

200 81 
1,299 38 

330 88 
11,752 16 


13,703 95 




733 56 




'""304 49 

179 20 

53 95 

20 75 


963 80 
1,784 09 
203 92 
785 79 
207 81 
1,297 38 




20 35 
SSO 96 


328 13 
11,. 575 33 


Grand totals . 


2,382 


4,858 


23,306 73 


436,268 43 


432,202 29 



J89<» ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



21 



Court Business. — Continued. 



(10) 


(11) 


(12) 


(13) 


(14) 


(15) 


(16) 


(17) 


(18) 


(19) 


(20) 


(21) 


(22) 


(23) 


•S c. 
55 521 


4 

17 




1 


6 
25 


§ c. 




$ c. 


$ c. 




$ c. 






20 25 
























1 


















3 

2 
2 

31 
3 
3 


1 
2 


i 


38 2 


23 00 
11 00 




1 80 

2 21 

97 

18 

15 01 

1 77 

1 56 

13 01 

2 52 
6 37 
1 12 
1 61 
1 37 
1 36 








1 
3 




30 70 


27 
18 
10 


1 


1 


5 00 






7 

1 
3 






li 06 

22 00 
10 00 


i 




92 72 
54 57 


95 
25 
10 


1 

2 
1 


6 26 


3 


15 00 


d 
1 






41 98 




1 


10 00 




148 63 


30 
3 

13 
1 
2 
2 
4 


1 


1 
"i 


59 

69 

124 

6 

15 
15 

7 










7 


37 50 


5 
















14 00 


1 


10 00 










3 




44 31 
















"""i 




20 00 








i 

1 




50 00 




















4 














26 35 


22 

5 

9 
5 
3 


"l 
2 


1 


72 
15 
36 
75 
42 
19 


41 00 




9 46 
87 
2 60 
5 49 
2 21 
1 32 








6 




5 00 










18 62 










1 


7 00 


1 
4 

2 




708 62 










23 00 




1 


7 00 


1 


55 85 
























































4 
1 
2 
1 
5 
4 
8 
6 
11 






9 
6 
10 
18 
17 
30 
19 
32 
21 


'"i 


900 




1 54 

52 

1 68 

1 64 

1 85 

2 56 

3 36 

3 36 

4 04 




















15 77 








1 


8 00 


1 












30 75 


2 
1 


""3 
1 
















5 00 


1 


12 00 










2 




110 88 




1 


5 00 





412 01 








2 
2 


, 


93 25 


4 


















235 55 


25 
7 
1 
1 


2 


2 


101 

11 

4 

11 

6 

2 

7 

67 


41 00 


1 


19 24 
2 59 
52 
76 
45 
36 
77 

14 07 


50 88 



I 


15 00 
5 00 


20 
3 












1.... 


12 80 




1 














I 






2 
1 


12 00 




















11 00' 














3 

33 








■ ■ 












464 17 


7 


1 


5 
4 


48 00 






2 


10 00 


16! 1 


691 54 
68 35 


165 

13 

4 

18 
6 
7 
5 
6 
6 

157 


15 


3 


278 

13 

10 

40 

11 

3 

6 

60 

5 

260 


40 00 




72 48 
5 23 


695 23 


11 

2 

1 
7 
1 


52 00 
12 00 

5 CO 
26 00 

5 00 


■ i ' 


68 75 


'"5 






2 29 
8 51 
2 06 
S ifi 


ii.... 


206 98 
153 06 


1 


12 00 




2 

1 




236 11 


2 




1 

'"2 

1 

6 


12 00 

'23'66 
11 00 
29 GO 






25 75 


2 on 








3 

1 

"'ii5 




2 00 


3 
3 


""i 

1 




4 26 

2 21 

67 63 










23 10 
1,057 79 


"677 'so 


'17 


""'82'6o 




24,968 43 


2,475 


232 


118 


10,051 


228 


1,975 10 


19 


1,175 97 


3,726 68 


233 


1,388 50 


1,193 


59 



22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



TABLE B. 

List of Division Court clerks, their post office address, the couaty and number of 
division in which their Courts are situated, for the Province of Ontario, up to 31st 
December, 1899, inclusive. 



County. 




Name of clerk. 

E. Biggins 

Thomas Sullivan 

Wm. L. Nichols 


Post Office Address. 


Algoma 


1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

1 
2 

3 
4 
5 


Sault Ste. Marie. 
Bruce Mines. 

Thessalon. 






D. M. Brodie 


Webbwood, 




H. A. Madden 


Chelmsford. 




Wm. J. Smith 


Richard's Landing. 






Brant 








John K. Finlayson 

David Reid 


Paris 

St. George. 




Hy. Cox 


Burford. 




Walter E. Hooker 


Scotland. 








Bruce 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


Wm, Collins 






John K. McLean 


Teeswater. 




Joseph Barker 

N. McKechnie 

Robert Munro 


Kincardine, 

Paisley. 

Port Elgin. 

Underwood. 

Tara. 

Wiarton. 

Ripley 




Hugh Murray 

W. R. Hilborn 

J ames Walmsley 

Angus Martyn 




W. Moshier 


Lion's Head. 


• 


David B. Forster 

M. A. Halliday 


Lucknow. 
Chesley. 


•Oarleton 


1 
2 
3 
4 
.5 
6 
7 








Mark Danby 

Henry W. McDougall 

Matthew Riddell 


Richmond. 

Carp. 

Galetta. 




John Kerr 


North Gower, 


• 


Daniel McLaurin 

F. W. Harmer 


Metcalf. 
Mosgrove. 


Dufferin 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

1 
2 
3 
4 

1 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 




Orangeville. 
Shelburne. 




Hug;h Falconer 




J. A. Love 

James Henry ... 

R.E.Hamilton 


Stanton. 
Mono Mills. 
Grand Valley. 


Elgin 




Aylmer. 
St. Thomas. 
St. Thomas. 
Dutton. 




Alex. McRride 

Alex. McBride 

Samuel Maccoll 








Essex 


C. H. Ashdown 


Sandwich. 




J, A. 0. Leffffatt 


Amherstburg. 




E. Allworth 


Kingsville. 




C. Bell 


Oxley. 




George A. Morse 

F. P. Booutellier 


Leamington. 
Belle River. 




John McCrae 

Wm . Laing | 


Windsor, 

Essex. 
Comber. 









1899] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



23 



List of Division Court Olerks, etc — Continued. 



County. 




Name of clerk. 


Post office address. 


Frontenac 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 




Kingston. 








C. Ruttan 

W. H. Reynolds 


Sydenham. 
Verona. 




F. W. Vanluven 


Sunbury. 




Matthew W. Price . 


Sharbot Lake. 










1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


Beniamin Allen 


Owen Sound. 




Arch'd Davidson 


Durham. 






Meaford. 




W. L. Tyson 


Clarksburg. 




A. S. VanDusen 


Flesherton. 




John McDonald 


Chatsworth. 






Hanover. 




Richard L. Stephen 


Markdale. 








Haldimand 


1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 


D. McGrresfor 


Caledonia. 




David T. Rogers 


Cayuga. 


• 


T. Armour 

R. A. Havill 

Robert E. Johnson 


Dunuville. 

Rainham. 

Canboro'. 




C. ii. Bourne 


Jarvis. 








Halihurton ... 


1 
2 
3 


C. D. Curry 


Minden. 




Wm. Prust 


Haliburton. 




Stephen Kettle 


Ursa. 








Halton , 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

1 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

9 

10 

11 

12 


Wno. Panton 


Milton. 
Oakville. 




Lachlan Grant 


Georgetown. 




R. J. McNabb 


Acton. 




M. Beatity 


Nassagaweya. 




James Robinson 


Burlington. 








Hascings 




Belleville. 




A. B Randall 


Shannonville. 


• 


T. McCann 

F. B. Parker 


Tweed. 
Stirling. 




Arthur W. Coe 


Madoc. 




J . G. Johnston 


Deseronto. 




James B. Young 


Trenton. 




B. C. Hubbell 

James Haryett 

Dermott Kavanagh 


Marmora. 

Mayncoth. 

Umfraville. 


Huron 


1 
2 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 




Godericb. 






Seaforth. 




W. W. Farran 


Clinton. 
Brussels. 




Chas. Snell 


Exeter, 
Dungannon. 




James Thomson 


Bayfield. 




James McGuire 

Joseph Cowan 

Michael Zeller 


Wingham. 
Wroxeter. 
Zurich. 






Crediton. 






Blyth. 









24 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



List of Division Oourt Olerkp, etc. — Continued. 



County. 


0.2 


Name of clerk. 


Post office address. 


Kent 


1 
2 
.3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


W. B. Wells 

Arthur McKinlay 


Chatham. 
Ridgetown 






Jas. T. Smith 


Dresden. 




Arch'd Sampson 

Ghas. B. Jackson 


Blenheim. 

Wallaceburg. 

Bothwel). 




George Moore 




D. K. Farquharson 


Fletcher. 


Lambton 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

n 




Sarnia. 




Wm. McLeay 


Watford. 




John Webster 


Florence. 




Wm. W. Stover 


Sombra. 




Robert R. Dickey 


Forest. 




Chas. Hall 

John McRae 

W. G. Kraser 


Thedford. 

Moore, 

Petrolea. 




Richard Code 


Alvinston. 


Lanark 


1 

2 
3 

4 

.5 
6 


R. Jamieson ; . . . 

W. A. Field 


Perth 




Lanark. 




F. McEwan 


Carleton Place. 




G. F. McKimm 


Smith's Falls. 




Alex. Graham 


Pakenham. 




Wm. P. McEwan 


Almonte. 


Leeds and Granville 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


D B .Tones 


Brockville. 




J. B. White 


Prescott. 




S. McCammon 

Oliver Pascom 

W. H. McCrea 


Gananoque. 
Kemptville. 
Merrickville. 




N. L. Phelps 


Delta. 




Cyru- A. Wood 


Toledo. 




L. S. Lewis 


Newboro . 




Isaac C. Alguire 


Athens. 




C. W. McLean 


Spencerville. 




J. B. Bellamy 

M. J. Connolly 


North Augusta. 
Caintown. 








Lennox and Addington 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


A. Knight 

Fred. W. Armstrong 


Napanee. 
Bath. 






Joseph B. Allison 

G. A. Aylsworth 

W. Whelan 

J. A . Timmerman 

James Aylesworth 


AdolphustowD. 

Newburgh. 

Centreville. 

Odessa. 

Tamworth. 


Lincoln 


1 




Niagara. 

St. Catharines. 

Smith ville. 




2 
.3 
4 


W. A. Mittleberger 

John Roszel 




C. F. Riggins 


Beamsville. 


^ 






Manitoulin 


1 

2 

3 




Gore Bay. 
Little Current. 
Manitowaning. 




W. H. Becks 

W. J. Tucker 








Middlesex 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


J. W. Mcintosh 


London 




Ernest A . Dickson 


Parkhill. 




Robert .T. McNamee 

W. C. Harris 

G. Wilson 


Lucan. 

Delaware. 

Glencoe. 




Ed. Rowland 

Ed. Thos. Shaw 


Strathroy. 
Dorchester Station. 




Walter R. Westlake 


Arva. 


, 


E. S. Jarvis , 


London. 









1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



25 



List of Division Court Clerks, Qtc.—Gontinue,d. 



County. 



^•i 



Mu8koka 



Nipissing. 



Norfolk 



Northumberland and Durham 



Ontario 



Oxford 



Parry Sound . 



Ni>me of clerk. 



Post office address. 



ChasBard Bracebridge. 

Robert K. Sharpe Gravenhurst. 

J. R. Reeee S^^^r^'H-;. 

Fred D. Stubbs ' Po'* Carling. 



J. D. Cockburn 

John McMeekin 

M. W. Flannery 

Thomas J. Ryan ?"?^".^y, 



Sturgeon Falla. 
Mattawa. 
North Bay. 



Thomas Cahill, Jr. 

J. T. Froysell 

Hector McQuarrie. 



Charles E. Freeman 
Abraham M. Tobin 

R. Green 

E. A. Buchner 

M. J. McCoU 

Arthur P. Barrett . . 
Wm. W. Williams.. 
Lawrence Skey . . . . 



Lake Talon. 

Warren. 

Hailebury. 



] 

2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 



Simcoe. 
Waterford. 
Windham Centre. 
Ronson- 
Vittoria. 
Port Rowan. 
Fairground. 
Port Dover. 



John Moorecraft. Bowmanville. 

L. B Davidson Newcastle. 

G. M. Furby I ?%* T' 

H. M. Wood I Millbrook. 

JohnG. Orr Cobourg. 

Reuben Lawless, Jr ™*°"- 

S. S. Brintnell 2°?^?!°®" 

R. B. Macklem Sr"^," Vu 

R. P. Hurlburt Warkworth. 

T. R. Garratt ^°°\^-i,r a 

Ed C.West Campbellford. 



Whitby. 
Greenwood. 
Port Perry. 
Uxbridge. 
Cannington. 
Beaverton. 
R Hart!.... 1 Uptergrove. 



D. C. Macdonell 

M. Gleeson 

J. W. Burnham 
Jos. E. Gould . . 
Geo. Smith . . . . 
G. F. Bruce 
Thos. 



F. W. Macqueen Woodstock. 

Chas. K. Currey ^''T^''- 

James Munro I Embro. 

Norwich. 

Ingersoll. 

Tilsonburg. 



Jas. Barr. 
James Stevens 
John C. Ross. . 



D. Macf arlane 

David Paterson 

Wm. Ditchburn 

Walter Sharpe 

Saml. G. Best Maganetawan 

R. B. Maw Commanda. 

James Dunn Sundridge. 



Parry Sound, 
McKellar P. 0. 

Rosseau. 
Burk's Falls. 



26 



THE KEPCMIT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



List of Divieion Court Clerks, etc. — Continued. 



County. 


"6 Z 
^"1 


Name of clerk. 


Post office address. 


Peel 


1 
2 
3 
4 


J. W. Main 

H. H. Shaver 

John Harris 

David Pearcy 


Brampton. 
Cooksville. 
Caledon. 
Bolton. 


Perth 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

1 
2 
3 
4 

5 


D. B. Burritt 

(ieorge K. Matheson 

E.Long 


Stratford. 

Mitchell. 

St. Mary's. 

Shakespeare. 

Milverton. 

Listowol. 










G. Brown 

Thomas Trow 

F. W. Hay 










Peterborough 


Francis James Bell 


Peterborough. 

Norwood. 

Keene. 

Lakefield. 

Apsley. 






Thomas Kraser - 






Jas. McNeil 






W. Sherin 

VVm. Gallon 




Prescott and Russell 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 


David S. Buchan 


L'Origina\ 

Vankleek Hill. 

St. Eugene. 

Plantagenet. 

Cumberland. 

Russell. 

Hawkesbury. 

Fournier. 

Alfred. 

Clarence Creek. 

Grant. 






John Shields 

I J. J. Labi'osse 






Joseph Belanger 






J. S. Cameron 






A. Carson 






M. J. Costello 

J . Downing 

F. W. Langrell 

Moise Rochon 

Ptter Stewart 










Prince Edward 


1 
2 

, 4 
5 
6 
7 

8 


Fred Slavin 

Theodore Dodge 

Charles H. Wright 


Picton. 

Milford. 

I Jemore.'itville. 

Ameliasburg. 

Wellington. 

Bloomfield. 

Consecon. 

Waupoos. 










William C. Delong 

John W. Clarke 






A. B. Saylor 






Geo. H. Crane 






B. E. Harrison 










Rainy River 


1 
2 
3 
4 


P. H. Clark 

Jno. Dougherty 


Rat Portage. 

Emo. 

Fort Francis. 

Wabigoon. 










C. S. Smith 






John R. Lumby 










Renfrew 


1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 


W. C. Irving. 


Pembroke. 

Beachburg. 

Renfrew. 

Arnprior. 

Shamrock. 

Eganville. 

Cobden. 

Rockingham. 






Hugh K. Dunn 






George Eady, Jr 

James W. Tierney 






Thomas F. Gorman 






•J ames Reeves 






Robert Allan 






J. C. Gurney 





1899] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



27 



List of Division Court Clerks, etc — Continued. 



County. 



rftormont, Dundas and Glengarry . 



Thunder Bay. 



Victoria. 



Waterloo . 



Welland. 



^s 



3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Name of Clerk. 



W. C. McLean.... 
Thomas S. Graham 
Geo. Chrystal . . . . 
R. G.Campbell.... 

A. Craig 

J. P. Henderson . . . 

J. A. Mather 

J. G. Hood 

W. J. Martin 

J.C.Steele 



Hugh Munro. 
J. J. Wells... 



James D. Webster. 
Thos. McGivern. . . 

J. Allchin 

Alfred Boomer 

Wm. H. Winkler.. 
W. D. Watson.... 



Post ottice address. 



Barrie. 

Bradford. 

Beeton. 

Collingwooa. 

Craighurst. 

Orillia. 

New Lowell. 

Alliston. 

Penetanguishene. 

Coldwater. 



G. H. McGillivray. . 
Hugh R. Macdonald 

C. J. Mattice 

Fred. Warren 

F. F. Plantz 

A. F. Sherman 

M. J. Cleland 

J. A. Cockburn 

Duncan C. McRae. . 
W. Rae 

D. Mcintosh 

John D. Mcintosh. 



Peter Mclntyre . . 
Edward D. Hand.. 

W. C. Moore 

James D. Thornton 

Elias Bowes 

J. F. Cunnings 

A. C. Graham .... 



A. J. Peterson Berlin 



Williamstown. 

Alexandria. 

Cornwall. 

Wales. 

Morrisburg. 

Iroquois. 

South Mountain. 

Crysler. 

Bridge End. 

Chesterville. 

Strathmore. 

Dominionville. 



Port Arthur. 
Fort William. 



Woodville. 

Fenelon Falls. 

Bobcaygeon. 

Omemee. 

Lindsay. 

Oakwood. 

Victoria Road. 



Preston. 

Gait. 

New Hamburg. 

Linwood. 

St. Jacobs. 

Ayr. 



G. L. Hobson Welland. 

Paul J. Wilson Marsbville. 

Ernest Cruikshank ! Fort Erie. 

Jos. G. Cadham Niagara Falls .South. 

D. J. C. Munro..,,,,.,,,.... Thorold. 

A. K. Schofield Port Colborne. 



28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



List of Division Court Clerks, etc — Continued 



County. 


«- a 

4 


Name of Clerk. 


Post office address. 




1 

2 

3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


Thos. J. Day 


Guelph. 




Wm Nicoll 

Hugh Black 


Morriston. 
Rockwood. 




John Brownridge 


Fergus. 




Thoinas Young 


Erin. 




Henry Clarke 


Elora. 




W. W. Farewell 


Drayton. 




Joseph DriscoU 

John Livingston 

J. C. Wilkes 


Arthur. 
Harriston. 
Mount Forest. 








Wentworth 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 


H. T. Bunbury 


Hamilton, 




F. D. Suter 


Dundas. 




Hugh Thompson 


Waterdown, 




W. McDonald 


Rockton. 




J. C. Moore 


Stoney Creek. 
Glanford. 




J. McCleraent 


' 


Samuel C. Wright 

R. L. Gunn 


Binbrook. 
Hamilton. 


York 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


A. McL Howard 


Toronto. 




Robert J. Corson 


Unionville. 




Thos. F. McMahon 

D. Lloyd 


Richmond Hill. 
Newmarket. 




Warren P. Cole 

A . Armstrong 


Sutton West. 

Lloydtown. 

Woodbridge. 




John Nattress 




Jno. Hamshaw 


Toronto Junction. 




J. H. Richardson 

,E. H. Duggan 


West Hill. 
Toronto. 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



29 



TABLE C. 

List of Division Oourt Bailiff's, their Post Office Address, the County and Number of 
Division in which their Courts are situated, for the Province of Ontario, up to Slst 
December, 1899, inclusive. 



County. 


o 2 

4 


Name of bailiff. 


Post office address. 


Algoma 


1 
2 
3 

4 
5 
6 


John Cragg 

John Knight 


_ 




Bruce Mines. 




J. C. McKay 






Wm. Irving 

Isaie Hortier 

Daniel McPhail 


Webbwood. 
Chelmsford. 
Marksville, St. Jos. Is 








Brant 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 








Horace Huson 

Geo. S. Wait 


Paris. 

St. George. 

Burford. 

Scotland. 




Daniel Dunn 

A. M. Malcolm 








Bruce ; 


1 

H 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 


Dan'i Proctor 

P. Corrigan 






Hollywood. 




John Farquharsoa 




Alex. Campbell 


Kincardine. 




W. W. Hogg 


Paisley. 




William Mulvany 


Port Elgin. 
Underwood. 




Gore Leggett 




Charles A. Kichards 


Tara. 




M.C. Bell. 

John McRitchie 


Wiarton. 
Ripley. 




Wm. Laidlaw 




William Little 

M. F. Ramage 


Lucknow. 
Chesley. 








2 
3 
4 

.5 
6 

7 


E. A. Lapierre 


Ottawa. 




John Whitten 


Ottawa, 




W. H. Hamilton 






Wm. Falls 


Carp. 




Ed. W.Owens 

Wesley Hicks 


Antrim. 
Kars. 




Ed. J. Murphy 


Metcalfe. 




.A. Wilson 


Hintonburgh. 






Duff erin 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 




Orangeville. 

Shelburne. 

Stanton. 




E. F. Bows 

Arthur Love 




James McQuarrie 


Orangeville. 
Grand Valley. 




T. W. Rounding 






Elgin 


1 
2 
3 
4 


W. W. White 


Aylmer. 
St. Thomas. 




John McKenzie 




John McKenzie 


St. Thomas. 




Malcolm C. Leitch 


Dutton. 


Essex 


4 








William Kelly 

C. Wright 

Ralph Piper 


Amherstburgh. 
Amherstburgh. 
Pelee Island. 




John S. Middough 






Ralph Piper 


Pelee Island. 




Arthur T. Munger 

Jesse T. Brown 


Harrow. 
Leamington. 


''I 


Ralph Piper 


Pelee Island. 




6 

8 
9 


Charles F. Cornetel 

W. A. Millard 


Belle River. 
Wind.sor. 




Clement Reaurae 


Windsor. 




Daniel Sinclair 

Raphael Marion 


Essex. 
Chevalier. 









30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No 29 



List of Division Oourt Bailiffs, etc. — Continued 



County. 


.4- a 

O 

4 


Name of bailiff. 


Post ofHce address. 




2 
3 
4 
5 


George Greenwood . . 

J. A. Gardiner 

Jacob J. Gardiner . 


Wolfe Island. 
Kingston. 
Kingston. 
Kingston. 
Sydenham. 
, Verona. 






John A. Gardiner 

Edwin G. Ruttan 




Isaac L. Smith 




Wra. J. Arthur 






Joshua A. McDermott 

James Mitchell 


Tichborne. 
Plevna. 








Grey 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
« 

7 
8 








James Carson 


Durham. 




George Brown 

George Mitchell . . . . 

John Wright, jr 

Wm. Donlon 


Meaford. 
Clarksburg. 
Flesherton. 
Chatsworth. 




John Small 

W. G. Pickeil 


Hanover. 
Markdale. 


Haldimand 


1 
2 
3 
1 4 
5 
6 


James T horburn 






John Farrell 

W. R Mclndoe 

Jno H. Fite 

Eli Piper 

F. Hartwell 


Cayuga. 

Dunnville. 

Kainham. 

Canboro'. 

Jarvis. 


Haliburton 


1 
2 

3 


R. C. Garrett 

W. J. Austin 


Minden. 
Haliburton. 




Adam Graham 


Ursa. 








HaltoD 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


J. A. Frazer 

Alfred Benham 


Milton. 




Oakville. 

Georgetown. 

Acton. 

Campbellville. 

Burlington. 




John Lawson 




J. W. Henderson 




H 

3 

4 

M 

6 

k 

10 

11 

12 


John H. Gordon . . 

Jones Phillips 


Belleville. 




Belleville. 




W. E. Pearsall 


Shanuonvilh 




W. J. Bowell., . ... 

C. Butler 

H. W. Harris 


Tweed. 

Stirling. 

Stirling. 

Madcc. 

Deferonto. 




John Allen Hufif . 

J. L Ferguson 




Lewis Cruikshank 

W. D. Ketcheson 

James C. Bowen 

B H. Sweet 


Trenton. 

Trenton. 

Marmora. 

Maynooth. 

Bancroft. 




Geo. B. Sweet 








Huron 


1 
• 2 
3 
4 
5 
6 

7 1 
8 


Thos. Gundry 






Joseph P. Brine 


Seaforth, 


1 
1 


D. I'ickenson 


Clinton. 




Finlay S. Scott 


Brussels. 




John Gill 

James Mallough 

J. Ferguson 

Francis Patterson 


Exeter. 

Dungannon. 

Baytield. 

Wingham. 

Wroxeter. 




9 


John Brethauer 




10 
11 
12 


Phillip Sipp'e 


Zurich. 




■f. Beanes 

Richard Homers 


Crediton. 
Blyth. 



1899] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION' COURTS. 



31 



List of Division Court Bailiffs, etc, — Contirmed. 



County. 


i'i 


Name of bailiff. 


Post ofiice address. 


Kent 


2 1 

3 1 

*\ 

5 

7 


Charles J. Moore , — 

A. Wells 


Chatham. 




Chatham. 




W. A. Gosnell 

Alex. Cuthbert 


Ridgetown. 
Dresden. 




W.Felluws 

John M. Burke 


Blenheim. 
Blenheim. 




Thos. Forham 


Wallaceburg. 
Thamesville. 
Both well. 
Merlin. 




G. A. Bobier 

S J. Thomas 

M. Dillon 




1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
•7 
8 
9 


Rich. Macdonald 


Sarnia. 




J. F. Elliott 


Watford. 




Richard L. Bobier 


Florence. 




N. Cornwall 


Sombra. 




Eugene ^lason 


Wyoming. 




J. G. Braddon 


Thedford. 






CoruDna. 




John Sinclair 


Petrolea. 














Lanark 


2 
3 
4 

g 

6 

^^ 

3 

4 
5 

H 

7 

H 

9 

11 

12 


P. J. Lee 

James Patterson 


Perth. 
Perth 




James D. Mclnnes 

John ^IcPherson 


Lanark. 
Carleton Place. 




■J ames Murray 


Smith's Falls. 






Pdkenham. 




John Sla' tery 


Almonte. 










H. McPhail 


Brcckville. 




Matthew White 


Brockville. 






Charles H. Row 


Prescott. 




Edward McE. Hiscocks 

Michael Sweeney 

Wm. J. McCarney 


Ganancque. 
Kemptville. 
Merrickville. 




W. H. Denaut, jr 


Delta 
Delta. 




R. Richards 


Frankville. 




Chester Stewart 

Delorma Deacon 


Xewboro'. 
Westport. 
Athens. 




G. W. Brown 




Wm. Stitt, jr 


Spencerville. 




James P. Lawrence 


Spencerville. 




S. J. Whaley 


North Augusta. 




W. I. Mallory 


Mallorytown. 




1-1' 

2' 
3 

*{ 

5 

6 


Z. Ham 


Napanee. 




W. H. Huff 

R. R. Finkle 


Napanee. 
Bath. 




D. Daverne 

Z Ham 


Adolphu&town. 
Napanee. 






Newburgh. 
Centreville. 
Odessa. 




P. Vandewater 

John W. Denye3 




P. F. Carscallen 

.Justus Sweetman 


Tamworth. 
Vennachar. 






Cloyne. 






Lincoln 


1 
2 
3 
4 


1 Jas Rohprts^on 


Niagaia-on-tlif -Lake. 




Richard E. Boyle 






A. D. Lacv 


Smithville. 




W. E. Tufford 

• 


Beamsville. 



32 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



List of Division Court Bailiffs, etc. — Continued. 



Coutity. 


4 


Name of bailiff. 


Post office address. 


Manitoulin 


1 

2 

3 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


S. M. Frazer 


Gore Bay. 




Ed. M. Bradley 




John Gorley 


Manitowaning. 


Middlesex 


John Burns 

Edward Manes 

Sylvanus Gibson 






Parkhill. 
liUcan. 




Henry Lockwood 

James Poole 

Malcolm Mclntyre 


Delaware. 
Glencoe. 
Strathroy. 
Dorchester Station. 




W. H. Shaw 




Chas. E. Smith , . . . 


Arva. 




L. W. Stevens 


London . 


Muskoka 


1 
2 
3 
4 

1 
2 
3 

4 ■ 

5 

6 

7 


Fred Sanders 


Bracebridge. 
Gravenhurst. 




T. M. Robinson 






Huntsville. 






Port Carling. 






Nipissing 


H. Kinch 


Sturgeon Falls. 
Mattawa. 




J. H . Belanger 




L. W. Brennan 

M. J. Powell 

J. L. Manseau 


North Bay. 

Sudbury. 

Bonfield, 




Ij. N. Gervais 


Warren. 




W. G. Armstrong 


Liskeard. 








Norfolk 


1 
2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 

t 

1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 








Orlando H. Duncombe 

D.C. Wood 

Robert Power 


Waterf ord . 

Simcoe. 

Delhi. 




Aaron Erb 


Vittoria. 




Henry C. Ellis 

J. W . Massacar 

Hiram Fairchild 


Port Rowan. 
Clear Creek. 
Port Dover. 








Northumberland and Durham. 


R. J. Mallory 

David Rutherford 


Bowmanville 




Newcastle. 




H. Sing 


Port Hope. 
Milbrook . 




Wm. Carveth 




0. Dean 


Cobourg 




Chas. S. Bradley 

Jas. E. Allyea 


Grafton. 
Colborne. 




J as. M. Snider 

Luke Bprry 


Brighton. 
Wark worth. 




Arthur Terill 


Wooler. 




Geo. Hay 


Campbellford. 








Ontario , . ^ . . , 


B. F. Campbell 

R. W. Mowbray 


Brooklin. 




Kinsale. 




James D. Paxton 


Port Perry. 




J. C. Widdifield 


Uxbridge. 

Cannington. 

Beaverton. 








John H. Smith 




Joseph Fox 

1 


Millington. 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



:-53 



List of Division Court bailiffs, etc.— Continued. 



County. 



Oxford 



Parry Sound 



Peel 



Perbh 



Peterborough 



Prescott and Russell. 



Prince Edward 



3 D.c. 



10 { 



Name of bailiff. 



M. Virtue 

M. Virtue, jr 

L. S. Kennedy 

George C. McKay. 

C. E. Burgess 

James Stirton 

M. Dillon 



T. W. George 

Duncan McCrae 

W. J. Moffatt 

James Harvey 

Wm. Alexander 

Ed. B. Parker 

David Ricker 

Archibald McDonald 



Thomas Tobin . . . 
Thomas S. Tobin 

J. S. Coppin 

Wm. Box 

J. 4.. Donaldson. 
W. D. Weir . . . . 
W. H. Hay 



Thomas Laplante 
James Pengelly .. 
Joseph Elmhirst . 
Thomas Nicolls . . 
W. H. Webster . . 



S. W. Wright 

Thomas Shields 

Michael Kelly 

Wm. Adolphus McKay. 
Docitte Lavergne 



Post office addre'-s. 



Woodstock. 

Woodstock. 

Richwood. 

Embro. 

Burgessville. 

IngersoU. 

Tilsonburg. 



Parry Sound. 
French River. 
McKellar. 
Rosseau. 
Burk's Falls. 
Maganetawan. 
Commanda. 
Sundridge. 



John W. Smith Brampton. 

Wm. Henry Rutledge Cooksville. 

James K. Leslie 

J. F. Warbrick 



Caledon. 
Bolton. 



Stratford. 

Stratford. 

Mitchell. 

St. Mary's. 

Shakespeare. 

Milverton. 

Listowel. 



Peterborough. 

Norwood. 

Keene. 

Lakefield. 

Apsley. 



L'Orignal. 
Vankleek Hill. 
St. Eugene. 
Plantagenet. 
Cumberland. 



Thomas Young , | Russell. 



S. Wright. 

C. Gates 

Napoleon Dupuis 
Oliver Miron .... 

John A. Dent 

Moise Lavoilette 
Wm. D. Heron . 
Eugene Parent . 



L'Orignal. 
Fournier. 
St. Isidore. 
Alfred. 
Rockland. 
Clarence Creek. 
South Indian. 
Casselman. 



D. A. Spencer 

Marshall Palen 

George Farrell 

A. Harvey 

Chas. Harrington .. 
Alex. McDonald.... 
Harman W. Weeks 

E. A. Williams . . . . 



Picton. 

Milford. 

Demoiestville. 

Ameiiasburg. 

Wellington. 

Bloomfield. 

Consecon. 

Waupoos. 



34 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 29 



List of Division Court bailiffs, etc. — Continued. 



County. 



Rainy River 



Renfrew 



Simcoe. 



Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 



Thunder Bay 



Victoria. 



Waterloo. 



0.2 



1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 



1 

2 



10 

11 
12 



Name of bailiff. 



W. H. McKay 



Wm. Neil 

Thomas W. Thomson , 



James Millar 

Charles Taylor . 

John Beaupre 

John Devine 

Wm. Wilson 

John Lyonp 

Thomas J. Gorman. 

Hugh ••Jallagher 

John Burton 

Thog. L. O'Grady . , 



John Weymouth 

Fred. B. McKay 

John Wilson 

A. W. S. Cunningham . 

Jameti Martin 

A. R. McKay 

Andrew Patton 

Thomas A. Whitesides. 

Ed. E. J. Hewson 

Thomas Blaney 



P. W. Robert s'on . . . 
H. J. Patterson . . . . 

Homer Stiles 

R. J. Gravely 

Simon Warner 

G S. Casselman 

Jacob Hopper 

Wm. A. Coons 

Andrew Redwood . . 
Samuel Dillobough . 

Daniel McLeod 

A. Stallmayer 

Milo Knowland . . . 

Ed. J. Molony 

Chas. P. Robertson 



Post office add^ss. 



Rat Portage. 



Fort Francis. 
Dryden. 



Pembroke. 

Westmeath. 

Beachburg. 

Renfrew. 

Arnprior. 

Arnprior. 

Shamrock. 

Egan villa. 

Cobden. 

Brudenell. 



Barrie. 

Bradford. 

Tottenham. 

Collingwood. 

Hillsdale. 

Orillia. 

New Lowell. 

Alliston. 

Penetanguishene. 

Coldwater 



Williamstown. 

Alexandria. 

Cornwall. 

Cornwall. 

Osnabruck Centre. 

Aultsville. 

Morrisburg. 

Iroquois. 

South Mountain. 

Orysler. 

Lancaster. 

Chesterville. 

Chesterville. 

McMillan's Corners. 

Maxville. 



Thomas Connor Port Arthur. 

Thomas Connor Port Arthur. 



John C. Gilchrist. 
Steven Nevison . , 

W. R. Given 

Wm Glass 

Peter Mitchell 

Abel Minthorn . . 
Wm Boden 



J. Klippert 

Peter Gillies 

Peter Gillies . . . 
Alex. Eraser . . . 
Benj. J. Ballard. 
Benj. J. Ballard. 
Ed. Bourchier... 



Woodville. 
Fenelon Fall?. 
Bobcaygeon. 
Omemee. 
Lindsay. 
Oak wood. 
Victoria Road. 



Berlin. 

Gait. 

Gait. 

New Hamburg. 

Hawkesville. 

Hawkesville. 

Washington. 



Ib99 ] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



85 



List of Division Court baihtis, etc. — Concluded. 



County. 


.2" 


Name of bailiff. 


Post office address 


Welland 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Casper Ramey 


Welland. 




John E. Stay zer 

Irwin E. Teal 


Marshville. 
Ridgeway. 




George E. Buckley 


Niagara Falls, South. 




P. R. Warner 


Thorold. 




Ellas Augustine 


Humberstone. 








Wellington 


1 
2 
3 
4 
•5 
6 
7 
8 

10 
11 




Guelph. 

Guelph. 

Rockwood. 

Fergus. 

Erin. 

Elora. 




J. H. Doughty 

John W. Farriea 

Wm. M. Frank 

James Broddy 

Wm. Findlay 




S. B. Trask 


Drayton. 




David T. Small 


Arthur. 




Henry Torrance 


Clifford. 




A. Godfrey 


Mount Forest. 








Wentworth 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
7 
8 
9 


John Hunt 

E. P. Hanes 






Dundas. 




W. Harvey 


Waterdown. 




Emerson Clement 


Troy. 




H. A. Combs 

A. de C. Boyes 

A. de C. Boyes 

J. Greenfield 


Stoney Creek. 
Binbrook. 
Binbrook. 
Hamilton. 








York 


1 
2 
3 

I 

7 

8 

9 

10 


J. M. Wingfield 

P. L. Barkey 


Toronto. 
Ringwood, 




P. L. Barkey 


Ringwood. 




Wm. Malloy 

A. E. Widdifield 


Newmarket. 
Newmarket. 




Amos H. Wilson 

R. A. Sheppard 


Newmarket. 
Sutton, West. 




Geo. E. Reynolds 


Lloydton. 
Lambton Mills. . 




Wm. Suggitt 




Wm. Suggitt 

Jno. Annis 


Lambton Mills. 
Scarboro'. 




Peter Small 


Toronto. 









Sa THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



TABLE D. 



DIVISION COURTS AND THE LIMITS OF THE RESPECTIVE DIVI- 
SIONS IN THE PROVINCE OF ONTARIO, 



DISTRICT OF ALGOMA. 

1. Bounded west by Thunder Bay District, 85th parallel of west longtitude, and 

east by Barr River, including all the islands in front. 

2. Bounded west by Barr River, and east by the westerly boundary of the Town- 
ships of Thessalon River, Kirkwocd, Bridgeland and Houghton, and by said boundary 
line of the last three named townships, produced northerly. 

3. Bounded west by the westerly boundary of the Townships of Thessalon River, 

Kirkwood, Bridgeland and Houghton, and the boundary line of the last named three 
townships, produced northerly, and on the east by the eastern boundary of the Township 
of Sprague, produced northerly. 

4. Bounded on the west by the boundary line between the Townships of Sprague, 
and Lewis, produced north to the northern boundary of the District of Algoma, thence 
alone the northern boundary of the said district, thence south along the eastern boundary 
to the waters of Lake Huron, thence westerly along the southern boundary of the Dis- 
trict of Algoma, to a point opposite the boundary line between the Townships of Sprague 
and Long, thence northerly to said last-mentioned boundary line, thence easterly along 
the said southern boundary line of the Township of Sprague to the place of beginning, 
except che territory comprised in the limits of Division No. 5. 

5. The Townships of Rayside, Balfour, Snyder, Oreighton, Fairbank, Dowling, 

Lanark, Morgan, Lumsden, Carscaden, Cartier, Ermatinger, Hart, Hess, Moncreif and 
Crai» and all those portions of Algoma lying adjacent to the main line of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, south of said railway and west of the westerly boundary, of the Town- 
ship of Moncreif to the westerly boundary of the Provisional Judicial District of Algoma, 
and all that portion of the said district lying north of the said C. P. R, and west of 
the said westerly boundary of the said Township of Moncreif. And that such portion of 
the said territory above described as has been and is a portion of the other Division 
Oourt divisions in said district shall be separated from such several divisions ; and that 
the said divisions are altered accordingly. 

6. — Consisting of St. Joseph's Island. 



COUNTY OF BRANT. 

1. The City of Brantford and that part of the Township of Brantford not included 

in the other divisions hereinafter described. The Townships of Onondaga and Tuscarora, 
and that part of the Township of Brantford lying south of the main road from Brantford 
to Hamilton and east of Fairchild's Creek. 

2. The Town of Paris and the part ot South Dumfries west of the line between lots 

18 and 19, and that part of the first concession of the Township of Brantford lying west 
of a continuation of the last-mentioned line. 

3. The remainder of the Township of South Dumfries and of the first concession of 

the Township of Brahtford. 



1899] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 37 



4. — The ten northern concessions of the Township of Burford, and that part of the 
2Qd, 3rd, 45h and 5th concessions of the Township of Brantford, west of the line between 
lots numbers 10 and 11, and that portion of the Kerr tract west of a continuation of the 
last mentioned line. 

5. — The Township of Oakland, the four southern concessions of the Township of 
Burford and lots numbers 1 to 5, inclusive, in the ranges east and west of the Mount 
Pleasant Road, in the Township of Brantford, adjoining the Township of Oakland. 



COUNTY OF BRUCE. 

1. — The Town of Walkerton and the Township of Oarrick, and all the Township of 
Brant, south of the line between the 11th and 12th concessionp, in lots up to No. 25, and 
south of the line between concessions 9 and 10, in lots 26 to 34, inclusive, 

2. — The Village of Teeswater, all the Township of Culross, and that part of the 
Township of Greenock lying south of the line between the 11 th and 1 2th concessions, 

3. — The town of Kincardine and that part of the Township of Kincardine lying 
south of a line drawn between the 9th and 10th concessions. 

4. — The Village of Paisley and that part of the Township of Brant lying north of a 
line drawn between the 11th and 12th concessions of the Township of Brant. 

That part of the Township of Elderslie, except lots 16 to 36, both inclusive, in con- 
cessions 12, 13 and 14 of said Township, except so much of said Township as lies south 
of concession 12 and east of lot 25, and so much of the Township of Brant as lies north 
and east of lot 25. 

All the Township of Greenock lying north of a line drawn between concetsions 11 
and 12 of said Township. 

Lots 26 to 35, both inclusive, in the 8tb, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th con- 
cessions of the Township of Bruce ; and that part of the Township of Saugeen lying east 
of a line between lots 28 and 29, and south of the production of the town line between 
the Townships of Arran and Elderslie to the Saugeen River. 

5. — All Saugeen Township not included in No. 4, all that part of the Township of 
Arran lying west of a line between lots 10 and 11 and north of Arran Lake and the out- 
let of said lake, and that part of the township of Amabel lying north of the 10th conces- 
sion and west of the eastern boundary of concession 0. of Amabel, and the Villages of 
Port Elgin and Southampton. 

6. — The village of Tiverton, and that portion of Kincardine Township north of aline 
drawn between concessions 9 and 10 in said Township, and all the Township of Bruce, 
except that part included in No. 4. 

7. — That part of the Township of Elderslie not included in No. 4, and that part of 
Arran Township not included in No. 5, that part of the Township of Amabel which lies 
south of the 8th concession and east of concession lettered C in said Township, and the 
said Village of Tara. 

8. — The Village of Wiarton, the Township of Albemarle and that part of the Town- 
ship of Amabel lying north of a line between the 9th and 1 0th concessions. 



38 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 

9. — All the Township of Huron. 

10. — All the Townships of Eastnor, Lindsay and St, Edmunds. 

11. — The Village of Lucknow ; all of the Township of Kinloss. 

12 — The Village of Chesley ; that part of the Township of Elderslie lying east of the 
25th side line and south of 12th concession of said Township; all that part of the 
Township of Brant lying east of the 25th side line and north of the 9th concession of 
said Township. 



COUNTY OF CARLETON. 

1. — Comprising all the City of Ottawa, and the Township of Gloucester, to lot 15, 
inclusive, Rideau front and concessions 1 to 6, inclusive, Ottawa front and the islands in 
the Ottawa River opposite thereto. 

2 — All the Township of Goulboum ; the 8th, 9th and 10th concessions of the Town- 
ship of Marlborough ; all that portion of the Township of Nepean south of the River 
Goodwood ; and the 4th, 5th and 6th concessions thereof north of the same river to the 
boundary line between lots 20 and 21 in the last mentioned concessions. 

3. — All the Township nf Huntley, and all the Township of March, except lots 1 to 5, 
inclusive, in concessions I, 2, 3 and 4 thereof. 

4. — All the Townships of Fitzroy and Torbolton. 

5. — All the Township of North Gower ; Long Island in the Rideau River and Ist, 
2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5bh, 6th and 7th concessions of Marlborough. 

6. — All the Township of Osgoode ; the 6th, 7th and 8th concessions Ottawa front 
and from lots 16 to 30, inclusive, of the Rideau front of the Township of Gloucester. 

7. — All the Township of Nepean, except the city of Ottawa, and the part of the 
said Township lying south of the River Goodwood and concessions 4, 5 and 6 north of 
said River Goodwood to the boundary line between lots 20 and 21 in the said last men- 
tioned concessions, and including also lots 1 to 5, inclusive, in concessions 1, 2, 3 and 4 
in Township of March. 



COUNTY OF DUFFERIN. 



1" — The Town of Orangeville, the Township of East Garafraxa, and all that portion 
of the Township of Amarant^^h lying south of the southerly boundary of lot number 26, in 
each concession of the Township ot Amaranth. 



1899] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 39 



2. — The Village of Shelburne, the Township of Melancthon, and all that portion of 
the Township of Amaranth lying north of the southerly boundry of lot number 26, in 
each concession of the Township of Amaranth. 

3.— The Township of Mulmur. ' 

4. — The Township of Mono. 

5. — The Township of East Luther. 



COUNTY OF ELGIN. 
1 — The Township of Bayham, Malahide and South Dorchester. • 

2 — The Townships of Southwold and Yarmouth (except the City of St. Thomas). 
3.— The City of St. Thomas. 
4. — The Townships of Aldborough and Dunwich. 



COUNTY OF ESSEX. 

1. — Town of Sandwich and Township of Sandwich West. 

2. — Town of Amherstburg and Townships of Alden and Anderdon. 

3. — The Village of Kingsville, and all that part of the Township of Gosfield not 
included in Division No. 8. 

4. — The Township of Colchester South, and all that part of Colchester North, south 
of the 9th concession, exclusive of the said concession and the lots on both sides of 
Maiden street. 

5. — Township of Mersea and Village of Leamington. 

6 — The Township of Rochester, the Village of Belle River, the first concession of 
the Township of Maidstone, and all north of the Middle Road in said Township ot 
Maidstone. 

7. — Town of Windsor, the Town of Walkerville and all part of Sandwich East, 
north of the Talbot Street range. 

8. — The Town of Essex, all that part of the Township of Maidstone lying west of 
the first concession and south of the Middle Road; so much of Sandwich East as is south 
of Talbot street, including the lots on both sides of said street to Nos. 306 and 307 ; all 
of Colchester north of the 9th concession, including said concession and lots on both sides 
of Maiden street, and all that part of Gosfield lying north of concession 6, and extending 
as far east from the limits between Gosfield and Colchester as lot No. 12, including such 
lot in each concession north of concession 6, inclusive. 

9.— The Townships of Tilbury West and Tilbury North. 

[Note. — A resident bailiff appointed on Pelee Island, is authorized to serve and 
■execute process of the Second, Third and Fifth Division Courts of Essex on the Island.] 



40 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 29 



OOUNTY OF FEONTENAC. 

1. — City of Kingston, Township of Garden Island, Wolfe Island, Howe Island, and 
part of the Township of Pittsburg. 

2. — Cataraqui, comprising the Township of Kingston and the Village of Ports- 
month. 

3. — LoBghboro', comprising the Townships of Loughboro' and Bedford. 

4. — Verona, comprising the Townships of Portland and Hinchinbrooke. 

5. — Sudbury, comprising the Township of Storringtbn and part of the Township o! 
Pittsburg. 

6. — Comprising the Townships of Kennebec, Olden, Oso, Barrie, Clarendon, Palm- 
erston, Miller, North Canonto and South Canonto. 



COUNTY OF GREY. 

1. — The Town of Owen Sound, the Village of Brook, and the Townships of Derby, 
Keppel, Sarawak and Sydenham. 

2. — The Town of Durham, the Township of Egremont, and those portions of the 
Townships of Bentinck, Normanby and Glenelg as f jIIows : — That pare of the Township 
of Bentinck lying east of the line between lots 30 and 31 in the 1st, 2nd and 3rd conces- 
sions south of the Durham Road, and in concessions 1, 2 and 3 north of the Durham 
Road, and east of the line between lots 15 and 16 in concessions 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 
12, 13, 14 and 15 thereof. That part of the Township of Normanby lying east of the 
line between lots 20 and 21, in the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, lOih, 11th, 12th, 13th, 
14th, 15th, 16th, 17th and 18th concessions, and all the Township of Glenelg, excepting 
that portion lying east of the line between lots 10 and 11 in the 7th, 8th, 9bh, 10th, 
11th, 12th, 13th, 14th and 15th concessions thereof. 

3. — The Town of Meaford, the Township of St. Vincent, and that part of the Town- 
ship of Euphrasia lying west of the line between the 6th and 7th concessions and north 
of the line between lots 15 and 16. 

4. — The Township of Collingwood and the east half of the Township of Euphrasia, 
excepting that part thereof lying west of the line between the 4bh and 5th concessions, 
and south of the lots between lots 12 and 13, and east half of the Township of Osprey. 

5. — The Township of Proton, the west half of the Township of Osprey, and those 
parts of the Township of Artemesia, consisting of the ranges of lots lying parallel to the 
Toronto and Sydenham Road, and south of the line between lots 130 aud 131, and con- 
cessions 1, 2 and 3 south of the Durham Road, and 1, 2, 3. 4, 5 and 6 north of the said 
Durham Road, and those portions of concessions 7, 8 and 9 lying east of the ranges of 
lots parallel with the Toronto and Sydenham Road, and those portions of concessions 10, 
11, 12, 13 and 14 lying east of the line between lots 30 and 31. 



1899 ] mSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 41 



6, — The Township of Sullivan, and the Township of Holland, excepting those por- 
tions of concessions 9, 10, 11, and 12 lying south of the line between lots 15 and 16, and 
those portions of concessions 7 and 8 west of the ranges of lots lying parallel with the 
Toronto and Sydenham Road, and the ranges of lots lying parallel with the Toronto and 
Sydenham Road : atd south of the line between lots 50 and 51. 

7. — All the lots from 1 to 30, inclusive, in the three concessions south, and the 
three concessions north of the Durham Road, in the said Township of Bentinck ; and all 
the lots from 1 to 15 inclusive, in the 12th concession, from the 4th to the 15th con- 
cessions inclusive, of the said Township of Bentinck ; and all the lots from 1 to 20 
inclusive, in all the concessions from 4 to 18 inclusive, in the Township of Norman by 
aforesaid. 

8. — All the lots from 51 to 130 inclusive, in all the concessions from parallel to 
(and being north-east and south-west) of the Toronto and Sydenham Road, in the Town- 
ships of Art* mesia, Glenelg, and Holland aforesaid ; all lots to the westward of the 
dividing line between lots 30 and 31, in all the conctsaions from 10 to 14 inclusive, and 
all the lots from 1 to 5 in the 7ih, 8th and 9bh concessions, inclusive, which lie to the 
south-west of the third concession, south-west of the said Toronto and said Sydenham 
Road, in the said Town&hip of Artemesia ; all the lots from 1 to 12, inclusive, in con- 
cessions 5 and 6, and the lots frcm 1 to 15 inclusive, in the concessions from 7 to 12, 
inclusive, in the Township of Euphrasia ; all lots south of the allowance for road bet-ween, 
lots 15 and 16 in the 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th concessions, and from lots 25 and 30 
inclusive, in the 7th concession, and lots 28, 29 and 30, in the 8th concession of the 
said Township of Holland ; and all the lots lyirg east of the allowance for road between 
lots 10 and 11, in all the concessions frcm 7 to 15, inclusive, in the said Township of 
Glenelg. 



COUNTY OF HALDIMAND. 



1, — All the Township of Seneca, except the first and second concessiops, the Young 
tract, and the property of the late Richard Martin, and the late Robert Weir ; all the 
Township of Oneida, except the first range north of the Cayuga line ; the Dennis tract 
and the lots southerly of said tract. 

2. — The whole of the Township of North Cayuga, except that portion thereof lying 
north-east of side line between lots 12 and 13; the first and second concessions of the 
Township of Seneca, except that portion thereof lying north-east of the side line between 
lots 12 and 13 ; the Young tract and the lands of the late Robert Weir and the late 
Richard Martin, Esquires ; the first range of Oneida and north of Cayuga line ; also 
the Dennis tract and River lots lying south. 

3. — The Townships of Moulton, Sherbrooke and Dunn, including the Village of 
Dunnville. 

4. — The Townships of South Cayuga and Rainham. 

5 — The Township of Canboro', and those portions of North Cayuga and Seneca not 
included in the other divisions. 

6. — The Township of Walpole. 



42 THE KEPORT OF THE [No. 29. 



COUNTY OF HALIBURTON. 

1. — The Townships of Glamorgan and Snowden, except that portion of both included 
in the third division, and all of the Townships of Snowden, Lutterworth, Minden, Anson, 
Stanhope, Hindon, Sherbourne and McClintock. 

2. — The Townships of Dysart, Guilford, Havelock, Livingston, Lawrence, Eyre, 
Harburn, Dudley, Harcourt, Bruton, Clyde and Nightingale and that portion ot Mon- 
mouth, not included in the third Division. 

3. — The Township of Cardiff, the Township of Monmouth (except lots 1 to 19 
inclusive) in the 13th. 14th, 15th, 16th and 17th concessions ; the south 12 concessions 
of the Township of Glamorgan, and from lot 21 inclusive, to the eastern boundary in 
the south six concessions ot Snowden. 



COUNTY OF H ALTON. 

1. — All the territory comprised in the new survey of the Township of Trafalgar, 
and the first ten lots in concessions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 in the Township of Esquesing, 
and the first five lots in concessions 7, 8, 9, 10 and 11 in said township. 

2. — That part of the Township of Trafalgar known as the Old Survey. 

3. — All the rest of the Territory comprised in concessions 8, 9, 10 and 11 in the 
Township of Esquesing not comprised in the first division. 

4. — All the rest of the territory comprised in concessions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, in the 
Township of Esquesing. 

5. — The Township of Nassagaweya. 

6. — The Township of Nelson, 



COUNTY OF HASTINGS. 

1. — To cotrprise the City of Belleville and the Township of Thurlow ; also all that 
portion of the Township of Sidney lying south of the 8th concession, and east of the line 
between lots 18 and 19. 

2. — (Order made discontinuing this court, from 1st of March, 1897. The territory 
to bo divided amongst the 1st, 5th and 9th courts as given under these respective 
divisions.) 

3. — The Township of Tyendinaga, except that part called Deseronto. 

4. — The Township of Hungerford. 

5. — All that part of the Township of Sidney which lies to the north of the 8th con- 
• cession, and to the east of lot No. 6 in each concession north of the 8 th concession, and 
all that part of the Township of R\wdon, which lies to the south of the 9th concession, 
and that part of the Township of Huntingdon south of the 5th concession ; also Block A, 
and lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, in the 8th and 9th concessions of the Township of Sidney, 
(heretofore forming part of the 2ad division) together with all that portion of the Town- 
.ship of Sidney lying norbh of the 7th concession, and e*sb of the line between lots 6 and 7. 



ism ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 43 



6. — The Townships of Madoc, Tudor, Limerick, excepting that part lying north of 
the 10th concession, and also chat part lying west of lot 25 in the different concessions 
south of the 11th concession of said township, and including all that part of the Town- 
ship of Huntingdon north of the 6th concession of said township, the Townships of 
Elzevir, Grimsthorpe, Cashel, excepting that part of Cashel lying north of the 10th con- 
cession of the said Township, 

7. — The Village of Desoronto. 

9- — The Town of Trenton, and all that part of the Township of Sidney which lies to 
the west of lot 7 in each of the concessions of the township, including Mill Island. Also, 
all of said Township of Sidney lying south of the 8th concession and west of the line 
between 18 and 19, and east of the line between lots 6 and 7. 

10. — The Townships of Marmora, Lake, and all that part of the Township of Raw- 
don which lies to the north of the 8th concession. 

11. — The Townships of Herschell, Monteagle, Carlow, Bangor, Wicklow and McClure. 

12 — The Townships of Wollaston, Farady, Dungannon, Mayo, and all that part of 
the Township of Oashel lying north of the 10th concession of said township, and all 
those parts of the Township of Limerick lying north of the 10th concession, and west of 
lot No. 25 in the several concessions of the said Township of Limerick. 



COUNTY OF HURON. 



1. Comprising that part of the Township of Goderich to the north of the Cut Line 
and the Huron road until the same meets the road allowance between the 13th and 14th 
concessions ; then back along the Huron Road to its junction with the Cut Line ; then 
west by the road allowance between concessions 11 and 12 to the River Maitland ; then 
along the River Maitland to Goderich, together with the Township of Colborne. 

2. — Comprising the Township of McKillop, the Town of Seaforth, and all that por- 
tion of the Township of Tuckersmith not included in the third division, south of the 
blind line between the 7th and 8th concessions of the said Township of Hullett. 

3. — Comprising the Township of Hullett ; that part of the Township of Goderich 
not included in Nos. 1 and 7 ; 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th concessions Township of Stanley ; 
Ist and 2nd concessions Township of Tuckersmith, L.R.S., north of Lot 15, and that 
portion west of side road between lots 25 and 26, H.R S., and Town of Clinton. 

4. — Comprising the Township of Grey ; all of the Township of Morris east of side 
road between lots numbers 10 and 11 (which is not included in No. 12), and the Village 
of Brussels. 

5. — Comprising the Townships of Usborne and Stephen, and the Village of Exeter. 

6. — Comprising the Townships of Ashbeld ana West Wawauosn, exuwpc tnat portion 
ast of Maitland River. 



44 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 

7. — Comprising the Township of Goderich south of Cut Line and Huron Road until 
the same joins the road between the 12th and 14th concessions of the Township of 
Goderich ; thence along the said concessions until the same joins the River Bayfield ; all 
Stanley not included in number 3 ; and the Village of Bayfield. 

8. — Comprising the Village of Wingham, the Township of Turnbury ; all that part 
of East Wawanosh not included in number 12, and all the Township of Morris not 
included in Nos. 4 and 12. 

9. — Comprising the Township of Howick and the Village of Wroxeter. 

10. — Comprising the Township of Hay. 

11. — Comprising the Township of Stephen. 

12. — Commencing at the north-east angle of the Township of Hullett, thence 
southerly along the easterly boundary of the said Township of Hullett to the blind line, 
between the 7 th and 8th concessions of said township ; thence westerly along said line to 
the western boundary of the township ; thence northerly along the westerly boundary of 
the township to the Maitland River at the southeastern corner of the Maitland Block ; 
thence along the said river northerly till the western boundary of East Wawanosh is 
reached : thence northerly along said westerly boundary to the road running between the 
6th and 7th concessions of said Township of East Wawanosh ; thence easterly along said 
road to the easterly limit of said township ; thence northerly along the gravel road to 
the road running between the 5th and 6th concessions of the Township of Morris ; thence 
easterly along said road to the line between lots 10 and 11 ; thence southerly along said 
line between the 6th and 7th concessions ; thence easterly along said line to the line 
between lots 15 and 16 ; thence southerly to the boundary line between the Townships 
of Morris and Hullett ; thence easterly to the place of beginning, including the Village 
of Blyth. 



COUNTY OF KENT. 

1, — The First Division to consist of the Town of Chatham and that part of the Town- 
ships of Dover East and West to the south of the 12 th and 13th concession line of the 
Township of Dover East ; and that part of the Township of Chatham south of the 12tb 
and 13th concession line, and west of the side road between lots 12 and 13, from the first 
mentioned 12th and 13th concession line to the 5th and 6th concession line, and all south 
of the said 5th and 6th concession line of said township ; that part of the Township of 
Harwich rorth of 5th and 6th concession line, by the easterly boundary ; that part of the 
Township of Raleigh north of the 16th concession to the west side road between lots 12 
and 13 north to the 6th and 7th concession line, and all of the said township north of 
the said last mentioned line, and that part of the Township of Tilbury East north of the 
4 th concession. 

2. — The Second Division to consist of that part of the Township of Howard south of 
the 2nd and 3rd concession line by the eastern boundary (known as the Botany Eoad), 
and that part of the Township of Orford south of the 10th and 11th concession line of 
said township. 



1899] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 45 



3. — The third division to consist of all that part of the Gore of Camden lying 
west of the 10th and 11th concession line, and ttiat part of the Township of Camden 
lying west of the side line between lots 6 and 1 ; the Village of Dresden ; and that part 
of the Township of Chatham north of the 5th and 6th concession line and east of the 
side road between lots 12 and 13. 

4. — The Fourth Division to consist of that part of the Township of Harwich south 
of the 5th concession of the eastern boundary, and south of the third concession by the 
Vf'estern boundary, and that part of Raleigh south of the 15th concession and east of the 
side road between lota 12 and 13, and the road to the Lake shore through lot 14G on the 
Talbot road. 

5. — The Fifth Division to consist of the Village of Wallaceburg, the Gore of Chat- 
ham, and that part of the Township of Chatham northwest of the 12ch and 13th conces- 
sion line and west of the said road between lots 12 and 13, and that part of Dover Eist 
lying north of the 12th and 13th concession side road. "J^^ J,. 3 vf-.:^4^ 

6. — The Sixth Division to consist of that part of the Township of Howard north 
of the Botany road aforesaid, and of that part of the Township of Oxford north of the 
10th and 11th concession line, the Township of Rone, the Town of Both well, the Village 
of Thamesville, and that part of the Gore of Camden east of the lObh and 11th con- 
oession line, and that part of the Township of Camden east of the side line between 
lots 6 and 7. .,:^:;^ 



7. — The Seventh Division to consist of that part of Tilbury East south of the 3rd 
concession, the Township of Romany, and that part of the Township of Rileigh, soath 
of the 6th and 7th concession line and west of the side road between lots 12 and 13 in 
the said township, and the road through lot 147 on Talbot road. 



COUNTY OF LAMBTON. 

1. — The external boundaries of the Township of Sarnia and the Town of Sarnia, 

2. — The external boundaries of the Township of "Warwick, including that portion of 
the Village of Arkona south of the township line. 

3. — The external boundaries of the Townships of Euphemia and Dawn. 

4. — The external boundaries of the Township of Sombra. 

5. — The external boundaries of the Township of Plymptoa. 

6. — The external bouadiries of the Township of Bosanquet, including that portion' 
of the Village of Arkona north of the township line. 

7. — The external boundaries of the Township of Moore. 

8. — The eternal boundaries of^the Township of Enniskiilen. 

9. — The external boundaries of the Township of, Brock. 



46 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 29 



COUNTY OF LANARK. 



1. — The Townships of Drummond, Eathuret, South Sberbrooke, Burgess North, and 
that part of the Township of Elmsley North, north of the Rideau River, within the 
Gounty of Lanark and west of lot No. 12 in each concession. 

2. — The Townships of Lanark, Dalhousie, Darling, Lavant and North Sherbrookp 

3. — The Township of Beckwith, and the first six lots in the first seven concessions 
of the Township of Ramsay. 

4. — The Township of Montague, and that part of the Township of North Elmsley 
from lot No. 1 to lot No. 12, in each concession, both inclusive. 

5. — The Township of Pakenham. 

6. — The Township of Ramsay, with the exception of the first six lots on the first 
seven concessions of the said township. 



UNITED COUNTIES OF LEEDS AND GRENVILLE. 



1. — To consist of the Ist, 2nd, 3rd, 4tb, 5th, 6th and 7th concessions and broken* 
front of the Township of Elizabethtown, and the concession roads between them. 

2. — To consist of the Ist, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th concessions, and broken front, 
and that part of the 6th, 7ch and 8th concessions from the town line of Edwards- 
burgh, to lot No. 18, inclusive of the Township of Augusta and the concession roads 
between them. 

3. — To consist of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th concessions and broken front 
of the Townships of Leeds and Lansdowne, respectively, and the concession roads 
between them. 

4. — To consist of the Township of South Gower, the Township of Oxford from 
the west side line of lots number 1 1 in all the concessions of the eastern boundary 
of the township, and the gore of land between South Gower, Oxford and Edwards- 
bnrgh. 

5. — To consist of the Township of Wolford (except the 7th and 8th concessions and 
the allowance of rcade within and between them), 'lots No. 1 to 10 inclusive in the 1st, 
2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th concessions of the Township of Oxford, and the 
allowance of roads within and between them. 

6. — To consist of the Townships of Bastard and Burgess, and those parts of the 
Townships of Leeds and Lansdowne, on the north side of the rear of the 5th concession 
in each, respectively. , 

7. — To consist of the Townships of Kitley and Elmsley. 

8. — To consist of the Townships of North Orosby and South Crosby. 



1899 INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 47 



9. — To consist of that part of the Townships of Escott and Yonge, in rear of the 4th 
concession of Yonge, and in the rear of the 6th concession of Egcott ; that part of the 
Township of Elizabethtown, in rear of the 7th concession, and west of lot number 18 in 
the Stb, 9th, 10th and 11th concessions, and the allowances for roads embraced therein. 

10. — To consist of the Township of Edwardsburg. 

11. — To consist of that part of the Township of Augusta, in rear of the 5th conces" 
sion and west of lot number 18, in the 6th, 7th and 8th concessions ; the whole of the 
9th and 10th concessions of the Township of Augusta ; the Gore between the Townships 
of Oxford, "Wolford and Augusta ; that part of the Township of Elizabethtown in rear 
of the 7th concession, and east of the commons, between lots number 18 and 19 in the 
8th, 9th and 10th concession ; the 7th and 8th concessions of the Township of Wolford ; 
lots numbers 1 to 10, inclusive, in the 9th and 10th concessions of the Township of 
Oxford ; and the allowance for roads embraced therein. 

12. — To consist of the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th concessions and broken front of the 
Township of Yonge ; the 1st, 2nd 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th concessions and broken front of 
the Township of Escott, and the allowance for roads embraced therein. 

The said 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 12th Divisions shall, respectively, embrace and compre- 
hend within their limits those portions of the River St. Lawrence, and Islands therein, 
within the exterior lines of which such portions of said river and islands would lie and 
be, if such exterior side lines were produced and extended in that direction to the utmost 
limits of the Province. 



COUNTY OF LENNOX AND ADDINGTON. 

1. — The Town of Napanee ; Township of Richmond ; all that part of North Freder- 
icksburgh and AdoJphustown lying north of Hay Bay ; and all that part of North 
Fredericksburgh lying north of Big Creek. 

2. — Comprises 1st concession of Ernestown, the Village of Bath, the Township 
of Amherst Island, an<l the 2nd, 3rd and 4th concessions of the said Township of 
Ernestown, from the west limits thereof to the west limit of lot No. 21 in each con- 
cession. 

3. — Township of South Fredericksburgh and all that part of North Fredericksburgh 
and Adolphustown, not included in Division No. 1. 

4. — 1st, 2nd and 3rd concessions of the Townships of Camden and the Village of 
Newburg. 

5. — All that part ol the Township of Camden not included in Division No. 4. 

6. — All that portion of the Township of Ernestown not included in the li-mits of 
Division No. 2. 

7. — Townships of Sheffield, Kalada, Anglesea, Abinger, Effiingham, Ashby and 
Denbigh, 



48 THE REPORT OF THE [ N... 29 



COUNTY OF LINCOLN. 
1. — The Town and Township of Niagara. 

2. — The Township of Grantham (including the City of St. Catharines, the Villages 
of Merriton and Port Dalhousie), and the Township of Louth. 

3 — The Townships of Caistor and Gainsborough, and the 9tli concession of the 
Township of Grimsby, including the 1st and 2nd ranges as part of the said concession. 

4. — The Villages of Grimsby and Beamsville ; the Township of Clinton and the 
Township of Grimsby, except the 9th concession and 1st and 2nd included as part of the 
said 9 th concession. 



DISTRICT OF MANITOULIN. 

1. — The Town of Gore Bay, the Townships of Gordon, Allan, Campbell, Mills, 
Burpee, Robinson, Dawson, the islands known as Cockburn, Barrie, Olapperton and the 
Dack Islands and that part of the Township of Billings lying west of the road allowance 
between lots fifteen and sixteen in the several concessions thereof and so much of the 
Townships of Carnarvon as lies west of Lake Mindemoya and north of the line between 
the sixth and seventh concessions thereof. 

2. — The Town of Little Current, the Township of Rowland and those parts of the 
Townships of Sheguindah and Bidwell, lying north of the line between the sixth and 
seventh concessions of Sheguindah, and fourth and fifth concessions of the Township of 
Bidwell, and the sixth and seventh concessions of the line between lots seventeen and 
eighteen in the Township of Billings, and the adjacent islands lying north and east of the 
said Townships, except the Clapperton Island. 

3. — Manitowaning, the Townshps of Assiginack, Tehkummah and Sandfield and 
those parts of the Township of Sheguindah lying south of the line between the sixth 
and seventh concessions of Sheguindah, and fourth and fifth concessions of the Township 
of Bidwell, and the sixth and seventh concessions of the Township of Billings to the line 
between lots seventeen and eighteen of said Township, and the Township of Carnarvon, 
except so much of the same as lies west of Mindemoya Lake, and all that part of Mani- 
toulin lying east of the Township of Assiginack, Manitowaning and South Bays and the 
islands adjacent thereto. 



COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX. 

1 , — That part of the City of London lying to the west of Maitland street, with that 
portion of the Township of London lying south of the line between the 4th and 5th con- 
cessions and west of the said street, produced northerly or a line in the same direction 
to the line between the said 4th and 5th concessions, and with that portion of the Town- 
ship of Westminster lying west of the main road leading south from Clarke's Bridge 
across the Thames ; south to the line between the 1st and 2ad concessions ; and westerly 
to the line between lots 42 and 43, and extending northerly to the River Thames ; and 
also including the Village of London West. 



1899.] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 49 

2. — The Villages of Parkhill and Ailsa Oraig, the Townships of East Williams and 
West Williams, and that portion of the Township of Lobo lying north of the line 
between the 11th and 12th concesbions; and east of the liae between lots numbers 12 
and 1 3. 

3 — The Townships of McGillivray and Biddulph and the Village of Lucan. 

4.— The Township of Delaware, with that portion of the Township of Westminster 
west of the line between lots 30 and 31 in the second concession ; then southerly on the 
line between lots 20 and 21, to the southerly limit of the township, including all west 
of said line, and also including all that portion of the front of said Townsnip of West- 
minster, lying; west of the line between lots numbers 42 and 43, not included in the first 
division ; with that portion of the Township of Caradoc lying south of the line between 
the 5th and 6th concessions, to the River Thames ; and with that portion of the Town- 
ship of Lobo, lying south of the line, between the 6th and 7th concessions, to the Eiver 
Thames. 

5. — The Township of Exfrid and Mosa, including the Villages of Wardsville, New- 
bury and Glencoe. 

6. — Townships of Adelaide and Metcalfe; the Town of Strathroy, with that por- 
tion of the Township of Caradoc lying north of the line, between the 3rd and 4th con- 
cessions ; with that portion of the Township of Lobo which lies north of the 6th con- 
cession and west of the line between lots 12 and 13 of the said Township. 

7. — The Township of North Dorchester, north and south of the Itiver Thames ; that 
portion of the Township of West Nissouri which lies touth of the line between lots 14 
and 15 ; and with that portion of the Township of Westminster lying south of the line 
between the Ist and 2nd concessions, and east of the line between lots 30 and 31 in the 
second concession, and thence east of the line between lots 27 and 21, continued south 
to the southerly limit of the said Township of Westminster. 

8. — All that portion of the Township of London which lies north of the line between 
the 4lh and 5th concessions ; that portion of the Township of Lobo which lies north of 
the line between the 6th and 7th concessions, and east of the line between lots 12 and 
13, to the line between the 11th and 12th concessions, End with all that portion of the 
Township of West Nissouri which lies north of the line between lots numbers 14 and 15. 

9. — That part of the City of London lyiog east of Maitland street ; that part of the 
Township of London lying south of the line between the 4th and 5th concessions and 
east of the said street, produced northerly or in a line in the same diiection to the line 
between the said 4th and 5th concessions ; and that part of the Township of Westminster 
lying north of the line between the 1st and 2nd concessions, and east of the main road 
leading south from Clark's Bridge across the Thames. 



DISTRICT OF MUSKOKA. 

1. — The Village of Bracebridge, and the Townships of Macaulay, McLean, Ridout, 
Monck and Cardwell, concessions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9, in the Townships of Stephen- 
sen, Biuce and Franklin, and that part of the Township of Watt, situated east of lot^21, 
in the several concessions thereof; and concessions 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and^l3 in the 
Townships of Muskoka and Draper. 

2. — The Village of Graveiihurst ; the Townships of Morrison, Ryder and Oakley, 
and concessions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 of the Townships of Muskoka and Draper. 
4 B.C. 



50 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 29 



3. — The Village of Huntsville; the Townships or Stisted, Chaffe/ and Siaclairj and 
concessions 10, II, 12, 13 and 14 in the Townships of Stephenson, Branel and Franklin. 

4. — The Townships of Wood, Medora and Humphrey, and that part of the Town 
ship of Watt situated west of lot 21 in the several concessions thereof. 



DISTRICT OF NIPISSING. 

1. — To be composed of the Townships of Springer, Field, Badgerow, Caldwell and 
all that part of the District of Nipissing which is situated west of the line between 
the Indian Reserve and the Township of Widdifield, produced north and south, to the 
boundary of the said district and east of the eastern boundary of the fourth division. 

2. — To be composed of the Townships of Matt a wan, Olrig, Oalvin, Papineau, Louder, 
Pentland, Boyd, Osier, McLaughlin, Canisby, Sabine, Lyell, Airy, Murchison and Robin- 
son, and all that part of the District of Nipissing situated east of the line between the 
Townships of Bonfield and Calvin, produced south to the provisional County of Hali- 
burton, and east of the line between the Townships of Phelps and Olrig, produced north- 
to the Ottawa River. 

3. — To be composed of the Townships of Widdifield, Merrick, Mulock, Phelps, 
Ftrris, Chisholm, Balhntyne, Wilkes, B ggar, Paxton, Butt, Davine, Hunter, McOraney, 
FinlaysoD, Peck and all that part of the District of Nipissing situated west of the line 
between the Townships of Phelp3 and Olrig, produced north to the Ottawa River and 
east of the eastern boundary of first division. 

4. — To be composed of the Townships of McKim, Neelon, Dryden, Blezard and all 
that part of the District of Nipissing which is situated west of the line between the said 
Township of Awrey and the Township of Hagar, produced north and south to the 
boundary of the said district. 

5. — To be composed of the Townships of Bonfieid and Boulter. 

6. — To be composed of Awrey, Hagar, Rutter, Hugel, Kirbpatrick, Dunnett, 
Appleby and Hawley, together with that portion of the said District of Nipissiug lying 
north and south of the said district township » between hues produced northerly and 
southerly along the easterly and westerly boundaries of the said division. 

7. — To be composed of the Townships of Lorain, Buckley, Dymond, Harris, Casey, 
Brethour, Harley, Hilliard, Ingram, Hudson, Kerns, Armstrong, Evantruel, Mirter, 
Henwood, Beauchamp, Dack, Chamberlain, Pacaud, Bryce, Robillard, Savard, Marqaia, 
Otto, Eby, Blain and Sharpe, and those portions of the unsurveyed parts of the said 
District lying northerly of the line marking the northerly boundary of the Township of 
Wyse, produced, westerly till it meets the liae between the Townships of Badgerow and 
Hugel, produced northerly for a distance of eighteen miles and easterly of the last men- 
tioned line, produced northerly to the boundary of the said district. 



COUNTS OF NORFOLK. 

1. — The Town of Simcoe, the Gore of the Township of Woodhouse, and all that 
part of said Township lying west of the side line between lots 5 and 6, together with 
that part of the tth, 5th and 6th concessions lying west of the side line between lots 12 
and 13. 

2. — The Township of Townsend, and the Village of Waterford, 



1899] • INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 51 



3.— The Township of Windham. 

4. — The Township of Middleton, and the Village of Delhi. 

5. — The Township of Charlotteville. 

6 — The Townships of North Walsingham, South Waldngham and the Village of 
Port Rowan, 

7. — The Township of Houghton. 

8. — The Village of Port Dover, and that part of the Township of Woodhouse not 
included in Division No. 1, viz : all that part of the 1st, 2Qd and 3rd concessions lying 
east of the side line between lots 5 and 6, and that part of the 4th, 5th and 6bh conces- 
sions lying east of the said line, between lots 12 and 13 in said Township. 



UNITED COUNTIES OF NORTHUMBERLAND AND DURHAM. 

1 — Townships of Carbwright and Darlington, and the Town of Bowmanville. 

2. — Township of Clarke and Village of Newcastle. 

3. — Township of Hope and Town of Port Hope. 

4. — Townships of Oaven, Manvers, South Monaghan and Village of Millbrook. 

5. — Township of Hamilton and Town of Oobourg. 

6. — Townships of Haldimand and Alnwick. 

7. — Township of Cramahe and Village of Colborne. 

8. — Township of Brighton and Village of Brighton. 

9. — Township of Percy and Village of Hastings. 
10. — Township of Murray. 
11. — Township of Seymour and Village of Campbellford. 



COUNTY OF ONTARIO. 

1. — Including the Townships of Whitby and East Whitby and the Towns of 
Whitby and Oshawa. 

2. — The Township of Pickering. 



52 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 2» 

3. — The Townships of Reach and Scugog and the Village of Port Perry. 

4. — The Townships of Uxbridge and Scott and the Town of Uxbridge. 

5. — The Township of Brock and the Village of Cannington. 

6. — The Township of Thorah, and all that part of the Township of Mara lying south 
ol the line between the 4th and 5th concessions. 

7th.— All that part of the Township of Mara lying north of the liae between the 4th 
and 5th concessions thereof, and the Township of Rama. 



COUNTY OF OXFORD. 

1. — Oomprising the Town of Woodstock, the Townships of Blandford, East Zorra, 
East Oxford, and that part of the Township of North Oxford situated east of lot 16, and 
that part of West Oxford lying east of lot No. 7 to the Stage Road, thence on the north 
side of the Stage Road to where the said road intersects the Township of East Oxford. 

2. — Oomprises the Township of Blenheim. 

3. — Comprises the Townships of West Zorra and East Nissouri. 

4 — Comprises the Townships of North Norwich and South Norwich and the Village 
of Norwich. 

5. — Comprises all those portions of the Townships of North Oxford and West 
Oxford not comprised in the 1st Division ; the Town of Ingersoll and those portions of 
the 1st and 2nd concessions of the Township of Durham west of the Middle Town line. 

6. — Comprises the Town of Tilsonburg and all that portion of the Township of Dur- 
ham not included in the 5th Division. 



DISTRICT OF PARRY SOUND. 

1. — The Town of Parry Sound and the Townships of Foley, McDougall, Cowper and 
Carling, and all that portion of the district lying to the west of the east boundary of 
Carling, produced to the French River. 

2. — The Townships of McKellar, Croft, Hagerman, Ferguson and all that portion of 
the district lying between the east boundary of Ferris and the west boundary of Fergu- 
son, produced to the French River. 

3. — Townships of Humphrey, Christie, Monteith and Conger. 

4. — Townships of McMurrich, Perry and Armour. 

5. — The Townships of Spence, Chapman, Ryeraon, Lount, Proudfoot, Bethune and 
Sinclair. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 53 



6. — That territory bounded on the west by the western boundaries of Townships of 
Pringle and Patterson, atd the western boundary of the Township of Patterson, produced 
to French River and Lake Nipissing ; on the east by the boundary of the District of 
Parry Sound, and on the south by the southern boundaries of the Townships of Hims- 
worth, Gurd and Pringle. 

7. — The Townships of Machar, Laurier, Strong and Joly, 



COUNTY OF PEEL. 

1, Town of Brampton, Township of Chinguacousy and northern Division of Town- 
ship of Toronto Gore. 

2 — Village of Streetsville, Township of Toronto, and southern Division of Township 
of Toronto Gore. 

3 — Township of Oaledon. 

4 — Village of Bolton, Township of Albion. 



COUNTY OF PERTH. 

1. — To consist of all that part of the Township of North Easthope west of the line 
between lots 25 and 26, and south of the road between the 8th and 9th concessions, and 
all that part of the Township of South Easthope west of the side line, between lots 25 
and 26 ; all that part of the Township of Downie and Gore north and east of the conces- 
sion line between the 10th and 11th concessions and the Oxford Road ; and all the 
Township of EUice from the 1st to the 13th concession, inclusive. 

2. — To consist of all that part of the Township of Fulton not included in Division 
No. 3, and the Townships of Hifbbert and Logan. 

3. — To consist of that portion of the Township of Downie west of the Oxford Road, 
and south of the concession line between the 10th and 11th concessions; the Township 
■of Blanshard ; all that part of the Township of Fullerton comprising the 13 th and 14th 
concessions, and south of a road leading from the Mitchell Road, between lots 24 and 25, 
east to lot 3 in the 10th concession ; thence east along the line between tie 10th and 
11th concessions to the town line. 

4 — To consist of that part of the Township of North Easthope east of the line, 
between lots 25 and 2G, and north of the 8th concession, inclusive, with the 9th and 10th 
concession ; all that part of the Township of South Easthope not included in Division 
No. I. 

5. — To consist of th-^ Township of Mornicgtoc, and all that part of the Township of 
Elma from lots 53 to 72, both numbers inclusive, of the first concession, and from lots No. 
27 to 16, both numbers inclusive, in and from the 2Qd to the 18th concession, both con- 
cessions inclusive, of the said Township of Elma ; and concessions 14, 15 and 16 of the 
Township of EUioe ; and concessions 11th, 12fch, 13th and 14th of the Township of North 
Easthope. 



54 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



6. — To consist of the Township of Wallace, and all that part of the Township of 
Elma from the 1st concession to the 18th concession, both concessions inclusive, and com- 
prising lots Nos. 1 to 52, both inclusive, of the 1st concession, and lots Nos. 1 to 26, 
inclusive, from the 2nd to the 18th concession, both concessions inclusive. 



COUNTY OF PErERBOROUGH. 

1. — Composed of the Town of Peterborough, the Village of Ashburnham, the Town- 
ships of North Monaghan and Ennismore, and all that part of the Township ot Harvey 
lying west of Pigeon Lake and south of Bobcaygeon ; and all the Township of Smith 
lying south of the 7th concession ; and all the Township of Otonabee lying west of the 
8th concession and north of lots 21 from the said 8th concession to the western boundary 
of said Township of Otonabee; and all the Tosvnship of Douro lying south of lots 
numbered 11 ; and all that part of the Township of Dummer lying south of lots num- 
bered 11 and west of the 5 th concession. 

2. — Composed of the Township of Asphodel, Belmont and Methnen, and that part of 
the Township of Dummer lying east of the 4th concession and south of lots numbered 1 
to 11. 

3. — Composed of all that part of the Township of Otonabee lying east of the 9th 
concession ; and all that part of the said Township of Otonabee lying south of lots 
numbered 22 and west ol the 8th concession. 

4. — Composed of all that part of the Township of Smith lying north of the 6th con- 
cession ; all that part of the Township of Douro lying north of lots numbered 10; and 
all that part of the Township of Dummer lying north of lots numbered 10 ; and also of 
the Village of Lakefield, and of the Township of Galway, and all the Township of Harvey, 
except that portion lying west of Pigeon Lake and south of Bobcaygeon. 

5. — Composed of the Townships of Burleigh, Cavendish, Anstruther and Ohandos. 



UNITED COUNTIES OF PRESCOTT AND RUSSELL 

1. — Comprises the whole of the Township of Longueuil, the municipality of the 
Village of L'Original, and the 1st concession ot the Township of Caledonia. 

2. — Comprising all that part of the Township of West Hawkesbury, extending from 
front of the 3rd concession to the rear of the said township. 

3. — Comprises the whole of the Township of East Hawkesbury. 

4. Comprising the Township of North Plantagenet, and that part of the Township 
of South Plantagenet, lying north of the Nation River. 

5. — Comprising the whole of the Township of Cumberland. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 55 



6. — Comprising the whole of the Township of Russell. 

7. — Comprising the two front concessions of the Township of West Hawkesbury, 
and the Municipility of Hawkesbury Village, within the same. 

8. — Comprising the Township of Caledonia (excepting the Ist concession of the said 
township), and also that portion of the Township of South Plantagenet lying south and 
east of the Nation River. 

9. — Comprising the whole of the Township of Alfred. 

10. — Comprises the whole of the Township of Clarence. 

11. — Comprises the whole of the Township of Cambridge. 



COUNTY OF PRINCE EDWARD 

1. The Town of Picton, the 2nd and 3rd concessions of " Military Tract," from the 
west line of lot No. 13, eastward : Gore " G " ; 1st and second concessions north of the 
Carrying Place ; Ist Concession southeast of the Carrying Place, and 2nd concession north 
of Black River, including Gores " K " and " L " and McCan Gores, all in the Township 
Hallowell ; Block "I" the concessions north and east of East Lake, and Gore " B" in 
the Township of Athol, and 1st and 2nd concessions south of the Bay of Quinte, and 
Gore " A" in the Township of North Marysburg. and 1st concession southwest of Green 
Point, to the end of Carmen's Point in Sophiasburg. 

2. — The Township of South Marysburg, and the southern part of Athol, commencing 
at the outlet of East Lake, thence down to the head of the lake, thence down to the base 
line between the Ist concession south and the 1st concession north of East Lake, till it 
strikes the township line of Hallowell, thence down said township line till it strikes South 
Marysburg. 

3. — The Township cf Sophiasburg, together with Big Island, excepting the 1st con- 
cession southwest of Green Point to the end of Carman's Point. 

4. — All that part of the Township of Ameliasburg lying east of the line between 
lots No. 86 and 87, in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th concessions of said Township, including 
Huflf's Island. 

5. — That part of the Township of Hillier not included in the 7th Division, also the 
Ist j»nd 2nd concessions north of West Lake, and west of Lot No. 7 in the said concession, 
and that part of Irwin Gore lying north of and west of lot No. 7 in the 2nd concession, 
and the west part of the 2nd conceesion produced west of lot. No. 74, in that concession, 
in the Township of Hallo welJ. 

6. — Block (IV.) four, concession south side of West Lake, let concession " Military 
Tract," 2nd and 3rd concessions of said tract west of lots No. 13 in those concessions. 
Gore *' E " Ist and 2nd concessions north of West Lake and east of lot No, 6 in those 
concessions ; the Gerrow Gore and that part of Irwin Gore not included in Division No. 
8, and all that part of the 2nd concession produ:ed east of lot No. 75 in the township of 
Hallowell. 



56 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



No. 7. — All that part of the townsl ip of Ameliasburg lying west cf the line between 
lots No. 86 and 87, in the 1st, 2Qd, 3rd and 4th concessions of said township; all that 
part of the 4th and 5th concessions of the township of Hillier west of the line between 
lots No 36 and 87, and the 3rd concession wast of the line between lots Nos. 22 and 
23, with that part of the 2nd concession lying north of Pleasant Bay in the said Town 
ship of Hillier. 

8. — All the point lying east of the west line of Mirshlaad's Gore, the CDncession 
north of Smith's Bay and Waupoos Island in the Township of North Marysburg. 



DISTRICT OF RAINY RIVER. 

1. — That part of the District composed of the territory lying west of a line com- 
mencing at Pickerel Rapids, on Oedar and Manitoa Lakes, and extending Northward 
parallel with the Sixth Meridian line to the northern boundary of the district, and north 
of the line drawn from the Mouth of Rainy River, at Hungary Hall, in a north and 
easterly direction along the shore of the Lake- of- the- Woods to the easterly end of Sabis- 
kong Bay, thence easterly to the siid Pickerel Rapids. 

2 — That part of the district composed of the territory lying south of said line, drawn 
from the mouth of Rainy River, at Hungary Hall, in a north-westerly direction along the 
shore of the L%ke-of-the- Woods to the ea<Jtern end of Sibiskong Bay, thence easterly to 
where it intersects a line extending northwards, from its easterly boundary line to the 
Townships of Aylesworth, Lash and Carpenter, and west of the said line extended north- 
wards from the eastern boundary of the said townships. 

3. — That part of the district composed of the said line forming the eastern boundary 
of the said above mentioned townships, extended northward and south of the said line 
running eastward from the east end of Sabiskong Bay to Pickerel Rapids, and extended 
further in an easterly direction to the boundary line, between the Districts of Rainy 
River and Thunder Bay, at the southwest angle of Hawk Lake. 

4. — That part of the District lying north of the western boundary of the said Third 
Division Court, and east of the eastern boundary of the said First Division Court. 



COUNTY OF RENFREW. 

1. — Comprising the Town of Pembroke, the Township of Pembroke, Stafford, Alice, 
Petawawa, Buchan, Rolph, Wylie, McKay, Frazer, Herd, Clara and Maria, and all that 
part ot the Township of Wilberforce from the 18 jh to the 25th concession, bath inclusive ; 
and also those parts of the 14th, 15th, 16th and 17th concfssions of the same Township 
of Wilberforce lying north of Snake River and east of Lake Dore. 

2. — Comprising all that part of the Township of Westmeath lying east and north of 
the Muskrat Lake and River and all those parts of the Township of Ross, from the 5th 
to the 9th concession, both inclusive, east of Muskrat Lake, and from the 7th to the 13th 
(of the other) concessions of Ross, both inclusive, of the said Township of Ross. 

3 — Comprising the Village of Renfrew, and the Townships of Horton and Adamston, 
excepting the lots numbered 1 to 22 inclusive, in the 9th, 10th, Uth and 12th concession 
and the whole of the concessions numbering 13, 14, 15 and 16 in said township. 



1899] 



INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 



4 — Oomprising the Village or Arnprior and the Township of McNab. 

5 —Comprising thp Townships of Bagot, Blythedeld, Broagham, and Matawatchan, 
and all the lots numbered 1 to 22, inclusive, in the 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th concessions 
in the said Township of Adamston, and the whole of the concessions numbered 13, 14, 
15 and 16 in the said townships. 

6 —Comprising the Townships of Grattan, Sebastopol, South Algoma, North Algoma, 
and all that part of the Township of Wilberforce from the Ist to the 17th concessions, 
both inclusive, excepting those parts of the 14th, 15th, 16 and 17th concessions of said 
Township of Wilberforce lying north of Snake River and east of Lake Dore. 

7 —Comprising the Township of Bromley, and all that part of the Township of 
Westmeath west of Muskrat Lake, and all thos3 parts of the Township of Ross from the 
Ist to the 4th concessions, both inclusive, east of Muskrat Lake, and from the Ist to the 
6th of the other concessions, both inclusive, of the said Township of Eoss. 

8.— Comprising the Townships of Brudenell, Radclifie, Raglan, Lynedoch, Griffith, 
Hagarty, Sherwood, Jones, Richards and Barns. 



COUNTY OF SIMCOE. 

1 —Oomprising the Town of Barrie, the Township of Vespra, except that portion 
Hinc west of the Nottawasaga River, and excepting also lots Nos. 38, 39 and 40 in the 
1st and 2nd concessions, and lots Nos. 1, 2 and 3 in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th con- 
cessions, respectively. That portion of the Township of Oro lying south of lots Nos. 21 
in the first and 2nd concessions (including the Ranges), and south of lots Nos. 13 m the 
3rd 4th 5th 6 th, 7 th and 8th concessions, respectively ; that portion of the iownship 
of Innisfil lying east of lots Nos. 5 in the 6th, 7th and 8th concessions, and that portion 
lying north of the 8th concession ; that portion of the Township of Essa lying north of 
lots Nos, 19 in the 7th, 8th, 9bh, 10th and Uth concessions. 

2 —The Village of Bridford ; the Township of West Gwillimbury, excepting there- 
out lots Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in the Uth and 15th concessions ; the Township of I^^i^isfil, 
except that portion lying north of the 5th concession, and excepting also Jots No^ 1, w 
3, 4 and 5 in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th concessions. ; ^ ^3 i 

3— The Township of Tecumseth, except concessions 12, 13, 14, and 15; the 
Township of Adjala, except that portion lying north of lots Nos. 25 in the 8th conces- 
sion thereof. 

4 —The Town of Collingwood, the Village of Stayner, that portion of the Township 
of Nottawasaga lying north of lots Nos, 18 in the 12th concession thereof; that portion 
of thR Township of Sunnidale lying north of the 8th concession ; that portion of the 
Town hip of Fi03 lying west of the Nottawasaga River ; the Islands in Like Huron con- 
tiguous to the Township of Nottawasaga. 

5— The Township of Flos, except th»t portion lying west of the Nottawa- 
saga River, the Township of Medonte, except that portion lying east of the lOtti 
concession; and north of lots Nos. 10 in the 9th and 10th concessions, respectively. 



58 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



that portion of the Township of Ore lying north of the southern boundaries of lots Nos. 
21 in the Ist and 2nd concessions, and north of the southern boundaries of lots Nos. 15 
in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th and 8th concessions, respecti <7ely ; lots 38, 39 and 40 in the 
first and second concessions, and lots Nos. 1, 2 and 3 in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th and 7th 
concessions of the Township of Vespra. 

6. — The Town of Orillia, the Township of Orillia, southern division, the Township 
of Orillia, northern division, except that portion lying north of lots Nos. 15 in the first 
seven concessions thereof ; that portion of the Township of Oro lying east of the 8th con- 
cession ; that portion of the Township of Medonte being composed of lots Nos. 1 to 6 
(both inclusive) in the 11th, 12th, 13th and 14th concessions ; the Islands in Lake Simcoe 
contiguous to the townships and portions of townships above described lying wholly or 
for the most part opposite thereto. 

7. — The Township of Nottawasaga, except that portiou lying north of lots Nos. 18 in 
the 12th concessions thereof; the Township of Sunnidale, except that portion lying north 
of the 8th concession ; that p-)rtion of the Township of Vespra lying west of the Notta- 
wasaga River ; that portion of the Township of Essa lying north of lots Nos, 19 in the 
lat, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th concessions ; that portion of the Township of Tossorontio 
lying north of lots Nos. 20 in each of the seven concessions thereof. 

8. — The Township of Essa, except that portion lying north of lots Nos. 19 in each 
of the eleven concessions thereof ; the Township of Tossorontio, except that portion lying 
north of lots Nos. 20 in each of the seven concessions thereof, that portion of the Town- 
ship of Innisfil being composed of lots Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th» 
6th, 7th and 8th concessions; the 12th, l3th, 14th and 15th concessions of the Township 
of Tecumseth ; lots Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 in the 14th and 15th concessions of the Town- 
ship of West Gwillimbury ; that portion of the Township of Adjala lying north of lots 
Nos. 25 in the eight concessions thereof. 

9. — The Town of Penetanguishene, and the Village of Midland, the Township of 
Tiny ; that portion of the Township of Tay Ijing west of the 8th concession ; the Islands 
in Lake Huron contiguous to the Township of Tiny, and to that part of the Township of 
Tay, forming part of the ninth division, and lying wholly and for the most part opposite 
thereto. 

10. — The Township of Matchedash, that portion of the Township of Orillia, northern 
division, lying north of lots Nos. 15 in the first seven concessions thereof; that portioa 
of the Township of Medonte lying north of lots No. 6, in the 11th, 12tb, 13th acd 14th 
concession J, and that portion lying north of lots No. 10, in the 9 th and 10 th concessions 
thereof ; the Township of Tay, except portion lying west of the 8th concession ; the 
Island in Lake Huron, contiguous to that portion of the Township of Tay, forming part 
of the 10th division, and lying wholly or for the most part opposite thereto. 

Note. — Each of the said several divisions shall include all allowances for roads 
embraced within its external limits, and shall also extend to the centre of every allow- 
ance for road lying external and adjacent to svery such division, excepting always where 
any such last-mentioned allowance is hereinbefore declared to belong to or form part off 
any particular division. 



UNITED COUNTIES OF STORMONT, DUNDAS AND GLENGARRY. 
1. — Township of Charlottenburg, in the County of Glengarry. 
2. — Township of Lochiel, in the County of Glengarry. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 59 



3 — Town and Township of Oornwall, in the Oounty of Stormont. 

4 — Township of Oanabrook, in the Oounty of Stormont. 

5. — Township of Williamsburg, in the Oounty of Dundas. 

6. — Township cf Matilda, in the County of Dundas. 

7. — Township of Mountain, in the County of Dundas. 

8. — Township of Finch, in the County of Stormont. 

9.- — Township of Lancaster, in the County of Glengarry. 
10. — Township of Winchester, in the County of Dundas. 
11. — Township of Roxborough, in the County of Stormont. 
12. — Township of Kenyon, in the County of Glengarry. 



DISTRICT OF THUNDER BAY. 

1. — All that part of the District lying west of the meridiac of 87 degrees of west 
longitude, to the meridian of the most easterly part of Hunter's Island, excepting there 
from the Municipality of Neebing. 

2. 

3. — Ooif prising the Municipality of Neebing, 



• COUNTY OF VICTORIA. 

1. — The first consists of the following Townships and parts of Townships, viz. : of 
the 15th concession of the Township of Mariposa, and the Township of Eldon, except the 
ranges north and south of Portage Road. 

2. — The second consists of the following Townships : all of the Township of Fenelon, 
except that portion lying east of the Scugog River, and south of Sturgeon Lake, and 
the Township of Somerville 

3. — The third consists of the Township of Verulam. 

4. — The fourth consists of the Township of Emily. 

5. — The fifth consists of the Town of Lindsay, Township of Ops, and that portion of 
the Township of Fenelor, lying east of the Scugog River, and south of Sturgeon Lake. 



00 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



6. — The sixth consists of the Township of Mariposa, except the 15th concession. 

7. — The stventh consists of the Townships of Garden and Dal ton, Laxton, Digby 
and Longford, and the Township of Bexley, and that portion of the Township of Eldon 
north of Portage Road, and the range south of Portage Road 



COUNTY OF WATERLOO. 

1. — All that portion of the Township of "Waterloo lying north of Block line on the 
west side of the Grand River, and that part of the upper block of said township lying on 
the east side of the Grand River, north of lots Nos, 115, 109, 104 86 and 95, to the 
Guelph Township line, incluaing the Towns of Berlin and Waterloo. 

2 — All that part of the Township of Waterloo lying south of the Block line on the 
west of the Grand River, and that part lying on the east side of the Grand River, south 
of the northern Boundary of lots Nos. 115, 109, 104, 85, and 95, to the Guelph Township 
line, including the Villages of Preston and Heapeler. 

3. — All that portion of the Township of North Dumfries lying east of lot No, 19, in 
the 7th concession, and running a course with the eastern boundary of the said lot in a 
northerly direction up to the 12th concession ; thence along the eastern boundary of lot 
No 23, in ths said 12th concession, to the township line, including the Town of Gait. 

4. — The Township of Wilmot, including the Village of New Haoiburg. 

5. — The Township of Wellesley. 

6 — The Township of Woolwich. 

7. — All that part of the Township of North Dumfries lying west of the eastern 
boundary of said lot No. 18, in the 7th concession; thence along the eastern limits of 
said lot No. 19, the same course thereof, in a northerly direction to the 15th concession ; 
thence along the westerly limit of lot No. 23, in the said 12th concession, to the township 
line, including the Village of Ayr. 



THE COUNTY OF WELLAND. 

1. — Comprising the Township of Crowland ; that part of the Township of Thorold 
lying south of the line between lots 178 and 195, running through to Pelham ; that 
part of Pelham lying south of the 4th concession, and that part of Humberstone lying 
north of the concession line, between the 4th and 5th coacassions, being the whole of the 
15sh concession and the Town of Welland. 

2 — Comprising the Township of Wainfleet. 

3. — Comprising the Township of Bertie, and those parts of the Township of Hum- 
berstone not included in Nos. 1 and 6, and the Village of Fort Erie. 



1899] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 61 



4. — Oom prising the Township of Willoughby, the Village of Chippawa, and that 
part of the Township of Stamford south of the line between lots 136 and 137 ; easterly 
from the westerly limit of the Township to the southeast angle of lot No. 133.; thence 
north on the line between lots No 132 and 133, to the northern boundary of the 
Township, including the Towns of Clifton and Navy Island. 

5. — Comprising those parts of the Township of Stamford, Thotold and Pelham, not 
included in any other Division, and the Town of Thorold. 

6. — Comprising all the Township of Humberstone, lying south of the 5th concession, 
and west of the side lines, between lots No. 9 and 10 in the several other concessions, 
thereof, and the Village of Port Oolborne. 



COUNTY OF WELLINGTON. 

1. — The Town and Township of Guelph. 

2. — The Township of Puslinch. 

3. — The Township of Eramosa. 

4. — Oonsisting of the Township of Nichol, excepting the 11th and 12th concessions ; 
the Municipality of Fergus ; the first eight concession of the Township of Garafraxa, 
and lots 1 to 18, both inclusive, in concessions A and B of the Township of Peel, lots 
13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18, in concessions 18 and 19, and lots 19, 20 and 21, in the 17th 
concession of the Township of Peel. 

5.— The Township of Erin. 

6. — Oonsisting of the Township of Pilkington, and the 11th and 12th concessions of 
the Township of Nichol ; the Municipality of the Village of Elora, and lots numbers 19 
and upwards belonging to the 9th,'10tb, llth, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th and 16th conces- 
sions of Peel. 

7. — Consisting of concessions 1 to 16, inclusive, of the Township of Maryboro', and 
concessions 1 to 16, inclusive, of the Township of Peel, except lots 19, 20, 21, 22 and 23 
of those concessions in that Township. 

8. — Oonsisting of that part of the Township of Arthur, south and southeast of lot 
15, on the weet side of the Owen Sound Road, in the Township of Arthur ; that part of 
the Township of Lather, from 1 to 16, both inclusive ; and lots 1 to 12, both inclusive, of 
the llth. and 18th concessions of the Township of Peel ; lots 5 to 11, both inclusive, of 
the 19th concession of said Township of Peel; and lots 19 to 23, both inclusive, of con- 
cessions "A" and " B " of said Township of Peel. 

9. — The territory formerly comprised in this Division is now in the County of 
Dufferin. 

10. — Consists of the Township of Minto. 

11. — Consists of the Town of Mount Forest, and that part of the Township of Arthur 
north of lot 16, west of the Owen Sound Road : lot 17, on the Owen Sound Road, and 
lot 13, east of the Owen Sound Road. 



62 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



COUNTY OF WENTWORTH. 

1. — All that part of the Township of Barton lying east of the lines between lots 14 
and 15, and all that part of Hamilton City east of Hughson Street. 

2. — The whole of the Township of Flamboro' West, the Town of Dandas, and the 
east half of the Township of Ancaster. 

3. — The whole of the Township of Flamboro' East. 

4. — The whole of the Township of Beverley, and the west half of the Township of 
Ancaster. 

5. — The whole of the Township of Salt fleet. 

7. — The whole of the Township of Glanford. 

8. — The whole of the Township of Binbrook. 

9. — All that part of the Township of Barton lying west of the lines between lots 14 
and 15, and part of Hamilton City west of Haghson Street. 



COUNTY OF YOEK. 

1. — The City of Toronto, east of Yonge Street, at date of 14th September, 1875 
.{i.e., Bloor, Sherbourne and Howard Streets on the north, the Don on the east, down to 
Queen Street, and all soath of Queen Street as far as Lee Avenue. 

2. — Concessions 5 to 11, inclusive, of the Township of Markham ; and concessions 5 
to 10, inclusive, of the Township of Whitchurch, from 1 to 10, inclusive, together with 
the Villages of Markham and Stouffville. 

3. — Concessions 1 to 4, inclusive, of the Township of Markham ; and concession 1 
to 4, inclusive, of the Township of Whi:;church from lots 1 to 10, inclusive; and conces- 
sions 1 to 3, inclusive, of the Township of Vaughan, 

4. — The Township of Whitchurch, from the line between lots 10 and 11 northward ; 
and the Township of East Gwillimbury. 

6. — The Townships of Georgina and North Gwillimbury. 

6. — The Township of King and the incorporated Village of Aurora. 

7. — Concessions 1 to 11, inclusive, of (he Township of Vaughain. 

8. — All that portion of the Township of York lying west of Yonge Street and the 
Township of Etobicoke. 

9. — Township of Scarboro' and all that portion of the Township of York which lie 
east of YoDge Street and the Village of Leslie ville. 

10.— The City of Toronto, west of Yonge Street, at date of 10th Sept., 1875, 'i. e, 
Bloor Street on the north and Duflferin Street on the west). 



1899] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 63 



DIVISION COURT TARIFF. 

Fees to be received by the several Clerks and Bailiffs of Division Courts, from and 
after lat July, 1894. 

FORM I. 
Clerk's Fees. 

I. Receiving claicn, numbering and entering in procedure book $0 15 

(This item to apply to entering in the proceduie book a transcript of 
judgment from another Court, but not an entry made for the issue of a 
judgment summons). 

'2. Issuing summons, with necessary notices and warnings thereon, or judg- 
ment summons (as provided in the forms) in all : 

Where claim does not exceed $20 40 

" exceeds $20 and does not exceed $60 50 

" exceeds $50 and does not exceed $100 60 

" exceeds $100 100 

{N. B. — In replevin and interpleader suits the value of goods to regulate 
the fee). 

3. Copy of summons, including all notices and warnings thereon 25 

4 Copy of claim (including particulars), when not furnished by plaintiff. ... 25 

5. Copy of set oS or counterclaim (including particulars), when not furnished 

_ by the defendant 25 

(Note. — In either of the last two preceding {^^"^p +hp *<ioH may be 
taxed against th«^ party ordered to pay costs). 

6. Receiving and entering bailiff's return to any summons, writ or warrant 

issued under the seal of the Court (except summons to witness and re- 
turn to summons or papers from another division) . 15 

7. Taking confession of judgment 10 

(Tnis d038 not include affidavit and oath, chargeable under item 8). 

8. Every necessary affidavit, if actually prepared by the clerk, and admin- 

istering oath to the deponent 25 

9. Furnishing duly certified copie=i of the summons and notices and papers 

with all proceedings, for purposes of appeal (under section 151), as 
reqiured by either party, per folio of 100 words 05 

10. Certificate therewith « 25 

II. Certifying under the seal of the Court, and delivering to a judgment 

creditor a memorardum of the amount of judgment and costs against a 
judgQient debtor, under The .Creditor's Relief Act or for any other 
purpose , 25 

12. Copies of papers, for which ^no fee] is otherwise provided, necessarily re- 

quired for service or transmission to the judge, each 10 

If exceeding'two folios, per folio 05 

13. Every notice of defence or admission entered, or other notice required to 

be given by the Clerk to an/ party to a cause or proceeding, including 
mailing, but notjpostages 15 



g^ THE REP.'RT OF THE . i^^- -^ 

U. Entering final judgment by clerk, on special summons, M.here claim not ^^ 
disputed • • • • 

15. Entering every judgment rendered at the hearing, or final order made by 

the judge 

(Note.— This fee does not apply to any proceeding on judgment summoBs) 
(This one fee of 50 cents will include the service of recording at the trial 
andafterv^ards entering in the procedure book the judgment decree and 
order in its entirety, rendered or made at the trial If a garnishee proceed^ 
infbefore a judgment, the fee of 50 cents will be allowed for the judgment 
in^respect toWprimkry debtor,, and a like fee of 50 cents for the adjudica- 
tion whenever made, in respect to the garnishee). 

25 

16. Subpoena to witness 

(rhesQbpcenamay include any number of names therein, and only one 
original subptena shall be taxtd, unless the judge otherwise orders). 

1 7. For every copy of subpoena required for service 

18. Summons for jury (including copy for each juryman, when repaired by the ^ ^^ 

parties) 

19. Calling and returning jury ordered by the judge • 

20 Every order of reference, or order for adjournment, made at hearing, and 
e/ery order requiring the signature of the judge and entering the same, 

including final order of judgment debtor's examination -^ 

(Any warning necessary with order, e.g., the warning in Form 73. forms 
part of the order.) 
21. Transcript of judgment to another Division Court ^^ 

23. Eveiy writ of execution, warrant or attachment, or warrant of commit- ^^ 

ment and delivering same to bailifi - 

24. Renewal of every writ of execution, when ordered by the judgment creditor, • 

or of warrant of committment, when ordered by the judge 

25. Every bond, when necessary, and prepared by the clerk, (including affidavits ^ ^^^ 

of justification and of execution) 

■Ae. For necessary entries in the debt'.attachmenc book, in eacn ca^e, (in aii) . . iO 

27. Transmitting transcript of judgment ; or transmitting V^^^'ll^''^^2lZ 
another division, or to the judge, on application to him, including 
necessary entries and mailing, but not including postages • -> 

98 Receiving papers from another division for service, entering the same, handing 

to ihe Ba^iM, receiving and entering his return and transmitting the same (if ^^ 
return made promptly, not otherwise) 



29. Search by pen on not party to the suit of proceeding, to be paid by the applicant 



10 



Search by party to the suit or proceeding, where the suit or proceeding is over ^^ 
one year old • • •- 

(No fee is .Largeable for search to a party to the suit or proceeding, if the 
same is net over one jear old.) 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 05 

30. Taxing coats, in defended suits, after judgment pronounced $0 25 

31. Making out statement of costs in detail (including bailiff's fees), at the request 

of any party, or for the purpose of settlement, or upon entering judgment by 
default ". 10 

(Neither item 30 nor 31 applies to statement of costs endorsed on summons or 
copy to be served.) 

32. Taxing bailiff's costs, under section 7 of the Division Courts Act, 1889 „. 25 

33. Copying and transmitting to municipal clerk, judge's decision to appeal « 50 



2. Bailiff's Fees. 

1. Service of summons issued under the seal of the Court, or judge'd summons or 

order, on each person, (except summons to witness and summons to juryman :) 

Where claim does not exceed $20 30 

" exceeds $20 and does not exceed $60 40 

" exceeds $60 and does not exceed $100 -"^O 

exceeds $100 , 75 

(In interpleader suits the value of the goods to regulate the fee.) 

2. For every return as to service under item 1 ; attending at the clerk's office and 

making the necessary affidavit (as provided by Rule 183) 15 

3 Service of summons on witness or juryman, or service of notice 15 

4. Taking confession of judgment and attending to prove 10 

5. For calling parties and their witnesses at the sittings of the Ooart, in every 

defended case, and at the hearing of every judgment summons 15 

6. Enforcing every writ of execution, or summons of replevin, or warrant of 

attachment or warrant against the body, each : 

Where claim does not exceed $20 50 

" exceeds $20 and does not exceed $60 75 

'• exceeds $60 100 

(When goods replieved, the value of the goods to regulate the amount of 
the fee. This fee does not include service of summons in replevin on defendant,) 

Fees under Creditor's Relief Act (see section 7 of 52 Vict, cap, 12; and 
section 25 of R. S. O. cap. 65) shall be taxed according '"o this tariff. 

7. Every mile necessarily travelled to serve summons, or process, or other 

necessary papers, or in going to replevy goods, or to seize on attachment, or 
in going to eeize on a writ of execution, where money paid on demand, or 
made on execution, or case settled after seizure $ 12 

8. Mileage going to arrest under warrant, when arrest made, per mile 12 

9. Mileage carrying delinquent to prison, including all expenses and assistance, 

per mile 20 

5 D.C. 



6(i THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 29 



10. Every schedule of property seized, attached or replevied, including affidavit 

of appraisal, when necessary : 

Not exceeding $20 $0 30 

Exceeding $20 and not exceeding $60 50 

Exceeding $60 75 

11. Every bond, when necessary, when prepared by the bailiff, including affidavit 

of justification and execution 50 

12. Every notice of sale, not exceeding three, under execution or under attach- 

ment, each . < - — 15 

13. Reasonable allowances and disbursements, necessarily incurred, in the care and 

removal of property : 

(a) If a bailiff removes property seized, he is entitled to the necessary disburse- 

ments, in addition to the fees for seizure and mileage. 

(b) If he takes a bond, then to 50 cents, instead of disbursements for removal of 

property. 

(c) If assistance is necessary in the seizure, or securing, or removal, or retaining 

of property, the bailiff is entitled to the disbursements, for such assistance. 

(d) All charges for disbursements are to be submitted to the clerk for taxation, 

subject to appeal to the judge. 

(e) The bailiff must in all cases endorse a memorandum of all his charges on the 

back of the execution, or state them on a separate slip of paper, so that the 
clerk may conveniently tax the bailifi's charges for fees and disbursements. 

(/) The clerk is in all cases to sign the memorandum of his taxation and preserve 
it among the papers in the cause, together with the execution, for future refer- 
ence, and thereby enable the clerk to certify the bailiff's returns properly. 

14 If execution, or process in attachment in the nature of execution, be satisfied, 
in whole or in part, after seizure and before sale, whether by action of the 
parties or otherwise, the bailiff shall be entitled to charge and receive 3 per 
cent, on the amount directed to be levied, or on the amount of the value of 
the property seized, whichever shall be the lesser amount. 

15. Poundage on execution, and on attachments in the nature of executions,' 5 per 
cent, exclusive of mileage for going to seize and sell, upon the amount realized 
from property, necessarily sold. 



3. — Fees to Witnesses and Appraisers. 

Allowance to Witnesses. 

Attendance, per diem, to witnesses residing within three miles of the place where . 

the Oourt is held, if within the county 75 

And if without the county 1 00 

Attendance, if witness resides over three miles from the place of sittings, and within 

the county, per diem 1 00 

Attendance, if witness resides without the county and more than three miles from 

the place of sittings, per diem 1 25 

Barristers and solicitors, physicians and surgeons, engineers and veterinary sur- 
geons, other than parties to the cause, when called upon to give evidence of 
any professional service rendered by them, or to give professional opinions, 
per dism - • ^ 00 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF DIVISION COURTS. 67 



(Note. — Disbursements to surveyors, architects and professional witnesses, such as 
are entitled to specific fees by statute, are to be taxed, as authorized by such 
statute.) 

If witnesses attend in one case only, they will be entitled to the full allowance. 

If they attend in more than one 'case, they will be entitled to a proportionate part 
in each cause only. 

The travelling expenses of witnesses, over three miles, shall be allowed, according to 
the sums reasonably and actually paid, but in no case shall exceed twenty cents per 
mile, one way. 



Fees to Appraisers. 

Fens to Appraisers of Goods, etc., Seized Under Warrant of Attachment. 

To each appraiser, 50 cents, per day, during the time actually employed in appraising 
goods — rto be paid in the first instance by plaintiff, and allowed as costs in the cause. 

Fees in Suits not Exceeding $10. 

(57 Vict, cap 23, sec. 11.) 

Clerk. 

For all services, from entering action, or suing out a judgment or interpleader 
summons, up to and including the entering of final judgment, or final 
order on any such judgment, or inpleader summons, in case the action 
proceeds to judgment or final order %\ 25 

In case the action does not proceed to judgment or final order, the fees hereto- 
fore, or that may hereafter be payable, but not exceeding in the whole the said sum. 

For issuing writ of execution, warrant of attachment, or warrant for arrest of 

delinquent, and entering the return thereto 50 

Bailiff. 

For all services rendered in serving summons and making return, and any 
other service that may be necessary, before the judgment is entered by 
the clerk or pronounced by the judge, mileage excepted 40 

For enforcing execution, schedule of property seized, or attached, bond, where 
necessary, and all other necessary acts done by him, after seizure, mile- 
age excepted, if money made or case settled, after levy ^ 1 00 

(Necessary disbursements incurred in the care and removal of property shall be 
allowed, to be first allowed by the clerk, subject to the approval of the judge. 



EEPORT 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES 



OISTT^^E^IO 



1899. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




TORONTO: 

Printed and Published by L. K. Cameron. 

Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty, 
ISOO. 




WARWICK BROS & RUTTER, Printers, 
TORONTO. 



SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



To the Honourable Sir Oliver Mowat, K. 0. M. G., Lieutenant Governor of the Province 
of Onfario : 

Sir, — I have the honour to present the seventeenth annual report of the Inspector 
of Legal Offices for the Province of Ontario upon the affairs and conditions of the Oounty 
Judicial Officers throughout the Province for the year ending the Slst December, 1899. 

The following officers have been appointed during the year : — 

Surrogate Judges. His Honour, Alexander David Hardy, Judge of the County 
Court of the County of Brant to be Surrogate Judge of the said County, in the room and stead 
of His Honour Stephen Jatres Jones, rebigned, gazetted 7th October; Archibald Bain Mc 
Galium, of the village of Paisley, in the Oounty of Bruce, Esquire, Judge of the District 
Court of the Provisional Judicial District of Manitoulin, to be Judge of the Surrogate 
Court cf the said Provisional Judicial District of Manitoulin, gazetted 4th November; 
Daniel Frazer MacWatt, of the town of Barrie in the Oounty of Simcoe, Esquire, Judge 
of the County Court of the County of Limbton. to be Surrogate Judge of the said Oounty 
( f Lambton in the room and stead of His Honour Charles Robinson, resigned. 

Sheriffs. — Ttomas Dawson, Esquire, to be Sheriff of the County of Frontenac, in 
the room and stead of William Ferguson, Esquire, deceased ; E. B. Jackson, Esquire, to 
be Sheriff cf the Provisional Judicial District of Manitoulin; James F. Middleton, 
Esquire, to be Sheriff of the County of Wentworth, in the room and stead of John W. 
Muiton, Esquire, deceased. 

Local Masters. — John Mudie, Esquire, to be Local Master cf the High Oourt of 
Justice in and for the Oounty of Frontenac, in the room and stead of John Machar, 
Esquire, Q.C , deceased ; His Honour Judge McCallum to be Local Master of the High 
Court of Justice for the District of Manitoulin ; His Honour Judge Chappie to be Local 
Master of the High Oourt of Justice for the District of Eainy River. 

Crown Attorneys and Clerks of the Peace, — A. J. Wilkes, Esquire, Q. C, as 
Crown Attorney and Clerk of the Peace for the Oounty of Branb, in the room and stead 
of G. R, Van Norman, Esquire, Q. 0., resigned ; Hamill H. Deroche, Esquire, Q. C, as 
Crown Attorney and Oleik of the Peace for the united counties of Lennox and Adding- 
ton, in the room and stead of S. 0. Warner, Esquire, resigned; James W. Cashman, 
Esquire, as District Crown Attorney and Clerk of the Peace for the District of Manitou- 
lin ; H. E Irwin, Esquire, to be Clfrk of the Peace for the Oounty of York, in the room 
and stead of T. H. Bull, Esquire, resigned; A. G. MacKay, Et quire. Crown Attorney of 
the Oounty of Grey, became Clerk of the Peace for said County on the death of William 
Armstrong, Esquire. 

[3] 



THE REPORT OF THE ' [ No. 30 



Local Registraes, etc. — W. A. Bishop, Esqutre, to be Local Registrar of the 
High Court of Justice, Clerk of the County Court, and Registrar of the Surrogate Court 
for the County of Grey, in the room and stead of George Inglis, Esquire, deceased ; W. 
S. Francis, Esquire, to be Local Registrar of the High Court of Justice for the District 
of Manitoulin ; W. C. Moscrip, Enquire, to be Local Registrar of the High Court of 
Justice, Clerk of the County Court, and Registrar of the Surrogate Court for the County 
of Perth, in the room and stead of James Macfadden, Esquire, resigned. 

Coroners. — William Tyndall, of the Town of Walkerton, in the County of Bruce, 
Esquire, to be Associate Coroner within and for the said County of Bruce ; Willis A. 
Sargent, of the Village of Spring Brook, in the County of Hastings, Esquire, M.D , to be 
Associate Coroner within and for the said County of Hastings ; John Mill Piper, of the 
City of London, in the County of Middlesex, Esquire, M.D., to be an Associate Coroner 
within and for the said County of Middlesex, in the room and stead of John Richard 
Flock, Esquire, M.D., deceased ; John Patrick Boyle, of the Tillage of Casselman, in the 
County of Russell, Esquire, M. D., to be an Associate Coroner within and for the said 
County of Russell ; Horace Bascom, of the Town of Wybridge, in the County of Ontario, 
Esquire, M. D., so be an Associate Coroner within and for the said County of Ontario ; 
James Archibald McKim, of the Village of Comber, in the County of Essex, Esquire, 
M. D , to be an Associate Coroner within and for the said County of Essex, in the room 
and stead of John Westley Sifton, Esquire, M. D.; Alan Bowman Gram wood, of the 
Village of Sutton West, Esquire, M. D., in the County of York, to be an Associate 
Coroner within and for the said County of York ; Robert Loran Stewart, of the Village 
of Britton, in the County of Peel, Esquire, M. D., to be an Associate Coroner within and 
for the taid County of Peel, in the room and stead of William Boman, Esquire, M. D., 
deceased ; William John McKenzie, of the Village of Kingsville, in the County of Essex, 
Esquire, M. D,, to be an Associate Coroner within and for the said County of Essea ; 
Peter Steward McLaren, of the Village of Cobden, in the County of Renfrew, Esquire, 
M. D., to be an Assojiate Coroner within and for the eaid County of Renfrew ; John 
Hubat McConnelJ, of the City of Toronto, in the County of York, Esquire, M. D., to be 
an Associate Coroner within and for the said County of York ; Frank Innes Farley, of 
the Town of Trenton, in the County of Hastings, Esquire, M. D., to be an Associate 
Coroner within and for the said County of Hastings ; Morley Currie, of the Town 
of Picton, in the County of Prince Edward, to be an Associate Coroner within and 
for the said County of Prince Edward; William James McNichol, of the City of 
Hamilton, in the County of Went worth. Esquire, M. D., to be an Associate Corocer 
within and for the said County of Went worth. 

Police Magistratbs.i — Thomas Ross, ot the Town of Hawkesbury in the County of 
Prescott, to be a Police Magistrate within and for the Town of Hawkesbury, without 
salary ; Elihu Burritt Smith, of the Village of Ailsa Craig in the County of Middlesex, 
to be Police Magistrate in and for said village, and also for the other municipalities com- 
prisiog the North Riding of the said County of Middlesex, in the room and stead of John 
Hall Priestly, Esquire, deceased, without salary ; John Robertson Blake, of the Town of 
Gait in the County of Waterloo, Esquire, Barrister- at-Law, to be Police Magistrate in and 
for the said Town of Gait, without salary, in the room and stead of William Sutherland 
TurnbuU, Esquire, resigned ; William Steers, of the Town of Lindsay in the County of 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF LEGAL Oj^ FICES. 6 

Victoria. Esquire, Barrister-at-Law, to be Police Magistrate in and for the said Town ; 
James Hall, of the Village of Merriton in the County of Lincoln, Esquire, to be Police 
Magistrate in and for the Village of Port Dalhousie ; Samuel Entwistle Mitchell, of the 
Town of Pembroke in the County of Renfrew, Esquire, to be Police Magistrate in and 
for said town, and also to be Police Magistrate for the territory embraced in the Town- 
ships of Alice, Eraser, McKay, Petwawa, Staflford, Pembroke, Wilberforce, and West- 
meath in the County of Renfrew, without salary ; Charles Eustace Higgins, of the Village 
of Beamsville in the County of Lincoln, Esquire, to be Police Magistrate in and for the 
said Village of Beamsville, without salary , Joseph Farrer, of the Town of Parry Sound, 
Esqaire, to be Police Magistrate in and for the said Town of Parry Sound, and also to be 
Police Magistrate, without salary, in and for the territory embraced in the townships and 
other territory in the District of Parry Sound lying west of the to'wnships and other terri- 
tory through which the Northern Pacific Junction Railway passes, that is to say, for the 
said District of Parry Sound without the limits of the Town of Parry Sound for which 
William Henry Spencer is not Police Magistrate ; Henry Taylor, of the Town of Perth, 
Esquire, to be Police Magistrate in and for the said Town of Perth, without salary ; 
James Robinson, of the Town of Rat Portage in the District of Rainy River, Etquire, to 
be Police Magistrate in and for the municipalities of Rat Portage and Keewatin ; Patrick 
Kerman Ilalpin, of the Town of Prescott, in the County of Grenville, Esquire, Barris' 
ter-at-Law to be Police Magistrate in and for the Town of Prescott, in the room and 
stead of Thomas Richard Melville, Esq., resigned; George O'Keefe, of the City of Ot- 
tawa, in the County of Carlton, Esquire, to be Police Magistrate in and for the City 
of Ottawa, in the room and stead of Martin O'Gara, Esquire, deceased ; James Parr, of the 
Township of Cartwright, in the Township of Durham, Esquire, to be Police Magistrate 
in and for the said Township of Cartwright, without salary 3 Henry Gorman, of the 
Town of Sarnia, in the County of Lambtftn, Enquire, to be Police Magistrate in and for 
the said Town of Sarnia, in the County of Lambton, Esquire, to be Police Magistrate in 
and for the said Town of Sarnia ; James Johnston Anderson Weir, of the Town of Ber- 
lin, in the County of Waterloo, Esquire, to be Police Magistrate in and for the Towns of 
Berlin and Waterloo, without salary ; Francis Love of the City of London, in the County 
of Middlesex, Esquire, Barrister-at-Law, to be Police Magistrate in and for the said City 
of London, in the room and stead of Ephraim James Parke, Esquire, Q.C., deceased; 
James Barr, of the Village of Norwich, in the County of Oxford, Esquire, to be Police 
Magistrate in and for the said Village of Norwich, fro tern., without salary. 

Sheriff's Offices. 

The business of the SheriflF's Offices continues to be most satisfactorily performed. 
Complaints of any kind are now very rare. Returns of executions and payment over 
of moneys collected thereunder are promptly made, and the books are generally so kept 
that at a glance the various steps taken under executions are fully shown. The incomes 
of the offices generally show a slight increase over those of the past year, but they still 
are small compared with the importance and dignity of the office. 

In Appendix A. I have set out, in tabulated form, the statistical returns made by 
the Sheriffs for the year 1899. 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 30 



Local Masters. 

The busitess done in the offices of the Local Masters shows no improvement in. 
volume over past yearc, but it has all been promptly doae. There have been no com- 
plaints, during the past year, of delays in references before these officers. 

In Appendix B. I have Sbt out, in tabulated form, the statistical returns of the busi- 
ness done in the office of the Local Masters for the year 1899. 

Local Registrars, Deputy Clerks of the Crown, and .County Court Clerks. 

The work of these officers has generally been satisfactory during the year. In one 
or two instances only have I had to complain of delays in the conduct of business. I 
have, as is the case every year, had to settle questions of practice that are constantly 
arising. The more important of these questions that are of general interest I furnish to 
the President of the County Clerks Association, and they are embodied in his report. In 
this way the decision is brought to the attention of all the Clerks. 

I have before drawn attention to the importance of the immediate payment into the 
Accountant's office of fees received for The Reporters Fund. There ia still comp'aint 
made that these returns are not promptly made. The returns of judgments to the Central 
Office have been sent in more promptly, but in some cases I have had to wiite to the 
Officers to remind them of this duty. Last year I drew attention to the importance of 
Rule 556, and I am glad to say that it has since been more carefully observed. In my 
report last year I made suggestions in this matter, and would again impress the officers 
with the necessity of a careful observance of the rules. In County Court Appeals it often 
happens that the stenographers notes of the evidence are not properly indexed, and the 
Judges have a difficulty in referring to difficult passages of the evidence. It is only 
necessary, I think, to draw attention to this. If the Clerks will see that all typewritten 
copies of evidence for use on appeals are indexed for ready reference, I am sure the Re- 
porters will be glad to make their copies as useful as possible. 

Appendix 0. is a return of all business in the offices of Local Registrars, Deputy 

Registrars, and Deputy Clerks of the Crown for the year ending 31st December, 1899, 

and Appendix D. is a tabulated return of business done in the County Court Clerk's 

offices for the same period. 

Surrogate Registrars. 

The business of the Surrogate Court has been increasing for some years past. The 
Registrars are generally very careful and efficient officers, and only in one or two cases 
have I had occasion to interfere. In matters of charges I have been able to settle any 
questions that have been raised. 

In Schedule E. I have set out the business done in these Courts during the year 

1899. 

General Remarks. 

The annual returns this year have been promptly made, except in one or two cases. 
In these few instances I have had to write several times before getting the information 
required. There has been, as usual, a good deal of correspondence during the year, and 
several informal investigations have been held. During the year, by Order-in-Council 
Coroners have been added to the offices under my inspection. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 7 

The amounts paid to the Provincial Treasurer, under R. S. 0. Cap. 18 by the fol- 
lowing officers, have been as follows : 

Local Registrars, etc $3,697 93 

County Attorneys, etc 288 18 



5,986 11 



I have required new securities to be given by several Officers when the old bonds 
had become unsatisfactory from any reason. 

In Appendix F. I have set out a detailed statement of the fees and emoluments 
of the several officers, and to this table I have added columns giving the information 
formerly entered in a separate schedule, and showing the sources from which these Offi- 
cers derive their incomes. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, your most obedient servant, 

JAS. FLEMING. 
Oegoode Hall Toronto, February 13, 1900. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix A. — Oontaining in tabulated form Statistics as returted 





Number of Services of Writs of — 


Counties or diatricts. 


Summons. 


Subpoena. 


Order for arrest 


Miscellaneous 
process. 






H.O.J. 

4 
11 

8 
104 

7 

11 
14 
24 
12 

7 

2 
17 
23 
16 

6 
13 
24 
30 
19 
19 

8 

7 


0.0 

3 

12 

10 

47 

9 

11 

12 

11 

6 

4 

3 

10 

18 

10 

10 

5 

20 

12 

15 

16 

3 

3 

7 

5 

2 

9 

2 

3 

5 

5 

12 

4 

13 

12 

11 

11 

4 

4 

14 

7 

5 

26 

4 

51 

466 


H.C.J. 

""'46" 

16 

40 

2 

8 

70 
2 

\ 

3 
5 
1 

21 
5 
7 

13 
6 
8 

45 

23 
1 

47 
6 
3 

32 
4 
5 
7 
4 
2 
6 
6 
1 
9 

10 
3 
1 

5' 

7 

4 

1 

14 

498 


C.C. 

6 

114 

31 

32 

7 

24 

125 


H.C.J. 


C.C. 


H.O.J. 


0.0. 


1 


Algoma 


1 


1 


2 

4 
4 
4 
1 
1 
4 
4 
1 


17 


Brant 


181 


Bruce 

Carlton 

DuflFerin 





3 


3 
45 


T5 

272 

26 


Elgin 

Essex J 


1 


"3 

1 


3 

10 
4 
4 


59 
238 


Frontenae 


46 


Grey 


17 




44 


Haldimand 


1 







23 


Halton 


10 
36 
13 
44 
33 
12 
16 

"24" 
91 
60 
17 
90 
27 
8 
40 







1 


19 


Hastings , 






6 1 


74 


Huron 

Kent 


3 


1 


3 

19 

4 

3 

8 

11 

10 

6 

3 


2 
2 
3 
1 
4 
5 
4 
4 


64 
112 


Lambton 





1 


62 


Lanark 


41 


Leeds and Grenville 






85 


Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 


i' 


1 


65 
81 


Middlesex 


181 


Muskoka 






97 


M ipissing 






28 


Norfolk 








2 

■ ■4' 

7 

'""% 

""8 
1 
1 
9 

... ^. 

1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
9 


146 


Northumberland and Durham 

Ontario 


17 
7 
18 
9 
14 
11 
17 

11 
4 
7 

11 

14 

19 

7 

6 

13 

11 

7 

36 

10 

126 

761 


1 





9 

24 

18 

1 

2 

6 

8 

4 

3 

9 

2 

14 

4 

7 

2* 

4 
3 
5 
7 
38 


66 

48 


Oxford 






124 


Parry Sound 






16 


Peel 


15 

6 
2 

4 

1 
55 

2 
29 

6 


i 

1 




42 


Perth 

Peterborough 


36 
44 


Prescott and Russell , 






34 








19 


Rainy River 







99 


Renfrew 

Simcoe 


1 
1 


""2 


29 
83 


Stormont, Dundas & Glengarry 

Thunder Bay 


50 






26 


Victoria 






1 


13 


Waterloo 


i 

19 
20 

1 

189 

4 




32 








47 


Wellington 


i' 

2' 




43 


York. !..'.; ■■■.;;■ 


75 
213 
244 








1,242 


13 


14 


314 


110 


3,418 







1899 1 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



by the different Sheriffs for the year ending 31st December, 1899. 







Number of Writs of Execution received. 





a 
_o 

"> 

s 

2 


17 

6 

15 

31 

3 

19 

21 

10 

20 

3 

9 

13 

11 

32 

33 

6 

19 

5 

6 

27 

7 

14 

15 

21 

13 

12 

5 

5 

7 

15 

11 


Number of renewals of Writs of 
Execution received. 


Number of 
Estreats re- 
ceived. 


Against both 
lands and goods 


Against lands 
only. 


Against goods 
only. 


Against both 
goods and land. 


Against lands 
only. 


H.C.J. 


c.c. 

'"'i' 
""2 




H.J.C. 


C.C. 


H.J.C. 


CO. 


H.C.J, 


C.C. 


H.C.J. 


C.C. 


H.C.J. 


C.C. 




6 

8 
11 
44 

3 
16 
17 
21 
18 

8 


18 

5 

9 

30 

8 

18 

20 

11 

14 

5 


9 
3 
2 
6 

5 
2 

1 
1 
4 

7' 

3 
5 
2 
2 
2 


10 

1 

"'ii' 
2 


2 

2 

- 6 


6 


....... 


1 






1 


: 






4 



































3 









3 

1 








1 


2 
1 


1 


"2 

■"1 

5 

12 

""i 


8 

i" 

7 
1 

4* 

1 


2 
3 








6 1 4 










i 


27 

13 

10 

13 

9 

14 

15 

17 

25 

2 

3 

15 

13 

10 

18 

5 

12 

12 

17 

6 

7 

14 

11 

23 

20 

13 

8 

9 

16 

13 

38 

38 

175 


22 

13 

24 

19 

10 

15 

7 

16 

22 

4 

5 

5 

17 

9 

9 










2 









1 
"1 


3 










2 


i 






1 
















4 
1 

1 


6 

""2 










2 


2 
























1 
















1 






1 
5 
9 
3 
4 

"5' 


1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
5 


2 


3 






4 


4 
2 




2 






1 








7 
15 

8 

5 
38 
13 
14 
16 
10 

7 
12 
11 

6 
20 
18 
90 










1 












2 


























10 


2 

13 
2 
4 
8 
1 

i' 

17 

13 
93 

241 


1 




1 




9 













47 

9 

2 

14 

5 

13 

13 

22 

19 

13 

598 


2 

"io' 
4 


2 

1 
1 


5 










2 










1 
2 
1 


: 










" i 
10 

14 

26 


2 

8 
25 
97 


1 







1 











1 








7 


2 

8 


1 
2 


4' 

5 




19 
61 




4 


798 


653 


19 


6 


139 


172 


132 



10 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 30 



Appendix A. — Containing in tabulated form Statistics as returned by the 





No. of Renewals of 
Writs, etc.— Con. 


Other Writs of Execution 
received. 


iN umber of 
of 


• 
Counties or districts. 


Against goods 
only. 


§ 



a 
,0 

'> 

s 

a 
2 


Possession. 


Ca. Sa. 


Against goods. 




H. C. J. 


CO. 


H. C. J. 


CO. 


H. 0. J. 


CO. 


H. 0. J. 

1 
1 


CO. 


Algoma 


I 


2 


4 

3 








Brant 


1 

1 
2 






1 




Bruce 












Carlton 






8 

14 
3 

■■■■4 










1 


Dufierin 
















Elgin 






3 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
3 
I. 
2 


1 
3 
1 






2 




Essex 




3 

2 






1 


Frontenac 


5 








1 


Grey 






1 




Haldimand 














1 


Halton 






' 2 
3' 


""i 






6 




Hastings 


3 


"i 

""2 


1 


Huron 








Kent 


1 


1 
1 

1 










Lambton 






1 




Lanark 




* * * * * 


Leeds and (rrenville 








2 






2 
1 
2 
2 




Lennox and Addington 
















Lincoln 








2 

1 








Middlesex 

Muskoka 


1 


2 












Nipissing . , 






1 

1 
9 
4 
1 
7 
4 
2 
5 


2 












Norfolk 
















Northumberland and Durham 


1 





5 












Ontario 








i 
1 




Oxford 






2 
1 

1 
1 
1 










Parry Sound 














Peel 








1 




1 

3 




Perth 




1 




Peterborough 
























2 
1 


1 


Prince Edward 








:::::::: :::::: 
















2 
1 

2 
2 
1 

1 








4 


Renfrew 








...... 

1 


1 




. 




Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry . . 


1 
1 
2 


3 1 

1 


15 




2 
2 


2 
1 








1 


Victoria 




9 
1 


1 




















1 
2 
1 
4 


1 


Welland 






3 

1 
1 

6 

8 

70 








1 










1 






3 


Wentworth , 






6 

8 
9 






1 




i 

6 

1 
22 


■■■4" 










Toronto 


7 
20 


2 
4 




3 
43 


2 


Totals 


21 


123 


3 


22 







INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES 



11 



different Sheriffs for the year ending 31st December, l^'^^. -Continued. 



Sales under Writs 
execution. 



Agairst lands. 



H. 0. J. 



C. C. 



O 



t< 



(eO 



S'O 



15 



12 



13 



S'S 



17 



78 



48 






§0? 



Amounts endorsed on Writs of Execution. 



For Debt or Damages. 



30 



H.C.J. 



4,088 11 
16,004 89 

9,526 06 
35,101 70 
838 37 
16,204 39 
13,789 26 
17,582 84 
10,080 47 

3,497 87 

2,112 58 

350,905 85 

15,746 06] 

5,318 191 
30,432 89 j 

1,612 68 
12,024 07 
31,167 25 
15,887 58 
26,877 931 

1.767 00 

1,139 44 

4,342 12 

14,955 03 

63,397 49 

108,309 18 

4,043 00 
19,805 53 
10,242 38 
13,519 65 

6,605 84 

12,741 99 

106,500 87 

6,033 25 

44.092 70 

122,215 56 

23,784 98 

13,784 18 

6,820 13 
14,148 99 

5,092 69 

52,067 48 

55,324 01 

459,346 09 




1,788,878 52 



For Taxed Costa. 



3,000 89 
1,228 68 
1,906 75 
8,269 75 
2,388 63 
3,172 59 
3,086 51 
2,600 72 
2,362 28 
727 15 
1,032 18 
4,282 69 
3,883 02 
7,027 60 
5,337 37 
2,468 70 
4,209 82 
2.035 08 
3,357 49 
5,177 98 
713 40 
1,107 97 
1,673 61 
4,324 89 
2,560 39 
2,306 79 
1,306 00 
169 42 
1,049 66 
3,761 31 
l,3n9 37 
1,568 80 

17,896 92 
2,940 87 
3,679 24 
3,942 04 
3,792 24 
1,985 26 
3,381 77 
1,581 67 
1,081 58 
4.609 03 
5.152 37 

20,550 29 



Div. Ot. 



1,953 57 

404 56 

76 08 

2,709 00 

241 70 

1,698 54 

2,243 43 

898 94 

155 85 

191 63 

1,060 70 

1,204 88 

959 47 



H. C J. 



3,074 67 

837 21 

1,740 40 

302 91 

455 43 

3,004 80 

972 70 

578 95 

1,628 84 

2.127 38 

1,523 50 

1,325 34 



446 21 
496 90 
988 21 



953 73 

866 60 
4,628 62 

686 56 

78 33 

2,091 15 

379 22 



1,162 13 
1,973 83 
3,110 17 
1,023 191 



I 
342 34 
410 39 
648 31 

1,783 42 
188 38 
576 75 

2,269 37 
945 84 

1,356 lb 
489 87 
412 67 

1,382 43 
160 13 
982 45 

1,181 38 
618 59 
786 76 
785 10 
659 38 

1,209 77 

154 83 

77 97 

76 49 

225 86 

220 45 

1,408 64 
283 00 
641 62 

3,013 60 
740 23 
191 19 
508 28 
803 01 
481 26 
984 53 

2,124 54 
527 04 
254 02 
709 69 
620 74 

1,380 51 

1,994 65 
488 81 

8,346 42 



C C. 



$ c. 

856 26 
71 09 
217 69 
1,034 60 
185 20 
897 16 
355 57 
226 59 
237 40 
146 58 
83 40 
808 56 
274 09 
885 83 
762 77 
466 72 
364 78 

136 96 
338 47 
449 62 

276 57 
239 30 
134 87 
369 90 
387 09 
274 84 

48 00 
43 75 

137 86 
660 11 
470 37 

70 14 
1,143 73 
327 04 
794 40 
509 68 
208 79 
126 17 
663 85 

277 45 
146 07 
868 06 
429 12 

2,606 69 



160,000 77 50,254 381 43,431 74j 20,010 98 



12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix A. — Containing in tabulated form Statistics as retarned by the 





CO 

u 
f3 

o 
O 

1 
'> 

Q 

S 

o 


Amount realized by actual Sales under Execution. 


Counties or districts. 


Against goods. 


Against lands. 


*3 

U 

S 

s 

a 




H. C. J. 


1 

c. c. 


H. C. J. 


C.C. 




P 


Algoma 

Brant 


$ c. 

99 02 

43 76 

4 27 

149 47 
12 55 
20 19 
99 66 
74 40 
4 42 
17 77 
59 16 

138 36 


$ c. 

94 20 
24 50 


$ c. 


$ 0. 


$ c. 
2 28 


$ 0. 
4 88 


Bruce . . 








Carlton 


505 47 








Dufferin 








Elgio 


361 07 


" 316'34 
6 25 




""75336 




Essex 




Frontfenac 




""740'6o 
267 00 




Grey 


1,384 70 




Haldimand 


87 25 






Halton 








Hastings . . 

Huron 


4,797 81 


482 12 


1,038 28 




729 51 


Kent 


253 '29 
31 42 

118 89 
22 19 

38 50 


"3,206' 58 

""322'55 

2,610 00 

263 00 

949 54 






389 00 
62 63 




Xiainbton 


1,838 07 
' 82'26 

40 06 






Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 


""236'89 


Lennox and Addington 






114 00 


Lincoln 


3,050 00 
45 00 






Middlesex 






Muskoka .... 


80 57 
5 95 
94 33 
313 75 
57 89 
52 04 




287 33 


Nipissing 








137 66 
20 00 




Norfolk 






142 90 




Northumberland and Durham 






300 00 


Ontario 


180 00 
130 00 








75 00 


Oxford 










Parry Sound 










Peel 


30 10 
35 13 
98 17 


10 21 

318 65 

20,000 00 

145 00 

32 25 




2,126 71 






Perth 








Peterborough 


5.000 00 


15 00 


250 00 




115 47 
""75300 






Pi ince Edward 


54"i5 

36 00 

163 01 

50 

3 10 

195 44 










'75'66 
25 00 


100 00 




Renfrew 




231 00 




246 48 
1,714 62 


290 86 

87 00 

265 25 


172 06 


Stonnont, Dundas and Glengarry 




319 86 











Victoria 










20 00, 333 46 

748 30 lt2 25 








Welland 




3,755 00 
1,663 51 


434 00 
34 85 






122 92 
173 71 


494 88 
873 03 

'"i78'66 


412 37 
18 85 

"'l60'25 




Wentworth 




York 








Toronto 


41 86 




36 00 










Totals 


2,745 94 


39,105 37 


5,806 46 


17,918 40 


1,983 12 


2,720 48 







1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



13 



different Sheriffs for the year ending 31st December, 1899. — Concluded. 



Amounts realized on Executions without 
Sales. 


Amount received for Fines, 
Penalties, etc. 


Amount realized under Writs 
of Ca Sa 


H. C. J. 


CO. 

1 


Div. C. 


H. C. J. 


c. c. 


H. C. J. 


C. C. 


$ c. 
218 00 


$ c. 

473 71 
379 40 
201 00 

2,999 07 
255 61 
125 66 

1,358 76 

325 85 

14 15 


$ c. 

153 25 
102 14 


% 0. 


•S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 






25 00 






63 54 






5,753 86 


608 52 
















221 52 
204 79 










1,776 65 

3,802 01 

363 61 




40 00 






228 84 
124 21 
















123 47 










88 47 


168 66 
655 97 
65 50 
782 77 
355 12 
449 63 
993 32 


100 00 
296 26 
127 34 
220 38 
464 73 




150 00 






2,255 73 
135 00 
















672 20 




50 00 
















10 00 








1,101 53 






















310 24 


671 55 
211 47 












1,483 84 


151 73 





500 00 




























115 06 
358 57 
384 70 
292 03 
4^0 16 












705 40 


99 24 
116 48 
205 28 
176 18 










119 94 




5 98 






403 15 






702 64 




















86 45 


308 30 


69 55 






















65 19 












55 68 














1,368 92 

387 38 


95 55 




















198 41 








6 00 
20 00 






2,319 15 


647 04 52 28 
1 . 
















58 01 


232 04 
1,078 39 


1 212 08 










58 40 




40 00 






1,251 83 










1,425 53 


379 61 


1 495 59 
1 225 48 
I 45 35 




















403 68 


15 00 
591 42 




105 00 






8,566 88 












10 00 


941 98 






34,990 64 


17,130 34 


4,796 77 













14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix B — Being a Return of Bunness transacted by Local Masters throughout the 





Number of Orders made for the following 




Si 








purposes : 




S 


County or District. 


1 i 

o 

a 

_o 

u 

*s 
■§ 

OS 

o 


>> 

2 
a 

o 

S 

"is 

05 
h 

o 

a 
_o 
*3 
'S 

ft 

o 


o3 
as 


a 

&o 
a 

a 

Si 
<D 

a 


E 

B 
<a 

J3 
u 

.s 
a 

u 

<D 

T3 

k. 


a> 




X 

'S 
a> 

a 

tB 

3^ 

.2 "^ 

11 
"5 2 

=«? 




(1) 


(2) 


(3) 


(4) 


(5) 


(6) 


1 Algoma 




1 










2 Brant 


1 











3 Bruce. ,. 










20 


4 Carleton 

5 Dufferin 


2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 


2 




1 


93 

16 

1 


56 


6 Elgin 








10 


7 Essex 


1 

1 
1 




34 










11 


9 Grey 






44 


9 


10 Haldimand 








11 Halton 












12 Hastings 


1 






71 

8 

12 

27 


33 


13 Huron 








14 Kent 


4 
1 


i" 


1 





4 


15 Lambton 












17 Leeds and Grenville 


2 
1 




1 
1 

2 

1 






22 

7 
1 




18 Lennox and Addington 


1 


19 Lincoln 






12 


20 Middlesex 


1 


3 




65 


21 Muskoka . 















1 

1 

19 




23 Norfolk 




2 






24 Northumberland and Durham 








3 


25 Ontario 


1 
2 









26 Oxford 


2 








22 


27 Parry Sound .... 










28 Peel 










41 

41 

56 

9 


1 


29 Perth 


5 
2 


1 








30 Peterborough 


1 
















32 Prince Edward 










2 














7 


34 Renfrew 1 










2 

52 
65 
51 
10 




35 Simcoe ' 


2 
2 








36 Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 






2" 




37 Thunder Bay 






38 Victoria 


2 

1 
















2 


40 Welland 














3 

2 

41 








50 1 
59 


37 




7 












3 




Totals 


29 


4 


759 


329 



1899] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



15 



Province of Ontario during the year ending 31st December, 1899, 



Nnmber of judgments or orders brought into the Masters' Office for taking the following 

accounts, etc. 



i 
1 

a 
"o 

a 
o 

'i 

a 

"s 

< 

(7) 


m 
(D 
<D 

a-2 
§1 

ii 

ll 

if 

s o 

w 

(8) 


•d 

a 

s 

o 

<D 

be 
o 

s 

O 

<c 

§ 

HI 

o 
(9) 


-d 
§ 

o 
m 
bo 
e3 
&C 

a 

O 

s 
& 

a 

<s 
(10) 


<D 
bo 

CS 

u 
o 

0) 

bo 

? 
bo 

o 

a 

u 

=! a 

(11) 


^ Account on any charge or lien 
f^ on land other than mechanics' 
^ liens. 


a 

ID 
13 

_o 

'S 

08 
j3 
u 

03 
T3 

a 

3 

a 

o O 

8<! 

<: 

(13) 


f^ Specific performance. 


'^ Partnership accounts. 


a 
o 

.a 
< 

(16) 


;^ Partition or sale. 


c 
S 

O 

,c 
o 
es 

(B 
u 
.Q . 

,2 « 
"" a 

0; > 

boc 

a » 

(18) 




" ' 2 


2 
8 
1 
'.1 

1 








2 
















1 






















2 
1 




5 




2 






2 




2 




1 








1 












2 


1 


1 

1 





1 










2 

1 
1 




2 
















1 




1 


1 














1 
















1 






1 
4 
















3 


1 
1 



i" 


1 










2 


2 


1 
2 















4 


5 
2 
1 

i" 

2 
2 


















1 












1 




1 






i" 


2 
1 










2 








1 
2 








1 




l" 




1 















2 
2 




2 


1 


1 












1 











1 










1 


2 












1 


















1 




1 


1 


1 




5 


























1 
3 




2 


1 




1 












1 














1 


i" 

6 


5 




2 
1 
1 
1 








1 








3 










2 




4 


3 






































1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 




















2 




1 














1 
















2* 

1 
























1 
























4 






2 




2 












1 


i" 

18 




7 






1 


i" 


1 
1 
1 
3 


1 




4 

2 

11 

78 




4 


4 

1 
4 

41 




3 






5 








3 


1 


3 




1 






50 


15 





12 


4 


29 


3 



16 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix B. — Being a Return of Business transacted bj Local 





Number of Judgments or Orders, etc. — Con- 


County or District. 


6 

a 
o 

s 

a 
(19) 


n3 
u 

a 

> 

> 

s 

(20) 


•6 
£ 

ID 

-a 
•o 

m 
O 

o 

O 

(21) 


•^ Promissory notes and bills of ex- 
J5 change. 


g Bonds, life and fire insurance. 


"S 

42 

to 

1 

a 
(24) 


2 
1 

.2 
'S 

bo 
a 

1 

3 
O" 

(25) 


1 Algoma 














2 Brant 












1 


3 Bruce 












1 


4 Carleton 




2 


1 


1 




■ 


5 Duflferin 






1 




8 Elgin 














7 Essex 














3 


8 Frontenac 

















9 Grey 






1 











10 Haldimand 














11 Halton 
















12 Hastings 




1 












13 Huron 












1 


14 Kent 












1 




16 Lambton 












16 Lanark . 
















17 Leeds and Grenville 
















18 Lennox and Addington 
















19 Lincoln 
















20 Middlesex 














1 


21 Muskoka 
















22 Nipissing 
















23 Norfolk 
















24 Northumberland and Durham 
















25 Ontario 














1 


26 Oxford 














1 


27 Parry Sound 


1 














28 Peel 














29 Perth ... 














1 


30 Peterborough 
















31 Prescott and Russell 

















32 Prince Edward 
















33 Rainy River 
















34 Renfrew 
















35 Simcoe 
















36 Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 
















37 Thunder Bay 
















38 Victoria 
















39 Waterloo 




1 












40 Welland 














41 Wellington 










. . 





1 


42 Wentworth 






i" 

3 










Totals 


1 


4 


1 




2 


9 







1899] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



17 



Masters throughout the Province of Ontario, etc. — Concluded. 



tinned. 














'3 




■3 

a 


ters. 














^ 


X 










t 




^ 

5 





•0 




c3 




* 
§ 










h 






, fl 











-a 

<D 

s 




"0 


08 


2 




Jl 









.22 






S 




(D.r: 


e« S 


XI 










to 
a 




as 


U CD 

° u 


a a 
.2.2 

1^ 


a 




o 


a 

a 


i 


a 
ft 


e3 

CO 








a 




>, 


CS 




m 





u 


a 


^2 


a. 2 




a 


.1 


4) 

> 










3 a 






-w 

(S 


3 


g 


I-:) 


§ 


< 


rt 


(^ 


M 


< 


<J 


< 


<! - 


(26) 


(27) 


(28) 


(29) 


(30) 


(31) 


(32) 


(33) 


(34) 


(35) 














$ c. 


S c. 


$ c. 


S c. 




1 
1 




3 

7 

2 

30 












46 30 




2 

1 
7 


6 

2 

26 




546 51 

77 99 
3,251 77 




114 83 




""44] 4.^4 '88 




22 30 


1 


6 


8 


276 66 


3,029 05 






1 
2 


4 
14 


"ii" 


16 
12 


1,500 00 
4,871 80 


336 37 
508 49 


895 86 
199 86 


101 76 


1 


6 


993 45 




7 


4 


16 


9 


11 
3 

19 


38,902 00 


1,092 62 
478 60 
445 88 


849 80 
240 00 
182 30 


903 75 
178 70 








2 


5 


2 


1,900 00 


291 57 


1 


1 


l" 


5 
3 


1 
1 


t 






120 00 
335 00 


70 26 




15,300 66 


334 13 


121 10 


1 


5 


5 


19 


10 


25 


6,780 00 


2,382 07 


964 00 


1,283 80 


2 




6 


9 


4 


17 


7,925 00 


1,739 00 


1,174 25 


314 72 


3 





4 


5 


3 


9 


1,275 00 


759 50 


513 00 


320 00 






2 


2 


1 


3 


3,500 00 


219 24 


311 00 


143 25 






1 


5 


2 


3 


3,1.^0 00 


359 43 


251 40 


121 64 




1 


4 


5 


10 


5 


2,200 00 


626 62 


300 00 


220 36 





1 


1 


5 


1 


6 


8,880 00 


442 29 


169 00 


387 60 




1 


1 


6 


3 


6 




894 42 


631 75 


391 11 


i 




2 


8 


8 


4 


6,600 00 


508 63 


240 80 


510 00 
51 32 








1 

3 

10 












2 20 


1 




1 
3 






2,460 00 
3,665 00 




433 80 


50 76 


1 


2 


14 


1,569 24 


285 66 


3 




1 


2 




1 


1,300 00 






71 70 


















778 58 





















39 10 






3 
4 


7 
13 


3 


10 

7 


7,855 00 
8,200 00 


1,465 81 




174 68 




2 




404 34 




1 




10 


2 


4 


5,632 50 


353 20 


165 00 


471 50 


2 




2 


4 


1 


6 


1,700 00 

160 61 

5,960 00 


609 54 




65 60 


1 


1 


2" 


3 
6 










147 05 




1 
1 
3 


6 


523 22 




103 75 








5 20 






3 


3 


3 


10,387 50 
6,332 00 


385 03 




144 16 




2 


5 


12 


8 


9 


502 93 


127 50 


389 50 




1 

2 






1 

3 
4 
3 


1 
1 
8 
4 




118 95 
464 96 

894 84 
472 71 




53 25 


1 




7 

9 

10 


274 54 
'""8,440 GO 


101 72 




252 31 

48 00 


387 00 


1 





4 


161 08 


1 




2 


12 


6 


11 


2,261 00 


824 76 


582 75 


1,016 10 




3 


10 


27 


17 


21 


24,438 00 


1,518 98 


382 86 


6t'8 72 


21 


42 


84 


292 


131 


286 


236,304 83 


24,647 73 


9,656 24 


15,078 52 



2 L.O. 



18 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[30 



APPENDIX — A return of all business transacted by Local Registrars, Deputy 









M 






di 




Actions 








o 






a 

o 


T3 


entered for 








CQ 








a 


trial. 














>> 


h 










hi 

J3 






Xi 


H 












. 




73 






Tl 


£ 












(B 






<S 










0) 


0) 


o 






a 
to 


.2 










3 


PU 




to 


<o 


ki 

03 






County or district. 


ID 

a i 




a 


TD 


m 


a 


a 








O ] 


■S 


'a 





•" 


c3 


o 








S 

s 








n 


t3 


n 




>* 






c3 




« 


"3 


s 


o 








s 






s 


h 


09 


•^ 








o 


O 


W 

a 


TS 

s 


.a. 


<i5 

to- tio 


OS 


b 


3 




'S 

^ 


o 


.2 
"5 


54, 


1 


o 


a 


a 

>> 
M 


J3 


Algoma . 


29 




24 


1 






2 


2 


3 


Brant 


44 




40 


1 


a 


21 


5 


6 


4 




39 




Si 


4 


15 


25 


20 


5 i 6 




220 
24 
122 
101 
105 


1 
"" 1 


226 
20 

89 
98 

82 


15 
8 
7 

14 
3 


140 
14 
46 
34 

27 


51 

■"'65' 

44 
49 


91 
6 
49 
62 
19 


22 

4 

10 

17 

4 


61 




4 


Elgin 


13 




22 


Frontenac 


JO 


Grey 


71 

14 

IS 

110 




.52 
10 
14 
92 


3 

3 

1 

14 


24 
5 
5 

65 


4 
10 

7 
24 


13 
3 
1 

10 


7 
1 
3 
4 


11 




4 




1 


Hastings . . . 


22 




65 
67 
64 
45 
61 


2 


59 
57 
fiO 
33 
53 


8 
6 
8 
3 
6 


21 

38 

37 

18 

6 


23 
24 
19 

38 

1 


y 

30 
44 
13 
21 


4 

7 
7 
8 
3 


20 


Kent 


17 




8 




8 


Leeds and (Jrenville 


10 


Lennox and Addington 


51 




43 


5 


38 


7 


34 


10 


7 




49 
163 


1 


41 
162 


6 
15 


29 
152 


23 

118 


4 
20 


9 
41 


9 


Middlesex.. • 


42 




18 
19 




13 
17 


5 
4 


7 
7 


2 
13 


8 

7 


1 



4 


Nipissing 


5 


Norfolk 


23 
67 




24 
35 


4 
11 


f; 

47 


3 

9 


5 
9 


A 


3 


Northumberland and Durham 


15 




27 
68 




22 
65 


1 
4 


14 
54 


7 
35 


8 
46 


3 

8 


8 


Oxford 


14 




5 
25 

77 


""'l' 
1 


6 
24 

80 


3 

3 

10 


6 
27 

47 


3 

27 

77 


5 

6 

59 


2 

1 

13 


3 


Peel 


13 


Perth 


16 




73 




54 


4 


22 


6 


8 


6 


9 




19 
22 
55 
54 




14 
18 
45 
43 


1 

1 

3 

11 


9 

5 

35 

8 


7 

8 

41 

27 


8 
10 
18 

5 


2 
3 

7 
3 


3 




4 




16 


Renfrew 


6 




96 





70 


11 


34 


8 


32 


15 


16 


Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 


111 




94 


4 


64 


60 




13 


22 




19 
24 
66 

47 

1 67 
258 


::::: 


27 
16 
39 
31 
47 
163 


11 

2 
3 
6 
6 
16 


4 

7 
12 
26 
34 

128 


18 

9 

i 22 

27 

4 

82 


8 
7 
22 
16 
26 
55 


1 

...... 

2 
14 
30 


2 




3 




8 


"Welland 


8 




14 


Wentworth 


41 


Totals 


2,704 


7 


1,135 


253 


1,334 


1,048 


1 

824 


321 


515 




1 



1899 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



19 



Registrars and Deputy Clerks of the Grown for the year ending 31st December, 1899 





_j^ 








^ 














3 
o 
JS 




TJ 




3 
c 


C 

® 


-d 














'$ 


s 

3 




«S 


■? 


a 

3 






0" 



id" 




O. 


u 








%* 










3 






IT 


+3 


-*j 


(D 


W3 






<u 


o 


9 


■C 






a 


J3 








TS 


j3 


s 


"O 


a 

<D 


O) 


S 




a 




3 
3 


a 

3 


^ 


ao 


(U 


s 




bo 




g 






^ 




■n 








13 


X 













rs 


s 


c« 




t3 




C3 




























© 




s 


j= 


-S 


^ 


tM 


J3 


« 


3 




iri" 


fM 


•*» 








-*:> 


a 






€(& 






c 


s 


o 
u 


'5 




3 

03 





■o 


u 


u 


U 




**- 


•»-. 


C4_, 


O/ 


^4-1 


t4-l 


«4-l 




> 


> 




o 


o 




■*;* 






















J_J 


.4J 


.^^ 






.,J 


■*J 






U 


s 


a n 


C 


c 


2^ 


C m 


a 





(D 


0) 


lU 


3 -ts 


3 


3 


d 


3 -»^ 


3 


3 


-Q 


^ 


^ 


bc 


o 2 


o 
















a 

3 


g 


S 


•O 


SS 


S 


s 


73 


SS 


S 


a 


3 


3 


*-5 


< 


< 


< 


1-5 


< 


< 


< 


^ 


» 


^ 




S c. 


.f c. 


$ e. 


Z c. 


$ c. 


« c. 




5 


3.927 34 
15,410 58 


189 20 

204 78 


44 56 

58 28 
















14 


5 


593 29 


714 84 


257 30 




1 


3 


5 


10,903 20 


125 61 


33 11 


2 


686 30 


150 11 


109 97 




1 


1 


66 


575,308 09 


1,708 24 


462 87 


61 


13,989 12 


5,387 43 


2,411 91 


4 


2 


7 


1 


314 90 
22,872 50 






3 
16 




108 05 
562 04 


107 92 
199 80 








20 


561 87 


150 28 


162 82 




1 


2 


21 


16,G23 20 


544 53 


154 65 


26 


2,700 25 


1,375 89 


859 98 






3 


31 


30,355 74 


641 28 


198 54 


10 


7,025 19 


756 17 


513 31 




i 


8 


17 


6,683 2t 

466 86 

3,436 74 

49.693 04 


276 26 


66 76 


9 


38S 00 


2,111 18 


1,532 25 








1 


28 90 
59 95 


6 10 
22 53 


5 
I 


2,924 11 


869 25 


182 00 








3 








29 


533 48 


123 95 


22 


2,617 91 


735 28 


339 89 


1 


4 


2 


8 


3,015 70 


239 16 


60 54 


9 


1,461 40 


666 14 


423 89 








8 


3 637 12 


293 77 


120 26 


9 


1,170 00 
4,764 00 


1,372 27 
1,510 02 


673 21 






1 


14 


20,855 86 


434 13 


106 33 


8 


851 71 






5 


7 


6,230 29 


281 42 


82 29 





6,145 04 


1,390 13 


846 46 






1 


19 


42,309 01 


414 82 


127 87 


7 


5,805 18 


1,361 93 


824 06 






4 


15 


14,392 91 
16,486 61 


345 12 


103 03 


2 


40 a 00 


1,312 03 


540 00 






'>. 


12 


553 24 


213 53 


5 


391 29 


855 77 


473 60 






3 


45 


46 632 39 


804 85 


240 43 


19 


5,577 77 


1,108 25 


414 39 


i 




4 


1 


1,118 83 

1,825 49 

987 28 


146'79' 

56 47 


3029' 

19 04 


2 

4 
6 


402 62 

25 

1,912 17 


402 62 

318 37 

1,807 80 


290 42 

187 57 

1,014 28 








8 








6 








9 


12,481 54 


353 95 


68 61 


4 


56 00 


150 84 


141 60 




2 


3 


6 


9,623 29 


121 95 


50 42 


3 


2,000 00 


420 27 


550 44 






2 


12 


8,815 05 


362 81 


55 22 


7 


3,247 73 


1,731 20 


811 13 






2 


' io' 


'6,6i6'42 


"10095' 


2697 


8 


250 00 


642 62 


336 65 






1 


11 


9,970 91 


436 09 


120 05 


19 


5,488 70 


3,379 55 


1,615 86 






2 


2o 


35,322 61 


949 70 


254 86 


9 


3,341 63 


1,770 02 


613 46 




1 


6 


4 


4,560 85 
11,442 72 


138 06 
249 51 


48 81 
72 95 


2 

8 


205 12 
21,284 14 


299 36 
676 85 


140 62 
338 38 








H 


1 




2 


8 


91,267 74 


247 49 


62 81 


4 


11,721 23 


957 S9 


27 53 


1 


1 


2 


12 


8,214 80 


314 57 


106 34 


6 


4,127 59 


615 11 


391 59 






1 


16 


49,888 78 


508 27 


114 52 


9 


11,500 00 


485 20 


195 96 


i 


i 


4 


27 


18,708 69 


791 40 


191 92 


25 


118,808 50 


3,787 03 


940 40 


1 


1 


3 


1 


4,076 39 


■ 59 24 




4 


245 91 


90 22 


20 72 






1 


12 


6.998 92 

5,072 07 

10,748 47 


373 11 
271 03 


116 08 
79 61 


1 
6 




156 45 
801 60 


91 70 
332 54 






1 


15 


2 628 00 




10 


167 15 


65 79 


9 


11^042 65 


239 09 


25 00 






5 


12 


7,980 30 


125 94 


29 32 


8 


130 70 


1,667 29 


797 71 




1 




75 


131,144 49 


2,226 ^9 


637 34 


41 


34.806 20 


6,198 46 


2,796 75 


3 


6 


i? 


629 


1,3.6,450 96 


16,235 98 


4,526 88 


409 


290,022 81 


48,944 12 


23,221 96 


14 


23 


98 



20 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[30 



APPENDIX 0. — A return of all business transacted by Local Registrars, Deputy 



County or district. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton] 

Dufiferin 

Elgin 

Essex ... 

Frontenac 

Grey 

Haldimand 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron . 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark 

Leeds and Grenville 

Lennox and Addington 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland and Durham 

Ontario 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel . . 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Prescott and Russell 

Prince Edward 

Rainy River 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 

Thunder Bay 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 



Totals . 



14 



113 



228 



1 
36 

4 
18 
22 
12 
12 

3 

1 
1" 
13 
12 

5 

6 I 

3 

6 

8 
23 



329 



7 
2 
4 
6 
4 
8 
21 



193 






11 

7 

7 

47 

2 

19 

11 

20 

12 

5 

1 

30 

3 

16 

4 

5 

I 

11 

13 

28 

1 

3 

6 

11 

11 

9 

1 

3 

15 

15 

3 

6 

5 

8 

28 

24 

2 

5 

7 

8 

7 

34 



468 



O 



53 " 



So; 



3o 



1899] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



21 



Registrars and Deputy Clerks of the Crown for the year ending Slst December, 1899. 



g 

1 
_o 

IS 
a »• 

is 
< 


u 

0) 

ID 

J3 

& 

O 

1 

o 
o 

o 

a 

§ 


Amount of money paid into court 
defence. 


Amount of money paid out of court. 


Number of days' sitting of Judge 
with jury. 


0) 

bD 
-a 

o 

ai 
D 



.a 



^j 

■rs 

m 
;m 


ts 

<v 



11 

1.2 


ID 
ED 

"eS 

IB 

t4 

43 


u 

0) 

s 


Amount of jury fees paid County 
Treasurer. 


Fees collected in law stamps by 
Deputy Clerks and Local Registrars. 


Fees colleced in law stamps by 
Deputy Registraro, 


$ c. 


$ 0. 


S c. 


$ c. 




2 

3 

4 

21 






•S c. 

6 GO 
18 00 
15 00 
66 00 
12 00 
30 00 
51 00 
12 00 
21 00 

3 00 

6 00 
12 00 

9 00 
18 00 
18 00 
24 00 

9 00 

30 00 

24 00 

123 00 

3 00 


$ c. 

94 90 
195 50 
201 70 
796 60 

113 60 
527 20 
307 70 
453 15 
451 30 

98 30 
83 90 
1.219 60 
188 10 
252 00 
327 00 
255 80 
263 55 
276 30 

114 60 


S c. 






1,185 00 




6 
6 

11 
4 
7 

13 
3 

5 
2 
7 
7 
4 
6 
7 
6 
6 
5 
27 
4 
3 
4 
9 
3 
5 
3 
1 
6 
6 
4 
3 
8 
5 

3 
7 
2 
4 
5 
4 

10 
18 
























743 58 








287 10 























2 
7 
5 
3 

""6 
4 
9 
3 




















5i 76 
















135 00 


























354 00 
2,100 00 










569 30 
















2,769 03 








115 00 


















3,150 00 
















5 












210 00 
490 30 














2 
8 






67 00 








406 90 1 220 30 












75 30 
102 90 
122 10 








330 00 


300 00 














3 
2 
3 

7 
2 
3 
5 
3 

'"3 






3 00 

42 00 

9 00 

24 00 

6 00 

6 00 

36 00 

18 00 

6 00 

6 00 

9'66" 

42 00 

39 00 

3 00 








208 43 








235 90 
185 50 
193 20 

49 20 
209 70 
.537 »^5 
373 70 

94 70 
J 57 30 
232 50 
209 70 
147 30 
551 30 
895 82 

73 40 
211 90 
247 20 
329 60 
























47 10 






150 00 

























4 00 
903 00 


" '903 go' 




124 24 


























































5 
4 
1 
2 
3 






59 73 


































1 


































6 00 
42 00 
90 GO 












2 

6 












83 GO 




' 




884 30 


690 87 








12,748 87 




124 24 




1 
12,815 04 1.203 00 


257 


138 






897 00 


2,108 10 















22 



THE REPORT Oh' THE 



[No. 30 



Appendix D — Being a return of business transacted by County Court Clerks 









u 










Actions 


i 








s 






'73 




entered for 






T3 




2 

Oh 






.1 




trial. 


a 
o 




s 










m 


m 






43 




m 

a 


§ 

." 


_g 


•6 


S 










T5 


County or District. 


o 
8 


s 


-d 


s 


w 








h 


B 




£ 


u 






t3 . 












S 


a 


<B 




<D 


0) a> 


a 




•^ 











a 


09 


TS 




o 


>. 


■*^ 






o 
m 


Ol 


to t^ 


1 

^ 


O 
1 


.S s 

1-5 


a 

1 


Em 
3 

03 


o 


43 




u 


TS 


■^CQ 


60 


?^ 


"73 O 


cS 






-o 




^ 


O 


< 




a. 


o 


W 


^ 


s~ 


s 


Algoma 


15 
35 




12 
31 








4 

7 


1 
10 


4 
3 


5 


Brant 


1 


14 


15 


8 


Bruce 


31 


2 


21 


3 


12 


21 


2 


1 


4 


7 


Carleton 


107 
16 




81 
13 




28 
3 


23 
13 


19 
4 


8 
2 


9 
1 


51 


Dufiferin 


8 


Elgin 


44 




31 




11 


17 


3 


7 


4 


9 


Essex 


36 


1 


37 


2 


5 


28 


5 


4 


2 


12 


Frontenac 


41 




24 




7 


21 


12 


2 


3 


14 


Grey 


20 


i 


13 




10 




3 


2 


5 


2 


Haldimand . .. 


9 




6 




1 


3 


2 


2 


1 


1 


Halton 


7 




7 




11 


3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


Hastings 


46 


1 


35 


..>... 


18 


14 


8 


3 


2 


10 


Huron 


43 


1 


37 




19 


14 


6 


7 


6 


11 


Kent 


46 




40 




12 


25 


17 


6 


8 


15 


Lambton 


27 


1 


21 




11 


10 


17 


4 


3 


7 


Lanark 


19 




16 




6 


4 


5 


2 


1 


4 


Leeds and Gtenville 


37 




30 




5 


3 


3 


1 


5 


16 


Lennox and Addington 


16 




12 




7 


22 


4 


3 




8 


Lincoln 


21 
20 




14 
17 


7 


3 

6 


10 
12 


3 
1 


1 
2 


2 
2 


7 


Manitoulin 


7 


Middlesex . . . . 


125 1 


87 




18 


27 


9 


5 


10 


33 


Muskoka 


3 




2 






8 


^ 








W ipissing 


18 




9 


1 


3 


8 


1 


2 


3 


3 


Norfolk 


13 

27 


.... 


10 

10 


'" 4 


4 
12 


2 
19 


""ll 


2 
3 



2 


6 


Northumberland and Durham 


6 


Ontario 


14 




11 




6 


9 


4 


2 


1 


4 


Oxford 


31 




28 




12 


16 


5 


5 


3 


10 


Parry Sound ~. 


5 




6 




3 


6 


2 




9 




Peel 


11 




11 




4 


12 


13 




3 


1 


Perth 


39 


1 


33 




29 


7 


16 


7 


10 


9 




35 




24 


1 


16 


4 


5 


5 


3 


6 


Prescott and Russell 


10 




6 




10 


9 


2 


2 




1 




6 




9 




2 


7 


2 


1 




5 


Rainy River 


77 




76 




41 


77 


10 


6 


17 


9,7 




44 




35 


1 


10 


12 


2 


2 


7 


22 


Sinicoe 


43 




20 


2 


17 




15 


5 


4 


9 




45 




33 




17 


36 


3 


3 


8 


11 


Thunder Bay 


33 




27 


1 


9 


33 


9 


1 


5 


5 




17 


1 


17 


1 


4 


6 


5 


3 


2 


5 


Waterloo 


37 




28 




22 


8 


11 


3 


7 


13 




10 




6 




1 


6 


4 


1 


1! 3 


Wellmgton 


35 




31 




17 


26 


7 


4 


7 


7 




97 




73 




25 


61 


7 


7 


6 


35 


York 


504 


2 


401 


8 


216 


360 


50 


41 


105 


167 


Totals 


1,915 


12 


1,491 


32 


687 


1,017 


319 


180 


272 


591 



1899] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAfi OJ^TICES. 



23 



throughout the Province of Ontario during the year ending Slat December, 



be 

T3 
3 

" m 

o o 
o 

2 => 

O fl 


u 
<a 

a 
s 

X 

2 

O 

o 

O 

H 


<t> 
& 

w 
C 

s 

U 

'■5 
'a 

1 


<v 

"S 

T3 

1 
S) 

a 

<D 

s 

'a 
s 
•-» 


so 

3 

o 
^ o 

fl 42 

P 3 

o o 

..- 

o a 


-a 

3 
« 

X 

cS 

o 
u 


73 

43 

s 

!S 

S 

43 

o 


c 

<u 

S 

60 

S 

o 

h 
SI 

s 

3 

a 

43 
O 

H 


a 
'3 
bo 

eS 

a 
_o 

3 . 
u m 
01 -a 

S o 

3 6C 


(D 

3 

.2 

i 

w 

hi 


'an 

B 

1 
o 

a 

= 4i 
J^ 

OS <4-> 

U D 

'^■^ 

U 


$ c. 

1,903 06 
2,301 89 
1,374 03 
12,546 91 
2,596 61 


■S c. 

161 25 

148 93 
115 60 
920 81 

141 30 

149 98 
294 45 

142 59 
49 22 
26 67 
10 85 

194 91 
214 52 
446 15 
117 88 
68 39 
269 95 
160 84 
181 06 
146 13 
571 22 


$ c. 

41 46 
47 50 
25 13 

235 88 
56 30 
37 85 
44 89 
49 80 
10 94 
4 91 
3 02 
52 96 
68 09 
89 20 
30 44 
16 34 
82 15 
46 48 

42 OG 
29 80 

125 36 


2 
6 
3 


$ c. 

1,295 00 
25 00 
50 no 


•*? c. 

288 64 
231 06 
323 68 
1,267 94 
152 20 
585 22 
273 81 
196 55 
329 11 
125 70 
43 90 
314 94 
146 10 
645 62 
562 72 
174 22 
223 10 
161 11 


$ c. 

194 48 

82 35 

172 64 

504 48 

51 16 

261 79 

51 31 

98 88 

159 19 

3i 97 

34 98 

157 65 

64 90 

296 44 

236 77 

115 92 

124 44 

43 20 

«?37 79 


7 

13 

10 

62 

9 

18 

17 

17 

6 

3 

2 

12 

13 

20 




3 

10 
40 

5 

15 
8 

18 
7 
3 
2 

15 

8 

17 




111 1,308 97 
11 100 43 
8 29 75 
8 S6S 71 






2,556 67 
2,437 37 










4,323 00 

306 42 

67 13 


4 

2 
1 
2 


340 00 
243 81 
311 55 
175 65 
inn nn 




7 


251 18 
2,636 01 
2,902 35 
4,433 60 
2,427 34 

976 87 






2 1 634 70 
5 fi9l7 dO 






4 

1 

9 


85 00 
60 00 


11! 7 
4 5 

20 9 

9| 6 

9 

11 13 

39 30 
11 2 




5 


4,750 73 






1.914 13 
2,359 43 


1 



15 00 


8 


642 30 


4 

6 


302 00 

458 73 
109 81 


503 02 




8,712 23 


417 00 96 89 

88 53' 47 23 

279 36] 117 51 










733 56 
2,125 16 


43 80 
103 66 

92 22 

63 48 
176 62 
138 72 

43 75 
225 27 
106 01 


7 90 
23 28 
23 57 
27 53 

46 32 

47 50 
16 25 
67 34 


3 


300 00 


6 
6 
7 
5 
11 


6 

t 

15 
14 






1,624 68 
1,320 22 
3,478 48 


i 


<ia 19 


4^ 62 
44 60 
11 55 






1 
1 


259 53 1 36 42 
545 00 49 85 

1 






40 00 
2,144 74 
2 120 21 


1 

5 
6 
2 
4 

18 
5 

6 

1 
1 
2 
1 
6 
6 
61 


120 00 

1,274 13 578 46 

1,209 10 647 22 

88 44 298 01 

323 16 235 46 
4 112 99 "S "^^ 


"" 27339 
381 47 
214 00 
107 115 
338 82 
134 55 


2 
14 
11 

3 

9 
45 
27 

9 
17 

6 

6 
15 

4 

13 

41 

228 


'"ll 

7 

2 

3 

20 

10 

10 

16 

4 

5 

8 

6 

9 

22 

167 










316 16 


38 48 If; 14 






1,665 34 

19,929 59 

6,232 96 

2,199 04 


94 ?8 
634 84 
480 52 
179 16 
211 25 


26 08 
146 37 
176 96 

47 31 






528 62 


315 74 


.... 




3,123 19 
1,556 89 

904 40 
4,345 96 

645 15 


503 32 
189 50 

40 00 
38S 00 

26 22 

941 23 

776 81 

6,232 23 


872 11 

67 11 

178 28 

361 84 

10 00 

514 91 

538 21 

4 942 56 


329 82 

36 41 

105 96 

121 08 

"" 30730 

227 86 

1 nK9 QQ 




41 42 8 67 
214 41 1 91 50 
224 58; 80 90 

39 39' in n? 


.. .. 


8 
4 






1,557 64 

8,973 60 

43,041 86 


140 27 

779 59 

2,539 32 


33 63 
248 53 
571 19 








2 




1 




170,498 09 


11,143 74 


941 


204 


24,889 79 


1 
17,781 06 6,928 45 


789 


575 


29 



24 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 30 



County or District. 


o 
'% 

s 
.2 
.a 

O 

IS 

il 
as 


to 

<D 

J3 
X! 

o 

m 
1 

O 

.a § 
< 


43 

a 
o 
O 
o 

"3 

11 

a & 

< 


■§ 
o 

•a 
*3 
ft 

a 
o 

a 

o 
a 1: 

O O 

SO 


-a 
s 

"o 
be 

a 


bo 
-o 

3 

"o 

a 

m 

!l 

43 

II 


a 

3 



bo 
a 

49 

'S 

73 

a 

sO 




•»:> 

T! 

'§ 
ft 

a 
3 
*" ^; 

>Ȥ 

ss 

43 ^ 
aa 
3 a 



ao 


a 

a 
43 

u 
(S 
ft 

%> 

a 

3 


Amount of money paid in there- 
under. 


Algoma 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 






4 

7 
7 

17 
5 

10 
5 
7 

16 
3 
5 
7 

12 

12 
8 
5 
4 
4 
5 
3 

18 
2 
6 
4 
8 
5 

11 
4 
8 
7 
8 
5 
3 

10 
9 

12 
4 

10 
5 

10 

4 

9 

9 

109 

426 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Brant 






100 00 


100 00 






15 00 
1 50 

12 00 
3 00 

10 50 
6 00 
3 00 
3 00 
3 00 

"4'50 

10 50 

9 00 

6 00 

3 00 
1 50 

4 50 
1 50 

"7 50 






Bruce 












509 94 


Carleton 






59 67 
288 00 


"288"66 


9 






Duff erin 










Elgin 










Essex 


















Frontenac 


















Grey 

Haldimand 


772 33 44 71 


95 07 


95 07 














Halton 














.... 










15 00 










Huron 














100 57 


Kent 










4 






Liambton 


2,711 21 


Ill 02 


"i87'6o 

66 50 

45 00 

282 37 


200 00 
"66 50 






Lanark 






Leeds and Grenville 




21 70 






Lennox and Addington 


681 41 






Lincoln 


282 37 








Manitoulin 










Middlesex 


















Muskoka 






191 67 


191 67 






Nipissing , . 






3 00 
3 00 
1 50 
3 00 
7 50 






Norfolk 
























125 00 


125 00 










Ontario 






Oxford 


















Parry Sound 




7 00 


7 00 










Peel ... 






4 50 

10 .50 
7 50 
3 00 


... 




Perth 






146 00 


140 00 


















Prescott and Russell 






100 00 


























Rainy River 






569 25 
463 17 


169 00 
463 17 


'"'4 


""% 


'e 00 
7 50 
4 50 
1 50 
4 50 

16 50 
1 50 
6 00 

10 50 

61 50 














Simcoe 










Thunder Bay 


1,220 '50 
242 25 


73 '97 


86 57 


86 57 










'"35'66 












Waterloo 








4 


637 90 








184 61 


Wellington 








180 00 

15 00 

1,266 75 


'"'6 


"*3 




York 


2,421 47 


30 57 


15 00 
1,103 79 


1 

1 






8,049 17 




23 


31 




Totals 


281 97 


3, 980 96 


3,676 10 


268 50 


6 


1,433 02 



1899] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



25 



the Province of Ontario during the year ending 31sb December, 1899. — Concluded. 



TJ CD 

^ S3 
■S.2 

.-^ bo 

-a c 

O 3 

.11 

o "" 

11 

< 



624 70 



2,116 69 



23 68 



8 57 



1,810 36 



4,.584 00 



$ c. 



156 10 
3,200 90 



295 75 

95 22 

379 14 



855 89 
1,722 48 



483 68 



2,452 31 



51 43 



100 00 
'466 26 



629 33 

184 61 

1,710 53 



4,556 09 



17,273 71 









208 
239 
755 
334 
115 
419 
405 
435 
533 
129 
88 
892 
385 
L,216 
400 
190 
238 
129 
208 
102 
379 
252^ 
251 
244 
319 
202 
224 



107 
120 
311 
101 
126 



180 
470 
357 
55 
179 
282 
314 
407 
531 
,857 



14,688 



437,816 75 

266,864 85 

111,919 00 

441,957 fil 

32.708 69 

162.726 12 

185,793 51 

208,273 02 

249,388 36 

32,3£1 68 

35,445 33 

211.953 18 

238,674 28 

165.863 50 

139,240 30 

97,698 26 

55,596 84 

36 883 48 

64,968 60 

62.796 77 

104,680 69 

149,573 79 

918,709 67 

38,626 09 

174,483 39 

75,742 02 

73,489 23 



41 

138 

340 

347 

124 

149 

189 

200 

424 

59 

54 

319 

178 

460 

218 

73 

211 

139 

135 

25 

288 

71 

62 

104 

364 

216 

123 



38,558 05 
92,002 56 
449,975 71 
73 ."^57 52 
75,019 02 



48,453 76 
236,702 83 
131,009 04 

26,210 34 
130.170 60 
123.192 97 
173,924 70 
210,491 45 
165,549 97 
502,437 00 



7,249,280 53 



63 
93 
149 
92 
85 



148 
3211 
1291 
22 
129 
143 
109 
194 
362 
926 



8,005 



7 
6 

11 
3 
3 
1 

10 
7 

20 

41 



'VJ 




53 




rn 








a 




<u 




3 


•^ 


CIM 1 


hr 


,— ) 






m 


6 


< 


' 




6 





•n 




« 







S 



48 
73 
84 
44 

171 
58 

140 

76 

8 

18 

83 

28 

1,067 

100 
22 
47 

142 

17 

6 

86 

22 

9 

111 

101 
71 
48 



319 421 



31 

147 
99 
81 
64 
68 
82 
191 
428 



3,992 



a " 

c9 a 



5,226 89 

9.873 03 

18,976 77 

4,862 53 

7,272 79 

5.532 97 

38,867 50 

10,423 15 

1,367 50 

6,286 22 

6,687 00 

3,196 50 

35,640 43 

10,303 86 

3,183 00 

3,362 22 

5,697 fO 

8,152 75 

666 00 

19,389 48 

1,967 79 

1.603 54 

9,015 35 

6,318 00 

7,720 79 

7,759 05 



3,106 00 
3,901 00 
4,939 08 
3,850 60 
970 00 



5,873 81 



9,693 28 

14,673 00 

32,015 30 

7,652 00 

3,450 00 

15,658 36 

22.586 32 

116,386 00 



483,994 46 



O 
73 a 



^13 






164 00 

520 66 
743 50 
1,069 45 
257 95 
513 47 
624 45 
445 00 
742 15 
178 20 
135 95 
779 47 
334 50 
879 40 
596 12 
262 85 
656 38 
306 30 
391 15 
177 75 
716 10 
286 13 
275 60 
368 40 
487 11 
299 90 
686 05 
34 65 
222 63 
589 97 
336 06 
163 75 
402 05 

310 25 
424 30 
729 95 
570 66 
323 10 
250 51 
548 40 

311 10 
485 00 

1,220 27 
4,205 70 



23,724 32 



26 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[No. 30. 



APPENDIX E, — Being a return of business transacted by Surrog-ite Registrars 











73 t>l 




















<j': 


a 


Number of Wills proved 






o 


a. 


'*' 1 




or 


Guardianship issued 






.0 
£3 


15 


m "O 










as fol- 






.a 


s 

C3 




.2 
























a 


t3 


qjCC 


■il 












"S 


s 




^OJ 


iJ 












p 


"^ 


3 


•« u 


-o 












s 


<J 


C5 


2 ® 


i . 












05 


o 


o 


m 3 
s s 



















m 














County or District. 


ei 

O 

a* 




<D 


£.2 


es CO 

OC-. 

^ 6 





© 


§ ' 









o 


o 


"o 


«-< a 




°6 




CD 


2. 


5 











IM 


















-Q 


^ . 


.a . 




^m 


0" 


R 










S 


S'S 


s-s 


S m 


S03 


i-H 


0" 


»n 









3 £ 


s S 


§.2 


3 t, 


^ 


10 


IM 


S 




a 


n S 


a g 


a a> 




&h 


m 


€& 




"? 


-a -2 


"3-" 


-ss 


n"^ 


> 


S 


a 


a 












s 















o 


o 


o 







u 


u 


u 




^ 


H 


H 


H 


H t 


< 


^ 


fH 


Pm 


Algoma 

Brant 


13 


8 




8 


2 








1 


56 

84 

108 

39 


32 
34 

77 
11 


8 

4 

10 

4 


10 

15 

37 

6 


18 

10 

17 

3 








3 


Bruce 






1 

2 


3 


Carleton 






4 


DufiFerin 






3 


Elgin 


83 


41 


5 


23 


16 




1 


1 


5 


Essex 


71 


40 


9 


14 


14 


i 


1 




3 


Frontenao 


41 


27 




10 


14 




3 


2 


3 


Grey 


100 


48 


1 


19 


9 




1 




3 


Haldimand 


52 


24 


5 


10 


13 








4 




46 

82 


16 
49 


1 
9 


5 
22 


7 
20 


"i 






2 


Hastings 


i 




2 


Huron 


125 


55 


3 


20 


17 






2 


7 


Kent 


105 


54 


5 


39 


48 




1 


2 


1 


Lambton 


92 


61 


4 


18 


27 




1 


1 






44 
98 
43 


16 
54 
18 


2 
7 
1 


16 

18 

9 


18 
16 
10 


1 






3 


Leeds and Grenville 


1 


2 


8 






Lincoln 


55 


45 


2 


24 


15 






1 


2 




5 
183 


6 

77 


5" 


5 

28 


3 
29 










Middlesex 




4 


5 


12 


Muskoka 


9 
3 


7 
7 




1 
3 










] 


Nipissing 

Norfolk 












59 
102 

73 
114 

16 


21 
64 
40 
43 

8 


6 
2 

7 

10 

1 


12 
18 
18 
25 
11 


9 

21 

24 

12 

3 






1 

1 
2 


1 


Northumberland and Durham . 






5 








1 


Oxford 






14 


Parry Sound 




1 






Peel . 


50 


22 


4 


7 


10 




2 


1 


1 


Perth 


91 
55 


36 
28 


4 
1 


25 
15 


34 
14 








5 








1 


3 


Prescott and Russell .... . 


24 

39 


18 
11 


1 


9 
9 


9 

9 








1 


Prince Edward .... 








1 


Rainy River .... 


2 


14 




4 


5 








1 


Renfrew '. . . . 


21 

103 

71 


18 
63 
46 


3 
4 
4 


5 
31 
16 


4 
22 
21 








1 


Simcoe 




1 


1 
1 


2 


Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry 


4 


6 


14 


3 


5 


7 








3 




37 
107 


19 
25 


1 
2 


4 
13 


15 
11 










Waterloo 






2 


12 


Welland 


51 
107 


39 

57 


4 
5 


10 
24 


16 
23 






1 
1 


7 


Wellington 






3 




129 


62 


4 


35 


29 


1 


1 


2 


7 


York 


375 


289 


27 


87 


137 


5 


7 


17 


26 


Totals 


3,169 


1,744 


ns 


743 


761 


9 


26 


50 


168 

1 



1899.] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



27 



throaghout the Pioviace of Ontario duriag the year ending Slat Deoamber, 1899. 



and Letters o 


t Administration 




■a 








where 


personality valued 












lows : 










"S 

"a 


Amount earned for 


J 


d 









> 
■a 
>. 

"S 

a 


u 

<D 

ft 


(D 

. 

tSr-l 
U t3 








m 

•o" 








u 

T5 

a 

3 


"0 

a 

S 


etc 






'6 


9& 


^ 


:» 


a 


es 


^ s 


u 


,"" 


a 


s 


S 


g 




3 


--T3 


.2 







s 




U4 











3 


^ 


T3 




0) 


Eh 


fa 


U* 


•» 


H 


H 


tf 


i-s 


f^ 










$ c. 


$ c. 


•S c. 


$ c. 


S c. 




8 


6 


4 


43,028 54 


10,430 00 


148 27 


79 00 


66 00 


■■■g" 


22 


25 


38 


156,-15) 29 


208,439 55 


781 29 


355 40 


210 00 


3 


45 


36 


34 


220,9118 00 


280,911 00 


1,274 89 


578 65 


313 00 


14 


61 


55 


59 


427.050 62 


34,885 00 


1,638 85 


773 25 


626 00 


1 


19 


15 


16 


105.052 00 


86,910 00 


483 45 


214 20 


136 50 


7 


38 


28 


39 


381,119 67 


248,767 00 


1,110 93 


605 30 


429 50 


6 


23 


30 


33 


503,540 72 


271,180 70 


908 21 


678 50 


436 00 


5 


33 


12 


10 


248,557 39 


137,06i 00 


671 00 


509 10 


238 00 


9 


48 


52 


36 


324,401 83 


2.58,738 00 


1,396 10 


714 50 


427 00 


6 


22 


16 


28 


155,698 43 


100,075 00 


770 10 


445 25 


194 00 


4 


25 


15 


17 


117,912 93 


138,402 00 


563 05 


284 75 


156 00 


7 


42 


31 


47 


373,467 15 


61,870 00 


1,195 50 


535 50 


455 50 


23 


63 


33 


55 


497,137 3t 


54,730 00 


1,765 83 


1,142 75 


540 50 


6 


34 


39 


48 


271,042 73 


2.35,338 00 


1,217 00 


628 00 


363 50 


6 


43 


33 


51 


254,691 90 


245,961 00 


1,129 00 


595 25 


365 50 


5 


17 


16 


18 


465,479 00 


114.9.56 00 


476 39 


549 25 


320 80 


12 


49 


44 


36 


503,143 53 


49,878 13 


1,489 26 


807 25 


519 50 


3 


19 


18 


22 


75,019 32 


68,575 00 


565 81 


648 40 


132 00 


7 


26 


23 


41 


206,912 67 


180,532 00 


728 80 


382 90 


279 50 




3 


5 


3 


7,098 50 


7,497 00 


55 13 


25 00 


18 00 


16' 


86 


58 


84 


1,010,985 45 


10 ',795 00 


2,265 60 


1,640 10 


942 00 





2 


2 


11 


17,610 77 


20,-155 55 


109 56 


45 00 


35 50 




4 
32 


1 
14 


5 

27 


8,634 93 
163,085 51 




67 43 
980 92 


21 75 
380 50 


21 00 


""b" 


'""11 8^929 "to"" 


218 00 


13 


63 


36 


46 


378.987 30 


325,575 44 


1,326 43 


666 50 


477 00 


5 


39 


22 


4t 


202,848 01 


18 710 00 


856 45 


494 50 


267 00 


43 


63 


25 


12 


S32,407 64 


319,497 00 


1,898 37 


885 00 


456 00 




10 

32 


12 

18 


2 
14 


81.;^84 00 
285,349 76 




129 18 
742 49 


124 75 
494 60 


79 00 


■■■4" 


"'"i33,'6i6'o6" 


252 50 


11 


. 54 


25 


34 


287,552 92 


37,170 00 


1,235 90 


574 00 


368 00 


6 


30 


12 


32 


203,921 39 


149,211 00 


619 79 


365 25 


228 50 




24 


9 


9 


31.671 10 


35,110 00 


255 58 


103 25 


83 00 


■■■.5" 


13 


10 


21 


99,231 98 


99.529 75 


455 .35 


155 25 


125 00 




3 


2 


6 


22,131 85 


9,489 00 


90 75 


55 75 


34 50 


"I" 


10 


10 


14 


78,870 36 


67,760 00 


312 73 


140 00 


98 50 


8 


61 


30 


50 


351,344 09 


244,575 00 


1,225 75 


610 10 


405 00 


3 


45 


29 


39 


235,424 32 


38,050 00 


1,077 40 


388 00 


292 50 




4 


1 


5 


47,381 39 




132 13 


75 00 


125 48 


"i ' 


16 


14 


25 


61,519 97 


i6;966'o6'" 


437 63 


146 00 


94 50 


12 


54 


20 


34 


459.485 25 


337,090 00 


885 01 


701 20 


463 60 


17 


39 


10 


16 


157,854 11 


181,529 00 


905 75 


439 50 


214 50 


8 


44 


58 


55 


282,468 00 


30',228 00 


253 73 


677 CO 


383 50 


15 


52 


42 


75 


1,233,408 82 


720,660 48 


1,966 65 


1,749 75 


931 50 


58 


195 


121 


262 


4.468,052 00 




6,352 83 


2,988 26 


3,043 50 


366 


1,615 


1,113 


1 
1,551 


15,839,413 47 


6,072,420 60 


41,952 27 


24,473 20 


16,766 28 



28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix F, 



-Return of fees and emoluments of County Judicial Officers throughout 
of such officers payable by the Government, the County 



County 
and town. 


Office. 


Officer. 


<o 
u 

hi 

c« 

a 




cs o 

.a % 
s.s 


•T3 no 

.2-3 


received for 
ent year's 
ices. 








O 

s 




"3^ 


o <" 


otal 
pres 
serv 








< 


rji 


H 


H 


E-t 


Algoma : 






-S c. 


S c. 


% c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Sault St- Marie 


SherifiE 


W. H. Carney .... 
John Johnston . . . 


1,801 04 


1,000 00 


2,801 04 


2,801 04 


2,424 69 




Surrogate Judge . . . 


79 00 




79 00 


125 70 


79 00 




Local Master 


" 


46 30 




46 30 




45 70 




Dist. Crown Attny. 


J. J. Kehoe 


70 00 




70 00 


754 96 


68 00 




Clerk of the Peace. 


" 


284 96 


400 00 


684 96 




639 74 




Local Registrar 


G. M. Farwell 


18 00 


160 00 


168 00 


1,080 27 


168 00 




Dist. Court Clerk.. 


" 


164 00 


600 00 


764 00 




764 00 




Surrogate Registrar 


" 


148 27 




148 27 




148 27 


Brant : 
















Brantford .... 


Sherifif 


Wm. Watt, Jr 


2,303 40 




2,303 40 


2,303 40 


2,207 74 




Surrogate Judge . . 


Judge Jones 


commuted 


588 00 


588 00 


588 00 


.588 00 




Local Master 


Judge Hardy, Actg. 


commuted 


577 00 


577 00 


577 00 


577 00 




County Attorney . . 


A. J. Wilkes, Q.C. 


686 05 


, . . , ... 


686 05 


1,629 47 


686 05 




Clerk of the Peace. 


" 


943 42 




943 42 




943 42 




Local Registrar 


J. T. Hewitt 


47 40 


675 00 


722 40 


2,024 44 


722 40 




County Court Clerk 


" 


520 65 




520 65 




520 65 




Surrogate Registrar 




781 29 




78129 




78129 


Bruce : 
















Walkerton . . . 


Sheriff 


F. S. O'Connor .... 


2,531 27 




2,531 27 


2,531 27 


1,736 81 




Surrogate Judge . . . 


Judge Barrett) .... 


578 65 




578 65 


578 65 


578 65 




Local Master and 


' 














Local Registrar. . 


W. A. McLean 


commuted 


1,300 00 


1,300 00 


1,300 00 


1,300 00 




Crown Attorney . . 


Thos. Dixon 


451 00 




45100 


1,857 71 


222 20 




Clerk of the Peace . 


" 


1,406 71 




1,406 71 




859 36 




County Court Clerk 


M. Goetz 


743 50 




743 50 


2,018 39 


628 32 




Surrogate Registrar 




1,274 89 




1,274 89 




1,045 14 


Carlton : 

' i^Ottawa 


Sheriff 


John Sweetland . . . 


4,892 29 




4,892 29 


4,892 29 


4,160 43 




Surrogate Judge. . . 


Judge McTavish . . 


773 25 




773 25 


773 25 


773 75 




Local Master 


W. L. Scott 


3.029 05 




.3,029 Ot 


3,636 90 


2,933 84 




Deputy Registrar . 


" 


607 85 




607 85 




604 31 




Crown Attorney . . 


J. A. Ritchie 


662 70 




662 70 


1,590 40 


499 10 




Clerk of the Peace 


" 


927 70 




927 70 




444 67 




Dep, Clk. of Crown 


J. P. Featherston . . 


909 40 


450 00 


1,359 40 


4.067 70 


1,308 70 




County Court Clerk 


" 


1,069 45 




1,069 45 




1,069 45 


DUFFERIN : 

Orangeville . . 


Surrogate Registrar 


" 


1,638 85 




1,638 85 




1,591 45 


Sherifif 




1,508 22 




1,508 22 


1,508 22 


939 75 




Surrogate Judge . . 


Judge McCarthy . . 


commuted 


168 00 


168 00 


269 76 


168 00 




Local Master 


" 


101 76 




101 76 




96 28 




County Attorney . . 


W. C. L. McKay.. 


192 75 




192 75 


662 80 


69 75 




Clerk of the Peace . 


" 


470 05 




470 05 




1.^4 15 




Local Registrar 


John McLaren 


68 95 


675 00 


733 95 


1,475 35 


733 95 




County Court Clerk 


" 


257 95 




257 95 




247 05 




Surrogate Registrar 


11 


483 45 




483 45 




48110 


Elgin : 
















St. Thomas . . 


Sherifif 


Dugald Brown 

Judge Hughes 


1,812 66 
commuted 




1,812 66 


1,812 66 


1,221 89 




Surrogate Judge 


68100 


68100 


68100 


68100 




Local Master 


Robert Miller 


993 45 




993 45 


993 45 


486 83 




Crown Attorney . . 


D.J. D.nahue,Q.C. 


736 10 




736 10 


1,835 11 


610 84 




Clerk of the Peace . 


" 


1,099 01 




1,099 01 




722 49 




Local Registrar . . 


D. McLawa 


494 95 


675 00 


1,169 95 


2,794 35 


98137 




County Court Clerk 


" 


513 47 




513 47 




487 85 




Surrogate Registrar 


1 1 


1,110 93 




1,110 93 




1,078 43 


Sandwich 


Sherifif 


J. C. Her 


2.481 37 




2,481 37 


2,481 37 


1,937 53 




Surrogate Judge . . 


Judge Home 


678 50 




678 50 


678 50 


678 50 




Local Master 


J. F. Hare 


903 75 




903 75 


1,066 45 


84175 




Deputy Registrar . 


" 


162 70 




162 70 




143 90 




Crown Attorney . . 


A. H. Clarke 


558 70 




558 70 


1,503 93 


379 90 




Clerk of the Peace. 


(1 


945 23 




945 23 




646 06 




Dep. Clk. of Crown 


F. E. Marcon 


232 05 


450 00 


682 05 


2,114 71 


682 05 




County Court Clerk 


« 


524 45 




524 45 




524 45 




Surrogate Registrar 


'* 


908 21 




908 21 




908 21 



1899 J 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



29 



the Province of Ontario for the year ending 3 1st December, 1899 ; and of total earnings 
and the general public respectively for the same period. 



So 


Total receipts by 
officer from all 
his offices. 


a 

m 

m 

u 

'"5 

■s 


S 



a 

■s 


Amount paid to Gov- 
ernment under 57 
V. cap. 9. 


6 

a 



.5 

a 

S 

"5 




Earnings of each officer pay- 
able by the Government, 
the County, and the ;gener- 
al public respectively. 


County. 


Total re 
past y 
vices. 


From 
Govern- 
ment. 


From 
County. 


From 
general 
pubhc. 




$ c. 
195 73 


$ c. 

2,620 42 
409 60 


•S c. 
1,207 40 


S c. 

1,413 02 
409 60 


S c. 


$ c. 

1,413 02 
409 60 


$ c. 
2.408 61 


$ c. 


$ c. 

392 43 
79 00 
46 30 


Algoma. 


284 90 








42 00 


878 96 
1,080 27 


2100 


857 96 




857 96 


70 00 
659 82 
150 00 
600 00 






129 22 


........ 


24 14 

18 00 
164 00 
148 27 

435 81 






150 00 


930 27 




930 27 


















70 01 


2,277 75 
588 00 
577 00 

1,629 47 

2,024 44 


538 40 
' '756 33 


1,739 35 
588 00 
577 00 
87314 




1,739 35 
588 00 
577 00 
873 14 


1,392 22 
588 00 
577 00 
465 60 
247 40 
675 00 


475 37 


Brant. 












200 70 
660 31 


19 75 

35 71 

47 40 

520 65 

781 29 

820 53 
578 65 






936 66 


1,087 78 




1,087 78 






















466 02 


2,202 83 
578 65 

1,.300 00 
1,692 71 


633 96 

"nbi 


1,568 87 
578 65 

1,300 00 
1,621 70 





1,.568 87 
578 65 

1,300 00 
1,621 70 


1,023 22 

1,300 00 
428 35 
169 75 


687 52 


Bruce. 


53 90 

557 2o 


22 65 
1,143 68 


■ 93'28 

743 50 

1,274 89 

2,503 04 
773 25 

3,029 Oo 

607 85 

17 00 

100 96 

909 40 

1,069 45 

1,638 85 

416 16 




141 94 


2,221 85 


330 50 


1,891 35 


39 13 


1,852 22 




406 45 








884 38 


5,044 81 

773 25 

3,623 85 


2,204 49 
"316 70 


2,840.32 

773 25 

3,307 15 




2,840 32 

773 25 

3,307 15 


1,705 35 


683 90 


Carleton. 


72 70 








13 00 








238 40 

575 75 

40 01 

75 


1,757 92 
4,034 05 


790 08 
l,24l'99 


967 84 
2,792 06 


'237 61 


967 84 
2,554 45 


645 76 

262 55 
450 00 


554 19 




23 65 


















584 73 


1,524 48 
376 94 


562 10 
3 00 


962 38 
373 94 




962 38 
373 94 


672 28 
168 00 


419 78 


Dufiferin. 


112 66 




101 76 




42 30 


544 74 




60 00 


484 74 




484 74 


i92 75 

98 60 

675 00 






278 54 


343 45 


28 00 

58 95 

257 95 

483 45 

657 48 

'"993 '4.5 




""'4'80 


1,468 15 


59 71 


1,408 44 




1,408 44 




1 25 


















348 39 
147 70 


1,570 28 
68100 
6:^4 5.S 

1,970 09 

2.770 87 


863 38 

"10466 
310 29 

' 359 60 


706 90 

681 00 

530 53 

1,659 80 

2,41187 


"132 '37 


706 90 

681 00 

530 53 

1,659 80 

2',27'9'56 


774 86 
681 00 


380 32 


Elgin. 


142 85 


736 10 
4()i 22 
675 00 






493 91 


635 79 






155 50 


491 95 

513 47 

1,110 93 

9-5 62 
678 5tJ 
90$ 75 
162 70 
71 00 
9J 35 
232 05 
524 45 
908 21 




51 72 


















699 95 


2,637 48 

678 50 

1,084 25 


1,432 00 
' 156 66 


1,205 48 
678 50 
928 25 




1,205 48 
678 50 
928 26 


1,722 65 


503 05 


Essex. 










7 90 








223 67 
392 80 


1,642 43 
2,114 71 


600 00 
260' 60 


1,042 43 
1,'8'5'4 71 


'"3547 


1,042 43 
1,819 24 


472 32 
164 90 
450 GO 


15 38 

687 98 












.::;::::r:::::: 









30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



r No. 30 



Appendix F. — Eeturn of fees and emoluments of Com ij 















'2 ^ 


t^ 










>, 


^^ 


03 5£ 


S. 71 


County 
and town. 


Office. 

1 


Officer. 


a 

cS 
a> 

n 

3 


a 
"3 S 


.... H 


.3-3 
1-9 

u 


received 
sent year 
vices. 








o 

s 


•1^ 




5-3 

o " 


3 '-' " 








< 


xn 


H " 


Eh 


H 








$ ^ c. 


% c. 


2 c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


Frontenac : 
















Kingston. ... 


Sheriff 


Thomas Dawson 


2,335 04 




2,3.35 04 


2,335 04 


2,335 04 




Surrotrate Judaje. . . 


Judge Price 


commuted 


752 m 


752 00 


752 00 


752 00 




Local Ma^tpr 


J. Moodie 


17S 70 




178 70! 178 70 


35 90 




Crown Attorney. . . . 


J. L. Whiting, Q.C. 


18.=) 00 




185 00 


982 39 


130 (10 




Clerk of the Peace. 


" 


797 39 




797 39 




648 00 




Local Registrar ... 


Archibald McGlee. . . 


134 85 


675 00 


809 85 


1,925 85 


790 07 




County Court Clerk. 


" 


445 00 




445 00 




3!)5 76 




Surrogate Registrar. 


" 


671 GO 




671 00 


549 35 


Grey : 














Owen Sound. . 


Sheriff 


<^. H. Moore 


2,618 23 




2,618 231 2,618 ?3 


2.033 07 




Surrogate Judge 


•Judge Creasor . . . 


714 50 




714 .50! 714 50 


714 .^,0 




Local INIasters \ 


Judge Cte sir 

Judge Morrison 


291 57 




291 57 291 57 


215 41 




Crown Attorney 


A. 1^. VlacKay 


445 80 




44.^ 80 


1,S04 66 


3io 90 




Clerk of the Peace 


" 


858 86 




858 86 




551 40 




Local Registrar. 


W. A. Bishop 


123 16 


750 00 


873 15 


3,011 40 


873 15 




County Court Clerk. 


" 


742 15 




74-2 15 




742 15 




Surrogate Registrar. 


" 


1,3;)(J 10 




1,396 10 




1,396 10 


HALDIM.4.Nn: 
















Cayuga 


Sheriff 


R. H. Davis 


J, 514 01 


100 00 


1,6)4 01 


1,644 01 


1,644 01 




surrogate Judge 


.ludge McMillan 


445 25 




445 ?5 


515 5) 


445 25 




Local Master 


" 


70 26 




70 20 




30 96 




Crown AtCornej' ... 


C. W. Colter, QC. 


364 90 




364 90 


1,623 48 


274 50 




Clerk of the Peace. . 


" 


1,268 68 




1,258 58 




768 24 




Local Registrar ... 


James Mitchell 


102 30 


600 00 


702 30 


1,650 60 


702 30 




County Court Clerk. 


" 


178 20 




178 20 





178 'iO 




Surrogate Registrar. 


" 


770 10 




770 10 


. . . 


770 10 


Halton : 
















Milton . 


Sheriff 


VI. Clements 


1,090 66 




1,090 66 


1,090 66 


1.C65 77 




Surrogate Judge 


Judge Hamilton 


284 75 




284 75 


405 85 


284 75 




Local Master 


" 


121 10 




121 10 




121 10 




Crown Attorney 


T. G. Matheson .... 


419 76 




419 ^5 


1,740 15 


274 75 




Clerk of the Peace. . 


" 


1,320 40 




1,320 40 




847 86 




' ocal Rfgistrar 


W. A. Lawrence . . . 


103 20 


600 GO 


703 20 


1,403 20 703 yo 




County Court Clerk. 


" 


135 95 




135 95 




135 95 




Surrogate Registrar 


<( 


563 05 




563 05 




563 05 


Hastings : 
















Belleville .... 


Sheriff 


G. F. Hope 


3,52 i 91 




3,.'S2-) 91 


3,525 91 2,740 fO 




Surrogate Judge 


Judge Lazier 


commuted 


500 00 


51 00 


500 (0 500 00 




Local Master and 






3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 


3,000 00 




Deputy R'^gistrar. 


S. S. Lazier 














Crown Attorney 


P. J. M. Anderson.. 


1,195 85 




1,195 85 


2,496 88 


760 85 




Clerk of the I'eace 


'• 


1,301 03 




1,30103 


823 80 




Deputy Clerk of the 














Crown 


A. G. Morthrup 


137 46 


450 00 


.^87 46 2, .^62 43 


,537 46 




County Court Clerk. 




779 47 




779 47 


405 20 




Surrogate Registrar. 


■' .... 


1,195 50 




1,195 50 


950 GO 


Huron : 














Goderich 


Sheriff 


R. G. Reynolds 


1,983 31 




1,983 31 1,983 31 


1,815 19 




■Surrogate Judge. . . . 


*Judge Masson .... 


1,000 00 




1,000 CO 1,000 00 


1,000 00 




Local Master 


•Judee Doyle 


314 72 




314 72 


314 72 


204 80 




Crown Attorney . . . 


1 r ji Lewid 


643 31 




043 31 


2,071 11 


643 31 




Clerk of the Peace. . 


" 


1,427 80 




1,427 80 




1,067 30 




Local Registrar .... 


D. McDonald .... 


145 25 


750 00 


895 25 2,995 58 


896 25 




County Courn Clerk. 


" 


334 50 




33 1 50' 


334 50 




Surrogate Regi trar 


" 


1,765 83 




1,765 83| 


1,765 83 


Kknt : 










1 




Chatham .... 


sheriff 


J. R Gemmill 


3,015 65 




3.045 65 3,045 65 


1,870 55 




Surrogate Judge 


Judge Bell 


commuted 


450 00 


450 GO 450 00 


450 GO 




Local Master and 














Dt^putv Registrar. 


R. 0' Rara 




1,600 00 


1,600 00 1,600 00 


1,600 f 




County Attorney . . . 


Wm. Douglas, Q.C.. 


1,56.< 50 




1,563.50 3,022 42 


1,563 50 




Cl^rk of th'' HeHce. . 


" 


1,4.58 92 




1,458 92 


1,4.58 92 



§147.75 surplus Judge's fees paid to junior Judge. 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



31 



Judicial Officers throughout the Province, etc. — Continued. 





Total receipts by 
officer from all his 
offices. 


S 

<D 

3 

'5 
Is 
o 
H 


6 

i 

S5 


Amount paiil to 
Government under 
57 Vict. cap. 9. 


S 


.s 

a 
< 


Earnings of each officer pay- 
able by the Government, the 
County,and the general pub- 
lic respectively. 


County. 


Total rec 
past yi 
vices. 


From 
Govern- 
ment 


From 
County. 


From 
general 
public. 




% c. 


$ c. 

2,335 m 

752 00 

35 90 

1,184 40 

1,999 42 


$ c. 

618 48 

'"'12 00 
100 00 

"67100 


$ c. 

1,716 56 

752 00 

23 90 

1,084 40 

1.328 42 


$ c. 


$ c. 

1,716 56 

752 00 

23 90 

1,084 40 

1,328' 42 


$ c. 

977 85 
752 00 


$ c. 
612 02 


$ c. 
745 17 


Frontenac. 




1 




178 70 




65 00 


185 00 
130 95 
675 00 






335 40 


666 44 






90 00 
27 24 


134 85 
445 00 
671 00 

944 56 
714 50 
291 57 


• 


147 CO 


















767 63 


2,801 30 
1,069 83 


818 97 
5 00 


1,982 33 
1,064 83 




1,982 33 
1,064 83 


972 90 


700 77 


Grey. 


139 89 





















:;;::::::: ::::■:: 




180 30 
305 48 


1,353 08 


435 75 


917 33 




917 33 


147 13 
167 20 
750 00 


294 27 
595 43 


4 40 

94 25 

123 15 

742 15 

1,396 10 

379 26 

445 25 

70 26 






3,011 40 


388 00 


2,623 40 


187 02 


2,436 38 






















125 10 


1.76911 
685 47 


216 74 


1,-552 37 
685 47 




1,552 37 
685 47 


783 07 


481 68 


Haldimand. 


209 26 








106 50 


l,i514 12 


337 00 


1,177 12 




1,177 12 


348 67 
176 95 
600 00 


16 23 

997 08 




364 88 


84 55 

102 30 
178 20 
770 10 

157 86 

284 76 

121 10 

7 CO 

36 93 

103 20 
135 95 
5«3 05 

1,681 13 






1,650 60 


38 00 


1,612 60 


11 26 


1,601 34 






















23 68 


1,089 45 
405 85 


295 60 


793 85 
405 85 




793 85 
405 85 


610 .50 


332 30 


Halton. 


79 20 
440 78 


1,642 59 


75 03 


1,567 56 




1 .5"6'6 56 
1,102 20 


412 75 
135 20 
600 00 


1, 148 27 






1,402 20 


300 00 


1,102 20 
























662 56 


3,402 56 
500 00 

3,000 00 
2,507 19 


892 92 

550 00 
501 01 


2,509 64 
500 00 

2,450 00 
2,006 18 


ei 


2,509 64 
500 00 

2,450 00 
2,005 57 


1,094 40 
500 00 

3,000 00 

1,101 10 

171 20 

450 00 


750 38 


Hastings 


*"437'6o 
485 54 


"42'6o 

1,082 38 


52"75 

47 45 

137 46 

779 47 

1,195 50 

628 13 

1,000 00 

314 72 




107 00 
221 78 


2,539 19 


712 48 


1,826 71 


32 71 


1,794 00 




317 75 


















84 91 


1,900 10 

1,000 00 

229 Ifi 

2,181 26 


502 04 

""'is '65 

690 00 




1,338 06 

1,000 00 

216 11 

1,491 26 


' "ii5'55 


1,338 06 

1,000 00 

216 11 

1,491 26 

2 "212 23 


859 90 


495 28 


Huron. 


24 36 








102 10 


613 31 
227 80 
750 00 






371 55 


1,100 00 


166 00 

145 25 

334 50 

1,765 83 

756 .50 






2,995 58 


667 SO 


2,327 78 






















784 31 


2,654 86 
4.50 (JO 

1,600 00 
:i,uj2 42 


937 05 

16 GO 
900 00 


1,717 81 
450 00 

1 1,584 00 
2,122 42 


'" "12*24 


1,717 81 
450 00 

1,584 00 
2,110 18 


1,568 50 
450 00 

1,000 00 

1,305 00 

338 15 


720 65 


Kent 












'I'.bbooj 


258 50 
1 120 77 





32 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix F. — Return of fees and emoluments of County 



County 
and town. 



Kent.— Con. 
Chatham , 



Lambton 
Sarnia . 



Lanaek : 
Perth . . 



Leeds & Gren- 

VILLE : 

Brockville 



Lennox & Add'n 
Napanee 



Lincoln : 
St. Catharines 



Office. 



Deputy Clerk of the 

Crown 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Masters I 

County Attorney . . . 
Clerk of the Peace. . 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Officer. 



W. A. Campbell. 



•James Flintoft . 
Judge McVVatt 



Judge Mackenzie 
J. P. Bucke . . 



W. R. Gemmill . 



James Thonipsou. 
Judge Senkler 



E. G. Malloch 
Charles Rice . . 



Sheriff G-. A. Dana 

Surrogate Judge | Judge McDonald . 



Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace. , 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



M. M. Brown 



Samuel Reynolds. 



She'iff 

Surrogate Judge 

1/ocal Master 

Crown Attorney . . . . 
Clerk of the Peace. . 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Manitoulin ; 
Gore Bay . . 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Deputy Registra.r. . 
Crciwa Attorney.... 
Clerk of the Peace . . 
Deputy Clerk of the 

Cr')wn 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace. . 

Local Registrar 

Diwtrict Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



G. D. Hawley .... 
Judge Wilkinson . 

S. S. Laz'er 

H. M. Deroqhe, Q.C 



W. P. Deroche 



Thos. C. Dawson . 
Judge Senkler. . . . 
F. W. Macdonald 



M. Brennan 

Johnson Clench ., 

E. A. Jackson. . . 

Judge McCallum 
it 

J. W. Cashman 

t( 

W. S. Francis . . 



304 50 

879 40 

1,217 00 

2,723 .^4 
595 25 



143 25 
953 11 

1,318 11 
457 18 
596 12 

1,129 00 



•la 



46 



450 00 



<D 


»• 


es O 


gs and 
11 office 


a-g 


a ei 


i3 cS 


B Z 


a a 




i^-" 


c«— ' 


<^ >, 


<u >, 


<D i: 




—. <s 


cS eS 






o S, 


O 'O 


H " 


EH 



754 50 

879 40 

1,217 00 

2,7^3 34 
595 25 



2,850 90 



2,723 34 
595 26 



143 25 
2,271 22 



675 00 



143 25 

953 11 
1,318 11 
1,132 18 2,857 30 

596 12 
1,129 00 



1,589 11 1,589 11 

549 25 649 25 

121 64 181 64 

622 42 622 42 

624 00 624 00 

195 50 650 00 845 60 

262 85 262 85 

476 39 47(> 39 



2,420 16 
commuted 
220 36 
525 32 
919 45 
209 90 
556 38 

1,489 26 

1,387 02. 
commuted 
389 60 
115 61 
383 67 
543 50 
306 30 
565 8) 

2,433 23 
commuted 
391 11 
148 94 
563 00 
926 00 

84 50 
391 15 
728 80 

Newly ap 



600 00 



750 00 



400 00 



600 CO 



566 00 



450 00 



2,420 16 
600 00 
220 36 
525 32 
919 45 
959 90 
553 38 

1,489 26 

1,387 02 
400 00 
389 60 
115 61 
383 67 

1,143 50 
306 30 

565 81 

2,433 23 

566 00 
391 n 
148 94 
563 00 
926 00 



1,589 11 
670 89 



1,246 42 
1,584 74 



2,420 16 
820 36 



1,444 77 
'3,bb5'64 



1,387 02 
400 00 
389 60 
499 28 



2,015 61 



2,433 23 
566 00 
540 05 



1,489 00 



534 50 1,654 45 
391 15 

728 80 



pointed. No returns for 



177 75 350 00 
55 13 



527 75 
55 13 



582 88 



1899. 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



33 



J udicial Officers throughout the Province, etc — Continued. 



ceived for 
ear's ser- 


Total receipts by 
officer from all his 
offices. 


s 
i 

h* 

3 
Xi 

CD 

'3 

o 


o- 1 
o 

_g 

^ 1 

$ c. 
1,900 90 


Amount paid to 
Government under 
57 Vict. cap. 9. 


6 

a 

o 
o 

.g 

a 

3 

< 


Earnings of each officer pay- 
able by the Government, the 
County,and the general pub- 
lic respectively. 


County. 


Total re 
past y 
vices- 


From j 
Govern- ' 
'ment 


From 
County. 

$ 0. 


From 
general 
public. 




$ c. 


* c. 
2,850 90 


1 

S c. 

950 00 


$ c. 
40 09 


$ c. 
1,860 81 


$ c. 
450 00 


$ c. 

304 60 

897 40 

1,217 00 

1,108 92 
595 25 


Kent.- Continued. 


.:::::::;:■■:-.: 




1 












1 

466 46 


2,554 26 
595 25 


835 36 


1,718 90 
595 25 




1,718 90 
595 25 


1,157 40 


457 02 


Lambton. 


49 30 
90 10 


192 55 
2,035 53 

2,85'7'36 


"392'76 


192 55 
1,642 77 





i92 55 
1,642 77 


"""92i'ii 

298 11 
075 00 


"32 66 
1,020 00 


143 25 




. 118 17 


""457 18 
596 12 






145 00 


2,7 12 30 


213 69 


2,498 61 






1,589 11 
796 37 


507 87 












1,129 00 






1,081 24 
796 37 




1.081 24 
796 37 


829 98 




425 71 


333 42 
649 25 
121 64 
36 50 
53 00 
195 50 
262 85 
476 39 

920 43 


Lanark. 


247 12 


::■■■:::: ::::::; 




223 75 
263 11 


1,343 08 
1,5'92 4i 


114 15 


1,228 93 




1,228 93 


512 30 73 62 
158 52 412 48 




91 25 
64 20 


1,592 41 


9 24 


1,582 27 


650 00 






92 32 


















172 03 


2,1.36 76 
630 04 


731 60 


1,405 15 
630 04 




1,405 15 
630 04 


997 51 
600 00 


502 22 


Leed.s and Granville. 


10 00 




"574'96 


220 36 






1,444 77 


150 00 


1,294 77 




1,291 77 
2,387 97 


525 32 
160 80 
750 00 


163 69 





3,005 54 


451 31 


2,554 23 


160 26 


209 90 
556 38 


791 16 


1,719 26 
400 00 
398 00 
243 83 

2,015 61 


267 69 


1,451 .57 
400 00 


"" 37 68 


1,451 57 
400 00 
323 00 
186 88 

1,839 is 


664 67 
400 00 


367 23 


1,489 26 
355 12 


Lennox and Adding- 
ton. 


33 00 


75 66' 323 66 






389 60 
26 00 
30 81 
543 50 
306 30 
565 81 

910 73 






56 95 
"i38"75 


186 88 
1,876 86 


86 33 

71 66 

600 00 




3 28 
281 20 






















61 03 


2,288 21 
566 00 
627 37 

"l,489 66 


523 50 
, 165 66 


1,764 71 

1 566 00 

627 37 

1,324 66 




1,764 71 
566 00 
627 37 


956 45 
566 00 


566 05 


Lincoln. 


407 07 




391 ii 

148 94 

40 00 

84 50 
391 15 
728 80 

177 76 
55 13 




61 02 












1,324 00 


523 06 
102 95 

450 00 


823 65 




7 10 

7 75 


1,590 38 


264 50 


1,325 88 




1,325 88 
























682 88 




582 88 




582 88 


360 00 




Manitou'in. 



3 L.O. 



34 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix F. — Return of fees and emoluments of Connty 















50 










13 


>> 


o 


T3"i. 








s 


a 


a " 


fifls 


0) c« 


County 
and town. 


Office. 


Officer. 




2S 


.5 ts 


■g.a 


•s >• 

^ (O m 








o 


s ? 


c3 OS 


<!>'m 


IS j;.u 








S 


•1^ 


og 


o * 


"S a> 








< 


02 


H °° 


H 


H 








$ c 


$ c. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


MlUDIKSKX : 
















London 


Sheriff 


D. M Cameron . . . 


4,399 16 




4,399 16 


4,399 16 


4,348 47 




Surrogate Judge. . . 


*Jude'e Elliott 


commuted 


1,000 00 


1.000 00 


1,000 00 


1,( 00 OC 




Local Master 


R. K. Cowan 


510 00 




510 00 


2,071 78 


330 OC 




Deputy Registrar . . 


" 


1,561 78 




1,511 78 




1,20186 




County Attorney . 


James Magee, Q C. 


1,818 74 




1.818 74 


3,640 17 


1,140 34 




Clerk of the Peace 


" 


1,821 43 




1,821 43 




1,039 54 




Deputy Clerk of the 
















Crown 


John Macbeth ... 


361 50 


500 00 


86150 


3,843 20 


773 7C 




C'lunty Court Clerk 


" 


716 10 




716 10 




691 9C 




Surrogate Registrar 


' ' .... 


2,265 60 




2,265 60 




2,139 IC 


MUSKOKA : 
















Bracebiidge . . 


SherifiF .. ... 


James W. Bettes . . 


1,484 68 


500 00 


1,984 68 


1,984 68 


1,433 74 




Surrogate Judge . . 


Judge Mahaffy .. . 


45 00 




45 00 


96 32 


45 OC 




Local Master . . 


" 


51 32 




5132 




5135 




Crown Attorney . . 


Thomas Johnson . 


252 68 


250 CO 


502 68 


90163 


439 6f 




Clerk "f the Peace. 


" 


398 95 




398 95 




235 36 




Local Registrar 


Laac Huber 


?8 00 


600 00 


638 00 


1,032 69 


6?8 0C 




1 >istrict Court Clerk 


" .... 


2'S.T 13 




285 13 




285 IS 




Surrogate Registrar 


" 


109 56 




109 fO 




109 5C 


NiPissiNG : 
















North; Bay .. . 


Sheriff 


H. C. Varia .... 


1,285 51 


760 00 


2,035 51 


2,035 51 


937 0? 




Surrogate Judge . . 


Judge Valin 


21 76 




2175 


23 95 


21 7£ 




Local Master .... 


" 


220 00 




2 20 




2 0C 




Crown Attorney . 


A. G. Browning . . 


178 10 


250 00 


428 10 


550 67 


317 Oi 




Clerk of thn P. ace 


«i 


122 57 




122 57 




122 57 




Local Registrar . 


Thos. J. Bourke . 


105 60 


150 00 


255 60 


1,048 63 


265 61 




District Court Clerk 


" 


275 60 


450 CO 


726 60 




726 6( 




Surrogate Registrar 


" 


67 43 




67 43 




59 4S 


Norfolk : 
















Simcoe 


Sheriff 


Joseph Jackson 


1,844 77 




1,844 77 


1,844 77 


1,844 77 




Surrogate Judge . . 


Judge Robb 


380 50 




380 60 


43126 


380 6( 




Local Master 


" 


50 7b 




50 76 




49 U 




Crown Attorney . . 


J. H. A nsley 


716 60 




716 60 


1,696 49 


716 6C 




Clerk of the Peace. 


" 


979 89 




979 89 




967 3t 




Local Registrar 


C. C. Rapelje 


154 50 


676 00 


829 50 


2,178 82 


757 3 




County Court Clerk 


" 


368 40 




368 40 




253 5( 




Surrogate Registrar 


" ... 


980 92 




980 92 




70185 


Northumber- 
















land & Dur- 
















ham : Cobourg 


Sheriff 


T. 0. Proct r 


2,931 43 




2,931 43 


2,931 43 


2,336 O: 




Surrogate Judge . 


Judge Benson 


commuted 


840 00 


840 00 


840 00 


840 0( 




Local Master . . 


J. H. Durable . . . 


285 66 




285 H6 


2-5 66 


76 7f 




Crown Attorney . . 


J. W. Kerr 


873 57 




873 57 


1 998 59 


699 5- 




Clerk of the Peace 


" 


1,125 02 




1,125 02 




512 9^ 




I ocal Registrar 


John Fi.sher 


114 70 


760 00 


864 70 


2,678 24 


8P4 7( 




County Court Clerk 


" 


487 11 




487 11 




487 1 




>urrogate Registrar 


<> 


1,326 43 




1,326 43 




1,326 4. 


Ontario ; 
















Whitby 


Sheriff 


J. F. Paxtou 


1,628 68 




],62»fi8 


1,628 68 


1,166 9 




Surrogate Judge . . 


G. Y. Smith 


494 50 




494 50 


f 66 20 


494 5( 




Local Master 


" 


71 70 




7170 




61 7( 




Crown Attorney . . . 


J, E Farwell, Q.C 


405 95 




405 96 


1,569 46 


26^^ 0( 




Clerk of the Peace. 


it 


1,163 61 




1,163 51 




fi95 5{ 




Local Registrar . 


L. T. Barclay . . . 


31 00 


675 66 


70R00 


1,862 35 


706 0( 




County Court Clerk 


" 


299 90 




i99 90 




299 9( 




Surrogate Registrar 


ti 


856 45 




866 45 




856 4E 


Oxford : 


















Sheriff 


James Brady 


1,821 66 




1,821 66 


1,821 66 


1,654 6 




Surrogate Judge . . 


Judge Finkle 


885 00 




885 00 


885 00 


88.1 0( 




Local Master 


W. T. McMuUen . . 


778 58 




778 68 


948 47 


570 7 




Deputy Registrar . . 


1 


169 89 




169 89 




169 !•' 



* $640.10 surplus Judge's fees paid to Junior Judge. 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



35 



Judicial Officers throughout the Province etc. — Continued. 



Si 

> fa 
g ? 


Total receipts by 
(ifficer from all his 
offices. 


-2 

a 

i 

3 

o 
H 


S 


a 


Amount paid to 
Government un- 
der 57 Vict. cap. 9. 


i 



a 

"S 

< 


Earnings of each otficer pay- 
able by the Government, the 
County, and tlie general pub- 
lic respectively. 


County. 


Total re 
past 3 
vices. 


From 
Govern- 
ment. 


From 
Count}'. 

1 


From 
general 
public. 




72 06, 4,420 63 
. ... 1 000 00 


$ c. 

1,949 45 

■337 63 


$ c. 

2,471 08 
1,000 GO 
1,275 07 


$ c. 

1 


$ c. 
1,471 08 

i.onooo 


$ c. 

1,837 00 
1,000 00 


$ c. 
1,296 94 


$ c. 
1,265 16 


Middlesex. 


53 00, 1,612 70 


11,275 07 




610 00 

1,561 78 

7H 20 

168 58 

361 50 

716 10 

2,266 SO 




27 84 






408 00 
514 79 


3,102 67 


978 50 


2,124 17 


12 41 2,111 76 


1,652 64 90 00 
490 80 1,162 05 

1 
600 00 




96 80 
16 40 


3,779 50 


936 00 


2,843 fO 


253 05 


2,590 45 




61 60 












1 




402 69 


1,836 43 
96 32 


863 11 
387 35 


973 32 
96 32 

593 72 




973 32 
96 32 

" ' 693 72 




1,981 68 











46 60 
51 32 











13 L 60 


98107 
1,032 69 


502 68 
317 84 
600 00 






174 43 








81 11 

38 00 

285 13 

109 56 






11 30 


1,021 39 





1,021 39 






















1,116 91 


2,802 98 
36 35 

' ' 784 79 


1,276 38 
129 70 


1,526 60 
36 35 

' ' 655 09 




1,526 60 
36 35 

■"65609 

985 66 


2,035 51 




Nipissing. 




21 75 
2 20 


12 60 
221 80 


" 63710 
122 57 
150 00 
450 00 

1,062 14 






123 40 


580 43 

"'436' 20 
773 90 


" " 106 60 

275 60 
67 43 

2 2 20 

380 50 

50 76 

17 00 

50 29 

154 50 

368 40 

980 92 

• 

852 09 






1,048 63 


63 63 


985 00 




7 95 
49 48 


1,894 25 
43146 

1,717 79 

2,013 97 


90 09 
2 14 

"'256'i6 

"30 65 


1,804 16 
429 32 

1,467 63 

1,983 32 


"48 33 


1,804 16 
429 32 

1,467 63 

1,934 99 


Norfolk. 


1 80 

"ss'so 

93 00 
37 95 


269 40 
155 70 
675 00 




170 3") 


















664 96 


3,000 99 
840 00 
322 02 

1,659 04 

2,678 24 


1,231 26 

355 66 
'636'66 


1,769 73 
840 00 
322 02 

1,304 04 

2,'oV8 24 


""59"65 


1,769 73 
840 00 
322 02 

1,304 04 

'l,988 59 


1,209 62 
840 00 

"8i5'57 
199 95 
750 00 


869 72 


Northumberland and 


245 27 

90 00 

356 53 


"'58'00 
738 54 


286 66 

'"' 18653 

114 70 

487 11 

1,326 43 

277 94 

494 50 

71 70 

71 50 

56 82 

31 00 

299 90 

856 45 

547 74 
885 00 
778 58 
169 89 




469 47 


1,636 38 
546 20 

'l,5V9'86 


369 95 
396 12 


1,266 43 
546 20 

1.123 74 




1,266 43 
646 20 

1,123 74 


826 99 


523 75 


Ontario. 


80 05 
479 26 


""334'46 
180 41 
675 00 


" '926 28 






1,862 36 


231 00 


1,628 35 


12 83 


1,615 52 


















441 92 




110 04 


1,764 60 

885 00 

1,167 30 


991 21 
115 00 


773 39 

885 00 

1,0;)2 30 




773 39 

885 00 

1,052 30 


832 00 


Oxford, 


409 5^ 








17 10 



























86 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix F. — Return of fees and emoluments of County 



County 
and town. 



Oxford.— Com. 
Woodstock . 



Pabey Sound : 
Parry Sound. 



Pkkl: 

J i Brampton 



Pekth : 
Stratford . 



Petbrboegugh 
Peterborough 



Presoott and 
RcssELL : 
L'Orignal . . . 



ticton 



Edw'rd 



Rainy River : 
Rat Portage . 



Office. 



Crown Attorney . . . 
Clerk of the Peace. . 
Deputy Clerk of the 

Crown 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar 



Officer. 



F. R. Ball, Q.C 
Jag. Canfield . . 



Sheriff 

Surrogate J udge . . 
Lrcal Master. . . . 
Crown Attorney . . 
Clerk of the Peace 
Local Registrar 
District Court Clerk 
Surrogate Registrar. 

Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge .... 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney. . . . 
Clerk of the Peace . 
Local Regi.Htrar 
County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 

Sheriff . 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 
Local Registrar .... 
County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 

Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge . . . 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney ... 
Clerk of th^ Peace . 

Local Re?istrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Samuel Armstrong. 
Judge McCurry . . . 

W. L Haight . . ." 

E. Jordan 



Robert Broddy . . 
Judge McGibbon , 



W. H. McFadden 
J. A. Austin 



John Hossie. . 
Judge Barron 



John Idington, Q.C. 
W. C. Moscrip 



$ c. 

209 30 
787 60 

396 60 

585 05 
1,898 37 

1,300 53 

124 75 

39 10 

320 32 

178 67 

66 55 

34 65 

129 18 

1,768 84 
494 60 
174 68 
443 80 

1,067 26 
240 25 
222 63 
742 49 



'S 2 

ft a 



TJ S 


"O s 


o 


56 


Si-a 


S,^ 


a S 


.2-3 


p a. 


26 


5i2 


<D r 


s >> 




b 


.-H ^ 


— , cS 


eS !« 


«8':3 






o ^ 


o " 


H " 


Eh 



> 0, 



450 00 



!& C. 

209 30 

787 60 



^ c 
996 90 



846 60 1 3,330 02 
58=) 05 
1,898 37 



500 00 1,800.531 1,800 53 

I 124 75,' 263 85 

.S9 10 
570 32 
178 67 
666 55 
34 65 
129 18 



250 00 



600 00 



600 00 



Sheriff Albert H 



J. A. Hall . . . 

I Judge Weiler 

n 

R. E. Wood.. 



John Moloney. 



Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace. . 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 

Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Sheriff . 

I Surrogate Judge 

'Local Master 



agar . 
I Judge O'Brian. 



John Maxwell 
John Eraser.. 



Jas. Gillespie 

Judge Merrill 

C. H. Widdifield... 
J. Roland Brown.. 

W.H.R. Allison, Q.C 



W. H. Carpenter 
Judge Chappie . . 



commuted 
404 34 
447 04 
972 03 
978 40 
589 97 
1,235 90 

1,941 oo: 

3S5 25' 
471 50 
389 00 
832 63 
236 70 
336 06 
619 79 



1,258 96 
103 25 
65 60 
69 93 
882 32 
132 90 
163 75 
255 58 



873 00 




1,768 84 1,768 84 
494 60 669 28 

174 68 

443 80 1,511 06 

1,067 261... 
840 251 1,805 37 

222 631 

742 49' 



2,023 90 2,023 90 2,023 90 




675 00 




1,263 90 200 00 1,463 90 1,463 90 1,431 50 



155 25 
147 05 
151 70 
626 47 

402 05 . 
455 35 



675 00 



873 00 1,277 34 

404 35' 

447 041 1,419 07 
972 03! . . . 
1,653 40 3,479 27 
589 97 



1,235 90 



1,941 00 1,941 00 1,902 70 

365 25 836 75 365 25 

471 50 . . 471 50 

389 00 1 1,221 63 272 80 

832 63 386 04 

911 70 1,867 65i 911 70 

.336 06 336 06 

619 79 619 79 



170 70 
758 90 

606 60 
400 00 

1,136 37 

1,206 41 

124 75 

39 10 

607 28 
118 38 
666 55 

34 65 
129 18 

1,360 31 
494 60 
174 68 
328 30 
798 77 
840 25 
219 71 
723 86 

1,135 36 
873 00 
383 94 
293 09 
452 77 

1,653 40 
589 97 

1,235 90 



1,758 96 1,758 96 1,213 38 

103 25 1 168 851 103 25 

65 601 ..' 15 80 

69 931 952 25 69 93 

882 32 . . .1 817 07 

807 90 1,227 23 760 50 

163 751 I 126 80 

255 .58' 146 21 



155 25 
147 05 
778 17 



600 00 



2,024 10 

55 75 

103 75 



155 25 

147 05 

151 70 

62H 47 

600 00 1,457 40 

402 05 

455 35 . 



1,000 00' 3,024 10 

I 55 75 

I 103 75 



155 25 
61 05 
1?9 10 
363 34 
600 00 
402 05 
455 35 



3,02 » 10 2,739 10 
159 50' 55 75 
! 98 05 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



Judicial Officers throughout the Province, etc. — Continued. 



OS 


^1 

aS 
"5 S 

C}<u 

-goo 
H 

$ c. 
1,349 77 


a 
c 

s 

£ 

'•5 

o 
H 

$ 0. 

4 00 


s 

o 
o 

■o 


Amount paid to 
Government un- 
der 67 Vict. cap. 9. 


Actual net income. 


Earnings of each officer pay- 
able by the Government, the 
County, and the general pub- 
lic respectively. 


County. 


Total re( 
past y 
vices. 


From 
Govern- 
ment. 


From 
County. 


From 
general 
public. 




$ c. 

109 90 
310 27 


$ c. 
1,345 77 


c. 


$ c. 
1,345 77 


$ c. 

209 30 
68 05 


$ c. 
"765 '65 


9 c. 

14"5C 

396 60 

585 05 

1,898 37 

233 22 

124 75 

39 10 


OxirjT A.— Continue 


201 50 
136 00 


3,142 47 


247 27 


2,895 20 


268 66 


1 
2,620 64 


1 
450 00 




563 00 
















249 84 


1,456 25 
263 85 


824 32 


631 93 
263 85 

753 53 


• 


631 93 
263 85 

'"753'53 


1,567 31 




Parry Sound. 


64 00 
98 89 


788 55 


35 02 


570 32 
155 02 








23 65 
66 55 

34 65 
129 18 

494 21 
494 60 
174 68 

"" 58'52 
240 25 
222 63 
742 49 

574 61 

38394 
16 24 
114 97 
978 40 
589 97 
1,235 90 

742 64 
365 25 
471 50 

35 00 
106 58 
236 70 
336 06 






830 38 


13 25 


817 13 




817 13 


600 00 

1 










868 62 
699 28 










446 61 

' 30 00 


1,806 92 
699 28 


938 30 


868 62 
699 28 


889 08 


386 55 
786 '69 


Peel. 


182 00 
301 01 


1,610 08 


95 95 


1,514 13 


' 1,514 13 


443 80 
222 05 
600 00 




14 60 
5 35 


1,816 07 

1,616 18 
1,256 94 


254 40 
710 38 


1,661 67 

906 80 
1,256 94 

1,298 63 

2,37911 


6 17 


1,5.55 60 




12 30 








480 82 


905 80 
1,256 94 


944 00 
873 00 


505 29 


Perth. 


106 00 
446 77 


1,298 63 
3,479 27 


i.ioo'ie 




1,298 63 
2,379 ii 


430 80 

166 80 

676 00 




696 26 














1 


478 66 




71 25 


1,973 95 
836 75 


671 45 
"2i 66 


1,302 50 
836 75 





1,302 50 
836 75 


719 80 


.Peterborough. 










216 50 1.280 68 
405 34' 


1,269 68 




1,259 68 


308 66 
155 65 
675 00 


46 00 
670 40 




'1,867 55 


320 00 


1,547 65 


4 76 


1,542 79 






















619 79 




576 72 
is 50 


1,790 10 
137 55 

952 25 

1,176 4i 


831 28 


"30 00 

280 66 


958 82 
137 65 


".".'.'.'. 


958 82 
137 55 


905 11 


395 63 

"15 25 

810 77 

467 86 


45S 22 

103 25 

65 60 

"21 '25 
132 90 
163 75 

255 58 

178 13 
155 25 
147 05 

25 36 


Prescott & RuBsell. 


""2i'25 
17 22 
43 00 
82 68 


922 26 
896 41 

-■ : : : . : ■ 

926 65 
1.55 26 1 
268 82 
767 26 


' 


922 25 
896 4i 

926 65 
155 25 
268 82 
767 26 


54 68 

56 30 

675 00 

817 91 




344 93 

" 207 77 


1,776 43 
ir.5 25 
268 82 
815 761 


849 78' 
' ' 48 .50 


Prince Edward. 


48 50 
274 82 


151 701 

38 OOl 563 11 




1,457 40 


43 25 


1,414 15 




1,414 15 


600 00 


1 








402 05 




::::::::i::::::: ::::'""i 












4.55 35 




1 

435 65 3.174 75 
1 153 80 


990 28 
4 50 


2,184 47 
149 30 




2.184 47 
149 30 


2,690.39 




333 71 

65 75 
103 75 


Baiay River. 




1 









38 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 30 



Appendix F. — Return of fees and emoluments of County 



CouQty 
and town. 



Rainy River. - 
Continued. : 
Rat Portage. 



Remfbbw : 
Pembroke 



SiMCOE : 
Barrie 




Stobmont, Dun 
DAS & Glen'y 
Cornwall 



Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace. . 
L cal Registrar .... 
District Court Clerk 
Surrogate Registrar. 

Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge .... 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 
Local Registrar . . . . 
County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Sherifif 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

Deputy Registrar. . . 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace. . 
Deputy Clerk of the 

Crown 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar . 



Thundkk Bay : 
Port Arthur. 



ViCTOKIA : 
Lindsay 



Waterloo ; 
Berlin . . . 



Sheriff 

Surro,?ate Judge — 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 
Local Registrar . . . . 
County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



H. Langford . . . 
F. J. Apjohn. . . 

Wm. Moffato . . 
Judge Deacon . . 

J. H. Metcalf.. 

Arch'd Thomson 



Hon. Chas Drury . 

Judge Ardagh 

J. R. Cotter 

J. Mcli. Stevenson. 



A. McNab 

Judge Pringle 

Jas. Dingwall . . . 

John A. McDougald 



D.£ 



313 59 

363 40 
207 90 
310 25 

90 75 

1.942 16 

commuted 

5 20 

186 86 

741 99 

h2 00' 

424 30 

312 73 

2,580 Sfi 

commuted 

144 16 

364 95 

774 5.i 
1,133 48 

153 05 

729 95 

1,225 76 



2,810 7a 

388 00 

389 50 
241 28 
599 04 
147 50 
670 65 

1,077 -fD 



250 00 
175 00 



264 00 



600 00 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master. 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 

Local Registrar 

District Court C'erk 
Surrogate Registrar. 

Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge .... 

Local Master 

Crown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 

Local Registrar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 

Sheriff 



Surrogate Judge 

Local Master 

_^rown Attorney 

Clerk of the Peace . . 

Local Reg.strar 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



A. W. Thompson. 
Judge Fitzgerald . 



T. A. Gorham. 
Jams'S Meek. . . 



585 00 



500 00 



750 00 



John McLennan .... 
Judge Dean 

A, P. Devlin '.'.'.... 

Wm. Grace 

W.H. Bowlby,QC., 

acting 

Judge Chii^holm . . . . 

J. J. A. Weir 

W. H. Bowlby, Q.C. 

John McDougall 

A. J. Peterson .... 



1,385 47 1,000 00 

75 00 

53 25 
116 40 250 00 

73 87 . 
251 88 600 00 
323 10 
132 13 



1,520 21 
commuted 



190 25 
551 24 
66 00 
250 51 
437 63 



2,063 16 
701 20 
387 00 
616 95 

1,324 94 
303 80 
548 40 
885 01 



03 O 

a « 



O * 



C.2 

u 

^ c3 



S c. 

313 59 
613 40 
382 00 
310 25 
90 75 

1,942 16 
264 00 
5 20 
186 86 
74199 
652 00 
424 30 
312 73 

2,580 86 
585 00 
144 16 
364 95 
774 55 

1,133 48 



926 99 
'783 90 



1,942 16 
269 20 

"928 85 



1,389 03 



2,580 86 

585 00 

2,417 14 



653 05 2,608 75 
729 95 
1,225 75 



2,810 73 2,810 73 

388 00 677 50 

389 50 

241 28 840 32 
599 04 

897 50 '2,545 55 

570 65 

1,077 40 



2,385 47 
128 25 



4 JO 27 



600 00 
900 00 



675 00 



100 00 



1,075 00 



2,385 47 

75 00 

53 25 
366 40 

73 87 
851 88 1,307 11 
32310 
132 13 

1,520 21 1,520 21 
500 00 1400 00 

900 00 

190 26 741 49 

55124 

741 00 1,429 14 

250 511 

437 63 



2,163 16 2,163 16 

701 20 701 20 

387 00 387 00 

616 95 1,941 89 

1,324 94 

1,378 80 1,927 20 

548 40 .... 
885 Oil 885 01 



1,235 88 
500 00 
900 00 
155 55 
399 52 
716 00 
190 01 
42113 



2,093 17 
70120 
314 50 
566 75 
1,294 50 
1,352 30 
486 90 
885 01 



1899 ■] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



39 



Judicial OflScera throughout the Province, etc. — Conlimied. 





Total receipts by 
officer from all his 
offices. 


5 

a 
« 

S 

u 

1 

3 

H 


s 

o 
u 

a 
® 


Amount paid to 
Government under 
57 Vict. cap. 9.j| 


6 

g 
o 
o 
_a 

a> 
a 

u 1 


Earnings of eacfi officer pay- 
able by the Government, the 
County, and the general pub- 
lic respectivtly. 


County. 


Tt.tal re( 
past y 
vices. 


From 
Govern- 
ment. 


Krom 
County. 


From 

general 
public. 

$ c 




-S c. 


8 0. 

926 99 

"783 90 


S c. 

8 00 

15 00 


S c. 
918 99 


8 c. 


S c. 
918 99 


$ c. 

313 59 
613 40 
175 00 


S c. 


Rainy River. 




768 90 




768 90' 




207 90 

3 25 

90 75 

734 00 
















1,105 79 
266 80 


".".■■;:;: 






40 32 


1,867 63 
206 80 


761 84 


1,105 79 
266 80 




682 64 
264 00 


525 46 

t 


Renfrew. 




. 1 


5 20 

1 

88*37 

52 00 
424 30 
312 73 

879 95 
.... 
" "144 16 

364 95 

" "22'96 

153 00 

729 95 

1,225 75 

1,042 31 

388 00 

289 50 

10 38 

80 32 

147 50 

570 65 

1.077 40 

394 18 
75 00 

53 25 




12 00 
372 69 


1,066 39 
'lV389 03 

2,779 36 

585 00 

2,643 63 


19 96 
'"l55'50 

1,234 06 
191 20 


1,046 43 
1,233 53 

1,545 .30 

585 00 
2,449 43 




1,046 43 
1233 53 


.... 

186 86 

122 39] 531 23 
600 00 




540 64 


1,545 30 

585 00 

2,449 43 


1,171 20 
585 00 


529 71 

...;■..;; 

"k^kik 


Simcoe. 


22649 













774 55 
274 80 






2,608 75 

2,867 46 
765 67 


420 00 


2,188 75 


87 75 


2,101 00 


500 00 

L 


















369 06 


1,582 37 


1,285 09 
765 67 




1,285 09 
765 67 


862 63 


905 79 


Stormont, Dundas 
and Glengarry. 




.::::":::i::::::': 


94 96 
362 64 


954 96 


45 56 


909 40 




909 40 


321 29, 32 07 
80 80 4S7 92 






2,545 55 


442 55 


2,103 00 


70 60 


2,032 40 


750 00 








2.312 14 
119 65 

' 552 ie 

lV4'53 46 


633 35 


1,678 79 
119 65 












715 96 


1,678 79 
119 65 


1,991 29 




Thunder Bay. 











50 10 


108 50 


443 66 




443 66 


366 4C 






61 79 


61 15 


1 


12 72 
251 88 
323 10 
132 13 

329 05 




132 f>9 

48 95 


88 90 


1,364 55 




1,364 55 


600 00 




482 03 


1.717 91 
1,400 00 


327 80 


1,390 11 
1,400 00 




1,390 11 
1,400 00 

' 899 16 

1.466 84 


681 60 
! 500 00 
900 00 
190 25 
74 10 
675 00 


i 

509 53 


Victoria. 


1.S2 sn 


899 16 
1,52184 


"65 66 


899 16 
1,466 84 




211 2'A 
35 40 
S5 6f 


425 14 


52 00 

66 00 

250 51 

437 63 

643 82 
701 20 
387 00 




74 7C 
49 87 


2,143 04 

701 2C 

314 50 

2,008 2C 



1,839 2C 


742 67 

1 35 80 
! 400 OO 

374 5C 

'400 6c 


i 1,400 37 

! 7<)1 20 

•J78 70 

[ 1,60<2C 

i 1,464 70 

485 01 









1,400 .37 

70 i 20 

278 70 

1,608 20 

1,461 70 


! 1,058 84 


' 460 50 

1 


Waterloo. 




1 1 




97 9£ 


i 612 45' 4 56 

239 10 1,000 00 

1.075 00 




49 OC 


, 85 84 

1 303 80 

548 40 

885 01 








1 






88 J 01 




485 01 







THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No 30 



Appendix F. — Return of fees and emoluments of County 



County, 
and town. 



Wklland : 
Welland 



Wellington : 
Guelph. .. 



Wentworth 
Hamilton . 



YoBK : 
Toronto 



Toronto ; 
City . . 



Office. 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Ma&ter 

Crown Attorney . . . . 
Clerk i>f the Peace . 
L')ca- Registrar ... 
County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 

Local Master . 

Local Registrar 

Crown Attorney . . 
Clerk of the Peace. 
County Court Clerk 
Surrogate Registrar 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge . 
Local Master and 

Deputy Registrar 
Crown Attorney. . . 
Clerk of the Peace. 
Deputy Clerk of the 

Crown 

County Court Clerk. 
Surrogate Registrar. 



Officer. 



James Smith . . . . 
Judge Fitzgerald 

T. D. Cowper 

I. P. Willson 



Robt. McKim . . . 
Judge Chadwick. 
A. M. McKinnon 

H. W. Peterson . 

Wm C'arroll 



Jas. T. Middleton 
Judge Snider. . . . 
J. E. O'Reilly . 

John Crerar, Q.C 



S. H.Ghent. 



Sheriff 

Surrogate Judge 



Crown Attorney 
Clerk of the Peace . . 
Surrogate Registrar. 
County Court Clerk. 



Sheriff . 

Crown Attorney 



J. H. Widdifield 
Judge Maclougall 
Judge Morgan. . . 
Judge Morson 
U. H. Uewart, Q 
H. E. Irwin . ... 

Jos. Tait 

Hon. A M. Ross 

Fred. W. Mowat . . 
J. W. Curry, Q.C 



-ScS 



$ c. 



3,2.51 91 1 

*l,O0O 00 . . 
commuted I 3,500 00 



2,046 46!. 

439 501 . 

161 08 1 . 

649 75 . 
1,360 32 1 . 

136 801 

311 10|. 

905 75! . 

2,228 521. 
677 OOl. 

1,016 101 
164 16| 
660 501 . 

1,985 20| . 
485 00 
253 73 



600 00 



750 00 



1,895 45| 
920 481 

363 001 
1,220 27| 
],966 65 

.fi,905 801 
2,988 251 



500 00 



666 00 
666 CO 



3,244 281 
3,249 68 1 
5,352 831 
4,205 701 

9,229 681 
3,911 831 



-o 6 

is 
o 

a <u 

Z ^ 
^1 



c S 

m O 

ga 

"^-^ 

O (Kl 



$ c 

2,046 46 
439 50 
161 08 
649 75 

1,360 32 
736 80 
311 10 
905 75 

2,228 52 
677 00 

1,016 10 
914 16 
660 50 

1,985 20 
485 00 
253 73 

3,251 91 
1,000 00 
3,500 00 

1,895 45 
920 48 






2,046 46 1,744 39 
600 78 439 50 

I 121 28 

418 50 
1,212 36 
714 40 
292 55 
892 70 



2,010 07 
1,95'3'65 



2,228 52 

677 00 

1,930 26 

2,645 76 

" ' 738 73 



3,251 91 
1,000 00 
3,500 00 

2,815 93 



863 00 
1,220 271 4,049 92 
1,966 65 



5,905 80 5,905 80 4,565 49 
2,988 25 1 2,988 25 2,988 25 
666 OOl 666 00 666 00 
666 00| 666 00 666 00 
3,244 281 3,244 28 2,264 48 
3,249 68| 3,249 68 3,249 68 
6,35L 831 5,352 831 f),352 83 
4,205 70 1 4,205 70 1 4,192 25 

9,229 641 9,229 641 6,335 64 
3,911 831 3,911 83 2,973 00 



2,170 28 
677 00 
959 76 
914 16 
461 50 

1 ,762 94 
481 25 
242 58 

2,703 99 
1,000 00 
3,600 00 

1,895 45 
920 48 

816 20 
1,022 77 
1,804 86 



*In addition $666 was paid to the Junior Judge and .S83.75 to Provincial Treasurer. 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF LEGAL OFFICES. 



4] 



Judicial. Officers throughout the Province, — Concluded. 



<u to 


^^ 

ft 

'!> h » 

- 0) 4) 

o c c 

E- 

$ c. 

2,125 06 

577 88 

2,181 15 


a 
<L 

S 

« 
U 

3 
XI 

c. 
593 00 

"637 79 


6 

a 

V 

% c. 

1,532 05 
577 88 


05 

o a ft 

- 3 c« 
o 

■3 ^.H 

ftHf> 

$ c. 


e 
s 

3 

< 

$ c. 

1,532 05 
577 88 


Earnings of each officer pay- 
able by the Government, tiJe 
County, and the general pub- 
lic respectively. 


Couijty. 




From 

Govern 

ment. 


From 
Coun y. 


From 
general 
public. 




$ c. 

380 66 

17 10 


$ c 
869 70 

'"'649 75 
221 25 
600 00 


c. 
603 37 

'1,139 07 


§ c. 

573 39 
439 50 
161 28 

" ise'so 

311 10 

905 75 

809 83 

677 00 

1,016 10 

164 16 


Welland. 


79 40 
470 89 


1.543 36 





1,543 36 




.4 70 
11 90 


1,929 35 


315 30 


1,614 05 


11 40 


1,602 65 




3 10 






> 










65 62 


2,2.35 90 

677 00 

2,077 49 


1,420 03 
"l75'76 


815 87 
677 00 




815 87 

677 00 

1,901 74 


1,032 87 


385 82 


Wellington. 


203 57 


1,901 74 


""75600 
660 50 
162 30 


1,700 00 




179 .^0 


2,613 65 


696 00 


1,917 65 


1,917 65 




209 71 






132 90 
485 00 
253 73 

973 10 
1,000 00 




2 20 


726 03 


53 75 


672 28 




672 28 












644 77 


3,348 76 
1,000 00 
3,500 00 

2,815 93 


1,672 28 
200 00 
730 OO 


1.67H 48 
1 ,000 00 
3.:-'.00 00 

2,086 93 
3,321 00 




8 59 


1,676 48 
1.000 00 
3,300 00 

2,077 34 


1,841 46 


437 36 


Wentworth. 




3,500 00 

1,895 45 
322 20 

500 00 
















598 28 


363 00 
1,220 27 
1,966 65 

1,064 72 
2,988 25 




34 60 
159 95 


4,047 96 


726 96 


460 50 


2,860 50 




209 58 


.5,615 94 
2,988 25 
666 00 
fi66 00 
3,061 88 
3,249 68 
.%352 83 
4,221 18 

8,625 77 
3,949 00 
















1,050 45 


2,536 82 

897 50 
1,185 15 
1,321 00 
1,140 51 

4,255 90 
577 50 


3.079 12 
2.988 26 

666 00 

666 00 

2,164 38 

2,064 53 

4,031 S3 

3.080 67 

4,369 87 
3,371 50 


'"ie 43 

6 45 
815 92 
340 33 

"26i'45 


3,079 12 
2,988 25 
666 00 
666 00 
2,147 95 
2,058 08 
3.215 91 
2,740 34 

4,369 87 
3,110 05 


4,100 20 


740 88 


York. 




666 00 

666 00 

3,067 05 

1,0£0 50 














797 40 


144 00 
2,102 68 


33 23 

116 50 

5,352 83 

4,205 70 

4,226 40 




28 93 

2,290 13 
976 00 


3,754 90 
3,911 83 

( 


*1049 38 


Toronto. 









*0f this .$382.63 was paii by county 



4 L.O. 



REPORT 



INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES 



FOR THE YEAR 



1899. 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO. 




TORONTO: 

Printed and Published by L. K. Cameron, 

Printer to the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty. 




WJ.RWICJ\ 3R0'S & RUTTER, Printers. 
TO MO N TO. 



REPORT 



INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES 

FOR 

1899. 

GuELPH, 18th April, 1900. 
To The Honorable J. M. Gibson, 

Attorney- General of 

The Province of Ontario. 

Sir, — I have now to present my report, as Inspector of Registry Offices, for the 
year 1899. 

The -wcrk of the Eegistry Offices during the past year has, on the whole, been carried 
on in an efficent and intelligent manner. 

The Registrars' returns for last year show, amongst other results, the following : 

Total number of instruments registered. in 1899 116,937 

" « " 1898 110,678 

Increase 6,359 

Gross amount of fees received in the Registry Offices in 1899 . . $186,069 90 
" " " «• 1898 .. 172,911 40 

Increase $13,058.50 

The net fees in 1899 were 106,460.99 

" 1898 " 101,090 75 

Increase $5,370.24 

I add herewith a copy of the tabulated statement from the Registrars' retuina, giving 
particulars of the fees and emoluments of the different Registry Offices. 

Amongst the important and salutary amendments made to the Registry Law in the 
Session of 1899, were provisions for greatly restricting the use of the General Register, 
and for compulsory registration of powers of attorney and notices of exercising powers of 
sale in mortgages. 

The amendments referred to have giveu rise to a number of extra references to me 
for opinions on various new questions which have arisen. Notes of some of the decisions 
and opinions I have given since my last report are appended to this report. 

I beg respectfully to suggest, for your consideration, and that of the Government, 
whether it would not be expedient to pass an Order-in Council, to require that the cove, 
nants or bonds of Guarantee Companies, given for the faithful performance of their duties, 
by Registrars, and which are usually issued for a year and continued by the payment of 
premiums, should all be renewed by the payment of premiums on the same day in each 
year. At present, the covenants terminate at different periods of the year. 

[3] 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



I think it would be well to make the premium on all such covenants due on the Slat 
of December in each year, and then the Registrars in making their yearly returns, which 
have to be made in the first fifteen days of the new year, should be required, with the 
returns, to forward the renewal receipts to the Department. 

So far as Registrars are concerned, the change suggested would work automatically. 
I have further to recommend that such Guarantee Companies be required to cove- 
nant or stipulate to give a reasonable notice before they shall have power to terminate 
their liability in respect of the covenants given by them. I think they ought to be 
required to give at least one month's notice both to the Registrar and to the Government* 
As you are aware, in one case a Guarantee Company sought, by a notice on the 26th of 
one month to terminate its liability on the first day of the ensuing month — a period 
unreasonably short. 

I have had to call the attention of Registrars to defects in the forms of old abstract 
indexes still in use. In many cases these forms do not provide for showing the considera- 
tion in deeds, merely the consideration in mortgages. I have notified the Registrars to 
enter in the abstract indexes the consideration in deeds as well as in mortgages. 

In connection with the registration of original wills, I have impressed upon the 
Registrars, and now desire to repeat my advice, that they should be careful to see, where 
original wills are offered for registration, that the affidavit of execution by the subscrib- 
ing witnesses or one of them sets forth, amongst other things, that the will was executed 
according to the requirements of the Wills Act of Ontario ; and particularly to see, in 
regard to wills executed since January 1st., 1874, that the affidavit of execution shows 
that the Testator made or acknowledged his signature in the presence of two or more 
witnesses present at the same time, and that such witnesses attested and subscribed the 
will in the presence of the Testator. In the eastern part of the Province especially, the 
registration of original wills, without probate, is not uncommon. Hence, I wish, by this 
report, further to call the attention of Registrars to the necessity of requiring that the 
affidavits of execution shall be sufficient under the Wills Act. 

I avail myself of this report, to emphasize some other directions I have had occasion 
to give to individual Registrars, as follows : — 

So far as possible, Registrars should, in entering description of lands in the abstract 
indexes, endeavor to comply more fully than has hitherto, in some cases, been done, with 
the requirements of Section 36 of the Registry Acb. 

Registrars should do the abstracting of instruments in the indexes very promptly — 
the same day, if possible, that they are received ; this to include entries not only in the 
abstract but in the alphabetical indexes. 

The marginal entries in the registers of registration should b3 signed by the Regis- 
trars or their deputies as soon as the instruments are copied. 

Where Registrars use rubber stamps for forms of certificate, they should see that 
the stamp is not only carefully used, but is in good order, so that the impression may be 
perfectly distinct. In several cases I have found the impression to be somewhat 
indistinct. 

On registration of special conveyances, such as conveyances to uses, and the like, 
Registrars should exercise great care in entering them in the abstract index and in giving 
out abstracts of their contents. 



1899] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 



Where there are special clauses, conditions, recitals or covenants in conveyances, 
that fact should always be noted in the column for remarks in the abstract index, and 
attention called to the matter in abstracts furnished. 

Where deeds are made to two or more persons as joint tenants ard not as tenants- 
in-common, that fact should be noted in the abstract indexes. 

The use of separate alphabetical indexes is every year becoming more general. The 
use of them ought to be commenced, where not a' ready begun, as soon as the current 
registers aie completed. 

I have the honor to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

(Sgd.) DUN. GUTHRIE, 

Inspector R. (). i 



DECISIONS BY DONALD GUTHKIE, Q.O, INSPEOToR OF REGISTRY 

OFFICES. 

Plan Amended by Judge's Order— Description of Lands and Entries op Instru- 

MBKTs Subsequent Thereof. 

Some disputes as to fees have arisen and been referred to me, between a Solicitor 
and a Registrar. 

The first dispute is as to the fees for registering a deed to A and mortgage from A 
to B ; and the second is as to the fees for registering a discharge of a prior mortgage on 
the same lands. 

The lands affected are parts of lots 18 and 19 in the 5th concession of M. They had 
been subdivided into village lots by one X, and a plan registered, and had been mort- 
gaged as village lots. On 8th March last the judge of the county court made an order 
under Section 110 of the Registry Act, amending this plan. The judge ordered that the 
plan be altered and amended by striking out from it all the lots therein contained except 
lots numbers 2, 106, 108 and 109, and ail the streets and ways marked thereon, except 
N street and street, and that all the lands contained in the plan, except lots 2, etc., 
and the last named streets, should constitute one single parcel of land for all purposes 
relating to the Registry Act, and that the lands might be described in all deeds of con- 
veyance relating thereto, as all the lands contained in the said plan as the same was 
amended by the order, except lots 2, etc , and N street and street. This ordfr was 
registered in the registry office on the 27th day of March last, and the deed to A and the 
mortgage from him to B were registered on the same day, after the registration of the 
order. The deed and mortgage described the lands according to the judge's order. The 
charge for registering the order, which was $5, is not disputed ; but the charge^* for 
registering the deed and mortgage, which are $5 each, are disputed. The solicitor con- 
tends the charge for registering the deed should only be $1.40, and for registering the 
mortgage $1, as the latter was endorsed " Not to be registered in full." The registrar 
contends that he was compelled to ent^r the deed and mortgage against each of the 100 
odd lots on the original plan, and is entitled to charge 5 cents per lot. 

I assume from his charge that the Registrar entered the Judge's Order against each 
of the village lots affected, and against the streets affected, and he also, treating the 
order as an instrument (as by his charge for registering he treated it) I assume, opened 
a new page in the Abstract Index for the block of land consisting of the whole land on 
the plan, excepting the four small lots and two streets. 

Having done this work, why should he go back and enter the deed and mortgage 
subsequently registered, against the village lots which, according to the order already 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



registered, could no longer be properly described as village lots 1 The subdivision of the 
lands, less these lots, was put an end to by the Judge's Order, at all events in respect to 
registration purposes, and to instruments like the deed and mortgage, which were not 
only registered subsequent to the order, but which described the land, not according to 
the original plan, but according to the altered description, as prescribed by or following 
the Judge's Order. If the Registrar's view is correct, that he was compelled to register 
the deed and mortgage against every village lot, then every instrument hereafter regis- 
tered, affecting the lands, would also have to be so entered, and the alteration or amend- 
ment of the plan by the Judge's Order would be ignored by the Registrar. 

It seems to me the deed and mortgage should not have been entered against the 100 
odd village lots, and that the Solicitor's contention in respect to the fees for registering 
them is correct. I therefore allow $1.40 for registering the deed and $1.00 for register- 
ing the mortgage. 

A further dispute between the same parties exists with regard to the fees for regis- 
tration of a discharge of an old mortgage on the same lands. 

This old mortgage was upon the village lots, and was made long before the plan was 
amended by the Oounty Judge. 

Subsequently to the registration of the Judge's Order and of the deed and new mort- 
gage describing the land as one lot, the discharge of the old mortgage was tendered for 
registration by the Solicitor, with fifty cents fee therefor, he contending that as the sub- 
division had been put an end to, the discharge only embraced one parcel or lot. The 
Registrar refused to accept this fee upon the ground that the lands embraced in the dis- 
charge were all the subdivision lots, and it was his duty, as he conceived, to enter the 
discharge of mortgage upon all the old subdivision lots, and he claimed a fee of five cents 
per subdivision lot therefor or up to $5, under the recent amendment to the Registry 
Act, the discharge having been tendered for registration after that amendment came into 
force. 

While I think there is some force in the view submitted to me by the Registrar, I 
have come to the conclusion that my decision as to the deed and mortgage also covers the 
point raiaed as to the discharge of old mortgage. The subdivision of lots by the old plan 
was at an end before the discharge was registered, and I therefore think the property 
embraced in the discharge consisted of one parcel or part of one parcel. 

The description of the land had, by the Judge's Order, been altered ; and in making 
entries in the Abstract Index subsequent to that order respect should be had to that order 
and to the change in the mode of describing and abstracting the land thereby affected. 

Supposing the release of mortgage, iastead of being by Statutory Certificate, had 
been by deed, what would be the proper description of the land, and against what pro- 
perty would the Registrar enter such release or deed in his Abstract Index 1 

It seems to me that as the subdivision of the land into small lots had been put an 
end to, such release under seal, like any other instrument, should describe the land sub- 
stantially according to the Judge's Order, treating the land as now constituting one parcel. 
At all events in whatever way such release under seal described the land, it could properly 
only be entered in the Abstract Index in the same page as the deed and the new mort- 
gage were entered, treating the land as now^ one parcel. 

I do not see that any particular inconvenience will arise from entering the ceititicate 
of discharge of the old mortgage against the land as described in the Judge's Order, 
because this order having been entered in the Abstract Index against each subdivision of 
the lots affected by it, there is notice to any one who searches any of the subdivision lots 
that the subdividing plan has been amended, and for subsequent registrations the party 
making a search will look at the entries on the new page opened in the Abstract Index, 
after registration of the Order, and he will ascertain what are the subsequent registra- 
tions, including the Discharge of Mortgap;e. 

I decide this dispute also, therefore, in favor of the solicitor's contention, and I 
think the proper fee lor registering this discharge of mortgage is 50 cents, unless it be 
over three folios, in which case there will be some small additional charge. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 



Requisition for Abstract — Abstracts furnished not in strict Accordance 

therewith. 

A dispute a? to fees comes before me by way of reference, the parties being a firm 
of solicitors for a loan company, and a Registrar. 

The solicitors sent to the Registrar, for registration, a mortgige made by one A to 
the Society, and, by printed circular, they requested the Registrar to return same to them 
at his "earliest convenience with an abstract of title to the property since the registration 
of No. 177." 

The mortgage covered seven lots; No. 177 was an instrument which covered only 
two of these lots. The Company held a previous mortgage, made in 1896, on these pro- 
perties. It was No. 145 on the other five lots. The solicitors sent the abstract of the 
two lots for continuation, but not of the other five. The Registrar understood the requi- 
sition to require him to make abstracts from the Grown of the five lots and from No. 177 
of the two lots, and he made and supplied abstracts accordingly. The solicitors declined 
to accept the abstracts of the five lots from the Crown, and say that they did not order 
them. They only intended, according to their contention, as the Company held a pre- 
vious mortgage on the property, to order an abstract of registrations subsequent to that 
mortgage, and they say that the Registrar should have so understood it. He, on the 
other hand, says that the solicitors have another form of requisition, which requests the 
Registrar, if abstracts are unusually long, or are likely to be expensive, to communicate 
with them before preparing them. This requisitioa did not so request, and the old 
abstracts of the five lots, not having been returned to be continued, and the solicitors 
requiring the abstracts at the Regisirar's earliest convenience, he considered they required 
what he furnished, namely, abstracts from the Crown. The solicitors, of coarse, admit 
that the requisition was not correctly expressed in regard to the five lots, because what 
they wanted in respect to them was abstracts from their previous mortgage. No. 145. 

I do not think the Registrar's interpretation of the requisition was altogether un- 
reasonable, yet I think, if he had considered the situation more fully, he would have 
written for further explanations before preparing abstracts from the Crown of the five 
lots, even although the solicitors had not used that form of requisition, which invites such 
a communication in certain events. Then, again, may the requisition not be read as one 
requiring abstracts from the time when No. 177 was registered ? It is clear only limited 
abstracts were required, that is to say, of registrations since the registration of No. 177. 
There was, of course, no No. 177 on the five lots, but I question whether it could pro- 
perly be said that because there was no such number on any of the five lots, therefore 
the requisition should be held to have required that five abrtracts from the Crown 
onwards be prepared. 

On the whole I think under the circumstances the Registrar was scarcely authorized 
by the requisition to prepare abstracts from the Crown of the frve lots, and I decide the 
dispute accordingly. 



Registration of Will in both Separate and General Registers — Residuary Clause 

A Registrar has referred to me a dispute between himself and a Solicitor. 

It raises the question as to whether or not a will should have been registered in the 
General Register for the County, as well as in the Separate Register of the Township of 

A The Registrar contends that it should have been so registered in the 

General Register, and the Solicitor contends that it should not. After devising two 

parcels of land in the Township of A by local description and one parcel in 

another County, by local description, the testator gives legacies to his daughters, provides 
for the furnishing of a home for them ; bequeaths to them his household property. The 
pecuniary legacies to the daughters are to be paid by his son B, who is Executor of the 

will, and to whom he devises the several parcels of land in A After 

apparently providing for his family the will winds up thus — 

" The residue of my estate I bequeath to my son B." 



THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



Qaestions of this sort come up frequently, varying according to the language of the 
different instruments I was at one time inclined to think that where the will was that 
of a resident of the County in which it was to be registered, and where it contained some 
such residuary clause as the will here contains, registration in the General Register ought 
rather to be favored. Further consideration inclines me now to think that such a residu- 
ary clause as this is, should not render it necessary to put the will in the General Register, 
as well as the Separate Register, where there is a devise of lands by local description in 
the Oounty, and where, therefore, registration is evidently effected for the purpose of that 
particular land and where the residuary clause dees not show, or where the will itself 
does not otherwise show or indicate that the testator has other real estate in the Oounty 
than the lands described by local description. 

It has to be noticed that this will was registered in the other County. The Registrar 
there did not register it in the General Register : registration was effected in that Oounty 
plainly because the will contained a devise of lands by local description in that County j 
and the Registrar ot that Oounty did not consider it necessary because of the residuary 
clause to put the will into the General Registar of his Oounty, because there was nothing 
in the will to indicate that the residuary clause afiected Ian is in that County. 

Supposing a testator owned lands in many different Counties in Ontario, and devised 
them all by local description, it could hardly with propriety be said that where registra- 
tion of the will is effected in each of these counties it must, because of a residuary 
clause expressed as the one before me is expressed, be necessary that the will should go 
into the General Register of each Oounty as well as into the Separate Register. 

I think on the whole it was not necessary to register the will in the General Register 
as well as in the Separate Register for the Township of A, and I decide accordingly. 



Discharge of Mortgage Executed in 1889 by Attorney may be Registered without 
Containing Particulars of Kegistration of Power of Attorney. 

A difference between a firm of Soliitors and a Registrar, h*s come before me for 
my opinion. 

The Solicitors offered for registration a discharge of mortgage signed by A, by 
attorney B. The discharge was executed in March, 1889. The Registrar refused to 
registrar the discharge, as the date of registration and Number of the Power of Attorney 
were not mentioned in the certificate of discharge, basing his refusal on Section 7 of the 
Act recently passed to amend the Registry Act. The Power of Attorney is registered 
in the Registry Office 

I do not think Section 7 applies to a discharge executed before that section came 
into force. I considered a similar question in 1895, and then expressed the opinion that 
what is now Section 78 of the Registry Act, had not a retroactive effect, and did not 
apply to discharges of mortgage validly executed before it came into operation. To that 
opinion I adhere It will be found in my Report for 1895, page 7. 

I therefore hold that the discharge of mortgage signed by A by attorney, in 1889, 
should be registered. 



An Agreement extending Time for payment of Mortgage Money is not an Instru- 
ment which may be Endorsed " Not to be Registered in full." 

A Registrar has referred to me a question which has arisen between himself and a 
Solicitor, as to whether an instrument between A and B is an instrument which may 
be properly endorsed " Not to be registered in full." 

I have seen a duplicate of the instrument, which is endorsed " Agreement extending 
Mortgage." It is an Agreement under seal, whereby the time for the payment of a 
registered mortgage is extended for five years from 20th April last, with interest at five 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 



per cent., payable half-yearly, with certain privileges as to pre-payment, and contains 
clauses stating that the mortgage thus amended, with all covenants and provisoes, shall 
be and continue in full force and eflfect. It contains other uaual provisoes in similar 
documents. A is not the original mortgagor ; she claims to be the third grantee of the 
equity of redemption, and, by the instrument, she gives her personal covenant to the 
mortgagee for the payment of the mortgage money and the interest, according to the 
terms of the extension agreement. 

I think this is a special instrument, and is not a mortgage, but is an instrument 
amending and affecting a mortgage, and that it does not come properly under the 
term " mortgage " within the meaning of the clause of the Registry Act now under 
consideration. 

My decision, therefore, is in favor of the view of the Registrar, namely, that the 
instrument in question is not an instrument which could be endorsed " Not to bo regis- 
tered in fall." 



A Mortgage may be Endorsed " Not to be Registered in full," notwithstanding a 
PRIOR Mortgagee is a Party thereto and thereby agrees to Postpone his 
Mortgage. 

A difference has arisen between a Registrar and a Solicitor, regarding a mortgage 
endorsed " Not to be registered in full," made by A and wife to the B Savings and Loan 
Company, these being parties of the first, second and third parts respectively, and being 
added as a party of the fourth part. The only reference to C in the body of the instru- 
ment, is the following : 

" And the party of the fourth part postpones his mortgage, dated 5th October, 1897, 
on the said lands, and agrees that it shall stand second to this mortgage, and in all 
respects be the same as if it had been made and registered after this mortgage " 

The Registrar raises a question as to whether the mortgage, with the additional 
clause, comes within the section of the Act authorizing mortgages not to be registered 
in full. 

I think the point raised in this case is covered by a decision I made upon a reference 
to me from another Registrar, a copy of which decision I forward to the Registrar with 
my present opinion. I adhere to that decision I am of opinion that the instrument in 
question here is an instrument which could properly be endorsed " Not to be registered 
in full." 



A Mortgage to Secure Future Advances May be Endorsed "Not to be Regis- 
tered IN Full." 

A dispute which exists between a Registrar and a Solicitor, has been referred to me 

The Solicitor registered a mortgage for future advances, and endorsed it " Not to be 
registered in full " The Deputy-Registrar considered it was not such an instrument as 
could be so endorsed, because it contained a covenant by the mortgagors to allo«v the 
mortgagee to " take up by way of further advances as aforesaid and obtain assignments 
of all existing incumbrances against the lands or any claim that may arise against the 
same." 

The question for my decision is, does the presence of this Uovenant in a mortgage 
for future advances, deprive the mortgagee of the right to endorse the mortgage " Not to 
be registered in full V 

In my opinion the question must be answered in the negative, and I decide the 
matter in favor of the Solicitor. 



10 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



An Instrument Granting Lands, Assigning a Mortgage and Assigning an Agree- 
ment OF Purchase by way of Mortgage may be Endorsed " Not to be Regis- 
tered in Full." 

A question has arisen between a firm of Solicitors and a number of Registrars, which 
has been referred to me for my ruling. 

The solicitors tendered for registration an instrument, A to B, endorsed as a mortgage 
and endorsed " Not to be registered in full." 

The several Registrars contend that the instrument is not, as a whole, a mortgage, 
that it has a triple operation, namely, that of a mortgage in respect to some properties, 
that of an assignment of mortgage in respect to other property, and that of an assignment 
of agreement to purchase, in respect to another parcel of land, and therefore is not such 
an instrument as is contemplated by the Statute, which is capable of being endorsed 
" Not to be registered in full." 

On the other handj the solicitors' view is that the assignment of mortgage is by way 
of derivative mortgage, and notwithstanding that the instrument contains a special power 
of sale, special covenants and obher special provisions, it may be endorsed in the short 
form. 

On examining the instrument, I find that it grants and mortgages certain estates, 
that it assigns an agreement for purchase, and that it assigns a mortgage, but it appears 
to me from the instrument that the grant and the assignments are all merely by way of 
mortgage to secure a specified sum. There is the ordinary proviso for redemption con- 
tained in the mortgage, and it applies to all the subjects transferred ; the whole transfer 
is by way of security for the same debt. The instrument has all the incidents of a 
mortgage. The mortgagor has the right to redeem, and the mortgagee the right to fore- 
close, and the various special clauses do not alter the nature of the instrument. They 
are for the purpose of facilitating the realization of the securities. 

A man may mortgage by one instrument various properties, although he may in 
these various properties have several diflferent interests. His title to one property may 
be that of tenant in fee; in another, that of tenant for life ; in another he may only have 
a leasehold interest, but the fact that the interests in the properties mor*-gaged are of 
different kinds will not alter the nature of the instrument, if the properties are all trans- 
ferred by way of mortgage. 

T therefore think this instrument wa3 properly endorsed as a mortgage and could be 
properly endorsed " Not to be registered in full," and 1 decide tha matter in difference 
accordingly. 



Fees for Arstracts — What References to Copies Instruments Should be 

Allowed for. 

Mr. S, Solicitor, has disputed the fees charged by a Registrar for an abstract of 
title, and the matter has been referred to me. 

Mr. S applied for an Abstract of Title to the south half of the south half of lot No. 
18 in the 7th concession of the Township of A, the abstract to be of ail instruments from 
and subsequent to the registration of the instrument numbered 4474, but not including 
that instrument. 

The Registrar charged the following fees : — For searches, $1.20, and for writing, 
.40; in all $1 60. 

Mr. S disputes the fees for searches on the ground that the Abstract Index either 
showed, or ought to have shown, that the only instruments aflfecting the south half of the 
south half were the two instruments referred to in the Abstract, and for searching as to 
same, a fee of 25 cents is sufficient, and should include four references to the copies of 
instruments in the Registers, should such references be necessary. 

The Solicitor points out that the Registrar's duty under section 36 of the Registry 
Act was to enter in the Aostract Index a sufficient description of the land mentioned in 
the various instruments as will readily identify its location, and if this had been done, the 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 11 



Abstracc ^ndex would have been so complete as to have rendered a reference to any 
instruments, other than the two instruments mentioned in the Abstract furnished, un- 
neceRBary. 

The Registrar states his position in the matter to be that lot 18 in the 7th conces- 
sion of A, which was a 200 acre lot, was divided into several parts, and the registrations 
from 4474, exclusive of that number, to the date of the Abstract, were 23, and he con- 
sidered it necessary to refer to these 23 instruments in the preparation of the Abstract. 
He mentions that the parts of the lot are simply described as parts, and the metes and 
bounds given, without otherwise indicating what part of the lot is afiected, and he con- 
sidered upon that ground that it was necessary to refer to the 23 instruments, in order 
to prepare an accurate Abstract and to be s ife from responsibility. 

The Registrar concedes that waere a description of the land affected can, from the 
description given in the document, be made perfectly plain in the Abstract Index, refer- 
ences are not necessary, but where there is any doubt he should be allowed the privilege 
of making a reference to the instrument. 

I think the position taken by the Registrar, last mentioned, is a correct view of the 
matter. The question, however, is, were 23 references in this case rendered necessary by 
insufficient entries in the Abstract Index, of the descriptions of the lands taken from the 
instruments registered against this lot, or were these references rendered necessary by 
any defective or complicated descriptions contained in the instruments themselves 1 

I considered it would be of advantage to me, before deciding the matter, to see for 
myself the Abstract Index, arid, where necessary, the instruments. 

Accordingly, when I recently inspected the office, I took occasion to examine the 
Abstract Index and many of the instruments with reference to the 23 entries in question. 

I found that nine of the entries referred to in the Abstract Index were made before 
the appointment of the present Registrar. 

As to these entries, the present Registrar stated that his experience, since he became 
Registrar, was that the Abstract Indexes in the office had been, in many instances, incor- 
rectly kept, and that for his own protection in the giving of Abstracts, he found it abso 
lutely necessary to examine the instruments for himself, and he showed me several 
instances (principally of omissions) where he has had to correct and amend the Abstract 
Indexes in consequence of the imperfect work of his predecessor. 

14 of the instruments in question have been registered since the present Registrar 
assumed (•he duties of the office 

Fur a time since he assumed the office, he retained the Deputy who had been acting 
as Deputy under the previous Registrar, and the same somewhat imperfect or insufficienl; 
system of entering descriptions of land from the instruments, in the Abstract Index, was 
continued, but he freely admitted that he was responsible for the entries made by that 
Deputy, while his Deputy, as well as for those made by himself, personally or by his new 
Deputy, since the former Deputy ceased to act. 

Giving all reasonable effect to the present Registrar's position with respect to some 
of the entries made in the Abstract Index in the time of his predecfssor, I think there 
are some of these nine entries in respect of which it was not necessary to refer to the 
copies of the instruments. 

Touching the fourteen entries made in the Abstract Index, since the present Regis- 
trar assumed office, I think a number of these entries might have contained a better de- 
scription of the part of the land affected by the instruments than they do contain. In 
the case of some of these instruments, however, the descriptions were such as to justify 
reference to the copies of the instruments. 

On the whole, I think it right to ailow for eight references. That will make the 
fees for searching as follows : — For search, including the first four references. 25 cents, 
and 20 cents for the four additional references, or 45 cents for searches ; and for the 
written matter of the Abstract, about which there is no dispute, as I understand it, 40 
cents ; in all 85 cents. 

I decide this matter accordingly. 



12 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



Fees for Abstract — Necessity for Rkference to Copies of Instrcments — Entries 

Abstract Index. 

I am asked to decide a dispute as to fees for an abstract of title, which has arisen 

between Messrs J. & M , Solicitors, and the Registrar of the County 

of 

The solicitors required an abstract of the north quarter of lot No. 21 in the 2nd 

concession of the Township of The fees charged for the abstract were 

^3.45, made up thus, — searching and references on north quarter, and abstract thereof, 
3 folios, $1.20 — this charge is not disputed; the balance of the $3.45, viz., $2.25, is 
charged in respect of 45 other registrations at 5 cents each. The dispute is as to the 
right of the Registrar to charge this $2.25. 

The lot was patented as a 200 acre lot. The patentee granted the lot to one S. who 
granted the north quarter to T., making three entries. The only other entries affr^cting 
the north quarter are 6 in number, and refer to mortgages made by T., and discharges to 
him. These account for the nine entries aSecting the north quarter, the fees for search- 
ing which are not objected to. 

The other 45 entries, it is conceded, do not affect the north quarter. Then was it 
necessa.y for the Registrar to refer to the instruments with respect to them, and if ao, 
why 1 The solicitors contend that it was not necessary, or, if it was necessary, it was so 
because the present Registrar or his predecessor had not entered in the abstract index, as 
required in Section 36 of the Registry, such a sufficient description of the land mentioned 
in the instrument as will readily identify its location. The Registrar says the title was 
an involved one because the instruments registered affect different parts of the lot, fehow- 
ing divisions described by the parts thus, — south half, north half of north half, south half 
of north half, north quarter of south half, south quarter of south half, and other forms 
thereof. 

Where the description in the abstract index is of the south half or any part of the 
south half, I do not think it would be necessary to refer to the instrument in prepariug 
an abstract of the nortb quarter. 

I think it plain, also, that the north half of the north half is tbe same as the north 
quarter, and that the south half of the north half would not be part of the north quarter. 

These descriptions are all of definite parts of the lot and are so entered in the 
abstract index. The north quarter, otherwise the north half of the north half, is, in the 
words of Section 27 (1) of the Registry Act, "a part of a lot which is clearly described 
and can be identified in connection with the chain of title " 

It is very different from a case where the description in the abstract index is defec- 
tive ; as, fo»" instance, where it says " part " of a lot, without clearly showing what part ; 
or where there is a doubt as to whether a particular instrument aff"ects or may afftct the 
parcel of land in respect of the title to which the obatract is registered. 

Where the descriptions in the instrument are not clear or are complicated, the Regis- 
trar oftentimes cannot comply with the part of Section 36 above referred to, in so far as 
noting the descriptions in the abstract index is concerned ; and in such cases the Regis- 
trar is justified in referring to the copies of the instruments. And where a previous 
Registrar has not entered in the abstract index such a sufficient description of the land 
as the Act requires, although the instrument itself does give a definite description, I think 
the succeeding Registrar is justified also in referring to the descriptions in the instrument 
or copies thereof, and in charging therefor. 

But in the present case no such questions arise, because it seems to me that the 
parts of the lot as entered in the abstract index are " clearly described and can be identi- 
fied in connection with the chain of title." 

I therefore decide this dispute in favor of the solicitors. 



1899 J INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 13 



Discharge of Mortgage by Administratrix of Mortgagee under Assignment 

REGISTKRED IN 1891 — Is REGISTRATION OP LETTERS OF ADMINISTRATION NeCESSARY? 

A difference has arisen between the Registrar of the County of 

and Messrs H & H, solicitors, upon the foUoving paint : — 

The solicitors desire to register a discharge cf mortgage. The Registrar refuses to 
register the discharge unless certain Letters of Administratijn are registered. The 
Registrar relies on Section 7, Ohap. 16, 62 Victoria. 

The solicitors state that the mortgage sought to be discharged was executed Janu- 
ary ISoh, 1890; ani on January lObh, 1891, it was assigned by the administratrix of 
the mortgagee to an assignee. This assignment was registered shortly after svardi. The 
Letters of Adoainistration to the estate of the original mortgages were not registered. 

I gave an opinion in 1896, reported in my report for that year (page 6), which 
covers the point. The assignment by the administratrix having baen executed and regis- 
tered in 1891, I think the title of the assignee was perfect then, and that the statute of 
1895 had not a retrospective eff"ict. At the time that statute was passed the assignee of 
this mortgage had a perfect right to receive the mortgage money and to give a discharge 
capable of registration, without registering the Letters of Administration ; and I am of 
opinion that he or his assignee still has that right. I do not think the amendment of 
1899, referred to by the Registrar, aff^ects the question. That amendment does not 
affect the question as to what instruments require to be registered prior to the registra- 
tion of a discharge. The Act of 1895 is the Act that settles what instruments shill be 
registered, and that Act, as I have mentioned, has not in my opinion a retrospective 
effect, and therefore does not apply to the present case. The Act of 1899 provides that 
whatever instruments the Act of 1895 requires prior registration of are to be described, 
etc., in the certificate of discharge. 

I decide this matter in favor of the contention of the solicitors. 

I may say that in December last I decided a similar question raised in another county 
in the same way. 



Instruments Describing Land by Local Description and also affecting Lands 
BY general description — How TO be Registered. 

A case has arisen between a Registrar and Mr. F, a Solicitor, touching the registra- 
tion of a mortgage from the A Company to the B Company. 

The instrument describes certain lots by local description, but to the operative 
■words are addel the following :— " And especially all the real and personal property of 
the Company of whatever kind and wheresoever attested, now or at any time hereafter 
owned or possessed by the Company during the currency of the debentures," and there 
are other clauses containing words which would cover lands hereafter acquired by the 
Company, without local description. 

The Registrar has a difficulty in accepting the instrumeat, because of Section (1), 
Chap. 16, 62 Victoria, which prohibits the registration of such an instrument fn the 
■General Register, unless accompanied by a Statutory Declaration giving a local descrip- 
tion of the lands attested. 

• Mr. F candidly conceded that there is force in the position taken by the Registrar 
in the matter ; but he offers to attach to the instrument a statutory declaration to the 
effect that the instrument effects the lands within the county, described in the Schedule 
to the instrument, and no other lands within the county, and that the mortgagors have 
no other lands within the County of F than those described in the Schedules to the 
instrument, and do not appear to have any further lands. 

I am of opinion as follows : — 

While the instrument cannot, and should not, go into the General Register, the 
parties entering it for registration are entitled to have it registered in respect of the 
lands particularly described therein. Bat I think a statutory declaration, such as Mr. F 



14 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



offers to give, ought to be attached to the instrument, and, if attached, ought to be accepted. 
That will, in my view, be a substantial compliance with the requirements of the amend- 
ing Act of last Session. I do not think the Registrar will incur any responsibility by 
reason of the non-registration of the instrument in the General Registrar. 



A Plan Amended or Filed in Pursuance op a Judge's Order — Not Necessary 
THAT Person Amending or Filing same should appear by Registry Books to 
be Owner op Land, 

A difierence has arisen between Mr. M., Solicitor, and a Registrar, which has been 
referred to me. 

Mr. M. procured an order from the County Judge, under section 110 of the Registry 
Act, amendicg a plan which subdivided a parcel of land, about 25 acres in extent, into 
some 157 building lots and ftreets. The Judge's Order, which is endorsed on the plan, 
amended the plan so as to divide the 25-acre parcel into 2 blocks, and which put an end 
to the subdivision into the smaller lots, with streets, etc. 

The Registrar considered that Subsection 4 of Section 102 applied, and that there- 
fore he could not receive the plan according to the Judge's Order unless the person on 
■whose behalf the plan is filed appears on the Registry Books to be the owner of the land 
subdivided by the plan, nor unltss the consent of the mortgagees is endorsed on the plan. 
The Registrar states that all the small lots had been sold and mortgaged, and although 
Mr. M's client had got most of them back into his own hands, there were two or three 
which he had not got back. As to these two or three lots, it appears that when the 
Registrar pointed out the situation to Mr. M. the latter had the Judge's Order amended, 
he having satisfied the Judge that the parties referred to had, in reality, no interest in 
them. 

I had occasion to consider a somewhat similar question in connection with another 
reference, and I then was of opinion that the clause which now forms Subeection 4, on 
which the Registrar relies, does not apply to the case of a plan which is amendtd by 
Judge's Order, or to a plan filed to give eflect to an flmecdment made by Judge's Order 
under Section 110; (see p*ge 6 of my report for 1897); and, on further consideration, I 
adhere to the view there expressed. 

I decide this present difference therefore in favor of the contention of the Solicitor. 



OPINIONS BY DONALD GUTHRIE, Q.O., INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY 

OFFICfeS. 

Map of Town Omitting Reperbnck to Unregistered Plans. 

To 

A Solicitor. 

« 

I have enquired into the subject matter of your letter to me, touching the plan of 
survey made for the late Mr. H, and the position appears to be as follows : — 

1. The map of the town cannot be said to be improper or defective, because the plan 
of the survey made for Mr. H was not registered, and I do not think, strictly speaking,, 
that the Act required the surveyor employed to prepare the map of the town to recog- 
nize the unfiled plan. 

2. By the Registry Act, the Registrar, as no such plan as is referred to in your 
deed was ever registered, has taken the proper course, viz., to place your lands upon the 
index of the original farm lots. 



3899] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 15 



3. I do not think you will have any difficulty in dealing with your lands in case you 
wish to sell, because of the non-registration of the plan, for I think Section 107 will pro- 
tect you, your deed having been registered. 



Affidavit of Execdtion sworn before a Foreign Justice of the Peace insuppi- 
ciENT. — Affidavit defective in omitting Residence and Occdpation of 
Witness. 



To 



A Registrar. 



I return deed from A to B. I think the affidavit of C, the witness, is not sworn before 
a person authorized to take it. The Rpgistry Act, Section 40, Sub-section 5, says, that the 
affidavit, if made in any foreign country, shall be made before a Mayor, Consul, Judge of 
a Court of Record, Notary Public, or a Commissioner authorized by the Courts of Onta- 
rio. The affidavit on this deed seems to have been sworn before a Justice of the Peace 
in a County in Iowa. Perhaps Mr. D may get from your Judge a certificate under Sec- 
tion 50, on the ground that the witness is out of the Province. You may, as a friendly 
act, suggest that ; although I do not know or say that the Judge will give it. 

I return the deed from E to F. One affidavit is defective in not setting forth the 
name in full, place of residence and addition, occupation or calling, under Section 40, of 
the subscribing witness, G. 

Section 45 gets over the name not being in full ; an#if you see fit to register it, I 
fancy the registration will be good, and I do not suppose any particular fault will be 
found with you for doing so ; at the same time I cannot tell you that I authorize it. 
Clearly, you canrot be compelled to register it on that affidavit. 



Discharge of Mechanic's Lien — Fee where Copy (nptiimknt ordeked ; what 
Charge may be made for searching fou same; ex p.ibte cptntovs on ques- 
tions OF fees discouraged. 



To. 



A Registrar. 

Answering your recent letter, I have to say that I think Schedule "N" of the 
Registry Act does not apply to a discharge of Mechanic's Lien. I think the fee for 
registering such a discharge of lien is 25 cents. 

As to the second question, if a person wishes a copy of an instrument, but dops not 
know its number, I should thick he would have to pay you for a search, 25 cents, to find 
the instrument, in addition to the charge for copying it ; but he would nit have to pty 
10 cents for exhibiting it to yourself in order to enable you to make a copy. 

I call your attention to the fact that these ex parte opinions on questions of fees are 
not generally given by me, because, under Section 119 of the Registry Act, I m*y be 
called upon to give a decision, and that I should only give, after hearing both sidts I 
have told other Registrars that their proper course in questions of fees is to makf a 
charge which they think is right under the tarifi", using their judgment in interprHung 
the tariff correctly, so far as they are able to do so ; then, if their charge is disput^ft, 
they can refer the dispute to me, and I will decide it, after hearing both sides. 

I do not consider that if objection is made by a Solicitor to a R-^gistrar's fees, he 
Registrar should tell the person objecting what my opinion is, where that opinioa h 'S 
been given ex parte. I may, on hearing both sides, change my views. 



16 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



Fees for Registration op Certificates under recent Act — Ex parte opinions on 
Questions of fees not to be cited. 

To 

A Registrar. 

Re Registration of Discharge of Mortgage. 

In answer to your letter of yesterday, I have to say that I think Section 21, of the 
recent Act to amend the Registry Act, is intended to giv^e the Registrar, in cases of cer- 
tificates where the aggregate copying exceeds 300 words, either by reason of its having 
to be entered in two or more books, or by reason of the length of the document where it 
has only been copied into one book, an additional charge of ten cents per folio for each 
100 words, or fractional part of them, for all copying over 300 words, not to exceed $5, 
in the whole, for the registration of the certificate. 

I express these views ex parte., and, of course, it may be that I shall change my mind, 
after hearing the matter discussed, in the event of a dispute arising, and in the event of 
a reference to me. I have further to say, that where I give an ex parte opinioa, I do not 
think that a Registrar should in any case ciention that opinion to any Solicitor who 
objects to his fees. In other words, if the solicitor takes a diflFerent view from the one 
expressed above, you are not authorized, until I formally decide the question, after hear- 
ing both sides, to say what my view i?, because the opinion I have expressed is a mere 
ex parte or prima facie opinion, and in no way binding, and therefore should not be cited. 



Affidavit by an Officer of a Corporation. 

To 

A Registrar. 

I am in receipt of your letter. If the A Company is an incorporated Company, it 
may bo that my opinion quoted by you, Report of 1895, page 28, does not apply, because 
no doubt a Corporation, in law, is a person by itself, and it is different from the indivi- 
dual members composing it, and I should, in the event of the Company being an incor- 
porated Company, be inclined nob to disallow the affidavit by a person who is simply a 
shareholder, or even an offije-holder of the Company. 

If, however, the Company is not an incorporated Company, then I think my opinion 
applies, for in law B would himself be a party in his individual and personal capacity to 
the instrument. 



Court Certificates affecting Lands without Local Description — How to be 

Registered. 

To 

A Solicitor. 

I wrote to the Registrar lately and I presume it was with reference to the matter 
you mention, that he should register Court Certificates aflFecting lands without local des- 
cription, provided they had the Statutory Declaration attached, describing the lands 
under 62 Victoria, Chap. 18, Sec. 1. 

I think that the Statutory Declaration by the plaintiffs, etc., may be accepted as a 
aufl&cient declaration under this section. 



1899] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 17 



Rules of a Cooperative Society piled with Registrar need not be copied 

BY Him into a Book. 

To 

A Registrar. 

I agree with you in thinking that the amendments of rules of a Oo-operative Society, 
filed with you under R. S. O. 202, are not required to be copied by you into any book. 
Your duty seems to be to file them, and if required, to give certificates of filing. Subject to 
further consideration in the event of a dispute, I should sav fifty cents, would be a fair 
fee for filings, including certificate. 



Exemplification op Foreign Probate — Registration. 



To^ 

A Registrar. 



Re K. 

I return the Exemplification papers re will of A. 

Under Section 70, Sub-section 1, of the Registry Act, an Exemplification of Probate 
tinder the seal of any Court in any foreign country may be registered by the production 
of such Exemplification, and by the deposit of a copy of the Exemplification with an 
affidavit verifying the same. I think that if a copy of the enclosed, with an affidavit 
verifying the copy, is left with you, you may register the Exemplification under the 



above section. 



Registration op Probate in Abbreviated Form — Original should be 

Produced 

To « 

A Registrar. 

In answer to your enquiry I have to say that, in my opinion, where Probate of a 
will is registered in abbreviated form, under Sub section 2 of Section 78 of the Registry 
Act, it is necessary for the parties registering to produce the original Probate, as required 
under Section 70 of the Act. 

In giving a certificate of registration upon the Probate, it might be well to state 
that it was registered under Sub-section 2 of Section 78 of the Act. 



Premium paid by Registrar to a Guarantee Company a proper Disbursement. 

My opinion is asked by a firm of solicitors upon the following question : — 

A Registrar has, in his return of disbursements, made under Section 124 of the 

Registry Act, put in as a disbursement, the amount he has paid by way of premium to a 

Guarantee Company who are sureties for him as Registrar, under Section 13 of the 

Registry Act. 

The question is, is the charge one in connection with the office, etc., under Section 124 

Subsection 3, column 18, or one incident to the business of the office under Section 128 of 

the Registry Act. 
2 R.O. 



18 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



It is expressly provided that a Registrar may give security by bond or policy of a 
Guarantee Oompany. See Section 24 (1) of the Act respecting Public Officers. He 
must, if he does so, disburse the premium necessary to effect and keep on foot that form 
of security. A Registrar may be unable or unwilling to procure private persons to become 
sureties for him. It has been said it is in the public interest that Registrars should be 
encouraged to give security by bonds of approved Guarantee Companies rather than by 
the covenant of individuals. 

Supposing a Registrar was not bound to account to anyone else for his net income, 
but for his own satisfaction he desired to find out what his net income as Registrar was, 
what would he do 1 Would he not naturally and properly include in his deductions from 
his office recf-ipts the amount paid out for premiums on the guarantee bonds'? It is 
because he is Registrar he has to pay these premiums, and he ceases to have to pay them 
when he ceases to be Registrar. To what account, therefore, would he charge the 
expenditure for premiums in his private account book, if he did not charge it as part of 
his outlay incident to the business of his office as Registrar, before arriving at the amount 
of his net income 1 

On the whole, I think the premium paid is a ctiarge in connection with the office, or 
a disbursement incident to the business of the office of Registrar, under Section 128 of 
the Registry Act. ^ 



Where Signature op One Party to an Instrument has not been Proved ; Course 

TO BE Pursued. 

To 



A Registrar. 

Answering the question submitted by you for my opinion, I have to say : — 
I think the document which has been executed by two Corporations under their Cor- 
porate Seals, may be registered in respect to the execution thereof by such Corporations, 
and in so far as their execution affects rights in the land. With respect to the signature 
of the individual party whose signature has not been proved by affidavit, I approve the 
course suggested by the Solicitors, namely, that in all your certificates and also in your 
Abstract Index, you either omit the name of the party, if he is a granting party, or you 
state and also note in the column for remarks in Abstract Index, the fact that his signa- 
ture has not been proved. The instrument, in fact, will only be registered in respect to 
the Execution thereof by the Corporations. 



Entry of Instruments in General Register under the Recent Amendment. 

To 

A Registrar. 
Be Certificate C. v. E. 

I thick this certificate of judgment may go into the General Register. 

One reason in favor of this course is, that the judgment was pronounced 28th April, 
1897. Another reason is, that it relates to an agreement already recorded in the General 
Register ; but I think that Mr. G. should be asked also to attach a Statutory Declaration 
within the amending Act, stating that amongst other lands the judgment affects the lands 
following, — (then describing as many of the lands as he is in a position to give a descrip- 
tion of) 

This double registration will, in the first place, accomplish what Mr. G. conceives 
ought to be done in respect of the General Registsr, and will also, as far as possible, carry 
out the spirit and pio^isions of the amending Act of last year (1899). 



1899] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 1^ 

Registration of Notice op Exercising Power of Sale — Proof of Service. 

To 

A Registrar. 

In answer to your letter, as to the registration of Notice of Exercising Power of 
Sale in a Mortgage, I have to say, that whereai here a notice is addressed to four persons by 
name, and you are asked to register the same, but are furnished with affidavits or declara- 
tions of service on only three of the persons, and there is no affidavit or declaration of 
service upon the fourth person, who is said to have given an admisuon of service, 
I think you should, before registration, require a further declaration proving the admis- 
sion of service. That declaration should state the time, place and manner of the service. 

This view is to apply to the particular case referred to in your letter, and is not to 
be considered as a general rule. 



Registration of Old Instrument by Memorial — Necessity for Production of 

Instrument. 

To 

A Registrar. 

I return mortgage in fee, John and David to Joseph , and the memorial 

of a deed from Joseph to John and Pavid The deed seems to be dated 

16th of April, 18G2. 

As far as I can judge, the Memorial is of an instrument which amounts to a Dis- 
charge of the Mortgage, but the difficulty is that the original instrument or deed of 16th 
April, 1862, does not seem to be forthcoming, so that you cannot comply with the require- 
ments of Section 74 of the Registry Act. , 

The old law required the production, not_ only of the Memorial, but of the instru- 
ment of which it was a memorial. The Memorial was left in the R' gistry Offi e, and the 
instrument was returned, after registration, with a certificate. The new law in force 
since 1st of January, 1866 (speaking in a general way), substituted a duplicate original 
of the instrument registered, and abolished memorials for the future. 

I notice that under the old law also, where the instrument was executed out of 
Upper Canada (now Ontario), it had to be identified as that referred to in the affidavit or 
declaration, by a certificate endorsed on the Deed or Conveyance under the hand of the 
person before whom the affidavit or declaration on the Memorial was made, showing, 
under the old law, the necessity for the production of the instrument, as well as the 
Memorial, to the Registrar. 

I recommend you meantime not to register the Memorial as for the Deed or Dis- 
charge, unless the instrument to which it refers is produced, or some further authority 
is produced to you. 



Defects in Affidavit of Execution. 

To 

A Registrar. 

In answer to your letter of the 20th., I think, where, through inadvertance, you 
register a deed with such an affidavit as you describe, that is, an affidavit which does not 
contain the name, place of residence, addition, occupation or calling of the subscribing 
witness, but contains his signature, perhaps the defects aie errors under Section 44 of the 



.20 THE RKPORT OF THE [ No. 31 

Registry Act. But, if the affidavit is not filled up with the names or some description 
of the parties who executed the instrument, and other particulars of that sort, it is hope- 
lessly bad. 

In the latter case, I think you may exchange the duplicate for the one containing 
the properly filled up affidavit, as the other one for registration purposes is a mere 
nullity. 



Proof of Service of Notice of Exercising Power op Sale. 

To 

Barristers. 

I am in receipt of your favor of the 20th inst, enclosing Notice, in this matter ; of 
Exercising Power of Sale in a Mortgage. 

I observe that the notice is addressed to three parties, namely, W, B., A. B. and 
<jr. S. Attached thereto is a Statutory Declaration proving the time, place and manner 
of service of the notice on W, B. and A. B., but there is no declaration or affidavit of 
service of the notice on G. S. There appears, however, to be an admission of service by 
G. S., endorsed on the duplicate original notice submitted to me. 

I am of opinion as follows : — 

1. That under Sub-section 2 of Section 72 of the Revised Statutes of Ontario, 
Chapter 136, the declaration, for the purpose of registering this notice, is sufficient as 
regards the B's. 

2. There must however, be an affidavit or declaration of the service upon S. There 
aeems to be no provision for accepting an admission of service. 

3. I think that you should, before registration, have provided to you a declaration 
proving the admission of service, and the time, place and manner of the service so 
admitted by S, and also that the copy served on S was either a duplicate original, 
or a true copy of the notice now enclosed. 

I return the notice and remain, etc. 



Registration of Will — Afterwards Admitted to Probate. Discharge of 

Mortgage by Execdtor. 

To 

A Registrar. 

The matter submitted by you for my opinion is as follows : — 

The will of T. B, was registered in your office 15th August, 1899. Subsequently, 
probate was granted of the will by the proper Surrogate Court. 

You have now been asked to register a Discharge of Mortgage to the deceased, 
which discharge is signed by the Executrix of the will. 

That discharge sets out the date of registration of the will. Your view was that 
the probate should be registered, because, through the probate, you consider the Executrix 
claims title to the mortgage moneys. The Executrix, you state, is legatee of the mort- 
gage moneys. 

I am of opinion that, for the purposes of the Registry Act, probate of the will 
should be registered prior to the registration of the Discharge of Mortgage. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 21 



Who Entitled to make Copy op a Registered Plan. 



To. 



P. L. S. 

I am in receipt of yours of the 25th inst. 

I know of no provision under which you are entitled, except for the Registrar, to 
make a copy of a registered plan. You may, of course, with the permission of the 
Registrar, make a copy of any registered plan, but he will be entitled to be paid for it. 
He may, when a copy plan is ordered, either make it himself or have it done for him by 
another. Probably your better way is to show the Registrar this letter and arrange with 
him to permit you to make a copy of the plan, as for him, and on terms to be agreed upon. 

Should you not so arrange, and should you desire to order a copy of any plan you 
can give the Registrar the necessary requisition, and afterwards if there is any dispute 
between you as to the Registrar's fees, the matter can be referred to me for my decision 
under Section 1 1 9 of the Registry Act. 



Fees for Copy of Registered Instruments where Oopy not Made by Registrar, 

To 

A Registrar. 

In answer to your letter of the 27th January, I have to say, that as I understand 
the question submitted therein for my opinion, it is this : — 

Solicitors frequently send you copies of Court Certificates — these certificates not 
being in duplicate. The original certificate has, of course, to be left with you, and the 
solicitor asks you to return the copy certificate, with your certificate of registration 
endorsed thereon. 

The question submitted by you is substantially this, — as to whether you are entitled 
to charge anything in respect of the copy or the certifying thereof, in addition to the fee 
for registering the certificate. 

1. You are aware that under the Act of last Session to amend the Registry Act, 
Section 21, there is an amendment aflFecting the Registry fees for the registration of cer- 
tificates, where the certificates, or aggregate copying; exceed 300 words. 

2. In 1895 (see my report for that year, page 17), I gave a ruling upon a reference 
to me, that a Registrar was not bound to certify a copy prepared elsewhere than in his 
own office, and that if he does so, "he is entitled to retain the right to the same emolu- 
ments as if he had himself done the work." 

3. I further considered then, and I consider now, that if a Registrar has been in the 
habit of certifying to copies of documents made by Solicitors, without charge for same, 
he should not depart from his practice, without due notice to the solicitors ; so that if 
you intend to charge for certifying copies of documents where you have hitherto not 
made such a charge, you should notify the solicitors, before you give the certificate, that 
you intend to make a charge for the certified copy. 



Endorsement on Mortgage, " Not to be Registered in Full," Need not be 
Made Personally by Solicitor 

To 

A Deputy Registrar. 

I am in receipt of your letter of the 18th inst. 

While I think there is a good deal to be said in support of your view — that the word 
"endorse" in the Statute (section 61, sub-section 1 of the Registry Act) implies a per- 



22 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



sonal endorsement, still I have been constrained to hold that an endorsement in any 
manner, i.e., written or printed, which was made or authorized by the solicitor, would be 
sufficient. 

I think you may assume that the person who signed Mr. T's (the solicitor's) name to 
the endorsement referred to had authority to do so. 

The second question put by you for my opinion is with regard to a deed with a num- 
ber of the grantors living in diflEerent places, the deed being dated, say 31st December, 
1899. There are three affidavits, two of which are dated prior to the above date, and 
another on that date or subsequent thereto. The question is, whether the affidavit of 
execution purporting to be made before the ddte of the deed is good proof for the pur- 
poses of the Registry Act, 

My opinion is that you should not reject the deed simply because the affidavit of 
execution appears to have been sworn at a date prior to the date of the deed. A deed, 
generally speaking, is good without a date. It takes effect upon delivery. The date 
might be wrong from oversight, or clerical error, etc. The deponent makes an affidavit 
in pr per form that the deed was duly executed, and I think that should be accepted as 
sufficient for the purposes of registration. 



A MERE Statutory Declaration not to be Registered — Suggestions re Correction 
OF Error in Description of Land in Registered Instrument. 

To 

A Registrar. 

Regarding the statutory declaration and disclaimer by R C, upon which you ask 
my opinion, I beg to refer you to page 44 of my report for 1897. I then thought, and 
to that opinion I adhere, that a mere statutory declaration could not be registered as an 
independent instrument. 

With regard to so much of the document as consists of a disclaimer under seal, of 
any title or interest in the east half of west half of lot 18 in the 8th, I think such an 
instrument, being duly proved, is ordinarily capable of registration. It is, however, 
rather difficult to say what ought to be done in the case of this document, combining two 
separate things, as this purports to do. As at present advised, I think the better way is 
to reject it. It is of a very exceptional character. A statutory declaration does not 
require a witness ; neither does it require a seal. The instrument, taking it altogether, 
is and purports to be a statutory declaration. 

The solicitor can accomplish all his purpose in another way. Of course, I merely 
throw this out by way of suggestion, but as I have, in somewhat similar cases, made a 
like suggestion, and I believe it has been acted upon, I repeat it now, viz , that R C, can 
execute a deed reciting the facts, quitclaiming or disclaiming any interest in the east half 
of the west half of 18 to the proper person, and conveying the west half of the east half 
of 18 to his own use in fee. The solicitor will, of course, know that it will be better to 
get P. C. (the grantor) and wife to correct the instrument ; but perhaps they may be 
dead, or absent, or unwilling to grant it. But I think a quitclaim or disclaiming deed, 
and a deed operating under the Statute of Uses, as above suggested, will accomplish his 
purpose. These could be combined in one instrument. 



Fee for Registering Notice under Power of Sale where it affects Four Lots. 

To 

A Registrar. 

The point submitted by you for my opinion is as to what fee you can charge for 
registering a notice of exercising power of sale in a mortgage when the notice afiects 
more than four lots. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 23 

I am of opinion that, under Section 72 of the Registry Act, the fee is 50 cents only. 
There seems to be no provision for an increased fee by reason of there being more than 
four lots afie:ted. 



Deed Registered without Affidavit of Execution having been Sworn to — 
Abstracts may be made out after Office Hours — Holidays. 

To 

A Registrar. 

Regarding the first; point mentioned in your letter of the 20fch inst., I have to say 
that a deed registered without the affidavit of execution being sworn to is, of course, quite 
irregular. The proper way to do, I think, will be to ask the parties concerned to register 
the duplicate which you gave out, first having the affidavit sworn. And under the 
circumstances you should, I think, not charge for the second registration, and you should 
give them a certified copy of the deed without charge. 

As to the second point, I know of nothing in the Act which prohibits you from 
giving an abstract at any particular time of the day when you see fit. I do not think 
you are confined, so far as the giving of abstracts is concerned, to the hours between 10 
and 4 o'clock. In large offices a very general practice is to make abstracts after office 
hours and send them off by post the same night or early the next morning. 

I do not think that instruments should be registered on public holidays, such as the 
24th of May, Ist of July, and the like. 



Registration op Court Certificate Affecting Lands Without Local Description. 
Statutory Declaration now Required. 

To 

A Registrar. 

In answer to your letter, I have to say that I think the Court certificate referred to, 
which does not describe lands by local description, cannot, since the amendment to the 
Registry Act, of 1899, be registered in the General Register, but it can be registered in 
your office by having a statutory declaration attached to it, describing the lands, or some 
of the lands, affected. 

I gave a similar opinion some time ago to another Registrar, and I understand that, 
in his office (and others), he has found no difficulty in having solicitors in similar cases 
-attach a statutory declaration to the Court Order. 



Discharge of Mortgage by Attorney, Executed in 1892. Not Necessary to 
Register Power op Attorney. 

To 

A Registrar. 

I return discharge of mortgage F to M, executed the 13th Feb., 1892, by two gentle- 
men as attorneys for Mr. F, the mortgagee. 

My previous opinion covers this case. I do not think the Act of 1895 applies, and 
the Act of 1899 does not apply except where the Act of 1895 applies, perhaps not always 
then. 



24 THE REPORT OF THE f No. 31 



I also return copy power attorney and Mr. K's letter. The discharge may be 
registered without the Power of Attorney. 



Necessity for Signature of Mortgagee, his Solicitor or Agent, to Endorsement 
ON Mortgages " Not to be Registered in Full " 

To 

Barristers. 

I enclose a letter which I have received from the Registrar of P, relating to your 
objection to sign the endorsement on mortgages " not to be registered in full." 

Please return same after perusal, with any observations you desire to make in 
support of your view. 

I may, however, say that in 1895 I had occasion to give an opinion to a firm of 
solicitors on the same subject, to the effect that something was required upon the instru- 
ment itself, to show that the parties making the endorsement were either the mortgagees 
or their solicitors or agents, and so entitled, under the Act, to make the endorsement. 

Many cases have come under my notice, in practice, where the mortgage was pre- 
pared and registered by the solicitor for the mortgagor and where he was not solicitor for 
the mortgagee, and since I gave that opinion I have, in the course of my inspection, found 
many mortgages where the endorsement " Not to be registered in fall," was signed by 
different solicitors from the solicitors who prepared the mortgage. 

I lately had a case where the Deputy Registrar himself was the mortgagee He had 
lent some money to a party, upon the application of that party's solicitor, who prepared 
the mortgage, and that party's solicitor endorsed it " Not to be registered in full," but he 
refused to sign it as solicitor for the mortgagee, and the Deputy Registrar told me that 
he had no authority, in fact, so to sign it. 

It is more necessary than ever, if we are to pay attention to the requirements of the 
Act, that such endorsements should be authenticated, that is, should be signed by either 
the mortgagee or his solicitor or agent, because these words are now being put on by law 
stationers and others who prepare printed forms of mortgage. 

I incline to think that the word "endorse" implies a signature, but at any rate I 
think there should be something in the Registry Office on the instrument itself to show 
that it is entitled to the short form of registration provided in the Act of 1894, i.e., to 
show that the words •' not to be registered in full " have been put on by some person 
authorized by the Statute to endorse. 



Duties of Registrars in Furnishing Information Regarding Registrations — 
Not to Express Opinions on Titles. 

Messrs. G. & Co., 

Merchants. 

Regarding the difference between yourselves and a Registrar, I have now heard 
from him. He states that his reply to you was to the eff'ect that it was not the duty of 
the Registrar to advise as to who was the owner of any lot ; but he off'ered to send you 
any abstract of mortgages registered against the lot, or an abstract of all the registrations 
against the lot. 

I think the effect of your requisition to the Registrar was to see whether or not M. 
appeared by the registry books to be the owner of the lot mentioned, and as to whether 
or not the property appeared from these books to be free from encumbrances. 



1899] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY 01 FICES. 25 



I think the answers to these questions would involve much more than the Registrar 
sbould do ; that is to say, they would involve an investigation of the title by the Regis- 
trar and an expression of opinion on the title by him as the result of such investigation. 

I have held, in other cases, that a Registrar should state facts, such as the instru- 
ments registered (in so far as he is asked for same), and also the contents of any instru- 
ment, if required. He should not, I think, express an opinion as to who is the owner of 
the lot, or as to whether it is free from encumbrances. 

My view is that, consistently with the duties of the Registrar, you may accomplish 
your purpose at less expense than the obtaining of a full abstract by preferring your 
requisition in some such way as this : — Ask the Registrar to search to ascertain whether 
there appears to be a deed registered in favor of M. upon that property ; and, if there is 
such an instrument, to give the particulars thereof, such as the date, the name of the 
grantor, and other particulars usually furnished in an abstract ; and also to search to see 
whether there is any subsequent instrument from M., and, if so, to give you particulars 
regarding it. Such a search would not, however, show whether or not, if there was such 
a conveyance in M's. favor, his grantor had a good title. 

Then, with regard to mortgages, the Registrar appears to have been willing to give 
you an abstract of any mortgage, and, I suppose, a certificate, if he found none, to that 
effect. The information, however, whether as to deeds or mortgages which he furnishes 
under the Registry Act, unless you search personally, will be in the form either of a 
certificate or a certified abstract. The Registry Law does not provide for giving inform- 
ation by letter, although I do not discourage the practice of Registrars giving information 
by letter if they see fit to do so. 

With regard to encumbrances generally, I think a Registrar cannot be expected to 
give a certificate that a lot is free from encumbrances or that a lot is not encumbered 
except by certain instruments. There is no practical difficulty with regard to mortgages, 
but there are many other different ways in which a lot may be encumbered ; for instance, 
by reason of legacies charged on land, by annuities, by lien agreements and other charges, 
dower rights, etc , and sometimes it is not easy to say what is an encumbrance and what 
is not. For instance, take the case of legacies ; it is often a question which judges find 
it difl&cult to decide, whether a legacy is or is not charged on land. While, therefore, a 
Registrar may certify regarding mortgages, and these are, of course, the most general 
form of encumbrances, I think regarding encumbrances generally, his duty is, if desired, 
to give a general abstract and let the parties searching the title determine for themselves 
whether the lot is free from encumbrances or not. 



Registration op Notices under Powers of Sale — Previously Deposited under Cus- 
tody OF Title Deeds Act — Plan Registrations — Very Old Mortgages Appear- 
ing still Undischarged — Filing Plans by Heirs at Law cf Apparent Owner. 



To. 



A Deputy Registrar. 

Answering the question eubmitted by you, I have to say : — 

1. I understand you have had cases where a deed purporting to be a conveyance 
under power of sale contained in a mortgage, after Notice of Sale, is tendered for regis- 
tration, but the notice of sale has not been registered ; it is, however, upon deposit in 
your office under the Custody of Title Deeds Act. 

I suggest that if the Notice of Exercising Power of Sale as deposited under that Act 
contains an affidavit or declaration of its service, it may be registered. Section 16 of the 
Title Deeds Act says that the Registrar shall not part with the possession of any such 
instrument, but if you had the request of the person depositing the document to register 
it, and you registered it, you would not be parting with its possession, and you would be 
doing nothing that, in my opinion, would be contrary to the spirit of the Custody of 
Title Deeds Act ; you would — by registration — simply be making the deposit more per- 
fect and absolutely permanent, at the request of the party who made the deposit. 



26 THE REPORT OF THE [ No. 31 



2. In the case of Plans presented for registration, where you find some very old 
mortgages not discharged — in one case a mortgage nearly 100 years old — I should say, 
dealing with the Act in a liberal spirit, that you could scarcely be required to consider 
that such an instrument still retained its character as a mortgage or a charge upon the 
land, and I do not think you should refuse to register a plan because of the want of the 
signature of a mortgagee, where the mortgage was anything like 100 years old. 

3. I should, however, say that it will be for the parties who oflfer such plans for 
registration to exert themselves and give some reasonable explanation to the Registrar 
with regard to these old mortgages, showing either that they were foreclosed or are for 
some reason not now subsisting encumbrances. 

4. As to the filing of a plan by the heir-at-law of a person who appears to be owner, 
the Solicitor who wants to file the plan had better find out for himself some lawful way 
of doing it. 

One suggestion that has occurred to me was the one I mentioned to you verbally, 
namely, have the heir-at law make a deed under the Statute of Uses to the use of him- 
self, reciting the facts, and thus show the title. 



Registration of a Memorial of Deed of B. & S as an Original Instrument. 



To, 



Registrar. 

Your letter of the 7th raises an interesting question. 

I had occasion to consider a similar question some little time ago, B.nd I then formed 
an opinion that on the whole the memorial of a deed being executed by the grantor might 
be treated as an original instrument whereby lands are affected under Sub- section 1 of 
Section 2 of the Registry Act. 

I quite agree with you that Sections 73 and 74 apply where the applicant desires to 
register a deed executed before January let, 1866, and that the proof here is insuflicient 
for the registration of the deed of which the instrument profesEes to be a memorial. In 
noting the instrument in your Abstract Index I would recommend you to enter it not as 
a bargain and sale but simply as a memorial, and make an entry also in the margin, 
" Deed of bargain and sale not produced or registered." It will then be for the parties 
searching the title to satisfy themselves with regard to the value of the memorial. 



Discharge of Mortgage by Assignee of a LEGATtE Ihereof — Under Will not 

Admitted to Probate. 

To 

A Registrar. 

The point you submit for my opinion is as follows : 

One Mrs. M. has executed a statutory discharge of mortgage, which is presented to 
you for registration. This discharge shows that her claim arises upon an assignment of 
the mortgage to her on the 29th August, 1895, made to her by Mrs. D., alleged to be a 
legatee under the will of the mortgagee. 

The will itself has been registered in your office, but has not been admitted to pro- 
bate. By that will Mrs. D., the assignor of the mortgage, does appear to be a legatee 
thereof, but she is not an executrix of the testator, I think that as the assignment was 
made after the Act of 1895 came into force you were right in thinking that the will 
should be admitted to probate and that the assignment or discharge should be by the 
administrator with the will annexed. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 27 



Of course if the parties interested are sutisfied with that, Mrs. M. could give a re- 
conveyance and a discharge by deed which could recite her title, and that might save them 
the expense and trouble of proving the will. 



Endorsement "Not to be Registered in Full" on Mortgages may be Qdalipibd. 

To 

A Registrar. 

I am to-day in receipt of Mr. S's letter in answer to my letter to him touching the 
subject of your communication of the 7th February as to the necessity for having the 
endorsement " Not to be registered in full " when made on mortgages authenticated by 
the signature of either the mortgagee or the solicitor or agent for the mortgagee. 

I see no objection to a solicitor or agent describing himself by some such words as 
" Solicitor herein," that is, in respect of the particular mortgage, or even " Solicitor in 
respect of the registration of this mortgage " for the mortgagee. Mr. S: objects to calling 
himself " Solicitor," as he thinks he would then be considered to be solicitor for every 
purpose of the mortgagee. No doubt what the statute contemplates is that in respect of 
the short registration the endorsement shall be made by some person duly authorized to 
make the endorsement, so that if any solicitor or agent desires to use words of limitation 
such as I have indicated I see no objection to his doing it. The words may be " Soli- 
citor herein for the mortgagee " or " Agent herein for the mortgagee," or •' Solicitor for 
the purposes of this endorsement for the mortgagee," and so on. I may say that solici- 
tors almost universally now sign the endorsement without any qualifying words. It seems 
to me that a solicitor cannot very well ask the Registrar to take the responsibility of 
deciding that he, the solicitor, has authority, when the latter himself declines to say so in 
writing. 



OOURSB WHERE OnE ONLY OF THE DUPLICATES OP A MORTGAGE IS ENDORSED " NoT 

TO BE Registered in Full." 

To 

A Deputy Registrar. 

Touching the point referred to in your letter of the 10th, and speaking generally, I 
think where only one of the duplicates of a mortgage is endorsed " Not to be registered 
in full," thereby showing' an intention on the part of the mortgagee to avail himself of 
the short registration, the better course beforer registering it in full is to communicate 
with the mortgagee, pointing out the omission, i.e., the non-endorsement on the other 
duplicate. 



Registration op Will where Land is not Correctly Described — Correcting 

Error. 

Messrs. A. & B., 

Barristers. 

I have considered this matter, and I agree with the view of the Registrar, and also 
what seems to be your own view, that where the will, as here, contains a devise of a par- 
ticular lot by local description, and you desire to register the will, it is necessary, under 
the present law, to enter it on the Abstract Index, under the heading of the lot described 
in the will, even although, owing to a clerical error, the lot is not described correctly. 



28 THE REPORT OF THE [No. 31 



I do not think it will be possible, by affidavits or declarations filed accompanying 
the probate, to avoid the necessity of registering the will against the lot therein 
described. 

By way of suggestion, I submit for your consideration whether it is expedient for 
you, in order to get over the difficulty created by the clerical error, and to avoid the 
expense of an application to the courts, for your clients, the executors, to execute to the 
tenants in fee of the land erroneously described in the will a quit claim or disclaiming 
deed reciting the error in the will, etc. 

I return herewith the copy of the probate. 



Pees Re a Ocurt Certificate which Discharges Several Mechanics' Liens.. 

To 

A Registrar. 

In answer to your letter of the 23rd, I am of opinion that the instrument to which 
you refer, being a certificate from the High Ocurt of Justice, which vacates and dis- 
charges four Mechanics' liens and one certificate of Lis pendens, the liens and Lis pen- 
dens, being registered against the same lot, may be treated as one certificate, notwith- 
standing that it operates upon four Liens and one Lis pendens ; and the fees for regis- 
tration will be charged accordingly. 



Discharge of Mortgage by Inspector op Prisons in his Official Capacity. 

To M. M 

A Deputy Registrar. 

I am in receipt of your letter of the 27th, asking my opinion regarding a discharge 
of mortgage. It appears that in 1894 a mortgage was made to "Wm. M, who has since 
become insane. There has now been tendered to you for registration a discharge of this 
mortgage, executed as follows : 

•«Wm. M, 

By his Statutory Committee, 

RoBT. Christie, ,,^--v— ^ 

Inspector of Prisons and Public Charities. /" Seal of \ 

j Inspector f 

«' RoBT. Christie, \ °^ ^^^''^ f 

Inspector of Prisons and Public Charities. \ Charities. / 

You state that the discharge does not mention the registration of any instrument or 
document through which Mr. Christie claims the right to receive the mortgage moneys 
and to discharge the mortgage ; and you wish to know if it is necessary that the instru- 
ments and documents through which he is entitled to receive the mortgage moneys and 
to discharge this mortgage, should be registered, and whether the discharge should men- 
tion the particulars of the registration of these instruments or documents. 

You refer to the fact that, previous to the recent amendment, 62 Victoria, Chap. 16, 
Section 7, you considered this to be unnecessary, but you are now doubtful about it. 

In my opinion, the recent amendment does not affect the question. It is not neces- 
sary now, any more than it formerly was, that Mr. Ohris'ie should file any documents to 
show his right to execute the discharge. His right is a statutory right. (See Prisons 
and Asylums Inspection Act, Section 53 and other sections.) 

I recommend you, therefore, to receive and register the discharge. 



1899 ] INSPECTOR OF REGI&TRY OFFICES. 29 



Assignment of an Interest in Lands by way op Mortgage may be Endorsed 
" Not to be Registered in Full." 

To 

A Deputy Registrar. 

I am in receipt of your favor of the 28th, with instrument to L. endorsed " assign- 
ment by way of mortgage security." 

I am of opinion that the instrument is a mortgage within the meaning of the section 
of the Act which permits mortgages to be endorsed " Not to be registered in full." 

It is a grant of an interest in lands to secure a loan of money, and it contains a pro- 
viso, that upon repayment of the advance with interest, the estate is to be reconveyed to 
the assignors. It also contains a covenant by them for the payment of the money. 

In my view, the instrument has all the incidents of a mortgage. The assignors, 
otherwise the mortgagors, have the right to redeem, and the assignees, otherwise the 
mortgagees, have the right to foreclose. J return the instruments. 



What Particulars Required by Act of 1899 are to be Inserted in Discharges 

Mortgage. 



To, 



A Registrar. 

I am in receipt of your letter of the 29th. 

I may inform you that, in other cases, I have expressed an opinion that the general 
■eflfect of the Act of 1899, Chap. 16, Sec. 7, is not to enlarge the class of prior instruments 
requiring to be registered under the Act of 1895 The Act of 1895 defines, in other 
words, what must be registered, and the Act of 1899 requires particulars of such instru- 
ments as require to be or must be registered, to be given in the discharge. This is the 
substance of the view I have expressed. 



30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



[ No. 31 



Fees and Emoluments received by the Registrars of Deeds for the Province of Ontario for the year 1899, 

and 7, with vs^hich are contrasted the amount of Fees, Surplus to 



Schedule A, 



o > 

1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 

49 

50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 



Name of registration 
division. 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce 

Carleton 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Durham, East 

Durham, West 

Elgin 

Essex 

Frontenac , 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey, North 

Grey, South 

Haldimand 

Hahburton 

Halton 

Hastings 

Huron 

Kingston, city 

Kent 

Lambton 

Lanark, North 

Lanark, South 

Leeds 

Lennox & Addington. 

Lincoln 

London, city 

Manituulin.. . 

Middlesex, N. & E... 

Middlesex, West 

Muskoka ... 

Nipissing 

Norfolk 

Northumberland, E . 

Northumberland, W. 

Ontario 

Ottawa, city 

Oxford 

Parry Sound 

Peel 

Perth, North 

Perth, South 

Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward 

Rainy River 

Renfrew < 

Russell 

Simcoe 

Stormont 

Thunder Bay 

Toronto, East 

Toronto, West 

Victoria 

Watf^rloo 

Welland 

Wellington, North . 
Wellington, S. & C. 

Wentworth , 

York, E. & W , 

York, North 



Name of Registrar. 



Robert A. Lyon 

W. B. Wood 

Donald Sinclair 

Patrick J. Coffey 

WiJham McKim 

Thomas Mc Donald 

Henry Elliott 

J. W. McLaughlin 

James H. Coyne 

J. Wallace Askin 

J. Duncan Thompson. . . 

John Simpson 

Patrick McCrea 

R. McKnight 

Thos. Lauder 

J. Baxter 

E. C. Young 

D. Robertson 

Henry W. Day 

J. D.O"Connell(act. reg.) 
James P. Gildersleeve . . 

P. D. McKellar 

A. McLean 

John Menzies 

James Armour 

W. H. Cole 

S. Gibson 

J. G Currie 

W. C. L. Gill 

D. R. Springer ....... 

John Waters 

Stephen Blackburn 

John Ewart Lnunt 

A. G. Browning 

A. J. Donley 

A. E. Mallory 

F. W, Field 

George W. Dryden 

Alex. Burritt 

George R. Pattullo 

Thomas Kennedy .... 

K. Chisholm 

D. D. Hay 

P. Whelihan 

B. Morrow 

John Higginson 

Walter Mackenzie 

F. J. ApJohn 

W. C. Irving, 1st 6 mths 
M. McKay, last " 

Alex. Robillard 

Samuel Lount 

John C. Alguire 

John M. Munro 

Peter Ryan 

Charles Lindsey 

Charles D. Barr 

A. W. Merner (acting) 

James E. Morin 

John Anderson 

N. Higginbothem 

R. K. Hope 

James Massie 

James J. Pearson . . . 






18 
7 

27 

13 

9 

8 

5 

5 

13 

22 

19 

8 

9 

12 

9 

14 

9 

9 

30 

95 

1 

20 

20 

10 

10 

15 

17 

14 

1 

38 

13 

9 

27 

22 

13 

9 

5 

17 

1 

16 

47 

8 

9 

7 

20 

10 

9 

6 

41 

6 
26 

5 
26 

1 

1 
19 
13 
16 
11 
11 
10 
14 
10 



la 



S oi CO 

• o a 

o m.S 

^ S-a 



993 
1,818 
3,475 
2,447 
1,440 
1,051 

658 

570 
2,855 
3,f60 
1,310 

947 
1,041 
2,045 
1,731 
1,268 

186 

918 
2,539 
3,735 

774 
4,022 
4,108 

560 
2,148 
1,825 
1,041 
1,789 
1,912 

355 
2,079 
1,115 
1,031 

.<^90 
1,965 
1,055 

636 
1,764 
2,770 
2,745 

632 
1,367 
1,745 

955 
1,834 
1,408 
1,025 

356 

2.180 

993 
4,162 
1,215 

615 
3,364 
3,073 
1,694 
2,607 
. 1,950 
1,395 
1,487 
4,038 
2,018 
1,002 

110,578 



Instruments registered in 1899. 



939 
2,000 
3.544 
2,484 
1,405 
1,101 

605 

579 
3,607 
3,933 
1,367 

880 
1,177 
2,402 
1,672 
1,180 

242 
1,751 
2,820 
4,042 

666 
4,554 
4,413 

615 
1,998 
1,825 
1,360 
1,942 
1,929 

874 
2,296 
1,300 
1,158 

405 
2,396 
1,908 

551 
1,896 
3,030 
3,008 

633 

816 
1,861 
1,075 
1,911 
1,274 
1,009 

319 
1,270 
1,304 

967 
4,266 
1,303 

966 
4,092 
4,246 
1,682 
2,763 
2,051 
1,455 
1.477 
4,032 
2,186 
1,199 

116,937 



Pm 



$1,157 30 
2,312 15 
4,053 55| 
2,896 70, 
1,705 60 
1,294 401 

541 00! 

780 35 
5,064 70 
4,681 65 
1,644 65 
1,047 25 
1,513 30 
2,880 90 
2,243 73 
1,P12 73 

310 35 
1,523 75 
3,373 15 
4,401 65 

769 85 
5,063 10 
4,918 80 

746 50 
1,657 40 
2,198 95 
1,623 25 
2,240 OQl 
2,350 45 1 

485 80 
2,538 831 
1,3.34 70 
L468 30, 

516 80 
2,797 89 
1,.580 30' 

715 65, 

2,413 80 1 

3,189 25 

■ .3,591 05 

771 80 
1,168 80 
2,207 50 
1,235 80 
2,160 30 
1,789 05 
1 115 35 

367 97 
1,423 35 
1,347 90 
1,129 75 
5,030 05 
1,528 80 
1,314 80 
4,803 00 
5,309 85 
2,016 45 
3,215 65 
2,676 45 
1,689 50 
1,736 75 
4,433 85 
2,914 50 
1,490 60 




112, 281 



87 



14 

163 

90 



33 



1899 ] 



INSPECTOR OF REGISTRY OFFICES. 



31 



made in accordance with the provisions of 56 V. cap, 21, sees. 117, 120 and 121, and 57 V. c. 9, sees. 6 
Municipalities and Registrars' incomes for the years 1898 and 1897. 



Schedule A. 



Patents. 


Depds. 


Mor 
10 


tgages. 
11 


Dis. of 


mortgagee 


Wills. 


Leases. 


s 


6 


7 


8 


9 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


to 


^3 
1 


6 

S 

u 
a 


<o 

u 

M 

'So 

£ 

6 


a 

to 
u 



<a 


■0 
"So 

<D 

d 


S 
m 
u 

m 


U 

(V 

'So 
u 

6 


s 
a 


T3 

2 

"So 

H 

6 


a 

m 
h 

•2 

w 

(S 
<D 

5h 


T3 

£ 

'm 
u 
6 

1 

11 

7 

6 

1 

5 

2 

1 

35 

48 

32 

2 

5 

7 

4 

10 

1 

2 

25 

3 

2 

43 

30 

2 

6 

14 

5 

23 

4 


i 

u 


> 
•3 

u