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Sluiy  )fe^e>.n\.CicM;EL 


Toronto  Public  Library. 


Reference   Department. 


THIS  BOOK  MUST  NOT  BE.  TAKEN    OUT  OF  THE   ROOM. 


Trio*  18    mo 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2010  with  funding  from 

University  of  Toronto 


http://www.archive.org/details/n14apsessionalpap43canauoft 


SESSIONAL    PAPERS 


VOLUME    14 


FIRST  SESSION  OF  THE  ELEVENTH  PARLIAMENT 


OF   THE 


DOMINION  OF  CANADA 


SESSION    1900 


VOLUME  XLIII 


I  ^l(^f 


8-9  Edw.  VII. 


Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1909 


See  also  Numerical  List  Page  5. 


ALPHABETICAL    INDEX 


TO    THE 


SESSIONAL    PAPERS 


OF    THE 


PARLIAMENT  OF  CANADA 


FIRST  SESSION,  ELEVENTH  PARLIAMENT,   1909 


A 

Adulteration   of   Food 11 

Agriculture,    Annual    Report 15 

Alaska  Boundary 81 

Alberta  Natural  Resources 81 

All-Bed  Line 17 

Aluminum  Exports  and  Imports 119 

Armouries    Erected Ill 

Assiniboia  River 116 

Astronomer,  Chief,  Report  of 25a 

Auditor    General,    Annual    Report..     ..  1 

Aylwin,   Francis  Pereival.. 123 

B 

Balance   Sheet   of   Canada 66 

Banks,  Chartered 6 

Banks,  Unpaid  Balances  in 7 

Bill  Miner 110 

Bouaventure   Riding 138 

Bonds  and  Securities 55 

Boring  for  Oil,  &c 75 

British  Canadian  Loan  and   Investment 

Co 92 

British   Columbia; — 

Bibington,   Thomas 118 

Dominion   Lands 59,  106u 

Indian   Reserves 122 

British  Fleet Ill 

Budget   Speech,  1898 109 

5654^1 


C 

Caledonia  to  Liverpool   Railway 118 

Canada    and   France  Convention..    ..101,    102 
Canadian    Pacific    Railway; — 

Additional    Stock 63,   63d 

Business  with  Interior   Department.      63a 

Lands  sold  by 63c 

Running      Rights      over      Intercolo- 
nial  63b,  63c 

Canal    Statistics 20a 

Carillon    and   Grenville    Canals 98 

Cash   to   Credit    of    Government 108 

Cassels,    Hon.    Justice,    Report   of. .    .  .38,    38a 

Chartered  Banks 6 

Chicoutimi   Pier 161,    161a 

Chinese  Capitation  Tax 162 

Civil  Service: — 

Appointments    and    Promotions..     ..       58 

Bill 49fl 

Classifications 19  to  19e 

Examiners 31 

Insurance 42 

List 30 

Regulations    of    Commission 113 

Re-organization 58a  to  58j 

Superannuations 11 

Coal  Oil 103 

Colclaugh,  F.   W 116a 

Cold  Storage 133 


8-9  Edw.  VH. 


Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A,  1909 


Costello,   Thomas, 
Cotton    Factories, 


Deport   of 87 

Industrial    Disputes 


ainal  Statistics 17 


Dairy  and   Cold   Storage  Commissioner.      15a 

Disallowance  of  an   Ontario  Act 140 

Dividends   Unpaid  in   Banks 7 

Dog-Fish   Reduction 131 

Dominion  Lands 61,   70 

Dominion   Police 54 


Flections,  House  of  Commons,  1908. ...       18 

Electric  Light,   Inspection   of 13 

Estimates 3   to  5a 

Exchequer  Court  Rules 48 

Excise  Revenue 12 

Experimental   Farms 16,   89 


Farming  in  Canada,  Report  on 156 

Fisheries,   Annual   Report 22 

Fishermen's  Union,  Nova  Scotia 167 

Fishing   Bounties 1656 

Fishing  Leases 125 

Fishing   Vessels  Seized 126 

Foot   and  Mouth   Disease ..    ..82,  82a 

France  and   Canada   Convention..    ..101,  102 
Fie=h  Fish 83 


Gas,  Inspection  of 13 

General   Election,    1908 18 

Geodetic  Service  Bureau 145  to  145b 

Geographic  Board 21a 

Geological  Survey   Report 26 

Georgian   Bay  Ship  Canal 19a 

Government  Savings   Department 124,   124a 

Governor  General's  Warrants 43 

Grand   Trunk    Pacific   Lands 69 

Grand   Trunk    Railway    in    Ottawa..    ..     127 


Half-breed   Scrip 

Hand   Hills  Post  Office..    . 
Harbour    Commissioners. . 

Hogs  Killed 

House   of   Commons:— 

General   Election,   1908. 

Employees   Appointed.. 

Internal    Economy..    .. 

Translation    Branch.. 
Hudson   Bay   Railway..    .. 


.93, 


139 

128u 

23 

169 

18 
80 
52 
142 
93a 


2 


Ice-breaking    Steamers 115,  161 

Immigration   Agents 129   to  129b 

Imperial  General  Staff 99 

Imperial  Xaval  Defence 170 

Indian    Affairs,   Annual   Report 27 

Indian  Reserves 100  to  lOOe 

"Industry",   Dredge 134 

Inland   Revenue,  Annual  Report 12 

Insurance,   Abstract 9 

Insurance,  Annual  Report 8 

Intercolonial  Railway: — 

Board  of  Management 67e 

Branch   Lines 67 

Cap   St.  Ignace 67/,   67g 

Damages 85a" 

Dismissals S7d 

Freight  Clerks 67c 

Machinery    Purchased 85 

Open  Accounts 67b 

Report  of  Privy  Council 67i 

Under   Railway  Board 67h 

Wire   Fencing 67a 

Interior,    Annual   Report 25 

International   Boundary   Waters..    ..104,  104a 


Jacobs,  F.  Macdonald 113 

Justice,  Annual  R-eport 34 


Kingston  Barracks 112 

Kingston   Penitentiary 121 

Kingston  Veterinary  Hospital 112a 


Laberge,  Alphonse 160 

Labour    Department,    Annual    Report..  36 

Lachute  Mills  Post  Office 62 

Lakes   Simcoe   and   Couchiching 111b 

Lake  St.  John  Repatriation  Society.  .157,  166 

Lands  in  various  Provinces 106  to  106e 

Laterriere  Village 171 

Liabilities  of  Government 105g,  109« 

Library  of  Parliament,  Annual  Report.  33 

List  of  Shipping 21b 

Loans  by  Government 105  to  105;; 

Lobster  Licenses 165a 

Logberg  Printing  Co 132,  132<i 

M 

Mail  Contracts 149 

Mail   Deliveries 73,    73a 

Manitoba  Fisheries 116 

Manitoba  Post  Offices 128 

Marine  and  Fisheries,  Patronage  System  51 

Marine,    Annual   Report 21 

Measures,  Inspection  of 13 


8-9  Edw.  VH. 


Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1909 


M 

Militia    Council,    Annual    Report..     ..35,  35a 

Militia  General  Orders 74 

Mines,  Report  of  Department 2Ga 

Mint,  Royal 71,  71<i 

Miscellaneous  Revenue 72 

Mounted  Police 28 

N 

National  Transcontinental  Railway: — 

Contract,  Station  9370  to  9180 46b 

Dominion   Police   Constables 16c 

Eastern  Division  Classifications..    ..  16/ 

Interim   Report 46d 

Persons  Employed 46g,  461 

Questions  by  Mr.  R.  L.  Borden..    ..  16; 

Report    of    Collingwood    Schreiber..  16c 

Report  of  Commissioners 46 

Tenders  for   Various  Sections..    . .46rc,  46m 

Treatment   of   Employees 46fc 

Winnipeg    Terminals 46<i 

Work   Executed 46i 

Nation   River,  Dundas 154 

Newfoundland,  Admission   of 159 

Newmarket   Canal 91,  91a 

North    American    Conservation    Confer- 
ence   90 

Northwest  Irrigation  Act 60 


O 

Report   of. 


Olin,    Charles, 

Otonabee  River 

Ottawa    Improvement    Commission.. 
Ottawa  Station 


Pacific   Cable  Board 

Payments   by    the    Departments 

Penitentiaries,    Annual    Report 

Police,   Royal   Northwest    Mounted..    . 

Postal  Law 

Postmaster    General,    Annual    Report. 

Prisoners,  Release  of 

Public  Accounts,  Annual  Report 

Public  Printing  and  Stationery 

Public    Works,    Annual    Report 

Public  Works  Constructed 

Public   Works  Employees 

Public   Works,   Purchases  by 


96 
111 

57 
127 


158 

130 
34 
28 

163 
24 
53 
2 
32 
19 

168 
49/ 

135 


Q 

Quebec  Bridge  Co 64 


Railway   Charters 141,  141a 

Railway   Commissioners,  Report   of..    ..  20c 

Railway  Crossings 76  to  76b,  120 

Railways  and  Canals,  Annual  Report. .  20 

5654V-U  3 


R 

Railway  Statistics 20b 

Railway   Subsidy 117 

Remissions  under  Indian  Act 79 

Ross  Rifle 136 

Royal  Mint 71,  71a 

Royal    Northwest    Mounted    Police..     ..  28 


Secretary   of  State,   Annual  Report. ...       29 

Seed  Grain  Distribution 25c  to  25e,  65 

Seine  Trap  Licenses 1G56 

Seining  Licenses 165 

Seizures  by   Dept.   of   Inland   Revenue.78,   78a 
Shareholders   in    Chartered    Banks..     ..        G 

Shipping,  List  of 21b 

Soulanges  Wharfs 153 

Statistical   Publications 117 

Steamboat  Inspection 23a 

Steel  Imports 77 

St.  John  Harbour 137,  137a 

St.  John  River  Survey 152 

St.    Lawrence    Insurance   Rates 91 

Stony   Lake Ilia 

Subsidized  Steamship  Service 10b 

Subway  near  Kingston  Junction 50 

Surveyor   General,   Report  of 25b 

T 

Timber  Berth  1122 68 

Topographical    Surveys   Branch 25b 

Trade  and  Commerce 10  to  10b 

Trade   and   Navigation,  Annual   Report.      11 

Trade  Unions 56 

Transcontinental  Ry.  Commissioners 46 

Treaties  and  Conventions 10a 

Treaties  with  United  States 86,  88 

U 

Unclaimed    Balances    in    Banks 7 

Unforeseen  Expenses 40 

V 

Veterinary   Director   General 15a 

Villa  Lots 97 

Voters'  Lists 95  to  95c 

W 

Weights,  Measures,  &c 13 

Weymouth  Post  Office 128b 

Winnipeg  "Canada  Posten  " 155 

Winnipeg  "  Eree  Press" 107,  107a 

Woollen  Industry  in  Great  Britain..    ..      87 

Y 

Yukon  : — 

Imposition  of  Tax 151 

Mining  Lands 150 

Ordinances 44 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


See  also  Alphabetical  Index,   page    1. 

LIST  OF  SESSIONAL  PAPERS 

Arranged  in  Numerical  Order,  with  their  titles  at  full  length;  the  dates  ivhen  Ordered 
and  when  Presented  to  the  Houses  of  Parliament ;  the  Name  of  the  Senator  or 
Member  who  moved  for  each  Sessional  Paper,  and  whether  it  is  ordered  to  be 
Printed  or  Not  Printed. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  1. 

(This  volume   is   bound   in   two   parts.) 

1.  Report    of   the    Auditor    General    for    the   year    ended   31st    March,    1908.      Presented   21st 

January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson;  also  19th  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  S.  Fielding; 
also  23rd  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers 

CONTENTS  OE  VOLUME  2. 

2.  Public  Accounts   of  Canada,   for  the   fiscal  year   ended  31st   March,   1908.     Presented  21st 

January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson.  .Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

3.  Estimates  of  the  sums  required  for  the  services  of  Canada  for  the  year  ending  31st  March, 

1910.    Presented  1st  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

4.  Estimates  of  the  sums  required  for  the  services  of  Canada  for   the  year   ending  on   the 

31st  March,  1909.     Presented  15th  March,  1909,  by  Hon.  TV.  S.  Fielding. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

4o.  Further  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  Canada  for  the 
fiscal  year  ending  31st  March,  1909.     Presented  10th  May,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  S.  Fielding. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

5.  Supplementary  Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year 

ending  on  31st  March,  1910.     Presented  10th  May,"  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  S.  Fielding. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

» 

5n.  Further  Supplementary   Estimates  of  sums  required  for  the  service  of  Canada,  for  the 
year  ending  on  31st  March,  1910.    Presented  18th  May,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  S.  Fielding. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

6.  List  of  Shareholders  in  the  Chartered  Banks  of  Canada,  as  on  31st  December,  1908.     Pre- 

sented  13th   May,   1909,    by   Hon.    F.   Oliver. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  3. 

7.  Report  of  dividends  remaining  unpaid,   unclaimed  balances  and  unpaid  drafts  and  bills 

of  exchange  in  Chartered  Banks  of  Canada,  for  five  years  and  upwards,  prior  to  31st 

December,  190S Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

5 


S-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  4. 

8.  Keport  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance  for  the  year  ended  31st  December,  190S. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

9.  Abstract   of   Statements   of   Insurance   Companies   in   Canada,   for   the   year   ended   31st 

December,  1908 Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  5. 

lO.  Keport  of  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March, 
1909.     Part  I.— Canadian  Trade.     Presented  27th  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

10a.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  Part  II,  Trade  of  Foreign  Coun- 
tries and  Treaties  and  Conventions,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March,  1908.  Pre- 
sented 5th  April,  1909,  by  Sir   Wilfrid  Laurier. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  6. 

10b.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce,  Part  III,  Subsidized  Steamship 
Service,  &c,  for  the  year  ended  31st  March,  1908.  Presented  22nd  March,  1909,  by  Sir 
Wilfrid  Laurier Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

11.  Tables  of  the  Trade  and  Navigation  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March, 
1908.     Presented  21st  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  7. 

12.  Inland   Revenues   of   Canada.     Excite,   &c,   for   the   fiscal   year   ended  31st  March,   1908. 

Presented  21st  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

13.  Inspection  of  Weights,  Measures,  Gas  and  Electric  Light,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st 

March,  1908.     Presented  21st  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

14.  Report  on  Adulteration  of  Food,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March,  1908.    Presented 

11th  March,   1909,  by  Hon.   W.   Templeman. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

15.  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Agriculture,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March,  1908.     Pre- 

sented 21st  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  S.  A.  Fisher. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

15a.  Report   of   the   Dairy   and   Cold   Storage   Commissioner,   for   the   fiscal  year   ended   31st 
March,  1908.     Presented  21st  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  S.  A.  Fisher. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 
15a.  (2)  Report    of    the    Veterinary    Director    General    and    Live    Stock    Commissioner,    for 

two  years  ended  31st  March,  1908 Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

6 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  8. 

16.  Report  of  the  Directors  and  Officers  of  the  Experimental  Farms  for  the  year  ended  31st 

March,  1908.     Presented  31st  March,  1909,  by  Hon.  S.  A.  Fisher. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

17.  Criminal  Statistics  for  the  year   ended  30th   September,   1908. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

18.  Return  of  the  Eleventh  General  Election  for  the  House  of  Commons  of  Canada,  held  on 

the  26th  day  of  October,  1908 Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  9. 

19.  Report   of   the   Minister   of   Public   Works,   for   the   fiscal   year   ended  31st   March,   1908. 

Presented  3rd  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Pugsley. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  10. 

19u.  Georgian  Bay  Ship  Canal.  Report  upon  survey,  with  plans  and  estimates  of  cost, 
1908.    Presented  22nd  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Pugsley. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  11. 

20.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March, 

1908.     Presented  19th  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P.  Graham. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

20a.  Canal  Statistics  for  the  season  of  navigation,  1907. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

20b.  Railway  Statistics  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ended  30th  June,  1908.  Presented  25th 
February,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P.  Graham. Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

20c.  Third  Report  of  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  Canada,  to  31st  March,  1907, 
for  the  year  ending  31st  March,  1908.  Presented  29th  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P. 
Graham Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  12. 

21.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  (Marine)  for  1908.     Presented  18th 

February,   1909,  by  Hon.   L.   P.   Brodeur. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

21a.  Seventh  Report  of  the  Geographic  Board  of  Canada;  containing  all  decisions  to  30th 
June,   1908.     Presented  22nd  February,   1909,   by  Hon.  L.   P.   Brodeur. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

21b.  List  of  Shipping  issued  by  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  being  a  list  of 
vessels  on  the  registry  books  of  Canada    on  the  31st  December,   1908. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

22.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries   (Fisheries)  for  1908.     Presented  9th 

February,   1909,   by   Hon.   L.   P.   Brodeur. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

7 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  13. 

23.   Report  of  the  Harbour  Commissioners,  &c. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

23a.  Report  of  the  Chairman  of  the  Board  of  Steamboat  Inspection,  1908. 

Priiited  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

24.-  Report   of   the   Postmaster   General,   for   the   fiscal   year   ended   31st   March,    1908.     Pre- 
sented 21st  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  R.  Lemieux. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessioyial  papers. 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  14. 

25.  Report  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March,  1908. 
Presented  15th  February,   1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

25n.  Report  of  the  Chief  Astronomer  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  31st  March,  1908.  Presented 
13th  May,  1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver..    .  .Printed  both  for  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

25b.  Annual  Report  of  the  Topographical  Surveys  Branch,  including  Report  of  the  Surveyor 
General  of  Dominion  Lands,   1907-1908  Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

25c.  Correspondence  and  papers,  including  financial  statement,  relating  to  Seed  Grain  Dis- 
tribution of  1908  in  the  provinces  of  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta.  Presented  28th 
January,  1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver..   ..Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

25d.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  March,  1909,  showing  how 
many  bushels  of  seed  wheat  were  bought  for  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  for  the  season 
of  1908,  whom  it  was  bought  from,  at  what  price,  and  what  grade  it  was;  if  the  wheat 
so  bought  was  cleaned  for  seed;  how  the  wheat  so  bought  was  used;  who  it  was  sold  to, 
and  at  what  prices;  the  total  loss  in  connection  with  the  wheat  so  bought.  Presented  15th 
March,  1909.— Mr.  Sharpe  (I.isyar) Not  printed. 

25e.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  March,  1909,  showing  how 
many  bushels  of  English  oats  were  bought  for  seed  in  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  for 
the  season  of  1908,  and  at  what  prices;  the  condition  the  oats  were  in  before  or  when 
they  were  bought;  if  used  for  seed  or  sold;  whom  they  were  sold  to  and  in  what  places  . 
the  total  loss  in  connection  with  the  oats  bought  in  England,  and  any  complaints  there 
were  about  them.     Presented   15th    March,    1909.— Mr.   Sharpe    (Lisgar) Not  printed. 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  15. 

26.  Summary  Report  of  the  Geological  Survey  Branch  of  the  Department  of  Mines,  for  the 

calendar  year  1908.     Presented  3rd  May,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Templeman. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

26a.  Summary     Report   of   the   Jlines   Branch   of    the   Department   of   Mines,   for   the   nine 
months    ended    31st    December,    1908.. Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

27.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs,  for  the  year  ended  31st  March,  1908.    Pre- 

sented 22nd  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver. 

Printed  for  bolh  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 
8 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   16. 

28.  Report   of  the   Royal   Northwest   Mounted  Police,   190S.     Presented  9th   March,    1909,   by 

Sir   Wilfrid   Laurier Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

29.  Report  of  the   Secretary   of   State   of   Canada,   for   the   year   ended   December.    1907,   and 

the   first   three   months   of   the   year    190S      Presented   22nd   January,    1909,   by   Hon.   C. 
Murphy Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

30.  Civil  Service  List  of  Canada,  190S.    Presented  22nd  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  C.  Murphy. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

31.  Report  of  the  Board  of  Civil  Service  Examiners,  for  the  year  ended  31st  December,  190S. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17. 

32.  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Public  Printing  and  Stationery,  for  the  fiscal  year 

ended  31st  March,  1908.    Presented  7th  May,  1909,  by  Hon.  C.  Murphy. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

33.  Report  of  the  Joint  Librarians  of  Parliament  for  the  year  1908.    Presented  21st  January, 

1909,  by  the  Hon.  the  Speaker , Printed  for  sessional  papers. 

34.  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Justice  as  to  Penitentiaries  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year 

ended  31st  March,  1908.     Presented  21st  January,   1909,  by  Hon.   W.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

35.  Report  of  the  Militia  Council,  for  the  fiscal  yeai   ended  31st  March,  1908.    Presented  9th 

March,  1909,  by  Sir  Frederick  Borden. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

35a.  Memorandum  respecting  the  estimates  for  Militia  and  Defence  for  1909-10.  Presented 
9th  March,  1909,  by  Sir  Frederick  Borden. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

36.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Labour,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  31st  March,  1908.     Pre- 

sented  21st   January,   1909,   by   Hon.    R.    Lemieux. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

37.  Report  upon  the  Survey  of  (he  Georgian   Bay  Ship  Canal,   with   plans  and  estimate  of 

cost See  No.  19a. 

38.  Report   of    the    Hon.    Mr.    Justice    Cassels,    Commissioner    appointed    to    investigate    the 

affairs  of  fhe  Department  of  .Marine  and  Fisheries.     Presented  22nd  January,  1909,  by 
Hon.    L.    P.    Brodeur Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

38n.  Minute  of  a  Report  of  the  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council,  approved  by  His  Excellency 
the  Governor  General  on  the  29lh  March,  1909: — The  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council 
have  had  under  consideration  a  report,  herewith,  dated  27th  March,  1909,  from  the 
Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  upon  the  investigation  recently  held  by  the  Honour- 
able Walter  Cassels  respecting  the  statement  contained  in  the  Report  of  the  Civil 
Service  Commission  reflecting  upon  the  integrity  of  officials  of  the  Department  of 
Marine  and  Fisheries  and  submitting  certain  recommendations  affecting  the  officials 
therein  named.  The  Committee,  concurring  in  the  said  Report  and  the  recommenda- 
tion therein  contained,  submit  the  same  for  Your  Excellency's  approval.  Presented 
30th  March,   1909,   by  Hon.   L.   P.   Brodeur. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

39.  Report  of  the  Royal   Commission   appointed  to  inquire  into   industrial  disputes  in   the 

cotton  factories  of  the  province  of  Quebec.     Presented  25th  January,   1909,  by  Hon.  R. 

Lemieux Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

9 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

40.  Statement  of  expenditure  on  account  of  miscellaneous  unforeseen  expenses  from  the  1st 
April,  1908,  to  the  20th  January,  1909,  in  acordance  with  the  Appropriation  Act  of  1908. 
Presented  26th  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson Not  printed. 

41.  Statement  of  superannuations  and  retiring  allowances  in  the  civil  service  during  the 
year  ended  31st  December,  1908,  showing  name,  rank,  salary,  service,  allowance  and 
cause  of  retirement  of  each  pearson  superannuated  or  retired,  also  whether  vacancy 
filled  by  promotion  or  by  new  appointment,  and  salary  of  any  new  appointee.  Presented 
26th  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson Not  printed. 

42.  Statement  in  pursuance  of  section  17  of  the  Civil  Service  Insurance  Act  for  the  year 
ending  31st  March,   1908.     Presented  26th  January,   1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Paterson. 

Not  printed. 

43.  Statement  of  Governor  General's  Warrants  issued  since  the  last  session  of  parliament, 

on    account    of    the    fiscal    year    1908-9.      Presented    26th    January,    1909,    by    Hon.    W. 
Paterson Not  printed. 

44.  Ordinances  of  the  Yukon  Territory,  passed  by  the  Yukon  Council  in  the  year  1908. 
Presented  27th  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  C.  Murphy Not  printed. 

45.  Third  Report  of  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners See  No.  20c. 

46.  Report  of  the  Commissioners  of  the  Transcontinental  Railway,  for  the  year  ending  31st 

March,  1908.    Presented  29th  January,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P.  Graham. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

46a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence  between  Rothwell,  Johnston  &  Stubbs,  lawyers,  of  Winnipeg,  and  the 
government,  or  the  Transcontinental  Railway  Commissioners  respecting  their  instruc- 
tions in  regard  to  the  purchase  of  the  Winnipeg  terminals  from  Kern  &  Mathews,  and 
in  respect  to  the  legal  services  rendered  by  them  for  the  government,  and  passing  of 
titles  of  the  property,  and  a  copy  of  the  solicitors'  bills  of  costs,  charges  and  corres- 
pondence arising  therefrom ;  and  of  all  correspondence  between  the  government  and 
the  Railway  Commissioners  and  the  vendors,  Kern  &  Mathews,  from  the  commence- 
ment of  the  negotiations;  and  also  showing  what  steps,  if  any,  were  taken  towards 
expropriating  the  property,  or  obtaining  judicial  determination  as  to  the  value  of  the 
said  property.     Presented  4th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Bradbury Not  printed. 

46b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22ud  February,  1909,  showiug  the 
final  estimates  on  the  contract  entered  into  on  August  22,  1906,  between  J.  D.  McArthur 
and  Smith  &  Prendible  on  the  National  Transcontinental  Railway,  for  work  from  sta- 
tion 9370  to  station  9480;  and  the  contract  entered  into  on  21st  November,  1908,  between 
the  same  parties  on  the  same  railway  for  work  from  station  9260  to  station  9370.  Pre- 
sented 11th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Haggart  (Winnipeg) Not  printed. 

46c.  Report  of  Collingwood  Schreiber,  Esquire,  chief  engineer  western  division  National 
Transcontinental  Railway.     Presented  15th  March,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P.  Graham. 

Not  printed. 

46<i.  Interim  Report  of  the  Commissioners  of  the  Transcontinental  Railway,  for  the  nine 
months  ending  31st  December,  1908.  Presented  15th  March,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P. 
Graham Not  printed. 

46e.  Statistics  of  Dominion  Police  Constables  employed  along  the  line  of  the  Transconti- 
nental Railway  during  the  calendar  year  1908.  Presented  23rd  March,  1909,  by  Hon. 
A.  B.  Aylesworth Not  printed. 

46/.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
litters,  correspondence,  statements  and  writing  between  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Rail- 
way Company,  or  its  engineers  or  agents,  and  the  Commissioners  of  the  Transcon- 
tinental Railway,  or  their  engineers  or  agents,  and  between  the  commissioners  and  their 
engineers,  and  between  the  commissioners  and  their  engineers  and  agents  aDd  the  con- 

10 


8-9  Edw.  Vn. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

tractors  or  sub-contractors  on  Districts  B  and  F  after  mentioned,  as  to  classification  or 
alleged  over  classification  on  Districts  B  and  F  of  the  Eastern  Division  of  said  rail- 
way, and  of  all  estimates,  returns,  certificates,  memoranda,  statements  or  writings, 
showing  classification  or  over-classification  of  the  cuttings  and  work  on  said  Districts 
B  and  F.    Presented  22nd  April,  1909.— Mr.  Lennox Not  printed. 

46j.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing  the 
names  of  all  persons  appointed  to  office  or  employment  by  the  Transcontinental  Rail- 
way Commission  since  its  creation,  showing  the  county  or  city  from  which  such  person 
came,  the  office  or  employment  to  which  he  was  appointed,  the  date  of  appointment,  the 
salary  and  allowances  attached  thereto,  the  place  or  district  where  the  work  of  each 
employee  is  done,  and  the  total  amount  paid  each  year  for  all  such  services  up  to  the 
end  of  December,  1908.     Presented  22nd  April,  1909.— Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

46h.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
tenders  received  for  the  construction  of  the  following  sections  of  the  Eastern  Division 
of  the  National  Transcontinental  Railway,  together  with  the  itemized  schedules  of  the 
engineer's  estimates  of  quantities  on  which  the  award  of  contracts  was  based,  the 
sections  referred  to  being  those  mentioned  in  the  answer  of  the  Minister  of  Railways 
and  Canals  in  the  House  on  the  13th  April,  1908,  as  follows: — 

STATEMENT  NO.  1.— COMMISSIONERS -EASTERN  DIVISION. 


Mileage  from 
Moncton. 


From 


0 
50 
58 

97 
164 
195 

256 


To 


Description. 


309  74 

459  74 

509  74 

609  74 

f  54  74 
656  07 

877-75 

1,02175 
1,027-75 

1,17185 
1.334-35 

1,409  35 

1,42976 

1,557*0 


50 
58 
'.17 
161 
195 
256 
309 


50 


459  74 


509 
609 


054  74 


656 
877 


1,02775 


1,127 
1,171 

1,334 

1,40!) 
1,429 

1,557 

1,804 


Moncton  to  near  Chipman 

Near  Chipman  easterly  8  55  miles 

Near  Chipman  westerly  to  LOR.  crossing 

I.C.R.  crossing  to  Mile  164 

Mile  164  to  Grand  Falls     

Grand  Falls  to  New  Brunswick  boundary. . 
N.B.  boundary  to  150  miles  east  of  Quebec 

Bridge 

t  From  Quebec  Bridge  150  miles  eastward.  . 
'.  Quebec    Bridge    link    (not    included    in 

(_     estimate 

Quebec  Bridge  westerly  50  miles 

50  miles  west  Quebec   Bridge  to  150  miles 

west 

150  miles  west  Quebec  Bridge  to  near  Way- 

montachene 

To  be  included  in  this  contract 

Near  Wayniontachene  to  near  Harricanaw 

River .    

Near  Harricanaw  River  to  Junction   T.    & 

N.  O.  Ry 

Junction  T.  &  N.  O.  Ry.  for  100  miles  west.  100 
100  miles  west  of  Junction  T.  &  N.  O.  Ry. 

to  west  end  of  District  '  D' 

West  end  of  District  '  D'  westerly 

From  19J  miles  west  of  Mud  River,  easterly, 
n  ii  „  to  west 

end  of  District  '  E' 

From     westward     District    '  E '    to    Lake 

Superior  Junction . .    .    

From  Lake  Superior  Junction  to  west  bank 

of  Red  River |246 


No.  of 

One 

Miles. 


LOO 


45 
1 

221 


L50 


Amount  of 

Estimate 

on  which  Con 

tracts 

were  lit. 


S      eta. 


089,895 

289.190 

767,434 

1,898,124 

1,646,253 

1,385,941 


2,377,409 
5,011,346 
1,489,537 
3,807,719 


I1 


00 
50 
92 
54 
,691,073  41 


Date  of 


Contract. 


Comple- 
tion. 


Mar.14,'117  Sept. 
Aug  23, '07  Aug, 

Mar.  28/081  Sept. 
„    28, '08 
„    28,'08 
.,      9, '07 

„    28,*08 

„  9, '07 
May  15, '( 16 
15, '06 
Mar.  14, '0: 


Not  let. 

3,986,901 
3,936,566 

Not  let. 

2,101,499 

Not  let. 


13,010,398  92 


14,  'o; 

28, '08 


28, '08 


May  15, '00 


1,'08 
1,'08 
1,10 
1,10 
1,10 
1,'OS 

1,10 

1,'09 
1,'07 
1,'07 
1,'08 


1.'09 
1,10 


1,10 


1,07 


Presented  26th  April,  1909. — Mr.  Lennox Not  printed. 

11 


S-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  0E  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

46/'.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  showing  the  various 
quantities  of  work  of  each  description  or  class  actually  executed  by  the  several  con- 
tractors and   certified  as  correct   by  the   engineers  and   paid   for   up  to  31st  December, 

1908,  upon  the  several  sections  of  the  Eastern  Division  of  the  National  Transcontinental 
Railway,  where  the  sections  have  not  been  completed,  the  various  chief  engineers' 
estimates  of  the  quantities  of  the  various  class  of  work  remaining  to  be  executed, 
together  with  an  estimate  of  the  cost  of  completing  the  same,  based  on  the  contractors' 
prices  attached  to  each  tender.     Presented  26th  April,  1909.— Af r.  Lennox.. Not  printed. 

46j.  National  Transcontinental  Railway.  Information  in  reply  to  questions  by  Mr.  R.  L. 
Borden,  M.P.    Presented  (Senate)  7th  May,  1909,  by  Hon.  Sir  Richard  Cartwright. 

Not  printed. 

46/,-.  Correspondence  and  reports  relative  to  complaints  as  to  the  manner  men  employed  on 
the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  construction  are  treated  in  the  hospital  at  Prince 
Rupert;  the  complaint  of  non-payment  of  just  claims  for  wages,  &c,  on  the  Prince 
Rupert  section  of  the  said  railway.     Prtsented  12th  May,  1909,  by  Hon.  R.  Lemieux. 

Not  printed. 

46?.  Supplementary  Return  to  46//.     Presented  14th  May,  1909 Not  printed, 

46//?.  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  idh.     Presented  14th  May,  1909 Not  printed, 

47.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 

all  orders  in  council,  correspondence,  reports  and  other  documents  and  papers,  not 
already  brought  down,  touching  or  relating  to  the  All-Red  Line,  so-called,  as  referred  to 
in  the  resolution  passed  by  this  House-  on  the  9th  day  of  July,  1908,  or  touching  or 
relating  to  any  similar  or  substituted  proposal  for  the  like  purpose.  Presented  29th 
January,   1909. — Mr.  Borden   (Halifax) Not  printed. 

48.  General  rules  and  orders  in  the  Exchequer  Court  in  Canada,  1909.  Presented  29th 
January,  1909,  by  Hon.  C.  Murphy - Not  printed. 

49.  Classification   of  the   following   departments   of   the   inside   Civil   Service   at   Ottawa,   by 

order  in  council  of  the  25th  January,  1909,  as  on  the  1st  September,  1908,  viz.: — Agri- 
culture, Auditor  General,  Customs,  Finance,  Superintendent  of  Insurance,  Governor 
General's  Secretary,  Indian  Affairs,  Inland  Revenue,  Justice,  Labour,  Library  of  Par- 
liament, Marine  and  Fisheries,  Militia  and  Defence,  Mines,  Post  Office,  Privy  Council, 
Public  Printing  and  Stationery,  Public  Works.  Railways  and  Canals,  Royal  Northwest 
Mounted   Police,    Secretary   of   State,   Trade   and    Commerce.     Presented    1st   February, 

1909,  by  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurier Not  printed. 

49n.  Classification  of  the  officers,  clerks  and  employees  of  the  Library  of  Parliament,  as  on 
the  first  day  of  September,  1908.     Presented  11th  March,  1909,  by  Sir  Wilfrid   Laurier. 

Not  printed 

49b.  Classification  and  organization  of  the  officers  and  clerks  of  the  Distribution  Office  of 
the  Department  of  the  Printing  of  Parliament,  as  on  the  first  day  of  September,  1908. 
Presented  11th  March,  1909,  by  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurier Not  printed. 

49e.  Classification  of  the  permanent  officers,  clerks  and  employees  of  the  House  of  Commons. 
Presented  11th  March,  1909,  by  the   lion,  the  Speaker.. Not  printed. 

49//.  Organization  of  the  Staff  of  the  House  of  Commons,  with  the  classification  of  the 
rarious  officers,   clerks   and   employees.     Presented   11th    March,   1909,   by   the   Hon.   the 

Speaker Not  printed. 

12 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  0E  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

4Pc  Classification  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior  (Inside  Service}  at  Ottawa,  by  order  in 
council  of  the  1st  February,  1909,  as  on  the  1st  September,  1908.  Presented  1st  April. 
1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver Notprinted. 

49/.  Order  in  Council  approved  by  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  on  the  5th  .May, 
1908,  granting  authority  for  the  continued  employment  of  certain  officers  and  clerks 
of  the  non-permanent  branches  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works.  Presented  5th 
April,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Pugsley Not  printed. 

49y.  Schedules  in  connection  with  the  Civil  Service  Bill.  Presented  10th  May,  1909,  by  Hon. 
S.  A.  Fisher Not  printed. 

50.  Correspondence,  &c,  relative  to  the  construction  of  a  subway  near  the   Kingston  Junc- 

tion of  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  of  Canada.  Presented  1st  February,  1909.  by  Hon. 
G.  P.  Graham Notprinted. 

51.  Copy  of  official  communication,  addressed  by   the  Minister  of  Marine  and   Fisheries,  to 

Commissioner  Cassels,  respecting  the  abolition  of  the  patronage  system  in  the  Depart- 
ment of  Marine  and  Fisheries.     Presented  1st  February,  1909.-  Mr.  Foster. Not  printed. 

52.  Minutes  of  proceedings  of  the  Board  of  Internal  Economy  of  the  House  of  Commons, 

pursuant  to  Rule  of  the  House  Xo.  9,  from  the  16th  December,  1907,  to  14th  July,  190S, 
inclusive.     Presented  29th  January,   1909,   by   the  Hon.   the  Speaker Not  printed. 

53.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,   1908,  showing  the 

number  of  applications  for  the  release  of  prisoners  and  the  number  granted  since  the 
year  1896  by  the  Minister  of  Justice  before  the  expiry  of  sentence,  the  terms  of  sen- 
tence, the  date  of  release,  the  reasons  therefor  as  far  as  expedient,  and  the  name  of 
the  solicitor  who  was  interested  in  procuring  the  release.  Presented  2nd  February, 
1909.— Mr. -Foster Not  printed. 

54.  Report  of  the  Commissioner,   Dominion  Police  Force,  for  the  year  1908.     Presented  2nd 

February,  1909,  by  Hon.  A.  B.  Aylesworth Notprinted. 

55.  A   detailed   statement   of   all   bonds   or   securities   registered   in    the   Department   of   the 

Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  since  last  return,  7th  December,  1907,  submitted  to  the 
Parliament  of  Canada  undtr  section  32,  of  chapter  19,  of  the  Revised  Statutes  of 
Canada,  190G.     Presented  2nd  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  C.  Murphy Notprinted. 

56.  Return  under  chapter  125  (R.S.C.),  1906,  intituled:  'An  Act  respecting  Trades  Unions/ 

submitted  to  Parliament  in  accordance  with  section  33  of  the  said  Act.  Presented  2nd 
February,  1909,  by  Hon.  C.  Murphy Not  printed. 

57  Report  of  the  Ottawa  Improvement  Commission  for  the  nine  months  ended  the  31st 
March,  1908.     Presented  4th  February,   1909,   by  Hon.  W.   Paterson Not  printed. 

58.  Partial  Return  to  an  order  of  the  Hou^e  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  show- 
ing what  persons  have  been  appointed,  transferred,  or  promoted,  respectively,  since  1st 
July,  1908,  in  the  various  departments  coming  under  the  operation  of  the  Civil  Ser- 
vice Act  of  1908 ;  the  positions  and  salaries  of  such  persons  as  have  been  transferred  and 
promoted  at  the  time  of  the  change;  the  positions  and  salaries  at  present  of  all  who 
have  been  so  appointed,  transferred  or  promoted,  and  which  of  these  appointments, 
transfers  or  promotions  were  made  in  accordance  with  the  present  Civil  Service  Act. 
Presented  5th  February,  1909.— Mr.  Foster Notprinted. 

58a.  Partial  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  for 
a  copy  of  all  orders  in  council,  departmental  orders,  rules  and  regulations,  and 
schemes   of   reorganization   adopted   in   the   several   departments,   rules   and   regulations 

13 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 
made  by  the  Civil  Service  Commissioners,  and  all  other  orders,  steps  and  proceedings 
made,  had  or  taken  under  or  pursuant  to  the  Civil  Service  Amendment  Act,  1908.     Pre- 
i    sented  8th  February,  1909. — Mr.  Borden  (Halifax) Not  printed. 

58b.     Supplementary  Return  to  No.  58.     Presented  8th  February,  1909 Not  printed. 

58c.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  showing  how 
many  officials  were  appointed  in  the  year  1908  to  the  various  departments  and  brought 
from  the  outside  service  into  the  inside  service  under  the  Civil  Service  Act,  with  their 
names  and  salaries;  and  what  addition  to  the  various  staffs  have  been  made  thereby. 
Presented   11th   February,   1909. — Mr.   Sharpe   (Ontario) Not  printed. 

58d.  Further  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  58.    Presented  11th  February,  1909.. Not  printed. 

58e.  Keturn  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1909,  showing  the 
names  of  the  temporary  clerks  formerly  paid  out  of  Civil  Government  Contingencies 
who  have  been  classified  under  section  7  of  the  Civil  Service  Act  since  the  1st  Septem- 
ber, 1908,  and  placed  in  the  third  division  subdivision  B;  the  position  filled  by  each  at 
the  time  of  classification  and  the  salary  paid,  the  length  of  service,  the  age  and  what 
examination  has  been  passed ;  the  position  to  which  assigned  under  the  classification 
and  the  salary  attached ;  the  names  of  the  persons  appointed  to  the  Civil  Service  since 
1st  September,  1908,  under  section  47  of  the  Civil  Service  Act,  the  positions  to  which 
appointed,  the  date  of  appointment,  and  the  salary  attached.  Presented  11th  February, 
1909.— Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

58/.  Further  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  5S.     Presented  18th  February,   1909.Not  printed. 

58y.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  February,  1909,  for  copies 
of  orders  in  council  by  authority  of  which  increases  of  salary  detailed  on  pages  556, 
557,  558,  559,  560,  561,  562,  563  and  564,  unrevised  Hansard,  1909,  were  granted.  Pre- 
sented 23rd  February,  1909.— Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

58h.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  February,  1909,  showing  the 
name  and  date  of  the  first  appointment,  position  and  salary  at  time  of  increase  of  each 
clerk  or  other  employee  in  the  outside  service  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works  at 
Ottawa,  to  whom  any  increase  of  pay  was  given  on  and  after  the  1st  of  April,  190S,  the 
amount  of  such  increase  or  increases,  the  date  on  which  increase  was  granted,  the  date 
it  became  effective,  and  the  date  on  which  (he  increase  was  paid.  2.  A  similar  return  from 
each  of  the  following  Departments:  Militia  and  Defence,  Marine  and  Fisheries,  Rail- 
ways and  Canals,  Customs,  Inland  Revenue,  Public  Printing,  Indian  Affairs,  Auditor 
General,  Finance,  Mines  and  Post  Office  Department.  Presented  23rd  February,  1909.— 
Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

58t.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  February,  1909,  for  copies  of 
orders  in  council  passed  from  the  1st  of  May,  1908,  to  31st  January,  1909,  authorizing  in- 
creases to  the  employees  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works.  Presented  25th  February, 
1909.— Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

58/.  Orders  in  Council  attached  to  Sessional  Paper  No.  58g  herewith  were  the  only  ones 
passed  in  connection  with  the  increases  of  salary  detailed  on  pages  556,  557,  558,  559,  560, 
561,  562,  563  and  564,  unrevised  Hansard,  1909.  The  increases  given  to  the  officials  em- 
ployed in  the  Surveys  Branch  were  granted  in  accordance  with  the  Act  respecting  the 
Department  of  the  Interior,  chapter  54,  sections  6  and  8,  of  the  Revised  Statutes,  which 
relate  to  the  employment  and  payment  of  temporary  assistants  in  the  Surveyor  Gen- 
eral's Branch,  for  the  performance  of  services  requiring  technical,  scientific  or  pro- 
fessional qualifications.  The  increases  given  to  the  employees  on  Dominion  Lands, 
Outside  Service,  School  Lands,  Immigration  and  Boundary  Surveys  were  granted  under 
departmental  authority.     Presented  26th   February,   1909,   by   Hon.   F.   Oliver. 

Not  printed. 

14 


8-9  E<Jw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

59.  Return  of  orders  in  council  which  have  been   published  in  the   Canada  Gazette  and  in 

the  Hritis'i  Columbia  Gazette,  between  1st  December,  1907,  and  1st  December,  1908,  in 
accordance  with  provisions  of  subsection  (d)  of  section  38  of  the  regulations  for  the 
survey,  administration,  disposal  and  management  of  Dominion  lands  within  the  40-mile 
railway  belt  in  the  province  of  British  Columbia.  Presented  5th  February,  1909,  by 
;         Hon.  F.  Oliver Not  printed. 

60.  Return  under  the  provisions  of  section  57  of  the  Northwest  Irrigation  Act,  being 
chapter  61  of  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  1906,  being  copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council, 
which  have  been  passed  or  regulations  which  nave  been  made  or  forms  prescribed  by 
the  Minister  of  the  Interior  under  that  Act,  and  which  have  been  published  in  the 
Canada  Gazette,  since  the  date  of  the  presentation  to  Parliament  of  a  similar  return  at 
its  last  preceding  session.     Presented  5th  February,   1909,  by  Hon.   F.   Oliver. 

Not  printed. 

61.  Return  under  the  provision  of  section  77  of  the  Dominion  Lands  Act,  chapter  20,  of  the 

Statutes  of  190S,  of  section  5  of  the  Dominion  Lands  Surveys  Act,  chapter  21,  of  the 
same  Statutes,  of  subsection  2,  of  section  13  of  the  Dominion  Forest  Reserves  Act. 
chapter  56,  R.S.C.,  1906,  of  subsection  3  of  section  5  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  Park  Act, 
chapter  60,  R.S.C.,  1906,  and  of  subsection  2  of  section  18  of  the  Yukon  Act,  chapter  63, 
R.S.C.,  1906,  being  copies  of  all  orders  in  council,  ordinances  or  regulations  which  have 
been  passed  under  any  of  the  above  mentioned  Acts  and  which  have  been  published  in  the 
Canada  Gazette,  since  the  date  of  the  presentation  to  Parliament  of  a  similar  return  at 
its  last  preceding  session.  Presented  to  Parliament  of  a  similar  return  at  its  last 
preceding  session.    Presented  5th  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver Not  printed. 

62.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 

all  correspondence  during  the  last  three  months  with  reference  to  Lachute  Mills  post 
office.     Presented  8th  February,   1909. — Mr.  Perley Not  printed. 

63.  Order  in  Council,  &c,   in  relation  to  the  issue  of  $50,000,000   additional  stock  by  the 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company.  Presented  8th  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P. 
Graham Not  printed. 

63a.  Return  (in  so  far  as  the  Department  of  the  Interior  is  concerned)  of  copies  of  all 
orders  in  council,  plans,  papers,  and  correspondence  which  are  required  to  be  presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  under  a  resolution  passed  on  20th  February,  1882,  since  the 
date  of  the  last  return  under  such  resolution.  Presented  8th  February,  1909,  by  Hon. 
F.  Oliver Not  printed. 

63b.  Correspondence  on  the  subject  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  securing 
running  rights  over  the  Intercolonial  Railway  between  St.  John  and  Halifax.  Pre- 
sented 8th  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P.  Graham Not  printed. 

63c.  Return  of  lands  sold  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  from  the  1st  October, 
1907,  to  the  1st  October,  1908,  and  the  names  of  the  purchasers.  Presented  15th  February, 
1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver Not  printed. 

63d.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
any  order  in  council  authorizing  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  to  increase  its  capital 
stock.    Presented  18th  February,  1909. — Mr.  Maclean  (York) Not  printed. 

63c.  Further  correspondence  on  the  subject  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company 
securing  running  rights  over  the  Intercolonial  Railway  between  St.  John  and  Halifax. 

Presented  22nd  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P.   Graham Not  printed. 

15 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

64.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  what 

sums  of  money  have  been  paid  each  of  the  several  holders  of  stock  in  the  Quebec 
Bridge  Company  on  account  of  stock,  bonus  and  interest,  respectively;  and  what 
amount  remains  to  be  paid  nnd  to  whom.    Presented  XI  h  February,  1909.— Mr.  Foster. 

Not  printed 

65.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  what 

disposition  has  been  made  in  detail  of  the  vote  of  £25,000  under  Miscellaneous,  for 
seed  grain  in  Alberta  and  Saskatchewan.  Presented  11th  February.  1909,  by  Hon.  F. 
Oliver Not  printed. 

66.  Return   to  an  order   of   the   House  of  Commons,   dated  26th  January,   1909,   showing    in 

detail  the  assets  amounting  to  $157,483,926.17  in  the  balance  sheet  of  Canada  on  31st 
December,   1909.     Presented   11th   February,    1909.— Mr.    Ames Not  printed. 

67.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 

of  the  report  of  the  commissioners  appointed  by  the  government  to  inquire  into, 
examine  and  report  upon  the  branch  lines  of  railway  connecting  with  the  Intercolonial 
Railway;  also  a  copy  of  the  report  of  the  commissioners  appointed  by  the  government 
of  the  province  of  New  Brunswick  to  inquire  into,  examine  and  report  upon  the 
branch  lines  of  railway  within  said  province  and  connecting  with  the  said  Intercolonial 
Railway.     Presented  11th   February,   1909. — Mr.  Emmcrson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

67a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commas,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  the 
tenders  called  for  by  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  for  144  miles,  more  or 
less,  of  wire  fencing  during  the  summer  or  fall  of  190S.  and  the  advertisements  or  cir- 
culars calling  for  same:  how  many  tenders  were  received  and  from  whom;  how  the 
contract  was  let,  at  what  price  and  to  whom;  the  quantity  of  wire  fencing  purchased 
by  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals  during  1908,  by  tender  or  otherwise,  and  the 
prices  paid  per  mile.     Presented  2nd  March,  1909.— Mr.  Taylor  (Leeds)..   ..Not  printed. 

67b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing,  in 
respect  of  the  following  items  which  appear  in  the  Public  Accounts: — 

Intercolonial  Railway,   open   account $965,418  00 

Windsor  Branch,  open  account 180  34 

Prince  Edward   Island  Railway,  open  account 19,687  00 

(a)  what  proportion  of  these  amounts  represents  moneys  due  the  government  since  a 
date  prior  to  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  1906-7;  (b)  what  part  of  the  amount  thus  over- 
due was  incurred  in  each  fiscal  year  prior  to  1906-7;  (c)  a  list  of  the  items  included  in 
(a)  which  represent  an  amount  exceeding  one  hundred  dollars,  with  name  in  each  case 
of  debtor,  date  and  nature  of  services.     Presented  4th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Ames. 

Not  printed. 

67c.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  the 
Report  of  the  Conciliation  Board  in  connection  with  the  freight  clerks  of  Halifax  and 
St.  John.    Presented  23rd  March,  1909.— Mr.  Crosby Not  printed. 

67a\  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  showing  the 
names  of  the  Intercolonial  employees  dismissed  or  suspended  during  the  year  1908,  the 
position  held  by  each,  the  date  of  dismissal  or  suspension,  and  the  special  cause  alleged 
therefor ;  also  the  names  of  any  such  persons  so  dismissed  or  suspended  who  have  been 
reinstated  up  to  28th  February,  1909,  and  the  dates  of  reinstation.    Presented  22nd  April, 

1909. — Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

16 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

67c  Copy  of  Order  in  Council  constituting  a  Board  of  Management  for  the  Government 
Railways — the  Intercolonial  and  the  Prince  Edward  Island  Railway — and  naming  the 
members  of  the  said  Board  of  Management.  Presented  26th  April,  1909,  by  Hon.  G.  P. 
Graham Not  printed. 

67/.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  cf  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
petitions  and  correspondence,  whether  by  letter  or  telegrams,  and  all  plans  submitted 
either  to  the  Railway  Department  or  to  the  authorities  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway, 
and  of  all  decisions  arrived  at,  relating  to  the  enlargement  of  the  station  of  the 
Intercolonial  Railway  at  Cap  St.  Ignace,  or  the  construction  of  a  new  station.  Pre- 
sented 14th  May,  1909. — Mr.  Boy  (Montmagny) Not  printed. 

G7g.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence,  memorials,  reports  nnd  decisions  arrived  at  respecting  the  construc- 
tion of  a  tank  at  the  Intercolonial  Railway  station  at  Cap  St.  Ignace,  and  the  increased 
cost  to  be  paid  to  the  Aqueduct  Company  supplying  the  water  for  the  engines  running 
on  the  said  railway.     Presented  14th  April,  1909. — Mr.  Roy  (Montmagny).. Not  printed. 

G7h.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  Senate,  dated  18th  March,  1909,  praying  for  all  petitions 
presented  to  the  Governor  General  in  Council,  asking  that  the  Intercolonial  Railway 
may  be  placed  under  the  Railway  Board,  together  with  all  correspondence  in  connec- 
tion therewith.     Presented  4th  May,  1909.— lion.  Sir  Mackenzie  Bouell..    ..Not  printed. 

67i.  Certified  copy  of  a  Report  of  the  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council,  approved  by  His 
Excellency  the  Governor  General  on  the  20th  April,  1909,  re  Intercolonial  Railway. 
Presented   (Senate)   30th   April,   1909,   by  Hon.   Sir  Richard  Cartwright..    ..Not printed. 

68.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  for  the  produc- 

tion of  all  the  original  applications  and  tenders  filed  in  the  Department  of  the  Interior 
in  respect  of  Timber  Berth  No.  1122,  and  that  the  same  be  laid  on  the  Table  of  the 
House,  said  papers  not  to  be  part  of  the  archives  of  this  House,  but  to  be  returned  by 
the  Clerk  to  the  Department  of  the  Interior  after  inspection.  Presented  12th  February, 
1909. — Mr.  Campbell Not  printed. 

69.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  what 
lands,  at  what  price,  and  to  what  persons  or  corporations  have  been  sold  along  the  route 
of  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  for  stations,  terminal  or  town  site  purposes.  Presented 
12th  February,  1909.— Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

70.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing,  year 

by  year,  since  1881,  the  expenditures  charged  annually  to  capital  under  the  caption  of 
Dominion  lands,  together  with  a  similar  statement  of  the  total  receipts  from  sale  of 

lands,  town  sites,  &c,  where  public  domain  lias  been  permanently  alienated.  Presented 
12th  February,  1909. — Mr.  Ames Not  printed. 

71.  Return   to   an  order  of  the   House  of  Commons,   dated  1st  February,   1909,   showing  the 

amount  of  gold,  silver  and  copper  coins  manufactured  by  the  branch  of  the  Royal  Mint 
in  Canada,  and  the  amount  of  said  coin  not  disposed  of  since  it  commenced  operation 
up  to  1st  January,  1909.  2.  How  much  silver  in  its  crude  state  has  been  offered  for 
sale  to  the  management  of  the  Royal  Mint  from  Canadian  mines  in  the  year  1908,  and 
what  quantity  has  been  accepted.  3.  What  reason  the  government  gives  for  not  pur- 
chasing all  the  silver  in  its  crude  state  that  is  offered.  4.  The  system  used  in  deciding 
from  whom  to  make  purchases.  5.  How  many  Canadian  mines  have  sold  silver  to  the 
government,  the  names  of  said  mines,  and  the  quantity  purchased  from  each.  Pre- 
sented 12th  February,  1909. — Mr.  Armstrong Not  printed. 

17 
565>1— 2 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

71a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  the 
total  cost  of  the  Royal  Mint  to  3\<t  December,  190S;  the  total  expenses  of  Royal  Hint 
for  the  calendar  year  190S,  (a)  for  additions  and  improvements,  (b)  for  maintenance, 
(c)  for  salaries,  (d)  for  bullion  copper,  silver  and  gold,  respectively;  the  amount  of 
copper,  silver  and  gold  coinage  that  was  struck  during  that  time;  and  the  net  profit  on 
each   kind  of  coinage.     Presented   31st  March,   1909. — Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

72.  Return   to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,   dated  25th  January,   1909,   showing,  in 

detail,  the  items  comprised  in  the  amount  $699,235.52,  given  as  miscellaneous  revenue 
for   the   month   of  December,   1908.     Presented   12th   February,   1909. — Mr.   Ames. 

Not  printed. 

73.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1909,  showing  all 
free  mail  deliveries  established  or  authorized  since  the  30th  of  June,  1908,  in  towns  or 
villages;  all  free  rural  mail  deliveries  established  or  authorized  since  said  date,  the 
number  of  persons  served  by  each  such  free  mail  delivery  in  the  community  or  route 
for  which  it  has  been  so  established  and  the  cost  in  each  instance.  Presented  12th 
February,  1909.— Mr.  Borden  (Halifax) Not  printed. 

73a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence  and  memoranda  relating  to  rural  mail  delivery  in  the  province  of 
Alberta.    Presented  17th  May,  1909.— Mr.  McCarthy Not  printed. 

74.  General  orders  issued  to  the  Militia  between  28th  November,  1907,  to  31st  January,  1909. 

Presented  15th  February,  1909,  by  Sir  Frederick  Borden Not  printed. 

75.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  in  detail  show- 

ing what  disposition  has  been  made  of  the  vote  of  $35,000  to  cover  the  cost  of  boring  for 
oil,  gas,  coal,  &c,  passed  on  15th  July,  1908,  with  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  reports, 
telegrams,  memoranda,  &c,  connected  with  the  matter,  giving  the  district  in  which 
the  wells  were  drilled,  the  cost  and  present  condition  of  each  well,  and  a  copy  of  all 
contracts   and   tenders.     Presented   15th   February,    1909. — Mr.    Armstrong.. Not  printed. 

76.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1909,  showing:  1.  The 
number  of  accidents  which  occurred  at  level  railway  crossings  in  Canada  during  the 
period  of  five  years  prior  to  the  31st  of  March,  1908.  2.  The  time  where  and  the 
places  at  which  these  accidents  occurred.  3.  The  alleged  cause  of  the  accident  in  each 
case.  i.  The  number  of  persons  killed  in  each  case.  5.  The  number  of  persons  injured 
and  the  nature  of  the  injury  in  each  case.  6.  A  statement  in  each  case  as  to  whether 
the  crossing  was  protected  or  not,  and  if  protected,  by  what  means.  Presented  16th 
February,  1909. — Mr.  Lennox Not  printed. 

76a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  showing  since 
the  constitution  of  the  Railway  Board,  in  how  many  cases  they  have  ordered  protection 
of  highway-railway  crossings,  (a)  by  separation  of  the  highway  and  railway,  (b)  by 
gates,  (c)  by  other  means,  and  the  method  adopted  in  each  case;  how  the  proceedings 
were  initiated  in  each  case;  what  order  was  made  as  to  the  expense  of  the  work  or 
service  in  each;  at  what  points  separation  of  highway  and  railway  was  ordered,  and 
the  actual  or  estimated  cost  in  each  case;  in  how  many,  and  what  cases  applications 
were  refused.     Presented  4th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Lennox Not  printed. 

76b.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  Senate,  dated  25th  February,  1909,  for  copies  of  all 
requests  to  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  by  the  Minister  of  Railways,  under 
section  2S  of  the  Railway  Act,  and  also  copies  of  all  orders  in  council  made  within  the 
last  twelve  months  respecting  level  crossings  by  railways  over  public  highways,  the 
dates  of  making  such  requests  or  orders  in  council  to  be  given.    Presented  19th  March, 

1909.— Hon.  Mr.  Ferguson Not  printed. 

18 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

77.  Return   to  an   order   of  the  House  of  Commons,   dated   1st   February,   1909,   showing   all 

importations  of  steel  bars,  steel  ingot,  rolled  iron  and  steel,  steel  rails  and  structural 
steel,  into  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  by  months,  since  the  31st  day  of  March,  1908,  and 
up  to  the  31st  January,  1909,  showing:  (a)  the  quantity  imported,  (b)  the  country 
from  which  imported,  (c)  port  of  entry,  (d)  the  value  of  the  imports,  and  (e)  the 
amount   of   duty   paid   thereupon.     Presented   18th    February,    1909. — Mr.    Boyce. 

Not  printed. 

78.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  Sth  February,  1909,  showing  the 
number  of  seizures  made  by  the  Department  of  Inland  Revenue  during  the  years  1901, 

1905,  1906,  1907  and  1908;  the  date  of  seizures;  by  whom  seized;  what  the  seizures  con- 
sisted of;  amount  realized  by  the  sale  of  such  material  seized;  and  how  the  seized 
material  was  disposed  of.    Presented  18th  February,  1909. — Mr.  Barr Not  printed. 

78a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  Ilouse  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  showing  the 
number  of  seizures   made  by  the  Department  of  Customs  during  the  years   1901,   1905, 

1906,  1907  and  1908;  the  date  of  seizures;  by  whom  seized;  what  the  seizures  consisted 
of;  the  party  from  whom  seized;  amount  realized  by  the  sale  of  such  material  seized; 
and  how  the  seized  material  was  disposed  of.     Presented  11th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Barr. 

Not  printed. 

79.  Return  showing  remissions  of  interest  made  under  subsection  2  of  section  88  of  the  Indian 

Act,  chapter  81,  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ended  31st  March,  1908. 
Presented  18th  February,  1909,  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver Not  printed. 

80.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  February,  1909,  showing  how 

many  sessional  clerks  and  messengers  have  been  appointed  to  the  House  of  Commons 
since  1880;  their  names  and  the  date  of  their  appointments;  if  appointed  by  the  Internal 
Economy  Commission  or  otherwise;  how  many  sessional  clerks  and  messengers  have 
been  removed  from  the  House  of  Commons  since  1880;  their  names  and  the  dates  of 
their  removal;  if  removed  by  the  Internal  Economy  Commission  or  otherwise.  Pre- 
sented 19th  February,  1909. — Mr.  Paquet Not  printed. 

81.  Copy   of  an  order   in  council  of  the   15th   February,   1909,   relative  to  the   Second   Joint 

Report  of  the  Commission  for  the  demarcation  of  the  meridian  of  the  141st  degree  of 
west  longitude  (Alaska  Boundary),  appointed  in  virtue  of  the  First  Article  of  the 
Convention  between  Great  Britain  and  the  United  States,  signed  at  Washington  on 
the  21st  April,  1906;  and  abo  a  copy  of  the  said  Report.  Presented  22nd  February,  1909, 
by  Hon.  F.  Oliver Not  printed. 

82.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  February,  1909,  showing  what 

precautionary  measures  were  taken  by  the  government  to  combat  the  introduction  of 
the  foot  and  mouth  disease  into  Canada  from  United  States;  what  officials  were  ap- 
pointed especially  for  the  work,  the  dates  of  appointment,  length  of  service,  remunera- 
tion paid  to  each  as  salary  or  expenses;  the  present  danger,  and  when  the  embargo  on 
live  stock  from  the  United  States  was  raised.  Presented  22nd  February,  1909. — Mr. 
Sharpe  (Ontario) Not  printed. 

82a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  Ilouse  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  showing 
what  States  of  the  United  States  have  been  quarantined  by  order  in  council  by  reason 
of  the  prevalence  of  foot  and  mouth  disease  in  such  States;  how  many  inspectors  were 
appointed  by  the  government  to  prevent  the  importation  of  live  stock  into  Canada 
from  quarantine  Slates;  at  what  points  such  inspectors  were  stationed;  and  what 
salaries  these  inspectors  were  paid.  Presented  22nd  February,  1909.— Mr.  Chisholm 
(Huron) ' Not  printed. 

19 

5654r— 2J 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

83.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  showing  the 
quantity  of  summer-caught  white  fish,  and  the  value,  the  pickerel,  quantly  and  value, 
the  sturgeon,  quantity  and  value,  exported  to  the  United  States  for  each  year,  respec- 
tively, during  the  years  from  November  1893  to  November,  1908,  from  the  Manitoba 
ports.     Presented  23rd  February,  1909.— M r.  Bradbury Not  printed. 

84.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  Sth  February,  1909,  showing,  in 
detail,  all  moneys  received  by  this  government  from  the  sale  of  land,  forest,  mines, 
fisheries  and  other  natural  resources  of  the  province  of  Alberta  for  the  last  fiscal 
year.     Presented  23rd  February,  1909. — Mr.  McCarthy Not  printed. 

85.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  eHouse  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  showing  from 

whom  the  wood-working  machinery  was  purchased  for  Intercolonial  Railway  shops  at 
Moncton  or  elsewhere  since  1st  January,  1908,  how  much  from  each  and  the  prices 
paid;  from  whom  the  iron-working  machinery  was  purchased  for  the  Intercolonial 
Railway  shops  at  Moncton,  or  elsewhere,  since  1st  January,  1908,  how  much  from  each, 
and  the  prices  paid,  the  dates,  (a)  of  purchase,  and  (b)  of  delivery.  Presented  23rd 
February,  1909. — Mr.  Clare Not  printed. 

85a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  showing  the 
claims  of  any  person  or  persons  in  Nova  Scotia  against  the  government  by  reason  of 
personal  damages  or  losses  of  animals  or  damages  to  property  on  account  of  the  Inter- 
colonial Railway,  settled  or  paid  between  1st  June  and  31st  December,  190S,  together 
with  the  names  and  addresses  of  such  persons,  the  nature  of  their  claims,  how  settle- 
ment was  effected,  and  on  what  date  settlement  was  effected  in  each  case.  Presented  26th 
March,  1909.— Mr.  Rhodes Not  printed. 

86.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  orders  in  council,  regulations,  reports,  correspondence,  documents,  and  papers 
under,  relating  to  or  touching  the  several  treaties  of  11th  April,  1908,  between  His 
Majesty  and  the  United  States  of  America,  relating  to  or  touching  any  action,  proceed- 
ing, appointment,  reports  or  other  matter  made,  had  or  undertaken  under  or  pursuant 
to  the  said  treaties  or  either  of  them.  Presented  25th  February,  1909.— Mr.  Borden 
(Halifax) Not  printed. 

87.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  February,  1909,  for  copy  of  a 

report  of  Thomas  Costello,  special  officer  of  customs,  on  the  subject  of  the  'Woollen 
Industry  in  Great  Britain.     Presented  26th  February,   1909. — Mr.  Paterson. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

88.  Copy  of  special  agreement  for  the  submission  of  question  relating  to  Fisheries  on  the 
North  Atlantic  Coast  under  the  general  treaty  of  Arbitration  concluded  between  the 
United  States  and  Great  Britain  on  the  4th  day  of  April,  1908.  Presented  26th  Feb- 
ruary, 1909,  by  Hon.  A.  B.  Aylesworth Not  printed. 

89.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February,  1909,  showing  how 

many  heads  of  stock  there  are  on  the  respective  experimental  farms  and  what  they 
consist  of;  the  estimated  value  of  the  different  kinds,  and  for  what  purposes  they 
are  utilized;  how  many  acres  there  are  in  each  experimental  farm;  how  many  acres 
there  are  under  cultivation  on  each  farm.  Presented  26th  February,  1909. — Mr. 
Staples Not  printed. 

90.  Declaration  of  Principles,  North  American  Conservation  Conference.  Presented  2tith 
February,  1909,  by  Hon.  S.  A.  Fisher.  .Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessiotial  papers. 

91.  Statement  of  insurance  paid  on  the  St.  Lawrence  route  on  merchandise,  provisions  and 

grain,  from  1900  to  1907,  both  years  inclusive.     Presented   (Senate)   28th  January,  1909, 

by  Hon..  Sir  Richard  Cartwright Not  printed. 

20 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

92.  Statement    of    the    affairs    of    the    British    Canadian    Loan    and    Investment    Company 

(Limited),  for  the  year  ended  the  31st  of  December,  1908,  also  a  list  of  the  shareholders 
for  the  same  year,  in  compliance  with  the  Loan  Corporation  Act.  Presented  (Senate) 
25th  February,  1909,  by  the  Hon.  the  Speaker Not  printed. 

93.  Copy  of  the  Progress  Report,  Hudson  Bay  Railway  Surveys,  1st  February,  1909.     Pre- 

sented 4th  March,  1909. — lion.  G.  P.  Graham Not  printed. 

93«.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  showing  all 
surveys  made  to  date  in  the  prosecution  of  the  proposed  Hudson  Bay  Railway.  Pre- 
sented 8th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Meighen Not  printed. 

94.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  of  all  correspon- 

dence, papers  and  reports  of  engineers  or  others,  relating  to  the  authorization  and 
construction  of  a  canal  from  Lake  Simcoe  to  Newmarket,  including  all  contracts 
entered  into,  the  amount  of  money  so  far  paid,  and  the  estimated  cost  of  the  com- 
pleted work,  with  plans  showing  the  capacity  of  the  canal,  and  for  all  statements  and 
estimates  of  the  commercial  ieasons  for  the  work.  Presented  4th  March,  1909. — 
Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

94a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22ud  March,  1909,  showing:  1. 
Who  were  employed  to  value  the  land  of  the  right  of  way  of  the  canal  from  Holland 
River  to  Newmarket,  and  what  other  duties  than  valuation  of  lands  these  parties  were 
entrusted  with.  2.  The  remuneration  of  each  of  these  valuators.  3.  How  long  they 
were  employed,  and  upon  what  terms.  4.  («)  What  properties  they  valued,  (6)  at  wTjat 
amount  or  rate  in  each  case,  (c)  the  acreage  of  each  property,  (d)  in  how  many  cases, 
by  names,  the  valuations  were  accepted  by  the  owners,  (e)  in  how  many  cases,  by 
names,  the  valuations  were  finally  rejected  by  the  owners,  (/)  in  what  cases  expro- 
priation proceedings  were  resorted  to,  and  (g)  the  result  as  compared  with  valuators' 
figures.  5.  What  titles  to  all  properties  have  been  required.  Presented  31st  March, 
1909. — Mr.  Lennox Not  printed. 

95.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 

all  lists  of  voters  as  prepared  by  the  enumerators  and  completed  by  the  deputy  return- 
ing officers  for  the  several  polling  subdivisions  in  the  electoral  riding  of  Calgary,  in 
the  province  of  Alberta,  and  used  in  the  recent  general  election  for  the  House  of  Com- 
mons.    Presented  4th  March,  1909. — Mr.  McCarthy Not  printed. 

95a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  showing  the 
names  of  the  deputy  returning  officer,  poll  clerk,  scrutineer  or  agent,  or  any  other 
officer  who  acted,  respectively,  as  such  in  the  several  polling  subdivisions  in  the  elec- 
toral district  of  Calgary  in  the  recent  general  election  for  the  House  of  Commons. 
Presented  4th  March,  1909.—  Mr.  McCarthy Not  printed. 

95b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  March,  1909,  showing,  in 
respect  of  the  election  for  the  House  of  Commons,  held  in  the  county  of  Montcalm,  on 
the  26th  of  October,  1908,  and  in  respect  of  each  polling  subdivision  (a)  the  number  of 
votes  polled  for  each  candidate;  (b)  the  total  number  of  valid  votes  polled;  (c)  the 
number  of  rejected  ballots;  (d)  the  number  of  spoiled  ballots;  (e)  the  number  of 
voters  on  the  revised  voters'  list;  (/)  the  number  of  ballot  papers  in  possession  of  the 
deputy  returning  officer  at  the  hour  of  the  opening  of  the  poll;  (a)  the  number  of 
ballot  papers  remaining  unused  in  the  hands  of  the  deputy  returning  officer  at 
close  of  the  pool;  (li)  the  name  and  the  address  of  the  returning  officer 
and  names  and  addresses  of  each  of  his  deputies  and  poll  clerks; 
(t)  all  correspondence  between  the  government,  or  any  officer  thereof,  and  the  return- 
ing officer,  or  any  deputy  returning  officer  or  poll  clerk  or,   any  candidate  in  respect 

of  said  election.    Presented  22nd  March,  1909.— Mr.  Ames Not  printed. 

21 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

95c.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  lists  of  voters  as  prepared  by  the  enumerators  and  completed  by  the  deputy 
returning  officers  for  the  several  polling  subdivisions  in  the  electoral  riding  of 
Qu'Appelle,  and  used  in  the  recent  general  election  for  the  House  of  Commons;  also 
for  a  return  showing  the  boundaries  of  the  said  polling  subdivisions,  and  the  names 
of  the  enumerators,  deputy  returning  officers,  poll  clerks,  candidates'  agents  or  scru- 
tineers who  acted  for  each  poll.     Presented  22nd  March,  1909.— Mr.  Lake.. Not  printed. 

96.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 

a  report  made  by  Charles  Olin  to  the  Department  of  the  Interior,  of  his  visit  to 
Sweden  for  that  department  in  1907-S,  and  of  all  correspondence  leading  up  to  his 
appointment  to  make  such  trip,  and  in  any  way  relating  thereto.  Presented  4th  March, 
1909.— Mr.  Goodeve Not  printed. 

97.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 

all  applications  that  have  been  received  for  the  transfer  of  villa  lots  in  section  14, 
township  21,  rauge  1,  west  of  the  fifth  meridian,  and  all  correspondence  in  connection 
therewith  since  the  10th  day  of  June,  1908.    Presented  4th  March,  1909.— Mr.  McCarthy. 

Not  printed. 

98.  Return   to   an   order   of   the   House   of   Commons,  dated   1st  March,   1909,   showing  the 

average  number  of  men  employed  in  every  capacity  in  the  working,  maintenance  and 
repairs  of  the  Carillon  and  Grenville  Canals  during  each  of  the  following  months: 
July  and  August,  1906  and  1908,  September  and  October,  1907  and  1908;  and  the  total 
outlay  for  wages  and  salaries;  also,  the  total  expenditure  of  every  kind  in  connection 
with  the  said  canal  during  each  of  these  months.  Presented  4th  March,  1909. — Mr. 
Perley Not  printed. 

99.  Return  to  on  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 

orders  in  couucil,  correspondence,  letters,  despatches,  memoranda  and  communications, 
between  the  Imperial  and  Canadian  governments  relating  to  the  organization  of  a 
Imperial  General  Staff.     Presented  5th  March,  1909.— Mr.   Talbot. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

100.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence  between  the  Surveyor  General's  Department  or  Department  of 
Indian  Affairs  and  the  late  Mr.  Vaughan,  D.L.S.,  covering  his  instructions  to  survey 
the  parish  of  St.  Peters,  St.  Clements  and  St.  Peters  Indian  Reserve;  together  with 
Mr.  Vaughan's  correspondence,  &c;  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Department  of 
the  Interior  and  Mr.  II.  if.  Howelf,  Commissioner  to  investigate  Indian  claims  on  said 
reserve;  of  the  report  of  Mr.  Rothwell,  Law  Clerk  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior, 
on  the  said  St.  Peters  land  claim  ;  of  the  itemized  account  of  Frederick  Heap,  of  the 
services  rendered  during  the  investigation,  and  instruction  to  him  from  the  Depart- 
ment of  the  Interior  and  Indian  Affairs.     Presented  5th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Bradbury. 

Not  printed. 

100«.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  the  treaty  arranged  between  St.  Peters  Indians  and  the  government;  and  of  all 
correspondence,  papers,  instructions,  and  documents  relating  to  the  aforesaid  treaty. 
Presented  11th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Bradbury Not  printed. 

lOOb.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  showing  the 
number  and  names  of  all  parties  who  were  entitled  to  receive  patents,  and  did  receive 
patents,  under  the  treaty  made  by  Mr.  H.  M.  Howell  for  the  surrender  of  St.  Peters 

Reserve,   Manitoba.     Presented   12th   March,   1909-Mr.   Bradbury Not  printed. 

22 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

100c.  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  100.    Presented  5tli  April,  1909 Not  printed. 

lOOd.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
papers,  letters  and  correspondence  relating  to,  and  an  itemized  statement  of,  the 
account  of  Mr.  H.  M.  Howell  in  regard  to  the  surrender  of  St.  Peters  Reserve. 
Presented  27th  April,  1909.— Mr.  Smyth Notprinted. 

lOOe.  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  100.    Presented  19th  May,  1909 Notprinted. 

101.  Supplementary  Convention  respecting  the  commercial  relations  between  France  and 
Canada,  entered  into  at  Paris  on  the  23rd  day  of  January  1909,  between  His  Majesty  and 
the  President  of  the  French  Republic.  Presented  8th  March,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  S. 
Fielding Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

102.  Correspondence  relating  to  Supplementaiy  Convention  respecting  commercial  relations 
between  Canada  and  France.     Presented  10th  March,   1909,  by   Hon.   W.   S.   Fielding. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

103.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  evidence,  reports,  correspondence,  writings,  papers  and  documents  in  possession 
or  control  of  the  Department  of  Inland  Revenue,  including  all  correspondence  and 
written  statements  between  the  department  or  its  officials  or  agents,  and  the  govern- 
ment of  Manitoba,  or  the  Attorney  General  or  other  officials  or  agents  of  that  pro- 
vince, in  reference  to  the  quality  of  coal  oil  sold  in  Manitoba,  and  accidents  caused  by 
coal  oil  there  during  the  year  1908,  and  connected  with  recent  investigations  into  the 
cause  of  these  disasters.     Presented  Sth  March,  1909. — Mr.  Schaffner Notprinted. 

104.  Copies  of  cablegrams  between  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  and  the  Honour- 
able the  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies  respecting  the  International  Boundary 
Waters  Treaty.    Presented  8th  March,  1909,  by  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurier Notprinted. 

104a.  International  Boundary  Waters  Treaty,  signed  at  Washington,  11th  January,  1909, 
(2)  Rider  attached  by  United  States  Senate.  Presented  15th  March,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  S. 
Fielding Notprinted. 

105.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  January,  1909,  showing  the 
number  and  amount  of  temporary  loans  made  by  the  government  since  1st  July,  1906, 
the  bank  or  corporation  with  which  each  was  made,  the  conditions  and  cost  of  the 
same.    Presented  9th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Foster Notprinted. 

105a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing  the 
]  amount  and  conditions  of  each  permanent  loan  made  by  the  government  since  1st  July, 
1S96,  the  bank  or  corporation  through  which  it  was  made,  the  cost  of  each,  in  (a) 
brokerage  and  commission,  (b)  stamps,  &c,  (c)  legal  or  other  services,  and  (d)  dis- 
counts, the  net  result  of  each  loan  and  per  cent  of  interest  upon  the  same.  Presented 
24th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Foster Notprinted. 

105b.  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  105a.    Presented  31st  March,  1909 Notprinted. 

105c.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  showing  what 
expenses  under  the  following  heads:  (a)  bank  commission,  (b)  underwriting  charges, 
(c)  brokerage,  and  (d)  advertising,  were  incurred  by  the  government  on  each  of  the 
following  loans,  and  to  whom  the  several  amounts  were  paid,  viz: — 

£        s.     d. 

1874  loan  extended  to  1911,  4  per  cent 1,753,830  4  10 

1875-8   Public   Works   guaranteed   loan,   4   per   cent 3,200.000  0    0 

Loan  of  1S84,  3J  per  cent 5,000,000  0    0 

23 


S-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

Canada  reduced  1S85,  4  per  cent 6,443.136  2    9 

Loan  of  1885,  4   per  cent 4,000,000  0    0 

C.  P.  R.  land  grant  1888,  3£  per  cent 3,093,700  0    0 

4  per  cent  loan  of  190S-12,  4  per  cent 1,379,600  0    0 

31  per  cent  loan  1908,   (February  issue)  31  per  cent 3,000,000  0    0 

31  per  cent  loan  1908,  3|  per  cent 5,000,000  0    0 

3h  per  cent  loan  1908  (October  issue)  3J  per  cent 5.000.000  0    0 

3J  per  cent  loan  1909,  3J  per  cent 6,000,000  0    0 

Payable  in   Canada — 

Reduced  loan  of  1883,   extended  3V  per  cent $1,425,800  00 

Dominion  stock  issue — 

A    reduced  in   1897,  3!   per  cent 58,899  67 

B  reduced  in  1897,  31  per  cent 325,900  00 

C  reduced  in  1897,  31  per  cent 49,066  34 

E  extended-  for   10  years,   from   1st   July.   1906,   3§   per   cent..     2,500,000  00 

Dominion  stock  issue  1S91,  31-  per  cent 404.202  00    ] 

$5,000,000   for    one    inontli;    Bank    of    Montreal.    Ottawa;    2nd    March,    1909;   4   per   cent. 
Presented  6th  April,  1909.— Mr.  Sharpe  (Ontario) Not  printed. 

105d.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing,  in 
respect  of  the  sinking  fund  in  connection  with  each  outstanding  loan  forming  on  31st 
March,  190S,  part  of  the  funded  public  debt:  (a)  term  of  loan,  (b)  the  sinking  fund 
rate,  (c)  the  amount  that  has  been  each  year  set  aside,  including  earnings  of  interest 
reinvested,  (d)  the  aggregate  amount  to  credit  of  sinking  fund  of  that  particular  loan 
on  31st  March,  1908,  (c)  the  aggregate  amount  which  may  be  reasonably  expected  to 
stand  to  credit  of  sinking  fund  on  date  when  loan  shall  fall  due,  and  if  extended  at 
the  end  of  final  period,  (/)  percentage  which  accrued  sinking  fund  and  its  earnings 
.  will  bear  to  the  nominal  amount  of  loan  on  date  of  expiry.  Presented  6th  April,  1909. — 
Mr.  Ames Not  printed. 

105c.  Supplementary  Return  No.  105c.     Presented  19th  April,  1909 Not  printed. 

105/.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  orders  in  council,  correspondence  and  papers,  including  prospectuses,  in  relation 
to  the  loans  negotiated  by  the  Minister  of  Finance  from  the  1st  January,  1907,  to  date. 
Presented  19th  April    1909.— Mr.   Foster Not  printed. 

105i/.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing,  in 
detail,  the  contingent  or  nominal  liabilities  of  the  Do.ninion  government  on  the  1st  of 
January,  1909;  that  is  to  say,  a  statement  of  all  amounts  which  might  under  existing 
legislation  become  exigible,  such  as  earnable  railway  subsidies,  government  guaranteed 
loans,  deficiencies  which  might  require  to  be  made  good,  &c.  (See  also  109a.)  Presented 
19th  April,  1909.— Mr.  .4 mes Not  printed. 

106.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February,  1909:  1.  Showing 
the  approximate  area  of  coal  and  timber  lands,  respectively,  in  each  of  the  provinces 
of  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  (a)  owned  by  private  individuals  or  companies,  (b) 
leased  by  the  government  to  private  individuals  or  companies;  and  the  approximate 
area  in  each  province  on  which  mining  or  lumbering  operations  are  actually  being 
carried  on.  2.  The  approximate  amount  of  revenue  collected  by  the  government  between 
1st  January,  1906,  and  the  31st  December,  1908,  on  account  of  (a)  payments  for  coal 
lands;  (b)  coal  royalties;  (c)  bonuses  and  rentals  on  timber  lands;  (d)  timber  dues; 
(e)    hay   lands ;    (/)    grazing   lands,   and    (a)   irrigation   areas   within   each   of   the   above 

provinces.     Presented  11th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Lake Not  printed. 

24 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

106a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22ud  February,  1906,  showing 
how  many  acres  have  already  been  taken  up  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta, 
respectively,  by  homestead  and  pre-emption,  by  railway  lands,  by  Hudson  Bay  lands; 
by  other  corporations  or  persons;  by  waste,  swamps  or  mountainous  land  unfit  for 
tilling;  by  lake  areas,  including  Winnipeg,  Winnipegosis,  Manitoba,  Big  Quill,  Birch 
and  Beaver;  and  the  area  in  square  miles  of  each  province  above  named.  Presented 
11th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Hughes Not  printed. 

106b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
applications,  advertisements,  tenders,  leases,  correspondence  and  papers  of  every 
description,  with  respect  to  timber  berths  Nos.  1316,  1317,  1318,  1330,  1331,  1332,  1333, 
1334,  1335,  1336,  1360,  1361,  1362,  1363,  1364  and  1365.  Presented  30th  March,  1909.— Mr. 
Bradbury Not  printed. 

106c.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence,  communications  in  writing  and  documents,  to  the  Minister  of  the 
Interior,  or  any  official  of  the  department,  and  the  replies  or  communications  from 
the  minister  or  any  official  of  the  department,  since  11th  January,  1905,  relating  to  the 
transfer  of  certain  swamp  lands  in  the  Big  Grass  Marsh,  in  the  province  of  Manitoba, 
to  Bis  Majesty  King  Edward  VII.,  for  the  purposes  of  the  province  of  Manitoba.  Pre- 
sented 30th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Molloy Not  printed. 

106<i.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909, 
showing  with  respect  to  leases  granted  since  30th  June,  1896,  for  timber  on  Dominion 
lands  in  British  Columbia,  the  names  and  addresses  of  lessees,  the  date,  term  and 
acreage  of  each  lease,  and  the  bonus  received  for  the  same.  Presented  5th  April,  1909. 
—Mr.  Taylor  (New   Westminster) Not  printed. 

106c.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence,  reports,  papers,  and  communications  in  the  possession  of  the  Dominion 
Lands  Office  at  Prince  Albert  and  the  Department  of  the  Interior  at  Ottawa,  in  con- 
nection with  the  application  for  patent  for  the  N.E.  -J  section  10,  township  47,  range  1, 
west  3rd  meridian  of  A.  A.  Strachan,  and  the  performance  of  his  homestead  duties. 
Presented  16th  April,  1909.— Mr.  Lake Not  printed. 

107.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  the 
total  amount  received  by  the  Winnipeg  Free  Press  from  all  the  departments  of  the 
government  from  1st  July,  1896,  to  1st  January,  1909,  specifying  amount  each  year. 
Presented  11th  March,  1909.— Mr.-  H erron Not  printed. 

107a.  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  107.     Presented  26th  March,  1909 Not  printed. 

108.  Return  to  an  order  to  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing 
approximately  the  total  amount  of  available  cash  on  deposit  to  the  credit  of  the  gov- 
ernment on  the  last  day  of  each  month  during  the  period  between  the  1st  of  April,  1907, 
and  the  31st  December,   1908.     Presented  11th  March,   1909.— Mr.  Ames..    .  .Not  printed. 

109.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing  to 
date  the  statement  found  on  page  15  of  the  Budget  Speech  of  1898.  Presented  11th 
March,  1909. — Mr.  Ames Not  printed. 

109a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing,  in 
detail,  the  contingent  or  nominal  liabilities  of  the  Dominion  government  on  the  1st 
January,  1909;  that  is  to  say,  a  statement  of  all  amounts  which  might  under  existing 
legislation  become  exigible,  such  as  earnable  railway  subsidies,  government  guaranteed 
loans,  deficiencies,  which  might  require  to  be  made  good,  &c.  (Supplementary  to  No. 
105g.)     Presented  11th  March,   1909.— Mr.   Ames Not  printed. 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

HO.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence  passing  between  the  Department  of  Justice  and  the  officers  of  New 
Westminster  Penitentiary  or  other  persons  whatsoever,  relating  to  the  visit  or  pro- 
posed visit  of  detectives  to  Bill  Miner  during  his  incarceration  in  said  penitentiary; 
also  of  the  report  of  the  Inspector  of  Penitentiaries  after  investigating  the  circum- 
stances connected  with  Miner's  escape,  and  of  the  evidence  on  which  such  report  is 
based;  also  a  copy  of  telegram  sent  from  the  said  penitentiary  to  the  department  or  its 
officers  respecting  Miner's  escape,  and  of  such  telegrams  as  received  and  of  telegrams 
sent  and  received  in  answer  within  two  weeks  from  such  escape.  Presented  12th  March, 
1909.— Mr.  Taylor  (New  Westminster) Not  printed.. 

111.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  showing  what 
amounts  the  government  has  paid  property  owners  for  damages  caused  by  the  holding 
up  of  water  in  the  Otonabee  River,  between  Hastings  and  Peterboro',  and  the  names  of 
the  parties  receiving  settlements.     Presented  15th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Sexsmith. 

Not  printed. 

Ilia.  Return   to   an   order   of   the   House  of  Commons,   dated   17th   February,   1909,   showing 

what  amounts  the  government  has  paid  property  owners  in  or  around  Stony  Lake  for 

damages   caused   by  the   rising  of  water,   and   who   they   were.     Presented   15th   March, 

1909. — Mr.  Sexsmith Not  printed. 

111b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  showing  what 
measures,  if  any,  have  been  taken  by  the  government  to  lower  the  waters  of  Lakes 
Simcoe  and  Couchiching;  what  moneys,  if  any,  have  been  expended  for  this  purpose, 
the  date  of  expenditure,  and  persons  superintending  the  same;  the  future  intention  of 
the  government  in  this  direction,  for  the  purpose  of  reclaiming  thousands  of  acres 
of   first-class   arable   land.     Presented   25th   March,   1909. — Mr.    Sharpe    (Ontario). 

Not  printed. 

112.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  for  the  produc- 
tion of  the  original  tenders  received  in  reponse  to  advertisement  calling  for  tenders 
for  the  erection  of  the  building  at  Kingston  R.  M.  C,  intended  for  barracks  accom- 
modation, for  stables;  and  also  for  a  Return  showing  the  advertisement  and  the  papers 
in  which  inserted;  said  papers  not  to  be  part  of  the  archives  of  this  House,  but  to  be 
returned  by  the  Clerk  to  the  Department  of  Public  Works  after  inspection.  Presented 
15th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Edwards Not  printed. 

112a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  for  the  produc- 
tion of  the  original  tenders  received  in  response  to  advertisement  calling  for  tenders  for 
the  erection  of  the  Veterinary  Hospital  at  Kingston,  and  also  for  a  return  showing  the 
advertisement  and  the  papers  in  which  inserted,  said  papers  not  to  be  part  of  the 
archives  of  this  House,  but  to  be  returned  by  the  Clerk  to  the  Department  of  Public 
Works  after  inspection.    Presented  24th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Edwards Not  printed. 

113.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  papers,  letters,  telegrams  and  communications,  with  reference  to  the  complaint 
against  and  conviction  and  fine  of  F.  Macdonald  Jacobs,  of  Caughnawaga  Reserve, 
for  cutting  cordwood  upon  territory  occupied  by  him  on  the  reserve,  and  to  have 
refund  of  dues  or  fine.     Presented  15th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Boyce Not  printed. 

114.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence,  letters,  despatches,  memoranda,  &o.,  between  the  Imperial  gov- 
ernment, or  any  member  thereof,  and  the  Governor  General,  government  or  any  mem- 
ber thereof,  relating  to  or  bearing  upon  the  question  of  Canada  contributing  to  the 
support  of  the  British  fleet,  or  purchasing  ships  of  her  own,  or  assisting  in  any  way  in 
maintaining  with  the  mother  country  the  supremacy  of  the  seas.  Presented  17th 
March,  1909.— Mr.   lVorthington Notprinted. 

26 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

115.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  reports,  memorials,  documents  and  correspondence  in  possession  of  the  government 
with  regard  to  the  superannuation  and  to  making  provision  for  the  superannuation  of 
officers  and  members  of  the  crew  of  the  winter  or  ice-breaking  steamers  owned  or  in 
the   employ    of    the   government.     Presented    17th    March,    1909. — Mr.    Warburton. 

Not  printed. 

116.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence  between  J.  H.  Davis  and  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fish- 
eries referring  to  the  fisheries  of  Manitoba;  and  of  all  petitions  and  correspondence  from 
the  Fisherman's  Union,  Gimli,  Manitoba,  to  and  with  the  said  department.  Pre- 
sented 17th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Bradbury Not  printed. 

116a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence  or  petitions  received  from  F.  W.  Colclaugh,  while  he  was  inspector 
of  fisheries  for  Manitoba,  referring  to  the  operations  of  commercial  companies  and 
others.    Presented  29th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Bradbury Not  printed. 

117.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  Sth  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
reports,  correspondence,  statements,  receipts,  vouchers  and  documents  of  every  descrip- 
tion with  respect  to  the  granting  and  payment  of  the  railway  subsidy  authorized  under 
6-7  Edward  VII.,  chapter,  40,  section  1,  subsection  16.  Presented  17th  March,  1909.— 
Mr.  Ames Not  printed. 

118.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence,  documents  and  papprs  relating  to  the  construction,  or  proposed 
construction,  of  a  line  of  railway  from  a  point  at  or  near  Caledonia  to  Liverpool,  not 
exceeding  29  miles,  referred  to  in  the  Acts  of  1903,  chapter  57,  section  23d,  and  all 
orders  in  council,  reports,  contracts,  agreements  and  other  papers,  relating  to  the 
same  matters.     Presented  18th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Borden   (Halifax)'. Not  printed. 

119.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  Senate  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  calling  for  a  statement 
showing  the  imports  of  oxide  of  aluminum  for  the  years  1903,  1904,  1905,  1906,  1907, 
1908,  with  value.  Also  a  statement  showing  the  exports  of  aluminum  for  the  same 
years,  with  values.     Presented  10th  March,  1909. — Hon.  Mr.  Domville..    ..Not  printed. 

120.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  the 
number  of  applications  made  to  the  Board  of  Railway  Commissioners  for  the  privilege 
of  crossing  railway  tracks  with  telephone  and  telegraph  wires  and  with  water  mains, 
each,  over  the  said  period  from  1st  February,  1904,  to  the  1st  January,  1908;  the  total 
number  of  applications  granted  over  said  period;  the  total  number  of  applications 
refused;  the  date  of  each  application;  the  date  each  application  was  granted;  the 
length  of  time  from  the  application  to  the  granting  of  same;  and  what  time  should 
elapsed  before  the  board  should  give  its  decision.  Presented  23rd  March,  1909. — Mr. 
Barr Not  printed. 

121.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  giving  de- 
tailed items  of  the  sum  of  $10,646.93,  being  revenue  received  from  Kingston  Penitentiary, 
other  than  from  sale  of  twine,  as  shown  on  page  L — 36  of  the  Auditor  General's  Report, 
and  stating  what  proportion  of  such  revenue  was  derived  from  6ales  to  officers  of  the 
penitentiary,  with  the  names  of  such  officers,  and  the  amounts  and  nature  of  the 
goods  purchased  by  them.     Presented  23rd  March,  1909. — Mr.  Barnard Not  printed. 

122.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  papers  and  correspondence  between  the  government  and  the  government  of  British 
Columbia  with  reference  to  the  reduction  of  Indian  Reserves  in  that  province,  propor- 
tionately to  the  decrease  of  Indian  population  as  provided  for  by  order  in  council. 
Presented  23rd  March,  1909.— Mr.  Barnard Not  printed. 

27 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

123.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence,  reports  and  papers  of  every  description  treating  of  or  in  con- 
nection with  the  application  of  or  grant  to  Francis  Percival  Aylwin,  of  the  city  of 
Ottawa,  of  a  tract  of  land  in  the  province  of  Alberta  for  irrigation  purposes.  Pre- 
sented 23rd  March,  1909.— Mr.  Magrath Not  printed. 

124.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  showing  the 
amounts  on  deposit  in  the  Government  Savings  Department  on  1st  October,  1889, 
1st  October,  1896,  and  1st  October,  1897  and  1898;  how  many  officials  were  employed  in 
connection  with  the  management  of  this  fund  in  the  years  1888,  1S90,  189S,  1900  and 
190S;  the  cost  of  the  management  of  this  fund  in  the  years  1888,  1890,  189S,  1900  and 
1908.    Presented  23rd  March,  1909.— Mr.  Sharpe  (Ontario) Not  printed. 

124a.  Supplementary   Return  to   No.   124.     Presented  5th  April,   1909 Not  printed. 

125.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing  what 
operations,  iucluding  all  expenditures,  were  carried  on  last  year  under  the  fishing 
leases  granted  to  F.  H.  Markey,  of  Montreal,  for  Great  Slave  Lake,  Nelson  and  other 
rivers;  J.  K.  McKenzie,  of  Selkirk,  for  Lesser  Slave  Lake  and  Arthabaska  Lakes; 
Archibald  McNee,  for  parts  of  James  Bay;  Coffey  and  Merritt,  Cedar  Lake;  The  Capital 
City  Packing  Company  (Limited)  and  the  William  Hickey  Company  (Limited).  Pre- 
sented 24th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Bradbury Not  printed. 

126.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  January,  1909,  showing  the 
names  and  places  of  registry  of  the  several  American  fishing  vessels  seized  by  the 
Dominion  fishery  cruisers  for  illegal  fishing  in  Canadian  waters  since  1900.  and  of  the 
courts  in  which  action  for  penalties  or  forfeitures  were  instituted,  the  mode  of  service 
of  the  writs  or  other  process  on  such  foreign  fishing  vessels,  and  in  what  court  tried  • 
and  a  statement  of  the  fines  imposed,  or  proceeds  of  sale  realized,  and  how  such  fines 
or  proceeds  of  forfeiture  were  appropriated;  also  a  copy  of  the  judgment  of  the  High 
Court  of  Justice  for  Ontario  in  the  case  of  Rex  vs.  American  Gasoline  Fishing  Boat. 
Presented  24th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Maedonell Not  printed. 

127.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  for  n  copy 
of  all  orders  in  council,  reports,  correspondence,  deeds,  conveyances,  regulations,  con- 
ditions and  other  documents  relating  to  («)  the  grant  or  conveyance  to  the  Grand 
Trunk  Railway  Company  of  Canada  of  a  portion  of  Major  Hill  Park,  so-called,  for  the 
site  of  an  hotel,  or  touching  the  use  or  purpose  for  which  the  said  conveyance  was 
made  or  proposed;  (b)  the  grant  or  conveyance  to  the  said  company  or  to  the  Ottawa 
Railway  Terminal  Company  or  to  any  other  person  or  corporation  of  any  lands  in  or 
adjoining  the  city  of  Ottawa  for  the  purpose  of  or  in  connection  with  the  building  of  a 
station  at  Ottawa  or  for  other  railway  purposes.  Presented  24th  March,  1909.— Mr. 
Borden  (Halifax) Not  printed. 

128.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  showing  how  many 
post  offices  have  been  transferred  in  the  province  of  Manitoba  since  1st  November,  1908; 
who  the  former  postmasters  were,  and  who  the  present  postmasters  are,  with  the 
names  of  offices;  and  the  reasons  assigned  for  the  transfers.  Presented  24th  March, 
1909.— Mr.  Roche Not  printed. 

128a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
applications,  correspondence,  reports,  documents  and  papers  relating  to  the  establish- 
ment and  service  of  a  post  office  at  Hand  Hills,  Alberta.  Presented  13th  April,  1909  — 
Mr.  Magrath Not  printed. 

23 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

128b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence,  petitions  and  reports  addressed  to  the  government,  or  Post  Office 
Department,  and  all  correspondence  and  orders  consequent  thereon,  relating  to  the 
change  of  the  name  of  the  post  office  of  Weymouth  North,  and  of  the  post  office  of 
Weymouth    Bridge    to    Weymouth.      Presented    19th    April,    1909.— Mr.    Jaineson. 

Not  printed. 

129.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  showing  the 
names  and  addresses  of  the  several  immigration  agents  in  Canada  whose  duty  it  is  to 
locate  or  settle  immigrants  upon  their  arrival  in  Canada,  what  salary  or  remuneration 
has  been  paid  to  each  such  agent  for  the  fiscal  year  190S  and  up  to  the  1st  February, 
1909,  and  on  what  basis  they  are  paid.     Presented  25th  March,  1909.— Mr.  Macdonell. 

Not  printed. 

129a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  showing  the 
names  and  addresses  of  the  several  inspectors  of  immigrants  employed  by  the  govern- 
ment; what  salary  or  remuneration  has  been  paid  to  each  such  inspector  during  the 
fiscal  year  1908  and  up  to  the  1st  February,  1909;  and  on  what  basis  they  are  paid. 
Presented  25th  March,  1909. — Mr.  Ilerron Not  printed. 

129b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence,  reports  and  documents  between  the  Department  of  the  Interior 
and  the  immigration  agents  in  the  United  States;  and  between  the  Department  of  the 
Interior  and  the  colonization  societies  since  the  1st  of  January,  1908.  Presented  30th 
March,  1909. — Mr.  Paquet Not  printed. 

130.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  March,  1909,  showing  the 
amounts  paid  during  the  years  1903-4,  1905-6  and  1907-8  by  the  following  Departments: 
(a)  Marine  and  Fisheries,  (b)  Railways  and  Canals,  (c)  Customs,  (d)  Post  Office,  (e) 
Militia  and  Defence,  and  (/)  Public  Works,  to  the  following  persons,  firms  and  com- 
panies, viz. — The  Wilson  Gas  Buoys  Company,  the  Canadian  Fog  Signal  Company, 
James  Murphy,  William  R.  Blakiston,  James  Holliday,  Allison  Davie,  J.  B.  Cote, 
Adolph  Huot,  Joseph  Samson,  Samson  A  Philion,  E.  Pelletier,  Napoleon  Mercier,  Severin 
Martel,  Michel  Thibodeau,  Fdmond  Belanger  &  Co.,  Marie  &  Themblay,  Terreau  & 
Racine,  Rock  City  Tobacco  Company,  J.  N.  Martineau,  George  Marchand,  Jean  Drolet, 
Elie  Amyot,  Charles  A.  Parent,  A.  N.  Melvin,  W.  G.  Robertson,  Wm.  Robertson  &  Co., 
Howell  &  Co.,  St.  John  Iron  Works,  Charles  McDonald,  John  A.  Moore,  Wm.  J.  Vroom, 
John  A.  McAvity  Bros.,  George  McAvity,  Patrick  J.  Mooney,  Poison  Bros,  or  Poison 
Iron  Works,  Merwin  &  Company,  F.  L.  Brooks  &  Company,  F.  S.  Brooks,  Safety  Com- 
pany, Submarine  Company,  Wm.  J.  Allen  and  Mr.  Willard.  Presented  25th  March, 
1909. — Mr.  Sharpe  (Ontario) Not  printed. 

131.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1909,  showing  in 
relation  to  each  dog-fish  reduction  plant  or  establishment  for  the  reduction  of  dog- 
fish erected  by  or  for  the  government  or  maintained  in  whole  or  in  part  by  the  gov- 
ernment (a)  the  cost  of  construction,  (b)  the  cost  of  maintenance  for  each  year,  (c) 
the  location,  (d)  the  quantity  of  dog-fish  treated  thereat  in  each  year,  and  (e)  the 
amount  realized  from  the  sale  or  disposal  thereof  in  each  year.  Presented  25th  March, 
1909.— Mr.  Borden  (Halifax) Not  printed. 

132.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February.  1909,  showing  the 
amount  of  money  paid  by  the  government,  including  all  branches  of  the  service,  from 
1st  January,  1897,  to  1st  January,  1909,  to  the  Logberg  Printing  Company,  Winnipeg. 
Presented  26th  March,   1909.— Mr.   Bradbury Not  printed. 

29 


8-9  Edw.  VTI.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

132a.  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  132.    Presented  6th  April,  1909..   .     ...   ..Not  printed. 

133.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  showing  the 
amount  of  produce  of  the  following  lines  shipped  to  Great  Britain  or  other  countries 
in  cold  storage,  or  cooled  air  chambers,  during  the  rears  1907  and  1908:— Apples,  in 
barrels  or  other  packages,  pears,  plums,  tomatoes,  fresh  meat,  in  pounds,  fowl,  fish, 
butter,  eggs  and  cheese;  to  what  country  or  countries  they  were  shipped,  and  their 
condition  on  landing;  the  system  of  cold  storage  principally  in  use  on  the  steamships 
carrying  such   produce.     Presented  2Gth   March,   1909.— Mr.   Sproule Not  printed. 

134.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  H>use  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence,  telegrams,  papers,  reports  and  valuations  of  officers  or  experts, 
and  orders  in  council,  in  connection  with  the  purchase,  removal  and  repairing  of  the 
dredge  Industry  and  parts  thereof,  including  scow,  boilers  and  parts.  Presented  29th 
-March,  1909—  Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

135.  Copy  of  a  letter  sent  to  all  officers  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works  charged  with 
the  purchase  of  materials  and  supplies,  and  the  certifying  of  accounts  for  same,  under 
the  different  branches  of  the  chief  architect,  the  chief  engineer  and  the  superintendent 
of  telegraphs.     Presented  31st  March,  1909,  by  Hon.  W.  Pugsley Not  printed. 

136.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  showing  the 
Ross  Rifles,  Mark  I.  and  Mark  II.,  or  any  other  description  of  Ross  Rifle,  used  by  the 
Canadian  rifle  team  at  Bisley  last  year  in  the  regular  team  competitions;  what  Ross 
rifles  of  any  description  were  used  in  the  Bisley  competitions,  regular  or  extra  series 
matches,  by  any  member  of  the  Canadian  team,  or  any  Canadian  marksman  engaging 
in  such  matches ;  with  the  name  of  the  individual,  and  if  in  the  employ  of  the  Ross  Rifle 
Company ;  the  description  of  the  rifle,  and  in  what  way  it  differs  from  the  Ross  Rifle, 
Mark  I.  and  Mark  II.,  both  as  to  length  of  barrel  and  such  expert  accessories  as  wind 
gauges,  sights,  globe  or  ring,  spirit  levels,  4c,  if  a  target  rifle  or  a  service  rifle,  and  if  to 
be  adopted  by  the  government  for  the  militia;  and  where  the  rifle  was  manufactured 
in  toto.     Presented  1st  April,  1909. — Mr.   Worthington Not  printed. 

137.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence,  papers,  reports,  estimates,  orders  in  council,  4c,  in  connection 
with  the  surveys  of  and  boring  in,  and  called  for  tenders  for  dredging  or  excavation 
in  the  St.  John  Harbour  and  Courtney  Bay,  or  either  of  them,  during  the  year  1908; 
a  copy  of  the  advertisements,  names  of  the  papers  in  which  they  were  inserted,  the 
tenders  received  and  dates,  the  names  of  the  tenderers  end  the  amount  of  each  tender; 
which  tender,  if  any,  was  accepted,  the  deposit  required,  and  in  which  bank  it  was 
deposited.     Presented  6th  April,   1909. — Mr.  Daniel Not  printed. 

137a.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  10th  February,  1909,  for  a 
copy  of  all  correspondence,  papers,  orders  in  council,  advertisements,  tenders,  con- 
tracts, 4c,  in  connection  with  dredging  in  the  harbour  of  St.  John,  New  Brunswick, 
covering  the  area  dredged  by  Gershen  B.  Mayes,  the  Dominion  Dredge  Company,  John 
Moore,  or  other  parties,  during  the  years  1904,  1905,  1906,  1907  and  1908;  the  quantities 
dug  under  each  contract,  the  amounts  paid  to  each  contractor,  the  date  of  each  pay- 
ment,  and  to  whom.     Presented   11th   May,   1909-  Mr.  Daniel Not  printed. 

138.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  February,  1909,  showing:  1. 
The  total  amount  expended  on  public  works  by  this  government  in  the  riding  of 
Bonaventure  prior  to  the  general  elections  of  1900.  2.  The  total  amount  expended  by 
the  government  in  this  riding,  (a)  on  public  works,  and  (b)  in  aid  of  the  railways  and 
other   undertakings   since   said   general   election,   and   the   estimated   additional   amount 

30 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

m 

required,  (a)  to  complete  these  public  works,  and  (b)  to  meet  the  subsidies  or  grants  in 
aid  of  railways  or  other  undertakings.  3.  The  various  public  works  undertaken  by  the 
Government  in  this  riding  between  the  general  election  of  1896  and  the  general  election 
of  1900,  the  dates  when  the  several  works  were  undertaken,  whether  they  were  let  by 
public  advertisement,  tender,  and  contract,  or  how  otherwise,  and  the  sums  of  money, 
stated  separately,  expended  upon  these  works  prior  to  the  election  of  1900.  i.  Which  of 
these  several  works  were  completed  and  which  of  them  remained  uncompleted  at  the 
date  of  the  election  in  1900.  5.  The  sums  of  money,  stated  separately,  expended  in  or 
towards  completing  these  works  since  the  said  election  of  1900,  and  the  dates  of 
expenditure.  6.  The  various  public  works  undertaken  and  carried  on  by  the  Gov- 
ernment since  the  general  election  of  1900,  the  dates  when  the  several  works  were 
inaugurated  or  commenced,  the  sums  of  money,  stated  separately,  expended  upon  these 
works,  and  the  estimated  amount  required  to  complete  such  of  these  works  as  have  not 
been  completed;  and  showing  whether  these  works  were  done  by  tender  or  contract,  or 
how  otherwise.  7.  The  moneys  granted  by  the  Government  by  way  of  subsidy  aid  to 
railways  or  other  undertakings  in  said  riding  since  the  general  election  of  1900,  the 
sums  of  money  paid  under  these  grants  and  the  estimated  amount  required  to  meet 
future  payments.  8.  The  public  works  commenced  and  the  money  obligations  incurred 
and  moneys  expended  for  public  works  within  said  riding  of  Bonaventure  during  the 
month  of  October  last.    Presented  13th  April,  1909.— Mr.  Lennox Not  printed. 

139.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  Housa  of  Commons,  dated  1st  March,  1909,  showing  the 
names  and  addresses  of  all  half-breeds  living  in  the  United  States  who  have  been 
allotted  scrip  since  January,  1902,  and  to  whom  said  scrip  was  sent  or  delivered. 
Presented  13th  April,  1909. — Mr.  Bradbury Not  printed. 

140.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence,  orders  in  council,  papers  and  other  documents  relating  to  the  dis- 
allowance, or  application  therefor,  of  an  Act  of  the  Legislature  of  the  province  of 
Ontario,  intituled:  'An  Act  respecting  Cobalt  Lake  and  Kerr  Lake,'  being  chapter  15 
of  the  Statutes  of  1907.     Presented  13th  April,  1909—  Mr.  Clarke  (Essex] .  .Not  printed. 

141.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  15th  February,  1909,  showing:  1. 
The  total  mileage  of  railways  authorized  to  be  constructed  under  charters  granted  by 

the  Dominion  Parliament,  between  the  period  from  18S8  to  1908,  inclusive,  exclusive  of 
the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company,  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  the  Cana- 
dian Northern  Railway  Company,  and  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  Company. 
2.  Exclusive  of  the  above  named  companies,  the  number  of  miles  actually  constructed 
under  said  charters.  3.  The  number  of  said  companies  so  incorporated.  4.  The  num- 
ber of  those  that  have  actually  constructed  any  portion  of  the  railway  so  authorized. 
5.  The  number  of  said  charters  which  have  lapsed.  6.  The  number  granted  an  exten- 
sion of  time  for  construction.  7.  The  number  granted  two  such  extensions.  8.  The 
number  granted  three  such  extensions  or  more.  Presented  19th  April,  1909. — Mr. 
Middlebro Not  printed. 

141a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  Housa  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  giving  a 
list  of  railway  charters  granted  since  1st  January,  1900,  other  than  to  the  Grand  Trunk, 
Grand  Trunk  Pacific,  the  Canadian  Northern  and  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Com- 
panies, showing  those  wlio.se  powers  have  lapsed,  and  the  length  of  each  of  the  pro- 
posed roads  and  branches,  the  date  of  charters  and  renewals,  if  any,  the  total  mileage 
constructed,  the  capital  stock  authorized,  subscribed  and  paid  up.  Presented  19th 
April,  1909. — Mr.  Magrath Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

31 


8-9  Edw.  YII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS   OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

142.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  March,  1909,  showing:  1.  At 
what  work  the  Translation  Branch  of  (he  House  of  Commons  is  employed.  2.  The 
number  of  permanent  translaturs  in  this  branch.  3.  The  total  amount  of  salaries 
paid  to  these  translators.  4.  The  documents,  reports  and  other  matters  which  have 
been  translated  in  this  branch  in  the  last  twelve  mouths,  not  including  the  pages 
already  translated  in  the  preceding  year  and  repeated  for  the  purpose  of  the  report, 
nor  the  tables  already  made  and  translated  and  repeated  for  the  purpose  of  completing 
these  reports  and  documents,  which  have  been  most  recently  translated.  5.  The  total 
number  of  pages  translated  by  the  permanent  translators.  6.  The  total  number 
of  persons,  outside  of  the  Translation  Branch,  to  whom  has  been  given  transla- 
tion work.  7.  How  much  this  o\itside  work  has  cost,  and  how  many  pages  have  been 
translated  in  this  way.  S.  What  Blue-books,  if  any,  and  other  matters,  excepting 
Hansard,  is  translated  in  other  departments  other  than  the  Translation  Branch  of  the 
House  of  Commons,  and  in  what  departments.     Presented  19th  April,  1909. — Mr.  Boyer. 

Not  printed. 

143.  Certified  copy  of  a  Report  of  the  Committee  of  the  Privy  Council,  approved  by  His 
Excellency  on  the  19th  April,  1909. — Regulations  of  the  Civil  Service  Commission  with 
reference  to  entrance  into  and  promotion  in  the  service.  Presented  20th  April,  1909, 
by  Hon.  C.  Murphy Not  printed. 

144.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1909,  showing  all 
armouries  built  since  1st  July,  1S96,  giving  situation,  cost,  capacity,  officials  employed 
in  each,  with  yearly  expenses  of  each  armoury,  distributed  under  the  head  of  main- 
tenance, improvements,  extensions  and  salaries,  with  the  number  of  troops  actually 
making  use  of  the  same,  and  to  what  extent  each  year.  Presented  20th  April,  1909.— 
Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

145.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence,  reports,  documents,  orders  in  council,  in  the  possession  of  the 
Government  relating  to  the  establishment  of  a  Geodetic  Service  Bureau,  and  the  com- 
mencement of  a  Geodetic  Survey  in  Canada.  Presented  20th  April,  1909.— Mr.  MacLean 
(Lunenburg) Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

145a.  Supplementary  Return  to  No.  145.     Presented  27th  April,  1909. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

145b.  Further    Supplementary   Return    to    No.    145.     Presented   28th    April,    1909. 

Printed  for  both  distribution  and  sessional  papers. 

146.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  correspondence  respecting  the  improvements  made  in  the  Assiniboia  River  near 
Portage  la  Prairie,  in  September  and  October,  1908;  and  of  all  papers,  vouchers,  orders, 
resolutions,  returned  cheques,  &c,  in  any  way  relating  to  the  said  work  or  to  carry- 
ing out  of  same.     Presented  22nd  April,   1909.— Mr.  Staples Not  printed. 

147.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1909,  showing  the 
various  statistical  and  special  informative  publications  issued  by  the  several  depart- 
ments of  the  Government,  the  number  and  pages  of  each,  the  number  and  cost  of 
each  for  the  year  190S,  the  number  of  persons  employed  in  their  preparation,  the 
salaries  paid  to  each  person  so  employed,  the  number  of  special  employees  for  engraving 
or  illustrating  these  publications,  and  the  salaries  and  expenses  of  the  same,  including 
work  and  apparatus,  the  firm  or  printing  company  publishing  the  same,  and  the 
amount  paid  in  each  case  for  printing  and  binding.  The  above  return  is  not  to 
include  the  regular  reports  of  the  departments,  but  to  be  so  presented  as  to  show  the 

32 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  17— Continued. 

name  of  each  statistical  or  special  publication,  the  number  of  such  printed,  and  the 
number  of  pages  in  each,  the  number  of  officials  employed  in  the  preparation  of  the 
publication,  the  total  cost  of  each,  and  the  total  cost  of  all  such  publications  for  the 
year  1908.     Presented  22nd  April,  1909.— Mr.  Foster Not  printed. 

148.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Marine  and  Fisheries  Department  and  any  person  or 
persons  relative  to  the  concellatioo  of  the  certificate  of  Thomas  Bibbington,  or  the 
removal  of  his  name  from  the  list  of  certified  pilots  for  the  port  of  Victoria,  B.C. 
Presented  22nd  April,  1909. — Mr.  Barnurd Sot  printed. 

149.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February,  1909,  showing  all 
contracts  for  the  carrying  of  mail,  whioh  expire  in  the  month  of  April,  1909,  that  have 
been  renewed  without  asking  for  tenders;  where  the  routes  are  situated,  the  price  paid 
for  carrying  the  mail,  and  the  name  of  the  carrier,  and  his  place  of  residence  in  each 
case.     Presented  27th  April,  1909. — Mr.  Armstrong Not  printed. 

150.  Copy  of  an  ordinance  respecting  the  hearing  and  decision  of  disputes  in  relation  to 
mining  lands  in  the  Yukon  Territory.  Presented  (Senate)  5th  May,  1909.  by  Hon.  Sir 
Richard  Cartwright Xot  printed. 

151.  Copy  of  an  ordinance  respecting  the  imposition  of  a  tax  upon  ale,  porter,  beer  or 
lager  beer  imported  into  the  Yukon  Territory.  Presented  (Senate)  5th  May,  1909,  by 
Hon.   Sir   Richard  Cartwright Not  printed. 

152.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  February,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  communications,  accounts,  reports  and  other  papers  received  by  the  Department 
of  Public  Works  from  A.  Edgar  Hanson,  E.  T.  P.  Shewan,  or  other  person  or  persons, 
relating  to  the  survey  of  the  St.  John  River  channel  between  Fredericton  and  Wood- 
stock, and  of  all  letters,  instructions,  &c,  from  the  department  to  Mr.  Hanson,  Mr. 
Shewan,  or  other  person  or  persons  in  connection  therewith.  Presented  7th  May,  1909. 
—Mr.  Crocket Not  printed. 

153.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  orders  in  council  directing  that  repairs  be  made  on  different  wharfs  in  the 
county  of  Soulanges,  a  copy  of  all  correspondence,  reports,  accounts  and  pay-rolls 
relating  to  the  valuation  of  these  works,  the  payment  and  the  list  of  names  of  all  who 
were  employed  as  day  labourers  on  these  works:  a  copy  of  all  letters,  reports  and 
recommendations  exchanged  between  the  Government  and  all  other  perons  relating  to 
the  choice  of  men  to  be  engaged  on  these  works  and  those  who  should  be  refused  em- 
ployment ;  a  copy  of  the  report  of  accounts  produced  by  Mr.  Alfred  Bissonette, 
wharfinger  at  St.  Zotique,  and  Mr.  Trefle  Poirier.  wharfinger  on  the  wharfs  of  the 
canal  and  River  St.  Lawrence,  in  the  parish  of  Des  Cedres,  and  of  those  of  Mr.  Isaie 
Lalonde,  son  of  Albert,  farmer,  of  St.  Zotique;  a  copy  of  accounts  for  furnishing  wood, 
iron,  cement,  sand  and  stone  used  in  the  building  of  said  wharfs,  and  also  a  statement 
of  the  materials  purchased  as  aforesaid,  paid  for  by  the  department,  and  which  were 
not  used  because  they  were  considered  unfit  for  the  building  of  these  wharfs.  Presented 
11th   May,   1909.— Mr.   Lortie Not   printed. 

154.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  Eth  P'ebruary,  1909,  for  a  copy 
of  all  orders  in  council,  correspondence,  papers  and  other  documents  between  the  Gov- 
ernment or  any  member  thereof,  and  any  person  or  persons,  referring  in  any  way  to 
the  drainage  of  the  Nation  River,  running  through  the  township  of  Matilda  and  Win- 
chester, in  the  county  of  Dundas,  from  the  year  190).  Presented  11th  May,  1909. — 
Mr.  Broder Not  printed. 

33 
5654—3 


S-9  Edw.  VLT.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  •  A.  10(19 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

155.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  showing  the 
amount  of  money  received  from  the  GoTernment  by  the  Canada  Posten  of  Winnipeg 
during  the  years  1907  and  1918.     Presented  12tli  .May.  1909.— Afr.  Bradbury.  .Not  ]>rinted. 

156.  Farming  in  Canada.— Report  of  the  Scottish  Commission  on  Agriculture  in  Canada, 
1908.     Presented  12th  May,  1909.  by  Hon.  F.  Oliver Sot  printed. 

157.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence  and  reports  respecting  the  Colonization  and  Repatriation  Society  of 
Lake  St.  John  from  1900  to  this  date,  and  a  detailed  statement  of  the  moneys  paid  to 
the  society  and  of  the  manner  in  which  they  have  been  expended  between  these  dates. 
Presented  14th  May,  1909.—  Mr.  Girard Not  printed. 

158.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  Senate,  dated  19th  March,  1909,  calling  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  documents  from  the  Pacific  Cable  Board  on  the  working  and 
revenue  of  the  Pacific  cable  and  all  information  on  the  subject  of  a  state-owned 
Atlantic  cable  and  Empire  cables  generally.  Presented  13th  May,  1909. — Hon.  Mr. 
Belcourt Not  printed. 

159.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  Senate,  dated  29th  April,  1909,  for  copies  of  all  correspon- 
dence between  the  Honourable  Sir  Frederick  Borden,  Minister  of  Militia  and  Defence, 
Mr.  Crowe  and  others,  relating  to  the  admission  of  Newfoundland  into  the  Dominion 
as  a  province  of  the  same.     Presented  13th  May,  1909.— Hon.  Sir  Mackenzie  Boirell. 

Not  printed. 

160.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
T  lments,  complaints,  correspondence  and  decisions  arrived  at  relating  to  a  contract 
of  lease  entered  into  between  Alphonse  Laberge,  lessor,  and  the  Government  of  the 
Dominion  of  Canada,  lessee,  of  date  20th  day  of  July,  1904.  Presented  11th  May,  1909. 
— Mr.  Roy  (Montmagny) Not  printed. 

161.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  correspondence,  tenders  and  documents  in  connection  with  the  construction  of  an 
ice-breaking  steamer  for  Northumberland  Straits,  let  to  Messers.  Vickers,  Sons  & 
Maxim;  also  the  same  in  connection  with  the  construction  of  a  lighthouse  tende.-  and 
buoy  steamer  for  the  Great  Lakes,  by  Messrs.  Swan,  Hunter,  Wigham  &  Richardson. 
Presented  15th  May.  1909.— Mr.  Currie  (Simcoej Not  printed. 

162.  Order  in  Council  granting  authority  for  the  exemption  from  payment  of  the  Chinese 
Capitation  Tax  in  certain  cases.     Presented  17th  May,  1909,  by  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurier. 

£  Not  printed. 

163.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1909,  showing  with 
respect  to  prosecutions  since  1906  for  violation  of  postal  law.  the  nature  of  each  offence 
alleged,  the  place  of  residence  of  person  charged,  and  the  result  of  each  trial  and 
penalty    imposed.      Presented    17th    May.    1909. — Mr.    Taylor    (New    Westminster). 

Not  printed. 

164.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
reports,  specifications,  offers,  tenders,  contracts,  alterations  of  contract,  correspondence 
and  documents  of  every  description  relating  to  or  in  connection  with  the  contract  of 
Thadee  Desbiens  for  an  extension  to  the  Chicoutimi  pier;  and  the  same  in  connection 
with  the  contract  of  the  General  Construction  Company,  for  work  done  by  the  dredge 
Algonquin  at  at  near  said   pier.     Presented   18th   May,   1909.—  Mr.   Ames Not  printed. 

34 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

164a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of 
all  petitions,  reports,  specifications,  offers,  tenders,  contracts  or  papers,  of  any 
description  in  connection  with  the  protection  pier  at  Riviere  du  Moulin,  near  Chicou- 
timi;  Saguenay  County,  P.Q.     Presented  19th  May,  1909. — Mr.  Ames Noi  printed. 

165.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  showing  how  many 
seining  licenses  for  fishing  in  Pacific  coast  waters  are  now  current ;  to  whom  they  have 
been  granted;  the  area  covered  by  each  license,  and  how  many  of  these  licenses  are 
being  operated  by  the  original  licensees,  and  how  many  by  aliens.  Presented  18th  May, 
1909. — Mr.  Cowan Not  printed. 

165a.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  showing:  1.  How 
many  licenses  to  fish  and  pack  lobsters  in  the  coast  waters  of  Prince  Edward  Island 
have  been  issued  by  the  Dominion  Government  since  1st  January,  1904,  to  this  date, 
and  to  whom  same  were  issued.  2.  A  copy  of  any  petitions,  requests,  or  correspon- 
dence received  by  the  Government  from  any  person  or  persons,  or  corporations  since 
1st  January,  1904,  asking  for  licenses  to  fish  and  pack  lobsters  in  said  province.  3.  The 
number  of  new  licenses  likely  to  be  issued  by  the  Government  during  the  present  year. 
Presented  ISth  May,  1909.—  Mr.  Fraser Not  printed. 

165b.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  April,  1909,  showing  the 
names  of  all  persons  residing  in  the  town  of  Liverpool,  Nova  Scotia,  or  in  its  vicinity, 
who  were  paid  fishing  bounties  in  the  year  1908,  and  the  names  of  all  persons  residing 
in  Liverpool,  Nova  Scotia,  or  in  the  vicinity  thereof,  to  whom  seine  trap  licenses  were 
issued  in  1908,  and  the  amounts  paid  lor  the  same  in  each  case.  Presented  19th  May, 
1909  -Mr.  Crosby \'ot  printed. 

166.  Return  to  an  address  of  the  Senate,  dated  18th  March.  1909,  calling  for  copies  of  all 
charges, — complaints  made  by  Mr.  Joseph  Girard  or  others  to  the  Prime  Minister,  or 
any  member  of  the  Government,  against  the  Lake  St.  John  Colonization  Society.  Pre- 
sented 18th  May,  1909.— Hon.  Mr.  Tessier Not  printed. 

167.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  March,  1909,  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence,  communications  in  writing  and  documents  from  the  grand  secretary, 
or  any  other  officials  of  the  Fishermen's  Union  of  Nova  Scotia,  or  any  branch  or 
station  of  the  said  union,  to  the  Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  or  to  any  official  of 
the  department,  and  the  replies  or  communications  from  the  minister  or  any  official  of 
the  department  since  the  1st  of  January,  1907.  Presented  19th  May,  1909. — Mr.  Borden 
(Halifax) Not  printed. 

168.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  13th  January.  19118.  showing  all 
wharfs,  piers,  breakwaters,  and  other  public  works  of  a  similar  character  which  have 
been  constructed  at  the  expense  of  Canada,  since  1st  January,  1897,  or  for  which  public 
money  has  been  voted  or  appropriated  since  that  date,  giving  the  amount  expended  or 
appropriated  in  each  instance,  the  total  cost  of  each  such  work,  the  estimated  total 
cost  in  each  case  where  the  work  has  not  yet  been  completed,  the  name  of  the  place 
where  the  work  is  situated,  the  cost  of  annual  maintenance  and  upkeep  of  each  such 
work,  and  the  amount  of  annual  revenue  derived  therefrom  in  each  instance.  Pre- 
sent d   19th   May,   1909.— Mr.    Borden   (Halifax) Not   printed. 

169.  Return  to  an  order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  February.  1909,  showing  how 
many  hogs  have  been  killed  during  each  month  from  the  1st  of  November,  1907.  to  1st 
November,  1908,  inclusive,  by  the  following  packing  companies:  the  Laing  Pack,  and 
Prov.  Co.,  Ltd.,  Montreal;  the  t'olliugwood  Pack.  Co.,  Ltd.,  < 'ollingwood ;  the  Williams 
Davis   Co.,    Ltd.,   Harriston;   the   George    Matthews   Co.,   Ltd.,    Hull;   the   George    Mat- 

35 


8-9  Edw.  VII.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1909 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME   17— Continued. 

thews  Co.,  Ltd..  Brantford.  the  George  Matlhews  Co.,  Ltd.,  Peterborough;  the  Whyte 
Packing  Co.,  Ltd.,  Brantford;  the  Canadian  racking  Co.,  Ltd.,  London,  and  the  number 
of  hogs  condemned,  including  intestines,  during  the  same  period.  Presented  19th  May, 
1909.— Mr.  Bciillic Not  printed. 

170.  Copy  of  correspondence  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  British  Govern- 
ment on  the  subject  of  Imperial  Naval  Defence.  Presented  19th  May,  1909.  by  Sir 
Wilfrid  Laurier Not  printed. 

171.  lieturn  to  an  order  of  the  Senate,  dated  12th  May,  1909,  calling  for  copies  of  the  peti- 
tions,  letters  patent  and  telegrams  sent  by  the  citizens  of  the  parish,  or  of  the  town- 
ship, and  of  the  village  of  Laterriere,  in  the  county  of  Chieoutimi.  asking  for  a  subsidy 
for  the  Ha-Ha  Bay  Railway  Company,  or  any  other  railway  company,  to  build  a  rail- 
way from  Jonquiere,  or  near  thereto,  to  St.  Alphonse.  Presented  19th  May,  1909.— 
Bon.  Mr.  Choquctte Not  printed. 


36 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


A.   1909 


ANNUAL    REPORT 


OF   THE 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


FOR    THE 


Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908 


PRINTED  BY  ORDER  OF  PARLIAMENT 


OTTAWA 

PRINTED  BY  C.  H.  PARMELEE,  PRINTER  TO  THE  KING'S  MOST 
EXCELLENT  MAJESTY. 

1909 
[No.  25—1909.] 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


To   His   Excellency   the   Right   Honourable   Sir   Albert   Henry    George,   Earl    Grey, 
G.C.M.G.,  &c,  &c,  Governor  General  of  Canada. 

May  it  Please  Your  Excellency  : 

The  undersigned  has  the  honour  to  lay  before  Your  Excellency  the  report  of  the 
transactions  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, 
1908. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

FRANK  OLIVER, 

Minister  of  the  Interior. 
Ottawa,  September  5,  1908. 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


TABLE   OF   CONTENTS 

Page. 

Report  of  the  Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior ix 

PAET  I.— DOMINION  LANDS. 

No.  1  Report  of  the  Commissioner 3 

2  Inspector  of  Dominion  Land  Agencies 3 

3  "             Agent  at  Battleford 10 

4  "                      "         Brandon 11 

5  "                     "         Calgary 12 

6  "                     "        Dauphin 14 

7  "                     "         Edmonton 16 

8  "                     "        Estevan 17 

9  "                     "         Humboldt 18 

10  "                     '•        Kamloops 19 

11  "                     "        Lethbridge 20 

12  "                     "         Moosejaw 21 

13  "                     '•        New  Westminster 23 

14  "                      "         Prince  Albert 23 

15  "                     "         Red  Deer 25 

16  "                     "        Regina 26 

17  "                     "        Winnipeg 27 

18  "                     "        Torkton 28 

19  "            Mines  Branch 29 

20  "            Timber,  Grazing  and  Irrigation  Branch 41 

21  "             Inspector  of  Crown  Timber  Agencies 45 

22  "            Crown  Timber  Agent  at  Calgary 51 

23  "                                "                         Edmonton 56 

24  "                                "                         Prince  Albert 61 

25  "                                 "                          Winnipeg 64 

26  "                                "                         New  Westminster 68 

27  Inspector  of  Ranches 74 

28  "            Accountant 75 

29  "            Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  Branch 82 

30  "             Registrar  of  Correspondence 87 

31  "             School  Lands  Branch 89 

32  "             Correspondence  Mailing  Office 98 

33  "             Geographer 99 

34  "            Land  Patents  Branch 106 


Vi  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
PAET  II.— IMMIGRATION. 
Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration 3 

OPERATIONS  IN  EUROrE. 

No.  1  Report  of  the  High  Commissioner 62 


2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


J.  Obed  Smith,  Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration.  ...  68 

A.  F.  Jury,  Agent  at  Liverpool 73 

G.  H.  Mitchell,  Agent  at  Birmingham 74 

L.  Burnett,  Agent  at  York 75 

M.  Mclntyre,  Agent  at  Glasgow 76 

John  McLennan,  Agent  at  Aberdeen 77 

John  Webster,  Agent  at  Belfast 78 

H.  M.  Murray,  Agent  at  Exeter .  80 

Edward  O'Kelly,  Agent  at  Dublin 81 

Paul  Wiallard,  Agent  at  Paris,  France 83 

D.  Treau  de  Cceli,  Agent  at  Antwerp,  Belgium 84 


OPERATIONS   IN   THE  UNITED  STATES. 

No.  13  Report  of  W.  J.  White,  Inspector  of  Agencies  in  the  United  States. ...  86 

OPERATIONS    IN    WESTERN    CANADA. 

No.  14  Report  of  J.  Bruce  Walker,  Commissioner  of  Immigration. 89 

15  "            Dr.  S.  C.  Corbett,  Medical  Officer  at  Winnipeg 92 

16  C.  W.  Speers,  General  Colonization  Agent 93 

JUVENILE   IMMIGRATION. 

No.  17  Report  of  G.  Bogue  Smart,  Inspector  of  British  Immigrant  Children  and 

Receiving  Homes 96 

MEDICAL    INSPECTION    SERVICE. 

No.  18  Report  of  Dr.  P.  H.  Bryce,  Chief  Medical  Officer 109 

PART  III.— SURVEYS. 

Report  of  the  Surveyor  General 3 

APPENDICES. 

No.  1  Schedule  of   Surveyors   Employed  and  Work  Executed 21 

2  Schedule  Showing  Miles  Surveyed  and  Cost 28 

3  Yukon  Territory  Surveys 29 

4  "                 "              Miscellaneous 31 

5  Work  Executed  in  Office  of  Chief  Draughtsman 32 

6  List  of  New  Editions  of  Sectional  Maps  issued 34 

7  Work  Executed  in  Survey  Records  Office .  .   .  .  35 

8  "                   Photographic  Office 36 

9  Lithographic  Office 37 

10  Names    ai  d    Duties   of   Topographical    Surveys   Branch 38 

11  List  of  Dominion  Land  Surveyors  Supplied  with  Standard  Measures....  42 

12  Examination  Papers  for  Dominion  Land  Surveyors 46 

Note. — The  remaining  schedules,  from  13  to  44,  inclusive,  comprising  reports  of  sur- 
veyors and  descriptions  of  surveyed  townships,  and  the  maps,  will  appear  with  the 
monograph  form  only  of  the  Surveyor  General's  Report. 


TABLE  OF  COX  TEXTS  vii 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

PART  IV.— CHIEF  ASTRONOMER. 

Note. — This  part,  comprising  the  Report  of  the  Chief  Astronomer  and  Appendices. 
will  appear  as  a  separate  report,  in  monograph  form. 

PART  V.— ROCKY  MOUNTAINS  PARK. 

Report  of  the  Superintendent 3 

"             Curator  of  the  Museum 18 

Meteorological  Tables 20 

PART  VI.— YUKON  TERRITORY. 

Report  of  the  Commissioner 3 

No.  1  Report  of  the  Acting  Comptroller 6 

2  Acting  Gold  Commissioner 8 

3  Mining  Engineer 13 

4  "            Acting  Crown  Timber  and  Land  Agent 19 

5  Director  of  Surveys 22 

6  Assistant  Gold  Commissioner 23 

PART  VII.— FORESTRY. 

Report  of  the  Superintendent,  R.  H.  Campbell 3 

APPENDICES. 

No.  1  Report  of  Norman  M.  Ross,  District  Superintendent  of  Forestry 24 

2  "            F.  W.  H.  Jacombe,  Technical  Assistant 30 

3  "            A.  P.  Stevenson,  Tree-planting  Inspector 31 

4  '            Angus  MacKintosh,  Tree-planting  Inspector 33 

5  "            John  Caldwell,   Tree-planting  Inspector 34 

6  "            Walter  B.  Guiton,  Tree-planting  Inspector 35 

7  "    .         James  Leamy,  Crown  Timber  Agent 37 

8  "            W.  J.  Margach,  Chief  Forest  Ranger 39 

9  "            W.  A.  Davis,  Chief  Forest  Ranger 40 

10  "            C.  A.  Walkinshaw,  Forest  Ranger 42 

11  "  John  Stewart,  D.L.S.,  C.E.,  Commissioner  and  Chief  Engineer 

of  Irrigation 43 

12  "            P.  M.  Sauder 44 

13  "            Ralph  J.  Burley 45 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


EEPOET 

OF  THE 

DEPUTY  MINISTER  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

1907-8 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa,  September  1,  1908. 
The  Honourable  Frank  Oliver, 

Minister  of  the  Interior. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  report  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior  for 
the  year  ending  March  31,   190S,   being  the   thirty-fifth   annual  presentment   of   the 
department  since  its  inception  in  the  year  1873. 

While  the  general  results  obtained  were  not  so  satisfactory  as  for  the  previous 
year,  as  evidenced  by  the  falling  off  in  the  number  of  free  homestead  entries  recorded 
and  in  the  gross  amount  of  revenue  collected,  it  is  gratifying  to  note  that  the  depression 
caused  by  the  unfavourable  climatic  conditions  prevailing  during  the  winter  of  1906 
and  the  following  spring  and  summer  of  1907,  has  been  only  of  a  momentary  character 
and  has  not  perceptibly  retarded  the  progress  of  the  western  grain  fields. 

The  grain  shortage  of  1907,  coupled  with  the  temporary  financial  depression  which 
existed  at  the  time,  made  it  necessary  for  the  government  to  assist  needy  settlers  with 
advances  of  grain  so  as  to  enable  them  to  seed  their  farms  last  spring,  and  a  special 
appropriation  for  this  purpose  was  made  by  parliament  at  its  last  session.  Thanks  to 
the  active  co-operation  of  the  governments  of  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta,  the  purchase 
and  distribution  of  the  grain  was  effected  by  the  department  in  a  very  satisfactory 
manner,  and  the  present  crop  prospects  are  such  that  there  is  every  reason  to  believe 
that  the  majority  of  the  settlers  affected  will  be  in  a  position  to  return  promptly  the 
amount  of  the  advances  made  to  them.  A  report  was  issued  some  months  ago  con- 
taining full  particulars  as  to  the  terms  of  the  contracts  under  which  the  seed  grain 
was  purchased,  and  as  to  the  methods  followed  in  distributing  the  samp. 

On  the  whole,  the  season  of  1907  has  been  a  difficult  one  for  a  large  proportion  of 
the  western  settlers,  but  it  has  not  been  without  its  compensations.  It  has  demonstrated 
beyond  doubt  that  if  the  expectations  of  one  season  are  not  realized,  those  of  the  next 
may  safely  be  relied  upon ;  that  on  the  whole  the  western  farm  compares  favourably 
in  constant  productiveness  with  the  best  grain  areas  in  the  world,  and  that  the 
magnificent  crops  now  maturing  adequately  testify  to  the  sturdiness  and  intelligence 
of  the  present  tillers  of  the  soil. 

25— b 


x  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 
NEW    APPOINTMENTS. 

The  only  new  appointment  at  headquarters  during  the  past  year  was  that  of  Mr. 
J.  A.  Cote  as  assistant  deputy  minister.  The  necessity  for  bringing  about  such  a 
division  of  the  work  as  would  relieve  the  deputy  head  of  a  portion  of  the  arduous 
duties  devolving  upon  him  became  imperative  as  a  result  of  the  large  increase  in  the 
business  of  the  department  within  the  past  few  years.  Under  the  present  arrangement, 
with  a  judicious  apportionment  of  the  work  of  the  office  between  the  deputy  head  and 
his  assistant,  the  former  will  thus  be  enabled  to  devote  to  the  general  administration 
of  the  department  such  attention  as  the  same  demands,  which  will  better  ensure  the 
proper  carrying  out  of  the  regulations. 

Mr.  Cote  has  been  connected  with  the  department  in  a  permanent  capacity  since 
1882,  and  having  been  for  the  past  twenty  years  attached  to  the  office  of  the  deputy 
minister,  he  is  in  every  way  specially  fitted  to  discharge  satisfactorily  the  new  duties 
now  devolving  upon  him. 

In  the  outside  service  the  following  new  appointments  were  made  during  the 
year,  namely: — 

Mr.  Howard  Douglas,  who  had  for  a  number  of  years  past  occupied  the  position 
of  Superintendent  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  Park  of  Canada,  was  appointed  to  the  new 
position  of  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Parks  on  April  1,  1908.  Mr.  Douglas  had  here- 
tofore exercised  supervision  over  the  several  Dominion  parks  and  buffalo  reservations 
in  the  west  ever  since  the  establishment  of  these  reservations,  and  in  view  of  the  fact 
that  it  is  proposed  to  place  these  parks  under  the  control  of  superintendents  it  wa9 
felt  that  it  would  be  in  the  public  interest  to  have  a  responsible  outside  officer  who 
would  have  the  general  control  of  the  parks  and  act  upon  direct  instructions  from 
Ottawa.  Mr.  Douglas  has  shown  himself  to  be  eminently  qualified  to  fill  the  position 
of  commissioner,  and  there  is  no  doubt  that  the  general  administration  of  parks  will 
be  greatly  benefited  by  the  new  arrangement. 

Mr.  G.  E.  Hunter,  who  has  been  employed  at  the  Pocky  Mountains  Park  office  for 
several  years  past,  and  whose  services  have  been  highly  satisfactory,  was  promoted  to 
the  position  of  superintendent  of  the  park  on  the  first  of  April  last. 

In  the  Dominion  lands  outside  service  two  new  agents  were  appointed,  namely, 
Mr.  K.  W.  McKenzie  as  agent  for  the  district  of  Edmonton,  in  lieu  of  Mr.  A.  G. 
Harrison,  who  resigned,  and  Mr.  James  Stafford  as  agent  for  the  district  of  Lethbridge, 
in  lii  u  of  -Mr.  J.  W.  Martin,  who  was  promoted  to  the  position  of  assistant  inspector. 
Mr.  McKenzie's  appointment  was  dated  September  16,  1907,  and  that  of  Mr.  Stafford, 
July  1,  of  the  same  year. 


I  regret  to  report  that  there  were  ten  deaths  in  the  department  during  the  past 
twelve  months,  three  at  headquarters,  four  in  the  Dominion  lands  service,  and  three 
in   the  immigration  branch. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xi 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  following  is  a  list  of  the  officials  in  question,  and  of  the  dates  of  their  deaths : — 

Head  Office- 
Mr.  Brown- Wall  is,  September  22,  1907. 
Miss  Eeba  Sharp,  November  21,  1907. 
Miss  M.  L.  Ouiniet,  Aug-ust  2,  1907. 

Dominion  Lands  (outside  service)  — 

T.  H.  Aikman,  Crown  timber  office,  Winnipeg,  August  22,  1907. 
J.  W.  E.  Darby,  Dominion  lands  office,  Winnipeg,  in  March,  1908. 
Charles  Fisher,  on  half-breed  claim  commission,  in  August,   1907. 
James  Paisley,  Dominion  lands  office,  Brandon,  January  14,  1908. 

Immigration  Branch — 

Samuel  Gray,  Winnipeg  office,  August  22,  1907. 
Joseph  Daigle,  Montreal  office,  March  13,  1908. 
Thos.  Bennett,  immigration  agent,  January  27,  1908. 

Statement  showing  Gross  Cash  Revenue  received  from  all  sources,  during  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1908,  compared  with  the  receipts  of  the  previous  twelve 
months. 


Source  of  Revenue. 

Twelve 

months  ended 

March  31, 

1908. 

Twelve 

months  ended 

March  31, 

1907. 

Increase. 

Decrease. 

Net 
Decrease. 

S          cts. 

1,998,219  92 

708,045  83 

8,674  95 

12.899  84 

20,069  03 

2,256  65 

1,650  00 

S          cts . 

2,125,958  51 

829,881  90 

9,216  59 

15,016  35 

13,328  47 

1H7,407  47 

2,875  00 

21  00 

8        cts. 

3        cts. 

127,738  59 

121,836  07 

541  64 

2,116  51 

$       cts. 

6,740  56 

105,150  82 
1,225  00 

21  00 

Fines  under  the  Immigration  Act   . 

Fines    and    forfeitures,    Northwest 

2,751,816  22 

3,103,705  29 

6,740  56 

358,629  63 

351,889  07 

25— Bi 


xii  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

Statement  of  receipts  of  Dominion  Lands  Kevemie  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31, 
1908,  compared  with  the  receipts  for  the  previous  twelve  months. 


Particulars 


1907-1908. 


Homestead  fees 

Improvements 

Sales  of  lands  

Map  sales,  office  fees,  &c 

Rental  ol  lands 

Survey  fees 

Timber  dues . 

Grazing  lands 

Coal  lands 

Hay  permits   

Mining  fees 

Hydraulic  leases 

Dredging  leases 

Export  tax  on  gold 

Free  miners'  certificates 

Free  certificates  for  export  of  gold.  - 

.Stone  quarries : . . 

Irrigation  fees 

Rent  of  water  power 

Fees  rt  Board  of  Examiners  D.L.S. 

Patent  and  interchange  fees 

Rocky  Mountains  Park 

Townsite  sales 

Suspense  account 

Refunds  of  refunds 

Miscellaneous 


Refunds.    . 
Net  totals. 


s 


cts. 


301,693  73 

71,139  47 

656,303  03 

7,727  29 

5,30!l  01 

141,25  i  35 

473,008  94 

43,211  78 

29,697  64 

4,976  45 

130,703  55 

6,243  97 

19,616  84 

70,504  65 

7G  25 

162  50 

1,270  93 

516  75 

2,640  78 

690  00 

1,283  50 

27,232  87 


Twelve 

months  ended 

March  31, 

l!i07. 


1,385  35 
692  77 

271  52 

1,998, 21  !l  92 
114,000  04 


■I 


1,883,619  88 


.?  cts . 

377,043  55 

.-,1,221  50 

721,441  00 

7,680  38 

15,213  44 

74,993  28 

4911,048  44 

59,436  43 

3,803  91 

:uon  is 

126,221  00 

3,844  58 

4,2f,:i  54 

128,531  40 

19,578  31 

266  50 

1,526  38 

589  51 

500  00 

554  00 

1,069  00 

21.679  33 

9,085  32 

4.2SI  97 

1,230  76 

228  17 


2,127,434  88 
50,337  50 


2,077,097  38 


Increase. 


$         cts . 

19,917  H7 

46  111 

66,262  07 

25,983  73 

1,876  30 

4,482  55 

2,404  39 

15,353  30 


2,140  78 
136  00 
214  50 

5,553  54 


43  35 

144,325  39 
64,262  54 


Decrease. 


S        cts. 
75,349  82 


65,137  97 
:>.!<oi   13 


16,439  5o 

ir.,224  65 


58,026  75 

19.5(12  i.i!  I 

104  00 

255  45 

72  76 


9,085  32 

2,8!l!l  02 
537  99 


S0.062  85 


273,540  35 
273,540  35 


Net 
Decrease. 


cts 


1113,477  50 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


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svi  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

Statement  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  Park  Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 

March  31, 1908. 

Particulars.  Amount. 

Rent $5,351  49 

Timber  dues.. 1,34139 

Water  rates 208  44 

Transfer  fees 46  00 

Cave  and  basin  (bathing  tickets) 3,277  00 

Quarry  permits '.  .  488  00 

Dog  licenses 181  50 

Livery  licenses 567  00 

Pool  and  billiard  licenses 160  00 

Boat  licenses 25  00 

Butcher  licenses 40  00 

Coal  lands 11,866  SO 

Grazing  lands 230  00 

Hot  springs  (bathing  tickets^ 3,108  50 

Telephone  rent 242  50 

Fines 11  00 

Sale  of  lumber 20  00 

Peddlers'  licenses 36  00 

Camping  permits 22  00 

Miscellaneous 10  25 

Total $27,232  87 

Xote. — The  average  monthly  revenue  for  the  nine  months  ended  March  31,  1907, 
was  $1,765.27. 

The  average  monthly  revenue  for  the  twelve  months  ended  March  31,  1908,  was 
$2,209.40. 

REVENUE. 

The  financial  returns  will  show  that  the  falling  off  in  the  gross  cash  revenue  is 
chiefly  attributable  to  a  decrease  in  the  amount  realized  from  the  sale  of  school  lands 
and  the  collection  of  registration  fees.  As  regards  the  latter  item,  it  may  be  explained 
that  the  revenue  from  this  source  ceased  from  and  after  September  1,  1906,  when  land 
titles  offices  passed  from  federal  to  provincial  control  as  a  result  of  the  coming  into 
force  of  the  Acts  establishing  the  provinces  of  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta. 

The  falling  off  in  the  revenue  on  account  of  school  lands  amounted  to  $121,836.07, 
which  added  to  the  decrease  in  the  collection  of  registration  fees,  $105,150.82,  and 
$58,026.75  on  the  export  tax  on  gold,  represents  a  total  decrease  for  these  three  items 
of  $285,016.34,  leaving  a  deficit  of  only  $66,875.43  properly  chargeable  to  the  Dominion 
lands,  and  which  is  accounted  for  by  the  falling  off  of  7,000  entries  during  the  past 
year,  as  compared  with  the  previous  twelve  months.  ■ 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xvti 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  following  is  a  comparative  statement  of  the  homestead  entries  and  sales  which 
have  been  made  at  the  several  agencies  of  the  department  during  the  fiscal  years  ending 
March  31,  1907  (nine  months),  and  March  31,  1908  (twelve  months),  respectively: — 


Fiscal  Year  ending 
March  31.  1907. 
(Nine  months). 

Fiscal  Year  ending 

March  31,  1908. 

(Twelve  months). 

No.  of 
Entries. 

21,6-18 

Acres. 

No.  ..f 

Entries. 

Acres. 

3,463,520 
56,430 

30,424 

4,867,840 
179,894 

The  following  statement  shows  the  number  of  homestead  entries  reported  in  each 
year  since  1874: — 

Departmental  year  ended.  Number  of  Entries. 

October  31,  1874 '. 1,376 

"       31,  1875 499 

31,  1870 347 

31,  1877 845 

31,  1878 1,788 

31,  1879 4,068 

31,1880 2,074 

"       31,  1881 2,753 

"       31,  1882 7,4S3 

31,  1883 6,063 

31,  1884 3,753 

"       31,  1885 1,858 

"       31,  1886 2,657 

31,  1887/ 2,036 

31,  1888 2,655 

"       31,  1889 4,416 

31,  1890 2,955 

"       31,  1891 3,523 

31,  1892 4,840 

31,  1893 4,067 

31,  1894 3,209 

December  31,  1895 2,394 

"       31,  1896 1,857 

•'       31,  1897 2,384 

"       31,  1898 4,848 

31,  1899 6,689 

•June  30,  1900 7,426 

"     30,  1901 8,167 

"      30,  1902 14,673 

"     30,  1903 31,383 


XVlli  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

June  30,  1904 26,073 

"      30,  1905 30,819 

"      30,  1906 41,869 

Nine  month*  ended  March  31,  1907 21,647 

Twelve  months  ended  March  31,  1907 37,788 

Year  ended  March  31,  1908 30,424 

Statement  showing  the  number  of  Homestead  Entries  made  during  the  fiscal  year 

ended  March  31,  1908,  and  the  Nationality  of  the  Homesteaders,  as  reported  by 
the  several  Agencies  of  the  Department  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and 
British  Columbia. 

Nationalities.                                                                                    Xo.  of  Entries. 

Canadians  from  Ontario 3,696 

"           "      Quebec 494 

"      Nova  Scotia 197 

"          "     New  Brunswick 120 

"      Prince  Edward  Island 74 

"          "      Manitoba 1,043 

"      Saskatchewan 1,152 

"          "     Alberta 532 

"          "     British  Columbia 109 

Persons  who  had  previous  entry 2,949 

Newfoundlanders 7 

Canadians  returned  from  the  United  States 510 

Americans 7,818 

English 4,S40 

Scotch 1,026 

Irish 339 

French 306 

Belgians 128 

Swiss 30 

Italians 29 

Roumanians 58 

Syrians 11 

Germans 574 

Austro-Hungarians 2,472 

Hollanders 59 

Danes  (other  than  Icelanders) 84 

Icelanders 106 

Swedes 437 

Norwegians 433 

Russians  (other  than  Mennonites  and  Doukhobors) 722 

Mennonites 5 

Doukhobors 36 

Chinese 2 

Japanese 3 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Persians 9 

Australians S 

New  Zealanders 

Bermudians 3 

Servians -  1 

Portuguese 1 

Hindoos 1 


Total 30,424 

Representing  73,078  souls. 

Statement  showing  the  number  of  Homestead  Entries  made  during  the  fiscal  year 

ended  March  31,  1908,  by  persons  coming  from  the  various  States  and  Territories 
of  the  American  Union. 

States.                                                                                                     No.  of  Entries. 

Arizona 4 

Alabama 3 

Alaska 2 

Arkansas. 21 

California 06 

Carolina,  North 6 

Carolina,  South 2 

Colorado 30 

Columbia,  District  of 

Connecticut 8 

Dakota,  North 2,795 

Dakota,  South 445 

Delaware 4 

Florida 

Georgia 2 

Idaho 96 

Illinois 296 

Indiana 79 

Indian  Territory 6 

Iowa 460 

Kansas 115 

Kentucky 8 

Louisiana 2 

Maine 13 

Maryland 3 

Massachusetts 82 

Michigan 391 

Minnesota 1,543 

Mississippi 

Missouri : 119 

Montana 199 


xx  DEPARTMENT  OF  TEE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Nebraska 173 

Nevada 2 

New  Hampshire 10 

New  Jersey 9 

New  Mexico 1 

New  York 137 

Ohio 98 

Oklahoma 13S 

Oregon 91 

Pennsylvania 75 

Ehode  Island G 

Tennessee S 

Texas 22 

Utah 28 

Vermont 11 

Virginia 5 

Virginia,  West 14 

Wisconsin 3G4 

Wyoming 18 

Washington 315 

Total 8,328 

Statement  showing  the  number  of  Letters  Patent  issued  by  the  Department  of  the 

Interior  in  each  year  since  1874. 
Period.  Number  Issued. 

Tear  ended  October  31,  1874 536 

31,  1875 492 

31,  1876 375 

"               31,  1877 2,156 

"               31,  1878 2,597 

31,  1879 2,194 

31,  1880 1,704 

"                31,  1881 1,768 

31,  1882 2,766 

31,  1883 3,591 

31,  1884 3,837 

31,  1885 3,257 

31,  1886 4,570 

31,  1887 4,599 

"                31,  1888 3,275 

31,  1S89 3,282 

31,  1890 3,273 

31,  1891 2,449 

31,  1892 -. 2,955 

"                31,  1893 2,936 

31,  1894 2,553 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MIXISTER 
SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Tear  ended  December  31,  1S94 2  689 

31,  1895 2118 

31, 1896 ; ; ; ;  2;665 

"                       31,  1S97 2  972 

31-  1898 s'>m 

31,1899 3;904 

Six  months  ended  June  30,  1900 j  g-0 

Year  ended  June  30,  1901 g  ,i;, 

30,1902 '.'.".'.'.'.'  .■".'.■  .'.'  8,768 

30,  1903 -  ,iu 

3o,i9w 6;890 

30.  1905 S798 

30,  1906 1237o 

Nine  months  ended  March  31,  1907 10  596 

Year  ended  March  31,  1908 18690 


xxii  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

Statement  showing  the  number  of  Homestead  Entries  made  during  the  fiscal  year 
1907-8,  at  the  several  Dominion  Land  Agencies. 


Agencies. 


Battleford 

Brandon 

Calgary 

Dauphin 

Edmonton 

Estevan 

Humboldt 

Kamloops    

Lethbridge 

Moosejaw 

New  Westminster. 
Prince  Albert. . . 

Regina 

Red  Deer 

Winnipeg. 

Yorkton 


Total. 


1907-1908. 


4,535 

90 

1,278 

772 
4,055 

502 
2,493 

195 
2,456 
5,181 
42 
1,622 
1,653 
1,825 

886 
2,839 


30,424 


CORRESPONDENCE 


The  following  statement  shows  the  number  of  letters  received  and  sent  by  the 
department  in  each  year  since  its  establishment: — 


Departmental  Year  ended  October  31. 

Letters 
Received. 

Letters 
Sent. 

Total. 

1871    

1876                                    

3,482 

1,974 

2,255 

3.137 

4,642 

5,586 

8,222 

13,605 

25,500 

27,180 

27,525 

33,970 

611,964 

47,846 

43,407 

48,316 

36,200 

38,000 

41,990 

50,794 

48,619 

49,991 

47,501 

65,714 

88,913 

95,023 

121,219 

144,978 

167,200 

185,582 

222,316 

245,470 

407,794 

372,231 

543,647 

4,120 

2,1x9 

3,0'.  I? 

3,677 

6,009 

6,179 

9.910 

15,829 

30,31)0 

33.500 

33,386 

43,997 

67,973 

60,890 

52,298 

50,500 

36,008 

36,267 

42,203 

48,145 

50,840 

45,898 

44,238 

64,147 

87,845 

91,876 

133,177 

136,348 

185,548 

223,463 

274,675 

302.723 

529,465 

620,968 

1,106,772 

7,632 
4,163 
5,353 

1878 

6,814 
10,651 
11,755 
18.162 

29,434 

55,800 

1884                                                           

60,680 
60,911 

1885                    

77.967 

1886                                                               

128,937 

108,735 

95,705 

1895 

98,816 
72,208 
74,267 
84,193 
98,939 
99,459 
95,889 
91,739 
129,861 
176,758 

1S6.899 

254,396 

1901                                                    

281,326 

1902     .                                                        

352,748 

1903  (From  June  30,  1902,  to  July  1,  1903) 

409,045 

1904  (Prom  June  30   1S!03   to  Julv  1,  1904) 

496,991 

1905  (From  June  30   1904,  to  July  1,  1905)...           

548,193 

1906  (From  June  30,  1905,  to  July  1,  1906) 

1907  (From  June  30,  1906,  to  April  1,  1907) 

1908  (From  March  31,  1907,  to  April  1,  1908) 

937,259 

993,199 

1,650,419 

REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xxiii 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  number  of  registered  letters  during  the  departmental  year  ending  March  31, 
190S,  was:    received,  11,097;    sent,  36,770. 

HOMESTEAD  ENTRIES. 

As  will  be  seen  from  these  returns,  there  were  in  all  30,424  homestead  entries  made 
during  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31  last.  This  is  a  falling  off  of  7,364  as 
compared  with  the  corresponding  previous  year.  However,  it  is  still  surprisingly  large 
when  one  considers  that  for  the  previous  five  years  147,922  entries  were  granted,  or  an 
annual  average  of  29,584. 

The  acreage  of  the  land  taken  as  free  homesteads  during  the  past  year  was 
4,867,840  acres,  and  for  the  past  six  years  28,535,360  acres.  At  the  present  rate  of 
settlement,  vast  as  are  the  grain  areas  of  the  western  provinces  at  present  opened  to 
entry,  the  time  must  soon  come  when  it  will  be  necessary  to  direct  the  incoming  settler 
to  the  northern  parts  of  Alberta  and  Saskatchewan,  where  it  will  probably  be  found 
that  the  agricultural  possibilities  arc  in  no  way  inferior  to  those  of  the  regions  more 
to  the  south. 

It  is  interesting  to  note  that  of  the  30,424  entries  granted  last  year,  7,417  were 
made  by  Canadians,  7,818  by  Americans,  6,205  by  English,  Scotch  and  Irish,  and  510 
by  Canadians  returned  from  the  United  States,  or  21,950  in  all,  representing  a  popula- 
tion of  over  52,000  souls,  and  leaving  8,534  entries  made  by  other  nationalities  repre- 
senting a  population  of  about  21,000  souls. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  TUE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
Statement  of  Land  Sales  by  Railway  Companies  having:  Government 


Year. 

Hudson's  Bay 

(  lOMPANY. 

Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  Company. 

Manitoba  Km  tii    1,11   Aitiu.k,  Lom;  Lakk 

western  Colo-         and  Saskatchewan 

nization  Railway    Railroad  and  Steam 

Company.                boai  Company. 

I 

\rir-.        Amount. 

Acres. 

Amount. 

Acres, 

Amount. 

Acres.           Amount. 

L893. 

x 

93,184 
43,155 
55,453 
66,624 

135,681 
L'I2,1H.> 
261,832 

379,091 

339,985 

1,362,478 

2,260,722 

857.474 

411,451 

1,012,322 

851,083 
81,060 

295,288 

131,628 
176. '.150 
220,360 
431,095 
757,792 
814,857 

1,152,836 

1,040,665 

4,440,500 

S.  172.25(1 

3,516,864 

2,045,800 

6,015,000 

4,817.632 

727,367 

35,062,944 

14,164 
6,312 

5,623 
21,254 

63,800 
106,473 
58,019 

133,507 

59,749 
206.  Ill 
250,372 

2!  1.522 
80,342 
83,418 

3,051 
31,982 

1.15.S,99!i 

s 

57,559 
28,003 

22,330 

88.56S 

234,644 

363,982 

199,458 

437,449 

214,953 

713,365 

699,210 

113,303 
296,936 

360,889 

22,645 

153,007 

s 
1,603    

1S94 

7,526 

4.4X1 

9,299 

10,784 

62,000 

56,875 

70,196 

82,308 

269,577 

330,046 
144.S57 
139,721 
236,191 

69,158 
21,184 

48,220 
23,209 
52,410 
53,277 
310,000 
274,625 

352,631 

399,804 

1,412,332 

1.939,804 

879,910 

865,905 

1,863,375 

742,221 
267,215 

640 

2,391 

286 

2,524 

22,534 
01,030 

18,932 

22,266 

39,835 

843,900 

L895 

1896 

1  s'  1 7 

1898 

L899 

(Fiscal  Year) 
1900.. 

178,517 
53,974 

(Fiscal  Year) 
1901...  . 

74,810 

( Fiscal  Year) 

1902 

(Fiscal  Year) 

1903 

(Fiscal  Year) 
1901 

147,365 
1,476,900 

(Fiscal  Year) 

1905 

1  Fiscal  Year) 

1906 

(9  months  to 

March    31, 

1907), 
(Fiscal  Year) 
1  ill  IS  , 

1,353            16,789 

5,621              68,869 

Totals    ... 

1,514,153 

9,484,943 

8,453,730 

4.006,301 

1,022,915         2,017,224 

REPORT  OF  TEE  DEPUTY  MINISTER 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Land  Grants  and  by  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company. 


XXV 


cal3ary  anp               canadian 

Edmonton   Railway: Northern    Railway 
Company.                     Company. 

Great  Northwest 

Central 
Railway  Company. 

Totals. 

Average 

Per 
Acre. 

Acres. 

Amount. 

Acres. 

Amount. 

Acres. 

Amount. 

Acres. 

Amount. 

11,260 
11,035 
46  815 

8 

S 

s 

120,211 
6S.668 
114,713 
108,016 
222,225 
448,623 
462,494 

648,379 

'621,027 

2,201,795 

4,229,011 

1,267,187 

990,005 

1,642,6S4 

1,277,759 
341,072 

s 

352,847 
2117.856 
222,489 
301,338 
719,016 
1,431,774 
1,520,792 

2,125,146 

2,088,269 

7.746,958 

14,651,757 

5,564,240 

5,046,572 

9,871,241 

7,697,930 
2,985,992 

S    cts. 
2  93 

3  02 

1  94 

10,553 

9,436 

15,481 

24,73S 

3  23 

3  18 

53,335 
128,256 

352,037 
1,033,390 
909,600 
563,507 
512,898 
480,063 

346,061 
75,644 

3  28 

46,653 
116,719 
323,494 
231,800 
129,007 
100,191 

85,784 

59,515 
8,606 

3  27 

3  36 

3  56 

183,736 

64,469 

231,707 

204,966 

289,576 
196,946 

631,503 

313,575 

1,221,469 

1,014,351 

1,711,109 
1,716,504 

128,435 
41.S58 
17,593 
20,003 

4,023 
1,294 

522,490 
177,081 
103,564 
137,503 

41,470 

13,855 

3  46 

4  39 

5  09 

6  01 

6  02 

8  78 

1,240,087 

4,454,800 

1,171,400 

6,638,511 

213,206 

995,963 

14,763,869 

02,594,217 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


SALES. 


There  has  been  a  large  decrease  in  the  acreage  of  land  disposed  of  by  sale  during 
the  year  by  the  Hudson's  Bay  Company,  and  railway  companies  holding  government 
land  grants.  The  total  area  of  land  sold  during  the  fifteen  years  ending  March  31  last 
has  been  14,769,490  acres,  and  the  gross  amount  derived  therefrom  was  $62,663,086,  or 
an  average  of  $4.24  per  acre.  In  1893,  when  the  acreage  disposed  of  was  nearly  the 
same  as  during  the  past  year,  the  average  price  per  acre  was  $2.93,  whereas  the  average 
per  acre  for  the  latter  period  rose  to  $8.78,  or  an  increase  of  $5.85.  In  1893  only  a 
comparatively  small  proportion  of  these  companies'  lands  had  passed  into  private  hands, 
so  that  those  desirous  of  acquiring  lands  from  the  companies  at  that  time  were  favoured 
with  the  opportunity  of  selecting  the  choicest  sections  available  in  near  proximity  to 
the  lines  of  railway.  Xotwithstanding  this  fact,  there  was  then  such  a  depreciation 
in  the  value  of  real  estate  that  the  average  price  which  these  lands  commanded  was 
but  $2.93,  whereas  during  the  past  year,  with  nearly  one-half  of  the  entire  land  grants 
disposed  of,  the  average  price  was  $8.75,  or  over  three  times  as  large  as  in  1893. 

It  should  be  further  considered  that  the  large  reduction  in  the  total  acreage 
disposed  of,  as  compared  with  the  previous  year,  is  an  indication  that  the  high  advance 
in  the  price  per  acre  was  not  the  result  of  an  increased  demand  and  the  consequent 
abnormal  inflation  of  this  class  of  property,  but  that  land  value  in  the  western  pro- 
vinces is  on  a  sound  and  permanent  basis,  and  is  regulated  by  the  prosperous  condition 
of  the  country. 

IMMIGRATION. 

Comparative  statement  of  arrivals  at  inland  and  ocean  ports  during  the  twelve  years 

ending  March  31,  1908. 

ARRIVALS. 


Year. 

Great  Britain 

and 

Ireland. 

Other 
Countries. 

United  States. 

Total. 

1896-7  

11,383 
11,173 
10,660 
*     5.141 
11,810 
17,259 
41,792 
50,374 
6.-.,  359 
86,796 
55,791 
120,182 

7,921 
11,608 

21,938 
*   10,21 1 
19.352 
23.732 
37.099 
34,785 
37,255 
44,349 
34,217 
83,975 

2,412 
9,119 
11,945 
*     8,543 
17,987 
26,388 
49,473 
45,171 
43,652 
57,919 
34,659 
58,312 

21.716 

1S97-8  .                                                

31,900 

1899-1900 

1900-1 

44,543 
23,895 
49,149 

67,379 

1902  3 

128,364 

1903-4 

130.330 

1904  5     

1906-7  (nine  months  ending  March  31) 

1907-8  

146.266 
189,064 
124.667 
262,469 

487,720 

366,442 

365.580 

1,219,742 

*  Arrival's  for  six  months  only. 

The  report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration  will  be  found  under  Part  II.  of 
the  general  report. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xxvii 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

There  arrived  in  the  country  during  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31  last, 
262,469  immigrants,  which  is  an  increase  of  39,767  over  the  preceding  year.  It  is  the 
largest  immigration  in  any  one  year  in  the  history  of  Canada. 

During  the  decade  ending  1907-8  the  total  number  of  arrivals  was  1,166,126,  of 
which  819,213  came  from  Great  Britain,  Ireland  and  the  United  States,  and  the 
remainder,  or  356,913,  from  other  countries. 

This  tremendous  movement  of  people  is  more  than  one-sixth  of  the  total  population 
of  Canada,  according  to  the  census  of  1901.  And  if  the  present  population  of  the 
country  be  estimated  at  7,000,000,  the  immigration  during  the  past  twelve  months 
represents  over  one-twenty-sixth  of  such  population.  Never  in  the  history  of  the  United 
States,  where  during  the  past  century  there  was  witnessed  the  mightiest  immigration 
ever  recorded  in  the  annals  of  the  world,  even  when  the  movement  reached  its  highest 
tide,  did  there  come  in  from  outside,  during  any  given  space  of  time,  such  a  large 
immigration  as  flowed  into  Canada  since  the  advent  of  the  new  century,  proportionately 
to  its  population.  During  the  decade  ending  lt>30  there  arrived  into  the  United  States 
143,439  immigrants,  and  this  represented  one-seventy-eighth  of  the  average  population 
of  the  country  in  1820,  when  it  was  9,638,453,  and  in  1880,  sixty  years  afterwards, 
when  the  population  was  50,155,783,  there  arrived  457.257  immigrants,  which  repre- 
sented one-one  hundred  and  ninth  of  the  total  population,  and  even  in  1907,  when  the 
immigration  in  the  neighbouring  republic  had  passed  the  million  mark,  each  new-comer 
on  arrival  was  thrown  into  a  group  of  at  least  one  hundred  old  occupants  of  the  soil 
with  which  he  has  become  merged,  and  thus  the  absorption  of  this  large  influx  of  new 
comers  has  been  going  on  quietly.  An  eminent  American  economist  has  said,  after 
reviewing  the  movement  of  immigration  to  the  United  States  during  the  nineteenth 
century : — 

'  No  probability  can  bo  discerned  that  any  later  century  will  see  the  equal  of  this 
migration.  The  fairest  parts  of  the  world  that  were  wildernesses  in  1800  now  teem 
with  industry  and  population.  There  are  no  more  virgin  lands  in  abundance  to  occupy 
in  this  country;  no  more  such  enticements  to  draw  millions  from  the  homes  of  their 
fathers.' 

Judging  from  the  unprecedented  influx  of  population  to  Canada  during  the  past 
eight  years,  and  the  consequent  increase  in  agricultural  products  and  railroad  mileage, 
there  would  appear  to  be  a  strong  probability  discernible  that  the  twentieth  century 
will  see  a  migration  to  Canada  equal  to  that  witnessed  in  the  United  States  during  the 
last  half  of  the  century  just  closed.  There  still  remain  vast  areas  of  the  fairest  parts 
of  the  world  in  the  northern  half  of  the  American  continent  that  were  wildernesses  in 
1900  but  which  will  teem  with  industry  and  population  before  the  milestone  marking 
the  half  of  the  present  century  has  been  passed,  and  it  is  these  virgin  lands  that  are 
to-day  drawing  from  the  homes  of  their  fathers  the  hundreds  of  thousands  of  settlers 
who  are  arriving  in  Canada. 

The  same  conditions  which  induced  the  movement  of  population  to  the  United 
States  in  the  decade  1831  to  1840,  namely  the  construction  of  railroad  works  and  the 
opening  up  of  new  territory  for  settlement,  where  land  could  be  secured  cheaply,  while 

25— ci 


XXVU1  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
a  market  would  be  open  for  the  produce  raised,  are  presenting  themselves  to-day  in 
connection  with  the  opening  up  of  the  wheat  fields  of  the  western  provinces  and  the 
consequent  development  of  industrial  and  commercial  activity.  The  statistics  furnished 
by  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration  indicate  clearly  that  the  vast  majority  of 
arrivals  are  agriculturists  or  workers  who  have  found  it  to  their  advantage  to  move  to 
Canada  in  view  of  the  large  demand  for  labour.  Within  the  last  six  years  the  total 
immigration  to  Canada  has  been  1,097,6S9.  All  these  immigrants  were  carefully 
inspected  at  the  ports  of  landing,  and,  as  a  result  of  this  inspection,  3,294  were  refused 
admission.  The  remainder  were  allowed  to  enter  and  they  have  dispersed  throughout 
the  various  parts  of  Canada,  have  become  self-supporting,  and  are  now  adding  to  the 
common  wealth.  There  come,  it  is  true,  a  few  complaints  from  isolated  quarters  as  to 
the  inability  of  new-comers  to  provide  for  themselves,  but  such  cases,  compared  with 
the  hundreds  of  thousands  of  contented  and  successful  immigrants,  are  so  limited 
that  on  the  whole,  viewed  from  a  selfish  national  point  of  view,  our  immigration  has 
been  of  a  superior  class,  and  it  is  sincerely  to  be  hoped  that  for  a  long  time  yet  the 
same  predominating  elements  may  continue  to  be  added  to  our  nationality. 

BRITISH  IMMIGRATION. 

From  the  above  schedule  it  will  be  seen  that  during  the  past  twelve  years  there 
arrived  in  Canada  from  the  British  Isles  487,720  immigrants,  whose  nationalities  were 
declared  to  be  English,  Scotch,  Irish  and  Welsh.  Of  these,  376,502  came  during  the 
past  five  years,  262,769  during  the  past  three  years,  and  120,182  during  the  past 
twelve  months.  As  compared  with  the  total  British  arrivals  in  the  twelve  years,  more 
than  three-quarters  came  in  within  the  last  five  years,  considerably  more  than  one- 
half  within  the  last  three  years,  and  one-quarter  during  the  twelve  months  ending 
April  1,  1908.  It  will  thus  be  seen  that  in  so  far  as  the  quantity  of  this  particular 
class  of  immigration  is  concerned,  it  has  now  assumed  sufficiently  large  proportions  to 
satisfy  the  widely  expressed  desire  on  the  part  of  Canadians  throughout  the  old  and 
new  provinces  that  for  obvious  reasons  we  should  receive  a  fair  share  of  British  subjects 
emigrating  from  the  old  land.  Complaint  was  made,  however,  early  last  year  that 
sufficient  care  was  not  exercised  by  the  department  in  eliminating  from  prospective 
British  emigrants  such  of  them  as  were  not  possessed  of  the  necessary  means  to  enable 
them  to  become  self-supporting  on  arrival  here.  This  matter  engaged  your  serious 
attention  during  your  visit  to  England  last  year,  and  I  have  no  doubt  that  the  changes 
which  were  subsequently  made  in  the  regulations  governing  the  inspection  of 
immigrants  at  the  ports  of  sailing  will  have  the  desired  effect  in  this  regard. 

I  desire  to  add,  however,  that  in  my  opinion  there  were  scarcely  any  grounds  for  the 
uneasiness  manifested  as  to  the  large  proportion  of  undesirables  who  found  their  way  to 
Canada  from  the  British  Isles.  It  is  true  that  some,  otherwise  deserving  immigrants 
who  had  not  on  entering  Canada  the  necessary  means  to  permit  them  to  at  once  become 
self-supporting,  may  have  been  induced  to  come  through  the  injudicious  zeal  of  philan- 
thropic societies  engaged  in  this  class  of  work.  But  of  this  class  there  were  only 
few  as  compared  with  iho  hundreds  of  thousands  of  British  immigrants  who  have 
been  added  to  our  population.  When  ten  years  ago  there  arrived  from  England  ten 
or  twelve  thousand  immigrants,  there  may  have  been  a  comparatively  larger  number 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xxix 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

of  undesirables  than  to-day,  but  it  was  not  felt,  owing-  to  the  limited  number  of  tho 
total  arrivals.  According  to  the  report  of  the  chief  medical  inspector,  Dr.  Bryce, 
which  will  be  found  under  Part  II.  of  the  general  report,  after  a  rigid  inspection  at  the 
ports  of  landing,  1,002  immigrants  were  refused  entry,  out  of  which  112  were  British, 
or  about  one-ninth  of  the  total  exclusions,  although  British  arrivals  last  year  were 
nearly  one-half  of  the  total  immigration.  This  proportion  is  a  highly  satisfactory  one, 
and,  on  the  whole,  when  one  considers  the  strenuous  efforts  that  are  being  put  forth 
by  other  colonies  to  attract  British  settlers  to  their  shores,  from  a  national  point  of 
view  it  must  be  admitted  that  Canada  has  been  singularly  fortunate  in  this  respect. 
Our  immense  undeveloped  resources  certainly  justify  such  a  policy  of  selection  and 
exclusion  as  will  ensure  the  entry  into  Canada  of  the  choicest  immigration  possible, 
but  there  is  little  doubt  that  Australia,  South  Africa,  and  other  British  colonies,  which 
also  have  immense  undeveloped  resources,  would  gladly  bear  with  the  momentary 
inconvenience  caused  by  the  incoming,  within  less  than  half  a  decade,  of  376,502 
settlers  from  the  mother  country,  even  if  out  of  that  number  they  had  to  deport,  at 
the  expense  of  the  transportation  companies  bringing  them  in,  one  thousand  of 
undesirables  on  account  of  disease  or  other  causes. 

CONTINENTAL    IM MIGRATION. 

The  total  arrivals  during  the  year  from  European  and  other  foreign  countries 
amounted  to  83,975,  which'  was  an  increase  of  24,502  as  compared  with  the  previous 
twelve  months.  It  is  satisfactory  to  note  from  the  report  of  the  Commissioner  of 
Immigration  at  Winnipeg  that  the  vast  majority  of  continental  immigrants  who 
proceeded  direct  to  the  western  provinces  were  of  a  desirable  class,  and  that  they  have 
either  engaged  at  once  in  farm  work  or  secured  employment  on  railway  construction. 

It  will  be  observed  also  that  there  has  been  a  large  increase  in  the  number  of 
Austro-Hungarian  arrivals.  This  particular  current  of  immigration,  which  from  its 
inception  found  its  way  to  the  western  wheat  fields,  has  been  gradually  and  steadily 
increasing  during  the  past  decade.  Concurrently  with  the  increase  in  the  total  arrivals 
do  we  find  a  corresponding  increase  in  the  number  of  free  homesteads  taken  up  by 
them  during  each  successive  year.  It  is  worthy  of  notice  that  of  the  5,510  entries 
made  by  foreigners  last  year,  exclusive  of  Americans,  2,472  were  recorded  by  Austro- 
Hungarians.     Of  these  people,  the  Commissioner  of  Immigration  speaks  as  follows : — ■ 

'The  largest  number  of  Ruthenians  and  Poles  came  from  the  Austrian  provinces 
and  a  few  from  Bohemia  and  Russia.  Most  of  the  people  from  Austria  were  farmers 
and  went  immediately  to  homesteads.  The  majority  of  the  others  went  to  railway  con- 
struction work.  Quite  a  number  came  from  the  United  States,  nearly  all  of  whom 
entered  homesteads.' 

FRENCH  AND  BELGIAN   IMMIGRATION. 

There  has  again  been  an  increase  in  the  number  of  arrivals  from  France  during 
the  past  year.  In  fact,  it  has  been  the  largest  immigration  from  that  country  since 
1897,  when  reliable  statistics  were  first  obtained  by  the  department  in  this  relation. 
During  that  year  the  combined  French  and  Belgian  immigration  only  totalled  740 
arrivals,  whereas  during  the  past  twelve  months  it  was  3,885,  or  more  than  five  times 
as  large  as  in  1897. 


xxx  DEPARTUEST  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

Comparative  Statement  of  Immigrant  Arrivals  from  France  and  Belgium  during  the 
twelve  years  ending  March  31,  1908. 

Year.  France  and  Belgium. 

1897 740 

1898 545 

1899 413 

1900 483 

1901 492 

1902 645 

1903 1,240 

1904 (1,534)— 2,392— (    858) 

1905 (1,743)—  2,539—  (    796) 

1906 (1,648)— 2,754— (1,106) 

1907  (9  months) (1,314)— 1,964— (    650) 

190S    (to  March  31) (2,671)-3,SS5—  ( .1,214) 

Total  French  and  Belgian  immigration  from  1897  to  1902  (six  years),  3,318. 

Total  French  and  Belgian  immigration  from  1903  to  1908  (five  years  and  nine 
months),  14.774. 

Special  attention  is  called  to  the  report  submitted  by  Mr.  Paul  Winllard,  the 
agent  of  the  Canadian  government  in  France,  and  also  the  report  of  Mr.  D.  Treau 
de  Cceli,  the  Canadian  agent  at  Antwerp,  Belgium. 

Mr.  Arthur  Geoffrion,  advocate,  of  Montreal,  was  added  to  the  staff  of  the  Paris 
office  early  last  spring,  as  it  was  felt  that  Mr.  Wiallard  could  not,  consistently  with  the 
proper  administration  of  the  work  of  his  office,  devote  the  time  necessary  for  visiting 
the  rural  districts  and  disseminating  among  the  peasants  and  sons  of  agriculturists 
reliable  information  with  regard  to  Canada.  Mr.  Geoffrion  is  well  fitted  for  this 
special  class  of  work,  and  will  be  able  to  render  good  service. 

There  is  little  doubt  that  the  substantial  increase  within  the  past  few  years  in 
the  number  of  arrivals  from  France  has  been  due  directly  to  the  efforts  put  forth  by 
the  department  to  attract  this  very  desirable  class  of  settlers  to  Canada. 

Attention  is  also  called  specially  to  Mr.  De  Cceli's  report.  This  officer  has  been 
carrying  on  in  Belgium  a  most  effective  propaganda.  His  achievement  in  inducing 
2,380  schools  in  Belgium  to  introduce  in  their  curriculum  the  study  of  the  geography 
of  Canada  certainly  speaks  very  highly  for  the  effectiveness  of  his  work.  No  better 
means  could  possibly  be  devised  to  convey  to  the  minds  of  the  growing  population  of 
Belgium  reliable  information  as  to  the  advantages  offered  by  Canada  as  a  suitable 
field  for  settlement  and  the  investment  of  capital. 

IMMIGRATION  FROM  THE  UNITED  STATES. 

By  far  the  most  satisfactory  feature  of  the  immigration  of  1907-S  has  been  the 
unprecedented  number  of  arrivals  from  the  neighbouring  republic.  Mr.  W.  J.  White, 
inspector  of  agencies  in  the  United  States,  in  submitting  his  annual  report,  makes  the 
following  very  significant  remarks: — 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xxxi 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

'The  most  pleasing  feature  of  the  work  has  been  the  splendid  character  and 
quality  of  the  immigrants.  The  money  and  effects  brought  in  by  these  58,312  people 
was  in  the  neighbourhood  of  the  total  value  of  $52,000,000,  or  nearly  $1,000  per  head. 
This  has  been  added  to  the  money  wealth  of  Canada  in  one  year.  In  addition  to  its 
money  wealth  there  is  the  physical  wealth  which  these  people  bring.  Forty-eight 
thousand  of  those  arriving  took  up  homesteads;  most  of  the  balance  purchased  land 
and  went  into  farming,  a  life  that  90  per  cent  of  them  had  been  following  in  their 
old  homes.' 

These  figures  of  course  refer  to  the  total  membership  of  the  families  comprised 
in  the  8,000  odd  homestead  entries  made  by  settlers  from  the  United  States. 

JUVENILE  IMMIGRATION. 

The  report  of  Mr.  G.  Bogue  Smart,  chief  inspector  of  British  immigrant  children 
and  receiving  homes,  which  will  be  found  under  Part  II.  of  the  general  report,  contains 
much  valuable  information  upon  this  interesting  subject. 

It  is  estimated  that  since  this  class  of  emigration  was  inaugurated  in  1869,  or 
forty  years  ago,  60,000  British  children  have  been  sent  to  Canada.  The  work,  which 
is  a  purely  philanthropic  one,  is  conducted  under  the  immediate  supervision  of  the 
Home  and  Dominion  governments.  It  is  gratifying  to  note  that,  under  the  existing 
regulations,  the  emigration  of  each  child  is  subject  to  such  careful  inspection,  both 
at  the  ports  of  sailing  and  of  landing,  that  we  are  receiving  only  the  most  carefully 
selected  wards  of  the  state  homes  in  the  old  country.  It  is  significant,  as  pointed  out 
by  Mr.  Smart,  that,  although  during  the  past  seven  years  and  nine  months  there 
arrived  in  the  country  16,610  of  these  immigrant  children,  two  of  these  only  were 
formally  charged  with  offences  in  our  courts  during  the  past  year.  This  percentage 
compares  very  favourably  with  any  of  the  other  classes  of  our  population.  The  work 
of  general  supervision  and  inspection  would  appear  to  be  carried  on  in  the  most 
satisfactory  manner. 

SURVEYS. 

The  work  of  the  year  consists  of  6,123,040  acres  of  new  subdivision,  1,372,160 
acres  of  resurveys,  377  miles  of  base  lines  and  initial  meridians,  and  of  other  surveys 
of  a  miscellaneous  character. 

Sixty-three  parties  were  employed  on  the  survey  of  Dominion  lands.  Of  these, 
eleven  were  located  in  Manitoba,  fourteen  in  Saskatchewan,  twenty-five  in  Alberta, 
six  in  British  Columbia,  one  in  the  Northwest  Territory,  one  on  the  boundary  between 
British  Columbia  and  Yukon  Territory  and  five  part  of  the  time  in  one  province  and 
part  in  another.  Five  of  the  parties  were  engaged  part  of  the  time  in  the  examination 
of  the  surveys  made  under  contract. 


xxxii  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

The  following  table  shows  the  distribution  of  parties  paid  by  the  day  and  of  those 
working  under  contract: — 


B 

§"S  2 

-^ 

| 

o 

a 

<3 

3 

i«=H 

Parties. 

a 

d 

£ 

.L  a 

-^ 

Total. 

<5 
c 

a 

< 

-■z 

> 

h- 1 

O 

go.  a* 

6 

4 

13 

6 

1 

1 

2 

33 

5 

it 

10 

12 



3 

5 

30 

1 

1 

14 

25 

6 

<!3 

Two  hundred  and  twenty-three  whole  townships  and  eighteen  fractional  townships 
were  completely  subdivided,  while  126  townships  were  partially  subdivided.  Also  32 
whole  townships  and  one  fractional  township  were  completely  resurveyed,  while  131 
townships  were  partially  resurveyed. 

An  effort  is  being  made  to  extend  the  system  of  initial  meridians  and  base  lines, 
from  which  all  township  surveys  are  started,  so  as  to  be  ready  to  proceed  with  the 
subdivision  of  the  land  wherever  a  demand  may  arise.  These  lines  must  be  located 
with  the  greatest  care  and  accuracy;  as  they  run  through  difficult  country  and  are  far 
from  settlements,  they  are  very  expensive. 

In  comparing  data  of  this  report  with  the  surveys  report  of  the  former  year,  it  is 
to  be  observed  that  the  report  of  last  year  covered  a  period  of  only  nine  months,  while 
all  data  in  this  report  cover  a  period  of  twelve  months. 

The  statement  of  mileage  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908,  shows  21,191  miles 
surveyed;  the  number  of  parties  is  fifty-nine  as,  owing  to  the  nature  of  their  work, 
Messrs.  P.  A.  Carson,  P.  G.  Stewart,  W.  Thibaudeau  and  A.  O.  Wheeler  are  not 
included,  and  the  average  number  of  miles  per  party  is  364. 

The  amount  of  land  thrown  open  for  homesteading  during  the  past  year  was 
exceptionally  large  owing  to  the  rapid  settlement  of  the  western  provinces.  There 
were  many  requests  for  surveys  in  remote  districts,  especially  along  the  line  of  the 
Grand  Trunk  Pacific  railway  and  around  Lesser  Slave  lake. 

The  fifth  meridian  is  being  extended  northward  from  Lesser  Slave  river  to  Peace 
river  by  Mr.  A.  W.  Ponton,  with  a  view  to  the  establishment  of  the  base  lines  westerly 
to  the  sixth  meridian.  He  started  work  in  May,  1907,  and  is  about  half  way  through. 
This  survey  will  be  carried  out  until  the  line  reaches  Peace  river. 

The  sixth  meridian  was  produced  southerly  to  the  Yellowhead  pass  and  base  lines 
were  surveyed  westerly  from  the  fifth  meridian  towards  the  Rocky  mountains.  It 
is  the  intention  to  continue  this  work  until  all  the  base  lines  are  surveyed  to  the 
boundary  of  British  Columbia  or  to  the  foot  of  the  mountains  where  the  boundary  is 
the  summit  of  the  mountains. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  Xxxiii 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

A  few  base  lines  were  also  surveyed  in  Manitoba  at  the  southeast  end  of  Lake 
Winnipeg  and  near  the  narrows  of  Lake  Manitoba;  these  were  wanted  for  the 
immediate  subdivision   of  the  adjoining  land. 

Mr.  P.  A.  Carson  was  engaged  on  the  triangulation  of  the  railway  belt  in  British 
Columbia ;  his  survey  was  west  of  the  Beaverf oot  range.  This  work  is  for  the  purpose 
of  fixing  accurate  reference  points  from  which  subdivision  and  other  surveys  may  be 
started  or  to  which  they  may  be  connected. 

Mr.  A.  O.  Wheeler  continued  the  photo-topographical  survey  of  the  main  range  of 
the  Rocky  mountains  near  the  Canadian  Pacific  railway;  he  was  working  in  the 
valley  of  the  Columbia  river  and  along  Blaeberry,  Spillimacheen  and  Beaverfoot  rivers. 
The  connection  with  the  survey  of  the  Selkirk  range  is  nearly  complete  and  the  map 
is  well  advanced. 

Mr.  P.  G.  Stewart  explored  the  country  along  the  line  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific 
railway  west  of  Edmonton,  for  the  purpose  of  selecting  the  townships  which  are 
adapted  for  settlement  and  require  to  be  subdivided  immediately. 

Two  parties  were  employed  on  irrigation  surveys  in  Southern  Alberta,  under  the 
direction  of  the  Commissioner  of  Irrigation.  They  were  in  charge  of  Messrs.  P.  M. 
Sauder  and  K.  J.  Burley. 

An  investigation  of  the  water  powers  available  in  the  northwest  provinces  has 
been  commenced  and  it  is  expected  that  the  results  will  prove  of  great  value  to  the 
public.  Mr.  W.  Thibaudeau,  an  experienced  engineer,  has  been  placed  in  charge  of  the 
investigation.  He  began  with  a  preliminary  survey  of  the  Winnipeg  river,  the  inten- 
tion being  to  resume  the  work  another  year  and  to  make  a  more  exhaustive  investiga- 
tion. 

A  further  extension  of  the  Yukon-British  Columbia  boundary  was  made  by  Mr. 
J.  N.  Wallace,  the  part  of  the  line  located  being  across  the  Dalton  trail.  The  sixtieth 
parallel  of  north  latitude  is  the  boundary  and  its  position  has  to  be  determined  by 
astronomical  observations. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

Hereunder  is  the  usual  table  of  subdivision  or  settlement  survey  work  completed 
each  year  since  the  inception  of  the  surveys,  with  the  result  of  last  season's  operations 
added : — 


Period. 

Acres. 

Number 

of  Farms  of  160 

acres  each. 

1874 

4,792,292 

4,237,864 

665,000 

420,507 

231,691 

306,936 

1,130,482 

4.472,000 

8,147,000 

10,186,000 

27,234,000 

6,435,000 

391,680 

1.379,010 

643.71" 

1,131.810 

516,968 

817,075 

76,560 

1,395,200 

2,928,640 

300.240 

406,240 

506,560 

428,640 

859,840 

1,022,720 

735,480 

1,603,680 

2,553,120 

6,173,440 

12,709,600 

10,671,520 

4,973,920 

3,S19,700 

6,123,040 

29,952 

26,487 

4,156 

1875...             

1876           

1877   

1878 

2,628 
1,448 
1,918 

1879                                                                              

7,066 

1880...                                                                                

27,950 

1881 

50,919 

63,662 

170,212 

40,218 

1882 

ism;   . .                      

1884 ...                           

L885        

1886                               

2,  i48 

8,620 

1SS7                                                                                           

4.023 

1888      

1889...                                                                        

7.071 
3,231 

1890...                                                       

5,106 

1891 

1892   .                                                                                        

476 
8,720 

1893 

1894  

18,304 

1,876 

1895                                                                           

2,539 

1896    .                                                                                                       

3,166 

1897 

1898   

1899 

•-'.679 
5,374 
6,392 

1900  (first  6  months). . .               

4,596 

1900-1901 

10,023 

1901    19H2                                                                                     

15,957 

1'..  02  -1903. 

38,584 

1903-1904...                                                                        

79,435 

1904-1905. . .                                                                  

66,697 

1905-1906 

1906-1907  (9  months) 

1907-1908 

31,087 
23,873 
38,269 

130,427,195 

815,165 

INTERNATIONAL   BOUNDAEY    SURVEYS. 

The  operations  of  last  year  under  the  treaty  of  1906  consisted  primarily  in  the 
production  of  the  141st  meridian  of  west  longitude  southward  from  the  point  deter- 
mined by  astronomical  observation  on  the  Yukon  river,  and  the  selection  of  suitable 
points  on  the  line  for  the  permanent  monuments,  having  regard  to  the  intervisibility 
required  by  the  treaty.  The  line  was  laid  down  for  a  distance  of  130  miles  from  the 
Yukon.  Arrangements  have  been  made  for  the  placing  of  the  monuments  on  this, 
section  of  the  line  this  season.  Following  the  principal  line  party,  were  parties  engaged 
in  cutting  out  the  line  where  it  passes  through  woods,  and  in  making  a  topographical 
survey  of  the  country  adjacent  to  the  line.  The  general  management  of  the  field  work, 
on  the  part  of  Canada,  is  in  the  hands  of  ^Ir.  A.  J.  Brabazon,  D.L.S. 

The  demarcation  of  the  international  boundary  along  the  Alaska    'Coast  Strip' 
has  made  satisfactory  progress. 


REPORT  OF  TEE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xxxv 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Mr.  J.  D.  Craig,  D.L.S.,  was  instructed  to  determine  the  boundary  line  from.  1ft. 
Whipple,  which  lies  to  the  south  of  Stikine  river,  to  the  successive  boundary  peaks, 
southeasterly,  to  connect  with  the  surveys  already  made  near  Unuk  river.  He  entered 
this  region  by  way  of  Bradfield  inlet  and  Bradfield  river,  ascending  to  the  height  of 
land  between  this  river  and  Iskut  river,  a  tributary  of  the  Stikine.  He  found  that 
the  boundary  line,  as  defined  by  the  award  of  the  tribunal,  falls  into  the  valley  of  the 
Iskul,  to  which  it  was  impracticable  for  him  to  bring  his  party  from  the  Bradfield. 
It  was,  therefore,  necessary  to  leave  this  section  until  the  present  year,  when  Mr. 
Craig  will  approach  it  by  way  of  the  Stikine  and  Iskut  rivers.  Through  the  upsetting 
of  a  canoe  in  Bradfield  river,  some  of  his  topographic  photographs  were  lost.  This 
unfortunate  accident,  though  involving  considerable  expense  in  going  over  some  of  the 
ground  a  second  time,  does  not  seriously  affect  the  main  results  of  Mr.  Craig's  survey. 

Mr.  W.  F.  Ratz,  D.L.S.,  monumeutcd  the  line  at  the  crossing  of  Taku  and  Whiting- 
rivers,  and  conducted  a  topographic  survey  of  the  region  lying  between  Stikine  river 
and  Stephens  passage.  The  object  of  this  survey  was  to  determine  the  topography  of 
the  mountains  with  a  view  to  the  selection,  by  the  commissioners,  of  the  peaks  which 
the  boundary  line  shall  follow,  in  accordance  with  the  agreement  of  1905,  supple- 
mentary to  the  award  of  1903. 

This  region  is  a  very  difficult  one  to  traverse,  containing  many  high  mountain 
masses,  which  can  only  be  approached  over  the  glaciers,  there  being  hardly  any  water 
communication  into  the  interior. 

An  American  party  under  Mr.  Fremont  Morse,  who  was  accompanied  by  Mr.  D. 
H.  Nelles,  D.L.S.,  as  Canadian  representative,  made  a  triangulation  from  Glacier  bay, 
with  the  view  of  locating  the  boundary  line  along  the  summits  southwesterly  from 
the  vicinity  of  Klehini  river  to  the  Fairweather  range.  An  important  part  of  this 
survey  was  a  triangulation  to  determine  the  geographical  position  of  a  certain  peak, 
lying  among  the  glaciers  at  the  height  of  land  between  Glacier  bay  and  Alsek  river, 
which  was  required  for  the  determination  of  the  crossing  of  the  Alsek  river. 

Another  United  States  party  was  engaged  in  connecting  by  a  triangulation  the 
boundary  peaks  on  the  east  side  of  Lynn  canal. 

The  re-monumenting  of  the  19th  parallel  has  been  completed  west  from  the  Rocky 
mountains  to  the  straits  of  Georgia.  Inspection  of  the  accuracy  of  the  line  tracing 
and  the  setting  of  the  monuments  was  made  by  Messrs.  N.  J.  Ogilvie,  D.L.S.,  and  C. 
H.  Sinclair  of  the  United  States  Coast  Survey,  over  so  much  of  the  line  as  they  were 
able  to  reach  during  the  season.  The  part  from  Osoyoos  lake  to  the  straits  is  to  be 
inspected  this  season. 

A  general  inspection  of  the  line  was  made  by  Dr.  King  with  Messrs.  Tittmann 
and  Walcott,  the  United  States  commissioners. 

A  little  work  still  remains  to  be  done  to  complete  the  survey  of  this  section  of 
the  49th  parallel.  This  consists  in  the  completion  of  the  triangulation  in  the  western 
part  of  the  Cascade  mountains,  which  will  be  done  this  year. 


xxxvi  DEPARTMENT  VF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Mr.  J.  J.  McArthur,  who  has  field  charge  of  this  work  on  behalf  of  Canada,  has 
transferred  his  party  to  the  east  side  of  the  Rocky  mountains,  to  continue  the  resurvey 
of  the  49th  parallel. 

The  survey  of  the  boundary  line  between  the  province  of  Quebec  and  the  state  of 
Vermont,  under  Messrs.  G.  C.  Eainboth,  D.L.S.,  and  J.  B.  Baylor,  of  the  United  States 
Coast  and  Geodetic  Survey,  with  the  establishment  of  the  new  monuments,  has  been 
completed.  The  survey  this  season  will  be  transferred  to  the  north  line  from  the  source 
of  the  St.  Croix,  dividing  the  province  of  New  Brunswick  from  the  state  of  Vermont. 

The  survey  of  the  eastern  section  of  the  boundary  and  that  of  the  49  th  parallel 
have  hitherto  been  carried  on  under  agreements  between  the  governments.  By  a  treaty 
recently  entered  into,  provision  is  made  for  the  survey  and  monumenting  of  the  whole 
of  the  boundary  line  from  the  Atlantic  to  the  Pacific  ocean,  comprising,  besides  the 
above  mentioned  sections,  the  boundary  line  in  Passamaquoddy  bay,  along  St.  Croix 
river  to  its  source,  along  the  St.  Johns  river  and  the  Highlands  to  the  Connecticut 
river,  from  Lake  Superior  to  the  northwest  angle  of  Lake  of  the  Woods,  from  the 
49th  parallel,  through  the  straits  of  Georgia  and  Fuca  to  the  Pacific  ocean,  and  r.long 
the  St.  Lawrence  river  and  through  the  Great  Lakes  and  connecting  waters. 

Reconnaissance  for  the  geodetic  survey  has  now  extended  from  near  the  city  of 
Quebec  to  west  of  Toronto. 

Towers  have  been  erected  where  necessary  for  the  purposes  of  observation,  and  the 
observing  itself  has  been  actively  proceeded  with.  Lines  of  precise  levels,  necessary  as 
a  basis  for  the  vertical  co-ordinates  of  the  points  determined,  have  been  carried  on  along 
the  railway  lines. 

The  geographical  positions  of  five  points  in  Yukon  Territory  and  nine  in  eastern 
Canada  have  been  determined  by  the  field  observing  staff  of  the  observatory. 

Full  details  of  the  astronomical,  astrophysical,  seismological  and  other  work  of 
the  observatory  will  be  found  in  the  report  of  the  Chief  Astronomer  and  Boundary 
Commissioner. 

NATIONAL  PARKS. 

The  Dominion  parks  were  all,  in  the  latter  part  of  the  year,  placed  in  charge  of 
the  Forestry  Branch,  and  Mr.  Howard  Douglas,  Superintendent  of  the  Rocky  Mountains 
park,  was  appointed  to  have  general  oversight  of  them  with  the  title  of  Commissioner 
of  Dominion  Parks. 

These  parks  are  now  six  in  number,  comprising  the  Rocky  Mountains  park,  Voho 
park  and  Glacier  park  on  the  main  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  Jasper  park 
on  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway,  where  it  ci'osses  the  Rocky  mountains.  Elk  Island 
park,  near  Edmonton,  and  Buffalo  park,  on  the  Battle  river  near  Wainwright.  These 
parks  comprise  a  total  area  of  15,500  square  miles,  or  9,920,000  acres,  the  largest  being 
Jasper  park,  with  an  approximate  area  of  5,450  square  miles. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xxxvii 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  mountain  parks  include  some  of  the  grandest  of  the  beautiful  mountain 
^scenery  of  the  Rockies  and  Selkirks,  and  the  large  and  increasing  number  of  people 
resorting  to  those  which  are  accessible  demonstrates  that  they  are  a  public  necessity 
and  that  the  policy  of  thus  retaining  for  the  use  of  the  public  in  general  opportunities 
for  delightful  and  healthful  outdoor  recreation  is  fully  justified.  The  number  of 
visitors  at  the  Rocky  Mountains  park  increased  from  10,696  in  1893  to  32,209  for  last 
year.  And  with  the  increase  of  visitors  has  come  an  increase  of  revenue  from 
$6,143.08  in  1903  to  $25,586.43  in  1908.  .  It  may  be  expected  that  in  time  these  parks 
will  become  entirely  self-supporting. 

Buffalo  park  was  established  to  provide  for  the  herd  of  buffalo  purchased  from  Mr. 
Pablo,  of  Montana,  and  which  have  been  temporarily  placed  in  Elk  Island  park.  Three 
hundred  and  thirteen  head  were  placed  in  the  latter  park  and  will  be  transferred  to 
Buffalo  park  next  year,  it  having  been  completely  fenced  and  made  ready  for  occupa- 
tion. There  are  still  some  300  head  to  be  shipped  from  Montana  and  it  is  hoped  before 
the  end  of  another  year  to  have  them  all  safely  in  Buffalo  park.  The  Dominion  is  to 
be  congratulated  on  having  thus  secured  the  last  great  herd  of  buffalo  in  existence. 

FORESTRY. 

The  report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Forestry  for  the  year  ending  March  31  last, 
will  be  found  under  Part  VII.  of  the  general  report. 

It  has  besn  found  advisable  to  place  under  the  immediate  control  of  the  superin- 
tendent of  forestry  the  work  in  connection  with  irrigation  and  the  administration  of 
parks,  as  it  was  felt  that  these  services  are  closely  connected  with  the  preservation  of 
forest  areas,  and  there  is  no  doubt  that  under  the  present  arrangement  the  Forestry 
Branch,  which  has  become  one  of  very  great  importance  from  a  public  point  of  view, 
will  be  in  a  position  to  devote  to  the  work  coming  within  its  purview  the  careful 
attention  which  it  deserves. 

Mr.  Campbell,  who  has  been  placed  in  charge  of  the  branch,  has  devoted  con- 
siderable time  to  both  forestry  and  irrigation,  and  he  is  in  every  way  specially  qualified 
to  efficiently  discharge  the  duties  now  entrusted  to  his  care. 

From  the  various  statements  submitted,  it  will  be  observed  that  considerable 
progress  is  being  made  by  the  department  in  having  the  permanent  forest  reserves 
carefully  examined  with  a  view  to  ascertaining  the  existing  conditions  and  taking- 
such  steps  as  may  be  necessary  to  properly  protect  the  timber  growing  thereon. 

It  is  satisfactory  to  note  that  there  has  been  a  growing  demand  in  the  west  on 
the  part  of  actual  settlers  for  a  supply  of  trees  from  the  nursery  station  at  Indian 
Head,  and  that  the  efforts  of  the  department  within  the  last  few  years  to  encourage 
Tree-planting  have  proved  highly  satisfactory. 

SCHOOL    LANDS. 

In  view  of  the  very  satisfactory  result  of  the  auction  sale  held  in  Manitoba  during 
the  autumn  of  1906  it  was  decided  to  hold  another  series  of  sales  in  that  province  in 


xxxviii  DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
the  spring  of  1907,  for  which  purpose  the  lands  had  previously  been  inspected  aud 
valued. 

The  sales  were  held  at  twelve  different  points  in  the  province,  which  were  so 
selected  as  to  be  within  a  convenient  distance  of  the  lands  offered,  the  sales  beginning 
at  Pilot  Mound  on  May  28,  and  ending  at  Winnipeg  on  June  28. 

The  result  was  most  satisfactory,  86,511-50  acres  being  sold  for  $902,624.71,  or 
an  average  price  of  $10.43  per  acre.  Further  details  of  the  sales,  showing  the  acreage 
sold,  the  amount  realized,  and  the  average  price  per  acre  at  each  point  of  sale,  will  be 
found  in  the  report  of  the  chief  clerk  of  the  School  Lands  Branch. 

While  it  was  not  considered  advisable  to  hold  general  auction  sales  of  school  lands 
in  the  following  autumn,  it  was  decided  in  view  of  the  number  of  applications 
received  for  school  lands  in  that  vicinity  to  hold  sales  at  Rossburn  and  Russell  in  the 
western  part  of  the  province. 

Sales  were  accordingly  held  at  these  points  on  November  5  and  7,  1907,  and 
16,250-20  acres  were  sold  for  $160,533.27,  or  an  average  of  $9.88  per  acre. 

It  had  been  arranged  to  hold  a  sale  at  several  points  in  the  province  of  Saskatche- 
wan during  the  autumn  of  1907,  but  owing  to  the  comparatively  poor  harvest,  and 
the  general  financial  stringency,  it  was  found  advisable  to  postpone  tbem.  A  number 
of  small  parcels  were,  however,  disposed  of  for  school  sites,  and  a  number  sold  to 
railway  companies  under  the  Railway  Act  for  right-of-way,  station  grounds,  and  other 
purposes. 

Two  parcels  applied  for  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  were  also 
offered  at  public  auction  so  as  to  afford  them  an  opportunity  of  acquiring  them,  on 
the  condition  that  the  company  should  pay  half  the  expenses  of  the  sale,  namely, 
section  11,  in  township  25,  range  5,  west  of  the  3rd  meridian,  and  the  northeast  quarter 
of  section  29,  in  township  39,  range  27,  west  of  the  3rd  meridian. 

The  sales  took  place  in  October,  1907,  the  first  parcel  mentioned  being  sold  for 
$13,200,  or  an  average  of  $20.62  per  acre,  and  the  latter  for  $25  per  acre,  half  the 
expenses  of  the  sale  being  paid  as  agreed  upon  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
Company. 

Auction  sales  were  also  held  in  the  province  of  Alberta,  at  Calgary  and  Cardston, 
on  November  13  and  14,  1907,  respectively,  4,779-52  acres  being  sold  at  the  former 
point  for  $41,106.69,  or  an  average  price  of  $8.06  per  acre,  and  at  the  latter  point 
5,261-33  acres  for  $55,958,  or  an  average  price  of  $10.62  per  acre. 

The  total  area  sold  during  the  fiscal  year  in  the  three  provinces  of  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  was  114,712  07  acres  for  $1,192,615.85,  or  an  average  price 
of  $10.40  per  acre. 

There  has  been  a  strong  demand  for  leases  for  grazing  purposes,  411  leases  having 
been  issued  during  the  past  fiscal  year. 


REPORT  OF  THE  DEPUTY  MINISTER  xxxix 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  revenue  from  this  source  is  $21,123.32,  and  the  revenue  from  coal  leases  for 
the  same  period  is  $1,463.84. 

The  total  gross  revenue  from  school  lands  for  the  fiscal  year  was  $709,074.08,  and 
the  net  revenue  $703,692.99. 

The  revenue  would  have  been  even  larger  had  it  not  been  for  the  financial 
stringency  and  the  comparatively  poor  harvest,  owing  to  which  the  number  of  auction 
sales  held  was  not  as  large  as  it  woidd  otherwise  have  been. 

The  statement  accompanying  the  report  of  the  chief  clerk  of  school  lands  shows 
balances  to  the  credit  of  the  three  school  lands  funds  on  March  31,  1908,  to  be  as 
follows : — 

Manitoba $1,935,791  84 

Saskatchewan 736,703  75 

Alberta 369,763  43 

THE  YUKON  TERRITORY. 

The  report  of  the  Commissioner  of  the  Yukon  Territory,  Mr.  Alexander  Henderson, 
and  of  the  other  Yukon  officials  who  are  in  charge  of  the  several  branches  of  the 
administration  of  that  Territory,  will  be  found  in  Part  Xo.  YI.  of  the  general  report. 

These  reports  would  appear  to  indicate  that  the  spirit  of  optimism  which  has 
hitherto  prevailed  still  exists  among  the  people  of  the  Territory.  It  would  appear  that 
former  methods  of  mining  have  to  a  large  extent  been  abandoned,  and  the  principles 
of  co-operation  are  being  successfully  applied  to  the  gold  industry.  Mining  claims 
which  heretofore  were  operated  separately  by  comparatively  crude  methods  have  been 
grouped  for  operation  on  a  large  scale  by  one  plant,  thus  materially  reducing  the  cost 
of  production.  Dredges  of  the  largest  type  and  most  modern  equipment  appear  to  have 
been  installed  and  are  being  operated  with  marked  success.  Hydraulic  mining  plants 
seem  to  be  in  full  operation  in  different  parts  of  the  Territory,  and  a  system  of  electric 
elevators,  which  appear  to  have  been  first  introduced  as  an  experiment,  have  proved 
to  be  highly  successful.  This  new  system  of  winning  the  gold  is  likely  to  prove  a 
most  valuable  auxiliary  to  the  recognized  dredging  and  hydraulic  methods,  the  efficiency 
of  which  has  already  been  abundantly  proved. 

With  the  introduction  of  a  hydro-electric  transmission  plant  by  the  Yukon  Gold 
Company  for  the  operation  of  their  dredges,  elevators  and  other  works  they  would 
appear  to  have  overcome  the  obstacle  hitherto  encountered  in  the  high  cost  of  fuel  for 
operation,  and  the  completion  of  their  extensive  water  system  and  of  the  reservoir  on 
Bonanza  creek  will  apparently  command  the  pay  gravels  over  a  very  considerable 
area,  and  will  as  a  result  materially  increase  the  gold  output  of  the  Territory. 

It  will  be  noted  with  satisfaction  that  the  coal  production  of  the  Territory  during 
the  year  was  over  12,000  tons,  which,  with  the  introduction  of  electric  energy  as  a 
motive  power,  should  very  materially  lessen  the  hitherto  large  consumption  of  wood 
for  fuel  purposes. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

W.  W.  CORY, 

Deputy  of  the  Minister  of  the  Interior. 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


PAET    I. 


DOMINION    LANDS. 


25— i— 1 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 

DOMINION    LANDS. 

No.  1. 
EEPOET  OF  THE  COMMISSIONER  OF  DOMINION  LANDS. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  Office, 
TV.  W.  Cory,  Esq.,  Ottawa,  April  1,  1908. 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  beg  to  submit  ury  report  for  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1908,  on 
the  Dominion  Lands  Branch  of  this  department,  together  with  the  reports  of  the 
Inspector  of  Dominion  Land  Agencies  and  the  agents  of  Dominion  Lands  for  the 
several  districts. 

A  summary  statement  has  been  prepared  of  the  work  transacted  during  the  period 
mentioned  as  compared  with  the  corresponding  twelve  months  during  the  previous 
year. 

statement  of  work  for  twelve  months  ending  march  31,  1908. 

1907.  1908. 

Number  of  files  dealt  with 152,739  147,794 

Letters  written 119,235  125,430 

Triplicates 77,305  80,014 

Total  letters 196,540  205,444 

Applications  for  patent : — 

Number  examined 18,759  27,557 

New  applications 13,153  15,269 

Certificates  issued 12,415  15,215 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

J.  W.  GREENWAY, 
Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands. 

No.  2. 

REPORT  OF  THE  INSPECTOR  OF  AGENCIES. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Office  of  Inspector  of  Dominion  Land  Agencies, 
J.  W.  Green  way.  Esq.,  Brandon,  Manitoba,  July  14,  1908. 

Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — Permit  me  to  submit  my  report  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 
Allow  me  to  say  that  the  past  year  has  been  marked  by  a  check  in  the  general  and 
increasing  progress  and  development  which  have  characterized  recent  years  for  nearly 
a  decade. 

The  spring  of  1907  was  unusually  late  in  the  three  prairie  provinces,  delaying 
seeding  operations  beyond  dates  that  had  any  precedent,  and  consequently  jeopardizing 
crop  prospects. 
25— i— 1J 


4  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

Harvest  was  correspondingly  late,  and  while  crops  grew  rank  and  strong  in  con- 
siderable areas  of  the  country,  owing  to  late  maturing,  they  suffered  by  frost.  The 
high  prices  prevailing  for  grain  aided  to  some  extent  in  making  up  to  the  country 
the  loss  occasioned  by  frost,  hut  the  individual  losers  were  considerably  inconvenienced, 
many  settlers  being  left  without  seed  for  the  present  year's  sowing,  or,  having  the 
.means  with  which  to  secure  it,  satisfactory  seed  not  being  within  their  reach. 

To  meet  this  unhappy  situation  which  prevailed  almost  entirely  in  Saskatchewan 
"and  Alberta,  the  Dominion  government  and  the  governments  of  the  provinces  men- 
tioned, acting  conjointly,  supplied  seed  to  such  applicants  as  were  unable  to  secure  it. 
I  was  assigned  the  duty  of  making  the  distribution  of  seed  necessary  and  taking  the 
securities  required.  This  work  involved  receiving  and  considering  16,615  applications 
and  delivering  upwards  of  1,500,000  bushels  of  seed  wheat,  oats  and  barley  at  250 
railway  stations  in  over  30,000  consignments,  with  as  many  securities  and  settlements 
to  be  taken. 

This  work  has  very  fully  occupied  my  time  since  January  1  to  the  present.  I 
opened  offices  in  Regina  in  the  handling  of  this  work  and  a  large  staff  was  necessary 
to  cope  with  the  work. 

HOMESTEAD   ENTRIES. 

From  the  statement  of  homestead  entries  made  last  year  it  will  be  observed  there 
has  been  quite  a  falling  off  from  the  year  preceding.  Unfavourable  climatic  condi- 
tions in  the  spring  of  1907,  together  with  general  business  and  financial  depression 
prevailing,  were  doubtless  contributing  causes. 

SUB-LAND    OFFICES. 

In  the  past  year  it  has  been  deemed  advisable  to  close  the  sub-land  offices  at 
Pincher  Creek  and  Bowden.  Alberta,  and  Ranehvale,  Manitoba. 

New  offices  were  opened  at  Etiomami,  Sheho  and  Gull  Lake,  Saskatchewan;  Ma- 
kinak,  Manitoba;  Sedgewick  and  Lesser  Slave  Lake,  Alberta;  and  Revelstoke.  British 
Columbia,  the  total  number  now  being  sixty-five. 

INSPECTION  OF  OFFICES. 

My  formal  inspections  of  offices  have  been  made  and  reported  to  you  from  time  to 
time,  as  they  were  made.  From  the  regular  '  returns  of  work '  from  all  land  agents, 
sub-agents  and  homestead  inspectors  and  from  constant  travelling  about  among  the 
different  agencies,  I  am  able  to  keep  a  close  supervision  of  all  the  work  and  generally 
to  aid  in  the  inspection  of  it.  In  this  connection  I  desire  to  note  the  general  pro- 
ficiency of  Dominion  Lands  officials  in  the  west  and  the  interest  and  care  taken  in 
their  work. 

During  the  year  I  have  travelled  by  rail  46,725  miles;  by  boat  1,300  miles  and  by 
team  480  miles,  making  a  total  of  48,505  miles  covered. 

INSPECTION  OF  BANFF,  YOHO  AND  BANFF  PARK  RESERVATIONS. 

In  addition  to  the  duties  of  Inspector  of  Dominion  Land  Agencies  I  have  kept 
•up  the  inspection  of  the  Banff,  Yoho  and  Rocky  Mountains  Parks,  carefully  noting 
the  work  being  done  and  checking  the  books  and  records  in  connection  with  the  same. 

The  reports  of  my  inspections  have  been  duly  forwarded  to  the  department,  and 
I  need  only  add  that  I  have  found  the  work  generally  in  very  good  shape. 

STATEMENTS  ATTACHED. 

Herewith  please  find  statements  attached,  as  follows : — 
'  A '  Dominion  Lands  agencies,  principal  transactions. 
'B'  Dominion  Lands   sub-agencies,   principal   transactions. 
'  C '  Homestead  inspectors,  principal  work  performed. 
I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

R.  E.  A.  LEECH, 
Inspector  of  Dominion  Land  Agencies. 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


DOM IX ION  LANDS 


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10  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.  3. 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  BATTLEFORD. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 
Dominion  Lands  Office, 

Battleford,  Saskatchewan,  April  4,  190S. 

The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  annual  report  of  this  office  for  the  year 
ending  March  31,  1908. 

Last  summer,  preceded  by  the  severe  and  long  winter  of  1906-7,  was  unfavourable 
for  farming  operations,  and  consequently  the  crops  failed  to  properly  ripen  in  several 
parts  of  the  district.  This  caused  a  scarcity  of  seed  of  sufficiently  good  quality,  but 
it  was  again  remedied  by  the  timely  action  of  the  government  in  the  matter. 

The  past  winter  has  been  unusually  mild,  with  very  little  snow  up  to  March  1, 
so  that  the  settlers  were  saved  from  the  fuel  troubles  of  the  previous  winter. 

The  road  bed  for  both  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  and  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
passing  through  the  southern  portion  of  this  district  is  now  ready  for  the  steel,  and  it 
is  expected  that  regular  railway  service  will  be  inaugurated  on  these  two  lines  before 
the  snow  flies. 

The  spring  rush  of  settlers  has  already  commenced,  and  judging  from  this,  as  well 
as  from  inquiries  received,  there  is  all  the  appearance  of  a  very  heavy  immigration 
during  the  coming  season. 

Following  is  a  statement  of  the  work  performed  during  the  past  year : — 

Homestead  entries  granted 4,543 

Homestead  entries  cancelled 2,381 

Land  scrips  located  (acres) 10,840 

Timber  permits  issued 243 

Hay  permits  issued 150 

Applications  for  patent  recommended 952 

Letters  received 46,253 

Letters  written 31,031 

Total  revenue $62,634.79 

I  also  enclose  a  detailed  statement  showing  the  revenue  on  account  of  coal  and 
minerals  collected  at   this  agency. 

Your  obedient  servant. 

L.  P.  O.  NOEL, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  11 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


No.  4. 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  BRANDON. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  Office, 

Brandon,  Manitoba,  April  14,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — In  submitting  the  annual  report  for  the  year  ending  March  31  last,  I  beg  to 
say  that  from  the  present  outlook,  there  is  every  prospect  of  a  good  crop  with  an 
increased  area  under  cultivation  in  this  district.  The  spring  has  been  most  favourable 
and  the  farmers  are  busy  seeding.  Yearly,  the  farmers  learn  the  advantages  of  mixed 
farming  and  do  not  now  depend  upon  their  wheat  as  formerly;  this  has  the  result  of 
their  bringing  as  much  under  cultivation  as  possible  and  of  their  having  ready  money 
[the  year  through.  The  demand  to  purchase  has  not  been  as  large  as  in  the  past  two 
seasons,  owing  to  the  stringency  in  the  money  market,  which,  however,  has  not  been 
felt  here  as  much  as  in  the  eastern  provinces  and  is  now  gradually  passing  away  and 
the  situation  is  becoming  normal  again.  Before  the  season  has  passed  a  great  deal  of 
xeal  estate  will  have  changed  hands. 

Immigration  has  opened  up  and  people  from  all  parts  of  the  eastern  world  are 
coming  west  to  find  homes  and  for  the  investment  of  their  moneys.  The  class  of 
people  keeps  improving  and  we  are  now  getting  settlers  who  will  further  the  interests 
of  the  country.  The  farmers  in  this  vicinity  are  making  applications  for  experienced 
|farm  hands,  but  the  supply  does  not  equal  the  demand,  very  few  applications  being 
received  for  work. 

There  are  no  lands  left  in  this  agency  suitable  for  homesteading,  the  vacant  ones 
consisting  of  a  few  scattered  quarter  sections  which  have  been  left,  being  inferior  and 
not  worth  the  taking  up.  Intending  settlers  are  being  sent  west.  The  cancellations 
grow  less,  as  the  homesteaders,  who  are  fortunate  enough  to  secure  land  within  a  well 
settled  part,  fulfill  their  duties  promptly  and  obtain  their  patents. 

The  following  is  a  statement  of  the  work  performed  for  the  past  twelve  months, 
ending  31st  ultimo  : — 

Homestead  entries  cancelled 88 

Applications  for  patent  received 378 

Cancellation  of  entries 70 

Letters  received 7,474 

Letters  sent 5,970 

Your  obedient  servant, 

L.  J.  CLEMENT, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


12  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.  5. 

EEPOET  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  CALGAKY. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office.. 

Calgary,  Alberta,  April  25,  1908. 

Tho  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir. — I  have  the  honour  to  report  on  the  business  transactions  of  this  office  during 
ttie  fiscal  year  ending  March  31  last,  as  follows : — 

The  number  of  homesteads  granted,  1,280,  although  an  increase  of  307  over  the 
number  granted  in  the  period  covering  the  nine  months  previous,  is  still  226  short  of 
the  number  granted  in  the  corresponding  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1907,  but, 
Itaking  into  consideration  the  fact  that  no  new  lines  of  railway  have  been  opened  up 
since  that  time,  this  decrease  cannot  be  considered  seriously  and  was  to  be  expected. 

There  appears  to  be  no  abatement  of  the  anxiety  of  incoming  settlers  to  secure 
homesteads,  and  their  attention  is  now  being  directed  towards  the  north-easterly  part 
of  the  district,  in  which  a  large  number  of  homesteads  are  yet  available  and  through 
which  it  is  expected  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  and  Canadian  Northern  Railway  Com- 
panies will  have  branch  lines  in  operation  in  the  next  eighteen  months  or  two  years. 

The  revenue  derived  from  the  disposal  of  Dominion  lands  is  $37,210.12,  which  is 
an  increase  of  $9,294.99  over  the  amount  collected  during  the  period  covering  the 
nine  months  previous. 

The  revenue  collected  under  Timber,  Grazing  and  Irrigation  is  $17,232.36  and 
that  collected  under  the  heading  of  Mines  is  $13,299.91. 

These  returns  cannot  be  compared  separately,  as  the  revenue  collected  under  these 
two  headings  was  shown  collectively  under  the  heading  of  '  Timber  and  Mines '  last 
year,  but  comparing  them  collectively  after  adding  the  amount  collected  under  the 
heading  of  '  School  Lands'  (which  was  done  last  year)  there  appears  to  be  a  decrease 
of  $1,861.27  between  the  total  of  these  returns  and  the  total  collected  under  the  head- 
ing of  '  Timber  and  Mines '  for  the  nine  months  previous.  This  decrease  is  easily 
explained  and  is  caused  by  the  difference  in  the  amounts  shown  as  collected  from  the 
sales  of  coal  rights  which  have  been  discontinued  since  March  4,  1907. 

During  the  year  34,801  letters  were  received  and  29,164  written;  also  1,498  appli- 
cations for  patents  were  recommended. 

The  past  winter  has  been  very  mild  and  was  a  very  easy  one  on  farmers  and 
ranchers,  as  the  stock  was  able  to  graze  nearly  all  winter  and  very  little  feeding  was 
necessary,  which  will  be  of  material  assistance  to  the  settlers  in  recovering  from  the 
losses  sustained  in  the  extremely  hard  winter  of  1906  and  1907. 

Owing  to  the  mildness  of  the  weather  no  shortage  of  fuel  was  experienced,  and 
in  any  event  every  possible  precaution  was  taken  to  avert  a  famine  of  fuel  such  as 
was  experienced  during  the  previous  winter. 

Spring  opened  very  early  and  seeding  is  well  advanced  at  this  date.  Quite  a  large 
number  have  availed  themselves  of  the  assistance  extended  to  them  by  the  govern- 
ment in  the  matter  of  seed  grain,  and  satisfaction  is  being  expressed  both  as  to  the 
quality  of  the  seed  supplied  and  also  as  to  the  action  of  the  government  in  furnishing 
such  supply,  which  was  urgently  required  in  some  localities  owing  to  the  damage  done 
to  last  year's  crop. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  13 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

This  part  of  the  province  at  least  appears  to  be  recovering  rapidly  from  the  wave 
of  financial  stringency  which  has  been  experienced  more  or  less  through  the  whole 
Dominion,  and  wholesale  houses  inform  me  that  business  is  as  good  as  in  the  past 
years  and  will  within  the  near  future  be  on  a  sounder  basis  than  ever  before;  also,  I 
am  assured  by  bank  managers  that  there  will  be  no  shortage  of  funds  for  legitimate 
business  purposes. 

I  am  forwarding  by  mail  of  even  date  under  separate  cover : — 

Schedule  '  A '  showing  revenue  on  account  of  timber,  grazing  and  hay  on  Dom- 
inion lands. 

Schedule  'B  '  showing  operations  of  saw-mills  under  government  license. 

Schedule  '  C  '  showing  revenue  collected  on  account  of  mines  and  minerals. 

Schedule  '  D '  showing  revenue  collected  on  account  of  school  lands. 

Attached  to  schedule  '  B '  you  will  find  a  summary  showing  the  amount  of  sales 
of  timber  manufactured  during  the  year,  the  royalty  thereon  and  the  average  price 
at  which  sold. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

E.  B.  MATHESON, 
Acting  Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


14  DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.  6. 

REPORT  OF  THE  A3ENT  AT  DAUPHIN. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  Office, 

Dauphin,  Manitoba,  March  31,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  report  on  the  Dauphin  lauds 
district,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  this  day. 

Conditions  during  the  past  year  have  on  the  whole  been  very  favourable,  though 
owing  to  the  exceptionally  late  spring  of  1907,  which  delayed  seeding  to  a  very  marked 
extent,  some  portions  of  the  district  were  not  quite  as  fortunate  as  in  former  years; 
but  even  in  these  parts,  the  good  prices  obtained  for  such  grains  as  could  be  marketed 
early  compensated  for  any  shortage  in  yield.  Prices  have  dropped  somewhat  of  late, 
for  all  but  the  high  grades,  but  as  most  of  the  grain  has  already  been  disposed  of  this 
will  not  materially  affect  conditions.  Owing  to  the  many  points  and  routes  open  for 
shipment,  I  am  unable  to  arrive  at  an  estimate,  but  would  believe  it  to  be  largely  in 
excess  of  any  former  season. 

Stock,  in  both  horses  and  horned  cattle,  is  increasing  rapidly,  and  a  very  marked 
improvement  is  met  with,  owing  to  the  importation  of  better  sires,  and  the  establish- 
ment of  several  creameries  has  given  an  incentive  to  settlers  to  go  further  into  mixed 
farming.  This  will  without  doubt  result  in  great  gain  to  the  country.  All  varieties 
of  stock  have  wintered  well,  and  though  it  was  feared  at  one  time  that  the  unfavour- 
able weather  during  the  haying  period  would  cause  a  shortage  in  feed,  the  prolonged 
good,  open  weather  during  the  late  fall  enabled  animals  to  feed  out  on  the  meadows 
and  stubble,  for  a  much  longer  period  than  had  usually  been  possible,  thus  effecting 
a  great  saving,  with  the  result  that  farmers  have  still  plenty  of  feed  for  spring  work 
and  many  have  some  surplus  for  disposal. 

More  attention  could  with  advantage  still  be  paid  to  sheep,  pigs  and  poultry,  as  im- 
portations of  these  have  yet  to  be  made  to  supply  local  demands;  this  may,  however, 
be  taken  up    ere  long,  in  fact  it  is  now  being  looked  into  by  many. 

The  influx  of  settlers  has  not  been  quite  as  heavy  as  during  the  past  two  years; 
still,  a  fair  number  have  reached  us,  and  the  homestead  entries  are  in  excess  of  last 
year. 

Considerable  activity  has  been  noticed  in  sales  of  improved  farms,  and  prices  are 
6teadily  on  the  rise,  these  sales  being  chiefly  to  actu,al  farmers  from  other  parts,  who 
preferred  buying  improved  lands  to  taking  wild  free  grants. 

Many  new  villages  have  sprung  up,  chiefly  along  the  extensions  of  line  of  rail, 
•which  were  opened  during  the  past  two  seasons,  and  have  furnished  markets,  where 
grain  and  produce  can  be  disposed  of  and  supplies  secured,  at  easy  distances  from 
most  settlements.  In  fact,  the  tract  between  lakes  Manitoba  and  Dauphin  is  now 
jabout  the  only  section  of  the  district  at  all  remote  from  market,  and  it  is  expected  that 
ihis  will  be  served  in  the  near  future,  as  it  is  being  rapidly  settled. 

Lumbering  operations,  so  far  as  the  larger  mills  are  concerned,  have  not  been 
prosecuted  with  the  usual  vigour,  owing  no  doubt  to  the  financial  stringency  and  the 
fact  that  heavy  stocks  were  carried  over  from  last  summer,  though  the  fine  weather 
experienced   during   the  winter  was  most   favourable   for   this   work,   just   about   the 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  15 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

proper  quantity  of  snow  having  fallen  to  permit  cheap  production.  Due  advantage 
of  this  fine  weather  was  taken,  however,  by  the  settlers,  who  secured  permits  in  greater 
numbers  than  ever,  and  which,  so  far  as  I  can  learn,  are  being  largely  filled. 

The  more  careful  supervision  of  the  timber  in  the  reserves  has  had  good  effect, 
but  it  is  feared  that  closer  watch  over  the  operations  of  the  small  portable  millowners 
is  urgently  needed,  as  these,  having  no  vested  rights,  can  see  nothing  bait  the  im- 
mediate profit  to  be  derived  from  the  cutting  and  disposing  of  the  timber  ,at  the 
present  time,  and  in  most  instances  prosecute  their  work  without  any  due  regard  to 
^conserving  the  timber.  At  the  present  rate  of  wasteful  cutting,  it  is  feared  that  unless 
more  stringent  measures  are  adopted  and  carried  out,  the  timber  of  any  commercial 
value,  for  lumber,  which  has  been  spared  by  the  fierce  fires  that  several  years  ago 
devastated  the  Riding  Mountains  Reserve,  will  in  a  very  short  time  be  gone. 

The  municipal  authorities  have  continued  the  good  work  in  the  way  of  improving 
roads,  ditching  and  bridge  building,  and  though  perhaps  not  quite  as  much  money 
"was  spent  as  in  former  years,  more  permanent  structures  have  been  erected,  steel 
bridges  taking  the  place  of  the  former  wooden  ones.  Many  new  school  districts  have 
been  established,  and  all  are  well  attended  and  kept  up. 

The  health  of  the  district  has  been  good,  no  epidemic  having  visited  us,  though  the 
various  hospitals  throughout  the  country  have  as  usual  had  plenty  of  patronage,  and 
have  rendered  signal  service. 

I  attach  a  summary  of  the  principal  items  of  work  carried  through  the  office. 

Your  obedient  servant. 

F.  K.  HERCHMER, 
Agent  of  Dominion  Lands* 

Summary  of  principal  items  of  work  passed  through  office: — 

Homestead  entries  granted 772 

Entries  where  improvements  collected 67 

Land  sales 13 

Searches 217 

Timber  permits  issued 1,169 

Seizures 31 

Hay  permits  issued 199 

Grazing  leases 20 

Mining  locations 14 

Letters  received 16,427 

Letters  written 10,315 

Applications  for  patent  taken 496 

Entries  cancelled 2,651 


16  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.  7. 

KEPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  EDMONTON. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Edmonton,  Alberta,  April  2,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  annual  report  of  this  office  for  the  year 
ending  March  31,  1908. 

Two  outstanding  features  mark  the  year  just  closed  which  must  have  had  their 
effect  upon  the  operations  of  this  office,  namely,  the  unfavourable  summer  of  1907, 
and  the  financial  stringency  which  began  during  that  summer  and  continues  to  the 
present  time;  and  yet  on  examining  the  actual  business  done  at  this  office  during  the 
year  and  comparing  it  with  that  of  former  years  there  appears  to  be  nothing  to  indi- 
cate that  two  such  potent  and  adverse  influences  have  been  at  work  within  the  district. 
There  might  appear  to  be  an  exception  to  this  general  statement  in  the  falling  off  in 
the  total  revenue  of  the  office  for  the  year,  which  would  appear  to  be  $76,473.35  as 
against  $82,325.72  for  the  nine  months  immediately  prior  to  this  year.  The  difference 
in  revenue  may  be  held,  however,  to  be  owing  almost  entirely  to  a  falling  off  in  the 
larger  sales  of  coal  and  other  lands  which  is  due,  in  a  large  measure,  if  not  entirely. 
to  other  causes  than  those  mentioned  above.  Almost  every  other  item  in  the  state- 
ment of  the  year's  work  shows  a  very  decided  increase  over  the  same  period  of  the 
preceding  year. 

The  very  unfavourable  summer  of  1907  and  the  financial  stringency  which  set  in 
during  that  summer  combined  to  make  it  a  very  trying  season  for  the  settlers  of  this 
district, .  and  tended  to  prevent  many  from  homesteading  ;  but  apparently  the  effect 
passed  away  with  the  season,  as  the  records  of  the  past  three  months  show  a  very 
marked  increase  when  compared  with  the  corresponding  period  of  last  year.  The 
winter  was  very  mild  and  in  striking  contrast  with  its  predecessor,  and  everything 
points  to  an  early  spring. 

The  last  report  from  this  office  referred  to  the  marked  increase  in  the  value  of 
timber  lands,  activity  in  obtaining  control  of  coal  lands  by  companies  and  individuals, 
great  demand  for  labour  of  all  kinds,  and  increase  in  the  price  of  lumber;  while  now 
it  might  be  quite  as  accurate  to  say  that  the  scarcity  of  money  has  either  altogether 
reversed  the  condition  or  checked  the  tendency.  Now  there  is  little  doing  in  coal  or 
■timber  lands,  labour  of  all  kinds  is  more  than  equal  to  the  demand  and  prices  of  lum- 
ber, brick  and  other  building  material  have  been  substantially  reduced.  The  general 
effect  would  be  to  appear  to  induce  the  man  who  is  undecided,  to  get  out  and  engage 
more  seriously  in  the  business  of  farming,  and  there  is  little  doubt  that  it  will  prove, 
perhaps  within  the  next  year,  to  be  a  benefit  to  the  district.  Very  few  cases  of  desti- 
tution have  been  reported  and  a  general  feeling  of  hopefulness  prevails  among  the 
settlers. 

The  timely  assistance  rendered  by  the  government  in  advancing  seed  grain  to 
such  of  the  settlers  as  could  not  afford  to  buy  their  seed  grain  or  find  it  within  easy 
Teach  will  be  gratefully  remembered  by  thousands  of  settlers,  and  by  preventing  the 
sowing  of  an  inferior  quality  of  seed  this  action  will  have  done  perhaps  more  for  the 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  17 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

benefit  of  the  district  than  the  mere  alleviating  of  the  comparatively  few  cases  of  pre- 
cuniary  distress.  The  expressions  from  the  settlers  in  this  connection  are  those  of 
general  satisfaction. 

There  is  a  continued  keen  interest  in  the  opening  up  of  the  country  to  the  west 
and  north-west  of  Edmonton,  as  also  in  the  Peace  River  country.  The  lack  of  trans- 
portation facilities  seems  to  be  the  only  thing  that  stands  in  the  way  of  a  very  speedy 
settlement.  New  surveys  and  the  trend  of  railway  construction  are  being  closely 
watched. 

The  following  comparison  will  serve  to  indicate  the  progress  of  the  district : — 

Nine  months. 
1905-6.  1906-7.  1907-8. 

Entries 4,601  2,766  4,051 

Revenue $70,984  81  $82,325  72  $76,473  35 

Summary  of  actual  business,  1907-8 : 

Letters  received 37,618 

Letters  sent 35,969 

Applications  for  patent. . .  .■ 1,851 

Homestead  entries  cancelled 1,906 

Hay  .permits  issued 223 

Timber  permits  issued 2,630 

Homestead  entries  granted 4,051 

Land  scrips  located 16 

Revenue $76,473  35 

Your  obedient  servant, 

K.  W.  MACKENZIE, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


No.  8. 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  ESTEVAN. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Estevan,  Saskatchewan,  April  7,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  annual  report  of  this  office  for  the  year 
ending  March  31,  1908. 

There  has  been  a  decrease  in  the  number  of  homestead  entries  granted  over  last 
year,  owing  to  the  fact  of  the  lands  west  of  range  18,  west  of  the  second  meridian, 
which  were  formerly  in  this  district,  being  transferred  to  the  Moosejaw  agency.  Owing 
to  the  lateness  of  last  spring  and  to  the  early  frost,  which  struck  some  localities,  a 
portion  of  the  crop  was  damaged,  and  many  of  the  settlers  have  applied  for,  and  re- 
ceived, seed  grain  advanced  by  the  government.  The  past  winter  has  been  one  of  th" 
mildest  on  record ;  there  was  little  snow,  so'  that  the  cattle  and  horses  have  been  able 
to  run  out  most  of  the  winter.  The  farmers  have  already  commenced  work  on  the 
land,  and  it  is  expected  that  seeding  will  be  general  in  a  few  days.  There  will  be  con- 
siderable increase  in  acreage  sown  over  any  previous  year. 
25— i— 2 


18  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  iyTERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

Appended  is  a  statement  of  work  performed  during  the  fiscal  year : — 

Letters  received 10,914 

Letters  written 11,294 

Applications  for  patent 1,208 

Entries  cancelled 404 

Homestead  entries 518 

Land  sales 18 

Timber  permits 3 

Hay  permits 222 

Grazing  rents 21 

Mining  fees  and  royalty 16 

Coal  lands  (applications  for  lease) 11 

Total  revenue  of  the  office $11,8S9.66 

Your  obedient  servant, 

E.  CLAUD  KISBEY, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


No.  9. 
REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  HUMBOLDT. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Humboldt.  Saskatchewan.  April  2,  1908. 

The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  for  your  consideration  the  annual  report  of 

this  office  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

The  total  receipts  for  the  year  amounted  to  $34,351.08,  being  made  up  as  follows : 

Homestead  entries,  2,494 $24,740  00 

Restoration  of  entry,  1 10  00 

Payments  for  improvements.  207 6,018  25 

Payments  on  account  land  sales,  18 2,245  86 

Payments   on   account    sundries,    150 232  75 

Timber  permits,  201 8190 

Hay  permits,  24 6100 

School  lands  sales,  2 322  75 

School  lands  sundries.  105 616  37 

Seed  grain  collections,  2 22  20 

$34,351  08 

Number  of  letters  received :ii',173 

letters  written.  . 32,022 

applications  for  patent  recommended 1,256 

homestead  entries   granted 2,494 

homestead  entries  cancelled 1,482 

As  this  office-  was  only  opened  on  November  1,  1906,  I  am  unable  to  give  a  com- 
parative statement,  showing  bow  the  year  just  ended  compares  with  the  previous  year. 


j  DOMINION  LANDS  19 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

I  might  say,  however,  that  the  five  months  from  November  1,  1907,  to  March  31,  1908, 
show  an  increase  in  revenue,  and  a  large  increase  in  the  amount  of  work  over  the 
corresponding  five  months  of  the  year  ending  March  31,  1907. 

Taking  into  consideration  the  fact  that  the  year  just  ended  includes  a  period 
of  more  or  less  world-wide  depression  in  almost  all  lines  of  manufacture  and  com- 
merce, we  in  Canada,  and  perhaps  more  especially  those  of  us  who  are  privileged  to 
live  in  this  western  portion  of  our  Dominion,  have  a  right  to  feel,  and  do  feel  justly 
proud  of  the  way  our  country  has  weathered  the  storm. 

Immigration  shows  no  sign  of  decrease,  in  fact  from  correspondence  on  file  in 
this  office,  I  am  led  to  believe  that  the  number  of  new  settlers  who  intend  settling  in 
this  district  during  the  coming  spring  and  summer  will  be  greatly  in  excess  of  that 
of  the  past  year.    This,  I  believe,  is  also  true  of  the  west  in  general. 

The  financial  assistance  rendered  by  the  federal  government  to  assure  the  prompt 
moving  of  the  western  grain  crop  has  had  the  desired  result  and  has  been  greatly 
beneficial  to  western  farmers  and  to  the  country  at  large. 

The  prompt  action  of  the  federal  government  in  taking  steps  to  provide  an  ade- 
quate supply  of  seed  grain  for  all  settlers  who  were  in  need  of  same  has  been  greatly 
appreciated.  Above  two  thousand  applications  have  been  received  and  accepted  in  this 
district  alone. 

The  general  work  of  this  office  and  of  the  seven  sub-agencies  tributary  thereto  is 
in  a  satisfactory  condition. 

Extra  assistance  is  required  at  this  office,  and  will,  I  trust,  be  received  shortly. 

I  am  pleased  to  be  able  to  state  that  the  outlook  for  the  coming  season  is  bright, 
and  with  favourable  weather  conditions  we  may  look  forward  to  a  year  of  renewed 
activity  and  prosperity. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

GEO.  L.  DEMPSTEK, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


No.  10. 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  KAMLOOPS. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  Office, 

K amloops,  B.C.,  April  3,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  for  this  office  for  the  year  ending 
March  31,  1908. 

As  predicted  in  last  year's  report,  the  harvest  of  1907  was  a  good  one.  All  crops 
were  above  the  average  and,  with  the  exception  of  hay,  were  well  harvested.  Rain 
destroyed  much  of  the  hay,  but  the  abundant  yield  more  than  made  up  for  the  loss. 
Stock  of  all  kinds  went  into  winter  quarters  in  good  condition  and  the  winter  season 
being  favourable,  have  come  through  in  good  shape.  I  have  not  heard  of  any  losses. 
Prices  on  the  whole  were  high;  the  only  complaint  was  from  stockmen  on 
account  of  the  low  price  of  beef  cattle  and  also  the  slow  market,  some  of  the  stock- 
men having  to  hold  their  stock  for  weeks  after  the  date  appointed  for  delivery.  This 
is  explained  by  the  action  of  the  banks  refusing  the  usual  bank  accommodation  to  the 
cattle  buyers.  This  district  did  not  participate  in  the  land  boom  to  any  great  extent, 
neither  did  it  suffer  as  some  districts  have  from  the  money  stringency. 
25 — i — 2i 


20  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

The  work  in  the  office  shows  a  healthy  increase  in  all  branches.  Homestead 
entries  have  greatly  increased.  The  revenue  from  land  sales  shows  a  large  increase 
and  that  in  face  of  the  fact  that  the  land  has  been  withdrawn  from  sale.  The  increase 
is  solely  from  collections  on  old  sales.  This  of  itself  shows  the  healthy  financial  state 
of  the  community.  The  revemie  from  grazing  leases  has  also  increased  in  a  marked 
degree. 

The  attention  of  the  outside  world  has  been  directed  to  the  possibilities  of  culti- 
vation by  irrigation  in  the  dry  belt,  with  the  consequence  that  a  large  amount  of 
private  property  has  changed  hands  with  that  end  in  view.  If  a  success,  it  will  mean 
the  bringing  of  a  large  unproductive  area  under  intensified  farming  and  make  what 
is  now  almost  a  barren  waste  the  happy  homes  of  hundreds  of  families. 

With  the  same  end  in  view,  the  department  has  sold  a  large  block  of  land  under 
strict  conditions  as  to  irrigation.  This,  in  my  opinion,  is  the  only  way  that  the  drv 
belt  can  be  made  productive,  unless  the  government  undertakes  the  building  of  reser- 
voirs, dams  and  ditches.  The  undertakings  are  too  expensive  for  the  individual  farmer. 
The  laws  governing  the  disposal  and  distribution  of  water  for  irrigation  have 
been  under  consideration  by  the  provincial  government,  and  a  valuable  report  has  been 
made  by  experts.  Many  hoped  that  some  of  the  disabilities  under  which  they  are  now 
suffering  would  be  removed  at  the  last  session  of  the  legislature,  but  the  House  pro- 
rogued without  any  measure  having  been  introduced. 

The  following  is  a  summary  of  work  done  during  the  year: — 

Homestead  entries  granted 196 

Homestead  entries  cancelled 28 

Applications  for  patent  received 114 

Letters  received 4,042 

Letters  sent 3,605 

Revenue  collected $23,078.40 


Your  obedient  servant, 


A.  B.  CURRIE, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


No.  11. 
REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  LETHBRIDGE. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Lethbridge,  Alberta,  April  7,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 
Sir, —  I  have  the  honour  to  submit  for  your  consideration  the  annual  report  of 
this  office  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

I  have  much  pleasure  in  stating  that  the  prosperity  of  southern  Alberta  is  con- 
tinuing and  settlers  from  all  parts  of  the  United  States,  as  well  as  eastern  Canada  are 
daily  arriving,  which  tends  to  show  the  faith  they  have  in  its  future  possibilities. 

In  consequence  of  the  heavy  crops  harvested  throughout  this  district  during  the 
past  season,  the  immigration  has  every  prospect  of  being  larger  than  in  any  previous 
year. 

Settlement  is  reaching  out  in  every  direction  and  in  order  to  be  able  to  provide 
suitable  locations  for  incoming  settlers  it  will  be  necessary  to  have  surveys  of  this 
district  proceeded  with. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  21 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  " 

Large  tracts  of  land  are  being  purchased  from  railway  corporations  and  others, 
by  settlers  whose  intentions  are  to  settle  on  this  land  in  the  near  future. 

The  homestead  entries  for  the  Lethbridge  agency  are  considerably  larger  this  year 
than  in  other  years.  The  work  has  increased  materially  in  every  branch  and  has  been 
disposed  of  satisfactorily,  although  additional  office  accommodation  and  assistance 
are  very  necessary.  The  entries  of  homesteaders  who  are  not  performing  the  required 
duties  are  being  cancelled,  although  the  entries  cancelled  this  year  are  not  as  numerous 
as  in  previous  years,  as  the  homesteaders  are  making  every  effort  to  comply  with  the 
regulations.  In  eases  where  cancellations  are  effected  the  lands  are  rapidly  being 
taken  up  by  people  on  the  ground  who  desire  suitable  localities. 

The  revenue  of  the  mines  branch  as  well  as  the  land  branch,  has  increased  during 
the  present  year  to  almost  double  that  of  any  previous  year,  but  as  a  large  amount  of 
the  timber  business  for  this  district  is  transacted  through  the  Calgary  office,  the 
revenue  of  this  branch  is  much  smaller  than  it  would  be  were  the  whole  business  per- 
taining to  the  same  transacted  here.  A  large  percentage  of  the  grazing  rental,  as  well 
as  moneys  paid  on  account  of  coal  lands,  is  paid  direct  to  the  department  and,  there- 
fore, the  amounts  do  not  appear  in  my  returns. 

The  sub-agents  and  homestead  inspectors  throughout  this  district  have  been  very 
busy  and  deserve  credit  for  the  manner  in  which  they  have  performed  their  depart- 
mental duties.    The  staff  has  worked  faithfully  and  is  deserving  of  special  mention. 
The  following  is  a  partial  list  of  the  work  performed  during  the  past  year: — 

Letters  received 28,208 

Letters  written 21,926 

Homestead  entries  granted 2,458 

Entries  cancelled 1,094 

General  sales 94 

Hay  permits  issued 102 

Timber  permits  issued 496 

Timber  seizures 6 

Applications  for  patent  received 1,061 

Grazing  rents 213 

The  total  revenue  collected  for  the  fiscal  year  1907  and  1908  is  $107,096.75. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

J.  W.  STAFFORD, 
Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


No.  12. 
REPORT   OF  THE  AGENT  AT   MOOSEJAW. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Moosejaw,  Saskatchewan,  May  7,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir,— I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  of  this  office  for  the  fiscal  year 
ending  March  31,  1908. 

This  office  was  opened  on  March  25,  1907,  representing  the  newly  formed  Moose- 
jaw  Lands  District,  which  district  was  previously  included  in  the  Regina  and  Alameda 
districts. 

The  past  year  has  been  a  very  successful  one,  in  spite  of  the  fact  that  the  office 
was  opened  on  the  eve  of  a  general  financial  depression,  which  is  happily  passing  into 
history. 


22 


DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

Although  a  small  percentage  of  the  farmers  in  this  district  suffered  some  loss  by 
hail  and  frost,  the  crops  generally  were  very  fair,  and  any  loss  sustained  was  well 
made  up  by  the  high  prices  received.  There  would,  however,  have  been  a  great  scarcity 
of  good  seed  grain,  had  not  the  department  taken  prompt  action  in  meeting  all  the 
requirements  in  this  respect. 

This  district  has  a  wonderful  future  before  it,  containing  as  it  does,  practically 
no  waste  land.  There  is  a  tremendous  area  of  the  finest  agricultural  and  ranching 
agricultural  point  of  view,  will  be  observed  from  the  fact  that  in  the  large  number  of 
various  kinds  may  be  found  adjacent  to  ravines,  creeks,  lakes  and  rivers,  which  add 
much  to  the  picturesque  appearance  of  the  district,  as  well  as  to  the  comfort  and  con- 
venience of  the  settlers. 

A  large  portion  of  this  district,  lying  to  the  south  and  south-west  of  Moosejaw, 
is  not  yet  surveyed.  That  this  section  of  the  country  is  very  promising  from  an 
agricultural  point  of  view,  will  be  observed  from  the  fact  that  of  the  large  number  of 
townships  which  were  surveyed  and  opened  for  homestead  entry  last  season,  very  few 
of  these  homesteads  are  now  available  for  entry,  while  squatters  are  going  into  resi- 
dence in  adjoining  townships,  in  advance  of  survey.  Other  parts  of  the  district  are 
receiving  similar  attention,  and  as  most  of  these  newly  settled  districts  are  many  miles 
from  railroads,  the  settlers  are  anxiously  awaiting  the  advent  of  railway  communi- 
cation. 

The  prospects  for  a  good  crop  this  year  were  never  better.  The  weather  is  all  that 
could  be  desired,  and  the  rush  of  home-seekers,  who  are  of  the  highest  grade,  is  steadily 
increasing  in  number. 

Appended  is  a  statement  of  work  performed  during  the  fiscal  year. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

J.  RUTHERFORD, 
Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 

Statement  showing  the  business  transacted  in  the  Moosejaw  Land  office  during  the 

year. 


Patent  Branch — 
Homestead  entries. 
Improvements   .  . 
Land  sales,  cash   .    . 
t.             scrip    . . 
Sundries ... 


Timber  and  Mines  Branch- 
Royalty  on  sales 

Timber  permits 

Hay  permits 

Grazing  rents 

Coal  lands,  royalty 

Sundries 


Miscellaneous — 

School  land  sundries  . . 
Se.  (1  grain  collections 


Total  revenue 


Number.         Revenue. 


5,189 

214 

37 

7 

88 


1 

670 

1% 

39 

1 
1 


14 


s    cts. 

51,650  00 

s,7n4  53 

6,057  69 

1,282  29 

66  75 


2  so 

19S  85 

528  10 

1,227  34 

42  90 

2  50 


521  09 
726  67 


Totals. 


8    cts. 


67,761  26 


2.H02  49 

1,247  76 

71,011  :.l 


Letters  received 34,636 

Letters  written     42, 195 

Applications  for  patent 910 

Entries  cancelled 2,680 


I  DOMINION  LANDS  23 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

No.  13. 
REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  NEW  WESTMINSTER. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  Office, 

New  Westminster,  B.C.,  April  16,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 
Sir, — In  accordance  with  instructions  and  the  usual  custom,  I  have  the  honour 
to  submit  a  report  as  to  the  operations  of  this  office  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 
Although  the  great  bulk  of  the  immediately  available  agricultural  lands  are  dis- 
posed of,  yet  because  the  remainder  are  peculiarly  situated  at  the  base  of  the  moun- 
tains, and  in  narrow  irregular  valleys  along  the  mountain  streams,  the  number  of 
homestead  entries  gives  only  a  one-sided  idea  of  the  time  and  labour  demanded  in  the 
carrying  on  of  the  work. 

About  three-fourths  of  the  number  of  entrants  have  resided  on  the  lands  for  months 
before  the  formal  entries  could  be  granted,  but  in  nine  cases  out  of  ten  these  are  the 
permanent  settlers,  who  make  the  most  progress. 

As  mentioned  last  year,  several  of  the  old  farms  in  favoured  localities  are  being 
subdivided  to  meet  the  demand  for  small  holdings. 

More  attention  to  dairying  is  evident  throughout  the  lower  Fraser  valley;  but  as 
a  rule,  mixed  farming  is  carried  on. . 

Good  prices  are  obtainable  at  all  seasons  of  the  year  for  farm  produce.     The 
market  at  New  Westminster  has  been  very  successful  in  developing  trade;  and  the 
city  of  Vancouver  is  fitting  up  a  market  building  at  a  suitable  point  in  that  city. 
The  monthly  statements  show  the  following  details: — 

Letters  received 2,508 

Letters  sent,  besides  circulars 2,142 

Homestead  entries 43 

Total  receipts $3,379.65 

Total  contingent  expenditure 346.55 

Applications  for  patent  recommended 17 

Your  obedient  servant, 

john  Mckenzie, 

Agent  of  Dominion   Lands. 


No.  14. 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  PRINCE  ALBERT. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 
Prince  Albert,  Saskatchewan,  April  11,  1908. 

The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, 
1908. 

The  total  receipts  amount  to  $53,600.31.  The  homestead  entries  number  1,626  as 
against  1,699  for  the  previous  year,  which  shows  that  there  is  no  falling  off  in  the 


24  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

number  of  settlers  coming  into  this  district,  and  judging  from  present  indications, 
we  will  receive  quite  as  large  an  immigration  this  year. 

The  year  just  closed  has  been  the  most  unfavourable  in  the  history  of  the  country. 
The  severe  winter  of  1906-7  was  followed  by  a  late  spring  and  a  cold,  wet  summer. 
The  crop  prospects  in  August  were  never  better,  but  the  grain  did  not  fill  properly, 
and  in  many  parts  of  the  west,  owing  to  the  rank  growth  and  delay  in  ripening,  the 
wheat  crop  was  very  seriously  damaged  by  frost;  the  Prince  Albert  district,  however, 
harvested  a  good  crop  of  oats  and  a  fair  crop  of  wheat,  the  latter  grading  about  20  per 
cent  two  Northern,  30  per  cent  three  Northern,  and  50  per  cent  four  to  six  Northern, 
with  very  little  bad  enough  to  grade  feed.  Following  the  partial  crop  failure  came 
the  consequent  reaction  after  years  of  unbroken  prosperity  and  over-expansion,  giving 
the  country  a  most  severe  test,  and  I  am  pleased  to  be  able  to  report  that  we  have  come 
through  without  serious  setback,  which  speaks  volumes  for  the  natural  resources  of 
this  great  country.  All  indications  now  point  toward  a  good  season,  and  the  farmers 
have  more  land  ready  for  crop  than  ever  before;  the  crop  should  be  in  in  good  time, 
and  the  soil  is  in  excellent  condition. 

The  Prince  Albert  district  is  essentially  a  mixed  farming  country  and  the  light 
wheat  crop  does  not  seriously  affect  the  condition  of  the  farmer.  The  banking  institu- 
tions and  implement  men  inform  me  that  collections  are  good,  and  that  there  is  no- 
serious  falling  off  in  business. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

R.  S.  COOK, 
Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 

Statement  of  work  at  the  Prince  Albert  office  for  the  twelve  months  ending  March 

31,  1908. 

Nos.  Revenue. 

Homesteads 1,626  $16,000  00 

Improvements 178  5,120  87 

Land  sales 29  2,066  53 

Land  sales,  scrip 4  1,039  58 

Sundries 50  14  10 

Seed  grain 19  379  13 

School  lands,  sundries 130  616  36 

Crown  Timber. 

Ground  rent 28  5,928  50 

Royalty  on  sales 32  16,251  93 

Timber  permits 1,075  5,494  55 

Timber  seizures 33  445  81 

Hay  permits 70  209  75 

Grazing  rents,  Dominion  lands 1  3  20 

Mining  fees 3  15  00 

Coal  land  fees 3  15  00 


$53,600  31 


Twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1908: — 

Letters  received 13,379 

Letters  sent 9,968 

Applications  for  patent 848 

Entries  cancelled 667 


1  DOMINION  LANDS  25 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


No.  15. 

EEPOET  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  EED  DEEE. 

Department  of  the  Interior,, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Eed  Deer,  Alberta,  April  6,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  beg  to  submit  my  annual  report  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, 
1908,  and  am  pleased  to  say  that  notwithstanding  adverse  circumstances  the  Eed 
Deer  district  has  made  satisfactory  progress  during  the  past  year. 

As  mentioned  in,  my  last  report,  we  had  passed  through  the  most  severe  winter 
ever  experienced  in  the  Northwest,  but  at  that  time  it  was  too  soon  to  estimate  with 
any  certainty  the  loss  of  cattle;  however,  after  the  spring  round-up,  it  was  found  that 
the  losses  throughout  this  district  were  little  above  normal.  The  cold  winter  was 
followed  by  a  backward  spring  which  retarded  seeding  operations,  a  cool  summer 
which  retarded  the  maturing  of  crops,  with  snow  and  frost  in  September;  and  yet, 
notwithstanding  all  these  drawbacks,  the  crops  harvested  in  the  Eed  Deer  district 
were  on  the  whole  satisfactory,  especially  so  in  the  eastern  portion  of  the  district, 
where  the  yield  of  wheat,  oats  and  barley  was  an  average  crop  and  the  grain  of  good 
quality.  In  the  western  portion  of  the  district,  which  is  heavily  timbered  and  sub- 
ject to  more  severe  frost,  not  much  grain  matured ;  however,  as  all  the  settlers  have 
more  or  less  cattle,  the  damaged  crops  were  not  a  complete  loss  as  they  furnished 
excellent  feed.  The  past  winter  was  mild,  with  very  little  snow,  and  cattle  came 
through  in  excellent  condition,  little  if  any  feeding  being  required,  and  should  we 
have  an  early  spring  followed  by  a  favourable  summer,  farming  in  the  Eed  Deer 
district  will  be  a  profitable  calling.  There  has  been  a  sufficient  snowfall  during  the 
past  winter  to  ensure  ample  moisture,  and  fall  wheat  looks  well  at  the  present  time. 
This  district,  as  well  as  all  other  portions  of  the  North  American  continent,  has  felt 
the  stringency  in  the  money  market,  but  from  my  observation  it  has  not  affected  the 
farmer  so  much  as  the  real  estate  agents,  speculators  and,  possibly,  the  merchants. 
When  the  banks  refused  to .  loan  money  for  speculative  purposes,  the  cry  became 
general  that  money  was  tight,  and  those  who  had  the  cash  hung  on  to  it,  in  many 
cases  making  the  reported  stringency  an  excuse  for  not  paying  their  accounts,  but  I 
notice  that  all  sales  of  stock,  farm  implements,  machinery,  &c,  are  well  attended 
by  the  farming  community,  good  prices  being  realized  and  the  cash  forthcoming  at 
the  close  of  the  sale,  nor  can  I  see  how,  at  least  for  some  time  to  come,  any 
hard  times  can  be  experienced  in  the  west,  where  such  large  sums  are  being  expended 
for  public  improvements  and  where  the  farmer  finds  a  ready  market  for  his  products 
at  good  prices.  The  creameries  throughout  the  district  are  doing  well,  and  the  butter 
produced  is  of  such  an  excellent  quality  that  the  demand  is  far  in  excess  of  the  supply. 
I  very  much  regret  to  see  by  the  press  that  the  contract  for  the  extension  of  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Eailway  branch  line  east  from  Stettler  has  been  cancelled.  The 
eastern  portion  of  this  district  has  been  settled  by  a  fine  class  of  farmers,  who  have 
taken  up  homesteads  and  purchased  lands  in  the  expectation  that  they  would  be 
provided  with  transportation  for  their  products  within  a  reasonable  time,  and  if  the 
extension  of  this  line  is  deferred  for  another  year  it  will  have  a  very  serious  effect 
on  the  settlement  of  the  eastern  portion  of  the  district,  nor  would  it  surprise  me  to 
see  many  of  the  settlers  pull  up  stakes  and  depart  for  pastures  new.     It  is  to  be 


26  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

hoped  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  management  will  reconsider  the  matter  and  see 
their  way  clear  to  doing-  something  on  the  extension  of  their  branch  line  east  from 
Stettler  this  summer. 

There  has  been  a  large  increase  in  all  branches  of  the  work  of  this  office  during 
the  past  year,  with  the  exception  of  homestead  entries,  as  will  be  seen  by  comparing 
the  following  statement  with  the  statement  for  the  nine  months  period  ending  March 
31,  1907  :— 

1907-8.  1906-7. 

Homestead  entries 1,826  1,693 

Inspections 990  453 

Letters  received 18,730  12,901 

Letters   written 16,479  10,091 

Applications  for  patent 1,072  636 

Your  obedient  servant, 

W.  II.  COTTINGHAM, 

Agent   of  Dominion    Lands. 


No.  16. 


REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  REGIXA. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office. 

Regina,  Saskatchewan.,  May  5,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of   Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Out. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  190S. 
The  statement  of  the  work  performed  is  as  follows: — 

Xo.  Keveiuie. 

Homestead  entries 1,666  $16,400  I K) 

Improvements 201  8,897  28 

Loud  sales 70  10,306  71 

Sundries 202  25 

Timber  permits 708  228  75 

Timber  seizures 2  20  42 

Hay  permits 283  841  60 

'  Grazing  rents 41  662  86 

Mining  fees 7  65  00 

School  land  sales < 4  1,528  70 

Seed  grain  collections 27  1,075  34 

$40,128  91 

Land  scrip  located 11  1,280  acres 

Letters  received         37.441 

Letters  written.  .• 35,449 

Applications  for  patent 2,736 

Entries  cancelled '  1,304 

The  opening  of  the  Lund  office  at  Moosejaw  in  March,  1907,  made  a  great  differ- 
ence in  the  business  transacted  at  this  office  during  the  past  year,  especially  in  the 
homestead  entries.  The  other  branches  of  the  work  were  not  affected  to  any  great 
extent  considering  the  large  area  which  has  been  taken  from  this  district  in  the  Inst 
two  years  and  included  in  the  Humboldt  and  Moosejaw  agencies. 


i  DOMINION  LAXDS  27 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  past  year  has  been  a  very  poor  One  so  far  as  the  farming  interests  are  con- 
cerned. The  failure  of  the  crops  by  frosts,  &c,  in  certain  districts  was  disastrous  to 
some.  The  action  taken  by  the  government  this  year  in  granting  seed  grain  to  settlers 
has  been  a  great  benefit  to  the  country.  There  were  hundreds  of  farmers  who  had  no 
means  in  sight  to  procure  the  seed  necessary  to  sow  their  •  land  this  spring.  The 
granting  of  the  seed  grain  has  enabled  these  parties  to  procure  the  seed  required,  and 
a  large  acreage  which  would  otherwise  not  have  been  sown  this  year,  will  now  be  put 
under  crop.  I  have  had  conversations  with  a  large  number  of  those  who  have  received 
the  seed,  and  they  pronounce  it  good  and  state  that  the  change  of  seed  will  be  of  great 
benefit  to  the  country  at  large. 

The  early  spring  has  enabled  farmers  to  have  their  ground  seeded  early,  and  at 
this  date  the  wheat  is  about  all  sown  and  everything  points  to  a  prosperous  year. 

Your  obedient  servant. 

L.  RANKIN, 
Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


No.  17. 

REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  WINNIPEG. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Offk  v.. 

Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  June  1,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  report  upon  the  business  trans- 
acted at  this  branch  of  the  department,  for  the  year  ended  March  31.  1908. 

I  regret  to  record  the  death  on  the  3rd  of  March  last,  of  Mr.  J.  W.  E.  Darby, 
who  held  the  position  of  assistant  agent  in  this  office  from  the  date  of  his  entering 
the  service  in  January  1902.  The  vacancy  caused  by  his  death  was  filled  by  trans- 
ferring Mr.  A.  F.  Crowe  from  the  Crown  Timber  Branch.  Mr.  Andrew  Freeman 
succeeded  Mr.  Crowe  as  assistant  Crown  Timber  agent. 

The  revenue  from  all  sources  collected  from  Dominion  lands,  amounted  to  the 
sum  of  $98,375.70,  and  from  school  lands,  $5,552.05.  of  which  sum  $19,541.05  was  real- 
ized from  homestead  entry  fees  and  land  sale<.  and  the  balance  from  timber,  grazing 
tind  mines. 

The  year  was  an  exceedingly  busy  one  in  all  departments  of  the  work.  The 
counter  work  was  extremely  heavy,  arising  in  part  from  the  increased  number  of 
callers  at  the  office,  seeking  general  information. 

The  settlers  within  the  agency  obtained  good  results  from  their  farming  operations 
of  last  year.  There  was  practically  no  loss  in  grains  from  frost,  and  prices  and 
demand  for  all  kinds  of  farm  products  were  good.  A  few  cases  of  distress  were 
reported  in  the  northern  part  of  the  district,  among  certain  foreigners  on  bush  farms, 
who  obtained  the  needed  relief  from  the  immigration  branch. 

The  trend  of  settlement  during  the  year  was  northward,  chiefly  along  the  east 
side  of  Lake  Manitoba. 

Conditions  are  showing  favourably  for  good  crops  during  the  current  year.  The 
spring  opened  some  three  weeks  earlier  than  that  of  1907.  and  the  weather  has  been 
most  favourable  for  growth. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

E.  F.  STEPHENSON, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  TEE  INTERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.   18. 
REPORT  OF  THE  AGENT  AT  YORKTON. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Yorkton,  Saskatchewan,  May  18,  1908. 

The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  beg  to  submit  for  your  consideration  the  report  of  the  transactions  of  this 
office  for  the  year  ending  March  31  last. 

The  number  of  homestead  entries  granted  for  the  past  year  was  2,840,  an  increase 
of  1,119,  which  can  be  attributed  to  the  throwing  open  of  certain  lands  held  by  Douk- 
hobors  and  made  available  for  homestead  entry,  while  the  fact  that  the  Yorkton  dis- 
trict has  acquired  a  reputation  for  good  land,  progressive  and  successful  farming,  and 
easy  distance  to  market  points,  serves  as  an  inducement  and  arrests  the  attention  of 
home-seekers,  consequently  wild  land  that  gives  promise  of  being  turned  into  profitable 
farms  by  scrubbing  and  clearing  are  taken  as  homesteads  rather  than  going  further 
afield  for  open  prairie. 

The  important  and  outstanding  feature  of  last  year  was  the  cancelling  of  Doukho- 
bor  entries  and  the  confining  of  these  people  to  the  land  immediately  surrounding  their 
villages,  a  course  of  action  which  was  hailed  with  satisfaction  and  approval.  The 
entries  thus  cancelled  made  available  1,386  quarter-sections,  and  the  granting  of 
entries  commenced  on  June  1  and  continued  each  working  day  until  July  6  following. 
Arrangements  were  made  so  that  entries  could  be  granted  with  despatch  and  errors 
guarded  against.  When  this  work  was  finished,  after  five  weeks  of  strenuous  labour, 
it  was  found  that  not  one  mistake  had  been  made,  clerical  or  otherwise,  in  the  grant- 
ing of  entries. 

Land-seekers  were  from  almost  every  part  of  the  Dominion,  hotels  and  restau- 
rants being  overcrowded  with  men,  young  and  old,  awaiting  the  particular  day  for 
the  chance  of  securing  a  homestead.  On  days  when  lands  near  the  Canadian  North- 
ern Railway  were  for  entry  an  enormous  crowd  of  determined  homesteaders  were 
massed  in  front  of  the  office,  so  much  so  that  doors  and  windows  were  barricaded  with 
stout  timbers. 

The  Royal  Northwest  Mounted  Police  had  charge  of  the  besieging  homesteaders, 
and  they  discharged  their  duties  in  a  fair,  just  and  impartial  manner,  which  can  be 
placed  on  record  as  a  matter  of  commendation.  When,  as  a  matter  of  fact,  many  of 
the  homesteads  were  worth  $2,000,  and  men  were  there  determined  to  secure  the  prize 
of  a  lifetime  in  a  rush  for  first  places,  the  moderation  and  patience  of  the  police  are  a 
credit  to  the  discipline  of  that  force. 

There  were  rumours  of  favoritism  on  the  part  of  the  police  and  collusion  of  offi- 
cials of  the  Land  Office  with  outsiders.  There  was  no  truth  whatever  in  these 
rumours.  The  police  were  strangers  in  the  town  aud  the  inside  arrangements  were 
such  that  no  collusion  could  happen  without  the  knowledge  of  the  whole  staff  engaged 
at  the  work.  All  publicity  possible  was  afforded  as  to  the  lands,  and  I  am  not  aware 
of  one  instance  of  individual  preference. 

The  district  has  gone  through  a  very  trying  period  during  last  year.  Seeding 
did  not  commence  until  about  May  10,  which  shortened  the  growing  season  about  a 
month.     The  result  was  that  the  wheat  crop  was  No.  2  feed  and  oats  rejected.     This 


I  DOiintlON  LANDS  29 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

calamity  to  some  extent  was  counterbalanced  by  a  fall  of  dry  weather  and  sunshine, 
which  dried  away  the  moisture  of  the  frozen  grain.  On  account  of  shrinkage  which 
follows  a  frozen  crop,  the  yield  was  badly  impaired,  although  prices  were  high  and 
altogether  farmers  fared  better  than  was  expected. 

The  conditions  as  described  left  the  district  without  seed,  and  it  was  soon  appar- 
ent that  government  aid  must  be  rendered,  which  was  done,  and  locally  the  distribu- 
tion of  seed  was  placed  in  the  hands  of  homestead  inspectors  and  in  other  respects  has 
been  the  source  of  extra  work  at  this  office.  This  distribution  of  seed  grain  is  appre- 
ciated by  those  whom  it  lias  helped,  the  quality  of  seed  being  sound  and  free  from 
noxious  weeds. 

The  work  of  the  office  appears  to  me  to  be  in  a  very  satisfactory  position,  and 
each  member  of  the  staff  efficient  and  interested  in  doing  his  work  thoroughly. 
The  following  is  a  summary  of  the  work  transacted : — 

Homestead  entries 2,840 

Timber  permits 474 

Hay  permits  (Dominion  lands) 42 

Hay  permits   (school  lands) 141 

Letters  received 29,973 

Letters  written 23,766 

Applications  for  patent 1,438 

Entries  cancelled 3,024 

Eevenue $42,310.S6 

Your  obedient  servant, 

JAS.  E.  PEAKER, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


No.  19. 
REPORT  OF  THE  MTNES  BRANCH. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa,  June  1,  1908. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq, 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  herewith  the  report  of  the  Mines  Branch  of 
the  Department  of  the  Interior  for  the  fiscal  year  which  ended  on  March  31,  1908. 

The  total  revenue  derived  from  all  sources  during  the  fiscal  year  amounts  to 
$649,083.39,  and  the  statements  lettered  'A'  and  '  B,'  showing  in  different  forms 
how  this  amount  is  made  up,  will  be  found  at  the  end  of  the  report.  Statement 
lettered  '  A '  shows  the  total  revenue  for  each  month,  and  statement  lettered  '  B ' 
shows  the  revenue  collected  at  each  agency,  including  the  Yukon  Territory. 

The  revenue  for  the  Yukon  Territory,  which  amounts  to  $260,319.10,  is  shown 
separably  in  statement  lettered  '  C 

The  reports  and  statements  for  the  fiscal  year  from  the  Gold  Commissioner  at 
Dawson  and  the  Assistant  Gold  Commissioner  at  Wliitehorse  will  be  found  under 
Part  VI.  of  the  general  report. 


30  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
TIMBER  IN   THE   YUKON   TERRITORY. 

The  total  amount  of  dues  collected  on  account  of  timber  in  the  Yukon  Territory 
during  the  fiscal  year  was  $17,555.22. 

There  are  in  existence  114  timber  berths  held  under  license  to  cut  timber  within 
the  territory,  covering  an  area  of  270-11  square  miles,  which  licenses  were  granted 
prior  to  May  10,  1906,  on  which  date  the  regulations  governing  the  granting  of 
licenses  to  cut  timber  in  the  territory  were  rescinded  and  regulations  for  the  issue 
of  permits  to  cut  such  timber  substituted  therefor.  Three  saw-mills  are  in  operation 
within  the  territory,  two  on  the  Klondike  river  near  Dawson  and  one  on  Twelvemile 
reiver. 

According  to  returns  received  in  the  department  the  number  of  feet,  B.M.,  of 
lumber  manufactured  during  the  year  was  3,116,967,  and  the  quantity  sold  3,220,669, 
a  .pantity  0f  the  lumber  having  been  held  over  from  the  previous  year.  The  number 
of  eordfa  of  wood  cut  during  the  year  was  5,509  -5,  and  the  number  sold  5,697.  This 
dees  not  include  the  very  large  amount  of  timber  and  cordwood  cut  free  of  dues 
for  lirning  purposes. 

MINING   LANDS   OTHER  THAN   COAL. 

During  the  rifcal  year  97  entries  for  quartz  mining  claims  were  granted  by  the 
agents  of  Dominion  Lands  in  the  western  provinces  and  territories. 

In  the  Yukon  Territory  38,290  placer  mining  claims,  8,408  qiiartz  mining  claims 
and  59,838  renewals  and  relocations  were  recorded  up  to  March  31,  1908. 

According  to  the  returns  ie<eived  du-ing  the  fiscal  year  1,537  entries  for  placer 
mining  claims,  1,054  entries  i'cr  quartz  mining  claims  and  5,647  renewals  and  re- 
locations were  recorded  during  llitl  period.  The  revenue  collected  from  these  sources, 
and  from  fees  for  rep-isloring  documents  in  connection  with  mining  operations,  was 
$127,355.50. 

ROYALTY    ON    GOLD    MINED   IN    THE    YUKON    TERRITORY. 

The  total  amount  collected  up  to  March  31,  1908,  for  royalty  on  the'  gross  out- 
put of  placer  mining  claims  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  after  deducting  the  exemption 
at  one  time  allowed  under  the  regulations,  is  $3,623,140.08,  of  which  amount  $70,- 
504.65  was  collected  during  the  last  fiscal  year. 

The  following  statement  shows  the  agencies  at  which  the  royalty  was  collected 
and  the  amount  collected  at  each : — 

Dawson .     $69,012  05 

Whitehorse 1,492  60 

DREDGING. 

Forty-eight  leases  to  dredge  for  minerals,  other  than  coal,  in  the  submerged  beds 
of  rivers  in  the  Yukon  Territory  are  now  in  force,  covering  a  total  frontage  of 
303  'S3  miles.  The  total  revenue  derived  from  this  source  up  to  March  31,  190S, 
amounts  to  $169,400.02,  of  which  amount  $17,875.42  was  collected  during  the  fiscal 
year. 

These  leases  are  chiefly  confined  to  the  Yukon,  Stewart,  Fortymile,  Klondike 
and  Hootalinqua  rivers.  By  an  order  in  council,  dated  May  14,  1907,  the  regulations 
governing  the  issue  of  leases  to  dredge  for  minerals  in  the  submerged  beds  of  rivers 
in  the  Yukon  Territory  were  rescinded  and  other  regulations  substituted  therefor. 
These  regulations  define  'river'  as  a  stream  of  water  the  bed  of  which  is  of  an 
average  width  of  150  feet  throughout  the  part  sought  to  be  leased,  and  'river  bed' 
is  defined  as  the  bed  and  bars  of  the  river  to  the  foot  of  its  natural  banks.  The 
exclusive  right  is  given  to  every  lessee  under  these  regulations,  or  under  the  regula- 
tions rescinded,  to  dredge  the  river  bed  within  that  portion  of  the  river  leased  to 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  31 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

him.  Under  these  regulations  a  lease  shall  not  include  more  than  10  miles  of  a  river, 
and  not  more  than  one  lease  shall  be  issued  to  an  applicant.  The  term  of  the  lease 
is  15  years  and  the  rental  $100  a  mile  for  the  first  year  and  $10  a  mile  for  each 
subsequent  year,  and  provision  is  made  that  the  lessee  shall  install  and  operate  a 
dredge  on  his  leasehold  within  three  years  from  the  date  of  the  lease. 

There  are  in  operation  in  the  Yukon  Territory  12  dredges,  nearly  all  of  which 
have  an  indicated  capacity  of  3,000  cubic  yards  in  24  hours.  Several  additional 
dredges  have  been  ordered  and  will  be  in  operation  during  the  present  season. 

Forty  leases  to  dredge  for  minerals  in  the  beds  of  rivers  in  the  provinces  of 
Alberta  and  Saskatchewan  are  in  force,  covering  a  total  frontage  of  199  miles.  The 
total  revenue  derived  from  this  source  up  to  March  31,  1908,  amounts  to  $38,539.03, 
of  which  amount  $1,741.42  was  collected  during  the  fiscal  year. 

HYDRAULIC    MINING. 

The  regulations  for  the  disposal  of  mining  locations  in  the  Yukon  Territory  to 
be  worked  by  the  hydraulic  mining  process  were  withdrawn  by  order  in  council,  dated 
February  2,  1904,  such  withdrawal,  however,  not  to  affect  leases  already  granted. 
Thirteen  hydraulic  mining  leases  are  still  in  force,  covering  a  total  frontage  of 
38-58  miles.  These  leaseholds  are  all  situated  in  the  Yukon  Territory.  Since  the 
regulations  were  first  established,  in  December,  1898,  forty-seven  hydraulic  mining 
leases  have  been  issued,  all  of  which  have  now  been  cancelled  with  the  exception  of 
the  above  number.  Under  the  grouping  provisions  of  the  Placer  Mining  Act  opera- 
tors can  now  acquire  and  group  for  operation  a  sufficient  area  to  warrant  the  installa- 
tion of  efficient  hydraulic  machinery. 

'  COAL    MINING    LANDS. 

By  an  order  in  council,  dated  March  4,  1907,  the  regulations  governing  the  sale 
of  coal  mining  lands,  the  property  of  the  Crown,  which  had  been  in  force  since  the 
year  1883,  were  rescinded,  and  by  an  order  in  council,  dated  May  9  following,  new 
regulations  were  established  for  the  leasing  of  coal  mining  rights. 

The  regulations  which  were  rescinded  on  the  above  date  provided  for  the  sale  to 
one  applicant  of  an  area  of  coal  mining  lands  not  exceeding  320  acres,  at  the  rarte  of 
$10  an  acre  for  the  surface  and  under  rights,  or  $7  for  the  coal  mining  rights  only. 
l\was  shown,  however,  that  320  acres  of  coal  mining  lands  was  not  a  sufficient  area 
to  warrant  the  large  expenditure  necessarily  incurred  by  operators  in  opening  up  and 
equipping  a  mine,  and  the  regulations  of  May  9,  1907,  provided  for  the  leasing  to  one 
applicant  of  the  coal  mining  rights  under  2,560  acres  of  land,  either  in  surveyed  or 
unsurveyed  territory,  for  a  term  of  twenty-one  years  at  an  annual  rental  of  $1  an 
acre,  and  a  royalty  at  the  rate  of  five  cents  per  ton  upon  the  merchantable  output  of 
the  mine.  While  the  lease  includes  the  coal  mining  rights  only,  the  lessee  may  acquire, 
at  the  rate  of  $10  an  acre,  whatever  area  of  the  available  surface  rights  may  be  neces- 
sary for  the  efficient  and  economical  working  of  the  mining  rights.  The  lessee  may 
also  be  required  to  commence  active  operations  on  his  leasehold  within  two  years  from 
the  date  of  the  lease,  and  to  produce  at  the  pit's  mouth,  ready  for  shipment,  a  quantity 
of  coal  proportionate  to  the  area  included  in  his  lease. 

Under  the  provisions  of  these  regulations,  which  came  into  effect  on  June  15, 1907, 
380  applications  were  received  during  the  balance  of  the  fiscal  year,  covering  an 
approximate  area  of  299,985  acres,  and  payment  was  made  of  the  sum  of  $20,393.43  on 
account  of  rental. 

The  total  number  of  applications  for  coal  mining  lands  received  during  the  year 
was  i551.  The  revenue  for  the  year  derived  from  the  sale  of  coal  mining  lands  was 
$346,813.23,  being  greater  than  any  previous  year.  The  area  sold  was  84,612,  acres,  of 
which  83,712  acres  are  in  the  province  of  Alberta,  700  acres  in  the  province  of  Sas- 


32  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

katchewan  and  200  acres  in  the  Yukon  Territory.  The  total  area  of  coal  lands  dis- 
posed of  by  the  Crown  up  to  March  31,  1908,  was  293,105  88  acres,  and  the  total 
amount  of  revenue  received  for  the  sale  thereof  was  $1,227,176.77. 

The  statement  lettered  '  D '  at  the  end  of  this  report  shows  the  revenue  derived 
from  the  sale  of  coal  lands  for  each  fiscal  year  since  1896. 

As  the  late  regulations  for  the  sale  of  coal  mining  lands  provided  for  the  payment 
thereof  in  four  equal  annual  instalments,  with  interest,  the  revenue  now  derived  from 
the  sale  of  such  lands  is  on  account  of  the  unpaid  balances  of  the  purchase  price  and 
interest  only. 

The  following  is  a  statement  showing  the  revenue  collected  in  the  western  pro- 
vinces and  in  the  Yukon  Territory  on  account  of  the  sale  of  coal  lands  during  the 
fiscal  year: — 

Province  of  Alberta $334,635  58 

Province   of   Saskatchewan 6,134  25 

Kailway  belt  in  the  province  of  British  Columbia.  .   .  .  1,120  00 

Yukon'  Territory 4,923  40 

Total $346,813  23 


Forty  coal  mining  licenses,  embracing  a  total  area  of  16,076  acres,  within  the 
Rocky  Mountains  Park  of  Canada,  are  now  in  force.  The  revenue  derived  from  these 
licenses  during  the  fiscal  year  amounted  to  $10,419.40,  and  was  made  up  as  follows : — 

Rental $5,608  20 

Royalty  on  coal  mined 4,811  20 

The  total  amount  of  rental  collected  on  account  of  such  lands  up  to  starch  31  last 
was  $14,089.27,  and  the  total  amount  of  royalty  collected  up  to  the  same  date  was 
$16,106.50. 

By  an  order  in  council,  dated  the  10th  day  of  December,  1907,  the  annual  rental 
of  coal  mining  lands  within  the  Rocky  Mountains  Park  of  Canada  was  increased  from 
30  cents  to  one  dollar  an  acre  per  annum. 

The  following  is  a  statement  showing  the  revenue  derived  during  the  fiscal  year 
from  royalty  on  coal  mined  on  Dominion  lands  in  the  western  provinces  (except  lands 
in  the  Rocky  Mountains  Park),  and  in  the  Yukon  Territory: — 

In  the  province  of  Alberta       $     2,459  47 

In  the  province  of  Saskatchewan 355  30 

In  the  Yukon  Territory 1,543  38 

Total $4,358  15 


The  total  amount  of  royalty  collected  on  coal  mined  up  to  March  31,  1908,  includ- 
ing that  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  Park,  is  $24,460.59. 

The  following  is  a  statement  of  the  office  work  performed  during  the  year: — 

Letters  received  and  recorded 5,609 

Letters  sent 19,796 

Pages  of  memoranda  and  schedule 3,146 

Plans  and  sketches  prepared 328 

Accounts  kept  posted 1,530 

Accounts  rendered 824 

Assignments  accepted  and  registered 191 

Returns  examined  and  posted 1,172 

Receipts  issued 475 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  33 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Applications  for  coal  locations  received 551 

New  entries  and  renewals  for  mining  locations  granted  in  the 
western    provinces    and    territories,    not    including    the 

Yukon 97 

Applications  for  stone,  gypsum  and  clay 47 

Applications  for  tar,  asphalt  and  petroleum 50 

Applications  for  quartz  claims 102 

Applications  for  iron  claims 31 

Applications  for  hydraulic  locations 2 

Applications  for  dredging  leases 62* 

Placer  mining  grants,  renewals  and  relocations  in  the  Yukon 

Territory 7,184 

Quartz  mining  locations  granted,  Yukon  Territory 1,054 

Applications  to  dredge  for  sand  and  gravel 1 

Applications   to   purchase   or   lease   lands   in   the   Yukon 

Territory 42 

Applications  for  water  frontage 11 

Agricultural  leases  in  force  in  the  Yukon  Territory,  com- 
prising an  area  of  389-4  acres 7 

Leases  for  water  frontage  issued 1 

Water  front  leases  in  existence 17 

Stone  quarrying  leases   in  the  Rocky  Mountains  Park   of 

Canada  issued,  comprising  a  total  area  of  1,277-96  acres  5 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

H.  H.  ROW  ATT, 

Chief  Clerk. 


*  Of  whioh  46  were  in  the  Yukon  Territory  and  16  in  the  western  provinces. 
25 — i — 3 


34  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
REVENUE  OF  DOMINION  LANDS 

A. — Statement  of  Receipts  on  account  of  Coal  and  Minerals  in  the  Western  Provinces 
Mining  Fees,  Rental  of  Agricultural  Lands,  Water  Power  and 

the  Yukon  for  the 


Months. 


1907. 


April    .    .    . 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 

October 

November . 
Deceml  ler . 


Improve- 
ments. 


S     cts. 


Gypsum. 


Millsite. 


S     cts. 


57  90 


Sale  of 
Quarts! 

Acreage. 


S     cts. 

17  00 
196  30 
191  30 


1908. 


January .  . 
February 
March  . . . 


15  00 


Total. 


15  00 


5  00 


57  90 


5  00  4'i4  60 


Months. 


Free 
Certificates 

Export 
of  Gold. 


Rental 
Yukon, 


Registration 
Fees. 


1907. 


April 

May 

June     . .    . 
July     . 

August 

September  . 
October. . . 
N',  i\  ember 
December   . 


$      i  i-. 

4  00 
4  50 

19  00 
18  00 

20  00 
59  50 
28  OS 


4,371  00 
426  13 


S     cts. 

6  50 

2  00 


305  30 


.-,    Illl 


12  91 
51  17 
50  50 


1908. 


January  . 
February  . 
March    . . . 


17  00 

18  00 
6  00 


Total . 


1  50 
50 

2  50 

5  mi 

2  00 

162  50 

5,282  00 

51  50 

DOMINION  LANDS 


35 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

INCLUDING  THE  YUKON  TERRITORY. 

and  Territories,  also  Timber,  Hay,  Coal,  Hydraulic  Mining,  Dredging,  Royalty  on  Gold, 
Water  Fronts,  Survey  Fees,  and  Sale  of  Dominion  Lands  in 
Fiscal  Year  1907-08. 


Yukon 

Homestead 

Fees. 

Yukon 
Timber 
Dues. 

Coal 
Mining. 

Mining 
Fees. 

Yukon 

Hydraulic 

Leases. 

Dredging 
Leases 
Alberta  and 
Saskat- 
chewan. 

Dredging 
Leases 
Yukon. 

Gold  Export 
Tax. 

S     cts. 

8     cts. 

4,171  49 

2,326  91 

1,224  46 

1,438  48 

506  09 

794  55 

2,559  44 

1,295  07 

921  28 

620  39 
928  65 
768  41 

S      cts. 

2,050  31 
294  25 
534  25 
1,809  95 
2.724  58 
5,335  00 
5,841  60 
1.491  72 
4.H20  20 

4,429  98 
9,008  76 
3,963  78 

•S     cts. 

12,551  50 

7,601  50 

11,869  50 

14,916  00 

14,879  30 

17,302  00 

18,538  00 

S,704  00 

S.420  50 

6,272  50 
4,346  50 
5,302  25 

S     cts. 

1,090  02 
750  00 
1.50  00 

S     cts. 

S     cts. 

836  16 

9,605  99 

60 
2,975  00 
1,000  00 

$     cts. 

76  05 

51  00 
700  00 

13,401  23 
11.775  08 

10,047  60 

8,397  84 

12,419  94 

13,346  48 

75  15 

19  81 

40  00 
30  00 

1,580  35 

650  42 
200  00 

10  00 

1,191  15 

1,205  00 

403  00 

375  00 
1,474  37 

10  00 

225  00 

4  55 

1,257  90 

923  99 

140  00 

17  73 
3  75 

90  00 

17,555  22 

41,564  44 

130,703  55 

6,248  97 

1,741  42 

17,875  42 

70,504  65 

Survey 
Fees 

Yukon. 


8     cts. 
200  00 


100  00 
100  00 


400  00 


Hay. 
Yukon. 


Water 
Power, 
Yukon. 


•S     cts. 


29  00 

8  00 

70  00 

27  00 


134  00 


$     cts. 
2,500  00 


2,500  00 


Sale  of 
Dominion 

Lands 
other  than 

Coal. 

Yukon. 


§     cts, 

663  38 
112  89 

1,108  12 
356  55 
145  98 
601  74 
512  38 
80  00 

1,226  60 


17  31 
85  00 

286  75 

5,196  70 


Free 
0™       C'Sa'te, 


Stone 


246  80 


149  40 

203  33 

14  11 

82  68 
245  00 


154  00 

29  65 

576  06 


11  75 
19  25 
26  75 


13  50 

5  00 


1,701  03 


76  25 


Sale 

of 

Coal  Lands. 


*     cts, 

30.744  71 
16,943  37 

60,008  20 
57,151  54 
47,674  55 
47,715  47 
8,293  54 
25,503  46 
15,996  60 


15,777  90 

12,395  28 

8,608  60 


346,813  23 


Amount. 


S     cts. 

59,282  45 
51,756  82 
87,853  96 
86,358  67 
79,887  51 
85,705  94 
49,195  72 
39,688  73 
31,263  05 


28,827  57 
26,876  60 
22,386  37 


649,083  39 


H.  H.  ROW  ATT, 

Chief  Clerk. 


-i— H 


36 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
DOMINION  LANDS 

B. — Statement  showing  the  Total  Amount  of  Revenue  Collected  at  each  Agency, 
Revenue  received  at  Head  Office,  on  account  of  the  Bale  of  coal  land-  in  the  Western  Provinces, 


Agency. 

n 

B 
- 
> 

h 

B 

s 

o 

X 

P.  i 

0 

"3 
r. 

m 

0» 
V 

~  i 

|> 

3 
K 

Coal  Mining. 

Mining 

IV.-- 

DC 
<b 

00 

as 
a 

- 

03 

IE 

Dredging  Leases 
Alto  and  Sask. 

1    . 

-  ; 

-*  — 

.=  a 
z 

- 

%  cts. 

Sc. 

%   ctS. 

Seta 

-    .1-. 

$    cts. 

25  iki 
147  95 

*     cts. 

•S    cts. 

%    cts 

-     cts 

132  50 

70  00 

673  7" 

2.264  17 

40  00 

11,842  55 

40  00 

57  90 

Ml  00 

15  no 
504  85 

8,272  7:. 

3.599  05 

15  7'i 

15  00 

Rocky    Mountains 
Park       

65  00 

680  iki 

12: 

j,  140  :.:> 

105,904  oo 

6,608  mi 

2.033  00 

5,546  on 

4.0S4  IKI 
2,525  50 

2,784  30 

3,404  67 

1.711  42 

5  00 

12,290  34 

17,875  12 

Dawson  * i-old   '  Jom 

Duncan  Mining  Re- 

Sixtyinile       Mining 

Whitehorse     Asst, 

t  told        <  '"in  Hi  i  B- 

Kluahne  Mining  Re* 

Conrad   Mining  Re- 

Dawson  Crown  Thn- 

16,035  22 
1,520  00 

1,543  38 

VVhitehorse     <  !ro\*  a 

I  tawson     Comptrol 

Whitehors<-  Royalty 

Fortymile     Royalty 

Dawson     Dominion 

li 

15  00 

ii  n  60 

50  iki 

55  no 

Whitehorse    1  >«  >inin 

m  on 

6.248  97 

1,741  42 

Total 

57  90 

" 

404  60  90  00 

17,555  22 

41,564  44 

130,703  55 

17.S75  42 

i 


DOMINION  LANDS 


37 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

REVENUE. 

including  the    Yukon  Territory,   for  the   Fiscal  Year  ending   March  31,    1908. 

is  in  this  statement,  credited  to  the  several  agencies   in   which  the  lands  affected  are  situated. 


Gold 

Export 
Tax. 

i't 
-E'o 

O    43 

:  x 

Rental 
Yukon. 

CO 
V 
CC 

o 

"■43 

43 

so 

'5b 

ID 

CO 
CD 
© 

N 

>> 

clv 
> 

s 

s 

o 
.a 

W 

Water 
Power. 
Yukon. 

Sale  of  Dominion 
Lands   other 
than  coal,  Yu- 
kon. 

to 

3 

o 
a 

o 

43 

CO 

*-  2 

ffi 

Sale 

of 

Coal 

Lands. 

Amount. 

S      cts. 

•S  cts. 

$    cts. 

$  cts. 

$  cts. 

$  cts. 

8    cts. 

$      Cts. 

S    cts. 

$  cts. 

$    cts. 

$     cts. 
25  00 

246  80 

47,084  09 
5,474  25 

47,911  34 

70  00 

6,147  95 

82  68 

56,003  95 

1,120  00 

200,513  76 

58,390  80 

1,217  90 

212,436  31 

25  00 

25  00 

30  00 

31,033  78 

31,538  63 

65  00 

5  25 

8,278  00 

4,279  05 

660  00 

705  70 

125  00 

1  00 

2,500  00 

1,341  30 

5  00 
71  25 

40,684  33 

109,439  92 

6,608  00 

2,633  00 

5,546  00 

4,084  00 

134  00 

! 

2,525  50 
17,712  60 

1,520  00 

69,011  30 

156  50 
6  00 

69,167  80 

1,492  60 

1,498  60 

75 

2,513  51 

2,767  50 

35  50 
16  00 

400  00 

1,477  59 
3,719  11 

4,923  40 

9,874  60 

6,542  61 

70,504  65 

162  50 

5,282  01 

51  50 

400  00 

134  00 

2,500  00 

5,196  70 

1,701  03 

76  25 

346,813  23 

649,083  39 

H.  H.  ROWATT, 

Chief  Clerk. 


38 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


1 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
REVENUE  OF  THE 


C. — Statement  of  Receipts  from  Timber,  Hay,  Coal,  Hydraulic  Mining,  Dredging, 

Water  Power,  Survey  Fees,  and  the  Sale  of  Dominion 


Month. 

OB 

c 
3J 

a 

> 

£ 

D. 

J 

Hay. 

Timber 
Dues. 

Coal 
Mining. 

Mining 
Fees. 

Hydraulic 
Leases. 

"Water 
Power. 

Dredging 
Leases. 

1907. 
April 

$  cts. 

8    cts. 

8    cts. 

4,171  49 

2,326  91 

1.224  46 

1,438  48 

506  09 

794  55 

2,559  44 

1,295  07 

921  28 

620  39 
928  65 
768  41 

$    cts. 

"4606 

10  00 

39  05 

275  48 

1,006  90 

126  90 

41  45 

3  60 

S    cts. 

12,551  50 

7,579  00 

11,672  00 

14,193  50 

14,514  00 

16,734  50 

18,385  50 

7,629  00 

8,350  50 

6,227  50 
4,299  00 
5,219  50 

8    cts. 

1,090  02 
750  00 

S     cts. 
2,500  00 

$      Cts. 

836  46 

29  00 

8  00 

70  00 

27  00 

9.605  99 

150  00 

July 

60 

1,580  35 

2,975  00 

1,000  00 

1,191  15 

1,205  00 

403  00 

1908. 

15  00 

225  00 
4  55 

1,257  90 

375  00 

1,474  37 

Total.. 

15  00 

134  00 

17,555  22 

1,543  38 

127,355  50 

6,248  97 

2.500  i» 

17  B75  4'J 

DOMINION  LANDS 


39 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 
YUKON  TERRITORY. 

Royalty  on  Gold,  Mining  Fees,  Rental  of  Agricultural  Lands,  Water  Fronts  and 
Lands  for  the  Fiscal  Year  1907-1908. 


Gold 

Export 

Tax. 

Free 
Certifi- 
cates 
Export 
of  Gold. 

Free 
Miner's 
Certifi- 
cates. 

Rental. 

Regis- 
tration 
Fees. 

Survey 
Fees. 

Home- 
stead 
Fees. 

Sale  of 
Dominion 

Lands 
other  than 

Coal. 

Sale  of 
Quartz 
Acreage 

Sale  of 

Coal 

Lands. 

Amount. 

$    cts. 
76  05 

$     cts. 

4  00 
4  50 

19  00 
18  00 

20  00 
59  50 
28  00 

S    cts. 

8    cts. 

4,371  00 
426  13 

365  30 

S    cts. 

6  50 
2  00 



17  00 

18  00 
6  00 

$    cts. 
200  00 

$    cts. 

$    cts. 

663  38 
112  89 

1,108  12 
356  55 
145  98 
601  74 
512  38 
80  00 

1,226  60 

17  31 

85  00 
286  75 

$    cts. 

17  00 
196  30 
191  30 

$    cts. 

600  00 

100  00 

400  00 

3,478  99 

$  cts. 
27,087  40 

13,401  23 

11  75 
19  25 
26  75 

34,485  70 

11,775  08 

10,047  6( 

8,397  84 

100  00 
100  00 

"4000 
30  00 

10  00 

26,277  21 
27,055  83 
32,077  73 

12,419  94 

13  50 
5  00 

12  91 

51  17 
50  50 

32,691  54 

13,316  48 

35,020  87 

75  15 

54  41 

11,631  73 

19  81 

5  00 

1  50 
50 

2  50 

10,929  79 

923  99 

5  00 

10  00 

8,420  69 

17  73 

5,335  43 

3  75 

2  00 

290  00 

9,305  18 

70,504  65 

162  50 

76  25 

5,282  01 

51  50 

400  00 

90  00 

5,196  70 

404  60 

4,923  40 

260,319  10 

H.  H.  ROW  ATT, 

Chief  Clerk. 


40 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

D. — Statement  showing  the  total  revenue  derived  from  the  sale  of  coal  land  for  each 

fiscal  year  since  1*96. 


Fiscal   Year. 

Amount. 

1896-1897   

$      cts. 

1897-1898 

1,833  74 

1898- 1S99 

350  00 

1899-1900   

5,650  33 

1900-1901 

101,772  00 

1901-1902 

16,270  32 

1902-1903 

1903-1904 

1904-1905   

31,055  38 
(',8,949  75 
35,695  00 

1905-19015 

125.754  12 

335.795  97 

1907-190S ... 

346,813  23 

YUKON   REVENUE. 

H. 

H. 

ROAVATT, 

Chief  Clerk. 

E. — Statement  showing  the  total  Gold  Production,  the  total  Exemption,  the  total  sub- 
ject to  Royalty,  and  the  total  Royalty  collected  for  each  Fiscal  Year  from  May  1, 
1898,  to  March  31,  1908. 


Fiscal  Year. 

Gold 

Production. 

Exemption. 

Subject  to 
Royalty . 

Royalty 
Collected. 

Infringe- 
ments. 

Total 
Revenue. 

1897-1898  

S        cts. 

3,072.773  20 
7,582,283  02 
9,809,464  64 
9,162,082  79 

9,566,340  52 
12.113,015  34 
10,790.663  12 
8,222,053  93 
6,540,007  09 
3,304,791  05 
2,820,161  60 

S       cts. 

339,845  00 

1,699,657  02 
2,501.744  64 
1. '.127,666  62 
1,199.114  64 

S        cts. 

2,732,928  20 
5,882,626  00 

7,307,72o  (XI 
7.234,416  17 
8,367,225  88 
12,113,015  34 
10,790,663  12 
8,222,053  91 
6,540,007  09 
3,304,791  05 
2,820,161  60 

$       cts. 

273,292  82 

S   ots. 

$       cts. 
273,292  B2 

1898-1899  

1899-1900   

1900-1901 

5S8,262  37 
730,771  99 
592.660  98 

1,681  15 
2,269  05 
3.707  05 

589,943  52 
733.041  04 
596,368  03 

1901-1902 

331,436  79 
302.893  48 
272.217  96 
206,760  87 
163,963  25 
82,622  42 
70,504  65 

95  25 

331,532  04 

1902-1903 

302,893  48 

1903-1904. .. 

272,217  96 

1904-1905 

206,760  87 

1905-1906 

163,963  25 

1906-4907 

82,622  42 

1907-1908 

70.504  65 

Total      

S2,983,636  28 

7,668,627  92 

75.315.6(18  36 

3,615.387  58       7.752  50       3.623.140  OS 

i  DOMINION  LANDS  41 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

No.  20. 

REPORT  ON  TIMBER,  GRAZING  AND  IRRIGATION. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq..  Oitawv,  July  29,  190S. 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  report  of  the  Timber,  Grazing  and  Irriga- 
tion Branch  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

During  the  year  several  new  features  of  considerable  importance  in  connection 
with  the  timber  regulations  have  become  operative,  chief  among  which  may  be 
mentioned  the  change  in  the  method  of  awarding  timber  berths.  The  practice  of 
calling  for  tenders  for  a  certain  berth  and  awarding  the  berth  to  the  highest  tenderer 
has  been  discontinued.  Henceforth  before  a  berth  is  sold  it  is  to  be  surveyed  and 
then  cruised  by  a  competent  timber  cruiser  in  the  employ  of  the  department  who  will 
make  his  report  to  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  under  affidavit  as  to  the  quantity  and 
value  of  the  timber  on  the  berth  in  question.  With  the  cruiser's  report  for  a  basis 
the  minister  will  fix  an  upset  price  below  which  the  berth  cannot  be  sold. 

In  connection  with  lumbering  operations  in  British  Columbia  difficulty  had  been 
experienced  in  securing  accurate  returns  of  the  mill-cut  upon  which  to  base  royalty 
dues,  owing  to  the  fact  that  so  many  operators  were  cutting  upon  provincial  as  well 
as  Dominion  lands,  and  the  logs  becoming  mixed  on  their  way  to  the  mill.  It  has 
therefore  been  decided  that  beginning  with  the  fiscal  year  1908-09  royalty  at  the  rate 
of  50  cents  per  thousand  ft.  B.M.  will  be  collected  on  the  measurement  shown  by  the 
culler's  returns,  in  which  the  British  Columbia  log-scale  is  used.  These  returns  are 
to  be  furnished  once  a  year  at  the  close  of  the  season  and  the  royalty  due  thereon 
paid  in  quarterly  instalments. 

Notices  were  sent  during  the  year  to  all  holders  of  timber  berths  granted  prior 
to  May  1,  1902,  who  had  not  erected  a  mill  and  operated  their  berths  to  the  extent 
required  by  the  regulations,  namely,  60,000  ft.  B.M.  per  year  for  each  square  mile 
held  under  license,  that  it  would  be  necessary  for  them  to  comply  with  the  regula- 
tions as  regards  operations.  Provision  was  made  in  these  notices  whereby  if  the 
berth  holder  was  prepared  to  cut  at  the  minimum  annual  rate  of  100,000  ft.  B.M.  per 
square  mile  his  application  to  have  the  logs  manufactured  at  a  mill  not  his  own 
property  would  be  considered. 

With  a  view  to  securing  to  settlers  in  outlying  districts  in  Manitoba,  Saskat- 
chewan and  Alberta  a  cheap  supply  of  lumber,  there  was  established  last  year,  by  order 
in  council,  a  provision  whereby  owners  of  portable  sawmills  might  secure  on  applica- 
tion a  permit  to  cut  over  a  tract  of  land  not  exceeding  one  square  mile  in  extent,  on 
payment  of  a  fee  at  the  rate  of  $100  per  square  mile  per  annum,  such  permit  to  be 
renewable  for  one  year  only.  In  addition  to  the  above  payment  a  royalty  of  50,  cents 
per  thousand  feet  B.M.  is  charged.  The  success  of  this  provision  is  amply  attested 
by  the  fact  that  32  of  these  permits  have  already  been  issued,  and  approximately 
seven  million  feet  of  lumber  has  been  cut  thereunder. 

There  has  also  come  into  operation  during  the  year  a  regulation  which  allows  the 
issue  of  what  is  known  as  cordwood  permits  under  which  an  applicant  may,  upon  pay- 
ment, in  advance,  of  $25  receive  a  permit  good  for  one  year  and  renewable  for  one  year 
to  cut  cordwood.  fence  posts,  telegraph  poles  and  mining  timber  over  a  tract  not 
exceeding  160  acres,  the  usual  Crown  dues  to  be  paid  at  the  close  of  the  period  for 
which  the  permit  is  issued.  Nineteen  of  such  permits  have  been  issued  during  the 
year. 


«2 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

The  revenue  derived  from  timber,  grazing,  hay  and  irrigation  on  Dominion  lands 
for  the  fiscal  year  just  ended,  amounted  to  $510,244.10,  an  increase  of  $99,989,03,  over 
the  fiscal  nine  months  ending  March  31,  1907. 

Statement  '  A,'  showing  the  total  revenue  of  this  branch  from  its  various  sources, 
will  be  found  at  the  end  of  this  report. 

Reports  received  from  the  Crown  Timber  agents  at  Calgary,  Edmonton,  Prince 
Albert,  Winnipeg  and  New  Westminster,  showing  the  revenue  collected  on  Dominion 
lands  within  their  respective  agencies,  and  other  information,  are  appended 
hereto.  The  report  of  the  Inspector  of  Ranches  is  also  attached.  The  report  of  the 
Commissioner  of  Irrigation  will  be  found  with  the  report  of  the  Forestry  Branch. 

The  total  revenue  from  timber,  grazing  and  irrigation  received  at  the  above 
Crown  Timber  agencies,  together  with  the  ruling  price  of  lumber  and  the  number  of 
mills  in  each  may  be  summarized  as  follows : — 


Agency. 

Total  Revenue 

Average 

price 

of  Lumber 

I>erM.  ft. 

B.  M.  at  Mills. 

No.  of  Mills 

operating 
under  license. 

No.  of 

Portable  Mills 

in  operation. 

•?       cts . 

41.585  20 
87,225  13 
40,733  83 
90,263  04 
192,128  88 

9      cts . 

20  29 
15  00 
20  90 
20  to  27  00 
17  00 

16 

"5 

31 
32 

9 

10 

2 

6 

Sawmill  returns  received  at  this  department  give  the  following  quantities  of 
building  material  as  having  been  manufactured  and  sold  during  the  year  in  the  above 
mentioned  agencies: — 


■Sawn  lumber,  ft.  15.  M. 

Shingles 

Shingle  bolts,  cords. . . . 
Lath 


Manufactured. 


Sold. 


243,493,881 


167,916.665 
50,000 
9,15s;-  7,597i 

29,119,988  i        16,623,038 


The  quantity  of  lumber  manufactured  and  sold  within  each  agency  will  be  found 
in  the  agent's  report  appended  hereto. 

Licenses  to  the  number  of  770  were  prepared  in  duplicate  and  issued. 

The  areas  under  license  and  permit  respectively  in  the  provinces  of  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan  and  Alberta,  and  within  the  railway  belt  of  the  province  of  British 
Columbia  on  March  31,  1908,  were  as  follows: — 


Under  License 


Manitoba 

Alberta ....    

Saskatchewan 

P.ritish  Columbia 

Total . 


Sq.  Miles. 

1.279  05 
2,955  48 

2,511  10 
2,260  74 


Under  Permit. 


9,006-37 


Sq.  Miles. 

52219 

552  84 

285  09 

25  79 


1,38591 


il  D01IIXI0X  LANDS  43 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  number  of  applications  to  cut  timber  received  during-  the  year  was  596.  The 
number  of  berths  granted  was  201.  The  total  number  of  berths  under  license  is  770. 
The  number  of  berths'  covered  by  permits  is  170.  The  number  of  portable  sawmill 
berths  existing  under  order  in  council  of  February  19,  1907,  is  32. 

GRAZING   LANDS. 

Provision  was  made  by  order  in  council,  dated  March  15,  1907,  whereby  the 
Minister  of  the  Interior  may  grant  a  lessee  of  grazing  lands  permission  to  cultivate 
and  crop  such  portion  of  his  leasehold  as  may  be  considered  necessary  for  the  growing 
of  fodder  for  his  'stock ;  provided,  however,  that  the  crops  so  raised  shall  be  used 
exclusively  as  fodder  and  shall  not  be  disposed  of  by  barter  or  sale  without  the  con- 
sent of  the  minister. 

This  legislation  was  designed  to  provide  ranchers  with  a  reserve  of  feed  for  their 
stock  against  severe  winters,  and  to  make  possible  the  maintenance  of  a  greater  num- 
ber of  cattle  on  a  given  area  than  could  be  maintained  otherwise. 

The  total  number  of  leases  in  force  is  939,  including  a  total  area  of  3,259,271 
acres,  distributed  as  follows : — 

Acres. 

Province  of  Manitoba 12,642 

Province  of  Saskatchewan 632,493 

Province  of  Alberta • 2,132,718 

Railway  belt,  British  Columbia 481,418 

Total 3,259,271 

IRRIGATION. 

A  full  account  of  irrigation  matters  dealt  with  by  this  branch  will  be  found  in 
the  report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Forestry. 


OFFICE  WORK. 

The  following  is  a  partial  statement  of  the  office  work  performed  at  Ottawa  for 
the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908  : — 

Letters  received  and  recorded.  .   . 19,014 

Letters  sent 22,962 

Plans  and  sketches  prepared 1,328 

Cash  receipts  issued  in  quadruplicate 2,074 

Timber  and  grazing  assignments  registered 149 

Timber. 

Berths  applied  for 596 

Berths  granted , 201 

Licenses  for  timber  berths  prepared  in  duplicate 770 

Instructions  issued  for  survey  of  timber  berths 256 

Returns  of  survey  of  timber  berths  examined 68 

Returns  of  operating  sawmills  verified  and  posted 387 

Timber  permits  checked  and  entered 10,801 

Ledger  accounts  kept  posted 972 

Seizures  checked  and  entered 178 

Fire-guarding  accounts  posted 972 


44 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


I 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
Grazing. 

Applications  for  grazing  lauds  received >  . .  577 

Leases  of  grazing  lands  issued 283 

Applications  for  hay  lands  received 80 

Ledger  accounts  kept  posted — grazing 939 

Ledger  accounts  kept  posted — hay 

Hay  permits  checked  and  entered 2,315 

Your  obedient  servant, 

B.  L.  YOKE. 

Chief  Clerk. 


REVENUE    OF   DOMINION   LANDS. 


A. Statement  of  Receipts  on  account   of  Timber,  Grazing,  Hay,  and  Irrigation  fur  the 

fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Month. 

Timber. 

Grazing. 

Hay. 

Irrigation. 

Total. 

1907. 

April 

May 

3         cts. 

:u.l-24  Ofi 
47,67-1  02 
13,758  65 
145,248  67 
25,321    1" 
21,504  95 
31,237  76 
14,894  73 
28,874  72 

37,079  30 
13,385  63 
14,341  52 

457,445  11 

$       cts. 

1,820  62 

5,988  68 
3,463  18 
2,523  94 
5,373  68 
5,631  40 
7,337  84 
4.05!)  03 
3,253  19 

1,558  78 
3,953  48 

1,575  97 

47,439  79 

8        cts. 

1,004  05 

1.037  95 

755  85 

1,352  95 

519  65 

89  05 

47  80 

1  95 

5  80 

25  70 

1  60 
10 

4,842  45 

$   cts. 

3  25 
40  50 
32  25 
30  25 
40  25 
85  00 
30  75 

53  25 
30  25 

54  2;" 
5  25 

111  50 

$        cts. 

36,951  98 
54,741  15 
4S,009  93 

149,155  81 
31,254  68 

1908. 

27,310  40 
38,654  15 
19.90S  96 
32,163  96 

38,718  03 

17.345  96 

16,029  09 

516  75 

510.244  10 

Bonus, . 
Rent... 
Royalty. 
Permits. 
Seizures . 


TIMBER  DUES  MADE  UP  AS  FOLLOWS: 

S      cts. 

212,067  05 

04,101  20 

.   . . .  97,615  19 

66,582  74 

17.078  93 

457,445  11 

F.  LOYER, 

Book-keeper  Timber,  Grazing  and  Irrigation  Branch. 


1  DOUISIOX  LAXDS  45 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


No.  21. 

EEPOET  OF  THE  INSPECTOR  OF  CROWN  TIMBER  AGENCIES. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  June  23,  190S. 
J.  W.  Greexway,  Esq., 

Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  beg  to  submit  my  annual  report  upon  my  work  of  inspection  of  the  timber, 
grazing  and  mining  branches  of  the  department  in  Manitoba  and  the  North-west  pro- 
vinces and  in  British  Columbia,  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 

Between  the  date  of  my  last  previous  report  and  the  present  I  was  called  to  Ottawa 
twice  to  confer  upon  timber  matters.  I  also  made  inspection  of  a  majority  of  the  agen- 
cies (the  more  important  ones),  and  in  a  number  of  instances  made  two  inspections, 
my  reports  upon  which  were  duly  forwarded  to  you. 

It  was  not  found  convenient  for  me  to  leave  my  duties  at  Winnipeg  a  sufficient 
length  of  time  to  make  a  tour  of  all  the  agencies,  owing  to  having  to  assume  active 
charge  of  the  work  of  the  Lands  Branch  for  several  months,  on  account  |of  the  long  ill- 
ness and  death  of  my  late  assistant,  Mr.  J.  W.  E.  Darby. 

The  position  rendered  vacant  by  his  death  was  filled  by  the  appointment  of  Mr. 
A.  F.  Crowe,  who  was  transferred  from  the  Timber  and  Mines  Branch;  his  assistant, 
Mr.  A.  Freeman,  was  appointed  to  succeed  him  as  assistant  Crown  timber  agent. 

The  appointment  recently  of  one  additional  forest  ranger  for  the  Edmonton  dis- 
trict and  two  official  scalers  for  British  Columbia  has  filled  a  long  needed  require- 
ment, and  will  add  greatly  to  the  efficiency  of  the  inspection  service. 

In  the  round  of  my  inspection  duties  I  met  these  new  officers  and  posted  them  on 
their  work.  I  also  met  the  other  members  of  the  forest  ranger  staff  and  discussed 
with  them  both  new  and  unfinished  work  and  advised  with  them  in  regard  thereto. 

While  in  some  respects  the  year  has  shown  an  improvement  in  the  manner  the 
local  officers  are  conducting  the  business  of  the  Timber  branch,  still  it  is  far  from 
being  efficiently  dealt  with,  which  applies  more  particularly  to  those  offices  exercising 
supervision  over  the  operations  of  millmen  operating  under  license  and  permit. 

There  are  two  reasons  which  may  be  assigned  for  this:  namely,  that  the  offices 
have  been  undermanned  and  preference  has  been  given  to  Land  branch  work;  and, 
secondly  and  mainly,  the  need  of  each  clerk  having  a  practical  knowledge,  in  all  its 
workings,  of  the  lumber  business. 

Within  the  past  few  years  the  lumbering  industry  in  the  west  has  assumed  large 
proportions,  and  is  rapidly  growing. 

I  took  occasion  to  point  out  in  my  annual  report  for  the  year  1904-5  that  a  closer 
supervision  than  is  at  present  maintained  should  be  exercised  over  the  operations  of 
licensees  and  permittees  operating  upon  Dominion  lands. 

Inspections  should  be  made  at  least  once  a  year  of  the  books  and  stock  of  the 
respective  lumbermen  transacting  business  with  the  department.  This  is  partially 
being  done  in  some  of  the  districts,  but  not  fully  or  in  a  systematic  manner. 

This  work  should  be  laid  upon  the  respective  Crown  timber  agents,  who  could  see 
that  it  is  done,  provided  they  had  upon  their  office  staff  a  practical  timber  man,  who 
should  also  be  an  expert  bookkeeper.  The  inspection  of  bush  operations  should  be 
done  by  the  forest  ranger. 


46  DEPART.VEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
REVENUE. 

The  revenue  from  all  sources  collected  on  account  of  timber,  grazing  and  mining 
at  the  agencies  (exclusive  of  that  paid  in  direct  to  the  department  at  Ottawa)  amounts 
to  $329,330.04,  which  sum  is  shown  in  detail  in  statement  '  A '  appended.  As  the  pre- 
vious departmental  year,  as  amended,  only  covered  nine  months'  business,  a  compara- 
tive statement  of  revenue  with  present  year  could  not  satisfactorily  be  given,  even  on  a 
basis  of  proportion.  A  large  increase  in  revenue  appears  in  favour  of  present  year. 
Appended  will  be  found  another  statement,  marked  '  B,'  which  shows  the  total  manu- 
facture of  lumber  and  other  products  at  the  sawmills  of  the  respective  licensees  and 
permittees. 

It  will  be  observed  therefrom  that  no  less  than  267,532,730  feet  of  lumber  was 
manufactured  by  licensees  and  57,170,935  feet  by  holders  of  permits,  making  a  total  of 
324,703,665  feet  B.M. 

The  total  quantity  shown  by  sworn  returns  of  licensees  for  departmental  year 
ended  June  30,  1906,  was  114,756,083  feet,  and  for  the  nine  months  ended  March  31, 
1907,  141,050,292  feet. 

It  will  thus  be  seen  that  the  volume  of  business  has  more  than  doubled  in  the  past 
two  years. 

The  stock  of  logs  taken  out  during  the  past  winter  was  small  in  comparison  with 
that  of  the  previous  winter ;  due  to  the  decline  in  sales  of  lumber  during  the  year  1907, 
consequent  chiefly  upon  the  depression  in  portions  of  the  country  over  loss  of  crop, 
and  to  the  large  stock  of  lumber  being  carried  over.  While  the  sales  amounted  to 
180,909,384  feet  B.M.,  there  was  carried  over  in  stock  on  March  31  last  no  less  than 
139,805,143  feet  B.M.  This  lumber  was  held  principally  at  points  in  Manitoba  and 
Saskatchewan  and  in  the  railway  belt  in  British  Columbia. 

The  statement  shows  1,540,674  pieces  of  tie  timber  to  have  been  manufactured. 
Of  this  quantity  591,037  pieces  were  cut  under  free  permits,  by  contractors  for  the 
Canadian  Northern  Railway,  and  upwards  of  S00,000  pieces  in  same  manner  for  the 
Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway.  The  remaining  number  of  ties,  on  which  dues  were 
paid,  went  principally  to  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company. 

I  would  draw  special  attention  to  the  large  amount  of  timber  covered  by  permits 
granted  to  settlers,  for  the  most  part  without  payment  of  dues : — 

Number  of  permits  issued  during  the  year  under  review,  10,801,  covered  thereby — 
57,170,935  ft.  B.M.  lumber,  1,654,940  pieces  roof  poles,  2,831,028  pieces  fence  posts, 
6,522,425  pieces  fence  rails,  190,202!  cords  cordwood. 

The  demand  for  permits  from  settlers  to  cut  timber  on  Dominion  lands  increases 
with  each  year.       During  the  p»3ceding  year  1906-1907,  the  number  issued  was  6,971. 

To  my  mind  greater  restrictions  than  are  provided  by  the  existing  timber  regula- 
tions should  be  placed  upon  the  cutting  of  timber  under  permit  by  settlers  and  others. 

Cutting,  as  far  as  practicable,  should  be  restricted  to  mature  trees  and  dead 
timber.  The  foregoing  statement  shows  that  permits  issued  authorized  the  cutting 
by  settlers  of  11,008,393  pieces  of  timber  for  purposes  of  roof  poles,  fence  posts  and 
rails.  In  the  cutting  of  this  class  of  timber  young  growing  trees  are  taken,  and  as 
a  tree  is  required  to  supply  each  piece,  it  would  seem  that  that  number  of  trees  were 
cut,  provided  the  permittees  cut  up  to  the  allowance  of  their  permits. 

I  would  strongly  recommend  the  withdrawal  of  the  privilege  of  cutting  green 
roof  poles  and  fence  rails.  They  are  now  very  little  used,  having  been  replaced  by 
the  use  of  sawn  lumber  and  wire  fencing. 

So  long,  however,  as  the  regulations  provide  for  the  cutting  of  this  class  of 
material  free  of  dues,  settlers  will  apply  for  the  right  thereto  and,  as  is  the  practice, 
the  timber  is  taken  and  used  for  other  purposes  than  that  specified,  generally  for 
purposes  of  fuel.  The  cutting  of  cordwood  should  be  restricted  wholly  to  dry  and 
fallen  timber  in  districts  where  the  same  may  be  had  in  quantity  sufficient  to  meet 
the  requirements. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  47 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

In  ray  last  annual  report  I  gave  particulars  regarding  the  number  of  timber 
berths  held  under  Dominion  license,  and  the  area  of  land  comprised  therein,  also  the 
number  of  berths  upon  which  operations  took  place.  As  this  same  information  was 
given  in  last  year's  report  of  the  Timber  Branch  of  the  Department,  Ottawa,  it  is 
assumed  that  like  particulars  will  be  given  again  this  year.  I  will,  therefore,  omit  it 
from  my  report. 

According  to  official  report  dated  December  31,  190'7,  the  following  is  a  state- 
ment of  the  extent  of  cutting  which  took  place  during  the  year  1907,  upon  Provincial 
Government  lands  in  British  Columbia,  by  leaseholders,  and  hand  loggers,  which  ia 
given  as  the  main  market  therefor  is  found  in  Manitoba  and  the  two  provinces 
lying  to  the  west,  namely,  509,022,854  ft.  B.M. 

The  total  revenue  derivable  from  timber  sources  during  the  year  in  British 
Columbia  was  $1,723,023.28,  which  sum  is  made  up  chiefly  of  rentals  and  license  fees. 

NORTHERN    COUNTRY. 

According  to  reliable  information  received,  there  are  at  present  nine  sawmills 
in  operation  at  points  on  the  Mackenzie,  Peace  and  Athabaska  rivers  and  at  Lesser 
Slave  lake  and  Lake  Athabaska.  The  owners  of  these  mills  have  not  acquired  timber 
berths,  and  the  lumber  manufactured  by  them  for  the  most  part  is  taken  from  the 
lands  of  the  Crown  without  authority. 

Special  regulations  for  the  granting  of  rights  to  cut  on  Dominion  lands  in 
Northern  Alberta  and  in  Athabaska  were  passed  by  order  in  council  of  August  10, 
1905.  These  have  only  partially  been  enforced  over  a  small  district  in  the  neighbour- 
hood of  Athabaska  Landing  and  at  Lesser  Slave  lake. 

In  the  centre  of  all  settlements  are  stationed  police  officers  who  could  give 
enforcement  to  the  regulations  if  it  were  deemed  advisable  to  engage  their  services. 

While  I  would  not  advocate  charging  dues  on  timber  to  be  used  by  settlers  engaged 
in  farming  or  stock  raising,  I  am  of  the  opinion  that  timber  taken  for  barter  or  sale 
or  used  in  commercial  enterprises  should  be  paid  for. 

Bespectfully  submitted, 

E.  F.  STEPHENSON, 
Inspector  of  Crown  Timber  Agencies. 


18 


DEPARTMEyT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


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DOMINION  LANDS 


49 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Statement  B.— Statement  showing  Manufacture  and  sale  of  timber  products  by  Licen- 
sees of  timber  berths  on  Dominion  Lands  during  the  twelve  months  ended  March 
31,   1908. 


Agency. 

Lumber  ft. 
B.M.  Manu- 
factured. 

Lumber  ft. 

B.  M. 

Sold. 

Lumber  ft. 

B.M.  on 

Hand. 

Lath 
Manufac- 
tured. 

Lath  Sold. 

Edmonton 20,947,566 

Prince  Albert 53,048,790 

Winnipeg |    95,077,330 

12,328,701 
12,241,419 
51,141,393 
38,212,510 
66,985.361 

8,901,939 

8,706,147 

30,743.265 

29,933,170 

61,520,622 

431,851 

431,858 

4,349,900 

12,238,130 

12,100,100 

431,851 

431,858 

2,552,650 

6,572,130 

7,071,400 

267,532,730 

180,909,384 

139,805,143 

20,551,839 

17,059,889 

Agency. 

1 

Titli            Railway 
„  "  ,    '  Ties  Manu- 
0,1  Hand'        factured. 

Sliingle 
Bolts  Cords 
Manufac- 
tured. 

Shingle 

Bolts  Cords 

Sold. 

Shingle 

Bolts  Cords 

on  Hand. 

108,907 

482,950 

94.943 

1,870,450 

9.519J 

7,597g 

7,390), 

8,212,410              43,imo 
12,279,000           811,574 

22.361,860 

1,540,674 

9,519§ 

7,5975 

7,3904 

Statement  of  timber  material  covered  by  Permits  issued  at  the  respective  Agencies 
during  the  Year  ended  March  31,   1908. 


Agency. 


Alameda 

Battleford 

Brandon 

Calgary 

Dauphin 

Edmonton 

Humboldt . 

Lethbridge 

Moosejaw 

New  Westminster 
Prince  Albert .... 

Red  Deer 

Regina 

Yorkton   

Winnipeg 


Lumber 

and  Logs 
feet  B.M. 

Roof  Pule-;. 

Fence  Posts. 

Fence  Rails. 

Cordwood 
(Cords). 

2,780 

900 

950 

700 

28 

1,878,050 

50,600 

66,400 

248,000 

1,889 

393,466 

4,700 

4,050 

2,400 

4,563 

4,700,000 

298,824 

371,499 

1,090,282 

28,1373 

5,001,501 

6,950 

44,320 

20,700 

7,751 

18,670,543 

416,375 

511,768 

2,096,239 

39,450 

1,368,831 

53,015 

70,620 

269,250 

2,010 

3,721,430 

173,378 

865,702 

196,157 

4,915 

1,332,936 

133,675 

199,595 

469,240 

6,284 

3,854,344 

1,142 

6,450,156 

192,184 

256,267 

1,060,599 

22,814 

3,155,002 

110,821 

140,741 

563,818 

7,902 

1,224,000 

100,033 

110,610 

82,700 

7,699 

3,332,439 

77,600 

110,530 

327,705 

1,716 

2,085,457 

35,885 

77,976 

94,635 

53,902 

57,170,935 

1,654,940 

2,831,028 

6,522,425 

190,2022 

E.  F.  STEPHENSON, 

Inspector. 


25— i 


50 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


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DOMINION  LANDS 


51 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


No.  22. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CROWN  TIMBER  AGENT  AT  CALGARY. 

Statement  A.,  showing  the  Revenue  collected  on  account  of  Timber,  Grazing  and  Hay 
on  Dominion  Lands  at  the  Calgary  Agencv  during  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March 
31,  1908. 


M.  nth. 

Timber. 

Grazing. 

Hay. 

Fire  Tax. 

Total. 

H«i7. 

$     cts. 

990  28 

95  33 

1,523  82 

1,815  o;, 

1,336  87 

194  25 

2,358  20 

4:1s  07 

101  36 

2,919  61 
.113  63 
237  si 

8     cts. 

2  52 
796  84 

8  00 
586  51 
20S  00 

4  80 
631  89 
714  55 
927  66 

71  61 

3  90 
26  85 

S      cts. 

3  00 

332  00 

252  50 

255  00 

48  30 

1  75 

19  90 

S     cts. 

$     cts. 
!l!)5  80 

May 

1,224  17 
1,800  18 
2,656  5 
1,596  38 
200  80 

.     ■ 
July  

15  86 

August 

3  21 

September 

3,009  99 
1,152  62 
1,032  02 

3  00 

10  00 

1908. 

3,001  22 
317  53 

261  69 

Head  Office 

12,324  31 
24,333  24 

3,983  13 

925  45 

19  07 

17,251  96 
24,333  24 

36,657  55 

3,983  13 

925  45 

19  07 
19  07 

41,585  20 

36,657  55 

3,983  13 

925  45 

41,585  20 

R.  SUTHERLAND, 

Crown  Timber  Agent. 


25— i— 4J 


52 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


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56  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.  23. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CROWN  'TIMBER  AGENT  AT  EDMONTON. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 
Edmonton,  Alberta, 'July  28,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  report  with  respect  to  the  timber  operations  within 
this  agency  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, '1908. 

The  amount  cut  by  licensed  berth  owners  was  16,104,087  feet  B.M. 
The  amount  cut  under  permit  from  portable  mill  permit  berths  was  2.183,367 
feet  B.M. 

The  amount  cut  by  portable  mills  under  settlers'  permits  was  6,703,765. 
The  average  price  at  which  the  lumber  was  sold  at  the  mills  would  appear  to  be 
$15  per  thousand  B.M. 

A  very  considerable  loss  was  sustained  during  the  past  year  by  some  of  the  larger 
mill  operators  owing  to  the  sudden  rise  of 'the  waters  of  the  Saskatchewan  river. 

The  winter  just  passed  was  quite  favourable  for  the  lumber  industry,  and,  as 
owing  to  the  financial  conditions  there  is,  perhaps,  less  activity  in  building  operations, 
mill  men  have  a  larger  stock  than  usual  on  hand. 

!  Your  obedient  servant, 

K  W.  MACKENZIE, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


DOMINION  LANDS 


57 


SCHEDULE  A. 

Statement  of  receipts  from  Timber,  Grazing  and  Hay  at  the  Edmonton  Office  for 
the  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

Month. 
1907. 

A.priI $1,614  92 

f  a* 1.200  36 

^\ne       740  15 

JuIy 1,427  49 

£"^st  ■ 1,676  68 

heptember -<Q9  qq 

°ctobef '■'■'.'.'.   '■'■         271  60 

.November ^g   <>- 

December '.'.'.!...'  .'.'  .V         520  53 

1908. 

l™™y 540  5S 

lebruary o  774  14 

March "770  58 

TT     .  T°tal $12,467  5S 

Head  office -. 74,757  55 

$87,225  13 
Certified  correct. 

K  W.  MACKENZIE, 

Agent  of  Dominion  Lands. 


58 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


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i  DOMINION  LANDS  61 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


»  No.  24. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CROWN  TIMBER  AGENT  AT  PRINCE  ALBERT. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

Prince  Albert,  Sakatchewan,  April  2,  1908. 

The  •  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  herewith  my  report  for  the  twelve  months 
ending  March  31,  1908. 

The  total  receipts  amount  to  $29,012.76.  Schedule  B  is  a  statement  of  lumber 
and  lath  manufactured  under  license  during  the  same  period.  The  total  number  of 
feet  B.M.  of  lumber  manufactured  is  50,208,790,  and  the  sales  amount  to  35,372,510 
feet  and  the  average  selling  price  is  $20.90  per  M.  The  six  mills  operating  under 
license  have  now  on  hand  687,244  spruce  logs,  which  is  not  as  large  ,a  cut  as  I  had 
anticipated,  but  owing  to  the  financial  depression  the  lumbermen  all  curtailed  their 
operations.  The  small  portable  mills  scattered  throughout  the  district  have  manu- 
factured some  2,500,000  feet  for  settlers  under  free  permits.  The  cut  of  cordwood 
amounted  to  about  12,000  cords,  and  some  60,000  ties  were  manufactured.  The  lum- 
bermen all  report  a  good  demand  for  lumber  since  April  1. 


Your  obedient  servant, 


R.  S.  COOK, 

Crown   Timber  Agent. 


62 


DEPARTUEXT  OF  TEE  IXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


SCHEDULE  A. 

Statement  of  receipts,  Crown  Timber  Office,  Prince  Albert,  for  twelve  months  ending 

March  31,  1908. 


Month. 


Ground 

Rent. 


Royalty. 


1907. 


April 

May 

June  ...... 

July 

August 
September. 
October . . . . 
November  . 
I  December  . 


S    cts 

602  14 

5.03G  421 
•J7  81 
43  24 
45  65 
110  74 


1908. 


January  . 
February 
March  . . . 


62  50 


I'aid  at  Head  Office. 


2,894  95 

302  30 


6,057  32 


5,660  76 
25 


1.336  35 


5,928  50       16,251  93 


Permit 
Dues. 


.?      cts 

605  45 

586  L'4 

■  17  40 

55  76 

231  71 

29  50 

132  75 

554  98| 

1,123  'J'.i 


Seizure 

Dues. 


1,078  25 
396  89 
582  33 


5,494  55 


S      cts 

221  62 

10  13 

!)  00i 

50  35 


59  62 


1  00 


6  00 
22  00 
66  09 


145  si 


School 
Lands, 
Timber, 
Grazing 
and 
Hay. 


$     cts. 

63  20 

77  40 

120  10 

169  15 

25  70 

9  40 

57  55 

41  51 

8  15 


Dominion 

Lands, 
Grazing 

and  Hay. 


S      cts . 

78  80 
10  80 
30  50 
51  90 
13  25 
25  50 


13  80 
61  20 
31  86 


1  20 


1  no 


679  02         212  95 


Total. 


S        Cts. 

4.466  16 
6.023  29 

304  81 
6.427  72 

316  31 

234  76 
5,851  06 

597  74 
1,132  64 


2,496  90 

481  09 
680  28 


29,012  76 


11.721  07 


40,733  83 


Crown  Timber  Office, 

Prince  Albert,  April  29,   1908. 


Et.  S.  COOK, 

Crown  Timber  Agent. 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


DOMINION  LANDS 


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64  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

No.  25. 
EEPOET  OF  THE  CROWN  TIMBER  AGENT  AT  WINNIPEG. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Crown  Timber  Office, 

Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  April  1,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Out. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  upon  the  Timber,  Mines  and  Graz- 
ing Branch  of  the  department  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1908,  to  which  are  append- 
ed the  following  tabulated  statements : — ■ 

A. — Classified  statement  showing  revenue  collected  on  account  of  Dominion 
lands  for  timber,  grazing  and  mines  during  the  year. 

Aa. — Classified  statement  showing  revenue  collected  on  account  of  school  lands 
for  timber,  grazing  and  mines  during  the  year. 

B. — Schedule  giving  list  of  names  of  the  respective  holders  of  timber  berths  held 
under  license  and  permit  who  are  conducting  operations,  and  the  extent  thereof.  ' 

LUMBER    SALES. 

The  statement  given  hereunder,  showing  the  amount  of  lumber  and  other  pro- 
ducts of  timber  sold  within  this  district,  was  compiled  from  particulars  procured  from 
reliable  sources,  and  is  as  nearly  correct  as  can  be  obtained: — ■ 

From  province  of  Ontario,  west  of  Lake  Superior — 

Ft.,  B.M. 

From  Canadian  logs 58,000,000 

From  American  logs. .    . 50,000,000 

From  province  of  British  Columbia 92,000,000 

Imported  from  United  States 2,642,076 

From  mills  operating  under  Dominion  license 53,485,301 

From  mills  operating  under  Dominion  permit.  ...    .  .  13.500,000 


Total 269,627,437 

Owing  to  the  active  demand  throughout  the  country  for  lumber  material  and 
shortage  in  supply,  prices  were  increased  early  in  the  year  and  were  maintained  until 
this  spring,  when  a  reduction  was  made  of  from  two  to  five  dollars  per  thousand  feet. 
For  purposes  of  comparison.  I  give  hereunder  the  selling  price  of  the  different  classes 
of  lumber  during  the  nine  months  ended  Mirch  31,  1907,  with  that  for  the  year  ended 
March  31,  190S:— 

Pine,  Cedar  and  Fir.  1907. 

Dimension  lumber $23  00  to  $30  00 

Fir  for  interior  finishing 40  00  to 

Flooring,  siding  and  ceiling 35  00  to 

Shiplap  and  common  boards 23  00  to 

Spruce. 

Dimension   lumber 22  00  to 

Siding--  flooring  and  ceiling 23  00  to 

Shiplap  and  common  boards 20  00  to 

Lath 4  00  to 

Shingles 3  35  to 


1908 

,30  00 

$20  00  to  $27  00 

50  00 

40  00  to 

50  00 

45  00 

33  00  to 

40  00 

26  00 

21  00  to 

23  00 

28  00 

18  00  to 

25  00 

28  00 

23  00  to 

28  00 

26  00 

18  00  to 

24  00 

5  00 

4  00  to 

5  00 

.".  i  .  > 

3  00  to 

3  65 

1  DOMINION  LANDS  65 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

REVENUE. 

The  total  revenue  collected  on  account  of  this  branch  from  all  sources  during  the 
year  amounts  to  $90,263.04  from  Dominion  lands  and  $3,591.04  from  school  lands,  the 
details  of  which  are  shown  in  statements  A  and  Aa  appended. 

TIMBER    PERMITS. 

The  number  of  timber  permits  issued  at  this  office  to  settlers  during  the  year 
amounted  to  1,435  (including  106  on  school  lands),  covering  the  following  quantity 
of  itimbefl : — 

Dominion  lands — 

Building  logs  (lineal  feet) 318,071 

Lumber  (feet,  B.M.) .  . 1,131,244 

Roof  poles 35,8^:, 

Fence  rails 94,635 

Fence  posts 77,976 

Cordwood 51,082 

School  lands — 

Building  logs  (lineal  feet) 600 

Cordwood 2  820 

SEIZURES. 

During  the  year  forty-nine  seizures  were  made,  thirty-nine  of  which  covered 
material  cut  on  Dominion  lands  and  ten  on  school  lands,  as  follows: — 

Dominion  lands — 

Building  logs  (lineal  feet) .    .  .  8,436 

Lumber  (feet,  B.M.) 205  365 

Railway  ties 4  285 

Fence  posts j-QO 

Cordwood 1673 

School  lands — 

Lumber  (feet,  B.M.J 1,000 

Railway  ties 1423 

Fence  posts :;;,<i 

Cordwood 193 

Telegraph  poles 185 

FUEL. 

The  figures  given  hereunder  give  approximately  the  sales  of  coal  and  wood  during 
the  same  years: — 

1906-7.  1907-8. 

American  anthracite 115,000  tons.  140,000  tons. 

American  bituminous 105,000  "  150,000     " 

Canadian  anthracite 40,000  "  40,000     " 

Canadian  bituminous 62,200  "  61731     " 

Canadian  lignite 68,796  "  120.000     - 

Total 390,996     "  511,731     " 

These  figures  are  exclusive  of  coal  used  in  connection  with  the  oporations  of  the 
railroads. 

25— i— 5 


66  *  DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII..  A.   1909 

The  following  retail  prices  were  obtained  at  Winnipeg: — 

1906-7.  1907-8. 

American  anthracite $10.50  to  $11.00  $10.50 

American  bituminous 8.00  to      9.00  8.00  to  $8.50 

Canadian  anthracite 10.00  10.00 

Canadian  bituminous 8.00  to      9.00  S.OO  to     9.00 

Canadian  lignite 5.00  5.00  to    5.50 

CORDWOOD. 

The  sales  of  cordwood  in  the  city  of  Winnipeg  and  town  of  St.  Boniface  during 
the  year  amount  to  about  105,000  cords.  The  retail  price  charged  per  cord  was,  for 
poplar,  $3.50  to  $4.50;  spruce  and  jackpine,  from  $4  to  $5,  and  tamarack,  from  $5  to  $6. 

This  wood,  excepting  14,970  cords  imported  from  the  United  States  was  princi- 
pally taken  from  Dominion  and  provincial  lands  under  permits.    . 

HAY. 

The  hay  crop  of  1907  was  excellent.  The  number  of  settlers  acquiring  permits 
to  cut  hay  upon  Dominion  and  school  lands  was  738,  aggregating  16,108  tons. 

FOREST    FIRES. 

The  damage  to  timber  resulting  from  forest  fires  in  this  district  was  very  small. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

E.  F.  STEPHENSON, 

Crown   Timber  Agent. 


SCHEDULE  A. 
Statement  of  Receipts  from  Timber,  Grazing  and  Hay  Lands,   collected  at  the  Winni- 
peg Agency,  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

DOMINION  LANDS. 


Brums. 

Timber  Dies. 

J. 

m 

IB 

bo 
u 

a 
ft 

'3 

>> 

X 

Month. 

Ground 

Rent. 

Royalty. 

Permits. 

Seizures. 

Totals. 

1907. 

April   

May 

•5     cts. 

S    cts. 

653  46 

1,429  79 

3,074  34 

399  09 

921  19 

1  90 

$    cts. 

1,911  69 

1,839  32 

611  98 

4,306  07 

817  89 

989  59 

4,271  03 

1,850  52 

4,387  66 

S    cts. 

996  73 
1,688  56 

639  28 
1,105  81 
5,419  44 

793  40 

1,380  63 

3,235  49 

12.669  51 

$    cts. 

169  00 

15  00 

496  72 

264  75 

211  26 

4  50 

26  66 

385  03 

$   Cts. 

6  18 

4  45 

'  160 

7  36 

$    cts. 

"l7  50 
32  50 
107  50 
112  50 
235  00 
107  50 

8  cts. 

319  75 
117  30 

95  60 
235  70 
108  70 

36  50 
1  00 

S    cts. 

4,050  63 
5,107  47 

June 

July 

August 

4,956  60 
6.423  37 
7,590  98 
2,002   19 

5,794  18 

146  84 
19  35 

7  93 

5,232  85 

4  45 

17  50 

30  00 

22  50 

2  50 

20 

17,979  05 

1908. 

6,857  96       1.334  35 

S,234  89 

1,931  68 
104  34 

6,560  91 
2,201  20 

123  60 
441  52 

8,638  69 
2,749  56 

Oollee ted  at 
H  <) 

8,552  00 

6,653  89 
2,691   14 

29,879  73 
3  89 

38,025  31 

25 

2,638  04 
195  00 

24  04 

685  00 

914  75 

78,820  76 
11,442  28 

Total .... 

8,552  00 

9,345  03 

29,883  62 

38,025  56 

2,833  04 

24  04 

685  00 

914  75 

90,263  04 

E.  F.  STEPHENSON, 

Crown  Timber  Agent. 


DOMISIOX  LAXDS 


67 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


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25— i— 5i 


68  DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII..  A.  1909 


No.  26. 

REPORT  OF  THE  CROWN  TIMBER  AGENT  AT  NEW  WESTMINSTER. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Dominion  Lands  and  Crown  Timber  Office, 

New  Westminster,  B.C.,  May  15,  1908. 

The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  herewith  my  annual  report  for  the  fiscal  year 
■ended  March  31,  last.  I  also  inclose  a  schedule  containing  the  list  of  the  saw-mills 
situated  within  the  railway  belt  in  this  province  and  statistics  of  the  lumber  trade 
for  the  period  mentioned. 

The  lumber  business  in  this  province  up  to  the  month  of  September  last  was  in 
a  very  healthy  condition,  but  a  lull  came  over  the  financial  world  about  that  time, 
that  had  its  effect  upon  this  most  important  branch  of  industry,  and  while  at  the 
present  time  the  trade  can  hardly  be  said  to  have  recovered  from  its  setback  there  are 
prospects  of  a  fairly  prosperous  season. 

During  the  year  about  72,000,000  feet  of  saw  logs  were  manufactured  within  tie 
railway  belt  in  this  province;  out  of  this  amount  and  what  was  on  hand  from  the 
previous  year,  approximately  49,000,000  feet  were  sold,  leaving  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal 
year  about  30,000,000  feet  on  hand.  As  there  were  only  nine  months  in  the  fiscal 
year  ended  March  31,  1907,  it  would  be  impossible  for  me  to  draw  a  comparison,  but 
taking  the  year  of  1906  as  an  example,  there  was  in  that  year  21,000,000  feet  of 
timber  manufactured  in  the  railway  belt,  and  a  similar  amount  sold.  The  receipts 
of  this  office  for  that  year  were  $33,627.27,  while  the  receipts  for  the  year  ending  March 
31  last,  were  $65,670.77,  to  which  please  add  amount  collected  at  head  office  on  account 
of  this  agency. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

JAMES  LEAMY, 

Grown  Timber  Agent. 


DOM  IX f OX  LANDS 


69 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


SCHEDULE  A. 

Statement  of  Receipts,  British  Columbia  Crown  Timber  Agencv,  for  the  fiscal  year 

ended  March  31,  1908. 


Month. 

Ground 
Kent. 

Royalty 
Dues. 

Permit 
Dues. 

Seizure 
Dnes. 

Total. 

1907. 

Aj.nl 

$     cts. 

2,822  80 

7,090  23 

1,316  77 

33  38 

54  10 

304  89 

174  59 

60  33 

1   18 

8  00 

08 

$    cts. 

5,455  29 
3,110  89 
2,097  02 
6,097  52 
2,840  47 
1,506  37 
5,186  59 
1,746  88 
3,760  26 

2,551  35 

166  29 

1,442  49 

$    cts. 

400  26 

2,965  06 

250  25 

768  23 

276  82 

703  78 

44  60 

5  25 

373  00 

519  95 
119  02 
795  18 

S    cts. 

$     cts. 
8,678  35 

May 

321  80 

13,487  98 
3,664  04 

July 

August 

September 

October   

November 

2,902  86 

6,899  13 
6,074  25 
2,515  04 
5,405  78 
1,812  46 
4,134  44 

1908. 

•  lanuary 

February 

5,396  94 

8,468  24 

293  31 

2,237  75 

Totals 

Head  Office 

11,866  35 

35,~961  42 

7,221  40 

8,621  60 

63,670  77 
128,458  11 

Total   . 

192,128  88 

70 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

List  of  Mills  operating  in  Dominion  Railway  Belt  in  British  Columbia 

and  on  hand  during  the  fiscal 


Name  of  Owner. 

Where  situated. 

Capacitv 

of 
Mill. 

JPower. 

Operating 

on 
Limit  Nos. 

Palliser  Lumber  Co     

Columbia  River  Lumber  Co 

Golden,  B.C 

Beaver,  B.C 

Kualt,  B.C 

Carlin,  B.C 

Revelstoke,  B.C 

Comaplix,  B.C 

Wigwam,  B.C 

Arrowhead,  B.C 

Three  Valley,  B.C... 
Crazv  Creek,  B.C. 
Mara,  B.C 

Ft. 

40,000 
100,000 
100,000 

50,000 

411,(10(1 

50,000 

100,001) 
30,000 

100,0011 

125,000 
50.000 

100,000 
20,000 
40,0(10 
30,000 
20.000 
50,000 
25,000 

100,000 
75,000 

100,000 
*       40,000 

1 00,1100 

100,000 
40,000 

Steam . . 
"     • 

29  and  3 

258,  257  and  422 

17,  277  and  278 

45,  72  and  305 

120,421,  241,  239and2S6 

88  and  207 

366,  113  and  114,  112 

118 

310  and  302 

333 

285,  326,  363,  365  and  457 

Not  operating 

402 

A.  R.  Rogers  Lumber  Co 

Lamb- Watson  Lumber  Co 

Eudeiby,  B.C 

237 
it        on  Horn.  Lands. 

Harrison  River  Mills  T.  k  T.  Co.. 
E.  H.  Heaps  &  Co 

Harrison  River,  B.C. . . 
Ruskin,  B.C 

63 

33,  185  and  26S 

Port  Moody,  B.C 

Barnet,  B.C.  . 

Pacific  Coast  Lumber  Co 

B.  C.  Mills  T.  &  T.  Co  . . 

Vancouver,  B.C 

New  Westminster,  B.C 
Vancouver,  B.C 

New  Westminster,  B.C 

Ladner,  B.C 

Ebume,  B.C  

New  Westminster,  B.C 

Abbotsford,  B.C.   .. ". 

52 

H         on  Dom.  Lands. 
„ 

„            .. 

E.  J.  Farrer 

433  and  468 

246 

209 

429 

0 

33 

77 

N.  <;.  Elliott 

Brunette  Saw  Mill  Co 

75,000 

Steam. . 

75.0OO 
125.  oi  hi 
25,000 
25.000 
25,000 
No  mill 

Steam . . 

" 

ii 

Manitoba  Lumber  Co 

293 
290 

323 

Neil   Mitchell 

453 

Kwong  Man.  Fai  &  Co 

E.  J.  Fader 

223 

Permit  Claim  430 

25,000 

Steam. . 

332 

♦Shingle  Mill. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


71 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

and  Statement  showing  Quantity  of    Timber    Manufactured,  sold 
year  ended  March  31,  1908. 


Locality  of  Limits. 

Quantity   of    lumber  manu- 
factured. 

Quantity     of    lumber    sold 
from   quantity   manufac- 
tured   and   quantity    on 
hand    from     previous 
year. 

Quantity     of     lumber     on 
hand. 

Quantity    of    shingle  bolts 
manufactured. 

Ft. 

6,686,211 
4,815,619 

1,019,316 
8,491,653 
5,101,705 
7,883,555 
2,948,151 
1,777,996 
2,593,924 
3,052,911 
11,056,106 

Ft. 

4,663,467 
1,579,917 

54,918 
3,393,487 
3,537,893 
7,185,745 

Ft. 

2,463,760 
4,815,742 
985,434 
4,120,864 
1,563,812 
1.199.564 

Cords. 

Nil. 

Columbia  River 

'• 

2,948.151  ! 

134,107             1.643.F89 

1,016 
593 

Three  Valley  Lake 

2,266,349 

3,052,911 
5.321,352 

327,575 

Nil. 
9,752,814 

Nil 

736 

453,371 
3,323,444 

221,900 

Nil 

231,471 
3.323,444 

Nil. 

Mabel  Lake    

Harrison  Lake 

581,450 

442,574 

581,450 

127,678 

Nil.                     Nil. 
314,896  |                 4.856J 

Burrard  Inlet 

268,115 

268,115 


Nil 

647g 

Coquitlam 

1,062,907 
1,064, 199 

1,062,907            Nil 
1,064,499 

Nil. 

560 

Nil 

363,061 

313,060 

Nil. 

23,680 
1,708,102 

363,061             Nil. 

313.060 

2,218,374 
23,680 

1,708,102 

Elgin 

2,531,789 
467,846 

2,531,789            Nil. 

467,846  : 

Nil 

2,761,815 

Nil 

1,636,814 
1,632,006 

2,761,815  1          Nil. 
Nil. 

1,656,814 
1,632,006 

Burrard  Inlet 

Pitt  Lake 

8314 
279 
Nil. 

"4,081,680 

51,141,393 

30,743,265 

9,5195 

72 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
List  of  Mills  operating  in  Dominion  Railway 


Name  of  Owner. 

Quantity     of    shingle    holts 
sold    out     of     quantity 
manufactured,    and 
quantity    on   hand   from 
previous  year. 

- 

o 

X 

— 

it 

B 

'£ 

>>  ■ 

is 

=  — 

3 
= 

5 

-6 
m 

SB 

._  *j 

I* 

3 

PaUJBer  Lumber  Co   

Columbia  River  Lumber  Co 

Cords. 
Nil. 

l,01fi 
568 
Nil 

650 

Cords. 
Nil. 

65 
Nil. 

558 

M. 

502,250 

Nil 

1,166,950 

Nil. 

Big  Bend  Lumber  Co 

2,680,700 

Rothesay  Lumber  Co 

Nil 

Nil. 

Nil 

Harrison  River  Mills  T.&T.  Co 

E.  H.  Heaps  &  Co 

Nil 

3,313} 

Nil 

:>,:i";,' 

Nil 

:::;:: 

6476 

Nil. 

Nil. 

B  C   Mills  T   &  T  Co 

K.  Mikuni 

Spencer  &  Daison 

N.  G.  Elliott 

Nil 

487 
Nil. 

Nil. 

90| 
Nil. 

II 

Nil 

» 

Nil 

Nil 

Nil. 

Neil  Mitchell 

713 
202f 

Nil. 

■  t 

490 
6761. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

11 

7,5978 

7,39M 

4.349,900 

i  DOMINION  LANDS 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 
Belt  in  British  Columbia,  ifcc. — Concluded. 


73 


•a 

"c 

•n 

.= 

J5 

"3 

>> 

*a 

"*j 
s 
a 

3 

Or 

X. 

a 
o 

Quantity    of    railway     ties 
manufactured. 

Quantity    of    railway     ties 
sold. 

Quantity  of  railway  ties  on 
hand. 

No.  of  mill  returns   received. 

Date  of  last  return. 

M. 

325,800 
Nil. 

764,850 
Nil. 

1.462,000 

M. 

176,450 
Nil. 

474,100 
Nil. 

1,219,900 

Pieces. 

8,889 
1.176 

48,350 
6.844 

27.884 
Nil. 

Pieces. 

8,889 

1.176 

48,350 

6,844 

27,8S4 
Nil. 

Pieces. 

Nil. 

4 
4 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

March  31.  1908 
„      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
,i      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
.,      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
,,      31,  1908 
.,      31,  1908 
i,      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 

Nil. 

Nil. 

1,100 

Nil. 

1,100 

Nil. 

Nil. 

il 

4 

4 

March  31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 

Nil                   Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

4 
4 

March  31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil . 

Nil 

Nil. 

4 

March  31,  1908 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

ii 

Nil. 
" 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

March  31,  1908 
,.      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 
„      31,  1908 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Nil. 

4 

3 

4 
3 
4 
t 
4 

March  31,  1908 
Dec.      31,  1907 

March  31,  1908 

Nil. 

Nil 

Nil. 

il 

Nil. 

Nil. 

Dec.     31,  1907 
March  31,  1908 
May       1,  1908 
March  31,  1908 

2,552,650 

1,870,450 

94,243 

94,243 

Nil. 

1  5  permits  issued. 


74  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  I  \  TERIOR  1 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.  27. 
REPORT  OF  THE  INSPECTOR  OF  RANCHES. 

Office  of  the  Inspector  of  Ranches, 

Calgary,  Alberta,  March  31,  1908. 
The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands, 
Ottawa,  Ont. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  of  the  transactions  of  this  office  for 
the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

During  the  year  4,473  inspections  have  been  made  of  grazing  leases,  stock 
watering  reserves  and  applications  to  purchase,  and  requests  for  permission  to  be 
allowed  to  cultivate  part  of  leases  for  growing  fodder  crops.  In  the  discharge  of  these 
duties  10,844  miles  have  been  driven  by  team  and  21,247  miles  travelled  by  rail. 

Conditions  on  the  range  have  been  almost  perfect  during  the  past  fall  and 
winter;  light  snows,  mild  weather  and  few,  if  any,  storms  which  could  be  called  severe 
and  these  only  of  short  duration  have  prevailed.  Yet,  as  the  department  is  aware, 
lessees  of  grazing  lands  have,  in  many  cases,  relinquished  their  holdings  wholly  or  in 
part.  In  my  opinion  this  state  of  affairs  is  caused  partly  by  the  dread  of  a  provincial 
tax  on  leased  lands,  partly  on  account  of  the  winter  losses  of  the  season  of  1906-07, 
but  chiefly  because  the  stockman  no  longer  fears  the  encroachment  of  other  ranchers, 
as  the  ranching  business  does  not  appear  to  present  the  same  attractions  to  the  new 
investor  as  formerly.  The  established  rancher  is  not  abandoning  the  business,  but 
appears  to  be  taking  advantage  of  these  conditions  in  order  to  curtail  expenses. 

Inspections  are  now  pretty  well  up  to  date. 

Your  obedient  servant. 

ALBERT  HELMER, 

Inspector  of  Ranches. 


i  DOMXIOX  LAXDS  75 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


No.  28. 

REPORT  OF  THE  ACCOUNTANT. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa,  July  16,  1908. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  herewith  statements  of  revenue  collected  from 
various  sources  during  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  190S,  as  follows: — 

A. — Dominion  lands,  including  Yukon  Territory  .  . .  $1,979,499  13 

B.— Ordnance  lands '.  .    .  .  8,674  95 

C— School  lands 708,045  83 

D. — Registration  fees 2,256  65 

E. — Fines  under  the  Immigration  Act 1,650  00 

F  —  Casual  revenue 20,069  03 

G. — Seed  grain  repayments 12,899  84 

$2,733,095  43 

A  statement  of  revenue  on  account  of  Dominion  lands  (marked  H.)  shows  the 
receipts  monthly,  classified  under  subheads.  Statement  (marked  I.)  shows  a  com- 
parison between  the  receipts  on  account  of  Dominion  lands  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 
March  31,  190S,  as  compared  with  the  revenue  of  the  previous  twelve  months. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

P.  MARCHAND, 

Acting  Accountant. 


76 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII..  A.   1909 


A. — Dominion  Lands  Revenue  (casli  and  scrip)   for  the  fiscal  period  ended    March 

31,  1908. 


Salt-  of  lands 
Rental  of  land   .    . 

Map  sales,  office  fees.  &c 

Survey  fees 

Timber  dues    

Hay  permits 

Mining  fees 

Export  tax  on  gold 

Free  Miners'  certificates 

Free  certificates  for  export  of  gold 
Hydraulic  leases 

I  Iredging  leases 

Homestead  fees 

Improvements 

<  'oal  lands 

Kent  of  water  power 

Suspense  account 

M  isoellaneous 


DOMINION  LANDS  AGENCIES. 


Battleford 

Brandon 

Calgary 

Dauphin 

Edmonton 

Kstevan 

Humboldt 

Kamloops 

Leth  bridge 

Moosejaw 

New  Westminster 

Prince  Albert 

Red  Deer 

Regina. 

Winnipeg 

Yorkton 


1'ROWN  TIMBER  AGENCIES. 

Battleford 

Brandon 

T'algary 

Dauphin 

Kdmonton 

Estevan 

Humboldt 

Lethbridge 

Moosejaw 

New  Westminster 

Prince  Albert 

Red  Deer 

Regina 

Winnipeg 

Yorkton     


10,524  70 

5,282  01 

51  50 

400  00 

17,555  22 

134  00 

127,355  50 

70,504  05 

70  25 

1P2  50 

0,198  97 

17,925  42 

90  00 

15  00 

1,543  38 

2,500  00 

407     OK 

11  00 


200,737  10 


00,009  35 
10,004  39 
95.224  90 
11,709  54 

100,082  32 
17,730  56 
35,148  41 
12,254  62 

371.060  03 
74,923  40 
3,446  3o 
23,383  87 
57,01.5  28 
52,175  45 
18,503  56 
39,800  00 


990,381  98 


106  95 

774  27 

36,657  55 

9,305  95 

86,61  Ki  03 

75 

82  65 

716  84 

201  35 

192,128  88 

39,841  86 

190  20 

224  50 

88,639  25 

576  69 


456,053  72 


560  Mil 
71,0  00 


3,254  53 
1,760  00 
1.282  29 

1J99  58 


78,403  61 

4,871  23 

160  00 


260,737  lo 


61,229  35 
11.364  39 
95,224  90 
11,709  54 

106,082  32 
17,730  56 
35,148  41 
15,509  15 

372,820  03 

76,205  09 

3,446  30 

24,583  45 

57,665  28 

130,639  06 
23,374  79 
39,960  00 


92,311  24  :    1.082.693  22 


456,053  72 


Douiymy  LAyDs 


77 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

A. — Dominion  Lands  "Revenue   (cash  and  scrip)   for  the  fiscal  period  ended   March 

31,  1908.— Continued. 


Agencies. 

Cash. 

Scrip. 

Total 

Rocky  Mountains  Park 

Survey  fees 

Patent  fees  and  interchange  fees 

Map  sales,  office  fees,  &c  

$        cts. 

27,232  87 

516  75 

140, S55  35 

768  50 

6,467  50 

690  00 

3,348  05 

43,211  78 

4,842  45 

28,154  26 

1,270  93 

1,741   42 

682  77 

978  35 

29,844  11 

29  73 

140  78 

271  52 

291,047  12 

1,998,219  92 
114,600  04 

8       cts. 

$            Cts 

27,232  87 

516  75 

140,855  35 

768  50 

1,048  01 

6,467  50 
690  00 

Mining  fees 

Grazing  lands  .                 

3,348  05 

47,259  79 

4.842  45 

Coal  lands . 

Stone  quarries ...... 

Dredging  leases 



28,154  26 
1,270  93 

1,741  42 

682  77 

978  35 

29,844  11 

29  73 

Rent  of  water  power 

140  78 
271  52 

4,048  01 

295,095  13 

Refunds 

96,359  25 
480  00 

95,879  25 

2,094,579  17 
115,080  04 

1,883,619  88 

1.979,499  13 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Accounts  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  15,   1908. 


P.  MARC  HAND, 

Acting  Accountant. 


B. — Statement  of  Ordnance  Lands  Revenue  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ended  March  31, 1908. 

Month.  Amount. 

1907— April $     676  52 

"        May 483  82 

June 2,269  01 

"        July 1,365  54 

"        August 280  20 

"         September 1,080  24 

October 437  39 

"        November 399  13 

"        December 91  86 

1908— January 852  63 

"        February 399  80 

"        March 338  81 

Total $  8,674  95 

P.  MARCHAND, 

Department  of  the  Interior,,  Acting  Accountant. 

Accounts  Branch, 

OttawAi  July  15,  1908. 


78 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


SCHOOL  LANDS. 


C. — Statement  of   Receipts  on  account  of  School  Lands  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 

.March  31,  1908. 


Month. 


Manitoba 
School 
Lands. 


1907 


April 


S    cts. 

6,137  89 

\l'av  22, 156  86 

June 32,944  12 

July   4K.122  15 

August 45,282  45 

September -4,210  04 

October 211,037  95 

November 101,494  16 

December 45,073  70 

1908. 

January   11,964  64 

February 13,288  38 

March.: 8,421  G6 


Saskatche- 
wan School 
Lands. 


Transfer  to  Alberta  School  Lands  of  amount  wrongly 
credited  to  Saskatchewan  School  Lands  in  1906- 
1907 


368,134  00 


S  cts. 

12,252  59 
25,454  36 
28,323  08 
33,034  05 
7,513  95 
15,205  99 
21.S.VJ  43 
32,987  42 
15,845  44 


6,054  36 

7,339  96 

10,865  04 


Alberta 
Soh<  »<>1 
Lands. 


Total." 


S  cts. 

6,174  16 

3,509  30 

1.728  50 

2,092  39 

1,632  65 

6,519  65 

15,393  11 

35,610  70 

31,041  50  I 


■5  cts. 

24,564  64 
51,120  52 
(£. 995  70 
S3.248  59 
54,429  05 
25,935  68 
66,283  49 
170,092  28 
91,960  64 


7.422  96  25,441  96 
4,816  60  25,444  94 
7,241  64  j  26.528  34 


211',.  728  67 
25  60 


368,134  00 


216,703  07 


123,183  16 


25  Co 


123,208  76 


708,045  a? 


708,045  83 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Accounts  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  15, 


P.  MARCHAND. 

Acting  Accountant. 


1908. 


D. — Statement  of  Registration  Fees  for  ths  fisca'  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 


District. 


Registrar. 


Total. 


•North  Alberta. . 
Yukon  Territory 


. .  . .  i  feo.  Roy     . . 
. .   .  .1.  E.  Girouard 


$     cts. 

100  00 
2,156  65 

2,256  65 


*  Revenue  collect. -d  pri  \  Lous  to  8th  September,  1906. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Accounts  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July   15,  1908. 


P.  MARCHAND, 

Acting  Accountant, 


DOMIXIOX  LANDS 


79 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  125 

E. — Statement  of  Fines  Collected   under  the  Immigration  Act  for  the  fiscal  year 

ended  March  31,  1908. 


11107. 


August   .    . 
September . 

October  . . . 


Dr.  A.  S.  Monroe  re  S.  S.  Jaurequiberry 

Dr.  G.  L.  Milne  re  S.  S.  Wangard 

f  E.  R.  Stephan  re  N.  Y.  &  K.  Co 

E.  B.  Marvin  &  Co.  re  S.  S.  Indiana     . . . 


S     ots. 

400  00 
350  00 

900  00 


1,650  00 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Accounts  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July   15,   1908. 


P.   MARCHAND, 

Acting  Accountant. 


F. — Statement   of  Casual   Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  ended    March  31,  1908. 


Name. 


W 


mmpeg. 


Immigration  Com 
J.  T.  Lithgow    . . 

Howard  Douglas 

James  White 

J.  B.  "Harkin 

F.  T.  Congdon 

.1.  M.  Macoun 

J.  A.  Bannerman 

D.  J.  McDonald 

Dr.  J.  E.  Woodman 

Hon.  Frank  Oliver 

Otto  J.  Klotz 

Dr.  W.  L.  Ellis 

E.  .1.  O'Connell    

•Tames  White 

Grand  Trunk  Railway  Co. 

Alex.  Ayotte 

Kilroy,  Morgan  &  Co. . . 


A.  F.  Jury 

J.  B.  Cha'llies 

F.  T.  Congdon 

Geo.  L.  Dempster 

Immigration  Com.,  Winnipeg, 


Particulars, 


Tents  sold  by  J.  K.  Buim .' 

Unclaimed  tstates  in  the  Yukon  Territory 

Refund  of  overpayment  to  C.  H.  Deutchman 

Refund  acct.  travelling  expenses 

ii  travelling  expenses 

..  travelling  expenses 

M  expenses 

Proceeds  sale  of  team  of  horses    ..        

Refund  acct.  expenses  re  Genelle  vs.  The  King 

Refund  travelling  expenses 

■  i  travelling  expenses 

■i  travelling  expenses 

H  expenses 

ii  expenses 

M  expenses 

■  I  of  double  payments  for  freight 

.1  of  salary  15  to  31  Aug.,   11105,  not  used. 

„  of  overcharge  on   towels   re    Vancouver 

Hospital  

Proceeds  sale  of  old  bonus  forms. 
Refund  acct.  travelling  expenses 

■  i  travelling  expenses 
Proceeds  sale  of  old  office  furniture 


of  sheaves  of  barley  to  D.  Wood 

ii  ii  ii     of  hard  tack  by  C.  W.  Speers 

Public  Works  Dept Refund    acct.    freight    paid    G.    T.  Ry.    Co.,    Royal 

Observatory 

A.  R.   Wade     Refund  acct.  travelling  expenses 

G.  R.  Lancofield '  h  travelling  expenses 

C.  A.  Bigger  

K.  M.  Ogilvie  

C.  A.  Bigger 

K.  O'Kelly   

A.  D.  L.,Calgarv 

J.  W.  E.  Darby  ' 

Miss  Sarah  Doyle 

Markham  &  Dracup 


W.  A.  J.  Baker 
W.  S.  Davis 


trigonometrical  surveys  of  1006 

travelling  expenses   

trigonometrical  surveys  of  1906 

travelling  expenses 

of  cheque  re  extinguishing  fire  not  used .  . 

travelling  expenses 

of  cheque  acct.  services  re  Doukhobors. . . 
of    cheque    acct.    livery    re    Doukhobor 

pilgrimage ...    

services  and  expenses  re  insane  in  Kee- 

watin  

services  and  expenses  re  insane  in  Kee- 

watin. 


Amount. 


$    cts. 


!)  25 
,363  54 

71 

25 

21  95 

57  20 

141  95 

125  00 

20  75 

5  10 

450  00 

16  76 

50  00 

11  10 

10  00 

1  11 

41  13 

60  00 

2  13 

30  65 

25 

8  00 

3  00 

29  50 

3  91 

46  45 

25  00 

491  23 

24  31 

2  99 

50  85 

100  00 

42  48 

20  00 

2  00 

20  00 

14  00 

80 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


i 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
F. — Statement  of  Casual  Revenue  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1908. — Con. 


Name. 


Particulars. 


Immigration  Comr.,  Winnipeg.    ...  »  A.  E.  Rogers  railway  fare 

.1    \V.  E.  Darby     n  of  Dom.  Lands  cheque  No.  17432  of  Aug. 

29,  1900,  not  used 

Immigration  Comr.,   Winnipeg  Proceeds  saleof  fittings,  &c,  of  old  Selkirk  Hall 

Imperial  Government Share  of  Alaska  Boundary  Arbitration  


Refunds. 


Casual R  penue,  Northivest  Territories. 

Hudson's  Bay  Co Liquor  permit .   . .  S 


K.  and  L.  McL 1 

Supt.  J.  I).  Moodie 
Inspr.  E.  A.  Pelletier 
Robert  Kane 


.1.  McKay 

Hudson's  Bay  Co. 


Fine  for  taking  liquor  into  North  west  Ter- 
ritories   

Liquor  permit 


F.  Fisher 

Hudson's  B;n  I '" 


Casual  Btvenue,  Relief  Advances. 

1876. 

Relief  mortgages 1894 

Seed  grain  advances 1896 

190U. 

1901  . 

„   .  1906 


Refunds 


8  00 
16  00 

29  25 
4  00 

4  00 

5  00 
2  00 
2  00 

25  00 

2  00 

28  00 

30  00 
2  00 
2  00 

83  00 

6  00 

2,554  44 

34  85 

1.503  31 
1,812  19 
425  10 
51  98 
1,018  42 
4,233  53 


Amount. 
•*    cts. 

1   -' 

100  00 

72  00 
13,789  94 

S17.260  34 
18  75 

SI 7,247  59 


248  25 


2,519  59 


9.H44  53 
29,059  96 


P.  MARCH  AND, 

Acting  Accountant. 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Accounts  Branch. 

Ottawa,  July  15,  1908. 

G. — Statement  showing  Seed  Grain  and   Relief    Mortgages  for  the   fiscal  year  ended 

March  31,  1908. 


• 

G 

-p 

o 
at 

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o 

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o 

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=  i 

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$        cts. 

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$       cts. 

%     Cts. 

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Sets. 

S        cts. 

S       cts. 

%  Cts. 

$        cts. 

S       cts. 

4,336  31 

1,062  97 

52  )■". 

446  94 

1,820  13 

1,907  88 

790  7!. 

973  00 

1.503  31 

12,899  84 

Refunds. 

102  78 

44  55 

47 

21  84 

19  38 

9S  69 

27  33 

f.-J  15 

374  19 

1,233  53 

1,018  42 

r.l  us 

425  10 

1,806  75 

1,812  19 

703  46 

910  91 

1.503  31 

12,525  65 

Department  of  the  Interior, 
Accounts  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  15,  1908. 


P.  MARCHAND, 

Acting  Accountant. 


DOM  I  \  m\T  LANDS 


81 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


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82 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


DOMINION  LANDS  REVENUE. 

Statement  of  Gross  Receipts  (Cash  and  Scrip)  on  account  of  Dominion  Lands  Re\enue 
for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1908,  compared  with  the  period  of  twelve 
months  ended  March  31,  1907. 


• 

Part  Millars. 

Fiscal  year 

ended  March 

31,  Won. 

Twelve 

months. 

Twelve 
months  end- 
ed March 
31,  19o7. 

Increase.       Decrease. 

Net  decrease 

Dominion  Lands  Agencies.         

$      cts. 

1,082,693  22 
156,053  72 
27,232  S7 
87,274  43 

180,587  83 

S       cts. 

1,157,227  80 

458,285  37 
21,683  24 
71,235  74 

105,455  42 

$      Cts.           8      cts. 
74.534  58 

1      cts. 

Crown  Timber  Agencies 

Rocky  Mountains  Park  of  Canada 

Hav,  mining,  coal,  grazing.  Sic...     .    . 

5.  .".49  63 
L6.038  69 
75,132  41 

2.231  65 

1,833,842  07 
260,737  10 

1,813,887  57 
326,909  66 

96,720  73 

76,766  23 
66,172  56 

Yukon  Territory 

2,o94,579  17 

2,140,797  23 

96,720  73 

142,938  79 

46,218  06 

Note— Increase  in  Dominion  Lands  Revenue 
Decrease  in  Yukon  Revenue.  ....... 


819,954  50 
66,172  56 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Accounts  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  15,  1908. 


P.  MARCHAND, 

Achat/  Accountant. 


No.  29. 

REPORT  OF  THE  ORDNANCE  AND  ADMIRALTY  LANDS  BRANCH. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq.,  Ottawa.  June  15,  1908. 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  report  upon  the  work  in  con- 
nection with  this  branch  of  the  department  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  Maroh  31, 
1908. 

Within  the  period  covered  by  this  report  two  sales  of  ordnance  land  were  held, 
namely,  in  the  city  of  Toronto  and  in  the  town  of  Niagara-on-the-Lake,  and  which 
are  fully  reported  on  under  these  respective  localities. 

In  reference  to  lands  previously  sold  or  held  under  leases  issued  by  the  Imperial 
authorities  with  the  privilege  of  having  such  leasehold  property  converted  into  free- 
hold upon  payment  in  cash  of  the  amount  of  consideration  money  placed  thereon.  38 
whole  lots,  6  half  lots  and  one  small  island  (Commissary  Island),  situated  in  the 
various  localities  mentioned  hereunder,  and  in  the  accompanying  statement  marked 
'  A.'  have  been  redeemed  and  letters-patent  issued: — 

(1.)  Chambly,  P.Q. — Four  lots,  forming  part  of  the  ordnance  .reserve  at  this  point 
which  were  sold  in  1905  for  the  sum  of  $780,  and  this  .amount  having  been  paid  in 
full,  letters-patent  were  issued  for  these  lots.  The  sum  of  $390,  being  the  balance  of 
purchase  money,  was  received  during  the  past  fiscal  year. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  83 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

(2.)  Edmunston,  N.B.- — Four  lots,  being  part  of  the  ordnance  reserve  in  this 
locality,  and  previously  sold  for  the  sum  of  $310,  were  fully  redeemed  and  letters- 
patent  issued.   The  balance  of  purchase  money  received  within  the  last  year  was  $96.03. 

(3.)  Grand  Falls,  N.B. — Twenty  lots,  embraced  within  the  limits  of  the  reserve 
near  this  town  which  were  sold  at  various  dates  for  the  total  sum  of  $1,040,  have  been 
paid  for  in  full  and  letters-patent  issued  therefor.  The  balance  of  purchase  money 
received  within  the  past  fiscal  year  amounts  to  $494.15. 

(4.)  Nepean. — One  lot,  forming  part  of  a  sub-division  of  part  of  lot  K.  conces- 
sion C,  being  a  portion  of  the  land  in  this  township  acquired  for  the  purposes  of  the 
Rideau  canal,  and  which  was  sold  at  public  auction  in  1S98  for  the  sum  of  $270, 
was  paid  for  in  full  and  letters-patent  issued.  The  balance  of  purchase  money  re- 
ceived during  the  year  was  $216. 

(5.)  Niagara-on-the-Lake. — Six  lots  in  this  historic  town,  being  a  sub-division 
of  what  is  known  as  '  The  Hospital  Lots,'  were  offered  for  sale  by  public  auction  with- 
in the  fiscal  year.  These  lots  were  put  up  en  bloc,  but  as  only  one  bid  was  received 
and  that  slightly  in  advance  of  the  upset  price,  it  was  considered  advisable  to  offer 
them  separately.  Lot  '  A '  was  then  started  at  the  upset  price,  namely,  $250  and  was 
sold  for  the  sum  of  $268,  an,  advance  of  $18  on  the  upset  price,  and  one-fifth  of  the 
purchase  money,  or  $53.60,  was  paid  down. 

Owing  to  the  indifference  shown  on  the  part  of  prospective  purchasers  to  ac- 
quire these  lots,  and  the  small  advance  on  the  upset  price  obtained  for  lot  '  A,'  it 
was  deemed  expedient  and  in  the  interest  of  the  department  to  withdraw  frvru  sale 
the  remaining  five  lots,  it  being  confidently  anticipated  that  at  a  more  favourable 
time  these  lots  could  be  readily  disposed  of  at  a  considerable  advance  on  the  upset 
price. 

(6.)  Ottawa. — The  lots  in  this  locality  are  held  by  tenants  under  the  provisions 
contained  in  the  original  leases  granted  by  the  Imperial  authorities  with  the  option 
of  purchasing  their  leaseholds  upon  payment  in  cash  of  the  amount  of  consideration 
money  placed  thereon.  During  the  last  fiscal  year  four  whole  lots  and  six  half  lots 
were  redeemed  and  patents  issued,  the  total  amount  of  consideration  money  received 
therefor  being  $1,141.99. 

(7.)  Quebec. — Five  lots,  forming  part  of  the  sub-division  of  the  '  Cove  Field,' 
which  were  sold  in  1900  for  the  sum  of  $3,375.  This  amount  having  been  paid  in  full, 
letters-patent  were  issued  covering  these  lots. 

(8.)  Shelburne. — A  small  island,  situated  in  Shelburne  Harbour  and  known  as 
'  Commissary  Island '  which  was  held  under  lease  for  upwards  of  14  years  and  upon 
which  the  lessee  had  made  extensive  improvements,  was,  in  accordance  with  the  pro- 
visions of  the  Ordnance  Lands  Act,  Chapter  58,  Revised  Statutes  of  Canada,  1906, 
sold  at  a  valuation.  The  island  in  question  was  valued  at  $650,  and  payment  of  this 
amount  having  been  made  in  cash,  letters-patent  were  issued  for  this  property. 

(9.)  Toronto. — A  sale  of  ordnance  land  by  public  auction  was  held  in  this  city 
within  the  fiscal  year.  The  property  offered  for  sale  consisted  of  one  small  lot  situated 
on  the  north  side  of  Clifford  street,  upon  which  an  upset  price  of  $250  was  placed. 
This  lot  was  sold  for  the  sum  of  $510,  more  than  double  the  upset  price,  and  the  first 
instalment  of  the  purchase  money  amounting  to  $102,  was  paid  down  at  the  time  of 
sale. 

The  following  statements  are  hereto  annexed : — 

(A.)  Statement  showing  the  number  of  lots  sold  or  redeemed;  the  amounts  for 
which  such  lots  were  originally  sold  and  the  sums  received  during  the  fiscal  year  as 
instalments  or  balances  of  purchase  money. 

(B.)  Statement  giving  the  several  localities  where  ordnance  lands  are  situated  on 
account  of  which  moneys  have  been  received  during  the  fiscal  year,  the  net  revenue 
received  amounting  to  $8,652.95. 

25— i— 6J 


81  DEPARTMENT  OF  Till;  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

(C.)  Statement  showing  the  amounts  received  each  month  of  the  fiscal  year,  classi- 
fied as  fees,  rent  or  interest  equivalent  to  rent,  and  principal. 

(D.)  Statement  showing-  the  amounts  due  and  unpaid  on  account  of  purchastt 
money  and  rent  or  interest.  The  total  amount  shown  to  be  due  and  unpaid  is 
$60,166.36,  or  $853.70  less  than  last  year. 

The  correspondence  and  general  office  work  in  connection  with  thi<  branch  show 
a  marked  increase  during  the  last  year.  The  number  of  letters  received,  registered 
and  filed  was  460;  number  of  letters  written,  copied,  indexed  and  mailed,  475;  and 
74  reports  upon  various  properties  and  matters  pertaining  to  this  branch  were  prepared 
and  submitted. 

In  addition  to  the  number  of  letters  written  there  were  281  circulars  mailed  from 
this  office,  and  215  accounts  open  in  the  books  of  this  branch  with  purchasers  and 
tenants  of  ordnance  lands  prepared  and  rendered. 

The  accounts  open  in  the  ledgers  have  been  carefully  and  regularly  posted;  the 
receipt  book,  cash  book  and  monthly  statement  book  have  been  carefully  kept,  and  a 
monthly  return  of  all  moneys  received  in  this  branch  regularly  furnished  the  Ac- 
countant of  the  department. 

There  were  23  assignments  received,  examined  and  registered,  an  increase  of  9 
over  the  previous  fiscal  period;  26  draft  letters-patent  prepared,  an  increase  of  3  com- 
pared with  the  report  for  1906-7. 

Within  the  last  fiscal  period  two  new  leases  and  one  renewal  lease  were  issued : 
and  one:  piece  of  ordnance  land  situated  in  the  city  of  Kingston  transferred  by  order 
in  council  from  class  two  to  class  one  and  placed  under  the  control  of  the  Minister 
of  Militia  and  Defence. 

In  addition  to  the  foregoing  report  upon  the  work  appertaining  to  the  Ordnance 
Lands  Branch,  the  work  in  connection  with  the  recording,  copying,  indexing,  printing 
and  filing  of  copies  of  all  orders  in  council  passed  from  time  to  time  relating  to  this 
department  is  likewise  faithfully  and  efficiently  carried  on  under  my  supervision. 

The  number  of  orders  in  council  dealing  with  the  administration  of  this  depart- 
ment in  its  various  branches  is  annually  increasing,  owing  no  doubt  to  the  many, 
varied  and  important  questions  with  which  the  department  is  called  upon  to  deal. 

A  conception  may  be  formed  of  the  rapid  increase  in  this  branch  of  departmental 
work  when  attention  is  drawn  to  the  fact  that  the  records  in  this  office  show  that  94 
more  orders  in  council  affecting  this  department  were  passed  in  1907  than  in  the  pre- 
ceding year,  or  an  increase  of  over  30  per  cent. 

I  may  also  point  out  that  many  of  the  orders  in  council  passed  each  year  have 
long  schedules  accompanying  them  which  must  be  copied  and  carefully  compared 
and  the  proof  copy  thereof  read  and  corrected  before  the  printed  copies  are  struck  off. 
Other  orders  in  council  have  plans  attached  for  the  purpose  of  illustrating  the  point 
or  points  which  the  order  is  intended  to  cover;  these  plans  must  be  ordered  on  requisi- 
tion and  lithograph  copies  obtained  and  attached  to  the  printed  copies  of  the  order 
in  council  before  the  same  are  filed. 

The  bound  volumes  of  the  orders  in  council  intended  for  departmental  use  only, 
and  for  the  purpose  of  a  permanent  record  likewise,  received  earnest  attention.  During 
the  past  year  two  additional  volumes  covering  the  years  1903  and  1904  have,  with 
their  very  full  indexes  been  completed,  the  volumes  for  1903  have  been  distributed 
among  the  several  branches  of  the  department,  and  those  for  1904  have  been  in  the 
hands  of  the  binder  at  the  Printing  Bureau  for  some  time  and  delivery  of  the  same 
at  an  early  date  has  been  promised. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir. 

Tour  obedient  servant. 

JOS.  P.  DUNNE, 

Clerk  in  charge  of  Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  Branch. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


85 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

A. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  Lots  sold  or  redeemed,  the  amounts  for  which 
such  redeemed  lots  were  originally  sold,  and  the  amounts  of  purchase  monf-y 
received  during  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Locality. 


Chambly. 

Kdmundston 

Grand  Falls 

Nepean 

Niagara-on-the-Lake 
Ottawa 


Quebec . 


Shelburne 
Toronto  . . 


Total  . 


Number  of 

Lots  sold 

or  redeemed. 


4  lots 
4  lots 
20  lots 
1  lot 
1  lot 

4  lots   and  6 
half- lots 

5  lots 


1  Island 
1  lot 


Amount  of 
consideration 
or  purchase. 


$       cts. 

780  00 
310  00 
1,040  00 
270  00 
268  00 

1,141  99 
3,375  00 


650  00 
510  00 


8,344  99 


Amount 

eceived  on 

account  during 

fiscal  year. 


Remarks. 


9       cts. 

390  00 

96  03 

494  15 

216  00 

53  60 

1,141  99 
Nil. 


Balance  of  purchase  money. 


650  00 
102  00 

3,143  77 


1st  instalment. 

Consideration  money. 
Balance    of    purchase    money 
paid  prior  to  period  covered 
I     by  this  report. 
Amount  of  valuation. 
1st  instalment. 


JOS.  P.  DUNNE, 

Clerk  in  Charge  of  Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  Branch. 


B. — Statement  showing  the  several  localities  on  account  of  which  moneys  have  been 
received  during  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

Locality.  Amount. 

Amherstburg $        2  00 

Burlington  Beach 100  00 

Chambly 673  77 

Edmundston 110  52 

Elmsley 9  70 

Fort  Cumberland 50  00 

Fort  Erie 22  00 

Gloucester 215  70 

Grand  Falls 888  53 

Grenville ....  2  00 

Kingston       202  25 

Longueuil 142  00 

Marlborough .  .■ 30  00 

Montreal 1  00 

Nepean 322  98 

Niagara 63  60 

Ottawa 2,177  16 

Owen  Sound 42  00 

"Oxford 14  20 

Point  Pelee 100 

Quebec 830  00 

Queenston 1  00 

Sarnia 200  00 

Shelburne 650  00 

Sorel 48  54 


DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII..  A.  1909 

Locality.  Amount. 

Brought  forward $6,75:*  95 

St.  Croix  River 2  00 

St.  Joseph's  Island 18  10 

Toronto 1,662  00 

fl'olford.. 102  40 

Registration  fees 90  50 

$    8,674  95 
Less  refund 22  00 


$   8,652  95 


JOS.  P.  DUNNE, 
Clerk  in  Charge  of  Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  Branch. 


C. — Statement  of  Receipts  on  account  of  Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  for  each  of 
the  fiscal  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Month. 


Pees. 


Kent 

or 

Interest. 


Princii>al. 


Total. 


1907 


■  t-. 


cts. 


-    eta 


cts. 


April 
May . . 
June. 


July . 

Augi^t 

September 

October. . . 

November. 

December 


January 

February 
Much. . . . 


1908. 


Total 


12  00 

12  00 
6  00 
2  00 
4  00 

12  CO 
2  00 

12  50 


8  00 

2  00 

13  50 


S3  10 


169  52 

173  m 

2,034  26 

1,067  21 

276  20 

.144  54 

83  11 

78  13 

68  35 


142  63 

338  30 

96  41 

4,862  32 


495  00 
298  16 
226  25 
296  33 

720  60 

352  28 

306  00 

31  01 


099  50 
50  00 

228  90 


3.704  03 


676  52 

483  82 

2,266  51 

1,365  54 

2S-I  20 

1.077  74 

437  39 

396  63 

89  36 


850  13 

390  30 

33S  81 

8,652  95 


JOS.  P.  DUNNE, 
Clerk  in  Charge  of  Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lands  Branch. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

D. — Money  due  by  Purchasers  and  Tenants  up  to  March  31,  1908. 


87 


Locality. 

Rent  or  Interest. 

Principal. 

Total. 

Beaver  Harbour 

Burlington  Beach .... 

Carillon 

Chambly 

$      cts. 

6  00 

240  00 

5  00 

256  62 

9  66 

32  78 

50 

92  00 

393  96 

56  08 

100  00 

51  00 

25 

2,903  08 

40  50 

11  60 

1  00 

1  00 
30  00 

2  00 
1,397  00 

1  00 
780  00 

4  00 
18  67 
71  40 

$        cts. 

347  00 
23  00 
38  40 

$       cts. 

6  00 
240  00 

5  00 
603  62 

32  66 

71  18 

Elmsley 

50 
92  00 

Grand  Falls 

Longueuil 

1,201  90 

50  96 

1,595  86 
107  04 
100  00 

Oromocto 

51  00 
25 

Ottawa 

2,903  06 
40  50 
11  60 

Oxford 

1  00 

1  00 
30  00 

Shelburne 

Sorel 

St.  Croix  River 

Toronto 

Township  of  Tay 

Turkey  Point 

52,000  00 

2  00 

1,397  00 

1  00 

52,780  00 

4  00 

18  67 

Wolford 

71  40 

6,505  10 

53,661  26 

60,166  36 

JOS.  P.  DUNNE, 
Clerk  in  Charge  of  Ordnance  and  Admiralty  Lawis  Branch. 


No.  30. 


REPORT  OF  THE  REGISTRAR  OF  CORRESPONDENCE. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Correspondence  Registration  Branch, 

Ottawa,  May  11,  190S. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  place  before  you  statement  '  A '  showing  the  number 
of  letters  filed  during  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1908,  and  the  amount  of  money 
received,  registered  and  sent  to  the  accountant;  also  statement  'B'  showing  the  num- 
ber of  letters  and  the  amount  of  money  received  during  each  fiscal  year  from  1900  to 
March  31,  1908. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

J.  M.  ROBERTS, 

Chief  Clerk. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  [XTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

A. — Statement  showing  the  Number  of  Letters  received  and  recorded  and  the  Money 
received  during  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 


■April 

May 

June 

July    

August 
September. 
October  . . . 
November 
December 


January 
February 

.March-  .  - 


1!M>7 


1908. 


Total 


Letters 

Received. 


14,250 
13,410 
16,630 

17,180 
17,116 
15,302 
14,100 
15.123 
16,820 


lti,025 
15,500 
16,232 


187,688 


Daily 

Average. 


Registered  Letters 


Received.        Sent. 


570 
536 
665 
661 
658 
638 
542 
605 
673 


641 
620 
650 


794 

' '.'.<: 

SI  I.", 
888 
!I46 
784 
936 
998 
'.'.-.7 


1,019 

1,315 

95S 


3,271 
3,177 
2,615 
2,511 
2,966 
2,529 
3,988 
3,652 
3.004 


3,115 
3,670 


Money 
Received. 


S 


cts, 


150.13r,  65 

99,225  94 

142,635  47 

206,14s  83 

77,116  88 

86,489  43 

87,207  06 

319,082  32 

185,821  63 


S6.247  19 
44,685  40 
73,433  52 


11.097       -   ::7.--'70  ;    1,558,230  32 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Correspondence  Registration  Branch, 
Ottawa,  May  11,  1908. 


M.  ROBERTS. 

Chief  Clerk 


B. — Statement  showing  the  Number  of  Letters  received  and  recorded  and  the  Money 
received  during  each  fiscal  vear  from  1900  to  March  31,  1908. 


Fiscal  Year. 


Letters  Received 
and  Recorded 


1900 

1901     

1902 

1903 

1904 

1905 

1906   

1907  (nine  months) 

1908     


48,663 

67,860 
67,722 
87,861 
113,074 
135,908 
170.729 
150,462 
187,684 


Money 

Received. 


¥  cts. 

200,S31  71 

333.534  02 

382,999  87 

629,586  47 

630,355  44 

628,219  76 

875,933  54 

1.337.780  94 

1,558,230  32 


Dkpartment  of  the  Interior, 

Correspondence  Registration  Branch, 
Ottawa.   May  11,  1908 


J.  M.  ROBERTS, 

Chief  Clerk. 


DOUIXIOX  LANDS 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


No.  31. 

REPORT  OF  THE  SCHOOL  LANDS  BRANCH. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

School  Lands  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  14,  1908. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 
Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  report  on  the  business  of  the 
School  Lands  Branch  of  the  department  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


sales. 

In  consequence  of  the  success  of  the  series  of  auction  sales  of  school  lands  held 
in  Manitoba  during  the  autumn  of  1900.  it  was  decided  to  hold  another  series  in  the 
following  spring.  These  lands  had  been  previously  valued  by  Inspectors  Ingram  and 
Potts,  and  sales  were  accordingly  held  at  a  number  of  points  in  Manitoba  after  they 
had  been  well  advertised,  both  through  the  newspapers  and  by  means  of  posters. 

The  result  of  the  sales  was  as  follows  : — 


Place  of  Sain. 


Pilot  Mound 

Manitou 

Somerset    ... 

Holland 

Carman 

l'ortage  la  Prairie 

McGregor 

C'arberry 

Neepawa 

Gladstone 

Gimli  

Winnipeg 

Total . 


Date  of  Sale. 


May 

I     >. 
June 


1907 

28.. 
«!.. 

4   . 

6. . 

8.. 
11.. 
13.. 
15.. 
18.. 
20.. 
25. 
28  . 


Area  in  acres 
sold. 


7,499 
5,226 
5,088 
2,616 

16,637 
6,505 
2,240 
640 
3,021 
4,399 
3,854 

28,182 


16 

■45 
•39 
•38 
33 
52 
•36 
00 
00 
•52 
'87 
•22 


86,511  50 


Amount 
realized 


$        cts. 

74,712  72 
48,513  46 
56,212  25 
20,461  16 

160,977  54 
56,422  64 
17,922  52 
4,480  00 
28,636  00 
37,992  02 
40,797  96 

355,496  44 


902,624  71 


Average 

price  per 

acre. 


cts. 

9  96 
9  21 
9  88 

7  82 
9  67 

8  67 

8  00 

7  00 

9  44 

8  63 

9  48 
12  61 


10  42 


As  it  was  found  in  the  case  of  several  parcels  offered  at  the  Winnipeg  and 
Gimli  sales  that  the  land  was  more  or  less  timbered,  it  was  made  a  condition  of  these 
particular  sales  that,  the  purchaser  would  have  to  take  out  a  permit  to  remove  the 
timber  from  the  land  subject  to  the  payment  of  the  usual  dues,  but  that  the  amount 
so  received  would  be  applied  on  the  purchase  price  of  the  land,  the  object  being  to 
prevent  the  purchaser  stripping  the  land  of  valuable  timber  and  then  abandoning  the 
sale  after  paying  possibly  only  the  first  instalment. 

While  it  was  not  considered  advisable  to  hold  any  general  auction  sales  during 
the  following  autumn,  it  was  decided,  in  consequence  of  the  number  of  applications 
received  for  school  lands   in    the   vicinity  of  Russell  and  Rossburn,   to  hold  auction 


90 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


\ 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

sales  at  these  points,  and  after  the  lands  had  been  duly  valued  sales  were  held  with 
the  following-  results  : — 


Place  of  .S;,!,.. 

1  >ate  of  Sale. 

Area  in  acres 
sold. 

Amount 

realized. 

Average 

price  per 

acre. 

Knssell 

Rossburn 

1907. 
November  5. . . . 

9.114  00 
7,136  20 

$        cts. 

90,668  05 
69,865  22 

S       cts. 

9  95 
9  79 

Total 

10,150  20 

160,933  27 

9  87 

The  total  area  sold  at  public  auction  during  the  fiscal  year  in  the  province  of 
Manitoba  was  102,761-50  acres  for  $1,063,157.98,  an  average  price  of  $10.35  per  acre. 

In  addition  to  this  there  were  a  number  of  small  sales  to  railway  companies  for 
right  of  way  and  other  purposes  of  the  railway,  comprising  329  -77  acres  for  $3,701.96, 
or  an  average  of  $11.22  per  acre. 

Upon  the  recommendation  of  the  Honourable  Mr.  Motherwell,  Commissioner  of 
Agriculture  for  Saskatchewan,  it  had  been  decided  to  hold  auction  sales  of  school 
lands  at  Abernethy  and  Esterhazy  in  that  province  during  the  autumn  of  1907,  and 
the  lands  were  valued  and  the  necessary  arrangements  made  for  the  sale. 

In  view,  however,  of  the  unfavourable  season,  and  of  the  unusual  financial  string- 
ency, it  was  found  necessary  to  postpone  them,  and  in  consequence  no  general  auction 
sales  were  held  in  that  province  during  the  fiscal  year. 

Several  small  parcels  were,  however,  sold  for  school  sites,  and  upon  the  applica- 
tion of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  and  as  they  agreed  to  pay  one-half 
the  expenses  in  connection  with  the  sale,  section  11,  in  township  25,  range  5  west  of 
the  3rd  meridian,  and  the  northeast  quarter  of  section  29,  in  township  39,  range  27 
west  of  the  3rd  meridian,  were  put  up  at  public  auction  after  being  advertised  in  the 
usual  way.  The  first  mentioned  parcel,  section  11,  in  township  25,  range  5  west  of 
the  3rd  meridian,  was  put  up  at  Davidson  on  Ojtober  13,  1907,  ani  wis  sold  for 
$13,2)00,  or  an  average  price  of  $20.62,  and  ths  njrthaast  quarter  of  saction  29,  in 
township  39,  range  27  west  of  the  3rd  meridian,  was  sold  at  Battleford  for  $25  per 
acre,  half  the  expenses  being  paid  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  as 
previously  arranged. 

As  an  evidence  of  the  keenness  of  the  competition  at  some  of  the  sales,  I  may 
quote  that  of  a  parcel  of  three  acres  of  land  near  Humboldt,  which  was  offered  in 
order  to  afford  the  board  of  school  trustees  an  opportunity  of  acquiring  it,  and 
which  was  put  up  at  an  upset  price  of  $7  per  acre  and  sold  at  $501  per  acre. 

The  total  area  sold  by  public  auction  in  the  province  during  the  fiscal  year  was 
806  acres  for  $18,724.75,  an  average  price  of  $15.21  per  acre. 

There  were  5S2  -44  acres  sold  under  the  Railway  Act  to  the  railway  companies  for 
right  of  way  and  other  purposes  of  the  railway  for  $7,604.98,  an  average  of  $13.06 
per  acre. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


91 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

In  Alberta,  auction  sales  were  held  at  Calgary  and  Cardston  on  November  13, 
1907,  with  the  following  results  : — 


Place  of  Sale. 

Date  of  Sale. 

Area  in  acres 
sold. 

Amount 
realized. 

Average 

price  per 

acre. 

Calgary   .    . 
Cardston   . . . 

Total   

1907. 

November  13 

16  ... 

4,779  52 
5,261  33 

10,010  85 

$       cts. 

41,106  09 
55,958  54 

97,065  23 

S       cts. 

8  06 
10  62 

9  34 

Several  small  parcels  were  also  sold  for  school  sites  and  cemetery  purposes. 

The  total  area  sold  at  auction  in  the  province  during  the  fiscal  year  was  10,057  -So 
acres  for  $97,134.23,  or  an  average  price  of  $9.66  per  acre. 

In  addition  to  this,  180  -94  acres  were  sold  to  railway  companies,  under  the  Rail- 
way Act  for  right  of  way  and  other  purposes  of  the  railway  for  the.  sum  of  $2,350.85, 
an  average  of  $12.99  per  acre. 

The  total  area  sold  by  public  auction  during  the  fiscal  year  in  the  three  provinces 
was  113,625  -35  acres  for  $1,179,016.96,  an  average  price  of  $10.38  per  acre. 

In  addition  to  this.  1,093  -15  acres  were  sold  in  the  three  provinces  to  railway  com- 
panies, under  the  provisions  of  the  Eailway  Act,  for  right  of  way  and  other  purposes  of 
the  railway  for  the  sum  of  $13,657.79,  or  an  average  price  of  $12.50  per  acre,  making 
the  total  area  disposed  of  114,712-07  acres,  for  $1,192,615.85,  or  an  average  price  of 
$10.40  per  acre. 

LEASES. 

The  number  of  grazing  leases  issued  during  the  current  year  was  as  follows : — 

Manitoba 23 

Saskatchewan •  •     226 

Alberta 162 

Total 411 

The  total  revenue  from  grazing  leases  during  the  same  period  was  as  follows: — 

Manitoba $1,717  75 

Saskatchewan ' 8,518  10 

Alberta 10,887  47 

Seventeen  leases  were  issued  for  coal  mining  purposes  during  the  fiscal  year, 
all  of  which  were  in  Alberta. 

The  revenue  from  coal  leases  was  as  follows: — 

Saskatchewan $1,160  82 

Alberta 3,303  02 

Appended  hereto  are  three  statements,  lettered  '  A,'  '  B,'  and  '  C,'  showing  the  total 
net  revenue,  duly  classified,  from  all  sources  during  the  fiscal  year,  from  school  lands 
in  the  provinces  of  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  respectively,  and  showing 
separately  the  revenue  collected  at  head  office  and  at  the  different  agencies. 

It  will  be  seen  from  these  statements  that  the  gross  revenue  received  at  head  office 
from  the  school  lands  in  the  three  provinces  during  the  fiscal  year  was  $672,025.39,  and 
at  the  agencies  $37,048.69.  making  a  gross  total  of  $709,074.08,  or,  after  deducting  all 
refunds,  a  net  total  of  $703,692.99. 


92  DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

Statement  '  D,'  hereto  appended,  shows  the  revenue  collected  from  school  lands  by 
:i'h  agency  during  the  fiscal  year. 

Statements  '  E,'  '  F,*  and  'G5  show  the  revenue  and  expenditure  for  each  province, 
and  the  balance  standing  to  its  credit  on  the  1st  of  April,  1008,  the  balance  being  as 
follows : — 

Manitoba $1,935,791  84 

Saskatchewan 736,703  75 

Alberta 369,763  4:: 

These  figures  represent  only  the  principal  moneys  collected  on  account  of  sales. 
all  revenue  from  other  sources,  after  deducting  the  cost  of  management,  having  been 
paid  over  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  to  the  governments  of  the  three  province?.  The 
amount  so  paid  to  the  provinces  for  the  past  fiscal  year  was  as  follows: — 

Manitoba $59,038  14 

Saskatchewan 51,053  25 

Alberta 43,633  93 

In  addition  to  the  above  amounts  the  following  sums  were  paid  to  the  provinces 
of  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  by  the  Finance  Department,  being  the  interest 
on  the  school  lands  funds,  namely:  to  Manitoba,  $69,147.25;  Saskatchewan,  $32,352.23; 
Alberta,  $16,392.17,  making  the  total  sum  paid  to  each  province  as  follows: — 

Manitoba $128,185  39 

Saskatchewan 83,405  48 

Alberta 60,026  10 

The  revenue  for  the  past  fiscal  year  shows  a  slight  falling  off  as  compared  with 
that  for  the  prvious  fiscal  period  ending  March  31,  1907,  being  $703,692.99,  as  against 
$721,864.S8  for  the  previous  year. 

This  is  chiefly  due  to  the  fact  that  owing  to  the  partial  failure  of  last  seasoivs  crop, 
and  the  fnancial  stringency,  many  purchasers  were  unable  to  meet  their  instalments, 
and  also  owing  to  the  same  cause  fewer  auction  sales  were  held. 

The  business  of  the  branch,  however,  continues  to  increase  in  volume,  as  applica- 
tions to  purchase  and  lease  school  lands  become  more  numerous  each  year. 

The  following  is  a  statement  of  the  clerical  work  of  the  School  Lands  Branch 
for  the  past  fiscal  year: — 

Letters  received 9,955 

Letters  sent 18,682 

Notices,  statements  of  accounts,  &e 6,000 

Leases  prepared  and  issued 428 

Cultivation  permits 26 

Receipts  issued 2,542 

Accounts  kept  posted 8,75S 

Assignments  registered 192 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

FRANK  S.  CHECKLEY, 

Chief  Clerk. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


93 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


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DOMINION  LANDS 


95 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


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02 


96  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

STATEMENT  D. 

School  Lands  Revenue  collected  through    Dominion   Lands   Agencies  during  the  fiscal 

year  ending  March  31.  1908. 


Sales. 

Total. 

2    r 

■^  ."^ 

rt  c 

>  Z 
'3  J- 

6 

Grazing. 

Timber. 

Hay. 

Coal. 

Agem 

Principal. 

Interest 

Total. 

{      ots. 

359  12 
1,611  70 
8,432  45 

§    cts. 

74  65 

234  48 
2,862  82 

"335  75 
806  79 

433  77 

1,846  24 

11,295  27 

1,428  70 
1,410  16 

S  cts. 

7  75 

10  00 

S    cts. 

219  86 
187  10 
349  50 
253  79 
062  S6 
180  60 
322  07 
303  62 
451  07 
310  49 
2,554  35 
1,615  08 
451  26 
175  70 

$    cts. 

2,446  78 
115  25 

9  25 
01  20 
42  25 

11  25 
'513  85 

S        LtS. 

784  00 
300  10 

$  cts. 

t      cts. 

3,884  41 
2,448  69 

11.9S2  22 
782  09 

2.79.'.  21 

1.96S   16 

679  02 

Brandon..      

329  7o 
528  30 ' . . .   . 
694  40. 
316  20  .  .    . . 
304  70 
321  50 

165  30! 

210  60     .... 
35  50  181  80 
304  00  102  25 
344  20  293  60 
454  69    97  02 

Regina 

Yorkton 

Prince  Albeit 

1,092  95 
603  37 

Battleford 

625  12 

Humboldt 

322  78 

322  75 

1  25 
13  25 

939  12 
521  09 

2  772  90 

Calgary    

Edmonton 

1,792  27 

124  15 
97  00 

1,068  24 

131  85 

1  00 

2,860  51 

256  00 

98  on 

4,953  09 

1,345  06 
1.352  51 

14,435  82 

5,515  58 

19,951  40 

32  25 

S,037  35 

3,199  83 

5,153  19  674  07 

37,048  69 

Department  of  the  Interior, 
School  Lwds  Branvh. 

Ottawa,  June  10,  1908. 


FRANK  S.  CHECKLEY, 
C/i  iff 


dork. 


STATEMENT  E. 

Revenue  and  Expenditure  on  account  of  Manitoba  School  Lands 

ended  March  31,  1908. 


for  the  fiscal  year 


Particulars, 


Bv  balance  on  April  1,  11107 

By  sales 

By  cultivation  permits 

By  timber,  hay,  grazing,  etc     

By  interest  on  fund 

By  interest  on  fund 

Ti '  ci  1st  of  management  at  Ottawa 

To  salaries,  printing,  advertising,  etc. . . . 

To  interest  on  fund  paid  to  Manitoba 
Government 

To  interest  and  revenue  paid  to  Manitoba 
Government 

To  interest  on  fund,  paid  Manitoba  Go- 
vernment     . 

To  balance  on  March  31,  1908 


Period. 


12  months   to  March   31,   1908. 


On  account 

9  months  to  March  31,  1908.. 
12  months  to  March  31,  1908. 


cts. 


I  In  account   

12  months  to  March  31,  1908 
9  months  to  March  31,   l'.HiS. . 


1,395  83 
10,124  81 

28,000  00 

59,038  14 

41,147  25 
1,935,791  84 


2,075,4!C  s; 


Cr. 


S       cts. 

1,640,689  70 

360,041  71 

170  25 

5,448  90 

28,000  00 

41,147  25 


2,075,497  87 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

School  Lands  Branch, 

Ottawa,  June  10,  1908. 


FRANK  S    CHECKLEY, 

Chief  Clerk. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


97 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


STATEMENT  F. 


Revenue  and   Expenditure  on  account  of  Saskatchewan   School    Lands     for  the   fiscal 

year  ended  March  31,  1908. 


Particulars. 


By  balance  on  April  1,  1907 

By  sales   

By  cultivation  permits 

By  timber,  hay,  grazing,  coal,  etc.. 

By  interest  on  fund 

By  interest  on  fund 


By  interest  on  fund. 

To  cost  of  management  at  Ottawa 

To  salaries,  printing,  advertising,  etc   . . . 
To  interest  on  fund  paid  to  Saskatchewan 

Government 

To  interest  on  fund  paid  to  Saskatchewan 

Government 


Period. 


12  months  to  March  31,  190H. 


12  months  to  June  30,  15107 

Amount  short  paid  to   June  30, 

1907 

12  months  to  March  31,   1908.  . . 


To  interest  on  fund  paid  to  Saskatchewan 
Government 

To  interest  and  revenue  paid  to  Saskat- 
chewan Government ...     .    

To  balance  on  March  31,  190S 


12  months  to  June  30,  1907 

Amount  short  paid  to   June  30, 
1907   


12  months  to  March  31,   1908. 


Dr. 


cts. 


1,395  83 
5,668  92 

16,203  34 


42  37 

16,106  52 

51,053  25 
736,703  75 


827,173  98 


Cr. 


S       cts. 

579,438  39 

203,362  09 

86  40 

11,934  87 

16,203  34 

42  37 
16,106  52 


827.173  98 


Department  op  the  Interior, 

School  Lands  Branch, 

Ottawa,  June  10,  1908. 


FRANK  S.  CHECKLEY, 

Chief  Cl-rk. 


STATEMENT  G. 

Revenue  and   Expenditure  on  account  of   Alberta  School   Lands   for  the  fiscal    year 

ended  March  31,  1908. 


Particulars. 


Period. 


By  balance  on  April  1,  1907 

By  sales 

By  cultivation  permits 

By  timber,  hay,  grazing,  coal,  etc 

By  interest  on  fund    

By  interest  on  fund    

To  cost  of  management  at  Ottawa 

To  salaries,  printing,  advertising,  etc. . . . 

To  interest  on  fund  paid  to  Alberta  Go- 
vernment   

To  interest  and  revenue  paid  to  Alberta 
Government 

To  intere-t  on  fund  paid  to  Alberta  Go- 
vernment      

To  balance  on  March  31,  190S 


12  months  to  March  31,   1908.. 


12  months  to  June  30,  1907 

9  months  to  March  31,  1908. .    . 
12  months  to  March   31,  1908.. 


12  months  to  June  30,  1907. . 
12  months  to  March  31,  1908. 
9  months  to  March  31,  1908.. 


Dr, 


S       cts. 


1,395  84 
6,828  97 

8,615  56 

43,633  93 

7,776  61 
309,703  43 


Cr. 


$ 


cts. 


298,973  40 
106,671  73 

17  75 

15,959  29 

8,615  56 

7.776  61 


438,014  34 


438,014  34 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

School  Lands  Branch, 

Ottawa,  June  10.   1908. 
25— i— 7 


FRANK  S.  CHECKLEY, 

Chief  Clerk. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


No.  32. 
REPORT  OF  THE  CORRESPONDENCE  MAILING  OFFICE. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Correspondence  Comparing  and  Mailing  Office, 

Ottawa.  May  18,  190S. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  to  you  herewith  a  statement  showing  in  part 
the  work  done  in  the  comparing  and  mailing  office  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior 
during  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant 

CHAS.  C.  PELLETLER, 

Clerk  in  Charge. 

Statement  of  the  work  done  in  the  Comparing  and  Mailing  Room  during  the  fiscal 

year  ending  Match  31,  1908. 


From  April  1,  1907,  to  March  31,  1908. 


Letters 
sent. 


1907. 


April. ..... 

May 

June 

July 

August    . 

September 

Octol"'i 

November 

December 


19(18. 


January. 

February 
March 


Total  for  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


24,730 

26,320 
23,659 
25,655 
22,641 
23,246 
25,317 
23,630 
22,600 


24,959 
23,102 
25,261 


Registered 

letters 
sent. 


291.02C 


3.271 
3,177 
2,615 
2,511 

2,966 
2,529 

:;.:<ss 

3.652 
3,004 


3,115 
3,670 

2.772 


87,270 


Telegrams 

-"•lit. 


Totals 


102 

28,103 

127 

29,630 

136 

26,310 

71 

28,237 

70 

25,677 

68 

25,843 

.S3 

29,388 

125 

27,407 

81 

25,685 

62 

28,136 

63 

26,835 

74 

27,607 

1,062 


329,358 


These  outgoing  letters  were  copied  in  135  1000-paged  letter-books. 
Besides  the  verifying  of  each  letter,  the  checking  of  the  thousands  of  inclosures 
accompanying  them,  there  were  1,095  pages  of  documents,  &c,  compared  during  the 
year. 

The  number  of  pages  of  letter-book  indexed  was  131,307;    almost  every  page  was 
indexed  i  i  double  entry 

Tbc  daily  average  of  letters  sent  out  was  965,  compared  with  950  last  year,  and 
the  grand  total    for   this   office  during  the   fiscal   year  was  329,358,   or   an   estimated 
ase  of  over  17,300  letters. 

CHAS.  C.  PELLETIER, 

Clerk   in    Charge. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  99 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

No.  33. 
REPORT  OF  THE  GEOGRAPHER, 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Office  of  the  Geographer, 

Ottawa,  March  31,  1908. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  report  as  follows  on   the   work  of  my   office  for  the 
past  year  : — 

The  staff  at  present  is  as  follows  : — 

J.  E.  Chalifour,  chief  draughtsman. 
H.  E.  Baine,  draughtsman. 
H.  Tache,  draughtsman. 
W.  Anderson,  draughtsman. 
J.  Beveridge,  draughtsman. 

F.  Inkster,  draughtsman. 
E.  D.  Bryant,  draughtsman. 
H.  M.  Blatchly,  draughtsman. 

G.  E.  Dumouchel,  draughtsman. 
•7:is.  Tv.  Bennie,  draughtsman. 
11.  W.  Craig,  draughtsman. 

C.  G.  Wood,  draughtsman. 

A.  M.  Darrach,  draughtsman 

I T.  W.  Wilson,  draughtsman. 

J.  P.  McElligott,  draughtsman 

A.  Groulx,  draughtsman. 

W.  Blue,  draughtsman. 

S.  Chandler,  draughtsman. 

Jules  Pigeon,  draughtsman. 

A.  Akerlindh,  in  charge  of  maps  and  plans. 

J.  S.  Gagnon.  clerk. 

Mrs.  D.  E.  Waine,  stenographer 

Miss  M.  P.  Martin,  stenographer. 

■T.  L.  Merrifield.  messenger. 

Mr.  E.  D.  Bryant  was  appointed  on  May  5,  1908,  to  undertake  the  compilation 
of  northeastern   Ontario   sheets  of  the   Standard   Topographical  map. 

Mr.  J.  P.  McElligott,  who  resigned  September  11,  1906,  to  accept  a  position  on 
the  National  Transcontinental  Railway,  was  reappointed  on  May  2,  1907. 

Mr.  Jules  Pigeon  was  appointed  on  May  17,  1907,  to  assist  in  the  preparation  of 
preliminary  compilations,  &e. 

Miss  M.  Perley  Martin  was  transferred  from  the  Immigration  Branch  on  July 
3,  1907,  to  assist  in  the  stenographic  work  and  typewriting. 

The  routine  work  of  the  office  has  been  carried  on  and  good  progress  has  been 
made  with  the  Standard  Topographic  sheets.  By  the  end  of  the  next  fiscal  year,, we 
will  have  sheets  covering  the  whole  of  southern  Ontario,  New  Brunswick  and  Nova 
Scotia,   east   of   Halifax.      In   northern   Ontario    two   sheets — 27   and    29 — have   been 

25— i— 74 


100  DEPARTMENT  OF  TEE  INTERIOR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VI!.,  A.  1909 

printed,  and  the  engraving  of  a  third.  No.  2S,  is  well  advanced,  the  compilation  of 
Nos.  30  and  31,  is  nearly  completed  and  the  ywill  be  engraved  during  the  coming 
winter.  As  soon  as  an  additional  draughtsman  is  appointed,  a  beginning  will  be  made 
on  the  sheets  of  northern  British  Columbia,  and,  before  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific 
is  opened  for  traffic,  we  will  have  completed  sheets  covering  the  whole  territory  trav- 
ersed by  it  between  the  Pacific  and  Quebec.  At  present  the  best  map  of  northern 
British  Columbia  is  that  compiled  in  1879,  under  the  direction  of  the  late  Dr.  G.  M. 
Dawson. 

Additions  and  corrections  have  been  made  to  the  copper  plates  of  the  southern 
British  Columbia,  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta,  Peace  Eiver,  the  100-mile 
map  of  Canada  and  the  35-mile  map  of  the  Dominion.  By  making  these  correction- 
to  the  plates,  these  maps  are  kept  up  to  date  and  new  editions  can  be  prepared  in  a 
very  short  time  and  at  a  minimum  of  cost.  Thus,  three  editions  of  the  western  prov- 
ince map  were  published  during  the  year,  two  for  the  homestead  map  and  one  for  the 
Odd-section  map.  Extensions  of  the  western  and  northern  portions  of  the  Alberta 
sheet  have  been  engraved,  so  that  we  now  have  a  complete  map  of  that  province  on 
the  scale  of  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Upwards  of  6.000  copies  of  the  atlas  of  Canada  have  been  bound  and  an  extensive 
distribution  made  to  the  higher  educational  institutions,  public  libraries,  banks,  news- 
papers, &c,  in  Canada.  In  Great  Britain,  760  copies  have  been  sent  to  the  most  im- 
portant public  libraries,  clubs,  newspapers,  government  offices,  scientific  societies,  &c. 
The  distribution  in  Great  Britain  was  made  under  the  instructions  of  His  Excellency 
Earl  Grey  who,  in  the  circular  letter  of  notification  sent  with  each  atlas,  stated  that 
he  did  '  not  know  of  any  work  of  equal  merit  published  in  any  other  country.'  I  need 
not  say  that  His  Excellency's  kindly  interest  in,  and  appreciatory  remarks  on  my 
work  are  highly  appreciated  by  me. 

On  August  11,  I  left  Ottawa  for  the  maritime  provinces,  and,  during  the  three 
weeks  following,  the  following  places  were  visited: — St.  John,  Fredericton,  Digby. 
Moncton,  Halifax,  Sydney,  North  Sydney  and  Charlottetown.  The  time  at  my  dis- 
posal did  not  permit  a  lengthy  stay  at  any  point,  except  St.  John,  but  I  was  enabled 
to  acquire  a  general  knowledge  of  the  developments,  &c,  which  was  of  material  assist- 
ance later. 

On  September  10,  I  received  instructions  to  prepare  information  respecting  trans 
Atlantic  steamship  navigation,  particularly  between  Canada  and  Great  Britain.  In 
connection  therewith  visits  were  made  to  a  number  of  points  in  Canada  and,  on 
October  15,  I  left  for  England  to  complete  the  information  required.  While  in  Eng- 
land a  set  of  fog  charts — one  for  each  month  in  the  year — based  on  the  inset  map> 
in  the  North  Atlantic  Pilot  charts,  published  monthly,  by  the  United  States  Hydro - 
graphic  Office,  were  prepared  and  a  small  preliminary  edition  printed.  These  charts 
showed  conclusively  that  the  number  of  days  in  each  and  every  month  in  the  year  in 
which  fog  may  be  expected  on  the  New  York  route  is  much  greater  than  in  the  same 
month  and  in  the  same  longitude  on  the  Canadian  route.  These  charts  were  defective 
inasmuch  as  they  did  not  show  the  fog  data  for  the  Belleisle  route  except  in  the 
immediate  vicinity  of  (he  strait,  but  since  my  return,  the  Director  of  the  British 
Meteorological  Office,  London,  has  courteously  had  this  information  compiled  so 
that  it  is  now  possible  to  compile  complete  '  fog '  charts  of  the  routes  from  Great 
Britain  to  the  Atlantic  ports  of  Canada  and  to  New  York.  Having  completed  the 
work  on  which  I  was  engaged,  I  left  London  December  13,  arriving  in  Ottawa  on  the 
21st.  On  January  19,  I  left  for  Washington  to  procure  information  respecting  the 
disputed  boundary  between  Labrador  and  Canada.  While  in  Washington  I  examined 
in  the  library  of  Congress,  upwards  of  two  hundred  maps  and  made  notes  respecting 
the  information  contained  in  them  that  bore  directly  or  indirectly  upon  the  subject 
of  my  mission.  Much  information  that  will  be  valuable  in  the  preparation  of  the  case 
for  submission  to  the  tribunal,  was  obtained  but  much  remains  to  be  done  and  the 


1  DOMINION  LANDS  101 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

work  cannot  be  considered  to  be  complete  till  the  maps  in  that  great  storehouse,  the 
British  Museum,  have  been  examined. 

During  the  past  year  4,036  letters  were  received  and  4,322  sent  out,  also  98,548 
maps  were  received  and  S0,781  sent  out. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Tour  obedient  servant, 

JAMES  WHITE, 

Geographer. 


MAPS   PUBLISHED. 

Railway  map  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  and  Newfoundland,  eight  sheets,  each  25 
inches  by  2(3  inches;  extends  from  the  Atlantic  to  the  Pacific  and  from  Maryland  and 
Oregon  on  the  south,  to  Cumberland  sound  and  Herschell  island,  on  the  north.  Scale, 
35  miles  to  1  inch.    Price,  mounted  with  rollers,  $3. 

Dominion  of  Canada  and  Newfoundland,  railway  edition,  16  inches  by  36  inches. 
Scale,  100  miles  to  1  inch. 

Dominion  of  Canada.     Scale,  58  miles  to  1  inch. 

Relief  map  of  Canada.     Scale,  100  miles  to  1  inch. 

Resource  map  of  Canada.     Scale,  100  miles  to  1  inch. 

Water-power  map,  average  rainfall  at  principal  points  in  Canada.  Scale,  100 
miles  to  1  inch. 

National  Transcontinental  Railway  map,  shows  route  of  the  National  Transconti- 
nental Railway,  Moncton  to  Pacific.     Scale,  100  miles  to  1  inch. 

Explorations  in  northern  Canada  and  adjacent  portions  of  Greenland  and  Alaska. 
Scale,  75  miles  to  1  inch. 

Rocky  Mountains — Banff  sheet — contoured  map  of  mountains  in  the  vicinity  of 
Banff.     Scale,  2  miles  to  1  inch. 

Rocky  Mountains — Lake  Louise  sheet — contoured  map  of  mountains  in  the  vicin- 
ity of  Laggan  and  Field.     Scale,  2  miles  to  1  inch. 

Manitoba,  Saskatchewan,  Alberta  and  southwestern  portion  of  Keewatin;  three 
sheets,  each  25  inches  by  36  inches.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Index  map  showing  townships  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta,  plans  of 
which  have  been  printed.     Scale,  35  miles  to  1  inch. 

General  map  of  the  northwestern  part  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada.  Edition  of 
lSl'S.     In  2  sheets.     Scale,  35  miles  to  1  inch. 

Map  showing  railways  in  Manitoba,  Alberta  and  Saskatchewan.  Scale,  35  miles  to 
1  inch. 

Manitoba.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Regina  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Red  Deer  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Calgary  land  district.     Scale,  12A  miles  to  1  inch. 

Estevan  land  district.     Scale,  12A  miles  to  1  inch. 

Winnipeg  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Lethbridge  land  district.     Scale,  12A  miles  to  1  inch. 

Edmonton  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Dauphin  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Yorkton  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Prince  Albert  land  district.     Scale,  12*  miles  to  1  inch. 

Battleford  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Moosejaw  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Brandon  land  district.     Scale,  12J  miles   to  1   inch. 


102  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  n'TERWR  i 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

Peace  River  district — Northern  Alberta — includes  the  country  between  Wetaskiwin 
and  Lake  Athabaska,  and  between  Athabaska  river  and  the  eastern  boundaryof  British 
Columbia.    Scale,  %ooooo  or  12  :63  miles  to  1  inch. 

Map  showing  electoral  divisions  (for  provincial  legislature  >  in  southern  Saskat- 
chewan.    Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch. 

Map  showing  electoral  divisions  (for  provincial  legislature)  in  southern  Alberta. 
Scale,  12J  miles  to  1  inch.  

Map  showing  all  the  even-numbered  sections  patented  to  January  1,  1908,  and  all 
even-numbered  sections  homesteaded  and  unpatented  or  finally  allotted  to  railway  com- 
panies to  that  date,  in  Manitoba.  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta.  3  sheets.  Scale,  12J 
miles  to  1  inch. 

Odd-section  map — Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta — shows  odd-numbered  sec- 
tions in  these  provinces  that  have  been  alienated  as  railway  land  grants,  &c.  Scale,  12  jr 
miles  to  1  inch. 

British  Columbia  '  Railway  Belt '  map.  including-  the  '  Railway  Belt '  and  the 
portion  of  the  province  lying  south  of  it.     Scale,  %ooo r  7*89  miles  to  1  inch. 

British  Columbia  Railway  Belt  Homestead  map — includes  southern  portion  of 
the  province  between  longitude  116°  and  123°  W.     Shows  lands  in  the  'railway  belt' 

that  have  been  alienated  by  homesteading,  sale.  &c.     Scale,  ih «>.  or  7-89  miles  to  1 

inch. 

Southeastern  Alaska  and  portion  of  British  Columbia.     Edition  of  1897.     Scale, 


Southeastern  Alaska  and  portion  of  British  Columbia,  sh  iwing  award  of  Alaska 
Boundary  tribunal,  October  20,  1903.     Scale,  %60000. 

Yukon — extends  from  Lynn  canal  on  the  south,  to  Eagle  on  the  north,  and  from 
the  Pacific  to  the  Frances  river.     Scale.  Vn or  11-82  miles  to  1  inch. 

White.   Alsek   and  Kluane  rivers  district,   southwestern    Yukon.      Si-alo.   ]i 

or  6  '31  miles  to  1  inch. 

Timiskaming  sheet,  Pontiac  county,  Quebec  and  Nipissing  district,  Ontario.  Scale, 
V oo,  or  11-83  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  1  S.W.  Ontario — Windsor  sheet — Essex,  Kent  and  Lambton  and  portions  of 
Elgin.  -Middlesex  and  Huron  counties.     Scale.     .  ,   3-95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  1   S.E.   Ontario — London  sheet — Norfolk,  Oxford,  Brant   and  portions  of 
Elgin,    Middlesex,  Huron.  Perth.  Waterloo  and  Wentworth  counties.     Scale,  $650 
or  3  '95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheets  1  X.W.  and  1  X.E.  Ontario — Guelph  sheet — Wellingti  a,  Grey,  Bruce  and 
portions  of  Huron,  Perth,  Waterloo,  Halton,  Dufferin  and  Simcoe  counties.     Scale. 
or  3-95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheel  2  S.W.  Ontario — Hamilton  sheet — Lincoln.  Welland,  Haldimand  and  por- 
tions of  Wentworth  and  Halton  counties.     Scale.  !&>0000,  or  3-95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  2  X.W.  and  9  S.W.  (part)  Ontario^Toronto  and  Muskoka  sheet — Peel. 
York,  Ontario  and  Victoria  and  portions  of  Halton,  Simcoe,  Dufferin,  Muskoka,  Parry 
Sound.  Halliburton,  Durham  and  Peterborough.     Scale.  '■■- on  3 '95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  9  X.W. — Timiskaming  sheet — includes  the  country  between  Lake  Nipissing 
and  the  height  of  land.     Scale.  ^50000,  or  3-95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  13  includes  whole  of  New  Brunswick,  with  exception  of  Madawaska  and 
portions  of  Westmoreland  and  Albert  counties.  Scale,  %ooooo,  or  7-89  miles  to  1 
inch. 

Sheet  15 — Cape  Breton  island  and  portions  of  Antigonish  and  Guysborough  coun- 
.  N.S.    Scale,  %soooo,  or  3-95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  27,  Ontario- — Lake  of  the  Woods  sheet — Rainy  river  district  and  portions  ot 
Thunder  bay  district  and  Keewatin.    Scale,  }5ooooo   or  7-S9  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  29,  Ontario — Lake  Nipigon  sheet — includes  central  portion  of  Thunder  bay 
district.     Scale,  V&ooooo,  or  7-89  miles  to  1  inch. 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  103 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

MAPS   IN   PROGRESS. 

Sheet  2  N.E.  Ontario — Belleville  sheet — Northumberland  and  Prince  Edward 
and  portions  of  Durham,  Peterborough,  Hastings  and  Lennox  and  Addington  counties. 
Scale  %50ooo,  or  3  -95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  3  N.W.  Ontario — Kingston  sheet — includes  Leeds  and  Grenville  and  por- 
tions of  Hastings,  Addington,  Renfrew,  Frontenac  and  Lanark  counties.  Scale  ^soooo. 
or  3  "95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  7  N.E. — Sault  Ste.  Marie  sheet — includes  part  of  Algoma  district.  Scale 
%5oooo,  or  3  -c*5  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  8  N.W. — Sudbury  sheet — includes  part  of  Algoma  and  Nipissing  districts. 
Scale  %50ooo,  or  3  -95  miles  to  1  inch 

Sheet  9  S.E.  Ontario  and  Quebec — Pembroke  sheet — includes  portions  of  Hast- 
ings, Addington,  Renfrew,  Haliburton  and  Nipissing,  Ont.,  and  of  Pontiac  county, 
Quebec.     Scale  Visoooo,  or  3-95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  10  S.E. — Cornwall  sheet — includes  Dundas,  Prescott  and  Russell  counties, 
Ont.,  and  Vaudreuil  and  Soulanges  and  portions  of  Argenteuil  and  Ottawa  counties, 
Que.     Scale  %soooo,  or  3  ^95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  10  S.W.  Ontario  and  Quebec — Ottawa  sheet — includes  portions  of  Carle- 
ton,  Lanark,  Frontenac  and  Renfrew  counties,  Ont.,  and  of  Ottawa  and  Pontiac 
counties,  Quebec.     Scale  Vjsoooo,  or  3  -95  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  11,  Montreal  sheet — includes  the  country  between  Quebec  and  Vaudreuil 
and  between  the  international  boundary  line  and  latitude  48°  N.  Scale  ^ooooo,  or  7  -89 
miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  14  S.E. — Truro  sheet — includes  Pictou,  N.S.,  King's  and  Queen's,  P.E.I.. 
and  portions  of  Halifax,  Guysborough  and  Colchester,  N.S.  Scale  ^soooo,  or  3  -95 
miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  28,  Ontario — Thunder  Bay  sheet — includes  portions  of  Thunder  Bay  and 
Rainy  River  districts.     Scale  %ooooo,  or  7  -89  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  30,  Ontario — White  River  sheet — includes  portions  of  Algoma  and  Thunder 
Bay  districts.     Scale  % or  7 -SO  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  31,  Ontario — Abitibi  sheet — includes  portions  of  Algoma  and  Nipissing 
districts.     Scale  ^ooooo,  or  7  -89  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  41,  British  Columbia — Prince  Rupert  sheet — includes  portions  of  the  pro- 
vince between  longitude  128°  W.  and  131°  W.,  and  between  latitude  52°  N.  and 
55°  N.     Scale  %ooooo,  or  7-89  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  42.  British  Columbia — Babine  Lake  sheet — includes  portion  of  the  prov- 
ince between  longitude  125°  W.  and  12S°  W.,  and  between  latitude  52°  N.  and  55°  N. 
Scale  ^ooooo,  or  7 '89  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  43,  British  Columbia — Fort  Ceorge  sheet — includes  portion  of  the  province 
ince  between  longitude  125°  W.  and  128°  W.,  and  between  latitude  52°  N.  and  55°  N. 
Scale  ^ooooo,  or  7:89  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  44,  British  Columbia — Tete  Jaime  Cache  sheet — includes  portions  of  the 
province  between  longitude  119°  W.  and  122°  W.,  and  between  latitude  52°  N.  and 
55°  N.     Scale  %ooooo,  or  7:89  miles  to  1  inch. 

Sheet  45,  British  Columbia — Jasper  House  sheet — includes  portions  of  the  pro- 
vince between  longitude  116°  W.  and  119°  W.,  and  between  latitude  52°  N.  and  55° 
N.    Scale  %ooooo,  or  7  -89  miles  to  1  inch. 

Rocky  Mountains  between  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  the  North  Saskat- 
chewan.   Scale  4  miles  to  1  inch 

Atlas   of   Canada — Price,   half  leather $    3  00 

Atlas  of  Canada — Price,  full  morocco 5  00 


104  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
ATLAS  OF   CAXADA — MAPS. 

1.  Territorial  divisions. 

2.  Relief  map,  west  sheet. 

3.  Relief  map,  east  sheet. 
4  Geology,  west  sheet. 

5.  Geology,  east  sheet. 

6.  Minerals,  west  sheet. 

7.  Minerals,  east  sheet. 

8.  Forests. 

9.  Limits  of  trees. 

10.  Telegraphs — Quebec  and  maritime  provinces. 

11.  Telegraphs — Ontario   and   Quebec. 

12.  Telegraphs — Manitoba,   Saskatchewan   and   Alberta. 

13.  Telegraphs — British  Columbia,  Yukon  and  Alberta. 

14.  Telephones — Maritime  provinces  and  Quebec. 

15.  Telephones — Ontario  and  Quebec. 

16.  Telephones — Manitoba.  Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  British  Columbia. 

17.  Railways — Quebec  and  maritime  provinces. 

18.  Railways — Ontario   and   Quebec. 

19.  Railways — Manitoba,   Saskatchewan  and  Alberta. 

20.  Railways — British  Columbia,  Alberta  and  Yukon. 

21.  Transcontinental  railways. 

22.  Canals,  lighthouses  and  sailing  routes— St.  Lawrence  and  Great  Lakes. 

23.  Lighthouses  and  sailing  routes — Pacific  coast. 

24.  Lighthouses  and  sailing  routes — Atlantic  coast. 

25.  Isotherms  for  months  of  year. 

26.  Isotherms  for  summer  and  year;    precipitation,  snowfall  and  isobars. 

26a.  Average  possible  hours  of  sunshine  in  summer  months  and  temperature  maps. 

27.  Density  of  population — Maritime  provinces  and  Quebec. 
27a.  Density  of  population — Ontario  and  Quebec. 

28.  Density  of  population — Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan. 
28a.  Density  of  population — British  Columbia  and  Alberta. 

29.  Aborigines  of  Canada,  Alaska  and  Greenland. 

29a.  Origins  of  the  people — Maritime  provinces  and  Quebec. 
29b.  Origins  of  the  people — Ontario  and  Quebec. 
29c.  Origins  of  the  people — Manitoba  and  Saskatchewan. 
29d.  Origins  of  the  people — British  Columbia  and  Alberta. 

30.  International    and    interprovincial    boundaries    (a)    eastern    Canada-United 

states;    (b)   New  Brunswick-Quebec;    (c)   Quebec-Labrador. 

31.  Interprovincial    boundary — Ontario-Manitoba. 

31a.  International   boundary — British    Columbia    and   Yukon- Alaska. 

32.  Routes  of  explorers. 

33.  Drainage  basins, 

34.  Montreal. 

35.  Toronto. 

36.  Quebec,  St.   John. 

37.  Winnipeg. 

38.  Vancouver,   Ottawa. 

39.  Hamilton,   London,   Halifax. 


DIAGRAMS. 


40.  Trade  and  Commerce — Exports. 

41.  Trade  and  Commerce— Imports 


i  DOMINION  LANDS  105 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

42.  Trade  and  Commerce — Exports,  principal  items. 

43.  Trade  and  Commerce — Imports,  principal  items. 

44.  Trade  and  Commerce — Imports  per  head,  duty,  increase  of  trade. 

45.  Minerals,  telegraphs. 

46.  Population  according  to  (a)  age  and  sex;  (b)  sex  and  conjugal  condition. 

47.  Population  according  to  age,  sex  and  conjugal  condition. 

48.  Population   (a)   proportion  of  British  and  foreign  born;    (b)  birthplace  of 

native  population;  (c)  areas  of  provinces  and  territories. 

49.  Population  (a)  origins;    (b)  religions;    (c)  birthplaces. 

50.  Population  (a)  interprovincial  immigration:    (b)  proportion  of  population; 

(c)  density  of  population;  (d)  rural  and  urban. 

51.  Population,  from  earliest  records  to  1901,  in  Ontario,  Manitoba,  British  Col- 

umbia, Alberta,  Saskatchewan,  other  territories. 

52.  Population,  from  earliest   records   to   1901,  in   Quebec,   Nova  Scotia,   New 

Brunswick,  Prince  Edward  Island. 

53.  Population — Cities  and  towns  with  a  population  of  upward  of  7,000. 

54.  Population — Cities  and  towns  with  a  population  of  upward  7,000. 

55.  Population — Cities  and  towns  with  a  population  of  upward  of  7,000. 

56.  Agriculture — Value  of  land,  &c. ;  of  farm  products;  number  of  farmers  and 

classification  of  farm  area. 

57.  Agriculture — Improved  and  unimproved  area;  value  of  farm  property. 

58.  Agriculture — Sie  of   farms;   number  of   farms;    value   of  agricultural  pro- 

ducts. 

59.  Agriculture — Number  of  (a)   sheep,   (b)  horses,   (c)   cattle. 

60.  Agriculture — Value  of  crops,  live  stock,  dairy  produce,  <fcc. 

61.  Agriculture — Productions 'of  grain,  &c. 

62.  Agriculture — Principal  crops  of  Ontario. 

63.  Agriculture — Principal  crops  of  Manitoba. 

64.  Manufactures — Capital  invested;  number  of  wage-earners;  value  of  products. 

65.  Manufactures — Proportion  of  population;  value  of  product,  by  provinces. 

66.  Vital  statistics — (a)  blind  (b)   deaths. 

67.  Vital  statistics — (a)  insane,  (b)  deaf  and  dumb. 

68.  Finance — Revenue. 

69.  Finance — Expenditure. 

70.  Finance — -Debt;  expenditure  for  public  works;  assets. 

71.  Currency  and  Banking — Savings  banks,  deposits  and  withdrawals. 

72.  Currency   and  Banking — Chartered  banks,   liabilities,   assets,   deposits,  loan 

and  reserve  fund. 

73.  Currency   and  Banking — Chartered  banks,  capital,  deposits,  liabilities   and 

assets. 

74.  Marine — Light  stations,  &c,  vessels  entered,  1903. 

75.  Marine — Vessels  arrived  and  departed;  coasting  vessels. 

76.  Marine — Sea-going  shipping;  vessels  on  inland  waters. 

77.  Marine — Vessels  in  coasting  trade,   by  provinces. 

78.  Fisheries — Yield;  fishermen;  value  of  vessels,  &c. ;  fish  exports. 

79.  Railways — Capital;   passengers;  freight;   mileage. 

•80.     Railways — Earnings;  working  expenses;  receipts;  expenditure. 

81.  Railways — Train  mileage ;  rolling  stock ;  passengers ;  freight. 

82.  Government   railways — Expenditure    and   revenue;   earnings   and   operating 

expenses;  receipts. 

83.  Education,  Immigration — Literate   and  illiterate;   schools,  teachers,  pupils; 

expenditure  ;    number  of  immigrants. 


106  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  I 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
REPORTS. 

Altitudes  in  the  Dominion  of  Canada.  With  a  relief  map  of  North  America. 
8vo.  pp.  226. 

Dictionary  of  Altitudes  in  the  Dominion  of  Canada.  With  a  relief  map  of 
Canada.     8vo.,  pp.  143. 


No.  34. 

REPORT  OF  THE  LAND  PATENTS  BRANCH, 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Land  Patents  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  for  your  information  the  statements  herein- 
after enumerated  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 

A. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  homestead  entries  as  compared  with  the 
corresponding  period  of  the  previous  year. 

B. — Abstract  of  letters  patent  covering  Dominion  lands  situate  in  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  British  Columbia  and  the  Yukon  Territory. 

C. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  acres  of  swamp  lands  in  Manitoba  trans- 
ferred by  order  in  council  to  the  province  of  Manitoba. 

D. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  patents  forwarded  to  the  several  registrars 
of  the  land  registration  districts  of  the  provinces  of  Alberta,  Saskatchewan  and  the 
Yukon  Territory;  and  the  number  of  notifications  mailed  to  the  patentees. 

E. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  entries  cancelled :  also  the  year  in  which 
such  entries  were  made. 

F. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  assignments  recorded  in  the  Land  Patents 
Branch. 

G. — Statement  of  entries  affecting  Dominion  lands  which  were  made  at  head 
office. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir, 

Your  obedient  servant, 

N.  O.  COTE, 

Chief  C'lrrh. 


DOMINION  LANDS 


107 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

A. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  homestead  entries  made  during  the  year  ended 
March  31,  1908,  as  compared  with  the  year  ended  March  31,  1907. 


Agency. 


Battleford 

Brandon  

Calgary 

Dauphin     .    ...... 

Edmonton 

Estevan 

Humboldt 

Kamloops-. 

Leth  bridge     . . 

Minnedosa    

Moosejaw 

New  Westminster. 
Prince  Albeit    . . 

Regina 

Red  Deer 

Winnipeg 

Yorkton 


Total. 


1907-08 


4,535 

90 

1,278 

772 
4.055 

50? 
2,493 

195 
2,456 


5,181 
42 
1.622 
1,653 
1,825 
886 
2,839, 


1906-07 


6,699 
110 
1,494 
582 
4,598 
1,936 
751 
70 
1,988 
152 
57 
32 
1,701  . 
lo,:;  12  . 
3, 189 1 
1,034' . 
3,053  . 


190 


1,742 
125 
468 

5J24 
10 


30.424;     37,788    7,659 


2,164 

20 

216 


543 

1,434 


152 


79 

8,689 

1,364 

148 

214 


15,023 


Month. 


April 

May . . 

June 

July 

August. . . 
September 
October  . . 
November 
December. 
January.. 
February 
March 


Total. . 


1907-08 


2,594 
3,253 
4,574 
3,690 
2,814 
2,395 
2,252 
2,261 
1,849 
1,453 
1,420 
1,869, 


19i.ii;  »: 


6,189 
4,583 
5,369 
4,174 
3,388 
2,595 
3,389 
2,966 
1,402 
1,111 
1,033 
1,589 


30,424     37,78 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Land  Patents  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 


N.  O.  COTE, 

Chief  Clerk. 


108 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


&-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

B. — Abstract  of  Letters  Patent  covering  Dominion  Lands  situate  in  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan,  Alberta,  British  Columbia  and  the  Yukon  Territory,  issued  from 
the  Department  of  the  Interior,  during  the  fiscal  year  (twelve  months)  ending 
March  31,  1908,  as  compared  with  the  fiscal  year  (nine  months)  ending  March 
31,  1907. 


c 

Nature  of  Grant. 

From  April  1,  11*07,  to 
March  31,   L908 
(Twelve  months.) 

From  July  1,  190i\  10 
March  31,  1907. 
(Xine  months.) 

J3 

S 
s 
Z 

Patents. 

Acres. 

Patents. 

Acres. 

1 

Alberta  Railway  and  Irrigation  Co.'s  sales. 
British  Columbia  homesteads 

2it 

102 

49 

36 

6 

1 

14,506 

3 

3 

6 

4 

17,932 

14,783 

2,739 

7.903 

281 

240 

2,300,706 

1,761 

- 

2 
3 
4 

5 

25 

32 

2 

0 

3,829 

2,919 

632 

251 

>; 

7 

8.8114 

25 

1,417,541 

8 

20,111 

9 
10 

117 

12 
13 

14 

1 
3 
4 
2 
333 
8 
9 

1 

160 

Military  homesteads 

Mineral  rights  (7, 574  acres) 

Mining  lands  sales       

Quit  claim,  special  grants  (1.842  acres) 

Railways  : 

9 

39 

6 

220 

C 

12 

93 

9 
1,330 

21i; 
:.o 

711 

33 

471 

34 

L92 

10 

43 
607 

189 
204 

ii.'. 
1 

2,872 

959 

15 
16 
17 
IS 

102 

37,255 

1,546 

65,975 

2,138,422 

377,427 
114,611 

1,062 

301 
676,160 

211,421 

52.77'.' 

5,911 

98,886 

159,050 

21,949 

6,579 

2, 147 

400 
07,381 

770 

111 

■'n 

160 

21 

22 
23 
24 

2:. 

2i; 

"7 

Calgary  and  Edmonton   Railway  Co.,  Under 
rights  (2,001  acres) '      

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  grants 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  grants,  Souris  Branch 
Canadian  Pacific  Railway  roadbed  and  station 

Grand  Trunk  Pacific  Railway  grants     

Manitoba  and  Northwestern  Railway  Co. 
Manitoba  Southwestern  Colonization  Railway 
Co ' 

2 

332 

140 

66 

6 

284,662 
237,861 
195,692 

117 

28 
29 

18 
99 
41 

361 

105 
05 
20 

271 
37,592 

30 
SI 

Qu'Appelle,    Long  Lake   and    Saskatchewan 
Railroad  and  Steamboat  Co 

22,910 

32 

33 
34 

50.161 

15.3S2 

720 

35 
36 

Totals             

843 

18,690 

6,138,977 

10,596 

2,361,330 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Land  Patents  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 


X.  O.  COTE, 

Chief  Clerk. 


i 


DOMINION  LANDS 


109 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  26 

C. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  acres  of  swamp  lands  in  Manitoba  transferred 
by  order  in  council  to  the  province  of  Manitoba,  up  to  March  31,  1908. 

Acres. 

Total  area  transferred  to  March  31,  1907 1,413,244-21 

August  1,  1907 3,192  -00 

September  26,  1907 160-00 

December  4,  1907 247,607-82 

20,  1907 16,332-85 

24,  1907 141,107  -41 

"          24,1907 77,494-70 

January  29,  1908 7,502  -70 

March  9,  1908 11.167  -00 

Total 1,917,808  -69 


N.  O.  COTE. 

Chief  Clerk. 


Department  of  the  Interior 

Land  Patents  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 


D. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  patents  forwarded  to  the  several  registrars  of 
the  land  registration  districts  of  the  provinces  of  Alberta,  Saskatchewan  and 
Yukon  Territory,  and  the  number  of  notifications  mailed  to  patentees  during  the 
year,  April  30,  1907-March  31,  1908. 


Registration  District. 


Number  of 

Patents  sent  to 

Registrars. 


Number  of 

notifications 

mailed  to 

Patentees. 


Yukon  Territory  . . 

Assiniboia 

South  Alberta   

North  Alberta 

West  Saskatchewan 
East  Saskatchewan . 
Yorkton ....    


68 
7,943 
2,522 
2,9ni 

841 
2,182 

654 


85 
7,547 
2,470 
3,008 

831 
2,013 

602 


N.  O. 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Land  Patents  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 


COTE, 
Chief  Clerk. 


110 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

E. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  entries  cancelled  during  the  year  ended  March 
31,  1908;  also  the  year  in  which  such  entries  were  made. 


Year. 

Homesteads. 

Pre-emptions. 

Time  Sales. 

Sales. 

1>77      

1 

1878 

lX7:i 

1880 

1881 

1882 

4 

>; 
~i 
2 
3 
1 
3 
3 

1883 

5 

1 
2 
2 

18S4 

1886 

1887 

1 

1888      

1 
2 

1889 

1890 

1891 

2 
2 

1892 

1 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1 

1 

1 

10 

11 

15 
52 

144 

518 

656 

2,331 

8,035 

3,848 

25 

18% 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 

2 

1 

1901 

1902 

1903 

1 
1 

1 
3 


1904 

■2 

1905 

1906 

L908 

3 

15,668 

32 

12 

4 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Land  Patents  Branch. 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 


K  O.  COTE, 

Chief  Clerk. 


i 


DOMINION  LANDS 


111 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

F. — Statement  showing  the  number  of  assignments  recorded    in    the  Land  Patents 
Branch  during  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 

Number  of  deeds  registered 853 

Fees  received  in  connection  therewith $1,752.50 


N.  O.  COTE, 

Chief  Clerk. 


Department  of  the  Interior, 

Land  Patents  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 


G. — Statement  of  entries  affecting  Dominion  lands  which  were  made  at  head  office 
for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 


Name  of  grant.  No.  of  grants. 

Special  grants 210 

Alberta   Railway   and   Irrigation    Company 

Calgary  and  Edmonton  Railway  Company 

Canadian  Northern  Railway  Company 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  main  line 

"  "  "  Souris  branch 

"  Pipestone   extension    .  . 

Manitoba  and  Southeastern  Railway  Company 

Manitoba   Southwestern   Colonization   Railway   Company    . 
Qu'Appelle,   Long   Lake   and    Saskatchewan    Railroad     and 

Steamboat  Company 

Saskatchewan  and  Western  Railway  Company 

Railway  right  of  way 153 

Hudson's  Bay  Company's  grants 10 


Acres. 

6,474-00 

9,774-02 

88,199  -14 

2,152,054-69 

355,403  -72 

93,808  -70 

642-00 

676,202  -30 

50,222  83 

5,757  -72 

98,880  -00 

2,301  -00 

370,089  -00 

3,909,800-12 


Department  op  the  Interior, 

Land  Patents  Branch, 

Ottawa,  July  30,  1908. 


N.  O.  COTE, 

Chief  Clerk. 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


PART    II 


IMMIGRATION 


25— ii— 1 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


IMMIGRATION 


REPORT    OF    THE    SUPERINTENDENT    OF    IMMIGRATION. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa,  May    1,  1908. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I  beg  leave  to  transmit  to  you  herewith  the  annual  reports  of  the  principal 
officers  engaged  in  the  immigration  service,  together  with  a  report  from  the  High 
Commissioner  for  Canada  in  London,  and  reports  appended  thereto  from  British  and 
continental  agents,  &c.  These  reports  have  reference  to  the  fiscal  year  ending  March 
31,  1908. 

The  following  statistical  tables  for  the  same  period  have  been  compiled  in  my 
office  : — 

IMMIGRANT  ARRIVALS. 
Summary  for  the  Fiscal  Year  1907-8. 

Per  ocean  travel — 

Quebec 112,324 

Halifax 28,319 

St.  John 17,894 

Vancouver 6,566 

Victoria 6,024 

Xorth  Sydney 3.722 

New  York 22,379 

Portland 3,650 

Boston 1,987 

Philadelphia 898 

Baltimore 394 

29,308 

204,157 


From  the  United  States  (direct) 58,312 

Total 262,469 


25— ii— 1J 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENT. 


Total  Immigrants  arriving  for  Canada,  by  months,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March 
31,  1908,  and  for  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1907. 


TWBLVE   MONTHS   ENDING    MARCH 
31,    1907. 

1 

ISCAL  Ykai:    1907  1908. 

Males. 

Females. 

Children.    Totals. 

Males. 

Females. 

Children. 

Totals. 

May   

23,143 

22.701 
13.657 

9.850 
9.641 

6,031 

7.425 
5,849 
4,420 
3.792 
3,817 
3,558 
2,689 
1,851 
1.177 
1,340 
4,312 

6.139      35,313 
7,065      37.191 
6,025      25.531 

4.087  18.357 
3,590      17,023 
3.173      14,335 
3,251       13.802 
2.370      11,454 
1,688        7. ''is 

892        5,i  ;73 
1,034       7,745 

4.088  28,630 

30,103 
28,493 

2(1,913 
14,601 
10.741 
10,039 
9.374 
7,516 

5.51.X 
3.174 
3,609 
9.749 

7.155 
8,675 
8,450 
6,150 
5,508 
"'.1174 
4,779 
3,583 
1,899 

1.274 
1,434 
2,931 

6.J93 
8,509 

8,280 
5,5911 
4,760 
3.944 
4.090 
3,166 
1.624 
1.119 
1.121 
2,733 

44,o:,l 
45,677 

37.643 

July     

26,341 

21,012 

October 

7.345 
6,993 
6,395 
4,109 
3,604 
5,371 
20,230 

19,057 

18,243 

14,265 

9,036 

January 

5,567 

6,164 

15.413 

Totals 

133,039 

46,261 

43,402    222.702 

153.828 

56,912 

51,729 

262,469 

COMPARATIVE   STATEMENT. 


Total  Immigrants  arriving  for  Canada,  by  ports,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March 
31,  1908,  and  for  the  twelve  months  ending  March,  31,  1907. 


Twelve  months  ending 
31.   1907. 


March 


Malis.     Females. 


North  Sydney     845 

Halifax". 19,290 

St.  John 13,199 

Quebec 43,498 


Vancouver. 

Victoria 

Via  United  States  Ports 

(New  York,   Portland, 

Boston,  Baltimore  and 

Philadelphia)  

From  the  United  States 

Totals 133.039 


2,948 
2.516 


17.10'. 
33.5H7 


122 

t,862 

3,128 

20,908 

2X5 

269 


3,914 
12,823 


46.261 


Children.     Totals. 


45 
4,460 
2,593 

19.49S 

118 

57 


Fiscal  Ykar  1'.hi7  1908. 


1,012 

28,612 

18,920 

83,904 

3,301 

2.842 


Males.     Females. 


2.726 
17.857 
11,913 
57,218 

6.21S 
5.011 


3.788      24.848      20,960 
12.843       59.263       31.5X5 


43.402 


618 

5,514 

3,454 

28,708 

208 

487 


4.552 
13.371 


222.702     153,828  56.912 


( Ihildren, 


37S 
4,948 

2,527 

26.398 
140 
136 


Totals. 


3,7-2 
28,319 
17,894 

112.321 
6,566 
6,024 


3,796      29.3os 
13.406      58,312 


51.729    262,469 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


IMMIGRATION 


COMPARATIVE  STATEMENT. 


Total  Immigrants  arriving  from  the  United  States,  direct,  by  months,  for  the  Fiscal 
Year  ending  March  31,  1908,  and  for  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1907. 


Twelve  months  ending  March  31, 

I '."17. 


Totals. 


April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October 
November. . 
December . . 
January . . . 
February. 
March 

Total 


7,005 
4,085 
2,844 
2,007 
2,463 
2,331 
2,857 
2,306 
1,298 
073 
896 
3,572 

33,597 


2,542 
1,502 
1,044 
1,164 
870 
892 
1,135 
963 
533 
381 
329 
1,378 


12,8231 


2.800 
1.677 
1,006 
1.010 
S34 
820 
1.103 
960 
509 
321 
295 
1.481 


I  12,843; 


12,356 
7,354 
4,894 
5,150 
4,167 
4,052 
5,095 
4,229 
2,340 
1,675 
1,520 
6.431 


59,263 


Fiscal  Yeah  1907-1008. 


Males. 


5,131 
3,749 
2,806 
2,760 
2,160 
1,9.54 
2,435 
2,140 
1,627 
1,542 
1,446 
3,785 


31,535 


2,103 

1,522 

1,279 

1,455 

1,077 

1,010 

1,139 

951 

615 

606 

525 

1,08(1 


2,379 
1,651 
1,239 

1,180 
839 
880 

1,072 

1,065 
605 
614 
105 

1.207 


Females.    Children. 


Totals. 


9,613 
6,922 
5,324 
5,395 
4,076 
3,853 
4,646 
4,156 
2,937 

•-•.7';-' 

2,466 
6,162 


13,371 


13.4H6       58,312 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


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SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


IMMIGRATION 


COMPARATIVE   STATEMENT. 


Immigrants  arriving  for  Canada,  by  nationalities,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  1907-8,  and  for 
the  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1907,  showing  increase  or  decrease  of  each 
nationality. 


Twelve 

months 

ending 

March  31, 

1907. 

Fiscal 
year, 
1907-8. 

Increase. 

Decrease. 

Welsh 

76,298 

870 

20,729 

6,069 

90,380 
1,032 

22,223 
6,547 

14.0S2 

162 

1,494 

478 

Total  British 

103,966 

120,182 

76 

180 

1,899 

102 

2,145 

224 

10 

14,268 

1,307 

321 

912 

188 

1.214 

2,529 

1 

1,884 

1,212 

2,671 

2,363 

2 

7 

5 

134 

43 

101 

1,053 

1,679 

5,738 

46 

195 

54 

11,212 

7,601 

3,374 

70 

2 

255 

586 

16 

736 

7 

949 

6,281 

1,212 

61 

195 

48 

290 

97 

2,132 

1,554 

16,216 

44 

362 

716 

32 

293 

1,537 

163 

1,429 

273 

51 

6,313 

850 

435 

482 

216 

1,216 

221 

7 

97 

658 

2,129 

2,801 

1 

4 

24 

176 

13 

18 

702 

736 

8,128 

62 

215 

51 

10,584 

3,244 

1,121 

62 

5 

231 

470 

24 

652 

33 

637 

3,609 

1,444 

34 

203 

8 

481 

94 

1,888 

1,636 

113 

61 

49 

7,955 
457 

41 

114 

430 
2,308 

28 
2 

6 

1,787 
554 
542 

Dutch 

German,  N.E.S 

438 

Alsatian    

1 
3 

19 

30 

83 

351 

943 

3 

628 

4,357 

2,253 

8 

24 
116 

42 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

2,390 

Polish 

16 

20 

Japanese 

New  Zealand 

Portuguese   

3 

Polish,  N.E.S 

8 

84 

;;i'j 

2,672 

Persian  ....    

Russian,  N.E.S 

26 
232 

27 

8 

40 

3 
244 

Danish 

191 

82 

8  DEPARTMENT  OF  TEE  INTERIOR  II 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
Comparative   Statement — Immigrants   arriving  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities — Con. 


Twelve 

months 

ending 

March  31, 

1907. 

Fiscal 
year, 

1907-8. 

Increase, 

1 1>  •■■]. 

Turkish 

445 

231 

11) 

:«7 

36 

143 

149 

2,329 

489 

563 

8 

732 

50 

133 

136 

2,623 

44 
332 

2 

395 

14 

10 

294 

13 

Total  <  iontinental,  &c 

United  States  (direct) 

:,9.473 
59,263 

83,975 

- 
58,312 

24.502 

951 

Total  Immigration. 

222.702 

262,469 

39.767 

ARRIVALS  AT  OCEAN  PORTS. 

For  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived,  via  Canadian  and  United  States  ocean 
ports,  269,503  passengers,  of  whom  15,995  travelled  saloon  and  253,508  steerage.  Of 
the  saloon  passengers  13,575  were  destined  to  Canada  and  2,420  to  the  United  States. 
Of  the  steerage  passengers  227,272  were  for  Canada  and  26,236  for  the  United  States. 
Included  in  the  steerage  passengers  for  Canada  were  17,652  returned  Canadians  and 
5,463  tourists,  leaving  the  immigration  proper  visi  ocean  ports  at  204,157  souls,  which, 
together  with  the  58,312  settlers  direct  from  the  United  States,  brings  the  total  immi- 
gration to  262,469,  an  increase  over  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31,  1907,  of 
39,767  persons. 

The  following  further  statistical  information  will  be  of  interest:    Table  I.  deals 

with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total  arrivals  of  steer- 

ge  passengers.  Table  III.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants  for  Canada,  and 

Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from  immigrants  for 

Canada  upon  arrival. 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


IMMIGRATION 


TABLE   I. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at  Ocean  Ports  for  the  Fiscal 

Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

1 

NITED 

States. 

CANA I  )A  A  N 1 1 

Jkitkd  States 

a 

a 

0 

1 

IS 

u 

•a 

o 

i 

0 

f. 

s 

a; 

2 
D 

r. 

0 

O 

Is 

2 
0 

0 

1 

6 

5 

1 

6 

62 

65 

18 

145 

25 

27 

7 

59 

87 

92 

25 

204 

5 

12 

2 

2 

9 

5 

14 

Hungarian 

Belgian 

5 

5 

5 

5 

21 

4 

2 

27 

3 

1 

4 

24 

5 

2 

31 

Chinese 

15 

9 

4 

28 

9 

3 

1 

13 

24 

12 

5 

41 

Dutch 

7 

1 

8 

1 

1 

7 

2 

9 

French  

17M 

124 

46 

349 

19 

25 

10 

54 

198 

149 

56 

403 

German 

51 

14 

65 

19 

2 

21 

70 

16 

86 

2.799 

1,515 

251 

4,565 

110 

67 

14 

191 

2,909 

1,582 

265 

4,756 

Welsh   

28 

9 

3 

4(1 

1 

1 

28 

in 

3 

41 

Scotch  

488 

245 

25 

758 

26 

15 

1 

42 

514 

260 

26 

800 

Irish 

132 

75 

7 

J14 

11 

ft 

17 

143 

si 

1 

231 

West  Indian 

35 

25 

19 

79 

1 

1 

2 

36 

26 

19 

SI 

48 

04 

31 

143 

48 

64 

31 

.143 

6 

1 

14 

7 

6 

1 

14 

1 
11 
54 

1 

3 

12 

2 
14 
70 

■ 

1 
13 
73 

4 

15 

4 

2 

""4 

2 
19 

1 
3 

3 
22 

17 

Japanese 

92 

Newfoundland 

439 

265 

54 

758 

134 

114 

24 

272 

573 

379 

78 

1,030 

New  Zealand 

31 

23 

2 

56 

5 

2 

1 

8 

36 

25 

3 

4 

Polish 

2 

s 

2 

14 

1 

I 

3 
8 

63 

3 

3 

3 

3 

14 

1 

1 

1 

1 

Spanish     

6 

2 

5 

13 

2 

2 

8 

2 

0 

15 

6 

4 

3 
1 

1 

in 
5 

2 

1 

2 
2 

8 
5 

3 

2 

1 

12 

Danish.. 

1 

7 

10 

2 

12 

1 

T 

10 

3 

13 

Norwegian 

4 

1 

■  1 

2 

1 

.    3 

6 

2 

8 

Armenian 

1 

1 

2 

4 

1 

1 

4 

Egyptian 

1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

11 
151 

11 
274 

1 
si  16 

609 

1 
91 

2 

1,506 

12 

957 

713 

1 

110 

13 

U.  S.  A.  Citizens.. 

1D4 

111 

1,780 

4 

J 

4 

3 

1 

3 
2,196 

3 

4,220 

3 

2,199 

3 

Canadian 

1,704 

320 

3 

2 

5 

1,706 

320 

4,225 

950 

577 

108 

1,635 

129 

51 

3 

183 

1,079 

62S 

111 

1,818 

Totals 

7,782 

4,86S 

925 

13,575 

1,333 

934 

153 

2,420 

9,115 

5,802 

1.07s 

15,995 

10  DEPARTMENT  OF  TEE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
TABLE   II. 

Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  Ocean  Ports  for  the  Fiscal 

Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

United 

States. 

Canada  and  United 

States. 

CD 
IS 

00 

"3 

£ 

1 

■   IS 

an 
O 

00 

5 

s 

3 

102 

227 

5 

oc 

GJ 

"3 

S 

03 

% 

5 

■r. 

n 

-1-2 

s 

m 

13 

a 

00 

V 

u 

O 

00 

"3 
0 
EH 

African,  South 

Austrian,  N.E.S 

Bohemian    

40 

105 

1,333 
50 

1.931 

204 

10 

9,646 
789 
201 
647 
135 
693 

2,516 
1 

1,719 
671 

1.578 

1,079 

10 

44 
296 

25 
119 

15 

2,312 

254 

58 

132 

30 

283 

7 

"  39 

228 

1189 

580 

1 

I 

1 

20 
31 
270 
27 
95 
5 

2^0 

264 

62 

133 

23 

238 

6 

126 
313 
404 
704 

1 

21,420 

175 

1,195 

910 

3 

4 

10 

34 

555 

1,798 

14 

41 

16 

547 

90 

306 

6 

.... 

41 

71 

4 

97 

265 

1,544 

97 

2 

19 

3^ 

24 

416 

2«3 

9 

101 

76 

180 

1,899 

102 

2,145 

224 

10 

14,268 

1,307 

321 

912 

188 

1.214 

2,529 

1 

1,884 

1,212 

2,671 

2,363 

2 

7 

5 

90!  380 

1,032 

22,223 

6,547 

134 

43 

101 

1,053 

1,679 

5,738 

46 

195 

54 

11,212 

7,601 

3.374 

70 

2 

256 

:,sii 

16 

736 

949 

6,281 

1,212 

61 

195 

48 

290 

97 

2,132 

1.554 

489 

563 

8 

"69 

127 

5 

7 

53 

109 

9 

10 
224 
463 

19 

43 

207 

1,560 

55 

1,931 

229 

10 

9.742 

913 

201 

647 

135 

777 

3,740 

1 

1,875 

748 

1.635 

1,34S 

"7 

7 

1 

47,243 

709 

12,415 

4,028 

86 

26 

64 

1,133 

691 

2,399 

23 

101 

24 

10,122 

7,535 

3,218 

74 

2 

220 

423 

5 

568 

11 

541 

5,380 

2,096 

52 

153 

34 

441 

44 

2.0S2 

2,688 

616 

344 

8 

16 
113 
423 

30 
119 

19 

2,365 
330 

58 
132 

30 
304 

18 

27 
84 
379 
36 
95 
8 

2,346 

325 

62 

133 

23 

86 

404 

2,362 

121 

2,145 

256 

10 

25 

4 

3 

32 

Galician. 

Hungarian,   N.K.S, , 
Magyar 

96 
124 

53 

76 

36 

61 

185 
261 

14,453 

1,568 
321 

912 

Slovak 

iss 

84 
1,224 

21 
11 

24 
3 

129 
1,238 

2621    1.343 

Bulgarian.    .    

9 

3.767 
1 

Dutch 

German.  N.E.S 

156 

77 

57 

269 

1 

3 

1 

1,256 

46 

325 

229 

8 

2 

52 

36 

192 

1 

1 

1 

1 

68 

25 

206 

3 

162 

197 

118 

667 

4 

2 

4 

1 

2,848 

84 

784 

452 

8 

41 
2S0 
725 

772 
2 
2 
2 

130 
381 
429 
910 
4 

2,046 
1,409 
2,789 
3,030 

6 

English 

Welsh  

6 

4 

9 
9 
1 

45.987 

663 

12,090 

3,799 

78 

26 

64 

982 

648 

2,332 

21 

99 

23 

9,957 

6,945 

2,497 

50 

1 

167 

422 

5 

513 

6 

481 

3,487 

844 

50 

136 

33 

195 

43 

1,271 

466 

320 

6 

22,973 

194 

5,938 

1,838 

53 

13 

27 

37 

476 

1.608 

U 

52 

15 

7o,s 

566 

:.71 

14 

1 

47 

93 

7 

126 

1 

203 

1,250 

271 

9 

40 

6 

61 

30 

445 

337 

14 

142 

2 

929 

23 

261 

165 

663 
15 

198 
58 

23,902 

217 

0,199 

2,003 

53 

13 

27 

39 

519 

1,664 

12 

52 

15 

738 

687 

1,165 

31 

1 

68 

93 

(7 

143 

4 

251 

2,224 

"'901 

9 

46 

7 

167 

30 

956 

1,170 

16 

167 

3 

22,083 
190 

93,228 
1,116 

Scotch  

Irish 

4,393  23.007 
968    6,999 

West  Indian 

3  142 

4  43 

10        101 

Greek 

Hebrew,  N.K.S 

"        Russian  . . . 
Polish 

151 

43 

67 

2 

2 

1 

Km 

590 

721 

24 

1 

53 

1 

2 
43 
56 

1 

3 
56 

70 

156 

142 

193 

3 

2 

1 

211 

716 

1,406 

45 

1 

84 

1 

37    1,209 
611    1,821 

1,868    5,931 
14          49 
44        197 

"         German.... 

Italian 

Japanese.. . .        .... 

Newfoundland 

New  Zealand..    .    . 

Portuguese 

Polish,  N.K.S 

30 
121 

.".94 
17 

16 
5 

91 
4 

16 
563 

95 
397 

10 

51 

71 

4 

123 

302 

2,521 

365 

2 

21 

12 

101 

24 

55 

11,423 

8,317 

1,780 

115 

3 

21 

10 

339 

587 

16 

"       Russian 

55 

5 

60 

1,893 

1,252 

2 

17 

1 

246 

1 

811 

1,754 

150 

24 

2 

17 
3 

48 
974 
630 

26 

37 
977 
268 

98 

8 

145 

3,844 

2,150 

2 

25 

5 

419 

1 

1.601 

2,990 

152 

61 

3 

834 
15 

1,094 

Russian,  N.E.S 

Finnish 

Spanish 

10,125 

3,362 

63 

6 

1 
106 

2 

3 

67 

220 
53 

Danisli 

709 
9s 

511 

833 

2 

25 

1 

279 
403 

12 

695    3,733 

686     4.544 

Turkish 

9       64] 

113       62. 



IMMIGRATION 


11 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE    II. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  Ocean  Ports  for  the  Fiscal 
Year  ending  March  31,  1908. — Concluded. 


Canada. 

United  States. 

Canada  and  United 
States. 

OD 
CD 

a) 

£ 
pa 

X 

"3 

s 

B 

Is 
D 

"a 
o 
H 

"3 

EG 

CD 
3 
g 

fa 

c 

5 

Syrian  . 

Arabian 

I".  S.  Citizens  . . 
Negro 

469 

37 

77 

91 

2,620 

165 

6 

27 

34 

98 
7 

29 

11 

3 

732 

50 

133 

136 

2,623 

112 
5 

949 
4 
4 

44 

959 
3 

41 

4 

411 

197 

9 

2,319 

7 

4 

581 
42 

1,026 

95 

2,624 

135,779 

12,391 

5,066 

209 

6 

986 

37 

139 

11 

440 

11 

3 

929 

59 

2.452 

143 
2.627 

j 

Total  Immig'n . . 
Ret'd  Canadians. 
Tourists 

122,293 

12,391 

3,909 

43,541  38,323 
3,799    1,462 
1,250       304 

204.157 

17,652 

5,463 

13,486 
1,157 

7,077 
110 

4,330 
76 

24,893 
1,343 

50,618 
3,799 
1,360 

42,653;  229,050 

1.462    17,652 

380      6,806 

Totals 

138,693 

48,590  40.089 

227,272 

14,643    7,187 

4,406 

26,236 

153,236 

55,777 

44.495  253,508 

i 

12 


DEPARTVEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
TABLE    III. 


Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  at  Ocean  Ports  for 
the  Fiscal  Tear  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Apr. 

May. 

June. 

July. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Total-. 

African.  Smith.    .  . 
Australian 
Austrian,  X.E.S. 

Bukowinian 

!l 

15 

214 

Hi 

676 

49 

•  i 

4.414 
268 
116 
201 
69 
266 
104 

9 

13 

135 

5 

554 

37 

2 

3,257 

433 

5 

4:i 

2 

224 

468 

3 

26 

215 

19 

397 

38 

3 

4.U53 

102 

36 

176 

23 

116 

145 

s 

:«i 

120 

4 

134 

11 

1 

761 

56 

10 

174 

9 

126 

139 

'.I 

14 

142 

s 

60 
11 

3 
10 

i" 

11 

41 

12 

12 
111 
79 
15 
63 
28 

6 

15 

•.Mill 

S 

9 

14 
2 

307 

123 
38 
34 
13 
87 

548 
...1 

9 
6 

211 

1 
58 

1 

3 

1 
29 

6 
38 

3 

4 

7 

:;:, 

20 

1 

1 
24 
142 
14 
S6 
19 

7<i 
180 

1,899 
1H2 

2.145 
224 

10 

i  lalician 

Hungarian, |X.  K.S. 

31  il 
45 

21 

79 

99 
12 

192 

114 
111 
77 
28 
67 
159 

386 
96 
47 
45 
13 
52 

347 

221 
71 
11 

9 

37 

567 

88 

S 

., 
45 

II 
34 

9 

74 
2 

10 

40 
5 

29 

211 
39 

'2 

77 
1 

14,268 

1.807 
321 

Kuthenian 

912 
1SS 

Belgian 

Bulgarian 

1,214 
2,529 

I 

1  Ihinese         .  .  . 

Dutch 

French 

German,  X.E.S   . . 

92 

311', 
175 
290 

1 

16,067 

153 

3,483 

1,025 

14 

'." 

5 

79 

62 

2!  IS 

1 

h; 
o 

3.036 
714 
180 

1 

"    3 

84 

3 

54 

112 
222 

627 

355 

2 

2 

17.'i7li 

195 

:,.43'.i 

1.271 
20 
13 

67 

42 

603 

1 

7 

2 

3,083 

521 

537 

'T 
62 
26 

63 

143 
178 
305 
246 

175 

311 

263 

25!  1 

195 

122 
29S 
221 

17S 

39 
217 
228 

244 
91 

2111 
21(1 

207 

82 

134 

is.", 

144 

24 

102 

si 

110 
22 

73 
84 

101 
23 

92 

Si, 

182 

113 

169 

82 

1,884 

1.212 

2.071 

2,363 

2 

1 

1 

14,737 

129 

4,213 

1.200 

11 

6 

2 

184 

si; 

658 

1 

43 

13 

1,538 

so: 

267 
12 

21 
US 

r, 

102 

2 

'.1,551 

95 

2.224 

525 

29 

9 

12 

118 

108 

737 

12 

12 

5 

638 

2,323 

231 

2'i 

35 

102 

3 

lis 
3 

so 

581 

163 

.       3 

29 
6 

29 

"9 
276 
mi 

15 
123 

"ho 

21 
12 

28 
54 

s,i,:,7 

103 

1,424 

622 

3 



41 

126 

203 

961 

1 

38 

8 
513 
649 

21S 

5 

12 
24 

1 

0,264 

68 

1,981 

56G 
13 

15 

121 

237 

594 

•i 

6 
2 

45o 

1,238 

230 

3 

29 

il7 

1 

1 

6,095 

105 

1,125 

471 

16 

2 

111 

Its 

237 

357 

13 

1S2 
396 
328 

s 

1 

17 

12 

1 

SS 

2 

7 

5 

English 

Welsh     

3,420 

52 

S01 

206 

12 

9 
103 
56 

511 

15 

9 

3711 

198 

445 

3 

1.337 

17 

357 

124 

6 

69 

258 

344 

3 

197 

359 

144 
2 

610  1,689 

27        32 

1.89      296 

55      114 

4,877 

56 

691 

308 

6 

90,380 

1,032 
22.223 

H.547 

West  Indian  . .    .  . 
Bermudian 

2 
I 
1 

17 

227 

298 

3 

15 

'85 
108 

11H 

2 
o 

134 
43 

lnl 

1 

35 

197 

s 

10 

232 
139 
101 

L'o 
128 
180 

10 
7 

"582 

149 

333 

4 

1.053 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

Russian. . 
Polish     . 
ii         Austrian. 
German 
Italian    

Newfoundland. . . . 

1.H79 

5. 788 

Hi 

195 

54 

11,212 

7,601 

3,374 

7'i 

Portuguesi    

Polish,  X.E.S 

Austrian. 

•1 

4 
35 

7 
11 

4 
27 

28 

111 

22 

3 

Hi 

22 

230 

1 

2 

18 
4 

17 

255 

586 

16 

Russian  .    . 

86 

44 

56 

2,8 

37 
2 

84 
183 
28 

I 
2 

11 

2 

27 

124 

in 

5 
2 

9 

8 

736 

7 

Roumanian 

Russian,  N.  K.S 

144 

HIT 

I'M 

S 

21 

154 

1,225 

214 

10 

15 

1 

US 

s 

4111 

372 

134 

14 

2 

38 

2 

14 

19 

'.in 

(ill 

855 

149 

8 

20 

7 

34 

8 

255 

24S 

34 

32 

1 

79 

15 

17 

108 

si; 

531 

128 

1 

23 

5 

n; 

5 

178 

139 

21 

42 

4 

14S 

8 

26 

5" 

160 

52 

311 

80 

10 

9 

1 
HI 

3 

134 

122 

is 

97 

1 
68 

s 

14 

8 
903 

56 

45(1 

85 

5 

11 

19 

32 

2 

172 

109 

24 

49 

ill 

I 

3 
555 

128 

797 

115 

7 

9 

2 

13 

161 

76 

119 
153 

1117 
3 

I 
9 

47 

575 

llll 

1 

6 

1 

12 

9 

60 

28 

61 

1 

949 

0.281 
1,212 

61 

195 

4S 

13 

8 

.'ill.-, 

273 

ss 
HI 

2 

290 

97 

HI 

111 

4 

12 

34 

26 
3 
3 

50 
44 
18 
27 

2,132 

Turkish 

1,554 
489 

Armenian 

563 

8 

5 
4 

in 

7 

98 

35 

'   "8 

356 

5 

1 
2 

'67 

2 
2 

1 

6 

3,69.8 

9 

.   .    . 

"9 

3 

217 

9,251 

782 

50 

133 
136 

Hindoo  

2.H23 

Totals 

34,438 

3S,755 

32,319 

20,946 

[16,936  15.204 

13,597 

10,109 

6,099 

2,805 

204,157 

IMMIGRATION 


13 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


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14 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  II 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


TABLE 

Nationality,  Sex,  Occupation   and   Destination  of   Immigrant  Arrivals 


African,  Smith-  - 

Australian  ... 

Austrian,  N.E.S 

Bohemian 

Bukowiman 

Croatian 

Dalmatian 

Galician 

Hungarian,  N.E 
o. - 

Magyar 

Ruttienian 

Slovak 

Belgian 

Buleai  ian 

Brazilian 

Chinese 

Dutch 

French  

German,  N.E.S. 

Alsatian 

Bavarian 

Prussian 

English 

Welsh 

Scotch 

Irish 

West  Indian      . 

Bermudian 

Jamaican 

Greek 

Hebrew,  N.E.S. 

ii         Russian 

Polish  . 

ii         Austrian 

.•         German 

Italian 

Japanese 

Newfoundland . 

New  Zealand  ... 

Portuguese 

Polish,  N.E.S... 
I.        Austrian 
German., 
..        Russian . 

Persian 

Roumanian  ...... 

Russian,  X.K.S 

Finnish 

Spanish 

Swiss 

Servian 

Danish 

Icelandic 

Swvdish. 

Norwegian 


Trade  or 


General 
Labourers. 


533     783 


2 

27 
13 
67 


112 
38 

116 

10 

30 

2 


7 

67 

38 

106 


2,827 

171 

2,520j     405 

934     132 


1,060 

24 

536 

158 


Mechanics. 


8 

34 

100 

10 

51 

7 


273 

31 
7 

11 

1 

153 

17 


41 
257 
320 

292 


1 

60 

139 

102 

1 


1 

1 

11 

25 

48 

93 

121 

170 

1 

2 

1 

262 

273 

147 

34 

99 

114 

1 

12 

17 

41 

50 

1 

29 

;«i 

60 

109 

240 

422 

40 

21 

3 

4 

1 

2 

4 

4 

3 

61 

107 

49 

93 

2 

1 

17,873 

221 

4,776 

912 

25 

14 

4 

23 

304 

1,485 

13 

46 

15 

424 

96 

186 

18 


26 
17 

3 
38 

2 

72 

658 

56 

9 
43 

4 
40 

8 
209 
163 


1 

8,128 

55 

1,879 

407 

4 

2 

3 

3 

267 

902 

8 

16 

10 

39 

20 

45 

4 


7 
2 

24 

"43 

295 

12 

1 


O 


7 
6 
34 
3 
3 


68 
19 


1 
56 


1 

97 

103 

132 

1 


8,989 

61 

1,892 

284 


246 

999 

13 

13 

15 

25 

3 

66 

4 


4 
3 

15 

"63 

310 

19 

2 

6 

3 

3 

5 

73 

43 


ii 


IMMIGRATION 


15 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


V. 


for  Canada  at  Ocean  Ports,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March   31,  1908. 


Occupation- 

Destination. 

Clerks 
Traders, 

te. 

Miners. 

> 

-r. 

~. 
S 
o 

Not 

00 
D 

% 

Classified. 

03 
U 

if 

.§8 

.■Sfc 

a? 

6 

08 

5 
1 

*2 

5 

a 

.s 

±* 

o3 
H, 

00 
03 
-J2 

03 

■s 

< 

.03 
J3 

"o 

O 

jS 
.2 
V> 
'u 
PQ 

DO 

CD 

-. 

a 

a 

u 

2 

2 

o 

no 

X 

- 
- 

— 

2 

Is 

. 

09 

£ 

83 

u 

2 
2 
0 

s 
0 

12 

3 

6 
7 

2 
10 
98 

6 
41 

4 

5 

7 

12 

3 
3 

130 
25 

122 
15 

15 

9 

720 
11 

851 

15 

4 

2,595 

108 
20 
302 
5 
327 
186 

16 

24 

315 

12 

223 

149 

5 

1,714 

355 

102 

191 

63 

53 

2,203 

24 

10 

432 

19 

717 
17 

'  7,452 

262 
36 

357 
11 

406 
15 

2 
134 

8 
127 

1 
1,169 

459 
99 
37 

3 
83 

3 

4 

5 

108 

13 

87 
1 

14 
127 
59 
14 
18 
27 

15 

21 

1 

"l2 

13 
76 
19 
22 
14 

2 
9 

4 
2 

6 

15 
9 
1 

1 

17 
36 

7 
4 

y 

14 

49 

10 

4 

4 

i 

1 
1 

1 

6 

89 
12 

11 
2 

22 
2 

901 

50 

10 
59 
11 
38 
3 

6 

■: 

2 

1 
7 
3 

54 

42 
14 
11 
il 
15 

84 

01 
21 
17 
12 
20 

249 

60 
25 

7 

191 

116 

1 

14 

17 

208 

74 

989 

32 
36 
11 
45 
111 

100 

31 

3 

7 

61 

43 

6 

4 

2 

1 

1 

17 

9 

2 

111 

1 

39 
6 

36 

39 

1 

1,105 

48 

16 
18 
66 
38 

37 
20 
21 
37 

1 

2 

34 

45 

1 

28 

116 

114 

87 

9 

124 

;v.i 

19 

26 

152 

74 

81 
31 

3t; 
47 

156 

219 

1,178 

418 

2 

4 

2 

15,903 

162 

4,549 

1,330 

7 

143 
379 
185 
371 

8 
408 
616 
790 

74 
178 
344 

9 

86 

202 

256 

1,554 

29 

102 

109 

161 
114 

15 
6 

15 
7 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

44,464 

362 

8,650 

2,687 

52 

1 

12,618 

146 

4,274 

1,329 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4,412 

53 

1,083 

222 

1 

4,378 

86 

1,285 

411 

5,470 
168 

1,646 
349 

4,552 
59 

1,374 

627 

12 

2,218 

18 

592 

235 

1 

1,619 

18 

405 

149 

1,211 

115 

316 

38 

403 

17 

116 

11 

575 

23 

201 

6 

4,432 

40 

1,849 

681 

45 

9 

111 

15 

.  45 

232 

3 

15 

1,455 

17 

304 

139 

10 

4 

7 

5 

14 

35 

1 

3 

1,796 

25 

444 

183 

2 

2 

10 

6 

28 

168 

10 

1 

164 

226 

94 

5 

2,480 

14 

380 

113 

2 

4 

5 

5 

26 

266 

1 

18 

3,127 

55 

736 

218 

74 

30 

53 

97 

11 

147 

7 

8 

i 

2 

12 

8 

4 

2 

23 

146 

5 

12 

318 

1,257 

2,925 

16 

98 

34 

5,213 

7 

141 

9 

36 

583 

183 

1,764 

25 

80 

12 

4,365 

1 

105 

5 

2 

33 

131 

2 

177 

6 

128 

1,268 

922 

19 

39 

22 

73 

3 

635 

371 

an 

10 

161 

714 

1 

10 

3 

215 

45 

1 

39 

66 

59 

288 

52 
85 

14 

64 

171 

3 

3 

9 

16 

10 
3 
9 

61 

8 
2 
1 

1 
1 

11 
1 
4 
6 
5 

11 

"5 
200 

769 

7,589 

78 

43 

1 

48 
596 

201 

77 
95 

4 

5 

2 

30 

2 
41 

189 

15 

293 

35 

747 
22 

205 

36 

80 

2 

439 

4 

3,014 

44 

8 

23 

7 

2 

11 
6 

2 

2 

8 
3 

2 

3 

13 

35 

4 

44 

15 
1 

"4 

35 

1 

2 

7 
1 
2 
5 
9 
4 

6 

13 

2 

12 

1 

9 

128 

12 

3 

11 

1 

5 

1 

29 

26 

3 

15 

4 

13 

"l4 
214 

17 

1 

2 

2 

9 

33 

42 

10 

26 

"32 

'"  0 
202 
13 
2 
4 
6 
7 

45 
79 

101 

149 

2 

345 

1 

421 

1,750 

103 

6 

82 

6 

63 

12 

192 

114 

53 

188 

6 

124 

31 

15 

6 

17 

9 

65 

9 

18 
12 

32 

5 

2 

4 

27 

2 

3 

16 

5 
50 

1 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
5 
3 

6 
80 

52 

267 

190 

1 

9 

128 

1,607 

44 

19 

27 

3 

71 

79 

588 

375 

257 

727 
5 

29 

233 
222 

8 

373 

37 

1 

18 

3 

36 

3 

192 

170 

1 
354 
88 
14 
14 
1 
11 

247 
223 

74 

2 
8 

115 
86 

5 
11 

7 
25 

13 

1 

4 

10 

2 

24 
21 

187 
153 

3 

17 
14 

5 
2 

38 
30 

9 
2 

17 
1 

16  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

TABLE 
.Nationality,    Sex,     Occupation     and    Destination     of     Immigrant    Arrivals 


Skv 


Track  OB 


i. 

3 

/ 

:. 

t 
fa 

Fanners,  or  Farm 
Labourers  (.'lass. 

Genera 

Lai*  mii'i 

g. 

Mechanics. 

a 

■i. 

:. 

~x    ■ 

Females. 

( 'liildn-n. 

i. 

5 

a 

— 

1 

- 

A       I 

_ 
O 

Turkish    . 

Armenian 

Egyptian 

466 

320 

6 

469 

37 

77 

91 

2,620 

14 

142 

2 

165 

t; 
'I 

9 
101 

98 

7 

29 

11 

3 

189 

563 

8 

732 

50 

133 

136 

2,623 

138 

4, 

2         3 

4          7 

280 
150 

2 
27 

2 
28 

33           3 

103         39 
3    ... 

4S          25 
o 

2 
87 

151 

2 

14 

ill: 

12        is 

1  1 

2  3 

2(13 

•>i; 

19 
9 

12 

26          1 

U.S.  Citizen*    .  .  . 

8 

31 

2,429 

6 

31 

35 

2 

7 

1 

4 

0 

.    .  . 

T<'t;ils 

122.293 

43.541 

38,323 

204,157 

27,388 

6,192 

8,286  49,656 

5,670 

7,846  29,706 

12.S7S 

13.751 

II  IMMIGRATION  17 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

V. 

Canada  at  Ocean  Ports,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908 — Continued. 


OCCIPATION. 

De 

STINATION. 

Clerks, 
Traders,  &c. 

Minei 

s. 

c 
© 

2 
O 

> 

X 

0) 

H 

Not  Classified. 

X 

9 

»"> 
.9  8 

■c- 

ea 

% 

c5 

■8 

3 

B 

OS 
■t 
— 

w 

43 

S 
J* 

s 

a: 

U 

< 

IS 

2 
2 
O 

.2 
'■£ 

M 

■j. 

c 

S 

33 
2 

s 

8 

1 

14 

I 

£ 

2 

o 

2 
11 

33 

o 

"3 

3J 

= 

30 

s 
"3 
% 

35 

03 

S 

2 

2 
o 

. 
o 

cd 

2 
O 

.2 
5 

s 

10 

i 

46 

5 
8 
2 
T 
1 
7 

12 
10 

3 

50 
45 
3 
367 
10 
30 
95 

98 

375 

4 

252 

34 

29 

16 

3 

334           5 
139           1 

-' 

3 

11 

2 

18 

1 

30 

1 
6 
6 

18 
42 

a 
11 

5 

1 

1 

96 

60 

6 
1 
2 

i 
i 

1 
3 

57 
2 

2 
26 

13 

4 

5 

4           2 
24            5 
2J           4 

14 
0 

3 

1 

6 

7 

1 

32 
2,619 

63 

3 

1 

9,485 

3,614 

2,831 

2,818  710 

1,034 

10,490 

3,240 

3,1178 

4,575 

10,309 

43,28674,328)34,436 

10,209 

9,405 

22,171 

13 

25- 


18 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


PORT    OF    NORTH    SYDNEY. 


For  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived  at  the  port  of  North  Sydney  9,790  pas- 
sengers, of  whom  2,953  travelled  saloon  and  6,837  steerage.  Of  the  saloon  passengers 
2,116  were  destined  to  Canada  and  837  to  the  United  States.  Of  the  steerage  pas- 
sengers 5,159  were  for  Canada  and  1,678  for  the  United  States.  Included  in  the  steer- 
age passengers  for  Canada  were  1,204  returned  Canadians  and  233  tourists,  leaving 
the  immigration  proper  at  3,722  souls. 

Table  I.  deals  with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total 
arrivals  of  steerage  passengers,  Table  m.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants 
for  Canada,  and  Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from 
immigrants  for  Canada  upon  arrival. 

TABLE  I. 

Nationality  and   Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  North  Sydney  for 
the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Can 

U>A. 

TJ 

NITED 

States. 

Canada  and  Un 
States. 

TF.n 

3 

X 

e 

c 

O 

2 
ja 

0 

■A 

i. 

3 

"3 

S 
i 
w 

IS 

■s- 

■~ 

s 

S 

s" 

t 

C 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

•1 

1 
■■<■ 

2 

1 

3 
S3 

2 
136 

5 
38 
14 

2 

1 
423 

1 
2 

t 

3 

186 

2 

157 
6 
44 
16 
2 
2 
1 

718 
1 
2 

1 

70 

"  33 

12 

6 

16 

20 

8 

40 

6 

22 

"   41 

3 

:'s 

152 

5 

41 

21 

2 

2 

2 

.V,3 

1 

2 

1 

2 

3 
5 

400 
1 

5S3 
47 

90 

226 

8 

Welsh 

21 

1 
6 
2 

"242 

53 

4 

o 

2, 
9 

5 

2 

179 
6 

6 

7 

3 
3 

9 
10 

53 

26 

2 

2 

1 
130 

1 
267 

2 

114 

23 

356 

76 

985 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

453 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

1  .. 

1       .... 

1 

2 

* 

1 
583 

35 

2 
4 

78 

1 

815 

73 

1 

1 

343 

4 

0 

18 

3 

92 

18 

110          21 

170        57 

531 
1 

175 
30 

57 
8 



12 

1 
7 

1 
19 

816 

37 

s 

92 

Totals 

1,397 

505 

154 

2,116 

539 

247 

51 

837 

1,936 

812 

205 

2,953 

IMMIGRATION 


19 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE  II. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  North  Sydney 
for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

United 

Statu 

0 

Canada  and  TJn 

States. 

TED 

o 

a 

o 

fa 

a 

a* 

■a 
O 

0 

S      |     fa 

t 
2 

O 

m 

"a 

EC 

to 

£ 
fa 

c 
a 

u 

Is 

0 

O 
Eh 

. 

2 

12 

104 

9 

49 

6 

15 

7 

3 

1 

6 

2,4(54 

•6 
1 
3 

1 

■2 

5 

12 

196 

10 

56 

6 
is 

8 
3 

I 

3,320 

7 
1 
3 

I 

2 

12 

111 

10 

60 

10 

17 

9 

3 

1 

7 

3,167 

6 

8 

1 

3 

1 

19 

11 

1 

13 
27 

1 

"SO 
1 
2 

"4 
2 

2 

42 

6 

1 

5 

7 
1 
12 
4 
3 
4 

12 

50 

1 
1 

42 
6 

203 

German 

English 

Welsh . 

1 
11 
4 
2 
2 

"i 

11 
68 
10 

Scotch 

3 

1 

1 
1 

1 

21 

12 

3 



555 

1 

2 
301 

i 

Italian 

1 

703 

6 

2 

"593 
"1 

"91 
.... 

1 

1,387 

6 

4 

1,148 

2 

392 

9 

Newfoundland 

Polish 

4,707 
6 

Russian,  N.E.S 

2 

"  1 
1 

1 

4 
1 

11 
1 

1 
4 
3 

1 

4 
3 

3 

1 

15 

8 
1 
8 
6 

1 
1 

4 

1 

20 
10 

1 

8 

29 

24 

13 

1 

3 

"20 

5 
21 

3 

14 

174 

8 
209 

3 
17 

194 

16 

I  .H.A.  Citizens 

238 

Total  immigration.... 

2,726 
787 
117 

618 

216 

92 

378 

201 

24 

3,722 

1,204 

233 

773 

614 

267 

1,654 

3,499 
787 
132 

1,232 

216 

97 

645 
201 

28 

5,376 
1,204 

15 

5 

4 

24 

257 

3,»i30 

926 

603 

5,159 

788 

619 

271 

1,678 

4,418 

1,545 

874 

6,837 

iJ.r. — ii — 2* 


20  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
TABLE    III. 

Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  at  the  Port  of  North 
Sydney,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


< 

>> 

a 

s 

c 

3 

31 

< 

c 

% 

i 

s 

8 

= 
> 

u 

— ' 

a 

9 

« 

c 

i 
i 

— 

o 

u 
E 

Totals 

2 

1 

2 

17 
2 
5 
3 

5 

3 

12 

4 

5 

1 

15 

6 

4 

4 
22 

i 

4 

12 

57 

18 

19 
10 

28 

1 
2 
2 

5 

2 

196 
10 

English 

3 

2 

15 

1 
4 

1 

3 

2 

3 

56 
6 

7 
2 

2 

1 

"l" 

2 

1 
1 

18 

1 

1 

2 

8 

West  Indian... . 

1 

1 

3 

1 

1 

1 
507 

3 
326 

439 

1 

4 
14.! 

g 

Newfoundland.  . 

428 

266 

231 
2 

208 
3 

228 

110 

1 

101 

333 

"l 

1 
1 

3,320 

1 

2 

1 
2 

1 
3 

3 

14 
3 

1 
1 

20 

Norwegian 

Armenian    ... 

1 
1 

2 

10 

1 

2 
5 

2 

5 

1 

2 
5 

1 

8 

1 
2 

8 

t".  S.  Citizens  . 

1 

2 

29 

Totals 

440 

592 

295 

264 

268 

264 

367 

472 

185 

120 

110 

345 

3.722 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


IMMIGRATION 


TABLE    IV. 


21 


Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Occupation  and  Destination,  at  the 
Port  of  North  Sydney,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


'u 

< 

£ 
i 

414 
GS 
23 
11 
52 
23 

% 

^> 

2 

199 

33 

9 
11 
33 

8 

jsj. 

2 

134 

49 

8 
10 
30 
31 

a 
bo 

11 

129 

33 

8 
12 
27 

48 

s 

a 
o 

12 
141 
21 
3 
21 
29 
37 

£ 

O 

a 

O 

3 
240 
35 
10 
21 
40 
18 

S 

> 

0 
'A 

5 

312 

41 

8 
51 
38 
17 

u 
CD 

x> 
c 

33 

0 

0 

.Q 

io2 

12 
12 
15 
18 
26 

■A 
u 

es 
3 
C 
<S 
1-5 

3 
78 
9 
6 
17 
3 
4 

D 
u 

.0 
Ph 

3 
71 
13 
2 
5 
8 
8 

J3 
p 

1 

288 

30 

1 

9 

12 

4 

O 

43 
2,484 
378 
96 
186 
300 
235 

Mechanics 

376 

34 

6 

3 

10 

11 

Totals 

440 

404 
9 
9 
3 
1 
2 
12 

440 

592 

463 

87 

295 

266 
4 

264 

228 

24 

4 

"i 

1 

6 

264 

268 

213 

15 

7 

27 

264 

237 

22 

1 

1 

367 

334 

27 

3 

472 

401 
24 
33 

185 

170 
4 
7 

120 

117 
1 
1 

110 

93 
5 
2 

345 

317 
7 
1 
1 

3,722 

3,243 

229 

115 

39 

26  21 

...I.1 
5 

2 
12 

268 

"3 

264 

"3 

367 

3 

11 

472 

1 

18 

345 

British  Columbia 

5 
592 

3 

295 

4 
185 

1 
lL'o 

10 
110 

82 
3,722 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  li 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

TABLE 
Nationality,  Sex,  Occupation  and  Destination  of  Immigrant  arrivals  for 


Sex. 

Trade  or 

Farmers 

Farm  Labo 

Class. 

or 
irers 

= 
u 

0 

General 
Labourers. 

Mechanics* 

■j. 

— 

DO 

S 

HI 

i. 

0 

00 

■5 

0 
EH 

Males. 

Females. 

n 

s 

00 

5 

"a 

a 

s 

u 

O 

7a 

3 

2 

12 

104 

9 

49 
6 

15 
7 
3 
1 
6 
2,464 
6 
1 
3 

15 
8 
I 
8 
6 

1 

"  50 

1 
1 

'  y 
i 

"42' 

6 

196 

10 

56 

6 

18 

8 

3 

1 

8 

3,320 

7 

1 

3 

20 

10 

1 

8 

29 

1 

6 
87 
1 
23 
1 
7 
3 
3 

1 

9 

2 

5 

12  u  21 
1   1 .... 

9           13 

Welsh 

3 

5           3       ..    . 

555 
1 

"i 
l 

3 

"2 
301 

..„. 

1 

'26' 

1 

31          2 

Newfoundland 

Russian    X  E  S 

4 

2,091 
5 
1 

98 

110 

182          44 

1 

66 

.... 
1 

"1 

1 

2 

12 
6 

1 
2 

1 
2 

1 

4 

"l 

1 

T      6 

3 

Totals 

2,726 

618 

378 

3,722 

36 

3 

4 

2,252 

109    123 

222 

62 

94 

ii  IMMIGRATION 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 
V. 
Canada  at  the  Port  of  North  Sydney  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Occupation. 

Destination-. 

Clerks, 
Traders,  &c. 

Miner 

s. 

D9 
4a 

C 
S3 
> 

CO 

en 

3 
01 

Not  classified. 

CO 

s  - 

5 
3 

127 

10 

47 

6 

12 

5 

3 

1 

8 

2,963 

6 

1 

1 

9 

6 

1 

6 

23 

u 
,2 

?. 

c 

* 

3 

3 

0 
43 

a: 
ca 
CO 

03 

CO 

"a 

3 

£ 
o 

El. 

B 
o 

2 
IS 
o 

ad 

_ 

1 

Is 

s 
s 
u 

2 
'J: 
O 

"3 
S 

CD 

c 

X 

D 

b3 
IS 

'  — 

-co 

M 

..    .. 

x. 

} 

ii 

"io 

8 
69 

3 

1 

4 

3 

6 

lli 

1 

6 

10 
2 

2 

2 

1 

S 

4 

3 

1 

^ 

2 

1 

"2' 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

l 

- 

140 
1 

6 

s 

2 
5 

41 

95 

30 

41 

284 

21 

89 

79 



103 

23 

2 

11 

78 

2 
1 
1 

1 

l' 

10 
1 

1 

1 

fi 

1 

1 
5 

2 

11 

1 

11 

13 

115 

30 

72 

41 

300 

29 

103 

103 

3,243 

229 

115 

39 

2 

12 

82 

24 


DtiPARTUEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


PORT    OF    HALIFAX. 


For  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived  at  the  port  of  Halifax  36,091  passengers, 
of  whom  2,002  travelled  saloon  and  34,089  steerage.  Of  the  saloon  passengers  1,909 
were  destined  to  Canada  and  93  to  the  United  States.  Of  the  steerage  passengers 
31,279  were  for  Canada  and  2,810  for  the  United  States.  Included  in  the  steerage 
passengers  for  Canada  were  2,624  returned  Canadians  and  336  tourists,  leaving  the 
immigration  proper  at  28,319  souls,  a  decrease,  as  compared  with  the  twelve  months 
ending  March  31,  1907,  of  293  persons. 

Table  I.  deals  with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total 
arrivals  of  steerage  passengers,  Table  III.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants 
for  Canada,  and  Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from 
immigrants  for  Canada  upon  arrival. 

TABLE   I. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  Halifax  for  the 
Fiscal  Tear  ending  March  31,  190S. 


(  Ianada, 

United 

States. 

Canada  and  United 
States. 

33 

SO 

w 

"3 

B 

a 
£ 

3 

IS 

o 

-r' 

*e8 
0 

2 
24 

1 

455 

5 

59 

17 

12 

16 

4 

1 

35 

1 

1 

2 

4 

29 

375 

866 

1.W9 

DO 

"3 

H 

-  h 

c 
to 
u 

-3 
.-3 

o 

e3 

"3 

'rt 
S 

a 

IS 
o 

i 

17 

1 
4 
1 
133 
2 

22 

7 
4 

10 
2 

3 
28 

1 
4 

1 

17 

295 
3 

37 

10 

7 

2 

2 

1 
17 

1 

4 

1 

134 

2 

22 
7 
4 

10 
2 

3 
"    "28 

1 
4 

o 

24 

2 

1 

English' 

Welsh 

294 

3 

37 

10 

7 

2 

9 

i 

13 

1 

1 

457 
5 

59 

17 

12 

16 

4 

1 

21 

1 

1 

4 

1 

5 

21 

1 

2 

40 
1 

i 
1 

1 

16 

218 

474 

l.ons 

1 

1 

1 

23 

219 

545 

1 

1 
1 

Jrl 
123 
322 

666 

2 
2 

34 
70 

145 

1 

1           2 

13            2 

123          34 

326        71 

2 

4 

7 

1 

71 

84 

2 

9 

1 
76 

38 
376 

4 

1 

942 

Totals        

7 

2 

93 

1,182 

673       147 

2,002 

IMMIGRATIOX 


25 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE    II. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  Halifax  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


<  'AN ADA. 

United 

States. 

Canada  and  United 
States. 

a 

£ 
- 
ft 

e 

u 

"3 

0 

0Q 

a) 
13 

5 
ft 

c 
<s 

u 
5 

O 
E-i 

□Q 

s 

S 
ft 

B 
u 

5 

x' 

"3 
"0 

? 

9 

102 

14 

59 

14 

1,114 

21 

138 

290 

1 

15 

208 

349 

191 

1 

7 

15 

9 

123 

20 

73 

15 

1,854 

31 

236 

294 

1 

15 

367 

528 

456 

2 

2 

15,422 

129 

3,330 

868 

53 

10 

58 

145 

571 

922 

21 

28 

10 

227 

3 

54 

12 

6 

61 

4 

144 

749 

139 

3 

29 

4 

29 

11 

104 

153 

109 

393 

2 

412 

14 

11 

38 

7 

9 

119 

15 

59 

31 

1,122 

30 

157 

396 

1 

15 

219 

354 

239 

1 

"39 

1 
12 

1 

366 

11 

57 

7 

"l9 

5 

2 

3 

382 

\ 

15 

!) 

Au-triaii.  N.E.S   

12 

'  360 

5 

54 

8 

2 
1 
380 
5 
44 
4 

17 

1 

17 
8 
9 

19 
106 

11 
5 

48 

23 

1 
6 
6 

3 

.... 

3 

2 

26 

14 

54 
1 

20 
16 
17 
24 
106 

"  25 

11 

109 

177 
21 

2 
2 
2 
2 

11 

4 

35 

73 

Galician 

Hungarian 

Belgian 

35 

1,870 

48 

260 

400 

1 

15 

Dutch 

German,  N.E.S 

54 

105 

91 

1 

2^940 

13 

661 

170 

14 

3 

8 

6 

177 

270 

6 

4 

2 

16 

"  16 
3 

1 
10 

""37 

152 

35 

2 

4 

105 

74 

174 

I 

2J509 

17 

517 

97 

1 
1 

194 

289 

7 

3 

3 

11 

5 
2 

10 

"  64 
224 

8 

3 

57 

107 

117 

1 

3,028 

16 

674 

175 

14 

3 

8 

7 

179 

287 

6 

4 

2 

21 

"   17 

6 

1 

24 

3 

39 

288 

109 

2 

4 

116 

78 

209 

1 

2,581 

17 

525 

100 

1 

1 

5 
195 
303 

7 

3 

3 

16 

"fi 

4 

392 
539 

565 
2 

Bavarian, 

Welsh 

2 

9,973 

99 

2,152 

601 

38 

6 

50 

135 

200 

363 

8 

21 

5 

200 

3 

33 

7 

5 

41 

4 

43 

373 

96 

1 

22 

4 

23 

2 

73 

116 

105 

196 

2 

272 

10 

7 

34 

"l60 

4 

26 

23 

7 

88 
3 

13 
5 

72 

"8 
3 

320 

47 
31 

7 

18 

11 

64 

1 

2 

2 

10,133 

103 

2,178 

624 

45 

6 

50 

151 

208 

396 

9 

23 

5 

219 

3 

50 

17 

6 

83 

7 

48 

732 

254 

1 

23 

4 

51 

2 

155 

352 

135 

218 

2 

368 
13 
30 
35 

2 
15,742 

136 
3.377 

899 

60 
10 

16 
8 

33 
1 
2 

1 
2 

17 

1 

1 
14 

58 

Hebrew,  N.E  S 

163 

582 

Polish 

986 
22 
30 

10 

Italian  . 

19 

5 

5 

29 

256 
3 

Newfoundland   

Polish,  N.E.S 

17 

10 

1 

42 

3 

5 

359 

158 

1 
3 

2 

18 

15 

1 

81 

6 

7 

658 

256 

72 

27 
7 

14 
3 
2 

136 
74 

25 

163 
24 

35        142 

in 

Russian,  N.E.S 

Finnish 

64 

387 

32 

3 

151 

1,407 

395 

3 

1 

1 

30 
4 

6 

1 
20 

25 
3 

115 

"85 

2 

3 

4 

8 
11 
12 

1 
82 

55 
2 

1 

28 

"82 

236 

30 

22 

8 

'"39 

71 

2 

24 

13 

25 
35 

12 

49 

146 

342 

32 

58 

14 

1 

59 

96 

139 

13 

8 
36 

47 

1 

94 

78 

11 

250 

495 

Turkish 

Egyptian. 

U.S.  Citizens.  .. 

141 

451 

2 

96 
3 

23 
1 

39 
"ll 

ii 

3 
3 

176 

6 

37 

1 

124 

2 

14 

4 

96 
5 

4 

588 
20 
48 

39 

Total  Immigration... 

17,857 

2,108 

239 

5,514 
347 

78 

4,948 

169 

19 

28,319 

2,624 

336 

1,657 

631 

522 

2,810 

19,514 

2,108 

239 

6,145 
347 

78 

5,470 

169 

19 

31,129 

2,624 

336 

Totals 

20,204 

5,939 

5,136 

31,279 

1,657 

631 

522 

2,810^1,861 

6,570 

5,658 

34,089 

DEPARTMEyT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


TABLE  Iir. 


Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  at  the  Fort  of  Halifax, 
for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


< 

1 

— 

>> 

— 

s 
< 

u 

t 

s 

*~ 
T 

DO 

- 

g 

-* 

- 
- 
B 
> 

u 

— 

- 

- 

5 

CS 

-; 

- 
- 

— 

- 

m 
c 

African,  South 

6 

5 
8 

34 

3 

1 
5 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 
3 

1 

2 

53 

14 

15 
i) 

32 

37 

1 

158 

8 

24 

25* 

3 

6 

19 

123 

1 

20 
73 

4 

1 

2 
12 

14 

15 

1) 

52 

15 

1,040 

11 
71 

4 

2 

26 

14 

126 

61 
2 

1^252 
17 
53 
62 
17 
3 

3 

15 
47 

52 

616 

- 

7 
11 

13 

i 
36 

5 
2 

1 
1 

"7 

1 

9 

2 

12 

37 

1 

1,854 

31 
236 

294 

28i 
129 
136 

14 

"l 
13 
55 
42 

53 

115 

38 

1 
15 

Dutch 

18 

"i 

3 

5 
34 

16 

36 
46 

IS 

38 

367 

French  

German,  X.  E.S 

528 

456 

2 

1 

9,392 

64 

2,353 

473 

1 

2 

3 

7 

14 

76 

80 

1 

473 

3 

2 

English 

Welsh 

140    159     88 
•>       2        3 

7S 

'l2 
5 
2 

326 
7 

83 
31 

442 
1 

160 

26 

4 

223 
10 

10s 

23 

47S 

5 

126 

34 

2,371 

15 

316 

133 

3 

15,422 
129 

Scotch 

Irish 

3ti      23      39      21 
47      15        9      10 

0      16  . .            4 

3,330 

868 

53 

2        2 
2       1 

0 

1 

10 

39 

5 
8 
1 
9 

8 
29 

it 
121 

'  3 

5 

58 

32     •>.", 

24 

243 

249 

2 

13 

1 

46 

11 

179 

121 

2 

5 

8 

1 

4 

13 

67 

5 

1 

18 

91 

88 

10 

5 

20 

1 

145 

3        1   .. 

2 
41 

571 

..        Russian   

Polish 

34 

1 

1 

52 

1 
1 

.... 

17 

922 
21 

28 

4 

10 

2 

227 

3 

2 

30 

1 

10 

2 

1 
1 
4 

4 

2 

6 
3 

1 

4 

3 

21 

30 

203 

20 

1 

3 

2 

9 

14 

7 

•l 

54 

Polish,  N.E.S 

12 

1 

48 

50 

1 

6 

15 

34 

4 

1 
3 

26 

1 

18 

114 

4 

'  8 
4 
5 

to 

10 

5 

6 

i,      Russian 

Russian.  N.E.S 

Finnish 

13 

1 

6 

5 

20 

1 

164 

36 

7 

2 

80 

84 

16 

2 

1 

8 

1 

4 
5 

"2 

53 

8 
1 

"3 

14 
5 

1 
1 

61 

4 

144 

749 

139 

3 

9 

1 

29 

4 

12 
2 

36 
110 

24 
6 

1 

1 

3 

3 

38 

22 

1 
1 

4 

'20 
3 

40 

129 

127 
2 

1 

29 

11 

"3 
10 

"7 

17 

1 

45 

1 
6 

2 

"8 

71 

39 

2 

"l4 

6 

25 

119 
4 

13 

85 

1 

41 

104 
153 

Turkish 

109 

Armenian    

393 
2 

12 

3 

1 

4 

"  5 

1 

412 

4 

2 

1 
12 

14 

1 

n 

18 

38 

T.itals 

14,491 

1,885 

1,355 

443 

523 

387    200 

1,282 

2,159 

1,009    981 

3,604 

28,319 

IMMIGRATION 


27 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE  IV. 


Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada  by  Occupation  and  Destination  at  the 
Port  of  Halifax  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Agriculturists 

General  labourers . . , 

Mechanics 

Clerks 

Miners 

Female  servants . . .  . 
Not  classed 

Totals 

Maritime  Provinces. 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia.  . 

Totals.... 


5,494 
2,678 
4,508 
743 
216 
504 
348 


14,491 


834 

1,602 

6,409 

3,562 

822 

930 

332 

14,491 


482 

585 

467 

79 

46 

52 

174 


1,885 


655 
376 
161 
22 
48 
63 
30 


1,355 


309, 
288 
518 
381 
260 
92 
37 


494 
115 
125 
364 
94 
161 
2 


1,885'  1,355 


125 
83 

U.'i 
27 
20 
22 
23 


443 


184 
103 
91 
17 
12 
2 
4 


143 


62  43 
197!  96 


119 
37 
28 
31 
49 


523 


118 
43 


45 
44 
53 

13 
171  14 
18  16 
52   15 


387  200 


120 
49 
25 

4 


416 

184 

56 

132 

25 

37 

9 

1 

5 

19 

6 

1 

6 

13 

523 

387 

2 
200 


285 
282 
337 
138 

70 
105 

65 


529 
589 
677 
109 

58 
125 

72 


203 
203 
395 
54 
50 
61 
43 


1,282 

2,159 

360 

291 

331 

572 

307 

736 

154 

320 

54 

105 

47 

70 

29 

65 

1,282 

2,159 

1,009 


82 

475 

256 

100 

30 

32 

34 


1,009 


336 

111 

289 

104 

51 

57 

33 


981 


115 

254 

307 

157 

47 

38 

63 


981 


1,854 
342 
735 
213 
165 
185 
110 


3,604 


377 
429 
1,068 
555 
347 
266 
562 


3,604 


10,113 

5,586 
8,002 
1,582 
783 
1,239 
1,014 

28,319 


3,766 
4,406 
9,904 
5,654 
1,795 
1,645 
1,149 


28,319 


28 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

TABLE 

Nationality,    Sex,    Occupation    arid   Destination   of   Immigrant    arrivals 


Sf.x. 

Trade  or 

Farmers  or 

Farm  Labourers 

Class. 

General 

Labourers. 

Mechanics. 

H 

EQ 

IS 

s 

» 

fa 

g 

6 

4 

3 

-J. 

Is 

3 

CD 
J2 

z 

S3 
2 

5 

7) 

"3 

_ 

3 

5 
o> 
fa 

c 
u 

2 
o 

3 

C 
Q 

fa 

5 

7 

9 

102 

14 

59 

11 

1,114 

21 

138 

290 

1 

IS 
203 
349 
191 

1 

7 

15 

9 

123 

20 

73 

15 

1,854 

31 

236 

294 

15 

367 

528 

456 

2 

2 

15,422 

129 

3,330 

86S 

53 

10 

58 

145 

571 

922 

21 

28 

10 

227 

3 

54 

12 

6 

61 

4 

144 

749 

139 

3 

29 

4 

29 

11 

104 

153 

109 

393 

2 

412 

14 

11 

38 

28,319 

5 

3 

12 

1 
3 

5 
2 

2 

i 

21 

4 

7 

16 

I 

12 

300 

5 

54 

5 
5 
2 
1 
380 
5 
44 
4 

1 

3 

Bukowinian 

40 

8 

2 

19 

1 

116 

11 

968 

6 

55 

95 

212 

2 

13 

343 

4 

20 

3 

16     16 

1  .... 

28 

1 
16 

4 

7 
1 
12 

13 

1 

19       3 

L88 

"  l 

2 

54 
105 

91 

1 

"ioa 
74 

174 
1 

1 
28 

Dutch 

121 

203 

90 

27 
48 
54 

45 

48 

144 

8 

34 
5 

53 

68 
47 

9 

19 
11 

1 

17 

3S        Ii 
17        1 

13 

German,  N.E.S.    . . 

22 

i 

2 

9,973 

99 

2,152 

BO] 

38 

6 

50 

135 

2i  10 

363 

8 

21 

5 

200 

3 

33 

5 
41 

4 

43 

373 

96 

1 
22 

4 

1 

73 

116 

105 

196 

2 

272 

10 

7 

34 

1 

3,747 

27 

551 1 

208 

3 

1 
3,148 

37 
844 
109 

18 
2 
2 
6 

74 

276 

7 

13 
2 

15 
1 
4 
4 
1 
9 
2 

12 

48 
4 

2,94H 

13 

661 

170 

14 

3 

8 

6 

177 

270 

6 

4 

2 

16 

'   16 

3 

1 

10 

2,509 

17 

517 

97 

1 
1 

4 

194 

289 

7 

3 

3 

11 

5 

2 

10 

737 

1 

111 

26 

848 

7 

121 

29 

2,271 

14 

447 

183 

16 

3 

43 

107 

25 

25 

1 

2 

348 

392 

844 

4 

163 

33 

811 

Welsh 

49 
11 

1 

74 

10 

1 

173 

23 

1 

12 
82 
40 

2 
9 

12 

4 
9 

15 

2 

105 
180 
5 
3 
2 
2 

Hebrew,  N.E.S... . 
"        Russian  . . 
ii         Polish 

46 

14 

90 

21 

78 

175 
6 

1 

3 

18 

2 

3 

4 

4 

161 

5 

4 

2 

1 
1 
3 
6 

24 
2 

1 
1 

4 

1 

1 

polish  N  E  s 

2 

18 

2 

15 

146 
76 

1 
1 

3 

4 

5 

4 

37 
152 

35 
2 
4 

'   6 
1 
20 
25 
3 
US 

'"85 
2 
3 
4 

64 
224 

8 

"   3 

8 
11 
12 

1 
82 

5J 

2 

1 



13 
148 

7 

11 

63 

2 

26 

129 

5 

6 
15 

8 

16 
26 

? 

15 

36 

2 

21 
38 

1 

1 

12 

2 

8 



14 

30 

52 
21 

41 

5 
2 
32 
40 
73 
61 



2 

2 

1 
4 

t; 

8 
3 

11 

'  a  '  5 
i     i 
i  .... 

18 
10 

81 

1 

26 

1 

2 

15 

1 

2 

1 

31 

3 

Norwegian 

Turkish 

1 

4 

7 

22 

23 

25 

118 

2 
2 
4 

Hi 

13 

102 

5 

15 

1 
1 

11 
.... 

17 

4 

K.  S.  Citizens 

10 

555 

Totals 

17,857 

5,514 

4,948 

6,765 

1,408 

1,940 

4,373 

658 

5,038 

1,521 

1,443 

il  IMHIGRATIOX  29 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 
V. 
for  Canada,  at  the  Port  of  Halifax,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Occupation. 

00 

ta 
C 

> 

s 

a; 

O 

I 

Eh 

-i- 

"> 

z 
u 

6 

s 

Destination. 

Clerks, 
Traders.&c. 

Minei 

Not  Classified. 

el 

— 
= 

O1 

0 

O 

i 

O 

J 

1 

O 

n 
S 

c3 

U 

0, 

< 

s 

£ 

"3 

i       = 

1    s 

a     3 

r     3 
Eh     -j 

03 

"a 

£ 

2 

03 

'rt 

s 

0 

'Z 

f, 

\ 

2 

1 
83 
20 

6 
14 
53 

9 
91 
41 

1 

1 

12 

7 
6 
8 

1 
4 

9 

2 

1 
7 

-j 

1 

1 

2 

3 

61 

11 

2 

1 

"5 

4 

1 

4 

27 

9 

19 

11 

1 

13 
2 
3 

41 

i 

1 
1 

1 

118 
1 

7 

6 

7 

218 

2 

31 

15 

202 
1 
4 

236 

934 

11 

75 

2 

135 

6 

15 

311 

2 

19 

1 

7 

18      22 

i 

1 

1 

9, 

1 

14 

15 

20 

162 

38 

2 

1 

1,711 

13 

340 

86 

1 

22 
372 

488 

10 

10 

7 

125 

1 

1 

6 

1 

22 

3 

1 
4 

7 

7 
"5 

6 
15 
14 

3 

15 
6 

3 

6 

1 

2 
3 

I 

34 

130 

47 
37 

144 
190 
187 

17 
35 

114 

47 
38 
28 

3 

16 

1? 

9 
19 

7        8 

5 

In 

■ 

1 

1,857 

29 

413 

129 

39 

9 

,,n 
93 
10 
59 
3 
5 

518 
9 

182 

82 

1 

2i)0 

49 

20 

1 

124 

4 
39 
17 

178 

12 

74 

4 

go 
2 

27 
2 

87 
6 

32 
2 

568 

4 

232 

60 

12 

2 

8 

1 

0 

21 

111 

55 
15 

183 

2 

30 

18 

247 

78 
16 

6,605 

37 

1,419 

322 

13 

"8 

28 

34 

242 

8 

9 

52 

2,663 

20 

610 

156 

1,006 

17 

161 

57 

742 

6 

232 

76 

,s:;'.i 

7 

155 

42 

1 

1 

1 

10 

1 
4 

23 

2 
101 
114 

14 

7 
54 

I 

14 

10 
21 

1 

47 

7 
19 

20 

3 

1 

1 

2 

4 

1 
12 

2 

19 

?, 

1 

1 

4 

3 

2 
1 

1 

8 
2 

51 
1 
2 

24 

11 

3 

... 

9 
1 
1 
1 

5 

1 

2 

3 

2 

13 

4 

17 

128 

96 

1 

6 

2 
1 
1 

1 
8 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

7 

1 
14 

2 
19 

23 

1 
3 

2 
9 

14 

1 

65 
8 

62 
113 

13 

41 

244 

11 

23 
113 

2 

26 
9 

3 

3 

46 
1 
1 
5 

40 
10 

1 

1 

1 

4 

1 

2 
4 
3 

10 

2 

3 

1 

4 

3 

1 

1 

2 

11 

7 

6 

11 

37 
45 

1 

1 

•> 

1 

i 

5 

I" 
14 

1 

1 

2 

1 

16 

17 

10 

24 

27 

44 

1 

340 

7 

3 

30 

9 

11 

48 

301 

1 

54 

7 

3 

3 

20 
37 
34 

48 

10 
16 

15 
15 

3 

1 

5 

1 

5 

5 

10 

1 

■\; 

7 

1 

22 

7 

3 

1 

25 

4 

.... 

i 

3 

11 

1 

1 

23 

2 

18 

?, 

1 

1 

1 

1 
3 

2 

1 

2 

2 

1 
339 

2 

1 

292 

490 

125 

I'M 

108 

1.239 

240 

327 

447 

3,766 

4,406 

9,904 

r>,<;:i4 

1,795 

1,645 

1,149 

30 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


PORT   OF   ST.   JOHX. 


For  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived  at  the  port  of  St.  John  23,774  passengers, 
of  whom  1,323  travelled  saloon  and  22,451  steerage.  Of  the  saloon  passengers  1,286 
were  destined  to  Canada  and  37  to  the  United  States.  Of  the  steerage  passengers 
20,527  were  for  Canada  and  1,924  for  the  United  States.  Included  in  the  steerage 
passengers  for  Canada  were  2,228  returned  Canadians  and  405  tourists,  leaving  the 
immigration  proper  at  17,894  souls,  a  decrease,  as  compared  with  the  twelve  months 
ending  March  31.  1907,  of  1,026  persons. 

Table  I.  deals  with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total 
arrivals  of  steerage  passengers.  Table  1TI.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants 
for  Canada,  and  Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from 
immigrants  for  Canada  upon  arrival. 

TABLE  I. 


Xatioxality  and  Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  St.  John  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

United  States. 

Canada  and  United 
States. 

m 

CD 

3 

f- 

<D 

= 

- 

s 

i. 

c 

X 

"3 
■** 
o 
Eh 

x 

X 

8 

= 
9 

a 

U 

O 

X 

."5 

i      i 

'-      0 

4 

1 

1 

1 

3 

5 

4 

2 

1 

12 

5 

521 

12 

72 

25 

59 

127 

7 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

14 

7 

2 

360 

40 

1 

1 

2 
3 

1 

l 

2 
3 

1 

1 

3 

2 
3 
2 

1 

I 

337 
6 
55 
21 
24 
46 
4 

2 

3 

2 

1 

7 

5 

348 

6 

56 

22 

24 

46 

4 

5 

Belgian 

4 

2 

Dutch . 

1 

5 

1 
141 

3 
14 

4 

18 
:>4 

2 

1 

"  i 

43 
3 
3 

17 
27 

1 

1 
11 

1 
1 

1 

3 

1 

"2 

1 
1 

16 

1 
1 

1 

6 

1 

144 

4 

\4 

18 

54 

2 

1 

15 
3 
3 

17 
27 

1 

13 

6 

537 

Welsh 

13 

73 

26 

59 

127 

7 

1 

Spanish 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 
1 
9 
4 
2 
196 
26 

3 
2 

15 

4 

2 

196 

27 

3 

Egyptian 

1'.  s.  Citizens      

1 

6 

1 
13 

io 
3 

"2 

2 

4 
3 

1 

6 

1 

27 

7 

2 

134 
11 

30 
3 

1 

1 

1 
1 

135 
11 

30 
3 

361 

41 

Totals 

755 

402 

129 

1,286 

22 

12 

3 

37 

777 

414 

132 

1.323 

IMMIGRATION 


31 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE    II. 

Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  St.  John  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Can. 

m 

"3 
c 
a 

IDA. 

United 

States. 

Canada  and  United 

States. 

O 

EC 

0J 

■3 

DO 

n 

E 

V 

1     s 

3; 

IS 
0 

O 

Eh 

to 

a; 
"3 

to 

* 

£ 
En 

a 
g 

IS 
O 

O 

African,  South 

1( 

2 

93 

4 

746 

9 

2,994 

134 

1 

2 

121 

118 

10 

23 

36 

61 

4.004 

92 

851 

443 

26 

19 

2 

6 

34 

153 

6 

3 

i',6ir 

3 

2 

2 

2 

51 

11 

230 

74 

4 

11 

23 

247 

142 

30 

2 

6 

1 

4 

48 

5 
2 

13 
4 

42 

2 
1 

It 
6 

28 

17 

5 

122 

14 

816 

9 

3,792 

225 

1 

2 

193 

lis 

10 

45 

72 

128 

7,314 

129 

•  1,401 

640 

62 

32 

2 

« 
106 

317 

6 

4 

3 

1.048 

3 

2 

3 

3 

74 

25 

292 

101 

4 

15 

to 

6 

351 

202 

31 

2 

1 

6 

85 

10 

2 

117 

5 

746 

10 

3,012 

147 

1 

2 

135 

207 

10 

23 

36 

100 

4,098 

95 

878 

456 

26 

19 

2 

11 

34 

163 

6 

3 

1,030 

3 

2 

3 

2 

51 

24 

443 

149 

4 

11 

6S 

!          1 

2 

30 
4 

42 

1 
35 

6 
28 

5 

Bohemian 

24 

1 

17 

19 

60 
1 

182 
15 

Bukowinian 

816 

1 

18 
13 

1 
40 
23 

■*  10 

Hungarian,  N.E.S. .    . 

472 
44 

326 
47 

12 
9 

10 

1 

484 
53 

336 

48 

3,832 

248 
I 

2 

39 

33 

14 
89 

14 

89 

39 

33 

207 
207 

Bulgarian 

"5 

35 

30 

1,856 

24 

330 

130 

36 

10 

17 

1 

37 

1,454 

13 

220 

67 

"   3 

10 

Dutch 

2 

37 
58 
1 
15 
11 

2 

"i02 

221 

5 

55 

32 

7 

35 

56 

1,925 

25 

343 

138 

36 

10 

17 

1 

74 

1,512 

14 

235 

78 

3 

47 

72 

230 

7,535 

134 

1,456 

672 

62 

32 

2 

English 

Welsh 

Irish 

39 
94 
3 
27 
13 

26 

69 

1 

13 

8 

Bennudian 

Greek 

5 
10 

5 

1 

48 

11 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

Polish 

44 
101 

28 
63 

1 
21 

17 

45 
122 

28 
80 

107 

365 

6 

1 

1 
17 

2 
14 

1 
1 

18 

"3 

1 

17 

14 

111 

55 

"'4 

28 

2 

122 

97 

1 

"2 

2 

14 

6 
20 

84 
18 

14 

4 

74 

65 

i 

4 

"        German 

Japanese 

13 

1 

13 

213 

75 

1 

14 

3 

1,062 

3 

New  Zealand 

1 

17 

4 

36 

23 

4 
8 
2 

30 
1 

6 
10 
26 

4 

"9 

4 
48 
30 

2 

3 

2 
6 
3 

Polish,  N.E.S 

Herman 

74 

Russian,  N.E.S 

Finnish 

Spanish 

10 
75 
32 

10 

58 
14 

33 
346 
121 

58 

638 

222 

4 

Danish 

Icelandic      

45 

20 

5 

70 

15 

110 

6 

Swedish 

105 

259 

15 

66 
67 

26 
35 

197 

361 

15 

352 

401 

45 

2 

6 

1 

37 

51 

548 

563 

46 

Turkish 

Egyptian 

Syrian 

2 

"2 

26 

1 
11 

9 

1 

33 

3 

11 
3 

9 

53 
6 

13 
29 

9 
11 

59 
91 

Total  immigration  . . . 
Returned  Canadians  . . 

11,913 

1,704 

293 

3,454 

347 

59 

2,527 

177 

53 

17,894 

2,228 

405 

1,126 

466 

326 

1,918 

13,039 

1,704 

299 

3,920 

347 

59 

L'.s;-,:; 
177 
53 

19,812 

2,228 

411 

Tourists 

6 

6 

13,910 

3,860 

2,757 

20,527 

1,132 

466 

326 

1,924 

15,042 

4,326 

3,083 

22,451 

32  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
TABLE    III. 

Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  at  the  Port  of  St. 
John  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


"C 

— 

< 

* 

B 
3 
1-9 

-. 

CO 
3 
& 

< 

= 

— 

I      i 

o     £ 

— 

a 

X 

Q 

3 

c 

1-5. 

a 

3 

J5 

1\>tal> 

' 

9 
1 
2 
1 

21 

3 

7 
"  38 

3 

12 

1 

T 

17 

95 

13 

642 

122 

14 

Bukowinian 

29 

86 

816 

9 

9 

3,374 

200 

1 

66 

4 

85 

7 

72 
2 

195 

1 

14 

1 
1 

i 

1,761 

31 

290 

122 

2 

3,792 

5 

225 

1 

Slovak  

11 
22 

3 

4 
22 

2 

.646 

12 

124 

73 

2 

2 
16 

7 

5 
19 

7 
32 
269 
15 
62 
23 

1 

ii 

.... 

'ii 

20 

912 

22 

99 

51 

1 

2 

2 

Belgian 

141 

193 

88 

118 

i 

10 

Dutch 

19 

2 

02 

3,379 

41 

763 

357 

10 

8 

1 

6 

19 

81 

1 

1 

3 

1,001 

1 
14 

2 
290 

7 
58 
14 
11 

"i 

4.". 

l 

72 

128 

English 

8 

1 

22 

3 

11 

3 

10 

7,314 

Welsh 

129 

5 

1.401 

Iri-.li 

649 

3       4 
10       3 

11 

7 

2 

14 
2 

62 

32 

2 

6 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

9 

27 

1 

42 

HI 
1 
1 

8 

3 

1 

28 

40 

1 

106 

3 

317 

Polish 

6 

4 

3 

4 
3 

8 

13 

1 

21 

1,048 

3 

1 
2 

1 

1 

2 

Polish,   X.K.S   

3 

16 



52 
2 

4 

5 

3 

:>, 

18 

14 

93 

25 

3 

8 

21 

6 

7 

4 

3 

26 

43 

25 

2 

44 

12 

4 

1 

as 
i 

l 
l 

4 

74 

5 
39 
15 

25 

Russian,  X.K.S   

292 

101 

4 

1 

1 
8 

1 

16 

1 

40 

6 

227 

63 

9 

1 

33 

2 
10 

10 

18 

2 

16 
24 

351 

Turkish 

127 
27 

1 

202 

31 

2 

•> 

Arabian 

1 

2 

2 

4 

9 

1 

1 

3 

...   „ 

1 

1 

6 

7 

11 

28 

32 

48 

6 
10 

85 

10,793 

29 

40 

50 

34 

RSR 

1.206 

863 

1,403 

2.760 

17,894 

I3IJJIGRATI0X 


33 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE  IV 


Monthly   arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Occupation  and   Destination,  at  the 
Port  of  St.  John,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


c 

1,306 

0.406 

1.937 

273 

393 
309 

10,793 

720 

1,854 

2.920 

3.785 

G75 

529 

310 

s 

1 

"o 

7 

s 

2 
1 
9 

4 

~3 
Ha 

"i.7 

in 
2 

ti 
s 
<! 

6 

2 

13 

3 

a 

0? 

■Jl 

4 
3 

0 

C 

.... 

s 

d 

s 

03 

-: 

S. 

s 
Ph 

312 

289 
368 
163 
50 
105 
116 

c 

119 

1'IS 

15S 

320 

85 
'^61 

534 
664 
873 
301 
58 
138 
192 

2,523 
8  166 

Mechanics 

Clerks 

10 

141 
58 
49 
49 
44 

357    286 

116      85 
112      43 
94      4S 
99     55 

1,206    863 

1.(11(1 

1,025 
431 

Female  servants  .    

\"t  classed 

1 

J? 
29 

_1 

r> 

4 

19 
5 

40 

24 
2 
9 
2 

16 
5 

50 

11 

"6 

10 
14 

48 

33 

7 
3 
4 

1 

"3 
10 

7 
3 

7 
2 

880 
859 

Totals 

34 

658 

1,403 

2,760 

17,894 

16 

"is 

73 

175 

149 

56 

70 

24 

111 

161      68 
229    198 
441    232 
120    180 
30      36 

83 
238 
394 
251 

67 
129 
240 

1 

173 
362 
864 
555 
254 
203 
289 

1  400 

Ontario 

3,075 
5,044 
4,957 
1,133 
1,044 
1,240 
1 

Saskatchewan 

British  Columbia 

n 

l 

3 

46 
179 

39 
110 

10,793 

29 

40 

50 

48 

10 

34 

658 

803 

Totals 

1.206 

1,403 

2,760 

17,894 

25— ii— 3 


34  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

TABLE 
Nationality,  Sex,  Occupation  and  Destination  of  Immigrant  Arrivals  for 


Sex. 

Trade  or 

Farmers  or 

Farm  Labourers 

Class. 

General 

Labourers. 

Mechanics. 

OB 

s 

BO 

X 

I 

= 

2 
IS 

D 

J. 

■a 

5 

13 

DO 

£ 

B 
u 

"3, 

3 

"3 

E 
0 

a 

© 

u 

IS 
O 

1 

S 

5  • 

£ 

S 

IS 

O 

10 

2 

93 

4 

746 

9 

2,994 

134 

1 

2 

121 

118 

10 

23 

36 

61 

4,004 

92 

851 

443 

26 

19 

2 

6 

34 

153 

6 

3 

1,017 

3 

2 

2 

2 

51 

11 

230 

74 

4 

U 

23 

247 

142 

30 

2 

6 

1 

4 

48 

5 

2 

13 

4 

42 

2 
1 

16 
6 

28 

17 

e 

122 

14 

816 

9 

3,792 

225 

1 

2 

193 

118 

10 

45 

72 

128 

7,314 

129 

1,401 

640 

62 

32 

2 

6 

106 

317 

6 

4 

3 

1,048 

3 

2 

3 

3 

74 

25 

292 

101 

4 

15 

40 

6 

351 

202 

31 

2 

9 

1 

6 

85 

3 

2 

2 

0 
1 
2 
3 
29 

1 
2 
2 

Austrian,  N.E.S.  .. 

1 1 

3 
4 

89 

1 

706 

9 

2,893 

130 

1 

2 

48 

97 

8 

4 

5 

30 

873 

9 

108 

107 

6 

2 

1 

3 

7 

50 

4 

1 

4 

7 

2 
3 

23 

19 

Hungarian,  X.E.S. . 
Slovak 

472 
44 

326 
47 

7'        10 
1             4 

12 
4 

222 
30 

291 
37 

79 
3 

8 

1 

9 
3 

39 

33 

6 
19 

6 

9 

8 

14 

22 

1 

7 

4 

Dutch 

5 

35 

30 

1,856 

24 

330 

130 

36 

10 

17 

1 

37 

1,454 

13 

220 

67 

3 

9 

9 

12 

1,038 

22 

239 

119 

1 

1 

1 

4 

7 

300 

2 

46 

23 

4 

11 

263 

2 

63 
25 

9 
6 

12 
1,413 

40 

372 

128 

6 

11 
1 
1 

21 

96 
1 
2 

3 
4 

8 
577 

5 
75 
26 

4 

1 

12 

4 
247 

3 
26 
11 

9 

259 

3 

19 

8 

15 
576 

Welsh 

Scotch 

7 
77 

18 

Greek 

"44 
101 

""28 
63 

2 
1 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

4 
12 

3 

7 

26 
65 

"l 

1 

19 
37 

Polish 

1 
1 

17 

2 
14 

2 

3 

998 

ii 

13 

11 
3 

Japanese 

1 
1 

6 

1 

24 

4 

Polish   N.E.S 

i 
1 

17 
4 

36 
23 

6 
10 
26 

4 

1 
1 

38 

6 

183 

67 
2 
7 
9 

1 

1 
1 

1 
4 
3 

1 
3 

"3 

1 
6 
3 
21 
1 
2 
2 
4 

it       Russian 

4 

1 
6 

1 

Russian,  N.E.S 

12 
1 

"i 

16 

1 

4 
8 
2 
56 
30 
1 

9 

4 

48 

30 

2 

8 

1    . 

2 

9 

1 
1 
3 

4 

49 
30 
11 

ii 
7 

26 
10 

174 
94 
10 

5 
5 

8 
11 

21 
15 

8 

1 

Turkish . . . 

Egyptian 

2 

"2 
26 

1 
11 

2 
1 

2 

2 

1 

1 
18 

16 

1 

6 

Totals 

11,913 

3,454 

2,527 

17,894 

1,633 

435 

455 

6,805 

634   727 

2,378 

835 

797 

U  IMMIGRATION  35 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

V. 

Canada  at  the  Port  of  St.  John,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  190s. 


Occupation. 

Destination. 

Clerks, 
Traders,  &c. 

Minei 

s. 

§ 

12 
O 

■J. 

c 
> 

03 
BO 

03 

"3 

s 

Not  Classified. 

DD 

03 
C3 
S 

03"r 
J  J 

3 

8 

J 

03 

a 

0 
•E 
3 
43 

c 
O 

S 
1 

s 

c 
03 
is 

03 
g 

03 

^0 
m 
CO 

03 
< 

.3 
B 

O 

j= 
00 

M 

8 

in 

03 

S 
2 

e 
u 

2 

Q 

00 

03 

"a 

00 

3 

aj 
03 
'3 

8 

BO 

s 

03 

s 

03 
h 

2 
2 
O 

s 
0 

s 

1 

6 
73 

2 
1 
2 
6 
66 

494 
38 

1 
1 

21 

2 

338 

1 

2,328 

49 

8 
2 
6 
5 
9 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
5 

"lO 
"39 

"5 
1 

24 

1 

1 
2 

] 

3 
3 

1 

4 

9 

9 

4 

4 

103 

237 

8 

571 

10 

l 

13 

2 

1 

217 

7 

1 

13 
2 

13 
3 

131 
14 

137 

114 

1 

107 

2 
17 

24 

9 

42 
1 

5 

6 

10 

1 

3 

51 

24 

1 

23 

77 
7 

2 

11 

1 

73 
6 

1 

33 

8 

57 

1,290 

21 

279 

130 

1 

20 

7 

•?, 

"3 
8 

550 
5 

116 
30 

"3 

20 

561 

5 

129 

75 

12 

12 

1 

9 

790 

36 

148 

56 

1 

1 

1 

3 

3 

3 

151 

17 

31 

4 

3 

6 
326 

5 
94 
33 
31 

7 

107 

1 

15 

22 

4 

4 

24 

5 

200 

5 

45 

21 

1 

2 

1 

2 

177 

1 

29 
10 

"3 

6 

7 
533 
12 
77 
28 
30 
20 
1 

49 
9 

699 
7 

172 

83 

3 

2 

18 

2,890 

43 

480 

238 

28 

3 

422 
3 

164 

4 

38 

10 

124 

"20 
6 

42 

55 

1 

86 

63 

9 

6 

12 

1 

1 

84 
187 
3 
4 
3 
609 
1 
1 

1 
5 
2 

57 
1 

6 

2 
5 

4 

7 

6 
11 

3 
1 

6 

8 

2 

12 

1 

31 

1 

15 

40 

1 

4 

2 

" 

1 

... 

1 

•> 

3 

5 

1 

143 
2 

261 

22 

4 

9 

i 

1 
1 
1 
6 

44 

71 

2 

6 

8 

2 

21 

7 

103 

3 

1 

1 

1 

8 

1 
1 

1 
2 

5 
4 

1 
6 
6 
4 

4 
2 
53 
2 
2 

33 

15 

47 

6 

1 
3 
5 
7 
10 
4 

1 
1 
6 

13 

7 

9 

26 
12 

1 

1 
2 

12 

18 

2 

4 

1 

30 

10 

2 
16 

5 

0 
4 

1 
19 
31 

4 

2 

?, 

1 

2 

1 

2 
2 

2 

2 

1 

5 

7 

11 
9 

11 
31 

175 
41 

27 

37 

48 

57 
23 

45 
18 

1 
1 

1 

2 

2 
3 
1 
2 
63 

4 

2 

1 

6 

1" 

i 

1 
4 

"5 

11 

1 
11 

2 

1 

3 

21 

9 

625 

237 

163 

287 

61 

83 

880 

185 

372 

302 

1,400 

3,075 

5,044 

4,957 

1,133 

1,044 

1,240 

1 

25— ii— 3J 


36 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 


PORT  OF  Ql 


For  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived  at  the  porl  of  Quebec  146,142  passengers, 
of  whom  7,210  travelled  saloon  and  138,932  steerage.  Of  the  saloon  passengers  0.412 
were  destined  to  Canada  and  798  to  the  United  States.  Of  the  steerage  passengers 
122,028  were  for  Canada  and  16,904  for  the  United  States.  Included  in  the  steerage 
passengers  for  Canada  were  T.'.'^1  returned  Canadians  and  1,715  tourists,  leaving  the 
immigration  proper  at  112,324  souls,  an  increase  over  the  twelve  months  ending  March 
31,  1907,  of  2S.420  persons. 

Table  T.  deals  with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total 
arrivals  of  steerage  passengers,  Table  III.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants 
for  Canada  and  Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from 
immigrants  for  Canada   upon  arrival. 

TABLE  1. 

NATIONALITY  and  Sex  of   Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at   the  Port  of  Quebec,  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada, 


United  Si  n  i  - 


Canada  and  I'nitki 
States. 


o 


African,  South. 
Australian.  .  .  . 

Hungarian 

Belgian 

( Ihinese 
Dutch.. . 
French  .    . 
German 


9 

1 
13 

1 

-1 

55 

17, 

English  1.541 

Welsh 

Scotch 

Irish 

Hebrew   

Italian 

Japanese 

Newfoundland. 

New  Zealand 

Polish. 
Russian. 

Spanish      

Su  iss 

Danish 

Swedish     

Syrian 

I  '.S.   ('ill/. -us.      .  . 

( lanadian. . 


13 
298 

70 
1 
7 

12 
1 
4 


35 


1 

11 

4 

3 

■J 

39 

i; 

C 

•.mi 

1211 

3 

182 

IS 

53 

5 

1 

2 

l 

Tourists 


42 

1,062    1.154 

148 


Totals 


260 


3.425    2,649 


4 
24 

1 
IS 

1 
4 

1IHI 

23 

2,652 

16 

4!>s 

12.S 

2 

(I 

13 

3 


-= 
-_ 


-  -i 


U 


in 


1 
9 

7 
2 
3 

• 

Ml 

161     2.377 
13        421 


3 
3 

mi 


24S 


365 


1 
28 


1 

641 


3 

in 
I 

14 
1 
4 

57 

L'n 
1,598 

13 
312 

73 
1 
9 

[2 
1 
4 
1 


338    6,412       337 


2 
5 
2 
3 

283 

1,064 

262 


1 

11 

4 

1 

2 

"ill 

C 

6 

1,031 

124 

3 

192 

19 

55 

5 

1 

3 

1 

2 

.» 

1 

2 

5 

2 

1 

1 

4(17 

1.154 

155 


127 


31 


31 

161 

13 


798    3,762    3,076       37:2 


4 
25 

1 
20 

1 
I 

1113 

26 

2,753 

16 

523 

133 
■i 

12 
13 

3 
II 
1 
1 
!l 
s 
2 
3 
8 

721 
2.37H 

430 


7.21H 


IMMIGRATION 


37 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE    II. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  Quebec,  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada 

United 

States'. 

( Janada  ami  United 

States. 

03 

s 

-c 

EC 

0 

3D 

'3 

5 

c 

3. 

o 

■i. 

o 

Is 

S 

c 

CD 

IE 

u 

tr' 

c 

EH 

African,  South.   . 

Australian. 

Austrian,   N.E.S 
Bohemian 

19 
24 

492 

is 

1  1211 

3 

.1 

5,53:> 

246 

1 

314 

S77 

18 

370 

865 

499 

4 

4 

27,213 

334 

8,334 

2,299 

342 

341 

1.397 

7 

41 

16 

2.07" 

5 

s 

5 

144 

10 

65 

10 
o 

163 

6 

65 

37 

31 

799 

34 

1,256 

3 

3 

S.618 

441 

1 

608 

882 

18 

647 

1,493 

1,158 

5 

5 

60,28] 

606 

16.  MSI 

4.318 

359 

876 

3.412 

19 

so 

ill 

2.186 

5 

1 

177 

3 

7 

70 
102 

2 
87 

5 

3 

.•15 
61 

2 

76 
9 

1 

24 

58 

3 

2 

340 

17 

"  11 

129 
221 

20 

24 

111  19 

21 

1.126 

10 

3 

5,605 

348 

1 

365 

1,906 

is 

436 

907 

667 

1 

28,139 

369 

8,595 

2,462 

463 

376 

1.421 

8 

41 

17 

2.191 

5 

1 

20 

8 

231 
15 
65 

12 

2 

239 

15 

65 

40 
33 

1,139 
51 

1,256 

3 

14 

Dalmatian 

Galician 

Hungarian,    N.E.S. . 

1.479 
87 

160 
4 

' ' 132 

380 
290 

1 

1 

16,810 

110 

4.679 

1,352 

2 

218 

:H2 

5 

23 

11 

60 

1.604 
108 

134 

1 

"l45 
248 
369 

16,258 

132 

3,368 

667 

15 

317 

1.10.3 

7 

16 

7 

56 

1.511 
148 

17s 
15 

"i79 

413 

418 

1 

1 

2 

17.551 

159 

4,905 

1,491 

3 

258 

930 

6 

23 

11 

84 

i',628 

166 

"l56 
4 

202 

269 

501 

3 

16,782 

146 

3,541 

710 

17 

372 

1,142 

7 

16 

7 

67 

3 

8,747 
662 

1 

51 
1,029 

66 

42 

168 

is 
11 

47 

33 

128 

1 

22 
3 

57 

21 

132 

3 

91 
1,043 

170 

96 

428 

4 

1199 
1,925 

Chinese 

18 

Dutch 

German,   N,  E.S. 

SI  7 

1,589 

1,586 

4 

Prussian  .    

English 

Welsh  

3 

926 

35 

261 

163 

121 

35 

24 

1 

1 

741 

19 

226 

139 

1 

40 

18 

1 

524 
14 

173 

43 

2 

55 

39 

4 

2,191 

68 

660 

315 

124 

130 

81 

2 

9 

62,472 
t>74 

Irish 

Greek 

Hebrew,   X.  E  S.. 

Russian.   . 

Polish 

17,041 

4,663 

483 

1,006 

3,493 

21 

80 

1 
124 

1 
159 

35 

Italian 

24 

11 

2.345 
5 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

19 

4 

1 
35 

2 
67 

1 

99 

613 

183 

6 
25 

1 

33 

27 

313 

237 

1 
24 

2 
39 

4 
13 

:;i 

3 

66 

103 

706 

76 

2 

15 

2 

19 

12 

315 

200 

2 

15 

16 
5 
6 

2:: 

] 

167 

12 

370 

3 

390 

2.S46 

7S4 

32 

124 

11 

161 

80 

1,364 

974 

53 

94 

3 

147 

27 

59 

3 

4 

1 

51 

2 

70 

1 

134 

1,371 

707 

6 

31 

2 

108 

27 

718 

932 

1 

25 

3 

41 

4 

870 

"   42 

3 

67 

130 

1,456 

306 

2 

17 

5 

67 

12 

543 

533 

2 

15 

16 

6 

205 

24 

1 

Polish,  X   E  S. 

"       Russian 

98 

237 

2 

188 

1,527 

525 

24 

SI 

8 

109 

41 

;:.ii ; 
537 

50 
£5 

1 

92 
18 
40 

3 

36 

"l3 

2 

39 

1,307 

1,017 

15 

1 
165 

16 
3 

8 
"l 

60 

17 
o 

101 

2,815 
1.771 

23 
5 

288 

134 

7 

250 

4 

227 

2,834 

1,542 

24 

99 

9 

274 

41 

1,353 

1,791 

155 

57 

3 

103 

20 

778 

3 

227 

12 

387 

5 

Roumanian 

Russian.   N.E.S.    . 

35 
758 
524 

6 

1 

75 

27 
750 
230 

2 

3 

48 

491 
5,661 
2,555 

Spanish 

32 

147 

Servian 

Danish 

16 
449 

80 

Swedish 

617 

1,254 

105 

2 

2 

11 

2 

738 

405 
695 

228 
333 

1,250 

2,282 

105 

3 

3 

13 

3 

1,794 

2,614 

3,256 

158 

1 
1 

2 

857 

97 

I 
199 

6 

160 
30 

1".  S.  Citizens 

1,853 
3 

Total  immigration  . . . 

r7,218 

4,457 

807 

2S,708 

2,729 

835 

26,398 

803 

73 

112,324 
7,989 
1,715 

8,738 

5,020 

3,099 

16,857 

65,956 

4,457 

830 

33,72s 

2,729 

855 

29,497 
803 

77 

129,181 
7,989 

23 

20 

4 

47 

1.762 

Totals 

62.4S2 

32,272 

27,274 

122,028 

8,761 

5,040 

3,103 

16,904  71,243 

i 

37,312 

30,377 

138,932 

38  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
TABLE    ni. 

Monthlt  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalists,  at  the  Port  of  Quebec, 
for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


May. 

June. 

July. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct, 

Nov. 

Totals. 

5 

3 
184 

5 
553 

2 
5 

185 
14 

396 

3,437 

73 

1 

109 

22 
5 

174 
242 

167 

1 

13,759 

109 

4,013 

1,096 

105 

72 

518 

31 

12 

345 

5 
12 
91 

2 
134 

1 

761 

41 

5 
5 
129 
2 
60 
2 

296 
28 

3 
2 

57 
2 

41 

12 
2 

61 
8 

63 

5 
2 

92 
1 
9 
1 
2 
295 

26 

37 

Austrian.  N.E.S 

31 

799 

34 

1,256 

3 

Dalmatian 

3,253 

188 

102 
33 

384 
52 

3 

8,618 

441 
1 

161 

-177 

102 

77 
6 

23 
205 
189 

2 

9,200 

90 

2,144 

475 

61 

93 

557 

11 

6 

5 

138 

2 

10 

85 

13 

1 

108 

249 

169 

8,353 

99 

1,350 

568 

74 

192 

818 

1 

23 

4 

131 

2 

55 
119 

32 
178 
155 

1 

6,044 

62 

1,932 

532 

23 

228 

411 

2 

4 

2 

81 

3 

1 

46 

L>07 

2 

67 

168 

205 

1 

1 

5,921 

105 

l.ns.-. 

440 

72 

234 

300 

4 

7 

5 

147 

50 
177 

6? 

S4 

103 

2 

2,728 

35 

638 

187 

15 

39 

304 

7 
4 

51 

f.u.s 

882 

18 

Dutch 

German,  X.E.S 

176 
367 

170 
2 

647 
1,493 
1,158 

5 

Welsh 

14,276 

106 

5,219 

1.020 

9 

18 

5l« 

1 

2 

2 

1,293 

60,281 

606 

16,381 

4,318 

Greek 

359 

876 
3.412 

Polish 

19 

80 

34 

Japanese 

2,186 
5 

2 

6 

1 
1 

14 
1 

65 

1 
25 

23 
1 

Polish,  N.E.S 

59 

1 

43 

19 

8 

49 

35 

106 

3 

80 

460 

156 

2 

28 

6 

23 

49 

254 

84 

6 

45 

12 

2 

63 

28 
19 

167 
12 

370 

3 

Spanish 

83 

491 

144 

8 

29 

60 

460 

135 

5 

19 

55 

405 
125 

22 

1 
15 

5 
14!l 
107 

8 
16 

1 
16 

4 
21 

29 
236 

77 
8 
9 

15 

3 

111 

116 

1 

9 

43 

359 

84 

2 
10 

4 
25 

2 

162 

85 

15 

7 

40 

385 

63 

7 
i 

8 

5 

67 

52 

19 

B 

390 

2,846 

784 

32 

124 

11 

Danish 

49 

8 

384 

305 

1 

3 

2 

31 

26 

8 

237 

225 

3 

9 

161 

Icelandic   

80 

Swedish 

1,364 

974 

53 

94 

3 

20 

25 

19 

5 

16 
2 
6 

2 

23 

1 
6 

1 

16 
1 

6 

147 

27 

7 

8 

59 
3 

Totals 

29,344 

26,190 

15,829 

13,844 

10,883 

10,600 

5,634 

112,324 

IMMIGRATION 


39 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE  IV. 


Monthly   arrivals  of  Immigrants   for  Canada,  by  Occupation  and    Destination,  at  the 
Port  of  Quebec,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


May. 

June . 

July. 

August. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

1,596 

2,244 

3,753 

1,128 

562 

802 

515 

Nov. 

795 
1,228 
2,120 
577 
185 
446 
283 

Totals. 

6,750 
8,541 
8,879 
1,920 
421 
1,463 
1,370 

29,344 

6,979 
6,383 
8,186 
1,822 

411 
1,655 

754 

3,323 

3,066 

5,950 

1,546 

355 

830 

759 

2,388 

2,261 

5,897 

1,432 

442 

777 

647 

1,468 
1,927 

4,085 

1,322 

399 

854 

828 

23,299 
25,650 
38,870 
9,747 
2,775 
6,827 
5,156 

Clerks 

Totals 

26,190 

15,829 

13,844 

10,883 

10,600 

5,634 

112,324 

327 
7,080 
10,591 
7,174 
1,832 
1,387 

953 

236 
5,692 
10,361 
5,813 
1,613 
1,504 

971 

223 

3,901 

6,942 

2,377 

730 

829 

827 

186 

3,829 

6,008 

1,831 

547 

635 

805 

3 

143 

3,189 

4,438 

1,328 

444 

530 

810 

1 

189 
3,002 
4,228 
1,124 
509 
530 
1,018 

83 
1,916 
2,246 
585 
219 
199 
386 

1,387 

28,609 

44,814 

20,232 

5,894 

'  5,614 

5,770 

4 

Manitoba 

Totals 

29,344 

26,190 

15,829 

13,844 

10,883 

10,600 

5,634 

112,324 

40 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  » 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

TABLE 

Nationality,  Sex,  Occupation  and  Destination  of  Immmigrant  arrival- 


Trade  oh 

Farmers  or  Farm 
Labourers  Class. 

ieneral  Labourers. 

Mechanics. 

8 

d 

E 

- 

3 

i 
U 

0 

H 

go 
a 

"3 

BO 

s 

3 

Z 
- 

O 

11 

54 

1 

"3 

X 

£ 

5h 

£ 

Z 

i 

f. 

£ 

- 

■i.  South.    . . 

Australian 

Austrian,  N.E.S 

Rukowinian 

in 

24 

492 

is 

1,126 

I 

5,535 

246 

1 

314 

S77 

is 

370 

865 

4-19 

4 

4 

27,213 

334 

S,334 

•J.  299 

342 

341 

1,397 

7 

41 

16 

2.070 

5 

19 

98 

7 

237 

2 

188 

1,527 

525 

24 

SI 

8 
109 

11 
73j 
537 

m 

1 
92 
18 
40 

3 

8 
5 

144 
111 
65 

in 

2 

163 

6 

6E 

37 

31 

799 

34 

1,256 

3 

3 

8,618 

441 

1 

COS 

882 

18 

1147 

1,493 

1,158 

."> 

5 

60,281 

606 

16,381 

4,313 

359 

876 

3,412 

19 

80 

34 

2,186 

5 

23 

1 

167 

12 

370 

3 

390 

2,846 

784 

32 

124 

11 

161 

80 

1,364 

974 

53 

94 

3 

147 

27 

:,'. 

a 

7 

6 

L46 

9 

418 

1 

2,372 

95 

124 
24 

1 

89 

412 

171' 

4 

1 

32 

3 

21 

1 
6 

257 
3 

673 

3 

2 

2,914 

124 

1 

31 

1 

L3 

l 
:.i 

i 
is 

". 

8 

114 

2 

22 

2 

4 

20 

1 
1 

22 
3 



Hungarian,  X.  E.S. 
Ruthenian 

1,479 

S7 

160 

l 

1.604 

108 

134 

1 

7.27 
34 

998 

:.l 

295 
23 

I7ii 
38 

1116 
17 

1 

84 

11 

174 

194 

143 

1 

1 

11.4H0 

98 

3,257 

581 

9 

177 

861 

5 

24 

11 

82 

49 
10 

411 
15 

11 

55 

1 

54 

846 

7 

(13 

81 

118 

2 

5,341 
36 

1,845 

.Mi] 

223 

86 

3511 

2 

12 

2 

1.721 

5 

1 

17 

2 

IT. 

54 

1" 

Bulgarian 

Dutch        ... 

132 

380 

290 

1 

1 

L8.810 

140 

1.1.7'.' 

1,352 

■> 

218 
912 

£ 

n 

60 

4 

1 

2 
67 

1 

9! 

613 

is: 

6 
2f 

1 

33 

-'7 

313 

237 

1 

24 

•_ 

3! 

4 

13 

145 
248 

369 

16,258 

132 

3,368 

667 

15 

317 

1,103 

7 

16 

56 

31 

3 

mi 

103 

706 

76 

2 

15 

2 

19 

12 

315 

200 

2 

15 

HI 
5 

i 

to 

97 

97 

44 

137 
194 

12 
19 

34 

24 
20 

•■'7 

r. 

92 

111 

1 

11,380 

12 

1,598 

33 1 

65 

i;.-> 

German,  Nf.E  S 

Ml 

1 

:..899 

85 

1,917 

7  is 

99 

40 

67 

...    . 

■      - 
2,039 

17 
is:' 
129 

19 

21 

2.49S 

23 

596 

136 

3 

41 

42 

English           ... . . 

2.044 

12 

321 

101 

32 

87 

3,064 

2" 
43.', 
130 

11 
78 

140 

7,267 
53 

1,617 

23U 

Hebrew,  N  E.S 
Russian 
Poli 

121 

.M2 

3 

10 

6 

13 

2 

144 

111  13 
7 

1 

2 

104 

10 

I 
26 

:;s 

il 

Italian 

4 

6 

7 

6 

•.' 

Polish,  N.E.S.       . 

Austrian  . . 

M       Russian  .   . 

19 

2 

49 
1 

4 

1 

11 

L0 
3 

21 

25 
280 

10 

51 

5 

110 

1 

90 

727 

347 

12 

15 

5 

17 

12 

270 

209 

41 

30 

10 

17 

to 

29 

20 
56 

13 

1" 

Roumanian 

Russian,  N.E.S  . 
Finnish.     

36 
302 

57 

4 

25 

L3 

119 

3 

18 

89 

26 

2 

2 

2 

27 

Mil 

19 

1 
1 
2 

49 
365 

4.') 

11 

30 

2 

24 

8 

155 

loo 
4 

HI 
1 

14 

14 

'_'.'. 

190 

9 

'  1 

11 

ft 
U 

4 
44 
30 

1 

8 

41 
220 

is 
■i 

5 

9 

5 
1 

Danish 

62       Hi 
13 

14 

2 
14.'. 
80 

1 

3 

1 

Swedish 

Norwegian 

Turki -I  i 

261 

r.'i 
2 
4 

81 
53 

17 
36 

S3 
63 

Gil 

41 

1 

Ai  menian    

Egyptian   

3 

3 

11 

7 



8 

1 
1 
2 

4 
1 

3 

51 
15 

4 
3 

8 

2 

3 
2 

5.014 

1 
5 

1 

Arabian 

U.  S.  Citizens    .  . . 

1 

Totals  

57,218 

2S.70S  26,398 

112,324 

13,892  3.921 

5,487 

17,302 

3.334 

18.381 

'1.712 

10.777 

ii  IMMIGRATION  41 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 
V. 
Canada  at  the  Port  of  Quebec,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  190*. 


Occu 

>ATI01 

s,  Tr 

&c. 

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0 
c 

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O 

X 
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S 

u 

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63 

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a 

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0 

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4 

1 

3 
5 

2 

1 
5 

6 

9 

321 

587 

1 

2 

1,805 

77 

1 

220 

55 

14 

185 

727 

298 

3 

2 

12,563 

108 

3,829 

1,012 

47 

744 

1,906 

3 

52 

24 

1,700 

5 

8 

6 

14 
97 

148 
2 

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1,016 

89 

22 

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191 

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85 

1 
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9 

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li 

3 
13 

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5 

74 
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8 

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20 
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5(15 
17 

4 

35 

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64 
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4,189 
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5 

70 

75  ... . 

2 

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23 

16 

9 

20 

13 

11 

18 
2 

3 

1 

5 

1 

64 

9 

1 

4 

49 
1 

33        175 
816            5 

18 
0 

3 

187 

77 

136 

1 

30,426 

205 

6,213 

1,760 

310 

91 

880 

10 

23 

5 

226 

1    . 

41 

13 

»7 
21 

10 
12 
23 

2 
15 

11 

17 
59 
56 

7 
63 
13 

1 

2 
12 
10 

.8 
20 
12 

190 

365 
380 

1 

7,771 

78 

3,253 

937 

1 

36 

421 

35 

117 

162 

1 

1 

2,646 

22 

778 

128 

35 
141 
136 

46 
34 

99 
46 

I 

» 

0 

2 

5 

1 

2,823 

70 

868 

232 

2,975 

37 

958 

390 

10 

1,730 

14 

488 

185 

1 

14 

101 

1,300 

14 

341 

110 

773 
72 

182 
18 

293 

15 

81 

7 

425 

17 

155 

3 

3,244 

23 

1,405 

488 

1 

24 

155 

2 

8 

765 

6 

175 

61 

1 

2 

14 

1,074 
12 

297 
108 

s 
33 

1,704 

5 

224 

52 

1 

10 

43 

626 

8 

220 

41 

1 

51 

3,422        I 
115  .... 

1,220  .... 
208  ... . 

36 

44 
206 

1 
80 

4 
43 

::i 

97 

2 

3 

9 

4 

5 
3 
2 

6 

1 

2 

1  IS 

3 
2 

43 

1 

1 
1 

4 

- 

3 

20 

3 

12 

139 

3 

1 

11 

12 

47 
2 

3 

1 
1 

1 

1 

4            li 
1    ...  7 
20          36 
3 

2 

8 

2 

3 

11 

1 

22 

::::.'  '2 

2 

4 

74 

2 

197 

1 

261 

1,084 

76 

3 

64 

6 

42 

146 

82 

14 

71 

3 

101 

25 

26 

3 

23 

5 

4 

1 
11 

3 

1 

2 

19 

21      3 

1 
1 
3 
29 
1 
2 
5 

1 

4 

84 
2 

37 
480 
593 

5« 

12 

4 

12 

3 
33 

5 

37 
151 
133 

1 
5 

1 
12 

6 

5 
51 

4 

1 

42 
2 

44 

730 

30 

41 
239 

5 

6 
156 

27 

40 
1 

SI 
75 

2 

11 

4 

25 

115 

51 
3 
3 

2 

7          19 
19          22 

3  .. 

8 

2 

1 
2 
1 
3 
2 

1 
2 

6 

9 

1 

4 

1 

13 

20 

122 
108 

2 
5 
4 
1 

1 

2 

1 
9 

7 

46 

3 

383 

239 

39 

22 

36 
68 

4D4 
247 

10 

13 

146 

21 

2 
US 
105 

6 

1 58 
137 

3 

9 

5 

13 

12 
18 

8 
10 
2 

1 
2 

33 
22 

7 
1 

15 

1 

5 

3 
1 
4 

1 

1 

9 

1 
1 
5 

1 

3 

9 

18 

2 
1 

17 
2 
2 

2 
1 
6 

34            3 

2 

14            5 

1 

1 
2 

1 

3 

6 

1 

0 

5 

3 

4 

6,827 

4,880 

2,710 

2,157 

1,591 

407 

717 

1,172 

1,738 

2.246 

1,387 

28,609 

44.814  20,232 

5,894 

5,014 

5.770 

i 

42 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


PORT  OF   VANCOUVER. 


For  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived  at  the  port  of  Vancouver  14,786  passen- 
gers, of  whom  1,978  travelled  saloon  and  12,808  steerage.  Of  the  saloon  passengers 
1,408  were  destined  to  Canada  and  570  to  the  United  States.  Of  the  steerage  passen- 
gers 11,179  were  for  Canada  and  1,629  for  the  United  States.  Included  in  the  steer- 
age passengers  for  Canada  were  1,977  returned  Canadians  and  2,636  tourists,  leaving 
the  immigration  proper  at  6,566  souls,  an  increase  over  the  twelve  months  ending 
March  31,  1907,  of  3,265  persons. 

Table  I.  deals  with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total 
arrivals  of  steerage  passengers,  Table  III.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants 
for  Canada,  and  Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from 
immigrants  for  Canada  upon  arrival. 

TABLE   I. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  Vancouver,  for 
the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

United 

States. 

Can 

ADA  ami  United 

States. 

to 

'a 

BO 

5 
e 

u 
■a 

'2. 
o 

X 

EO 

CD 

"3 

CD 

la 
B 

CD 

c 
u 

■r. 

0 

to* 

"a 

2 
2 

o 

aa 

i 

49 

4 

3 

4 

4 

2 

17 

25 

356 

49 

16 

1 

21 

1 

26 

1 

6 

2 

2 

1 

4 

1 

30 

63 

lis 

1 
111 

6 
3 

4 

11 

2 

'-'7 

30 

583 

71 

24 

1 

2 

28 

1 

I.", 

1 

in 

2 

3 

1 

6 

1 

68 

141 

225 

i 

68 
4 
3 
6 

22 
33 

380 
53 
16 

1 

38 

1 

31 

1 

i 

3 

1 
4 
2 

198 
63 

189 

1 

49 
2 

13 

19 

25 

7 

:.i 

74 
2 

20 

162 
6 

3 

2 

9 

2 

13 

"  9 

2 

6 

6 

1 

3 

1 

24 

Dutch  . 

2 

6 

5 

176 

18 
6 

I 
1 
6 

4 

52 

4 

2 
1 

5 

8 

24 

4 

1 

2 

1 

19 

2 

1 
1 

2 
6 

9 

9 

49 

6 

1 
2 

8 

6 

194 

20 

7 
2 

I 

6 

58 
4 
2 

1 

36 

German. 

English 

Scotch 

632 
77 
25 

3 
2 

17 

:: 

20 

48 

1 

17 

2 

5 

2 

1 

8 

19 

3 

53 

Polish 

1 

1 

3 

1 

3 

10 

1 
1 

1 
1 

3 

1 

1 

4 

1 

2 

2 

6 

1 
168 

1 
323 

2 

[".  S.  Citizens 

28 
44 
64 

10 
34 
13 

120 

35 

14S 
44 
95 

45 
34 
15 

391 
141 

41 

31 

2 

74 

299 

Totals 

837 

■:s2 

139 

1.40S 

306 

210 

54 

570 

1,143 

642 

193 

1.97S 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


IMMIGRATION 


TABLE   II. 


*i 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  Vancouver,  for 
the  Fiscal  Tear  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

United  State 

3. 

Canada  and  United 
States. 

CO 

S 

i 

o 

to 

"3 

tn 

1 

a 

V 
M 

2 

o 

"3 
o 
H 

tn 
V 

"3 

to 

0» 

a 

fa 

Q 
3 

Ja 

o 

"3 

0 

2 
57 

1 
1,017 

8 

3 
71 

1 
30 
11 

4 

5 

2,568 

28 

3 

2 

3 

10 

2,389 

32 

"23 

1 
1 

19 
1 
5 
1 

1 
27 

"  71 

9 
5 

1 

3 

116 

1 

1,111 

9 

4 

99 

7 

36 

12 

4 

5 

2,704 

38 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
3 
14 
2,389 

2 

85 

2 

1,166 

10 
3 

86 
1 

31 

16 

5 

5 

2,666 

36 
5 
2 
3 
1 
1 
3 
5 
4 
3 

61 
2,390 

47 

24 
2 
4 

30 
1 
9 
5 

1 

38 

"75 

"9 

5 
1 

3 

Australian 

28 

1 

139 

2 

15 

1 
5 
1 

15 

"l 

1 

3 

11 

4 
4 

11 

'"4 

54 

1 

144 

3 

3 

26 

5 
9 

1 

170 
2 

Chinese 

1,255 
12 

7 

125 

Welsh  

7 
41 
21 

5 

113 

8 

23 

2 

5 

98 
8 
5 
1 
2 

20 
4 
4 

1 

5 

118 
13 

14 
1 
2 

133 

12 

4 

23 
3 
5 

2,822 

New  Zealand    

51 

14 

2 

3 

1 

2 

1 

1 

Danish 

1 

2 
2 

2 

"51 

1 

2 

4 
2 
2 

80 
1 

5 
6 

4 

"  3 

1 

23 

6 

"26 

"  7 

3 

U.  S.  Citizens 

94 
2,390 

Total  immigration  .... 

6,218 
1,893 
2,354 

208 

37 

156 

140 

47 

126 

i;,:,r,i; 
1,977 
2,636 

364 

92 

27 

483 

6,582 
1,893 
3,402 

300 

37 

202 

167 

47 

178 

7,049 
1,977 

1,048 

46 

52 

1,146 

3,782 

Totals 

10,465 

401 

313 

11,179 

1,412 

138 

79 

1,629 

11,8/7 

539 

392 

12,808 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


TABLE     III. 


Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  at  the  Port  of  Van- 
couver, for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


A  |  ir. 

May. 

June. 

July. 

Au- 

- 

Oct. 

X..V. 

I  lec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Totals 

1 

4 

4 

t 

21 

1 

102 

1 
II 

4 

1           1 

19 

3 

Australian  . 

; 

61 

21 

'.it 

(i 

7 

8 

in; 
l 

■ 

119 

mi 

109 

128 

97 

57 

65 

123 
9 

l.in 

13 
G 
b 

1 
7 

2 
37 

I 

1 

3 
1 
5 
1 
1 

., 

1 
1 
8 

4 

English 
Welsh 

ti 

12 

4     . 

4             1 

•-".I             4 

1 

8 

1 

99 

Scotch 

11 
2 
2 

•i 

43 
6 

7 
5 
1 
3 
1,480 
5 

1 

l 

2 

i 

517 

.....  ^ 


36 
12 

4 

307 
3 

309 

2 
1 
1 

1 
901 

Japanese 
New  Zealand- 

m 



S6 
9 

4 

11 
4 

L',704 
• 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

Swedish  

jian.    . . . 

■» 

4 
47 

1 

2 

1 

102 

4 
2 

3 

U.S.  <  Citizens  . 

i    

-1 
37 

145 

284          42           6 

'  216 

14 
2,389 

Totals 

551 

27-2 

2S!> 

1,700 

588 

1.339 

1147 

nit 

426       1(17         90 

3*4 

IMMIGRATION 


45 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE   IV. 


MONTHLY  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Occupation  and  Destination,  at  the 
Port  of  Vancouver,  for  the  Fiscal  Tear  ending  March  31,  1908. 


£ 

u 
0 

>, 

< 

s 

6 

C 

■r. 

O 

y 

O 

1 
> 

0 

1 

s 

V 
V 
0) 

PI 

20 

5 
c 
1^ 

u 

Si 

g 

I: 
3 

O 

36 

17      78 

25 

8 

44 

2 

2 

17 

250 

34!) 

120      16 

1.490 

515 

1,163 

:,2i; 

99 

286 

44 

58 

215 

1,917 

13 

141     15 

40 

i 

* 

6 

14 

:i 

0 

3 

134 

Clerks 

94     53    111 

103 

31 

116 

93 

9 

02 

02 

10 

116 

S90 

Miners 

5     7     o 

17 

2 

? 

3 

2 

6 

50 

Female  servants  .          

l       :: 

1 
32 

1 
27 

2 

25 

1 
8 

2 
10 

2 

37 

1 
11 

90 

3 
24 

17 

Not  classed ... 

53 

5S 

10 

1 

308 

Totals    ...                 

551 

272 

289 

1,709 

588 

1,339 

047 

104 

426 

107 

384 

0,560 

3 

1 

1 

4 

1 

1 

11 

2 

12 

21 

12 

16 

4 

12      11 

3 

19 

112 

4 

10 

3 

0 

14 

22 

20 

11 

11      10 

13 

24 

151 

2 

4 

2 

"2 
548 

2 

2 

1J297 

i 

3 

000 

647 

3 

1 

14 

3 

2 

:.li 

551 

4 

25G 

272 

3 

143 

104 

3 
400 

426 

1 
33S 

18 

British  Colombia 

284 

1,683 

86 
107 

74 

6,257 

Totals 

289 

1,709 

588 

1,339 

90 

384 

0,500 

46  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

TABLE 
Nationality,    Sex,    Occupation    and   Destination  of   Immigrant   Arrivals   for 


Trade  or 

Farmers  or  Farm 
Labourers  Class. 

General 

Labourers. 

Mechanics. 

X 

r. 
CD 

"3 

5 
cs 

9 

o 

CO 
O 

to 

ED 
0 

e 

CD 

c 

CD 

IS 

o 

00 
CD 

"3 

CD 

"3 

S 
s 

R 

£ 

.■3 

J3 
D 

CO 
CD 

15 

a 

00 

0 

i 

£ 
2 

IS 

African,  South .  . 

2 

57 

1 

1,017 

8 

3 

71 

1 

30 

11 

4 

5 

2,568 

28 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

3 

2 

3 

10 

2,389 

32 

"23 
1 
1 

19 
1 
5 

1 

1 

27 

"n 

9 
5 
1 

3 

116 

1 

1,111 

9 

l 

99 

7 

36 

12 

4 

5 

2,704 

38 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

2 

3 

14 

2,389 

1 

6 

2           4 

7 

2 

19 

2 

5 

3 

7 
1 
9 

1 

255 
1 

6 

3 
2 
2 

1 
2,279 

4 

1 

9 

German.    . 

English 

Welsh 



1 
32 

14 
4 

1 

"2 

"i 

4 

1 

1 

"ii3 

8 

23 
2 

113 

7 

4 
2 

New  Zealand. . . . 

69 
1 

17 

19 
9 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

- 

1 

Norwegian 

1 

3 
2 

2,260 

3 

1 

1 

4 
1 

1 

86 

Totals 

6,218 

208 

140 

6,566 

236 

10 

4 

4,826 

73 

18 

117 

9 

8 

11  IMMIGRATION  47 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

V. 

Canada,  at  the  Port  of  Vancouver,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,   1908. 


Occupation. 

Destination. 

Clerks, 
Traders,  &c. 

Miners. 

O 
S 

05 

cc 

05 
05 

Not  Classified 

09 

05 
W 

.  a 
8> 
.S£ 
.-Ph 

s 

2 

o 

05 

05 

a 
& 

-** 

c 
O 

93 

o 

d 

cS 
05 
g 

05 

3 

3 

4 

IS 

3 
"o 

-= 

CD 

•c 
n 

0D 

a: 

a 

a 

05 

S- 

2 

O 

05 
05 

s 

05 

d 

05 

u 

2 
o 

DD 

05 

"3 

4) 

Is 

d 

05 

2 
2 
o 

2 

5 

3 

10 

2    ...    . 

10 

i 

1 

6 

8 

15 

12 

3 

4 

2 

107 

1 

698 

11         18 

1 

52 

11 

52 

10 

112 

138 

7 

9 

835 

9 

l 

7 
1 
4 
3 

1 

12 
1 
2 
1 

4 

14 

2           3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

5 

2 
6 

1 

"  i 

3 

"3 

1 

93 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

32 

2 

1 

10 

1 

4 

4 

3 
3 

5 

71 

5 
1 

1 

7 

83 

26 
3 

5 
2 

1 

2,703 

5 

i 

3 

34 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

4 

2 

4 

1 

1 

3 

14 

34 

8 

1 

2,388 

844 

23         23 

1 

37 

4 

9 

17 

158 

72 

78 

11 

112 

151 

14 

3 

18 

6,257 

18 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


PORT    Or    VICTORIA. 


l'or  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived  at  the  port  of  Victoria  9,108  passengers, 
of  whom  312  travelled  saloon  and  8,796  steerage.  Of  the  saloon  passengers  227  were 
destined  to  Canada  and  >5  to  the  United  States.  Of  the  steerage  passengers  7,505 
were  for  Canada  and  1,291  for  the  1'nited  States.  Included  in  the  steerage  passen- 
gers for  Canada  were  1,365  returned  Canadians  and  116  tourists,  leaving  the  immi- 
gration proper  at  6,024  souls,  an  increase  over  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31, 
1907,  of  3,182  persons. 

Table  I.  deals  with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total 
arrivals  of  steerage  passengers,  Table  III.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants 
for  Canada,  and  Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from 
immigrants  for  Canada  upon  arrival. 

TABLE   I. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  Victoria,  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


■r. 

<  '  \N  IDA. 

Totals. 

I 

FXITKD 

Si  vi  k 

1      ' 
Totals. 

'    ANA  LA   AM'   UKITEII 

States. 

- 

v. 

■r. 

■i 

X 

S 
u 
— 

- 

- 

s 

X 

- 

2 
1 
5 

2 

3 

1 

4 

1 

11 

1 

5 

■ 

i 

i 

i 

1 
1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

4 

11 

3 

1 

5         :;         3 

>> 

l 

4           2 
'.11         32           3 
7           2  .... 

1        .    . 

1 

17           3           2 
1    . 

1 

Chinese     

11 
2 

1 

3 
90 

6 

1 
32 

2 

1 
1 
3 

1 

1 
9 

2 

4             1 
125          1 

8            1 

1 

6 

English 

3 

126 

1 

16 

1 

1 

4 

24 

6 

1 

1 

2 

21 

2*> 

1 
1 

5 
33 

1 

1 

1 

Polish 

::.:i  ::. 

1 

9 

1 

34         24 

9 

67 

38         25 

72 

"l 

24           f    . 

33 

H 

2           2 

4 

8 

4             1 

13 

Totals 

159 

59 

a 

227 

45         31           9 

85 

204 

no      is 

312 

IMMIGRATION 


49 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE    II. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  arriving  at  the  Port  of  Victoria,  for  the 
Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31.  1908. 


Canada. 

I 

SITED 

States. 

Canada  and  United 
States. 

Id 

in 

S 

B 
u 

o 

X 

"3 
o 

H 

■r. 

05 

£ 

2 
u 

o 
H 

to 
V 

"a 

§ 

31 

5 

E 
fc. 

IS 

15 

o 

rfi 

O 

1 

"is 

i 

718 

1 

2 

2 
74 

8 
17 

1 

13 
1 
1 

50 
8 

23 

1 

8 

8 

492 

15 
1 
3 
7 
1 
1 
6 
1 

83 
3 

52 

5 
42 

7 

168 

8 

18 

1 

24 

2 

1 

78 

14 

31 

) 

8 

8 

598 

31 

1 

4 

7 

1 

1 

8 

2 

146 

3 

2 

84 

9 

664 

1 

1 

15 

1 

1 

84 

13 

24 

1 

11 

11 

4,857 

16 

1 

3 

100 

1 

1 

6 

1 

90 

231 

56 

5 
43 

7 

10 

1 

647 
1 

4 

183 

9 

Dutch   . . 

16 

55 

1 

i7 

55 

736 
1 

1 

German,  N.E.S.    . 

2 

9 

1 

2 

9 

1 

2 

26 

2 

Wurtemburg 

34 
5 
1 

.... 
"l 

2 

43 

5 
5 

1 

19 
4 

8 

1 

26 
4 

9 

11 
2 
3 

121 

Irish 

19 

36 
1 

3 

3 

4,305 

1 

453 

2 

"67 
4 

3 

3 

4,SS5 
7 

11 

11 

101 

13 

1 

5 
3 

554 
15 

72 
7 

5,483 

38 

1 

New  Zealand 

1 

4 

93 

1 

94 

1 

101 

1 
1 

1 
45 

i 

21 

3 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 

43 

1 
20 

8 

o 

IT.  S.  Citizens 

7 
228 



2 

1 
3 

10 
231 

156 
234 

Total  immigration 

5,401 

1,272 
84 

487 
51 
24 

136 
42 

8 

6,024 

1,365 

116 

828 

254 

89 

1,171 

6,229 

1,272 

149 

741 
51 
63 

225 
42 
24 

7,195 

1,365 

236 

65 

39 

16 

120 

Totals 

6,757 

562 

186 

7,505 

893 

293 

10." 

1,291 

7,650 

855 

291 

8,796 

■l'o— ii-4 


50  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  il 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
TABLE  IH. 

Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Nationalities,  at  the  Port  of  Victoria, 
for  the  Fiscal  Tear  ending  March  31,  1908. 


d 

u 

a. 
< 

§ 

1-5 

- 

00 

i 

3 
< 

- 
z 
a 
-r. 

3 

i 

U 

O 

u 
m 

s 

> 

o 

P 

u 

B 

s 

b 

9 
C 

.a 

P 

u 

d 

s 

1 

X 

S 
43 

9 

3 

1 

38 

2 

6 



1 

1 

1 

15 

1 

51 

44 

65 

72 

59 

128 

76 

44 

48 
1 

2 

35 

58 

718 

Dutch 

1 

1 

1 
2 

7 
1 

1 

2 

English. . . 

8 

4 

1 

12 
1 
5 
2 
1 
840 
5 

11 

2 

4 
2 

1 

43 

5 

5 

1 

2 

284 

5 

3 

3 

434 

1 

15 

764 

342 

926 
23 

395 

1 

17 

195 

330 

103 

135 

137 

4,885 

7 

15 

"i 
l 

72 

S 

94 

1 

5 
51 

6 

fi 

2 
17 

1 
37 

"i 

"25 

1 

"  i 

10 

15 

231 

Totals 

398 

5131  815 

967 

431 

1,010 

5S5 

289 

452 

187 

179 

198 

6,024 

IMMIGRATION 


51 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE   IV. 

Monthly  arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Occupation  and  Destination,  at  the 
Port  of  Victoria,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


— 

1 
< 

6 
c 

i-s 

>■. 

■3 

hi 

bo 

3 
< 

a 
o 

o 

o 

>' 

o 

a 

c 

>-5 

u 

Totals. 

Agriculturists 

General  labourers 

70 
HM 

17 

110 

3 

81    287 

171    242 

18     23 

350 

228 
38 

116 
114 
19 
75 
38 
2 
67 

431 

434 

276 
13 

119 
31 

137 

145 

183 

25 

141 

3 

3 

85 

77 

149 

17 

19 

2 

25 

76 

257 

10 

83 

1 

1 

25 

50 
70 

8 

48 

2 

12 

107 

10 

28 

1 

14 

89 

4 

71 

6 

1 

13 

1,711 

1,990 
202 

Clerks  

111    1112    159 

1,049 
88 

1 

2 

9 

94 
398 

149 

159 !  191 

9 

21 

975 

Totals 

.513    815    9fi7 

1,010 

585 

289 

452 

187 

179 

198 

6,024 



British  Columbia 

398 
398 

513 
513 

815 
815 

967 

431 

1,010 

585 

289 

452 

187 

179 

198 

6,024 

967 

431 

1,010 

585 

289 

452 

187 

179 

198 

6  024 

25— ii— 4J 


52 


DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

TABLE 

Nationality,  Sex,  Occupation  and  Destination  of  Immigrant  arrivals  for 


Skn. 

Trade  oh 

Farmers  or  Farm 
Labourers  Class. 

General  Labourers. 

Mechanics. 

CO 

0) 

s 

j. 

— 

E 

c 

1 

DO 

a 

Si 

u 

'£ 

O 

- 
~5 

-1" 

S 

3. 

u 

2 
0 

-f. 

"3 

-. 

1 
1 

27 

X 

- 

= 

s 

1 

c 
3 

6 

10 

l 

647 

1 

2 

34 

1 

3 

3 

4,365 

1 
93 

7 
228 

4 

"ie 

1 

15 

1 

718 

1 

2 

43 
5 
5 
3 
3 
4,885 
7 

04 
1 

10 
231 

3    . 

• 
4 

1 

Dutch 

28 

176 

1 

2 

6 

1 

1 

7 

2 

3 

1 

5 
1 

1 

1 

13 

1 

1 

Irish     

1 

3 

1 
3 

Greek 

1 
1,488 

1 
41 

Japanese 

4:53 

2 
1 

1 
2 

117 
4 

1 
3 

1,543 

91 

11 

78 
1 

17 

73 

IS 

1 

3 

4 

. 

Swi-*    

IX.  S.  Citizens 

1 
30 

\ 

166 



*?! 

Totals 

5,401 

487 

130 

r,,024 

1.K08          92 

11 

1,884 

82 

24 

170 

10 

II  IMMIGRATION 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  _  SI 

V. 
Canada  at  the  Port  of  Victoria,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


53 


OCCUPATION. 

D 

Clerks,  Traders,  &c. 

Miners. 

to 

+3 

> 

a> 

» 
IS 

a 

Not  Classified. 

a* 

93 

o 

s 

c 

6 

to 

1 

S 

o5 
"3 

£ 

o 

■§g 

•-  - 

JS  2 

-a 
a. 

3 

3" 

.9 

■*- 
o 

3 

s 

C 
d 

3° 
go 

8 

est-. 

■2 

1 
5 

3 

19 

1 

6 
3 

1 

1 

8 

15 

29 

29 

1 

380 

718 

1 

1 
5 

1 



1 
2 

1 

2 
43 

1 

3 

5 

1 
74 

3 

1 

3 

525 

56 

5 

2 

8 

! 

662 

200 
1 

31 



4,885 

3 

3 

94 

i 

1 

2 

1 

1 
3 

1 

10 

29 

2 

231 

i 

955 

66 

28 

85 

3 

9 

699 

213 

63 

6,024 

54 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


UNITED    STATES    PORTS. 


Fur  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  there  arrived  in  Canada,  via  ports  in  the  United  States, 
29,812  passengers,  of  whom  217  travelled  saloon  and  29,595  steerage.  Included  in  the 
6teerage  passengers  were  265  returned  Canadians  and  22  tourists,  leaving  the  immi- 
gration proper  at  29,308  souls,  an  increase  over  the  twelve  months  ending  March  31, 
1907,  of  4,460  persons. 

Table  I.  deals  with  the  total  arrivals  of  saloon  passengers,  Table  II.  with  the  total 
arrivals  of  steerage  passengers,  Table  III.  with  the  monthly  arrivals  of  immigrants 
for  Canada,  and  Tables  IV.  and  V.  give  summaries  of  the  information  obtained  from 
immigrants  for  Canada  upon  arrival. 

TABLE   I. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Saloon  Passengers  for  Canada,  via  Ports  in  the  United  States, 
for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

Males. 

Females. 

Children. 

Total.-. 

Welsh 

1 
45 
1 
5 
1 
2 
5 
50 
1 

1 

22 

5 

72 
1 

1 
2 
1 
4 
65 

6 

3 

1 

1 
4 

4 
10 

119 

1 

Totals 

111 

95 

11 

217 

u 


IMMIGRATION 


55 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE    II. 


Nationality  and  Sex  of  Steerage  Passengers  for  Canada,  via  Ports  in  the  United  States, 
for  the  Fiscal  Tear  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Canada. 

Males. 

Females. 

Children. 

Totals. 

2 

3 

642 

14 

178 

3 

388 

200 

646 

133 

120 

1,231 

69 

216 

314 

4,043 

131 

703 

437 

11 

12 

492 

73 

419 

34 

2 

6,656 

1 

1 

60 

410 

3 

184 

239 

1,258 

147 

20 

18 

20 

36 

197 

129 

281 

68 

1 

88 

8 

3 

9 

2 

1 

122 

10 

15 



4 

4 

84 

10 

4 

848 

34 

197 

7 

1 

118 

58 

4 

104 
62 

010 
320 

132                  133 

911 

Slovak 

30 

30 

3 

37 

118 

167 

1,340 

16 

260 

183 

3 

19 

29 

37 

325 

23 
27 

1 

46 

39 

124 

1,182 

8 

89 

76 

2 

10 

15 

16 

343 

186 

177 

1,235 

152 
373 

605 

Welsh      

7,165 
155 

1,052 

696 

Greek 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

16 

41 

536 

126 

1,087 

24                    25 

1 

83 

7 

615 

464 

7.7X' 
1 

1 

Polish,  N.E.S 

8 

90 

6 

32 

63 

447 

30 

1 

6 

5 

14 

54 

44 

9 

3 

5 
68 

4 

15 

88 

588 

•9 

1 

I 

38 

40 

0 

4 

73 

568 

13 
231 

390 

2,293 
186 

21 

25 

32 

56 
289 

213 

Turkish 

296 
75 

1 

39 

26 

153 

8 

1 

4 

4 

13 

20,960 

170 

15 

4,552 

72 

6 

3,796 

23 

1 

29,308 
265 

22 

Totals 

?1,145 

4,630 

3,820 

29,595 

56 


DEPAHTUEXT  OF  THE  WTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


TABLE    III. 


Moxthly    arrivals   of   Immigrants    for   Canada,   by   Nationalities,    via    Ports   in   the 
United  States,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Apr. 

M:i\  . 

June. 

July. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Oct 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Mar. 

Totals 

1 

1 

2 
3 

8 
6 
9 

4 

1 
4 

"l 

88 
5 

4 

Austrian,  N.E.S 

Croatian 

110 
3 

49 
2 

51 

115 

201 

69 

54 

104 

16 

43 

102 

3,281 

48 

361 

195 

2 

1 

65 

29 

141 

15 

6 

1,953 

246 

37 
2 

243 

5 

49 

2 

37 

277 

1(1 

77 

124 

1,508 

64 

158 

189 

30 
5 

38 
3 

28 

2 

11 

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4 

12 

18 

7 
28 

100 

7 
4 

177 

19 
3 

848 
34 

197 
7 

3 

1 
5 

45 
4 

14 
1 
2 

13 

14 

113 

2 

17 
9 
1 
1 
6 
6 

66 
■1 

64 

10 
10 
5 
6 

1 
32 

2 
11 

4 

Hungarian,  X.E. 
S 

27 

36 

175 

23 

123 

4 

38 

67 

474 

17 

158 

55 

1 

15 
10 

174 
9 
24 
49 
6 
40 
36 

154 

49 

24 

2 

11 

48 

14 

128 

5 

496 

15 
24 
71 

9 
13 
28 
14 
30 
51 
122 

2 
27 
43 

1 

2 

20 

11 

126 

15 

382 

31 
19 
77 
28 

3 
40 

7 

24 

48 

113 

3 
27 
24 

7 

15 
73 

7 
142 

2 

369 

44 

47 
45 
13 
6 
.-Ki 
24 
26 
39 
74 

19 
24 

11 
68 

2 
48 

6 

330 

92 
38 
34 
13 

276 
11 
12 
45 
63 

2 
16 
32 

1 

"58 

8 

83 

5 

321 

59 

11 

9 

2 
287 

4 

16 

31 

241 

2 
69 
23 

'"45 
6 

68 

.  139 

610 

Magyar 

Ruthenian 

Slovak 

320 
911 

186 

Belgian 

Bulgarian 

Dutch 

177 
1,235 

10 
21 
24 

282 

5 

68 

27 

1 

8 
33 
24 
740 
10 
83 
51 

152 
373 

German 

Welsh 

605 

7,165 

155 

1,052 

West  Indian  . . . 

696 
16 
41 

55 
9 

52 
5 

1,737 

1 

1 

3 

25 

20 

56 

685 

66 

2 

7 

1 

18 

106 

67 
130 

1 

77 

11 

106 

12 

1 

1,190 

1 
14 
75 

8 

213 

20 

9 

52 

1 

541 

536 

HeBrew,  N.B.S. 

..      Russian . 
ii      Austrian 
,i     German. 

126 

1,087 

83 

7,735 

1 

Portuguese 

Polish,  N.E.S... 
.,       Austrian 
ii       German. 
1.       Russian. 

Roumanian 

Russian,  N.E.S. 

Finnish 

"l 

84 

3 

35 

130 

261 

86 

4 

7 

1 

2 

109 

6 

50 

9 

369 

14 

3 

1 

7 

8 

18 

21 

24 

6 

"l02 

3 

42 

95 
6 

1 
1 

5 
19 

16 
1 

7 

3 
41 

1 

18 

13 

80 

1 

3 

1 

15 

5 

9 

19 

6 

4 

1 
35 

2 

8 

61 

21 

73 

22 

"23 
31 
67 
3 
1 
1 
3 

15 

7 

1 

1 

11 

66 

"21 

23 

48 

2 

1 

1 

1 
23 
5 
4 
3 

27 

28 

568 
13 

4 

82 
193 

1 

3 

14 

346 

3 

5 

2 

46 

1 

6 

5 

7 
"-2 

7 
26 
33 
4 
3 
1 
2 

"7 

3 

"  2 

2 

1 

3 

4 
70 



2 
6 

'7 
23 
9 
18 
22 

"l 

1 
1 

231 

390 

2,293 

186 

21 

2 

10 

11 

9 

19 

1 
2 

13 
8 

60 

25 

32 

Danish 

Swedish 

Norwegian 

Turkish 

Armenian    . . . 

10 
40 
35 
37 
3 

56 

289 

213 

296 

75 

1 

4 

5 
1 
2 

10 

51 

10 
6 

2 

14 

21 

22 

153 

8 

U.S.  Citizens.  .. 

1 
7 

2 

1 

4 
13 

Totals 

7,765 

6,120 

3,335 

1,684 

1,234 

1,311 

1,164 

1,610 

1,671 

519 

935 

1,960 

29,308 

IMMIGRATIOX 


57 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE    IV 


Monthly   arrivals  of  Immigrants  for  Canada,  by  Occupation   and   Destination,   via 
Ports  in  the  United  States,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


Agriculturists 

( Jeneral  labourers. . . 

Mechanics 

Clerks 

Miners 

Female    servants  . .  . 
Not  classed 

Totals 

Maritime  Provinces. 

Quebec 

Ontario 

Manitoba 

Saskatchewan 

Alberta 

British  Columbia '. 
Yukon 

Totals 


o 

03 
.2 

o 

>> 

1? 

< 

816 

_>■ 

B0 
3 

to 

3 

< 

S 

0J 

03 

03 
.O 

Q 
t 

O 

s 

03 
> 
O 

E 

o 

0 

3 

« 
| 

03 

o 

1 

1,518 

242 

43 

30 

53 

61 

311 

380 

39 

72 

362 

3,927 

r4,165 

2,438 

2,004 

1,036 

675 

717 

656 

846 

667 

196 

358 

621 

14,379 

1,712 

1,140 

401 

203 

173 

136 

100 

139 

215 

100 

182 

238 

4,739 

343 

384 

118 

68 

103 

65 

38 

43 

93 

54 

89 

143 

1,541 

63 

49 

29 

23 

6 

19 

16 

13 

6 

t 

9 

9 

249 

265 

130 

137 

79 

57 

72 

55 

92 

161 

20 

65 

94 

1,227 

401 

461 

404 

232 

190 

249 

238 

166 

149 

103 

160 

493  3,246 

7,(65 

6,120 

3,335 

1,684 

1,234 

1,311 

1,164 

1,610 

1,671 

519 

935 

1,960  29,308 

80 

86 

40 

15 

17 

30 

47 

92 

43 

3 

23 

26 

502 

1,594 

1,350 

938 

403 

288 

316 

282 

315 

476  167 

274 

452 

6,855 

4,027 

3,170 

1,548 

716 

561 

583 

494 

768 

so;,  217 

388 

1,023 

14,300 

1,159 

■  757 

433 

304 

121 

111 

92 

96 

15H  61 

71 

184 

3,540 

289 

321 

142 

70 

65 

64 

106 

164 

52   5 

36 

68 

1,382 

243 

210 

118 

35 

57 

62 

48 

61 

79  16 

59 

84 

1,072 

370 

222 

116 

141 

125 

145 

95 

114 

65  50 

83 

123 

1,649 

3 

4 

1 

8 

7,765 

6.120 

3,335 

1;684 

1,234 

1,311 

1,164 

1,610 

1,671 

519 

935 

1,960 

29,308 

58 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  It 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
TABLE 


Nationality,    Sex,    Occupat 

ion    and    Destination    of 

Immigrant 

arrivals 

for 

Sex. 

Trade  or 

DO 

s 

z 
o 

o 

Farmers 

Fa  nn  Labi 
Class. 

or 
nirers 

s 
e 
u 

'£ 
o 

General 
Labourers. 

Mechanics. 

- 

B 

SQ 

"3 
5 

30 

Is 

S 

t 
O 

m 
CD 

"3 

- 
"a 

a 

c 
5 
u 

o 

2 
3 

642 

14 

178 

7 

3 

388 

200 

646 

133 

120 

1,231 

69 

216 

314 

1,643 

131 

703 

437 

11 

12 

492 

73 

419 

34 

2 

6,656 

1 

1 

60 

410 

3 

184 

239 

1,258 

147 

20 

18 

20 

36 

197 

129 

281 

68 

1 

88 

8 

3 

9 

2 

1 

122 

10 

15 

84 
10 

1 

4 

4 

848 

34 

197 

7 

4 

610 

320 

911 

186 

177 

1.235 

152 

373 

605 

7,165 

155 

1,052 

696 

16 

41 

536 

126 

1,087 

83 

7 

7,735 

1 

1 

73 

568 

13 

231 

390 

2,293 

186 

21 

25 

32 

56 

289 

213 

296 

75 

1 

153 

8 

4 

13 

1 

1 

26 

5 

7 

IS!)      14 

20 

408 

152 

7 

1 

150 

187 

(122 

126 

63 

880 

23 

54 

100 

1,061 

28 

109 

138 

1 

22 
1 

1 

21 

12 

l" 

, 

1 

118 

58 

132 

30 

30 

3 

37 

118 

167 

1,340 

16 

260 

183 

3 

19 

29 

37 

325 

24 

1 

615 

104 
62 

133 
23 

27 

46 

39 

124 

1,182 

8 

89 

76 

2 

10 

15 

16 

343 

25 

4 

464 

1 

223 

2 

13 

Hungarian,  X.E.S 

21 
3 

11 

3 

29 

29 

61 

9 

2 

2 

7 

9 

25 

187 

37 

38 

116 

10 

1 

1 

9 

8 

40 

344 

10 
7 

10 
1 

31 
6 

21 

40 

88 
1,798 

43 
2S4 

89 
1 
1 
3 

32 

252 

7 

2 

316 

3 
2 

1 

1 

13 

Slovak 

3 

14 
340 

1 

1 

10 

Dutch 

17 

1 

5 

6 

26 

88 

3 

1 

10 

5 
13 
18 

317 

4 

40 

14 

3 

42       8 
48      21 
620      92 
29        2 
90!      6 
74     11 

4 

15 

330 

Welsh 

2 

1 

9 
9 

8 
10 

24 

7 

1 

1 

23 

3 

6 

3 

1 

15 

145 

3 

1 

23 

1 

453 
21 

93 

18 

9 
3 

10 

1 

10 
3 

8 
2 

Hebrew   N  E  S 

5 

ii         Russian 

1 

3 

124 
1 

4 

Italian 

967 

32 

28 

5,275 

1 

1 

15 

389 

1 

154 

205 

778 

139 

11 

9 

17 

18 

146 

84 

150 

69 

220 

218 

16 

Polish  NES 

8 

90 

6 

32 

63 

447 

30 

1 

0 

5 

14 

54 

44 

9 

3 

5 
68 

4 
15 

88 

588 

9 

1 

7 
6 
38 
40 
6 
4 

26 
2 

2 

2 

1 
41 

2 

50 

2 

16 

2 

17 

8 

177 

6 

2 

3 

12 

23 

25] 

1 

1 

2 

1 

8 

19 

16 

1(14 

1 

1 
10 

82 

1 
18 
149 

6 

36 

123 

5 

3 

06 

234 

2 

2 

62 

1 

Roumanian 

Russian,  N.K.S   

1 
51 

1 

1 
2 
2 
6 

7 
1 
2 

3 
1 
11 
18 
2 
2 

3 

2 

8 

22 

24 

11 

6 

1 

8 

1 

2 

2 

1 
2 

1 

2 

4 
4 
4 
2 

3 
3 

1 
2 

4 

1 
1 

3 

1 

Turkish       

1 

39 

26 

25 

1 

1 

44 
5 

3 

5 

4 

4 

U.S  Citizen 

1 
4 

\ 

1 

Negro 

5 

Totals                  

20,960 

4,552 

3,796 

29,308 

3,218 

324 

385 

12,214 

883 

1,282 

3,400 

717 

62? 

11  IMUIGRATIOS  59 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 
V. 
Canada,  via  Ports  in  the  United  States,  for  the  Fiscal  Year  ending  March  31,  1908. 


OcCUPATIO> 

Destination. 

Clerk 
ers 

s,  Trad- 

Miners. 

> 

m 
to 

Not  Classi6ed. 

CO 
Ct> 
O 

= 

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a 

a 

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c« 
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do 

1 

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S 

a 

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c 

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53 

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1 

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1 

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33 

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21 

1 
20 

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1 

2 
2 

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10 

7 

25 
6 
9 

33 
10 

4 

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4 

1 

314 

4 

6 

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20 

301 

5 

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171 

73 

927 

34 

206 

148 

3 

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248 

57 

344 

32 

208 

6 

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227 

102 

191 

63 

14 

1,140 

62 

59 

180 

4,539 

71 

538 

365 

11 

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240 

56 

585 

48 

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216 

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128 

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357 

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166 

891 

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106 

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100 

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463 

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9 
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48 

54 

326 

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1 
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56 
21 
17 
12 
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13 

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347 

3 

49 

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26 
25 

7 

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64 

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2 

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156 

98 

37 

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22 
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60 

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9 

28 

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20 
72 

251 

5 

53 

27 

29 

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61 

17 

4 

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41 

42 

282 

9 

85 

28 

1 

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7 

1 

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3 

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119 

2 

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68 

39 

51 

615 

10 

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11 

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140 

89 

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2 

38 

1 

S 

10 

3 

17 
4 

4 
21 

4 

52 

113    1ST 

8 

9 

18 

9 

157 

094 
1 

25 

6   1 

50 

2 

1 

170 

23 

162 

200 

132 

2,779 


i 
9 

126 

1 

74 

74 

616 

162 

9 

8 

19 

12 

57 

53 

234 

69 

1 

43 

4 

3 

6 

2 

1 
33 

4 
13 
13 
85 
16 

is 

l 

"i 

16 
"2 

4 

13 
2 

10 
2 

85 
7 
1 
2 
1 
2 
14 
10 
2 
1 

1 
15 

4 
11 

3 
143 

9 

2 

2 
17 

20 

1 

5 
24 

"*2 

36 

1 

21 

146 

2 

93 

83 

505 

8 

3 

7 

14 

181 

4 

44 

36 

530 

7 

15 

6 

4 

192 

369 

4 

65 

i3 
11 

1 

2 

1 

5 
2 

158 
2 

11 

1 

79 

14 

9 

4 

2 



29 

10 
1 

11 

7 

1 

6 

4 

1 

1 
3 

2 

7 

2 

3 

10 

40 

19 

2 

3 

2 

1 
1 

5 
25 
21 

1 

".3 
1 
4 
1 

1 
3 

"23 

5 
29 
10 
32 

3 

90 
2 

13    is 

2 

37 
60 

5 

4 

2 

1 

100 

34 

5 

23 

37 

3 

1 

6 

2 

2 

1 

io 

1 

1 

15 

1 

14 

16 

9 
2 

10 
3 

"  1 

1 

2 

1 

3 

1 

2 

2 

1,158 

228 

155 

213 

20 

16 

1,227 

757 

1,153 

1,336 

502 

6,855 

14,300 

3.540 

1,382 

1.072 

1,049 

8 

60  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  II 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

In  my  report  for  the  fractional  fiscal  year  19O0-7  I  remarked  that  the  volume  of 
work  at  headquarters  had  not  shown  any  diminution,  and  I  may  now  say  that  it  has 
gone  on  steadily  increasing.  There  were  163,115  attachments  made  to  our  correspon- 
dence files  in  1907-8,  as  compared  with  140,635  during  the  next  preceding  twelve 
months,  and  during  the  year  now  reported  upon  430,336  requests  for  information, 
direct  and  indirect,  were  attended  to,  the  total  number  of  pamphlets  sent  out  of  my 
office  during  the  year  being  2,397,747. 

The  following  is  a  statement  showing  immigration  literature  ordered  during  the 

year  :— 

Copies. 

Suggestions  to  Medical  Officers 1,500 

Immigration  Act  (English) 5,000 

(French) 3,000 

Last  Best  West  (English) 173,000 

"      (Swedish) .  10,000 

"      (French) i  60,000 

-  ( German) .  50,000 

"      (Norwegian) 45,000 

"      (Dutch) . 20,000 

-  (Flemish) 25,000 

"      (Finnish) 25,000 

Canada  the  Land  of  Opportunity 250,000 

Canada  West  Magazine 10,000 

Winter  Wheat  Pamphlet 175,000 

Icelandic  Pamphlet 10,000 

Peace  Eiver  Trail  Pamphlet 800 

Book  on  Nova  Scotia 100 

Canada  in  a  Nutshell 150,000 

Work,  Wages  and  Land 200,000 

(German) 50,000 

Atlas  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada   (English  Edition) .  .    .  .  25,000 

"       (Canadian    Edition)    .  .  25,000 

■•       (French) 25,000 

"                         ■•       (Finnish) 10,000 

«                        ••                        ••       (Flemish) 10,000 

(German) 10,000 

«                        ••                        "       (Dutch) 10,000 

"                        "                        •'       (Danish) 10,000 

«                         "                         •'       (Norwegian) 10,000 

"                        "                        '•       (Swedish) 10,000 

Philanthropic  and   Charitable  Societies 2,000 

Souvenirs  et  Impressions  de  Voyage  au  Nord-Ouest  Cana- 

dien 100 

Small  Dodger  (French) •  •    •  •  50,000 

Ontario  Wants  Farm  Labourers 100,000 

Nova  Scotia  pamphlets 31,500 

Hungarian  pamphlets 5,000 

New  Brunswick  pamphlets 31,500 

Ruthenian  pamphlets 12.000 

New  Ontario  pamphlets.  .   .  .• 5,000 

The  Lake  St.  John  Region  (Settlers'  Guide) 25,000 

The  Unemployed  in  Canada 20,000 

Canada  wants  Domestic  Servants 50.000 

Canada   Life  and  Resources 0,000 


ii  IMMIGRATION  61 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

llcrfis. 

Small  Dominion  Maps  of  Canada 31,000 

Newspapers. 

Alberta  German  Herald 26,000 

"            "            "      Special  Edition 6,667 

Canada  Swedish  Weekly 18,000 

"       Special   Edition 1,000 

Der  Nordwesten  (German) 26.000 

Danebrog • 12,000 

"        Two  Special  Editions,  500  eacb 1,000 

Logberg  (Icelandic) 52.000 

Le  Nouveliste 3,000 

'Canada.*  published  in   London,  England 26,000 

Saskatoon  Phoenix. . 5,000 

•  The  Ked  Deer  Advocate  ' : .  1,000     ■ 

Le  Courrier  de  TOuest 5-000 

Saskatchewan  Courier-German 8,360 

The  Canadian  Hungarian 30,000 

I  have  received  a  report  from  the  Women's  National  Immigration  Society,  87 
Osborne  street,  Montreal,  showing  that  this  organization  has  continued  its  good  work 
during  the  year. 

The  Ottawa  Valley  Immigration  Aid  Society,  which  receives  some  financial 
assistance  from  the  department,  has  also  made  a  report  showing  that  the  society  has 
had  2.946  visitors,  has  directed  the  settlement  of  683  individuals,  distributed  8.4Ti> 
pamphlets  and  given  8  lectures.    The  settlers  have  been  placed  as  follows:— 

In  Xew  Ontario H  ' 

New  Quebec 220 

Western  Provinces ■'" 

Total./ 683 

We  have  now  three  officers  regularly  employed  in  the  deportation  of  undesirable 
immigrants,  and  two  others  who  are  called  upon  to  act  from  time  to  time  when 
required. 

We  may.  I  think,  confidently  expect  a  falling  off  in  the  number  of  deportations 
as  a  result  of  the  more  stringent  measures  we  are  now  taking  to  shut  out  undesir- 
ables. 

Dr.  George  W.  Elliott,  who  is  stationed  at  New  York,  reports  that  during  tW' 
last  fiscal  year  22,472  aliens  were  landed  at  that  port  destined  to  different  parts  of 
Canada.  Out  of  this  number  Dr.  Elliott  rejected  102  as  disqualified  for  various 
reasons. 

In  my  last  annual  report  I  made  reference  to  the  demand  in  recent  years  for 
farm  help  in  Ontario,  and  stated  that  in  order  to  assist  as  far  as  possible  in  meeting 
this  demand  the  plan  would  be  tried  of  employing  agents  on  commission.  This 
plan,  I  may  say.  has  worked  well,  and  the  commission  agents  appointed  in  Ontario 
(and  a  smaller  number  in  Quebec)  have  altogether  placed  in  employment  about  7,000 
farm  bands  during  the  fiscal  year. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

W.   D.   SCOTT. 
Superintendent  of  Immigration, 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


OPERATIONS  IN  EUROPE 

No.  1. 

EEPOET  OF  THE  HIGH  COMMISSIONER. 

Office  of  the  High  Commissioner  fob  Canada, 

17  Victoria  Street,  London,  S.W.,  June  13, 1908. 
The  Honourable 

The  Minister  of  the  Interior, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  transmit  herewith  the  annual  reports  of  the  immigra- 
tion agents  of  your  department  in  Europe  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908.  These 
representatives  at  the  present  time  are: — 

the  immigration  staff. 

Mr.  J.  Obed  Smith,  Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration,  11-12  Charing  Cross, 
London,  S.W. 

Mr.  A.  F.  Jury,  Old  Castle  Buildings,  Preeson's  Eow,  Liverpool. 

Mr.  G.  H.  Mitchell,  139  Corporation  Street,  Birmingham. 

Mr.  L.  Burnett,  16  Parliament  Street,  York. 

Mr.  M.  Mclntyre,  35  and  37  St.  Enoch  Square,  Glasgow. 

Mr.  John  McLennan,  26  Guild  Street,  Aberdeen. 

Mr.  J.  Webster,  17-19  Victoria  Street,  Belfast. 

Mr.  H.  M.  Murray,  81  Queen  Street,  Exeter. 

Mr.  E.  O'Kelly,  44  Dawson  Street,  Dublin. 

Mr.  Paul  Wiallard,  10  Rue  de  Rome,  Paris. 

Mr.  Arthur  Geoflrion,  10  Rue  de  Rome,  Paris. 

Mr.  Treau  de  Coeli,  23  Place  de  la  Gare,  Antwerp. 

During  the  year  Mr.  Murray  was  removed  from  Cardiff  to  Exeter,  Mr.  Webster 
from  Glasgow  to  Belfast,  and  Mr.  O'Kelly  from  Belfast  to  Dublin;  while  during  the 
same  period  Mr.  H.  Mclntyre  was  appointed  to  take  charge  of  the  Glasgow  office,  Mr. 
John  McLennan  of  the  Aberdeen  agency,  and  Mr.  Geoffrion  to  assist  Mr.  Wiallard 
in  Paris. 

The  following  is  a  list  of  the  Canadian  delegates  appointed  during  the  year  to 
visit  the  United  Kingdom  for  the  purpose  of  promoting  emigration: — 

Mr.  C.  A.  Aylesworth,  Mr.  E.  E.  Brewster,  Mr.  J.  Robert  Brown,  Mr.  A.  R.  Bredin, 
Mr.  Allen  Cruikshanks,  Mr.  Andrew  Dalgarno,  Mr.  W.  Moulding  Baker,  Mr.  Donald 
Grant,  Rev.  Andrew  Galley,  Rev.  A.  Garritama,  Mr.  Geo.  Gibbard,  Mr.  John  L.  Gray, 
Mr.  John  Hay,  Rev.  James  Lawson,  M.  Edouard  Montpetit,  Mr.  Alex.  McOwan,  Mr. 
J.  T.  Mayor,  Mr.  H.  F.  Morel,  Mr.  Henry  Goodridge,  Rev.  Geo.  McArthur,  Mr.  Hugh 
McKerracher,  M.  Edouard  Parent,  Mr.  Wm.  Patterson,  Mr.  Thomas  Parsons,  Rev. 
Father  Royer,  Mr.  W.  J.  Smith,  Mr.  Geo.  L.  Stewart,  Mr.  W.  West 

Mr.  James  Robinson  of  Larne  was  also  appointed  to  take  charge  of  an  exhibition 
wagon  to  travel  through  Ireland. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  63 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

During-  the  year  Mr.  Bruce  Walker,  the  recently  appointed  Assistant  Superintend- 
ent of  Emigration  in  London,  has  exchanged  posts  with  Mr.  J.  Obed  Smith,  who  held 
the  office  of  Commissioner  of  Immigration  at  Winnipeg. 

The  condition  of  financial  and  industrial  affairs  in  Canada  towards  the  end  of 
1907  exercised  a  decisive  effect  in  diminishing  the  volume  of  emigration  from  Europe 
to  the  Dominion,  but  while  this  is  the  case,  there  still  remains  much  scope  for  official 
activity,  as  there  is  occasion  for  increased  effort  in  supervising  and  inspecting  the 
class  of  emigrants  proposing  to  proceed  to  Canada,  with  a  view  to  eliminating  the 
unfit  and  the  undesirable. 

There  is  always  a  large  number  of  persons,  both  in  this  country  and  on  the  con- 
tinent, who  desire  better  opportunities  of  improving  their  positions,  and  who  possess 
all  the  qualities  that  go  to  the  making  of  good  settlers.  Such  persons  ordinarily 
emigrate  of  their  own  volition,  and  one  of  the  problems  in  dealing  with  emigration, 
along  lines  necessarily  of  a  general  description,  is  to  place  before  this  class  the  attrac- 
tions of  Canada,  without  at  the  same  time,  and  by  the  same  means,  influencing  others 
pf  a  much-  less  desirable  sort,  for  the  natural  effect  of  an  over-zealous  propaganda 
must  be  to  tend  to  draw  unsuitable  persons  to  the  Dominion.    • 

During  the  past  year  or  two  the  various  emigration  bodies  and  societies  in  this 
country,  founded  for  more  or  less  charitable  purposes,  have  exhibited  great  energy  in 
their  operations,  and  have  doubtless  been  mainly  responsible  for  directing  to  Canada 
that  class  whose  presence — chiefly  in  the  industrial  centres  of  eastern  Canada — has 
given  rise  to  a  congested  condition  of  affairs. 

In  addition,  the  abnormal  scarcity  of  labour  in  Canada  during  1906  and  1907  no 
doubt  somewhat  embarrassed  employers  of  labour,  and  men  were  engaged  at  high 
wages  who,  under  ordinary  circumstances,  would  not  have  been  considered  employable. 
This,  it  is  suggested,  led  to  misapprehension,  and  it  was  too  readily  assumed  that 
any  and  all  sorts  and  conditions  of  men  could  find  employment  in  Canada,  and  was 
in  part  responsible  for  the  congestion  which  ensued  in  some  of  the  towns  of  the 
Dominion  towards  the  end  of  1907. 

Official  action  has,  as  usual,  been  carefully  confined  to  the  encouragement  of 
'  agricultural  emigrants,'  that  is  to  say,  those  persons  possessing  a  knowledge  of  farm 
life,  and  those  intending  to  embark  in  the  same  on  arrival  in  Canada;  railway  con- 
struction men,  and  female  domestic  servants. 

The  exercise  of  the  restrictive  powers  provided  for  during  the  present  session  of 
the  Dominion  Parliament  will  no  doubt  prevent  the  emigration  of  as  many  '  undesir- 
ables '  as  was  the  case  last  year,  and  will  doubtless  ensure  a  better  type  of  immigrant. 

So  far  as  I  am  able  to  judge,  official  and  public  sentiment  in  this  country  realises 
that  the  action  of  the  Dominion  government,  in  taking  measures  to  prevent  indiscrim- 
inate immigration,  was  justified  by  the  conditions  which  have  developed.  Nevertheless, 
it  may  be  expected  that  a  large  number  of  persons  who  may  not  be  able  to  comply  ^to 
the  letter  with  the  regulations  that  have  been  devised,  will,  in  consequence  of  the  indus- 
trial position  here  and  on  the  continent,  desire  to  emigrate  to  Canada.  A  great* 
number  of  these  persons,  although  engaged  in  towns  and  cities,  have  had  some  experi- 
ence of  farm  life,  and  in  cases  where  the  probability  is  that  they  may  become  good 
farmers  or  efficient  farm  labourers,  the  regulations  will  no  doubt,  with  advantage,  be 
administered  in  a  generous  manner. 

Cases  have  repeatedly  transpired  in  which  recorders,  chairmen  of  sessions,  and 
others,  have  postponed  passing  judgment  on  transgressors  against  the  law,  on  the  con- 
dition of  their  being  sent  to  Canada.  I  have  drawn  the  attention  of  those  concerned 
to  these  cases,  stating  the  strong  objection  which  was  felt  by  the  people  and  the  govern- 
ment of  Canada  in  respect  of  them,  and  at  my  request  wide  publicity  was  given  to  the 
matter  in  the  press,  and  it  was  hoped  that  as  a  consequence  such  practices  would  cease. 
This  hope  was  not,  however,  fully  borne  out,  and  I  ultimately  brought  the  matter  offi- 
cially to  the  notice  of  the  Imperial  authorities,  with  the  result  shown  in  the  appended 
correspondence : — • 


64  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  edward  vii.,  a.  1909 

'Office  of  the  High  Commissioner  for  Canada, 

'  June  28,  1907. 

'  Sin. — 1  beg  to  state,  fur  the  information  of  the  Earl  of  Elgin,  that  from  time  to 
time  the  Canadian  government  has  had  brought  to  its  notice  that,  on  occasions  magis- 
trates and  others  in  this  country  have  agreed,  on  the  representation  oi  interested  per- 
sons, to  defer  passing  judgment  on  transgressors  against  the  law  on  the  condition  of 
their  being  sent  to  Canada. 

'  In  November,  1905,  I  had  a  correspondence  with  the  recorder  of  London  in  regard 
to  a  young  man  who  was  convicted  of  obtaining  money  by  false  pretences,  but  was  nol 
sent  to  prison  but  allowed  to  go  to  Canada.  I  then  communicated  to  the  recorder  the 
strong  opposition  which  was  felt  by  the  government  and  people  of  Canada  to  the  send- 
ing to  the  Dominion  of  any  person  convicted  of  a  crime,  having  exhibited  criminal 
tendencies;  and  at  the  same  time  directed  attention  to  the  provisions  of  the  Canadian 
Act  respecting  immigration  and  immigrants  (  C>  Edward  VII.,  chap  19),  under  which 
powers  are  given  to  prohibit  the  landing  of,  and  to  deport,  any  undesirables  or  criminals, 
such  powers  being  rigidly  enforced  by  the  Canadian  authorities. 

'  Attention  was  widely  drawn  to  the  correspondence  at  the  time,  both  in  the  press 
of  this  country  and  of  Canada,  and  it  was  hoped  that,  as  a  consequence,  the  practice! 
complained  of  would  cease. 

'It  would  appear,  however,  from  the  enclosed  copy  of  a  letter  from  the  Criminal 
Investigation  Department  to  the  Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration  in  connec- 
tion with  my  office,  dated  the  15th  ultimo,  that  such  is  not  the  ease;  and  it  is  feared 
that  the  course  to  which  objection  is  taken  may  have  been  adopted  to  even  a  larger 
extent  than  has  been  apparent. 

'  In  these  circumstances,  the  Canadian  government  greatly  desires  that,  it'  possible, 
some  notification  of  its  views  on  the  subject  may  be  conveyed  to  magistrates  and  others 
concerned,  in  order  definitely  to  put  a  stop  to  the  sending  to  Canada  of  persons  con- 
victed of  crime.  I  therefore  venture  to  bring  the  matter  to  the  attention  of  Lord  Elgin, 
with  a  view  to  such  action  being  taken  as  His  Lordship  may  deem  advisable. 

'  I  am,  sir, 

'Your  obedient   servant. 

(Signed)     '  STRATHCONA. 
'Tin'  Under  Secretary  of  State, 
•Colonial  Office,  S.WY 

(Enclosure.) 

•  Criminal  Investigation  Department,  New  Scotland  Yard, 

'London,  S.W.,  May  15,  1907. 
'To  the  Assistanl   Superintendent  of  Emigration, 

'  Interior  Department  of  the  Government  of  Canada, 

•  II   and  12  Charing  Cross.  S.W. 

'  Sit;, — With  further  reference  to  your  letter  of  the  2nd  instant,  regarding  the 
encouragement  given  to  criminals  to  emigrate  to  Canada,  I  have  to  acquaint  you,  for 
the  information  of  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration,  Ottawa,  that  the  circumstances 
relating  to  the  two  eases  to  which  you  refer  are  as  follows: — 

•Arthur  Lloyd,  who  laid  been  twice  previously  convicted  for  burglary,  once  (for 
embezzlement  ami  once  as  a  rogue  and  a  vagabond,  was  arrested  on  March  10  last  and 
charged  with  committing  a  burglary  at.  Lancaster  Lodge,  ISayswater  Road,  W.  For 
this  offence  he  was  tried  at  the  North  London  Sessions  on  March  2G  and  was  put  back 
for  sentence  till  April  111  for  inquiries  to  be  made  with  a  view  to  his  being  sent  to 
Canada.  On  the  latter  date  be  appeared  before  the  court  and  was  bound  over  in  the 
sum  of  £5  to  come  up  for  judgment,  if  called  upon,  being  handed  over  to  his  friends 
on  the  condition  that  he  went   to  Canada. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  65 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

'  With  regard  to  Charles  Stevenson,  alias  Charles  John  Parr,  this  man  was  arrested 
on  March  3  last  and  charged  with  stealing  a  kit  bag  and  contents,  value  £25,  from  a 
guard's  van  at  Euston  station.  After  appearing  at  Clerkenwell  Police  Court  he  was, 
on  March  26,  arraigned  before  Mr.  Robert  Wallace,  K.C.,  chairman  of  the  North  Lon- 
don Sessions,  who  postponed  sentence  till  April  10  with  a  view  to  Parr's  parents  send- 
ing him  to  Canada,  and  in  the  meantime  for  Mr.  Wheatley,  of  St.  Giles'  Christian 
Mission,  to  make  the  necessary  arrangements. 

'  The  prisoner,  who  had  been  previously  convicted  of  stealing  luggage  from  Euston 
station,  appeared  before  the  chairman  of  the  sessions  on  the  10th  ultimo.  He  (pri- 
soner) declined  to  avail  himself  of  the  assistance  of  Mr.  Wheatley  to  send  him  to  Can- 
ada, and  was  sentenced  to  four  months'  imprisonment  with  hard  labour. 

'  I  am,  sir, 

'  Your  obedient  servant. 
(Signed)        <M.   T.  MACNAGHTON.' 

'  Colonial  Office,  S.W.,  July  11,  1907. 

'  My  Lord, — I  am  directed  by  the  Earl  of  Elgin  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of 
your  letter  of  the  26th  June,  relative  to  two  cases  in  which  judgment  on  convicted 
criminals  has  been  postponed  on  condition  of  their  being  emigrated  to  Canada,  and 
to  inform  you  that  His  Lordship  is  in  communication  with  the  Home  Office  on  the 
subject. 

'  I  am,  my  Lord,  your  Lordship's  most  obedient  servant, 

(Signed)        '  C.  P.  LUCAS. 
'  The  High  Commissioner  for  Canada.' 

'  Colonial  Office,  S.W.,  August  19,  1907. 
'  The  Under  Secretary  of  State  for  the  Colonies  presents  his  compliments  to  the 
High  Commissioner  for  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  and,  with  reference  to  his  letter 
of  the  28th  June,  is  directed  by  the  Secretary  of  State  to  transmit  to  him,  for  his 
information,  a  copy  of  a  correspondence  with  the  Home  Office  on  the  subject  of  the 
emigration  of  convicted  criminals  to  Canada.' 

'Colonial  Office,  S.W.,  July  11,  1907. 
'  Sir, — With  reference  to  the  letter  from  your  department  of  the  17th  February, 
1897,  and  previous  correspondence  on  the  subject  of  the  emigration  to  Canada  of  con- 
victed criminals,  I  am  directed  by  the  Earl  of  Elgin  to  transmit  to  you  for  the  con- 
sideration of  Mr.  Secretary  Gladstone,  copy  of  a  letter  from  the  High  Commissioner 
for  Canada  asking  that  the  attention  of  magistrates  might  be  called  to  the  views  of 
the  Dominion  government  with  regard  to  emigration  of  this  class  to  Canada. 

'  I  am,  &c, 

(Signed)        '  C.  P.  LUCAS. 
'The  Under  Secretary  of  Stale, 
'Home  Office.' 

'  Home  Office,  Whitehall,  S.W.,  August  9,  1907. 

'  Sir, — In  reply  to  your  letter  of  11th  July,  forwarding  a  communication  from  the 
High  Commissioner  for  Canada  on  the  subject  of  the  emigration  to  Canada  of  con- 
victed criminals,  I  am  directed  by  Mr.  Secretary  Gladstone  to  say,  for  the  information 
of  the  Earl  of  Elgin,  that  he  has  communicated  with  the  Chairman  of  the  London 
Sessions  regarding  the  cases  of  Arthur  Lloyd  and  Charles  Stevenson,  which  were 
brought  to  Lord  Strathcona's  notice. 

25— ii— 5 


66  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  ISTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Mr.  Wallace  states  that  he  acted  in  the  belief  that  the  Canadian  government 
■would  not  be  averse  to  receiving  men  who,  like  the  two  prisoners  above-mentioned,  had 
committed  an  offence,  but  were  shown  by  the  evidence  before  the  court  to  have  every 
prospect  of  doing  well  if  given  the  opportunity  in  fresh  surroundings. 

On  learning,  however,  that  the  Canadian  government  objected  to  the  emigration 
of  such  persons,  no  further  steps  were_ taken  to  enable  the  men  to  proceed  to  Canada, 
and  the  Emigration  Commissioner  was  informed  some  weeks  ago  that  the  matter  was 
at  an  end. 

'  The  Secretary  of  State  has  no  knowledge  of  any  similar  eases  having  occurred 
elsewhere,  but  if  any  such  cases  should  come  to  the  High  Commissioner's  notice,  he 
will  be  ready  at  once  to  take  any  steps  necessary  to  stop  the  practice. 

'  I  am,  &c, 

(Signed)  C.   E.   TROUP. 

'  The  Under  Secretary  of  State, 
'  Colonial  Office.' 

I  have  no  doubt  that  in  time,  by  entering  a  protest  whenever  such  cases  occur, 
they  will  be  reduced  to  a  vanishing  point.  In  pursuance  of  this  policy  I  recently 
addressed  the  following  letters  to  the  Lord  Mayor  of  London: — 

'  Office  of  the  High  Commissioner  for  Canada, 

•17  Victoria  Street,  S.W.,  April  2,  190S. 

'  My  dear  Lord  Mayor, — My  attention  has  been  drawn  fo  the  inclosed  extract 
from  the  Montreal  Herald  of  the  8th  March,  relative  to  a  youth  who  appears  to  have 
been  charged  at  the  Mansion  House  with  theft,  and  to  have  been  discharged  on  the 
understanding  that  he  would  go  to  Canada,  and  I  have  been  asked  to  take  official 
action  with  regard  thereto. 

'  I  feel,  however,  that  it  will  be  sufficient  if  I  point  out  informally  that  the  people 
and  government  of  Canada  strongly  resent  the  sending  to  the  Dominion  of  any  person 
who  has  shown  criminal  tendencies.  Indeed,  powers  exist  under  the  Canadian  law 
for  deporting  such  persons,  and  these  are  rigidly  put  into  force. 

'I  am  confident  that  it  is  only  necessary- to  mention  this  matter  informally,  as  T 
now  do,  to  secure  your  hearty  co-operation  in  a  matter  with  which  the  Canadian  gov- 
ernment is  greatly  concerned. 

'Believe  me,  yours  very  truly, 

(Signed)        '  STRATHCONA. 
'  The  Rt.  Hon.  the  Lord  Mayor, 
'  Mansion  House,  E.C 

To  which  I  received  the  following  satisfactory  reply  from  His  Lordship:— 

'  The  Mansion  House,  E.C.,  April  4,  1903. 

'  Dear  Lord  Strathcona, — I  am  much  obliged  to  you  for  your  letter  of  the  2nd 
instant. 

'  The  statement  of  the  Montreal  Herald  is  virtually  correct,  but  the  lad  was  not 
discharged  on  the  understanding  that  he  should  be  sent  to  Canada.  The  boy  was  dis- 
charged under  the  Probation  of  Offenders  Act,  and  that — so  far  as  this  court  was 
concerned — closed  the  matter.  The  boy  need  never  have  left  Loudon,  and,  perhaps, 
has  not,  but  it  was  mentioned  in  court  that,  in  order  to  give  him  a  fresh  start,  his 
parents  were  going  to  send  him  to  Canada.  Whether  they  have  done  so  or  not,  we 
do  not  know.  The  boy  was  of  good  parentage  and  education,  but  had  been  tempted 
to  bet  with  bookmakers  and,  having  lost,  was  induced  to  steal.  This  was  his  first 
offence,  and  very  likely  this  warning  will  make  him  a  good  citizen,  either  in  London 
or  elsewhere. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  67 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

•  Xo  prisoners  have  ever  been  sent  to  Canada  from  this  court,  and  I  quite  appre- 
ciate and  applaud  the  strong  objection  which  the  Dominion  rightly  entertains  to  any 
attempt  to  unload  our  criminals  on  its  shores. 

'Tours  very  truly, 

(Signed)        'J.  C.  BELL, 

'Lord  Mayor. 
'The  Et.  Hon.  Lord  Strathcoxa,  G.C.M.G., 
'  17  Victoria  Street,  London,  S.W.' 

This  correspondence  was  given  to  the  press,  and  its  publication  will  serve  to  extend 
the  knowledge  of  the  strong  feeling  that  exists  in  Canada  on  the  subject. 

My  attention  was  recently  drawn  to  the  fact  that  apparently  a  misapprehension 
existed  on  the  part  of  the  Hungarian  government  as  to  the  restrictive  regulations 
issued  in  December  last.  Communication  with  His  Majesty's  Consul  General  at 
Buda-Pesth  elicited  the  fact  that  the  authorities  there  had  issued  the  following  notice 
to  the  chiefs  of  the  different  municipalities  in  Hungary: — 

'  The  Imperial  and  Boyal  Consul  General  at  Montreal  reports  by  cable  that  the 
Canadian  government  has  prohibited  immigration  till  further  notice.  I  hereby 
inform  you  (the  chiefs  of  the  different  municipalities  in  Hungary)  that  in  conse- 
quence of  the  above  decision,  I  forbid,  by  virtue  of  the  power  conferred  on  me  by 
clause  5  of  the  Law  IV.  of  1903,  emigration  to  Canada  until  further  notice.  I  call 
upon  you  to  give  this,  my  order,  the  fullest  publicity.' 

I  have  caused  the  exact  position  to  be  notified  to  the  Hungarian  government, 
through  the  Foreign  Office,  and  have  drawn  attention  to  the  fact  that  this  order  would 
appear  to  have  been  issued  under  a  misapprehension,  as  the  Canadian  government 
has  not  prohibited  immigration  into  Canada.  This  will  no  doubt  result  in  clearing 
away  any  misconception  which  may  have  arisen. 

The  relief  of  Canadians  who,  from  one  reason  or  another,  become  destitute  in 
Europe  is  a  matter  to  which  this  department  devotes  much  consideration  during  the 
course  of  the  year.  The  fund  appropriated  by  parliament  for  this  purpose  is  a  very 
small  one,  and  needs  careful  distribution  in  order  to  meet  the  demands  made  upon  it. 
During  the  past  year  93  persons  applied  for  assistance.  For  17  of  these  return  pass- 
ages were  procured,  and  of  the  balance  57  were  provided  with  subsistence,  lodging  oi 
clothing.  "With  regard  to  the  remaining  19  persons,  the  conclusion  was  arrived  at, 
after  careful  consideration  of  the  claims  they  presented,  that  their  condition  did  not 
warrant  the  extension  to  them  of  any  government  aid. 

Assistance  to  distressed  Canadians  has  also  been  extended  by  the  British  consuls 
at  various  foreign  points.  In  such  cases  it  is  the  practice  to  act  as  far  as  practicable 
upon  the  recommendations  of  these  gentlemen,  whose  intervention  on  behalf  of  the 
Canadian  subjects  of  His  Majesty  is  much  appreciated. 

The  press  cable  service  which  was  established  as  the  result  of  arrangements  made 
between  us  when  you  were  last  in  this  country  has  worked  well  and  achieved  valuable 
results. 

The  information  which  you  have  communicated  to  me  I  have  transmitted  to  the 
press  of  this  country,  and  through  this  medium  there  has  been  placed  very  fully  from 
time  to  time,  before  the  public  of  the  United  Kingdom  information  as  to  the  crops, 
public  revenue  and  expenditure,  customs  receipts,  bank  clearings,  movement  of  grain, 
mineral  production,  urban  development,  and  generally  as  to  the  industrial  progress  of 
the  Dominion. 

The  information  sent,  as  above,  is  also  directly  conveyed  to  a  number  of  special 
newspaper  correspondents,  various  banking  institutions  which  are  jidentified  or 
interested  in  Canada,  the  English  offices  of  the  Canadian  railways  and  shipping  con- 

25 — ii — 5i 


63  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

eerns,  the  Canadian  emigration  agencies,  and  also  to  a  large  number  of  influential 
financiers  and  others  identified  with  Canadian  interests  in  this  country.  Many  of  the 
concerns  to  whom  this  information  is  conveyed  have  excellent  facilities  for  displaying 
the  cable  messages  in  conspicuous  "public  places,  and  by  so  doing  still  further  extend 
the  usefulness  of  the  cable  sen-ice.' 

Satisfactory  as  this  service  has  been,  experience  will  doubtless  point  to  the  advis- 
ability of  still  further  extensions  in  the  future. 

I  have  the  honour  to  be,  sir,  your  obedient  servant. 

STRATHCOXA. 

High  i  'om  m  issioner. 


No.  2. 
REPORT   OF  MR.  J.   OBED   SMITH. 

Assistant  Superintendent's  Office, 

11-12  Charing  Cross,  London,  April  2.  1903 

The  Rt.  Hon.  Lord  Strathcona  and  Mount  Royal,  G.C.M.G., 

High  Commissioner  for  Canada, 

17  Victoria  Street,  London,  S.W. 

My  Lord, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  herewith  the  report  of  the  Emigration 
Branch  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior,  covering  the  agencies  in  the  United  King- 
dom and  the  continent  of  Europe  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31,  1908,  together 
with  the  .individual  reports  of  the  various  emigration  agents  under  this  branch  for  the 
same  period. 

Up  to  the  end  of  the  calendar  year  1907  the  number  of  persons  emigrating  to 
Canada  from  this  side  of  the  Atlantic  shows  a  material  increase  over  the  same  period 
of  the  year  1906,  but  the  first  three  months  of  the  present  calendar  year — and  being 
the  last  three  months  of  the  fiscal  year  covered  by  this  report — show,  for  various  rea- 
sons hereinafter  mentioned,  some  decrease. 

The  wisdom  of  the  policy  inaugurated  by  the  honourable  the  minister  during  his 
last  visit  here,  by  which  all  offices  of  the  agents  were  brought  into  better  prominence 
by  the  removal  from  some  obscure  situations  to  positions  on  the  ground  floor  on 
important  business  thoroughfares,  has  been  abundantly  proved  from  the  increased  num- 
ber of  callers  making  personal  inquiry,  and  the  attractive  displays  from  time  to  time 
furnished  by  the  department,  which,  being  shown  to  advantage, have  undoubtedly  laid 
the  foundation  for  still  further  increase  of  inquiries  concerning'  Canada,  not  only  in 
the  field  of  emigration  but,  I  doubt  not,  along  the  line  of  commercial  enterprises  among 
those  who  may  be  seeking  opportunities  for  investment.  I  am  pleased  to  report  that 
our  agents  in  districts  where  there  is  no  Canadian  trade  commissioner  have  not  hesi- 
tated to  secure  for  themselves  information  on  commercial  matters,  the  better  to  enable 
them  to  impart  such  knowledge  to  all  inquirers. 

In  amplification  of  the  propaganda,  an  extensive,  but  carefully  revised  list,  of 
newspapers  has  been  from  time  to  time  prepared  and  used  for  the  insertion  of  adver- 
tisements which  would  draw  attention  to  the  resources  of  Canada.  The  geueral  policy 
in  this  regard  to  avoid  tli"  large  metropolitan  and  large  provincial  city  newspapers 
has  been  continued,  but  at  all  times  special  regard  is  had  to  the  peculiar  experience 
of  the  local  emigration  agents,  who  satisfy  themselves  of  the  value  of  one  paper  over 
another.  It  is  hoped  that  this  system  lias  been  the  means  of  sowing  seed  which  will 
ultimately  reap  a  large  emigration  harvest  of  desirable  people  from  the  country  dis- 
tricts. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  69 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Mention  may  also  be  made  of  the  work  performed  by  the  motor  car,  which  has 
toured  the  Midland  counties  and  attended  at  the  Eoyal  Agricultural  Show  held  at 
Lincoln.  In  addition,  three  wagons,  supplied  by  the  department,  were  placed  on  the 
road  the  early  part  of  the  year—  one  in  North  Wales,  one  in  the  north  of  Ireland  and 
one  in  the  Highlands — reaching  districts  not  possible  to  cover  by  motor  car. 

Owing  to  the  financial  depression  which  existed  in  other  parts  of  the  world,  and 
reflected  injuriously  upon  Canadian  commerce  and  enterprise  during  the  latter  part 
of  1907,  the  department  wisely  directed  the  issue  of  the  following  circular: — 

'  Sir, — I  am  advised  by  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration  for  Canada  that  the 
demand  for  labour  of  all  kinds  in  the  Dominion  is  over  for  the  present  season,  and  I 
am  directed  to  ask  you  to  strongly  advise  all  persons  looking  for  employment  in  Can- 
ada not  to  sail  earlier  than  April  next,  and  then  only  if  they  have  employment  assured 
or  have  sufficient  cash  to  keep  them  until  they  secure  employment. 

'  I  shall  be  greatly  obliged  if  you  will  take  immediate  steps  to  convey  this 
announcement  to  prospective  emigrants. 

'  Your  obedient  servant, 

'J.  BKTJCE  WALKER. 

'  December  4,  1907.' 

So  well  has  the  circular  done  its  work  that  the  returns  show  a  marked  decrease 
in  the  number  of  arrivals  in  Canada  for  this  3ide  of  the  Atlantic  ocean  for  the  first 
three  months  of  the  present  calendar  year,  and  if  that  regulation  has  in  other  respects 
detracted  somewhat  from  the  flow  of  emigrants  Canadawards,  there  has  appeared  no 
criticism  whatever  regarding  the  wisdom  of  this  action  of  the  department,  which 
doubtless  prevented  some  going  to  the  Dominion  who  would  have  suffered  through 
lack  of  employment  or  sufficient  means  to  live  upon. 

The  regulations  lately  adopted  with  respect  to  emigrants  receiving  financial 
assistance  through  philanthropic  societies  or  public  funds  have  been  received  with 
somewhat  mixed  feelings  on  the  part  of  those  interested,  but  I  am  pleased  to  note 
that  the  more  the  regulations  become  understood  even  those  who  were  inclined  at  first 
to  consider  them  unnecessary  and  harsh  are  rapidly  coming  to  one  point  of  agree- 
ment, viz..  (hat  it  is  better  from  the  intending  emigrant's  standpoint  alone  that  he 
should  be  subject  to  such  inspection  and  approval  before  going. 

It  is  hoped  that  still  greater  care  will  be  exercised  by  booking  agents,  and  the 
result  of  the  restrictions  intended  only  to  prevent  undesirables  from  going  to  Canada, 
will  have  the  effect  of  still  further  reducing  the  percentage  of  deported  persons.  Not 
only  is  it  inadvisable  to  have  any  one  returned  from  Canada  as  being  inefficient  or 
incapable,  but  the  placing  of  such  deports  in  the  hands  of  their  friends  or  local 
authorities  in  the  United  Kingdom  has  entailed  a  very  large  amount  of  labour  upon 
the  officers  of  this  branch,  as  obviously  many  of  the  cases  returned  are  not  willingly 
received  by  their  relations,  friends  or  local  authorities. 

I  am  pleased  that  the  records  and  inspections  will  show  that  the  minister's  in- 
structions to  secure  quality  rather  than  quantity  have  been  successfully  carried  out, 
and  while  taking  some  credit  for  this  condition  of  affairs  to  this  branch  of  the  public 
service,  I  cannot  lose  sight  of  the  fact  that  the  great  attraction  is  the  wonderful 
resources  and  development  of  Canada,  and  it  is  not  necessary  to  do  aught  than  state 
the  exact,  truth  concerning  the  possibilities  of  the  Dominion. 

It  is  gratifying  to  all  our  agents  to  have  visits  from  a  largely  increased  number 
of  persons  who  emigrated  to  Canada  years  ago,  and  having  attained  a  fair  amount 
of  success  are  visiting  the  old  land  and  their  friends  therein.  All  such,  whether 
willing  or  not  (because  of  the  active  demands  for  information  at  some  time  during 
their  stay  here),  become  volunteer  lecturers  and  emigration  agents  for  Canada.  Added 
to  jthis  has  been  the  active  desire  of  this  branch  to  co-operate  with  the  officials  in 
Canada  so  that  those  going  there  may  be  able  to  send  back  favourable  reports,  thus 
widening  the  policy  that,  an  emigration  induced  by  those  already  in  Canada  is  even 
better  than  the  emigration  which  may  be  stimulated  on  this  side. 


70  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

The  stringent  regulations  under  which  the  houus  is  paid  to  booking  agents  on 
certain  classes  of  emigrants  have,  in  my  opinion,  worked  successfully  thus  far,  being 
an  intimation,  in  the  first  place,  that  none  but  the  best  will  be  accepted,  and,  secondly, 
an  encouragement  to  the  booking  agent  to  select  from  those  leaving  the  old  country 
those  most  desirable  for  Canada,  and  who  might  by  some  persuasion  on  his  part  be 
induced  to  go  to  Canada. 

Considering  there  are  several  thousand  booking  agents  on  the  bonus-earning  list 
it  is  believed  the  bonus  granted  is  a  factor  in  good  selection.  Reports  on  nearly  all 
booking  agents  throughout  the  United  Kingdom  have  already  been  placed  on  file 
with  the  department  at  Ottawa. 

During  the  year  the  minister  decided  to  extend  the  bonus  arrangements  to  cer- 
tain selected  continental  booking  agents,  but  owing  to  the  existence  of  anti-emigration 
laws  in  some  of  those  countries  the  department  have  not  been  called  upon  to  pay  out 
much  of  the  public  funds  for  bonuses  on  the  continent. 

It  was  felt  by  some  that  the  Small  Holdings  Act,  passed  by  the  Imperial  parlia- 
ment, would  be  a  grave  factor  against  the  emigration  of  farmers  and  other  agricul- 
turists to  Canada,  but  on  going  into  the  provisions  of  the  Act,  which  in  the  main 
provide  that  certain  small  holdings  may  be  secured  by  local  authorities,  and  there- 
after rented,  I  am  of  opinion  thai  a  persistent  advertisement  of  the  fact  that  Canada 
offers  160  acres  of  free  land  must  eventually  prove  a  greater  attraction  than  the  possi- 
bility of  renting  land  under  the  Small  Holdings  Act,  and  I  would  respectfully  recom- 
mend that  consideration  be  given  to  this  suggestion. 

While  it  is  true  that  somewhat  undue  prominence  has  been  given  to  letters  dero- 
gatory to  Canada,  which  in  some  cases  have  been  published  without  regard  to  the  bona 
fides  of  the  writer,  I  am  pleased  to  say  that  the  press  of  the  United  Kingdom  has 
shown  a  willingness  to  publish  our  side  of  the  story,  and  we  have  not  been  slow  to  take 
advantage  of  this  favour.  Canada  is  not  the  unknown  quantity  and  the  far-off  land 
which  some  years  ago  was  known  to  so  few  on  this  side,  and  the  desire  of  the  British 
public  to  know  more  about  the  Dominion  has  enabled  us  to  secure  the  insertion  of  a 
large  number  of  readable  news  items  and  paragraphs,  which  are  prepared  under  the 
authority  of  this  branch.  I  consider  the  insertion  of  news  items  of  this  kind  amply 
repays  the  expense  of  their  preparation. 

Recently  the  department  at  Ottawa  has  arranged  to  furnish  from  time  to  time 
letters  from  successful  settlers  in  Canada,  and  these  are  exhibited  in  suitable  frames 
in  all  our  agency  windows. 

Necessarily  the  cultivation  of  the  demand  for  information  regarding  Canada 
brings  with  it  an  increased  number  of  requests  for  literature,  and  I  beg  strongly  to 
(recommend  (that  this  office  be  furnished  with  a  very  much  larger  supply  than  has 
ever  been  provided  before.  The  people  like  readable  facts  and  maps,  and  nothing- 
could  exceed  the  value  of  the  atlas  and  geography  which  the  department  has  published 
during  the  last  year.  In  this  connection  I  would  strongly  recommend  the  issue  of  some 
literature  in  the  Welsh  language.  There  is,  I  believe,  a  field  to  be  worked  in  Wales 
which  should  produce  a  number  of  extremely  desirable  agriculturists,  but  many  of 
them  prefer  to  disregard  any  literature  as  being  of  doubtful  origin  unless  it  appears 
in  their  native  tongue. 

In  the  Liverpool  district  and  Aberdeen  district  some  25,000  copies  of  the  geo- 
graphy, prepared  by  the  minister,  have  been  distributed  to  school  children,  the  method 
being  to  require  the  individual  scholar  to  ask  for  it,  and  not  to  send  a  supply  in  bulk 
to  the  schools.  In  addition,  the  distribution  of  the  wall  map  of  Canada  to  schools  had 
continued,  and  I  can  conceive  of  no  better  value  for  the  expenditure  of  public  funds 
than  would  be  received  by  getting  these  geographies  in  the  homes  of  the  school  children 
in  the  United  Kingdom  and  on  the  continent. 

A  very  large  quantity  of  such  geographies  will  be  required  for  the  Franco-British 
exhibition,  opening  in  the  city  of  London  in  the  month  of  May  this  year,  and  for  the 


ii  IMMIGRATION  71 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Edinburgh  exhibition  a  few  weeks  later.  It  is,  therefore,  extremely  desirable  that  an 
immediate  and  very  large  supply  of  literature  of  all  kinds  be  furnished  to  this  office. 

It  is  quite  plain  that  the  Dublin  exhibition  of  1907,  together  with  the  re-arrange- 
ment of  our  offices  in  Belfast  and  Dublin  have  resulted  in  a  large  increase  in  emigra- 
tion from  Ireland,  but  the  movement  is  even  now  easily  intercepted  by  the  many 
friends  living  in  the  United  States  and  elsewhere,  who  seek  to  draw  their  relations 
to  them  instead  of  to  Canada,  and  the  restriction  requiring  $25  to  be  in  possession  of 
each  emigrant  is  actually  being  used  by  some  of  the  bankers  in  Ireland  as  a  reason 
for  their  statement  that  Canada  is  short  of  money. 

I  am  pleased  to  record  the  great  efficiency  and  labour  expended  by  the  various 
emigration  agents,  and  the  transaction  of  their  duties  during  the  past  fiscal  year. 
Great  activity,  considerable  tact,  business  ability,  and  human  kindness  are  daily  re- 
quired of  them.  The  correspondence  received  and  sent  out  by  each  agent  has  largely 
increased,  and  the  distribution  of  literature  would  be  greater  still  if  their  supply  had 
be?n  equal  to  their  demands.  They  are  obliged  to  be  constantly  on  the  watch  for 
undesirables,  and  unofficial  and  unworthy  agents  who  may  by  faulty  information  send 
emigrants  to  Canada  who  are  not  up  to  the  required  standard. 

Our  agents  attend  the  weekly  markets  and  country  fairs  for  the  purpose  of  dis- 
tributing literature  and  giving  information,  and  at  agricultural  shows  where  we  are 
not  able  to  put  up  a  regular  exhibit  they  provide  a  large  exhibition  stand,  containing 
samples  of  the  products  of  Canada,  and  by  personal  attendance  seek  in  every  way 
to  aid  the  business  of  this  department.  Not  a  small  portion  of  their  work  is  the  care- 
ful and  periodical  inspection  of  all  the  booking  agents,  numbering  about  400  in  each 
such  district,  and  seeking  such  joint  action  with  the  booking  agents  as  would  be 
creditable  to  all  concerned. 

At  London,  Liverpool  and  Glasgow,  the  inspection  of  all  out-going  emigrant 
steamers  by  our  respective  agents  at  those  ports  has  continued,  and  a  report  on  each 
such  steamer  has  been  forwarded  to  the  department  at  OttawTa. 

Some  idea  can  be  secured  from  the  above  regarding  the  extent  of  the  ramifications 
of  the  business-seeking  propaganda  of  this  office,  but  it  will  be  our  ambition  to  still 
further  extend  it  during  the  coming  years,  and  reach  out  to.  the  smaller  country 
villages  by  means  of  correspondents,  advertisements,  lecturers  and  the  visits  from  our 
motor  cars  and  exhibition  wagons. 

The  policy  of  sending  farmer  delegates  (who  have  been  more  or  less  successful 
in  their  operations  in  Canada)  to  give  lectures  and  verbal  information  jto  persons 
contemplating  emigrating  has  been  continued  with  marked  success,  and  all  the  prov- 
inces of  the  Dominion  have  been  personally  represented  by  the  twenty-one  delegates 
sent  to  the  United  Kingdom,  and  some  par£s  of  the  continent. 

Nothing  can  exceed  the  value  of  the  experiences  related  by  these  men  to  people 
of  their  own  class  in  person,  and  obviously  they  are  able  to  answer  many  practical 
questions  which  only  those  engaged  for  years  in  up-to-date  agricultural  methods  can 
possibly  give  a  reply  to.  Therefore.  I  have  no  hesitation  in  respectfully  recommend- 
ing the  continuance  and  enlargement  of  that  portion  of  our  propaganda. 

This  branch  of  the  department  has  kept  in  close  touch  with  the  Imperial  govern- 
ment emigrants'  information  office  and  the  board  of  trade,  the  latjter  department  con- 
trolling the  issuing  of  licenses  to  booking  agents,  and  one  license  was  cancelled  because 
the  agent  concerned  did  not  properly  carry  out  the  instructions  received  from  the 
department. 

The  whole  of  ,,the  United  Kingdom  has  been  divided  into  districts  covering  a 
number  of  counties,  and  each  district  is  in  charge  of  a  regular  agent  and  office  staff. 

The  London  district  consists  of  fifteen  counties,  forming  a  compact  area  lying 
around  the  metropolis,  which  itself  occupies  a  most  central  position  in  that  arm.  It 
includes  Norfolk,  Suffolk,  E^sex,  Cambridge,  Middlesex.  Kent.  Surrey.  Bedford.  Hert- 
ford. Buckinghamshire,  Oxford-hire,  Berkshire,  Hampshire.  Sussex  and  the  Channel 


72  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  U 

8-9  EDWARD  VII..  A.    1909 

Islands,  and  is  attended  to  by  this  office  in  addition  to  the  general  work  of  supervising 
all  the  other  districts. 

In  this  connection  some  of  the  London  staff  make  periodical  visits  to  steamship 
agents,  and  we  have  numerous  calls  from  booking  agents  at  the  London  office. 

The  good-will  of  the  local  press  has  been  cultivated  as  far  as  possible,  and  will 
continue  to  receive  attention.  It  must  be  admitted  that  the  sum  of  these  influences 
is  a  factor  of  great  value  when  adopting  means  to  an  end,  and  I  gladly  acknowledge 
the  service  these  features  have  been  in  securing  the  best  results  from  the  work  of 
Canadian  lectures  and  farmer  delegates. 

During  the  past  year  thirty-five  lectures,  with  lantern  slides,  were  delivered  in 
the  London  district,  outside  the  metropolitan  area.  The  meetings  were  excellently 
well  attended,  were  all  reported  in  the  local  press,  and  served  to  allay  any  fears  as 
to  the  agricultural  outlook  for  those  who  intend  to  settle  on  the  land,  or  otherwise, 
in  Canada. 

Four  farm  delegates  made  a  tour  of  the  fifteen  counties  in  the  district,  and 
where  the  number  of  callers  upon  them  was  less  than  in  former  years,  notices  of  the 
delegates'  views  appeared  in  the  locals  press. 

Between  35,000  and  40,000  persons  visited  the  London  office,  making  personal 
inquiry,  and  nearly  three-quarters  of  a  million  stopped  to  inspect  the  window  display 
here. 

Participation  in  agricultural  shows,  cattle  fairs,  horticultural  meetings,  &c,  was 
resumed  on  an  extended  scale,  and  an  increased  interest  in  Canada's  resources  was 
evident.  Exhibits  of  Canadian  produce  have  been  placed  with  a  large  number  of 
selected  country  booking  agents  in  the  district. 

I  wish  to  bear  testimony  to  the  excellent  results  which  have  been  manifested 
through  the  employment  agent  system  in  Canada,  which  was  put  in  force  by  the 
department  last  year.  This  has  been  of  great  assistance  to  booking  agents  throughout 
the  country,  and  has  enabled  them  in  many  cases  to  direct  their  passengers  to  actual 
employment  beyond  the  port  of  landing.  The  system  has  worked  well  from  this  end, 
and  has  been  highly  appreciated  by  all  the  agencies  concerned. 

The  British  Columbia  government  has  maintained  fruit  experts  in  England 
during  the  past  winter  for  lecturing  purposes,  with  marked  benefit  to  that  province. 

Consideration  should  be  given  to  the  fact  that  Australia  is  now  definitely  in  the 
field  here  for  securing  desirable  British  emigrants,  and  already  their  advertisements 
are  appearing  in  the  public  press,  offering,  in  certain  cases,  assisted  passages. 

Appreciation  and  cordial  thanks  are  tendered  to  the  officers  of  the  steamship  and 
railway  transportation  companies  for  their  unfailing  efforts  to  comply  with  every 
regulation  from  time  to  time  issued,  and  their  evident  desire  to  consider  that  all  such 
regulations  are  intended  for  the  permanent  good  of  Canada.  I  have  assured  them 
that  they  can  depend  upon  the  hearty  sympathy  of  this  department  in  their  work  of 
transporting  passengers  to  the  Dominion. 

J.  OBED  SMITH, 
Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  73 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


No.  3. 

REPORT  OF  MR.  A.  F.  JURY. 

Old  Castle  Buildings,  Preeson's  Row, 

Liverpool,  April  9,  1908. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq., 

Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration, 

11  and  12  Charing  Cross,  London,  S.W. 

Sir, — The  past  year  has  been  one  of  great  activity  in  the  movement  of  popula- 
tion from  this  country  to  Canada.  Persons  connected  with  emigration  work  un- 
officially have  vied  with  each  other  in  securing  the  greatest  number  of  people  to  go  to 
Canada.  This  has  not  always  been  done  with  a  due  regard  to  quality,  but  rather  from 
the  superficial  business  idea  of  quantity,  which  in  a  short  time  was  bound  to  bring 
about  its  own  downfall  by  unduly  augmenting  the  city  and  town  population  out  of  all 
proportion  to  the  rural.  This  state  of  things  is  accountable  for  the  unprecedented 
number  of  letters  that  have  appeared  in  the  British  press  during  the  past  winter, 
describing  the  hardships  of  the  unemployed  in  the  industrial  centres  of  Canada.  I  have 
never  lent  countenance  to  this  kind  of  propaganda,  because  I  felt  it  was  both  bad 
business  and  unnecessary ;  bad  business  because  it  was  sure  to  be  the  cause  of  numbers 
going  to  Canada  who  were  totally  unfit  for  pioneer  life,  and  to  one  whose  connection 
with  Canada  extends  over  a  period  of  thirty-five  years,  it  was  quite  apparent  what 
the  result  must  be;  and  unnecessary  because  my  experience  has  taught  me  that  just 
as  many  of  the  right  sort  can  be  got  by  right  methods  as  wrong  ones  by  wrong  methods, 
and  I  can  point  with  some  degree  of  pride  to  the  comparatively  small  number  of  un- 
desirables that  have  been  deported  from  Canada  who  have  gone  out  from  this  district, 
and  if  the  other  agents  that  are  working  in  emigration  in  this  country  can  be  made 
to  confine  their  efforts  along  the  same  line  as  the  government  agents,  a  recurrence  of 
the  present  congested  state  of  the  labour  market  in  the  centres  of  population  and  its 
consequent  burden  upon  the  authorities  and  charitably  disposed  people  of  Canada 
will  be  prevented  in  future. 

The  lantern  slides  contained  in  the  sets  that  are  in  use  at  this  office,  for  loaning 
out  to  people  lecturing  on  Canada,  are  in  most  cases  very  old  and  in  some  cases  not 
of  the  best  quality,  and  complaint  is  often  made  by  those  using  them  that  they  are  the 
same  scenes  year  after  year.  If  some  new  and  more  artistic  slides  could  be  made  and 
sent  over  for  the  ensuing  lecture  season,  it  would  meet  a  long  felt  want  among  those 
who  are  continually  using  them. 

Last  summer  and  fall  the  wagon  work  under  the  charge  of  Mr.  Morris,  in  North 
Wales,  created  a  large  amount  of  interest  and,  I  believe,  will  produce  good  results, 
but  the  benefit  derived  from  such  work  can  never  be  fully  achieved  until  we  have  some 
emigration  literature  printed  in  the  Welsh  language.  The  most  desirable  people  wp 
are  able  to  secure  in  Wales  for  ( 'anada  are  the  struggling  tenant  farmer,  the  agricul- 
tural laborer,  and  the  domestic  servant.  Among  these  classes  there  are  large  numbers 
who  can  speak  and  read  Welsh  much  better  than  they  can  English,  and  would  be  more 
likely  to  understand  anything  written  in  their  own  than  in  foreign  language.  I  regard 
the  rural  Welshman  as  a  most  desirable  emigrant;  as  a  class  they  are  industrious, 
sober,  thrifty,  ambitious  and  law  abiding.  They  are  accustomed  to  rural  life,  have 
been  used  to  hard  work,  and  are  among  the  best  type  of  settlers  that  could  be  obtained 
for  Canada,  but  I  do  not  think  a  propaganda  in  Wales  will  ever  have  a  fair  chance 
of  obtaining  the  best  results  until  we  have  a  pamphlet  printed  in  the  Welsh  language. 


74  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  II 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

We  have  had  the  annual  visit  of  the  farmer  delegates  from  Canada,  but  their 
success  has  not  been  as  great  as  in  former  years.  Steamship  agents  do  not  seem  :w 
anxious  to  obtain  their  services  as  formerly,  on  account  of  the  bad  reports  that  have 
reached  this  country  about  Canada,  and  the  more  stringent  regulations  imposed  upon 
emigrants  by  the  department,  which  they  felt  would  prevent  them  getting  the  number 
of  passengers  that  would  warrant  them  in  spending  money  advertising  the  attendance 
of  the  delegates  at  their  respective  offices.  Some  of  the  delegates  arrived  here  too 
late  in  the  season  to  be  of  much  use,  and  I  would  suggest  that  any  future  delegates 
coming  here  should  arrive  about  the  end  of  the  old  or  the  beginning  of  the  new  year. 

All  indications  point  to  an  ebb  in  the  tide  of  commercial  prosperity  enjoyed  by 
this  country  during  the  past  few  years;  this  will  naturally  be  followed  by  a  larger 
amount  of  unemployment  in  most  industrial  centres,  which  will  cause  those  out  of 
employment  to  be  looking  for  opportunities  to  sell  their  labour  outside  the  British 
Isles,  and  many  will  look  Canadawards.  A  large  number  of  those  employed  in  the 
various  industries  or  contingent  employments,  such  as  carters,  ftc.,  have  had  some 
experience  of  farming,  and  if  properly  selected  and  advised,  would  make  most  estima- 
ble settlers  for  Canada.  Some  way  could  and  should  be  found  of  admitting  into 
Canada  such  men,  even  though  they  may  not  possess  five  pounds,  in  addition  to  their 
inland  railway  fare,  as  they  would  help  to  supply  the  real  want  that  exists  of  assist- 
ance on  the  farms. 

The  work  of  this  office  in  connection  with  deports  has  increased  enormously  during 
the  past  year,  and  now  forms  one  of  the  heaviest  branches  of  the  business  here. 

Letters  received  during  the  year .   .  .   .  .     8,945 

Letters  sent  during  the  year 9,150 

No.  of  callers  in  person  at  this  office 4,512 

Your  obedient  servant, 

A.  F.  JURY, 

Canadian  Government  Agent. 


No.  4. 

REPORT  OF  MR.  G.  H.    MITCHELL. 

139  Corporation  Street, 

Birmingham,  March  31,  1908. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq., 

Assistant    Superintendent  of  Emigration, 
London. 

Sir. — I  beg  to  submit  my  report  for  the  year  1907-8. 

Having  been  at  the  present  address  just  over  twelve  months  it  is  possible  to  com- 
pare the  advantages  obtained  by  the  removal  from  a  second  floor  office  in  a  side  street 
to  ground  floor  premises  with  a  shop  front  on  the  principal  thoroughfare,  with  a 
window  made  attractive  by  a  display  of  grains,  grasses,  fruit,  pictures  and  trans- 
parencies of  Canadian  views ;  the  result  has  been  quite  five  times  the  number  of 
callers  for  literature  and  personal  interviews.  My  correspondence  has  also  been  con- 
siderably larger  than  during  the  previous  twelve  months,  owing  no  doubt  to  the 
greater  general  emigration  movement. 

The  shipping  agents  in  my  district  had  Ihcir  full  share  in  the  record  season  ex> 
perienced  last  year,  and  any  suggestions  that  had  to  be  made  to  them  were  cordially 
adopted.    It  was  of  course  made  very  clear  to  them  that  outside  the  capitalist  classes 


ii  IMMIGRATION  75 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

the  only  emigration  encouraged  by  the  department  was  that  of  men  able  and  willing 
to  take  up  agricultural  or  railway  construction  work  and  female  domestic  servants, 
and  in  regard  to  the  latter  it  is  worthy  of  mention  that  a  decided  increase  has  taken 
place  in  the  number  of  inquiries  from  young  women. 

The  season  which  has  just  opened  of  course  does  not  promise  as  well,  the  combina- 
tion of  circumstances  existing  in  Canada,  the  warning  notices  published  by  the  de- 
partment, and  the  restrictions  imposed,  having  had  a  deterrent  effect  as  regards  num- 
bers, although  the  average  quality  will  be  still  further  improved,  and  in  this  connection 
it  may  be  noted  how  large  is  the  demand  for  second-class  accommodation  on  the 
steamers. 

Another  temporary  adverse  influence  will  be  the  Small  Holdings  Act,  which 
enables  county  councils  to  acquire  land  to  be  rented  to  men  desiring  to  cultivate  50 
acres  or  less.  The  Board  of  Agriculture  has  taken  exceptional  steps  to  make  the 
provisions  of  this  Act  known  among  farm  laborers,  meetings  having  been  addressed 
all  over  the  country  by  officers  of  the  department ;  the  consequence  has  been  that  in 
the  aggregate  many  thousands  of  acres  have  been  applied  for  by  the  very  men  wanted 
in  the  Dominion,  and  many  of  whom  doubtless  would  have  attempted  by  emigration 
to  satisfy  their  land-hunger  and  improve  their  position.  But  in  my  opinion  the 
quantity  of  land  they  can  rent  (the  Act  does  not  contemplate  ownership),  will  stimu- 
late their  ambition  to  assume  larger  responsibilities,  and  the  future  will  see  them  or 
their  families  emigrating,  and  better  fitted  both  pecuniarily  and  in  character,  for  the 
change. 

My  time  has  been  fully  employed  on  much  the  same  lines  as  in  former  years;  in 
addition  to  office  duties,  attending  and  exhibiting  at  agricultural  shows,  visiting  ship- 
ping agents,  supplying  them  with  printed  matter,  making  suggestions  as  to  their  work, 
and  furnishing  them  with  information  on  current  Canadian  topics  which  should  assist 
them  to  satisfy  inquirers,  arranging  for  lectures,  for  itineraries  for  delegates  from 
Canada,  for  the  motor  exhibition  car,  and  maintaining  an  oversight  in  regard  to  many 
other  things  to  which  attention  is  necessary. 

During  the  year  the  office  has  been  visited  by  the  Deputy  Minister,  Mr.  W.  W. 
Cory;  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration,  Mr.  W.  D.  Scott;  and  the  Assistant  Super- 
intendent o*  Emigration,  Mr.  J.  Obed  Smith,  besides  many  Canadians  who  were 
visiting  relatives  and  friends  in  the  district.  A  total  of  3,965  persons  visited  this 
office.     We  sent  4.207  and  received  3,803  communications. 

Tour  obedient  servant, 

G.  II.  MITCHELL, 


No.  5. 
REPOET  OF  ME.  L.  BUENETT. 

16  Parliament  Street, 

York,  March  31,  190S. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq., 

Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration, 

London. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  to  you  my  annual  report  for  the  year  ending 
March  31,  1908. 

As  you  are  already  aware  this  office  has  only  been  open  a  little  over  one  year, 
fnJ  during  that  period  my  time  ha?  been  actively  employed  in  the  interest  of  Canada, 
and  I  have  no  hesitation  in  saying  with  satisfactory  results. 


76  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

I  attend  the  weekly  markets  and  monthly  fairs  in  York  and  the  surrounding 
towns,  which  are  always  well  attended  hy  farmers  and  men  of  the  agricultural  cla-s. 
There  is  plenty  of  scope  for  me  at  such  assemblies  as  those  to  instil  into  the  minds 
of  these  people  the  advantages  of  emigration,  and  to  point  out  to  them  what  chances 
there  are  in  Canada  for  a  successful  career. 

The  two  sets  of  slides  which  I  have  I  find  very  useful  to  me  in  my  lecture  work, 
and  when  not  in  use  by  myself  I  always  have  plenty  of  applications  for  them  from 
people  who  have  visited  Canada,  and  who  were  so  favourably  impressed  that  they 
desired  to  give  a  course  of  lectures  in  the  neighbourhood  in  which  they  live. 

I  have  a  great  many  applications  from  children  and  school  teachers  for  literature 
for  school  use,  and  whenever  possible  I  comply  with  their  requests,  thereby  getting 
the  parents  and  brothers  and  sisters  interested  in  Canada. 

During  the  winter  I  have  had  some  very  interesting  conversations  with  young 
men  who  went  out  to  Canada  two  years  ago,  and  came  over  here  for  a  holiday.  They 
speak  in  the  highest  terms  of  Canada,  and  have  induced  others  to  return  with  them. 

The  unfavourable  reports  from  Canada  during  the  last  few  months  have  had  the 
effect  of  checking  emigration  to  a  certain  extent,  but  I  am  under  the  impression  that 
it  will  be  a  good  thing  for  Canada,  as  there  were  some  emigrating  who  were  no  good 
to  this  country,  and  never  will  be  to  any  country,  and  I  am  satisfied  that  it  will  be 
to  the  interest  of  Canada  for  me  to  continue  to  send  'quality'  instead  of  'quantity.' 
The  longer  I  am  engaged  in  emigration  work  the  more  I  am  impressed  with  the  fac( 
that  it  behooves  those  of  us  who  arc  soliciting  men  and  women  for  that  country  that 
the  best  are  none  too  good,  and  undesirables  are  not  needed  at  all. 

Tour  obedient  servant, 

L.  BURNETT. 


No.  6. 

REPORT  OF  MR.  M.  McINTYRE. 

33  and  37  St.  Enoch  Square, 

Glasgow,  March  31,  1908. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq., 

A—istant  Superintendent  of  Emigration, 

11  and  12  Charing  Cross, 
London,  S.W. 
Sir, — In  submitting  my  report  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1908,  it  is  possible 
for  me  to  make  reference  only  to  the  months  from,  and  including,  September,  1907, 
to  March  31,  1908,  that  being  the  period  during  which  I  have  been  in  charge  of  the 
district  in  Scotland  operated  from  the  Glasgow  office. 

During  that  period  of  time,  the  number  of  emigrants  leaving  this  district  for 
Canada  has  been  smaller  than  for  the  same  period  the  previous  year.  This  is  due  to 
:.  combination  of  circumstances.  The  general  financial  depression  throughout  the 
United  States  having  to  a  certain  degree  affected  Canada — and  in  fact,  the  British 
Isles  as  well — Scotch  '  canniness'  took  possession  of  the  people,  and  they  became  very 
backward  in  the  matter  of  emigration.  Following  this  came  newspaper  reports  grossly 
exaggerating  the  condition  of  the  unemployed  in  Canada.  The  government's  warning 
to  emigrants  not  to  proceed  to  Canada  until  spring  has  had  the  desired  effect  of 
keeping  out  numbers  of  undesirables,  and  of  course,  which  was  unavoidable,  somei 
irables  have  also  held  back.  While  the  numbers  have  been  reduced,  it  i-  gratifying 
to  note  that  those  going  have  been  of  ;i  most  superior  class,  the  latest  sailings  -bowing 
a  fair  increase  in  numbers. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  77 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

One  policy  of  the  government  to  be  highly  commended,  is  that  of  sending  farmer 
delegates  to  this  country,  to  meet  the  agricultural  classes  and  give  information  regard- 
ing Canada,  giving  their  own  experience  as  examples  of  how  one  can  succeed,  if  a 
willing  worker. 

Another  source  of  bringing  Canada  before  the  people,  which  is  very  much  appre- 
ciated, is  the  use  of  lantern  views  of  the  country.  I  find  that  a  number  of  persons 
having  the  welfare  of  Canada  at  heart,  enjoy  exhibiting  these  views  and  lecturing  to 
different  organizations  throughout  the  district.  I  myself  have  used  them  on  a  num- 
ber of  occasions  when  talking  to  an  audience  in  an  endeavour  to  place  Canada  in  its 
proper  light. 

While  the  numbers  for  the  year  may  not  be  all  one  would  wish,  still,  as  a  whole, 
I  believe  the  quality  will  be  most  satisfactory. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

M.  McINTYRE, 

Canadian  Government  Agent. 


No.  7. 

REPORT  OF  MR.  JOIIX  McLENNAN. 

Canadian  Government  Office, 

26  Guild  Street, 

Aberdeen,  March,  31,  190S. 
The  Assistant   Superintendent   of  Emigration, 
11  and  12  Charing  Cross, 
London. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  report  of  the  Aberdeen  office  for  the  year 
ending  March  31,  190S. 

Although  I  have  not  personally  the  advantage  of  comparing  the  work  of  the  past 
year  with  those  preceding  it,  the  office  having  been  opened  only  two  months  last  year, 
yet  I  have  the  assurance  from  every  source,  that  it  has  been  the  most  successful  in 
the  history  of  Canadian  emigration  from  the  north  of  Scotland.  In  addition  to  the 
office  duties,  I  have  visited  during  the  year  nearly  every  booking  agent  in  my  terri- 
iory,  and  conferred  with  them  and  others  interested  in  our  work.  I  have  also  delivered 
a  large  number  of  lectures,  part  of  them  illustrated  by  lantern  slides.  To  avoid  dis- 
appointment hereafter,  I  think  it  is  only  fair  to  say  that  in  my  judgment  we  have 
reached  high  water  mark  as  far  as  it  relates  to  farm  labourers,  especially  that  of  skilled 
and  experienced  labour.  The  area  of  cultivated  land  in  the  district  is  very  limited, 
hence  the  number  of  people  required  for  the  ordinary  farm  work  is  limited.  The  last 
three  or  four  years  have  made  a  heavy  drain  upon  this  class,  and  in  sections  where 
there  was  a  surplus  of  men  a  few  years  ago,  there  is  now  a  scarcity  and  wages  steadily 
increasing.  To  such  an  extent  is  this  true  that  the  farmer  has  become  an  active  agent 
against  our  work  in  the  best  localities,  and  they  have  used  the  many  conflicting1 
reports  of  the  past  four  months  very  effectively  to  pursuade  men  not  to  leave. 

While  a  certain  surplus  will  always  be  available,  yet  I  think  the  maximum  has 
been  reached.  Besides,  we  are  now  confronted  on  every  hand  with  the  active  assisted 
emigration  policy  of  the  Australian,  States  and  Dominion  of  New  Zealand.  The 
almost  uniform  success  of  those  who  have  gone  to  Canada,  has  endeared  the  country 
to  the  friends  at  home,  and  we  have  a  warm  greeting  everywhere  and  in  every  place, 
except  from  those  who  for  selfish  purposes  would  have  labour  a  drug  on  the  market. 


78  DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  II 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Although  the  field  for  skilled  agriculturists  is  limited  there  is  still  a  large  number  to 
be  reached  among  the  crofters  in  the  highlands.  These  people,  inured  to  hardships 
and  living  in  poverty,  although  entirely  ignorant  of  farming  as  it  is  conducted  in 
Canada,  make  excellent  settlers,  and  the  want  of  means  to  take  them  out  is  the  only 
thing  that  prevents  thousands  of  them  from  going.  We  may  look  for  a  liberal  supply 
from  this  section  to  continue  yearly  as  they  acquire  the  means  to  leave. 

Tour  obedient  servant, 

JOHN  McLENNAN,. 

Canadian  Government  Agent. 


No.  8. 

REPORT  OF  MR,  JOHN  WEBSTER. 

17  and  19  Victoria  Street, 

Belfast,  March  31,  1908. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq., 

Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration, 
London. 

Sir, — I  beg  to  submit  report  of  my  work  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

The  spring  of  1907  was  a  record  one  as  regards  emigration  from  Scotland  to  the 
Dominion,  and  the  ships  which  left  the  Clyde  were  usually  filled  up  at  least  a  month 
previous  to  date  of  sailing.  Some  of  the  steamship  agents  expressed  themselves  to 
me  that  '  the  difficulty  lay  not  so  much  in  finding  emigrants  as  in  securing  accommo- 
dation for  them.'  Indeed,  large  numbers  had  to  postpone  their  departure  for  weeks 
on  this  account. 

As  often  as  I  could  spare  the  time  I  travelled  on  the  ship  from  Glasgow  to 
Greenock,  and  thus  had  a  good  opportunity  of  going  round  and  advising  emigrants. 

The  steamship  companies  tell  me  that  the  second  cabin  accommodation  was  far 
more  in  demand  than  the  third,  which  is  an  evidence  regarding  the  respectable  class 
from  whom  the  emigrants  were  recruited. 

The  statistical  board  of  trade  return  shows  that  20,699  persons  left  Scotland  for 
Canada  during  five  months,  April  to  August,  as  against  13,413  for  similar  period  in 
1907. 

With  the  commencement  of  the  fine  weather  the  large  exhibition  wagon  was  put 
on  the  road,  and  was  for  a  considerable  time  in  charge  of  Mr.  Edgar,  and  later,  for 
several  weeks,  in  care  of  Mr.  McLaughlin  from  Prince  Edward  Island.  „ 

During  the  summer  I  visited  many  of  the  steamship  agents  in  my  district  Jfor 
the  purpose  of  posting  them  in  their  work,  seeing  that  they  were  supplied  with 
literature,  and  that  I  might,  in  accordance  with  instructions,  be  able  to  report  on 
them  to  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration  at  Ottawa.  An  occasional  visit  from  the 
government  agent  has  a  useful  effect  on  the  steamship  agents,  and  stimulates  them  to 
keep  Canada  well  to  the  front.  Where  an  agent  has  a  good  window  in  a  prominent 
position  I  was  glad  to  furnish  him  with  grasses  and  grains  for  exhibition.  Some  of 
the  agents  made  very  good  use  of  them. 

Towards  the  end  of  August  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration  instructed  me  to 
take  charge  of  the  work  in  the  North  of  Ireland,  in  the  room  of  Mr.  O'Kelly.  who  had 
been  appointed  to  thi  net*  office  about  being  opened  in  Dublin.  On  the  5th  September 
I  transferred  to  Belfast  and  spent  a  couple  of  days  with  Mr.  O'Kelly,  who  spared  jio 
pains  to  explain  everything  connected  with  the  working  of  the  office.  On  the  7th 
September  I  took  charge,  and  Mr.  O'Kelly  proceeded  to  Dublin. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  79 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

I  was  glad  to  find  the  office  established  in  a  good  central  position  and  in  c 
proximity  to  the  offices  of  the  prominent  steamship  agents.  Belfast  is  a  fine  city, 
and  a  splendid  centre  from  which  to  look  after  the  Canadian  interests  in  Ireland.  I 
am  pleased  to  discover  in  the  north  of  Ireland  an  amount  of  sympathy  with  Canada 
which  is  helpful  to  my  work.  The  attitude  of  some  of  the  papers  in  Belfast  has  been 
very  satisfactory.  I  would  specially  mention  the  '  Belfast  Evening  Telegraph,'  which 
has  been  publishing  most  favourable  illustrated  articles  depicting  farm  life  in  Canada. 
The  editor  is  one  of  the  journalists  who  last  year  visited  the  Dominion  at  the  invita- 
tion of  the  government  of  Canada. 

In  September,  1906,  the  Canadian  Bacific  Eailway  Company  arranged  for  a  fort- 
nightly service  of  their  ships  to  call  at  Belfast.  I  am  glad  to  say  this  experiment  has 
proved  a  distinct  success,  and  Belfast  and  Londonderry  are  now  the  principal  ports 
of  departure  for  north  of  Ireland  people.  On  Thursday,  March  26,  1908,  one  hundred 
and  thirty  emigrants  sailed  for  Canada  from  Belfast  by  SS.  '  Lake  Manitoba.' 

One  of  the  democrat  wagons,  with  grain  exhibit,  has  been  travelling  through 
Ireland  since  July  20,  in  charge  of  Mr.  Robinson.  I  kept  him  continuously  going 
during  the  open  season  until  December  21.  The  work  of  the  wagon  was  of  a  most 
useful  nature.  It  visited  almost  every  district,  village  and  town  in  the  counties  of 
Antrim,  Derry,  Tyrone,  Armagh,  Monaghan,  Fermanagh,  Down  and  a  small  portion 
of  Donegal.  As  far  as  possible  I  arranged  that  visits  to  towns  should  fit  in  with 
markets  and  fairs.  Mr.  Eobinson  had  thus  a  fine  opportunity  for  meeting  country 
people  and  distributing  literature.  I  would  recommend  that  this  work  should  be 
continued  when  the  season  opens  and  when  the  fine  weather  comes. 

During  last  winter  I  visited  a  large  number  of  the  steamship  agents  in  my  dis- 
trict, and  reported  on  some  who  had  not  already  been  reported  upon  by  Mr.  O'Kelly. 
There  is  no  question  but  that  the  liberal  bonus  paid  by  the  department  acts  as  a  great 
stimulant  to  the  steamship  agents  to  do  work  for  Canada. 

During  the  winter  there  has  been  a  fair  demand  for  the  use  of  our  lantern  slides 
for  lecturing  purposes. 

Three  Canadian  farmer  delegates,  Messrs.  Delgarno,  Bredin  and  Batterson,  were, 
this  spring,  placed  under  my  direction.  I  had  the  services  of  these  gentlemen  for 
about  two  weeks,  and  arranged  engagements  for  them  with  the  principal  steamship 
agents  in  my  district.  Their  presence  at  these  places  was  well  advertised,  so  I  trust 
their  work  may  show  good  results. 

There  were  3,637  letters  received,  4,405  were  sent  and  5,S55  persons  made  personal 
inquiry  at  thio  office. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

JOHN  WEBSTER, 
Canadian  Government  Agent. 


80  DEPAHTMEXT  OE  THE  IXTERIOIi  it 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


No.  9. 

REPOET  OF  ME.  IT.  M.  MURRAY. 

81  Queex  Street,  Exeter, 

March  31,  1908. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq., 

Assistant   Superintendent  of  Emigration, 
11-12  Charing  Cross,  London. 

Sib, — I  have  the  honour  to  report  on  the  work  of  this  office  for  the  year  ending 
March  31,  1908. 

The  removal  last  year  of  my  headquarters  from  Cardiff,  South  Wales,  to  this  city, 
has  been  a  most  satisfactory  change — a  change  which  enables  me  to  work  efficiently 
in  the  agricultural  centres  of  the  west  of  England,  and  at  the  same  time  to  reach 
South  Wales,  Hereford  and  Monmouth  within  a  few  hours. 

In  Devon,  Somerset  and  Hereford  we  have  the  right  sort  of  agriculturists — strong, 
strapping  and  healthy  fellows,  men  who  are  not  afraid  of  hard  work,  and  will  do,  and 
have  done,  well  in  Canada.  I  have  not  the  figures  before  me,  but  I  am  certain  that 
last  year's  emigration  from  my  district  exceeded  to  a  large  extent  that  of  any  previous 
year,  and  what  was  of  more  importance,  we  had  the  quality.  During  the  season  I 
was  frequently  present  at  Exeter  railway  station  when  batches  of  emigrants  were  pass- 
ing through  from  all  parts  of  the  west,  and  could  not  but  admire  the  generally  healthy 
appearance  and  capital  physique  of  the  emigrants.  I  am  glad  to  say  that  not  one  case 
of  non-success  has  been  reported  to  me.     This  is,  I  think,  highly  satisfactory. 

In  the  district  covered  by  this  office  there  are  placed  by  the  steamship  companies 
440  agents.  Some  of  these  men  are  capable  and  energetic  workers.  Others,  and 
many  of  them,  are  absolutely  useless,  both  from  their  social  standing  and  ability  for 
the  work.  Again,  in  some  small  county  villages,  there  are  very  often  placed  two  or 
three  agents  representing  the  same  lines  of  steamships,  the  result  being  that  one  will 
not  go  to  the  expense  of  advertising  in  case  it  might  benefit  his  opponent.  The  same 
thing  applies  to  several  large  towns  and  cities.  Cardiff,  for  instance,  has  eleven 
agents;  Swansea  and  neighbourhood  twelve.  Fewer  agents  but  a  better  class  of 
workers  would  in  many  cases  be  more  profitable  and  acceptable  if  the  steamship  com- 
panies could  be  brought  to  see  it. 

Devon,  Somerset  and  Gloucester  continue  to  show  the  best  results.  Wiltshire  ha9 
done  better  than  before.  Dorset  comes  along  slowly,  whilst  South  Wales  has  main- 
tained its  average.  Cornwall  produces  the  typical  navvy,  splendidly  suited  for  rail- 
way construction  work,  but  during  the  past  year  the  tin  mines  and  stone  quarries 
situated  in  this  county  have  been  fully  employed — in  fact,  many  mines  which  had 
been  closed  for  years  were  re-opened,  thus  lessening  the  possibilities  of  getting  any 
large  number  of  these  men  for  Canada. 

On  the  whole,  when  we  take  into  consideration  the  many  adverse  reports  regard- 
ing the  conditions  of  employment  in  Canada,  I  think  the  results  obtained  have  been 
satisfactory. 

Apart  from  the  usual  routine  of  office  work  I,  as  usual,  set  apart  several  days  of 
each  week  to  visiting  booking  agents,  so  as  to  observe  how  they  are  advertising  Canada, 
seeing  intending  settlers  at  their  offices  and  keeping  them  well  posted  as  to  Canadian 
affairs,  especially  in  regard  to  emigration,  pointing  out  the  prospects  for  agricultural 
settlers,  construction  men  and  female  domestics. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  81 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  bonus  of  one  pound  paid  by  the  department  to  booking  agents  on  the  special 
adult  classes  who  enter  Canada  for  farming  work,  railway  construction,  and  also  on 
female  domestics,  is  acting  in  a  satisfactory  manner.  As  a  rule,  agents  realize  that  a 
certain  sense  of  responsibility  rests  upon  them  to  select,  where  possible,  the  very  best 
material  to  earn  the  bonus.  I 

The  windows  of  this  office  now  present  a  very  attractive  appearance.  Trans- 
parencies and  pictures  of  Canadian  life  and  work  with  exhibits  of  grains  and  grasses 
draw  large  crowds  to  our  doors,  many  coming  in  for  pamphlets  and  information. 

The  number  of  callers  during  the  fiscal  year  now  closed  was  6,291.  Correspond- 
ence received  was  5,312  letters,  and  6,406  were  sent,  as  well  as  over  2,000  circulars  to 
agents;  1,908  bonus  forms  were  received  and  passed  on  to  Ottawa. 

As  usual,  our  lantern  slides  were  loaned  out  to  voluntary  lecturers,  close  upon  a 
hundred  of  these  lectures  having  been  delivered  by  school  teachers,  clergymen  and 
others  interested  in  Canada. 

I  was  glad  to  have  the  services  of  Mr.  George  A.  Aylesworth,  who  lectured  at 
Taunton,  Cardiff  and  Bridgewater  to  crowded  meetings,  and  was  listened  to  with  the 
closest  attention.  Lectures  were  also  delivered  at  Salisbury  and  Hereford  by  Mr.  E. 
Brown,  of  British  Columbia.  Here  also  we  had  good  audiences.  The  limelight  and 
cinematograph  pictures  shown  of  Canadian  life  and  work  were  much  appreciated  and 
created  great  interest.  The  work  of  Delegates  Goodridge,  Gibbard  and  West  has  been 
most  satisfactory.  The  numbers  who  called  upon  them  at  booking  agents'  offices  for 
information  have  been  much  behind  last  year,  still  I  am  sure  their  efforts  will  pi'oduce 
good  results. 

I  attended  a  number  of  agricultural  shows  in  the  various  counties,  exhibiting  our 
produce,  distributing  pamphlets  and  giving  interviews.  This  work,  in  my  opinion, 
well  repays  the  cost  and  time  given  to  it.  We  meet  at  these  shows  the  agricultural 
labourer  in  his  thousands  as  also  the  well-to-do  farmer.  The  latter,  however,  is  hard 
to  be  persuaded  to  move,  and  as  they,  as  a  rule,  hold  their  farms  on  long  leases  they 
are  loath  to  quit,  even  at  the  end  of  the  lease,  and  give  up  the  land  and  farm  build- 
ings with  all  the  improvements  carried  out  at  their  own  expense. 

Your  obedient  servant. 

II.  M.  MURRAY, 

Agent  for  South   Wales  and  West  of  England. 


No.  10. 
REPORT  OF  MR.  EDWARD  O'KELLY. 

Canadian  Government  Offices.. 

44  Dawson  Street,  Dublin,  March  31,  190S. 

The  Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration, 
11-12  Charing  Cross,  London,  S.W. 

Sir, — I  beg  to  submit  my  annual  report  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

The  number  of  emigrants  who  have  left  Ireland  for  Canada  during  the  past 
twelve  months  has  not  only  been  very  considerably  the  largest  on  record,  the  class1 
has  been  better  and   the   amount   of   capital  taken  more   substantial.     The  judicious 

25— ii— 6 


82  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

advertising  of  Canada,  the  wonderful  display  made  by  the  Dominion  at  the  inter- 
national exhibition  held  in  Dublin  this  year,  the  travelling  through  the  province  of 
Ulster  of  the  wagon  of  Canadian  specimens  of  farm  products  and  the  presence  of 
farmer  delegates  from  different  provinces  of  the  Dominion,  have  all  aided  me  in 
securing  a  favourable  result  for  this  year's  work.  I  also  had  my  usual  stand  of 
Canadian  exhibits  at  the  show  fairs  held  in  the  important  towns  of  Dungannon, 
Poitadown,  Ballymena  and  Londonderry,  before  I  was  moved  to  Dublin. 

A  considerable  portion  of  my  time  has  been  occupied  in  visiting  the  steamship 
agents  in  my  new  district,  supplying  them  with  information  and  urging  them  to  take 
advantage  of  the  generous  action  of  the  Canadian  government  towards  them  in  the 
granting  of  the  increased  bonus  by  inducing  as  large  a  proportion  of  those  leaving 
Ireland  as  possible  to  settle  in  Canada.  In  addition  to  visiting  the  agents  I  keep 
them  supplied  with  maps  and  literature,  and  frequently  send  them  newspapers,  &c, 
from  Canada,  illustrating  the  wonderful  progress  of  the  Dominion.  By  these  means 
I  am  endeavouring,  with  some  success,  to  divert  the  stream  of  emigration  at  present 
flowing  to  the  United  States  to  Canada. 

Early  in  June  Mr.  J.  Bruce  Walker,  by  desire  of  the  minister,  instructed  me  to 
proceed  to  Dublin  and  look  over  premises  suitable  for  an  office  for  the  department. 
1  found  the  rents  in  Dublin  higher  than  in  Belfast  and  the  choice  of  locality  more 
restricted,  but  eventually  secured  suitable  offices  at  44  Dawson  street,  one  of  the 
leading  thoroughfares,  at  a  very  reasonable  rent.  On  September  8,  by  direction  of 
Mr.  Walker,  I  transferred  the  Belfast  office  to  Mr.  Webster,  and  on  the  10th  opened 
the  Dublin  office,  where  I  have  been  kept  busy  attending  to  correspondence  and 
callers  when  not  travelling  through  my  new  district,  the  provinces  of  Leinster  and 
Munster. 

Owing  to  the  normal  conditions  existing  in  these  provinces,  where  over  ninety 
per  cent  of  the  emigrants  have  been  going  to  the  United  States  for  years,  it  may  take 
some  time  to  show  them  that  they  will  do  better  in  Canada,  but  that  time  is  coming 
ajid  sooner  than  I  expected  a  year  ago,  by  reason  of  the  number  that  have  returned 
from  the  United  States  during  the  past  five  months  with  woeful  accounts  of  the 
condition  of  things  in  that  country. 

Under  date  December  4,  Mr.  Walker,  by  circular  letter,  issued  under  direction  of 
the  Superintendent  of  Immigration,  advised  the  booking  agents  that  the  demand  for 
labour  of  all  kinds  in  Canada  was  over  for  the  season,  and  to  make  known  to  all 
persons  looking  for  employment  in  Canada  net  to  sail  earlier  than  April,  and  then 
only  if  employment  was  a  isured  them,  or  if  they  had  sufficient  cash  to  keep  them  until 
they  secured  employment.  T  quote  this  circular  to  some  extent,  because  I  found  that 
though  it  curtailed  emigration  for  the  early  part  of  the  season,  it  was  well  received 
and  favourably  commented  on  by  {he  clergy  and  general  public,  showing,  as  it  did. 
the  care  talon  by  the  Dominion  government  for  those  seeking  homes  in  Canada,  and 
I  am  of  opinion  that  the  publicity  given  to  this  circular  will  lessen  the  opposition  to 
emigration  to  the  Dominion  in  the  future. 

I  have  received  some  trade  inquiries  and  have  attended  to  them.  I  am  sorry  to 
have  to  state  that  I  have  also  received  strong  complaints  from  Irish  importers  of 
Canadian  apples  of  the  methods  used  by  the  shippers.  I  have  inspected  at  hap-hazard 
a  dozen  barrels  of  one  shipment  complained  of  and  found  the  complaint  justified  by 
every  barrel  I  inspected.  I  brought  the  complaints  before  Mr.  A.  W.  Grindley,  chief 
inspector  in  Croat  Britain  for  the  Department  of  Agriculture.  Mr.  Grindley  for- 
warded my  letter  and  complaint  to  Mr.  W.  W.  Moore,  Department  of  Agriculture. 
Ottawa.  1  have  sent  copies  of  the  Canadian  Gazette,  containing  reports  of*  the  steps 
taken  by  the  Minister  of  Agriculture  to  put  a  stop  to  the  fraudulent  packing  of  fruit, 
and  also  extracts  from  the  letters  of  Messrs.  Grindley  and  Moore  to  the  merchants 
making  complaints,  and  have  received  replies  thanking  me  for  bringing  their  griev- 
ance before  the  proper  officials  and  expressing  their  satisfaction  with  the  steps  taken 
to  protect  their  interests. 


ii  rilillGRATWN  83 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

In  the  six  months  this  office  has  heen  open  1,771  letters  have  been  received,  and 
2,415  sent  out.  The  number  of  callers  for  same  period  who  registered  their  names  was 
1.781,  a  large  proportion  of  same  from  counties  outside  Dublin. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

EDWARD  O'KELLY, 

Canadian  Government  Agent. 


No    11. 

REPORT  OF  MR.  PAUL  WIALLARD. 

10  Rue  de  Roue,  Paris,  April  1,  1908. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq.. 

Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration, 
11  and  12  Charing  Cross,  London. 

Sie, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  1908. 

The  season  1907-8  seems  to  have  been  particularly  bright.  The  opening  was 
marked  by  an  abundance  of  departures,  which  we  expected  from  the  considerable  num- 
ber of  demands  for  information  received  during  the  preceding  winter.  On  each 
steamer  we  have  booked  many  emigrants,  and  it  was  only  towards  the  end  of  the 
summer  that  one  could  readily  find  a  place  on  board  an  outward-bound  vessel. 

Then  came  the  American  crisis  which  drove  back  to  Europe  a  crowd  of  immigrants 
of  all  nationalities  and  determined  at  the  same  time  a  very  serious  exodus  of  labourers 
from  the  United  States,  thus  disturbing  the  equilibrium  between  the  supply  and 
demand  for  employment.  From  the  standpoint  of  emigration,  the  effects  of  this  crisis 
were  not  much  felt  during  the  winter  itself,  because  generally  few  think  of  moving 
before  the  spring,  the  time  when  agriculture  is  resumed,  but  the  echo  which  these 
'•vents  found  in  the  French  press  and  the  importance  several  organs  appeared  to  give 
to  this  temporary  state  of  affairs  may  perhaps  be  of  a  nature  to  offset  the  results  of 
the  season  of  1908-9  to  a  certain  extent.  Although  this  setback  may  have  been  more 
apparent  than  real,  there  is  little  doubt  but  that  Canada  will  this  year  suffer  from 
the  view-point  of  immigration  by  the  financial  crisis  from  which  the  neighbouring 
republic  has  suffered. 

During  the  year  we  received  upwards  of  10,000  letters,  exactly  10,250  being  replied 
to. 

The  visits  to  the  Commissioner  General  for  Canada  of  persons  seeking  informa- 
tion about  the  country  totalled  6,750.  Independent  of  this  demand  for  information 
at  least  the  same  number  of  persons  asked  for  and  were  given  pamphlets. 

Every  time  a  party  of  colonists,  ready  to  leave,  required  to  consult  us  in  person 
and  invited  us,  we  did  not  hesitate  to  go  to  them  and  to  give  them  all  the  information 
possible.  Being  very  busy  during  the  week,  I  generally  devoted  my  Sundays  to  these 
trips,  leaving  on  Saturday  and  returning  on  Monday. 

M.  Foursin  has  continued,  as  in  previous  years,  to  give,  with  his  knowledge  of 
Canadian  affairs,  verbal  information  as  to  the  advantages  afforded  by  Canada  in  return 
for  the  industries  of  farming  or  railway  construction. 

M.  Geoffrion,  who  was  added  to  my  staff  several  months  ago,  has  assisted  M. 
Foursin  in  his  work,  and  in  addition  has  been  delegated  to  reply  to  a  part  of  the  mail. 
My  intention  is  to  send  him  out  into  the  provinces  as  soon  as  tin1  work  of  the  office 

•J.-.—  ii— 64 


84  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

will  permit,  to  give  a  series  of  lectures,  which  will  assist  in  making:  the  country 
better  known,  to  which  the  general  attention  has  elsewhere  been  recently  directed  by 
the  conclusion  of  the  Anglo-French  treaty. 

The  department  sent  to  France  this  year  two  delegates — M.  Brutinel,  of  Edmon- 
ton, and  M.  Parent,  farmer,  Manitoba.  These  gentlemen  have  co-operated  in  spread- 
ing among  the  French  people  the  idea  that  we  are  diligent  workers,  and  that  if  we  do 
not  force  people  to  emigrate  it  is  not  that  our  country  does  not  offer  such  chances  of 
success  as  would  not  be  readily  met  with  elsewhere. 

We  do  not  persuade  persons  who  expect  in  Canada  business,  administrative  or 
professional  employment  to  emigrate,  and  as  the  countryman  who  has  never  left  his 
native  land  or  the  village  which  gave  him  birth  is,  of  all,  the  one  who  will  last  think 
of  emigrating,  it  follows  that  we  receive  a  considerably  less  number  of  requests  for 
information  from  people  not  belonging  to  the  class  likely  to  succeed  in  the  country 
than  of  those  who  are  practically  certain  to  find  immediate  work,  and  that  the  emi- 
gration from  France  to  Canada  is  not  as  extensive  as  we  would  desire. 

During  the  course  of  the  year  I  have  translated  and  corrected  five  new  pamph- 
lets, of  which  three  were  pretty  voluminous.  Of  these  five  three  have  been  printed 
in  France  under  my  supervision.  I  trust  that  my  work  in  this  and  other  respects 
has  been  satisfactoi-y  to  the  department,  and  I  shall  continue  my  efforts  to  increase 
still  further  the  good-will  which  Canada  enjoys  in  France. 

One  hundred  and  fifty  thousand  pamphlets  have  been  distributed  this  year. 

Your  obedient  servant. 

PAUL  WIALLARD. 


No.   12. 
REPORT  OF  MR.  D.  TREATT  DE  CCELI. 

23  Place  de  la  Gare, 

Antwerp,  Belgium,  March  01.  190S. 
J.  Obed  Smith,  Esq., 

Assistant  Superintendent  of  Emigration, 

London.  I 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  report  for  the  year  ending  March  31,  190S. 

The  policy  of  propaganda  inaugurated  since  my  arrival  in  Belgium  has  been 
steadily  followed,  namely,  lectures  in  winter,  attendance  at  fairs  in  summer,  with 
distribution  of  literature  and  meetings  witli  intending  emigrants  in  order  to  give 
them  all  important  or  necessary  information. 

I  have  followed  up  the  introduction  in  our  common  and  superior  schools  of  the 
teaching  of  the  geography  of  Canada.  I  had  the  honour  to  make  mention  of  my 
endeavours  to  that  effect  in  my  report  of  1905,  when  I  stated  that  twenty-two  schools 
were  giving  lessons  on  Canada;  in  1906  this  number  increased  to  505,  and  during 
this  year  I  am  pleased  to  state  that  in  1,875  more  schools,  forming  the  grand  total 
of  2,380,  the  geography  of  Canada  is  taught.  Every  one  of  these  schools  has  the 
large  wall  map  of  Canada  in  its  classes,  and  a  certain  number  of  atlases  and  other 
pamphlets  have  been  forwarded  to  'them  for  free  distribution.  Special  attention  has 
been  paid  to  provide  also  the  schools  of  adults  with  the  above. 

I  think  it  my  duty  to  remark  that  I  was  greatly  encouraged  in  this  distribution 
by  the  seho<'l  inspectors  of  the  different  districts  and  by  other  educational  authorities, 
and  also  that  neither  map  nor  pamphlets  were  forwarded  except  on  demand  and  on 


ii  IMMIGRATION  85 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

special  promise  that  the  map  should  be  used  in  the"  school  and  the  pamphlets  distri- 
buted gratuitously.  Besides  this,  I  loaned  a  good  many  Canadian  views  to  be  used 
for  lectures. 

I  am  quite  sure  that  a  more  effective  propaganda  could  not  be  made,  and  I  expect 
the  best  results  in  the  near  future. 

During  the  winter  season  I  have  given  20  lectures,  generally  in  the  localities  where 
a  certain  movement  of  emigration  was  noticeable. 

The  orders  issued  by  the  department  to  restrict  immigration  have  caused  a  cer- 
tain hesitation,  not  only  with  those  who  were  directly  prevented  from  executing  their 
project,  but  also  with  others  who  feared  to  risk  their  capital,  the  more  so  as  these 
restrictions  were  closely  allied  with  the  crisis  in  the  United  States,  but  if  it  has  made 
people  more  cautious,  it  has  also  brought  forward  those  who  had  the  will  and  the 
means  necessary  to  succeed. 

Although  my  principal  work  has  always  been  in  Belgium,  I  have  continued  and 
even  increased  my  propaganda  in  Holland,  and  I  am  pleased  to  state  that  the  emi- 
gration from  that  country  will  give  good  results  this  year;  already  different  groups 
have  left  for  the  west,  and  the  month  of  April  will  see  a  still  larger  number  emi- 
grating to  Canada. 

The  most  pleasing  feature  is  not  so  much  the  number  as  the  quality  of  the  emi- 
grants; very  few  single  men,  generally  families  of  6,  8  or  10,  taking  with  them  a 
sufficient  capital  to  settle  on  a  homestead,  in  most  cases  chosen  for  them  by  the  father 
or  one  of  the  sons  who  preceded  them. 

As  a  result  of  judicious  advertising  in  a  certain  number  of  local  papers  mostly 
agricultural,  as  well  in  Holland  as  in  Belgium*,  and  through  the  propaganda  made  by 
different  teachers,  the  correspondence  of  this  office  has  been  numerous;  not  less  than 
6,290  letters  have  been  received  and  due  attention  given  to  all  demands  of  information. 

In  conclusion,  I  may  state  that  according  to  all  information  I  have  received  from 
new  colonists,  every  one  of  them  feels  satisfied  with  his  new  country,  and  in  no  case 
was  any  complaint  made  as  to  having  been  deceived  by  the  pamphlets  or  by  official 
information. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

D.  TEEAU  DE  CCELL 


86  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII..  A.   1909 


OPERATIONS  IX  THE  UNITED  STATES. 

No.  13. 

REPORT  OF  MR  W.  J.  WHITE.  INSPECTOR  OF  AGENCIES  AM)  PRESS 

AGENT. 

Ottawa.  April  1."..  1908. 
The  Superintendent  of  Immigration. 

Sir, — The  fiscal  year  just  closed  shows  that  the  mimber  of  immigrants  from  tha 
Fuited  States  was  58,312,  a  splendid  return  under  existing  conditions,  fully  illustrating 
the  fact  that  the  advantages  of  Canada  as  a  farming  proposition  have  been  well  pre- 
sented to  the  moving  element  in  the  United  States,  and  proving  also  that  it  would 
take  more  than  one  year  of  irregular  crops  to  offset  the  work  that  has  been  so  well  done 
in  the  United  States.  The  most  pleasing  feature  of  the  work  has  been  the  splendid 
character  and  quality  of  the  immigrants.  The  money  and  effects  brought  in  by  these 
^.312  people  was  in  the  neighbourhood  of  the  total  value  of  $52,000,000,  or  nearly 
$1,000  per  head.  This  has  been  added  to  the  money  wealth  of  Canada  in  one  year. 
In  addition  to  its  money  wealth  there  is  the  physical  wealth  which  these  people  bring. 
Forty-eight  thousand  of  those  arriving  took  up  homesteads;  most  of  the  balance  pur- 
chased land  and  went  into  farming,  a  life  that  90  per  cent  of  them  bad  been  follow- 
ing in  their  old  homes.  It  has  not  been  thought  necessary  to  point  out  .the  moral 
value  of  the  United  States  settlers.  They  have  largely  been  obtained  in  the  western 
and  central  western  states,  where  they  or  their  fathers  were  pioneers.  Pioneering  is 
therefore  no  hardship  to  them.  In  fact  they  rather  enjoyed  it,  as  we  find  many  of 
■them  desirous  of  moving  as  far  as  they  can  be  carried  by  railroad.  They  bring  with 
them  a  wealth  in  experience  in  tilling  prairie  lands,  and  are  able  to  take  from  the  soil 
the  best  that  it  will  afford.  I  am  satisfied  that  if  a  census  were  taken  it  would  be 
found  that  the  United  States  farmer  almost  always  succeeds  in  having  good  crops  and 
realizing  the  highest  price  for  his  products.  His  presence  in  a  neighbourhood  is  wel- 
comed for  the  experience  he  brings  with  him  and  is  willing  to  impart  to  his  neighbour, 
and  in  this  way  the  new-comer  from  other  parts,  be  it  eastern  Canada,  Great  Britain 
or  the  continent,  is  taught  lessons  in  farming  that  arc  valuable  to  himself  and  the 
country. 

During  the  past  year  only  two  or  three  of  the  stale-  in  the  American  Union  have 
not  been  represented  in  the  homestead  entries.  There  is  nut  a  state  in  the  Union  in 
which  Canada  is  not  advertised.  The  offices  of  the  government  are  located  in  the 
best  agricultural  sections,  with  a  view  to  being  in  easy  touch  with  the  surrounding 
country  so  as  to  make  it  possible  for  the  agents  to  cover  their  respective  districts  with 
the  least  trouble.    The  offices  are  located  as  follows: — 

M.  V.  ^ItTnnes,  6  Avenue  Theatre    Block,   Detroit.   Mich. 

C.  A.  Laurier,  Marquette,  Mich. 

Jas.  N.  Grieve,  Spokane,  Wash. 

J.  S.  Crawford,  125  West  Ninth  street.  Kansas  City,  Mo. 

T.  O.  Currie,  108  Third  street,  2nd  floor,  Milwaukee,  Wis. 

J.  M.  McLachlan,  Box  626,  Watertown,  South  Dakota. 

F.  T.  Holmes,  315  Jackson  street,  St.  Paul,  Minn. 

\V.  V.   Bennett,  215   Hoard  of  Trade   Building,  Omaha,  Neb. 

Chas.  Pilling.  Clifford  Block,  Grand  Forks.  N.  Dakota. 

U.  M.  Williams.  413  Gardner  Building,  Toledo,  Ohio. 


ii  IUUlGRATIOy  87 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

C.  J.  Broughton,  412  Merchant's  Loan  &  Trust,  Chicago. 

Benj.  Davies,  Boom  G,  Dunn  Block,  Great  Falls,  Montana. 

W.  H.  Bogers,  316  Traction- Terminal  Building,  Indianapolis. 

Thos.  Hetherington,  73  Fremont  street,  Boston,  Maryland. 

Thos.  Duncan,  30  Syracuse  Bank  Building.  Syracuse,  N.Y. 

Geo.  A.  Hall,  210  House  Building,  Pittsburg,  Pa. 
The  work  of  these  agents  is  very  much  the  same  in  character.  At  almost  all  the 
offices  there  are  one  or  two  assistants,  whose  duty  it  is  to  look  after  the  correspondence, 
issue  the  certificate  which  entitles  the  applicant  to  the  reduced  rates  afforded  by  the 
Canadian  railroads  to  the  actual  settler  and  give  to  the  caller  all  available  informa- 
tion. At  the  end  of  the  week  the  assistant  keys  the  letters  received  according  to  post 
offices  and  districts.  The  agent  then  selects  the  district  that  he  should  visit  during 
the  next  or  coming  weeks  and  advises  one  or  more  of  the  correspondents  that  he  will 
meet  them  and  their  friends  at  some  given  place  on  a  set  date,  or.  if  this  is  not 
possible,  when  necessary,  he  visits  the  individual  correspondent.  He  carries  with 
him  samples  of  the  grains  and  grasses  of  Central  Canada,  has  with  him  a  supply  of 
literature  and  quotes  rates  from  their  home  to  such  a  point  in  Western  Canada  as 
they  may  desire  to  go  to.  He  assists  the  intending  settler  by  securing  him  the  lowest 
freight  rates  for  his  stock  and  effects,  advises  him  the  best  way  in  which  to  get  cars 
and  afterwards  follows  the  course  of  the  car  to  its  destination.  Very  often  the  male 
members  of  the  family  move  in  advance  of  those  dependent.  When  this  occurs  it  is 
the  duty  of  the  agent  to  assist  the  family  in  every  way  possible  in  order  to  get  a  start. 
During  the  fall  of  the  year  exhibits  of  grain  and  grasses,  roots,  vegetables,  etc., 
with  which  the  agent  has  supplied  himself,  are  taken  from  fair  to  fair  and  tastefully 
arranged,  then  the  agent's  time  is  pretty  well  occupied  in  this  way  for  from  two  to 
three  months.  A  chain  letter  system  is  adopted  which  is  very  effective  in  getting 
the  names  of  those  in  a  neighbourhood  who  would  likely  be  interested  in  Canada. 
To  the  names  thus  secured  literature  and  circulars  are  sent,  and  it  is  surprising  the 
amount  of  effective  work  that  is  done  in  this  way.  It  is  sometimes  the  case  that  the 
manner  in  which  one  state  may  be  worked  will  differ  from  another  state.  In  each 
case,  however,  the  agents  keep  me  advised  as  to  what  they  feel  is  the  best  course  to 
pursue,  and  I  am  always  prepared  to  accept  and  act  upon  such  suggestions  as  may  be 
safely  adopted.  In  some  cases  it  is  found  that  the  management  of  a  fair  does  not 
care  to  allow  our  exhibits  to  be  placed,  but  these  cases  are  so  rare  that  it  is  scarcely 
necessary  to  refer  to  them.  In  most  cases  there  is  no  difficulty  whatever  in  securing 
space,  and  in  others  managements  have  requested  that  we  exhibit,  offering  a  space 
free  of  charge.  Generally,  however,  we  rent  a  space  in  some  building,  and  sometimes, 
unable  to  do  this,  ground  space  is  rented.  On  this  ground  a  temporary  structm-e  is 
sometimes  erected,  and  in  other  cases  a  tent  is  secured  in  which  exhibits  are  placed. 
It  is  often  necessary,  in  order  to  interest  people  in  a  certain  district,  to  secure  the 
assistance  of  one  or  two  or  more  responsible  men.  Various  ways  are  adopted  in  order 
to  do  this.  One  of  the  best  methods  is  to  secure  transportation  for  these  people  and 
send  them  through  to  our  western  provinces  to  report  to  their  friends.  The  agent 
fills  up  his  report  very  carefully,  and  in  this  way  gets  in  touch  with  a  good  class  of 
people.  Again,  parties  are  accompanied  as  far  as  the  boundary  line,  as  there  is  a 
possibility  that  in  passing  through  some  of  the  western  states  towns  some  of  the 
people  who  may  have  been  directed  by  the  efforts  of  local  agents  to  Canada  may 
hecome  interested  in  American  lands. 

I  referred  in  my  last  report  to  the  inducements  held  out  by  Texas  land  agents. 
The  railroad  rates  from  St.  Paul.  Chicago,  Des  Moines.  Omaha,  Kansas,  Indianapolis 
and  other  points  to  Texas  lands  were  much  lower  than  those  to  Canada.  The  Western 
Passenger  Association,  however,  has  adjusted  this,  so  that  the  rates  are  now  more 
even :  therefore,  some  of  this  difficulty  has  been  overcome.  There  is  still  opposition, 
and  considerable  of  it  is  owing  to  the  fact  that  Texas  lands  are  reasonably  low  in 
price  and  an  army  of  agents  at  work  throughout  the  country  setting  forth  the  advant- 
ages in  Texas  from  a  settlers'  standpoint. 


88  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Besides  the  inducements  held  out  by  land  owners  in  Texas,  those  offered  by 
holders  in  Colorado,  Montana,  Wyoming  and  South  Dakota  were  sufficient  to  arouse  a 
disturbing  sentiment  amongst  possible  movers,  and  divert  the  attention  of  land  seekers. 
These  lands  do  not  carry  the  advantages  that  Canadian  lands  do,  but  the  desire  to 
keep  within  one's  own  country  is  something  that  is  hard  to  overcome.  There  is  the 
wish  to  know  what  it  has  to  offer  before  going  outside.  It  is  true  that  Canada  has  the 
'last  best  west,'  but  there  is  sufficient  of  the  AJmerican  west  (whatever  the  character  of 
the  land  may  be)  to  keep  the  department  and  its  corps  of  agents  busy  in  the  presenta- 
tion of  the  superior  advantages  and  opportunities  afforded  by  Canada. 

The  results  of  Canada's  immigration  work  in  the  United  States  for  the  fiscal  year 
ending  March  31,  1908,  have  been  as  satisfactory  as  was  expected.  They  have  been 
more  than  normal,  and,  as  will  be  seen  by  reference  to  the  official  report  published 
elsewhere,  a  splendid  increase  in  number  is  shown  asjcompared  with  the  previous  year. 
The  department  and  the  people  of  Canada  have  reason  to  feel  pleased  that  the  work  has 
been  so  effective.  It  is  only  fair  to  say  that  the  conditions  of  the  spring  of  1907,  and 
the  unusually  embarrassing  climatic  conditions  of  the  succeeding  summer  were  very 
unfavourable.  These  conditions  and  the  adverse  reports  sent  back  to  friends  by  some 
of  the  unfortunate  ones  at  the  critical  period  required  to  be  met  by  strenuous  work  on 
our  part,  but  the  fact  that  it  was  possible  to  secure  a  fair  percentage  of  increase  over 
1906-7  vvill  fully  justify  the  extra  trouble  with  which  we  were  taxed. 

The  advertising  that  has  been  done  during  the  past  year  has  been  of  the  same 
character  as  that  done  during  the  past  several  years.  Space  is  purchased  in  about 
7,000  newspapers  throughout  the  United  States,  farm  journals  and  the  country  weeklies 
being  preferred.  Reading  notices  and  display  advertising  are  both  used  freely.  As  in 
the  past,  I  can  see  no  better  way  of  reaching  the  people. 

A  party  of  eleven  editors  of  the  British  Provincial  Press  saw  Canada  to  such  good 
advantage  that  these  papers  published  hundreds  of  columns  of  matter  setting  out  their 
views  on  the  conditions  of  Canada.  These  articles  reached  the  class  of  people  we  were 
desirous  of  reaching  and  already  good  results  are  seen  in  consequence. 

The  correspondence  at  the  various  offices  has  increased  from  ten  to  thirty  per  cent. 
From  the  nature  of  it  and  the  direct  inquiries  made  I  feel  safe  in  making  the  state- 
ment that,  the  year  1908-9  will  show  a  much  greater  increase  in  numbers  from  the 
United  States.  It  would  not  be  surprising  if  the  number  would  reach  the  75,000 
mark. 

Although  homestead  lands  near  lines  of  railway  are  month  by  month  becoming 
scarcer,  those  amongst  whom  the  agents  are  working  are  finding  out  that  the  best  land 
does  not  always  lie  contiguous  to  the  railway  line.  They  are  willing  to  go  back  fifty 
and  even  a  hundred  miles,  taking  the  chances  of  getting  railway  advantages  in  a  short 
time.  The  number  last  year  seeking  lands  to  purchase  was  not  as  large  as  the  previous 
year.  The  movement  was  made  up  of  those  who  had  homesteaded  during  1907.  At  the 
time  of  writing,  however,  the  number  desiring  to  purchase  lands  is  increasing,  and 
those  having  large  blocks  of  lands  for  sale  may  expect  a  fairly  good  season,  if  they  do 
not  set  too  high  a  price  on  their  lands. 

Your  obedient  servant, 
J  ":f:T:~  W.  J.  WHITE. 


ii  IMMIGRATION 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


OPERATIONS  OF  IMMIGRATION  OFFICIALS  IN  WESTERN 

CANADA. 

No.  14. 

KEPORT  OF  THE  COMMISSIONER  OF  IMMIGRATION. 

Winnipeg,  Manitoba,  April  1,  1908. 
W.  D.  Scott,  Esq., 

Superintendent  of  Immigration, 
Ottawa. 

Sin, — I  beg  to  submit  the  following  report  for  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, 
190S. 

During  the  year,  by  means  of  the  employment  bureau  in  this  office,  aided  by 
agents  at  every  point  of  importance  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta,  a  thorough 
system  of  distributing  and  finding  suitable  employment  for  immigrants  was  success- 
fully conducted;  and  it  is  to  be  noted  as  showing  the  steady  and  increased  demand  for 
farm  labourers  that,  throughout  the  whole  year,  unfilled  applications  for  farm  hands 
were  on  file  at  this  office.  The  number  of  applications  for  farm  hands  received  was 
6,442,  of  which  3,579  were  filled.  In  addition  to  this,  512  applications  were  received 
for  married  couples,  of  which  378  were  filled. 

A  large  number  of  intending  settlers  from  Eastern  Canada,  the  United  States,  the 
British  Isles  and  continental  Europe  called  at  this  office  in  quest  of  information  and 
advice  in  order  to  enable  them  to  secure  suitable  locations  in  which  to  settle;  and  I 
have  much  pleasure  in  reporting  that,  so  successfully  and  satisfactorily  has  the  work 
of  locating  settlers  been  conducted,  no  complaints  have  been  received  at  this  office 
that  parties  have  been  directed  to  undesirable  locations. 

In  this  connection,  it  might  be  well  to  mention  that  homesteads  well  adapted  for 
both  grain  and  cattle  farming  can  be  secured  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta 
within  twenty  miles  of  existing  railways  and  railways  now  under  construction.  Among 
these  districts  may  be  specially  mentioned:  Prince  Albert;  the  district  north  of  the 
Canadian  Northern  Railway  from  Battleford  to  Vegreville;  along  the  Grand  Trunk 
Pacific  and  Canadian  Pacific  Railways  between  Saskatoon  and  Edmonton;  along  the 
South  Saskatchewan  river  north  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  main  line  from 
Moosejaw  to  Irvine;  also  south  of  the  same  line  between  the  same  points. 

ENGLISH. 

The  immigrants  from  England  were,  generally  speaking,  of  a  class  likely  to  suc- 
ceed in  western  Canada,  with  the  exception  of  a  number  sent,  mostly  from  the  slum' 
of  London,  by  charitable  and  philanthropic  institutions.  Measures,  however,  hav< 
been  taken  to  deport  every  undesirable  who  came  or  was  brought  to  our  notice. 

WELSH. 

The  class  of  Welsh  immigrants  was  unexceptionable.  A  large  proportion  of  these 
peop'e  went  to  farm  work,  for  which  they  are  well  adapted. 


90  DEPARTS! EXT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
SCOTCH. 

With  the  exception  of  a  number  of  Scotch  labourers,  mostly  from  Glasgow  and 
district,  sent  to  work  on  railway  construction,  who  drifted  into  the  city  last  fall, 
and  appear  determined  to  remain  here,  the  large  majority  of  arrivals  went  to  farm 
work,  with  satisfactory  results,  few  seeking  employment  at  this  office  a  second  time. 

IHISH. 

Immigrants  from  Ireland  were  mostly  of  the  agricultural  class  and  accepted  farm 
work  almost  to  a  man.  It  is  to  be  regretted  that  a  larger  number  of  these  people  do 
not  come  to  Canada,  as  they  are  very  popular  with  the  farmers  here. 

GERMANS. 

Germans  who  arrived  during  the  last  fiscal  year  were  a  very  desirable  class,  and 
most  of  them  went  to  farm  work,  or  took  up  land  in  western  Canada;  and  the  reports 
we  have   received  from  these  newly-arrived   immigrants  are  very  satisfactory. 

S(    \\1  'IN AVIANS. 

The  Scandinavians  who  arrived  during  the,  year  were,  with  few  exceptions,  of  a 
very  desirable  class.  Many  went  direct  to  the  hmd;  and  the  others  to  employment  oh 
railway  construction,  and  other  work,  at  which  they  received  high  wages. 

ICELANDERS. 

During  the  year  a  considerable  number  of  Icelanders  came  from  their  native 
country,  and  a  few  from  the  United  States.     They  have  mostly  engaged  in  agriculture. 

swiss. 
The  immigrants  from  Switzerland  practically  all  went  to  farm  work. 

DUT<  ii- 

The  arrivals  from  Holland  went  mostly  to  farm  work  and  railway  construction. 
These  people  make  excellent  settlers  and  learn  the  English  language  quickly. 

HEBREWS. 

Of  the  Hebrews  who  arrived  during  the  past  year  many  went  to  friends  and 
relations  in  country  districts,  and  a  few  remained  in  Winnipeg.  On  account  of  the 
arrangements  made  by  their  friends  these  people  give  very  little  trouble  to  the  officials. 

GAL1C1ANS. 

The  largest  number  of  Ruthenians  and  Poles  came  from  the  Austrian  provinces 
and  a  few  from  Bohemia  and  Russia.  Most  of  the  people  from  Austria  were  farmers 
and  went  immediately  to  homesteads.  The  majority  of  the  others  went  to  railway, 
construction  work.  Quite  a  number  came  from  the  I'nited  States,  nearly  all  of  whom 
entered  for  homesti 

FRENCH   AND  BELGIANS. 

The  French  and  Belgian  immigrants  who  came  here  last  year  were  a  very  desir- 
able class;  and,  as  nearly  all  were  agriculturists,  they  went  to  work  upon  farms  or 
took  homesteads. 


11 


IMUlORATIOy  91 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

IMMIGRATION    ACCOM  MODATION,    WINNIPEG. 

Seventy-six  thousand  three  hundred  and  ninety-three  days'  accommodation  was 
given  to  immigrants  at  buildings  Nos.  1  and  2  during  the  year. 


IMMIGRANT    HOSPITAL. 


The  services  of  this  hospital  have  proved  of  great  benefit  to  immigrants.  321 
cases  of  sickness  having  been  treated  during'  the  year.  A  full  report  by  Dr.  Corbett, 
Dominion  Health  Officer,  has  been  forwarded  to  you. 


NEW   IMMIGRATION    HALLS. 


During  the  year  immigration  halls  were  erected  at  North  Battleford,  Vermilion, 
Swift  Current  and  Wilkie. 


CORRESPONDENCE. 


During  the  year  there  were  sent  from  this  office  2,454  registered  and  31,290  unre- 
gistered letters,  besides  many  thousands  of  pamphlets  and  maps.  The  number  of 
letters  received  was  27,810. 


EXHIBITS. 

During  this  period  875  cases  of  agricultural  exhibits  were  sent  to  agents  in  the 
United  States,  Great  Britain  and  British  colonies,  besides  95  sacks  of  samples  of  grain 
to  public  schools  in  the  United  States. 

DEPORTATIONS. 

There  were  255  undesirable  immigrants  deported  from  the  1st  of  April,  1907,  to 
31st  March,  1908. 

Annual  reports  have  been  received  from  officers  and  agents  stationed  at  Port 
Arthur,  Ontario:  Brandon,  Dauphin,  Swan  River  and  Teuton,  Manitoba;  Begina, 
Moosejaw,  Saskatoon,  Yorkton,  Battleford,  North  Portal,  Maple  Creek,  Estevan, 
Lloydminster  and  Duck  Lake,  Saskatchewan;  Edmonton,  Calgary,  Medicine  Hat, 
Lethbridge,  Strathcona,  Bed  Deer,  Vegreville,  Stettler  and  Sedgwick,  Alberta.  These 
reports  deal  fully  with  the  duties  performed  by  the  officers,  and  besides  contain  much 
valuable  information  as  to  the  number  of  settlers  who  arrived  during  the  year,  the 
number  and  value  of  carloads  of  stock  and  effects  brought  by  them,  the  increase  of 
acreage  under  crop,  the  output  of  grain  and  number  of  animals  shipped  to  market, 
the  number  of  homestead  entries  and  other  statistical  information,  which,  as  a  whole, 
shows  that,  although  last  year's  crops  in  some  districts  were  partially  damaged  by 
frost,  much  material  progress  was  made  throughout  Western  Canada  during  1907. 

Since  taking  charge  of  the  work  of  Commissioner  of  Immigration  at  Winnipeg 
and  throughout  the  west  I  have  given  some  attention  to  the  conditions  under  which 
the  work  is  carried  on.  I  believe  the  organization  generally  is  in  a  very  satisfactory 
condition,  and  I  think  it  only  fair  to  say  that  much  of  the  success  that  has  attended 
the  work  in  this  department  is  due  to  the  faithful  and  conscientious  services  both  of 
the  inside  staff  at  Winnipeg  and  of  the  various  officers  at  outside  points. 


Your  obedient  servant, 

J.  BRUCE  WALKER, 

Commissioner    of   Immigration. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII..  A.   1909 


No.  15. 


REPORT  OF  THE  MEDICAL  OFFICER  AT  WINNIPEG. 


Office  of  the  Commissioner  of  Immigration. 

Winnipeg,  Manitoba.  April  13,  1908. 
W.  D.  Scott,  Esq., 

Superintendent  of  Immigration, 
Ottawa. 
Sir, — I  beg  to  submit  a  report  of  the  medical  attendance  and  inspection  service  at 
this  point  for  the  fiscal  year,  ending  March  31,  1908. 

Daily  visits  were  made  to  the  immigration  halls  and  hospital ;  and,  in  many  eases, 
I  was  obliged  to  visit  new  arrivals  at  their  homes  in  the  city  and  elsewhere. 
Medical  attendance  was  given  to  the  following  cases  of  sickness: — 


Measles 25 

Diarrhoea 15 

Bronchitis 21 

Rheumatism 23 

Influenza 31 

Biliousness 29 

Injuries 31 

Tonsilitis 13 

Cellulitis 9 

Stomatitis 1 

Synovitis 2 

Phlebitis 1 

Debility 3 

Neurasthenia 1 

Confinement 1 

Pleurisy 6 

Varicose  Veins 2 

Scarlet  fever 1 

Heart  disease 3 

Corneal  opacity 1 

Mastitis 1 

Dyspepsia 3 

Ulcers 5 

Inflammation  of  ear 3 

Erysipelas 1 

Rupture 1 

Dressings 8 


Neuralgia 4 

Quinsy 2 

Pneumonia 9 

Gastritis 2 

Gout 1 

Carbuncle 2 

Dysentery 5 

Asthma 3 

Frost-bites 7 

Adenoids 1 

Eczema 2 

Pleurodynia 1 

Phthisis 1 

Chicken-pox 2 

Nephritis 3 

Convulsions 1 

Epilepsy 3 

Conjunctivitis 4 

Diphtheria 3 

Skin  diseases .' 9 

Chorea 1 

i  >ropsy 2 

Abscess 3 

Inflammation   of  breast 1 

Scabies 7 

Otorrhcea 1 


Certificates  were  given  for  the  purpose  of  deporting  129  undesirable  immigrants. 
I  am  pleased  to  report  that  the  incoming  immigrants  for  the  past  year  have  been 
exceptionally  free  from  all  infectious  and  contagious  disease. 

Tour  obedient  servant, 

S.  C.  CORBETT, 

Dominion  Health  Officer. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  93 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

No.  16. 
REPORT  OF  THE  GENERAL  COLONIZATION  AGENT. 

Brandon,  Manitoba,  April  17,  1908. 
W.  D.  Scott,  Esq., 

Superintendent  of  Immigration, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  report : — 

During  the  month  of  April,  1907.  I  made  an  extended  tour  through  Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan  and  Alberta,  inspecting  the  condition  of  our  immigration  halls,  and  also 
assisting  belated  settlers  who  were  detained  on  their  journey  by  the  different  railways 
through  heavy  storms,  incurring  much  hardship  to  live  stock,  as  well  as  detention  to 
settlers.  Many  points  were  congested  with  cars  of  settlers'  effects,  owing  to  the  very 
heavy  snowfall  and  late  spring.  The  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  the  Canadian 
Northern  Railway  did  all  in  their  power  on  this  occasion  to  relieve  the  settlers.  They 
supplied  food  for  both  man  and  beast  and  did  everything  possible  for  the  comfort  of 
the  people. 

In  addition  to  the  above,  during  the  same  month  I  took  up  the  question  of  colon- 
izing the  districts  north  of  Prince  Albert,  being  a  country  specially  adapted  for  eastern 
Europeans,  report  of  which  was  submitted,  dated  Prince  Albert,  April  25,  1907.  The 
foregoing  work  incurred  much  correspondence  with  the  Saskatchewan  legislature  and 
the  Board  of  Trade,  Prince  Albert. 

During  the  month  of  May  reports  were  forwarded  to  the  department,  dealing  with 
general  conditions  in  the  west,  at  points  on  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway,  and  also 
setting  forth  the  particulars  of  seed  grain  advanced  to  settlers,  and  referring  to  accom- 
modation to  immigrants  at  different  points. 

The  Canadian  Northern  Railway,  during  March  and  April  moved  1,376  carloads 
of  settlers'  effects  over  their  line,  compared  with  933  cars  for  the  corresponding  two 
months  of  the  year  previous.  Considering  the  extraordinary  conditions,  much  work 
was  involved  in  assisting  settlers  to  their  destination,  providing  accommodation  for 
them  at  different  points,  and  reaching  some  outlying  districts  isolated  from  railway 
facilities  to  see  that  the  settlers  had  fuel  and  food. 

Under  instructions  from  the  minister  literature  was  placed  in  the  hands  of  the 
Doukhobor  community,  each  head  of  a  family  receiving  a  pamphlet. 

During  the  same  month,  under  instructions  from  the  secretary  of  the  department, 
dated  June  4,  1907,  I  revisited  the  townsite  of  Lloydminster,  and  adjusted  the  rights 
of  certain  residents  to  claims  they  had  for  town  lots. 

During  the  same  month  the  question  of  immigration  furnishings,  seed  grain 
advances  and  other  departmental  matters  were  attended  to. 

I  submitted  a  report  on  the  general  conditions  existing  in  the  west,  pointing  out 
new  districts  for  colonization  purposes,  as  well  as  reporting  on  the  different  nationali- 
ties, their  progress  and  prospects. 

I  also  reported  on  the  final  revision  of  the  British  settlement  at  Lloydminster. 

I  also  submitted  a  report  on  some  colonies  in  the  west,  with  statistical  information. 

During  the  month  of  July,  I  submitted  a  report  setting  forth  the  outlook  as  to 
crops,  (See.  * 

I  also  made  a  report  on  the  Medicine  Hat  district,  showing  the  production  of 
lands  that  were  formerly  considered  semi-arid,  now  irrigated. 

I  also  prepared  a  report  on  the  Doukhobor  community,  dated  July  18,  1907,  and 
a  full  report,  dated  July  22,  1907,  pointing  out  the  improved  conditions  in  the  west. 

Report  to  W.  J.  'White,  dated  July  30,  1907,  concerning  the  completion  of  the 
itinerary  of  the  British  editors  visiting  Western  Canada. 

In  August  I  completed  the  itinerary  for  the  British  editors,  arranging-  for  their 
entertainment  and  reception  at  thirty-two  different  towns  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan 


94  DEPARTMENT  OF  TEE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

and  Alberta,  notifying  the  boards  of  trade  and  civic  representatives  at  the  various 
places.  A  universal  response  was  given  by  all  communicated  with  to  entertain  thel 
distinguished  visitors.  I  accompanied  the  editors  throughout  Manitoba,  Alberta, 
Saskatchewan  and  Ontario.  They  represented  the  leading  journals  of  the  British 
islands.  The  reception  accorded  them  was  most  friendly.  I  was  ably  assisted  by  the 
officials  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  the  Canadian  Northern  Railway  and  the 
Grand  Trunk  Railway.  They  supplied  private  cars,  literature  and  intelligent  men, 
who  made  the  trip  very  instructive  to  the  newspaper  men.  I  endeavoured  to  point 
out,  not  only  the  fertility,  but  the  great  possibilities  of  the  country,  particularly 
through  the  districts  in  the  western  provinces,  where  many  people  from  the  British 
isles  are  now  making  homes  on  the  prairie. 

During  the  month  of  September  I  visited  the  United  States  and  assisted  in 
placing  the  Western  Canada  exhibit  at  Springfield,  111.  Having  assisted  at  that 
state  fair  for  some  years  in  succession,  I  beg  to  say  that  a  very  great  interest  is 
manifested  there  in  our  products,  and  also  a  great  many  inquiries  are  made  there 
every  year  by  intending  settlers. 

These  exhibitions  do  a  great  deal  of  good,  as  they  arouse  an  interest  in  the 
minds  of  people  who  are  somewhat  undecided  as  to  the  best  place  to  emigrate  to,  for 
I  have  observed  that  other  agencies  are  very  diligent  and  spare  no  expense  in  holding 
out  the  advantages  that  they  claim  can  be  secured  by  moving  into  Texas,  Oklahama, 
Mexico  and  other  countries.  Our  exhibits  and  distribution  of  literature  are  indis- 
pensable to  combat  these  influences  and  direct  people  to  a  better  country. 

Under  instructions  from  the  minister.  I  examined  the  conditions  as  to  food  and 
fuel  and  the  prospects  of  settlers  throughout  the  west. 

During  the  month  of  October  I  examined  and  investigated  certain  departmental 
matters  at  Mortlake. 

Made  a  report  also  relating  to  United   States  work. 

During  the  month  of  November,  under  instructions  from  the  department,  I 
inspected  the  crofter  colonies  at  Wapella. 

I  submitted  a  report  to  the  secretary  of  the  department  relating  to  tin-  lien 
security  at  Battleford.  Sask. 

I  also  submitted  a  report  pointing  out  the  fact  that  our  country  had  suffered 
from  a  premature  frost,  which  had  affected  the  production,  and  placing  tin-  production 
of  our  milling  wheat  at  40,000,000  of  bushels;  and  also  showing  that  many  districts 
of  Western  Canada  had  been  specially  favoured  with  a  good  crop.  By  way  of  com- 
parison, I  pointed  out  the  stringency  and  financial  depression  in  the  United  States, 
and  expressed  the  belief  that  thousands  of  Americans  would  come  to  Canada  as  the 
result  of  conditions  in  that  country. 

During  the  month  of  November  I  made  an  extended  tour  through  the  Tramping 
Lake  district,  south  of  Battleford,  in  compliance  with  instructions  from  the  Minister 
of  the  Interior.  I  drove  some  two  hundred  miles  and  personally  ascertained  the 
existing  conditions. 

During  the  month  of  December  1  supervised  the  distribution  of  supplies  to  i. 
settlers  in  conjunction  with  the  Royal  Northwest  Mounted  Police.  This  involved 
considerable  work.  I  found  it  necessary  to  place  -mall  emergency  rations  at  Tramp- 
ing lake,  fifty  miles  south  off  Battleford;  at  Sounding  lake,  eighty  miles  south  of 
Lashburn,  and  also  north  of  Jackfish  lake.  These  supplies  were  placed  in  the  care  of 
the  Northwo-t  Mounted  Police  to  bo  used  in  emergency.  I  am  pleased  to  observe, 
however,  that  very  little  was  required  by  the  settlers  and  that  my  former  reports  h 
been  fully  verified. 

During  the  same  month,  under  instructions  from  the  secretary  of  the  department, 
I  had  all  the  lien  securities  forwarded  to  Ottawa. 

Believing  that  many  dist riots  in  Alberta  and  Saskatchewan  would  require  seed 
grain  in  the  spring  of  1908,  I  submitted  a  report  to  the  minister,  calling  attention  to 
ibis  fact,  outlining  the  possibility  of  the  obligation  being  a  heavy  one,  and  suggesting 
by  way  of  recommendation,  a  modus  operandi. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  95 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

During  the  month  of  January,  1908,  I  assisted  in  investigating  the  requirements 
of  the  settlers  in  the  way  of  seed  grain. 

In  addition  to  this,  I  let  the  tenders  for  new  immigration  buildings  at  Swift 
Current,  Vermilion  and  North  Battleford,  as  well  as  examined  the  condition  of  our 
immigration  halls  at  different  points. 

In  February,  1908,  I  reported  on  the  condition  of  the  old  immigration  buildings 
ai  Battleford. 

Also  made  a  report  of  isolated  cases  throughout  Saskatchewan,  at  Bruno,  Wadena, 
and  Prince  Albert,  requiring  attention. 

Also  a  report  relating  to  certain  Italian  immigration. 

Also  a  report  relating  to  matters  of  importance  in  connection  with  immigration 
work,  dated  February  11,  1908. 

A  complete  report  of  the  settlers  north  of  Swift  Current,  with  a  map,  showing 
location. 

A  report  on  the  condition  of  our  immigration  buildings,  addressed  to  the  Com- 
missioner of  Immigration,  dated  February  29,  1908. 

During  the  month  of  March,  1908,  I  submitted  a  report  reviewing  conditions  in 
Saskatchewan. 

I  also  reported  to  the  Commissioner  of  Immigration  the  conditions  of  the  immi- 
gration buildings  at  Craig  and  Davidson,  and  made  a  report  on  the  requirements  of 
our  department  at  Warman,  Sask. 

I  also  reported,  at  the  request  of  J.  O.  Smith,  the  condition  of  certain  land  in 
Saskatchewan.  I  reported  also  to  the  Superintendent  of  Immigration  particulars  per- 
taining to  the  construction  of  the  new  immigration  hall,  to  be  built  at  Wilkie,  Sask., 
south  of  Battleford,  on  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  which  work  I  let  by  tender  on 
March  4,  1908. 

In  connection  with  the  distribution  of  seed  grain  to  settlers  in  the  unorganized 
portion  of  Manitoba,  full  report  submitted  to  the  Commissioner  of  Immigration,  dated 
March  30.  1908. 

The  foregoing  is  the  eleventh  annual  report  that  I  have  had  the  honour  to  submit  to 
the  department.  During  these  series  of  years,  our  population  has  very  greatly  increased, 
and  the  development  of  western  Canada  is  simply  astounding.  The  uniform  coloniza- 
tion of  the  west  is  very  significant.  Eleven  years  ago  a  few  people  could  be  found,  far 
remote  from  each  other,  settled  in  little  groups,  along  the  rivers,  at  places  such  as 
Edmonton,  Battleford,  Prince  Albert,  Qu'Appelle,  and  other  points.  At  the  present 
time,  our  country  is  well  filled  with  progressive  and  thrifty  agriculturists.  Great 
areas  have  been  brought  under  cultivation.  Towns  have  sprung  up,  and  centres  of 
commerce  established,  and  in  reviewing  these  eleven  years  one  is  struck  with  the  fact 
that  the  country  has  been  wonderfully  prosperous. 

The  prospects  too  were  never  better.  All  our  districts  are  accessible  by  railway 
communication,  and  I  might  safely  say  that  we  have  under  construction,  and  in 
embryo,  under  contemplated  construction,  railways  that  will  mean  an  expenditure  of 
over  $50,000,000.  This  in  itself  should  inspire  hope  in  the  individual,  as  there  will  be 
plenty  of  money  to  earn  for  many  years  to  come.  The  agricultural  classes  will  find  a 
good  market  for  their  cattle,  their  hogs,  their  grain,  their  poultry,  and  all  the  products 
of  the  farm,  and  this  fact  should  impel  greater  energy  on  the  part  of  the  producer, 
and  still  greater  confidence  in  the  country.  Last  year  we  produced  above  40,000,000 
bushels  of  wheat  for  milling  purposes,  and  more  of  an  inferior  grade.  True,  it  was  not 
well  distributed.  Many  of  our  people  got  rich,  and  others  suffered,  but  our  people  are 
all  hopeful  for  the  future.  We  have  just  experienced  a  very  mild  winter.  The  spring 
has  opened  unusually  early.  Seeding  is  general  throughout  the  entire  west;  a  largely 
increased  area  will  be  put  in  crop;  the  ground  is  in  good  condition,  and  the  settle- 
ments throughout  western  Canada  are  in  good  shape,  and  hopeful  for  the  future. 

Your  obedient  servant. 

C.  W.  SPEERS, 
General  Colonization  Agent. 


96  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

JUVENILE  IMMIGRATION. 

No.  17. 

REPORT  OF  G.  BOGUE  SMAET,  CHIEF  INSPECTOR  OF  BRITISH  IMMI- 
GRANT CHILDREN  AND  RECEIVING  HOMES. 

The  Superintendent  of  Immigration, 

Ottawa.  Ottawa.  March  31,  1908. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  ninth  annual  report  as  chief  inspector  of 
British  Immigrant  Children  and  Receiving  Homes.  The  work  of  my  office  con- 
tinues to  grow  with  each  year's  immigration  from  the  British  Isles. 

The  children  are  segregated  throughout  the  length  and  breadth  of  our  settled 
agricultural  districts,  and  their  inspection,  for  each  child  must  be  personally  seen 
and  privately  interviewed,  necessitates  not  merely  an  enormous  mileage  but  consider- 
able time. 

The  following  statement  indicates  the  progress  of  the  work  of  inspection  during 
the  year: — 

January lt^ 

February 214 

March 184 

April 183 

May 269 

June 152 

July 175 

August *62 

September 163 

October 116 

November 105 

December 10 

Total 1,841 

Delightful  weather  and  good  roads  greatly  facilitated  the  completion  of  the 
work,  and  early  in  December  the  last   child  received  its  annual  inspection. 

It  is  a  matter  of  satisfaction  to  know  that  the  work  of  this  branch  of  the  public 
service  has  met  with  the  approval  of  the  local  government  board  of  London. 

The  Parliamentary  Secretary  to  the  Board  in  a  communication  to  the  Right 
Honourable  the  Prime  Minister  of  Canada  stated  in  part  : — 

'  I  should  like  to  say  what  very  real  pleasure  it  has  given  me  to  note  the  extra- 
ordinary kindness  with  which  your  people  in  Canada  treat  these  children,  and  to  say 
also  how  very  much  I  appreciate  the  care  which  your  officers  of  the  Department  of 
the  Interior  take  to  keep  an  eye  on  them,  nothing  has  given  me  such  real  pleasure 
during  my  three  months  at  the  Local  Government  Board  as  the  reading  of  the  reports.' 

Only  a  small  proportion  of  the  children  dependent  on  the  ratepayers  of  Great 
Britain  reach  the  goal  of  immigration  to  Canada,  to  which  I  found,  during  my  visit 
to  England,  so  many  aspire.  From  the  latest  available  statistics  one  learns  that  on 
January  1,  1907,  there  were  60,427  children  in  the  various  state  homes  and  schools 
of  England  and  Wales.  It  is  to  be  regretted  that  an  increased  number  of  children 
could  not  have  been  sent  to  the  Dominion  in  order  that  the  pressing  demand  for 
juvenile  farm  labour  and  splendid  opportunities  available  for  carefully  selected  and 
trained  children  of  this  class  might  have  been  taken  advantage  of.  For  some  years 
the  total  emigration  has  been  wholly  inadequate  to  the  demand.     A  larger  emigration 

*  Holidays. 


ii  IMMIGRATION  97 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

was  prevented  only  by  lack  of  funds.  The  labour  of  saving  the  lives  of  orphaned 
and  neglected  children  for  a  better  and  more  useful  service  to  the  state  is  dependent 
in  a  large  measure,  on  the  voluntary  offerings  of  the  charitable  and  benevolently 
inclined.  Thousands  of  pounds  are  raised  annually  for  maintenance  and  emigra- 
tion from  various  sources.  Owing  to  her  long  established  civilization  and  her  over 
populated  cities  and  rapid  development,  Great  Britain  is  famed  amongst  the  nations 
of  the  world  for  her  wide  established  and  useful  charities,  both  of  private  and  state 
origin,  for  the  purpose  of  alleviating  juvenile  want  and  suffering. 

The  most  ancient  institutions  of  a  benevolent  nature  are  to  be  found  in  the 
United  Kingdom.  Some  of  them  have  risen  from  small  and  most  discouraging 
beginnings  to  a  degree  of  prosperity  which  has  augmented  their  sphere  of  benevo- 
lence far  beyond  the  bounds  anticipated  by  their  long  departed  founders.  Excluding 
all  calculation  of  casual  beneficence,  the  money  voluntarily  given  reaches,  as  I  have 
already  stated,  an  enormous  sum,  but  notwithstanding  these  heroic  efforts  on  the 
part  of  philanthropists  and  the  contribution  of  the  Imperial  Government,  a  vast 
work  has  yet  to  be  done,  as  dire  distress  and  wretchedness  still  exist  to  a  painful 
degree,  and  the  cry  of  neglected,  suffering  children  is  still  to  be  heard  in  the  cities 
of  the  old  land. 

It  was  as  a  partial  remedy  for  these  distressing  conditions  that  the  emigration 
of  children  at  an  early  age  to  our  shores  was  inaugurated  in  the  year  1869  by  the 
late  Miss  Annie  Macpherson  and  Miss  Eye. 

The  work  has  gone  forward  unostentatiously  all  these  years,  amidst  much  hostility 
and  discouragement  both  at  home  and  abroad,  until  the  present  time,  and.  notwith- 
standing the  obstacles  placed  in  its  way,  over  60,000  boys  and  girls  have  been  settled 
on  our  shores,  and  hundreds  of  these  are  on  the  highway  to  prosperity.  Had  it  not  been 
for  the  outlook  emigration  afforded,  incalculable  numbers  of  most  deserving  children 
would  have  been  practically  lost  to  the  nation,  would  have  been  swallowed  up  in  the 
social  maelstrom,  and  would  have  gone  to  the  ranks  of  the  unemployed  and  unem- 
ployable of  the  old  land,  and  thus  have  added  to  the  great  economic  problems  that 
are  continually  engaging  the  attention  of  His  Majesty's  Imperial  Government. 

As  illustrating  the  benefits  of  emigration  f»r  a  worthy  class  of  children,  I  might 
mention  the  following  cases  which  were  recently  brought  to  my  attention : — 

Nine  years  ago  a  lad  of  ten,  who  had  lost  his  mother,  was  left  with  his  stepfather. 
It  was  found  that  he  was  being  treated  shamefully,  and  he  was  then  sent  to  his  grand- 
parents, but  they  were  too  old  and  poor  and  quite  unequal  to  his  proper  upbringing. 
Finally  he  was  placed  in  the  Children's  Home  and  Orphanage,  Bonner  Boad,  London, 
and  in  due  time  was  sent  to  Canada  and  placed  in  an  excellent  farm  home.  The  far- 
mer describes  him  as  a  smart,  intelligent  boy,  with  a  splendid  reputation  in  the  neigh- 
bourhood, and  in  fact  states  that  a  finer,  nicer  lad  never  came  under  his  roof. 

Sixteen  years  ago  W.B.,  then  a  lad  of  ten  years  of  age,  poor  and  unbefriended, 
applied  at  the  Manchester  and  Salford  Boys'  Homes  for  a  helping  hand.  He  was 
admitted  and  in  time  developed  into  a  sturdy  lad.  Expressing  a  desire  to  go  to  Canada, 
he  was  sent  out  in  1896  with  a  party  of  boys,  a  friend  of  the  home  personally  defray- 
ing the  expenses  of  his  emigration.  On  his  arrival  in  the  Dominion  he  was  placed 
with  a  farmer  in  one  of  the  central  counties  of  Ontario,  and  soon  earned  for  himself 
an  excellent  reputation.  After  completing  his  indentures  he  decided  to  go  to  Western 
Canada,  which  he  did,  settling  in  British  Columbia,  where  he  has  prospered.  Last 
year  this  young  '  Canadian '  paid  a  four-months'  visit  to  England,  returning  at  the 
end  of  that  time  to  this  country.  He  has  not  forgotten  to  express,  personally,  his 
gratitude  to  those  connected  with  the  Manchester  Homes  for  the  help  they  gave  him 
in  sending  him  to  Canada. 

Many  similar  cases  might  be  mentioned  showing  how  boys,  who  were  homeless 
and  unbefriended  in  England,  have  reached  positions  of  independence  in  this  country 
through  pluck  and  perseverance. 
25— ii— 7 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

A  few  weeks  ago  I  received  the  following  letter  from  a  young  man  who  had  come 
to  Canada  through  the  agency  of  one  of  our  societies: — 

'  I  came  to  Canada  about  the  first  of  September,  1S95.  In  December  of  that  year 
I  obtained  a  position  with  a  farmer  in  the  province  of  Quebec,  for  whom  I  worked 
until  the  fall  of  1902,  and  in  which  time  I  practically  learned  the  rudiments  of  farm- 
ing. In  that  year  I  took  a  trip  to  England,  but  the  condition  of  the  country  prevalent 
at  that  time  not  being  any  too  bright  on  account  of  the  British-Boor  war,  I  made  a 
short  stop  and  was  back  in  Canada  and  with  the  same  farmer  by  the  end  of  January. 
1903.  In  May  following  I  entered  the  employ  of  a  provincial  lumberman  with  a 
slightly  better  monetary  remuneration,  and  remained  there  until  May,  1905.  In  that 
year  I  had  two  or  three  good  offers  for  work  when  an  opening  presented  itself  on  one 
of  the  railroads  as  baggage  master.  The  wage  was  not  as  good  as  the  offers  I  pre- 
viously received,  but  I  saw  the  chance  to  get  a  step  higher,  and  accepted  it.  The  days 
were  ldng,  and  with  the  exception  of  a  few  hours  the  work  was  hustling.  While  there 
I  also  took  care  of  the  offices.  I  thought  I  would  like  to  take  a  course  at  a  business 
college,  and  in  September,  1905,  I  entered  the  college,  where  after  five  months  of 
hard  studying  I  obtained  a  position  with  a  prominent  company  in  a  large  city  in 
Ontario,  which  position  I  have  held  for  the  past  two  years,  and  I  am  making  a  good 
living.' 

This  youth's  employer  drew  my  attention  to  the  case  as  an  illustration  of  what  a 
well-behaved,  steady  young  fellow  can  do  in  Canada  by  perseverance. 

The  demand  of  our  farmers  for  English  juvenile  labour  has  been  incessant,  and 
the  societies  were  able  only  to  satisfy  a  small  percentage  of  the  applications  they 
received.  In  fact  some  of  these  agencies  received  as  many  as  six  applications  for  each 
child.  This  speaks  well  for  the  children,  and  illustrates  the  fact  that  the  Canadian 
farmer  appreciates  the  usefulness  of  the  home  boy  as  a  farm  labourer. 

Considering  the  thousands  of  these  young  immigrants  who  have  been  settled  in 
Canada,  and  the  continuous  demand  for  their  labour,  their  value  to  the  country  from 
a  national  and  economic  view  point  is  beyond  question.  They  soon  settle  down  to 
work  and  adapt  themselves  to  their  altered  conditions,  and  while  one  hears  of  other 
immigrants  drifting  into  our  cities  out  of  work,  it  is  a  most  significant  fact  that 
amongst  such  derelicts  one  does  not  find  the  so-called  '  home  boys.' 

Under  the  existing  agreement  with  the  British  government,  the  cost  of  the  first 
annual  inspection  is  borne  by  the  Canadian  government,  and  each  subsequent  inspec- 
tion is  provided  for  by  the  government  of  Great  Britain  on  a  fixed  scale  of  fees  regu- 
lated according  to  the  age  of  the  child  at  the  time  of  its  emigration,  as  upon  the  age 
of  the  child  depends  the  number  of  visits  of  inspection  that  would  be  required.  Under 
the  terms  of  the  agreement  up  to  December  31,  1906,  2,112  children  have  received 
first  and  recurrent  inspections.  The  following  statement  shows  the  number  of  Poor 
Law  or  Union  Children  emigrated  to  Canada  under  the  authority  of  the  Boards  of 
Guardians  since  1898: — 


Year  Emigrated. 

Year  Reported  Upon. 

Number. 

1898 

1S99 

63 

LflOO        

123 



1! 

1901         

162 

l'.IHl                                

1902     

160 

1902..                            

L903             

116 

1903                                           

1904 

360 

334 



1906  

419 

1906 

369 

Total 

2,112 

U  IMMIGRATION  99 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Whenever  circumstances  have  permitted  I  have  made  special  journeys  to  the 
centres  of  distribution  for  the  purpose  of  inspecting  newly  arrived  parties  of  juveniles. 
The  number  so  individually  inspected  are  not  included  in  the  statistics  already  given. 
These  inspections  have  confirmed,  in  a  large  measure,  my  opinion  that  every  care  is 
exercised  in  the  old  land  in  selecting  the  children  for  colonial  life.  This  is  important 
and  far-seeing. 

If  a  child  is  sent  to  the  Dominion,  the  Home  authorities  must  stand  in  loco 
parentis  to  it  until  it  reaches  its  18th  year.  There  must  also  be  reasonable  grounds 
for  judging  that  it  is  the  right  subject  to  send  abroad.  This  knowledge  is  to  be  gained 
only  by  a  period  of  probation  in  an  atmosphere  different  from  what  it  has  been  accus- 
tomed to  before  final  arrangements  had  been  effected  for  its  emigration.  This  pro- 
cedure, I  learned  during  my  visit  to  Great  Britain,  is  adopted  by  most,  if  not  all,  of 
the  agencies. 

Further,  a  stringent  medical  examination  is  conducted  in  the  homes  during  this 
probationary  period. 

From  my  personal  acquaintance  with  the  authorities  of  the  English  homes  and 
schools,  I  am  free  to  report  that  reasonable  precautions  are  taken  to  send  to  Canada 
only  such  children  as  are  free  from  moral  and  physical  taint.  How  far  these  philan- 
thropists have  succeeded  may  be  judged  by  the  fact  that  only  two  home  children,  both 
boys,  were  formally  charged  with  offences  in  our  courts  during  the  year.  One  of  these 
unfortunates  who  had  previously  conducted  himself  respectably,  and  bore  a  good  char- 
acter, was  permitted  to  leave  the  court  on  the  guarantee  of  the  home  to  return  him 
to  England  at  their  own  expense.  From  recent  information  I  learn  that  he  has  settled 
down  and  is  working  steadily  in  the  old  country.  The  action  of  the  home  in  returning 
him  was,  in  my  opinion,  a  wise  decision,  not  only  for  the  boy  himself,  but  for  other 
young  immigrants.  In  the  other  case,  the  offender  will  be  deported  by  process  of  law. 
This  youth,  as  far  as  I  have  been  able  to  ascertain,  was  not,  strictly  speaking,  a  home 
boy,  but  had  been  brought  to  Canada  under  some  private  auspices. 

Little  need  be  said  concerning  the  general  health  of  the  children.  Six  deaths 
occurred  during  the  year,  and  in  these  cases  it  is  a  significant  fact  that  they  were  all 
young  children  and  had  been  in  this  country  less  than  two  years.  Two  boys  came  to 
their  death  by  accident;  one  by  drowning  and  the  other  dying  under  an  anaesthetic 
whilst  undergoing  a  surgical  operation  as  the  result  of  a  cut  received  at  his  work  in 
the  lumber  woods.  I  made  both  cases  the  subject  of  official  investigation,  and  they 
were  found  to  have  been  purely  accidental. 

It  happens  inevitably  that  each  year  some  chidren  are  temporarily  lost  track  of  by 
the  agencies.  They  are  usually  boys  of  about  16  years  of  age  and  able  to  take  care  of 
themselves.  However,  every  effort  is  made  to  locate  them  and  they  are  eventually 
found.  Since  the  inauguration  of  this  branch  of  the  service  a  successful  supervision 
has  been  maintained,  as  may  be  inferred  from  the  fact  that  out  of  the  large  number 
of  children  inspected  there  have  been  only  twenty-nine  absconders,  i.e.,  those  who  have 
left  their  situations  and  whose  whereabouts  have  not  been  discovered. 

Thirteen  children,  four  girls  and  nine  boys,  have  been  returned  to  England  during 
the  past  two  years. 

Three  children  have  removed  to  the  United  States. 

It  may  be  well  to  observe  that  the  juvenile  emigration  movement  is  conducted 
without  financial  gain  by  accredited  and  responsible  persons  and  agencies,  who  .are 
actuated  by  the  highest  motives.  For  well  nigh  forty  years  it  has  occupied  a  unique 
position  in  relation  to  our  general  immigration  system,  in  that  each  individual  mem- 
ber of  every  band  of  young  immigrants,  under  the  age  of  seventeen  years,  must  pass 
an  examination  at  the  hands  of  Canadian  government  officers  in  Great  Britain  before 
being  permitted  to  set  sail  for  these  shores. 

The   procedure,    in  brief,   is    as    follows: — The   emigration    agency    advises    the 
Dominion  emigration  agent  of  the  proposed  emigration  party  and  the  date  of  their 
25— ii— 7i 


100  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

sailing.  As  the  children  approach  the  gangway  in  single  file  they  are  individually 
examined  by  the  medical  officer  of  the  board  of  trade  and  subsequently  by  the  ship's 
physician.  The  Dominion  emigration  officer  is  furnished  with  a  list  of  the  names, 
ages  and  intended  destination,  together  with  other  data  concerning  the  children.  He 
calls  out  the  names  and  carefully  scrutinizes  each  child.  This  official  then  signs  a 
certificate,  which  reads  as  follows : — 

I  hereby  certify  that  the  above-named  children — in  number,  are  of  a  desirable 
class,  and  have  been  duly  placed  on  board  the  SS.  in  charge  of 

Liverpool,  190  . 

Dominion  Immigration  Agent. 

A  similar  procedure  is  followed  on  the  ship's  arrival  in  Canada : — 
This  is  to  certify  that  the  within-named  (number)  (  )  children  are  of  a  desir- 

able class  and  have  been  duly  landed  at  in  charge  of 

190     . 

Canadian  Immigration  Agent  at  the  port  of 

The  Canadian  port  medical  officer  also  examines  each  child,  and  detains  for  a 
nable  period  any  that  are,  in  his  opinion,  unable  at  once  to  pass  muster  under  the 
Canadian  medical  regulations. 

After  successfully  running  the  gauntlet  of  such  recurrent  examinations,  it  has 
been  claimed  by  many  friends  of  the  work  that  Canada  gets  only  '  hand-picked ' 
juvenile  immigrants.  Be  that  as  it  may,  however,  I  am  of  the  opinion  that  were  it 
not  for  the  guarantee  these  precautions  afford,  the  children  as  a  whole  would  not  have 
been  so  eagerly  sought  after  by  our  farmers. 

The  societies,  I  am  pleased  to  state,  co-operate,  with  the  government  in  respecting 
to  the  letter  the  provisions  of  the  law. 

It  is  quite  beyond  my  recall  to  mention  a  single  case  of  a  boy  or  girl,  xmder  the 
supervision  of  the  homes  or  the  department,  that  has  become  a  public  charge  during 
the  past  few  years. 

In  dealing  with  such  a  large  number  of  children  it  is  inevitable  that  there  should 
be  failures.  Notwithstanding  the  fact  that  each  person  to  whom  a  boy  or  girl  is 
entrusted  must  produce  satisfactory  credentials  as  to  character,  some  are  subsequently 
found  to  be  undesirable,  and  removals  are  necessary  in  the  interest  of  the  child. 
Incompatibility  of  temper  is  frequently  found  between  employer  and  employee,  and 
in  some  cases  I  have  found  that  the  children  have  contributed  to  their  own  discom- 
fort and  also  that  the  employer  is  largely  to  blame;  but  taking  everything  into  con- 
sideration, there  is  only  an  infinitesimal  number  of  these  young  labourers  who  are 
not  doing  and  faring  well  at  the  hands  of  the  Canadian  farmer. 

That  a  wise  discrimination  has  been  shown  in  the  selection  of  situations  is  obvi- 
ous after  a  perusal  of  the  reports  received,  which  indicate  that  of  1,816  inspections 
1,397  children  were  found  in  very  good  homes  and  situations,  187  in  good  or  fair 
homes  and  situations  and  24  in  homes  designated  as  doubtful  or  unsatisfactory. 

In  this  connection  it  may  not  be  uninteresting'  to  here  point  out  some  of  the 
precautions  taken  by  the  local  government  board  to  safeguard  the  welfare  of  these 
young  immigrants  in  Canada. 

When  the  emigration  of  a  child  at  the  cost  of  the  poor  rate  is  proposed  the 

rdians  of  the  union  or  parish  to  which  the  child  belongs  are  responsible  for  the 
fulfilment  of  the  following  conditions  under  which  the  local  board  authorize  the 
guardians  to  incur  the  expenditure  that  may  be  proposed  for  the  emigration: — 

(a)  The  production  of  a  justice's  certificate  of  the  child's  consent  to  emigrate; 
also 

(b)  A  medical  report  as  to  its  health,  both  of  body  and  mind,  certifying  whether, 
in  the  medical  man's  opinion,  the  child  is  in  all  respects  a  suitable  subject 
for  emigration  to  Canada;   and 


ii  IMMIGRATION  101 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

(c)  A  cheque  (where  due)  in  payment  of  fees  for  inspection  of  the  child  in 
Canada  by  the  Dominion  Immigration  Inspector.    It  must  also  be  shown: — 

(d)  That  the  child  has  been  educated  at  their  cost  for  at  least  six  months.  The 
guardians  must  also 

(e)  Give  the  name  and  address  of  the  agency  under  whose  auspices  the  child  is 
to  emigrate; 

(f)  State  whether  they  are  satisfied  that  the  person  taking  out  the  child  has  a 
reasonable  prospect  of  finding  a  suitable  home  for  the  child  in  Canada; 

(g)  Specify  whether  they  have  obtained  from  the  person  taking  out  the  child  a 
written  understanding  that  the  child  shall  be  placed  with  a  family  of  the 
same  religion  as  that  to  which  the  child  belongs ;  and  that  immediately  after 
the  child  is  placed  out  the  Department  of  the  Interior  at  Ottawa  shall  be 
furnished  with  a  report  containing  the  name  and  address  of  the  person  with 
whom  the  child  is  placed  (such  address  to  include  the  name  of  the  nearest 
post  office,  the  name  of  the  lot,  the  concession  and  the  name  of  the  township 
in  which  such  person  resides),  and  that  a  report  containing  similar  infor- 
mation shall  be  furnished  to  the  guardians; 

(h)  Assure  the  local  government  board  that  in  connection  with  the  emigration 
the  requirements  of  the  Canadian  Immigration  Act  (or  laws)  will  in  no  way 
be  contravened. 

The  local  government  board  deprecate  the  sending  out  to  Canada  of  girls  above 
the  age  of  twelve  years  except  under  very  special  circumstances.  Such  girls,  if 
accompanying  a  younger  brother  or  sister,  are  permitted  to  emigrate,  but  otherwise 
the  board  do  not  assent  to  their  emigration  unless  the  agency  effecting  the  emigra- 
tion undertake  that  each  such  girl  will  be  looked  after  in  Canada  by  a  lady  resident 
in  the  neighbourhood  of  the  home  in  which  the  girl  will  be  placed,  who  will  undertake 
to  act  as  her  special  friend,  and  who  will  not  at  the  same  time  occupy  that  position  in 
regard  to  another  child. 

It  will  thus  be  seen  that  the  system  by  which  the  work  is  regulated  and  carried 
on  shows  a  very  careful  selection  of  emigrants  and  the  rejection  of  those  of  a  doubt- 
ful or  undesirable  type. 

Inspector  R.  W.  Hillyard  says  in  his  report  for  the  year: — 

'  After  another  year's  inspection  of  immigrant  children  in  the  provinces  of  Ontario 
and  Quebec,  I  beg  to  report  that  I  am  more  than  ever  impressed  with  the  great 
importance  of  child  immigration  to  Canada  and  with  the  satisfactory  condition  in 
which  I  found  the  children  placed.  One  cannot  but  feel  how  wise  it  is  to  send  these 
children  to  enjoy  the  advantages  of  the  Dominion  while  they  are  still  young  and  easily 
adaptable  to  these  new  conditions. 

'  I  found  the  great  majority  of  the  children,  both  boys  and  girls,  comfortably 
placed  and  generally  well  treated.  With  few  exceptions  they  are  a  rugged,  healthy 
lot  and  are  fast  developing  into  sturdy  and  useful  helpers.  Their  intelligence  and 
education  are  fair,  comparing  favourably  with  the  generality  of  our  children  in  rural 
districts.  I  found  that  they  readily  adapt  themselves  to  their  new  environments  and 
to  the  work  on  farms. 

'  Complaints  of  ill-treatment  are  few  and  are  becoming  less  frequent  probably 
owing  largely  to  the  vigilance  of  inspectors  of  the  societies  and  the  government.  It  is 
also  noticeable  that  the  remuneration  received  by  the  children  is  better  than  in  the 
past;  the  growing  demand  for  labour  and  the  liberal  wages  now  paid  to  farm  hands 
is  helping  the  condition  of  these  children. 

'  Some  of  the  children,  who  are  not  very  satisfactory,  prove  so  owing  to  the  in- 
judicious method  of  training  adopted  by  employers.  Boys  and  girls  will  generally 
follow  a  good  leader;  it  is  the  driver  they  object  to.  There  is  undoubtedly  a  grave 
responsibility  in  dealing  with  the  children  of  a  certain  age.  They  should  be  moulded 
rather  than  coerced.  Being  fully  impressed  with  the  importance  of  this  statement,  I 
do  not  fail  to  commend  those  who  are  dealing  with  the  children  along  these  lines ; 


102  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  il 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

■while  on  the  other  hand  remonstrances  are  made  with  parties  who  adopt  harsher 
methods.  One  cannot  but  be  interested  in  the  welfare  of  these  children  and  realize 
that  it  is  a  duty  to  do  what  is  possible  to  develop  their  material  and  moral  welfare.' 

Mr.  Thomas  Cory,  Assistant  Inspector  in  Western  Canada,  reports: — 

'  I  have  visited  the  different  boys  and  girls  and  have  found  them  doing  satisfac- 
torily. Many  of  the  boys  are  looking  forward  to  the  time  when  they  can  take  up  home- 
steads for  themselves.  In  this  I  encourage  them  as  it  makes  them  more  contented  and 
is  an  incentive  to  take  advantage  of  their  opportunities. 

'  As  a  whole  the  children  give  their  employers  good  satisfaction,  and  I  did  not 
receive  a  complaint  concerning  a  single  boy  from  their  masters;  neither  were  there 
any  complaints  from  the  boys  concerning  their  treatment.' 

Inspector  K.  J.  Henry  says  in  his  report  for  the  year: — 

'  I  resumed  the  duties  of  inspection  in  January  last  and  have  visited  upwards  of 
fifty  counties  in  the  provinces  of  Ontario  and  Quebec,  besides  the  districts  of  Mus- 
koka,  Parry  Sound,  Nipissing  and  Algoma.  I  am  pleased  to  state  that  with  few 
exceptions  the  children  were  found  in  desirable  homes  and  fully  appreciated  by  their 
employers.  The  appeal  which  is  met  in  every  district,  by  farmers  and  others  for  both 
boys  and  girls  is  a  sure  indication  that  their  services  are  required  and  that  the  pre- 
judice against  them  which  formerly  prevailed  has  now  almost  disappeared. 

'  I  am  constantly  preaching  patience  and  fair  treatment  for  the  children  and 
illustrating  by  comparisons  what  is  to  be  expected  from  the  employer. 

'  The  country  stands  in  need  of  the  children.  Close  and  careful  inspection  such 
as  I  believe  is  being  done,  is  therefore  necessary.  The  children  need  it  and  many  look 
anxiously  for  the  inspector's  visit,  while  those  with  whom  they  are  placed  as  a  rule 
prefer  it,  and  in  many  instances  are  not  only  pleased  but  agreeably  surprised  to  learn 
that  the  government  is  taking  such  a  deep  interest  in  this  good  and  noble  work. 

'  My  report  on  each  child  inspected  is  in  your  possession.' 

Mr.  F.  W.  Annand,  Assistant  Inspector  in  the  provinces  of  Nova  Scotia  and  New 
Brunswick,  reports: — 

'  The  children  who  have  come  under  my  inspection  have  been  found  to  be  gener- 
ally, both  physically  and  mentally  satisfactory.  I  have  already  reported  upon  them 
individually  with  regard  to  the  physical  condition,  general  behaviour,  and  character 
of  the  situations  provided  for  them. 

'  During  the  past  year  I  visited  children  in  the  maritime  provinces  and  found 
them,  with  few  exceptions,  giving  general  satisfaction  and  adapting  themselves  to 
their  new  life  and  conditions. 

'  In  the  main,  their  general  behaviour  has  been  satisfactory  and,  .'altogether,  I  find 
they  are  making  good  progress.  Generally  speaking  these  children  were  found  to  be  in 
good  homes,  true,  some  poor,  but  good  honest  thinking  people  who  take  an  interest  in 
the  welfare  of  their  children  of  adoption. 

'  Their  condition  of  life  appeared  favourable  to  their  becoming  good  citizens  of 
the  Dominion  of  Canada.  The  large  majority  of  the  children  were  upon  farms,  and 
seemed  to  be  satisfied  with  their  lot,  taking  an  interest  in  all  pertaining  to  farm  life. 
The  girls,  upon  the  other  hand,  show  that  they  are  being  educated  to  domestic  life. 

'  The  children,  in  the  majority  of  cases,  are  bright  and  intelligent,  and  are  well 
spoken  of.     I  was  well  pleased  with  my  tour  of  inspection. 

'  It  is  a  noticeable  fact,  each  year,  the  homes  in  the  British  Isles  realize  the  im- 
portance that  Canada  wants  nothing  but  the  best.' 


11 


IMMIGRATION 


103 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Table  showing  the  number  of  juvenile  immigrants  who  arrived  in  Canada  during 
the  past  six  years,  together  with  the  number  of  applications  received  by  the  various 
agencies  during  the  same  period : — 


Fiscal  Year. 

Children 
Immigrated. 

Applications 
Received. 

1900-1 

977 
1,540 
1.979 
2.212 
2,814 
3,258 
1,455 

5,783 

1901-2 

8,587 

1902-3 

14,219 

1903-4  

16,573 

17,833 
19,374 

1905-6 

1906-7  (9  months) . 

15,800 

Total 

14,235 

98,169 

The  following  statement  will  show  the  number  of  children  emigrated  to  Canada 
during  the  fiscal  year  by  some  of  the  principal  societies,  and  the  number  of  applica- 
tions received  for  children  during  the  same  period : — 


Society  or  Agency. 


Dr. 


Children 
Emigrated. 


Barnardo's  Homes,  Toronto  and  Peterboro',   Ontario,  and  Winnipeg  and 

Russell,  Manitoba     950 

Miss  Macpherson,  Stratf<  >rd 166 

Mr.  J.  W.  G.  Fegan,  Toronto 7:; 

Rev.  Dr.  A.  E.  Gregory,  Hamilton 76 

Rev.  Robert  Wallace,  '  Marcliinont  Home,'  Belleville So 

'Fairknowe  '  Home,  (Mr.  Quarrier's,  |  Brockville. 183 

The  Misses  Smyly,  Hespeler   25 

Mrs.  Birt,  Knowlton 173 

The  Catholic  Emigration  Association    332 

Church  of  England  Waifs'  ami  Strai  b'  Society,  Sherbrooke 45 

Church  of  England  Waifs'  and  Strays'  Society,  Niagara-on-the-Lake 81 

"Bristol  Emigration  Society ! 

Mr.  Middlemore,  Halifax    145 

Salvation  Army  Emigration  Agency 

Mrs.  Wall  is,  Toronto 12 

Mrs.  Close,  Nauwigewauk,  X.I', 3 

Women's  National  Immigration  Society,  Montreal 31 


Applications 

rectived 

f.  ii' ( lnldren. 


11,060 
660 

(<>)500 
458  . 
702 
937 
212 
929 
805 
133 
415 


300 


53 

2.". 
50 


Juvenile  immigration  has  certain  obvious  advantages  over  adult  immigration 
m  that  juveniles  are  sent  to  Canada  at  the  impressionable  age  and  are  placed  in  the 
country  districts,  where  they  receive  elementary  education  in  the  public  schools  and 
early  acquire  Canadian  sentiments.  In  the  great  majority  of  cases  they  remain  on 
the  land,  and  assist  in  developing  our  agricultural  resources.  They  come  with  no 
exaggerated  ideas  of  the  country,  have  no  prejudices  to  surmount  and  their  adapta- 
bility to  farm  life  is  beyond  question. 

The  records  of  the  various  societies  show  that  many  of  the  home  boys  of  a  few 
years  since  are  now  the  owners  in  fee  simple  of  the  soil  they  till,  and  rejoice  in  an 
independence  of  the  most  sturdy  character. 

It  is  a  recognized  fact  that  juvenile  immigration  cannot  be  properly  conducted 
in  the  absence  of  receiving  and  distributing  homes;  indeed  it  has  been  a  decision  of 
both  the  British  and  Canadian  governments  of  many  years  standing  that  these 
young  immigrants  must  have  a  home  to  which  they  may  return  while  out  of  employ- 
ment or  during  illness.  Each  indenture  contains  a  definite  clause  to  the  effect  that 
in  case  an  employer  finds  a  boy  or  girl  unsuitable,  it  may,  after  a  reasonable  notice 
has  been  given,  be  returned  to  the  home. 


*  Did  not  emigrate. 


(a)  Approximate. 


104  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

It  is  significant  that  on  the  occasion  of  my  annual  inspections  of  these  homes  I 
have  found  a  surprisingly  small  number  of  children  in  residence. 

The  work  of  these  centres  has  so  expanded,  that  in  addition  to  a  superintendent 
a  permanent  staff  of  '  visitors '  are  employed  by  the  societies  for  the  purpose  of  main- 
taining a  continuous  supervision  of  their  wards  in  their  homes  and  -ituations.  In 
this  connection  it  is  my  desire  to  say  that  all  matters  concerning  the  welfare  of  the 
children,  and  suggested  improvements  or  alterations  which  I  have  proposed,  have  been 
promptly  acknowledged  and  acted  upon. 

During  the  past  year  changes  have  occurred  in  the  personnel  of  the  executive 
of  some  of  the  homes,  and  one  agency  has'  been  added  to  my  list — Airs.  James  Wallis, 
of  the  Hurst  Training  Home,  London,  S.E.  This  lady  has  established  a  receiving 
and  distributing  home  at  Toronto  for  boys.  From  her  agent  who  accompanied  the 
first  party  to  Canada,  I  learned  that  her  young  immigrants  are  gathered  from  a  class 
other  than  the  exceptionally  poor,  and  many  are  connected  with  families  of  respect- 
able tradespeople  and  artisans.  On  their  arrival  at  Toronto  and  before  the  party  was 
broken  by  distribution  I  inspected  the  children,  and  found  them  of  good  physique 
and  intelligence  and  of  such  a  type  as  should  be  acceptable  to  the  Canadian  farmer. 
The  Reverend  Robert  Hall,  a  prominent  Toronto  clergyman,  has  undertaken  the  re- 
sponsibility of  placing  the  children  in  situations,  and  will  act  as  agent  for  Mrs. 
Wallis. 

DR.   BABNARDO's   HOMES — TORONTO   AND   PETERBOROUGH,   ONTARIO. 

Mr.  Owen,  the  Canadian  representative  of  the  Barnardo  Homes,  advises  me  that 
their  operations  of  the  past  year  were  the  most  successful  and  satisfactory  in  the 
history  of  their  work.  It  has  witnessed  a  steady  increase  in  the  demand  for  their  young 
immigrants  and  with  this  increase  is  recognized  an  advance  not  only  in  the  quantity 
but  in  the  quality  of  the  openings  that  are  offering.  It  is  rare,  the  superintendent 
stated,  to  find  one  of  their  wards  who  is  not  abundantly  fed,  well  clothed,  decently 
housed  and  enjoying  not  only  the  necessaries  of  life  but  a  fair  share  of  its  comforts. 

During  the  year  exceedingly  few  complaints  of  neglect,  overwork  or  any  kind  of 
mis-usage  have  been  reported ;  on  the  whole,  satisfaction  with  their  lot  prevails. 

Their  boarding-out  system  is  still  in  active  operation  and  showing  good  result-. 
There  are  now  1,350  boys  and  girls  placed  in  foster-homes  where  their  maintenance 
is  paid  for  by  the  Barnardo  organization.  This  department  alone  involves  the  dis- 
bursement of  money  drawn  from  English  sources  to  the  extent  of  over  $S0,000  annually. 

The  demand  for  girls  is  insatiable  and  the  wages  paid  useful  and  competent 
girls  are  higher  than  ever. 

Two  visits  of  inspection  have  been  made  to  Hazel  Brae,  Peterborough,  the  dis- 
tributing centre  for  girls,  and  I  can  only  repeat  what  I  have  stated  in  former  reports, 
that  the  comforts  and  accommodation  for  the  girls  are  all  that  could  be  desired.  The 
home  is  in  charge  of  a  large  staff  of  sympathetic  ladies  who  are  devoted  to  the 
interests  of  the  children. 

The  boys'  headquarters,  52  Peter  St.,  Toronto,  is  splendidly  adapted  for  its  pur- 
pose. The  building  is  spacious,  comfortable  and  conveniently  situated.  At  the  time 
of  my  inspection  workmen  were  engaged  in  making  alterations  which  will  afford 
accommodation  for  a  larger  number  of  boys.  A  large  clerical  staff  is  permanently 
employed  and  an  enormous  correspondence  carried  on  with  the  children. 

Since  the  inauguration  of  Dr.  Barnardo's  emigration  system  over  19,000  children 
have  been  placed  out  in  the  Dominion. 

MR.   J.   W.   C.   FEGAN's  RECEIVING   HOME,  TORONTO. 

On  May  30  I  inspected  this  home,  and  personally  inspected  a  party  of  60  boys 
of  an  average  age  of  12  years  that  had  just  reached  Canada.  In  health  and  type  they 
were  acceptable  immigrants.  This  home  is  splendidly  arranged  for  the  reception  of 
children. 


il  IMMIGRATION  105 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

I  had  previously  seen  many  of  the  boys  in  training  in  Mr.  Fegan's  excellent 
schools  at  Stony  Stratford  and  Southwark,  London.  Each  boy  had  a  trunk  or  box 
filled  with  a  well  assorted  supply  of  clothing  and  other  necessaries.  Five  hundred 
applications  were  on  file  for  this  spring's  parties. 

Between  1,800  and  1,900  children  have  been  sent  to  Canada  by  Mr.  Fegan,  and 
of  this  number,  I  understand  400  have  voluntarily  repaid  their  passage  money  for  the 
purpose  of  assisting  other  juveniles  to  Canada. 

MR.   QUARRIER's   FA1RKNOWE  HOME,  BROCKVILLE. 

Mr.  Burges  reports  a  most  satisfactory  year's  work.  The  children  are  cordially 
received  by  the  people  of  Brockville.  I  have  inspected  some  of  their  young  immi- 
grants during  the  past  year,  and  have  found  them  a  sturdy,  promising  lot.  The  work 
of  this  agency  is  held  in  the  highest  esteem  by  the  people  of  Brockville  and  surround- 
ing country.    The  home  is  well  equipped  and  splendidly  maintained. 

MISS    MACPHERSON'S    HOME,    STRATFORD,    ONTARIO. 

During  the  past  year  two  parties  of  children  were  received  and  distributed  from 
this  centre  totalling  one  hundred  and  seventy  nine  boys  and  girls  of  the  average  age 
of  twelve  years.  These  juveniles  were  distributed  in  the  farming  districts  of  western 
Ontario. 

On  May  2  last,  I  paid  a  special  visit  to  Stratford  and  had  an  ample  opportunity 
to  individually  inspect  these  youthful  immigrants — their  ninety-first  emigration  party 
— and  found  them  a  promising  lot.  They  were  all  well  supplied  with  clothing  and 
other  necessaries. 

A  large  number  of  their  wards  are  under  departmental  supervision  and  the  report 
speaks  in  satisfactory  terms  of  their  progress  and  adaptability  for  their  new  occupa- 
tion. I  am  again  pleased  to  report  that  the  work  of  this  agency  is  conscientiously 
and  efficiently  carried  on. 

MR.   J.  T.   MIDDLEMORE'S  CANADIAN  HOME,  FAIRVIEW,  HALIFAX,  N.S. 

Mr.  Middlemore's  Canadian  receiving  home  was  visited  by  me  on  June  7.  I 
found  a  number  of  young  children  in  residence,  who  had  within  a  few  days  of  my 
inspection  arrived  from  the  Birmingham  homes.  The  ocean  journey  had  told  rather 
heavily  on  the  children  and  it  was  considered  advisable  not  to  send  them  out  for  a 
few  days. 

This  home  is  well  managed  and  the  superintendent,  I  believe,  exerts  £  beneficial 
influence  over  his  wards. 

There  are  900  children  under  18  years  of  age  under  active  supervision. 

REV.  ROBERT  WALLACE,  MARCHMOXT,  BELLEVILLE,  ONTARIO — MANCHESTER  AND  SALFORD  BOYS' 

AND  GIRLS'  REFUGES. 

The  first  annual  party  of  juveniles,  for  1908,  will  it  is  expected  sail  for  Canada 
in  April  next. 

The  children  are  carefully  selected  and  their  physical  fitness  is  always  given  first 
consideration.  This  important  feature  is  borne  out  by  the  satisfactory  reports  of  the 
last  departmental  inspection.  Another  fact  worthy  of  notice  is  that  no  child  is  sent 
to  the  Dominion  without  the  consent  of  its  relatives  or  other  persons  who  should  be 
consulted. 

The  young  immigrants  are  placed  out  under  indenture  with  farmers  in  central 
and  eastern  Ontario. 

Mr.  Wallace  has  an  extensive  clientele  and  for  many  years  has  supplied  the  same 
farmers  with  juvenile  help.  Marchmont  is  the  pioneer  receiving  home  for  British 
children  in  Canada. 


106  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  U 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
MRS.  C.  L.  CLOSE'S  FARM  HOME  SCHOOL,  NAUWIGEWAUK,  N.B. 

This  institution  was  established  in  1905,  by  Mrs.  C.  L.  Close  of  101  Eaton  Square, 
London,  England,  and  is  situated  within  18  miles  of  the  city  of  St.  John.  The 
farm  consists  of  180  acres  partly  cleared  and  is  charmingly  situated.  It  has  been 
stocked  with  horses,  cattle  and  poultry.  A  practical  Canadian  farmer  oversees  the 
work.  Mrs.  Close's  policy  is  to  combine  the  English  poor  law  system  with  emigration, 
and  to  establish  from  time  to  time  similar  farm  schools  throughout  the  maritime 
provinces. 

At  present  the  Nauwigewauk  farm  is  at  the  experimental  stage.  Mrs.  Close  hopes, 
however,  to  prove  by  its  success  the  feasibility  of  her  scheme,  from  an  economical 
point  of  view. 

The  boys  are  to  be  taught  general  farm  work  as  soon  as  they  are  old  enough  to 
perform  labour,  and  the  girls  dairy,  kitchen  and  house-work.  The  children  all  attend 
the  public  school  of  the  district,  an  excellent  country  school  presided  over  by  a  cap- 
able and  painstaking  teacher.  I  called  at  the  school  and  examined  the  children  in 
their  various  forms  and  found  their  progress  very  fair  indeed.  Their  personal  appear- 
ance indicated  proper  attention.  A  peculiar  feature  of  the  scheme,  and  one  which 
may  not  prove  to  be  advantageous  to  the  children;  is  that  after  reaching  the  age  of 
16  or  18  should  situations  be  found  for  them  in  Great  Britain  they  are  expected  to 
return.  During  the  past  summer,  owing  to  the  great  demand  for  juvenile  labour  in 
New  Brunswick,  it  was  decided  to  place  the  boys  with  neighbouring  farmers,  at  a 
fair  wage.  This  policy  I  learned  from  Miss  Close  resulted  satisfactorily,  and  it  is 
to  be  hoped  it  may  be  continued.  Only  one  party  of  juveniles  has  as  yet  been  sent 
to  Canada.  At  the  time  of  my  visit  there  were  ten  boys  and  two  girls  in  residence. 
Their  ages  varied  from  7  to  15  years.  The  home  is  under  the  supervision  of  a  resident 
lady  superintendent,  assisted  by  a  trained  nurse.  Keen  interest  is  manifested  by  the 
people  of  the  neighbourhood  in  the  success  of  Mrs.  Close's  work. 

THE  CHILDREN'S  AID  SOCIETY  OF  LONDON,  ENGLAND — CANADIAN  BRANCH,  SHAFTESBURY  HOME, 

WINNIPEG. 

During  the  past  twelve  years  this  influential  society  has  carried  on  a  limited 
emigration  of  juveniles.  Since  1896  one  hundred  and  eighty-eight  children  have  been 
received  and  placed  in  situations  in  western  Canada.  Such  gratifying  reports  as  the 
following  have  been  received  : — 

'  E.  L.  has  turned  out  a  first-class  boy.  If  all  the  boys  turn  out  as  good  they  are 
the  right  sort.' 

Another  employer  wrote  : 

'  P.  N.  is  quite  satisfactory,  and  I  think  is  pleased  with  his  home  with  us.  I  am 
a  merchant  here  and  intend  to  take  him  into  our  store.' 

The  children  are  placed  out  under  agreements  which  provide  for  wages  and  the 
majority  receive  board  and  lodgings  and  $-1  per  month  for  their  first  year's  service. 

OUR  WESTERN   HOME,  NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE,  ONTARIO. 

On  May  S  I  inspected  this  interesting  and  pioneer  receiving-home.  There  were 
22  girls  in  residence  here,  all  were  in  school  at  the  time.  Their  general  brightness, 
well-cared  for  and  happy  appearance  were  particularly  impressed  upon  me.  The  lady 
superintendent  has  had  years  of  experience  in  the  management  of  the  home,  and 
she  and  her  assistants  perform  their  responsible  duties  with  efficiency.  The  home  was 
comfortable  and  in  splendid  order  throughout. 

THE  SELF-HELP  EMIGRATION  SOCIETY,  LONDON,  ENGLAND. 

This  society  has  sent  to  Canada  a  small  contingent  of  boys  of  sixteen  years  of 
age.  They  were  placed  with  farmers  in  eastern  Ontario  and  Quebec  under  the  direc- 
tion of  Mr.  E.  Marquette,  Provincial  Immigration  Agent,  Montreal.     Some  of  them 


il  IMMIGRATION  107 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

are  under  departmental   inspection,   and  in  the  main  favourable  reports  have  been 
received  concerning  them. 

THE    SOUTHWARK    RESCUE    SOCIETY,    LONDON,    ENGLAND RECErVING    HOME,    ST.    JOSEPH'S 

ORPHANAGE,    PRINCE    ALBERT,    SASKATCHEWAN. 

On  July  18  this  society  emigrated  and  sent  forward  to  western  Canada  six  girls 
and  fourteen  boys. 

MRS.  BIRT's   HOME,   KNOWLTON,   QUEBEC. 

For  thirty-six  years  Mrs.  Birt  has  been  engaged  in  the  emigration  of  children  to 
the  Dominion  and  for  as  many  years  has  personally  accompanied  parties  across  the 
Atlantic.  Many  of  her  former  proteges  have  engaged  in  farming  and  other  pursuits 
in  eastern  Canada. 

During  the  past  calendar  year  258  children  have  entered  her  training  home  in 
Liverpool,  and  of  this  number  192  have  been  sent  to  Canada.  In  a  recent  report  Mrs. 
Birt  stated  that  '  the  attempt  to  train  such  a  number  of  children,  means  constant 
attention  to  the  task  and  the  utilization  of  every  hour.  The  history  of  every  child 
must  be  gone  into  in  detail,  their  health  and  habits  must  be  watched.' 

Such  a  wise  precaution  has  doubtless  assisted  very  materially  in  the  selection  of 
proper  homes  and  situations  for  the  children  in  Canada. 

Fifty  marriages  were  reported  since  last  report. 

A  party  of  sixty  juveniles  is  expected  to  reach  Knowlton  early  in  March  and  I 
understand  situations  for  all  have  been  arranged.  With  few  exceptions,  the  depart- 
mental inspection  shows  that  the  children  sent  out  from  this  home  are  doing  well. 

THE   GIBB   HOME,   SHERBROOKE,   QUEBEC. 

This  home  is  the  Canadian  branch  of  the  Church  of  England  Waifs'  and  Strays' 
Society  of  London,  England,  for  boys. 

It  is  well  maintained  and  under  the  supervision  of  a  conscientious  and  painstak- 
ing lady  superintendent.  A  local  committee  of  management  directs  the  operations  of 
the  home.  There  was  but  one  child  in  the  home  on  this  date  and  he  was  merely  a 
lodger,  being  employed  by  the  day  by  a  dairyman. 

Advantage  was  taken  of  my  visit  to  Sherbrooke  to  inspect  a  number  of  boys 
placed  in  that  city.  I  found,  as  in  other  cities,  that  there  is  dearth  of  domestic 
servants,  and  in  lieu  of  girls  the  services  of  the  society's  boys  when  possible  are  requi- 
sitioned. Such  occupation  for  boys  is  open  to  criticism,  as  it  keeps  them  in  the 
cities  and  towns;  but  it  is  doubtful  whether  the  natural  ambition  of  these  lads  will 
permit  them  to  remain  in  such  work.  It  is  to  be  hoped  that  a  short  experience  will 
lead  the  local  committee  to  a  change  of  policy  in  this  regard.  Of  the  boys  with 
farmers  in  the  Eastern  Townships,  excellent  reports  have  been  received. 

THE  '  COOMBE   HOME,'    HESPELER,  ONTARIO — CANADIAN   BRANCH  OF  THE   MISSES   SMYLY'S 

DUBLIN    (IRELAND)    HOMES. 

On  the  occasion  of  my  annual  visit  of  inspection,  I  found  a  particularly  bright 
and  well-selected  party  of  children  at  this  receiving  home.  The  party  had  only  recently 
arrived  from  the  Misses  Smyly's  Training  Schools  in  Dublin  where  I  understand  they 
had  been  under  training  from  infancy.  The  superintendent  informed  me  that  they 
would  remain  at  Hespeler  for  some  months  before  being  sent  out  to  situations.  In 
this  period  they  will  attend  the  Hespeler  Public  School  and  become  acquainted  with 
Canadian  ways.  After  school  hours  the  children  are  employed  about  the  premises  at 
gardening,  poultry-raising,  bee-keeping,  &e.  In  addition  to  the  every  day  routine  the 
boys  under  the  direction  of  Mr.  Tebbs  have  done  considerable  carpentry  work,  and 
have  erected  a  splendidly  equipped  poultry  house.  Poultry  rearing  is  one  of  the  chief 
occupations. 


108  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  11 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

The  citizens  of  this  stirring  little  town  take  a  commendable  interest  in  the  home 
and  many  spoke  to  me  in  a  complimentary  manner  of  the  superitendent  and  the 
diligent  and  well  directed  training  the  children  receive  at  his  hands. 

This  is  the  only  home  in  Canada  which  receives  Irish  children  exclusively. 

st.  george's  home,  Ottawa,  Ontario — the  catholic  emigration  association. 

The  operations  of  this  society  are  constantly  growing.  For  the  year  ending 
December  31,  1907,  263  boys  and  68  girls  were  received  and  distributed,  as  follows : — 

Boys,  Ontario,  110 ;  province  of  Quebec,  149 ;  Nova  Scotia,  4.  Girls,  Ontario,  34 ; 
province  of  Quebec,  32 ;  New  Brunswick,  2.  These  boys  were  indentured  with  farmers 
and  the  girls  went  into  domestic  service.  Including  these  children  there  are  1,610 
juveniles  under  supervision.  They  are  all  under  active  supervision  and  are  visited 
at  least  once  each  year. 

The  home  is  in  charge  of  four  sisters  of  the  English  order  of  St.  Paul  the  Apostlr. 
Since  taking  over  the  affairs  of  the  institution  many  improvements  have  been  made 
to  the  interior  of  the  home.  The  children's  quarters  were  found  scrupulously  neat 
and  tidy  and  the  home  throughout  was  in  splendid  condition,  affording  every  con- 
venience for  the  proper  carrying  out  of  the  work.  The  records  and  visitors'  reports 
are  well  and  systematically  kept. 

Six  parties  of  young  immigrants  are  expected  to  arrive  on  April  30,  composed  of 
boys  :  May  28,  composed  of  boys :  June  25,  composed  of  girls ;  July  23,  composed 
of  boys;    August  20,  composed  of  boys;    September  17,  composed  of  boys. 

For  the  most  part  the  children  are  from  the  homes  and  schools  in  the  Catholic 
dioceses  of  Westminster,  Southwark,  Birmingham  and  Liverpool. 

From  the  departmental  reports  of  the  past  year's  inspection  the  society's  wanl< 
with  few  exceptions  are  filling  their  situations  with  good  satisfaction. 

THE  NATIONAL  CHILDREN'S  HOME  AND  ORPHANAGE    (REVEREND  DR.  GREGORY) — CANADIAN 
BRANCH,   HAMILTON,   ONTARIO. 

I  paid  my  annual  visit  of  inspection  to  this  home  on  March  28.  The  first  party 
for  1908,  numbering  some  sixty  boys  in  all  had  a  few  days  previously  reached  Hamil- 
ton. The  demand  being  so  great  the  work  of  distribution  began  on  the  day  following 
their  arrival.  I  made  an  individual  inspection  of  thirty-five  of  the  party,  and  sub- 
sequently witnessed  the  dispersion  of  a  number.  Farmer  after  farmer  called,  pro- 
duced their  testimonials  as  to  character,  signed  their  agreement  and  proudly  drove  off 
with  their  young  labourer.  Some  of  these  fanners  had  driven  over  very  bad  roads  a 
distance  of  twenty  or  twenty-five  miles.  A  number  of  farmers  called  for  boys  but  were 
obliged  to  return  home  disappointed  as  the  demand  was  far  greater  than  the  supply. 
A  yearly  agreement  system  is  adopted  by  the  governor,  i.e.,  boys  are  only  placed  out 
for  one  year  and  at  the  end  of  this  period  if  agreeable  to  all  concerned,  a  new  and 
different  agreement  is  entered  into  providing  for  wages  according  to  the  boys'  actual 
earning  power.  These  agreements  are  as  far  as  possible  uniform  in  character  and  only 
vary  in  the  case  of  boys  of  school  age. 

In  sending  the  children  to  Canada  each  one  is  supplied  with  a  complete  outfit  of 
clothing  and  other  essentials.  I  carefully  took  stock  of  each  boy's  box  or  trunk  and 
found  them  to  contain  one  overcoat,  one  tweed  suit,  working  clothes,  one  Sunday  suit, 
ee  shirts,  three  caps,  four  pairs  socks,  one  pair  braces,  one  pair  new  boots,  one  pair 
Sunday  boots,  one  pair  slippers,  one  pair  top  boots  made  of  strong  durable  leather,  one 
scarf,  four  dickies,  six  handkerchiefs,  one  tie,  one  cord  suit,  one  pair  overalls,  one 
brush  and  comb  and  bag,  one  toothbrush,  boot  lacos,  one  bible  and  text  book.  I  was 
rather  surprised  to  find  that  their  articles  of  clothing  were  of  such  good  durable 
material  and,  with  care,  should  suffice  for  at  least  eighteen  months  wear. 

The  personal  appearance  and  good  manners  of  these  lads  indicated  a  wise  and 
intelligent  training.  The  opportunity  was  afforded  me  of  saying  a  few  words  to  the 
young  immigrants  as  they  were  assembled  in  one  of  the  recreation  rooms,  in  which  I 


ii  IMMIGRATION  109 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

pointed  out  to  them  their  opportunities  in  Canada  and  what  would  be  expected  of 
them  here. 

I  subsequently  made  an  inspection  of  the  home  and  found  it  quite  up  to  its 
wonted  standard  of  excellence.  The  work  of  this  receiving  home  is  held  in  good 
esteem  by  the  citizens  of  Hamilton  and  adjoining  counties. 

THE  SALVATION  ARMY. 

Twenty-nine  juveniles  of  an  average  age  of  16  years  were  brought  to  Canada 
during  the  past  year  by  the  Salvation  Army,  and  placed  in  farm  work  under  their 
immediate  supervision.  They  were  located  in  the  provinces  of  Ontario,  Quebec  and 
British  Columbia.  The  interests  of  these  young  immigrants  are  protected  by  the 
following  indenture  which  must  be  entered  into  : — 

I  herewith  make  an  application  for  a  boy  of  about  years  of  age.    I  agree  to 

provide  him  with  proper  lodging,  food,  clothing  and  medical  attendance.  If  under 
school  age  I  will  see  that  he  receives  the  common  school  education — as  provided  in) 
the  district  where  I  reside — for  at  least  months  of  the  year. 

I  undertake  to  retain  the  boy  in  my  home  and  service  for         year  or  until  he  is 
years  of  age.    I  will,  in  addition  to  providing  him  with  food  and  clothing,  pay  him 
dollars  for  the  first  year,  and  dollars  for  the  second  year  that  he  is  under 

my  care,  and  an  increase  of  dollars  per  year  afterwards,  until  he  receives  the 

ordinary  wages  paid  in  the  district  to  a  farm  hand. 

If  anything  should  occur  that  might  necessitate  his  removal  or  discharge  before 
the  expiration  of  this  agreement,  I  will  notify  the  officer  in  charge  of  the  home  so  that 
the  boy  can  be  returned  to  the  home.  If  he  should  leave  of  his  own  account  I  will 
notify  the  officer  at  once.  He  must  not  be  placed  in  the  care  of  another  person  with- 
out the  consent  of  the  officer  in  charge.  I  also  agree  to  furnish  a  report  concerning 
him  as  often  as  required  on  (1)  health;  (2)  general  conduct;  (3)  education  and 
ability  to  work;    (4)  wages  received. 

I  acknowledge  the  Salvation  Army  to  be  the  guardians  of  the  said  boy,  and  agree 
to  permit  the  officer  in  charge  of  the  home,  or  any  authorized  officer  at  all  times  to 
have  access  to  the  said  boy,  and  I  also  acknowledge  their  right  to  remove  him  from 
my  care  if  they  consider  it  in  the  interests  of  the  boy  so  to  do. 

Signature.  .    .  .i 

Address 

Witness Date 


Forty-four  boys  are  under  supervision.  Having  inspected  the  reports,  I  find  they 
are  doing  satisfactorily. 

Your  obedient  servant, 

G.  BOGUE  SMAET. 

No.  18. 
EEPORT  OF  THE  CHIEF  MEDICAL  OFFICEE. 

Ottawa,  May  14,  1908. 
W.  W.  Cory,  Esq., 

Deputy  Minister  of  the  Interior, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  my  fifth  annual  report  on  the  medical  inspec- 
tion of  immigrants,  being  for  the  twelve  months  of  the  fiscal  year  ending  March  31, 
1908. 

The  work  carried  on  by  this  service  includes  the  inspection  of  all  steerage  and 
second-class  passengers  landing  both  at  the  Atlantic  and  Pacific  seaports  of  Canada, 
as  well  as  all  similar  passengers  destined  to  Canada  but  arriving  at  the  United  States 


110  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  il 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

ports  of  Portland,  Boston,  New  York,  Philadelphia  and  Baltimore.  The  latter  are 
examined  at  these  several  ports  by  United  States  immigration  officers,  while  those,  the 
greater  number,  arriving  at  New  York  are  again  examined  there  by  a  medical  officer 
of  this  branch.  All  immigrants  arriving  at  Montreal  via  United  States  ports  are 
finally  inspected  there. 

The  task  of  medical  inspection  further  includes  much  work  at  Montreal,  Winni- 
peg and  the  various  other  points  in  Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta,  where  large 
numbers  of  immigrants  arrive  at  the  different  distributing  points.  This  work  especi- 
ally includes  sick  recent  immigrants  who  require  hospital  treatment,  or  who  are 
reported  upon,  if  sick,  as  regards  their  deportation.  The  results  of  the  work  done  in 
these  several  directions  will  be  found  referred  to  in  the  various  tables. 

With  a  view  to  obtaining  yet  more  accurate  knowledge  as  to  the  character  of  the 
immigrants  who  have  been  admitted  to  Canada,  the  chief  medical  officer  has  under- 
taken special  inquiries  to  determine  the  extent  of  diseases  in  admitted  immigrants, 
especially  as  regards  insanity,  feeble-mindedness,  tuberculosis  and  trachoma.  Obviously 
except  as  regards  the  inmates  of  public  institutions,  the  information  to  be  obtained 
lacks  the  definiteness  of  tabulated  statistics;  but  as  the  immigrant  who  becomes  sick, 
if,  of  limited  means,  soon  must  ssek  charity,  we  may  fairly  assume  that  relatively  few 
cases  occur  which  do  not  come  under  the  attention  of  some  institution,  whether 
federal,  provincial  or  municipal. 

In  addition  to  this  there  is  the  trans-Atlantic  medical  inspection.  There  has 
been  added  what  may  be  considered  as  an  additional  medical  inspection  in  Great 
Britain  where  the  following  particulars  must  be  supplied  on  a  regular  printed  form, 
in  the  instance  of  every  emigrant  who  in  any  way  receives  official  assistance  to 
emigrate : — 


DEPAETMENT  OF  THE  INTEEIOE,  GOVEENMENT  OF  CANADA 
EMIGEATION  BEANCH. 

REPORT  AND  MEDICAL  CERTIFICATE. 


In  respect  of (the  undersigned)  assisted  by 

to  the  following  extent 

Age Nationality Eeligion 

Address  in  full 

Present  occupation How  long  in  such  occupation  ? 

Has  applicant  ever  worked  on  f arm  ?    If  so,  for  how  long  and  where  ? 

Can  applicant  drive  horses? Plough? Milk? 

Is  applicant  suitable  for: — Farm  work?. .   .  .  •. Eailway  construction 

work  ? Domestic  service  ? 

Intended  occupation  in  Canada? At  what  place? 

Is  applicant  willing  to  accept  farm  work  on  arrival  in  Canada? 

Name  and  address  of  agent  or  person  in  Canada  to  whom  going  for  employment .... 


General  appearance  of  applicant: — Strong? Vigorous?. .   .  . 

Delicate? Buddy? Pale? 

Approximate  height Approximate  weight.  .   .  . 

Has  applicant  any  obvious  physical  defect  or  malformation?     Give  details 


II  IMMIGRATION  111 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Is  he  feeble-minded Idiotic? Epileptic? 

Insane? or  had  an  attack  of  insanity  within  five  years? 

Is  he  deaf  and  dumb? Deaf? Dumb? Blind? 

Infirm? If  so,  give  details  and  state  if  applicant  is  going  with  family  or 

to  family  already  in  Canada 

Address  of  such  family  in  Canada 

What  security  is  proposed  in  such  case  under  section  26  of  the  Immigration  Act  ? . . 

Is  applicant  afflicted  with  a  loathsome  disease,  or    with    a  disease    which    is    con- 
tagious?  Is  he  a  pauper,  destitute,  professional  beggar,  vagrant,  or  likely  to 

become  a  public  charge  in  Canada? 

Has  applicant    been  a  charge  on  the  public  in  Great  Britain  or  Ireland? 

If  so,  how  long  and  where? 

Has  applicant  been  convicted  of  a  crime  or  been  in  prison?     Give  details 

is  applicant  honest? Sober? Industrious? 

Thrifty? Of  good  morals? 

What  amount  of  money  or  money's  worth  will  applicant  have  on  landing  in  Canada? 


Is  applicant  married  or  single? H  married  give  age  and  name  of  wife 

Is  wife  good  housekeeper  and  tidy  ? 

Give  children's  names,  ages,  trade  and  earnings.     Have  the  girls  been  in    service,  or 
prepared  for  service,  and  if  so,  how? 

Is  family  accompanying  him?     If  so,  what  provision  is  being  made  for  family    in 

Canada  ? 

H  family  not  accompanying  applicant  what  provision  is  being  made  for  family  here? 


Has  applicant  any  relations  or  friends  in  Canada,  and  at  what  address? 

Relationship 

Are  such  relations  or  friends  willing  to  assist  and  house  applicant  temporarily?     Or 

does  the  assisting  society  undertake  to  do  so? 

What  reason  has  applicant  for  desiring  to  go  to  Canada? 

Has  applicant  applied  to  any  other  society  ?   J£  so,  give  particulars 

Give  name  and  address  of  parents  or  nearest  living  relatives  in  England 

Signature  of  applicant  certifying  correctness  of  above  statement. 


Dated  at this day  of 19     . 

* 


*Signature  and  designation  of  responsible  officer  of  society  assisting. 

Note. — In  addition  to  the  above  report,  the  original  records  must  be  submitted 
for  inspection  with  this  form. 


112  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


DEPARTMENT   OF   THE   INTERIOR,    GOVERNMENT   OF   CANADA, 
EMIGRATION  BRANCH. 

MEDICAL  CERTIFICATE. 

In  respect  of an  assisted  emigrant. 

Is  the  physical  history  of  the  applicant's  family  good?    If  not,  state  defects 


Do  the  sounds  of  the  chest  as  ascertained  by  percussion  and  auscultation  indicate  a 

perfectly  healthy  condition  of  the  lungs? 

Is  there  any  disposition    to    tubercular    disease    of    the    lungs,  hereditary  or  other- 
wise ? 

Have    any   relatives    died    or   suffered   from    consumption,    bronchitis    or  other  lung 

disease  ? 

Is  the  condition  of  the  heart  healthy? Is  there  any  tendency 

to  epilepsy  or  fits  of  any  kind  ? 

Has  the  applicant  ever  had  rheumatic  fever? Is  the  applicant 

ruptured  ? 

Has  the  applicant  ever  had  trachoma  or  suffered  from  diseases  of  the  eye? 

Is  applicant's  sight  good? Give  condition  of  applicant's  teeth 

Is  applicant  suffering  from  eczema  or  any  other  skin  disease? 

Has  applicant  undergone  an  operation?    If  so,  what? 

When  was  applicant  last  vaccinated? 

Has  applicant  any  organic  defect  or  bodily  deformity? 

Is  applicant  strong — Physically? Mentally? 

Has  the  applicant  or  any  relation  been  at  any  time  the  inmate  of  a  lunatic  asylum? 

If  so,  when  ? 

Has  the  applicant  had  any  serious  illness  or  injury?    If  so,  of  what  nature  and  at  what 

time? 

Is  any  such  affliction  likely  to  recur? 

I  hereby  certify  that  the  above  named  person  has  been  examined  by  me,  and  that 
I  am  of  the  opinion  that  he  is  of  good  constitution,  in  robust  health,  mentally  fit,  and 
a  suitable  person  for  emigration  to  Canada. 


Address 


Dated 19     . 

Subsequently  each  emigrant  must  pass  the  inspection  of  the  port  officer  appointed 
by  the  board  of  trade,  as  well  as  the  shore  medical  officer  of  the  ss.  line,  and  finally 
thn  medical  officer  of  the  vessel  before  being  taken  on  board.  In  addition  to  this  the 
medical  officer  and  the  master  of  the  vessel  must  certify  to  the  following  bill  of  health 
before  the  immigrants  can  be  removed  from  the  vessels. 


IMMIGRATION 


113 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


SS 


BILL  OF  HEALTH— CERTIFICATE  OF  MEDICAL  OFFICER. 

of line. 


This  is  to  certify  that  I  am  medical  officer  of  the  steamship of  the 

S.S.  line,  and  that  I  have  daily  inspected  all  the  passengers 

and  crew  on  the  vessel  during  the  passage  from to ,  and 

that  to  the  best  of  my  knowledge  and  belief  there  have  been  no  cases  of  sickness  or 
death  on  board  other  than  the  following  : 


No. 

Name. 

Age. 

Nature  of  Sickness. 

Cause  of  Death. 

Quantity  and  des- 
cription of  property 
and  money  left  by 
deceased. 

2 

3 
4 

5 

6 

7.  ,. 

9 

Certified  correct, 


Port  of ■ 

Dated 190 


Medical  Officer. 


CERTIFICATE   OF    MASTER. 


This. is  to  certify,  that  I  am  master  of  the  steamship of  the 

i SS.  line,  and  that  I  have  daily  inspected  all  the  passengers 

and  crew  on  board  the  vessel  during  this  passage  from to 

and  that  to  the  best  of  my  knowledge  and  belief  there  have  been  no  cases  of  sickness 
or  death  on  board  other  than  those  certified  to  by  the  medical  officer  of  the  vessel,  as 
above. 

Certified  correct, 

Port  of Master. 

Dated 100    . 

REPORT   OF   MEDICAL  INSPECTOR   OF   IMMIGRATION   SERVICE. 

Re  SS of SS.  line.    I  hereby  certify,  that  I  have 

examined  the  schedule  giving  the  names  and  description  of  passengers  thereon,  and 
have  inspected  the  passengers  themselves,  and  beg  to  make  the  following  statement 
regarding  the  sanitary  condition  of  the  ship  and  'of  the  health  of  the  passengers  : — 

Amount  of  cubic  air  space  and  provision  for  ventilation 

Number  of  immigrants  to  each  washbasin 

25— ii— 8 


114  DEPARTUEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  il 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Kind  and  condition  of  latrines  and  closets,   and  number   in   relation  to  the 

number  of  immigrants 

Condition  of  ship   as   regards  light   and  cleanliness 

Statement  regarding  the  correctness  of  certificates  of  medical  officer  and  master 

Signed, 

Port  of Medical  Inspector. 

Dated 190    . 

When  in  addition  to  these  various  measures  taken  to  sift  out  undesirable  immi- 
grants the  examination  of  each  person  in  succession  is  made  by  one,  and  at  the  large 
seaports  by  two  medical  officers,  followed  by  a  thorough  civil  examination  or  inquiry 
into  their  age,  occupation,  destination,  financial  standing  and  an  estimate  of  their 
moral  qualities  and  likelihood  to  succeed  in  Canada  and  become  good  citizens  it  would 
appear  that  little  more  could  reasonably  be  done  to  prevent  the  ingress  of  improper 
persons  to  the  country. 

In  the  criticisms  which  from  time  to  time  are  made  of  the  work  of  medical 
inspection  of  immigrants,  one  piece  of  advice  is  almost  always  given,  viz.,  '  Have 
Canadian  officials  inspect  at  foreign  ports,  all  immigrants  before  they  take  passage.' 
Remembering  the  number  of  seaports  at  which  immigrants  coming  from  different 
countries  embark,  knowing  how  all  those  in  any  way  assisted  are  required  to  present 
certificates  as  to  physical  and  mental  health,  and  realizing  that  a  very  large  proportion 
of  emigrants  go  to  some  one  of  the  thousands  of  -booking  agents  in  these  several 
countries,  buy  their  tickets  inland,  and  arrive  at  the  steamer  only  a  few  hours  before 
sailing,  it  will  be  apparent  that  no  effective  scheme  can  be  devised  for  dealing  with 
these  several  classes  of  cases,  other  than  requiring  intending  passengers  to  be  present 
in  the  seaport  towns  several  days  before  sailing,  to  undergo  a  rigid  examination  before 
being  allowed  to  go  on  shipboard.  Apart  from  the  diplomatic  difficulties  of  having, 
say,  at  Liverpool,  the  medical  officers  of  the  United  States,  Canada,  Mexico,  fee., 
severally  interfering  with  the  rights  of  citizens  of  any  other  country  to  board  a  vessel 
in  a  home  port,  it  is  evident  that  there  would  be  inconveniences  and  hardships  imposed 
upon  emigrants  greatly  beyond  any  actual  gain  from  such  examination.  As  the 
situation  exists  at  present  booking  agents  in  all  foreign  countries  are  fully  aware  of 
the  requirements  of  the  Immigration  Act  of  Canada.  Board  of  trade  medical  officers 
at  seaports  constantly  give  general  supervision  of  emigrants,  and  medical  officers 
attached  to  the  several  shipping  companies  are  specially  engaged  in  sifting  emigrants_ 
prior  to  embarkation,  while  they  are  finally  looked  over  by  the  ship's  medical  officer 
as  they  go  aboard.  What  seems,  however,  quite  practical,  is  a  further  detailed  and 
thorough  examination  during  the  voyage,  and  a  daily  observation  by  the  ship's 
medical  officer  of  every  person  on  shipboard,  subject  to  inspection.  He  is  required 
at  present  to  certify  in  the  manner  already  indicated,  and  if  the  company  can  be 
compelled  to  enforce,  and  such  officer  can  be  stimulated  to  make  such  examination  an 
exact  and  serious  matter,  by  filling  in  a  blank  form  with  the  particulars  of  the  exnmi- 
nation  of  each  individual  emigrant,  every  practical  requirement  would  be  fulfilled, 
grace  such  a  signed  report  containing  such  an  examination  would  bring  to  the  atten- 
tion of  the  medical  inspecting  officer  at  the  port  of  landing  any  person  regarding  whom 
any  remarks  were  made  and  a  further  special  investigation  could  be  made  of  such  after 
the  general  inspection  was  completed.  For  instance,  insane  persons  or  those  on  the 
borderland,  alcoholics  and  persons  whose  actions  on  board  ship  show  them  to  be 
degenerates  wouid  in  many  cases  have  revealed  their  true  characters  during  the  seven 
or  more  days  on  shipboard.  It  is  therefore  not  unreasonable  to  expect  that  such  sys- 
tematic examinations  would  gladly  be  concurred  in  by  every  steamship  company  bring- 
ing emigrants  to  Canada,  since  subsequently  they  are  required  to  bear  the  expense  of 
deporting  the  undesirables,  while  it  is  evident  it  would  make  less  necessary  any  long 
delay  at  the  seaports  on  landing,  resulting  from  the  more  detailed  examination'  l>f 
every  immigrant,  such  as  many  who  criticise  would  seem  to  demand. 


IMMIGRATION 


115 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE  I. 

Statement  showing  the  total  number  of  vessels  carrying  immigrants,  arriving  at  the 
ports  of  Quebec,  Halifax,  St.  John,  North  Sydney,  Vancouver  and  Victoria  dur- 
ing the  fiscal  year  1907-8. 


Port. 


Quebec 

Halifax 

St.  John 

North  Sydney 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Totals 


— 

.' 

_: 

<c 

- 
- 

< 

a 

be 

-- 

•r. 

o 

1 

33 

25 

32 

30 

29 

28 

24 

10 

7 

7 

10 

9 

15 

4 

3 

7 

4 

2 

5 

10 

13 

18 

15 

17 

15 

17 

5 

3 

4 

6 

4 

4 

3 

8 

8 

8 

9 

8 

8 

9 

63 

73 

05 

76 

73 

67 

" 

15 


13 

13 

8 

10 

16 

17 

3 

2 

8 

6 

48 

48 

12      14 


45 


53 


o 


195 

132 

88 

179 

44 

97 


735 


The  above  statement  shows  a  notable  increase  in  the  vessels  engaged  in  carrying 
immigrants  to  Canada,  these  being  275  more  than  for  the  nine  months  of  1906-7,  or 
120  more  if  estimated  for  the  whole  year.  It  is  to  be  noted,  however,  that  the  number 
of  vessels  arriving  is  not  necessarily  a  measure  of  the  increase  of  the  immigrants 
landed,  since  with  the  tri-weekly  Newfoundland  steamer  to  Sydney  the  number  of 
immigrants  was  only  5,376  in  179  vessels,  compared  with  19,812  in  88  steamers  to  St. 
John  and  7,049  in  44  vessels  'to  Vancouver.  It  does  mean,  however,  that  the  medical 
officers'  time  is  more  engaged  year  by  year  at  the  several  seaports,  while  the  more 
exacting  examinations  required  add  further  to  their  duties.  As  remarked  in  a  pre- 
vious report,  the  different  distribution  of  immigrants  by  months,  and  the  varied 
nationalities  of  immigrants  make  the  necessity  of  different  arrangements  at  the  seve- 
ral sea,ports  apparent.  Thus,  at  Quebec  the  mail  steamers  are  boarded  at  Rimouski 
by  a  medical  officer  who  examines  the  immigrants  en  route  to  Quebec,  and  so  saves 
delay;  but  the  time  of  such  medical  officer  .so  devoted  to  a  single  ship  is  at  least  two 
days.  A  similar  arrangement  made  it  necessary  for  the  medical  officer  of  St.  John, 
N.B.,  to  meet  the  vessel  at  Halifax  and  inspect  while  eh  route  to  St.  John.  At  Mon- 
treal there  are  some  14  passenger  trains  arriving  daily  from  Portland,  Boston  and 
Xew  York,  and  the  time  of  the  medical  officers  there  is  therefore  largely  taken  up 
with  the  inspection  of  immigrants. 

This  year  has  seen  the  two  splendid  detention  hospitals  at  Quebec  and  Halifax 
completed  and  put  into  commission.  Their  fireproof  character  and  equipment  with 
all  modern  requirements  ha(ve  made  it  possible  to  give  the  detained  immigrants  every 
assurance  of  safety  and  comfort,  with  the  best  expert  medical  treatment.  Improve- 
ments and  enlargements  have  been  made  at  St.  John,  while  the  over-crowded  wards  at 
the  Montreal  hospital,  where  most  immigrants  being  deported  are  detained  till  the 
date  of  sailing,  h^ve  necessitated  the  free  use  of  double  walled  tents  for  consumptives 
and  other  special  cases.  It  is  hoped  that  the  much  needed  permanent  hospital  and 
immigration  building  at  Montreal  may  be  erected  during  the  coming  year.  At  Vic- 
toria a.  splendid  fireproof  building  is  beinfe-  erected  which  will  contain  both  immigrant 
quarters  and  hospital.  The  detailed  characteristics  of  these  hospitals  will  be  found 
in  the  report  of  1906-7. 

It  will  be  no'ted  that  while  the  number  of  passengers  to  Canada,  inspected  at  the 
several  seaports  was  253,508,  including  26,236  arriving  at  Canadian  ports  and  destined 
to  the  United  States,  the  total  immigration  to  Canada  for  1907-8  is  262,469,  the  num- 
ber of  returned  Canadians  17,652,  and  tourists  5,463.  It  is  apparent,  therefore,  that  a 
very  considerable  number  of  immigrants  enter  Canada  via  the  American  border  who 

25 — ii — 8i 


116 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

hitherto  have  not  undergone  regular  inspection.  Actually,  at  border  points  the  num- 
ber entering  was  58,312.  In  my  report  of  190-1-5  it  is  pointed  out  that  there  were  nine 
different  areas,  beginning  with  the  Xew  Brunswick  border  to  the  east,  and  ending  with 
the  British  Columbia  border  on  the  west,  in  which  there  were  regular  routes,  whethei 
by  steamboats  or  rail,  by  which  immigrant's  came  into  Canada.  Recalling  especially 
at  that  time  some  of  the  immigrants  entering  Canada  via  the  British  Columbia  bor- 
der, that  report  stated:  'If  for  many  years  it  has;  been  recognized  that  there  is  an 
essential  need  for  systematic  supervision  of  trans-oceanic  immigrants,  most  of  whom 
are  so  desirable,  if  diseased,  defective  and  criminal  immigrants  are  to  be  debarred,  then 
it  must  be  equally  manifest  that  if  Canada  is  exposed  to  the  same  extent  from  the 
United  States,  the  necessity  for  inspection  will  be  equally  great  and  even  greater,  since 
the  facilities  for  entrance  are  so  many  more.' 

The  latter  half  of  this  fiscal  year,  duriug  which  financial  panic  and  an  industrial 
stasis  have  taken  place  in  the  United  States,  has  made  the  force  of  this  statement  espe- 
cially evident.  At  all  points  along  the  boundary  the  unemployed,  not  infrequently  of 
an  undesirable  class  physically,  mentally  and  morally,  have  entered  Canada,  and  some 
have  found  their  way  into  charitable  institutions  and  others  into  our  common  jails. 
The  action  now  being  taken  by  the  department  to  deal  with  the  situation  'thus  created 
is  as  necessary  from  the  medical  standpoint  as  from  the  social  and  economic,  and  may 
very  well  be  extended  to  all  points  where  any  regular  influx  of  immigrants  is  taking 
place.  The  fact  that  all  such  persons  who  find  their  way  into  our  asylums  are  promptly 
dealt  with  illustrates  how  similar  reports  from  superintendents  of  prisons,  charities 
and  other  municipal  institutions,  will  aid  in  relieving  our  different  communities  of 
such  persons. 


TABLE  II. 


Statement  showing  the  number  of  immigrants  who  were  detained  and  the  number 
debarred  at  ports  since  December,  1902,  when  medical  inspection  was  first  begun. 


Port. 

Fiscal 

Year 

1902-03. 

Fiscal 

Year 

1903-04. 

Fiscal 

Year 

1904-05. 

Fiscal 

Year 

1905-06. 

!  'i .  .  i  n.ii..! 

Fiscal 

¥ear 

(9  months) 

1906-07. 

Fiscal 
Year 

1907-08. 

Total.-. 

s 
P 

15 

12-1 
134 

XI 

a 

T5 
X 
P 

■0 

X 

3 

*.- 
ta 

p 

a 

-3 

a 

•a 

XI 

a. 
- 

P 

X) 

3 

33 

- 

T3 

X 

a 

0) 

P 

— 
- 

P 

Halifax 

15 
124 
134 

817 
705 
313 

179 
27 
68 

1.422 
449 
145 
146 

454 

36 
6 
9 

1,163 
366 

396 

137 

320 
10 
32 

523 
392 
113 
208 

117 

7 

13 

11 

873 

730 
296 
589 

278 

274 

46 

9 

4,813 
2,766 
1,397 
1,080 

1,36? 
478 
299 

22 

North  Sydney 

i. .    . 

4i          4 

2,040        455 
106       106 

4            4 

Yancouverand  Vic- 

1 

397    U3 

1,456 
52 

118 

44 

2,257 
50 

242 
50 

6,150.       92S 
208       200 

New  York- 

Totals 

Total  Immigration. 

273 

273 
28,364 

1,835 
13i 

274 
>,331 

2,559   611 
146,266 

3,570 
18' 

524 
1,064 

3,543 
12- 

440 

1,667 

4,638    1,172 
262,469 

16,418    3,294 
1,097,689 

The  above  statement  gives  at  a  glance  the  story  of  the  work  of  medical  inspection 
since  the  passage  of  the  amendment  to  the  Immigration  Act  in  1902,  made  necessary 
by  the  sudden  increase  of  immigration  from  49,149  in  1900-1,  to  67,379  in  1901-2. 
Taking  1903-4  as  the  first  year  of  regular  medical  inspection  it  is  found  that  while  the 
ratios  of  detained  and  debarred  to  the  total  were  1  in  71  and  1  in  476,  in  1907-8  there 
were  1  in  57  detained  and  1  in  224  of  those  debarred,  or  to  make  it  more  evident,  it  may 
be  stated  that  while  the  immigration  of  1907-8  was  almost  exactly  double  that  of  l°03-4, 


il 


IMMIGRATION 


117 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

the  increase  of  the  debarred  in  1907-8  to  that  in  1903-4  was  4  -28  times.  In  other  tables 
it  is  shown  that  while  the  rejections  in  1903-4  were  almost  wholly  from  trachoma, 
there  being  233  of  a  total  of  274  debarred,  yet  in  1907-8  there  were  only  362  in  a  total 
of  1,172  deported  on  account  of  trachoma. 

The  report  of  1903-4  further  states : — '  Remarkably  few  indeed  of  English-speaking 
people  were  detained — only  35  out  of  50,374,'  while  it  especially  deals  with  the  number 
of  detentions  and  deportations  of  people  from  southern  Europe,  there  being  150  out  of  a 
total  of  510.    In  1907-8  the  rejections  of  British  numbered  122. 

Comparison  of  the  detentions  and  rejections  in  table  3  is  of  little  absolute  value 
since  immigrants  arriving  via  several  points  of  entry  present  several  important 
differences.  Those  arriving  via  Montreal  from  Portland,  Boston,  New  York,  &c, 
represent  a  normal  European  immigration  mostly  from  continental  countries,  notably 
Austria,  Eussia  and  Italy ;  those  via  North  Sydney  are  nearly  all  from  Newfoundland, 
while  those  arriving  at  Victoria  and  Vancouver  are  largely  Asiatics.  As  the  Montreal 
inspection  is  superadded  to  that  at  Ameiican  ports,  few  persons  have  been  debarred  at 
that  point,  but  106  out  of  22,381  arrivals  were  debarred  or  1  in  211  or  50  per  cent 
greater  than  for  the  total  at  the  ports  of  Quebec,  Halifax  and  St.  John. 

Of  Pacific  coast  arrivals  1,143  were  detained  at  Victoria  in  a  total  of  8,796  or  1  in 
7  .7  and  1  in  111  debarred,  while  at  Vancouver  of  12,808  arrivals,  897  were  detained  or 
1  in  14,  and  376  were  debarred  or  1  in  34.  The  causes  of  refusal  to  land  were  in  some 
cases  due  to  diseases,  but  in  many  others  the  clauses  of  the  Act  relating  to  other  unde- 
sirable classes  became  operative. 

TABLE  in. 


Statement  for  the  Ports  of  Halifax,  St.  John  and  Quebec,  showing  the  number  of 
Immigrants  detained  and  debarred  during  the  fiscal  year,  1907-8. 


SS.  Line. 

Port. 

Number 
Ex- 

amined. 

Detained. 

De- 
barred. 

Ratio  of  de- 
tained to 
Number  ex- 
amined. 

Ratio  of  de- 
barred to 

Males. 

Females 

Number  ex- 
amined. 

Halifax 

St.  John 

Quebec . 

Totals 

Halifax 

St.  John 

24,534 

180 

54,057 

461 
"l74' 

196 

1 

93 

261 

1 

102 

364 

1  in     37 
1  in  ISO 
1  in  202 

1  in    85 

1  in     94 
1  in  180 
1  in  530 

78,771 

615 
20,355 

48,758 

69,728 

635 

3 
220 
257 

290 

1  in  216 

C.  P.  R.  SS.  Line 

3 
53 
65 

31 

95 

1  in  103 

1  in     74 
1  in  151 

1  in  657 
1  in  513 

Totals 
Halifax 

480 

122 

126 

1  in  116 

1  in  553 

6,374 

29,479 

15 
125 

25 

84 

10 
50 

1  in  159 
1  in  141 

1  in  637 
1  in  590 

Totals... 

St.  John 

Quebec 

Totals 

Halifax     

St.  John 

Totals 

35,853 

1,411 
6,570 

7,981 

140 

109 

60 

1  in  144 

1  in  598 

Donaldson  SS.  Line . .   . . 

17 

42 

3 
24 

13 
26 

1  in    71 
1  in  100 

1  in  109 
1  in  253 

59 

27 

39 

1  in     93 

1  in  205 

2,566 

505 

68 

16 
1 

7 

11 
2 

3 

1 

5 

1  in    95 
1  in  505 
1  in      8 

1  in  855 

1   in  505 



1  in    14 

3,139 

195,472 

24 

13 

9 

1  in    85 

1  in  349 

1,338 

561 

598 

1  in  103 

1  in  327 

118 


DEPARTMENT  OF  TUE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

This  illustrates  several  remarkable  results  due  to  the  varied  character  of  immigra- 
tion at  different  seasons  of  the  year.  Thus  of  the  large  number  24,534  brought  to 
Halifax  by  the  Allan  steamship  line,  1  in  37  were  detained  and  1  in  94  debarred;  while 
of  54,057  arriving  at  Quebec  but  1  in  202  were  detained  and  1  in  530  debarred.  As 
remarked  last  year,  '  the  difference  is  due  to  the  fact  that  a  notably  larger  number  of 
continentals  arrive  in  winter.'  It  has  been  found  that  such  are  especially  suffering 
from  diseases  of  the  eyes,  contracted  or  made  worse  during  cold  weather  and  under 
confinement  on  railways  and  on  shipboard.  The  Dominion  line  showed  a  proportion  of 
detentions  and  deportations  very  close  to  the  Allan  line,  being  1  in  144  detained  and  1 
in  598  debarred.  The  Canadian  Pacific  steamship  line  showed  the  detentions  1  in  74  at 
St.  John  during  the  winter  months  and  1  in  657  debarred.  In  the  large  number 
arriving  by  both  these  lines  at  Quebec,  there  is  much  the  same  proportion  detained,  the 
latter  having  1  in  151,  as  also  debarred,  the  ratio  being  1  in  513. 

The  Donaldson  steamship  line,  sailing  wholly  from  Glasgow,  presents  the  anomaly 
of  having  the  largest  detentions  and  rejections,  there  being  1  in  93  and  1  in  205.  This 
line  has  come  recently  into  the  field  of  competition,  and  shows  what  has  been  before 
commented  upon,  that  being  unable  to  get  at  first  their  share  of  the  regular  passengers, 
they  are  liable  to  have  brought  to  them  doubtful  emigrants  refused  by  other  lines. 

Taking  these  Atlantic  seaport  arrivals  together  it  is  seen  that,  whereas  last  year 
1  in  695  only  was  debarred,  this  year  1  in  327  was  refused  admission  to  Canada,  or  in 
all  598  persons  in  a  total  of  195,472  arrivals. 


TABLE  IV. 


Statement  showing  the  number  of  Immigrants  detained  and  debarred  from  Montreal, 
New  York,  North  Sydney,  Vancouver  and  Victoria  for  fiscal  year  1907-8. 


Port  of  Entry. 

Port  of  Arrival. 

Total 
Arriving. 

Total 
Detained. 

Total 
Debarred. 

Total 
Released. 

Still  in 
Hospital. 

9181 
396 
3,802  V 
2,098 
22.3S1  ! 
as  above. 
6,837 
12,  SOS 
8,796 

589 

106 

4 

897 

1,143 

9 

106 

4 

376 

79 

567 

13 

1  New  York 

New  York 

Vancouver 

516 
1,058 

5 
6 

Totals 

58,036 

2,739 

574 

2,141 

24 

The  medical  officer  of  the  branch  at  New  York  debars   a   certain  number  on 
inspection. 


IMMIGRATION 


119 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE  V. 

Statement  by  nationalities  of  number  of  Immigrants  debarred,  showing  total  arrivals 
of  the  same  nationalities  for  the  fiscal  year  1907-S. 


Total 
Arrivals 

for 
Canada 
and  U.S. 

Atlantic  Ports. 

Pacific  Poets. 

Via    U.S. 
Pouts. 

Totals. 

Nationality. 

For 

Canada. 

For 

U.S. 

For 
Canada. 

For 

U.  S. 

For 
Canada. 

For 
Canada. 

For 

U.  S. 

Totals. 

Austrian,  N.E.S 

2,3112 

121 

2,145 

14,453 

1,56S 

10 

256 

3,767 

912 

321 

53 

4,544 

3,733 

709 

93.22S 

6,999 

23,007 

1,116 

3,030 

1,821 

1,343 

2,789 

3,362 

339 

587 

834 

2,046 

404 

4,780 

10,125 

5,931 

15 

63 

641 

624 

929 

11,423 

8,317 

1,209 

142 

2,452 

58,312 

2,627 

143 

19 

3 

4 

1 

23 

1 

4 

11 

6 

1 

1 

127 

4 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

69 

14 

28 

1 

21 

15 

3 

8 

4 

2 

8 

13 

21 

1 

3 

33 

33 

3 

48 

3 
3 

7 
2 

1 
5 

3 

2 
3 

28 
4 
2 

2 
24 

2 

7 

8 

13 

26 
1 

4 

11 

5 

4 

11 

Hungarian,  N.E.S. . 

1 

1 
1 
11 
4 
2 
1 

6 

1 

1 

116 

48 

175 



4 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

65 

14 

28 

1 

13 

11 

2 

7 

4 

2 

10 

3 
3 

4 

5 

1 

English 

7 
2 

1 

5 

1 

3 

76 
16 

28 

Welsh 

2 

8 
4 
1 

1 

26 

Hebrew.  N.E.S.. 

15 

3 

8 

3 

7 

Polish,  N.E.S... 

2 

2 
3 

8 
3 

10 

Polish  Russian..   . . 

"'21' 

16 
21 

1 
3 

19 
29 

1 

8 
21 
15 
23 

1 

3 

Russian,  N.E.S 

Hebrew  Russian. . . . 

28 
4 
2 

1 

13 

4 

61 
37 

2 

1 

8 

22 

19 

51 

76 

9 

1 

2 
131 
218 

2 

1 

Turkish 

2 

24 

2 

7 

10 

1 
4 

28 

2 

46 

21 

58 

76 

8 

84 

Greek 

7 
1 

2 
1 

13 

22 

1 

U.  S.    Citizens    via 

2 

Prom  U.S.  direct. . . 

130 
218 

131 

218 

1 

I 

2 

8 

Totals 

283,592 

448 

162 

447 

107 

1,002 

170 

1,172 

This  table  has  always  had  a  special  interest  for  the  general  observer,  since  rightly 
or  wrongly  many  of  the  public  are  accustomed  to  found  their  judgment  regarding 
immigrants  from  the  particular  personal  experience  they  have  had  with  them  as 
domestic  servants,  farm  hands,  citizens,  clerks  or  as  competitors  in  the  labour  market. 

Compared  with  last  year,  notably  more  Austrians,  Germans.  Scotch  and  Irish 
were  debarred  ;  twenty  times  as  many  Chinese,  fewer  Japanese,  but  almost  twice  as 
many  Hindoos  (218),  while  133  coming  from  the  United  States  were  debarred  com- 
pared with  17  last  year.  It  is  notable  that  so  much  larger  a  number  from  the  United 
States  have  been  refused  admission  this  year  as  compared  with  last  year. 


120 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Other  tables  will  show  causes  for  which  immigrants  were  debarred,  but  it  may  be 
said  here  that  the  financial  distress  in  the  United  States  has  not  only  been  the  cause 
of  many  persons  out  of  work  coming  to  Canada,  but  probably  explains  the  increase 
of  some  other  nationalities  who  hitherto  had  not  largely  come  to  Canada.  Thus  the 
179  Bulgarians  of  1907  were  increased  to  2,529;  the  passenger  agencies  previously 
sending  such  to  the  United  States,  diverting  the  stream  to  Canada  and  resulting  in 
175  being  debarred,  and  many  more  being  subsequently  deported  on  account  rather 
of  lack  of  funds  and  employment  than  of  disease. 

TABLE  VI. 

Statement  showing  the  total  number  of  Chinese,  Japanese  and  Hindoos  detained, 
released  and  debarred  at  the  Ports  of  Vancouver  and  Victoria,  during  the  fiscal 
year  1907-8. 


Nationality. 


Vancouver — 
Chinese 
Japanese  . . 
Hindoos . . . 


Victoria — 
Chinese  . . 
Japanese  . 
Hindoos   . 


Totals. 


Totals . 


Total   No. 
Arriving. 


1,255 
2,822 
2,390 


Detained. 


6,467 

736 

5,483 
234 

0,453 


96 
157 

.Mil 


793 

100 

943 

11 


1,114 


Released. 

Debarred. 

72 

21 

120 

35 

322 

218 

514 

274 

155 

0 

891 

52 

10 

0 

1.056 

52 

No.  still  in 
Hospital. 


What  is  notable  is  the  considerable  increase  in  Chinese  arrivals  both  at  Victoria 
and  Vancouver.  There  were  detained  in  all  256  Chinese,  of  whom  21  were  debarred. 
Thus  while  1  in  8  was  detained,  but  1  in  95  was  debarred.  The  notably  large  number 
of  detentions  was  due  as  last  year  to  returning  Chinese,  who  had  contracted  conjunc- 
tivitis and  who  were  treated  and  released.  Of  the  1,100  detentions  in  8,305  Japanese, 
many  were  for  causes  other  than  medical,  since  only  87  were  debarred.  Of  the  2,624 
Hindoos  arriving  551  or  1  in  4-8  was  detained  and  of  218,  1  in  12  debarred,  a  consider- 
able number  being  diseased  or  physically  unfit. 

TABLE   VII. 

Statement  showing  the  diseases  and  other  causes  for  which  immigrants  were  detained 
at  the  Ports  of  Quebec,  Halifax,  St.  John,  Montreal,  North  Sydney,  Vancouver, 
Victoria  and  New  York  during  the  fiscal  year  1907-8. 


Class  of  Disease. 


I .   Ci  intagious  diseases. 


I  law  eoi  I  letenl  ion. 


Typhoid  fever 

I  Measles 

Parotiditis  (mumps). 

Erysipelas 


Totals, 


q  v 


1(3 


20 
(2  died ) 


g<3 


to 


IMMIGRATION 


121 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


Table  VII — Continued. 


Class  of  Disease. 

Cause  of  Detention. 

13 
C 

"a" 

m 

■2  "3 
a 
■fc 

-  5 
11 

Still  in 
Hospital. 

27 
1 
1 
4 
1 

12 
1 
1 

1 
2 

16 
1 
1 
4 
1 

12 
1 
1 
(died) 
1 
2 

Rheumatism 

51 

40 

11 

1,013 
1,810 
2 
1 
3 
3 
1 
3 
16 
3 
1 

(1  died) 

635 

1,768 

1 

1 
1 
1 
5 
3 
1 

362 
3 
1 
1 
3 
2 

"2 

11 

16 

39 

Corneal  opacity    

Choroiditis 

Defective  sight 

Pterygium 

Trachomatous  cicatrization 

Totals     . 

2,856 

20 
8 

18 
4 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
4 

62 

2,416 

385 

55 

Insanity 

IV.  Nervous  system 

(died) 
1 
4 
5 
3 

1 

1 
4 

19 

18 
4 

13 
1 
1 

2 
3 

1 

Other  nervous  diseases 

Totals 

42 

6 
1 
3 

10 

1 
ied) 

1 

1 

V,  Circulatory  system    

16 
1 

11 

10 

8 

18 

2 

(4d 
13 
(1  died) 
2 

2 
2 

Totals 

28 

3 

13 

3 
2 
2 

Totals 

23 

21 

2 

Dysentery 

8 

4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

(1  died) 
4 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

8 

Intestinal  hemorrhage 

Piles 

20 

12 

8 

122 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


Table  YII. — Continued. 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 


se  of  Detention. 

Number 
1  letained. 

- 
-     :- 

y. 

•6 
2 

Still  in 
Hospital. 

VIII.  Genito-urinary  system 

Syphilis 



Bubo  

3 

1 

1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

(1  died) 

1 
1 
1 

3 

Totals 

8 

5 

:; 

10 
1 
2 
S 

64 
2 
4 
3 

5 
1 
2 
7 
62 
2 
4 
3 

5 

Alopecia 

1 

2 

Totals 

94 

si; 

8 

4 
1 
2 
4 
1 
1 
26 

3 

1 

2 

13 

1 

Deaf  and  blind 

2 
2 

1 

1 

13 

■ 

Clubfeet    

Totals 

39 

19 

20 

5 
4 
2 
2 
1 

4 
2 

2 
2 

1 
2 

1 

Totals 

14 

10 

3 

1 

35 

7 
1 

10 
6 

1 

25 

1 

physical  debility 

Exhaustion  from  seasickness . 

Totals 

43 

17 

26 

364 
163 

178 

24 
2 

89 
271 
3 
3 
195 
2 
1 

13 
7 
3 

21 
5 
2 

19 
4 
2 
2 
5 

1,378 

302 

11 

(2  died) 

125 

2 

88 
20 

154 
2 

1 

7 
3 
3 

2 

57 
152 

53 
24 

5 

Likely  to  become  a  public  charge. . . 

Waiting  for  information 

2oi 
3 

3 

41 

1 

Contravention  of  Order-in-Couneil.. 

13 

Held  by  U.S.  officers 

18 
5 
2 

19 
4 

2 

5 

Totals 

720 

652 

6 

4,638 

3,403 
L4died) 

1,172 

63 

IMMIGRATION 


123 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Of  the  total  311,820  who  arrived  in  Canada,  58,312  crossed  at  border  ports  of  the 
United  States  boundary,  and  were  not  medically  inspected,  but  26,236  others  who 
arrived  at  Canadian  seaports,  and  were  detained  for  the  United  States  were  inspected. 
Hence  of  253,508  undergoing  medical  inspection  4,638  were  detained  and  1,172  were 
debarred. 

All  causes  for  which  immigrants  were  debarred  are  set  forth  in  the  last  statement, 
whether  medical  or  otherwise.  The  usual  cases  (18)  of  measles,  14  of  which  occurred 
in  children  infected  on  shipboard  were  detained  with  parents.  Of  the  general  diseases, 
class  II.,  notably  the  largest  number  27  was  of  tuberculosis;  some  of  these  were  detained 
for  observation,  others  having  the  disease  in  its  initial  stages,  and  having  funds  or 
going  to  friends,  were  admitted  while  11  were  rejected.  How  far  the  excluding  clauses 
of  the  Act  should  be  made  operative  in  this  sad  but  interesting  class  of  cases  by  our 
medical  officers  at  the  seaports,  is  a  matter  which  has  received  very  careful  attention. 
While  the  infectious  nature  of  this  disease  in  its  advanced  stages,  and  under  certain 
conditions  is  fully  recognized,  yet  in  no  country  is  it  being  dealt  with  as  severely  as 
the  acute  contagious  diseases,  and  experience  shows  that  it  need  not  be  if  intelligent 
precautions  are  taken. 

But  in  the  case  of  the  immigrant,  there  are  two  other  phases  of  the  matter  which 
cannot  be  overlooked.  The  first  is,  if  he  comes  seeking  health,  advised  by  his  physician, 
say  in  England,  is  not  in  an  incurable  stage,  and  has  a  reasonable  amount  of  money  or 
is  coming  to  friends  who  have  sent  for  him  and  who  are  willing  and  able  to  take  care 
of  him,  then  there  Is  every  reason  why  such  an  one  should,  viewing  the  matter  from  the 
humanitarian  standpoint  and  the  higher  law,  be  given  a  chance  for  life,  just  as  the 
Canadian  goes  south  to  Jamaica,  California  and  Florida  in  search  of  health.  On  the 
other  hand,  if  the  immigrant  is  in  an  advanced  stage  of  the  disease,  or  is  without  funds, 
both  causes  unfortunately  for  which  individual  cases  have  been  sent  to  Canada,  there 
can  be  but  one  course  to  pursue  and  that  is  to  reject.  Other  cases  where  a  member  of 
an  otherwise  good  family  is  infected,  where  a  wife  or  child  is  coming  to  a  husband  or 
father  already  settled  in  Canada,  have  each  to  be  dealt  with  separately  and  the  course 
of  action  to  be  determined  on  with  due  regard  to  the  best  interests  of  the  individual 
and  of  Canada. 

TABLE  VIII. 


Statement  showing  number  of  suspected  tubercular  immigrants  detained,  released  and 
rejected;  also  number  who  died  at  ocean  ports  during  the  fiscal  year  1907-8  by 
nationalities. 


Nationality. 

Detained. 

Released. 

Rejected. 

Died. 

Galician 

1 
8 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 

1 
2 

English 

6 
3 

2 

2 

Hebrew,  N.E.S.. 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

Polish  Russian  . . 

1 

1 

Russian,  N.E.S. . 

1 
1 
I 

1 

Totals 

27 

14 

11 

2 

The  only  other  important  cause  for  detention  in  this  class  was  fever,  and  all  were 
released.  These  cases  were  largely  the  effects  of  seasickness  and  the  confined  life  on 
shipboard,  and  were  in  no  sense  infectious. 


124 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  TXTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

Class  III.  as  usual  contains  the  chief  number  of  detained  persons,  there  being 
1,013  cases  of  trachoma,  of  whom  362  were  debarred;  1,810  cases  of  conjunctivitis,  of 
whom  3  were  debarred,  and  16  cases  of  defective  sight,  of  whom  11  were  debarred.  In 
all  2,856  cases  were  detained  on  account  of  eye  disease,  and  385  were  debarred.  While 
still  a  very  important  factor  in  the  work  of  medical  inspection  at  Atlantic  seaports,  it 
has  become  yearly  less  so,  since  the  booking  companies  in  Europe  and  Asia  have  insti- 
tuted the  practice  of  a  routine  medical  examination  of  continental  and  Asiatic  immi- 
grants either  in  their  home  countries  or  at  ports  of  sailing,  especially  as  regards 
trachoma. 

Class  IV. — Of  the  62  cases  in  this  class  of  nervous  diseases,  20  were  cases  of 
insanity.  Remembering  that  this  is  a  disease  which  the  Act  absoutely  excludes,  and 
that  in  most  cases  nothing  less  than  close  and  prolonged  observation  and  examination 
will  suffice  to  detect  cases  of  insanity,  it  is  gratifying  to  state  that  our  officers  succeeded 
in  detecting  20  cases  in  the  necessarily  short  examination  at  the  ports  of  entry.  In 
view  of  the  criticism  which  here  and  there  is  made  of  the  work  of  medical  inspection, 
the  following  table  illustrating  comparative  progress  in  detecting  insanity  is  given,  as 
taken  from  Annual  Reports  of  the  United  States  Commission : — 

TABLE  IX. 

Statement  showing  the  number  of  Insane  detained  at  the  seaports  of  Canada  and 

the  United  States. 


1903-04 . 

1!  104-05. 

1905-06. 

1906-07. 

1907-08. 

6 
33 

7 
92 

139 

15 
189 

20 

Remembering  that  the  number  of  immigrants  coming  to  the  United  States  in 
1906-07  was  1,298,413,  added  to  which  were  153,120  non-immigrant  aliens  as  cabin 
passengers  who  were  also  inspected,  we  find  that  1,451,533  had  1S9  insane  or  1  in 
every  7,680  inspected  as  compared  with  1  in  every  11,187  coming  to  Canada.  There 
is,  however,  a  difference  in  the  comparative  number  of  immigrants  from  different 
countries  to  Canada  and  the  United  States  which  is  of  interest  in  this  connection. 

TABLE   X. 


Statement  showing  number  of  British  immigrants  arriving  in  Canada  and  the 

United  States. 


1906-07. 

1907-08. 

Canada — English  and  Welsh 

43,590 

11,355 

3,706 

:m,344 

23,007 

6,999 

58,651 

59,404 
19,740 
34,530 

124,350  "M 

Report  not  yot 

received. 

113,674 

IMMIGRATION 


125 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Thus  the  remarkable  fact  is  developed  that  the  total  immigration  from  the  British 
isles  in  1907-8  to  Canada  was  greater  than  that  to  the  United  States  in  1906-7.  Of  the 
total  18  insane  rejected  at  Canadian  ports  '8  were  English,  2  Scotch,  2  Irish,  or 
together  67  per  cent  of  the  whole;  2  French  and  1  each  of  Galician,  Russian  Hebrew, 
Newfoundlander  and  Negro  race.  Of  those  at  United  States  ports  debarred  on 
account  of  insanity  there  were  in  1906-7  26  or  1  in  2,284  English,  7  or  1  in  2,820 
Scotch  and  44  or  1  in  784  Irish.  In  other  words  in  a  total  of  113,674  British  or  in  one 
eleventh  of  the  total  immigration  to  the  United  States  there  were  77  insane  rejected 
or  40  per  cent  of  the  whole  rejected  insane,  while  the  total  rejected  at  Canadian  ports 
is  thus  seen  to  be  comparatively  as  6  to  12.  There  is,  as  seen  in  the  British  rejections 
at  the  ports  of  both  countries,  seemingly  good  evidence  to  show  that  the  same  influ- 
ences tend  to  send  to  both  Canada  and  the  United  States  certain  ill-balanced 
persons  of  erratic  habits,  who  at  times  of  their  own  caprice  and  at  others  at  the  sug- 
gestion of  others  come  to  these  countries,  reached  as  easily  and  almost  as  cheaply  as 
is  London  from  Aberdeen,  and  where  the  language  and  customs  present  no  difficulties 
to  be  overcome,  and  where,  too,  many  are  sent  to  friends,  or  have  been  advised  to  try 
America  for  their  health  whether  financial  or  physical.  That  the  rate  of  progress  of 
detentions  of  the  insane  and  rejections  at  the  Canadian  ports,  has  been  at  any  rate 
comparatively  satisfactory,  may  be  concluded  from  the  fact  that  three  times  as  many 
were  detained  at  Canadian  ports  in  1907-8  as  compared  with  1903-4. 

As  regards  the  numerous  other  causes  for  detention  or  rejection,  little  need  be 
said  from  the  purely  medical  standpoint ;  cases  of  poor  physique  and  physical  debility 
are  readily  detected,  and  when  to  these  are  added  evident  moral  defects  of  character 
or  lack  of  funds,  the  line  of  action  indicated  is  easily  determined. 


TABLE  XL 

Statement  showing  diseases  and  other  causes  for  which  Immigrants  were  deported 

during  the  fiscal  year  1907-8. 


Class  of  Disease. 


I.  General  diseases 


II.  Tli.-  eye 


III.  Nervous  system . . 


IV.  Circulatory  system., 


Cause  of  Deportation. 


Tuberculosis 

Rheumatism 

Alcoholism 

Malarial  fever   . . . 

Hip  disease 

Blight's  disease. . . 
Hodgkiu's  disease 


Defective  sigh! 

Trachoma 

Cataract . 


Insanity 

Feeble  minded.    . . 

Epilepsy 

Paralysis 

Locomotor  Ataxia 


Heart  disease 
Varicose  veins. 


Total  . 


Total. 


Total . 


70 

21 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

W 

3 
2 
1 


122 

13 

10 

2 

2 

149 

6 
4 


Total 10 


126 


DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  II 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 
Table  XL — Continued. 


Class  of  Disease. 


Cause  of  Deportation. 


V.  Respiratory  system Haemoptysis. 

Bronchitis. . 


VI.  Digestive  system 

VII.  Genitourinary  system. 

VIII.  The  skin   


Rupture 

Syphilis  . .   . 
Metrorrhagia. 


Abscesses 

Fistula. .  . . 
Mastoiditis 


IX.   Malformation,  diseases  of  oldageand 
infancy 


X.  Accidents 

XI.  Ill-defined  C: 

XII.  Other  causes 


Old  age . . 
Cripple.  - 
Deafness . 

Flat  f.  .ot 


Broken  leg 

Physical  del  >ility . 


Likely  to  become  public  charge. 

Accompanying  patients 

Criminality 

Prostitution 

Vagrancy .      ... 

Contract  labour 

Immorality 

Drug  habit 


3 

1 

Total 4 

1 

3 

1 

Total 4 

2 

1 
1 

Total 4 

7 
5 
2 

1 

Total 15 


33 

279 

116 

49 

26 

23 

6 

2 

1 

502 

825 


Total 

Grand  total. 


However  satisfactory  the  work  of  port  inspection  comparatively  may  have  been, 
it  has  been  supplemented  by  further  action  which  the  department  wisely  or  the 
opposite  laid  down  of  itself,  and  which  the  Immigration  Act  requires  all  muni- 
cipalities in  Canada  to  take.     Clauses  28  and  33  of  the  Immigration  Act  read: — 

'  28.  No  immigrant  shall  be  permitted  to  land  in  Canada  who  is  a  pauper,  or 
destitute,  a  professional  beggar,  or  vagrant,  or  who  is  likely  to  become  a  public  cbarge; 
and  any  person  landed  in  Canada  who,  within  two  years  thereafter,  has  become  a 
charge  upon  the  public  funds,  whether  municipal,  provincial,  or  federal,  or  an  inmate 
of  or  a  charge  upon  any  charitable  institution,  may  be  deported  and  returned  to  the 
port  or  place  whence  such  immigrant  came  or  sailed  for  Canada. 

'33.  Whenever  in  Canada  an  immigrant  has  within  two  years  of  his  landing  in 
Canada  committed  a  crime  involving  moral  turpitude,  or  become  an  inmate  of  a  jail 
or  hospital  or  other  charitable  institution,  it  shall  be  the  duty  of  the  clerk  or  secretary 
of  the  municipality  to  forthwith  notify  the  minister  thereof,  giving  full  particulars. 
On  receipt  of  such  information  the  minister  may,  on  investigating  the  facts,  order 
the  deportation  of  such  immigrant  at  the  cost  and  charges  of  such  immigrant  if  he 
is  able  to  pay,  and  if  not  then  at  the  cost  of  the  municipality  wherein  he  has  last 
been  regularly  resident,  if  so  ordered  by  the  minister,  and  if  he  is  a  vagrant  or  tramp, 
or  there  is  no  such  municipality,  then  at  the  cost  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior. 
Every  such  immigrant  shall  be  carried  by  the  same  transportation  company  or  com- 
panies which  brought  him  into  Canada  to  the  port  from  which  he  came  to  Canada 


ii 


IMMIGRATION  W? 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

without  receiving  the  usual  payment  for  such  carriage.  In  case  he  was  brought  into 
Canada  by  a  railway  company  such  company  shall  similarly  convey  him  or  secure  his 
conveyance  from  the  municipality  or  locality  whence  he  is  to  be  deported  to  the 
country  whence  he  was  brought.' 

The  history  of  British  emigration  legislation  for  a  century  had  clearly  shown  the 
necessity  for  this  legislation,  as  for  instance  the  Act  of  1834  which  provided  that 
persons  entitled  to  vote  at  any  public  vestry  meeting,  could  vote  to  direct  that  money, 
not  exceeding  one-half  the  rate  of  the  preceding  year  may  be  applied  to  assisting  its 
residents  to  emigrate,  and  might  be  borrowed  to  be  repaid  within  five  years.  The 
reason  for  such  a  Bill  is  understood  when  Horton  who  introduced  the  Bill  stated  that 
in  the  parish  of  Frome  14,000  habitually  or  casually  received  relief.  'He  said  the 
parish  was  too  poor  to  keep  them  and  would  borrow  money  if  allowed  to  emigrate 
them.' 

It  is  not  too  much  to  expect  perhaps,  in  spite  of  the  notification  and  of  announce- 
ments made  in  Great  Britain  by  the  department  of  the  kind  of  emigration  desired, 
and  what  is  not  wanted,  that  there  have  been  in  the  enormous  number  of  British 
emigrants  who  came  in  1907-8  to  Canada,  some  persons  who  were  of  this  assisted  class. 
While  all  of  those  on  arrival  who  desired  work  obtained  it  until  the  financial  crisis 
occurring  in  the  United  States  in  the  autumn  of  1907  affected  Canadian  industries 
and  caused  a  stoppage  of  work,  which  resulted  in  the  least  desirable  and  energetic 
immigrants,  especially  in  Ontario  to  which  they  had  largely  gone,  61,475  in  the  calendar 
year  1907,  repeating  what  was  stated  in  the  Immigration  Committee's  report  in  the 
parliamentary  papers  of  Canada  of  1858,  '  There  were  more  jail  commitments  in  1858 
than  in  1857  due  'to  lack  of  general  employment  in  Canada  and  the  United  States.' 

It  may  also  be  stated  that  the  seven  years  previous  to  1858  had  seen  a  total  of 
291,134  arriving  in  Canada,  and  nearly  all  in  Upper  Canada,  so  that  the  conditions 
following  the  financial  crisis  of  1857  must  have  been  very  serious  indeed  resulting  in 
immigration  to  Canada  decreasing  from  59,716  in  1854  to  6,689  in  1858,  and  from 
193,065  to  43,761  for  the  same  years  to  the  United  States. 

Under  ©lass  I.  the  chief  cause  of  deportation  has  been  tuberculosis.  In  order 
to  know  to  what  extent  cases  of  this  disease  had  passed  inspection,  a  circular 
was  sent  in  January  last  to  every  hospital  and  known  refuge  in  Canada,  requesting 
reply  to  questions  as  to  the  nationality,  age,  date  of  arrival  in  Canada  and  of  admis- 
sion to  hospital,  and  the  final  disposition  of  the  case.  From  Ontario  answers  were 
received  from  61  institutions;  from  Quebec  18;  from  Nova  Scotia  49;  from  Manitoba 
6 ;  from  Saskatchewan  3 ;  from  Alberta  9 ;  from  British  Columbia  7 ;  from  the  Yukon  1. 
Of  these  only  10  in  Ontario  reported  any  cases,  there  being  21  in  all.  Seven  in  Quebec 
reported  66  cases;  three  in  Manitoba,  25  cases;  twelve  cases  from  Saskatchewan;  three 
from  Alberta,  and  none  from  either  British  Columbia,  Nova  Scotia  or  the  Yukon,  or 
in  all  127  cases  were  reported.  Most  of  these,  apart  from  11  who  died,  have  been 
reported  to  the  department,  and  are  included  in  the  70  cases  deported  during  the  year. 
Of  those  deported  up  to  the  date  of  the  circular,  I  have  analysed  them  according  to 
the  information  obtained,  with  the  following  results  : — 

Evidently  tuberculized  on  admission  to  Canada 25 

Probably  tuberculized  on  admission  to  Canada 17 

Not  tuberculized  on  admission  to  Canada 15 

Of  others,  two  recent  arrivals  died  in  in  refuge  in  Hamilton;  two  at  Port  Arthur 
within  a  year  of  arrival,  and  two  others  without  particulars;  four  Austrians  who  were 
navvies,  died  in  St.  Thomas  hospital  and  one  in  Lethbridge.  Of  61  cases  of  tuberculosis 
treated  in  Victoria  hospital,  Montreal,  not  born  in  Canada,  18  had  arrived  within  three 
years,  and  4  in  Notre  Dame,  all  of  whom  had  arrived  within  a  year.  While  it  is  doubt- 
less true  that  others  may  have  arrived  and  been  admitted,  they  have  evidently  arrived 
with  and  been  maintained  by  their  families  or  have  come  to  friends.  In  Winnipeg 
the  Margaret  Scott  Nursing  Mission  had  22  cases  of  tuberculosis  during  10  months, 


128 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.   1909 

visited  by  its  nurses,  but  no  information  was  available  as  to  whether  they  were  immi- 
grants and  if  so  had  recently  arrived. 

In  Class  II.  diseases  of  the  eyes  were  the  cause  of  but  6  deportations.  This  is  the 
best  illustration  possible  of  the  thoroughness  of  the  wrk  of  inspection  as  regards  this 
class  of  disease.  A  careful  personal  investigation  instituted  during  the  year  developed 
the  following  facts :  In  the  general  hospital  in  Winnipeg  there  were  in  all  14  cases  of 
trachoma  operated  upon  in  1907,  and  of  these  only  three  judging  by  their  names  were 
immigrants.  In  the  out  patient  dispensary  of  2,941  cases  treated  in  1907,  there  were 
but  17  of  trachoma,  and  3  for  corneal  ulcers.  Of  25  cases  treated  in  1907  in  St.  Boni- 
face, Winnipeg,  6  were  French  half-breeds;  6  Austrians,  two  only  of  whom  had 
arrived  within  two  years,  and  4  Russians,  of  whom  1  had  arrived  within  2  years.  The 
Montreal  General  Hospital  outdoor  clinic  treated  102  cases  of  trachoma;  but  no  par- 
ticulars were  kept,  and  the  report  states,  '  Quite  a  number  of  the  cases  were  natives  of 
French  Canada.'  These  constituted  practically  all  the  cases  of  trachoma  found  in  the 
country. 

Class  III. — In  all  122  cases  of  insanity  were  deported;  a  very  remarkable  number 
indeed,  as  indicating  the  activity  of  the  department  in  relieving  the  public  institutions 
of  this  serious  source  of  expense.  When  it  is  remembered  that  it  is  very  difficult  to  get 
correct  information  from  some  of  these  unfortunates,  whose  relatives  or  friends  are 
often  only  too  reluctant  to  have  them  return,  it  is  perhaps  surprising  that  it  has  been 
possible  to  make  arrangements  for  the  return  of  so  many. 

Reference  has  already  been  made  to  the  measures  taken  for  preventing  the  admis- 
sion of  such  cases  to  Canada.  How  large  is  the  number  of  the  cases  deported  may  be 
gathered  by  comparison  with  the  United  States  returns  which  show  that  in  1906-7, 
some  360  aliens  were  deported  on  the  ground  of  their  becoming  insane  within  three 
years  after  landing.  In  Canada  within  less  than  two  years  from  the  passing  of  the 
present  Act,  1*4  were  deported,  or  more  than  half  as  many,  though  our  immigration 
within  the  two  years  was  but  one-sixth  of  that  to  the  United  States. 


TABLE   XII. 


Statement  showing  the  number  and  year  of  admission  of  insane  and  other  immigrants 
deported  during  the  fiscal  year  1907-8. 


Province 
irted  From. 

Year 

Of  Arrival. 

- 

Total  No. 
Deporti  'I. 

s  £ 

Si 

O 

1900. 

1901.     1902. 

1903. 

1904. 

1905. 

1906. 

1907. 

1908. 

1 

1 

'     "3 
0 
6 

1 
32 
87 
6S 

4 

8 
13 

11 

91 

243 

151 

2 

8 

39 

19 

12 

131 

343 

233 

2 

12 

56 

36 

Quebec 

1 
...    . 

3 

4 
8 

25 
50 

25 

1 

2 

s 

1 
1 

6 

1  \S.  A.  via  ( lanada 

1 

2 

13 

Totals 

1 

2 

1 

2 

17 

213 

564 

8 

17 

825 

122 

Class  IV.  of  Table  XI.  had  few  deportations,  there  being  6  of  heart  disease  and  4 
of  varicose  veins. 

Class  V.  of  Table  VII.  had  in  all  28  detentions  and  10  rejections,  6  being  from 
heart  disease. 


ii  XUMIGRATIOy  129 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Class  VI.  had  23  detentions  and  2  rejections  from  diseases  of  the  respiratory  sys- 
tem, 13  being  acute  pneumonit,  mostly  developed  on  shipboard,  of  whom  4  died. 

Class  VII. — Including  diseases  of  the  digestive  organs,  shows  a  remarkable 
immunity  from  diseases,  such  as  cholera,  typhoid,  &c,  which  in  the  early  history  of 
immigration  were  the  causes  of  serious  sickness  and  mortality. 

Classes  VIII.  and  IX. — Detentions  in  Classes  VIII.  and  IX.  are  confined  almost 
wholly  to  two  skin  diseases  peculiarly  prevalent  amongst  the  people  and  schools  of  the. 
poorer  parts  of  Great  Britain  and  continental  cities.  They  are  favus  and  ringworm 
(tinea) ;  both  difficult  to  cure  and  both  liable  to  spread  in  insanitary  houses.  In  all  5 
cases  of  favus  were  rejected  and  2  of  ringworm. 

Class  X.  is  an  ill-defined  group.  Had  39  eases  detained  and  20  rejected.  Of  these 
13  were  old  persons,  senile  and  unable  to  care  for  themselves. 

Class  XI.  contains  but  few  cases  whether  of  injuries  or  wounds. 

Under  Class  XII.  of  Table  XL  we  find  for  the  first  time  a  notable  number  of 
immigrants  deported  as  paupers,  or  those  liable  to  become  a  public  charge.  While  last 
year  there  were  but  23,  in  1907-8  there  were  279,  and  along  with  those  there  were 
deported  49  as  criminals  and  52  for  other  forms  of  immorality  or  vagrancy. 

That  there  should  have  been  in  the  stress  of  a  sudden  stoppage  of  work  during  a 
Canadian  winter  so  few  cases  subject  to  deportation  from  some  one  or  more  of  the 
causes  set  forth  in  the  Act,  is  probably  the  best  commentary  possible  upon  not  only  the 
industrious  qualities  of  most  of  our  imniignants,  but  more  so  upon  their  moral  char- 
acters. The  paucity  of  immigrants  in  public  institutions  may  be  best  illustrated  per- 
haps from  the  Ontario  annual  reports  of  the  Public  Charities: — 

TABLE  XIII. 

Statement  giving  Number  of  Refugees  in  Ontario  and  Admissions  thereto   in   1905 

and  in  1907. 

l'JOo.  i -JO". 

Institutions 74  73 

Number  of  inmates 5,507  5,528 

Previous  Residence. 

Received   from  city  or  town  where  refuge   is 

located 4,020  4,017 

Counties 718  464 

Received  from  some  other  county  in  Ontario.  (551  883 

Emigrants  and  foreigners 118  134 


5,507  5,528 

Thus  the  total  increase  in  two  years  was  only  21,  and  the  immigrant  increase  but 
li;. while  the  total  immigrants  were  less  than  3  per  cent  of  the  whole.  It  is  further 
interesting  to  note  that  the  number  admitted  into  the  House  of  Industry,  Toronto,  in 
L905,  was  1117.  and  152  in  1907;  in  the  House  of  Providence,  Toronto,  320  in  1905,  and 
299  in  1907.  The  last  annual  report  of  the  House  of  Industry,  Toronto,  including 
the  hard  winter  of  1907-8,  shows  an  increase  in  the  cost  of  outdoor  relief  from  $11,- 
149  05  to  $18.407. IS.  and  as  it  is  to  this  refuge  that  most  applicants  to  the  city  hall  are 
sent,  it  may  be  said  that  the  increased  calls  for  help  there  which  began  in  November 
with  the  shutting  down  of  large  factories  were  the  measure  of  official  charity  exer- 
cised. Moreover,  this  outdoor  relief  was  chiefly  to  some  200  families,  mostly  English, 
who  came  late  in  the  autumn,  of  which  only  two  of  the  number  were  deported,  while 
outdoor  relief  ended  with  March. 

25— ii— 9 


130 


DEPARTMEXT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 


TABLE  XTV. 

Statement  showing  the  Number  and  Nationality  of  Immigrants  Deported  after  Ad- 
mission during  the  Fiscal  Years  1903-4,  1904-5,  1905-6,  1906-7  (9  months),  and 
1907-8. 


Nationality. 

Total  No. 
Arriving. 

Deported. 

Ratio  of 

Deported  to 

Number 

Arriving. 

2,795 

1,939 

1,120 

228 

2.445 

306 

281,521 

6,481 

9,009 

22,095 
447 
3,792 
5,532 
4,531 
1,238 
4,617 

71,094 

949 

5,179 

8,910 

36,231 
1.137 

11,684 
6,430 
5,138 

32,203 

15,202 
1,994 
2,344 
2,665 

26,138 

!.>>-' 1 

239,481 
5,452 

63 

13 

5 

1 

10 
1 

SSL' 

19 
23 

47 
1 
8 

11 
8 
2 
7 

80 
1 
5 
8 

32 
1 
8 
4 
3 

17 
8 
1 
1 
1 

10 
1 

51 
1 

1  in           44 

1  in         14!l 

1  in         224 

Dutch 

Hebrew  German .                                                                     

1  in  328 
1  in  24". 
1  in  306 
1  in        319 

1  in        341 

Swedish 

1  in        392 

1  in         17ii 

Welsh 

1  in        503 

Hebrew.  N.E.S. 

1  in        566 

Polish,  N.E.S 

Scotch   

Australian 

Hindoo 

1  in  619 
1  in  660 
1  in  889 
1  in  '.149 
1  in  1,036 
1  in  1,114 
1  in      1,132 

Turkish 

1  in     1,137 

1  in     1,461 

Austrian,  N.E.S 

Russian.  X.E.S 

1  in  1,608 
1  in  1,713 
1  in  1,894 
1  in     1,000 

1  in     1,994 

Syrian 

1  in  2,344 
1  in  2,665 
1  in     2,614 

1  in      4.(12 1 

Newfoundland 

1  in     4,696 

1  in     5,452 

Totals. . .                  .   .                             

824,951 

1,334 

1  in        618 

As  was  remarked  in  a  preceding  report,  the  number  of  immigrants  of  some 
nationalities  has  been  too  small  to  draw  conclusions  from,  yet  some  nationalities 
show  continued  freedom  from  deported  cases.  As  a  racial  group  the  Scandinavian, 
including  Xorwegian,  Swedish.  Danish  and  Icelandic,  shows  most  deported  or  1  in 
every  309  of  18,549  immigrants.  TheBritish  group,  by  far  the  most  important,  is  next 
highest,  and  in  spite  of  the  very  large  number  of  English  emigrants,  shows  1  in  319 
in  a  total  of  281,521,  or  S82  in  all;  that  is,  supplied  two-thirds  of  the  total  deportations 
in  a  number  of  immigrants  a  little  more  than  one-quarter  of  the  whole.  The  Austrian 
group  as  before  stands  well,  being  1  in  1,139  of  52,416  returned.  Similarly  of  the  Ger- 
mans, but  1  in  1,461  of  11,684  returned.  Of  French  1  in  1,114  of  8,910,  and  but  one 
person  in  4,624  Belgians.  Of  Russian  and  Russian  Hebrews  1  in  2,297  were  returned 
out  of  a  total  of  41,340.  Similarly  a  remarkable  immunity  continues  amongst  Italians, 
but  17  in  32,203,  or  1  in  1,894  being  sent  back. 


IMMIGRATION 


131 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


TABLE   XV. 

Statement  showing  the  Number,  Nationality  and  Cause  for  which  Immigrants  were 
deported  during  the  Fiscal  Year  1907-8. 


Nationality. 

Whence  sent 

for 
Deportation. 

tjj 

s 

© 

a 

Class  of  Disease. 

Cause  of  Deportation. 

Deported  at  Montreal. 

Winnipeg 

2 
1 
1 
1 
6 
3 
1 
1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
1 

"   1 
2 
1 
2 
1 

— 

1 
1 

1 
1 
7 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
i 

6 
10 
1 
1 
4 
1 

1 
1 

1 
7 

4 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

i 

i 
i; 

l 

i 

"5 
1 
1 

... 

1 

1 

General  diseases 

The  eye 

Dutch 

<  rerman 

English 

St.  John 

" 

„ 

Woodstock 

Port  Arthur 

Meaford,  Ont 

" 

U.S.   A. 

" 

Winnipeg 

Toronto  .          .... 

" 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 

Polish 

Winnipeg 

Montreal 

Winnipeg 

Niagara  Falls  . . . 
Fort    William 
Winnipeg 

Winnipeg 

Chesley,  Ont 

Winnipeg 

Montreal 

Miniico,  Ont   .... 

" 

Russian,  N.E.S 

" 

English. . 

Hip  disease. 
B right's  disease. 
Hodgkin's  disease. 
Defective  sight. 

Trachoma. 

Bukowinian 

Galician 

Nervous  system 

Insanity. 

Winnipeg 

„     . 

English 

Stanstead,   Que.  . . 

Montreal 

Toronto    

Cobourg,  Ont. . . . 
Renfrew,  Ont   . . . 

Ottawa 

Thamesville,  Ont 

Penetangui  «  h  en  e , 

Ont 

Kingston 

Winnipeg 

■      ■ 



Calgary 

Edmonton 

New  Westminster, 

B.C 

Mimico,  Ont   

Toronto    

Montreal 

U.  S.  A 

"i 

2 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

Hebrew,   Russian 

132 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  ii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 
Table  XV.— Continued. 


Nationality. 

Whence   sent 

for 
I  deportation. 

1 

d 

~. 

i 
"\ 

"i 

l 
l 
l 

i 
l 
l 
i 

2 

1 

1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

1 

1 

H 

o 

'— 



"l 

1 

.... 

T 
"l 

i 

2 

1 

.... 
1 

1 

1 

5 

Id 

I 

1 

1 
3 

3 

"s 

1 

3 

1 

3 

10 

( ilass  of  I  tisease. 

1 '. !,--  of  1  teportation. 

[tali  an 

Dutch   . 

Hamilton 

Montreal. .    

Winnipeg 

Nervous  system 

Circulatory  system .    . 

Respiratory  system. . . . 

Digestive  system 

Genitourinary  system. 

C    Malformation,       "1 

•  Diseases  of  old  age  [• 
{        and  infancy.         j 

Ell-defined  causes   .... 

(  )thei  causes 

Insanity. 

Winnipeg 

Montreal 

Sherbrooke 

Winnipeg. 

English. .  . 

Polish 

•• 

Epilepsy. 

English. . . . 

St.  <  'atharines  ... 
Carle  ton,  Ont. 
Winnipeg 

Paralysis. 

Winnipeg. 



Ilaunoptvsis. 

Winnipeg 

St.  Andrew's,  Que. 
Winnipeg 

From  U.S. A 

Bronchitis. 

Rupture. 

Syphilis. 

,, 

Metrorrhagia. 

Abscesses. 



Winnipeg 

1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 

,, 

Old  age. 
Cripple. 

Hebrew,  N.E.S 
English 

Winnipeg    

Montreal 

Toronto 

Scotch   

Winnipeg 

3 
1 

1 
2 

"l 
14 

1 
1 

1 

2 

27 

Physical  debility. 

Dutch 

Winnipeg 

English 

Osluiwa 

, 

Swedish 

Winnipeg 

■■ 

Winnipeg 

Montreal 

\jikely    to   become    a    public 
charge. 

Bulgarian. .  .    

,, 

English 

" 

7 
13 
11 
1 
1 
1 
6 

,, 

Toronto 

,, 

( tehawa 

" 

„ 

Clinton 

Sault  Ste.  Marie,  , 
Winnipeg 

,, 

,, 

Scotch  

Montreal 

Toronto 

"i" 

3 
2 



Turkish  . 

Accompanying  patients. 

Toronto  

Dutch   

English 



*         i 

Toronto  

6 

,, 

IMMIGRATION 


133 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


Table  XV. — Continued. 


Nationality. 


Whence  sent 

for 
Deportation. 


English. 


Scotch 

Irish 

Australian . 

Dutch 

English  . .  . 


Winnipeg 

Montreal . . . . 

Toronto 

London,  Ont. 

ii         . .    Ottawa 

..         Winnipeg  . . . 

Scotch Montreal 

n       Hamilton  . . . 


Oshawa 

I  Ittawa 

Chesley,  Ont. . 
Renfrew,  Ont 

Clinton,  Ont   . 

Ingersoll 

Meaford,  Ont. 
Winnipeg 


Montreal . 


Woodstock 

Toronto 

Winnipeg  . 

Ottawa 

Toronto 


Irish 

Hebrew,  N.E.S. 

Danish Montreal . . . 

Eroui  U.  S.  A I 

n  Sherbrooke  . 

English Winnipeg  . . 

Scotch  

Irish 


Galiciau 
English 


Scotch  . 
English 


Deported  (it  St.  John. 
English 


U.S.  A 

Monti  eal 

Toronto 

London,  Ont. . 
I  Ittuwa  . 

Woodstock 
Cobourg,  Ont. 
Winnipeg 
Lethbridge  . .  . 


Winnipeg 


Totals 


Montreal 

Toronto 

.<         London,  Ont.. 

■i         Oshawa,  Ont. . 

St.   Tohn 

ii         Winnipeg  .  .    . 

Welsh i  Michel,  B.  C. . 

Scotch Toronto 

Irish Winnipeg. . .    . 

tt     Vancouver. 

Hebrew  Russian 

Italian 

Finnish 


Sault  Ste.  Marie   . 
Swedish  . .  Montreal 

U.  S.  A 

Norwegian Winnipeg. ... 

English jCampbellton,  N.B, 

..         ...    Montreal 


Montreal . 


Irish 

Italian  .  . 
English . . 
Scotch.. . 
Galician 
German  . 


Winnipeg  . 


Montreal 

St.  John. .      

Winnipeg 

New  Westminster 
U.S.  A   ... 


325 


Class  of  Disease.' 


( lause  of.]  »<■["  irtatii  in. 


Other  causes 


131 


Accompaning  patients 


( trmrinality. 


Prostitution. 


Vagrancy. 


tic  niral   diseases 


Drug  Habit. 


Tuberculosis. 


The  eye 


Nervous  System 


Rheumatism 


Defective  sight. 
Trachoma. 

Insanity. 


134 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  1STER10R 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 


Table  XV. — Continued. 


Nationality. 

Whence  sent 

fi  ii- 
Deportation. 

1 
1 

8 

-. 



i 

i 
i 

i 

i 

"i" 

i" 

i 
i 

Y 
i 

i 

i 

i 
i 

5 
u 
2 

1 
4 

9 
12 

"u' 

'  i 
3 

Class  "f  Disease. 

Cause  of  Deportation. 

English 

Wakefi.-ld.  Que.. 

Nervous  system 

The  skin 

I     Malformation,       \ 
-  Diseases  of  old  age  J- 

1^     arid  infancy. 

Accidents 

Ill  defined  causes. .    .. 

Insanity. 



I.'  mi  ton,  '  hit  . 

I'm  :     Vrthnr    

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
'J 
1 
1 
1 

D .  s    A  

Port  Arthur 

Winnipeg 

CT.S    A 

Winnipeg 

V.  S    A    

1 

Hebrew  Russian   

U.  S.  A 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
2 
1 

Finnish 

r.  s  a  

Vermilion,  Ont.. . . 
Winnipeg 

1  itt.iwa 

U.  S.  A 

English 

Ottawa 

Broadview.  Saak 

Epilepsy. 
Paralysis. 

Fort  William 

Russian,  N.E.S 

English 

Winnipeg 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
5 
6 
1 
5 
1 
1 
4 

16 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

Fistula. 
Cripple. 

Scotch 

Winnipeg 

Broken  leg. 
Physical  debility. 

English 

Bukowinian 

U.S.  A 

Winnipeg 

U.  S    A 

Other 

causes 

Likely    lo    become   a    public 
charge. 

Winnipeg 

" 

English 

Toronto    

" 

ii 

•  trough 

St.  'Thomas.    ...    . 

Winnipeg 

Victoria,  B.C 

" 

Scotch 



Ottawa 

" 

5 

1 
1 
1 
2 

TJ.  S.  A 

•• 

Hebrew  Russian 

" 

IMMIGRATION 


135 


SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 


Table  XV. — Continued. 


Nationality. 

Whence  sent 

for 
Deportation. 

CD 

3 

<6 
S 

Clas.s  of  Disease. 

Cause  of  Deportation. 

Italian 

Bulgarian 

U.S.A 

Montreal 

Toronto 

l 

5 
19 
1 
1 
1 
2 

r 
5 
2 

2 
2 
1 

"i 

79 

1 

1 

14 
16 

4 

4 
1 

4 

5 
T 

1 
236 

Other  causes 

Likely    to    become   a  public 
charge. 

Russian,  N.E.S 

U.  S.  A.'..'..". .'.'. 

Norwegian 

Accompanying  patients. 

Oshawa 

Toronto 

Winnipeg 

U.S.A 

7 
3 

1 
-1 

Toronto  

St.  Thomas 

Winnipeg 

Hamilton 

1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
4 
1 

Criminality. 

Toronto 

English 

Toronto 

U.S.A 

Totals 

212 

Deported  at  Vancouver. 
From  U.S.A . 

Nervous  system 

Insanity. 

Likely    to    become    a    public 
charge. 

Totals 

Burlington,  Ont. .  . 
Toronto 

Halifax       .     

3 

5 

3' 

11 

1 
10 

3 

1 
1 
1 

17 

3 

2 
1 

From  U.S.A 

,, 

Vagrancy. 

Epilepsy. 

Likely    to   become    a    public 
charge. 

Deported  at  Halijax. 
English 

Nervous  system 

English 

,, 

St.  Catharines.. . 

Totals 

Victoria ... 

Deported  at  Victoria. 

Other  causes 

Likely   to    become   a    public 

charge. 
Criminality. 

From  U.S.A.... 

.. 

,, 

6 
2 

14 

1 

2 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
1 

10 

589 

Nervous  system 

Vagrancy. 
Immorality. 

Alcoholism. 
Insanity. 

Totals 

Deported  at  Quebec. 

U.S.A.'..  V.. '.'.'.'.'.'. 

Physical  debility. 

Likely   to    become    a    public 

charge. 
Criminality. 

,, 

Dorchester,  N.B.  . 

Totals 

Grand  totals. . 

136 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.    1909 

Table  XV.  is  a  detailed  statement  of  what  i-  summarized  in  Table  XIV.,  and 
serves  not  only  to  indicate  the  nationality  of  those  deported,  but  also  the  place  whence 
they  were  sent.  Bow  widely  distributed  is  our  immigration  throughout  Canada,  and 
how  genera]  is  the  knowledge  of  the  provisions  of  the  A.-t  regarding  deportation,  are 
seen  from  the  list  of  places  whence  immigrants  have  been  deported.  These  places 
were : — 


Winnipeg 232 

Toronto 190 

Montreal 115 


Oshawa  .... 

Unite. 1   States. 
Vancom  er  .  . 
i  >ttawa  .... 
Victoria    . . 
Chatham   .  .    . 
Quebec   .  .   . .   . 
Edmonton   .  .   . 
Peterborough  . 
Halifax  .... 
London    .  . 
Renfrew    .  .    . 
( ihesley  .... 
Hamilton  .  .    . 


38 
36 
33 

21 
20 
25 

in 
;> 

7 
7 
S 


New    Westminster 4 

Vleaford 4 

Clinton .". 

i  lobourg '■'• 

St.   Catharines 3 

Port  Arthur .". 

[ngersoll 3 

Woodstock :: 

Munico 

St.  John 3 

St.  Thomas 2 

Sherbrooke 2 

<t.   Andrews 2 

Sae.lt  Ste.  .Marie 2 

Lethbridge 2 

Fori    William 2 


and  one  from  Brandon,  Michel,  Campbellton,  Wakefield,  Vermilion,  Ont.,  Broad- 
view, Burlington,  Dorcheser.  Stanstead,  Ripley,  Niagara  Falls,  Carleton,  Ont.,  Brock  - 
ville,  Kingston,  Penetanguishene,  Thamesville.  Calgary,  Yorkton. 

Nol  only  does  the  large  number  of  people  from  English  cities  come  to  our  large 
cities,  but  it  is  especially  true  of  that  class,  '  ne'er-do-wells,'  social  and  moral  derelicts, 
and  ineffectives  in  general.  They  are  not  only  physically  unequal  to  the  tasks 
of  farm  life,  but  they  are  further  usually  incapable  of  enduring  the  quiet  of 
rural  life.  Hence  if  sent  to  the  country  they  too  frequently  drift  back  to  town,  and 
when  winter  comes  and  work  fails  they  seek  aid  in  those  institutions  set  apart  for  the 
city  poor  and  helpless.  It  i-  not  unusual,  moreover,  for  officials  of  smaller  towns  and 
villages  to  buy  a  ticket  for  some  individual  whom  they  may  have  on  their  hands  and 
with  pious  good  wishes  send  him  to  Toronto.  Montreal  or  Winnipeg.  That  there  were 
re  such  during  the  past  winter  would  seem  quite  remarkable  remembering  a^l 
the  circumstance-,  and  that  we  have  found  a  means  of  dealing  effectively  with  the 
'  no-goods,'  the  number  deported  very  well  proves. 

The  following  statement  shows  the  amount  expended  on  detention  hospitals  for 
salaries  of  medical  officers,  guards,  matrons  and  other  employees,  medicines,  pro- 
visions and  other  genera]  running  expenses,  but  not  including  the  expenditure  for 
furniture,  kitchen  utensils,  &c,  also  the  amounts  refunded  by  the  various  steamship 
companies  and  the  net  cost  to  the  government  for  the  fiscal  year  1907-1908. 

TABLE  XVI. 
STATEMENT  showing  hospital  expenditures  and  receipts  for  1907-8. 


Hi  'SP1TAL. 

Total 
Expenditure. 

Total  Refunds 

by  s.  s. 

Companies. 

Net  Cost, 

Net  Pro 

fit. 

8,453  40 
2.594  68 
16,954  :<:' 
6,065  81 
6,091  41 
1,488  28 

S    eta 

6,074  7."' 
1,197  50 
4,790  75 
1,221  02 

5,626  00 

2,215  50 

S  "cts 

2,37s  65 

1.397  IS 

12,164  18 

4,841  79 

465  41 

72; 

cts. 

St    John                                         

- 

12 

Deduct  i 

41,648  61 

21,125  52 

21,250  21 
727  12 

72; 

12 

1907-1908  

1    

•  20,5z3  09 

1 

ii  IMMIGRATION  137 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

Such,  as  summed  up  in  the  several  tables,  is  the  story  of  the  largest  immigration 
to  Canada,  viewed  from  the  medical  standpoint,  which  has  taken  place  during  any 
year  in  her  history.  It  was  the  culmination  of  a  remarkable  influx  of  people  to 
Canada  from  other  countries,  which,  comparatively,  has  never  had  its  parallel  even 
in  the  history  of  the  United  Sta.tes.  Since  April  of  the  census  year  1900  to  April  1, 
1908,  the  immigrant  arrivals  destined  to  Canada  have  numbered  1,066,684,  as  compared 
with  6,667,732  to  June  30,  1907,  to  the  United  States;  or  to  the  census  population  of 
5,371,315  has  been  added  almost  exacts  one-fifth,  and  but  one-eleventh  to  'the  76,303,- 
387  census  population  of  the  United  States.  Thus  within  these  short  years  one  per- 
son has  had  to  be  found  a  place  for  beside  every  other  five  workers  in  Canada,  and 
until  the  financial  stress  of  last  winter,  work  in  abundance  has  been  found  for  all,  as 
the  absence  of  any  notable  increase  in  the  inmates  of  charitable  institutions  up  till 
then  has  shown.  But  if  we  are  to  judge  by  comparative  statistics,  the  machinery  for 
eliminating  the  undesirables  has  been  so  effective  that  in  no  class  will  it  be  found  that 
even  a  proportionate  number  per  1,000  of  defectives  has  been  allowed  admission  to 
Canada.  What  nationalities  have  had  the  larger  number  of  failures  to  make  good 
has  been  shown,  and  now  that  the  measure  of  the  work  of  prevention  requiring  to  be 
done  has  been  fully  gauged  and  experience  in  methods  of  working  has  increased  we 
have  a  right  to  conclude,  judging  from  the  past,  that,  whatever  number  of  immigrants 
may  in  future  years  come  to  Canada,  while  a  welcome  will  be  extended  to  all  who 
are  in  earnest  to  make  Canada  their  home  and  add  to  her  strength  and  weajtfo,  yet 
at  the  same  time  an  equally  positive  refusal  to  allow  any  to  make  Canada  the  scene 
whether  of  their  ineffectiveness,  follies  or  crimes  will  be  shown. 

Respectfully  submitted, 

P.  H.  BRYCE, 

Chief  Medical  Officer. 


25— ii— 10 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


PART    III 


SURVEYS 


25— iii— 1 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.  SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25  A.  1909 


SURVEYS 


KEPOET  OF  THE  SURVEYOR  GENERAL. 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Topographical  Surveys  Branch, 

Ottawa,  August  31,  1908. 
The  Deputy  Minister  of  tbe  Interior, 
Ottawa. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honour  to  submit  the  following  report  on  the  operations  of  the 
Topographical  Surveys  Branch  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 

In  what  was  formerly  called  the  fertile  belt,  that  is  to  say  the  country  lying  south 
of  the  North  Saskatchewan  river,  the  subdivision  surveys  are  practically  completed  ; 
in  fact  they  extended  for  some  distance  north  of  the  river.  The  homesteads  within, 
this  area  are  being  rapidly  taken  up  and  the  newcomers  will  soon  have  to  look  else- 
where for  free  lands.  What  direction  settlement  will  take  cannot  be  foreseen  with 
accuracy ;  it  will  depend  not  only  upon  climatic  and  soil  conditions  as  yet  imperfectly 
known,  but  also  upon  other  considerations  such  as  the  opening  of  communications, 
building  of  railroads,  &c.  The  department  must  be  prepared  to  meet  the  demand  for 
surveys  wherever  it  arises  and  for  this  purpose  the  initial  meridians  and  base  lines 
have  to  be  located  over  a  very  large  extent  of  country.  These  lines  governing  all 
Milisequent  operations,  have  to  be  established  with  the  greatest  care  and  accuracy.  The 
difficulties  of  transportation  are  enormous.  The  lines  run  through  dense  woods  and  the 
extensive  marshes  peculiar  to  the  northern  country  are  a  great  impediment.  The  pro- 
gress of  the  work  is  slow  and  as  a  result  the  cost  is  very  great.  The  figures  which  are 
given  in  appendix  No.  2  show  that  it  varies  from  $79  to  $218  per  mile,  and  averages 
$140. 

Incidentally  it  may  be  mentioned  that  these  surveys  are  a  source  of  wonder  to 
the  inhabitants  of  the  outlying  settlements.  They  cannot  understand  why  survey 
parties  are  sent  out  hundreds  of  miles  away  in  the  wilderness  while  the  settlers  are 
waiting  for  the  subdivision  of  their  lands ;  the  only  explanation  which  occurs  to  them 
is  that  there  is  gross  ignorance  at  Ottawa  of  the  needs  of  the  West.  There  is,  how- 
ever, no  other  way  of  extending  the  surveys;  the  benefits  of  our  splendid  system  of 
township  subdivision  are  the  direct  result  of  these  outlying  operations. 

In  comparing  items  in  this  report  with  those  in  the  report  for  the  fiscal  year 
< -nded  March  31,  1907,  it  is  to  be  noted  that  in  some  cases  the  latter  covered  a  period  of 
nine  and  in  some  cases  fifteen  months,  owing  to  the  change  then  made  in  the  date 
of  the  beginning  of  the  fiscal  year;  in  the  present  report  all  items  are  given  for  a 
period  of  twelve  months  only. 

SURVEYS  FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED  MARCH  31,  1908. 

The  spring  of  1907  was  very  backward  and  the  summer  unusually  wet,  which 
had  the  effect  of  greatly  retarding  survey  operations.     The  sloughs,  creeks  and  rivers- 
25— iii— 1J 


4  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  IXTERIOR  iii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909, 

were  filled  with  watery  rendering  the  task  of  moving  an  outfit  a  very  difficult  one 
especially  in  the  case  of  the  surveyors  paid  by  the  day,  who  have  often  long  distances 
to  travel  from  one  survey  to  another.  On  account  of  the  frequent  rains  and  con- 
tinuous cloudy  weather  much  difficulty  was  also  experienced  in  making  the  necessary 
observation-  to  determine  the  astronomical  bearings  of  lines  surveyed. 

Another  cause  of  trouble  to  surveyors  in  charge  of  parties  was  the  difficulty  of 
retaining  the  services  of  good  men  on  their  parties  under  such  unfavourable  condi 
tions.     Owing  to  the  scarcity  of  feed  for  horses  some  surveyors  were  compelled  to 
close  operations  much  earlier  than  usual. 

The  result  has  been  that  the  amount  of  survey  work  done  during  the  year  was  not 
as  great  as  estimated  at  the  beginning  of  the  season.  The  average  amount  of  survey 
per  party,  however,  compares  well  with  those  of  previous  years. 

During  the  year  the  complete  subdivision  was  made  of  two  hundred  and  twcntv- 

e  whole  and  of  eighteen  fractional  townships,  while  a  partial  subdivision  was  made 
of  one  hundred  and  twenty-six  other  townships.  In  addition  to  this  a  complete  re- 
survey  was  made  of  thirty-two  whole  townships  and  of  one  fractional,  as  welJ  as  a 
partial  resurvey  of  one  hundred  and  thirty-one  others. 

Sixty-three  survey  parties  were  employed,  fifty-seven  of  which  were  engaged  on 
township  work  and  six  on  miscellaneous  surveys.  Of  these  parties  thirty-three  were 
paid  by  the  day  while  thirty  worked  under  contract. 

Of  the  parties  under 'daily  pay,  six  were  employed  in  Manitoba,  four  in  Sas- 
katchewan, thirteen  in  Alberta,  six  in  British  Columbia,  one  on  the  boundary  between 
British  Columbia  and  Yukon  Territory  and  one  in  the  Northwest  Territory,  while 
two  others  were  part  of  the  time  in  one  province  aud  part  in  another.  Five  of  the 
parties  working  under  contract  were  located  in  Manitoba,  ten  in  Saskatchewan  and 
twelve  in  Alberta,  while  three  were  part  of  the  time  in  one  province  and  part  in 
another. 

Five  of  the  parties  under  daily  pay,  in  charge  of  Messrs.  P.  E.  A.  Belanger, 
E.  W.  Hubbell,  G.  J.  Lonergan,  Geo.  McMillan  and  C.  F.  Miles  were  for  the  greater 
part  of  the  season  employed  in  inspecting  surveys  made  under  contract,  thirty-four 
of  which  were  examined  during  the  year.  In  addition  to  inspection  these  parties 
investigated  errors  reported  in  survey,  and  wdiere  necessary  made  corrections.  The 
errors  reported  in  almost  every  case  existed  in  surveys  made  years  ago  when  the 
methods  employed  were  not  of  a  nature  to  produce  the  accuracy  attained  under  our 
present  methods. 

TOWNSHIP    SURVEY. 

The  reports  of  the  surveyors  working  under  daily  pay  are  given  as  appendices  No 
13  to  No.  43.  These  convey,  though  inadequately,  some  idea  of  the  methods  of 
carrying  on  surveys  and  the  dangers  and  difficulties  encountered. 

Mr.  Johnson  in  his  report  says,  '  To  those  who  have  packed  steadily  for  a  month 
over  high  mountains  any  description  is  superfluous,  and,  to  those  who  have  not,  no 
words  of  mine  could  make  them  realize  what  it  is  like.' 

The  field  of  survey  operations  extended  from  the  eastern  boundary  of  Manitoba 
to  the  western  boundary  of  Alberta,  and  in  the  railway  belt  as  far  west  as  the  Pacific 
ocean.    It  also  extended  from  the  international  boundary  as  far  north  as  the  twenty- 
id  base  line,  about  500  miles. 

Mr.  i'.  F.  Aylesworth,  D.L.S.,  who  was  employed  on  resurvey  work  in  eastern 
Manitoba,  reports  that  the  country  around  Beausejour  is  not  very  thickly  settled,  as 
l  In  land  i<  partly  boggy  and  in  many  places  very  stony.  A  great  many  large  ditches 
have  recently  been  dug  which  render  land,  formerly  flooded,  now  fit  for  cultivation. 

Mr.  B.  J.  Saunders,  D.L.S.,  was  engaged  on  surveys  of  block  outlines  in  eastern 
Manitoba  in  the  vicinity  of  Fort  Alexander.  This  settlement  which  is  an  old  Hud- 
son's Bay  trading  post  is  very  prosperous  and  is  well  equipped  with  schools,  churches. 


iii  REPORT  OF  THE  SURTETOR  GENERAL  5 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

saw-mills,  &c.     The  Indians  of  the  adjoining  reserve  are  very  industrious  and  find 
employment  in  fishing,  cutting  cord-wood  and  railway  ties,  and  other  similar  work. 

About  thirty  miles  north  of  Fort  Alexander  there  is  a  gold  prospect  which  has 
made  but  little  progress  owing  to  lack  of  capital.  During  the  past  winter  an  iron  ore 
location  was  being  worked  on  Black  island  at  the  mouth  of  Manigotagan  river. 

Mr.  C.  E.  Bourgeault,  D.L.S.,  was  employed  on  survey  work  around  the  south  end 
of  Lake  Manitoba.  He  also  did  some  resurvey  near  the  town  of  Sewell,  and  retraced 
the  colonization  road  north  from  Teulon. 

Base  line  work  in  central  Manitoba  was  done  by  Mr.  W.  Christie,  D.L.S. 

Mr.  W.  J.  Deans,  D.L.S. ,  made  some  correction  and  retracement  surveys  along 
the  second  meridian.  He  remarks  on  the  phenomenal  growth  of  the  town  of  Yorkton 
since  his  former  visit  there  in  1899.  The  surrounding  country  contains  several  well 
cultivated  farms,  while  the  farmhouses  are  fitted  up  with  many  modern  conveniences. 

Mr.  W.  R.  Reilly,  D.L.S.,  made  some  surveys  along  the  Saskatchewan  river  near 
the  fourth  meridian.  The  soil  is  good  for  growing  wheat,  but  early  frosts  are  apt  to 
do  some  damage  occasionally.  Mr.Beilly  advocates  mixed  farming  as  being  more 
profitable,  for  if  the  wheat  be  damaged  the  farmer  has  something  to  fall  lack  on. 

Mr.  David  Beatty,  D.L.S.,  resurveyed  some  townships  in  eastern  Alberta  about 
one  hundred  and  fifty  miles  north  of  Medicine  Hat.  He  speaks  of  the  generally  good 
quality  of  the  soil,  but  reports  a  scarcity  of  good  water. 

Mr.  L.  E.  Fontaine,  D.L.S.,  was  engaged  in  making  a  traverse  and  taking  levels 
of  Milk  river  along  its  course  through  Canadian  territory. 

Mr.  T.  A.  Davies,  D.L.S.,  was  employed  on  retracement  and  correction  surveys  in 
central  Alberta. 

Mr.  C.  C.  Smith,  D.L.S.,  made  some  subdivisions  and  resurveys  in  southern 
Alberta  west  of  Macleod.  This  is  the  great  ranching  country  of  the  West,  but  it  is 
fast  being  fenced  up  into  farms.  The  land  is  good  and  easily  worked.  Timber  for 
fuel  and  building  purposes  can  be  easily  obtained  in  Porcupine  hills,  and  all  condi- 
tions tend  to  make  the  district  very  desirable  for  homesteading. 

Mr.  W.  F.  O'Hara,  D.L.S.,  who  was  working  in  the  Pincher  Creek  district,  repi  rts 
the  existence  of  a  large  oil-field,  the  development  of  which  is  yet  in  its  initial  st:ige, 
although  the  companies  operating  there  have  met  with  very  encouraging  result-. 
From  tests  which  have  been  made  the  petroleum  is  said  to  be  of  the  highest  grade. 

Mr.  W.  T.  Green,  D.L.S.,  was  working  in  the  foothills  south  of  Calgary.  He 
speaks  of  the  extraordinary  growth  of  the  town  of  Claresholm.  Five  years  ago  this 
place  could  boast  of  only  a  station-house,  while  to-day  it  is  a  thriving  centre  of 
industry.  The  surrounding  country  consists  of  the  best  of  land,  well  watered,  and 
suitable  for  either  farming  or  ranching. 

Base  line  surveys  west  of  the  fifth  meridian  were  performed  by  Messrs.  A.  II. 
Hawkins,  D.L.S.,  and  Geo.  Boss,  D.L.S.  Mr.  Hawkins  produced  the  thirteenth  base 
and  Mr.  Ross  the  fourteenth. 

Mr.  A.  Saint  Cyr,  D.L.S.,  ran  the  sixth  meridian  south  from  the  sixteenth  base 
line  to  Bullrush  mountains.  Some  idea  of  the  difficulties  encountered  by  surveyora 
maj  be  obtained  from  a  perusal  of  his  report.  He  was  forced  to  travel  from  Edmon- 
ton around  by  Lesser  Slave  lake  in  order  to  reach  his  destination,  as  the  snow  was 
too  deep  and  feed  too  scarce  to  travel  directly  west  to  the  sixth  meridian.  As  the 
snow  had  not  yet  melted  in  the  bush  and  the  ice  along  the  route  was  in  a  treacherous 
condition  it  was  necessary  for  him  to  carry  both  sleds  and  wagons  in  his  outfit.  To 
add  tii  the  difficulties  of  his  journey  some  of  the  ferry  boats  had  been  swept  away  by 
the  high  spring  floods,  which  rendered  fording  the  rivers  difficult  and  dangerous.  Bad 
trails  up  steep  hills  often  covered  by  fallen  trees  to  a  height  of  several  feet  al-o 
retarded  his  progress  considerably. 

Mf.  J.  B.  Saint  Cyr,  D.L.S.,  was  employed  on  subdivision  and  settlement  surveys 
around  Dunvegan  and  Peace  River  crossing.     The  fact  that  surveys  are  required  so 


6  DEPARTMENT  OF  TUE  INTERIOR  Hi 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

far  north  goes  to  prove  the  extensive  settlement  of  the  west.  The  soil  in  the  Peace 
River  district  is  of  the  best  quality  and  the  oats  and  wheat  grown  are  of  the  highest 
grade.  Timber  for  fuel  and  building  purposes  is  easily  obtained  and  the  district  bids 
fair  to  beoome  one  of  the  most  prosperous  in  the  west. 

.Mr.  A.  W.  Ponton,  D.L.S.,  was  engaged  on  the  production  of  the  fifth  meridian 
from  the  twentieth  to  the  twenty-second  base  line. 

Surveys  required  around  the  west  end  of  Lesser  Slave  lake  were  performed  by 
-Mr.  H.  W.  Selby,  D.L.S.  This  district  being  so  far  north  is  generally  considered  to  be 
subject  to  summer  frosts,  but  Mr.  Selby  reports  that  very  little  damage  was  done  by 
frost  there  last  year,  although  much  damage  was  done  in  other  districts  of  the  west 
'  farther  south.  The  great  drawback  to  the  settlement  of  the  country  is  the  lack  of 
railroad  transportation. 

BRITISH   COLUMBIA   SURVEYS. 

During  the  season  of  190",  three  regular  parties  were  employed  on  numerous 
scattered  surveys  within  the  railway  belt  of  British  Columbia.  In  all,  530  miles  of 
line  were  run,  generally  in  very  rough  country.  On  this  work  Mr.  J.  E.  Ross,  D.L.S.. 
.-pent  nearly  eleven  months,  and  Mr.  A.  G.  Stacey,  D.L.S.,  eight  months,  while  Mr.  A. 
W.  Johnson,  D.L.S.,  took  the  field  early  in  March  and  returned  in  August.  The  details 
of  these  surveys  will  be  found  in  the  reports  of  the  surveyors  and  elsewhere  in  this 
volume.  The  execessive  amount  of  field  work  does  not  leave  to  these  surveyors  much 
time  for  the  completion  of  their  returns,  and  it  is  probable  that  at  least  one  more 
party  will  be  required  during  the  coming  season.  Mr.  Ross  was  engaged  on  survey 
rk  east  of  Kamloops,  while  Mr.  Stacey  was  employed  on  surveys  west  of  Kamloops. 
This  city  is  the  distributing  centre  for  the  north  Thompson  district  and  is  a  place  of 
considerable  activity.  It  operates  its  own  electric  lighting  plant  and  waterworks 
system  and  has  the  provincial  asylum  and  hospital  located  there.  The  town  of  Ash- 
croft  is  situated  about  forty  miles  west  of  Kamloops.  All  traffic  for  the  northern 
interior  passes  through  this  place,  and  great  freight  wagons,  drawn  by  four  or  five 
teams,  and  a  well-equipped  stage  travel  two  hundred  and  fifty  miles  north. 

Vegetation  in  the  Kamloops  district  is  several  weeks  ahead  of  that  in  Ontario, 
and  where  irrigation  is  employed  the  soil  proves  very  productive.  Fruit  raising  is  a 
very  important  and  growing  industry,  and  of  late  years  exhibits  from  this  district 
have  carried  off  the  highest  awards  at  international  exhibitions  on  both  sides  of  the 
Atlantic. 

Mr.  Johnson  made  some  surveys  in  the  railway  belt  between  Yale  and  Port  Moody. 

MISCELLANEOUS  SURVEYS. 

Mr.  P.  A.  Carson,  D.L.S.,  continued  the  triangulation  in  the  railway  belt  north- 
east from  Beavermouth. 

Mr.  .V.  O.  Wheeler.  D.L.S.,  made  a  photographic  survey  of  the  railway  belt  in 
the  Dogtooth  and  Selkirk  mountains  for  mapping  purposes. 

Mr.  Lewis  Bolton,  D.L.S.,  was  engaged  in  settlement  surveys  around  The  Pas 
and  Cormorant  lake 

Mr.  W.  Thibaudeau,  C.E.,  made  a  preliminary  investigation  of  the  water-power 
on  the  Winnipeg  river  from  the  eastern  boundary  of  Manitoba  to  Lake  Winnipeg. 
In  this  district  there  is  a  large  amount  of  spruce  and  poplar  suitable  for  the  manu- 
facture of  pulp  and  the  falls  along  Winnipeg  river  furnish  an  unlimited  amount  of 
power  for  the  development  of  the  pulpwood  industry.  Little  was  known  of  the  value 
of  this  water-power  except  by  some  companies  in  Winnipeg  who  secured  sites  along 
the  river,  built  a  control  dam  at  Kenora  to  regulate  the  flow  of  water  in  the  river, 
established   generating    stations  and   supplied   power   to   the   city   of   Winnipeg    at    a 


iii  REPORT  OF  THE  SURVEYOR  GENERAL  7 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

very  small  cost.  It  was  accordingly  deemed  advisable  to  ascertain  the  available  water- 
power  on  this  river  and  Mr.  Thibaudeau  was  sent  to  investigate  it.  Comparing  the 
water-power  on  the  Winnipeg  river  with  that  on  the  Niagara  the  former  is  about 
forty-three  per  cent  of  that  available  on  the  Canadian  or  Horseshoe  falls,  but  it  is 
more  advantageous  on  Winnipeg  river  as  it  is  distributed  over  a  very  large  area. 

Mr.  J.  1ST.  Wallace,  D.L.S.,  ran  part  of  the  boundary  between  British  Columbia 
and  Yukon  Territory  in  the  neighbourhood  of  the  Dalton  trail. 

The  country  along  the  line  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Pacific  railway  west  of  the  sub- 
divided townships  was  explored  by  Jlr.  P.  ('■.  Stewart.  He  travelled  through  twenty- 
six  townships  between  ranges  7  and  16,  and  townships  51  and  57  west  of  the  fifth 
meridian.  The  country  generally  is  rolling,  partly  opened  and  partly  timbered  with 
oplar,  spruce  and  jackpine.  On  the  hills  the  land  is  sandy,  while  in  the  valleys  it  is 
clay  loam.  The  hills  range  a^  high  as  three  hundred  feet,  while  the  valleys  generally 
are  about  six  hundred  feet  wide.  Some  of  the  valleys  along  the  larger  streams,  such 
as  the  Macleod  river,  are  about  half  a  mile  wide.  Mr.  Stewart  estimates  the  amount 
of  timber  in  the  townships  explored  at  between  two  hundred  and  thirty  and  two  hun- 
dred and  forty  million  feet. 

The  following  is  a  comparison  of  the  mileage  surveyed  since  1905 : — 


Township  outlines . 

Section  lines 

Traverse 

Re-survey ..... 


Total  for  season 

Number  of  parties 

Average  miles  per  party 


Jan.  1,  1905, 

to  Dec.  31, 

1905. 


16,523 
46 

359 


The  following  table  shows  the  mileage  surveyed  by  the  parties  under  daily  pay 
and  by  the  parties  under  contract: — 

Work  of  parties  under  daily  pay. 


Township  outlines 

Section  lines 

Traverse   

Re-survey 

Total  for  season 

X  umber  of  parties 

Average  miles  per  party 


April  1,1907 

to  Mar.  31, 

1908. 


Miles. 

542 

975 

1,313 

2,782 


5,612 

29 
194 


Jan.  1,  1906, 
to  Mar.  31, 

1907. 


Miles. 

756 
1,035 

643 
4,815 

7,249 

29 

250 


Jan.  1,  1905, 

to  Dee.  31, 

1905. 


Miles. 


1,008 
939 

421 
2,499 


J.S67 

26 

187 


DEPARTHEXT  OF  TEE  IXTERIOR 


iii 


8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909| 


Work  of  parties  under  contract. 




April  1,1907, 

to  Mar.  31, 

1908. 

Jan.  1,  1906, 

to  M;ir.  31, 

1907. 

Jan.  1,  1905, 

to  Dec  31. 

1905. 

Miles. 

1,132 
12,735 

l.SSC 
135 

Miles. 

550 
7,927 
1,205 

133 

Miles. 

9,605 
1,388 

80 

Total  foi  season 

15,882 

30 
529 

9,S15 

27 

364 

11,656 

Number  of  parties 

20 

Average  miles  per  party 

583 

Xote. — Owing  to  the  nature  of  their  work,  the  parties  under  Messrs.  P.  A.  Carson, 
P.  G.  Stewart,  W.  Thibaudeau  and  A.  O.  Wheeler  are  not  included  in  the  statement 
of  mileage  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908. 

The  following  statement  shows  the  average  cost  per  mile  of  surveys  done  by 
contractor-  and  by  surveyors  under  daily  pay  for  the  year  ended  March  31,  1908: — 

Surreys  Surveys 

made    under  made    by 

day   pay.  contract. 

Total  mileage  surveyed 5,612  15,882 

Total  cost $247,220  96  $336,230  08 

Average  cost  per  mile $44  05  $2118 

DESCRIPTIONS  OF  TOWNSHIPS. 

Descriptions  of  the  townships  subdivided  have  been  compiled  from  the  surveyors' 
reports  received  during  the  year  ended  March  31,  190S.  They  are  given  as  Appendix 
Xo.  44.  The  townships  are  put  in  order  of  township,  range  and  meridian,  and  the 
descriptions  are  preceded  by  a  list  of  all  townships  described. 

A  map  accompanying  this  report  shows  all  the  townships  in  the  provinces  of 
Manitoba,  Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  subdivided  prior  to  April  1,  1907,  coloured  in 
buff,  those  subdivided  between  April  1,  1907,  and  March  31,  1908,  are  shown  in  green, 
while  those  resurveyed  during  the  same  period  are  showTi  in  red. 


REMUNERATION    OF   SURVEYORS. 

At  the  inception  of  the  survey  of  Dominion  lands,  nearly  forty  years  ago, 
Dominion  land  surveyors  were  paid  five  dollars  per  day.  Shortly  after  six  dollars 
per  day  was  allowed  to  surveyors  of  base  lines.  These  rates  remained  in  force  until 
j 901,  when  they  were  increased  to  $6.50  and  $7.50,  respectively.  The  advance  proved 
inadequate;  in  order  to  induce  properly  educated  men  to  qualify  as  Dominion  land 
surveyors,  so  that  there  should  be  no  difficulty  in  securing  the  services  of  competent 
surveyors  when  they  are  wanted,  a  further  increase  to  $8  and  $10,  respectively,  was 
granted  by  order  in  council  of  March  30,  190S.  The  increase,  it  will  be  observed,  is 
for  ordinary  surveyors  60  per  cent  over  the  rate  of  forty  years  ago;  for  surveyors  of 
ines  it  is  a  little  over  60  per  cent.  Considering  the  enhanced  cost  of  everything, 
the  increase  does  not  appear  too  large.  By  the  same  order  in  council  the  salary  of 
lhe  inspectors  of  surveys  was  fixed  at  $9  per  day  in  tlve  field  and  $5  per  day  at  office 
work. 


iii  REPORT  OF  THE  SURVEYOR  GENERAL  9 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

RESERVATION    FOR    ROADS. 

The  system  of  survey  of  Dominion  lands  provides  road  allowances  along-  section 
lines.  When  a  section  line  strikes  a  lake,  the  cut  banks  of  a  river  or  other  obstacle, 
the  road  has  to  be  located  elsewhere.  The  location  of  these  deviations  is  placed  under 
the  control  of  the  provinces  by  the  Manitoba  Supplementary  Provisions  Act  and  the 
Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  Boads  Act.  It  was  represented  that  the  establishment  of 
these  deviations  involved  great  expenditure,  and  that  a  considerable  part  of  this  ex- 
penditure consisted  in  payments  for  the  land  to  homesteaders  and  others  who,  although 
directly  benefited  by  the  new  road,  frequently  exacted  a  large  price  for  land  which 
they  had  just  acquired  for  nothing'  or  at  a  small  price.  This  difficulty  was  adjusted 
by  order  in  council  of  November  20,  1907,  which  directs  that  every  homestead  entry 
shall  be  granted  and  every  lease  or  sale  of  Dominion  lands  made  subject  to  the  right 
of  the  province  to  take,  without  compensation,  such  land  as  may  be  required  for  road 
purposes,  not  exceeding  2i  per  cent  of  the  area  of  such  Dominion  lands. 

STAR  DIAGRAMS  FOR  LATITUDE  OBSERVATIONS. 

In  extending  the  principal  meridians  and  the  base  lines,  surveyors  have  to  observe 
the  latitude  from  time  to  time  for  the  purpose  of  checking  their  measurements  and 
detecting  accidental  errors.  The  most  convenient  and  precise  method  of  observation 
for  this  purpose  is  known  as  Talcott's  method,  and  consists  in  measuring  differences 
of  stars'  zenith  distances.  The  new  model  of  transit  theodolite  for  base  lines  has  been 
especially  designed  to  make  use  of  this  method.  The  most  tedious  part  of  a  latitude 
observation  by  Talcott's  method  is  the  preparation  of  the  observing  list,  especially 
when  several  star  catalogues  have  to  be  consulted.  To  facilitate  the  preparation  of 
these  observing  lists  and  save  the  surveyor's  time,  star  charts  have  now  been  compiled. 
By  the  use  of  these  charts  an  observing  list  of  stars  for  the  hours  of  darkness  may  be 
prepared  in  a  very  short  time.  These  charts  give  the  mean  places  of  all  stars  up  to 
and  including  the  fifth  magnitude  listed  in  the  Berliner  Jahrbuch,  Greenwich  Ten 
Years'  Catalogue  of  Stars  for  1890  and  Ambronn's  Stemverzeichnis  for  1900.  Stars 
smaller  than  fifth  magnitude  are  not  visible  with  the  telescope  of  the  base  line  transit 
■theodolite.  The  charts  are  in  -four  sets  of  six  hours'  right  ascension  each,  as  follows : 
No.  1,  0  to  6  hours ;  No.2,  6  to  12  hours ;  No.  3,  12  to  18  hours ;  No.  4,  18  to  24  hours. 
F.ach  set  consists  of  two  sheets,  an  upper  and  a  lower,  each  16  inches  by  19J  inches, 
the  lower  sheet  of  thick  opaque  paper  printed  in  black  and  the  upper  sheet  of  thin 
transparent  paper  printed  in  red.  Each  sheet  is  ruled  in  sections,  the  arguments  being 
the  stars  declination  for  the  horizontal  lines  and  right  ascension  for  vertical  lines. 

As  the  sections  are  roughly  one-half  inch  in  declination  by  three-eighths  of  an  inch 
in  right  ascension,  interpolation  by  the  eye  to  the  nearest  ten  minutes  in  declination 
and  the  nearest  two  minutes  of  time  in  right  ascension  is  quite  easy.  On  the  lower 
sheet  the  mean  places  of  stars  from  5°  south  declination  to  65°  north  declination  are 
plotted  in  their  correct  positions,  the  declinations  increasing  from  bottom  to  top. 
On  the  upper  sheet  are  plotted  stars  from  45°  north  declination  to  90°  with  the 
lower  transits  of  stars  from  65°  north  to  90°,  the  declinations  increasing  from  top 
to  bottom.  The  right  ascensions  increase  the  same  from  left  to  right  on  upper  and 
lower  sheets.  One  symbol  is  used  for  stars  from  0  -0  to  1  -0  magnitude,  another  for 
stars  from  1-1  to  2-0  and  so  on  a  different  symbol  being  used  for  every  magnitude. 
This  is  of  great  assistance  in  quickly  identifying  the  star  when  afterwards  looking- 
for  it  among  the  different  star  catalogues.  If  now  the  transparent  or  upper  sheet  is 
placed  on  the  opaque  or  lower  sheet  so  that  the  horizontal  lines  of  the  upper  sheet  for 
that  particular  declination  which  is  equal  to  the  latitude  is  directly  over  the  same 
line  of  declination  through  its  whole  length  on  the  lower  sheet,  all  stars  on  the  upper 
and  lower  sheets  on  the  same  horizontal  lines  have  the  same  zenith  distance  north  and 
south  from  the  observation  spot,  the  black  symbols  showing  through  from  the  lower 


10  DEPARTMENT  OE  TEE  INTERIOR  iii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909; 

sheet  representing  stars  of  south  zenith  distance  and  the  red  of  upper  cheet  stars  of 
north  zenith  distance.  The  vertical  lines  show  the  times  of  transit  of  the  several 
stars.  Hence  the  working  methods :  The  approximate  latitude  of  the  observation  spot 
and  the  hours  of  right  ascension  during  which  it  is  desired  to  observe  being  known, 
those  sets  are  selected  which  include  the  desired  hours  of  right  ascension.  Place  the 
upper  sheet  of  each  set  on  the  lower  with  the  vertical  or  right  ascension  lines  cor- 
responding and  bring  into  coincidence  the  horizontal  or  declination  line  of  both  sheets 
for  that  particular  declination  which  is  equal  to  the  latitude.  Then  select  those  pairs 
of  south  and  north  zenith  stars  within  the  limits  of  right  ascension  desired  whose 
zenith  distance  is  not  too  great,  whose  difference  of  zenith  distance  is  no  more  than 
one-half  the  run  of  the  micrometer  and  which  have  a  suitable  interval  between 
transits.  Having  taken  out  the  stars  for  limits  of  time  allowed,  there  will  probably 
be  found  long  intervals  in  places  between  different  pairs.  These  may  be  filled  in  by 
extending  the  limit  allowed  for  the  difference  of  zenith  distance  to  the  full  run  of  the 
micrometer.  The  pairs  having  thus  been  selected,  the  stars  are  identified  in  the 
several  catalogues,  and  their  mean  places  in  right  ascension  and  declination  are 
deduced  from  the  epoch  of  the  star  catalogue  to  the  beginning  of  the  year  which. is 
sufficiently  close  for  the  purposes  of  the  observing  list. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

The  correspondence  consisted  of  : 

Letters  received 10,092 

Letters  sent 12,912 

The  staff  consists  of  the  secretary,  one  clerk,  four  stenographers  and  typewriters 
and  two  messengers. 

ACCOUNTS. 

The  accountant's  record  shows  : 

Number  of  accounts  dealt  with 633 

Amount  of  accounts .$766,000 

Number  of  cheques  forwarded 3,051 

The  staff  consists  of  an  accountant  and  an  assistant   accountant. 

OFFICE    STAFF. 

A  list  of  the  office  staff  of  the  Topographical  Surveys  Branch  at  Ottawa  is  given 
as  Appendix  No.  10. 

Many  changes  have  taken  place  during  the  year.  In  the  Metcalfe  street  office  Mr.  F. 
Lynch  has  been  added  to  the  secretary's  staff  and  Mr.  A.  Paquette  has  been  appointed 

-enger  in  place  of  Mr.  J.  J.  O'Leary,  who  was  transeferred  to  the  School  Lands 
Branch.  Messrs.  A.  G.  Stacey,  H.  L.  Seymour,  C.  C.  Fitzgerald,  M.  Kimpe,  E. 
H.  Phillips,  J.  M.  Empey,  E.  B.  Owens,  J.  N.  Goodall,  E.  V.  Heathcott,  J.  W.  Eochon, 

F.  L.  Marriott,  H.  J.  Smith.  J.  C.  Ball  and  S.  H.  Shore  have  resigned.     Messrs.  F. 

G.  D.  Durnford  and  E.  E.  Brice  have  been  transferred  to  the  Lands  Patent  Branch 
and  Messrs  J.  M.  Mudie  and  W.  C.  Gillis  to  the  survey  records  office.    Mr.  Gillis  was 

Dinted  to  the  Metcalfe  street  office  during  the  year,  as  were  :il-"  Messrs.  A.  Vickery, 
H.  P.  Moulton  and  N.  Bawlf  all  three  of  whom  subsequently  resigned.  Miss  A.  White- 
head was  employed  for  a  short  time  during  the  year  as  extra  typewriter.  Messrs.  F. 
W.  Rice,  A.  L.  Gumming,  W.  L.  Macllquham,  E.  M.  Dennis  and  G.  B.  Dodge  have 
been  absent  part  of  the  time  acting  temporarily  as  assistants  to  surveyors,  while 
Messrs.  W.  T.  Green,  D.L.S.,  P.  A.  Carson,  D.L.S.,  and  T.  A.  Davies,  D.L.S.,  have 
also  been  absent  part  of  the  time  in  charge  of  survey  parties  in  the  field. 


iii  REPORT  OF  THE  SURVEYOR  GENERAL  11 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

The  additions  to  the  staff  during-  the  year  are  as  follows:  In  the  Metcalfe  street 
office,  Messrs.  A.  D.  McRae,  A.  G.  Stewart,  A.  W.  Grant,  E.  C.  Eochon,  M.  J.  Mc- 
Laughlin, G.  A.  Gaudry,  A.  Vickery,  H.  P.  Moulton,  W.  C.  Gillis,  N.  Bawlf,  J.  R. 
Akins,  E.  H.  Maynard,  H.  S.  Dav,  H.  E.  Sutherland,  F.  H.  Kitto,  L.  Goodday,  F.  H. 
H.  Williamson,  G.  C.  Webb,  C.  IL  Wilding,  R.  P.  Bray,  E.  W.  Harrison,  A.  W.  Ault, 
C.  B.  Binks,  C.  H.  Holbrook,  R.  J.  Dawson,  Jas.  Watters  and  E.  Davy;  in  the  office 
of  the  geographer,  Messrs.  J.  Beveridge,  I.  P.  McEUigott,  J.  Pigeon  and  J.  R.  Merri- 
field;   and  in  the  lithographic  office,  Mr.  J.  IT.  Deslauriers. 

OFFICE    OF   THE    CHIEF    DRAUGHTSMAN. 

A  summary  of  the  work  executed  in  the  office  of  the  chief  draughtsman  is  given 
as  Appendix  No.  5. 

The  last  twelve  months  have  seen  a  considerable  increase  in  the  draughtsmen's 
work.  This  is  due  partly  to  the  fact  that  the  surveys  were  on  a  larger  scale,  but  per- 
haps still  more  to  the  constant  increase  in  the  miscellaneous  business  of  the  office, 
such  as  answers  to  inquiries,  both  from  inside  and  outside  the  department,  as  to  sur- 
veys made  or  proposed,  areas,  corner  monuments,  errors  found  or  suspected  in  lines, 
petitions  for  resurveys,  etc.  The  draughting  office  has  gradually  become  of  late  yiears, 
and  unavoidably  so,  to  a  great  extent  a  correspondence  office,  a  large  portion  of  the 
letters  sent  out  having  to  be  drafted  in  this  part  of  the  branch. 

The  staff  is  larger  by  three  than  at  the  date  of  the  last  report,  now  including 
eighty-one  men,  whose  time  is  fully  occupied  with  necessary  work  in  connection  with 
the  surveys.  The  frequent  changes  of  personnel  and  the  location  of  a  part  of  the 
force  in  a  separate  building  at  some  distance  is  still  the  cause  of  a  certain  amount  of 
delay,  and  makes  proper  oversight  of  business  more  difficult.  The  staff  is  distributed 
In  five  divisions. 

First  Division — Instructions  and  General  Information. 

The  staff  of  this  division,  which  consists  of  nineteen  employees,  is  in  charge  of 
Mr.  T.  E.  Brown,  B.A.  Instructions  were  drafted  for  eighty-one  survey  parties,  which 
involved  the  preparation  of  879  sketches  and  77  tracings  and  maps  ;  1,002  progress 
sketches  were  received  from  surveyors  in  the  field,  as  well  as  577  books  of  field  notes, 
334  plans,  56  timber  reports  and  473  statutory  declarations;  494  books  of  field  notes 
of  township  surveys  were  transmitted  to  the  survey  records  office  after  complete  ex- 
amination, also  476  notes  and  plans  of  miscellaneous  surveys.  Plans  were  printed  for 
518  townships.  5  settlements  or  townsites  and  59  sectional  sheets.  Preliminary  plans 
of  369  townships  were  issued.  A  noteworthy  feature  about  the  work  of  this  division 
is  the  great  increase  in  the  number  of  communications  on  miscellaneous  subjects 
received  and  dealt  with.  The  number  for  tlie  year  was  1,296,  involving  the  prepara- 
tion of  283  sketches  and  77  maps  and  tracings ;  ■  3,427  draft  letters  and  memoranda 
were  written. 

Second  Division — Examination  of  Surveyors'  Beturns. 

This  division  is  in  charge  of  Mr.  T.  S.  Nash,  D.L.S.,  and  the  staff  consists  of 
twenty-eight  employees.  The  returns  of  all  the  surveys  of  Dominion  lands  in  Mani- 
toba. Saskatchewan  and  Alberta  are  examined  here.  Plans  of  these  surveys  are  com- 
piled and  the  accounts  for  the  surveys  performed  under  contract  are  made  out. 

Surveyors  are  required  to  send  in  from  time  to  time  sketches  showing  the  progress 
of  their  work  in  the  field.  These  sketches  show  the  bearings  and  lengths  of  all  the 
lines  that  have  been  surveyed  together  with  all  the  important  topography  of  the 
country.  If  on  examination  they  are  found  incomplete,  supplementary  sketches  are 
required  from  the  surveyor.  During  the  year  722  progress  sketches  were  examined. 
When  the  final  returns  of  surveys  are  received  they  are  given  a  cursory  examination, 


12  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  iii 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

and  if  found  generally  incomplete  they  are  sent  back  to  the  surveyor  for  correction. 
This,  however,  seldom  happens,  the  returns  now  received  being  nearly  always  carefully 
made.  After  cursory  examination  the  work  of  compiling  is  begun.  This  consists  in 
gathering  together  all  the  returns  of  previous  surveys  in  the  township,  settlement  or 
townsite  as  the  case  may  be  and  plotting  the  whole  together  as  a  new  plan.  During' 
this  process  a  minute  examination  is  made  of  the  field  notes  of  the  new  survey,  tin 
surveyor  is  notified  of  all  clerical  errors,  omissions  or  discrepancies  found  in  his 
notes  and  is  required  to  correct  them  before  his  survey  is  finally  accepted.  A  more 
detailed  description  of  the  above  work  was  given  in  the  report  for  the  year  ended 
June  30,  1906.  The  same  system  with  improvements  in  the  minor  details  is  still  in 
use.  During  the  year  347  subdivisions,  157  township  outline  and  23  miscellaneous 
survey  returns  were  examined,  348  memoranda  on  examination  were  sent  to  surveyors, 
323  answers  to  memoranda  were  received  and  noted,  857  letters  were  drafted  and  550 
plans  compiled. 

In  addition  to  the  examination  and  compilation  mentioned  above,  a  large  amount 
of  work  is  involved  in  the  examination  of  plans  of  road  diversions  in  Alberta  and 
Saskatchewan  surveyed  under  instructions  from  the  provincial  governments  and  in 
the  examination  of  railway  right-of-way  plans  for  approval  by  the  Surveyor  General 
before  being  filed  in  the  records  office.  During  the  year  233  plans  of  road  diversions 
and  112  right-of-way  plans  were  examined. 

Third  Division — Drawing  for  Reproduction. 

The  staff  of  this  division  which  consists  of  fourteen  employees  is  in  charge  of 
Mr.  C.  Engjer,  D.L.S.  The  most  important  work  of  this  division  is  the  preparation 
of  copies  properly  drawn  for  reproduction  by  photo-zincography  or  photo-lithography 
of  the  rough  plans  compiled  in  the  second  and  fourth  divisions.  The  letters  and 
figures  of  the  plans  are  stamped  with  type  held  in  position  by  means  of  the  stamp 
'•  scribed  in  the  annual  report  for  1900-7.  In  this  way  uniformity  of  style  is  ensured 
and  at  the  same  time  a  beginner  quickly  acquires  the  skill  necessary  for  speed  and 
neatness.  This  has  proved  a  decided  advantage  during  the  past  few  years  owing  to  the 
constantly  changing  personnel  of  the  staff  of  this  division.  The  great  majority  of 
the  plans  drafted  are  township  plans.  Uniformity  exists  among  these  so  that  the 
work  can  be  done  systematically  and  occupies  much  less  time  than  that  upon  plans  of 
a  miscellaneous  character. 

During  the  year  568  township  plans  and  130  miscellaneous  plans  were  made. 
Although  the  number  of  miscellaneous  plans  is  less  than  one-fourth  of  the  number 
of  township  plans  yet  the  time  spent  upon  the  former  \va^  almost  as  great  as  upon 
the  township  plans.  A  noteworthy  feature  about  the  miscellaneous  plans  is  then- 
variety.  They  comprise  settlement,  group  lot  and  townsite  plans,  which  are  made 
something  after  the  style  and  manner  of  township  plans.  Occasionally  maps  and 
plans  are  made  to  illustrate  some  subject  under  consideration  by  the  House  of  Com- 
mons or  the  Senate. 

There  are  also  drawings  of  the  diagrams  of  the  altitude  and  bearing  of  the  ; 
star.     These  have  to  be  made  with  the  greatest  accuracy  as  the  slightest  error   in 
drawing  destroys  the  value  of  the  diagrams.     These  diagrams  are  issued  periodically 
with  the  astronomical  field  tables,  the  drawings  for  which  are  also  prepared  in 
division. 

Diagrams  and  explanatory  drawings  for  the  Manual  of  Survey,  and  artists'  draw- 
-  for  the  illustration  of  pamphlets,  have  also  been  made.    In  the  line  of  mechanical 

wings,  may  be  mentioned  all  drawings  of  survey  instruments  or  of  additions  or 

alterations  to  the  same,  as  w;ell  as  drawings  to  scale  of  furniture  or  apparatus  of  a 

eial  nature  required  for  this  branch.     Among  the  drawings  of  an  artistic  nature 

were  two  for  the  office,  one  of  a  crest  and  one  of  a  letter  head.    In  this  class  also  mar 

be  mentioned  the  making  of  diplomas  and  certificates  for  the  board  of  examiners  for 


lii  REPORT  OF  THE  SURVEYOR  GENERAL  13 

SESSIONAL  PAPER  No.  25 

.Dominion  land  surveyors  and  the  engraving  of  graduations  on  instruments  when! 
special  scales  are  required.  On  the"  small  printing  press,  which  forms  part  of  the 
equipment  of  this  division,  a  great  deal  of  work  has  been  done.  The  demand  for  this 
work  has  been  so  steady  that  it  has  been  necessary  to  employ  a  man  experienced  in 
typesetting  and  presswork.  He  also  takes  care  of  the  type  used  for  stamping  plan?, 
the  printers'  ink,  the  composition  rollers,  etc.  The  press  is  used  for  printing  titles 
and  foot  notes,  which  are  pasted  on  the  plans  in  proper  position.  In  the  same  way 
are  added  the  names  of  any  largo  lakes,  rivers,  Indian  reserves,  etc.,  which  cannot  be 
stamped  on  the  plan  in  the  ordinary  way.  As  all  the  plans  are  photographed,  no 
traces  of  the  edges  of  the  pieces  of  paper  added  by  pasting  can  be  seen  on  the  printed 
plan  as  the  photographer  removes  them  all  in  retouching  the  negative.  The  press  is 
also  used  to  print  labels,  numbers  and  letters  for  shelves,  file  backs  and  cupboards  in 
the  office,  as  well  as  any  small  blank  forms  required,  circular  letters  to  surveyors  when 
it  is  impossible  to  obtain  these  from  the  Government  Printing  Bureau  in  time  to 
serve  the  purposes  for  which  they  are  required. 

In  order  to  be  able  to  make  suitable  titles  for  all  the  different  maps  and  plans 
and  also  to  stamp  all  the  letters  and  figures  on  the  plans  themselves,  it  has  been  neces- 
sary to  procure  a  variety  of  type.  Eighty-eight  styles  in  all  have  been  procured,  but 
as  only  a  small  font  cf  each  style  is  necessary  the  expense  of  buying  the  type  has  not 
been  great.  The  expense  saved  on  a  single  plan  by  printing  a  title  instead  of  drafting 
it  often  equals  the  total  cost  of  the  typo  required  to  print  it. 

Fourth  Division — British  Colurnbia  Surveys. 

This  division  consists  of  eight  employees  in  charge  of  Mr.  Rowan-Legg.  The 
examination  of  the  returns  sent  in  by  the  three  regular  surveyors  who  were  working 
in  the  railway  belt  lias  been  proceeded  with  and  is  now  well  advanced.  As  most  of 
1he  traverse  surveys  in  British  Columbia  were  made  for  the  purpose  of  establishing 
section  corner?'  and  land  boundaries,  this  portion  of  the  work  had  to  be  carefully 
checked  by  latitudes  and  departures,  which  entailed  a  great  amount  of  work. 

The  returns  of  the  survey  by  Mr.  J.  E.  Ross,  D.L.S.,  tying  in  various  points 
along  the  right  of  way  of  the  Revelstoke  and  Arrow  Lake  branch  of  the  Canadian 
Pacific  railway  to  points  on  the  Dominion  lands  system  of  survey  have  been  cheeked, 
and  the  areas  of  adjacent  surveyed  Dominion  lands  as  well  as  the  right  of  way  are 
now  obtainable.  Returns  of  small  surveys  consisting  of  mineral  and  other  lots,  private 
surveys  and  special  surveys  have  also  been  received  from  Messrs.  E.  A.  Cleveland,  J. 
A.  Kirk,  W.  A.  Bauer  and  others.  These  have  been  or  are  being  examined.  Four 
plans  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  railway  right  of  way  from  Spatsum  to  Port  Moody 
were  also  examined. 

Owing  to  the  recent  more  strict  enforcement  of  the  regulations  for  the  survey  of 
timber  berths,  it  was  found  that  more  returns  were  being  received  by  the  Timber, 
(■razing  and  Irrigation  Branch  than  could  be  dealt  with.  It  was  therefore  decided 
that  part  of  the  examination  of  such  returns  should  be  undertaken  by  the  staff  of  this 
cfHce.  The  British  Columbia  division  commenced  this  work,  on  the  berths  lying  within 
the  belt,  in  November,  1907,  and  completed,  during  the  ensuing  five  months,  the 
examination  of  sixty  returns  of  surveys  of  this  class. 

In  1906  Mr.  A.  W.  Johnson,  D.L.S.,  made  a  resurvey  of  the  town  of  Hope  and 
the  compilation  of  a  plan  of  it  was  commenced  in  this  office,  but  it  was  found  that 
further  surveys  were  required  to  furnish  the  information  necessary  to  complete  the 
plan. 

In  1907  Mr.  Johnson  made  a  resurvey  of  the  Pitt  meadow  lands  and  a  special 
plan  was  made  in  order  that  these  lands  might  be  dealt  with  as  soon  as  possible. 

When  compiling  plans  of  many  of  the  townships  in  the  railway  belt  in  British 
Columbia  it  is  found  that  so  many  details,  in  connection  with  the  showing  of  mineral 


14  DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR  IU 

8-9  EDWARD  VII.,  A.  1909 

claims,  provincial  lots,  &c,  have  to  be  given  that  a  plan,  made  to  a  scale  of  forty 
chains  to  one  inch,  is  too  crowded  and  indistinct.  To  obviate  this  difficulty  in  such 
cases,  plans  of  quarter  townships  are  made  on  a  scale  of  twenty  chains  to  one  inch, 
which  show  the  information  clearly  and  make  more  useful  plans.  During  the  year 
573  letters  and  memoranda  have  been  received  and  dealt  with,  330  sketches  and  plots 
made,  sixty  plans  compiled  for  printing  and  709  draft  letters  and  memoranda  pre- 
pared. 

Fifth  Division — Mapping. 

The  number  of  employees  in  this  division  is  ten,  the  staff  being  in  charge  of  Mr. 
J.  Smith.  The  principal  work  of  the  fifth  division  is  the  preparation  of  sectional 
maps  for  publication,  as  shown  in  Appendix  No.  6  and  the  registering  and  compiling 
of  surveys  in  the  Yukon  Territory  as  shown  in  appendices  Nos.  3  and  4. 

In  addition  to  the  above,  other  maps  that  may  be  required  by  the  department  are 
drawn  and  proofs  of  maps  being  printed  are  examined. 

The  method  of  producing  a  sectional  map  is  as  follows  :  All  available  informa- 
tion, such  as  Dominion  lands  surveys,  railroad  locations,  road  surveys,  &c.,  is  drawn 
on  good  mounted  paper  on  a  scale  of  two  miles  to  an  inch;  a  clean  tracing  on  cloth 
is