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V. 





EWFDUNDEVND 




SUMMER NUMBER, 1914 



JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 





Long Pond, near St. John s. 







THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Furness, Withy & Company, Ltd., 




Steamship Owners and Brokers. 

Commission, Insurance and 

Forwarding Agents. 

The new steamship " Digby " launched last 
season and sailing in conjunction with the regular 
steamers between Liverpool, St. John s and Halifax, 
is specially built and fitted for her present services, 
the passenger accommodation and catering being 
unsurpassed. 

First Class Fare. Second Class. 
Liverpool to St. John s, 

^"13 to /i4 IDS 9 

St. John s to Halifax . . .$18 $12 

St. John s to Liverpool,. . $65 $45 

Regular Sailings also from Liverpool to St. John s. 



PLANT LINE 

The Popular Route 
To and From ^e 

BOSTON 

The Plant Line route is the shortest, 
quickest and most direct between 

HALIFAX and BOSTON 

Only 389 miles, no changes or transfer. 

The new twin screw steamer " EVANGELINE " 
of the Plant Line is the finest fitted and most 
luxurious steamer on the Atlantic coast, and the 
largest ship in service between the United States 
and the Maritime Provinces, having accommoda 
tion for seven hundred passengers. 

Summer Sailings 1914 

From Halifax Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays 
at midnight. 

From Boston Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Satur 
days at noon. 

Through tickets for sale by Ticket Agents of 
Reid-Newfoundland Railway and via the Red Cross 
Line steamers. 

Write for time tables and any information to 
H. L. CHIPMAN, 

Eastern Manager, Halifax, Nova Scotia. 



If you use 

Windsor Patent 



and 



Royal Household 
| Flour 

You will have the satisfaction of knowing that 
|f money cannot buy better in any 
part of the World. 




Marble and 

Granite Worker. 

Dealer in 

Marble& Granite 
Headstones, 
Fonts, Tombs, 
Monuments, etc., 

of the Latest Designs. 
Orders executed promptly. 

340 Water Street, 

Opp. Alan Goodridge & Sons, 
St. John s. P. O. Box 4JI. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 






FUR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OK 

MJA. 


i pou 

2 poll 

3 

4 

i 

8 
9 

10 

1 1 


id 


See 
ii 
4 

17 

20 

2 3 

26 
29 

3 2 
35 
35 
Under i Ib 
per 2 02. 


nts 


24 ce 
24 
24 
48 
48 
48 
48 
72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel - 
less than 


nts .... 


12 ce 
24 
36 
48 
60 
72 
84 
96 
$i 08 . 




15 cents. 
30 
45 
60 

75 
90 

$1-05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 












t 


















































i . 20 








1.72.. 




weight, i cent 


ent to U. K. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York : 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



General Post Office. 



RSTES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding gio 5 cts. Over $50 but not exceeding $60 . . . . 30 cts. 

Over 5 10, but not exceeding $20 10 cts. Over $60 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 . . . . 15 cts. Over $70 

( )ver 830, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. Over $80 

i i\er $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. Overdo 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

Gc /iera/ Post Office St. John s, Newfoundland, June, fpfj. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



but not exceeding $70 35 cts. 

but not exceeding $80 40 cts. 

but not exceeding 890 45 cts. 

but not exceeding $100 50 cts. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



Postal Telegraph 




POSTAL TELEGRAPH OFFICES arc operated throughout the Colony at all 
the principal places. Messages of ten words, not including address or signature, are forwarded 
for Twenty Cents, and two cents for each additional word. 

A Government cable to Canso, Cape Breton, connects with the Commercial Cable Co. s system 
to all parts of the World. There is no more efficient Telegraphic Service in existence. 

A ten word message to Canada, exclusive of ) From SO. 85 

signature and address, costs > To I.OO 

A ten word message to the United States, / From $I.IO 

exclusive of signature and address, costs i To I. SO 

To Great Britain, France or Germany 25 cents per word. 

Telegrams are transmitted by means of the Wireless Service during the summer season, and 
all the year round to Steamers equipped with the wireless apparatus, which are due to pass within 
the radius of the wireless stations at Cape Race and Cape Ray. 

Telegraph messages may be obtained at all Post Offices and from Mail Clerks on Trains and 
Steamers, and if the sender wishes the messages may be left with the P. M. to be forwarded by 
first mail to the nearest Telegraph Office free of postage. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

General Post Office, St. John s, Newfoundland, June, 1914. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Imperial Life Assurance Co y 

Of Canada. "g 



Toronto. 



What is Your Wife s Salary ? 

Don t think the question absurd. We ask it to emphasize 
the fact that wives do not get salaries ; they just work for 
their board and clothes. They can t lay aside anything for 
times of sickness or old age. Their husbands are supposed 
to do that for them. 

It is pretty selfish of a man not to make proper provision 
for his wife in the event of his sudden death. 

An Imperial Life policy will provide the one definite, sure 
and easily obtained provision for your wife; and she de 
serves something definite and sure -doesn t she ? 
Apply for Rates lo 

JAS. A. MACKENZIE, 

Manager for Newfoundland, 

P. O. Box 147. Law Chambers Building. 



FDELITY (FIRE) 
UNDERWRITERS 

oe * * OF NEW YORK. 

This Company has Assets of 

Over Forty Millions of Dollars. 

I will be pleased to carry your 

Insurance at Lowest Tariff Rates. 

CYRIL J. CAHILL, 

Agent for Newfoundland. 

La,w Chambers, St. John s, Nfld. 



Brandram Henderson [nglish Paint, 



The best and cheapest * 
High-Class Paint in the market. 

Paint Brushes of all kinds 



at 



Sold by BOWRING BROTHERS, LIMITED, 

Hardware Department. 



The Good Article 

IS NEVER DEAR! 



If you want the *g g 
good article in clothing 
go to ^6 $ <$ 

Jackman The Tailor, Limited, 

The Men s and Boys Clothier. 



North West 

Eire Insurance Co. of Winnipeg. 

Incorporated 1880. 

Policies Guaranteed by the Union Assurance Society, 
of London, England. 

Chas. O Neill Conroy, 



Oke Building, SI. Ji ln s. 



Agent lor Newfoundland, 



whin* to AdT.rtum kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quijteriy. 



Vol. XIV. No. 1. 



JULY, 1914. 



40 cents per year. 



The "Newfoundland Tragedy 

And the Loss of the * Southern Cross/ with Passing References to Other 

Notable Sealing Disasters* 

By Alex. A. Parsons, J.P. 



" I i.i- fares the barque, with trembling people charged, 

That, toss d amid the floating fragments, moors 

Beneath the shelter of an icy isle, 

^ hile night o erwhelms the sea and horror looks 

More horrible. Can human force endure 

The assembled mischiefs that besiege them round? 

Heart-gnawing hunger, fainting weariness, 

The roar of wind and waves, the crash of ice, 

Now ceasing, now renewed with louder rage, 

And in dire echoes bellowing round the main." 

HE prosecution of the seal fishery off these coasts, 
has always been, and will continue to be, so long 
as it is carried on as at present, a highly danger 
ous and exciting occupation, those engaged there 
in being perpetually exposed to disaster and 
death under conditions and circumstances that would intimidate 





Photo In S. If- Parsons &> Sons. 

THE STEEL SEALING FLEET OFF 



FOR THE ICE-FIELDS. 



any men less daring than the hardy and intripid sons of New 
foundland. Born, for the most part, along the seaboard, within 
the sound of the surging ocean as it rolls in from the storm- 
tossed Atlantic and breaks in thunder against our rugged shores, 
and "rocked in the cradle of the deep" from their infancy, 
they naturally find an inspiration therein that incites them to 
follow in the footsteps of their forefathers and earn their liveli 
hood in the same free and fearless manner. 

\ -Jever happier, never more at home, than when engaged in 
sorv.i extremely hazardous occupation or pastime, our boys 
begin their adventurous career by skating over the lightly-frozen 
lakes and " copying " on the pans of ice in the coves and 
harbors, emulating each other in the risks they run. As they 
row up to manhood they long for the time when they can go 



to the ice-fields in the early spring and to the Banks and coast 
of Labrador during the summer season. To our young New 
foundlanders both these branches of the staple industry possess 
attractions that are irresistible. They love to " dare and do,"- 
to sail close in the wake of the tide-driven iceberg, to climb its 
slippery sides, not knowing, or apparently caring, what moment 
it tni^ht rill over and engulf them, to put out to sea in the 
severe t gales, ai d to display Ihe marvellous skill they acquire 
in "handling" th. ir boats under circumstances so frau,ht with 
danger as to ihrill and fascinate the spectator. To ste these 
boats coming in from the fishing ground " under a press of 
canva- 1 . with the spray " going over them, is a sight one cannot 
witness with mt expressing the liveliest admiration for the daring 
b >atmen. I hive seen mere lads of founeen or fifteen years of 
.a;je ieanmg out over Leetling cliffs, or clinging to a single tope 
or overhanging shrub, pulling }oung sea birds or eagles from 
their eyries, with jiggers attached to fishing lines, while hun- 
dre Is of leet below lay, sometimes the angry waves, sometimes 
the jagged rocks, in any case meaning an awful death in the 
event of accident. Ve^ ! our fishermen, young and old, are a 
splendid race, well worthy of the West Country vikings from 
whom most of them claim descent ; nor is it any wonder we 
are now plunged in grief because so many of them have 
recently lost their lives on the treacherous and trackless ice-floss. 
But while the magnitude of the present disaster is appalling, 
it is not true, as stated by some of the local newspapers, that 
" it reaches the proportions of the greatest sealing disaster in 
the Colony s history." At least one other tragedy involving a 
greater sacrifice of life than that caused by the loss of the 
Southern Cross and the death of eighty of the Newfoundland s 
crew, has occurred in connection with the seal fishery. If my 
readers will turn back to the first half of the nineteenth century 
they will find that, in the instance to which I refer, the " toll of 
the sea " was much greater than now, and that, on several other 
occasions, more than one vessel which left port for the ice-fields 
never returned. They went down with their gallant crews, 
leaving nothing to mark the spot where the ice-crested waves 
rolled over them. Here are some of the disasters recorded : 
In 1830, the schooner True Blue, Capt. Picco, of Portugal Cove, 
was lost with all on board ; in 1833, the schooner Union, Capt. 
Delaney, also with all hands she had a crew of 28 men ; 1837, 
six of crew of the schooner Harriet, Capt. Parsons, of Harbor 
Grace ; 1838, fourteen vessels went down, not a single one of 
the crews escaping; 1843, fifteen of the crew of the schooner 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 2. 



Princess, of Harbor Grace ; 1847, twenty-one of the crew of the 
Margaret, of that place; 1852, six men from the schooner 
Georgia : 1867, ten women and two men lost off Ragged Islands 
while in quest of seals ; the same year two men and two women 
off Catalina ; 1868, seven men from Fogo ; 1872, forty-five of 
the crew of the Huntsman, Capt. Dawe, of Bay Roberts ; the 
same year thirty-three of the crew of the schooner Dundonald, 
Capt. Jenkins, of St. John s, and eighteen men belonging to the 
schooner Village Belle, Capt. Antle, of Brigus. In 1892, twenty- 
four perished on the ice after being driven off from different 
places in Trinity Bay, and in 1898 forty-eight of the crew of the 
s.s. Greenland, Capt. Barbour, died from exposure on the ice. 

It will thus be observed that as I have already said the 
worst disaster on record took place in the spring of 1838. Dur 
ing the voyage to the ice-fields that year the fleet experienced one 
of the greatest hurricanes ever known in the prosecution of this 
industry. In that storm fourteen vessels were lost with all their 
crews. Exactly how it happened none can tell, as not a vestige 
of them was ever seen or heard of from that day to this. Over 
three hundred perished, or fifty more than the total number 
lost by the Southern Cross and Xewfinindlnnd disasters combined. 

Prosecuted as the seal fishery is during the cold and stormy 
month of March, it cannot be otherwise than a perilous avoca 
tion. It is, indeed, a voyage of hopes and fears, trials and 
disappointments, and the pursuit of it causes more anxiety, ex 
citement and solicitude than any other occupation in the island, 
or perhaps anywhere else. Often the seals are sought after at 
a distance of four to eight miles from the ship, over huge masses 



The first great tragedy since the introduction of 
the prosecution of the sealing industry occurred n Ma 
when forty-eight of the ere* of the s.s Greenland *e 
to death during an awful experience of twenty-four hours e po 
sure to the low st temperature and biggest snow-storm of that 
unusually cold and tempestuous season. Previous 
,892, we had the terrible affair known as the Trinity Bay 
ing 9 disaster, already casually mentioned here. On that occasion 
the seals were scattered about the Bay, some on pans 
others in the water. Many of the people pulled their boats far 
out into the Bay in quest of them, heedless of the approaching 
tempest. Some of the older and more observant fishermen 
noticed in time the first signs of the storm, and before 
force was felt, they were near enough to the land to reach 
safety Over two hundred men were out among the ice 
seals that day. About two-thirds of these got to shore 
tremendous struggle. The rest of them were not so fortunate 
With strong arms and brave hearts they fought for their 
but the freezing ice-tornado swept down upon them and para 
lyzed their efforts, while instant death appeared on every wave. 
Let me briefly quote from a contemporary writer - 
crew from English Harbor, seeing all their attempts to stem the 
tempest were in vain, made for the ice. So cutting was the 
blast that before the boat had reached the floe, rlyi"g before the 
wind, one young fellow became unconsci >u-,. Iliwever. they 
climbed to a pan higher than the rest where they made a rude 
shelter ; their boat was broken up to make a fire, and with this 
and some seals, they minaged to live through the night. Thir- 




Photo by S. H. Parsons &= Sons. 

s.s. " NEWFOUNDLAND" CAPT. w. KEAN. 

of ice ; and, during the toilsome journey, the men have to jump 
from one pan to another across frightful chasms, where yawns 
the dark blue water ready to receive them, should they miss 
their footing. Sometimes, as in the case of the Newfoundland s 
crew, when the sealers are at a distance from the vessel in 
search of a patch of hoods are harps, a freezing snow-s orm 
comes on, when no object around c.m be descried, and tlie dis 
tant ship is entirely lost sight of. The bewildered sealers gather 
together. They try one course, then another ; but in vain ; no 
vessel appears. The lights shown from their ship cannot be 
seen. The guns fired and the whistles blown cannot bi heard. 
Night comes on and the unfortunate men peri-.h through fatigue, 
cold and hunger, on the shelterless ice-floe. Such tragedies are 
alas too frequent in the experience of our seal fishers. Scarcely 
a season passes in which some of the wives and children of 
those hardy " ice-hunters " are not called to mourn the loss of 
their bread-winners. Our past history particularly that portion 
of it which belongs to the sailing fleet tells us how vessels were 
crushed between large masses of ice, and how all on board were 
consigned to one common destruction. Thus the force and 
meaning of the poet s lines are again and again brought home 
to us when he says: 

" There lieth a wreck on the distant shore 

Of cold and pitiless Labrador ; 

Where, under the snow, upon mounds of fi 

Full many a mariner s bones are toss d." 




THE RESCUE SHIP S.S. " BELLA VENTURE," 
CAPT. R. RANDELL. 

teen fishermen were found frozen to death in their little punts ; 
eleven others were driven up the Bay, where they perished in 
that dark cold night of death. The hardships that were endured 
the sufferings of the poor fellows that were saved, the agony of 
suspense for the dear ones on shore, the heroism of those humble 
souls in their hour of agony is known only to the Almighty 
Power that rules both sea and land. All that could be done 
was done to alleviate the distressed : a gallant crew from Heart s 
Delight saved the sixteen men on the ice. Capt. Fowlow put 
out in his schooner and succored some others and brought them 
home to their agonized families. Charity flowed in to the 
widows and orphans, and tender sympathy was called forth for 
the mourners." 

But certainly the greatest disaster since 1898 is the one to 
which I now more particularly refer: The Newfoundland s 
death roll numbers 80. Add to this the crew of the ill-fated 
Southern Cross and we have a total for I9U o f 2:0 It was on 
the 2nd of April last, just as we were expecting to hear some 
encouraging news from th ice-fields that a wireless me^agr was 
received by Messrs. Bowring Brothers from Capt J \V\ - m 
of the steamer Florist/, conveying to them the first intelligent:. 
the disaster to the Newfoundland s crew. This message 
stated that a portion of them were caught out in the terrible 
ard which had raged along the coast a dav or two p re 
viously, and that the Bellarenture had found fifty of them dead 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 3. 



and dying on the ice. In a few hours the whole Colony became 
aware of the melancholy facts and a feeling of deep and heart 
felt grief manifested itself throughout the community. Never, 
perhaps, in the history of the Island were the hearts of the 
people more deeply moved than on that memorable occasion ; 
and this feeling was, if possible, intensified a few days later 
when it was acertained that the dead would number eighty and 
that many of the survivors were so badly frostbitten as to be 
maimed for life. The whole city felt a pang of bereavement 

" But who shall paint the various grief, 

Where none was near to yield relief; 

The cutting thoughts that crowd the mind 

(The wives and children left behind) 

Of those whom hope had left a prey 

To dark Suspense and pale Dismay." 

The Government acted with commendable promptitude in the 
matter. As soon as the nature and extent of the tragedy be 
came known, arrangements were made bv the Acting Premier, 
Hon. John R. Bennett, (in the absence of the Prime Minister 
from the Colony) for a public meeting in aid of the sufferers and 
the bereaved wives and children. This meeting was convened 
by Sheriff Carter, and took place in the Court House on the 
yth April. There and then His Excellency the Administrator, 
Sir William H. Horwood, appointed a general committee, which 
met on the gth of that month, in the Board of Trade Building 
when His Excellency nominated an executive committee, and on 
the following day, April loth, the latter held its first meeting, 
at which steps were taken with a view to a thorough canvass of 



pit il and volunteers, first-aid assistants, corps from the Naval 
Reserve and Lads Brigades, stretcher-bearers, ambulances from 
the Hospitals and express wagons supplied by the Reid-New 
foundland Company, were at hand and ready for immediate use. 
The arrangements were all that could be desired, and within 
ten minutes after the steamer s arrival at the wharf the work of 
removing the injured and the bodies of those who had perished 
on the ice began. 

The " Newfoundland District of the St. John Ambulance 
Brigade Overseas" had all three of its divisions on duty. The 
muster comprised the following : One district officer ; medical 
officers, two ; ambulance officers, four ; nursing officers, two ; 
sergeants, two ; privates, twenty-eight ; thirteen nursing sisters ; 
ten volunteer helpers first aid certificates ; three other volun 
teer helpers. On receipt of the news that the Bellaventure was 
homeward bound with the sick and dead, the Government made 
arrangements with the Port Medical Officer, who was given 
complete charge of everything except the stretcher work, which 
was allotted to the Police. Doctor Macpherson, District Sur 
geon and Superintendent, at once offered the services of the 
Brigade to the Port Medical Officer for ambulance and nursing 
du ies at King George V. Seaman s Institute, and they were 
readily accepted. Later, in conversation with the Inspector 
Geneial of Constabu ary, the latter informed him that, with the 
limited number of men at his disposal to deal with the immense 
crowd which would gather, he feared the ambulance work would 
seriously hamper him, and gladly passed it over to the Brigade, 




" BELLA VENTURE S" CREW BRINGING SURVIVORS AND BODIES 
ABOARD SHIP. 

the city and an appeal to the people generally for donations in 
aid of the " Marine Disaster s Fund." Between the ijth of 
April and the 2oth of May the committee held no less than 
seventeen meetings, when responsible reports were received as 
to needy cases, all of which were promptly considered. These 
obtained help at once, a sum of 4,500 being dispersed for that 
purpose. 

The BeUaventitre, with the dead and injured people on board, 
arrived at about five o clock p.m. on Saturday, the 4th of April. 
As she steamed in through the Narrows, with her flag half-mast 
high, the pulse of business along the water-front for a moment 
stood still, while the thousands of spectators who had congre 
gated about the Public Wharf, the premises of Harvey & Co., and 
the slope known as Custom House Hill, leading from Duckworth 
to Water Street, held their breath as they gazed out over the 
harbor at the advancing ship and thought of the scores of their 
fellow-countrymen on board, still and cold in the embrace of 
death. Slowly she approached the wharf, where every necessary 
preparation had already been made for the landing of the dead 
as well as the injured, many of the latter being so badly frost 
bitten as to need the utmost care and attention. This they re 
ceived unsparingly. The big, warm heart of the commu 
nity was moved as, perhaps, never before, by an intense feel 
ing of sympathy, every one being anxious to lend a helping 
hand. All the city Physcians, the Ambulance Corps, under 
Drs. Macpherson and Campbell, nurses from the General Hos- 




Plioto liy S. H. Parsons &> Sans. 

LANDING SURVIVORS AT HARVEY & GO S. WHARF. 

which undertook full responsibility for all the ambulance woik. 
The Commander of H.M.S. Calypso, placed a stretcher party, 
consisting of one warrant officer, s x petty officers and twenty- 
four blue jackets, under Dr. Macpherson s orders, for service with 
tie Brigade. These did most of the actual carrying of the 
patients. No. i (C. L. B ) Division were given the most trying 
task that of loading the stretchers and bringing them to the 
ship s rail. No. T. (Avalon) Nuring Division, with the assistance 
of two graduate nurses (Misses Taylor and Cunningham) con 
vened the third flat of the Seamen s Institute into a temporary 
ho-pit il, whe:e they cared for ten convalescent parents from the 
General Hispital, removed to make room for the most serious 
cases among the frost-bitten sealers. To this hospital were 
brought eighteen of the less severe cases of frostbite among the 
survivors. These were cared for by No. 2 Nursing Division 
u nil dischirged, or room could be made for them at the General 
Hospital. It is gratifying to be able to say that, from start to 
finish, every one thus engaged performed his or her work in a 
most satisfactory manner. No one faltered or fainted in the 
performance of their most trying duties, and this, too, in face of 
the fact that none of them had seen active service before. Thus 
this organization, the holding together of which has, in the past, 
met with so much difficulty, owing to the seemingly visionary 
character of the work for which it sought to prepare its members, 
has been amply rewarded for all its efforts by the excellent 
work its training has enabled it to do in this terrible emergency. 
But to return to the actual work of landing the sick and dead. 







THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.--4- 

TO>e <3ranb priory of 
TCbe roer of tbe Dospftat of St. 3obn of Jerusalem in Englano. 

AMBULANCE DEPARTMENT. 

fcbe St. John Hmbulancc Bn oabe Overseas 

Chief Commissioner: Major-General J. C. Dalton (late R.A.) 
NEWFOUNDLAND DISTRICT. District Surgeon and Superintendent in Charge of District : Cluny Macpher: 




Holloway Photo. 

Members of the St. John s Divisions engaged in transport of the survivors of the s.s Newfoundland disaster and the caring 
for them in the temporary Hospital which they established in King George V. Seamen s Institute. 

TOP Row: J. King (Volunteer), Private H. Grant (3), Pte. P. O Mara (3), Pte. E. Maunder (3), Pte. H. Macpherson (31. 1). Brenton (Vol. F.A.), 
Pte. G. House (3), Pte. C. Edgar (3), J. Ellis (Vol. F.A.), Pte. W. Stevenson (3), Pte. H. Chafe (3), Pte J. Hustins (3), J. Bemister 
(Vol.), Pte. G. Cross (3), Pte. L. O Mara (3) 

SECOND Row: Mr. Prout (Sick-Berth Steward H.M.S. Calypso), Pte. B. Noseworthy (3), Pte. A. Rumsey (3), Pte. W. Chafe (3), Pte. F. Williams (3) 
Pte. J. Carbery (3), Pte. J. Jeans (3), Pte. W. Strong (3), Pte. M. Murphy (3), Pte. W. Taylor (31. 

THIRD Row: Pte. E. Ellis (i), Pte. F. Roberts (I), Pte. G. Edgecombe, Nursing Sister Miss M. Kent (2), N.S. Mrs. C. Muir (21. Miss M. Joyce 
(F.A. Vol.), . N.S. Miss C. Ball (2), Miss M. Taylor and Miss E. Cunningham (Trained Nurses working as volunteers in St. ]. A B ) 
N.S. Miss E. Ellis (2), N S. Miss A. Tessier (2), N.S. Miss J. Gale (2), N.S. Miss E. Hawkins (->), Pt. F. Samiielson (i), Pt. A. Bishop (i) 

FOURTH Row : Pte. E. Spry (3), F. Miles (Vol. with No. i), Second Ambulance Officer E. Churchill (3), Capt. W. March of M.G.B. (Vol. F A 
with No. 3), Miss L. Spry, First Nursing Officer (2); Dr. W. Roberts, Divisional Surgeon (2) ; Dr. Cluny Macpherson, District Surgeon _V 
Superintendent, Newfoundland District; Mr. W. Reeves, Ambulance Officer No. I Division; Miss E. Gaul, Second Nursing Officer (2) 
Mr. N. Alderdice, Supt. No. 3 Division; First Ambulance Officer H. Pedigrew (3), Sgt. & Sec. H. Spry (3), Pte. S. Dewling (i). 

BOTTOM Row: Pte. T. Hammond (i), Pte. H. Barnes (I), *Miss Lloyd, N.S. M. Worral (2), N.S. B. Christian (2), N.S. H. Gallishaw U ) *Miss 
Forsey, N.S. A. Worsley (2). N.S. I. LeMessurier (2), N.S. E LeMessurier (2), Pte. W. Miles (I), M. Wadden, Inspt o 
Pte. A. Hammond (I). 

* Sisters from General Hospital, who accompanied convalescents from hospital and remained while patients were being received from s.s. Btllaventure 



Under the direction of Dr. Campbell on board the ship, one 
after another, the frost-bitten men were gently taken on shore, 
the worst cases being removed first. They were at once con 
veyed to the Seamen s Institute, where they were examined by 
the doctors before driven to the Hospital. Those who were not 
seriously ill. but still suffered from the effects of exposure to the 
storm and frost, found the support they needed in the strong 
arms that assisted them as they walked from the wharf to the 
comfortable quarters provided for them at the Institute. The 
sick and suffering sealers having received careful attention, the 
melancholy task of removing the dead to the Grenfell Hall was 
begun. All the bodies had been placed on the forward part of 
the ship and were covered with tarpaulins and canvas. Gently, 
as if the vital spark still lingered in these cold and inanimate 
forms, they were brought on shore, the Brigade boys saluting 



and the citizens raising their hats and remaining uncovered 
while the cortege of stretcher-bearers passed from the ship to 

Jj-3,11. 

Inside the Institute, as the bodies were taken into the Hall 
many sad and touching incidents were witnessed, as relatives 
waited to receive their dead fathers and brothers. Undertakers 
and their assistants stood around and clergymen of all denomi 
nations were there ready to render any service that might be 
required of them. So pathetic was the entire scene that manv 
strong men who were not directly interested vainly endeavoured 
o restrain their tears as sobbing friends came forward to iden 
tify the remains of their loved and lost ones. The bodies were 
then removed to the basement of the Institute, divested of their 
old clothing, cleaned, shaved, newly clothed and taken back to 
the Hall, where their friends were permitted to see them. The 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 5. 



touching scenes here witnessed have already been described in 
detail by the daily papers, and they are too fresh in the public 
mind to need further description by me. 

The work of preparing the bodies for removal and burial 
went on all through Saturday night. Those belonging to the 
city and suburbs had been removed, and the larger number of 
those that belonged to (he extern places, were sent out by train 
on Sunday evening, a large number of sympathizing citizens fol 
lowing them from the Institute to the railway station, where they 
were put on board cars specially prepared for the sad occasion, 
and taken to their late homes. /Memorial services were held in 
all the city churches, and in most of the churches outside the 
city as well, where eloquent tributes were paid to the self-sacri 
fice and splendid heroism of those lion-hearted men who, enured 
to danger from childhood, could uncomplaingly meet their fate 
under such awful conditions. They did not " turn aside or 
falter" when death so grimly confronted them amid the biting 
frost and blinding snow-drift of an Artie winter on the pitiless 
ice-floe. Perhaps they could, and did, say to each other during 
the lingering hours of that terrible Wednesday night, ere the 
chilly fingers of death had gripped them 

" In the darkness as in daylight, 

On the water as on land, 
God s own eye is looking on us, 

And beneath us is His hand ! 
1 eath will find us soon or later, 

On the deck or in the cot ; 
And we cannot meet Him better 

Than in working out our lot." 

The story of this tragedy is best told in the words of Captain 
Randell of the rescuing steamer. In his evidence before the 
Commission of Inquiry appointed by the Government immedi 
ately after the arrival of the Bellaventure, Capt. Randell said in 
effect: "On the morning of Tuesday, 3ist of March, the 
weather conditions were such as would warrant the ordinary 
sealing master in sending his men out on the ice in quest of seals. 
The glass gave no indication of an approaching storm, and. seals 
being reported in the neighborhood of the Newfoundland, it was 
not unreasonable that Capt. Kean should have his full comple 
ment of men on the ice. That morning I had most of my men 
out after a patch of old seals ; but these were diiven off and the 
men returned to the ship. At noon the barometer indicated an 
approaching storm, and it was snowing a little, with increasing 
wind from the southward. It began to get cold about 3 p.m., 
the riiild weather giving place to a severe blizzard, with hurri 
cane force of wind. At this time it was not intensely cold, but 
as the day grew so did the storm. Late in the afternoon there 
was a change for about an hour, when the wind swung round 
from the westward, making it quite mild, with soft snow. Up 
to 9 p.m. the temperature was such as not to cause frostbite; 
but about that time the wind suddenly changed to north, blow 
ing with great violence and the temperature falling to zero. 
These conditions continued all Tuesday night, the ice being in 
such a state, and the atmosphere so thick as to render it im 
possible to find a crew, if any considerable distance from the 
ship. On Wednesday morning there was no change, the weather 
continuing frosty. If during this time Capf. Kean knew his 
men had not reached any other ship, it would be useless for 
him to search for them. If the men had taken the Newfound 
land s position and set their compasses before the storm came 
on, it is just possible that she would be running away from them 
instead of drawing nearer. The men would be unable to reach 
the ship, owing to the thick snow, unless apprised by the sound 
of the whistle. At noon on Wednesday there was an abatement 
of the storm and at 2 p.m. it ceased to snow; but there was a 
"ground drift " on the ice, making it hard for those on the ship 
to see men at any great distance, though men on the ice would 
be able to see the ship and yet be unable to reach or signal her. 
On Wednesday afternoon the Bellaventure s men were on the 
ice and killed some three hundred seals. During this time we 
worked toward the Newfoundland. The night was colder and 
more severe than Tuesday, with continued north wind and drift 
ing snow. Soon after daylight on Thursday the barrelman re 
ported that he saw a couple of men on the ice. When he told 
me this I remarked that there must be a large patch of seals 
inside the Newfoundland or Capt. Kean would not have his men 



out so early. Subsequently another report reached me from the 
lookout to the effect that the men were " wobbling " about and 
appeared as if they were out all night. The Bellaventure was 
then forced toward them and some of her men were sent out to 
render assistance. One of the men sighted walked to the ship 
and reported that he belonged to the Newfoundland s crew, that 
more than one hundred of them hid been out since Tuesday 
morning and that upwards of fifty were dead on the ice-floe. " 

Captain Randell then goes on to speak of the work of rescue: 
" Full speed was ordered on the Bellaventure when the disaster 
was made known, and the crew were sent out in relays with 
food, stretchers, wood to light fires and various other things 
such as would be of service in caring for the survivors. Owing 
to the ice being very compact, the progress of the ship was 
necessarily slow, but the men sent out continued on and rescued 
those who had outlived the storm and brought them on board. 
Meantime a second man from the Newfoundland s crew walked 
to the Bellaventure and gave the death toll as greater than at first 
reported." " All day," says Captain Randell, we continued 
the work of rescue, our men assisting those who could walk to 
the Bellaventure, and those who could not were placed on 
stretchers and brought to the ship as gently as possible. As 
the ship continued on, the dead bodies were taken aboard with 
the living, no less than fifteen being found OT a single pan. At 
5 p.m. the work was practically completed, when about sixty 




Photo by S. H. Parsons & Sens. 
WAITING FOR SURVIVORS AND F!OT)IES AT SEAMEN S INSTITUTE. 

dead bodies and thirty-five survivors were on board our ship. 
Some of the latter completely collapsed as they reached the 
deck; a few were unable to speak and more or less suffered 
mentally as well as physically. These, during the night, recov 
ered their reason, and the others, who had been but slightly 
frost-bitten, were able to relate the awful experience through 
which they had passed." 

The Southern Cross was -on her "way home from the Gulf seal 
fishery with 17,000 seals. She had called at Channel, on the 
West Coast, where her commander, Captain Clarke, reported to 
thi owners agent here that the ship was loaded and everything 
right on board. It seems that she left Channel on Monday, 
March 3oth, and at n o clock the following day was reported 
five miles W.S.VV. of Cape Pine, by the s.s. Poilia, and, accord 
ing to a private message, heading tor Trepassey. Some of our 
experienced master mariners are under the impression that 
Capt. Clarke, after sighting Gallantry Head, St. Pierre, shaped 
his course directly for Cape Pine, giving Cape St. Mary s a wide 
berth, and, after passing the former Cape, made for Cape Race, 
hoping to get across Trepassey Bay before the full force of the 
storm could reach him. In this, however, it is painfully obvious 
that he failed, as nothing has since been seen or heard of him, 
his ship or her sturdy crew. The assumption is that they went 
down in the awful gale of that memorable night and the succeed 
ing day. Most of those competent to give an opinion on such 
matters think that he (Capt. Clarke) would not take the risk of 
trying to enter Trepassey, and, seeing no chance to get around 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 6. 



Cape Race," " hove to," believing that, with plenty of sea-room, 
he could weather the gale and come out all right. But the days 
and the weeks and the months have gone by and the loved ones 
left behind are now reluctantly compelled to abandon all hope 
of ever seeing their bread-winners again 

" Now is the ocean s bosom bare, 

Unbroken as the floating air ; 

The ship hath melted quite away, 

Like a struggling dream at break of day. 

No image meets the wandering eye 

But the new-risen sun and the sunny sky. 

Though the night-shades are gone, yet a vapour dull 

Bedims the waves so beautiful. 

While a low and a melancholy moan 

Mourns for the glory that hath flown." 

The appeal for donations in aid of the bereaved and suffering 
people, made by the Relief Committee, was handsomely respond 
ed to at home and abroad. And just here I would like to men 
tion the suggestive fact that the two first contributors in England 
to the Relief Fund were their Majesties King George and Queen 
Mary, the former giving 100 and the latter ^50. I use the 
word " suggestive " advisedly, because it further emphasizes the 
inborn sympathy of the Sovereigns with their people a sym 
pathy not confined to the Parent State," but one that reaches 
out to their suffering subjects in the remote dominions beyond 
the seas. Such acts as these keep us in friendly touch with (he 
centre of the Empire and the gracious Rulers t>> whom we pay 
a loyal and willing allegiance. But never was the proverbial 
generosity of our own people more freely and universally dis 
played. Everbody felt a desire to contribute according to his or 




Photo by S. H. Parsons &- Sons. 

FUNERAL PROCESSION TO RAILWAY STATION. 

her means. Even the children gave entertainments, and held 
sales of their own work, gladly bringing the proceeds and plac 
ing them in the hands of the Honorary Treasurer. Nor was 
this feeling of practical sympathy confined to our own people. 
Much as the latter contributed and the Treasurer, Hon. Robt. 
Watson, tells me they gave nearly half the total amount sub 
scribed their contributions were pretty well covered by the 
generosity of sympathizers outside. Friends in the Mother 
Country, as usual, responded in the open-handed manner so 
characteristic of them on such occasions. Stimulated by the 
active efforts of His Excellency the Governor (Sir Walter 
Davidson) and the Prime Minister (Rt. Hon. Sir E. P. Morris), 
both of whom happened to be in England at the time, they sur 
passed all our expectations in the number and size of their dona 
tions. The London Fund alone amounted to 45,000. This, 
with $5,000 contributed in other parts of England, brought the 
total amount received from the Old Land up to $50,000. 

On this side of the Atlantic the Canadian Government led off 
with the munificent vote of $25,000, while the corporations and 
private citizens of the Dominion contributed as much more. 
Large contributions also reached us from Newfoundlanders 
and others in the United States, aggregating about 25,000, the 
whole amount in the hands of the Treasurer on the 1 5th of 
June, when the lists were closed, being no less than 275,000. 



Add to these figures the sum of $100 per cap.ta of the 250 men 
lost-contributed by the local Government-Hind we have a 
erand total of $100,000, for which it is needless to add, the 
widows and orphan^ the sufferers still in hospital (those who 
are maimed for life) and all others interested in that awful 
tragedy express their deep and heartfelt gratit 

" Break, break, break, 
,.-- On thy cold gray stones, O Sea ! 
How I wish that my tongue could utter 

The thoughts that arise in me ! 
And the stately ships go on 

To their haven under the hill ; 
But O for the touch of a vanish d hand, 
And the sound of a voice that is still ." 



Our Dead Seal Hunters* 

By M. A. Devine. 

NOT theirs to die where the falchion s flash 
Mid the din and the smoke of war, 

Where the fratricidal legions clash, 
And the cannons blaze afar. 

No drum-beat boomed o er the field they trod 

The plain of shimmering white, 
Where our brothers yielded their souls to God 

In the dark of the Borean night. 

Red-blooded stalwarts were they all, 

The pick of a Viking race, 
From a hundred hunting sires the call 

Impelled them to the chase. 

And though danger lurked by berg and pan, 

They counted not their lives, 
Each faced his duty like a man 

For home, and babes, and wives. 

To life and laughter and kindred face, 

To home on the sea-swept shore, 
The siren call of the ship of the chase 

Shall wake them nevermore. 

No greave or cuirass for martial strife, 
Was laced to their limbs or breast; 

The gaff, the goggles, the belt the knife, 
Sufficient for their quest. 

And forth they fared on the frozen fields. 

Unheeding the threat ning sky, 
To prove that the true man never yields. 

And to teach us how to die. 

Oh, mothers, sisters, babes and wives, 

Who weep by the Northern Sea, 
May the God of pity o erlook your lives, 

And assuage your misery. 

And believe that your husband, brother, son, 

Has entered the Realm of Light, 
Where the homespun garb for the deed well done, 

Shall be changed into robes of white. 



April, 1914 



In Memoriam. 

Eunice T. Holbrook Ruel. 

Out of the dark and driving sleet, 

Out of the void and the lonely night, 
Sweet came a voice o er the icy deep, 
" Let there be light." 

Out of the terror and agony, 

There where it seemed death could never cease 
One was among them stronger than death. 
" Let there be peace." 

Down on the floes of the bitter north, 

Out where death terrified with its shade 
Wonderful comfort! wonderful hope 1 
" Be not afraid." 

Out of the shadow of death they went, 

Brave heart and Uue, where He led the way, 
Out of the darkness ! Into the light 
Of Eternal Day. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 7. 

Some Indian Dream Pictures* 



By Dr. Arthur Selwyn- Brown. 




I HE world is surprised at rare intervals by the 
sudden appearance of a poet or symbolist who 
expresses in a few terse words, great thoughts 
and emotions that everyone has long felt, but 
has been unable to satisfactorily phrase or utter. 
Such a poet has arisen in India and his work re 
ceived the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1913. The extraor 
dinary prose poems of the Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore 
are to-day attracting the attention of literary men in every 
country. These poems, or dreams as they might better be 
called, were published in a small volume in Bombay several 
years ago. They were in the Bengali language. Last year 
they were translated by the author into English and published 
in a small volume in London, and created a sensation through 
out Europe. Indians say of Tagore : " He is the first among 
our saints who has not refused to live, but has spoken out of 
life itself and that is why we all give him our love." 

Tagore is a musician and an English scholar. He sets his 
songs to music and has translated his " Gitanjali," or dream 
songs, into a most beautiful English prose which is quite un 
equalled by other modern writers. 

These dream songs are philosophic pictures that have a haunt 
ing sweetness which seems to grow the more we become ac 
quainted with their mysticism. William Butler Yeats, the Irish 
poet, writes of them : " I have carried the manuscript of these 
translations about with me for days, reading it in railways, or on 
the tops of omnibuses and in restaurants, and I have often had 
to close it lest some stranger would see how much it moved me. 
These lyrics display in their thought a world I have dreamed of 
all my life long. The work of a supreme culture, they yet ap 
pear as much the growth of the common soil as the grass and 
the rushes. A tradition, where poetry and religion are the same 
thing has passed through the centuries gathering from learned 
and unlearned metaphor and emotion and carried back again to 
the multitude the thought of the scholar and of the noble." 

Tagore s dreams, as we will call these splendid visions of the 
seer.begin with an invocation which is at once simple and preg 
nant with grand thoughts. He writes a-; folio vs : 

DREAM I. 

" Thou hast made me endless, such is thy pleasure. This frail vessel 
thou emptiest again and again and fillest it ever with fresh life. This little 
flute of a reed thou hast carried over hills and dales and hast breathed 
through it melodies eternally new. At the immortal touch of thy hands 
my little heart loses its limits in joy and gives birth to utterance ineffable. 
Thy infinite gifts come to me only on these very small hands of mine. 
Ages pass and still thou pourest and still there is room to fill." 

DREAM 2. 

" When thou commandest me to sing, it seems that my heart would 
break with pride ; and I look to thy face, and tears come to my eyes. AH 
that is harsh and dissonant in my life melts into one sweet harmony and 
my adoration spreads wings like a glad bird on its flight across the sea. 
know that thou takest pleasure in my singing. I know that only as a 
singer I come before thy presence I touch by the edge of the far spread 
ing wing of my song thy feet, which I never could aspire to reach. Drunk 
with the joy of singing, I forget myself and call thee friend who art my 
Lord." 

DREAM 3. 

" I know not how thou singest, my Master ! I ever listen in silent 
amazement. The light of thy music illumines the world. The life breath 
of thy music runs from sky to sky. The holy stream of thy music breaks 
through all stony obstacles and rushes on. My heart longs to join in thy 
song, but vainly struggles for a voice, I would speak, but speech breaks not 
into song, and I cry out baffled. Ah, thou hast made my heart captive in 
the endless meshes of thy music my Master 1" 

In these beautiful words the poet invokes his muse, tells of 
his inspiration ; glances throughout the many ages of the past 
and summarizes a quaint, mystical philosophy. "Thou hast 
made me endless, such is thy pleasure." What a world of 
thought is hidden in this melodious line ! Philosophical stu 



dents will therein find not only a summary of Buddhistic princi 
ples but a good view of the teachings of Schopenhauer. " Thou 
hast made me endless " an immortal spirit, living endlessly 
like the essence of a crystal or an electron ; a passion adventur 
ing as long as time extends. " At the immortal touch of thy 
hands my little heart loses its limits in Joy and gives birth to 
utterance ineffable." Here is a great confession. The poet 
simply suggests that when the weary soul gives itself up to that 
ecstatic meditation so favoured by the poets of the Orient and 
by idealistic philosophers, it passes out of the realms of casual 
cognition and enters the happy fields of aesthetic and philoso 
phical intuition which exist on the farther side of the veil of 
Maya, in Nirvana, and gladdens all hearts that are privileged to 
see them. Then silent singers break forth into sweet songs like 
the famed melodies the wind makes in the pine groves on 
stormy nights, and seers receive the secrets of the ages and 
revibrate them so that they may be understood by all men. 
" Ages pass and still thou pourest and still there is room to fill." 
In Oiher words, our life is but an episode in the grand proces 
sion of physical and spiritual changes that ceaselessly accompany 
the planetary evolutions. Such luminous ecstacies as the 
Roman Ovid felt many centuries ago are rivalled by the 
dreams of romantic spirits like Tagore to-day and will, likewise, 
be enj iyed by thousands of spiritual souls yet unbsrn. The 
Fifth dream says " To-day the summer has come at my win 
dow with its sighs and murmurs ; and the bees are playing their 
minstrelsy at the Court of the flowering grove." This gladdens 
the poet s heart and lead; him to sing soma fairy-like love son 
nets and then we reich the 48th Dream one of the most beau 
tiful of all. This grand outburst is a delightful p liljsophical 
and musical prose anthem. It runs as follows : 

DREAM 48. 

"The morning sea of silence broke into ripples of bird songs; and the 
flowers were all merry by the roiiiide ; and the wealth of gold was scatter 
ed through the rift of the clouds while we busily went our way and paid no 
heed! We sang no glad sonjs, nor played ; we went not to the village 
for barter; we spoke not a word nor smiled; we lingered not on the 
way. We quickened oar pace more and more as time sped by. The 
sun rose to the mid sky and doves cooed in the shade. Withered 
leaves danced and whirled in the hot air of noon. The shepherd 
boy drowsed and dream ;d in the shadow of the banyan tree, and I 
laid myself down by the water and stretched my tired limbs on the 
grass. My companions laughed at me in scorn; they held their heads 
high and hurried on; they never looked back nor rested; they vanished 
in the distant blue haze. They crossed many meadows and hills, and pas 
sed through strangd far-away countries. All honour to you, heroic host of 
the interminable path ! Mockery and reproach picked me to rise, but 
found no response in me. I gave myself up for lost in the depth of a glad 
humiliation in the shadow of a dim delight. The response of the sun 
embroidered green gloom slowly spread over my heart. I foigot for what 
I had travelled and I surrendered my mind without struggle to the maze of 
shadows and songs. At last when I woke from my slumber and opened 
my eyes, I saw thee standing by me, flooding my sleep with thy smile. 
How I had feared that the path was long and wearisome and the struggle 
to reach thee hard!" 

Tnere is a magic and witchery in these lovely words which 
must suggest to trie reader all the beautiful pictures that the 
romantic posts have drawn for him with the utmost cunning of 
their art when they wished to describe a holiday in Cithera or 
the entrance of souls to paradise. This subtle dream provokes 
a multitude of dreams, curies us through all the countries we 
have travelled in and read about, while it holds in solution a 
grand philosDp iy. Not only a great expressionist but a great 
mystic penned such lines as these : 

" When in the morning I looked upon the light, I felt in a moment that 
I was no stranger in this world, that the inscrutable without name and 
form had taken me in its arms in the form of my own mother. Even so. 
in death the same unknown will appear as ever known to me. And be 
cause I love this life, I know I shall love death as well. The child cries 
out when from the right breast the mother takes it away, in the veiy next 
moment to find in the left one its consolation," 

Minds that have been drilled by continued interest in common 
place affairs will see little more than a succession of beautiful 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 8. 



words in the above passage. But what a vast sunlit Vista it 
opens up for those who are fortunately able to appreciate the 
spiritual aspects and mysticism of life I The theme of the above 
quotation from the 95111 Dream greatly attracts Tagore. He 
turns to it again and again, and lovingly clothes it with beauti 
ful imagery. Thus he says : 

"The day was when I did not keep myself in readiness for thee ; and 
entering my heart unbidden even as one of the common crowd, unknown 
to me, my king, thou didst press the signet of eternity upon many a fleeting 
moment of my life. And to-day, when by chance I light upon them and 
see thy signature, I find they have lain scattered in the dust, mixed with 
the memory of joys and sorrowsof my trivial days forgotten. Thou didst 
not turn in contempt from my childish play among dust, and the steps that 
I heard in my playroom are the same that are echoing from star to star. 

England has bestowed many benefits upon India and the 
Indian not the least being good instruction in English, the finest 
and most expressive of all languages. It is agreeable to notice 
that one of the first offerings in Indian literature written in our 
beautiful tongue by a Bengali is this wonderful collection of 
prose poems, so full of philosophical truths, so graceful and 
delicate that no English writer to-day could surpass them. The 
spirit of the ages breathes in the 6yd Uream which runs as 
follows : 

DREAM 63. 

" Thou hast made me known to friends whom I knew not. Thou has t 
given me seats in homes not my own. Thou hast brought the dis 
tant near and made a brother of the stranger. I am uneasy at heart when 
I have to leave my accustomed shelter; I forget that there abides the old 
in the new, and that there also thou abidest. Through birth and death, in 
this world or in others, wherever thou leadest me it is thou, the same, the 
one companion of my endless life who ever linkest my heart with bonds of 
joy to the unfamiliar. When one knows thee, then alien there is none, 
then no door is shut. Oh, giant me my prayer that I may never lose the 
bliss of the touch of the one in the play of the many." 

The old abides in the new ; alien is b-jt a relative ter.n ; n th 
ing is strange to the conte nplative in-elect. Man is imnortal ; 
the spirit never dies; time only pisse; and ages; haw then can 
kindred souls marching dow.i the ages together appear as 
strangers ? It is only in moments of forgetfulness, according to 
the poet, when we " lose the bliss of the touch of the one in the 
play of the many," that it is possible for us to be ignorant and 
alien. These thoughts are re-echoed in the 6Qth Dream which 
says: 

DREAM 69. 

" The same stream of life that runs through my veins night and day runs 
through the world and dances in rhythmic measures. It is the same life 
that shoots in joy through the dust of the earth in numberless blades of 
grass and breaks into tumultuous waves of leaves and flowers. It is the 
same life that is rocked in the ocean-cradle of birth and of death, in ebb 
and in flow. I feel my limbs are made glorious by the touch of this world 
of life. And my pride is from the life-throb of ages dancing in my blood 
this moment." 

Throughout the book, Tagore indicates that he is but the 
medium through which the spirit of the ages reaffirms its promises 
and leads us futurewards with the life-throb of the past stirring 
our blood and prompting to higher achievements. Bravely and 
in a clear, majestic voice the poet sings his postlude in this song ? 

DREAM 103. 

In one salutation to thee, my God, let all my senses spread out and 
touch this world at thy feet. Like a rain-cloud of July hung low with its 
burden of unshed showers, let all my mind bend down at thy door in one 
salutation to thee. Let all my songs gather together their diverse strains 
into a single current and flow to a sea of silence in one salutation to thee. 
Like a flock of homesick cranes flying ni ;ht and day back to their moun 
tain nests let all my life take its voyage to its eternal home in one saluta 
tion to thee." 

In sparkling dreams like these, expressed in vivid thought 
provoking phrases, an Oriental poet and philosopher in our 
materialistic days tells us of spiritual things in the simplest and 
most musical English prose and startles us by the brevity, con- 
creteness and powerfulness of his pictures and the profundity of 
his expressions. In a few charmingly selected words he draws 
cameo-like symbol Mosaics that reflect the ages of the past and 
conjure up the aeons of the future, while with a startling sud- 



he 



the rapidi.y of the 



TAGORE, HIS LIFE AND POETRY. 

Rabindranath Tagore, winner of the Nobel Literary Prize, 
has won lasting fame among the Bengali they call this 
Epoch of Rabindranath." 



Rabindranath Tagore, to whom the Nobel prize for > iterature .. h " 
awarded, is known to the Occidental world by only three ; small 
"Gitanjali," " The Gardener," and "The Crescent Moon (MacmilUn). 
These are the Bengali poet s own translations in simple but beauti 
lish prose of the songs that have made him more famous and more popular 
among the millions speaking Bengali than is any poet in h 
erica among his own people to-day. 

But, to quote a distinguished Bengali physician on the native fame that 
was undoubtedly a great factor in winning for Rabindranath Tagore the 
greatest literary prize in the world : " We have other poets, but none that 
are his equal; we call this the epoch of Rabindranath. He is as great in 
music as in poetry, and his songs are sung fcom the west of India into 
Burmah wherever Bengali is spoken. He was already famous at nineteen, 
when he wrote his first novel, and plays written when he was but little older 
are still played in Calcutta. When he was very young he wrote much of 
natural objects, and would sit all day in his garden. From his twenty-fifth 
year or so to his thirty-fifth, when he had a great sorrow, he wrote the 
most beautiful love poetry in our language." 

The following lyrics of love from " The Gardener " will give an idea of 
the music and spirituality of Mr. Tagore s poetry : 

" I hold her hands and press her to my breast. I try to fill my arms 
with her loveliness, to plunder her sweet smile with kisses, to drink her 
dark glances with my eyes. Ah, but where is it ? Who can strain the 
blue from the sky ? I try to grasp the beauty, it eludes me, leaving only 
the body in my hands. Baffled and weary I come back. How can the 
body touch the flower which only the spirit may touch ? " 

" Love, my heart longs day and night for the meeting with you for 
the meeting that is like all-devouring death. Sweep me away like a storm ; 
take everything I have; break open my sleep and plunder my dreams. 
Rob me of my world. In that devastation, in the utter nakedness of spirit, 
let us become one in beauty. Alas for my vain desire ! Where is this hope 
for union except in thee my God ? " 

Rabindranath Tagore, who is now in his fifty-fourth year, was educated 
in a manner to develop his mystic and poetic nature. As a child at home 
books and music were his companions. The father, who was quick to see 
and foster the boy s intellectual qualities, sent him at the age of eleven to 
the Himalayas so that their grandeur might stimulate his soul. When 
seventeen years old he went to Europe, and in London he continued the 
study of English, the rudiments of which he had learned in the schools at 
home. 

Few of those who have read his poetry know that the poet now conducts 
a school in Bengal. " I have a boarding school in India," he said in talking 
about his plans before returning to Bengal in September, "and that is the 
work to which I am going back. It is my principal work. I have nothing 
else to do because I think that this is the only propblem we have the 
educational problem. This boarding school we do not have many of 
them in India is about a hundred miles away from the distractions and 
excitements of Calcutta, in very open country." 

" My father, who was a very famous man in India and very pious, was 
travelling by the place and was attracted to this spot of land, a sort of 
heath, with two very shady old trees. He bought the ground and built a 
bungalow upon it and spent a great deal of his time there in meditation. 

" And in this place associated with his memory I started a school I 
began with five boys, and now have two hundred." 

Mr. Tagore paid a visit to America last year, and when asked what im 
pressed him most he said : "In America, and in England as well I have 
been most impressed by the spirit of social service. It has been an in 
spiration to me, whereas it escapes, perhaps, you who are engaged in it 
But coming from India, as I did, it was the first thing that impressed me 
deeply. I felt it in the atmosphere here. I have met a good many men 
quite simple men men not of very great culture who are intensely taken 
up with this ideal of self-sacrifie for the good of society, and it has been 
a great benefit for me to know them." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 9. 

Royal Birthday Honors. 




the Royal birthday honors announced early in 
June, His Majesty s representative in this Colony, 
Governor Davidson, figured as the recipient of a 
knighthood, and we warmly congratulate Sir 
Walter and Lady Davidson on his advancement 
to a K.C.M.G. Few Governors have come amongst us who 
have earned more the confidence and good will of the people 
than the present occupant of Government House, and the 
pleasure at the announcement will be widespread and very 
sincere. 

Walter Edward Davidson was born at Killybeagh, County 
Down, Ireland in 1859, the son of James Davidson, Esq., and 




Colonial and Indian Exhibition held at South Kensington in 
that year, where he had the good fortune to meet and make the 
acquaintance of many of the leading representatives of the 
Colonies, at that very successful Exhibition. The object of 
Ceylon, at that time just emerging from the industrial calamity 
caused by the sudden failure of the Coffee crops, was to intro 
duce to the world its new industry of Tea-planting. The export 
of tea then was under eight million pounds, while it has now 
reached 192,000,000 Ibs. The plan of the Ceylon authorities 
was to attract visitors to the Ceylon Court by a show of attrac 
tive exhibits in order that tea should bs dispensed at the Tea 
Pavilion adjacent to I he Court. This policy, which was pur 
sued at subsequent Exhibiti -ns, notably at Chicago, Paris and 




SIR WALTER E. DAVIDSON, K.C.M.G. 

after a successful career at Rossall College, entered in 1880, 
while a student at Christ s College, Cambridge, for the competi 
tive examination for Eastern Cadetships and passed second on 
the list, and in December of that year left England to take up 
an appointment in Ceylon. 

Among his companions on the voyage out were two other 
successful candidates bound for the Straits Settlements, both of 
whom have achieved success, Sir Edward Merewether, now 
Governor of Sierra Leone, and Sir Walter Egerton, now Gov 
ernor of British Guiana. 

His first holiday was taken to Calcutta where he had the 
good fortune to turn to good account his physical strength and 
training as an oarsman by stroking a Ceylon Four which won 
the Hoogly Challenge Cup, and in winning the pair-oared race 
also, after a very close contest. In a sporting centre like St. 
John s it may be of interest to know that he continued to row 
and to play football until 1885, despite the tropical climate. 

In 1886 he was nominated as Secretary for Ceylon at the 



I.ADY DAVIDSON. 



St. Louis, was one cf the principal methods by which the atten 
tion of the uorld was secured !o the tea industry of Ceylon. 

During twenty \ears, Mr. Davidson tilled many posls, adminis- 
trauve and judicial, in the Ceylon Civil Service : perhaps the 
most interesting of all being that of Chairman of the Municipal 
Council and Ma) or of Colombo. During his two years of office 
in charge of Colombo, he carried through many important 
improvements, including a new Sanitary service for the disposal 
of night soil, the development of electric tramways into the 
suburbs, which paved the way for the reduction of the over- 
crowi ei areas in the town itself, and the extension of the sys 
tem of elecuic lighting. During part of 1899 anc ^ tne " hole of 
1900,- he was employed as the represent itive of Ceylon at the 
Paris Exposition of 1900, where his aim, under cover of an 
attractive Show, was to aid in the expansion of the tea 
industry and to push the commercial interests of the Colony. 
At this time he was nominated to membership of the Interna 
tional Jury which determined the awards to be given to Exhibi- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 



, 10. 



ors, his special duties relating to sporting equipment. The 
Government of the Republic honoured him with the rosette of 
the Academie and a service of porcelain from the Government 
works at Sevres, in recognition of his co-operation with the 
direction of the Exposition. 

( In returning to Ceylon he was appointed Land Settlement 
Officer in connection with the Governor s scheme for the adjudi 
cation and registration of native titles; but in August, 1901, was 
selected by the Secretary of State to join the temporary admin 
istration of the Transvaal which was being formed by Lord 
Miner after the occupation of Pretoria. 

His connection with the Transvaal continued for two and a 
half years. He was first appointed Assistant Secretary of the 
Administration and subsequently, on the retirement through ill- 
health of Mr. (now Sir George) Fiddes, was appointed to suc 
ceed him as Secretary to the Administration and, on the promul 
gation of the temporary constitution under the Crown Colony 
system of Goverment, was appointed to be the first Colonial 
Secretary. During this eventful period it was the duty of the 
Executive Council, under the Governorship of Lord Milner, to 
reconstruct the civil government of the Transvaal, to enact new 
laws suitable for the altered position of the country, to reconsti 
tute the administration, urban and provincial, to repatriate and 
restore to their holdings the population of Dutch descent, to 
bring into harmony the conflicting elements in the population 
and to prepare the ground for self-government. It was during 
this period that he was honored by having the C.M.G. 
conferred on him. 

In May, 1904, he was appointed Governor of the Seychelles 
Islands where he remained until December 1912, and during 
these eight happy years he aided in the development of the 
resources of those rich and beautiful Islands. The most im 
portant achievement, judged by the material benefits conferred 
on trade, was the settlement of a contract with the directors of 
a Steamship Company, the Messageries Maratimes, to carry 
copra at a minimum scale of freight in return for an augmenta 
tion of the mail subsidy. This assured the staple industry on 
the easiest terms for transportation of any country exporting the 
products of the cocoanut palm.v It was, no doubt, a satisfaction 
to him to have forwarded, as well, the cultivation of Para Pubber 
and the preparation of c nnamon which, with vanilla, will consti 
tute the principal subsidiary products of Seychelles. The ex 
ploitation, also, of the phosphate guano deposits on some of the 
islands has meant steady and remunerative employment for 
labour and a large addition to the revenue. He left, as a 
memento of his administration, apart from pub ic works, a new 
and very beautiful Government House set in exquisite grounds, 
besides a full Treasury, no public debt and light taxation. 

His Excellency has been very fortunate in his married life. 
He married for the first time at an early age in 1882. His wife 
was daughter of Dr. Baber of Thurloe Square, a well known 
physician ; and his son Douglas thanks to the love of letters and 
the instruction imparted by his mother was brilliantly success 
ful as a scholar at Winchester and at Balliol College, Oxford, 
and is now discharging responsible duties in the Board of Edu 
cation ot Whitehall in London. His mother fell a victim to an 
epidemic rife in Pretoria in December 1901, after nineteen years 
of married life. Her memory is commemorated in their old 
Kandyan home by the erection of a Rest House for Wayfarers 
at Ruwanawella, to the cost of which all races, castes and creeds 
contributed ; and her name is venerated throughout the country. 
She was also honoured by the Government nf the French 
Republic, by appointment as officer d Academie, an honour 
rarely bestowed on women. 

Governor Davidson married again in 1907 with equal good 
fortune, a daughter of a distinguished soldier and veteran of 
the Crimea, General the Hon. Sir Percy Feilding, of Broome 
Park, Betchworth in Surrey, and their two little girls (Diana 
and Daphne) are with them now in St. John s. 

In February 1913 Mr. Davidson assumed duties as Governor 
of Newfoundland where it is the chief desire of himself and wife 
to contribute to the welfare of the ancient and loyal Colony. 

This sentiment ellicits the cordial co-operation of the whole 
community and there will be a universal wish on the part of 
Newfoundlanders that the sojourn of Sir Walter and Lady 



:8 4 6, son of the late Principal Roddick, of the 
there and of his wife, whose maiden name was E 
and who was one of the eleven daughters of 
Esq , merchant, of Port de Grave. \ oung Rodd ck aft 
piling his primary education proa Montreal 

medicine and then started in P rac;.ce there He gradually won 
distinction in h s profession and ultimately bee n,,e one 
Lecturers at McGill University and later Lean of the r acuity 
of Medicine, besides h e i, g one of the leading medical men 
attached to the Royal Victoria Hospital. He won fame through 
out Canada and Ins outstanding pre-eminence as a medical man 
enabled him a few years ago to get through the 
Parliament, of which he was then a member, a Bill creating a 




SIR T. I ,. KOl IH. k. K.T. 

Medical Association for the whole of the Dominion, as prior to 
that every Province had its own Board, and medicos with 
diplomas in one Province could not practice in another. At 
the time of the visit of the B.itUh Medical Association to 
Montreal in 1896, he was elected to the Presidency of that 
important scientific body, being the first Overseas Briti>her to 
attain that distinction. In 1904 he contested the St. Antoine 
division of Montreal and was elected over the late Mr. James 
Maclntyre, one of the wealthiest and most popular of Montreal 
citizens. Dr. Roddick s first wife died many years ago. In 
1907 he married Miss Redpath, of Montreal. 

Sir Thomas Roddick was always most kind to Newfound 
landers visiting Montreal, especially those going there for 
medical treatment, and scores in this country have the best 
cause to thank his medical skill and his personal kindness and 
efforts for their restoration to health. There will be a chorus of 
satisfaction throughout the Colony at the honor he has so 
worthily won. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 1 1. 



Another dislinciion that fell to ihe Colony amongst this year s 
birthday honours was the convening of an I.S.I), on Mr. F. C. 
Berteau, Comptroller and Auditor General of this Colony for 
the past sixteen years. 

Francis Cyril Berteau is the eldest son of the late Francis 
Berteau, Stipendiary Magistrate at Twillingate, and was born 
in Burin in 1856, where his father was then in business. He 
was educated at Victoria College, Jersey, and on returning to 
Newfoundland spjnt some years in the Bui in business. After 
this he entered the civil service as a clerk in the Custom House 
on January ist, 1879, so that he has been over thirty-five years 
in the employ of the Crown, lie became successively clerk in 
the Treasury Department in 1880; Co lectoi of Customs on 
Labrador in iSSi; clerk in the Colonial Secretary s office in 
1889 and chief clerk in the same office in 1891 and was appoint- 




task was not an easy one, but called for both patience and tact 
of an unusual kind. In his present position Mr. Berteau has 
won the confidence of the country, which recognizes that in him 
it has an honest and unselfish public official, and which is satis 
fied that in his able hands the work of the department has been 
so capable and efficiently done that the department has paid for 
itself many times over. We wish him many years of good 
fortune in the position he now so admirably fills, 



V. C. BERTEAU, ESQ., J.I ., I.S.O., 
Comptroller and Auditor General fur Newfoundland. 

ed to his present position tf Comptroller and Auditor General 
in 1898 after the pissae of the Act by the Winter-Morine 
Government which reorganized the civil service and created new 
departments by modern methods in substitution for the meffi 
cient ones which previously prevailed. 

Mr Berteiu was also temporarily in charge of the financial 
Secretary s offi :e in .889: of the Br.ard of Works in 1890; 
and of the Savings Bank from the death of the late Mr. W. 
Payn in June 1910, un il the appointment of Hon. Mr. Watson 
in September, 1013. In .898 Mr. Berteau was com mssioned 
by the Government of the day to proceed to Ottawa to inquire 
into the Canadian finincial system, with a view to applying 
to Newfoundland; and on his return re-modelled our system, 
which with a few changes made-necessary by altered conditions, 
has been working most satisfactorily up to the present time. A* 
the Colony s first Auditor General the work of organizing that 
department and applying, the principles of a modern audit 
all the other department, devolved on Mr. Berteau, and thos 
who remember the old regime will easily appreciate that the 



The Loss of the "Empress of Ireland" 



By J. G. Higgins. 



< ) 



DEATH J Thy dreaded deeds show forth 

In many an awful form : 
Thou comest in the tempest, 

Thou comest in the storm. 
But Ahl how terrible thou wert, 

When on the treacherous sea 
In the dim vastness of the night 

The two met silently J 

One was of a noble mould, 

For the matchless skill and art. 
Born of the brains of centuries, 

Fashioned her every part. 
Hers were toe stately halls and aisl-es 

A fair palatial home; 
And like a glorious thing of pride 

She rode across the foam. 

And one was of a smaller bulk, 

But a. stauncher ship was she. 
She was not made a floating town 

To roam upon the sea. 
She was no palace of airy rooms, 

Nor a geldeo cargo bore, 
But hers was the build of a thing oi sirengtk 

To carry the heavy ore. 

The shades of (darkness ,<Srape the ky 

And a mist hangs o er the sea, 
Whew liiae two thieves at dead of night 

They <zeep >on silently. 
And nearer, nearer, nearer, 

They oome, util at last 
They meet with a sudden sickening shook 

And the whole world stands aghast J 
The ooean makes no mourning moan, 

But a thousand to rest have passed J 



Years Ago* 

Robert Gear MacDonald. 



I could mot faope the -days wuuld bring 
Some wondrous thing to .me, 

How could I smile, how .could I sing 
Of blithesome could I be ? 

All joy seemed dead, tke weary years 
Behind, befone me, Lay; j 

For Lov had turned her face &n tears 
From me for many a day- 

Vet Hope an dreams carae near to bless : 

And, special sign of grace, 
Rebuked despair and weariness, 

And showed jne, sweet, thy face. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 12. 

What Newfoundland Offers to Investors. 




Special Statement by the Prime Minister of 

VERY time I come to England I am asked the 
question, What have you in Newfoundland for 
investors? In other words, what are the induce 
ments in Newfoundland for people in England 
to go out and invest their money in that country 
with a reasonable promise of a good return. My 
invariable answer is : We have the finest fisheries in the world 
from cod, lobster, herring, and salmon to seal and whale, which 
have been profitably worked for two hundred years and which 
are capable of infinite development. We have forests of the 
finest spruce and pine limber for paper pulp and lumber. We 
have copper, coal, iron pyrites, lead and silver, gold, iron ore. 
petroleum, asbestos, marble, slate and oil-bearing shale. Go 
and see for yourselves ; send reliable experts, and you will 
quickly learn whether the country affords inducements for 
investors. To give some idea of the rate at which Newfound 
land is advancing, it will be sufficient to slate that the total 
imports into the country in 1904 amounted to $9,000,000 (I am 
quoting round figures) ; in 1913, 16,000,000. The exports in 
1904 were $10,000,000 ; and in 1913, $14,000,000. In other 
words, the total trade has risen from $19,000,000 in 1904, to 
$31,000,000 in 1913. Take, for instance, the export of iron 
ore. In 1904 we exported 500000 tons; in 1913 we exported 

i 2 43,000 tons. In 19 10 
we exported $421,000 
worth of paper and pulp, 
an l i,i 1913. $2,500,000 
worth of paper and 
pulp, and for the Instsix 
months we have export 
ed nearly $2,000,000 
worth of p.ipsr and 
Pulp- 
Newfoundland is just 
beginning to attract at 
tention to its great min 
eral deposits. The coal 
areas in the centr.il por 
tion of the Island, situ 
ate on (he West Coast 
of St. George s Bay, as 
well as the gre it paper 
mills at Grand Falls 
and the Albert E. R^ed 
Company s paper mills 
at Bishop s Falls will be 
examined this year by 
Professor Dunstin, of 
the Imperial Institute, 
South Kensington. 
Newfoundland now im 
ports nearly 200,000 
tons of coals from 

Cape Breton valued at about $1,250,000, and the needs 
of these large paper concerns will represent another prob 
able 50,000 tons, swelling the value of the coal imported into 
the country to nearly $1,500,000 annually. Could our coal 
seams be developed commercially in the island it would mean - 
the retention of this large amount amongst us every year, which 
now is being exported, and would likewise employ a consider 
able force of operators. There is no question about the presence 
of coal in the country, as several very large seams have been 
exposed and have been reported on favourably from time to 
time by the official Geological Surveyors of the Colony, Mr. 
Murray and How ey, as well as by many independent investi 
gators, who have come from abroad. The island possesses 
varied mineral resources, but for centuries our people have 
been fishermen before anything else, and the only mines that 
have been developed exist on the seaboard and have been found 
as the result of accident rather than of intelligent investigation. 




RT. HOX. SIR E. P. MORRIS, K.C.M.G., 
IVime Minister of Newfoundland. 



Newfoundland in " The Britannic Review." 

For instance, the iron ore deposits of Bell Island, in Concep 
tion Bay, about twelve miles from St. John s from which the 
Dominion Iron and Steel Company and the Nova Scotia Stee 
Company obtain the supply of the large amount of raw material 
for the smelteries at Sydney, as well as the very large quantity 
which they export to Germany, were discovered by a piece of 
ore used to ballast a boat having fallen into the hands of a 
geologist, and now more than one and a half million tons of 
this ore are mined every year, on "which the owners claim they 
can make a very hanesome profit per ton by its ordinary sale, 
not to mention the profit made by them in its manufacture. 
Splendid copper deposits are found all over Newfoundland, but 
their lack of development is due to the fact that the owners 
have not the means of opening up their properties. The Anglo- 
Newfoundland Development Company, who own the paper 
mills at Grand Falls, some few years ago came upon what pro 
mised to be a very excellent mine, through one of their survey 
ors picking up a piece of ore-bearing rock in the lumber woods. 
The locality proved to contain a complex ore body consisting 
of lead, silver, and covered with a little gold. T iey sunk a 
shaft on it for 300 feet, and found a bed of ore ni e fset wide, 
with a mineral line in lenses. As they were hurryi g uvtrr their 
construction at Grand Falls they have suspended ope atio.is for 
the time being. 

Then again, a very wonderful developme .t must inevitably 
take place in relation to our peat areas, which up to the present 
time have been overlooked. The inland has a great many of 
these peat bo-s, and in every place where they have been used 
for fuel the most sat sfactory results have betn achieved : but 
there has been no lirge u iTzaiion of them for this purpose, 
largely due to the fact that our people are unacquainted with 
the methods ot preparing the material for suchu-e. Four years 
ago the Government imported seveial expert peat-cutters, to 
give instruction in this wo k in the sections where they can 
operate to ths best advantage. In every case these experts re 
ported favourably on the peat. Go d^ silver pyiites, nickel, 
asbestos, mica, and other minera s of recognised commercial 
availability exist in many places in Newfoundland, but our 
difficulty hitherto has been to attract outside capital to the 
islar.d. There are splendid opportunities for the British. Ameri 
can, Canadian, and other investors in Newfoundland, and I 
trust that the present attention which Newfoundland is receiv 
ing from this class of investor wi l produce such results as will 
enlarge the area of its work. If one quarter of the money that 
has been spent in -wild-cat schemes we e to be appli d to legiti 
mate mining development in Newfoundland, a much better 
result would accrue to the investors. It is impossible to suppose 
that the iron ore deposi s of Bell Island are the only ones of 
their kind that exist. There must be equally large; deposits in 
that part of Conception Bay only awaiting discovery by some 
fortunate prospector, and when that time arrives there will be 
an area uncovered more profitable than any given area in 
Klondyke or Cobalt, because the leading scientists have deter 
mined that the Bell Island properties contain an inexhaustible 
supply of ore, the bodies extending under the bed of the sea for 
many miles and at a depth to warrant safe submarine working 
I have myself been out in the company s train over a distance 
of three miles under the waters of Conception Bay and have 
gone through the great subterranean caves on the line of rail 
excavated by them for the ores which are now making the ted 
rails wh,ch span the Continent from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
Then as regards our agricultural capabilities there is 

! en : ! S ;u an l> et n thi "? is h -rd of them. wT ^ ^ 



(Continued on page 21.) 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 13. 

.* "Drawing the Port." 



By M. 




jMONGST our many \vinterpastimesCurlinghas 
taken a foremost place. During the past tew 
years new life has come into the game, and now 
nearlv two hundred enthusiasts " soop it up. 1 
It is a game in which boyishness of spirit pre 
dominates, where one can get away from the cares and worries 
of the day and forget awhile the conventional lines that separate 
man from man in the struggle for existence. Here the true 
man is revealed, for Curling brings to light those characteristics 
which govern the every day life of the individual. Here the 
truest sportsmanship is displayed. In an age where we are 
occasionally prone to minimize the merit of our opponents play, 
and where, sometimes, if we do not approve of questionable 
methods being used to .win games, are yet not unwilling to profit 



our own Club and we have not had many opportunities to compare 
our curling with that of the outside world. Some time ago, two 
rinks, comprising the late J. C. Strang, John Syme, Thomas 
Winter and others, attended a Bonspiel at Montreal, and made 
a very creditable showing. Last winter an invitation was 
received from the Halifax Curling Clubs to attend a Bonspiel 
they were holding, covering the Maritime Provinces and New 
foundland. Three rinks were made up, including such well- 
known curlers as John Jackson, W. H. Duder, W. Shirran and 
A Salter, who, as the energetic Secretary of the local Associa 
tion, has been the greatest force in making a success of the 
game we have ever had. The party, accompanied by represen 
tatives of the press and municipality, in the persons of Messrs. 
Herder and Slattery, left by the express on Wednesday, Febru 
ary 6th. being given a grand send off by President Carter and 
other members, the genial " Abbie " informing them on the flute 
that we would not " be home till the 
morning." Our orchestra was further 
supplemented by an organ ably pre 
sided over by Fred. Chesman, while 
the choral singers included all the 
players. Those who could not take 
the highest or lowest notes, chipped in 
as the range of their registers permit 
ted. During the trip across country 
games were indulged in, and in order 
that curling might not be altogether 
forgotten, terms familiar to that sport 
such as " draw," "raise," and "bor 
row " were frequently used. 

Crossing by the Bruce, we arrived 
at North Sydney on Friday evening. 
Two rinks skipped by H. Duder and 
A. H. Salter played two of the strong- . 
est North Sydney rinks, the result 
being a draw. This was the first 
game played against outside teams, 
and we felt well pleased with the re 
sult, as the boys had curled with the 
North Sydney stones and on unfami 
liar ice. 

We reached Halifax on Saturday 
morning, and while the thermometer 
A. II. Salter, W. Shirran, F. V. Chesman, W. J. Herder, F. Rendell, Dr. Knight, H. J. Duder. T. J. Duley, wag going up our hearts were falling 
}. L. Slattery, AY. H. Duder, John Jackson (the oldest curler), A. Montgomerie, E. MacNab. to zero Rain na( j succeec jed snow 

the weather was very mild, and a more 
hardly 




Photo by P. M. Duff. 

NEWFOUNDLAND 



CURLERS AND FRIENDS ON THEIR WAY TO HALIFAX. 



by the use of such methods, it is refreshing to have a sport in 
which absolute fairness governs the issue and in which the Skip 
of the rink, whose chances of winning have been shattered by a 
well directed stone of his opponent, can say with all heartiness 
" Well played sir. A nice shot." 

As a healthful recreation it appeals specially to those whose 
day of strenuous athletics is over. It requires skill of hand and 
eye of a high order to become a good curler, while, to be a 
successful skip, one must combine excellence of play with keen 
ness of judgment, knowledge of men, and abundance of nerve 
and courage. 

Considerable interest has been aroused in the game univers 
ally by the interchange of visits between rinks representing the 
pioneer body in Scotland and the Canadian Associations. A 
massive trophy was presented for competition by the late Lord 
Strathcona, and few years ago a team of six rinks, captained by 
the late Hon. D. C. Fraser, then Lt. Governor of Nova Scotia, 
went to Scotland and captured the cup. Early in the season 
of 1911-12 the Scotchmen sent a team to Canada, but did not 
succeed in winning. During the coming winter arrangements 
are being made whereby six Canadian rinks are going over to 
Scotland to test their strength. 

In Newfoundland our playing is restricted almost altogether to 



miserable prospect for curling could hardly be imagined. On 
Monday morning, however, the wind had changed and exceed 
ingly cold weather was experienced, the temperature during most 
of the week being well below zero. We played several matches 
wiih the glass at one below zero in the rink. The head quarters 
of most of the visiting teams was the Halifax Hotel, where we 
stopped, and there we met a splendid and representative crowd 
of curlers. The arrangements for carrying on the Bonspiel 
were almost perfect. All we had to do was to be at the special 
rinks we were playing at, at the time ordered, and everything 
was in readiness. As there were over fifty rinks competing, 
representing two hundred different pairs of stones, it was no 
small task to have all the stones at the right place at the right 
time. The Bonspiel was played at three rinks. The new rink 
of the Mayflower Club, situated in the north end of the city, is a 
fine building covering five sheets of ice divided by board parti 
tions like our own. They have fine quarters, and above the 
rinks are three bowling alleys used when there is no curling. 
The Halifax Club building is in the south end of the city and 
covers four sheets of ice, not divided by partitions. The third 
rink, called the Middle Rink, had been used for skating and was 
improvised for the occasion. The ice and lighting here were 
very poor and interfered somewhat with the curling. Our 
players were also bothered by the absence of partitions between 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 14. 



the different sheets. Owing to the extremely frosty weather it 
was difficult to keep the ice in good condition. There were 
four competitions, all conducted on the single rink knockout 
principle, so that all rinks defeated in the first round were elimi 
nated. While not successful in winning any of the trophies 
which could only fall to four out of fifty rinks, our rinks made a 
splendid showing, and, considering the conditions, compared 
very favourably with any of the rinks there. The work was 
very strenuous we having to play almost continuously from 9 a.m. 
to ii p.m. each day. Some of the visiting rinks lost all their 
games in the first round. We were more fortunate, one rink 
winning all four games, another three, and the third tivo. Our 
three rinks played a total of twenty-three games, winning eleven. 
To show how we compared with the Maritime, rinks it will 
be sufficient to give a short analysis of some of the play. 
of our rinks defeated Grant, the strongest skip of the May 
flowers of Halifax. Grant won his way to the semi-finals in 
another competition, and in yet another defeated Carroll of 
Pictou by a large margin. Carroll had one of the strongest 
rinks, being in the finals of the Twentieth Century Cup, which 
he lost only by a point or two. We also eliminated Kerr of 
the Halifax Club, who in another competition won his way to 
the semi-finals. In the second round one rink tied with Ford 
of Sackville and lost by one point in the play-off. Ford defeat 
ed Torey of New Glasgow, whose rink won one of the trophies. 
The grand aggregate prize and one of the trophies were won 
by Semple of Truro, who was the most successful skip in the 



competition. One of our rinks played against him, losing on!) 

by four or five points. The Twentieth Century Cup was wo 

by a Halifax Rink, skipped by Prof. Murray MacNe.l 

born here, being a son of the late Rev. L. G. MacNeil, an o d 

time Newfoundland Curler. Our curlers were impressed th 

the keenness displayed by the Maritime rinks 

variably used the broom in giving directions ; the playen 

first stone up endeavoured to make every shot count, while 

sweeping was given special attention. 

Returing home a stop was made at Sydney where we : were 
royally entertained. A three rink match skipped by U . H. 
Duder, H. Uuder and F. Chesman resulted in a win f 
.Newfoundlanders by about 12 points. The Sydney curlers are 
amongst the best in the Province, Turnbull s rink being second 
in the grand aggregate at the Bonspiel. 

The trip was both pleasant and beneficial, and good results 
should spring from it as Mr. Salter obtained a great deal of in 
formation with regard to ice making and other points which will 
be of value. At the same time it was gratifying to find that our 
local curlers averaged well up with the exponents of the game 
abroad. 

The personnel of the Newfoundland rinks was as follows: 

Dr. Knight, F. Rendell. M. Duff, 

W. Shirran, A. H. Salter, T. J. Duley. 

H. J. Duder, I MacNab, I . V. Chesman, 

W. H. Duder, skip. J. Jackson, skip. A. Montgomerie, skip. 




Photo bv S. H. Parsons & Sons. 



Members and Officials of House of Assembly, J9J4. 

Back Row-R. Jennings, J. T. Stone, A. Targett, W. F. Lloyd, D.C.L J \ Qift K C r K 



- W. J. Walsh, 
Front Row-W Griffin (Page), Robt. Walsh (Sergeant-at-Arms), H. Y Mott (Clerk) Rt 

. Prime Minister), Hon. J. R. Goodfson (Speaker/, Hon. J. R^enn tt\Co oSlSe refanT Ho^""! P ^ ^ 
and Customs), P. K. Devine (Assistant Clerk), E. Chafe (Page) 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 15. 

In Memoriam of the Late C* S* Pinsent 




By H. W. 

|i N the first day of last April, a well known and 
much respected citizen Mr. C. S. Pinsent was 
suddenly called away from this world, in his 
seventy-third year. He had been ailing for some 
time, and was sufficiently recovered to resume 
his customary avocations ; but he overestimated 
his strength, and on his way to attend the Installation Ceremony 
of Whiteway Lodge, A. F. and A. M., he was suddenly stricken 
at the door of the Hall and immediately passed away. 

Mr, Pinsent belonged to that rapidly disappearing school of 
which old world courtliness is the great characteristic, and in 
Masonic circles he held prominent positions, being at the time 
of his death Past Deputy District Grand Master R. F.. He was 
the oldest Past Master, and the oldest member of St. John s 
Lodge No. 579, into which he was initiated a Mason in 1863. 
Eight years later he became its Worshipful Master, and held 
the office for two years. Later on, when Sir. W. V. Whiteway 
succeeded Mr. J. S. Clift as Grand Master of the District Grand 
Lodge, Mr. Pinsent became his Deputy, and after Sir William s 




THE LATE C. S. PINSENT. 

death he acted as District Grand Master until the appointment 
of the present incumbent of the office Mr. J. A. 
Pinsent was specially honored when the Diamond Jubilee 
St John s Lodge was celebrated. Shortly after his retirement 
from office he was presented by the Grand Lodge with a hand 
some piece of gold plate suitably engraved as a token 
great appreciation by the craft of the services he had willingly 
and cheerfully rendered to Masonary. In December of last 
year he celebrated his Masonic Jubilee, and in the evening k 
John s Lodge met and presented him with an illuminated addres 
on silk To quote a prominent Mason-" He was much 
beloved by his Masonic Brethern, his gentle kindness 
counsel, and true brotherliness were at once a pleasure and 



nfe, Mr. Pinsent joined the staff of the Union Bank 
and was its Manager when the Bank closed in 1894. . He was 
held in such esteem by the Liquidators that his .services were 
retained throughout the long years of liquidation. He was 



LeMessurier. 

appointed Usher of the Black Rod in the Legislative Council 
in 1898, a position which he filled with dignity and courtesy. 
In church circles he was quite prominent, and occupied the 
position of Lay Secretary of the Synod. He also was Secretary 
and Treasurer of the Directorate of Bishop Feild College, and 
performed the duties of his office in that methodical and genial 
way that was characteristic of him. A thorough Christian and 
a loyal churchman he was always ready and willing to help in 
the lay work of the Church. 

Mr. Pinsent was the son of R. J. Pinsent, Esq., for some time 
Judge of the Labrador Court. His brother, Sir Robert J. 
Pinsent. Knight, was for some years Puisne Judge of the 
Supreme Court, and was the eldest of the family. Mr. 
Pinsent, on his mother s side, comes from one of the oldest 
and most distinguished families of the colony. The present 
generation knows but little of the past, and families, like the one 
referred to, are unknown to them. The mother of Mr. Pinsent 
was the daughter of Mr. Thomas Williams, who died in St. 
John s in 1851 at the age of eighty-one, he and his brother 
John carried on a mercantile business here and were prominent 
personages. Mr. Thomas Williams was Captain of the Rangers 
Company, a volunteer force raised here in 1806. The Williams 
came from Monmouthshire and were well known county person 
ages. George Williams of Silverdale, Swansea, married the 
sister of the celebrated Dr. Butler, the author of Hudibras. 
Visitors to London may see Dr. Butler s tomb in St.- Pauls 
Church, Convent Garden. Mr. George Williams had three sons 
and one daughter. John died single and bequeathed his estate 
near Monmouth to a Monastery. Griffith served as a Colonel 
of the Royal Artillery under General Burgoyne in the American 
Revolution, he subsequently came to Newfoundland and, after 
wards removing to Woolwich died there. George married 
Mary Monier ist June 1762, settled in Newfoundland, was 
appointed Magistrate and died in 1803 at the age of seventy- 
five. The only daughter, Emma, married a Mr. Sutherland. 
Mr. George Williams and Mary Monier, his wife, had a large 
family. John was associated with his brother Thomas (the 
father of Mrs. R. J. Pinsent) in a merchantile business in this 
city. George, who was born in Newfoundland,, served under 
General Burgoyne, at Saratoga, during the American Revolution 
Henry was a Lieutenant of the Royal Navy and served at Tra 
falgar, and also served in Command on this station. He died 
single. Thomas already alluded to as the father of Mrs. R. 
Pinsent married Mary Spurrier Broom, a daughter of 
John Broom, some time -a. Surrogate in Newfoundland.. Monier 
married Anna Brown and beame Surveyor General of Bombay, 
they were the parents of Sir Monier Williams, the great Indian 
Sanscrit scholar. Mary Williams married George Hutchings, 
the grandfather of Mr. George A. Hutchings. Hannah married 
General Bethune R.A., and the youngest daughter Anna, in 
1801, married Col. Thos. Skinner R.E. who died in St. John s, 
a tablet to his memory may be seen in St. Thomas s Church 
near the north porch. Mr. Thomas Williams family consisted 
of four daughters Marianna.- Julia, Louisa Brown, and Caroline 
Brown. Marianna married Captain R. Vicars, R.E., who was 
then servisg on this station, they were the parents of Captain 
Hedley Vicars, known as the godly soldier, because of his great 
piety, and grand-parents of Lord Rayleigh. Julia married the 
Revd. Chas. Blackman, for some time Rector of St Thomas s 
Church, she died at Tronfield, Wiltshire, in 1872. Louisa 
Brown, the mother of the late Mr. C. i. Pinsent, married Robert 
John Pinsent. The youngest daughter, Caroline Brown became 
the first wife of the late W 7 . F.. Rennie and was the grand 
mother of the Hon. E. R. Bowring. 

This is the genealogy of one of our oldest familes, 
the subject of this memoir was a worthy descendent; it is an 
interesting record of the past and could be amplified with remi- 
nisences of its various members if time and space permitted. 

Mr Pinsenfs widow is a daughter of the late Earl Brown, of Harbo 
Grace. One son, Mr. Earl S. Pinsent, Barrister, and two daug 
Birch by and XILss Frances survive him. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 16. 

Bone of Our Bone "-The Newfoundland Appeal. 




By Traveller, in the " London 

IK, Newfoundland, oldest, hardest, and most 
English of our Colonies, is in the sorrow that 

o 

passes thought, and is appealing- to us for aid. 

The story of that tragedy of the Newfoundland 
sealers in all its circumstances of anguish al 
most like that end of Captain Scott and his four magnified into 
hundreds of human fates must have moved every heart. It is 
still more moving to those who have visited Newfoundland and 
felt that strange thrill of the Englishman travelling in America 
when his ship steers in, between gaunt headlands and growling 
rocks, to that bird-head shaped harbour and he comes to St. 
John s, most stubbornly English of all little cities of the Empire, 
and is greeted by those simple people with the accent of his 
homeland. 

Nothing else in American travel leaves that abiding memory. 
Not here has the ocean distance worked alchemy upon far kins 
men and changed manner and speech. The very latitude of 
Newfoundland, jutting easternmost of America, fosters delusion 
that here is a limb of our own west country drifted, with its 
pleasant people, over the Atlantic. And the west country in 
deed colonised Newfoundland and sowed in its blood the hard 
courage of the Elizabethans. 

The Newfoundlander leads what is perhaps the stoutest and 
most virile of all lives in the world. He is a farmer whose farm 
is the sea, the fog-bank, and the ice-floe ; whose harvest is in 
the teeth of the sub-Arctic winter ; whose plough is a cockleshell 
driven by the blizzard. There are thousands to-day warm in 
England in the pelts that have been gathered by those very men 
who are now dead with a fate whose rigours surpass all our 
metaphors of the coldness of the king of terrors. 

All who know those kind, brave people and their welcome to 
their great Island of lashed coasts and infinities of spruce forest, 
who know the hardness, narrowness, and self-reliance of the 
Newfoundlander s life, his love and long loyalty to his Mother 
land, are touched by this appeal far his stricken and helpless 
ones more than by any cry of our times. Newfoundland has 
asked little of us in all the long centuries of her faithfulness. 
And there was a time when we treated her none too well. This 
is our chance in great pity and sympathy to wipe out that 
fading memory. 

TRAVELLER. 

-fome They Brought Our Brothers 
Dead! 

Garb d in the armor of Labour, 

Sacred to all you lie 
Your beautiful, manly faces 

Blanch d neath the Arctic sky " 

Sons of our pioneer settlers, 

You re worthy of your sires! 
Men who first brav d our tempests, 

And kindled our earliests fires L 

Then why dwell on your prowess, 

In an hour when the setting sun 
Was drap d in a hell of darkness, 

And the struggle with Death begun 1 



Daily Mail," April 9th. 

God ! And they sang their dirges * 
As out to their doom they steer d ! 

Now ? we gaze on their up-turn d faces- 
Silent, and sad and seared ! 

Seared ? From the breath of the Ice King 

U hile the scarlet sun hung low, 
He seal d your lips for ever 

In a shroud of the Arctic snow ! 

The light of those eyes had darken d, 
While stars they saw not, shone 

The throb of each heart was silenc d 
On the ice-floe bleak and lone ! 

Thro hair a mother had wreathed, 

The Borean King had hiss d ! 
The brow she had held so tender 

Is sear d with the cruel mist ! 

The forest of spruce and alder 
Will ring with their axe no more ; 

Their voices were hush d forever 

Mid the bergs of their native shore . 

****** 

There s a void in each quiet village 
By each hearth there s an empty place 

And the children who ran to geeat them 
Will sigh for each pleasant face ! 

The heart of the great world s throbbing, 

And sends us its solace best; 
While each thought of the Empire s tuning 

To the stricken " Isle of the West 1" 

But you ll rest in your quiet graveyards 
With your lov d to mourn your loss ; 

While the ocean the mystic ocean 
Holds those of the Southern Cross. 

*It is the custom for the sealers to sing a cheer and the syrens to scream 
when leaving for the ice-fields. 



St. John s, May. > i 



E. C. 



At Anchor, 

By William Hamilton Hayne. 

MY love was like a buoyant boat, 
O er sunny waves at sea ; 

And, in the voyage of my heart. 
She sailed away from me. 

I followed in her flying wake ; 

The waves grew strong and fleet ; 
I passed by shoals of circumstance, 

And quicksands of defeat. 

But little winds of coquetry 
Still kept our lives apart, 

Till, in my cruise of love, I reached 
The harbor of her heart. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 17. 

The Knights of Columbus* 




HE Order of the Knights of Columbus was 
estalished in New Haven, ( miiiecticut. under a 
charter from the General Assembly of that State 
in the year 1882. The objects of the institution 
of the Order were : to \ender pecuniary aid to its 
members, to effect which its plan of insurance was established, 
its sick benefit, &c. ; to give assistance to sick and disabled 
brothers and to promote s ci.il and intellectual intercourse 
among its members. 

The ( >rder was of slow grovv.h in its early years, but since its 
cmsti uti n and riliral received the approbation of Cardinal 
Gibbons it increased in numbers rapidly and now has a member 
ship of 318 124, composed of 214,202 associate and 103,922 
insurance members. It conducts its insurance on the step late 
pi in, that by which a member pays a small monthly premium 
until he attains the age of 60, when it greatly increases. It is 
absolutely safe and is under most careful management. 




CHARLES O NKri.L CONKOY. ESQ., K.C., 
Territorial Deputy. 

Butitisnotin mu u;l helpto iti members that the Order 
has become such a powerful fac- or in the Cuholic life of ihe 
United States and dnad., but through its v.ide activities i-i the 
cause of Catholic education. Recently its gift of $500,000 to 
Washington University as finalized and there soon will be 
forty graduates annually receiving an education at that Insti 
tion in the higher branches of learning as a direct outcome 
this benefaction. Another notable achievement is the course c 
lectures against socialism which Bros. Goldstein, a former sons 
1st and Collins are now delivering in the chief centres of popu 
lation and socialism in the United States and Canada. 
prevents a reference to the many other ways in which the ( 
has manifested its willingness to act as the right arm c 
Church. 




C. P. EAGAN, ESQ., 
Grand Knight, Terra Nova Council, 1452. 

The Knights of Columbus is governed by a Supreme Council 
and a Board of Directors. Each subordinate Council sends 
delegates to a state convention, which in turn elects representa 
tives to attend the Supreme Convention, held on the first 




CHAS. T. ELLIS, ESQ., 
Deputy Grand Knight. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 18. 





1 . I. SUMMERS, KS.).. i: I 
Chancellor. 

Tuesday in August yearly in a different city. This year the 
Convention will meet at St. Paul, last year it assembled at 
Boston. 

Where a state or province does not contain at least three 
councils it is erected into a territory. This is Newfoundland s 
case, where but two councils exist: Terra Nova at St. John s, 



C. J. CAHILU ESi.).. I! I... 
Financial Secretary. 

and Dalton at Harbor Grace. When the Order was instituted 
in this country, in December. 1909, it was tacked on to the 
Maritime Provinces, but wi hin the past few months Newfound 
land was made a separate territorial jurisdiction and Mr. Chas. 
O Neill Conroy, a past Grand Knight and an ardent member of 
Terra Nova Council was appointed by the Supreme Knight, 





V. P. BURKE, ESi.).. M.A., 1 1 l>, < I r 
Lecture v. 



KT. KEY. MONSIGNOR KOC1IK, V.G 
Chaplain. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 19. 



Territorial Deputy. Mr. Conroy will attend the Supreme Con 
vention annually and will make a fitting and worthy representa 
tive of the Knights of Newfoundland. 

Within the past two months some distinguished honors have 
been conferred on two of the officers of Terra Nova Council. 
The Chiplain, Rt. Rev. Monsk tiur Roche, was elevated by 
Pope Pius X. to the position of a Domestic Prelate, and Mr. V. P. 
Burke was the recipient of the degree of Master of Arts honoris 
causa from St. Francis Xavier I Diversity, and of the degree of 
Doctor of Laws de merito from the University of Ottawa. Dr. 
Burke also received the Papal Decoration of the Cross of 
Leo XIII. from the present Pontiff as a recognition of his work 
in the cause of Catholic education. The Council marked the 



occasion by a suitable presentation to both members. 

As one of the first duties of every council is to make a per 
manent home for itself, the energies of the Newfoundland 
councils have been mainly directed to that object, since their 
charters were granted. The St. John s Knights have spent 
about $35,000 in altering and making into beautiful club rooms 
and council chamber the building formerly used as a clothing 
factory on Duckworth Street. The order in this country is 
greatly indebted to its charter members and notably among these 
to the Rev. Dr. VVhelan and Mr. M. A. O Brien of Dalton 
Council and Messrs. John Barron, the first Grand Knight, Chas. 
O Neill Conroy and C. P. Eagan, of Terra Nova Council. The 
combined membership of both councils is now about 450. 



The Drift of the "Karluk/ 




Captain Robert Bartlett, of Brigus, left for 
the Arctic seas last year, his friends knew that 
he would make discoveries that would increase 
his reputation. But few anticipated he would 
become so fortunate as events have proved. 
Captain Bartleit sailed from Seattle in an old 
whaling ship, the Karluk, as commander and second in com 
mand of the Stefansson Expedition. Th : s expedition was sent 
out into i he Arctic by the Canadian Government with the object 
of bringing all the Arctic Islands north of America under the 




CAPTAIN ROBERT BARTLETT. 

British flag and to make closer investigations of the blonde 
Eskimo in the Mackenzie River district, which Stefan-sjn had 
discovertd during a previous visit to that locality. It is Capt. 
Bartlett s first voyage to that part of the northern seas and he 
had strange ice-cond : tions to contend with. After the arrival of 
the Karluk and the accompanying schooners. Stefansson, the 
leader of the expediiion, went ashore at Fort McPherson to 
investigate the basin of the Mackenzie River. Captain Bartlett 
was lelt in charge of the ships. On September 20, 1913, while 
the Karluk was fifteen miles off the mouth of the Colville River, 
and west of Flaxman I-land, a ,-trong easterly wind sprang up 
and drove the ice around the ship. When the gile subsided, 
there was no open water and the vessel was carried away west 



wards by the currents. On September 25 and 26 fresh easterly 
gales and snowstorms were experienced and ice conditions be 
came worse. The currents carried the ice-pack and imprisoned 
ship at a good sailing speed. 

On New Year s Eve, 1913, the ice-pack carried the Karluk 
to a point about 60 miles north by east of Herald Island, near 
Wrangel Land, off the Siberian coast. Early in the morning 
of January 10 the ice began to squeeze the vessel. Later in 
the day her decks began to open, water poured into her engine 
room, and it could be seen that she was a doomed ves 
sel. Captain Bartlett ordered his crew to save all the pro 
visions and instruments and build a camp on the icefield. The 
Kailuk sank in deep water on the following djy, Januiry nth. 
Two camps were then built on the ice and on January 2oth, 
when the light improved, Captain Bartlett sent his first and 
second officers eastwards to find a new camp site on Herald 
Island, or Wrangle Land, where good game is obtainable. At 
the end of the month, Capt. Bartlett led his party to Herald 
Island where he established a cache and then went to Wrangel 
Land where a permanent camp was established. Realizing 
the necessity of communicating with the Canadian Government 
as soon as possible the Captain left for the Siberian coast on 
February 18. He travelled by dog sleds over the ice, accom 
panied by several Eskimo and a sailor named Perry. He landed 
in Siberia at a point about 50 miles west of Cape North and 
then followed (he coast eastwards to East Cape where the 
Russian trader, Baron Kleist, was met. Captain Bartlett was 
well received by the Russian s and was escorted to Emma 
Harbour where the American whaler Herman was anchored. 
Captain Peterson of the Herman got up steam and took Capt. 
Bartlett to St. Michaels, Alaska, where he arrived on May 3ist. 

Captain Bartlett has gathered more glory than the leader of 
the Expedition and there is no doubt that his name will now be 
inscribed on the grand roll of Arctic discoverers. 

The great value of the drift of the Karhtk arises from the 
fact that the course taken by that vessel is in line with that 
taken by the American ship Jenette from Wrangel Land to the 
North Cape in 1881 and Nansen s Fram from the North Cape 
t) Spitzbergen in 1893. The drifting of these ships indicates 
that there is a strong current running along the Alaskan and 
Siberian coasts and this could only be possibe by the existence 
of an Arctic Continent. Although Dr. Cook and Admiral Peary 
have claimed to have visited the North Pole and reported hav 
ing met with no land, but vast sheets of sea ice, everything has 
long pointed to the existence of a vast Arctic Continent. Both 
Stefansson and McMillan wintered in the north last year and 
intended visiting the fringe of this continent. Both will soon 
be heard from and we will, doubtless, learn some interesting 
details. Early next year the Norwegian Explorer Amundson 
will leave Alaska for the North Pole and will clear up all its 
mysteries. But Newfoundlanders are pleased to know that one 
of their distinguished sailors has made one of the most 
important discoveries relating to the Arctic continental areas, 
and done some ice travelling, which when full accounts are 
published, will shed renown, not only upon the great navigator, 
but upon all Newfoundland seafarers. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.--^ 

BLACK^DiaiVIOND LINE ! 

ST. LAWRENCE ROUTE; MONTREAL TO ST. JOHN S. 



Passenger Rates Including Meals and Berths 
FIRST CLASS. 

One Way. Return. 

Montreal to or from St. John s.. $30 to $35 $50 to $55 

Quebec to or from St. John s. . . $30 to $35 $50 to $55 

Charlottetown to St. John s $15.00 

Charlottetown to St. John s and 

return to Sydney $25.00 

Sydney to St. John s . $12.00 $20.00 

Children under two years of age, 

between Montreal and St. John s $5.00 



to and from Montreal and Intermediate Ports. 
THIRD CLASS. 

One Way. 

Montreal to or from St. John s . $15.00 

Quebec to or from St. John s . $15.00 

Charlottetown to St. John s. ... $8.00 

Charlottetown to St. John s and return to 

Sydney 

Sydney to St. John s . . . $6.00 

Children under two years of age, between 

Montreal and St. John s $2.00 



Return. 

$25.00 
$25.00 



$12.00 
$10.00 



HARVEY & Co., Limited, 



Agents Black Diamond Line. 



Coats and Costumes! 

The success which has attended the establishment of a 
Showroom in our Upper Building 

is largely due to the character of the goods shown there. Great care is taken to secure 

The Very Latest Styles, 

and the most-favored materials. Our better-class garments are all fitted on Live Models 



before being selected. 



Call in and 
See Our Stock. 



Mail Orders 
Carefully Filled. 



Moore & Company 





Plumbers, 
Hot Water & 
Steam fitters. 



Heaters, Stoves, Toilets, Baths and everything in our line 
of the Best Quality at Lowest Prices. 

SHIPS PLUMBING A SPECIALTY 

128 Duckworth St., - St. John s, Nfld. 

Phone 456. P. Q. Box 1124. 




Sporting Wear 
Summer 1914 ! 



fl^-.v 



We are ready with full line of 

Men s and Boys Cricket and Tennis Pants 
Shirts and Belts; St. Bon s Caps, Belts and 
Ribbons; C.L.B. and C.C.C. Ribbons. 

Gentlemen s High-Class 
Tailoring Store. 

W. P. SHORTALL, 

The American Tailor 
300 Water Street, St. John s. P. Q. Box 445 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newf..nJl an j n,,,, 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 21. 



(Continued from page 12.) 

policy has been inaugurated by the Government, the effects of 
which are now being felt in the remote settlements of the island. 
We import fully $1,000,000 of agricultural produce annually, 
and at least $3,000,000 more of food stuffs, including flour, 
much of which could be raised at home, or substituted by do 
mestic products ; thus keeping this large amount of money in 
the Colony. In other words, by the development of agriculture 
in the island it is possible to make this industry almost as valu 
able as the whole of the fisheries, and that without sending a 
single item of all this produce out of our own country. A very 
high opinion on the farming capabilities of Newfoundland was 
formed three years ago by Mr. Beach Thomas, the agricultural 
expert of the London Times, who spent some weeks in the 
interior of the inland and went into the whole question very 
thoroughly. The previous year Professor Zavitts, of Guelph 
Agricultural College, visited Newfoundland and he also testified 
to the capabilities of the island for creating a much wider run 
of crops than those at present cultivated. Following Professor 
Zavitts came Professor Robertson, who h.is been the Principal 
of the MacDonald Agricultural College, Quebec and head of 
the model farm of the Canadian Dominion Government at 
Ottawa ; he also was greatly impressed with the possibilities of 
Newfoundland as an agricultural country. 

The Anglo-Newfoundland Development Company, whose 
mills are at Grand Falls, supplies the paper now being used by 
the Daily Mail and other London publications, and, following 
out the traditional English method of doing things, has already 
cleared a large farm near the summer house of Lord Northcliffe 
as well as an additional farm for the use of the staff, and there 
they have all varieties of garden produce, suitable to the climate 
of the country, many of which are of a kind that flourishes in 
England with conspicuous success The Company have also a 
large farm of over fifty acres at Rushy Pond, which has been 
cultivated in order to instruct f.irmers and settlers in the neigh 
bourhood in the best methods of raising cattle, and culivating 
oals, hay, p itatoes, etc. Cattle and sheep raising I am quite 
satisfied could be carried on in the interior with great profit. 
Sections of the country are covered with rich, nutritious wild 
grasses, which provide excellent forage for cattle and sheep. 
The A N.D. Company use over 100 horses every winter in the 
lumber woods, and in the summer turn them out to graze in the 
r .ver bottom, where this grass is to be found, and it is one of the 
si-hts of this area to see great herds of these rnrses in sleek 
and perfect candition upon a summer feed which costs their 
owners nothing. Cattle for the English markets could be 
handled in the same way, and the comparative nearness of New 
foundland to the British Isles would ensure tiiat ihe animils 
woul I be c ir.veyed across the Atlantic wi h a minimum of dis 
comfort and loss of weight, for they would be 1,000 miles 
nearer to Engla d than Quebec. 

Then, again, our never failing fi heries, described by Lord 
Bacon as more valuable than the mines of Peru, are capable of 
infinite development. Although we have in some measure 
developed the cod fishery, the herring fishery, the lobster and 
the salmon fishery, we have adapted ourselves only to the 
markets of the Mediterranean, Brazil and the West Indies. We 
have salt-cured our fish while at our very door is the United 
States with its 100,000,000 inhabitants crying out for our fresh 
fish. Whoever wants to make a great fortune should organise 
a cold storage system, between Newfoundland and the United 
States. We have not been able to find the money for these 
industries for the reason that all our capital is invested in the 
older methods, and, owing to the imperfect transportation to the 
country, we are not on the visiting list of the world s capitalists; 
but some day we are certain to attract their notice. Thirty 
years ago not a human habitation existed five miles from the 
coast, the whole of our population living around that portion of 
the country nearest to their fishing operations. Today our 
woods ring with the axes busily plying to keep pace with the 
timber hunger of the great paper mills and iron mines, and 
every day more and more men turn their eyes inland towards 
all that the world s experts tell us has lain there neglected for 
so many years. The village at Grand Falls where the paper 
mills are situated is an excellent illustration. Ten years ago 



the site where it stands was a forest through which no man had 
been known to force his way. To-day it is a thriving town, with 
a theatre, town hall, fifteen miles of streets lit by electricity, 
four or five hotels, and the most up-to-date paper mills in the 
world. Thirty years ago we had hardly thirty visitors to New 
foundland in the year, last year nearly 7,000 tourists and health 
seekers came to reap the benefits of our excellent climate We 
are not going to be content with 7,000. Newfoundland has 
only just awakened to the value of advertising. Too long we 
have been almost unknown to the Home country, the great 
Dominions, and foreign countries. No matter how excellent a 
business or an individual may be, there is only one thing that 
can start it or him forward to success, and that is advertising. 
So long as you are content to sit back and say nothing, so long 
will the world allow you to sit there. In the past we were satis 
fied with our fisheries alone ; in the future all the possibilities 
of our island are to be developed because we are becoming 
know. 

In 1908 to show the wonderful fecundity of our fisheries 
and their inexhaustible supply we reached the highest point as 
regards the catch of codfish namely 1,800,000 quintals over 
400,000 quintals higher than has ever been recorded in the his 
tory of our fisheries, and this notwithstanding the fact that no 
more men or appliances were engaged than usual. This quan 
tity can be easily doubled when we have discovered new metods 
and new markets in Canada and the United States. To-day 
other countries put up their codfish in fiity differnt ways; the 
fish is smokt-d, shredded, canned, and dealt with in many other 
methods, and up to the present we in Newfoundland have con 
fined ourselves entirely to I he curing of our fish by what is 
known as the hard, salt cured system. Here is an opportunity 
for the investment of British capital with the certainty of a good 
dividend. The fish can be purchased in Newfoundland for 
about a half penny per pound out of the water. The cod found 
in the waters around Newfoundland and on the banks is a very 
much better, stronger, larger, and more palatable fish than that 
found in warmer waters, and there would be no difficulty what 
ever in getting for this fish at least ten times this price if deliver 
ed fresh. Other methods, too, could be adopted for dealing 
with this fish, which would make it attractive in the markets 
abroad. 

In addition to the natural scenic beiuties of the island, which 
have evoked the unstinted praise of some of the most notable 
writers in the English language, we h.ive fishing and hunting 
opportunities which few countries can rival to-day. Our caribou 
are the finest in the world. They exist in countless herds, and 
the pursuit of them is accounted a sport fit for kings. For 
years past Newfoundland has been coming to be recognised as 
a sportsman s paradise and every year makes this claim more 
justifiable. Some of the leading English hunters have been 
coming regularly to the island of late years, and Americans are 
also pouring in every summer. 

In addition to deer stalking, there are the possibilities of bear, 
lynx arid wolf hunting, as well as the shooting of smaller game; 
and our salmon and trout fishing are admittedly not to be equal 
led anywhere. We have adopted the policy of not permitting 
any sections of the rivets or the coast to be leased, unlike the 
policy pursued in certain other countries where the best game 
preserves are the undisputed property of millionaires and large 
landowners. In Newfoundland everybody may fish who feels 
so inclined and anywhere his fancy takes him, so long as he 
does not transgress the law. 

Our salmon fishing is one of the finest known forms of sport 
in the world, and the policy decided upon by the Government 
has made for the abolition of the practice of netting the rivers, 
which has hitherto been more or less common. At the same 
time we believe that great benefit can be deriyed from the 
addition to the supply of salmon by artificial hatching, and we 
look forward to satisfactory results being obtained from this as 
from the addition of trout and re-stocking of the rivers and 
streams which is now being carried out. The fame of the 
island as a hunting and tourist paradise is now so well establish 
ed that the inrush of summer visitors has reached a stage where 
the matter of adequate hotel accommodation is forcing itself 
upon us and will have to be taken up. Already a project is on 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 22. 




Public Notice. 



UNDER the provision of Cap. 23, 2 Edward VII., entitled 
" An Act to Amend the Post Office Act, 1891," and upon 
the recommendation of the Board appointed under Section i 
thereof, notice is hereby given that, three months after this date, 
a Proclamation will issue for the alteration of name, or re-nam 
ing of places as under, that is to say : 

i. That Sibley s Cove, Placentia Bay, be re-named PROWS- 
TON. 

2. That Chance Harbour, near Moreton s Harbour, Notre 
Dame Bay, be re-named BRIDGEPORT. 

3. That Chance Harbour, Friday s Bay, Notre Dame Bay, be 
re-named CHANCEPORT. 

4. That Farmer s Arm, Dildo Run, Notre Dame Bay, be re 
named SUMMERFORD. 

5. That the Western section of Mortier Bay, extending from 
West s Point to Glendon (including Butler s Cove) be re 
named CRESTON. 

6. That Piper s Hole, Placentia Bay, be re-named SWIFT 
CURRENT. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 

Department of the Colonial Secretary, June i5th. 1914. 




PUBLIC NOTICE ! 

UNDER the provisions of Chapter 23, 2 Edward VII., entitled 
"An Act to amend the Post Office Act, 1891," and upon 
the recommendation of the Board appointed under Section i 
thereof, notice is hereby given that, three months after this date, 
a Proclamation will issue for the alteration of name, or re-nam 
ing of places as under, that is to say : 

i. That Scissors Cove, Notre Dame Bay, be re-named 
STANHOPE. 

2. That New Harbour. St. Barbe District, be re-named 
NORTON. 

3. That Ha Ha, in Ha Ha Bay, District of St. Barbe, be 
re-named RALEIGH. 

4. That Limeville, Port-au-Port, District of St. George s, 
be re-named AGGUATHUNA. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 
Department of the Colonial Secretary, March 24th, 1914. 



Tailoring 

We are now showing some very neat patterns 
in English and Scotch 

Summer Suitings, Serges, Trouserings, 
and Fancy Vestings. 

Prices Moderate. 

Samples and Measuring Cards sent to any 
part of the Island on application. 

Strict attention given to Outport Orders. 

E. J. MALONE, 

Custom Tailor, 268 Water Street. 

James Pidgeon, 

Carpenter and Builder. 

Jobbing Promptly Attended to 

Workshop 15 Bannerman Street. 
Residence-28 Prescott Street. ST. JOHN S, NPLO. 

(MM. J. MURPHY, 

1 1 Pennywell Road, 

HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTER. 

Interior Work a Specialty* 

P. O. BOX 142. 

Are you paying too much ? 
Why not order your Jams, 
Marmalade and Jellies from 
RENNIE & CO., LTD., 

St. John s. Prices moderate; Quality first class. 

Channing slrugltorc 

145 New Gower Street, (Opposite old stand.) 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The 



Mail Orders promptly attended to; every satisfac 
tion guaranteed. 

Store open every night throughout the year until 11 o clock. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 23. 



foot for providing a modern hotel for St. John s, with tourist 
hotels at other points throughout the island, and I have no 
doubt that definite action in this respect will be taken in the 
very near future. St. John s, being the railway headquarters 
and likewise the steamship headquarters for all the lines plying 
to and from the island, demands for increased hotel accommo 
dation are natural, and must be complied with shortly, because 
it is beyond question that a new hotel would prove a profitable 
speculation in a very short time. The C.P.R. has done much 
to render Canada famous by the chain of hotels across the con 
tinent, and I see that the I.C.R. is about to establish hotels in 
the Maratime Provinces. Newfoundland will shortly be pre 
pared to do her share in the same respect, realising what an 
immense advantage it means to a country nowadays to have a 
tourist and sporting Clientele. Nor is it alone for the mere 
vacationist, whom we know as the summer tripper," that New 
foundland provides an attraction. The island offers many in 
ducements to the scientist, the botanist, the geologist, the 
mineralogist, and others. A very great number of American 
university professors of various branches come to Newfoundland 
now and find profitable occupation there during the summer 
months. Yachtsmen are also coming to realise its advantages, 
and big and little cruisers flying yacht club burgees are common 
on the coast during the summer. The Newfoundland waters 



afford splendid opportunities fo fjord yachting, and those who 
are partial to canoeing and camping will find various parts of 
the interior possessing many attractions for them. 

The fishing villages can be observed, the industry can be 
studied, delightful cruise can be made along the coast or through 
the interior, and the beautitul summer-like weather can be en 
joyed to the fullest extent. Every lake and stream is filled with 
trout and salmon : every thicket with game birds ! and the 
forests are the home of the noble caribou. 

Soon we hope to have a much improved ocean steamship 
service. Indeed, there are many who argue that Newfoundland 
should be made a link in a short Atlantic steamship service, 
but whilst various projects in this direction have been launched 
they have not come to anything, and while the Newfoundland 
Government will facilitate any such scheme, the wisdom of 
which may commend itself to their judgment, they are, in the 
meantime, dealing with the question of an improved steam ser 
vice more adapted to the Colony s local needs. 

Few countries to-day offer such inducements to outside 
capitalists for the profitable investment of money as Newfound 
land, whether in its fisheries, or its mineral or forest wealth, 
and we count upon a very marked increase in prosperity during 
the next few years, even though we have enjoyed an unusually 
liberal measure during the past decade. 



Wadden s Soda fountain said to be The Mosl 3s; r 




HEREWITH is shown a bird s eye view of the 
Soda Fountain Department at the Central 
Pharmacy M. F. Wadden s Drug Store with his 
head clerk, who, with Mr. Wadden the popular pro 
prietor, has made the town talk of this branch of 
the business. Mr. Wadden states that his success 
is due to the fact that he insists upon the use of 
products of recognised quality only, and his busi 
ness is kept progressive and up-to-date, with the 
result that the increase has been very satisfactory. 
The fruits and syrups of ]. Hungerford Smith & 
Co., which are the finest in America, are exclusively 
used ; besides Horlick s Malted Milk ; the only 
genuine Coca Cola ; and Ice-Cream, etc. 

Having opened a new Parlor in the rear of the 
Store, Mr. Wadden manages to keep this business 
altogether seperate from the general Drug busi 
ness, but it is a very valuable side line and keeps 
the crowd ever going in and out of the Store. 



Bowring Brothers, Limited, Coastal Service, 



S.S. "PORTIA," WESTERN ROUTE, 

Calls at the following places : Cape Broyle, Ferry- 
land, Fermeuse, Renews, Trepassey, St. Mary s, 
Salmonier, Placentia, Marystown, Burin, St. Law 
rence, Lamaline, Fortune, Grand Bank, Belleoram, 
St. Jacques, Harbor Breton, Pass Island, Her 
mitage, Gaultois, Pushthrough, Richard s Harbor, 
Rencontre (W.), Francois, Cape LaHune, Ramea, 
Burgeo, Rose Blanche, Channel, Bay of Islands, 
Bonne Bay. 



S.S. "PROSPERO," NORTHERN ROUTE, 

Call at the following places : Bay-de-Verde, Old 
Perlican, Trinity, Catalina, Bonavista, Salvage, 
King s Cove, Greenspond, Pool s Island, Wesley- 
ville, Seldom-Come-By, Fogo, Change Islands, 
Herring Neck, Twillingate, Moreton s Harbor, 
Exploits, Fortune Harbor, Leading Tickles, 
Pilley s Island, Little. Bay Island, Little Bay, 
Nipper s Harbor, Tilt Cove, LaScie, Pacquet, 
Baie Verte, Coachman s Cove, Seal Cove, Bear 
Cove, Western Cove, Jackson s Arm, Englee, 
Conche, St. Julien, St. Anthony, Griguet, Quirpon 
and Battle Harbor. 



are now 



booking Round Trip Passages per steamers Pr,#ero and Portia, at $18.50. Finest and cheapest trip c 
U "L, Boo k , S a .- - - 






THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY.-! 




BOUNDER S 

First in 1893 ^ Foremost in 1914 

Figures that *#* themselves BoHlHler S OH 

(1) Largest Hot Bulb Marine Engine in the World. 
(2) Holds 14 World s Records. 

(3) Over 250,000 B.H.P. in use. 

(4 ) Over 1,000 Engines built every year. 
(5) Used by 16 Governments. 

(6) Has the lowest fuel consumption for Hot Bulb Engines. 

( 7 ) Has been on the market for 2 i years. 
Built in sizes from 5 to 32O B.H.P. 

ALEX. McDOUGALL, # McBride s Cove, ** St. John s, N.R 

Telegrams : McDOUGALL," S. John s. J P. O. Box 843. .* Telephone 18O. 




PROCLAMATION 



W. E. DAVIDSON 

Governor, 

[us.] 



By His Excellency WALTER EDWARD DAVIDSON, 
Esquire, Companion of the Most Distingu 
ished Order of St. Michael and St. George^ 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief, in and 
over the Island of ~ Newfoundland and its 
Dependencies. 

WHEREAS it is provided by Chapter 23, of 2 Edward VII., 
entitled "An Act to amend the Post Office Act, 1891," 
that upon the recommendation of the Board appointed under the 
provisions of the said Act, the Governor in Council shall, by 
Proclamation, give notice of any alteration of name, naming or 
re-naming of places within this Colony, provided that Public 
Notice of such proposed alteration of name, naming or re-naming 
of places shall have been given for Three Months previous; 

And whereas, by Public Notice of date the i8th of Novem 
ber, 1913, certain alterations of name and re-naming of places 
within this Colony were notified, as required by the above-men 
tioned Act ; 

I do, therefore, by this my Proclamation, order and direct 
that the alterations of name and re-naming of places within this 
Colony, as contained in the said Public Notice of the i8th day 
of November, 1913, shall come into effect from the date of these 
Presents, that is to say : 

i. Aspen Cove, Smith Sound, Trinity Bay, to be re-named 
" Aspen." 




NOTICE. 



2. New Harbour, Notre Dame Bay, to be re-named 
stead." 



New- 



3. Daniel s Cove, Smith Sound, Trinity Bay, to be re 
named " Waterville." 

Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
St. John s, this igth day of February, A.D. 1914. 

By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 



The attention of the Public is directed to the 
following Section of Cap. 39 of Consolidated 
Statutes dealing with " Nuisances and Municipal 
Regulations " : 

" Any person who shall throw any 

Stones or Ballast, 

or anything else hurtful or injurious, into any 
harbor or roadstead in this Colony or its Depend 
encies, shall, for every offence be liable to a penalty 
not exceeding 

Fifty Dollars, 

or imprisonment for a period not exceeding 

Fifty Days." 

a. w. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
June 22nd, 1914. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The NT-IT* -"- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 25. 



A Neighborly Feeling 

prompts one to be sociable at times and 
extend hospitality to their friends when they 
call. So keep your tea caddie well stocked ; 
your friends will appreciate the Cup of 
Quality brewed from 

HOMESTEAD. 

Faultless in quality, its flavor makes staunch 
friends. 4Oc. Ib. For 5-lb. parcels 10 
per cent, discount allowed. 

C. P. EAGAN, 

Duckworth St. and Queen s Road. 




An Ellis Suit 

Is the Best made in St. John s, 

pronounced so, and admitted 
by sartorial critics. 

The Reason : 

Only First-Class Workmen, 
High-Class Linings, and the 
Best of Material are used in 
manufacture. 

Chas. J. Ellis, 

302 Water Street 



THE SUPREME SILENT SUNBEAM. 

Winner of Many Gold Medals, Silver Medals, and Non-Stop Diplomas; 1st, 2nd and 3rd 
in Grand Prix 1912; Winner of Tourist Trophy 1914. 

C.A.V. and Rushmore 
Lighting Outfits, Oils, 
Greases and Gasolene 

Goodrich Tires, Rayf ield 
Carburetors, Accesso 
ries, etc. 

Phone 318. THE CENTRAL GARAGE, Catherine Street. 




Lnderwood Typewriter 

has time and again proven 
to users that it combines 

Speed, Accuracy 
and Stability. 

We now wish to call 
attention to its 

Simplicity of 
Construction. 

In a Salesman s Contest held at Chicago, 111., on June 6th, 
fifteen members of the UNDERWOOD Selling Organization 
demonstrated clearly that the Underwood Machine can be taken 
to pieces and reassembled under seven minutes. The winner, 
Geo. F. Pinne, of Rockford, III., doing it in 3 min. 53 3-5 sees. 

MEEHAN & CO., Agents, 




St. John s, 
Nfld. 



M. & E. KENNEDY, 

Contractors, 
Builders and 
Appraisers. 

Office: RENOUF BUILDING. 

P. O. Box 214. PHONE 767. 

Factory and Store, off James Street 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 26. 

Some Wefl-Known Sayings, Phrases and Words, 

With their Meaning and Origin, Part IV* 



By Arch. G. Gibb. 



To pour oil on troubled waters, as a figure of speech means 
to soothe the troubled spirit. A soft answer turneth away wrath. 
The phrase is mentioned by the Venerable Bede in his Ecclesi 
astical History, written in Latin, and compiled in 735. Stapleton 
translated the book in 1565. St. Adrain, it appears, gave his 
blessing to a young priest who was to set out by land, but re 
turn by water, to convey a young maiden destined for the bride 
of King Oswin. St. Aidan gave the young man a cruise of 
oil to pour on the sea if the waves became stormy. A storm 
did arise, and the young priest pouring oil on the waves did 
actually reduce them to a calm. Bede says he had the story 
from a " most creditable man in Holy Orders." In modern 
days the expedient has frequently been resorted to by masters 
of sailing vessels with more or less success. 

Peers of the Realm. The five orders of Duke, Marquis, Karl, 
Viscount and Baron. The word Peer is the Latin pare s (equals) 
and in feudal times all great vassals were held equal in rank. 
The Gaulois says. It is well known that, although the English 
aristocracy recruits itself from the sons of barbers, as Lord 
Tenturden ; merchant tailors, as Count Craven ; mercers, as the 
Counts of Coventry, etc., it will never tolerate poverty within 
its ranks. The male representative of Simon de Montfort is 
now a saddler in Tooley Street ; the great grandson of Oliver 
Cromwell a porter in Cork market ; and Stephen James Penny, 
Verger of St. George s, Hanover Square is a direct descendant 
of the fifth son of Edward III." 

m pluck his goose for him. That is ; I ll cut his crest, I ll 
lower his pride, I ll make him eat umble pie. Comparing the 
person to a goose, the threat is to pluck off his feathers in which 
he prides himself. 

Umble Pie. A pie made of umbles i.e. the liver, kidneys, 
etc., of a deer. These " refuse " were the perquisites of Ihe 
keepers, and umble-pie was a dish for servants and inferiors. 

To Jump over the Broomstick. To marry in an informal way 
a " brom " is the bit of a bridle ; to " jump the brom " is to skip 
over the marriage restraint and " broomstick " is a mere corrup 
tion. 

The Land of Nod. To go to the land of nod is to go to bed. 
There are many similar phrases, and more in French than in 
English. The refrence is to Genesis IV. 16. "Cain went . . . 
and dwelt in the land of Nod, but where the land of Nod, is or 
was, nobody knows. In fact, "nod" means a vagrant or vaga 
bond, and when Cain was driven out he lived a " vagrant life, 
with no fixed abode, till he built his city. 

Legend of a Coin is that which is written round the face of a 
coin. Thus, on a shilling, the legend is round the head of the 
reigning Sovereign, as GEO. V DEI GRATIA BRITT. 
REX :F.D. The words " one shilling." on the other side of the 
coin written across it, is dominated the inscription. 

Flowers at Funerals. The Greeks crowned the dead body 
with flowers, and placed flowers on the tomb also. The Romans 
decked the funeral couch with leaves and flowers, and spread 
flowers and and wreaths on the tombs of their friends. 

When Sulla was buried as many as 2,000 wreaths were sent 
in his honour. Most of our funeral customs are derived from 
the Romans ; as dressing in black, walking in procession, carry 
ing insignia on the bier, raising a mound over the grave, called 
tumultiis, when our tomb. 

Funeral. Funeral means a torchlight procession (from the 
Latin funis, a torch) because funerals among the Romans took 
place at night by torchlight, that magistrates and priests might 
not be violated by seeing a corpse, and to be prevented from 
performing their sacred duties. 

The Gtft of the Gab. Fluency of speech ; or rather the gift 
of boasting (French, gaber to boast); Danish and Scotch, gab, 
the mouth; Gaelic, gob ; Irish cab; whence our gap, gape, 
gabble and gobble. The gable of a house is its beak 



" There was a good man named Job, 

Who lived in the land of Uz, 
He had a good gift of the gob, 

The same thing happened us. 

Book of Job, by /ach. Boyd. 

The Scottish Kilt. In a little book published recently on 
Scottish national dress, Mr. Louden McQueen Douglas gives a 
most interesting account of the origin and evolution of the Kilt. 
This style of dress is peculiar to the Celtic races, and was in 
earlier days common to them. On its first appearance in Scot 
land it formed part of an extremely simple dress. One single 
piece of cloth was folded so ingeniously by the thrifty Scot that 
it formed with a belt a complete garment by day, and at night 
served the purpose of a blanket. The peculiar coloring known 
as tartan was introduced from France where it was most fashion 
able among the Parisians. Presbyterian Record. 

Deadhead. The origin of the word " deadhead " takes us 
back to the theatres of ancient Rome. R. H. Broadhead in 
" A History of Pantomime" give the following realistic explana 
tion. He says : Persons were instructed to give appl.iuse with 
skill. The proficient hired themselves out to the poets, authors, 
etc., and were so disposed as to support a loud applause. The 
free admission tickets were small ivory death s heads, and 
specimens of these are to be seen in the Museum of Naples." 

Ill Lace Youi Jacket for you. I will beat you. (French, 
laisse, a lash ; German, lashen to strike ; our lash). 

Studen s of philology will find an interesiing study in the 
registered trade-marks of manufactured goods. Take up any 
of the many magazines and periodicals of the day and look 
through the advertisements. There you will find a number of 
coined names applied to various special articles. These names 
as a rule, are registered, or copyrighted, as a protection to the 
manufacturer or controller of some particular artic e, or make of 
article. Some of these names are descriptive of the goods, but 
most of them are derived from the names, or part of the names 
of the manufacturer. The usual way is to take one of the sylla 
bles of each partner of the firm, and form them into one word. 

If for example a firm by the name of Carson and Bonar 
manufactured muskets, they might take the first syllable of 
Carson (car) and the first syllable of Bonar (bona) and form it 
into the word C-A-R-B-O-N-A and advertise their muskets as 
the : Carbona Carbine." There are scores of instances where 
this plan has apparently been adopted. Here are a few well- 
known names, with their probable derivation. 

" Tobralco," a cotton fabiic, manufatured by Tootal. Broad- 
hurst, Lee Co. This word is made by taking the T-O in Tootal 
the B-R-A in Broadhurst ; the L in Lee and the C-O in com 
pany. Put that together and you have TO-BRA-L-CO. 

1 ii le " finish is part of the word Ripley transposed P-I-R L-E 

" Pesco " Underwear comes from Peter Scott & Co thus 
P-E of Peter and S-C-O of Scott P-E-S-C-O. 

" Ellaness " Underwear, is manufuctured by Lyle and Scott 
and the name is simply made by using the initials of each 
partner L and S which makes Ell-an-ess. 

"VVinsco " is Scotch Wincey, with the first syllable of each 

" oi wince> and s - c - - s -">- 



" om 



Vama " cloth advertised by Henry Bannerman & Sons is 
made up of the Y , Henry and the A-M-A in Bannerman 

"Marast" cloth, is composed M-A-R and A-S-T the first 
syllables of the vendors, Marshall & Aston. 

These are just a few examples ; hundred of others will occur 
to anyone who w.ll take the trouble to study the many trade 

UalllCSi 



Tariff or no Tariff 

SICKLE TOBACCO 



is now manufactured to sell at 



CENTS A CUT 




Same Quality! # Couldn t be 
better. # Just a little difference 
in the size, that s all 
Ask your dealer for 

Sickle the 15 cent Cut 





THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 28. 



FIRE! 



The 



FIRE! 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Co. 

[Established 1809.] 
Assets 23,000,000. Annual Income, 5,400,000. 

Head Offices Edinburgh & London. 

Insurance effected on all kinds of property at lowest 
current rates. 

Insure where your insurance is sure. 

GEORGE SHEA, 

General Agent for Newfoundland. 



COOK A DINNER 

In Thirty Minutes ! 

With a Gas Cooker 




you can prepare a break 
fast in ten minutes, a 
luncheon in fifteen 
minutes, and a complete 
dinner in thirty minutes 

Full particulars from 



The St. John s Gas Light Co. 



Public Notice! 



INSPECTION REGULATIONS. 

The boilers of every steamer registered in the Colony shall 
be subject to annual inspection by the Inspector. 

Every steamer carrying local crews or passengers to or from 
this Colony, or to or from any ports therein, shall be subject to 
annual inspection. 

All persons installing new boilers for any purpose, to work 
under steam pressure, shall notify the Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries, in writing, as to the locality of said boilers. 

All persons removing boilers or installing second hand boilers 
for any purpose, to work under steam pressure, shall notify the 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries, as to the new locality it is 
intended to work boilers in ; and shall not work such boilers 
until they have been inspected. 

The Inspector shall grant a certificate of inspection for every 
boiler which shall be approved by him. The certificate shall 
be displayed in a prominent place in the vicinity of the boiler 
to which it refers. 

INSPECTION FEES. 

When a boiler is not in good condition, and the Inspector 
has granted a certificate for a period less than twelve months, 
the fee for each extra inspection during the twelve months, 
shall be the extra inspection fee of that class. 

For any special visit to be made by the Inspector, other than 
the annual inspection, or for any special inspection made at the 
request of the owner or manager of a. boiler, the owner shall 
pay the expenses incurred by Inspector from St. John s to loca 
tion of boiler and return, subject to approval of Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries. 

MODE OF INSPECTION. 

Notice of alterations or additions to any boiler should be 
given to the Inspector, in writing, for his approval, before pro 
ceeding with the work. 

Every boiler made after the coming into force of these Regu 
lations shall be stamped with the initial letters of the Inspector s 
name who inspected it and tested it, the year it was made, and 
the pressure under which it was tested ; also the actual working 
pressure under which it was tested ; also the actual working 
pressure allowed upon it. 

A. W. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
St. John s, June, 1914. 



NOTICE! 

THE ATTENTION of Vessel Owners is called to the 

following Section of the Harbor Regulations: 

13. If, in the opinion of the Harbor Master, any vessel 
anchored in the harbor is likely to sink or to become an obstruc 
tion to navigation, the Haibor Master may, after giving twelve 
hours notice to the owner or agent of such vessel, or without 
notice where there is no owner or known agent in St. John s, 
take charge of and remove .such vessel, and may deal with and 
dispose of such vessel in such manner as he shall think neces 
sary, to provide for the free navigation of the port; and all ex 
penses incurred under this section shall be borne by the vessel 
or her owners, and may be recovered with costs in an action in 
the name of the Harbor Master before a Stipendiary Magistrate. 

EDWARD ENGLISH, 

Harbor Master. 

NEWFOUNDLAND PENITENTIARY. 

BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, # Hearth Brushes, ^ Whisks. 

A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand ; and having reliable Agents 
in Chicago and other principal centres for the purchase of 
Corn and other material, we are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we feel as 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
o being favoured w,th a share of your patronage. 
A orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt 



ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent 
Newfoundland Penitentiary, June, 1914. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 29. 



Moir s Chocolates and Cakes, 
Dunlop Tires and Heels, 
Office Specialty filing Systems, 
Pittsburg and Victor Safes, 

Remington, Smith Premier, and Monarch 
Typewriters and Supplies. 



All Leaders in their own line. 



fRCD. V. CHESMAN, 



Representative. 



I9I4-CADILLAC 




Hinged Steering Wheel, Double Drive Rear Axle, Electric Gear Shift. 

The Cadillac Company have sold more Cars this year to date than all 
the other High-Class American cars combined. Intending Purchasers 

would do well to place their orders early, as the demand for this Car is 
very great. 

JOHN R. PARSONS, Agent, 

City Garage, Gower Street, 
Phone 96. Adjoining Cochrane House. 



Make Secure, 

What You Can t Insure ! 

Buy a VICTOR Safe and protect 
your books and valuable pipers. 

We have them in all sizes, 
and at all prices. 

F. G. HOUSE & Co., 

Sole Agents for Newfoundland, 

Columbus Building, St. John s. 




INLJ. Murphy 

Carriage & Sleigh Builder 
Undertaker, etc. 

Agent for 
Carriage Stock, Rubber Tyres, etc. 

Wheels Re-Rubbered 

at shortest notice and reasonable prices. 
We always have on hand a large stock 
of Polished and Cloth-Covered 

Caskets and Coffins. 

Personal attention given to all Undertaking 
Orders Night or Day. Phone 737. 

West End Carriage Factory, - - 32 Bambrick Street. 



Miss May Furlong 

WILL BE FOUND AT THE OLD STAND 

282 WATER STREET 

WITH A COMPLETE NEW and FRESH STOCK COMPRISING 
ALL THE LATEST NOVELTIES IN 

Millinery, Furs, French Dresses & Blouses 

FANCY GOODS. ETC. 



James J. Whelan, 



Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 



I T. MARTIN, .* 

MORTICIAN, 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture Horses and Vans for 

a Specialty. 



Removing Pianos, &c. 



Corner of Gower and 

Colonial Streets. 

carries the very finest lines of 

Provisions, Groceries, Fruit, 
Confectionery, Vegetables. 

All the leading brands of Tobaccos, Cigars and Cigarettes 

Watered Herring and Watered Fish every Wednesday and 
Friday. Fresh Country Eggs a specialty ; also, Fresh Milk daily. 

Your patronage Solicited. Jt^ Store open every night. 

Evening in June. 

By Slullcy. 

IT was bright and cheerful afternoon, 
Towards the end of the sunny month of June, 
When the north wind congregates in crowds 
The floating mountains of the silver clouds 
From the horizon, and the stainless sky 
Opens beyond them like eternity. 
All things rejoiced beneath the sun, the weeds, 
The river, and the cornfields, and the reeds, 
The willow leaves that glanced in the light breeze 
And the firm foliage of the larger trees. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



OUR ROYAL VISITOR. 




iEWFOUNDLAND was favored recently wi h a visit from His Royal 
Highness the Duke of Connaught, uncle of our present King, and him 
self the Governor-General of Canada. The Duke, there is the best 
reason to believe, enjoyed every hour of his stay amongst us. and was 
more than pleased with the cordial reception extended to him at every 
point he touched. Our people eagerly availed of the occasion to testify to their loyalty 
and devotion to the Throne and Empire, and in point of whole-hearted enthusiasm, the 
Duke s visit will certainly challenge comparison with any reception to royalty anywhere 
in the oversea Dominions or the Motherland itself. \Ve trust that the Duke s successor 
in the Governorship of Canada will in due course honor Newfoundland with a visit, the 
more especially as he, the brother of our present Queen, was one of those who made 
up the royal suite when our present sovereigns, as Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and 
York, visited Newfoundland some years ago. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 31. 




PROCLAMATION 



W. E. DAVIDSON, 
Governor, 

[L.S.] 



By His Excellency WALTER EDWARD DAVIDSON, 
Esquire, Companion of the Most Distingu 
ished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 
Governor and Commandcr-in-Chief, in and 
over the Island of Newfoundland and its 
Dependencies. 



3. All that piece of land lying between Reid Newfoundland 
Company s Lots 66 and 68, bounded on the north by the shore 
of Exploits Bay, and on the south by the shore of Norris Arm. 

4. All that piece of land lying between Reid Newfoundland 
Company s Lots 70 2nd 72, bounded on the north by the shore 
of Burnt Bay, and on the south by the Railway track. 

5. All that piece and parcel of land situate inland west of 
Northern Arm, Exploits, in the District of Twillingate, bounded 
on the north by Phillip s timber limit, south by the Exploits 



WHEREAS by an Act passed in the Fourth Year of the 
Reign of His present Majesty, entitled, " An Act re 
specting the Operation of Saw Mills," it is provided that: 

" The Governor in Council shall have the right to reserve by 
Proclamation in the Royal Gazette, such sections or areas of 
Crown Land as may, from time to time, in the public interest, 
be deemed expedient, and to prohibit the cutting of limber on 
such lands for milling purposes, and the penalty for cutting 
timber on such lands shall be fixed and determined in such 
Proclamation: Provided, however, thu no such reservation 
shall be made until public notice has been given to those resid 
ing in and near the locality in which the land proposed to be 
reserved is situated." 

And whereas notice has been given in accord ince with the 
foregoing provision of the intention of the Governor in Council 
to reserve the land hereinafter described. 

I do, therefore, by this my Proclamation, prohibit the cutting 
of timber for milling purposes ovtr the following areas of land, 
namely : 

1. All that piece and parcel of land situate between Logy 
Bay and Robin Hood s B.iy, in the District of St. John s East, 
and extending from the property of John and Michael Doran to 
the seashore, containing an area of about 200 acres. 

2. All those pieces and parcels of land situate and being 
at Harry s Brook, in the District of St. George, bounded and 
described as follows, namely : 

(a) the land lying between the Railway track and Harry s 
Brook, aforesaid, bounded on the north, by Reid Newfoundland 
Company s Lot No. 24, on the south by the said Company s 
Lot No. 22; also a strip along each side of the said Brook 
between the aforesaid Company s Lots, five chains wide. 

(b) The land lying between the Railway and the said Brook, 
described as follows: Commencing at the south boundary of 
Reid Newfoundland Company s Lot No. 22, extending along 
the Railway southerly three miles and sixty chains, thence east 
to Harry s Brook, thence northerly along the said Brook to the 
boundary of the Reid Newfoundland Company s Lot aforesaid, 
ant/ hence west to the place of commencement. 

(c) A strip along the east side of Harry s Brook, extending 
from the south boundary of Reid Newfoundland Company s Lot 
No. 22, to the north boundary of said Company s Lot No. 20. 



Lumber Company s timber limit, and east 
public reservation. 



:y the Three Mile 



6. The Island known as Great Triton Island in the District 
of Twillingate. 

7. All that piece or parcel of land being the neck between 
Indian Arm and Loon Bay, and extending from Comfort Cove 
on the north side of the road from the bottom of Indian Arm to 
the bottom of Loon Bay on the south. 

8. The Island known as Thwart Island, Exploits. 

9. The Island known as Chapel Island, in the District of 
Twillingate. 

10. All that piece and parcel of land lying between the 
bottom of Brown s Arm and the bottom of Scissors Cove, in the 
District of Twillingate, and extending back from the shore for 
a distance of three miles. 

it. All that piece and parcel of land commencing at a point 
about Terenceville, Fortune Bay, following the coast south-west 
to Point May, continuing thence in a easterly direction to Cape 
Chapeau Rouge, and thence continuing in a north-westerly 
direction to the bottom of Paradise Sound, Placentia Bay, and 
thence to the point of commencement at Terenceville, the said 
land being commonly known as and called the " Burin Pen 
insula. 

12. All that piece and parcel of land in the District of St. 
John s West, bounded on the south-east by the Bay Bulls Road, 
and extending along said road from Doyle s Bridge seven miles 
more or less towards Bay Bulls, thence running southwesterly 
seven miles more or less at right a ngles to the general trend of 
the said Bay Bulls Road, thence about northwesterly seven miles 
more or less, and thence in a straight line seven miles more or 
less to the place of commencement, containing forty-nine square 
miles, more or less. 

13. All that piece and parcel of land being a strip fifty feet 
wide on each side of the road leading from Fox Harbour fo 
Villa Marie, in the District of Placentia and St. Mary s. 

14. All that piece and parcel of land situate at May s Cove, 
Bay L Argent, in the District of Fortune Bay, and being all the 
timbered land in the said Cove. 

Any person cutting timber for milling purposes on any of the 
lands herein described shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding 
Twenty Dollars for every tree so cut. 

Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
St. John s, this gth day of June, A.D., 1914. 

By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 





THE ARCHBISHOP S WELCOME HOME. 

IS Grace Archbishop Howley returned from l.is visit to Euiope on 
Thursday, July 23, and received an ovation from the deputitions await 
ing his arrival. His Grace visited Spain, Italy and Ireland. While in 
__ Rome, he received audiences with His Holiness Pope Pius X., and with 
other high dignitaries of the Church. On the evening of his return home 
to St. John s, the various Catholic Societies presented His Grace with an Address of 
Welcome which testified to the esteem in which he is held and the way his able admini 
stration of the Church is appreciated. In replying to the address at the Altar steps of 
the Cathedral, His Grace expressed thanks for the hearty welcome accorded him and 
touchingly referred to the grief the news of the recent sealing fatalities caused him. 
While visiting a Christian Brothers school in Tralee, Ireland, the band conducted by 
Brother Power, a Newfoundlander, welcomed the visitors with the tune, entitled " The 
Banks of Newfoundland." His Grace keenly enjoyed his visit to Ireland and reports, 
as a result of his observations there, that the country is now richly flourishing and that 
the Irish people are exhibiting a buoyant spirit which indicates that within the next 
quarter of a century Ireland will regain much of her ancient prosperity and glory. 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.?*. 



SUGAR. 

We can always quote 
the Lowest Prices on 

American Granulated Sugar 

(barrels), and 

Cube Sugar 

HEARN & Co., 

Wholesale Provision Dealers, 

St. John s, Newfoundland. 



in barrels 
and boxes. 



Our Clothes and 
Furnishings for Boys 

are receiving very special compliments 
from the many Pleased Mothers who have 
been here. 

The Good Quality, Neat Styles 

and exceptional values are what pleased them. 

They will please you, too. 

T. J. BARRON, 

Boys and Men s Outfitter. 



358 Water Street. 




Newfoundland 
Savings Bank. 

Established in 1834. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature. 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ........ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1- 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...... 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

DIRECTORS : 

Hon. George Skelton, M.D., 
Hon. John Harris, P.L.C., 

Hon. John B. Ayre, M.L.C. 

CASHIER: 

Hon. Robert Watson. 

|li|ii|.i|il|ll|ll|il|llllllllllll lllllllll IIIIIHIII ll llll|llllllilllllllli:l I I I I I I I I I I I I I l"lll|l]lllll1lllll1l|llllll l|ll|i |.l|JII I I I I I I I I I 

Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate. 

BRANCHES : Harbor Grace, Heart s Content, Bay Roberts, 
Bell Island, Grand Falls, Placentia, Wesleyville. 

IOO,OOO 





All our popular brands, and just opened. 
Orders by Mail or Express forwarded same day. 

A new shipment of 

Irish Hams and Bacon 
and Pigs Heads. 

New Fruit and Vegetables 

Every Week. 

J. D. RYAN, - - St. John s. 



Sheep Preservation ! 

1. It shall be lawful for the duly qualified electors, resident within an 
area or district within this Colony, to present to the Governor in Coun 
cil a petition or requisition in the form prescribed in the Schedule to this 
Act, or as near thereto as may be, setting forth the limits or boundaries 
within which such area or district is comprised, and the names of the 
towns, harbours or settlements included therein, and praying for a Procla 
mation prohibiting the keeping of dogs within such area or district. 

2. Such petition or requisition shall be sent to the nearest resident 
Stipendiary Magistrate, and shall be by him (after examination and certi 
ficate as hereinafter provided) furnished to the Governor in Council. 

3. If, upon due scrutiny of such petition or requisition, the Stipendiary 
Magistrate shall find that the same contains the bona fide signatures of a 
majority of the duly qualified electors resident within the limits or bound 
aries set forth in the said petition or requisition, he shall forthwith have a 
certificate to that effect endorsed upon or attached to the petition or re 
quisition, and shall forward the same to the Governor in Council. 

4. Any Stipendiary Magistrate to whom such petition or requisition may 
be presented may, before certifying the same to the Governor in Council 
as aforesaid, require proof to be made before him of the bona fide signa 
tures of any of the names subscribed to such petition, upon the oath of 
either the party whose name purports to be signed or of a witness to such 
signature. 

5. Upon receipt of any such petition or requisition containing the signa 
tures of not less than one-third of the electors resident within any such 
area or district, certified as aforesaid, the Governor in Council shall issue 
a Proclamation or Public Notice prohibiting the keeping of dogs within 
such area or district. 

6. From and after the date prescribed in and by such Proclamation or 
Notice, it shall not be lawful for any person resident within such area or 
district, to keep, or have in his possession, or under his control, any dog 
within the area or district to which such Proclamation or Notice shall 
relate, under a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars or imprisonment for a 
term not evceeding three months. This prohibition shall not apply to any 
person or persons travelling or passing through such areas or districts and 
having a licensed dog or dogs in his or their possession, charge or control, 
and not at large. 

A. W. KNIGHT, Clerk of the Peace. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- -34- 

Brief Sketch of Captain George Barbour. 




" Earth, her valleys and her mountain-, 
Mortal man s behest obey 

Thy unfathomable ; fountains 

Scoff his search, and scorn his sway. 

Captain Barbour has been prosecuting the seal fishe y for the 
past forty springs. He was two springs at the ice in the Artel, 
Tvessel owned "at one time by J. & W. Stewart. The Arriv** 
commanded by Capt. Joseph Barbour, Capt Barbour s brother 
Then he went in the Walrus, also owned by J. & W. Stewar 
He next went in the Hector (now Diana) in charge of his 
brother Capt. William Barbour. He was one spring in the 
Eagle with the famous Caot. William Knee; after that we I 
him in the Ranger with his brother Captain Joseph Barbou 
The first year the Hectors re-christened Diana, Capt. Barbour 
was " second hand " of her at the ice. He assumed command 
of a steamer himself in 1893 the ffWrw-a lucky little vessel 
which in one spring succeeded in bringing three trips to pa 
His record since then has been an enviable one, and proud he 
should feel of it, as we know that his many admirers and the 
country in general does. The following is Captain Barbour s 
record for the past twenty-one springs. 



Photo by l ey.1 CAPTAIN GEORGE BARBOUR. 

OUR readers, we are sure will be pleased with the following 
outline of the principal events in the life of Captlin 
George Barbour, one of Newfoundland s most succassful Vikings. 
Born at Cobbler s Island, near Newtown, Bonavista Bay, 1858, 
he was but twelve and a half years of age, when he was first 
swayed on the bosom of old ocean, since then h? has been a 
faithful devotee of the hardships and dangers which are met 
with on the broad Atlantic, either when smiling summer sheds 
her balmy breezes, or when rude Boreas blows his strongest in 
the winter time. The poet tells us in the choicest and most 
philosophical language, the weakness of mankind when pitted 
against the ocean s might 



Year. 
1893... 


Steamer 
, . . Walrus .... 


No. Seals. 

. . . . 5,288 
10 065 


Year. 

1905 
1906. . 


Steamer. 
.... Neptune . . 


No. Seals. 

21,220 

. . . 24.020 


IO94. . 


(t 


3,028 


1907, . 


.. 


30,985 




, 






it 


23,814 


1807 




899 


1909. . 


.... Beothic . . 


34,837 


iSnS 


4[ 


14 O78 


1910. . 


H 


32,029 











U 


35.767 


1599- . . 




. . . . 25,Il6 


1912. . 


.... Wascofie . . . 


i7,o57 




u 


26 $2$ 


1913 . . 


.. 


31,805 






2C 707 


1QI4. - 


.1 


18,151 














1903. . . 




. 12 874 




Total 


461,213 
















Photo l>y IMli ~a. ny. 

MESSRS. JOB BROS. & CO. S S.S. " NASCOPIE," CAPTAIN GEORGE BARBOUR. 



Captain Birbour s average for the past fourteen springs 
amounts to 25,644 seals. Benjamin Barbour, of Pinchard s 
Island, and Rebecca Green, of the same place, were the fajher 
and mother of Captain Barbour ; nine sons and two daughters 
blessed the union. Captain Barbour was married to Miss 
Oakley, a daughter of Robert Oakley, at one time lighthouse 
keeper on Little Denisr Island, Bonavista District Their 
family consists of three all young men Stanly, Wilfred, and 
Percy. The former is the eldest, and the past spring was in 
command at the ice-fields of Crosbie & Go s Fogota. Percy was 
" second hand " with his father in the Nascopie, and Wilfred is 
at Vancouver, British Columbia, where we know that he will, 
like his father and brothers, make an 
honoured name for himself. Four of 
Capt. Barbour s brothers were well 
known and successful sealing masters 
in their day, namely, James, Thomas, 
William and Joseph. Capt. Barbour 
was three summers fishing in the s.s. 
Euphrates at the Straits of Bell 
Isle, and was very fortunate, and 
also one summer in the Diana fishing 
at Cape Chidley and one summer in 
the Stella Maris on the Mail Service 
at Northern Labrador for the Gov 
ernment and the Reid-Newfoundland 
Company. Captain Barbour is of 
medium height, has a clear, fresh com 
plexion and a merry twinkle in his 
keen blue eyes. He is a very enjoy 
able companion, without the least 
attempt at bluster, being af a very 
quiet disposition ; and in consequence 
has won a host of admirers. THE 
NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY hopes 
that he will be long spared to hunt 
the seal, and \ve know our many read 
ers of all classes will join with us in 
wishing him health and happiness and 
a continuation of success. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



Sailings Every Saturday to Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. 

TUB RED CROSS LINE 

Bl 




*****> 



*, and St. John s, Newfoundland. This service will be 



"STEPHANO" and "FLORIZEL," 



3r this service. Steamers remain long enough at each port to enable passengers to visit these interesting cities 
the summer at Chester, Digby, Hubbards or any of the other charming seaside resorts in Nova Scotia will 
rind that the Red Cross Line provides the best, easiest and most direct method of getting there. 

the Lw nhh? ,? K Tfi , fiS ling >ll th | Vidnity f St J hn>S - Lodl Leven and Rainbow trout have been im P rted Curing 
e angler of the very best fishing. The finest salmom fishing on this side of the Atlantic can be reached in one day from 
bt. Johns at very small expense. 

Ptarmigan or grouse shooting is from October ist to January i2th. Caribou shooting commences August ist, and in no other 

the world can big game shooting be enjoyed for so little expense. 

The rate for the round trip including berth and meals while at sea and in port is only $60.00 and up according to accommo- 
llustrated folder, with complete rates, plans, sailings and other information will be sent upon application to 

BOWRING & COMPANY, ^l^^.^ 1 ^. 



A Dainty and Delicious 

SODA BISCUIT 



f 

I 
1 



TIP TOP 

TIP TOP 



For your Biscuit Requirements ask 
for those manufactured by 

fl. fiarocp $ Co. 



Best Ingredients, 



Finest Grades. 



I 

i 

I 



I 
i 



Why did the Fly fly? 

Because the Spider spied her? ^ ^ 

No, but because the T router was using McMurdo s 
Tar Oil and Pennyroyal on his face and hands. If 
you use that, the flies will fly away. It is the 
best thing to keep them off. Against mosquitoes 
it is particularly effective. Try it on your next 
T routing Excursion and you will never omit it 
from your list again. Prepared only by 

THOMAS McMURDO & COMPANY, 

CHEMISTS SINCE 1823. 

Water Street and Military Road. 



Three Great Leaders: 

Passage s Soaps, 
Texaco Kerosene, 

Fairbanks-Morse 
Motor Engines. 

GEO. M. BARR, Agent. 



W. & G. RENDELL, 

Insurance, Property, and 
General Commission Agents, 

Water Street, - St. John s, Newfoundland. 



-Importers of and Dealers in- 



Lumber of all descriptions, Paints, Oils, 
Cement, Roofing Materials, &c. 

A large supply of above goods always in stock. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR- 

RAINBOW PAINTS, AND 

BRANTFORD ROOFING, 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 36. 



The CaU to London* 

An English Song Cycle. 



Lilac Time. 

By Alfred Noyes. 
Go down to Kew in lilac-time, in lilac-time, in lilac-time ; 

Go down to Kew in lilac-time (it isn t far from London . ) 
And you shall wander hand in hand with love in summer s wonderland ; 

Go down to Kew in lilac-time (it isn t far from London !) 

The cherry-trees are seas of bloom and soft perfume, and sweet perfume, 
The cherry-trees are seas of bloom (and oh, so near to London !) 

And there they say when dawn is nigh and all the world s a blaze of sky 
The cuckoo, though he s very shy, will sing a song for London. 

The nightingale is rather rare and yet they say you ll hear him there 
At Kew, at Kew in lilac-time (and oh, so near to London !) 

The linnet and the throstle too, and after dark the long halloo 
And golden-eyed tu-whit, ttt-wAoo of owls that ogle London. 

For Noah hardly knew a bird of any kind that isn t heard 
At Kew, at Kew at lilac-time (and oh, so near to London !) 

And when the rose begins to pout and all the chestnut spires are out 
You ll hear the rest without a doubt, all chorussing for London: 

Come down to Kew in lilac-time, in lilac-time, in lilac-time, 
Come down to Kew in lilac-time (it isn t far from London f) 

And you shall wander hand in hand with love in summer s wondei land ; 
Come down to Kew in lilac-time (it isn t far from London !| 



The Call lo London. 

By Radcly/e Halt. 
Come to London, young lad, 

There s much to be seen. 
* But," said he, "! cannot come, maid. 
Till the cuckoos all be dumb, maid. 

On the hills of green." 

Come to London, fine ?ad. 

Here s where money flows. 
" But," said he, " There s gold in plenty. 
Gold enough and more for twenty 

Wheie the King Cup grows." 

Come to London, strong lad, 

I am waiting you. 

" But," said he, " It be a grand sight 
"When the stars at midnight 

Stretch along the blue." 

Come lo London, dear lad, 

I am fair to see. 

" But," said he, " Aiong our way 
The trees are thick with white-may 

Wonderful they be." 



Down Vauxhall Way. 

By Edward Tisekemacher. 
When Lady Betty walks abroad, 
By all who see her she s adored, 

At Vauxhall in the morning ; 
The very stones are proud to beait 
A burden that s so light and fair. 

At Vauxhall in the morning! 

But none do love her more than I r 
When her sweet presence wanders by. 
The sun breaks through the leaden sky 
At Vauxhall in the m&rning t 

There are roses fair at Chelsea, there are daffodils at Kew,, 
And the primrose many in Richmond s lanes adorning., 
Bat the flower I hold most sweet, 
Is the blossom that I meet 
Down Vauxhall way upon a summer morning I 



When Lady Betty passes by, 

I strive to catch her bright blue eye, 

At Vauxhall in the morning; 
And when I think she smiles at me 
In Paradise I seem to be, 

Not Vauxhall way that morning ! 

O may life s skies on her ne er frown, 
Her days be glad, of fair renown, 
Without her, sad were London Town 
At Vauxhall in the morning. 



May-Day at Islington. 

By Edward Taichemacher. 
Here s a rabble, here s a rout, 
Here s a merry song and shout, 
Here s a crowd down every way. 
At Islington on May-day ! 

Lassies young in charming frocks, 
Farmer Boys in caps and frocks, 
London lads whose work is done, 
One and all just out for fun. 

Seeking all a day of leisure, 
Hours of mirth and love s sweet treasure. 
Filling high life s cup of pleasure 
At Islington on May-day ! 

So come to the Fair with a hey down derry O ! 
Life s a song that is blithe and merry O ! 
Step it out with a hey ho nonny no . 
Choose a lass that is young and bonny O ! 

Leave afar your care and pain, 
All dark thoughts and dreams disdain. 
Greet the merry spring again. 
At Islington on May-day ! 

Here s a rabble, here s a shout ! 
What s the happy throng about ? 
Here s a lad with frowning face 
Duck him in the pond apace ! 

Here s a gipsy who foretells, 
If you ve money, wedding bells ! 
There is Parson Jack you see, 
Rush him round the May-pole tree ! 

All the world a Fair is seeming, 
Golden skies above are gleaming, 
Life s a dream that s worth the dreaming 
At Islington on May-day ! 



Spring in London. 

By John Davidson. 

At early dawn through London you must go 
Until you come where long black hedgerows grow 
With pink buds pearled, with here and there a tree, 

And gates and stiles; and watch good country folk- 

And scent the spicy smoke 

Of withered weeds that burn where gardens be ; 
And in a ditch perhaps a primrose see 
The rooks shall stalk the plow, larks mount the skies, 

Blackbirds and speckled thrushes sing aloud 

Hid in the warm white cloud 
Mantling the thorn, and far away shall rise 
The milky low of cows and farmyard cries 

F TVi n u y heavens th e climbing sun shall shine 

And { ebruary greet you like a maid 

In russet cloak arrayed ; 

And you shall take her for your mistress fine 
And pluck a crocus for her valentine. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 1 



Parker & Monroe, Ltd. 

Wear Our Makes of footwear. 




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"Victoria" and 
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" Cinderella" and 
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Contractor, Builder t 
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Estimates Given for all kinds 
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([^^Manufacturers and Real Estate Owners contemplating 
any addition to their present holdings, or the erection of new 
structures, will find it advantageous to get our estimates and 
terms. 



Customs Circular 



* No. 15 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, Angler s Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms, and Am 
munition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be admitted 
under the following conditions: 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipage. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
St. John s, if taken in St. John s the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
o the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre 
senting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com 
pared with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken upon such articles. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Deputy Min ster of Customs. 
CUSTOM HOUSE, 

St. John s. Newfoundland, June, 1914. 



HENLEY S 



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Orders Called For and Delivered Free. 

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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 

An Old Hunting Ground* 




the Island. 



jIRCHY, Aldery, and Adies Lakes are situated 
about half way between the head of Deer Lake 
and the bottom of White Bay and are the sources 
of that noble river the Upper Humber. Together 
^ the route affords one of the finest canoe trips in 
Starting on Humber Arm, up the Lower Humber, 
and from end to end of Deer Lake, the Upper Humber over 
the big falls, (or Grand Falls) to the west branch of the Upper 
Humber, through Aldery Lake, thence Bircy Lake, to Adies 
Lake, and Silver Mountain, in all over ninety miles. 

Dr. Sexton of the Public Health Department and Willard 
Parker Reception Hospitals, New York, made this trip 
last season accompanied by a party of friends with guide, E. P. 
Brake, of Bay of Islands, and was so delighted with the trip that 
he intends to return the coming season for a much longer stay. 

The country all along, but especially around Birchy Lake, is 
an ideal hunting ground. Judging from the great number of 
Caribou found there it would appear that this locality is used by 
them as a resting place, or a herding park before they migrate 
south over the Topsails each Autumn. 

Dr. Sexton securtd some of the finest antlers ever taken 
from the country. He was surprised at the immense herds of Cari 
bou and the abundance of other game all along the route, and 
our country he said is truly " A Sportman s Paradise." 

In connection with this Birchy Lake country I have a little 
bit of interesting history to offer : In speaking of that locality to 
one of our western guides a year ago, he informed me that the 
previous summer, while hunting there, he located a monster 
pine tree with the following inscription cleverly cut thereon, to 
gether with a number of Masonic symbols in the lower left hand 
corner: 



By D. F. Meaney, Humbermouth. 

Alo the following from a correspondent signing "Old Timer": 

"In your issue of the i 3 th inst. there is a communication 
from Humbermouth, Newfoundland, headed " Mystery of the 
Pines " For the information of your correspondent I woi 
that during the years mentioned (1853-7) and later, there lived 
in Halfax Captain William Chearnley and rus brother, whos 
name I think was John. 

William was a retired Captain of the British Army and was a 
great sportsman. He took an active part in the formation of 
the old Volunteer Companies, now composing the 63rd Rifles 
of Halifax, and was.if I remember rightly, their firt Colonel. 
Cope is a common name among the Micmac Indians and it 
looks as if the Messrs Chearnley accompanied by Cope as a 
Guide, must have been in the habit of visiting the place men 
tioned on hunting expeditions during those years. 

Many of our eldery citizens will remember Colonial Chearn 
ley quite well and I am surprised that no one (so far as I have 
seen) has written you on the subfect. Possibly there may be 
no connection between the tree inscription and the gentlemen 
mentioned, however. 

OLD TIMER. 

Halifax, Feb. 2 4 th. 

I have received several communications in connection with 
above, but the letters given sufficiently prove that Birchy Lake, 
and Aldery Lake conntry, that ideal hunting ground, was re 
sorted to as early as sixty years ago, and must have afforded 
excellent sport to induce Colonel Chearnley to visit it four years 
in succession, and again after an interval of three years, particu 
larly when we consider the means of travel and accommodation 
in those early dajs, and (he fact that the Maritime Provinces 
offered good hunting in their virgin forests. But perhaps then 
as now Newfoundland was the real " Sportsman s Paradise." 



William Chearnley 
John Chearnley 
Tames Cope 

Halifax, N.S. 



Sept. 171 M 



7th, 1853 
1854. 
1855 
1856 
1859 



The discovery was so interesting that I sent particulars of it to 
the Halifax Chronicle and the following information was received 
from Mr. John A. Boak, of Chicago (who by the way is the 
Reid-Newfoundland Co s General Agent in that city) : 
To The Editor of the Chronicle : 

Sir, In your issue of February i3th I notice an article head 
ed " Mystery of the Pines " referring to William and John 
Chearnley. William Chearnley was formerly a captain of the 
8th King s own Regiment and came to Halifax, Nova Scotia, 
I believe with that regiment between 1850 and 1860. He was 
a famous hunter and no doubt hunted in Newfoundland as well 
as Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. 

Captain Chearnley was afterwards Colonel of the Halifax 
Volunteer Battalion, which ts now known as the &3rd Rifles. 
He died in Halifax in 1870 or 1871 and with his brother John 
who died before him was buried in Camp Hill Cemetary, leav 
ing a wife, who was the daughter of the late Captain John 
McNab, and a daughter Mrs. Lambe who have resided in 
Rome, Italy, since 1878. 

Mrs. Chearnley was a sister of my wife. Some of the older 
residents of Halifax especially any of the Chebucto Greys, will 
remember the Colonel and can give you any further information 
you require. My recollection is that George Ackhurst was like 
myself, a full private in the Greys when Colonel Chearnley com 
manded the Battalion, and George Piers was our Captain. 

JOHN A. BOAK. 

Chicago, Feb. i8th, 1913. 



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Provisions and Oilmen s Stores, etc., etc. 

Commission 2^/2 per cent, to j per cent. 

Trade Discounts allowed. 

Special Quotations on Demand. 

Sample Cases from $50.00 upwards. 

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A FEW HINTS 

Regarding Tire Danger 

DON T use coal or gas Stoves or Heaters unless securely set on 
stone, concrete or metal; all woodwork near stoves or 
pipes must be well protected. Gas Stoves on metal-clad 
wood or with flexible pipes are objectionable. 

DON T put Ashes in wooden boxes or barrels ; use onl) metal 
ash cans. 

DON T have Steam-pipes in contact with woodwork or near 
inflammable materials, and don t permit rubbish to accu 
mulate behind radiators or steam coils. 

DON T hang clothes or drapery near open Fires or Stoves, or 
on Stove-pipes or Steam-pipes. 

DON T permit loose-jointed Gas Brackets, which can be swung 
against woodwork or curtains, or Gas Brackets without 
wire screens or globes if inflammable materials are near. 

DON T destroy the insolation on flexible electric light or fan 
cords by hanging them on hooks or nails. 

DON T fail to keep Lamps filled and wicks trimmed; with the 
oil low, explosive gas may be generated ; but in no case 
fill the lamps after dark. 

DON T permit Benzine, Gasoline or Explosives on your pre 
mises unless used from approved safety cans. 

DON T throw oily waste or rags on the floor ; keep them in 
approved self-closing cans during the day and at night 
remove from the building they are self-igniting. 

DON T mix greasy or oily rags w th papers or with clean 
clippings, or keep more clippings in your place (even if 
clean and in bales), than is unavoidable. 

DON T use sawdust on floors or in spitoons. or to catch oil 
drippings from machines or gearing. Sand is safe. 

DON T keep Matches loose in paper boxes, but only in metal or 
earthen safes. Those lighting on the box are safest. 

DON T throw away lighted cigars, cigarettes, or matches. 

DON T permit your employees to Smoke. Don t permit any 
one to Smoke in a Garage ; or if combustible materials 
are kept on the premises. 

DON T store gasolene in a Garage or fill cars from open 
vessels. 

DON T fail to have fire-pails filled, distributed and placed in 
conformity to Rules of local Boards of Fire Underwriters. 

DON T fail to test periodically your hose and fire appliances. 

DON T permit Stairs or Hallways to be blocked up or used for 
storage, or permit packing materials and rubbish to accu 
mulate and remain on your premises ; packing materials 
must be kept in approved metal-lined bins. 

DON T fail to close at night all doors and traps to Elevators, 
Hoistways, Stairs and Communications, as well as Iron 
Shutters. 

DON T forget that Neglect and Carelessness are the cause of 
more fires than all other things. 

And above all things keep your Matches where 
children cannot get at them. 

JOHN SULLIVAN, 

Inspector General of Constabulary, 

and Chief of Fire Department. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 40. 

The Mawson Expedition* 



Off TO ANTARCTICA. 

WHEN early in December, 1911, the Australian Antartic 
Research Expedition sailed from Hobart for the frozen south in 
the sturdy Aurora, it was intended that Dr. Mawson and his gal 
lant comrades, should spend but one winter in that solitary land. 
For the intrepid leader and six other members of the main base 
party, however, events so shaped themselves that they were 
obliged to remain yet another year amid the ice, whilst other 
two brave men were never more to return! On January 13, 
1912, Mawson and fouiteen of his followers were landed at 
Commonwealth Bay. Stores were discharged, and then the 
Aurora steamed westward with Mr. Wild and eight other mem 
bers of the expedition. These landed in due course at the 
second base a distance of some 1,300 mile as the crow flies. 
The sea route was 1,600 miles. Numerous sledging trips fol 
lowed, hampered by terrible weather. At the main base in 
Adelie Land, much useful work was done. The Aurora, mean 
while, had returned to Australia. She was due to pick up the 
western party on February i, 1913, but it was February 13 be 
fore this feat was accomplished. Early on the morning of Janu 
ary 13, exactly a year after the landing of the main party, the 
Aurora reappeared in Commonwealth Bay, but Dr. Mawson, 
Dr. Mertz, and Lieutenant Ninnis had not returned from a 
lengthy sledging trip. 



The cold winds swept the mountain-height. 
And pathless was the dreary wild" 

The Snow-Storm. 

corned with joy, clouded, however, by the story of the loss of 
his less fortunate companions. The narration of that remark 
able journey has thrilled with pride, not only Australia, but the 
whole of the British Empire. 

On the other side of the ice the memorable Scott tragedy had 
been enacted, but although that impressive event has almost 
obsessed the public mind, the deaths of Mawson s comrades, 
and his own triumph over perilous odds, are now appealing to 
the imagination in a way that must give a high place on the roll 
of fame to the heroes of the research expedition. 



A TALE OF DISASTER. 

WITH eighteen Greenland dogs these three heroes had set 
out to tra/erse some 600 miles. As they did not return when 
expected, sledge parties were sent out in search, whilst the 
Aurora cruised along the eastern coast. A kite was fllown, de 
tonators were fired at frequent intervals, whilst the ice cliffs 
were carefully scrutinized. A terrible hurricane arose, and the 
ship lost her anchors. Returning to the base, Captain Davis 
had an axious time, as it was imperative to keep faith with the 
party 1,600 miles away. Eventually it was decided to leave six 
members of the expedition behind for another year, besides the 
three who had not returned from the sledging trip. With the 
other six the Aurora started for the second base, where Wild 
and his party were taken aboard, and brought back to Australia 
It is a pathetic circumstance that whilst the Aurora was yet in 
sight at Adelie Land, Dr. Mawson arrived but alore ! It was 
too late to recall the steamer, so the seven men settled down for 
another year in the Antarctica. There had teen a disastrous 
happening. Lieutenant Ninnis, with dogs and sledge, had 
disappeared ; lost in a deep crevasse ! As this sledge contained 
the food supplies, the plight of the survivors was indeed desper 
ate. Dr. Mertz was the next to perish. Fatigue and starva" 
tion proved too much for him, and with reverent hands his 
lonely leader laid him in an icy grave. Undismayed, the heroic 
Mawson continued the perilous journey. For thirty days he 
struggled on, even when the last of the dog flesh had been de 
voured by the famishing man, and had it not been for the provi 
dential discovery of provisions deposited in an elivated cache 
by a search party, he, too, must have succumbed. Probably no 
man ever put up a braver fight for dear life than did this hardy 
and courageous leader of the expedition. Almost exhausted by 
his strenuous exertions, he reached the camp, where he was wel- 



HOME AGAIN. 

MUCH anxiety was felt in Australia during the enforced exile 
of Dr. Mawson and his six companions. Happily this anxiety 
was relieved by occasional wireless messages. It was, there 
fore, with intense relief that Australia learned that the Aurora 
(which had returned to the Adelie base after a sojourn in Aus 
tralian waters) was sighted on February 26, 1914, making her 
slow way toward St. Vincent s Gulf. The next day Captain 
Davis, who deserves the highest praise for the part he took in 
the great enterprise, landed his precious freight at Port Adel 
aide. Owing to the delay in coming up the gulf there was little 
demonstration when the Aurora arrived, but Adelaide and Aus 
tralia rose to the occasion at the public gatherings held in 
honour of the home coming explorers. Nothing could exceed 
the warmth of the welcomes there given. The Governor-Gen 
eral (Lord Denman) had hurried across the border to be pre 
sent, and in a notable speech he paid just tribute to Dr. Maw 
son and his men. 

The King s message was a timely one, and was appreciated 
by all, and the heads of numerous societies expressed the pride 
and satisfaction of the educational and scientific world at the 
achievements of the Australian Scientific Research Expedition. 
But the popular gathering at the Adelaide Town Hall on March 
3 unmistakably showed that Dr. Mawson and those who shared 
in the great adventure, had touched the hearts and captured the 
imagination of all sorts and conditions of people. 



on 



THE RESULTS. 

It is too soon, perhaps, for experts to pass opinions, 
the actual scientific results of the expedition, but enough is 
known to demonstrate that these are of a likely valuable order. 
Even, however, if such results were practically nil, the feats of 
endurance, the acts of courage, and the tests of comradeship, 
have been of a character that must tell for good in this forma 
tive period of a young nation. Pride in the endeavours of 
brave men, admiration for the manifestation of a sacrificial 
spirit, and satisfaction over the unsullied record of many months 
of closest intimacy, go far to stimulate the best elements in 
national character. 

The Mawson Expedition is now a matter of Australian his 
tory, and it provides a page that reflects credit on its promoters 
and honor on its members, while it will furnish for many a year 
an incentive to the youth of Australia in a direction calculated 
to develop those qualities which have in every generation 
tnbuted to the making of that vast Empire in wS Ss 
monwealth is destined to play no insignificant 
Fauldings Journal, Adelaide, Australia. 



Prosperous & 
Progressive. 

Sun Life Assurance Company 

. ... ~ ~ Of Canada. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Amount of Assurance in force, - 
Payments to Policy holders, - 



$202,363,996.00 
39,385,287.91 



Largest Company 
in British Empire, 

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Fire Premiums for 1912 exceeded.. $6,500,000. 



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OUR BRUSHES is but one line of our business. We have 
for many years been dealing in Lumber, Doors, Sashes, 
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our business and endeavoured to increase it constantly. We 
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E. LEO CARTER. 



]y[orris & Carter, 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

I. All OFFICES: 

<BANK OF MONTREAL WILDING, 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 

P O Box 184 Telephone 184. Cable Address " GIBBS," St. John r s. 

M. P. GIBBS, K.C., 

BARRISTER -AT -LA IV, SOLICITOR and 
NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Commissioner of Deeds for the State of New York. 
Solicitor for the Merchant Service Guild, Liverpool. 

Law Office, BANK OF MONTREAL BUILDING, Water Street, 
St. John s. Newfmindland. 




Notice to Mariners! 



NEWFOUNDLAND. 
(No. i, 1914-) 



Iron Island, 



Off Eastern Entrance to Burin Harbour, Placentia Bay. 

Latitude 47* 02 40" North. 
Longitude 55 06 50" West. 

NOTICE is hereby given that the Fixed Red Light on 
Iron Island is discontinued. 

A. W. PICCOTT, 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
Department Marine and Fisheries, 

St. John s, Newfoundland, February 2oth, 1914. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Department of Agriculture and Mines. 



PUBLIC NOTICE. 

The attention of the Public is called to the following 
provisions of the Act to further amend the Crown Lands 
Act t I 903, passed at the last session of the Legislature : 



Application for Timber Limits. 

SEC. 3. Section 24 of the Crown Lands Acts, 1903, is 
hereby repealed, and the following substituted therefor : 

No such licenses shall be granted until notice of intention to 
apply therefor has been published in the Royal Gazette for a 
period of one month prior to such application. The said notice 
shall contain the name and address of the applicant, and with 
as much certainty as possible shall describe the location and 
boundaries of the land applied for. naming the Electoral i 
District in which same is situated and its approximate area. 

Returns of Timber Cut. 

SUB-SEC. 4, SEC. 4. To make returns to the Government an 
nually on oath, on or before the 3oth of November in each and 
every year of (a) the total quantity of timber cut between the 
ist day of July and the 3Oth day of June then last past, which is 
liable to the payment of royalty ; and (b) of all timber cut for the 
manufacture of paper or paper pulp, also to make returns 
annually, or at such other periods as may be required by the 
Governor in Council, or by regulations under this Act, sworn to 
by him or by his agent or employee, cognizant of the fact of 
the quantity of all sawn lumber, timber, railway car stuff, ship 
timber and knees, shingles, laths, cordwood or bark, or any 
other product of timber sold or disposed of by him during such 
quarter or other period and the price of value thereof, the 
to be liable to a fine of $50.00 if the returns aforesaid 



be not filed in the Department of Agriculture and Mines within 
thirty days from the date on which they nre required to be 
filed as aforesaid. 

Forfeiting Title for Non-Payment of 
Rents of Limits. 

SEC. 6. Whenever the rent or royalties payable under any 
lease to cut timber shall be in arrears and unpaid for the period 
of six months from the day on which the same became due, the 
Governor in Council may, without any suit or other proceedings 
to enjoin the same, declare such license forfeited and there 
upon the same shall be again open to application by the public. 

Survey of Mining Location. 

SEC. 17. Within one year from the date on which notice is 
given by the applicant for a ninety-nine year lease of a mining 
location or locations to the Minister of Agriculture and Mines, 
that it is his attention to hold said land as provided by Section 
47 of the said Crown Lands Act, 1903, such applicant shall, at 
h.s own expense, cause a survey of the location or locations 
referred to therein to be made by a Surveyor approved by the 
Minister of Agriculture and Mines, and shall cause a diagram 
thereof, with the notes of the surveyor, to be filed in the Depart 
ment of Agriculture and Mines within the same period In 
all such surveys of mining locations, the bearings of the 
boundaries shall be from the True Meridian. 




SYDNEY D. BLANDFORD, 



St. John s, Newfoundland, June, J9J4. 



Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 



writing to Advertisers kindly 



EWFOUNDI2USD 





Qutumn fluni6er, 1914 

JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 





7 /V H.M.S. "LANCASTER," 

One of Great Britain s fast cruisers, which is playing an important part in keeping 
the Atlantic open to British and neutral shipping. The Lancaste 
St John s during the war when the above photo was taken. She is at present 
operating off New York. The effective work these cruisers are doing has astonished 
the world. 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




PROCLAMATION 

By His Excellency SIR WALTER E. DAVIDSON, 

Knight Commander of the Most Distingu- 

W. E. DAVIDSON, ished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 

Governor, Governor and Commander-in-Chief, in and 

[L.S.] over the Island of Newfoundland and its 

Dependencies. 



Your King and Your Country Need You ! 
Will You Answer Your Country s Call ? 

At this very moment the Empire is engaged in the greatest 
War in the history of the World. 

In this crisis your country calls on her young men to rally 
round Her Flag and enlist in the ranks of Her Army. 

If every Patriotic young man answers Her Call, Great Britain 
and the Empire will emerge stronger and more united than ever. 

Newfoundland responds to the Homeland s Call and promises 
to enlist, equip and despatch to England the First Newfound 
land Regiment of 500 strong. We want to send our best, and 
we believe that Britain s Oldest Colony will gain greater honour 
and glory for Her Name. 

If you are between 19 and 35 years old, will you answer your 
Country s Call ? If you will, then go to the nearest Magistrate 
and enrol your name for service in the righting line. If you 
live in St. John s go to the C. L. B. Armoury and enter your 
name at the Central Recruiting Office, or any evening between 
8 p.m. and 10 p.m. 

Tickets to St. John s will be provided by the Magistrate free 
of cost. 

The terms of enlistment are : To serve abroad for the dura 
tion of the war, but not exceeding one year. It is intended the 
men shall leave within one month of their enrollment, and that 
in the meantime they shall receive a course of instruction and 
training in St. John s. 

A complete outfit will be provided. 

Each private will receive pay at the rate of $1.00 per day 
and free rations, from the date of enrollment to the date of 
return, a portion of which will be paid to dependents left behind, 
or it will be allowed to accumulate for their personal benefit 
until termination of service. 

Volunteers from outports will be given free passages to 
St. John s. 

Any applicant for service, forwarded by the proper authorities 
and not accepted after arrival at Headquarters, will be provided 
with a free passage and maintenance back to his home. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 

Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
St. John s, this 2ist day of August, A.D., 1914. 

By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " Th* 



PROCLAMATION. 

By His Excellency Sir Walter Edward Davidson, Kn.ght 
Commander of the Most Distinguished Order of St. 
Michael and St. George, Governor and Commander. 
in-Chief, in and over the Island of Newfoundland and 
its Dependencies. 

WHKREAS, by the 2 SS th Section of " The Customs Act, 1898," 
it is enacted that the Governor in Council may prohibit the 
exportation or carriage coastwise of the following goods :- 
Arms, ammunition and gunpowder, military and naval stores and 
any articles which he, by and with the advice aforesaid, deems 
capable of being converted into or made useful in increasing 
the quantity of military or naval stores, or for purposes of 
hostility, or destruction in war, provisions or any sort of victual 
which may be used as food for man. 

AND WHEREAS I by and with the advice of my Council deem 
it expedient and necessary that I should exercise such power of 
prohibition in manner hereinafter appearing: 

Now, therefore, I, by and with the advice aforesaid, do 
hereby order and direct that from and after the date hereof the 
following goods, being articles which I have judged capable of 
being converted into or made useful in increasing the quantity 
of military or naval stores, that is to say : 

Acetone ; 

Aeroplanes, airships, balloons, of all kinds, and their com 
ponent parts ; 

Animals, pack, saddle and draught, suitable for use in war ; 

Arms, rifles of all kinds and their component part-- : 

Benzol ; 

Blast furnace oil ; 

Carbons required for searchlights ; 

Cartridges, charges of all kinds and their component parts; 

Chrome and ferro-chrome ; 

Cloth, hempen ; 

Copper ore ; 

Cotton suitable for use in the manufacture of explosives ; 

Cotton wastes ; 

Creosote ,- 

Dimethylaniline ; 

Engines and lorries, internal combustion, capable of carrying a 
load of 25 cwt. and upwards, whole or in parts. 

Fuel oil shale ; 

Fulminate of mercury ; 

Gunpowder, 

Mineral lubricating oil ; 

Nets, torpedo ; 

Nickel and ferro-nickel ; 

Oil, coal, tar; 

Oil, olive ; 

Petroleum, fuel oil; 

Petroleum, gas oil; 

Petroleum, spirit or motor spirit, (including shell spirit) ; 

Projectiles of all kinds and their component parts ; 

Sacks, coal ; 

Silk cloth, silk-braid, silk-thread, suitable for cartridges 

Silk noiles ; 

Surgical dressings and bandages 

rjl J , 

ioluol ; 

Zinc; 

shall be, and the same are hereby prohibited either to be 

exported from the Colony or carried coast wise. 

Given under my hand and seal, at the Government House, 
St. John s, this 5 th day of August, A.D, 1914. 

By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 






KoK NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 
CANADA. 


I pou 

2 pOU 

3 

4 

6 

8 

9 
10 
1 1 


nd 


8 cents 


24 C 
24 

24 
4 8 
4 8 
4 8 
4 8 
72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel 
less than 




12 ce 
24 
36 
48 
60 
72 
84 
96 
$1 08 


nts 


15 cents. 
3 
45 
60 

75 

90 
$1.05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 


nds 


n" 








14 " .... 


, 






17 " 


, 






20 " 


, 






23 " 








26 " 








2Q " 








-12 " 
















? c 








Under I Ib. weight, I cent 
per 2 oz. 


5ent to U. K. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



General Post Office. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 

RSTES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 . 5 cts. Over 50 but not exceeding $60. . . .30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 10 cts. Over $60 but not exceeding $70.. . -35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 15 cts. Over 70 but not exceeding $80 .. . . 4 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. Over $80 but not exceeding $90 . . 45 cts - 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. Over #90 but not exceeding $100. . 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John s, Newfoundland, Sept., 1914. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



Postal Telegraph 




POSTAL TELEGRAPH OFFICES are operated throughout the Colony at all 
the principal places. Messages of ten words, not including address or signature, are forwarded 
for Twenty Cents, and two cents for each additional word. 

A Government cable to Canso, Cape Breton, connects with the Commercial Cable Co. s s>stem 
to all parts of the World. There is no more efficient Telegraphic Service in existence. 

A ten word message to Canada, exclusive of i From $O.85 

signature and address, costs 

A ten word message to the United States, | From $I.IO 
exclusive of signature and address, costs 

To Great Britain, France or Germany-25 cents per word. 

Telegrams are transmitted by means of the Wireless Service during the summer season, and 
all the year round to Steamers equipped with the wireless apparatus, which are due 
the radius of the wireless stations at Cape Race and Cape Ray. 

Telegraph messages may be obtained at all Post Offices and from Mail Clerks on Trains and 
Steamers and if the sender wishes the messages may be left with the P. 
first mail to the nearest Telegraph Office free of postage. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

General Post Office, St. John s, Newfoundland, Sept., 1914. 

When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 






Imperial Life Assurance Co y 
Of Canada. Head Office> Toront - 

When You are Old 

\\ ho ll provide the money to keep you ? Will 
you then be compelled to keep on working the 
same as some old men you know ? Or will you 
be able to enjoy an old age of comfort and 
independence ? 

A moderate annual saving now when you can 
spare the money invested in an Imperial En 
dowment Policy "ill secure you a regular income 
in your old age ; or it will provide for your 
family should death call you early. 

Apply for Rates to 

JAS. A. MACKENZIE, 

Manager for Newfoundland, 



P. O. Box 147. 



Law Chambers Building. 



American 
Sole Leather, 



We offer at wholesale prices 
Best Trimmed and Ordinary 
Leather, 



Selected Quality. 



HEARN & Co. 



Two 
New Models. 



Keystone Vacuum Sweepers, 

Rolls off and on Rugs t lifting over 
Polished Floors without scratching. 

Guaranteed forever against Mechanical Defects. 

BOWRING BROTHERS, LIMIHD, 

Hardware Department. 



W. & G. RENDELL, 

Insurance, Property, and 
General Commission Agents, 
Water Street, - St. John s, Newfoundland. 



-Importers of and Dealers in- 



Lumber of all descriptions, Paints, Oils, 
Cement, Roofing Materials, &c. 

A large supply of above goods always in stock. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR 

RAINBOW PAINTS, AND 

BRANTFORD ROOFING. 



North West 

fire Insurance Co. of Winnipeg. 

Incorporated 1880. 

Policies Guaranteed by the Union Assurance Society, 
of London, England. 

Chas. O Neill Conroy, 



Oke Building, S. John s. 



Aaent for Newfoundland, 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention 



Vol. XIV. No. 2. 



OCTOBER, 1914. 



40 cents per year. 



The War and Afterwards* 




By Dr. Arthur 

lURING the past thirty years the leading nations 
have made wonderful progress. Trade and com 
merce have rapidly developed, wealth has accu 
mulated and the standard of living has advanced. 
In addition to the remarkable increase in the 
material aspects of national life, there has been 
a widespread development of education, and the evolutionary 
theories of Darwin have caused scholars to revolutionize most 
branches of learning. The psychological results of these vast 
changes in thought and national well-being have be^n no less 
remarkable. They have been objectively shown in the advance 
ment in civilization of Japan, China and other Oriental nations, 
the destruction of the Boer republics through overweening am- 




HIS MAJESTY KING GEORGE V. 



Selwyn- Brown. 

bition, the Russo-Japanese, Balkan and Mexican wars and the 
revolutionary outbreaks in many European States. In every 
nation which has experienced the evolutionary movement 
towards a higher civilization, there have been counter movements 
of a conservative nature. Powerful forces have been operating 
against progress. The results of these forces have been widely 
manifested in labour disputes, opposition to enlightened legisla 
tion, taxation, and social improvement. At the same time, some 
political parties have been exceedingly active in propagating 
schemes for national aggrandizement by military conquest. In 
the United States, Russia, Japan, the Balkan nations, Italy and 
in Austria and Germany, the military parties have been particu 
larly active and aggressive. In consequence of their various 
propaganda, the world s peace has been greatly disturbed during 
the past two generations. The present war will probably mark 
the culmination of these extraordinary national movements. 

The great European upheaval now in progress was caused by 
the blood-lust of the Germanic people who have been preparing 
for the war with a fixed purpose for over forty years. When 
the German people conquered France in the wars of 1870-71 
and secured the rich booty from the French treasury, they deter 
mined to dominate the whole of Europe. Immediately on the 
resumption of peace, extensive plans were made for increasing 
the military establishment of the German empire and for the 
investment of the billion dollar war indemnity. This money 
was partly expended in fortifications and artillery and partly in 
building up a great mercantile marine and lately in establishing 
a powerful fleet of battle ships. 

In the meantime, the whole of the manhood of Germany was 
forced into either the army or navy and all the national thought 
was centied on the conquest of the world by military, naval and 
aerial forces. Much territory was won by diplomatic means. 
Germany has always been looked upon as a nation in arms 
ready to fight for territorial spoils and her diplomats have 
always seized the chances to secure colonies whenever foreign 
disputes arose, In this way, colonies were secured in Africa, 
China, Oceania and elsewhere. Recent adventures of this 
character were undertaken in Morocco and Turkey. The 
present war was commenced with the object of seizing large por 
tions of European territory, and robbing France with the 
view of obtaining the vast financial resources necessary to assist 
in the conquest of the British Empire. 

The plans for this war were drawn long ago and they were 
widely published. In a book entitled " Germany in the Twen 
tieth Century," published in Berlin early in 1900, the author, 
General Eisenhart, said : " We consider a great war with 
England in the 2oth century as quite inevitable and we must 
strain every fibre in order to be prepared to fight that war single 
handed." 

General Von der Goltz, in a military review, published in 
March, 1900, stated : " We must contradict the frequently ex 
pressed opinion that a war between Germany and Great Britain 
is impossible. The material basis of our power is large enough 
to enable us to destroy the present superiority of Great Britain." 

The " Kolfliiiale Zeitshrift,on January i8tb, 1900, said : 
" The old century (the XlXth) saw a German Europe. 
new one shall see a German U orld. To attain that consum- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 2. 



mation two duties are required from the present German 
generation : to keep its own counsel and create a powerful 
fleet." 

Events have shown that while the German people failed to 
keep its own counsel, and boldly boasted of its intentions to 
conquer England, it did build a powerful fleet. Indeed, it failed 
lamentably to keep its own counsel. The country has been 
deluged with writings and speeches proposing plans for the con 
quest of England and the German domination of the world. 
The writings of Von Tirpitz, Von der Goltz, Treilschke, 
Bernhardi and other Pan-Germanists have exposed all the 
German aims and taught the world that under the pretence of 
civilizing the world, the leaders of the Germanic people have 
for the past forty years bent every effort to develop the strong 
blood-lust of the Teutons with the single object of again over 
running the world, like their Hunnish ancestors in earlier days, 
and robbing the nations of their wealth. 

The German people let it be known to all mankind before 
the present war commenced : (i) That Germany intended to 
fight a ruthless war with the object of conquering Belgium, 
robbing France of her wealth and England of her brilliant 
position in the world. They aimed at seizing England s " place 
under the sun," as they phrased it. 

(2) The ambition of the Germanic people was the acquire 
ment of the world s wealth and the establishment of a world 
wide dominance by Germany a vast Germanic suzerainty. 

All readers of the German press will recall endless statements 
of the aims of the German people. The following abstracts 
from prominent writings and speeches will indicate German 
views. The Emperor said in an address to his troops : 

" I christen thee Fort Haeseler. Thou wilt be called upon 
to defend the conquests of Germany against her Western foes." 

This passage occurs in a speech of the E nperor s on March 
i, 1900, on the occasion of the completion of a fort. Seven 
months later, in celebrating Moltke s birthday, he expressed the 
desire that " the staff may lead Germany to further victories." 
A few years later he said at an anniversary : 

" Nothing inust be settled in this world without the inter 
vention of Germany and of the German Emperor." 

In a formal history Professor Treitschke writes : 

" To whom will belong the sceptre of the universe ? What 
nation will impose its wishes on the other decadent and enfeebled 
people? Will it not be Germany that will have the mission to 
ensure the peace of the world ? . . . The future belongs to 
Germany, to which Austria will attach herself if she wishes to 
survive." 

The most popular historical work that has appeared ia 
Germany is "The Foundations of the Nineteenth Century." In 
reviewing early German history the author says: 

"It was high time that the deliverer appeared. . . . We 
can regret only one thing that the German did not, everywhere 
his conquering arm preyed, exterminate more completely." 

The theologians are as bitter as the professors. Professor 
Lezius was cheered by students and professors for the following 
passage in a popular lecture : 

" All Polish societies should be suppressed without the slight 
est apology . as well as the societies of Alsace and 
Lorraine, and Schleswig-Holstein. . . . The people should 
be allowed only three privileges : to pay taxes, serve in the 
army and shut their jaws." 

If the professors and divinity teachers spe.ik in this way, 
what are we to expect of the soldiers ? General Von Bernhardi 
writes : 

" The efforts directed towards the abolition of war must not 
only be termed foolish but absolutely immoral, and must be 
described as unworthy of the human race." 

This statement lead; to two direct and practical conclusions : 

" (a) France must be so completely crushed that she can 
never again come across our path, (b) A pacific agreement 
with England is after all a will-o -the-wisp which no serious 
German would trouble to follow" 

The standard passage for German delight in the winning of a 
bloody and brutal war is the Kaiser s speech on the eve of the 
Chinese expedition ; the most ruthless passage in the speech 
was circulated on post-cards throughout Germany. 



" When you meet the foe you will defeat him. No quarter 
will be gnwi, no prisoner will be taken. Let all who fall into 
your hands be at your mercy." 

The rest of the passage urges the Germans to act like Huns 
who ravaged Europe a thousand years ago. Field-Marshal Von 
der Goltz, who was sent to train the Turks because they were 
" the only people who could attack the British trade route to 
liuli;i," wrote a book entitled "The Nation in Arms." It leads 
up to this : 

"Wars are the fate of mankind, the inevitable destiny of 
nations. . . . Inexorability and seemingly hideous callous 
ness are among the qualities necessary to him who would achieve 
great things in war." 

It vv.is to a people educated with such sentiments as these that 
the German Chancellor said : 

" We are now in a state of necessity, and necessity knows no 
law. Our troops have occupied Luxemburg, and perhaps are 
already on Belgian soil. Gentlemen, that Is contrary to the dic 
tates of international law. The wrong I speak openly that 
we are committing we will endeavour to make good as soon as 
our military goal is achieved." 

The belief in war is founded on an amizing conceit, fed by 
a host of popular and professional wtiters, that Germans are 
"The Chosen People." 

" True history begins from the moment svhen the German, 
with mighty hand, seizes the inheritance of antiquity." 

So writes the author of " The Foundations of the Nineteenth 
Century," and he is followed by the preachers. 

" The German people is the elect of God, and its enemies 
are the enemies of the Lord," is one pulpit utterance. 

" We are the best colonists, the best sailors, and even the best 
merchants. . . . We are the most intelligent nation there 
is, and the most advanced in science and art. We are, without 
contradiction, ihe most warlike people on earth." 

Such is another claim, one of hundreds of a like tenor. They 
are followed by the sonorous passage from a speech of the 
Kaiser s, who usually says pictoriilly and grandiloquently what 
his public feels and thinks: 

" Our German people will be the granite block on which the 
good God may complete his work of civilizing the world. Then 
will be realised the word of the poet who said the world will one 
day be cured by the German character." 

Von Bernhardi tersely summarizes the civic aphorisms of 
Germany thus : 

1. The first duty of every citizen is to the State. 

2. As war is not only an integral part of hununity but the 
great civilizing influence of the world, it is the duty o f every 
State, and every citizen of every State, to be prepared for war. 

3. England is stati >nary or retrog essive i.i the world s pro 
gress. Germany is the coming world-pnver, who by her rise 
will elevate the world s standard of civiliza ion, art and com 
merce. Germany s rise is, in fact, civilization s greatest asset 

4. Germany s inevitable expansion is being jealously watched 
by other countries. 

5. It is the duty of Germany to utilize \\\ and every means to 
protect her legitimate interests; and in this world if mi^ht 
is not right it is so like it as to be hardly dis inguis ^ble fronTit 

After reviewmg German aims and ambitions, Be nhardi closes 
his interesting book " Germany and the Next War " with this 
exordium : 

"If people and government stand togethe-, resolved to guard 

he honour of Germany and make every sacrifice of blooS and 

treasure to msure the future of our country and our State Je 



M T ^ but we may, with 
hands t > heaven and cry to God : 

" ^"r "" he he ? ht of the starry sky 

May thy ringing sword flash bright 
Let every craven cry 

Be silenced by thy might!" 
Ihese lessons were well taken to HP- r t h,. *.u /^ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 3. 



well the Emperor William s advice that "No quirter will be 
given, no prisoners will be taken. Let all who fall into your 
hands be at your mercy" is acted on. The destruction of Lou- 
vain, Rheims and other cities and towns, the cold-blooded mur 
ders of innocent non-combatants and prisoners of war and the 
innumerable barbaric acts d.iily reported in the world s press, 
amply demonstrate how well the Germans have t\ken the 
Kaiser s lessons to heart and reverte 1 to barbarism. Some of 
their recent deeds of callous savige- y have moved a great Am 
erican publicist to exclaim : 

" If before he strikes the fatal blow the murderer could only 
stop and think ; could see the bleeding body of his victim ; could 
realize the awful consequences of his act ! Insanity ! What else 
was the foray upon the English embassy by the mob in Berlin ; 
what else the succeeding insults heaped upon the French am 
bassador; the burning of Louvain by the German soldiers; the 
destruction of the beautiful cathedral at Rheims regardless of 
the world s protests ; the dropping of bombs into Antwerp by 
the Kaiser s airmen ? Yet the German writers in America chat 
ter about civilization. They dare to talk of German civilization. 
They too, have lost all sense of perspective and all distinction. 
They, too, are mad. Instead of whooping up the hordes of death 
in Europe and hurling anathemas at their neighbours in the 
United States, the Germans of America should be down on their 
knees asking God to have mercy upon the wives, the mothers 
and the children of the Fatherland." 

Germany s many warnings of her intention caused her neigh 
bors to prepare their defences and no sooner were the German 
troops set in motion against France than England and Russia 
rushed to the defence of Belgium and France, and the Belgians 
and French were not themselves unprepared. 

The forces now opposing Germany are so large, that there 
can only be one ending of the war the utter defeat of the Ger 
manic people. Their deeply cultured blood-lust has led them 
into blood-riots which are rapidly carrying them to nationaal 
effacement. When the allied Governments are ready to end 
the war, Germany will be dismembered and financially pen 
alized. Every public man in England has expressed the neces 
sity of dealing with Germany so that the national blood-lust of 
the Germanic people will never again endanger the peace of 
Europe. France must be reimbursed the war levies imposed on 
her in 1871 and the costs of the present war; Belgium must 
rtctive money and wo ks of art to restore, as A ? ell as possible, 
the City and University of Louvain ; Alsace and Loraine, of 
rour.-e, will be restored to France, Luxemburg to Belgium, 
Poland to the Poles, Schleswig-Holstein to the Danes, and 
Eastern Prussia to Russh. England will insist on the parti 
tioning of the Carman North Sea coast among the adjacent 
mtions as it is the fixed will of the British people that Germany 
will never again be powerful on the seas. 

Austria must pay the penalty for being the agent of Germany 
in bringing about trouble with the Slavic people in the East of 
Europe. Her unstable empire will be largely divided up be 
tween Russia, Servia, Montenegro, Rumania and Italy. A new 
Slavic confederation will arise from her remains which will 
dominate the Eastern portions of Europe. 

Within the next couple of 3 ears the world will witness the 
passing of the influences of the Germanic peoples, the re-arrange 
ment of the map of Europe and of European political and inter 
national alliances. 

This is the last great war that will be witnessed for many 
generations. It indicates the culmination of far-reaching poli 
tical movements that were 1 >ng gathering strength and began to 
rise to the surface in the African wars in the nineties. The 
war will be long and costly, and will be followed by a protracled 
period of unbroken peace, which will be distinguished by 
wonderful industrial and commercial developments and great 
social advancements. The destruction of the Germanic ideals, 
which fetiered the civilization of the past with birbarous mili 
tarism, will thus greatly benefit the world and lead to an era of 
exceptional progress and prosperity. 



The First Newfoundland Regiment* 




VOLUNTEERS CAMPED AT PLEASANTVILLE. 

Tl 1 E great European war now in progress has resulted in 
stirring up the dormant martial instincts of the British 
people and has caused in the formation of new regiments in 
nearly all parts of the Empire. The people of Newfoundland 
are taking a good share in the war and are contributing a splen 
did regiment of men to the Empire s defences in addition to the 
fine corps comprising the local Naval Reserve. The First 
Newfoundland Regiment is the first military force this Colony 
has enlisted for foreign service during its several centuries of 
eventful history, and the members of the force have never seen 
active service before. The five hundred are fine, handsome young 
men, who, will fight in company with the great Colonial Corps 
like the Canadian Princess Patricias Horse and the Strathcona 
Horse, and like the great Australian infantry regiments which 
fought so well in the South Africa wars. Our regiment is com 
posed of sober and intelligent men who will quickly qualify for 
warfare. The war authorities hive arranged a training depot 
in England for Canadian troops, to which our men will be sent 
for a thorough military training. When they reach the front, 
they will be as well qualified as any of the British regiments 
and will make a record which will not only shed honour on 
Newfoundland, but lead to the establishment of a permanent 
defence force in St. John s a force which like our Naval Re 
servists will always be ready at the Empire s call. 





;iVc.< l>v Theo. A. Thompson. 

AMBULANCE TENT AT PLEASANTVILLE. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 4. 



The Coming of Arthur* 

"The Landing of H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught at Bay of Islands, West Coast of Newfoundland, July 8th, 19J4. 

By Eunice T. Holbrook Ruel. 




" So tender with the children and so full 
Of a sweet grace and Royal gentleness " 

ARCHES ? Yes ! As green and gaily decked 

As loving hands could make them and the arch 

Of God s good sky above them, smiling down. 

The Church and State ! And Scouts ! And smiling children ! 

And a throng of people ; with hearts beating high in joy 

And full of friendly welcomings and gleams. 

The Colours? Brave and bright against the green 

Of many branched trees that waved their boughs 

Like outstretched hands of greeting. 

Music? Yes I A charming courtesy 

From a brave ship ; that made the day 

Seem brighter for the kindly fellowship 

And for the lovely strains of harmony. 

But these were only outward signs at best, 

Only the visible part of the great chord, 

The note of inner grace, that made the day 

Like some great sacrament, a sacred thing ; 

A day to be remembered through the years. 

****** * 

When first the note was struck it faintly lang 

A welcome ? Yes ! Our Newfoundland fails not 

"To welcome strangers, be they rich or poor, 

" Or high or lowly in the world s esteem. 

" Who is this stranger whom you bid us welcome ? " 

Her son ! The son of our great Empress Queen 

Who loves her country still in her blest home 

Beyond the stars. She whom we loved. 

And love and evermore shall love, 

" Victoria, the Good. Her Son ? " The note rang clear 

And very tender. " We will do our part, 

All, all we can, for is he not her son." 

His brother! Younger brother of the King 

We reverenced and loved these many years ; 

He, who has gone with God s own children, where 

The peace-makers are gathered. Calm, serene, 

Above all earthly tumult now to wait 

God s own appointed time for peace to reign. 

"//^brother! Edward s brother?" 

Ah, the note rang true ; with many lovely chords accompanying 

And rounding to a splendid harmony. 

******* 

So the day dawned; and the brave ship Essex swung 

On the swift tides upon the inner Bay. 

And all the stately hills rose tier on tier 

In terraced green and gold; and bells rang out 

And muskets crackled on the morning air; 




[Photos by S. //. Parsons cH Sons. 
" No stranger this, but a thrice welcomed friend." 

And all the many crested rocks and hills 
Echoed the splendid booming of the guns 
And Arthur came and set foot on our shores. 



" Her son ! His brother ! Yes, but what of him ? 

What, what of him, the man. 

The bearer of the name so long entwined 

In English hearts with flowers of poesy, 

With tender chivalry and knightly lore : 

The name of him, who bore Escalibur." 

We turn to Chaucer for a borrowed phrase, 

A truly, " Yery parfit, gentil knight." 

No need to think of any other now, 

No need to ask who this may be who comes 

For hearts sprang up to greet him and a shout 

Of three times three rang out across the tide. 

No stranger this, but a thrice welcomed friend. 

And Newfoundland, forgetting that her pride 

Lay in traditions of the ancient rite 

Forgot to be hospitable, and TIWJ. 

Gave all she had, with lavish out-stretched hand 

Her heart, her welcome, and the love of years. 

And he, bei guest, so courteous and so kind, 

So tender with the children and so full 

Of a sweet grace and Royal gentleness. 

Oh ! Not for nothing bears he that great name, 

Not only of the Royal House that is. 

But of the Royal House that used to be 

When Arthur gathered round him all the knights 

And sanctified the land with courtesy. 

***** * * 

The outward symbols fade, the day goes past ; 
The sun once more his daily couise has run. 
The people scatter and round goes the world. 
But the deep note of loyalty and love, 
i inee struck, does not again return to silence 
But goes on and on. 

Out on the mystic waves through the vast blue 
It gathers little tender sounds and notes 
From the deep-bosomed hills and from the trees 
And from the rocks that stand in quiet 
In every heart it thrills, and every voice 
Has a new deep vibration in its depths. 
The little waves that frill along ihe shore 
Catch and repeat it to the deeper rolls 
Of the great ocean. And the living depths 
Where light on light breaks lambent into gleams 
Of emerald and gold and palest rose, 
In caves of dreaming shadow. 
Where the sea-fronds wave, and catch the sound 
And wave again their hands, 
Their many fringed little sea-green hands. 
In harmony of motion with the stars. 
And everywhere it gathers to itself new chords- 
All rippling sounds and tender cadences 
And martial melodies that ring the world. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 5. 

Newfoundland Name-Lore. 



By His Grace, Archbishop Howley. 
XL. 

The next name which attracts our attention is 

CONNO1RE BAY, 

like Conne, Conaigre &c., the meaning of the word is unknown. 
There is then Ciitteaux Bay. This is a corruption of Coitteaux, 
and so on English Maps it is translated Knife Bay. 

The most important group of Islands on this shore is that 
of the 

BURGEO ISLANDS. 

They are a very numerous group and are, as usual in such 
cases, stated to number 365. On one of the largest of these 
Islands is a Cairn placed there by Captain Cook when he made 
a survey of the Coast in 1766. From this Island he observed 
an Eclipse of the Sun. Hence it is called 

ECLIPSE ISLAND. 

Burgeo is a very important settlement numbering over 1,000 
people. It gives the name in conjunction with a neighboring 
Harbour to the Electoral District of 

BURGEO AND LA POILE, 

and returns one member to (he Legislature. 

CINC CERF BAY. 

(Five Stag Bay) probably recalls some hunting episode. 

GRAND BRUIT. 

(great noise) or rout is called from a large and magnificent 
cascade which leaps down from the cliffs, which are over a 
thousand feet high, and mikes a rouf which is heard at a great 
distance off. The people call it Grand Britt. 

The next inlet is the largest on this coast and is called 

LA FOIL HAY 

(either Fur Bay or Frying-Pan Bay). It extends inland about 
ten miles. At the entrance is a small island called Ireland 
Island. In recent years a whale factory has been established 
here in a cove (to keep up the fiction) called Dublin Cove. 

West of this is a bay named 

GARIA. 

The meaning of which I do not know. Harbour Le Con, (Neck 
Harbour) so called from its narrow entrance. 

ROSE BLANCHE. 

This name is alluded to in Article XXXI. when speaking of 
Rose a Rue. The first part of the word is a corruption of 
softening of the word Roche, rock. This place is called White 
Rock from the fact that the geological substratum is a beautiful 
white granite, which being in many places denuded of its mossy 
covering shows as white as snow. There is here also an 

ILE AUX MORTS 

(Deadman s Island) which no doubt has its wierd legends and 
tradilions. 

The next harbour westwards is one which has recently re 
ceived a great impetus from being made the terminus of the 
Newfoundland Railway, and starting port for the line of steamers 
running daily to Sydney in connection with the train from 
St. John s. This harbour is railed 

PORT AUX BASQUES, 

Port or Harbour of the Basques. 

That the Basque fishermen played a very important part in 
our early history there can be no doubt. Relics of their pre 
sence are to be found in the names of a great many places along 
our coasts. It is admitted now by almost all students of our 
early Colonial history that the Basques had in the XV. century, 



and long before the voyages of Columbus or Cabot, visited the 
coasts of Newfoundland. It is certain that as early as 1447 
they had a regular fishery on the Grand Banks of Newfound 
land. There is here another 

ISLE A MORTE 

(Deadman s Island) with its usual gruesome and fanciful tradi 
tions. The harbour of 

CHANNEL 

is so called from it peculiar formation. It is formed by a string 
of islands lying close to the land. It is open at both ends, so 
that craft can pass right through, and thus it presents the ap 
pearance of a canal or channel. This place is famous for its 
wrecks, though it is now well protected by lights, fog whistles, 
buoys, signals, &c. Between this and Cape Ray, about nine 
miles distant, there are no other names of any importance. 

CAPE RAY. 

All that is necessary to say as to the philology of this name is 
said in Article XXVII. when speaking of Cape Race. There 
I have shown that these two names are the same. Cape Ray is 
historically important as having been the commencing point 
of the 

" FRENCH SHORE," 

a name which took a very prominent place in our local history 
for over two centuries as limiting the French fishing rights. 
But all this is now a thing of the past since the extinction of 
the French rights. 

At Cape Ray about two miles inland commences the great 
chain of mountains, which stretches away towards the north 
east and runs practically across the whole Island to the opposite 
shore in White Bay. It is the highest range of mountains in 
Newfoundland. It is generally known as the 

"LONG RANGE." 

It divides the Island into two distinct countries. Distinct in 
every sense. In climate, in physical formation, in geographical 
stratification ; in fact it is this last which is accountable for all 
these great differences. The Long Range is an obstrusive out 
crop of the lower geographical formation of granites and 
sienites, in what geologists call metamorphic formations. The 
meaning of which in plain language is that in the convulsions of 
nature of former pre-historic times, the upper and carboniferous 
strata have been swept away making what is scientifically called 
a great fault, but I speak under correction and return to my sub 
ject which philological or onomatological rather than geological. 
The S.W. end or the commencement of the great " Long Range " 
is a very remarkable feature in the landscape of this part of the 
Island. It starts with an immense table mountain nearly two 
thousand feet high. There are three large conical hills or 
mountains at the S.W. end of the great table plateau giving a 
very remarkable appearance easily recognised by nautical men. 
I think the following excellent description of this place is worthy 
of reproduction here. It is taken from the " Sailing Directions." 
&c., 1898. 

. . . The land of the Cape (C. Ray) is very remark- 
" able ; near the shore it is low, but three miles inland is a very 
" high table mountain, which rises almost perpendicularly from 
" the low land and appears to be quite flat at the top, excepting 
" a small hillock on its south west point." (N.B. This hillock 
is said to be one of Captain Cook s cairns. "fM. F.H.) " This 
" land may be seen in clear weather from the distance of fifty 
" miles. Close to the foot of the table mountain, between it 
and the point of the Cape is a high round hill resembling a 
" sugarloaf (known as the sugarloaf of Cape Ray) whose summit 
" is a little lower than that of the table mountain ; and to the 
northward of this hill, under the table mountain, are two other 
" conical hills resembling sugar loaves, which are not so high as 
" the former : One of these sugarloaf-hills is from all points of 
" view seen detached from the mountain." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 6. 



There is no resemblance whatever to a sugar-loaf in this great 
conical hills, no more than is generally the case with hills that 
are called by this trite and trivial name of Sugarloaf. These 
hills are nearly 1000 feet high and are of majectic proportions. 
They did not escape the observant eye of that shrewd old 
navigator Jacques Cartier, who in the year 1535 passed along 
this coast and gives us in his " Relation Originale (part II 
p. 45) a very correct and most interesting description of this 
land. He writes as follows. He had explored the Magdalen 
Islands and then steered for the coast of Newfoundland about 
Cape Ray " Apres ksqudles chases cougneuis, retournasmes au 
" cap tie la dicte terre (Cape Ray t M. F. H.) qui se faict a deux 
" on trois caps hnultz a mernerlles " After having observed 
these things, (viz. the contour &c. of the Magdalen Islands) we 
returned to the cape of the said land C. Ray which shows 
itself in two or three capes wonderfully high.) They reminded 
me strikingly of the Pyramids of Egypt, and I should sug 
gest that instead of the Sugar-loafs, they be called " The 
Pyramids " of Cape Race. One of these pyramids is remark 
ably clear-cut showing four angles as regular as if done by 
mason work and running to a point as sharp as a cottage roofed 
house. This I propose to call the Pyramid Cephren, which is 
the name of the Second Pyramid at Cairo, from its constructor 
the Pharaoh Khafra. It is not the largest or highest of the 
Pyramids, but it is the most perfect. The Great Pyramid, 
which is called Cheops (pronounce Key-ops) was once the 
largest and highest, being 482 feet, but it is now truncated, the 
top having been taken off, reducing the height by about thirty 
feet so that it is now only about 450 feet high and shows 
ins;ead of a pointed apex, a flat top. The top is a level area 
of about twelve yards square or about 1300 square feet. A 
large party may stand on it, I stood on it in the year 1896, with 
a party of about twenty persons. One of the pyramids of Cape 
Ray presents precisely the same truncated appearance. Hence 
I propose to give the name of Cheops to this pyramid. The 
third pyramid at Memphis is called Menkaura. But as this 
name is rather difficult I would propose to call it Ghiza (pro 
nounce Gheesa, the g hard as in geese.) This is the general 
name given to this whole group of Pyramids. If these names 
are not acceptable as being too hard to remember, and too diffi 
cult to pronounce I would at least suggest that the name " Cape 
Ray Pyramids " be suggested instead of Sugar-loaves." 

From Cape Ray the coast takes a sharp turn to the N.E. and 
presents an entirely different contour from any other part of the 
coast-line of Newfoundland. Jt does not any longer show the 
bluff hummocky rocky appearance which is encountered to the 
eastward of Cape Ray, on the contrary it shows a gentle level 
plane outline, with no rocks on the sea coast but a sloping bank 
of gravel or drift about 50 to 100 feet high, while on the top is 
a flat fertile surface of rich soil covered with brushwood right 
out to the coast and stretching away inward to the distant blue 
mountains. I shall never forget the impression which it made 
on me when first the magnificent panorama burst on my view 
(in the summer of 1871). I also remember the late Venerable 
Monsignor Sears saying that when he rounded Cape Ray coining 
from the eastward, he felt as if a great load were removed from 
his chest. Not only is the whole landscape of the country 
changed, but there is a change in the climate and the state of 
the atmosphere. One leaves behind the dull, heavy, damp, 
foggy air of the south and east shores of Newfoundland and 
enters into a veri-able "fog free zone!" 

For about twenty miles from Cape Ray to Cape Anguille the 
coast trends in a regular curved line, showing an arc of a circle. 
The seashore or as our people call it the landwash is no longer 
composed of rubble beach-stones or sharp jagged points of 
broken cliff, with deep coves, but of beautiful sandy beaches. 
The sand being composed of the detritus of granite boulders 
and shows a beautiful golden-salmon-colour in the reflected 
sunlight. This is the characteristic of nearly the whole of this 
western shore. This wide belt of seashore between Cape Ray 
and Anguille is the entrance to the far-famed 

CODROY VALLEY. 

The two rivers of Great and Little Codroy flow into the sea, 
from the eastward into this bight of coast from the distant 



mountains. Thus this beautiful valley is watered by these IWD 
splendid rivers which enter the sea about five miles apart 
the northern side the valley is protected from the Arct.c breeze 
by the magmficient range of the Anguille Mountains which are 
nearly as high as the Long Range and run parallel to it, thus 
forming at one time the northern boundary of the Codroy 
Valley and the southern shore of Bay St. George. 

The name of Codroy, had long been a puzzle to me, t 
think I have found the solution of it. Some time ago I saw o 
a French map the name 

C. DE ROY 

for C*pe Ray. The analogy of this with some other names on 
the coast (already discussed) immediately struck me. Such as 
C. de Grat (Cape de Grat), C. de Spear (Cipe Spear), ( 
Raz (Cape Race) C. de Rah (Cape Ray). I at once thought 
that this form C. de Roy gave origin to Codroy just as C. Rouge 
gave rise to Carouge, and that the name of this valley is nothing 
else than the valley of Cape Ray, as the valley commences 
immediately at this point. 

Between the mouth of the Great Codroy Ri^er and the 
harbour of Codroy there is a pjint of land called 

POINT ENRAGEE, 

in English "stormy." The name itself does not call for any 
prolonged discussion. It is a name found on several parts of 
our coast and in thii place is very appropriate, as there is a long 
reef of partly submerged rocks running out from the shore 
which break in a very angry and forbidding manner in storny 
weather. But this particular point was once a matter of s-rious 
consideration and of much newspaper correspondent and aome 
diplomilic discussion. In a letter published by me in the 
Evening Telegram of Februaty 25th, 1890 some twenty four 
years ago. I pointed out how Mr. R. T. Squarey. J.P., 
Magistrate at Channell, in boking over the Treaties connected 
with the " French Shore," made a very startling discovery. To 
j;ive a clear statement of this matter it wi 1 be necessary to make 
a short historical statement : 

By tne Treaty of Utrecht, entered into between Great Britain 
and France in 1713, the French were given fishing rights on 
our coast between the points of Cape Bonnvista (on the east) 
and Point Riche (on the west). In the ciurse of time it was 
found that disputes arose between the French a-^d English 
fishermen, so to prevent these quarrels a new Treaty was 
entered into at Versailles in 1783, by which the limits of the 
French fishing rights were changed (from Cape Bonavista on the 
N.E. coast to Cape John in 50 North Latitude, and from Point 
Riche on the W. coast " to the plate called Cape Rage situate in 
forty-seven degrees and fifty minutes latitude. 

By this ch.mge the French had }ielded about 200 miles on 
the N.E. csast and had rectived as a quid pro quo neirly the 
same extent of coastline on the western shore from Point Riche 
westward and southward. Xow since the date of that Treaty 
(1783) for over one hundred years (to 1890) it hid been uni 
versally accepted that the western terminus of the " French 
Shore " was Cape Ray. But the nautical eye of Mr. Squarey 
(who I may say was not only well versed in Civil and Local Law 
but was also a practical expert in Navigation, being a passed 
master of foreign course) immediately discovered a most serious 
mistake in La itude. He read in the V. Section of the Treaty : 
The place called Cape R,iy situated in forty-seven 
" degrees fifty minutes latitude." " But," said he, " that is not 
so. Cape Ray is not situated in 47 50 , but in 47 37 " a very 
serious mistake for it gave the " French Shore" some fifteen or 
twenty miles more than its due. Looking more closely into the 
J ea :^l 5q " arey f U " d tha the word in ^at document is not Cane 



77u IT ".?" matter 01 no consequence owine to the fart 

of the French rights having become extinguished For this great bo 

one of the greatest eve, secured by Newfoundland we are indebted to 
statesman-like action of Sir Robert RonH t he 

debt of g,ati,de which sho.id neTer be 1; rgo t,e n 



A couple of miles north of Point Enragee is the little harbor of Codrov 
formed by an island of the same name just off the coast. It is not a 
or commodious harbour but in the days of French fishing ririite ve 
flunshmg establishment of fishery was kept here by the French 



H. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 7. 

<* Pale Gold. " 

An Ancient Story, retold by Dr. Arthur Selwyn-Brown. 








ARTHUR SEL\VYN-BRO\VX. M.A., PH.D., LL.D. 

" The lives of men are like earthen vessels wrought in a potter s 
mill, howsoever carefully formed, all are sooner or later doomed to 
destruction. Nought that exists shall endure ; life is as the 
waters of a river that flaw away but never return." 




FATHER and his son were working in a wheat 
field when a hooded snake bit the young man so 
that he soon died. There is no remedy known 
that will prevent the venom of this deadly snake 
almost instantly taking effect, filling its victim s 
eyes with sudden dirkness and stilling the beating of his heart. 
But the father finding his son was dead, and the ants commenc 
ing to gather, gave a subdued sigh and returned to his work as 
unconcernedly as before. 

A Buddhist priest soon afterwards passed the farm and seeing 
what had happened, was surprised that the dead boy s father 
continued to work. 

" Whose son was that youth who is lying dead ? he asked. 
The farmer, still working on, said: "He was my own son." 
"Well, as he was your own son, why do you take his death 
so calmly ? " 

" What folly sir," replied the farmer; "do you not know 
that the instant a child is born into this world so soon does it 
take its first step in the direction of death ; and the ripeness of 
its strength marks also the beginning of its decline? For those 

* The above story has a history almost as interesting as itself. It was 
written in India many centuries ago. In early times it was taken to China 
where it enjoyed a wide popularity. It was translated from Chap. 51 of 
the Chinese book Fa-youen-tchou-lin," by the Rev. Samuel Beal, in 1878, 
and was retold by Lafcadio Hearn, in 1884. The present version is based 
on Hearn s adaptation. This story clearly illustrates the fatalistic manner 
in which many of the Asiatic people view life. 



(Copyright.) 

who do good there is, of course, a recompense, for the wicked 
there is, on the other hand, punishment. What therefore do 
tears and grief avail ? They can in no way serve the dead . . . 
Perhaps sir, you will be passing through the city ? If so I will 
esteem it a favor if you will call at my house and ask my wife 
to send me my noonday lunch and tell her of the death of our 
son." 

" What kind of man is that ? " thought the priest as he con 
tinued his journey. " His son is dead, but he does not grieve ; 
the corpse lies out in the field, but he continues working ; the 
ants gather about the dead young man, but the father thinks 
only of his lunch ; surely he is wanting in compassion and is 
without paternal instincts." 

On nearing the farmer s house, his son s man-servant was met 
and the priest said : " Thy master is dead, having been bitten 
in the fields by a hooded snake. Why ! do you not weep ? " 

" No," replied the man, " my master and I were united by the 
will of destiny ; I was only as the little calf which follows the 
great bull. If the great bull were slain, the little calf could 
not save him from the butcher s knife ; his cries and bleatings 
would be useless. Well, not knowing when my own time will 
come, why should I weep?" 

Then the dead youth s sister was met and the priest said : 
" Your brother is dead, my girl, do you not grieve for him ? " 

The girl answered with comparisons saying : " Sometimes a 
strong woodrrun enters the forest, cuts down the large trees 
with the mighty strokes of his axe, ties them together to form a 
raft and floats them down a river. But a storm advances, 
lashes the river current into great foaming waves which dash 
the raft about until the lashings come undone, and the logs 
come asunder and are whirled away so that they can never be 
again collected. Such was the fate of my brother. We were 
bound together by destiny in one family. We have been 
separated forever by this fatality. There is no rigidly fixed 
time of life or death. Whether our existence be long or short, 
filled with happiness or misery, we are united only for a period 
to be separated for evermore. Remember the wisdom of the 
Devas song in the " Light of Asia ": 

" We are the voices of the wandering wind, 
Which moan for rest, and rest can never find 1 
Lo ! as the wind is, so is mortal life, 
A moan, a sigh, a sob, a storm, a strife. 



Wherefore and whence we are ye cannot know, 
Nor where life springs, nor whither life doth go: 
We are, as ye are, ghosts from the innane, 
What pleasure have we of our changeful pain ? 

What pleasure hast thou of thy changeless bliss ? 
Nay, if love lasted, there were joy in this ; 
But life s way is the winds way, all these things, 
Are but brief voices, breathed on shifting strings. 

O Maya s son ! because we roam the earth. 
Moan we upon these strings ; we make no mirth, 
So many woes we see in many lands, 
So many streaming eyes and wringing hands. 

Yet mock we while we wail, for, could they know, 
This life they cling to is but empty show, 
Twere all as well to bid a cloud to stand, 
Or hold a running river with the hand." 

My brother has ended his allotted career ; each of us is 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 8. 






following a destiny, like the winds way, that m ly not be changed. 
It was not given to me to protect and save him. How futile it 
would be to grieve over that which I could not prevent ? " 

The young man s beautiful wife now approached and the 
priest, addressing her, said : " Madam, thy comely husband 
has been cut off in the summer of his agile manhood. Is it not 
a terrible calamity ? " 

The wife wistfully replied : " Even as two birds flying one 
from the east and one from the south meet and look into each 
other s eyes and circle about each other, and seek the same 
summit of tree or temple, and perch together until the dawn, so 
was our own fate. When the golden light breaks in the roseate 
east, the two birds, leaving their temple perch on the tree-top, 
fly in opposite ways, each to seek its food. They meet again if 
destiny wills ; if not, they never behold each other more. Such 
was the fate of my husband and myself. When death sought him 
his destiny was accomplished, and it was not in my power to 
save him. So why should I weep over the pale and spurious 
gold of sorrow instead of recognizing the bright and real gold 
of contentment and the inexorable decree of fate? 

The priest then knocked at the door of the farmer s home 
and asked for the dead man s mother. She came to him and 
heard of her son s death and her husband s request for his 
noonday lunch to be sent. She said : 

" Yes, his lunch is prepared and I am waiting for the man 
servant to take it into the fields. As for my son, sir, I am 
sorry ; but I knew he only received a passing life from his 
parents, like their own a perilous life threatened by many 
adverse influences so his departure does not surprise me. 
I could not control it. We are, you know, like travellers halt 
ing at a roadside inn ; the traveller rests and passes on , should 
the inn keeper restrain him ? Such is really the relation of 
mother and son. Whether my son came or went, whether he 
remained or passed on, I had no determinative power over his 
movements ; he has evidently fulfilled his appointed destiny, 
and from that destiny none of us could save him. How very 
foolish we would be if we were to lament over what we know is 
inevitable ?" 

As the priest resumed his journey along the highway he 
thought of all the comparisons the dead man s people made for 
him and the wisdom they contained, and at night when he 
rested at a wayside inn and slept, something seemed to whisper 
to him : " The lives af men are like earthern vessels wrought 
in a potter s mill, howsoever carefully formed, all are doomed to 
destruction, nought that exists shall endure, life is as the waters 
of a river that flow away, but never return." 

And then he awoke and smiled ; for he remembered hearing 
his old mother sing in India long ago : 

" Here is the common destiny of man; 
The high and low, the good and bad, must die, 
And then, tis taught, begin anew and live, 
Somewhere, somehow who knows ? and so again 
The pangs, the parting and the lighted pile- 
Such is man s round." 

When he resumed his journey after the night s rest, the priest 
felt that he had lately added much to his knowledge of human 
nature, and sorrow with its insidious mysteries, and, as the day 
was bright and pleasant, and the country was well inhabited 
by simple farming people, he looked forward to meeting new 
adventures and experiences before the night. 

Not always actions show the man ; we find 

Who does a kindness is not therefore kind. /fyv. 



The Reaping, 1914. 

i. 

The Harvest. 

By Jnne Bat-low. 

O ER harvest hills soft haze of shimmering heat 

Folds blue and dim ; glows fiery sheen of wheat 

At core of sunbeams ; kindled white, 

The road creeps in beneath green shadow plight 

Of woven branches. Here two gossips greet : 

"Good morning, ma am ; sure tis the grand hot day," 

" Aye, aye, too hot for our poor lads away 

Off yonder in the battles, where they fight." 

" Ah ! cold enough, God knows, before the night 

Tis many a one will sleep." 

Such talk have they 
Along the footpath flecked with leaves and light. 

The road glares like a white-hot ploughshare thrust 

Athwart the plain, whereon a rider lone 

Three times the blaze of noontide fierce hath known, 

Mocked with the parching air, the choking dust, 

For all his daily fare ; still, grown half-blind. 

Goes stumbling, starved, and goads his starving horse 

With restless steel, that rage may bring remorse 

The more to sadden his sick heart. Yet shined 

This summer day that ripes the red-gold corn 

In rustling field-;, on none whose lot forlorn 

Draws nigh through heavier hours a desolate end ; 

Since comes in foeman s guise his one grim friend, 

Nor holds his cruel doom a kinder fate 

Than if, ere close the sunset s fire-silled gate, 

Some long-flamed shaft a curven blade shall bend, 

And thither reach, that, reaped as harvest fruit, 

Be to the great Dark gathered man and brute. 



II. 
Commandered. 

By I.. AMerly. 

Last year he drew the harvest home 
Along the winding, upland lane ; 
The children twisted marigolds, 
And clover flowers, to deck his mane ! 
Last year he drew his harvest home! 

To-day with puzzled, patient face, 
With ears a-droop, and weary feet, 
He marches to the sound of drums. 
And draws the gun along the street. 
To-day he draws the guns of war ! 



III. 
The Vintage. 

By Clinton Scvllard. 

Rumors of ravaging war perturb the mind 

Ruffling the channels of our wonted ease 

Within the sky we read red auguries 
And hear grim portents shivering down the wind 
Not as aforetime do we fondly find 
Orchestral notes or lulling harmonies 

In the long plunge and murmur of the seas 
?* d c ? rds ho <Tent unto all mankind? 
The fields of France are bright with poppy flowers - 

Along the terraced vineyards by the Rhine 

npenmg grapes are crimsoning for the wine ; 

Beneath the sun what fairer sight to see 1 

mV M, m K arC K f many hastenin s hours 

What W!ll the hlnnm who, will thjf ,.;* K . 5 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 9 . 

Forgotten Days in Old Newfoundland. 





THOMAS R. JOB, ESQ., J.P. 

HE present war in Europe will affect Newfoundland 
in many ways ; but the trade disturbances will be 
different to wh.it were experienced in the early 
days of the St. John s pioneers. The writer 
possesses a diary \\hich was kept by an early 
Newfoundland trader at a time when England was at war with 
France. In those days, the British Navy was not proportionately 
as large as it is to-day and was not so efficient. It was unable 
to bottle up the enemy s fleets as effectively as Admiral Jellico 
has bottled up the great German Navy during the present war. 
England is now the undisputed mistress of the seas, and while 
the principal nations in Europe are engaged in a titantic struggle 
that is destined to change, not only the map of Europe and the 
destinies of the Teutons, but to revolutionize the world s com- 
me ce, the Newfoundland merchants to-day can ship their fish 
cargoes to their ordinary markets with the same sanguine 
security that they enjoy in times of peace. It is proposed to 
cite some items from the diary relating to some experiences of 
English planters while sailing to the Newfoundland fisheries in 
the eighteenth century. Before doing this, however, a few words 
may be said relative to the diary and its author. 

The diary was kept by Mr. John Job, the son of an English 
naval officer. Mr. Job was left an orphan in early childhood 
and was adopted by Mr. Samuel Bulley, an English merchant 
residing in Devonshire, who had vessels employed in the 
Newfoundland fishery. Mr. Bulley had a planter s business in 
St. John s, and when Mr. Job grew up he was apprenticed to 
the Newfoundland business. Later on he married Miss Bulley 
and became a partner in the firm which then assumed the name 
of Bulley &: Job. 

Mr. Job left England for St. John s in 1778 and kept a diary 



By Thos. R. Job, J.P., Liverpool, England. 

in whieh he entered items covering not only business matters, 
but notes relating to everything that attracted his attention. 
The writer of this article is a grand-son of Mr. John Job and 
possess his grandfather s papers. This article is written with 
the object of contrasting the security now enjoyed by Newfound 
land merchants in prosecuting their business with the dangers 
experienced by merchants in the early days when they travelled 
to and from England in small schooners and were often inter 
fered with or captured by the enemy s warships and privateers. 
The fleet of vessels bound out and home were usually under 
convoy, but it occasionally happened that some vessels scattered 
and fell a prey to the enemy. Such was the experience of 
John Job when on a voyage outwards in April 1799 in one of 
his own vessels the Flora on which were several other 
passengers. It is best told in his own simple words taken from 
his diary, which are as follows : 

" We were captured on Thursday, nth April in Lat. 48 08 , 
Long. i8by the Privateer Role, Captain Claud Digeaux, of 
Bordeaux, France. All the ship s crew and passengers were 
taken on board the Privateer except M. Payn, the cook, his son, 
Manly and myself. We immediately stood to the eastward in 
company with the Role until Saturday, i3th. It being then more 
moderate, the boat came alongside with Samuel (Mr. Job s 
brother-in-law) who took all his clothes, the quadrants, and charts 
excepted. In the boats were taken several of the aforesaid 
passengers. Samuel was in good spirits and told me they were 
assured of kind treatment. This was the last I saw of him as 
the Role stood immediately to the westward. May God grant 
us a happy deliverance ere long and a safe meeting with wife 
and children ! 

" Nothing particular happened till Friday, April igth, 1799, 
when we anchored inside Isle de Re. 

" 2oth. We got into La Rochelle. The Flora was immedi 
ately hauled into the pier alongside the quay, hatches sealed, &c. 
Mr. Payne, myself and the boys were taken to the Commissary, 
whence we were ordered after examination to a place of con 
finement, where I am now making this memorandum. Passed 
the night veiy heavily. We left La Rochelle on the 27th April, 
travelled 20 miles. We were obliged to carry our baggage on 
our backs; roads very bad indeed; hearts heavy. We stopped 
the night at Sougeur, and got some refreshment at the Prison 
House. Accommodation very indifferent indeed. 

" 28th. This day we left Sougeur, travelled twenty-four miles. 
Stopped at the village of Niort, at which place Mr. Payne 
became very ill indeed, and was obliged to get a Surgeon. 

" agth. Detained to get refreshed. 

" 3oth. Left Niort, travelled twenty miles, stopped at St. 
Maiscent. 

" ist May. Detained here for want of a guard, closely con 
fined. 

" 2nd. Left St. Maiscent and travelled twenty miles, rested at 
Poitiers. Here we had the liberty of the town with guards to 
walk with us. Tolerably accommodated at night. 

" ^rd. Detained at Poitiers for want of Gent d Armes. 

" 4th. Obliged to wait here for want of Guards. 

" ^th. Left this place and travelled twenty-eight miles. This 
day was a melancholy one, for the greater part of it we experi 
enced very bad weather, excessively heavy rain and wind. Ac- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 10. 



commodation tolerable. We were supplied with a fire to dry 
our clothes. 

" 6th. Left this place and walked twenty-seven miles to 
Saumur, our place of rendezvous." 

The Journal closes here and the author leaves no record of 
six months imprisonment in Saumur. He was liberated by 
Cartel after six months incarceration. There is nothing very 
startling in this diary, but the discomforts and restraint, not to 
say hardships, he records will appeal to the modern traveller. 
Prisoners of war in France were then harshly, and in some 
cases barbarously treated. His vessel and cargo were im 
pounded a serious loss to him. 

Unfortunately his troubles were not confined to the loss of 
the Flora and cargo and his imprisonment. He records the 
fact that some years later a vessel he had built at Teignmouth. 
England the Hilton, captained by his brother-in-law, Thomas 
Bulley, and despatched thence to Newfoundland outfitted for 
the fishery, was captured in the English Channel by a French 
man-of-war commanded by Jerome Bonaparte and burnt on the 
spot, the crew being cast adrift in one of the boats to find their 
way to the coast as best they could. The Hilton was uninsured. 
He needed the patience of his namesake to meet these disasters. 
He soon afterwards gave up voyaging and transferred the 
business of Bulley & Job from Teignmouth to Liverpool in 
1809. He lived for the remainder of his days in the latter city. 

I have before me an old letter dated 25th Octobet, 1789, 
from the Southside Room, St. John s, from John Job to his 
Agent in Teignmouth, Devonshire, which is mainly of interest 
owing to its going so far back. The letter is an ordinary busi 
ness one in which he deals with a cargo he was shipping by the 
bearing vessel, and some money matters, but there is an inter 
esting postscript, like the traditional one in a lady s letter, in 
which he sends his "love to Sally Bulley," his sweetheart, and 

subsequently devoted wife, which shows that the adventurer, 

and I suppose he was a type of his class, was very human, 
and having his " best girl " didn t forget her. Romance plays 
an important part in all our lives 1 

To return to more prosaic things I see a record of " the sailing 
of the Nymph from Torbay on the 2oth March, 1800, for the 
Banks, arriving at St. John s 2 ist May, sailed again 7 th June, 
catch not mentioned. 

" The Penguin arrived with 9,000 fish, 23rd June, sailed again 
25th with old bait. On this date two skiffs came from Caplin 
Bay with bait not quite loaded. Bait rather scarce. 

" Brig Nymph arrived ist July, with 17,543 fish, resailed on 
the 3rd." 

Under this date he notes sales of Salt on one of his vessels 
at prices varying from i6s. to 245. per hogshead ! What a 
contrast to present day value ; but cost of freight and insurance 
must have been much higher then. 

History records the fact that these Adventurers were a parcel 
of Tories who took narrow views of the Colony s interests and 
selfishly considered their own, and that they barred its progress ; 
but it must be borne in mind that their lives were very hardi 
that they were drawn mostly from small hamlets in Devon| 
Somerset, and Dorsetshire, mostly the former, and that in those 
days there were neither newspapers nor politicians. Happy Age ! 

1 have a list in my possession of the names of a number of 
these Traders in 1793 , but they seem to have had few 
successors in the business. It looks as if it was not too remun 
erative. No doubt some of them were drowned in their voyag 
ing. I have one notable instance in my mind of a Liverpool 
family whose grandfather visited Forteau, in the Straits, annually, 



and was one of the sea s victims, being lost on the passage home. 
Then, as now, the business depended upon the elements 
beyond human control. Bread was cast upon the waters, but 
an inopportune north-easter, or a gale from any quarter, upset 
the best laid plans, and where profit was looked for, disaster 
often followed. Included in the above referred to list are three 
names Roope, Rendell and Gumming, subsequently associated 
with the Fish Trade in Oporto, Figueira and Alicante. 

So much for the Adventurers, but what about the men who 
manned their ships and were brought to Newfoundland by them ? 
These are the forebears of the present sturdy race of fishermen, 
who, supplemented by the Irishmen, constitute the present 
inhabitants of the Island. The average Newfoundlander is one 
of the cleverest and most resourceful beings on the face of the 
earth. The local fisherman, in his own element, is absolutely 
fearless, as is evidenced by the sad disaster last Spring which 
devastated so many homes. I have often admired the courtesy 
and hospitality of the people. These qualities are always noticed 
by those who visit the Island, whether for sport, pleasure or 
business. 

Looking back on my residence of mure than half a cen.tu.ry in 
St. John s, I can recall some of the most interesting aod happy 
friendships of my long life with fishermen and planters, for the 
most part untutored and unlettered men. In my time education 
was at a very low ebb, the school-master of the day rejoicing in 
an income of 160 per annum, with the privilege of a week s 
fishing in the cap in school. Poverty was the rule when mer 
chantable fish brought und;r $3 per qil., and flour as during 
the Russian war in 1854-5, was as high as $12 per barrel. In 
spite of these untoward circumstances, however, the fishermen 
struggled on with the help of the merchants, who often carried a 
heavy load. The relaiions between them were of the happiest. 
My mind to-day reverts to many of these men, old friends of 
mine, possessing the qualities of true gentlemen, a characteristic 
of which even their poverty could not rob them, and which is 
the heritage of every class. Their natural nobility of character 
always impressed me with the truth of the Scotch bard s lines : 

" The Rank is but the guinea s stamp 

The man s a man for a that." 



* ENGLAND. ^ 

By Rose M. Greene, Bell Island. 

ENGLAND the way of war again must tread, 

Because her honour calls her ; 
Nations are in battle locked, and peace has fled, 
Brave men still fight (brave as her bravest dead) 

For England and her valour. 

Her battlements gleam brightly as before, 

When Victory s laurels crowned her, 
And float her standards as of yore, 
While her brave heroes through Honor s guilded door 

Ascend in merit s order. 

In times of peace the world has known her power, 

And foes in war have strongly feared her; 
She rises foremost leader of the arts, 
With her noblest gifts fair Science crowns her- 
Oh noble land so destined to play great part s ! 

Peace she would have through all this fretful world 

I to the weak her aid is given 
With flags out-flung and banners bright unfurled, 

ough her sons to death through war be hurled 
To shameful deeds she ll not be driven. 

England 1 We raise our hearts in suppliant prayer 

To God in the Heavens above, 
For renewed strength and for His blessed care 
ictories for our Homeland dear, 

Success for the dear land, we love 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. i i. 



The Duke of Connaughfs Visit* 





A. A. 1 AKMINS, KScj. 



How We Received and Entertained His Royal Highness. 
By Alex. A. Parsons, J.P. 

" Sw r in ?? hCr S de Ule rUStUng Cab e althou g h he did n t officially land till the following day, the 1 5 th, 

yet we were glad to have him in port and to know that he would 
be with us three days instead of two, that he would come on 
shore at once (unofficially, of course), lunch with the[Governor, 
take a drive through the city in the afternoon, and, on the way, 
call at the General Hospital and see, and speak a kindly word 
to the s.s. Newfoundland s frost-bitten sealers, who still remain 
ed there. This outward and visible manifestation of His Royal 
Highness s sympathetic disposition was I need hardly say- 
very much appreciated by the sufferers. It was suggestive of 
" the touch of nature that makes the whole world akin." 
The afflicted sealers felt better after the Duke had left the 
hospital. In paying that visit he was doing good and getting 
good at the same time. As Wordsworth says : 

" O think it not a little thing 

To lessen but one throbbing pain ; 

The act will surely with it bring 
To you its o\vn reward again : 

To wipe one tear from sorrow s eye, 

Ourselves will feel the greater joy." 

On the following day, Wednesday, the i5th, the official pro 
gramme was opened by Governor Davidson, who shortly after 
9 o clock a.m. proceeded on board the Essex in full uniform to 
receive His Royal Highness. The Duke, accompanied by His 
Excellency and entourage, landed at the King s Wharf at 10, 
sharp, and was received by a guard of honor of foity formidable 
looking men of the Newfoundland Constabulary, under the com 
mand of Inspector-General Sullivan, whose fine, soldierly appear 
ance we could not help admiring. Then the Band of the Me 
thodist Guards played the first six bars of the National Anthem. 
This they did just as his Royal Highness stepped on the wharf. 
His Honor Mayor Gosling, who was accompanied by the other 
Municipal Commissioners, here presented an address, bidding 
His Royal Highness welcome to the capital of the ancient and 
loyal Colony of Newfoundland. The Duke very graciously and 
gracefully replied and then the Mayor and Council were pre 
sented to His Royal Highness by His Excellency the Governor, 
as were also, at the same time, the Prime Minister and Mem 
bers of the Executive Council, the heads of the religious denom 
inations andathe different foreign Consuls. 

The Duke then started on a tour of the city. He was escorted 
by two mounted officers, who formed all the body-guard neces 
sary in this loyal old city ; but they had to be there, because it 



Her speed is checked and, anchoring, 

round she swings, 
While gathering loiterers on the 

strand discern 
The boat descending from the lat 

ticed stern. 
She s manned, the oars keep concert 

to the land, 
Till grates her keel upon the shall iu 

sand." 

JETWEEN nine and 
j ten o clock on tr.e 
morning of the 
I4th of July last, 
His M a j e sty s 
cruiser Essex, 
Captain Watson, arrived in the 
harbor of St. John s with an 

illustrious visitor on board in the person of His Royal Highness 
the Duke of Connaught, Governor General of the great neigh 
bouring Dominion of Canada. He had been on a salmon fish 
ing trip to our West Coast, and His Excellency Sir Walter 
Davidson, our own Governor, availed of the opportunity to 
incite him to this ciiy, as the guest of the Government, 
which invitation he was too good and too gracious to decline. 
His Royal Highness, accompanied by his Military Secretary, 
Lieut.-Colonel F. O. Farquhar, D.S.O., first landed at Bay of 
Islands, St. George s, where he was met by Governor Davidson 
and suite and tendered a right royal welcome. The people of 
that important distiict, led and inspired by the patriotic Magis 
trate there, Mr. Levi March, turned out in force, and with flags, 
banners, volleys of musketry and every other conceivable 
demonstration of loyalty, besought him to make the Colony and 
all it contained his own during his brief sojourn here. 

The Duke did not remain long at Bay of Islands. He enjoy 
ed a few days fishing there, and had a charming trip in spite 
of the mosquitoes up the beautiful Humber River, where His 
Rojal lliuhne-s was pleased to change the name of Marble 
Mountain (which abuts on the Humber) to that of Patricia 
Head, after his amiable and popular daughter, the Princess 
Patricia. He did this, I am told, at the happy suggestion of 
Sir Walter Davidson, who, by the way, never seems happier 
than when he is suggesting something of an interesting nature. 
The royal visitor then proceeded down through 
the Strait of Belle Island, calling at St. 
Anthony, whe-e he inspected the Grenfell 
Hospital, fox farm and herd of reindeer. 
Thence he came on to Grand Falls, where a 
brilliant reception awaited him. There he 
spent Sunday and attended Divine service in 
the morning at the Church of England, the 
preacher on the occasion being His Lordship 
Bishop Jones, who had gone on there to meet 
His Rojal Highness and accompany him to 
St. John s 

It was the intention of the Duke to call at 
Bonavista and Trinity on his way south from 
Grand Falls, and the people of these two im 
portant towns had built arches, decorated their 
houses with flags, and imported fireworks to 
give His Royal Highness a fitting reception. 
But they were doomed to disappointment, and 
they felt it keenly. It seem that, "owing to 
fogs and numerous icebergs, he was compelled, 
with deep regret, to pass by the harbours of 
Bonavista and Trinity" without paying the 
good people there that promised visit ; and so 
he came on here directly, arriving on July 
a day earlier than we had anticipated. 



14, 
And 




1 hi ti I V S. II. Parsont & Sons. 

LANDING OF HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS AT THE KING S WHARF. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 12. 




Photo by S. H. Parsotu Sons. 
HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS AND GOVERNOR DAVIDSON INSPECTING THE BRIGADES. 



was in accordance with the fitness of things, and we were all 
pleased with the dignified manner in which they performed their 
part in the grand pageant. The first halt was made at the King 
George V. Seamen s Institute, where His Royal Highness was 
received by the Directors and Secretary of the Newfoundland 
Grenfell Association and by the Manager of the Institute. Here 
the Duke had a guard of honor consisting of one officer and 
sixteen men of the Catholic Cadet Corps. He yvas received by 
the Hon. R. Watson, Chairman of the Institute Committee, 
Hon. W. C. Job, Chairman of the International Grenfell Asso 
ciation, Mr. J. A. Paddon, Honorary Treasurer, and Mr. A. 
Sheard, the Secretary. After these gentlemen were presented 
to His Royal Highness by His Excellency, they entered the 
Grenfell Hall, where the various committees were assembled. 
The Duke here graciously gave his consent to a photograph of 
the whole group being taken : His Royal Highness and His 
Excellency the Governor standing together on the platform with 
the committee-men ranged on either side. Then the Governor 
and Mr, Watson presented to the Duke the Directors of the 
Newfoundland Grenfell Association, of which Sir Walter 
Davidson is Chairman, the members of the Entertainment Com 
mittee, and Mr. Jones, the Superintendent of the Institute. Mr. 
Watson, on behalf of the Institute Committee, then, in a neat 
and happy little speech, asked His Royal Highness to accept 
an album of views of the Institute, which had been specially 
prepared by Mr. A. Sheard, the Secretary. In making the pre 
sentation, Mr. Watson expressed his regret that Dr. Grenfell, 
through whose efforts the Institute had been erected, was not 
present on such an auspicious occasion, and thanked the Duke 
for his visit, assuring him of the great pleasure it gave them to 
welcome him, the uncle of our beloved King and Emperor. In 
accepting the album, His Royal Highness made a very pleasing 
reply ; he thanked the committee for their hearty reception and 
assured them of his deep interest in the work of the Institute, 
expressing his sincerest wishes for its prosperiry and usefulness. 
The Duke then inspected the Royal portraits in the Grenfell 
Hall and promised to send his own portrait ; after which, accom 
panied by the Governor and Mr. Sheard, he inspected the men s 
quarters and expressed his appreciation of the various depart 
ments. Next His Royal Highness visited the girls department, 
where Mrs. \V. C. Job, President of the Ladies Auxiliary, the 
Ladies Committee and Lady Davidson were presented. After 
viewing the new extension of the girls department, His Royal 
Highness said to Mrs. Job, the Honorary President, and the 
other members of the Auxiliary who were present : " I have 
much pleasure in declaring open these beautiful rooms for the 
comfort and happiness of the girls, and I wish you every suc 
cess. Returning to the men s department His Royal Highness 



took leave of the members of the committee, 
and as he proceeded to his carriage, -Mr. 
Watson called for three cheers for the distingu 
ished visitor, which call, it is needless to say, 
was heartily re-ponded to by the vast concourse 
of citizens at the front of the building, as well 
as by those inside. Before tl;e Duke left the 
Institute, the following ladies and gentlemen 
were presented to him, with each of whom he 
smilingly shnnk hands: Mis \V. C. Job, Mrs. 
Edgai K. lowering, Mrs. W. G. Gosling, Mrs. 
J. S. Benedict, Mrs. J. B. Mitchell. Miss Annie 
Hayward. Miss Barnes, Miss Manuel, Miss M. 
Furlong and Miss Bennett; Right Hon. Sir 
E. P. Morris, \}< n. M. G. Winter, Hon. P. T. 
McGrath. Dr. Macpherson, Messrs. H. W. 
I eMessurier, J. Fenelon. A. A. Parsons, H. R. 
Brooks, G. H. -Grimes, M.H. A. : I . F. Moore, 
M.H.A. ; B. E. S. Dunfuld. F. C. Herteau, 
l.S.o. : W. F. Lloyd, LL.D.. M.II.A. ; 
W. W. Halyard. M.II.A.: II. F. Shortis, 
Arthur Me AS! 1). ]. Davies, I. C. Morris, 
W. G. Gosling, C. P. Ayre, Dr. Mosdell. R. P. 
Holloway, Thomas McNeil. Fiank J. Morris, 
K.C., M.H.A.; J. W. Munis and W. Jo.-ies, 
Superintendent of the Institute. 

Having thus carefully inspected the Institute 
and taken leave of the officials and committee, the cortege p o- 
ceeded through the city to St. George s Field, where they ar 
rived at 11.30. On the way there, as the Duke and his party 
were passing the Roman Catholic C.ithedral, a very pleasing 
incident occurred, the joy-bells rang out a glorious peal of wel 
come, and sent the joyful sound down over the city, where it 
could be heard by everyone. " The Duke" observed one of 
our evening papers next day "was particularly impres-ed with 
this beautiful expression of loyalty, as was also His Excellency 
the Governor and other members of the party." 

At the Field the Cadet Corps, consistii g of the Church Lids 
Brigade, the Catholic Cadet Corps, the Newfoundland High 
landers, and Company A from Harbor Grace, and Company A 
from Carbonear, of the King Edward Cade s, were drawn up in 




HX. E. R. BOWRING, 
Dirprtnr of TCowrine Bros.. Ltd. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 13. 




Photo by S. H. Parsons 6- Sons. 

THE DUKE LAYING THE CORNER-STONE OF THE REID SANITORIUM. 



quarter column. On entering His Royal Highness was received 
with a royal salute, and the massed bands pla) ed the first six 
bars of the National Antht m. The Duke then walked down the 
grounds and, with the ke n eye of a soldier, carefully inspected 
the various battalions, whi e the bands played marches and 
other selected airs. The inspection over, he took his place at 
the sjlu ing base and the battalions formed fours and marched 
past, the music furnished each battalion being supplied by its 
own bind. When the second corps had reached their halting 
ground, the officers on parade returned to the saluting point 
and were presented to His Royal Highness Field Marshal the 
Duke of Connaught. 

On leaving the Parade Ground the Duke proceeded to Mili 
tary and King s Bridge Roads, entering Government House 
grounds by the cistern g-tte. In the afternoon he drove along 
the Waterford Bridge Roid, arriving at Bowring Park at 4 
o clock, where more than ten thousand people had assembled to 
greet him. He was received by a guard of honor and six 
teen men from the Methodist Guards. Assembled on the 
spacious platform erected for the occasion were many prominent 
citizens, guests of fie generous donor of the Park. Here the 
Right Hon. Sir E. P. Morris, Prime Minister, formally presented 
the Hon. Edgar R. Bowring as the pub ic benefactor through 
whose generosity the Park had been obtained; and in doing 
this, Sir Edward made a most effective speech. I have heard 
him a hundred times or more, but never to better advantage 
than on this particular occasion. He rose to all the requirments 
of the supreme moment and carried his immense audience 
with him. Mr. Bowring then, in a very unostentatious and 
graceful manner, acknowledged the glowing tribute paid him by 
the Prime Minister and in I hat happy style peculiarly his own, 
a^ked His Roy .1 Highness to declare the Park open for the 
pleasure and rec- cation of the public. The Duke smilingly 
acceded to Mr. Bowring s request, and enhanced the value of 
the gift by the hiudsjme compliment he paid the giver. 

Then the Governor, in his big, frank, manly way, and without 
any attempt to display his latent oratorical powers, tendered to 
Mr. Bowring the thanks of the community; after which His 
Royal Highness, accompanied by the guests, and followed by 
the public generally, proceeded to another part of the grounds, 
where he commemorated the event by planting a tree and ac 
cepting a miniature silver spide as a souvenir of the incident. 
I almost forget what kind of a tree it was, but a " mutual friend" 
who stood beside me during the function remarked in a sug 
gestive sort of way that he thought the band played The Maple 
Leaf Forever " as soon as His Royal Highness had finished. 
Then tea was served and the Duke left for the site of the con 
templated hospital for the treatment of tuberculosis. Here he 



was received by an officer and sixteen men of 
the Newfoundland Highlanders, as a guard of 
honor. Mr. W. D. Reid the donor of the 
Hospital, was then presented to His Royal 
Highness by Governor Davidson ; whereupon 
Mr. Reid prayed the Duke to lay the founda 
tion stone of the structure, which he well and 
truly did, and received for his services a little 
silver trowel. Mr. M. W. Furlong, K.C., 
brought this function to a close by tendering 
thanks to His Royal Highness on behalf of the 
modest donor and the Directors of the Reid- 
Newfoundland Company. 

The Duke then returned to Government 
House where a dinner was served to which a 
number of those who hold, or have held, high 
positions were invited. But .this did not end 
the eventful day s proceedings. His Royal 
Highness, as Grand Master of the United 
Lodge of Freemason s in the British Domin 
ions, had been pleased to accept an invitation 
of the District Grand Master and Freemasons 
in St. John s and arranged to visit the Masonic 
Temple at 10 p.m. At the entrance a guard 
of honor was furnished composed of an officer 
and sixteen men of the Church Lads Brigade, 
of whic 1 ! corps the Duke is Honorary Colonel- 
in^Chief. Here His Royal Highness spent a delightful hour. 
The Temp e. which stands on the brow of a hill over-looking 
the harbor, was brilliantly illuminated. The Masons had made 
ample preparation. AH that level-headed imagination could 
suggest was done, and the Duke (practical man that he is) knew 
this and entered into the spirit of the gathering with all the en 
thusiasm necessary on his part to make it an unqualified success: 

" Again the feast, the speech, the glee, 
The shade of passing thought, the wealth 
Of words and wit. the double health, 

The crowning cup, the three-times three " 




W. D. REID, ESQ., 
President of the Reid-Newfoundland Company. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 14- 




SCENES IN BOW RING PARK. 



The third day of the Duke s visit did not have so strenuous a 
programme, it being the wish of the Governor and his advisers 
to give His Royal Highness an opportunity of seeing the country 
about St. John s as well as of meeting with the people The 
French cruiser Friant, Captain de Lagrence, had already ar- 
nved in port on a visit of courtesy to the Duke. After an 
exchange of salutes with H.M.S Essex, Captain Lagrence paid 
his official call at Government House, which was duly returned 
by His Royal Highness and the Governor. The Duke then 
went for a drive in a motor car belonging to Mr. H. D. Reid 
during which he had an opportunity of getting a view of Bell 
Island, though the time at his disposal was not sufficient to 
admit of a visit to the mines there, which run out in Conception 
Bay for nearly three miles under the sea. His Royal Highness 
returned from his drive in time to lunch with Sir Edward and 
Lady Morris, who, at the same time, entertained His Excellency 
the Governor and Captain Watson, of the Essex, and their 
suites. After luncheon the royal party left for Government 
House grounds, where they inspected the Ambulance Corps, 
and where His Lordship the Chief Justice (Sir Wm. Horwood), 
President of the Local Division ; Mr H. W LeMessurier, Chair 
man ; Dr. Cluny MacPherson, Secretary, and Mr. John 
Fenelon, Treasurer, were presented to the Duke by His Excel 
lency the Governor. The Duke was highly pleased with the 
whole outfit, congratulated all concerned on the establishment 
of this Local Branch of the Order, and wished the members 
every success in theii work. 

From 4 to 6.30 p.m. there was a garden party at Government 
House, for which over six hundred invitations had been issued. 
The bands of the several cadet corps were in attendance, as well 
as the pipers of the Highlanders. A wee bit of dissatisfaction 
manifested itself just here and this was the only semblance of 
a cloud that appeared in our social sky during the whole of the 
royal visit. It seems that the guests expected to be presented 
to His Royal Highness, as was the case when their Majesties 
the King and Queen (then the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall 
and York) visited Newfoundland in 1901. At that time a much 
larger number of people attended the functions at Government 
House than on the i6th of July last, and the Duke and Duchess 
warmly shook hands with the whole of them. As a member of 
the reception committee on that auspicious occasion, I had the 
pleasure of being present at pretty well all the functions, and 
can bear testimony to the beaming happiness with which the 
guests greeted each other as they filed out of the gubernatorial 
residence and said : " I have just shaken hands with our future 
King and Queen !" 

Later in the evening some guests were invited by the Gov 
ernor to meet His Royal Highness at dinner ; after which he 
made a tour of the city and witnessed the illuminations, some 
of which were truly magnificent: notably the displays at the 
Colonial Building, the Masonic Temple, the Knights of Columbus 
Building, the Irish Society, Orange, Total Abstinence and City 
Halls, and the Railway Station. While passing down Duck 
worth Street, on his way back to Government House, and when 
near the Masonic Temple, the Duke received a perfect ovation. 
The Masons and their friends, to the number of a thousand, 
more or less, assembled outside the building, where they sang 
the National Anthem and cheered lustily for His Royal Highness 
till they were hoarse. A brilliant display of fireworks in the 
Colonial Building grounds brought the royal programme to a 
close. The Duke went on board the Essex at 1 1 o clock, and 
at midnight left for Quebec, taking with him the undoubted 
assurance that in no part of the vast British Empire are the 
people more devoted to the Royal Family than in this ancient 
and loyal Colony. If the writer were permitted to sum up his 
personal impressions of the Duke, he would be inclined to char 
acterize him as a striking type of the perfect English gentleman 

easy and graceful in his movements, affable to all with whom 

he is brought in contact, and possessing a charm of manner that 
is positively irresistible. The latter trait, no doubt, accounts for 
his great popularity in Canada as well as in the United Kingdom. 
He is, indeed, a worthy son of the illustrious mother to whom 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 15. 

Tennyson refers in that inimitable dedicatory poem of his when 



he says : 



Revered, beloved O you that hold 

A nobler office upon earth 

Than arms, or power, or brains, or Uuh 
Could give the warrior kings of old : 

O leave us rulers of your blood 

As noble till the latest day ! 

May children of our children say 
" She wrought her people lasting good!" 




On the Death of Pope Pius X, 

Who died at Rome, August 2Oth, 1914, aged 79 vears. 
By Rose M. Greene, Bell Island. 

HEAVEN S sublimity and perfect grace, 

Seemed mirrored in his life ; 
A prayer- becalmed and nobly tranquil face 

Innocent of sin and stiife 

A soul kept bright as when God gave it breath ; 
A well spent life and lo ! a holy death. 

The Pope, solicitous for his last earthly care. 

Offered to Heaven above, 
A prayer for peace, and hope for man s despair ; 

A blessed psalm of love. 

Ere from the mist of might God s messenger had come 
To lift the veil and lead our Prelate home. 



God gave him gifts divine in childhood s hour : 
Not gold, and so the world proclaim d him poor; 

God made him rich with Heaven s wealth of power, 
And crowned his wealth with piety and sacred lore. 

A Peasant Pope whose simple, holy mind 
Had held the Church s children to his heart ; 

A saint and man in human ways combined, 

Who sought through prayer God s wisdom to impart. 

Pius the Tenth frpm Peter s throne is gone 
To join the noble band of the eternally blest; 

His duties and his labors were well done, 
And so in Christ he finds eternal rest. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 16. 

The Old Volunteer Force. 



By H. W. LeMessurier, J.P. 




this particular time it will be interesting to the 
present generation to have a short sketch of the 
formation of the " St. John s Volunteer Rifle 
Battalion." 

On the 1 7th January, 1860 the principal mer 
chants of St. John s held a meeting in Mr. Ewen Stabb s office 
to consider the advisability of raising a Volunteer force in St. 
John s. At this meeting it was decided to open a list to obtain 
the signatures of those who would be willing to join a volunteer 
force and on the 2oth of the same month, according to announce 
ment, Mr. Ewen Stabb received a large number of signatures. 
The success of the movement was so assured that it was decided 
to call a public meeting of those interested in the formation of 
a volunteer corps, and on the 24th such a meethg was held at 
2 p.m. in the Presbyterian School House. Mr. F. C. K. 
Hepburn took the chair, about 300 men being present. The 
enrolment ot No i Company, " Prince of Wales," took place, 
when P. Tasker was elected by ballot as Cap ain, John Fox as 
Lieutenant, and H. K. Dickinson as Ensign. No. 2 Company, 
" Queens," was at the same time enrolled and G. Ehlers, was 
elected Captain, F. C. K. Hepburn Lieutenant and M. W. 
Walbank Ensign. The following editorial from the Morning 
Postoi the 24th January, 1860, gives an idea of the origination 
of the movement and the assistance rendered by the Mother 
Country: 

" We are very glad to observe by an advertisement of to-day, 
the beginning of a movement for the formation of Local Rifle 
Companies. This mode of self defence is being now taught, 
and adopted with great spirit throughout the United Kingdom, 
and our Sister Colonies ; and we are sure Newfoundland (pro 
verbial for her loyalty) having such important interests to p-o- 
tecf, and a population courageous, and already accustomed to 
the use of arms, will be a match for her neighbours, in alacrity 
and zeal on this occasion. 

" The idea of a Rifle Force was suggested by the gallant 
General Williams, during his visit here last season, in reply to 
the address of the Executive Council which drew his attention to 
the subject of our imperfect defences. The General gave his 
assurance of his good offices with the Imperial Government at 
the same time recommending that we should aid the Parent 
State as far as possible by helping ourselves in the manner now 
proposed, by learning the effective use of the great instrument 
of modern warfare the Rifle. The Local Government we 
learn, subsequently affirmed this view in a communication to 
Downing Street, represented that the formation of Volunteer 
Corps would be the mode of proceeding most acceptable here, 
and intimated that the gratuitous supply of arms and accoutre 
ments by the Imperial authorities would tend to stimulate the 
energies of our people. Acting on this suggestion, the Home 
Government have recently sent out some fifteen hundred (1500) 
rifles. With these necessary accompaniments an act of liber 
ality for which they are entitled to our best thanks, it is 
most satisfactory to see the present prompt anxiety to corres 
pond with the endeavours of the Government in the introduction 
of this valuable knowledge of the art of self defence. Doubtless 
a little time will show the determination of all classes of the 
community to avail themselves of it." 

On the 2ist February, No. 3 Company, "Victoria," was 
enrolled and James S. Clift elected as Captain, Robt. Thorburn 
as Lieutenant and R. Dicks as Ensign. No. 4 Company, 
" Terra Nova " was enrolled, Henry Renouf being elected as 
Captain, Michael Whelan as Lieutenant and John T. Barron, 
Ensign. On the istMay, No. 5 Company was enrolled E. D. 
Shea being elected as Captain, G. Hogsett. Lieutenant, R. J. 



Kent, Ensign, and Dr. Henry Shea, Surgeon. The officers of 
this Company do not appear in any Gazette, and it is not men 
tioned as forming part of the Battalion in the Gazette of 1864. 

At first the Volunteers were drilled without rifles or uniform, 
No. i drilling in Hunter s Store, No. 2 in McBride s Store, No. 3 
in the Old Church and Continental School and Nos. 4 and 5 in 
the Old Factory. On March the 23rd rifles were served out to 
the Volunteers from the Army Military Stores and the Compan 
ies drilled for the first time with arms. 

The Legislature voted 150 for the first three years for the 
upkeep of the force, the Volunteers paying, where they coulH, 
for their own uniforms, subsequently the Legislative grant was 
increased to 250 ($1000) and the British Government provided 
a new uniform, which was a scarlet tunic, black trousers with 
red stripe, &c., arms and ammunition, and also drill instructors 
for each company. The Old Gymnasium on Gower Street 
where now Lawrence s Factory stands, was taken for a drill shed, 
and subsequently the drill shed on Military Road, now occu 
pied by the Water Department of the City Council, was built by 
the Government, for the use of the Volunteers. 

On the i6th February, 1861, No. 2 Company formed an 
instrumental band, the members of which were instructed by the 
Regimental Band Master of the Royal Newfoundland Compan 
ies. In April of the same year. No. i and 2 Co npanies were 
called into Barracks and remained in Camp at Fort To vnshend 
from the 26th April to the i2th May. 

On the 2oth July the five Companies of Volunteers wit i the 
Royal Newfoundland Companies and a Company of the 62nd 
Regiment, were reviewed on the Parade Ground by General 
Trollope, the Officer Commanding at Halifax. 

On the 2oth June, 1864, the Companies were formed into a 
Battalion, as may be seen by the following notice : 
" VOLUNTEER GAZETTE." 

COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF S OFFICE, 

St. John s, Newfoundland. 

2oth June, 1864. 

" In conformity with rhe 2nd clause of the Local Act 2=;th 
Victoria, cap. IV., entitled An Act to provibe for th- Or i.iiza- 
tion of a Volunteer Force for the Protection of Newfound] aid," 
His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief is pleased to direct 
that the four Volunteer Rifle Companies of St. fohn s shall be 
combined, and constitute a Batallion, to be desi- -.ated the 
"Saint John s Volunteer Rifle Batallion," and to be under the 
Command, on parade, or in the field, of the Deputy \ssistant- 
Adjutant-Geueral for the time being." 

On the ist June, 1865, Henry Renouf was gazetted as M ,jor 
Lieut. R. Dicks as Adjutant and Dr. J. N. Fraser and I)r \V C 
Simms as Surgeons. Major Renouf served as M ,j ,r until the 
i2th February, 1867, when he was promoted to the po^t of 
Adjutant General, which he held until the 2oth January .874 
when he resigned upon being appointed Magistrate of the 
Central District Court. The following Volunteer General 
Order was published on the sth July _ 

VOLUNTEER GENERAL ORDERS 
ASST. ADJUTANT GENERAL S OFFJCE, 

St. John s Newfoundland 



having been approved by His Excellency the Comma, 

Ch ie f,-are pubhshed for the guidance of all concm 

are to be punctually observed: and 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 17. 



/ The St - John s Battalion of Volunteer Rifles will meet for 
drill under the command of Captain Coen, D.A.A.G., every 
Monday and Thursday, during the season, at 7 o clock p.m. 
precisely, on the Parade-Ground on the Barrens outside of Fort 
Townshend. 

2. The first Parade for Drill will take place on Thursday the 
3oth of June, at the hour and place above indicated. 

3. Officers Commanding Companies will transmit to this 
offi -e, every Monday, in the drill season, correct returns of the 
number of Volunteers belonging to their respective Companies 
present at each parade during the previous week, and the 
number of absentees therefrom, detailing the names of the 
latter upon the back of the Return. 

4- Should the weather on either of the evenings appointed 
for Drill be very wet, and unfavourable, the parade for that day 
will be considered as cancelled, and due notice will be given 
of any Parade on the following day in place of it. 

5- Arrangements will be made in future orders for proceed 
ing with the annual course of Target Practice; but, it is to be 
distinctly understood that no Volunteer will be permitted to 
take part in it until he is perfectly efficient in the Manual and 
Platoon Exercises, and has attended at least six general Drill- 
Parades this Season ; as it is indisputable that practice with 
ball ammunition cannot be carried on by men who, through 
absence from their drill, or inattention, are but imperfectly ac 
quainted with their arms, without the gravest risk to the lives 
of themselves and others. 

6. Before concluding, the Commander-in-Chief would direct 
the serious attention of tvery member of the Volunteer Force of 
Newfoundland, whatever may be his Rank, to No. 5 of 
Volunteer General Orders, issued on the i6th June, 1862, and, 
which is now republished, for the guidance of all : 

"5. The Commander-in-Chief feels it incumbent on him, 
before concluding, to direct the serious attention of the Officers, 
Non-Commissioned Officers and Privates of the Newfoundland 
Rifle Volunteers, to the absolute necessity which exists on their 
parts for a regular and punctual attendance at the Parades for 
Drill, which, with that view, have been ordered at hours fixed 
on by themselves as least calculated to interfere, at this season, 
with their usual business pursuits. The discipline and general 
efficiency which can alone make their services useful in case of 
need, are not to be acquired in any other way ; and His 
Excellency confidently relies on their not being found wanting in 
that zeal and perseverance which are indispensable it the Volun 
teer Force is to endure, and the movement prove successful 
here." 

7. Officers Commanding Companies will send into this Office 
by the ist proximo, corrected nominal lists of the effective 
members of their respective companies, distinguishing those 
who, having recently enrolled themselves, have not yet take the 
Oath of Allegiance prescribed by the Volunteer Act. 

By order, 

W. J. COEN, Captain, 
(Unattached) D. A. Gl. Volunteers. 

Many changes took place in the Commands of the Companies, 
Mr. Tasker died in 1861 and Mr. Stephen Rendell took his 
place, he resigned in 1864 and Mr. H. K. Dickinson was ap 
pointed Captain, Mr. Nicholas R. Mudge, Lieut., and Mr. Geo. 
T. Rendell, Ensign. Captain Dickinson resigned in November 
1865 and the officers gazetted for that year were H. J. Stabb, 
Captain, M. J. Delaney, Lieut., C. S. Pinsent, Ensign. In No. 3 
Company, 1864, we find R. Thorburn, Capt., R. Dicks, Lieut, 
and T. R. Job, Ensign. In No. 2 Company W. W. Walbank 
became Captain, T. R. Smith, Lieut, and in No. 4 Company 
Robt. J. Parsons became Captain in 1865, H. B. Dryer, Lieut, 
and W. O. Wood, Ensign. 

On the 1 2th June, 1866, Captain W. B. Bowring resigned from 
No. 3 Company and his place was filled by the appointment of 
Lieut. T. W. Stabb, Ensign N. S. Stabb being promoted to 
Lieut, and Charles Bowring being appointed Ensign. 

About the same time a Volunteer Artillery Section was formed 
and Ensign John B. McLea from No. 2 and Ensign C. 
Pinsent from No. i Company were detailed for instruction in 
field Battery Drill. Thomas Brown was appointed Ensign of 
No i Company and Corporal Wm. Thorburn of No. 2 Company 



was promoted to be Ensign. 

In January, 1867, J. B. McLea was appointed extra Lieut, in 
No. 2 Company for artillery duty. Ensign C. S. Pinsent, on 
the 22nd was gazetted Lieutenant of No. i vice E. M. J. Delaney 
deceased Sergt. J. E. Roach being appointed Ensign. On the 
2gth January, 1867, the New Drill Shed on Military Road was 
opened and on the 4th February Major General Mesham was 
appointed Lieut-Colonel of the Battalion. On the 151(1 June 
Lieut. J. B. McLea resigned from No. 2 Company, and on the 
9th September Lieut. Thos. R. Smith followed suit, Ensign 
W. O. Wood succeeding him. 

On the 24th February, 1868, Mr. Weston Carter was ap 
pointed Ensign of No. 4 Company. 

The resignations of Messrs. McLea and Smith from No. 2 
Company led to the appointment by the Governor of W. H. 
Warren who was not an active member of the Volunteer Force. 
This was resented by the Company which thought that one of 
their senior Sergeants should be promoted to the position of 
Ensign. In consequence of this very unpopular move No. 2 
Company refused to attend drill during the gear, and on the i4th 
July the Governor severely reprimanded Capt. Walbank for not 
informing him of the CoTipany s action, cancelled his Commis 
sion and disbanded No. 2. 

On 26th January, 1869, a new Company was formed called the 
" Avalon Company," and was chiefly composed of men who had 
served in No. 2. The following officers were gazetted: R. T. 
Rankin, Captain ; J. S. Winter, Lieut ; and James Browning, 
Ensign. 

On the 22nd March, Capt. H. J. Stabb, of No. i company 
was appointed Major of the Battalion vice H. Renouf promoted, 
and C. S. Pinsent was appointed to succeed him as Captain of 
No. i. Ensign John E. Roach was appointed Lieut., vice-Pinsent 
promoted. 

These are the last gazettings to the " St. John s Volunteer 
Battalion " that I have been able to find, and although the 
corps drilled until 1874 I find no official Gazette disbanding 
them. 

The interest in the Volunteers died away with the removal of 
the Imperial Garrison, and if it were not for a few enthusiastic 
members of the Corps, who formed a Rifle Club, no military 
training would have been kept up. For years the Rifle Club 
was kept going, sometimes in full force and at other times at a 
low ebb it was much hampered by the losses of rifles and am 
munition in th fire of 1892, but a few of its members struggled 
to maintain it and time and again begged the Government for 
assistance, which was not forthcoming. Rifle practice of late 
years h is been so well kept up by the Cltb that members have 
been of very great service to the country as instructors for the 
Newfoundland Contingent. 

Before closing the article I would note that in 1861 a Vol 
unteer Corps was raised in Harbor Grace and styled the Harbor 
Grace Volunteer Corps, the officers were John Hayward, 
Captain ; H. T. Moore, Lieutenant ; R. S. Munn, Ensign. In 
1869 Capt. Hayward was promoted to be Major, H. T. Moore 
to be Captain, R S. Munn, Lieutenant and W. P. Munn to be 
Ensign. This Corps ceased to exist in 1874. 



To the Troubler of the World, 

By William Watson. 

AT last we know you, War-Lord. You, that flung 

The gauntlet down, fling down the mask you wore, 

Publish your heart, and let its pent hate pour, 
You that had God for ever on your tongue. 
We are old in war, and if in guile we are young, 

Young also is the spirit that evermore 

Burns in our bosom ev n as heretofore, 

Nor are these thews unbraced, these nerves unstrung. 
We do not with God s name make wanton play ; 

We are not on such easy terms with Heaven; 
But in Earth s hearing we can verily say, 

" Our hands are pure; for peace, for peace we have striven 

And not by Earth shall he be soon forgiven 
Who lit the fire accurst that flames to-day. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 18. 



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THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 19. 

Some Weil-Known Sayings, Phrases and Words, 

With their Meaning and Origin, Part V. 




By Arch. 

.LOTSAAT and Jetsam. Waifs found in the sea 
or on the shore. " Flotsam," goods found " float 
ing " on the sea after a wreck ( Anglo-Saxon ), 
flotan, to float. Jetsan," or Jetsam, goods 
thrown overboard in a storm to lighten the vessel 
(French, jeter, to throw out.) 

Sterling Money. Spelman derives the word from estirlings, 
merchants of the Hause Towns, who came over and reformed 
our coin in the reign of John I. Others say it is starling 
(little star) in allusion to a star impressed on the coin. Others 
refer it to Stirling Castle in Scotland, where money was coined 
in the reign of Edward I. In the time of Richard I. monie 
coined in the east parts of Germany began to be of especiall re 
quest in England foi the puritie thereof, and was called Easterl- 
ing monie, as all the inhabitants of these parts were called 
Easterlings, and shortly after some of that countrie, skillful in 
mint matters and allaies, were sent for into this realm to bring 
this coin to perfection, which since that time was called of them 
sterling or Easterling. Camden. 

I have a straw to break unth you. I am displeased with you; 
I have a reproof to give you ; In feudal times possession of a 
fief was conveyed by giving a straw to a new tenant. If the 
tenant misconducted himself, the lord dispossessed him by going 
to the treshold of his door and breaking a straw, saying as he 
did so: "As I break this straw, so break I the contract made 
between us." 

By hook or by crook. Either rightfully or wrongfully; in one 
way or another. Formerly the poor of a manor were allowed 
to go into the forests with a hook and a crook to get wood. 
What they could not reach with the hook they could pull down 
with crook. 

Rubert of Debate, Edward Geoffrey, fourteenth Earl of 
Derby. It was when he was Mr. Stanley, and the opponent of 
the great O Connell, that Lord Lytton so described him (1799- 
1869). 

"The brilliant chief, irregularly great, 

Frank, haughty, bold the Rubert of Debate." New Timon. 

To get the sack, or to give one the sack. To get discharged by 
one s employer. Mechanics travelling in quest of work carried 
their implements in a bag or sack; when discharged, they 
received back the bag that they might replace their tools, and 
seek a job elsewhere. Another explanation says : The Sultan 
puts into a sack and throws into the Bosphorus, any one of his 
harem he wishes out of his way. 

1 don t care a fig for you. Not worth a fig. Anything at all. 
Here fig is fico a fillip or snap of the finger. Thus we say 
I don t care that for you " snapping the fingers at the same 
time. 

To throw up the sponge. " To join the majority." " To cave 
in." " To pass in one s cheques " and many other like phrases 
mean that one gives up for good dies. 

To scrape an acquaintance. The Gentleman s Magazine says, 
that Emperor Hadrian went one day to the public baths, and 
saw an old soldier, well known to him, scraping himself with a 
potsherd for want of a flesh-brush. The Emperor sent him a 
sum of money. The next day Hadrian found the bath crowded 
with soldiers scraping themselves with potsherds, and said 
" Scrape away, gentlemen, but you ll not scrape acquaintance 
with me." 

To put on the screw. To press for payment, as a screw 
presses by gradually increasing pressure. 

Selling the pass. This is a phrase, general in Ireland, applied 
to those who turn King s evidence," or who impeach their 
comrades for money. The tradition is, that a regiment of 
soldiers was sent by Crotha, "Lord of Atha," to hold a pass 
against the invading army of Trathal, " King 



G. Gibb. 

pass was betrayed for money. The Fir-bolgs being subdued. 
Thrathal assumed the title of " King of Ireland." 

Throwing the wedding-shce. It has long been a custom in 
England, Scotland and elsewhere to throw an old shoe, or 
several shoes, at the bride and bridegroom when they quit the 
bride s home after the wedding-breakfast, or when they go to 
church to get married. Some think this represents an assault 
and refers to the ancient notion that the bridegroom carried off 
the bride with force ond violence. Others look upon it as a 
relic of the ancient law of exchange, implying that the parents of 
the bride give up henceforth all right of dominion to their 
daughter. When the Emperor Wladimir proposed marriage to 
the daughter of Reginald she rejected him saying " I will not 
take off my shoe to the son of a slave." In Anglo-Saxon 
marriages thr? father delivered the bride s shoe to the bride 
groom, who touched her with it on the head to show authority. 
In Turkey, the bridegroom, after marriage is chased by the 
guests, who either administer blow by way of adieux, or pelt 
him with slippers. 

Better be the head of an ass than the tail of a horse. Better be 
foremost amongst commoners than the lowest of the aristocracy; 
better be the head of the yeomanry than the tail of the gentry. 

To draw in one s horns. To retract, or mitigate, a pro 
nounced opinion ; to restrain pride. The illusion is to the snail. 

To hop the twig. To run away from one s creditors, as a bird 
eludes a fowler, "hopping from spray to spray." Also to die. 
There are numerous other phrases to express the cessation of 
life, for example : " To kick the bucked," " To lay down one s 
knife and fork," "To peg out" (from the game of cribbage), 
" To be snuffed out " (like a candle). 

I have a bone to pick with you. An unpleasant matter to 
settle with you. At the marriage banquets of the Sicilian poor, 
the bride s father, after the meal, used to hand the bridegroom 
a bone, siying " Pick this bone, for you have taken in hand a 
much harder task." 

Dead as a door nail. The door-nail is the plate or knob on 
which i he knocker or hammer strikes. As this nail is knocked 
on ths head several times a day, it cannot be supposed to have 
much life left in it. 

Mad as a March hare. Hares are unusually shy and wild in 
March, which is their rutting season. Erasmus says : Mad as 
a marsh hare," and adds " hares are wilder in marshes from the 
absence of hedges and cover." 

As happy as a clam. A clam is a bivalve mollusca, which 
burrows in sand or mud. It is about the size of a fifty-cent 
piece, and may be eaten raw or fried, like an oyster. Clams are 
gathered only when the tide is out ; when the tide is in they are 
safe from molestation, hence the saying "Happy as a clam at 
h gh tide." (Anglo-Saxon, clam, mud; verb clam-ian, to glue; 
German klamm, close). 



Post Office Notice! To Postmasters. 



of Gael." The Aug., 1914. 



Payments to families of the Nfld. Naval Reserve is being made 
by means of British Postal Orders, and when presented at any 
Newfoundland Post Office they should be cashed when receipted 
by the payee, date stamped by the Postmaster and forwarded 
as cash to the General Post Office when remitting for stamps, 
&c., or may be forwarded as Money Order remittance or for 
deposit to the Bank of Montreal. 

The orders are in sterling and should be cashed at rate of $4.86 to the 
H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 20. 




Published by Authority. 

An Act Respecting Stamp Duties. 

[Passed September ;th, 1914.] 

Be it enacted by the Governor, the Legislative Council and 
House of Assembly, in Legislative Session convened, as fol 
lows : 

1. From and after the commencement of this Act there shall 
be paid for the use of His Majesty. His Heirs and Successors, 
upon the several instruments mentioned in the Schedule hereto, 
the several duties in the said Schedule specified. 

2. No such instrument executed after the commencement of 
this Act in this Colony, or relating wherever executed to any 
property situate or to any matter or thing done or to be done in 
this Colony shall, except in criminal proceedings, be pleaded 
or given in evidence or admitted to be good, useful or available 
in law or equity unless it is duly stamped in accordance with 
the provisions of this Act. 

3. Nothing in this Act shall apply to any Bank note payable 
to bearer or on demand, issued or circulated by any Bank doing 
business in this Colony. 

4. If any Bank doing business in this Colony or any branch 
of such bank cashes any cheque not duly stamped, the manager 
of such bank or branch shall be liable for every offence to a 
penalty of ten dollars to be recovered in a summary manner be 
fore a Stipendiary Magistrate. 

5. Every instrument to which this Act applies shall be stamped 
with adhesive or impressed stamps of value equal to the duty 
payable thereon, and for the purpose of so stamping any of the 
instruments in the Schedule hereto, either stamps provided or 
procured for the purpose of the Act 61 Vic., Cap. 14 entitled 
" An Act respecting the Payment of Certain Fees and Charges 
by Stamps," ordinary postage stamps may be used. 

6. In this Act "instrument" means any paper or writing men 
tioned in the Schedule. 

7. An instrument shall not be deemed to be duly stamped un 
less the stamp affixed thereto is cancelled. 

I. All the provisions of the Act 61 Vic., Cap. 12, entitled 
" An Act respecting the Payments of Certain Fees and Charges 
by Stamps, " shall apply to this Act and the Schedule hereto 
and this Act and the Act 61 Vic., Cap. 14, may be cited together 
as " The Stamp Acts, 1898-1914." 

9. The Governor in Council shall make rules and regulations 
as to the affixing of stamps to all instruments under this Act and 
the cancelling of the same. All such rules and regulations 
when published in the Royal Gazette and one other paper pub 
lished in the Colony, shall have the force and effect of law. 

10. This Act shall come into operation on the ist day of Oc 
tober, 1914. 



SCHEDULE 

Cheques on a Banker .......... 

Promissory Notes ................ 

Bills of Lading and Shipping Receipts 

Bill of Exchange for every $100 or part thereof 

Charter Parties . 



2C. 

2C. 
2C. 




Published by Authority. 

Under the provisions of " The Stamp Acts, 1898-1914" His 
Excellency the Governor in Council has been pleased to approve 
the following Rules and Regulations respecting Stamp Duties. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary . 
Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
September I5th, 1914. 



i. Every instrument shall be stamped on its face. 

2. Cancellation of Stamps shall be made by person cancel 
ling by writing name or initials, with date across Stamp. 

3. Bills of Exchange, Cheques, Promissory Notes, Bills of 
Lading, Shipping Receipts and Charter Parties, shall be stamped 
and the Stamps thereon cancelled : 

(1) Bills of Exchange, Cheques, Promissory Notes drawn in 

the Colony by the person signing the same. Provided 
that in the case of a Cheque on a Banker, the Banker to 
whom it is presented for payment may, if it is unstamped, 
stamp the same and cancel the stamp. 

(2) Bills of Exchange, Cheques and Promissory Notes drawn 
or made outside the Colony by the person into whose 
hands same shall come before the same is paid or 
negotiated. 

(3) Bills ot Lading and Shipping Receipts by the shipper. 

Provided that if presented unstamped they may be 
stamped by person receiving same. 

4. Charter Parties by the Charterer. 

5- The person on whom the obligation to stamp and cancel 
is imposed by these Rules, shall be deemed to be a person 
issuing an instrument, and if he issues such an instrument with 
out its proper stamp or without properly cancelling same he shall 
be liable to the penalties imposed by Section 23 of the Act 61 
Victoria, Cap. 14, entitled " An Act respecting the payment of 
certain fees and charges by stamps." 



If you use 

Windsor Patent 

and 

Royal Household 
Flour 



You will have the satisfaction of knowing that 
money cannot buy better in any 
part of the World. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newf* 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 21. 



Insure Your Property 




WITH THE 



LIVERPOOL and LONDON and GLOBE 

Insurance Company, Limited. 

Bowring, Bros., Ltd., 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



M. & E. KENNEDY, 

Contractors, 
Builders and 
Appraisers* 

Office: RENOUF BUILDING. 

P. O. Box 214. PHONE 767. 

Factory and Store, off James Street. 



A Neighborly Feeling 

prompts one to be sociable at times and 
extend hospitality to their friends when they 
call. So keep your tea caddie well stocked ; 
your friends will appreciate the Cup of 
Quality brewed from 

HOMESTEAD. 

Faultless in quality, its flavor makes staunch 
friends. 4-Oc. Ib. 

C. P. EAGAN, 

Duckworth St. and Queen s Road. 



Prosperous & 
Progressive* 

Sun Life Assurance Company 



Of Canada. 



Amount of Assurance in force, - 
Payments to Policy holders, 



$202,363,996.00 
39,385,287.91 



Largest Company 
in British Empire* 

ALEX. BRYDEN, Mgr. for Nfld. 



For Fall and Winter. 

Our Clothes and 
furnishings for Boys 

are receiving very special compliments 
from the many Pleased Mothers who have 
been here. 

The Good Quality, Neat Styles 

and exceptional values are what pleased them. 

They will please you, too. 

T. J. BARRON, 

Boys and Men s Outfitter. 
358 Water Street. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 22. 



The Knights of Avalon. 

By Robert Gear MacDonald. 

[The Poet Laureate, Mr. Robert Bridges, in a letter to the Times, main 
tains that this is really a Holy War, manifestly a \var declared between 
Christ and the Devil, and that on its issue depends almost all that makes 
life worth living. Mr. Hillaire Belloc accuses Germany of being an atheistic 
state since atheism is not the mere denial of the existence of God, but 
the denial of justice, of mercy, and the rights of the weak. These state 
ments are quite true, and those who by a dreadful necessity are called 
npon to oppose the attempt of the German Emperor to rule the world, are 
as much Knights of the Cross as ever the Crusaders were.] 

GIRD ye, gird ye, for the fight, for your place in this fateful war; 
Join ye, join ye, with your brethem who hasten from countries afar ; 

Briton, and Sikh, and Boer, men of the mighty West, 
Meii-from the Austral islands coming at Freedom s behest 

Belgian and Slav and Gaul fighting God s battles to-day 
Fighting for freedom and right, joining this terrible fray. 

Ye too whether on ocean ye guard our sea girt lands 

Or upon the warfields of Europe, where the great arch enemy stands, 

Brutal, swollen with blood lust, power of the earth and of sin, 
Mighty with sword and with chariot, armed both without and within. 

Altar and home overthrowing, culture and art destroying, 
Science with lowest cunning, and brainwork with force alloying. 

Go then, knights of our country, help with what stiength ye may 
The efforts of those by whose side ye battle for Freedom to-day, 

Bold little Belgium, her fields lying wasted, her shrines overthrown. 
But struggling for freedom yet, the freedom that shall be her own, 

France, the Republic, if ever her hope and her witness were dim 
Finding her Faith in this hour, chanting her marvellous hymn, 

Great Christian Russia, growing in wisdom, in freedom, in joy, 
Leaving her barbarous past as the Man leaves behind him the Boy ! 

India, all her kingdoms at one, with the Empire stands ; 
Canada s sons, Australasia s, swiftly unsheathing their brands ; 

And the gray Motherland, first of the lands o er which Liberty shone 
Strong in the strength of her canse, standing no longer alone, 

Fields must be fought and be won, many a heart must be broken, 
Or ever the blest word of Peace shall over this sad world be spoken ; 

Till Germany, free from the war lords, shall stand beneath Liberty s flag, 
Praising the hands that have freed her, ceasing to bluster and brag. 

Go then, ye knights of the Cross, our Avalon bids you God speed 
Go in the name of the Lord, be ye ( iod s soldiers indeed . 



Respectfully and Synthetically Dedicated to the Mother 

of Newfoundland s First Hero in 

the Present War. 



in &terna 



Lieut-Commander B. M. HARVEY, H.M.S. Cressy, 
Died in Action, Sept. 22nd, 1914. 

Just a little quicker through his clear blue veins his Northern blood pul- 
satas when comes to him the Call to Arms of his lord The King. Devo 
tion and Duty kindle his eyes alight, and in answer to the Call he is at his 
Post. Absent are the quivering glance and haggard mien that betray the 
craven. At his brief Farewells to Home and those he loves perhaps a tear 
is shed but not from Fear nor Sorrow. Gentle in Manners yet Resolute 
in Deed, forth he goes, a Sailor and a Man AL" REVOIR. 
Just a little flash of flame a spout of dark, cold sea and then, the end of 
this short period which men call Life. Farewell! His days of waiting 
watchfulness are o er, his Duty ended. The dark grey waves of the 
boisterous ocean chant their Requiem, and the chill blasts of the Northern 
seas screech their dirge over the resting place of Our Hero. His obituary 
_ " Died in Action." words simple enough in mere expression convey 
that poignant grief which scarce can find alleviation, but words none the 
less symbolic of the demise and a fitting epitaph of a Sailor and a 
Man. VALE. 

Just a little Prayer that when the vast and mighty Sea gives up its Dead, 
the One whose valiant young Life was given to his Country s Cause, may 
find an eternal Reward and Repose in the Kingdom of the Most Merciful 
and Omnipotent God. RESURGAM : 

Requiescat in Pace, 

P. (J. 
St. John s Newfoundland. Sept. 30, 1914 







OUR ROYAL NAVAL RESERVE AT RIFLE EXERCISE. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 23. 



FISHERY GEAR! 

We are Manufacturers of the Gill Nets, used by Messrs. Job Brothers & Co. in the Straits this year. 
They have been successful at a time when traps had partially failed. We make them in all sizes to order. 

We are Manufacturers of Cotton Drift Nets, such as are used in the North Sea Herring Fishery. As 
the catch of Herring will be interfered with during the war, a good opportunity occurs for use of these 
Nets in Newfoundland. 

We are Manufacturers of the celebrated Standard brand of Herring Nets, which is universally acknou- 
ledged to be the very best Net on the market. We are now making the Crescent brand Herring Net, 
which is the best and strongest Low-Priced Net Made. It is mounted just the same as the Standard Net, 
and is barked for preservation, not merely dyed like other cheap Nets. 

We are Manufacturers of Squid Traps, which are now legal ; we make them in any size required, to order. 

We manufacture Tarred Cotton Lines, all sizes, for Bankers use ; strong, durable and easily handled. 

We make Cod Traps, Cod Seines, Caplin Seines, Etc., to order, in all sizes. 

All the above fishery gear we can strongly recommend, and we would urge our fishermen to patronize 
articles of home manufacture, in order to give employment, which is so much needed this year. 

COLONIAL CORDAGE COMPANY, LIMITED. 



Tailoring 

just Received, our Fall and Winter Stock of 
Beaver, Melton and Cheviot Overcoatings. 

Tweed and Worsted Suitings and Trouserings. Also, 
a very neat line of Fancy Vestings, all the very 
latest from the English markets. 

Prices Moderate. 

Samples and Measuring Cards sent to any 
part of the Island on application. 

Strict attention given to Outport Orders. 

E. J. MALONE, 



Custom Tailor, 268 Water Street. 



EVERY SATISEACTION 

When You Purchase at Our Store! 

Just arrived : 

New Season Jams and Jellies, 
Ceylon and China Teas* 

And a choice assortment of 

High-Class Groceries* 

No order too small ; none too large. 

J. D. RYAN, - Water Street, 

ST. JOHN S. 



FIRE! 



The 



FIRE! 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Co. 

[Established 1809.] 
Assets 23,000,000. Annual Income, 5,400,000. 

Head Offices Edinburgh & London. 

Insurance effected on all kinds of property at lowest 
current rates. 

Insure where your insurance is sure. 

GEORGE SHEA, 

General Agent for Newfoundland. 



Channing s Drug Store 

145 New Gower Street, (Opposite old stand.) 
\Ve carry in stock a complete line of Drugs, Chemicals, 
Patent Medicines, Toilet Requisites, &c., &c. 

Mail Orders promptly attended to; every satisfac 
tion guaranteed. 

Store open every night throughout the year until 11 o clock. 

James Pidgeon, 

Carpenter and Builder. 

Jobbing Promptly Attended to 

Workshop 15 Banner-man Street. 
Residence-28 Prescott Street. ST. JOHN S, NFLD. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfound 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 24. 



BOLINDER S 



DIRECT REVERSIBLE 

Crude Oil Engines. 

First in 1893 * Foremost in 19 14 

Built in sizes from 5 B.H.P up to 32O B.H.P. 

Nearly 100 vessels fitted with Bolinder s Engines for towage in the British Isles, the object of 
Messrs. Bolinders design being for large Propellors at low revolutions and consequent efficiency. As an 
example mention might be made of the Miri (i6oB.H,P. ) which tows regularly at Sea a 1500 Ton 
Tank Barge. 

The Bolinder will run light indefinitely without any load whatever, and without any recourse 
to the Blow-lamps. 

The Bolinder will run at any load down to a speed which only enables the engine to just turn 
over, this maneuvering is carried out by a special device which entirely does away with the 
necessity for the Blow-lamps. 

Bolinder Engines reverse in under 3 seconds according to the power of the engine and what 
is more reverse without a failure and without a strain on the crankshaft. 



ALEX. McDOUGALL, 

Telegrams : " McDOUGALL," St. John s. 



McBride s Cove, ^ St. John s, MR 



P. O. Box 845. 



Telephone 18O. 



Furness, Withy & Company, Ltd., 




Steamship Owners and Brokers. 

Commission, Insurance and 

Forwarding Agents. 

The new steamship " Digby " launched last 
season and sailing in conjunction with the regular 
steamers between Liverpool, St. John s and Halifax, 
is specially built and fitted for her present services, 
the passenger accommodation and catering being 
unsurpassed. 

First Class Fare. Second Class. 

Liverpool to St. John s, 

^13 to 14 IDS 9 

St. John s to Halifax . . .$18 $12 

St. John s to Liverpool,. .#65 $45 

Regular Sailings also from Liverpool to St. John s. 



THE SUPREME SILENT SUNBEAM. 

Winner of Many Gold Medals, Silver Medals, and Non-Stop Diplomas; 1st, 2nd and 3rd 
in Gra7id Prix 1912; Winner of Tourist Trophy 1914. 

C.A.V. and Rushmore 
Lighting Outfits, Oils, 
Greases and Gasolene 

Goodrich Tires, Rayf ield 
Carburetors, Accesso 
ries, etc. 

Agents for Regal Car. 
THE CENTRAL GARAGE, Catherine Street 

Advertisers kindly mention " The N^ 




Phone 318. 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY.: 




Department of Agriculture and Mines. 



PUBLIC NOTICE. 

The attention of the Public is called to the following 
provisions of the Act to further amend the Crown Lands 
Act t 1903, passed at the last session of the Legislature: 



Application for Timber Limits. 

SEC. 3. Section 24 of the Crown Lands Acts, 1903, is 
hereby repealed, and the following substituted therefor: 

No such licenses shall be granted until notice of intention to 
apply therefor has been published in the Royal Gazette for a 
period of one month prior to such application. The said notice 
shall contain the name and address of the applicant, and with 
as much certainty as possible shall describe the location and 
boundaries of the land applied for. naming the Electoral 
District in which same is situated and its approximate area. 

Returns of Timber Cut. 

SUB-SEC. 4, SEC. 4. To make returns to the Government an 
nually on oath, on or before the 301(1 of November in each and 
every year of (a) the total quantity of timber cut between the 
ist day of July and the 3Oth day of June then last past, which is 
liable to the payment of royalty ; and (b) of all timber cut for the 
manufacture of paper or paper pulp, also to make returns 
annually, or. at such other periods as may be required by the 
Governor in Council, or by regulations under this Act, sworn to 
by him or by his agent or employee, cognizant of the fact of 
the quantity of all sawn lumber, timber, railway car stuff, ship 
timber and knees, shingles, laths, cordwood or bark, or any 
other product of timber sold or disposed of by him during such 
quarter or other period and the price of value thereof, the 
licensee to be liable to a fine of $50.00 if the returns aforesaid 



be not filed in the Department of Agriculture and Mines within 
thirty days from the date on which they are required to be 
filed as aforesaid. 

Forfeiting Title for Non-Payment of 
Rents of Limits. 

SEC. 6. Whenever the rent or royalties payable under any 
lease to cut timber shall be in arrears and unpaid for the period 
of six months from the day on which the same became due, the 
Governor in Council may, without any suit or other proceedings 
to enjoin the same, declare such license forfeited and there 
upon the same shall be again open to application by the public. 

Survey of Mining Location. 

SEC. 17. Within one year from the date on which notice is 
given by the applicant for a ninety-nine year lease of a mining 
location or locations to the Minister of Agriculture and Mines, 
that it is his attention to hold said land as provided by Section 
47 of the said Crown Lands Act, 1903, such applicant shall, at 
his own expense, cause a survey of the location or locations 
referred to therein to be made by a Surveyor approved by the 
Minister of Agriculture and Mines, and shall cause a diagram 
thereof, with the notes of the surveyor, to be filed in the Depart 
ment of Agriculture and Mines within the same period. In 
all such surveys of mining locations, the bearings of the 
boundaries shall be from the True Meridian. 



SYDNEY D. BLANDFORD, 



St. John s, Newfoundland, August, J9J4. 



Minister of Agriculture and Mines, 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 26. 

Marching to the Rhine- English War Songs, 19 14. 



The Vigil. 

England ! where the sacred flame 
Burns before the inmost shrine, 

Where the lips that love thy name 
Consecrate their hopes and thine, 

Where the banners of the dead 

Weave the shadows overhead, 

Watch beside thine arms to-night 

Pray that God defend the right. 

Think that when to-morrow comes 
War shall claim command of all, 

Thou must hear the toll of drums, 
Thou must hear the trumpets call. 

Now, before they silence ruth, 

Commune with the voice of truth ; 

England! on thy knees to-night 

Pray that God defend the right. 

Single-hearted, unafraid, 

Hither all thy heroes came, 
On the altar s steps were laid, 

Gordon s life and Outram s fame- 
England ! if thy will be yet 
By thy great example set, 
Here beside thine arms to-night 
Pray that God defend the right. 

So shall thou when morning comes 

Rise to conquer or to fall, 
And when all thy soldier sons 

Joyful hear the trumpets call; 
Then let Memory tell thy heart: 
u England ! what thou iwt thoit art /" 
Gird thee with thine ancient might, 
Forth ! and God defend the right. 

Henry Neivttol t. 



Onward. 

Now in thy splendour go before us, 

Spirit of England, ardent-eyed I 
Enkindle this dear earth that bore us 

In the hour of peril purified. 

The cares we hugged drop out of vision ; 

Our hearts with deeper thoughts dilate ; 
We step from days of sour division 

Into the grandeur of our fate. 

For us the glorious dead have striven ; 

They battled that we might be free, 
We to that living cause are given, 

We arm for men that are to be. 

Among the nation s noblest chartered 

England recalls her heritage. 
With her is that which is not bartered, 

Which force can neither quell nor cage. 

For her immortal stars are burning, 
With her, the hope that s never done. 

The seed that s in the Spring s returning, 
The very flower that seeks the sun. 

We fight the fraud that feeds desire in 

Lies, in a lust to enslave or kill, 
The barren creed of blood and iron. 

Vampire of Europe s wasted will. 

Endure O Earth ! and thou, awaken, 
Purged by this dreadful winnowing fan, 

O wronged, untameable, unshaken 
Soul of divinely suffering man ! 

Lawrence Binyon. 



The Hush. 

There is a hush before the thunder-jar, 

When white the steeples against purple stand ; 
There is a hush when night with star on star 

Goes ashen in the summer like a brand. 
Now a more awful pause appals the soul, 

When concentrating armies crouch to spring ; 
Stillness more fraught than any thunder-roll, 

Dawn European with a redder wing. 
The Teuton host no conscience onward drives ; 

Sullen they come ; to slaughter shepherded ; 
Timed for the shambles with unwilling lives, 

With doubt each soldier is already dead. 
The massed battalions as a myth shall reel ; 

Vainly they fight, if first they cannot feel. 

St:t>ken Phillip!:. 



The Hour. 

We ve shut the gates by Dover Straits, 

And North where the tides run free, 

Cheek by jowl, our watchdogs prowl, 

Grey hulks in a greyer sea. 

And the prayer that England prays tonight 

O Lord of our destiny !- 

As the foam of our plunging prows, is white; 

We have stood for peace, and we war for right. 

God give us victory ! 

Now slack, now strung, from the mainmast flung. 

The flag throbs fast in the breeze; 

Strained o er the foam, like the hearts at home 

That beat for their sons on the seas. 

For mothers and wives are praying tonight 

O Lord of our destiny ! 

But we ve no time, for our lips are tight, 

Our fists are clenched, and we re stripped to fight. 

God give us victory I 

The west winds blow in the face of the foe 

Old Drake is beating his drum 

They drank to " The Day " for The Hour " we pray 

The day and the hour have come. 

The sea-strewn Empire prays to-night 

O Lord of our destiny ! 

Thou did st give the seas into Britain s might, 

For the freedom of Thy seas we smite. 

God give us victory ! 

Janus Bernard Fagan. 



England, My England. 

The die of war is cast, 

England, my England ; 
The die of fate is cast, 
And the hour has come at last 
When the dead heroic past 

Wakes for England ! 

Should we answer guns with words, 

England, my England? 
Loud guns with civil words? 
Then our blood were whey and curds, 
\Ve should live by naught but words 

Here in England. 

There s a red patch on the foam, 

England, my England ; 
There is blood upon thy foam, 
Where thy mighty navies roam, 
And a chained fleet snarls at home 

Close by England. 

Of old thy sea-folk died, 

England, my England ; 
Yet they rise again in pride, 
On the great historic tide 
Where their children s warships ride, 

Here by England. 

What would our Drake have said, 

England, my England, 
And the mighty souls who led 
Their ships when seas were red 
With the great heroic dead, 

Dead for England ? 

Say ye, who are not dumb, 

England, my England, 
Strike ye, whose hands, not numb, 
Can answer to the drum 
That bids home and outlands come 

And strike for England ! 

We hear their tramping feet, 

England, my England, 
Thy children s children s feet 
In the snow or Southern heat, 
On the age-long war-path greet 

The call for England. 

God s truth Thou hast the men, 

England, dear England, 
Who can boast by plough or pen 
And give battle once again, 
Tho they were but one to ten, 

For England, dear England : 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 27. 



Job s Stores, Ltd.. 

IMPORTERS and TWAT T?P,g -_ = 

In Provisions, Groceries, Naval Stores, fishery Supplies, Etc. 

J AGENTS FOR j 

Climax Molasses Feed, Champion Tobacco, 

Climax Dairy Meal, Lily Safety Matches, 

Cow-Boy Milk, Sail Soap (Laundry), 

Manderson s Pickles, Vesta Cigars. 

GET OUR PRICES ON THE ABOVE ARTICLES. 

JOB S STORES, LIMITED. 



P. 0. Box 236. 



Phone 522. 



SLATTERY S 

Wholesale Dry Goods. 



Full Stock Full Stock 

of of 

Regular Dry Goods Remnants & Seconds 



WAREROOMS : 

Slattery Building, 

Duckworth & George s Sts., St. John s, N.F. 




fire Insurance Contpanp 

FUNDS. ...$60,000,000 



INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 

JOHN CORMACK, 

AGENT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND. 



Extract from The Merchant 
Shipping Act Referring to 
the Naming of Ships. 

Regulations made by the Board of Trade, in con 
junction with the Commissioners of Customs, under 
Section 50 of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1906. 

Under the provisions of Section 50 of the Mer 
chant Shipping Act, 1906, the Board of Trade, in 
conjunction with the Commissioners of Customs, 
hereby make the following Regulations relating to 
ships names, and direct that they shall come into 
force on ist January, 1908: 

1. Any person who proposes to make application 
for the Registry of a British Ship shall give notice 
in writing of the proposed name of the ship to the 
Registrar of Shipping at the intended Port of 
Registry at least fourteen days before the date on 
which it is contemplated to effect the registry. 

7. When it is proposed to register the ship at a 
port not situated in the British Islands, the Regis 
trar to whom the name is intimated may proceed 
with the registry of the ship if he satisfies himself 
that the name does not appear in the Current Mer 
cantile Navy List ; but if the name does so appear, 
the Registrar shall transmit the application to the 
Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen, and 
the case shall be treated in the manner laid down 
for registry in the British Islands. 

Department of Customs, 
August, 1914. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 

A Lonely Bit of Coast. 




JOSEPH E. RAY, ESQ., 

Trade Commissioner of the Government of Canada 
at Birmingham, England; formerly of St. John s. 



By Joseph E. Ray. 

fair a face. How the blue of the sky gets into your 
How the subdued green of the grass calls to your heart 
Just look at those purple shadows playing among the 
What a companionable lonliness, too ! 

If my old age should find me friendless, it is in such a spoi 
as this that I would seek a companion. 



Leaves from My Sketch-Book on the 
Bay of Islands, 

By Eunice T. Holbrook Ruel. 

A PASTEL. 

A BAR where the sunset lingers, 

And trails all her tresses rare 
To the touch of the crisp wave s fingers 

Like a mermaid combing her hair. 

A little boat fast at her moorings, 

And tugging to be away ; 
A heart like the heart of the ocean, 

Restless yet longing to stay. 




: X the east coast of Newfoundland between Saint 
John s harbour and Conception Bay there is a 
certain short stretch of coast that has riveted 
itself to my imagination, so awful is its solitude, 
so majestic is its structure. From the boulder 
upon which I usually sat in the cool summer evenings, I could 
look down one hundred feet of an almost vertical cliff that sets 
a bound to the march of the great Atlantic. 

Sometimes from the distant sea-line to the water s edge below 
me there is scarcely a ripple on the surface of the sea; and I can 
just catch the music of the water " lapping on the crag." I 
suppose it is only a poet s fancy; but I often think that the sea 
tries to coax these rugged cliffs into surrender by fawning at 
their feet. 

When they will not surrender by persuasion the subtle wave 
lets retreat sullenly to the far-off sea-line to return as " long, 
dim rollers" gathering force at every leap, until they hurl them 
selves with indescribable fury at the heads of the relentless 
cliffs. But how futile 1 Listen to those exhausted waves moan 
ing in the cavern below ! Even the gulls that encircle the leaping 
spray are screaming with delight at their distress. 

To the left of these lonely cliffs, a few miles from the coast of 
Newfoundland, Bell Island lifts its head up out of the sea. 
What a desolate, forsaken chunk of land it seems ! And yet 
there are living upon it thousands of men who daily travel under 
the great Atlantic to blast the iron ore what is perhaps the largest 
bed of that mineral in the world. 

To the right is to be seen the imposing Signal Hill from the 
summit of which Cabot Tower looks down upon the quiet city of 
St. John s. 

When I turned my back to the sea, in front of me and on 
either side stretched a great expanse of spruce and pine trees. 
I never thought that the oldest of Britain s colonies had so 



AN AQUARELLE. 

A reach of amber water and a sail, 

Sharp silhouetted on the evening sky ; 

A drift of clouds, like blossoms, rosy pink 

And purple shadows ; where the day did die. 

A fisher maiden, singing on the beach, 

Meshed in her nets, like an enchanted bride ; 

A fisher-lad with woiship in his eyes, 

And roughen d hands, sea-toiling by her side. 

AN ETCHING. 

A line of willows, gainst a rain- washed sky. 

One clear white star, low shining in the West ; 
A quiet cove, reflecting all and high 

In the still air birds circling to their rest. 

A BLACK AND WHITE. 

A sketch of calm gray water, washing o er 
A rock weed-tangled like a sea-maid s hair ; 

The sun, just gone, leaving a tender light, 

A white gull, high above a sand bar bare. 



Summer in Terra Nova, 

By Eunice T. Holbrook Ruel. 

BLOOM fair trees . Blow sweet, sweet winds 

Summer in Newfoundland 
Land of dreams and lovely moods 

And waves on a moon-lit strand. 

Land so cold so calm, so still, 

Only a day ago 
Now all alive with glowing life 

And ships that come and go. 

Like ourselves first storm, then calm 

Moods of earth and sea and sky, 
Like ourselves to ourselves a marvel and dream- 

Land full of Mvsterv 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 29. 



BM Of MONTREAL. 

ESTABLISHED 1817. 
Capital $16,000,000. Rest $I6,OOO,OOO. 

Bankers for the Government of Newfoundland. 

Bankers and Financial Agents for the Government of the Dominion of 

1 anada. 

West Coast Branch: 

A General Banking Business is transacted, and a 

Savings Department 

is operated in connection with the Branch where amounts from 4 upwards 
will be received on deposit and interest at the rate of Thiee 1 tr Cent per 
annum allowed, which will be compounded on June 3oth and December 
3 ist in each year. 

Banking by Mail. 

All mail business has the personal attention of the Manager, and deposi 
tors from a distance may open accounts or transact Banking business by 
mail with the knowledge that it will have the same consideration as if they 
were present. The Manager will be pleased to hear from anyone desiiing 
fuller information. 

Office Hour: 



s : 10 to 3 ; Saturdays, 10 to 12. 
F. HERBERT J. RUEL, Manager. 




1914-15 
Tall * Winter ! 



HI A nice assortment of Overcoatings and 
Suitings to hand. 

All the latest material and weaves are represented, 
and if you need a SUIT or OVERCOAT we can 
Suit you down to the ground. 

Samples and measuring forms sent on application. 
Neat, Stylish and Durable work we give you. 

W. P. SHORTALL, 

The American Tailor, 
300 Water Street, St. John s. P. 0. Box 445 



OFFICE AND STORE Adelaide Street. STONEYARD Just East Custom 
House. Water Street. Telephone, 364. 

W.J.ELLIS 

Contractor, Builder, 
and Appraiser* 



HENLEY S 



MATTRESSES 



Dealer in Cement Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps ; Chimney Tops, all sizes, Plate Glass and 

Crushed Stone for Concrete, 

Estimates Given for all kinds 
of Work at Shortest Notice. 

(Cy Manufacturer-; and Real Estate Owners contemplating, 
any addition to their present holdings, or the erection of new 
structures, will find it advantageous to get our estimates and 
letms. 



Are made of the Best Material, 
Are Durable, < < * 
And Handsomely Finished. ^ 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

J. J. HENLEY, 

Factory and Office : Henry Street, head of Bell Street, 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 





149 

Gower Street. 

Dealer in 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, 

Veal, Pork and 

Poultry. 

All Orders Called For and Delivered Free. 

Corned Beef, Vegetables 
and Fish a specialty. 




(MM. J. MURBHY, 

\ \ Pennywell Road, 

HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTER. 

Interior Work a Specialty. 



P. O. BOX 142. 



James J. Whclan, c "" r of c c zii a sL, 

carries the very finest lines of 

Provisions, Groceries, Fruit, 
Confectionery, Vegetables. 

All the leading brands of Tobaccos, Cigars and Cigarettes 

Watered Herring and Watered Fish every Wednesday and 
Friday. Fresh Country Eggs a specialty ; also, Fresh Milk daily. 
Your patronage Solicited. J=Store open every night. 



- to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 30. 

The First Battle Call-War Songs of Newfoundland, 1914. 



Loyalty. 

fly Rose Af. Greene. 

Hark ! there was lulling stillness soft and calm 

i the wide world and men were quietly sleeping ; 
Time had held forth a generous healing balm, 

And eyes had long been done with fruitless weeping. 
Hark ! now drums are beating and cannon roar, 

Words whirl through confused dreams and men arise 
To girt them with the panoplies of war, 

And through earth s peace the sound of battle flies. 

Old England, with quick throbbings of her heart, 

Calls to her children, and the cause is fair, 
Determines battle for a righteous part 

While all the wondering world commends her. 
" FOR GOD ANI> FREEDOM !" sons of Britain hear ! 

The Empire s call, with splendid omens frought, 
Throughout the fields of France rings true and clear, 

And augurs victory, though most dearly bought. 

Go ! kiss in faith Britannia s guiding hand, 

And call from heaven God s blessing on her souh 
Go ! Join Great Britain s proud heroic band, 

And win in life or death a hero s goal. 
Oh ! England, how thou art prodigal with grand deeds ! 

And e en thy foes must laud thy firm command, 
And to your loyal support of friends give heed, 

Learning from thy teachings on sea and land. 



The Call of the Blood. 

By Eunice T. Holbrook Ruel. 

Quiet, serene and strong, 

Steady and still and fine, 
The splendour of England s battle ships 

Swing out in silent line. 

Firm and calm and grim, 

Sinew and nerve of steel, 
The power of England s army 

Lines up for woe or weal. 

Loyal and strong and swift, 

Armies and Navies all; 
The strength of her far-flung dominions 

Answer their Mother s call. 

Kushing with keen warlike ardour, 
Quickly over the white-crested sea, 

Are England s sons with hearts aflame. 
All nurtured at England s knee. 

Not for a petty anger, 

Not for the lust of gain, 
Does England summon her children 

To agony, death, or pain. 

Not to hold her borders, 

Not to defend her throne ; 
England is old and has battled long, 

With a lion s heart she holds her own ; 

But to help in the hour of trouble, 

To answer a brother s need, 
To rescue the weak in adversity, 

For this is England s creed. 

And they fail not, her fine bred children, 

They question her not at all, 
But silent and itrong they buckle their swords 

And come to their Mother s call. 

Swift through the air they circle; 

As eagles scenting their prey. 
But England s ships come in stately line 

Like birds at the close of day. 

Land, and sea, and the air, 

And the power of God over all 
And her faith s in the Lord Jehovah, 

So how can fair England fall ? 

Quiet, serene, and calm, 

Stronger than death to prove ; 
And the flag-emblem of England s glory, 

Bears the cross of the God of love. 



Britain s Call. 

Bv J. .Sinclair Tait. 

Britain s call to overseas, 
Bend your banners to the breeze; 
Forward all a willing band, 
Help to save the Motherland ; 

Empire needs you, 

Britain leads you, 
Forward ; save the Motherland ! 
German pomp and Austrian pride, 
Never shall our land divide ; 

Empire needs you, 

Britain leads you, 
Forward ; march; for Motherland; 

Britain s call to overseas, 
This no time for mirth and ease, 
Threatened both by land and wave ! 
Onward ! Motherland to save ! 

Empire needs you, 

Britain leads you, 
( inward ! Motherland to save ! 
Up, and at them ! tyrants all, 
They who seek Britannia s fall ; 

Empire needs you, 

Britain leads you, 
Onward ! Motherland to save ! 

German state-ciaft deftly smite ; 
Stand for King and Empire,s right ; 
Honour win by conquest brave, 
Forwaid ! Motherland to save ! 

Empire needs you, 

Britain leads you, 
Forward! Motherland to save ! 
On to victory hand in hand 
Fight for Home and Motherland 

Empire needs you, 

Britain leads you, 
Fight for Home and Motherland ! 

Sabre s clash and cannon s roar, 
Marshalled armies drenched in gore, 
These will only nerve your hand, 
Make you fight for Motherland. 

Empire needs you, 

Britain leads you, 
< inward ! as by magic fanned 
Then when Right shall conquer Wrong 
Homeward march with triumph song; 

Empire thanks you, 

Britain ranks you 
Loyal sons from Newfoundland. 



The Call And the Answer. 

By Terra Nova. 

The old grey Mother is calling, 

And her children rise in their might ; 
Oh where should the sons of Great Britain be 

When England goes to the fight ! 
Our sires came forth from her threshold 

To cross the ocean s foam ; 
Now the old roof tree is in danger 
Our sons are going home : 

Singing : " Homeland or farland. 

Dark face or white, 
Truth is clear, Honor s dear, 
Right is always Right." 

We carry no war-stained banners, 
Oui laurels are yet to be won ; 
But the hands we clasp across the sea 

Are the hands of Mother and Son 

The glories of Nile and Trafalgar, and the story of Waterloo 
A ^ re . B ved ,n ur hearts as our Mother s Name 
And the signal that Nelson flew ; 
While we go marching and 

Singing i " Old Time or New Time, 

Dark times or bright 
When Old England is in danger 
Is ewfoundlanders will fight." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 31. 



Brushes, Lumber, Doors, Sashes, Felt, etc. 



R BRUSHES is but one line of our business. We have 
for many years been dealing in Lumber, Doors, Sashes, 
Felt, Pitch, Nails, and in fact everything that is used in house 
building. We have 

An Expert Designer and Stair Builder 

in our employ, and builders can always rely on having the best 
ideas when they give us their order. We have furnished Mantels, 
Window Frames and Sashes, Doors, Stair Balusters and Rail, 
Newel Posts, Mouldings, Turnings, Brackets, Counters, Ceiling, 
Flooring, Framing, Shingles, etc., to all parts of this country, 
and always satisfy our customers. We have always studied 



our business and endeavoured to increase it constantly. We 
have made provision for immediate reply to inquiries, quick 
shipment of orders, and prompt furnishing of shipping receipts 
and invoices. 

Our Efforts to Satisfy Customers, 

we are glad to say, have been appreciated, and result in an 
ever increasing demand with which we are keeping pace by 
improved and enlarged equipment. We will count you among 
our friends, and will be glad of a friendly word from you to 
any person needing supplies in our line. We will especially 
value any order of your own with which you may favour us. 



THE HORWOOD LUMBER Co., Ltd. 



"HHS OUR OUTPORT PATRONS 

ATTtlfflOM 

can always rely on having their orders 

carefully looked after by experienced & 
assistants* * * oe *g 

The bulk of our FALL GOODS is now in, and 

WE ARE READY TO SERVE YOU. 






F. J. MORRIS, K.C. E. LEO CARTER. 

& Carter, 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

I.A It OFFICES: 

BANK OF MONTREAL BUILDING, 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 

P O Box 184 Telephone 184. Cable Address " G/S," St. John s. 

M. P. GIBBS, K.C., 

BARRISTER -AT -LA IV, SOLICITOR and 
NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Commissioner of Deeds for the State of New York. 
Solicitor for the Merchant Service Guild, Liverpool. 

Law Office, BANK OF MONTREAL BUILDING, Water Street, 
St. John s. Newfoundland. 




Notice to Mariners! 



(No. 10, 1914.) 



Newfoundland Labrador, 
Ause-au-Loup* 



- Approx. 



Latitude 51" 31 North. 
Longitude 56 49 West. > 

NOTICE is hereby given that a Fixed Red Lantern Light 
will during September and to close of navigation be shown 
from head of the Public Wharf in the harbor of Ause-au-Loup 
as a guide to steamers and vessels entering the port. 

A. W. PI CCOTT, Minister Marine & Fisheries. 
Depart. Marine & Fisheries, St. John s, Nfld., Aug., 18, 1914. 



~\Vhen writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- -32. 

The Indian Scrape* 



By Richard S, 





THE SHOPROCK, WITH MY MICMAC GUIDE. 

LD John Mitchell, a Micmac Indian, was on his 
way from Conne to Piper s Hole, and as this was 
nearly a century ago, there were precautions to be 
taken on such a lone-handed seventy-five-mile 
journey. The luggage did not trouble Joe much. 
It consisted only of his gun, powder horn and shot bag, the 
latter containing besides the necessary assortment of bullets and 
shot, his bidirontech or hunting mascot, a gland taken from 
the neck of a caribou, but found only in perhaps one in a 
thousand caribou. It was still summer and when night over 
took Joe, at Tagaleech Gaspen, the goosepond, he leisurely 
climbed a tall fir, making a ladder by cutting the branches off a 
few inches from the stem. At the top he spent a considerable 
time scanning the country in every direction, and when his 
sharp eyes saw no disquieting movement anywhere, he descended 
again. He made a small fire between some big rocks to hide 
the light and used dry pine bark for his fuel. The fire he 
kindled by deftly catching on a piece of tinder the sparks from 
two pieces of iron pyrites struck together, then blowing on it 
vigorously and applying a small piece of birch bark which soon 
became alight. The pine bark gave practically no smoke, and 
what was more important, no man could tell how old the ashes 
were, after they became cold. Old or new pine-bark ashs look just 
the same. When he had his little fire, just about nine inches 
square, burning well, he placed several handsize stones in it. 
Then he gave his attention to a beaver he had killed that after 
noon. He took out the intestines, pulled them between two 
fingers and platted them neatly like a plait and placed it in 
a vessel he had made of birch bark. Out came the 
heart and the liver and then, oh joy ! the gizzard 
like howisnowitsk. They say a Newfoundlander will 
walk through a snowstorm to get a meal of flippers : 
an Indian will walk through two to get a howisnowitsk. 
All this was placed in the birch bark vessel, which was 
filled with water, and the now nearly red-hot stones 
were added at intervals till the delicacies were boiled. 
Supper over, Joe ascended the tree again and just 
about halfway up, nicely sheltered by the surrounding 
trees, he settled down where three branches came out at 
the same level and then slept. 

Joe heard the big owl send out his dismal cry into the 
dark night, he heard the squeal of the rabbit, when the 
fox caught it, and he heard the wolf feeding on the 
remains of his meal ; but when Tagaleech, the Scolder, 
greeted the rise of the sun with his sonorous cronk, 
Joe w.is already well on his way. His breakfast had 
been a quarter of the beaver, eaten raw. 

Mile after mile he covered with his quick springy step 
and when the sun stood high in heaven towards the south 






Dahl, M.A. 

he stopped for his mid-day meal. During the morning he 
had killed a partridge with a stone, and now it looked so 
templing that he could not resist eating it. 
the river-bank close by and covered the partridge with a 
layer of clay, rubbing it well in under the feathers. 
Lighting a fire he placed the partridge in live coals and 
stolidly smoked a pipe of goldenwood tobacco. The 
pipe finished, he raked the partridge out of the fire and 
soon the bones were crumbling between his teeth. But 
now a sizzling sound made him spin round. A glowing 
coal, carelessly scattered, had set the bark of an old 
birch on fire and in an instant it was spluttering, leap 
ing up the tree as a thing incarnate and sending forth 
demise clouds of smoke. Joe fled, as hard as he could 
go towards Piper s Hole ; for the Beothucks were still in 
that part of the country, though very few in numbers. 

The Toll loomed up to the north, a giant volcanic 
cone on the plain and ahead the hills of Piper s Hole 
were peeping through the haze. He could plainly see the Bear s 
Folly, the Rattling Brook Hill over Belle Chute and Grip s Nest 
further out ; but the shadows were lengthening and the hilltops 
beginning to blush in rosy hues. 

Joe could not get home before dark and the smoking birch tree 
far behind him made him uneasy. Suddenly, as he walked on, 
a branch caught his gun and broke the deerskin thong he carried 
it in. He stopped and mended it, and then he heard from the 
marsh, he had just passed, a sucking sound, like a foot drawn 
out from mud. 

A thrill passed through Joe, as he noiselessly went ahead. 
< Iver ihe ridge he went and then straight towards an enormous 
frost split rock called the Shoprock. Among the fragments 
he crouched, gun to shoulder and cheek. 

Minutes passed, then a head appeared over the ridge. It was 
motionless, the fierce eyes trying to pierce the gloom. 

Slowly the man emerged with long, c ein cut limbs, graceful 
as only a savage can be. The Red Indian stood, bo A- in hand, 
silhouetted, against the purple of the setting sun. The gun spit 
fire, its thunder roaied, and after rebounding in the air, the body glided 
down the long sloping rock called the Indian Scrape. 

Now, when travellers are night-bound in that locality, they are unable to 
get their Micmac guides to camp near any of the above-named rocks. No 
matter how brightly the lightning flashes in the fall of the year, and the 
booming thunder fills the animals of the lonely bush with fear and heralds 
torrential rains, the passing Micmacs avoid any shelter the prominent rocks 
afford. And when they are urged to moderate their pace they point to the 
Indian that Joe shot, who was petrified and can now be seen transfixed to 
the Indian Scrape. At night, they say, lie moans and sighs in hi* mUery. 
and if travelers were to camp near him and cause him further anger, he 
would turn around and hurl the fragments of the rock at them. 




THE i ru> 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



OVER- 
COATINGS 



The Style 
and Finish of 
our Overcoat 
ings were ac- 
knowled ge d 
Leaders last 
season ; and 
we will be 
Right on Top 
again this 
Season ; our 
Goods and 
designs being 
better than 




CHAS. 

St. John s Best Tailor, 



J. ELLIS, 

302 Water Street. 



Parker & Monroe, Ltd. 

Wear Our Makes of footwear. 




" Rambler," 

for Men. 

"Victoria" and 
"Duchess," 

for Women. 

" Cinderella" and 
" Princess," 

for Children. 
"Rover," for Boys. 



Public Notice! 



INSPECTION REGULATIONS. 

The boilers of every steamer registered in the Colony shall 
be subject to annual inspection by the Inspector. 

Every steamer carrying local crews or passengers to or from 
this Colony, or to or from any ports therein, shall be subject to 
annual inspection. 

All persons installing new boilers for any purpose, to work 
under steam pressure, shall notify the Minister of M-irine and 
Fisheries, in writing, as to the locality of said boilers. 

All persons removing boilers or installing second hand boilers 
for any purpose, to work under steam pressure, shall notify the 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries, as to the new locality it is 
intended to work boilers in ; and shall not work such boilers 
until they have been inspected. 

The Inspector shall granl a certificate of inspection for ever} 
boiler which shall be approved by him. The certificate shall 
be displayed in a prominent place in the vicinity of the boiler 
to which it refers. 

INSPECTION FEES. 

When a boiler is not in good condition, and the Inspector 
has granted a certificate for a period less than twelve months. 
the fee for each extra inspection during the twelve months, 
shall be the extra inspection fee of that class. 

For any special visit to be made by the Inspector, other than 
the annual inspection, or for any special inspection made at the 
request of the owner or manager of a boiler, the owner shall 
pay the expenses incurred by Inspector from St. John s to loca 
tion of boiler and return, subject to approval of Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries. 

MODE OF INSPECTION. 

Notice of alterations or additions to any boiler should be 
given to the Inspector, in writing, for his approval, before pro 
ceeding with the work. 

Every boiler made after the coming into force of these Regu 
lations shall be stamped with the initial letters of the Inspector s 
name who inspected it and tested it, the year it was made, and 
the pressure under which it was tested ; also the actual working 
pressure under which it was tested ; also the actual working 
pressure allowed upon it. 

A. W. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
St. John s, September, 1914. 



NOTICE! 

HTHE ATTENTION of Vessel Owners is called to the 

following Section of the Harbor Regulations: 
13. If, in the opinion of the Harbor Master, any vessel 
anchored in the harbor is likely to sink or to become an obstruc 
tion to navigation, the Harbor Master may, after giving twelve 
hours notice to the owner or agent of such vessel, or without 
notice where there is no owner or known agent in St. John s, 
take charge of and remove such vessel, and may deal with and 
dispose of such vessel in such manner as he shall think neces 
sary, to provide for the free navigation of the port ; and all ex 
penses incurred under this section shall be borne by the vessel 
or her owners, and may be recovered with costs in an. action in 
the name of the Harbor Master before a Stipendiary Magistrate. 

EDWARD ENGLISH, 

Harbor Master. 

NEWFOUNDLAND PENITENTIARY. 

BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, <* Hearth Brushes, ** Whisks. 



A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand ; and having reliable Agents 
in Chicago and other principal centres for the purchase of 
Corn and other material, we are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we feel as 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported. Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
of being favoured with a share of your patronage. 

orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt- 
attention. 



ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent. 
Newfoundland Penitentiary, September, 



Hfir|g to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 34- 



The Toll of the Sea, 



PERSONS : 

Maurya An old woman. 
Bartley Her son. 



An Episode from " Riders to 

Cathlctn Her daughter. 
Nora A younger daughter. 
Men and Women. 



SCENE: A fisherman s hut on an island off the west coast of 
Ireland. 

Nora. Where is she ? 

Cathken. She s lying down, God help her, and may be sleep 
ing, if she s able. 

Cathken. What is it you have ? 

Nora. The young priest is after bringing them. It s a shirt 
and a plain stocking were got off a drowned man in Donegal. 
. . . We re to find out if its Michael s they are, some time 
herself will be down looking by the sea. 

Cathken. How would they be Michael s, Nora ? How would 
he go the length of that way to the far north ? 

Nora. The young priest says he s known the like of it. " If 
it s Michael s they are," says he, "you can tell herself he s got 
a clean burial by the grace of God, and if they re not his, let 
no one say a word about them, for she ll be getting her death 
with crying and lamenting." 

Cathken. Did you ask him would he stop Bartley going this 
day with the horses to the Galway fair ? 

Nora. " I won t stop him," says he, " but let you not be 
afraid. Herself does be saying prayers half through the night, 
and the Almighty God won t leave her destitute, with no son 
living." 

( The girls uncoiier a bundle of clothes the priest brought to the 
house and discover they had belonged t<> their brother. ) 

Cathken. Tell me is herself coming, Nora ? I hear a little 
sound on the path. 

Nora. She is, Cathleeri. She s coming up to the door. 

Cathken. Put these things away before she ll come in. 
Maybe it s easier she ll be after giving her blessing to Bartley, 
and we won t let on we ve heard anything the time he s on the 
sea. 

Nora. We ll put them here in the corner. Will she see it 
was crying I was ? 

Cathken. Keep your back to the door the way the light ll not 
be on you, . . . Did you see him riding down ? God for 
give you ; isn t it a better thing to raise your voice and tell what 
you seen, than to be making lamentation for a thing that s done ? 
Did you see Bartley, I m saying to you. 

Maurya. My heart s broken from this day. 

Cathken. Did you see Bartley ? 

Maurya. I seen the fearfulest thing. 

Cathken. God forgive you ; he s riding the mare now over 
the green head, and the grey pony behind him. 

Maurya. The grey pony behind him. . . . 

Cathken. What is it ails you, at all ? 

Maurya. I ve seen the fearfulest thing any person has seen, 
since the day Bride Dara seen the dead man with the child in 
his arms. 

Cathken and Nora. Uah ! 

Nora. Tell us what it is you seen. 

Maurya. I. went down to the spring well, and I stood there 
saying a prayer to myself. Then Bartley came along, and he 
riding on the red mare with the grey pony behind him. The 
Son of God spare us, Nora ! 

Cathken. What is it you seen ? 

Maurya. I seen Michael himself. 

Cathken. You did not mother; it wasn t Michael you seen; 



the Sea," by J. M. Synge. 

for his body is after being found in the far north, and he s got 
a clean burial by the grace of God. 

Mawva I m after seeing him this day, and he riding and 
galloping. Bartley came first on the red mare ; and 
say "God speed you," but something choked the words in my 
throat. He went by quickly ; and " the blessing of God on you," 
says he, and I could say nothing. I looked up then, and 
crying, at the grey pony, and there was Michael upon it with 
fine clothes on him, and new shoes on his feet. 

Cathken. It s destroyed we are from this day. It s destroyed, 
surely. 

Nora. Didn t the young priest say the Almighty God won t 
leave her destitute with no son living? 

Maurya. It s little the like of him knows of the sea. . . 
Bartley will be lost now, and let you call in Eamon and make 
me a good coffin out of the white boards, for I won t live after 
them. I ve had a husband, and a husband s father, and six 
sons in this house six fine men, though it was a hard birth I 
had with every one of them and they coming to the world and 
some of them were found and some of them were not found, 
but they re gone now the lot of them. . . . There were 
Stephen, and Shawn, were lost in the great wind, and found 
after in the Bay of Gregory of the Golden Mouth, and carried 
up the two of them on one plank, and by that door. 

Nora (whispering) Did you hear tint Cathleen ? Did you 
hear a noise in the north-east ? 

Cathken. There s someone after crying out by the seashore. 

Maurya. There was Sheamus and his father, and his own 
father again, were lost in a dark night, and not a stick or sign 
was seen of them when the sun went up. There was Patch 
after was drowned out of a curagh that turned over. I was 
sitting here with Bartley, and he a baby, lying on my two knees, 
and I seen two women, and three women, and four women 
coming in, and they crossing themselves, and not saying a word. 
I looked out then, and th-re were men coming after them, and 
they holding a thing in the half of a red sail, and water drip 
ping out of it it was a dry day, Nora and leaving a track to 
the door. . . . 

( The door opens and women begin to come in crossing themselves ) 

Maurya. Is it Patch, or Michael or what is it all ? 

Cathken. Michael is after being found in the far north, and 
when he is found there how could he be here in this place ? 

Maurya. There does be a power of young men floating 
round in the sea, and what way would they know if it was 
Michael they had, or another man like him, for when a man is 
nine days in the sea, and the wind blowing, hard set his own 
mother would be to say what man was in it. 

Cathken. It s Michael, God spare him, for they re after 
sending us a bit of his clothes from the far north. 

Nora. they re carrying a thing among them and there s 
water dripping out of it and leaving a track by the big stones. 

Cathleen. Is it Bartley it is ? 

A Woman. It is surely, God rest his soul. 

Cathken. What way was he drowned ? 

A Woman. The grey pony knocked him over into the sea 
and he was washed out where ihere is a great surf on the white 
rocks. 

Maurya. They re all gone now, and there isn t anything 
more the sea can do to me. ... m have no call ^ 
be up crying and praying when the wind breaks from the south 
and you can hear the surf is in the east, and the surf is in the 
west, making a great stir with the two noises, and they hittine 
one on the other. I ll have no call now to be going down and 
getting Holy Water in the dark nights after Samhain and 
won t care what way the sea is when the other women will be 
keening. . . . Give me the Holy Water, Nora, there s a 
small sup still on the dresser. ... It isn t that T K,,, n - 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 35. 



BLACK DIAMOND LINE! 

ST. LAWRENCE ROUTE; MONTREAL TO ST. JOHN S. 



Passenger Rates Including Meals and Berths 
FIRST CLASS. 

One Way. Return. 
Montreal to or from St. John s.. $30 to $35 $50 to $55 

Quebec to or from St. John s $30 to $35 $50 to $55 

Charlottetown to St. John s $15.00 

Charlottetovvn to St. John s and 

return to Sydney... $25.00 

Sydney to St. John s . $12.00 $20.00 

Children under two years of age, 

between Montreal and St. John s $5.00 



to and from Montreal and Intermediate Ports. 
THIRD CLASS. 

One Way. 

Montreal to or from St. John s $15.00 

Quebec to or from St. John s $15.00 

Charlottetown to St. John s $8.00 

Charlottetown to St. John s and return to 

Sydney 

Sydney to St. John s $6.00 

Children under two years of age, between 

Montreal and St. John s $2.00 



Return. 

$25.00 
$25.00 



$12.00 
$10.00 



HARVEY & Co., Limited, 



Agents Black Diamond Line. 




PROGRAM ATION 



W. E. DAVIDSON, 
Governor, 

[L.S.] 



By His Excellency SIR WALTER E. DAVIDSON, 
Knight Commander of the Most Distingu 
ished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief, in and 
over the Island of Newfoundland and its 
Dependencies. 

WHEREAS it is provided by Chapter 23, of 2 Edward VII., 
entitled "An Act to amend the Post Office Act, 1891," 
that upon the recommendation of the Board appointed under the 
provisions of the said Act, the Governor in Council shall, by 
Proclamation, give notice of any alteration of name, naming or 
re-naming of places within this Colony, provided that Public 
Notice of such proposed alteration of name, naming or re-naming 
of places shall have been given for Three Months previous; 

And whereas, by Public Notice of date the i8th of Novem 
ber, 19 13, certain alterations of name and re-naming of places 
within this Colony were notified, as required by the above-men 
tioned Act ; 

I do, therefore, by this my Proclamation, order and direct 
that the alterations of name and re-naming of places within this 
Colony, as contained in the said Public Notice of the i8th day 
of November, 1913, shall come into effect from the date of these 
Presents, that is to say : 

i. Aspen Cove, Smith Sound, Trinity Bay, to be re-named 
"Aspen." 

2 . New Harbour, Notre Dame Bay, to be re-named " New- 
stead." 

3. Daniel s Cove, Smith Sound, Trinity Bay, to be re 
named " Waterville." 

Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
St. John s, this igth day of February, A.D. 1914. 
By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 



Moore & Company 




Plumbers, 

H hot Water & 
Steam fitters. 



Heaters, Stoves, Toilets, Baths and everything in our line 
of the Best Quality at Lowest Prices. 

SHIPS PLUMBING A SPECIALTY 

128 Duckworth St., - St. John s, Nfld. 

Phone 456. P. 0. Box 1124. 

Make Secure, * < * 
What You Can t Insure ! 

Buy a VICTOR Safe and protect 
your books and valuable papers* 

We have them in all sizes, 
and at all prices. 

F. G. HOUSE & Co., 

Sole Agents for Newfoundland, 

Columbus Building, St. John s. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 36. 



prayed for you, Hartley, to the Almighty God. It isn t that I 
haven t said prayers in the dark night till you wouldn t know 
what I ll be saying; but it s a great rest I ll have now, and it s 
time surely. It s a great rest I ll have now, and great sleeping 
in the long nights after Samhain, if it s only a bit of wet flour 
we do have to eat, and maybe a fish that would be stinking. 

Cathleen (to an old man) Maybe yourself and Eamon would 
make a coffin when the sun rises. We have fine white boards 
herself bought, God help her, thinking Michael would be found, 
and I have a new cake you can eat while you ll be working. 
The Old Man. Are there nails with them? 
Cathleen. They re not, Colum ; we didn t think of the nails. 
Another Man. It s a great wonder she wouldn t think of the 
nails, and all the coffins she s seen made already. 
Cathleen. It s getting old she is, and broken. 
ffora. She s quiet now and easy ; but the day Michael was 
drowned you could hear her crying out from this to the spring 
well. It s fonder she was of Michael, and would anyone have 
thought that ? 

Cathleen. An old woman will be soon tired with anything 
she will do, and isn t it nine days herself is after crying and 
keening, and making great sorrow in the house ? 

Maurva. They re all together this time, and the end is come. 
May the Almighty God have mercy on Bartley s soul and on 
Michael s soul, and on the souls of Shamus and Patch, and 
Stephen and Shawn (bending her head} ; and may He have 
mercy on my soul, Nora, and on the soul of every one is left 
living in the world. 

( She pauses. The keening of the women increases ; then be 
comes faint.) 

Maurya (continuing). Michael has a clean burial in the far 
north, by the grace of the Almighty God. Hartley will have a 
fine coffin out of the white boards, and a deep grave surely. 
What more can we want than that ? No man at all can be 
living for ever, and we must be satisfied. 
(All kneel and pray.) 

The Newfoundland Quarterly 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 

Issued every third month about the I5th of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John s, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rates: 

Single Copies, each 10 cents 

One Year, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada 40 " 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) 50 " 

Advertising Rates 

$30.00 per page; one-third of a page, $1000; one-sixth of a page, $5.00. 
one-twelfth of a page, $2.50 for each insertion. 

N.J.Murphy 

Carriage & Sleigh Builder 
Undertaker, etc. 

Agent for 

Carriage Stock, Rubber Tyres, etc. 

Wheels Re-Rubbered 

at shortest notice and reasonable prices. 
We always have on hand a large stock 
of Polished and Cloth-Covered 

Caskets and Coffins. 

Personal attention given to all Undertaking 
Orders Night or Day. Phone 737. 

West End Carriage Factory, - 32 Bambrick Street. 






I. J. O l 



p. nV.RADY. 



O GRADY BROS., 

House and Church Painters ; Graining, Marbling, Lettering, 
Kalsomining, Paper Hanging and Glazing. Scene Painting 

a specialty. Outport orders promptly attended to. 

P. 0. Box 216. Address : 13 Carter s Hill. 




Sheep Preservation ! 

1. It shall be lawful for the duly qualified electors, resident within an 
area or district within this Colony, to present to the Governor in Coun 
cil a petition or requisition in the form prescribed in the Schedule to this 
Act, or as near thereto as may be, setting forth the limits or boundaries 
within which such area or district is comprised, and the names of the 
towns, harbours or settlements included therein, and praying for a Procla 
mation prohibiting the keeping of dogs within such area or district. 

2. Such petition or requisition shall be sent to the nearest resident 
Stipendiary Magistrate, and shall be by him (after examination and certi 
ficate as hereinafter provided) furnished to the Governor in Council. 

3. If, upon due scrutiny of such petition or requisition, the Stipendiary 
Magistrate shall find that the same contains the bona fide signatures of a 
majority of the duly qualified electors resident within the limits or bound 
aries set forth in the said petition or requisition, he shall forthwith have a 
certificate to that effect endorsed upon or attached to the petition or re 
quisition, and shall forward the same to the Governor in Council. 

4. Any Stipendiary Magistrate to whom such petition or requisition may 
be presented may, before certifying the same to the Governor in Council 
as aforesaid, require proof to be made before him of the bona fide signa 
tures of any of the names subscribed to such petition, upon the oath of 
either the party whose name purports to be signed or of a witness to such 
signature. 

5. Upon receipt of any such petition or requisition containing the signa 
tures of not less than one-third of the electors resident within any such 
area or district, certified as aforesaid, the Governor in Council shall issue 
a Proclamation or Public Notice prohibiting the keeping of dogs within 
such area or district. 

6. From and after the date prescribed in and by such Proclamation or 
Notice, it shall not be lawful for any person resident within such area or 
district, to keep, or have in his possession, or under his control, any dog 
within the area or district to which such Proclamation or Notice shall 
relate, under a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars or imprisonment for a 
term not exceeding three months. This prohibition shall not apply to any 
person or persons travelling or passing through such areas or districts and 
having a licensed dog or dogs in his or their possession, charge or control 
and not at large. 

A. W. KNIGHT. Clerk of the Veace. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



A FEW HINTS 

Regarding Tire Danger 

DON T use coal or gas Stoves or Heaters unless securely set on 
stone, concrete or metal; all woodwork near stoves or 
pipes must be well protected. Gas Stoves on metal-clad 
wood or with flexible pipes are objectionable. 
DON T put Ashes in wooden boxes or barrels; use onlj metal 
ash cans. 

DON T have Steam-pipes in contact with woodwork or near 
inflammable materials, and don t permit rubbish to accu 
mulate behind radiators or steam coils. 

DON T hang clothes or drapery near open Fires or Stoves, or 
on Stove-pipes or Steam-pipes. 

DON T permit loose-jointed Gas Brackets, which can be swung 
against woodwork or curtains, or Gas Brackets without 
wire screens or globes if inflammable materials are near. 

DON T destroy the insolation on flexible electric light or fan 
cords by hanging them on hooks or nails. 

DON T fail to keep Lamps filled and wicks trimmed; with the 
oil low, explosive gas may be generated ; but in no case 
fill the lamps after dark. 

DON T permit Benzine, Gasoline or Explosives on your pre 
mises unless used from approved safety cans. 

DON T throw oily waste or rags on the floor ; keep them in 
approved self-closing cans during the day and at night 
remove from the building they are self -igniting. 

DON T mix greasy or oily rags with papers or with clean 
clippings, or keep more clippings in your place (even if 
clean and in bales), than is unavoidable. 

DON T use sawdust on floors or in spitoons. or to catch oil 
drippings from machines or gearing. Sand is safe. 

DON T keep Matches loose in paper boxes, but only in metal or 
earthen safes. Those lighting on the box are safest. 

DON T throw away lighted cigars, cigarettes, or matches. 

DON T permit your employees to Smoke. Don t permit any 
one to Smoke in a Garage ; or if combustible materials 
are kept on the premises. 

DON T store gasolene in a Garage or fill cars from open 
vessels. 

DON T fail to have fire-pails filled, distributed and placed in 
conformity to Rules of local Boards of Fire Underwriters. 

DON T fail to test periodically your hose and fire appliances. 

DON T permit Stairs or Hallways to be blocked up or used for 
storage, or permit packing materials and rubbish to accu 
mulate and remain on your premises ; packing materials 
must be kept in approved metal-lined bins. 

DON T fail to close at night all doors and traps to Elevators, 
Hoistways, Stairs and Communications, as well as Iron 

Shutters. 

DON T forget that Neglect and Carelessness are 

more fires than all other things. 
And above all things keep your Matches where children cannot get at them. 

JOHN SULLIVAN, 

Inspector Geneial of Constabulary, 

and Chief of Fire Department. 



the cause of 



Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 

T. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 




MARTIN,^ 



MORTICIAN, 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Gower Street. 

Repairing Furniture a Specialty. 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 




. Or LONDON, 



ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Subscribed Capital over $15,000,000.00 

Accumulated Funds over $75,000,000.00 

Place your business with us, the premier Company 
in Newfoundland. 

Lowest Current Rates of Premiums. 

W. & G. RENDELL, St. John s, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



Three Great Leaders: 

Gossage s Soaps, 
Texaco Kerosene, 

Fairbanks-Morse 
Motor Engines. 

GEO. M. BARR, Agent. 







f 


f 

W 

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I 
1 



A Dainty and Delicious 

SODA BISCUIT 

TIP TOP j* 

TIP TOP 



For your Biscuit Requirements ask 
for those manufactured by 

j\. fiarocp $ Co. 



Best Ingredients, 



Finest Grades. 



i 
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i 

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When 



writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Published by Authority 

His Excellency the Governor in Council has been pleased 
fo direcl that the following Proclamation of His Majesty 
the King, setting forth the Law and Policy with regard to 
Trading with the Enemy, shall come into effect on the 
date thereof. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, Colonial Secretary. 
Department of Colonial Secretary, Aug. 6, 1914. 

A PROCLAMATION. 

GEORGE R. I. 

WHEREAS a state of war exists between Us and the German 
Emperor : 

And whereas it is contrary to law for any person resident, 
carrying on business, or being in Our Dominions, to trade or 
have any commercial intercourse with any person resident, 
carrying on business, or being in the German Empire without 
Our permission : 

And whereas it is therefore expedient and necessary to warn 
all persons resident, carrying on business, or being in Our 
Dominions of their duties and obligations towards L"s, Our 
Crown, and Government : 

Now, therefore. We have thought fit, by and with the advice 
of Our Privy Council, to issue this Our Royal Proclamation, 
and We do hereby warn all persons resident, carrying on busi 
ness, or being in ( )ur Dominions : 

Not to supply to or obtain from the said Empire any goods, 
wares or merchandise, or to supply to or obtain the same from 
any person resident, carrying on business, or being therein, nor 
to supply to or obtain from any person any goods, wares or 
merchandise for or by way of transmission to or from the said 
Empire or to or from any person resident, carrying on business, 
or being therein nor to trade in or carry any goods, wares or 
merhandise destined for or coming from the said Empire or for 
or from any person resident, carrying on business, or being 
therein : 

Xor to permit any British ship to leave for, enter or com 
municate with any port or place in the said Empire : 

Xor to make or enter into any new marine, life, fire, or other 
policy or contract of insurance with or for the benefit of any 
person resident, carrying on business, or being in the said 
Empire, nor under any existing policy or contract of insurance 
to make any payment to or for the benefit of any such person 
in respect of any loss due to the belligerent action of His 
Majesty s forces or of those of any ally of His Majesty : 

Xor to enter into any new commercial, financial. or other 
contract or obligation with or for the benefit of any person 
resident, carrying on business, or being in the said Empire : 

And Y\ e do hereby further warn all persons that whoever in 
contravention of the law shall commit, aid or abet any of the 
aforesaid acts will be liable to such penalties as the law- 
provides : 

And We hereby declare that any transactions to, with, or for 
the benefit of any person resident, earning on business, or 
being in the said Empire, which are not treasonable and are 
not for the time being expressly prohibited by Us. either by 
virtue of this Proclamation or otherwise, and which but for the 
existence of the state of war aforesaid would be lawful are 
hereby permitted : 

And We hereby declare that the expression -person" in this 
Proclamation shall include any body of persons corporate or 
incorporate, and that where any person has or had an interest 
in houses or branches of business in some other country as well 
as in our Dominions, or in the said Empire (as the case may be i 
this Proclamation shall not apply to the trading or commercial 
intercourse carried on by such person solely from or bv such 
houses or branches of business in such other country 

GIVEX at Our Court at Buckingham Palace this Fifth day of 
August, in the year of Our Lord One Thousand Nine 
Hundred and Fourteen, and in the Fifth year of Our 
Reign. 

GOD SAVE THE KING 




NOTICE. 



The attention of the Public is directed to the 
following Section of Cap. 39 of Consolidated 
Statutes dealing with " Nuisances and Municipal 
Regulations " ; 

" Any person who shall throw any 

Stones or Ballast, 

or anything else hurtful or injurious, into any 
harbor or roadstead in this Colony or its Depend 
encies, shall, for every offence be liable to a penalty 
not exceeding 

Fifty Dollars, 

or imprisonment for a period not exceeding 

Fifty Days." 

a. w. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
Department of Marine and Fisheries. 
June 22nd. 1014. 



Newfoundland 
Savings Bank. 

Established in 1834. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature 

...,,,,. , , 

DIRECTORS : 

Hon. George Skelton. M.D.. 
Hon. John Harris. P.L.C.. 

Hon. John B. Ayre, M.L.C. 

CASHIER: 

Hon. Robert Watson 
> "" 1111 """ ..,, ,.,,,,, 

Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate! 
BRANCHES : -Harbor Grace, Heart s Content, Bar RnK, 
Bell Island, Grand Falls, Placed, WM e ^ 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Ne 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Notice to Owners and Masters 
of British Ships ! 

o 

The attention of Owners and Masters of British 
Ships is called to the 74 th Section of the " Mer 
chant Shipping Act, 1894," 

74. (i) A Ship belonging to a British subject 
shall hoist the proper national colours 

( a) on a signal being made to her by one of His 
Majesty s ships (including any vessel under the 
command of an officer of His Majesty s navy 
on full pay), and 

(b) on entering or leaving any foreign port, and 

(c) if of fifty tons gross tonnage or upwards, on 
entering or leaving any British Port. 

( 2) If default is made on board any such ship in 
complying with this section, the master of the ship 
shall for each offence be liable to a fine not exceed 
ing one hundred pounds. 

At this time of war it is necessary for every Brit 
ish Ship to hoist the colours and heave to if signal 
led by a British Warship ; if a vessel hoists no 
colours and runs away, it is liable to be fired upon. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 

St. John s, Newfoundland, 
i5th August, 1914. 

LONDON DIRECTORY 

(Published Al ally) 

ENABLES traders throughout the World to communicate direct with 
English 

Manufacturers and Dealers 

in each class of goods. Besides being a complete commercial guide to 
London and its suburbs the Directory contains lists of 

Export Merchants 

with the goods they ship, and the Colonial and Foreign Markets they 
supply ; 

Steamship Lines 

arranged under the Ports to which they sail, and indicating the approxi 
mate sailings ; 

Provincial Trade Notices 

of leading Manufacturers, Merchants, etc., in the principal provincial towns 
and industrial centres of the United Kingdom. 

A copy of the current edition will be. forwarded, freight paid, on receipt 
of Postal Order for $5.OO. 

Dealers seeking Agencies can advertise their trade cards for $5.OO, 
or larger advertisements from $15. OO. 

The LONDON DIRECTORY Co., Ltd., 
25. Abchurch Lane, London, C. C. 




Public Notice. 

T JNDER the provision of Cap. 23, 2 Edward VII., entitled 
*- " An Act to Amend the Post Office Act, 1891," and upon 
the recommendation of the Board appointed under Section i 
thereof, notice is hereby given that, three months after this date, 
a Proclamation will issue for the alteration of name, or re-nam 
ing of places as under, that is to say : 

i. That Sibley s Cove, Placentia Bay, be re-named PROWS- 
TON. 

2. That Chance Harbour, near Moreton s Harbour, Notre 
Dame Bay, be re-named BRIDGEPORT. 

3- That Chance Harbour, Friday s Bay, Notre Dame Bay be 
re-named CHANCEPORT. 

4. That Farmer s Arm, Dildo Run, Notre Dame Bay be re 
named SUMMERFORD. 

5- That he Western section of Morlier Bay, extending from 
West s Point to Glendon (including Butler s Cr -e) be re 
named CRESTON. 

6. That Piper s Hole, Placentia Bav, be re-named SWIFT 
CURRENT. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 
Department of the Colonial Secretary, June i5th. 1914. 




PUBLIC NOTICE! 



UNDER the provisions of Chapter 23, 2 Edward VII., entitled 
" An Act to amend the Post Office Act, 1891," and upon 
the recommendation of the Board appointed under Section i 
thereof, notice is hereby given that, three months after this date, 
a Proclamation will issue for the alteration of name, or re-nam 
ing of places as under, that is to say : 

i. That Scissors Cove, Notre Dame Bay, be re-named 
STANHOPE. 

2. That New Harbour. St. Barbe District, be re-named 
NORTON. 

3. That Ha Ha, in Ha Ha Bay, District of St. Barbe, be 
re-named RALEIGH. 

4. That Limeville, Port-au-Port, District of St. George s, 
be re-named AGGUATHUNA. 



JOHN R 



BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 



Department of the Colonial Secretary, March 2 4th, 1914. 



writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 








Reid Newfoundland Company 

Proprietors of the Dry Dock, St. John s, Newfoundland 

One of the best equipped Dry Docks in America. Steamships docked and repaired 
at the lowest rates. Well equipped and thoroughly fitted with all modern appliances 
for temporary or permanent repairs. Length of Dock, 610 feet. Depth of Water, 25 feet. 

Proprietors and Operators of the St* John s Electric 
* Street Railway. * 

All the Electric power supplied in St. John s is generated on this system. City 
Lighting and Power for Factories, etc., supplied at moderate rates. Those requiring 
Electric Power for any purpose should consult the undersigned. 

Owners of Thirteen Clyde-Built Steamships 

Royal Mail Steamers operating on Bays and Coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador. 

Lessees and Operators of the Newfoundland Railway, 831 miles. Owners of 
2,500,000 acres of Mineral and Timber Lands. 

The Newfoundland Express Company, carrying on Express Business with all Express Com 
panies of the world, and Money Orders issued to all parts. 

The Railway and Steamship Systems give the best 

connection between Newfoundland and Canada and the United States, and the best 
freight line between Canada and Newfoundland. S. S. " BRUCE " and " LINTROSE " 
connect at North Sydney with the Intercolonial Railway daily, except Sunday, leav 
ing North Sydney on the arrival of the I. C. R. Express Trains on these evenings. 

Newfoundland offers to the Tourists, Sportsmen and Health-Seeker the grandest 
scenery in the Western Hemisphere. A most beautiful climate in the summer 
months ; cool, even and invigorating. No hay fever. 

Finest Caribou Hunting Grounds in the World, < <g ^ 

Best Salmon and Trout Streams that have yet been discovered. The Railway is equipped 
with Dining and Sleeping Cars, and everything to please the taste and add to the 
comfort of the Tourist is provided. 

All information in regard to Newfoundland and Labrador will be given ,pli 

cation to the 

REID NEWFOUNDLAND CO., 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The 




Christmas Dumber, 1914 



JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 








Photos by Dr. A. Selwvn-Brown.~\ CHURCH PARADE FIRST NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT. 




FLOWERS IN BANNERMAN PARK. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



$2O.OO 

For Suit or Overcoat! 

We are now showing swell line 
of Suitings and Overcoatings, at 
all one Price -$20.00 ; Value 
equal to $25.00. Terms, Cash. 

W. H. JACKMAN, 




West End Tailor, 

39 WATER STREET WEST. 



At Christmas Time 

Everybody tries to put the best foot foremost. 
Everybody tries to have things a little nicer 
than usual especially things to eat. The way 
to make your Bread, your Tea-Buns, Pastry, 
Cakes and Puddings extra good is to use 

The Best Flours. 

s Windsor Patent, 
Royal Household, 



"" 



are absolutely The Best. 
Triumph of Modern Milling. 



James J. Whelan, 



Co er 



carries the very finest lines of 

Provisions, Groceries, Fruit, 
Confectionery, Vegetables. 

All the leading brands of Tobaccos, Cigars and Cigarettes 

Watered Herring and Watered Fish every Wednesday and 
Friday. Fresh Country Eggs a specialty ; also, Fresh Milk daily. 

Xmas Groceries. iSEf^Store open every night. 



Red Rose Tea stands alone 
in its sterling quality. 

You, if you use it, have 
always found it good tea. So 
good that no other tea pleases 
you as well. 

You may try substitutes, 
but you always return to Red 
Rose, simply because it has 
the fine quality and full value 
that pleases and satisfies. 



I ^ T ^ J ^- ^-^ I ^ J ^ ^^ ^i^^^^^M / 1 

Red Rose 




"Is Good Tea." 



The sealed lead packages protects the flavor and strength 
of the tea. 

If you are not using it will you try a package ? 

Prices : $40c., 50c. and 60c. 

MEEHAN & CO., Agents, s< rr 




MURPHY 

11 Pennywell Road, 

HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTER. 

Paper-Hanging and 
Interior Work a Specialty. 



P. O. BOX 142. 



"When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The X< 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 






FOR NEWFOUNDLAND AND 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 

CANADA. 


I pou 

2 pOU 

3 

4 

6 

8 

9 
10 
ii 


nd 


See 
1 1 
U 
7 
20 

2 ~\ 
26 
29 
32 

35 
35 
Under i Ib 
per 2 oz. 


nts 


24 ce 
24 
24 
48 
48 
48 
48 
72 
72 
72 
72 

No parcel < 
less than 




12 ce 
24 
36 
48 
60 
72 
84 
96 
jjji 08 




15 cents. 

3 
45 
60 

75 
90 
$1.05 

Cannot exceed seven pounds 
weight. 

No parcel sent to D. of C. for 
less than 15 cents. 


nds 
















































































weight, i cent 


ent to U K. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by " Bruce" train. 



RSTES Of COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 



General Post Office. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 5 cts. Over $50, hut not exceeding $60 30 cts. 

Over $10, but not exceeding $20 10 cts. Over J6o, but not exceeding $70 35 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 15 cts. Over $70, but not exceeding $80 40 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. Over $80, but not exceeding $90 45 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. Over $90, but not exceeding $100 50 cts. 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John s, Newfoundland, Nov., 1914. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

NEWFOUNDLAND 

Postal Telegraph 




POSTAL TELEGRAPH OFFICES are operated throughout the Colony at all 
the principal places. Messages of ten words, not including address or signature, are forwarded 
for Twenty Cents, and two cents for each additional word. 

A Government cable to Canso, Cape Breton, connects with the Commercial Cable Co. s system 
to all parts of the World. There is no more efficient Telegraphic Service in existence. 

A ten word message to Canada, exclusive of ) From $O.85 



To 



I.OO 



signature and address, costs 
A ten word message to the United States, ) From $I.IO 
exclusive of signature and address, costs To 

To Great Britain, France or Germany 25 cents per word. 

Telegrams are transmitted by means of the Wireless Service during the summer season, and 
all the year round to Steamers equipped with the wireless apparatus, which are due to pass 
the radius of the wireless stations at Cape Race and Cape Ray. 

Telegraph messages may be obtained at all Post Offices and from Mail Clerks on Trains and 
Steamers, and if the sender wishes the messages may be left with the P. 
first mail to the nearest Telegraph Office free of postage. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 

General Post Office, St. John s, Newfoundland, Nov., 1914. 

When writing to Advertisers kinly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Imperial Life Assurance Co y 



Of 



Offce,Toreito. 



MARRIED MAN! 

The best Xmas Gift you can hand your Wife and 
Children is, an 

IMPERIAL POLICY 

on your own life. 

This Policy will provide for them if you should 
die, and furnish a competence for your old age 
should you live to maturity of policy. 

For full information WRITE or CALU to 

JAS. A. MACKENZIE, 

Manager for Newfoundland, 

P. O. Box 147. Law Chambers Building. 



American 
Granulated 
Sugar ! 

Being amongst the largest importers 
of Sugar we can always offer Lowest 
Wholesale Prices. 

HEARN & Co. 



LETS HELP YOU 

make the Festive Season enjoyable, by getting your 

Grocery Order filled by us* 

If you are not pleased with the TEA you are using, 
try our brands of Royal, Crown, and Our Best. 
They will be sure to suit your taste. 

White House Coffee, Chase & Sanborn s Coffee, Whitman s 
Instant Chocolate, Calarab Candy Figs, Almond Paste. 

Bottled Fruits in Syrup, Rolled Ox-Tongue in Glass, 

Table Raisins i I D. pkgs., Turban Dates i Ib. pkgs., 
Assorted Nuts, Kopp s Wines, Rose s L Juice Cordial. 
Phone 332. 

BOWRING BROS., Ltd., 

.* ^ GROCERY. 



Barlei Oil Heaters! 

all brass fount, the best heater on the market : burns 
less oil than any other, but gives the maximum amount 
of heat. 

No Smoke or Smell. 



Ideal Draught Tubing! 

for Windows and Doors. 

BOWRING BROS., Ltd., 

HARDWARE DEPT. 



W. & G. RENDELL, 

Insurance, Property, and 
General Commission Agents, 
Water Street, - St. John s, Newfoundland. 



-Importers of and Dealers in- 



Lumber of all descriptions, Paints, Oils, 
Cement, Roofing Materials, &c. 

A large supply of above goods always in stock. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR 

RAINBOW PAINTS, AND 

BRANTFORD ROOFING. 



North West 

fire Insurance Co. of Winnipeg. 

Incorporated 1880. 

Policies Guaranteed by the Union Assurance Society, 
of London, England. 

Chas. O Neill Conroy, 



Oke Building, S<. John 



Aqen< for Newfoundland. 



When writing to Advertisers kinly mention 



Vol. XIV. No. 3. 



DECEMBER, 1914. 



40 cents per year. 




"ft- 



A Little while and we shall know- 
Where all our vanished children go, 

And e en, perchance, may recognize 
Their old remembered, astral eyes ! 

(O Noel, Noel ! comest thou 

From them to us with kiss and vow ?) 

A little while and we shall hear 

The Child s soft footfall drawing near. 



Koef. 



The Child who our dead children takes, 
In his safe keeping for our saUes, 

And they those children we loved most 
Will watch for him and think him lost, 

And yearn for his return with eyes 
That search the deeps of Paradise. 

(O, Noel, Noel 1 in thy rest 

Mav all our vanish d ones be blest !) 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 2. 



Patriotism and Wfiat it ffleatis. 

Departure of tfte HevofoufidCcitid Regiment. 




A. A. PARSONS, ESI,). 



By Alex. A. 

" Swell, swell the shrill trumpet clear 

sounding afar, 

Our sabres flash splendor around ; 
For freedom has summoned her sons 

to the war, 

Nor Britain has shrunk from the 
sound. 

" Let plunder s vile thirst the invaders 

inflame ; 

Let slaves for their wages be bold ; 
Shall valor the harvest of avarice 

claim ? 
Shall Britons be bartered for gold ? 

" No 1 free be our aid, independent 

our might, 

Prowd honor our guerdon alone ! 
Unbought be the hand that we raise 

in the fight, 

And the sword that we brandish our 
own. 



" And, oh ! if returning triumphant we move 

Or sink on the land that we save 
Oh ! blest by his country, his kindred, his Jove ; 

How vast the reward of the brave 1" 

| UR island home has long been called " the ancient 
and loyal Colony of Newfoundland," and very 
properly so. We are always proud of the name 
and jealously anxious to retain it. But at no 
time in our Colonial history (and we go back to 
1497, when John Cabot made his first discovery 
here) have we felt greater attachment to the old flag and the old 
institutions than we feel at the present moment. The reason for 
this is obvious : We are purely Anglo-Saxon by birth and educa- 




Parsons, J.P. 

tion. The Mother Country is in greater danger now than at any 
time since 1803, when an invasion of her shores was threatened 
by Napoleon Bonaparte. Therefore, our sympathies naturally 
go out to her, and so we desire, earnestly desire, to participate 
in the supreme effort she is making to repel the modern Goth 
and uphold those great principles of national honor and integrity 
without which treaties and other solemn obligations are not 
worth the paper on which they are written. 

Then there is the feeling of patriotism by which all Newfound 
landers are actuated in their demonstrations of loyalty. Patriot 
ism is the love of one s country, as philanthropy is the love of 
one s kind. It is a pure and noble passion. The wise and 
brave of every age have cherished it. Artists have portrayed it 
upon canvas, and sculptors traced it in marble. History has 
recorded its encounters and poetry sung its praises. Illustrious 
instances of its power increased as the population of the work! 
grew. When men began to multiply upon the earth when the 
solitary were set in families when other instruments of industry 
were in requisition, besides the plough and the pruning hook 
when the temporary tent and rude camp were succeeded by 
highly civilized societies, and bulwarked cities when in- lieu of 
the narrow limits of patriarchy there were imposing monarchies, 
and growing republics when the national weal was menaced, 
and its name stained ; then the fires of patriotism were repeat 
edly enkindled ; then the sons of the soil came to the rescue ; 
then to fatherlanJ, in terrible emergencies, they offered the 
highest efforts of which they were capable, heedless either of tie 
knife of the assassin on the one hand, or the axe of the execu 
tioner on the other. 

While it is true that every nation has had its patriots, yet fiW 
have surpassed those of Greece and Rome. The great 




Photo [<y James 



OFFICERS OF FIRST NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT. 

Top Row : Lieut. H. Goodridge, Lieut. Tail, Lieut. Nunns, Lieut. Ledingham 
Row: Lieutenants Hewlett, Raley, Wighton, Ayre, Summers 1) -- 1 



Bottom Row: Lieut. Alderdice; Leonard Reid (Despatch Rider). 



, A . D . C . 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 3. 



belonged to the former. He was one of the most celebrated 
persons among the ancient Greeks, but was condemned to death 
by his ungrateful countrymen. When about to drink the fatal 
hemlock, he was asked if he had anything to say to his son, 
" Bring him to me," said he. " My dear son," said Phocion, 
" I entreat you to serve your country with as much fidelity as I 
have done, and above all, to forget that an unjust death was the 
price with which she recompensed my service." The Roman 
patriot subordinated every other passion, however strong or 
tender, to his love of country ; to conserve its judicial integrity, 
to meet some apparent political necessity, he shrank not from 
the severance of the tenderest of ties. Upon the altar of his 
country s honor he was prepared even to offer his offspring. 
When the capital was put in hazard, it was not the time, they 
felt, to recriminate or quarrel with each other ; how could it be ? 
The Carthaginian was meditating the ruin of the State Hanni 
bal was at the city gates ; forgetful, therefore, at once of their 
personal interest, or party disputes, they advanced unitedly 
towards the common enemy of their country, in order to secure 
his discomfiture and overthrow. 

During the past few months our observation and experiences 
have taught us, however, that patriotism has its varieties; mere 
mockeries and shadows sometimes pass for its substance. 
There may be not only a thorough and genuine but a spurious 
patriotism. It may be confounded with pride of place, or poli 
tical ambition ; hence there are those who care little for their 
country, either its honor or its interests, so that by the posses- 



alone, who loves honestly, loves to some purpose, and will hail, 
when needed, not only the kindly but the caustic criticism. 
There is no utility in studiously and continuously concealing 
that which somewhat discredits the national reputation and may 
threaten its stability. He who has to speak comprehensively and 
candidly of his country must tell of that by which she is degraded 
as well as of that by which she is exalted. Many are the 
charges which we may prefer against a country. There is her 
oft-repeated intermeddling in the internal government of other 
lands, instead of guarding and perfecting her own. Every 
nation has a right to determine what shall be its own particular 
form of government, or code of laws; and that it should do 
without any impertinent interference or officiousness on the part 
of any other land, whether adjacent or remote. 

To turn directly to our own country, we look in vain for a 
better governed one on the Continent of Europe, and to the 
rapidly increasing, the already gigantic American Republic. 
Even in the latter great, free and enlightened country, property 
is not so secure, opinion not so free, law nor so inviolable, and 
life not so sacred as in this good old Britain of ours. Admitting 
therefore, that upon the national pedestal there is dust, and 
upon its sun spots, yet our patriotic ardour is not thereby 
lessened. Under the broad shadow of the protecting wing 
Britain spreads over us, we are proud to repose, and thus re 
posing we are pleased to sing : 

" The tree which our forefathers planted of old 
They nursed with their hearts dearest blood, 





Photos by Dr. A. Sehi y 



CHURCH PARADE FIRST NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMKNT. 



sion of the honors of office, their vanity be flattered. It may 
also be confounded with the love of money. There are those 
who are anxious, not so much for the honors, as the emoluments 
of office. They serve their country, not for the love of it, but 
for the sake of the money and other advantages they are able to 
obtain thereby. 

Then, again, patriotism, even when genuine, may be injudici 
ous, and may intercept the very object it seeks to attain. Half 
a century ago, an Italian, outraged with the conduct of a certain 
Emperor towards his then very much oppressed country, went 
to sad extremes ; believing that the only remedy accessible to 
him was assassination, he matured his scheme formed his plan. 
The fruit, however, ere it was ripe, was plucked ; the object 
singularly miscarried ; the bird, despite the stratagem, was left 
unsnared, and the prey untaken. The price of all this was 
Orsini s life; but his patriotism was put beyond dispute : for as 
he went barefooted, ah ! and bareheaded, too, to the block of 
the executioner, ere he was headless, his heart, scorning to 
cherish a feeling on ils own behalf, throbbed out an earnest, and 
final prayer, for then, but not now prostrate Italy. 

Of course, patriotism has its legitimate developments ; but there 
are courses of conduct which do not indicate it correctly, 
not shown in ignorance, or, having been admitted, in apologising 
for our country s faults. There are some patriots who love 
their country as many a mother loves her child blindly, 
-tfachment is deficient in intelligent and honorable policy. 



Till its roots in the giound had so fiimly laid hold 

That it feared neither tempest nor flood. 

From the noith, from the south, from the east, from the west, 

On its head hath the battle stroke broke, 

But Britons have ever found shelter and rest 

Neath the boughs of their own sturdy oak. 

It has thriven for centuries, sound at the core, 

Not a root has yet gone to decay, 

And if burdened with boughs that are needful no more, 

Why carefully cut them away. 

Bot long may it flourish, the boast of this land. 

Unharmed by hostilities stroke, 

And perish forever the paracide hand 

That xvoi.ld tear but a leaf from our oak." 

Some yeais ago in one of the European countries, a patriot, 
through the press, p>aised his country, as far as he could; and 
ihen he blamed her because she had not. what we t.nve, though 
she deserved it, and might, as he maintained, be safely entrusted 
with it, namely : freedom of utterance. For such an open and 
frank declaration he was t\kev\ into custody, sentenced to six 
months impiisonment, and fined three thousand francs. About 
the same time, in England, a patriot, speaking, as he knew, 
for the million for he spoke through the medium of the press- 
said things which bore upon the position and reputation of his 
country. Referring to the Foreign Office, he remarked : " He 
had con pared, in his mind, the pecple of England and the 
people of Eg\pt ; ,ird the monumtnts of Egypt to our Foreign 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 4- 




Photo by Theo. F. Thompson. 

CAMPS AT PLEASANTVILLE. 

Office." "We have," said he, "no obelisks, no columns, such 
as those on the banks of the Nile ; but in the Foreign Office of 
England there is a mystery as great, a superstition as fearful, 
and a loathsomeness as horrible as among the ancient tombs of 
the Egyptians." Now, what was the penalty of speaking thus? 
There was no penalty, but the result in each case is striking. 
The one patriot was sentenced to imprisonment and fined; and 
the other, by his outspoken and somewhat extreme op nion, was 
all the more endeared to many of his countrymen. The reason 
of all this was that Montalembert was a Frenchman, and in 
France the press was fettered at that time ; but John Bright was 
an Englishman, and in England the press was free, even at that 
time " free as the torrents are that leap our rocks and plough 
our valleys without asking leave." 

But to refer more directly to the present patrnlic move 
ment here and the formation and departure for the front of the 
First Newfoundland Regiment ! War was declared by Britain 
against Germany on the 4th of August last, because of the viola 
tion by the latter of her solemn pledge to respect the neutrality of 
Belgium. On the evening of i2th of that month a patriotic meet 
ing was held in the C.L.B. Armoury for the purpose of consider 
ing the question of enlisting volunteeis for army service abroad, 
as well as for home defence, during the war. There was an 
immense gathering of all classes and the greatest enthusiasm 
prevailed. At 8.30 His Excellency Sir W. E. Davidson, attend 
ed by his suite, arrived at the Armoury and -vas greeted by an 
outburst of cheering, the band playing the Natnnal Anthem. 
On the platform with the Governor were the Prime Minister 










Photo by S. //. fiii-JuHj & . 

PRESENTING COLORS AT CAMP GROUNDS. 

(Right Hon. Sir E. P. Morris), members of his Executive Coun 
cil, and a number of other prominent citizens. Sir Edward 
briefly stated the object for which the meeting had been con 
vened and asked His Excellency to take the chair. This the 
Governor did, and, after thanking the large audience for the 
hearty reception accorded him, delivered a comprehensive and 
forcible address on the causes of the present war and Gerrmny s 
reprehensible object in precipitating it. He concluded by 
saying : 

"" It behoves every British subject to aid the Mother Country 
to finish the fight as speedily as possible. The war \vas pro 
voked by a despot and Britain, in self-defence, was compelled 
to resort to arms. Newfoundland must do her part, laying claim, 
as we do, to being the oldest and most loyal colony. In my 
telegram to the Home Government," continued His Excellency, 
" I stated we were poor in money and rich in men men who 
are accustomed to meet all difficulties without waveriug. I 
pledged myself that Newfoundland would furnish 500 men, but 
I hope the number will be 5,000. The struggle may be des 
perate, but we will win, and I hope our folks will get to the 
front, so that they may have a chance to uphold our reputation. " 
The resolutions necessary to give effect to the Governor s 
suggestions were then, on motion, put and carried unanimously 
amid tremendous enthusiasm. A vote of thanks was tendered 
His Excellency, with ringing cheers for the King, the Mother 
Country and France ; after which the meeting closed with the 
National Anthem. It was a great gathering and showed, in an 
unmistakable manner, that Terra Nova would take her proper 
place among the " Dominions Beyond the Seas " in defending 
our great and glorious Empire from the pointing touch of the 
Hunnish invader. Subsequent meetings were held in the 
Armoury, at all of which recruits for the Newfoundland Regi- 






-; 












LAST DAY AT PLEASANV1LLE READY TO EMBARK FOR ENGLAND. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 5. 



ment were enrolled, until a sufficient number had been received 
to meet the present demand. These, after passing the required 
examination, were sent to Pleasantville, where they went " under 
canvas " for training preparatory to their departure for England. 
Here they were visited from time to time by the Governor, 
Prime Minister and other prominent members of the community, 
as well as by their parents and friends. On the occasion of my 
first visit to the Camp, the parade ground was occupied by 
nearly one hundred men, who were being diilled by the Regi 
mental Instructor Captain O Brien. On the same afternoon 
three hundred of the more advanced recruits were skirmishing 
about the country in the vicinity of the White Hills, while 
another large contingent was engaged at rifle practice at the 
Range on the Southside Hills. In the evening the officer in 
charge there shewed me the scores made by his men that day 
and they appeared to be remarkably fine for recruits. As a 




CAPT. WILLIAM J. MARTIN (NEWFOUNDLANDER), OF THE 
RED CROSS STEAMER " FLORIZEL." 

member of the " Old Volunteers " alluded to by Mr. H. W. 
LeMessurier in the last number of the QUARTERLY and we did 
some excellent work at the " butts " in those days, notwith 
standing the great weight and length of our rifles I have a 
pretty fair idea of what good shooting really means. However, 
most of the men to whom I now more particularly refer had 
already been training for some time in the Brigade and Territor 
ials. They are sturdy young fellows, and will, I am sure, give a 
good account of themselves and their fighting capabilities when 
they go to the front. 

On the 2oth of August the Government issued a Proclamation 
calling the Legislature together, and eleven days later, on the 
2nd of September, our local Parliament met to consider such 
emergency measure^ as the Cabinet had to propose. The 
Legislature was opened V^ His Kxcellency at 3 o clock in the 
afternoon of that day, the b f e ec h from the Throne having been 
c -efully and thoughtfully prep. . e< j f or the important occasion. 



The legislation which had been found advisable in the case of 
Britain and Canada was, of couase, followed here. Each of 
these countries had deemed it necessary to confer on the Govern 
ment power to control food supplies, &c. They also found it 
expedient to assume power to protect our banks in the event of 
panic and, if necessary, to proclaim a moratorium dealing with 
any contingency that may arise. 

Then, again, provision had to be made for the raising of a 
volunteer force, as no legislative authority to enrol such a corps, 
to swear in its members, or to provide for its equipment, had yet 
been obtained here. Other matters relating to the holding of 
suspected persons, spies and censorship also demanded prompt 
and special legislation. It is pleasing to record that, in this 
great emergency, both sections of the Opposition loyally sup 
ported the Government in passing all these measures. Mean 
while the work of drilling and equipping-the Regiment went on 
steadily and successfuly at Pleasantville, and by the end of 
September the men were sufficiently trained to admit of their 
being sent across with the Canadian Contingent, leaving early in 
October. Governor Davidson, who had assumed the Lieut. - 
Colonelcy of the Regiment, and his staff were indefatigable in 
their efforts to have " our boys " as efficient as possible before 
they embarked, and, as a result, when they marched up from 
Pleasantville on the afternoon of the 4th of October to go on 
board the troopship Fiorizel, they presented the appearance of 







Photo by S. H. Parsons & Sons. 

H.M. TROOPSHIP "FLORIZEL" THAT CONVEYED THE FIRST 
NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT TO ENGLAND. 

as fine a body of young soldiers as I have ever seen anywhere. 
At 4.30 p.m. on that date they broke camp and, under command 
of Captain Carty, and headed by the C.C.C. Band, proceeded, 
by way of King s Bridge, Circular and Military Roads, and 
Prescott and Water Streets, to the pier of the Furness Withy 
Company, where the transport lay. 

Large numbers of relatives and friends accompanied them on 
their march from the Camp to the City, and thousands gathered 
along the route to wish them good by. Many of the principal 
buildings, stores and private residences had strings of flags fly 
ing, and so, also, had the shipping in port. Business along the 
waterfront was practically suspended during the afternoon, em 
ployers, as well as employed, being anxious to say farewell to 
"the boys," many of whom had recently been engaged here as 
clerks, accountants, &c. In spite of the fact that they were go 
ing off to face the stern realities of war, some of them never 
to return, all were in excellent spirits and apparently eager to 
get away. Assembled at the Pier to see them off were His Ex 
cellency the Governor, Lady Davidson, the Prime Minister, 
members of the Legislature, clergymen of the various denomi 
nations and citizens of every walk in life. When the Regiment 
arrived at the wharf they were drawn up in companies and 
marched on board the Florizel. People were lined up on both 
sides the wharf, and as the men passed between them and in 
over the ship s side, they were cheered to the echo. During all 
this time patriotic and other appropriate airs were rendered by 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 6. 



the C.C.C., C.L.B., M.G. and Salvation Army bands, finishing 
up with the well known and touching hymn : " God be with you 
till we meet again !" 

About 6 P.M., all the men and their Supplies being on board, 
the transport hauled off from the pier, amid the blowing of 
whistles, firing of guns and other encouraging demonstrations. 
The C.C.C. Band, now on board the tug-boat John Green, played 
the familiar m itching son?: : It s a long ways to Tipperary, " 
the contingent on the Florizel z.nd the multitude on shore joining 
heartily in the chorus. The transport anchored in the harbor 
off the King s Wharf where she remained, surrounded by a flo 
tilla of motor and other boats, till ten o clock on the folio ving 
(Sunday) night, when His Excellency the Governor visited the 
ship for an hour, and bade the boys farewell ; almost immediately 
after which she got under way and steamed through the Nar 
rows to join the fleet wilh the Canadian Contingent outside. 
Quite a number of the larger boats accompanied the ship 
some distance beyond the headland and gave her threi 
times three lusty cheers as she disappeared in the dark 
ness. Captain Franklin having sailed for England the pre- 
day, on the " Carthaginian" so as to be there in time to make 
arrangements for the proper equipment of our men on arrival, 
the Regiment left here under the command of Capt ain Alexander, 
who, during the voyage across, kept his men well in hand and 
gave the utmost satisfaction to all concerned. The prayers of 
our people will follow them into the field and abide with them 



hile they are there. That is the best we can do for hem 
great issue is in the hands of a higher Power, and It tha : Power 
we must all submit. As Alison says in referring to the g rea 
crisis in British history on the eve of Trafalgar :- . f we faU, 
if the ancient prowess and intrepidity of our people , g >ne, 
there is then along close to all the hopes and all the honor ot 
humanity ; over the fairest portion of the civilized earth the tide 
of military despotism will roll, and bury, in * sangu.nar od 
alike the monuments of former greatness, and the promise , ot 
fuiure glory. But,-if we prevail ; if the hearts of our people 
are exalted to the sublimity of the contest, that mighty spell 
which has enthralled the world will be broken, the spirit of 
ture and of liberty will rekindle and the same blow which 
prostrates the enemy of our land, will burst the fetters of nations 
and set free the energies of an injured world." Yes, 

" The Old Lion of Britain grows youthful again ; 

He rouses, he rises he bristles his mane ; 

His eye-balls flash fire; his tenible roar, 

Like thunder, bursts awfully over our shore ! 

We, sons of the Lion, inspire d by the sound, 

Devoted to Liberty, gather around. 

Our Edwards and Henrys, tis true, are no more 

But George lives their glory and worth to restore : 
On him we depend. 
Our Ruler our Friend, 

The King whom we honor! the man whom we love ! 
By him now renew d, 
Its nerves fresh endu d, 

The Old British Lion immortal shall prove." 





OUR ROYAL NAVAL RESERVES 
ON BOARD THE TRAINING SHIP 
" CALY1 1 - 



Cftristmas 



Au Christmas joys, and Christm 

Are mem ry s touch revealing. 
In pent-up heart, the thought that swells 

To chords of deepest feeling : 
For high and lowly, weak and strong, 

Awake to Christmas measure ; 
And toilers of Earth s mighty throng 

Seek solace, rest and pleasure. 

Hearts thrill with love, hearts shrink in pain. 

And some blend love and sorrow ; 
As old-time friendships live again, 

Mid scenes glad Yule-tides, borrow. 
Oh 1 Christmas bells, what magic spells. 

Your chimes o er Earth are weaving ; 
Anon they ring afar they bring 

Sweet Peace, to all believing. 



(Written for 1913) By S. M. J. 



Again they tell to all who dwell. 

In cottage, court or city ; 
The tidings true, so old, yet new, 

So blending love and pity. 
That men of good-will now rejoice, 

That glory great me given ; 
For oh ! the Christ-Child s tender voice 

Proclaims the Peace of Heaven. 

Thus from the Crib to Home above, 
Our thoughts and hearts e er turning; 

We plead for grace with Heart of Love, 
With Heart of Love, all-burning. 

Fiom Crib to Cross, thro light and gloom, 
May bells of Christma= ;all us ; 

May Star of Faith, I ii e s path illume 

Till Hpa pnlv ; .<-* enthrall ,, c 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 7. 

360 ate Qrcfifcisfiop KovoCey. 




Y the death of the late Most Rev. Michael Francis 



Howley, Archbishop of St. John s, Oct. ij, the 
Colony loses a great churchman and great patriot. 
Admirably filling in the eyes of his co-religionists 
the exalted post of primate of their church in 
Newfoundland, he occupied no less prominent a 
place in the minds of people of all classes by the 
sterling quality of his citizenship, his unquestion 
ed patriotism and the earnestness and sincerity 
which he brought to every form of public en 
deavor. And not the least tribute to his worth 
in all respects was the spectacle presented at his 
funeral obsequies, when delegations of clergymen 
all the Pro- 



representing 

testant Churches in New 
foundland were included 
among the official mourn 
ers who occupied places in 
the Roman Catholic Ca 
thedral and followed his 
remains to their last rest 
ing place at Btlvidere. 

Michael Francis How- 
ley was born at St. John s 
on September 25, 1843, 
in the family home now 
the residence of the Chris 
tian Brothers of the Or 
phanage at Mount Cashel 
in the suburbs of the city. 
He was the son of Richard 
Howley, a native of Glan- 
goole, Tipper ary, who had 
emigrated here about a 
hundred years ago ard 
who established a mercan 
tile business in the city 
and operated a large farm 
in the suburbs. The fu 
ture cleric was one of a 
family of thirteen, of \\ bom 
only two no.v s> rviv-, his 
brother, James P. Howley, 
Geologic.il Surveyor, at d 
his sister, Miss Annie 
Howley. 

Destined, like his elder brother Richa r d, ho died two years 

ago, for the priesthood, he was sent to Ro;ne as a \outh after 

preliminary studies at St. Bonaventure s College in this city, 

and in due course.was ordained priest at Propaganda College in 

1868. He was chosen as Secretary by Archbishop Eyre, of 

Glasgow, and served on the Scotch Mission with him for twelve 

months ; but while at Rome with him for the Vatican Council 

of 1870, he met the late Bishop Power, then just named for the 

See of St. John s, and returned here with him in the same 

capacity. He served for some years in St. John s and then was 

called to St. George s as assistant to the late Rt. Rev. Mgr. 

Sears then Prefect Apostolic of the West Coast. Here he 

cerved for some years, excepting one \\inter, when, owing to a 



breakdown in health he did duty as Curate at Harbor Breton 
under its then pastor, the present Mgr. Reardon, of Placentia. 

< >n the death of Mgr. Sears, in 1885, Dr. Howley was 
named his successor and in 1892, when St. George s was eleva 
ted to a Vicariate, he was consecrated its first prelate with the 
title of Bi-jbop of Amastris in infidel parts, in the Cathedral at 
St. John s, by the late Bishop Power, on St. John s Day, June 
24th, in that year, the assisting prelates being Bishop McDonald, 
of Harbor Grace, and Bishop McDonald, of Charlottetown, 
Prince Edward Island. 

Little more than two years later, after the death of Bishop 
Pow r, in the fall of 1894, Dr. Howley was transferred to St. 
John s as his successor and was installed in the Cathedral here 

February 22, 1895. 



THE LATE MOST KKV. Ml \l\KL FKANCIS HOWLEY. 



on 

Nine years later, in Febru 
ary 1904, Newfoundland 
was elevated to an Eccle 
siastical Province. Bishop 
Howley being created 
Archbishop and First Me 
tropolitan of the Province, 
the Pallium, or insignia of 
an Archbishop, being con 
ferred on him by the late 
Bishop McDonald in July 
of that year. 

Dr. Howley was thus 
the first Newfoundlander 
of the Catholic Faith to 
be elevated to theBishopric 
and likewise to the Arch 
bishopric, and he had the 
satisfaction, before he 
died, of seeing the 
other two Sees filled 
by natives of the Colony 
as well as himself Bishop 
March at Harbor Grace 
and Bishop Power at St. 
Georgs s. 

During his labors on the 
West Coast Dr. Howley 
provtd himself an ener 
getic and capable adminis 
trator, one who was con 
stant in his efforts to pro 
mote the material as well as the spiritual welfare of his flock. 
He bui .t the Cathedral, Presbytery, and Convent at Sandy 
Point ; Churches and Presbyteries at Bonne} L Bay, Bay of 
1-1 inds, Bank Head, Port au Port, and Stephenville ; the church 
at Chinnel and the church at St. George s, while he also built 
many schools, helped to widen the educational advantages of 
the people, and in addition took a prominent part in freeing 
our Western Coast from French occupation, stamping out the 
traffic in smuggled goods with St. Pierre, and awakening the 
outside world to the tourist and sporting possibilities of our 
western seaboard as well as to the grievances from which its 
people suffered at that time. Moreover, as he spoke both Gaelic 
and Acadian dialects, he was specially revered on the West 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 8. 




Photo by James Viy. 

REQUIEM MASS FOR THE LATE ARCHBISHOP HOWLEY AT THE CATHEDRAL. 



Coast, which has many settlers of Scotch and French extraction 
and to the older ones, who spoke these tongues, he specially en 
deared himself, and will be greatly regretted by them. 

In St. John s he continued similar active labors, restoring the 
Cathedral at a cost of Si 00,000. improving St. Patrick s Church 
(including new spire) at a cost of $30,000 ; promoting the boys 
Orphanage at Mount Cashel, for which be gave the site ; build 
ing the new wing to St. Bonaventure s College at a cost of 
$70.000, and encouraging the erection of the O Donel Wing 
at St. Patrick s Hall ; the Oratory, Military Road Convent ; 



new Mortuary Chapel at Mount Carmel Cemetery ; the enlarge 
ment af Littledale Academy ; the founding of St. Clare s Home, 
etc., in the city; while in every outport parish new churches, 
presbyteries and schools have been built, the last function in 
which he took part being the laying of the corner stone of a 
new convent at Ferryland in September. 

In addition to the multiplicity of the ecclesiastical tasks de 
volving upon him through the administrative necessities of the 
Archdiocese of St. John s, he personally prepared the plans and 
supervised the work of much of the construction of church 







H OWLET s 



PA of i l-y S. II. I nrs,,iis & Sons. 

THE LATE ARCHIIISHOP S FUNERAL LEAVING THE CATHEDRAL 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-g. 



buildings carried out in this city, and also plans of various 
churches, presbyteries and schools for outports, and he also 
contributed frequently to local and foreign publications. He 
wrote an " Ecclesiastical History of Newfoundland " and also 
a " Life of Bishop Mullock," and for the Royal Society of 
Canada, of which he was a member, he prepared a paper 
annually on some subject of scientific or historical interest, lie 




RIGHT REV. MGR. ROCHE, ADMINISTRATOR. 



was a special friend of the NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY, and 
not an issue for the past twelve years has appeared without an 
article from hirr, on a most comprehensive and interesting 
subject " The Name Lore of Newfoundland." This he had 
nearly completed and we hope to be able from his notes and 
otherwise to round out the series. 

In addition to all this, he found time to olay his part in 
public affairs. He was possessed of an intensely earnest 
patriotism, and took an active interest in all public questions, 
social, municipal, and colonial. Of course, not all of the 
people even his own people agreed with him in regard 
to these matters, but none, even those who held strong views to 
the contrary, questioned the sincerity of his purpose or the zeal 
for the country s interest which influenced him. 

His passing was mourned by the public generally as that of a 
citizen whose like will not soon be seen again, and to the wide 
spread expressions of sympathy to the Catholic Clergy and 
people and to the relatives of the deceased, the NEWFOUNDLAND 
QUARTERLY adds its tribute. 

On the death of Archbishop Howley the direction of the 
affairs of the Archdiocese devolved upon the Vicar-General 
Rt. Rev. Mgr. Roche, the Rector of the Cathedral here and the 
Administrator of the Archdiocese under the late Ordinary. For 
this post Mgr. Roche is admirably suited, and has, besides, the 
experience acquired from officiating in this capacity for the past 
seven years, notably during the first half of the present year 
when the Archbishop was making his ad limina visit to Rome 
and availed of the occasion to enjoy an extended tour of the 
European Continent. It is needless to dilate upon the admirable 
qualities of Mgr. Roche, who has shown himself to be in every 
way a model or a Cuholic clergyman and who was only a few 
months ago honored with the dignity of a Domestic Prelate at 
the Papal Throne. Pending the appointment of a successor to 
tiie late Arciibishop the affairs of the Archdiocese of St. John s 
may be sa cly trusted to the worthy Administrator. 




from 
The 



Hamc-^ore. 

The last instalment received from His Grace Archbishop Howley before his death. Article XLI. 
ASSING north of Codroy village we round the 
magnificent promontory of 

CAPE ANGUILLE, 

the most westerly point in Newfoundland. From 
this point the shore trends eastwardly and form 
the opening of the splendid Bay of St. George s. 
The very euphonious name of Cape Anguille 
means in English Eel Cape (EEL). Eels are very 
plentiful along this shore, and there is a cove 
quite near, just inside the entrance to Great 
Codroy River, which is particularly remarkable 
for them. 
The grand 



Channell about once in 
path followed the line of 



BAY OF ST. GEORGE S 

is one of the most splendid estuaries in Newfoundland. It is 
forty miles wide at the mouth from Cape Anguille on the south 
to Cape St. George on the north, and extends eastwards in the 
form of a very regulat isosceles triangle to a depth of over fifty 
miles. There is a river running into this bay at the head (or 
bottom) called by the name of the Bay (St. George s River). 
There is also a lake bearing the same name George s Pond. 
But the George s River does not flow out of it. The beautiful 
lake of St. George s, surrounded by magnificent hills clothed 
with rich forests, is situated between St. George s Bay and Bay 
of Island s. The old slide-path passed by this lake which is 
several miles long and was used as pait of the mail track, about 
the year 1870. when a mail was first granted to this shore. The 



mail was brought on dog-teams 
three weeks during winter-time. 
the valley of 

BENOIT S BROOK 

which empties out of this lake into the main river of St. George s. 
The brook was called after an old Frenchman named Benoit k 
Blanc. The railway now passes along this route and there is 
daily communication twice each way ! The hotel or bungalow 
of Log Cabin is built on the shore of this lake, and is a favorite 
resort of sa mon fishers. On some maps this lake is called 
George IV. Lake, presumably after the last of the " Four 
George s." If so it is a very great mistake, for the name of St. 
George s, given to the Bay, Cape, Island, River, &c., is found on 
all the maps as far back as the early decades of the XVII. 
cen ury, il not earlier. Thus it is on the map of De Laet, dated 
1930. I cannot tell the origin of the name, but it is well known 
that St. George was the patron of England long before that 
time. The Bay of St. George is unique in this particular that 
it has not one single harbour on either side of its 5o-mile stretch. 
The only harbour is quite at the bottom of the bay and is formed, 
not by an indenture of the coast as is generally the case, but by 
the veiy remarkable spit or peninsula of sand known as 

SANDY POINT. 

1 his reef of sand and beach-rocks takes its rise on the southern 
side of the bay about twelve miles from the Bottom, and curving 
inwards towards the north-east extends about seven miles, and 
forms the splendid harbour called Sandy Point Harbour. 

For about twelve miles from Cape Anguille the coast is 
formed by the lofty range of the Anguille Mountains called t by 
the people " The Highlands." t M. F. H. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 10. 



Siefd of Watcrtoo. 

By Rt. Hon. Sir Edward Morris, P.C. 



RT. HON. SIR EDWARD MORRIS, T.C 



" Thou first and last of fields I 
King-making victory ?" 

Byron. 

HEN Parnelldied 
in 1891 a friend 
said to Lord Sal 
isbury : " You 
must have known 
Parnell intimate 
ly ?" " I never 
saw him was the 
reply; "I went to 
the House of 
Lords from the 
House of Com 
mons on the death 
of my father in 
1868. I under 
stand Parnell did not enter the House of Commons until 1875." 
"But surely," insisted his friend, - in all the years you were in 
office as Prime Minister between 1875 and 1891, when the Irish 
question was acute, and the Irish vote important from a. party 
standpoint, you must have met and conversed with Parnell ?" 
" I never saw him" was the reply. 

I have not seen this story vouched for, but I believe it to be 
a fact. It was told me by one very close to Lord Salisbury, and 
I have no reason to doubt its veracity. It illustrates the char 
acter of the man as compared with Gladstone, his great rival and 
Parliamentary opponent. Anyone who has read the life of 
Parnell, recently written by his widow (Mrs. O Shea), will find 
there the story of the negotiations between her and Gladstone 
in relation to the Kilmainham Treaty. They bring out in bold 
relief the men and their methods Salisbury and Gladstone. 
Gladstone was essentially a reformer. Having satisfied himself 





Gladstone was not alone a great statesman but a modern poli 
tician and to that end was untiring in the development of every 
factor that contributed for the time being to the paramount ob- 
jtct he had in view. The fact that he was intimate with Parnell 
and his circle and that Salisbury had never met Parnell is illu 
minating in throwing light on the characters and methods of 
these two great parliamentary generals. It was not from the same 
motives that Wellington never met Napoleon, but from the fact 
that although he had been for years fighting the French on the 
Continent he and Napoleon never came to close quarters or 
fought on the same battlefields until the day they met at Water 
loo, and even then Wellington did not see Napoleon. In the 
" Life and times of King Edward VII," by Sir Richard Holmes, 
an interesting anecdote explains this. King Edward VII, as a 
boy, worshipped Wellington who lived for eleven years after the 
birth of the future king. One morning the young Prince of 
Wales displayed with pride a drawing which he had made re 
presenting Napoleon on horse-back levelling a pistol at the 
head of the Duke, who was advancing with sword drawn 
to cut down his enemy. Just at this moment the Duke of Well- 




WELLINGTON. 

as to the need and justice of a reform he pursued it with all the 
vigour and earnestness of his nature, and no assistance was too 
small or inconsiderate to be recognized, or sought, in accomp 
lishing his ends. What would in others be regarded as intrigue 
and conspiracy, was by him glorified into negotiation and diplo 
macy founded on principles of the highest morality. Salisbury 
was ponderous and slow and believed in allowing things to 
naturally evolve themselves. Gladstone was for forcing the pace. 



NAPOLEON. 

ington enterd the Prince s room. You are just the man I want 
to see," cried the boy, holding up his picture in delight. " How 
is that ?" asked the veteran duke. Why, because you can best 
criticise my drawing," said the Prince. " Now, can you tell me 
who is on the left?" he went on, showing the drawing to the 
Duke. " Well," said the latter, " From the waistcoat and the hat 
I can see it is meant for Napoleon". " Right," said the Prince 
" and who is the other ? By the cut of the features I should 
say it was myself, " Right again," answered the Prince. "Well 
now what I want to know is is the drawing accurate?" The 
u ke T PUt d wn the drawi ng and impressively answered 

My boy I am go ,ng to tell you something that the English 
people don t know. I never in my life set eyes on Napoleon ! 
Once m the midst of a battle, someone cried " Look ! there is 
Napoleon 1" Before I could get the field glass to my eye the 
smoke from a field gun had enveloped him " 

During the months we were at the Hague the Court did not 
sit on Saturdays and as a rule we spent Saturday and Sunday 
in Belgium France and distant parts of Holland. In the Tear 
1910 he i8th of June, the anniversary of the battle of Water 
loo, fel on Saturday and early on that morning, with some Tm 
encan friends, we motored from Brussels to the battlefielT Tr?e 
distance. (I write from memory) is about fifteen miles through a 



HE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. n. 



delightful woods over a well kept road, the same as Wellington 
and his army marched over on the night of the celebrated ball 
at Brussels. The weather was much the same as a fine July day 
in Newfoundland. A thick mist, covered the land during the 
early morning. One can best describe the run from Brussels to 
Waterloo as a drive through a well wooded, beautiful park, with 
glorious tall trees, whose over-spreading branches and thick 
foliage completely hide the sun even at noon. We seem to have 




THE LION OF WATERLOO. 

hardly left the historic square in Brussels where stands the 
Equestrian statue of Godfrey de Bouillon the spot where he 
formed his first little Army of Crusaders with their slogan of 
" God wills it," when suddenly we come out on to an open plain. 
You are on the field of Waterloo. There is the lion. In the 
distance you see in the centre of a great plain an immense pyra 
mid lifting itself hundreds of feet into the air on the top of which, 
stands the lion of Waterloo. The monument commemorates the 
defeat of the French army by the English, Dutch, Belgian and 
Prussians on the i8th of June, 1815, and records the bloodiest 
day of modern battles. The base of the monument or pyramid 
is about 2000 feet around and the lion, made of metal from guns 
recovered on the battle field, weighing about three tons, stands 
on the top of the mound, its head turned towards France and 
one of its paws resting on a globe symbolic of the world. The 
site of the monument is the spot where the Prince of Orange 
was wounded where the last stand was made by the French that 
fateful evening, when Wellington gave the order "Up Guards 
and at them," and just before the French faltered, broke, and 
fled. 

When we alight we go up the side of the monument by the 
aid of some two hundred and fifty steps, and from the top you 
have a magnificent view of the battlefield. Spread out before 
you is a quiet, peaceful agricultural scene, the whole country 
being intensively cultivated. Even the immense grassy slopes 
of the monument are grazed by lambs and sheep. The country, 
as far as the eye can reach, is level, but undulating, much 
leveller than on the day of the famous battle, as since then thou 
sands of tons of material required to construct the pyramid have 
been taken from the battlefield. In all other respects the field 
of Waterloo is the same. The fate of Europe was decided here 
on that memorable day, on a field that would not be regarded as 
too large for four or five farmers in Newfoundland with reason 
able help, to cultivate. Tc-day we have a battle-field in almost 
the same country extending nearly one hundred and fifty miles 
with three million men engaged. A battle commenced, as I 
write four months ago, and to all appearances hardly yet fully 
under way. Engraved on the monument on the east and west 
sides is the simple legend " 18 June, 1815," and yet on reflection 
no words would seem more eloquent or more calculated to im 
press than these plain words, fittingly solemn and sublime for 
the Epitaph of the heroes of five nations, and the hopes and 
aspirations buried in their graves. When Byron visited Water 
loo, in 1816, no monument had been erected. All are familiar 
with the stanzas in " Childe Harold " commemorating his visit: 

.. stop ! For thy tread is on an Empire s dust ! 
An Earthquake s spoil is sepulchred below I 

Is the spot mark d with no colossal bust ? 
Nor column trophied for triumphial show ? 



None ; but the moral s truth tells simpler so, 
As the ground was before, thus let it be ; 

How that red rain has made the harvest grow ! 
And is this all the world has gained by thee, 
Thou first and last of fields ! king-making victory ?" 

At day-break on the i5th of June the first engagemeut took 
place between Napoleon and the Prussians near Charleroi. On 
that evening Wellington was at Brussels and present at the 
famous ball. He had purposely attended it with a view of quiet 
ing and allaying the fears of the citizens of Brussels. The ball 
was given by the Duchess of Richmond, and has been immor 
talized as much by the stanza in " Childe Harold " as by the 
occasion on which it was held, and those who attended: 

" There was a sound of revelry by night, 

And Belgium s capital had gather d then, 
Her Beauty and her Chivalry, and bright 

The lamps shone o er fair women and brave men; 
A thousand hearts beat happily; and when 

Music arose with its voluptuous swell, 
Soft eyes look d love to eyes which spake again, 

And all went merry as a marriage bell ; 

But hush ! hark I a deep sound strikes like a rising knell ! " 

When at Brussels we were shown the site of the ball room 
which then consisted of a common granary or store which the 
poetic genius of Byron converted into a room of oriental pro 
portions. Everyone is familiar with the line " Within a window, 
ed niche of that high hall sat Brunswick s fated Chieftan. 
Wellington left the ball with the Prince of Orange when it was 
about half through, and marched with his army out to Waterloo. 
Further on in the Canto, Byron refers to the breaking up of the 
ball, and the battle next day : 

" Ah ! then and there was hurrying to and fro, 

And gathering tears and tremblings of distress 
And cheeks all pale which but an hour ago 

Blushed at the praise of their own loveliness; 
And there were sudden partings, such as press 

The life from out young hearts, and choking sighs 
Which ne er might be repeated, who could guess 
If ever more should meet those mutual eyes, 
Since upon night so sweet such awful morn could rise ! 
* * ** *** 

Last noon beheld them full of lusty life, 

La*t eve in beauty s circle proudly gay, 
The midnight brought the signal sound of strife, 

The mom the marshalling in arms the day 
Battl s magnificently stern array ! 

The thunder clouds close o er it which when rent 
The earth is covei d thick with other clay 

Which her own clay shall cover, heap d and pent, 

Rider and horse-friend, foe, in one red burial blent." 




PRINCE OF ORANGE. 



The next day Napoleon attacked Blucher at Ligny, the latter 
being forced to retreat, while Ney attacked the allied army at 
Quatre Bras about ten miles from Waterloo. Seeing that an 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 12. 



encounter with Napoleon was inevitable, Wellington chose the 
plain of Mont Saint Jean, now called Waterloo, as the theatre for 
the battle. In reality the battlefield is about seven miles from 
the village of Waterloo. The battle derives its name from 
Waterloo village, because here it was that Wellington wrote the 
celebrated despatch to the British Government announcing the 
victory of the allied armies. Wellington had visited the battle 
field the previous year and, it is said, noted it as a possible site 
for a great battle. Being on the ground first he selected the 
most favourable site leaving the unfavorable one for Napoleon. 
As now, so it was then, Sunday was a favourite day for a battle, 
and Sunday, June the iSth, was the day chosen by Napoleon for 
the long deferred duel with Wellington. Wellington fully ap 
preciated what was before him. The day preceding the battle, 
as well as the night, a downpour of torrential rain took place, 
followed by a fearful storm. The troops, without any protection, 
were drenched and were soaking with rain. Blucher, who was 
making a forced march to join Wellington, travelled the greater 
part of the night. Wellington had under his command about 
60,000 troops : 25,000 British, 17,000 Dutch. 11,000 Belgians 
and Hanovarians, and 6,000 Brunswickers, with 156 cannon ; 
while Napoleon had 72,000 French troops and 256 cannon. 
Napoleon had the advantage of Wellington in that he had more 
men, better men, old trained experienced French soldiers a l 
of one nationality, and many of whom had fought with him 
before on many a victorious battle-field under the Eigles of 
France. The Duke s army was a heterogenious collection 
badly equipped, short in numbers and also in field guns, and 
for this reason Wellington had urged Blucher to come to his 
assistance and bring with him his whole army. Standing on 
the top of the monument you see in the direction of the lion s 
head that is to the West where the army of Wellington was 
encamped, and to the East that of Napoleon. As I gazed on 
the quiet peaceful scene spread out before me, I tried to 
imagine myself back a century looking on at that fearful confl : ct 
when thousands of lives were sacrificed. Where countless 
homes were robbed of their bread winner, finding a grave in 
a foreign land, not in defence of any great principle, but merely 
to satisfy the ambition and lust of power of one individual. The 
years that had gone seemed to roll before me with all their 
accumulated regrets. This year, when at the Derby, as I looked 
out from an elevation commanding a view of the whole Epsom 
Downs, with its quarter of a million people, saw its tents, colours, 
flags, banners, horses, motors, busses, carriages, and all varieties 




CHAPEL OF HOUGOMONT. 

of vehicles, and its bands of music, it occured to me that here 
was an illustration of what a great battle-field must be like in 
the days of Napoleon, when colors, banners, bands and trap 
pings played such a great part. 

The battle of Waterloo commenced at noon and was over the 
same day at 7 p.m. When the troops rose in the early morning 
of the 1 8th it was still drizzling rain. The positions taken up 
by both armies being on slopes, enabled them easily to see each 
other. Across the slopes ran the high road to Brussels over 
which we had just motored. Nearby was the farm house La 



Have Sainte, south of the village of Waterloo but on the road o 
Quatre Bras. Opposite to it, but on the same road and with 
the French line, was the farm house of La Belle Alliance the 
headquarters of Napoleon. On the angle of the northern slope, 
serving as the key to the British position, was Hougomout an 
old red brick chateau. Around these two bu Idings all day was 
the white hot point of the battle. The little bnck enclosed 
farm-yard of the chateau formed a natural fortress that 
the battle was like one of the pits in the Inferno. It was never 
taken by the French, but its present condition even to day shows 




Waterloo 



Mar&hal Btuclar 



BLUCHER. 

that it was literally shot to pieces. I went over the walls and 
examined every foot of them which are pitted with scores of 
bullets, grape and canister, Fifteen hundred men were killed 
here in one hour. The old well in the yard is shown, into which 
it is said 300 bodies dead and alive were thrown on that day. 
A portion of the family chapel in the chateau still stands. We 
were brought into it by the old French woman who now lives 
there and shown the life-size Crucifix on the wall. The fire 
broke out in the chapel ; the burned walls are there showing 
where the fire burned up to the foot of the Crucifix and then 
went out of its own accord. It was about 11.45 w hen the first 
shot was fired from the English guns. The French artillery 
replied, and then a cannonading took place that never was 
equalled before. 

Whole libraries have been written descriptive of the battle, 
and to most readers it is familiar. Just now, however, the main 
points, will bear recounting. The French first dashed on 
Hougomont held by the English. For a portion of the day the 
battle raged furiously here. The French captured the woods 
around the house, but were unable to withstand the merciless 
fire from the English who used the chateau and were protected 
by it. Marshall Ney took La Haye Sainte in the afternoon be 
cause the ammunition of the Germans had given out, but this 
was too late to be of any real value. The great feature of 
Waterloo was the trial of strength between the hollow square of 
the English and the French cavalry. When the French force 
had vainly spent their strength falling all day on the English 
squares the English cavalry charged and rode over the French 
lancers and curiassiers. What gave a sudden termination to 
the battle however, was the coming up of the Prussians under 
Blucher, led by Bulow. That was about five in the afternoon. 
They attacked the French in the rear on the right flank 
Napoleon now saw the game was up and made a final effort to 
break the English Imes. This he did by calling up the Old 
Guard, which had been kept by him all day in reserve. Riding 
at their head himself he led them to within a short distance ol 
the English. Pointing to the latter, Napoleon said : " Through 
there is the road to Brussels." This was the last order Napoleon 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 13. 



ever, made. On rode the Guard, under Ney, until they came to 
the top of the rise of La Haye Sainte. Here they met the 
English guards led by Maitland and Adams, who had been 
lying down and held in all day by Wellington. It has been dis 
puted as to the exact order given by Wellington. " Up guards 
and at them " finds favour with many, but the best historians 
say that the order was " Let the whole line advance." And it did 
advance. The whole mass that, for a long summer s day, had 
stood in patient expectation for the order, rushed on their foe- 
infantry horse and guns carrying every position of the French. 
The field was won ! The remnant of the grand army of 
Napoleon turned and fled making for the French frontier over 
the wreck-strewn Brussels road. 

No student of the Napoleonic wars can fail to see in them a 
resemblance to the Armageddon in which Europe is now engag 
ed. The causes of both are the same. The lust of conquest, 
supreme egotism, ambition, which " should be made of sterner 
stuff," the desire to have a place in the sun, to be " It." We 
are like snakes in a bottle, all trying to get on top, no one 
appreciating the second or third place and failing to understand 
that in the economy of the universe every one is essential and 
all of use. But it is human nature, and just as long as human 
nature remains what it is, so long will there be aggressive wars. 
Men will be found always ready to put self-interest first and 
country last, readv to " wade through slaughter to a throne and 
shut the gates of mercy on mankind." The individual who 
thinks that he can bring about permanent peace, that it is 
possible to do away with standing armies is preaching folly 
talking utter nonsense. Since the dawn of time man has had 
to be governed by force, and what is true of the individual is 
true of the nation, and especially of the nations of to-day, with 
their immense areas, wealth, and vast heterogeneous population. 
We do not realize what is happening in the world. 

One hundred years ago we were righting Napoleon ; we were 
also at war with the United States, a country that had then a 
population less than the city of greater New York has to 
day. The United States has now a population of a 100,000,000, 
an area of 3,000,000 square miles, wealth almost incalculable, 
the third largest navy in the world, and side by side countries 
like China with a population of 500,000,000; India with 300,- 
000,000, and Japan with 50,000,000. What these countries 
may develop within the next hundred years is impossible to 
foretell. It is of no avail having a magistrate, unless you have 
a policeman to carry out his orders. A country cannot expect 
to have her treaties upheld, or her people respected, and her 
trade protected without an effective and efficient army and navy. 
It is the national insurance of a country. It was only a mere 
accident that England a century ago, like the rest of Europe, did 
not "lie at the proud foot of a conqueror," in the person of 
Napoleon. It will require our greatest efforts to prevent a like 
risk in the war in which we are now engaged. 

You will find no parallel in fable or legendery lore, to equal 
the exploits and achievements of Napoleon. If we read of such 
deeds as he accomplished in a Milton or a Homer, we should 
regard it as untrustworthy, as a myth. He rose from a simple 
peasant in an obscure village in Corcica, to be the ruler of 
France, carried war into Egypt, brought his armies like Hannibal 
over the Alps, warred against England, Russia, Prussia, Austria, 
Holland, Belgium, Norway and Sweden, and practically at the 
same time and in the days when there were no railways and no 
steamers. He divorced Josephine, and demanded from the 
Emperor of Austria the hand of his daughter as one of the 
terms of Austerlitz. He took Pius VII. from Rome and lodged 
him for two years in a prison in France, invaded Russia with 
600,000 men and came back with about 10,000. Escaped from 
Elba after being there for a hundred days, and with scarcely any 
preparation went out to Waterloo to face the combined armies 
of Europe. He set up and pulled down kings with less con 
sideration and compunction than if they were domestic servants. 
Even those who hate his memory admit that his brain was 
colossal in the conception of undertakings, for which to carry 
out he possessed a courage that rarely failed him. He pre 
vailed over every state except England, and England crushed 
him on the sea and on the land. When he was at the zenith of 
his oower the British fleet swept him from the seas. He only 



engaged a British commander twice on the land, at Acre and 
Waterloo, and was defeated on each occasion. For years he 
kept Europe in alarm, and it was to the English he finally sur 
rendered himself a prisoner, and died a miserable exile on the 
rock of St. Helena. And yet from some standpoints he was a 
great man, a great soldier, a wonderful organizer, and comman 
der of men. There is no comparison between him and the 
" pinch back " Napoleon the present German Emperor who 
for the past twenty years or more has been masquerading as a 
great general playing, the same role, of satisfying his personal 
ambition. Although it will be a hundred years next June since 
he was banished to St. Helena, Napoleon still occupies men s 
thoughts as much as some of the living rulers of to-day. He 
was essentially a bad man, in that he never refused himself any 
thing he desired. Untruthful and unfaithful he yet has succeed 
ed in finding defenders of his life and work, to a greater extent 
than any other man who has ever walked the earth. False 
and hollow, he still inspired nations with fear and dread, even 
from his surf-washed rock in the far away Atlantic. The 
records of his career furnishes the material for a dozen comedies 
and tragedies. We have him at his Zenith as the President of 




MEETING OF WELLINGTON AND BLUCHER 
AFTER THE BATTLE. 

the great Dresden Conference of 1812. Within a year he was 
knocking as a stranger at the Tuilleries at the dead of night, 
unannounced and unlocked for, having arrived fresh from the 
horrors of his retreat from Moscow, where he left behind him in 
the snow to whiten on the Russian steppes and furnish souvenirs 
for the globe trotting tourist, the bones of half a million of the 
flower of the French army. I have seen it somewhere that on 
the eve of the battle of Actium, Mark Anthony received the 
homage of twenty kings. At the Dresden Conference Napoleon 
received the fealty of nearly all the princes and kings of Europe, 
including the Emperor of Austria, the King of Prussia and 
Saxony, the King of Italy, representatives of all those who were 
contributing their quota to the armies to invade Russia to 
punish the Emperor Nicholas for having the hardihood to be the 
only European monarch to stand out against his order to close 
their ports against British shipping. 

And yet notwithstanding his monumental mistakes, and 
blemishes, it is impossible, to contemplate the career of Napoleon 
without coming under the influence of that fascination, which 
historians tell us he exercised over all, who came within the 
sphere of his operations. It is so hard to measure him by con 
trast with any other human standard. He was everything at 
the same time. The ruler of a great nation, a soldier, a states 
man, a financier, a law maker. He did not war with one nation, 
but with all nations. As Byron says of him, " He warred with 
a world which conquered him only when the meteor of conquest 
allured him too far." He found France prostrated, suffering 
from the effects of a fratricidal and foul revolution. He made 
her the mistress of the world ; reduced every other country, 
except England, to the level of a satrap. He would have added 
much to his name had he died at Waterloo, but in the supreme 
moment of his life he funked it and joined in a rout which, 
ceasing to be a retreat, became the flight of a pitifnl demoralized 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 14. 



rabble. He had thousands of soldiers on the field lhat day who only 
wanted encouragement to make a further stand, but he himself 
ran away, and lost the one chance of showing that he was not 
a mere actor, but a great soldier and patriot. Millions had laid 
down their lives at his mere beck and call without understanding 
why. They had said, as the Roman gladiators of old, Hail 
Emperor those who are about to die saluie thes." He could 
have died at Waterloo with those brave men who constituted his 
guard, and won for himself, as they, imperishable fame; but he 
chose otherwise, and died in exile a common place, miserable 
death. 

Is it too much to hope that history is about to repeat itself, 
and that we are shortly to have another Waterloo a " Berlin," 
another " place of skulls," the grave of Germany ? Is it not 
a case of " nations combating to make one submit ?" I think so. 
I like to read in the following stanzas from the same Canto of 
Byron a phrophesy of the doom of the disturber of Europe, 
It would not be in keeping with the fitness of things, that we who 
struck Napoleon down, should j>ay homage to the German 
Emperor : 

" And Harold stands upon this place of skulls, 

The grave of France, the deadly Waterloo ; 
How in an hour the power which gave annuls 

It s gifts, transferring fame as fleeting too ! 
In " pride of place " here last the eagle flew. 

Then tore with bloody talon the rent plain, 
Pierced by the shaft of banded nations through ; 

Ambitions life and labours all were vain ; 

He wears the shatter d links of the world s broken chain. 

Fit retribution ! Gaul may champ the bit 

And foam in fetters ; but is earth more free ? 

Did nations combat to make one submit ; 

Or league to teach all kings true sovereignty 

What ! shall reviving Thraldom again be 
The patch d-up idol of enlighten d days " . 

Shall we who struck the Lion down, shall we 
Pay the Wolf homage ? proffering lowly gaze 
And servile knees to thrones ? No ; prove before ye praise. 

If not, o er one fallen despot boast no more ! 

In vain fair cheeks were furrow d with hot tears 
For Europe s flowers long rooted up before 

The trampler of her vineyards ; in vain yedis 
Of death, depopulation, bondage, fears, 

Have all been borne, and broken by the accord 
Of roused-up millions; all that most endears 

Glory, is when the myrtle wreathes a sword 

Such as Harmodius drew on Athens tyrant lord." 

But we are warned of the departing day we have spent the 
whole morning and afternoon on the battle-field and at the vil 
lage of Waterloo. We have now to return. We go home a dif 
ferent road, taking in the historic spots of Charleroi, Quatre 
Bras, Ligny, Namur and Louvain, setting back to Brussels in 
time for dinner, the whole distance motored being about as far 
as from St. John s to Cape Bro) le and back. 




OUR FIRST 

fiis Grace Rt. Reu. ttl. J. Rowley, 

WHO DIED OCTOBER ISTH, 1914, A<;u> 71 YEARS. 

" FLING out the flag" surcharg d with grief, 
For him whose eyes are clos d to-night ! 

The Crosier, Mitre laid aside, 
Reposes from the " garish light" ! 

Our first Archbishop loving belov d 

His passing his eternal gain 
Our loss 1 His friendship soggarth aroon 

We mourn thee with an endless pain ! 

The " Hills," the sea, the moaning wind- 
Each tree neath which his footstep trod 

The silent altar, throne and aisle 

Proclaim he s gone to meet his God 1 



We ll never see the Southside Hills 
We ll never see the " Folk lore fame," 

We ll never read this simple page 
Apart from our Archbishop s name 

If " simple faith s" bove " Norman blood" 
If goodness count where classics fail 

Then dear Archbishop thine s the crown 
Fur pride ne er held thee in its trail ! 

A child could see thee in its tears 
A beggar reach thee in his grief 

A sinner wile the " Right Divine" 
Was thine to heal and give relief. 

The Bells have toll d a requiem sad- 
Fond hearts have sobb d above his Bier 

He sleepeth in a simple grave 

Where those who love him breathe a prayer ! 



E.G. 




Sfte and 



By J. G. Higgins. 

WHEN first we met she stood amidst 

A crowd of worshippers, 
And I beheld with ravished gaze 

The beauty that was hers : 
The laughing eyes, the dimpled cheeks, 

The lips as red as wine, 
The wavy locks oh how I wished 

That she was only mine ! 

Breathless I kissed those ruby lips ! 

There was a sudden hush ! 
Oh no ! Not one was there amazed, 

She did not even blush ! 
Her lovely eyes looked into mine 

As if to ask for more ! 
Why not ? For I was twenty-one 

And she was only four ! 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 15. 



Damnation of Germany. 

By Dr. Arthur Selwyn-Brown. 




A. SELWYN-BROWN, M.A.. I H.L)., I.L.I). 



HE great war which 
is now progressing 
in Europe will un 
doubtedly result in 
the destruction of 
the German Em 
pire. The Allies 
have a nobler duty 
to perform than the 
mere stopping of 
the predatory at 
tacks of the Ger 
manic hordes in 
Belgium, Russia and 
France. They must 
heed the cries of 
the whole civilized 
world and prevent 
all possible future outbreaks of the German barbarians against 
the world s peace. And the Allies will do this. All of them 
have sworn not to stop fighting until Prussian militarism is 
completely and finally crushed. That can only be done by 
dismembering the Empire of Germany. All the colonies will 
be taken away. All the sea coast of Germany will be absorbed 
by the neighbouring countries, Poland, Denmark and Holland, 
while the internal countries will be divided into three small 
kingdoms. This is the only way to effectively prevent the 
Germans from concentrating their thoughts, energies and wealth 
upon another aggresive war as they did in the past forty years. 
The Germanic people have been disturbers of the peace from 
the earliest times. Just as Julius Caesar described them over 
two thousand years ago, we find them savage barbarians to-day. 
The ages have not improved them. No modern civilized people 
could be guilty of the awful savagery exhibited by the German 
soldiers in Belgium and France. Never before have invading 
hordes been guilty of worse crimes than those now daily prac 
ticed on a large and systematic scale by the bloodthirsty follow 
ers of the Emperor William : never before did Europe witness 
such atrocities as those now perpetrated by the German armies 
which, in many cases, sullenly begrudge to leave their mutilated 
victims even hands to eat with, tongues to pray with, and eyes 
to weep with. 

The whole world stands aghast at the fiendish and revolting 
German crimes against humanity, and the callous manner in 
which the German Government and public men have elevated 
such infernal barbarism to a cynical national dogma. The Pre 
sident of France in his decrees of November igth, striking all 
German names from the roll of the Legion of Honor, voiced sen 
timents accepted the world over when he said: " We remain true 
to our ideals of humanity and liberty, but the Germans have con 
ducted the war in a manner which systematically violated all the 
rules of international law and have practiced acts of cruelty and 
barbarism without precedent in the history of humanity acts 
which have incited against Germany the universal conscience." 

We may search the pages of history in vain for such a terrible 
arraignment of a nation. This French decree is a unique 
historical document which will never be forgotten by the 
German people. No one of German descent will again be 
able to walk this world of ours with head erect. The sins of 
the Germans of to-day must be carried by them like grim 
Chimeras and their weight will make them droop their heads. 
They will be hereafter scorned by the people of the nations 
almost as outlaws from the pale of civilization. 

One of the saddest features of this damnation of the German 
people is that their fearful misdeeds have been done in the name 
of religion. The Kaiser has on many occasions proclaimed that 
he is & the vice-regent of God. All the foreigners who have 
corrupted German thought Clausewitz, Nietzche, Chamberlain 
and Bernhardi ignored the biblical admonition : " God resis- 
teth the proud and giveth grace to the humble." Pity and 
sympathy are the keynotes of Christianity. Throughout the 



Bible, humility, charity and pity are extolled. But Clausewitz 
preache; differently. He taught his willing pupils that : "War 
belongs not to the province of the arts and sciences but to the 
province of social life. It is a conflict of great interests which 
is settled by bloodshed, and only in that respect is it different 
from others. It would be better, intead of comparing it with 
any art, to liken it to trade, which is also a conflict of human 
interests and activities ; and it is still more like state policy, 
which again on it its part, may be looked upon as a kind of 
trade on a great scale. Besides state policy is the womb in 
which war is developed, its outline being hidden in a rudimentary 
state like the qualities of living creatures in their germs. . . . 
War is a wonderful trinity, composed of the original violence of 
its elements hatred and animosity which may be looked upon 
as blind instinct ; of the play of probabilities and chance, which 
make it a free activity of the soul ; and of the subordinate 
nature of a political instrument by which it belongs purely to 
the reason. The first of these three phases concerns more the 
people ; the second, more the general and his army; the third, 
more the Government. The passions which break forth in war 
must already have a latent existence in the people. There are 
three principal objects in carrying on war: (i) To conquer 
and destroy the enemy s armed force ; (2) To get possession of 
the material elements of aggression and of the other sources of 
existence of the hostile people ; (3) To gain public opinion." 
These are strange precepts to train a dull-witted nation on. 

The conduct of the present war shows how well Clausewitz s 
teachings have been learned by the German people who, appar 
ently, have taken to heart Clausewitz s aphorism ; War is an 
act of violence which in its application knows no bounds." 

No people could long harbour such perversive views and live 
peacefully with their fellow men. It is, therefore, not surprising 
that a keen observer like Hilaire Belloc, writing about the 
Germans before the war had to say : " Prussia is atheistic. 
Her atheism has profoundly penetrated the private morals of 
her people. It has not only pene 
trated, it has permeated the minds 
of her rulers." 

Nietzche with his anti-christian 
doctrine of the super-man had a 
wonderful influence in perverting 
the German mind. He prepared 
it for Bismark s startling theory of 
the Virile man. Bismark taught 
that: "The Germanic race is, so 
to speak, the male principle 
throughout Europe, the fructifying 
principle. The Celtic and Slav peoples represent the female 
principle." 

Chamberlain developed this theory and said: "The German 
in the narrower Tacitean sense, has kept himself so pre-eminent 
among his kinsmen intellectually, morally and physically, that 
we are justified in applying his name to the whole family, of 
Celts and Slavs. The German is the soul of our culture. The 
Europe of to-day spread over the globe exhibits the brilliant 
result of an infinitely varied ramification. What binds us into 
one is the Germanic blood. Only Germans sit on European 
thrones. What has happened is only prolegomena. True his 
tory begins from the moment when the German with mighty 
hand seizes the inheritance of antiquity." 

The ground so well prepared by the multifarious writings on 
war by Clausewitz, by the philosophy of Nietzche, the speeches 
of Bismark and the writings of Chamberlain, Von der Goltz. 
aud Von Bulow, was well fertilized by the writings of Baron 
Bernhardi and the speeches of the Emperor William 

Bernhardi taught that " Nations stand, like the Hercules of 
the legend, at the parting of the ways. They can choose the 
road to progress or to decadence. A favorite position in the 
world will only become effective in the life of nations by the 
conscious human endeavour to gain it. That social system in 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 16. 



which the most efficient personalities possess the greatest in 
fluence will show the greatest vitality in the intra social struggle. 
In the extrasocial struggle, in war, that natian will conquer 
which can throw into the scale the greatest physical, mental, 
moral, material and political power and is therefore, the best 
able to defend itself. War will furnish such a nation with favor 
able vital conditions, enlarged possibilities of expansion and 
widened influence." 

That is what the Germans have been long striving for suffi 
cient material power to strike down the two great civilized 
nations France and England and seize their wealth and power 
as their Hunnish ancestors did in early times. For forty years 
they prepared for the paesent conflict and when they believed 
they were powerful enough to " Hack their way through to Paris 
by mere weight of men," they started to sack France with such 
preparations that a neutral spectator, an American writer, was 
compelled to declare : 

" The chorus of admiring comment that has gone up over the complete 
ness of the Kaiser s preparations for the present struggle in Europe has 
signally failed to emphasize the broad meaning of it all. To anyone who 
stops to think about tha technical side of such things in the same way that 
one thinks about building a railroad, the German mobilization has proved 
beyond the shadow of a doubt : first, the dominance of the war party in that 
country ; second, their long-framed plans to strike for the mastery of 
Europe. It is obvious that all the resources of Germany men, money, 
and wealth of every sort have been prepared and put utterly at the dis 
posal of the military authorities. History shows no other case of a nation 
so entirely enlisted and massed for war. The detailed completeness of it 
is absolute. We read of gigantic stocks of new shoes, new clothes, count 
less aeroplanes, mobilization posters printed two years ago, gigantic seige 
guns of novel construction, and so on without end. And all these technical 
details point to one sole purpose ; aggresive war. The autocrats of Berlin 
summoned their countrymen, not to defend Germany, but to crush France 
through Belgium. It was a scheme of such destrucuive arrogance that no 
diplomatic arrangements were possible. The foreign office was unable to 
keep up with the general staff, and failed either to get Italy into the war or 
to keep England out. But the struggle had to go forward nevertheless. 
To say that it was caused by this or that incident is precisely saying that 
the Panama canal was built because the foremen blew the starting whistle. 
The tragic side of it is that this exhibition of military tyranny is applauded 
by the German people as a whole. They are willing and eager to take the 
chance of empire. They believe that a nation which has not yet developed 
constitutional government is fitted to rule all Europe ; that the other races 
of civilized mankind are to be subjected to the culture that has no toler 
ation for the Poles of Posen or the Fiench of Alsace." 

The Kaiser was an important instrument in the corrupting of 
the German national mind. Like the other leading conspirators, 
he is not a pure German. He is partly of English descent and a 
pronounced atheist. Openly since the war has been in progress, 
he asked his troops to pray for victory, not to the God of Love 
and Peace and Charity, but to the old German war God the 
God of their rude ancestors. The Kiiser s speeches to the 
German troops have greatly stimulated their natural blood-lust. 
His address on the eve of the Boxer trouble in 1900 is notorious 
for its infamy. He said to the troops : " When you meet your 
foe you will defeat him. No quarter will be given, no prisoners 
will be taken. Let all who fall into your hands be at your 
mercy. Just as the Huns, a thousand years ago, under the 
leadership of Attila gained a reputation in fierceness of which 
they still live in historical tradition, so may the name of 
Germany become known." 

On other occasions the Kaiser said : (i) The German people 
are the salt of the earth. (2) It may happen, men, that you 
may have to fire on your parents and brothers. Prove your 
fidelity then by your sacrifice. (3) May the Germans in time 
come by the unified co-operation of princes and peoples, of their 
armies and citizens, become as powerful, and as firmly united, 
as wonderful as the universal Roman Empire, so that one day 
it may be possible to say, as formerly, Civis Romanus Sum, i.e., 
I am a German citizen. (4) To us Germans great ideals have 
become permanent possessions, whereas to other peoples they 
have been, more or less, lost. (5) Far stretches our speech 
over the ocean, far the flight of our science and exploration ; no 
work in the domain of new discovery, no scientific idea but is 
first tested by us and then adopted by other nations. This is 
the world-rule the German spirit strives for. (6) Our German 
people will be the granite block on which the good God may 
complete his work of civilizing the world. Then will be realiz 
ed the word of the poet who said that the world will one day be 



cured by the German character. (7) I have no fear for the 
future. I am convinced that my plan will succeed, 
within me the indomitable purpose to walk with a firm step, in 
despite of every resistence, in the path that I have once recog 
nized to be the right one. (8)Nothing mnst bo settled in this 
world without the intervention of Germany and the German 
Emperor. (9) Remember that the German people are the 
chosen of God. On me, as German Emperor, the spirit of God 
has descended. I am His weapon, His sword and His vice- 
regent. Woe to the disobedient! Death to the coward and 
unbeliever ! 

For forty years the leaders of the German people have taught 
destructive doctrines to the Germans who have always been 
noted for their dulness and proneness to accept extraordinary 
cynical teachings. In recent years the leading German scientists 
have contributed to the poisoning of the national beliefs by pros 
tituting science, and Sir E. Ray Lankester, the leading living 
English biologist, was compelled to protest as follows: "The 
Germans are a dull-witted, ignorant, sentimental race who have, 
by the childish impertinances of Bernhardi, Treitschke and the 
Emperor William, been hypnotised into the belief that war is 
the greatest good, and that the mere desire for wealth justifies un 
limited slaughter and torture of mankind, calculated treachery, 
and meanest falsehood. By audacious and none-the-less stupid 
misrepresentation the Daiwinian theory of the survival of the 
favored races by natural selection in the struggle for existence, 
the sanction of science has bsen mendaciously claimed for the 
religion of murder. 

Let us remember the words of Pasteur, spoken in 1888 : 

" Two opposing laws seem to me to be now in contest. The one a law of 
blood and death, opening out each day new modes of destruction, forces 
the nations to be always ready for battle. The other a law of peace, work 
and health, whose only aim is to deliver man from the calamnities which be 
set him. The one seeks violent coquests; the other the relief of mankind. 
The one places a single life above all victories ; the other sacrifices hun 
dreds of thousands of lives to the ambition of a single individual. The law 
of which we (men of science) are the instruments strives, even through the 
carnage, to cure the wounds due to the law of war. Treatment by ovu anti 
septic methods may preserve the lives of thousands of soldiers. Which of 
these two laws will prevail, God only knows. But of this we may be sure, 
that science will obey the law of humaneness, and will always labor to en 
large the frontiers of life." 

This war will show which is the correct law and it is oleasant 
to know the British people will play an important part in the 
decision. The fruit of the national poisons fed so persistently 
to the German people from thi throne, pulpit, press and schools 
for many years is now ripening in Belgium, France and Russia. 
It may be seen in Louvain, Rheims, Antwerp and hundreds of 
other towns and cities. There are many plants in tropical 
countries which bear very poisonous fruits and then die down. 
So it will be with the fruit of German " Kultur." The 
Nietzchean philosophy, now being put into practice, will surely 
lead to the dismemberment of the German Empire and we will 
find that, instead of the impious Emperor being, as he insolently 
pretends, the vice-regent of God, he will be known to posterity 
as a Wanton Scourge, and hereafter, like the Jews who were 
long ago doomed to wander the earth with downcast heads des 
pised by all peoples for their wickedness and untrustworthiness, the 
Germans of the future will feel the universal resentment and scorn of the 
civilized world. 

While we are witnessing the dissolution of the German Empire and the 
expulsion of the Hohenzollerns, we may recall the prophetic words in th 
Persae of Aeschylus : 

His hordes came, and without shame, to desecrate 

The churches of God and burn them down ; 

They hauled the altars over, the sanctuaries, 

They backed and hewed to ruinous overthrow 

So for ill deeds they suffer ill and worse 

Shall surely be. Here is the base of woe, 

Not yet the structure. He has still to learn 

Those silent heaps of dead abide to show 

Children of children s children that a man 

d have no thoughts that are too high for men 

Always presumption blossoms and the fruit 

Is doom and all the harvest only tears. 

i-or God, be sure, exacts a strict account 
T , J sm "5, s Wlth heav y hand the overproud " 

ine QJ om of German presumption has been sounded and h 

fliS!Ei=IH|3E^ 

sts of tears, is not an enoounrii and nrofirjr^ n^iL^^^V^ har 



ha 

vests 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



17. 




PROCLAMATION 

By His Excellency SIR WALTER E. DAVIDSON, 

Knight Commander of the Most Distingu- 

W. E. DAVIDSON, ished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 

Governor, Governor and Commander-in-Chief, in and 

[L.S.] over the Island of Newfoundland and its 

Dependencies. 

YVTHEREAS, by my Proclamation of date the Fifth day of 
W August last, the Seventh day of August last, and the 
Twenty-fifth day of September last, I did specify the articles 
which it was my intention, under and by virtue of the authori 
ties therein referred to, to treat as Contraband of War. 

And whereas I now deem it desirable to publish a complete 
list of articles to be treated as Contraband of War, as afore 
said, during the present War. 

Now therefore, I do hereby declare, by and with the advice 
of my Council, that during the continuance of the War, or until 
I do give further public notice, the articles enumerated in the 
Schedules hereto will, notwithstanding anything contained in 
Article 78 of the Declaration of London, be treated as 
Contraband. 



SCHEDULE I. 



Absolute Contraband. 

Arms of all kinds including Arms for Sporting purposes, and 
their distinctive component parts ; 

Projectiles, charges and cartridges of all kinds, and their dis 
tinctive component parts ; 

Powder and explosives specially prepared for use in War; 

Sulphuric Acid ; 

Gun-mountings, limber boxes, limbers, military wagons field 
forges and their distinctive component parts ; 

Range finders, and their distinctive component parts ; 

Clothing and equipment of a distinctively military character ; 

Saddle, draught and pack animals, suitable for use in War; 

All kinds of Harness of a distinctively military character ; 

Articles of camp equipment, and their distinctive component 
parts ; 

Armour plates ; 

Haematite Iron Ore and Haematite Pig Iron ; 

Iron Pyrities ; 

Nickle Ore and Nickel ; 

Ferrochrome and Chrome Ore; 

Copper, unwrought; 

Lead, pig, sheet or pipe ; 

Aluminum ; 

Ferrosilica ; 

Barbed wire, and implements for fixing and cutting the same; 

Warships, including boats, and their distinctive component 
parts of such a nature that it can only be used on a vessel of 
War. 

Aeroplanes, airships, baloons and aircraft of all kinds and 
their component parts together with accessories and articles 
recognizable as intended for use in connection with baloons and 
aircraft ; 



Motor vehicles of all kinds and their component parts ; 

Motor tyres : rubber ; 

Mineral oils and Motor spirits, except lubricating oils ; 

Implements and apparatus designed exclusively for the manu 
facture of munitions of War, for the munufacture of or repair of 
arms or war material for use on land and sea. 



SCHEDULE II. 



Conditional Contrband. 

Foodstuffs (excepting fish) ; 
Forage and feeding-stuffs for animals ; 

Clothing, fabrics for clothing, and boots and shoes suitable 
for use in war; 

Gold and silver, in coin or bullion, Paper money ; 
. Vehicles of all kinds, other than motor vehicles, available for 
use in war, and their component parts; 

Vessels, craft and boats of all kinds ; floating docks, parts of 
docks, and their component parts ; 

Railway materials, both fixed and rolling stock, and materials 
for telegraphs, wireless telegraphs, and telephones; 

Fuel, other than mineral oils : Lubricants ; 

Powder and explosives not specially prepared for use in War ; 

Sulphur; 

Glycerine ; 

Horse-shoes and horse-shoeing materials ; 

Harness and saddlery ; 

Hides of all kinds, dry or wet, pig skins, raw or dressed ; 
leather, dressed or undressed, suitable for saddlery, harness or 
military boots ; 

Field-glasses, telescopes, chronometers, and all kinds of 
nautical instruments. 

Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
St. John s, this jyth day of November, A.D. 1914. 

By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 



The International Grenfell Association. 

King George the Fifth 
Seamen s Institute. 

St. John s, Newfoundland. 

Patron : His S^Lajesty The King. 

Men s Bedrooms can be booked at all hours ; night porter in 
in attendance. Single rooms 20 cts., and double rooms 35 cts. 
per night, including shower bath. 

Meals are served in Restaurant at moderate prices. 

Billiards, Pool, Bowling Alley and Swimming Pool. 

Library of 2,000 well selected books. 

Reading Rooms, and Writing Tables provided with stationery 
without charge. 

Lectures and Entertainments in the Grenfell Hall. 

Girls Department, separate entrance, in charge 
of a matron and controlled by a Ladies Auxiliary Committee, 
$3.00 board and lodging per week ; baths free. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 18. 



ctte Commander Karv>ey, R. fl. 



iNE of the most remarkable aspects of the present 
war in Europe is the attention that is being given 
to the British soldiers aiid sailors. All the com 
ment of the foreign press, except the German, 
eulogises the pride of race, gallantry and pluck 
of the British forces. Even the German official 
reports of the land and sea fighting bear testimony 
to the fighting skill and pluck of the English. 
The men are always alert, and absolutely and 
under all circumstances devoid of fear. Where 
duty calls them, the English forces will be found 
prepared to fight until the last. This glorious 
character is shared by the whole British race and 
it is shown by many gallant feats on sea and land 
that Newfoundlanders are as brave as any other 
sons of the Empire. The late Lieut-Commander 
Harvey, R.N., of H.M.S. Cressy, which was destroyed in the 
North Sea by a German submarine, gave a splendid example of 





THE LATE LIEUT.-COMMANDER BERNARD M. HARVEY, R.N. 

the way a Newfoundlander can meet death. There was a larger 
loss of life on the Cressy than on her sister ships. This was due 
to the self sacrifice of the Cresty s men. Lieut.-Com Harvey 
was authorised by the Captain to get the boats away to rescue 
the crews of the other ships, and he personally supervised this 
work. When the Cressy was herself struck, her boats were all 
away. Lieut.-Com. Harvey remained at his post until his ship 
sank. When precipitated into the water he helped to cheer those 
about him, until his strength failed and he sank to a sailor s grave 
in company with many other gallant British gentlemen who will be 
long remembered as having done their duty for England and 
manfully died at their posts. Well may (he poet say to them 



" Your ashes o er the North Sea s waves were scattered 

But hold a fire more hut than flesh of ours ; 
. The stainless flag, that flutters, frayed and tattered, 

Shall wave, and wave, like Spring s immortal flowers. 
You die, but in your death life grows intenser ; 

You shall not know the shame of growing old ; 
In endless joy you wave the holy censer, 

And blow the trumpet, tho your lips are cold. 
Life is to us a mist of intimations ; 

Death is a flood that shows us where we trod ; 
You, following nobly for the righteous nations, 

Reveal the unknown, the unhoped for, face of God. 

After long toil your labours shall not perish ; 

Through grateful generations yet to come, 
Your ardent gesture, dying, love shall cherish, 

As like a beacon you shall guide us home." 

Lieut.-Commander Bernard Matheson Harvey, R.N. was 
born at "Omrac," St. John s, Nfld., on the 4th July, 1882, and 
was the youngest son, but one, of the late Hon. A. W. Harvey 
and brother of the Hon. John Harvey of St. John s. His youth 
w.is spent in Newfoundland. Being fond of out-door sports and 
having an affable disposition, he was popular with his school 
mates and acquaintances. There is a tradition in Europe that 
England s naval and military heroes are developed on English 
playing fields. Commander Harvey s career appears to indicate 
that the play-fields of Newfoundland can also develop heroes. 
The present war promises to plainly show that. Young Bernard 
Harvey attended Bishop Feild College, where he was pre 
pared for H.M.S. Britannia by Dr. Lloyd. He passed direct 
into the Britannia in 1896, and obtained his Naval Cadetship 
in 1898. He served in H.M.S. Flora in South American waters. 
Then he became Sub-Lieutenant in H.M.S. Charybdis during 
her Commission in Newfoundland under Commodore 
Montgomery. He was promoted in 1903 to Lieutenant and 
Commanded the destroyer Foyle in 1910. The same year he 
married Miss Wood, daughter of Sir Josiah Wood, Governor of 
New Brunswick. He lost the sight of one eye in 1911 in an 
accident but, notwithstanding that this handicap was likely to 
affect promotion, he determined to hold to his profession. In 
1912 he was appointed to H.M.S. Cressy with rank of Lieut.- 
Commander. 

The Cressy, a cruiser of 12,000 tons, sailed from Chatham, 
England, under sealed orders, fully manned on August 5th 
1914. immediately upon the outbreak of hostilities. Lieut.- 
Commander Harvey was second in command of her as well as 
filling the offices of censor, signal officer arH wireless officer 
Unceasing vigilance was observed on board. From dusk till 
dawn no light showed outside the ship, the decks being kept in 
absolute darkness. Every gun and all searchlights were kept 
ready to turn on Torpedo craft. Machine guns and rifles 
always prepared for use at a moment s notice, the former more 
especially for Torpedo and aerial craft, and the smaller guns 
for Submarines. Under date of September 7 th, in one of his 
last letters home he wrote : \Ve don t expect in this ship to get 
into the final mig hty battle, but we shan t be very far behind and 
expe< t to get some scrapping in somewhere " On the 
raormng of the 22 nd September the three cruisers Aboukir, 
Hague, and Cressy being together, the first named -as observed 

oTtomeT T PS ^K 11 " 6 reCdVed 3 b OW dther from - 3 
or torpedo. It was thought to be a mine; but as the ffo* ue 

was seen to have been struck almost immediately afterwards 
the Cressy recogmsed the presence of submarines Her boats 

een Tnd fired rTT h ^ "" m The -bmarL wa 
fired at by the Cressy and thought to have been hit 





Thus perished a brave British sailor 
Newfoundlander doing duty for his country in 










THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. IQ. 



N^-W^-vx 

Compliments 

Or the 

Season 





We Extend to Our Numerous Customers 
Our Heartiest \A/ishes for a 

Rigbt merrp Xmas 

and a ftappp Dcio 

Our preparations for Xmas, in spite of the troublesome times, are as elaborate as ever. 
Huge Stocks of Beautiful Xmas Supplies are making their appearance in all departments. 

Toys, Dolls, Leather Goods, Purses, Bags, Dressing Cases, Manicure Sets, Albums, 
Collar Boxes, Gloves, Furs, Handkerchiefs, Mufflers, Pipes, Cigar and Cigarette Cases, 
Pouches, Silverware, Cut Glass, Furniture and Gramophones. 

Everything marked at our usual- lowest-in-the-city Prices. 

THE ROYAL STORES, LTD. 




PROCLAMATION 



W. E. DAVIDSON, 
Governor, 

[L.S.] 



By His Excellency SIR WALTER E. DAVIDSON, 
Knight Commander of the Most Distingu 
ished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief, in and 
over the Island of Newfoundland and its 
Dependencies. 

WHEREAS by the 255th Section of " Customs Act, 1898," 
it is enacted that the Governor in Council may prohibit 
the exportation or carriage coastwise of the following goods : 

Arms, ammunition" and gunpowder, military and naval stores 
and any articles which he, by and with the advice aforesaid, 
deems capable of being converted into or made useful in increas 
ing Ihe quantity of military or naval stores, or for purposes of 
hostility, or destruction in War, provisions, or any sort of vic 
tual which may be used as food for man : 

And whereas I, by and with the advice of my Council, deem 
it expedient and necessary that I should exercise such power 
of prohibition in manner hereinafter appearing; 

Now I, by and with the advice aforesaid, do hereby, from and 
after the date hereof, prohibit the exportation, except to British 
ports, of Rubber Graphite, suitable for the manufacture of 
crucibles. 

And further I, by and with the advice aforesaid, do hereby, 
from and after the date hereof, prohibit the exportation to alii 
Foreign ports in Europe and on the Mediterranean and Black 
Sea, with the exception of those of France, Russia (except the 
Baltic ports) Spain and Portugal, of the following articles : 

Food stuffs (excepting fish), for men, and feeding stuffs for 
animals, and all raw materials for the same; 

Gold and silver, in coin and bullion, paper money; 

Accessories and articles recognizable as intended for use with 
balloons and flying machines ; 

Motors of all kinds ; 

Motor Tyres ; 

Wollen Sheep Skins. 

Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
Saint John s, this iyth day of November, A.D., 1914. 
By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 




first Newfoundland Regiment. 



CALL FOR RECRUITS. 



Your King and Country Need You ! 

Will You Answer Your Country s Call ? 



AT this very moment the Empire is engaged in the greatest 
War in the history of the world. In this crisis your Country calls 
en her young men to rally round Her Flag and enlist in the 
ranks of Her Army. 

If every patriotic young man answers Her Call Great Britain 
and the Empire will emerge stronger and more united than 
ever. 

Newfoundland has already equipped and sent to- the front her 
First Contingent, 540 strong. But we must not stop at this. 
Further drafts are urgently needed to reinforce our numbers on 
the battle line, and must be sent forward at the earliest possible 
moment. 

Suitable Recruits between the ages of 19 and 36 will be ac 
cepted and trained in drill and shooting so as to fit them for 
military service. They will then be formed into regular Compa 
nies of the Regiment, and will be given the option of volunteer 
ing for service abroad, if required, on the same terms and con 
ditions as the men of the First Contingent. Pay will commence 
when the men are actually enrolled for service abroad. 

Recruiting Offices will be opened in St. John s and the offices 
of the different Magistrates, and at the other suitable places in 
the Colony, (as to Recruiting in case of doubt write to the Re 
cruiting Officer, St. John s). Where not less than fifty men 
offer for enlistment at any recruiting centre a drill instructor 
will, if possible, be sent to the District to train them. 

Men of the Ancient and Loyal Colony, Show Your Loyalty 
NOW. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



When writing to Advertisers kinly mtntion "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 20. 



A FEW HINTS 

Regarding Tire Danger 

DON T use coal or gas Stoves or Heaters unless securely set on 
stone, concrete or metal; all woodwork near stoves or 
pipes must be well protected. Gas Stoves on metal-clad 
wood or with flexible pipes are objectionable. 

DON T put Asbes in wooden boxes or barrels ; use on\j metal 
ash cans. 

DON T have Steam-pipes n contact with woodwork or near 
inflammable materials, and don t permit rubbish to accu 
mulate behind radiators or steam coils. 

DON T hang clothes or drapery near open Fires or Stoves, or 
on Store-pipes or Steam-pipes. 

DON T permit loose-jointed Gas Brackets, which can be swung 
against woodwork or curtains, or Gas Brackets without 
wire screens or globes if inflammable materials are near. 

DON T destroy the insolation on flexible electric light or fan 
cords by hanging them on hooks or [.ails. 

DON T fail to keep Lamps filled and wicks trimmed; with the 
oil low, explosive gas may be generated ; but in no case 
fill the lamps after dark. 

DON T permit Benzine, Gasoline or Explosives on your pre 
mises unless used from approved safety cans. 

DON T throw oily waste or rags on the floor ; keep them in 
approved self-closing cans during the day and at night 
remove from the building they are self-igniting. 

DON T mix greasy or oily rags with papers or with clean 
clippings, or keep more clippings in your place (even if 
clean and in bales), than is unavoidable. 

DON T use sawdust on floors or in spitoons. or to catch oil 
drippings from machines or gearing. Sand is safe. 

DON T keep Matches loose in paper boxes, but only in metal or 
earthen safes. Those lighting on the box are safest. 

DON T throw away lighted cigars, cigarettes, or matches. 

DON T permit your employees to Smoke. Don t permit any 
one to Smoke in a Garage ; or if combustible materials 
are kept on the premises. 

DON T store gasolene in a Garage or fill cars from open 
vessels. 

DON T fail to have fire-pails filled, distributed and placed in 
conformity to Rules of local Boards of Fire Underwriters. 
JNT fail to test periodically your ho-e anrl fire appliances. 

DON T permit Stairs or Hallways to be b ocked up or used for 
storage, or permit, packing materials -md rubbish to accu 
mulate and remain on )ou r premises; packing materials 
must be kept in approved mtal-lined bins. 

DON T fail to close at night all doors and traps to Elevators 
Hoistways, Stairs and Communications, as well as Iron 
Shutters. 

DON T forget that Neglect and Carelessness are the cause of 
more fires than all other things. 

And above all things keep your Matches where children cannot get at them 

JOHN SULLIVAN, 

Inspector General of Constabulary, 

and Chief of Fire Department. 



Parlor, Dining and 
Office Furniture. 



Venetian Blinds 
Made to Order. 

J, T. MARTIN, ,* 

MORTICIAN, 

Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer, 

38 New Cower Street. 

Repairing Furniture a Specialty. 




Published by Authority. 

His Excellency the Governor in Council has 
been pleased to direct that the following Order 
of His Majesty the King in Council, No. 2, 1914, 
passed on the 29th day of October last, repealing 
the Order in Council of date the 20th day of 
August last, with respect to the Declaration of 
London, shall come into effect as from the date 
thereof. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 

Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
November 17th, iJ4. 



1. During the present hostilities the provisions of the Declar 
ation of London shall, subject to the exclusion of the list of con 
traband and non-contraband and to the modifications hereinafter 
set out, be adopted and put in force by His Majesty s Govern 
ment. The modifications are as follows : 

( i) A neutral vessel, with papers indicating a neutral destin 
ation, which, notwithstanding the destination shown on 
the papers, proceeds to an enemy port, shall be liable to 
capture and condemnation if she is encountered before 
the end of her next voyage. 

(2) The destination referred to in Article 35 ot the said Dec 

laration shall (in addition to the presumptions laid down 
in Article 34) be presumed to exist if the goods are con 
signed to or for an Agent of the enemy State. 

(3) Notwithstanding the provisions of Article 35 of the said 

Declaration, conditional contraband shall be liable to 
capture on board a vessel bound for a neutral port if the 
goods are consigned to order," or if the ship s papers 
do not show who is the consignee of the goods, or if they 
show a consignee of the goods in territory belonging to 
or occupied by the enemy. 

(4) In the cases covered by the preceeding paragraph three, 

it shall be upon the owners of the goods to provide that 
their destination was innocent. 

2. Where it is shown to the satisfaction of one of His 
Majesty s Principal Secretaries of State that the enemy govern 
ment is drawing supplies for its armed forces from or through a 
neutral country, he may direct that in respect of ships bound for 
a port in that country, Article 35 of the said declaration shall 
not apply. Such direction shall be notified in the London 
GAZETTE, and shall operate until the same is withdrawn. So long 
as such dtrection is in force, a vessel which is carrying condi 
:ional contraband to a port in that country shall not be immune 
from capture. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 21. 



Bowring Brothers, Limited, Coastal Service. 



S.S. "PORTIA/ WESTERN ROUTE, 

Calls at the following places : Cape Broyle, Ferry- 
land, Fermeuse, Renews, Trepassey, St. Mary s, 
Salmonier, Placentia, Marystown, Burin, St. Law 
rence, Lamaline, Fortune, Grand Bank, Belleoram, 
St. Jacques, Harbor Breton, Pass Island, Her 
mitage, Gaultois, Pushthrough, Richard s Harbor, 
Rencontre (W.), Francois, Cape LaHune, Ramea, 
Burgeo, Rose Blanche, Channel, Bay of Islands, 
Bonne Bay. 



S.S. "PROSPERO," NORTHERN ROUTE, 

Call at the following places : Bay-de-Verde, Old 
Perl ican, Trinity, Catalina, Bonavista, Salvage, 
King s Cove, Greenspond, Pool s Island, Wesley- 
vine, Seldom-Come- By, Fogo, Change Islands, 
Herring Neck, Twillingate, Moreton s Harbor, 
Exploits, Fortune Harbor, Leading Tickles, 
Pilley s Island, Little Bay Island, Little Bay, 
Nipper s Harbor, Tilt Cove, LaScie, Pacquet, 
Bale Verte, Coachman s Cove, Seal Cove, Bear 
Cove, Western Cove, Jackson s Arm, Englee, 
Conche, St. Julien, St. Anthony, Griguet, Quirpon 
and Battle Harbor. 



We are now booking Round Trip Passages per steamers Prospers and Portia, at $18.50. Finest and cheapest trip obtainable. 
Freight and Passage to all points. Booklets and further information can be obtained at Coastal Office of 

BOWRING BROTHERS, LIMITED. 



Biscuits! 
Biscuits! 

BROWNING S 

BISCUITS, 

Finest and Largest Selection 
in the Country *g 
FOR CHRISTMAS TRADE. 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 




Co., Ltd., 



_ 

Of LONDON, ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Subscribed Capital over $15,000,000.00 

Accumulated Funds over $75,000,000.00 

Place your business with us, the premier Company 
in Newfoundland. 

Lowest Current Rates of Premiums. 

. & G. RENDELL, St. John s, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



BOUNDER S 



DIRECT REVERSIBLE 

Crude Oil Engines. 

First in 1893 Foremost in 19 J4 

These Engines are at present being used by the British Admiralty in Boats for the transport 
of large Guns, Ammunition, and Stores, also in Oil Tankers, and for Scouting and other work. 

These Engines are built in sizes from 5 B.H.P. up to 320 B.H.P., and consequently are suitable 
for all kinds of vessels from the small Fishing Boat up to the Cargo and Passenger Boat of 2,000 Tons. 

BOLINDERS are also the largest Manufacturers in the World of- 

Stationery Oil Engines of all kinds, 
Sawmill Machinery, 

Woodworking Machinery, 

Heating and Cooking Stoves, 

Engineering specialties in general. 

ALEX. McDOUGALL, ** McBride s Cove, ^ St. John s, N.R 



Telegrams: " McDOtGALL," St. John s. 



P. O. Box 845. 



Telephone 18O. 



When writing to Advertisers kinly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 1 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 22. 



" 



Potomac s" 3Hp to tfte 



By 0. C. Gould, 

jOMEHOW it seems to a visitor that Newfound 
land is in the very centre of the world of unusual 
maratime events. It may be only a question of 
perspective, combined with the colony s sentinel- 
like station beside the trans- Atlantic pathway; 
but there has been a remarkably interesting series 
of disasters and adventures in the waters here 
about. When some of these incidents were first 
related to me, I little thought to ever be a party 
to any adventure of the sea, least of all one 
including with the perils of the deep the fascina 
tion and uncertainty of the ice-fields. However 
my turn came : and the exherience of the United 
States str. Potomac may well be sketched to take 
its place in Newfoundland history. 

The commander of the Potomac, one of the 
largest and most powerful tugs in the American Navy, ordered 





THE UNITED STATES STR. " POTOMAC" IN THE ICE 

OFF ST. JOHN S BAY, ON MAY 22ND. 

her crew to leave her and procted to shore while the vessel lay, 
on February i4th, 1914, about four miles off the mouth of Bonne 
Bay. As the crew left the vesstl a southeast gale was threaten 
ing; soon after the arrival of the crew on shore the Potomac, in 
a blizzardy blanket, had been borne into the uncertainty of the 
Gulf with no human hand to guide her. 

Now, I had a " hunch " (to use American slang) that the 
Potomac was not destined to be lost, to which 1 gave implicit 
belief. Upon my arrival at Bonne Bay, I reported to my 
Department that the vessel probably could be saved, a view in 
which at the time I found no local agreement, and within ten 
days, based upon my report and quite unexpectedly. I was assign 
ed the whole problem of bringing her safely from the ice. 

Almost at once the plan was evolved. It is needless to re 
view for Newfoundland readers the various possible contingen 
cies for which proper foresight had to make provision. In 
general, the expedition fell into three divisions: (ist) the em 
ployment of crews to board and look after the Potomac; (2nd) 
the carrying of a cargo of coal to refill the nearly empty bunkers 
of the tug (done by means of the schr. Bessie Jennex) ; and 
(3rd) the provision of a powered vessel to render assistance if 
the Potomac s engines should be found disabled by frost or in 



Bay of Islands. 

case of accident later (a task given to the steam trawler Wren} 

The party sent to the Potomac was divided into two groups 
under separate leaders -one for shore and the other for boat 
dutv One group arrived at and boarded the steamer when she 
blew inshore to Port Saunders bight after spending the 
half of March far out at sea in the Gulf. This group had hardly 
gotten aboard when the tug blew off into the Gulf again, 
other group reached her in Bay St. John s, during the next week, 
with emergency pumps and supplies. Both groups did excelleni 
work during the month and a half after their advent while await 
ing the arrival of the coal. The time was utilized in bunkering 
the Potomac with wood (by dog-teams from distances so great as 
20 miles), in thawing the vessel out inside, and in collecting an 
emergency supply of coal at Port au Choix as a reserve in case 
of misfortune to the schr. Bessie Jennex and her precious cargo. 
In this work the services of Mr. G. \V. Wilton, of Bonne Bay, 
were indispensable. He knew everyone along the coast, from 
French Shore times when he had endeavored to operate lobster 
factories in St. John s Bay. Much praise must be given to the 
Canadian light house keeper at Ferolle Point (Mr. Damase 
Beaudoin) whose komatik and dogs frequently arrived from the 
shore and who, in every storm, kept the safety of our party 
uppermost in his mind. Knowing his thoughts, there was a 
restful assurance after May ist in the steady wink-wink-wink- 
wink-pause of his powerful bacon through the nights. 

It will be readily understood that at the beginning of March 
the task of obtaining a steamer to proceed into the Gulf of St. 
Law rence was not easy. Most of the ice-breakers were reserved 
for the seal fishery and despite tempting offers in case larger 
ihan the subsequent trip of seals none could be secured. 
Further, owners were not anxious to risk crafts in the Gulf when 
insurance was refused. However, early in March the s.s. H roi 
was chartered, leaving Halifax later that month to join the 
expedition. 

She was ordered on April 28th to proceed from Port aux 
Basques to Bonne Bay. The manner in which she crept "do.vn" 
the shr re inside of the ice to Bonne Bay was remarkable, as well 
as her run, also inside ihe ice, from Bonne Bay (then still frozen) 
to Port au Choix (open). More than once, I am told, there was 
little hope of escape but each time the doughty crew of the craft 
brought her through safely. Many who had " been to the ice " 
predicted that the Wren would surely be lost or seriously 
damaged, so it was a satisfaction when the task was done to 
know that she was still whole and sound. 

While the opportunity did not present itself that would render 
the service of the ll icti invaluable, it was always possible and 
not unlikely. For this reason, the presence of the Wren was a 
considerable assurance. 

By the twentieth of March, the old schr. Bessie Jennex. veteran 
of a number of trips to the ice for seals, was fitted, sheathed 
and loaded. Her cargo was coal and sufficient supplies to serve 
all three branches of the expedition. Because of her valuable 
cargo, I elected to go in her myself. A large enough crew was 




MEN ON THE "RAMS" OF THE SCHR. "BESSIE JENNEX" 
FORCING A WAY THROUGH THE ICE. 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 23. 




Published by Authority. 

Under the provisions of " The Stamp Acts, 1898-1914," the 
following Rules and Regulations, respecting Stamp Duties, in 
substitution for those of date September i 5 th, 1914, have been 
approved by His Excellency the Governor in Council. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary . 

Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
October 6th, 1914. 



i. Every instrument shall be stamped on its face, when 
possible. 

2. Cancellation of Stamps shall be made by the person can 
celling, writing, printing or perforating his name or initials with 
date across Stamp. 

3. Bills of Exchange, Cheques, Promissory Notes, Bills of 
Lading, Shipping Receipts and Charter Parties, shall be stamped 
and the Stamps thereon cancelled as follows : 

(a) Bills of Exchange, Cheques, and Promissory Notes drawn 
or made in the Colony by the person signing the same ; pro 
vided that in the case of a cheque on a Banker, the Banker 
to whom it is presented may, if it is unstamped, stamp 
the same and cancel the stamp. 

(b) Bills of Exchange, Cheques and Promissory Notes drawn 
or made outside the Colony by the person in the Colony 
into whose hands any such bill, cheque or note shall come 
unstamped before he in any manner negotiates or pays the 
same. 

(c) Bills of Lading executed outside the Colony by the 
consignee in the Colony into whose hands any such Bill of 
Lading may come before he in any manner negotiates the 
same. 

(d) Bills of Lading executed in the Colony by the shipper. 
Provided that if any Bill of Lading is presented to any 
person or Company for signature unstamped, such person 
or Company may stamp the same and cancel the stamp. 

(e) Shipping Receipts by the shipper. Provided that if any 
Shipping Receipt is presented to any person or Company 
for signature unstamped, such person or Company may 
stamp the fame and cancel the stamp. 

(f) Charter Parties by the person in the Colony last executing 
the same. 

(g) Charter Parties excuted wholly outside the Colony by 
the person in the Colony into whose hands any such 
Charter Party comes unstamped before he in any manner 
uses or takes any action upon such Charter Party. 

4. The person upon whom the obligation to stamp and cancel 
any instrument is imposed by these Rules shall be deemed to 
be a person issuing an instrument, and, if he fails to stamp such 
instrument with its proper stamp, or to cancel such stamp, he 
shall be liable to the penalties imposed by Section 22 of the 
Act 6 1 Victoria, Cap. 14, entitled -An Act respecting the 
Payment of Certain Fees and Charges by Stamps." 

5. Any Rules and Regulations which may have been hereto 
fore made under the provisions of The Stamp Acts, 1898- 
1914," are hereby rescinded. 

NOTE: Copies of " The Stamp Act " and of the foregoing 
es and Regulations may be obtained from the Banks, the 

the Stipendiary Magistrates, the Departments of Justice, 

Finance and Customs, or the Colonial Secretary. 



SEASONABLE GOODS 

Turkeys, Chicken, 

Geese, Ducks. 

Citron, Orange and Lemon Peel, 
Table Raisins. 

Genuine Irish Hams and 
Bacon, Irish Pigs Heads. 



Phone 4O. 



J. D. RYAN, 281 Water St. 

^ ^^^^^^^^~ f ^- f ^^^^ ^^^^^-^^^^^^ 

D)rs. fl. mitcbcll, 

Cadics Outfitter. 



Mantles, Millinery, Hosiery, 
Dress Goods, Gloves, Laces, 
and Trimmings of all kinds. 



In Stock: 

English and American \Silk Blouses, 
Underwear and Novelties. 




Notice to Planners! 



NEWFOUNDLAND. (No. n, 1914.) 



IRON ISLAND, 

Off Eastern Entrance to Burin Harbour, Placentia Bay. 
Re-Establishment of Light. 

Latitude 47* 02 40" North. 
Longitude 55 06 50" West. 

NOTICE is hereby given that a Fixed Red Light on Iron 
Island, discontinued as per Notice to Mariners, No. i, 
1914, dated February 2oth, 1914, is now reestablished. 

A. W. PICCOTT, Minister Marine & Fisheries. 
Depart. Marine & Fisheries, St. John s, Nfld., Sept., 5, 1914. 



When writing to Ad/ertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 24. 



signed to permit giving sufficient men later for a full comple 
ment for the Potomac. And what a crew for a schooner ! As 
" purser " was signed Augustus Tulk, second engineer of the 
Bruce, who joined us to get money for his schooling for a chief s 
ticket in Glasgow. He was a pleasant and resourceful man, 
who deserves great praise for the manner he engineered the 
Potomac alone on her long trip to New York. Then we had 
ice-pilots, an oiler, a fireman, a trimmer, etc. an "all-star" 
crew. 

Fitted, loaded and manned the Bessie Jennex lay in Channel 
for weeks awaiting easterlies to open a passage around Cape St. 
George. This period was enlivened by continual discussions, 
with divided opinions, with the wiseacres of the port as to the 
possibilitv of reaching the Potomac and delivering the cargo of 
coal, as well as in speculation, more unfavorable than otherwise, 
as to the situation and chances of the Potomac. We interrupted 




THE s.s. "WREN" STOPPED BY HEAVY ICE 

IN ST. JOHN S BAY. 

these discussions with periodic, but unsuccessful, attempts to 
be gone, and finally, just after Easter, the Bessie Jennex put to 
sea to stay. 

Anyone who has been into the ice-fields will realize how 
exciting this voyage was for me. There were magnificent 
Northern Lights " and gloriously colored sunrises and sunsets 
appparently possible in the same degree only over ice-fields. 
We had plenty of rough weather and plenty of ice. We ran 
close to herds of seals so numerous as to tempt us to abandon 
our trip temporarily to secure and take back a deck-load. 

Our primary objective was the lighthouse at Roche Harbor 
because it is an international signal code station, and because we 
knew beforehand the cordial assistance that its keeper Wm 
Young, would render. By his energy and hospitality he won a 
fine place for himself in the opinion of the Potomac s naval con 
tingent. In spite of the unusual features of the trip to interest 
a newcomer like myself the voyage to Roche Harbor was not 
Itogether pleasant or without emergencies and times of great 
risk. With a smaller or less skilful crew we might easily have 
all been lost. There is a great difference in going to the ice to 
reach a definite port in the narrowing funnel of the Straits and 
in going to the ice merely to obtain a load of seals. However 
Providence was with us, and even though we did zig-zag about 
considerably to regions as distant as the island of Anticosti we 
made Roche Harbor light within eight days. 

Shortly after reaching the entrance to Bonne Bay the Bessie 
Jennex was " hove out" something we considered remarkable 
in view of her heavy cargo and remained for several days 
jammed in this way. When we once got her into open water 



again on May 3rd it was but little more than a steady day s 
going to within sight of the Potomac. 

From our arrival there, with coal at hand, we played a waiting 
g.une through twenty days of May. Luckily, when the break 
came on the late Queen s anniversary we had plenty of coal 
transferred from the schooner to the Potomac and banked fires. 
Without banked fires on that eventful Sunday (which were war 
ranted only by the assurance of ample coals on board, and which 
gave us power in a hurry) the Potomac would likely now be 
ornamenting Old Boy Shoal. You can see, therefore, why I 
hold in high esteem the men who worked like heroes to move 
that coal. 

The ice over which the transfer had been made was honey- 
corned , treacherous and uneven. The crude sleds, made aboard 
the Bessie Jennex and shoed with sheet brass aboard the Potmac, 
on which the coal was moved were real curiosities, but labor sav 
ing devices of doubtful efficiency. A fog throughout the period 
of transferring cargo made all fearful lest men go astray, ob 
scured the lay of the ice and hid each vessel from the other. 
Only men well used to the ice could have transferred the cargo. 

With the escape of the Potomac from St. John s Bay the ex 
citement was practically over, though we did run into a heavy 
storm off Louisburg whose wreckage marked most of the remain 
der of our trip to New York. At last, on June gth, at Brooklyn 
Navy Yard, the same contingent, man for man, which had left 
the tug off Roche Harbor, rejoined her. 

Such is the tale ! I hope yet to have again for mate and crew, 
respectively, men like Captain " Xed" Seeley and the sturdy 
boys from Channel who stuck faithfully to the very end of the 
task. I believe they all were sorry to see the adventure closed, 
even, as it was, successfully. 

Mention should be made before closing of the co-operation of 
Messrs. M. Pike, M. Jenkins, M. J. McEvoy and Wm. Garland, 
of the Customs Service, and of Messrs. Smart, and A. and C. 
Read, of the Postal Telegraphs, in particular, whose assistance 
was greatly appreciated. 

There were enough interesting details which space crowds 
from this account to provide a dozen romantic sketches ; but 
this brief narrative will, I hope, insure the remembrance of an 
unusual incident. 





FROM "BARREL" TO SHEATHING ; H E 
ESKIMO OF THE SEAS SCHR. " BESSIE 
JENNEX" SAILING THROUGH .RACK IN 
- 




ree 



m ootn cases 



We give you three valuable 
Coupons with every package 
of Gems, Why not buy 
this package and save the 
Coupons, 




When you have saved or collected 
a number of the Coupons shown 
above, exchange them for one of 
the many Valuable Premiums we 
are giving, free of all costs. 

In ootn cases 

F, 



ree 



A post card to our Premium Department 
will bring you a Circular giving full particu 
lars of this talking machine. 





THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 26. 

Kovo Heroes Die, or dlfte tragedy of tfte Seat Hunt. 

March 31st, April 1st and 2nd. (By I. C. Morris. I 



FAR out on Arctic ice, and frozen sheet. 
And open to the storm and blinding sleet, 
forth the Vikings of our sealing fleet, 

To dare and toi?. 

Their fathers long before them did the same, 
And sought for bread but nothing knew of fame 
As in the Arctir chase, they played the game, 

Of fearless men.. 

Theirs was the hunt, and theirs the Arctic prize, 
Where bergs float by, neath sulfea northern skies, 
And where tke &torm King human skill defies, 

And rules supreme^ 

Not theirs to> haft, nor turn when dangers loom, 
And rafting ice portends impending doom, 
Which may for them, mean lonely, icy tomb, 

Om northern floe. 

But. though, sctch dangers stand so thick aroundV 
Our sealers are ia thousands ready found, 
To face them all, and earn an honest pound,. 

For those at home. 

Tis love alone, impels such daring deeds. 
When duty calls to meet the household needs, 
And "-home, sweet home," far e\:er to them pleads, 

Foi their support. 

And so our sons went forth some months ago.. 
To tramp the ice, and travel mrd the snow, 
And then return, to, ship with seals in tow, 

To rest awhile. 

And then renew the htmt from day to- day, 
Until the captain from the bridge should say, 
u Enough My lads, so now for home away." 

"To land the catch." 

But in the chase a sudden storm came on. 

And one brave crew, who from their ship had gone, 

Fell victims to its power, till one by one, 

Near four score died. 

For forty hoars they wandered on the floe. 
And sought their ship amid the blinding snow, 
But met defeat whatever course they d go, 

And so gave up. 

They fought for life for life to all is sweet, 
They hoped to make their ship, and comrades greet, 
And warm themselves, and thaw their frozen feet, 

And join the c:ew. 



But all things failed, there was no earthly hope; 
But in their dismal hour their faith looked up, 
While e en they drank to dregs their bitter cup, 

Amid the gloom. 

But they were brave, and died as heroes die, 

And mid the snow-drift made their prayer on high, 

To Him who hears when e er His children cry, 

For help and grace. 

For they had faith, a faith which failed them not, 
And hope in life beyond they ne er forgot, 
Ne er failed their faith in little nor in jot, 

In those lone hours. 

Some sang the hymns which they had sung at home, 
Before they left the treacherous ice to roam, 
And which they often sang on ocean s foam, 

On summer sea. 

And all in turn knelt down a prayer to say, 

Ere they should breathe their last and pass away, 

From darkness, ice, and frost, to brighter day, 

And home beyond. 

Some blessed themselves, and made the holy sign, 
Which often they had made near sacred shrine, 
And then their souls into God s hands resign, 

In perfect peace. 

And as they prayed, they fell upon the floe 
No more to rise, nor with their comrades go, 
But there to die amid the ice and snow, 

Out on the sea. 

And one young lad, benumbed, in his distress, 

Amid the darkness and the loneliness, 

Tried hard his hand to raise, himself to bless, 

Ere he should die. 

His arm was stiff, and frozen as if dead, 

He therefore to his comrade faintly said. 

" Lift up mine arm to my poor aching head," 

Myself to bless. 

The comrade raised his arm with tenderness, 
And helped him ere he died, himself to bless, 
Then when the Angel called he answered yes, 

And all was peace. 

Thus died our heroes on the northern floe, 
Thus perished they amid the Arctic snow, 
Far from the world of noise, and pomp and show. 

They breathed their last. 

With them the voyage is o er, and they have done, 
With earthly care, and toil beneath the sun, 
They fought their fight, and have their victory won, 

At duty s post. 




Halifax and City Hockey Teams, 1914 

Back Row: F. C. Brien (C), H. Anderson 
(H), \V. D. Brennan (H). H. J. Bren- 
nan (H. Manager), \V. I. Higgins (Re 
feree), J. M. Tobin (Secretary), W. 
Hutchings (C), E. S. Pinsent (C), 
J. G. Higgins 

Second Row : J. Whebby (H), F. Reardon 
|H>. S. McKenzie (H), S. Cogswell 
(H), C. Patterson (H), Gus Herder 
(C), I C. Parsons (C), R. Shortall (C), 
C. S. Strong ( ( 

nit Row: P. McDonald I Hi, C Rear 
don (H), T. Winter \. Hunt(C). 
Absent L. Stick (C). 






- H. Pa 



Sons-. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 27. 





Gower Street. 



Dealer in 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, 

Veal, Pork and 

Poultry. 

Orders Called For and Delivered Free. 

Corned Beef, Vegetables 
and Fish a specialty. 





^ 
f 

J 

j> 

f 
I 

f 



A Dainty and Delicious 

SODA BISCUIT 

TIP TOP .* 
* # TIP TOP 



1 
fi 

4 



For your Biscuit Requirements ask 
for those manufactured by 



fl. fiarixp $ Co. 



Best Ingredients, 



Finest Grades. 

vftig^JrxgLVJXyXjXslVJ^J 

^ ^^j^r ^7ff/g?jyw ^j&tf* 




NOTICE. 



The attention of the Public is directed to the 
following Section of Cap. 39 of Consolidated 
Statutes dealing with "Nuisances and Municipal 
Regulations " : 

" Any person who shall throw any 

Stones or Ballast, 

or anything else hurtful or injurious, into any 
harbor or roadstead in this Colony or its Depend 
encies, shall, for every offence be liable to a penalty 
not exceeding 

Fifty Dollars, 

or imprisonment for a period not exceeding 

Fifty Days/ 

a. w. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
November, 191 4- 



Three Great Leaders: 

Gossage s Soaps, 
Texaco Kerosene, 

Fairbanks-Morse 
Motor Engines. 

GEO. M. BARR, Agent. 



Newfoundland 
Savings Bank. 

Established in 1834. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature. 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 ..... 1 1 1 1 1 * 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...... 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

DIRECTORS : 

Hon. George Skelton, M.D., 
Hon. John Harris, P.L.C., 

Hon. John B. Ayre, M.L.C. 

CASHIER : 

Hon. Robert Watson. 

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 ..... I I I I I I C I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I I 

Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate. 

BRANCHES : -Harbor Grace, Heart s Content, Bay Roberts, 
Bell Island, Grand Falls, Placentia 






When writing to Advertisers kinly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY 



28. 



Some WefC-Known Sayings, Pftrases and Words, 

Witn tneir ffleaning and Origin.- -Part VL 




By Arch. G. Gibb. 

7 E is at High Jinks. The present use of the phrase 
expresses the idea of uproarious fun and jollity. 

" The frolicsome company had begun to prac 
tise the ancient and now forgotten pastime of 
High Jinks. The game was played in several dif 
ferent ways. Most frequently the dice were thrown 
by the company, and those upon whom the lot fell 
were obliged to assume and maintain for a time a 
certain fictitious character, or to repeat a certain 
number of fescannine verses in a particular order. 
If they departed from the character assigned they 
incurred forfeits, which were compounded for by 
swallowing an additional bumper." - Sir W. Scott ; 
Guy Mannering. 

To Hob-nob together.^ To drink as cronies, to 
to clink glasses, to drink tete-a-tete. In old English 
houses there was a hob at each corner of the hearth for heating 
the beer, or holding what one wished to keep hot. This was 
from the verb battau (to hold). The little round table set at the 
elbow was called a nob ; hence to hob-nob was to drunk 
and cosily in the chimney-corner, with the beer hobbled, and a 
little nob-table set in the snuggery. 

Lick into shape. According to traddition the cubs of bears 
are cast shapeless, and remain so still the dam has licked them 
into proper form. 

" So watchful Bruin forms, with plastic care, 
Each growing lump, and brings it to a bear." Pope ; Duncia 
Like Hunt s dog, he would neither go to Church or stay at 
home. One Hunt, a labouring man in Shropshire, kept a mas 
tiff, which on being shut up while he went to church, howled 
and barked so terribly as to distract the whole congregation ; 
whereupon Hunt thought he would take the disturber with him 
the next Sunday, but on reaching the Churchyard the dog posit 
ively refused to enter. 

The proverb is applied to a tricky, self-willed person, who will 
neither be led or driven. 

A Pandora s Box. A present which seems valuable, but 
which in reality is a curse. According to the legend Midas was 
permitted, according to his request, to turn whatever he touched 
into gold, and turned his very food into gold and therefore un 
eatable. Prometheus made an image and stole fire from heaven 
to endow it with life. In revenge Jupiter told Vulcan to make 
a female statue and gave her a box which she was to present to 
the man who married her. Prometheus distrusted Jove aid his 
gifts, but Epimetheus, his brother, married the beautiful Pandora, 
and received the box. Immedinely the bridegroom opened the 
box all the evils that flesh is heir to fl-w forth, and ever since 
continued to afflict the world. The list thing that flew from 
the box was Hope. 

Lilly of France (fleur de-lys.) The device of Clovis w.is 
three black toads, but an aged hermit of Joye-en-valle saw a mir 
aculous light stream one night into his cell and an angel appear 
ed to him holding a shield of wonderful beauty; its colonr was 
azure, and on it were embaxoned three gold lilies that shone 
like stars, which the hermit was commanded to give to Queen 
Clotilde. Scarcely had the angel vanished when Clotilde enter 
ed, and receiving the celestial shield, gave it to her royal hus 
band, whose arms were everywhere victorious. 

Long Words. Here are a few of the best-known " Jaw 
breakers." Antipericatametanaparbengedamphicribationes 

Toordicantium. One of the books in the library of St. Victor. 
Don Juan Nepomuceno de Burionagonatatorecagageazcolcha. 
An employee in the finance department of Madrid (1867). 
Drimtaidhvickhillichattann in the Isle of Mull, Argyleshire. 
Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyrndrobllllandyssiliagogogoch, 
the name of a village in Wales. In the postal directory the first 
twenty letters only, are given as a sufficient address for practical 
purposes, but the full name contains fifty nine letters. The 
meaning is " The Church of St. Mary in a hollow of white hazel, 






The Iliad m a nutshell.-^ tale of the siege of Troy, an 
epic poem by Homer in twenty-four books. Phny tells 
Cicero asserts that the whole Iliad was ^l*J^ 
parchment which might be put into a nutshell 
of New York engraved on a plate one eight of an inch square 
looo words. The Iliad contains 501,930 letters and would 
therefore occupy forty-two such plates engraved on t 
Huet has proved by experiment that a parchment 27 * 21 centi 
metres would contain the entire Iliad and such a parchment 
would go into a common-sized nut ; but Mr. Toppan s engrav 
ing would get the whole Iliad into half that size. 

Lang 5vw. In the olden time, in days gone by. " The song 
called Auld Lang Syne, usually attributed to Robert Burns was 
not composed by him, for he say expressly in a letter to J 
son" It is the old song of the olden times, which has nevei 
been in print. I took it down from an old man s singing 
another he says : " Light be the turf on the breast of the Heaver 
inspired poet who composed this glorious fragment. 
whatever is known of the author of the words; the composer i 
wholly unknown." That is Dr. Cobham Brewen s opinion, 
it is not universal. William Gunnyon in an edition of Burns, 
published in 1882 says (in referring to these letters): " 
probability is that the poet was indulging in a little mystif 
on the subject and that the entire song was his own composition 
The second and third verses describing the happy days of 
youth are his beyond a doubt. 

We two hae run about the braes 
And pu ed the gowans fine ; 

And we ve wondered mony a weary foot 
Sin auld lang syne ! 

We twa ha e paidle t i the bum 

Frae morning sun till dine ; 
But ssas between us braid hae roared 

Sin auld lang syne. 

This finishes for the present at least, the series of papers on 
Well-Known Sayings, etc. If they have proved as interesting 
to the readers of the QUARTERLY, as the compiling of them has 
been to the writer, then the labor has nol been in vain. 

As I mentioned in my first paper, that while those synonyms 
have been collected from various authorative sources, there may 
be, of course, equally plausible derivations. As the rubicund 
proprietor of the peep-show said to the child when he asked, 
" Please, Mr. Showman, which is Daniel and which is the Lion ? 
"Vichever you please, my little dear, you pays your money and 
you takes yer choice." 







The Newfoundland Quarterly 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 

Issued every third month about the I5th of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John s, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rales: 

Single Copies, each . . Io cents . 

One Year, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada . . . . ; 40 " 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) r o .. 

Advertising Rates 

S30.00 per page ; one-third of a page, $10.00; one-sixth of a par^, $5.00 
one-twelfth of a i>age, $2.i;o for each insertion. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 29. 



SAVE MONEY .* 

SHOPPING BY MAIL. 

At McMURDO S you can obtain all Medicines, 
Chemicals, Patent Preparations, Toilet Articles, 
Rubber Goods, and all goods carried by a first- 
class Drug Store, many of which cannot be pro 
cured at your local store for love or money. 
Send to us ! We have them ! We shall send 
them at once if you order them. 
Send Express or P. 0. Order, or Stamps. 

T. McMURDO & Co., 

Chemists since J823. 
Water Street and Military Road. 

Os^^ t 





?ire Insurance Companp 

FUNDS $60,000,000 

INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 

GEO. H. HALLEY, 



SGENT FOR INEWFOIINDLSND. 



P. 0. Box 236. 



Phone 522. 



SLATTERY S 

Wholesale Dry Goods. 
Full Stock Full Stock 

of of 

Regular Dry Goods Remnants & Seconds 



WAREROOMS : 

Slattery Building, 

Duckworth & George s Sts., St. John s, N.F. 





For the 

Christmas 
Season 

One needs to be Comfortably and Stylishly 
dressed. Make yourself a present of a 
Swell Overcoat, Suit, or 

Fancy Vest, and come to us to 
get it. We can " Suit" you down 
to the ground. 

W. P. SHORTALL, 

The American Tailor, 
300 Water Street, St. John s. P. 0. Box 445 




Extract from The Merchant 
Shipping Act Referring to 
the Naming of Ships. 

Regulations made by the Board of Trade, in con 
junction with the Commissioners of Customs, under 
Section 50 of the Merchant Shipping- Act, 1906. 

Under the provisions of Section 50 of the Mer 
chant Shipping Act, 1906, the Board of Trade, in 
conjunction with the Commissioners of Customs, 
hereby make the following Regulations relating to 
ships names, and direct that they shall come into 
force on ist January, 1908: 

1. Any person who proposes to make application 
for the Registry of a British Ship shall give notice 
in writing of the proposed name of the ship to the 
Registrar of Shipping at the intended Port of 
Registry at least fourteen days before the date on 
which it is contemplated to effect the registry. 

7. When it is proposed to register the ship at a 
port not situated in the British Islands, the Regis 
trar to whom the name is intimated may proceed 
with the registry of the ship if he satisfies himself 
that the name does not appear in the Current Mer 
cantile Navy List ; but if the name does so appear, 
the Registrar shall transmit the application to the 
Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen, and 
the case shall be treated in the manner laid down 
for registry in the British Islands. 

Department of Customs, 
November, 1914. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 



When, writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 






ttty garden in St. 



HAVE often heard it said in the outports that 
the winter is the most enjoyable time in New- 
foundland. Then the dogs can be harnessed to 
the sleds and tobogganing can be experienced. 
When the sun shines on the snow crystals hang 
ing on the branches of the trees and shrubs, or 
covering the hillsides, it often seems that dia 
monds and other sparkling gems are as plentiful 
as the sand grains on the sea beaches. But I 
prefer the summer time. Now, as Christmas 
quickly approaches, I am compelled to remain 
indoors. I am old, and the sea and fishing 
schooners are henceforth but memories for me, 

and my old bones and the Christmas weather sadly disagree. 
I have a porch in front of my little home in St. John s which 

opens out into the garden. I have my barometer and other 






thoughts 



stray into summer themes 



As 



out 



to the Golf Links. How lovely that scene is in May and 
Even to-day it presents a beautiful aspect as the snow _ cry=, a s 
sparkle on the ground and cover the bare brances of the 
with a superb lace-mantle of perfect whiteness 

I remember, in the Summer that has lately passed, how I 
used to walk into the Park each morning to see the new.y bud 
ding flowers the stocks, sweet william, the wall flowers, 
cosmos, centaurei, the frail sweet peas and nasturtiums, the 
bright campanulas, daisies and violets, the zinnias verbenas, 
sunflowers and gentle pansies, the forget-me-nots nestling amid 



FLOWERS IN BANNER.MAN PARK NEAR PARLIAMENT BUILDING. 

instruments hanging on the wall. All around the porch are 
shelves containing pots of various kinds with bulbs and flower 
ing-plants which, like their owner, like a warmer temperature 
than our Christmas climate, and dislike having to hibernate 
indoors. I at least have this advantage over them ; I can sit 
in the porch and look out of doors into the garden and, on 
sunny days, even go out a little among the snow-covered beds 
and see the frail shoots of my beautiful spring bulbs peeping out 
to catch the fleeting sunbeams the scarlet amaryllis, the blue 
iris, the gay ranunculus, the gladioli, the golden crocus and 
tulips, the brightly colored hyacinths and narcissus, the little 
ixias and freezias and the stately dahlias. What memories 
these plants recall ! Oh ! how I long for spring so that I may 
see the gladness of the flowers again ! Over in the little btd in 
the centre of the lawn are sleeping a multitude of bulbs that are 
only waiting for a genial sun to bring them to life and, when 
the trees regain their leaves and the birds commence to teach 
their young to sing, those dormant plants will bedeck themselves 
with all the colours of the summer rainbow and will not only 
bring me joy, but will delight the bees, the wasps, the lady-birds 
and countless butterflies and moths. But now at Christmas 
time, the garden is bare of colours and of all insect life ! 

I believe all our moods are influenced by the sunlight. I 
never feel well and happy when the winter clouds lie low in the 
skies and while snow-beds heavily mantle the land. My hap 
piest moments are in Spring and summer-time when the 
flower world is alive and the sun tempers the gentle land 
breezes with a genial warmth. That is why, I think, whenever 




FLOWERS IN BANNERMAN PARK NEAR MILITARY ROAD. 

wide borders of mignonette, larkspur and candytuft. How splen 
didly they reward the loving care besto.ved upon them by the 
gardener ! I really believe Ruskin was right when he said that 
flowers recognize their friends and reward their kindness. The 
flowers in my own garden seem to recognize me. Last year I 
had a pansy plant that flowered splendidly. Every time I look 
ed at it I could see the flowers sparkle and turn on their stems 
so as to follow my thoughts and when I admired their bright 
colourings, their frailly pencilled veinlets and their spirit of sym 
pathetic repose, they would bow affectionately and seemingly 
smiled in joy with their master s admiration. And I had a car 
nation bush that was very fruitful in flowers, an:! from which I 
plucked many a cheerful buttonhole, which always claimed my 
attention. Whenever I went into the garden its flowers turned 
towards me. No matter how gay the pansies seemed or how 
bright the sweet peas, the cornflowers, the cosmos and the dah 
lias, the carnations insisted on claiming my notice. And ho.v 
gleefully they bowed and smiled when I took one of them for 
my button-hole ! 

The flowers in Bannerman Park were very beautiful last 
summer. There was a large bed of multi-coloured dahlias near 
the Military Road that seized the attention of all who passed by. 
Nearby, a pretty bed of astors, phlox and peonies vied with them 
in colouring. But the large bed of stocks made the best show 
ing and attracted most of the butterflies and moths by their 
charming scent. Their scents were better than the perfumes of 
all the other flowers and their memories still linger with all who 
experienced them. Many friends of flowers care little for their 
perfumes, because, like the unsentimental botanists, they con 
sider the perfumes, and even the colours, of flowers as mere 
superfluous luxuries. But what excellent lessons the bees, 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 31. 



OVER 
COATINGS 



The Style 
and Finish of 
our Overcoat 
ings were ac- 
knowled ge d 
Leaders last 
season ; and 
we will be 
Right on Top 
again this 
Season ; our 
Goods and 
designs being 
better than 



CHAS. 

St. John s Best Tailor, 




ELUS, 

302 Water Street. 



Parker & Monroe, Ltd 

Wear Our Makes of footwear. 




" Rambler," 

for Men. 

"Victoria" and 
" Duchess," 

for Women. 

" Cinderella" and 
" Princess," 

for Children. 

"Rover," for Boys. 



Public Notice! 



INSPECTION REGULATIONS. 

The boilers of every steamer registered in the Colony shall 
be subject to annual inspection by the Inspector. 

Every steamer carrying local crews or passengers to or from 
this Colony, or to or from any ports therein, shall be subject to 
annual inspection. 

All persons installing new boilers for any purpose, to work 
under steam pressure, shall notify the Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries, in writing, as to the locality of said boilers. 

All persons removing boilers or installing second hand boilers 
for any purpose, to work under steam pressure, shall notify the 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries, as to the new locality it is 
intended to work boilers in ; and shall not work such boilers 
until they have been inspected. 

The Inspector shall grant a certificate of inspection for every 
boiler which shall be approved by him. The certificate shall 
be displayed in a prominent place in the vicinity of the boiler 
to which it refers. 

INSPECTION FEES. 

When a boiler is not in good condition, and the Inspector 
has granted a certificate for a period less than twelve months, 
the fee for each extra inspection during the twelve months, 
shall be the extra inspection fee of that class. 

For any special visit to be made by the Inspector, other than 
the annual inspection, or for any special inspection made at the 
request of the owner or manager of a boiler, the owner shall 
pay the expenses incurred by Inspector from St. John s to loca 
tion of boiler and return, subject to approval of Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries. 

MODE OF INSPECTION. 

Notice of alterations or additions to any boiler should be 
given to the Inspector, in writing, for his approval, before pro 
ceeding with the work. 

Every boiler made after the coming into force of these Regu 
lations shall be stamped with the initial letters of the Inspector s 
name who inspected it and tested it, the year it was made, and 
the pressure under which it was tested ; also the actual working 
pressure under which it was tested ; also the actual working 
pressure allowed upon it. 

A. W. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
St. John s, November, 1914- 



NOTICE! 

HTHE ATTENTION of Vessel Owners is called to the 

following Section of the Harbor Regulations: 
13. If, in the opinion of the Harbor Master, any vessel 
anchored in the harbor is likely to sink or to become an obstruc 
tion to navigation, the Harbor Master may, after giving twelve 
hours notice to the owner or agent of such vessel, or without 
notice where there is no owner or known agent in St. John s, 
take charge of and remove such vessel, and may deal with and 
dispose of such vessel in such manner as he shall think neces 
sary, to provide for the free navigation of the port; and all ex 
penses incurred under this section shall be borne by the vessel 
or her owners, and may be recovered with costs in an action in 
the name of the Harbor Master before a Stipendiary Magistrate. 

EDWARD ENGLISH, 

Harbor Master. 

NEWFOUNDLAND PENITENTIARY. 

BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, # Hearth Brushes, & Whisks. 

A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand ; and having reliable Agents 
in Chicago and other principal centres for the purchase of 
Corn and other material, we are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we feel as 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported. Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
of being favoured with a share of your patronage. 

j^l^All orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt 
attention. 



ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent. 

Newfoundland Penitentiary, November, 1914. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



wasps, butterflies and moths teach such sad people 1 Imagine one 
of our admiral butterflies passing by a bed of stocks and violets 
to woo a non-oderiferous salvia bush or a blazing morning glory 

vine I 

Ah ! my old bones are rebellious again and I must place an 
other log upon the fire to warm the room. The days are short 
now. It seems only an hour ago that I heard the mid-day gun 
fired from the Cabot tower. And now, on the north-east, the fly 
ing scud obscures the crown of the Sugarloaf. The headland of 
Logy Bay is quite invisible, and the pines at Bally Haley are 
clothed in a heavy mist. Oh ! how I wish the winter would 
speed away, so that I might see my spring flowers blooming in 
the gardens, see the crocus rivalling the hyacinths and ins, and 
the tulips trying to eclipse the Hunnemannia and eschscholtzia 
the dear eschscholtzia that recalls to me happy days spent on its 
sunny home-hills near the Golden Gate, beside the fair Pacific, 
in faraway California. 

What charming friends the flowers are to those who love them 1 
Even as I think of them, I forget the dull, damp Christmas 
weather, and my memory goes away to other countries, to other 



climates. It is taught that the rose never grows so beau ufully 
as in the rich gardens of Persia, because there ,t meet 
did warmth its generous soul appreciates and wher : Ks bes ^ad 
mirers are and I believe that is true. Even in my o*r .garden 
my flower friends often tell me of their gayer hves in other 1 
and seek my sympathy. I know it is true ; because I have seen 
how well the various flowers express climatic Preferences Do 
the hawthorns, fuchsias and pelagoniums grow any-where 
uriantly as in Tasmania? Or the glorious HiWscus riot in a 
g Ind r magnificence than in Tahiti or Samoa ? Can the jonquils 
fnd heliotrope in the scent fields of the Rwiera and the Canary 
Isles be surpassed? And what wisteria and peach blossoms 
are better than those of Japan and China ? Ah! now I begin to 
think of earlier day s of the sea and long journies around 
the World. But I will stir the fire and warm the room, or I must 
quarrel with the sea again the source of all my ills and these 
sore old bones. We are no longer friends, the sea and I 
who now am a landsman: a grower of bulbi and flowers: a 
student of flower-lore. A.S.-B. 




3fie Ofd and tfte Hew. 




By S. P. Provse. 



Santa CCaus. 

F all the traditional patron saints of childhood, 
Santa Claus is the greatest and most beloved. He 
has survived the dethronement of gnomes and 
elves. Greek and Gothic deites have vanished 
but he remains. Other ard mo;e i npo^ing cults 
have been buried with forgotten things, but his ritual continues 
to be ever mystical, always pleasing and never dreary. While 
thrones have been overthrown and dynasties have disappeared 
he has maintained unbroken sway over the United Kingdom of 
the Little Ones and that domain is limitless. Those who wel 
comed his attention when their years were few and childish faith 
was undisturbed, bring him gold and frankince ise and myrrh as 
yearly recompense for former joys. They grow you ig again 
when they see their gifts dispensed with laughter and good 
cheer. 

In ancient days at Christmastide all quarrels were forgotten, 
old friendships were renewed, and the spirit of charity was then 
evoked. . May the poor and destitute be cheerfully remembered 
by those whose homes have never been neglected by the smiling 
Saint who comes before the dawn and leaves without delay. To 
follow some faint ray from the manger star that leads to a dreary 
home where hopeless longing, seen in looks of needy little ones, 
can be transformed to glad surprise, will help to bring fulfillment 
of the prophecy of peace that rang from cloudless sky OP that 
first Christmas morn. 





SAMUEL P. PROWSE. 

Wisftes. 

AY we start good resolutions now and may we 
know the joy of dawning strength so that the 
courage of today may be added to the courage of 
the day to come. May we increase our usefulness 
by knowing objects beneath us and enlarge our 
higher aims by knowing those above us. May we discover that 
gratification derived from revenge is momentary ; that the plea 
sure of forgiveness is lasting. May faults and weaknesses of 
others be used as danger-signals to warn us from paths which 
have led to them. May our disappointments prove foundations 
of future success which never could have been reared on any 
other base. 

May hope give vitality to the mechanism of existence and may 
we not suffer the misery of being misunderstood. May we rea 
lize that nothing is ever done beautifully which is done in rivalry ; 
nor nobly which is done in pride. May we be deaf to the grum 
bler, blind to the scorner and dumb to the arrogant. May we 
have smiles for the children, sympathy for the suffering and 
words of cheer for those whose backs are pressed against the 
wall. 

May the New Year bring us all more sunshine than showers, 
more peace than pain, more honor than hate, more triumphs than 
tears, and may we not desire more than we can get justly use 
soberly and dispense cheerfully. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 33. 



THE SUPREME SILENT SUNBEAM. .* 

Winner of Many GoJd Medals, Silver Medals, and Non-Stop Diplomas; 1st, 2nd and 3rd 
in Grand Prix 1912; Winner of Tourist Trophy 1914. 

C.A.V. and Rushmore 
Lighting Outfits, Oils, 
Greases and Gasolene 

Goodrich Tires, Rayfield 
Carburetors, Accesso 
ries, etc. 

Agents for Regal Cars. 

Phone 318. THE CENTRAL GARAGE, Catherine Street. 




For Winter Wear. 

Our Clothes and 
furnishings for Boys 

are receiving very special compliments 
from the many Pleased Mothers who have 
been here. 

The Good Quality, Neat Styles 

and exceptional values are what pleased them. 

They will please you, too. 

T. J. BARROIM, 

Boys and Men s Outfitter. 
358 Water Street. 



M. & E. KENNEDY, 

Contractors, 
Builders and 
Appraisers* 

Office: RENOUF BUILDING. 

P. O. Box 214. PHONE 767. 

Factory and Store, off James Street. 



HENLEY S 



MATTRESSK 



Are made of the Best Material, 
Are Durable, 



And Handsomely Finished. ** 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

J. J. HENLEY, 

Factory and Office : Henry Street, head of Bell Street, 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



OFFICE AND STORE Adelaide Street. STONEYARD Just East Custom 
House, Water Street. Telephone, 364. 

W.J. ELLIS 

Contractor, Builder, 
and Appraiser. 



Dealer in Cement Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps ; Chimney Tops, all sizes, Plate Glass and 

Crushed Stone for Concrete. 

Estimates Given for all kinds 
of Work at Shortest Notice. 

[[^Manufacturers and Real Estate Owners contemplating 
any addition to their present holdings, or the erection of new 
structures, will find it advantageous to get our estimates and 
terms. 



When writir^ to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 34- 

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THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY.- 




Zenobia Perfumes. 

All Zenobia Perfumes are extracts from the natural flowers. That is 
why these delightfully fragrant Perfumes have become so deservedly popular 
in Newfoundland. 

For Christinas Gifts there is nothing more acceptable 
than ZENOBIA -QUALITY PFRFUMES. j* # ^ 



Zenobia 

Eau de 
Cologne, 
65,85, i. So. 

Lavender 
Water, 

6sc. 

Sachets, 

loc. each. 



55c. each, 

Postage 50. 
Purplr 1 It ;ither, 
Wild Hyacinth, 
Lilacea Sweet Pea, 
Carneta, 
Bean Blossom, 
Night-Scented Stock, 
Red Rose Violet, 
Madouna Lily, 
Honey Suckle, 
Treck-a-Trique. 



9Oc. each, 

Postage yc. 
Wall Flower, 
Sweet Pea, 
Bean Blossom, 
Purple Heather, 
Jasmin, 
Honey Suckle, 
Jockey Club, 
White Rose, Red Rose. 



$1.3O each. 

Postage 70. 
Lily of the Valley, 
Celesta, 
Violette, 

Night-Scented Stock, 
Sovrona, 
Girorlee-de-Soir, 
Honey Suckle, 
White Rose. 



Sample Bottles, lOc. and 2Oc. 



$1.8O each, 

Postage 8c. 
Night-Scented Stock, 
Bean Blossom, 
Sweet Pea, Red Rose. 






Sleep Preservation ! 



1. It shall be lawful for the duly qualified electors, resident within an 
area or district within this Colony, to present to the Governor in Coun 
cil a petition or requisition in the form prescribed in the Schedule to this 
Act, or as near thereto as may be, setting forth the limits or boundaries 
within which such area or district is comprised, and the names of the 
towns, harbours or settlements included therein, and praying for a Procla 
mation prohibiting the keeping of dogs within such area or district. 

2. Such petition or requisition shall be sent to the nearest resident 
Stipendiary Magistrate, and shall be by him (after examination and certi 
ficate as hereinafter provided) furnished to the Governor in Council. 

3. If, upon due scrutiny of such petition or requisition, the Stipendiary 
Magistrate shall find that the same contains the bona fide signatures of a 
majority of the duly qualified electors resident within the limits or bound 
aries set forth in the said petition or requisition, he shall forthwith have a 
certificate to that effect endorsed upon or attached to the petition or re 
quisition, and shall forward the same to the Governor in Council. 

4. Any Stipendiary Magistrate to whom such petition or requisition may 
be presented may, before certifying the same to the Governor in Council 
as aforesaid, require proof to be made before him of the bona fide signa 
tures of any of the names subscribed to such petition, upon the oath of 
either the party whose name purports to be signed or of a witness to such 
signature. 

5. Upon receipt of any such petition or requisition containing the signa 
tures of not less than one-third of the electors resident within any such 
area or district, certified as aforesaid, the Governor in Council shall issue 
a Proclamation or Public Notice prohibiting the keeping of dogs within 
such area or district. 

6. From and after the date prescribed in and by such Proclamation or 
Notice, it shall not be lawful for any person resident within such area or 
district, to keep, or have in his possession, or under his control, any dog 
within the area or district to which such Proclamafion or Notice shall 
relate, under a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars or imprisonment for a 
term not evceeding three months. This prohibition shall not apply to any 
person or persons travelling or passing through such areas or districts and 
having a licensed dog or dogs in his or their possession, charge or control, 



vmg 
and not at large. 



A. W. KNIGHT, Clerk of the Peace. 




Just Received, our Fall and Winter Stock of 
Beaver, Melton and Cheviot Overcoatings. 

Tweed and Worsted Suitings and Trouserings. Also, 
a very neat line of Fancy Vestings, all the very 
latest from the English markets. 

Prices Moderate. 

Samples and Measuring Cards sent to any 
part of the Island on application. 

Strict attention given to Outport Orders. 

EB BWIAI ONF" 
. Jm StfS/^ **m\*/ B TS C_ , 

Custom Tailor, 268 Water Street. 



F. J. MORRIS, K.C. 



E. LEO CARTER. 




orris & (Barter, 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

LAW OFFICES: 

OF MONTREAL BUILDING, 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



P O Box 184 Telephone 184. Cable Address " GIBBS" St. John s. 

M. P. GIBBS, K.C., 

BARRISTER- AT -LAW, SOLICITOR and 
NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Commissioner of Deeds for the State of New York. 
Solicitor for the Merchant Service Guild, Liverpool. 

Law Office, BANK OF MONTREAL BUILDING, Water Street, 
St. John s. Newfoundland. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 36. 



Prowse: Reminiscences. 



lEADERS of THE QUARTERLY will miss this 
Christmas an article and story by the late Judge 
Prowse. The old Judge was one of our esteemed 
contributors from the time this periodical was 
founded, July, 1901, until his death on January 
28th last. He was a prolific writer to whom our 
readers always looked forward to for an article 
dealing with homeland topics of interest, and they 
rarely looked to him in vain. His thoughts were 
always centered in assisting in the development 
of and in furthering the well-being of Newfound 
land, and as he was the fortunate possessor of 
rare literary gifts, his pen was ever ready at the 
call of the editors of local journals. He was always solicitous 
in giving our readers his most interesting articles and reminis 
cences. While we, unfortunately, cannot give a story from the 





THK I.ATK H llC.K I ROWSK, K.C., C M.O. 

Judge s pen this year ; we can reprint an interesting story in 
which he figures in a characteristic light. 

The story is related in the September number of the Cornhill 
by Mr. H. Hesketh-Prichard, the well-known traveller who has 
hunted caribou in Newfoundland and the Librador, Mr. 
Prichard in speaking of goose shooting said : 

" Another goose whose visit to our shores has been recorded 
is the Canada goose, a splendid bird. I have never seen him 
in British waters save in the semi-domesticated state ; but else 
where, in Canada, in Newfoundland, and in Labrador he has 
many times rejoiced my eyes. 

" There was an occasion when a very curious incident befell 
me in which a Canada goose played a part. I was, at the time, 
in camp by the Terra Nova River in Newfoundland, up which 
I was about to start on a trip into the interior, and during the 
day I had seen many Canada geese. Night fell, as wet and 
stormy as it can only be in England s Oldest Colony, and I was 



about to turn in, when a voice boomed through the darkness 
Is this my friend Prichard s camp ? moment ter that 

most remarkable and able man, the late Judge Prows , J 
C.M.G.., advanced into the circle of light. He was at the 
between seventy and eighty years of age, but as vigorous as 
many a youngster would wish to be. He was clad in a thin 
butter-colored suit, his neck and chest were bear and his 
were thrust into a pair of easy slippers. I he spot where I was 
encamped was on the river, and the Judge informed me that he 
had been down stream looking after some salmon poacher 
the interests of the Government, and had not eaten for 1 
hours. It was ten at night, the day had been drenching wet 
and he was soaked through. I and the woodsmen with me 
marvelled at the strength and stamina that enabled him to unde 
a such hardships. He was a man whose bodily gifts were 
only exceeded by his mental powers ; and r.ad his role in 1 
been cast upon some larger stage, his natural energy and fore 
would have had a wider scope, and he must have left his impress 
upon his generation. 

" Soon he was sitting before a roaring fire, clad in my 
change and eating a meal of trout and bacon. While we were 
talking together, I was suddenly aware of a curious noise behind 
me among the spruces. It sounded at first if some animal were 
beating itself against the ground. What is it ? I said. 
" A fox or a lynx, was the Judge s suggestion. 
" I caught up a log of wood and hurled it in the direction of 
the sound. It ceased at once, and, picking up a brand from 
the fire, I went towards the place and presently came upon a 
young Canada goose. The log hurled at a venture had struck 
it on the head. I carried it back to the fire. 

" A goose 1 A Canada goose ! cried the Judge. It must 
have been attracted by the light of the fire. This is most 
interesting ! I will write a letter to the papers telling the facts, 
and will send on a copy to the London Field the moment I get 
back to St. John s. 

" Later in the night the Judge departed, taking the train 
which passes through Terra Nova station, rather higher up the. 
river. I went to sleep. 

" I awoke just after dawn to find a red haired man regarding 
my camp with gloom. 

Have you seen my tame goose? said he. 
" I explained exactly what had occurred, and, with many 
apologies, invited the red-haired man to dinner. 

" He accepted. At the end of the dinner I said, The Judge 
intends to write to the papers in St. John s and London abont 
the singular attraction possessed by fire for wild geese. 

The red-haired man smiled sadly. It was a good goose, 
he said. It would follow me about like a dog. Pass the 
whiskey. 

" The letter of the Judge to the papers was providentially 
never written. When, on my return to St. John s, I asked him 
what he had done, he said : I forgot all about it, my boy, but 
I ll write to-night. You can take home a copy with you on the 
boat for the London Field. 

" Then I revealed the true story. The Judge was convulsed 
with laughter. I ll tell that story against you in the Cornhill. 
It will please my friend, the Editor, said he. 

" But that letter also was never written. And now even his 
iron strength has not availed, and he has passed on through 
those changes which he never dreaded, for I believe he was one 
of the few men whose faith knew no fear." 



>\>ery\*>fWe, Cftristtnas 



Everywhere, everywhere, Chistmas to-night : 
Christmas in lands of the fir tree and pine, 
Christmas in lands of the palm tree and vine ; 
Christmas where snowpeaks stand solemn and white, 
Christmas where cornfields lie sunny and bright ; 
Everywhere, everywhere, Christmas to-night ! 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 37. 



Sailings Every Saturday to Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. 

(Nil RE;D CRDSe L 

- - .. 

Halifax, Nova Scotia, and St. John 5 



k V erViCe f twelve da y tri P s 
by their two new steamers, 




oundland. This service will be 



STEPHANO" and "FLORIZEL," 



Steam " s remain lon S en "g h a t each port to enable passengers to visit these interesting cities. 
find tn r ^ SUmmer J at Chester D g b > - Hubbards or any of the other charming seaside resorts in Nova Scotia will 

a that Red Cross Line provides the best, easiest and most direct method of getting there 
the aW ; S ,. SP , tr u ( ! u fishln S ,|n th e vicinity of St. John s. Loch Leven and Rainbow trout have been imported assuring 

Tnhnv y if g - 6 fi " eSt Salm ni fisllin * on this side of the Atlantic c an be reached in one day from 

bt. John s at very small expense. 

Ptarmigan or grouse shooting is from October lst to J.inuary I2t h. Caribou shooting commences August ist, and in no other 
part of the world can big game shooting be enjoyed for so little expense. 



. 

The rate for the round trip, including berth and meals while at sea and in port is only $60.00 and up according to accommo- 
lustrated folder, with complete rates, plans, sailings and other information will be sent upon application to 

BOWRING & COMPANY, 



upon appli 

General Agents Red Cross Line, 
17 Battery Place, New York City. 



The Good Article 

IS NEVER DEAR! 




If you want the * 
good article in clothing 
go to * fc <je ^5 

Jackman The Tailor, Limited, 

The Men s and Boys Clothier. 




Marble and 

Granite Worker. 

Dealer in 

Marble & Granite 
Headstones, 
Fonts, Tombs, 
Monuments, etc., 

of the Latest Designs. 
Orders executed promptly. 

340 Water Street, 

Opp. Alan Goodridge & Sons, 
St. John s. P. O. Box 4H. 





j. j. O GRADY. 



p. O GRADY. 



O GRADY BROS., 

House and Church Painters ; draining, Marbling, Lettering, 
Kalsomining, Paper Hanging and Glazing. Scene Painting 
a specialty. Outport orders promptly attended to. 
P. 0. Box 216. Address : 13 Carter s Hill. 




N.J.Murphy 

Carriage & Sleigh Builder 
Undertaker, etc. 

Agent for 
Carriage Stock, Rubber Tyres, etc. 

Wheels Re-Rubbered 

at shortest notice and reasonable prices. 
We always have on hand a large stock 
of Polished and Cloth-Covered 

Caskets and Coffins. 

Personal attention given to all Undertaking 
Orders Night or Day. Phone 737. 

West End Carriage Factory, - - 32 Bambrick Street. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 38. 



Ct 



Entertainer. 




By Dr. Arthur 

;ARRY LAUDER, the Scotch Comedian, has 
been, since 1905, the most widely discussed pub 
lic entertainer in Great Britain and is the most 
prosperous of the British vaudeville stars. No 
actor or operatic singer approaches him in popu 
larity. His ability to draw full houses at every 
vaudeville theatre in the British Isles, Australia 
and the United States, that is fortunate in secur 
ing his services, is unsurpassed. He is unques 
tionably the most amusing of the popular enter 
tainers of the day and the amount of merry 
making he is responsible for is inestimable. His 
singing has made many a weary soul happy, 
while his phonograph records are carried to the utmost ends 
of the earth, and give a healthy entertainment to many a tired 

sailor on the seas. 
Many of these re 
cords can be heard 
at night in the homes 
of fishermen in our 
outports and the 
writer can testify as 
to their popularity 
on the Labrador. 

Lauder is a native 
of Scotland : He was 
born on a coal-field 
a little south of Glas 
gow. His father was 
a coal miner and he 
was brought up to 
the coal mining 
trade. Harry was 
nearly thirty years 
old when he sudden 
ly blossomed forth a 
star on the English 
vaudeville stage. 

The writer had 
heard so many Lau 
der records, and had 
seen so many inter 
esting criticisms of 
his singing that he 
became anxious to 
hear him sing. But 

HARRY LAUDER. th S proved difficult. 

It generally hap 
pened that he had just left a city as I entered it, or was 
expected to arrive a few days after I left. Once I saw an 
advertisement in a newspaper in Aberdeen, Scotland, saying 
Harry Lauder was engaged to sing at the Trivoli theatre in that 
city. I immediately booked the best available seat. But I 
found that the artist was Niels Kenyon, who the programme 
said, was "better than Harry Lauder." 

However, early this year I had better success. I was passing 
along the Strand, in London, one evening, and noticed that 
Lauder was billed to appear at the Trivoli that night. I secur 
ed a seat and had the good fortune to hear Lauder at his best. 
The audience, which was largely composed of soldiers and 
sailors, soon assumed a cheerful mood and insisted on recalling 
the singer many times. This appealed to his vanity so much 
that he fell in love with everyone and sang his full repertoire. 
Some of his songs were sung many times over and when the 
orchestra retired late in the evening from shear exhaustion, 
Lauder sang on without any musical accompaniment whatever. 
When he became tired of singing he would tell a little tale like 
this: "It wasn t because McPherson had a lot to drink. 




Selwyn-Brown. 

Certainly not ! because we are absolutely teetottlers, only we 
are not pledged. That s the only difference. However, seeing 
it was McPherson s birthday, we had a " great doc , 1 
a smoking concert. We sang The Dear Little Shamrock 
eighteen times ; Scots wha hae, nineteen times ; 
Laurie twenty times ; and Auld Lang Syne. Then McLean 
suggested we go to our beds. So McPherson rose to turn oot 
the gas, but said : " Chaps, I suggest we sing that wee chorus 
o ours befo-e we go." And so the old songs were re-sung until 
the break of day." 

There is nothing very amusing in this little story; but when 
it is told by Harry Lauder, it is impossible for the dullest person 
to refrain from explosive laughter. 

I remember how very funny he was when he told us about 
his son" a rare wee laddie, a grand wee Hielan lad, an if ye 
only. saw him, he s the picture o the dad," and as his dad says: 

" Of course he s just a boy, but he s got notions in his head ; 

I ve never had to smack him yet an hope I ll never need, 

Ev ry time he drinks the milk he blames it on the cat ; 

Well, a wee boy wouldna be a boy if he didn t do like that ! 
When the audience stopped laughing at this song Lauder told 
this story of the boy : 

"Oh! he s a great wee boy. I said to him when he cam 
in frae schule the ither day. How is you an your teacher 
gettin on noo, son ? He said, Not very well pa. I said, 
What s the matter? Oh ! he said because I couldna answer 
a question th day ; the teacher said, What is your head for 
boy? And I said, What did you say? Oh! he said I 
told him it was for keeping on my collar." 

" He cam in tY ither day roarin like a bull. said, what s 
the matter ? He said, Ye remember the penny ye gave me 
this mornin ? I said, I m not likely to forget it. Well, he 
said, It s lost ! So I gave him another one. He looked at it 
lovingly, slipped it into his pocket and bunted oot, roarin like 
a. couple of bulls. I said, What s the matter? he said, If I 
hadn t lost the other penny, I would have had twopence now ! 
Oh ! He is a great wee boy I" 

Lauder was so intimate with his audience the night I heard 
him that we were well able to judge the characteristics of the 
man and, perhaps, learn the causes of his great popularity. 

He does not differ personally from an ordinary typical Scotch 
working man. He is of medium height, and having been 
brought up to the hard work of picking coal for nearly tweniy 
years, he is physically well-developed. He is not musical. 
When he sang a favorite song with orchestral accompaniment he 
was able to keep tune alTd his pantomime gestures detracted 
attention from his singing. He sang the following words with 
orchestral accompaniment : 

" I never, never worry, and I never, never grieve, 

I take things very easy what I canna take I leave. 

I work the whole week round frae early morn till late at nicht, 

On Saturday, I early look forward wae delicht 

To beautiful Sunday ! 

1 wish it would never come Monday : 

For I lie between the sheets my bed adornin 

O, its very nice ! yes, its very, very nice 

To get yer breakfast in yer bed on Sunday mornin ." 
It was very amusing to hear Lauder sing that sjng with the 
assistance of the musicians, but when he sang it alone there was 
a different entertainment. It was quite evident when he sang 
without musical accompaniment that his wide popularity is not 
due to his musical abilities. 

It cannot be due to the wording of his songs. Many of these 
are not only commonplace, but positively vulgar O.ie of his 
greatest song successes is" It s nice when you love a wee 
Lassie," which runs : 

" It s nice when you love a wee lassie, 
It s nice when the lassie is true ; 
Oh ! it s nice when ye ken 
That yer bonnie wee hen 
Is in love and her lover is yon !" 

There is nothing in such words to arouse sentimental excite- 
e wording is quite banal. But Harry Lauder 



can 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 39. 



Job s Stores, Ltd., 

IMPORTERS and FT I TTr 

In Provisions, Groceries, Naval Stores, fishery Supplies, Etc. 

j* AGENTS FOR * 

Climax Molasses Feed, Champion Tobacco, 

Climax Dairy Meal, Lily Safety Matches, 

Cow-Boy Milk, Sail Soap (Laundry), 

Manderson s Pickles, Vesta Cigars. 

GET OUR PRICES ON THE ABOVE ARTICLES. 

JOB S STORES, LIMITED. 
Furness, Withy & Company, Ltd., 

Steamship Owners and Brokers. 

Commission, Insurance and 

Forwarding Agents. 

The new steamship " Digby " launched last 
season and sailing in conjunction with the regular 
steamers between Liverpool, St. John s and Halifax, 
is specially built and fitted for her present services, 
the passenger accommodation and catering being 
unsurpassed. 

First Class Fare. Second Class. 
Liverpool to St. John s, 

13 to 14 IGS -9 

St. John s to Halifax . . .$18 ..$12 

St. John s to Liverpool,.. $65 . .$45 

Regular Sailings also from Liverpool to St. John s. 

Brushes, Lumber, Doors, Sashes, Felt, etc. 




OUR BRUSHES is but one line of our business. We have 
for many years been dealing in Lumber, Doors, Sashes, 
Felt, Pitch, Nails, and in fact everything that is used in house 
building. We have 

An Expert Designer and Stair Builder 

in our employ, and builders can always rely on having the best 
ideas when they give us their order. We have furnished Mantels, 
Window Frames and Sashes, Doors, Stair Balusters and 
Newel Posts, Mouldings, Turnings, Brackets, Counters, Ceiling, 
Flooring, Framing, Shingles, etc., to all parts of this country, 
and always satisfy our customers. We have always studied 



our business and endeavoured to increase it constantly. We 
have made provision for immediate reply to inquiries, quick 
shipment of orders, and prompt furnishing of shipping receipts 
and invoices. 

Our Efforts to Satisfy Customers, 

we are glad to say, have been appreciated, and result in an 
ever increasing demand with which we are keeping pace by 
improved and enlarged equipment. We will count you among 
our friends, and will be glad of a friendly word from you to 
any person needing supplies in our line. We will especially 
value any order of your own with which you may favour us. 



THE HORWOOD LUMBER Co., Ltd. 



When writing to Adveitisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 40. 



sing them with music in such a way that a vast audienc; will be 
carried away with enthusiasm. 

Let us take another popular favorite, " Every lad die loves a 

lassie." The chorus runs : 

" Every laddie loves a lassie, 

Whether she be dark or fair, 

And every lassie loves a laddie, 

Just because her love lies there." 

It is quite impossible on reading these words to see any humor 
in the song. The words express an extremely commanplace 
theme. But when Lauder sings them how we are all compelled 
to heartily laugh ! 

When I heard Lauder sing "Just a wee Deoch-an-Dons," it 
seemed he had reached the zenith of his power as a public 
entertainer. The audience commenced to laugh before he sang 
a word and was convulsed before he reached the line : " We ll 
a unite and sing 1" 

This song has probably more sentiment in it than any other 
in Lander s repertory. It seems to have something reminiscent 
of Old Lang Syne about it. Just read the words: 

There s a good old Scottish custom 

That has stood the test of time, 
It s a custom that is carried oat 

In every land and clime ; 
Where brother Scots foregather. 

It s aye the usual thing, 
When just before they say guid-nicht, 

They fill their cups and sing : 

Just a wee deoch-an-doris, 

Just a wee yin, that s a s 
just a wee deoch-an-doris 

Before we gang awa , 
There s a wee wifie waitin, 

In a wee but-an-ben ; 
If you can say; It s a braw bricht moonlicht nicht, 

Ye re a richt, ye ken. 

I like a man that is a man, 

A man that s straight and fair. 
The sort o man that will and can, 

In all things do his share. 
I like a man, a jolly man, 

The sort o man you know. 
The chap that slaps your hack and says, 

Here, Jock, before you go! 

I ll invite you all some other nicht 

To come and bring your wives, 
I ll promise you the giandest time 

You ll have in all your lives ! 
I ll hae the bagpipes skirling. 

And we ll dance the Hieland rling, 
And just for auld acquaintance sake 

We ll a unite and sing ! 

The moral teachings of this song are not, pjrhips, of hig i 
standing if it is literally construed by a highly mcral person. 
But if we take it liberally, it means thit we sh >uld be sociable, 
entertaining and alwa>s prrp.ired to exhibit good fellowship. If 
we take it in this spirit we will get some clue to Laud^r s great 
popularity all over the world. 

When I heard Lauder sing this song in London, the audience 
was so delighted that it had to be repeited many lines a ,d 
everybody spontaneously joined in the chorus. And when the 
theatre closed, the people went home whistling the melorly or 
singing " There s a wee wifie waitin." 

It is a strange phenomenon we see when this Scotch comidi.in 
is singing his banal dialect ditties and rmvmg cro vds of people 
to laughter or tears. What str.mge gifts enabled Lauder to be 
come such a successful entertainer ? 

It matters not where Lauder sings. He is as popular in 
America as in Scotland. If he would generously visit us he 
would be equally popular in St. John s. 

An American lady tried to find the s-cret of hi; mesmeric 
powers when he sang in New York at Christmas time in 1912. 
She said to him : " How did you come to sing in public ?" 

" \Vtll madam," he replied, " I always liked to sing when I 
was a boy. I amused the miners at the collieries with omic 
songs whenever they gave a conceit in the vill ge hail. I was 
singing at a miners benefit concert near Glasgow one night when 
an English gentleman present liked my songs so well that he 
told me he would secure a vaudeville engagement for me in 



London, if I would care to go there with him I went with him 
and by hard work made progress on the English music 

ta ^But how is it your songs are everywhere so popular?" 

Ah ! now I think I know that. I take great care in selecting 
them. I have always taken pains to Cultivate laughter ad 
make men happy People don t laugh enough. I like aughing 
so much that Ttake pleasure in trying to make the whole world 
laugh and sing jolly songs. It does everyone good to laugh and 
I feel sure, from my own experience, that music is a great seda 
tive. I always do my best to make people I come in contact 
with as happy as possible. I study the newspapers carefully and 
whenever in reading them I see any thing that would suggest a 
comic song I make a note of it and use it whenever possibl, 

The songs I write are all based on human experience. 1 hey 
reflect some real phase of life that I have seen and experienced. 

I believe everyone has an inborn liking for rhythm. We all 
like to whistle, dance and sing when we are well. Have you not 
noticed how a march or waltz melody sometimes impresses itself 
on your brain so that you are compelled to whistle it or hum it 
all day long ? Didn t the Sons of the Sea or " 
King" once effect you that way ? 

" I have known people suffering the sorest mental distress be 
ing made happy by the effects of a jolly march air operating 
subconsiously during sleep. When they have awake ied in the 
morning with a desire to sing the air, and have heard the birds 
outside in the trees chorusing their joys, they hive completely 
discarded their despondency and forgotten their various little 
worries." 

"That may be well for people who are musical a id cm sing 
well. But what solace is there in singing for those people who 
cannot sing ?" 

" I believe," said Lauder, " a music il voice is a sp endid, but 
very rare gift one of the best that nature cm endow us with." 

But I am also sure that great enjoyment can be had even from 
silent singing. I think it is very doubtful whether vocil singing 
is more beneficial in its effects on the sentiments than silent sing 
ing or even humming." 

" What is meant by silent singing ?" " Letting the blood beat 
through the brain in unison with the rhythm or lilt of the song." 

"But singing is your hobby?" "No, I am not suie that I 
have any hobby except travelling, unless yovi would call making 
people happy a hobby. My greatest recreation certainly is in 
making new songs and originating comic patter that will please 
my audiences and make them laugh. Oh ! how I love to see 
people laugh ! It warms me through and through when my audi 
ences laugh and sing my choruses with me." 

These last words, I believe, explain the secret of Lander s 
success and popularity. He is a master of the rare art of hap 
piness a man of clean character, fairly gifted with a humorous 
temperament, with a wide self-learnt knowledge of human nature, 
who assiduously and consistently strives to amuse people and 
make them happy. He has experienced poverty and realizes 
how a radient temperament and chastened comic spirit can 
lighten and overcome its wretchedness. 

Humor is contagious, and Lauder has so well cultivated his 
humorous powers, and learnt to express himself in unique ways, 
that his expressions appeal to even the gravest people whenever 
they come into his presence, and sentimental people are quite 
carried away as soon as they see him. He appears to them to 
radiate happiness like the nymphs and fauns of the Pastoral Age. 

This popular comedian of humble origin is a humble man and 
will continue so. For a number of years he has been a profes 
sional laughter maker and has amused the whole English speak 
ing world with his jokes and songs. But his name does not ap 
pear in any biographical dictionary and in a few years probably, 
he will be forgotten. His efforts, however, in making millions 
of people happy have been crowned with success and his popu 
larity is well deserved. As we sit by our firesides this Christmas 
in Newfoundland and hear Lauder sing to us through our grama- 
phones let us reflect on the value of merriment and geniality. 
How much richer the world would be if there were many come 
dians like Lauder more merry-makers who would compel us 
to get a richer pleasure and gather a more fruitful harvest from 
life! 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



Cfiristtnas in War-5ime. 

By Robert Gear MacDonald. 

OH turn away, the fields of Europe stand 
Grim, horrid with red carnage day by day, 
Until the ^eart is sick; yea, turn away, 
And for a little join the humble hand 
Of shepherds kneeling low where hand in hand 
Sweet Child and Mother sit, and there display 
Meet homage to the Prince of Peace, and pray 
That He will pour His blessing on our land. 

" Protect us, Lord from devastating strife, 

Let not our sins on us be visited, 

But spare us yet, Thou Judge of quick and dead ! 

Grant to our Empire newer, purer, life, 

And give us soon, in this wild tumult s stead 

A noble peace with victory s blessings rife." 



Sotnetfiing Hew 
for 



Tf 7TR. M. F. VVADDEN, proprietor of the Central Pharmacy, 

J- V Water Street, has recently been given the exclusive agency 

in St. John s for the world famous Rexall Remedies. These 

remedies, of which there are over 300, represent the prod ucts of 

the United Drug Company of Boston, Mass. ; London, Eng. ; 

Paris, France ; and Toronto, Canada, and the largest Drug Co. 

in the world, with a capital of $6,000,000, represented by some 

7,000 drug stores all over the world. Owing to the enormous 

manufacturing possibilities of the United Drug Co, the coast of 

production has been materially reduced in all their remedies, 

and the result is that in buying Rexall goods the consumer gets 

a bigger package for less money. The one aim of the Rexall 

Company is to satisfy every customer regardless of any extra 

expense. All goods are sold under a bon-a-fide guarantee, and 

persons failing to get relief from any of their remedies, are 

asked to return them and get their money back. These Rexall 

remedies are not patent medicines, but rather the " ready-made " 

prescriptions of some of the greatest health and beauty special 

ists of America. We congratulate Mr. Wadden on his enterprise 

in securing for his patrons such a meritorious assortment of 

household remedies and toilet preparations, and no doubt when 

our people have realized the many advantages of Rexall reme 

dies, they will join with the people of other countries in demand 

ing for every disease, and ailment the famous Rexall Cures. 



BAIT ! 



Or rather the want of it, is one of the principal 
drawbacks to the fisheries of Newfoundland, and as 
it is tolerably certain that we shall have good 
markets and high prices in 1915, now is the time to 
prepare to capture BAIT fishes. 

As a means to this end we are making cheap 
light Caplin Seines, that will be easily handled ; and 
as one good haul will pay for the outfit, every 
Schooner should have one. 

We are making Squid Traps, which will be most 
effective. 

We are making Smelt Nets, in all sizes. 

We are making Gill Nets, various sizes. 

We make Cod Traps and Cod Seines, Hemp and 
Cotton, to order. 

We make superior Herring Nets, Standard and 
Crescent brands. 

We make Hemp and Cotton Lines and Twines of 
Superior quality. 

We make Cordage and Cables, of all sizes. 

In fact we make everything required for the 
fisheries, and we ask all our people to support Home 
Industries by using everything that is home made 
where ever possible, and so keep the money in 
circulation in Newfoundland. 

Colonial Cordage Co., Ltd. 

The Caille Perfection 
Kerosene Engine 

is known all over the world. 
It is now being used by 
Admiral Jellicoe in the 
North Sea, by the United 
States Navy whose order 
was secured against all 
competitions, by The Hud 
son Bay Co. fur traders 
and makers of history, by 
the Newfoundland fishermen 
who claim there is nothing 
better. 

The Newfoundland Agents arc 

F. G. HOUSE & Co, 

Columbus Building, St. John s. 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 42- 




Employees of Ayre & Sons, Ltd., 
with First Newfoundland Regiment. 

Back Row ( ,. Harsant, --Western, C 
March, Osmond, Legrow. 

Second Row J. Nicholle, W. Bradley, 
Color-Sergt. George Taylor, Lieut. C. 
ie, Lieut. J. Nunns, Sergt. W. Ayre, 
T. Smythe. 

Front Row J. Cleary, H. Lidstone. \V. 
Wilson. 

Walter Taylor, who also went with the con 
tingent, was not present when the photo 
was taken. 



BYRINC S BOOKSTORE 

For Fancy Goods, Toys, Dolls, Xmas and 
New Year Cards, Annuals, Picture Books. 

Illustrated War Numbers by every mail < 
from England* # # S> S> * 
QARRDTT BYRNE, Bookseller and Stationer. 



The Royal Bank of Canada. 

INCORPORATED 1869. 

Capital Authorized $25,000,OOO 

Capital Paid-up 11,560,000 

Reserve and Undivided Profits 13,5OO,OOO 

Total Assets 185,000, OOO 

HEAD OFFICE, MONTREAL: 

H. S. Holt, President. E. L. Pease, V.-Pres. & G. Mgr. 

340 Branches in Canada and Newfoundland. 

Twenty-eight Branches in Cuba, Porto Rico and 

Dominican Republic. 

BRITISH WEST INDIES : 
BAHAMAS Nassau; BARBADOS Bridgetown ; 

GRENADA St. George s ; JAMAICA Kingston ; 

TRINIDAD Port of Spain and San Fernando. 
BRITISH HONDURAS Belize. 

BRITISH GUIANA Georgetown and New Amsterdam. 
LONDON, ENGLAND: NEW YORK CITY = 

2 Bank Bldgs., Cor. William and 

Princes Streets, E. C. Cedar Streets. 

Business Accounts carried upon favorable terms. 

Savings Department at all Branches. 

St. John s Main Office: W. H. CROWDY, Manager. St. John s West End 
Branch : A. MARSHALL, Manager. Trinity Branch: J. W. FINN, Manager. 



THOMAS SMYTH, 

Commission and Manufacturers 
Agent (Wholesale.) 

Telephone 523. Cable Address: SMYTH, ST. JOHN S. 

Codes: A.B.C. 4th & 5th Editions. Western Union and Private. 

Office : 25O Water Street. 

St. John s, Newfoundland. 

Encourage Home Industries 

and keep your Money circulating at Home. 

Why pay more for Imported Candies, when we can 
supply your wants cheaper, and deliver Fresh Goods, 
as required. 

Head-quarters for all kinds of Candies 

RENNIE & CO., LTD. 



When writing to Advertisers kinly mention " The Newfoundland OnarterU- -! 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Insure Your Property 




WITH THE 



LIV[RPOOL and LONDON and GLOBE 

Insurance Company, Limited. 
Bowring, Bros., Ltd., 

Agents for Newfoundland. 




Notice to Owners and Masters 
of British Ships ! 



-o- 



The attention of Owners and Masters of British 
Ships is called to the 74th Section of the " Mer 
chant Shipping Act, 1894," 

74. (i) A Ship belonging to a British subject 
shall hoist the proper national colours 

(a) on a signal being made to her by one of His 
Majesty s ships (including any vessel under the 
command of an officer of His Majesty s navy 
on full pay), and 

( b) on entering or leaving any foreign port, and 

(c) if of fifty tons gross tonnage or upwards, on 
entering or leaving any British Port. 

( 2) If default is made on board any such ship in 
complying with this section, the master of the ship 
shall for each offence be liable to a fine not exceed 
ing one hundred pounds. 

At this time of war it is necessary for every Brit 
ish Ship to hoist the colours and heave to if signal 
led by a British Warship; if a vessel hoists no 
colours and runs away, it is liable to be fired upon. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 

St. John s, Newfoundland, 
i5th August, 1914. 



Moore & Company 




Plumbers, 
Hot Water & 
Steam fitters, 



Heaters, Stoves, Toilets, Baths and everything in our line 

of the Best Quality at Lowest Prices. 
SHIPS PLUMBING A SPECIALTY 

128 Duckworth St., - St. John s, Ntld. 

Phone 456. P. 0. Box 1124. 

Prosperous & 
Progressive. 

Sun Eife Assurance Company 

^^=^==^^== Of Canada. 



Amount of Assurance in force, - - 
Payments to Policy holders, - - 



$202,363,996.00 
39,385,287.91 



Largest Company 
in British Empire* 

ALEX. BRYDEN, Mar. for Nfld, 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Department of Agriculture and Mines. 
PUBLIC NOTICE. 

The attention of the Public is called to the following 
provisions of the Act to further amend the Crown Lands 
Act, 1903, passed at the last session of the Legislature: 



Application for Timber Limits. 



IS 



SEC. 3. Section 24 of the Crown Lands Acts, 1903 
hereby repealed, and the following substituted therefor : 

No such licenses shall be granted until notice of intention to 
apply therefor has been published in the Royal Gazette for a 
period of one month prior to such application. The said notice 
shall contain the name and address of the applicant, and with 
as much certainty as possible shall describe the location and 
boundaries of the land applied for. naming the Electoral 
District in which same is situated and its approximate area. 

Returns of Timber Cut. 

SUB-SEC. 4, SEC. 4. To make returns to the Government an 
nually on oath, on or before the 3oth of November in each and 
every year of (a) the total quantity of timber cut between the 
ist day of July and the 3Oth day of June then last past, which is 
liable to the payment of royalty ; and (b) of all timber cut for the 
manufacture of paper or paper pulp, also to make returns 
annually, or at such other periods as may be required by the 
Governor in Council, or by regulations under this Act, sworn to 
by him or by his agent or employee, cognizant of the fact of 
the quantity of all sawn lumber, timber, railway car stuff, ship 
timber and knees, shingles, laths, cordwood or bark, or any 
other product of timber sold or disposed of by him durin^ such 
quarter or other period and the price of value thereof, the 
licensee to be liable to a fine of $50.00 if the returns aforesaid 



be not filed in the Department of Agriculture and Mines within 
thirty days from the date on which they are required to be 
filed as aforesaid. 

Forfeiting Title for Non-Payment of 
Rents of Limits. 

SEC. 6. Whenever the rent or royalties payable under any 
lease to cut timber shall be in arrears and unpaid for the period 
of six months from the day on which the same became due, the 
Governor in Council may, without any suit or other proceedings 
to enjoin the same, declare such license forfeited and there 
upon the same shall be again open to application by the public. 

Survey of Mining Location. 

SEC. 17. Within one year from the date on which notice is 
given by the applicant for a ninety-nine year lease of a mining 
location or locations to the Minister of Agriculture and Mines, 
that it is his attention to hold said land as provided by Section 
47 of the said Crown Lands Act, 1903, such applicant shall, at 
his own expense, cause a survey of the location or locations 
referred to therein to be made by a Surveyor approved by the 
Minister of Agriculture and Mines, and shall cause a diagram 
thereof, with the notes of the surveyor, to be filed in the Depart 
ment of Agriculture and Mines within the same period. In 
all such surveys of mining locations, the bearings of the 
boundaries shall be from the True Meridian. 




SYDNEY D. BLANDFORD, 



St. John s, Newfoundland, November, J9J4. 



Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 



writing to Advertisers kinly mention " The Newfoundland Quarter]^ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



A Neighborly Feeling 

prompts one to be sociable at times and 
extend hospitality to their friends when they 
call. So keep your tea caddie well stocked ; 
your friends will appreciate the Clip of 
Qualify brewed from 

HOMESTEAD. 

Faultless in quality, its flavor makes staunch 
friends. 5Oc. Ib. 

For 5 Ib. Parcels, ten per cent, discount allowed. 

C. P. EAGAN, 

Duckworth St. and Queen s Road. 



Our Christmas Ulisb 

is that your 

Bread, Pies 
and Pudding 

be made from 

Verbena 
flour. 

W. A. mm, Wholesale Agent. 




1914 Greeting 1914 

CHANNING S DRUG STORE desires to publicly thank 
their many friends for the kind patronage during the past 
year, and wish them, one and all, a Merry Christmas. 

We respectfully draw your attention to our Stock of 

i PERFUMERY ! i 

It is the very choicest obtainable, and being put up in 
fancy boxes, baskets, &c., would make ideal Christmas 
Presents. We also carry a full line of 

Perfume Sprays, Sachet Powders, Toilet Boxes, 

Hair Brushes, Shaving Brushes, Fancy Toilet Soaps, 
^ ^ ^ i Smelling Bottles, Washing Gloves, 

in fact a complete assortment of everything necessary 
for Toilet and Medicinal purposes. 

A visit to our Store will convince you, that right here 
is the best place to buy anything in the above line. 

We defy competition in goods or prices. 

CHANNING S DRUG STORE, 145 New Gower Street 

Phone 785. Open till n o clock every night. P.O. Box 806. 



Mm, Johnston & Co., 



ESTABLISHED I78O. 



Merchants, Ship-Owners, &c. 



Agents 



The Alliance Assurance Co., Ltd. 

LONDON. 

Total Assets exceed $120,000,000. 

Fire Premiums for 1912 exceeded.. $6,500,000. 



Agents 



J 



Newman s Celebrated Port Wine 

In Hhds., Quarter Casks, Octaves and Cases. 



GUARDIAN 

ASSURANCE CO., LTD., 
Of London, England. 



ESTABLISHED 1831. 



The Guardian has the largest paid-up capital of any 
Company in the world transacting a Fire business. 

Subscribed Capital $10,000,000.00 

Paid-up Capital ........ 5,000,000.00 

Invested Funds exceed 25,000,000.00 

T. & M. WINTER, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



Miss May Furlong 

Is now showing everything suitable for XMAS PRESENTS. 

Handsome Fur Sets, Fur Caps, all kinds of French 
Gloves in Ladies and Gentlemen s, French Neck 
wear, Ladies and Gentlemen s Handkerchiefs. 

Also, a large assortment of Fancy Goods, just the thing for the 

XMAS SEASON. 

Post Office Notice! To Postmasters. 

Payments to families of the Nfld. Naval Reserve is being made 
by means of British Postal Orders, and when presented at any 
Newfoundland Post Office they should be cashed when receipted 
by the payee, date stamped by the Postmaster and forwarded 
as cash to the General Post Office when remitting for stamps, 
&c., or may be forwarded as Money Order remittance or for 
deposit to the Bank of Montreal. 

The orders are in sterling and should be cashed at rate of 84.86 to the . 
Nov., 1914. H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 



When writing" to " Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 




Reid Newfoundland Company 

Proprietors of the Dry Dock, St. John s, Newfoundland 

One of the best equipped Dry Docks in America. Steamships docked and repaired 
at the lowest rates. Well equipped and thoroughly fitted with all modern appliances 
for temporary or permanent repairs. Length of Dock, 610 feet. Depth of Water, 25 feet. 

Proprietors and Operators of the St. John s Electric 
* Street Railway* < 

All the Electric power supplied in St. John s is generated on this system. City 
Lighting and Power for Factories, etc., supplied at moderate rates. Those requiring 
Electric Power for any purpose should consult the undersigned. 

Owners of Thirteen Clyde-Built Steamships 

Royal Mail Steamers operating on Bays and Coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador. 

Lessees and Operators of the Newfoundland Railway, 831 miles. Owners of 
2,500,000 acres of Mineral and Timber Lands. 

The Newfoundland Express Company, carrying on Express Business with all Express Com 
panies of the world, and Money Orders issued to all parts. 

The Railway and Steamship Systems give the best 

connection between Newfoundland and Canada and the United States, and the best 
freight line between Canada and Newfoundland. S.S. "BRUCE" and " LINTROSE " 
connect at North Sydney with the Intercolonial Railway daily, except Sunday, leav 
ing North Sydney on the arrival of the I. C. R. Express Trains on these evenings. 

Newfoundland offers to the Tourists, Sportsmen and Health-Seeker the grandest 
scenery in the Western Hemisphere. A most beautiful climate in the summer 
months ; cool, even and invigorating. No hay fever. 

Finest Caribou Hunting Grounds in the World. < # # 

Best Salmon and Trout Streams that have yet been discovered. The Railway is equipped 
)ining and Sleeping Cars, and everything to please the taste and add to the 
comfort of the Tourist is provided. 

catfon t f The ati n ^ ""^^ ^ Newfoundland and Labrador will be given on appli- 

REID NEWFOUNDLAND CO., 

ST. JOHN S, NE WFOUNDLAND. 



E WFOUNDI2VND > 




SPRING NUMBER, 1915 



JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 







STEEL SEALING KI.KKT. 




HA VI. INC, SEALS AT THE ICE-FIELDS. 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Insure Your Property 



WITH THE 



IMRPOOL and LONDON and GLOBE 

Insurance Company, Limited. 
Bowring, Bros., Ltd., 

Agents for Newfoundland. 

CENTRAL GARAGE,^ 



F. J. DODD, Proprietor. 



AGENCIES : 

The Famous Sun 
beam Cars, 

White Cars and 
Trucks, 

Regal Cars, 
Dodge Cars, 

C.A.V. and Rush- 
more Lighting 
Outfits. 

Phone 318. 




Always in Stock : 

Goodrich Tires, 

Vacuum Oils and 
Greases, 

Assortment of Ac 
cessories and 
Spare Parts. 

> 

Repairing a Specialty 
Estimates Free. 



THE CENTRAL GARAGE, Catherine Street. 



(MM. J. MURPHY, 

1 1 Pennywell Road, 

HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTER. 

Paper-Hanging and 
Interior Work a Specialty* 



P. O. BOX 142. 



James Pidgeon, 

Carpenter and Builder. 

Jobbing Promptly Attended to 

Workshop 15 Bannerman Street. 
Residence 28 Prescott Street. ST. JOHN S, NfLD. 




Notice to Mariners! 

NEWFOUNDLAND. (No. n, 1914.) 



IRON ISLAND, 

Off Eastern Entrance to Burin Harbour, Placentia Bay. 
Re-Establishment of Light. 

Latitude 47 02 40" North. 
Longitude 55 06" 50" West. 

TICE is hereby given that a Fixed Red Light on Iron 
Island, discontinued as per Notice to Mariners, No. i, 
1914, dated February 2 oth, 1914, is now reestablished. 

A. W. PICCOTT, Minister Marine & Fisheries. 
Depart. Marine & Fisheries, St. John s, Nfld., Sept, 5, 1914. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland OnartpHv 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Post Office Department 

Parcels way be Forwarded by Post at Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 






FOR NEWFOUNDLAND A\D 
LABRADOR. 


FOR UNITED KINGDOM. 


FOR UNITED STATES. 


FOR DOMINION OF 

CANADA. 


I pou 

2 pOU 

3 

4 

I 

8 
9 

IO 

1 1 


nd 


See 
ii 
>4 
1? 
20 

2 3 
26 
29 
3 2 
35 
35 
Under i Ib 
per 2 oz. 


nts 


24 ce 
24 
24 
48 
48 
48 
48 
T- 
7 2 
72 
7 2 
No parcel 
less than 






12 cents. 
24 
36 
48 
60 
72 
84 
96 
$1.08 

I .20 
I 3 2 

No parcel sent to I), of C. foi 
less than 12 cents. 


nds 














l6 








d8 








60 






( 








( 


84 






t 


96 




t 


$1 08 






t 








i 






weight, i cent 


sent to U. K. for 
24 cents. 


No parcel sent to U. S. for 
less than 12 cents. 



N.B. Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers : say Red Cross Line to and from New York ; 

Allan Line to and from Philadelphia. 
Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Tuesday at 3 p.m., for despatch by Express train. 

RATES OF COMMISSION 
ON MONEY ORDERS. 

THE Rates of Commission on Money Orders issued by any Money Order Office in Newfoundland to the United States 
of America, the Dominion of Canada, and any part of Newfoundland are as follows : 

For sums not exceeding $10 S cts. Over #50 but not exceeding $60 . .30 cts. 



General Post Office. 



Over $10, but not exceeding $20 . . . . 10 cts. 

Over $20, but not exceeding $30 15 cts. 

Over $30, but not exceeding $40 20 cts. 

Over $40, but not exceeding $50 25 cts. 



Over $60 
Over $70 
Over $80 
Over $go 

Maximum amount of a single Order to any of the ^ABOVE COUNTRIES, and to offices in NEWFOUNDLAND, $100.00, but as 
many may be obtained as the remitter requires. 

General Post Office St. John s, Newfoundland, March, igij. H. J. B. "WOODS, PostmastCf General. 



but not exceeding 870 35 cts - 

but not exceeding $80 4 cts - 

but not exceeding $90 45 cts - 

but not exceeding Sioo 50 cts. 



NEWFOUNDLAND 



Postal Telegraph 




POSTAL TELEGRAPH OFFICES are operated throughout the Colony at all 
the principal places. Messages of ten words, not including address or signature, are forwarded 
for Twenty Cents, and two cents for each additional word. 

A Government cable to Canso, Cape Breton, connects with the Commercial Cable Co. s system 
to all parts of the World. There is no more efficient Telegraphic Service in existence. 

A ten word message to Canada, exclusive of ) From $O.85 

signature and address, costs 

A ten word message to the United States, i From $I.IO 
exclusive of signature and address, costs 

To Great Britain, France or Germany-25 cents per word. 

Telegrams are transmitted by means of the Wireless Service during the summer season, and 
all the year round to Steamers equipped with the wireless apparatus, which are due to pass 
the radius of the wireless stations at Cape Race and Cape Ray. 

Telegraph messages may be obtained at all Post Offices and from Mail Clerks on Trains and 
Steamers and if the sender wishes the messages may be left with the P. 
first mail to the nearest Telegraph Office free of postage. 

H. J. B. WOODS, Postmaster General. 
General Post Office, St. John s, Newfoundland, March, 1915. 

""When, writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Imperial Life Assurance Co y 



Of 



Head Qffice Toronto - 



The Cost of Smoking 

Do you know that the cost of your two or three 
cigars say a quarter a day will maintain about 
$4,000 of life assurance for a man between 25 
and 30? 

You can afford to smoke, sure ! But you can also afford an 
Imperial Life Policy to provide for your wife and little 
ones should death call you suddenly. 

For full information WRITE or CALL, to 

JAS. A. MACKENZIE, 



P. O. Box 147. 



Manager for Newfoundland. 

Law Chambers Building, 



Why Red Rose is a 

"Distinctive" Tea 

Because it is largely composed of the fine teas 
of Northern India, which are generous in strength 
and richness. These, blended with the flavory teas 
of Ceylon, produce the qualities for which RED 
ROSE is famed. 



N.B. Coffee users will 
find Red Rose Coffee 
as generously good as 
Red Rose Tea. 



Red Rose 

IfA 



"Is Good Tea." 



LET US SUIT YOU ! 



The majority of American and Canadian 
men are wearing READYMADE CLOTHING. 
So also are the majority of Newfoundland 
ers. Our Experts Cutting and Making 
enables you to obtain a fit and style that 
Satisfies the most fastidious. Our popular 
brands are : Americus, Fitreform, Stylenfit, 
Truefit, and Progress. 

Newfoundland Clothing Co y, Limited. 



At times of 
crisis it must 
be Bovril 

BRITISH TO THE BACKBONE, 

T. J. EDENS, Agent for Newfoundland. 



[lectric Pocket Lamps 

At BYRNE S Bookstore. 



t 750., 95c., $1.00, 1.35, 
.75, 2.10, 2.50, 3.30 each. 

$1.90, 2.75, 3.30, 5.50, 
and 7.50 each. 



Pocket Lamps, \ 
Pocket Torches, 

Extra Bulbs and Batteries to suit above kept in stock. 

GARRETT BYRNE, 
Bookseller and Stationer. 



North West 

fire Insurance Co. of Winnipeg, 

Incorporated 1880. 

Policies Guaranteed by the Union Assurance Society, 
of London, England. 

Chas. O Neill Conroy, 



Oke Building, SI. John s. 



Agent lor Newfoundland. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Ne\ 



r 11 



Vol. XIV. No. 4. 



APRIL, 1915 



40 cents per year. 



tTcwfounaCand and tfte War. 

By Dr. Arthur Selwyn-Brown. 









j 





HEN the news was 
flashed across the 
cables on August 
5th that England 
had declared war 
with Germany in 
order to fulfil the British Govern 
ment s promise to protect the 
sovereignty ot Belgium, New 
foundlanders at once felt a 
desire to assist the Motherland 
in what was clearly foreseen 
would be a gigantic war. Steps 
were at once taken to offer 
sailors and soldiers to the British 
Government. The people did 
not hold back from the battle 



A. SELWVN-BROWN, M.A., PH.D., LL.D. 

when civilization in Europe was 

threatened, and like the Americans pursue, to their eternal shame, 
a cowardly policy of watchful wailing. They were of British stock 
and were determined to fight to the last man with characteristic 
British assurance. While the fighting promised to be severe, 
thev felt there could only be one end the triumph of Britain 
and h;r Allies. They remembered Ihe teachings of history. 
Never has England called on her soldiers and sailors in a good 





H.M.S. " IKON HIKE. 

cause in vain and never before was the Empire called to battle 
in defence of more glorious principles. Not only has Britain 
undertaken to fight so as to restore Belgium to the Belgians, but 
to help France, to protect the civilization of Europe as well as 
the rights and freedom of the small nations and to uphold Chris 
tianity. It is a splendid task that could only be undertaken by 
the grandest nation this world has ever developed. While all 
the world wondered at the task Great Britain set herself, the 
people of even the remotest portions of the Empire vied with 
each other in offering their services and their means to assist 
the Motherland. They felt and dedicated themselves to Eng 
land s cause as the Indian Poet Nizamunt Jung pictured the 
people of India doing when they sang : 

O England in thine hour of need, 

When Faith s reward and valor s meed 



Is death or glory ; 
When Faith indites, with biting brand, 
Clasped in each warrior s stiff ning hand 

A Nation s story ; 

? hou 
The 

On Victory s field ; 
Yet turn, O mighty Mother! turn 
1 nto the million hearts that burn 
To be thv shield. 



sugh weak our hands, which fain would clasp 
i warrior s sword with warrior s grasp 



They, whom thy love hath guarded long ; 
They, whom thy care hath rendered strong 

In love and faith, 

Their heartstrings round thy heart entwine ; 
They are, they ever will be thine 

In life in death ! 




A BRITISH SUBMARINE. 

They felt that the most tremendous, most unscrupulous and 
most inhuman predatory assault of the Germans upon the 
world s civilization would tax the British Empire s full military 
and naval strength and, consequently, it was only just that in 
return for all the benefits bestowed upon the various constituent 
units of the Empire, all capable of bearing arms should give 
their services. And Newfoundland has done her share well. 
Two units of 1,000 men each have been given to the Empire 
one being a naval unit and the other a military one. These 
units, together with their reserves will absorb about 2,500 men 
and there are several hundred Newfoundlanders, not included 
in the above, who are serving on land and sea with English and 
Canadian units. 

Newfoundlanders are serving in all the fighting services in 
the infantry, cavalry, artillery, the flying corps, in battleships, 
transports, submarines, patrol boats, coast-defences, cycle, 
medical, ambulance and hospital corps and in the various mili 
tary and naval engineering services. No part of our great 
Empire is more fully represented in diversity of service and 
efficiency. Nor ha r e our recruiting returns been exceeded on a 
per capita basis by any other Colony. 

The first draft of the First Newfoundland Regiment, ^40 
strong, left St John s in the Florizel on October 5th. 1914. It 
was landed at Devonport, England, on October 16 and sent to 
Salisbury Plains, near London. A large amount of training was 
undergone there. Over 70,000 soldiers were in the camp 
and the military authorities found that the Newfoundland Regi 
ment soon became one of the smartest and most trustworthy 
of all. The Regiment was inspected by Lord Roberts, 




A BRITISH SEAPLANE. 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 2. 




OFFICERS OF SECOND DRAFT OF NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT. 

Top Row Lieut. H. Rendell, Lieut. S. Robertson, Lieut. W. Pippy. 2nd Row Lieut. J. Donnelly, 
Capt. E Ayre, Capt. A. Montgomerie, Capt. L. Patterson, Lieut. H. S Windeler. 3id K<uv 
Lieut. H. V. Reid, Lieut. C. B. Carter. [P/iote by A . P. IMlo-^ay. 

Lord Kitchener, the King and many other distinguished people 
who were all favorably impressed by its soldierly qualities. It 
was represented in the Lord Mayor of London s annual pro 
cession and was loudly cheered by vast throngs of Londoners. 

The Regiment had the good fortune to be ordered to complete 
its tiaining at Fort George Barracks, near Inverness, Scotland. 
These barracks are in the heart of the Scottish Highlands and 
are the head-quarters of the famous Seaforth Highlanders. Our 
men arrived there on December 8th, 1914, and underwent a 
severe training, exactly as the famous Highland troops are 
trained, until February 2oth last when they were ordered to 
Edinburgh Castle to await the remaining drafts. When the Regi 
ment was in the Highlands it was possible to compare it with 
the celebrated Scotch troops. The general opinion of the 
Scotch people, as voiced by the Inverness, Nairn and Edinburgh 
newspapers, is that they compare favorably with the Scotch 
regiments. 

The Regiment was welcomed to 
Edinburgh by the Mayor and civil 
and military authorities. The good 
impression it made in the Highlands 
induced crowds of citizens in Edin 
burgh to give the Regiment a hearty 
welcome on its arrival at the Waverly 
Station. The Fort George draft found 
250 men of the second draft awaiting 
it in Edinburgh Castle in the heart of 
the Scotch Capital. The second draft 
left St. John s on February 5th on the 
s.s. Dominion and arrived in Edinburgh 
on Feb. lyth. The third draft by the 
s.s. Orduna now makes the Regiment 
in Scotland 1,000. The final draft will 
soon join it and bring its strength up to 
1,400 when it will leave for the front. 

The Naval units amounting to 
nearly 1,000 men have been drafted 
to England in several drafts. They 
have been trained in the principal 
naval depots in England and assigned 
to positions on various ships. All the 
naval men have gained the confidence 
and praise of the Admiralty and have 
been entrusted with a variety of duties. 



The British sailor is everywhere known as 
a handy man. But the Newfoundland 
Naval Volunteers have snown that there 
are degrees of handiness and they are among 
the handi< t. 

It fell to the lot of our naval men to be 
assigned to active service first. As a result 
they have also suffered the first losses. Some 
who formed part of the crews of H.M. Ships 
Vicknor, Clan MacNanghtcn and Baytino, 
which were sunk by submarines off the 
English Coast lost their lives while on duty 
and found graves in the historic seas where 
the great admirals and seamen of England 
fought O many gallant fights in the defence 
uf the freedom we have so long enjoyed. 

While the men have freely volunteered 
for active service, the women and girls of 
Newfoundland have not been idle spectators. 
They have, by means of concerts, bazaars 
and other charitable entertainments, secured 
many thousands ot dollars for the relief of 
the victims of German savagery in Belgium 
and France, and have laboured incessantly 
since the commencement of the war in knit 
ting socks jackets and other useful articles 
for the men at the front and on the war- 
An astonishing number of presents 
be-n shipped from St. John s for the 
front. The efforts made by the women of 
Newfoundland to assist the Biitish soldiers 
and sailors, and alle\iate the suffering of the sick and wounded, 
cannot be praised t:o highly. They show how the justness of 
England s cause is appreciated here and how thoroughly the 
sentiments of the peole of England s oldest Colony are united 
with those of the people of Great Britain and the British Empire. 
It is fully recognized that we are not engaged in an ord:nary 
war; but in a war in defence of ino-al princip es : a holy war 
waged whole-heirtedly ii the defei:e of all that is no ole and 
beautiful in Christian civilization. 

It is imposs ble to conceive the true meani ig of this .var un 
less we learn something of the character of the G;-m\n people, 
their national ideals and the extraordinary philosophy which 
has urged them to the destruction of their Empire. 

The Germans, since the earliest times have been know i as a 
barbarous, quarrelsome people who could never be civilized. 
Julius Caesar in his History of the Conquest of Gaul asserted 
that the Germans were too q larrelsome and du l to be p operly 




Photo by S. H. Parsons &> Sons. 

VOLUNTEERS FAREWELL DANCE AT THE BRITISH HALL. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 3. 




VOLUNTEERS EMUVRK1NG ON THE TENDER "NEPTUNE." [PhotobvA.Tooton. 

civilized. The history of Germany is a continual record of 
fighting. The wild Germans several times over-ran Europe, as 
they recently tried to do again, robbing, plundering and laying 
waste the territory they traversed by fire and sword like they 
have lately done in Belgium, Poland and France. 

In recent years, like the Japanese, they have taken on a 
veneer of civilization. But the war has disclosed that the 
modern Germans are at heart essentially savages. Nietzsche in 
one of his lucid intervals wrote of them : " The Germans are 
written down in the history of knowledge with imposing, ambigu 
ous names ; they have never produced anything but unconscious 
swindlers (Fichte, Schelling, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Schleierma- 
cher, deserve the word as much as Kant or Leibnitz : they are 
all mere Schleiermachers or veil mikers). The German mind 
is my bad air ; I breathe with difficulty in the neighborhood of 
this instinctive impurity in psychologicis vvhi:h is betrayed by 
every word, every Ijok of a German. They have never come 
through a seventeenth century of laborious self-criticism as the 
French did. The Germans have had m psychologist up to the 
present. But capacity for psychology is almost the standird of 
the purity or impurity of a race. If one is not pure how can 
one be deep ? We can never giuge the depth of a German, 
because, like women, he has none. And if a man has no d^pth 
he cannot even be c.illed shallow. What in Germany is called 
deep is just this instinctive impurity against one s self, about 
which I am now speaking: they will not see themselves as they 
are. May I not propose the wo-d "German" as an interna 
tional coin for this psychological degeneracy? 

" It is part of my ambition to bs looked upDn as a despiser 
of the Germans par excellence. I expressed my distrust of the 
German character as far back as my twenty-sixth year (1870). 
The Germ .ins are impossible to me. When I think of a type 
of man that runs counter to my instincts, a German always 
appears. The first means I have of weighing a man is by know 
ing whether he perceives rank, grade and order between men; 
whelhf r he distinguishes : In this way he is a gentleman; in 
every other respect he belongs irretrievably to the open minded, 
good-natured tribe of canaille. But the Garmans are canaille- 
oh, they are so good natured ! One lowers oneself by having 
dealings with Germans. With the exception of my intercourse 
with some German artists, especially Richud^Wagner, I have 
not spent a single happy hour with a. German." 

That is the candid opinion one of the greatest teachers of 
modern .Germany held of the character of the German people. 
It confirms what many modern wri ers have said of them. 

Prince Von Bulow, Germ in Ambassador to Italy, formerly 
Impe ial Chancellor, lately wrote in his "Imperial Germany : ; 
" Despite the abundance of merits and great qualities with 
which the German nation is endowed, political talent has been 
denie 1 to it. . . . We are not a political people. 



Not that we ever lacked penetration and 
understanding for the sequence of political 
things . . . but what we did lack, and 
what we still often lack, is the art of pro 
ceeding from insight to practical application 
and the great art of doing the right thing 
politically by a sure creative instinct. . 
Politically there is an obvious disproportion 
between our knowledge and our power. . . . 
There is too often a lack of the political 
discernments which can grasp the bearing 
of acquired knowledge. . . . We are 
political donkeys." 

After drawing attention to the amena 
bility of the Germans to discipline, which 
he thinks is a good characteristic, Von 
Biilow admonishes his countrymen to re 
member that Tacitus writing about their 
ancestors related that it was through envy 
and jealousy, the old Germans destroyed 
their liberators, the Cherusci. 

From what these writers have said of the 
inherent defects of the German character 
(he causes of many of their wanton actions 
in the present war will be perceived. 

Dr. Dillon, writing about the causes of the present war, in 
dicates his belief that a lack of penetration or depth, the same 
deficiency that Nietzsche pointed out, accounts for many of the 
mistakes the Kaiser and his advisers have fallen into. He says 
that: Despite their powers of observation and analysis, the 
Germans, even those who are gifted and experienced, are devoid of 
some indefinable inner sense without which they must ever lack 
(rue insight into the soul-stuff, the dormant qualities of the 
people whose wrath they have wantonly aroused. To the realm 
of British thought and feeling they, with their warped psycho 
logical equipment, find no access. Its secondary characteristics 
they grasp with their noted thoroughness and seek to practice 
upon with their traditional cynicism. But the deeper springs of 
our race character, its clear-souled faith, its masculine vigour 
and its vast reserve of elemental force lie beyond their narrow 
range of vision. To the sentient and perceptive powers even 
of the most acute German observer, the workings of the British 
soul, its inherent nobilities, its deep moral feeling, are inac 
cessible." 

The Germans, unlike all the other races of Europe, have a 
very unstable character. They cannot rule themselves, but re 
quire autocrats to manage them. Whenever they settle among 
other people, as in Russia, England or the United States, they 
lose their identity and become merged with the people of il.c 
country. But they have always exhibited a strange sentimental 
liking for exotic and whimsical doctrines of a particularly deca 
dent nature- A majority of their principal literary men have 
been undoubted decadents men who have not only preached 
decadent themes but lived decadent lives. They were jealous 




Photo by Miss U ay ward. 

s.s. "NEPTUNE" ON HER WAY TO s.s. "DOMINION" OUTSIDE 

THE HARBOR AWAITING OUR VOLUNTEERS. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 4. 



of the grandeur and beauty of the world and dedicated their 
lives to lauding and painting impure phantoms, skeletons and the 
slimy phosphorescent elements of putresence and decay in gay- 
colours, in proclaiming beauty in sin and seeming to sing with 
the French Poet Baudelaire : 

We will embark upon the shadowy sea, 

Like youthful wanderers for the first time free 

Hear you the lovely and funereal voice 

That sings : O come all ye whose wandering joys 

Are set upon the scented Lotus flower, 

For here we sell the fruits miraculous boon ; 

Come ye and drink the sweet and sleepy power 

Of the enchanted, endless afternoon. 

O Death, old captain, it is time, put forth ! 

We have grown weary of the gloomy north ; 

Though sea and sky are black as ink, lift sail ! 

Our hearts are full of light and will not fail. 

pour thy sleepy poison in the cup ! 

The fire within the heart so burns us up 

That we would wander Hell and Heaven through, 

Deep in the Unknown seeking something new ." 
Degeneracy runs through all German intellectual work in 
the works of German playwrights, artists, novelists and musi 
cians. Even Nietzsche, one of the masters of German decadence, 
saw degeneracy in the German music. In his " Case Against 
Wagner" he said : "I am far from wishing to be a harmless on 
looker when that decadent is ruining our health and our music 




Photo I V S. H. Parsons cV Sons. 
S.S. DOMINION AWAITING THE S.S. NEPTUNE OUTSIDE ST. JOHN S. 

veil I Indeed, is Wagner really a man ? Is he not rather 
disease ? Everything he touches falls ill he has made music ill. 

Wagner is the modern artist par excellence, the Cagliostro of 
modernity. In his heart we find bound up, in the most seductive 
fashion possible, what is necessary for everyone today the three 
great stimulants of exhaustion : the brutal, the artistic and the 
idiotic." 

The same decadent characteristics will be found in the artists 
and musicians today. They are the distinguishing features of the 
music of Strauss and Wolff-Ferrari. 

When a nation s intellectual life is permeated with decadent 
principles it would be absurd to expect to find the people enjoy 
ing good aesthetic and moral standards. Even a superficial 
examination of German works of art, paintings, statuary, sculpture 
arid architecture, shows a very primitive degree of taste. The 
art-forms are coarse and crude, the colour schemes are 
grotesque and bizarre. 

Emil Reich an Austrian writer, attributes Germany s crude- 
ness and lack of culture to the fact that it is an upstart among 
the nations. He says : " Prussia was 250 years ago a small state 
under the suzeranity of the King of Poland. Six hundred years 
ago, most of the Prussians proper were still heathens talking a 
Slav language. It was only by the end of the thirteenth century 
chat the Prussi were converted to Christianity. Some of the South 
German people contend that this conversion is not complete 
even in our day. 

It is common knowledge that, of all the kinds of intractable 



STby f7 re n En^Ts^s, Poles and formerly ,ven 
by the Hungarians. For centuries the German Princes hat in 
hand, went the round of all the courts in Europe begging or 
subsidies, kissing the hands and licking the shoes of powerful 
Ministers Kings* Popes and Generals. For centuries they were 
utilized like so many flunkeys by the older and more powerful 
nations around them." 

We might expect that among a people dull and envious as the 
Germans, and having experienced such a disagreeable history, 
there would be a better field for the dissemination of evil than 
goodness. So Nietzsche found. He is their great instructor. 
While many writers conspired to bring about the present war, the 
teachings of Nietzsche did incomparably more to lead the Ger 
mans to destruction than any other writer. And Nietzsche suc 
ceeded in doing that by his anti-Christian ideas. The doctrine 
of " Frightfulness " and the cult of universal lying now b;mg so 
widely practised by the Germans are almost entirely due to 
Nietzsche s instructions. The war is but a manifestation of the 
fruitage of his theories. As Frederic Rogers says : " It is de 
cadence and only that which is manifesting itself in the German 
soul now. A war can be marked by noble characteristics, even 
if it is in a wrong cause. History has proved that many times. 
But let anyone point out, if the can, one single act of nobility in 
Germany s actions or in her attitude towards Europe in this 
struggle. Only treachery and cowardice have manifested them 
selves in her conduct in Poland, Belgium and France and hypo 
crisy towards the rest of the world. And this is not altered by 
the fact that there are brave soldiers in the German army. 
There are such men in all armies. This decadence in the soul 
of Germany found its response in the decadence in the philoso 
phy of Nietzsche." 

The two main ideas permeating Nietzsche s philosophy are 
" the Will to Power" and " Master and Slave Morality." The 
motive power of all organic life, he thought, is not the "Will to 
Live," but a desire to expand, to grow, to appropriate, to gain 
power and this desire he called the " Will to Power." He con 
sidered that men are not equal. They can be divided into two 
classes, masters and men, the aggressive and the passive, those 
who command and those who obey. " Wherever I found a liv 
ing thing," he says, " there I found the -Will to Power " .- and 
even \n the will of the servant, I found the will to be master. 
Neither necessity nor desire, but the love of power, is the demon 
of mankind. You may give men everything possible health, 
food, shelter, enjoyment but they are and remain unhappy and 
capricious, for the demon waits and waits and must be satisfied. 
Passion for power is the earthquake which breaketh and up- 
breaketh all that is rotten and hollow ; the rolling, rumbling, 
punitive demolisher of whited sepulchres ; the flashing interro 
gative sign beside premature answers ; passion for power, 
before whose glance man creepeth and croucheth and drudgeth. 
and becometh lower than the serpent and swine, until at last 
great contempt crieth out of him. The criterion of truth lieth 
in the enhancement of the feeling of power." 

In this way Nietzsche finds nobility consists in the ability to 
command and obey and therefore culture consists essentially in 
obedience and habituation. Good is all that enhances the feel 
ing of power, the " Will to Power" and power itself in man. Evil 
on the other hand is that which weakens such power all that 
proceeds from weakness, envy and revenge. These were his 
moral principles and he deducted from them that to be brave 
and fight is good. Every national gift should be allowed to 
develop by contests. It was from these teachings that Bern- 
hardi learnt that " War is a biological necessity, an indispensable 
regulator in the life of mankind, failing which would result a 
course of evolution deleterious to the species and too utterly 
antagonistic to all culture." 

And when the Germans speak of culture, they have in view 
the doctrine of the superman, and mean the parallelism of the 
brute power of the ruling classes and the mule like obedience 
of the people. It is the cult of the brute in man. 

The development of the " Will to Power," Nietzsche tl ought, 
leads mankind upwards from the species to the super snecies 
from man to super-man. Anything hindering this is not benefi- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 5. 



cial to the race. Among those things which would strongly pre 
vent the development of supermen, pity, compassion and bene 
volence are prominent. Nietzsche felt so strongly opposed to 
these so-called anti-eugenic factors that he wrote his " Anti- 
Christ " to oppose Christianity which emphasizes such virtues. 
In that work he said that if the sick and poor were of the same 
value as the strong and rich the natural course of evolution 
would bs thwarted and the unnatural would become law. The 
species requires the suppression of the physiologically batched, 
the weak and degenerate ; but it is precisely to these people 
that Christianity appealed as a conservative force. Christian 
altruism is the mob-egotism of the weak. It aims at the self- 
preservaiion and advantage of the inferior classes of society. It 
is an additional means, perhaps, for the super-men to overcome 
the resistance in the exercise of authority ; but he finds many 
disadvantages accompanying it and after surveying them he is 
overcome by a fit of anger and exclaims : " I condemn Christianity 
and confront it with the most terrible accusation that an accuser 
has ever had in his mouth. To my mind it is the greatest of 
all conceivable corruptions. I call Christianity the one great 
curse, the one enormous and innermost perversion, the one 
great instinct of revenge, for which no means are too venemous, 
too underhand, too underground and too petty I call it the one 
immortal blemish of mankind." 

It is quite evident these words were never uttered by a sane 
man. They are the product of a diseased mind. Nietzsche 
said many correct and clever things in his many writings, but 
it is plain to all who read his works that he was never a sane 
man. He was only a violent lunatic towards the end of his life; 
but his mind was never normal. Still, this unbalanced intellect 
has swayed all modern German thought and led the Gerrruns 
away from Christianity backwards into bubarism and caused 
the whole nation to revert to the primitive belief that might is 
right. 

A distinguished writer reviewing conditions in Europe says: "We 
seem to be confronted with a great nation maddened by success 
and wholly in the the thrall of a theory which other nations are 
just beginning to out-grow the theory of brute force and disre 
gard for the rights of others. But the matter is simplified if we 
bear in mind, first, that the Germans have, as a nation, appar 
ently thrown aside Christianity ; secondly, that they are a logical 
people. ... I should find it quite impossible to intrepret 
the modern German mind without noting first this guiding fact- 
it is a national mind in revolt from Christianity. Many who 
have written and spoken on the subject during the last few 
weeks have emphasized the war being a conflict between civili 
zation and barbarism. But it makes the position much clearer 
if we observe that when d ; sbelief in the central doctrines of 
Chrisiianity spreads over the whole governing class of a nation, 
there is no hing to bar the intrusion of the only rival creed- 
that is force. Obviously the history of Prussia has helped the 
Prussians to become votaries of this creed fas preached by 
Clausewitz, Treitschke, Von der Goltz, Bulow, Bernhardi and the 
Kaiser) ; but no national annals would have had this particular 
effect unless the German mind, in respect to fundamental prin 
ciples, had been empty, swept and garnished. . . . 

The Germans appear to have developed the idea that the 
possession of the earth is above all things desirable; next that 
the great obstacle in the way is some lingering meek spirited- 
ness among the people. Therefore this must give way to violence. 
But if men go so far as that, the next step is to terrorism and 
in that word is included an indefinite number and variety of 
savageries. Meantime, have they not learnt from Bismark that 
the most useful handmaid of violence is lying? so the world is 
appalled by a hideous blend of brutality and lumbering cun 
ning Moreover, the prospect is distinctly revealed that 
chance this nation should prove victorious, a tyranny would 1 



set up o/er other nations. 



The behaviour of the Germans 



atL u M v/v w* vfc "*- , . - 

in Belgium his shed a lurid nomination on the logical outcome 
of heathenism in the Europe of to-day. It has astonished 
its thoroughness. . . . 

To many of us the greatest marvel of all the marvels of this 
time is the evidence, which is even now at hand, that in spite of 
her unutterable failings, infirmity of purpose, blindness to warn 
ings and callousness of wrong, Britain is again to be entrusted 



with an unspeakably great commission : the charge not only her 
self to act on the principles of the Gospel message, but to get 
all the foremost nations of the world to see, to understand and 
to know." 

Newfoundland s participation in the war is being watched with 
pleasure by the whole empire, and it is generally conceded that 
she has amply earned a distinguished place in whatever scheme is 
developed for closer Imperial Confederation when the war is over. 

Throughout the many wars and international negotiations 
recorded in the long and brilliant history of British diplomacy 
from the early Anglo Saxon days, through the periods of the 
Norman and Plantagenet Kings, indistinctly at times, and then 
again shining brightly like the sun s rays on a sparkling summer 
sea, as we see it to-day triumphantly emblazoned on our 
proud battle standards in France and Belgium, the majestic 
emblem of the Libertas Bntannica, has been bravely borne, 
the symbol of the creative force and steadfastness of the larger 
freedom and higher justice bestowed by those British ideals 
which have bound over a fifth part of the world s population 
into the grandest empire that has ever existed and brought the 
sacred blessings of peace, goodwill, and justice to the majority 
of mankind. It was a splendid inspiration that caused New 
foundland to send her finest manhood to battle under such 
standards and to assist in upholding such noble ideals, so that 
when the war is over they may prevail over a still larger part of 
the world than hitherto, thereby leading to a newer and greater 
epoch in civilization and to the binding of the nations into a 
lasting, mutually beneficial entente. 



Dies 



By Eunice T. Holbrook Ruel. 

WHAT of That " Day," you who have tried, 

To steal what belongs to God ? 
The Earth is The Lords and the fullness thereof, 

Though He grant us the use of the sod. 
The cattle upon a thousand hills, 

And the valleys thick with corn 
Belonged to the Lord of the Universe 

Before the war-lord was bom. 

He made the world and He s kept the world 

In the face of the Devil s host 
He has conquered death and conquered Hell 

By the power of the Holy Ghost. 
Yet you have said in your inmost heart 

There is never a God that will pay, 
For God and I we are partners and I 

Shall have it mine not God s way. 

For you thought to chain in iron bands, 

The world Christ died to save. 
But the world helongs to the Son of God; 

There is life beyond the grave. 
Have you tliought of that when you bade your men, 

Harrow and hack their way, 
Have you thought of the morning that will dawn, 

On the Resurrection Day? 

When the dead will rise and you will rise, 

And meet the clear, white flame 
Of the eyes of the Lord, who died to save, 

The world you have tried to shame. 
What will you say to the marks on his hand, 

The marks of the Calvary Tree, 
And what will you answer when He says : 

" This is what you have done to Me." 

The Devil will statvd, with the crowd of the damned. 

Will he pity your shamed head ? 
And where-ever you turn you will see the eyes, 

Of your risen accusing dead. 
And when in despair you turn away, 

The contempt of humanity, 
And the murdered babies of Belgium 

Standing at Jesus knee. 

O Second Herod ! What will you do 

To whom can you turn and pray * 
When the seal of the Lamb s great Book of Life, 

Breaks apart at the Judgment Day. 
AVill you call it " a scrap of paper " //, 

The pages wlieie your name should be ? 
He scorneth the scorner : and what will you do. 

When you face Eternity ? 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 6. 



Our Breat Seating industry, 

Qnd tfte fUen and ffletnods SmpCoyed from 3ime to 3ime in 4ts Prosecution. 



By Alex. A. Parsons, J.P. 




A. A. PARSONS, ESi.). 



" The salt . ea s secrets are all known 

to me, 

The dry earth s mysteries I under 
stand. 
What is a furrow but a wave of 

land? 

And what are waves but furrows of 
the sea ? 

"My love for both is equal and entire : 
This gives me wealth of fish and 

that of corn ; 

The son of both, I am the sea 
board s born, 

The land my mother and the sea my 
sire." 




|N preparing for the NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 
these illustrated notes on the rise and progress 
of our sealing industry, it is not my intention to 
write a history of this once great source of in 
come to the Colony, but merely to glance at the 
various important stages of development through 
which it has passed since its inception, little more than a cen 
tury ago. I shall begin by taking the reader back to 1800, 
when George the Third was King of Great Britain and Ireland 
and Admiral C. M. Pole Governor of Newfoundland and its 
Dependencies. That was fifty ye.irs before the Colony posses 
sed the " priceless boon of Responsible Government," as Mr. 
Philip Little, our first Prime Minister used to call it and when 




TYPES OF FIRST BOATS USED IN SEAL FISHERY. 

the Island was regarded by the Imperial authorities, and the 
" folks at home " generally, "as a valuable fishing station, but 
scarcely fit for permanent settlement." 

It seems that, at first, "seals were taken in nets which were 
placed between the shore and some island or rock at no great 
distance." In their migratory movements the seals go south 
along the shore during the early part of winter, and by means 
of nets placed in these narrow passages, a few were taken. We 
are told by L Abbe Raynal that, " even previous to the year 
1763, English fishermen were in the habit of repairing to certain 
favorable places in order to capture seals in the way referred 
to." A similar method is still pursued on some parts of the 
Northern Coast of the Island and also on Labrador. 

In 1800 the adventurous and perilous pursuit of seal-hunting 
was prosecuted in two different ways during the winter months 
by nets, and from March to June in decked boats and small 
schooners, pictures of which I herewith append. At that time 
the fishery by nets extended from Conception Bay to the coast 
of Labrador. Four or five men, ordinarily, constituted a crew 
to attend about twenty nets; but when seals were plentiful this 
number of nets required a double crew in separate boats. I 
remember to have heard the late Mr. Henry Lock of this city 
say that in comparatively recent years, when he was light-house 
keeper at Cape Norman, he and his assistants caught, one spring. 




FIRST VESSEL OF IOO TONS EMPLOYED IN THE SEAL FISHERY. 

in nets and on the ice, five hundred young and old seals. Un 
usually large herds passed up through the Strait of Bell Isle 
that season, and great numbers were captured by residents on 
both sides of the Strait. 

On the Labrador coast the seal net-fishery began in Novem 
ber and ended with Christmas, when the nets were taken up. 
On the coast of Newfoundland it began about Christmas and 
continued through the winter and spring. Up to the year 1800 the 
sealing business carried on by large boats and small schooners 
had not been general longer than nine years. It was pursued 
with varied success. From three to four thousand men were 
employed, and the historian of the time tells us that very few 
fatal accidents happened, notwithstanding the great risks they 
ran. St. John s, even then, we are told, took the lead in carry 
ing on this industry, and sent out to the icefields almost as many 
vessels as did all the ports of Conception Bay combined. For 
some years the ijth of March (St. Patrick s Day) was the date 
fixed for the sailing of the sealing vessels ; but there was then 
no legal enactment in reference to the matter. By thus delay- 




THE SEALING BRIG OF FIFTY YEARS AC.f 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 7. 



mg their departure they managed to avoid the equinoctial gales 
or " St. Patrick s brush," as it was called. 

Subsequently, ho.vever, they learned by experience the advan 
tage of making an earlier start in order to reach the young 
harps before they had taken to the water. The first of March 
at length becams the usual time for the fleet s departure. In 
these small schooners the men speedily acquired hardihood and 
daring, and became expert in battling with the ice-floes, hardi- 
hjjd because they had no fire except in the gilley for cooking 
purposes, and daring on account of their being exposed to im 
minent danger all the time. The Rev. Dr. Harvey, in his pre 
face to Mr. Chafe s excellent " Repsrt on the Newfoundland 
Seal Fishery " to which I am indebted for much of the infor 
mation contained in this article says the people of Conception 
Bay took prominence in prosecuting this enterprise, and Car- 
bonear, Harbor Grace, Bay Roberts, Cupids, and especially 
Brigus, became centres of the sealing industry. The skippers 
of these little vessels of from 40 to 80 or 100 tons, became re 
nowned as mighty hunters of seals, and many of them acquired 
cons : derable wealth. The c ews also shared in the profits, and 
comfort and abundance prevailed in these sealing towns and 
villages, especially in such places as Brigus, Biy Roberts, Har 
bor Grace and Carb >near. At the close of the voyage the men 



of us lay the barque Barbara, Capt. Kean, father or uncle of 
Capt. Abraham Kean of this city, the former at that time, like 
the latter now, one of the most successful seal-killers in the 
Colony. The weather continued boisterous all through the 
week, and Saturday morning it blew a terrific gale, with the 
temperature at zero. We had seen the storm coming and made 
the best arrangements we could to meet it. There were " lakes 
of water" all about, on the edge of one of which we lay, with a large 
ice berg just to windward. To the latter we fastened our strong 
est and best hawser and two smaller lines. The storm came on 
with increasing violence and the ice began to run with greater 
force than we had ever seen it. I had just turned in to warm 
and dry myself, during a temporary abatement of the storm, and 
was stretched out comfortably in the captain s bed, when I 
heard the sharp vibrating snap of a rope. Our second best line 
had parted, and we were swinging by the other two, the gale roar 
ing like a cataract through the pinnacles and bergs on our wea 
ther quarter. 

Half an hour more and " twang-twang !" came a second 
report. I knew it was the smaller line by the weight and sharp 
ness of the report. Our biggest and newest line still held on, 
and to its strength and durability we pinned our faith. I was in 
the act of tying on my " Elsinore" when Tom Glavine, the 




S.S. DIANA, BUILT ABOUT 45 YEARS AGO. 





enjaied therein spent their mo iey laviihly, and diJ not seam 
to lake he s ightest thought of the fu ure. In 1857 there were 
400 vessels of from 70 to 200 tons employed in the seal fishery, 
of which St. John s sent out about 150 ; their united crews num 
bering 13,000 men. The average annuil value of the seal 
fishery at that period was from a million it a million and a 
quarter dollars. 

I still remember quite distinctly my first and only experience 
at the ice-fields. We left Harbor G ace in the brigantine Union 
on the 5th of March in the middle sixties. For some days pre 
viously the harbor and bay had been packed with ice, but on 
the 4th the wind swung round from the south-west and blew 
with hurricane force all that afternoon and nuht. Next morn 
ing the bay was clear and most of the fleet (there were abiut 
ninety vessels in all) got off during the forenoon. They certam- 
Iv presented a pretty sight as with all their sails set and flags 
flyingthey glided out through the channel already cut for 
them in the hatbor ice, and, amid hearty cheers from the shore 
and responsive hurrahs on boar I, shaped their course for the 

habitat of the phoca. 

We ran out of Conc-ptioi Bay through the loose ice, taking a 
NNE course until daylight next morning; then hauled in t 
the N N W. till we sighted C^pe John. Here we picked up a 
few whitecoats ; but the wind suddenly shifting to the north 
with increasing violence, all hands were called on board and 
flings made as comfortable as possible. Some distance outsidi 



S S. TERRA NOVA, BUILT ABOUT 30 YEARS AGO. 

master of watch came tumbling down the companion ladder. 
" Skipper," said he to the captain, my uncle, who was drinking 
a cup of coffee, "she can t hang on much longer; tis blowing 
like blazes, and I m afraid our last line will soon go, and if so, 
we ll be driven clean out of the seals before daylight." When I 
reached the deck, at the heels of the captain, the big hawser 
was proving its strength, and the crew, as they gathered around 
it, were speculating as to how long it would bear the strain. It 
svas then as straight and hard as a bar of iron, and its ^olian 
music could be distinctly heard swelling through the deafening 
roar of the wind and the moaning of the shrouds. It seemed to 
be singing its requiem, as, in a few moments, the strands gave 
away and we were at the mercy of the running ice. Howexer, 
towards morning the wind gradually subsided and at daylight 
we found that we had passed out of the danger zone and were 
i i comparative safety. The sun shone brightly and the weather 
was all that could be desired. We took on board that day 800 
young harps. But it is not my purpose here to furnish a detail 
ed account of the incidents connected with an ordinary sealing 
voyage ; I am writing on the development of the seal fishery 
" simply that and nothing more 1" 

The fishery was not prosecuted by Newfoundlanders prior to 
1763. In 1787 about 5,000 seals were taken from the ice. To 
show the progress made in one hundred years, I would here 
remark that in 1871 there were 201 sailing vessels and 13 steam 
ers employed, with an aggregate crew of 9,791 men. The export 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 8. 




s S. l;ELLAVENTURE A. HARVEY & CO. ONE OF THE STEEL FLEET. 



of seal skins from the Colony between 1838 and 1848, when 
only small schooners were employed in the industry, varied from 
450,000 to 700,000 annually. With the introduction of steamers 
and for a time the indiscriminate slaughter of old seals, the 
work of extermination began, and has been slowly and surely 
going on ever since, until we now regard a crop of 300,000 as 
about as large a catch as we can reasonably expect. The ab 
normally good years for this industry were experienced from 
1820 to 1952, when the following large crops of seals were 
brought in from the icefields : 



1831 686,836 

1832 508,407 

1840 631,375 

- ^44 685,530 

1848 521,004 

l8 52 534,378 

The only other notably large catch secured between the years 
1852 and 1862 was that of 1858, when the number taken amount 
ed to 507,624. 

To quote again from the late Dr. Harvey: "In the year 
1863 the great innovator steam entered the field and the first 
steamer took part in the seal fishery. The value of steam in 
connection with Arctic exploration had been previously demon 
strated, and its introduction speedi 
ly revolutionized the seal fishery. 
The sailing vessels were gradually 
driven out of the field, and the 
number of steamers increased. In 
1866 there were 177 sailing vessels 
and only five steamers. In 1873 
there were 1 8 steamers; in 1882 
there were 25 steamers." At pre 
sent there are only 1 4, and the sailing 
vessel in the seal fishery has be 
come a thing of the past. Is this 
industry within reasonable distance 
of its end ? We hope not ; but it 
certainly looks very much like it, 
unless common sense and rational 
legislation are permitted to step in 
and make provision for a close 
season. 

Among the many items of use 
ful information furnished us by Mr. 
Chafe in his remarks on the " Steam 
Seal Fishery," I notice he states 
that the largest bill ever made at 
this industry was that made by the 



crew of the s.s. Retriever, owned by 
Messrs. Ridley & Sons, of Harbor 
Grace, and commanded by Capt. 
James Murphy, of Catalina, in 1866. 
The crew numbered 105 men and 
made $303.00 each. From the 
same reliable source we also learn 
(hat the largest bill ever made in 
a St. John s steamer was that shared 
by the. men of the s.s. Nimrod, 
Capt. Peter Cummins, in 1871, 
wht-n his crew of 140 made $208. 
47, each. That was in " the good 
old days gone by." At the present 
time a bill of $80 would be regard 
ed as a remarkably large one and 
mean for the owners a full load of 
seals. I do not know what the 
men of the s.s. Commodore made 
out of the big trip " she had in 
1872. That year the veteran seal- 
killer, Capt. Azariah Mundon, not 
only had a deck-load, but towed a 
quantity of seals from Bacalieu up 
Conception, as far as Western, Bay, 
where they were taken on board 

and placed along with others in pounds on deck. She was so 
deep that the crew could ea^ly touch the water with their hands 
by leaning out over her side. She turned out 31,314 seals, was 
290 tons and carried a crew of 200 men. 

Of course the fishermen have suffered by the introduction of 
steamers in the prosecution of the sealing business. Mr. Chafe 
says the numbers employed have been reduced by more than 
one-half, and they now receive one-third of the value of the seals 
taken by each vessel instead of one-half, which was their share 
in sailing vessels. Especially has th ; s I een the case since the 
employment of those big steel ships, such as the Stephana, 
Florizel, Nascopie, 6ff. As Mr. Chafe points out, the great 
difficulty now is to get births on board the steamers and hence 
it is that hundreds are every year left behind. The reduction 
of wages is a matter of necessity, owing to the heavy expense 
incurred in fitting out sealing steamers and keeping them in 
good, seaworthy condition. However, it is not at all likely that 
we shall ever again revert to the use of sailing vessels in the 
sealing voyage, and the steam fleet is getting smaller and smaller 
every year. Obviously, the seal, like the whale, is doomed to 
extermination and its disappearance from the icefloes and 
waters of Newfoundland is only a matter of time. Possibly the 
middle of the present century will witness the end of it. It is 




i. FLORIZEL BOWRING BROS.. LTD. OF THE STEEL FLEET. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 9. 



argued by some people whose opin 
ions on other matters are well 
worthy of consideration, that, if 
steamers were dispensed with in 
the prosecution of the seal fishery 
and sailing vessels employed, as of 
yore, this branch of our staple 
industry would slowly and surely 
be restored to normal conditions. 
But, I doubt this very much. As 
one of the writers already quoted 
observes, it is a mere dream to ex 
pect steamers to be withdrawn and 
sailing vessels restored. As well 
may we hope to abolish railways 
and revert to the ancient modes of 
locomotion. Steamers have come 
to stay, and we have to submit to 
destiny. 

As I write these notes I hear the 
sound of the sealing steamers 
whistles. They are leaving for 
their annual trip to the ice-fields. 
May Providence favor them, and 
grant that no accident, like the 
terrible tragedy of last year, may 
bring sadness and gloom to those 
engaged therein in 1915. One 

almost fancies he hears them sing as they steam out through 
the Narrows : 

" From the hill-tops look the steeple, 

And the light-house from the strand ; 
And the scattered firs are waving 

Their farewell from the land. 
One glance, my lads, behind us ; 

For the homes we leave one sigh, 
Ere we take the change and chances 
Of the ocean and the sky. 

" Now, brothers, for the ice-bergs 

Of frozen Labrador, 
Floating spectral in the moonshine, 

Along the rugged shore! 
Where, like snow, the gannets feathers 

On Wadhams rocks are shed ; 
And the noisy murr are floating 

Like black scuds overhead." 




THE S.S NASCOP1E JOB BROS. \" i O S, OF THE STEEL FLEET. 



Regiment Pftotograpfts. 

We have to thank Capt. A. O Brien and Lieut. R. H. Tait for 
their kind interest in having Photographer D. A. Grant, of 
Nairn, Scotland, send us the photographs of The Officers, " A" 
Company, and B" Company," that appear on pages 14- 15 
and 1 6 of this issue. Besides the groups we reproduce, there 
are numbers of others ready ; while numerous others still are com 
ing off shortly. The following are among the subjects produced 
thus far, and cm be had from D. A Grant. Nairn, Scotland: 
A Company, B Company, Officers, Quartermaster Staff, Groups 
of 14 & 4, Church Lads Brigade, Drums and Bugles, Mr. Tail s 
Platoon; while Capt. O Brien s and Lieut. Wighton s Platoons 
are also being done. But in the set-up form : that is, all the 
members are photographed separately and mounted on a large 
board, the whole being subsequently copied and reduced to a 
convenient size. The photographs received are excellent. 




THE S.S. " STEPHANO" - BOWRING 
BROS., LTD. THE LARGEST SEAL 
ING STEAMER. OWING TO WAR 

CONDITIONS, SHE IS NOT AT THE 
SEAL-FISHERY THIS SEASON ; AND 
ON MARCH 20 TOOK THE THIRD 
DRAFT OF OUR VOLUNTEERS TO 
HALIFAX TO BE TRANSFERRED 
TO ENGLAND. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 10. 



d Sew Holes on Qntwerp and its treasures. 





RT. HON. SIR EDWARD MORRIS, P.C. 



By Rt. Hon. Sir 

; O one can read the 
story of Antwerp 
and Venice, their 
rise and growth as 
great commercial 
cities, without see 
ing in them a wonderful resem 
blance. Writing of Venice, 
Byron says : 

" But unto us she hath a spell beyond, 
Her name in story, and her long 

array 
Of mighty shadows, whose dim forms 

despond 
Above the dogeless city s vanish d 

sway ; 

Ours is a trophy which will not decay 
\Vith the Rialto ; Shylock and the 

Moor, 

And Pierre, cannot be swept or worn away 
The keystones of the arch ! though all were o er, 
For us repeopled were the solitary shore." 

What is true of Venice is equally true of Antwerp, for while 
she is no longer the great maritime city she was, her story has 
created a halo of interest around her " trophys which will not 
decay" that Time will never altogether efface. 

Antwerp resembles more than anything else the fabled story 
of the Phcenix. Just as that bird fanned its funeral pyre with 
its own wings, so has Antwerp, by her greatness and industry 
in the past, fanned the flames of jealousy amongst nations, and 
thus repeatedly lead to her own destruction ; but like the Phoenix 
she has risen time and again from her ashes, and I have no 
doubt will rise again gloriously over her present trials. The 
name Antwerp is said to be derived from Flemish words, which 
means "on the wharf." From her past history as a great sea 
port town, whose wealth was daily deposited on her wharves 
and piers, no name would seem more appropriate. 

When I first visited Antwerp, five years ago, it was then a 
great prosperous maritime town, whose population was getting 
up for nearly four hundred thousand, with piers as fine as any 
country in the world. These were built by Napoleon I. when 
Antwerp formed a part of his Empire. No one can visit Antwerp 
and look at these docks and piers and see the ships laden with 
commerce flying the flags of all nations, without being struck 
with the collosal imagination possessed by that great soldier 
when he planned and executed them. And, as in Venice to-day, 

"Tasso s echoes are no more, 

And silent rows the songless gondolier ! 

Her palaces are crumbling to the shore, 
The spouseless Adriatic mourns her Lord. 

And annual marriage now no more renew d. 
The Bucentaur lies rotting unrestored, 

Neglected garment of her widowhood !" 

So has the glory of Antwerp departed, and her great commercial 
industrial institutions but suggest what she was in the fifteenth 
and sixteenth centuries. Then 2500 sailing vessels furrowed 
her waters with their keels, and her custom house has been 
known to give clearance to 500 ships in one day. Through the 
city s gate 2,000 loaded waggons from neighbouring provinces 
have passed daily, and in all Europe in the day of her prosperity 
no city could rival Antwerp. Her merchants surpassed the 
Venetians in the splendour of their homes and the luxury of 
their surroundings. Her cathedrals, her palaces, and her works 
of art were more wonderful than those of any other city. But it 
was this very wealth and prosperity that made her the prey 
and attraction, for the civilized savages, who from time to time 
despoiled her. No other city has had so large a share of the 
horrors of war, that for fwe hundred years has desolated her, 
and now she has her crowning humiliation, in the invasion of the 
German vandals, and has just gone through a siege of nameless 
horrors. Her worst disaster occured in 1576 known as the 
" Fury of Antwerp," when she was pillaged and burned by 
mutinous drunken Spanish soldiers. Next in 1584 she suffered 



Edward Morris, P.C. 

a fourteen months siege by Alexander of Parma. In 1589 her 
population fell as low as 55,000. Then she lost her commerce 
to the Dutch, and the River Scheldt upon which she is built was 
closed till 1790 when she had only 40,000 people. She was be 
ginning to recover her self somewhat when the revolution of 
1830 prostrated her again. But her great national advantages 
of port enabled her to surmount all difficulties, and she had pre 
vious to the present war a population of nearly 400,000. 

It is not a pleasant task to contrast Antwerp of to-day, robbed 
of all the blessings of peace and prosperity, suffering from the 
widespread nameless loathing of war with the great and prosper 
ous Antwerp of the middle ages. Amongst the many pictorial 
horrors one sees in the art galleries of the Netherlands there is 
nothing which strikes one with such horror as those which 
depict the sack of Antwerp by the Spaniards, when 8.000 men, 
women and children were massacred, burned or drowned in 
three days, and bodies lay by hundreds in the streets. The 
Spanish soldiers, drunk with wine and blood, cast off the sem 
blance of humanity and played the part of fiends. But it is the 
great Joss of life and art that one trembles for, when reading of 
the desolation of this fair city to-day. Money and labour can 
restore most of the material injuries inflicted on her, but the 
thousands of useful lifes, the beautiful works of art, can never 
be replaced. For five hundred years Antwerp has been the 
home of painters and sculptors and goldsmiths and architects, 
giving birth to Tenniers, Jordeans and Van Dykes. Rubens 
lived and worked and died there, and Antwerp had a collection 




THE CHURCH OF NOTRE DAME, BETTER KNOWN AS 
THE CATHEDRAL OF ANTWERP. 

of these great masters larger than any other city in the world 
The church of Notre Dame usually c, lied the Antwerp Cathe- 

v 1 , "f Standm Stbeautifulof Guthic architecture in 
the Netherlands. It contains three of Rubens most famous 
pictures, namely the " Descent from the Cross," "The Elevation of 
the Cross and the "Assumption of the Virgin." All are 
superbly beaunful. and when the sun comes out and bathe- them 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. n. 




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o u 



is 

<D 




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u 

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to 
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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 12. 



in light, one gets as it were a glimpse of paradise. The artist 
seems to have put his very soul into these pictures. The 
Descent from the Cross is the most realistic picture one could 
possibly view. 

Near the tower of the Cathedral is an old well protected by a 
handsome canopy of wrought iron, forged by Quinton Matsi, a 
blacksmith. Matsi fell in love with the daughter of the painter, 
and in order to obtain her father s consent to his suit, studied 
painting and became a great artist. His wrought iron well shows 
the true artistic taste, in shaping iron as he exhibited later with 
his brush. Van Dyke s " Entombment " is also one of the trea- 



nation both in Europe and the United States, as it was in direct 
contravention of the provisions of the Hague Convention which 
Germany had signed. The bombardment of the city ended in 
its fall on January 6th and caused much loss of property and 
misery to the whole population. Fortunately none of the great 
treasures of art to which I have referred were damaged, and it is 
pleasing to be able to record that when the city was being 
bombarded those splendid works of art in the cathedrals, and 
museums were taken down and removed to places of safety. 

The treasure of Antwerp is its Cathedral. When the Germans 
neared the city, when the entanglements of barbed wire were 





THE SCREEN, SHOWING THE HIGH ALTAR IN 
THE DISTANCE, ANTWERP CATHEDRAL. 

sures in the Royal Museum and has a place near the " Adora 
tion of the Magi," "Christ Between the Thieves" and " Christ 
on the Pallet of Straw," by Rubens. 

Antwerp has an historical interest for all Englishmen. King 
Edward III. spent the winter of 1338 in Antwerp with his 
Queen Phillipa, who gave birth there to Lionel, afterwards the 
Duke of Clarence, and the house of Rubens which, still stands, 
was one time occupied by the Duke of Newcastle after the battle 
of Marston Moor, where he entertained Charles II. and many 
cavaliers. 

From the time of the Francs, under Clovis, down to the siege 
of Antwerp in 1830, the wars of Western Europe have, to a large 
extent, been fought in and around Antwerp and her sister cities. 
Within a radius of fifty miles of Antwerp there are at least 
twenty broad plains where great battles have been decided, 
Waterloo, Ramilles, Fontenoy, Quatre Bras, Waver, Namur, 
Liege, Charleroi and Ligny, and many others during the 
present war. 

On August 24th, in defiance of the regulations of the Hague 
Convention, there was a Zepplin bombardment by the Germans 
of Antwerp. Shrapnel bombs were dropped on the city killing 
a number of persons and injuring others, causing much damage 
the royal palace and other buildings. An attempt was made 
to repeat the raid on the following night. Amongst the many 
acts of piracy and the violation of international law, none was 
clearer than this raid on Antwerp, and naturally it aroused indig- 



THE CALVARY OUTSIDE THE CATHEDRAL. 

being cut by the German soldiers, when the big guns were 
booming enough to strike terror into the hearts of the brave the 
people of Antwerp came into this Cathedral, and took down 
Ruben s masterpieces and the sacred relics from their places and 
carried them away where they would not be found. Antwerp 
was not destroyed as was Liege, or Louvain, or Rheims. The 
Germans shot their guns and dropped their bombs more to 
frighten the inhabitants and convince them of the futility of 
resistence. Antwerp to-day is like the city of the dead ; most 
of her citizens have fled to Holland and England. Her King 
and her army are gone and are wanderers. The government 
is being transacted in another country at Havre in France. 
Though a great maratime port, Antwerp retains a good deal of 
the old world city character. The street cars stop at 1 1 o clock, 
and if you are not at your hotel at 1 1 p.m. you will have to tip 
the night porter to get in. 



# Via Vitac." ^ 

By Ernest Blake. 

Do you see the road a-winding through the dear green field? below? 
Hear the bridle bells a-jingle on the horses as they go ? 
Then beside blue flashing rivers, where the tall reeds softly sing 
Plaintive songs of weary autumn, lyric carollings of spring. 

Down the slopes wild pines rush headlong, tossing each his ragged plume 
Plunging all the life and glory in a shadow-land of gloom. 
But tne shadows are but shadows Hark, the bells are jingling still. 
See, it ends the journev mounting where the sun-light s 011 the hill. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



13- 




N February 2 3 rd His Lordship Bishop March, of 
Harbor Grace, Senior Bishop of the Ecclesias 
tical Province of Newfoundland, was officially 
notified by the Papal Delegate at Ottawa. Most 
tev. Arc ibishop Stasni, that the headship of the 
Arch-diocese of St. John s vacated by the death 
o the late Most Rev. M. F Howley, last October, had been 
n led by the appo.ntment of Rt. Rev. M*r. Roche, Vicar-General 
Price s dtS" a " d US Ad ^^ ^ the late 
The news was received with every evidence of satisfaction by 
the people of St. John s, regardless of class or creed, and by the 
ntry generally, for the ne v appointee hid shown in the per- 
>rmance of his priestly du ies thu he possessed qualities of 
head and heart which rendered him eminently suitable for this 
honoured and responsible position of Metropolitan of the Roman 
Catholic Hierarchy in this Island. 



Hevo Clrcft6isftop. 




MOST REV. EDWARD PATRICK. ROCHE, 
Archbishop-elect of St. John s. 

The Most Rev. Edward Patrick Roche WAS born at Placentia, 
Newfoundland, on February igth, 1874, and thus received 
notice of his appointment a few days after he completed his 4ist 
ye.nr. He was the oldest son of the late Edward Roche, of St. 
John s, then manager of ihe Anglo-American Telegraph Com 
pany s Cable Station at Placentia. His mother was the 
sister of the late Thomas O Reilly, J.P., then Magistrate 
at Placentia. The family, in its various branches has given 
several sons to the Church, cousins of the new Archbishop being 
Rev. Dr. O Reilly, now of St. John, N. B., Rev. Dr. Ryan, now 
a Professor at St. Augustine Seminary, Toronto, and the late 
Rev. Fr. Bonia of Ihe Canadian Redemptorists. The new 
Archbishop s mother ditd when he was but four years old and 
his f.ither passed away when the lad was but ten. An aunt, 
Miss Roche, cared for him until he reached manhood, and his 
education was impaited at St. Patrick s Schools and later at St. 
Bonaventure s ColUge, after which, being destined for the priest 
hood, he repaired to All Hallows College, Dublin, where he 
completed his theological course, being ordained by Bishop 
Kellv, of Ross on June 24th. 1897, for the diocese of St. John s. 
He enjoyed the -cputation of being one of the most brilliant 



students ever graduated by that college, and from the outset of 
his clerical career distinctions were predicted for him, if his 
health, which at that time was none too robust, permitted of his 
doing justice to his intellectual abilities. 

Returning to Newfoundland in the autumn of that year he was 
appointed to the parish of Topsail, as its pastor, where he 
served for ten years, being then transferred to the 
Cathedral where he acted as Rector of the Parish, and as 
Administrator of the Arch-diocese during absences of the late 
Archbishop. He was elevated to the dignity of Monsignor by the 
late Pope Pius X. during the visit of Archbishop Howley to 
Rome in the early months of 1914, and being appointed to the 
Administratorship of the Arch-diocese when Archbishop 
Howley was called to the other world. 

The new Archbishop needs few words to commend him to the 
esteem and admiration of his countrymen, but it must be an 
added source of pride to him to know that he is to-day in 
all probability, the youngest Metropolitan in the Catholic world. 
Such a promotion rarely comes to an ecclesiastic so early in 
life, and his elevation to this dignity conclusively attests the 
confidence which the Papal Curia imposes in him ; while the 
fact that the appointment was made within four months after 




R. C. CATHEDRAL, ST. JOHN S. 

the death of his predecessor is further evidence that his .merits 
stood out conspicuously in warranting his selection. The 
Archbishop-elect is assuming a post which will tax his energies 
to the full, but he will have the support of a devoted clergy and 
laity to lighten his labors, and we trust that he may be spared 
by Providence to enjoy a long and glorious episcopate. 

The elevation of Mgr. Roche to his new post has made it in 
cumbent upon his, in order to give full attention to the many 
Parishes composing his Diocese, to resign the Rectorship of the 
Cathedral, and accordingly he appointed thereto the Rev. Fr. 
McDermott, who had filled for some time past a similiar posi 
tion at St. Patrick s Church in the West End. Fr. McDermott 
is a native of Ireland and a B.A. of the Royal University, a noted 
scholar and a theologian of unusual brilliancy. Ordained some 
twenty years ago for the Diocese of St. John s, he was appointed 
one of the curates at St. Patrick s, after a brief outport service, 
and since the death of the late Dean Ryan has been in charge 
of that Parish. Here he proved himself a man of splendid 
business capacity ; and largely through his energy, activity and 
good judgment, herculean work has been accomplished in pro 
viding substantial improvements in the Parish, such as the com 
pletion of the Church, the addition of a tower thereto, the enlarge 
ment of Holy Cross Schools, etc. In his new post we feel sure 
he will give equally good service and that he will uphold the 
ideals of his eminent predecessor. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 14. 



Prussian fKacfiiav>e(Cistn. 



By Rev. M. J. Ryan, D.D. 




;REDERICK II. of Prussia, often called the 
Great, distinguished himself before he succeeded 
to the government, by writing a book against 
Machiavellism. " That," said Voltaire to him 
afterwards with lively relish, " is exactly what 
Machiavelli himself would have advised you to 
do." Frederick truly needed no advice from any predecessor 
in unscrupulousness ; his own spirit was well able to prompt 
him. He was by a distinct degree more depraved than Machi 
avelli : for Machiavelli s unscrupulousness had for its end the 
deliverance of his country from a foreign, and especially from a 
German yoke. But the Prussian prince practised his unprinci 
pled policy for his own aggrandizement and the extension of his 
yoke over other races, who had not offended. 

Lord Acton, who was born abroad and of a German mother, 
and who was educated in Germany and chose a German lady 
for his wife, Lord Acton ,vho carried cosmopolitism so far that 
he always had a leaning towards finding fault with his own 
country and had a warm affection for Germany, Acton never 
theless sketched from the resources of his vast learning the 
history of the rise and growth of Machiavellism in Germany, 



country. 

FALSEHOODS IN FAVOR OF GERMANY. 

Macaulay in his essay on Chatham says of the peace of 1763 
that Great Britain " withdrew, at the cost of a deep stain upon 
her faith, from her German connections." 

Once upon a time I believed this falsehosd, and I used to 
admire the nobility of the politician who uttered it. How fine 
it was, I used to say to myself, of this man to rise above the 
narrowness of nationality, to uphold the moral law at the sacri 
fice of patriotic affection, and with a wounded heart to censure 
his own country for a breach of faith ! But it happened to me 
one day that my curiosity led me to read the account of the 
peace by Edmund Burke in the Annual Register for 1762 and 
1763, and then alas! I learned that this was only a Whij; and 
Opposition electioneering lie, and that the conduct of the British 
Government had been just to Prussia and conducive to the 
peace and balance of power in Europe. Edmund Burke was as 
good a Whig or Liberal as Macaulay, but even amid the exci e- 
ment of the lime he was able to write more judicially about con 
temporary events than Macaulay was at a date three-quarters of 
a century later. Burke explains that when Britain and France 




OFFICERS OF THE FIRST NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT AT FORT GEORGE, SCOTLAND. 

Top Ro W -Lieut. Tait Lieut. Ledingham Lieut. Nunns, Lieut. Wighton, Lieut-Quartermaster Summers, Lieut. Rowsell, Lieu,. Goodridge 
Butler Lieu D,.Wakefield Second Row-Lieut. Ayre, Lieut. Raley, Capt. O Brien, Cap,. Alexander, Capt. Rendell 
L,eut,Colonel Burton, Capt. Carty, Capt. Bernard, Capt. March. [Photo b V D. A. Grant, Nairn Gotland 



thirteen years ago in the intro.Juction which he contributed to 
Mr. Burd s edition of Machiavelli ; and he declared in his 
Lectures on Modern History that Prussian militarism (more 
thoroughgoing than Russian militarism) was the greatest danger 
threatening the " Anglo-Saxon " nations. Unfortunately few of 
his fellow-Liberals took the warning to heart. 

Of all the nations in the world the Germans should be the 
last to be hostile to England, for they owe much both of their 
independence and their regudation to the English. As Sir 
Wilfrid Laurier remarked, many a time in the past France would 
have wiped Germany off the face of Europe but for England 
The old Romans had a proverb, Ingratum si ,/ixeris, omnia 
dixeris; whan you have said of a man that he is ungrateful you 
have said everything. And the Germans, or at least the Prus 
sians and the Prussianized Germans are a very envious people 
who cannot bear to see any others prosperous. 

As for reputation, English men of letters have admired 
Germany far too much, and in favor of Germany have gone far 
beyond the truth, even to the length of disparaging their own 



(who had severally been financing Prussia .md Austria) paired 
Prussia was more than a match for Austria, and therefore 
Austrii -oon made peace with Prus-ia. 

Micaulay s essay on Frederick of Prussia also contains many 
misrepresentations in his favor. 

Did Macaulay, then, tell deliberate falsehoods? or did he 
elieve what he wrote ? For my part, I think he belived those 
falsehoods because I think he could believe am thing that 
tended to damage the opposite party, even though it tended also 
to destroy the reputation of his country and the confidence that 
any foreign p->wer might feel in its engagements 

is a still worse tissue of misrepresentations. 

cm,ghtnotbe discreditable to a Prussian; but the 

t. ? her who could compose such a work cannot b, classed 

politically, among the respectable part of mankind. What must 

the hero-worshipper be where the hero is a Frederick 

Let us take Macaulay s essay on Frederick-as Macaulav is 
the wnter from whom the most readers get their notions of 
b-story and examine it a little carefully, and see how n^ny mis- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 15. 



M P nrn , i are C0ntained in * I do not suppose that 

Macau ay was consaous of the falsehood of his statements ; he 
as only repeating what Whigs had been saying since 1763. 
"When I say a thing three times, tis true," says the Bellman in 
The Huuntmg of the Snark; and what is an electioneering lie 
in one generation is history in the next. No doubt Macaulav 
would not scrutinize closely any statement damaging to his 
political opponents even if it were also damaging to his country s 
character for fidelity to its engagements with its allies 

\\ h,t is usually known as the Seven Years War broke out in 
the begin mm; of , 7S 6 in consequence of disputes between 
British and French Colonists; the French in Canada aiming at 
securing the whole interior territory from the great lakes to the 
mouth of the Mississippi, and the Americans being equally 
intent on expanding Westwards and, if they could, Northward s 
In April 1755 Frederick advised the French to attack 
Hanover, which was then connected with the Crown of England. 
This fact Macaulav does not mention. Frederick was suspected 
by the British Government of having designs, himself, upon 
Hanover, and a treaty was made with Russia to keep,him in awe. 
In the mean time, Austria had been secretly negotiating with 
various continents! powers for help in the recovery of Silesia 
which Frederick had seized in 174 ! in defiance of all interna 
tional riiht and wi hout the slightest pretext. At this time, too, 
he was planning the future annexation of Saxony; the design 
he hid in view was to invade Bohemia suddenly, as he had 



many years has been secretly working up a Pan-German senti 
ment and party among the Flemish portion of the Belgian 
people. Those who believed that Germany, if allowed to march 
her armies through Belgium, would ever leave the country, must 
have more of the innocence of the nursery than of the wisdom 
of the world. The value Germany sets on the possession of 
Belgium may be measured by the fact that she has secretly 
offered to restore Alsace Lorraine to France, if France would 
make peace and recognize Germany s seizure of Belgium. If 
Great Britain had not interfered, as those simpletons, Lord 
Morley, John Burns and Ramsay Macdonald, and that impudent 
fool, the Trevelyan who was Secretary of the Board of Educa 
tion, proposed, Germany would by this time be master of 
Belgium and the north-west of France, and France would have 
had to make peace, surrendering also Morocco ; Germany, 
would probably be master of Poland to do there what it might 
judge best; Austria would be master of Servia ; the Balkan 
States would be terrified! Denmark and Holland would be 
vassals of Germany, soon to be provinces; Italy would also be 
a vassal ; Spain would be forced into the German alliances ; 
and thus Germany would be lord of all Europe right around 
from the Baltic to the Sea of Marmora ; nor would it be long 
till Sweden and Norway would be dependencies. Then would 
come our own turn I and what good would be done by Lord 
Morley s plan of " husbanding our resources ? " It might be 
doubted if the nation could bear the strain of having its com- 




Photo by D. A. Cr.nii 



1 A" CJMPANY FIRST NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT AT FORT GEORGE. 



invaded Silesia in 1740, and hold on to it until Austria to get 
him out should assent to his annexation of Saxony. But in 
July 1756 he discovered the Austri.m negotiations for aid in the 
recovery of Silesia. The French government of that day, wiser 
thin some uhich cime after, had been made to see that the real 
enemv was not Austria but the rising power of Prussia, and had 
agreed to be neutal. Later on. France consented to join in 
the war against Prussia on this condition that, if she could 
enable Austria to recover Silesia, she should receive the Austrian 
Netherlands as compensation. It is in this way that Prussia and 
Britain came to bs fighting as allies against Austria and France. 
When Frederick discovered the Austrian designs for the recovery 
of Silesia, having kept his army always ready for offensive war, 
he at once rushed it into Saxony, which, as I have said, he had 
long designed to seize, just as Kaiser Wilhelm rushed his army 
into Belgium. Maximilian Harden h.is lately declared, with 
cynical boldness, that Germany had long aimed at annexing 
Belgium, because Germany needs it; and certainly I myself, 
without special opportunities, have known that Germany for 



merce shut out by a German revival of Napoleon s continental 
system. 

When Frederick invaded Saxony, he found, according to 
Macaulay, abundant evidence of designs against him. That is 
the old Prussian trick, by which Prussia has " found" in Belgium 
evidence of English designs to violate Belgian neutialitv in 
order to invade Germany. Saxony had feared Frederick, with 
good reason, and had applied to greater powers for protection. 
This war will; at all events, teach some lessons to our historians. 
And Frederick treated the Saxons as his successor is treating 
the Belgians. Anyone who wishes to measure how deeply 
Macaulay was besotted with party spirit, and how much easier it 
was for him to speak well of a foreigner than of a countryman 
who was a political opponent, may compare his account of 
Frederick s flight * at Molwitz with his account of Charles s flight 
at Naseby (in the essay on- Hallam). 

* Voltaire wittily said that Frederick never in his life felt grateful but 
once, and that was to the horse which carried him out of the field at 
Molhvitz. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 16. 



And Macaulay finishes up his account of Frederick by assert 
ing that " the whole Continent in arms " had been unable to tear 
Silesia from his grasp. Who would imagine from this statement 
that he had the aid of the British fleet, a British and a 
Hanoverian army, and a British subsidy; that at the beginning 
of 1762 the hostile ruler of Russia died and a new ruler of 
German origin succeeded, who made peace with Prussia, equip 
ped his Prussian prisoners and sent them home to fight, and then 
sent an army to aid Frederick; and that at the end of the year 
Turkey threatened Austria with war and sent a hundred thou 
sand men to the frontiers of Hungary? It seems that English 
men of letters, perhaps not they alone, prefer to create fictions 
from their imagination rather than relate facts. Mr. Holland 



that eminent Baptist preacher, the Rev. Mr. Clifford was visit ng 
Germany and proposing peace and friendship on the baas of a 
common hostility To the Catholic religion (as ,f infidel Prussia 
were going to abandon its ambitions for the sake of English 
Protestantism) ; and when some English "Reformers in this 
country were dreaming of "reforming " (that is destroying) our 
denominational school system ; I then raised my voice in warn 
ing and declared that sectarian fighting was encouraging the 
enemies of the Empire in every quarter of the world ; and that it 
was. nabling the Geimans in the United States to secure the 
alliance of the Clan-na-Gael. But I got no thanks for my pains. 
Some of my Methodist and Presbvterhn friends chose to ta <e 
offence at the censures which I cited from English writers upon 




Photo by D. A. Grant, Scotland.} 



1 B" COMPANY FIRST NEWFOUNDLAND REGIMENT AT FORT GLORC.E. 



Rose in his lectures on the war tells us that Germany is so effi 
ciently organized that she has been able " almost single-handed " 
to keep three great powers at bay. As if the Austro Hungarian 
Empire were not at the begining of the war a greater military 
power (I do not say greater in any other respect) than France ; 
having heen able to send four army corps to aid Germany, and 
having supplied the heavy artillery which battered down the 
frontier forts ; while Turkey has been able to stop Russian com 
merce by closing the Dardanelles, to keep a large Russian army 
in the Caucasus, and to keep a British army in Egypt. No 
doubt Mr. Rose s statement has been very useful to those in the 
United States of America who wish to exalt Germany. Now if 
he is not able to state facts that are before his eyes, how can we 
trust his accounts of the Napoleonic times, or of the revolution 
ary times, in his lives of Napoleon and of Pitt. 

The fact is that no State in the world has ever been so much 
misrepresented and calumniated as the British Empire, for it, 
unlike other states, has been calumniated not only by foreigners 
but by its own children, especially by the English Whigs and 
Radicals. And if the Whig (Macaulay) and the Radical 
(Carlyle) have misrepresented their country for the advantage 
of their foreign hero, how can we wonder that, for the sake of 
whitewashing their hero Cromwell, they have calumniated the 
Irish race and the Catholic Church ? We do not realise, until 
we look back, what a blessing is the unity which we enjoy in this 
war. 

Seven or eight years ago, when the Radical party got into 
power by the most brazen electioneering lying that any English 
party since the eighteenth century has ever practised. when 
their own leaders could scarcely restrain them, when they sought 
to conciliate the German wolves by reducing the number of 
sheep-dogs, when they put Home Rule on the shelf and made 
themselves the instruments of a bigoted sectarian attack on de 
nominational schools by Unitarians, Baptists, and infidels, when 



the " Political Dissenters ;" and some of my Catholic friends 
were quite sure that there was no danger of Radicalism or 
Socialism. It is no insignificant thing that the responsibility for 
waging this war has fallen on Mr. Asquith, Mr. Churchill, and 
Mr. L oyd Geoige. But I gladly testify that the Engli->h people 
did not follow the assailants of the Catholic Church, and that the 
years which followed were marked by the alteration in the King s 
oath, the establishment of a Catholic University in Ireland, and 
the enactment of Irish Home Rule. And now, thank God, we 
find the people of the Mother Country (a term by which I mean 
England, Ireland, and Scotland together) readily pouring out 
their treasure and their blood like wa er in defence of interna 
tional law and human right. Righteousness exalts a nation and 
therefore we may hope for God s blessing upon our arms. 




TESTING ONE OF THE TWO MACHINE GUNS PRESENTED TO THE 
NFI.D. REGIMENT BY W. D. REID, ESQ. [P hoto fy A , 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 17. 

in tfte Britisft Service. 



Lieut. Howard Vincent Reid. 

THE British aeroplane service in France has attracted the 
attention of the world. General Joffre has publicly thank 
ed it in many of his reports to the French War Office and 
General French has made many complimentary references to it. 
It is admitted by all authorities to be superior to similar services 
in any other country. Its scouting services in France and 
Belgium as well as in Egypt and the Dardanells has been in 
valuable to the Allies. Newfoundland is represented in this 
service by Sub-Lieutenant Howard Vincent Reid, eldest son of 
William L). Reid, President of the Reid-Newfoundland Company. 
Lieutenant Reid was born in St. John s and educated at Harrow 
School, England. He is a good sportsman and mechanic and 
was noted in St. John s as a particularly clever automobile driver 
and motor cyclist. He has the distinction of being the youngest 
officer in the flying corps being only nineteen years old when 
he obtained his Commission. Lieut. Reid is a clever and dar 
ing soldier and will worthily uphold the honour of Newfound 
land in the Air Service. 




THE war taxed England s medical and hospital facilities to 
the utmost. But the whole empire co-operated so heartily 
with the Motherland that shortly after the commencement 
of hostilities all deficiencies were made up. Many of our medical 
men are filling important positions on land and sea, in hospitals, 
troop-ships and on the war-ships. Dr. Harold G. Chaplin, of St. 
John s, is serving as surgeon on H.M.S. Agadir. He is the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Mark Chaplin, and was born at St. John s on 
March loth, 1888. His scholastic record was a most creditable 
one, terminating with his Matriculation at London University, 
and also passing the qualifying examination for the Rhodes 
Scholarship. Having decided on following the profession of 
medicine, he went to England, and entered St. Thomas Hospital, 
London. Here he repeated his educational triumphs, and con 
cluded a brilliant term by leading his class in his final examina 
tion and passing out with his medical degree adorned by a Gold 
medal. He was appointed House Surgeon at the Hospital, but 
on the outbreak of war immediately applied for and obtained a 
Commission in the Royal Navy. He is at present surgeon on 
H.M.S. Agidir, which ship is with Admiral Jellicoe s fleet in tha 
North Sea. This young Surgeon has always believed that physi- 
development should accompany mental activities. Before leaving 
Newfoundland he was a noted figure in athletics, particularly 
on the football field. His abilities give every indication that he 
will have a distinguished career in the Navy. 




.IN. 



Lieut. Stanley C. Duder, R.IN.R. 

LIEUT. Stanley Carter Duder, grandson of the late Chief 
Justice Sir Frederick Carter and son of Mr. Charles R. 
Duder, of St. John s, is one of many Newfoundlanders 
serving in the British Navy. When war broke out Mr. Duder 
had just returned from a nine months voyage to China, Japan, 
and the Phillipines as Chief Office of the s.s. Sumga. He at once 
volunteered for the Naval Service and was accepted ; and went 
into training on H.M.S. Calypso, in St. John s. When the 
Governor, Sir Walter Davidson, learnt that a bright and experi 
enced sailor like Mr. Duder was on board the Calypso, he 
cabled to the Admiralty recommending him for a Commission. 
He was at once granted a Commission as Sub-Lieutenant in the 
Royal Naval Reserve and now Lieut. Duder is on active service 
in the North Sea. Lieut. Duder was born in St. John s in 1888. 
He was educated in the city schools, and studied navigation 
under Mr. F. J. Doyle. He was apprenticed to the sea. He 
has sailed to foreign poris during the past eleven years. For six 
years of that time he sailed out of England. He holds a Master 
Mariner s Certificate and has gained destinction as an able and 
daring seaman. He is an excellent type of Naval Officer and 
his career in the Navy will be watched with interest. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 18. 



Ocean 3FCy 3-isfiing. 

By f. J. Morris, K.C. 



FEW years ago when first I was told that river 
trout were caught in the sea with a fly, a smile of 
incredulity greeted the information. I heard the 
story from Mr. H. W. Stirling, who informed me 
the discovery was made by Rev. H. Uphill, who 
caught the first trout with a fly in the salt water at 
Kelligrews in the Summer of 1910. Now, whilst most of us sec 
ulars are generally disposed to accept the statements ot clergy 
men as ex cathedra on m.itters doctrinal, yet when it comes to a 





AT FULFORD S HOTEL, SOUTH-EAST PLACENTIA, JULY, 1911. 

fish story, one is inclined to the belief that they are as other men. 
Since, then, however, Mr. Uphill s discovery has been fully 
brought to the knowledge of sportsmen, and within the past 
two seasons I have, myself, captured with fly, in the waters of 
Conception Bay, Loch Leven trout weighing from eight to ten 
pounds. 

The late, much regretted, Rector of St. Thomas s, Rev. Mr. 
Godden, a day or two before the fishing season closed last year, 
took three splendid fish from the sea with the fly, their aggre 
gated weight being thirty-two pounds. 

It may be interesting to some of the readers of THE QUAR 
TERLY to know to whom we are indebted for the introduction 
of pisciculture in Newfoundland. The first trout hatchery was 
established at Long Pond, near St. John s in the year 1888, 
and the late Mr. John Martin, C.E., will ever be remem 
bered as the pioneer of the art of fish culture in this 
country. He was the first who demonstrated its practical 
success, and amidst numerous perplexities, discouragements, 
and impediments, succeeded in establishing at Long Pond 
a hatchery for the procreation of fresh-water fish. Mr. Martin, 
about that time, also stocked Winsor Lake. The ova were ob 
tained by him from Sir James Maitland at Howietoun Hatchery, 
Scotland, and the consignment contained one hundred and 
eighteen thousand Loch Leven trout eggs, shipped at Liverpool 
on board the s.s. Assyrian, the voyage from hatchery to 
hatchery occupying ten davs." 

Mr. Martin had associated with him, at that time, gentlemen 
who are always to be found assisting pioneer work of a public or 
sporting character ; amongst them were A. S. Rendell, the late 
A. J. VV. McNeily, R. G. Rendell, P. G. Tessier, W. A. B. 
Sclater and the late Von Stein. Since then others have taken 
up the good work and the hatchery at Murray s Pond, with the 
Club-house, situated amidst beautiful and picturesque surround 
ings, is the worthy offspring of its Long Pond progenitor. 

The names of Hon. W. C. Job, H. D. Carter, Dr. Keegan, 
F. W. Ayre and C. McK. Harvey are amongst those who have 



perpetuated the efforts of the good men and true, who formed the 
Committee of the Long Pond hatchery. It is because of the 
success of the operations at Murray s Pond that we have had 
such wonderful results in respect to the propagation of the Cali 
fornia Rainbow trout, which, admittedly, for shapeliness of form, 
strength, weight, and sportiveness, is only second to the King 
of all game fish, the lordly Salmon. From this stock sprung the 
noble specimen of rainbow trout, weighing twenty-two pounds, 
taken from Manuels Pond which we exhibited at the Newfound 
land Court during the Festival of Empire. 

How eminently successful fish culture has been in Newfound 
land, is amply testified to each year by the splendid fishing ob 
tained from our rivers and ponds by the local angler, and the 
sporting tourist. 

Much has been said and written about Loch-Leven trout, the 
general belief being that it is a distinct species, but there is no 
doubt that since the introduction of the trout to our rivers, its 
shape, colour and general, proportions have considerably 
changed, especially now that it seems to have forsaken our 
estuaries and apparently adopted the habits of the salmon and 
sea trout. 

The Loch Leven trout that I have caught in the sea were of a 
much larger size than and different in colouration fiom the Loch 
Leven caught by me in inland waters. The fish from the sea 
were of a silvery white, more the colour of the sea trcut or the 
salmon species, whilst the Loch Leven you take from the stream 
or pond is of a bluish grey, the spots light and yellow, ihe head 
being also somewhat differently formed. The fish when cooked 
has a delicious flavor, is a beautiful pale pink in color and of 
a fine quality. 

Most of these trout return in the evenings back from the sea 
to the rivers or pools and lie near to the s\\ ift. but in the quiet or 
dead water. 

I have often, at my favorite haunt, with the moonlight glinting 
on the river, drawn a fly ovtr such a likely spot and hooked 
many a good trout as he lay near the top of the water, watching 
every motion, or wrinkle, made by the tide, which might indicate 
the approach of some tasty morsel swimming between him and 
the surface. 

These old trout are very subtle, and as fearful and timorous 
as a hare. They lie close together and do not stir out of their 




AT 



MRS. LINAHAN S, SOUTHEAST PLACENTIA, AUGUST, 1912. 

holds until the evening light has left the sky, but they will feed 
freely and baldly during the night, returning again to the sea at 
the peep of dawn. 

Fly fishing in the oce.in rrny i-.ot appeal to many of the dis- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 19. 



ciples of the gentle Izaak Walton, and the contemplative man 
would no doubt pass the hours away more pleasantly sitting 
quietly on the bank of a placid stream, endeavouring to deceive 
with an artificial fly, the speckled beauty, who is said to be more 
sharp sighted than the hawk ; or amidst surroundings so well 
and artistically described by my friend Mr. W. J. Carroll in the 
following stanza from his now celebrated poem The Humber." 
Tis there the kingly salmon through the drowsy summer day, 

Disport in glee amid the steadies deep, 
In the limpid, living waters, how they breach and leap and play, 

While the eddies onward, seaward, grandly sweep. 
There the angler realises the serenest earthly joy, 

As from his reel his line swift singing goes, 
Like gleams of glinting silver, crazy fish flash round his fly; 
While, all serene, the lordly Humber flows." 

Nevertheless what one loses in the absence of the placid and 
pleasant surroundings of the stream or steady is made up for in 
the excitement of this rare new sport in the ocean, when you 
hear a splash, a whirl, and the music of the running reel, and 
you find you have hooked a ten pound Loch Leven who is 
fighting for his life at the end of a fifty fathom line. 

I have fished in Eagle River and the North-West River, Ham 
ilton Inlet. Labrador and have hooked some fine fish, but I have 
never had anything like the splendid sport obtainable from fly 
fishing in the ocean. 

The illustrations here shown are mementoes of two very p ea- 
sant fishing trips spent in company with some of the best sports 
men, and the most genial companions it was ever my happy lot 
(o be associated with. The fish shown in the pictures are salmon, 
averaging from five to stven pounds, captured by my friends 
(who in sporting circles are known as "The Irish Consul" and 



" John Knox ") and myself in the " Beaver Pond Falls " about 
five miles from " Fulford s Hotel" at the head of the beautiful 
South-East Arm of Placentia. 

" Sweet Auburn ! lovliest village of the plain, 
Where health and plenty cheer d the labouring swain, 
Where smiling Spring its earliest visit paid, 
And parting Summer s lingering blooms delay d : 

How often have I paused on every charm, 

The sheltered cot, the cultivated farm, 

The never failing brook, the busy mill, 

The decent church that topt the neighbouring hill." 



in Wartime. 



By Robert Gear MacDonald. 

PUT by your needles, for the day is done ; 
That soldier s scarf of thickest woollen, which 
This afternoon has held you, its last stitch 
You just have finished; and the hours have run 
Busily in the making. The red sun 
Has long been set ; and the pink sunset rich 
Shines no more on the harbor, black as pitch, 
Save where grey icepans float, or steam-tugs dun. 

Here in the twilight lifting up each palm, 

Let us thank God our Island Home is free 

F rom battle s horrors ; yet inaudibly 

For those who have laid their lives down, breathe a psalro; 

A solemn De Profundis let it be, 

Eternam rtquiem Jona sweet and calm. 




Home of .3* ?* * 

Matchless 
Paint, 

Perfection 
Soap, 

And the Best & & 

Oiled Clothing 

in Newfoundland. & 



Manning s Drug Store 

145 New Gower Street, (Opposite old stand.) 
We carry in stock a complete line of Drugs, Chemicals, 
Patent Medicines, Toilet Requisites, &c., &c. 

Mail Orders promptly attended to; every satisfac 
tion guaranteed. 

Store open every night throughout the year until 11 o clock. 



The Newfoundland Quarterly 

AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE 

Issued every third month about the I5th of March, June, September and 

December from the office 
34 Prescott Street, St. John s, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR, 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rates: 

Single Copies, each .10 cents . 

One Year, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada 40 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) 

Advertising Rates 

$30.00 per page ; one-third of a page, $10.00; one-sixth of a page, $5.00. 
one-twelfth of a page, $2.50 for each insertion. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 20. 



100 Per Cent. 



B. H. English Paints, Pure 

In Gallons, Half Gallons, Quarts, 2 lb. and 1 Ib. Tins ; 

Sapolin Varnish Stain, Furniture Varnish, Enamels, 
Wall Colours in all shades, Floor Paints and Linoleum Finishes, 

Paint Brushes of all kinds, Feather Dusters, Brooms, etc, 
A full assortment of General Hardware selling at low prices. 

Hardware Department, BO WRING BROS., Ltd. 



PHCENIX 



Assurance 

Of LONDOX, 




Co., Ltd., 



ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Subscribed Capital over $15,000,000.00 

Accumulated Funds over $75,000,000.00 

Place your business with us, the premier Company 
in Newfoundland. 

Lowest Current Rates of Premiums. 

W. & G. RENDELL, St. John s, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



BANK Or MONTREAL 

ESTABLISHED 1817. 
Capital $16,OOO,OOO. Rest S16.00O.OOO. 

Bankers for the Government of Newfoundland. 

Bankers and Financial Agents for the Govermment of the Dominion of 

Canada. 

West Coast Branch: 



Curling, 

Bay of Islands, Nfld. 



A General Banking Business is transacted, and a 

Savings Department 

is operated in connection with the Branch where amounts from $4 upwards 
will be received on deposit and interest at the rate of Three Per Cent per 
annum allowed, which will be compounded on June 3oth and December 
3 1st in each year. 

Banking by (Mail. 

All mail business has the personal attention of the Manager, and deposi 
tors from a distance may open accounts or transact Banking business by 
mail with the knowledge that it will have the same consideration as if they 
were present. The Manager will be pleased to hear from anyone desiring 
fuller information. 

Office Hours : lo to 3 ; Saturdays, 10 to 12. 

F. HERBERT J. RLEL, Manager. 



NOTICE! 

E ATTENTION of Vessel Owners is called to the 

following Section of the Harbor Regulations : 

13. If, in the opinion of the Harbor Master, any vessel 
anchored in the harbor is likely to sink or to become an obstruc 
tion to navigation, the Harbor Master may, after giving twelve 
hours notice to the owner or agent of such vessel, or without 
notice where there is no owner or known agent in St. John s, 
take charge of and remove such vessel, and may deal with and 
dispose of such vessel in such manner as he shall think neces 
sary, to provide for the free navigation of the port; and all ex 
penses incurred under this section shall be borne by the vessel 
or her owners, and may be recovered with costs in an action in 
the name of the Harbor Master before a Stipendiary Magistrate. 

EDWARD ENGLISH, 

Harbor Master. 




PUBLIC NOTICE. 



His Excellency the Governor gives notice that 
on and after the first day of April next, the fee for 
British Passports will be two dollars and fifty cents. 
Such Passports will be valid for two years, and will 
be renewable on application in the proper form for 
four further periods of two years each. The fee 
payable for each renewal will be one dollar. 

By His Excellency s Command, 
ARTHUR MEWS, 

Deputy Colonial Secretary. 
Dept. of the Colonial Secretary, March 15, 1915. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfc 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



21. 




Published by Authority. 

Under the provisions of " The Stamp Acts, 1898-1914," the 
following Rules and Regulations, respecting Stamp Duties, in 
substitution for those of date September i S th, 1914, have been 
approved by His Excellency the Governor in Council. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary . 

Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
( >ctober 6th, 1914. 



i.--Every instrument shall be stamped on its face, when 
possible. 

2. Cancellation of Stamps shall be made by the person can 
celling, writing, printing or perforating his name or initials with 
date across Stamp. 

3. Bills of Exchange, Cheques, Promissory Notes, Bills of 
Lading, Shipping Receipts and Charter Parties, shall be stamped 
and the Stamps thereon cancelled as follows : 

(a) Bills of Exchange, Cheques, and Promissory Notes drawn 
or made in the Colony by the person signing the same; pro 
vided that in the case of a cheque on a Banker, the Banker 
to whom it is presented may, if it is unstamped, stamp 
the same and cancel the stamp. 

(b) Bills of Exchange, Cheques and Promissory Notes drawn 
or made outside the Colony by the person in the Colony 
into whose hands any such bill, cheque or note shall come 
unstamped before he in any manner negotiates or pays the 
same. 

(c) Bills of Lading executed outside the Colony by the 
consignee in the Colony into whose hands any such Bill of 
Lading may come before he in any manner negotiates the 
same. 

(d) Bills of Lading executed in the Colony by the shipper. 
Provided that if any Bill of Lading is presented to any 
person or Company for signature unstamped, such person 
or Company may stamp the same and cancel the stamp. 

(e) Shipping Receipts by the shipper. Provided that if any 
Shipping Receipt is presented to any person or Company 
for signature unstamped, such person or Company may 
stamp the same and cancel the stamp. 

(f) Charter Parties by the person in the Colony last executing 
the same. 

(g) Charter Parlies excuted wholly outside the Colony by 
the person in the Colony into whose hands any such 
Charter Party comes unstamped before he in any manner 
uses or takes any action upon such Charter Party. 

4. The person upon whom the obligation to stamp and cancel 
any instrument is imposed by these Rules shall be deemed to 
be a ptrson issuing an instrument, and, if he fails to stamp such 
instrument with its proper stamp, or to cancel such stamp, he 
shall be liable to the penalties imposed by Section 22 of the 
Act 61 Victoria, Cap. 14, entitled -An Act respecting the 
Payment of Certain Ftes and Charges by Stamps." 

5. Any Rules and Regulations which may have been hereto 
fore made under the provisions of "The Stamp Acts, 1898- 
1914," are hereby rescinded. 

NOTE: Copies of " The Stamp Act " and of the foregoing 
Rules and Regulations may be obtained from the Banks, the 
the Stipendiary Magistrates, the Departments of Justice, 
Finance and Customs, or the Colonial Secretary. 




W. E. DAVIDSON, 
Governor, 

[L.S.] 



Proclamation. 



By His Excellency SIR WALTER E. DAVIDSON, 
Knight Commander of the Most Distingu 
ished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 
Governor and Commatider-in-Chief, in and 
over the Island of Newfoundland and its 
Dependencies. 

YVTHEREAS by the 2551)1 Section of "The Customs Act, 
" 1898," it is enacted that the Governor in Council may pro 
hibit the exportation or carriage coastwise of the following goods : 
Arms, ammunition and gunpowder, military and naval stores, 
and any articles which he, by and with advice aforesaid, deems 
capable of being converted into or made useful in increasing the 
quantity of military or naval stores, or for purposes of hostility, 
or destruction in War, provisions, or any sort of victual which 
may be used as food for man : 

And whereas I, by and with the advice of my Council, deem it 
expedient and necessary that I should exercise such power of 
prohition in manner hereinafter appearing: 

Now I, by and with the advice aforesaid, do hereby, from and 
after the date hereof, prohibit the exportation of the following 
articles, namely : 

To Sweden, Denmark and the Netherlands: 
Tinned meats : 
Tin plates. 

To all Foreign Ports in Europe and on the Mediterranean and 
Black Seas, other than those of France, Russia (except the Baltic 
Ports), Belgium, Spain and Portugal : 
Tea. 

To all destinations abroad, other than British Possessions and 
Protectorates : 

Vessels, craft and boats of all kinds, floating docks^parts of 
docks, and their component parts. 
To all destinations: 
Aniline oil ; 
Aniline salt ; 
Explosives of all kinds ; 
Extracts for use in tanning; 

Grindery used in the making of boots and shoes ; 
Picric acid and its components ; 
Raw Rubber ; 
Valonia. 

Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
St. John s, this ist day of February, A.D. 1915. 

By His Excellency s Command, 
JOHN R. BENNETT, Colonial Secretary. 



Three Great Leaders: 

Gossage s Soaps, 
Texaco Kerosene, 

Fairbanks-Morse 
Motor Engines. 

GEO. M. BARR, Agent. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



1844-19OO. 




By Sam Thorp 

is better," said J. S. Mill, "to be a human being 
dissatisfied than a pig satisfied," and immediately 
he added, " better to be Socrates dissatisfied than 
a fool satisfied." The reference to the Greek 
philosopher emphasises a truth, of which the first 
line is but a moiety. Merely to grumble does 
not constitute manhood : the true man is he who seeks to find 
a solution for his discontent. Socrates was one of the first to 
attack the problem : Nietzsche is among the latest, and whatever 
be our opinion of his work, he, at least, thought that he was of 
fering a genuine method for uplifting humanity. 

Certainly, his profound dissatisfaction with the Europe of his 
day, that is about thirty or forty years ago, has much justification. 
In politics, he saw Italy the plaything of France and Austria ; 
whilst Russia, seeking to advance in the Balkans, was thwarted 
by "the Powers." Germany, with its lack of unity, seemed to him 
a failure : yet Europe was calling for a strong man, a strong 
nation. In science, the new conception of evolution had deposed 
man from his throne as " the only rational animal" and had left 
him as a detail in that " cosmic process" which is called Nature. 
Against this suppression of individuality, this denial of one s self 
in order to advance the type, Nietzsche s whole soul revolted. 
" You desire to live according to Nature ? What fraud of words. 
Imagine to yourselves being like Nature, boundlessly extra 
vagant, boundlessly indifferent, without purpose or consideration 
without pity or justice, at once fruitful and barren and uncertain : 
imagine to yourselves indifference as a power : how could you 
live in accordance with such indifference ?" In still a third Ophere, 
that of ethics, he rejected the solution given by Kant. The latter 
had answered the question as to the essential nature of the highest 
good by asserting that in each of us there is enshrined another 
self, a self which it is impossible for us to know, and yet through 
which alone can come the assurance that any act of ours is disin 
terestedly good. All such metaphysical subtleties are swept aside 
by Nietzsche : " man is a creator of ethical values " is his car 
dinal ethical principle. 

It is precisely because of the savage ferocity with which 
Nietzsche develops his ethical creed that the unique nature of 
his solulion arises. Even in his own times, other men had seen 
the same defects in society and thought : Mazzini, Tennyson, 
1 luxley had not hesitated to express their views. Yet they, and 
indeed all the great thinkers, anticipated peace, goodwill among 
men. It is interesting to trace this yearning for rest from 
struggle, with its opportunity for developing the best in man. 
Take the Greek view. Speaking of his guardians, Plato says 
that " they will often turn their eyes upwards and downwards : 
I mean that they will first look at absolute justice and beauty 
and temperance, and again at the human copy ; and will mingle 
and temper the various elements ot life into the image of a man 
until they have made the ways of man agreeable to the ways 
of God." Similarly, Aristotle finds " the high-minded man," at 
peace with himself and his fellows, to possess the crown of vir 
tue." Or, later, turn to Dante, who designed his Monarchy so 
that " in this little plot of earth belonging to man life may pass 
in Freedom and Peace." Even the Utopias of the Renascence 
are to be kingdoms of peace. Sir Thomas More would abolish 
warfare by pitting the leaders against one another. Bacon leaves 
his New Atlantis with an old man s prayer, " God bless thee, my 
son, and God bless this relation which I have made. I give thee 
leave to publish it, for the good of other nations." But all such 
aspirations are ruthlessly attacked by Nietzsche. R-jec ing ihe 
lofty, the spiritual, he asks that each man be allowed to develop 
himself as his passions (Nietzsche would say emotions) direct. 
"Hatred, envy, covetousness, imperiousness are life-conditioning 
emotions." How terrible the thought behind these words " I 
hear with pleasure that our sun is moving rapidly towards the 
constellation Hercules. I hope the men on this earth will do like 
the sun." And once more, " Life itself is essentially appropria 
tion, injury, conquest of the strange and weak, suppression, 
severity, obtrusion of its own forms, incorporation, and, at the 



, lKI.Sc., B.A. 

least, putting it mildest, exploitation. . . . Exploitation is a 
consequence of the intrinsic will to power, which is precisely the 

will to life." 

No hesitancy is noticeable in Nietzsche s development of these 
fundamental positions. The rearing of a new ruling caste, a new 
aristocracy, for Europe is his problem. Coexistent with his aris 
tocracy, he postulates a slave class in society. " Every elevation 
of the type man has hitherto been the work of an aristocratic 
society and so will it always be a society believing in a long 
scale of gradations of rank and differences of worth, and requiring 
slavery in some form or other." Although he attaches great im 
portance to his two-fold classification of men, i.e. as rulers or as 
slaves, Nietzsche can claim neither originality nor consistency. 
A submerged tenth is the sine qua non of all Greek writers on 
politics: whilst presently, in his violence, Nietzsche demands the 
extermination of all except the rulers, although he says that 
" without a slave class, there can be no widening of the 
soul." 

How shall a man become a ruler ? By exercising the will to 
power. Whatsoever leads to power is GOOD in a new sense : 
whatsoever hinders power is, in this same sense, BAD. A re- 
determination of ethical values becomes necessary, or as Nietz 
sche expresses it in the title of one of his books, we must pass 
" Beyond Good and Evil " in our present senses of the seterms. 
The outlines of this new "good" or "master morality" may be 
summarised thus : the good man will reverence himself ; he will 
be unwilling to renounce or to share his responsibilities ; to his 
equals he has duties, calling for the exercist of profound grati 
tude or of profound revenge, for " there is a certain necessity to 
have enemies, as outlets for envy, and arrogance ; to those of a 
lower rank he may act " as the heart desires." In brief, his high 
est test of moral value is that " what is injurious to me is injuri 
ous in itself." Opposed to this " good" is " slave morality" though 
we must bear in mind that in this case Nietzsche used the word 
morality with a sneer. His real meaning is non-morality : a quota 
tion will perhaps help to make this clear. To a slave, evil is per 
sonified in his master: actually the master represents the good." 
He outlines slave morality as " whatsoever alleviates the exist 
ence of these abused, oppressed, weary, suffering people, i.e. 
sympathy, patience, humility, kindness, friendliness," and pro 
ceeds : "we believe that severity, violence, slavery, danger in the 
street and in the heart, secrecy, stoicism, tempter s art and devil 
ry of every kind everything wicked, terrible, tyrannical, preda 
tory and serpentine in man, serves as well for the elevation of 
the human species as its opposite." 

Such a system finds its climax in three great rejections 
society, Christ and truth. " All society makes one somehow, 
somewhere, or sometime common-place." In another place, 
Nietzsche condemns society on the ground that it originates in 
an instinct for self-preservation, that is, in feai of one s neigh 
bour. "At present, morality in Europe is herding-animal mor 
ality," and the fear which gives it birth must be crushed. " It is 
a privilege of the strong to be independent, to have no 
fear." His theory of punishment is developed from this same 
position punish the criminal so that you need not fear him. 
He sneers at the fastidiousness which says : " Do not punish the 
wrong-doer ; make him harmless." 

It is difficult to summarise his attitude to Christianity. His 
central theory is that this religion was invented for the express 
purpose of maintaining an inferior class that class to which tbe 
blessings of the Sermon on the Mount were specially directed, 
but his distorted view vitiates his facts. Of Christ he writes : " It 
is possible that under the holy fable of the life of Jesus there is 
hidden one off the most painful cases of the martyrdom of 
knowledge about love : the martyrdom of the most innocent and 
craving heart, that never had enough of any human love, that 
demanded frantically and inexorably to be loved and nothing else, 
with terrible outbursts against those who refused him their love: 
the story of a poor soul insatiated and insatiable with love, that 
had to invent hell to send thither those who would not love him 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 23. 




A FEW HINTS 

Regarding fire Danger 

DON T use coal or gas Stoves or Heaters unless securely set on 
stone, concrete or metal ; all woodwork near stoves or 
pipes must be well protected. Gas Stoves on metal-clad 
wood or with flexible pipes are objectionable. 

DON T put Ashes in wooden boxes or barrels ; use onlj metal 
ash cans. 

DON T have Steam-pipes in contact with woodwork or near 
inflammable materials, and don t permit rubbish to accu 
mulate behind radiators or steam coils. 

DON T hang clothes or drapery near open Fires or Stoves, or 
on Stove-pipes or Steam-pipes. 

DON T permit loose-jointed Gas Brackets which can be swung 
against woodwork or curtains, or Gas Brackets without 
wire screens or globes if inflammable materials are near. 

DON T destroy the insolation on flexible electric light or fan 
cords by hanging them on hooks or nails. 

DON T fail to keep Lamps filled and wicks trimmed ; with the 
oil low, explosive gas may be generated ; but in no case 
fill the lamps after dark. 

DON T permit Benzine, Gasoline or Explosives on your pre 
mises unless used from approved safety cans. 

DON T throw oily waste or rags on the floor ; keep them in 
approved self-closing cans during the day and at night 
remove from the building they are self -igniting. 

DON T mix greasy or oily rags with papers or with clean 
clippings, or keep more clippings in your place (even if 
clean and in bales), than is unavoidable. 

DON T use sawdust on floors or in spitoons. or to catch oil 
drippings from machines or gearing. Sand is safe. 

DON T keep Matches loose in paper boxes, but only in metal or 
earthen safes. Those lighting on the box are safest. 

DON T throw away lighted cigars, cigarettes, or matches. 

DON T permit your employees to Smoke. Don t permit any 
one to Smoke in a Garage ; or if combustible materials 
are kept on the premises. 

DON T store gasolene in a Garage or fill cars from open 
vessels. 

DON T fail to have fire-pails filled, distributed and placed in 
conformity to Rules of local Boards of Fire Underwriters. 

DON T fail to test periodically your hose and fire appliances. 

DON T permit Stairs or Hallways to be blocked up or used for 
storage, or permit packing materials and rubbish to accu 
mulate and remain on your premises; packing materials 

must be kept in approved metal-lined bins. 

DON T fail to close at night all doors and traps to Elevators, 
Hoistways, Stairs and Communications, as well as Iron 
Shutters. 

DON T forget that Neglect and Carelessness are the cause of 
more fires than all other things. 

And above all things keep your MATCHES where 
children cannot get at them. 

JOHN SULLIVAN, 

Inspector General of Constabulary, 

and Chief of Fire Department. 




Published by Authority. 

His Excellency the Governor in Council has 
been pleased to direct that the following Order 
of His Majesty the King in Council, No. 2, 1914, 
passed on the 29th day of October last, repealing 
the Order in Council of date the 20th day of 
August last, with respect to the Declaration of 
London, shall come into effect as from the date 
thereof. 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 

Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
November 17th, 1J4. 



i. During the present hostilities the provisions of the Declar 
ation of London shall, subject to the exclusion of the list of con 
traband and non-contraband and to the modifications hereinafter 
set out, be adopted and put in force by His Majesty s Govern 
ment. The modifications are as follows: 

( i) A neutral vessel, with papers indicating a neutral destin 
ation, which, notwithstanding the destination shown on 
the papers, proceeds to an enemy port, shall be liable to 
capture and condemnation if she is encountered before 
the end of her next voyage. 

(2) The destination referred to in Article 350! the said Dec 

laration shall (in addition to the presumptions laid down 
in Article 34) be presumed to exist if the goods are con 
signed to or for an Agent of the enemy State. 

(3) Notwithstanding the provisions of Article 35 of the said 

Declaration, conditional contraband shall be liable to 
capture on board a vessel bound for a neutral port if the 
goods are consigned to order," or if the ship s papers 
do not show who is the consignee of the goods, or if they 
show a consignee of the goods in territory belonging to 
or occupied by the enemy. 

(4) In the cases covered by the preceeding paragraph three, 

it shall be upon the owners of the goods to provide that 
their destination was innocent. 

2. Where it is shown to the satisfaction of one of His 
Majesty s Principal Secretaries of State that the enemy govern 
ment is drawing supplies for its armed forces from or through a 
neutral country, he may direct that in respect of ships bound for 
a port in that country, Article 35 of the said declaration shall 
not apply. Such direction shall be notified in the London 
GAZETTE, and shall operate until the same is withdrawn. So long 
as such direction is in force, a vessel which is carrying condi 
tional contraband to a port in that country shall not be immune 
from capture. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 24. 



and that at last, enlightened about human love, had to invent a God 
who is entire love, entire capacity for love who takes pity on 
human love, because it is so paltry, so ignorant ! He who has 
such sentiments, he who has such knowledge about love seeks 
for death !" Elsewhere, he refers to the Crucifixion as the last 
term in a series of acts of religious cruelty. " First, man sacrifi 
ced human beings, next human nature, and finally God Him 
self I" Divine love stooping to relieve suffering, is to Nietzsche 
both unthinkable and undesirable. " Among men there is a sur 
plus of defective, diseased, degenerating, infirm and necessarily 
suffering individuals. . . . Christianity has preserved too 
much that which should have perished. It has deteriorated Eu 
rope." " You want to do away with suffering, and we ? it really 
seems that we would rather have it increased and made worse 
than it has ever been !" 

" To recognise untruth as a condition of life : to admit that 
from our fundamental nature we have been accustomed to lying : 
to agree that everything that is profound loves the mask and 
that men need to be two-faced " all this marks Nietzsche s 
third rejection. " The falseness of an opinion is not for us any 
objection to it. ... The question is: How far is the opinion 
life-preserving ?" " In our democratic age, education and culture 
must be essentially the art of deceiving. . . . An educator 
who nowadays preached truthfulness above everything else and 
called out to his pupils : Be true ! even such a virtuous and 
sincere ass would learn in a short time to have recourse to the 
fork of Horace in order to throw Nature out." 

This rampant optimism in his ability to create a powerful 
ruling caste has its foundation in profound pessimism : in brief, 
Nietzsche is convinced that Heredity is the force that damns all 
spiritual progress and that, therefore, our whole effort must be 
directed to handing on, unimpaired, to our children, the beast 
which we ourselves have inherited. " It cannot be effaced from 
a man s soul what his ancestors have preferably and most 

constantly done Whatever appearances may 

suggest to the contrary. Any kind of offensive incontinence, 
any kind of sordid envy, or of clumsy self-vaunting such must 
pass over to the child." Hence the new commandment which 
Nietzsche gives: "A new commandment, O my brothers, give 
I unto you. Be hard!": and a still further development, his 
praise of cruelty. " Almost everything that we call higher culture 
is based upon the spiritualising and intensifying of cruelty." We 
admit that the last extract scarcely represents the precise thought 
in Nietzsche s mind it is almost impossible to give it : none the 
less, the difference is so subtle as to be negligible. 

His criticisms of European nations are characteristic of his 
outlook. " European noblesse is the work of France : European 
ignobleness is the work and invention of England. . 
Industrious races find it a great hardship to be idle : it was a 




THE REID-NFLD. Go s STR. " LINTROSE" PURCHASED BY THE 



master stroke of English instinct to hallow and begloom Sunday 
to such an extent that the Englishman unconsciously longs for his 
week-and work-day again." He applauds Napoleon : " the his 
tory of the influence of Napoleon is almost the history of higher 
happiness to which the entire century has attained in its worthi 
est individuals and periods." He ridicules Shakespeare, " that 
marvellous Spanish-Moor-Saxon synthesis of taste : over whom 
an ancient Athenian of the circle of Aeschylus would have half- 
killed himself with laughter or irritation." Two peoples call for 
his approval the Jews and Russians. Of the former he writes : 
" The Jews are the strongest, toughest and purest race at pres 
ent living in Europe, they know how to succeed even under the 
worst conditions. ... A thinker who has the future of 
Europe at heart will calculate upon the Jews as above all the 
surest and likeliest factors in the great play and battle of forces": 
of the latter he says, "I desire such an increase in the threaten 
ing attitude of Russia, than Europe would have to make up its 
mind to become equally threatening, viz., to acquire one will a 
persistent, dreadful will of its own, that can set its aim thousands 
of years ahead. . . . The time for petty politics is past: the 
next century will bring the compulsion to great politics." 

Hidden away in much that is repulsive, the student of Nietz 
sche will find many striking sentences. Here are a few : 

" A man of genius is unbearable unless he possesses two things 
at least, besides gratitude and purity." 

" Our vanity is most difficult to wound, just when our pride 
has been wounded." 

" It is not enough to possess a tilent : one must also have your 
permission to use it eh, my friend?" 

" One may indeed lie with the mouth : but with the accom 
panying grimace one nevertheless tells the truth." 

" He who does not wish to see the height of a man looks all ihe 
more sharply at what is low in him and in the fore-ground and 
thereby betrays himself." 

" It is too bad ! Always the old story ! when a man has finished 
building his house, he finds that he has learned unawares some 
thing he ought absolutely to have known before he began 
building. The eternal, fatal Too late !" 

" The maturity of man that means to have reacquired the 
seriousness that one had as a child at play." 

Had Nietzsche reached this maturity ? We believe so, and we 
believe also that his philosophy cannot be dismissed by reference 
to his madness, for the " tu quoque" is inevitable. Heraclitus, 
Socrates, Dante: Con-per and Mary Lamb: Tschaikowsky : 
Christ each was, rightly or wrongly, said to be : mad." Nor does 
it appear that modern Germany is the outcome of Nietzsche s 
teaching. Rather does it seem that these doctrines find a real 
basisin every man-German or not German, for their influence has 
spread far beyond Saxony, the home of Nietzsche, and Prussia, 
which he hated. In English speaking 
countries, he has his disciples, joined to 
gether in the Good European Society. 
There have always been men who see 
only the base in their nature : thank God, 
there have also been men who could see 
the higher. Long ago, Thrasymachus 
preached the same doctrine "Justice is 
the interest of the stronger, and injustice 
is more profitable and also stronger than 
justice." Socrates and Plato showed a 
more excellent way, Carlyle and Emerson 
called for personal idealism : Nietzsche s 
counter blast is a deification of .inimal 
passion. Every man who yields to his 
worse self, to his passions, is a disciple of 
Nietzsche, even though he may never 
have heard his master s name. 

Rudolf Eucken, a fellow countrymen 
of Nietzsche s, does not spare his critic 
ism: "the balance of Nietzsche s effec 
tive influence lies with \\hat he denies 
rather than with what he affirms." In our 
simple way, we repeat, - Let not your 
heart be troubled : ye believe in God 
RUSSIA.V ADMIRALTY. believe also in Me." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 




PROCLAMATION 

By His Excellency SIR WALTER E. DAVIDSON, 

Knight Commander of the Most Distingu- 

W. E. DAVIDSON, ished Order of St. Michael and St. George, 

Governor, Governor and Commander-in-Chief, in and 

[ L - s -] over the Island of Newfoundland and its 

Dependencies. 

TVTHEREAS by the 255111 Section of " The Customs Act, 1898," 
" it is enacted that the Governor in Council may prohibit 
the exportation or carriage coastwise of the following goods : 
Arms, ammunition and gunpowder, military and naval stores 
and any articles which he, by and with the advice aforesaid, 
deems capable of being converted into or made useful in increas 
ing the quantity of military or naval stores, or for purposes of 
hostility, or destruction in War, provisions, or any sort of vic 
tual which may be used as food for man : 

And whereas I, by and with the advice of my Council, deem 
it expedient and necessary that I should exercise such power 
of prohibition in manner hereinafter appearing; 

Now I, by and with the advice aforesaid, do hereby, from and 
after the date hereof, prohibit the exportation of the following 
articles, namely : 

To all Foreign Ports in Europe, and on the Mediterranean 
and Black Seas, other than those of France, Russia (except the 
Baltic Ports), Belgium, Spain and Portugal ; 

Clover and grass seeds ; 

Motor vehicles of all kinds, and their component parts ; 

Cocoa. 

To all destinations abroad, other than the United Kingdom, 
and British Possessions and Protectorates : 

Fish (whale) oil, viz : Train, blubber, sperm or head 

matter; 
Jewelled draw-plates for drawing steel wire. 

And whereas I deem it expedient, by and with the advice 
aforesaid, that the following alterations should be made in m 
previous Proclamations, as hereinafter specified, which pro 
hibited the exportation or carriage coastwise of certain articles, 
under the authority before mentioned, viz. : 

That the heading " Animals, pack, saddle and draught, suit 
able for use in War," should be deleted from the list of articles 
prohibited by my Proclamation dated the sth day of August, 
1914, from being carried coastwise; 

And that the heading "Tea" should be deleted from the list 
of articles prohibited by my Proclamation dated ist day of Feb 
ruary, instant, from being exported to all Foreign Ports in 
Europe and on the Mediterranean and Black Seas, other than 
those of France, Russia (except the Baltic Ports), Belgium, Spain 
and Portugal ; 

I do, therefore, order and direct that my Proclamations afore 
said shall be amended in manner hereinbefore specified, as and 
from the date hereof, of which all persons concerned are hereby 
required to take due notice and govern themselves accordingly. 
Given under my Hand and Seal, at the Government House, 
Saint John s, this i6th day of February, A.D., 1915. 
By His Excellency s Command, 

JOHN R. BENNETT, 

Colonial Secretary. 




Public Notice. 

Censorship of Telegraphs, Cables and 
Wireless Stations. 



BY direction of the Chief Censor, London, the following 
Regulations will be in force on and after Friday next, Jannary 
the 1 5th, namely : 

1. Cablegrams in authorized editions of A. B.C., Lieber s, 
Scott s and Western Union Codes only may be exchanged be 
tween British, Allied or Neutral Territory, on extra European 
Telegraph System, on one side, and British or Allied Territory, 
wherever situated, on the other side. 

2. The term " Extra European Telegraph System " means the 
places outside the Telegraph System of Europe. Besides the 
places in Europe proper, the following are also counted as being 
on the European Telegraph System, namely : Russia and Asia; 
the following French possessions in North and West Africa, 
namely : Algeria, Mauritania, Senegal, Upper Senegal and 
Niger; and French Morocco. The Island of Cyprus is regarded 
as outside the European Telegraph System. 

3. Until further notice cablegrams in the following three 
Codes, namely : Meyer s Atlantic Cotton Code, Thirty-ninth 
Edition ; Bentley s Complete Phrase Code, not including sep- 
erate Mining and Oil Supplements; Broomhall s Imperial Com 
bination Code, not including Special Rubber Edition, are allow 
ed only between United Kingdom and places in Extra European 
Telegraph System. 

N.B. As all messages sent under the above Regulations have 
to be decoded and censored, the carrying out of this work will be 
greatly facilitated if persons sending such messages would hand 
in at the Telegraph Office, at the time of presenting the message, 
the translation of the same. 



JOHN R. 



BENNETT, 

Deputy Chief Censor 



J. T. MARTIN, 

Mortician and Embalmer* 

A Large Assortment of Caskets always on hand. 

PHONE 489. 

38 New Gower Street. 



MAKE YOUR PURCHASE AT THIS 

CORNER SHOP and save $$$$ 

We handle the very finest lines of 

Provisions, Groceries, Fruit, 
Confectionery, etc. 

All the leading brands of Tobaccos, Cigars and Cigarettes. 

SPECIAL! Watered Fish of No. i quality, and Watered 
Herring (Labrador). The above obtainable at my store on 
Wednesdays and Fridays throughout the year. Fresh Eggs. 

JAS. J. WHELAN, Cor. Gower & Colonial Sts. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 26. 



Our 



Honored 




ability of its present head, aided by the fire captains in control 
of the stations. 

The Inspector General has been always fearless in the 
charge of his duties, performing his difficult and sometimes 
disagreeable work, with malice to none, without favor and will 
no unnecessary harshness. In tendering him our felicitations 
we are but voicing the sentiments of the whole community in 
wishing him more years of service to his King and country. 



JOHN srl.I.lVAN, ESQ., J.P. 

WE offer our sincere congratulations to J .hn Sullivan, Esq., 
J.P., Inspector General of the Newfoundla id Constabu 
lary, on the distinguished honor conferred on him by His 
Mnj-sty the King, when distributing the New Year honors. 
His Majesty has rewarded the Inspector General s long 
service to his country, as a Guardian of the Law, by confer 
ring on him the distinction known as the King s Police 
Medal the first King s Medal to Newfoundland insti 
tuted by King Edward VII. in the year 1909. This is a 
rare honor, not conferred for long service alone. The recipient 
must also have been a success in his business. But one hundred 
are conferred annually throughout the whole empire, and fifty 
of these go to the Indian empire. It gives official approbation 
and recognition of the Inspector General s dintinuui-^hed career. 
It is forty-four years since Mr. Sullivan joined the police force 
as a simple private. He is now more than seven years at its 
head a position he reached not by politicil favoritism, but by 
c.utstancling ability and fitness and he is generally recognised 
to be one of the most efficient Chiefs of Police in the history of 
the Colony. The force under his control was never in better 
order, and never was crime more quickly detected and brought 
to the courts for punishment. The Fire Department which 
is also under the Inspector General s control is in a high state 
>f efficiency ; it owes much of its success to the organizing 




THE LATE REV. G. R. GODDEN. 



THE LATE BEI.i VI-T> 

Rev. G. Ross (ioJJcn, Rector of St. Chomas s, 

WHO iiim i i iu;i \uv 12, 1915. 
DEAR Heart! Dear heart ! 

So fond of " silent places !" 
Dear heart ! Dear heart ! 

Whose throbs are still d for e er ! 
The sad bells toll, the tender flow rs are drooping 

And heads bow, rev rent, by thy honour d bier ! 

Such souls as thine 

See Faith beside the mountain 
In lake, in stream the majesty of stars . 

The camp-fires gleam night s deep and tender silence, 
And morning s dawn, thro opalescent bars! 

The silent Church, the little path, the garden ! 

To those who lov d him, 
What enduring pain ! 

The spring will come 
And kiss to life the blossoms 

< >ur Rector ne er will look on them again ! 
****** 
Such souls as thine 

See Faith beside the mountains 
In lake, in stream the majesty of stars ! 

The camp-fires gleam night s deep and tender silence ! 
The morning s dawned 

And thou art past the "bars"! 

T? r 



_TH_E NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 27. 



Spring Suitings ! 

The Best Selection we have yet 
shown ; bought before the rise in 
price. ELLIS MAKE SUITINGS 

are the Best Tailored in the City, 
and will cost no more than the 
other kind* 

CHAS. J. ELLIS, 

302 Water Street, 
English and American High-Class Tailor. 




UN j IFE 

ASSURANCE COMPANY 

OP CANADA 

THE COMPANY S GROWTH. 



YEAR 



LIFE ASSURANCES 
IN FORCE. 



1872 . . 

1914 



48,210.93 s 96,461.95 S 1,064,350.00 
15,052,275.24 64,187,656.38 218,299,835.00 



ALEX. BRYDEN, 

Manager for Newfoundland* 




Moore & Company 

I Plumbers, 
I Hot Water & 
Steam Titters. 

Heaters, Stoves, Toilets, Baths and everything in our line 
of the Best Quality at Lowest Prices. 

SHIPS PLUMBING A SPECIALTY 

128 Duckworth St., - St. John s, Nfld. 

Phone 456. P. 0. Box 1124. 



NOTICE. 

I am in receipt of a communication from the Postal Depart 
ment of the United Kingdom intimating that the Postmaster- 
Generai has agreed to a reduction of , the postal rates on regis 
tered newspapers and magazines published in this country and 
mailed to Great Britain. 

On and after this date all such magazines and newspapers will 
be accepted and forwarded at the rate of two cents per pound or 
fraction thereof, instead of eight cts. (8c.) per pound as hitherto. 

Whereas it appears some mis-understanding. has arisen with 
respect to the free delivery of parcels mailed to our volunteers 
in Great Britain, the public will please take notice that such 
parcels cannot be delivered free of postage. I have been notified 
that the Postmaster-General of the United Kingdom could not 
undertake the delivery, without charge, of unpaid or insufficiently 
paid parcels to the troops on active service in Great Britain. 
Consequently all parcels mailed to members of the Newfound 
land Contingent must be stamped according to established rates. 

H. J. B. WOODS, 
March 8, 1915. Postmaster General. 





Sheep Preservation ! 

1. It shall be lawful for the duly qualified electors, resident within an 
area or district within this Colony, to present to the Governor in Coun 
cil a petition or requisition in the form prescribed in the Schedule to this 
Act, or as near thereto as may be, setting forth the limits or boundaries 
within which such area or district is comprised, and the names of the 
towns, harbours or settlements included therein, and praying for a Procla 
mation prohibiting the keeping of dogs within such area or district. 

2. Such petition or requisition shall be sent to the nearest resident 
Stipendiary Magistrate, and shall be by him (after examination and certi 
ficate as hereinafter provided) furnished to the Governor in Council. 

3. If, upon due scrutiny of such petition or requisition, the Stipendiary 
Magistrate shall find that the same contains the bona fide signatures of a 
majority of the duly qualified electors resident within the limits or bound 
aries set forth in the said petition or requisition, he shall forthwith have a 
certificate to that effect endorsed upon or attached to the petition or re 
quisition, and shall forward the same to the Governor in Council. 

I \ny Stipendiary Magistrate to whom such petition or requisition may 
be presented may, before certifying the same to the Governor in Council 
as aforesaid, require proof to be made before him of the bona fide signa 
tures of any of the names subscribed to such petition, upon the oath of 
either the party whose name purports to be signed or of a witness to such 
signature. 

5. Upon receipt of any such petition or requisition containing the signa 
tures of mil less than one-third of the electors resident within any such 
area or district, certified as aforesaid, the Governor in Council shall issue 
a Proclamation or Public Notice prohibiting the keeping of dogs within 
such area or district. 

6. From and after the date prescribed in and by such Proclamation or 
Notice, it shall not be lawful for any person resident within such area or 
district, to keep, or have in his possession, or under his control, any dog 
within the area or district to which such Proclamation or Notice shall 
relate, under a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars or imprisonment for a 
term not exceeding three months. This prohibition shall not apply to any 
person or persons travelling or passing through such areas or districts and 
having a licensed dog or dogs in his or their possession, charge or control, 
and not at large. 

A. W. KNIGHT, Clerk of the Peace. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 



,28. 



3wiCigftt [Memories. 

By Ella H. Rozier, Shrewsbury, England. 

WHEN Twilight draws her curtain round, 
And hides the last faint ray of setting sun ; 
When once again the work of day is done. 

And all is hushed in calm profound ; 

Then memory comes on silent wing, 
And speaks to us, in whisperings soft and clear, 
Of those bright early days we hold most dear. 

Round which our fond affections cling. 

And as she speaks we taste again 
The sweetness and the bliss of youthful days ; 
When all the paths of life seemed pleasant ways, 

And nought we dreamt of coming pain. 

When each day as it glided by 

Was filled with dreams, each brighter than the last 
Dreams that, when mirthful, careless childhood passed, 

Were lost in aspirations high. 

But still they with us kindly s ay, 
Like silvery chimes that mark the passing hour, 
Whose echoes seem to float around the tower 

Long after they have ceased to play ; 

Or like the hollow ocean-shell, 
Which, taken from its home in deep sea-cave, 
Still echoes forth the roar of rolling wave, 

And whispers of the surges swell ; 

Or like the chords of some sweet lay 
Swept o er the harp-strings by some skilful hand, 
Whose notes still vibrate exquisitely bland, 

Though long the strain has died away. 

E en thus the memories of our early days 
Shall in sweet chords, undimmed by darkling fears, 
Reverberate through all our future years, 

And cheer us through Life s wildering maze; 

Until at length, our journey o er, 
We find our youthful hopes fulfilled at last ; 
And start to find now wondrously surpassed 

Are all our brightest dreams of yore. 

[The above poem is from the pen of a Newfoundland lady daughter of 
the Rev. Mr. Rozier, who labored in the Colony for several years.] 




THE FIRST 
Newfound 
land soldier to 
give his life in 
the great Euro 
pean war was 
John F. Chaplin, 
son of Mr. and 
Mrs. M. Chaplin, 
Saint John s, a 
private in the 
First Newfound 
land Regiment. 
Young Chaplin 
went away with 
the first draft of 
the regiment, and 
while at Fort 
George, Inver- 
nesshire, was at 
tacked with 
pneumonia and 
died in the local 
hospital. He 

was one of the 
youngest, and 
one of the keen 
est, in the ranks, 
a volunteer filled 

with the buoyancy and the enthusiasm of youth. When the call came, his 
response was eager. The sacrifice of his bright, young life has been con 
summated on the altar of his country, not facing the foe, it is true, but none 
the less whilst on active service. He has fallen as a soldier, and to the 
young soldier s memory it is Newfoundland s honour to pay the tribute of 
praise and pride. John F. Chaplin belonged to the Methodist Guards, 
and was a lad beloved by all who knew him, generous, kindly and full of 
vitality and fun. Almost the first to offer condolence to the grief-stricken 
parents was His Excellency the Governor, Lieutenant-Colonel Sir W. E. 
Davidson, whose sympathetic letter will ever be a treasured possession. 
The Chief of the Clan Davidson lives not far from Fort George, and His 
Excellency expresses his intention to visit the grave on his next visit home, 
for where the young soldier fell, he will, to quote His Excellency, " rest in 
th2 military cemetery looking over the Moray Firth, n-here so many brave 
soldiers have been buried with Highland honours during many genera 
tions." 




THE LATE PRIVATE JOHN F. CHAPLIN. 




RECRUITING OFFICE 
AND DRILL QUAR 
TERS OF THE FIRST 
NEW FOUNDLAND 

REGIMENT C.L B. 

ARMOURY. 




THE_NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 29. 



Tailoring 

Just Received, our Spring and Summer Stock 
of Rain-Proof Overcoatings. 

Tweed and Worsted Suitings and Trouserings. Also, 
a very neat line of Fancy Vestings, all the very 
latest from the English markets. 

Prices Moderate. 

Samples and Measuring Cards sent to any 
part of the Island on application. 
Strict attention given to Outport Orders. 

E. J. MALONE, 



Custom Tailor, 268 Water Street. 



fOR A FRAGRANT SMOKE 



TRV 



SOUTHDOWN 

VIRGINIA S flNEST 



American 
Granulated 
Sugar ! 

Being amongst the largest importers 
of Sugar we can always offer Lowest 
Wholesale Prices. 

HEARN & Co. 



MAGNIFICENT 
PHOTOGRAPHS 

of the Newfoundland 1st Contingent have 
been secured by D. A. Grant, Nairn, 
Scotland, and copies will be forwarded 
on receipt of remittance. Copies of 
" A" Co y, on large mount, post free, 
55. 6d., or if unmounted, 45. Prices 
for " B " Co y likewise. Copies of 
the Officers group are 45. 6d. mounted 
and 35. 6d. unmounted. 

D. A, GRANT, 

The Studio, Nairn, Scotland. < & 



NEWFOUNDLAND PENITENTIARY. 



BROOM DEPARTMENT. 



Brooms, # Hearth Brushes, ** Whisks. 

A Large Stock of BROOMS, HEARTH BRUSHES and 
WHISKS always on hand; and having reliable Agents 
in Chicago and other principal centres for the purchase of 
Corn and other material, we are in a position to supply the 
Trade with exactly the article required, and we feel as 
sured our Styles and Quality surpass any that can be 
imported. Give us a trial order, and if careful attention 
and right goods at right prices will suit, we are confident 
of being favoured with a share of your patronage. 

(T2P"A11 orders addressed to the undersigned will receive prompt 
attention. 

ALEX. A. PARSONS, Superintendent. 

Newfoundland Penitentiary, March, 



EUROPEAN AGENCY. 

Wholesale Indents promptly executed at lowest cash prices 
for all British and Continental goods, including 

Books and Stationery. Boots, Shoes and Leather, 

Chemicals and Druggists Sundries, 

China, Earthenware and Glassware. 

Cycles, Mgtors and Accessories, 

Drapery, Millinery and Piece Goods, 

Fancy Goods and Perfumery, 

Hardware, Machinery and Metals, 

Jewellery, Plate and Watches, 

Photographic and Optical Goods, 

Provisions and Oilmen s Stores, etc., etc. 

Commission 2^/2, per cent, to 5 per cent. 

Trade Discounts allowed. 

Special Quotations on Demand. 

Sample Cases from 10 upwards. 

Consignments of Produce Sold on Account. 

WILLIAM WILSON & SONS, 

(Established 1814), 25, Abchurch Lane, London, E.C. 

Cable Address : " ANNUAIRE, LONDON. 



Wiien writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 30. 





Kigftfcmd 3artcms and Cfatis, 

By Arch. G. Gibb. 

On the ist day of August, 174?, after the rising of 1745, an 
act was passed forbidding the wearing of tartan, as any part of 
a Highland dress, under a penalty of six months imprisonment 
for the first offence, and transportation " beyond seas " for 
seven years for the second. 

No Highlander could receive the benefit of the Act of 
Indemnity without first taking the following dreadful oath 
" I, A. B., do swear, and as I shall answer to God at the great 
day of judgment, I have not, nor shall have, in my possession 
any gun, sword, pistol, or arm whatsoever, and never use tartan, 
plaid, or any part of the Highland garb; and, if I do so, may 
I be cursed in my undertakings, family and prosperity may I 
never see my wife and children, father, mother, or relations 
may I be killed in battle as a coward, and lie without Christian 
burial, in a strange land, far from the graves of my forefathers 
and kindred ; may all (his come across me if I break my oath." 
Dr. James Browne s History of the Highland Clans, 1859. 

This severe and harsh act, as might have been expected, was 
most unpopular, and, in consequence of the discontent created 
by it, it was repealed in 1782, through the influence of the 
gallant Duke of Montrose. 

Since that date (1782) clan tartan has with varying fluctua 
tions of fashions, been a highly popular article of dress, by no 
means confined to Scotland alone ; and many new and imaginary 
" sets" have been introduced by manufacturers, with the result 
of causing confusion in the heraldry of tartan, and of throwing 
doubt on the reality of the distinctive " sets " which were un 
doubtedly recognised as the badge of various clans. The 
manufacture of tartans has long been carried on at Bannock- 
burn, and in the Devon Valley, at Alva, and Tillicoultry, and in 
other parts of that district. 

It should be borne in mind that many Clans have from one 
to five various Tartans, such as, the common Clan Tartan, the 
Chief s Tartan, used only by himself and heir, the Dress Tartan ; 
the Hunting Tartan and Mourning Tartan. The ignorance of 
this fact often leads to many disputes as to the correctness of a 
particular tartan, it being generally supposed that a clan had 
only one tartan. 

Martin, in his " Western Isles of Scotland " (1703), says : 
" Every isle differs from each other in their fancy of making 
plaids, as to the stripes in breadth and colours. This humour 
is as different through the mainland of the Highlands, in so far 
that they who have seen those places, are able at the first view 
of a man s plaid to guess the place of his residence. 

With the limited space at my disposal it would be impossible for me to 
attempt to describe the many different sets and colourings in which tartans 
are woven, so that any description must necessarily be brief. The dominat 
ing colours are purple, green and blue, and red and yellow are also great 
favorites with some Clans. 

There is, amongst some of the tartans, a great similarity, that is, in the 
general appearance. The basic colours, and the arrangement of the " sets " 
in the background may be similar, but with the over-check " in a different 
colour, the difference is quite noticable, the over-check is generally in white, 
yellow or red, and sometimes in a combination of red and white, red and 
yellow and so on. Take for instance the Gordon (which is perhaps the 
most familiar to s here, being adopted by our Highland Brigade) and 
compare it with the Forbes. 

The basic colours and the set arrangement are very similar, but the 
" over-check " on the Gordon is yellow, while that on the Foibes is white, 
which makes quite a difference in the t\vo tartans, and makes them easily 
distinguishable. 

In a future paper I may give the history of some of these old Clans. 

The visit of "our boys" to Fort George and their sojourn in that 
romantic corner of Scotland, has brought them in close touch with people 
and places that, previous to their visit were, to many of them, almost un 
heard of, except in a vague way. They have climbed the rugged hills, 
traversed the romantic glens, and "foregathered" with the men of the 
tartan and the plaid, and possibly by this time some have even learned to 
talk " the Gaelic." Visits have been paid to the Chief of one of the High- 
Clans (the Mackinnon) where they experienced the fervor and kindli 
ness of a Highland welcome and hospitality they are not likely to forget 
And if all we hear is true, not a few of the boys have succumbed to the 
rosy cheeks and " bonnie blue een " of many of the Highland lassies! 
This all tends to bring the Colonial boys, and the folk of the " Far North " 
into a closer knowledge of each other, and has cemented a. friendship that 
will never die. Our boys will now be able to say, with Aytoun 
" Nowhere beats the heart so kindly 
As beneath the tartan plaid." 



" Where the Highland Tartans wave, 
Love and friendship join together; 
No vile tyrant, serf or slave 

Treads the bonnie, purple heather ! " 

i HE picturesque High 
land costume, with its 
kilts and plaid of 
handsome " chequer 
ed" clan tartan, is 
familiar to us all, and 
\ has endeared itself in the heart of every 
true Scot, no matter what corner of 
the globe he may reside in. The 
sight of it in a foreign land takes his 
memory back to the scenes of his 
boyhood, spent perhaps amongst the 
heather-clad hills, or the beautiful 
glens of the " Far North." 

Scotch tartans, or plaids, as they 
are often called, have become exceed 
ingly popular in other countries, 

especially in America where they are largely imported, and 
manufactured in cotton goods, and in France, where they are 
made in silk, and other fabrics. Some writers claim that the 
word Tartan is from the French tartaine and that the designs 
originated in that country. Be that as it may, tartans are uni 
versally recognised as being peculiar to the Highlands of 
Scotland, where the tartan kilts of the Clans are looked on as 
the national dress. While tbe origin of tartan is obscure, the 
following account of the material and its history should be of 
interest to the readers of the QUARTERLY. 

Tartan is a worsted cloth woven with alternate stripes or 
bands of coloured waft and weft, so as to form a chequered 
pattern in which the colours alternate in " sets " of definite 
width and sequence. 

While the wearing of parti-coloured and striped cloth cannot 
be claimed as peculiar to any race or country, the term " tartan" 
is specially applied to the varigated cloth used for the distinc 
tive costume of the Highlanders of Scotland. For this costume, 
and the tartan of which it is composed, great antiquity is claimed, 
but it is difficult to find out just when and where it originated. 

George Buchanan in his Reriim Scoticarum Historia (1582) 
says : " Undoubtedly the term tartan was known, and the 
material was woven "of one, or two colours for the poor, and 
more varied for the rich, as early as the middle of the i5th 
century." Logan in the Scottish Gael gives the following 
extract from the accounts of John, Bishop of Glasgow, Treasurer 
of King James III. in 1471 : 

Ane elne and ane halve of blue tartane to lyne his 

gowne of cloth of gold i ios. oo 

Four elne and ane halve of tartane for a sparwort 

aboun his credill, price ane elne ios 2 5 oo 

Halve ane elne of doble Tartane, to lyne ridin col 
lars to her Lady the Queen, price 8 oo 

In 1538 accounts were incurred for a Highjand dress for King 
James V. on the occasion of a hunting excursion in the High 
lands, in which there are charges for " variant cullorit velvet " 
for " ane schort Heland coit," and for "Heland Tartane to be 
hose to the King s grace." 

In more modern times the following references may be 
quoted. In 1640, General Leslie states that the Highlanders 
under his command were composed of men of the same name 
or clan ; as to the Tartan, reference is made as to its price in 
the Acts of Parliament of Scotland in 1661. 

In the ornamental title to Blean s map of Scotland, published 
in 1654, two Highlanders are represented in striped clothes, 
one of them wearing the " Belted Plaid," consisting of a large 
and long piece of plaiding, which was so folded and confined 
by a belt round tne waist as to form a complete dress, plaid and 
kilt in one piece. This is supposed to be the origin of the now 
highly ornamental Highland dress. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Bowring Brothers, Limited, Coastal Service. 



S.S. -PORTIA," WESTERN ROUTE, 

Calls at the following places : Cape Broyle, Ferry- 
land, Fermeuse, Renews, Trepassey, St. Mary s, 
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rence, Lamaline, Fortune, Grand Bank, Belleoram, 
St. Jacques, Harbor Breton, Pass Island, Her 
mitage, Gaultois, Pushthrough, Richard s Harbor, 
Rencontre (W.), Francois, Cape LaHune, Ramea, 
Burgeo, Rose Blanche, Channel, Bay of Islands, 
Bonne Bay. 



S.S. "PROSPERO," NORTHERN ROUTE, 

Call at the following places : Bay-de-Verde, Old 
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Herring Neck, Twillingate, Moreton s Harbor, 
Exploits, Fortune Harbor, Leading Tickles, 
Pilley s Island, Little Bay Island, Little Bay, 
Nipper s Harbor, Tilt Cove, LaScie, Pacquet, 
Baie Verte, Coachman s Cove, Seal Cove, Bear 
Cove, Western Cove, Jackson s Arm, Englee, 
Conche, St. Julien, St. Anthony, Griguet, Quirpon 
and Battle Harbor. 



BOUNDER S 



We are now booking Round Trip Passages per steamers Prospero and Portia, at $18.50. Finest and cheapest trip obtainable. 
Freight and Passage to all points. Booklets and further information can be obtained at Coastal Office of 

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Telegrams: " McDOl/GALL," St. John s. 



P. O. Box 845. 



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When writing to Advertisers kinly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 32. 






Vafuafcfe ITCeat 



for W)ar-5imes. 




By Clarence 

lURING the Spanish-American war a large num 
ber of American soldiers were incapacitated as a 
result of eating spoiled meat. In all wars the 
meat portion of the soldiers rations is likely to 
be one of the most difficult and expensive to 
supply. Yet it is vitally important that each man 
receive meat regularly. Non-combatants, also, find that the ef 
fect of any great war is to lessen their supply of meat and to in 
crease its cost. Obviously, therefore, it would be a great benefit 
to combatants and non-combatants alike if in such times as the 
present a good substitute for beef, pork, mutton, and other 
domestic meats could be made available in large quantities and 
at a low cost. 

I believe that the hair-seal and whale fisheries of Newfoundland 
can be made to furnish just such a cheap yet valuable substitute 
for domestic meats. Many, perhaps most, people will consider 
the idea of eating seal or whale meat disgusting or absurd. Vet 
it is neither. I have eaten most kinds of game to be found in 
North America, and consider that the flavor of none of them 
surpasses that of young " white-coat " harp seal. The flesh of 
young whales, also, especially that of young " fin-backs", is much 
like beef and as tender as the best tenderloin. The meat of old 
seals and old whales may be both strong and tough ; but so is 
that of old bulls, or of old stags or old bears. In respect to the 
quality of seal flesh as food I quote from Dr. A. Homer, surgeon 
of the Pandora, in " Land and Water " 

" From the length of time these people (the Eskimos) have 
inhabited this cold country, one naturally expects them to have 
found some special food well adapted by its nutritious and heat 
giving properties to supply all the wants of such a rigorous cli 
mate, and such is found to be the case ; for there is no food 
more delicious to the tastes of the Esquimaux than the flesh of 
the sea). . . . Seal s meat is so unlike the flesh to which u-e 
Europeans are accustomed, that it is not surprising that we 
should have some difficulty at first in making up our minds to 
taste it ; but when once that difficulty is overcome, every one 
praises its flavour, tenderness, digestibility, juiciness, and de 
cidedly warming after-effects. Its color is altiost black, from the 
large amount of venous blood it contains, except in very young 
seals, and is therefore, very singular looking, and not inviting, 
while its flavor is unlike anything else, and cannot be described 
except by saying delicious ! . . . The daintiest morsel of 
a seal is the liver. . . . The heart is good eating, while 
the sweetbreads and kidneys are not to be despised. 

" The usual mode of cooking seal meat is stew it with a few 
pieces of fat bacon, when an excellent rich gravy is formed ; or 
it may be fried with a few pieces of pork. . . . 
* December 18, 1875, p. 475. 



Birdseye. 

" For my own part I would sooner eat seal s meat than 
mutton or beef, and I am not singular in my liking for it, as 
several of the officers on board the Pandura shared my liking 
for it. I can confidently recommend it as a dish to be tried on 
a cold winter s day to those who are tired of everlasting beef 
or mutton. . . . It is very fattening, and if eaten every day 
for several wefks together it is likely to produce rather surpris 
ing effects. 

The flesh of the -white coats" (suckling harp seals; is not 
nearly so dark as that of adult animals, and tastes a little like 
the tenderest sort of veal. That the meat of both seals and 
whales is exceedingly nourishing I can testify from personal ex 
perience during the last two winters I have frequently eaten 
both sorts on my prolonged dog-team trips along the Labrador 
Coast, and ha/e found them far more invigorating than vtnsion. 
rabbit, bear, or partridge. There is no better food than seal or 
whale meat for do~s engaged on longkomatik trips ; and captive 
foxes, mink, marten, and other carnivors thrive exceedingly well 
on either sort. 

In the annual spring seal fishery of Newfoundland, prosecuted 
during March and April, there ^re from 200,000 to 285,000 seals 
taken, almost all of them being young "white coat" harps. 
These are killed solely for their fat and skins, and the carcases 
are left on the ice. The average weight of the fat and skin uf 
one of these " white-coat " seals is about a quintal (56 pounds i. 
and the edible portion of the carcase is of about equal weight. 
Considering each of ihe 200,000 or more seals killed each spring 
to afford 50 pounds of meat, there is a minimum of 10,000,000 
pounds (5,000 tons) of exceedingly nutritious and delicious flesh 
left on the ice, a total waste! The amount of available whale 
meat is more difficult to estimate, but some idea of its vastness 
is furnished by the fact that each whale factory ". to pay must, 
catch from 30 to 80 whales a year, and that each of these 
"fish " would furnish in the neighborhood of a hundred barrels 
of -choice cuts "! 

This immense amount of valuable meat might be salted, can 
ned or frozen, and made available for use either by the armies 
of the warring nations or by the innumerable refugees and other 
noncombaiants rendered destitute by the effects of the war. 
Canada has sent large quantities of flour and grains as her con 
tribution to the Mother Country : why \vjuld it not be well for 
Newfoundland to utilize some portion of her vast meat resources 
for helping to feed the British armies and unemployed ? 

Th-re would be some difficuliie-; in the way of util zing this 
meat many of them serous, but none insurmountable-. 

Sandwich Bay Fur Farms, Cart-aright. Labrador. 
.\< ,-i inl i-r. roij. 



A YOUNG NEWFOUNDLAND " WHITE- 
COAT" HARP SEAL. 










THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 33. 



N.J. Murphy 

Carriage & Sleigh Builder 




Undertaker, etc. 



Agent for 



Carriage Stock, Rubber Tyres, etc. 

Wheels Re-Rubbered 

at shortest notice and reasonable prices. 
\\ e always have on hand a large stock 
of Polished and Cloth-Covered 

Caskets and Coffins. 

Personal attention given to all Undertaking 
Orders Night or Day. Phone 737. 
West End Carriage Factory, - - 32 Bambrick Street. 




Marble and 

Granite Worker. 

Dealer in 

Marble & Granite 
Headstones, 
Fonts, Tombs, 
Monuments, etc., 

of the Latest Designs. 
Orders executed promptly. 

340 Water Street, 

Opp. Alan Goodridge & Sons, 
St. John s. P. O. Box 4JJ. 




149 

Gower Street. 



Peckham, 



Dealer in 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, 

Veal, Pork and 

Poultry. 

Orders Called For and Delivered Free. 



Corned Beef, Vegetables 
and Fish a specialty. 






j. j. O GRADY. 



p. <> GRADY. 



O GRADY BROS., 

House and Church Painters ; Graining, Marbling, Lettering, 
Kalsomining, Paper Hanging and Glazirg. Scene Painting 
, a specialty. Outport orders promptly attended to. 
p Q g ox 216. Address : 13 Carter s Hill. 

When writing to Advertisers kindly mention 




Notice to Owners and Masters 
of British Ships ! 

- o - 

The attention of Owners and Masters of British 
Ships is called to the 74th Section of the " Mer 
chant Shipping Act, 1894," 

74. (i) A Ship belonging to a British subject 
shall hoist the proper national colours 

(a) on a signal being made to her by one of His 
Majesty s ships (including any vessel under the 
command of an officer of His Majesty s navy 
on full pay), and 

(b) on entering or leaving any foreign port, and 

( c) if of fifty tons gross tonnage or upwards, on 
entering or leaving any British Port. 

( 2) If default is made on board any such ship in 
complying with this section, the master of the ship 
shall for each offence be liable to a fine not exceed 
ing one hundred pounds. 

At this time of war it is necessary for every Brit 
ish Ship to hoist the colours and heave to if signal 
led by a British Warship ; if a vessel hoists no 
colours and runs away, it is liable to be fired upon. 



H. W. LeMESSURIER, 



St. John s, Newfoundland, 
March, 1915. 



Registrar of Shipping. 



The Newfoundland Quarterly." 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY 34. 

3fiis HcvofoundCand of Ours" Wftat is Ker Destiny 







By Rev. Frank 

If we look at the matter calmly 

and philosophically, we shall see that we are every 
day drawing nearer to our destiny incorporation 
with the Dominion of Canada." A, A. Parsons in 
Xmas Bells, 1914. 

HESE Christmas Numbers ! What joy they bring ! 
Coming over leagues of ocean, they breathe 
around us the spirit of the old home-land and 
transport us back once more to scenes of long 
ago. Yes, the spirit of the old home land that 
indefinable something which makes her different 
from any other land on earth. And right from their pages comes 
something that disquiets us. Her destiny ! She is to lose her 
identity to be swallowed up in the great m nv of some devour 
ing whale, and Newforndlaid. thou old rough island-home of 
ours, we shall know thee as thine own old sdf m more ! 

But what is it that makes the visits of the NEWFOUNDLAND 
QUARTERLY and the various Christinas Numbers so welcome to 
us ? There are no Christmas Numbers like them. They are 
quite distinct from anything we know and they are interesting 
absorbingly interesting. Is this not because they spsak of a 
people in formation, a national spirit, growing iito youth from 
childhood, full of promise for its maturer years, a spirit in 
which we have been nurtured and which we think we understand. 
It is the spirit of a people welded of English. Irish and Scotch, 
yet like none of these ; a people akin to the great nations of the 
adjacent mainland, yet distinct from those. 

But we are told their destiny is to be absorbed. Tney are a 
little nation not powerful, not strong a tiny sister who must 
place her little hand in that of her big sister if she wou d be 
protected in the storm and stress of life. 

One has known for a long time that public men who ought to 
know have said that this is so. One has felt that many, like the 
esteemed author of the article from which I quote, have con 
sidered federation with the great Dominion as her inevitable 
fate. One has felt perhaps without good reason that the 
officials at Downing Street would rather deal with the people of 
British North America in bulk. No doubt, it wo jld simplify 
matters considerably for the Imperiil authorities. But ought 
she yield to considerations such as these and allow herse f to be 
dealt with as a part of Canada? Te^nysoi has beautifully 
said of England : 

" Thank him who isled us here and roughly set 
His Saxon in blown seas and storming showers. 

\Ve have a voice with which to pay the debt 
< if boundless love and reverence and regret 

To those great men who fought and kept it ours." 

If Philipp of Spain had had his way, England would have been 
a province of the mighty Spanish Empire; had Napoleon 

triumphed, she would have bean an appendage of Erance, 

and why not ? Surely her destiny ought to have been to be 
incorporated into the great Dominion at whose gates she lay; 
should William s ruthless legions succeed in rolling back the 
tides that rise against him, she will be incorporated into the 
realm of her "German kindred." 

If Newfoundland, against all threats and blandishments, holds 

o the position she has held so long, might there not come a 

time when some Newfoundland Tennyson would address his 

country in words akin to those I have quoted ? Visions rise 

before one s eyes of a day that is not ours the future ages of 

the world. One sees the teeming millions of America looking to 

Europe as we now look to Persia and the Middle East as the 

cradle of their race, and nothing more. And these teeming 

millions will not all be of the same race. There are more races 

now on the two Americas than there are on the Continent of 

Europe. Will they always be content to sink their racial 

characteristics in one common unity, or will they develjp along 

their own lines a new set of races with ideas and aspirations all 

their own ? Will our United States cousin always retain the 

hegemony she now possesses over the Americas ? Will she 



Hope Scott. 

always remain united alway a republic? Or will she break up 
into the races of which she is composed and will she lose her 
premier-place ? Will the Latin nations contest her position, and 
will she always prevail ? If not, is there to be no warden of the 
liberties of America no eye, no soul of Colombia no watch 
dog set to guard the gates against the encroaching tyrant ? Well, 
we are dreaming, yet dreams oft come true. Will this one, I 
wonder? 

Again, let us look at the Empire. There are not wanting 
signs that we are on the verge of great things for it. In the 
coming re-adjustment of the relations of the parts of the Empire 
to one another, will our interests be always identical with those 
of Canada? There is at least a chance that they will not. Are 
we to barter our voice and influence in the shaping of the future 
of the Empire for the doubtful advantages of union with Canada? 
Things which do not enter our minds at the present moment, 
may happen. Disjoined from Canada we can follow our own 
course and seek our own best interests. Joined with her, we 
may bs dragged into courses of action which accord neither 
with our sentiment nor our highest development. 

And as I sit and think of things at home, I am struck uith 
the absence of that calm and philosophical discussion of the 
question to which the writer refers. When have I se-n the 
question discussed in a really effective way ? One has heard 
the word Confederation used as a party cry often enough, but 
seldom or never has one seen a cool, clear and logical state 
ment of either the pros or the cons of the case. One may be 
wrong, but one likes to think that dear old Terra Nova has a 
higher destiny than absorption into the Dominion of Canada, 
and one fears that it may be brought about by a snap vote, not 
given on the merits of the case, or given thoughtlessly, because 
the larger issues are not appreciated. A distant view of the 
picture seems to bring a new set of ideas, a larger conception of 
the relationship of pans than a close examination of a few of 
the details. Confederation may come or it may not : but if it 
does, one feels it will be a vast pity. 

Hull, England, January, 1915. 



trioon-Setting. 

By B. F. d Erone. 



THE moon that fainted through the longsome day 
Now enters the pale gate-way of the west. 
Her star-tiara pale 
Weaveth a filmy veil 

That sheds a guiding light before her way 
And falls like star-dust on her purple vest, 

A gown mosaic -wise wove, deft-fingered Night 

Wrought from the listless rags the day-sky wears, 
Plashed through her yellow hair 
Pale threads the dawn-stars wear 
Elusive beams, like rainbows of wan light 

That love-light at love s parting strikes through tears. 

But lo! the jagged hill she erstwhile gilt 

Before her yawns its mouth obscurely green. 
Alone she goes within 
Those pale night-portals dim, 
The dome of light eternal God has built, 
But where She goes no mortal eye ha seen. 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY. 35. 



Sailings Every Saturday to Nova Scotia and Newfoundland. 









Offers a weekly service of twelve-day trips 
maintained by their two new steamers, 



Nova Scotia, and St. John s, Newfoundland. This service will be 



STEPHANO and FLORIZEL, 

especially built for this service. Steamers remain long enough at each port to enable passengers to visit these interesting cities. 

People who spend the summer at Chester, Digby, Hubbards or any of the other charming seaside resorts in Nova Scotia will 
find that the Red Cross Line provides the best, easiest and most direct method of getting there. 

There is splendid trout fishing in the vicinity of St. John s. Loch Leven and Rainbow trout have been imported assuring 
the angler of the very best fishing. The finest salmom fishing on this side of the Atlantic can be reached in one day from 
St. John s at very small expense. 

Ptarmigan or grouse shooting is from October ist to January i2th. Caribou shooting commences August ist, and in no other 
part of the world can big game shooting be enjoyed for so little expense. 

The rate for the round trip, including berth and meals while at sea and in port is only $60.00 and up according to accommo 
dations desired. Illustrated folder, with complete rates, plans, sailings and other information will be sent upon application to 



BOWRING & COMPANY, 



General Agents Red Cross Line, 
17 Battery Place, New York Cily. 



Extract from The Merchant 
Shipping Act Referring to 
the Naming of Ships* 

Regulations made by the Board of Trade, in con 
junction with the Commissioners of Customs, under 
Section 50 of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1906. 

Under the provisions of Section 50 of the Mer 
chant Shipping Act, 1906, the Board of Trade, in 
conjunction with the Commissioners of Customs, 
hereby make the following Regulations relating to 
ships names, and direct that they shall come into 
force on ist January, 1908: 

1. Any person who proposes to make application 
for the Registry of a British Ship shall give notice 
in writing of the proposed name of the ship to the 
Registrar of Shipping at the intended Port of 
Registry at least fourteen days before the date on 
which it is contemplated to effect the registry. 

7. When it is proposed to register the ship at a 

port not situated in the British Islands, the Regis 
trar to whom the name is intimated may proceed 
with the registry of the ship if he satisfies himsell 
that the name does not appear in the Current Mer 
cantile Navy List ; but if the name does so appear, 
the Registrar shall transmit the application to the 
Registrar General of Shipping and Seamen, and 
the case shall be treated in the manner laid down 
for registry in the British Islands. 
Department of Customs, 
March, 1915. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 



fekZ 



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Best Ingredients, 



Finest Grades. 



Newfoundland 
Savings Bank. 



Established in 1834. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature. 



1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ....... 

DIRECTORS : 

Hon. George Skeltun, M.D., 
Hon. John Harris, P.L.C., 

Hon. John B. Ayre, M.L.C. 

CASHIER : 

. Hon. Robert Watson. 



,,,1,111111111 



Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate. 

BRANCHES : -Harbor Grace, Heart s Content, Bay Roberts, 
Bell Island, Grand Falls, Placentia. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 36. 



Hcvpfoundfatid limestone. 




is found in extensive deposits in 
many parts of Newfoundland, and is one of the 
Colony s valuable non-metallic mineral assets. It 
occurs extensively in the carboniferous areas at 
Bay St. George and Deer Lake and, in the form 
of marble, in White Bay and other places on the northern and 
southern coasts. The lime occurs in the rocks as calcium car 
bonate. It is sometimes pure, as in the White Bay marbles, 
and sometimes it is associated with alumina and magnesia. 

Limestone is commercially valuable as a building stone, and as 
a flux for smelting iron, copper, lead and other metallic ores. It 
is an important source of lime and Portland cements. Bricks, 
porcelain and other furnance products are made from it. In 
recent years it has been extensively employed in the electrolytic 
industries for making carbides like calcium carbide which yields 
lights for automobiles, nitrates for fertilizers, artificial petroleum 
and other synthetic chemical products. Each year new fields 
of usefulness are being developed for limestone and, con 
sequently, every year our limestone deposits are becoming better 
national assets. 

Lime plays a very important part in nature and is destined, 
like magnesium, silicon and aluminium, to play many more im 
portant roles when it is better understood. 

It also occurs very extensively in the sun and other celestial 
bodies and in an astronomical work, Sir Robert Ball writes of 
lime as follows : " The shell of the hedge-sparrow and a shell 
cast up by the sea have qualities in common besides their 
beauty. They have both been fabricated from the same ma 
terial. Lime is, of course, the substance from which the birr 1 , 
by some subtle art of physiology, forms those exquisite, walls, 
by which the vital part of the egg is protected. The soft organ 
ism that once dwelt in the cowrie was endowed with some power 
by which it extracted from the waters of the ocean the lime wiih 
which it gradually built an inimitable shell. Is it an exaggera 
tion to say that this particular element calcium, this element 
so excessively abundant and so rarely seen, seems to eny y 
some peculiar distinction by association with exqui.-ite grace 
and beauty ? The white marble wrought to an unparalleled 
loveliness by the genius of a Phidias or a Canova is but a form 
of lime. So is the ivory on which the Japanese artist works 
with such delicacy and refinement. Whether as coral in a 
Pacific island, as a pearl in a necklace or as a stone in the 
Parthenon, lime seems often privileged to form the mateiial 
basis of beauty in nature and beauty in art. 

"Though lime in its different forms, in the rocks of the earth 
or the waters of the ocean, is one of the most ordinary sub 
stances met with on our globe, yet calcium, the essential element 
which goes to the composition of lime, is not by any means a 
familiar body, and not many of us, I imagine, can ever have 
seen it. Chemistry teaches that lime is the result of a union in 
definite proportions between oxygen gas and the very shy metal 
calcium. This metal is never found in nature unless in such 
intimate chemical union with some other element, like oxygen or 
chlorine, that its characteristic features are altogether obscured, 
and would indeed never be suspected from the mere appearance 
of the results of the union. To see the metal calcium you must 
- :sit a chemical laboratory where, by electrical decomposition or 
other ingenious process, this elusive element cm be induced to 
part temporarily from its union with the oxygen or other body 
for which it has so eager an affinity, and to which it returns wiih 



such alacrity. Though calcium is certainly a metal, it is very 
unlike the more familiar metals such as gold or silver, copper 
or iron. A coin might conceivably be formed out of calcium, 
but it would have no stability like the coins of the well-known 
metals. Calcium has such an unconquerable desire to unite 
with oxygen that the unstable metal will speedily grasp from the 
surrounding air this vital element. Unless special precautions 
are taken to withhold from the calcium the air, or other source 
from whence it could obtain oxygen, the union will most cer 
tainly take place, and the calcium will resume the stable form of 
lime. Thus it happens that though this earth contains incalcu- 
able billions of tons of calcium in its various combinations, yet 
calcium itself is almost unknown except to the chemist. 

" It is plain that calcium plays a part of tremendous signifi 
cance on this earth. I do not say that it is the most important 
of all the elements. It would indeed seem impossible to assign 
that distinction to any particular element. Many are, of course, 
of vital importance ; but without calcium there would neither be 
fertile soils for plants nor bones for animals, and consequently, 
a world, inhabited in the manner of our present globe would be 
clearly impossible. There may be lowly organisms un this 
earth to which calcium is of no appreciable consequence, and it 
is of course conceivable that a world of living types could be 
constructed without the aid of that particular element which is 
to us so indispensable. But a world without calcium would be 
radically different from the world which we know, so that we are 




HUMBER RIVER NEAR NK Hi >] xy I LLE. 

disposed to feel a special interest in the important modern dis 
covery that this same tlemeif calcium is abundantly distributed 
throughout the universe." 

In a climate, like our own, which has a heavy rainfall, the 
surface waters dissolve and carry away the fertilizing e eme ntof 
the soil. The result is that the untilled soil is acidic and will 
not bear crops unless it is icfsrtilized. The long stitches of 
peaty soils which are seen by railroad travellers in Newfoundland 
are acidic and require neutralizing with lime before they will 
grow good crops of vegetables, fruit or hay. But at Stephen- 
ville Crossing and St. George s immense hills of splendid lime 
stone can be seen from the train that could be used to make 
the barren lands of the interior bloom like the most beautiful 

p3TKS. 

In the near future, the Newfoundland limestone deposits , 
the West Coast will undergo extensive development Thev are 
only used at present for fluxing the Bell Island iron ores at the 
Sydney furnaces. But within a couple of years they will V 
extensively employed in making Portland cement, fertilizers an 
calcium carbide. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 





No Advance 

in Prices is our name just now. 

A Big Advance 

isfaction is another object of ours. 

We are showing some Chic designs in 
Spring and Summer Suitings, and Over 
coatings, and we place them before you in 
all confidence. 

Try a garment from us ; our best service 
is at your disposal. 

W. P. SHORTALL, 

The American Tailor, 
300 Water Street, St. John s. P. 0. Box 445 







The Caille Perfection 
Kerosene Engine 

(The Trouble-Proof Engine) 

is known all over the world. 
It is now being used by 
Admiral Jellicoe in the 
North Sea, by the United 
States Navy whose order 
was secured against all 
competitions, by The Hud 
son Bay Co. fur traders 
and makers of history, by 
the Newfoundland fishermen 
who claim there is nothing 
better. 

The Newfoundland Agents arc 

F. G. HOUSE & Co., 

Columbus Building. St. John s. 





P. 0. Box 236. 



Phone 522. 



fire Insurance Company 

FUNDS $60,000,000 

INSURANCE POLICIES 

Against Loss or Damage by Fire 

are issued by the above 

well known office on the most 

liberal terms. 

GEO. H. HALLEY, 

5GENT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND. 



SLATTERY S 

Wholesale Dry Goods. 

Full Stock Full Stock 

of of 

Regular Dry Goods Remnants & Seconds 

WAREROOMS : 

Slattery Building, 

Duckworth & George s Sts., St. John s, IM.F. 



OFFICE AND STORE Adelaide Street. STONEYARD Just East Custom 
House. Water Street. Telephone, 364. 



HENLEY S 



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Contractor, Builder, 
and Appraiser* * 

Dealer in Cement Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps; Chimney Tops, all sizes, Plate Glass and 

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Estimates Given for all kinds 
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02p=Manufacturers and Real Estate Owners contemplating 
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ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



When writing to Advertisers kinly mer.tion " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 38. 



of Sarming. 



By Samuel Ruby. 




i HE prices of many commodities have advanced 
during the war and those of food-stuffs, like flour 
and meat have, in many cases, reached almost 
prohibitive figures, notwithstanding the efforts of 
the various Governments to prevent merchants 
from taking advantage of the war to increase 
their profits. It is plain to every householder that in war-time, 
more so than in times of peace, the farmer feeds the nation and 
he is the basis, the back-bone of our naiional life. 

In Newfoundland we have millions of acres of good agricul 
tural land that with intelligent husbandry could be made to yield, 
not only all the food our people need, but a large and valuable 
surplus for export. We are told by the Newfoundland Agricul 
ture Board that: "The area of land seeded to grass throughout 
the country is capable of yielding a very much heavier crop than 
is at present- obtained. It is an undeniable fact, that if the area 
under grass were made to produce the average cut of one and a 
half tons per acre, we would be independent of imporUti jns, 
would supply the home demand and thus keep in the country 
the S6o,ooo to $75,000 that we yearly send to Canada for im 
ported hay. A good field of timothy and clover will yield two 
and a half tons per acre and there is no reason why two tons 
should not be cut off any acre of reasonably well-cared for 
land." 

In order to draw attention to the great need for more and 
better farming in Newfoundland and to arouse interest in our 
agricultural industries and opportunities, I purpose to show how 
the farmer is encouraged in other countries and indicate how 
farming may be stimulated here. 

That the cost of living has been rising for many years is well 
known, and the cause must be world wide, for the increase is 
world wide, as shown by statistics compiled by the London 
Board of Trade. Taking the year 1900 as a basis, it appears 
that the price of foodstuffs had, in 1912, risen 15 per cent, in 
Great Britain and France; 20 per. cent, in Italy ; 23 per cent, in 
Holland; 23 per cent, in Belgium; 35 per cent, in Austria; 38 
per cent, in Japan (1911); 39 per cent, in the United States 
(1911); and 51 percent, in Canada. 

Among the world wide causes (hat have been suggested are 
the greater production of the gold, reducing its value, and the 
progressive withdrawing of labor from Agriculture to the manu 
facturing industries. 

In Great Britain and France the soil is handled most intelli 
gently with intensive Agriculture. That the percentage of in 
crease should be larger in some of the important food producing 
countries than in Great Britain is worthy of note. It is especi 
ally remarkable that in Canada it should be highest of all. The 
causes assigned to this have been operating in the Dominion 
with full force. From being a food exporting nation Canada 
has become, in some lines, a foid imporing one. While we 
boast of city growth that is the consequence to the farm. 

Such results should justify us in taking steps to increase the 
fertility of our soil. God said " Let us multiply and replenish 
the earth." We have multiplied, but have we replenished the 
earth? This is a most important matter to consider. 

In the soil lies our salvation. Agriculture is the basis of every 
thing. By treating our soil intelligently, we can double our 
crops ; then cattle will be fed with good clover hay, and the pro 
ducts of the farm will then be double and treble what they are 
to-day and bring us great national wealth. 

There are large sums of money being spent in builain- rail 
roads. Railroads hpve undoubtedly been of great assistance in 
the building up of every progressive country in the world. The 
building of railroads encourages the opening up of new indust 
ries and the employment of large numbers of people; that means 
flu-re will be more people to be fed. They increase the demands 
tor the products of Agriculture. 

Are we acting wisely in sending our money away to other 
countries where the cost of foodstuffs has gone up 40 or 50 per 
cent, in ten years, instead of taking more interest in the financing 



of agriculture such as they are doing in other countries ; and 
recommended by Sir William McGregor when he was here ? 
The financing of agriculture will make cheaper living for the 
people and will settle many happy families on the land in good 
and comfortable homes. 

We say we have a good asset in our railroads. That is cor 
rect, but in a good virgin fertile soil we have a better asset. 

There has been a greater interest taken in poultry raising dur 
ing the last few years, and in most cases the feed has to be im 
ported for it. It would be cheaper to import the poultry, but 
certainly then you would not have the fresh eggs ! all this feed 
can and should be grown here, and then it would be a paying 
business. The same may be said of pig feed. Most of it is im 
ported. If we would take this matter up in earnest, it would 
make farm life more attractive, and would be the means of keep 
ing our young men in the country, and inducing others to go in 
to farming, and that is what we want. As the late Rev. Brother 
Slattery said in a report to the Board of Agriculture : " We 
want a million more farmers ;" and the writer quite agrees with 
him. 

Whatever the government would do to foster Agriculture 
would be more beneficial to the consumer than the producer, 
because when the farmer grows large crops he has 10 employ 
more labor to handle them, and the farming products h,,ve to be 
sold cheaper in the market. There is .vhere the people reap the 
benefit. Mr. Morine tells us " we must read to know what they 
are doing in other countries."! Well, we do read about these 
great Agricultural countries, but what made them great? The 
governments efforts to help the farmers out. 

The American farmers are one billion dollars in debt. That 
is what made their great farms. Now, the American government 
had delegates abroad seeking the best European method^ of 
financing Agriculture to help them out. Mr. Morine says "the 
financing of Agriculture is not a r.ew thing, it is only ne>\ in 
Newfoundland." 

The Irish tenant farmer who wants to own his own land can 
go to day to the landlord and buy the land from him ; and the 
Government of England helps him with the mone> . 

If a person wants to get a farm to-day in the North West, ihe 
Canadian Government will give him a farm; or the Canadian 
Pacific will give him a farm, put a fence round it and a house 
on it, and assist him to stop there in every way : and then 
says : " Now take it in the name of God, and pay for it in ten 
years." 

In the Proi ince of Ontario the farmers are given help to drain 
their farms by the Government. If they want to benefit their 
lands in that way they can go to the government of the province 
and get money advanced at 5 per cent. 

The young and progressive State of Western Australia has, in 
recent years, been making great economical progress, which 
Hon. Sir Newton J. Moore, formerly Premier, attributes in large 
measures to the fact that agriculture has been succeeding the de 
pendence upon mining as a productive agency; also railways 
for the purpose of agricultural developement have heen con- 
struc ed and the land settlement conditions liberalized. 

A third direction in which the Australian States undertook to 
aid the industries of the soil has been by means of the Govern 
ment Agricultural Bank, which lends money on approved hold 
ings in sums ranging from 25 to 2,000 for improvements, 
water conservation, stock-farming, impliments, and any other ap 
proved purposes. The success of this policy has been com 
pletely demonstrated. The amount advanced by the Bink last 
year was 400,000, the next heaviest year being that immedi 
ately preceding, when 300,000 was lent. As shoeing the careful 
which the institution is managed and the caution with 
T i advances are made out of a total amount of 3 ooo ooo 
the arrears of repayment have been quite negligible 
Last year the profit on the Bank s transactions wae 806! 
which brought the reserve fund up to 35,000. There are now 
:ounts current on the books, representing as many cus- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 39. 



Job s Stores. Ltd., 



IMPORTERS and DEALERS 



In Provisions, Groceries, Naval Stores, fishery Supplies, Etc. 

j AGENTS FOR j 

Climax Molasses Feed, Champion Tobacco, 

Climax Dairy Meal, Lily Safety Matches, 

Cow-Boy Milk, Sail Soap (Laundry), 

Manderson s Pickles, Vesta Cigars. 

GET OUR PRICES ON THE ABOVE ARTICLES. 

JOB S STORES, LIMITED. 
Brushes, Lumber, Doors, Sashes, Felt, etc. 



OUR BRUSHES is but one line of our business. We have 
for many years been dealing in Lumber, Doors, Sashes, 
Felt, Pitch, Nails, and in fact everything that is used in house 
building. We have 

An Expert Designer and Stair Builder 

in our employ, and builders can always rely on having the best 
ideas when they give us their order. We have furnished Mantels, 
Window Frames and Sashes, Doors, Stair Balusters and Rail, 
Newel Posts, Mouldings. Turnings, Brackets, Counters, Ceiling, 
Flooring, Framing, Shingles, etc., to all pans of this country, 
and always satisfy our customers. We have always studied 



our business and endeavoured to increase it constantly. We 
have made provision for immediate reply to inquiries, quick 
shipment of orders, and prompt furnishing of shipping receipts 
and invoices. 

Our Efforts to Satisfy Customers, 

we are glad to say. have been appreciated, and result in an 
ever increasing demand with which we are keeping pace by 
improved and enlarged equipment. We will count you among 
our friends, and will be glad of a friendly word from you to 
any person needing supplies in our line. \Ve will especially 
value any order of your own with which you may favour us. 



THE HORWOOD LUMBER Co., Ltd. 



J< J. MORRJS, K.C. 



E. LEO CARTER. 




orris & Carter, 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

I. A II OFFICES: 

<BANK OF MONTREAL WILDING, 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 

P O Box 184 Ttlep/ione 184. Cable Address " GIBBS," St. John s. 

M. P. GIBBS, K.C., 

BARRISTER- AT- LAW, SOLICITOR and 
NOTARY PUBLIC. 

Commissioner of Deeds for the State of New York. 
Solicitor for the Merchant Sen ice Guild, Liverpool. 

Law Office, BANK OF MONTREAL BUILDING, Water Street, 
St. fa/Hi s. Newfoundland. 



Parker & Monroe, Ltd. 
Wear Our Makes of footwear. 




" Rambler," 

for Men. 

"Victoria" and 
" Duchess," 

for Women. 

" Cinderella" and 

" Princess," 

for Children. 

" Rover," for Boys. 



When writing to Advertisers kinly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 40. 



tomers, and the number continues to increase. Last year 461 
accounts were closed and 1,334 new accounts were opened, leav 
ing nett increase of 873 accounts. " The effect of the policy 
pursued," writes Mr. Reid, "has been to induce other banks and 
financial institutions, to come into the field for the purpose of 
lending money on Western Australian agricultural land." 

Sir William McGregor, in his Address at the opening of the 
Newfoundland Agricultural Show, October, 1906, said : 

" Now we come to ask ourselves what can bs done to assist 
agriculture? For that the experience of other countries will give 
us sure indications in every direction. In the first place I would 
mention the desirability of introducing here the system of regis 
tration of titles and dealings in land, known in Australia as the 
Torrens Act. Briefly, it makes the transfer of an estite in land 
as simple and easy as the transfer of a share in a ship. It en 
ables security with respect to advances on land to be given and 
taken, with a minimum of cost and troub e, and with certainty 
as to good faith. This system is a great boon to every agricul 
tural country in which it has been introduced." 

" Then comes into consideration the system of Advances to 
settlers, which has been of immense advantage to the Australian 
Colonies, and is, at the present time, doing so much for agri 
culture in Italy, Germany, France, Belgium, and elsewhere. In 
South Australia, for example, this is managed by an Office called 
The State Bink established by the Government, which makes 
advances in aid of rural industries. This Office raises its required 
capital by the issue of Bonds guaranteed by the Government 
and bearing interest at 3^ per cent. Stacks of these bonds are 
issued as required and are taken up locally, chiefly by Savings 
Banks and Insurance Companies. The money is then lent out 
at 4^ per cent. This system in all the Australian Colonies has 
been an unqualified success, a source of profit to many, and it has 
caused no loss to anyone. This plan is well worthy of consid 
eration here. For one thing it would keep down the price of beef." 
Now, I have indicated what is being done in many other 
countries. Will we try to do a little better? In reading the 
debates of the House of Assembly, we can see that some of our 
legislators advise keeping up-to-date with other countries ; but 
that is in a minor matter. Will they keep up-to-date in the 
matter of agriculture, that will make more work for the labour 
ing man ? Any man who can work on a railroad can make a 
better living on the land if h- is put in the proper way of doing 
it, as science tells us 

Mr. D. J. Davits, in his articles on "Soils and their improve 
ment," tells us that lime, by its chemical act : on, supplies the soil 
with a valuable and costly manure, namely, nitrate of potassium. 
An acid known as nitric acid is formed dining the decking of 
animal and vegetable matter. Lime unites with this acid, form 
ing a substance called nitrate of lime ; this reacts on the potash 
compounds present in the soil producing nitrate of potassium. 
We are giving away our lime-stone to another country for nothing. 
For our iron our Government is getting 7^ cents per ton. They 
send us back the by-products and charge us twelve or fifteen 
dollars a ton for Basic Slag, refuse from our lime and our iron 
they also charge us two or three dollars a birrel for cement 
made from our iron and our lime. Basic slag is recommended for 
the large percentage of lime it contains, but that is a dear way to 
buy hme. Outfits can be bought for crushing and pulverizing 
lime-stone. An outfit for a tons an hour, costs $ 1)S oo oo to 
be operated with 20. H. P. The money that was spent the last 
ten years in Agricultural shows, would have supplied all the 
farms in the country with lime. v 

In a report from the Rothamstead Experimental Station it is 
stated that they give credit to the fertility of the soil to lime that 
was applied to it a hundred years ago. The lime caused the clover 
to grow and that kept up the fertility of the soil. In the south 
France some time ago, Agriculture was at a very low ebb and 
the farmers were poor. They put lime into the soil and the 
cattle industry thrived and the people were made comfortable 
Lime shows its effects in many different ways. Where there is 
a sufficient quantity of lime in the soil for plant growth to take 
up, the animal consuming this will receive the benefit The 
finest steeple chase horses in the world are raised on the lime 
stone soil of Ireland. We are told that bones are about half 
.f we cannot get the lime in our food in sufficient quantity 



what will be the result ? Weak, small bones ; but with plenty of 
lime, good strong bones to support the body. 

In the United States of America they are printing bul 
letins and circulars and sending them broadcast to the farm 
ers, showing them the necessity and value of lime for the 
crops. I have the names of twenty-eight different companies 
supplying lime-stone to farmers in Illinois. Ground lime-stone 
can now be obtained at 60 cents per ton or $1.25 in bags from 
Southern Illinois penitentiary, other places from gocents to 
$1.00. Some of these companies furnish fine ground lime-stone 
and some furnish limestone screenings, which include both very 
fine dust and some coarser particles, even as large as wheat grain, 
in carload lots. The price on board cars at the plant varies 
from 50 cents to $1.00 per ton, according to the fineness. The 
freight charges are one half cent per ton per mile, with a mini 
mum carload of thirty tons. There is no doubt that the Reid 
Newfoundland Co., would adopt similar freight charges here, 
carrying limestone over the railways as it would be an advan 
tage to them to see the products of the soil increased ; it would 
make more freight for their trains. 

The only way to supply abundance of food is to increase the 
productiveness of the land. We have in our soil a great 
natural asset, a dish out of which we can eat and eat to day, to 
morrow and for ever. If we handle our soil with skill and intel 
ligence, we may have the dream of the philosopher realized, we 
mean a thing that can be used over and over again. There is 
nothing more certain than that we have in our soil a permment 
and inexhaustible asset. In the circulars distributed by the ex 
perimental stations, they ha~ve illustrations showing the difference 
in limed and unlimed crops to educate the farmers. Then it is 
put to the government this way : If a shoe company can afford 
travelling men to introduce their shoes, and if other mercan 
tile companies can afford travelling men for the sam; purpose, 
cannot the State afford one or more men to go among 
the farmers and land owners and help introduce the use 
of limestone in systems of soil improvement? The result already 
secured amply justifies the conclusion that not one but several 
such men should be in the field, and we hope, largely to extend 
this line of effort. While the first car-loads of ground limestone 
ever applied to Illinois soils were used on the experimental fields 
less than ten years ago, the records from the Southern Illinois 
Penitentiary already show shipments to the farmers as follows : 

In 



I2 2tons 
,,520 " 



4,846 



..... , 
The above is from one factory only. 

In agriculture we have the most important basis of a 
country s prosperity. The conservation of the fertility of the 
soil out-weighs all the other economic subjects in importance. 
History shows that the almost uniform course of agiiculture over 
long periods, is downwaid, towards decreasing fertility and in 
creasing poverty. The real strength of the population comes from 
those who till the soil, and efforts should be made to sustain their 
strength and numbers. The soil must be preserved in a condi 
tion to afford a comfortable livelihood. We cannot afford to re 
peat the experience of other countries, particularly the history 
of the abandonment of the farms in the New England States 
Lime is rot the only thing neglected in Newfoundland We can 
see the sanitary carts going to the dump with refuse and animal 
bones to be buried to get them out of sight. In other coun 
tries they take care of these, grind them up and send them here 
to get our money for them. 

I sincerely hope others will take up this subject and not only 
A do still more for the agricultural advancement of our 
dear old Newfoundland. Could not some teachers who have 
also been farmers be enabled to take summer courses and 
hen return to teach the rising generation to take more interest 
in agriculture and remam on the farm ? My friend Mr P. 
Butler, has suggested this and he believes it would have ag 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 41. 







MOTTO: 



The Best 



Manufactured by 

W. A. MUNN, 

Board of Trade Building, 

St. John s, Newfoundland* 

Quotation on Application. 



Other Teas 

May be More Expensive, 

But we do not know of any better flavored than 

STAR, at 4Oc. Ib. 

Whatever tea business we may build up we expect for it 
to stand upon merit. 

STAR is carefully selected quality is uniform rich 
aromatic, in fact a well balanced tea that cannot fail to 
please the most exacting tea drinker. 

STAR TEA, at 4Oc. Ib. 

For 5 Ib. Parcels, ten per cent, discount. 

sou Imp . rtn 



Duckworth St. and Queen s Road. 



BANK DF MONTREAL! 

<a s-. -^ x.. i .- , - . ^,.-,;-; 

Capital and Rest, $32,OOO,OOO. 

Bankers for the Government of Newfoundland* * * * 
Financial Agents for the Dominion of Canada* 



H. V. Meredith, Esq., President. 
Sir Frederick Williams-Taylor, General Manager. 

London, England, Branch 47 Threadneedle Street. 
Branches in New York, Chicago, and every Province of the Dominion of Canada. 

Commercial Letters of Credit, and Travellers Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the world. 
J. A. PADDON, Manager, - - St. John s, Newfoundland, Branch. 



For Spring and Summer Wear. 

Our Clothes and 
furnishings for Boys 

are receiving very special compliments 
from the many Pleased Mothers who have 
been here. 

The Good Quality, Neat Styles 

and exceptional values are what pleased them. 

They will please you, too. 

T. J. BARRON, 



358 Water Street. 



Boys and Men s Outfitter. 



M. & E. KENNEDY, 

Contractors, 
Builders and 
Appraisers* 

Office: RENOUF BUILDING. 

P. O. Box 214. PHONE 767. 

Factory and Store, off James Street. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNLAND QUARTERLY.--^ 




St. John s Municipal Board. 

PUBLICT_NOTICE. 

The following was adopted at a meeting of the 
Municipal Board, held March 19th, 1915, and 
ordered to be published : 

WHEREAS: The 1910 Amendment to the 
Municipal Act, Sections 11, 12, 13, provides as 
follows : 

( i ) All tenements of a lesser rented value than 
$50.00 shall be maintained by the owner 
or lessee in all respects reasonably fit for 
habitation. 

( 2 ) The Council to have power to order any 
house not fit for habitation to be removed 
as a nuisance. 

( 3) The Council to have power to make Rules 
and Regulations for putting and keeping 
dwelling houses in wholesome and sanitary 
condition. 
BE IT RESOLVED :- 

(i ) A house reasonably fit for habitation shall 
have its roof, outer walls, windows and 
doors sound and watertight. 
( 2) Upon complaint being made to the Council 
by the Occupier of any tenement of a 
yearly rental value not exceeding fifty 
dollars, that the tenement occupied by him 
is not in a habitable condition, for reasons 
specified, and if upon investigation by the 
Council s Inspector such proves to be the 
case, notice shall be given to the owner of 
the said tenement to have repairs effected 
within a time to be stipulated or the 
Council may direct the Inspector to 
inspect such dilapidated dwellings with the 
view of having the same repaired or 
condemned. 

If repairs are not effected within the time 
specified in said notice, the said owner 
shall be subject to a penalty of $5.00 per 
day for every day during which the speci 
fied repairs are not effected, to pe recover 
ed in a prosecution before a Magistrate. 
By order, 

JNO. L. SLATTERY, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



FIRE! Ihe FIRE. 1 

North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Co. 

[Established 1809.] 
Assets 23,600,000. Annual Income, 5,630,000. 

Head Offices Edinburgh & London. 

Insurance effected on all kinds of property at lowest 
current rates. 

Insure where your insurance is sure. 

GEORGE SHEA, 

General Agent for Newfoundland. 



Bargains in Typewriters 

You Save Fifty Dollars. 



For we will sell you a Sioo.oo Remington Typewriter for $50.00. 
Why pay more? We will sell you a $120.00 Oliver Type 
writer for S6o.oo. Why pay more ? Or a $120.00 Under 
wood Typewriter for $80.00. Why pay more? The factory 
guarantee them, and we guarantee them. 

Come in and see them. 

We have sold over twenty of these Machines to firms in the 
city already. 

We are also selling the best Typewriter Ribbon on the market 
for 6oc. each ; all shades, all widths for all machines. We 
call it " Dicks Special," for we guarantee them ; having put 
them through the most severe test, and found them to out 
wear any other Ribbon. 

See the New Triumph Adding Machine, only $45.00. Does the 
work of the higher-priced machines, and saves you hundreds 
of dollars. Let us demonstrate it for you. 

DICKS & CO., LTD., 

Biggest, Brightest, Busiest and Best 

Bookstore in the City. 



Mustad s 

Fish Hooks are 
the Best made, 

and Cheapest in the World. 
See the KEY brand is marked on each Package. 




When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoi 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



BAIT! 




Or rather the want of it, is one of the principal 
drawbacks to the fisheries of Newfoundland, and as 
it is tolerably certain that we shall have good 
markets and high prices in 1915, now is the time to 
prepare to capture BAIT fishes. 

As a means to this end we are making cheap 
light Caplin Seines, that will be easily handled ; and 
as one good haul will pay for the outfit, every 
Schooner should have one. 

We are making Squid Traps, which wall be most 
effective. 

We are making Smelt Nets, in all sizes. 

We are making Gill Nets, various sizes. 

We make Cod Traps and Cod Seines, Hemp and 
Cotton, to order. 

We make superior Herring Nets, Standard and 
Crescent brands. 

\Ye make Hemp and Cotton Lines and Twines of 
Superior quality. 

\Ye make Cordage and Cables, of all sizes. 

In fact we make everything required for the 
fisheries, and we ask all our people to support Home 
Industries by using everything that is home made 
where ever possible, and so keep the money in 
circulation in Newfoundland. 

Colonial Cordage Co., Ltd. 




first Newfoundland Regiment. 



CALL FOR RECRUITS. 



Your King and Country Need You ! 

Will You Answer Your Country s Call ? 

AT this very moment the Empire is engaged in the greatest 
War in the history of the world. In this crisis your Country calls 
on her young men to rally round Her Flag and enlist in the 
ranks of Her Army. 

If every patriotic young man answers Her Call Great Britain 
and the Empire will emerge stronger and more united than 
ever. 

Newfoundland has aheady equipped and sent to the front r>ei 
First Contingent, 540 strong. But we must not stop at this. 
Further drafts are urgently needed to reinforce our numbers on 
the battle line, and must be sent forward at the earliest possible 
moment. 

Suitable Recruits between the ages of 19 and 36 will be ac 
cepted and trained in drill and shooting so as to fit them for 
military service. They will then be formed into regular Compa 
nies of the Regiment, and will be given the option of volunteer 
ing for service abroad, if required, on the same terms and con 
ditions as the men of the First Contingent. Pay will commence 
when the men are actually enrolled for service abroad. 

Recruiting Offices will be opened in St. John s and the offices 
of the different Magistrates, and at the other suitable places in 
the Colony, (as to Recruiting in case of doubt write to the Re 
cruiting Officer, St. John s). Where not less than fifty men 
offer for enlistment at any recruiting centre a drill instructor 
will, if possible, be sent to the District to train them. 

Men of the Ancient and Loyal Colony, Show Your Loyalty 
NOW. 

GOD SAVE THE KING. 



W. & G. RENDELL, 

Insurance, Property, and 
General Commission Agents, 

Water Street, - St. John s, Newfoundland. 



Baine, Johnston S Co., 



ESTABLISHED I78O. 



Merchants, Ship-Owners, &c. 



-Importers of and Dealers in- 



Agents 



Lumber of all descriptions, Paints, Oils, 
Cement, Roofing Materials, &c. 

A large supply of above goods always in stock. 
SOLE AGENTS FOR- 

RAINBOW PAINTS, AND 

BRANTFORD ROOFING. 



The Alliance Assurance Co., Ltd, 

LONDON. 

Total Assets exceed $120,000,000. 

Fire Premiums for 1912 exceeded.. $6,500,000. 



Agents 



Newman s Celebrated Port Wine 

In Hhds., Quarter Casks, Octaves and Cases. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Department of Agriculture and Mines. 



PUBLIC NOTICE. 

The attention of the Public is called to the following 
provisions of the Act to further amend the Crown Lands 
Act t 1903, passed at the last session of the Legislature: 



Application for Timber Limits. 

SEC. 3. Section 24 of the Crown Lands Acts, 1903, is 
hereby repealed, and the following substituted therefor : 

No such licenses shall be granted until notice of intention to 
apply therefor has been published in the Royal Gazette for a 
period of one month prior to such application. The said notice 
shall contain the name and address of the applicant, and with 
as much certainty as possible shall describe the location and 
boundaries of the land applied for. naming the Electoral 
District in which same is situated and its approximate area. 

Returns of Timber Cut. 

SUB-SEC. 4, SEC. 4. To make returns to the Government an 
nually on oath, on or before the 3oth of November in each and 
every year of (a) the total quantity of timber cut between the 
ist day of July and the 3oth day of June then last past, which is 
liable to the payment of royalty ; and (b) of all timber cut for the 
manufacture of paper or paper pulp, also to make returns 
annually, or at such other periods as may be required by the 
Governor in Council, or by regulations under this Act, sworn to 
by him or by his agent or employee, cognizant of the fact of 
the quantity of all sawn lumber, timber, railway car stuff, ship 
timber and knees, shingles, laths, cordwood or bark, or any 
other product of timber sold or disposed of by him during such 
quarter or other period and the price of value thereof, the 
licensee to be liable to a fine of $50.00 if the returns aforesaid 



be not filed in the Department of Agriculture and Mines within 
thirty days from the date on which they are required to be 
filed as aforesaid. 

Forfeiting Title for Non- Payment of 
Rents of Limits. 

SEC. 6. Whenever the rent or royalties payable under any 
lease to cut timber shall be in arrears and unpaid for the period 
of six months from the day on which the same became due, the 
Governor in Council may, without any suit or other proceedings 
to enjoin the same, declare such license forfeited and there 
upon the same shall be again open to application by the public. 

Survey of Mining Location. 

SEC. 17. Within one year from the date on which notice is 
given by the applicant for a ninety-nine year lease of a mining 
location or locations to the Minister of Agriculture and Mines, 
that it is his attention to hold said land as provided by Section 
47 of the said Crown Lands Act, 1903, such applicant shall, at 
his own expense, cause a survey of the location or locations 
referred to therein to be made by a Surveyor approved by the 
Minister of Agriculture and Mines, and shall cause a diagram 
thereof, with the notes of the surveyor, to be filed in the Depart 
ment of Agriculture and Mines within the same period. In 
all such surveys of mining locations, the bearings of the 
boundaries shall be from the True Meridian. 




SYDNEY D. BLANDFORD, 



St. John s, Newfoundland, March, 1915. 



Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 




Windsor Patent 



and 



Royal Household 
Flour 

You will have the satisfaction of knowing that 
money cannot buy better in any 
part of the World. 




^[ltllllllllllllllNIII|lll|iJllfll|ll|l!|ll||||.!|,l||||tl||||"||||||||||r| | | | I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I _ 

I CLOMS I 

| With Style and Individuality. ; 

: There is something to our custom garments which : 
1 makes them look as if they belonged to the wearer. ; 
i Not only the well selected materials, but also 

j The Artistic Cut and j 

I the Thorough Construction, j 

| make our suits stand out above all others for fit, finish I 
E and quality. I 

| CHAPLIN. I 

The Store that Pleases* 

~r i i i it i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i I I I I i i i i i i I J I I"- 



Public Notice! 



INSPECTION REGULATIONS. 

The boilers of every steamer registered in the Colony shall 
be subject to annual inspection by the Inspector. 

Every steamer carrying local crews or passengers to or from 
this Colony, or to or from any ports therein, shall be subject to 
annual inspection. 

All persons installing new boilers for any purpose, to work 
under steam pressure, shall notify the Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries, in writing, as to the locality of said boilers. 

All persons removing boilers or installing second hand boilers 
for any purpose, to work under steam pressure, shall notify the 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries, as to the new locality it is 
intended to work boilers in ; and shall not work such boilers 
until they have been inspected. 

The Inspector shall grant a certificate of inspection for every 
boiler which shall be approved by him. The certificate shall 
be displayed in a prominent place in the vicinity of the boiler 
to which it refers. 

INSPECTION FEES. 

When a boiler is not in good condition, and the Inspector 
has granted a certificate for a period less than twelve months, 
the fee for each extra inspection during the twelve months, 
shall be the extra inspection fee of that class. 

For any special visit to be made by the Inspector, other than 
the annual inspection, or for any special inspection made at the 
request of the owner or manager of a boiler, the owner shall 
pay the expenses incurred by Inspector from St. John s to loca 
tion of boiler and return, subject to approval of Minister of 
Marine and Fisheries. 

MODE OF INSPECTION. 

Notice of alterations or additions to any boiler should be 
given to the Inspector, in writing, for his approval, before pro 
ceeding with the work. 

Every boiler made after the coming into force of these Regu 
lations shall be stamped with the initial letters of the Inspector s 
name who inspected it and tested it, the year it was made, and 
the pressure under which it was tested; also the actual working 
pressure under which it was tested ; also the actual working 
pressure allowed upon it. 

A. W. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 
St. John s, March, 1915. 




NOTICE. 



The attention of the Public is directed to the 
following Section of Cap. 39 of Consolidated 
Statutes dealing with " Nuisances and Municipal 
Regulations " : 

" Any person who shall throw any 

Stones or Ballast, 

or anything else hurtful or injurious, into any 
harbor or roadstead in this Colony or its Depend 
encies, shall, for every offence be liable to a penalty 
not exceeding 

Fifty Dollars, 

or imprisonment for a period not exceeding 

Fifty Days/ 

S. W. PICCOTT, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
March, 1915. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention -" The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



Reid Newfoundland Company 

Proprietors of the Dry Dock, St. John s. Newfoundland 

One of the best equipped Dry Docks in America. Steamships docked and repaired 
at the lowest rates. Well equipped and thoroughly fitted with all modern appliances 
for temporary or permanent repairs. Length of Dock, 610 feet. Depth of Water, 25 feet. 

Proprietors and Operators of the Si John s Electric 
*& Street Railway* 

All the Electric power supplied in St. John s is generated on this system. City 
Lighting and Power for Factories, etc., supplied at moderate rates. Those requiring 
Electric Power for any purpose should consult the undersigned. 

Owners of Thirteen Clyde-Built Steamships 

Royal Mail Steamers operating on Bays and Coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador. 

Lessees and Operators of the Newfoundland Railway, 831 miles. Owners of 
2,500,000 acres of Mineral and Timber Lands. 

The Newfoundland Express Company, carrying on Express Business with all Express Com 
panies of the world, and Money Orders issued to all parts. 

The Railway and Steamship Systems give the best 

connection between Newfoundland and Canada and the Urrted States, and the best 
freight line between Canada and Newfoundland. S. S. BRUCE" and "KYLE" 
connect at North Sydney with the Intercolonial Railway d; ly, except Sunday leav 
ing North Sydney on the arrival of the I. C. R. Express Trains on these evenings. 

Newfoundland offers to the Tourists, Sportsmen and Health-Seeker the -randest 
scenery in the Western Hemisphere. A most beautiful climate in the summer 
months ; cool, even and invigorating. No hay fever. 

Finest Caribou Hunting Grounds in the World. # * # 

Best Salmon and Trout Streams that have yet been discovered. The Railway is equipped 
with Dining and Sleeping Cars, and everything to please the taste and add to the 
comfort of the Tourist is provided. 

All information in regard to Newfoundland and Labrador will be given on appli- 
cation to the 

REID NEWFOUNDLAND CO., 

ST. JOHN S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 




writing to Adverti,*,