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John J. Evans, Printf.r .\\u I'rhpriktor, 
Sr. John's, N'ewfdunhlanu. 



Corner Brook -Proposed Sile of Humber Town. 

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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



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Marine Kerosene Engines, 

Fairbanks-Morse 

Marine and Stationary Engines, 

I Saw-Mill Machinery 

and 

Motor Boat Parts, 

A. H. Murray & Co., Ltd., 



ST. JOHN'S. 



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Come to the Clothing Show ! 

Opening the New 

'True-Value' Clothing Line. 

Here is Clothing Style for you! 

—and Fit! 

— and Quality! 

Already men are commenting. 

Graceful easy lines, comfort, plenty of swing 

— yet Tailored to thi.s store's ideals of 

what's what. 
They'll create a sensation and a feeling of 

erivv, when sonieone says to you — 
"'Lo, boy. come into a fortune!" 

•• Xope, just know where to buy Clothing. 

that's all. $35 I tiung for it." 
'' What ! S35 ! Say whisper that name, 

Geor»e. 




Style, Wear and Value 

are the main standards by which good clothes are 
judged. 

Careful Designing and 
Superior V/orkmanship 

enable us to j^roduce Correct Styles and Good Tailoring. 
This is an assurance that the shape will be retained 
throughout the life of the garment. 

Choose yovir material from our large assortment 
of Tweeds and Serges, or bring us your own goods, 
and we will prove to YOU, as we have to others, 
that we are turning out 

The BEST there is 
IN TAILORING. 

Newfoundland Clothing Co'y, Limited, 

231, 233, 235 Duckworth Street. 



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When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly," 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— i. 



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Offers a Weekly Service of Twelve-day Trips 
Between New York, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and St. John s, Newfoundland. 

This service will be maintained by the steamers "Silvia" and " Rosalind," and provides the fastest and most up-to-date 
service to these ports. Steamers remain long enough at each port to enable passengers to visit these interesting cities. 

There is splendid trout lishing in the viciniti- of .*^t. John's. Loch Le\en and Rainbow trout have been imporied assuring 
the anjjler of the very best fishing. The finest salmom fishing on this side of the .Atlantic can be reached in one day from 
Sl John's at very small expense. 

Ptarmigan or grouse shooting is from September jist to December 31st. Caribou shooting commences .August ist, and in no 
other p.irt of the world can big game shooting be enjoyed for so little expense. 

The rate for the round trip, including berth and meals while at sea and in port is to New York S120.00 and up: and to 
Halifax S65 00, accoiding to accommodations desired. Illustrated folder, with complete rates, plans, sailings and other informa- 
tion will be sent up'in applic.ition to 

G. S. CAMPBELL & Co., BOWRING&Co., HARVEY & Co., Ltd., 



Halifax, N.S., Agents. 



General Agents Red Cross Line, 
17 Batlery Place, New York City. 



St. John's, N.F., Agents. 



Parker & Monroe, Ltd, 
Wear Our Makes of rootwear. 




" Rambler," 

for Men. 

"Victoria" and 
" Duchess," 

for Women. 

" Cinderella" and 
" Princess," 

for Children. 

"Rover," for Roys. 



Geo. jKeaJ, Ltd., 

St. JoJin s, J^ewfoundlana, 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Provisions, Groceries, 
and Fruit* 
Consignments of Live 
Stock Solicited* 



Our Clothes and furnishings 

for Boys mi yim 



are receiving very special compliments from the 
many Pleased Customers who lia\e been here. 

Tiie Good Cuality, ^eal Styles 

and exceptional values are what pleased them. 

They will please you. too. 

T. J. BARRON, 

358 Water Street. Boys' and Men's Outfitter, 



FIRE! 



The 



FIRE! 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Co., Ltd. 

[Established 1S09.] 
Head Offices Edinburgh & London. 

Available runds-" £30,000,000 

Insurance on any description of property at lowest 
current rates. 



Prompt Settlements. 



Liberal Adjustments. 



GEORGE SHEA, 

General Agent lor Newioundland. 



When wilting to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 2. 



Furiiess, Wiihy ^ Company, Ltd., 



Steamship Owners and Brokers ; Commission, Insurance 
and Forwarding Agents. 
The well known stennu-r " Digby," in conjunc- 
tion with the steamer "Sachem," maintain a pas- 
senger service between Liverpool, St. John's, liali- 
fa\ and Boston and vice \ersa. These steamers are 
excellently fitted up for the carrving of First Class 
Passengers. Passenjjers to Liverpool must be in 
possession of passports. 

First Class Fare. 

St. John's to Haliiax 



St. lohn's to Boston 6 = 



.00 
.00 



St. John's to Li\erpool trom Si 15.00 up. 

For informalion apply lo 

Fumess, Withy & Co., Ltd.. Liverpool, Halifax, Sydney; 
10 State Street, Boston ; St. John's, Nfld. 








Mad.am :— riaveyou a package of OLD DUTCH CLEANSER 
in your home? It makes everything clean and pure. Cleans 
Bath Tubs. Sinks. Porcelain. Marble, Painted Walls, Woodwork, 
Floors. Cutlerv. China, Enainelnare. Silver. Glassware, Windows, 
Furniture. Linoleum, Oil Cloth. Brass and Copper. 

l>on't take substitutes; they are not as good as Old Dutch 
Cleanser. For sale at all First-Class Grocers, 

Get a Package with Your Next Order. 



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for Present Enjoyment 

USE 



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TEA 

Packed in I-lb. Tins 

At all Leading Grocers. 



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Okftce anp Store — Adelaide Street. Stonevard — Just Ea>t Custom 
House. Water Street. Telephone, 364. P. O. Box 143. 





B 

Contractor, Builder, 
and Appraiser, ^ 

Dealer in Cement Selen.te. I'la^ler, Sand. Mon.^r, Brick, Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps; Chimney Tops, all sizes, Plate Glass and 

Crushed Stone for Concrete. 

Estimates Given for all kinds 
of Work at Shortest Notice. 

C5^^^anufacturers and Real Estate Owners contemplating 
any addition to their present holdings, or the erection of new 
structures, will find it advantageous to get our estimates and 
terms. 





Carriage & Sleigh Builder 
ft W^'vf! Undertaker, etc. 

.\gcnt for 

Carriage Stock, Rubber Tyres, etc. 

Wheels Re-Rubbered 

at shortest notice and reasonable prices. 
We aKvnvs have on hand a large stock 
of Polished .ind Cloth-Covered 

Caskets and Coffins. 

Personal attention given to al', Undertaking 
Orders — Ni;;ht or Day. Phone 737. 
West End Carriage Factory, - - 32 Bambrick Street. 



When writinc to Advertisers kindli- mention 



The Xewfour.c'and Quarterly.' 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— : 



Newfoundland Gov^t Coastal Mail Service. 



S.S. "PORTIA," WESTERN ROUTE, S.S. "PROSPERO," NORTHERN ROUTE. 



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Calls at the following places: — Cape Broyle, Ferrv- 
land, Fernieuse, Renews, Trepassey, St. Mary's, 
Salmonier, Placentia, Marystown, Burin, St. Law- 
rence, Lamaline, Fortune, Grand Bank, Belleoram, 
St. Jacques, Harbor Breton, Pass Island, Her- 
mitage, Gaultois, Puslithrough, Francois, Cape 
LaHune, Ramea, Burgeo, Rose Blanche, Chan- 
nel, Bay of Islands, Codroy, Aquathuna, Bonne 
Bay. 



Call at the following places : — Bay-de- Verde, Old 
Perlican, Trinitv. Catalina, Bona\ ista, Sal \ age. 
King's Cove, Greenspond. Pool's Island, Wesley- 
\ille, Seldom-Come- By, Fogo, Change Islands, 
Herring Neck, Twillingate, Moreton's Harbor, 
Exploits, P'ortune Harbor, Leading Tickles, 
Pilley's Island, Little Bay Island, Little Bay, 
Nipper's Harbor, Tilt Cove, LaScie, Pacquet, 
Bale Verte, Coachman's Cove, Seal Cove, Bear 
Cove, West Port, Jackson's Arm, Englee 
Conche, St. Julien, St. Anthony, Griguet, Quirpon. 



GUARDIAN 

ASSURANCE CO.. LTD., 
Of London, Englana. 

The Guardian has the largest paid-up capital of any 
Company in the world transacting a Fire business. 

Subscribed Capital $10,000,000.00 

Paid-up Capital 5,000,000.00 

Invested Funds exceed 25,000,000.00 

T. & M. WINTER, 

Agents for NewfouncLlana. 




i;4j^«iay<»^ii«iH9 Phone 1008. 
Dealer in 

Beef, Rlutton, Lamb, 
Veal, Pork and 

^^^i^j-Z^^*^^ Poultry. 

jigrAll Orders Called For and Delivered Free. 

Puddings and Sausages, 

Corned Beef, Vegetables 
and Fish a specialty- 



INSURE YOUR PROPERTY WITH 

Globe & Rutger's Fire Insurance Co'y, 

OF NEVA/ YORK, 

AND — 

United British Insurance Co'y, Ltd., 

OF LONDON. 

R. A. SQUIRES, Agent, 

Bank of Nova Scotia Building. 



Piilpe!] 



yrpiiy, 



Carpenters and Builders. 

Estimates on all kinds of Work. 
Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Ofiice: Basement K. oi C. Building, Duckworlh SI. 

J. I'Il)(;r.<JN, ^S I'rescott Street. W. MIKI'H V, jf) Tempenmre St. 

With Style and 

Individuality. 

There is something to our custom garments which makes 
them look as if they belonged to the wearer. Xot onK the 
well selected materials, but also the Artistic Cut and the Tho- 
rough Construction, make our suits stand out above all others 
for tit, finish and quality. 

CHAPUN, The Store that Pleases. 




old, reliable and 
g comp.ui). 



Fire Insurance. I:!;;;:;;!; 
CDc JDorlcsDirc 

Insurance Company, £ld. 

Lo>ses by r,as. Lighli\ii\R and Koiest Kites not exceiited. A>k for rale 
liefote iiiMiring el.^ewhere. All information gladly given. 
JAMES J. McGHATH, Harrister, Solicitor ii Notary PuhUr, A grnt 
Oltice: 263 Duckworth Street. I'hone 61. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 




HSGH G2IADE FURNITURE!; 

Carefully selected stock, wide assortments and prices that are beyond the lowest ]Xi 

otTered in this vicinity, have made our Furniture Store the ONLY Store fur hundreds ^ 

of shrewd buyers. We claim to save you money on Furniture, and a rapid and steady ^ 

increase of trade proves beyond a doubt that the puplic recognises and appreciates jW 

good values. m 

One of the strong features of our stock is that it is broad enough to suit ^ 

everybody — Furniture to suit e\ ery kind of home ; jM 

CHAIRS — Dining, Rockers, Morris, Rattan ; TABLES for Dining Rooms, ^ 

Parlors, Halls, etc. ; Sideboards and Buffets, Over-Mantles, Bed Room Suites, tj^ 
Bedsteads, Parlor Suites, Couches, Book Cases, Secretaries, Hall Stands, 
.\_^ Wardrobes, Office Furniture, Spring Mattresses, etc. 

THE ROYAL STORES, LTD. 





S: No. 15 e^ 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, .Vngler's Outfits, '["routing Gear, Fire-arms, and .-^m 
munition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be admitted 
under the following conditions : — 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles. 'I'routing poles. Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipage. .\ receipt (Xo. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noti d in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt -No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
St. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt .Vo. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, .•\ngler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of Kxit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Kxamining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

.\o groceries, c.nnned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted tree and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken ui)on such articles. 

H. W, LeMESSURIER, 

Deputy Min ster of Customs. 
June, 



CL'ST().-\1 HOLSE, 

St. John's, Xewfoundlanc 



'923- 






tice to Owners and Masters 
of BritisiiSiiips! 



The attention of Owners and Masters of British 
Ships is called to the 74th Section of the " Mer- 
chant Shipping Act, 18194." 

74. — (I) A Ship belonging to a British subjec. 
shall hoist the proper national colours — 

(a) on a signal being made to her by one of His 
.^L^jesty".s ships (including any vessel under the 
command of an officer of His Majesty's navy 
on full pay), and 

(b) on entering or leaving any foreign port, and 
{o if of fifty tons gross tonnage or upwards, on 

entering or leaving any British Port. 

( 2) If default is made on board any such ship in 
complying with this section, the master of the ship 
shall for each offence be liable to a fine not exceed- 
ing one hundred potmds. 

At time of war it is necessary for every Brit- 
ish Ship to hoist the colours and heave to if signal- 
led by a British Warship; if a vessel hoists no 
colours and runs away, it is liable to be fired upon. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 
1923- 



lune. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUxNDLAND QUARTERLY.-5. 








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MOTTO: 
THE BEST 



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Manufacturers and^^ 
Exporters S> ^ ,^ 

OF THE VERY FINEST 



^^ GENUINE \$^^ 

(CODLTVEKI 



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Ical Cod Liver ©11, 



Shipped in Tin Lined Barrels. 

Quotation on application. 

Board of Trade Building, 

it. John's, Newfoundland. 



W. A. MUNN, 



iCilS k 





We Sell Everything Needed 
in a Modern Office* 

Special Loose-leaf Systems, 
Binder Sheets, 
Index SysteTUSf 
Files, Transfer Cases, Etc. 



Booksellers, Stationers, 

Printers and Binders. 

M. k E. KENNEDY, 

Contractors, Builders 
and Appraisers. 
Office: RENOUF BUILDING. 

p. O. Box 214, riione 71.7. 

Factory and Store, off James' Street. 



/. D. RYAN, 

Importer and Distrihuior of 

• — f ■ — -— — ■ ■' - ■"'" ' " 

Southdown, Hard a Port, 

Perfection, 

Cornucopia, Sailor's Hope, 

Virginia Tobaccos. 

323 Duckworcli Street, St. John s. 




The above Trade Mark appears ( n the co\ers of 
ail of our makes n: 

Writing Tablets, 
Exercise Books, etc. 

Ask your Dealer for WritinL; rA:)le:>, E\erci>e 
Books, etc., carryin,;^^ this Trade .Mark and insure 
getting' Good X'alue tor your money. 

We make a specialty of Shooki for Paper Boxes ; larer Cards for Confectioners : 
Cover Papers, slit and re-»i)and according to spe;iriotion. Send yonr orders 
direct to our Factory at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. 

WE SELL TO THE TRADE ONLY. 

R. H. D.WIS & CO., LTD., 

Manufacturing Stationers. Book B nders and Makers of Paper Boies, 
Yarmontli and Sydney. Noy« Scotia. 



When writing to .Advertisers kindly mention " Tlie Newfoundl.ind Quarterly." 



ttmrnm^a^M* n-iinTtir^MiM 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 6. 



PHONE 603. P. O. BOX IZeS. 

GEOnSGE HDAVEY ^ Co., 

Contractors, Builders 
and Appraisers, 

Office : Bond Street, St. John's. 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES: Cement, Lumber, Sand, 

Lime, Roofing Materials, Oak and Maple Flooring, 

always in Stock at Market Prices* 

We are prepared to Supply any quantity of these materials, 
and to furnish estimates on any class of work. 

Agents for Gyproo \A/ali-board, 

Imperial Flooring, 

and Metal Ceilings. 



NOTICE TO 



Drivers of Cerriages, Carts, ^ylotor Cars, [tc. 

ORDER No. 3. 

Under "Street Traffic Regulation Act, 1918." 

Vehicles must travel on the left hand side of the street or road. Vehicles moving slowly must 
be Icept as close as possible to the curb or side drain on the left, allowmg more swiftly movmg 

vehicles passage on the right. ^ ^i i u u.„j ^,.rK r^r 

A vehicle turning into anodier street to the left, shall turn the corner at the left hand curb or 

3 A'^t'hicle'turninglnto'another street to the right, shall turn around the centre of the intersection of 

the two streets, and keep to the left of the street mto which it turns. 
4. Police, Fire and I\Lail vehicles and Ambulances shall have the nght of way over f J^'her vehicle,^^ 
5 The driver of a vehicle on the approach of any apparatus of the Fire Department shall bung his 

vehicle to a stand still as near the left hand curb or side dram as possible. . . 

6. Vehicks going in a westerly or easterly direction shall have the right of way over vehicles going in a 

northerlv or southerlv direction. P^ll^,,, Vnrcp either 

7 Drivers of vehicles shall stop whenever required to do so by any member of the Police horce. either 

vXllv or by a signal with^he hand, and they shall obey his order and comply with any direction 
which he may aive then^ in the interest of good order, of traffic or public secuntv. (,,■„„ 

8 T le drh er "a vehicle meetin^r or overtaking a street car which is stationary, for the purpose of taking 

on or dtc^a'^n" passengers? shall stop his^•ehicle at a distance of at least ten eet from the said car 
Snd shall kce? such vehide at a stand still until such car is set in motion, and any passenger who 
may have alighted shall have reached a place of safety. 



CHAS. H. HUTCHINGS, 



Inspector General 

ol Constabulary. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



iirrliMaiiiifrrtiiKii i]\\ i 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 7. 




Delco Lightinsf Plants. 



Electric Kettles. Teapots, Grills, 

Percolators, Irons, Toasters, 
Curling Irons, Cosy Glows, 
Boudoir Lamps, Vacuum Cleaners, 
and Heating Pads. 
Desk Lamps, Flash Lights all sizes, 

Sewing Machine Motors, Shop Fixtures, 
House Fixtures all kinds, 

Bulbs of all sizes, and Disc Stoves. 



Repair Department. 

We have a competent staff of men for Repairing, 
and Wiring Churches, Halls, Schools and Houses. 
Estimates cheerfully given. 



Bowring Brothers, Limited, 

Electrical Department. 



GOLDEN PHEASANT 

All we ask is that 

you just Try it once. 

Ferguson Holness & Co., Ltd. 

J. B. Mitchell & Son, Ltd., 

Selling Agents. 

The Eastern Trust Co. 

A SERVICE THAT SA TISFIES. 

Complete Trust Service is 
Our Business Exclusively. 

Our policy has been to build up an organization 
of men who, by. training and experience, are expert 
in trust matters. 

Our steadily increasing business is evidence that in the 
administration of estates, the care of trust funds, and invest- 
ment of money we are rendering a service that satisfies. 

A conference with one of our oiificers will be worth your while. 



W. 



HEAD OFFICK: 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. 



A. TUCKER, Manager, 

Newfoundland Branch. 
Pitts' Building, St. John's 




Our Initial Showing 



-of— 



Mi^ Summer Suitings 



is more generously sprinkled with bright colors and 
fancy pattern designs than usual. 

We are meeting the growing tendency to lively 
effects in wearing apparel because we anticipated 
the trend and provided accordingly. 

Try us ^^ For Style, ■< Fit and Finish. 

The Annerican Tailor, 



fire ifisiiracel 

The Employers' Liability Assurance 
Corporation, Ltd., of London, Eng. 

The North West Fire Insurance 
Company, of Winnipeg, Man. 

Iliggins, Hunt & Emerson, 



p"aVor.s. W. p. SKORTALL, 



300 Watsr Street 



Aqenis ior Newloundland. 



Columbus Hall, St. John's. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— S. 



CLEANLINESS AND CIVILITY GUARANTEED AND 

PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS 

ENTRUSTED TO OUR CARL 

;3. Phones 48:; & 7S6. 




CI 



Co., Limited, 



203 Water Street. 

Piirve\ors ut lli;;li-L'las.s 

Groceries, Meats, Poultry, 

and Delicatessen Market. 

All mer\ts are per^onal'v >e!ected. 

We Guarantee to Stock the Choicest Meat 
Procurable in the Dominion. 

Our Sausages are a Specialty, 

Pork, Beef or I'omato. v 




A Welcome 
Necessity. 



Dale & Company, Limited, 

MARINE — FIRE — ACCIDENT 

insurance: underna/riters. 



Head Office: MONTREAL. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

Halifax, Winnipeg, 

Toronto, 
Quebec, Vancouver. 

Bank of Nova Scotia Building, 

St. John's, Newfoundland. 




GIVES A QUICK 
ABUNDANT LATHER 



There is a reason for the popularity of 
" Crescent" and that reason is to be found in 
its all-round usefulness. For all Laundry 
and Household cleaning purposes it is no 
exaggeration to say that "Crescent" is with- 
out a rival. 

Su preme in Quality and Purity. 

JOSEPH CROSFIELD & SONS, LTD., SOAPMAKERS, 
WARRINGTON, ENGLAND. 

MEEHAN & COF.iPANY, Agents. 



cr. 



MAIL ORDERS CAREFULLY FILLED. 



Wash Fabrics, 

M illinery. 

Gloves, 

Blouses, 

Dresses, 

Undergarments, 

Canvas Foot\A/ear. 



Sporting Goods 

of all l<"id>. 

Camping, 
Picnic, 

Football, 
Tennis, 
Fishing. 



Bathing Suits, 

Rubber Sole Shoes, 

Balbriggan Underwear. 

Poroskcnit Underwear, 

B.V.D. Under-w/ear. 

Athletic Suits, 

Sports' Shirts. 



Patterns of Yard Goods cheerfully sent on request. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 

Aiiciu^ for 

Law Union & Rock Insurance Co., Ltd. 
London & Lancashire 




ST.JOHN'S NEWFOUNDLAND. 



When wri 



iting to Advertisers kind))' mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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Vol. XXIU.— No. 1. 



JULY. 1923. 



80 cents per year. 



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The New Government. *^ 



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a7^"-j^^'^oi.i OWING upoi the general election the Prime 
/X^^i^^^-. Minisier made some necessary changes in his 
j^. fi^^?\^ Execiiiive helorc m^e'ing ihe Legislature on June 
rili^^Aw '^^''^ "'"^ '^'-" '■''construcleil C.ibinct is as fullowi; 
fci'rS^3U ^..^ j^ ^ Sq'iires. K.C.M.G.. Pri.ne Minister 
and Colonial Secretary. 

Hon. \V. H. Warren, K.C.. Minister of Justice. 

Hon. \V. W. Halfyard, Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Hon. .■X.. Barnes, Ph.D., Minister of Education. 

Hon. Wex. Caiiipbell. .M.IX. Mi'iis'er of .Agriculture and 
Mines. 

Hon. VV. H. Cave, Minister of iMnance. 

Hon. Thns. Bonia, Minister of Posts and Telegraphs. 

Hon. George She.i, Leader in the I-egislative Council. 



Hon. S. J. Foote, K C Minister without portfolio. 

Hon. Sir. NL G. Winter, Kt., Minister without portfolio. 

In addition Mr. \. W. Piccott became Minister of Public 
Works, but without a seat in the Cabinet, 

A familiar fisure in the last Executive is missing from this 
lone namely, Hon. (now Sir.) W. F. Coaker. who held the port 
folio of Marine and Fisheries during the first term of the Squires. 
Government. Sir William Coaker, who attained the honor of 
Knighthood on the King's birthd.iy, withdrew of his own free 
will in order to give more time to the extensive and rapid'y 
growing enterprise he has create I in the Northern Bays with its 
headquarters at Port Union. His lirst lieutenant, Hon. W. W. 
Halfyard, succeeds him in the Ddpartm-nt of Marine and 
Fisheries and in this capacity t!ie best wrll-being of our hardy 
toilers are assured of proper af.er.tion. While the withdrawal 



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HON. MR RICHVRIl A. .sijllKKS, K C M .G , K.L.. 1.1, l:. 
l'RI.\lt MI.VISIKR AND COI.OSI-M. SKCKt.rAKV. 



Hd.V. Wtt.lH.M K. WAkRK.V. K.l." 
.\I1.MSTEK Ot Jl'^TJLE. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QU ARTERLY.-io 



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HON. AKTHUR RARNES, PH.D., 
-MINISTER OF EL/LCATION. 



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HtlN". AFKXANIll-K (A M I'llH- 1 . K,R.i;.S.. 
MINIMI tH OK AliRICULTVRK A.\l> .MINts. 



HON. W. II. CAVE, 
.MINISTER OF FINANCE ANU CI'STOMS. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 1 1. 



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THE NE\VFOUx\DLAND QUARTERLY.— 12. 



of Sir William Coaker will be regretred, (he interests of the 
business community will suffer no loss because he is replaced by 
Sir Marmadukc Winter, who is one of our captains of cumnierce 
and a foremost leader in the trad'ng community, a man of wide 
grasp of business affiirs and thorough'y competent to voice the 
views of the business people in the Cabinet. It is unnecessary 
to speak of the nien who are beginning their second terms — 
the Prime Minister himself, the Minister of Justice., the 
Minister of Education, the .Mini>ter of .Agriculure, while of Mr. 
Cave, who succeeds to the Fmance port folio, it need only be 



the Railroad and allied enterprises fiom the Reid Company, 
and when these measures are put into operation *e may confi- 
dently hope to see the Colony move firmly forAari on the high 
road of prosperity once more. 




t ! 



A. VV. PiCt'OTT, ESij,, 
MINISTER OK PUBLIC .VORKS. 

said that from his general competence and the success with 
which he operated the Department of Shippin:i during the past 
four years there is an .^s^uTance that he will carry on the work 
of the Finance Department with similar .success. Capt. Bonia. 
who takes the Post Office Department, is a new-comer to 
K.xecutive life, but his legislati-e carreer as a supporter of Sir 
Rol>ert Bond's Government, during two terms, and the services 
he has given as Inspscor of Outport Reads, since, should 
familiarize hlni with the requirements of our people and make 
him a very admirable man in that position. Mr. Piccott is not 
new to Departmental work, having been Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries under the Morris .Administration and its successors 
up"to the general election of 1919. \ man of the people like 
several others of the new Cabinet, he knows well the require- 
ments of the masses, and can be trusted 10 satisfy them. 

The new Cabinet takes olTice at a critical time in the 
Colony's history, but si.alesman-like measures have been pre- 
sented to the I^egi-^lature tendin- to rc^tore the industrial and 
financial progress of the country. The Prime -Minister has 
vindicated the high opinion held of his statesmanship by the 
manner in which he has worked out the project for the establish- 
ing of a Paper Mill on the We>t Coast and for the purrh.ise of 




A Country Child's Day. 

By P. Florence Miller. 

A.growin* in our gro-e is a' ol' .Spruce-Tree 

Tha's jes' so big that it :akes t'nree 

O' us small fellers to clasps' it roun' 

By joinin* ban's, down 'nigbst -.he groun'. 

An' its roots is 'way -.ip out o' tW earth, 

So as anything o' jolly ol' worth 

Kin happen under th* o:' Spruce-Tree. 

In lliem lOot-holleTS ■^e have out ■• p^ay," 
Throwed out things that we find all day — 
^oley kettles an' wo-e-out pans, 
(Ma jes' lets us. She understan's ') 
Bits o' china an' colored glass. 
With broken dishes, laid on the grass 
All tidy, under tb' ol' Spruce-Tree. 

One root-holler*s a n;ossy cove 

Where is our kitchen, wiih roun' rock stove. 

An the fryin'-pan sizzlin' (jes' p'tend ') 

With ham an' eggs fer 'nexpecied fiiend. 

Bachelor-buttons fer eggs is good. 

An' ham is only a ch;p o' wood 

A-cookin', under lb' ol' Spruce-Tree. 

'.\ other boiler's a sleepin'-room 

With boughs fer beds, an' clover-bloom 

Fer pillers — girls' doKs sleep there. 

They're prutty, too. Bu: 1 don't muc'n care : 

Tbev plays their part in our pirate-games, 

'Cept that, I don't even know lieir names, 

.\er nutliin' — under th' cl' Spruce-Tree. 

One part's full of a frirf-al joy. 

Girls cry sometimes, Sat I'm a boy 

.\n' has to l)e tierce an' brave, you know 1 

We carries our plunder 10 an' f:o. 

Us pirates— lovely laiie? fair 

With dead-shut eyes and golden hair. 

.\n' lavs "em under ih' oV Spruce- I'ree. 

An" then, at sunset, with grim set lips. 

We all comes in I'm our wicked ships. 

An' takes off all their jools an' gold. 

An' digs their graves in :hc mo>sy mould. 

An' spades in clay on their lovely ci.)'es — 

I'm alw'ys liddlin' with my nose 

T' funerals under tli" ol' ipruce-Tree 1 

Then, all f wunst, our n-.l sings out. 
An' every piraie, put :o tout, 
Digs up the dolls fer the little girls 
Who shakes the clay fm their na.\y curls, 
An' shout, as they va-.ish 'roun' the bend— 
" O say, le's play a new p'tend 
To-morrer, undei th' ol' Spruce Tree 1" 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 13. 

The Exploits of Dasher Jack, or The Romance of Forsaken Island. 



By W. J. Power. 



i^BOi-T half a century ago there lived at Dunville on 
a^l the southern coast of Newfoundland a famous 
f yj cod and seal hunter, nicknamed Dasher Jack, who 
{Sf AJ ''^^■'"^ '° "aerate the .nany anecdotes of his long 
'' "^ ^"d eventful career on the frozen pans, and his 
many hair-breadth escapes on the wild Atlantic 
on whose bosom one might say he had been cradled, and ovei^ 
its stormy billows he loved to roam. 

On one occasion when supplying bait to the French bankers 
at St. Pierre, Miquelon. his boat was seized bv a French mer- 
chant for a tririing debt, hawled up along side his wharf, a 
strong chain being passed over her. thence under the keel, and 
both ends taken around his store, and padlocked, in order to 
prevent the possibilitv of her b;ing taken away. 

She was a bran-new boat, every timber of' which bad been 
cut and hauled by Dasher Jack from the back woods of Dun- 
ville at the e.vperditure of much time and labor and he was 
soreley grieved to see the products of so much toil, and his sole 
means of earning a livehood, ruthlessly taken from him. 

In his sad e.\tremity, he repaired to the little French church 
to ask Divine guidance in the course then to pursue, and on 



There was a strong breeze blowing at the time, and with every 
stitch of blankets, sheets, and quilts spread, the little D.ni'itless 
presented a unique sight as Dasher Jack with glad and palpi- 
tating heart shaped his course for Placentia. 

Old Neptune proved propitious, the wind gradually increased, 
and at dawn such was the progress made, that Isle le Cliien 
was scarcely a speck upon the horizon. 

The wind blew strong all the day, and at six p.m. he was in 
sight of Cape Chapereau. a blutt headland at (he entrance of 
Placentia Bay, and as Dasher Jack and his crew were tired, 
sleepy, and hungary, not having taken a Morsel of food since 
the previous dav, they decided ro settle the watch, and take 
some rest which they needed badly after such a trying and 
exciting experience. / 

Just before supper the cook espied a faint speck of smoke 
upon the western horizon and as he was apprehensive of pursuit, 
he called the skipper, who peering through his spy-glass could 
plainly discern a small steamer coming towards them. Dasher 
Jack's heart throbbed violently at the sight, and a dark frown 
settled on his brow, as his hope of a well earned rest seemed 
not likely to be realized, but being one of those Captains 




FISHING SCHOONERS .Vf SANDV ISLANDS. LABRADOR. 
{Photo hy J. C. Parsons] 



returning from the house of prayer, he resolved to liberate the 
DauntUs!, as she was called, come what may. 

He then sought the merchant, and asked permission for him- 
self and crew to remain on board until aq opportunity pre- 
sented itself to return to their homes — a reqiest which was 
readily acceded to. Accordingly, Dasher Jack and his heroic 
crew took up their quarters on board their little craft again, and 
apparently, seemed reconciled to their fate, though greatly dis- 
heartened. He fold his plans to his faithful crew, who were 
ready and willing to do all in their power to assist him to liberate 
the Dauntless. 

Dasher Jack resolved to run his schooner out to .'ea as soon 
as an opportunity offered, but what were they to do for sails and 
rudder, both of which h,id been taken, and put under lock and 
key in the merchai.t's store. In order to o\erconie these diffi- 
culties they secretly constructed a rude rudder at night in the 
hold of their little craft, and decided to use bed-clothes for sails 
when a fair wind blew. 

Four days after the seizure of the Dauntless a strong 
westerly wind sprung up, and at midnight three of the cre.v 
stealthily fell upon the two French officers on guard, bound 
and gagged them whilst the rest of the crew bent the improvised 
sails, broke the padlock, quietly removed the chain, and at one 
o'cloock a.m. made for the open sea. 



courageous who wa.s practically rocked in the cradle of ihe deep, 
and inured to that Spartan Training School the Grand Banks 
and Cape St. Mary's fishing ground, danger, hardship, and pri- 
^•ation were almost an every day experience, .'O laying down 
his glass he said, "if the Frenciiman is pursuing us, he •von't 
capture us without a fight." 

Dasher Jack called his second-hand or male, and instructed 
him to have the ten sealing guns in the hold fully charged, cut 
five holes in the cabin roof which would serve as embrasures for 
the gunners and steer fair for Cape St. Mary's, and if that 
vessel in the distance overhaules us during the night stand 
ready, if she tries to capture us. " Evidently." he said. ■ French 
Merchant is sending her in pursuit of us. I have h.id many 
fierce encounters with old do<;hoods on the icttloes, and came 
off victorious, and those dapper little Frenchmen will reckon 
without their host, if they show any dispo^iiion to fi^ht. I don't 
want you to send any of those fellows to Davy Jones locker. 
so I advise you all to leave the Frenchmen come right abeam, 
and then fire straight at the rudder, and if possible, knock her 
out of commission without any loss of life." 

.-\fter giving these instruc'ions. so characteristic of Newfound- 
land fishermen, whose avocation compel them to battle with 
wind and wave, in order to obtain the wherewithal from old 
ocean to support themselves and families. Dasher Jack went lo 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 14. 



bed to indulge in ■• Xature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep," as un- 
conscious of danger, as if the solid earth, inste.id of the rockin" 
waves lay around him, and nought but an inch of plank between 
him, and the -dark unfathomed caves of ocean." 

The wind gradually increased and the little Dauntless sped 
before the breeze like a frightened fawn, and at flaylight was 
opposite Bird Island a precipitous rock and a few yards from 
Cape St. Mary's upon which myriads of birds have made their 
home sincetime iinmemonal. The tishermen say that formerlv the 
common sea gull held sway upon this island, but latterly the 
gannet has become so numerous there that he has ousted the 
sea gull from that position, and now exercises dominion over 
three fourths of this almost inaccessible rock. (Inly two persons 
have scaled its perpendicular, jai;ged. sides since' John C.ibot 
discovered Newfoundland, one- a Newfoundlander, named Best. 
the other an American taxiderinisf. named Cahoon from 
Tauntan. Mass., who by the 'vay went up its steep sides, but was 
unable to decend 'vithout the assi>iance of ropes conveyed to 
him in some way from the mainland, but the former performed 
the feat of ascending, and descending its craggy .sides with- 
out assistance. Its summit is a vcriuble mine of wealth, con- 
taining thousands of tons of guano, the deposits of myriads of 
birds for countless ages, and which only awaits the enterprise 
and energy of some capitalist to transmute it into gold and 
silver. 



tow of seals, and have sunk more than once in those mantraps 
that occur when the ice is not closely frozen; I have stemmed 
the fierce and wild .\tlantic in a frail dorv on the Grand Banks 
when the seas weie mountains high, and I would rather repeat 
those trying ideals again, than go between Bi'd Island and ihe 
mainland, but there is no alternative, I would prefer to see the 
Dauntless, dasked to pieces against ihese chits, and meet a 
watery grave than give the Frenchman the satisfaciion cf captur- 
ing us, and taking us back to St. Pierre again. We will anchor 
in this dangerous place out of sight, and when the steamer 
rounds the island in search of us give him a broadside of 
musketry, but concentrate the fire on the stern and if possible 
put his steering gear out of commission, and leave him at the 
mercy of wind and waves in dangerous pro.\im;tv to the island." 

Dasher Jack's crew carried out his instriictions to the let'.er. 
When the Frenchman approached the island he fired three 
shots over its summit one of which carried away the DauntUss' 
topmast, but did no further damage. " That was a close shave," 
says Dasher Jack, " anH since he has declared war on us in 
that fashion, stand to your posts my men, and «hen he rounds 
the island, and comes in view do as I have already advised, 
and let hiin take the consequences. 

It w'as an extremely e.xcitirg time, as everyone st"od at his 
post in breathless silence, waiting for the Frenchman to come in 
sight. Presently, he steamed boldly up in view, and as soon 



w 





MlDtiLE CiUF.. ABOUT SIX MII.F.S FROM ST. JOHN'S. 



I have made this digression advisrdly, in the hope that it may 
catch the eye of some wealiliy Canadian farmer desirous of 
developing an industry of ihis kind, and who thus may be in- 
duced to e.vploit one of iht- many resnurces of tnis couiitry- 
which are unfortun.itely Ij ing dormant, and which only needs 
the introduciio:! of a little rnt -rp ise and capital to make them 
prosperous and lucraiive indu.-tries, which wuild lie a great b:>on 
to the country at this p;:riod i)f ec momic aid industrial depres- 
sion from which Xcwfoundland in common «ith other counfies 
is suffering. 

But to resume the thread of my story. When the sun rose 
and dispelled the ciiuius l)jsher Jack scanned the horizon for 
his pursuer, and sure enou.;h he soon beheld a small steamer 
making a bee-line for Bird Island. 

.Vs the wind and sen had consi.Ier.ihly ab.afed Dasher Jack 
decided to hide his craft between Bird Island and the main- 
land, and await event.s. Me knew he h.is at least safe from 
capture there, as no one unacruslomed to the place would ven- 
ture in such a dangenms localliy. ".Now." sa) s D.isher Jack, 
to his gallant crew, •• no cralt has e\cr ventured between Bird 
Island and the mainland in all my experience fishing 
around Cape St. Mary's and (jolden Bay. I have been in 
many perilous situations, I have walked over the swaying 
buckling icelloes of the North in blinding snow-storms with a 



as he espied the little vessel riding at anchor in ihe charvbdis 
between the island and mainland, and observing no one on deck, 
he fired several shots across her prow, eviJer tly. to d'aw at;en- 
tion to his august presence. The echo of the Frenchman's 
salutat'on had scarcely died away, when the crew of the 
D.iuntlcss f()cu,«sing their aim on the coumer and steering gear 
of the enemy discharged their guns simultanioisly, the report of 
which was answerel by a succession of peais icsembiing the 
loudest thunder, which seemed to traverse tae singularly wild 
and enchantin;; scenery of Golden B.iy, and die a.vav among 
the distant crags of the precipiiious cliffs of C pe St. Mary's. 

The Krrnch.nan did not reply, being e"idei tly par.il-. zed by 
the suddenness and unexpectedness of the onslaught. When the 
smoke cleared away, it was seen that the little steamer had 
sustained severe dainnges, her steeling gear beini; completely 
demolished and her escutcheon perfor.ited at !he water line by 
a large hole into which the watei was rapidiy pnuiing. She was 
completely at the mercy of wind and wa»es. ar.d tlifting help- 
lessly towards Bird Island. Soon •'Iter st^e was observed to 
settle in the waiter, ard heist a signal of distress, as she disap- 
peared from \iew on tlie opposite side of the ijiand. 

Dasher Jack now made haste to extricate the D):tinlless from 
this veritable Jura and Scarba into which he had purposely run, 
in order to preclude the possibility of capfjre. This was no 



SSTFKIBBIBTJWPPaiMi 



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T'-^'Wiii tifi I iiw III' 



i^iiifTlirfrrtii aii^ ii^mffiwi i^ir "' i 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 15. 



easy task as there was only very little wind between the island 
and the mainland, althouf;h there was a strong breeze outside, 
and to make sail was extremely dangerous owing to the battling 
wind, incident to p'ace> of this kind, and the tremendous surf 
which threatened to overwhelm the little cr.ift every moment, 
enhanced the danger and difiicuitv. 

It is customary tor tishing vessels of the Dauntltsi type to 
carry long oars which are used fur propulsioi m calm weather. 
or to take crafts otl the shore when in dangerous proximity to it, 
so putting out four of these, t«o on each side, and with this ante- 
deluvian method of propiil.-,ion, and almost superhuman efforts 
they succeeded tn taking the Dauntless out of the vortices of 
this veritable seething niaeKtorm. Having reached the offing, 
sails were hoist and >c.irch was made for the steamer, but no 
trace of her could bi found, so Dasher Jack concluded that she 
had gone down \vi:h all on bo.ud. 

He felt e.vtremely sorry at the apparently terrible loss of life, 
but he consoled himself by saying that self preservation is the 
first I.1W of nature — a principle he vvis accustomed to act upon 
only «hen necessity imperatively demanded it. 

.\fter having cruised up and down the seaward side of the 
island for some time and seeing no sign of life, and considering 
further search futile he again shaped his course for PI..C-ntia. 



The Daniitliss made good progress in the Bay, and at sunset 
was off Forsaken Island, which has since been renamed by the 
Nomenclature Committee by a more appropriate and euphonious 
name. 

.\s the shades of night approached, the wind increased, and 
a heavy sea arose, so that every moment the little jolly-boat 
seemed in danger of being swamped ; and to take its occupants 
on board the IJauiilhss was a difficult and dangerous task in 
such an angry sea, and knowing that the Frenchman was op- 
posed to transhipment the best thing to do was to cut the tow- 
line, and possibly, they may make a landing on Forsaken Island, 
on which the wind was blowing, and were less than a mile dis- 
tant. To continue the tow during the night meant certain deatn 
for the French captain and his wife, and as there was no other 
alternative, Dasher J.ick decided to cut the tow-line: and as he 
did so the occupants of the Utile boat were barely visible in the 
twilight, and a lew moments afterwards disappeared in the dark- 
ness of the night, and henceforth Dasher Jack never heard of 
the f ite of the boat or its occupants. , 

As night wore on the wind gradually increased, a great sea 
arose tossing the little Dautitluss — now high upon a white-capped 
wave, row deep into the trough of the sea. or as an .Vmerican 
satirist phrases it. '• no.v her prows are shooting at a star, now 



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Af;er proceeding about a mile on the way he espied a little jolly 
boat to the leeward of Bird Island, and thinking it may belong 
to the little French steamer he made all possible haste to rescue 
it. 0.1 rounding up alongside the little boat he ivas surprised 
to find it contained only two occupants — a man and a woman — 
and accosting them in French, a little of which he had learned 

'\ from visiting St. Pierre, and trading with its people, he found 

I that they were tlie captain of tne little French steamer and his 

' young wife the latter having embarked to recruit her failing 

^ heahh, and enjoy the novelty of life on the sea. They informed 

Dasher Jack that the crew had escaped to the mainland, and 
that they had stood by until their steamer had disappeared 
beneath the waves, hauling up the jolly boat along-ide. D.isher 
Jack promised to treat ihcm kindly, and take them to his home 
in Placentia where they could remain until an opportunity came 
to return to their home at St. Pierre, but for some latent reason 
they refused to do so, I^ut requesting, however, to be taken in 
tow and landed at the nearest harbor. 

The sun was now high above the horizon, and the sea was 
remaikably smooth with just a mild zypher blowing, as the 
Z'(;///;/'/d-j-.f resumed her course for Placentia. There was scarcely 
any danger in towing the jolly-boat whiUt the wind did not 
increase, and the sea remained smooth but what was to be done, 
if old Neptune became perturbed, and lashed the waves into 
fury ? 



harpooning a shark," She scud before the gale all night having 
her improvised sails badly lorn by the voilence of the storm, and 
at dawn was nearing the mouth of PU'cntia harbor, and soon 
after sailed through the crafts anchored in Placentia roads, the 

haven 

" Where the small waves gently glide 
Like plavful l;^n^hs ou mountain side." 
She presented a novel and unique sight, as she sailed throui;h 
the shipping with her blanketing and sheeting streaming in 
the wind. 

There was much speculation an\ong--t the mariners, a*; to the 
reason for using such apologies (or sails, but none gue.ssed the 
real cause of the marine anomaly. 

The Dauntless dropped anchor in the calm waters of the 
picturesque village of Duin-ille. about ten o'clock, and Dasher 
Jack cautioned all his crews to keep their escape from St. 
Pierre, and the sinking of the Fiench steamer, a profound 
secret, a thing which the\ promised, and faithfully kept for many 
years, until jealously, the green eyed monster, caused it to be 
disclosed. 

Dasher Jack immediately purchased new sails for the ]\uint- 
less, and prosecuted the cod, and seal fishery for many years 
with great success. He not only prosecuted the inshore, but 
also embarked in the Grand Bank fishery, having several large 
bankers when he retired from the sea, one of which was com- 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 16. 



manded by his eldest son, who was nickname young Dasher 
Jack, who was well educated having graduated with honors at 
College, and was afterwards awarded a captain's ceniticate of 
competency. He commanded the A'l'i^fis/ifr for several years 
with great success. 

He was a man of splendid physique, being handsome, tall, 
and debonair. He was the life of all social galherings, nt which 
he was generally the cynosure of all eyes, especially the gentler 
sex : for along with his good looks he was an adept m the 
terpsichorean art. as well as a musician of no mean ability. 

"Twenty summers had gone past 

And June's red sun was sinking" 
since the destruction of the French steamer at Bird Island, 
when the Kin^fii/ier sailed into Fair Harbor, now a populous 
settlement, situ.ite on the svest df Forsaken Island, and a popular 
rendezvous for Newfoiii;dljnd, Canadiin. and .American bankers 
in quest cf bait. She was a splendid schooner of eighty tons, 
carrying nine dories, manned by fvenly men, and well equipped 
to prosecute the fishery on Grand Banks' stormy sea. 

it was a glorious evening, the sun was shining with dazzling 
splendor from a deep blue, cloudless, sky. A soft brignt golden 



celebrating her twenty-first birthday in this manner. 

Miss Benoit was remarkably pretty, being a rail beautiful 
blond, shy and unassuming, and as stie presided at the piano, 
and discoursed sweet music for the lancers and quadrills, many 
of the gallant captains longed for an introduction to (his fair 
young girl, and amongst the number was young Dasher Jack, 
who eagerly sought, and soon made her acquiiniince throjgh 
the medium of a lady friend who was an adept at tnatchmaking. 
Miss Benoit was soDn captivated by the engaging, personality 
of the handsome young ciptain, who had already iuccumbed to 
the fascination and charm of this accomplished yojng lady. 

He engaged her for many dances to the jea'.uusr and chagrin ' 
of a host of admirers. .\ll the dances of the period were per- 
formed, whilst miith and jollity ruled the hour, as the summer 
night flew by, and in the migic of social life, even lae industrious 
and hardworking master ot the Killgns!t^r forgot :hat his vessel 
was fully baited, and ready to proceed to the Grard Banks. To 
him the atmosphere around seemed charmed ; the night, alto- 
gether too short, and when the wee stna' hours ci morning ap- 
proached, and the company began to disperse he would fain 
linger longer. 







''^9' 




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,"2 






FLACESTIA, FROM .MOLNT PLEASANT. 
[P/iirto by /'. Doyli] 



haze hung over the gorgeous colored woods, and fields of fair 
Harbor, and its waters presented a forest like appearance, from 
the large fleet of bankers anchored there awaiting bait. The 
place was all agog at the announcement of a ball that was to 
take place the following night at the residence of one Michael 
B(moit's, the most social, and wealthiest inh.ibitant of the place, 
to which all the elite of the locality were invited, together with 
all the dashing captains of ihe vessels laying in port, and young 
Dasher Jack was one of the number who received an invit.Kion. 
This gave him great pleisurc. as he apprecialed nothing as well 
as a few hours spent in dancing. mu>ic and .song, and it m.\v be 
truthfully said that. 

" Xo love lorn .•iKaiii in lady's boner 
Ever panted for tlie appoinled hour." 
as the young captain did, until the time for the opening of the 
ball arrived." A large number of the youth and beauty wended 
their way lo the handsome, and imposing residence of Mr. 
Benoit at the appointed time. 

The ballroom presented a very line appearance, being beauti- 
fully and artistically decorated for the occasion, by the deft 
hand's of Miss Murial Benoit. who had just left school, and was 



The entertainment was voted a grard success in every way. 
every one expressing himself as thoroughly pleased with the 
night's enjo\ment although it may be truly said as always after 
such festivities 

" Many a heart is aching, 
H we could see ttiem all. 
Many a hope has vanished. 
After the ball." 

and so it was on that eventful night : for many dashing young 
oallants who paid their addresses to the beautiiul Muriel, had 
Their hopes sadly dashed to the ground, by her very marked 
preference for young Dasher Jack, ar.d among-t the number 
was his cousin. Captain Carey, who knew of he Bird Island 
episode, and who was now prepared to turn traitor in order to 
supplant him in the altections of Mi^s Beno t. .v hose parents 
were none other than the man and woman who hid been picked 
up at Bird Island after the .sinking of their little steamer or tug 
boat, and who refused to leave the jolly-boat in which they were 
found, and which was cut away from the Da;intUss opposite 
Forsaken Island in the hope that she might drift ashore, and 
thus save the lives of its occupants. 



' — ^^iit..^-^-. ■-'■' III! iffl rtiMiiiiii ffrrihiif I 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 17. 



I 



Everything happened as anticipated, the boat being casf 
ashore thit stormy night on the reels of Forsaken Island 
opposite the lighthouse, an h nir after the toivline h.id been cut, 
and froin which thev were lak;n by the lifjht-kecper, and his 
hero c dwi^hter, the laiter of whom proved herself another 
Grace Darling, by the heroism she displ.iyed, having plied a 
heavy otr in an angry sea to an is'and rock a hundred fathoms 
from ihe shore where the occupants of the boat had been cast 
by the wives, and for w hich iliey were handsomely rewarded by 
the grateful French Ciptain. 

The light keeper treated thf m very kindly, and after remain- 
ing for several weeks at the Mghthouse until' Ntadam ISenoit was 
fully recovered from the effects of her terrible experience, they 
proceeded to F.iir Harbor, a fe.v miles distant, where they 
settled, the Captain being averse to going back to St. Pierre 
owing to the loss of his steamer and his inabilty to capture the 
DattiilUss. He prosecuted the cod tishery for many years at 
which he was remark ibly successful making a competence after 
a short period, and thus it was that he could afford to educate 
his family, and entertain a great deal of company. 

Young Ua>her Jack very reluctantly departed from Fair Harbor 
where he had been right royally entertained by the anglicised 
Mr. and .Mrs. Bennit, and their beautiful daughter, to whom he 
had proposed, and having been accepted, the nuptials were 
fi.\ed for Christinas. 

Cnptain Carey, who stayed at Fair Harbor a few days after the 
departure of the Kiri^ns/ier, lost no time in informing Mr. 
Benoil, that his daughter's intended husband was the son of the 
man who was instrumental in sinking his vessel twenty-one 
years ago at Bird Island, and wlio, he said, had designedly cut 
the two-line off Foisaken Inland, so that he and his wife may be 
lost on its sunken reefs. 

The information, so treacherously and purposely communica- 
ted by Captain Carey, had the desired effect, and the prertdious 
Captain chuckled with glee at the prospect of alienating the 
affections of Miss Benoit from young Dasher Jack, and of 
putting a barrier, between them and their marriage, and of 
eventually securing the coveted prize himself. 

Mr, and Mrs. Benoit were horrified to think that they had 
consented to give their idolized and only daughter to the son of 
the man who had at one time almost blighted their prospects of 
success in life; who had virtually e.xiled them from their native 
land ; and who had almost sent them to a watety grave. They 
forthwith resolved that the engagement should be broken off 
and that young Dasher Jack sliould never again darken their 
doorway. 

Captain Carey was greatly elated at the apparent success of 
his perfidy, but the betrayal of his cousin did not enhance his 
chances of winning .Muriel one iota ; on the contrary his 
treachery seemed only to increase her affection for young 
Dasher Jack. Every obstacle thrown in the way of their union 
served only to actuate her with greater desire to secure the 
object of her love, and repudiate the at'ention of Captain 
Carey. At length, she asserted her independence, discarded 
the suit Captain Carey, told her parents Ihat she had nov.' 
reached her majority, that she intended to use her own mind in 
the selection of a partner for life, and that young Dasher Jack 
was the one of her choice. 

This outspoken declaration of independence, and flagrant 
disregard of parental authority, so exasperated Mr, Benoit that 
he threatened to confine and punish his daughter, if she acted 
in defiance of his expressed wishes. 

Young Dasher Jack hearing of the traitorous conduct of Cap- 
tain Carey and the subsequent rage of Mr. Benoit, and his 
changed fee'ings towards him, purposely absented himself from 
Fair Harbor, though he managed to correspond frequently with 
his faithful fiancee who kept him informed of every detail that 
occurred relative to her father's opposition to their union. 

Mrs. Benoit had relented somewhat, as she did not wish to 
blight the happiness of her daughter, or undermine her health 
which now seemed to be giving way under the stress of parental 
chastisement and estrangement. 

As Christmas, the time fixed for the marriage was drawing 
near, and seeing that Mr. Benoit still continued obdurate, young 
Dasher Jack decided to steal his betrothed away (o which .Muriel 



willingly consented, and accordingly Christmas Eve was fixed 
for the elopement. 

Young Dasher Jack arrived in the Kiiii;tis/ier just after dark 
on that day and at midnight proceeded to the residence of his 
fiancee, and giving a preconcerted signal breathlessly awaited 
her coming. Muriel recognizing the signal hastily donned her 
travellmg clo,ik, noiselessly glided from her home, a few \ards 
from which she met her affianced husband, and exchanging 
cordial greetings wh'ch prov^-d convincingly that "Absence 
makes the heart grow fonder,'' they hastened with all possible 
speed to embark, and soon young Dasher Jack was sailing back 
over the placid waters of Placentia Bay to the Ancient Capital 
where the marriage was to be celebrated in typiral New foundland 
style. .\s he entered the Gut of Placetia the narrow entrance 
to the beautiful and commodious harbor, the '• boys"' who were 
aware of the proceedings and were anxiously awaiting his 
arrival tendered him a right royal welcome from the old French 
forts on Castle Hill, Jersey Side, and the Beach which reverber- 
ated along the wooded slopes of Mount Pleasant, and the beauti- 
ful seven isles of Dunville, a suburb of Placentia. 

The marriage was immediately celebrated and thus wete 
united two hearts that heat as one. When Mr. Benoit discover- 
ed that Muriel had eloped, and that all his plans for the future 
of his daughter had been frustrated, his anger was unbounded. 
He reared like a mad. nan, and poured out the phials of his 
wrath on the brave and fearless young Dasher Jack, who had 
robbed him of his loved and only daughter, the joy and pride of 
his life. But all his fulniinations were futile ; for young Dasher 
Jack was then comfortably ensconced in his beautiful hoirie at 
Dunville miles beyond the reach of his vengeance. 

Many years elapsed before the wound caused by the elope- 
ment was fully healed, but when Muriel's parents became old and 
infirm she was desirous of having them near her, a wish in 
which her husband heartily joined. Therefore, young Dasher 
Jack immediately issued an invitation to the two old couple, 
requesting them to spend the evening of their lives under his 
hospitable roof to which Mr. and Mrs. Benoit willingly assented, 
and a few days after he was sailing into Fair Harbor on a very 
different mission from that of thirty years ago. Muriel accom- 
panied her husband and when she stepped on shore, and gazed 
upon the home of her childhood which she had not seen for 
thirty years, and around which were entwined so many fond and 
treasured recollections, she could not refrain from humming the 
favorite song of her girlhood the opening lines of which were : 
" Many weary years have parsed 
Since I saw the old place la.-^t 
But memory still steals 
O'er me like a charm " 
each stanza of which seemed more tender and expressive than 
ever. 

The reconciliation was now complete, and as she entered the 
old home her parents received her and her husband with open 
arms, and did everything in their power to make their stay as 
comfortable and as pleasant as possible, .\fter a short sojourn 
they returned to Dunville, Mr. and Mrs. Benoit accompanying 
them. 

The old couple lived for several years after, and no one more 
highl)- appreciated young Dasher Jack's sterling qualities than 
Mr. Benoit, and both were made happy by the many acts of 
kindness bestowed on thein, not only by their son-in-law. but 
also by their grand children who inherited the many estimable 
qualities of their parents, and who did everything possible to 
render the last years of their grand parents bright and happy. 







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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-i,S. 

^ Sir William Ford Coaker, K.B.E., M.H.A. -j^ 




^S.: N the aniii%ersary of the Kinc,'s Birthdav, June yd, 
-•■' It was His Majestj's pleasure to confer upon 
Hon. \\,lh.im Ford Coaker the distinguished 
honour of Knighthood in the Mom Excellent 
Order of the British Empire. This recognition 
for pubhc services deserves more than passino- 
notice, inasmuch as it comes to one «-ho from the first has 
undertaken upon himself work which does not ordinarily lead to 
honours of tins kind. The greatest honour is to live in the 
hearts of one's fellows. It is W. F. Coaker's success that he 
has known what it is to be regarded with little short of venera- 
tion by man) thousands of those whom he has banded together 
under the banner of the Fishermen's Protective Union, and for 
whose welfare he has literally forced ameliorate measures 
through the House of .\ssembly. The name Coaker has be- 
come known from one end of the country to the other, and be- 



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SIR Wri.LIA.M K. COAkKR, K.B.K.. M.H.A. 

cause of his single aim and object ; the welfare of the fisherman 
and toiler, it is questionable if there has been anv name in- 
politicai history which conjures up such intimate pictures of the 
man and his work as that of Coiker. The honour of Knight- 
hood marks the recognition of worth alreadv proved. 

The establishment by Sir William Coaker in icjoS of the 
Fishermen's Protective Union, the building up of a distinct and 
separate township .it Port L'nii/o with warehouse-;, stores, 
wharves, shipping facilities, electric li.iht and power plant, ship- 
building yard, was an uiid'rrtiking of such magnittide as 
marked him as a genius of industry. N'o man worked as hard in 
the bringing about of this mighrv est iblishm-nt, and no min 
was happier to take hammer or pick-a.v; and put in actual work, 
as Sir V.illiim Coaker often did. It is no stretch of imagiiia- 
ti'on to say that every inch ot Port Union was literally and 
actually baptized with the sweat of the brow of the tnan who 
conceived it all and carried it into tttect. No man was on the 
job earlier in the morning, an I no man left the job later th.in 
Mr. Coaker. 

That is a type of man whom His Majesty the King delights 
to honour, because it is the t) pe of man upon whom the L'ritish 



Empire depends, the type of man that has made the Empire 
Great and the type of m.in that the Empire looks to for the 
future. 

In the political field. Sir WilHam Coaker started out to create 
better conditions for toiler and the lisherman, who after all. is 
the man who keeps this old Colony on her feet. That he has 
wortnily done this has been proven by the remarkable confi- 
dence given him at the polls. He, himself, has represented 
Bnnavista since 1913, and to all intents and purposes, since 
1909. when the F. P. U. was started. .A.t the end of this terra, 
therefore, he will have enjoyed the lovalty o: this district for 
almost twenty years, tribute indeed to his work. 
^ One of the most outstandi-g merits that belong to Sir \Vm. 
Coaker was his attitude on Conscription during the Great World 
War. In 1918 the-issue was a precarious ore for the Empire 
and for the Newfoundland Regiment. It looked as if oer 
Regiment could not preserve its identity any longer unless more 
recruits came forword. The issue hung upon Mr. Coakers 
decision. It was a new and in some senses, a terrible matter 
in the eyes of many Newfoundlanders that their sons should be 
forced to fight, and no one realized this as much as -Mr. Coaker 
being as he was, in close tOL:h with all classes. When Wi.liam 
F. Coaker, knowing the necessity, Mas a party to bringing in 
our .Military Service Act. he acted as a true Patriot, and rightiv 
earned the respect due to his action. .And then he set to wori 
to show the people why such an Act was necessary, and how 
fair and jusi it was, after all. ard backed it up by an oifer that 
if fifty Recruits would not ot:er themselves as Coaker Recruits 
he would go himself. 

This marks the type of man again which the Kirg delights to 
honour, the type of man wha thought of nothing else but the 
Empire's need when she was in danger. 
" There are many other quajlications throughout the career of 
Sir William Coaker which mars him as one worthy to bear ibe 
honour of Knighthood. The honour comes notor.l'v to him but 
to every member of the Fishirrr.en's Protective Union. 

We e.xtend congratulations to Sir William Ford Coaker and 
trust that he will be spared many years to enjoy the well-merited 
honour which is his to-day. 

At the age of sixteen he >vas made manager by the firm of 
McDougall & Templeton c: i.aeir business branch at Pikes 
.-\rii), Herring Neck, but in 1S95, ht engaged m farming at 
" Coakerville," in Dildo Run, where nith Mr. Ci^arles Bryant, 
now of the Union Trading Company's Start, he toiled strenuously 
and built up perhaps the mc^t lariving farmlands in Newfound- 
land. But, seeing a still wijer rield of Public endeavour and 
knowing by experience the hard conditions faced by the fisher- 
men, Mr. Coaker decided to leave '-Coakerville'" and devote a.l 
his powers and his life to the cause of the lishermen and his 
country. Thus ic was that t:ie ^reat Fishermen's Union or the 
F. P. U. was organized forrr.iily on November yd, of the year 
1908, in the Orange Hall at Herring Neck. 

Sir Wm. Cocker is the President and Managinj Director of 
the Union Publishing Co.. which issues T/ie ETenin<; Adfocjti 
and T/ie Weekly Adiocate. He is President of the F. P. U. and 
the Union Shipbuilding Co.. t.'-.e Union Power and Light Co., 
the Union Traaing Co., and the Union Export Co. He entered 
politics in 19 13, and his policy -.vas endorsed by ti-.e live Norti.- 
ern Constituencies returning ele.en incmters. A simjliar result 
took place in the elections cf i-ii9 and 1923. He entered the 
Executive in the Coalition Government cf 1917. and in the 
Squires Government of 1919 tco'k the Ponlol-.o or .Marine and 
Fisheries. He has travelled extensively in ihe interests of his 
work, gaining a wide knowledge of the markets to which New- 
foundland ships her Codfish, etc. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 19. 

^ Ice on the Summer Sea. ^ 

By Albert N. Holmes. 




?Tis early in June, 192.-. The trees are shooting 
forth their leaves in brightest green, the meadows 
appear spread with a new rich carpet of sum- 
mer's richest hue, in the fiower plot the beds have 
taken shape, and over them still bends a girlish 
figure busily engaged in sowing seeds that will 
soon spring forth from the warm earth and blossom, shedding 
fragrance and beauty to compensate the eager, patient and hope- 
ful little gardener. 

I look away to the hills, and behold the verdure! I listen to 
the song of birds mingling with the sighing of soft winds among 
the tre^s, the distant splash of the waterfall softened by the 
gurgle and murmur of the nearby stream; and I shout in my 
joy it is summer : And the birds, and the trees, and the fields, 
and the hills; the blue of the sky, and the soft blowing winds 
take up the strain — It is summer. 

But what of the sea ? From where I stand, I cannot look 
out upon its broad bosom, but I turn my eyes towards one of its 
arms that runs s^me twentv-one miles inland.' denying the e.>st 
coast of Newfoundland, and known as Hall's Bav, and there I 
see, floating upon its surface, numerous pieces of Arctic ice — 
relics of grim winter. 

Few days ago, with east wind and tide pressing in upon the 
main "jam" th.it extended for miles outside the farthermost 
reaching headland, the bays of the east coast were filled with this 
Arctic ice, giving the appe.irance of winter in the north, even in 
June. Indeed, so great was the field of ice that drifted up from 
the northern regions during the spring of 1922, and so irresist- 
able is such a tioe when once started by tide and winds, that 
during May of that season, ice forced its way to the very head 
of the longest indraft on the east coast. The numerous bays 
and inlets in the great Notre Dame Bay were filled with this 
drifting mass of ice. It forced its way up through the numerous 
islands lying to the south, and on up through the— Sir Charles 
Hamilton Sound, up the Exploits Bay, even to the mouth of the 
Exploits River. The strong tide from this grand river, the 
largest in the country, pressed ineffectively against this moving 
ocean of ice ; it moved forward until the wall of rock — the doors 
and bars that God hath set to stay the proud waves of the ocean 
compelled it to go no further. 

The first steamer to penetrate that barrier of ice, and force its 
way north, was s.s. Pi-ns/iem. She arrived at Springriale about 
the 30th of May. The s.s. C7yi/e and others followed soon after, 
when the ice slacked oft' the coast. 

I was anxious to get south, for my work called me to Botwood, 
but no steamer would be returning south for over a week. 
What must I do? 

My littie mno- launch, a m ;re pmt, wa^ floating bjoymtly 
at the wharf, and I decided that she must carry ms thither. 

Summer was in the air; only upon the ocean were marks of 
winter to be seen ; but filled with the lure of the summer sea, 
and the joy of speeding over its surface for some seventy miles, 
fanned by its cooling breezes, and tocked upon its heaving 
bosom, I decided to take the venture. So twelve o'clock noon, 
of June ist, found me speeding in my little launch over the 
placid waters of Hall's Bay, out towards the broid bosom of the 
Notre iJame. Three hours brought me to where I thought to 
get a view of the straight rim of the ocean meeting the sky. 
When a very small boy, I first looked out over the ocean, 
I thought its waters ascended to meet the sky. and that by fol- 
lowing it [ would .It last be able to peep through the stars into 
Heaven. I have seen the ocean many ticnes since then, and 
that childish, but happy hope has died out, and I hope, a fuller 
knowledge taken its place. 

As my tiny launch brought me onward, the land-locked bay 
seemed to swing wide its rocky portals, and allow me to fioat 
out upon the broad ocean. But what a disappouitment .' Where 



I hoped to see the great blue sea stretching up to meet the blue 
of the sky, and feel my soul thrilled with emotion because of its 
majesty, I saw only ice — mountains of it, fields of it, miles and 
miles of ice. Where I wished to feel my little boat rising, rising 
upon the top of the huge unbroken billow, and sinking, sinking 
in the hollow — the glorious sensational rise and fall of the ocean's 
bosom, I found the water as still as in the sheltered bay out of 
which I had come. 

Dash it! I said, there will be no thrill. Its as still as a milk 
pond I .And I sat back in the stern of the boat almost to sulk. 

But as I speed further out into the open bay the ice became 
heavier and closer drifted together. Great bergs towered a 
hundred feet in the air glistening in the warm June sun. Down'' 
over some of those bergs fiowed rivers of water — real water- 
falls, caused bv the melting of snow higher up. One of them 
toppled over, and a whole pond of water seemed to shoot off the 
top into the ocean, making a great noise which I could hear 
distinctly above the working of the motor. Now and then one 
of them would founder with a great noise and I was obliged to 
keep a safe distance from them. This was not an easy task as 
great Hat pans seemed always blocking the way. 

I had by this time forgotten to sulk. There were thrills; 
heaps of them. There was danger; and danger always bring 
thrills. It became necessary for me to watch very closely the 
progress of the launch, and even to retard the speed of the 
motor, to allow the little boat to maneuver in time to avoid run- 
ning upon some projecting point of ice running out under the 
water from some large pan or berg. 

But in spite of the attention required to guard against striking 
ice, and in looking after the working of the motor, I managed 
to mark and admire some of the beauty that I was speeding 
through. 

Some of the bergs were curiously shaped, and I regret till 
now that I had no camera to get pictures of them. One very 
large be-'g, when viewed from a certain angle, reminded me of a 
picture I have seen of the ruins of the famous Kheims Cathe- 
dral ; another presented the appearance of a facade of an 
ancient buildi.'ig of Gothic design: there were three unbroken 
arches, with numerous minarets, towers, domes and spires. 
Another resembled a huge square battery; and standing off 
from the main berg some ten yards, were two pillars of ice rising 
to near sixty feet in the air. These pillars were seperate from 
each other and rose out of the water as if they were not a part 
of the main berg at all. .At the base, these two pillars were 
very small in circumference, and stood on a mere pivot. I expect- 
ed to see them topple over at any time, but to my disgust they 
remained intact until I had pnssed out of sight. 

M the entrance of the Exploits •• Run" there was a very large 
flat pan of ice, almost brown in color with several large black 
objects upon it. At first I thought these objects were seal 
carcasses, but as I approached I discovered that they were large 
rocks; some of them must have weighed ten or fifteen ti>ns. I 
also discovered that the browness ot colour was caused by ihe 
quantity of sand frozen in the ice. 

There were many other pans and bergs resembling different 
curious objects, and were real caricatures of anim.il life and 
material objects; but it was all immensely interesting to me; 
and by the time I reached Botwood. which I did after a run of 
about ii'.- hours. I had decided that it was one of the most 
interesting trips of rny life. 

Out o'er the Hiiie, ii^ whiter hue 

III stern prim niijesty, 
Sweep.'i the Northern tl'oe. as the North winds blow. 

.And strews the Summer sea. 
It breathes its breath, a sickening death 

To Summer's soft warm wind 
And brins^ that chill of the Northern rill 

It could not Jeace behind. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 20. 





THE PRIME MINISTER PLACING WREATH ON CROSS OF SACRIFICE 
IN MILITARY CEMETERY AT ETAPLES, FRANCE. 



THE PRIME MINISTER PLACING A WREATH ON THE GRAVE 
OF A NEWFOUNDLAND SOLDIER IN FRANCE. 




I 1 



"The Son of Consolation." 

By Robert Gear MacOonald. 

How bright the sunset and how calm 

The softly heaving sea ! 
Kvening has shed its blessed balm, 

And day's distractions flee. 

O happy .Saint, at Kvensong 

We give Ciod thanks and praise 

For those who in their hearts belong 
To Thee, who tread thy wavs — 

To comfort the distressed, to lift 
The hearts and hands that droop ; 

The heavy load of life to shift 

Frotri them wliose shoulders stoop- 

With words of sympathy and power. 

With deeds of kindness due. 
To cheer the sad in darksome hour 

And bid them hope anew. 

Blest Son of Comfort, hail, all hail : 

Pray to thy lx3rd for me — 
That I, however men may rail. 
Thy follower true may be. 
In Kesta Sanct: liarnabas. A.D. .MCMXXIII. 



Let Me Sleep in Flanders Fields. 

By Henry Polk Lowenstein. 

In Flanders Fields, O let me sleep, 

And wake nie not and never weep 

For me. I rest in perfect peace: 
And till all earthly strife shall cease, 

1 shall in silence slumber deep. 



Vou do me wrong to stir and weep 
Away my fondest hopes and keep 

Me from my rest and just release. 
In Flandert Fields. 

Disturb me not, but let me sleep 
Kight where I am and never weep 
Again, for I shall never cease 
To live and make my li:;ht increase. 
As Time tolls on in silence deep. 

In Flanders Fields. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 21. 

^ Aeroplanes and the Labrador Goldfields. -< 



jr^TWHREE aeroplanes belonging to the Aeri.il Survey 
{^^^^ Company (Newfoundland), Limited, recently 
'}~^ landed at Botwood after operating in connection 
with the Labrador Goldtield. The machines 
comprised one Maninsyde. and two Weslland 
aeropl.ines, accommodating twelve passengers besides the three 
pilots, and t\) completely equipped wiih living gear for use in 
the event of a forced landinjj. 

After considerable delay caused by continuous bad weather 
and mechanical troubles, tne aeroplanes (which are lilted with 
skiis) were flown off the frozen Kiver of Exploits. The ice was 
in bad condition, and the "get oft" was made from eight inches 
of water ajid slush. 

Hawke's Bay, N'ewfoundlaiid, was used as a base, and where 
a landing was made, the \Ve>tland machines unloading a 
quantity of supplies. 

At Hawke's Bay the ice surface conditions were also very 
bad — everywhere covered with a foot or so of water and slush. 



only the chimneys showing. The schoomister at Cartwright 
was trapped in his house for two days and a man walking over- 
head on snowshoes heard him tapping the iron chimney to 
attract attention. 

The co.ist was tightly packed with ice for more than si.viy 
miles out to sea, which was as far as the eve could see from the 
aeroplane. All the big rivers were opening up and brirging 
do*n thousands of tons of ice with a deafening roar. 

The return flight was a race against time as the aeroplanes 
were fitted with skiis and the ice was rapidly breaking up in 
Newfoundland. .\ stop was made at Hawke's Bay and the 
company's base at Botvood was reached only just in time' 
Major Cottori lauding the Mirtinsyde on a strip of icc beside 
the bank of the River of Exploits. 150 yards long ani 6d yards 
wide, the aeroplane runnifjj tifty yards before she pulled up. 
Floats have now been fitted to this aeropia le to enable her to 
carry out summer living. 

The flight to the G,^ldfieidi was complstely successful, but 



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AEROPLANES AND MOTOR LAUNCH AT HAWKES BAY. 

Numerous holes were drilled through the fourfnot thickness 
of ice and a sufficient area was cleared to aiiow M.ijor Cotton 
in the Martinsyde to get away. His course took him over the 
Wreck of the Xonlfrf/Jt. from ivhich coal was being carted into 
Flower's Cove. From Flower's Cove the .Strr.its of Bell Isle 
were crossed to Point Amour un the Labrador Coast, where lies 
the wreck of the Biitish light crui-er Rakish which rin into the 
rocks during a fog last August. Photo_;;raphs from the air of the 
Kahigh have been secured by the Company. The cruiser w.is 
looking a pitiable sight, ar.d was coveted with ire and snow. 

About seventy miles North, Battle Harbour u.t; reached, 
where the radio station gave the last touch with the out>ide 
world. From here onwards very little but iceboiuid rocky co,ist 
was seen, broken at intervals by great rushing torrents and wir'e 
stretches of com- try. 

A noonstop flight wis ni.ide hy M ijor Cotton from Hawke's 
Bay, to Rigolet. Labrador, and the Martinsyde made a landing 
five miles outside u ith only foiir gallons of gasoline in her tanks. 
A further supply was brought out by dog-te.ims as the ice was 
badly broken up in places. 

The conditions on the Labr.idor Co.ist were the worst experi- 
enced in the memories of the oldest inh.ibitants. At Cjrtwri;;ht 
the houses were completely coveted by a level lield of snow «ith 



MAJOR F. S. COTTON AND y.F.CHANlC STANNARD WITH 

MARTINSYDE AEROPLANE AfTEX RF.TLRN 

FKO.M LAnRAr»)R GOLI FIELDS. 

naturally no det.iiled information cin be g^."cn of the acfial arra 
owing to the great adv.ritagrs ohtained ever competitors by the 
Aerial Survey Company (Nenf.ii-ndlai.d) Limited aiul the a«s:>- 
ciated companies — flie Hav.kr's Biy Tiading Company, and 
the Labrador fJold Deposits. I/ :.ited. oeig first on the ri.'d 
before the actual gold rush commenced. 

The remainder of the partv hive go; e by motor schooners. 

Never before in llie history of the world h ,ve aeropi.iues been 
used in this connection, and the valua'ule jX)siti.in i.i which she 
Hawke's Bay Tr.iding Company and tne Lahrador G.id lie- 
posits, Limited, must find theuiseives is hird ta reaiizj. r:ie 
river and country surrcunditig the area or which clai ns h.iie 
been taken out «ere not n..:pfed, ar.d the Aerial Map which 
was made on this tl ght and the i iform itioi^ <ibt.iincU place these 
companies in possession of inv.ili:.itjle iaiormation. Much credit 
is due to these companies in rea zini; the value of aoroplanes in 
this connection. Both th- Haw'se's Bn- Tradin:j Comoany and 
the La'nador (iolil Deposits. Li.:i;;ed, no.d a considerable num- 
ber of claims, including most of the claims on t.ie mouth of the 
Kiver. 

'I'he -Aeri.il Survey Compa^iy (' Ne«foiird!and'), Limited, has 
been carrying out sufey work :iPd has made flights al. thmui^b 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



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the last winter, notwithstanding temperatures as low as 40 
degrees below zero. The winter aerial surveys of timber limits 
have been a great success and show more details than summer 
surveys. The Company's aeroplanes, as a resuk of continuous 
experiments in overcoming freezing troubles and difficulties of 
landing on various surfaces, are able to tiv at all times in Arctic 
weather, as a result of which the preliminary survey party were 
able to commence work months earlier than otherwise 'would 
have been the case. 

It is difficult to realize that the aeroplane is the only means 
of reaching the Labr.idor in the winter. 

The MontrMl Star publishes an interview with Major Cotton 
in which he s.iys he saw something •' worth telling" when he 
Hew over the supposed gold fields on Labrador. The story is 
as follows ; 

Accounts of thrilling air flights over frozen Labrador and the 
northern part of Xe.vfoundland, of forced landings and lone 
battles against wind, rain, cold and fog. are given by >tajor F. 
Sydney Cotton, President of the Aerial Survey Company, of St. 
John's, Newfoundland, who passed through Montreal en route 
for New Yoik. vid Toronto. Major Cotton is one of the heroes 




M.^RTIN-SYDE I.V .^IR EK ROUTE TO LADRADOR GOLDFIELDS 
TAK.KS' FRO.M WESTI.AND A?;R01>LAN'E. 

of what all Newfoundland and Labrador talk of as a great fi)ing 
feat, carried out when he and a cnmpanion fought against ad- 
verse weather conditions and unknown dangers to make the first 
actual survey of the great Labrador tract where some gold was 
recently discovered, and where a gold rush is just commencing. 
Referring to the memorial flight, which took place at the 
beginning of June, Major Cotton just laughs, and says it was 
" all in the day's work." A big-boned young-looking man, who 
claims .\ustralia as his native land, the Major spoke with diffi- 
culty when seen .it the Mount Royal Hotel, bv reason of a husky 
voice. His vocal organs which had braved the experience of 
rushing through zero air at many miles an hour, and had with- 
stood the shrill blasts along the northern coasts, were affected 
by the draughts of the train which brought him to Montreal on 
the first lap of his journey. 

Of the gold in tlie district he had surveyed, and on which the 
ej'es of prospector and miner alike are fixed, the airman would 
say nothing. " You cin be sure that what I have seen is worth 
telling," he said. '■ but 1 must tell you emphatically that I will 
not say one word of the possibilities or the actualities of the 
district where the gold rush is now developing." 

A'thoiigh the headquarters of Major Cotton's company is at 
St, John's, the oper.iting head(]uarters. with its monster aero- 
dromes, is at Botwood. NewfoiindLind. Working from here, 
the comp.iny claims to have perfected winter flying, in itself a 
notable feat, and to have used ice Hoes and frozen fields as 
Landing places for many months every year, with the usual .skids 
under their machines. Telling of the great flight of observation 
in which he participated, .ind which turned out to he one of the 
most hazardous which airmen were ever called upon to under- 
take, he savs : 



THREE PLANS USED. 

" We- outfitted at Botwood at the end of April. It was de- 
cided that three "planes would go on the trip. One of these, a 
Martinsyde, was manned by myself as pilot, and J. R. Stannard. 
mechanic ; another, a -Vapier-Westland, had T. Knowles-Blackall 
as pilot, with H. Wallis as mechanic, and the third machine, a 
Rolls-Westland. had Major Kitchener, a nephew of the famous 
soldier. Earl Kitchener, as pilot, and W. D. Corse, in charge of 
photographic operations. There was also a surveyor with the 
party. Our object was to make a map of the gold areas, which 
covered a tract of about 450 square miles. 

" We all got off safely and two hours later arrived at Hawke's 
Bay, on the west coast of Newfoundland. Arriving here it was 
found that Major Kitchener had to return to Botwood. and 
from there go to Bermuda to keep an appointment. Conse- 
quently his machine returned, and the instruments and other 
articles were transferred to the other two machines. Another 
happening held us in Hawke's Bay for ten days. There was a 
thick fog on the Straits oi Bell Isle, over ivhich we had to fly to 
reach Labrador. We made five or six attempts to fly across, 
attaining an altitude of 8,000 feet, but the fog was thick as ever 
even that high up, and we had to wait. When we finally heard 
that the " head" ice had gone out, and the fog had almost disap- 
peared, we were ready to start. The long wait somewhat upset 
our plans, however, and we finally decided to make the flight in 
the Martinsyde alone. Consequendy the second machine was 
sent back to the base, and all the instruments transferred to my 
machine. Finally we left at 6.50 o'clock on the morning of 
May 10. The Napier-Westerland left there in the attrrnoon 
and we later found that it landed without mishap on a narrow 
stip of ice three miles from its hanger. It had to be dismantled 
there to get it into its shed. 

PASSED WRECK OF " RALEtGH." 

" Our chances of making the other side safely looked small. 
It was 7 40 o'clock in the morning of the same day that we 
passed over the wreck of H.M.S. Kalc-ii;li on the rocks in the 
Straits. We took snaps of it from the air. .At 9.50 o'clock we 
pissed over Cartwright, Labrador, and by 1 1 o'clock we were 
near Rigoulet, Labrador, our tirst halting place on the long flight. 
We had long before this taken precautions to place tanks of 
gasoline and oil at various accessible points on the Labrador 
Coast, and one of these bases -was at the Hudson's Bay Co's. 
post at Rigoulet. However, when we drew near the little post 
it was found that we had only a few gallons of gas left. We 
planed down and landed on the frozen surface of a little lake 
about three miles from the post. Here we found that we had 
only five gallons of gas remaining. We wrote a note on a piece 
of paper and weighed it. Then we flew off again, and over the 
trading p^st, dropping the note so that the agent there would 
find it. We then returned to the frozen lake and waited for 
help to come. We had asked in the note for a suppiy of 
gasoline. It was some time later when the agent at the post 
himself found us at the lake. He told us that it was impossible 
to bring ga.soline to the 'plane, as there were only di-g sleighs 
at the post, and they could not be used over the quickly thaw- 
ing ground around the lake, Following his instiuctions. how- 
ever, we took a chance with the small supply of gas we had left 
and once more rose into the air. Then we landed on the 
frozen edge of an arm of the sea about five miles from the post. 

" Here dog teams reached us over the ice-edge of the water 
and launches from the post came up the clear water and gave us 
a fresh supply of gas. Ta.\i-ing along the ice, however, we 
broke the "Kingpost" under "aileron control" and had to 
take it oft and bring it to the Hudson's Bay post for repairs. 

"Ne.Kt day we started off for Stag Bay, and reached that safely. 
I cannot say what we saw in the interior of Labrador, but we 
had some more trouble on the return trip. We reached 
Rigoulet safely and filled up with petrol. Frum 'here on. how- 
ever, we struck a nasty head wind and it rained haid (01 several 
hours. This held during the last lOo miles of our fight. 

•• We also faced the danger of a shortage of petrol when 
fifteen miles short of Hawke's Bay, but succeeded in gliding to 
earth." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 23. 

^ The Sentinel of the St. Lawrence. ^^ 

Newfoundland and Her Actual and Potential Wealth. 
By Alex. A. ? arsons, J. P. 
4RTICLE I. 



Uese y a story niii.h in raua;her shape 
fame ffoni :\ grizzled lisher »h,im I saw 

Sunning himself on a ruin'd wliarf alcne 

Old and a mine of memories— who had served. 
Long since, a liygone teacher of the place. 
And been himself a part of what he told. 

VAST RESOURCES OP THE SEA. 

t ERRA \oVA ! There she stands, still free and in- 
depetident— -the Sentinel of the St. Lawrence," 
as the late Sir .Ambrose Shea used to proudh- call 
her— right at the nicmth of " the Great River," 
«ith the Strait of Belle Isle on one side and Cabot 
Strait on the other. But at this perplexing crisis 
in the history of our great fishing i^dustrv, the question°natur- 
ally suggests Itself: '■ Uo we, \e«foun jlanders, rta'ly under- 




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A forenoon's catch Of SALMON, SKRI'ENriNE RIVER, NFI.l) , 
LARGEST SAL.MON l8 LIS. 

stand ho'.v vast are the resources of the seas that wash our 
shores, or how great ihe demmds upon tlieiii ?" .\s I stood, 
with a friend, on Si^inal Ilill, the other evening, and louUed 
along tiie coast, I could not liut realize Iha' there is a possibility 
of making these waters teem with food fishes of the very be.st 
varieties, instead of allowing them lo rem.iin, as they are to-day, 
scarcely equal to the demands of our comparativelv sm.ill city 
population. So far as European waters are concerned, accord- 
ing to Ihe London Ol'servcr- (an excellent authority on such 
matters), there is very present danger that thev will be over- 
fished. It is, therefore, all the more important that we should 
avail of every method within reach to preserve, and. if possible. 



increase the value of this our greatest and most indispensable 
source of income. 

THE PROBLEM OE -MAINTAINING SUPPLIES. 

Tvpenty years ago, or more, the maritime powers of Europe 
realized that they could only deal by united action with the 
problem of maintaining supplies, and' that united action de- 
manded agreement. The nations with North Sea borders there- 
upon agreed to join forces for investigation, to exchange intor- 
mation regularly and to apply such measures as might be needed 
to protect and preserve supplies important in varying measures 
to them all. The war destroyed this valuab'.e intercourse; it is 
now being resumed. Of course, Great Bri-.ain has a predomi- 
nant interest in the North Sea fisheries. In the period between 
190S and 19 1 2 the English share of fish f'om European waters 
was three and a half million tons out of a total of five and a 
half millions. In the year 1913 nearly s/.v hundred tons were 
landed daily at Grimsby alone, and this port was followed very 
closely by Lowestoft and Yarmouth. Vet in spite of these 
results and their importance to the community at laige. Greit 
Britain spends less than any other interested country on fishery 
administration and research. 

THE " FLATFISH" AS AN ARTICLE OF FOOD. 

Why. the plaice alone — a fish very similar in size, .shape, 
color and flavor to our common ■' flaifish" — i-. regarded on ■■ the 
other side of the .-V'lantic" as a most imoortant article of food. 
With us it is of vet y little account. In looking up statistics 
on the '-harvest of the sea" in Europe. I find that the plaice 
fisheries of the North Sea yielded between 1903 and 1913 rather 
more thin i 000 ions a week, and of. this huge haul English 
trawlers claimed between one half ard three-quarters, Holland 
came second, Denmark v\ as third and the several other countries 
" also ran." As I have already shown, the importance of this 
fish is very great. In Lowestoft in 19:; i its relation to the 
lrawlei"s harvest was 36 per cent by weight and 30 per cent by 
value. In such circumstances it is not surprising to learn that 
investig.itors are endeavoring to find out all that can be known. 
Trawlers have gone so far as the North Coast of Russia in 
search of plaice, and there ihey found a considerable number of 
very large and thin specimens. Strange though it may appear, 
scientific investigation has provtd th.U manv of them were over 
fifty years old. The age is reveal;d by the ear-stones (otoliths) 
on one of the bones of the eill cover. The years mark the two 
little ear-stones with rings like those that appear in the trunk of 
a tree. In the North Sea, where the trawlers are always at 
work, these very ancient '■ el-phant lugs," as the fishermen call 
them, are not found, the oldest hsh recorded being but thirty- 
trto years of age. 

SOME OF THE GREAT PRORI.KMS .SOLVED. 

It seems that nenmark has solv-'d some of the great plaice 
problems to her very considerable profit. S.ne transplants small 
fish lioin areas where they cannot thrive to districts where fhi-y 
grow rapidly. They are caught in seines and carried aw.iy in 
motor Well-vessels to the favorite feeding grounds: these are the 
Broads nearest the North Sea. Two ounce fi-h reach a pound 
weight within nine months; they are then n^ted and in the fol 
lowing spring the Broad is replenisheti with a fresli young stock. 
In two of the Danish liioads which have been under observaticm 
for twelve years or more an annual e.tpenditure of litile more than 
^300 has yielded a yearly profit of more than /'5.000. The 
D.inish coast cannot rival the famous Dogger Bank. The fish 
that doubles its weight on the Broads of the former will quad- 
ruple its weight on the Dogger in the same time. There a 
summer is sufticient to turn an immature p'aice into something 
that the trawler and his housewife will unite in welcoming. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 24. 



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POLLimON OF INLAND AND COASTAL WATERS. 

Here in Newfoundland, as elsewhere, we are confronted with 
the disastrous results of the pollution of our inland and coastal 
waters. Fotty years aj^o ne.irly all the rivers and ponds of the 
island were teeming with native trout. In the neighborhood of 
Sl John's and all around Conception Bay, excellent fishing 
could be had during the summer months. Now the little saw 
mills here and there, and other sources of pollution, have done 
their work so thoroughly that most of those streams and lakes 
have long since ceased to possess any attraction for the local 
angler. The number of factories emptying waste of all kinds 
into rivers and harbors has grown by leaps and bounds. 
Such constant and growing contamination constitutes a real 
menace to all existing aqueous life. Indeed, an eminent author- 
ity reports that hundreds of seabirds have been found dead 
and dying otT the English coast, their feathers heavy with oil. 
Our own Atlantic coasts could tell the same tale. " I invself."' 
he says, " saw wild duck and geese on the Atlantic Coast in the 
year 1921 stru<jglii'g vainly to rise. Last December, the same 
condition e.visted, and again on April loth of tnis year, on the 
New Jersey Coast at Cape May, when all that was necessary to 
get an oil-soaked wild duck was to rov out a short distance, 
pick as many of the wild foi\l as one desired and pu'l ihem out 
of the oil coated waters where they were held secure." Oil. tar 
and other industrial waste poisons become increasingly deadly 
in proportion to the length of lime they remain in the %vater. 
Ulcers and other skin atllictions are attributed to the irritatmg 
action of petroleum products. Fish have been known to dis- 
appear completely from pools and ponds follnvvini; oil di>-charges 
into the water. " Polluiion," says David Newbtrger. President 
of the National .Anii-Polluii-jn League ( f the United Stjtes, 
" affects fisheries in numerous ways: (1) It w;ll kill tne fish 
outright. (2) It will divert a migration, which is the time fish 
can be caught. (3) It will smother the ynuth hy depriving 
the spawn of o.xygen. (4) It will kill sea plants and other 
minute particles whereon fish subsist. (5) It destroys the 
spawning ground. (6) It kills vegetation in shallow waters. 
That our trout and salmon fishing has been seriously affected 
by industrial waste poisons cannot be disputed, and that legis- 
lative enactment to minimize the evil is urgently necessary 
seems equally obvious to most of us. 

A GOOD TIME ON THE HEART'S CONTENT BARRENS. 

Just to show bow easy it was in days gor.e by to get a basket 
of the finest native trout, let me here relate one of my own 
experiences a fac' years ago. While waiting at the half-way 
house between Carbonear and Heart's Content for the arrival 
of the s.s. Great Eastern with the second Atlantic cable, 1 had, 
perhaps, the best day's fishing in all my experience. We 
arrived at the little hostelry early in the morning of the day be- 
fore, and. after taking some breakfast, started for one of the 
many ponds in the heii;hboihood. where we began to throw our 
lines with much expectation. But, although the "speckled 
beauties" were plentiful enough, and -playing" all over the 
lake, they positively refused to bite ; and so we " toiled " all 
the morning and caught nothing. However, while " reeling 
up " and getting ready to return 10 the house for the night I 
saw a rty on the water something resembing the Mayfiy. 1 
hurried back, got hold of an old grey drake in the poultry y.ird, 
plucked some of its plunviue. applied to the mistress of the 
house for a silken thread and a pair of scissors, got some bees 
wax, pulled out a Limerick hook case, and. scraping some of the 
nap oft an old white c.stor, 1 made two excellent flies —one a 
tail, the other a drop. My fishing rod, which was a very port- 
able one and had been my companion for many yeirs, was stiU 
at band: I put my t:ickle in order and sallied forth, promising 
my impatient companion H) return in an hour. There svas a 
pretty ripple on the water, and a bright and warm sun, occa- 
sionally obscured by passi ig clouds, with the wind at my back. 
On my first throw, to the astonishment of two other fishermen 
who plied their rods a short distance further down the lake, I 
hooked n fine trout and landed him. and continjed to make 
almost every throw of my line a successful one. The other 
anglers looked on nie as a necromancer, most seriously examin- 
ing my tackle and eying my Hies, which they possibly concluded 



were bewitched to attract in such an extraordinary manner the 
finny tribe. Whilst I was hooking fish my travelling companion 
got himself hooked. The landlady's sister, a very pretty young 
lady from Sew Harbor, who was at the inn on a visit, had 
smitten my friend, and, when I returned, long after the pro- 
posed time of our departure, I found, instead of grumbling, he 
was all amiability, in raptures with the place, and lisiening to 
the sweet voices of the sisters as they sang for hiin one of their 
favorite dcets. 

AN INTERVIEW WITH BISHOP FEILD. 

I must not forget to mention that, as I labored along the 
main road, on my way from the lake back to the hotel. U\o car- 
riages pas-ed me. one of which contained the Lord Bishop of 
Newfoundland (Right Kev. Dr. Field). His Lordship accosted 
me and made his driver pull up. " Evidently, you've got some 
good fish" "he said. Would you mind lettuig me see thena?" 
" With pleasure, Vour Lordship," I replied ; and. opening my 
basket, took out the two largest — one nearly two and a half 
pounds, the other three and a q i.irter — and heU them upf.ir his 
inspection. "Oh, nrj !" he exclaimed, 'they're real beautie.s. You 




CLODE RIVER FALLS, BONAVISTA BAY. 

must have had great sport landing them 1'' I told him I h.id. 
and felt inclined to offer him the largest nl the two, but hesitated 
to do .so. it bein:: the first lime I h,id ever spo'<;en in such a 
frank and frieidiv ma' ner ^^Uh a (ml P.i-hop ol the Fstahlished 
Church. .\ little later on I met the Rev. r)r. Mves Hirvey at 
the hotel. He also seemed delig:itL-d with the -ize a::d qua^i^y 
of my fish and subsequently meniioiied the "hole incideni in 
one of his weeklv letters to'lhe .V,i.iliea/ Gazette. Tne spjriing 
men of Harbor Grace in tho.se drys— Ju ge Haywar.i. I)r Djw, 
Samuel Bennett, Wiili,im Squarcy. (iaiher of the present magi- 
strate at Channel), L W. Emerson (Cleik of the Court and 
urnndfather of our biilliant young banister, Mr. L E. Emerson), 
Earle Brown. Robert Walsh and others— used to visit those 
ponds regularlv. and the stories ihey told about :he number 
and size of 'the fish cau-iu by them were rehearsed at 
"Toussaint's" v.ith much interest, and sometimes published in 
the Stamhird newspaper, of which the first-mentioned Mr. 
Squarey was then editor and proprietor. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 25. 

^ The New Speaker. ^ 



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HARRY A. WINTER, ESIJ. 

WE extend our hearty cingratu'ations to Mr. Harry Winter, 
the new .Speaker of the House of Assembly, and wish 
him the fullest success in the political career which has 
opened so auspiciously. It is an encouraging circumstance that 
representatives of the second generation of our public men under 
Responsible Government are attaining recognition, the father of 
the present Speak-er, the l^te Hon. Sir J.imes Winter, K..C.M.G., 
having filled that position from the years 1S7; to iS/g. 
According to the records of the period he ^^on recognition as an 



able and impartial ollicial and gave evidence of the quality 
which afterwards earned for him elevation, first, to the Supreme 
Court Bench, and, later, to the Premiership ot the Country. 
Mr. Harry Winter is. moreover, the first of our Rhodes Scholars 
to obtain election to the Legislature ; though both Houses have 
others among their clerks. The new " First Commoner" is in 
his early thirties. Pursuing his early studies at Bishop Feild 
College in this City he completed his course there and was then 
elected a Rhodes Scholar and proceeded to Oxford, from which 
University he graduated in due time with high honors. Return- 
ing here he read law with his father, and afterwards went into 
partnership w ith his brother, Mr. Alex. Winter. Dissolved 
partnership with his brother in igi6, and edited the Telegram 
in 1916 and 191; ; wa.s partner with Squires & Winter in igiS; 
went to New York in 1919; returning in the summer of 1919/ 
when he entered into partnership with the present Attorney 
General, Hon. W. R. Warren, K.C. In recent years he has 
been associated with some of the biggest cases before the 
Courts and has won signal success, both by his knowledge of 
law and the abilities with which he presents his views. As a 
speaker he is of the most lucid and convincing in the Island, 
with an unusually rich and varied vocabulary and a facility in 
reasoning which few can equal. In the recent Election he con- 
tested Port-de-Grave in the interest of the present Government 
and was highly successful, carrying a small District by a 
majority of 297 votes, and rciurmng it to the Government 
column, as it was on the Opposition side four years ago. 
Reports say that he conducted a clean and clever campaign 
and made an instant and striking popularity with the voters. It 
is. therefore, not surprising that with his varied gifts he should 
be selected to preside over the Assembly, and the tribute paid 
to him on opening day is sufficient to show the esteem in which 
lie is held by otiier sides of the Chamber and the gen,;ral 
recognition of the fact that in him ti.e House has a man -vho can 
be trusted to maintain the di^niiy -ir.d ciedit of the position. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 26. 

^ Commemoration Day, July 1st, 1923. ^ 



"vta^-' ^^^^^^^^^' "••^''" «hich was observed on Suiidav, 
\ih% ^"'y ''*'^' ^^'^^ niarkod by large gatherings as were 
r^J ^ witnessed on previous years. 

;V ^ Kollowing the servires at the City Churches 
^M=^^ili^ thousands gathered in every available space till 
the whole Square, including Garrison Hill. Queen's 
Road, and Cathedral Hill down to Bind Street, was thronoed. 

At nocn the Colour I'arty moved to the allotted position and 
were received with the general salute. The colours were carried 
by Captain Eric Chafe. .M.C.. and Captain J. Snow. 

His E.xcellency the Governor and Ladv Allardyce. Miss 
AUardyce, accompanied by Maj ir Wilberforce-Bell and Captain 
Goodfcllow. arrived iinniedi.itcly afterwards, and were met by 
Capt. A. B. Baird, President, CapL G. J Whitty, M.C., Secre- 
tary and the Executive otticeis of the G W.V.A. His Excellency 
was received with the (Ji-neral Salute. The Hrime -Minisierand 
Lady Squires, and the Nfayor, Hon. Tasker Cook, were also 
present and were escorted to their positions directly in front of 
the monument by the otfici.ils in charge. 



their rioral tribute to the memory of some dear one who sleeps 
amidst ine poppy covered fields in Flanders, on the slopes of 
Gallopli. or in the migiity deep. X very beautiful wreath was 
presented by the French Consul, Monsieur E S. r)e Beauregard. 
in person, while a wreath from the i6th Irish Division, repre- 
.seiited by three of our officers, who served with that famed 
division, was placed by the monument, whose base was literally 
covered with a profusion of wreaths nnd rinal tokens. The 
tirir.g party in charge o( C.M.S , J. Andrews, then fired three 
volleys, the military coming to the " Pre.-ent." After this the two 
minutes reverent silence in honour of our fallen was observed; 
the vast throng remaining in silent med;t.ilion during that time; 
and then in the distance sounded the soul stirring strains of the 
"Last Post." Tnis concluded the lirst part of the ceremony. 

-THE Governor's address. 

His E.xcellency the Governor then delivered the panegyric, a 
platform bfin^ e-p;ci.dly provided, from which His E.xcellency 
in a cle.ir voice spok_- as tollorts: — 



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THE SERGEANTS .MFMORIAI.. 



Then the impressive but simple service commenced, the 
gathered throng leail by pui-.i!s fiom the city schools and the 
church choirs, accomp.ii'ied bv the M. G. Band joining in the 
singing of the gra- d old hymn. "O God Our Help in -Ages 
Past.'' Last year the sin:;ing was the one weakness of the 
service; Sunday to the leadership of Prof. Hutton, it was parti- 
cularly good, and one of the touching; fe itures of the pro- 
gramme. 

At the conclusion of the hvmii the C. L B. Band very beauti 
fully rendered the " Dead March in Saul." Then the wreaths 
were reverently placi-d at the base of the monument. The 
Prime Minister. Sir Kivhird Squires, attended by the Chief Staff 
Officer, Lt.Col. W. I''. K-ndcil, l.iid on the wreath from the 
Government of .N'ewfoundl.ind. Then into the enclosure escorted 
by Capt. Whitty. came Mrs. Frank J.ickman, who as last year 
carried the wreath from the bereaved mothers. Mrs. Jackman 
had two sons make the S'preme Sacri.-ice and it was very 
fitting that one who h.id suffered so grealy should present the 
little token from the mourning inothers of our gallant dead. 
Ne.xt representatives of the Sjcieties and organuations placed 
their wreaths, and the relatives and friends of those wlio tell and 
citizens generally folllowed. This w.is one of the most solemn 
features of the ceremony. Jlere a mother or f.ither came for- 
ward, there a young widow, here a sister, there a child to place 



I feel gre.illy honoured at being askrd to addrcFS you on 
Conin.emnTa'.inn \}.\\-, and lo lit- piiv.leo. d to share with you 
the pride and your heartache. On tl.i^ impressive and solemn 
anr.iversary our thoighls go li;ick to tl'at ever-memorable fourth 
of .August, 1(114. when our dear Mnthe^land wvnt to war for 
what the Pri:ssian Chancellor termed •■ a scrap of paper." But 
tha: so-called "scrap of piper" meant every hii^ to us ; it in- 
volved alike our Honour and our Libeitv. 'tVe had pledged our- 
selves to iii.iintain the neuiralitv of IJe'giv.m. a pledge which the 
Germans, although a party lo tlie same Treatv, wantonly \iolated. 
This was llie reason why (jreat Brii.iin deflired war. Germany 
had cast oil the mask under which she had leii;nt:d and dis- 
sembled for years, and now displaced herself in her true 
colcurs. Decade after decade she had secre;lv inirigutd and 
worked for " Uer Tag " an,1 " Deutschi.ind uber allcs " and 
she now threw down ine gauntlet of militarism and tnaierialisni. 
■fhe news of the declaration of war was immeciately fla-hed 
across the se.is and the Daughter .Nations and ptrples of every 
hue and colour throii.;l;out our vast Empire rec grized that the 
Moiheiiand. notwithstaiidni^ her unpreparedne^s for a coi.tin- 
eina; war, had no altcriaiive liut to accept Gern^any's challenge 
in the cause of humanity, aye, and of Chti-lianity. Does not 
the very thought of her action fill us with pride .ind make the 
pulse of each one of u;. beat faster, and the bleed to tingle as 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 27. 



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it rushes through our veins? Hundreds of thousands of 
Britain's sons, the crenm of her manhood both in the Mother- 
land and in every pan of her world-wide Empire at once volun- 
teered for active >ervice. And here in cur Did and Ancient 
Colony of Ntwfciindland ard its Dependencies, where its 
people are second to none in pride of race and loyally to the 
Monarchy, the clarion cry, •■ tor God, King and Country '' 
echoed and le-echpcd through town, oulport, and hamlrt to 
arms and rallied vrui'd the Flag and donned His Majesty's 
uniform. Their numbers ran into thousands, and thev pro- 
ceeded overseas, and many 

" N'ibly striving*, nobly fell, that we niight live." 
These men, assuredly had faith, faith that in making the 
Supreme Sacritice they were performing the highest duty that is 
given to men to perform, and this f.iith acted as a torch and 
threw across the daik abyss of the unknown valley rays of both 
light and hope. Light to guide them to that re;jion where 
neither sorrow nor disappointment are known having done their 



loved ones have entered into the deathless life of every-increas- 
ing possibilities. This being so it is alike our duty and our 
privilege to maintain in oui every day lives that high standard 
of duty which they set us. By doing this we shall be honour- 
ing in the best wav possible the memory of those who gave 
their all on our account. We must likewise hand down to our 
children and our children's children, as their most precious 
treasure and their most powerful inspiration, that same spirit of 
self-sacrilice which was possessed by all those whose memory 
we commemorate to-day, who, when duty called, fearlessly and 
unhesitatingly obeyed the summons. 

'* Heed not the dropping liai;s nor bugle calls. 
His soul ha-s long passed further than our praise. 
He turned away from all that makes life fond. 
To face, brave heart, the inscrutable Beyond. 
\\\ men within them-.eKes have this de^'vte 
To li^e abiive the glamor of the hour; 
To pledge themselves to sacritical fire. 
And leave to all Htetnity a power. 



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THE SHRINE IX IJAN'NERMAN FARK JULY 1ST, 1919. 



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tJuty, and Hope that the cause for which they had fou-ht and 
voluntarilv ai-d willingly laid do.vn their lives would prevail, 
and that tliey would again see those they so dearly loved. 

Be assured of this, you who are here to-day, and you also 
throughout Newfoundland ard Labrador who gave vour boys 
to the^great fight for ri.;ht, that wheresoever \our dear ones 
peacefullv repose, whether in G.illipoli, or in Flanders tields, 
or at the 'bottom of the deep, they arc not lost. True, they 
may not be with us in the Mesh, but they are nevertheless 
with us. Their i' ducnce cannot die. It 's indestruclible. 
Their heroism and their valor cannot perish, tor they are 
heaven-sent and imperishable. Neither can their example be 
forgotten so long as our English tongue is spoken. \our 



His E.\i:H.l.KXCV SIK Wll I.I.AM L AI.I..\K IIVL E. K.C.M.t;. 



Weep not for such a m:in. 
No darkened sun goes down a^l.int his tomb. 
He rests within the ever-wondetous plan 
That. birth's its virtues from a nation's tomb 
His epitaph is writ where writing cannot he : 
The man who died — the man who'll never die." 



At the conclusion r.f His Excellency's Address the H.rlle- 
lujah Chorus w,is rendered by the C.C C. Band, and the Memo- 
rial Service for 19:3 was over. The War Veterans, Naval Guaid 
and City Brigades reformed, and marched to Gmernment House 
where the Colours were depositetl, after which they returned to 
to their respective Armouries.— y;rw;///i' .l.nn-.it,: 




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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— =8. 



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Introducing 

an old friend in a 
different form 

The last word in slice 
cut plug tobacco -- just 
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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 29. 

The History of Cigarette Smoking and Some Famous Devotees. 

Modern Custom Began With Introduction of American Tobacco Into Europe 
Through Spain, France and England. 

By Dr. Arthur Selwyo- Brown. 




10ARF.TIF. is a French word. It means a little 
cigar. 'J'he modern historj- of cigarette smoking 
begins with the introduction of .\incrican tobacco 
into Europe through spain, France and England. 
The Spaniards have always shown a preference 
for cigars, whereas the Krench like cigarettes. 
The Spaniards smoke, to a large extent, cigarettes wrapped with 
tobacco leaves ; while the French introduced a particular type 
of paper for wrapping cigarettes and have induced a large part 
of the smoking world to prefer paper-wrapped cigarettes. 

The Spaniards found the .-Vnierican Indians smoking tobacco 
wrapped in little tubes when the\ first arrived in their trans- 
Atlantic colonies and quickly adopted the habit themselves. 
These cigarettes they called all-tobacco cig.irettes. 

There can be little doubt that these early European smokers 
of American tobacco soon learned that a paper wr.ipper could 
be used in emergencies. The French, however, owing to the 
more advanced state of their paper-making industries, were the 
first to make a special paper for cigarettes. In the early thirties 
of last century paper-wrapped cigarrettes were sold in the 
European markets. The war in the Crimea led to a great de- 
mand for cigarettes. Soldiers had found their value during 
caiJipaigns and became confirmed cigarette smokers, just as 
those who took the field during the recent wars did. 

CRIMEAN SOLDIERS MADE OWN CIGARETTES 

The British and Russian troops in the Crimean campaigns 
made their own cigarettes from Turkish tobacco and French 
cigarette papers which were manufactured for them and sold in 
little booklets. 

When the ofiicers returned to London or, furlough, they con- 
tinually rolled and smoked cigarettes. This set a smoking 
fashion in England which statistics show has continued to gain 
cumulative favor until to-day wuen immense quantities of 
cigarettes are smoked. 

The British cigarette smoking fashion began to spread in the 
United States about 1865. Earlier, in 1852, a new type of leaf, 
the bright yellow, was successfully grown in Caswell county. 
North Carolina, and when Amcruan cigarette manufacturers 
began putting rolled cigarettes in packages on the inarket. they 
soon learned the value of the new leaf for cigarette making. It 
quickly made them to a large e.vtent independent of Turkish 
and Egyptian le.if. 

The success of the new .American yellow leaf, v.ith its delicate 
texture and fine tiavor, caused such a large demand for ciga- 
rettes in the United States and Canada that inventors turned 
their attention to the perfecting of cigarette-making machinery. 
It was in the early seventies that inventions enabled cigarette 
manufacturers to use autoinatic machinery for the production of 
cigarettes on a large scale. Since then, America has led the 
world in the efficiency and excellency of its cigarette-making 
machines. 

ASSURED AMFI.E TOBACCO SUPPLIKS 

The success of the new Carolina bright tobacco and the fine 
promises attending the cultvation of yellow tobacco in Kentucky. 
\'irginia and Tennessee, as-ured manufacturers of ample tobacco 
crops. Experience has shown that cigarettes requires the rinest 
and purest tobaccos. The smokers of cigarettes secure satisfac- 
tion from the delicate aroma of the fine tob.icco. .Anything 
which hides or destroys the aroma spoils the cigarette. American 
smokers liked the bright Southern leaf and demanded home 
made cigarettes. These developments, coupled ivith the simul- 
taneous improvements made in manufacturing methods ,ind the 
invention of effective cigarette-making m.ichinery and packages, 
gave the United States control of the home markets and enabled 
America to spring to the forefront among cigarette-imoking and 



manfacturing countries, a unique position which is still retained. 
Cigarette-making industries were established in many 
Southern cities where tobacco was marketed in bulk and these 
industries gradually extended along the East Coast, and thence 
into the Middle West. They now embrace the whole country 
as well as Canada. 

Europe, also, continued to develop cigarette manufacturing. 
New brands were continually brought out and advertised. No 
other article of commerce has been more extensively, effectively 
and successfully advertised thart the cigarette. 

From the pioneer days of the industry until the present time, 
cigarette manufacturers have been among the most extensue 
and boldest advertisers. They have found that effective adver- 
tising pays. 

The thing advertised must " speak for itself" if a permanent 
market is to be made for it. Cigarettes ha\e usually done so 
and warranted Charles Lamb's statements in his celebrated 
" Parcwell to Tobacco." which opens with the following stanza: 

" Scent to match thy sweet perfume 

Chetnic art did ne'er presume 

Through her quaint alembic strain. 

None so sov'reign to the rira-.n. 

Nature, that in thee excel 

Framed again no second smell. 

Roses, violets, but toys 
. • For the smaller sort of boys. 

Or for the greener damsels tneant. 

Thou art the only nianiy scent." 

CIGARETTE SMOKINC, MADE RAPID PROGRESS 

In the early Victorian days in England and Scotland, cigar- 
ette smoking made rapid progress. The military ofiicers had 
taught it to the navel men and both land and sea officers intro- 
duced the custom into the city clubs and from the clubs it 
widely spread throughout society. The chronicle of the times 
are full of interesting refences to cigarette smoking. From 
these early times, certain sour-minded people conceived antipa- 
thies to cigar smoking and carried on campaigns against it. But 
by reasons of its great virtues, the cigarette was not injured in 
any way and continued winning the favors of the poor and rich, 
the soldier and sailor, poet, statesman and priest. 

Thackeray, in Fmzer's Ma!;azine, 1S42, sketched smoking 
conditions at that time as follows: 

•• I am not, in the first place, what is called a ladies' man. hav- 
ing contracted an irrepressible habit of smrjking after dinner, 
which has ohi'ged me to give up a greu deal of the dear 
creatures' society ; nor can 1 go much to country houses for the 
same reason. The ladies seem to distrust men who smoke. 
But why should they consider smoking a crime ? I believe 
in my heart that women aie jealous of it. as of a rival. 1 hey 
speaic of it as of some secret, awful vice that seizes upon a 
man. and makes him a pariah from genteel society. I would 
lay a guinea that many a lady who has just been kind enough 
to read the above lines lays down the book, now I have con- 
fessed to smoking, and says, 'Oh. the vulgar wretch '.' and 
passes on 10 something el.se. I veninre to prophesy that this 
• most gratuitous of follies' will be justified by its yirtnes and 
that tobacco smoking will conquer. Look over the wide world, 
ladies, and see that your adversary has overcome it. Germany 
has been puffing .away for over three-score years; Italy and 
Spain spend hours every day in rolling cigarettes; France 
smokes cigarettes to a man. Do you think you can keep such 
an enemy out of England ? Pshaw ; look at his wonderful pro- 
gress. Ask the club houses, rest.iurarts and hotels. Have 
fhev not smoking rooms? Are they not obliged to yield to the 
general want of the age, in spite of the poor old women on the 
committees? I. for my part do not despair to see a bishop 
lollin-' out of the 'Athenaeum ■ club with a little cigarette in 



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PAIR DEVOTEES 



theforegoIn'I?h'!,"„°^|■'''P"'■ '" have Vea'izeH k 

tees of ,he de'.ht , °' "f -'"'>■ ^-"oked and t^^'"'^' ^'^king. 
char„„n. mald^nf ^ "*'=''• J"^' ^^ Queen p^'^ J^^"^^ ''evcv 
In a l.bel „ ""■" '^"^- Eiuabeth and her 



rae (cheers). /„ mv 






In a letter wriiten ,r, -, f 
"I have smoked qll tu^ . l 

°f >- - b. .o ki';:'; o% ?d"„^: -"- '^^^ -'" - -d r be. 

Cel.a F.ennes, who made a hor "I '""'^ '' °"«-- 

*.;;;:£'..;*,:; »"™ .""„r.7„;r;:v„' "»■ 

Still, a few -sour douoh. - V. r. \^ , '^°" "^ '^e bra n - 
s-noke, and: "^=" ^^ I^odsley tells us. rel.sed to 



Lady Nicotine.' Richard" Vl TT"^ '° "e a devotee of • \fT. 

^and took snunf and s.iid rhJ , ■ ""^ smokers. TaJlev 

one might not be re.idv \l-,l! ■ °^'^)'"i: a replv «i,h «hich 
;ng".shed men smoked^n'd in p ' ^•T"' '"'^ "^^-Y other dTs 

;^-shiseveni;'c;;2.t";.7,,:t"° which bit his tongue 
'hat he ecu d cuf a ^,„ ^ iiorninj orison H<. k j 

j;;«- Hugo! BuUver'Sr-T^r^'^""- ^—.Carlisle 
• I> ckens and Thackerav a 1 sm^kS?^'?'. ^''^''°"- J^'"?^lev 
' I fned ag.in-a^d'fai edT n f .^^^^ded smokin-^ ' 
hated tobacco. I could almo t ha e' "'"'' ""''''"'' -- I 
='"y>nst,tution that had foThl k "' "'>• "ame to support 
-okers to death. (Chee rs/ ^'" "'^ ?"«">« of tobilco 



sS^°^':---J;;;^.^odio.st,nk, 

,.^^s,ft,se.embe^.,%t;^-:;;:-;;--;^,,^_^ 

toba;c^f::.'^„;;f'-;.^P^-ise to .nd^ .ne some Bra.i, 

=.^ H-nt:;S t rv^' ^^^ 

^-eneva m .August, /s ,6 .„h^ 'laughters, at an hotei in 

daughter whom'he had n'o::-„"iTaIv\" ,^T'' ''"^ ^^ '^ " 

them. l,,,ing the d.nner the' oun. E ' I l""'','" ^° ^ine with 
If he smoked. The ro,- r . > , "S tngljsh oir asked I;,r-»„ . 

lorn " ^r^ ^ 't--^ '-U- ir^i^;;-^- ^^ -^ ^'°net^?d 
some good ones when we .o un 1 '^ '"'^' "^''^ gi'e you 

«ent up,ta>rs, they «ere Jo.ned b^an '''^"' "■'^^" '^e P" " 
daughter. The daughter i°s 'L. "'^'"^^■"n lady and her 

J"^t as old as her mc!he T ^'"'^ "^ "^^^ ^"^ seeded 

beaut.ful case and the were mfd^o;: ,""" °P^"^<^ '-- ^ 
declared was - strong enough r, f, ^°'''''"" "'"ch Dickens 
^'ckens then said! "° fj'j tl d" "'P*^'^"' '" =''-^- -"i-is " 
'■ghted hers at n.ine ; leanedZ!; ^ f"* "'^' ^'S^^-'te, daughter 
^at,on with me ,• put 'oTS s Sm"c ' o'l ^ii^L^'P""- '" --•- 
her pretty face cocked up s dlwavf and .''' ^" ''"''• ^"^ -''h 
a«-ay hke a Manchester cotton 1^- ,' ft f' ''='^'^"« burring 
smoked in the most oentlem" i, "'^' '"'Sh^<^. talked and 

^'^. ''i^-ewise: i„ , f,,, m,n te 'i;/ "'" ''^>- ^"^ ^^^-g^-'er 
«h,te smoke. Two French '*"^/"°"' "as becloudeauith 
"'ed us to a game of -^Z" T ''"" '"'"'' '"^ P^"y and m 

'" ^h,ch he said • " J'0"don. He made a tine address 

•• ^^^ forty years o. my life tobacco was a dead, poisor to 



.. J f^ ■* CHANGED .M.ix 

^ few years ago, I visited k „ 

-mtoanmn. My in^T^^Z^^'''"'' '''''"'■ '''- 
« «as raining and outside w,V3 ^^' "P "^eir cigarettes 

cigarettes chee.ed my tds 't' T' "'-^^^^'"^- ^"tthe 
hough, ; ought to tr'y one ' I di^r^ 'T'' -, ^appy that I 
°h.). I- rom that moment I becam. V'"' '^^^"^'ou. (oh, 
beheve that smoking in moder.n Changed man. r now 

^ble practice and is'mcs. produ "e of " T'^'"'^'"'^ ^^ '-^ 
harm m a cigarette or p,p^ ?har 'f -°°'^\ ^here is no more 
^rm opinion that tobacco in 1h ^ °^ '"^- ^ am of the 

equalizer of temper and d,sios,In""°" " ' -eetener and 

-f^cJt^;^:-;-:: --depressed ^^ fhis speech 

Colone Robert r rT 
■". smoking a5::!n£. f S;;- J^d of telling of an interest- 
srnok.ng cars of trains. He said that th''"'^ *'"' '^'"' '" 'he 
crusade on in Cleveland. Ohio o e dav wV^^" ^"twobacco 
.■^ medical man from Boston was sne.T- ^" ""^ ^""'^'^ 'here, 
irg in tobacco. Afterwards T-f 'P'^'''"S On [he dangers ^urk- 
of their smoking e.pl^t.T" l7' 't^ ^ 
speak. He said: Ingersoll was nominated to 

CC.RETTE S..VED tN-GERSOLL's L,PE 

est and m;:" ".^^r^:^:: L";^;';^ 'i-^' '- °- °f -he wud- 

been committed by a notorious th^e ' and"'" '' ^"^ ^^"""Z 
v:?.lants were watching for him Itt'. " "mmittee of local 

H'^'htfall, I was ridin. bac'- tnt ^^' ''°'* '°^'^- J"st after 

a white horse. The tiHant h^H '"™'" ''■' """<=■ "^"""ted on 
desperado would pass a^' h,fv::r':"V"J^™^"°" '^at the 
a white horse. == '''-' '°ad that evening, rid-n- 

a^da?L^a°m\%t:'n^t"S,e^\T^'r - — ^aparrak 
me. No time «as wasted on tral it. -'^°' '"°>' '° ^re at 
f^^tirely unconscious at ah do" 'ha, section in those davs. 
my shirt front. I stopped nu h "'°' -"^^ «ere sight,n<r 

c.-^-arette. Thinking^t li^ht r"i/'^"'^' ' ""'"^^ ^"^ i:t 2 
m.rk to shoot ,-. The co L', T *="'' ''''"' =» stili better 
second. Inthat eondtirbtenf'7 "'■'' '""='' ^re for a 
features revealir. the" tee not '^%'^-'^i^ redected on my 

and stepping out"on he oad .hi? '"' '"^" "'^>- ^^-'^d 
fortunate escape ' "''^> congratulated me on mv 

had i?^dtr^:'r^:',Ck^^"-v see that if I hadn. 

The Boston doctor said^^ . ^ , »0"-dn t be here now." 

gcod fortune ,'■• ^. '"> ^'>'^- " and you called that 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 31. 






-( 



•A 



" ' Wasn't It ?' I enquired, smiling at his discomfiture." 
" I don't see it. If it hadn't been for that miserable ci.^ar. 
ette there would have been one lawyer less in the world !' " 

STRONGLY CO.MMESTlED CIOAREITE SMOtClNi:. 

While the early \ictjrians were chierty pipe smokers and 
snuff-takers, the men in later Victorian times smoked the milder 
cigarette. Professor BUckie, the famous Scutch publicist. 
writing to his wife about a lecture he delivered at E:1i[iburgh 
University made the following s.ige remirks: ■' The first thing 
I did on entering the lecture hall was to say — 'what a deligtful 
thing the smell of tobacco is, in a warm roDm on a wet night!' 

Tobacco and similar stimulants have their foundation in 
nature and cannot bi abolished, or rather should not, and 
should be content ^vith a wise regulation. Even pious ladies 
are fond of tea which, taken in excess, is worse for the nerves 
than a glass of sherry." 

Dr. Blackie noticed the students had filled the lecture hall 
with cigarette smoke while awaiting him. Instead of berating 
them, the professor commended their wisdom in prepiring their 
minds by cigarette smoking so that they might retain the ficts 
he wished to bring before them in the lecture. On many other 
occasions Blackie championed smoking. 

Carlyle, a mighty smoker, was presented with a bo.x of 
cigars by Ruskin and in a characteristic letter of thanks for the 
gift he wrot"" : 

" We are such sturf. 
Gone \sith a puft' — 
Then think, and smoke tobacco !" 

He, of course, was a great defender of the happy art of smok- 
ing. It would have been most interesting to have heard him 
singing Richard's " Song to My Cigarette," which runs : 

To my sweet cigarette I am singing 

This joyous and bright bacca-role ; 

Just now to my lips she is clinging. 

Her spirit was soothing my soul 

With figure so slender and dapper 

I feel the soft touch of it yet. 

Adorned in her dainty white wrapper. 

How fair is my own cigarette 1 

'Twere better perhaps, that we part, love ; 

'Twere better if never we'd met. 

Alas, you are part of my heart, love, 

Seductive and sweet cigarette ! 

Though matchless, by matches she's fired, 
And glows both with plea.sure and pride ; 
By her soft balmy breath I'm inspired. 
And kiss and caress my dear bride. 
E'en the clouds that surround her are joyous. 
Though other clouds cause us regret; 
From worry and care they decoy us. 
Fair clouds of a sweet cigarette. 

'Twere better, etc. 
The hours in paradise living 
Dissolve in the hrst love embrace, 
Their life to their love freely giving, — 
And so with :iiy love, 'tis the case ; 
For when her last life spark is flying 
Still sweet to the end is my pet. 
Who helps me, although she is dying, 
To light up a fresh cigarette. 

'Twere better, etc. 

GENIAL AND JOVIAL. 

Carlyle is generally thought of as a stern critic and a taciturn 
character. But such ideas are erroneous. He was a great 
smoker and all such are genial and jovial men. He could h.ave 
sung the above lyric as approvingly as Ella Wheeler Wilcox 
sang her own " Song to a Cigarette," in which he said : 

" Smoke cigarettes, 

Svveetest cot|uettes, 

I'pon the waters blue. 

I love to tioat 

While rocks the boat 

L'pon the waves — Uon't you.' 

To rest the oar 

And drift to shore 

While soft the moonbeams shine, — 

To laugh and joke, 

And idly smoke ; 

I think it quite divine." 

" MAY WOMAN SMOKE?'' 

Fair Wanda von Djnajeu, an Austrian lady, published a book 



in iSSo, entitled, "May Women Smoke?" She then asserted 
women in Europe were fond of cigarette smoking. She speci- 
fied Russia, Poland, 'I'urkey, and Wallachia as countries where 
many women smoke. She remarked : 

" If the ladies of England, Germany, Hungary and partially 
also of France are conventionally prohibited from smoking, 
their sisters in Spain, Russia, Poland. Wallachia, Turkey and 
South America lose not a fraction nf their grace, womanliness, 
soundness of health or admiration of the other sex by smoking 
cigarettes or other forms of tobacco." 

These remarks show that cigarette smoking was widely pre- 
valent in Europe in the " Seventies'' and " Eighties." Not much 
ptiblicity, however, was given to cigarettes. .\ feiv of the 
British newspapers in the " Seventies" published an occasional 
advenisement for cigarettes chietiy Turkish or Egyptian. 

CIGARETTE CLASSED AS HYBRID. 

In his very interesting •• History of Tobacco." published in 
Hartford, Conn., in 1S75, E. R. Billings had little to say about 
cigarettes. They do not appear to have made such a Stirling 
in the world in his day as snuff and cigars, about which h^ 
writes fully. He does, however, give us this information : 
" The smoker of cigarettes is passionately attached to nis little 
roll and regards this method of obtaining the fiavor of Tobacco 
the best. Ttie finest are made in Havana, and vast quintities 
are used by the Cubans and Spaniards. The cigarette is a sort 
of Hvbrid half-pipe half-cigar ; neither one nor the other ; 
neithei the delight of the epicure nor the solace of the true 
tobacco lover. Far be it from us to deny, or even question its 
value, its utility or its charm. We have smoked too many to 
dream of treating them with scorn — cigarettes of Virgina shag, 
strong pungent, luscious; of light and fragrant Persian, inno- 
cuous and soothing; cigarettes rolled by ladies' dainty fingers, 
compressed by elegant French machines of silk and silver, cut, 
stamped and gummed by prosy, matter of fact, and even titanic 

engines in great tobacco factories The Spaniards have 

always been great lovers of their minute rolls, and with them no 
other method of burning tobacco appears so delicate and refined. 
Especially is this true among the ladies, who prefer -Seville 
Cigarettes' to all others. Many smokers make their own cig- 
arettes, sometimes using Havana tobbaco and sometimes making 
them of two or more kinds. An excellent cigarette is made by 
using equal parts ot Virginia and Perique tobacco ; of equal 
parts of Havana Perique. A finely fiavored cigarette is also 
made from Vara and Havana tobacco, equal parts of each being 
used." • 

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MATCHES. 

This author refers to the development of matches. In this 
country, he tell us. negro boys were employed to carry burning 
sticks so that " ' Massa' may fire his cigar or cigarette. I'ravel- 
ling peddlers and others sit by the wayside and patiently woo 
the sun with a -burning glass,' till the tobacco ignites, while 
others, with equal prudence and skill, use the ancient but inimit- 
able tinder-bo.x. But this is the age of fusees. What a name ! 
When, in our youth, those longitudinal strips of tinder, semi- 
divided into innumerable transverse slips all tipped with harm- 
less ignilable matter, first assumed the title, we had little notion 
of the atrocities which would come to be dignified by their name. 
This was soon after the wond had been delighted by the 
Concreves, which drove Lucifer to the world and before English 
and''(;erman ingenuity had taught us to find death in the -box' 
as well as the • pot.' .... ' Fusees-' forsooth 1 More like 
bomb-shells, military mines, torpedoes and nitro-glycerine tmins 
—who has not had them explode in his eye, or his cheek, down 
his neck, scarring his skin, burning holes in his coat and 
trousers, frightening passers-by and doing all manner of deep-dyed 
devilment' Nor is this the worst. Those who will trust then- 
skins and their eyes, and their clothes to ' Vesuvians,' -Flamers' 
and the like are not to be pitied, for they are more cruel to their 
tobacco than the (usees are to them. t)ur grievance is that so 
many engines of destructiveness and offensiveness should be so 
largely patronized by smokers." 

SAFETY MATCH AND MATCH BOXES. 

This complaint of Mr. Billings reminds us that in the 
" Seventies," when he wrote his history, smoking was in a great 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 32. 



period of development. Manufactured cigarettes were bein» 
placed on the niaikcts all over the world. Bull Durham, Sweet 
Caporal. Cameo, \ irjjinia Brights, Old Judge, Liu le Beauties, 
and other cigarettes of .\mericaii manufacture were bringing 
joy to the camel drivers of Af;;hanistau, China, Central Asia, as 
well to the Australian sheep-breeders. The safety match was 
being developed. Experiments were being made to find the 
proper shapes and sizes for match bo.xes. Hand ci"arette 
rollers were being invented. Everything, in fact, con'nected 
with the modern art of cigarette smoking was slowly emerging 
into popularity. 

.MODERN CUSTOM OF CIGARETTE SMOKING. 

Consequently, we may see that while cigarette smoking is as 
old as humanity, the men of prehistoric times having widely in- 
dulged in the habit, the modern custom of cigarette smoking 
arose only at the end of the great \'ictorian era. 

Cigarette smoking is now quite universal. ■• All the world "' 
may be said to indulge in the habit, if we m.iy judge by the 
immense quantities of cigarettes manufactured to*dav. The 
custom is growing and statistics everywhere show an increasing 
tendency. T"he attachment which some smokers form to their 
cigarettes is well shown by current poetry, the following 
'• Invocation " illustrates it : 



When all my plans have come to grief, 

And every bill is due. 
And every faith that's worth belief 

Has proved itself untrue : 
.\nd w hen. as now, I've jilted been 

Dy every girl I've met. 
Ah ! then I flee for peace to thee. 

My darling cigarette. 

Hail, sorceress I whose cloudy spells 

Atx>ut my sense driven. 
Alone can loose their prison cells 

And waft my soul to heaven. 
Above all earthly lo\es, I swear. 

I hold thee best — and yet. 
Would I could see a match for thee. 

My charming cigarette. 

With lips uirstained to thee 1 bring 

A lover's gentle kiss. 
And woo thee, see. with rhi« fair ring. 

And this, and this and this. 
But ah the rings, no sooner cease 

(Inconstant, vain coquette!) 
Than, like the rest, thou vairishest 

In smoke, frail cigarette ! 

The cigarette has conquered the world. It has impressed 
itself upon the history of the times and has became a ponerful 
need in war and peace. 



'■^ The History of the Motion Picture. ^ 



By R. A. Young. 




©J^VJ^^J^^NE of the outstanding romances of modern life has 
^^^ii^^^'^ been the phenomenal development of the motion 
picture business. Within comparatively short 
period of a few years this very popular form of 
amusement has advanced from the e.vperimental 
stage to a plane of perfection. It was only in 
1893 that Iloll.iiid Brothers of Ottawa, Canada, m.ide the first 
practical presentation of motion pictures. Several years passed 
after the initial effort of these pioneer e.xhibitors before any 
advancement of note was inade. 

The films produced in those days were more than double the 
size of the present celluloid strips and many faults could be 
seen in their presentation. Progress came surely though slowly 
and the forerunner of the modern motion picture palace made 
its appearance in the form of what was known as ihe store 
show. In these lirst days of movie entertainment the program 
was not over five hundred feet in length in the big Americ.in 
houses, every detail of the work was indeed very crude. The 
one-piece "Orchestra" rattled off a couple of tunes, which if 
you he.ird it the presr-nt day. would cause you to write many 
letters in the newspapers, .-alternately with the '-Orchestra'' 
the lecturer told of the wonderful facts about motion picture, 
and the one picture was then run off. This picture probably 
consisted ot a passing railway train or a view of horsemen 
galloping r.ipidly down a road. The picture was over in about 
five minutes and the whole performance was concluded in ten 
minutes. 

The usual charge was five cents and the quicker the pro- 
prietor could get patrons into and out of the store the more 
succes-iful he was. There was absolutely no thought for com- 
fort, ventilation and lighting effec'.s which are now so important. 
More than not a small phonograph scraped away on one tune 
out ill front of the store while the proprietor of the show acted 
as spieler, ticket-seller, ticket-taker, machine operator, pianist 
and usher all in one. The store show had its d.iy because a 
few experiences were sufficient. After the novelty of seeing 
the first pictures had passed off. the crude store shore held 
little attractiveness for the discriminating person. The small 
theatre replaced the store show and eventually five-cent admis- 
sion prices were forgotten. Motion picture theatres gradually 
became more pretentious. They have expanded in every direc- 
tion. The one-man show has become an amusement palace in 
which the number of employees frequently reaches the 50 or 100 
mark in the big theatres in .-Vmerica. The orchestra o' the mod- 
ern motion picture theatre is invariably larger than that found in 



the best of high class legitimate theatres, and the music feature 
alone receives a vast amount of attention. The music feature 
in the N'ewfoundland theatre is so little that the patron often- 
times forgets that there is such a thing. The usual program in 
the modern moving picture theatre is entertaining, amusing, 
edifying and thrilling. The silent drama of ten years ago con- 
tained only two forms of entertainment — thrills and slap-stick 
comedy at its worst. Many people are asking if the screen has 
improved in its entertaiment. In reply to this, I say that it 
certainly has. The truth of the situation is that " important 
money" has entered the game. Wall Street is in the movies, 
and with its advent have come greater efficiency and honesty. 
Useless relatives have been pried from their sinecures, and 
graft, if not entirely wiped out. has been reduced to a minimum. 
'■ Love" and ".A-rt" have gradually been .divorced. In short, 
the productio'i end of the motion picture industry is being 
placed on something like a business basis. 

The story end of the motion picture has recently undergone 
a renovation. College men are being taken into the scenario 
and production departments. A better class of men is being 
developed as directors. There is still room for further improve- 
ment, of course. But at least 'he great magnates of the 
industry liave seen the handwriting 01 the wall and h.Hve started 
to clean house. 

As our good friend Prof. Coue would say, "day by day in 
every way, the .Movies are gettin}; better and better." Fhe day 
of the small love story as a moving picture entertainment is 
passed. Now big works are being wrought. The stories now 
going through the mill in California are of the kind that even 
the so-called reformers will appreciate. Douglas F.tirbanks is 
making his new production in pastel shades. This experiment 
with color, if successful, will be widely imitated, tor, since 
" Kobin Hood " has been acclaimed the finest photoplay ever 
made, Fairbanks' reputation has been greatly enh^nced. This 
new picture, by the way, will be a million-dollar production, the 
color part alone adding 5300,000 to its cost. 

.Another big undertikmg now underway in the film colony, is 
the screen version of "Ben Hur'' by the Goldwyn Company. 
It will cost more thin a million and rival in magnitude the 
biggest Griftith or Fairbanks' triumphs. It will make everybody 
forget the day when " Ben Hur" only had oae horse, .-^nd the 
filni version of "The Hunch-Back of Notre Dame," undertaken 
by the Universal Company, will be another serious effort along 
artistic lines. These are certainly great days for the Motion 
Picture — the queen of entertainments. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-33. 

*^ Summer Reminiscences. <^ 



^cg^-^ow, fr.end, be careful ! Of course, we kno.v thar 

/• l%k:^^-|=s»' r\' 'I ''^^'*' >°"' '"^P- ^"' ^" "^«^ s-'me time we 

' l^^l^ ''^"" ^""""^ "^ ""^ wreiched condiiion of 

fl\.M^^ °'Vu a ^"'^ '^^ '"''' '^'' >°" are not driving 

^^_|^^ a Rolls Ro)ce. but rather a near substitute shall 

we call It, you will observe the old tradition i e 

safety tirst^ It is a most peculiar thing, that one of the party 

(three in all), a well known bookkeeper, should a.k the boss 

to stop for just a short wh.le, being keen on observing the very 

excellent lakes ot water that are apparent everywhere for the 

purpose of expl.uning to the party that time is no object, and 

that we will reach our destination long before the allotted time 

Something happens just now and we all feel that we must help 

the Boss to straighten out a serious blow-out. or is it a puncture 

that we have to contend with. However the trouble is soon 

over and we again pursue our journev. We quickly reach Tor's 

Cove, an excellent rendezvous for tired folk, especially amateur 

motorists. Xow the skipper states that we will have a quick 

lunch, which is negotiated promptly. Then the order goes forth 



By W. F. C. 



party havino; reference thereto, but merely to jot down as far as 
my memory can serve me the incidents brought to mind from 
time to time. I well remember one special trip we made early 
in July, probably about the eisht of the month, leaving town 
approxim.itely at midnight, the party consisting of the trio, 
(^ur direction was towards a very favourable fishing resort near 
Cape Broyle. I have decided there is no harm in mentioning the 
different places. Through some reason or other our luck" was 
against us. and ive fared badly with the fish. We decided forth- 
with that we would spend our sp.ire time in exploration work, 
one of the party having a special hobby of mining in an amateur 
way, of cours-. Whilst at this particular work, the boss unex- 
pectedly came across .some very promising samples of ore, 
known geologically as Iron Pyrities. We all felt more or less 
elated, and it was decided forthwith on our return to town to 
have the samp'es analyzed by an official analyst. The result 
of the test showed that the specimens were not of the nature we 
anl'cipated, and in spite of our disappointment the boss was 
prepared to back up his excellent find, as we all termed it 




Minni.E poor., salmonier rivf.k 



that we will try Black Duck Pond at day-break. My, what an 
ordeal, but what happens at 3 a.m. the following day .' Our 
friend says that the matiress is an excellent Ostermoor and is 
loath to leave just at that time, but that he is quite satisfied for 
the others to try their luck at a small pool, just between Tor's 
Cove and Cape Broyle. We reach (he spot after a short cruise 
being joined later by our ■' sleepv friend." The denizens of the 
deep, however, seem to think that there is something radi.jally 
wrong with the bait, and alas and alack the catch is very poor. 
After all, we have been trying to do our best, and although we 
feel that the finny buckoes are watching our movements, 
we are more or less recompensed in our efforts to secure 'he 
delicious Alud Trout which is the eiivj' of every devoted follow- 
er of the late Isaak Walton. The fun is temporarily over, and 
after a while we join up our tackle, and say as with one voice 
'•alls we'l that ends well." This is merely a random sketch of 
a very short excursion which we made in the early part of Ihe 
summer, long before the weather was by any means pleasant for 
motoring, but it is surpring what a happy time can be had 
when you are blessed with good fellowship, and the necessary 
wherewithal to ensure a Irouling adventure which can be had at 
a very slight cost at any of the nearby ponds so well known to 
Ihe sporting fraternity of the city. 

Before proceeding further with my anecdotes of a very 
pleasant summer motoring and fishing at divers places, I think 
it will be seen by the reader that I have not tried to pre- 
serve a continuity, as no diary whatever was kept by any of the 



to the utmost of his financial abili'y. Soon, however, he became 
interested in some other mining veniues elsewhere. «bich 
diverted his attention for the time being, and we felt that our 
researches and hard spent l.ibor were indeed lost, and our 
thoughts of becoming rich beyond the dreams of avarice van- 
ished. 

In my previous notes I had intended to mention the proverbial 
hospitality of Xe'vfouudlandcrs wherever you meet thein, but 
apparently I have neglected that particular dutv. .Vo matter 
where one puts up, whether it is an isolated section of the sea- 
board or elsewhere the same generous treatment is accorded. 
No matter what time one returns after a hard day's tramp in the 
country, the " lady of the house" was alwavs on the job to see 
that we were fully provided with •' the cup that cheers though 
It does not inebfiaie." It is surely a remarkable character isiic 
and 1 suppose time will never change the custom. 

On another occasion we had a most e.vciting adventure. Our 
parly left toim by car about S pin., Ihe skipper deciding to 
drive slowly on account of the excellent weather and lull mo' n. 
It will not be interesting to the reader to know our destination 
on this particular trip. SutTice to say that we duly arri\ed 
about midnight. It was a Saiurday night, and during that dav 
a good many bankers, .American and otherwise, ariived at a 
certain Harbor to replenish their bait. ice. and general fishing 
outfits preparatory to proceeding to the Banks. During the 
night a dance was held in one of the Halls, and excellent head- 
way was being made in Ihe 'I'erpsichorean art by the assembly 



•iiiriiliBiilHiif'rl'lii 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-34. 



SALMD.V KISirrxG. 

present, when some of the visitors, presumablv l>iitchrtien 
(rather stor.iiy pelrcU) s: irt-d to show the native born the right 
way to conduct a d.uice ot ihe kind ih.-n in pro2;ress. The idea 
may have been alright, bu' it was very poorly executed by the 
visitors. «ith the result that the dance was soon forgotten, and • 
a rumpus was inevitable. It was a very laughable sight to see 
the I)utchiiien being chased lo th^ir ships by the boys of the 
vill.\ne. Fortunately no damage occurred, but it is a historical 
fact that although the Binkers were delayed a few days beyond 
their allotted tini?, the crews did not make any furiher incur- 
sions at the dances, or ii the homes of the village in question. 
Shortly aUer the trip ju^t referred to, we h.id the pleasure of 
pirticipating in the best adventure of the season. I refer to 
Salmon Fishing on tlie .Salmonier River. Tne p.irly consisted 
of four, one being the owner of an excellent hostelry, well known 
to thousands on tne Topsail R lad. We left town at noon on a 
Saiurd.ny. with all the trappings necessiry for such an e.'cpedition. 
We decided to stay for tlie night at th-t H >tcl. and after a splen- 
did ivight's rest, and light refreshments in the early inorninig, 
we continued our journey. Vassing through the different vil- 
lages on the Holyrood Line on a beau i'ul day. splendid lakes 
and windin;^ rivers are everywhere to be seen. The re.ider, I 
think, will undcr-,tand how necessarv it w,is to stop, in spite of 
our Pfohihiticin Laws, and indu'ge in hr cold spring water all 
along the linr-, nii.xe.l with a little Giape fuice, and ( ).'-.inge 
Crush with which we were so lienerously provideif. Our 
direction for the mome it wis th.; H dfWay House on Ihe 
Holyrood Line, well known to the tourist, where »e duly arrived. 
We stayed there f>r tlie night, and bright and early the ne.xt 
morning we s:arttd for Mur|)hy's Pool. I might say thitthe 
going was not altogether [jleisant, the journey being liresome, 
as we had t) tramp through at le.i^t thiee or fnur miles of bog. 
low bushes, and marshes. The path was e.xceedingly difficult 
to negoti.ite. and we were mighty glad when we ul'iiiately 
reached the River. The time, 1 should reckon, was just about 
mid-day. W'e unstrapp.d our packs and (i-.hiiig apparatus and 
had dinner, and it was '-some" dinner, the guide being an 
excellent cook, and it g les without saying that we did ju-tic.r 
to the meal provided. Before descrioiiig our luck at the Pool, 
one word about ihe shrck "ill not be amiss. I understand it is 
owned by a well kno.vn Lawyer in tonn, and b. sides cont. i ing 
sleeping cpiarters, and kitchen, (here is a Smoke Houseatlached. 
The property is prac ically new. and is ceitaiidy a credit to tlie 
owner, to whom I tender th.inks on behtlfof the party and self 
for Use and occupancy. 

To cirry on with tnv story. I'he appe ile of the boss appa - 
tntly was not as keen as those of Ihe rest of us, because in a 
short lime he w.is wipping the pool, which was directly oppo.s- 
ite the shack, less than thirty feet aw.iy. He w.is excitdingly 
lucky, and in an incredit.ibly short time l.inded h.ilf a dozen 
nice salmon. I understand that we were the first parly on the 
river lor the vear. although some friends of ours were lishing at 



the same time further down at Pinsent's Falls. We began to 
realize that we were in for an exceptionally interesting trip, but 
our anticipations were not altogether realized, and we were 
doomed to a certain amount of disappointment. .A.s the after- 
noon wore on, we noticed a party coming down the main path. 
He turned out to be a very prominent merchant of St. John's, 
who, wirh his niece and guide came to spend a few d.iys fishing 
at the Pool which we were using. K.nowing that the accommc- 
dation was not sufficient for both parties, we reluctantly decided 
to get our fishing apparatus together as soon as possible and 
start for home, and the journey back was just as tedious as the 
previous one, and were all glad to get back to the Half-SVay 
House one again, .\fter refreshiig the inner man. a move was 
made for Hicks', which 1 ui derstand is the last house on the 
Line. 

To any motori>t conlempl.iting a trip in the direction I 
have outlined above, 1 ccrtainlv would recommend a vi^it lo 
that well known, residence, and there ineet tiie owner and his . 
very amiable wife, ft is a trip not sonn forgotten as the excel- 
lent accommo^ation, food and other facilities tor the tired worker 
cannot be excelled in any part of ihe Islind. One reads of the 
open spices of ihe Canadian North VVe->t. the journey by train 
through the Rocky Mountains, and a trip through Colorado, 
taking in the Oand Canyon, With all due respect lo thcrse 
ttonderiul spots provided by nature. I conte'-d that the scenery, 
wholesome .surroundings, and excellent pleasure always to be 
had in our own country cannot be surp.issed an) where. In the 
vicini y'of Hicks', one obtains a splendid birdscye vie.v of the 
surrounding country. Splendid green p.istures' are there whilst 
on either side of the road are to be found tne wonderful spruce, 
birch and fir trees, rising up majesiicilly, one would think as 
hi;ih as the Heavens. It is really a sight to behold. I wonder 
will it be possible in our time to have our country properly ad- 
vertised and known. 

In this co:ineciion I maintain that we .should have a national 
highway, with modern hotels dotted all along the line, from St. 
John's to Port aux Basques and elsewhere, so that Newfound- 
land will be in spirit and in truin a haven of refuge for the tired 
millionaire and pleasure seeker. I have been diverting just 
a little from my pet topic, but I really think the time will come. 
if we hope to compete with other countries, in olTering attrac- 
tions to the visitor to our shores, an attraction that must be pei- 
manent in its kind, sufficiently so to prompt him lo come the 
srcond time and thereby help to demand and m lintain the po5> 
lion in the sun. as it were, which is nghily ours. I have often 
contemplated in my o vn mind, a motor trip to the Humber 
area, over our national h'ghway, with lio'el accommodation as 
aheady outlined, and don't you tiii'ik. Mr. Efitor, thit the time 
will cume sooner or lat>-r. p::ihips uiforiunately liter, when the 
abjve picture scene will b-^ a,i acco uplished fact.' Grand Falls 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 35. 



. a uonderful reality, but this City will be only one of many of 
lU k.nd let us hope, when the dormant waLr po^erTof the 
Humber and ,ts >r,butar,es, w,ll be harnessed for the General 
welfare of our great .-o.ntry. I find i, rather dimJtCi 
up sol,loqu,z,ng but I n,ust get back >o mv main topic We 
are all loath to leave the Hicks' b.au.iful hou.estead. and farm 
for ,t really constitute both. The drive ho.ne was verv pl-asan" 
.ndted, and con„ng on tow.uds ni.lufall. wi-h no traffic "to im- 
pede our progress and ,n the wond-rful silence of the forests 
we he,.rd nothing but the hu.n of the eng.ne. Hardly a word 
came from the occupants uf the car except an occasional joke 

rom the one and only comedian of the partv. and his sin^inaof 
the "Little Japanese.- rhe surrounding m'ade us all wonde7 at 
the beau'ies of nature, and the pleasant associations we had en- 
joyed s, ce leaving the Capital a few days before. We arrived 
home saftly the party having secured at least seventeen 
salmon but I must confess that si.vteen were caught bv the boss 
himself, as he wis fully equipped for hardl;ng big fi.h. and was 
indeed a past master in the art of Isaak Walton. On another 
occivion I remrmber making a trip to Tor's Cove Oi tlie 
following day some of the p,rty deci led to take a trip in the 
car up the shore and those of us who staved behind were sur- 



'iUifi^. 









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know whether it is a sculpon or whale, but with the help of the 
lantern and gait, your capture is generallv negotiated. A friend 
of mine, an .\merican, who was once with us on such an occasion, 
told us that It reminded him of fishing for •' tuna" in deep water" 
olf the .Vmerican coast near Florida, but that the fun was even 
more thrilling. I have seen as many as twenty-rive of the<e 
salt water trout taken between lo p.m. and 3 a.m. weigh- 
ing considerably over ,00 lbs., the largest tipping the scafes 
at 24 lb,. .Vfter having all the fun that we desired, our parry 
decided to take in the Garden Party just referred to by me. 
This necessitated a trip of at least one hours journey. 
However to make a long story short. I can safelv say that it 
was one of the most interesting parties that I ever attended. 
People from all parts of the country seem to have foregathered, 
and of course the village coon with his proverbial concertina 
was there in all his pomp and glorv. Talking about the 
Burmudas, the Bahamas and St. Pierre. «hv, they were dry 
territories compared with this particular section. ' One could 
buy anything from a keg of hop beer to a case of champigne 
at practically cost prices, mind you. In the evening a dance 
was held in the hall. T.ilking about dancing, one could have 
as a partner anything between nine and rii:ie-y. and it would not 



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LANDING A niO TROUT. 



AN O'JTPORT C.ARI'KN HARTV. 



p:ised to know of the luck th.-.t hrd at ended tie .skippr. 
He came back from the jaunt •• log loaded." (I mean of course 
the car was loaded to the hilche-j with the finest specimen of 
smuggled wares it wis my lot to lo >k upon. Now I don't 
want the re ider t.> i n igine fir a moment that we were not 
within the law. I just merely mention this item in passing. 
The good Lady of iht house w,is as'cni-<hed to find that it was 
possible to negotiate s ich an c.xceli;nt cargo, consi-ting as 't 
did of dry salted cd. the proveibial baskets of native trout, 
two or three ga.lons of berrie-, and other niiscellancous items 
that I would not caie to put i.i piint. 

^n writing of siiiiiiiier hulid:ns, one must nf necessity touch 
upon Garden Parties, wl ich are so generou.-lv .attended bv the 
young and old. both se.Nc^. in all pnrts of the Island, both on 
holid.ns and Si.nda\s. I well remember one in particular, 
which was advrrtistd far and wide to lake place on a certain 
Sunday. It was my gord fortune to be one of the party on the 
occasion referred t". The joy riders, if I remember righilv, 
consisted of the bo.-s, a nell-krown cashier (who is also an all- 
round sport), and ti.e wiiter. We left town on Satuiday right. 
just about seven p.m. f..r -Seal Cove to spend the midnight hours 
fishing in the Atlantic Ocean for the Sea Tn ut which were re- 
ported to be in lari;c numbers aiouid tlie Ge;t. Night fi-hii'g 
to most of us. while not alicgelhtr eniicii g. creates exctllent 
sport all the same. When your tackle is a I ready, three are 
allowtd in the boat, 01. e taking care of tI.e binttrn and ro«irg, 
whilst the others takes turns casting, but the fun really .'tarts 
when one is Iccky eiu ligh to "hook" a »lio(>per, ^'rni don't 



be possible to kno.v the diflference brtween youth and old a<re 
due no doubt to the facinatin; and clever v. ay the gent'e st.-c 
were able to make up. Both my friends were in attendance 
at the dance. For myself 1 must co:.fcss I decided that di-.cre- 
ti m was the be;ter part of v.i'our and remained in the car until 
the wee small hours of the mjrnipg when the dancers tinally 
di~p>-rsed. 

Coming back our Bo.ss, who up t) that time was most con- 
spicuous by his hilarity grew somewhat morose, and whilst in 
thit humour drove the car like the mill t-i'es of h — in otder to 
get bick to Seal Cove in time for brtakfajt. The night, or 
rather the early morning, wis e.xcctdins'y fog:iy, and in en- 
deavouring to negotiate the short cu:s. he temporarily lost his 
way. This fact seemed to increase his wrath all the more, and 
tended to make the jnumey not only embarrassing to the other 
occupants of the car. but aUo those who were paientlv waning 
for our return at Seal Cove. However we spied in the dist.ince 
an isolated home where we stopped, and after making erquries 
from the Dwner as to our Long, and Lar. we were politeiv in- 
formed that we were half way to Bell Island, reckonin;; of 
course on the vast amcunt of "ater necessary to plough through 
if we had continued on our course. 

I think. .Mr. Fditor, ihat I h.ivetnken up much more space in 
your v,iUi:ible jmiinal than yon mi;;ht care to allow me, and with 
your permission I will bid your readers adieu in the hope that 
in the near future you will allow me .space lo continue my ran;- 
blirg notes and recollections of some very pleasant nmior aid 
fishing trijis spert during the past scnimer. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 36. 



^ Old English Songs and Music. ^ 



By Dr. Arthur Selwyn-Browo. 




The isle is full of noise«, 

Sounds and sueet aire, that vtive deliglit and hurt not, 

Someiimes a thousand tnaiigling instruments 

Will hum alKjut mine ears ; and sometimes voices 

That if I then had waked after long sleep, 

Will make nie sleep again, and then in dreaming 

The clouds niethoiight would opeu and show riches 

Ready to di.ip on me, and when 1 waken 

I cried to dream again. 

— Shakespeare, Tempest, III. ii, 147. 

I HF. people of Englantl have always been fond of 
singino. Foreis;ners, since the remotest times, 
have referred to the pleasure they experienced in 
the merry land of England, with its nice homes, 
lovely gardens and beautiful songs. In recent 
times, peoples who have never been called merry, 
but have produced operas which have liad wide pcipularity. have 
claimed greater musical ability than the Kngljsh. Their noisy 
claims have created false impressions, and to-day few recognize 
that true melody flows most naturally, as it has always done, in 
England. 

Let Us recall a few of the older English songs which have 
charmed many distinguished musicians and have been heartily 
sung by many generations. Ard here let us say that if if is 
true, as many authorities contend, that when a song has com- 
manded and obtained the respectful attention of all classes of 
people for several generations, whatever be its technical, melodic, 
or literary merit, it must be accepfed as a classic, then England 
is very rich in musical classics. The number of charming old 
English melodies which are available for a goad singer is 
enoimous. 

We may remember a few which we have heard at different 
times. One of the oldest of English ballads is the well-known 
" Summer has Come." written in 1240. The words of the lyric 
breathe the merry spirit which underlies most popular English 
songs ; 

Summer has come in. 

Sing .Sweet Cuckoo ! 

Ripens the seed and blows the mead 

And sprouts the greenwood now. 

Sing on Cuckoo. 

Kwes bleat and call the laml>s. 
J.oweth after calf the cow ; 
huUock bellows, bucks verteth. 
Merrily Sing Cuckoo '. 
Cnckoo, Cuckoo ! 
Well singest thou cuckoo. 
Nor cease thou never now. 

Is it not a singular thing that this old .song tell us that its 
author was charmed with the melody of the cuckoo, or English 
song of his day, which he fotind delightfully merry, and hoped 
would never stop being sung ? 

Well singest thou. Cuckoo, 
Nor cease thou never, now. 
What prophetic words these were ! Here in this first melodic 
outburst in the prelude of English melody we find the writer 
unerringly pointing to the national characteristics of English 
music — merry and charming sentiments embellished by mellow 
melodies .' 

The Battle of .Agincourt of Henry \'.'s day is another fine 
song that has charmed many generations of Englishman. 

King Henry \III. was an accomplished musician and wrote 
many popular .songs. His song entitled " Pastime with (Jood 
Company." or the " King's Ballad" made a great popular appeal 
"Now Robin Lend Me Thy Bow"" is another fine song whicl 
has come down to us from Henry VHL time. 

Anne B)leyn's pathetic lament, ■■ Death, Rock Me to 
Sleep." which she wrote while in gaol waiting for her execution, 
when sung to-day makes an appeal as strong as in the time when 
it was written. The words of this song, as in most important 
English songs, are as fine as the melody. 
The distinguished author wrote : 



al. 
ich 



Death, O Death, rock me asleep. 
Bring me to cjuiet rest. 

Let pass my weary guiltless ghost. 

Out of my woeful breast. 

Toll on the pas.sing bell, 

King on the doleful knell. 

Let the sound my death tell. 

For I must die. 

There is no remedy. 

Ah now t die, I die, I die. 

Alone, in prison strong, 

1 waile my destiny. 

Woe worth this cruel hap that I 
Should taste this misery. 
Toll on the passing bell. 

Farewell my pleasures past. 
Welcome my present pain, 
1 feel my torments so increase. 
That life cannot remain. 
Cease now the passing bell. 
Rung is my doleful knell. 
For the sound my death doth tell. 
Death doth draw night. 
Sound my end dolefully. 
For now I die. 

This song, as well as many others of its period, finely demon 
strates how music is able to reconstruct the past. The whole 
atmosphere of its time is re-cast when this great work of art is 
properly sung with an accompaniment of lute, mandolin or other 
suitable instrument. Its effect, of course, is largely lost when 
the accompaniment is played with a pi.ino or organ, because 
these mechanical instruments are too heavy for such dainty- 
works as the classical English songs. Only delicate instruments 
like lutes, mandolins, harps, virginals, spinets, harpsichords, 
violas, flutes or similar light instruments are sttitable. A good 
guitar would be a better substitute than a piano lightly struck. 
It is also important to bear in mind that the words of English 
songs must be carefully pronounced and intelligently phrased, 
because the melodies were composed, not to hide these, but 
simply to embelish them. 

"My Little Pretty One," a dainty song composed in 1550 is 
still fresh and delightful, althotigh it is rarely sung now. 

When we enter the spacious times of Queen Elizabeth, a vast 
array of lovel\- songs are heard. Many think that was the 
golden age. not only of English poetry, but of English song too. 

The whole world acknowledg'S the pre-eminence of England 
in literature in the times of Spencer and Shakespare. She was 
just as great in music in those times. From the days of John 
Dunstable, in 1400; Lambe, .\ston and Ludford in 1472; 
Tavenor, Redford, Tye, Tallys, Shepherd, Merbecke, and B\rd 
in 1490-1542; OowUnd, Bull. Farnaby, Wilbye, Gibbons, Byrd, 
Lawes, Campion, Hvimphrey, Blow and a host of others, brilliant 
English musici.ins have composed not only v.ist quantities of 
beautiful son^s, madrig.ils, cho uses, anthems and other vocal 
forms, but every type of instrumental music. Few countries can 
complete with England in the quantity and quality of its cham- 
ber music. But most of this has been forgotien, or has never 
been printed, and because Burney and Haw kins in their cele- 
brated musical dictionaries belittled English music, and the 
compilers of musical te.\t books, using the work of Burney, 
chiefly for their facts, have led the world, even the English 
speaking world, to forget the great richness of England in n.itive 
music. Few English-speaking people today even recognize the 
fact that when the Italian and French were trying to develop an 
operatic form, p^nglish composers had already developed the 
form used by composers to-day. The operas of Purcell and his 
contemporaiics are as modern in their fotms as those of Puccini 
and Gounod. 

If we could carry ourselves back in time and visit one of the 
Palaces of (lueen Elizabeth when she was entertaining Kalei:;h, 
or some other celebrated adventurer, and heard the court musi- 
cians play the compositions of Dunstable, Wilbye, .Motley, 
Weelkes. Tomkins, Baleson and others, we would e.vperience 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-37. 



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pleasures unobtainable from the music of p->st-W.,gnerian times 
V\e are unfortunately living in an age of artistic decadence when 
banal music is bein- turned out and there are few artists left 
who are competent lo interpret good music. This is particularly 
true of sinL;ers. There are few competent singing teachers and 
there are few studt-nts who will put their souls into sympathetic 
attunement with studv. The greatest teacher of singin- in Italy 
recently I ment^d th:^ dearth of singers in an addressln Turin 
in which he said: "Our grand Oprra houses— where sin-in- 
- comes to us highest expressioi— are compelled to seek t'hei^r 
rep.-rtoires almost entirely in the works of past geneiaiions 
because our presi-nt day composers do not produce anvthin- 
endowed with sufficient promise of life. But the operas of past 
generations are interpreted in such a horrible way in the world's 
leading opera houses thu the public loses every artistic interest 
in them, and considers Grand Opera, not as a source of artistic 
emotions, but as an opportunity to spend an evening in a 
pleasant way, and thus degrade it to the level of the modern 
spectacular performances which openly have no other aim but 
to entertain. In this fact lies the very serious crisi-; — not only 
artistic but also economic — which grand opera is undeigr.ing at 
the present time. 

"There would be a possibility of an attraciion, if Grand Opera 
brought before the public beautiful and artistic voices; in other- 
words, given the absence of a purely artistic mission, it would 
become an exhibition of excepiionally fi. e singing But excep- 
tionally tine voices b.-come rarer and rarer ; the physical de- 
gent ration of our race, the conseqnenct s of the war, the activities 
of the Jews in music and music publishing, (he wholesale, 
slaughte ing of good voices whicfi goes on in our singing schools, 
the general condiiion of musical ait— all this co-oper.ifes in sup- 
pressing really fine voices, or at best in reducing the duration of 
their existence in such a degree th.)t after their short life it is 
impossible to find substitutes. 

"Never has the number of students of singing, singers and 
teachers of singing been greater than to-d ly : and neier h^s it 
been more difficult to find a singer, or a le.icher of singing, to 
whom the term 'satisfactory' could be applied in justice. And 
where is the present day composer who can really write for the 
voici? And what real musician is teaching singing?" 

Professor Silva was addres-ing a European coi gress of musi- 
cians when he drew ailention to the sc.ircity of singers ai d sing- 
ing teachers. He is interested in the grandest of all musical 
instiuments — the human voice. He said nothing abt u: the 
musical instruments of to-day. The piano and violin, because 
they are so easy to learn to play, are in general use. They are 
useful instruments but are not very musical. The piano, parti- 
cularly, is quite unsuited to accompanying the voice. Everyone 
knows that singing lo the piano is a more fiuitful source of 
voice failure than the exercises of all the poor singing teachers 
in the world. 

The violin blends with the voice better than the metallic piano 
strings, but it is a waywaid instrument subject to climatic and 
atmosheric variation in tonality and for that reason, among 
others, is a dangerous instrument to use with a good voice. 

The piano, violin, and phonograph lower musical tastes and 
these have lately been important factors in cau.-jing the rapid 
decline in musical appreciation. This decline is intensified by 
the poor orchestras in the theaters and picture houses and by 
the objectionable jazz and futuristic music which is flooding the 
world. 

When we go to seek relief in the beautiful music which gave 
England the proud title of " Merry England" or " Singing Eng- 
land," we find no suitable singers, no instruments and no printed 
music. Purcell's best compositions have not yet been printed. 
A recent festival was given in Westminster .Aliiijey to the me 
mory of Or. John Wow, when it was announced that over a 
hundred of his choruses and anthems are still awaiting a 
publisher ! 

The best way to get an insight into old English music is to get 
a lute, mandolin or guitar and a book of songs such as those in 
francis Pilkington's collection, issued in 1605. and re-issued in 
London in 1897, by G. E. P. Arkwright, or the collection of 
Elizabethan love songs edited, in 1909-, by Frederick Keel. 
Pilkin-ton's book has accompaniments for lute or viol di 



gainba. Keel's book has the .songs with piano accompaniment. 
It is therefore an easy matter for a lute or mandolin player or 
guitarist to accompany a singer from either of ihese, or the 
other available works. 

It is possible for any sincere studert of music to sing, with 
suitable accompaniment. Morley's Sweet N)mph, Come to thy 
Lover; Pilkingion's, Diamphenia; Ford's. Come Phillis: 
Campion's, Shall I Come Sweet Love to Thee, and a thousand 
similar songs. 

The lute was the best of the English accompanying inslrii- 
ments. It is a pear-shaped instrument which resembles a man- 
dolin, although it is much larger and lunclji. Its technique is a 
similar to the guitar while its tonal quality is something like that 
of a harpsichord, although of less volun"e. A new American 
instrument would make a good substitute forlha lure in accom- 
panying melodious songs like those of Tudor England. It is 
known as the mandolin banjo, being a bar.jo with a mandolin 
fingerboard. 

-Any student who goes to the trouble of fitting himself to in- 
terpret old English songs will learn many exraordinary mu-iral 
facts. He will learn, for instance, as Mr. Edmund Eeilowes, an 
authority on such music has recently shown that : • Uowland 
ranks among the greatest song-writers of a'.l time. He had a 
wonderful sense of beauty in melody, and of verbal phrasing and 
accentuation. He carried the development of song-torm to a 
very advanced point and was among the first of composeis to 
treat solo-song, as an art form in contrast to fjlk-song. which is 
essentially a thing of spontaneous origin. .Among the songs of 
Oowland's s'mp.'er manner, nothing cou'd be more beautiful 
than ' Rest you. Swett Love," and " Sleep. Wayward Thoughts." 
His pre-eminence is displayed in songs l!':;e '-Come, Hf'avy 
Sleep," " Weep you no more. Sad Fountain s.' and the exceed- 
ingly, lovely " From Silent .N'ight." Tre Engli.sh composers 
Dowland, Weelkes, Farnaby and others were great innovaters 
in the harmonic siructure of the inusic forms of their tunes." 

When a number of beautiful songs have been sung and some 
of the instrumental music has been pl.iyed. the studert can then 
in imagination visit a musical festival in England in Elizabeths 
time and enjoy a banquet of sweet sounds — iuch as cannot be 
found on earth to day. 

The music of the period of the lutenisis in England, the 
student tt ill discover, is, in the words of a recent writer : 

" Music of freshness and beauty, of exquisite workmanship, of 
the most authentically national idiom, and of a wide range of 
mood, deinanJing no more for its perfonn.^nce than intelligence 
musical kno.vledge, a trained voice and suitable accompanying 
instrument. These songs are so lovely as to be prcoi ag.iinst 
the tarnishing of familiarity as against the moths and rust of 
three centuries of neglect." 

The songs of Tudor times rank among tae fines', made in 
England, but there have been many other r;ch harvest periods 
in the history of English music. The musicfl gardens, of the 
17th and early iSth centuries were the nurse.'ies of many beauti- 
ful songs as well as of great singer-^. Vauxha'l. Ranelagh. 
Spring and Cremorne gardens Mirylehor.e. Sadler's Wells, 
Cuper's and the Grotto Gardens did much for English music. 
Songs like Michael Arne's Lass With a Delicate .\ir first were 
sung at N'auxhall. or one of the other concert i;ardens in London. 
Many Englishmen, and a few women, have been urged to sing 
as freely as the birds of England. What was the compelling 
force? There can belittle doubt that good health, me'odious 
souls and cheerful surroundings led them to express themselves 
jii beautiful melodious songs, just as it does the birds. 

" Who taught tht English blackbird to sinp in mimical intervals which 
we can reproduce throiiph our man-made uiusxal n. ■station .'" asks 
.\iexander Hrent Sniilli in the Music-il Times. July 1 j-2, and he answers 
this quesuon himseil as folK'WS :— " Is tliere in the Ccpth- .f Nature some 
quiding principle of sound which birds by chance mav slumole on in song.- 
"Personally. I like that view and I hazard an opinicn that though our e.\- 
perimentalisrs who live in the clangour of sireels may astonish their fnends 
with sophisticated intervals of liieir own devis.ng. vet frr rrankind who 
live in find's own fields, the music that will be their b appiness and corsoia- 
tion will lie within those wonl out intervals whicl: rirj as fiesh and br.iuli- 
ful among English trees to-day as they did when God nrst taught the 
blackbird, the cuckoo, the thrush and the nightinga e to smg, their native 
tunes in Paradise." 



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I Cable Address I " Crosble," S(. John's. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— m 



,i«. 1^.. ,,..,,, vr, 11,.,,, I,, Mr, II,,, 1,1,., ,.,,.. ,,,,,,,,, ...«»»«►,,.,.,, 

Codes Used i A.B.C. SIh Edition. 



Newfoundland Produce Company, Ltd. 

I C. CROSBIE, Manager. 



BUYERS AND EXPORTERS OF 



Codfish, Oil, and all other Newfoundland Products of the Sea. 

Agents for Fire and Marine Insurance, 

AND 

Importers of North Sydney Coal. 



71 iri I 1 1 I I I I- ( r I I' r U * ri i • i i t i 



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> I I I I I I I I I I I t' ■ I I t * • I I I I I • I ■ ■ I 




oalbQnc Notnce 

As a number of Newfoundlanders, proceeding to the United States of America, "have recently been 
stopped at Vanceboro, on the American Border, and sent back to Newfoundland, being thereby subjected 
to inconvenience and expense, the following extract from the United States Immigration Laws is publish- 
ed for general information — 

" That the following classes of aliens shall be excluded from admission into the United 
States: All idiots, imbeciles, feeble-minded persons, epileptics, insane persons; persons who 
have had one or more attacks of insanity at any time previously ; persons of constitutional 
psychopathic inferioritv ; persons with chronic alcoholism; paupers; professional beggars; 
vagrants ; persons afflicted with tuberculosis in any form or with a loathsome or dangerous 
contagions disease ; persons not comprehended within any of the foregoing excluded classes 
who are found to be and are certified by the examining surgeon as being mentally or physically 
defective, such physical defect being of a nature which may affect the ability of such alien to 
earn a living; persons who have been convicted of or admit having committed a felony or other 
crime or misdemeanor involving moral turpiture ;***** persons hereinafter called contract 
laborers, who have been induced, assisted, encouraged, or solicited to migrate to this country by 
offers or promises of employment, whether such offers or promises are true or false, or in conse- 
quence of agreements, oral, written or printed, express or implied, to perform labor in this 
country of any kind, skilled, or unskilled ; persons who have come in consequence of advertise- 
ments for laborers printed, published, or distributed in a foreign country; persons likely to 
become a public charge ; persons who have been deported under any of the provisions of this 
Act, and who mav seek admission again within one year from the date of such deportation, 
unless prior to their re-embarkation at a foreign port or their attempt to be admitted from 
foreign contiguous territory the Secretary of Labour shall have consented to their re-applying 
for admission ; persons whose ticket or' passage is paid for with the money of another, or who 
are assisted by others to come, unless it is affirmatively and satisfactorily shown that such 
persons do no't belong to one of the foregoing excluded classes; persons whose ticket or passage 
is paid for by anv corporation, association, society, municipality or foreign Government, either 
directlv or i'ndirectly ; stowaways, except that any such stowaway, if otherwise admissable, may 
be adnntted in the discretion of the Secretary of Labor. ********" 

In view of the above, Newfoundlanders who may contemplate proceeding to the United States should 
first satisfy themselves that they do not fall within any of the classes of Immigrants therein specified. 

/ARTHUR MEWS, Deputy Colonial Secretary. 
Department of the Colonial Secretary, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, June ist, 1923. 



When writing to Ad^-ertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



Mi i Miii. ^ mm\f. ' 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 40. 



eid f^iewfoondland Company, Ltd. 



*7^ 



Proprietors of the Dry Dock, St, John's, Newfoundland ^ 

One of the best equipped Dry Docks in America. Steamships docked and repaired 
at the lowest rates. Well equipped and thoroughly fitted with all modern appliances 
for temporary or permanent repairs. Length of Dock, 610 feet. Depth of Water, 25 feet 

Proprietors and Operators of the St, John's Electric 
«^ Street Railway, «^ 

All the Electric power supplied in St. John's is generated on this system. City 
Lighting and Power for Factories, etc., supplied at moderate rates. Those requiring 
Electric Power for any purpose should consult tl^e undersigned. 

Owners of Ten Clyde -Built Steamships 

Royal Mail Steamers operating on Bays and Coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador. 






Lessees and Operators of the Newfoundland Railway, 903 miles. Owners of 
2,500,000 acres of Mineral and Timber Lands. 

The Newfoundland Express Company, carrying on E.xpress Business with' all Express Com- 
panies of the world, and Money Orders issued to all parts. 

The Railway and Steamship Systems give the best 

connection between Newfoundland and Canada and the United States, and the best 
freiHu line between Canada and Newfoundland. S.S. "KYLE" and "SAGONA" 
connect at North Sydney with the Intercolonial Railway. 

Newfoundland offers to the Tourists, Sportsmen and Health-Seeker the grandest 
scenery in the Western Hemisphere. A most beautiful climate in the summer 
months ; cool, even and invigorating. No hay fever. 

Finest Caribou Hunting Grounds in the World. ^ ^ ^ 

Best Salmon and Trout Streams that have yet been discovered. The Railway is equipped 
with Dining and Sleeping Cars, and everything to please the taste and add to the 
comfort of the Tourist is provided. 

All information in regard to Newfoundland and Labrador will be given on apjili- 
cation to the 

REID NEWFOUNDLAND CO., LTD.. 

ST. JOHNS. NEWFOUNDLAND. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "T'he Newfoundland Quarterly." 



viiH 4ij| i> g e i v i »"KV»"B'i.- W ^K i ' J ' - " ' ' ' '^ 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 41. 



ON LABRADOR. 

Books and Charts. 



1.60 



1.50 



Labrador, Its Discoven,-, Exploration and 

Development, by \V. G. Gosling $6.00 

Labrador, with many Illustrations and Photo- 
graphs, by W. B. Cabot 5.50 

In An Unknown Land, a journey through 
the wastes of Labrador in search of gold, 
by E. C. Robinson i.oo 

Le Petit Nord, Annals of a Labrador Harbor. 
Life in the far North, by the wife of the 
famous Labrador Doctor and the nurse 
who accompanied them 

A Labrador Spring, Illustrated, by Charles 
Wendell Townsend, M.D 

With Grenfell on the Labrador, an American 
Journalist writes of Dr. Grenfell's Parish 
at close range 1.75 

A Methodist Missionary on Labrador, by 

Rev. Armenius \'oung i.io 

Among the Eskimos of Labrador, by Doctor 

S. K. Hutton 5.30 

A General Chart of Labrador 3.15 

Cape Charles to Sandwich Bay 1.80 

Sandwich Bay to Nain 1.80 

Also Harbor Charts of all principal Harbors on 
Labrador Coast. 

Shall be pleased to send further list on request. 

GARLAND'S BOOKSTORE, 



177-9 Water Street, 



St. John's, Newfoundland. 



Protect Yoiir Property. 

Insure with 

Niagara Fire Insurance Company 

Of New York. 

Canadian Department: Montreal, 

W. E. FINDLAY, Manager. 

Incorporated in 1850. 

Has been over 70 years in business. 

Unexcelled reputation for SERVICE, 

SECURITY and PROMPT PAYMENTS. 

A. T. GOODRIDGE, 

G. W. V. A. Building. Agent for Newfoundland. 





R. G. Silverlock, 



Distrwutor. 



WELSH 
ANTHRACITE COAL 

Stove and Egg Sizes. 

This Coal gave more satisfaction last season than 
any other Anthracite Coal procurable. 

About to arrive, 3,500 Tons. 

Book your orders now. 

The United Coal Co, 



PHONE 297. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-4: 



3 • 







Published by Authority* 



On recommendation of the Assistant Collector of Customs, 
and under the provisions of Cap. 22 of the Consolidated Sta- 
tutes, <Third Series , entitled " Of the Customs," His Excellency 
the Governor in Council has been pleased to approve Lhe fol- 
lowing Regulations respecting Travellers' Baggage, and Com- 
mercial Travellers' Samples, form of Oath to be annexed to 
Invoices, and Form of Invoice. 

R. A. SQUIRES, 

Colonial Secretary. 
Deparlnient of ColoninI Secretary, 
June :oth. \<)Zl. 

Travellers' Baggage. 

1. The Rules and Regulations published on the ;nd May, 
1905. and the amendments thereto, are hereby cancelled, and 
the following substituted therefor. 

2. Subject to the provisions of the next succeeding rules, 
wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet articles 
and similar personal effects in the possession of persons arriving 
in Newfoundland and not e.xceeding S50.00 in value may, after 
due examination, be passed free, wilhont entry at the Customs, 
as Travellers' Baggage, but this provision shall only include such 
articles as actually accompany and are in the use of. and as are 
necessary and appropriate for the wear and use of such persons 
for the immediately purpose of the journey and for their per- 
sonal comfort and convenience, and shall not be held to apply 
to any articles for use or wear at any future time or to merchan- 
dize or articles intended for other persons or for sale. 

3. Wearing apparel and other personal eii'ects taken out of 
Newfoundland by residents of Newfoundland 10 foreign countries 
shall, upon their return, be admitted free of duty without regard 
to their value, upon their identity being established. 

4. Wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet 
articles and similar personal etifects brought into the Co'ony by 
bona-(ide travellers who are not residents of the Colony shall 
be passed free, without entry at the Customs, as Travellers' 
Baggage. 

5. Articles of theatrical societies, known as " properties," 
circus horses and cattle, menageries, carriages and harr.ess 
thereof, musical instruments of companies visiting Newfound- 
land for exhibition purposes, may be admitted upon a deposit 
equal to the duty being paid, or upon a bond beii'g given secur- 
ing the duty. Such bond shall set forth a reasonable lime with- 
in which the export must be made. 

Commercial Travellers' Samples. 

Travellers' s.aniples of dutiable goods including trunks and 
other packages in which they are imported, may be admitted 
into Newfoundland upon a deposit of money equivalent to the 
duty or upon a good and sufficient bond being given for its 
payment. 

Such deposit may be returned and such bond cancelled upon 
the export of the goods within one year of the importation of the 
Samples, and upon the receipt of a certificate of landing from 
the foreign Customs to which they were exported. 

All samples shall be examined uixin arrival and the Com- 
mercial Traveller reporting them shall deliver to the Customs' 
Officer for entry purptrses an invoice or statement in detail show- 
ma the wholesale price of each sample at the Current Domestic 
Value thereof in the port or place from which it was imported. 



Such invoice or statement shall be attested by the Traveller, 
and the quantity of such samples snail be duly checked by the 
Customs' Ofticer and the proper duty thereon be deposited or 
Bond given before the samples are celivercd. 

The Regulations respecting forms of oath to be annexed to 
invoices presented at the Customs, published in the Royal 
Gazette of the 7th June, 1S98, and amendments thereto pub- 
lished on the 31st December, 1907, are hereby cancelled and 
the following substituted therefor. 

A. 

Certificate of Value to be Written, Typed or Printed on 

Invoices of goods for Exportation to the 

British Dominions. 

I ) Here insert man- I^l) .... of 

ager. chief clerk, or (•,," _, ' oiCxS 

as the case may be. ^~ ^ * ,.' ^^^ 

, , u . manufacturer 

(::) Here insert name 

of rirm or company. Supplier 

(3) Here insert name of the goods enumerated in this Invoice 
of city or country. amounting to 

(4) These words herebv declare that I '(4. have the autho- 
,should be omitted ^itv to make a-d sign this certifica'e on 
where the manufac- l ^ if ^ , r ■ , 

turer or supplier behalf of the aforesaid manu'acrurer 

himself signs the supplier 

Certificate. ^^d that 1] have the means of knowing and 

do hereby certify as follows. 

Value. 

1. That this invoice is in all respects 
correct and contains a true and fu;l state- 
ment of the price actually paid or to be paid 

, for the said goods, and the actual quantity 

thereof. 

2. That no di.^erent invoice of the goods 

mentioned in the said invoice has been or 

Paragraph 2 can be ^^\\\ t,e furnished to anvone ; and that no 
deleted m the case , j . ' - ^ .• ..i. 

ot exports to New arrangements or understancing anecting the 

Zealand, purchase price ct the said gjods his been 

or will be made cr entered .nto between the 

said exporter and purchaser, or by anyone 

on behalf of either of therr, either t>y way of 

(5) Here insert par- discount, rebate, compensation or in any 
titulars of any spe- manner whatever Other than as fully shown 
cial arrangement. „„ j^is invoice, or aS follows (3) . . ' 



(C) ffere insert 
" warehouse.'' " fac 
tor)-,'' or " port of 
shipment." 



3. That the domestic values shown in 
the column headed 'Current Domestic 
Values" are those at which the above men- 
tioned firm or conpany would be prepared 
to supply to any purchaser for home con- 
sumption in the country of exportation and 
at the date of exportation icentically similar 

goods in equal quantities, ai 1 6) 

subject 

to per cent cash 

discount and that such values include 

e.xclude 

the cost of outside packages, of any. in 
which the goods are sold in such country 
for domestic consjmption. 

4. That the S2id domestic value includes 
any duty leviable in respect of the goods 
before they are delivered for home consump- 
tion, and that on exportaiior a drawback or 
remission of duty amounting to 

has been 

will be 

allowed by the revenue authorities in the 
country of exportation. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 43. 



1 . 



A 



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lb 



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S o 






Enumerate the following charges and state whether each 
amount has been included in or excluded from the above 
current domestic value. — 



(i) Cartage to rail and | or docks. 

(2) Inland freight (rail or canal) 
and other charges to the dock 
area including inland insur- 
ance 

(3) Labour in packing the goods 
into outside packages 

(4) Value of outside packages. . . . 

(5) If the goods are subject to any 
charge by .vay of Royalties. . . 



Amount in cur- 
rency of expoit- 
ing country. 



State if 
included. 



1. The foregoing is the form of Invoice required by the 
Customs authorities of the Self-governing Dominions, viz. : — 
Canada, the Conimoiuvealth of .Australia, New Zealand, the 
Union of south Africa and Newfoundland. 

2. On the back of the invoice must be written, typed, or 
printed the Certificate of \'alue in respect of all goods whether 
sold outright or shipped on consignment. The Certificate of 
Value will be required in respect of goods on which preferential 
tariff treatment is claimed, exported either from the L'nited 
Kingdom or British Possessions ; and only the Certificate of 
Value in respect of exports from foreign countries, or exports of 
foreign goods from the L'nited Kingdom or British Possessions. 

3. Special attention should be paid to the Column of the in- 
voice dealing with current domestic value, as full information of 
this is required by the Customs .Authorities of the Dominions 
when assessing v.ilue for duty. Exporters should furthermore. 
see that the p.irticulars required by Clauses 3 and .^ of the Cer- 
tificate are acurately stated. 



4. It should be clearly understood that the prices shown in 
the column of the invoice headed "Current Domestic \alues" 
must be those which are being quoted in the open market at the 
date of invoice for delivery for home consumption, and not 
neccessarily those at which the order for the goods was accepted 
and it may frequently happen that fluctuations will occur in the 
home market price between the date of order ind the date of 
expoitation. In ordinary circumstances the date of invoice will 
be regarded as " the date of exportation," but where any con- 
siderable delay occurs between the date of invoice and the date 
of exportation, any changes in the " Current Domestic Values" 
should be shown on the invoice. 

5. If goods are sold for home consumption at gross prices, 
less discounts and or rebates, such gross prices, together with 
particulars as to discounts and rebates, should be shown in full 
in the " Current Domestic Values' Column of the invoice. 

6. Where the discounts shown in the " Current Domestic 
Values" column are not the ordinary trade or cash discounts 
but are of the nature of contingent discounts or rebates, they 
must be specified as such, and their nature detailed on Hie 
invoice. 

7. Where the goods invoiced are samples and the price on 
the invoice has been arrived at after the deduction of a sample 
discount, the ordinary gross prices and the ordinary trade dis- 
counts applicable to the goods in question should be specifi.ed 
in the "Current Domestic Values' column. 

8. Any shipment which forms portion only of a complete 
order should be valued at the price per unit which, at the date 
of despatch, of such shipment, would be quoted for the total 
quantity of such complete order for supply under similar condi- 
tions of delivery to a domestic purchaser. 

JVbfe — In the case of shipments to New Zealand, the total 
quantity referred to above is limited to the quantity 
actually specified for delivery within 12 months. 

9. When goods are shipped "on consignment" that fact 
should be indicated in the column headed " Selling price to 
Purchaser," and the "Current Domestic Values" inserted in the 
column provided for that purpose, as in the case of ordinary sales. 

10. In the case of goods exported in bond or subject to 
drawback, the value required, in the column headed "Current 
Domestic Values," is the duty-paid domestic value, and not the 
in-bond value of the domestic value less drawback. The 
amount of duty or drawback in\.olved should be specified in 
Clause 4 of the Certificate. A similar course shonid be follow- 
ed in regard to goods subject to stamp duty, luxury tax, or 
other internal imposts. 

11. As regards goods which are prepared specially for ex- 
port and which ordinarily have no sale on the domestic market, 
the value to be shown in the column headed "Current Domestic 
Values." is that at which the supplier would, at the d.ite of ex- 
portation be prepared to supply identically similar goods in 
equal quantities to any purchaser for home consumption in the 
country of exportation, in the event .jf an order for home con- 
sumption being accepted. In this connection attention is 
directed to Clause 3 of the Certificate. 

12. Care should be taken to enumerate correctly the charges 
detailed at the foot of the invoice, as the practice of the various 
Dominions, regarding the inclusion in or exclusion from the 
value for duty of such charges, is not uniform. 

13. It will be observed that charges such as wharfage, dock 
dues, literage, cartage, craneage, etc.. if incurred in the dock 
area, and changes in the nature of bank exchange and export 
duties are not required for duty purposes to be enumerated at 
the foot of the invoice. There is, however, no objection to such 
charges, if incurred, being shown separately. 

14. The certificate on the invoice must be signed, in his 
personal capacity, by the supplier or the manufacturer or any 
person having authority to sign on behalf o' the supplier or 
manufacturer. The witness to the signature need not neces- 
sarily be a magistrate, notary, or other public official, but may 
be any person competent to sign as a witness to signatures on 
ordinary business documents. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 44. 



jt THE .* 



Phoac 1476. 



My Own rood Products 

are known throughout the United States for 
their high standard of quality. 

My 0>A^n Evaporated Milk 

My Own Pork & Beans 

My 0\A/n Catsup 

My 0>A/n Assorted Soups 

My Own Tomato Soup 

My 0>A^n Clam Cho\A/der 

My Own Chicken Soup 

My Own Red Kidney Beans 

My Ov/n Chili Sauce 

My Ov>/n Salad Dressing 

My Own Hominy 

My Own Mustard Dressing 

are some of the deUcious articles put up by the 
MY OWN CO., which are on sale at leading Grocers 
of St. John's and throughout Newfoundland. 

J. B. ORR CO., LTD., 

AGENTS. 



THE 



Wliolcule and ReUiL 



BISCUITS 



are an ideal form of food, and no 
picnic basket is complete without 
an ample supply of 



B. 



rowmng s. 

Try our Chocolate Dainty, Anzac, 
Terra Nova, Vanilla Cream, etc., etc. 

All Varieties unrivalled 
for perfect purity and 
delicious flavour. 

G. Browning & Sons, 

Manufacturers of Fine Biscuits 
1865. jf- ^ <^ J^ 



since 



China and Glass Depot 

Opening Announcement. 

A complete line of Newly Imported Stocks in 

China, Glass & Earthenware 

at the shop with the 
CUP AND SAUCER SIGN. 

SELLING AT LOWEST PRICES. 



O^^osite Court House 



191 Water Street. 



PasseoprsaiMlfreiilit 

St. John's, Nfld.,— North Sydney, C.B., 

STEEL STEAMSHIP "SABLE L" 

Sailings from St. John's, 10 a.m. every Tuesday. 
Sailings from North Sydney, 2.30 p.m. every 
Saturday-. First-class accommodation. 

One Way Fare $27.00 including 
Meals and Berth. 

HARVEY & CO., Ltd., FARQUHAR & CO., Ltd., 

St. John's, Nfld. Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

FARQUHAR TRADING CO., Ltd., 

North Sydney, C.B. 



tes^ frits 

IN SEASON. 

Tomatoes, Plums, Bananas, 
Apples, California Oranges, 
Grape Fruit, Cucumbers, etc. 

Fresh supplies weekly. 

C. p. EAGAN, 

Duckworth Street and Queen's Road. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-46. 




f^i 



U 




FOREST FIRES ACT. 



Section 2. — Every person who — 

(1) Sets (lilt, lights or starts, or c.iiises t" be set oiit, lighted or 
st.irted, .iny tire in or iie.ir ,iTiy ^oocls, except for the pur- 
pose of cle.iriiig land, cooking, obtaining varnnlh. or for 
some industrial purpose ; or 

(2) Makes or starts, or causes to be made or started, a fire for 
the purpose of clearing land, without exercising and observ- 
ing every reasonable care and precaution in the m.iking 
and starling of such fire and in the managing of and 
caring for and controlling the .same after it has been 
made and st.irted, in order to present the same from 
spreading and burning up the trees, shrulis or plants sur- 
rounding, adjoining, or in the neighborhood of the place 
where it has been .so made and started ; or 

(3) Between the fifteenth day of April and the first day of 
December, makes or .starts or causes to be mide or started, 
a fire in or near any woods, or upon any island, for cooking 
or obtaining warmth, or for any industrial purpose, without 
observing the following precautions, that is to say : 

(a) Selecting a locality in the neighborhood in which there is 
the smallest quantity of dead ivood, branches, brushwood, 
dry leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, turf, dry moss or 
vegetable matter of any kmd ; 

(b) Clearing the place in which he is about to light the fite 
by removing all dead wood, branches, brushwood, dry 
leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, turf, dry moss and 
other vegetable matter from the soil within a distance of 
ten feet from the fire in every direction ; 

(c) Exercising and observing every reasonable care to pre" 
vent such fire from spreading, and carefully extinguishing 
the same before quitting the place ; or 

(4) Throws or drops any burning match, ashes of a pipe, lighted 
cigar, or any other burning substance, or discharges any 
firearm in the woods, barrens, fields or other place where 
there is vegetable matter, if he neglects complete))- to ex- 
tinguish before leaving the spot, the fire of such match, 
ashes of a pipe or cigar, wadding of the firearm, or other 
burning substance : or 

(s) Makes, lights or starts, or causes to be made, lighted or 
started, except for the purposes named in subsection (i) 
hereof, a fire on any land not owned or occupied by him- 
self, or does not prevent any fire made, lighted or started 
on land owned or occupied by him, from extending lo land 
not owned by him, shall be liable to a penalty of not less 
than Fifty Dollars "or inore ih.in Four Hundred Dollars for 
each odencf. or to Imprisonment tor any period not exceed- 
in? Twelve Months. 

MmmiR CAf.iPBELL, 

Mhmwr of A<JriVii/liirc' and Mines. 

Department ot Agriculture and Mines, 
St. Ii)hn's, Newfoundland. 



^7® MaEse 

the Very Best Qualify of 

Manila Rope, 
Coir Rope, 

Hemp Fishing Lines, 
V/hite and Tarred Cotton Fishing Lines, 
Hemp Seine Twine, 

Cotton Seine Twine, 
Herring Nets, 

Cotton Linnett. 

When anything better is invented 
We Shall Make That, 

Colonial Cordage Co., Ltd. 



[■IBLrSMF.r) .WM'Al.LV, 

LONDON DIRECTORY 

with Provincial and Foreign Sections, 

ctiaiile^ traders to comnimiicate direct Ailh 

Manufacturers and Dealers 

in I>-nidon and in the t'r()\ incial Towns and liidaslnal Centre^ of the L nited 
Kiiv..doni and the Continent of Europe. The names, addresses and other 
details are cia>sined under more than 2.000 trade headi.ngs. including 

Export Merchants 

with detailed i^arlicuiar? of the (iOi.ds shipped and the Colonial and 
Foreign .Marke;> supplied ; 

Steamship Lines 

artanqed under the Ports to which they sail, and indicating the approxi- 
mate ^.liling.^. 

One inch BL'SINESS C.^KDS of Firms desiring to extend their connec- 
tions, or Trade Cards uf 

Dealers Seeking Agencies 

ran be nrinted at a cost of 8 dollars for each tr.ide headir.g under which 

thev are inserted. Larger advertisements from 10 to >o dollars. 

A ccpv of the directory will be sent by parcel post fur lO d liars, netl 

The LONDON DIRECTORY Co., Ltd., 

23. Abchurch Lane, London. E. C. 4, England. 

mslNKSS ESTABLISHED loS VEAKs. 



When writing to Adverti.sers kindly mention " Tlie Newfoundland Quarterly. 



.-"'-■" iTf""^-"-'"-'' 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 4; 



■\r 



i 






■■-^'^^v 




i) '^v-1 -'-^ '"'(J^r 



Baine, Jcl^nston & Co., 



ESTABLISHED ITSO. 



Merchants, Ship-Owners, &c. 



Weigks arJ Measures The Alliance Assurance Co.,Lt(l., 

•3 1 OISIDON. 



Asents 



The following sections of the Act 
Respecting Weights and Measures are 
published for general information : — 

" Any persons who shall use a beam, scale, weight or mea- 
sure, in ths sale or exch.inge of any commodity, not assayed and 
stamped, or who shall alter the same after being so assayed and 
stamped, or who shall use steel-yards, except for the purpo-e of 
weighing hay or stray, or who shall use a btam made of wood, 
shall forfeit a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

"Salt may be sold by measure, or by weight, if sold by mea- 
sure, there shall be eighteen gallons to a tub (liquid measurement) 
and three tubs to a hogshead. Any person who shall sell or 
dispose of salt by measure otherwise than according to the stan- 
dard hereby established shall forfeit a sum not exceeding 
twenty dollars." 

'■The Chief Inspector, and Inspectors shall, when required, 
inspect and adjust all beams, scales weights -and measures, 
broucrht to the office of either of ihem according to the sa>d 
standard, and they shall stamp or mark thereon the imt.als of 
the reigning Sovereigns, and their own proper initials.- 



LONDON. 

Total Assets e.xceed j; 120,000,000. 

Fire Premiums for 1912 exceeded $6,500,000. 



Agents 



Newman's Celebrated Port WinC' 

In Pipes for Export. 



PHG 



jVf 



r^ 



M. J. 

Chief Inspector's Orfice, Stott Building, 
Marshall's Cove, June, i9:!3- 



O'MARA, 

Chief Inspector. 



Assurance 1^W'^# 



Co., Ltd., 



Of LONDON, - - - ESTABLISHtD 1782. 



_ , n J J $80,000,000.00 

Total Funds exceed $470 000,000.00 

Claims Paid exceed •'^' ' 

Place your business with us, the premier Company 

in Newfoundland. 

Lowest Current Rates of Premiums. 

W. & G. RENDELL, St. John^s, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



INSURE V/ITH THE 

QUEEN, 

tiie Company having the largest 
number of 'Policy Holders m 
Newfoundland. 

Every satisfaction given m 
settling los.ses. 
Office: Adrain BuMng. 16? Wazer Street. 
'P. O. Box 782. Telephone 658. 

QUEEN INSURANCE Co., 
GEO. H. HALLEY, 

aOENT fOR NEWfOLNDLSND. 



^ 

i2^ 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 

To Foreign Periodicals, 

If you wish to Subscribe to any Magazine, 
Newspaper, or Fashion journal, whether 
En-^lish, American or Canadian, ask us to 
take care of your Subscription. If the 
special paper that vou require is not among 
the " regulars" wh'ich we are receiving, we 
can easily procure it for vou at shortest 

notice. 

We will gladly quote prices for a Yearly Subscription 
to any Periodical now being published. 
PROMPT DELIVERIES. 

GARRETT BYRNE, 

Bookseller and Stationer. 



When writing 



'to Advertisers kindly mention 



" The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



-iiiiViiv^-^ -,. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 4S 



The attention of Ship Owners 

jj called to the following : — ^~— n 




SODA BISCUIT 



REGULATIONS 

RELATING TO THE EXAMINATION OF 
ENGINEERS.-CHAPTER I. 

GENERAL RULES. 

1. — These Regulations are issued in pursuance of 
an Act respecting the qualification of Engineers 
(6 Edward VIl., Cap. 24). 

In accordance with Section 9 of the said Act. 
" No steamers registered in Newfoundland shall 
go to sea from an)- port in or of Newfoundland 
or its dependencies unless the engineers thereof 
have obtained and possess valid certificates for sea- 
going ships, appropriate to their several stations in 
such ships, or of a higher grade from the Board of 
Trade in the United Kingdom, or valid certificates 
of competency appropriated to their several stations 
in such ships, or of a higher grade granted in any 
British possession, and declared by Order of His 
Majesty in Council, published in the London Gazette 
under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping 
(Colonial) Act, eighteen hundred and sixty-nme, or 
of anv Act of the Parliament of the United King- 
dom containing such provisions, to be of the same 
force as certificates of competency for foreign-going 
ships granted under the Acts of the Parliament of 
the United Kingdom relating to merchant shipping, 
or a certificate of competency under the provisions 
of this Act. And every person who, having been 
engaged to serve as an Engineer of any sea-gumg 
ship registered in Newfoundland, goes to sea as 
aforesaid after that date as such engineer without 
being at the time entitled to and possessed of such 
certificate for sea-going ships, as hereinbefore re- 
quired, or who employs any person as Engmeer of 
any sea-going ship, as aforesaid, without first ascer- 
taining that he at the time is entitled to, and pos- 
sessed of such certificate, shall fur such offence incur 
a penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars." 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 
June. 1923- 



« 



I TIP TOP s .* % 
i ^ ^ TIP TOP 






^ For your Biscuit Requirements ask 

^ for those manufactured by 



'^ 



t 



Jl. Rarocp $^ Co. | 

^J Best ingredients. Finest Grades. ^ 

■^s ^ 

Anolo-American Teleoraph Co., 

—-^—^=_- ^ LIMITED. ^— 

8 Transatlantic Duplex Cables 

Iniuie the Bist Cable Service m the World. 

Direct connection with the British Postal Telegraphs. 

. • Excl'j^ive connection with over 

25,000 Offices in Annerica, 

thro.:gh the Western Union Telegraph Company. 



A FAST n.W MESSAGE— For Immediate Delivery. 

\ D\V LETTER— The Popular 50-Word Subordinated Seruce. 

A NIGHT LETTER — Delivered in the Morning anywhere m the 

United States or Canada. 
FULL R.\TE CABLEGRAMS— AI^ Expedited Service. 
DEFERRED CABLEGRAMS— At Half Rates or Less. 
CABLE LETTERS— Delivered the Following Day. 
WEEK-END LETTERS— Filed Saturday. Delivered Monday. 

.Messages accepted lor all points in New foundland. 

IVIONEY ORDERS 

Domestic and Foreign, by Telegraph and Cable, 
accepted at all hours of the day or night. 

TELEPHONE 379 H. A. SAUNDERS, Superintendent. 

FOR Messenger. 



Newfoundland 
Savings Bank- 






Established in 1834. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature. 



I I I I I I I I I I ■ I < 



I t I 1 I I I t 1 t I ( t • > I t < < * 



" The General Revenue of the Colony 
shall be liable for all moneys deposited in 
this Bank and all interest payable thereon." 
—Extract from Bank's Charter. 



ii(itiii((iit 



I I I t ( I I I I I I < 



BRANCHES at Harbor Grace and Bay Roberts. 
Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate. 

ROBERT NA/ATSON, Cashier. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention 



The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 49. 



^ Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Fonjarcied by Post at Rahs Given Beloi.: 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders Mill ask for Declaration form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Slated 



foh. newkuunnuand and 
Labrador. 



KOR L'snED KlMipOM. 



pound . 
pound* 



S cents 
1 1 •• 
14 ■• 

17 ■■ 



26 

29 

3- 
35 



For Dominion of Canada 
AND United States. 



24 cents 

=4 

24 

4S 
■4S 
4S 
4S 

72 
72 



Under i lb. weight, i cent 
per 2 02. 



No parcel sent to U. K. for 
less than 24 cents. 



12 cents. 

24 " 
36 •• 
48 •• 
60 ■• 
72 •• 
84 •• 
96 ■• 
Si.oS 
1 .20 
<-32 
No parcel sent to Yi. of C. or 
U. S. foi less than 12 cents. 



N.B. — Tarcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged bv direct Steamers. Parcels of Kurs must be accompanied bv a 
Customs E.\port Entr>'. 

Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Monday and Thursday at 11 a.m., for despatch by train. 

"^ GENERAL POST^FFICE. 



LETTFR POST— INLAND. 

A LETTER enclosed in an envtlope, whether sealed or open, 
addressed to any place in Xewfoundland and the Labrador Coast, which 
does not exceed an ounce in weiijht will be conveyed to its destination for 
three cents. This late is applicable for letters posted in one settlement for 
delivery in another settlement a mile or more distant. 

LETTER POST— FOREIGN. 

Letters for Great Britain, the Dominion of Canada, and the United 
States of Amenca are forwarded to destination for four cents per ounce 
or fraction thereof. Valuable letters may be registered for delivery in 
Newfoundland for five cents. 

Circulars, that is, printed communications, when posted in lots of not 
less than lo, wholly alike, and left open for hispection, are accepted for 
one cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof. 

Xewapapers or periodicals posted in the Colony for delivery in the 
Colony shall be subject to a rate, when sent from and posted by any ottice 
or printing house publishing the same, of one half cent per pound weight 
or fraction thereof, and when sent or posted by any other person, of one 
cent for each four ounces or fraction thereof. 



May, 1933. 



Newspapers to the Dominion of Canada, the United States, France, 
Germany, etc., must be prepaid at the rate of one cent for each two 
ounces or fraction thereof. 

PARCEL POST, 

Parcels of Merchandise are delivered to destination in Newfoundland at 
the rate of o\\^ cent for the tirst two ounces, and so on up to J ih., which i? 
forwarded for eight cents, the second lb. three cents additional, or li cents 
and three cents for each additional lb., or fraction thereof, up to lo and 1 1 
lb«.. which is the limit, at 35 cents. Name and addre.-^s of sender must 
appear on all parcels. Otherwise we will refuse to accept them. 

Senders of Parcels for local destinations must write their names and 
addresses on the covers; if not Postmasters may refuse to accept them. 

Parcels for other countries must be accompanied by a Customs 
Declaration Form describing nature and value of contents. These 
forms will be supplied by the Post Ofhce and are essential to ensure 
prompt despatch of parcel. 

Money may be transmitted by means of the Money Order System and 
by Telegraph to places in Newfoundlaiwi, which are Money Order and 
Telegraph Stations, at reasonable rates on application. 

G. W. LeMESSURIER, Deputy Minister of Posts & Telegraphs. 



W. k G. REHDELL, 

Water Street, St. John's. 



-Importers and Dealers in 

Hardware of all descriptions, 
Paints, Oils, Cement 

and Roofing iMaterials. 

A large supply of above goods always in stock. 
—SOLE AGEXTS FOR— 

Brantford Roofing Co., Ltd, 



Insure Your Property 

WITH THE 



Liverpool and London 
S' S> and Globe S S 

Insurance Company, Ltd. 



Boiuriiig Bros,, Ctd,, 

flgcnis for Rcirfoundiand. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



i..H?«WIil» 



f/"rir" ('-rJ<a--i.a^-^--.v.-^. ... ^j.-^a^-..- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 50. 



ill 



Cable Address: "JOB," St. John's; "JOB," Liveqjool 

6¥ 



in 



? 




Water Street, St. John's, Nfld. 

ESTABLISHED 1780. 

EXPORTERS OF 

Codfish, Pickled Fish, Lobsters and Salmon, Cod Oil, Seal Oil and Whale 

Medicinal Cod Liver Oil 

(Norwegian Process, Non-Freezing), 
and other produce. 



Oil, 



AGENCIES: 

The Royal Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool, Fire and Life. 

The Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool. 

The National Fire Insurance Co y, Hartford, Conn. 



MANAGERS OF 



JOB'S STORES, LTD. 

DEALERS IN 

Provisions and Groceries, Naval Stores and Fishing Supplies, 
NA/HOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



MANAGERS OF 



4i 



Neptune" Steamship Co., Ltd., ^Thetis" Steamship Co., Ltd. 



JOB BROTHERS, 

Tower liiiiklinLT. 

Liverpool, G. B. 



\Vht;n writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



mrfmgraf^KBtJfwmw .irrvm^fUff 



B^: 



t 

'i 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— si 



uilu(3nil 



A 



Completes the Family IVIedicine Chest. 

Enables you to guard against Coughs, Colds, 
Croup, Asthma, Pneumonia. 

Promptly relieves Bruises, Sprains, Chilblains, 
Frost Bites, Sore Joints, Sore Muscles^ 
Rheumatism, and many other ailments to 
which every family is subject. 









"l • — LIMITEC — ■ ] 

.1^ YARMOUTH. M.S. |j 



The Original and Only Genuine. 
Beware of Imitations. 



P. C. ©^Driscoll, Ltd., Agents, St. John'Se 







\ ml 




A^ UMC ^ 

Shotgun Cartridges 
are really ''Wetproof " 

APPLY THE TEST: Take a fewof thewetproofcd REMINGTON UMC 
factory -loaded shotinin cartridiios — "NEW CLUB", "REMINGTON", 
"NITR0 CLUB" or ".VRROW— and a f<?w of any other make; soak all of 
them in ^v•atc^ for one hour, inspect the Remin^^ou UMC cartridges for 
signs of deterioration and tlien fire all of them. Inspect 
the other makes in a similar manner and fire them — if 
you can. If the one hour soaking test does not convince 
you, double the time. 

Remington Producls are for sale by leading hardware firms in St. John's 

Reminirton iVrins Curapany, Inc., 25 Broadway, New \ork 




. D-J 




When writing to Aflverti.'sprs kitldly mrntinn "The Newfounrllnnd Quarterly." 



^ -■'^'-Y^ifn 



.JJ^^^^^^^ir^:. . . VJ-. ..-v^ . ■ 



riiiiitfitn- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 52. 







Passport fleoulations. 



1. APPLICATIONS for Passports must be made in the 
authorized form and enclosed in a cover addressed to "THE 
DEPARTMENT UP THE COLONIAL SECRET ■\RY 
ST. JOHN'S." 

2. The ch.iro;e for a P.issport is S2.50. Passports are 
issued at the Office of the Colonial Secret.nrv between the hours 
of 10 and 4 <.)N THE 1>.\Y FOLLOWLNG TH-VP OX 
WHICH TiIE APPLICATION FOR THE PASSPORT 
H.\S BEEN RECEI\ED, e.xcept on Sundays and Public 
Holidays, whtn the Ottice is closed, .\pplicaiions should, if 
possible, reach the Office before 4 p.m. on the previous day. 
If the applicant does not reside in St. John's, the Passport may 
be sent by post, and a Postal Order fur S2.50 .should in that 
case accornpanv the application. POS T.AGE ST.\MPS WILL 
NOT BE RECEIVED I.N PAY.MENT. 

3. Passports are granted — 

(i) To natural-born British subjects; 

(2) To the wives and widows of such persons; and 

(3) To persons naturalized in the United Kingdom, in 
the British Colonies, or in Lidia. 

A married wnman is deemed to be a subject of the State of 
which her husband is for the time being a subject. 

4. Passports are granted — 

(i) In the case of natural-born British subjects and 
persons naturalized in Newfoundland, upon the 
production of a Declaration by the applicant in the 
authorized form verified by a Declaration made by 
a member or official of any Banking Firm establish- 
ed in .Newfoundland, or by an) Mayor, Magistrate, 
Justice of the Peace, Minister of Religion, Barrister- 
at-Law Physician, Surgeon, Solicitor, or Notary 
Public, resident in .Newfoundland. The applicant's 
Certificate of Birth and other evidence may also be 
required. 

(2) In the case of children under the age of 19 years 
a separate Passport, upon productiou of a Declara- 
tion made by the child's parent or guardian, in a 
Form (B). to be obtained upon application to the 
Office of the Colonial Secretary. 

(3) In the case of persons naturalized in the I'nited 
Kingdom or in any of the British Self-governing 
Colonies, upon production of a Recommendation 
from the Colonial Office, or the High Commissioner 
or .-Vgent-Oeneral in London of the State concerned; 
and in the case of natives of British India, and per- 
sons naturalized therein, upon production of a 
Letter of Recommendation from the India Ofiice. 
Persons naturalized in any of the Crown Colonies 
must obtain a Letter of Recommendation from the 
Colonial OlTice. 

5. If the applicant for a Passport he a Naturalized British 



subject, the Certificate of -Naturalization must be forwarded to 
the Office of the Colonial Secretary, with the Declaration, for 
delivery to the applicant. 

Naturalized British subjects will be described as such in ttieir 
Passports which will be issued subject to the necessaay qualifi- 
cations. 

6. Passports are not available beyond two vears from the 
date of issue. They may be renewed' for four further periods 
of two years each, after which fresh Passports must be obtained. 
The fee for each renewel is 5 1,00 

7. A P.assport cannot be issued on behalf of a person 
already abroad ; such person should apply for one to the nearest 
British Mission or Consulate. Passports must rot be sent out 
of -Newfoundland by post. 

R. A. SQUIRES, 

Co.onia! Secretary. 
Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
St. John's, Newfoundland, 
June, 1923. 



We are prepared to quote 

Low Price s 

...ON... 

General Lines of 



Merchandise. 



Robinson Export Co. 



The Newfoundland finarterly. 

— AN ILLL'STR.VTED MAGAZLNE — 

Issued every third month about the 15th of March, June. September and 
December from the office 

34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

JOIIX J. EVAN'S. -:- -:- PRINTER AND PROPRIETOR. 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rates : 

Single Copies, each 20 cents. 

One Year, in advance. Newfoundland and Canada So '* 

Kcrei^n Subscriptii' ns (t-.xcept Canada) 90 •' 



All Kinds of Job Printing 

Neatly Executed 

at "The Quarterly" Office. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



I1.|JI)I|IH . 1 . 111 



"■\ 



>■ i 



I 



_ JHEJJEWF OL'XDLAXD QUARTE RLY. 

rSs* $27,250,000.00 

T^rJi A '^ ; $27,250,000.00 

Total Assets 130th April. 19.3, $655,608,2A9.70 

bankers for the Government of Newfoundland .4 ^< .jt 
^ ^< .^ Financial Agents for the Dominion of Canada. 

Sir Vincent Meredith, Bart., President. 

Sir Frederick W'ilUams-Taylor, General Manager. 

London England, Branches— 47 Threadneedle Street, and 9 Waterloo Place. 

n u -kV^' '^^""""^^"•* of Montreal (France I, 6 Place, Vendome. 

Branches in New York, Chicago, and every Province" of the Dominion of Canada. 

Commercial Letters of Credit, and Travellers' Letters of Credit issued available in all parts of the .vorld. 

J. A. PADDON, Manager, - - St. John's, Newfoundland, Branch. 




POSTAL TELEGRAPH SERVICE. 

RING A36. 

*nr'HE POSTAL is the only extensive public telegraph service for Newfoundland, ar.d has con- 
■*■ nection to all inland places. A ten word message costs only twenty-five cents, the address 
and signature, as well as Postal telephone transmission to destination is free of cost. 

The Postal has also immediate and constant connection with the Wireless Stations at Cape Race, 
Fogo and Battle ffarbor, and in Summer with Labrador Wireless Stations. Also with Wireless 
to and from ships at sea. 

Cable business handed to the Postal ensures cpiick service via New York or Canso to Brazil, Bahia. 
Pernambuco, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda. Our connections are as follows: 

"American Postal Telegraph," "Canadian Pacific Railway Telegraijhs," "All American Cables tar 



) . Central and South America," " Halifax and Bermuda and Direct West India Cable-.'" 



A cheap night, as well as day service, is also given to all points in Canada and the United States ot 
America. The Postal has also direct connection with Great Britain, thence to all European p<.'int>. 
Rates as low as 6c. per word. Stamps to value of ten cents must be afifi.xed by senders to all cal^le 
( foreign ) mes.sages from Newfoundland. The Newfoundland revenue benefits largely when yuai 
patronize the Postal Telegraphs. Its whole stat^ (clerical and operators) frc>m Superintendent to 
{ Messengers are sworn to secrec\'. 

j DAVID STOTT, Superintendent. 

THOMAS BONIA, Min. Posts & Telegraphs. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



^' The Destiny of Dollars'' — How to expend money wisely* | 
An intense question which everybody must deal with, 

"WORK AND ECOnor.lIZE" IS THE ANSWER. 

riiere's never a goal worth getting but what yuu must work to attain ; 

You must suffer and bleed for it, cling to your creed fur it. 
Fail, and go at it again. 

Success is no whim of the moment, no crown for the indolent brow, 

You must battle and trv for it, offer to die ior it ; 
Lose it, yet win it somehow 

Tlie pathway to glory is rugged, and many the heart-aches you'll know, 

He who seeks to be master must rise from disaster. 
Must take as he giveth the blow. 

There's no royal highway to splendour, no short cut to fortune or fame; 

You must fearlessly' fight for it, dare to be right for it, 
Failing, yet playing the game. 
Tlie test of man's merit is tyoubh'. the proof of his worth is distress. 

Much as vou long for it, man must be strong for it. 



Work i.s' the door to success. 



The result of V/CRK and ECCNCrvxY is that we are able to quote^you 
prices on the following preparations at very much reduced Wholesale Prices: 

STAFFORD'S Liniment. 

Phoratone. 

Prescription "A"— small and large size. 

Essence Ginger Wine. 
Friar's Balsam, . and I 02. bottles. 
Essence Peppermint, ' and I oz. bottles. 
Tincture lodlns, and I oz. bottles. 

Paregoric Elixir, . and I oz. bottles. 
Glycerine, I oz. bottles. 
Oil Eucalyotus, I 02. bottles. 

Sweet Spirits of Nitre, '. and I oz. bottles. 
Brick's Tasteless Cod Liver Oil. 

Also, Special Prices on all kinds of Surgical requirements, such as— 

Gaur.es, Bandages, Absorbent Cotton, Thermometers, 
Adhesive Piaster, Hypodermic Syringes and Needles, 
OHed Silk, Ethyl Chloride, Formaldehyde Fum.gators, 
Boric Lint, Hot Water Bottles, Syringes, lodme Swabs, 

I^J I ^k C: "t" f^ r^^ ^5 "t (^ 

Also' Drugs, Chemicals, Lotions, Solutions, Pills, Tablets, of all descriptions. 
Phone 640 or 687 for Prices. 



ii e 



n fvTrr.^T^, 



: and I 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 




Wholesale and Retail Chemists and Druggists, 



"N 



When writing 



1^ Advertisers kindly mention ''the Newfoundland Quarterly." 




1 




^ 


YEMmEW-SnUllfMCCCCIICUII 


<3I 




^ . 

•31 





« 






^K 



Outumn Uu!ii6er, 1933 

John J. Evans, Printer and Proprietor, 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 





I 



Beaver Pond, Southside Hill, St. John's. 

A k. minutes walk from street car, Water Street West. -A popular spot for camping and picnicing. 



«. 



I2> 



cSi 



■!& 



^!& 









THE NllWi^UUi\iJi-/ii^i-' v^ 



COD OIL! 

We beg to remind the trade that we have been Tanking 

and Exporting OILS for the past 20 years and 

we are always able to quote the 

BEST PRICE. 



COAL! 



9^ 



A. 



North Sydney, Scotch or Anthracite. ^ 

Best Quality and Price. 

H. MURRAY & Co., Ltd., 



ST. JOHN'S, NFLD 



J- THE J- 



My Own food Products 

are known throughout the United States for 
their high standard of quality. 

My Own Evaporated Milk 

My Ov\/n Pork & Beans 

My Own Catsup 

My 0\hir\ Assorted Soups 

My 0\vn Tomato Soup 

My Own Clam Chowder 

My Own Chicken Soup 

My Own Red Kidney Beans 

My Ow^n Chili Sauce 

My Own Salad Dressing 

My Ow^n Hominy 

My Own Mustard Dressing 

are some of the delicious articles put up by the 
MY OWN CO., which are on sale at leading Grocers 
of St. John's and throughout Newfoundland 

J. B. ORR CO., LTD., 

AGENTS. 



Js^aincoats ! 



"BONE DRY!" 

After a 10 mile tramp in driving rain! 

That's a test! 

We naturally enquire the name of such 
a good weather proof. 

It's a Dexter— and the whole secret 
is in the "proofing." 

A scientific compound has been found 
to repel the hardest rain 
for the longest time. 

Dexter experts use it to "proof" 
the Dexter Weatherproof. 




I J—' M^J. VL\ 1^ 



\/\j r\i\. I iz^jvi-, X 








• I Offers a Weekly Service of Twelve-day Trips 

^^ Between New York, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and St. John's, Newfoundland. 

Jul This service will be maintained by the steamers "Silvia" and "Rosalind," and provides the fastest and most up-to-date 

service to these ports. Steamers remain long enough at each port to enable passengers to visit these interesting cities. 

There is splendid trout fishing in the vicinity of St. John's. Loch Leven and Rainbow trout have been imported assuring 
the angler of the very best fishing. The finest salmom fishing on this side of the Atlantic can be reached in one day from 
St. John's at very small expense. 

Ptarmigan or grouse shooting is from September 21st to December 31st. Caribou shooting commences August ist, and in no 
other part of the world can big game shooting be enjoyed for so little expense. 

The rate for the round trip, including berth and meals while at sea and in port is to New York $120.00 and up; and to 
Halifax $65.00, according to accommodations desired. Illustrated folder, with complete rates, plans, sailings and other informa- 
tion will be sent upon application to 

G. S. CAMPBELL & Co., BONA/RING & Co., HARVEY & Co., Ltd., 

HaliSax, N.S., Agents. General Agents Red Cross Line, St. John's, N.F., Agents. 

17 Battery Place, New York City. 



' Parker & Monroe, Ltd. 

Wear Our Makes of footwear. 

td, I ] "Rambler," 




for Men. 

"Victoria" and 
" Duchess," 

for Women. 

" Cinderella" and 

" Princess," 

for Children. 

"Rover," for Boys. 



Our Clothes and Furnishings 

Tor Boys and Men 



are receiving very special compliments from the 
many Pleased Customers who have been here. 

The Good Quality, Neat Styles 

and exceptional values are what pleased them. 

They will please you, too. 

T. J. BARRON, 

Kk Wofi... Qft-naf Rnv55' and Men's Outfitter. 



Geo. jKeal, Ltd., 

St. Johns, T^ewfoundland, 
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Provisions, Groceries, 
and Fruit. 
Consignments of Live 
Stock Solicited. 



FIRE! 



The 



FIRE! 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Co., Ltd. 

[Established 1809.] 
Head Offices Edinburgh & London. 

Available funds»E£30,000,000 

Insurance on any description of property at lowest 
current rates. 

Prompt Settlements. Liberal Adjustments. 

GEORGE SHEA, 

General Agent for Newfoundland. 



Furness, Withy & Company, Ltd., 



Steamship Owners and Brokers; Commission, Insurance 
and Forwarding Agents. 

The well known steamer " Digby," in conjunc- 
tion with the steamer "Sachem," maintain a pas- 
senger service between Liverpool, St. John's, Hali- 
fax and Boston and vice versa. These steamers are 
excellently fitted up for the carrying of First Class 
Passengers. Passengers to Liverpool must be in 
possession of passports. 

First Class Fare. 

St. John's to Halifax $35-00 

St. John's to Boston 65.00 



St. John's to Liver 



XX i I 



from $1 15.00 up. 



Por information apply to 

Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd., Liverpool, Halifax, Sydney; 
10 State Street, Boston ; St. John's, Nfld. 




Old I>utch 

Cleanser 




Madam r^Have you a package of OLD DUTCH CLEANSER 

inyoui home? It makes eveiything clean and pure. Cleans 
Bath Tubs, Sinks, Porcelain, Marble, Painted Walls, Woodwork, 
Floors, Cutlery, China, Enamelware, Silver, Glassware, Windows, 
P'urniture, Linoleum, Oil Cloth. Brass and Copper. 

Don't take substitutes; they are not as good as Old Dutch 
Cleanser. For sale at all First-Class Grocers. 

Get a Package with Your Next Order. 



For Present Enfoynienl 

USE 

ARMADA 
TEA 

Packed in l-Ib. Tins 



At all Leading Grocers. 




Office and Store — Adelaide Street. Stoneyard — lust East Custom 
House, Water Street. Telephone, 364. P. O. Box 143. 



W.J. ELLIS 

Contractor, Builder, 
and Appraiser* ^ 

Dealer in Cement Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Mortar, Briclc, Drain Pipe?, 
Bend.9, Junctions and Traps; Chimney Tops, all sizes, Plate Glass and 

Crushed Stone for Concrete. 

estimates Given for all kinds 
of Work at Shortest Notice. 

I^^Manufacturers and Real Estate Owners contemplating 
any addition to their present holdings, or the erection of new 
structures, will find it advantageous to get our estimates and 
terms. 



N.J.Murphy 



Carriage & Sleigh Builder 
Indertaker, etc. 




-\gt;nt for 



Carriage Stock, Rubber Tyres, etc. 

NA/heels Re-Rubbered 

at shortest notice and reasonable prices. 
We always have on hand a large stock 
of Polished and Cloth-Covered 

Caskets and Coffins. 



West End 



Personal attention given to all Undertaking 
Orders— Night or Day. Phone 737. 



Street. 



Newfoundland Gov't. Coastal Mail Service. 



S.S. - PORTIA/' WESTERN ROUTE, 

Calls at the following places :— Cape Broyle, Ferry- 
land, Fermeuse, Renews, Trepassey, St. Mary's, 
Salmonier, Placentia, Marystown, Burin, St. Law- 
rence, Lamaline, Fortune, Grand Bank, Belleoram, 
St. Jacques, Harbor Breton, Pass Island, Her- 
mitage, Gaultois, Pushthrough, Francois, Cape 
LaHune, Ramea, Burgeo, Rose Blanche, Chan- 
nel, Bay of Islands, Codroy, Aquathuna, Bonne 
Bay. 



S.S. "PROSPERO," NORTHERN ROUTE, 

Call at the following places : — Bay-de- Verde, Old 
Perlican, Trinity, Catalina, Bonavista, Salvage, , 
King's Cove, Greenspond, Pool's Island, Wesley- ■ 
ville, Seldom-Come-By, Fogo, Change Islands, ' 
Herring Neck, Tvvillingate, Moreton's Harbor, ' 
Exploits, Fortune Harbor, Leading Tickles, 
Pilley's Island, Little Bay Island, Little Bay, I 
Nipper's Harbor, Tilt Cove, LaScie, Pacquet, j 
Bale Verte, Coachman's Cove, Seal Cove, Bear ' 
Cove, West Port, Jackson's Arm, Englee 
Conche, St. Julien, St. Anthony, Griguet, Quirpon 



GUARDIAN 

ASSURANCE CO., LTD., 
Of Liondon, England. 

^ ^ ESTABLISHED /8j/. ^ jf 

The Guardian has the largest paid-up capital of any 
Company in the world transacting a Fire business. 

Subscribed Capital $10,000,000.00 

Paid-up Capital 5,000,000.00 

Invested Funds exceed 25,000,000.00 

T. & M. WINTER. 

Agents for J^ewfounalana. 



INSURE YOUR PROPERTY WITH 

Globe & Rutger's Fire Insurance Co^y, 

OF NEW YORK, 

AND 

United British Insurance Co'y, Ltd., 

or LONDON. 

R. A. SQUIRES, Agent, 

Bank of Nova Scotia Building. 

Pidgeon & Murphy, 

Carpenters and Builders. 

Estimates on all kinds of Work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Office: Basement K. of C. Building, DuckwortI) SI. 

J. PIDGEON, 28 Prescott Street. W. MURPHV, 36 Temperance Si 



VI. Peckham, 



149 
Gower Street. 



cioTn[s 




Phone 1008. 

Dealer in 

Beef^ Mutton^ Lamb, 

Veal, Pork and 

Poultry. 



With Style and 

Individuality 



g@==AlI Orders Called For and Delivered Free. 

Puddings and Sausages, 

Corned Beef, Vegetables 
and Fish a specialty. 



There is something to our custom garments which mak 
them look as if they belonged to the wearer. Not only iln 
well selected materials, but also the Artistic Cut and the Tho 
rough Construction, make our suits stand out above all othei 
for fit, finish and quality. 

CHAPLIN, The Store that Pleases. 

l^tt*^ Tn^ltl*;^nrf^ Effect it with old, reliable atu 
■*■ ■'"'■ '^ Al 10 L*! CVliC'C-* prompt-paying company. 

CDe yorksDire 

Insurance Company, £td. 

Losses by Gas, Lightning and Forest Fires not excepted. Ask for r.; 
before insuring elsewhere. All information gladly given. 

JAMES J. McGRATH, Barrister, Solicitor & Notary Public, A gen' 

Office: 263 Duckworth Street. Phone 61. 




HIGH GRADE FURNITURE!! 

Carefully selected stock, wide assortments and prices that are beyond the lowest 
offered in this vicinity, have made our Furniture Store the ONLY Store fur hundreds 
of shrewd buyers. We claim to save you money on Furniture, and a rapid and steady 
increase of trade proves beyond a doubt that the puplic recognises and appreciates 
good values. 

One of the strong features of our stock is that it is broad enough to suit 
everybody — Furniture to suit every kind of home : 

CHAIRS— Dining, Rockers, Morris, Rattan; TABLES for Dining Rooms, 
Parlors, Halls, etc. ; Sideboards and Buffets, Over-Mantles, Bed Room Suites, 
Bedsteads, Parlor Suites, Couches, Book Cases, Secretaries, Hall Stands, 
Wardrobes, Office Furniture, Spring Mattresses, etc. 

THE ROYAL STORES, LTD. 




ustoms Circular 

^ No. 15 e^ 



Y/HEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 



N 



arrivii>g in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 



ic3'c)es, Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms, and Am- 
unition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be admitted 
ider the following conditions : — 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
ameras, Bicycles, Trouting poles. Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
id tent equipage. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
tached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
le articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
arginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
lall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
t. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
' the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
- Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
mting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com- 
ired with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
le receipt the result of his examination and upon its correctness 
aing ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
iy kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
3 taken upon such articles. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

USTOM HOUSE, ^'^"' ^'''"" °' C*"'"^- 

St. John's, Newfoundland, August, 1923. 




Notice to Owners and Masters 
of British Ships ! 



-o- 



The attention of Owners and Masters of British 
Ships is called to the 74th Section of the " Mer- 
chant Shipping Act, 1894." 

74. — (i) A Ship belonging to a British subjec. 
shall hoist the proper national colours — 

(a) on a signal being made to her by one of His 
Majesty's ships (including any vessel under the 
command of an officer of His Majesty's navy 
on full pay), and 

(b) on entering or leaving any foreign port, and 

(c) if of fifty tons gross tonnage or upwards, on 
entering or leaving any British Port. 

( 2) If default is made on board any such ship in 
complying with this section, the master of the ship 
shall for each offence be liable to a fine not exceed- 
ing one hundred pounds. 

At time of war it is necessary for ever)- Brit- 
ish Ship to hoist the colours and heave to if signal- 
led by a British Warship; if a vessel hoists no 
colours and runs away, it is liable to be fired upon. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, ^''"*''" "^ ^^'PP^"^' 

AugL ' 



-r-rr^r LMi:.\\ rKJUi.\UL.I\i\U yUAKltKLY. 5. 



!E! 




MOTTO: 

THE BEST 

Manufacturers ande^ 
Exporters S S' S^ 

OF THE VERY FINEST 

Medical Cod Liver Oil, 

Shipped in Tin Lined Barrels. 

Quotation on application. 



(CODLMKl 



W. A. MUNN, ""-^'liX'?:; 



foundland. 



Dicks & Co., Ltd. 

We Sell Everything Needed 
in a Modern Office* 

S;pecm/ Loose-leaf Oystems, 
Binder OneetSy 
Index Systems, 
Files, Transfer Cases, Jbtc. 



Booksellers, Stationers, 

Printers and Binders* 



M. & L KENNEDY, 

Contractors^ Builders 
and Appraisers* 
I Office: RENOUF BUILDING. 

'"'''' p. O. Box 2M- Phone 767. 



K)ff James' Street. 



/. D. RYAN, 

Importer ana Distributor of 

Southdown, Hard a Port, 

Perfection, 

Cornucopia, Sailor's Hope, 

Virginia Tobaccos* 

323 Duckworth Street, St. John s. 



Use MARKLAND BOND Paper 

for your Typewriter Paper, for your Letter Heads 
and high grade Printed Commercial Forms. 

MARKLAND BOND Paper carries with it a prestige. 
A good impression is created by the letter written 
on a sheet of Markland Bond. 

Ask your dealer for Markland Bond Typewriter 
Paper, and insist that your Printer uses Markland 
Bond on your next lot of printed stationery. 

R. H. DAVIS & CO., LTD., 

542 George Street, 
Sydney, Nova Scotia. 

See that this trade mark is on every label. 
Every sheet of Markland Bond is watermarked 

Markland 
Bond 



Yarmouth, 

Nova Scotia. 



inCj I'HIZ.W ITKJt^ i■■V^uf±J^Xl.^ 



PHONE 603. 



p. O. BOX I26S. 



GEORGE DAVEY & Co., 

Contractors, Builders 
and Appraisers, 

Office: Bond Street, St. John's. 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES: Cement, Lumber, Sand, 

Lime, Roofing Materials, Oak and Maple Flooring, 

always in Stock at Market Prices. 

We are prepared to Supply any quantity of these materials, 
and to furnish estimates on any class of work. 

Agents for Gyproc NA^all-board, 

Imperial Flooring, 

and Metal Ceilings. 

= NOTICE TO ^ 



Drivers of Carriages, Carts, Motor Cars, Etc. 

ORDER No. 3. 

Under "Street Traffic Regulation Act, 1918." 

1. Vehicles must travel on the left hand side of the street or road. Vehicles moving slowly must 

be kept as close as possible to the curb or side drain on the left, allowing more swiftly moving 
vehicles passage on the right. 

2. A vehicle turning into another street to the left, shall turn the corner at the left hand curb or 
side drain of said street. 

A vehicle turning into another street to the right, shall turn around the centre of the intersection of 
the two streets, and keep to the left of the street into which it turns. 

Police, Fire and Mail vehicles and Ambulances shall have the right of way over all other vehicles. 

The driver of a vehicle on the approach of any apparatus of the Fire Department shall brincr his 
vehicle to a stand still as near the left hand curb or side drain as possible. *' 

Vehicles going in a westerly or easterly direction shall have the right of way over vehicles o-oing in a 
northerly or southerly direction. ^^ 

Drivers of vehicles shall stop whenever required to do so by any member of the Police Force either 
verbally, or by a signal with the hand, and they shall obey his order and comply with any direction 
which he may give them in the interest of good order, of traffic or public security 

The driver of a vehicle meeting or overtaking a street car which is stationary, for the purpose of taking 
""j^'u^^'if ,^'^'"^ passengers, shall stop his vehicle at a distance of at least ten feet from the said car, 
and shall keep such vehicle at a stand still until such car is set in motion, and any passenger who 
may have alighted shall have reached a place of safety. j r ■ & 

CHAS. H. HUTCHINGS, -•»- «:«-«-! 



3. 

4. 
5. 



7. 
8. 



iNJivvrwui\iJLAi\U yUAKTEKLY. — 7, 



INSURE WITH THE 

QUEEN, 

the Company having the largest 
number of Policy Holders in 
Newfoundland. 



Every satisfaction given in 
settling losses. 

Offiice : Adrain Building, 167 VC^ater Street. 



fP. O. Box 782. 



Telephone 658- 



QUEEN INSURANCE Co.. 
GEO. H. HALLEY, 



aOENT FOR NEWFOLNDLSND. 



fire Insurance! 

The Employers' Liability Assurance 
Corporation, Ltd., of London, Eng. 

The North West Fire Insurance 
Company, of Winnipeg, Man. 

Higgins, Hunt & Emerson, 



Aaents for Newfoundland, 



Columbus tiall, St. John's. 




Newfoundland Government 

POSTAL TELEGRAPH SERVICE. 

RING 436. 

THE POSTAL is the only extensive public telegraph service for Newfoundland, and has con- 
nection to all inland places. A ten word message costs only twenty-five cents, the address 
and signature, as well as Postal telephone transmission to destination is free of cost. 

The Postal has also immediate and constant connection with the Wireless Stations at Cape Race, 
Fogo and Battle Harbor, and in Summer with Labrador Wireless Stations. Also with Wireless 
to and from ships at sea. 

Cable business handed to the Postal ensures quick service via New York or Canso to Brazil, Bahia, 
Pernambuco, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda. Our connections are as follows: 

"American Postal Telegraph," "Canadian Pacific Railway Telegraphs," "All American Cables for 
Central and South America," " Halifax and Bermuda and Direct West India Cables." 

A cheap night, as well as day service, is also given to all points in Canada and the United States of 
America. The Postal has also direct connection with Great Britain, thence to all European points. 
Rates as low as 6c. per word. Stamps to value of ten cents must be affixed by senders to all cable 
(foreign) messages from Newfoundland. The Newfoundland revenue benefits largely when you 
patronize the Postal Telegraphs. Its whole staff (clerical and operators) from Superintendent to 
Messengers are sworn to secrecy. 

DAVID STOTT, Superintendent. 

M. E. HAWCO, Actg. Min. Posts & Telegraphs. 



I riC i\ Ji VV i" vy VJ 1^ i-'J-<.rvj.'>i i-' v^ ' 



CLEANLINESS AND CIVILITY GUARANTEED AND 

PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS 

ENTRUSTED TO OUR CARE. 

p. O. Box 353- Phones 482 & 786.. 

Ellis & Co.^ Limited) 

203 Water Street. 

Purveyors of High-Class 

Groceries, Meats, Poultry, 

and Delicatessen IVfarket. 

All meats are personally selected. 
We Guarantee to Stock the Choicest Meat 

Procurable in the Dominion. 
Our Sausages are a Specialty, 

Pork, Beef or Tomato. 




Dale & Company^ Limited^ 

VIARINE "- FIRE —ACCIDENT 



INSURANCE UNDERWRITERS. 



Head Office: MONTREAL. 

! BRANCH OFFICES: 

Halifax, Winnipeg, 

Toronto, 
Quebec, Vancouver. 

Bank of Nova Scotia Building, 

St. John's, Newfoundland. 



A Welcome 
Necessity. 




ii 



CRESCENT 

SOAP. 



GIVES A QUICK 
ABUNDANT LATHER 



There is a reason for the popularity of 
" Crescent" and that reason is to be found in 
its all-round usefulness. For all Laundry 
and Household cleaning purposes it is no 
exaggeration to say that " Crescent " is with- 
out a rival. 

Su preme in Quality and Purity. 

JOSEPH CROSFIELD & SONS, LTD., SOAPMAKERS, 
WARRINGTON, ENGLAND. 

MEEHAN & COMPANY, Agents. 



Our Extensive Stocks Giv e Wide Ran ge for Selection. 

NEVA/ GOODS ARRIVING BY EVERY STEAMER. 

Ladies' Dresses, Costumes, Coats, Raglans, Dress Goods, 

Millinery, Wool Coatings. 

Gloves, Travelling Requisites, Sweaters. 

Men's and Boys' Overcoats, Suits, Raglans, Mackinaws. 



Your Property IS VALUABLE, 
Insure it against FIRE. 

Agents for 

Law Union & Rock Insurance Co., Ltd. 
London & Lancashire " " " 



tjfi^T^ Yc/c 




ST .inHKI*<( KICU#r/Mii.it«.i « 



111 






Vcl. XXIII.~No. 2. 



OCTOBER, 1923. 



80 cents per year. 



^ The New Ministry. ^ 




^S^^ii©©^ a result of internal dissentions the Government 
of Sir Richard Squires, reconstructed after the 
General Eleciion of May 3rd, as a result of the 
defeat of ceitain office-holders, came to grief on 
July 33rd, when, following on the resignation an 
hour previr)us!y of four members of the Cabinet — Hon. Mr. 
Warren, Minister of Justice; Hon. Mr. Halfyard, Minister of 
Marin-- and Fisheries; Hon. Dr. Barnes, Minister of Education, 
and Hon. Mr. Foote, Minister without portfolio — Sir Richard 
tendered his ow.i resignation at noon, which sfp on his part, 
according to British co istitutional usage, carried with it the 
offi;esheidby its members. It was announced shortly after- 
wards that Sir Richard, on retiring, had advised His Excellency 
to invite Mr. Warren to form a new Ministry, and later in the 
day such a step was taken by the Governor. Mr. Warren asked 
for a week in which to attempt the formation of a new cabinet, 
and in this he was successful and on Saturday, July 28th he 
submitted the names to the Governor, after which its members 
were sworn in, as folloAS : 

Hon. W. R. Warren, K.C.. Prime Minis'.er and Minister 
of Justice. 



Hon. \V. W. Halfyard, Colonial Secretary. 

Hon. A. Barnes, Ph.D., Minister of Education. 

ion. W. H. Cave, Minister of Fin loce and Customs, 

Hon. J. F. Downey, Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 

Hon. M. E. Hawo, Minister of P.i>is and Telegr.iphs. 

Hon. Geoige Shea. Leader in the Upper House. 

Hon. Sir W. F. Coaker, K.B.E., Minister without portfolio. 

Hon. Sir M. G. Winter, Kt., Minister without portfolio. 

Hon. S. J. Foote, K.C., Minister without portfolio. 

The above form the Cabinet. 

Mr. A. W. Piccott, Minister of Public Works. 

Mr. G. F. Grimes, Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

The new Premier in announcing this ministry to the Assembly 
at its first sitting after the Government had taken ofifice, s'ated 
that negotiations had taken place between himself and the 
leaders of the Opposition with a view to forming a National 
Government, as during the war, but that no agreement could be 
reached, and therefore he had made up a Cabinet out of his 
own party, and he bespoke for it a " square deal" at the hands 
ot the house, intimating that he h id laken office burdened by a 
serious responsibiliiy because of the conditions uh.ch hid 





HON, WILLIAM W, HALFVARD, 
COLONIAL SECRETARY. 





HON. ARTHUR BARNES, PH.D, 
MINISTER OF EDUCATiON. 



HON. WILLIAM H. CAVE. 
MIMSTEk IF FINANCE AND CUSTOMS. 





Hoy. ynsEPH v. pownkv, 





HO.M. GK)KGE SHFA. M L.C , 
MINIbTKK WIlHoUT i'ORTFOLIO, 



HON. SIR WILLIAM F. COAKER, K.B.E,, 
MINISTER WITHOUT PORTFOLIO. 





HI IN. S. J. FOOIE, R.C., 





A. W. PICCOTT, ESQ., 
MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



G. F. GRIMES, ESQ., 
MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES. 



brought about the overthrow of the preceeding administration; 
and he pledged himself and his colleagues to appoint a Commis- 
sion to thoroughly investigate all the matters that had caused 
the convulsion. His attitude was very appreciatively viewed by 
the press and the public, and both, as well as the Opposition 
party in the House, evinced a disposition to give every reason- 
able consideration to the new Administration. 

The Premier-elect, Hon. Mr. Warren, though only in his 44th 
year, is one of the oldest members in point of service in the 
Legislature, having been first elected to it twenty-one years ago, 
and while his experience in the Executive Council is onlj' four 
years, he had a good training as Speaker of the Assembly from 
1909 to 1913, and with his ripe legal knowledge and general 
experience of the country's affairs, as well as the universal belief 
in his personal integrity and his honesty of purpose, he is ad- 
mitted on all sides to be a source of great strength to the Gov- 
ernment at the present time. 

He is fortunate in having been able to secure the return to 
the Cabinet of Sir William Coaker, who stands for so much in 
the Northern part of the country and whose acquaintance with 
the fishery and other interests makes him a valuable member of 
the Ministry. 

Also he is fortunate in having with him such departmental 
heads of the former administration as Messrs. Halfyard. Barnes 
and Cave, inen whose personal character is highly regarded, 



while their competence as Bureau chiefs is also recognized ; 
and with him too, he has competent counselors in Messrs. Shea, 
Winter and Foo'.e. 

Of the new msmbers of the Cabinet it is only needful to say 
that Mr. Downey, in his years of service to the public and his 
experience of all phases of the country's industries, is one of 
the b?st informed and most valuable men to occupy a seat at 
the Council Board ; and while Mr. Hawco is new to parlia- 
mentary life yet he brings to his po-,ition k.iowledge of a similar 
character and should prove a valuable secoid to the othe'. 

Mr. Piccott has had experience in variiui public po>ition>, an 1 
Mr. Grimes, who takes the Fishirie-; PortfoliD. has been for 
yeirs associated with the activities of the Fishermen's Protective 
Union and can be trusted to deal with pr )blems affecting that 
Department a soirit of helpfulness thit oug'it t) be Vity 
effective. 

Lastly Mr. Warren his the pie Ige of the unal'Dyed support 
for the new Government of the whole Parliamentary following of 
Sir Richard Squires's pirty and while he admitted in his first 
address, thit the party hid suffered a serious loss in prestige 
through the conditions that brought about the do ai -fall on the 
previous Ministry, an economical and efficient administration in 
the future should do much to overcome that and restore the Ad- 
ministration to a generous share of public confidence. 



vv i wv^-iNi^i^rviN !_.» y U/\K i IlK-L, Y. — 13, 



'^ Wireless Telegraphy in Newfoundland. ^^ 



By Arthur H. Morse. 




3^^^"^ '^^'^^^ ^^'l^^'^ ^gO' ^t a meeting of the Rojal Society 
of Arts in London, Lord Morris expressed his 
regret that Newfoundland did not appear to be 
on the visiting lists of Capitalists and the like, 
and he inferred that the slow development of the 
country's trade and natural resources was the inevitable conse- 
quence. This is a serious disability, and it is undoubtedly true 
that the outside world knows very little about Newfoundland. 

Probably every Capitalist, Captain of Industry and many 
other people know that a large Canadian corporation controls 
huge iron mines, and soms know that they are at Wabana, but 
it is certain that very few realize that these mines are in New- 
foundland. About a year ago, the writer noted in a prominent 
Canadian newspaper, an editorial in which the products of New. 
foundland's sealing industry were confounded with milady's fur 
coat. Many other instances could be cited to show how little is 
known of Newfoundland, but the reader is not likely to take 
much convincing. When a well-stocked Newfoundland fisb- 
salesman replies, '■ Yes, we have no fish to-day," he may start 
the stranger on the trail of .ill thit is unique in this interesting 
jountry ,- for here, incidentally, " fish" is not a generic term. 

It is true that, to-day, Newfoundland does not lack publicity, 
but it is not of the right kind. It is pertinent, therefore, to en- 
quire into the prime cause of the lack of the other kind ; and 
although contributory causes may be found in many directions, 
the purpose of this article is to consider whetlier or not the 





*T AMUR, 



TRANSMITTER OF S.S. " KYLE" — IN A WIRELESS SENSE, PERHAPS 

THE BEST EQUIPPED STEAMER OF HER SIZE 

IN NORTH AMERICA. 

services of wireless telegraphy could not be more fully enlisted 
to the desired end. 

First, let us establish the fact that it is axiomatic that ocean 
travellers are largely constituted of Capitalists and Captains of 
Industry and that, therefore, our object will be well-served if 
Newfoundland and its possibilities are impressed upon the con- 
sciousness of the ocean traveller. Then we must bear in mind 
that Newfoundland is, in every respect, unique, and its condi- 
tions and institutions are not to be measured by the yardstick of 
experience in other countries. 

Because of its geographical location, Newfoundland is the 
western focus of most of the trans-Atlantic cables and, for the 
sime reason, the first trans- Atlantic wireless telegraph tests were 
made on its shores ; but while the same technical reasons govern 
the selection of a cable and a wireless relay station, no trans 
oceanic wireless service is to-day focused on Newfoundland. 

Because of her insular position, rigorous climate and trans 
portation problems — particularly in winter — Newfoundland pm 
bably has a greater need of wireless than any other country, anc 
it was no doubt in recognition of this fact, nearly twenty year; 



IHH i\ii wrvjuiNi^L.iT.iM-' v^' 




CABOT TOWER WHERE WIRELESS TELEPHONE APPAKATUS WAS INSTALLED JULY, 192O; ALSO THE 180 FT. MAST 

USED IN CONNECTION WITH THE IMPERIAL PRESS CONFERENCE. 

\Copvright Photo by Holloway.] 



Stations which was the first of its kind in the world. These 
stations were, however, solely for domestic use, and their use 
has never been extended. 

Being the most easterly extremity of North America and loca- 
ted on the main route of commerce between the Old World and 
the New, Newfoundland might almost be styled the '■ Half-way 
House of the Atlantic." Ships bound to England from New 
York, pass it when they are a thousand miles at sea. It is in 
direct telegraphic communication with New York by means of 
many cables and obviously, therefore, has wireless potentialities 
of a unique order, whether considered from the standpoint of 
national revenue or national publicity ; but, alas 1 they are en- 
tirely unexploited. 

From its inception, until recently, wireless telegraphy has not 
been regarded as a serious competitor by the cable interests, 
but nevertheless it may be assumed that " Safety First" has been 
their motto, and that they have therefore done what they could 
to prevent its commercial development in Newfoundland. More- 
over, it is understood that it was their opposition that prevented 
the establishment in Newfoundland of the western terminal of 
the first trans-Atlantic wireless telegraph service. 

Another factor detrimental to wireless telegraph development 
is the annual tax which is eighty times greater than that which 
applies in Canada, and ... it might be made even greater 
in respect of a station working with more than one other 
station.* Then, of course, the Government owns and operates 
the domestic wire telegraphs and is therefore perhaps ultra- 
cautious of permitting developments which might lead to com- 
petition in that field. 

Here it may be remarked that it is very desirable that the 
Government should be able readily to supplant or supplement 
its existing lines by wireless ; in fact the time has come when, 
in the interest of efficiency and economy, the term "telegraph" 
should be held to connote both wire and wireless. 

The fact that, for many years, the Marconi Company has 
enjoyed a monoply of wireless telegraphy in Newfoundland, may 
have little to do with the present unfortunate state of affairs as 
the other disabilities have been probably sufficient in themselves ; 



* The law appears clear enough, but it is obviously drafted mainly to 
meet the case of the cables which can work only along definite lines, 
whereas wireless stations can work in any direction and mav need to do so. 



nevertheless, monopolies dj not usually make for progress. 
Except in so far as it can be maintained by the exercise of 
patent rights, this Marconi monoply expires in April, 1926. 

The unique strategic location of Newfoundland was taken 
advantage of by the Imperial authorities during the war, when 
they established a wireless telegraph station at Mount Pearl, 
near St. John's. This station was capable of working with 
Bermuda, Canada, and, at times, with England; but since the 
war it has been idle, although the Newfoundland Government 
could have had it for the taking. 

On the occasion of tlie Imperial Press Conference at Ottawa 
a temporary wireless telephone station was installed at St. 
John's whereby the Newfoundland Government was able to 
welcome to North America, the delegates from overseas, when 
they were nearly a thousand miles at sea. This was done solely 
at the expense of the Marconi Company; nevertheless, its 
publicity value to the country was enormous. 

For many years, and until about two years ago, the best 
known, the most useful and, perhaps, the most profitable wire- 
less telegraph station in all the world, was located in Newfound- 
land. Although comparatively few realized that this station 
was so located, its name — Cape Race — was known to every 
traveller on the Atlantic Ocean. It was and is owned by the 
Canadian Government and 's still being operated, but its 
publicity and revenue values have been destroyed by the com- 
petition of stations, under a comparative geographic disability of 
from 300 to 900 miles, but equipped with more modern apparatus. 
There is little now to lemind the ocean traveller of the existence 
of Newfoundland, and the country constitutes the missing but 
essential link in a fully efficient telegraphic service between 
the great cities of North America and ships in the North 
Atlantic. Meantime Mount Pearl is idle and the world lacks 
a much-needed public service which could be made profitable 
to all concerned. 

When this situation comes to be remedied. It will be 
important to so name the station that it will be inevitably identi- 
fied with Newfoundland. " Newfoundland" is really too long ; 
"Mount Pearl" bears no local significance to the stranger; 
while " Avalon " probably directs his thoughts in other direc- 
tions, and "St. John's" is particularly liable to give rise to con- 
fusion. Despite its length therefore, there would seem to be no 
alternative to " ^p"f'^""'^i'--'^ ■" I"- ■■ ->- 
it might be wi 



c came, 
-in were 



rniL 



iNiiWf-OUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 15. 



^ Dedication of Corpus Christi Church. ^ 

Erected by the Pastor of Kilbride-Rev. J. J. Rawlins. 




HE s .lemn dedication and opening of Corpus 
Christi Church, Waterford Biidge, took place 
Sunday. August 19th, at 11 a.m. Long before 
the hour appointed the spacious Church was filled 
to capacity. A squad of honour from the C.C.C. 
was present and on the arrival of His Grace the 
Archbishop a general salute was given, while the C.C.C. Band 
played the Pope's March. The corner stone being laid, the 
blessing of the Church took place at which the Band 
played " Mozart's Gloria." Solemn High Mass was celebrated 
by the Pastor— Rev. J. J. Rawlins— with Revs. P. Sheehan and 
E. J. Rawlins as Deacon and sub-Deacon respectively. Within 
the Sanctuary were Revs. J. J. McGrath and Dr. Kitchin ; assist- 
ants at the Thrnne, Revs. Pippy, St. John. P. J. Kennedy, 
Flynn, and M. Kennedy, with Dr. Carter as Master of Cere- 
monies. The singing of the Cathedral Choir under Mr. Charles 
Hiitton was of a very high order. 

THE archbishop's ADDRESS. 

Towards the conclusion of the ceremony, his Grace the Arch- 
bishop, speaking from the Throne, said that he would like to 
say a brief word to express the pleasure it gave him to be 



also in its chaste and artistic interior finish. The Pastor of 
Kdbride, who had labored so zealously to bring this work to 
completion, his parishioners who so loyally seconded his efforts, 
and the many generous friends who gave their assistance, had 
every reason to be proud of the monument which their united 
efforts had combined to erect. As they looked around at this 
new Temple of God — the fruit of zeal, sacrifice and generosity — 
they might with all humility repeat the words of the psalmist : 
" We have loved, O Lord, the beauty of Thy House and the 
place where Thy glory dwelt." 

Concluding the Archbishop prayed that the zealous efforts of 
Pastor and people would be blessed with an ample measure of 
reward, and that this new church would be to all who came 
within its influence a sacred centre from which blessings untold 
would radiate, a source of spiritual help and inspiration in this 
world and a preparation for sharing in the happiness of God's 
House in eternity. 

THE SERMON. 

The preacher of the day was the Right Rev. Monsignor 
McDermott, V.G., whose sermon was a masterpiece and one 
which will long be remembered by the large congregation 




DEDICATION OF CORPUS CHRISTI CHURCH, WATERFORD BRIDGE. 



present at the opening of the new Church, and also to congratu- 
late the energetic Pastor of Kilbride and his parishioners on their 
work which was being completed under such happy auspices that 
morning. He regarded the occasion as being an historic one 
inasmuch as it brought back their minds to the old church of 
Kilbride, which was destroyed by fire so many years ago, and 
which the present building w.is intended to replace. The old 
church, which was one of the venerable monuments of the Arch- 
Diocese, having been built by Bishop Mullock in the early 
sixties, was destroyed in that fateful year 1892, when nearly 
half of St. John's was left in ruins by fire. 

Speaking of the site selected for the new Church his Grace 
said that circumstances had greatly changed since the days 
when the first church was built and that many factors combined 
to favor the new site as being most suitable for all the interests 
concerned. It was not without a great deal of regret on account 
of its ancient associations that the old site (vas abandoned ; but 
practical considerations prevailed and hence they had erected 
the new parish church in picturesque Waterford Valley. 

The dedication of a new church, his Grace continued, was a 

solemn event full of importance and significance. Every new 

church was another centre of spiritual influence for the deffusion 

of the principles of virtue and morality and for the inculcation 

■^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ammm^Gse noble objects 



present. He spoke in part as follows : — 

" Go ye, therefore, and teach all nations Behold I am with 
you all davs even to the consummation of the world. "^Words 
of our Divine Lord tothe Apostles. 

Before the birth of Christ, my brethern, the whole world was 
spiritually blind, the blindness of paganism and superstition 
darkened the minds of men, and there was no place on the face 
of the earth where the name of the Lord God was loved and 
reverenced. It is true indeed; that in all lands people believed 
in another life, not only did they believe in a God, but they 
believed in many gods, to whom they prayed, and in many 
places they offered human sacrfice, men, women and even little 
children, to appease the wrath of their imaginary deity. In 
their blindness men believed that those deities possessed human 
passions, and as a consequence the crudest ideas of right and 
wrong prevailed all over the world. The most degtading forms 
of vice were openly practiced in their temples as virtue, and 
people believed the practice of such vices not only appeased 
the gods, but insured to themselves a dwelling-place in Heaven. 
Amongst Princes and Rulers, amongst the wealthy, and influen- 
tial and learned, such virtues as humility, meekness and patience 
were regarded as vain and in all sections of pagan society mercy, 
pity for the sick or the wounded, sympathy for the afflicted and 
aged, or respect for parents were practically unknown. Vanity 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND gu/^ 



spoken man of his time, gives us in one of his Epistles an 
account of the pagan society of his own day, and in his indict- 
ment of pagan culture and pagan customs he speaks not only of 
the barbarity, but also of the incontinence of the most civilized 
cities of his time, and the wrath of God is revealed from heaven 
at'ainst the injustice and irreligion of those men, for they would 
change the glory of the incorruptible man, and God abandoned 
them to the desires of their hearts, to the things that are filled 
with all malice, all iniquity, fornication, covetousness, wicked- 
ness, detraction. St. Paul, who spoke thus, had travelled far 
and 'wide, and knew whereof he spoke; he dwelt in great cities 
where art flourished and beautiful poetry was written, where 
oratory was highly esteemed, where buildings of surpassing 
grandeur were erected, and statesmen made laws so perfect 
that many of them are in actual use in all civilized countries 
to-day; in great cities where unnatural vices prevailed, where 
men were crucified, and where high-born women scourged their 
servants to death for trifling faults. It is true that in those days 
there were good and learned men who earnestly sought the truth, 
men who stood and rebuked the wickedness of their day, but 
they were few and far between, and sometimes, through their 
own ignorance of God, they ostentatiously led people into error. 
And out into that world, that old pagan world of brute stability, 
that world of hatred, murder and fornication, that world of 
shameless crime of universal blasphemy, went the Apostles 
to preach the crucified Christ. And what a task they faced. 



malignity and power of the forces waged against her, so since 
Te fight'^for souls began, it still goes on, and ^^^ f^^^^^'^^l 
end o1 time for though the ^-Pe -/^X^, /h^ G^^^^^^^^ 

"^^^£2^:;^^^^^^ -d?y to flght L her 
civilized me wor 'J enemies bitter and malignant, assail 

very existence as of yore , enemies, u i .„^^^ ;. has nnlv 

,er! the world has not changed in Us w-kedne- u ^has^only 

?S; s mucTn-oTa's re'did'thet'nd individually we aU have 
o wokouTour own salvation in fear and trembling We are 
well aware that the Church will never fail, that the gat s of hell 
rannofprevail against her, but we know at the same time that 
during L past fifty years untold harm has been inflicted upon 
Chrisfian people ; we know that in some lands supernatural 
faith has almost entirely disappeared, or become neglected, and 
we know that contumelious living has swept over the world ; but 
what the Church did the Church can do, and what prayer did, 
praver again can do ; but if she fails to convince people of the 
sacredness of the marriage tie and the degraduation of divorce: 
if she cannot teach children to respect their parents, then indeed 
one of two things must soon happen— either the world is 
rapidly drawing to a close, or God will abandon the Western 
races to the desires of their hearts and the faith will vanish, and 
belief in God will die out, and the faith will go back whence it 
came back to the East. This may seem farfetched, and we 
sincerely hope that it is farefetched, but we cannot close our 




THE ARCHBISHOP AND C.C.C. BAND AFTER THE CEREMONY. 



and what a miracle they wrought — well might their hearts have 
failed them, well might they have quailed at the ordeal, well 
might they have said, as St. Peter said, that " they knew not the 
man'' if God had not strengthened them from on high, if they 
had not been endowed with the seven gifts of the Holy Ghost, 
but in spite of opposition, of persecution, the Apostles and their 
successors successfully fought the world, and in spile of the 
hatred of Princes and Rulers, and the contempt of the rich and 
learned. Persecution after persecution raged for three long 
centuries, hundreds of thousands of people of all ages and all 
classes were brutally murdered but in the end the Gospel con- 
quered ; in the end Emperor and subject, patrician and slave 
were drawn to the Cross of Christ. Temples, whose walls had 
for long centuries echoed back the despairing cries of victims 
of false gods, were brought to the Christian Church. Monastries 
and convents, sprang up as if by magic, and into their walls 
flocked thousands of young people who devoted their lives to 
prayer and fasting, and " where sin had abounded grace did 
indeed abound more." In due course the Christian Church 
had been established in the world ; magnificent churches were 
erected to show the pure love and reverence for Christ in the 
Eucharist ; and the cunning hand of the Sculptor, the skill of 
the artist, the genius of the magician were all utilized to express 
the pure gratitude to God for the fall of ]:aganism. But though 
the Cross conouered. victorv did not mean a ressalion of hostili- 



eyes to facts, and we know that no amount of oratory, no 
amount of talk can hide the fact that belief in God, to a great 
extent, is dying out, this as everbody knows who reads the times 
aright, is true. Thirty years ago one of the greatest Popes that 
ever lived. Pope Leo XIII., foresaw what would happen, and 
ordered Catholic people all over the world to say certain prayers 
after Mass, and in one of the prayers we ask God for the 
exaltation and liberty of the Church, and we beg Him to thrust 
Satan down to hell and with him all the other wicked spirits 
who wander throughout the world for the ruin of souls. This 
petition to God is not sentiment, for all around us and about us 
are evil spirits, spirits wicked and malignant whose object is 
our destruction, and the humiliation of the Christian Church. 
To a great extent, fortunately we in this country are merely 
spectators of the terrific struggle between good and evil that is 
going on in the great centres of civilizaiion ; we view from 
apart the struggle between the Church and the world ; we have 
a sense of remoteness from the strife a feeling that our Christian 
faith can never fail, but let us not feel too sure or too sate, we 
are a part and parrel of the great world and whatever affects 
the world for good or for evil affects u.-,. Before the war noi'-e 
of us imagined for a moment ih.u we v\ould be engaged in ihe 
struggle that staggered humanity ; but our young men were 
called upo ■ ■ " ' ; wLo then 
shall sav ;„ thp 



Wt 






^>i:.vvrwui\ULANU QUARTERLY.— 1 7. 



then shall say the concerns of the Universal Church is no 
business of his ? Our chief business is indeed the sanctification 
of our own soul, that is our first duty, but we have also a duty to 
our neighbour, and our neighbour is all mankind, and so for the 
conversion of sinners we are asked to pray. Are we doing the 
missionary work that he can do. We may not be able to go 
out and preach and teach all nations, but we can pray for all 
nations; we can make the world better by being holier our- 
selves; and in this beautiful little Church, dedicated this morn- 
ing, in this Church must our best prayers be said ; here shall 
we give honour to God ; here shall we find means for the sal- 
vation of our immortal souls; this is the House of God and the 
Gate of Heaven this is the place where all things most important 
for our salvation happen ; here our sins will be remitted; here 
shall we receive the Body and Blood of our Redeemer, and here 
most important of all, shall we celebrate the Holy Sacrifice of 



the Mass, offered up for the salvation of mankind, ofTered up 
for all those who have sinned, ofifered up for ail who are friends 
of God that they might persevere for ever in his Grace. This 
is a place we should love and cherish here shall we come in the 
dusk of the evening when the day's work is done, to whisper 
our thoughts to God, to talk with Him as our best Friend, and 
here we are always sure to be heard ; here the Stations of the 
Cross and the Crucifix should remind us of the sufferings of 
Christ, and remind us that our sufferings are as nothing com- 
pared to His; here, in a word, we have the place that is " the 
House of God and the Gate of Heaven." 

The ceremonies of the day closed with the Blessing of the 
Bell. Amongst those present were Mayor Cook, Hons. J. D. 
Ryan, F. McNamara, W. J. Ellis, Sir Joseph Outerbridge, and 
many other prominent citizens, kind donors and generous 
benefactors. 




RUINS OF THE OLD STONE CHURCH AT KILBRIDE, ST. JOHN'S WEST. 



^ The Death of the Unknown Soldier. ^ 



By Henry 

Whilst I stood guard in France at noon one day, 
A pillow of cloud of marvelous grace 

Swept by; and as I humbly knelt to pray, 
In it I saw my mother's face. 

My comrades hurriedly carried me off the field. 

And gently placed me on a cot ; 
The blessed Angels of the Cross then sealed 

My eyes and left me to my lot. 

I started home on a ship of monstrous size ; 

It drifted far out on the sea ; 
Its mast-top pointed to the vaulted skies, 

Its passengers were God and me. 

As on it drifted each receding wave 

That broke upon that sea of Fate, 
Turned quickly to another soldier's grave, 

And left me there disconsolate. 

The nearer home I came thro' mist and spray. 

The further away it seemed to be, 
Until at last I failed to grope my way, 

And darkness hovered over me. 

At night I stood beside a railway train, 

And entered a single coach alone ; 
I felt no loving hand to soothe my brain ; 

My troubled heart then turned to stone. 

Like lightning from the sky it swiftly sped ; 

In front it drank the piercing wind. 
And ran so fast o'er graves of murdered dead, 

That it burnt up the rails behind. 



Polk Lowenstein. — Kansas City, Mo. 

The birds began to twitter in the trees, 
And faintly chirp their morning song; 

The glistening dew drops stooped on bended knees, 
To light my weary way along. 

Curled on the porch there lay my trusted friend. 

I whistled shrill and spoke his name ; 
He raised his head and faithful to the end. 

Fast bounding down the walk he came. 

He cried and licked my hands and kissed my feet, 

And threw his arms about my neck, 
And with my own I felt his great heart beat, 

And Oh ! the crash of Wor'ds and wreck 
Of Time that fell across my anguished soul 

As he looked in my face and said : 
"O Master! Master! where's the Broken Bowl?" 

And at my trembling feet fell dead. 
A crumbled rose hung o'er my drooping h«ad, 

As I stood on the steps of faded moss ; 
Its lifeless petals were seared and crisp and red 

As the poppies that bowed at the little white cross. 
Near in the window hung a service flag. 

Whereon I saw two golden stars ; 
My heavy heart within began to sag, 

As I beheld its crimson bars. 
Thrice I knocked the door. No Response within. 

I seized the knob and flung it wide : 
There lay an empty skull with mocking grin ! 

And I fell prostrate at its side. 
I writhed in pain and gasping cried aloud ; 

In vain I tried to raise my head ; 
Lo I there beside me lay an empty shroud 1 

*»««»«• She too, was dead. 

Dedicated to the American Legion Auxiliary by the author. 



1. ± L J-^ 



e^ From Crown Colony to Home Rule. 

THE " FATHERS OF RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT." 

By Alex. A. Parsons, J. P. 



«^ 




When a deed is done for Freedom 

Through the broad earth's aching breast 
Runs a thrill of joy prophetic, 

Trembling on from east to west. 
Through the walls of hut and palace 

Shoots the instantaneous throe, 
When the travail of the Ages 

Wrings earth's systems to and fro. 

THE BIRTH OF A NEW CABINET. 

I HIS article may be regarded as the prelude to a 
series of historical reminiscences and character 
sketches, which I contemplate contributing to the 
Newfoundland Quarterly, on the transition of 
our island home from the conditions of a Crown 
Colony to those of a self-governing Dominion, 
and the part the "Fathers of Responsible Government" played 
in connection therewith. I am not— as the reader will perceive— 
confining myself to a few individuals. I embrace that composite 
personality known as the Government ; for the great event of 
July last was the birth of a new Cabinet — a premature biith, it 
is true, but one which, nevertheless, sufficed to give to the 
Colony a new Ministry complete in all its parts. The Squires 
Cabinet was disbanded, making way for the first Warren Cabinet, 
or rather for the Warren-Coaker Cabinet, as Sir Wm. F. Coaker 
and followers take prominent parts therein. This Cabinet is 
not like any of those which have governed our island home for 
the past sixty years. It is a composite Cabinet, a Cabinet of the 
Siamese twins. It is not a Tory Cabinet, or a Conservative 
Cabinet, or a Liberal Cab'net. It is a Cabinet which is as yet 
without a name. And, what is even stranger, without a nick- 
name. The Liberals who have joined it would shrink from be- 
ing regarded as Conservatives ; the Conservatives who supply 
its leader and the majority of the rank and file, \yould naturally 
protest against its being regarded as merely a Liberal Cabinet, 
and therefore it is a little difficult to know how to describe it. 

A cabinet TO BE RECKONED WITH. 

Nevertheless, name or no name, it has to be reckoned with. 
Into its hands, with the knowledge and consent of Hie King's 
representative, have been made over the reins of power. The 
Government machinery of the Colony, which but yesterday, so to 
speak, was set in motion or at rest by the will of Sir Richard 
Squires and his colleagues, is to-day equally obedient to the 
new group which has found itself suddenly established at the 
Colonial Building — as the result of a revolt against the bribery 
and corruption of the late Administration, or some of the mem- 
bers thereof. Whatever its genesis, whatever its title, it is now 





OUR FISH CARRIERS — LOADING FOR MARKET. 

the ruler and governor of Newfoundland and its dependencies. 
Nothing is more marvellous to communities that have but com- 
paratively recently emerged from Crown Colony conditions than 
to note the extreme facility with which power changes hands in 
this Colony. 

OUR CONSTITUTIONAL MACHINERY AND HOW IT \VORKS. 

Our constitutional machinery is very much out of gear in 
parts. The front wheels seem often as if designed for no other 
purpose than to revolve in an opposite direction to the back 
wheels. There are brakes here and brakes there, and the 
machine, to a casual observer, seems often as if it were con- 
structed in order that it should stick in the mud rather than 
carry on the government of a civilized and fairly enlightened 
country. But in one respect we have almost obtained perfec- 
tion, and that is in the arrangements which have been made for 
a change of government. 

AS MANY MINDS AS MEMBERS. 

In a little self-governing community like ours, one of the first 
questions which everyone asks about a Cabinet is whether it 
knows its own mind or whether it does not. Cabinets 
being composed of nine or ten ministers, have somt- 
times the misfortune to have as many minds as mem- 
bers. On other occasions the Cabinet has only one mind, 
which is that of the dominant personality who called it into be- 
ing, and who piesides over its deliberations. This Cabinet 
comes into neither of ihese catagories. It is not a single-souled 
Cabinet, for it is a double-headed one, and as is natural to a 
double-headed enii y, it is in danj;er of 1 tirg a dcuble mindec 
creature — unstable in all its ways. In the foimaiion of thii 
Cabinet the Hoii Mr. Warren began by constituting an innei 
circle of those who may be regarded as the greater gods at thf 

present m" mnnt -' ^■■■' ' ■' ' '^ ^^.^ ^iite 

having const ^ ^p th( 



1 jnn 



iMivvruui\ULAJ\U yUARTERLY.— 19. 



or assortment of administrators as commended itself to tiie judg- 
ment of the inner circle. The group which lies at the heart of 
the Cabinet, as the yoke lies at the centre of the egg, is a com- 
posite junto consisting of gentlemen too well known in politics 
here to need personal mention. 

■WHERE THE PEOPLE STAND IN THE MATTER. 

It is needless to say that every civilized country, small or 
large, is governed by some species of authority for the purpose 
of preserving order in society. Some Governments are good, 
others are bad ; but it does not fall within my province here and 
now to point out where the ruling authority is injurious, or 
where it is most advantageous to the people. According to a 
law of universal application, every independent country is 
understood to have the undoubted right to model its government 
according to its own fancy, genius, or necessities ; provided that 
in the execution of its plans, it does not wontonly injure its 
neighbors. In this inst-ince, the neighbors are our Canadian 
friends, for the most part British born, like ourselves, and, 
therefore, so kindly disposed towards us, that we are not likely 
to be any less friendly with them in the future than we have been 
in the past. 



POLITICAL ASPIRATIONS MOVED BY UNSEEN INFLUENCES. 

Events of great colonial importance are hourly passing into 
history. Public opinion is visibly acquiring new animation. Poli- 
tical aspirations, moved by unseen influences, like the tide in 
the spring, are rising to a purer level. Statesmen of different 
parties, appreciating the requirements of the hour, forgetting 
alike the rivalries and jealousies of the past, are agreed in de- 
claring that the time is co.ne when all parties should practice 
in unison the graver duties of government, should accept the 
burden of new obligations, and the administration of new trusts. 
The wish to possess, even in an imperfect form, the resemblance 
of individuals whose names are still familiar to us, but whose 
forms have passed ofi the stage of time, is a very natural one. 
Indeed, such desires have almost become conventional habits, 
which we make very little effort to restrain and none to disguise. 
As one that wields an abler pen than mine puts it : " The grow- 
ing taste for collecting likenesses is not attributable to a passing 
fashion merely ; it has its roots in the better part of our nature 
and derives its nourishment from the higher sentiments of the 
mind — from reverence and respect, from the love of kindred and 
the charms of friendship ; from the regard for private worth, or 









.^^^^^^^gf^^^^Mr*' 





THE OLD CAMP GROUNDS" — CHURCH LADS BRIGADE— TOPSAIL, AUGUST, 1 923. 

[P/ioto by G. R. Williams] 



OUR RELATIONS WITH OUR NEIGHBORS. 

True in 1869 our relations were somewhat strained over the 
question of Confederation ; but the fault on that occasion was 
our own. Since then we have been getting along admirably, 
almost as if no "silver streak," or Cabot Strait, rolled between 
us and the "Black Diamond Isle." Directing our attention to 
our own country, with which we have here alone to do, we find 
that we are members of an enlightened community. We find 
ourselves subject to laws which were framed long before vi^e 
were born, and that we must act in a manner not to please our 
own caprice, but according to the arrangements which have 
been instituted for the benefit of society at large. For us and 
the liberties we enjoy armies have fought and bled ; for us, in 
past times, hosts of martyrs and patriots have contended ; for 
us the wisest statesmen and legislators have transacted negotia- 
tions securing civil liberty ; for us the people who have gone 
before us have established a variety of the most excellent, the 
most beneficent institutions. All these things we enjoy without 
having been put to the smallest trouble. All that we are called 
on to give in return, as soon as emancipated from the inex 
perience and ignorance of childhood, is obedience to the law. Of 
course, it was never contemplated that laws would be enacted 

lly obey — laws like 



from the appreciation of public service. It is no evanescent 
impulse, but a chronic craving, a craving that had existence 
when the means of gratification, if not wholly beyond reach, 
were laid aside among the expensive and almost unattainable 
privileges of life." 

ACQUISITIONS WITHIN THE ATTAINMENT OF ALL. 

At the present day, however, such acquisitions are within the 
attainment of all. The sun himself has become the limner; 
Science has unlocked her secrets; Art has applied them, while 
knowledge and experience have taught us that light, the first, 
the purest, and the most universal of God's gifts, has, by fusion 
with subtler agencies, become the source, it is scarcely an exag- 
geration to say, of the most cherished and economical of man's 
luxuries. 

THE PIONEERS AND FOUNDERS OF OUR COUNTRY. 

The pioneers and founders of a country, of whatever pro- 
fession or calling, will generally be found to be men of great 
force of character as well as of an adventurous turn of mind, 
who are more inclined to perform heroic deeds than to lecord 
them. Such were the Fathers of Responsible Government, and 
the descendants of such men still live amongst us. The tradi- 
tional, and, in some instances, the recorded transactions of such 
i;,7oc ma»r Trpt hp rprnvprpd : and the lessons which thev should 



iHiL k\t.vv fuui\ui^ni\u v^u/ip 



honor, would not only promote innocent gratification and mental 
pleasure, but might, by exciting a sense of laudable emulation, 
tend to our moral, social and political welfare. God only knows 
how much we need an upward jolt at the present moment ! As 
we now stand, a condition of afifairs may arrise at any moment 
that I may best illustrate by supposing the conditiion of a cheese 
that has been hollowed out by a nest of mice who inhabit it, 
leaving only the outward form and skin of the article to repre- 
sent itself. This hollow cheese may be taken as an apt illustra- 
tion of Responsible Government as it exists among us in these 
degenerate days. We have the form, but not the substance. 
The soul of the system has been burrowed out and consumed 
by the political mice who dwell therein, and who manipulate the 
people's representatives as if they were pawns on the chess-board. 
It is true that whilever needy and purchasable men are put into 
the House of Assembly, they will be nothing more or better than 
mere articles of merchandize ; fjr we cannot expect that " milk- 
and honey" politicians will resist the bribe that offers them a fat 
contract or government situation in order to make sure of their 
support in times of emergency. 



came into existence in 1855, (the election took place on the 5th 
of May that year) stood like this when the session opened :— 

Legislative Council.— \. O'Brien, President; James Tobin, 
John Rochefort, M.D.; George H. Emerson, Solicitor General; 
John Munn. S. Carson, M.D. ; T. R. Row, J. J. Rogerson, T. 
Harrison Ridley, James Furlong, P. Duggan, J. Cormack. 

House of Assembly.— ^^. John's West— Hon. P: F. Little, 
Attorney General and Prime Minister ; Hon. Ambrose Shea, 
Speaker; John Fox. St. John's East— Hon. John Kent, 
Colonial Secretary; R. J. Parsons, Peter VVinsor. Harbor 
Grace— John Hayward, J. L. Prendergast. Carbonear— Hon. 
E. Hanrahan, Surveyor General and Chairman of the Board of 
Works. Harbor Main — Thomas Talbot and Byrne. Port de 
Grave — R. Brown. Ferryland — Hon. Thomas Glen, Receiver 
General; Edward Dalton Shea. Burin — Benning and Morris. 
Bonavista — R. Carter, John H. Warren and Walbank. Twillin- 
gate and Fogo — Eilis and Knight. Fortune Bay — Hugh W. 
Hoyles. Burgeo and LaPoile — Robert Prowse. Placentia — 
Hogsett, Delaney and Kelly. Trinity — F. B. T. Carter, March 
and Winter. Bay de Verde — John Bemister. 




THE C.L.B, CADETS — PYRAMID SQUAD ANNUAL SPORTS, I92:;. 

\_Phoio by G. A'. Williams] 



THE AGITATION IN FAVOR OF RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT. 

The agitation in favor of Responsible Government began here 
in 1848. It was a year of revolution in Europe. With the 
exception of that of Great Britain, every throne was tottering 
and tumbling, almost as much so as at the close of 1918. The 
wave of political excitement, of course, reached our island. 
" Self Government," says Judge Prowse in his history, " was the 
war-cry of our modest rebellion, and, the only outbreak of 
violence, burning the image of the Governor, Mr. Ker Bailiie 
Hamilton." The revolutionary fever has, so far, alwavs attacked 
us in a mild form. The Legislature at that time consisted of the 
following gentlemen : — 

Legislative C(!7«m7.— Hon. Colonel Law, President • Hon E 
M. Archibald, Attorney General ; Hon. James Crowdy' Colonial 
Secretary ; Hons. W. B. Row, John Noad, Surveyor General • 
C. B. Bennett, J. J. Grieve, and L. O'Brien. 

House of Assembly.—St. John's— Philip Little, John Kent, R 
J. Parsons. Placentia— Ambrose Shea, George Hogsett 
Bunn— C. Benning. Fogo-G. H. Emerson. Ferryland^— p" 
Winsor. Conception Bay— John Hayward. John V. Nugent 
Thomas Talbot and Edward Hanrahan. Fortune Bay— H w' 
Hoyles. Bonavista— John H. Warren. Trinitv— Stephen 
March. ^ 

FIRST LEGISLATURE UNDER RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT. 



FIRST PRIME MINISTER UNDER HOME RULE. 

The first Prime Minister under Responsible Government, as 
I have shown, Mr. P. F. Little, (afterwards Assistant Judge of 
the Supreme Court), brother of the subsequent Judge, Sir J. 
I. Little. He came from Prince Edward's Island, whel-e he was 
born in 1824. It seems that he had a very uphill fight at the 
beginning of his legal career— he began practice as a lawyer 
about 1845. But his fine natural abilities, his attention to 
bu>iness, with much shrev\dness and knowledge of professional 
affairs, soon brought him a good practice. As I have already 
mentioned, hp was first elected to the Legislature in 1850, and 
at once became the real leader of the Liberal Party in the 
House and outside Throughout the agitation for responsible 
Government, Mr. P. F. Little, was very prominent, in fact, the 
organizer, and by far the most powerful man in the movement. 
He was not so polished a speaker as one of his contemporaries, 
Mr. Robinson, or as eloquent and ornate as Mr. Kent, but in 
astuteness, in assiduity, in political sagacity, in the management 
of his party, and in Constitutional knoAledge, he was a match 
for all his opponents. Mr. Little continued to lead the 
Liberal Party till .858, when he retired from politics and was 
^F^T^^$. ^" assisianl Judge of the Supreme Court: the Hon. 
A. W. DesBarres and J. S. Simms, as istant judges of that 
Court, having been pensioned, Mr. Little and Mr. Robinson 
were appoint"" '" tt^^.v ,^i„„„„ 

Go^^ 



inn iNiiW^UUNULAND QUARTERLY.— 21. 



and in 1859 another appeal was made to the country, th-'s time 
with Mr. Kent as leader of the Liberal Party. The Liberals 
again carried the Gov<-rnment and the Hon. John Kent became 
Premier and Attorney General. ■' The new Administration," to 
again quote trom Judge Prowse'.s history, "was inferior in strength 
to Mr. Little's Cabinet." Mr. Kent, as Prime Minister, was a 
most honest and capable ofificial, but his temper was uncertain. 
He never enjoyed the complete confidence of the Catholic Party 
and of Dr. Mullock, the great Bi^h^p of that time; the real 
leader was Mr. A. Shea. Though the sunshine of prosperity 
had risen upon them, it did not last. From i860 to 186 1 there 
were serious divisions in the Party. The strong and skilful 
hand of Mr. L'ttle was no longer felt, and the great Liberal 
Party of the day began to fall to pieces. Messrs. Shea and 
Kent did not work harmoniously together. In i860 the fish- 
eries partially filled, there was consequent distress, and lavish 
expenditure for relief by able-bodied poor. Mr. Kent was 
opposed to this indiscriminate expenditure. In the autumn of 
i860 there was a special sevi m of the Legislature held before 
Christmas. It w is soon manifest to outsiders that there was 
war in the Liberal Camp. A serious conflict had arisen earlier 
in the year between Bishop Mullock and the administration, 
which called out tlie following letter from His Lordship : — 



our outharbors than all the Houses of Assembly that ever met 
on the Island. 

" The Government, when they saw the matter brought to a 
point, refused to engage her. What was intended only to delude 
the people was about to become a reality, and the contract was 
repudiated. How does it happen that an enormous revenue, 
wasted in providing useless places for State paupers, cannot afford 
the sum of ;^3 000 a year for outport accommodation ? Year 
by year every improvement is put off for want of means, though 
every infant even in Newfoundland pays in taxes £\ a h( ad. 
Will strangers believe that in a British colony the shire town of 
Fortune Bay is in reality further from us than Constantinople ? 
But then we have the satisfaction of seeing thousands upon 
thousands of pounds distributed among our locus-Hke officials. 
We pay heavy taxes, but get comparatively no return ; almost 
all goes in salaries and pretended compensations, and I have no 
hesitation in saying that the collection of revenue under the 
present system is nothing but legalized robbery. I am aware 
that my name is made use of to prop up the supporters of this 
system, but I consider it due to myself, and to those interests I 
advocate to repudiate any connec'ion with a party who take care 
of themselves, but do nothing for the people. This is not a politi- 
cal or a religious qusstiD 1 ; It is one of civilization, in which 




p. F. LITTLE, ESQ.. 
FIRST PRIME MINISTKR UNDER HOME RULE. 

" My Dear People : — 

" I address you this letter on a matter of vital importance to 
your interests, and I consider that my advocacy cf everything cor- 
nected with the improvement of the country gives me a right to 
offer you a few words of advice. The great and paramount 
want of Newfoundland is a facility of communication between 
the capital and the outports ; as long as the outports are left 
isolated, so long will education, religion and civilization be left 
in the background. Newfoundland must remain in that state 
of darkness to which ages of bad government have reduced it. 
Forced by the indignant voice of the people, those whom you 
call your representatives passed a bill granting ;^3,ooo a year 
for five years for outport steam. It appears that, by a dishonest 
quibble, intended to defeat tne project, two steamers were smug- 
gled into the Bill so as to render the offer illusory, in plain 
English a humbug. 

"A beautiful steamer in every way adapted for the purpose, 

engaged to do the service north and south, twice a month, was 

offered in New York ; I visited the ship myself ; and if she was 

^^•n^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m. uld be terminated at 




SOUTH-EAST ARM, PLACEN'TIA. 



Catholics and Protestants, priests and ministers, are equally 
interested." 

DISSENSIONS IN THE GOVERNMENT RANKS. 

The spring session of 186 1 was marked with more dissen 
sions in the Government ranks about poor relief, and an inju- 
dicious utterance of the Premier brought matters to a clima.x. 
The strife in the camp was so keen that there would have been a 
split even if this untoward event had not happened. Mr. Kent, 
in his place in the House of Assembly, openly accused Sir Alex. 
Bannerman of conspiracy with the judges, the lawyers and a 
minority in the House of Assembly to defeat the Government 
Bill fixing the value to be given to sterling money in the payment 
of official salaries. This accusation appeared in the newspapers. 
The Governor wrote to the Colonial Secretary asking for an ex- 
planation. Mr. Kent replied that he did not consider himself 
called upon to give an account of his utterances as a member of 
the Legislature to His Excellency. Immediately on receiving 
this communication, Sir Alexander dismissed his ministry and 
called upon the Leader of the Opposition, Mr. Hoyles, to form 
a new Administration. Mr. Hoyles selected his Governmeni 
and announced its formation to the Assembly. The House was 
immediately dissolved, and a general election took place in 
April, 1861, with the result that the Hoyles combination obtained 
n t'lrn-o moinrifii at thp Pntls anH at onrp resumed control of the 



X J. 1 x^ 



SOME OF MR. little's OUTSTANDING CHARACTERISTICS. 

Mr. Little was a man who formed his decisions slowly, but 
who, having once made up his mind: carried out his ideas with 
persistent steadfastness, regardless of consequences. One of his 
most prominent characteristics was the avoidance of all haste 
and precipitation. A thorough organizer, he directed all his 
efforts on important measures of policy ; but he was quite defi- 
cient in the fantastic element, which gained its ends off-hand by 
the display of daring and brilliant conceptions. It is always 
most interesting to know what a veteran thinks of the net results 
of his life's campaign. As I write I recall conversations I had 
with Sir Frederick Carter and Sir Robert John Pinsent, both 
well up in years like Mr. Little, who looked at life from very 
different standpoints. Sir Frederick was buoyed up by an inex- 
tinguishable faith in progress. " We are like passengers," he 
used to say. " upon one of the Atlantic steamers. We meet each 
other day by day on deck and see very little difference in our 
position, or in the sea or the sky. But every day we are 
nearer our destined port. So it is with human society. We 
may not appear to be making much progress, but depend upon 
it we are ceaselessly forging ahead." James Russell Lowell, 
speaking of Theodore Parker, described the secret of his oratory 
in words which may be somewhat applied to Mr. Little : — 

" Every word that he speaks has been fiercely fumaced 
In the blast of a life that has struggled in earnest : 
His periods fall on you stroke after stroke, 
Like the blows of a lumberer felling an oak." 

At the conclusion of some of his periods, Mr. Little seemed to 
deliver himself as the hunter hurls his spear at his victim, with 
muscles quivering and the whole energy of the man concentra- 

ited into the single act. Nor should I omit to mention another 
notable characteristic of his oratory — the solemnity with which 
the first Premier of our Island appealed to the consciousness of 
his hearers, that if Newfoundland suffered her wretched j-alous- 
ies to thwart the efforts of the Legislature, she had " nothing to 
anticipate but a just judgment at the hands of the Almighty." 

, He, was always alert, vigorous and full of fire and animation, 
confident as to the future of the Colony, and full of complacency 

' as to the Past — with the customary and inevitable reserves and 

i limitations. 

; A MAN FOR THE D\Y AND FOR THE OCCASION. 

Mr. Little was a man for the day and for the occasion. He 
lived in the interests of the hour. His gun was always ready 
loaded and ready for use. His entire constitution i dicated' 
profnpt, clear and distinct thought and action. His skin was 
thin and his nerves lay near the surface, and were easily acted 



upon. His head was too high and '- --^^^^ ^f :i £ 
be underhanded in his movements. As a speaker 't ^°^ ^ ^ 
difficult for him to be governed by policy ^Z t"^^J^^^;^;^Jf 
ODinions The height of the front portion of he top brain indi- 
cated strong sympathies and deep interest in whatever would 
benefit mankind, rendering him liberal in his theology, and 
toTe ant in his feelings towards others. His intuitive powers 
were great ; his mind came to a focus at once; he acted upon 
the spur of the moment; discerned the sign of the times, and 
was alive to the passing hour, and knew how to act as the 
occasion required. For prompt action, for clearness of con- 
ception, for distinctness of character, frankness and openness 
of disposition ; for warm, generous, and spontaneous sympa- 
thies -for prompt decision and tenacity of will, for clearness and 
versatiUty of intellect, few at that day excelled him. Mr. Little 
was as well aware of his own failings as any one else, though 
he could cover up his introspective glances by his large self- 
esteem ; hence the public may not have been aware of that 
personal criticism that he gave himself and others. A man of 
his nature almost always standing on the defensive did not wear 
his heart upon his sleeve and so often his good came to be 
evil spoken of. But at the end of his political career here, 
when the sun of power had shone upon him, he revealed a 
milder and more genial character. The difference between 
Mr. Little and his successor in the Prime Minister's office 
(Mr. Kent), was strikingly obvious. Mr. Little was self- 
reliant; Mr. Kent was self-concei!ed. There is as much differ- 
ence between self-reliance and self-conceit as there is between the 
north and south poles— all the difference in the world I P>om 
the outset of his career Mr. Little was remarkable for the coura- 
geous .'spirit of independence wiih which he formed and maintain- 
ed his opinions, no matter whether the .'■ubject on which he adven- 
tured them was political, historia!, or social. The annexed stanza 
illustrates this phase of his character, and supplies a keynote 
to his conduct : — 

•' Let fortune frown and foes increase. 
And life's long battle know no peace. 
Give me to wear upon my breast 
The object of my eady quest, 
Undimm'd, unbroken, and unchang'd, 
The talisman I sought and gain'd 
The jewel. Independence !" 

In my next article on this interesting subject I shall review 
the public career of Mr! Robert John Parsons, senior — another 
of the " Fathers of Responsible Government" — and the stirring 
incidents connected with the time in which he, too, played his 
part in the political drama. 




Pumper and Aerial Ladder Truck Recently Importi 



int. i\ 



liWl^OUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-23. 



The Passing of Sir Walter Davidson, K.C.M.G. 




HE news received over the cable to the effect that 
Sir Walter Davidson, K.C.M.G., had died on 
September 15th at S)dney, N.S.W., was received 
with the deepest regret by the whole community. 
During the years of his administration as Gov- 
ernor of Newfoundland, by the devoted interest that he took in 
our general welfare, and the wholehearted manner in which both 
he and Lady Davidson associated themselves with every social 
movement that was undertaken during his term of office. Sir 
Walter established for himself a name in Newfoundland history 
that generations to come will recall with the greatest regard and 
respect. -^ 




THE LATE SIR WALTER DAVIDSON, K.C.M.G. 

In August, 19 14, the ominous cry of war sounded throughout. 
the world with piralyzing effect. It was a moment when a 
strong man was required at the head of affairs and one who 
could by his grasp of ihe situaiion and by his ready re.source 
and courage galvanize into life and action the people in his care. 
Newfoundland was fortunate in having as her Governor such a 
man. Stirred by his example, and roused to the necessity of 
immediate action, the people throughout the Island responded 
in a manner that was fully in keeping with the best traditions 
of the race from which they had sprung. As year followed year 
and the strain and anxiety grew greater, so did his strength arid 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m^^^^^Mid the satisfaction in 



Following his term of office here he was selected by the Im- 
perial Government to fill a similar office in New South Wales at 
a time when conditions were critical in that country. Well 
might he have advanced a plea for rest after his strenuous years 
of war service, but such was not Sir Walter Davidson's way. He 
threw himself into the work and, undismayed by criticism or 
even by violent opposition to what he knew was the right 
course to pursue, he persevered and eventually proved even to 
his opponents that he was their friend. 

At the earnest request of the people of New South Wales his 
tenure of office was extended, and now just as he had decided 
to take his well earned rest, part of which he hoped to spend in 
Newfoundland, the call elsewhere came suddenly and, like the 
great administrator that he was, Death found him at his post. 

From every section of the community has gone out de»p-felt 
sympathy to Dame Margaret, who, during the whole trying 
period of the war, proved such a worthy helpmate in all that her 
husband undertook, and who was so well fitted to aid and assist 
in such duties. Her work as President of the Women's Patriotic 
Association will ever be gratefully remembered in this Colony. 
The message of sympathy of His Excellency the Governor will 
find an echo in the heart of every Newfoundlander. 

Sir Walter Davidson was born sixty-four years ago at Killy- 
beagh. County Down, Ireland. He was a Cambridge man, and 
entered the Civil Service in Ceylon in 1880, where he occupied 
various positions of great responsibility throughout a period of 
twenty years. From 1902 to 1904 he was Colonial Secretary 
under Lord Milner in the Transvaal Administration. The next 
eight years were spent as Governor of the Seychelles Islands. 
In 19 13 Sir Walter came to Newfoundland, leaving four years 
later, prior to assuming his Australian Governorship. He was 
twice married, his widow. Dame Margaret Davidson, D.B.E., 
being a daughter of the late General the Hon. Sir Percy 
Feilding, son of the seventh Earl of Denbigh, and the Lady 
Louisa, daughter of the third Marquis of Bath. Two daughters 
of the second family survive and one son of the first. 

Dame Margaret is left to bear the burden of hejrTspfrpw, and 
in that grief Newfouridland shares; but amid it ajl come the 
memories of the zealous service, the faith and loyalty which 
were theirs. Of Sir Walter may it not be said with truth — he 
has fought a good fight, he has kept faith : henceforth there is 
laid up for him a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the 
righteous Judge, shall give him at that day. 



^ 



^ Nantucket. 



^ 



By Robert Gear MacDonald. 

Grey, treeless, isolated, rough, and bleak, 

When o'er the sea Atlantic tempests sounding 

In Autumn, Winter, Spring, and billows pounding 

On every side, their bitter surges wreak 

Upon thy shores. The sight of thee can speak 

Of whaling ships with sides of pine and teak. 

Whose coming home raised shouts of joy redoundiiig 

From Quakers quiet else, or Psalms resounding 

In Puritan's harsh nasal tones unique. 

Gone whaling vessels, gone the solemn psalm 

Uncouth, vanished the Quaker's sober joy ; 

" World's folk" the scanty liviers now employ 

To fetch them wood and water ; and alone 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUA 



^ The Legend of Hatuibac the Discoverer. «^ 




KUK-Koo, the quail, sat on a rock and scolded. 
He was a wise bird, so knowing that he under- 
stood not only the speech but also the unuttered 
thoughts of men. 

Because of the wisdom of I-kuk-koo, some said 
that the spirit of a great one masqueraded in the 
little feathered body. 

Though they flocked not with Ihe quails nor lived the same 
life, all the small birds paid attention to the words of I-kuk-koo. 
Even the jeering macaws and chattering parakeets kept still 
when I-kuk-koo spoke. The wild doves ceased their cooing; 
the woodpecker quit tapping; the humming birds darted to 
places of concealment, indigo bird faded out of sight, when 
I-kuk-kco, the watcful cacique of the quails, called a warning of 
the approach of hawks or human btings. 

Informed, by the glad, peculiar cry of I-kuk-koo, that the 
danger had passed, the hires of the woodland came forth again ; 
the rabbit and the rat ventured out; the chamelon emerged from 
his hiding place and sought a warm spot in the sunshine while 
Toquetzee-all, the mocking bird, with melody shrill, clear 
delightful, far-heard, would praise the sagacity of the ever 
faithful quail. 

If towards men he entertained a dislike that caused them to 
be avoided by all who listened to his voice, Ihuk-koo made an 
exception in the case of Hatuibac, the outcast. 

Second son of the chief of the tribe of Indians that inhabited 
'the Pinar dele Rio country centuries before Columbus came, 
Hatuibac accidentally killed a younger brother. Previously 
looked upon as an unlucky person, his criminal carelessness 
would hive caused his death if he had not been a chief's son. 
Instead of directing his execution, the tiibal council condemned 
Hatuibac to live long exile ; it was ordered that he should 
■ dwell apart, be cut off entirely. 

I Pointedly to direct misfortune to a solitary individual it was 
said that "the land shall be more blessed when Hatuibac 
' swallows fire." 

Compelled to live within bounds, deprived of human com- 
panionshij", forbidden to exercise a warrior's privi'ege, not al- 
lowed to hunt, -'doomed to cultivate the ground like a squaw," 
Hatuibac passed many weary hours, watching the birds or 
learning the ways of animals. 

Since remorse, caused by the death of his little brother, had 

made him swear that never intentionally would he take life again, 

Hatuibac, the exile, refused to kill even the snake that crawled 

I into his camping place. Subsisting on fruits, roots, nuts and 

seeds, he neither ate meat nor attempted to shed blood. 

A rain-drenched quail, just hatched, happened to flutter 
feebly across the path of Hatuibac. Moved by pity, he picked 
' up the bedraggled Itttle bird, took it to his hut, cared for it until 
i the storm had passed, and then put it out in the sunshine where 
it could run and rejoin the flock. The kind act of the Indian 
outcast did not escape the attention of I-kuk-koo, the watchful 
cacique of the quails. 

Nor did the keen-eyed I-kuk-koo fail to fee that Hatuibac 
•lived and acted differently. Unlike other Indians evidently, 
the outcast wouldn't harm a bird. Eventually " vouched for" 
iby the influential I-kuk-koo, lonely Hatuibac had a belter chance 
to become acquainted with the feathered residents of the district. 
With several including Toquetzee-al, the mocking bird, he got 
to be especially friendly. 

A.ssured that no danger threatened his flock, I-kuk-koo would 
perch on a rock and talk seriously to Hatuibac. If the Indian 
was glum and despondent, the knowing quail would include 
cheerfulness. 

How are you to-day ? 



The Origin of Smoking as Described in Cubin Folk Lore. 

weather is f^ne, it's wicked to be grouchy.' 
But my trouble." 



" Hello, old chap I 
ask. 



I-kuk-koo would 



"Ugh! miserable!" was the Indian's answer. 

" Look-a-here, you must cheer up." 

"Why?" 

" Because vou are alive and healthv. RpransP 



thf 



" Ignore it." 

"I can't. I have to stay here." 

" So does that plant growing so thriftily over there. It doesn t 
complain. It gives thanks as it thrusts its roots deeper into the 
soil. Gratefully it accepts the sunshine, eagerly it absorbs 
the rain, bravely it sways its silky leaves in the wind ; it lives 
and rejoices. Are you less intelligent than the plant ? 

" I-kuk-koo, do you liken me to that weed?" 

" I behold its attitude and yours." 

"Impudent bird, tell me of what use is the weed you praise ? 
you wouldn't put a bit of it in your craw. Guayabita, the rat, 
though starved wouldn't eat it. Though it grows green and 
vigorous, it will never become a tree. Its seeds are no good to 
me. The broad silky leaves won't serve to thatch a hut. Nor 
from them could I fashion so much as a durable breech-clout. 
That brave plant I Ugh ! What is it good for ?" 

" Have patience, Hatuibac ; restrain your anger ; be slow to 
speak concerning things of which you know not." 

" That weed ? ' 

" Yes. that weed, as you call it. Since it is here and you 
have noticed it particularly, who knows what the future of that 
herb may be ? Possibly, even you may discover a use for it?" 

Having uttered this rebuke, I-kuk-koo. the quail, flew away. 
But Hatuibac, the solitary man, remained fixed in thought, in- 
tently gazing at the thrifty plant. 

For days he squatted beside the weed and tried to think of 
ways to make it useful. Finally in despair and rage, he smote 
the plant with a stick, not desisting until he had struck oS. all 
the leaves. Then ashamed of his violence, he took the leaves 
and hung them on a pole in his hut that he might see them and 
be admo lished to control his temper. 

A storm came and wrecked the hut. The leaves, all rain 
splashed, tumbled in a pile and wt-re cover by fragments of the 
dislocated roof. Weeks went by before Hatuibac attempted to 
repair his shattered house. When he found the leaves that re- 
minded him of his penitence, he shoved them aside and went on 
with his work. 

Later, squatting by the fire, impatiently watching a yam roast 
he happened to poke the forked cane, that he was using to 
manipulate and test the baking sweet potato, into the pile of 
leaves previously brushed into a corner of the hut. As some 
of the leaves were stuck on the forked stick, he idly thrust them 
into the fire. 

He sniffed the air. He experienced a new sensation. His 
nose was working queerly. What produced that peculiar aroma? 
He would ascertain. 

Lifting the cane, he held the smouldering leaves underneath 
his nostrils. He almost choked as he inhaled some smoke. He 
withdrew the leaves and waited a moment or two. He repeat- 
ed the experiment and kept on until the leaves were consumed. 
He was stimulated, he obtained pleasure such as he never had 
known before. He found a use for the plant. 

In after years, Hatuibac, the wise man, the one who could 
converse wi;h the birds, the wizard who made smoke come out 
of his nose and mouth, was permitted, yea in\ited, to return to 
his tribe. And he taught the Indians of Cuba how to secure 
stimulation, solace and enjoyment by buining the cured leaves 
of the plant now called tobacco. Which word possibly is a 
modernized spelling and pronunciation of the ancient name of 
Hatuibac. 

According to tradition cherished by venerabl narrators of 
folk lore in Western Cuba, the place where Hatuibac, the exi'ed 
Indian, lived and ciscovered the use of the plant, is now known 
as Corojo, land owned by a member of the AUoi es family and 
famous for )ielding some of the choicest tobacco produced in 
the Vuelta Abajo district, 

And one ca. 

farm and hp 



brated 



TTTEL 



i 



iXtWI^OUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 25. 



^ Letters on Newfoundland History. ^ 



By Rev. T. J. Flynn, B.A- 
No. 6. 






^"RiJii; 




TOPSAIL BFACH. 




herp: are several factors of more or less importance 
that contribute to the growth and development of 
a country's resources, but none more so than 
waterways, roads, b:idges and railways. These 
means of communication v\ith the different sec- 
tions of a country as well as with the great world out>ide are 
very necessary to the prosparity of a country and the welfare of 
its people. For many long ysars, centuries we miy say, after 
its discovery this countiy was without any means of communica- 
tion be ween its various settlements save by a sea rou:e, or by 
the rough paths cut through our primeval forests. Indeed it is 
not more than one hundred years ago sines the first road con- 
strue ion was undertaken in this country. T.-diy when we 
walk or diive over our vary fiie roads, and see the interest take i 



in their betterment by such associations as the Road Commission 
and the Motor Association, we see how far we have advanced 
in this department of the civilizino; process for without doubt 
g od roads lead to a better understanding bstween the various 
sections of a country and so the social fabric is more lastingly 
knit. 

To return to the question of our early means of communica- 
tion, it may be said that much could not be expected before the 
granting of Responsible Government. We could scarcely 
expect a road or bridge policy during the reigrts of the Fishing 
Ad nirals and Naval Governors when it was a punishable offence 
to erect a house or cultivate the land. Being a country ivhich 
at that dat° particularly siw nothing m3re thin the fishery as 
an industry, the people rid not bother very much 
whether there were roads or not. A rough wood path enabled 
the fishermen of the outports to take the timber from the forests 




inn- i\ ji vv X vy «_< i^ 1--' j-<i^i> •I--' v^-'*- 



to the settlements. As far as communication with the other 
settlements was concerned, every man had his boat to sail in 
during the summer season, and if during winter the ice prevented 
his using the boat, there would be a track over the ice to the 
next harbour. So it was that before our own representatives 
began to meet to enact our laws and to argue for our welfare, 
the question of roads was not a burning one in our Island Home. 
It may be of interest to note that our first real road was that 
constructed something less than one hundred years ago from St. 
John's to Portugal Cove. This was built so that passengers 
from the city could drive to Portugal Cove and there join the 
packet tor points in Conception Bay. Of a later date are the 
roads around Conception Bay, the Old Piacentia Road, and the 
roads to St. Mary's and Trepassey, as well as the many small 
roads connecting the various settlements around the coast. 

The need of better land comnuir ication was constantly felt and 
as constantly discussed by thougniful cidzens. C -mmunication 
by steamer to the different se.tlement-j was a great blessii'g to the 



All kinds of rumours had been disseminated, causing great in- 
convenience to the Railway builders and workmen who as they 
passed through the various settlements of the "shore" were met 
by a hostile people. But at length all this passed away and it 
was seen what a great advantage the Railway would prove to 
those very settlements that had opposed its coming. By the 
year i8S8 the Thorburn Government which had succeeded the 
Administration of Sir William Whiteway in 1885 completed the 
Piacentia Branch, built as an agricultureal road to open up the 
large tracts of arable land found between Whitbourne and the 
Piacentia terminus. It was left for the Government of Sir 
William Whiteway to complete the road which they did through 
a contractor, Mr. R. G. Reid, well known for his railway con- 
struction work in Canada and other countries. A contract was 
signed in 1890 for the construction of something less than 300 
miles to Notre Dame B.iy, and another cjntract in 1894 for the 
completion of the road to Port aux Basques on the South West 
Coas'. From this point a daily or twice daily service, if found 




THE RF,IDNEWFntINPT,AND Co's. FLEET OF STEAMERS BUILT FOR 1S9S CONTRACT. 



•people, but It did not touch that great unknown interior of the 

country which mu t possess vast mineral weslib, fine limber areas 

^as well as goodly Imd w.iiting for the setder. It was thought 

;hat the time had come when some effort should be made to 

open up the country, a. d as Canada, the United States and 

Jther countries were engig.d in Railway construction, our legis- 

ators turned their thotig^is to Railway development O.it of 

heir de'erminaiior. to do something for opening up the country, 

;:aine the first laiUay bill of 1880 under the Government of Sir 

sVilJiam Whiteway, who was a firm believer in the p )s-ibil:iies 

)f the country and of the absolute necessity of a railway policy 

1 he bill passed the L-gislature and work on a light railway 

arrow gauge of 3^ feet, Irom St. John's to Hall's Bay was under- 

aken m iSSi by an American company. In 1884 the road had 

,een completed as far as Harbor Grace, and in spite of the various 

ifficulties and misrepresentations, which had arisen, the people 



necessary could be mained with thi Conii lent. It tok about 
three years tj complete this division of the roid, which brings 
us to a rather impoiiant period in our Railway Story. 

To discuss Raliway extension i., Newfoundland intelligently 
without mentioning the famous '98 contract would be impossible. 
>et the matter is so controversial and is so comparitively recent 
that one would fain - - •■ 
of an article su^h 



^PCcin t r\ c(^(^ rUc 



pass It over in the limited space 
„ • . n 1 • ^^ ^^^ present. Known as the 

Keid l)<;al It h.is caused more comment and con.motion 
in local poll ics and even to some extent in Canadian aflE.irs 
than even let us admit the q le.tio > of C Jnfeleration. It 
appears that when our Railway Contract was b.ing made in 
1S93 a .mthrr agreement w.s made with th: 
to the operation uf the Road. It was 1 
in operating th" tj .-u„, ,^„___ 

the Governmer 



contractor relative 
I realized from past experience 
hat for 



1. riiL 



iNr.vvruui\ULANU QU ARTERLY.— 27. 



to operate the road for ten years and was to receive in return 
5,000 acres of land for each mile of track. As it was the in- 
tention of the contractor, to open up various works and develop 
the mineral and forest areas along the line of Railway, and as 
the short period of operation and the possible change of opera- 
tors after ten years might prove inimical to his industries, he 
sought in 1897 from the Government of the day an extension 
of the contract. However, a general election coming on that 
year nothing was immediately done, and the Whiteway Ministry 
to which the application had been made was defeated in that 
year. We were given in its place the famous " Reid Deal " of 
1898. This, to describe it very britfiy, gave the Railway to Mr. 
Reid for $1,000,000. He was to operate it for a period of 50 
years for a further land grant of 2,500 acres per mile of track. 
Besides this grant of land certain subsidies were agreed upon 
for mail carriage. The Dry Dock in St. John's built some 
years before by the coun;ry was sold to the contractor as a 
terminal for the Railway. The telegraph service under the 
Government control passed into his hands. He undertook on 
the other hand to build ei^ht modern steamers to connect with 
the train service at various points so as to have an expeditious 
service between t' e capit.1l and the various towns and settle- 
ments along our great stretch of coast line. That this was a 
very important thing for the people of the various bays there is 
no doubt. It enabled freight to be carried direct to the little 
settlements f.ir away from the line of Railway, and it was a 
means when oppirtuiiy offered and if freights could be 
reasonably arranged whereby they could ship their pro- 
duce to the market. It is not my intention to pass 
any judgment on the Contract of 1898 in this paper. It 
was found necessary to change that contract in 1901, when an 
Act was passed by the Government of Sir Robert Bind incor- 
porating the RciJ-Newfoundlaiid Company and arranging a new 



agreement with the operator. This agreement provided for the 
payment to him of ^1,000,000 with interest at 6 per cent, in 
consideration of the reversion of the railway at the end of 1938. 
He received, moreover, $850,000 instead of 2^ million acres of 
land given him for the operation of the Railway under the 50 
year Contract. He surrendered the Telegraph System leaving 
to arbitration any damages for which either party might take 
action. He had certain claims on equipment, rolling stock, etc., 
which with the Telegraph question were submitted to arbitra- 
tion, and which resulted in awards approximately $900,000 and 
one and half million dollars respectively. Under the new 
arrangement the Reid-Newfoundland Co. became contractors 
for the operation of the Railway, the mail and steam services 
around the bays, as well as the Dry Dock at St. John's. The 
Liter history of the Railway is so recent that there is scarcely 
need for comment. By agreement of this year with the Reid 
Newfoundland Co., Ltd., the Railway, Steamboats and Dock 
revert to the Colony, and in return a certain payment has been 
made the contractors in Government of Newfoundland Bonds. 
Since the completion of the Cross Country Railway a good 
deal has been attempted in Railway development. Brancht 
have been built to B.iy-de- Verde, Bonavista and Trepasse) , 
and surveys were made of proposed lines to Bonne Bay and 
Fortune. Indeed work on the latter road was undertaken and 
the rails laid for a considerable distance. However the policy 
of rjilroad promotion resulting in the three branches mentioned 
above and taken up by tiie Morris Administration had to be 
abandoned as a result of war conditions and as at the present 
time there is in every country a curtailment of Railroad expendi- 
ture and a certain conservatism in opening up new lines, it 
seems probable that many years must elapse before railway 
branch extension will be found pr.cticil in this conntry. 



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NEWFOUNDLAND CARIBOU. 



1. I 11^ l.^i:.vvx v^v^j 



^ Fishing Notes.— The Angler's Nook. 



ftoF 



By Robert 

HERE are probably men living who remember when 
the Atlantic salmon was as numerous as its cousin 
the Pacific salmon and filled all the seacoast 
rivers along the northern Atlantic; when the 
^^^^^ seining and the marketing of this noble fish was 
ti>- ^^ industry of no mean order, indeed was one of 

the foremost industries from Connecticut north to Nova Scotia. 
But so keenly was this fish sought after it soon began to pass 
from prominence until to-day we see but a handful in comparison 
with the gigantic host of the past. Is the Atlantic salmon pass- 
? There are those who aver that such is the case ; others 



mg 

are not quite so skeptical and hold tenaciously to the belief that 
the species is as numerous as at any time within the last thirty 
years. But it is probable that such is not the case. Were cor- 
rect observations to be made by men aco.uainted with the matter 
' it would be found that the Atlantic salmon, while not disappear- 
jing, is just about holding its own and t'lat is all. Save for one 
or two rivers flowing into the Atlantic, in the north Atlantic 
■ States of the United States no rivers of the United States con- 
tain them. They are now principally identified with the rivers 
of the Adantic provinces of Canada and are there still sought 
by men of means under circumstances that are very much the 
same as when salmon fishing was boosted to the skies, and was, 
in truth, the sport of kings — kings of finance, then, as now. 
Newfoundland is now probably as well known as a salmon fish- 
ing locality as any and, of course, having the reputation the 
':endency of anglers to go there in preference to any other place 
is very marked. In one year a rod tax amounting to close on 
three thousand dollars was taken in in the province, the season 
lasting from the first of June to the fifteenth of September. In 
that year a matter of six thousand salmon were taken by rod, 
the largest being a forty-four pounder that was playt-d for an 
■hour on a ten ounce greenheart \od before it was finally gsffed. 
I Newfoundland has probably some of the fine-t .'■almon rivers in 
, North AiTieiica. There are the Little and the Gr, nd Codroy, 
nuch exploited by writers; eight hundred fish were taken on 
he south branch of that river in one lucky season. Other not- 
ible streams of Newfoundland are Crabb's River, Robinson's 
Flead, Fishel's River, Harry's River, Portland Ciesk, Hawk's 
Bay River and the Main and West Rivers. The b st salmon 
rshing rivers of eastern Newfoundland are the Gai der River, 
he Gambo River and its tributaries; Indian Brook and Hall's 
Bay; and near St. John's good fishirg is had in Trepassey 
River, the Salmonier and Placentia; in ihe southern part of the 
1 sland good fishing is had in the Keel's River, Corne River and 
he Grandy River. It is possible for .'■almon fishing in these 
ivers to he of worthvihile notice owing to the protection that is 
low given the fish especially during the spawning runs, or when 
hey are collected in the poc-ls. In the past there were no 
' estrictions and netting of the salmon was quite the proper thing. 
The Atlantic salmon is now propagated in Canada simply for 



Page Lincoln. 

1 .uof ;c tn eav the fish are not planted that 

sentimental reasons— that is to say, tne die t^ 

they may be increased for commercial reasons. Ihe fish is now 

important merely as an angler's fish but that is sufficient and of 

course calls many to Newfoundland for that very reason. 

On some rivers it is easier to say that the largest salmon to 
be caught is under fifteen pounds, although I believe one has 
been taken out of the Restigouche that weighed something like 
sixty pounds. I believe that the largest Atlantic salmon there 
is record of was captured off the coast of Ireland m the year 
i88i and weighed close to eighty-five pounds. That is of course 
an exceptional fish for this species. 

There are two distinct runs of the Atlantic salmon. The first 
one occurs in the spring or the early summer and the reason of 
it, I believe has never been settled although it is highly possible, 
indeed very probable that it is merely a feeding run, that they 
follow the spawning smelt up the rivers. The second run 
occurs in the autumn and this is surely, and distinctly the 
spawning run. It occurs in the month of October or November 
and at the conclusion of the spawning operations the inale fish 
go down again to the ocean. Some of them are now in an al- 
most grotesque condition and most unsavory appetizing; being 
lean and more than half starved. It is said by some that the 
Atlantic salmon does not take in any food during or after the 
conclusion of the duties of reproduction. This is not 
true for when the run downstream is made these spent salmon, 
now knowned as "kelts" pursue the younger salmon and make 
food of them. They are, at this stage, the worst enemies that 
the younger salmon have. It has been suggested that the de- 
stroying of these ' kelts" would result favourably in the protec- 
tion of the young salmon, though to what a degree this is open 
to debate. When the older salmon return to the salt water they 
start in feedirg again on the crustaceous of the sea, & shrimps, 
crabs and the myiiad other foods that swim and creep in the 
ocean. They speedily regain their lost weight and recover sur- 
prisingly well after their experience upstream. 

It is said of this salmon that it always seeks the parent stream 
in which to go up and spawn. 

By this is meanf that the salmon will ascend to spawn in the 
stream in which it was born no matter how far it is away from 
that stream. 

Of course there is no -real proof that anything of this sort is 
the case but the proposition is a feasible one. The moxements 
of the salmon up and down the Canadian rivers is by no means 
ascertained. Oie writer, after a long study of the matter, has 
stated that : " Someone h is said th it salmon are probably run- 
ning up and down Canadian rivers in every month of the year, 
and, while this is no doubt puiely conj-;cture I should not like 
to say that it is not true. There is very much yet to be learned 
about the movements of this noble game fish." — Rod and Gun 



in Canada. 




" A REAL LITTLE SPORT" WATCHING 

FOR A BIG ONE, HE BEATS HIS 

BROTHER WITH THE LARGEST 

SALMON AT PINSENT FALLS 

FOR MATCY \EARS. 



^ How the Little White Cloud Grew Big. ^ 



For the Children.— By Amy E. Mack. 




^^E was (he softest, darlingest little Cloud that ever 

I'M floated across a summer sky. He had come out 

Y of (he east with the fiist little morning breeze, and 

J now he was gently drifting up the sky, one tiny 

^^ white cloud against the stretch of blue. 

Although there was not another cloud to be seen 
as far as the eye could reach, he was not lonely, for it was his 
first day in the world, and everything around him was new and 
wonderful. Up from the earth below came the song of the birds 
as they greeted the new day, and the cloud stopped still to 
listen to the beautiful music. Then a little Breeze blew' up, and 
calling, "Come and pla)'," drove the Cloud rolling before him. 
Over the sky they went, laughing happily, the Cloud racing along 
in front, and the Breeze chasing him and blowing his white coat 
all over his face. 

" Oh, this is lovely !" cried the Cloud. " I could race with 
)0u for ever, dear Breeze.' 

"It is nice, isn't it ?" said the Breeze. " But I'm sorry I can- 
not stay. I must go down and play with the leaves. They're 
very hot, poor things, and they will be miserable if I don't go." 
"I don't want the leaves to be miserable, but what shall I do 
without you ?" asked the Cloud sadly. 

" Go and look at the Sun, and tell him that he is very cruel to 
shine so hard on the poor trees." 

" But I should be afraid to speak to the Sun," said the Cloud. 
" Besides, I don't know how to find him." 

'■ Go straight on up the sky, and \ou will come to him," called 
the Breeze, as she flew away to-wards the tree-tops. 

The Cloud looked after her wistfully, for she had been a merry 
playmate. Still, he did not want to go down amongst the tree- 
tops. It was nicer up in the blue sky. So he drifted slowely on 
by himself, dreaming happily. He was just wondering whether 
he would dare to go up to the Sun and give him the Breeze's 
message — for the Sun, you know, is the king of the sky, and 
little Clouds are rather afraid of him — when he heard a swish, 
swish, swish, like the sound of a noisy Breeze, and a voice cried 
out : — 

" Hullo, young Cloud ! What are you doing here ?" 
He looked round, and saw an Eagle coming towards him, his 
broad wings flapping loudly. 

" I'm not doing anything," said the Cloud. " I'm just here." 
The Eagle laughed. 

" I can see you are just here," he said, " and I must say that 
I am very surprised to see you just here. You're the first Cloud 
I have seen for many a day. Where are all your brothers and 
sisters ?" 

" I don't know," said the Cloud. " I don't think I have any. 
I don't know anyone except the Breeze, and — and" — very 
shyly — " I was jusi thinking about going to talk to the Sun." 

"Oh, were you? Well, I don't think the Sun will be very 
pleased to see you. He is in a zery bad temper this summer. 
I go up to see him every day, and J stare right into his face, and 
it makes him crosser than ever. Most things are afraid to look 
at him, but I'm not." said the Eagle, proudly. 

" You must be very brave," said the Cloud admiringly. 
" Oh, yes, I'm brave enough, and I'm strong, too. Some 
poor things shut their eyes in terror when they see the Sun, but 
I keep mine wide open and stare right into his face." 

" I don't think I'ln very brave or very strong," said the Cloud 
"but I should like to look into his face and give him the mes- 
sage from the Breeze." 

'■ Well, if you really want to see him 1 11 take you with me," 
said the Eagle. "Come along, before he goes too far away." 

So the two went sailing off across the sky together ; and a 
funny pair they made, the black Eagle and the little white Cloud, 
the only two things moving across the wide blue heavens. 

As they drew nearer the Sun it became much better, and the 
Fnaip o^iH " I'm afraid he is in a burning rage this morning . 

won't let him shrivel 



an 



He had hardly finished speaking when a loud voice cried 

igrily, " What's that Cloud doing there ? Didn't I say no 
Clouds were to come into the sky this summer ?" 

Before the Cloud had time to realise that the Sun was talking 
to him. the Eagle answered : — 

" Now, then. Sunny, don't get excited. He's only a little 
Cloud, and won't do any harm." 

" I know these little Clouds," shrieked the Sun. " They all 
begin little, and then they grow big and cover the whole sky. 
" What do you want here ?" he yelled. 

This time the Cloud answered for himself. Very gently he 
rolled towards the Sun and said, " I have a message from the 
Breeze. She said to tell you that you are very cruel to shine so 
hard on the poor trees." "What!" shrieked the Sun, "the 
Breeze to tell me — Well, of all the impueence! I'll shrivel you 
up. Get out of this !" 

" Keep cool. Sunny," said the Eagle, who was really enjoying 
the scene. " Remember that you are the king of the sky, and 
they are only children." 

" Yes, I am the king of the sky, and I'll teach those children 
how to behave. And you, too, Mr. Eagle, dont you come here 
staring at me any more." 

The Eagle looked straight into his face and laughed as he 
said: " I am going, not because I am afraid of you, my fine 
fellow, but because I prefer company with better manners." 

Then turning to the Cloud he said, " Come on, little Cloud ; 
this is no place for younsters." 

So off the two went together across the sky. 

"Why does he hate me so much ?" asked the Cloud. " And 
why doesn't he want me to stay in the sky? There's plenty of 
room for us both." 

"You might think so, but when the sun is in a real burnmg 
rage he wants the whole sky to himself, and cannot bear the 
sight of one of your family." 

Before the Cloud had time to ask another question they heard 
a voice calling s-ftly, "White Cloud, White Cloud, wait for me," 
and there was the Breeze coming towards them. 

But she was no longer the merry, happy litde Breeze that had 
played with the Cloud in the early morning. Softly and sadly 
she drew near, sighing gently as she came. When she was 
quite close she asked eagerly: — 

" White Cloud, did you go up to the sun ?" 

"Yes I did." 

"And did you give him my message?" 

"Yes I gave him your message; but — " 

" What did he say? Oh, what did he say ? Will he be kind 
to the trees, and stop burning them up?" 

The Cloud told the Breeze what the Sun had said, and shook 
his head sadly as he finished up : " I a'm afraid he won't be 
kind to the trees. He's in a very bad temper." 

The Breeze sighed pitifully as he listened to the Cloud's 
words. "Its no use, then," she moaned. "Poor trees I poor 
trees! I'll have to let them die-" 

" I don't see why you should," said the Eagle suddenly, "for 
if you and the Cloud joined forces you could soon make him 
stop his wicked games." 

" We could make him stop !" cried the Cloud and the Breeze 
together. How ? Oh, Eagle, tell us how 1" 

" Well if you two both worked hard, and brought the ram up 
here, the Sun would soon stop burning, and the trees would not 

die." 

" But how could we bring the rain ? We are both so little 1" 

" Yes, you are certainly both rather small. You would have 
to grow a bit." 

" But how could we grow ?" 

"Oh, I can't answer any more questions," said the Eagle. 
" I must go and look for my dinner. You go and ask the Sea. 
She'll tell you how you can grow. Good-bye, and good luck to 

(Continued on page 32.) 



###®®@^ 



,A /7SV>. /. 



^ 



H 



W/7i 



-1> 






^■Cjv 



^ Songs of The Earth. ^ 



[The following poems are translated from the Chinese. They 
are by various poets of the classic period of the eight century 
A.D. Four poets are represented. Li-T'ai-Po (A.D. 705-762), 
Chang Tse and Meng Hao-Jan (A.D. 689-740) and Wang Wei 
(699-759). These poems were used by the late Gustave 
Mahler as a libretto for a symphoric music suite.— Ed.]. 

I. 

THE DRINKING-SONG OF THE WOEFULNESS 
OF THE EARTH. 

(After Li-T'ai-Po.) 

Already beckons the wine in the golden goblet, 
Do not drink yet — first I will sing you a song ! 
The song of sorrow must in your soul be changed to 

laughter. 
When sorrow is nigh, the soul's garden is a desert waste 
Joy and song wither and die. 
Sombre is life, is death. 

Loid of this House ! 

Thy cellar stores abundance of golden wine ! 

Here, this lule I call mine ! 

To play the lute and empty the glasses 

These are things that count. 

A full beaker of wine at the right time 

Is worth more than all the riches of ihis ear!h ! 

Sombre is life, is death 1 

The heavens are ever blue and the earih 

Will long stay firm and bloom in spring. 

But thou, O Man, how long liv'st thou ? 

Not a hundred years ma}s thou de) ght thyself 

In all the rotting baubles of this earth ! 

Look there — below ! In the moonlight over the graves 

Crouches a wild and ghostly form — 

An ape 'tis 1 Hear ye, how its howling 

Pierces through the sweet perfume of life ! 

Now take the wine ! Now 'tis time, comrades! 

Empty )Our golden beaker to the bottom [ 

Sombre is life — is death ! 



II. 
THE LONELY ONE IN AUTUMN. 

(After Chang- Tsi.) 

Autumn clouds float in the blue over the lake ; 
With frost is tipped each blade of grass ; 
One might think, an artist, with dust of jade 
O'er all the delicate blossoms has strewn. 

The sweet perfume of flowers has passed away 
A coid wind has bent their stalks down, 
Soon will the withered, golden petals. 
Of the Lotus flowers be scattered on the water. 

My heart is weary. My little lamp 

Sputters and goes out— it seems to me to sleep. 

1 come to thee dear resting place [ 

Yea, give me rest, I have need of refreshment I 

I weep much in my loneliness. 

The autumn in my heart too long endure;^. 

Sun of Love, wilt thou ne'er more shine, 

My bitter tears to dry with thy tender beams ? 



in. 

OF YOUTH. 

(After Li-T'ai-Po.) 

In the midst of the little pool 
Stands a Pavilion of green 
And white porcelain. 

Like the back of a tiger 
Arches the bridge of Jade 
Over fo the Pavilion. 

In the little house sit friends 

In splendid raiment, drinking, chatting, 

Some are writing verses. 

There silken sleeves are slipping 

Backwards, their silken caps 

Merrily deck the backs of their necks. 

On the little pool the quiet 
Water's surface shows each object 
Wondrously in mirror-pictures. 

Everything on its head is standing 
In the pavilion of green 
And white porcelain ; 

L'ke a half-moon stands the bridge. 

Reversed the arch — friends. 

In splendid raiment, drinking, chatting. 

IV. 
OF BEAUTY. 

(After Li-T'ai-Po.) 

Young maidens are plucking flowers 

Plucking Lotus flowers on the bank of the stream, 

Amidst the bushes and leaves they sit. 

Gathering blossoms in their laps and calling 

To each other banteringly. 

The golden sun weaves around their forms. 

Mirrors them in shining water — 

The sun mirrors their slender limbs 

Their sweet eyes — 

And the gentle breeze lifts with flattering caress 

Their sleeves, and wafts the magic 

Of their fragrance through the air. 

And look! how the handsome bojs 

Exercise their spirited steeds by the river's edge! 

Brilliant afar like the sun's bright rays ; 

Now 'twixt the branches of the green willows 

Trot the blithe young folk along ! 

The horse of one of them neighs with joy 

And shies and rushes away. 

Over flowers, gras-;, his hoofs patter — 

They stamp to pieces as by a sudden storm the trampled 

blossoms. 
Hi 1 how flutters in frenzy his mane. 
How hot steam his nostrils ! 
■The golden sun weaves about the forms. 
Mirrors them in shing water — 
And the fairest of the maiden sends 
Long glances of longing after him. 
Her haughty pose is but a pretense 
In the spari-'" ^' '- - ' 
In the darl^— 
There beat, 



vvx v^uiNjji^/iiNU gUARTERLY.— 31. 



V. 
THE DRLNKEN ONE IN SPRING. 

(After Li-T'ai-Po.) 

If life is only a drea.n, 
Why all this toil and torment ? 
I drink, till I can drink no more 
Thro' the livelong day! 

And when I no more drink can hold, 
When throat and soul is full, 
I tumble down before my door — 
And sleep — a sleep of joy ! 

What hear I when I wake ? Hark ! 
A bird sings in the tree. 
I ask it if 'tis springtime yet — 
I'm still half in a dream. 

The bird twitters : Yes ! Spring 
Is here, it has come over night! 
I listen then with all my ears — 
The bird sings and laughs ! 

I fill me up my cup anew 

And drain it at one draught 

And sing till lo ! the moon shines forth 

From skies so darkly blue ! 

And when the pow'r of song has left — 
I sleep again so sound — 
What care I for springtide joys — 
Let me get drunk again ! 

VI. 
FAREWELL. 

(After Meng Hao-jan and Wang Wei.) 
The sun disappears behind the mountains. 
In all the v.iUey descends the evening 
With its shadows full of coolness. 



Behold ! Like a bark of silver floats 

The moon on the biue lake of heaven. 

I see the gentle breezes waving 

Behind the dark pines. 

The brook sings its melody thro' the darkness. 

The flowers pale in the twilight, 

The earth breathes forth rest and sleep. 

Ev'ry longing is lulled to dreaming. 

Weary mankind goeth homeward.s. 

In sleep, forgotten happiness 

And youth newly to learn ! 

The birds roost quietly in the branches. 

The world sleeps? 

A cool breeze blows in the shadow of my pine^ 

I stay here and awa't my friend ; 

I await him for a last farewell. 

I long, O friend, at thy side 

The beauty of this evening lo enjoy. 

Where art thou > Thou leav'st me long alone i 

I wander up and down with my lute 

On paths that swell with pale grass. 

beauty ! O eternal love — life — drunken world ! 
* * # # # 

He dismounts and hands his friend the drink 
Of farewell He asks him, whether 
He goes, and also why such a thing must be. 
He spoke, his voice was veiled : Thou my friend 
Wert not — in this world — fated for happiness 5 
Whither go I ? I go — I wander in the mountains. 

1 seek repose for my lonely heart. 

I journey toward my native place, my home ! 

I shall never stray in distant lands. 

Calm IS my heart; it awaits its hour. 

The dear earth everywhere blooms in spring and grows 

green 
Anew. Everywhere and everywhen the distance glows 

with blue — 
Ever . . . evei . . . 




LABRADOR FISHING SCHOONERS. 



^ When Sleepy-Time Comes. ^ 



When sleepy-time comes, my beloved. 

When sleepy-time comes. 
And you have grown weary of soldiers 

And trumpets and drums. 
And all the near things have grown hazy 

And misty and far, 
And your dear little peepers too lazy 

To watch for your star 1 

O then come to me, my beloved, 

O then come to me, 
And gently away we'll go swaying 

Great wonders to see. 
T'lt /^iiririit. »rnii rlnsp tn mv nerk. dear, 



By P. Florence Miller. 



How the old chair will rock, my beloved, 

O how it will rock ! 
How the squeak of its time-worn old rockers, 

My singing shall mock! 
Your own folk deem rocking a bother, 

The doctors say " no," 
But I'm not your dad nor your mother 

And so we may go. 

Away and away, nvy beloved. 

Where wonder-dreams dwell ! 

This chair has made many a journe)', 
It knows the -vay well ; 

For the sound of its old squeaky buzz, dear, 
With mother-sweet hums, 

oi-_ii _i: *^ « U.nK»» fUof isinc r\cnr 



(Continued from page 29.) 
you." And the Eagle sailed off, and was soon just a black 
speck agiinst the blue sky. 

"I came up from the sea this morning," said the Cloud, •' so 
she must know something about me. Come on little Breeze. 
We'll go and ask the Sea how we can grow." 

So off the two friends went, the white Cloud and the little 
Breeze, travelling together as fast as they could across the blue 
sky. 

And down on the Earth below, where the poor trees were 
shrivelling and dying, the men looked up to the blue sky, and 
said, " Oh there's a cloud at last. Perhaps it will bring the 
Rain." 

The two little friends heard the echo of the men's voices, and 
said to each other, " We must, we must!" Then on they went, 
across the sky towards the Sea. 

And when evening came they had gone so far that they could 
see the Sea lying just before them. Away in the west the Sun 
was glaring angrily, with his great red burning eye, but the two 
friends were not afraid of his anger, for they were very near the 
Sea now, and they knew that the Eagle was right, and that the 
Sea would teach them how to grow. 

So they hurried on, and very soon they were right over the 
Sea. Just as they reached her, the sun shot long burning shafts 
across the sky ; but tliey were too far away, and the shafts could 
not reach them. And then before the Sun could do anything 
more. Night came, and pushed him down over the edge of the 
world. 

The Sea received them wiih open arms and a smiling face. 

" I am glad to see yov," she said. " f 've had no one to play 
with all day — only the old Sun, and he's too cross." 

"We'll play with you for a little while, dear; but then will 
you tell us how to grow?" 

•' Why do you want to grow ?" asked the Ssa in surprise. 
" You are both very nice as you are." 

" Oh, no, we are not nearly strong enough," cried the Cloud, 
and then they told the Sea all about it. 

She listened quietly as they told her of the poor drooping 

I trees all burnt and shrivelled, and of their looking up into the 

, sky and searching for a sign of rain; of the Sun's anger and 

' rudeness to them, and of the Eagle's advice. And when they 

had finished their tale she said : — 

"Yes, I think that naughty Sun had his own way quite long 
enough. Poor old Earth, how she must have suff-red ! Now 
come close, little children, and I will whisper to you how you 
can grow big and strong enough to fight the Sun." 

The two fiiet:ds crept close to the Sea's face, and she 
whispered her secret, which is as old as the world. And as the 
two friends heard her they swelled wiih pride, for they knew 
I that now they would .soon be able to fight the Sun. 



So all night long the Sea talked to them, and they listened ; 
and everv hour they grew stronger and stronger ihen the 
Breeze, no longer soft and sighing, rushed off with a whirl and 
a whizz, shouting with a loud voice as he went And the 
Cloud, no longer soft and white, but big and thick and dark, 
dark grey, rolled up and up till he almost covered the face of 

the Sea. . • j u /-■i 1 

"I'm big enough now to bring the Rain, cried the Cloud, 

and spread out his arms in pride. And as he did so there came 

a splish, splash, splosh, and down came the Rain. 

" Now we'll save the poor trees, bellowed the Breeze. 
"Now we'll show the Sun that he can't have all the sky to him- 
self," roard the Cloud. 

" Well, now's your chance," said the Sea. " Here he comes." 

And, sure enough, there was the tip of the Sun's head just 
creeping up over the edge of the world. Slowly, slowly, but 
very surely, he came up, up, a big round red face on the grey 
morning sky. But he did not look nearly so angry and hot- 
headed as he had been the day before. 

" You can'i have the whole sky to yourself to-day," said the 
Cloud, who was now big enough to hide both sky and sea. 

" You can't shrivel and burn the trees again to-day," shriektd 
the Bretze, who was now as strong as a hurricane. 

" We've brought the Rain," cried they both together, "and 
the Rain will make you behave yourself." 

Then to their amazement, the Sun grinned at them in quite a 
jolly way, and said in a perfectly friendly voice: — 

" I'm really glad you've come. 1 was growing rather tired 
of having all the sky to myself, and I don't want to kill the trees. 
Besides" — and here he lowered his voice — - ' When you sail 
across the sky in front of me, Cloud, the Eagle can't come and 
stare into my face. It was that that made so angry." 

The Cloud and the Bretze roared with laughter. "Poor old 
Eagle ! Why, it was he who told us how to grow big enough to 
cover you up. and how he will suffer himself !" 

" Not he," said a voice beside them, and there was the Eagle 
himself soaring through the air. "To tell you the truth, my 
e^es were growirg tired from staring i;t the Sun. 

" Well," laughed the Sea, "It seems that you have all got 
what )0u wanted, so I think you had better go and visit the 
poor old Earth. She will be glad to see you." 

" Yes," cried ihe Breeze. "I must go and freshen up the 
trees. Come, Cloud ; come, Rain ; come, Eagle !" 

" Coming!" cried the others ; and over the sea went racing 
the Cloud, the Breeze, the Rain, ar.d the Eagle, while the Sun 
followed slowly in their wake. 

And on the Earth the n;en s.:w them coming, and cried aloud 
in a joyful voice, "Here's Rain at last! Here's the Rain ! 
That little white Cloud has brought the Rain ! 

And everythirg on Earth was glad. 




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Hygienic Value of Cigarette Smoking as Showen by Numerous Tests. 

When Moderately Indulged in Is Not Only Agreeable But Most Beneficial to Health— Refreshes and 

Renews Energies of Workers Performing Laborious Tasks— Cigarettes Restore Vigor 

to Tired Toilers Quicker Than Any Other Agency. 

By Dr. Arthur Selwyn-Brown. 

dealing with Polar exploration or sea adventures, and in every 
case i*! will we found that tobacco is praised, and smoking is 
commended to men for the benefits it bestows. 




^SYgYGiENic value of cigarette smoking has many times 
been demonstrated. Cigarette smoking when 
I moderately indulged in is not only pleasant but 
IqI most beneficial to the health. Everyone who has 
^I^S the management of large forces of men engaged 
in hard manual labor knows how important it is 
to give short breathing spells to the men. If they are supplied 
with cigarettes during such times, they will do the work, when 
it is resumed, in a magical manner. The power of the cigarette 
to restore vigor to lired workmen is unequalled by any other 
known agency. There is ample experience the world over to 
prove that. The observations of military commanders are full 
of accounts of the good effects of cigarette smoking on soldiers 
engaged in long marches or in heavy trench excavating. 

BENEFICIAL EFFECTS ON SOLDIERS. 

The importance of promoting cigarelte smoking among 
soldiers during the great European war was generally recognized 
and as experience was gained, the men were enabled to smoke 
more and more. Societies were formed the world over to pro- 
mote cigarette smoking among soldiers by supplying them with 
cigarettes. Medical opinion on the benefits which accrued to 
soldiers on ac'.ive field duties from smoking confirmed the 
observations of the regimental commanding officers. The result 
of this exp'^rience is now being shown by the after-the-war in- 
creases in the riianufacture and sale of cigarettes all over the 
world. Cigarette smoking was found beneficial during the war 
and is now being promoted on its merits. 

APPROVED BY MEDICAL AUTHORITIES. 

The British Medical Journal, in April, 1909, published a 
report on the chemical investigation of British tobaccos. Many 
interesting facts were brought out by this report. One was that 
Virginia, or bright yellow leaf tobacco, contains more nicotine 
than Turkish or Egyptian tobaccos. One of the most important 
results was that the heat in smoking destroyed the bulk of tie 
nicotine and other volatile substances in the cigarette, cigar and 
pipe and that very little travelled with the smoke in the mouth. 
That explained why smoking has so few apparent influences 
upon heavy smokers. 

GERMICIDAL AND INSECTICIDAL. , 

In the S2.mt Jonr?ial, on March 24, 1917, Dr. S. Mallannah" 
bacteriologist to the Nizam of Hyderabad, reports on his ex 
periences of tobacco as a germicide and insecticide in India, 
during plagues and fever epidemics. Smoking was found 
extremely beneficial during the great plague in England. In a 
recent epidemic in India, smokers and those who spread to- 
bacco and tobacco leaves on the floors, walls and other parts 
of buildings largely escaped contagion. It was found that the 
tobacco smoked and scattered about to destroy the plague germs 
also destroyed fleas, bugs, mosquitos, flies and other insects. 

Dentists are alarmed by the spread of germs in the moi;th 
and the general injury caused by them to the health. Experi- 
ments show that there are far fewer germs in the mouths of 
cigarette smokers than in those of non-smokers, and this is be- 
lieved to be one of the important causes of heavy smokers 
enjoying better health and physical powers than non-smokers. 

IMPORTANT AID TO SEAMEN. 

The great sea explorers were mostly heavy smokers No 
modern ship ever went to sea on a voyage of exploration with- 
out ample tobacco supplies. Tobacco is a generally recognized 
necessity for all men who are called upon to undergo great 
physical hardships. Consequently, the accounts of Arctic and 
other sea exploring expeditions ought to show, not that smoking 
that it is beneficial to men. That is really 



is deleterous but 



IMPORTANCE IN POLAR EXPEDITIONS. 

In the famous De Long account of the Jeannette Polar ex- 
pedition in the Arctic there are numerous complimentary 
references to smoking and, in Vol. II, page 7 17, the following 
extract from the log is given : " Our rations are now exceedingly 
simple. The coffee being gone we have tea at each meal. 
For breakfast we have beef extract, tea and pemmican ; for 
dinner, beef extract tea and pemmican, for supper, beef extract, 
tea and pemmican. But we seriously feel the absence of 
tobacco. Those who have a little piece left use it rarely and 
sparingly, and the lucky ones are few in number. The rest go 
without, or smoke cofifee-grounds, or coffe-grounds and tea- 
leaves mixed. The smoking of coffee-grounds gives our tent 
the odor of a grocery where coffee is being roasted." 

It was more than habit that made the men of \.\\& Jeannette 
miss the loss of their tobacco supplies more than oatmeal, milk, 
sugar and other common food articles. Their hardships and 
privations were eased by smoking and their living conditions 
were made endurable by the pleasant effects of the tobacco 
smoke. 

VALUABLE TO GREELY'S CREW. 

In greeley's Three Years of At die Service, Vol. II, page 228, 
the value of tobacco is testified to by the following exrract from 
the log, dated January 22, 1884: " Lieutenant Lockwood was 
in very depressed spirits this morning owing to his deprivation 
of tobacco. It is to be noticed that a similar effect has been 
produced on every man when his supply has given out, or when 
he has been directed medically to refrain from it." 

Smoking, particularly cigarette smoking, strengthens the will 
powers of men exposed in critical situations and undergoing 
abnormal hardships. It keeps their spirits up and enables 
their health to remain good. When they are suddenly stopped 
from smoking and the beneficial effects of tobacco are not 
operating, th-y give way to the strains experienced. Then the 
splendid work tobacco does for them can be dramatically 
demonstrated by their suddenly changed conditions. 

CIGARETTES SUPPORT MOUNTAIN CLIMBERS. 

The recent attempts of British explorers to scale the topmost 
heights of Mount Everest, the greatest mountain peak in the 
world, brings before us the value of cigarette smoking in the 
strongest pos.^ible manner. It was found that cigarette smoking 
at high altitudes promotes breathing and the oxidation of the 
blood and promotes man's capacity for physical endurance bet- 
ter than any other known agency.' The actual, practical tests of 
the value of cigarette smoking at high altitudes confirms the 
century old experience of sea and land travellers with regard to 
the physical aid cigarette smoking gives to men engaged in 
meeting physical hardships. 

Mount Everest, the outstanding peak of the Himalaya Moun- 
tains, 29,142 feet above sea level, situated between Thibet and 
India, just where the great plateau of Thibet drops down to the 
plains of India, has attracted the attention of explorers for 
nearly two centuries. It has always baffled them. Sir Joseph 
Hooker tried to scale the high peaks in 1848. 1849 and 1850. 
The Schhgintweit brothers climed Mou;t K^mit, one of the 
peaks 25,447 feet high in August, 1853. A Government sur- 
veyor, W. H. Johnson, clime,] Mount Lth, 21,500 feet, fn 1S60, 
cutting survey marks on that peak and many <>thers which are 

plainly visible ■ -tcured 

the data and u;^k «„r 



X V A-J V V 



v-'V-'J.ll^l^i-l.l.Ml^ 



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the mountains. Another surveyor, named Pocock, built a 
trigonometrical station on Eastern Kaiiiit in 1875, and in tlie 
same year, Sir Francis Younghusband crossed through the 
newly discovered Mastagh Pass on his journey from China to 
India. 

Sir Martin Conway ascended the Hispar Glacier, and climbed 
the summit of Pioneer Peak, 22,600 feet high, in 1893. Dr. 
Longstaff climed Gurla Mandhata, 25.350 feet in 1905 and in 
1907, he succeed in scaling Trisul, 23,360 feet in height. The 
Duke of the Abruzzi reached an altitude of 24,583 feet in 1909 
and in 1910, '12, '13, C. F. Meade made many expeditions up 
Mount Kamit, and reached an altitude of 23,50011. Many other 
explorers did minor work in each year since the Hooker Ex- 
peditions began their scientific explorations of the mountains. 
All these explorations were baffled by strange physical difficul- 
ties. The lack of oxygen at high altitudes caused much 
" mountain sickness." 



that they are now planning a new expedition in the coming 
season. The use of artificial oxygen carried in cans, a diet of 
sugar candy and tea, and copious supplies of cigarrettes are the 
means that are expected to lead the future explorers to victory. 
Men who do hard physical work must not eat mixed food in 
quantity. Sugar is digested easily and quickly and is an ideal 
tood for mountaineers. The beneficial effects of cigarrette 
smoking are not properly understood. They, however, were 
found so extraordinary that non-smokers among the expedition 
were forced to smoke them in order to keep up with the pro- 
nounced smokers, and it is safe to announce that no moun- 
taineers will ever again seek to conquer high altitudes without 
the aid of the cigarette. 

CIGARETTE SMOKING SUSTAINED BY SCIENCE. 

Science, of course, confirms what the general experience of 
mankind shows to be the beneficial effects of cigarette smoking. 



r 



'\ 





Smoke 



BELLBUOY 

Cigarettes. 

imp iih0k^^^' 



Cigarette smoking when mod- 
erately indulged in is not only 
agreeable but most beneficial 
to health. — Refreshes and re- 
news energies of workers per- 
forming laborious tasks. — 
Cigarettes restore vigor to tired 
toilers quicker than any other 
agency. 



imperial S^baccoC^ 

(t^tirfhuntlfand) Jj '—■ 



V. 



J 



CIGARETTES FURNISH THE ANSWER. 

Only a third of the ordinary amount of oxygen is in the air a^ 
the top of Mount Everest as compared with the fo^^Wls^ Fhe 
problem is : how can the human body ^:=^'''''X^£J^.^^s 
deficiency ? The cold, storms, difficulties in establishing camps 
and base stations at high altitudes and similar P™bl«J^ ^"^J^^ 
solved when the means ^r overcoming the troubles due t„ the 

insufficient oxidation of the blood at high altitudes c^n ^e °lve^; 
Can cigarette smoking serve as the key to these great questions 

The expedition led by Captain Geoffery Bruce, which at^ 
tempted to^cale Mount Everest in '9", reached a hight of 
.7,400 feet, when its men were driven back by ^^^^ ^.^^^^ 
l^^y, however, reached a far higher leveMhan^ previous^^ex 

reach the top of the 



Since the famous special reports of the Lancet and British 
Medkal /ounial on tobacco smoking were published tiiany im- 
portant scientific monographs have been issued which show that 
smoking in moderation is quite harmhss and is frequently of 

ereat importance. • 1 ^ ^ • 

Dr E P Ro^er of Paris, has recently carried out extensive 
experiments on "smoking and confirms the opinions dehnitelv 
expressed by other eminent medical experimenters to the eftec 
that smoking, when indulged in moderately is quite beneficia 
to heahh and that a tobacco smoker should be healthier and 
live longer than a non-smoker. 

MODERN MEDICAL APPROVAL. 

According to a recent report to the Netv York m... on th. 
Roge experiment it appears that. " My Lady Nicotine isn t so 
dTneerous as we hitherto have been given to understand, 
dangerous^ ^^ ^^^^^^ ^.^p^^^l tobacco, 



<--,i,£ 



1 riiL i\ i:, vv 1 v-/ «^ iN i-^j-^iT-i^ i->' Ve; 

Dr. Roger extracted all the nicotine, producing a liquid which 
was sufficiently poisonous to kill a dog weighing sixty pounds. 
The doctor then took ten grams of the same tobacco and incin- 
erated it under conditions similar to that of a pipe, producing a 
liquid which contained not only nicotine, but all the other 
chemical substances contained in tobacco. This liquid did not 
kill a guinea pig weighing two pounds and produced no effect 
whatsoever on the intestines of a dog weighing sixty pounds. 

" The reasons are said to be that incineration transforms the 
nicotine and turns the greater part of its poisonous substances 
into a chemical which is not dangerous, although possibly slightly 
irritating, such as cresols, phenol, pjridine, etc. These sub- 
stances, according to the theories of Professors Moureau and 
Bufraisse, may prove helpful to prevent the development of 
microbes requiring oxygen in order to multiply. Thus, smok- 
ing moderately, far from being unhealthy, should act bentficially 
on the health. 

" In the case of epidemics smokers rarely suffer. Cerebro- 
spinal meningitis, for instance, very rarely attacks smokers." 

RECORDS FILLED WITH FAVORABLE REPORTS. 

The medical records contain many extrordinary reports deal- 
ing with the extremely valuable effects of cigarette smoking in 
surgical work and in hospital practice. Anti-Cigarette crusa- 
ders would find difficuties eliciting sound medical opinion favor- 
ing their propaganda. The medical statements contained in 
their anti-smoking books and pamphlets are nearly all prima 
facie based upon false inferences and interpretations of scientific 
facts. It is for that reason they are so rarely combatted. The 
usual experience of men shows that moderate smoking is cer- 
tainly not injurious, and scientific, as well as inedical opinion, 
definitely affirms the value and import.ince of cigarette smoking. 



^ The Old Rock Wall. ^ 

By Georgina Cooper. 

Oh'! years, and years, and years ago, 

When I was only small, 
I used to steal through Father's field. 

Up to the Old Rock Wall. 
The walls of Troy, I know, were not 

So wonderfully builded ; 
And no rock wall in all the world 

With happy thoughts so gilded. 

Those loosely huddled old grey rocks, 

Held many lovely things, 
Flowers grew there lavishly, 

Which rested fluttering wings. 
The jovial Goldenrod is there, 

With Bramble making merry ; 
And ready to fall in my hand. 

The luscious ripe Raspberry. 

Wandering ivy lingers there ; 

And 'mong the dainty grasses, 
A spider weaves his magic web 

To catch each fly that passes. 
And maybe, somewhere on that wall, 

I'll find while summer dozes, 
Lifting their faces to the sun. 

The sweet perfumed wild roses. 

'Tis years, and years, and years since then. 

And I'm not young at all ; 
Yet I would steal through Father's field, 

Up to that old rock wall. 
The walls of Troy, I know, were not 

So wonderfully builded. 
And no rock wall in all the world, 

With happy thoughts so gilded. 













.^cfeNfeS IN fioWRINe PARK. 



'-^ Vj/^-'.n.ivii:^!^!^! . — i 7 . 



4 




LITTLE RIVER, CODROY. 



"1^ 




McQuarry's pool, little river, codrov. 



1 jn.j 



'arquhar Steamship Companies. 

Passenger and Freight Service 

St. John's to Halifax. 

Steel Steamship "Sable I." 

Sailing every Nine Days. 

Freight accepted and rates quoted to all points. 
For sailing dates and other information, apply 

larvey & Co., Ltd., ^ St. John's, Nfld. 

'arquhar Steamship Companies, 

HALIFAX, N. S. 




The Eastern Trust Co. 

A SERVICE T HAT SATISFIES. 

Complete Trust Service is 
Our Business Exclusively. 

Our policy has been to build up an organization 
of men who, by training and experience, are expert 
in trust matters. 

Our steadily increasing business is evidence that in the 
administration ot estates, the care of trust funds, and invest- 
ment of money we are rendering a service that satishes. 

\ conference with one of our officers will be worth your while. 



REGULATIONS 

For Salting Scotch Pack Herring. 

One barrel salt to five and a half barrels herring— Large Fulls 
One barrel salt to six barrels herring — Medium Fulls. 
One barrel salt to six and a half barrels herring — Matt Fulls. 
This amount of salt is for d'-edging and laying on rows only. 

' does not take into account that put on the herring before 

i bbing. 
All salt falling off herring in rousing tubs is put on rows as 
)u pack unless very dirty or scaly ; in that case, you have to 
lake good the same amount, or otherwi-e you could not have 
ly fixed rule on salt. 

Matt Fulls. ... 10-^ inches long. .. Milt or roe. 

Medium Fulls . . 1 1^ inches long Milt or roe. 

Large Fulls. . . 12^ inches long and upwards. Milt or roe. 
Medium Filling, n^ inches long and upwards. 

I Large Filling. . . 12^ inches long and upwards. 
Filling Fish may be branded as Scotch Cure without the 
rown BrarTd. 

I No drowned, stale, or scaleless herring can be used as Scotch 
ack, nor herring in half frozen state. 

The root cause of light salting is to come as near as possible 
I the pleasing of the palate of the consumer ; and if we bear in 
lind that over three-fourths of all Scotch- Pack Herring are con- 
imed as a tonic before the mid-day meal, just as they come out 

■ the barrel, without any fire cooking, we can see the reason at 
glance for the right salting. The herring is dressed by the 

, sad, and the tail being cut off, the main bone taken out. It is 
len cut into squares of about one inch, and is served with vine- 
ir and other condiments. This gives power to the stomach to 
gest the following meal and keeps the consumer in the best of 
ialth. 

People with bad stomachs please note that the art of cooking 
id eating right is just as escential as the art of curing ; and 
ised on the best medical directions, and with the chemical 
lalysis of the constituent parts of herring as a food ever kept 
ifore the consumer, we need not be surprised that the peop'e 
ho eat most herring are the most healthy and efficient. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES. 

St. John's, Otober, 1923. 



W. A. TUCKER, Manager, 

HEAD OFFICE: Newfoundland Branch, 

Halifax, Nova Scotia. Pitts' Building, St. John's. 




Rules for Making Cod Liver Oil. 

For the Guidance of Manufacturers. 

ist.— The manager in charge of factory must see that the 
livers are fresh; that all brown or poor livers are thrown out; 
that there is no bladder attached to any li-ers. 

2nd. — The good livers must then be washed in a tub of clean 
fresh water. 

3rd.— The pan in which the livers are boiled must be per- 
fectly clean inside, before any livers are placed in it. 

4th.— Before you start to boil any livers, you must have suffi 
cient steam. 

5ih. — Turn on the steam, and use as much as you need to 
have for the quantity of livers you have in your pan. Boil until 
the white scum floats off (which will take about thirty minutes.) 
Don't forget to stir the livers, and see that those in the bottom 
and those around the sides are brought into direct contact with 
the steam all the time. 

6th.— Turn the steam off, and allow all to settle, not exceed- 
ing five minutes, according to capacity of liver boiler. 

7th. — Then you dip all the oil you can get, which is the finest 
white oil. Put this oil in a cooling tank made of galvanized 
iron, and let the oil remain there till next morning. Don't for- 
get to put a straining cloth over the cooling tank before you 
put any oil in, so that it will catch any bits of blubber : allow to 
remain 12 or 14 hours, or longer if possible, then dip from cool- 
ing tank and strain through double calico bag, inside bag to be 
one inch smaller all around ; then strain into a tin shute under 
the bags, the cask to be at the end of the shure with a funnel, 
to lead oil into casks, which funnel to be covered with cheesecloth. 
8tb. — When you havi dipped the finest oil from the top of the 
liver boiler pan, take a'l the blubber from the pan while it is 
warm. The oil from this blubber is not fit for medicinal 
purposes. 

9th. — Then clean your liver pan with warm water and wash- 
ing powder. Have it b'ight and clean for the next boiling. 

loth. — Every bag, cloth, tank, funnel and pan, must be washed 
only with warm water, so.ip and water. Soda must not be used. 
The best results for medical oil can only be obtained by the 
use of tin barrels. Wooden packages generally make the oil 
dark, and destroy its fine flavor. Keep all oil in barrels in a 
cool place, and covered from the sun. 

DEPART'^^^'^ AC MkDIMi: ivrv r'Toiii'ri,»,„ 
St. John's, C 



xiix:. iM^vvrwuiNXJi^/\i\U yUAKTEKLY. — 39. 



JAMES STEVENS, 

Painter and House Decorator, 




23 jVLaxe Street, St. Johns. 



All Work Personally Attended To* 



Phone 363 W, 




St. John's Municipal Council. 
PUBLI^NOTICE. 



POLL TAX. 



The attention of the public is called to the following Sections of the St. 
John's Municipal Act, 1921 : — 

Section 249 : Every male person of the age of twenty-one years or up- 
ward who has resided in the city for the period of twelve inonths immedi- 
ately preceding the first day of October in any year, and who is not liable 
as owner or indirectly as tenant to the payment of the City Tax on any pro- 
perty rated in the appraisement book of the Council at an annual rental 
value of forty dollars or upwards shall pay to the City a Poll Tax of five 
dollars per annum. 

Section Z50 : The siid Poll Tax shall be due and payable without demand 
or notice by or from the Council between the fifteenth day of October and 
the fifteenth day of November in every year at the Office of the City Clerk. 

Section 251 : Any person who fails to comply with the provisions of the 
foregoing section shall, in addition to payment of the tax, be liable to a 
penalty not exceeding five dollars, or in default of payment to imprison- 
ment not exceeding ten days. 

All persons liable are hereby notified to govern themselves accordingly. 
By order, J. J. MAHONY, City Clerk. 

City Hall, .September 20th, 1923. 




our 



Efficiency 



in all business affairs will be measurably enhanced 
if you are conscious that 

Your Clothes 

are absolutely correct— tailored way. 

The American Tailor, 

P.O. Box 445 W. P. SHORT ALL, P.or.e477 

300 Water Street, ^ St. John's, Nfld. 



RING UP 



"The Newfoundland Quarterly" Office 



For all kinds of 



3 JOB PRINTING. ^ 

rsonal attention given to Outport Orders 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



»♦ 



Subscribe to "The Newfoundland Quarterly,' 
the only General Magazine in the country. 
80c. per year for Newfoundland and Canada. 
Foreign Subscription 90c. per year. 

JOHN J. EVANS, 

3A Prescott Street. 



I ni:^ i\ 12^ \\ r \^ \j i. 



^ 1^ J-*^ i i^ A^ 



Browning s 

BISCUITS 

have a distinctive rich flavour which 
is winning a larger and larger 
proportion of the market. 



"The taste will tell." 



The "BROWNING" Soda 

has no equal on the market to-day. 

G.B.S. Pilot, Anzac, Baby Lunch, 
Chocolate Dainty, Orange Gem, etc., 

are all of the same high quality. 

G. Browning & Sons, 

Manufacturers of Fine Bread and 
Crackers since 1865. ^ ^ J- 



The Newfoundland Consolidated 
Foundry Company, Limited. 

Manufacturers of Cooking, 
Parlor, Hall and Church 
Stoves, Gothic GRATES, 
Mantelpieces, Windlasses, 
Rouse Cnocks, HAWSER 
PIPES, and every variety of 

. Ship and General Castings 

Churchyard or Cemetery 

' Railings, Crestings, and all 
Architectural Castings 

SIR M. C. WINTER, S. WILL. CORNICK, 

President. Manager. 



Pidgcon 4 Murphy, 

Carpenters and Builders. 

Estimates on all kinds of Work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Office: Basement K. of C. Ouilding, Duckworth St. 

J. PIDGEON, 28 Prescott Street. W. MURPHY, 36 Temperance St. 



nOTICEl 



-o- 



Department of Controller. 



-o- 



Cheques drawn on banks 
outside of St John^s MUST 
be Certified by the banks on 
which they are drawn before 
being sent to this Department, 
and from this date none but 
certified cheques will be ac- 
cepted* 

THOMAS BONIA, 



October, 1923. 



Acting Controller. 



C. p. EAGAN, 

ramily Grocer, 



Duckworth Street 



y^ \^ A ^ Av X x-« 



X'VJ^ M t 



','^. 



V/l 



igfT" 'fgS^ '^ ^^[ ^^ sr>' ^'Civ sy> '>?t5'^ '\;|*7 ''^*^ v^j^ 




Public Notice. 



NOTICE is hereby given to the 
Public that applications for 

MINERAL AREAS 



m 
M 

-^ 



may be received at this office on 
and after the first day of August, 
1921, and licenses nnay be issued 
for such areas, reserving therefrom 
Coal, ^ Petroleum Oil, ^ Bitumen, 
Natural Gas and Bituminous Clays 
and Shales capable of yielding 
Petroleum Oil on distillation. 

J. F. DOWNEY, 

Actg. Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 



Department ot Agriculture and Mines, 
St. John's Newfoundland 









m 



■i 
i 
■i 



SI is: 



iMiMMMMM/i 



fi/Ml 



s/i 






S/i( 



p#* 






Theattentionof Ship Owners 

^ is called to the following : — = 



REGULATIONS 

RELATING TO THE EXAMINATION OF 
ENGINEERS.— CHAPTER I. 

GENERAL RULES. 

1. — These Regulations are issued in pursuance of 
an Act respecting the qualification of Engineers 
(6 Edward VII., Cap. 24). 

In accordance with Section 9 of the said Act, 
" No steamers registered in Newfoundland shall 
go to sea from any port in or of Newfoundland 
or its dependencies unless the engineers thereof 
have obtained and possess valid certificates for sea- 
going ships, appropriate to their several stations in 
such ships, or of a higher grade from the Board of 
Trade in the United Kingdom, or valid certificates 
of competency appropriated to their several stations 
■ in such ships, or of a higher grade granted in any 
! British possession, and declared by Order of His 
i Majesty in Council, published in the London Gazette 
under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping 
.(Colonial) Act, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, or 
of any Act of the Parliament of the United King- 
dom containing such provisions, to be of the same 
force as certificates of competency for foreign-going 
ships granted under the Acts of the Parliament of 
the United Kingdom relating to merchant shipping, 
or a certificate of competency under the provisions 
, of this Act. And every person who, having been 
. engaged to serve as an Engineer of any sea-going 
,ship registered in Newfoundland, goes to sea as 
aforesaid after that date as such engineer without 
, being at the time entitled to and possessed of such 
certificate for sea-going ships, as hereinbefore re- 
,■ quired, or who employs any person as Engineer of 
any sea-going ship, as aforesaid, without first ascer- 
taming that he at the time is entitled to, and pos- 
sessed of such certificate, shall for such offence incur 
a penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars." 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 
August, 1923. 



A Dainty and Delicious 

SODA BISCUIT 

TIP TOP S ^ 
^ ^ TIP TOP 

For your Biscuit Requirements ask 
for those manufactured by 

n, Rarucp ^ Co. 



Best Ingredients, 



Finest Grades. 




PHCENIX 




Co., Ltd., 



Assurance ;^ ; 

Of LONDON, ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Total Funds exceed $80,000,000.00 

Claims Paid exceed $470,000,000.00 

Place your business with us, the premier Company 
in Newfoundland. 

Lowest Current Rates of Premiums. 

W, & G. RENDELL, St. John's, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



Newfoundland 
Savings Bank. ^P 

Established in 1834. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature. 

" The General Revenue of the Colony 
shall be liable for all moneys deposited in 
this Bank and all interest payable thereon." 
—Extract from Bank's Charter. 

BRANCHES at Harbor Grace and Bay Roberts. 

Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate. 



T»ier. 



-^ i.-' 1^ x^^ i.l.-1 LJ Vj/ «-l .n. IN. A JJ^ J.V 1^ 1 , 



-4^- 




Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Forwarded by Post at -Rates Given Below. 
In the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration Form, upon which the Contents and Value must be State 



1 pound . 

2 pounds 

3 

4 " 

5 
6 

7 " 
8 

9 

10 " 

11 '• 



For Newfoundland and 
Labrador. 



8 cents 

II " 

14 " 

17 " 

20 " 

23 " 

26 " 

29 " 

32 " 

35 " 

35 " 



Under i lb. weight, 1 cent 
per 2 oz. 



For United Kingdom. 



24 cents 

24 " 

24 " 

48 " 

48 " 

48 " 

48 " 

72 " 

72 " 

72 " 

72 " 



No parcel sent to U. K. for 
less than 24 cents. 



For Dominion of Canada 
and United States. 



12 cents. 

24 

36 

48 

60 

72 

84 

96 

$1.08 

1 .20 

1.32 

No parcel sent to D. of C. or 
U. S. foi less than 12 cents. 



N.B. — Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers. Parcels of Furs must be accompanied by 
Customs Export Entry. 

Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Monday and Thursday at U a.m., for despatch by train. 



GENERAL POST OFHCE. 



LETTFR POST— INLAND. 

A LETTER enclosed in an envelope, whether sealed or opem 
addressed to any place in Newfoundland and the Labrador Coast, which 
does not exceed an ounce in weight will be conveyed to its destination for 
three cents. This late is applicable for letters posted in one settlement for 
delivery in another settlement a mile or more distant. 

LETTER POST— FOREIGN. 

Letters for Great Britain, the Dominion of Canada, and the United 
States of America are forwarded to destination for four cents per ounce 
or fraction thereof. Valuable letters may be registered for delivery in 
Newfoundland for five cents. 

Circulars, that is, printed communications, when posted in lots of not 
less than 10, wholly alike, and left open for inspection, are accepted for 
one cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof. 

Newspapers or periodicals posted in the Colony for delivery in the 
Colony shall be subject to a rate, when sent from and posted by any office 
or printing house publishing the same, of one half cent per pound weight 
or fraction thereof, and when sent or posted by any other person, of one 
cent for each four ounces or fraction thereof. 



Newspapers to the Dominion of Canada, the United States, Fran. 
Germany, etc., must be prepaid at the rate of one cent for each ti\ 
ounces or fraction thereof. 

PARCEL POST. 

Parcels of Merchandise are delivered to destination in Newfoundland : 
the rate of one cent for the first two ounces, and so on up to i lb., which 
forwarded for eight cents, the second lb. three cents additional, or n cen 
and three cents for each additional lb., or fraction thereof, up to 10 and 1 
Ibe., which is the hmit, at 35 cents. Name and address of sender nui 
appear on all parcels. Otherwise we will refuse to accept them. 

Senders of Parcels for local destinations must write their names an 
addiesses on the covers; if not Postmasters may refuse to accept them. 

Paicels for other countries must be accompanied by a Custon 
Declaration Form describing nature and value of contents. Ihes 
forms will be supphed by the Post Office and are essential to ensui 
prompt despatch of parcel. 

Money may be transmitted by means of the Money Order System an 
by Telegraph to places in Newfoundland, which are Money Order an 
Telegraph Stations, at reasonable rates on application. 



August, 1923. 



M. E. HAWCO, Acting Minister of Posts & Telegraphi 



W. & G. RENDELL, 

Water Street, St. John's. 



-Importers and Dealers in 



Hardware of all descriptions, 
Paints, Oils, Cement 

and Roofing Materials. 

A large supply of above goods always in stock. 
—SOLE AGENTS FOR— 



Baine, Johnston & Co. 



ESTABLISHED I780. 



Merchants, Ship-Owners, &c 



Agents 



The Alliance Assurance Co., Ltd. 

LONDON. 

Total Assets exceed $120,000,000. 

Fire Premiums for 1912 exceeded $6,500,000. 



Agents 



Newman's Celebrated Fort Wini 

In Pipes for Export. 



.,„;„l,g, ,,ir,ii,,^,,ir[|iiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiii|iiiiiiii|itiiiiiiiiiniiiliiliilulMiiiiiiliiliJi<lniiiliiliiliiliililliiliillilMliilii|iililliililliilillillnlNl'llj|illlllllliili« ' ~ 

il Cable address: "Crosbie," St. John's. Codes Used : A.B.C. 5<h EdiJion. ; 

i Newfoundland Produce Company, Ltd. ; 

j J, C. CROSBIE, Manager. 

I BUYERS AND EXPORTERS OF ! 

Codfish, Oil, and all other Newfoundland Products of the Sea. 

Agents for Fire and Marine Insurance, 

I AND \ 

f Importers of North Sydney Coal 

^IlilllJJIIJJ I I I I I I I I I I 'fi|iilii|iiJi'|iiliiliilli|.i|]il<iliMliilHi'l'ili'l'i|i<liil<il"i'l»liil l>'liiliilii|iil<i|ii|iiii'liilli|iiliil<'lii|ii|i:|ii|ii|ii|<'i I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I •■<• I • I liiiriliil"IMIii|]ili.lili'lii|'|il|n|iiliilii|ii|ii|ii|i|n|ifit|if|D|i|i-|B|n|n|iipmi i T 




Public Notice 

As a number of Newfoundlanders, proceeding to the United States of America, have recent!)' been 
stopped at Vanceboro, on the American Border, and sent back to Newfoundland, being thereby subjected 
to inconvenience and expense, the following extract from the United States Immigration Laws is publish- 
ed for general information — 

" That the following classes of aliens shall be excluded from admission into the United 
States: All idiots, imbeciles, feeble-minded persons, epileptics, insane persons; persons who 
have had one or more attacks of insanitj^ at any time previously ; persons of constitutional 
psychopathic inferiority ; persons with chronic alcoholism ; paupers ; professional beggars ; 
vagrants ; persons afflicted with tuberculosis in any form or with a loathsome or dangerous 
contagious disease ; persons not comprehended within any of the foregoing excluded classes 
who are found to be and are certified by the examining surgeon as being mentally or physically 
defective, such physical defect being of a nature which may affect the ability of such alien to 
earn a livmg; persons who have been convicted of or admit having committed a felony or other 
crmie or misdemeanor involving moral turpiture ;***** persons hereinafter called contract 
laborers, who have been mduced, assisted, encouraged, or solicited to migrate to this country by 
offers or promises of employment, whether such offers or promises are true or false, or in conse- 
quence of agreements, oral, written or printed, express or implied, to perform labor in this 
country of any kmd, skilled or unskilled ; persons who have come in consequence of advertise- 
ments for laborers printed, published, or distributed in a foreign country; persons likely to 
become a public charge; persons who have been deported under any of the provisions of this 
Act, and who may seek admission again within one year from the date of such deportation, 
unless prior to their re-embarkation at a foreign port or their attempt to be admitted from 
oreign contiguous territory the Secretary of Labour shall have consented to their re-applying 
tor admission; persons whose ticket or passage is paid for with the money of another, or whS 
npr.nn?? I u^^'^ ^ ^°"'^; T'^^' '^ '^ affirmatively and satisfactorily shown that such 
fs i^d W l" "^ ° ?-''^ °^ the foregoing 'excluded classes; persons whose ticket or passage 

iireritv nr ;n^^"^' ',;^'P°'"f ^°"' association, socicty, municipality or foreign Government; either 
cli.ectiy or mdirectl). ; stowaways, except that any such stowaway, if otherwise admissable, may 



**#*##*)! 



be admitted in the discretion of the Secretary of Labor. * 

first l^f^^'V^ '''', "^""l'' Nf^^°""^'^"ders who may contemplate proceeding to the United States should 
first satisfy themselves that they do not fall within any of the classes of Immigrants therein specified. 

Department of the Colonial Secretary, ARTHUR MENA/S, Deputy Colonial Secretary. 

St. John's, Newfoundland, August 13th, 1923. 



.. ^ v^ v^x^j^i_riiNi^ y u/\i^i rLKL,Y. — 45, 



*i*$*********#***#*$*^^**#^^^ $ $ #*^#^^^^^^j^^!r^^^$^,-^,^^,^,^j^^jt 



4t> 

ft 
fi> 






ft 

I 



ORDER YOUR 



Paint, Soap and Oiled Clotliing 



^ FROM ^ 



The Standard Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Quality and Satisfaction Guaranteed* 






if$^$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$^ 



Public Notice. 

Under an Act representing the St. John's General Hospital 
(6 George V., Cap. XIX.) and with the approval of the Gover- 
nor in Council, the Board of Governors have fixed and prescribed 
the following scale of fees to be levied from and paid by all per- 
sons who occupy beds or undergo treatment at the Hospital: 

Scale of Fees. 

Every person receiving treatment in the St. John's General 
Hospital shall pay fees according to the following scales: — 

Persons admitted to the public wards, $1.00 per day. 

Persons occupying private rooms, $10.00 per week in 
addition to the daily fee of $1.00. 

To cover cost of dressings, anaesthetics, and for the use 
of the Operating Room, patients undergoing opera- 
tions shall pay a fee of $10.00 in addition to the 
fees specified above. 

Every applicant for admission to the Hospital must bring or 
forward to the Superintendant of the Hospital, certificate 
signed by a duly registered physician that such applicant is a 
proper subject for Hospital treatment. 

Under the provisions of the General Hospital Act, 19 15, all 
patients who are unable to pay fees shall be required to bring 
with them a certificate of their inability to pay, which shall be 
signed by the resident Relieving Officer, or, where there is no 
such Officer, by a Justice of the Peace, a Clergyman or other 
responsible persons. 

The fees of such patients (hereupon payable by the Commis- 
sioner of Public Charity, by virtue of the said Act. 
By order of the Board of Governors, 

GEORGE SHEA, Chairman. 
W. H. RENNIE, Secretary. 




Public Notice. 

SUDBURY HOSPITAL. 

The following scale of fees payable by outside 
patients for treatment in the various Departments 
of Sudbury Hospital will be effective on and after 
November ist, 192 1 : 

MASSAGE AND ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Including treatment with sinusoidal, galvanic 
and high frequency currents, per treatment $1.00 

HYDRO THERAPEUTIC DEPARTMENT. 

Including Schott's Douche, whirlpool, sedative 
and electric bath with massage, etc, per 

treatment $1.00 

Electric Cabinet (Turkish) Bath $2.50 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographs. Plates under 10 x 12 $2.00 

All larger sizes 5-0" 

X-Ray Treatments 2.0c 

SCREEN EXAMINATIONS. 

With Bismuth Meal, $5.00 and upwards. 

This does not include prints. All cases to be 
dealt with through their own doctors to whom 
reports will be sent. Above scale of fees applies tr 
civilian cases only. 

JAMES HARRIS, 

Deputy Minister 

Department Public Works, 
St. John's, Nfid., August, 1923. 



X r^x:* 



lli J-J VV X V-/^ V-* . 




Published by Authority. 



On recommendation of the Assistant Collector of Customs, 
and under the provisions of Cap. 22 of the Consolidated Sta- 
tutes, (Third Series), entitled "Of the Customs," His Excellency 
the Governor in Council has been pleased to approve the fol- 
lowing Regulations respecting Travellers' Baggage, and Com- 
mercial Travellers' Samples, form of Oath to be annexed to 

Invoices, and Form of Invoice. 

VV. W. HALFYARD, 

Colonial Secretary. 

Department of Colonial Secretary, 
August 13th, 1923. 



Travellers' Baggage. 

1. The Rules and Regulations published on the 2nd May, 
1905, and the amendments thereto, are hereby cancelled, and 
the following substituted therefor. 

2. Subject to the provisions of the next succeeding rules, 
wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet articles 
and similar personal effects in the possession of persons arriving 
in Newfoundland and not exceeding $50.00 in value may, after 
due examination, be passed free, wilhont entry at the Customs, 
as Travellers' Baggage, but this provision shall only include such 
articles as actually accompany and are in the use of. and as are 
necessary and appropriate for the wear and use of such persons 
for the immediately purpose of the journey and for their per- 
sonal comfort and convenience, and shall not be held to apply- 
to any articles for use or wear at any future time or to merchan- 
dize or articles intended for other persons or for sale. 

3. Wearing apparel and other personal effects taken out of 
Newfoundland by residents of Newfoundland to foreign countries 
shall, upon their return, be admitted free of duty without regard 
to their value, upon their identity being established. 

4. Wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet 
articles and similar personal effects brought into the Colony by 
bona-fide travellers who are not residents of the Colony shall 
be passed free, without entry at the Customs, as Travellers' 
Baggage. 

5. Articles of theatrical societies, known as " properties," 
circus horses and cattle, menageries, carriages and harness 
thereof, musical instruments of companies visiting Newfound- 
land for exhibition purposes, may be admitted upon a deposit 

'equal to the duty being paid, or upon a bond being given secur- 
ing the duty. Such bond shall set forth a reasonable time with- 
in which the export must be made. 

Commercial Travellers' Samples. 

Travellers' samples of dutiable goods including trunks and 
'other packages in which they are imported, may be admitted 
into Newfoundland upon a deposit of money equivalent to the 
duty or upon a good and sufficient bond being given for its 
payment. 

Such deposit may be returned and such bond cancelled upon 
he export of the goods within one year of the importation of the 
Samples, and upon the receipt of a certificate of landing from 
he foreign Customs to which they were exported. 
j All samples shall be examined upon arrival and the Com- 
nercial Traveller reporting them shall deliver to the Customs' 
Officer for entry purposes an invoice or statement in detail show 
ng the wholesale price of each sample at the Current Domestic 

'lino tUc r ■ ., 



Such invoice or statement shall be f}'^''f,^y}^f,l'Z]l': 
and the quantity of such samples shall be duly checked by the 
Customs' Officer and the proper duty thereon be deposited or 
Bond given before the samples are delivered. 

The Regulations respecting forms of oath to be annexed to 
invoices presented at the Customs, published in the /?,yaj 
Gazette oi the 7th June, 1898, and amendments thereto pub- 
lished on the 31st December, 1907, are hereby cancelled and 
the following substituted therefor. 

A. 

Certificate of Value to be Written, Typed or Printed on 

Invoices of goods for Exportation to the 

British Dominions. 

(1) Here insert man- I ( i) of 

ager, chief clerk, or /j') of (3) 

as the case may be. ....'.'.'.'... manufacturer 

(2) Here insert name — ,. — 
of firm or company. . supplier 

(3) Here insert name of the goods enumerated in this Invoice 

of city or country. amounting tO 

(4) These words hereby declare that I [ (4) have the autho- 
should be omitted ^jh, jq make and sign this certificate on 
where the manufac- j^^ ^ ^ ^ aforesaid manufaclurer 

turer or supplier ^ 

himself signs the supplier 

Certificate. ^nd that I] have the means of knowing and 

do hereby certify as follows. 

Value. 

1. That this invoice is in all respects 
correct and contains a true and full state- 
ment of the price actually paid or to be paid 
for the said goods, and the actual quantity 
thereof. 

2. That no different invoice of the goods 
mentioned in the said invoice has been or 

Paragraph 2 can be ^^ju ^e furnished to anyone; and that no 
deleted in the case , ^ ,• rr .• ..u 

of exports to New arrangements or understanding affecting the 

Zealand. purchase price of the said goods has been 

or will be made or entered into between the 

said exporter and purchaser, or by anyone 

on behalf of either of them either by way of 

(5) Here insert par- discount, rebate, compensation or in any 
ticulars of any spe- manner whatever other than as fully shown 

cial arrangement. ^^ j^jg ^voice, or aS follows (5) 



3. That the domestic values shown in 
the column headed "Current Domestic 
Values" are those at which the above men- 
tioned firm or company would be prepared 
to supply to any purchaser for home con- 
sumption in the country of exportation and 
at the date of exportation identically similar 

goods in equal quantities, at (6) 

subject 

to per cent, cash 

discount and that such values include 



(6) Here insert 
" warehouse," "fac- 
tory," or " port of 
shipment." 



exclude 

the cost of outside packages, of any, in 
which the goods are sold in such country 
for domestic consumption. 

4. That the said domestic value includes 
any duty leviable in respect of the goods 
before they are delivered for home consump- 
tion, and that on exportation a drawback or 

remission of duty amounting to 

has been 

will be 
in the 



\^ \J .t^XV X JJ<XXJ-< I , 



4/- 



o 



o 

ojO ^ 


c 

3 


E 
< 








Current Domestic Values in 

currency of exporting country. 

(See Pars, j &' 4 of Certificate.) 



£ 
< 








Quantity and 

description 

of goods. 




S 




^ 








Enumerate the following charges and state whether each 
amount has been included in or excluded from the above 
current domestic value. — 



(i) Cartage to rail and | or docks. 

(2) Inland freight (rail or canal) 
and other charges to the dock 
area including inland insur- 
ance 

(3) Labour in packing the goods 
into outside packages 

(4) Value of outside packages .... 

(5) If the goods are subject to any 
charge by way of Royalties . . . 



Amount in cur- 
rency of export- 
ing country. 



State if 
included. 



B. 

1. The foregoing is the form of Invoice required by the 
Customs authorities of the Self-governing Dominions, viz. : — 
Canada, the Commonwealth of Australia, New Zealand, the 
Union of South Africa and Newfoundland. 

2. On the back of the invoice must be written, typed, or 
printed the Certificate of Value in respect of all goods whether 
sold outright or shipped on consignment. The Certificate of 
Value will be required in respect of goods on which preferential 
tariff treatment is claimed, exported either from the United 
Kingdom or British Possessions; and only the Certificate of 
Value in respect of exports from foreign countries, or ej^ports of 
foreign goods from the United Kingdom or British Pos,'«essions, 

3. Special attention should be paid to the Column of the in- 
voice dealing with current domestic value, as full information of 
this is required by the Customs Authorities of the Dominions 
wha., ^^o„^o;„~ , .„!.,„ <:„- ^„f,7 TTvnr.rtPrs should furthermore, 

; X and 4 of the Cer- 



4. It should be clearly understood that the prices shown in 
the column of the invoice headed " Current Domestic Values' 
must be those which are being quoted in the open market at the 
date of invoice for delivery for home consumption, and not 
neccessarily those at which the order for the goods was accepted 
and it may frequently happen that fluctuations will occur in the 
home market price between the date of order and the date of 
expoitation. In ordinary circumstances the date of invoice will 
be regarded as " the date of exportation," but where any con- 
siderable delay occurs between the date of invoice and the date 
of exportation, any changes in the " Current Domestic Values" 
should be shown on the invoice. 

5. If goods are sold for home consumption at gross prices, 
less discounts and or rebates, such gross prices, together with 
particulars as to discounts and rebates, should be shown in full 
in the " Current Domestic Values" Column of the invoice. 

6. Where the discounts shown in the " Current Domestic 
Values" column are not the ordinary trade or cash discounts 
but are of the nature of contingent discounts or rebates, they 
must be specified as such, and their nature detailed on the 
invoice. 

7. Where the goods invoiced are samples and the price on 
the invoice has been arrived at after the deduction of a sample 
discount, the ordinary gross prices and the ordinary trade dis- 
counts applicable to the goods in question should be specified 
in the " Current Domestic Values' column. 

8. Any shipment which forms portion only of a complete 
order should be valued at the price per unit which, at the date 
of despatch, of such shipment, would be quoted for the total ■ 
quantity of such complete order for supply under similar condi- 
tions of delivery to a domestic purchaser. 

Note — In the case of shipments to New Zealand, the total 
quantity referred to above is limited to the quantity 
actually specified for delivery within 12 months. 

9. When goods are shipped "on consignment" that fact 
should be indicated in the column headed '-Selling price to 
Purchaser," and the "Current Domestic Values" inserted in the 
column provided for that purpose, as in the case of ordinary sales. 

10. In the case of goods exported in bond or subject to 
drawback, the value required, in the column headed "Current 
Domestic Values," is the duty-paid domestic value, and not the 
in bond value of the domestic value less drawback. The 
amount of duty or drawback involved should be specified in 
Clause 4 of the Certificate. A similar course shonld be follow- 
ed in regard to goods subject to stamp duty, luxury tax, or 
other internal imposts. 

11. As regards goods which are prepared specially for ex- 
port and which ordinarily have no sale on the domestic market, 
the value to be shown in the column headed "Current Domestic 
Values," is that at which the supplier would, at the date of ex- 
portation be prepared to supply identically similar goods in 
equal quantities to any purchaser for home consumption in the 
country of exportation, in the event jf an order for home con 
sumption being accepted. In this connection attention 1- 
directed to Clause 3 of the Certificate. 

12. Care should be taken to enumerate correctly the charges 
detailed at the foot of the invoice, as the practice of the various 
Dominions, regarding the inclusion in or exclusion from the 
value for duty of such charges, is not uniform. 

13. It will be observed that charges such as wharfage, dock; 
dues, literage, cartage, craneage, etc., if incurred in the dock, 
area, and changes in the nature of bank exchange and export 
duties are not required for duty purposes to be enumerated at 
the foot of the invoice. There is, however, no objection to such 
charges, if incurred, being shown separately. 

14 The certificate on the invoice must be signed, in his 
personal capacity, by the supplier or the manufacturer or any 
person having authority to sign on behalf of the supplier or 
manufacturer. The witness to the signature need not neces- 
sarily be a magistrate, notary, or other public official, but may 
be any person competent to sign as a witness to signatures on 



Reid Newfoundland Company, Ltd. 

Proprietors of the Dry Dock, St. John's, Newfoundland 

One of the best equipped Dry Docks in America. Steamships docked and repaired 
at the lowest rates. Well equipped and thoroughly fitted with all modern appliances 
for temporary or permanent repairs. Length of Dock, 610 feet. Depth of Water, 25 feet. 

Proprietors and Operators of the St. John's Electric 
^ Street Railway. ^ 

All the Electric power supplied in St. John's is generated on this system. City 
Lighting and Power for Factories, etc., supplied at moderate rates. Those requiring ' 
Electric Power for any purpose should consult the undersigned. 

Owners of Ten Clyde -Built Steamships 

Royal Mail Steamers operating on Bays and Coasts of Newfoundland and Labrador. 

Lessees and Operators of the Newfoundland Railway, 903 miles. Owners of 
2,500,000 acres of Mineral and Timber Lands. 

The Newfoundland Express Company, carrying on Express Business wnth all Express Com- 
panies of the world, and Money Orders issued to all parts. 

The Railway and Steamship Systems give the best 

connection between Newfoundland and Canada and the United States, and the best 
freight hne between Canada and Newfoundland. S. S. "KYLE" and"SAGONA" 
connect at North Sydney with the Intercolonial Railway. 

Newfoundland offers to the Tourists, Sportsmen and Health-Seeker the <rrandest 
scenery m the Western Hemisphere. A most beautiful climate in the "summer 
months ; cool, even and invigorating. No hay fever. 

Finest Caribou Hunting Grounds in the World, ^ ^ ^ 

Best Salmon and Trout Streams that have yet been discovered. The Railway is equipped 

::l":ir r- r ^.^.^sr -^^-^ '° ^-- - -- - - - - 

cattn ',oThT"°" '" "^""^ '° Newfoundland and Labrador will be given on appli- 

REID NEWFOUNDLAND CO., LTD., 

ST. JOHN'S. NEWFOUNDLAND. 



^^^^^w.mwM'^^m^m^^^im^ 



^MMMM:^^'i^'^m 



Wh<= 



tv" 



PublicN^ice! 

FOREST FIRES ACT. 



Section 2. — Every person who — 

(i) Sets out, lights or starts, or causes to be set out, lighted or 
started, any tire in or near any woods, except for the pur- 
pose of clearing land, cooking, obtaining warmth, or for 
some industrial purpose ; or 

(2) Makes or starts, or causes to be made or started, a fire for 
the purpose of clearing land, without exercising and observ- 
ing every reasonable care and precaution in the making 
and starting of such fire and in the managing of and 
caring for and controlling the same after it has been 
made and started, in order to prevent the same from 
spreading and burning up the trees, shrubs or plants sur- 
rounding, adjoining, or in the neighborhood of the place 
where it has been so made and started ; or 

(3) Between the fifteenth day of April and the first day of 
December, makes or starts or causes to be made or started, 
a fire in or near any woods, or upon any island, for cooking 
or obtaining warmth, or for any industrial purpose, without 
observing the following precautions, that is to say : 

(a) Selecting a locality in the neighborhood in which there is 
the smallest quantity of dead wood, branches, brushwood, 
dry leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, turf, dry moss or 
vegetable matter of any kind ; 

(b) Clearing the place in which he is about to light the fire 
by removing all dead wood, branches, brushwood, dry 
leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, turf, dry moss and 
other vegetable matter from the soil within a distance of 
ten feet from the fire in every direction ; 

(c) Exercising and observing every reasonable care to pre- 
vent such fire from spreading, and carefully extinguishing 
the same before quitting the place ; or 

(4) Throws or drops any burning match, ashes of a pipe, lighted 
cigar, or any other burning substance, or discharges any 
firearm in the woods, barrens, fields or other place where 
there is vegetable matter, if he neglects completely to ex- 
tinguish before leaving the spot, the fire of such match, 
ashes of a pipe or cigar, wadding of the firearm, or other 
burning substance ; or 

(s) Makes, lights or starts, or causes to be made, lighted or 
started, except for the purposes named in sub-section (i) 
hereof, a fire on any land not owned or occupied by him- 
self, or does not prevent any fire made, lighted or started 
on land owned or occupied by him, from extending to land 
not owned by him, shall be liable to a penalty of not less 
than Fifty Dollars nor more than Four Hundred Dollars for 
each offence, or to Imprisonment for any period not exceed- 
ing Twelve Months. 

J. R DOWNEY, 

Acting Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 

Department of Agriculture and Mines, 



We Make 

the Very Best Quality of 

* ■ 

Manila Rope, 
Coir Rope, 

Hemp Fishing Lines, 
White and Tarred Cotton Fishing Lines, 
Hemp Seine Twine, 

Cotton Seine Twine, 
Herring Nets, 

Cotton Linnett. 



When anything better is invented 
We Shall Make That. 

Colonial Cordage Co., Ltd. 



PUBLISHED ANNUALLY. 

LONDON DIRECTORY 

with Proviocial and Foreign Sections and Trade Headbgs in Fire Languages 

enables traders to communicate direct with 

Manufacturers and Dealers 

in London and in the Provincial Towns and Industrial Centres of the United 
Kingdom and the Continent of Europe. The book contains over 250,000 
names, addresses and other details are classified under more than 2,000 
trade headings, including 

Export Merchants 

with detailed particulars of the Goods shipped and the Colonial and 
Foreign Markets supplied ; 

Steamship Lines 

arranged under the Ports to which they sail, and indicating the approxi- 
mate Sailings. 

One-inch BUSINESS CARDS of Firms desiring to extend their connec- 
tions, or Trade Cards of 

Dealers Seeking Agencies 

can be printed at a cost of 8 dollars for each trade heading under which 
they are inserted. Larger advertisements from 10 to 80 dollars. 
The directory is invaluable to everyone interested in overseas comiTietce, 
and a copy will be sent by parcel post for 10 dollars, nett cash with order. 

The LONDON DIRECTORY Co., Ltd., 

25, Abchurch Lan e, London , E. C. 4, England. 

BUSINESS ESTABLISHED IN 1814. 



Cable Address: "JOB," St. John's; "JOB," Liverpool. 

JOB BROTHERS & CO., LTD. 

Water Street, St. John's, Nfld. 

ESTABEiSHED 1780. 

EXPORTERS OF 

Codfish, Pickled Fish, Lobsters and Salmon, Cod Oil, Seal Oil and Whale Oil, 

Medicinal Cod Liver Oil 

(Norwegian Process, Non-Freezing), 
and other produce* 



AGENCIES: 

The Royal Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool, Fire and Life. 

The Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool. 

The National Fire Insurance Co'yt Hartford, Conn. 



MANAGERS OF 



JOB'S STORES, LTD. 

DEALERS IN 

Provisions and Groceries, Naval Stores and Fishing Supplies, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



MANAGERS OF 



Neptune" Steamship Co., Ltd., ^Thetis" Steamship Co., Ltd. 



JOB BROTHERS, 

Tower Building, 

Liverpoo' ^ ca 



i.i.\LJ \^\J/\K. I CSS.L,Y . 51. 



Minard's Liniment 

Completes fhe Family Mledicine Chest. 

Enables you to guard against Coughs, Colds, 
Croup, Asthma, Pneumonia. 

Promptly relieves Bruises, Sprains, Chilblains, 
Frost Bites, Sore Joints, Sore Muscles, 
Rheumatism, and many other ailments to 
which every family is subject. 

The Original and Only Genuine. 
Be\A^are of Innitations. 

P. C. O^Driscoll, Ltd., Agents, St. John's. 






l/AfC 



REMINGTON 
UMC 



Shotgun Cartridges 
are really ''Wetproof " 

APPLY THE TEST: Take a few o£ the wetproofed REMINGTON UMC 
factory-loaded shotgun cartridges _ "NEW CLUB", "REMINGTON" 
"NITRO CLUB" or "ARROW "-and a few of any other make; soak all ot 
them in water for one hour, inspect the Remington UMC cartridges for 
signs of deterioration and then fire all of them. Inspect 
the other makes in a similar manner and fire them — it 
you can. If the one hour soaking test does not convmce 
you, double the time. 

Remington Products are for sale by leading hardware firms in St.John's 
» Remington Arms Company, Inc., 25 Broadway, New York 





Passport Regulations. 



I I. APPLICATIONS for Passports must be made in the 
iiuthorized form and enclosed in a cover addressed to "THE 



DEPARTMENT 
ST. JOHN'S." 



OF THE COLONIAL SECRETARY, 



2. The charge for a Passport is $2.50. Passports are 
ssued at the Office of the Colonial Secretary between the hours 
,f 10 and 4 ON THE DAY FOLLOWING THAT ON 
VHICH THE APPLICATION FOR THE PASSPORT 
iAS BEEN RECEIVED, except on Sundays and Public 
iolidays, when the Office is closed. Applications should, if 
)ossible, reach the Office before 4 p.m. on the previous day. 
f the applicant does not reside in St. John's, the Passport may 
)e sent by post, and a Postal Order for $2.50 should in that 
i ase accompany the application. POSTAGE STAMPS WILL 
IsIOT BE RECEIVED IN PAYMENT. 

3. Passports are granted — 

(i) To natural-born British subjects ; 

(2) To the wives and widows of such persons ; and 

(3) To persons naturalized in the United Kingdom, in 
the British Colonies, or in India. 

A married woman is deemed to be a subject of the State of 
/hich her husband is for the time being a subject. 

4. Passports are granted — 

^ (i) In the case of natural-born British subjects and 

persons naturalized in Newfoundland, upon the 
production of a Declaration by the applicant in the 
authorized form verified by a Declaration made by 
a member or official of any Banking Finn establish- 
ed in Newfoundland, or by any Mayor, Magistrate, 
Justice of the Peace, Minister of Religion, Barrister- 
at-Law Physician, Surgeon, Solicitor, or Notary 
Public, resident in Newfoundland. The applicant's 
Certificate of Birth and other evidence may also be 
required. 

(2) In the case of children under the age of 19 years 
a separate Passport, upon production of a Declara- 
tion made by the child's parent or guardian, in a 
Form (B), to be obtained upon application to the 
Office of the Colonial Secretary. 

(3) In the case of persons naturalized in the United 
Kingdom or in any of the British Self-governing 

I Colonies, upon production of a Recommendation 

from the Colonial Office, or the High Commissioner 
or Agent-General in London of the State concerned ; 
and in the case of natives of British India, and per- 
sons naturalized therein, upon production of a 
Letter of Recommendation from the India Office. 
Persons naturalized in any of the Crown Colonies 
must obtain a Letter of Recommendation from the 

Colonial Office. 

j 

5. If the applicant for a Passport be a Naturalized British 



subject, the Certificate of Naturalization must be forwarded to 
theSce of the Colonial Secretary, with the Declaration, for 
delivery to the applicant. 

Naturalized British subjects will be described as such ,n their 
Passports which will be issued subject to the necessaay qualifi- 
cations. 

6 Passports are not available beyond two years from the 
date of issue They may be renewed for four further periods 
of two years each, after which fresh Passports must be obtained. 
The fee for each renewel is ;?i.oo 

7 A Passport cannot be issued on behalf of a person 
already abroad ; such person should apply for one to the nearest 
British Mission or Consulate. Passports must not be sent out 
of Newfoundland by post. 

W. W. HALFYARD, 

Colonial Secretary. 

Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
St. John's, Newfoundland, 
August, 1923. 



We are prepared to quote 

Low Price s 

...ON... 

General Lines of 
Merchandise. 

Robinson Export Co. 



The Newfoundland Quarterly. 

— AN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE — 

Issued every third month about the 15th of March, June, September and 
December from the otfice 

34 Prescott Street, St. John's, Newfoundland. 

JOHN J. EVANS, -:- -:- -:- Printer and Proprietor. 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rates: 

Single Copies, each 20 cents. 

One Year, in advance, Newfoundland and Canada 80 " 

Foreign Subscriptions (except Canada) 90 " 



All Kinds of Job Printing 

Neatly Executed 

at »*The Quarterly'' Office. 



inn iNiiWhOUNDLAND QU/.RTERLY. 



The Liverpool &London &GlobeInsurance Co.,Ltd. 

The World Auxiliary Insurance Corporation, Ltd. 

The G lobe Ind emnity Co. of Canada. 

Fire Insurance on all classes of property effected at tariff rates. 
Casualty and kindred insurance effected at reasonable rates. 

See us BEFORE PLACING YOUR INSURANCE elsewhere. 

Prompt settlement of claims.— Absolute securit)^ 

BOWRING BROTHERS, LTD., 

Agents for Newfoundland. 




Weights and Measures 

The following sections of the Act 
Respecting Weights and Measures are 
published for general information : — 

"Any persons who shall use a beam, scale, weight or mea- 
sure, in the sale or exchange of any commodity, not assayed and 
stamped, or who shall alter the same after being so assayed and 
stamped, or who shall use steel-yards, except for the purpose of 
weighing hay or stray, or who shall use a beam made of wood, 
shall forfeit a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

"Salt may be sold by measure, or by weight, if sold by mea- 
sure, there shall be eighteen gallons to a tub (liquid measurement) 
and three tubs to a hogshead. Any person who shall sell or 
dispose of salt by measure otherwise than according to the stan- 
dard hereby established shall forfeit a sum not exceeding 
twenty dollars." 

"The Chief Inspector, and Inspectors shall, when required, 
inspect and adjust all beams, scales weights and measures, 
brought to the office of either of them according to the said 
standard, and they shall stamp or mark thereon the initials of 
the reigning Sovereigns, and their own proper initials." 

M. J. O'MARA, 



Chief Inspector. 



l.hlpf Tncr\<ar't-r 



nff.r 



iitntt TinilHina 



Protect Your Property. 

Insure with 

Niagara fire Insurance Company 

Of New York. 

Canadian Departnient : Montreal, 

W. E. FINDLAY, Manager. 

Incorporated in 1850. 

Has been over 70 years in business. 

Unexcelled reputation for SERVICE, 

SECURITY and PROMPT PAYMENTS. 

A. T. GOODRIDGE, 

G. W. V. A. Building. Agent for Newfoundland. 



Coal! Coal! Coal! 

The Best Scotch Household Coal 
Imported ; all lumps, no slack, 

$13. 50 Per Ton. 

Wallsend 
English Household. 

The very name means the best coal obtainable 
at any price. 

$14. 50 Per Ton. 

The United Coal Co. 

PHONE 297. 



, THE NEWFOUNULANU yu/ 



Sporting GINS and RlfLES, 10 & 12 Gauge. 



POWDER, 
SHOT, 
CAPS, 

PRIMERS. 




FELT WADS, 
PAPER WADS, 

GUN CIL, 
GUN GREASE. 



Black and Smokeless Cartridges, 10 i ?2 Ouage, 



(English and American). 



LOADING SETS, 
CLEAN' RODS, 
EXTRA.- JRS, 
WAD CUTTERS. 




DOG LEADS, 
DOG COLLARS, 
POCKET COMPASSES. 



BOWRING BROTHERS, LTD 

HardNA/are Department. 



Custom Tailoring! 



Style, Wear and Value 



idged 



re the main standards by which good clothes are 

Careful Designing and 
Superior Workmanship 

liable us to produce Correct Styles and Good Tailoring. 

'his is an assurance that the shape will be retained 
iroughout the life of the garment. 

Choose your material from our large assortment 
[ Tweeds and Serges, or bring us your own goods, 
id we will prove to YOU, as we have to others, 
lat we are turning out 

The BEST there is 
IN TAILORING. 

(ewfoundland Clothing Co^y, Limited, 

231, 233, 235 Duckworth Street. 



Sell by Telephone ! 

■Tell Buyers' what you do 
and how you do it. 

The Telephone S 

is the door to the merchants' establishment. 
A single telephone call often results in 
a steady customer. • , 

One telephone order to-day means more 
in the fliture. 

No selling campaign intended to reach the 
consumer dii-ect is complete to-day 
if it fails to make it easy to 
buy via the telephone. 

Avalon Telephone Co., Ltd. 



.4 



























CDristmas dmViUr. 1923 



John J. Evans, Printer and Pruhkikwir, 
Sr. John's, Nkwfol'Xih.anu. 




:^i 



Si' \y rf- 



Indian Falls. Hall's Bay, Newfoundland. 






I 



M 






¥ 












■>>■ ii*.3UX 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



The Royal Bank of Canada. 

lU AlJ Ol net. Mii.N 1 Ki:,\l.: 
LONUoX, ENGLAND: NEW VOUlv: 

Himces Street. E.C. fiS William Streets. 

1;ari:eluna, Spain— riaz.i de Cataluiia C. 
/■RtWC/r A ( XJI. fA KY: 
Tilt; KOVAI. BANK OP CANADA (FRANlH TAKIS. 
2S Kiie dii (jtiiaire>epienil're. 

Wllh our Lh.iin of 6o3 Hran>.-hes througlioiit Canada, Newfouiulljiid. 
ilie West Indies. t,eiur.^l and Sontii Anierii.a, we oiler a complete 
banking service to c.vpurlers. intpoilers, manufacturers and oiiiers 
wishing to extend tlieir business in these cpuniries. Trade eiuiuiries 
are siilicited. Consult our local Manager or write direct to our 

J'Jrii^it Tr,tJt D'ptti-inteni. Ahn.'r,:}/. Oiif. 

Capital Paid Up anil Reser\es $40,800,000.00 

Total asset, 5l3,29tJ,"0B.87 

Newloundland Branches: 

St. John's MainOtiicei f. T. PAlfRfV, Manager. 

St. John's West End: A. MiRStULl, -Manager, 
lieans ( ontent : A. H. tttlITt, -\Igr. I'lacentia : J. E. VMIUSTON, Mgr 

Miryttown. M f CnVSSISG, Mgr Trinity, f. B. fiVNKIN. M-i 



INSURE WITH THE 

QUEEK, 

the Comp.iny liaving the largest 
number of Policy Holders in 
Newfoundland. 

Every satisfaction gi\en in 
settling losses. 

Offiice : Adrain Building, Id? ^C^ater Street. 



•P. O Box 782. 



Telephone 655. 



QUEEN INSURANCE Co., 
GEO. H. HALLEY, 



9GENT FOR NEWFOUNDLAND, 






POSTAL TELEGRAPH SERVICE. 



RING U3e. 



THE POSTAL is the onlv extensive public telegraph service for Newfoundland, ar.d has con- 
nection to all inland places. A ten word message costs only twenty-five cents, the address 
and signature, as well as Postal telejihone transmission to destination is free of cost. 

The Postal has also immediate and constant connection with the Wireless Stations at Cape Race, 
Fogo and Battle Harbor, and in Summer with Labrador Wireless Stations. Also with Wireless 
to and from ships at sea. 

Cable business handed to the Postal ensures quick service via New York or Canso to Brazil, Bahia, 
Pernambuco. Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda. Our connections are as follows: 

"American Postal Telegraph," "Canadian Pacific Railway Telegraphs," "All American Cables tor 
Central and South America," " Halifa.x and Bermuda and Direct West India Cables." 

A (heap night, as well as day service, is also given to all points in Canada and the United States of 
America. The Postal has also direct connection with Great Britain, thence to all European points. 
Rates as luw as 6c. per word. Stamps to value of ten cents must be affixed by senders to all cable 
(foreign) messages from Newfoundland. The Newfoundland revenue benefits largely when you 
patroi^i/.e the Postal Telegraphs. Its whole staff (clerical and operators) from Superintendent to 
Messengers are sworn to secrecv. 

DAVID STOTT, Superintendent. 
M. E. HA\A/CO, Minister Posts & Telegraphs. 



When writing to .Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



■jrta»aji-g-,a-.^.^n^-.— , 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-^ 



.1 















: 




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i . . . ,^^: 


,^,1.^...,^ 


ri 



MOTTO: 
THE BEST 



Manufacturers and^< S^^S^i 
Exporters S >^ ,^ 




OF THE VERY FINEST 



I^edlcel Cod Liver Oil, 

Shipped in Tin Lined Barrels. 

Quotation on application. 

AYT" A 1\/[T TNTKT ^oard of Trade Building. 

W ♦ r\* iViL>'iNiN, it. John's. Newfoundland. 



Didis I Co., Lti 

We Sell Everything Needed 
in a Modern Office. 

Special Loose-leaf Oystems, 
Binder Sheets, 
Index Systems, 
Files, Transfer Ceases, Jbtc. 

Booksellers, Stationers, 

Printers and Binders, 



\T 



. h E. KEHNED , 

Contractors, Builders 
and Appraisers. 
Office: RENOUF BUILDING. 

p. O. Box ;m- I'hoiie 767. 

Factory and Store, off James' Street. 



/. D. RYAN, 

Importer and Distributor of 

Southdown, Hard a Port, 

Perfection, 

Cornucopia, Sailor's Hope, 

Virginia Tobaccos. 

323 DucJzworcJi Street, St. John s. 



Use MARKLA^D BOND Paper 

for your Tvpewriter Pa;?er. for your Letter Heads 
and high grade Printed Commercial Forms. 

MARKLAND BOND Paper carrie^ -.ith it a prestige. 
A wood impre^^ion is created bv the letter written 
on a sheet of Markland Ix nd. 

Ask your dealer for Makkkanp Bond Typewriter 
Paper, and insist that your Printer uses Mra-kland 
Bond on your next lot of printed stationery. 

R. H. DAVIS & CO., LTD., 

Yarmouth. 542 George Street. 

Nova Scotia. Sydney, Nova Scotia. 

See that this trade oiirk is on every labe.. 
Every sheet of Marklsnd Bond is vv.itermarkec 

Markland 

BOND 



"when writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



iftHlfil'D'HUtafianit.- ■ . 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 6. 



To Please 
The Ladies : 

Stainless Cutlery, 
Carvers in Case, 
Silverware, 

A Large \'ariety. 
s .< -•< 

Brass Goods, 
Manicure Sets. 



GIVE 






SEnSiSLF 
GIFTS 



CHRISTMAS 

PRESSrlTS 

THEY CAN 
USE 

AMD 

KEEP 




A Selection for 
Young and Old: 

Case Briar Pipes, 
Smokers' Stands, 
Ash Trays, 
Skates, Sleds, 
Hockey Sticks, 
Safety Razors. 



BOVVRING BROTHERS, LTD., 

Hardware Department. 



C O D O I L ! Best Scotch Household 

We always pay highest prices, \ L/ W A L- , 



No Slack. $12. SO. 



EXPORTERS OF jNorth Sydney Screened, 

Codfish, Salmon, Herring, etc. j ^•^■^°- 

Also Anthracite, all sizes. 

We want to give YOUR order our 
particular attention. 

Our Coal is best, our prices 
Marine Engines and fittings. \ are always the lowest. 

A. H. I>v/3URRAY dt Co., Ltd., 

ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 



IMPORTERS OF 

Provisions, Cement and all 
Fishery Supplies. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly men 



tion "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



■ ■M.SUI JI.IIMJ.V 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-;. 



1©2 



*7> 



ID. A. LTD. 1©24 




^I-: extend to all our Clients hearty thanks for Patronage during the past 
U Strenuous Year, our Best Wishes for a Happy Christmas Season, 

and assure "One and All" of our best endeav'ours to give -'Prompt," " Reliable" 
and "Econoinicar Service during the coming )ear. uhich we hope uill be 
one of "Happiness and Prosperity" tliroughout the Dominion. 




The Direct A 



Cahh Add. 



ress 



"D,- 



rage. 



genaes, 

p. O. Box 



Lutd. 



866. 



W. & G. REMBELL, 

Water Street, St. John's. 



Importers and Dealers in 

Hardware of all descriptions, 
Paints, Oils, Cement 

and Roofing Materials. 

A large supply of above goods always in stock. 
—SOLE AGEXTS FOR— 

Brantford Roofing Co., Ltd* 




our personality 

expresses your 
individual character. 

It is not lite any other man's but 
YOUR distinctive quality and only slightly perceptible. 

Your clothes should reflect and accentuate this to the 
degree of refinement. 

It cannot be obiained in " Machine Cut'' clothes, for they are 
made to fit the aver.ige, not the individual man. 

We failor clothes to fit you 
and your personality. 

The American Tailor, 

P.O. Box 445. W. 1. briUKlALL, Phone 477. 

300 Water Street, .< St. John's, Nfld. 



J A MES S TE VENS, 




23 Jyfaxe Street, St. John s. 



All Work Personally Attended To. 



Phone 363 W. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



'JHfi ■ WflJ ■ 



, 1 



Mkinim^'i 



. ..^Jtig8»<iL^,=.^.t 



11111111 ITi1irt-'''irti'ir|i ir''i[ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-S. 



CLEANLINESS AND CIVILITY GUARANTEED AND 

PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS 

ENTRUSTED TO OUR CARE. 



p. O. Box 353. 



Pnones 4S2 & 7S6 



Ellis & Co., Limited, 

203 Water Street. 

Purveyors of Hi^lvClass 

Groceries, Meats, Poultry, 

and Delicatessen IMarket. 

All nirats are personally selected. 
We Guarantee to Stock the Choicest Meat 

Procurable in the Dominion. 
Our Sausages are a Specialty, 

Pork, Beef or Tomato. 



A Welcome 
Necessity. 



Dale & Company, Limited, 



MARINE 



FIRE —ACCIDENT 



INSURANCE UN PERXA/R ITERS. 
Head Office: MONTREAL. 

BRANCH OFflCES: 

Halifax, Winnipeg, 

Toronto, 



Quebec, 



Vancouver. 



Bank of Nova Scotia Building, 

St. John's, Newloundland. 




GIVES A QUICK 
ABUNDANT LATHER 

. « 

There is a reason for the popularity of 
" Crescent" and that reason is to be found in 
its all-round usefulness. For all Laundry 
and Household cleaning "purposes it is no 
exaggeration to say that "Crescent" is with- 
out a rival. 

Su preme in Quality and Purity. 

JOSEPH CROSFIELD & SONS, LTD., SOAP-MAKERS, 
WARRINGTON, ENGLAND. 

MEEHAN & COMPANY, Agents. 



sJlie Greel S3tt Goods &tore«^^ 

r- ) \RTICULARLV TH Is"sEASOx"hAVE WE A STOCK WHICH IS 
r SURE TO MEET YOUR APPROBATION :- 

Toys Games, Picture Books and Dolls in e nd .ss array 
for tl/ kiddies. .> Jewellery, Manicure Sets, Brush Sets 

Perfumery, Handkerchiefs, and an abundant selection ot„the, 0;f 
(To I ^, t^.^Jadies ; and in our Men's Store a really wonderful Mvnvu.g of 
approjjnate articles for (Jifts or Presentations. 
Decorations, 
Greeting Cards, 
Holly Boxes, 
Christmas Crackers. 





ST.JOKN'S NEVVFOUNDLANDc 



"vVhe'n writing to Advertisers kindly mer^tion "The .Newfoundland Quarterly." 




Vol. XXill.— No. 3. 



DECEMBER, 1923. 



80 cents per year. 



I. 



• » 



f^B^ 3rcm Crovon CoConi| to Home Rufe 

• AND THE " FATHERS OF RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT." 



'• Tki-'st me, each State must have its pohcies : 
Kiiigdums ha\c edicts, cities ha\e their cliarters ; 
i-lven the wild outlaw, in his furest-»valk. 
Keeps yet some touch of civil discipline. 
For not since .-Vdam wore his verdant apron. 
Hath man with man iit social union dwelt, 
But laws were made to draw the union closer." 

THE PATRIOT AN'D EniTOR. MR. ROBERT JOHN PARSONS 




Wi ITH the single exception of Mr. Philip Little — to 
whom I referred in mj- article on this prolific sub- 
ject in the last number of The Newkol-ndland 
Quarterly — Mr. Robert John Parsons. Patriot 
and Editor, was, beyond doubt, the nio>t outstand- 
ing personally in the agitation for Responsible 
Government carried on here froin 1S52 to 1S55. 
Indeed, I may say that he occupied a foremost 
pl.ice in the pub'ic life of Xewfoundjjnd during the gre-tir part 
of the pa.st century Mr. Parsons was born at Harbor (Irace in 
1S03. where he h.id only the limited educaiional advat tagrs 
available to the y )uth of the colony a hundred years ago. When 
but a little boy he w.is remarkable for his pre.'ocity and general 
intelligence. He led his playmates and school-fellou-s in all 
kinds of juvenile amusements, and when only ten or eleven 
years of age, used to stand on a table or chair and entertain 
'• the children of a larger growth" with songs and recitations 
from the standard authors. And so — 

•• Within that peaceful town he dwelt in youth. 

His sister's hero and his morher's pride,— 
The soul of honor, the abode of truth 
Beloved and reverenced on every side." 

Subsequently when his parents came to St. John's to reside, 
they apprenticed hitn to ilie printing business in the oliicc n( the 
A'jj.i/ Gazdtc, which at that time was published by Mr. John 
Ryan, the original proprietor. Mr. Parsons continued to work 
as' a journeyman print:=r till 1S33, when he launched the 
J'atriot newspaper and conducted it editorially and otherwise 
for fifiy years. The paper's motto was the immortal injunction 
of Cardinal Wolsey :— " Be just and fear not. Let all the ends 
thou ainiest at be thy God's, thy country's and truth's." .\iKi 
on the front page, in the most suitable place available v, ere the 
lines — 

■' Here shall the Cress the people's rights maintain. 
I'nawed 1)V iiulueuce and unhrihcd In- .s;ain ; 

Here patriot Truth her glorious piecepls draw. 
Pledged to Ueiigion, liberty and l,.iw." 

Mrs. Parsons, lur Eliza Flood— a literary woman of fine attain- 
Tients— w.is a granddaughter of Henry Flood, the brilliant Irish 
orator, statesni.in nnd pitrlcit. whose eloi|uence made a marked 
impression in the British House of Commons, wliere his activity 
in suppjrt of all measures beneficial to his country won him 
great popularity. His speeches were logical, pure in style and 
rich in figures and dassicil allusions. He left a pindaric "Ode 



By Alex. A. Parsons, J. P. 
ARTICLE II. 

to Fame," and a puem on the death of Frederick. Prince of 
Wales, to be found in the (l.^ford collection. 

THE VERY FIRST NEWS GATHERER. 

The editor in those days had few, if any, of the great advant- 
ages possessed by his successor of the present time. Thinking 
of the past in connection with newspapers and newsgathering, 
in imagination we so back to the primal age when -there were 
giants in the earth," when the " wickedness of men was great." 
when the son of Lamech embarked with his sons and his wife, 
and his sons' wives, and two of every kind of beast and fowl 
and creeping thi ig; when •• the waters prevailed e.xceed'ngly." 




Rdl'.KRr loiiv rM■-'l^-. 1--" 

when the Hood was unabated for one hunlred and nfiy days, 
and "when on the seventeenth d.iy of the seventh month, the 
rude vessel that had been huilded of gopher wood, rested on the 
summit of .\rarat, and the iu-..'s of dry land was not." But at 
the end of another fortv davs " Noah opened the window ot the 
ark which he made" and he sent forth first a raven and then a 
dove neither of which found rest for the sole of its foot. Ann 
vet another seven days, and again the dove goeth forth, to re- 
turn in the evening witlrUie first bulletin, of which inventive 



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■^ja»^i 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— lo. 



man hath record. '■ Lo. in her mouth s'.a'; an olive leaf plucked 
oil I" It was bijj news for those who had been cramped for 
months in the "kuver, second and third stories" of the historic.il 
craft, that was three hundred cubits in length, fifty cubits broad 
and thirty cubits hi^h, and no doubt poorlv ventilated, for re- 
member there was but one door and one window. How Ham 
and Shem and l.iphet, and even old Noih himself, and Mrs. 
Noah, and three dau;;hters-in-law must have rejoiced at the 
freedom vouched for them in every hue and tiber of the leillet 
they had taken trom the beak of their winf;ea carrier! It was 
the birth of a new world, the hnrbinger of hrin;ht days, the silent 
prophecy of a nobler manhood. Strange, that to this later day, 
when genius has annihilated space, and every item of momentous 
mtellisence is almost simultaneously in possession of ci\ ilized 
nations, the trauied pi<;eons of Antwerp, worthy decendants of 
ttieir gentle prototv pe of the ark, are held in great esteem as 
swift bearers of tiaingsl The feats of these birds have been 
often chronicled, and they are unequalled by any modern con- 
trivances cf .aiau, electric machines alone e.vceptcd. Of course, 
there were uo telegraphs, telephones and airships in those days. 
But turning abruptly to the news records of our own progressive 
land what a revolution since the Fathers of Responsible Gov- 
ernment here linked us up vvith the Mother Country by means 
of trans-.\tlantic monthly steam mail and passenger service 1 



AT THE BAR OF THE HOUSE OF COMMON'S. 

But to return to the subject of my present " sketch." In 1853 
Mr. Parsons, accompanied by Mr. Philip Little, was the bearer 
of a petition frcvii the people of N'ewfoundland to the Imperial 
Government pra>ing that the privilege of Home Rule may be 
conceded to his native country ; and, while in London, he had 
the honor of appearing at the bar of the House of Commons, 
wnere l.e prcsei.ted his petition and a^dres^ed the House in its 
behalf. Two years liter the priyer of the petition was granted 
and, for better or worse, we forthwith became a self-governing 
Colony. Accorni'ig to an enthusiastic admirer of his. who con- 
tributed to the Couritr about that lime, " Mr. Parsons was the 
greatest element.il force in Ne.vfoundland politics during the 
first decade of Home Rule." 

SENT TO PRISON BV JUDGE BOULTON. 

Previous to his appearance at the bir of the House of Com- 
m )ns Mr. Parsons had quite an eventful experience at another 
b.ir — the Bar of the Supreme Court. On the 38th of May. 1835, 
he was sentenced by Judge BjuJnn, to " three months' im- 
prisonme'''t in the common jail, or pay a fine of tifty pounds to 
ihe King," for refusing to disclose the author of a letter, signed 
'■ Stick a Pin Here." published in the columns of his paper on 
the 17th of that month, reflecting on the judicial honesty of the 




Aloxr, THE W.ATtR-FROXT— I'REMISES Of THE ROVAI. STORES, 7.Ta, ANT> JOB BROTHERS .^ CO., I.TP. 



Some of us can still remember the Galway boats and the irit- 
gul.ir service thev performed. \V lat must have been the 
emition of Postmaster General W, L. Solomon if he could have 
foreseen the expanding and unfolding of our posttl system 
through the succeeding yeais of its existence! What surpiise 
would h.ive attacked him if he could have fore-kno.vn that on 
the first day of January, 1923. there would be eight or nine 
hundred post oiiic^s in the Colony, telegraphic and telephonic 
connection everywhere, and a network of railways-connecting 
almost every important settlement one with the other ? 

THE MODERN' EDITOR'S MK.THOHS. 

Intelligence nov comes from all quarters, from over the laud 
and under the seas, from countries that are in darkness when it 
is mtd-d.iy here. The telepraph and telephone are at work all 
through the night, bringing messages which are lo be put into 
print "and sent off to the subscribers a few hours later. The 
click, click, click is going on incessantly over the wires — the 
wires which converge from all quarters of the globe, and the 
transcribed messages are brou-ht in to the editors and print; rs 
bv swift-footed little messengers, or else over au.xiliary wires to 
ai'i instrument alo.-igside the editorial chair itself. That's the 
way the news now keeps coming along, directly and indirectly, 
to the editorial work-table. .\ general never loses a battle, a 
speculator a hazard, or an athlete a competitive stnigale with 
'half the heart-ache that the experienced editor feels when his 
reporters are be.iten on a r-al item of news. Prestige is his 
oritbmme. and tireless activity his escutcheon of honor ! 



said Judge. The fine was promptly subscribed 'jy Mr. Parsons' 
p-)litical admirers, and his release made the occasion of one of 
the greatest ovations ever witnessed in this city. The letter in 
question reads as follows: — 

" We understand that a lecture was delivered in the Court 
" Hou^e yesterdav to Ihe Grand and Petit Juries on the opening 
"of the Central Circuit Court by the President of the Council 
•• in his capacity of Chief Judge, on the very great benetits 
'• which hanging the people confers on society, arising, no doubt, 
•'from its sed.itive effects upon the human system, which, to the 
'•unini;i,ited, are trulv astonishing. The same excellent plan 
'• is to be followed up, in order to quell the fiery spirits, which, at 
"this moment, keep up a wholesale ripple on the surface of 
"society, which, it would appear, is fearfully disturbing the re- 
" pose of the honorable lecturer and nil other de-pots who sl^all 
"dear to subvert the charters of the land, and plain lu their 
■'stead the undloved principles of arbitrary sway! Go it. ye 
"cripples I" 

Judge Boulton, by whom Mr. Parsons was committed, had 
undoubted ability, but he was the worst possible selection for 
the Supreme Court Bench. His views, both ot law and legisla- 
tion, were most illiberal. " -^s a technical lawyer he was mostly 
ri-ht and subli.uelv iudependent; but his harsh sentences, his 
indecent party spirit, and his personal meanness caused him to 
be hated as no one was ever hated in this Colony." 



' '^y^^fa yyf j jj w r'-^ 



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sy«ppfPM4 i J'Jf i ^-w » ' j^ i!! ^ .;'g ' 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY— 1 1. 



ONE OF A LONCr LINE OF STATESMEN. 

Robert John Parsons was, as a matter of fact, one of a )ong 
line of st.itesmen wfio dj radical work. Whether it be Sir 
Hugh Hoyles. st.indino up for fair play in the exercise of the 
franchise and the distribution of public patronage. Sir Frederick 
Carter, steering a course between Liberalism and Toryisii, .Mr. 
Charles Fox Bennett strenuously opposing Confederation, or 
Sir Kobert Bond dishing the Tories by est.iblishing manhood 
suffrage, the history of Toryism is alwivs the same. It is an 
unbroken record of successive surrenders. Whenever any insti- 
tution becomes the special cit.idel of the Tory Party, that insti- 
tution is marked for destruction, not by tlie violence of its foes, 
but by the treachery of its own garrison. Mr. Parsons grasped 
that fact in one of the hasty generalizations for which he was 
famous, and went one better than all his contemporaries. They 
each gave up one stronghold ; he would evacuate everything. 
They reluctantly betrayed position after position to the be- 
leaguering forces of Democracy. Mr. Parsons insisted upon 
;;oing over, horse, foot and artillery, with b.>g and baggage. 
colors rtyiiig and band p'aying, to the ■•enemy." In the poli- 
tical arena here, Mr. Parsons' importance arose from tlie 
quickness with which he perceived tnat the ga^ne was up; and 
hence arose the ifisinicia/we and audacity which disiingu'shed 
him on the platform and on the floor of th; House of Assembly, 



enjoyed office accidentally only and temporarily. To thwart 
their plans, therefore, in every legitimate way, was to hira a 
positive duty, a duty which he carried out with that persistent 
energy of which he was so remarkably capable. Mr. Parsons 
had at this time the appearance of a man of considerable 
strength and vigor. He was about the medium height, but was 
well proportioned, quick in his movements, and keenly alive to 
passing events. The last time I saw him was one Saturday after- 
noon in the law otVice of his son (kobert John Parsons, jr.), on 
Duckworth Street. On that occasion he appeared to be in ex- 
cellent health, talked ple.isantly of the home of 'tis boyhood, 
inquired about my father and mother, with whom he claimed a 
cousinly relationship, and invited me to call and see him often. 
Previous to this I had frequently heard him speak in the House 
of Assembly and once or twice from the hustings, while address- 
ing ■' the free and independant electors," as he never omitted 
to call them. 

A PLEA FOR THE VERY BEST TALENT. 

In the course of one of his speeches, I remember, he strongly 
argued that, for the management of our Public affairs, •• the very 
best talent a\ailable must be employed," irrespective of birth or 
wealth or any such consideration. It was characteristic, as. too, 
was his difference with one of his colleagues in St. John's East, 
which, in itself, was undoubtedly due to the latter's narrow- 



•f 



i. 



i 




-^».^twt^-3_.<rf^-..^^ -r-. - -. - -- ■__ 



i-'— t-^< -.-i ^^ -'-^ ' 



DRVINr; FISH AT MESSRS. JOB HROTHKKS C\: CO.. t/ll>. 



for forty or fifty years, the most conspicuous and, in many 
quarters, the most popular politician on our local boards. 

HtS MENTAL ENERGY AND PARLIAMENTARY SKILL. 

" During the first two years of my Parliament iry life," says a 
political contemporary of Mr. Parsons, " I .scarcely kirew him. 
I had always admired his mental energy and parliamentary skill, 
but we had never been in any way thrr)wn together, I was a 
new member of the Assembly ; he was an olJ parliamentary 
hand, an.i he was not a man who made new friends or even 
acquaintances quickly, partly, no doubt, in c^nsequence of his 
shortness of sight at that time; and in a sense it may be said 
that, though greatly respected, he had not then very many close 
friends in the House, but those whom he had were devoted to 
him. In 1S69. the debate on the French Shore Question, I 
think it was, brought us together, and I found a very useful 
colleigue in Mr. Parsons. Throughout the Session, up to i s 
termiiution, we fought together, and. the fii.-ndship then made 
was only terminated by his death. He was a sincere Liberal, 
stronglv in favor of administrative etficicicy. but opposed by 
convictioi to revolutionary legislation." 

A SINCERE FRIEND OF THE WORKING CLASSES. 

Like Mr. P. F. Little, he (Mr. Parsons) believed in the in- 
nate Liberalism of the Newfoundland working classes, in whose 
welfare he always took a sincere and active interest. He 
held, and ri"ht!v held, that the Conservative Government 



mindedness and his living, as Mr. Parsons said, " in a water 
ti^ht compartment and thus iinuairing the efficiency of the dis- 
trict's representation." Half an hour spent in the company of 
Mr. Parsons was as exhilarating as a day at Topsail or Holy- 
rood. There was a delightful breeziness about the man. a 
freshness which suggested the fir-clad slopes of our island home, 
of which he was so passionately fond. He possessed. moreu\ei. 
a cheerv self-confidence, the confidence of the man who had 
been successful in public life. He was a man of simple tastes. 
Given his pipe, a comfortable chair, and a pile of late papers- 
home and foreign— and he seemed perfectly happy. He was 
one of the public men of his time who, after a long and honor 
able career, still retained in his old age the enthusiasm and faith 
of his e.irly manhood. Of his home life I have not lett myself 
much space to speak. It was enough to be brought for a brief 
moment into the presence of one ot the old heroic breed wl.o 
ennobled the generation in which they lived. 

A TRIBUTE TO HIS MEMORY. 

Mr Parsons died on the 20th of |une. 1S83. and this is what 
the yS'n7;/>/-.!A-/v/^/-fsaid of him in its issue of the following 
day— ■• It' is with feelings of regret that we record to-d.iy the 
death of Robert luhn Parsons, Ksq., at the ripe age ot emhty. 
Not long since, our readers will remember, we took occasion to 
tender our congr.Uulations to the venerable journalist atid 
people's representative, on attaining his eightieth year and the 



i. i«, i u4-»j 'ij ijiBw.»" .'* "^vm'ST 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— i 2. 



I > 



fiftielh anniversary of ihe Patrwt newspaper, of which he was 
the founder. Were the life of Mr. P.irsons written, it would 
embody, to a large extent, the history of Newfoundland during 
the last half ccnuiry. tor he was iniiniately associated with every 
public movement aid bore an honorable part in all the stru<'<'les 
for freedom ibroujjh which the country passed. His talents and 
eloquence— both of a hit;h order— were ever on the side of 
reform and progress, and he has lived to see many of those im- 
provements m governmeut and in the administration of public 
afiairs, for which he so ably contended, become accompl'shed 
facts. Newfoundland owes a debt of gratitude to Mr. Parsons, 
and will long cherish his memory. .\s an eloquent spe.iker he 
was surpassed by few: and his journalistic talents were sufh- 
ciently attested by the energy and ability displayed in the 
editorial department of the 'j\ilri,<t. His popularity amonij 
those he represented in the House of .-Vs.sembly was unbounded. 
Mr. Parsons was well-known for the kindness and geniality of 
his disposition and was deservedly held in esteem bv his large 
circle of acquaintances. The departure of another veteran of a 
former generation of pjliticians will be deeply and widely 
regretted." 

A SELF-S.iCRIFClNO PATRIOT. 

Although Mr. Parsons enjoyed for a lime the distinction of 
being " The First Commoner of the Land" — he was Speaker of 



interests, and for his self-sacrifice on behalf of his fellow- 
countrymen :' However, "he is gone from us forever," has 
long since passed away, and 

•■ Lpon the grave my fading leaf I lay. 

And try to voice what oiilv tears can say, 

ho svaim and fast the ready waters swell! — 

So we.ik the faltering voice thou knewest welP 

Thy words of kindness calmed that voice before; 

Xi/ii.' thoujihts of them but make it tremble more ; 

And le ive its theme to others, and depart 

To dwell within the .silence where thou art." 

EVENT.S OF GREAT COLON'IAL I-MPORTANCE. 

But events of great Colonial importance are still passing into 
history. Public opii.i in is visibly acquiring new animation. 
Political aspirations, moved by unseen intiuences, like the tide 
in the Spring, a'e rising to a purer level. Statesmen of ditterent 
parties, appreciating trte requireuents of the hour, forgetting 
alike the rivalries and jealousies of the past, are agreed in de- 
claring that the time is come when all pirties should practice 
in unison the graver duties of g )vernment. should accept the 
burden of ne.v obligations and the adininistratinn of new trusts. 
The wish to possess, even in an imperfect for.n, the resemblance 
of individuals whose names are still familiar to us. but whose 
forms have passed off the stage of time, is a very natural one. 
Indeed, such desires have almost btcome co.iveniional habits. 



II 



i ti 




■^l - 



1^ Hi 






X-»:-^iL.^i.-Jl'!ii^.-.. 



*E.\IISES OF MESSRS. RAISE, JOHNSTON- & CO. 



the House for a term — yet he received hut little compensation 
for his services. Nevertheless, he laboured none the less earnestly 
in the interest of his country and compatriots, regardless of per- 
sonal advantage. To quote from the Rev. Philip Toque's 
history : ■• He (.Mr. Parsons) was one of that good old class of 
self-sacrificing patriots who helped to hew this country out of 
the rough granite and lay a foundation for the progress and 
prosperity we enjoy to-day." Ketaining his popularity to the 
last, he was never defeated' at an election, being returned term 
after term for forty years. He retired from the -political arena 
because of advanced years and the intirmities inseparable there- 
from. Indeed, his popularity was so great that on one occasion 
he was placed on a chair and carried through the city on the 
shoulders of four Hshernien. As observed by the .\fdr,iiry. already 
quoted, ■' he was a silver-tongued orator," and it was no unusual 
thing for him to speak for si.>; or seven hours at a time in oppo- 
sition to measures which be regarded as inimical to the interests 
of the people. .-\s that eminent judge of merit, the Hon. 1 hos. 
Talbot, wrote of Mr. Parsons at the time of his death: " .Vs 
long as Newfoundland retains a grateful memory, she will realize 
that she owes a debt of gratitude to him for his devotion to her 



which we make very little elTorl to restrain and none to disiu^se. 
The pioneers and founders of a country, of whatever profession 
or calling, will generally be found to be men of great force of 
character, as well as of an adventurous turn of mind, who are 
more inclined to perform heroic deeds than to record them. 
Such were the fathers of Responsible Gavernment, and the de- 
cendants of such men still live amongst us: 
" Life may be given in many ways. 
And loyalty to Truth be seeded 
As bravely in tiie clo-et as the held. 
So bountiful is Fate ; 
■But then to stand beside her. 
When craven chuils deride her. 
To front a lie in arms and not to yield — 
This shows, nielhinks, God's plan 
And measure of a slalwarl man. 
Limbed like the old heroic breeds. 
Who stand .self-poi.sed on manhood's solid earth, 
Not forced to frame excuses for his birth. 

Fed from wilhin with all the strength he needs." 

In the ne.\t issue of the Quarterly I shall devote the space 
at my disposal to character sketches of the late Sir F. B. T. 
Carter and Sir Ambrose Shea. 



^^^m^m^^^^i^^^^^^^^^^^^^' 



"H I .imji>,.ui i > i i,»» i t |i |jj! ! y»,l| l | ll[ l|U ! '. . ' . ' Hlj , »i l 



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^^'.Bly— 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



'3. 



3f\e Prime [Kin 

Hon. Dr. Warren at 

'•And statesmen at Me Council met 

Who knew the sejsons ,ihen to take 
Occasion by the hand and make 

The bounds of freedom luder yet," 

OXD has been received from I.otidon sivs the 
n.„,y .V;«.y in one of its recent issues, ihat 
Ireinier Warren made a deeded hii „ith hi. 
speech at the banquet given by the RomI Colonial 
Instuute to the delegates to the Itnperi.tl Confer- 
ence at the Hotel Victoria, October ^nd Mr 
'^^arrenVs speech; ivhioh «as brief and huinerous' 

'^^'"^ ^''<='' ^"I'e lengthy and heavy oralionsbv 
other speakers, and «as .11 the ntore appreciated on ihtt accourt 
he was «a.mly applauded and especially complimented by the 
Duke of Connai^ht, « ho was the chairtnan on the occasion 
Arrangements had been made beforehand for the broadcasting 




ister in fengfand. ^^ 

the Imperial Conference. 

but it ,s really tnterestinj: to know that not only were they broad 
ca ted .n the I^ndon area, but nil listenets'in throughout the 
enure country, as far North as Aberdeen. Consequently ( 
should ,n,agme that the speakers that the speakers that ni-ht 
were addressing a larger .u.dience than they have ever done"..! 
their lives before." 

As a result of this speech, the Premier was deluged with invi- 
tations to speak at all sorts of lunctions, and at two subsecjuent 
dinners at which he was not on the programme at his own re- 
quest, the audience intervened with calls for him to speak, uhich 
demand he had to how lo. and take part in the oratorical efforts 
ot the evening, aKvays with mucli acceptance. 

Mr. Burrows, ihe manager of the Broadcasting Company who 
was in Si. Johns some years ago, has invited Mr. '\arren to 
make an address on Newfoundland for broadcasting to th» 
Lnited Kingdom, the date ri.xed for it being October jTst when 



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HON'. IIR. W. R. W.aRREN in LONDON' FOR IHK IMRERI.-M. CONFIRKNI F. 
LEAVINr, cr.VRlDGF.'s IIOTKI, Willi |!|S M 111 F SOS .AND illS SFCRKT.VRV— M R W. J. CAREW. 



of all the speeches by wireless by the ISritish Mroa.ilcasiing Com- 
pany. The cxpeiiment .vas a great success, and ihe Company 
rec'ived, amongst others, a letter from Sir S imucl Chap nan, 
M. P. of Xewfargie in Fifcshire, 550 inil:rs away from London, 
reading as (olloivs: — • 

■■ The Premier of Newfouiidl.ind delighted us in Sculand as 
much as he did lii-i more nnmerocs audience i'l L mdon, and his 
points raised as hearty laughter and cheering here as at the 
Hotel Victoria. Keep it up, and let iis h-ive as many of such 
speeches as is possible. This is the best thing you have done." 

The company also received several other tl.ittering references 
to the speech, and so did Mr. Warren himself in letters from 
people in different parts of the I'liirrd Kingdom ; of these was 
from the Secretary of the I'cdcration of Hritish Industries, and 
read r'.i follows : — 

" I should very much like, if I may, to congr.itulite you upon 
the speech you made: it was exceedingly cKver and lefresning. 
The point you m.ide when jou said that had the dinner been 
held 400 yi ars pioviously, you would have been the only guest, 
was a splei.did ohe, and I hope was appreciated as such by your 
fellow Premiers as it was by others. [ take it that you were 
fully aware of thf fact that the speeches were being hro.idcasted, 



it is expected that the Premier will give an interesting little ta'.k 
on our islai d Home. 

Mr, Warren's nu.iierous friends will be glad lo k low that 1,; 
is doing so well in Kngland. 

A wiiter in the /fVj7w/V/j-/i/- Ci^r^Z/c- makes tl;e following re- 
ference to him ; 

"III personal appearance more like Mr. B.ildwin than any i.f 
the other visiting I'rime Ministers. When he speaks he takes 
hold of the lapels of his coat, and goes e.isily forward like a 
lav\yer much practised in advocacy. He has a sense ot tun. I 
have heard him pull the legs of his brother Prime Ministers l>>r 
their loquacity and pull the tegs of Whitehall sticklers lor pre- 
cedence because of the arrangement which places tne represen- 
tative ' f the oldest unit of ."he K npiie Conference always List on 
the list o( speakers. He can leg-pull in a way that even his 
victims enjoy. I fancy behind his Sun he can be intenseic 
serious and businesslike," 



Mrs. Warren, Lady (iouin, and Mr.s. (Iraham were present at 
a luncheon given in honour of the wives and daughters ut the 
delegates at the Ladies' Carlton Club, says Cir/nri/,r. of "Sow j; 

The Prime Minister nf Xewfoundland and Mrs. \\'.\r:r;; -■.,-:..■. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 14. 



lie week-end u Chequers as the truest of .\rr. and Mrs. Baldwin 
On Monday Mr. Warren was the guest of the Old Krainlin- 
hanii.ins at lunch at the luni,)r Consiitutional Club on Tuesda'y 
he was at the Roval .iltemoon party and a dinner to Lord 



McG 



McGregor. .Mr W H Measures, Major-General J. H. McBrien, 

Mr. Duncan .Marshall. S,r Patnck V. .NfcGrath, I.adv Moun 

Mephen. Mr. and .Mrs. W. C. No.von, Lieutenant Colonel and 



of nevonshire-s reception : and on Vrl'^^^^LJ^^^ UW^^ir ^^ L "^^ "^^^ ''l ''--^ ^'^ ^'^-^^ 



.Ma5.scy 

.\ddresses ol Welcome have been presented bv the Victoria 
I.ea;4ue and the l.idies' Empire Club to the Dominion Prime 
Ministers. .\t a reception held at Co (Jrosvenor .Street W on 
Monday, that for .Mr. N[.,ckenzie King was handed to Lidv 
(.oum. .ind that for .Mr. Warren to Mrs. Warren. The address 
to the C.inaduin Prune .Minister states : •■ .\t this moment, when 
the atleruiath of war is the heavy burden of uuemplovment 
your counsels will jo tar to solvinj the economic oroblems of 



Winter, .Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Wade 



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MRS. WARRK.V, 
WIFK OF THE PRIMF, MIMISTER. 

the Empire." That to the Prime Minister of .N'ewfoundland 
states : •' .N'ewfoundland always holds a special place in British 
hearts as the oldest of the Dominions < Iverseas. and we welcome 
you as the spokesman of a race of islanders who once again 
showed themselves of our kindred in the hour of need. We 
know th.it \ou hold that however good counsel may be the 
essential is to translate it into action." 

.\rr RfCKIXGHA.M P.AI.ACE. 

The Canadians and Xewfoundlanders invited to attend the 
afternoon party given by the K.ing and Queen at Buckingham 
Palace un Tuesday including Lieutenant R. L and Mrs. Agnew, 
Mrs. K. C. Blair. Major Graham Bell, Sir Edgar and Lady 
iiowring, Lieutenant-Colonel and .Mrs. (). F. Brothers, Dr. C. 
Camsell. .Mr. R. H. Coats. Dr. \. G. Dougty, Hon. G. P. and 
-Mrs. Graham, Sir Lonier and Lady (Jouin. Dr. J. 1 1. Grisdale, 
Captain Victor Gordon, Cofiimodore and Mrs. Walter Hose, 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs. [. Reid Hyde, Sir Ale-\inder and 
L.iily Il.irris, Mr. and .Mrs. j. Howard. Right Hon. W. L. 
-\L>cken/ie-Ring, Mr. Pauline Lafontaine, Hon. P. C. and Mrs. 
Larkin. Colonel and Mrs. R. W. Lennarrl. ^[r. and Mrs. F. \. 



Hon. Viclor Gordon. High Commissioner for Ncvvfoundland 
writes of Hun. Dr. Warren : 

The Premier of .Newfoundland has a double distinction He 
IS the yourgest Dominion Premier in the Empire, and he is a 
gr.andson ot a member of the l^rst Legislative .-Vssemblv set up 
in .Newfoundland. Ihis was the first assembly of the sort to sit 
in a colony. 

But 44 years of age. Mr. Warren is slight, very short, fair 
ele,-.n-shaven, wnh humorous twinkling eyes and 'a firm, but 
mobile mouth. 

He entered political life very young. When he first took his 
seat in the Newfoundland House he was little more than a 
boy— 23 to be e.v.ict— but he was alreadv a barrister with some 
reputation as a speaker. Seven years later he was elected 
Speaker of the Hous.- of Assembly, the youngest Speaker ever 
to hold ctfice. 

Mr. Warren's father, like most Newfoundlanders, held in high 
esteem the education of the Old Countrv. When his sun had 
passed some years at Bishop Fci:d College. St. John's, he 
packed him off to England, where he matriculated at London 
University in 1897, and five years later entered the legal pro- 
fession in .Newfoundland. 

PLAVS THE Game. 

He soon won recognition for his debating capacit\-, his know- 
ledge of public matters, and the manly spirit ui which he 
"pla)ed the g.mie." 

For Mr. Warren is essentially a sportsman. In his younger 
days he won distinction as a footballer and cricketer, and of late 
)eais he h.is won so much distinction at golf that for four vears 
he was champion of the Colony. One of his first engagements 
in this country was a " foursome" on a famous course near 
Town. 



PREMIER WARREX AT EDINBURGH UNIVERSITY. 

When being capped at Edinburgh, says the Daily Xews, 
Premier MacKenzie King of Canada spoke of his Scottish an- 
cestry and told of the wealth, influence and ubiquity of Scots- 
men in the big Dominion. Premier Warren followed in happy 
strain. If he was not Scot by descent, he was now a Scottish 
Doctor, but there were other ties with the land of the heather. 
We quote from "Canada " of November *4th : — 

'•Mr. Warren could not point to Scottish descent, like Mr. 
MacKenzie King, but he was able to claim to be a Scots 
Mason — a member of an Edinburgh Lodge — and also a skip in 
curling and a golf champion. Wfiile admitting that there were 
not as many Scotsmen in Newfoundland as in Canada, he de- 
clared that there enthusiasm made up for anything they lacked 
in numbers ; and he added that it was their boast that they had 
not a poor Scotsman in Newfoundland." 



" AN ECONO.MJC WAR." 

The Hon. W. R. Warren, Prime Minister of N'ewfoundland, 
speaking at a dinner given in his honour by the British Empire 
League, said that Newfoundland was proud of the position it 
held as the oldest colony in the Empire, because if Britain had 
not made a success of her first effort at colonisation she would 
never have made any more. 

With regard to the subject of Preference, he said the people 
of Britain had been invited to ask themselves whom they pre- 
ferred — those who belonged to the family or those who did not. 
" We could do with another war," added Mr, Warren: •• not a 
war of bloodshed, but an economic war, and we are well able to 
altord it. If this country is able to pay its debts and forgive its 
debtors — has money enough to do so — it can put some other 
people out of business." — Cuihidtj. Xov. 10. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— i-. 



^ 3f\Q atianVic Ca6te. -^ 




By the late Archbishop Howley 

X the year 1S5S, the ./?>,-/ Atlantic Cable was landed her, but 
at liay BulJs Ann, Trinity Bay. That cable 
»<-rkfd. though in an indifferent manner, for -i 

^ (twenty-one) days when it colbp-ed. A message 

|\^r,71 "■■« sent from Queen Victor! » to P,L-iid'ent 
\<r>' \>, Biichannan. Washington, and from Mr. T'iernan 
Major 01 New Vork, to the Lord -Mavor of Lon- 
don. For twelve years, from '^4,' when first 
issued, the scrip (5300 000.00) was absolutely valueless, fntil 
'66 nothinf; was done. 

In 1S66. the Cable w.is again (this time successfully) l.iid 
B.Ay Bulls' Arm was abandoned, and Heart's Coivent selected 
instead; and the Gr,-,!/ Eastern, the largt-st ship then artoat 
was subMitued for tlie Xmi^ara. Tne occasion was one of trreit 
e.\-Litement and interest throL'^hout the countrv. and large num- 
bers of e.KCursi()nists went from St. John's to'take part" in the 
Great Historical Event. T'he following letter of an eye witness, 
written at the tune by a lady of St. John's to her husband can- 



/ > 



not but prove inieres'ing. 

" Lake View," New Pf.rlica.y, 

Trinity Bay, july 2i)th, 1S66. 

Mio C.\RO Sposo,— I was just on the point of writing you 
when .\f— . O'M— . arrived with your letter and papers. I 
intend sending this by John Warren who goes to-morrow in the 
Lit\\ and « ho very kindly promised to take it. It would, be a 
useless task to write you about the Cable being successful, as 
you know, I suppose, much .-nore about it in St. John's than we 
who were looknig on at its landing. I will try to give you an 
account of how we passed that memorable day, the :;7th July. 

I was up early, and at about half-past seven o'clock there was 
a loar of voices—" The Greaf Eaiteinr' All who were dressed 
ran to some point from U'hich they could see her steaming up 
the Bay. I ran too, but being a stranger, missed the way, and 
on coming back to the house I found M — . 0'.\I — . had just got 
out of bed, quite cress, and when I asked her the way — '-I 
won't tell you," she said ' yow let me sleep it out,'' so I lost that 
part of. We got breakfast as quick as possible, and drove off 
to Heart's Content to see the 1 inding. As Uncle Michael's car 
could not accommodate us all, and had to come twice, M — . 
O'M — . and I got a lift from Mr. Kough. He was very polite 
to our hdies while he remained here taking a couple or three 
up each time. We had a splendi.i view of the •• Bi^ Eastern,'' 
as the B.iy people here cull her, coming up into Heart's Content 
Harbour. The shore end of the Cable being on board the 
'• ifedway," the tieet remained some time at the entrance to the 
Harbour splicing it. It took from two to three hours to com- 
plete this part. She then steamed slowly up the Harbour. 
We could distinguish the cable quite clearly as it was p.iid out, 
and it appealed to us that the vessel was scarcely able to move 
under the great weight. When she came up as fir as she 
intended she dropped anchor, and then the Cable was taken into 
a large bo.it. built purposely \ery wide, and H^t bottomed, so 
that a coil might be made in her, and towed by four man-o'-war 
bo.its to the shore. It was by this lime 2 o'clock. 

There was noiv .some great delay and C"nfu>ion caused by 
not having any person or agent there on the part of the Com- 
pany, to point out the place where the cable was to be landed. 
Mackay hid himself in the "Telegraph t)tiice," whether inten- 
tionally or not I don't know, but I heard .Miss McKen say. that 
Mr. Mackay said, it was none of his business. The boats must 
have been nearly two hours coining from the .\feiiuiiiy to the 
shore. At last .\Ir. Lundy came on shore, the place of the laud- 
ing was pointed out, and a deep trench had to be dug across 
the road and up to the office to burry the cable in. When we 
saw there was likely to be a delay in the landing we got a boat 
which took the v\hole party of us, with Ur. I'om, out on board 
the Big Eastern. She is immense. \'ou will hear ail about her 
better than I can tell you. We went through a great part of 



as we were in a hurry to get back to witness the land- 
ing, I think we shall pay her another visit. We nearh lost it. 
Te only saw the end of it. T'he jolly Tars all jumped out of 
the boats and caught ihe end of the Cable, and drew it upon 
their shoulders. They were out half the depth of themselves 
in the water bare-footed, and in the greatest excitement. All 
of the ships niw fired salutes, and we thought we would have 
been shaken to pieces in our boit. We were on our return 
from the great vessel at the time of the firing, ] think «e were 
better situated «i;h regard to the view we had. than those on 
shore, for there was such a crowd that some of us would not 
think of getting through it. 'i'tiere were prayers ot thanks-giv- 
ing in Church, and at niuht illuminations. M.O'M, .Miss McKen 
andd took te.i at Mrs. R. Kent's lodgings, and then drove home, 
the re-t went on before. I found a letter from you on the tabic 
and after reading it and resting a little we started orf again 
walking out this time. Uncle Michael, Mrs. H— ■, Mrs. Green. 
•^1 — ■ O'M — . and I went to see the illuminations. We had to gu 
nearly up to Heart's Content, and were but ill repaid for our 
trouble. They were very poor and very scanty, a few rockets 
only. Vou may be sure we were all very tired after the day 
and glad to get to bed. Mrs. 1)—. drove Agnes and I yester- 
day. She was looking for some beef for today, and tve got it 
by great compliment. It was very fine, we had it to-dav for 
dinner with young turnips, ham of home cure and white cab- 
l)%e. I h'lpe you will enjoy .Mrs. Kent's hospitality today . 
1 was thinking in the luoruiug before your letter arrived liow 
yuu would spend the day. If you have it wet like it is here, 
you cannot be very comfortabe. We intended having a long 
walk to-day to Xorman's Point, but the weather disappointed us. 
We have had a few baths since I wrote before. There 13 a nice 
retired place here, not two minutes walk from the house, where 
we bathe. It is called " Bitter's Cove." We were out lhi.^ 
morning before seven. I like it very much. We had some of 
our friends down here to-day, — John and the O'Maras and Dr. 
McKen. . . . He is going to dine this evening with Captain 
Anderson of the Great Eastern, a " towny of his and great 
friend of his mother's. Uncle Michael is hay-cutting. He has 
splendid hay. I never saw anything like it, so high and thick : 
his barley is very fine too ; and his potatoes. It is probable 
that .Mr. .Murphy will be up some time this week for us 10 go to 
Catalina. If not I suppose we shall be thinking of our return 
home after another week. -I have found out the spa. and have 
had some of it to drink. It is very cold and quite agreeable. 
I doubt if it be more than a good spring of common water. . , , 
I don't think there will be another opportunity of writing before 
Friday next. The post man will be here then, .so adieu for the 
present. . . . C — . M. — . 

The original or ■■ first" Cable was landed in Bay Bulls' .Arm. 
Trinity Bay, in August, 1858. This cable, after transmitting a 
few messages. '• gave out." Too much power had been put on 
and the conductor became fused. For nine or ten years ihe 
Company struggled against every difficulty, the Directors in 
New Vork were payir.g out money at the rate of tens of thou- 
sands, and nothing coming in. Their electrician in .Newfound 
land was named /Je Santy. To all the numerous and indignant 
inquiries sent by the Directors the only answer they go; was— 
" ■•\11 right !" — De Santy. So monotonous and e.xasperaling 
did this reply become, that Oliver Wendell Holmes imnioriali.'ed 
it in verse of u hich the following is a copy : — 

DE SAXTV. 

An F2i.KCTR<i-CiiK.\nrAL Eci.uiu'k. 

Prokkssor : — 

Tell me, (.) Provincial ! Speak Cercleo-Nasal 
Lives there one De Santy extant now among you. 
Whispering Boanerges, son of silent thunder, 
Uulding talk with nations? 



i ' 



I-'ke the ., , ,^v h ^ '""" ="^"°". 
Bi i'E.v„s •-_ ' ^'"° '^'""^' ' 

- .;f^"^' 'l^'"*^ "r-'lip towards me 

I liou Shalt hear them ,n ! 

""="• •inswered 

Called himself -neSanty- 

--^^.n.no...r^::-;Sx':;-:Xt;f-'^^'" 

Clicking in the current. 



'"lienton T^IL... *• ''■'• 


















S;S^;--;r.S:?^^ '^ -'--d stranger 
■^nd from tune to ti.ne in 1 ° ™ ^"'^ '°^y. 
'""<;, in sharp articulation 

From the lonelv , " ■^'''"''' ' ' '^"^ ^'^"ty." 

^■" ••'^ '-d .as hlled, „ -Sl^^' rX^-:-f stee^ples 

^^-''-ashado.,r:c:'fror*^^' 

,, *^f "J'^'itigration 

\-^,h- L '"""^ "'as no De Santv I 

No Jm.h^t a cloud of elements organic ' 

Calc.'sid^.tph'-MS'T,":-^"''^^--- 

Sii^h , • ° -^'"init) Cuprum 

»uch as man is made of. 

Bornofstreamgalvanic, „i,hi, heh.H • ,. 
1 here ,s no 1 .e Santy, now the e is nn ^"""""^ ' 
Give us a new Cable thpn ° current. / 

•-aWe. then ngain we'll hear him 

I am indebted for Co^" /',""'"'■' "' '^"'^■" 
-eful information concerning';': t^^^'r^' ^ '^ --h 
IhomasScanlan, E«n "=" -Atlantic Cable, to the late 

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Sof-rhun„dair.aha«c,-erUrch.ndfir.- 
A moon ,u.. showing,,, a li,|uid sky; 
' "' -"'"'"'"S ^'^^ °f ev. enthroned on l,i„i, • 
Anr on the peaceful harbor, scarce a stir ° ' 

Mooredfas,anday.«hena,,h.„,orn„.en,by 
,V'°V7 •-">■*''«'« ."^ "arched dav die 
''ve. dark l.ilb. .ilJ these l,eca,„e a blur 



By Robtrt Gtar MacDonald. 



^u.„ow,h...,«,i,„htcon,es,,.y swift thonghtsHee 
To a vaster, ...htier City, with i,s towers 
I pW.edh,gh. and .„ifc crowds moving fr.e 
A..drnyr,ad light, that da..,emphfs dark hours; 
And l.„ends who ch;umed me with the.r genial po.e 

Do some, this eve, I wonder, think of n,e> 
«t. John's. Xrtd.. November. ,02j. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-. s. 

Q rncmory 

OF THE LATE REV. BRO. O. B. O'FLANAGAN. 



By T. J. D. 



To a people who have ever honoured and respected that 
noble Order of self-sacriticing; gentlemen, the Iri-,h Chris- 
tion Urothcrs, the news of Rev. Brother O' Flanagan's 
sad passinc; c.ime is a shock, and to thnse who were privileged 
to have been his pupils it brought a poignant sense of loss, for 
Death had taken a kindly adviser and a lojal frietid. 

As I stood in Holy Cross on that fateful evening of October 
and looked upon the face so sweetly placid, even in the cold 
sleep of Death, it seemed as if the soul smiled through in 
triumph, for to him the consummation of a life's work had come 
in the old school he had loved so dearly^ and where he had 
laboured so bng and so patiently for the welfare ot his boys, 
and the greater glory of God. 

In memory's picture gallery there are always some treasured 
alcoves, where the light of recollection loves to linger, and as 
I write there comes to mind thoughts of my first meeting with 
him. to whose memory this little sketch is dedicated. On that 
unforgettable opening day of school liie, it was under the bene- 
diction of his kindly greeting that I crossed oyer the threshold 
and entered into that sanctuary of unselfish service whi-re the 
good Brothers so tenderly mould the characters entrusted to 
their care. 

To these outside the life of school, the Rev. Brother 
O'Elanagan was a man of rare reticence, extending aim )st to 
a degree of shyness, for he was humble, and his humility was 
the veil that hid fiom the world the learned scholar and pro- 
found thinker, whose gifts were lavished only in the allotted field 
of his endeavours. 

In his complete understanding of the little children, and in 
the lovable qualities that made him the friend and protector of 
even the most insignificant animal, was refiected the beauty of 
a truly great mind. 

The funeral cortege that accompanied his remains to their 
last resting place wms one of the l.irgest ever seen in the City, 
and exemplified the th^u^ht. •■ He that humbleth himself shall 
be e.xalted." 

He sleeps in Belvedere, resting beside his old friend Brother 
O'Hurley of saintly memory, an exile from home, and a martyr 
in the glorious cause of Christian education, but the seeds of 
wisdom and goodness he planted in life, will surely bear fiuit, 
and the sweet scent of its blossoms will always linger around 
the name and memory of our departed Teacher and Friend. 

Brother O'Flanagan was born in Monaghan, Ireland in 1835. 
He came of a very religious family and was the nc;phew of the 
late Cardinal Farley r^f Xew York. He joined the order of 
Christian Brothers in his seventeenth year, and came to N'ew- 
foundland in 1905. He is survived by his parents and one 
brother. The following poetic tribute was written by one of the 
many admiring friends of this lovable and Christian gentleman. 

In incmorp of Rcu. Bro. 0. B. O'fianai^an. 

B7 Dan. Carroll. 
When ytstere'en upon the hill> 

Soft twilight and the moonbeams met 
An angel parsed o'er Holy Cross 

A/rael the messenger uf Death. 

And found one at his duties there. 

And bid him " Come, tliy labours' o'er. 
Knter the fullness of the joy 

Thy God hath for thy soul in store !" 

Few hours ai;o in strength he stood 

Where at their tasks the children strove. 

The gentle Brother of the schools. 
The iiliiert of his pupiU' Inve. 



^ 



A voice across the evening cried, 

" He's dead !" It chilled our hearts to hear, 
Oh Death, that in the midst of life's 

Bright hours doth ever hover near. 

Thy hand that stealthily stilled his heart 

Has flung the portals open wide. 
To realms of everlasting bliss 

Where God's triumphant souls reside. 

Sad mother by the Irish hearth 

And father, who, across the lea. 
Oft watch him coming thro' the dusk. 

Our hearts are sorrowful with ye. 

The kind and well beloved was he. 

In this far land his worth was known. 
To lift the lives of youth to light 

In noble works he spent his own. 

By boyhoods love by grateful sires, 

By mothers of our men to be. 
By all who mark the good and true 

Revered shall be his meniorv. 




^ 



Cftristmas morning. 

By M. S. S. 

I SAT and heard the old familiar strain 

Wondering the while that mind could entertain 

A thought of incongruily so wild. 

The invisible, inefl'able, a human child ! 

He who has made the worlds that fill all space 

And keeps them moving in their ordered place, 

Where is the link could such a being tie, 

A spirit, unreal, to our reality ? 



Then came the thought to me. What are these orbs. 

Whose path he orders and their wandering curbs 

liut matter gross as ours, as real ; nay 

It not humanity the finer clay ? 

Foolish to grant him contact with the much. 

And with the liitle think him out of touch ; 

As if the clod of earth we call a stai 

More heavenly is became it is so far ! 

The spirit lifted me as if one took 

A child up shoulder high, and bade me look- 

I saw the myriad wonders daily done 

Pass in procession ; Sun give birth to sun, 

Man grow from dust, the daisy's petals bloom. 

In every Hesh the mighty soul rind room . 

Vea. the whole universe that round us reels 

Made not of atoms, but of miracles. 

.Still quired the age-old strain, but now I knew 
That in the book of life all tales are true. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 




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THE PALACE. 



R. C. CATHEDRAL, AND CONVENT. HARBOR GRACE. 

\Photo by T. J. l-riin,aii\ 




CAPE RACE — FROM THE S.S. "ROSALIND'' NEAR THE RoCk.s. 

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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 20. 



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'j^S Canon of 

THE REV. ERNEST 



PREVCHIXG ill St. Thiiraas' Church on Sundiy, -November 
iSth, the Bishop of .Vewfoundbiid announcei that he had 
appointed the Rector of the Parish, the Rev. Ernest 
Charles Earp. U..\., L.Th., C F., to the Stall in the Cathedral 
rendered vacant through the resignation of Canon Hewitt, who 
had left ihe I'ioc.'se to reside in the Old Country. Bv a happy 
coincidence the stall, which is dedicated to St. P.itrick, is that 
which was held by the last Rector of St. Thomas' who was a 
member of the C.xthedral Chipter— the late Canon Dunfield. 

r.he Rev. Canon E.irp is an Englishman, born in Leeds in 
iSSj. Twenty years ajjo he went to Canada and entered \Vy- 
clitTe College. Toronto L'niversity. Three vears later he w.is 
ordained priest in St. .\lban's Cathedral by the Archbishop of 
Toronto, and appointed Curate to the Rev. the Hon. Canon 
Cody, Rector of St Kuil's. Canon Cody is probably the most 
outstanding fij;ure in AnjjHcan Church life in the great Dj- 



St. Patrick. ^% 

CHARLES EARP, B.A. 



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THE REV. CANOS' EARP. 

minion. He has served as a Minister of ihe Crown — holding 
the portfolio of Education in the G ivernment of Ontario — and 
in his day has refused the Bishopric of Nova Sco'ia and the 
.\rchb;shopric of Melbourne, preferring to remain Rector of St. 
Paul's, Toronto. Rev. Mr. Earp's association with Canon Cody 
lasted three years, after which he became Rector of iJunnville, 
in the Diocese of Xia.;ara, and subseq'iently of Grace Church, 
Regina, in the Diocese of Qu' .Appelie. 

M the outbreak of the war .Mr. Etrp resigned his rectorship 
and, having received a Commission as Chapl.iin to the Forces, 
proceeded overseas with the I'iS-h B.itialion, C.K F. .After three 
months in England he crr)ssed over to France and was sent into 
ihe line with the ,^rd Canadian Infantry Brigade, servi'ig with 
distinction on the Western Front between Ypres and the Somme, 
and being present at the famous attack ot \';my Ridge. He 
was subsequently invalided to England, and on leavini; hospital 
was attached to the ;Est Division of the Forestry Corps in 
Scotland, Daring a portion of his military career he was .Ad- 
jutant to Colonel Wells. S-nior Chi|jlain to the ?nd Canadian 



Division, who is a Newfoundiander by birth, hailing from Salmon 
Cove, Conception B.iv. 

The published otii:ial record of Captain Eirp's work at the 
Front shows that he discharged his duties in a manner not 
merely satisfactory to his superior oiiicers but at all times with 
the greatest degree of faithfulness and devodon. He is descri- 
bed as one of the most capable, energetic and satisfactory caap- 
lains. The Director of Chaplain Services was moved to say 
that from long and constant observation of Mr. Eirp in the 
splendid work which he did he is coniident that he mav be de- 
pended upon to give an equally good account cf himself where- 
ever he may be placed in the service of the Church. 

.After the armistice, Rev, .Mr. Earp remained in EigUnd, 
accepting Ihe position of Deputation Secretarv of the Colonial 
and Continental Church Society, In this connection he travel- 
led extensively in the Old Land', preaching in a large number of 
Churches. Tne following year Canon Buchanin olfered him 
the Precentorship of Holy trioity. Hull, said to be tiie largest 
Parish Church in England. There he remained until 193 1 
when he was appointed Vicar of Sl Barnabas by the Archbisoop 
of York. Simultaneous with the appointment cime an invitaiion 
from the pirishion-rs of St. Thvnjs'. in this city, to be their 
Rector, in succession to the Rev. Dr. Edgar Jones, now Dean of 
St. Paul's, Cincinnati. After giving the matter full considera- 
tion, and up m the advire of the .Archbishop and the Bisaop 
of Hull, who recog died the larger field on this side of the 
water, the decision was made to c Mne to Newfoundland. 
Accompanied by his wife, son a-^d daughter, the reverend gen- 
tleman arrived in St. John's by s.s. V/g/n on October i.;th, 
1931, and on the following Sunday morninj was inducted 
Rector c^ St. Thomas' by the Bishop of Ncwfotindland. 

The people of St. Thomas' have had no cause to regret their 
choice. Since co.ning amongst them t.ne Rector has gisen faith- 
ful and z-alous service, and has worthily maintained tne highest 
traditions of the old Garrison Church. A preacher quite of the 
first rank, and with m.irkcd ability as an administrator, he has 
bee 1 abundant in labours, his invari b!e sympathy and ready- 
service having won appreciative and sincere rerard. His ser- 
mons, eloquent in delivery, rich in imagery a d choice in dic- 
tion, are always impressive and appealing, 

-And his woik has not been merely paroch-al. .At the first 
meeting of the Diocesan Synod after his arrival he was elected 
a member of the Bishop's E.\eculive Committee, and app )ii)ted 
a Director of the Church of England Colleges aid a member of 
the various Synod Boards. On all these coirmiitces he has 
served well and faithfully. .A man of broad, svnpathetic views, . 
his relaiions with the clergymen of other denominations have 
always been most cordial. It was no easy t;sk to succeed a 
Rector of the eloquence and magnetism of Dean Jores, That 
Canon Earp has been so successful is t'le bes: proof of his worth 
to the parish and to the Diocese. In Masonic circles, as Ch3|> 
lain of Lodge St. Andrew and later as Grand Chao'ain of the Dis- 
trict CJrand Lodge of Scotland, he has rendered splendid service. 

In announcing the appointment of the Recror as Canon of 
the Cathedral His Lordship Bishop White referred in the highest 
terms to the labors of Canon Eirp since his arrival in the 
Diocese and said he would bring to toe deliberations of the 
Cathedral Chapter a wealth of experience and a wisdom of 
counsel that would be invaluable. The dai'y press referred in 
the most conplimentary terms to the appointtr.ent, the £>iJi7y 
j.\l';i>s extending -'cordial coagratulatioos to the distinguished 
Churchman on whom so s'gnal and merited an honour has been 
conferred," and the £t-('I!h^' '/eA-gmm, after stating "the honour 
conferred upon the Rector of St. Thotiias' is most gratifying tu 
the parishioners and to the many friends that he has made here 
since his arrival," expresses the hope that -- tre Rev. Canon 
F.arp may long be spared to carry on the good w-ork which he 
has undertaken, and which he is so faithfully performing," 

In these expressions of congratulation and good will to the 
new- Canon the Quarterlv has much pleasure in joining. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 21. 



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WANnSWORTlI HOSPITAL. LONDON. KNGLAND. 



'^^ a Wan^svoorm memory! 

A Wanderer's Impressions of a Land Which Has Now Suffered the Effect of a Great Tragedy. 

By Capl. Leo Murphy, J. P. 




C.\ME across these notes the other day. They 
were given me by a young Officer of the Royal 
Fusiliers who occupied the same U'ard as I did 
at Wandsworth Hospir.il. 
^,. . . He had visited many lands ; had seen 

£jij'& many strange pLices and witnessed queer customs. 
''' ^ - 1 He had been a great traveller, and then, like 
many ethers of that ilk, had embarked on the Great Adventure. 
A snipei's bullet had wounded him so badly that his days of 
wanierirg in the ■• far off places" were over. Yet he always 
talked ot h'S travels i"to the heart of the other countries, and 
tht n «ou'd grow suddenly silent, smoking many pipes into the 
night, wi h the gleam of the "wanderlust" in his eyes, until a 
. kindly i U's; would smo )the his pilloivs and send him travelling 
into the land of dreams ! 

I append his notes verbatim. . . . 

" Here at the other side of the world I strike iny Japanese 
ttm)le-gung softly wi'h its padded ma'let. 
Tile sound lingers — and fades. 

I touch it again, ever so gently, and there comes to me the 
faint echo of bronze voices in 
morning. 

Listening, I shut my eyes, 

remember : 

At nigl t 

A deserted hotel up on a hill. In a rice field below frogs 
croak noisily; near the verandah-lamps huge spiders weave their 
webs and lie in wviit. 
Hours pas=. 

rh o gh the white cKiud-like mist of my mosquito net I can 
vaguely see the Japanese bi'y who brings tea and tells me that 
it is hnlf past four. 

Between sleeping and waking I lie wondering at the dark and 
the sudden stillness, when there conies to my ear a wonderful 
sound ; the sound of bronze in splendid bass. It is a sound 
precise and never varying. 

I go out upon the verandah. Spread below me is the city, 
gray-roofed, indefinite, still wrapped in the clinging vapour of 



the still dawn of a December 
and these are the things I 



departing night. Strange, intangible odors fill the air. 

Again a voice from somewhere far off to the Xc'rth. 

.And then another. .Vear-by the boom of bass again. 

Near and far cff, now here, now there — from .North, South 
and west — float these incomparable voices from the bronze bells 
of Kyoto. The call to morning prayer. 

Slow, mysterious, never confusing with each other, they com- 
pel response and mark the hour for that strange company of 
ghosts, the hooded memories, who must march w;th us, perforce, 
through all our years. 

For the last time the great bell, heard from afar off on the 
hill, makes the nearer air vibrate. 

Sonorous. Majestic ! 

Thousands are moving in steady stream towards the steps : 
at the foot they pause ; some kneel ; all ascend without their clogs. 

In the darkness of the lofty temple figures kneel on the soft 
floor : poorest poor and richer townsfolk huddled closely in one 
indiscriminate gray-blue mass. Like an immense wave there 
rises an incessant invocation. 

And still they come. The crowd packs closer, and the vast 
space tills until tardy ones tind room only upon the lloor of the 
veranda without, 

.A paper lantern Hashes like a firefly among the worshippers. 

The man who carries it steps with unconcern over prostrate 
bodies and mumbling heads. White uniformed, weird mockery 
of theifdevotion, he looks for thieves in the name of the civil law : 

Odors of incense come faintly. 

The muUimde crouch lower, niurn\uring a petpetual prayer. They chani 
in rasping fal>eUo : police otiu-ers keep watch ; the gloom grows les> 
den;.e and rhilJ, 

Suddenly this kneeling mass of little giay-clothed people rises, with 
curious rustling of bare feet upon a malted lloor; scatterin;; like anij 
fioni ihe. three open :.ide,< of the Iniildirig : some lo other ,service,s : most, 
out imn the courtvard with its tiocks of pigeons, its brouje cisterns. ii= 
sacred trees, and the welcome warmth of the sun no.v risen. 

Our kiiiumava slart cnce more upon their tortious run through narrow 
streets now wakened to the days' old-world ror.line. 

. , . GiineaTethe mysteries and the silenie of dawn ,' .-Vs a drearr. 
of ancient hells which ring beneath the sea are the magic voices of Kyoto— 
a memory ehoed .mly when 1 gtnlly touch the rim of my bronze gong with 
its padded hanmier :" 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 22. 



ST. JOHN'S, NEWFOUNDLAND. 



< To t/u- K.litor of Th< Xcivfoundland Quarttrly.) 

Government House, 

26th October. 1037. 
Dear bir, ' ^ 

As the public interest in Girl Guide work is growing many 
may be interested in the enclosed letter from a Commissioner 
in England written to Miss Bright in answer to her request for 
any hints that might make the work more interesting and simple 
for those who are new to it in Newfoundland. Miss Bright is 
the English Commissioner who has come out to Newfoundland 
10 train Commissioners and Guiders here. 

As you may already know the responsibility for this Move- 
ment rests with the Commissioners and Guiders who are in 
direct control of Companies composed of Rangers, Guides, or 
Brownies, and supported by Local Associations, which consist 
of ladies representative of the general public. 

If you believe that this letter will be of i iterest, and have 
space to publish it, we should be gr-ueful to you. 

Thanking you for any help you may give the .Association. 
I am. 

Yours sincerely, 

ELSIli E. .\l,LARIiVCE, 
Island Commissioner, 



NOTKS .AND I til- AS WHICH MAY HELP VOU. 

The duties of a Commissioner are very cleirly laid down In- 
Headquarters in Rules & Regula ions, and if these are care- 
fully read, no one can ciues'ion the great responsibility of 
Guiding. 

The Division and District Commissioners are appointed by 
the Country Commissioner who is approved and appointed by 
Headquarters, and on her shoulders re^ts this re<ponsibi!itv. 

These Commissioners are lor propa;ianda work and for suit- 
able supervision and help in iheir respective Districts. They 
should faithfully conform to all Rules laid down for their par- 
ticular Country and although they are under the County Com- 
missioner they are entirely responsible for the work which is 
done in their Di.->irict. 

The Commissioner [ think should if possible have a Company 
of her own to start with, she then goes through the routine 
work, lamiliarises hersclt with all Guide work, its difficulties, 
disappointments, and delight — the latter out:iH-i!;/i ail else. She 
can >tudy character, and get an insight into the home lives of 
those under her care: she realises perhaps what an effort is 
needed Xn keep ahe.id of her guides, how necessary it is to vary 
in work as well as in play. She will see how wonderful is the 
change which comes over a child after she has hecome a guide — 
how ttie whole character may be influenced for good, an 1 »hat 
a powerful handle we have in our Guide Drill and Games, the 
one teiches obedience and self-control, the latter •' thought for 
others." 

Some Commissioners are apt to make mistakes by zealous 
visiting of Companies. Do not worry your Captains by fre- 
quent visits, your duties lie in propaganda, it is for you to find 
suitable persons to take up the work, set a Company going on 
sound lilies, and give vonr (niiders a free hand. ILive Officers 
meetings for general instruction and business, but leave ihem 
alone with their o«n litile Company unless for a special visit, or 
when th-.y ask \ou to vi-it thi-m. 

In the Yorkshire W. R. (South) we Commissioners take all 
enrolments — this gives us an opportunity of meeting a'nl >peak- 
ing to all Guides, gives the Guirlrrs the ci'ance ol iilking over 
her work, and makes the Ijirolment a much more impressive 
ceremonv. 



The Rules notify "that a Captain may enrol her own guides" 
so if a change is made it must be discussed in a friendly wav at 
a meeting of the Officers— carefully explained i.hy a Com- 
missioner might tike the enrolments, and a vote taken before 
any decision Ls made. This plan of course mav onlv be possible 
where there are plenty of Commissioners and where the dis- 
tances are not too great. It is quite a good plan in large areas 
to have Guides who are reidy for enrolment in the various 
Companies t(3 meet at a central Club Room and join in an 
enrolment. This ceremony gives the Commissioner an oppor- 
tunity of speakin;j on subjects that really matter to the Guides— 
and they love it. 

Commissioners must shut their ears, and open their eyes, and 
use their judgment— we have ditficulties to contend with, and 




I.AIIV .ilXAKtlVCK, 
ISI.A-Sn COMMISSIONKR. 

tact and common sense (viih a keen se_^se of hu'noiir iliro« n 
in) are great acquisitions and a help in smoothing over 
difficulties. 

" Least said, soonest mended" is a good old moito! 

E.xperience teaches us many things. 

Do not exp-ct too much. 

Try and understand character and te;iiperament. 

Cultivate I'nct, Courtesy, pnd Cheerfulness. 

Do not be afraid of criticism^,)'!?// will ^'Ct it whatever you do I 

Let .■\dvice be sought rather than g've 1 unasked. 

B= chary of faulttindi'"g. but generous in praise of personal 
smartness — correct uniform, and work well done. 

.■\bove all have High Ideals. 

.Although the Guide Movement is undenominational 1 always 
aclvornte pra\-er anrl li\mn for cicsi.ig guide nights, or 3 lesper 



ii | i j_.,» ! pii.j. | i r -^ia >j il i twi» i ij,» ! :iN i>f W.W ' W« | IMM^V-W^^ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-2; 



hymn. We need not actually specify any pnrticulir religion in 
our leaching, bu'. we iiuist have the courage at all costs (\f our 
work is going to do any ^ood) to sprak of Religion as a joyous, 
helpful possession, pointing out the lesponsibilitv of the steward- 
ship of Life, Health, Mind— all f.od given — and for which we 
shall have to give an account. 

I always think Nature Study is such an opportunity for us to 
say something about God's handiwork. Children love the 
" wonderment" and beauty of it all, and if we can illustrate what 
we mean by some simple story it will not be lost. 

Commissioners have often to decide difficult questions, re 
publicity for Guides, and p.irents deem us rather pedantic and 
oldfashioned because guides are not allowed to take part in 
every local function. 

It is wise to make a tirni stand about this — .\iinual Church 
Parade — speci il anniversaries — of world wide interest — .Armi- 
stice, Etipire Day, etc., are good to join in — but girls and boys 
are very fond of parades, and often «e are asked to join pro- 
ce-i>ions '■ becnise we make rather a pretty picture I" We are 
better at home ! 

F.ncoura:;e the Love of Music — nothing is more elevating nor 
more enj lyable. Encourage thrift in the Companies — discourage 
gifts of uniform. Let every guide provide her own. she will 
value it more than if it costs htr nothing. 

At your public meetings impress upon your audience what an 
opportunity is given them in helping this Movement. The al- 
most abnormal increase in numbers is only a Shadow of what 
mi^ht happen ■' if only." . . . There are thousands, nay 
thousands of thousands of youna; women and girls who would 
become Ringers or Guides or Brownies "if only someone would i 
take us." 

Some of us haven't much time to spare. We are busy women 
these diys, but if we can spue a little we shall never rpgrct it — 
never regret having taken that wonderful Guide Proml^e. which 
if carried out faithfully will brighten many a sad and tired heart. 

It is difficult dear friends to say all I would say to you on this 
subject, 

I who have studied girl nature and have — from choice — had 
much to do with young people — prize my privilege of Guiding — 
for I feel that it is such a stronghold to be able to give our girls 
soTething healthy to think about, sometliinj^ active to do, some- 
thing tJ lake them away from the sordid temptation of everyday 
life. 

My besf wishes to my sister Commissioners, and my love and 
joy encompass all \our ettorts. 

^'our fellow Guider 

A. MaBKL I'lCKK.RlNr., 

County Comiiiis^)i<i'ier, 
Y(i:kshiie, Wesi Riding iSouth)/^ 

XoTK. — In Mrs. Pickering's Division she has 24 Commis- 
sioners: 306 Guidns; 145 C mpanies formed of 207 Rangiis 
and 3.45S (iiiide 



and 71 I'jcks of 1 566 Brownies. 











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Bringin' Heme 3fte Boys. 

By P. Florence MiUer. 

LAN*sakes! Hear them sleigh-bells now 

Jingle in the same ol' way '. 

Same ol' patient bapplc Grey, 

Same ol" gay re<i-pamted sleigh : 
Same ol' feelin' in my heart. 

Same ol' man, an' same ol' road. 
Hut — what sets 'em miles apart — 

See the difference in the load ' 

These er splendid chaps, 1 know. 

That I'm bringin' home to-day. 

With good sense in all they say. 

An' their pockets full o' pay. 
But they're men ' With shaven chins ; 

Lookin' spandy in their clo'es — 
Only their good-natured grins 

Point the way my memory goes ! 

Jes' the yether year, 'twould seem. 

Gloryin' in them nippers' glee. 

Take 'em drivin* on a spree 

Huntin' for a Chiis'mas-tree. 
When we'd tucked 'era in at night, 

Stockin's safely hunt;; below. 
How a man felt proud to light 

All of life — its joy er woe. 

Now that Chiis'mas-lime is here 

I keep thinkin' back u* days 

When we joined in all their plays 

Roun' the jolly Chris'nias-bUze. 
What, we're nearly home again ? 

Lads kin har'ly seem to wait — 
Did I say that they wuz men ? 

Both them fellers lep' the irate' 

When they reach their mother's knee. 

I've been told, the greitest men. 

Famed fer war, er power, er pen. 

Jes* become small boys again. 
Little firtrlit house, at last, 

Winkiu' welcome through the gloam— 
Ah, their mother has 'em fast. 

An' the little chaps er home ! 




HU.MI'-KK KIVKK NKAR NICllOl V I.M:. 



V0(xev2 it is QCvoays Cfirlstnias. 

By S. E. Kiser. 

I K.NOW a Utile girl who irics 

To pas5i her gladness all amnnd : 
She kee|)5 a glad look in her eyes. 

Her laughter has a cheerful sound ; 
'Tis time to say good by to gloom 
When she comes dancing through the tooui. 
Without complaint she does her pan 

In causing hate to disappear ; 
I fancy that in her glad heart 

It must he Christmas all the year 

1 know a boy who does not try 

To cheat ihe boys with whom he plays ; 
When he is called he does not sigh, 

r.nt always willingly obeys. 

His limbs are strong, his eyes are brighl. 
He does not fear the daik at night. 
Nor mock the weak and |)oor, nor jhow 

Contempt for those whose gifts are few : 
And «o he makes it seem as though 

•Twere Chrislni.istmie the whole year through. 



r, .i i,^,i.j;,ann„^m L...I ..I iiii i f jyMU-"-..-'-. -.J'miWW ' 



^1 



■I ^} 

: 1 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-24. 

3fte taie Or. VV. 3. ScuCCy. 



^^•-^.)MF. when it will death takes us by surprise," says a 

\^ writer in the A;/.'V .\W.,j. -Seldom has the blow 

fallen so unexpc^-ctedlv as it did October 19th \ few 

day^ before Dr. Scully w.is busy hither and thither, now his 

voice is silent, and his earthl) labours are ended. 

For abn.it a .(u .rter of a century his has been a prominent 
figure in o ir midst, and a populjr one. Dr. Scully h.ad the "ift 
of comrade-hip, and the -rratcr one of inspiring. connden''ce 
To his pif.ents he was friend as well as phvsician, and his 
geniiliiy and his n.uive kindliness formed an atmosphere of 
sympathy, a cura'.ive agency in itself. 

Loy.il to liis native l.ind and zealous of her progress and pros- 
perity he lojk a very real interest in public affairs, though not 
an active one. Te:-.a;ious of his opinions, he was ever tolerant. 




life's work is done. He played a man's part on the stage of 
life. We mourn his passing, but in this lies consolation that 
l>calh. 

" is ihat fint breatti 
\\ h;ch our souls drjw when we enter 
Life, which Ls of all lite ceutie." 

D.-. Scully left Sr. Jnhn's for a few day's shooting on the Cape 
Shore. He was accompanied by Mr. Jack McNeil, but a cold 
which had been troubling him. developed r.ipidly and return to 
Pl.icentia became necesssary. Doubtless the long walk and the 
longer ride a^grnvated his illness, pneumonia developed and at 
S 30 in the morning, about 13 hours alter his arrival, he passed 
aw^y. 

The critical nniure of his illness was at once apparent and on 
the advice of Dr. O'Connell Mrs. Scully was immediately noti- 
ti d, and the R-v. F.ither (('Flaherty summoned. Mrs. Scully 
left by train, but at Holyrood the sad nei\s of his passing was 
broken to her by the Rev. Father Finn. 

Dr Scully was a son of the late Mr, Rodger Scully of Har- 
bour Grace, and a gradu.ite of Baltimore L'niversity. He was 
a m-mber of the Denial l5o.ird, an H inorary member of the-' 
staff of the General Hcisoiial \nd Chaiiman of the Clinic Society. 
In 1913 he married .Miss Florence Dywer of Toronto, a niece 
of the late John Dayer. of The O.ks, Carpasi.m Road. One 
sister, Mrs. J. .Murphy of this city survives. The Rev. Father 
Scully of King's Cove is a cousin. To the widow in her great 
sorrow, and to the sister and rel tives the sympathy of the pub- 
lic goes forth in fullest me.isure." 

A large and representative concourse of citizens of St. John's 
paid their last tribute to the memory of the late Dr. Scully, when 
all that was mortal was convened 10 the Railway Station under 
supervision of Undertaker Myrick to be conveyed to his home 
town by e.\press. .•\ considerable number of people proceeded 
to Harbor Grace by the train, and others motored out, in order 
to be present at the funeral service. .Arriving at Harbor Grace, 
the casket was taken in charge by Undertaker Parsons. 

The congregation which assembled in the Cathedral filled the 
sacred edifice to ovcrriowing whf-n the service for the dead was 
taken by Rev. T. D. (J'Neill. The cortege then left the Cathe- 
dral and solemnly wended its way to tlie graveside in the faniilv 
plot ; a deputation of the Knights of Columbus acting as p^ll 
bearers. The closing prayers of the service were recited by 
Rev. Fr. O'Neill, assisted by Judge Casey and Messrs. R. and 
W. Kennedy. Many was the regret e.\pressed by the conjjrega- 
tion when, having paid their last tribute to the departed, they 
left him resting in the bosom of Motffer Earth, there to await 
the final call 



• :f. 



THE LATK DR- UIMU.M T. .SCUI.I.V. 

Uncompromising in his convictions he respected those of others, 
when convinced that they were .such in since-'ity. 

Though Dr. Scullv preferred to pursue the even tenior, and 
disliked the limelight, he followed .\orld events with keen in- 
terest, and discussed them both helpfully and ffopefully. The 
memory of the Aunt with whom he lived for many years en- 
dures to-day. Miss C.irberry was a great Newfoundlander, and 
from her he inherited that love for homeland, and that scorn of 
insincerity which domin.ited her life. 

Amon:;st hi- p'ofessional brtthrcn he held a place of honour, 
and by the 11 was heW in warm regard. He was mt content to 
move in the ruts of routine and tne conventional, but was al 
wavs on the lookout for new methods. Though not a specialist, 
he was rapidly trending in that direction, and by n>any of his 
co-practitioners cases, calling for a certain advanced form of 
treatment, were frequently referred to him. 

The cheery voice' is silent no.v ; the chair in the home and 
club is vacant: his familiar face and pleasant smile will no 
longer bring confidence and couraze to the sulfering. For hiin 



Clutumn. «58 



By Henry Polk Loweosteio. 

The autumn leaves are turning lirown. 

The hirds are flying south. 
The fruited trees are loaded down. 

To feed the hungry mouth. 

The ripened nuts are falling fast. 
The nights are cool and clear. 

The Summer time has come and passed. 
And winiet's drawing near, 

October moons light \ip ihe »ky. 
And silver stars shine bright, 

And they, in turn, will soon pa-s by. 
Submerged in God's sunlight. 

,\nd so in life »e come and go, 
And play our Utile part. 

And like the ever passing show- 
Come on. and then dcpait. 



- i j!rimmwwn! i -i- ' ,"-'?i^^!Hw» i »''wwf|i! > y!j>^t 






THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 



a 5iery Christmas. ^^^^ 




A Story of Australia — By Fergus Hume 

the young m.m. sorelv 



OU fion't love me '"' said 
disappointed. 

His coinpinion made a restless movrment. •• I 
don't say that. But it is impossible fur me to be- 
come your ttite." •• Why slumld it be ?" he urged. 
" You are a widow and 1 am single; nei her ul us 
has relatives to consider: and if it is a question 
of money. I have enou{;h for both. Come, 
BeatrlC:^. make me a Chri-tm:'s present of your hind." 

Mrs Hillyard looked at the lu-reachinq p'nin which rolled 
from their feet to the yellow reeds frin;.Mni; the banks of the 
Tambo River, and at the lofty Hhite c'iffs on the hither side 
streaked with scorched ve-dation. A mile di-tani was Linli- 
thg-nv township, founded and named by earlv Scoich setilers, 
when they came doun from the Manaio country. Behii.d 



caress. ■■ If you only knew— but I dare not tell you !" 

" Tell me what ?" 

'■ That which would make your Christmas as miserable as 
mine will be," said Mrs. HUlyard. and turned bas.ilv up ti,e 
path, which led through the scrub into ihe heart of the Bush 
where she had her home. ' 

Alec Monsoon stood where he was. fighting down the a»itation 
caused by this third refusal. Why Beatrice should so persistently 
decline to become his wife, he could not guess. Monsoon was 
voung, energetic, and comparatively well-lo-do ; an exceptionally 
fine specimen of the native-born, who love passionaielv and 
wooed eagerly. Since Mrs. Hil'yard had anivcd in the district 
tliree years before, he had decided that lite would be intolerable 
uilcss he passed it by her side. Clenching his fists in per- 
pe.Nicd anger at her causeless nb.sticncy. Alec f5ung him>eil on 




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IiANCI.sr, ON THK STIMH — rRlllSH COLUMBIA I. f .M II t: R CAMP. 



spread the I u h of blue.;iini and t:-t'ee. of acacia and stringy- 
bark tree, ri-i ig trjm a detise under :;ro.vth of waltle-scrub. 
Catile moved lazily over the ^razing-grounds of the plain, 
cock.itoos called noisly (roin the woods, and over landscape and 
life arched the turcjuoi.-e Australian sky, wherein the sun flamed 
like a jewel of pric.-. Kven in her white linen dre-s with cool 
bronn sh cs and a broid-'irimmed slraiv hat Mrs. Hillyward 
felt the amazing beat, which could actually be seen i-iuiveting 
and tremulous. 

■■Christmas!" she rtuinnnred, rather to herself than to her 
suiior, ■■\es. In tn-ee rioys it will be Cliiistmas, Snow a '.d 
holiy and ice and mistletoe !" Sne looked distast- fully at the 
blazing e.xpans-. •• Ho»v can it be Chri-.!tnas without such 
'.hirgs as these ?" 

■• There is pr.nte on earth and good-.viU to men in this sun- 
shine as well as under vour frosty t":igli.sh skies, dear. .And 
love also, Beatrice;'' he breathed the last i\ords soltly and trnk 
her hai d with a tenderness which made her «ince. 

■'Impossible! InnMi.ssible !" she cried, retreniing from the 



his horse, and rode furiously into the township. As man and 
beasr swept through the heated atmosphere, the mind of the 
lover concerned itseif with Mrs. Hillvard's past. 

Remittance men are plentiful in the colonies, but remittance 
women are quite unknown — at least Monsoon thought so. for he 
knew no other lady than Mrs. Hillyward who received regular 
sums from the old country. As such annual incomes are usually 
p.iid by relatives who wish to keep the recipients at a distance. 
it was to be presumed that Beatrice also possessed relations 
who desired her absence raiher than her presence. But this 
ardent lover declined to entcHain .so monstrous an idea, since 
the woman was his queen and could do no wrong in his eyes. 
All the Siime. convnun sence told him that it was strange she 
should live so lonely a life on quarterly payments. It she ha-l 
only gone to tile local dances .ind concerts and race-meetings. 
if she h.id only been friendly with, the bark manager's wife and 
the daighters of the graziers, comnient would not have been 
made. But because she dwelt in a fotirroomcd shanty surround- 
ed by nnlrinimed woods, visitirg no one and receiving no one. 



■...' ■'kl^' F ^ ■>■ .<lM^^^^■ ' ' » « ^' »K»B^ y. wl ^ »«a^^ ^ !^w*W^^^'-'r*'''^' ' - ' ^ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-2( 



•t aas rumoured that she must hive done something dreadful 
to account (ur th,s selfostracl...,. in the face of such doubts 
Alec Monsoon was wilhng to n.arry her, yet she refused such 
rehabilitation. 

In the liotel, v hith «• s the centre of township life manv 
people were gathered to quench their midday thirst Alec 
pushed his w.iy through a noisy croAd of -raziers, squatters 
loafers, bank-clerks, and shopkeepers to the bar-counter where 
dnnks were beino dispenced. He her.- found himself shoulder 
to shouldei wuh 1 smart stout youn? man, sutHcientIv well 
dressed m hnshsh-cut clothes to sugsest the new-chum' His 
fair weak f.ice aud snifty blue eyes contrasted stroncrlv- with 
Monsoon s dark roumenance and steadv gaze. .\!ec "look no 
notice of the j.:ckaroo uniil the lanlord. passing alon.^ a deep- 
sinker, whimpered infrrnation. " 

-That cnes askirj after Mrs. H., and wants to know where 
he can Icok her up straight away. Mv word, ain't he a nice 
ycung pup to ca 1 en the lady.''' 

Monsoon was all on fire immediately, resenting the well- 
drejsed strarge.s inquiries. However. 'he merely'nodded to 
the land'ord and wak. d away after finishing his glass. It 
occurred to him that he might intimate to Mrs. HiTlyard the 



u.iderst.ind-that Mrs. Hillyard is leaving this hole after ChrLsi- 
mas as my wife." 

The last word made Alec drive in his spurs, and the horse 
reared, bucked, then tore along the dustv street. Its rider did 
not strue to check it. for he frit that if he remained longer near 
this insolent stran-er it would be impossible tor hiai to keep his 
temper. The young Australian scented troub'e coming to the 
woman, and rode moodily to his homesteid. wondering if he 
could help her in anyway to avoid the s.ime. But oa the facts 
within his knowledge he was unable to move, since he held no 
key to the riddle of .\frs. Hilly.ird's isolated existence and Tares 
sudden appearance to cl.iim her as his wife. After a restless 
niyht Monsoon dciermi;ied to seek an e.xplanation from the 
woman he loved on the plea of t lat very same love, «hich could 
and would protect her if necessary. Alec judged that the need 
would soon arise. 

Mrs. Hillwird did not appear to think so, for she avoided her 
would-be protector skilfully f r the ne.xt two day. She was seen 
waking with the ne« chum, ho-ever. on vaiious occasions, con- 
versing eagrrly. Vet her worn looks and restless de.neanour 
did not hint that the conversation was soothirg. Alex would 
have given his soul to interfere, but Bdatiii.e gave him no light 

/ 





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FEEDING THE '• WHITE T.EGHORNs" KOR THE N KWfOU.NCI.AXD POULTRY SHOW, ST. JOHN'S SUBURIlS. 

[Phcilo by C. K. ir,//i,ims] . 



fact that she was beir-g inquired for. Then it crossed his mind 
that he had no right to meddle with her private afifairs. Unex- 
, 1 jl pectedly the jackaroo appeared on tlie veranda of the hotel. 

' _ ' "I say," he drawltd. superciliously, "the man in there tells 

me that you are a friend of Mrs. Hillyard's." 
" Ves ?" answered .Monsoon, curtly: -well?" 
"Can you point me out the way to her house?" 
" '" Follow the path accross the paddocks yonder into the Hush, 

r.ut I don't think .Mrs. Hillyard is seeing anyone at present. ' 

•' Oh, she'll see me fast enought." replied the man, chuckling; 
•'my name's Gilbert Tate, and I come with good news." 
•■ I'm glad of thai." said .A.!ec, soberly. 

Tate started. •■ Has she told you auylUing?" he asked, with 
marked anxiety. 

■■ \o !" Alec, winced, and mounted his horse hurriedly. 

'•Then you don't know if Mrs. Hillyard 

"Look here. Mr. 'I'nte. don't voii thirk it would he he'ter for 
you to discuss Mrs. Hillyard's private alfairs with herself rather 

than ask a stranger 

•■Stranger!'' Tate chuckled again in a particularly hateful 

manner. -'The man in there said 

■' I don't care what be said. I am a stranger to you, if not to 
:\Irs. Hilhard." 
', , ■' Uhat bad manners you .Vustralians have I" remarked Tale, 

shrugging; ''but let me tell you — to prevent mistakes, you 



to go to such lengths. It was ruinoured that the lonely widow 
intended to depart shortiv as the wife of the smart stranger, ai;d 
various people condoled with Monsoon on his loss of a charm- 
ing bride. Alec neither contradicted nor affirmed the gossip- 
as indeed for want of informaiion he could not — but haunttd 
the Bu^h wherein stood Mrs. Hillyard's shanty morn, noon, and 
night, in the hope of seeing her alone. But she gave him no 
chance of a private conversation, being whjily taken up with 
the new-comer, Gilbert Tale. 

It was late on Christmas Eve that .\lec's feelings became too 
much for him. and he rode to the clearing deep in the wo-.ds, lo 
enter the house and force, if need be, an explanation. If Tate 
was an acceptable husband to the widosv, then Monsoon arranged 
to try to forget her. But if this jackaroo was persecuting her 
and forcing the match then, by virtue of his love. A\cc decided 
to interfere. Only .Mrs. HilUaid could make things clear. So. 
when the voung m-'n had ti'd I'is horse to a tiee, he walked 
quietly towards tue humble habitation to put his fortune to liie 
te.st. On this Christmas Kve he would win all or lose all ; no 
middle course would sutiice. 

Kinged with lofty blue-gums, rising massively from the den^e 
undergrowth of scrub, the clearing was gloriously illuminattd 
by the midsummer moon, so that everything could be seen with 
wonderful minuteness. The brown scorched grass, the drooping 
branches of the mighty trees, Mo.,sojn could .see every blade and 



'*i>i4fH«Wl.'- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.^27. 



his 
In my 



leaf dry and parched in the intense h^at. The place was less 
like a hothouse than a furnace, and the vegetation cried aloud for 
rain, pa.uing and Raspin- as an imasinuive man might have 
thou.:iit in the great draught. But Monsoon's imnginarion ^^as 
too much taken up with forec.stin;; Mrs. Hiilvard's recepuon of 
such a belated visitor to trouble about the exhausted world of 
herb and plant and tree. He listlessly noted that th- white- 
curtained windo.v of the shinty was op^n to ad nit the heated 
air, as he raised his hind to knock at the dooi. Then a sin»-)e 
sentence utturcd by Beatrice paralyzed him, and he became"" a 
motionless eave--droppcr. 

"You know that I did not poison him." 

The hatefully smooth voice of Tate replied softlv : You did ■ 
only by accident did you escape being hanged. ' IE I told that 
young Au'itralian cub how ." . 

"Augh:" sobbed the woman; and then her voice leaped an 
octave. •• You would not do that. He loves me." 

"I love you als'," insisted Tate. " You shall never be 
wife. Remember that I can prove your innocence. 
portmanteau at the liotel I ha\-e the confession of the ren'l 
culprit." 

'■ You said that before, and yet you say that I am guilty." 
"Oh, that is for the benetit of the public to force^you to be- 
come my wife." 

Monsoon could hear Mrs. HiUyard gritting her teeth. " You 

hound !" she said in a low. fierce voice, " if I told Alex " 

" He would spurn you." 
"I — I — I do-i't believe he would." 

Tate laug'ied insultingly. -'What? Do you think he would 
m.irry the notorious Mrs. Raymond who pois med her husband 

five years ago in " 

" I did not poison him. You admit that I did not." 
'■To you I admit it. n<it to this Australian ass. I alone can 
prove your innocence. U'cu'd tiis .\lec you speak of mirry 
you knoiiing your black past?" 

Monsoon recovered the use of his limhs when that sneering 
questioT was put to the mo.ining woman. Sileutlv he opened the 
door, and sihntly he stoo.J on the t.^ireshuld of the pj:)r little 
room. With a stifled cry Mis. Hillyard looked up; with a 
snarl Tate greeted his appearaic . Bat A'ec was the first to 
speak, which he did steadily and unemotionally. 

"I would marry her," said Monsoon, "because by your own 
confession she is innocent." 

"Alec!" Mrs. Hillyard cowered on the floor, shaking and 
wh te, "do you," her vo-ce cracked, " do you — believe — that — 

that— I — that — I ?" 

" Beatiice !" Monsoon strode forward, brushing Tate aside 
as though he were a tfy, and raised the broken creature from 
the floor to rest on his heart. '■ Never think that I believe you 
capable of such a criaie. Without that man's te-itimany I should 

still think )'ou innocent, pure, spotless, and " 

" The testimony has not be.-n given yet," broke in Tate, 
venomously: "it never viill be given. Marrv that woman and I 

proclaim her infamy to " 

He was stopped by a strai^'htly d-livered blow which levelled 
him on the fljor, an i Alec stoid over him red with anger. 
" I'll break your neck if you say that word again." 

Tate sullenly surrendered to the superior strength of the 
Australian, and, unable to vent his anger on such an adversary, 
shot a lurid glance at Mrs. tli.lyard. "I shall punish him 
through you." 

" Stop !" Mrs. Hillvard sprang forward as her lover was 
about to stoop and shake the man, " let him rise ; let him speak 
our. You can judge between u-." 

Monsoon stared at her white face and at Tate's sullen 
countenance, then let his gaze wander round (he Christm is 
decorations of the room. " fVace oti earth and good will to 
men," he muttered, ironicilly; "get up, you dog, and tell the 
truth." 

The fallen bully refused to rise, only to find himself lifted by 
the scrulT of the neck like a whipped terrier and swung into a 
near chair. He felt enraged to tears, so humiliating was his 
position, and onlv the desire to blacken Mrs. Hillyard's charac- 
ter made him speak out. Also he had an argument in reserve 
which he intended to use when .Monsoon was olT his guard. 



" She is a poisoner," he said, scowling. 

" She is the woman I love," retorted Alec, placing a strong 
arm round the trembling creature, who winced and quivered -It 
the ominous word. 

"John Raymond loved her also, to his cost." sneered Tate. 
getting ready to control the situation; " she was married to him 

si.K years ago " 

'• .Against iny will— to save my father from ruin," panted >[rs. 
Hilly.ird, clinging to her tower of strength. 

"So you say. But everyime knew that you married the man 

for his money. Raymond loved you. and " 

" He did not love me," cried the woman, fiercely ; " for a 
year I was his toy, his plaything. He turned from me to others 
neglecting me for years. Then he loved the governess." She 
turned towards Monsoon feverishly. "I had a child of four 
years which died when I was in prison." 
" In prison!" .\lec winced. 

Tate saw the tremor, and laughed. " .-\h. you are now begin- 
ning to realize wtjat snrt of woman she is," he cried, triumph- 
antly. " Yes. she was in prison. Whether Raymond loved 
Miss Francis the governess, or not, I cannot say. But at after- 
noon tea, this Mrs. Hillvard, as she calls herself, poisoned her 

husband by putting arsenic in his cup. She bought the " 

"I did," admitted Mrs. Hillyard, swiftly. "I bought the 
arsenic at John's request. He wanted it to kill the rats." 

■' You wanted it to kill him. you mean. Only by chance did 
yoa escape, owing to ihe lack of pos'tive evidence. But eiery- 
one believed you to be guilty, and you tied here to hide, chang- 
ing your name." 

, ■■ I tied to escape your persecutions." retorted Beatrice, 
indignantly; "even when my husband was alive you made 
love to me." 

" 1 make love to you still," said Tate, suddenly, " and I in- 
tend to marry you." 

" No," put in .\Ionsoon. decisively. " Beatrice marries me." 
" Alec," gasped Mrs. Hillyard. "you believe in mv innocence?"' 
" Yes ! \oi\ are too good and sweet a woman to commit a 
crime," and he folded her in his arms. 

" It will be a merry wedding when the. truth is known." 
muttered Tate, with white lips, daunted by this great loi e. 

" The truth will be kno.vn," said .\lec, cooly. " That con- 
fession which you have in your portmanteau " 

" There is no confession." Tate slipped his hand to his hip- 
pocket and rose. 

"There is. I heard you say .so myself. Beatrice is innocent, 

and as my wife " 

" She shall never become vour wife !" 

Mrs. Hillyard dung hei'self before Alec, but was a moment 
too late, for the treacherous scoundrel had alreadv fired a 
suddenly-produced revolver. The buller grazed Monsoon's 
head and he dropped stunned, dragging down the woman, who 
wrung her hands in horror. " You hare killed him '" 

" Come awa)- !" shouted Tate, furiously grasping her arm : 
•' leave him to die." 

"Never! Never!" and with a swift movement she gained 
possession of the revover to point it at him.'' " Go away, or [ 
fire. Up with your hands." 

Tate obeyed, since he could do notliing else and staggered 
towards the door, white with battled rage. " You and that 
beast can die together !" 

He rushed out into the hot night, bent upon mischief. Not 
knowing what he meant, and not caring, Beatrice tried to re- 
vive her unconscious lover. She bathed his head, and poured 
brandy down his throat, wondering meanwhile at the tragedy 
taking place amidst the Christmas decorations. But what had 
haoDened was onlv the beginning of worse things, for a light 
Mii'oke (illir,g the room warned her that the house was on lire. 
Crving aloud, she scrambled along the floor to the door, to see 
Tate striving to mount Alec's horse. 'I'he beast was kicking in 
crazy terror, while right and left thin lines of red flame snaked 
amongst the dry grass and herbs and plants and trees. 

" Come ! I can save you," shouted Tate, now in the saddle ; 
" let that beast die." 

"I die with him." cried Mrs. Hillyard ; "may God forgive 
von for vour v,-ickedness. Look! Look! Heaven have merry 



,) i ijLiiM]«WWi- ' M.'. ' WS'iW,»*HI! ^!' »L'gwWy> ' ' ' ^ < tl6W ' *.->llv rr **l '* ^ 



. fff^ ! u^ui«;Bmmm*,m-fU ' W ' ! 



.1 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 28. 



Hi 






i ''J 



1 

! f1 



on us all." 

To conceal what he believed to be ,i murder T.ile had tired 
the clearing \i several places, bul had not counted on the rapid 
spreacjiiig ot the llames. Naturally the dry heat of many 
months had made tinder of the bush, and it seemed as ihough 
the miscreant would fall into his own trap. For^ietlinff the 
woman and his victim, in sheer terror he rede at life-or dcalh 
speed towards the only clear path. The horse fought ngainst 
its rider, bul in the end he forced it to break out of the circle of 
destruction. With a shout he disappeared, and she ran back 
into the hoi'se to dr.ip; her lover to some place of safetv. 

••.Alec ! Alec :" she called, hut received no reply from a man 
still stunned. 

Whither could vhe drag him ? F.'erywhere raged a perfect 
coi.tlagration, so that the clearing and its encircling trees fairly 
represented the heli of Calvin's cheerful theology. With super- 
human strength, and not quite sure of where she was going, 
Mrs. Ilillvard pulled her lover through the back door to a small 
space which the shanty — now burning furiously — protected for 
the moment from the Hames. The open air and the motion, 
together with the late administered brandy and the water, awoke 
Monsoon to a dazed consciousness. .\nd, wonderful to relate, 
in a muddled way he grasped the situation. tJonsidering all, it 
was a miracle of the finest. 

•• The creek ! The creek !'' he muttered, and again became 
a useless log. 

Mrs. Hillyard accepted the heaven-sent message immediate!}-. 
and down the slope ot dry herbage, which pioneer tlames were 
already licking, she rolled .Monsoon's body. Then brg.in a 
nightniaie journey under burning boughs and betneen flaming 
banks. The creek was very dry, with but a thread of moisture 
damping the stones. )et at intervals there were deep wate-holes 
into which the brave wmiinn and her burden p'unged. The 
tumble into the depths revivt-d .Alec siviftly, and this time he did 
not relapse into unconsciousness, ahhough he was too muddled 
in his wits to deal aul'i.niitalivcly wiih the situ.ition. 

It was Beatrice who conduct^d th° retreat from the burning 
forest, supporting .Alec's head above the water, half pulling and 
half pushing him over countless boulders, and crouching along 
".vith him under convenient nverhaiging banks. Overhead the 
flames threaded the trees with scarlet, and terrified birds riutter- 
ed and scuiried and siiiieked and dropfed every moment. 
Rabbits came scuttling diwn to the creek in search of safety, 
and snakes also wriggled through ihe dry grasses which were 
being eaten up by the fasi-iravelling fire. And still Mrs. 
Hillyard with her half-alive companion stumbled along the 
windings of the water-course nearly suffocated, very much 
scorched, wet to the bone, and blackened with the driving 
smoke. It was nightmare indeed. 

Xaturallv under stress of circumstances they did not count 
minute or hour, so that neither never knew how long they took 
to struggle out of that pit of Tophet. But after the fashion of 
the 'J'hree HoW Children they won clear of the tlames. and 
when the dawn broke eastward stood alive on the banks of the 
T.imbo. Behind lay a smoking and blackened waste with gaunt 
spears marking where trees had been. Far off the fire still 
moved on, searching for fresh fuel; but Alcc and his beloved 
were safe, and it was Christmas morning. Towards them hur- 
ried many alarmed people. 

■• We though: you were gone, also," said the hotel-keeper. 

•'.Also!" muttered Monsoon, weariU- ; "an) one else deid ?" 

•• That new chum, who stopped along o' me. Found him and 
a horse frizzled to cinders." 

• God is just," said .Mrs. Hillyard, as she cluna to her lover. 

" D.jn't say that, dear. If he sinned, he has suffere.l and it's 
Christinas morning, remember." 

Rsatrice did te nemher. but likewise remembered thit Ta'e 
had tried to murder Alec, and then had set lire to the bush. 
He had been caught in his o.vn trap, and as he hid sown so 
had he reaped. .Vll the same, she could not forgive htm, 
although she said nothing of this to Mon.soon svlien they re.ich- 
ed the shelter iif the hotel. There, in spite of pain and weari- 
ness, she managed tn find Tate's room and Tates porimanleau 
—found also the confession of .Miss Francis, the governess. It 
seemed that K.ivmond. intending to murder his wife, had 



induced her to buy the arsenic, and then had doctored her cup 
at that fatal attcrnoon tea. The governess, however, hated the 
man, since he hid taken her from someone she loved, and whtn 
R.iymond's back w.is turned had changed the cups. Beatrice 
had drunk the tei meant for h.-r husband, and he became the 
victim ot bis own wickedness. 

" t)h '. ' she d ew a long bre.ith of relief, "this proves my 
innocence. What a Christmas gitl!" 

.Armed wi;hthe precious confession, she sought .Alec, now 
cloth d and in his right mind, although still somewhat weak 
from the li^ss of blord. Eigerly she told of her disovcry. and 
eagerly e.'itended the document. He refused to even look at it. 
■' I don't need anyone's confessian to assure me of yur 
innocence," said Monsoon, insistently. "I love you; I believe 
in you. For t'nose reasons I make you my wife." 

It was no use Beatrice explaining and urging him to assure 
himself of the truth. Monsoon felt that it would be disloyal to 
read the confession, as it implied a doubt of her innocence. So 
he never did read what the governess had set down, but married 
itis. Hillyard on trust. Through the Ion; years of the future 
he never found cause to re.'ret his Qjixitic action, for stie give 
him passionate devotion and passionate love in return for his 
belief in her innocence. But all that wns yet to come, and it 
was on this holy Chri-tmis morning that they came into their 
Kingdom of Luvr. Thtyhad pa-^ved through a fiery furnace, 
both physical and mental ; and much as they had suffered, the 
result was worth the pain. Never haj lovers understood and 
tru'-ted each other as these two did. 

" We shall bury what remains of Tate and get married after 
Christmas," said -Alec, a^ the hours crew on to noon ; "to-day 
let us go to church and think G jd we are alive and safe." 

•' .And that all misundrstandings have been cleared a.vay," 
murmured Beatrice ; do you hear the bells, dear? They call 
us to joy and peace and happiness." 

" We'have walked throu;;h the Valley of the Shadow to get 
all three. It has been a fiery Christmas, Beatrice, darling." 
"The result is worth the pain !" 

Then they kissed twice, thrice, and again, beginning their 
new life of perfect trust and jiy to the chiming of the Vulc-tide 
bells. 

rHuDCcr f)Qar. 

By ETerard Jack Appletoa. 

Las' year they wasn't any Chiis'inus to our house 

For anybody, though they tried an' tried 
To make it seem like Chiis'mus. 'e-:Tit.iii' me ; 

I was so lone-onie 1 jest cried an' c-ied. 
My favver is the gDodest man th.it is. 

But still he couldn't take Her pl.ice — not near. 
They was a tree an' presinks— everuhing 

'C'ept Muvver dear. .She wasn't here las' year I 

Long lime afore, I writed out my list 

Of uhat I wanted, an' 'twas lots of fun. 
But .Muvver dear, she didn't 'joy it much ; 

She had a orUil headache when 'twas done. 
Ne.\t day the doctor come an' talked an' talked, 

.\n' made her smoke a 'mome er. an' nen 
He took her 'way away in his m.ichine 

To where folks live till they get well again. 

'N Favver, he jest loved me hard an' tight 

.•>in' said we'n " stick logelher." .\n' each wet-k 
We went to see Her, l)ut they wouldn't let 

Me squeeze-ahug her. Ijut jes! pat her cheek. 
An' .A.unty Hess, she come to live wiv us 

For nrful long— till winter went away 
An' suaimer come ; but Muvver dear w.is still 

I'd to th' llos Th' house where sick folks stay. 

Hut on Thanksgivin' Favver smiled an' smiled. 

An" pinch my ear an' say, " Good news, my lad ; 
In one month more we'll have her back again 

All well an' happy. My I won't we he glad !" 
I dunno why I cried, but Aunty Hess, 

She did it, too, au' lalf , an' say '• Hear, dear - 



They ain't a thing I want ihis Chris'musiime 
Ksceplin' Muvver dear— an' :-he'll be here I 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-2Q. 



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Smcfimc^ Qmong if\2 Beotfilcs 

Luxury fSm°ku., Known to Aborigines- Indian Pipe Designs Numerous and Varied from Simple 

to the Most Elaborate ProJuct.ons-Many Highly Ornamented With Birds, Fishes, 

Reptiles and Animals- Some Special Styles for Religious Ceremonies. 

By Dr. Arthur Selwyn-Brown. 
X an aye like the present, so greatly devoted to 




smoking;, it is interesting' to inquire svlicther the 
aboripnal inlinbitants of Newfoundland were able 
to avoide tlie pains of ennui by securing the solace 
of ihe cheerful pipe. 

Mr. Hoaley in his-worU dcilini ni:h the Beothics 
expresses the opinion that they aid not smoke. He 
voices his >loubts in a note descriliing a pipe, now 
in the Museum, St. John's, wnich is really of Beoihic manuf.ic- 
ture, in the following words : •• The pipe is beautifullv made of 
greenish serpentine. The bowl is ocl.igonal shaped outside, but 
perfectly circular inside. Thero is some doubt as to whether 
this can be really attributed to the B=ot!.ucks, especially as they 
are said not to have smoked. Aijain. it is so very fresh and 
unwe.ither.:d, it looks as though it WiS quite recendy mad . The 




.ARTHUR SKI.WYN-IlRilWN, M.A.. Pil.tv., I.L 1>. 

pany who gave it to me receiv..d it fnm a Micmac Indian who 
pickiid it up ne ir Piix^tone Pond, in ihe interior, and pronounced 
it to be of Rer) Indian manufacMire." 

In a:;o:h-r note, .Mr. Flowley stilted that only on one other 
occasi in did he hear about a Bectliic pipe. He w.is told that a 
pipe mnde from st'jatite, or soapstone. had been found by a resi- 
dent of Fleur de Lys. near that setUenient. The e.xtended stem 
behw the boAl was ornamented by a carved animal design of 
good workmanship. 

Mr. Hiwl-y. however, almitted t'lat it wa< quite pr;ib.ible 
that, like :he .Miciacs, Ihe B.i'^lhics used strips of hirth bark 
tw;st-d lo form a pipe. Tht;,se w.>re e i.siiy and con\-e i.jnlly 
made and were just as agreeable t'j smoke as a good cherry- 
wood pipe. For the purposes of the .Vntiquarian, and Historian, 
such a custom would servo to raise doubts and difficulties, owing 



to the destructability of such bark pipes. Stone pipes may last 
many thousands uf years ; but a birch-bark pipe would decav 
within a decade. The reason that so few Beothic pipes have 
been found seems to be that their stone pipes were used on cere- 
monial occasions imty, or by prominent chiefs who liked to pos- 
sess luxurious objects. For everyday smoking, the more prac- 
tical, lighter and sweeter birch-bark pipe and cigarette-holder 
were used. 

It was noted by Mr. Howley that the Eskimos living north of 
Hudson Strait make steatite pipes much like the Newfoundland 
pipe, but not so ornamental, in which they smoke moss. Thi-, 
practice of smoking iiioss. bark and leaves of shrubs was ver\ 
common all over North America. 

The Beothics had a word in their language for smoking 
material, or tobacco. It was Mr^m. In Mr. Albert S. Gatchet> 
paper on the vocabulary of the Beothics, appended to Mr. J. I', 
Howley's book, A'cr/ncur is given as representing tobacco, and 
the sentence i?t'/;-//f//;M iieechon .' is given as meaning: "Give 
me some tobacco ! ' 

The pipes discovered in Newfoundland, the term used to 
denote tobacco in the Beothic language, and the sentence asking 
for some tobacco in the Beothic Language noted by one of the 
philologists, prove quite clearly that the Beothics were smokers. 
This evidence is slight but ample proof. 

Such belief may be easily confirmed by studying the smoking 
customs of the Micm.acs and other North American Indians. 

The Indians of both North and South America were mighty 
smokers. All early nriteis who came in contact with them tell 
us tint thty spent a large p.irt of their time smoking. Cleorge 
Catlin, one of our best authoriiie^. writing in 1839. said: " The 
luxury of sir,okiiig is.known to all the Noith Ameiican Indians, 
in their primirive state, and ihat before they h.-.d any knowledge 
of tobacco; «hich is onl\ introduced among-t them by civilizcfl 
adventurers, who te.xh th.em the use and luxury of whiskey at 
tile same time, 

" In their native state, they are excessive smokers, and many 
of them wruid seem to be smoking one half of their lives. 
There may be two good reasons for this, the first of which is, 
that the idle and Icisuie life that the Indian leads induces him 
to look for occupation and amusement in so in"ocent a luxury, 
which again tempts him further to its excessive use from its 
feeble and harmless effects upon the system. There are many 
weeds and le.nes and barks of trees which are narcotics and 
of spontaneous growth in their countries, which the Indians dry 
and pulverize ai'd carry in pouches ai.d smoke to gre-it excess — 
and which i:i several ot the native largujiges, when thus pre- 
pared, is called K'lick K'neck, 



LUXURY Hir.HLV VALUIiD, 



the Indians, 
ingenuity, to 



" .-Vs smoking is a luxury so highly valued b 
they have bestowed much pains, and not a little 
the construction of their pipes. The bowls of these are 
generally made of red steatite (Soap^tone,) Many of them are 
designed and carvtd with much taste and skill, nith figures and 
groups in ti/li'-re/k':v standing or reclining upon them, 

"The Indians shape out the bov\ls of these pipes from the 
.solid stont. which is not quite as hard as inaiblt. with nuihir,:; 
but a knife. The stone, which is cherry red, admits of a beauti- 
ful polish, and the Indians make the hole in the bowl of the 
pipe by drilling into it a hard stick, shaped to the de.sired size, 
wirh a (yuantity of sharp sand and water kept coristantly in ti-.c 
hole, subjecting him to a very great labor and the necessity of 
much p^itience, 

"The shafts, or ■^ten-, of these pipes are from two to four feet 
long. ,-oire!in,; ' it most generally ilat : o! an inch • r 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-^o. 



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The deve'opment of American Indian pipes, on the left Land side, are: at the top, Micmac pipe from Ohio; 
an ornamented Micmac pipe from Fort Niagara, N. Y. ; a totemic Micmac pipe from St. John's River, Maine ; 
and a limestone " disk" pipe from Kentucky. On the right are : a mound pipe, of smoke design and a mound 
pipe, of frog design, both from Mound City, Ohio ; a mound pipe of racoon design, from Naples, Illinois ; 
and a Beothic pipe from Newfoundland, an old and rare type. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-^. 






\' 




Some antique American pipes. At the top is a Y-pipe or Tobago, described by Oviedo, and found in 
Tahuaviaco, Bolivii. Below is a tubular stone pipe, found in Tennessee. Next is a pipe of Mexican 
pottery, from Mexico Valley, and an animal head stone pipe from North Carolina. In the right hand 
upper corner is a Georgian stcne pipe ; next a brazed iron pipe of early Spanish times, from North 
Carolina, and two flat based "Monitors" from Tennessee. 



.MjLj ' iJ . mu ' ULWH I i-'i " ■ntm^ i SH-^MlMiLf ' "--'"''- ' """ ■ * " ■!■»-«■. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 3: 



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two II, breadth and wound half their length, or more, with braids 
of porcupine qinlls; and often ornamented with th^ beaki and 
tufts from the woudpecker-s head, with ermine .kins and Ion- 
red liair, dyed from white horse hair, or from the white 
buffalo s tail. 

••The stems of these pipes will be found carved in manv in- 
genious torms. and in all cases, they are perforated thiou^h the 
center. These stems are uniformly made of the stalkw>f the 
young ash. which -enerally grows str.iight and has a small pith 
throu-h the center «hich is easily burned out with a hut wire 
or with a piece of hardwood, by a much slower process. 

.\ CON-< r.^NT CLSTOM. 

"There is no custom more unifornilv in constant use amongst 
the Indians than that of smoking, nor anv other more highly 
valued. His pipe is the Indian'^ const.^nt comoanion thro'uoh 
life— his messenger ot peace; he pledges his friends through Us 
stem and us bowl— and when its care-dro.vning fumes cease 
to rtow. it takes a place with him in his solitarv grave, wiitt his 
tomahawk and war-club, companions of his long fancied -mild 
and beautiful hunting-grounds.'" 

^ These are the prinicipa! views on smoking expressed by 
Catlin in his great work on tne Xor;h American Indians. They 
are brie', but yield a large amount of information. They show 
the great social signiricance of the smoking custom in primitive 
life; the influence it had in developing morality, art and a-sthetic 
ideals ; the consolation obtained from the cimpanionship ci the 
pipe; and the inventions developed to meet the needs of the 
pipe-makers in shaping and ornamenting stone, wood, and in 
later times, clay and metals. 

LOXGKELLOW's WORD PICIUKE. 

Longfellow was so interc-ted in the accounts of the early ad- 
venturers regarding Indian smokirg customs and iheir art of 
pipe making, that in Hiawatha he sketched a preity picture of the 
quarry from «hich the red ^oapstone. or steatite, was obtained, 
and of the pipes and smoking. The reference is as folloivs; 

On the Mounta'Pi of the Prairie. 
On the gieat Kec i'ipe-Sioiie Quarrv. 
Gitchie Manuo. the mighiv. 

From the red stone of the qiarry. 
With hi^ hand hz broke a fragment. 
.Moulded it into a jupe-head. 
Shaped and fash^.tned it wiili tigures. 

From the margin uf the river 
Took a j-irge reed for a p;L>e-stem. 
With its dark green leave- upon it ; 
Filled the pipe with bark L-f willow^ 
With the bark of the red willow. 

Break the red stone from this quarry. 
.Mould and make it into i'eace-Pipes. 
Take the reeds that grow be>ide you. 
I'cck them with voui brightest feathers. 
Smoke tne calumtt together 
.\nd a^ brothers live hence forward 1 

PRI.MITIVE PIPES. 

Another old writer. Peler Kalm. said : '• The old tobacco 
pipes of the Indians are like.\ise made of clay, potsione or ser- 
pentine. The rirst sort are shaped like our tobacco pipes, 
though much coarser and are not well made. The tube is thick 
and short, hardly an inch long, but sometimes as long as a finger. 
Their color comes nearest to that of our tobacco pipes wnich 
have been long used. Their tobacco pipes of pot^tones are 
made the same as their ketl'.es. Some ot them are pretty well 
made, though ihey had neither iron nor steel. But besides these 
kinds of tr^bacco pipes, we tiid another sort of pipe, which are 
made with great in^enuitv. or a very line red potstone, or a kind 
of serpentine marble {'steatite). They are very scarce and sel- 
dom made use of by any other than the Indian Sachems ur 
■KIders." 

There appears fo !>e no doubt that the variety cf >teatile 
known as catlinite, after the explorer Catlin. wa.s the finest 
materiil employed i.n Indian pipe-iiiaking. It was cb'aineLl in 
l^.ikota, .Minnesota and \Vi>con-.in. Pipes were made in th.i.se 
localities and traded in to .such an e.\tent th.it they have been 
f'juiid in everv state from both the oceans. Kalni said that in 



his time they were worth their weight in pure silver and were as 
greatly cherished, 

EARLIEST lVjr.\BIT.\NTS S.MOSED. 

There are indications that the custom cf smoking was in- 
dulged in by the earliest inhabitants of the .\mericar, continent. 
They probably bru:ight th- custom from A>ia. The old rains 
in Central America and Peru and Me.xico, supaosed.v works of 
the Incas. Aztecs and other early people, the mounds of pre- 
historic Indians, a.id similar sources e.xhibit drawings, sculpt jres 
and other indications of early smoking customs and of pipes 
and pipe designs. 

-A. study of this evidence siiows that smoki.ag underwent an 
evolution in America simil,ir to what was witnessed in Asia and 
elsewhere. Incense was first smoked, then snut?. ' This was 
followed by cigarettes made Aith leaf wrappers, then bv forked 
pipes. Tubular pipes, similar to cigar and cigarette 'holders, 
lol lowed next in order. 

THE 'V" SHAPED PIPE. 

The forked pipe was described by the Oviedo and other euly 
Spanish writer. It was c.illed a "tobago" and it hss given us 
the word tobacco. The tube was about rive incaes long, an inch 
and a half wide at the e.xtremety of the bifurcation and it was 
often made from. the Dones of animals and biras. The Y-shaped 
pipes were mainly employed fur snuftirg up the tinely ouKerized 
smoking powder mi.xtures. 

The tubular pipe was developed from the forked pipe. At 
.first powdered smoking mi.\tures were used in it. Old pictures 
and sculptures show that in order to prevent the pcwder from 
falling out of tlie pipe, the .nioker was compelled to lie down on 
his back while smokin^;. Some of the .Aztec and lMe.\:car sculp- 
tures show amusing rigurcs cf reclining smokers havini; troiible 
from the smoking powtiers facing from their tubular pipes. 

EARILV MEXICAN METHODS. 

Clavigero, in his History of Me.xico. Slates that the early 
Indian settlers in .Me.xico tracticed smoking as tollows : •• Alter 
dining. Hie lords used to con pose themselves to sleep with the 
smoke of tobacco. This piai.t was greatly itt use among the 
Mexicans. Tliey make various plasteis with it and take it not 
only in smoke afihe moutn, but also in snuti at the nose. In 
order to smoke it at the mouth, they put the leaves, with the 
gum of liquid amber, and other hot, warm ar.d odoriferous 
herbs, into a little pipe of wood or reed, or some more valua'oie 
substance. They receive the smoke be su:ki-g ihe pipe and 
shutting the nostrils with the fingers, so that it might pa^s by 
the bre.ith more easily towards the ku'gs." 

These details show us how the early Mexicars used the tubu- 
lar pipes. V\e may reasonably infer th.^t li-.e earlier .-Vmerican 
peoples used similar smoking methods. Tne t-oldir.g ot the 
nostrils to assure the smoke going into the iunjs inc.cated the 
thoroughness of the smokirg process. The earlv smoker wisr.ed 
the aromatic smoking substance to reach his iieart and to do 
this he sent the smoke to trie lungs. 

Tube pipes were made in many forms and from many sab- 
stances. Some were made from wood, becajse these were 
easily cut and shaped. Some were made from gun.s, amber, 
soapstone or sandstone. Bird and animal bo-es, pirticukrly 
those of the llama, were extensively used for tubular pipes. 
Sometimes silver, gold, lead or copper were u^ed. M a iiter 
age, pottery pipes were made in Mexico and the Southern States. 
Tiiey Were often of tine workmanship and des'gs. Conbinatlon 
pipes were not in common. In the Natural Htstory Museum, 
Washington. D. C, there is a very artistic specltr.en of a tubu- 
lar pipe made of stone and wood. The bovl is made of 
octagons, chambers and hcles which )ield a most o-namental 
tlTect. 

Many tubular pipes were ornamented with figures of snakes, 
frogs, bears and other aitimais. These were sometimes re- 
markably well carved. 

TOOK AN •IPWARD TL'RN." 

The head of the tube pipe was finally curved up a little in 
order t ■ keep the sniol-iing mixture in the pipe, Thia .ed to the 
gradual enlargement of the bo.\l and the evolution ot the type 
of pipe smoked to drit'. Crude stone pipe bowls are found w.th 



fl»#IWIW !- IM'^S 



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THE NEWFOUNDLA 



i ; the remain, of tubular pipes in many places. Later on the 

art^t.c tastes of natu-es were impressed upon the bo.vls and we 
hod them ornamented and carved in a great number of i.uerest- 
wg ways. H.rd,, snakes, rish and the commoner an.mals ZTr[ 
largely m tne ornamentu.on of the early pipe bo.U. uCcks 
and swans were extensively used. Some of the s.van-shaped 
bowls are vere graceful and artistic. A pipe of this type, found 
in West \ ugMa, showmg a swan in the act of preen.ng or dres- 
sing Its tail fcrathers, with a graceful sweep of the neck is 
treasured as one of the prettiest of primitive American pipes'. 

The bowls of pipes appear to have lirst claimed oma.nenta. 
tion. bubsequently. the stem was ornamented. The same 
subjects were used in decorating the stems, Birds, traili.T^ rattle- 
snakes animals and linear figures were used. Some-time a 
human h.ind, a bird's cl.iw. an wgls's beak or si.iiiUr obiect 
attracted the attention of the pipe making artist and resulted m 



ND QUARTERLY.— 33. 

!!!^'r*'/''"°''"^""'"''"^ *■'*' ^^^ '^g"''^ o' •» bird or animal 
the head of which often projected above the bowl on the sice 
aw'ay from, Put facing the smoker, so as tu act as a wind break 
Ihe woodpecker, owl and lizard were favorite ornaments on 
these pipes. 

TRIBAL TYPES. 

Micmac pipes ditTered from those of other tribes on account 
of the pecuharity of the shape of the bowl. A favonte desiga 
for this type of pipe was an inverted acorn, set upon a keel- 
shaped stem base which is broadest where it touches the bowl, 
ilost ot tnese pipes had a prcjeciion underneath the keel, at 
the base of the bowl, «ith a small perforated circular hole. 
1 his hole H-as used for the insertion of a siring or piece of 
leather which hung from the owner's neck. The object of 
threading the pipe in this manner was to prevent it being lost 
in the snow. Smoking being a very prevalent custom, the pipe 



/r 




'■^ 



Just a little 
ruh ana it s 
ready for- 
y our ^i^e. 



YES 

one pipeful of B.C. 
Slice - Cur Plug will 
convince you thai i* 
is a delightfully satis- 
fying smoke. Every 
smoker to whom you 
recommend it will 
become a life • long 
friend. 






I 



■J 



a pipe ornamented with a stem shaped like a human hand and 
arm holding the bowl rested on the top of an eagle's head. 

One of the most striking designs of Indian pipes is known as 
the monitor pipe, it was vvidel)' distributed o\ttr the Eastern 
States. The Cherokees were very expert in making pipes of 
this type. More care was e.xercised in grinding and polishing 
this type of pipe than any other, and, consequently, it carried 
less ornamentation than the other types. Variety was obtained 
by vaiying the angle of the b<iwl and stem by the shape of the 
flat base, some peculiarity of the rim of the bowl, by curving 
the bowl, stem or other part and in similar ways. 

The rectangular pipe appears to have developed from the 
monitor pipe. These were used from Pennsylvania to the St. 
Lawrence River. They were chielly made from steatite and 
were characterized by the bowl and stem being set rectangularly 
and by the interior of the bowl being a square at times. Usually 



being a rare and valuable article of daily use, every Indian had 
to be very careful to prevent it from being lost. This was par- 
ticularly necessary in the northern districts where snow lies 
deep in winter when there is so much hunting to be done. This 
necessity for tying pipes was one of the chief factors in the 
evolution of the peculiar designs of the Micmac pipe by the 
tribe whose name it bears. Many of these pipes were beauti- 
fully ornamented with conventional line designs, which were 
frequently colored. Piers describes a fine example of an orna- 
mented Micmac pipe found in northern Nova Scotia as follows : 
" The bowl and keel are most tastefully ornamented with single 
and double straight lines, dots, very short diagnonal lines and 
dashes with conventional branches of foliage, all arranged in 
neat design, which entitle the carver to much credit for his 
excellent work," 



-....«W■,/>^'-''-^^^^ ™^■yA^^^■■*^-^■ly^'WJ J^ 



3 'A 



iii 



't ! 



I .(. 



PIPES FOR REMGIOCS I'URPOSfS. 

The grtales development of the Micmac pipe was for religious 
purposes and was known as the totemic variety. The tinest 
example was ioiind in the St. John River, Maine. Other ex- 
amples were found in Sew Brunswick and Nova Scotia. These 
are large pipes which are very beautifully Qrnan:\ented on both 
bowl and keel ; sometimes on the stem also. They are as 
elaborate as the rar\ed ivory pipes of the Arctic peoples and 
the large meerschaum and amber pipes of the Dutch and Ger- 
man smoking cunnoi>eurs. 

Disk pipes, so named on account of the peculiar disk-shaped 
stem parts of the bowls. It appears probable that the object of 
the disk «as to enable the stem to lie tied to the bowl by a cord 
or leather thoii;;'or str.ip. 

Disk pipes made of limestone, callainite and other rocks, 
have been fourd in Canada, Missouri and most of (he Eastern 
States. They appear to be of great a^e and were used by the 
mound builders of the Mississippi States. 

In the territories occupied by the Indians of the Iroquois race, 
a peculiar type of pipe, called the Iroquoian, is found. They 
are made of stone or pottery and are trumpet-shaped, as a rule. 
The stone pipes have their bowls at right ant;les to the stems, 
while those inade of pottery are curved like hunting horns. 

The tops of the bowls are generally ornamented and riuted. 
Heads of birds and animals frequei.tly embellish the howls. 
Some of these pipes have finely-carved escutcheons affixed to 
the inner sides ot the bowls, facing [he smoker. The Iroquoian 
pipe is of compantively modern development. The decorations 
inaicate a highly organized artistic sense, and show that these 
j:ipes were made many centuries later than the tubular ind disk 
pipes. 

BIRDS WERE FAVORITE ORNAMENTS. 

The Indians were fonder of decorating their pipes wi'h birds 
than anything else. .Many curiously shaped bird pipes have 
been collected from all tlie North American tribes. In the 
mounds in Pennsylvania, a peculiar type of bird pipe is found. 
The bowl is formed by a bird sitting on a perch -.Nhisilirg and 
looking about. In the more recent bird mound pipes, attention 
was given to the carving of the feathers, eyes. etc. In the early 
types, little detail was shown. 

It is probable that these bird pipes, like most Indian designs, 
h id a symbolical meaning. As we look at the pipes now, they 
appear graceful, cheerful and emulcmatic of repose. Did the 
Indian makers desire them to symbolize the good cheer and 
pleasure which smoking brings.' 

There are many other kinds of mound pipes found in ihe 
earthworks in many states and in Canada. A common t) pe 
has a round bowl like an Engli-^h clay pipe with peculiar curved 
bowl bases. Wonderful sculptured ornaments appear on 
some of the bowls. One of the finest pieces of Indian engrav- 
ings ever found occurs on a mound snake pipe found in Mound 
Cit)-, Ohio. The snake is curled around the bowl in a .striking 
attitude, with its fangs ready and its t.iil expended on the flat 
projecting bowl base. This design couid be made to serve for 
a very rich and attractive design for inotlern pipes. Indeed, 
the Indians have left us a lari;e number of beautiful and most 
artistic models for pipe-makers. 

Pipe-makers of the mound-building tribes were very fond of 
animal designs. The ingenuity they displayed in emploung ani- 
mals for pipe bowls is most astonishing. Racoon^, mammoths, 
buffaloes, frogs, turtles, snakes, as well as alf kinds of birds, 
served as models for a multitude of splendid pipe bowls. 

In many parts ot the United States, we tind pottery pipes in 
a great variety of shapes, sizes and designs. Some of tncse are 
no better than an oroinary Irish clay pipe, while otners aie 
elaborately decorated work's of an. The natives of the dry 
areas in the Southwestern States were e.\pert in the making .iiid 
oinainenting of baked clay pipes. 

1I.>0I. PIPES KOfNr). 

In .some States, in addition to the totem pipes of the Micnacs 
and other northern tribes, numerous types of idol pipes are 
found. Smoking has always been a religious as well as a cere- 
monial and social custom among primitive peoples. Not all 



such people, however, develop special pipes for social, cere- 
monial and religious purposes. The .American Indians, in many 
cases, developed the ceremonial pipes known as the calumet, or 
peace pipe, the totem and rel'gious or idol pipe and a great 
variety of social pipes. The most care, of course, was given to 
the religious pipes. These are the rarest we possess, but among 
them are the very finest specimens of pipe making ever executed 
by an artistic people. 

There is no valid ground for suggesting that the Reothics dif- 
fered Irom the other Indians by not smoking. No records exist 
of their h.iving long, gaily decorated ceremonial pipes of peace. 
The rare specimen of an ordinary smoking pipe in the St. John's 
Museum, the similitude of their general customs to those of other 
Indians, and the word neihu'a used in their language to denote 
tobacco are sufticiently convincing. If further coniirmation were 
ne- ded.it would be a simple matter to show how the word 
K'lie^k which Catlin found the Indians in the U'estern States in 
-America were using to denote smoking mixtures is the same as 
Sahica in the Beothic language. 

Rai.d. in his Micmac Dictionary, says Kweihimci meant to 
smoke tobacco. This does no' resemble the Beothic word ; 
but U'enaipkuihtak, the Micmac for smoke arises, is close to it. 

The .\lgonquins said oiiiinbuso riiiui o/'uuigon when they meant 
" come let us smoke our pipes." They had a word, riilaicigi/iii^'en 
which meant inhaling the smoke. This is also closely allied to / 
itech'd'Li. 

In the Ojibway language, which wis spoken by the Indians 
who inhabited ihe districts around Lake Superior, the Dakotas. 
Minnesota, .Manitoba and parts ot Saskatchawan, to smoke 
tobacco was //;/; sagnssn'a. Of course, it is easy to see the con- 
ncciion of these words with iicc/ia'a. 

.•\ close relationship is shonn by the Ojibway honor term of 
Netasai(ass7ihii/ which means a Great, or noble smoker. 

.A continu-ition of the study of the philology of the word 
tkchiK'ti would show that the Beothics were in touch with all the 
leading North American Indians and adopted many of their 
customs. That they were great smokers we cannot doubt. That 
fact is as clear as anything we know about that lost race : They 
were an advanced people who, we may believe, adopted every- 
thing of importance practiced by the North .American Indians. 
The Micm.ics. iheir immediate neighbors, were mighty smokers. 
There is no re.ison to im.igine that the Beothics failed to appre- 
ciate the smoking customs of the Micmacs. They were possibly 
greater smokers. 




WI\TFR SCKNK — NlWlOUMil.ANn KAILWAV. 



— ,-1-^ mir^t^^^r^jn 



^ ; j »)m)> i inii.LH i wr i ' i 



«^ 



THE NEWFOUxNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 35. 

O Fenius of tfte Press-Room 

Mr. Robert Mercer and His 



TBy Alei. A. 
HE original of the portrait which appears on this pa-e 
of the Nevvkounuland Quartkrly is not an ordinary 
tradesman, as might, perhaps, be inferred from a ha^tv 
glance at the somewhat demure features of t.ie picture onlv • but 
a genial, biainy. resourceful m.ichini.t of to-dav. of unbjuiHed 
energy, untiring industry and endless persistence in the w.vs of 
the world in general and the newsp.io.r world in -jarticular 
which qualmcations have helped to much of success and worthy 
achievement in his occupation : a man who has been for manv 
years known to (he printers of the entire city— and of late to the 
printers i^f the whole country. 

Although so long identilied with newspaper work here and 
elsewhere, he h.is nothing to do with pirtifs or politics With 
the true instinct uf a born ••industrialist,- he prefers good cle.in 
business to the rascalities of politics. Singleness of purpose 
has been a prominent causL- of the success that his attended his 




MR. KOIIERT .MKRCEK, 
FORKMW OF PRES.S ROO.\I, " EVENING TELEGRAM" OFFICE. 

efforts. .All his undertakings have been nilur.il developments 
of the line of work on which he tirst set out. 'iVnerever he has 
seen an atlvintage alon; his own legitimate path, he has follow- 
ed it up. but he has never w.indered off in:o side issues to the 
detriment of liis regular way of doing things. It is to such men 
of one purpose, of whii.h ihere are far too few, that the • craft" 
and the country owes its best work. 

.Mr. R'lbert M^rrcr was born at Biy Roberts in 1S56, He 
comes from a brawnv race, being a descendant of one of those 
sturdy old Devonshire " adventurers" who came to Newfound- 
land In the days of the '• Floating Surrogates," and whose an- 
cestors gbried in their connection with the British Empire- 
builders of days gone by — the men who, under renowned leaders 
like Drake, Frobisher. Howard, Hawkins. iVc, made '•the flag 
"f Old England" the emblem of civil and religious liberty " all 
-ver .ind around the Seven Seis." But Mr. Mercer's disposition 
is somewh;it different froii that of his forebears, inasmuch as 
he is a lover of tiie arts of peace rather than the arts of war. 
.\nd so he thinks 

" Tliey were made to exalt us. to teu:h us, to bless, 
'rUose invincible br..lhers — the /V« and llie /'//jj." 



Services to the " Great Art." 
Parsons, J.P. 

However, since his early boyhood he has been pretty closely 
identified with "the art preservative of a;i arts— the iioble art 
cf printing." .\s already intimated, the particular depa-^t'iient 
with which he has been in touch during the greater part of his 
active life is that of the all-important and indispensable press- 
room, where the ste'eotyped plate is made from the matri.v and 
where the intricate and complic.ited printing machine, which re- 
quires ttie lno^t careful and unremitting attenton. suppi.es the 
city and country with the indispenable morning and evening 
newspaper. 

Mr. Mercer's lirst knowledge of the printing business was 
acquired when a boy in the orfice of the JJWi-Jy Tcic-^mp/i, 

printed and p'iblished by the late Mr. John T. Burton. Here 
he spent a period of six years; after which he went to sea for a 
few months; but not taking kindly to the domain of •• Father 

N'eptune," he decided to return to the printing business and. 
proceedi"!; to Montreal, entered the employ ot Messrs. John 
Lovell & Sons, book publishers, where he remained the zreater 
part of a year. 'I'hence he moved on to the United States and 
obtained work at once in the big printing establishment of 
Ad.iiiis, Weston iV Co., at Rouse's Point, in the State of .Vew 
York. There he continued till 1SS7, wnen he returned to New- 
foundland and to his native town ot Bay Roberts. \X the latter 
place he obtained employment for a short time in the drv-goods 
store of Mr. Robert Simpson. But here, again, he seemed to 
be out of his natural element, and got back to St. John's as soon 
as possible, where he linked up his time and talents with the 
Evoniig Telc:;ram. and where he still remains — ■• the genius of 
the press-room" there ! 

. The position of press-man or, properly speaking, press-room 
engineer — as all who possess a practical knoAiedgsof the printing 
business will admit — is a most exacting one. To him the editor 
and proprietor looks for the regular and sa:isfactory appearance 
of the paper. V\'hen anything gets ''out ot gear" in the press- 
room the issue for the day is held up ti',i the ditnculty has been 
located and removed. Under Mr. Mercer's personal supervision 
and careful diiection. trouble with the press-room machinery 
seldom occurs, and when it does, his sensitive ear. keen observa- 
tion and long e.xperience enable him to locate and remove it 
immediately. 

Mr. Mercer is a firm believer in the axiom that "Great things 
can be done by application and industry." He says; ■•The 
man who sits down on the road 10 success and waits for a free 
ride, ttill be left: and the man v. ho jumps on the tailboard of 
someone else's success will be greeted with a cry of • Whip 
behind !' " 

As a matter o' fact, whatever success the E-.ening Telegram 
has achieved in the domain of journalism — and it has long been 
regarded as the leading newspaper here — must be largely attri- 
buted to the efticient services of Mr. Robert Mercer. Nor does 
he conline his operations to the press-room of that paper. His 
services are always available to others in distress, and I ihin'K I 
am safe in saying that pretty well a'l the printing concerns in the 
city have, from time to time, in emergencies, availed of his gen- 
erous assistance. I notice that Francis Quarles, in his '•Quaint 
Fancies," likens the world to a printing concern, and ina'rtes the 
following ••quaint" estimate of the universe: — 

" The world's a printing hoiise : 

Our words, our thoeizhts. 
Our deeds, are charaeiers ot 

Several .size.s ; 
Each soul is a compositor. 

<_>f whose faults 
The I.evites are correctors : 

Hea\en revises : 
Death is the common press 

From whence being driven. 
We're gathered, shcei by siiee:. 

And bounil tor heaven." 



t WW !»» -i!i ' ■»iyWBW»--Uy^'WJ» l ^l)U*fW^-H>W i . l jy^itl» '' .'J^-l ! " I "-'.!*- ' 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 36. 



Hi 



o» THE .* 



My Own fmi Products 

are known throughout the United States for 
their high standard of quality. 

My Own Evaporated Milk 
My Own Pork & Beans 
My 0\A/n Catsup 
My Own Assorted Soups 
My Own Tomato Soup 
My Own Vegetable Soup 
My Own Clam Chowder 
My Own Chicken Soup 
My Own Chili Sauce 
My Own Salad Dressing 
My Own Mustard Dressing 
My Own Pe-as 
My Own Corn 
are sonic of the delicious articles put up by the 
MY OWN CO., which are on sale at leading Grocers 
of St. John's and throughout Newfoundland. 

J. B. OEH'CO., LTD., 

AGEr^TS. 



THE DESSERT 
For the Christmas Dinner 

will not be complete 
without 

JDroivning s 

BISCUITS. 

"The Taste Will fell." 

Festive Season \'arities include: 

Chocolate Dainty, Anzac, 
Jam Jam, Finger, Cream Bar, 
Imperial Sandv/ich, 

Etc., Etc., Etc. 

G. Browning & Sons, 

Manufacturers of Fine Bread and 
Crackers for over half a century. 



NOTICE TO 



Drivers of Carriss^s, Carts, 




Under 



ORDER No. 3. 

Street Traffic Regulation Act, 1918." 

1. X'ehicles must travel on the left hand side of the street or road. Vehicles moving slowly must 

be kept as close as possible to the curb or side drain on the left, allowing more swiftly moving 
vehicles passage on the right. 

2. A vehicle turning into another street to the left, shall turn the corner at the left hand curb or 

side drain of said street. 

3. A vehicle turning into another street to the right, shall turn around the centre of the mtersection of 

the two streets, and keep to the left of the street into which it turns. 

4. I'olice, Fire and Mail vehicles and Ambulances shall have the right of way over all other vehicles. 

5. The driver of a vehicle on the approach of any apparatus of the Fire Department shall brmg his 

vehicle to a stand still as near the left hand curb or side drain as possible. 

6. Vehicles going in a westerly or easterly direction shall have the right of way over vehicles going m a 

northerly or southerly direction. ^ , _ ,. _ . . 

7 Drivers of vehicles shall stop whenever required to do so by any member of the Police Force, either 
verbally, or bv a signal with the hand, and they shall obey his order and comply with any direction 
which he mav give them in the interest of good order, of traffic or public secuntv. 
"-he dri^•cr of a vehicle meeting or overtaking a street car which is stationary, for the purpose of taking 
on or discharging pas-engcrs. shall stop his vehicle at a distance of at least ten eet from the said car, 
and shall keep such ^•chicle at a stand still until such car is set in motion, and any passenger- who 
mav have alighted shall have reached a place of safety. 

— - ..-.-«. ^"^ Inspector General 

of Constabulary. 



8. 'I 



CHAS. H. HUTCHINGS, 



When writing to Advertisers kiudly mention "The Newfoundland Quartedy." 



JIIJJiluUr'Wj'SlIHgBUll'!'"': ' " ""''■■ 



THEjvIEUTOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-37. 



. 



I. 




I, /; .1 :■<. . ,4 




EORGEl 



savs -. 



I^Wfifth---^^^ Aristocrat of 

1*^'^^^ ^^' Smoking Tobaccos. 

Sold by all Leading Stores. 



You can't ■^n wrong if you buy 
His Christmas Present from me. 

I am a specialist. 

N'othing bothers me from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. 

Only " How can I give you the 

best service obtainalJIe." 

My stock of the world's best 

for men was never more replete. 

My prices, taking quality and service into effect. 

are reasonable. 

Let mc help you decide what to give him 

This Christmas. ^ 

If vou do, I'xe made a life-long friend. 

Before closing, just a few suggestions: 

MufHers, silk and wool, 

Sox, silk and wc>ol. 

Handkerchiefs, silk and linen. 

Ties, silk. 

Pyjamas, silk and wool, 

Dressing Gowns, silk and wool. 

Shirts, silk and cotton. 

Slippers, Jaeger wool. 
Sweaters, wool : Sweater Coats, wool ; 
Umbrellas, silk ; Hats, velour. 

Yours for c|uality and service. 




eiuacainsss 



Psrce! P©§t, 



If you need a Prescrii^ion or Private Recipe filled accurately, or some particular 
Toilet Article or PrepaiTition or Patent Medicine, you have only to send to us 
a remittance to cover, and (if obtainable) you will receive it promptly by Parcel Post 
or Express. Stamps accepted. Olu" Manager (late of T. McMurdo & Co., Ltd.) 
has had nearly thirty-five year^ experience in the Profession, and our motto is, 

*' Our Drug Department is our Business and not our Sideline." 

254 Water Street, St. John's. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The .N'ewfoundland Quarterly." 



Ka ■ »«<■ '• •i .^ 'j' iMM.m''-' .- ■»MW ! S?J 



i ) 

■' if 
• f 



r 



T"E NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Valet Auto-Sfrop 
Safety l^azor 



THE V*iet Auto - Sirop 
* Ruon^ i^.e ooly Saiety 
Razor that can W virup- 
ped Used lor sha\ mc and 
cleiined wittiuut lakinj; 
apart or removing the 
bladt. Stri>ppjn;.' re- 
stores iht- Sharp, Keen- 
cnttiiic Edge (or j i>ciu-«.t 
shave. I'at up in .-atin- 
lined metal, and leather 
cases, 

Studvd S«ts each S5.00 

Come and Kx.mune 




1 



Gold Pldlod CoiNtcros 
Model C. Valet Aulo-Slrip Razor— it i> ;i scrikcahle Guld pLirtd S«(ttT 
Riior. Price Model C. Ouli t SI. 50. 

ANDERSON'S water Street, St. John's Nfid 

^ J 



n)errp Cl)ri$tnia$ )|2 



-To all the users of- 



Golden Pheasant Tea. 

To those that don't use Golden Pheasant 
we would sugjrest you buy a Pound and 
make Christmas Merrv. 

Ferguson Holness & Co., Ltd. 

J. B. Mitchell & Son, Ltd., 

Selling Agents. 



^ 



"'^-^^M^- 



^■-^^ .: -;;-v>^:- A-.^i:..^-.;-..:.^ 



TOKPAY — NORTH SIDE. 

\PllO,' hy T. R. n„V-.WrJ\ 



FIRE! 



The 



FIRE! 



North Britisli and Mercantile 
Insurance Co., Ltd. 

[Established 1S09.] 
Head Offices P^dinbur^^h Cs: London. 

Available fun(]s»-f 30,000,000 

Insurance on any description of property at lowest 
current rates. 

Prompt Settlements. Liberal Adjustments. 

GEORGE SHEA, 

General AgenI for Newfoundldnd. 




^^.^M. 



^>S^ 




%^ 



Ere msurence. 



THE BRAVE FiREIVUN ^^^'^'^f^\ c~-0 
can save lives and often 
your property, but the sur- 
est way to avoid financial 
loss is to insure it in the 

Westchester Fire Insurance 
Co., Tokio Marine Fire In- 
surance Co., Ltd., compa- 
nies represented by us in 
this cit) . 

Carry a policy with us 
and avoid risk and worry. 
When fire conies voiir loss is covered. 

TESSIER'S 

INSURANCE AGENCIES, 

ST. JOHN'S. 



i 4 '¥>fc^ 






When writing to Advertisers' kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 

i ' wim »ii ipj.^ii».i i f^)i !r sii w j >wy-- 



tf ; mlmf ! ^J f ^)^l ^ Jmm^•J^l fflgl sm l :^ 



T " ' I ' i - i wmi i iu.j » u.,i.) i i^wnjfUfik, ' 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-30. 



f 

V 



i - 



ST. JOHIf S LIGHT & POWER CO., LTD. 

SHONA/ ROOM DEPARTMENT. 

^ CHRISTMAS GIFTS FOR THE FAMILY. .< 



Kettles, 

Irons, 

Griils, 

Toasters, 

Percolators, 

Cozy Glows, 

Disc Stoves, 



Curling Irons, 

Vibrators, 

Milk \^Jarmers, 

Table Lamps, 

Tea Ball Tea Pots, 

Heating Pads, 

Egg Cookers, 



Combination Disc Stove and Kettle. 

Just opened a new line of fixtures, prices ranging from $7.00 up. 

St. Jclin's Liilit § Power Compaiiy, Limited, 

Show Room Department, -^ Angel Building. 



CiiSi 



„ f:Tr 




;-^ 



Style, Wear and Value 

are the main standards by uiiich good clothes are 
judged. 

Careful Designing and 
Superior Workmanship 

enable us to produce Correct Styles and Good Tailoring. 
This is an assurance that the shape will be retained 
throughout the life of the garment. 

Choose your material from our large assortment 
of Tweeds and Serges, or bring us your own goods, 
and we will prove to YOU, as we have toothers, 
that we are turning out 

The BEST there is 
IN TAILORING. 

Newfoundland Clothing Co'y, Limited, 

231, 233, 235 Duckworth Street. 



arconi Apparatus* 




rsfeuGJNlTHREE VALVE RECEIVER 

Marconi Model " C" regenerative three valve receiver, 
complete with valves, aerial and earth equipment. 

batteries and telephones $150.00 

Arcon Junior single valve receiver complete with 
valve, aerial and earth equiiwient. batteries and 

telephones $85.00 

These receivers, fitted with dry battery tubes, are 
capable of picking up the . English as well as the 
American broadcasting stations. 
Twenty years' radio engineering eKjierience and two 
hundred'ockl exclusive patents, are behind every 
Marconi product. 

Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company 

of Canada, Limited, 

240 Water Street, St. John's. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Ne«foundl..nd Quarterly." 

-,,j,M.i,>.uiijii.i,iLii''i'ii;'''.'?wy"M,'.»niwy#*!.^gW^^ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-40. 



NcwfoimdiorJ Oovemnicnt Railway. 

Best connection between Newfoundland 
and Canada and the United States, ^< 
S' and the Best Freight Line between 

^< CANADA AND NEWFOUNDLAND.^ 



Wearing 
Yes! 



OUR MANY CUSTOMERS HAVE BEEN 
WAITING FOR 

NOW LANDING 1000 TONS, ALL LUMPS, 
NO SLACK. 

PHONE 297 : 

The United Coal Co. 



SUBSCRIPTIONS ^ 

To Foreign Periodicals. 

If you wish to Subscribe to ar.y Magazine, 
Newspaper, or Fasliion Journal, whether 
English, American or Canadian, ask us to 
take care of your Subscription. If the 
special paper that you require is not among 
the "regulars" which we are receiving, we 
can easily procure it for you at shortest 
Notice. 

We will gladly quote prices lor a Yearly Subscription 
To any Periodical now being publibhed. 



PROMPT DELIVERIES. 



)ell by Teleplione ! 

Tell Buyers what you do 
and how you do it. 

The Telephone S 

is the door to the merchants' establishment. 

A single telephone call often results in 

a steady customer. 

One telephone order to-day means more 

in the future. 

No selling campaign intended to reach the 

consumer direct is complete to-day if it fails 

to make it easy to buy via the teleplione. 

Avalon Telephone Co., Ltd. 



GARRETT BYRNE, 

Bookseller and Stationer. 



Protect Yoi^r Properly. 

Insure with 

Niagara fire Insurance Company 

Of New York. 

Canadian Department: Montreal, 

\V. E. FIND LAY, Manager. 

Incorporated in 1S50. 

Has been over 70 years in business. 

Unexcelled reputation for SER\'ICE, 

SECURITY and PROMPT PAVMl'NTS. 

A. T. GOODRIDGE, 

G. W. V. A. Building. Agent for Newfoundland. 



When writing 



-^T^^i^;;;— Tid^dly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly. 



-•JW8»<''"!*'W-'W 



THE NEWFOUXDLAND QUARTERLY.— 41. 



Farquhar Steamship Companies. 

Passenger and Freight Service 
Sf. John's fo Halifax. 

Steel Steamship "Sable I." 
Sailing every Nine Days. 

Freight accepted and rates quoted to all points. 
For sailing dates and other information, apply 

Harvey & Co., Ltd., ^♦i St. John's, Nfld. 



Baine, Johnston & Co., 

ESTABLISHED I780. 

Merchants, Ship-Ovs/ners, &c. 



Agents 



The Alliance Assurance Co., Ltd., 

LONDON. 

Total Assets exceed ... ii2o,coo,ooo. 

Fire Premiums for 1912 exceeded $6,500,000, 



Farquhar Steamship Companies, 

HALIFAX, N. S. 



Agents 



Newman's Celebrated Port Wine 

In Pipes for E.xport. 



. !. REGULATIONS 

I For Salting Scotch Pack Herring. 

1 One barrel salt to five and a half barrels fierring — Large Fu'ls. 

I One barrel salt to six barrels herring — Medium Fulls. 

j One barrel salt to six and a half barrels herrins — Matt Fuils. 

' This amount of salt is for d'edging and laying on ro^vs orly. 

It does not take into account that put on the herrinj before 
gibbing. 

.All salt falling off herring in rousing tubs is put on rows as 
you pack unless very dirty or scaly ; in that case, you have to 
make good the same amount, or otherlvi^e you could rot have 
any fixed rule on salt. 

Matt Fulls. ... I o4 inches long Mik or roe. 

Medium Fulls.. 11 .V inches long Mik or roe. 

Large Fulls ... 12'^ inches long and upwards. Mi!: or roe. 

Medium Filling, i li inches long and upwards. 

Large Filling. .. i:;i- inches long and upwards. 

Filling Fish may be branded as Scotch Cure without the 
Crown Brard. 

No drowned, stale, or scaleless herring can be used as Scotch 
Pack, nor herring in half frozen state. 

The Ton cause ot light salting is to come as ner.r as possible 
to the plea>in=' of the palate of the consumer ; and if we bear in 
mind thai over three-fourths of all Scotch.P,ick Herring .ue con- 
sumed as a tonic before the mid-day meal, just as they cDme out 
of the barrel, without any fire cooking, we can see the reason at 
a glance for the rignt salting. The herring is dressed by the 
head, and the tail being cut off, the main bone taken t.u;. It is 
then cut into squares of about one inch, and is served w;th vine- 
gar and other condiments. This gives power to the st07iach to 
digest the following meal and keeps the consumer in the best of 
health. , . 

People with bad stomachs please note that the art of cookmg 
and eating right i, just as esceniial as the art of currg; and 
based on the best medical directions, and with the chemical 
analvsis of the constituent parts of herring as a food ever kept 
before the consumer, we need not be surpri.sed that the people 
who eat most herring are the most healthy and eincient. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES. 

St. John's, November. i<)-5- 



Rules for Making Cod Liver Oil. 

For the Guidance of iMannfacturers. 



1st. —The manager in charge of factory must see that the 
livers are fresh; that all bro«n or poor livers are thrown out; 
that there is no bladder attached to any livers. 

29d. — The good livers must then be washed in a tub of clean 
fresh water. 

3rd.— The pan in which the livers are boiled must be per- 
fectly clean inside, before any livers are placed iri it. 

4th.— Before you start to boil any livers, you must have sutfi 
cient steam. 

-Ih. — Turn on the steam, and use as much as you need to 
have for the quantity of livers >ou have in your pan. Boil until 
the white scum float's off (which will take about thirty minutes.) 
Don't forget to stir the livers, and see tha: those in the bottom 
and those around the sides are brought into direct contact with 
the steam nil the time. 

6th.— Ti;rn the steam off. and allow all to settle, not exceed- 
ing five minutes, according to capacity of liver boiler. 

"-th.— I'hen you dip all the oil you can get, which is t'ae finest 
white oil. Put this oil in a cooling tank made of galvanized 
iron, and let the oil remain there till ne.\t morning. Uan't for- 
o-et to put a straining cloth over the cooling tank before you 
put anv oi! in, so that it will catch any bits of bkbber : allow to 
remain 12 or 14 hours, or longer if possible, then dip from cool- 
ing tank and strain through double calico oag, inside big to be 
one inch -mailer all around ; then strain into a tm shute under 
the bags, the cask to be at the end of the ^hute «ith a funnel, 
to lead oil v-Ao casks, which funne; to be covered wr.h cneese cloth. 

Sth —When you have dipped the finest oil from the top of the 
liver boiler pan, take all the blubber from the pan while it is 
warm. The oil from this blubber is not f^t for medicinal 
purposes. , 

nth —Then clean vour liver pan with warm water and wash- 
ing powder. Have i't bright ana clean for the next boir.ng. 

loth — Fverv ba^cioth, tank, tunnel .and pan. must be washed 
only with warm water, soap and water. Scda mus^t rot oe used 

■I'he best results for medical oil can onlv be obtained by the 
use of tin barrels. Wooden packages generallv mnke .he oil 
dark, and destroy its fine flavor. Keep M oi! in barrels m a 
cool place, and covered from the sun. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES. 

St. John's, November, 19:3. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly m 



ention 



'The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 42. 




Published by Authority. 



On recommendation of the Assistant Collector of Customs, 
and under the provisions of Cap. 22 of the Consolidated Sta- 
tutes, 1 Third Series', entitled "Of the Customs," His Excellency 
the Governor in Council has been pleased to approve the fol- 
lowing Regulations respecting Travellers' Baggage, and Com- 
mercial Travellers' Samples, form of Oath to be annexed to 
Invoices, and Form of Invoice. 

\V. VV. H.^LFVARD, 

Colonial Secretary. 
Department cf Colonial Secretary, 
Xoveo^ber 15th, 1923. 

Travellers' Baggage. 

1. The Rules and Regulations publibtied on the 2nd May, 
1905, and the amendtuenis thereto, are hereby cancelled, and 
the following substituted therefor. 

2. Subject to the provisions of the next succetding rues, 
".earing apparel, artic'es of personal adornment, toilet articles 
and similar personal effects in the possession of persons arriving 
in Newfoundland and not exceeding $50,00 in value may. after 
due examination, be passed free, wiihont entry at the Customs, 
as Travellers' Baggage, but this provision shall only include sucfi 
articles as actually accompany and nre in the use of, and as are 
necessary and appropriate for li.e wear and use of such persons 
for the imniediately purpose of the journey and lor their p:;r- 
sonal comfort and convenience, and shall not be held to apply 
to any articles fur use or wear at any future time or to merchan- 
dize or articles intended tor other petsons or for sale. 

3. Wearing apparel and other personal effects taken out of 
Newfoundland by residents uf Newfoundland to foreign countries 
shall, upon their return, be admitted free of duty without regard 
to their value, upon their identity being established. 

4. Wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, to; et 
articles and similar personal effects brought into the Colony dv 
bona-fide travellers who are not residents of the Colony shall 
be passed free, without entry at the Customs, as Travellers" 
Baggage. 

5. Articles of theatrical societies, known as " properties." 
circus horses and cattle, menageries, carriages and harness 
thereof, musical instruments of coinpanies visiting Newfound- 
land for exhibition purposes, may be admitted upon a deposit 
equal to the duty being paid, or upon a bond beii-g given secur- 
ing the duty, such bond shall set forth a reasonable lime with- 
in which the export must be made. 

Commercial Travellers' Samples. 

Travellers' samples of dutiable goods including trunks ard 
other packages in which they are imported, may be admitted 
into .Newfoundland upon a deposit of money equivalent to the 
duty or upon a good and sufficient bond being given for irs 
p.iyment. 

■ Such deposit may be returned and such bond cancelled upon 
the export of the goods vnthin 01. e year ut the importation o: the 
Samples, ard upon the receipt of a certificate of landing from 
the foreign Customs to which they were exported. 

All samples shall be examined upon arrival and the Com- 
mercial Traveller reporting them shall deliver to the Customs 
Officer for entrv purpo.ses an invoice or st.itement in det-nl show- 
ing the wholesale price of e.ich sample at the Current I )omestc 
Value thereof in the port or place from which it was imported. 



Such invoice or statement shall be attested by the Traveller, 
and the quantity of such samples shall be duly checked bv the 
Customs' Officer and the proper du:y thereon be deposited or 
Bond given belore the samples are Celivered. 

The ReguLrlions respecting forms of oath to be annexed to 
invoices presented at the Customs, published in the K>\al 
G II zetti ol the 7th June, 1S98, and amendments t.'iereto pub- 
lished on the 3 ist r^ecember, 1907. are hereby cancelled and 
the following substituted thereffir. 

A. 

Certificate of Value to be Written, Typed or Printed on 

Invoices of goods for £.Tportation to the 

British Dominions. 

1 1) Here insert man- I ( i) . . . . ' of 

ager, chief clerk, or /,\ ' f / \ 

a? the case may be. ^'^ ,' '■•'•' 

,,, ,, . manufacfarer 

(21 liere insect name 

of lirni or company. supplier 

(3) Here insert name of the goods enumerated in this Invoice 
of city or country. _ amounting to 

(4) These words herebv declare that I [ (4 1 have the au:ho- 
should be omitted ^ity to make and sign tn:3 cettilicate on 
where the manutac- ,_ , tt / , - , < 

turer or supplier behalf of the aioresaid manufacturer 

himself signs the supplier 

Certificate. 3„(j ^)^^^ jj [,j^-g ,|,g nieans of knowing and 

do hereby certify .is follows. 

Valne. 

1. That this invoice is in ail respects 
correct and contiins a true and full state- 
ment of the price actually paid or to be piid 
for the said goods, and the actual quantity 

, a thereof, 

2. That no difierenr invoice of the goods 

mentioned in the said invoice has been or 

Paragraph 2 can be ,^,(11 5^ furnished to anvone : and that no 
deleted in the case , , . ' . „ tv „,■ „ .u^ 

of exports to Xew arrangements or understanamg atiecting .he 

Zealand. purchase price of the said goods has been 

or will be made or entered i: to between the 

said exporter and purchaser, or by anyone 

on behalf of eitner of them either by way of 

5) Here insert par- discount, rebate, rornpensa.ton Cr in any 

liculars of any spe- manner whatever other than as fully shoan 

cial arrangement. ^„ {his invoice, or as follows ( 5) 



3. That the domestic values shown in 
the column heatied "Current Domesic 
Values" are those at which tine ab^ve men- 
tioned firm or cotr.pany wouid be prepared 
to supply to any purchaser tor home con- 
sumption in the country of exportation and 
at the date of exportation identical. y simiiar 

goods in equal q aantities. at 0) 

subject 

per cent, ca-h 

and that such values include 
e.xc'iude 



16} Here insert 
'■ warehouse." '* fac- 
tory.'' or " port of 
shipment, " 



to 

discount 



the cost of oiitsiie packages, of any. in 
which the goods are sold in such counfy 
for domestic cotisu uption. 

4. That the said domestic value includes 
any duty levia'.Vie in respect of the gooes 
before they are delivered for home consump- 
tion, and that on exportation a drawback or 

remission of dutv a;nounting 10 

has been 

will be 

allowed by the revenue authorities in the 
country of expona:ion. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 43. 



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Enumerate the following charges and state whether each 
amount has been included in or excluded from the above 
current domestic value. — 



Amount in cur- 
rency of export- 
ing country. 



(1) Cartage to rail and | or docks. 

(2) Inland freight (rail or canal) 
and other charges to the dock 
area including inland insur- 
ance 

(3) Labour in packing the goods : 
into oulside packages i 

(4) Value of outside packages. ■ ■ ■ j 

(5) If the goods are subject to an)' | 
charge by .vay of Royalties. . . 



btite if 
included. 



1. The foregoing is the form of Invoice required by the 
Customs authorities of the Self-governing Dominions, viz. : — 
Canada, the Coniniouwealth of .\u.stralia. .\ew Zealand, the 
Union of south Africa and Newfoundland. 

2. On the back of the invoice must be written, typed, or 
printed the Certificate of Value in respect of all goods whether 
sold outright or shipped on consignment. The Certiticate of 
Value will be required in respect of goods on which preferential 
tariff treatment is claimed, exported either from the United 
Kingdom or British Possessions: and only the Ceriilicate of 
Value in respect of exports from foreign countries, or e.vporls of 
foreign goods from the L'uited Kingdom or British Possessions. 

3. Special attention should be paid to the Co!umn of the in- 
voice dealing with current domestic value, as full information of 
this is required by the Customs .Authorities of the Dominions 
when assessing value for duty. E.xporters should furthermore, 
see that the particulars required by Clauses 3 and i of the Cer- 
tificate are acuratelv slated. 



4. It should be clearly understood that the prices shown in 
the column of the invoice headed "Current Domestic Values" 
must be those which are being quoted in the open market at trie 
date of invoice for delivery for home consumption, and not 
neccessarily those at which the order for the goods was accepted 
and it may frequently happen that fluctuations will occur in the 
home market price between the date of order and the date of 
expoitation. In ordin.iry circumstances the date of invoice will 
be regarded as '• the date of exportation," but where anv con- 
siderable delay occurs between the date of invoice and the date 
of exportation, any changes in the •• Current Domestic Values" 
should be shown on the invoice. 

5. If goods are sold for home consumption at gross prices, 
less discounts and or rebates, such gross prices, together with 
particulars as to discounts and rebates, should be shown in full 
in the " Current Domestic Values" Column of the invoice. 

6. Where the discounts shown in the " Current Domestic 
Values" column are not the ordinary trade or cash discounts 
but are of the nature of contingr'nt discounts or rebates, they 
must be specified as such, and their nature detailed on the 
invoice. 

7. Where the goods invoiced are samples and the price on 
the invoice has been arrived at after the deduction of a sample 
discount, the ordinary gross prices and the ordinary trade dis- 
counts applicable to the goods in question should be specified 
in the "Current Domestic Values' column. 

8. Any shipment which forms portion only of a complete 
order should be v.ilued at the price per unit which, at the date 
of despatch, of .such shipment, would be quoted for the total 
quantity of such complete order for supply under similar condi- 
tions of delivery to a domestic purchaser. 

A^o/e — In the case of shipments to New Zealand, the total 
quantity referred to above is limited to the quantity 
actually specified for delivery within 12 months. 

9. When goods are shipped "on consignment" that fact 
should be indic.ited in the column headed " Selling price to 
Purchaser." and the "Current Domestic Values" inserted in the 
column provided for that purpose, as in the case of ordiiiarv sales. 

10. In the case of goods exported in bond or subject to 
drawback, the value required, in the column headed "Current 
Domestic Values," is the duty-paid domestic value, and not the 
in bond value of the domestic value less drawback. The 
amount of duty or drawback involved should be specified in 
Clause 4 of the Certificate. .\ similar course shonid be follow- 
ed in regard to goods subject to stamp duty, luxury tax, or 
other internal imposts. 

11. As regards goods which are prepared specially for ex- 
port and which ordinarily have no sale on the domestic market, 
the value to be shown in the column headed "Current Domestic 
Values," is that at which the supplier would, at the date of ex- 
portation be prep.ired to supply identically similar goods in 
equal quantities to any purchaser for home consumption in the 
country of exportation, in the event jf an order for home con- 
sumption being accepted. In this connection attention is 
directed to Clause 3 of the Certificate. 

12. Care should be taken to enumerate correctly the charges 
detailed at the foot of the invoice, as the practice of the various 
Dominions, regarding the inclusion in or exclusion from the 
value for duty of such charges, is not uniform. 

1 -,. It will be observed that charges such as wharfage, dock 
dues', literage, cartage, craneage. etc., if incurred in the dock 
area,' and changes in the nature of bank exchange and export 
duties are not required for duty purposes to be enumerated at 
the foot of the invoice. There is, however, no objection to such 
charges, if incurred, being shown separately. 

14. The certificate on the invoice must be signed, in his 
personal capacitv, bv the supplier or the manufacturer or any 
person having authority to sign on behalf of the supplier or 
manufacturer. The witness to the signature need not neces- 
.sarily be a magistrate, notary, or other public official, but may 
be any person'competent to sign as a witness to signatures on 
ordinarv business documents. 



"^.ijisii^'lifsww-wt'.y 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY— 44. 



The Liverpool & London &GIobeInsurance Co*,Ltd, 

The World Auxiliary Insurance Corporation, Ltd, 

The Globe Indemnity Co. of Canada, 

Fire Insurance on rvll classes of property effected at tariff rates. 
Casualty and kindred insurance effected at reasonable rates. 

See us BEFORE PLACING YOUR INSURANCE elsewhere. 

Prcnpt settlement of claitns. — Absolute securitv. 

BO WRING BROTHERS, LTD., 

Agents for Newfoundland. 




Weights and Erasures 

The following sections of the Act 
Respecting Weights and Measures are 
published for general information : — 

".\ny persons who shall use a beam, scale, weight or mea- 
sure, in the sale or e.xchange of any commodity, not assayed and 
stamped, or who shall alter the same after being so assayed and 
stamped, or who shall use steel-yards, except for the purpo e of 
weighing hay or stray, or who shall use a beam made of wood, 
shall forfeit a sum not exceeding twenty dollars." 

"Salt may be sold by measure, or by weight, if sold by mea- 
sure, there shall be eighteen gallons to a tub (liquid measurement) 
and thres tubs to a hogshead. .\ny person who shall sell or 
dispove of salt by measure otherwise than according to the stan- 
dard hereby established shall forfeit a sum not exceeding 
twenty dollars.'" 

"The Chief In.spector. and Inspectors shall, when required, 
inspect and adjust all beams, scales weights and measures, 
brought to the ortice of either of Ihem according to the said 
standard, and they shall stamp or mark thereon the initials of 
tl.e reigning Sovereigns, and their own proper initials.' 

M. J. O'MARA, 



NOTICE! 

o 

Department of Controller. 

— '■ — o 

Cheques drawn on banks 
outside of St. John^s MUST 
be Certified by the banks on 
which they are drawn before 
being sent to this Department, 
and from this date none but 
certified cheques will be ac- 
cepted* 

THOMAS BOMA, 



Chief Inspector. 



Chief Inspector's Office, Stott Building, 
Marshall's Cove, November, 1923. 



Acting Controller. 



November, 1923. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly me 



ntion "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



.0 7 



THE^ NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



TheattentionofShipOwners 

^^ ^ = is called to the following :— 

REGULATIONS 

RELATING TO THE EXAMINATION OF 
ENGINEERS.-CHAPTER 1. 

GENERAL RULES. 

1. — Tliese Regulations are issued in pursuance of 
an Act respecting the qualification of Engineers 
(6 Edward VII., Cap. 24). 



In accordance with Section 9 of the said .\ct. 
" No steamers registered in Newfoundland shall 
go to sea from any port in or of Newfoundland 
or its dependencies unless the engineers thereof 
have obtained and possess valid certificates for sea- 
going ships, appropriate to their several stations in 
such ships, or of a higher grade from the Board of 
Trade in the United Kingdom, or valid certificates 
of competency appropriated to their several stations 
in such ships, or of a higher grade granted in anv 
British possession, and declared by Order of His 
Majesty in Council, published in the Lnndon Gazette 
under the provisions of the Merchant Shipping 
(Colonial) Act, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, or 
of any Act of the Parliament of the United King- 
dom containing such provisions, to be of the same 
force as certificates of competency for foreign-going 
ships granted under the Acts of the Parliament of 
the United Kingdom relating to merchant shipping, 
or a certificate of competency under the provisions 
of this Act. And every person who, having been 
engaged to serve as an Engineer of any sea-going 
ship registered in Newfoundland, goes to sea as 
aforesaid after that date as such engineer without 
being at the time entitled to and possessed of such 
certificate for sea-going ships, as hereinbefore re- 
quired, or who employs any person as Engineer of 
any sea-going ship, as aforesaid, without first ascer- 
taining that he at the tinie is entitled to, and pos- 
sessed of such certificate, shall for such offence incur 
a penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars.'" 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 
October, 1923. 




,„i:^€f?^S€' 



A Dainty and Delicious 

SODA BISCUIT 



TIP 



TOP 



%c^ 



t^ 



^ s TIP TOP 



For your Biscuit Requirements ask 
for those manufaclured by 



fl. Baruep ^ Co. 



% 

iff,, 

'I 




PHC 

Assurance 



IMI^ 



r< 







Co., Ltd., 



OP LONDON, ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Total Funds exceed $80,000,000.00 

Claims Paid exceed $470,000,000.00 

Place your business with us, the premier Company 
in Newfoundland. 

Lowest Current Rates of Premiums. 

W. & G. RENDELL, St. John's, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



Newfoundland 
Savings Bank. 






Established in 1S34. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature. 



I ■ I I I I I I I 1 I I I I I ■ 



" The General Re\ enue of the Colony 
shall be liable for all moneys deposited in 
this Bank and all interest payable thereon." 
— Extract from Bank's Cha-'ter. 

I I I I I I I I I r I 1 ' • ' ' ' • 

BRANCHES at Harbor Grace and Bay Roberts, 
Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate. 

ROBERT \A/ATSON, Cashier. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



• - ■"'^^ 



■r II mlntiliti I 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 46. 




Che Sc.ison's 

I Greetings, 




Kmas, \QZ3 



\A/e Extend to Our Numerous Customers 
Our Heartiest VA/ishes for a 

Rigbt mcrrp Xmas 

and a Rappp Dcio year. 

Our preparations for Xmas are as elaborate as ever. 

Huge Stocks of Beautiful Xmas Supplies are making their appearance in all depsnnients. 

Toys, Dolls, Leather Goods, Purses, Bags, Dressing Cases, Manicure Sets, Albums, 
Collar Boxes, Gloves, Furs, Handkerchiefs, Mufflers, Pipes, Cigar and Cigarette Cases, 
Pouches, Silverware, Cut Glass, Furniture and Gramophones. 

Everything naarked at our usual lowest-iivthe-city Prices. 

THE ROYAL STORES, LTD. 





S No. !5 e^ 



WHEN TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving in this Colony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles. Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear. Fire-arms, and Am- 
munition, Tents. Canoes and Implements, they shall be admitted 
under the following conditions : — 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equipa-e. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. 2 if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the As.sistant Collector, 
St. John's, if taken in St. John's the Receipt No. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refutid of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of E.xit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the result of his e.\amination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

Xo groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any" kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund m.ay 
be taken upon such articles. 

H, W. LeMESSURIER. 

Deputy Min'ster of Customs. 
CrSTO.\r HOL'SE. 
St. John's, .Newfoundland, October, 1923. 




Notice to Owners and Masters 
of Britisii Ships! 

o 

The attention of Owners and Masters of British 
Ships is called to the 74th Section of the " Mer- 
chant Shipping Act, 1S94." 

74. — (i) A Ship belonging to a British subjec. 
shall hoist the proper national colours — 

(a) on a signal being made to her by one of His 
Majesty's ships (including any vessel under the 
command of an officer of His Majesty's navy 
on full pay), and 

( b) on entering or leaving any foreign port, and 

(c) if of fifty tons gross tonnage or upwards, gn 
entering or leaving any British Port. 

( 2) If default is made on board any such ship in 
comph ing with this section, the master of the ship 
shall for each offence be liable to a fine not exceed- 
ing one hundred pounds. 

At time of war it is necessary for ever)- Brit- 
ish Ship to hoist the colours and heave to if signal- 
led by a British Warship; if a vessel hoists no 
colours and runs awav, it is liable to be fired upon. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 
St. John's, Newfoundland, 
October, 1923. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " 



The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



yymmiivun^mi ■ "* " ".^f 



I JJ(.;r'(.l"W*iiffJ|";j 



. ^aZ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.—, 



47- 



Cable Address: ''JOB," St. John's; "JOB," Liverpool. 



•-.1 ir' 



m CO., LTD. 



\A/ater Street, St. John's, Nfld. 

ESTABLISHED 1780. 

EXPORTERS OF 

Codfish, Pickled Fish, Lobsters and Salmon, Cod Oil, Seal Oil and Whale Oil, 

Medicinal Cod Liver Oil 

(Norwegian Process, Non-Freezing), 
and other produce. 



AGENCIES: 

The Royal Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool, Fire and Life, 

The Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool. 

The National Fire Insurance Co'y. Hartford, Conn. 



MANAGERS OF 



JOB'S STORES, LT 

DEALERS IN 

Provisions and Groceries, Naval Stores and Fishing Supplies, 
\A/HOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



MANAGERS OF 



'^Neptune" Steamship Co., Ltd., ^Thetis'' Steamship Co., Ltd. 



JOB BROTHERS, 

Tower Building, 

Liverpool, G. B. 



"vVhen writii^to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-4S. 



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NOTICE is hereby given to the 
Public that applications for 

MINERAL AREAS 



may be received at: this office on 
and after the first day of August, 
1921, and licenses may be issued 
for such areas, reserving therefrom 
Coal, ^♦e Petroleum Oil, -jt Bitumen, 
Natural Gas and Bituminous Clays 
and Shales capable of yielding 
Petroleum Oil on distillation. 



Minister of Agriculture and f4ines 



Department of Agriculture and Mines 
St. John's Newfoundland 



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lfher«",^g";rAdvertisers kintlly ^^M^o^ "The Newfoundland Quanerly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- 




49- 



FOREST FIRES ACT. 



Section 2._Every person uho— 

(i) Sets out, li.:jht.s or starts, or causes tn be set out, li-^hted or 
started, any tire in or near any woods, except f„r"the pur- 
pose of cle.iring land, cooking, obtaining warmth, or for 
some industrial purpose ; or 

(2) Makes or starts, or causes to be made or started, a fire for 
the purpose of clearing land, without exercising and observ- 
ing every re.isonable care and precaution in the mnking 
and starting of such f\re and in the managin>» of and 
caring for and controlling the same after it has been 
made and started, in order to prevent the same from 
spreading and burning up the trees, shrubs or plants sur- 
rounding, adjoining, or in the neighborhood of the place 
where it has been so made and started ; or 

(3) Between the fifteenth day of April and the first day of 
December, makes or starts or causes to be made or started, 
a fire iti or near any woods, or upon any island, for cooking 
or obtaining warmth, or for any industrial purpose, withou't 
observing the following precautions, that is to say : 

(a) Selecting a locality in the neighborhood in which there is 
the smallest quantity of dead wood, branches, brushwood. 
dry leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, turf, dry moss or 
vegetable matter of any kind ; 

(b) Clearing the place in which he is about to light the fire 
by removing all dead wood, branches, brushw(jod, drv 
leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, tuif, dry moss and 
other vegetable matter from the soil within a distance of 
ten feet from the fire in every direction : 

(c) Exercising and observing every reasonable care to pre- 
vent such fire from spreading, and carefully extinguishing 
the same before quitting the place ; or 

(4) Throws or drops any burning match, ashes of a pipe, lighted 
cigar, or any other burning substance, or discharges any 
firearm in the woods, barrens, fields or other place where 
there is vegetable matter, if he neglects completely to ex- 
tinguish before leaving the spot, the fire of such match, 
ashes of a pipe or cigar, wadding of the firearm, or other 
burning substance ; or 

(j) Makes, lights or starts, or causes to be made, lighted or 
started, except for the purposes named in sul>seciion (i) 
hereof, a fire on any land not owned or occupied by him- 
■ self, or does not prevent any fire made, lighted or started 
on land owned or occupied by him, from extendmg to land 
not owned by him, shall be liable to a penalty of not less 
than Fifty Dollars nor more than Four Hundred Dollars for 
each oft'cnce. or to Imprisonment tor any period not exceed- 
ing Twelve Months. 

J. F. DOWNEY, 

Mini.s'kT oj Agrk'uUurt' luul A/iiic's, 

Department of Agriculture and Mines, 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 



We Meke 

the Very Best Quality of 

Manila Rope, 
Coir Rope, 

Hemp Fishing Lines,, 
White and Tarred Cotton Fishing Lines, 
Hemp Seine Twine, 

Cotton Seine Twine, 
Herring Nets, 

Cotton Linnett. 



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When anything better is invented 
We Shall Make That. 

Colonial Cordage Co., Ltd. 



ITBI.ISHFri .WNI'.M.l.V. 

LONDON DIRECTORY 

witb Provincial and Foreign Sections and Trade Headings in Five Languagel 

eiialiles traders to coninmnicate direcl with 

Mantifacturers and Dealers 

in London and in the I'ru'.iTici.iI Inwns anil Indiislnal Centres of the V ni'.iJ 
Kingdom and the Continent of turupe. 'i"he l)oolc contains over j^colx: 
names, addresses 'and niher details are classified under more Ihan 2.000 
tiadi heaiiings. including 

Export Merchants 

with detailed particuJars of ilie tionds shipped and the Colonial and 
F'oreign .Markets supplied: 

Steamship Lines 

arranged under the Port.s to which they sail, and indicating the approvi- 

mate Sailings. 

Cine-inch l;i;.'^INK.SS C.\KIJS of Kirnis desiring to extend their ccmnuc- 
tions, or Trade Cards of 

Dealers Seeking Agencies 

can be printed at a cost of 8 dull.irs fur each trade he.ading under which 

they are inserted. Larger advertisements from to to So dollars. 

Tlie directorv is invalnalile to evetvone interested in overseas commeice. 

and a copv ivill l>e sent l>v parcel post f'T 10 d..-llar-. nelt cash viilh order. 

The LONDON DIRECTORY Co., Ltd., 

23, Abchurch Lane, London, E. C. 4, England. 

Bl.SI.NKSS F.sr.VBI.IsHKII IN l^M- 



•"! "-yiBfiwvf'K; 'A*-^ 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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: Cable address: " Crosbie," Si. John's. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- so. 



Ih»l.«:|(.f IIM kliri t^llKl lit, ,»r*.»IMI».|.« (.1 ».|.|| I IJ II t (4 HI i IIIII^M 14 11 I rM4*U;M 

Codes Used : A.B.C. 5lh Edifion. : 



I Newfoundland Produce Company, Ltd. 

\ J. C. CROSBIE, Manager. 

: BUYERS AND EXPORTERS OF 

j Codfish, Oil, and all other Newfoundland Products of the Sea. 

! Agents for Fire and Marine Insurance, 

: AND 

i Importers of North Sydney Coal. 



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I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 



I I I i I I I I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I 





As a number of Newfoundlanders, proceeding to the United States of America, have recently been 
stopped at Vanceboro, on the American Border, and sent back to Newfoundland, being thereby subjected 
to inconvenience and expense, the following extract from the United States Imniigration Laws is publish- 
ed for general information — 

" That the following classes of aliens shall be excluded from admission into the United 
States: All idiots, imbeciles, feeble-minded persons, epileptics, insane persons; persons who 
have had one or more attacks of insanity at any time previously ; persons of constitutional 
psychopathic inferiority; persons with chronic alcoholism; paupers; professional beggars; 
vagrants ; persons afflicted with tuberculosis in any form or with a loathsome or dangerous 
contagioi'-s disease ; persons not comprehended within any of the foregoing excluded classes 
who are found to be and are certified by the examining surgeon as being mentally or physically 
defective, such physical defect being 'of a nature which may affect the ability »f such alien to 
earn a living; persons who have been convicted of or admit having committed a felony or other 
crime or misdemeanor involving moral turpiture ;***** persons hereinafter called contract 
laborers, who have been induced, assisted, encouraged, or solicited to migrate to this country by 
offers or promises of emplovment, whether such offers or promises are true or false, or m conse- 
quence of agreements, oral, written or printed, express or implied, to perform labor m this 
countrv of anv kind, skilled or unskilled ; persons who have come in consequence of advertise- 
ments for laborers printed, published, or distributed in a foreign country; persons like y to 
become a public charge; persons who have been deported under any of the-provBions of this 
Act, and who mav seek admission- again within one year from the date of such deportation, 
unless prior to their re-embarkation at a foreign port or their attempt to be admitted from 
foreign contiguous territorv the Secretary of Labour shall have consented to their re-applying 
for admission ; persons whose ticket or passage is paid for with the money of another, or who 
are assisted by others to come, unless it is af^rmatively and satisfactorily shou-n that such 
persons do not belong to one of the foregoing excluded clas.ses; Pe'-f"s^vhose ticket or passage 
s paid tor bv anv coq^oration, association, society, municipality or foreign Gove nmen eithu 
diiectlv or indirectlv; stowaways, except that any such^sto..awa>^ if otherwise admi..able, ma> 
be admitted in the discretion of the Secretary of Labor. 

In view of the above, Newfoundlanders who may contemplate proceeding to the United States should 
first satisfv themselves that thev do not fall within any of the classes of Immigrants therein specified. 

ARTHUR ME\A/S, Deputy Colonial Secretary. 

Department of the Colonial Secretary. 

St. John's, Newfoundland, October, 1923- ^ . 



When writing 



to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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nmtamiMifT' iiVtfariffi-i, 



^THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 



51- 




ORDER YOUR 

Soap mi Oiled Clothing 

^ FROM .j« 

The Standard P^fg. Co., Ltd. 

Quality and Satisfaction Guaranteed. 



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Public Notice. 



Under an Act representing the St. John's General Hospital 
(6 George V., Cap XIX.) and with the approval of the Gover- 
nor in Council, the Board of Governors have fixed and prescrioed 
the following scale of fees to be levied from and paid by all per- 
sons « ho occupy beds or undergo treatment at the Hospital: 

Scale of Fees. 

Every person receiving treatment in the St. John's General 
Hospital sh.iU pay fees accordii'.g to the following scales: — 
Persons admitted to the public wards, Si.oo per day. 
Persons occupying private rooms, Sio.oo per week in 
addiiioa to the daily fee of Si.oo. 

To cover cost of dressings, anaesthetics, and for the use 
of the Operating Room, patients undergoing opera- 
tions shall pay a fee of Sio.oo in addition to the 
fees specified above. 
Kvery applicant for admission to the Hospital must bring or 
forward to the Superintend.mt of the Hospital, certificate 
signed by a duly registered physician that such applicant is a 
proper subject for Hospital treatment. 

Under the provisions of the General Hospital .Act. 1915. all 
patients who are unable to pay fees shall be required to bring 
with them a certificate of their inability to pay. which shall be 
signed by the resident Relieving Officer, or, where there is no 
such Officer, by a Justice of the Peace, a Clergyman or other 
responsible persons. 

The fees of such patients thereupon payable by the Commis- 
sioner of Public Charity, by virtue of ihe said .Act. 
By order of the Board of Governors, 

GEORGE SHEA. Chairman. 
W. M. RENNIE, Secretary. 

October, 1923. 



'^^^tt!^^ 



When writing to Adverti.sers kindly me 



Public Notice. 

SUDBURY HOSPITAL. 

The following scale of fees payable by outside 
patients for treatment in the various Departments 
of Sudbury Hospital will be effective on and after 
November ist, 192 1 : 

MASSAGE AND ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT. 

Including treatment with sinusoidal, galvanic 

and high frequency currents, per treatment $1.00 

HYDRO THERAPEUTIC DEPARTMENT. 

Including Schott's Douche, whirlpool, sedative 
and electric bath with massage, etc, per 

treatment $1.00 

Electric Cabinet ('rurki>h\ Uath S2.50 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographs. Plates under 10 .\ 1 2 $2.00 

All larger sizes S-*^ 

X-Ray Treatments 2.00 

SCREEN EXAMINATIONS. 

With Bismuth Meal, S5.00 and upwards. 

This does not include prints. All cases to be 
dealt with through their own doctors to whom 
reports will be sent. Abo\e scale of fees applies to 
civilian cases onlv. 

JAMES HARRIS, 

Deputy Minister. 

Department Public Works, 

St. John's, Ntld., October, 1923- 

ntion "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-52. 




Passport RcQuiations. 



1. APPLICATIONS for Passports must be made in the 
authorized form and enclosed in a cover addressed to '•'I'Ht' 
DEPARTMF.NT OK THE COLONIAL SECRETARY' 
ST. JOHNS." 

2. The charge for a Passport is S2.50. Passports are 
issued at the Office of the Colonial Secretary between the hours 
of 10 and 4 ON THE DAY FOLLOWING TH.\T ON 
WHICH TtlE APPLICATION FOR THE PASSPORT 
H.\S BEEN RECEIXED, e.xxept on Sundays and Public 
Holidays, when the Office is closed. Applications should, if 
possible, reach the Office before 4 p.m. on the previous day. 
If the applicant does not reside in St. John's, the Passport niav 
be sent by post, and a Postal Order for S2.50 should in that 
case accompanv the application. POSIWGE SIWMPS WILL 
NOT BE RECEIVED IN I'AYMENT. 

3. Passports are granted — 

(i) To natural-born British subjects ; 

To the wives and widows of such persons : and 
To persons naturalized in the L'nited Kingdom, in 



(3) 



the British Colonies, or in Lidia. 



-A married woman is deemed to be a subject of the State of 
which her husband is for the time being a subject. 

4. Passports are granted — 

(i) In the case of natural-born British subjects and 
persons naturalized in Newfoundland, upon the 
production of a Declaration by the applicant in the 
authorized form verified by a Declaration made by 
a member or olfici.il of any Banking Firm establish- 
ed in Neufoundland. or by any Mayor, Magistrate, 
Justice of the Peace, Minister of Religion, Barrister- 
at-Law Physician, Surgeon, Solicitor, or Notary 
Public, resident in Newfoundland. The applicant's 
Certificate of Birth and other evidence may also be 
required. 

(2) In the case of children under the age of 19 years 
a separate Passport, upon production of a Declara- 
tion made by the child's parent or gOardian, in a 
Form (B). to be obtained upon application to the 
Office of the Colonial Secretary. 

(3) In the case of persons naturalized in the L'nited 
Kingdom or in any of the British Self-governing 
Colonies, upon production of a Recommendation 
from the Colonial Office, or the High Commissioner 
or.Agent-General in London of the State concerned; 
and in the case of natives of British India, and per- 
sons naturalized therein, upon production of a 
Letter of Recommendation from the India Otfice. 
Persons naturalized in any of the Crown Colonies 
n)ust obtain a Letter of Recommendation from the 
Colonial Office. 

5. If the applicant for a Passport be a .Naturalized British 



subject, the Certificate of Naturalization must be forwarded to 
the Otfice of the Colonial Secretary, with the Declaration, for 
delivery to the applicant. 

Naturalized British subjects will be described as such in their 
Passports which will be issued subject to the necessjay qualifi- 
cations. 

6. Passports are not available beyond two years from the 
dale of issue. They may be renewed for four further periods 
of two years each, after which fresh Passports must be obtained. 
The fee tor each renewel is ■ii.oo 

7. A Passport cannot be issued on behalf of a person 
already abroad ; such person should apply for one to the nearest 
British Mission or Consulate. Passports must not be sent out 
of Newfoundland by post. 

Vi/. W. HALFYARD, 

Colonial Secretary. 
Department of the Colonial Secretary, 
St. John's, Newfoundland, 
October, 1923. 



We are prepared to quote 

Low Price s 

...ON... 

General Lines of 
Merchandise, 

Robinson Export Co. 



The Newfoundland Quarterly. 

— AN II.I.LSTR.4TED MAGAZINE — 

Issued every third month about the 15th of March, June, September and 
December from the otiice 

34 Trescott Street, St. John's, Ncwfoundlattd. 

JOHN J. EV,\NS. -:- -:■ -:- Printer and TRorRiEToR 

To whom all Communications should be addressed. 

Subscription Rales: 

Single Copies, each =0 cents. 

One Vear. in advance. Newfoundland and Canada So " 

foreifc-n Subscriptions (except Canada) 9° 



All Kinds of Job Printing 

Neatly Executed 

at " The Quarterly" Office. 



1 ^ 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention 



The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



7... 



VW^^mUm^i 



THE NE\VFOUNDLAx\D QUARTERLY. 



^ Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Foncarded by Post at Rates Given Bclo-.j. 
I« the case of Parcels, for outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration form, upon which the Contents and Value must be Stated 



1 pound . 

2 pounds 
3 



For Newkol'npi.and and 
Lauraiji>k. 



For United Kingdom. 



8 cents 

II " 

M " 

-17 " 

;0 " 

23 " 

26 " 

29 " 

33 " 

35 '• 



Under i lb. weight, i cent 
per 2 o/. 



24 cents 
24 •• 
24 " 

48 " 
48 " 
48 " 

48 ,'• 
-3 f" 
72 " 
72 " 
72 " 



No parcel sent to U. K. for 
less than 24 cents. 



For Dominion of CAN.\t>A 
AND United Staiks. 

12 cents. 
24 ■• 
36 •■ 
4S " 
60 •• 
72 " 
84 •• 
96 " 
%\ .oS 
1.20 
'•32 
No parcel sent to D. of C. or 
U. S. foi less than 12 cents. 



N.B. — Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers. .Parcels of Furs must be accompanied by a 
Customs E.vport Kntry. 

Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Monda) and Thursday at II a.m., for despatch by train. 

GENERAL POST "oFFICeT ~ 



LETTfR POST— INLAND. 

A LETTER enclosed in an envelope, whether sealed or open, 
addTe.->ed to any place in Newfov^tidland aiid the Labrador Coast, which 
does not exceed an ounce in wei^iht will he conveyed to its destination for 
three cent.s. This late is applicable for letters posted in one settlement for 
delivery in another ^ettlen-.eni .i mile or more distant. 

LETTER POST— FOREIGN. 

Letters for Great Britain, the Dominion of Canada, and the United 
States of America are forwarded to destination for four cents per ounce 
or fraction thereof. Valuable letters may be registered for delivery in 
Newfoundland for five cents. 

Circulars, that is, printed communications, when posted in lots of not 
l«ss than 10, ivholly alike, and left open for in?pBciion. are accepted for 
one cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof. 

Newspapers or periodicals posted in the Colony for delivery in the 
Colonv shall be subject to a rate, when sent from and posted by any otiice 
orprinthig house publishing the same, of one lialf cent per pound weight 
or fraction thereof, and when sent or posted by any other person, ot one 
cent for each four ounce? or fraction thereof. 



Newspapers to the Dominion of Canada, the United States. France. 
Germanv, tic, must be prepaid at the rate of one cent for each two 
ounces or fraction theieof. 

PARCEL POST. 

Parcels of Merchandise are delivered to destination in Newfoundland at 
the rate of one cent for the tirst two ounces, and so on up to 1 lb., which is 
forwarded for eight cents, the second lb. three cents additional, or 11 cents 
and three cents for each additional lb., or fraction thereof, up to 10 and 1 1 
lbs., which is the limit, at 35 cents. Name and address of sender mu-i 
appear on all parcels. OtBerwise we will refuse to accept them. 

Senders of Parcels for local destinations must wiite their names and 
addresses on the covers; if not Postmasters may refuse to accept them. 

Parcels for other countries must be accompanied by a Custcms 
Declaration Form descril)ing nature and value of contents. These 
forms will be supplied by the Post Office and are essential to ensure 
prompt despatch of parcel. 

Monev may be transmitted by means of the Money Order System and 
by Telegraph to places in Newfoundland, which are Money Order and 
Telegraph Stations, at reasonable rates on application. 



November, 192; 



M. E. HAWCO, Minister of Posts & Telegraphs. 



RING UP 



*'The Newfoundland Quarterly" Office 

For all kinds of 

^ JOB PRINTING. ^ 

Personal attention given to Outport Orders 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

Subscribe »o "The Newfoundland Quarterly," 
the only General Magazine in the country. 
80c. per year Sor Newfoundland and Canada. 
Foreign Subscription 90c. per year. 

JOHN J. EVANS. ^^ p,,3,ott Street. 
Telephone I3B7. 



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d^rmsui import Co., Ltd 

169-171 Water ■?. »*»-■**. 



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St. John's, Newfoundland. 



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Wholesale Dry Goods. m Importers and Jobbers. 
Four Floors Brimful of Goods Ready to Serve at Lowest Wholesale Pri; 

COME AND SEE US WHEN IN THE CITY. 

The IBrMssa Import Cqo^ Ltd« 

When vvrifing lo AdverlUers kindly mention '* The New/ound land <JuarIerl>." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— i. 



TSU^ RBDJ CRDSS] LI N^ 

Offers a Weekly Service of Twelve-day Trips 
Between New York, Halifax, Nova Scotia, and St. John's, Newfoundland. 

This service will be maintained by the steadier^ "Silvia" and " Rosalind," arnl provides the fastest and rao>t up-to-date 
service to these ports. Steamers remain long enough at each port to enable passengers to visit these interesting cities. 

There is splendid trout rishing in the vicinity of St. John's. Loch Leven and Rainbow trout have bee?. impTined assuring 
the angler of the very best fishing. The finest salmonn fishing on this side of the Atlantic can be reached in one day from 
St. John's at very small expense. 

Ptarmigan or grouse shooting is from September 21st to December 31st. Caribou shooting commences August ist. and in no 
other part of the world can big game shooting be enjoyed for so little e.xpense. 

The rale for the ro-.md trip, including berth and meals while at sea and in port is to Nevr York 5i2c.co and up: and to 
Halifax J65.00, according to accommodations desired. Illustrated folder, with complete rates, plans, sailing, and other informa- 
tion will be sent upon application to 

G. S. CAMPBELL & Co., BONA/RING & Co., HARVEY & Co., Ltd., 



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Haliiax, N.S., Agents. 



General Agen(s Red Cross Line, 
17 Battery Place, INew York Cily. 



SI, John's, N.F., Agents. 



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Spring nutn5ev, 19S4 

John J. Evans, rRiNTF.R and Propriktor, 
St. John's, N'FWKOi'Nni.AND. 





Topsail Beach, Conception Bay. 

\_rk.f by C. A'. llW:,.i«,s\ 



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169-171 Water Street, 



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•«« St. John's, Newfoundland. 



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Newfoaandlanid GoverrsiiDiesit 

POSTAL TELEGRAPH SERVICE. 



RING A36. 



THE POSTAL is the only extensive public telegraph service for Newfoundland, and has con 
nection to all inland places. A ten word message costs only twenty-five cents, the address 
and signature, as well as Postal telephone transmission to destination is free of cost. 

The Postal has also immediate and constant connection with the Wireless Stations at Cape Race, 
Fogo and Battle Harbor, and in Summer with Labrador Wireless Stations. Also with Wireless 
to and from ships at sea. 

Cable business handed to the Postal ensures quick service via New York or Canso to Brazil, Bahia, 
Pernambuco, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda. Our connections are as follows : 

"American Postal Telegraph," "Canadian Pacific Railway Telegraphs," '"All .American Cables for 
Central and South America," " Halifax and Bermuda and Direct West India Cables." 

A cheap night, as well as day service, is also given to all points in Canada and the United States of 
America. The Postal has also direct connection with Great Britain, thence to all European points. 
Rates as low as 6c. per word. Stamps to value of ten cents must be attixed by senders to all cable 
(foreign) messages from Newfoundland. The Newfoundland revenue benefits largely when you 
patronize the Postal Telegraphs. Its whole staff (clerical and operators,! from Superintendent to 
Messengers arc sworn to secrecy. 

DAVID STOTT, Superintendent. 

HAWCO, Minister Posts & Telegraphs. 



M. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention " The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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Between New^S HaTr'V^" "' ^-'^^^^'^T^np^^^'' "'^ 

^'S i^-:; :zt^.^rr"-'- -"^"-™- -"^;; s^i,:° -;,;-. r-- rv^^ - » 

Q g _ *^ ^ ''''^^' P'^"5' sailings and Other informa- 

■ Hamax. Ns-^^fel;^ * ^o-' fOWRING&Co., HARVEY & Co i +^ 

,^«""f' Agents Red Cross Line 1/ Y f". ^°-' ^^^'^ 
17 Ballery Place. New York CiiC *'• John's, N.F.. Agents. 



Parker & Monroe, Ltd, 
Wear Our Makes of rootvvear. 

"Rambler," 

for .\ren. 

"Victoria" and 
" Duchess," 

for Women. 

" Cinderella" and 
"Princess," 

for Children. 

"Rover," for Boys. 




Geo. 7<[eal Ltd., 

St. Johns, Newfoundland, 
. WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Provisions, Groceries, 
and Fruit 
Consignments of Live 
Stock Solicited. 



Our Clotks arid rurnisfiinos 

[orjoys a nd Men 

are receiving very special compliments from tlie 
many Pleased Customers wlio ha\e been here. 

The Good Quality, \eat Styles 

and e.xceptionai values arc ujiat plea.sed them. 

They will please }ou, too. 

T. J. BARRON, 




The Employers' Liability Assurance 
Corporation, Ltd., of London, Eng. 

The North West Fire Insurance 
Company, of Winnipeg, Man. 

Higoins, Hunt & Emerson, 



358 Water Street. 



Boys' and Men's Outfitter. Columbus Han, St. John's. 



4qenls for Newfoundland, 




When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



NMni«»ji.<Lajin*ip;«K^m«n!fmqpi 



^.jiJtmmmiU^^'id -'^m 



THE NEWFOUN DLAND QUARTE><1.Y.- 2 






I 



,( t: 



'>l 



Furaess, Withy & Comparay, Ltd., 



Steamship Owners and Brokers ; Commission, Insurance 
and For.varding Agents. 

The well known steamer " Digby," in coninnc- 
tion with the ste:\nier "Sachem," mainiain a pas- 
senger *ervii'e between Liverpool, St. John's, Hali- 
fax and Boston and vice \ersa. These steamers are 
excellently titted up for the carrying of First Class 
Passengers. Passengers to Li\erpool must be in 
possession of passports. 

First Class Fare. 

St. John's to Halitax $35.00 

St. John's to Boston 65.00 

St. John's to LiverpAH>l from $115.00 up. 

for intormation apply to 

Furness, Withy & Co., Ltd., Liverpool, Halifax, Sydney; 
10 State Street, Boston ; St. John's, Nfld. 



^■ 











Old 




Madam :— Have you a package of OLD DUTCH CLEANSER 
in youi home? It makes evciythiiio; clean and pure. Cleans 
Baih Tubs, Sinks. Porce'ai". Matble, Painted Walls, Woodwork, 
Floors, Cutlery, Chin;i. flnaincKvare. Silver, Glassware. Windows, 
Furniture, Linoleum. Oil Cl</!h. Brass and Copper. 

Don't take substitutes; they are not as good as OM Dutch 
Cleanser. For sale at all First-Class Grocers. 

Get a Package with Your Next Order. 



Office and Store — .\delaide Street. Stonev.ikJ' — Fust East Custom 
House. Water Street Telephone, 364. P. O. Box 143. 











% 



B 

i 

h 



For Preseni Enjoyment 

USE 



iw. 




M 



t^^.li;^ 



Packed in I-lb. Tins 

At all Leading Grocers. 



m 

I 


■■■i2 
f -3 



HI 

tsBB i^an uma b 

. . Contractor, Builder, 
and Appraiser* -J* 

Dealer in Cement Selenite, Plaster, Sand, Monar. Brick. Drain Pipes, 
Bends, Junctions and Traps; Chimney Tops, all sizes, Plate Glass and 

Crushed Stone for Concrete. 

Estimates Given for all kinds 
of Work at Shortest Notice. 

I^.Manuf.iciurers and Real Evate Owners contemplating 
any addition to their present holdings, or the erection of new 
structures, will find it advantageous to get our estimates and 
■.erms. 





V] 

\ 1 



Carriaoe & SIciQli Builder 
^. -w>-^, ^. IndertaKer, etc. 

Ki^-^^^!^ Agent for 

Carriage Stock, Rubber Tyres, etc. 

Wheels Re-Rubbered 

at shortest notice and reasonable p-ices. 
We al'.vays h.i\e on h.ind a large stock 
of Polished and Cloth-Covered 

Caskets and Coffins. 

Personal atlcnlion given :.> all Undertaking 
Orders— Night or Day. Phone 737. 
West End Carriage Factory, - - 32 Bambrick Street. 



^w^ldi^r^-dTiSIS^^Tidi^^ Newfoundland Quarterly.'' 

, i,i!t | .l|i. I _ ^ . . J"" """ ' 



u^> 



>H 



>a-_Z_ 

J^1£_NEWF0UNDLAND QUARTERLY,—. 



V. 



«■! iitttej -— '-•■■■'r-^i ■. 



Nevyfounaiana Gov't. Coastal Mail Service. 

S.S. "PORTIA," WESTERN ROUTE. S.S. "PROSPERO," NORTHERN ROUTE, 

Calls at the following places:— Cape Brovle, Ferry- 
land, Fermeiise. Renews. Trepassey, St. Mary's, 
Salmonier, Placentia, Marystown. Burin, St. Law- 
rence, Lamaline, Furtune, Grand Bank, Belleoram, 
St. Jacques, Harbor Breton, Pass Island, Her- 
mitage, Gaultois, Pushthrough, Francois,' Cape 
LaHune, Ramea, Burgeo, Rose Blanche, Chan- 
nel, Bay of Islands, Codroy, Aquathuna, Bonne 
Bay. 



Call at the following places :—Bav-dc- Verde. Old 
Perlican, Trinity, Catalina, Bonavista, Salvage, 
King's Cove, (".reenspond. Pool's Island, Wesley- 
ville, Seldom-Come- Bv, Fogo, Change Island's, 
Herring Neck, Twillingate, Moreton's Harbor, 
Exploits, Fortune Harbor, Leading Tickles, 
Piliey's Island, Little Bay Island, Little Bav! 
Nipper's Harbor, Tilt Cove, LaScie, Pacque't, 
Baie V'erte, Coachman's Cove, Seal Cove. Bear 
Cove, West Port, Jackson's Arm, Englee 
Conche, St. J alien, St. Anthonj-, Griguet, Quirpopi. 



GUARDIAN 

ASSURANCE CO.. LTD.. 
Of London, England. 

The Guardian has the largest paid-up capital of any 
Company in the world transacting a Fire business. 

Sul scribed Capital $10,000,000.00 

Paid-up Capital 5,000,000.00 

iDvejted Funds exceed 25,000,000.00 

T. & M. WINTER, 

Agents for J\eufounalana. 



I r r/.i ( ., ■rriil cower 



149 
Street. 



lone 1C08. 



INSURE YOUR PROPERTY ^/t/ITH 

Globe & Rutger's Fire Insurance Co'y, 

OF NEW YORK, 

.\M 

United British Insurance Co'y, Ltd., 

or LONDON 

R. A. SQUIRES, Agent, 

Bank of Nova Scotia Building. 

Piflocon ^ Mnr^, 

Carpenters and Byiidcrs. 

Estimates on all kinds of V/ork. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

Ofiice: Basemen) h. ol C. Building, DucKwcrfh SI. 

J, MIKJHON. :« I'rcscott Street, \V M L Kl'HS, 30 Temperance St, 



Dealer in 



^^A'i'^-H ^^^^y Mutton, Lamb, 
fc%-.iffc^'A--"-j| Veal, Pork and 
^^M^^r:^^^ Poultry. 

tsS^All Orders Called For and Delivered Free. 

Puddings and Sausages, 

Corned Beef, Vegetables 
and Fish a specialty- 



PFC With Style and 

i i L O Individuality . 

There is something to our custom garments nhich makes 
them look as if tliey belonged to the wearer. Not only the 
well selected materials, but also the Artistic Cut and the Tho- 
rough Construction, make our suits stand out above all oiheis 

for lit. tir.'.sh and quality, 

CHAPLIN, The Store that Pleases. 

FirP Insurance 'l^ect.t.uhold, reliable .md 
■'-■'-'■'-' i.liO\~H. a-l.l\^^* prompt-paying company. 

Che ^orlcsDire 

Insurance Companu, itd. 

I.os^e,■; liy V.iii, I.i.c;htning and Forest Kites not excepted. A^k (or rai»- 
liefoie insuring elsewhere. .Ml information gladly given. 
JdMCS J. McGRATH, H.irri.-ter, Solicitor & Notary rulilic. .-Kgent. 
Ofiice: 263 Duckworth Street. I'hone Ol. 



When writing to .Aciverti.sers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



' "'■ lWi>j||WM,t,. i _w», i i< ! BMBiwi i <i>gT »fii ^r -.-T .' r . i ^ 



1ii>l ■ -aiW'MiifaiHilt, , , ..:w.,vw....... .,i.ff:-^il^ 



-^■■i^'-''-^----'----'-^-'^^--- ■r,iMi,i--> ■ :.^..aaaaBMi^ 



! I 



'< 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 4. 



PHONE 603. 



P. O. BOX 1265. 



GECDSGE DAVEY ^ Co,, 

Contractors, Builders 
and Appraisers, 

Office : Bond Street, St. John's. 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES: Cement, Lumber, Sand, 

Lime, Roofing Materials, Oak and Maple Flooring, 

always in Stock at Market Prices. 

We are prepared to Supply any quantity of these materials, 
and to furnish estimates on any class of work. 

Agents for Gyproc \A/all-board, 

Innperial Flooring, 

and Metal Ceilings. 






' h^pr-^'^'^\ 








Detnin^toii 

/V> UMC 

Shotgun Cartridges ^ 
are really "Wetproof " 

ArriY THE TEST: Take afewof the..tprc»j^a KE^U^T^ 

tl^m i tater f^ one hour, iu.p.t the Rcn.ington OIC cartridges for 
t^ d..terioratiun and then hreall -t/J-"- ^P" ^ 

tire other makes in a similar manner and hre them - it 
ymi^an. If the one hour soaking test does not convince 
vou, double the time. 

Ron,ing.on .Ws Company, Inc., 2o Broad^va^Wi°2, 




_-._- .— ^ ^."^'T~jr ^.^rnfinn "The Newfoundland Quaiterly. 

Wh^n writing to Advertisers kindly ment.on 



f 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— y 



L 



jiiSaiiium 



iEORGE 



SAVS: 



Before deciding on your 



Spring Readymade 



See those I am offering at 



One Price Only, 
$35.00. 

They have the style, backed up by qualitv 
such as are only sold by me, 
and remember the price, 

$35.00. 

All Sizes— 34 to 42. 

Yours for quality and service. 




FIRE! 



The 



FIRE! 



North British and Mercantile 
Insurance Co., Ltd. 

[Established 1S09.] 
Head Offices Edinburgh & London. 

Available runds"- £30,000,000 

Insurance on any description of property at lowest 
current rates. 



Prompt Settlements. 



Liberal Adjustments. 



GEORGE SHEA, 

General AgenI lor Newloundland. 




St. John's Municipal Council. 
•IPUBLIC NOTICE. 



POLL TAX. 



The attention of the public is called to the 
following Sections of the St. John's Municipal Act, 
1921 : — 

SECTION 249: Every male person of the 
age of twenty-one years or upwards who has resided 
in the city for the period of twehe months imme- 
diately preceding the first day of October in any 
year and who is not liable as owner or indirectly as 
tenant to -the pa\ment of the City Tax on any pro- 
perty rated in the appraisment book of the Council 
at an annual rental value of forty dollars or upwards 
shall pay to the Citv a Poll Tax of five dollars per 
annum. 

SECTION 250: The said poll tax shall be 
due and payable without demand or notice by or from 
the Council between the fifteenth day of October 
and the fifteenth day of November in every year at 
the office of the City Clerk. 

SECTION 251: Any person who fails to 
coniply with the provisions of the foregoing section 
shall in addition to payment of the tax be liable to 
a penalty not exceeding live dollars, or in default of 
payment to imprisonment not exceeding ten days. 

All persons liable are hereby notified to govern 
themsel\-es accordingly. 

By order. 

J. J. MAHOIMY, 

City Clerk. 

City Hall, Februar\- 14, 1924. 



W. & G. RENDELL, 

Water Str eet, St. John's. 

Impor;ers and I>ealers :ri 

Hardware of all descriptions, 
Paints, Oils, Cement 

and Roofing Materials. 

A large supply of above goods always m stock. 
—SOLE AGENT.S FOR— 

Brantford Roofing Co., Ltd. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly men 



tion "The Newfoundland Quirterly." 



^i,,.., ,^.^^,v.-^,._ ..^1^ ■--mr ii ia i h- in ftfri i i iittiuj^ 



iiiiiiMrt^ffri iifiifiiiiiifT -i^. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-6. 



f^^rm lmv>}^menis 



<^5^?^?^- 



Vv^ 









»•% 







Lookoveryour Gardening Tools 
You'll soon be needing them! 

Spading Forks, 
Manure Forks, 
Pointed Shovels, 
Garden Rakes, 
Weeding Hoes, 

Planting Trowels, 
and Mattocks. 

And the floresl must have 

Weeding Hooks, 

Spading Forks, 

Digging TroNvels. 



Less ^oTi 
—mora tqS 

BOWRmG BROTHERS, LTD., 

Hardware Department. 



J* THE 



My Own Tooil Proilucts 

are known tlirougliont Newfoundland for 
their high standard of C'ualitv. 

My Own Evaporated Milk 
My Own Pork & Beans 
My Ovk/n Catsup 
My Ov>/n Assorted Soups 
My Own Tomato Soup 
My Own Vegetable Soup 
My Own Clam Chowder 
My Ovyn Chicken Soup 
My Ov^n Chili Sauce 
My Ov^n Salad Dressing 
My Own Mustard Dressing 
My Ovyn Peas 
My Ov^n Corn 
are some of the -delicious articles put up by the 
MY OWN CO., which are on sale at leadin.^' (irocers 
I if St. [dhn's and throu;^diout Newfoundland. 

J. B. ORR CO.; LTD., 

AGENTS. 




Style, Wear and Value 

are the main standards b)- which good clothes are 
judged. 

Careful Designing and 
Superior Workmanship 

enable us to produce Correct Styles and Good Tailorinj. 
This is an assurance that the siiape will be retained 
throughout the life of the garment. 

Choose your material from our large assortment 
of Tweeds and Serges, or bring us your own goods, 
and we will prove to YOU, as we have to others, 
that we are turning out 

The BEST there is 
IN TAILORING. 

Newfoundland Clothing Co'y, Limited, 

231, 233, 235 Duckworth Street. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



-0 1. 



^lUiE^XfOUNDLAND^UARTERLY-; 

SUBSCRIPTIONS .« 



To Foreign Periodicals. 

If you ui>h to Subb-cribe to any Ma-a/ine 
Neuspaper. or Fashion Journal, .i.ethe; 
tngh.h, American or Canadian, ask us to 
take care of your Subscription. If the 
special paper that you require is not amon- 
the regulars xvhich ue are receiving \ve 
can easily procure it for vou at shortest 
Notice. 

\Ve «ill gladly quote prices for a Yearly Subscription 
lo any Periodical now being published. 

PROMPT DELIVERIES 

GARRETT BYRNE, 

Bookseller and Stationer. 



.c-^. 



..-. If '^ 




Weiglits and Measures 

The following sections of the Act 
Respecting Weights and Measures are 
published for general information : — 

"Any persons who shall use a beam, scale, weight or mea- 
sure, in the sale or e.xchange of any commodity, not assayed and 
stamped, or who shall alter the same after being so assayed and 
stamped, or who shall use steel-yards, e.xcept for the purpo'-e of 
weighing hay or stray, or who shall use a beam made of wood, 
shall forfeit a sum not e.xceeding twenty dollars," 

■ "Salt may be sold by measure, or by weight, if sold by mea- 
sure, there shall be eighteen gallons to a tub (liquid measurement) 
and three tubs to a hogshead. .\ny person who shall sell or 
dispose of salt by measure otherwise than .iccording to the stan- 
dard hereby established shall forfeit a sum not exceeding 
twenty dollars." 

"The Chief Inspector, and Inspectors shall, when required, 
inspect and adjust all beams, scales weights and measures, 
brought to the office of either of them according to the said 
standard, and they shall stamp or mark thereon the initials of 
the reigning Sovereigns. <>nd their o>vn proper initials." 

M. J. O'MARA, 



Chief Inspector. 



Chief Inspector's r)tifice, Stott Building, 
Marshall's Cove. February, nj::^- 



.^^^0^. 




Yo 



WE believe in the 
fitness of things, 



4.r 

^^^ Especially Clothes. 

can't get Style, Comfort, Qualitv off the shelf. 
\V e make and fit you with the Best. 
It takes experience and the best of workmanship 
to produce correct Clothes. 

Made for You, .^ Thats the idea, 

' that's where comfort, qualitv and good service 
begin and end — -By Us. 

P.O.Bo.«5. W. P. SHORTALL, F.o.e 4^7. 

The American Tailor, 

300 Water Street, .< St. John's, Nfid. 



/. B. RYAN, 

Importer and Distrihutor of 



Southdown, Hard a Port, 

Perfection, 

Cornucopia, Sailor's Hope, 

Virginia Tobaccos. 

ozo Duckworth Street, St. Johns. 

Use MARIlLAf^P BOND Paper 

for your Typewriter Paper, for your Letter Heads 
and hicfh i;r.-\de Printed Commercial Fornis. 

MARKLAND BOND Pajjer carries with it a prestige. 
A good impression is created b\- the letter written 
on a sheet of Markland Bond. 

Ask yoin- dealer for Makki.anh Bond Tvpeuriier 
Paper, and insist that your Printer uses Markland 
Bond on your next kit of printed stationery. 

R. H. DAVIS & CO., LTD., 

Yarmouth, 542 George Street, 

Nova Scotia. Sydney, Nova Scotia. 

See that this trade mark is on every label. 
Every sheet of Markland Bond is watermarked 

Markland 
Bond 



When writing to .Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Qnarterly." 



.■ ii iii nn j wum i .i ' j'iui. i t i ii ■ ' •mv 



Ta - i n<,^^ i y>y. 



^^j^ 



"*■""■' • 'i''^'«^"J*!'=ii-'--''" ' ^-'-^'^'^i ijjftfc'iiiifeijiiijiijj 



-^.. .^.ijjiat^ ■^- . fg..|^- 



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1 , 



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, f 



JTHEJ^EVVFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-S. 



CLEANLINESS AND CIVILITY GUARANTEED AND 

PROMPT ATTENTION TO ALL ORDERS 

ENTRUSTED TO OUR CARE 



p. O, B<« ',;;:;. 



I'hones 48 3 & 7S6. 



Ellis & Co., Limited, 

203 Water Street. 

Purveyors ot High-Class 

Groceries, IMeats, Poultry, 

and Delicatessen Market. 

All meats are personally selected. 
We Guarantee to Stock the Choicest Meat 

Procurable in the Dominion. 
Our Sausages are a Specialty, 

Pork, Beef or Tomato. 



Dale & Company, Limited, 

MARINE — FIRE — ACCIDENT 

INSURANCE UN DERNA/R ITERS. 

Head Office: MONTREAL. 

BRANCH OFFICES: 

Halifax, Winnipeg, 

Toronto, 
Quebec, Vancouver. 

Bank of Nova Scotia Buildino, 

St. John's, Newfoundland. 



A Welcome 
Necessity. 







GIVES A QUICK 
ABUNDANT LATHER 



There is a reason for the popularity of 
" Crescent " and that reason is to be found in 
its all-round usefulness. For all Laundry 
and Household cleaning purposes it is no 
exaggeration to say that " Crescent " is with- 
out a rival. 

Supreme in Quality and Purity. 

JOSEPH CROSFIELD & SONS, LTD., SOAPMAKERS, 
WARRINGTON, ENGLAND. 

MEEHAN & COMPANY, Agents. 



The Great P/3aII ©rder ^loMse. 



^¥^Sf^^i4*¥**-** 



BIG Sll 



The Latest Spring Merchandise, from the World's Fashion Centres. 

^'^"'*' Ladies' Millinery, Dresses, Costumes and Sports' Wear. 

Men's and Boys' Readymade Clothing. 
Dress Goods, Wash Fabrics, Draperies, Hosiery. 



SOUVENIRS 

LOCAL VIEW 

POST CARDS 

BOOKLETS, 

and 

SEALSKIN GOODS. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 

.AgeiiLs for 

Law Union & Rock Insurance Co., Ltd. 
London & Lancashire 




ST. JOHN'S NEV/FOUNDLAND. 



'when writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



- iljlpM.mS.1?!?!^!" ■ 



' wyjiMii^wi^.^w^J^V^UtfflB'i''- ' -'^- ' "^'l-^.- •-- 




•(• 



7 



\ 



Hiiiliiiii. 




13^ 



Vol. XXIII.— No. 4. 



APRIL, 4«8t- 



80 cents per year. 



The Shamrock, ^gt 



By Rev. M. J. Ryan, D.D., Ph.D. 




Ijj yya frrrrvr ii he Shamrock has been the national and religious 
.Vi^"T1"'^> emblem of the Irish lor fifteen centuries. Ancient 
tradition connects it with St. Patrick and tells 
that he used it to illustrate the idea of the Trinity 
of Persons in the one God. Some writers even 
suggest that St. Patrick's use of it and the value 
of the illustration to his hearers indicate that it was already no 
ordinary plant of the field but distinguished and held in honor 
by the people whom he was addressing as an emblem or badge. 
Nfoore seems to have held this opinion, judging by his l.iriguage 
in the poem — 

Chosen leaf 

Of Uard and Chief. 

Certainly if it was then a badge or emblem of <;ome'hing or 
some one that was honored, thr; argument would have a special 
ettectivencss with his audience. But if this was so, the Trefoil 
acquired from that day a special honor and importance, and 
when it was proscribed in the oppression of both nationality and 
religion, then it became peculiarly dear and venerable to the 
faithful Irish heart. 

No narrative of this net of St. Patrick is found in the old 
Lives of the S-iint. The earliest written reference to ihe story 




ment tiles of the twelfth to the fourteenth century, rescued from 
various ruined churches, have exquisite designs of the Sham- 
rook. Dr. \V. Fraser in the Journal of the Royal Society of 
Antiquaries of Ireland reproduced photographs of twelve of 
these designs, and wrote: "Their popularity for decorative 
purposes must be attributed to the universal belief of the 
association of the trifolia'e leaf with alleged teachings of St. 
Patrick, from which oiiiinattd the general acceptance of it as a 
special symbol of Ireland and Iri-hmen." 

The Shamrock mas also employed as a symbol on the coins 
of the realm. Soon after the Norman Inva.sion of Ireland. John 
de Courcy at Downpatrick in iiSi had farthings struck called 
" Patricks," and the Waterford pennies and half-pennies of 1350 
have a Shamrock on the obverse side. The Irish half-farthings 
of Henry VI. in r46o are known as "Patricks," from the word 
'■ Patrick" on the obverse, while the farthings bear the image of 
a bishop mitred. The Irish groats of Edward IV. in 1470-7J 
have the Shamrock at six p- ints, while the groat of Richard 
III. bears what is described as "a cross Shamrock within a 
tressure of four single aubes" (and by the way Richard in 14S4 
surmounted his crest as " Lord of Ireland" with a harp). The 
first Irish coinage of Henry VIII. is distinguished by the two 



^v. 



m 



THE TIIRFE r.EAFEI) SHA.MROCK. 

is in a M.S. work never published, on the Irish plants and 
dowers written about 1640 by an Irish Dissenting Minister. 
Uev. Richard Heaton. Hence some modern Lives of the Saint 
do not mention it ; and Joyce even argues that it must be an 
invention ol recent times. But this is giving the argument fr'-m 
silence a value which experience sho.vs that it does not possess. 
In fact the silence is not .so deep. The Sh.imrock is found as 
one of the outstanding ornaments in the decoration of the 
• Book of K.ells-— a manuscript which may be safely ascribed 
to the seventh centurv. Miss Margaret Stokes in her book on 
" Early Christian Art in Ireland" says that " the Trefoil .seems 
the only vegat.ible form in the designs." In the Antiphonary 
of St. G.ill, which was written by Irish monks about the year 
870, the prominent feature in the ornamental first letter of the 
Easter Sequence (beginning L'.udes S lUatori voce modiilemur 
suppliri) is the Shamrock with interlaced ornament. And it 
should be noted that the Trtfoil is made prominent in a 
Sequence for Easter, and it was the eve of this feast that St. 
Patrick is said to ha^'e preached the sermon in which he spoke 
of the Shamrock. In various ancient Baptismal Punts he 
Shamrock is very outstanding. Stone crosses, dating from the 
ninth to the twelfth century are adorned with it : beautiful pa^e- 



THE H.^RP. 

national emblems, the Harp as the Arms of Ireland, and the 
Shamrock Elizabeth's third coinage in i59Shad the Shamrock 
and a crowned Harp. The Confederation of Kilkenny in 1642 
issued coins bearing the figiJhe of St. Patrick with crozier in the 
left hand, and the Shamrock in the right stretched over a multi- 
tude. The copper coins issued in 1690 by the Duke of Tyrcon- 
nell displayed' the figure of Eiin, throned, holding out the 
Shamrock. 

It was an Irish custom to wear a cross of green on St. 
Prtrick's Day It is said that the earliest written record of this 
practice is in a book now r,,re-I"he Present State of Ireland, 
I ondon 1673 The journal of one Thomas Dimly 16S1 which 
was published in the" lournal of the Kilkenny Archaeological 
Societv in 1856, says: " The .7lh day of March yearly is 5t. 
Patrick's an immoveable feast, when the Irish of all stations 
and conditions wear crosses in their hats, some of pms. some 
of green ribbons." This writer says: "The vulgar stipersii- 
tioifslv wear Shamrogues. 3-leaved grass, which they likewise 
eat (they say) to cause a sweet breath." Swift writes from 
London to Stella on the .7th of March, 17. ^-.3, (the year at 
that time began in England on the 25th of March):- fhe 
Mall was so full of crosses that I thought all the world was Irish. 



f?r«" 



»wi>»'-. ' '' - " jUKtu-i : 



iw laiftiiiki 



te.- , -.„- xi^..^^..a,:^SL^.^ , .,■ ■ .^^-' ']gi^ 



~lilfif~'"i'flii it" - 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.- lo 



; *' 



He does not mention bh.mrocks, Mr. Nathaniel Col^an a 
Oublm bocamst who d>ed a tew years aac in an essav on "he 
bhamrock ,n the Journal of the Royal Society of .-Vntiquarie! 
of Ireland ,896. says: " The crois is still worn bv the children 
m the Dubhn Liberties, where tt takes the form of a pape bot" 
or rosetts. pinned on the breast, and bearing on its surface a 
conspicuous cross made of green paper ; but the custom is fist 
dying out. 

This seems a pity, i< it not? 

Mr. W. H. Grattan Flood has po.nted out, what is generallv 
unknown, that in the .-ighteenth century St. Patrick's Dav was 
observed as a •■ Collar Day" at the British Court. He has found 
that the o*c.al report of r7,6 and that of .720 informed the 
public that. •■ being the Feast of St. Pat?ick. -utelary Saint of 
Ireland, their Majesties with the Prince of Wales and the 
Princesses wore crosses in honor of that nation." He has also 
discovered that the London correspondent of ■■ Pue's Occur^ 
rences' * of March 24-S. 1752, svrites: -St. Patrick's U.iv was 
observed as a Collar Day at Court. Tne natives of Ireland 
adorned their hats with Shamroge, which is composed of a sort 
of grass called Trefoil, which allusion is taken from St. Patrick's 
tirst proprogating Christ there and establishing the doctrine of 
the Trinity." It would be interesting to know when and wliv 
this court custom died out. 



Irish 4fl .England. There is abundant evidence for this. For 
example. James Ebenezer Bicheno, in a paper read before the 
Linnean Society (of which he was then secretary^ and published 
in Ihe Journal of the Royal Institution of Great Britain (in 
1S3 1) "On the Plant intended by the Shamrock of Ireland" 
sa\s: " The feast of St. Patrick has been so long rrcognized by 
thoie who traverse the streets of this great citv r Lo-^on ) by 
the clover they see in the hats of the Irish, that any one who 
should entertain an Opinion that this pLint is net the original 
emblem of Ireland will be thought to have no ground for differ- 
ing from the established btlief; yet I think I ara m a situation 
to prove from abundant testimony that the Tr,/.>lium repens 
Running Trefoil or White Clover)' is not the Shamrock of the 
Irish Nation, nor any other clover." Mr. James Britten of the 
Catholic Truth Society, who is a very competent botanist, tells 
an amusing story about himself which confirins this evidence as 
to the former use of the white Shamrock :— •■ .About 1875 I had 
a lad's club at Isleworth : all the members Here Iristi. With 
them many of the_ happiest years of my life were passed, and 
from them and their parents I gained an affection for, and an 
understanding of the Iri.sh and their country which will never 
leave me. St. Patrick's Day was approaching, and I was 
anxious that the biys should have Shamrocks — rot knowing in 
thbse early days that the post would be laden with packets 



.- — * -it1inl)Ht»lli- 



-^ 



.: > — ^wSF' 'r«»m«ri>ii»iirffi'irirTf.''~"-^-' " 




VATURKS nEAl'TV SPOT — CLARKE S r!E.\CH, CONXEPTION HAY. 
\Ph,-t,< liy C. K. ll^i//iams] 



It will seem probably .ts strange to most of our readers as it 
was to me to find that there is any doubt or difference of opinion 
in Ireland itself as to the particular Trefoil which is the Sham- 
rock. Vet a leaflet circulated by the Sisters of Charity of 
Ballaghadareen, Co. .Mayo, (which was reprinted in the Catholic 
Heralil o\ London, Kngland, March 6, 1919) contains a des- 
cription of "two great varieties of genuine Shamrock, both 
loved, worn, and held in veneration by the Irish people accord- 
ing to the oldest traditions of the country." The first, the 
" Running 'I'refoiT' Ti ifoHiivi r,p^ii> or White Clover, is associ- 
ated with the fact that St. Patrick spent seven years of his life 
in Connacht, and "as the most sacred traditions of the land in 
the penal days were confided to Connacht for safe-keeping, there 
can be no mistake about the genuiness of their Shamrock." 
'The other, "the Spray or Yellow 'Trefoil" is Tnf,ilium miiini, 
which the people in the south of Ireland ■' hold in great venera- 
tion and wear as their sacred symbol. ... -As St. Patrick 
spent many years of his life in .Munster and gave a special bles- 
sing to everything in it. the people there are making no mistake 
about the purity of their Shamrock, which is also hallowed by 
old tradition. 'Both the varietie.s are real genuine Shamrock," 
say the Sisters, with an impartiality which we may well imitate. 
The white Shamrock at one time was generally worn by the 

•This was the first daily newspaper piililislied in Irtland. It was founded 
in 1700. and it lived foi nearly sixty years. 



carrying the 'chosen leaf all over the world, and taat Is'eworth 
Aould have its share. 'The feast came on Sundav that year, 
and I spent the Saturday afternoon in Kew Gardeis. collecting 
(with the fear of the gardeners before me) speci-nens of the 
common White Clover, which I in common with :iiost of my 
countrymen had always considered to be the true Shamrock. 
I took them down in triumph the next morning: but ray satis- 
faction was short-lived. .Most of the lads were already provided 
with the genuine article, and those who were not. rcpjdiated my 
offering with contumely— they did not knoiv me wel' then, and I 
suspect they thought I was tampering with their :a:th. From 
that date to this, every year there has reached me from an Irish 
convent a bo.x of Irish Shamrock. 'The origiial sender has 
gone to her rest, but the kind .ict is continued — and every jear 
it is Trif\i/iiim minus that arrives." 

It is certain, however, that the White Trefoil was U'^ed not 
only in Connnught and in Kngland. but in the Eas: of Ireland 
too. -Mr. Britten cites Anglo-Irish writers of the isth century. 
Thus Caleb Thrckeld. a competent botanist, in his Synopsis 
Slirpi:im Hiberniae. Dublin, 1727, writes of the White Clover : 
■■'This plant is worn by the people in their hats upon the 17th 
day of March yearly." .And several other authoriries are quoted. 
.Mr. Britten says: ■■ Whatever claims other plants mi\ have had 
in the past with the people who have most right to decide, there 
can be no doubt as to what holds the field at the present day. 



. . » w wuiW.W- *i MWW ! ' 



^^^(t3^-' 



.OIL 



linWii 



min'imiUr'*m 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 1 1. 



This IS the small, yellow Trefoil known to botanists as TrifoHum 
minus. Some ye.us ago, when engaged wiih the late Robert 
Holland in compilinu a Dictionary of I'.n^lish plant Names I 
obtained spcLimens from several Irish coimiics, and examined 
the Shamrocks sold in Covent Garden and elsewhere, and in 
every case the plant was identical. This is the plant invariably 
used by the Dublin and Belfast manufacturers of St. Patrick's 
Day and Christmas cards on which sprays of the real Shamrock 
are mounted : it is also the plant grown in the Botanical Garden 
of Trinity ColUge, Dublin, to meet the demands of Kngiish 
enquirers for the real Shamrock. A writer in the Westminster 
GiiZftle says that the Countess of Limerick who has for many 
years furnished the annual supply of Shamrock for the Irish 
Guards (presented to them by the tjueem is probably the 
largest amateur cultivator of the Clover emblem (this is the 
7: minus') in Ireland. The st.ills in Cuvent Garden label ihcir 
Shamrock as from belard. and it is quire likcl) that it is "rown 
there for importation" (into F.ngUnd). 

" My essay in The Dictionary of English Plant Xames," says 
Mr. Britten, " was fortunate in that it attracted Mr. Cnlgan lo 
the subject. In his tirst paper on the subj-ct in The Irish 
Naturalist for 1S93 he gives me 'the credit uf having been the 



,.<^ 



'■ -' ^, .V ?:- - • ,-■.■:■-'■;•■'-''""« 



QUIDI VIDl — NEAR ST. JOH.N S. 

first to discern a^d boldly advocate the strong claims of the 
Trifolium minus: The knowledge came to me in ihe first 
instance in a curious way." .•\nd then he tells the anecrlole of 
hisclu«of Irish bo\s. Bichenp, mentioned above, sterns to have 
been the fir.st to put forward the claim for the VVo»ri-s irrel or 
Oxalis Acetosetla. This is a delicate. nis;ht-fo!ding plant whose 
snowy flowers are at times dashed over «Ith a sm ill .show of 
bluish. In different Eiglish counties it is cilled by a variety 
of names— sheep-sorrel, bread-and cheese, lariies' cakes, cuckoo- 
spice, hailekijih. No doubt the -emerald (Jreen" of which 
Moore speaks might be more httmgly applied to the leaves of 
this plant than to any trefoil. Hut every other argument that 
Bicheno uses is fallacious and mere a.ssumption. 

The Shamrock used at one time to be eaten as a .salad. 
Henrv Mundv (16S0 an advocate of vegetarian diet, says: 
'•The Irish that nourish themselves with their Sh.imrock. which 
is the purole clover) are s.vift of foot and of nimble strength. 
Sir Henr; Piers, in a '• Chorographical De-c-iption of W"'" 
meath," published in 1682 says: •■ B.mer. cheese, curds, and 
Shamrocks are the ford of the meaner sor: for all this season. 
Sir James Ware. De Ilibernia. i6,U- mentions the nieaaow tre- 
foil, (Tnfolium pretense) or purple Clover as a .shamrock. 

Mr. Britten say. : ■■ It is a popular Irish belief that the Shanv 
rock does not lli.wer. This is intelligible enough; no trefoil 



blossoms as early as March, when the Shamrock is most in 
request. I remember once in' Ireland asking a man whether 
the plant which I showed him was a Shamrock, and he at once 
disqualified it on the ground of its having flowers. .Mr. Colgan 
records a similar e.\perience in the Aran Islands when he 
inquired for the Shamrock: — • Several of the islanders, search- 
ing for the plant in my presence, passed over the Trifolium rt- 
/f/rj (Runninij Trefoil) as too coarse; and though apparently 
inclined to fix on Trifolium minus, seemed so staggered by the 
appearance of its liowers that ihcy gave up the search in the 
belief that it was too late for the Shimrock." 

'• The Trifitlium minus." says Mr. Britten, " is a plant com- 
monly distributed throughout Britain as well as Ireland, and in 
Europe gcncrallv. bi saying that the plant is widelv distributed 
I know that I am running counter to a treasured Irish belief — 
namely that the plant is peculiar to Ireland, and will not grow- 
out of that country, and that the only chance (if preserving its 
life is to bring some of its own soil with it. and that even then, 
when that soil is exhausted, the plant will die." 

The custom, now obsolete, of " wetting the Shamrock" is said 
to be first mentioned in 1630 in a poem of John Taylor, the Si»- 
called •■ Water-poet" — a poem entitled Sir (Jregory .Vonsence, 
from which we might infer that the phrase originally was a 
literal one — 

While all the Hibernian Kernes in the Maititudes 
Did feast .vilh bhamroges sleeved (steeped =) in Usquebagh. 
Mr. Britten gives us a personal anecdote about the custom of 
wtltin^ the mttaphorical Shamrock. "Cardinal Manning 
granted an indulgence ot lorty nays to those who abstained from 
dill k on St. Patrick's Kve and on his feast and on the day 
alter the feast. K Proiotant neighbour said to me as we walked 
to the station together. 'I always have had a great admiration 
for Cardinal Manning, but I cant understand this business about 
St. Patrick's day.' 'What do you mean?' 'Well, what is the 
good ot people abstaining for three days if they may indulge 
tcr forty days alter?" 

It may be a question whether the humor of this was uncon- 
.scious (misunderstanding the meaning of " Indulgence") or 
whether.it was an intentional pun. 

The custom of wetting the Shamrock metaphorically has 
grown obsolete in proportion as the Irish people with widening 
opportunities have grown more cjiisc'ous of their great Provi- 
dential mission. But the wearn g of the Shamiock shows no 
signs of growing obsolete. The p.ssion of nationalism which 
in so many other countiies has caiKed schism and heresies has 
never yet! thank God. set itself in Ireland in opposition to 
Catholic unity in the truth. .•\nd now on St. Patrick's Day it 
can do us no harm to repeat once more" fhe Irish Peasant to 
his Mistress." who is the Catholic and Roman Church : — 
Throuuh grief and tliroush danger thy smile halh cheered my way. 
Till hope seemed to bud from each thorn that round me lay : 
The darker our fortuae. the brighter our pure love bvuned. 
Till shame into glory, till fear into zeal was turned ; 
Ve.s. slave as I »as, in thy arms my spirit felt free 
And blessed even the sorrows that made me more dear to thee. 
Thy rival .vas hoi'ored. but thou wtrt wronged and scorned: 
The crown was of briars, while gold her brows adorned : 
She wooed me to temples, while thou layst hid in caves: 
Her friend> were all masters, while thine alas! were slaves. 
^■et cold in the earth at thy feet 1 would rather be 
Than wed what 1 loved not or turn one thought from thee. 
They slander thee .-iorely who say thy vows are frail ; 
Iladst thou lieen a fal-e one. thy cheek had looked less pale: 
They s.ay, too, so long hast thou worn those lingering chains 
That deep in thy heart they have printed their servile s;:uns : 
Oh : foul is the slander : no chain could that soul subdue : 
Where shiuelh thy spirit, there ^hineth liberty, if" " 



4 






• 'Tij «»i i.^mui- jjuynu H .ojiMmiW'. 'Mn 



r 



frm«liiri[i>Ti.r-.K.t-- . ■-■j,ii|„-f- 



ii-1 



THE NEWFOUNDLANO QUARTERLY.-13. 

The Late Baron Shaughnessy, K.C.V.O. 



^.-^ORD M.xLv.HNEssVs Comparatively sudden demh 
,rr wh.ch emied a tomant>c. brilliant and highlv sue! 

,^]l^ ;"" "''''• ""'^ ^"^ ^ great shock to his col 
l^l.^Ys '"=■'!'",'" 'he C.P.R. directorate, to the thou- 

_^s4j ''^''°=*°"^'e':0'"Pa"y'somcialsandemploves and 

lit.l. 1 - a'° <-^"?d''i" People as a whole, and in but a 
imle lesser decree, to the many .n Great Britain, the Uni,ed 
Mates and other countries to «hom he was known personal v 

achielenl,"'" " ""'" "'" '""^ '""^'>- ''' ^'^ S^"^" 
Selected by, and trained under, the great and gifted Van 
Home, his progress, from the time he entered the C PR service 
in 18S-' was rapid and continuous, and in every position he 
occupied he displayed marked aHlity. When in ig.S desiring 
some rest and leisure, he resigned the Presidencv. he had 
undoubtedly become to be regarded as the greatest livin- rail- 
way administrator in the world. " 

\Vhcn he became President, in Tune, iS()r), the C P R 's 
mileage included in its trattic returns and other lines worked 
was 7,413.6, and the controlled lines, mileage was i,8',4 a total 
of 9,247.6. When he retired from the Presidencv,'in\)ctober 
1918. the mileage included in th- companvs traffic' returns, and 
other lines worked, was 13772 r, and the controlled lines' 
nnileage was 4.S53.6. a total ot iS.625.7, so that mileage o*ned, 
worked and controlled, more than doubled during his Presi- 
dency. The gro^s earnings for 1S9S. the year before he became 
President, were J26. 138.977. 13, and net e.irnings Sio.475.37 1.- 
62. The gross earnings for the year of his retirement from the 
Presidency, 191S. were S1.q7.537.69S0;. and the net e rnings 
$34,502,337.67. 

Born a L'nited States citizen, he became a great Canadian, 
assisted materially in the dcvelopm-nt of the cnu'ury, cui-cur- 
rently with the tremendo-.:s e.xpansion of the C.P.R's. railway 
and steamship systems, and proved of invaluable aid to the Em- 
pire during the Great War. 

While a strict disciplin.uian he was abolutely fair to those 
under him. quick to recognize merit, ard reward ir. and during 
his 41 years' with the C.P R. he had the unbounded confidence 
and loyalty of those uniler bim. 

His host of person.il friends will miss a great person jjitv, a 
man of strong feelings, and of a most kindly dispositi m. The 
present writer, who know him well over 40 years, will aUvays 
remember being a recipient from him of never failing courtesy, 
and of many personal kindnessrs. 

Lord Shaughnessy's illness was a very brief one. f)n Decem- 
ber 8 he went to his office in the Windsor station at Montreal, 
and while there remarked to an officer that he felt very well and 
intended going abroad for a few months. On Sunday Decem- 
ber 9, he attended high mass at St. I'atrick's Church, .Montreal. 
and in the afternoon was present at the dedication of the 
Knights of Columbus Montreal Council's new building on 
Mountain St., deli\ering an impromptu address. He was taken 
ill suddenly, while at dinner at his house, that evening. Dr. 
Gurd, for many vears his family physician, was called, and 
recognized at once that his condition was serious, he having a 
heart ailment and complications. Doctors C. F. .Martin and C. 
H. Keenan. were called in consultation, but little hope was 
entertained for his recovery, although he rallied for a time. 
During his brief illness, he retained his usual clarity of mind 
and purpose, recognizing all who spoke to him. E. \\. Beatty, 
K.C.. President. C.P.R. , had a final interview with him on 
December 10. .Vt 3.30 in the afternoon his spiritual adviser. 
Rev. Father McShane. of St. Patrick's Church, administered the 
last sacraments of the Roman Catholic Church, including the 
Holy \'iaticuni, during which I,ord Shaughnessv remained per- 
fectly conscious. Archbishop (lauthier, .Vpostolic Ad ninistrator 
of the diocese, visited him at 7. p.m. At 7.15 he became un- 
conscious, and died at about 7.30 p.m. there beinsf present, 
when the end came. I.ady Shaughnessy, their son, Lt.-Col, the 
Hon, \V, J, Shaughnessy'and Mrs. Shaughncssy. and their sons- 
in-law and daughters, H, W. and lion. Mrs. Beauclerk, Rene 



and Hon. Mrs. Redmond, and Hon. Marguerite Shaughnessy. 
also Father McShane and Doctors Gurd and .Martin. 

The funeral was held on December 13. and. despite hea\ v 
rain, was attended by a very large number of representatives of 
the Stale. t!ie churches. Ihe bench, the profes>ions, and of busi- 
ness, and by railway olticials and cmplovis of all classt-s, among 
those present being the Dominion Prime .Minister, Mr. King" 
the Minister of Justice, Sir Lo.-ner Gouin. and Senator 
Dandurand represeniing the Dominion Gjvernment; and by 
representatives of the Governor General and the Duke of Con- 
naught ; E. W. Beatty. President and a number of other C.P.R. 
directors, officers and officials. The Canadian -National Rv.s. 
were represented by Gerard Rucl. K..C.. Vice-President. Sir 
Henry Thornton, who was on an inspecticn trip on Grand Trunk 
Western Lines, being represented bv his Chief .-Vssistant. [). E. 
■Galloway. The body was taken from the house to St. Patrick's 
Church, the funeral arrangements being as simple as possible, 
in deference to Lord Shaughnessy 's expressed wish, and there 
were no honorary pall bearers. A high Mass of requiem was 
celebrated, after which Archbishop G.iu-.hier officiated at the 
solemn Libera. From the Church, the procession procetded to 
Cote ties -Veiges cemetery, where the burial took place. .At the 
time fi.xed for the funeral, 10 a,m., trains over the entire C.P.R. 
system, the company's steamships at sea, and all activities of 
the system, ceased for tl^o minutes. 

Thomas G. Shaughne^^sy was born at Milwaukee. Wis., 
October 6. 1853, and entered r.iilway service in July 1869, 
since when he had been, to January, 1879. '" Purchasing De- 
partment. Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Rd.: January, 1879, 
to ^October, 1882. General Storekeeper, same road ; October, 
1SS2, to January, 18S4, General Purchasing .Agent, C.P.R. 
.Montreal ; J.inuary. 1S84, to September. 1885, .Assistant to 
General Manager; September, 1885. to September 18S9, Assi- 
stant General .Manager; September 1S89. to June 24, 1891, 
Assistant President; June 24, r8gr to June 12, 1899. director 
and Vice-President : June 12, 1899. to October 15, 1918, Presi- 
dent. C.P.R,, and from May, 9, 1910, ako Chairman of the 
company. He was a delegate to the International Railway 
Congress in 1905. He was created Knijh: Bachelor in 1901. a 
Knijht Commander of the Royal Victorian Order in 1907, and 
Barron Shaughnessy. of Montreal, and .Ashford Limerick, Ire- 
land. January r. 19 16. He was a Knight o: Grace of the Order 
of St. John of Jerusalem, and a member of the Ord;r of the 
Sacred Treasury of Japan. He was an .aonorary D.C.L. of 
Trinity College. Dublin, a fello* of the Royal Colonial Institute, 
and an honorary member of the Engineering Institute of Canada. 
He was a member of the Mount Royal. St. James, Forest and 
Stream. Montreal Jockey, Montreal Winter, Royal Montreal 
Golf and Montreal Hunt Clubs, as well as other clubs in Ottawa, 
Toronto and Winnipeg. He was a direcror of the Bank of 
Montreal, Royal Trust Co. and Commercial Cable Co., a trustee 
of the Mackay Companies and a governor oi Montreal Univer- 
sity and of the Western Hospital, Montreal. His town Hou^e 
was at 905 Darchester St. West, Montreal, and he had a sum- 
mer house at Fort Tipperary, St. .Andrews-bythe-sea. Neiv 
Brunswick. He was a tirm believer in good real estate invest- 
ments and was interested in a number of co.Timercial properties 
in Montreal. 

In 18S0 he married Miss Elizabeth Bridget Nagle, Milwaukee, 
Wis., and they had a f.imily of two sons a-'d tnree daughters. 
One son. Capt. the Hon. .Alfred, went overseas with the 60th 
Battalion, during the Great U'ar, and was k: led in 19 16. The 
other son, Lt.Col. the Hon. W, J. Shauginessy. now Lord 
Shaughnessy, is a member of the legal firm of .Meredith, Holden, 
Hague, Shaughnessy and Heward. He was adjustant of the 
Irish-Canadian Rangers during the war for some time, before 
serving in several statT capacities. The daughters are as 
mentioned above. 

PERSONAL TRIBUTES. 

The King cabled Lady Shaughnessy :—" The Queen and I 
are grieved to hear of your bereavement, in which we ofifer you 



7 




THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— n. 



our sincere sympnhy. We shall always preserve the pleasantest 
memories of Lord Sliaiighnessy and'of his unfailing kindness 
and consideration botli to uurselves and to members of my 
family." 

E. W. Beatty, K.C., President, C.P.R.: " Lord .Shaughnessy's 
untimely death has removed from Canadian life its most out- 
standing lijjure. Public men have come and gone, and their 
respective merits as I think have been duly appreciated by the 
people of this country, but in no sin;;le instance, so far as my 
observation goes, has one man combined the achievement, the 
mentality, the force of character and the human qualities of 
generosity, charity and consideration for his fellow-men in the 
same degree as the late Chairm.m of C.P.R. .\l\vays he was a 
strict disciplinarian, but his discipline was impersonal, and his 
warm Irish disposition reflected itself in numerous acts of kmd- 
ness, which increased the loyalty he always inspired in those 
who were associ.ited with him. He possessed in a remarkable 
degree an acuteness of mental reasoning which few men enjoy. 
Nothing was overlooked by him, and no act that was meritorious 




RIGHT HOV. BARO-V SIIALT.H.N'ESSY. 

escaped his commendation. Thoroughly schooled as he was in 
the advantai;es of good reading, he became a great student of 
literature and a sagacious critic of public affairs. To those 
who knew him intimatelv his qualities of sympathy and chanty 
were perhips the most i;np^es,ive. He had'a unique career, 
filled with initiative, enterprise and durage. Having run the 
three-score years and ten he has departed with a record that 
few Canadians have ever mide, and all his accomplishments 
ani successes were clean. .Vever in his otRcial or his personal 
lif^ has a suggestion been made against the complete irtegnt) 
that characterized all his actions. In Lord Shaughnessy 
Canada loses ,ts most distinguished, most loyal and most ethcien 
citizen. Lord Shaughnessv's last words to me, were signihcan 
of sentiments which h,,d actuated him in his administration ot 
the compinv over a long period of years. They were: -Main- 
tain the property. It is a great Canadian property and a great 
Canadian enterprise.'" 

T). C Coleman, Vice-President. Western Lines. ^P^-;- 
■' Tne death of Lord Snaughnessy will come with the force of a 
personal bereavement to every C.P R. employe I hrougLout the 
world. During the ,9 years of his presidency, the <'P'<- de- 
veloped from a^trv,g^Ung pioneer railway to the '"-P";™ 
system it ,s to-day. .Masterful, he was exacting tn ^equr "merits, 
demanding from every man his very best in the -yay of serMce, 



refusing to suffer 'fools gladly," but generous in appreciation 
and reward, and always subject 10 the dictates of a warm Irish 
heart. Those who served under him will always consider that 
their lives were enriched by the inspiration of his leadership. It 
is doubtful, if many, outside of those associated with him in busi- 
ness quite appreciated nis devotion to the land of his adoption. 
He never regarded the C.P.R. as a mere business enterprise, but 
was determined that in all its activities it would contribute to 
Canada's development and reputation." 

Sir George McLaren Brown. European General Manager, C 
P.R.: — "In Lord Shaughnessy's death Canada and the British 
Empire have sustained an- irreparable loss. To me the news 
came as a great shock, as only on December 10, I received a 
personal letter from him stating that he and Lady Shaughnessy 
would be paying a visit to this country, sailing on January 4. 
and that he was looking forward tu meeting his friends again 
on this side. We, 100, were looking forward with keen pleasure 
to greeting him, hut death stepped in. During my 33 years' 
career in the C P.R. I was intimately associated «ith Lord' 
Shaughnessy. For 23 years he was my immediate chief, and 
his personality ever made a strong appeal to me, as it did to all 
who had a similar privilege of close association. The soul of 
efficiency, and a keen disciplinarian, nevertheless he possessed 
a warm human temperament which endeared him to all, and 
especially to those of us who were brought into direct business 
reationship with him. He was a man of sound judgment, with 
a strong and peretrati -g v sion : and he played an especially 
inportant part in the later development of the Dominion. It 
was indeed irue, as a Canadian writer h,is said, that «hen Sir 
William \'an Home reiired from the Presidency of the Canadian 
P.cific in 1899. his mantle of office was plated on the shoulders 
of a man well able to bear it — ,i man who had been his most 
brilliant lieutenant — Thotnas Shaughnessy, as he was then. It 
was primarily due to his executive genius that the company 
holds the proud posi'.ion it occupies to-day. and when Mr. Beatty 
took over the reins of oftice he stepped into a worthy heritage, 
which he has splendidly maintained and augmented. Lord 
Shaughnessy, despite the great position he occupied in Canada's 
national life, never courted the limelight. His bigness was 
innnte, and needed no outside embellishments, nor did he desire 
these. It has been related, for instance, that at 3.30 in the 
afternoon on wh'ch he was to take his scat for the hrst time in 
the House of Lords he was still glued to his temporary desk at 
the company's London office. One b'mr after walking between 
his sponsors. Lord .Vorthclilte and Lord MacDonnell, he entered 
the House of Lords to take his pait in ne<essary formalities. 
A few minutes later he left the House, amidst the hearty con- 
gratulations of his brother peers, at 5.30 he was again at Char- 
ing Cross transacting business. So the story goes, and it is 
a true story. It was characteristic of the man. Vet he had 
every reason to be proud of the work which had brought him to 
universal fame. Cnder his regime as PresiOent. the Canadian 
Pacific made unparalleled growth. I'he growth is a matter of 
history and needs but brief recapitulation by me. During his 
tenure of oliice as e.vecutive head of the company the railway 
e.xpanded to iS.ooo miles: the seven seas of the worid were 
linked m bv the C.P.R. vessels: the vast Prairies of Western 
Canada were peopled by settlers drawn from all parts ot the 
world : arid lands in Southern .-Mberta were irrigated and trans- 
formed into a garden r,f agriculture: a large portion of the 
C P R line was double-tracked : huge and palatial hotels were 
established across the Dominion and the C.P K. became a 
household name throughout the civilized worid. IheCP.R., 
Canada and the British Empire, in losing Lord Shaughnessy. 
have lost a man indeed. To those who follow in his footsteps 
his life and achievements will be a splendid inspiration. He 
was beloved by all." 

Hon G H Graham. Minister of Railways and Canals: 
■'The ne«s of Lord Shaughnessv's death has come to me as a 
.reat shock. 1 have alwavs regarded him as one of the highest 
npes of citizen Canada has had. His indomitable energy and 
ania/ii.g foresight have had a poweriul ettect on the upbu.ld- 
in<.of our Dominion and his going out is a distinct loss to 



Canada. 



-Prom Canadian Railway and Marine Worid. 



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■~-'-'^-^ H^ ■Hftij- iTWl I 



THE 



I:: 



%^ 



NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-,^. 

The Indian in Fiji. .je 




Fiji 



By HU Excellency Sir William L Allardyce, K.C M G 

"h "['V''"''.'""" ""^ """"">■ ^'^'^'^ '^ '• \\'hat was 
he Inri.an domo so many thov,sands of miles a«av 
from home, and why did he cross the •' Kalla 
pan, (the black waier) and therebv lose his 
c.iste? The answer is the 
He went to search, 



same in both cases. 
, , , . , , . not for the almighty dollar 

bur for us equivalent, the elusive rupee. It is over fortv 

since the ' <- - •- ' 

kno 
first 



:e the hrst b.tch of Indian labourers, termed coolies' and 
vvn to the l-ijian Hs the " Kai India" (the man from India) 
landed in the Pactic. He came voluntarily and with the 
consent and approval of the Indian Govem.iient, and the Gov 
ernmentto which he was consicn-d was hemmed round with 
restrictions and regulations that were diificuU to follow even bv 




H[S EXCF.I l.ESCY SIR WM. 1,, Ai.l.AKIlVCF.. K..C.M.C. 

the trained official, and simply bewildering to the unfortunate 
white planter to whom the coolie was indentured on arrival for 
a period of five years. 

In those da\'s larj;e sailing ships of about j.ooc tons were 
employed to transport the labourer from Calcutta to the port of 
destinaii >n. and they were specially tVaed to accommodate this 
particular class of passenger. There was a doctor on board and 
a hospital with its accompanying medical comforts, and needless 
to say the scale of rations, and everything else appertaining to 
-the welfare of the coolie, was laid down in black and white so 
as to preclude aii\ possibility of there being jjst cause lor com- 
plaint. The medical otticer was given a fee varying from S4.00 
to >vno a head for every soul landed, and as each ship cairied 
from eight hundred to a thousand labourers, and the voyage 
only occupied a couple of months, the position was eagerly 
sought after by young medical men. 

The medico was likewise fortunate in havng his travelling 
expenses defrayed out and home, namely, from England to Cal- 
cutta and from .Suva to f-ondon. It sometimes h ippened that 
several babies were born dining the voyage from the llongli to 



1 to the sat:sfaction of the Doctor who thereby had his pros- 
pective fees supplemented. It was sometimes possible to make 
a second trip daring the year in an immigrant ship but not to 
the same colony. In the year preceding the arrival of the im- 
migrants the planter had to make a written application 10 the 
I'limigraton Department for the labourers he required, it might 
be any number from live to live hundred or more, and at the 
same time make a deposit on account. Later— on receiving 
his allotment ot coolies (men and women")— he was called upon 
to pay the recruiting and introduction charges which varied 
from year to year and worked out as a rule somewhere between 
.s'lo 00 and S70 oD per caput. 

The first shipment of coolies to Fiji was made in the 
" Leonidas." Unfortunately, it was a bad start, as the ship 
arrived with small pox on board and as the natives had lately 
been subjected to the ravages of a foreign di_-ea.-e. to wit measles, 
which had been inadvertently imported, and to "hich 50.000 
Fijians succumbei, being nearly one-third of the abo.iiinal 
. population, the Government wa.s deeply concerned lest this very 
serious infectious complaint with its loathsome accompaniment's 
and disfiguring effects should get ashore and result in a second 
epidemic of possibly greaier severity than ihe first and with an 
even higher rate of mortality. Everv precautionary- measure 
that could be thought of was therefore adopt-d. and guard boats 
were placed arcuncl the ship ni^ht and day with instructions to 
prevent communicaiion with the land and vice versa. Fortunately 
the cases on board recovered, and after a per'od of several weeks 
the ship was released from quarantine. The first medical ex 
amina'tion had taken place in India prior tj embarkation, and 
after the coolies were landed at the depot at Nukulau, a small 
island where the Immigr„tion Department had large and com- 
modious barracks and e'.ery convenience for handling them, 
a second medical examinct.on took place. At this examination 
the physical condition of every imm'g-ant was mo^t carefully 
looked to, after which they were alloted to t.-.e various planters 
pro rata in accordance with the app icatijns that had been 
previously received. It was not always pc-sible to give each 
planter the full number of immigrants he hac aop'ied for as this 
depended on whetiier the recruiters in Ind.a r.ad been able to 
obtain the full complement asked for bv ihe Fij an Government, 
while this again dependea on the total nun:ber be'ng recruited 
for the various Colonies, also as to whether t.ae rains had been 
early or late, and whether famine threatened or not. Coming 
as the immigrants did from districts widely separated they were 
generally unknown to one another, but whenever there were 
relations and friends they were indentured to the same planta- 
tion. The medical e.xamination referred to above shewed, with- 
out e.xceplion, that all the coolies were not physically fit to per- 
form a full task, i.e., a daily task of eigh: hours ; they were 
therefore divided into three grades, full task, three-quarter task, 
and half task, according to their individual capacity, and the 
employer was notified accordingly. If not considered equal to 
performing a half task the coolie remained a; the depot tempor- 
arily until his health improved, while in exceptioral cases he was 
returned to India by the same ship. 

Having been classified the immigrants were removed by their 
employer to his plantation and the term of their five years' in- 
dentured commenced. It was a condition thereof that adequate 
and approved accommodation should be pro\ iieri by the planter, 
and the Immigration Department through .is lospectors sa.v 
that this and the other provisions of the I-.dian Immigration 
.Act were strictlv CTmplitd with. The dwcl irgs consisted of 
Touofi wooden barracks, each married couple having a separate 
section. Every plantation had its hospital wi'h attendants and 
all necessary drugs, while each district had i;s Resident Medi- 
cal Officer who was obliged to attend the incentured coolie 
gratis, the employer payii g him a lump sum at :he end of each 
year through the proper ctficial channel. Tne fee per caput 
worked out at about 50c. annually, which on a basis of say five 
thousand coolies came to Sz.joo, in addition to which he 



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^mmfitglftiii 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— i 



received a salary of 5,500 from Government and had likewise 
the ri^ht of [.mate practice. For a f.jll rfav's task the cool.e 
man received .-5c. ard the woman iSc This on the face of it 
seems meagre and insi.rricient but it was wealth compared to 
the 4C. he received in India. He was in reality much better ott 
than the hgures indicate because his tastes 'were exceedinuk- 
simple, he was able to live happily and work satisfactorily on" a 
ration of rice and condiments which tosjether did not cost hi.n 
more than 4c. daily. With average application a task could be 
completed by 2 or 3 p.m. and. if inclined, as some were to 
undertake more work, the daily wnges could ihus be supple- 
mented. Oihers preferred to do a little gardening in their spare 
time which in many ways was more remunerative. It must be 
remembered that the bu:k of the immii;rants were agriculturists 
and that their forefathers had derived a hand to moufh existence 
from the soil from time immemorial. llie coolie who was em- 
ployed by time in the sugar factory, or as a ploughman or cattle- 
man, or otherwise, started at the above wage and as each shjwcd 
application his pay inc r-ased. 

From what has already been stated it is evident that the 
planter had been obliged to incur a heavy financial responsibiliiy 
in intrcducirg the coolie ("bcse wages were a first lien on his 
land and his crops V in building him quarters, and guaranteeing 
him certain einplov ment for a period of five years at what was 
regarded as an equitable rate of wage, not to speak of providing 
the services, gratis, of a medical officer, likewise hospital accom- 
modation and medicinal comforts when indisposed. Not only 
so but under the Immigration Law he was liable 10 be fined for 
failing to provide work, or, for calling upon the coolie to perform 
an unreasonable task, or, for ne^lectini; to comply with any of 
the many regulations appertaining to his prott-cti.m and welfare. 

On the oher hand the coolie had his obliga'ions also. He 
was required to perform certain work daily, by task or time, 
subject to his physical ability to undertake it. If sick he was 
sent to hospital. The immi;^rar;t. however, before leaving India 
was led to clearly understand, and had it thoroughly explained 
to him by competent olfici.ils there, exactly what he was goinj; 
to and the nature of the contract he was entering into, and told 
that if he failed to perform a ^y reasonable task he would be 
liable to be summoned before the Magistrate, and, after being 
warned by him, would, on the offence being rep-attd, be liable 
to be lined or in default sent 10 prison and have tie term of 
his indenture extended for the period during which he was 
incarcerated. 

The system I have described above is no longer in existence 
as the Government of India was satisfied that abuses h,id crept 
in that rendered it undesirable. I was for several years a 
Magistrate in a large coolie distiict in Fiji in the eighties, and 
it is only right 'hat I should say that in those days t lie coolies 
as a whole were cheerful, contented, and satisfied with their lot, 
and, what to them was very important, were able to save much 
money, so much so that at the end of the five \ears indenture 
they were in a position to buy. and occasionally did buy or lea-^e 
a portion of the land they had been working on, and became 
cane growers themselves. Under the terms of the orij;mal 
indenture the coolie remained a second period of live years in 
Fiji as a free man before being returned at the e.xpense of the 
Colonial Government to India. 

On one occasion I remember a free Indian. lUissunlh by 
name, came to my office to deposit money which as .Magistrate 
it was my duty to receive and transmit to ihe Immigration De- 
partment. Indeed I was frequently receiving sums of money in 
this way. 

Bussunth.—" Sahib, me poor man. very poor man, come 
office, Sahib, give little money put Bank." 
S. M, — " Put it on the Court House table and count it." 
Bussunth.— "Sihib, my brother here, he very poor man. 
he give little money too." 
S. M _•• Put it on the table also and count it." 
When I went to count the money prior to issui'g the receipts 
I found e:ght-en hundred golden sovereigns! This was doubt- 
less the result of the accumulated thrift and petty tradings of 
many coolies, but it indicates their saving propensities. 

A friend of mine was the owner of a large sugar eslat.- m my 



district, and the Resident Inspector of Immigrants laid two 
charges against him as .Manager for neglecting to supply certain 
medical comforts ordered by the Doctor to two of his indentured 
coolies. The first case that was called lasted for an hour or 
more, but it was quite evident that although the .Manager hitn- 
sell knew nothing about the circumstances, his subordinate, the 
European Orticer in charge of the Hospiial, had neglected to 
comply with the Doctor's instructions. The .Manager was fined 
£-S- The evidence already adduced was allowed to stand in 
the second case and a similar fine was infiicted. .\s I left the 
Court House I happened to meet the Manager, and turning to 
him said. "Come and have some breakfast?" (It was the 
custom of the country to breakfast at 11 a.m. or later). He 
replied, with a sickly smile, '■ Voii brute." We had breakfast 
together. 

The impression prevailed in Fiji forty years ago that any 
Indian who professed Christianity was likely to turn out badly. 
.\fter engaging .\cckainul. a free Indian, as my cook and general 
servant I was surprised to learn that he was a Christian. My 
friends suiipathizcd with me and predicted the worst. .\s it 
turned out 1 had no reason to regret my choice, as he remained 
with me for sixteen years and proved himself invaluable in many 
ways. Unlike the generality of his countrymen he was a man of 
few words. M re than once when in difficulties I swore him in 
as a special constable with excellent results. On one of these 
occasions I had being sitting in Court for a couple of days in a 



r/|..f,-i|<_^ 



irv^ 



Y 



HIS FXCEI.I ENXV SIR WILLIAM AND I.ADV Al.LARnvCE VISITS 
PORT UNION- AND RECEIVED FV SIR WILLIAM COAKER. 

high moist temperature listening to a somewhat complicated 
case in which a white overseer had been assaulted and I had 
reserved mv decision till the following morning. .At dinner that 
evening .NecL-amul was waiting and I said to him, ■■ What do 
you think of the case now ?" 'I'here was no reply. I repeated 
the question and he then answered, " Sahib, black man lie al- 
ways lie: white man he very uncertain I" 

Kipling has sung of Gunga Din and placed him on a well 
deserved pinnacle of fame, and Fiji had her Gunga Dins, faith- 
ful and trusted, of whom we were justly proud. 

'• The uniform 'e wore 

Was notliinj; much btfore. 

.An' rather less than 'arf o' thai he'ind. 

It wa.^ Din ! Din ! Din ' 

Vou 'eathen. where the mischief "ave y*>u heen ? 

^'ou put some juldee* in it. 

Or I'll marrowt you lliis minute — 

Vou squidgy, nosed old idol. Gunga Pin. 

An' for all is dirty ide. 

"K was tthite, clear white, inside " 



I think we may leave it at that. 



• Lte quick. 'Hit you. 



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I ' 



V .1 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 16. 

In the Garden of Hafiz : Songs from the Persian. 

Traiulated by E. H. Bicknell. 



1 I 



The beauty of the«e verses harries praise : 

What guide is needed to ihe solar bla^e ? 

Extol that artist by whose pencil's aid 

The virgin, Thought, so ricblv is arrived. 

For her no substitute can reasoa show. 

Nor any like her human judgment knew. 

This verse, a miracle, or ir.apc white — 

Brought down some voice from Heaven, or Gabriel bri^-ht > 

By me as by none else art secrets sun^. ° 

No pearls of poesy like mine are strun;;. 

Come cup-bearer'— pass round and offer thou the bowl. 

For love, which seemed at tirst so easv. has now brou^jht trouble to my soul 

Thou whose features clearly-beaming make the moon of beauty bright 

Thou whose chm contains a well-pit which to LoveUr.ess gwes light. 

When, O Lord' shall kindly Fortune, sating mv arr-^uion pair 

This my heart of tranquil nature and thv wild and rLrrled hair? 

Pining for thy sight my spirit trembling on my lip doth wait; 

Forth to speed it. bacli to lead it. #peak the sentence of its fate. 

Pass me with thy skirit uplifted from the dustv, bloody ground : 

Many who have been thy victims dead upon this path are found. 

How this heart is anguish-wasted let my heart's po-^-essor know : 

Friends, your souls and mine contemplate, equal by their common woe. 

Aught of good accrues to no one witched by thy Narci.-.sus eve : 

Ne'er let braggarts vaunt theii virtue, if thy' drunken orbs are nigh. 

Soon my Fortune sunk in slv^mber shall ..er limbs with vieor brace ; 

Dashed upon her eye is water, sprinked I)y thy shining face. 

Gather from thy cheek a posy, ^peed it '.ly the rtying East; 

Sent be perfume to refresh me from thv garden's dust at lea^t. 

Hatii offers a petition, listen, and " Ame;!* reply : 

*• On thy sugar-dropping rubies let me for life's food rely." 

Many a year live on and prosper. Sakis of the court of jem.* 

E'en though I. to till my wine-cup never to vour circle come. 

East wind, when to Vazd thou wingest, >av thou to its sons from me: 

'■ May the head of everv ingrate ball like "neath your mail-bat be!" 

" What though from your dais distant, near it by mv wish I seem;" 

" VIomagc to your king I render, and 1 make vour prai'-e mv theme '* 

Shah of Shahs, of lofty planet, Grant for God what I implore; 

Let me, as the sky above thee. Kiss the du?t which strews thy rioor. 

L'p, Saki ! — let the goblet t^ow ; 

btrew with dust the head o:' our earthlv woe ' 

(iive my thy cup; thjt. joy-possessed. 

I may tear this azute cuwl from my oreast.t 

The wise may deem me lost to shame. 

But no care have I for renown or najne- 

Bring ^vine I — how many a ^"itiess head 

By the wind of pride has with dust been spread 1 

My bosom's fumes, my >ighs y-n warm 

Have inflamed yon crude and unfeeling swarm. t 

This mad heart's secret, we.l I know. 

Is beyond the thoughts of both high and low. 

E'en by that swettheart charmed am I. 

Who onre from my heart made sweetness tly. 

Who that my Silvern Tree haih seen. 

Woidd regard the cypress tnai decks the green ?§ 

In grief be pa'ient. 

Night and dav. 
Till thy fortune Hafiz, 

Thy wish oI>ey. 

My heart no longer brooks my hand : Sa;es. aid for God my woe ! 
Else, alas 1 mv secret-deep 'soon the curio js world must know. 

The bark we steer has stranded : O breeze auspicious swell : 
We yet may see once more the Friend wc love so well. 

The ten day's favor of the Sphere— magi: i« ; a tale which lies ! 
Thou who woud'st befriend thy friends, seize each moment ere it flies. 

O bounteous man. since Heaven sheds oer thee blessings mild. 
Inquire, one dav at lea.st, how fares -Misfortune's chiU. 

• lem or lemshid, an ancient King ot' Persia. By Jem and his Sakis 
are to he understood in this couplet the King of Va/d and his courtiers. 

t P,v the azure cowl is in^piied the cUak of deceit and false humility. 
Hafiz 'uses this expres>ion to cast ridicule upon shaikh Hazan's order ut 
dervi-^hes. who were inimical to the brotherhood of which the poet was a 
m^^mber. The dervishes mentioned wore blue to express their celestial 
aspirations. 

t The di>ciples of Shaikh Hazan. Ilai^z had incurred their displeasure 
by the levity of his conduct. 

§ In the ■' (^Julistan" of Sa'di a philosopher declares that, of all the trees, 
the cvpress is alone to be called free, because unlike the others, it is not 
subject to the vicissitudes of appointed place and seasori, "but is at an 
times fresh and green, and this is the condition of the free. ' 



What holds in peace this twofold world, let this twofdd sentence show 
" Amity to every friend, courtesy to every foe." 

My heart desires the face so fair— Of Famfch ;• 
It is pertubed as is the hair 

Of Farrukh. 

A blackamoor hy Fortune bles: is he. 
Placed at the side, and near the knee 

Of Fanxlth. 

Bent as the archer's bow my frame is now. 
From woes continuous as the brow 

Of Farrukh. 

That lofty soul 
Shall have my service true. 
■ That serves, as Hafiz, 
The Hindu— 1- 

Of Famikb. 

'Tis morn ; the clouds a ceiling make : 
The mom -cup. mates, the men-cup take ' 
Drops of dew streak the tulip's cheek ; 
The wine-bowl, friends, the ftinebowi seek ! 
The greensward breathes a uile divir.e ; 
Drink, therefore, always limf ;d wine. 
The Flower her emerald thrcne di^piavs : 
Bring wine tha: has the rubv's blaze. 
Again is closed the vintner's store. 
" Open, thou Opener of the door l"t 
While smiles on us the season's boon, 
I marvel that t.iey close so soon. 
. • Thy Hps have =alc-rights, 'tis confessed. 
O'er wounds upon the fire burnt breast. 

Hafiz, let not 

Thy courage fail ! 
Foilune, thy charmer 
Shall unveil. 

When now the rose upon the meadow from Nothing i:to Being springs. 
When at her feet the humble violet with h-^r head low .n worship clings. 
Take from thy morn-filled cup refreshment ■^vhile tah-irs and the harp inspire, 
Nor fail to kiss the chin of Saki while the dute warb!e> and the h re. 
Sit thou with wine, with harp, with charmer, until the rise's bloom be past ; 
For as the day of life which passes, is the brief week tiat she shall last. 
Earth rivals the Immortal Garden during ir.e rose and .ilv's reign ; 
But what avails when the immortal is !^oug.^t for on :h^ earth in vain .' 
O Hafiz, while his days conf.nue. let joy eternal be ihi-e aim : 
And may the shadow of his kindness etemdlly abide th-; 3ame I 

Bring wine ; for Hafiz, if in trouble. 
Will ceaselesslv the help imp.ore 
Of him who bojnty shall aid forever 
As it has aid \ouchsafed before. 

( > ! where are deeds of virt.ie and this trail spirit, where ? 
How wide the space that s^inders the bo-nds of lift and There I 
Can toping aught in common with work!) and worksy p own ? 
Where is regard for sermnr.s, where is the rebeck's Tone .'§ 
My heart abhors the cloister, and the false cowl its s j:n : 
Where is the Magian's cloister, and where is his pure wine ? 

Seek not. O friend, in Hafir 
Patience, nor re*t from care : 
Patience and rest — what are they? 
Where is calm slumber, where ? 

My heart has of the world grown wear)- and all that i: can lend: 

The shrine of my affection nolds no Beinj but my tiiir.d. 

If e'er for me thy love's s.veet garden a fragrant hrea:h exhale. 

My heart, expansive in its j?v. shall bjd-l.ke burs: it> veil. 

Should I upon love's path advise thee, when now a icol I've grown, 

'Twould be the story of the tool, the pitcher, and the -rone. 

L'pon the path of Love, O r.eart. deceit a-d risk are £reat ! 

And fall upon the way sha'.i he who at swift rate 

Shall go. 

• *' Farrukh" (auspicious ( is doubtles? the name of s^me favorite of the 
poet. 

t " Hindu" is here equivalent to " slave." 

t In Mohammedan countrie-i it is customary to write upon the doors : 
*' O Opener of the gates ! open us the gates of blessing.' 

!; The rebeck is a musical irstrument bom^iwhat simiUr to the viohn. 



' W}x»^}tjmnf* , imutB W Jamimm i mi ' ntP . VKV'^» " ' ■ "^ 



-Z._ 



■miten 



•I* 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— .7. 

^ From Crown Colony to Home Rule* -^ 

AND THE " FATHERS OF RESPONSIBLE GOVERNMENT." 

By Alex. A. Parsons, J.P. 



ARTICLe I 

THE HON. SIR FREDERlrK noWKER TFRRINGTON CARTER. 



"Ox thee the loyal hearted hung. 

The proud waj. half di>armed of piide, 

Nor cared the setpent at thy side 
To flicker with his double tongue. 

" The stem were mild when thou «ert bv. 

The flippant put him>elf to school, 

.\nd heard thee, and the brazen fool 
Was softened, and he knew not why." 

I HE Hon. Sir Frederirk B(uvker Terrin^ron Carter, 
K.C.M.G., who ligured so prominently in the 
public life of the Colony during (he greater part 
ot the past ctntury. was a member of one of the 
historical f-,imilies of this island. He was the son 
of Mr. Peter \Ve>lon Carter, who was for many 
years the Police Magistrate here, and the grandson of the Jud^e 
who, for upwards of fifty years presided in the Vice- Admiralty 





HON. SIR F. K. T. CARTER, K.C.M.G. 

Court of Newfoundland. He was born at St. John's on the 12th 
of February. 1S19, and, on completing hi< education, he com- 
menced the study of the law under Hryan Kr)bin.son. E^q.,^ who 
subsequent'v became one of the Judges of our Supreme Court. 
In 1840. on' being admitted as an .-Vftorney, he took his depar- 
ture for Engl.md, that he might the more perfectly prosecute 
the stu^y of his profession. He returned to Newfoundland 
in 184?. 

AS SOLICITOR OF THE HOUSE Of \SSF.MRI.V. 

The confusion and disorder which had characterized the 
politics of the island in the last-mentioned year, were, about this 
time, souoht to he removed bv thf inlervemion of the Imperial 
Oovernu.eni. .Vn .Act was passed in Ergland -for amending 
the Consiiiution of the Government of Ne«founabnd. l-y this 
-Act the Legislative Council, as a distinct branch of the 1-egisla- 
ture, was abolished and its membeis were incorporated with, and 



authorized to sit and vote in. the Legislative .Assembly. This 
bo-iy was to be made up according to the following proportions : 
Two-fifths were to be appointed by the Crown, and three-fitths 
were :o be elected by the people. This e.vperimental contriv- 
ance was known in the Olony by the name of '■ The .Amalga- 
mated Legislature. " I am not aware to whom the special inven- 
tion was attributable, but I infer that a single chamber, no 
matter how constituted, did not answer better in Newfoundland 
than it has done elsewhere. .After seven years' trial, the e.vperi- 
ment was abandoned and the old constitution was restored. 
During its continuance, the services of a Solicitor were required. 
This office, which corresponded in its duties to the office of 
Law Clerk to either House here now, was, in 184S. conferre«l 
on the subject of mv sketch. On the restoration of the old con- 
stitution, Mr. Carter appears to have selected the more popular 
branch in weich to continue his services. These services, for 
reasons with which I am unacquainted, terminated in 1852. 

HE REfRFSENTS THE DISTRICT OF TRINITY. 

On the introduction of Home Rule in 1855 Sir Frederick 
Carter (not Sir Frederick then) entered Parliament as one of 
the representatives of ihe district of Trinity. He thus became 
a member of a body whose number at that time was much less 
than it is today. The first House of .Assembly under Respon- 
sible Government ccrs;sted of the following members: — Hon. 
P. F. Little, Prime Minister and .Attorney General ; Hon. John 
Kent. Colonial Secretary ; Hon. E. Hanrahan. Surveyor General 
and Chairman of the Board of Works; Hon. .Ambrose Shea, 
Speaker; Messrs. [ohn Fox, Robt. John Parsons, Peter Winsor, 
John Hayward. James L. Prenergast, Thumas Talbot, \V. Byrne, 
R. Brown, E. I). Shea, J. Benning, E. Morris, R. Carter, M. 
Walbank, John H. Warren. C. Ellis, W. Knight, H. \V. Hoyles, 
Robert Prowse, George Hoasett, J. Delaney. P. Kelly, F. B. T. 
Carter, Steven March, Dr. Winter and J. Bemister. 

CHIKFI.V COMI-OSED OF SALARIED PEOPLE. 

It would appear that this small body was chiefly composed of 
official sal.iried people. There were Government Surveyors, 
Government Inspectors, and officer's of the Customs, a goodly 
compauy of Stipendiaries who were naturally inclined to regard 
with complacency things as they were, and take precautions 
again.'t all innovations. Comparatively speaking, there were 
almost as many otficinls in the .Assembly then as there are to-day, 
with our present membership of thirty-si.x. Now the subject of 
my sketch, like the greater number of those who at that time 
were members of the Assembly, subscribed to that confession of 
political faith which is commonly recognized as the Conservative 
formula. But .Mr. Carter did not deem it to be consistent with 
Conservative principles to introduce a Bill which had for its 
object to disqualify for seats all salared persons, e.vcept the 
members for the time being of the Executive Council. Such a 
measure was not calculatLd to be acceptable to a body which 
was chieHy composed of gentlemen whose seats in Parliament it 
was especially designed to declare vacant; nor is it matter for 
surprise that it should have been defeated, session after session, 
by the influence of the olTicial men whom it was introduced 
to disiiualify. 

MORAL FORCE TOO STROM; FOR OPPONENTS. 
The moral force of the measure, however, at length proved 
too Strong for the numerical force of its opponents. It was 
passed bv both Houses, and thus the Colony reaped the reward 
ot Mr Caiter's persistent perseverance, .and the class which 
considered itself to be wronged by the change was soothtd. if 
not satisfied, with pensions and retiring allowances. In 1S61, 
the lumber of repiesentalives in the Legislative .Assembly was 
increased from twentv-five to thirty. The old Parliament was 
dissolved and a new one elected. Of this new and eniaro^-d 




Parliament, the suhiprf ,^f ~ i 

the honor of i.ein"'cC:^s::\t"',,:'''^ -"-- A-ess, had 
of the- members had no elVect n ahenn '?"'''^ '" '^^ """^ber 
to have prevailed there nnd e set J e^' "h""''"'^ ''-'''' — 
for the Speaker of ,he House for he Leb "'""" "'^""^^^ 
">.n-t part in the debates of Par fam'nt Th '° '"''" ' ^"^ 
des.rable custon, possesses but fl if an .. ' ^^^'^emely un- 
t^g«. The exceptional usa^e L ' ' ^°'"P^"^'ti"S advan- 
theopportunitvof supp.rt"n>bv h • 1"°'^"^ ^^'- ^'^-^ter 

inriuence, the measurT", .f.'her secuT"',' "^ «'=" ^'^ bv his 
I'arUament, wh.ch, by reaso^of ^^0"' u^'^''^^'^'^''" "^ 
po>vertomtrodi,reatlhattime H„r th t' . "^' "°' '" ^is 
member, Mr. Carter nat.r r;eid 2 h T'^ ^Y ^r^o^k.r 
and he had the satisfaction, n the rir^/'l" ^'"'"'"" ^^ ^is own, 
s.ded as Speaker, ,0 see ihat ZZ,.\: V'?" '" 'r'"'^h he pre- 
of the Legislature. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-,,,. 



... .. MiLii lie ore- 
■mportant Act pass both Houses 

MR. C.RTEK ..vn THP gVESTtOV Or COXKEDER vr,OV 

On the formation of the Carrier \r,o^ u . , • 

in Canada, in ,858, i, will be rememh H .''"^ Administration, 
of agreement, ad\.pt:d t h" "ew "0"'''"' '1'^ ^"^' ^^'''^'^ 
about the Confederation of che Bnd h \or h T ' "" '° ''""" 
With the view of carrNino out ,h ,^°^th r^-^er.can Colonies. 

.0 the Maruime PrJJin'ce^.tvi t ^^^^^ J'r't" ''^'^ ''"' 
consider the subject, with a view"to prom^i^rhfr^rS " 



u°;oV;:d £::■„? f^'r^- ^-^ '■^^ ''^^ '-'"- °' '^'^"''--^^ 

rical.Quebe-c Conference "'"">-'^^° '^^^'"'-"^ of the histo" 

SIR FREDERICK ASSUMES LEADERSHIP 

beLVe'?^hi-nSe ofte s'" ""'T "'"'^'" °' '"^ Colony, 
the partv then na,ur!lU f.M ^^T" P""' '^'"^ 'eadership of 
In the dectlon o thi v« T /- ' '''°""^*^^^ "' ^'^ '^^^'1^^''^^. 
large majority The ^iar n r-^T'^""'"' "^"^ ^"^'^'"^^^ ^v a 
have alr.advVntimated ^'.s'^h r'' r/"^'"' °^ ''^ '■■"^' ^^ ^ 
America, To comoiete !h. ^'"f^^^^^^''^" °f British North 
.ncluded in , he scheme SW F.T Tr^'^'^"'^ "'''' necessarily 
Shea hav.ng been se^, as o ,r HI ^'"'" '"'' ^" -^■"'^^°^^ 

tion Conference rettrn^HK!''!" '° "'^ ^reat Confedera- 

might become 'nidwfth'the'D;' "' ''^^r^ °" ^■'^'='' "- 
tained in that drVff T ^'^nimion. 1 he proposals con- 

enthusiasm ""'" ""^'"'^ "« ^^'^^'^'ed here with 

THE MAIN QUESTION ONE OF TERMS 




I.ANr„NO AND LULI.I.^., FISH AT BAINE, JOHN-.STON & Co's. PREMISES. 



be attained. U ,th reference to that invita.ion, Mr, Carter on a 
subsequent occasion, is reported to have said "that he was proud 
that his native Province of Newfoundland was the only Colonv 
which responded to the request." He practised no reserve in 
advocating his opinions, neither did he seek to curbe his desire 
to advance them. What he determined on with the serene 
judgment of a statesman, he sought to promote with the Intel 
leciual fervor of a patriot. His instructed mind knew alik*- 
what his native land po.ssessed as well as what .she required 
Surrounded by the ocean, begirt with harbors, seamed with 
mineral wealth, and peopled with a race averse to husbandry 
but inured to hardship, he knew that Newfoundland had treasure 
to exchange for all the treasure she might receive. Her special 
possession is what the .Attorney General for Canada East des 
cribed at the time as •■ the maritime element,"— her special need 
IS still ihe ■• territorial element." In exchange for estuarie.s. and 
islets, and harbors teeming with fish, she needs the -'cattle upon 
a thousand hills" and the fields covered with golden corn. She 
P"s,es.ses the fishers heritage. She requires the husbaiulma.i's 
poriion. Sir J-rederick knew that between his own and the sister 
provinces there existed a community of feeling. He saw that 
there ought aLso to exist a community of interest. He believed, 
furthermore, that political strength and provincial wealth would 
result from the fusion of svmpalhetic and a congenial forces. 
Ihus he and his keen-witted' colleague, the Hon, Sir Ambrose 
^hea. being of one mind on the great question of Confederation, 



much doubt If any terms would have been accepted. The Anti- 
Confederate Party were strong in numbers, powerful in organi- 
zation, and their leader, .\[r. Charles Fox Bennett, showed him- 
se t a most able and indefatigable camp.iigner. The alarm.n.. 
tales that were told about exorbitant t.ixation and other oppres^ 
sue measures under Canadian rule, had a tremendous effect on 
the people of our extern districts. 

VIEWED IN THE LIGHT OF LOCAL HISTORY. 

In looking back at his public career, we are not impressed 
^vilh it because he charged his early opinions upon the question 
of Lnion wiih Canada, because he remained in Sir Huan Hovles' 
Cabinet after the misunderstanding with the latter, or becau'se 
he differed from Sir Hugh on several important points of policy. 
Slill less do we think of him on account of his failings or his 
shortcominus. Local History, with her cool hands, w'ill put all 
these things into her scales and mete out her measure with calm, 
unflinching eyes. But this is history's la.sk, not mine ! 

".Not ours 10 gauge Ihe nioit or less, 

The will's defect, the blood's excess, 

The earthy humors that oppress 
The radiant mind. 

His greatness, not his littleness. 
Concerns mankind.'' 

A TRADITIONARY RE.MEM RRANCE. 

There still lingered among all classes a traditionary remem- 
brance of the sufferings their forefathers endured from the 



StfA^- 



J 



9i^ 



\Sl.. 



mm 



atftrfi^Jli 



French Canadian and Indian raids maHo ;„ n. 

ot S,r Kreder,cU;s Adu,inLra,-on,^Mr°Benn IZTgI: 

through the sess.on of .S;, with only rhe Speakers casti.. vo"; 
In the autumn he dissolved the House a„d a general dec°on 
gave him a good working majority. section 

AS CHIEF JUSTICE AND AWIINISTR ATOR. 

fi" ^u'l ^'' ?"■''" ^°'^>"S°" ■■'^ti'-ed from the .e.t he effici- 
ently hlled on the bench of .he Supreme Court for so ml; 
years and S,r hrederick Carter t.ok his place. Thelater"n 
.88obecameCh,et Justice, «hich po,it,on he filied 4h much 
acceptance t,ll .805. «hen he, in turn, retired, having almost 
reached the patriarchal age of four score year.. He had the 
distinguished hqnor of being appointed Administrator of the 
Colony-^no less than five times in the decade and a half durin. 
which he occupied a seat on the Bench. "■ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-r9. 



and, fortunately, where there are few great friend; there is no 
htile enemy. One is thrown in life with a ;;reat manv people 
who, though not actively bad. though thev mav not wilfully lead 
us astray, yet take no pan.s to avoid the cancer of driftin.' into 
a mere morass of muddy thought and weedv words. Of'such 
«e may say : - I do de^ire that we be better strangers." 

EVERY M.4.\ STA.NDS FOR SOMTHING. 

Sir Frederick realized that every man stands for something 
He used to Oy : •■ What m.ikes a man ard gives him hi, plat'e 
and rank among men is that he means scmtthing. that f,.r hi'n 
to live IS— somcihin;;. Evervone alreadv stands for somethin<r. 
1 here is no such thing as neutralitv. Man must be on one sid""e 
°V J °"^"' ^' ^^ •^"^'^'^^s 'i'e is not a g^od thing, he has de- 
cided that It IS a bad thing. By refusing to decide ft.r the faith- 
view of life and backing up that decision' vijth life and deed., 
that refusal has to that extent let loo=e upjn the ivorld forces, 
moods, reasons whi:h could have been witnheld or turned on the 
enemy if the decision hhd been ditTerent Men have no dead 
option. They are all. by their living, agents and advocates of a 
general spirit and temper which, if it had its way unhindered, 
would bring about a society or civilization in harmony with their 
principles." He had seen the romantic background which is 
independent of circumstances, and knew that 




S. S. " MANGA IV ST. JOIIn's HARBOR. 



HI.S ATTirrDE TO'VARriS COI (TICAI. OPPO.VENTS. 

Sir Frederick was broad-minded and extremely liberal in his 
attitude to.vards political and o;her opponents. On one acca- 
sion. while discussing with the Hjn. J .hn H. Warren, grand- 
father of the pre-ent Prime Jr:ni.ter, certain aspects of the poli- 
ticjl situation and the cause of some friction which then r.visted 
in the party, he ('Sir Frederick) rcm.irked with much vehemence: 
"Who cares about Our personal quarrel.s. or who will notice them 
in future yeirs ? I care not what my poliiical enemies deserve, 
but what I must do to preserve my own' self-respect and retain 
the conridence of the people I represent. Moreover, I have no 
enemy so hateful that I do not hope some day to make a friend 
of him. Why d-prive myself of th^- chance.' Why speak harshly 
now of an enemy ihit which some day I m-iv vainly wi.h 1 had 
not so spoken of him who has become my friend .' Why blacken 
the character of one w ho n I can never again make spotless, 
even though he should in the future win my approbation .' I 
would rather be mistaken in praising people who do not deserve 
praise than in censuring those who do not deserve censure. To 
praise a blameworthv man passes for simple-mindedness : if, 
however, you ti iv a despicable wretch the world imputes it not 
to his wickedness but to your own selfish pissidn or political 
ill-will" Sir Frederick used to quote with approbation the ad- 
vice of Pythagoras, "not to shake hands wiih too many;" but, 
as long as frie ids are well chjscn, it is but true that — 
" He who has a thousand friends 

Has never a one to spare. 
And he who hx< one entniy 
Will nicel him e\ervw;icre" — 



"The power is our. Co make or mar 

Our faie as, 0:1 the earliest morn. 
The liarkness and the Radiance are 

Creatures within the spirit liorn. 
Vet. I-athed in gloom 100 i"ng. ne n.igh'. 
P'orge: hniv we im.is'ned iiciht." 

POST-PRANDIAL tTTERANCES AT OTTAWA. 

fn an aft^r-dinner speech at Ottawa. wh"ie there as a delegate 
on the question of Confederation — in iStg. I think it was — he 
(Sir Frederick) gave e.xpression to his ■• love of country" in the 
fullowing words: — ■• I live on the seaboud of a rugged isle 
among my hardy fe'iow-counlrymcn and con.stiuents — Gnd £)iess 
them 1 — where the barren rocks ol Newfoundland rise high into 
the free air of heaven, and the dews are k:ssed from her highest 
summits by the earliest light which breaks on .-Xmerica from the 
morning sun. Here, generation after generation, our oeople 
have fought the climate for seven months, and a despotic steril- 
ity of soil during the remainder of the year. Here. too. thev 
have grown vigofous. intelligent, virtuous and free ' 

THE COURAGK OF lil.S rOXV;CTION.s. 

Althongh Sir Frederick always received pressmen with cour- 
tes)'. he invariahii' declined tu be intervi-ned on political mat- 
ters, explaining that he objected to be made to say what he did 
not want to say. •■ We arc. all oi u.s." he contended, "inclined 
to he rebels against authority, but that does not mean that 
authorit}' is not good for us. Perhaps we were made not to 
need it, but were intended to be self-governors, living on a per- 
fect level of etrjuality with our fellow-men. Kut .something has 
warped us out of the straight line, if so we were made ! What 



'" laniM-ifclt 



• iraiiiij.f 



' - . J. - -!»- . 



...... ^^.i^.:^.i^w, -..^.^.^■^: . -^.^^K^ j^_ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-20. 



"h' 

; t 



1 ! 



1: 



M 



certain eld scientists called ' turba.' a sort of confusion set in 
and so tangled things up that, in the toss-up of life, some 'became 
governors over others by reason of a chance endowment of 
strength, brains or money. We even coi.perate to set up »ov- 
ernments over ourselves, and then kick against them as lustilv 
as slaves used to kick against the • nigger-drivers' of their evil 
days. Come to think of it, most of the evils men complain 
about, and kick at. are gods we men ourselves made and bowed 
down to at one time.'* 

THE HXtS ALONG WHItK HE AROUED. 

Such are the lines along which he argued. In the fore^oino- 
paragraph I have quoted him almost verbatim. He had withal 
the strongest sense of duty, wiih a gift of penetration into char- 
acter which amounted to genius. The best proof of this, if proof 
were needed, hid been- his unerrin^^ choice of his lieutenants 
and assistants throughout his public career. The best men in 
the political arena, the most noted, many who have since risen 
to consider,iblc distinction, made their mark under Sir Frederick's 
leadrrship. There was at one time a very erroneous impression 
abro.id, that .-^ir Frederick was the centre of a narrow clique, the 
so-called •• political ring," which monopolized the good thinirs of 
the profession, and outside of which no one, however cap.ible, 
could hope to make his mark. If clique there was, it embraced 
the whole political life of the C'lony ; the ri^g was a wide, ever- 
widening circle, which drew constantly within it the choicest 
spirits of the community. N'othiiig is more certain thin that 
Sir Frederick Carter h^d always been keenlv on the lo->k out"for 
the best ability, had bren prompt to recognize, and eager to 
utilize it, not for himself alone, but in the best interest of the 
Colony. No one knew the counrry better, more i^timatelv, had 
clearer ideas of what was best for it. a deeper and more abiding 
atfeciion for it and for the people of .ill ranks, high and low '. 

WHAT THE I.ATE JOH.N" BOOS-E THOLT.HT DF HI.\1. 

The late John H. B)ine used to mv of .Sir Frederick: "He 
is choke-full of law iind c\n trll all About it. But he re'ninds 
me of the captain of a La'irador vessrrl on his arriv il at the 
fishing part on the coast. He (the captain) knows that all 
things necessary for the pros-cution of the season's operations, 
and the bclor.gings of the different crews, are in the schnoner's 
hold, where ihey have been thrown pr.imiscuously ; but he finds 
it e.\tremely difficult to put his hu^ds on any piriicular article 
needed, without wasting much va'u.ib!e time in groping about 
before he can find it." Thus and so it is. We all have our 
peculiarities. We are 

■' The .slaves of custnm and estaMished mode. 
With i>ack-hur>e cunstaiicy «e keep tlie road, 
Croocked o' straight, throui^h cpiaiis or thorny delU, 
Through to tile jingling of our leader's liells." 

TO KT.V.V •• SCOUNTIREI.S" OUT of THE LEGISLATURE. 

Asked for his opinion as to the best way to maintain the in- 
tellectual, soci.il and moral tone of the I.egisl.iture, Sir Frederick 
replied: -'There are two methods by which the e.\clusion of 
scoundrels from the House of .Assembly can be brought about. 
One is by the education of the moral sense of the electors, and 
the other is by a direct legislative enactment declaring th t 
certain c.itegories of offenders shall be disqualified from sitting 
in Parliament. .\ny candid.ue who is pr(^ved to l)e guilty of brib- 
ery is disqualified by the Siaie from election during the lifetime 
uf the current Parliamen'. This rule would be enforced even 
if half a dozen con.stituencies elected the briber as their repre- 
sentative. Any member, even if duly elected, is compelled to 
vacate his seat should be become bankrupt. In like manner, 
any otticial in the .Municipal service who is found guilty of t.ik- 
ing bribes is by statute disi|ualitied>r ,-7v/- for any office in any 
municipalitv. At the same time no law e.>;isls to prevent a 
notorious thiff or cardshnrp^r from taking his seat in the House 
of Assembly or the Lrgisl.itive Council either. In Ihat case the 
moral sense of the community is. or ought lo be, strong enough 
to secure their e.\pulsion from the House. Where, however, the 
public seniiment needs ve-enforcing. as. in the case of bribers 
and bankrupts, the law steps in. As a means of education, as 
well as a measure of self-prntection. what has been done in the 
case of bribers and bankrupts should be done m the case 



of other tfagrant transgressors whose crimes against society 
have been proved in open court. The attempt to secure the 
passing of such a law would be in itself a potent means of 
educating public opinion. All those electors who desire to bar 
the doors of the House of Assembly against political adverturers 
and others who want to get there for the sake of what they can, 
by hook or by crook, get out of the public treasury, will do well, 
at the next general election, to use every means in their power, 
to press upon w hatever candidate appeals to them for their vote 
the importance of strengthening the law against proved evil- 
doers." 

,HIS VIEWS ON THE QUESTION OF FEMALE SUFFR.tCE. 

Sir Frederick was not in favor of female suffrage. " Women 
are not a class," he maintained ; "they are our mothers, sisters, 
wives;" Would it be too great an effort of imagination to the 
political leader of to-day, and those who U'e a similar line of 
argument, to attempt, in their own minds, to reverse the situa- 
tion ; to suppose a House of .\ssembly elected entirelv by wo- 
men, and then when the poor t.xcluded men asked (or some 
share at any rate in representation, would they be satisfied if 
some fair lady assured them they did not require repre.seniaiinn ? 
They are not a class. .A.re they not our broihers, our fathers, 
our husbands?" I think this would be but cold comforL His 
(Sir Frederick's) successor in the Prime Minister's cffice — Sir 
William Whiteway — however, took a more lenient view of the 
matter. In his opinion, "The question of the vote concerned 
the woman worker mo'e than >.ny oiher. It concerned her 
directly and indirectly, by immediate and by reflex action." 

A FINE PERSONAL APPEARANCE. 

Sir Frederick Carter presented a tine personal appearance. 
He had a broid and high foreliead ; keen deep-set eves; the 
lines of his mouth were strong and firm, and displayed resolu- 
tion- and tenacity of purpose. lie could be firm, eager and 
stern when legal or public matters were under consideration, 
and was no less animated, tender, winning, and affectionate 
when in a benevolent or "offbusmess" rnood. 

HOW HE EMPHASIZED HIS SPEECHES. 

He did not write his speeches, and never trusted to notes 
He spnke with neatness, force and precision — often emphasiz- 
ing his remarks with a peculiar shrug of the shoulders — although 
he was not a yieat orator. His method, I'Oth in the House of 
.Assembly and on the Bench, .was- to fill his mind with his sub- 
ject by a careful perusal of authirites. to think it well over, 
and trust to inspiration of the moTient for the shape which it 
took. Usually he was not particular as to the beginning of a 
speech, but was careful about the close, somcti.nes committing 
it to memory. A feiv of his more imporiant speeches in the 
House of Assembly were almost entirely written out. Though 
a Conservative of the old school in politics, his 5>mpathies made 
him o^-:e. of the most ardent I).-mocrats in all that concerned the 
welfare of the people- He h,id nn belief in Socialism as com- 
monly understood, but had cor^fide^'ce in the power of Christi- 
anity leavening the masses, to raise, elevate and improve. In- 
deed, Sir Frederick was an honest and patriot Newfoundlander. 
He used to say : " Whatever strengthens our local attachments 
is favorable to individual and nation,il character. Our home, 
our birthplace, our "native land — think for a while what the 
virtues are that arise out of the feelings connecled with these 
words, and if you have any intellectual eyes you will then per- 
ceive the connection between topography and patriotism. Show 
me a man who cares no more for one place tn.m anoihcr, and 
I will show you in that same person one who loves nothing but 
himself." We always had one or more leaders of Sir Frederick's 
form and fibre here in those days. and. as a resell, the Colony 
was honestly and successfully K'-verued. Bi.t limes are now 
changed antj so are the people's representatives, and hence it 
is that we are led to e.vclaim with the poet :— 

" .\h. C;od : for a man with heait. head. hand. 

Like sonje of the sini[)le great ones gone 

I-"or ever and ever by : 

One still stiong man in a blatant land. 

Whatever they call him, what care 1 — 

Aristocrat, democrat, autocrat — one 

Who can rule and dare not lie." 



..WM. -<»W1MI."'"". .WII"-»-'-" " ■"«%»> ..IL.I..,IWi|^UJ 111 



^JL^ll/ 



/ 



. 



THE NE\VFOUx\DLAND QUARTERLY.-21. 

The Late Sir William D. Reid, Kt. 



AT Montreal, March i.Mhere passed aw.v Sir \V,n Duff 
Kcd .n the hfty-Mxth vear of his age. His death had not 
been unexpected as for many months he had been critic- 
ally ill. Durmsj the past thirty-four years Sir WVliam had been 
very prominent in connrction with the aff.iirs of this Colony 
He came here with his father, the l.ue Sir Koben G:llespie Reid 
in 1890, and dun"? the period of railw.iv construction was his 
first heuten mr. Although nly 2 i years of age at that time the 




lirt',^'>i',<'-^»y-^a^.-ijfeT;a«L-^-a.-ai; cMa.W.- --■-^"A 



THE LATE SIR WILLIAM DUKK REID, KT. 

young railway builder had gained much experience through 
associ.ition with his father in connection with the Canadian 
Pacific Railway and other contracts. 

Born in New South Wales in the old mining d.iys. he was 
associated from youth with such activities and varied ti pes of 
manhood as must have stood him in good stead whrn the 
responsibility of railway building in this Colony devolved upoi 
him. On the withdrawal of the iate -Mr. Middleton from the 
partnership with the late Sir R. G. Reid these responsibilitirs 
increased continuously. It was as railway consiructor that 
Wiiiuoi Duff Reid won fame. 

Oil the death of Sir Robert Reid the active management of 
his various responsibilities devolved upon the eldot sor, and 
w.is retained by him until abiut six or seven years ago, «hen he 
was succt-eded by his brother, Mr. H. I). Reid. lll-heallh super- 
vened and during recent years Sir WilTam had been an invalid, 
and h^s resided in Canad.t. 

With the tansfer of the Light .ind Power Company to another 
cirporation, the connection between the Reid f.imily and the 
public utilities of Newfoundland, has apparently terminated, 
though the h.uidsome .suite of otlices erected on Duckworth St. 
indicate that its interest in the industrial development of the 
Colony's resources continues. 

Sir William DulT Reid was the el.lest son of the la;e Sir 



Robert Gillispie and Harriet Duff Reid. He was bom in New 
South Wales on November 20th, 186S, and came to this country 
in 1890, and was associated with his father in tne building of 
the cross-countrv railway. On the latters death he became 
President and General .Manager of the Reid Newfoundland 
Company, which posiiion he held until 191S. when he was suc- 
ceeded by his brother, Mr. H. D. Reid. 

Practiolly the entire railway system of the Colony was built or 
rebuilt under his management. 'He was his fathers's right hand 
man during the construction of the line from Whiibourne to 
Port-au.x-Ba^ques. and in later years the various branches were 
contracted for and built while he was at the head of the Com- 
pany. 

Sir William, ap.irt from his railway association, took a very 
keen interest in local affairs, and it was through his influence 
that the Company took an active part in the political fight of 
1900. He was created Knight in 1916. 

For several years Sir William Reid was a prominent figure 
in financial circles, and occupied a place on the directorates of 
several well-known financial institutions, including the Bank of 
Mon'real and the Domic iin Iron and Steel Company. Ill-health 
brought an end to his .ictivities and for the p.ist si.x or seven 
years he has resided in Montreal. 

Sir William was n.arried in 1893 to Minnie, daughter of the 
late John H. Co'm:ick, of Ottiiwa, who with four children. 
Howard. Leonard. (Inrdnn, and Mrs. ICnox-Nevin survive him. 
Another ?o ■, the gall.inl Lieut. Bruce Reid, made the supreme 
sacrifice at Beaumont Himel, on July ist, 1916. Messrs. H. U. 
and R. G. Reid are brothers and Mi^s Nellie Reid of Montreal, 
a sister. — Daily News. 



J 

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USING THE " RA.M " FORCINr, THROtOH THE ICE. 

Ice-Bound. 

By G. Cooper. 

Duml \\ t'lt^ Hills hurhouTS watch 
TI.e forces which surround them ; 

Tlie warring king of all the North 

Wiih his ice gnard;; has liound them. 

And there's no force can vangni-h hitu 
'Mong a!) P^arth's niiglity Races. 

But the unconquerable Sim. 

Who sails heaven"^ cloud veiled space-^. 

In the appointed time >tuili dii\e 

Tho>e ruthless hosts befi>re him 
And the unfettered smiling lands 

Iir freedom .shall adore him. 

Mutely ihe iitile harlxjurs wait 

To catch his first reflection 
Kven as our beloved dead 

Await the leauricciion. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-.-. 

"^ The Imperial Conference. ^ 



^^fS^'-"'^ ^^"o*'^^ there opened in London an Imperial 
|i("^V^ ^-'o'lf^e"" of the Prime Ministers of the Empire 

fi-|^x)' "^ '° "^"^ "'"^ "'"''"^ ^'^'>'"'^' and a supplementary 
^fcii;^ t^c"n'iniic Conference to discuss matters affecting 
^ the Empire itself. This Imperial Conference is 

the successor to similar meetinos in the past, the tirst df which 
took place in iSS? on the occasion of Queen Victoria's Golden 




HON. W. R. nARRF.N". K.i-'., Ll.D., I'KIME MIXISTER. 
A1 THE I.MPERI \r, CONKEKFNXK. 

Jubilee, it being then known as the Colonial Conference. An- 
other foUo.ved in iSi)7 when the Diamiivl Jubilee was cele- 
brated ; and yet anotner in 1907. to which the word '• Imperial" 
was first applied, 'i'hen it was aj;reed that such conferences 
should meet every four years, which prac:ice prevailed unsil the 
War began: after which conferences were held, during ;he pro- 
gress of the War. to deal more specifically wiih war-:imc pro- 
blems. The first Conference aftei the War was in ijji. but 
when it ended no definite provision was made for the next meet- 
ing, this being left for settlement as business demanded. 

The initiative in the recent Conference ca ne from Mr. Bonar 
Law after taking office in .N'oveniber. nyiz, when he declared 
his conviction that because of the depress! jn of British Industry 
it was desirable to promote inter-iniperi.il trade; and the pro- 
posed conference to be specially devoted to economic pro'jlems. 
.K date convenient to ill the Duminions could not be arranged 
until last October and meanwhile .Australia had suggested the 
consideration of Defence t|uestions and also of foreigti ..fiairs. 
.■\ccordinglv the policy was adopted holding two conferences the 
main subjects being as follows: — 

IMt'KRUt, :ONKEF<F.NCF,. 

The part each portion of the Empire was to play in future m 
relation to those foreign alTairs which concerned it primarily and 
how to secure joint action in such foreign affairs as concerned 
directly several pins or ail parts of the- Empire. 



Immediate inter-national problems, such as the situation in 
the Ruhr and the desirability of joint action and particularly of 
co-operation by the United Sutes. 

Defence Problems, particularly as regards Naval and air de - 
fence and especially the providing of a naval base at Singapore. 

The protest of the people of Indian agiinsl the political and 
soc;al disabilities of Indians in other parts of the Empire notably 
against the attitude of South .Africa and the policy of Great 
Butain in Kenya Colonv. 

ECONOMIC CONFERENCE. 

t. — Oversea settlement within the Empire. 

2. — Co-operation in financial assi>tdnce to Imperial deve- 
lopment. 

3. — Imperial preference; (1) Tariff preference; (2) Im- 
perial preference in public contracts. 

4- — Further steps for the improvement of mutual trade : — 

(a) Imperial co-operation in respect of commerciil intel- 

ligence: (i) com-iierci.tl, diplomatic, and consular 
services; (2) coiiimercial travellers' samples; (3) 
trade catalogues. 

(b) Stati-^tics. 

(c) Imperial communications: (1) Shipping; (2) air 
navigation ; (3) cables and wireless. 

(d) Reciprocal enforcement of judgments, including 
arbitration anan-'s. 

(e) Imperial CO operation with r ference to patents, dt- 
. • signs, and trade marks. ■ 

(f) Economic defence. 

(e) Valuation of goods for customs duty purposes. 

(h) Empire currency and t.Kchan^;e. 

(i) C "-operation for technical research and information. 

(j) Immunity of State enterprise. 

(k) Merchandise marks. 
3. — Imperial polic\ with regard to the import and e.xport of 

livestock. 
5. — Workmen's compe:.sation. 
7. — Kclucalion. 




HON. SIR M.^RM.^r.UKE WJNTF.R, KT., C^R.E , M.LC, 
AT THE l.Ml'KRI.U. JflNKtRENCE. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-: 



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HON. SIR PATRICK McORATH, Kll K.. M I,.r., 
AT THK IMPtRlAL CON FPRKNCK. 

At the Imperial Conference the Pri'ne Ministers s.it and Xe«- 
foundland was represented by the Hon. \V. R. Warren. The 
Economic Conference was a larger ^'ithering, other Ministers 
being included : and at this Mr. Warren had as his associate 
Hon. Sir Marmaduke Winter, Minister without portfolio. Hon. 
Sir Patrick McGrath. who was in London at the time workin" 
on the Ladi'.idor Bjnndary Case, and Captain \'ictor Gordon, 
the Acting High Commissioner, were called in as Economic 
Advisers: and in the same 'vay the other Dominions had large 
groups of '-specialists." Tne practice was for the two Con- 
ferences to sit on alternative diys and much of the detailed work 
was referre 1 to committees, to the sittings of which m.iny e.xperts 
from the British Public Service and the business community 
were called, so that it was possible to have available the know- 
ledge of the most competent authorities in the Empire's capital 
on every question that arose. 

At the various meetings of the Imper'al Conference .state- 
ments were made by the Cabinet Ministers directly concerned 
with the topics to be considered, this policy being adopted in 



order to fully enlighten the Overseas representatives. Perhaps 
the most interesting and impressive was one by Marquees 
Curzon on foreign all.urs in which he reviewed conditions in 
Europe and their etiect on the world at large, in a speech 
occupjing three hours and of so confidential a character that 
only portions of it could be published. As decisions were 
reached on the various subjects resolutions einbodving the same 
were approved and these, with summaries of the discussions, 
will be pufilishcd in due conrsr. 

At ihc Ki I'noinic Conlcrcuce a similar policv was pursued 
but here more rommiiice work had to be undertaken because of 
Ihe variety ot the subjects to be considered ard their sub-division 
m some cases into two and three .^ub-comiiiittees. However, 
conclusions «erc rf ached on all of the matters submitted to both 
Conferences by the middle of November and then the various 
delegates di^pir-rscd and returned to their respective countries, 
tor •Colonials" perhaps the question of greatest interest at Ihe 
Ectinomic Conference was the proposal for a preference in 
duties to be given on various foodstuffs, etc., produced by the 
Dominions. This policy had been in effect previously but was 
enlarged to some e.xtent, but apparently the new Labour Govern-'' 
ment is not inclined to approve of it and it will probably be de 
feated in Parliament shortly. The view has been expressed in 
Some of the Overseas Dominions, especially in .-Vustralia and 
New Zealand, that such a course will be harmful to Imperial 
interests, bit it is unlikely that any serious impairment of Iin- 
perijl relaiions will follow, though it is improbable that these 
Dominions will he inclined to send representativo to future Im- 
perial Conferences under the circumstances. 

Dealing rather more fully «i h the subjects discussed at the 
Imperial Conference it might he »ell to obsene that the question 
ot the foreign relations of Ihe different sections of the Empire 
proved the occasion of much discussion, the different scll- 
governing units of the Empire h.ive in large measure distinct 
foreign interests and problems, just as they have distinct 
domestic interests and problems, and it was realised that it is 
impossible lo deal with all the foreign affairs o' the various 
parts of the Empire tl)roui;h a -ingle channel. The question 
was seen to be the double one r f huw to enable Britain or Canada 
or Australia, to deal «ith those foreign affairs which concern it 
primarily, and how to serute joint action in such foreign affairs 
as concern directly sever.il part>or all parts of the Empire. -As 
to the first point, unanimous recognition was given, so far as the 
representatives present cou d give it. of ihe light of Biiiain or 
of any Dominion to negiii.ite and sign treaties, under full 
powers issued by the King on the advice ot the Governmeiit 
concerned, of course after informing any other part of the Em- 
pire which it might consider interested ; ratification rests with 
the same government, after parliamentary approval if desired. 
This constituted a formal recognition of the right of a Dominion 



'>*. 



c*.'Sv>33 



i f T ilTiiin V- -•^~'~^^~-^ -.-.--;?, 



THE S.S. "PAWNRK." LEAVING PORTUCAL COVE FOR HKLL tSLANtl 
WITH HIS FX( KI.r.ENCV SIR WILLIAM At.UKtlVCF. 

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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-34 



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government to negotiate and sign treaties on its own behalf or 
more strictly speaking, tn advise the issue bv the King of full 
powers tu us representative to sign in respect of the Dominion 
concerned. 

Where two or more governments were concerned, the practice 
of joint negotiation and signature, established in Paris, and rati- 
fication by the several governments or parliaments, "should, it 
was considered, continue. Before the Conference there had 
been much discussion as to the desirability of increased machinery 
for consultation or decision in atiairs of common interest, 
whether by cabinets or councils sitting in London, or by special 
secretariats or by resident Uommion ministers in London. 
None of these proposals found definite or substantial backing in 
the Conference ; the problem is still a problem, but the clearer 
understanding of the fact that each self-govering part of the 
Empire has foreign affairs which are primarily its o^vn concern 
reduces the scope of the problem, and the rapid transformation 
of the means of world-wide communication which is in prospect 
promises a great reduction in the physical obstacles to full and 
frequent cou>rultation on such issues as are of juint concern. 

On defence, there was a thorough review ot the general situa- 
tion and repeated discussion of technical details, particularly as 
regards naval and air defence. In this as in other fields, it was 
recognized that the task of the Conference was to permit an 
inter-chan.;e of views and information, and not to formulate 
policies; It would remain for each government and each Parlia- 
ment, in the light of all the data available, wherever secured, 
to decide on its act'on. Standardization as far as possible of the 
air forces of the different parts of the Empire was recommended. 
Of specific proposals, the provision of a naval Base at Singapore 
was much debated; the Biitish Government had already com- 
mitted itself to the project, and it was endorsed by the bulk of 
professional naval opinion, while the Liberal and Labor parlies, 
with backing from free lances such as Sir Percy Scott, .Admiral 
Kerr, and Col. Repington. attacked it vijorouslv ; the Dominions 
concerned. .Australia and New Zealand, ft lally e.xpressed their 
individual approval and "deep interest '' 

It would be regrettable if the policy of holding these Confer- 
ences in the future should lie- abindoned because of friction 
over "preference,' because a Conference such as that of 
1923 serves many ends. It enables the heads of the various 
gf>vernments to understand the person, il education in problems 
ci empire, to interpr-t ihe letter or the cable ihat without some 
knowledge of the sender is only half under-tood. It provides 
an intensive short course in Empire politics, an e.xchange of 
information and of views which leaves no man's opinion exactly 
as it was. It aids in the s:t lemeot o* such interimperiil issues 
as are creating friction and the anjustmtnt of such foreign affdirs 
as the dilTerent parts of the Empire have in common. It is of 
distinct value as a forerunner of the wider League of Nations. 
Its usefulness is limited, however, unless means are found of 
enabling p.iiliaments as well as ministers to coosider and debate 



the issues iavolved. As for the hopes Mr, Bonar Law or Mr. 
Baldwin entertained of finding in the Conference an immediate 
solution of Britain's industrial ills, it is doubtful whether they 
will or could under any circumstances come to fruition. The 
cure for those ills must be sought both closer at home and 
farther abroad. The return to stahility and prosperity rests 
primarily with each people for itself; so far as joint action is 
necessary, it will require to be on a wider than an Empire scale : 
it is not within the British Empire that the chief obstacles to the 
world's peace and prosperity are to be found to-day. 



T. P. on The Premier. 

In the London Sunday limes, of October 14th. Mr. T. P. 
O'Connor. M.P., the veteran Journalist in his weekly article 
thus refers to our Prime Minister : — 

" I have rarely been at a more interesting Speaker's reception 
than that of Wednesday of last week. It was for the Dominion 
Premiers, and, of course, they were the heroes of the occasion. 
• » « » » • 

" Mr. Warren, the Prime Minister of Newfoundland, with his 
dainty little wife, was accompanied by a whole bunch of his 
countrymen — including, of course. Sir Patrick McGrath, the 
journalist, who has held almost every position in his country, 
and is always put forward when any Newfoundland business 
has to be done. 

" There are no people in our Dominions wiih whom I fee' 
more akin than the nanves of our oldest Colony. I have been 
hearing of Newfoundland since I was a child — it was around 
me — tar more ihin heaven — in my infancy. In the old seaport 
of Galway there used to be lyin;; up in ihe harbor, between her 
voyages, a dreadful looking old hulk wh'ch was called the 
67(r«/?i"i?, and "■ hich was the pmperty if a shipbuilding family 
of ihe town. She was always known as the " Lucky Chireiue" ; 
I have always thought that she was called " lucky" because she 
ought to have gone down and never did. Anyhow, she was a 
tremendous favorite with the Galway people; and for some 
reason so was Newfoundland ; and hundreds, if not thousands 
of them went to Newfoundland every yea''. 

" When, therefore. I meet a man from Newfoundland I always 
expert ti find that he comes from Gilway or a Galway fimily. 
Lord Morris, for so many years Prime Minister and most pro- 
minent figure in Newfoundland, certainly comes from one of tlie 
b'st-known families of Couniy G.dwav ; Lord Killanin and his 
b-other Colonel Morris of the Irish Guards— killed early in the 
war and one ot the most popular commanders who ever lived — 
belong to the same fimily. I don't think Mr. Warrm is Irish — 
he has the fair hair ai d f.iir complexiim .^f ihe typical English- 
man ; lie is a short, alert, keen-locking man I'd hate to have 
to fiiht the periinacity in his c\es again-t anything that New- 
fonnaland asked from the Mother Countiy " 



A Scene at the Seal Fishery. 



.Or't>»r 




h.\l;i.i.ng seals 10 .\m KS FRO.M .SHII'. 



ARRIV,\1. NK\R SHlf WITH TOWS OF SEALS. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.--. 

^ What Guiding May Mean to Newfoundland. 



j^ 




Br Lady 

"The great ihinE in this world is not so much «he,e we stand as in wh»t 
direction we are moving.'* 

It. over our F.iiipire happy companies of Guides 
are springing up. Children cauyht by the 
romance and tnerry companionship of this en- 
chanting game learn to serve and love their ser- 
vice. Sir Robert Baden-Powell, the founder of 
the Boy Scouts and Girl Guide Movements, must indeed be 
happy as he watches the growth of his wonderful garden. It 
is given to few to sow dreams and so swiftly gather garlands, 
and he ar.d the Chief Guide now reap, and that deservedlyl 
a goodly harvest. 

The essence of guiding is service to others with whole hearted 
preparation that the service be worth the giving. Little Brownies 
begin with their motto " Lend a hand" and their promise " A 
Brownie gives in to the older folk, a Brownie does not give in 
to herself." The Guide learns the " laws" and promises to be 
true to her God. King, and Country, and to help other people 
at all limes, while her big Ranger sister promises to carrv these 
resolutions into a wider world and do her best as a citizen. 
What betler training could be given to our girls, or what higher 
ideals ? Their work of preparation helps thein to acquire know- 
ledge in home-making, nursing, cookery, games and nature- 
.study. The patrol systein teaches the child to accept responsi- 
bility and develop confidence, self-reliance and reliability. The 
standard of honour is high, and simplicity, kindly sincerity, and 
purity, are the ideals they aim at. A sisterhood which knows 
no barrier of class or denomination, a band of women and grow- 
ing girls who try with I heir whole heart to be true to their 
Church and loyal to their King and Country, working together 
for their own good and that of others, should ultimately influence 
public life and raise the standard of patriotic citizen.ship. 

The spirit of Guiding has crept into the homes of the crippled 
and maimed and blind. It carries love and comfort to orphan- 



Allardyce. 

ages and industrial homes. It brings sympathetic helpfulness 
and camaraderie into noisy factories and overheated workshops 
and turns work into play, and play into joyous serrice w he re- 
ever it rests. The corner stones are the Guide Laws which 
teach courtesy, helpfulness, purity, and loyalty, and a child's 
generous heart is quick to respond to their call. They may fail, 
but they try again. To realise this one need only attend a 
meeting of a Brownie Pack and watch the happy intent faces 
and listen to their voices, .^sk them what they do to " lend a 
hand" and hear the eager answers, " Help wash up," -Help 
scrub the Hoor," ■• Mind baby," -'Help cook," " Help mind the 
shop," or the shy answer, •• Clean farver's boots." And then 
watch the dance of the elves, fairies, pi.\ies or Little Folk, all 
under the care of their Brown or Tawny Owl. 

Then visit a meeting of Guides in the making, — bandaging, 
cooking, signalling, dancing, all movement and laughter, respon- 
sive to discipline, that they may " be prepared." Then later the 
Rangers — they are learning less easily: often too tired to re- 
spond to their Captain — but they too are eager to share in the 
magic of cheery companionship and wholesome recreation. 

Thousands would join were there others to guide them, and 
those who would guide should be keen, unselfish workers. 

In Newfoundland surely this Movement may spread to the 
Outports and isolated, lonely harbours, giving guidance and 
knowledge to the women and mothers of the future that all 
may have courage to profess and be true to the?e ideals. Then 
their sons will be statesmen and their country will prosper. 
Other countries than ours h.ive e.igerly grasped these ideals, and 
if they are followed a very lasting peace may come to this war- 
weary, anxious old world whose sunniest corners today are 
where Girl Guides are " preparing." 

"Thoushalt be served tin self by every sense of service which thou 
renderest." 



^^B'B^M^'WW' 



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The Fiery Cross. 



By Robert Gear MacDonald. 



[.\ notable feature in the conduct of the Vear of Continuous Prayer now 
being conducted for the Conversion of England to the I-'aith of lesus Clui>t 
in preparation for the great missionary campaign to be undertaken for this 
purpose next and the following veais, is a representation of the J-iery Cross, 
the parsing on of which among' the .'^cottish clans in olden days was the 
signal to prepare far war The Cross is being passed from parish to parish 
throughout the whole of England ; and a special form of service has been 
drawn up for the leception ot ihe Cros> at the lorders of the paris^h. or at 
the west doorof!he Church, liie clerizv. choir, and servers afterwards going 
in procession to the High .\ltar. Many hundreds of Churches and a large 
number of Keligious Communities are taking part m the (. rusade ] 

Not as of old when o'er the hills 

The heralds .sped the Cross of Kire 
With news of war. and clansmen's wills 

Were stirred by thoughts of feud and ire ; 

.\nd tartaned wairior.s mustered fast 

To the appointed pl.ice, to know 
Their chieftain's will,— these days are past 

Into the deeps of long ago. 



To-day to greater lights it calls 

To strenuous spiritual war — 
Where deadly sin the mind appals 

Where lust and crime and evil are. 

Where reeking slums are festering wide 

In cities, in the south or north. 
Through hamlets small, by rivers' side 

from point to point the t.ross goes forth 

Yiom peaceful convents, or wheie wend 
The hurrying hosts of London town. 

Ky day. bv night, instant ascend 

Prayers numberless, to Heaven's high 1 hrone. 

Prayers for a Nation's due return 
To Faith in fiod, to Chiisiian ways — 

Shine on, O Cross of Fire, and burn 
Till all Karth sec thy glory's blaze I 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— iS, 

Life and Letters of Sir Edward Mortimer Arcliibald, K.C.M.G., C.B. 

By his daughter Edith J. Archibald. 



^353M()NG Canadians who have achieved distinction 

^5g> beyond the limits of their o\Yn country, there is no 

A'ii '"Of« honorable ngure than Sir Ednard Mortimer 

\^/i^' ki •■^'■chibald. and n is the belief of the Publisher 

^^^^^i^ '^■^' '*i°se who like interej-ting and stimulating 

biography wiU be ^lad to have placed within their 

reach his Z;/f ./i./ l.etkn—z story of Fifty Vcars of Service. 

He was twenty-three years in the ancient Colony of New- 
foundland, where he filled several important offices, including 
that of Attorney-General and he was Consul at New York for 
twenty-si.t years, during what was perhaps the most eventiful 
period in the history of the I'nited States, — in all a period of 
nearly lifty years of active service under the C.overnmL-nt of 
Ore it Britain. 

The Rt. Hon. Sir Robert Laird Borden concludes his grace- 
ful Foreword with these words: 

•' His foresight and vision were never displayed more dis- 
tinctively and strikingly than in the remarkable dispatch of 
-April 24th, 1S61, which conieyed to his Government the tidings 
of civil war. destined to rage tor three years in the duided and 
distracted Union. If his conception of the conrtitions in the 
United States and of thtir certain outrome had impressed itself 
upon those who then directed and formulated the policy ol Great 
Britain, the bitterness and antagonism that persisted between 
the two countiies for many years might have been avoided. 

" His years of public duty were full and honourable. Not 
only his family but all his countrymen have a just pride in the 
memory of his distinguished service. 'I'o him at its conclusion 
the meed of praise that he received and had so well earned 
might be fittingly e.xpres.sed in famihar words : " Semper honos 
nomenqiie liiiiin latidesque maiiel'iiiit. ' 

FOR IHRMONY IS THE " ENGI.ISH-SPFAKING WORLDS" 

The late Walter H. Page, who was .Ambassador for the 
United Slates in ^Treat Britain during the World War, as re- 
vealed in his Life anil Letters published two years ago, is another 
examble of a man ot remarkable character and high ideals 
labouring for a great cause and a better understanding between 
the two great Nations. A wellk-nown publicist has declared ; 
"Sir Edward Mi» timer Archihald was l/te If'it/ter /fines Page 
of tne Ci'il Il'cir." 

The story of his life has been adequately and faithfully told 
by his daughter, who says in the preiace : 

» My father had carefully preserved a verv large number of 
papers, dispatches and personal letters; all on matters bearing 
on the story of those old davs; and had made memoranda relat- 
ing to State papers and dispatches already deposited in the 
Archives of the Foreign Office in London, to which he e.xpectfd 
to be allowed access. Indeed, he had already commenced his 
congenial task. when, but a few short months after his retire- 
ment, he was smitten with his tatal illness. 

It was many vcais afterwards, that, as the sole survivor of the 
family, all these papers came into my posses-io^i ; and several 
more before I fourd Icisuic to ex. .mine thctn with the attention 
they merited. 

Struck by their unusual interest, I spoke of them to several 
of the public men who had personally known and esteemed my 
late father. Among the.se were his lifelong friends, Mr. Cyrus 
W. Field and .Mr. Whitel.iw Reid ; and I also interviewed Mr. 
Richard Gilder, the Kditor of the Century Mag,nine. All of 
these gentlemen most emphatically urged me to have the papers 
put into shape for publication. A busy woman, much occupied 
with manv outside interests besides the care of a growing famil) , 
1 deterred the t.isk until I should have more leisure. 

1S61— THEV WIM. NUT HE FOROOTTEM— 1 Q I 4 

■■ Although the North has been taken at a disadvantage— has 
been bv the wily plans and pre-arrangements of the Sece.s.sionists 
stripped of arms, of which ihev are now in great want for their 



volunteers — there cannot be a question that they will, neverthe- 
less, ett'ectually suppress the rebellion. They tiave. after long 
and patient forbearance entered upon the struggle forced upon 
them with a determination never to bring it to a close until they 
shall have effectually prevented the possibility, for a long time 
to come, of the recurrence of any similar attempt to subvert the 
Constitution of the Republic." — Sit Edward Mortimer Archibald 
to the British GovernmerU, April 24th, lS6r. 

" . . . it seems inevitable to me that Germany will be 
beaten." 

"• . . F.ogland is now going in deliberately, methodically, 
patiently to do it^e task." — Walter H. Page to President Wilson, 
igi4. 

A WORD ABOUT THE AUTHOR. 

Edith Jessie Archibald, the youngest child of Edward 
Mortimer and Katherine Archibald, was born April 5th., 1854, 
in St. John's, Newfoundland. She was educated in New York 
and in London, England. 

On June 2iid., 1874, she married Charles, second son of the 
Hon. Thomas D. A.irchibald, Senator ot Sydney .Mines, Cape 
Bieion, and liveci at Gowrie Colliery, Port Morien, C. B., from 
1874 to 1895. Her active mind and broad sympathies found 
an outlet in work amongst the girU and in the endeavour to 
improve the condition of miners. She also used her pen to 
good purpose and wrote liiaiiy articles for magazines and 
papers. 

In 1S95 Mr. and Mrs. Archibald with their family moved to 
Halifrt.x, where her genius and engeries found many outlets. 
The Women's Council. .Musical Club, Victorian Order of Nurses 
and Children's Hospital were all channels of expression for her 
altruistic activities. For her services during the late war the 
Order of St. John of Jerusalem created her a Lady of Grace. 

Her education and sympathies eminently fitted her to write 
the Life of her distinsu'isli^d father, an effjrt of her later years, 
and a titling crown for a life so well spent. 

Price $3.50 net, postage 14 cts. extra. Pulilisher— George 
N. Murang, 386 Victoria S;reet, Foronto. 




ANGLING AT Nt.V'E MILE fOST. 



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p iniii i in i .piimi i ,ji««<jtij<j"i !i t»- ' .i.,^wt"j'»; i' H ' W" ' "."jjli^ 



K.s§(e~ 



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I- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-29 

"M.F.H."...A MEMORY 

Of the Right Rev. M. F. Howley, D.D., Patriot and First Archbishop of Newfoundland. 




T[iE hnur is now. when all the sie'Iinff worth 
Of this thv land should strip to face the storm 
In naked strength of so'.il — but who shall lead ? 
While the snug opportnni-t viens thy need, 
'Waiting the hour upon thy heart to fall — 
God is the country sleiile of [he breed, 
Whose batile-hlood responded to thy call ? 

When falsehood, trickery or brazen fraud 

In the hi^h seats of public service scorned 

The public good. then, like to a knightly standard 

Where the battle fiercest raged. 

Brave shone this trinity of signs 

And "round them patriots closed 

To guard thee Newfoundland. 

M. F. H. : to thee thy land w.is first 

Of all the lands of earth. 

Thy soul enrapt her as the mother's aims 

Her first-born fondiv folds. 

Thy thouijhls were ever searching for her good 

And like the riood tide sweeping in her bays 

Thy ardour rose ,it all that brought her fame. 

His pen proclaimed the prowe.ss of Ihy breed 
In tale replete with many a noble deed. 
In councils whe.e he met the men of slate 
His voice was potent in the grave debate. 
His coumiy's cau<e he ever made his own. 
Nor rested till the rights he s.iught were won. 

He searched the records of his land to find 
The valiant deeds her history enshrined. 
Triumphs and itri.sgles of her pioneer age 
^nd showed them forth in many a globing page. 



-"/^ 



The forum he.ird his message clearly told 
Of stored resources of more wealth than gold : 
Thy lake*, fair beavitioiis gianls of energy. 
And all their latent power meant to thee: 
Thy timbered liills and valleys spreading fair. 
For all ihv aims and efforts were his care. 

He sang the vistas of thy woodland ways 

Where oft he strolled the Humber's b.inks along. 

The calm majestic grandeur of thy bays — 

Thy Spring-kissed valleys — stirred his suul to song. 

The .-Vutunin's splendor and the rain fed rill 

.•\ Ivric gave. -The Dear did .'-outhside Hill." 

The crystal "berg, fantastically fair 

His fancy filled with beauteous forms and rare. 

.-Vnd all the wonders of o'lr northern night 

Thrilled his poetic spirit with delight. 

He prayed that from within thee might arise 

A son of strenuous soul and high empri-e. 

Who would achieve by pnwei of voice and pen 

Fame for his land before the eyes of men ; 

Fame for the noble deeds her sons have wrought. 

Fame for himself, by dignity of thought. 

Whose hand should rout with all his land's consent 

The vampire demagogues who sap her strenght. 

{"omc, like the Spring. Oh son of destiny ' 
Come, like the storm and wake thy land as he. 
The davs are waiting thro' all their shining lionrs 
The morns, the evenings are listening for thy song— 
The stars thev seem to' seek thee as they shine. 
And the waves thit dash themselves against our rugged lorelands 
\re calling, calling for thee through the night. 
Awake, awake ! O patriot spirit of the Isle, awake! 
Awake ' and siand once more 
For what those letters stood erstwhile. 
For Justice— Truth— for Patriotic pride- 
For love of NewfoundlinJ- 



— D. Carroll. 



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1 

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I-:! 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-30. 

^ An Opposite Name. ^ 



'd\ 






By Rev. Gordoa Elliott 

r was aU the game warden's fault, there is no 



■r^l ■:' //< doubt about that, at any rate we've alsvays said s 
'5^J) ''t'cui^.c someone was to blame, and guiltily w 



so 

guiltily we 
Vou shall 
was a really lovely dav, 
you know the kind, a deep blue sky over head, 
flecked with those big feather-bed clouds, and a nice warm 
breeze moving my Lady Birch's (ingers just ever so restlessly, 



y 



, ^ thouL^ht or at least said vve were not. 
'^ 35 judge for yourself. U 









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.ANOt.ING AT HOI.VRIXJP. 
[/'/;,./....- by T. Q'.\r.im\ 

and you could trace ench putf of wind over the leafy surface of 
the hill as easily as you could over the surface of the big trouty- 
looking pool that lay at our feet. It seemed a perfect day for 
fishing, and so it was. There lay as ideal a pool as you ever 
saw, either in or out of a railway guide, there were we wuh as 
go-)dly assortment of gear as ever graced a sports outfitters' 
window, and we as full of enthusiasm as any follower of Isaac 
Walton ever was. But the tact remain^id there was somethmg 
wrong with it somewhere, so-nething was too ideal or else the 
trout in that luc.ility were lacking in aesthetic sense, any how 
whatever it was they certainly refused to rise to the occasion. 

My companion, Sam is his name, turned to the warden and 
asked, "Are there ever any trout here, or salmon?" I thmk 
the warden rather resented this reriection on his presence and 
pointing to a slender spruce stick decorated with a piece of 
grocer's twine, and a No. 2O hook, if there is such a size, siid, 
" I cau"ht three dozen in half an hour yesterday evening right 
where von're standing now, sir. Beauties they were loo, tar larger 
than ihat bi<'-est one you lost just now." The full force of this 
is not apparent until I explain that the warden h,is only one 
arm. not even a stump, and only a left one left at that We 
wilted and became --ilent. prayirg only foi one bite so that we 
could haul it out and lay it in triump all Hashing in its silver 
sheen, at the feet of this one-armed slaughterer of trout. He 
had hardiv finished spe.iking when Sam did hook -^"^^ "^''j 
everv care and art known to the angler he carefully coaxed tne 
silver beauty to the shore and in triump I earned it up and laid 
at this •• three dozen ma,.'.-" feet a silent tribute to his pro^vess, 
.,nd there it lay m all the freshness of its beaut), its ^''^er side 
tiecked with cri,n=nn spots and up and down among the si e 
there flashed the shades of changing colours betokening toge he 
with the slowing flapping tail that it was fast P!^^^";S t° ^^ 
unseen trout world where worms do not ^'Sg^ne treacherous 
hooks, and all will be flies and .sheer content. The ward n 
looked at the ■•Tribute" and there flashed ncro.s h s face he 
same sort of a look as must have crossed the fact of any 



Pharisee who watched the widow deposit her offering, for 
I'm quite sure the "tribute" could not have measured, well, give 
us the benefit of the doubt and say — less than three inches. 
There were other bites too, and if possible they demanded and 
got more attention still but the-e were not trout bites nor salmon 
rises, in f.ict we were the bitten, and we did the rising. I really 
think that though flies were the only things that welcomed us, 
at any rate they were cordial in their reception. The game 
■warden was about sucked dry, at any rate he looked it, and our 
party with its young fresh blood, proved very popular and I 
verily believe that every kind of fly that ever bit or even 
thought of biting, sampled us that day. and finding the sample 
good spread the glad tidings and the fun soon became fast and 
turious. There was silence, drone of flies alone could be heard, 
and the demigod, he of the trout spoke agani. ■• Why don't \ou 
try the, Pond over there on the other side up the creek? The 
mill-men caught three dozen up there last week. My boy will 
put )o(i over in the dorv." .Again th.it lalisman of 3 dozen, and 
the prC'Spect of perhaps achieving greatness in the angling world 
lured us on to our defeat. The boy did put us over to the creek 
in the dory, what's more rowed back again. We found the 
pools in the creek, and they just be'cught us to whip their sur- 
face io try and seduce the trout from their amber depths. Vou 
know the kind where the current rolls sluggishly and turf sides 
m.-.ke their depths seem so great, and on the banks you brush 
the heavy webs of spiders from fragrant bog myrtle and the 
swish of marsh grass and the flght of oragon fly, and the inces- 
sant hum of flies and all outlined as a green sward by the 
darker green of spruce and fir as it edges into the forest. .And 
rties — just flits. Vou smoke yourself sick and no relief co.nes 
and what is worst no trout, no, not a sign, not a rise. We 
left the creek then and we wendrd our way towards the 
Pond, oh, yes sir, only about 20 minutes liom the handwash sir, 
oh yes sir not any more. .And so lured on by this promise of 
20 minutes and that Will O' the Wisp who haunts all anglers, 
who ever place their hopes on the ntxt pond or the run round 
that bend we travelled on. We left the stream at first and 
travelled on a path that led between tall green firs and spruce, 
over green grass with tall orchis, nature's perfumery run riot, 
and underneatli a wealth of colour, and light and shade, a little 
cool, and oh, above all here no flics ! From this we stepped 
into the remnants of a wood, filled with the tomstones of the in- 
habitants of a glade that had been, but now converted to those 









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'WHERE THF, SI'F.CKLKI) BEAITIES 1 IE ! 



BSJimiSW i,l«l"J*'l'r%,'" 



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MJiaukdilfliiA 



'III/.. 



- — ^^C&a. 'I 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 31. 



poor maimed things that once were trees,— Pit props, and mind 
you that was a name to juggle with in that day. Here our path 
was carpeted with a shivering pink and green, the I.ennaius 
Boreahs whose delicate perfume lilied the air with scent as ex- 
quisite as ever graced a peri's bower. .\nd then our troubles 
began. 

For the s.ike of ease, as we thought, we took the stream for 
our path. I winder if ever you have tried to crawl up a small 
driblet of a stream, all small gravel and mos^y rocks and never 
a pool big enough for a shrimp, with a rod in harness, and crawl 
under windfalls and over windfalls, and round windfalls, and 
along windfalls. The gloom of -.tunned spruce trees the silence 
and utter absence of bird-life, the awful dies who explored inside 
and out every square millimetie of exposed riesh. Vou'd walk 
along, slapping yourself and shirr would go the reel, your line 
entangled at the top of your rod in a windfall, your mouth full 
of dies, you scramble round and u^itangle the top and the reel 
is now hitched up in a dead root, in sheer desperation a thought 
of abandoning the rod to its contrariness enters your mind but 
no, dancing on the brink of the brook is thit hobgoblin of the 
hope engendered by the pond. For one solid hour we scrambled 
sometimes on the brook, some:imes oil it, often in it, we strug- 
gled on. A smothered exclamation, at least sometimes smothed 
not always, a crash of withered bjughs and Sam would disap- 
pear and hardly would he appe^ir ag.dn, wiping his face free 
from spruce needles and cobwebs, withered fern and moss and 
the evcrl.isting rtv, and I would fi i.i my f^^et standing on nothing 
and a headlong dive took place into and among the windfalls 
and red 'tops'" and spiders and bretles, dust and dirt, and that 
rod flung for safctv anywhere and anyhow. M last my com- 
panion shouted "We're nearly there, 1 see the ciearint:." .A.t 
once, for I was round the bend there was swept away all knn»v- 
ledge of tlies, or windfalls, or heat or spiders and there loomed 
the prospect of speckled beauties, and the lazy tlop of trout and 
the whirr of a reel. 

Buoyed up by this, the last ico yards of that brook wis done 
in record time and iust before that pond broke into view I think 
that hobgiblin of the brook bank must have leered and giinned. 
Yes there it lay, an old brokeu-dain at its mouth, its old wooden 
piles facing us like the decayed teeth in some old skull and just 
typical of the scene which lay beyond. .\ shallow muddy lily- 
pond it was, where the lilh s hid not the heart to bloom, and 
round its edge, gaunt ghosts of ?pruce trees, stunned and afraid 
to grow. Grey strawy grass formed a p'omt into this pond, and 
to t"his I struggled, every footstep sinking into a quag of sour 
smelling mi.d from which each withdrawal drew forth a squeaky 
squelch. So sound broke the stillness of this pool no sun 
reached its surface, no colour save dismal grey to be seen, and 
never a trout had disturbed wither its baleful mud or the sod- 
den stillness of Its surface. It was a place of departed beauty, 
no trace remained, it was ghostly, and no one could imagine that 
it was peopled by the outla.ved gh.^sts of departed trout, doomed 
to spend their time in ever anxious waiting for a sun which 
never shone, for luscious Hies wnich never danced upon its sur- 
face while from bough to bough of their spectral skeletons o 
what once had been trees in one's fancy, one saw the spirits o 
departed javs, and mopes, and bitterns and owls dooau^d e^e 
to flit in melancholy pursuit of prey that never came vs'th.n the. 
reach as a punishment for misdeeds ,n the bird «°^W the> harl 
enj.ved too much. Sam squelched round the P°"d " ^a n 
search for .some sign of trout and as he .a ked he looked to nie 
to ht into the picture as of some spectral angler punished for 
disregarding the ethics of angling -"'^ . ''°"'^^''"'i': ^'^,J,l 
squelch around and around in pursuu -^ ^^P^^l'^''^^^'^^^ 
never rose and would never rise. W e left the I ond and in 
silence wended our w.ay back once more, chastened m spirit, 
moist with heat, bitten, yes badly bitten, .^f.er a hasty and 
undigniRed scramble round a greasy beach we ---^d in th s 
uate once more by the side of our friend the warden. We , 

three weeks ago the mill-man caught 3 ^o"" ''":""=^ '" '^'l 
about that magical •• 3 dozen tio.v. Any 

at all. It is called 
way It's a ' 



r,n sceptical 
-Pond. So, I'm not swearing 
the l)am(n, Pond. The parenthesis is merely mine, that s all 



r^^Sa*. 



-%---■ 







I^L^^i^-^aci 




FISHING AT KENT S Posn. 



Big Davey's" Woolly Man." 

By P. florence Miller. 

Biti Dave ^Aho ketches tish for -.s. 

He's great at ketchin' whale?' 
An' sunipir.' else — you'd never, giiei: : — 

He's good at telUn' tale?. 
There's one about the " Woolly Man" 

Who livL-> down under ground. 
Who listens all the Uvcloi\g day 
'; Fer every children's sound. 

An' ef they laugh an' dance an" sing 

He chuckles in his i;lee : 
" How good them little hlesseds is 

To save such steps ter me." 
An' Big Dave says this Woolly Mar 

He keeps a great big book. 
An' writes down every bad chiles nime. 

Their homes an' how they loo'sc. 

He gives that chile a hun'red tiities 

To weep away his tears. 
But when tiat's up, you beicha life. 

The Wocily Man appears. 
He pops 'em in a great big sack 

,\n' takes 'em down a mile. 
.\n' savs— " Now. you'll go back a jiin 

Jes' when you learns to smile: 

When you have learned to ^ive an' :ike. 

.\n' cut out saucy words, 
.^n' be like Chris-chuns all the cay. 

.\-singin' ;ike the birds." 
(Big Uavey always pauses here 

.An' squinches up his eye ; 
Takes good care not to look at nie. 

.\n" sucks his pipe-stem dry. I 

" So ef you'd be fer stiyin' home 

Grin when you tumbles down. 
An' should :he fellers swipe yer slid; 

Vou chase away that frown. 
A feller'd better mind hisseif 

.An' be the best he can. 
Cos when yeV cried yer hundred tines 

Up comes that Wooliy -Man." 



am^mti i .HW ' WI^ ^ " !'*' 



I iijiwAi I] '■---'■'n'g;^" 



:-:ip- 



Tilt: coiiiTiuinitv "■enerilK- Tn.l ik^ 
John's in partilr e lo Ue;'r;'''"ru"'^-'"^^- 
demise of John W. MccSh 1 u* "^'" "'''^'" 

becuse when .\Y,ss C.tt ■ n ;'":" f "' "°^^ '"'^^'^^""^ 

CO visit her bro:he.. Mr, Ric ud ' t^^^^l; Th^^^ '" '^« -^ 
lymg dang.rouslv ill in the C^ner..! Hosn"..' L m" P'"'^"' 
h.s friend, thu Jack was in the b t o,' it;"'^ 'T' "' 
take a course .huh w.uld c,uahfv hi.n U^T A , e 1 '' bT '° 

Ihe son of the ate [am-s F MrCruu \r u '-'" "■"^• 
of Assen,blv for n.anv veirs and If ■^'"""',!^ °^ '^^ "°"^e 
Pe.iten.iarf. Jack shL.e , ?ro t;'';:;;^^/---- o' the 
markable natural abMitv to uh.ch hw bdlLntbu tl7 ^^ '" 
fully tes,-iried. Darin? hi. school d us v St H,n "' 

when other lads were th,nk,ng of the>r boyish p,M,mes he ^^^ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-3. 

The Late John W. McGrath. 




THE LATE JOHN U". .VrGRATH. 

servinj; as shorthand reporter on the House of Assembly Staff, 
m addition to doing his ordinary school work every dav. lie 
proved himself one of the best reporters that ever filled that 
position: u-hile by the experience gained there he, no doubt, 
laid Ihe foundation for still greater success as thccontidential 
recorder of the President of the L'nited States, the late Theodore 
Kooseielt. i5ut at no time wis he merely a book worm or a 
student only; ht; was conspicuous in coileue games and manly 
sports as in the scholastic exercises. In due course he led his 
college in the C.If.K. Exams, coming out at the head of the list 
in the various tests, and eventually carrying off the Jubilee 
Scholarsh-p. He then went to Dalhousie University to take the 
course which it nffered. and there he won further academic 
honors and conspicuous recognition in its various sports, plaving 
«ith the University teams in hockey, football, cricket and other 
games. From there he proceeded to New Vork. at the instance 
01 an uncle residing there, intending to study law, but his pro- 
ficiency as a stenographer and his suitability for a secretarial 
position caused friends to bring him to the notice of the late 
"resident Roosevelt, who took him on his stall and who retained 
nim in his services until he retired from active political life. 
His association with Mr. Roosevelt brought him in touch with 
nearly erery person of political and commercial prominence in 
the L nited States and enabled him to see more of that vast 



"most Am ^ ''''"' ""^ '^^ ^'■^^''^«"' "'••'" " 'he ?ood fortune 
Mr Ceote \v"p'- ^''\°':'"' '^"= ^--denfs closest friends, 
hi^ ouTv^f ^^r.'^''^ ^"" ^"'"'^"^'1 bv the abilities o 
this )oung NewfourdLmder, and put him in charge of a bi» nsh 

Mc >a.Vnr h'.'' '"'''"'' '"'"'■'''''■ -'^ *>-<= =^Sain younl 

u^n eTnh 'r TTV"' "^ ^""'P^''^""- ^'""°"'"« 
MrCrnth """"^ ° ^1^- I'^fkins som^ two yrars ago. John 
Mc'.rath succeeded ,n organising a -rerg.r of fish companies 

I att.rlv h h*^ '^^J"^?^"!^"' of these up to the time of his death. 
Ko ton\h. I^f been residing at Newton Centre, a suburb of 
tio, s o^ h "'^' ^"'""^ '^' ^''^^ ^^'' °f the fishing opera, 

enolh t '°'^P.'"'" '"'^ ''^"^'^ f'"™ "^^ homeland, fortunate 
intere 1 n """ '^''"■, '°""d always a hearty welcome and a keen 
mteres, ,n men and things in this ancient colonv. Amongst ihe 
younger generation of business men of the Eastern Siates he 
was regarded as one of the most pmmising, and his association 
with some of the biggest men in the Republic made it possible 
^r him ,0 secure their co-operation and support in the develop- 
ment of the busmess in which he was interested 

Only 33 years of age, John McGrath had already made a 
name for himself ,n the outside «orld and but for his untimely 
end ,t ,s certain that he «ould have achieved great success in 
the legal profession. He is survived bv his widow, formely 
Miss Florence hteirback. and his six children. While in St 
John s he leaves to mourn his mother. Richard his brother and 
a sister Betty. Another hr<,ther. James, is at present studvin- 
medicine in Dublin. To the sorrowing relatives the Quarterlv 
extends sympathy in their ..reat bereavement. 

The followinc extract from the Boston Post referring to the 
late John U . .McGrath bears testimony to the respect and esteem 
in which he was held by the sport lovers of Boston: 

'-Hockey plavers and followers la-t night were shocked to 
learn of the death of Johnny McGratn, ihe veteran referee who 
passed away at his Newton home yesterday morning after a 
brief illness. Johnny was beloved bv piavers. He ruled with 
an Iron h,-nd and his word was law. As' private secretary to 
the late Theodore Roosevelt, Johnny acquired many of the' lat- 
ter's famous qualities. Players respected Johnny McGraih 
because he was fair, impartial and showed common sense in his 
conduct of a hockey match, 

Johnny knew every angle of hockey. ' He pla\ed with the 
Irish-American A. C. team of New York in the old Amateur 
Hockey league. He «as a good player. He was game Hockey 
in those days was a rugged proposition, but Johnny never side- 
stepped an opponent. 

His reputation as a go through referee was universal. Last 
year he refereed the crucial games in the Western scries in ad- 
dition to handling the important games in the East. 
Johnny's passing is a distinct loss to hockey. 
He called them as he saw them." 



^ A Gathering. ^ 

By G. M. S. 

0.\E entered in, and straight I was aware, 
Not of that presence added, but one gone ; 
And whose 1 knew not, nor had ever known, 
Till that revealing flash, the blank was there. 
Great was the emptiness it showed, and bare 
My house of life, lit by its lightning, shone ; 
The much my years had lost, the little won. 
Cried out aloud to nie — a swift despair. 
Oh leaden days, which all things seem to lack 
That brace my spirit to its task again, 
• If hour of thine might bring the halcyon back- 
That dearest presence, yet no pang of pain — 
What shining out of star above the wrack, 
What glory of the bow amid the rain ! 



V / /:_ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-. 

^ The Newfoundland Caribou. 

By Rt. Hon. Lord Morris, P.C., K.C.M.G. 



^ 



jy-t vears to meet and know most cf the great 

l^^^ h'^ . '" ■^'="^'^'^l^"rf' =>^ «-ll as tlu,se who 
^^ ha^e come to photograph and paint these noble 

and "barrens of Neufo.ndlard. In -his^on.r.bmion on .he 
hunt ns . f car,bou ,he sport for ki^gs. I shall endeavour o 
subs.an„ate ary-h,rg I may say by reference to tho e " el° 
an hor„.es. some o, whom, I regret to sav, have passed aw^- 
.ti7''- X '^''1°', -^P°^'^'"^"- '^^0 d,ed for the Emp.re in 

tllr ^ "v ""/ ^"W" ^'- '''"^'^- '''° -^^-^ "^ 'hat magni- 
ficent «ork, •• .\e>vf.,undl.aij and its I'.trodden Ways;' and 



Hh,ch to base legislation for the protection of caribou, gone into 
his question very fully, and my opinion ,s that there are still 
large herds of caribou in Newfoundland. I have hunted ihem 
myself in a small way. (,n one trip «,th ihe present manager 
?, ^he liank of .Montreal at St. John's, Nfr Paddnn ; Sir UUliam 
Keid «ho just passed au-a>), l^res.dent of the keid-Xe« found- 
land Company, operating, ,1,^ .\'e»foundland Government rail- 
«ays^: ard Mr. William C. Job, head of the rirm of Job 
Brothers^ und Co. at St. John's and Liverpool, «e spent a «eek 
on, the lopsnils. In (he matter of securing heads «e were not 
oiv that occasion successful. We operated eniirely from the 
railway track and d-.d not penetrate verv far info the countrv 
where the great caribou herds live, although Mr. Paddun secured 




CARirOU NKAl; kAll\VA\ IKX K. 



.1 



f 



Admiral Kennedy, comniander of one of His M.ijrstv's ship<, 
who in the 'seventies hunted the caribou for several years and 
left his experiences in a volume that is a cla>sic in it-elf. 

It would be impossible to make an accurate eslimate of the 
number of these noble animals inhabiting ihe wikls of a country 
larger ihan Iieland. the coasts of which only may be said to be 
as yet setllvd. I have heard it variously estimated that there 
are in Newfoundiard between one and two hundred thousand of 
of these animals. The late Mr. James llowley, Geological Sur- 
veyor of NewfotiiKiland. h.-d probably better opportunities than 
anv other person resident in or visiting Newfoundland of esti- 
mating the number of caribou. For over forty years he visited 
the interiorin the woik of the geolo-ical survev. He told me ui 
1917, a fea iiiiniths befoie his death, that he was of opinion 
there was nothing less than one hui.dred thousand in the country. 
I have repeatedly, when tishing and travelling through the 
countrv with guides with the view of obtaining information upon 



O'-e very fine he. id : hut I will say that on that occasion we were 
all satisfied that, from the number of carbibou seen passing and 
those repi>rted to us, there was still no serious diminution in 
their nnniber. 

In iSgG, when ihe Newfoundland Railway was being built 
across the country, and on one or two other occasions, particu- 
larly some years earlier when hunting in Placentia Kav. up Bay 
de l.oue Brook, near Bane Harbour, I reme'iiber seeing herds in 
which there were many thousands passing at a great distance. 

Sir W. Whiteway, who lived near all his life in Newfoundland 
and was for many years Prime Minister of the country, annuallv 
hunted the deer, as did alse my old friend, Richard While, 
whose duties as lighthouse inspector for over thirty years took 
him all over the country. He was an aident spoitsman and 
hunter. Both these have testified that in their opinion there 
were still large herds of deer in the country that never came out 
of the interior and had never been hunted. 



■3lP- 



taiiiBiill ^I'li I ■! III! r tiiftM«»i> 11,1 >i ii'mii- --^iiljiVi 



■I nJiffra^iiiii- iiii'T<hiiiitt -ifc«;. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-34. 



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.,-.»A^:-HT. ,lf:^ -ll^^r.., V^^imiA^'^.^ 



CAKKVING VKNISOX TO RAILWAY. 

N'o one who h.is wiint-^sed Ilir .li'nual niigrntinn'; f oni nortli 
to south and vice Vrrs.i diirmg ■>p'in^ nnd aiirumn cm have anv 
doubt OR the point of the nnmbtT o! these aniinnls. In 1897 at 
Howley Station, I ni'.se'i saw ihoii^ands pass in one afternoon, 
and this no <;uessvvo'k but a careMil estimaie. Guides and 
American hunters conlinn this and say they have counted in ten 
days four or five thousand cms-ing the Kxploits K'ver at one 
point. This part of Newfoundland, the Upper Deer Lake, is 
tht? great crossing-pl ice of the deer. Here may siill be seen the 
remains of miles of fences aUmg the Exploits River erected by 
the Micmac Indians a century ago for the purpose of trapping 
the deer for food. It is a common thing in the late autumn or 
earlv in the spi ing, as the train passes over the Topsails and 
Patrick '.s .\/arsh, to see from the windows hundreds of deer 
scampering along. 

Sir ]. G. Millai.s, the author of 'Newfoundland .md its Un- 
trodden Ways." has dealt extensively with the wh le subject of 
the Newfoundland caribou, both in his great work and in 
magazine articles. Writing at a later d.ite than the work 
quoted, he says : — 

■■The Newfoundland caribou far su-pisscs jhe European 
reindeer, and is ec|ual in si/.e to the caribou of Eastern Canada, 
but distinctly finer in the matter of horn growth. For it.s size, 
Newfoundland today contains more caribou than any other 
part of tne world and, owing 10 the nutritive qualitirs of its 
super-excellent moss and lichens, the deer gmws to i;reat ex- 
cellence. A big carib.iu stag in the latter part of September is 
one of the grandest things in creation. I know of two recently 
killed heads of over fifty points, and more gnod heads have been 
killed during the p.ist four vtars than every before. In 1903 I 
killed stags of 3;. 4;, and '49 points, the two last-named being 
splendid specimens. ' Newfoundland is just as good a hunting 
ground as it was titty vears ago, and of how many countries can 
we say that = I have been there twice, and enjoyed the best of 
sport, the best of weather, the best of health, and Ihe best of 
comrades. 

"In no country have I experienced Tiore enjoyable hunting 
than in Newfoundland. Over there is a s^nse of freedom we 
know not here. 'I'here is the great sun, the wide honzon, the 
dancing rivers, the woods of ever-changing beauty, and the ever- 
restless herds of caribou. There is more than a 



tion too, m kno.ving that here i.s land, within seven day.s of 
England, a great part of the interior of which has never being 
trodden by a white man— even by (;overnment survevors— and 
that you can pinnae into this beautiful wilderness and feel all 
the delighis of wandering at will through the recesses of an un- 
trodJen waste where deerstalking— and such deer, too !— may 
D= pursued with gratifying success." 

Here we have the independent opinion of one who will be 
■ taken as an authority by all living sportsmen. It is quite true, 
as Sir J Millais says, that Newfoundland is seven davs from 
England, but it is a voyage accross the Atlantic at a season of 
the year— August or September— when the ocean is tranquil and 
the seven days spent can be well fitted in as part of one's holi- 
day; and such a holiday as will be good for those who lead the 
strenuous life in Ihe bii ciiies. On a good ship it is practically 
l>ke staying at ihe seaside in a comfortable hotel. There is. also 
It e alternative route from Liverpool to Newf.-iundland via New 
\ork, by which i,n a fast boat you can get to the Newfoundland 
drer grounds in eight or nine days at the most. I am still 
hopeful that when we settle down to develop the Empire in 
earnest we shaU run an Empire .Atlantic service from G.ilway to 
Newfoundland and Ilalifax. Canada, -o that tourists, hunters, 
and business men can be landed at St. John's from f iverpool 
after three nights at sea in a fist boal ; and not even a Liisitania 
at that. Newfoundland sh'-uld easily be reached in half Ihe lime 
sn_'i;esied by Sir J. Mill.iis. 1 have myself crossed on the 
Lusitiiiiia, leaving New York on Wednesday morning and taking 
niy dinner in London on ^fol'day. having reached Liverpool in 
five da\s. But New Vnrk is far' her west by a thousand miles 
or t vo days from St. John's, S'l ihal on ihe same trip we should 
have gone from St. John's to Liv-rponI in three diys or to Gal- 
wav in two and a hdf diys We must all work for this fast 
Imperial transport schem-i, which will be a rapid, cheap route 
for empire trade, for transporiing raw material as well as manu- 
factured goods, and f.>r p issengers. wh^'her business men, holi- 
day or he itlh-'eekers, tourists, hunters, or fishermen. Eastern 
Canad.i or, as it is lerintd. the Maritime Provinces, Newfound- 
land iind Ireland svant such a service — a weekly service — which 
would enable passenge's to reach Newfoundland, from Queens- 
town, or Galw.jy it may b:^, in three davs, if necessary, there 
is no reason why the ship should not come on tn Liverpool as 
a terminus afier landing pissengers. mails, and freight in Ire- 
land. No doubt in the past the time spent on the passage 
deterred manv English and European sportsmen from visiting 
Newfound'and. Hence it is that for the one Enu|i>h hunter or 
fisherman in the deer season we have had a hundred from the 
United States and Canada. Nor need ihere be any over-crowd- 
ing in hunting caribou. 

Mr. H. Heskcth PricharH has several times visited Newfound- 
land, and in his work ■■ Hunting Camps in Wood and Wilder- 



1 \ 




■^.* ■'i'^\^*> 

,) 


. ■■- ' i 





ittle tascina- 



DISCUSSI.NT, THE BAi;. 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 35. 



ness," a very lar^e porlion is devoted to the hunting of caribou. 
He conrirms the opinux, as to the number of caribou there and 
s lys : — 

'• I do not think I t ver in any part of the world enjoyed my- 
self better ih.in I did on my hunting trip in Neivfoundland. I 
had an excellent guide and was fortunate enou£h to strike the 
caribou in Kfeat numbers. In one day's shooting I saw eighteen 
stags and at least tive times as manv hinds. It would almost 
seem that the art of hunting in Ne-Afoundland lies in linowincr 
what sta:;s not to shoot, ai d it is the man who is bolrj enou'^h 
to 'et a good head slip, in the hope of geiii";; a bttier oie. who 
secures the tine-t trophies. 1 was very plea^^ed »ith tie heads 
I -hot. for not only did they run to a large nunrber of points, 
but also the horns v ere heavy. Mv e.xperience of Newfound- 
land huniii.o ceri.)inly leads me to think that thtre is no country 
so I ear England where such e.vce'le' t sport may be had." 

Adii iral Kennedy, already referred to. says: — 



" Our trip hns been excellent. We have h.id good heads. I 
have shot five. Hamilton four and a black bear. The most 
points 4v Saw numerous deer and got some excellent 
photographs." 

Thus it will be seen from the evidence of these reliable wit- 
nesses that those in search of caribou may still go to Newfound- 
land with every prospect of good sport. It is true that of late 
years the big grey wolf and the lynx have been added to the 
game preserves o( Newfoundland, emigrating there from Canada, 
and have become a menace to young and unprotected fawns. 
It is supposed that the lynx crosses in the winter on the ice in 
the Si raits of Belleisle, which at the nartovest part is only seven 
miles, coming, no doubt, to hunt the hare and rabbit for food ; 
but except fur the fawns — and especially the unprotected 
fawns — the wolf and the lynx do not always have the best of the 
battle. 

A trustworthy trapper states that he once witnessed an excit- 







i' 




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„^,r<IHSfi^i'rr 



--■ ^--"-^'«"'- 



C.^RinoU CROSSIXI'. r.R.VNP PONTi. 



" The sport Mr excclknce is with the ritie, hunting the canbou 
or woodland reindeer. The animal is a finer beast thanihe 
Norwegian reindevr and carries more masMV.- antle.s. l ne 
sport I enjoyed on these occasions would fill a volume. 

Dr. S. T. Davis, of Lancaster, Pa., who hunted in Nevvfound 
land before the War and published a work as the ^es"lt of h,s 
experiences, states in ii that, during a twenty days '"P °" '^e 
White Hills inland from Halls Bay. h,s party saw 9°° dee b) 
actual count. He brought down a very hne stag whose eg 
was not less than 600 pounds, wh.ch yK-kled him the '^^gest and 
most perfect woodland caribou bead m -^'.-""; , ''Z^^';^^; 
this opinion on specin^ens carefully e.xan.tned ^^h"-^J[ ^^ 
opportunity offered, including -hose at the Sportsmen s E.xh.b. 
tion held in Madison Square Gardens, New \orlc. 

Writin^. from the.... Halacia on October 6, '9>o.°"h.s re- 
turn to England after his hunting trip .n Ne^fo-d -cl n > 
friend, W. E. Burn-Murdoch, hunter and art.st, wrote me as 
follows: — 



ing chase bv wolves of a couple of - prickets" or t«o year-old 
canbou stags. Their long swinging (rot enabled them to keep 
at a sale distance, until from the n.atureof the ground they were 
driven to double on their course. Both sides doubtless were 
aoing at their utmost pace. At this spot he measured the 
bounds of the caribou, and found them eighteen feet, while the 
wolves only cleared fourteen, so that the caribou easily gained 
on them when close Dressed. So much ahead were the caribou 
at times that thev rolled over on their back; in the snow, to cool 
their p.anting and heaving sides, and seemed to gather new- 
strength and refreshment from the act. 

I h^'ave said there are parts of the country that hitherto have 
not been hunted. On that point Sir John Millais. m his intc 
resting article published in the "Wide World Magazine for 
January, 1911, says: 

.' In conversation with Joe Iedd<,re, he told me that if I could 
reach the open country to the south of Mount Sylvester some 
season late in October, I would see more stags than in any part 



.|iipij^kWl.iHW^5ffP 



si*^' 



BUiaMaiJiiMiUi 



: 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-3e 



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AT THE TO ["S AILS. 



of the island. No hunter has ever been there, so I re'^olved to 
try and reach this ground. AccTrdingly, in 1907, I ess.iyed the 
passage of the I.on>; Harbour River — quite the worst stream in 
the island — and after thirteen davs' hard work, with four e.\cel- 
lenl Indians, I got to my standing cjmp at Shoe Hill ridge on 
September 18. Joe had not lied, for during the next three 
weeks I saw over three hundred adult stags and killed two re- 
markable heads. The country here was quite open, just like 
Scotland, and I enjoyed the privilege of using the telescope and 
making stalks on the open hills with the greatest pleasure. The 
ground was hard, too, so I found it no fatigue to travel fifteen 
or twenty miles a day — a thing impossible in the swamps, bar- 
reris, and boggy woods farther to the north." 

The caribou herds of Newfoundland migrate semi-annually 
from north to south, and it is during these migrations, when 
they have to follow certain lanes and crossii'g-points on certain 
of the great rivers, that the killing is largely carried out. This 
is on a somewhat smaller scale than the trek of the caribou on 
the vast central plains of North America. Colonel W. F. ISutler 
describes, in -'The (ireat North Land" this reindeer migration 
in these untrodden regions : 

'• When the long days of Arctic summer begin to ."ihine over 
the wild region of the barren grounds, the reindet-r sets forth for 
the low shores of the northern ocean: in the lonely wilds, the 
shores of which look out on the .\rchip_-lag-<. where once the 
■ ships of England's explo.'ers struggled midst Hoe and pack and 
hopeless iceberg, the herds spend ih- ll.-eting summer season, 
subsisting on that short grass which for a few weeks changes 
these cold grey shores to softer green. 

"With the approach of autumn the bands turn south again 
and, uniting upon the borders of the barren grounds, spend^ the 
winter in the fore.sts which fringe ihe shores of the Brar. Great 
Slave, and Athabascan lakes, thousands being killed by the 
Indians 01, this homeward journey. Waylaid in the passes 
which they usuaMy follow, they fall easy prey to Dog-rib and 
Yellow-knife and Chipewyan hunter, and in years cf plenty the 
forts of the extreme north count by thousands the fat sides of 
caribou piled high in their provision stores.' 

It is a common thing in Newfoundland in the trekking season 
to see thousands of deer in one day cross at various pi;ints on 
the Exploits River, as well as at Junction Brook, near Deer 
Lake and (Jrand Lake. Now the Newfoundland Radway runs 



from east to west, and in their migration the deer have to cross 
the railway track. Consequently along the line of railway is a 
favorite ground for the hunter to erect his camp. In this way 
he combines business with pleasure, as the daily train across 
country- brings him his mail and enables him to keep his 
larder stocked. 

But here these rambling notes must stop bv quoting ooe more 
authority, that of the late K. C. Selou<=, that Nimrod of sport 
who won fame as a mighty hunter in the wilds of Africa, and 
who, alas! like many more with the call of the wild in their 
blood, but, above all. the call of Empire, made in the earlv years 
of the War the supreme sacrifice, fighting with our forces in 
Africa, the land from which his mighty prowess had won so 
many trophies, (^nly a few years ago, returning from one of 
his hunting expeditions in Newfoundland for caribou, he descri- 
bed his experiences thus : 

" I think I never enjoyed an outing more than my last trip to 
Newfoundland. I got off the bearen track, found plenty of 
caribou, and of the five stags I shot two carried very fine heads 
and two others very fair ones, the fifth being a small one. The 
wild primxvnl desolation of the country and the vast voiceless 
solitudes, where ihe silence is never broken save by the cry of 
some wild creature, have an -inexpressible charm all their own. 
You feel that you stand (in a portion ot the earth's surface \vhich 
has known no change for centuries, a land which may remain 
in its natural condition for centuries yet 10 come. 

" I am often asked, ' Where can I go for a little wild sport, 
not ftoo far from home?' Well, there are many parts of Africa 
still teeming witn big game, but these grandest of hunting 
grounds can only be visited by men of ample means and leisure, 
and the same objections apply to all these parts of Asia and 
Western America where wild animals are still to be found in any 
number. 

" I know of but one really wild country where big game is 
still plentiful which can be quick'y and easily reached, and 
■vhere a shooting trip can be undertaken at comparatively small 
cost, and that is the Island of Newfo>indland. 

" My own experience iji that wild and beautiful country has 
been all too small, though I hope to increase it in the near 
future, and once more take my canoe up some unexplored stream 
that will lead me to the haunts of the ' deer' — the game /irr 
excellence of Newfoundland." 

MORRIS. 



pa^ l LWJ^^J^yp l ^^.^ll | JJ l ^.,^y^ l VW^jft^ l L l .^ ^ l»J^^4^ 



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::3^ 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— -7. 




MOTTO: 

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Manufacturers and^PMIVEE| 
exporters ^ J^ ^ 



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Quotation on appltcation. 

Board of Trade Building, 

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W. A. MUNN, 



A Yankee Privateer and a British Cruiser of 1812-1815. 



By W. L. M. in The Marine Journal. 
NNUMERAiiLF. «ere the battles between American 



g^so(?=\ <jQqB NNUMERAlit-F. Were Itie Datlles Detween .American 
a?y.H' //^ privateers nnd Briiish vr.-sels in itie naval war of 

OZ^>^r:^J' i8i2-iSiv When the United St.iles enlcrcd that 
i^^JSLl).^^ conriict fur '• Free Trade and Sailors' Rigjhts," 
■ yjlL^i^~S^ there were fullv +0,000 native American seamen 
in the ports of the North Atlantic, or ten times as many as 
were rtquired <to man all of the dozen regular fiigaies and 
sloopi of the young republic. That '.eft an immense reserve 
for the crews of the ■' privalclj-owned ships" — convened 
merchantmen, which immediately put to sea out of Portsmouth. 
Newburyport. Salem, Boston, Newport, New London, New York. 
Philadelphia and Baltimore, to cruise against the commerce of 
the enemy. These privateer craft, as a rule, were, therefore, 
well officered and disciplined as well as strongly manned, and 
they did not hesitate to attack the smaller vessels of the British 
navy when they fail to fall in with British merch.-.ntment. 

One of these battles, 1-ng recalled in sailor song and story, 
was the duel of .\merican privateer brig Chasseur and the 
British cruiser St. Lawrence, on the edge of the West fndies, 
February 26, 18 15. The Chasseur, Captain Boyle, on the 
morning of that day had sighted a sail to the eastward of Hav 
ana and had .started at once in chase. -As the Chasseur drew 
near, the strange craft was made out to be American-binlf. of a 
Baltimore clipper model, topsail-schooner r.gged, hut -he soon 
showed British colors. .She was. indeed, a forn.er American 
privateer, a very smart craft, that had been captured in .8.; 
while King in Ocracoke Inlet, by boast from Rear .\dm,ral 
CockbJrn's squadron, and artned and ec|uipped as a regular 
British man-of-war, under command of a gallant young British 
officer, Lieutenant Henry Cranmer Gordon. 

Captain Boyle of the Chasseur, conrident of easy v.ctory over 
what he took to be a mere armed merchantman came do«n 
rapidly, u ith his men at tneir stations. When within pistol sho 
the St. Lawrence suddenly triced "^ ^^[^°^^::2:T'^ 
ner decks lull of ^^l^r. .u,r...r^.^^^^^^^- [^^ 

j-e:^3%o-%u;':he^-n^^:^"^:^-;'-deathis 



attempt, and for a dozen minuses the Chasseur and the Britain 
sailed side by side, tiring at p/int blank range at e.ich othci's 
hulls and canvas. Then Captain B nle put his helm to pjrt 
steered along--ide the .St. Lawrence and as nis bows toitchcii the 
quarter of his antagonist hs shiuted '■ B-)arders. aw.iy!" Led 
. \ty Sailing Master W. N. Christie, the .American sailors rushed 
f.^rward t > spring over the enemy's ra.l — but the British tijg it 
ihe schooner's peak was hauled down and the St. LawreiKe ^^ '- 
surrendered. 

Though a short acion. it was a very sanguinar> o;e. Fi.nv 
of the British crew and thirteen of the .American crew had been 
killed or wounded in a quarter of an hiur. All of the standing 
rigging and most of the running ligging of the St I.nwieiuc 
was shot away, and her ma^ts soon, weit overboard. I he 
Briiish ciuisir had a regular crew of 75. and a number of oit-.cers 
and men destined for the Biitish squac'r.in off New Orleans. 
The Chasseur had a large crew of 120, ai told— m."c than 
siiificient to man her battery of six i:!-pound and eight ^-pour.d. 
guns. The British ship had twelve i2-pounJers and ore .,- 
pounder. Seld )m in the whole course of the war of 1.S12 ^ere 
antagonists more evenly matrhrd. 



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SIR M. 0. WINTER, S. IVILL. CORMCK, 

Fresidenl. Manager. 



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I^llJ^^y^lOVNDLAND QUARTERLY.-^S. 



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Manufacturers of Fine Bread and 
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Wanted to purchase, ^ 

fur cash, early i>s-ies of Poslage Slamps of all 
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•Am open to purchasa current issues of Newfound- 
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envelopes. It may pay you to look up your old 
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A:jent for Newfoundland. 




sr. |()HN s ii.\Kr.ijn. 



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JElLLJiEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— ^ 



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Against 1 00-200-500 Stamps 

British Colonies, I give Egypt. Sudan. .Syrin, 
Palestine, Arabia. Abyssinia, etc. 
Buy al<o stamps in large and small (|uanlitics. 

PAUL VLXCENT, General Delivery. 

Cairo. (Egypt). 



The Original Tobacco 
^ Of It's Style, ^< 



-—, 






^■>^^l»^^^»Wi^V—i^i I 



^.^ ^ 



y^iii^^^^ 














The Quality Is .^ .^ 
e^ Always Maintained, 



l^i;;7;ritins to .Advertisers kindly me.iTion^The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



-.Jt^ 



liiiT iV 



-- -■■-n,.--.'^- 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



-40. 



'< 



•^ The Seal Fishery, 1924. ^ 



As -e close the pages of this nrnherof the QaARFERLv the 
c.itch to date (April 5) are reported as follows -.—All the 
ships did not report last night, probably due to atmospheric 
condil o .s, «h,ch ih. PoMal "IVlecraphs sav were not favourable 
llo«e.rr the mes.nges ih.u did co-iie are verv encouraging. 
The .W-ptune killed and panned a'l additional 6000, whch now 
give, that sh>p a to-ai of 3o,o„o, of which 7 000 are on board. 




CAPT. GKORGE HVRP.OUR, S.S. " XEPTUNE.'' 

If all these seals are secured the steamer will have a fine load. 
The Terra Nova spent the day picking up pans and has now on 
board 9.000. She has still on the ice 8,000. The Seal mus'. 
have done another good day's work killing, as she now reports 
having 19,000 or 20.000 panned, and is now hoping to do a 
good day's work today picking up. The message from the 
K.igle is verv short, merely giving her position and stating that 
another tiight of the aeroplane is impossible at this time. 

The Viking's message from the Gulf is of the most encourag- 
ing nature, and there are good hopes of her securing a load. 
The Captain reports having seen the first sign at noon yesterday 
and thinks that the m.iin patch lies 20 miles northwest of where 
he was, .^s he was then steering in that direction, and making 
good progress, it is 10 be hoped that by this time he is in the 
thick of the fat, and to-night's message well be awaited with 
interest. The following are the messages:— 

JOB BROS. iSl: CO.MPANV. 

Neptune:— Killed and panned t<'-day, 6.000: on board and 
stowed down, 7.000: weather line and frosty; wind West North 
West, fine; dilflcult to get in direction required. Thetis just m 
sight. 

BAINE. JOHNSTO.V & COMPAXV. 

Seal :— We.ither fine, ice very tight, impossible to do anything 
with picking up pans: 19,000 or 20.000 panned; hoping to do 
a good dav's work to-morrow. 




S.S. "NEPTUNE," JOB BROS. cS: CO., LTD. 
BOWRING BROTHERS. 

Terra Nova: — -Total on Bjard 9,020; still on pans. S.oco. 

Eigle: — Position 10 miles North Kjst Hall Eis: Part-idge 
Point, .\nother tiight impossible. 

Viking: — In heavv sheet ice making slow progress, steering 
North West. First sis;n at noon today 20 miles South Half 
East Deidman's Is'and ; too thick to s-e far. From present 
indication think -nain patch liss North West 20 miles. 

POSTAL TELEGRAPHS. 

The following ships report crews aboard and well, Terra Nova, 
Seal. Tlietis, Stella Maris, Silile I, N iptune. Vikin^. N 3 re- 
port from others owing to atmospheric conditions. 

THE CATCH TO DATE. 

Neptune 30.000 

Eagle 25.000 

S-al 2C.OOO 

Terra Nova 17.000 

Ranger 3-4°o 

Total 95400 

LATER. 

Messages received at noon Saturday, .April ;th, were as fol- 
lows; — Ranger, 3,000 ; Sagona, 3,000; The:i-, 7,000. Pros- 
pects good. 



- 

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1 

1 


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A SPELL DURING A 10 .MILE TRAMP 
WITH A TOW OF SEALS. 



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)00 

)oo 

JOO 
(00 

400 

fol- 
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127. 



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JHJiE^^Z^^^'^^LAND QUARTERLY.-4r. 



AGENTS FOR 

LATHROP 

Marine Engines, 

FAIRBANXS-MORSE 

Marine and Stationary 
Engines. 



Best Scotch Household 

COAU 

No Slack, $(2. SO. 

North Sydney Screened, 

$13.50. 

Also Anthracite, all sizes^ 

We want to give YOUR order our 
particular attention. 



Our Coal is best, our prices 
Marine Engines and fittings, | are always the lowest, 

A. H. MURRAY & Co., Ltd., 



ST. JOHN'S, NFLD. 



— NOTICE TO 

Drivers of Carrlafigs, Carls, 




Cars, [tc. 



ORDER No. 3. 

Under "Street Traf=fic Regulation Act, 1918." 

1. Vehicles must travel on the left hand side of the street or road. Vehicles moving slowly must 

be kept as close as possible to the curb or side drain on the left, allowing more swiftly moving 
vehicles passage on the right. 

2. A vehicle turning into another street to the left, shall turn the comer at the left hand curb or 

side drain of said street. r , • • r 

3. A vehicle turning into another .street to the right, shall tarn around the centre of the mtersection ot 

the two streets, and keep to the left of the street into which it turns. 
4 Police Fire and Mail vehicles and Ambulances shall have the right of way over all other vehicles. 
5' The driver of a vehicle on the approach of anv apparatus of the Fue Department shall bring his 

vehicle to a stand still as near the left hand curb or side drain as possible. ^ 

6. Vehicles going in a westerly or easterly direction shall have the right of way over vehicles going in a 

northerly or southerly direction. , r 1 ti r tt vi 

7 Drivers of vehicles shall stoi^ whenever required to do so by any member of the Po ice Force, ei her 

veHnllv or bv a ^i-nal with the hand, and they shall obey his order and comply with any direction 
which he mnv crive them in the interest of good order, of trafific or public security. 

8 The d ver of a vehicle meeting or overtaking a street car which is stationary, for the purpose of taking 

on o di'chail n ' paUngers? shall stop his\ehicle at a distance of at least ten eet from the said car. 
and shall kee? such vehicle at a stand still until such car is set in motion, and any passenger who 
may have alighted shall have reached a place of safety. 

CHAS. H. HUTCHINGS, '"'^''Z cZ::L.n. 



-^^^^;;;;-— — -^77;f;;;;^i;;;71^ mention "-rhe Ncnvfonnaiand Quarterly," 




-"-^-'^•'11 1 II 



»*w^ ^gw J. ■ 'Tfcrfifj-' 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-42. 



■t 
1 



■J 



■I 




1 



Published by Authority, 

On recommendatioD of (he Assistant Collector of Customs, 
and under the provisions of Cap. 22 of the Consolidated Sta- 
tutes, (.Third Series', entitled " Of the Customs," His Excellency 
the Governor in Council has been pleased to approve the fol- 
lowing Regulations respecting Travellers' Baggage, and Com- 
mercial Travellers' Samples, form of Oath to be annexed to 
Invoices, and Form of Invoice. 

VV. W. HALFYARD, 

Colonial Secretary. 
Department of Colonial Secretary, 
February 14th. 19J4. 

Travellers' Baggage. 

1. The Rules and Regulations published on the 2nd May, 
1905, and the amendments thereto, are hereby cancelled, and 
the following substituted therefor. 

2. Subject to the proiisions of the next succeeding rules, 
wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet articles 
and similar personal etlects in the possession of persons arriving 
in Newfoundland and not exceeding 550.00 in value may, after 
due examination, be passed free, withont entry at the Customs, 
as Travellers' Baggage, but this provision shall only include such 
articles as actually accompany and are in the use of, and as are 
necessary and appropriate for the wear and use of such persons 
for the immediately purpose of the journey and for their per- 
sonal comfort and convenience, and shall not be held to apply 
to any articles fur use or wear at any future time or to merchan- 
dize or articles intended for other persons or for sale. 

3. Wearing apparel and other personal effects taken out of 
Newfoundland by re>idenis of Newfoundland 10 foreign countries 
shall, upon their return, be admitted free of duty without regard 
to their value, upon their identity being established. 

4. Wearing apparel, articles of personal adornment, toilet 
articles and similar personal effects brought into the Colony by 
bona-fide travellers who are not residents of the Colony shall 
be passed free, without entry at the Customs, as Travellers' 
Baggage. 

5. Articles of theatrical societies, known as " properties," 
circus horses and cattle, menageries, carriages and harness 
thereof, musical instruments of companies visiting Newfound- 
land for exhibition purposes, inay be admitted upon a deposit 
equal to the duty being paid, or upon a bond being given secur- 
ing the duty. Such bond shiU set forth a reasonable time with- 
in which the export must be m..Je. 

Commercial Travellers' Samples. 

Travellers' samples of dutiable goods including trunks and 
other packages in which thty are imported, may be admitted 
into Newfoundland upon a deposit of money equivalent to the 
duty or upon a good and sutticient bond being given for its 
payment. 

Such deposit mav be returned and such bond cancelled upon 
the export of th.> goods within one year of the importation of the 
Samples, and upon the receipt of a certillcate of landing from 
the foreign Customs to which they were exported. 

All samples shall be e.xamined upon arrival and the Com- 
mercial Traveller reporting them shall deliver to the Customs 
Officer for entry purposes an invoice or statement in detail show- 
ing the wholesale price of each sample at the Current Uomestc 
\alue thereof in the port or place from which it was imported 



Such invoice or statement shall be attested by the Traveller, 
and the quantity of such samples shall be duly checked by the 
Customs' Officer and the proper duty thereon be deposited or 
Bond given before the samples are delivered. 

The Regulations respecting forms of oath to be annexed to 
invoices presented at the Customs, published in the Royal 
Gdzilte oi the 7th June, 1898, and amendments thereto pub- 
lished on the 31st December, 1907, are hereby cancelled and 
the following substituted therefor. 

A. 

Certificate of Value to be Written, Typed or Printed on 

Invoices of goods for Exportation to the 

British Dominions. 

(I) Here insert man- I ( i) of 

ager, chief clerk, or /,-, oi (x\ 

a^ the case may be. ^~ ^ .." ^^^ 

,,. u . manufacturer 

(3) Here insert name - 

of rirm or company, supplier 

(3) Here insert name of the goods enumerated in this Invoice 
of city or country. amounting to 

(4) These words hereby declare that I [ (4) have the autho- 
should be omitted ^jj j^ ^^j.^ ^^j ^ ,his certificate on 
where the manufac- , f ,c ,. , c ■ , 

turer or supplier behalf of the aforesaid manufac:urer 

himself signs the supplier 

Certificate. ^^^ ^^^^ jj [^^ve the means of knowing and 

do hereby certify as follows. 

Value. 

1. That this invoice is in all respects 
correct and contains a true and full state- 
ment of the price actually paid or to be paid 
for the said goods, and the actual quantity 
thereof, 

2. That no different invoice of the goods 
mentioned in the said invoice has been or 

Paragitiph 2 can be ^^\\\ bg furnished to anyone: and that no 

n^ exptr't" toV^' arrangements or understanding affecting the 

Zealand. purchase price uf the said goods has been 

or will be made or entered into between the 

said exporter and purchaser, or by anyone 

on behalf of either of their, either by way of 

(5) Here insert par- discount, rebate, compensation or in any 
ticulais of any spe- manner whatever other than as fully shown 
cial arrangement. q„ jhj^ invoice, or aS follows (5) 

3. That the domestic values shown in 
the column headed "Current Domestic 
Values " are those at which the above men 
tioned firm or company would be prepared 
to supply to any purchaser for home con- 
sumption in the country of exportation and 
at the date of exportation identically similar 
goods in equal quantities, at (6) 

subject 

(6) Here insert . , 

.. ' . •• .. f,, to per cent, cash 

" Harehouse, tac- to v 

tory." or " port of discount and that such values jiTClude 

shipment." exclutie 

the cost of outside packages, of any, in 
which the goods are sold in such country 
for domestic consumption. 

4. That the said domestic value includes 
any duty leviable in respect of the goods 
before they are delivered for home consump- 
tion, and that on exportation a drawback or 
remission of duty amounting to 

has been 

will be 

allowed by the revenue authorities in the 
country of exportation. 



- -rm*: ?iwwr* &jm>JKM ^JW^yf'-' ' 



• 'JLtUilW^'S^^?^^^ 



-■-^ 



.,-i&iW&»*' 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 42 



D 

ic 

d 

a- 
i 
ir 

:t 
,h 
le 
le 
in 
7 

;s 

is 

P- 
or 

;n 

e 
he 



iv 



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= -3 




Enumerate the followins charges and state whether each 
amount has been included in or excludjd from the above 
current domestic value. — 



(1) Cartage to rail and | or docks. 

(2) Inland freight (rail or canal) 
and other charges to the dock 
area including inland insur- 
ance 

(3) Labour in packing the goods 
into outside packages 

(4) Value of outside packages 

(5) If the goods are subject to any 
charge by way of Royalties. . • 



Amount in cur- 
rency of expoit- 
ing country. 




Slite if 
included. 



B. 



, The foregoing is the form of Invoice required by thj 
1. iiic e. b Splf p-overnin2 )omuiions, viz. .— 

Customs authorities of 'he Sel -go er ^ ^^^^ 

Canada, the Conimo.iwealth of .^u^ ralia, .>eiv 
Union of South .Urica and Newfoundland. . , ,, 

, On the back of the invoice mu.st be ;"Uten yped o 
printed the Certificate of Value in respect of a U goo J^^ [ 

sold outright or shipped on '^°"''f "'^"'- /„,|',h pX'=""-'^' 
Value willbe required in respect of goods on v m h P efe^en 
tanff treatment is claimed, e.xported eithe °'" ' «^^^^^^ „f 
Kingdom or British Possessions: and ""'^ 'J^\ ';7 ,,„,», of 
Value in respecr of e.xports f-";'J°^7" ""'^1 Poss ssions. 
foreign goods from the United Kingdom or Bi i^H fos 
/special attention sh..ld be paid to tl^Colur^ 
voice dealing with current domestic .aue a tu ^^,,,;^,„„^ 

this is required by the Customs j^ ■•^J '^";h„uld fur.h 
when assessing value for dut>^ ['^P°''lll \ ^^- „f uie Cer- 
see that the particulars required b) Clauses 3 4 

titicate are acurately stated. 



4. It should be clearly understood that the prices shown in 
the column of the invoice 'headed ■'Current Domestic Values' 
must be those which are being quoted in the open market at the 
date of invoice for delivery for home consumption, and not 
neccessarily those at which the order for the goods was accepted 
and it may frequently happen that fluctuations will occur in the 
home market price between the date of order and the date of 
expoitation. In ordinary circumstances the date of invoice will 
be regarded as " the date of exportation," but where any con- 
siderable delay occurs between the date of invoice and the date 
of e.xportation, any changes in the " Current Domestic \ alues 
should be shown on the invoice. 

5. If goods are sold for home consumption at gross prices, 
less discounts and or rebates, such gross prices, together \vith 
particulars as to discounts and rebates, should be shown in full 
in the " Current Domestic Values" Column of the invoice. 

6 Where the discounts shown in the "Current Domestic 
Values" column are not the ordinary trade or cash discounts 
but ate of the nature of contingent discounts or rebates, they 
must be specified as such, and their nature detailed on the 
invoice. 

,■ Where the goods invoiced are samples and the price on 
the invoice has been arrived at after the deduction of a sample 
discount, the ordinarv gross prices and the ordinary trade dis- 
counts applicable to' the goods in question should be specitted 
in the " Current Domestic Values' column. 

,8 Any shipment which forms portion only of a complete 
order should be valued at the price per unit which at the date 
of despatch, of .such shipment, would be quoted for the total 
quantity of such complete order for supply under similar condi- 
tions of delivery to a domestic purchaser. 

iVc;/^-In the case of shipments to New Zealand, the total 
quantity referred to above is limited to the quantity 
actually specilied for delivery within 12 months, 
q. When goods are shipped "on consignment" that fact 
should be indicated in the column headed ■■felling price to 
Purchaser," and the -Current Domestic Values" inserted in the 
column provided for that purpose, as in the case of ordinary sales. 
,0. In the case of goods exported in bond or subject t^^ 
drawback, the value required, in the column headed Current 
Domestic Values." is the duty-paid domestic value, and not_^he 
in bond value of the domestic value less drawback. I he 
amount orduty or drawback involved should be specified in 
aau"e 4 of the Certmca.e. " .^ similar course shonid be ollow- 
ed in regard to goods subject to stamp duty, luxury tax, or 
other internal imposts. 

ir As regards goods which are prepared speciall) tor ex- 
oot ^nd whTch ordinarily have no sale on the domestic market 
Fh° value to be shown in the column headed -Current Domestic 
Value "M that at which the supplier would, at the date of ex- 

mmmsMm 

"r^^':::^cf^;-"~ratecorrectlythe charges 

de;;;ie.^^^:h?fo. of the invoice, lis the P^^J^ J ^ ' th: 
Dominions, regarding the inclusion m or e.vcius 

area, and changes in the nature m enumerated at 

t"?o"«re'z,s ""-nSirr.™. .o..,.^ » ».* 

charges, if incurred, being shown separately. 

, The certiticate on the invoice must be signed, in Ins 

14. 1 lie cenintaic ,■ . the manufacturer or any 

personal capacity, by the ^"PP"^' °^ ' „,f „f ,he supplier or 

person having authority to sign on ^e J ;t < PP^^^^^ 

Lnufacturer. .n- -ti.s^^. '"^Z*; ^ f ^ubh^ official, but may 
sarily be a magistrate, "Otarv. or otne p ,ig„aiures on 

be any person competent to sign as a 
ordinary business documents. 



;-d»^ 



.^ 



0tmim^M, -* t^ 'a *m 



tihiiHiM'- -.. I ,.fca.t..^.^^,.L><ii«iik^-^-,- I I i mra ni w i 



V'lnWi'Mfc 



THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 44. 




Post Office Department 

Parcels may be Fonuarded by Post at Rates Given Belcru.-. 
'• the case ot Parcels, tor outside the Colony, the senders will ask for Declaration romt. upon which the Conlenu and Value mast be Stated 



1 pound . 

2 pounds 
3 

4 
5 
6 

7 
8 

9 
10 



Fo» Newfolndland and 
Lab&adoe. 



8 cents 

II " 

M " 

17 - 

20 " 

23 '• 

26 " 

29 ■• 

32 " 

35 ■' 

35 •• 



Undel I lb. weight, l cent 
per 2 oz. 



Fo» UsiTiD Kingdom. 



24 cents 

24 •' 

24 » 

48 " 

48 " 

48 " 

4S " 



72 
72 



Fob Dominion of Canada 
and United States. 



No parcel sent to V. K. for 
less than 24 cents. 



12 cents. 

24 " 

36 - 

4S - 

60 - 

72 - 

84 " 

96 " 
fi.oS 
1.20 



No parcel sent to D. of C. or 
U. S. foi less than 12 cents. 



N.B. — Parcel Mails between Newfoundland and United States can only be exchanged by direct Steamers. Parcels of Furs must be accompanied by a 
Customs Export Entry. 

Parcel Mails for Canada are closed at General Post Office every Monday and Thursday at ti a.m., for despatch by train. 

" GENERAL POST OFFICE. 



LETTfR POST— INLAND. 

A LETTER enclosed in an envelope, whether sealed or open, 
addressed to any place in Newfoundland and the l^brador Coast, which 
does not exceed an ounce in i\ei;^ht uill be conveyed to its destination for 
three cents. This late is applicable for letters posted in one settlement for 
delivery in another settlement a mile or more distant. 

LETTER POST— FOREIGN. 

Letters for Great Britain, the Dominion of Canada, and the United 
States of America are forwarded to destination for to'jr cents per ounce 
or fraction thereof. X'aluable letters may be registered for delivery in 
Newfoundland for five cents. 

Circulars, that is. printed communications, when posted in lots of not 
less than 10, wholly alike, and left open for inspection, are accepted for 
one cent for each two ounces or fraction thereof. 

Newspapers or periodicals posted in the Colony for delivery in the 
Colony shail be subject to a rate, when sent from and posted by any office 
or printing house publishing the same, of one half cent per pound weight 
or fraction thereof, and when <ent or postedby any other person, of one 
cent for each four ounces or fraction thereof. 



Newspapers to the Dominion of Canada, the United States, France 
Germany, e:c., must be prepaid at the rate of one cent for each two 
ounces or fraction thereof. 

PARCEL POST. 

Parcels of Merchandise are delivered to destination in Newfoundland at 
the itte of one cent for the hrst two ounces, and so on up to l lb., which is 
forwarded for eight cents, the second lb. three cents addinonal. or 1 1 cents 
and three cents for each additional lb., or fraction thereof, up to 10 and II 
lbs.. %vhich is the limit, at 35 cents. Name and address of sender must 
appear on all parcels. Otherwise we will refuse :o accept them. 

Senders of Parcels for local destinations tnu>t write their names ar.d 
add:e5ses on the covets; if not Postmasters may refuse to accept them. 

Paicels for other countries must be accompanied by a Customs 
Declaration Form describing nature and va'.ae of contents. These 
forms will be supplied bv the Post Ofiice and are essential to ensure 
prompt despatch of parcel. 

Monev mav be transmitted by means of the Money Order System a-id 
bv Telegraph to places in Newfoundland, which are Money Order and 
Telegraph Stations, at reasonable rates on application. 



Februan-, 1924. 



M. E. HAWCO, Minister of Posts & Telegraphs. 



RING UP 



"The Newfoundland Quarterly" Office 

For all kinds of 

s JOB PRINTI^JG. ^ 

Personal attention given to Outport Orders. 

g;^-riSPACTION GUARANTEED. 

Subscribe fo "The Newfoundland Quarterly," 
fhe only General Magazine in the country. 
80c. per year for Newfoundland and Canada. 
Foreign Subscription 90c. per year. 

JOHN J. EVANS, 

3 A Prescott Street. 
Telephone 1387. 



T" '■yiV.^.W!"- 



.'^ 



'■'■^ ^'-iiiHiiiH-'i I,, .iiinirlS'l'ii'iiBllfr*"'""!! 



''-"^^" -^-^^-" I iffliifStiinii iniiiii 



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. 



TJ4E^NEU^UNDLAND^QUARTERLY -45 

FOREST FIRES ACT. 




Section 2.— Every person who— 

(i) Sets out, lights or Jitarts, or cniises t" be set out, lighted or 
started any hre in or near any woods, except forihe pur- 
pose of clearing land, cookings obtaining warmth, or for 
some industrial purpose ; or 

(2) Makes or starts, or causes to be made or started, a fire for 
the purpose of clearing land, without exercising and observ- 
ing every reisonable care and precaution in the makin.' 
and starting of such t^re and in the managing of and 
caring for and controlling the same after it has been 
made and started, in order to prevent the same from 
spreading and burning up the trees, shrubs or plants sur- 
rounding, adjoining, or in the neighborhood of the place 
where it has been so made and started ; or 

(3) Between the fifteenth day of .^pril and the tirst day of 
December, makes or starts or c.iuses to be made or started, 
a fire in or ne<ir any woods, or upon any island, for cooking 
or obtaining warmth, or for any industrial purpose, without 
observing the following precautions, that is to say : 

(a) Selecting a locality in the neighborhood in which there is 
the smallest quantity of dead «ood, branches, brushwood, 
dry leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, turf, dry moss or 
vegetable matter of any kind ; 

(b) dealing the place in which he is about to light the fire 
by removing all dead wood, branches, brushwood, dry 
leaves, resinous trees, heath, peat, turf, dry moss and 
other vegetable matter from the soil wiihin a distance of 
ten feet from the fire in every direction ; 

(c) Exercising and observing every reasonable care to pre- 
vent such fire from .spreading, and carefully extinguishing 
the same before quitting the place ; or 

(4) Throws or drops any burning match, ashes of a pipe, lighted 
cigar, or any other burning substance, or discharges any 
firearm in the woods, barrens, fields or other place where 
there is vegetable matter, if he neglects completely to e.x- 
tinguish before leaving the spot, the fire of such matth, 
ashes of a pipe or cigar, wadding of the firearm, or o;her 
burning substance ; or 

(5) Makes, lights or starts, or causes to be made, lighted or 
started, except for the purposes named in sub-seclion (i) 
hereof, a fire on any land not owned or occupied by him- 
self, or does not prevent any fire made, lighted or started 
on land owned or occupied by him, from extending lo land 
not owned bv him, shall be liable to a penalty nf not less 
than Fifty Dollars nor more than Four Hundred Dollars for 
each oll'ence, or to ImprisonmeDt for any period not exceed- 
ing Twelve Months. 

J. F. DOWNEY, 

Mviistcr of A^riculiun' and Mines. 

Department of Agriculture and Mines, 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 





the Very Best Quality of 

Manila Rope, 
Coir Rope, 

Hemp Fishing Lines, 
White and Tarred Cotton Fishing Lines, 
Hemp Seine Twine, 

Cotton Seine Twine, 
Herring Nets, 

Cotton Linnett. 



When anything better is invented 
We Shall Make That. 

Colonial Cordage Co., Ltd. 



ilBIJSKFlP A.\M .\LI,V. 

LONDON DIRECTORY 

with Provincial and Foreign Sections and Trade Headings in Five Languages 

enaliies tr.ijei> 10 Liinnuinl. ate JircLi with 

Manufacturers and Dealers 

in 1/indon and in the Provincial Towns and Industrial C'^ntre;: of the I'ni'td 
Kingdom and iht Continent of Kurope. 1"he hook contains over 250.000 
names, addresses and other details are classified under more than 2,000 
radi headings, including 

Export Merchants 

with detailed i^articulars of the floods shipped and the Colonial and 
Foreign -Markets stipplied; 

Steamship Lines 

ariance^d under the Ports to which they sail, and indicating the approxi- 
mate Sailings. 

One-inch P.L'SINKSS C.VKDS of Firms desiring to extend their connec- 
tions, or Trade Curds nf 

Dealers Seeking Agencies 

can be printed at a cost of 8 d.'lJari fur e.u h uade Jit-uiini; under wliicii 
thev are inserted. larger adverti^ements from 10 to tlo dnllars. 
The diieclorv is invaluable to everyone interested in overseas commerce. 
and a copv will be ^ent i)V parcel po^t f-ir 10 J-'ILu^. nctt cash with order. 

The London directory Co., Ltd., 

25. Abchurch Lane, London, E. C. -I, England. 

lirsl.SF.bS KSIA1U.1>11KM IN l!M4. 



When writing to Adverti.sers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-46. 



*} 




HIGH GRADE FLRNITLREIj 

Carefully selected stock, wide assortments and prices that are beyond the lowest j 
offered in this vicinity, have made our Furniture Store the ONLY Store for hundreds ] 
of shrewd buyers. We claim to save you money on Furniture, and a rapid and steady ; 
increase of ir.ide proves beyond a doubt that the puplic recognises and appreciates j 
good values. j 

One of the strong features of our stock is that it is broad enough to suit ] 

everybody — Furniture to suit every kind of home: 

CHAIRS— Dining, Rockers, Morris, Rattan ; TABLES for Dining Rooms, 
Parlors, Halls, etc. ; Sideboards and Buffets, Over-Mantles, Bed Room Suites, 
Bedsteads, Parlor Suites, Couches, Book Cases, Secretaries, Hall Stands, 
Wardrobes, Office Furniture, Spring Mattresses, etc. 

THE ROYAL STORES, LTD. 






Circy'sr 



Ji No. 15 






WHEIVf TOURISTS, ANGLERS and SPORTSMEN 
arriving iri this tjolony bring with them Cameras, 
Bicycles, Angler's Outfits, Trouting Gear, Fire-arms, and .Am- 
munition, Tents, Canoes and Implements, they shall be admitted 
under the following conditions: — 

A deposit equal to the duty shall be taken on such articles as 
Cameras, Bicycles, Trouting poles, Fire-arms, Tents, Canoes, 
and tent equip.ige. A receipt (No. i) according to the form 
attached shall be given for the deposit and the particulars of 
the articles shall be noted in the receipt as well as in the 
marginal cheques. Receipt No. z if taken at an outport office 
shall be mailed at once directed to the Assistant Collector, 
St. John's, if t.aken in St. John's the Receipt Xo. 2 shall be sent 
to the Landing Surveyor. 

Upon the departure from the Colony of the Tourist, Angler 
or Sportsman, he may obtain a refund of the deposit by pre- 
senting the articles at the Port of Exit and having them com- 
pared with the receipt. The Examining Officer shall initial on 
the receipt the re.sult of his examination and upon its correctness 
being ascertained the refund may be made. 

No groceries, canned goods, wines, spirits or provisions of 
any kind will be admitted free and no deposit for a refund may 
be taken upon such articles. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Deputy Minster of Customs. 
CUSTOM HOUSE, 

St. John's. Xewfoundlanil, February, iQ-'-t- 



Notice, to Owners and Masters 
of British Siiips ! 

o 

The attention of Ownefs and Masters of British 
Ships is called to the 74th Section of the " Mer- 
chant Shipping Act, 1894." 

74. — (i) A Ship belonging to a British subjec. 
shall hoist the proper national colours — 

(a) on a signal being made to her by one of His 
Majesty's ships (including any vessel under the 
command of an officer of His Majesty's navy 
on full pay), and 

( b) on entering or leaving any foreign port, and 

(c) if of fifty tons gross tonnage or upwards, on 
entering or leaving aiiy British Port. 

( 2) If default is made on board any such ship in 
complving with this section, the master of the ship 
shall for each offence be liable to a fine not exceed- 
ing one himdred pounds. 

At time of war it is necessar}- for every Brit- 
ish Ship to hoist the colours and heave to if signal- 
led by a British Warship; if a vessel hoists no 
colours and runs away, it is liable to be tired uix)n. 

H. W. LeMESSURIER, 

Registrar of Shipping. 

St. John's, Newfoundland, 
February, 1924- 



When writing to Advertisers kindly m 



ention 



'The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 47. 



Cable Address: "JOB," St. Johns; '-JOB," Liveq^ool. 



^ PO I TO 



NA/ater Street, St. John's, Nfld. 

ESTABLISHED 1780. 

EXPORTERS OF 

Codfish, Pickled Fish, Lobsters and Salmon, Cod Oil, Seal Oil and Whale Oil,, 

Medicinal Cod Liver Oil 

(Norwegian Process^ Non-Freezing), 
and other produce. 



AGENCIES: 

The Royal Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool, Fire and Life. 

The Union Marine Insurance Co., Ltd., Liverpool. 

The National Fire Insurance Co y, Hartford, Conn. 



MANAGERS OF 



JOB'S STORES, LTD. 

DEALERS IN 

Provisions and Groceries, Naval Stores and Fishing Supplies, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 



MANAGERS OF 



44 



Neptune^^ Steamship Co., Ltd., ^^Thetis^^ Steamship Co., Ltd, 



JOB BROTHERS, 

Tower Building, 

Liverpool, G. B. 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.-4S. 



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Pnalbllc 




NOTICE is hereby given to the 
Public that applications for 

MINERAL AREAS 



s 






nnay be received at this office on 
and after the first day of August, 
1921, and licenses nnay be issued 
for such areas, reserving therefrom 
Coal, .ji Petroleunn Oil, ^< Bitumen, 
Natural Gas and Bituminous Clays 
and Shales capable of yielding 
Petroleunn Oil on distillation. 

J. F. DOWNEY, 

Minister of Agriculture and Mines. 

Department ot Agriculture and Mines, 
St. John's Newfoundland 






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THE N EWFOUN DLAND QUARTERLY.— 49. 



TheLiverpool&London&GIobeInsuranceCo.,Ltd. 

The World Auxiliary Insurance Corporation, Ltd, 

The Globe Indemnity Co. of Canada. 

Fire Insurance on all classes of property effected at tariff rates. 
Casualty and kindred insurance effected at reasonable rates. 

See us BEFORE PLACING YOUR INSURANCE elsewhere. 

Prompt settlement of claims.— Absolute security 

BOWRING BROTHERS, LTD., 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



NewleijEillaiii! (joyeramesit Railway. 

Best connection between Newfoundland 
and Canada and the United States, ^^ 
e^ and the Best Freight Line between 

^CANADA AND NEWFOUNDLAND. ^4 

JA?4ES STEVENS, 

Painter and House Decorasior, 




23 Jyfaxe Street, St. Johis. 
All Work Personally Attended To. Phone 363 W. 



When writing 



writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 50. 



The attention of Ship Owners 



==5 is called to the following : — 



^^^^S^^i^^ 




A Dainty and Delicious 

SODA BISCUIT 



REGULATIONS 

RELATING TO THE EXAMINATION OF 
ENGINEERS.-CH AFTER I. 

GENERAL RULES. 

1, — These Regulations are issued in pursuance of 
an Act respecting the qualification of Engineers 
(6 Edward VIL, Cap. 24). 

In accordance with Section g of the said Act, 
" No steamers registered in Newfoundland shall 
o-o to sea from any port in or of Newfoundland 
or its dependencies unless the engineers thereof 
have obtained and possess valid certificates tor sea- 
going ships, appropriate to their several stations in 
such ships, or of a hi^^ier grade from the Board of 
Trade in the United Kingdom, or valid certificates 
of competency appropriated to their .several stations 
in such ships,' or of a higher grade granted in any 
British possession, and declared by Order of His 
Majestv in Council, published in the Loin/on Gazette 
under 'the provisions of the Merchant Shipping 
(Colonial) Act, eighteen hundred and sixty-nine, or 
of any Act of the Parliament of the United Kmg- 
dom 'containing such provisions, to be of tiie same 
force as certificates of competency for toreign-going 
ships granted under the Acts of the Parhament of 
the United Kingdom relating to merchant shippmg, 
or a certificate of competency under the provisions 
of this Act. And every person who, having been 
en-aged to serve as an Engineer of any sea-go.ng 
ship registered in Newfoundland, goes to sea as 
aforesaid after that date as such engineer without 
beina at the time entitled to and possessed of such 
certificate for sea-going ships, as liere.nbefore re- 
quired, or who employs any per..on as Engineer ot 
anv sea-going sliip. as aforesaid, without first ascer- 
taining that he at the time is entitled to. and pos- 
sessed of such certificate, shall for .such offence u.cur 
a penalty not exceeding one hundred dollars. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 

St. Jolin's, Newfoundland, 
February. i9-4- 



« 



TIP TOP ^ ^ I 
^ s TIP TOP f 



^ I 

H^ for your Biscuit Requirements ask ^ 

a< for those manufactured by j^ 

I fl. Rarucp S( CO. I 

^ Best Ingredients, Finest Grades. ^ 

PHCHNiX 



Assurance 



%iC Co., Ltd., 



Of LONDON, - - - ESTABLISHED 1782. 



Total Funds exceed *^"'^°"'°°r«n 

Claims Paid exceed $470,000,000.00 

Place your business with us, the premier Company 

in Newfoundland. 

Lowest Current Rates of Premiums. 

W. & G. RENDELL, St. John's, 

Agents for Newfoundland. 



Newfoundland ^w^ 
Savings Bank. ^#' 

Established in 1834. 

Chartered by Acts of the Legislature. 



" The General Revenue of the Colony 
shall be liable for all moneys deposited in 
this Bank and all interest payable thereon. 
Extract from Bank's Charter. 

,,,,, , I. 

,111 1 , ii.ii>> > ' ■' ' 

BRANCHES at Harbor Grace and Bay Roberts. 
Interest on Deposits allowed at the current rate. 

ROBERT WATSON, Cashier. 



"-^hir^TI^i^^r^^'lver^isers ki.dly mention 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



Cable Sddres*t " Crosble." St. John's. Codes Used: A.B.C. 3lh Edition. : 

Newfoundland Produce Company, Ltd. ; 

J. C. CROSBIE, Manager. \ 

BUYERS AND EXPORTERS OF \ 

Codfish, Oil, and all other Newfoundland Products of the Sea. 

Agents for Fire and Marine Insurance, 

AND /: 

Importers of North Sydney CoaL 



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Public Notice. 

o 

Under an Act representing the St. John's General Hospital 
(6 George V'., Cap. XIX.) and with the approval of the Gover- 
nor in Council, the Board of Governors have fixed and prescribed 
the following scale of fees to be levied from and paid by all per- 
sons who occupy beds or undergo treatment .it the Hospital: 

Scale of Fees. 

Every person receivin;^ ueatment in the bt. John's General 
Hospital shall pay fees according to the following scales:— 
Persons admitted to the public wards, St.oo per day. 
Persons occupying private rooms, Sio.oo per week in 

addition to the daily fee of ?i.oo. 
To cover cost of dressings, anaesthetics, and for the use 
of the Operating Room, patients undergoing opera- 
tions shall pay a fee of Sro.oo in addition to the 
fees specified above. 
Every applicant for admission to the Hospital must bring or 
forward to the Superintendant of the Hospital, certificate 
signed by a duly registered physician that svfch applicant is a 
proper subject for Hospital treatment. 

Under the provisions of the General Hospital Act, 19 15, all 
patients who are unable to pay fees shall be required to bring 
with them a certificate of their inability to pay. which shall be 
signed by the resident Relieving Officer, or, where there is no 
such Officer, by a Justice of the Peace, a Clergyman or other 
responsible persons. 

The fees of such patients thereupon payable by the Commis- 
sioner of Public Charity, by virtue of the said Act. 
By order of the Board of Governors, 

GEORGE SHEA, Chairman. 
W. H. RtNNIE, Secretary. 

February, 1924- 




Public Notice. 

SUDBURY HOSPITAL. 

The following scale of fees payable by outside 
patients for treatment in tbe various Departments 
of Sudbury Hospital will be effective on and after 
November ist, 192 i : 

MASSAGE AND ELECTRiaL DEPARTMENT. 
Including treatment with sinusoidal, galvanic 

and high frec[uency currents, per treatment Si.oo 

HYDRO THERAPEUTIC DEPARTMENT 

Including Schott's Douche, whirlpool, sedative 
and electric bath with massage, etc. per ^ 

treatment S i.oo 

Electric Cabinet (Turkish) Hath $2.50 

X-RAY DEPARTMENT. 

Radiographs. Plates under 10 .\ 12 S2.OC1 

All larger sizes 5-0° 

X-Ray Treatments 2.00 

SCREEN EXAMINATIONS. 
With Bismuth Meal, ^5-oo and upwards. 

This does not iitclude prints. All cases to be 
dealt with through their own doctors to whom 
reix,rts will be sent. Above scale of fees applies to 
civilian cases only. _„.^ 

JAMES HARRIS, 

Deputy Minister. 

Department Public Works, 

St. John's, Ntld., February, 1924- 



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-^^^i^^^r^J^^iU^f^^-^ The-Nev,foundland Quarterly.' 



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JHE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY.— 52. 






G. F. GRIMES, 



Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
January 9. 19J+. 



NOTICE! 



The attention of those engaged in the packing or in the 
selling of Herring of •' Scotch and or Norwegian Cure Method" 
of pack is drawn to the following sections of (he Rules and 
Regulations respecting the Herring Fisheries of Newfoundland, 
which the Department of Marine nnd Fisheries is determined 
to enforce ; 

"SCOTCH CURE AND OR NORWEGIAN METHOD" 
OF PACK. 

No person shall engage in the business of curing and packing 
herrings under the " Scutch and or Norwegian Cure Method " 
at any place in the Island of Newfoundland without having pre- 
viously taken out an annual Licenie. And the owner or man- 
ager of every plant cause to be branded upon the head of everv 
barrel or half barrel, the nuinber corresponding t3 the number 
of the License of said curer or packer. For this purpose he 
shall obtain Ihrcgh " The Fisheries Board" a suitable branding 
iron, the cost of the same to be fi.^ed by said fio.ird and 
defrayed by the Licensee. No branding irons other than those I 
obtained from the Fisheries Board shall be used. And any 
person or persons in the Colony selling, purchasing or exporting, 
or being in any way a party ro any transaction in the nature of 
a sale, purchase or export of a pack ige containing any herrings 
put up under the "Scorch Cure and or Norwegian Method" 
without any brand as aforesaid, shall bs deemed guilty of an 
offence against these Rules and Regulations. 

Inspectors shall have the right to visit all Plants putting up 
Scotch and or N'oraegian I'ack. at all reasonable hours, and 
shall not be obstructed in any way from carrying out their 
duties. Any curer or packer in any way hindering or obstruct- 
ing such officer in the discharge of his duty shall be deemed 
guilty of a breach of these Regulations. The License of such 
packer may at the discretion of the Minister be cancelled without 
further notice. 

PENALTY CLAUSE. 

Contained in Chapter 11 of the Consolidated Statutes 
(Third Series) entitled "Of the Department of 
IWarine and Fisheries." 
Every one who violates any provisions of this .\ct, or of the 
Regulations under it. shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding 
one hundred dollars and costs, and in default of payment, to 
imprisonment for a term not exceeding two months. All 
materials, implements or appliances used and all fish caught, 
taken or killed in violation of this Act, or any regulations under 
It, shall be contiscated to His Majesty and may be seized on 
view by any Fishing Officer, or taken or removed by any person 
for delivery to any Justice of the Peace. 



Balne, Johnston 4 Co., 



ESTABUISHED I7SO. 



Merchants, Ship-Owners, &c. 



-Agents 



The Alliance Assurance Co.,Ltd., 

LONDON. 

Total -Assets exceed $120,000,000. 

Fire Premiums for 19 12 exceeded $6,500,000. 



Agents 



Newman's Celebrated Port Wine 

In Pipes for Export. 



Rules for Making Cod Liver Oil. 

For the Guidance of Manufacturers. 



1st. — The manajer in charge of f.ictory must see that the 
livers are fresh ; that all brown or poor livers are thrown out ; 
that there is no bladder attached to any livers. 

2nd. — The good livers must then be washed in a tub of clean 
fresh water. 

3rd. — The pan in which the livers are boiled must be per- 
fectly clean inside, before any livers are placed in it. 

4th. — Before you start to boil any livers, you must have suffi 
cient ste.iin. 

5th. — Turn on the steam, and use as much as you need to 
have for the quantity of livers you have in your pan. Boil until 
the «hite scum floats ott' (which will take about thirty minutes.) 
Don't forget to stir the livers, and see that those in the bottom 
and those around the sides are brought into direct contact with 
the steam all the time. 

6th. — Turn the steam off, and allow all to settle, not exceed- 
ing five minutes, according to capacity of liver boiler. 

7th. — Then you dip all the oil you can get, which is the finest 
white oil. Put this oil "in a cooling tank made of galvanized 
iron, and let the oil remain there till next morning. Uon't for- 
get to put a stmining cloth over the cooling tank before you 
put any oil in, so that it will catch any bits of blubber ; allow to 
remain 12 or 14 hours, or longer if possible, then dip from cool- 
ing tank and str.iin through double calico bag. inside bag to be 
one inch smaller all around ; then strain into a tin shute under 
the bags, the cask to be at the end of the shute with a funnel, 
to lead oil into casks, which funnel to be covered with cheesecloth. 

Sth. — When you have dipped the finest oil from the top of the 
liver boiler pan, take all the blubber from the pan while it is 
warm. The oil from this blubber is not fit for medicinal 
purposes. 

9th. — Then clean your liver pan with warm water and wash- 
ing powder. Have it bright and clean for the iie.\t boiling. 

loth. — Every baj. cloth tank, funnel and pan. must be washed 
only with warm water, soap and water. Soda must not be used. 

The best results for medical oil can only be obtained by the 
use of tin barrels. Wooden packages generally make ihe oil 
dark, and destroy its fine llavor. Keep all oil in barrels in a 
cool place, and covered from the sun. 

DEPARTMENT OF MARINE AND FISHERIES. 

St. John's, February, 1924. 



When writing to Advertisers kindly mention "The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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THE NEWFOUNDLAND QUARTERLY. 



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Passport Reoulations. 



1. APPLICATIONS for Passports must be made in the 
authorized form and enclosed in a cover addressed to "THE 
DEPARTMENT OF THE COLONI.YL SECRETARY, 
ST. JOHNS." 

2. The charge for a Passport is 52.5a. Passports are 
is<;ued at the Otfice of the Colonial Secretarv between the hours 
of 10 and 4 ON THE DAY FOLLOWING THAT ON 
WHICH THE APPLICATION FOR THE PASSPORT 
HAS BEEN RECEIVED, except on Sundays and Public 
Holidays, whtn the Office is closed. Applications should, if . 
possible, reach the Office before 4 p.m. on the previous day. 
If the applicant does not reside in St. John's, the Passport may 
be sent bv post, and a Postal Order for S2.50 should in that 
case acconipanv the application. F()STAGE STAMPS WILL 
NOT BE RECEIVED IN P.WMENT. 

3. Passports are granted — 

■ (i) To natural-born British subjects; 

(2) To the wives and widows of such persons; and 

(3) To persons naturalized in the United Kingdom, in 
the British Colonies, or in F.idia. 

A married woman is deemed to be a subject of the State of 
which her husband is for the time being a subject. 



subject the Certificate of Naturalization must be forwarded to 
the Office of the Colonial Secretary, with the Declaration, for 
delivery to the applicant. 

Naturalized British subjects will be described as such in their 
Passports which will be issued subject to the necessaay qualifi- 
cations. 

6. Passports are not available beyond two years from the 
date of issue. They may be renewed for four funher periods 
of two years each, after which fresh Passports must be obtained. 
The fee for each renewel is 51.00 

7. A Passport cannot be issued on behalf of a person 
already abroad ; such person should apply for one to the nearest 
British Mission or Consulate. Passports must not be sent out 
of Newfoundland by post. 



Passports are granted 
(■) 



(^) 



(3) 



W. W. HAUFYARD, 

Colonial Secretary. 

Department of the Colonial Secretary. 
St. John's, Newfoundland. 
February, 1924. 



We are prepared to quote 

Low Price s 

...ON... 

General Lines of 



In the case of natural-born British subjects and 
persons naturalized in Newfoundland, upon the 
production of a Declaration by the applicant in the 
authorized form verified by a Declaration made by 
a member or ot^cial of any Banking Firm establish- 
ed in Newfoundland, or bv any Mayor, Magistrate, 
Justice of the Peace, Minister of Religion. Barrister- 
at-Law Pbysician, Surgeon, Solicitor, or Notary 
Public resident in Newfounnland. The applicint s 
Certificate of Birth and other evidence may also be 
required. 

In the case of children under the age of 19 years 
a separate Passport, upon productiou of a Declar.i- 
tion made by the child's parent or guardian, in a 
Form (B). to be obtained upon application to the 
Office of the Colonial Secretary. 
In the case of persons naturalized in the United 
Kingdom or in any of the British Self-governing 
Colonies, uiwn production of a Recommendation 
from the Colonial Olfice, or the High Commissioner 
or Agent-General in London of the State concerned ; 
and in the case of natives of British India, and per- 
sons naturalized therein, upon production ma 
Letter of Recommendation from the India < )mce. 
Persons nntur.ilized in anv of the Crown Colun.es 
must obtain a Letter of Recommendation from the 
Colonial Office. 

S. If the applicant for a Passport be a Naturalized British 

When writing- to Advertisers kindly m 



Merchandise. 

Robinson Export Co. 



The Newfoundland Quarterly. 

A.N n.l.VSTR.MKU M.\.A/.iNJ. — 

Issued ever^■ third month about the .5th of Marc'n. June, .September and 

December from tlie omce 

-4 Tre^cott Street, St. John-s. Newfoundiand. 

JC.HN J. EVANS. -:- -■■ -- P-^'-"^ -^^" '•■'-^-'"■"' 

To whom all Communications should be addre.s,.^ed. 

Subscription Rates: 

. . 20 ce:ir5. 

Single Copies, each ■ : ^ .. 

Une Year, in advance. Newfoundland and Canada ^ _ 

Foreign Sub-crip-ion- (except CanadiU - 

All Kinds of Job Printing 

Neatly Executed 

af "The Quarterly" Oiiice. 



lention 



The Newfoundland Quarterly." 



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Price 35cts. Postage lOcts Extra. 



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Theatre Hill and Duckworth Street. 
St. John's, 



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Newfoundland. 



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The Newfoundland Quarterly.' 



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