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The Pa 


JOURNAL OF THE EVENING STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION 
SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY 


















per 


SPECIAL EDITION 


Montreal - february eleventh /69 





STATEMENT BY THE ACTING PRINCIPAL OF 
SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY 


About two weeks ago a number of students and other individuals occupied the university’s Com- 
puter Centre and for the last week have occupied the Faculty Club Lounge. The university, in order 
to avoid violence and in the hope that reason might prevail, had resisted all pressures to invoke 
the aid of the law and to call in the police. However, when violence broke out in the early hours 
of Tuesday, February 11th, 1969, and when the occupiers began to destroy university property, to 
ransack the cafeteria, and to turn on water hoses, the university decided that it would be derelict 
in its duty to the students, faculty and the community at large which supports it, if it took no action. 
Rather than tolerate any such further lawlessness, the university authorities after careful deli- 
beration decided that they had no choice but to call for the assistance of the Montreal Police, and 
to retrieve possession of the Computer Centre. 

The Montreal Police, with the full advice of the university to exercise due caution and to avoid 
any unnecessary use of force, attempted to remove the barricade which had been constructed by 
the occupants of the Computer Centre. At that moment, fire was set to the barricade from the in- 
side, and had it not been for the courage of many policemen, many of the occupiers and many in- 
nocent people would have died in the resulting blaze. 

About eighty individuals have been arrested and will be charged by the university before the 
criminal courts. Painful as this task may be for the university, the university has the duty to see 
to it that academic freedom is preserved and that no one is permitted to threaten or destroy its 
functions. | 

The Computer Centre has been wilfully destroyed with axes and other objects. Many precious 
records have been wantonly scattered to the wind and hundreds of pieces of furniture have been 
broken and damaged. The fire and other damage have rendered several floors of the university 
unusable. The university estimates that the material damage may exceed one million dollars, not 
to mention the invaluable faculty and student time lost. Immediate emergency steps will be an- 
nounced in due course. 

This is not a time for vindictiveness or revenge but for soul searching and re-examination of 
values. The university intends to act with firmness and responsibility. 

The administration has made every effort to-ensure that the rule of law is observed at Sir George 
Williams. This means that the law and regulations must be implemented by lawful process. All 
members of the university community, both faculty and students, have wide opportunities for ini- 
tiating and participating in such a process. pe | 

Many students have lost valuable study time as a result of the events of recent weeks. Every 
effort will be made to see that they do not suffer unfairly from this loss, a loss in many cases 
imposed on them through events outside their control. 


Douglass Burns Clarke 


February 11, 1969 Acting Principal 






2 THE PAPER February 11th, 1969 


EEE ooo OEE... 


THIS SPECIAL EDITION OF THE PAPER /S BEING PUT OUT TO PROVIDE, 
IN DEPTH, USING PICTURES AND STORIES TAKEN OFF TAPED EVENTS 
AND INTERVIEWS RECORDED FROM 7:00 AM TO 3:30 PM ON TUESDAY, 
FEBRUARY 11TH. THE STAFF OF THE PAPER SAW FIRST HANDED EVERY 
VITAL DEVELOPEMENT OF THE TRAGEDY WHICH WAS FOISTED UPON AN 


HONARABLE 


IF NOT PERFECT UNIVERSITY. 


RATHER THAN’ EDITORIZE 


AND USE THE PAPER TO PRESENT OUR VIEWS, AND WE ARE SURE THOSE 
OF THE VAST MAJORITY, WE HAVE PRESENTED THE READER WITH AN 
UNBIASED, CHRONOLOGICAL STORY OF THESE EVENTS. 





Before 4:00 a.m., Feb. 11th 


The Black studenus on Feb. 9th had drawn up a document 
agreed to by Mr. Oliver and Mr. Schwartz, outlining the five 
demands. The students said that as soon as O’Brien signed 
the document they would evacuate the 7th and 9th Floors. 
O’Brien said he would sleep on it and give an answer by Feb. 
10th at 1:00 p.m. However, an answer was not made available 
at that time because O’Brien wanted to consult S@WAUT on 
this agreement between the university and Black lawyers since 
it also involved the fate of a faculty member. On Feb. 10th at 
5:00 p.m. the Black students learned that O’Brien was meet- 
ing with SGWAUT. At the SQWAUT meeting at 12:00 p.m. 
on Feb. 10th, Dean O’Brien had agreed to the five demands 
with two changes suggested by SQWAUT. 

Instead of the Black students picking any two members, 
Anderson picking any two members and the fifth being mu- 
tually agreed upon, SGWAUT and O’Brien decided to have 
the Black students pick any two faculty members, Professor 
Anderson two and then four possibilities suggested by either 
side. Three or four of these eight would end up sitting upon 
the agreement by mutual agreement. But if both sides hadn’t 
agreed on three or four members within one week, then 
O’Brien himself would pick any three or four. 

That was the last event which took place before 4:00 a.m. on 
February 11th. 


SGWU Information Officer 


At 7:30 a.m. Malcolm Stone 
SGWU Information Officer 





“Students were in a path 
of destruction and so the uni- 


stated ‘“‘the police were in 
charge of the situation be- 
cause at around 4:00 a.m. 
students were tearing things 
up.” 


versity had no option but to 
call the police. Police arrived 
at 4:00 a.m. approximately, 
and have seen fit to call in 
the riot squad.” 


Cafeteria Upheaval - Police Called 


In discussion with Paper 
reporters Mr. D. Sheldon, 
Asst. to the Principal, re- 
vealed that “the lawyers for 
the Black students were in 


consultation with the univer- 


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sity lawyer, David Schwartz, 
yesterday. The lawyer for the 
Black students produced a se- 
ries of proposals that were 
submitted to the university. 
These proposals, because they 


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Part of the massive crowd which gathered after fire broke out. 









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Taken around 11:30 a.m., several news reporters inspecting the 
blocked up entrance to the Computer Center. 


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A view of some of the debris including computer punch cards and 
printout sheets time 9:30 a.m. 





STAFF PHOTO 


A view up Mackay Street showing a portion of the debris that was 


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thrown from 9th floor windows by black and white Computer Center 


occupiers. 


would affect Professor Ander- 
'son, were submitted to the 
‘SGWAUT Council. They 
considered them last night 
but they were considered un- 
acceptable from a_ faculty 
point of view, but that there 
were still grounds for further 
negotiation. The Council was 
to meet again at 1:30 p.m. 
today, and conveyed this in- 
formation to the Black stu- 
dents about midnight. That 
was the last event. until the 
crowd on the seventh floor 
broke loose.” 

The upheaval started with 
an attack on the cafeteria 
whereupon chairs and tables 
from there were used to bar- 
ricade the escalators and 
stairways. Atthat point, th 
students were pushed back to 
the 9th floor. : 

Mr. Sheldon also stated that 
the calling of the police was 
an official administrative de- 
cision. 

At 8:30 a.m. approximately 
200-300 students began con- 
gregating on De Maisonneuve 
Blvd. Also, 50-60 students 
started chanting ‘“‘justice, 


justice” while other students 
across the street were chant- | 
ing “‘We want classes,” and 
Cops Go’’, in opposition. 


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STAFF PHOTO | 
A portrait in the faculty lounge, 
which has been de-faced by the 


drawing in of a moustache. 


Two Policemen Injured 


In an interview with a police 
official at 12:15 p.m. it was 
revealed that two policemen 
had been injured this morning 
in an encounter with militants 
at 6:00 a.m. One constable 
received a cut on the palm 
of his hand requiring 7 stitch- 
es to close. The second of- 
ficer was sent to hospital 
after having a broken beer 
bottle. thrust in his face in 
the area of his left eye. The 
extent of his injuries are as 
yet undetermined although it 
has been established that nei- _ 
ther constable was a member 
of the riot squad. 









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A police car damaged by debris being thrown out of De Maison- 
neuve side of building. 












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More demonstrators including Carlyle Williams - an Arts Student’ 


Association (Day Division ) Executive. 


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STAFF PHOTO 


Demonstrators marching around Sir George chanting slogans such 
as: ‘‘We want justice’ and ‘‘Police go home’”’. 


Part of the massive crowd of angry Sir George students demanding 
“We want classes’ taken around 10:00 a.m. 










21st CENTURY 


Some of the furniture seperat- 
ing the occupiers from the po- 


lice. 


Demonstrators 
march outside 


At approximately 11:30 a.m. 
students outside the university 
began congregating at the Bi- 
shop Street garage entrance. 
A paddy wagon was set on 
fire and was quickly extin- 
guished by the police. Upon 
the arrival of the riot squad 
vehicles, a few outside mi- 
litants began throwing snow- 
balls and other objects at 
them when they entered the 
barage. Sir George students 
shouted down a small handful 
of radicals (almost all from 
McGill) nearby who were 
shouting ‘‘solidarité” and 
“revolution” through a bull 
horn. Some Georgians as- 
saulted these McGill indivi- 
duals and ripped off their 
McGill scarves, sending them 
scurrying. Similar results oc- 
curred when self-styled Black 
Panthers tried their oratory 
skills. Police had to form 
a flying wedge to protect the 
Panthers and escort them to 
safety. 


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February 11th, 1969 THE PAPER 3 


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Computer print-out paper hangs from lamp standard on McKay 
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Part of the furniture barricade created by 7th floor militants 
heaving cafeteria and faculty lounge facilities down stairwell lead- 
ing to 6th floor. 


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The 6th floor got more than its share when 7th floor occupiers 
threw cafeteria facilities down escalators. 


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4 THE PAPER February 1 Ith, 1969 


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Individual shots of some of the participants in the protest march 
during the morning. 


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One of the signs carried by protest marchers on De Maisonneuve 
indicating their attitude to Sir George and Higher Education. 


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The cafeteria, barren and desolate after all its furniture was 


thrown down stair wells and escalators by 7th floor occupation 
force around 4:30 a.m. 










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STAFF PHOTO 


A long range shot of the area 
in front of the Computer 
Centre showing (feintly) brok- 
en beer bottles and furniture. 


Davis Confrontation 


At approximately 9:00 a.m. 
a verbal confrontation took 
place between Professor Chet 
Davis and the students oc- 
cupying the computer centre. 
He warned them that, “if 
there are any axes or any- 
thing in there you can be 
sued.”” He also suggested to 
them that “‘... there is a pos- 
sibility of someone being kill- 
ed.” In a statement to the 
press later he said: “I do 
not want to see anybody get 
hurt, students or police.” 
However, when asked if the 
chances of negotiation were 
slim he stated that he saw no 
chance of getting the students 
to leave peacefully. 


Davis was then asked if 
the situation was now futile. 
He refused to comment upon 
the merits of the problem, 
on who was right or who was 
wrong, other than to say that 
**... the situation is here.’’ 
Professor Davis then left 
reporters and returned to the 
barricaded entrance to the 
Computer Centre where he 
was immediately asked by the 
occupying students to “... get 
us O’Brien... ”’. 


“If you want him Ill see 
if I can get him.”’ was Davis’ 
reply. Davis then left the area 
and was not subsequently 
available for comment. 


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An aerial photo, taken early in the afternoon, of the crowd of 
demonstrators attempting to enter SG WU garage but subsequently 
repelled by riot police. 


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Demonstrators including Sir George Student Movement, itinerant 
outsiders and many known radicals. 


21st CENTURY 


Traffic flows normally on Blvd. de Maisonneuve as marchers 


continue with their protestations. 


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The crowd, growings and rest- scene with oxygen resparators 
less, witnesses fire depart- for those overcome by smoke 


ment vehicles arriving on thé on the 9th and 8th floors. 





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Cafeteria Story from McPhie 


By 9:00 a.m., all students 
were in the Computer Centre 


while policemen were outside. 
A plain clothes officer stated 





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Debris littered around the lobby on the sixth floor. Tables and 
chairs are from the cafeteria. 


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Secretarial lounge, near the faculty lounge on the 7th floor is in 
shambles after the occupiers overturned all the furniture. 





The administration opened the Sandwich Counter for all newsmen 
who cared for a bite. 





: 
21st CENTURY 


What do you think? 





that he would investigate the 
situation and then confer with 
administration authorities. 

Mr. Donald Hathaway, Exe- 
cutive Director of the SGWU 
Alumni Association, stated 
that students from the 7th 
floor began taking over the 
cafeteria at around 5:30 a.m. 
When the police arrived, they 
found the students destroying 
articles in the cafeteria and 
working the fire hoses. They 
were driven back to the Com- 
puter Centre. 

The administration was 
waiting for the arrival of the 
Riot Squad, whereupon a de- 
cision would be made as to 
further action. 

Mr. Don McPhie, Manager 
of Food Services, described 
the entrance of the students 
as follows: ““They entered the 


cafeteria in twos and threes: 


until they numbered about 30. 


They then threw out the tables. 


and chairs into the stairwells 
and used two axes to open the 
food freezer. It seemed that 
they were trying to expand the 
occupation by blocking the 
entrances from the 7th floor 
on up.” They then used the 
firehoses to wet the stair- 
wells down, but upon the en- 
trance of the police, they re- 
treated back to the Computer 
Centre. 


Pre-Fire Damages 


At 8:00 a.m. this morning 
our Paper reporter _ sur- 
veyed damages on the 6th, 
7th, and 9th floors. On the 


6th floor, chairs and tables 


from the cafeteria were scat- 
tered around the lobby area 
and one escalator from the 
seventh floor was completely 
blocked by debris. The cafe- 
teria had been totally cleaned 
out of tables and chairs. 
There was evidence that mo- 
ney had been stolen in that 
torn coin wrappers were scat- 
tered across the floor. 

The Faculty Lounge and 
Secretarial Lounge was a 
complete shambles and fur- 
niture had been broken, as 
well, carpeting had been torn 
up and water was seeping 
through the halls. The stair- 
way form the 7th to the 6th 
floor near the Faculty Lounge 
was at this time completely 
barricaded with furniture 
from the stairs to the ceiling. 

On the 9th floor, the area 
of the Computer Centre, bet- 
ween 30 and 40 uniformed 
policemen were stationed out- 
side the entrance. Numerous 
broken beer bottles were lying 
on the floor as the fridge in 
the Cafeteria had been axed 
open to give the liberators 
some liquid refreshment. 
Pools of water lay on the 
floor. 

As to exterior damage, a 
number of windows on the 
9th floor had been smashed, 
and thousands of computer 
cards, tapes and computer 
paper as well as a few other 
pieces of technical equipment 
(i.e. typewriters) had been 
thrown onto Mackey Street. 
The garbage on Mackey Street 
was ankle deep. 


February 11th, 1969 THE PAPER 5 





21st CENTURY 


“Justice” was done by black militants, to the Computer Center 
entrance. Note piled up furniture (smashed), broken door glass etc. 













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THE RECORD CENTRE INC. 
2000 CRESCENT (CORNER de MAISONNEUVE)845-3541 


Over 10,000 Memberships issued -- now in our 10th Year 


The Paper 


The Paper is the official weekly publication of the Evening Students’ 
Association of Sir George Williams University and is authorized as 
second class mail by the Post Office Department, Ottawa and for pay- 
“ment or postage in cash at Montreal. Offices are located in Room 
H-331-1, Henry Hall Building, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W., Montreal 
107, Quebec, Canada. Telephone 879-2836 or 879-4514. 


Editor: Wayne S. Gray 
Associate Editor: James MacLellan 
Art Editor: Arno Mermelstein 
Sports Editor: Doug Hastie 
Copy Editor: Rita Martin 
Contributing Editors: Herb Bernstein 
Karl Feige 
Phillip G. Parker 
Ernest Zuendel 
Carl Hager 
Circulation Manager: R.S. Stanford 
Advertising Manager: Brian Levy 
Tony Malbogat 
Ian Dewar 
Steve Brent 


The Paper reserves the right to publish any and all submissions 
and to abridge lengthy articles or correct grammar where necessary. 
All submissions should be typewritten when possible. 


Publication: Weekly every Monday 
Deadline: 8 p.m. Friday prior to publication 


TYPE-SETTING & LITHO 
BY JOURNAL OFFSET INC. 
254 Benjamin-Hudon, Montreal 379, P.Q. Tel. 331-9721 


6 THE PAPER February 11th, 1969 


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One policeman, severly overcome by smoke inhalation is lead 


away for oxygen and a rest. 


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Firemen taking up respiration equipment to service victims of 


smoke poisoning on 9th and 8th floor. 









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Riot Squad prepared 
to enter 


Inside, the riot squad form- 
ed up down the hall from 
the Computer Centre for 
nearly one hour. Before the 
entrance of the riot squad, 
Mr. Coté, legal advisor to 
the Montreal Police Depart- 
ment briefed the press on 
the importance of both cover- 
ing the evacuation of students 
and maintaining the security 
of all concerned. He therefore 
urged all press people to fol- 
low instructions as given by 
the police in order to insure 
the above two points. 

Debris and water were 
cleaned away from the en- 
trance of the Computer 
Centre. Police then roped off 
an area leading to the Com- 
puter Centre. 





People and still more people 
gather to await the outcome 


of the Confrontation. 





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21st CENTURY 


Another aerial photo shows (at a distance) parts of the huge crowd 
that gathered around the garage entrance used by Riot police to 
enter the building to oust the militants in the Computer Center. 





men Ty | 


21st CENTURY 


One of the first arrested, a faculty member who became outraged 


at not being able to gain entrance to the Hall Building early in the 
morning. 





21st CENTURY 


One of the newsmen inhaling oxygen after being overcome with 


smoke on the 9th floor. 


o 


iis 


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21st CENTURY 


Broken windows abound on many floors of the Hall Building. Some 
broken by the militants and others, well who knows! 


February 11th, 1969 THE PAPER 7 


SIDELIGHTS 


Of those arrested there were 28 Negroes, 33 Whites and 16 women according to one policeman. 





When Michel Cété, legal adviser to the Montreal Police Department, was asked whether or not 
some of the students had escaped he replied that ‘‘we are not concentrating on arrests as much as 
we are trying to save the lives of those inside.” 

When the riot squad was mobilized they were very much surprised when they saw black fumes 
emerging from under the debris. They rushed to the firehoses only to find that they had been turned 
off earlier because the students had played havoc with them on the 7th Floor. 

The arrests were apparently made in three instalments. The first batch consisted of approximately 
seven people who surrendered voluntarily and were later brought down near H-116 for questioning. 
The second batch consisted of Frederick Kennedy and Kelvin Robinson who were promptly whisked 
away under the custody of four members of the Montreal Police. The third and last batch consisted 
of ladies, Negroes and radicals who were held on the 9th Floor with their arms above their shoulders 





21st CENTURY 


Another aerial photo shows (at a distance) parts of the huge crowd 


(See picture on Page 11). that gathered around the garage entrance used by Riot police to 


enter the building to oust the militants in the Computer Center. 


CANDID QUOTES 


‘. everyone says give them a chance. 
The administration gave them a three 
weeks chance, and now we’re the fall 


guys.” - POLICEMAN 


“Sir George lawyers don't want fo sign 
the charges of the people we arrest and 
that’s why we can’t move in now.” 

(10:30 a.m.) 
- POLICEMAN 





—_ 


“There won't be any brutality. They'll 
get what they deserve.” - POLICEMAN 


“Anything can happen. The violence : omer \: 

‘has already started... We don’t want this ti iM se . 
kind of thing but it has to happen. Eh, </h YY Yi YY So SS 
man?” Ap Y Wd; YY 7S 

; tt.4/4, EERIE! /// TBM // 
- BLACK MILITANT IN COMPUTER CENTER ee Mie NCE EM ME Uf Ms 
, a Ae ie 448 aN) A ry "4 Mipescd 5 
‘I don’t know what to say. This is bloody ; "4 ae fe Vea / ; 
profane. They (police) have got to take | essa I Nay? pee ae Oa ae en ‘Igy! 


t 5 iy 9!" 
care of them now.” , i) (4 
- FACULTY MEMBER ere 







| hope that they (police) have the tra- 
dition the Gurkh as used to have that 
when you draw your sword you have to 
draw blood. | hope they feel the same 
way about their clubs.” 


— 


“ANWR 
l 


W 
- ANGRY STUDENT \ 
The Way It Was — 1869: 100 years ago, people 
read the way you’re reading right now. Word. by 
word. About 250 words a minute. 100 years ago, 


that kind of reading was okay. You could keep up 
with what was happening fairly well. 

The Way It Is — 1969: Today, it doesn’t work. 
There’s simply too much to read. Too much home- 
work — too many magazines — too many books — 


About 9:30 a.m. a Professor tried to 
force his way in past a constable of Sta- 
tion 15, and was apprehended: 

‘! hope he doesn’t get Judge Beaudet. 
Then he’s going to pay. If this had happen- 
ed at night you'd feel sorry for him.” 

- ARRESTING OFFICER 


\ 


“it’s crazy. They ruin a nice building 
like that. They ruin everything.” 


- POLICE CAPTAIN 


“If they don’t like the university they 
don’t have to go to it. Ahandful shouldn't 
destroy it for everybody else. If | had 
my way I'd ship ‘em out... I'd line them 
up and say, ‘‘Get Out!”’ 

- TAXI DRIVER 


“The Computer Centre has been eva- 
cuated by the Police Department upon 
request of the university administration.’ 

OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE OF THE 


MONTREAL POLICE DEPARTMENT 


Cace tetog elt t bstude.7 

>Y we WiPse Con your 

a toy Pe leas ia ¢ ~. Paesp: 

— * wry} pee Rick aden of ( 
mn ALO LG! fHas © ee 


ae tee AS ko “ 





eve! 


too many reports and memos. Things are happen- 
ing so fast, changing so fast, that even the people 
who try to Keep up are falling behind. 

What’s The Solution? Learn to read faster and 
better. You can do it, too! So far, over 400,000 
other people have done it. People from all walks of 
life including business and professional people, 
students and wives. 

What’s The Gimmick? There is none. These people 
took a course developed by Evelyn Wood. Practi- 
cally all of them have at least tripled their reading 
speed. with equal or better comprehension. Most 
ae better. Our average graduate reads 6 times 
aster. 


How Is This Course Different? Conventional rapid 
reading courses try for 450-600 words per minute. 
Most Reading Dynamics graduates can read 1,000- 
2,900 words per minute. Yet you don’t skip or 
skim, You read every single word. Imagine being 







a.m. on Saturdays. 


ATTEND A FREE PRESENTATION 
NIGHTLY, FROM FEBRUARY THE 10TH TO THE 22ND INCLUSIVE 
(except Sunday) at 6:30 and 8:00 p.m. on weekdays and at 10:00 and 11:30 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HOTEL CONVENTION FLOOR 


yn wood 





STAFF PHOTO 
Comments of occupying students on the 
blackboard, in the board room on the 


seventh floor. 


reading Aynamics institute 
205 SHERBROOKE ST. W., MONTREAL, QUE. / 844-1941 
There are over 127 EWRD Institutes in the U.S.-and in Canada 






— -— 
oe 


i 


able to read a full daily newspaper page in less 
than two minutes... an average novel in about 
two hours ...a.complete magazine in 25 minutes... 
technical documents of over 100 pages in less than 
one hour... with better retention. No machines 
are used. 


Comprehension? As a Reading Dynamics graduate, 
you will actually understand more, remember more 
and enjoy more of what you read. 


Now! Shouldn’t you find out more about it? You 
can, simply by attending a free demonstration. 
We'll tell you why you read so slowly. Show you a 
film, explain the course more fully and answer any 
questions you might have. You’ll be under no pres- 
sure to enroll. But do attend. It could change your 
entire life. 


Our Guarantee: Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics 
guarantees to increase the reading efficiency of 
each student at least three times, according to the 
beginning and ending tests, or will refund the entire 
tuition, This refund is conditional upon the stu- 
dent’s having attended all the required classes, 
maintained the required hours of homework and 
followed the directions of his instructor. 


English courses are given in Quebec City, Sher- 


brooke, Ottawa, Montreal and all other major cities 
in Canada. 






Please send me, without obligation, information on the Evelyn 


Wood Reading Dynamics courses. 


Stop reading as they did 
100 years ago 


7 Name Occupation 

: Address ‘ Tel. 

| CS ih at ER Te Bs eM 

! [] Also, please send information on .in-company or special 

| classes for associations or academic groups, SGWU 
ee ee a ee 








21st CENTURY 


21st CENTURY 

Fire department aerial ladders go up side of Hall Building on The next time you eat lunch at 

Mackay to shoot water through windows of Computer Center. Sir a It maybe sifting in 
a stairwell. 


He likes 
THE BOOKSTORE 


on Bishop Street She likes 
THE POCKETBOOK STORE 


in the Hall Bldg. 










Bookstore 


and 


Pocketbook Store 


has a book to please everyone. 


Drop in and see our selections 


THE POCKETBOOK STORE 
ROOM 231 - HALL BLDG. 


THE BOOKSTORE 
2085 BISHOP ST. 


(just across from Sir George) 





Fire started by militants 


The riot squad then approached the entrance way to the Com- 
puter Centre. After a period of about five minutes the police began 
to break down the barricades at the entrance way. Students at- 
tempted to escape from other doors but were blocked by police. 
At that moment, smoke was seen coming from one of the doors. 
Then panic ensued. The lights in the hallway went off and at that 
point police evacuated all people on the 9th Floor. Smoke began 
to spread down to the eighth and seventh floors. Within 15 minutes 
the fire department arrived and with the assistance of students 
carrying fire extinquishers, the fire became the primary object 
of concern. 

Within half an hour the 9th floor was a shambles of twisted me- 
tal, absent of ceilings and walls. Water covered the floor and was 
dripping down as far as the Students’ Association offices. Damage 
on the 9th Floor is extensive with the verified fact that the entire 
computer system is destroyed (according to Clair Callaghan, 
Chairman of SGWAUT). Water damage was extensive on the 
9th, 8th, 7th and 3rd floors. 

The occupying students were evacuated sometime during the 
confusion and were placed in detainment in two classrooms on 
the 9th Floor. There were approximately 50 arrests, and those 
detained were booked, fingerprinted and photographed on the pre- 
mises. 





21st CENTURY 


Ninth floor a scene of torn 
electrical wires gutted floors 
and overturned furniture. 








The Militants - A Few 


Windows on the 9th Floor 
were smashed or opened to 
bring in fresh air. As a re- 


for those upcoming term papers. | _ sult, many classrooms are 


out of operation. 

Among those occupying stu- 
dents held in custody in 
Rooms 966 and 967 were the 
following: Mark Medicoff, 
President of the Arts Students 
Association (who had recently 
given over $300.00 to the oc- 
cupiers), Kelvin Robinson, 
Kennedy Frederic, Cheddi 
Jagan Jr. There were no 
injuries to occupying students. 

Immediately following the 
events, Mr. D. Schwartz, le- 
gal adviser to the university, 
told the Paper that the law- 
yer for the Black students, 
Mr. Oliver, had resigned due 
to the violence that had oc- 
curred. Mr. Oliver had pre- 
viously told the Black stu- 
dents in question that he would 
take such action in the event 
of any violent action-on their 
part. 

Dean of Students, Magnus 
Flynn, stated that no one had 
been seriously injured and 
that the damage could be 
overcome. When asked about 
the future of the occupiers, 
his answer was, “What do 
you think? Don’t you think 
we should throw the book at 
them?” 





~ ° 


21st CENTURY 








21st CENTURY 


Se 


21st CENTURY 


A sequence of shots taken as the first signs of smoke are being 
noticed by police and news reporters. Chaos ensued as fire spread. 





21st CENTURY 


Firemen and police survey damage in Computer Center after fire 


ts quelled. 


The Damage Costs 


An approximate estimate of 
the computer damage has been 
placed in the area of 4,000,000 
dollars. 


There was no evidence of 
resistance on the part of oc- 
cupying students according to 
police spokesmen. 


By 3:30 p.m. the fire was 
pretty well under control. The 
students were being held in 
custody. The university was 
seriously damaged (over 
$4,000,000). Two reporters 
were injured, three _ police- 
men were injured, three fire- 
men and six policemen were 
overcome by smoke. 


6:45 p.m.: Mop-up opera- 
tions are underway. Classes 
have been cancelled in the 
Norris and Hall Buildings un- 
til further notice. The public 
is still present. The vast ma- 
jority, if not all present, are 
very unfriendly in their at- 
titude towards the militants. 

And so ends, temporarily, 
a story which will never be 
forgotten. 





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February 1 Ith, 1969 THE PAPER 9 


. vw 
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21st CENTURY 


Riot Squad prepares to enter Computer Center to remove occupa- 
tion force. 








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10 THE PAPER February 1 1th, 1969 


21st CENTURY ENTR. 


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. BOX 1088 PLACE D’ ARMES 739-9074 - 274-1586 








. 21st CENTURY 
Part of the furniture barricade created by 7th floor militants 
heaving cafeteria and faculty lounge facilities down stairwell lead- 
ing to 6th floor. 





— mi 
a +3 


Back copies of THE PAPER find their final resting daming the 
flow of water coming down from upper floors and seeping into 


j M ; 21st CENTURY ” 
3rd floor student offices. ore Computer damage Ist CENTURY 


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February 11th, 1969 THE PAPER 11 





Special thanks to Herb 
Bernstein of The Georgian 
snoopies for providing fly- 
ing facilities for our aerial 
photography. 





21st CENTURY 






21st CENTURY ' 


Arrested occupation force awaits fingerprinting, questioning and 
booking in labs on 9th floor prior to being taken to cells. 


Remains of what once was an office in the maze of the Computer 
Center. 





er to 





Smoke billows from a window Per enmaT| 
of the Computer Center, at the 
oa olga at oe hieght of the outbreak of des-  Fipemen enter burning areas with axes, hoses and oxygen to quell 
IBM cards and other debris litter the rear entrance. truction. blaze in Computer Center. 












es leita ete 


ratnttat att 


ee 
STAFF PHOTO 
———Swew 





|SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS 
UNIVERSITY 


NEEDS YOUR HELP 
EVENING and DAY 


STUDENTS 
FACULTY & ADMINISTRATION 

















IF YOU GIVE A DAMN ABOUT 
YOUR UNIVERSITY, YOU CAN HELP 


US PUT IT PHYSICALLY BACK IN SHAPE. 


mM CAFETERIA TO BE CLEANED AND FURNITURE TAKEN 
FROM STAIRWELLS & ESCALATORS AND CLEANED AND 
SET UP AS BEFORE 








| MEWATER CLEANUP. MANY AREAS WERE FLOODED 
WHEN HOSES WERE TURNED ON. THIS HAS TO ssf 
BE MOPPED UP. — | | soe ee 


5 
a ee 
. : 
: 


Mi FACULTY LOUNGES TO BE CLEANED,VACUUMED AND 
FURNITURE PUT BACK IN PLACE. 


CONTACT MR JACK DUPUIS - H-116 (ocr ) OR CALL 879-5805