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ThePa 


JOURNAL OF THE EVENING STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION 


SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY 


per 





volume ONE - number fourteen 
Montreal - January thirteen/69 












JIM FANNING 


BASEBALL TALK IN 


i 





GENE MAUCH 


On Wednesday January 15th at 12:30 p.m. Jim Fanning, General Manager 
and Gene Mauch, Manager of the Montreal Expos will speak at a Baseball 
Talk-Inin H-110.Russ Taylor of CFCF-TV will host the event. 

The Talk-In is sponsored by the SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT 
OF MANAGEMENT. Billy Kowal, Vice-President stated in a press release 
to THE PAPER that this will be Mr. Mauch’s first day in Montreal. 


Gene Mauch, 43, has 81/2 years 
of major league managing experience 
all with the Philadelphia Phillies of 
the National League from 1960-67. 
He guided the Phils up from 8th 
place finishes in 1960 and 1961 to 
a tie for second in 1964. 

Mauch, born in Salina Kansas, had 
a lengthy career as a player-perfor- 
ming for clubs in both the National 
and American Leagues - before ma- 
naging. A right-handed throwingand 
battling infield, he appeared in 304 
major league games over a span of 
16 years (including 45 games with 


BLACK STUDIES 


PROGRAM 


A new program on Black Studies 
is finally underway in Sir George. 
Sponsored by Professor C. Davis 
of the Department of Education, 
Leroy Bucher, and Phil Griffin, un- 
der the auspices of the Black Stu- 
dents Association, the plan calls 
for a series of lectures and readings 
by educators from the United Sta- 
tes. 


The lecturers, all Black, have been 
chosen for their knowledge and ac- 
tivity in the various areas to be dis- 
cussed in coming weeks. Their con- 
tributions to the Black identity is 
best explained by their current po- 
sitions in various educational ins- 
titutions as well as impressive lists 
of publications. 


The program, will be held in the 
Alumni Auditorium, Room H-110 
of the Hall Building, and is free 
and open to the public. Further 
information may be obtained from 
Professor Davis at 879-4536. 


the old Montreal Royals of the 
International League). 

Jim Fanning, born in Chicago in 
1927 and holding degrees from the 
University of Illinois, played for 8 
years in the Chicago Cubs. He 
played and managed in South Ame- 
rican Leagues from 1957 to 1959. 
He managed and scouted for the 
Milwaukee Braves from 1961 to 
1967. Fanning was appointed direc- 
tor of the Central Scouting Bureau 
in January, 1968. On August 14th, 
1968 Fanning was appointed Gene- 
ral Manager of the Montreal Expos. 


SUMMER 


COURSE LOAD 
EVALUATION 


January 13th: The Univer- 
sity Councils’ sub-commit- 
tee studying summer course 
loads is conducting a survey 
(see page 2) on Evening Stu- 
dent attitudes towards 
change in summer course 
loads. In a recent interview 
with Dean Butovsky of the 
Arts Faculty, he said that 
the reason for the survey 
was to get enough opinions 
from Evening Students so 
that the course load could 
be re-evaluated in light of 
changing requirements of 
the Evening Students. 

The committe, meeting 
later this month, will decide 
at this time what the regu- 
lation changes, if any, will 
be effected for the 1969 sum- 
mer sessions, 





ENCOUNTER 
WEEK 


In conjunction with the publishing 
of the report of George R. Mar- 
shall to the co-curricular committee, 
on ‘‘The Educational effects of an 
Extended Living Experience between 
a face-to-face group of students and 
faculty’’, THE PAPER files this par- 
tial report on the results of the pi- 
lot study. 

During the encounter week, 15 to 
18 students were in attendance full- 
time (at a fee of $10 each) along with 
four faculty members. Since the con- 
cept of the living experience is to 
de-emphasize roles, very little struc- 
ture as we have it in our daily lives 
and in the university was provided. 
It was left up to the individuals (fa- 
culty and students) to recognize 
problems and make their own choice 
as to whether to fill the breach or 
not. This included numdane activi- 
ties such as cooking, washing dishes, 
general cleaning, feeding the animals, 
and gathering firewood. However, all 
these things were performed to a most 
reasonable degree without direction 
from ‘‘higher’’ authority. These func- 
tions were performed out of a feeling 
for general good, not duty. 

In our modern society, role playing 
from what is termed arole standpoint 
is all too prevalent. However, as Dr. 
Marshall pointed out, when the need 
for role playing is taken out of per- 
sonal interactions, the level of perso- 
nal development and communica- 
tions between people has an oppor- 
tunity to increase. 





This was emphasized both ona 
group level and individual level. So- 
me individuals wrote poetry, prose 
or chose to paint. One student cho- 
se to paint even though he hadn’t 
done so for some years. One student 
at the farm found an exam in En- 
glish on Hamlet. One evening, a 
few of the students and faculty, each 
taking one of the acting roles, read 
Hamlet and turned an academic as- 
signment into a shared living expe- 
rience. 


DRURY 
TO TALK 


AT S.G.W.U. 


“Bud” Drury, Chairman of the Federal 
Treasury Board has been invited to speak 
at Sir George Wednesday January 15th. 
The S.G.W.U. Liberal Club will sponsor 
the event that will see Mr. Drury talk on 
government spending and priorities under 
the Trudeau regime. 

The meeting, to be held in Room H-420, 
will start at |:15 p.m. and will open to all 
interested parties and questions from the 
floor will be entertained. 


UCSL PROGRESSES 
ON SENATE BRIEF 


On Saturday, January 11th, at ameeting ofthe University 
Council on Student Life the legality of the Evening Stu- 
dents’ Association was established as an outcome of deli- 
berations, and due to the firm stand of its Executive, the 
Evening Students’ Association has won its struggle to be 
recognized on a par with the day Students’ Association. 


The Student Affairs Senate proposal was modified to re- 
flect the general opinion that the Evening Students’ Asso- 
ciation and Students’ Association are to remain in existen- 
ce as the basic student governments. 


There was a proposal made 
to establish a Council on 
Student Life which is to gi- 
ve the Evening Students’ 
Association and Students’ 
Association equal represen- 
tation and rights. This it- 
self with matters of relevan- 
ce to both day and evening 


There was a proposal made 
to establish a Council on 
Student Life which is to gi- 
ve the Evening Students’ 
Association and Students’ 
Association equal represen- 
tation and rights. This new 
body will report directly to 
the proposed University Se- 
nate and it will concern it- 
self with matters of relevan- 
ce to both day and evening 
students. Including Health, 
Placement Services, Hous- 
ing, Athletics, Orientation, 
co -curricular Activities, 
Foreign Students, Space, 
Extra-Curricular Activities, 
Student Rights and Respon- 
sibilities, ternal fairs 
and Student Services. In a- 
nother category the Coun- 
cil on Student Life will al- 
so be involved with finan- 
ces, registration and other 
non-academic aspects. 


The original senate propo- 
sal by Mark Medicoff, 

Kallas, Don Rosenbaum, 
and other day students, 
(which would have comple- 
tely eliminated the Evening 
Students’ Association and 
would have emasculated 
night students be leaving 
them a grossly unrepresen- 
ted minority in the Senate 
vis-a-vis day students who 
have a 4 - 1 radio to their 
advantage) was altered in 
order to create a form of 
co-operative federalism. 
This federal proposal pre- 
vents a central, unatary and 
dictatorial system from 
being imposed. 


Key advocates of this co- 
pea federalism were 

SA president, Mr. W. 
O’Mahony and ESA Arts Re- 
presentative, Mr. R. Miles 
who worked Friday andinto 
the early hours of Saturday 
morning in order to prevent 
morning in order to present 
constructive alternatives 
which would enable the E- 
vening Students’ Associa- 
tion to continue its existen- 
ce and role in the universi- 
ty community. 


The new suggested struc- 
ture will enable the Senate 
to exist in conjunction with 
the various faculty commit- 
tees, the new Council on 
Student Life, and the Eve- 
ning Students’ Association 
and Students’ Association - 
each fulfilling its consti- 
tuent responsibilities and 


having full participatory in- 
cont’d on page-15 


CHANGE 
THE U.N. 


Lester B, Pearson, former Ca- 
nadian Prime Minister, atartled 
the world with a proposal to ra- 
dically reform the United Nations 
along regional lines in a speech 
on December 15th, 1968 on the 
British Broadcasting Corporation. 

Mr. Pearson drew on his know- 
ledge as president of the U.N, 
General Assembly in 1952 and 
as long-time chief Canadian Am- 
bassador to the United Nations, 

To be strong the U. N. must 
be made less national and more 
united, he said in a lecture com- 
memorating John C, Leith, first 
director general of the B.B.C, 

*s] think we should regionalize 
to a greater extent than at the 
present some of our U.N. activ- 
ities, especially those of the 126 
member general assembly’? he 
said, 


cont’d on page-13 





AFunny Thing Happened On The Way Io The Forum 


2 THE PAPER January 14, 1969 


BULLETIN BOARD 





OPEN MEETING 
EVENING STUDENTS’ 
ASSOCIATION 
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL 
MEETING 
JANUARY 13TH 
MONDAY 
8:30 PM 
ROOM #-331 


COMMITTEE 
on Philosophy 
and Goals 


Deadline is January 15th. for 
briefs from interested parties, 
For further details call Prof, 
A. Tarasofsky at 879-5824 or 
Prof, C, Martin at 879-5925 


Radio 
SIR GEORGE 


’ Evening Students interested 
in participating in working in 
Radio Sir George may get more 
details and information any 
Monday or Tuesday between 
5 and 8 pm in Room H-64l, 
Hall Building. 


St, 0: ¢: 
Student Lab on 
Communication 

Friday to Sunday 
January 
17th through 19th 
at 
La Caleche Hotel 
Ste Agathe 
Registration with Day 
Receptionist on 
3rd floor, or E.S.A. 
offices H-331-1. 
Information 
Laurie Abrams H-337 
or 879-4578 


EVENING 





SCIENCE 
FACULTY 


MATH CLUB 
PHYSICS CLUB 
CHEMISTRY CLUB 
BIOLOGY CLUB 


The above clubs are in 
the process of being for- 
med. Anyone interested 
in joining and participa- 
ting in these clubs is re- 
quested to fill out the 
coupon on this pageand 
drop it off at the E.S.A. 
office in Room H-331 or 
phone Ray Cornell at 
879-2832. 


DUEL 
IN ASSOCIATION WITH 


T.V. SIR GEORGE 
DIRECTED BY JOSEPH STRICKS 


ULLYSES 


ALUMNI AUDITORIUM 
H-110 
HALL BUILDING 
STUDENTS $1.00 PUBLIC $2.00 
JAN. 17TH - FRIDAY 
JAN. 18TH - SATURDAY 
7 and 9:30 PM 


ASSOCIATION 
ENGINEERING WEEK 
FEBRUARY 10TH TO 15TH 
ENGINEERING STUDENTS 
WANTED TO SUBMIT 
PROJECTS 
INFORMATION: 
ROOM H-349 
HALL BUILDING 
1:30 - 3:30 PM 
MONDAY TO FRIDAY 


STUDENTS 


ASSOCIATION 
ACTIVITIES 


Iam interested in finding out more about 


PD ea as ctw ode ncs cdncevacbigaswaccuaeycteess 


AVAILABLE WHEN: ................scesesceee 


DROP THIS FORM OFF AT THE ESA 
OFFICES IN ROOM H-331 OR THE PAPER 
IN ROOM H-338. 


ENGINEERING STUDENTS’ 


wh 


ON SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT 


GEORGIAN PLAYERS 


A FUNNY THING HAPPENED 
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM 


A rollicking, hillarious broadway musical 
for young and old alike. Not to be missed. 


Jan. 14th to 19th 8:30 pm 
Admission - Public $2.50 
- Students $1.75 


Tickets available at Mezzanine Level 
Hall Building 
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. 
or call 
879-4594 





Asa ae 





SOCIOLOGY STUDENTS 


OPEN MEETING 


THURSDAY JANUARY I6TH 
5:30 p.m. 
ROOM H-605 


PURPOSE 


TO DISCUSS EVENING 
STUDENT REPRESENTATION 


EVENING STUDENTS NOTE 





HISTORY 
SOCIETY 


GENERAL MEETING 


FRIDAY 
JANUARY 17TH 
2 PM 
ROOM H-609 
INFORMATION: 
WAYNE FABER 
352-0248 





CLASSIFIED 


RATES: Classified 

Advertising rates for registered students are 
75 for each insertion. Rates for non-students 
are $1.50 Content is limited to twenty-five 
words. Cash must accompany all ads. Thead- 
vertising deadline for each Monday edition 
is Thursday noon. Ads may submitted to the 
Editor's office, Room H-338, Hall Building, 
1455 de Maisonneuve Bivd. West. 

——— ieee 

HELP AVAILABLE 
Professional typing service such as 

term papers, thesis, correspondence, 


cic... 
Call 932-0496 or 626-7475 





INSURANCE 
All kinds of insurance free consul- 
tation special life insurance plan for 
students all risks cars fire easy pay- 
ments Harry Daniel 1018 Sherbroo- 
ke West Tel. 843-5016 





ART MODEL 
Wanted - interested woman to be 
interpreted by painter. Please call 
afternoons 931-2191 Remuneration 
$2.00 per hour. 





CAR 
1962 Volkswagon in good shape 
with radio and low mileage. $350. 
Call 731-0967. 


T.V. STERIO 
23" R.C.A. Victor 
Combination T.V. - AM- FM 








3 Speed Sterio SKI EQUIPMENT 
Solid Walnut Finish Edelweiss Skiis, laced ski boots 
$225.00 size seven, and poles. Price: $50.00 - 
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all: 879-2836 
879-2832 Room H-33] 





SUMMER COURSE LOAD 
EVALUATION 


The University Council has established a Committee to 
look into the matter of course load for summer session 
Evening Students, The present regulations limit this course 
load to two full courses but considers, as maximum course 
load, all single 400 level and certain 200 level courses 
starred in the Summer Session Calendar as maximum 
course load, 

In attempting to re-evaluate the present situation and 
make recommendations to University Council, your answers 
to the following questions would be helpful. 

The purpose of this brief questionnaire is to gain 
information to assist the Committee in properly ascer- 
taining the requirements of Evening Students, 


SUMMER COURSE LOAD EVALUATION 
QUESTIONNAIRE 

NAME: ‘ 
g 

FACULTY: ' 
- 

i 

i 


»~HAVE YOU EVER TAKEN SESSION COURSES?....... 
. SHOULD PRESENT REGULATIONS GOVERNING SUM-1 
MER COURSE LOADS FOR EVENING STUDENTS RE- 
MAIN UNCHANGED? ........000. eee cccescccccvcccveccscccocess oe. 


3.SHOULD THE COURSE LOAD LEVEL BE CHANGED 
TO INCLUDE A MAXIMUM TWO COURSE AT ANY, 
LEVEL INCLUDING 400 AND 200 STARRED COUR- 
SES? eeeeceeoeeeeeeceeareae eeerteaeaeecetceeeeee eeeeceete eeseeeeeeceeoere# 


H 
8 
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4,UNDER WHAT CONDITIONS, IF ANY, SHOULD ane 
3 
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MAXIMUM COURSE LOAD INCLUDE TWO (2) 400 
OR 200 STARRED COURSES:, 


eeeeeeeteeeeeeaes eeeree @eenenr 


De DO YOU ‘CONSIDER ANY 200 COURSES TO BE, IN 


9 


FACT, MAXIMUM COURSE LOAD? ....ccccccscececececccee - 
eesee Tera ot an a ee eee 

‘ 

COUPON DROP OFF . 

INFORMATION DESKS i 

HALL AND NORRIS BUILDING 4 

ESA OFFICES H-331 OR H-338 . 

iH 

Sitter TE TEE ELL LLC LCCC COCO. 








BLACK STUDENTS’ 
ASSOCIATION OF 
SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS 
UNIVERSITY 


Speakers for Informal Black Studies Program, 1969 
Friday, January 17th 


Don L. Lee - Poet: staff member of the Museum of African- Ameri- 

can History and teacher of Afro- American Literature at Columbia 
College, Chicago, 111. He is on the Editorial Staff of Black Expres- 
sion: A Journal of Literature and Art; and is a book reviewer for 
Negro Digest. Mr. Lee is currently Writer-in-Residence at Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, New York. 
Author of three volumes of poetry, Think Black, Black Pride and 
Don’t Cry, Scream - due for publication in January 1969. Poems and 
articles have appeared in Negro Digest, Journal of Black Poetry, Mu- 
hammed Speaks, Evergreen Review, Liberator, Freedomways, The New 
York Times and other publications. 


Bob Hamilton - Poet: teacher of Black Literature at Queens College, 
N.Y. Editor of Black Caucus and Soulbook. Mr. Hamilton’s poetry and 
articles have appeared in Negro Digest, The National Guardian, Black 
Arts, and other publications. He is also a painter and sculptor. 


Keorapetse Kgositsile - Poet, Essayist: Mr. Kgositsile, who was born 
in Johannesburg, South Africa and educated thereatthe Ohlange Ins- 
titute, has been living in the United States since 1962. His work has 
been published in Negro Digest, Liberator, Journal of Black Poetry, 
Presence Africaine, Transition, The New African, and other journals 
and several anthologies, including Black Fire. He has read and lec- 
tured on ‘“‘Contemporary Black Poetry”’ at many colleges and univer- 
sities, including Columbia University, Atlanta U., Queens College, 
Howard U., and U. of Buffalo. Two books of his poetry, Spirit Un- 
chained and For Melba are scheduled for pubtication this Spring. 
These poets will read from their own works. ~ 


Friday, January 24th 


James Turner - Mr. Turner graduated sumna cum laude from Cen- 
tral Michigan University and received his M.A. from Northwestern 
University where he also completed the Graduate Africa Studies 
Program. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in political sociology. 
Mr. Turner has been the recipient ofaJohn Hay Whitney Fellowship, 
and African Studies Program Fellowship, an N.D.E.A. Foreign Lan- 
guage Fellowship, and an N.I.M.H. Research Fellowship. Among his 
published articles have been ‘‘Afro-American Perspective on Africa” 
and ““Black Man in a White Defined Society”’. 

Lecture topic: “Black Nationalism - the function of an ideology of 
Ethnic Identity’. 


Friday, January 31st 


Dr. Chichi Onwauchi - Dr. Onwauchi is director of the African- Ca- 
ribbean Study Center at Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee where 
he is also professor of Anthropology. Hismembershipsinclude the A- 
merican Anthropological Association, the Society for Applied Anthro- 
pology, the American Sociological Association, and the African Studies 
Association. Among his published articles have been “Identity and 
Black Power’ and “African Traditional Culture and Western Educa- 
tion’’. 

Lecture topic: ‘‘Anthropology from a Black Point of View’’. 


Friday, February 7th 


Dr. Charles V. Hamilton - Formerly Chairman of the Political Scien- 
ce Department at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, Dr. Hamilton 
now holds that position at Roosevelt University in Chicago. He was 
co-author with Stokeley Carmichael of Black Power: The Politics of 
Liberation in America. Two other books by Dr. Hamilton will be re- 
leased shortly. They are The Politics of Civil Rights and Negro Po- 
litics and Political Modernization. His articles have appeared in the 
New York Times Magazine, Negro Digest, Partisan Review, Freedom- 
ways, etc. 

Lecture topic: “Race, Politics, and Social Change: Beyond ‘68’ 


Wednesday, February 12th 


Julius Lester - Mr. Lester, a graduate of Fisk University in Nashvil- 


le, Tennessee is a former Field Secretary for SNCC. He is presently: 


a free-lance writer and has had many articles published in The Na- 
tional Guardian, The Village Voice, Broadside, Liberator, and other 
publications. He recently had a book published entitled, Look Out 
Whitey! Black Power’s gon’ get your Mama. Mr. Lester is also a pho- 
tographer, with photos printed in The Movement, and a folksinger, 
with two albums of original and traditional folk songs to his credit. 
Lecture topic: “Beep! Beep! Bang! Bang! Umgawa! Black Power!” 


Friday, February 21st 


Michael Thelwell - Originally from Jamaica, Mr. Thelwellis presently 
on the faculty of The University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where 
he teaches Black Literature and Creative Writing. He has had articles 
and short stories published in Negro Digest, Partisan Review, Free- 
domways, Presence Africaine, and The Massachusetts Review, where 
he is also on the Editorial Board. He has a critical essay in William 
Styron’s Nat Turner: Ten Black Writers Respond. Winners of several 
prizes for short stories, Mr. Thelweill is a consultant to the National 
Endowment for the Humanities. He was active for several years with 
SNCC and the Mississippi Freedom Democrat Party. 

Lecture topic: ‘‘Black Sterotypes in White Literature’’. 


Friday, February 28th 


Robert S. Browne - Mr. Browne, who received his education at the 
University of Illinois, the University of Chicago, and the London 
School of Economics, is currently Assistant Professor of Economics at 
Farleigh-Dickenson University in New Jersey. He had many articles pu- 
blished in Freedomways, The New York Times Magazine, Ramparts, 
‘The New Republic, and other publications. He has just completed a 
book entitled Race Relations in International Affairs. Mr. Browne al- 
so spent a number of years in Cambodia and Viet Nam as a public 
official and has lectured and written extensively on the U.S. presen- 
ce there and the condition of Black military personnel. 

Lecture topic: ““The Economics of Black Separatism”’ 


GEORGIAN 
SNOOPIES 
STILL 
FLYING HIGH 


The Georgian Snoopies, new to 
Sir George this year, have now 
grown to a membership over 90 
active participants. Back reports 
have covered their growth from 
a small Evening Student Asso- 
ciation group to a bonafide day- 
evening group that appears to be 
well organized and on the move. 

In an interview with Harold 
Fues, President of the Snoopies, 
The Paper asked him about fu- 
ture plans. This year they plan 
to continue events until March, 
but until then a program will in- 
clude participation by several 
companies in the ground instruc- 
tion program. The program, hea- 
vily weighted in favour of all 
important navigational proficien- 
cy, will see Dr. Melvil Jones of 
the Institute of Aviation Mede- 
cine talking about advancements 
in that field as well as Air Cana- 
da, Canadair, United Aircraft, Ca- 
nadian Marconi, and Canadian 
Aviation Electronics sending in 
specialists to discuss commercial 
aviation, radar, turbine engines 
and air frames. 

Harold said that the Snoopies 
hope to have 3 or 4 private pi- 
lots graduated along with at least 
one commercial license passed 
before the cessation of this year’s 
events. 


WHERE IS IT? 


The EDUCATION WEEK- 
LY from the Department of 
Education of Quebec dated 
APRIL 11, 1968, in an article 
on university budgets sta- 
ted; 

“Tt also seemed essential 
to make a substantial in- 
crease in budget-balancing 
grants to Quebec universi- 
ties. About $88 million will 
be allocated for this purpo- 
se in 1968/69, up from $67 
million during the fiscal year 
now ending’. 

In reality, the expressed in- 
tention of the government 
to increase financial assis- 
tance to the universities did 
not fully materialize. Mr. 
Cardinal and his group of 
“‘experts’’ decided that what 
would do the English 
schools the most good was 
a decrease in assistance. 
Perhaps the English tax- 
payer should review his as- 
sistance,-to the Department 
of Finance in light of this. 
If your fees go up next year 
you know who to blame 
don’t you. Remember this 
at election time. 


E.S.A. FORUM 
MEETS 


The newly formed Evening Stu- 
dents Association Forum has 
wasted no time in organizing it- 
self into a working club. Original- 
ly reported as the Debating Club, 
the Forum is a more easy going 
idea of how individuals express 


ideas on an informal basis. 

As Fred Schmuck put it ‘“‘The 
normal idea of a debating club 
has been one of a speaker ram- 
bling on with his podium and 
glass of water to assist him with 
a particular importance being pla- 
ced on the ability of the individual 
to be able to speak to an audien- 
ce’’. The Forum is designed to 
help individuals express themsel- 
ves in an informal atmosphere. 

What they have in mind is a 


January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 3 


group sitting around a table ona 
casual basis discussing topics and 
issues using only the guidelines 
of a set topic agreed to by the 
participants with an appointed 
moderator for each session. 


The first open meeting is sche- 
duled for Friday, January 17th 
at 7:00 p.m. in Room H- 435. The 
meeting will be open to both e- 
vening and day students and 
requests will be welcomed. 


BIOLOGY CLUB 
SPONSORING FILM 
ON FEMALE STERILITY 


“Female Sterility” is the name 
of a special film being presented 
by the Biology Club of Sir Geor- 
ge. The three biological aspects 
of female sterility will be fully 
explained in the film lasting some 
30 minutes and Dr. R. Shatz of 
the Jewish General Hospital will 
be on hand to answer questions 
from the audience as well as pro- 
vide a laymans interpretation of 
the more clinical approaches in 
the film. 

Originally shown to day students 
last December, the enthusiasm 
and attendance by day students 
prompted the club to make the 
film available during evening 
hours. Mrs. T. McRae, club se- 
cretary, expressed her interest 
in seeing the Biology Club ex- 
tend its activities to the evening 


student population and she poin- 
ted out that this type of presen- 
tation is a particularly mature 
endeavour for evening students 
to see and find out about. 


The film will be shown in the 
Hall Building, Room H-635 at 
6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, January 
15th. 


She also recommended that the 
male population take special in- 
terest in the film as it would pro- 
vide insight into many of the 
problems women face. She cau- 
tioned however that the emotio- 
nal aspects of female sterility are 
not touched upon in the film. 

Should conditions permit it, a 
second film on the surgical pro- 
cedures to correct female sterili- 
ty will be presented. 


E.S.A. CONSTITUTION 
COMMITTEE ROLLING ALONG 


On Friday evening, January 3rd, the second meeting of the E.S.A. 
Constitutional Committee was held. The meeting was attended by 
Fay Lamont, Eunice Smith, Ian Buchanan, Esmond Dunne and John 
Walsh. 

The committee incorporated into their ‘Proposed Constitution’’ a 
preamble, then went on to the second review of: the responsibilities 
of the Executive Council of the E.S.A., those of the individual re- 
presentatives and those of “standing’’ committees, active at the pre- 
sent time. 

Additional items discussed included a review on or of: electoral pro- 
cedures, timing and tenure of office. 

It is expected that the revised constitution (‘‘proposed’’) will be pre- 
sented to the Electoral college at the meeting scheduled for the end 
of January or beginning of February 1969. 


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by 
Certified Mechanics 





Students: Present this 
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5710 UPPER LACHINE RD. 
(corner Harvard N.D.G.) 
489-9721 





4 THE PAPER January 14, 1969 


Editorial 


THE DANGER 
OF NATIONALISM 
TO CANADA 


Canadians are today developing a greater sense of national pride 
than ever before. Consciousness of our recent Centennial celebra- 
tions have led to a growing awareness of our nationhood and our 
potential for greatness. Despite the seemingly positive aspects of this 
new nationalism, it has also raised the spectre of a negative chauvi- 
nism that would reject our traditional policy of brotherhood and frien- 
dly mutual co-operation with America. Tocontinue our economic growth 
it is essential that we reject the unhealthy policy of anti-Americanism. 


Another danger lies in our cultivated ignorance of Europe and of the 
European Culture which is the basis of our Western Civilization. It 


would be wise to avoid encouraging the typeof petty nationalism that 


divided European brother against Canadian brother in the futility and 


fratricide of WORLD Wars | and Il. It is a vital necessity for the conti- 


nued survival of the Western World that we seek to stress and foster 
the values and common heritage that can politically reunite us and 
provide a source for a renewed spiritual resurgence of our Culture. 


Europe is not merely the fossil of our forgotten past -- it still remains 
as the potential fountainhead for a truly progressive future. Canada, 
far from abandoning N.A.T.O. should try to expand it according to its 
original long-range purpose advocated by Lester Pearson. That purpo- 
se was to make N.A.T.O. the foundation for a social-political-cultural 
union between Europe and America. 


Nationalism despite its colour and widespread sentiment must be ca- 
refully regarded as an outdated 19th Century emotion that has made 
our Western World heir to its present decadence and decline, and as 
such must be sublimated in favour of the more uplifting and futuris- 
tic concept of a firm Canadian- European relationship. 





PARKINSON’S LAW 


It has become more and more apparentthatthe expansion of bureau- 
cracy on the 3rd floor has led to the confirmation of the practical va- 
lidity of Parkinson's Law. The essence of Parkinson's Law implies that 
with the expansion of areas of responsibility ‘endless committees and 
sub-committees, etc.), the general situation becomes more and more 
complex and less and less ts accomplished. Stated as a formula it is as 
follows: The efficiency of an organization is inversely proportional to 
the expansion of responsibility. 


A meander down through the chasm of the third floor will reveal to 
any casual onlooker that bureaucracy has indeed gone mad. On the 
receptionists’ glass cage isalargecomplicatedanddaily growing chart 
of the various executives and appointed office-holders whodwell in an 
ever-burgeonning number of cubbyholes, replete with modern desks, 
typewriters and full executive office regalia, whether or not they are 
of any utility or practical service to the student body. Besides the vast 
number of desks, and the multitude of appointed positions, there is the 
additional phenomena of ‘the committee’. Committees are as super- 
fluous and ubiquitous as the sands on the seashore. And yet, what 
have all the infinite number of briefs on this and that accomplished? 
What has the extended verbiage, tenuous logic, andcontrived eloquen- 
ce of the new powers on the SLC and ASA accomplished in terms of 
meaningful academic or social assistance to the student. Where has 
all the money gone? Would it not be a good idea to make member- 
ship and dues to the students’ association voluntary- then we would 
see how much students appreciate our massive burgeoning bureau- 
cracy. Or are the new establishment powers too carefull and wary 
to allow the students to choose? 


We are inclined to think that the less government, the better govern- 
ment, and we feel that Parkinson's Law is most applicable to the pre- 
sent 3rd floor situation. We ask the average student to go down into 
the nightmare valleys of a bureaucracy fulfilling its wildest and most 
futile potentialities and observe. The situation speaks for itself and is 
apparent to any unprejudiced and unjaundiced eye. At least one no- 
table exception to this general milieu of purposelessness is the Com- 
merce Student Association and executive who havequietly and effecti- 
vely put into action concrete and useful programs with a minimum of 
expostulating and a maximum of tangible work. 

Perhaps another observation on student government is that power 
corrupts and total bureaucratic power corrupts totally. 


THE IMPOSSIBLE TASK 


ss 
Meany 


SS 


~* S ee 


THE GALE WIND IS GETTING STRONGER 








LETTERS 


to the editor 
ESTABLISHMENT 


Dear Sir: 
First of all | want to wish youand your staff 








well in your task of publishing The Paper. | 
have just returnedfrom two years in England 
and Europe and | would like to point out that 
the situation which you, the students in Mont 
real, find yourselves inis being duplicatedin 
the major seats of learning throughout the 
world. May | take up a few moments of your 
time in order fo pass on toyouthe observa 
tions of a traveller. 

The greatest thing that has impressed me, 
and this involves the unconscious reactions 
that you students are involved in, is that for 
the past 500,000,000 years or so, nature 
with the help of God Almighty has been 
moulding a universal environment for this 
thing called "man" and inless than 50 years, 
this thing that we call the ‘proletariate” or 
“establishment'’ has managed to provide us 
with an electronic warning system, which, at 
best, limits our existence to 20 minutes, 

| do not think thal this is very intelligent; 
and, as a matter of fact, if thisis the expres 
sion of all the efforts onthe part of educators, 
politicians and theologians down throughthe 
generations, then | think that it is the expres- 
sion of utmost stupidity on their part toconti- 
nue to impose, on students and peoples who 
are dependant on the establishmentfor their 
directives, a setofconditions which are being 
questioned by students even in the lower 
grades. 

It should be evident that if laws of natural 
progression had not been tampered with, 
then the situation in which we find oursel- 
ves would certainly not have come about. 
However, a system came into being about 
2,000 years ago whereby the proletariate 
of that time foisted upon the masses a set 
of laws of progression. This is manifesting 
itself in many ways. Race riots, religious, 
turmoil, economic and political upheavals, 
and finally and probably most important, 
the student reaction to a system which they 
know is not working. 

You may well ask how this all happened. 
The answer to this is rather complicated for 
it involves relativity, but let's try it this way: 
The establishment discovered through time 
that the mental energy of an individual could 
be accelerated and oriented by various ar 
tificial means; first, came light, and later 
through the guise of foisting upon the peo- 
ples, the necessity of following in the steps 
of the sacrificial Christ, the establishment 
found out that mental control to their satis- 
faction could be achieved by various me- 
thods: electricity, magnetism, high energy 
metal implants, high frequency light (va- 
rious colours), drugs, cerebral operations, 
etc. This is the power of the establishment 
and this is what you, the students, are ac- 
tually unconsciously involved in - the whole 
idea, that something is wrong, or out of pha- 
se. 

Sock it to'em! 
Yours truly, 
J. Neri 


CANADIEN 


Dear Sir: 

In our present day and age, we have a 
trend towards nationalism. Here in Canada 
this trend is prevalent but yet, is not what 
|, as a Canadian, would like to see. 

Here in Quebec we find our freres Fran- 
cais attempting to establish their own natio 
nal identity. | applaud their quest, but | can 
not help but feel that they seem to lack a 
sense of direction towards attaining their 
goal, They don't want a Canadian identity, 
they want a French identity. 

This search seems to reflect on the rest of 
les Canadiens as we fail to have any such 
aim. Most Canadians still refer to thensel- 
ves as English Canadians, French Cana 
dians in contrast to some other nationali 
ties, e.g. Americans, not English or Jewish 
or German Americans. | could name more, 
but space does not permit such. 

| would like to see every Canadian identi 
fy himself with one word; Canadian. Not 
English Canadian. | say: ‘| ama Canadian”. 
Je dit: “Je suis un Canadien”. 

Yours truly, 
R.J. Cornell, 
Un Canadien. 








POETRY 


Sirs: 

| do hope to see students of the evening di- 
vision respond to the idea of one page of 
poetry per issue. 

Sincerely yours, 

Luc Lechno 


Sirs: 

| would like to briefly tell you how stupen 
dous your newspaper is in printing every 
thing that leads to change for the better and 
that enhances our university. | would also 
like to thank our administrators for their good 
logic and zeal in patching up the “black 
blob’ in H-110 and in transferring the rear 
projector to a front projector. Now we can 
boast that we have a real cinema house. 
| knew that our good administrators have 
only the best interests for the students and 
the university at heart. 

May | also take up another line in wishing 
our good administrators the best of every- 
thing for this New Year. 

Yours truly 

Joseph Di Paolo 

Day Arts Ill 


FLU SHOTS ARE 
AVAILABLE AT THE 


HEALTH CENTER 


Hall Building 
Norris Building 





W, Montreal 107, Québec, Canada. 


The Paper 


THE PAPER is a weekly journal published under the auspices of the 
Evening Students’ Association of Sir George Williams University. Offices 
located in Room H-338, Henry Hall Building, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. 


‘Telephone: 879-2836 


Editor: Wayne S. Gray 
Associate Editor: James MacLellan 
Advertising Manager:Brian Levy 
Tony Malbogat 
Steve Brent 
Circulation Manager: Rick Stanford 
The Paper reserves the right to publish any and al] submissions and 


to abridge lengthly articles or correct grammar where necessary. All 
submissions should be typewritten when possible. 


Publication: Weekly every Monday 
Deadline: 8 p.m. Tuesday prior to publication 


H-003 
N-022 
















RADIO SIR GEORGE 





VOICE OF THE CONCRETE CAMPUS 8:45 AM TO 6 PM 


TUNDEX 








ON THE AIR 
JANUARY 13TH TO 1 
POPULAR TUNES 
1) 1 HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE MARVIN GAYE 
2) FOR ONCE IN MY WIFE STEVIE WONDER 
3) CLOUD: NINE TEMPTATIONS 
4) Love Child Supremes 
5) Cinnamon Derek 
6) Going Up The Country Canned Heat 


7) Crimson And Clover 


8) Son Of A Preacher Man Dusty Springfield 

9) Both Sides Now Judy Collins 

10) If I Can Dream Elvis Presley 

11) Everyday People Sly and the Family Stone 
12) Are You Happy Jerry Butler 

13) I’ve Gotta Be Me Sammy Davis Jr. 

14) Malinda Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers 
15) People Tymes _ 

16) I Can’t Turn You Loose Chambers Brothers 

17) Put Your Head On My Shoulder Letterman 

18) California Dreamin’ Bobby Womack 


19) Crosstown Traffic. 

20) California Soul 

21) Bluebirds Over The Mountain 
22) Shame Shame 

23) I Put A Spell On YOU 


Jimmi Hendrix Experience 
Fifth Dimension 

Beach Boys 

Magic Lanterns 


%) A Minute Of Your Time Tom Jones 

25) You Got Soul Johnny Nash 

26) Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Paul Mauriat 

27) Vance Roger Miller 

28) Goodnight My Love Paul Anka 

29) L. A. Breakdown Jack Jones 

30) In A Long White Room Nancy Wilson 

DISCoveries BUT YOU KNOW I LOVE YOU - FIRST EDITION 
FOX ON THE RUN MANFRED MANN 

GOOD LIFE LISTING 

1) BOTH SIDES NOW JUDY COLLINS 

2) TILL VOGUES 

3) 1VE GOTTA BE ME SAMMY DAVIS JR. 

4) CYCLES FRANK SINATRA 

5) Put Your Head On My Shoulder Lettermen 

6) Vance Roger Miller 

7) A Minute Of Your Time Tom Jones 

8) They Don’t Make Love Like They Used To Eddy Arnold 

9) Not Enough Indians Dean Martin 

10) Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Paul Mauriat 

11) L. A. Breakdown ( And Let Me In) Jack J ones 

12) In A Long White Room Nancy Wilson 

13) Goodnight My Love Paul Anka 

14) Yesterday’s Rain Spanky and Our Gang 

15) If I Can Dream Elvis Presley 


SOUL SAUCE 


1) 1 HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE MARVIN GAYE 


2) CLOUD NINE TEMPTATIONS 
3) FOR ONCE IN MY LIFE STEVIE WONDER 
4) Love Child Supremes 


5) Are You Happy 

6) Malinda 

7) Goodbye My Love 
8) Always Together 
9) California Dreamin’ 
10) Everyday People 


Jerry Butler 
James Brown 
Delis 


Bobby Womack 
Sly and the Family Stone 


SOPHISTICATED COUNTRY 


1) WHEN THE GRASS GROWS OVER ME 


GEORGE JONES 
2) YOURS LOVE WAYLON JENNINGS 
3) THEY DON’T MAKE LOVE LIKE THEY USED TO EDDY ARNOLD 
4) Flattery Will Get You Everywhere Lynn Anderson 
5) The Town That Broke My Heart Bobby Bare 
6) Ballad Of Two Brothers Autry Inman 
7) Vance Roger Miller 
8) In The Good Old Days Dolly Parton 
9) Ever Changin’ Mind Don Gibson 
10) Name Of The Game Was Love Hank Snow 





PREVIEW EXTRAS 


Nobody----- 3 Dog Night-----RCA Victor 
Heart-Teaser-----Flavor----- Columbia 

Nightmare----- Arthur Brown-----Polydor 

America----- The Nice-----Immediate 

I’m The Urban Spaceman-----The Bonzo Dog Doo-Dah Band 
Liberty 

Hip Hip Hooray-----Troggs----- Page One 

Walk Like A Man Again--—-Critters--—--- Trans World 
Never My Love-----Sandpepples-----Calla 


ACTION ALBUMS 


1) BEATLES 

2) STEPPENWOLF --- The Second 

3) JUDY COLLINS --- Wildflowers 

4) ROLLING STONES --- Beggar’s Banquet 

5) BARBRA STREISAND --- A Happening In Central Park 
6) SMOKEY ROBINSON & THE MIRACLES --- 

Special Occasion 


Tommy James and the Shondells 


Creedence Clearwater Revival 


Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers 


January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 5 


VIVE 
_ LES RESOLUTIONS 
DU JOUR DE L’AN! 


Il est de coutume a ce temps-ci de l’année d’offrir 
nos voeux et nos félicitations a ceux qui ont pris des 
résolutions pour le nouvel an. Fideéle 4 cette traditions, 
je désire offrir ici mes félicitations comme suit: 

BRAVO AU MOUVEMENT POUR L’INTEGRATION SCO- 
LAIRE: 

Ils se sont promis de continuer de plus bel la guerre 
qu’ils ont commencée l’an dernier contre l’usage de la 
langue anglaise au Québec; Ils ont l’intention de continuer 
a réaliser des exploits tels que ceux qu’ils ont accomplis 
déja, tel que le retardement d’un mémoire 4 la législatu- 
re sur les droits linguistiques au Québec (il est vrai que le 
contenu de ce mémoire laissait beaucoup 4 désirer, mais, 
tout de méme, c’aurait été un commencement vers la 
bonne voie), la désorganization du systeme scolaire de 
St-Léonard, le délogement du directeur de la Commission 
Scolaire de Matagami, et c. LeMouvementse promet d’ap- 
porter leur opposition a l’ouverture de toute école an- 
glophone dans les districts francophones tel que St-Hen- 
ri, St-Michel, Montréal Nord, etc. Mais ne désespé- 
rons pas: leur président, M. Lemieux, a avoué candi- 
dement dans les jours récents qu’ils sont tres 4 cours 
de fonds. Tant mieux! S’ils ne trouvent personne pour 
renflouer leurs finances, peut-étre que le Mouvement 
s’effacera avant de causer trop de dommage. 

BRAVO A MONSIEUR MICHEL MILLS, ETUDIANT 
A L,.UNIVERSITE DE MONTREAL: 

Il s’est fait le porte-parole d’un groupe d’étudiants 
des écoles du Québec. Leur intentions pour 1’an 1969 
semblent etre de s’emparer du gouvernement des éco- 
les de la province, Leur prétexte serait de démontrer qu’ils 
peuvent administrer les écoles d‘une facon plus effec- 
tive que des ordinatrices (car ils donnent l’impression 
d'etre convaincus que les écoles sont en effet dirigées 
par des ordinatrices!)Monsieur Lemieux a tout simple- 
ment affirmé qu’ils demandaient le droit d’étre utiles 
dans la société qu’ils veulent créer. Donc, non seule- 
ment ils ont l’intention de s’accaparer de |l’administra- 
tion du systeme scolaire, mais ils veulent en plus créer 
une nouvelle société! Trés intéressant! Vive les pou- 
voirs divins., 

BRAVO AU DETECTIF SERGENT ROGER LAVIGUEUR 
PRESIDENT DU “*‘MONTREAL POLICE BENEVOLENT 
AND PENSION SOCIETY’’: 

Il a récemment annoncé la possibilité imminente que 
la police de Montréal pourrait s’emparer du gouverne- 
ment au Québec (il semble que ces derniers temps beau- 
coup trop de groupes désirent accomplir exactement la 
meme chose) comme c’est la pratique dans certains 
pays de l’amérique latine. Bravo pour avoir affirmé que 
les partis politiques du Québec sont pires que le Partie 
Nazi de la derniere guerre, et pires que les communis- 
tes. Tous les Québecois sont donc assurés que la Police 


est prete a tout pour défendre leurs droits (et méme 
plus que leurs droits). 


BRAVO AUX MANUFACTURIERS DE LA GRANDE 
BRETAGNE: 

Ils méritent bien d’étre signalés pour leur geste gran- 
diose en ayant entrepris de fournir les armes nécessai- 
res a la Jordanie juste & temps pour lui permettre de 
détruire les nouveaux jets supersoniques que les Etats 
Unis vont bientot, dans un geste tout aussi grandiose, 
livrer a Israel, 


BRAVO POUR LES RESPONSABLES DES BOMBES QUI 
VONT CONTINUER A EXPLOSER ICI ET LA DANS LA 
PROVINCE. 


Vive les résolutions du jour de I|’an! 
SIR GEORGE’S MEETING PLACE 


@, SILENT MOVIES 
d DART BOARD 


roe) AND 


SING-A-LONG NIGHTLY 


WITH 
DENNY MOHNS 


AT THE PIANO 


DART TEAMS ARE NOW FORMING 
APPLY TO MR. DITTRICH 


NORTH SIDE 


1201 de MAISONNEUVE wo. gerween pRUMMOND & STANLEY STS. 


844-8355 





6 THE PAPER January 14, 1969 


‘perception’ 


a column dedicated to the fine arts 


A.E.MERMELSTEIN 


3 or fp if : 

. .. ie, ott 3 9 @) 4 £ , 
— ie / 4 

ps «(Me ig Me ak dau dry fs 

a. ee, (ie Pied { j i ju* / ae vs 
“: es: a S - j . 

“_ ‘a ny, 
rT ave 


Throughout time, man has decorated his places 
of worship, and produced depictions of the gods 
and animals he considered sacred. 

Thus the religious art of Christianity, Catholicism, 
and Judaism has always been prevalent, and most 
of us are familiar with the icons, statuary, and 
paintings relating to Christ, Buddah, and so forth. 
Generally unknown however, is the sacred art of 


the occult. 
Practitioners of Satanism, Wicca, and other De- 


monologically oriented faiths have always had a 
rich but relatively concealed religious art. ‘Black 
Art’ practitioners had their ‘‘Book ofSpirits’’ (also 
known by several other names) and other holy texts 
which rivaled the beauty of the ornate medieval 
Christian bibles. 

Reproduced here are some of the works of these 
cults, depictions of their rites, and the way in 5 
which they were seen by others. The Book of Spirits 

















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3 dyntua * J* s 
i J 4 oe Tt hall , en a theout® 
i’ Y tia f 





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cs 4 

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SS 4 ae 


7; « 
a r side s.4dd 
: : / ; 4 “a* Ps oe, 
™ et og hn en ee GEE POE 
Ske j : 4 nS n "oT od 
ae Roe é A aX nal ? eg Oy Adit ts 
a rr . ; . : Z saz tie ; 
: En eae SS ghee pd he 
H : . 4 oe 5 P sate . 
yw ae raeht! 4 7 i eel (Mei 
% ut” ¢ ; f gai fis 9 tatb 
gee 4 ° , 


- PPO 4%. 





,* 
; 72 
are r nat” 


+ oye gqaié 






A Black Book from Frances Barrett, 1801, The Magus 





The Hand of Glory 


The Devil as represented 
by statuary onthe Notre Dame 


Cathedral 


Satan gives the Adepts a Black-Book in Exchange for the 
Gospels. 
1626, compendium maleficarum) 


(from Secrets merveilleux de la 
magie naturelle et caballistique 


du Petit Albert - 1722) 






January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 7 


eae 
te 





THE SABBAT 
The word Sabbat has come to mean the religious meeting and cele- re held in a sacred area, and generally took place after midnight. It 
bration in which Satan is revered. Such festivals occurred during times was believed that the power of the cult was regenerated as a result. 


designated by natural occurances (such asthe phases of the moon} we- 


A Witch Preparing a Philtre - artist unknown Flemish 
school, mid fifteenth century. 





The Execution of Witches 





8 THE PAPER January 14, 1969 


Dr. MARSHALLS 
BRIEF ON COMUNITY FARM 


Application for funds to the co-curriculum committee 


The educational effects of an extended living experience 
face to face group of students and faculty 


between a 


We are made increasingly aware 
by students discontent, apathy, 
dropout or outright rebellion that 
the University is failing them. Some 
see the problem as residing pri- 
marily with the students; they are 
inadequately prepared, unmotiva- 
ted, misdirected and undisciplined. 
The danger in such a view is that 
educational institutions are seen 
as essentially correct in their 
philosophy. An alternate possibi- 
lity, of course, is that students want 
to learn but the sum and substance 
of University courses is not appli- 
cable to what they want to learn, 
to do, to explore, to reflect upon, 
Instead of University being one of 
the more dramatic and enlightening 
experiences of their lives entailling 
high levels of involvement it is 
reduced to a wasteful game of how 
can we best the system, obtain an 
optimal rating for minimal output 
and possess one ofthe cultures mo- 
re important ‘* bus tickets.’” It is 
quite likely that the University 
loses a number of bright and sen- 
sitive students because of a lack of 
correspondence between what they 
want or feel they need and what 
the University gives them. 

The pilot study proposes to bring 
together for an extended living ex- 
perience a group of faculty and stu- 
dents who are having difficulty re- 
maining at the University and who 
the University and Culture can ill 
afford to lose. An extended living 
experience outside of the formal 
structure of the University will 
provice opportunities for a freer 
interchange of ideas and feelings 
which will in turn reveal some 
of the underlying problems related 
to such matters as the amount of 
learning that takes place, or 
doesn’t take place, in the present 
classroom structure, identification 
of day to day problems of students 
which interfere with learning, how 
students feel about faculty and how 
they think faculty feel about them, 
and so forth. It is expected that 
the living experience will lead to 
dialogues and associations between 
individual students and faculty and 
create communication which trans- 
cends the usual role functions of 
professor and student, The encoun- 
ter week should be a learning 


experience for the faculty as well. 


The week will provide faculty with 
the opportunity to think primarily 
in terms of students needs, not 
their own or those of the institu- 
tion. The point is that students 
should see the relationship bet- 
ween what they are experiencing 
and learning in University and 
their own lives. The extent and 


depth of communication possible 
between themselves and others, be 
they students or faculty, is depen- 
dent on opportunities for personal 
encounter best provided by the kind 
of living experience being propo- 
sed, 

It is planned that the encounter 
week should take place from De- 
cember 13th to 23rd so as to al- 
low us to see the effects of the 
experience on the students during 
the second semester as to acade- 
mic performance, and personal 
attitudes, Both formalandinformal 
discussions will be planned discus- 
sion, Tape recordings will be made 
to allow for feedback to partici- 
pating students and faculty and to 
allow for a content analysis and 
report on the weeks prodedings. 
It is proposed that meetings be 
held with the students during the 
second semester to further evelua- 
te their reactions in retrospect. 

Dr. Hadley Dimock the chairman 
of the University Community Com- 
mittee has informed me that his 
committee would look with high 
favor upon such a project and will 
assist in any way they can, There 
might also be a small amount of 
support funds which the Faculty 
Arts Council will assign to the 
project, It might also be good idea 
to have the participating students 
pay a token amount, say ten dol- 
lars, to participate, in order to 
obtain students with a minimal 
degree of motivation, Mr. J.Sprou- 
le, Director of Guidance Service 
has indicated that he will have his 
counselors recommend students to 
me for participation in the pro- 
gram. Possibly the project should 
be limitedto Art Faculty students 
to begin with and if other encoun- 
ter weeks are planned then stu- 
dents from other faculties might 
be included, 

Discussions with Dr, Dimock 
brought out the importance of the 
living experience approach. The 
extended encounter will provide 
participants with a strong oppor- 
tunity to explore what aspects of 
faculty and student encounters 
should be standardized and what 
areas should be areas of freedom. 
The role of the professor must 
change, is changing, as it the 
role of the student. But if they 
are changing then what are they 
changing to and can we design 
some heuristicsto guide the chan- 
ge for the optimal benefit of edu- 
cation? 

Facilities at the farm community 

The farm has sufficient space 
to adequately house a small group 
of students and faculty along with 


IMITATED EVERYWHERE 
EQUALED NOWHERE 


1196 ST. CATHERINE ST. W. 
CORNER OF DRUMMOND 


OPEN 11 A.M. TILL 2 A.M. 
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY OPEN TILL 4 AM 





some of the community members. 
There is also enough space so that 
two or three people could go off 
on their own for a more quiet or 
reflective moment, It is an opera- 
ting farm with cattle, chickens and 
domestic animals and if students 
and faculty wanted to work on the 
farm together and share the ex- 
perience of doing something that 
does not involve the usual roles 
of student and professor they can. 
However, it is not the physical 
properties of the community so 
much as the general atmosphere of 
open communication, trust, shar- 
ing, exploration and love that has 
grown among its members and 
friends which could act as an im- 
portant catalyst or matrix for a 
warm, human and exciting learn- 
experience shared by students and 
professors. We speak of Universi- 
ty as a living experience but it 
rarely is. Large numbers, busy 
schedules, organization of time, 
meetings, space limitations, make 
it difficult. Students often fail to 
see their professors in more hu- 
man moments and there is often 
a gulf between students and fa- 
culty which can only act as a bar- 
rier to information interchange, I 
am also convinced that no essential. 
learning can take place unless some 
emotional arousal is involved, 

The University is often a place 
of ideas but not of feelings. Ste- 
rility leads to apathy which is a 
barrier to education, Students need 
to get excited, ecstatic, angry a- 
bout ideas, Students involved ina 
free interchange with faculty who 
are turned on by ideas in a com- 
munity atmosphere where intellec- 
tual and emotional interchange and 
frank and honest exploration of self 
and others is highly valued will 
have an opportunity of picking up 
some of the latent social structure 
and carrying it away with them. 
Dr. Samual Wallace, a sociologist 
at Brandeis University and a com- 
munity member and I will be among 
the people at the community during 
the ten days. The project will re- 
quire some continuity andDr, Wal- 
lace and I will be glad to take res- 
ponsibility for conducting the pro- 
ject and submitting a report of the 
results, probable significance and 
suggestions for future encounters 
to the co-curriculum commettee 
with a minimum fee attached for 
our professional services, Al- 
though it is of no direct concern 
to you, in order to give you some 
idea of our motives it might be 
added that the fee will be turned 
over to the community since we 
feel that the explotation ofalterna- 
te social structures is imperative 
and an important means by which 
man can find possible solutions 
to the socio-psychological pro- 
blems he is facing, 


SEE 


EUROPE 


on $2.50 apay 


Canadians travelling abroad recorded 
over 100,000 overnights at YOUTH 
HOSTELS last year. Most were students. 


Europe has over 3,000 YOUTH HOS- 
TELS. They provide low cost accommo- 
dation, meals and a friendly welcome. 


For Information: 
CANADIAN 


YOUTH HOSTELS 
ASSOCIATION 
1324 Sherbrooke St. W 842-9048 
































Again this year the Sir 
George ‘“‘Winter Carnival’”’ 
will be an attraction that 
should not bemissed. Start- 
ing on Thursday, January 
16th, and running until Sa- 
turday, January 25th, there 
will be events and activites 
on a variety of themes. 

ixicking-off the turned-on 
days will be a ‘‘Pub Crawl” 
(which means exactly what 
it says). All students enter- 
ing will pay .25 to literal- 
ly crawl from pub to pub, 
after appropriate refresh- 
ment at each stop-off point. 
If a miracle takes place, 
all remaining entrants will 
finish off at the ‘“Scandi- 
navian Club” for a glass 
of milk. 

Wednesday, January 
22nd, will be a little more 
sober. At 12:00 noon, in 
Room H-110, a “Sports 
Quorum”’ will feature ques- 
tioning by students of re 
presentatives of the super- 
team ‘‘ Montreal Alouettes’’, 
the Vancouver-less ‘‘ Natio- 
nal Hockey League’’, the 
world series champions of 
1984 ‘‘Montreal Expo’s”’ 
and the snowy-white “Na- 
tional Ski Association”’. 
Then from 2:00 p.m. to 
6:00 p.m., Ralph Lock- 


























a “live broadcast on mez- 
zanine’’, with free refresh- 
ments, compliments of any 
dead broadcast from the 
“Pub Crawl’’. 

In the evening, starting 
at 6:00 p.m. at the Il air- 
view Shopping Centre, a 
“Car Rally’’ will be fea- 
tured to give the Q.P.P. 
something to do besides 
chasing after bicycles. ‘The 
cost is $3.50 per car and 
will finish at the “‘Bava- 
rian beer Garden”’ located 


Fi) 





WINTER 
CARNIVAL 1969 





wood of CFOX will host’ 


at 20 Cremazie (corner of 
St. Lawrence, just below 
Metropolitan Blvd.). Price 
is $1.00 stag and $1.50 
for the lovers, while beer 
for lust will be .50 . The 
band on the scene will be 


“The Munks and Sweet 
Lorraine’”’. 

Thursday, January 
23 rd, will host “ Ski- 


movies” at 1:15 p.m. in 
Room H-110. Admission 
is free. Following at 8:15 
p.m. there will be a per- 
formance at Place des Arts 
featuring the genius of soul 
“Stevie \Wonder’’ and Co- 
median ‘“‘David Frye’’. Ad- 
mission is $3.50 singleand 
$4.50 double. 

“Ski-Day up North’’, in 
which most people will end 
upside down, will be on 
Friday, January 24th. Bu- 
ses leave Sir Georgeat 7:30 
a.m. (yawn ) andthrough- 
out the day. Bus tickets will 
be $3.00 per person while 
meal tickets, purchased in 
advance, are $1.25. For 
the lazy ones, ski-doos will 
be available. After all is 
sand and wet, a party at 
“Ny-Marks Inns’ will start 
at 8:30 p.m. with the‘‘Pow- 
er of Becket”? and “‘Kenny 
Hamilton and the Soul Ma- 
tes’. By the way, you will 
be skiing down ( for some 
of it will be up ) from hills 
70, 71, 72 in picturesque 
St. Sauveur. 

Finally, on Saturday, 
January 25th, the Carni- 
val Ball will issue forth in 
their Sunday best, at the 
Queen [lizabeth Hotel, in 
the Grand Salon, starting 
at 8:30 p.m. ‘Tickets are 
$4.50 per couple, and for 
that you get to see “Paul 
Beauregarde ”’ and “lhe 


66 rela n 
m sceid, 





design by Joseph Di Paolo 


HORROR FESTIVAL 


7:30 p.m. 


JANUARY 30 CURSE OF FRANKENSTEIN 
HORROR OF DRACULA 


JANUARY 31 
MAN 


INCREDIBLE SHRINKING 


DIARY OF A MADMAN 


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TWICE TOLD TALES 





Tickets may be purchased 
at the information desk of 
the Hall Building 
1455 Maisonneuve Blvd. 


$1.50 
$0.50 at door 








VOLUNTEER 
BUREAU 
SEEKS HELP 


The Volunteer Bu- 
reau of Greater Montreal is non- 
profit organization located at 985 
Sherbrooke St. W. corner of Mc 
Tavish St. Their basic require- 
ment is for students to give a 
bit of their free time to help out 
the many people and groups in 
Montreal that are not able to pay 
for assistance. 


The Bureau has co-ordinated 
the requests of such activities as 
the Unity Club, East End Boys 
Club as well as hospitals, indi- 
viduals and Weredale Home. 

Usually the requests are for tu- 
toring of children and young peo- 
ple as well as providing instruc- 
tion in photograph, music, se- 
wing groups and ballet. Hospi- 
tals are always in need of girls 
to help nurses in the distribution 
of juices, cookies and water to 
patients thus freeing the nurses 
for other responsibilities. 


Old people are a special case. 
Many older people lead lonely 
and friendless lives by themsel- 
ves. Younger people who visit 
them, talk about what is going 
on and provide a fresh approach 
are most welcome. 


The Bureau looks forward to ha- 
ving student volunteers fill out 
the ranks. They suggest that in- 
terested volunteers call them at 
844-4442 for an appointment ra- 
= ther than drop in unannounced. 

This gives them a chance to talk 
to you right away without you 
waiting. 


The helping hand finds a place 
to help here and the individual 
contact for young university stu- 
dents is well rewarded by knowing 
that the people they help appre- 

~ ciate the small kindness of a few 
hours per week. 







Dr. Marshall is currently teach- 
ing Experimental Psychology 471 
during the day and Social Psycho- 
logy 441 for both the Day and 
Evening Division, In both courses 


ACADEMIC 


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SHOP 
1026 


SHERBROOKE ST. W. 


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REBUTTAL 





by R.S, Stanford 


“The Paper’?, over the past 
few months, has chosen to inun- 
date itself with pathetic meander- 
ings about the immorality of day 
students and the wholesale irres-~ 
ponsibility of that other trap on 
campus, The Georgian.,.’’. 

It is obvious from the above 
extract of Mark Medicoff’s article 
**Our Property is Condemned”’ that 
Mr. Medicoff has spent little time 
in truly evaluating **The Paper’’ 
in reference to its purpose, content 
and ideals. The simple fact of the 
matter is that The Paper has taken 
upon itself the responsibility of 
informing and discussing the issues 
relevant to approximately 12,000 
evening students, In reference to 
content (if we take Issue 8 as the 
arbitrary position in which **The 
Paper’? became a distinct entity on 
this campus) one can see that the 
articles published not only in- 
formed but also exposed and dis- 
cussed issues, the idealogies of 
which could hardly be considered 
a part of the *‘comfortable middle 
class’’, Some articles no doubt 
were conservative; others merely 
informative; others liberal. But 
does this not increase the objecti- 
vity of the publication? 

‘Tf any medium of commtni- 
cation uses a simplistic approach 
to confront the crises of our times 
by branding agents of social change 
as radicals, hippies, commies, yip- 
pies and new left types other than 
discussing and analysing the ills 
and problems, then that medium 
is binding...’’. 

*“*The Paper can hardly be consi- 
dered ‘‘simplistic’’ or *binding’’, 
as again, an analysis of past edi- 
tions can reveal a logical, detail- 
ed, and varied approach tothe pro- 
blem, not only within this universi- 


he is attempting to initiate inde- 
pendent research and thought and 
coacern with the application of 
knowledge in psychology to social 
and human problems, With thelar- 
ger and more heterogeneous social 
psychology class he has aroused 
students’ concern and interest by 
using multi-media and mixed- 
media presentations, often requir- 
ing active participation on the part 
of students. 


Born in London, England, he 
received his doctoral degree from 
New York University in 1963 with 
a thesis entitled **The organization 
of verbal materials in free recall: 
the effect of patterns of associative 
overlap on clustering’’. Before his 
doctoral work he was a Phi Beta 
Kappa at Brooklyn College and a 
Pre-doctoral National Institute of 
Health Fellow from 1961 to 1963. 
Dr, Marshall joined the staff of 
SGWU in July 1966 at the rank of 
assistant Professor. Before the pe- 
riod, a post of assistant professor 
was held by Dr, Marshall at State 
University College- Plattsburgh, 
New York teaching undergraduate 
and graduate courses in general 
and experimental psychology. In 
addition, he taught at Fairleigh 
Dickenson University and Brooklyn 
College. 


During the past two years, Dr, 
Marshall has become involved in 
two new areas of research, These 
are 1) the effect of coordinated 
light feedback on the expreience and 
creation of music, poetry and prose 
and 2) problems of communication 


PROFILE 


DR. GEORGE R.MARSHALL 


ty, but also in other controversial 
issues, 

In addition to this, the very fact 
that The Paper is willing todiscuss 
any and all issues, does not make 
its ideals binding. If we are such, 
then how is it that you, Mr. Me- 
dicoff choose to publish your arti- 
cle in The Paper and not in The 
Georgian, Possibly because The 
Paper is being read, is becoming 
a distinct entity, is discussing the 
issues and therefore hardly makes 
the publication simplistic. 

**Evening students are more con- 
servative by nature, more tolerant 
of the status quo and more im- 
mersed in the quick-sand compla- 
cency than the day student.’’, 

That point is relatively true, 
but only relatively. As stated pre- 
viously, The Paper, for the first 
time, is telling the evening student 
where it’s at, and showing that the 
evening student is being screwed 
and being screwed royally in many 
facets of this university’s decision 
making bodies. It is no wonder the- 
refore that the evening student is 
complacent, If one is not informed 
fully, then we will most certainly 
remain ignorant, Up until now this 
has been the case, and as can be 
seen things are changing, 

**Evening students and day stu- 
dents, for the most part, have a dif- 
ferent set of values.’’, 

You seem to be operating under 
a rather ambiguous double stan- 
dard, Mr. Medicoff, In the last 
issue, Page 5, the reprint on the 
**Proposal on Student Affairs Se- 
nate’? stated in the preamble that 
the S.A. and E.S,A. should be 
united as one legislative body. You 
were co-author of that proposal, 
Mr. Medicoff, But yet you state 
that the students of the S.A. and 








between parents and their young 
adult children. Grants have been 
received to support behavioral stu- 
dies for the coming year, for the 
first project, and a laboratory of 
environmental design is going to 
be established at the University. 
When the laboratory is established 
it should act as a catalyst for 
inter-disciplinary studies for 
members of the departments of 
Sociology, English, Art, as well 
as Psychology. In the second pro- 
gram a preliminary study has been 
conducted and plans are under 
way for further studies with the 
application of psychometric ins- 
truments to analyze the problems 
of inter-family communication. 


Another interest of Dr. Marshall 
is the IAMU Community Farm in 
Elizabetown, New York. Since this 
project is dealt with at length 
in this issue of **The Paper’’, 
the reader can familiarize himself 
with this project. 


Dr, Marshall has thirteen pu- 
blications and fourteen papers at 
meetings to his solid academic 
credit. The publications range from 
research reports for the U.S. De- 
partment of Health Education and 
Welfare to an article in the Jour- 
nal of American Psychology on 
**A ball point pen device for ob- 
taining response latencies’’, 


For those students with an in- 
terest in psychology, this writer 
strongly recommends one of Dr, 
Marshali’s courses, His office is 
located at H-1170-1, 


E.S.A. have different values, How 
could they operate then? Under 
your values? 

**Maybe if a lot more people 
would awak e to the knowledge that 
things aren’t as good as they seem, 
maybe if a lot more people started 
demanding answers from their go- 
vernment -=- maybe the world seem 
vernment -- maybe the world would 
seem a lot better place to leave 
your cute safe kid in bed to grow 
up in’’, 

Never was a statement more per- 
tinent as the former part of the 
above quote, Things aren’t as good 
as they seem. There are injustices 
which are taking place within the 
university of direct consequence to 
the evening student, and The Paper 
is prepared to fight against these 
injustices. 

And Mr. Medicoff, your image 
of a cute safe kid really breaks 
me up. Emotionalism is hardly re- 
quired for an argument which sup- 
poses to claim truth and objecti- 
vity. 


“Maybe if The Paper...would 
shed some light on words and con- 
cepts instead of simly hardening 
attitudes, maybe then some under- 
standing might evolve.’’. 


And maybe if you, Mr. Medicoff, 
would get off your snowy white pe- 
destal and come down to earth, 
maybe, just maybe, your valiant 
calls would take on a different pers- 
pective. It is interesting to note 
here that one person’s ideology 
cannot set up the criteria for 
objective evaluation, Your sociolo- 
gical comments are very inter- 
resting, in reference to such ‘‘har- 
dening attitudes’’, but hardly origi- 
nal. The question that must be 
asked here is whether or not day 
students themselves upon gradua- 
tion and Mr, Medicoffin particular, 
will enter into the middle class 
system? Or will they conticue their 
valiant struggle for social reform? 
Hardly! Facts and figures show that 
the vast majority of college gra- 
duates enter the middle class sys- 
tem with a diploma guaranteeing 


January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 9 


security, comfort and complacen- 
cy. So don’t consider yourself out 
of the mainstream of society, Mr. 
Medicoff. You are part and parcel 
of a conservative institution, of 
which you attend and pay into to 
receive the typical intellect. So, 
don’t consider yourself special. 

Furthemore, in reference toyour 
comment on the **Attention Dad’’ ad, 
it is debatable that you are truly 
concerned with the real issues and 
also debatable as to whether or 
not you truly understood the real 
meaning of the ad, It is obvious 
in both cases that you are not, 
Firstly, todiscuss something which 
was meant as a satire, and then 
to reveal one’s persecution com~- 
plex, is very doubtful as a mea-~ 
ningful rationale, It is a virtue to 
laugh at oneself, Secondly, if one 
studies the ad closely, with present 
conditions as they exist, it merely 
shows a satirical comment on the 
traumatic conditions present in the 
U.S.A, 


Also, your questions are very 
interesting and very thought provo- 
king, and there is no doubt that all 
people can be considered guilty on . 
many of these counts. Note: all 
people! Tell me, Mr. Medicoff, 
are you a people? Oh! gosh, I’m: 
sorry, I forgot, ‘“You’re different’’! 

‘*That’s where it all begins, with 
an awareness, know whatI mean.’’, 


Yes, Mr. Medicoff, we know what 
you mean, but the question hereis;: 
who are you trying to kid? For 
a person who claims to have the 
answers to social change, freedom 
of thought, etc., you certainly do 
state a great many criteria to be 
followed. Your world view is vastly 
different from The Paper’s, not 
higher or lower, but different; 
so, therefore, don’t impose your 


standards upon those whom you 


yourself consider different and se- 
parate, 


So, carry on with the brave 
struggle, Mr. Medicoff, 1984 is only 
15 years away. Where will you be? 
What will you be doing? 


EVENING 
STUDENTS 


ASSOCIATION 


SALARIED SECRETARY 


Required to work for the Evening Students Associa- 
tion during the evenings from 5:30 pm to 10:15 pm. 
Contact Miss M. Rowe, Vice-President - E.S.A. Room 

H-331 or 879-2832 


eleleiie Me muellneh eine 
1445 Bishop 


RESTAURANT 
1445 Bishop 





10 THE PAPER January 14, 1969 


RE-LOCATE AND REORGANIZE THE UNITED 









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UNION wis 
T77iMOSLEM of Cis 
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J FEDERATION 


INDIA 
SOUTH EAST 
ASIAN FEDERATION 






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UNITED \ 
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——» REALISTIC FUTURE MIGRATION ROUTES 















BEWEGUNG FUR 
WESTLICHEN 
LUSAMMENSCHLUSS 






OCCIDENTALE 
THE WESTERN 
UNITY 
MOVEMENT 


UNITE THE WEST - HELP RE-SHAPE THE WORLD! 


UNITED WESTERN STATES: Population 900 Million — Area 22 Million Square Miles. 


NSA R W NO 


. SOVIET UNION: Population 175 Million — Area 8 Million Square Miles lessUkraine and Chinese Terr. 
. MOHAMMEDAN FEDERATION: Population 237 Million — Area 6,265,000 Square Miles. 

. BLACK AFRICA: Population 151 Million — Area 5,667,000 Square Miles. 

. INDIA: Population 439 Million — Area 1,247,000 Square Miles. 

. SOUTH EAST ASIA: Population 363 Million — Area 1,822,220 Square Miles — 18 Nations. 
. CHINA: Population 700 Million — Area 4,292,000 Square Miles & Quter Mongolia, etc., 2 Million Square Miles. 


Dn NEV HORIZONS for aNEW AC a 


A challenging proposal for 
the re-organization of the 
United Nations into seven 
basic ethnic and cultural 
federations in order to re- 
solve the present intra-Uni- 
ted Nations’ racial and ide- 
ological conflicts, 


INTRODUCTION 


There is an urgent need, 


for reform because the Uni- 


ted Nations as it is presen- 
tly constituted has deterio-| 


rated into a mere propa- 
ganda rostrum for anti- 


Western polemics and dia-. 


tribes, An avalanche of 
Afro-Asian mini-states, al- 


ternately led and goaded on 


by the Communists, outvo~ 
tes and out-maneuvers the 
West at every turn and pre- 
vents the United Nations 
from doing any constructive 
work, 

Present world crises can 
only be solved by a logical- 
ly structured United Nations. 
Only through new outlooks 
and the perspective of a 
New Horizon can peaceful 
and just foundations be laid 
for a New Age, and a more 
orderly and peaceful world. 


THE PROBLEM 

The present world struc- 
ture is based on outdated 
and unrealistic thinking. The 
obvious injustice of world 
division and alignment is one 
of the critical causes of 
world conflict today. 


The reason for this mis- 
structure and injustice lies 
in the un-natural barriers 
created by the 19th Century 
brand of ‘‘nation-state’’ thin- 
king; in this system linguis- 
_tic, ethnic, racial, and cul- 
tural formations were either 
misunderstood or largely 
ignored in the carving up 
of the world map by the 
big powers of the past, 

Such arbitrarily estabtis- 
hed borders, during the past 
. 100 years, have directly re- 


sulted in the numerous small 
wars, crises and in W.W. 
1 and W.W, ll, 


* THE 
INTERNATIONALIST”’ 

A facile answer to this 
vexing problem was given by 
some well meaning but nai- 
ve individuals who imagined 
that an international super- 
government would bring 
about Utopia and Eternal 
Peace through the forced 
integration of all individuals 
and cultures, Usually the 
greatest believers in‘“‘ Wor- 
ld Government’’ were to be 
found among the oversophis- 
ticated, highly urbanized, 
and cosmopolitan city dwel- 
lers of the Western World, 

They forgot or refused to 
believe that the African and 
Asian nations cherish their 
newly won independence and 
do not wish to subordinate 
themselves to a ‘“‘whi- 
teman’s’’ financed and orga- 
nized institution in New 
York, One cannot reasonably 
expect a people to jumpfrom 
nomadism and tribalism to 
acceptance and participation 
in an international World 
Government, The irrationa- 
lity of the ‘“‘internatio- 
nalists’: solution is blatantly 
in today’s world, 

On the other hand, a re- 
turn to isolationism and a 
resumption of the type of 
blood-stained petty nationa- 
lism of W.W, I and II va- 
riety is out of touch with 
all reality in this day and 
age of global travel, world 
trade, and instant world- 
wide communication sys- 
tems, 

We believe that the plan 
presented by the Western 
Unity Research Institute of- 
fers a unique and workable 
solution: 


THE SOLUTION 


As, Aristotle suggested in» 


his classic philosophy, the 


most workable solution can 
be found through the prin- 
ciple of the ‘Golden Mean’”’ 
of moderation between ex- 
tremes., 


The solution that is so 
urgently needed will promote 
the potential for international 
co-operation, while, at the 
same time, preserving the 
identities of the distinct 
racial-cultural members of 
the human community. This 
solution liesinthe develop- 
ment of a new and just global 
structuring along the ethnic 
lines determined by the 
different peoples of the world 
themselves. 

In this restructuring the 
basic cultural groupings of 
the world will be given 
recognition and the political 
identity and status of aninde- 
pendent Federal State will be 
preserved. 

On the basis of an economic 
union similar to the brilliant 
and successful European 
Common Market, the states 
within each Cultural Federa- 
tion would intergrate eco- 
nomically as a prelude and 
basis for a federal union in 





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which all member nations 
could co-ordinate action in 
such areas of joint concern 
as education, communica- 
tion, commerce, industry, 
trade, defence, technology, 
science and cultural develop- 
ments, 


Combined systems would 
unify administration and 
agencies, enabling cost-cut- 
ting, efficiency and greater 
effectiveness of operations 
and programmes. A single 
operative language and an 
auxiliary language wouldim- 
prove communications and 
foster understanding without 
denying regional language 
rights. India with over 500 
languages and almost 2,000 
dialects, and the Soviet Union 
with over 160 language groups 
are employed with consi- 
derable success A federal 
militia would safeguard 
against the tyranny of any 
narrow interest groups or 
member states. 


By accepting the main out- 
lines of the Swiss Federal 
System each of the seven 
new regional, self-governing 
and ethnically-oriented Fe- 


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NATIONS 


derations would be practical- 
ly transformed into federal 
and democratic republics. 
Eventually a constitutionally 
guaranteed check and balance 
system between judicial, 
executive, andlegislative 
branches could be evolved. 
To guarantee fair represen- 
tation, legislatures would be 
formed of a house of repre- 
sentatives, emerging from 
democratic federal elec- 
tions, and a senate composed 
of two delegates from every 
member state within the Fe- 
deration 

To assure faster accep- 
tance of a federal system 
and closer collaboration 
between the federal and 
national authorities, it may 
be advisable temporarily to 
supercede the Swiss and 
American example of elected 
senators and instead to con- 
sider the present prime 
minister or leaders and the 
foreign ministers of member 
state as national delegates to 
the senate. 

These two houses would 
elect a federal executive or 
cabinet composed of seven 
men originating from dif- 
ferent states These seven 
members of the federal 
executive would each be in 
charge of special depart- 
ments or ministries - foreign 
affairs, armed forces, fi- 
nance, trade andcommerce, 
interior justice, manpower, 
communication, and health 
and welfare. Their annually 
alternating chairman would 
perform the functions of 
a ‘‘president’’, “*premier’’ 
or leader of the United Fe- 
deration. 

The Supreme Court, as 
the highest moral and legal 
authority of the federation 
should be elected by the 
legislature in order to as- 
sure impartiality. 





THE NEW 
UNITED NATIONS | 
Autonomous and indepen- 
dent culturalfederations 
would then be the future basis 
for the formation of aproper 
United Nations, through 
which technical aid could be 
channelled to help under- 
developed cultural federa- 
tions to help themselves - 
instead of the present system 
of trying to buy co-operation 
through dollars which seldom 












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2. Russian 


3. Moslem 


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Asian 


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The above are the predominant racial group in each federation, there are of course many sub-groups, 
who will enjoy legal protection as ethnic and cultural entities. 





Autonomous’ and _ inde- 
pendent cultural federations 
would then be the future ba- 
sis for the formation of a 
proper United Nations, 
through which technical aid 
could be channelled to help 
under-developed cultural 
federations to help themsel- 
ves - instead of the pre- 
sent system of trying to 
buy co - operation through 
dollars which seldom filter 
down to the needy, and when 
it does it is so scattered 
and ill-planned as to be 
temporary at best and to- 
tally ineffective heworst. 
The only effective means for 
aid would be in the areas 
of birth control, improvec 
 Gectlabmaaia: methods, land 


reform and technical educa- 
tion. 

the best-trained citizens 
of each cultural federation 
should not be siphoned off 
by the West through its pre- 
sent negative and dangerous 
immigration policies; trai- 
ned individuals should be en- 
courage to help build their 
own needy and under-deve- 
loped societies. 

The New United Nations 
should concern itself chiefly 
with affairs of a truly su- 
pra-national nature and 
which affect all human be- 
ings such as: world wea- 
ther; world health (epidemic 
control, co - ordinated 


research into viruses and 
contatious diseases, etc.); 


world water and air pollution 
equitable and productive ex- 
ploitation of remaining na- 
tural resources (land, air, 
sea, artic regions, etc.)wor- 
ld - wide disaster control 
(floods, earthquakes, stor- 
ms, etc.) 

Do your part to achieve 
the unity of the West. Or- 


der and distribute this plan . 


for peace to political lea- 
ders, business-men, scho- 
ols, universities, churches, 
unions and to all other key 
areas of our society. 

Join the WESTERN UNITY 
MOVEMENT today and be an 
active supporter 

Order reprints of this plan: 
10 - $0.50; 100 - $4.50; 1000 
- $35.00 





EAST GERMANY’S 


STORY ON INVASION 





Reprinted from ‘‘Foreign Af- 
fairs Bulletin” of the German 
Democratic Republic. 

Imperialist Strategy Frustrated.. 

Helped by anti-socialist and 
counter-revolutionary groups in 
@zechoslovakia, the imperialist 
elements, above all in the Uni- 
ted States and West Germany, 
set about underminning the loa- 
ding role of the Communist Par- 
ty of Czechoslovakia and disrup- 
ting the social system. Czechos- 
lovakia was to be wrenched off 
the socialist family of nations to 
weaken socialism is a strategi- 
cally important position and ex- 
tend the sphere of NATO influ- 
ence right up to the Soviet fron- 
lier. 

In view of this dangerous deve- 
lopment, effective countermeasu- 
res to ward off imperialist at- 
lack against socialism, peace and 





security were imperiously called 
for, 


Guided by the principles of so- 
cialist. internationalism and the 
duly to protect every socialist 
country from imperialist ons- 
laughts, the five socialist allics 
decided to render the Czechos- 
lovak ally immediate assistance. 
By means of the steps taken on 
August 21st, the imperialist at- 
tack on Czechoslovakia was frus- 
trated and the Western frontier 
of the Furopean part of the world 
socialist system made safe. 


The five socialist states have ma- 
de a contribution to the mainte- 
nance of peace and frustrated the 
plans of the imperialist global 
strategy. Those socialist and de- 
mocratic elements in many coun- 
tries who sulllack understanding 
for this step will eventually rea- 


lize the truth of this. 

The five socialist states have 
made a contribution to the main- 
tenance of peace and frustrated 
the plans of the imperialist glo- 
bal strategy. Those socialist and 
democratic clements in many 
countries who still lack unders- 
tanding for this step will even- 
tually realize the truth of this. 
The complete hopelessness of 
an agression against the socialist 
states has become evident again, 
it being unable to succeed either 
by frontal attack or by detour. 

The working people of Czechos- 
lovakia, in their struggle against 
counter- revolutionary elements 
and for the consolidation of so- 
cialism, may be assured of the 
fraternal assistance of the party 
and Government as well as the 
people in the German Demo- 
cratic Republic. 


Meditation Society 


Lecturing At Sir George 


The Students International Meditation Society will be 
holding an introductory session on meditation techniques. 
Under Ron Goldman, the beneficial events to students be- 
cause of mind expansion and alleviation of tension, will be 
demonstrated through the use of transcendental meditation 
and with the artificial stimulation with 


Being held this Friday, 
January 17th, inRoomH-635, 
the lecture will stard at 8:30 
p.m. 

The concepts of Mahanishi 
Mahesh Yogi will be expoun- 
ded by Ron Goldman, co- 
ordinator for S,.I.M.S. in 
Quebec, and a 4th year Arts 


student at Sir George. Ron 
has been trained by the 
Mahanishi to lecture ex- 
Mahanishi to lecture es- 
pecially in meditation tech- 
niques and of their values 

In our interview with Ron, 
he stressed the difference 
between S.I.M.S. and other 


*f‘changing’’ groups with a 
special emphasis on the use- 
fulness of a meditation, not 
as a religion or cult, but as 
a tool in easing normal daily 
tensions with the resulting 
improvement in the students’ 
ability to concentrate and use 
his mental faculties to a much 
higher degree in studies and 
personal life 


Further information may 
be o btained from Ron 
Goldman at 931-1528 


We also operate aSpeakers 
Bureau - write for informa- 
tion. 

Send $1.00 for samples of 
all our publications and our 
action philosophy. 


WESTERN UNITY 
MOVEMENT 

P.O, BOX 156 
Verdun 19, Quebec 


CANADA 





AT 
ST AGATHE 


The 1969 version of the 
Student Lab on Communi- 
cation will be held at La 
Cleche in St. Agathe des 
Monts with about 90 stu- 
dents leaders and others 
involved in activities at- 
tending from both the E- 
vening Students’ Associa- 
Asso- 


tion and Students’ 
ciation. 
The event, taking place 


from Friday to Sunday 
January 17th to 19th, will 
feature the usual informal 
‘l-group conference arran- 
gement with professional 
trainers. 

Registration and addi- 
tional information may be 
obtained from the Day re 
ceptionist on the 3rd floor 
and Laurie Abrams, Stu- 
dent Affairs V.P., of the 
Students Association on H- 
337-7 or at 879-4578. 








January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 11 


Day Science 


to back 


evening 
Faculty 


Representation 


The SCIENCE STUDENTS’ 
ASSOCIATION is going to 
support the EVENING STU- 
DENTS’ ASSOCIATION re- 
quest for representation on 
the Science Faculty Council. 
Presently, only day students 
sit on the Council. 


In a_ letter to Faculty 
Council, BRUCE UDITSKY, 
Executive Vice-President of 
the day science group, re- 
quested the agenda of the 
next council to include an 
item on evening represen- 
tation. Mr. Uditsky also re- 
quested the council to sit 
tation. Mr. Uditsky also re- 
quested the council to sit 
during the evening so that 
evening students may attend. 


RAY CORNELL, Evening 
Science Representative, in an 
interview with. THE PAPER 
expressed confidence in the 
evening science students 
being able to present a sui- 
table brief and, more im- 
portant, come up with qua- 
lified evening students to sit 
on the Council 


12TH ANNUAL 
WINTER 
CAR RALLY 


In conjunction with this years 
Winter Carnival, the car rally 
will be held for novice drivers 
over a 100 mile prescribed 
route that will start late in the 
afternoon of January 22nd. 





“A FUNNY THING....” 


IS FUN 


This year The Georgian Players of Sir George Williams University 
celebrate their 33rd year asa student drama organization with the hi- 
larious Broadway musical ‘fA Funny Thing Happened On The Way To 
The Forum,’’ This is the most ambitious and demanding undertaking 
The Georgian Players have ever chosen and the production will be 


presented in The Henry F. Ha., 


Building Theatre from January 14 . 


through to the 19th at 8:30 p.m. each evening. There will be a matinee 


performance on Saturday, January 18 at 2:30 p.m. with an evening » 
performance being held at 8:30 p.m. 


*‘A Funny Thing Happened On 
The Way To The Forum’ enjoy- 
ed a very successful run on New 
York’s Broadway stage with such 
stars as Zero Mostel and Phil 
Silvers. The play itself is based 
on the works of Plautus and it 


concerns itself with a satire of 
young love, old love, chivalry and 
other games frequently played bet- 
ween the sexes all of which are 
shown to have existed even some 


two thousand years ago, It is song, ™ 


it is laughter, and it is...fun., 


12 THE PAPER January 14, 1969 


VOLUME: 1 


Sir George Gasette nvumeer3 





CO-CURRICULAR 
COMMITTEE 
SPECIAL MEETING 
NOVEMBER 28, 1968 





PRESENT: PP. Kontakos, Chairman, H. 
Schaechter, R. Miles, J. Denneboom, R. 
Cornell, J. Hopkins, Secretary 

ABSENT: J. Goodman 

The Chairman explained that it was ne- 
cessary to clear up the question of T.V. 
SIR GEORGE's request for money. J. Joyce 
made a request to the E.S.A. for money to 
buy specific equipment. In turn, the E.S.A. 
referred the request to the co-curricular com- 
mittee. 

J. Joyce was present to discuss the point. 
The point of view expressed at the meeting 
was that this request could not be defined 
in terms of the criteria for co-curricular pro- 
gram. J. Joyce agreed and explained that is 
why he sought help from the E.S.A. 

The request was not approved. 





CO-CURRICULAR 
COMMITTEE 
DECEMBER 11, 1968 





PRESENT: P. Kontakos, J. Goodman, J. 
Denneboom, R. Cornell, R. Miles, J. Hop- 
kins. 

APPLICATIONS: 

]. INSTITUTE OF ELECTRICAL AND E- 
LECTRONIC ENGINEERS INC., Sir George 
Williams University Student Branch. 

A documented application was explained by 
a student member. Following questions and 
discussions the request for $352. was appro- 
ved less $75.00 expenses for a project for 
Engineering Week. It was suggested that the 
Engineering Association should be asked to 
cover the $75.00 expense, but if refused, that 
this amount would be paid for out of co-cur- 
ricular fund. 

FINE ARTS. 

A fully documented request was received 
from 7 students in the Fine Arts Depart- 
ment. In addition to the three students, two 
faculty members spoke on behalf of the ap- 
plication for $2,028.00 to cover expenses 
for setting up a graphic studio to be called 
STUDIO 27. 

The presentation explained that this was 
not curriculum, but would complement it. Mo- 
ney to develop this experimental project can 
be seen as ‘'seed-investment’’ because next 
year the Fine Arts Students Association will 
be able to carry on. In the beginning only 7 
people will be involved, but could expand to 
35. Thus with more members and assistance 
from the Association the project should be 
self-supporting. 

One of the by-products of this creative and 
experimental program could be that it will 
help recruit students from across Canada. 
Artists could be invited to work with our stu- 
dents. Faculty from our University have vo- 
lunteered to work with the students in set- 
ting up the graphic studio. A public display 
in graphics is scheduled for February - open 
to all. 

Considerable discussion took place and fi- 
nally the request was approved. Craig Davis 
will be the liaison to submit bills. It was 
mentioned that the equipment to be purchased 
would belong to the Fine Arts Students Asso- 
ciation. 

3. SENSITIVITY TRAINING PROGRAM 
(STP) 

L. Abrams requested more money for this 
program which had been approved at an ear- 
lier meeting. Some of the increased costs 
will come from increasing the registration 
fee, but another $800.00 is needed. 

The request was approved. 

4. Sir George Williams University - HISTORY 
SOCIETY 
A written request to bring Dr. James Eayrs, 
University of Toronto, was received from Jon 
Bradley. It was explained that the speaker was 
to make his presentation in the evening. The 
request for $150.00 was approved in principle 
and J. Goodman was to follow through on this 
to see if the program plans were satisfactory. 
5. SIR GEORGE HILLEL 
A written request from the President of the 
Caribbean Students Society was read in which 
a grant for $40.00 to support the Hillel Club 
teach-in was asked. 

As there was not sufficient information about 
the program the Committee could notreachan 
agreement and the application was filed pen- 
ding further action. 


Following the review of applications, time 
was spent reviewing a written outline presen- 
ted by R. Cornell. This deals with the co- 
curricular committee structure and purpose. 

It was agreed that this document would be 
studied at a meeting in January. 

Meeting adjourned at 8:15 p.m. 





STUDENTS’ LEGISLATIVE 
COUNCIL 
(DAY ASSOCIATION) 





Precis of Minutes of Seventh Students’ Le- 
gislative Council Meeting, December 10th, 
1968. 

1. The meeting was convened with Mr. 
Don Rosenbaum in the Chair. 

2. The minutes of the sixth S.L.C. mee- 
ting were accepted. 

3. Mr. Rosenbaum advised Council that the 
problem with respect to The Georgian has 
been resolved at Communications Board. 
4. a) A motion, initiated by Mr. Laurie 
Abrams and seconded by Mr. Norman Laza- 
re, that nominations for the position of Edu- 
cation Vice-President be closed, was pre- 
sented and subsequently withdrawn. 

b). Mr. Eric Garsonnin moved, seconded 
by Mr. Solomon Schinasi, that the student 
body be notified of the vacancy and that the 
position be left vacant until the next $.L.C. 
meeting. The motion was carried. 

c) Mr. Schinasi moved, seconded by Mr. 
Geoff Power, that Mr. Klein be appointed to 
the position of Education Vice-President on 
a pro-tem basis. The motion was carried. 
Mr. Klein then joined the members at the mee- 
ting. 

5. Mr. Emmanuel Kalles moved, seconded 
by Mr. Abrams, that a Student Committee 
on Development be created to encompass 
the present Student Union Building Commit- 
tee and that the Chairman of the Student Com- 
mittee on Development be a member of the 
University Council on Development. The mo- 
tion was Carried. 

6. Mr. Kales took the Chair at 8:41. 

7. a) Mr. Rosenbaum moved, seconded by 
Mr. Alex Carsley, that $.L.C. adopt a posi- 
tion, paper endorsing ‘‘accelerated co-ope- 
ration’’ with Loyola College as a position 
of the Students’ Association. The motion was 
carried. 

b) Mr. George Galt and Mr. Howard Hop- 
penheim were appointed to acommittee which 
has been mandated to prepare a feasibility 
study concerning a merger between the Stu- 
dent's Associations of Loyola and Sir George. 

§. a) Mr. Lazare moved, seconded by Mr. 
Carsley, that the Students’ Association di- 
sassociate itself from the UGEQ statement 
concerning minority linguistic rights. The mo- 
tion was withdrawn. 

b) Mr. Lazare moved, seconded by Mr. 
Klein, that a committee be established tode- 
termine the status of Sir George within UGEQ. 

c) Mr. Lazare moved, seconded by Mr. 
Schinasi, that a committee be formed to dis- 
cuss the relevance of Sir George within UGEQ. 
The motion was carried, and the committee's 
memberships was named. 

d) Mr. Rosenbaum proposed a motion of 
support with respect to the minority linguis- 
tic legislation before the Legislative Assem- 
bly of Quebec. The motion was withdrawn. 

9. Mr. Tibor Jukelevics was appointed as 
a student representative on the Joint Com- 
mittee on University Affairs. 

10. Item 7 on the Agenda (Proposal for a 
Student Affairs Senate) was tabled until a 
— of the S.L.C. on Monday, December 
2 


i. The meeting was adjourned at 9:45p.m., 
having been convened at 8:10 p.m. 





CO-CURRICULAR 
COMMITTEE 
DECEMBER 18, 1968 


PRESENT: P. Kontakos, R. Miles, R. Cor- 
nell, H. Schaechter, J. Hopkins 

ABSENT: J. Goodman, J. Denneboom 

The meeting was called to order at approxi- 
mately 5:30 p.m. 

1. ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES CLUB 

Aron Pila and Steve Queller were in atten- 
dance to support their written request for 
$500.00 to bring Mr. Gora Ebrahim from 
Hong Kong. 

In explaining the request Mr. Pila and Mr. 
Queller pointed out that Mr. Ebrahim would 
give one or two public meetings at Sir George 


and other Universities in his 42 days in Ca- 
nada. It seems that Sociology students would 
benefit from hearing this person as well as 
others, since he brings a different point of 
view. 

The Committee agreed in principle to sup- 
port the request on the understanding that 
the Academic Activities Club would present 
a detailed program of the visitor's schedule 
at Sir George; and indicate what support is 
forthcoming from faculty and students as 
to the importance of this as a co-curricular 
activity. Final decision as to financial help 
would then be decided at the next meeting. 

2. A more detailed request from students 
in Professor Scheinberg’s class in 20th Cen- 
tury American History was presented to the 
meeting seeking $2,500. 

Two items in the program were accepted 
(a) Speakers for the themes ‘Cold War'’ and 
“New Left’’, which involves five speakers 
being brought in. Expenses for telephone 
calls, folk music night, a film and modest 
entertainment were refused. The other item 
requesting $450. for the Black People’s Mo- 
verment was also refused because a previous 
approved program would be bringing similar 
speakers to Sir George. 

The Committee approved the granting of 
$1,500. 

Minutes. The minutes of November 25th, 
28th, December 11th were accepted with some 
corrections. 

The next meeting will be held on January 
6th, 5:30 p.m. 

Adjournment 8:00 p.m. 





UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 
ON STUDENT LIFE 
SPECIAL MEETING 


DECEMBER 23, 1968 





PRESENT: Professor J. Callaghan, Chairman; 
A. Sproule, M. Flynn, A.t. Tari, C. Carsley, 
E. Kalles, G. Power, D. Rosenbaum (for L. 
Abrams), H.J. McQueen and J. Hopkins, Se- 
cretary. 

ABSENT: F. Chalk, J. Dick, A. Duff, M. 
Montpetit, W. O'Mahony, M. Rowe. 
VISITORS: A number of day students attended. 

Professor J. C. Callaghan convened the mee- 
ting in the absence of Professor D. McDonald. 
On a motion of M. Flynnand A. Sproule it was 
agreed that J. Callaghan act as Chairman. 

Introduction - The Chairman welcomed A. |. 
Tari. 

Minutes - Accepted as circulated on motion 
of E. Kalles and A. Sproule. 

Business Arising 

1. All day Conference. 

This item was referred from the last meeting 
and the following dates were suggested by the 
Executive: January 3, 4, or 11. It was pointed 
out that some members would be writing exams 
on January 3. The question was raised as to 
whether this meeting should decide on dates 
in the absence of any Evening Students’ Asso- 
ciation representation. It was agreed to put 
this item of business for later in the meeting 
on the expectation that the E.S.A. delegates 
would show up. 

STUDENT AFFAIRS SENATE PROPOSAL. 

The Chairman defined the procedure for par- 
ticipation of members on this topic. Each in- 
dividual who wished to talk would be given 
time and any queries from other members 
would be directed towards clarification of what 
was Said, rather than have the meeting become 
a forum for criss-cross arguments. The.fol- 
lowing ideas were raised for further explora- 
tion and study in conjunction with the Student 
Affairs Senate proposal. 


Mr. Carsley pointed out that (1) in the deci- 
sion-making process the tendency is to at- 
tempt streamlining in an effort to improve 
decision making. He wondered if having two 
Senates would not defeat the idea of increas- 
ing the effective decision-making process. 
(2) What about the effect of a decision being 
made now which will affect the student body 
in the years to come? 


Professor McQueen (1) Indealingwithissues 
that affect the total University which Senate 
will have the final authority to decide? Inter- 
dependent relations will develop in different 
areas - will the academic Senate authority 
override that of the Student Affairs Senate? 

(2) What about Alumni representation? 

(3) There appears to be a need to define 
specifically the number of student repre- 
sentatives and what areas they represent. 
(5 from Science Faculty, etc.) This would 
overcome the need to have ‘‘floating’’ mem- 
bers. 

(4) Chairman of Communications - unclear 


as to how he is appointed! Elected from Stu- 
dent Legislative Council or from Student 
body-at-large? 

(5) What is the position of the Dean of Stu- 
dents in this new proposal? Does he function 
only for the student Senate? What is his res- 
ponsibility to the total University? 

(6) Is there a need for a Bill of Rights to 
be part of the Student Senate, which defines 
the relationships and responsibilities of stu- 
dents in academic matters? 

(7) A building Committee should be part of 
the structure of this Student Senate where 
students take responsibility for damage or 
messy facilities. 

(8) An alternative form of Evening Student 
representation can be worked out if they are 
not interested in discussing the present mo- 
del. An example of one could beto have them 
look at a body similar to the Arts Students 
Faculty, with similar or revised representa- 
tion on the Senate. 

A. Sproule - Explained that he views this 2nd 
draft more positively and would reinforce the 
need to work out the relationship between the 
two senates. He asked why was not the area 
of admissions included in this new proposal 
and suggested that students review this omis- 
sion. 

M. Flynn - (1) Pointed out that admissions 
is not part of the Registrar's Office in many 
universities and supported A. Sproule in that 
admission functions are closely tied to stu- 
dent services and that better coordination of 
responsibilities need to be worked out. 

(2) He commented that this Student Senate 
document is one of the most important docu- 
ments to come before Canadian Universities, 
which gives students an important role in po- 
licy making in Student Services area, as well 
as integrating policies in the whole student 
life field. 

(3) He explained that Staff must know clear- 
ly their role and responsibilities to this Sena- 
te, as well as how they function in terms of 
the total university. Professional personnel 
practices must be maintained and these cri- 
teria must be safeguarded. However, some 
realighment of responsibilities would result, 
such as working closer with students in an 
administrative relationship. 

(4) The budget would have to safeguard ba- 
sic requirements to carry out the main task. 
Also, who sets up priorities as to budget 
expenditures. 

(5) Agreed that the mass of student need 
to be consulted. 

(6) The relationship to the Academic Sena- 
te needs to be closely studied. 

(7) Concern regarding the lack of participa- 
tion by the E.S.A. on this proposal. 

(8) Timing is important as to when such an 
organization, if acceptable, would be ready to 
operate - next academic year? One year or 
two from now? A time-schedule needs to be 
established and the ‘‘nuts and bolts’’ need 
to be set down. 

E. Kalles - It appears that we have accep- 
ted the concept, now we need to work on the 
detailed document. Ultimately, it will depend 
on the efforts of the Joint Committee, but Ju- 
ne | seems a possible date to complete the 
document. 


D. McDonald - Proposal on Student Affairs 
Senate. 

1. My general feeling is that if the Student 
Affairs Senate idea were to materlialize that 
most of our comments on the Academic Se- 
nate would still stand - that is, there are a 
number of places where the student mem- 
bership as proposed should be revised. Ad- 
ditionally, the Council on Student Life would, 
of course to exist. 

2. Regarding the students’ proposal, Draft 
*2. Paragraph #1 - might be rewritten to in- 
clude the following two points: 

(a) The effectiveness of any community is 
directly proportional to the feeling its mem- 
bers have about their ability or inability to 
influence the decisions that effect them. 
(b) Broaden the paragraph’s terms of refe- 
rence to point out that all universities are 
currently working on the fragmentation iden- 
tified here. 

3. It is awfully important that the Joint Com- 
mittee seek out ways in its hearings to test 
this second draft with 
a. The Evening Students’ Association 

b. The Day Students’ Association 
The Committee of students who draft this 
proposal are close to the problems they des- 
cribe. However, without adequate discussion 
among official student groups it seems to me 
most students are unaware of how important 
this document is. The ultimate disappoint- 
ment would be to have this kind of a docu- 
ment bring about a Student Affairs Senate 
without the students being aware of how fun- 
damental a responsibility to the university 
community the document has given to them. 
4. | am wondering if the Vice- Principal, 


Administration should not be a member of 
this body? 

5. The area around which | have the most 
concern is when the Academic Senate and 
Student Affairs Senate get to the real tough 
issues (whatever they are) how do they get 
worked out by the total university communi- 
ty. There is something appealing about the 
idea of the two Senates. One can think of the 
two areas of University life as lending them- 
selves to administration and decision making 
through these two bodies. However, in the 
last analysis, it seems to me that the work 
of either body is of concern to everyonein the 
university, and, therefore, an effective deci- 
sion making body needs to exist to meet this 
requirement. 

My feeling is that a discussion of this pro- 
blem is more important than the details of 
either the Academic Senate or Student Affairs 
Senate proposals. 

ALL DAY CONFERENCE. 

The full discussion generated in the meeting 
reached a point where details were being loo- 
ked at, and since there was obviously not e- 
nough time for this, the question of the all 
day conference was looked at. 

Of the three dates suggested, January the 
11th was decided on, but it was pointed out 
that due to lack of representation from the 
Evening delegates no final decision could be 
made. It was agreed that no conference should 
be held without an adequate voice from them. 
The question as to their absence and whether 
they would appear at an all-day-conference 
was referred to the Executive to follow up. If 
not, the day assembly would not be held, and 
other ways would have to be studied. 

On motion of E. Kalles and C. Carsley the 
meeting adjourned at 6:00 P.M. 





JOINT COMMITTEE 
ON UNIVERSITY AFFIARS 
MINUTES OF MEETING 
JANUARY 7TH, 1969. 





PRESENT: B. Young - Chairman, M. Flynn - 
Secretary, J. McBride, W. Reay, M. Euvrard, 
J. C. Callaghan, E. Kalles, D. Rosenbaum, 
W. Gray. 


APOLOGIES: F. Chalk, L. van Hoey. 
1. MINUTES 


The minutes of meetings held on October 
30th and December 12th, 1968, were approved 
on a motion proposed by J. McBride and se- 
conded by E. Kalles. 


2. MEMBERSHIP 


In the light of recent changes in the uni- 
versity administrative structure, the Secreta- 
ry was asked to contact Dr. Smola and re- 
quest that he complete the administrative 
representation. E. Kalles advised that Mr. 
Tibor Jukelevics had been appointed analter- 
native to replace Mr. L. Novak, which brought 
the student representation up to the full num- 
ber. The Secretary was also asked to write 
to Prof. Marsden requesting replacements for 
Profs. McKeen and Marsden. 


3. AGENDA AND MINUTES 


The J.C.U.A. was informed of a request 
from the Communications Committee for co- 
pies of agendas at least seven days in ad- 
vance of a meeting and for a precis of mi- 
nutes for distribution through the communi- 
cations media. It was agreed that every effort 
would be made to meet this request. 


4. BRIEFS 


Dates were established for the hearings on 
two briefs: 
a) Sir George Williams Association of Uni- 
versity Teachers - Tuesday, January 14th 
at 3.00 p.m. in room H-333. 
b) Student Affairs Council - Tuesday, Janua- 
ry 21st at 3.00 p.m. in room H-333. 
(The Secretary to provide 100-seat auditorium 
in the event that a large number of visitors 
attend .) 


5. FRAMEWORK FOR FUTURE WORK OF 
THE J.C.U.A. 


The J.C.U.A. considered various alternative 
approaches to their task of developing their 
submission to the University Council and it 
was decided that this topic should be exami- 
ned at a special meeting following the sub- 
mission of the final brief. 


6. EVENING STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION 


W. Gray, the Evening Student representative, 
raised the question of evening student parity 











SIR GEORGE GAZETTE CONT’D 





on the J.C.U.A. and on other decision-making 
bodies of the university. He was requested to 
submit a written brief to the J.C.U.A. and he 
agreed. 


7. DATE OF NEXT MEETING 


The meeting adjourned with the next meeting 
scheduled for January 14th to hear the $.G.W. 
A.U.T. brief. 


COMMUNICATIONS 
COMMITTEE 


Agenda for the 7th meeting scheduled for 
Thursday, January 23, 1969 at 5:30 P.M. in 
Room H-333-3. 

The members of the Committee are: Ken- 
neth Adams, Derek Bennett, David Bowman, 
Ray Cornell, James Dick, Norman Fletcher, 
George Galt, Jack Hopkins, James Joyce, 
Manny Kalles, Andre Laprade, Ab Moore, 
Malcolm Stone. 

Chairman James Dick 

1. Approval of Minutes of last meeting. 
2. Chairman's report on status of open-mee- 
ting committees, Agenda and Minutes. 

3. Chairman's report on Budgeting. 

4. New members - Mr. Michael Sheldon. 
5. Report of Sub-Committee on Communica- 
tions Distribution. 

6. Chairman‘s resignation. 

7. Other business. 


UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 


THE FOLLOWING IS A SUMMARY OF THE 
MINUTES OF THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 
MEETING, HELD ON FRIDAY, DECEMBER 
20, 1968. 


(1) The Chairman reported that two meetings 
of the Joint SGWU-Loyola Committee had 

been held thus far re the possibility of some 
Q iv of association between the two insti- 

tutions. The first meeting dealt with proce- 
dures whereas the second meeting had been 
an exchange of views as to the nature of a 
possible merger. There would be task forces 
in the areas of Arts, Commerce, and Science- 
Engineering to study the implications of a 
merger in each of these areas. 


(2) The Chairman reported that the Commit- 
tee of Deans had discussed procedures which 
Should govern ‘open’ meetings of the various 
Councils and other bodies but no detailed 
statement had been prepared as yet. Howe- 
ver, it was recommended that, in the interest 
of increased efficiency and utility, it had 
been AGREED to recommend that the format 
of the minutes of University Council be chan- 
ged to reflect only the nature of the items on 
the agenda of meetings and any decisions 
which were taken on them. University Council 
APPROVED this recommendation. 


(3) The Chairman made reference to the fact 
that Sir George has stated its intention of es- 
tablishing a CEGEP-parallel programme to 
begin in September, 1969 which would ope- 
rate for a transitional period of 1,2 or 3 years 
as might be necessary until suchtimeas there 
would be sufficient CEGEP-level English- 
language accommodation else-where. He re- 
ferred to the possibility of the Provincial Go- 
vernment increasing our annual grant or ma- 
king a special grant-in-aid which would ena- 
ble us to reduce the level of fees to be char- 
ged for that CEGEP-parallel programme. 


(4) University Council! APPROVED the Engi- 
neering course-change material as submitted 
by the Engineering Faculty Council with one 
minor amendment to the course-description 
of Engineering 512. 


(5) It was reported that the Engineering Fa- 
culty Council was not yet prepared to state 
its position with regard to an Arts Faculty 
Council proposal that a GPA system be in- 
troduced for implementation in 1969-70. The 
delay was occasioned by the fact that the En- 
gineering Faculties inthe various Quebec Uni- 
versities were presently considering a res- 
tructuring of Engineering programmes so that 
the Engineering Faculty Council could not sta- 
te its opinion of this proposal or position with 
regard to it until that other process had been 
completed. 


(6) University Council APPROVED the cancel- 
lation of classes on Friday, January 24th, be- 
cause of the Winter Carnival Weekend. 


(7) University Council APPROVED the cour- 
se-change material submitted by the Commer- 
ce Faculty Council. 


(8) University Council acknowledged notifica- 
tion of certain minor modifications in the M.A. 
in History Programme and in the MBA Pro- 
gramme which had been approved by the Board 
of Graduate Studies. 


(9) University Council considered and APPRO- 
VED in principle a report from the Joint Admi- 
nistration-SGWAUT Committee on ‘Procedu- 
res for Dealing with Complaints Against Fa- 
culty Members’ and referred the report back 
to that Committee for consideration of recom- 
mended changes and/or amendments in the 
light of the discussion at the Council mee- 
ting. 


(10) University Council confirmed the appoint- 
ment of Prof. Swamy (Engineering) to a new 
three-year appointment on the Board of Gra- 
duate Studies to replace Prof. Gerard. 


(11) University Council considered a series 
of matters presented to it by the Arts Facul- 
ty Council as follows: 


A. \t acknowledged notification of the ap- 
pointments of Asst. Prof. D. Gold (Psycho- 
logy - 1971) and Prof. J. MacDonald (Edu- 
cation - 1970) as replacements for Assoc. 
Prof. J. Stewart and Assoc. Prof. A.H. Adam- 
son on the Board of Graduate Studies. 


B. It acknowledged notification of the ap- 
pointment of Special Professor M. Inagaki 
as the Arts representative on the Computer 
Centre Advisory Committee. 


C. It acknowledged notification that the Arts 
Council passed the following motion: ‘that 
the Council approve the holding of Open Mee- 
tings, beginning in January 1969, and that the 
procedure for implementing them be adopted 
according to the ‘Recommendations from the 
University Communications Committee tothe 
Arts Faculty Council concerning Open Mee- 
tings, November 20, 1968'."’ 


D. It considered and APPROVED a recom- 
mendation that an inter Faculty- Registrar's 
Office Committee be established to study the 
academic implicatons of preregistration and 
it was further AGREED that the present Com- 
mittee on Enrollment be asked to undertake 
this function as an extension of its present 
terms of reference. The Chairman was au- 
thorized to make any needed changes in the 
membership of the present Committee on En- 
rollment in order to perform this function. 


E. It considered and APPROVED a recom- 
mendation that a ‘Special Summer Session in 
Sociology and Philosophy be established for 
the Summer of 1969. 


F. It considered and APPROVED a recom- 
mendation to establish a programme in ‘The 
Teaching of English as a Second Language’ 


for the Summer, 1969. 

G. It considered and APPROVED certain ad- 
ditional ‘course-change material’, as contain- 
ed in Report No. 15 of the Curriculum Plan- 
ning Committee of the Arts Faculty. 


(12) University Council considered and ap- 
proved the following appointments to the Aca- 
demic Planning Committee: Asst. Prof. Des- 
pland (until 1971), Asst. Prof. Verthuy (until 
1970), Prof. Knelman (until 1969) and Prof. 
French (until 1969) as replacements for Asst. 
Prof. Sheps, Asst. Prof. Grayson, Asst. Prof. 
Van Hoey and Asst. Prof. Zurif. 


(13) A. University Council considered and 
APPROVED the establishment of a Search 
Committee for a new Dean of Artstobe com- 
posed as follows: 

Vice-Principal (Academic) as Chairman 
The Acting Dean of Arts 

2 Faculty members from a Faculty or Fa- 
culties other than Arts to be elected by Uni- 
versity Council 

4 members of the Arts Faculty with 2 se- 
lected from the ranks of Associate and Full 
Professors, 1 selected from the ranks of As- 
sistant Professors and | student representa- 
tive to be elected by the Arts Faculty Coun- 
cil. 

B. It elected Assoc. Prof. G. Campbell 
(Chemistry) and Assoc. Prof. N. Fletcher 
(Management) to fill the two positions indi- 
cated above which were the responsibility of 
University Council. 


(14) A. The Chairman informed University 
Council that the Search Committee for a new 
Principal, which had been announced by the 
Chancellor at a Special Meeting held on Fri- 
day, December 13th, had been reconstituted 
in accordance with the following member- 
ship: 

A Chairman - who would be named by the 
Chancellor 

1 member of the Board of Governors 

] representative of the Association of Alum- 


ni 
5 Faculty members - 2 from Arts, | from 
Science, 1 from Commerce and | from Engi- 
neering 
2 representatives of the Day students 
2 representatives of the Evening students 
2 representatives of the Administration 
The Acting Principal 
The Chancellor 


B. After a lengthy discussion, Univer- 
sity Council APPROVED a motion with re- 
gard to the above as follows: 

“that we recommend to the Chancellor that 
the selection of the 5 Faculty representatives 
be referred to the various Faculty Councils 
but that, on aninterim basis, University Coun- 
cil nominate 5 members of Faculty to attend 
such meetings of the Search Committee as 
may be held between the time of the present 
meeting and the time in January when the va- 
rious Faculty Councils met and would beable 
to select their own appointees (or confirm the 
present appointments made by Council)."’ 


C. In fulfilment of the above, Univer- 
sity Council APPROVED the interim appoint- 
ment of the following Faculty members: 

2 Arts representatives - Asst. Prof. Des- 
pland & Asst. Prof. Maag 

1 Sc. representative - Asst. Prof. Deland 
1 Com. representative - Prof. C. Potter 
1 Engr. representative - Assoc. Prof. Dou- 
glass 


D. University Council APPROVED the 
referral of this matter by the Chairman to 
the various Faculty Councils without further 
need for ratification by Council of their ac- 
tions. 





CHANGE 
THE U.N. 


Mr. Pearson envisaged regional 
assemblies for the Western Hem- 
isphere, Europe, Africa and Asia 

**The full assembly, the town 
meeting of the whole world would 
then meet, say every three years, 
The regional assemblies meeting 
every year, would deal with re- 
gional problems, *‘Mr, Pearson 
stated, 

**When possible, they would set- 
tle their problems, and when it 
was not possible, they would lay 
the ground work, for settlement 
at the universal assembly’’ he 
wisely added, 

A Daring Proposal: 

Mr, Pearson suggested two 
other measures to strengthen the 
world body. One would be to de- 


velop a system of weighted voting 
based on relative strength and 
power of nations, to replace the 
current one - nation one - vote 
system. Another needed measure 
is a permanent U.N, peace force 
that could be sent quickly to trou- 
ble spots and be solely respon- 
sible to the United Nations. 

Just because the U.N. was racked 
by inner dissension, by tra- 
ditional nationalism and particu- 
lar by the realities of the cold 
war, was no reason to disband 
this latest attempt by mankind 
to bring a semblance of order 
on a global scale. 

There is an interesting paral- 
lel to this amazing proposal by 
our former prime minister. 

The Western Unity Movement 
had published a similar plan in 
late 1967, We reprint it below, 
as food for thought and a pos- 
sible means for discussion, ma- 


ny organizations in the past have 
submitted various proposals for 
changing the United Nations - 
everything from the Communist 
block‘s famous ** Troika ’’attempt, 
to the World Federalists’ ideas 
put forward by Count Coudenhove 
Kalerghi in his pre-World War 
II writings, notably his book 
‘Struggle For Pan-Europe’’, 


The Afro-Asian nations have 
long suggested changes and there 
was even an attempt by the for- 
mer President of Indonesia, Mr. 
Sukarno, to start a rival Afro- 
Asian U.N, 

At least one local, Montreal- 
based organization, has also been 
energetically advocating such a 
plan for several years - this is 
the Western Unity Movement, which 
is headed by Ernest Zuendel 
who is a Sir George student. We 
feel that their proposals merit 
serious consideration, 


ibis 
Sager. 


- 


¥ ee 
Teen 


January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 13 


SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS 
UNIVERSITY 12th ANNUAL 
CARNAVAL CAR RALLY 


The car rally committee pre- 
sents a straight forward novice 
rally in conjunction with the Win- 
ter Carnival. A car rally is a 
motoring event in which compe- 
titors follow a prescribed route 
at normal road speeds from prin- 
ted instructions distributed at the 
start of the event, Penalty points 
are gained primarily for faulty 
average speeds, they can not be 
regained by making up time fur- 
ther on in the rally by speeding, 
There will be numerous check- 
points throughout the route to 
record times and a verify that 
the correct route has been taken 
and the winner will be the crew 
with the least number of penal- 
ty points through these check- 
points, 

The running of this event will 
be guided by the following rules 
and regulations, It is of prime 
importance to know the follow- 
ing rules and regulations, 


RULES AND REGULATIONS, 
Date of rally: Wednesday Ja- 
nuary 22nd, 1969. 

Time: First car away at 5:01 
P.M, and each car at one mi- 
nute intervals thereafter, 

Place: Starting at Fairview 
Shopping Plaza, Pte. Claire. 

Finishing at Bavarian Beer 
Garden, 20 Cremazie 
Drivers’ Meeting: 
nuary 17 th. 

Room H-635 

1:00 - 2:00 P.M, 
Length: Approximately 100 miles 
lasting 3 1/2 hours. 

Road type: Snow covered second- 
ary roads, 

Fuel: Fuel is not available at 
the start but is available in the 
general area of the start. No 
gas stop is scheduled in the event 
Type of event: The event is in- 
tended primarily to bring enjoy- 
ment to the competitors, Instruc- 
tions will be varied in nature but 
without resort totricks, gimmicks 
or difficult mathematical pro- 
blems ( only very basic time- 
distant-average speed computa~ 
tions ). All instructions will be 
self-explanatory.. The number of 
average speed changes will be 
kept to a minimum, 

Entry fees: $3.00 prior to mid- 
night January 20th. $3.50 after 
Jan, 20th until last car away. 
No additional team entry fees. 
Eligibility: Entries will be ac- 
cepted from any combination of 
males and females but with a 
maximum of two (2) males per 
car. To be eligible for the tro- 
phies and / or prizes, crews 
must not have gained any natio- 
nal championship points in ral- 
lying and crews must consist of; 
A 2 males, both registered stu- 
dents at Sir George. 

B 2 males plus any number of 
females, both must be registered 
students at Sir George. 

C 1 male and 1 female, either 
or both registered students at 
Sir George. 

D 2 females, either or both re- 
gistered students at Sir George. 
All drivers must hold a valid dri- 
vers licence, all entry forms must 
be completed in detail where ap- 
plicable; proof of public Liabili- 
ty and property damage insuran- 
ce and drivers licence must be 
shown at the start of the rally. 
No commercial vehicles or 4 
wheel drive vehicles will be per- 
mitted to enter. 

Registration and Starting posi- 
tions: Starting positions will be 
assigned as the entries are re- 
ceived. Requests for a particu- 


Friday Ja- 


lar starting time will be consi- 


dered but can not be guaranteed. 
Entries will be limited to 150 
ears and officially open Monday 
January 12 th, All entry forms 


must be submitted in complete 
detail along with entry fees, Start- 
ing times and numbers will be 
posted Tuesday January 2lstin the 
offices of the Students’ Associa- 
tion on the 3rd floor of the Hall 
Building. Entries should be sub- 
mitted with fees to the Student 
Receptionist in the same offices 
and an official receipt will be 
obtained. This receipt is your 
entry ticket and must be shown 
at the start of the event. 

Teams: A team will consist of 
three cars. There will be five 
catagories for teams, Arts, Scien- 
ces, Commerce, Engineering and 
coup des dames, All team mem- 
bers must be from the same fa- 
culty with the exception of the 
coup des dames, Individual crews 
must form their teams before the 
entry forms for that team are 
returned and all three individual 
entry forms and fees of that team 
must be returned together at the 
time of registration. No teams 
may be formed after mid-night 
January 20th. Team cars will be 
separated at the discretion of 
the organizers, 
Compulsory Equipment: 
tires on all drive wheels, 
Recommended equipment: You will 
need a clipboard, pencils, paper, 
odometers registering in 1/10 of 
a mile, slide rule, full tank of 
gas, snow shovel and seat belts. 
All cars equipped with Haldas must 
have them disconnected so that 
their drive may be sealed, No 
Curtas. 


Scrutineering: All cars must ar- 
rive 30 minutes prior to their 
departure time, Cars and drivers 
will be checked for: 

1, entry receipt 

2. valid drivers licence 

. proof of insurance 

ownership registration 

, compulsory equipment 

. working order of lights, horn, 
windshield wipers, general body 
and condition of the car, 


Entry and release forms may 
be obtained at the third floor re- 
ceptionist desk. 


Snow 


DP Oe 


Competitors arriving at scru- 
tineering later than 30 minutes 
prior to their starting time may 
be unable to start on time and 
therefore will start after the last 
car and suffer a 10 point penal- 
ty. Cars not passing any part 
of the scrutineering will not be 
allowed to start and may have 
their money refunded, 

Timing: Timing will be to the 
minute and the minute will be 
constituted as that exact minu- 
te until 59 seconds after the ex- 
act minute. All checkpoints will 
be as close as possible to the 
half minute. 

Scoring: - for each minute early 
at checkpoint 2 points 

- for each minute late at check- 


point 1 point 
- for missing a checkpoint 
50 points 


- for missing a route question 
or incorrect answer 10 points 
~ failure to pull past checkpoint 
vehicle and to the side of the 
road ( at checkers discretion ) 


10 points 
- creeping up to a checkpoint 
within sight of the check- 
point 5 points 


- approaching checkpoint from 
wrong direction 
Checkpoints; All checkpoints close 
1 hour after the last car is due 
calculated from the instructions 
and allowing for 150 cars at l 
minute intervals. 

Finishers: To be classified as a 
finisher, competitors must get 
50% of the checkpoints, All finish- 
ers may pick up their results 1 
week after the rally in the Car- 
nival offices on the 3rd floor, 


> he 


20 points 2 


rd 


14 THE PAPER January 14, 1969 


PATRICK BURNSME 


advisor in residence 
exclusive to THE PAPER 


HOW WAS THAT AGAIN? 





A recent write-up on ‘he Paper 
by the Gazette’s Mr. Thurston 
included, among other things, an 
attack on this writer by stating 
that he writes ‘‘hysterical’’ war- 
nings about impending world fa- 
mines. (‘‘There will be enough 
hunger for everyone - come 1975’’. 
The Paper, December 9, 1968). 

Admitted, the column was writ- 
ten rather hastily and under pres- 
sure, what with mid-term exams 
coming up, but the information 
given was based on articles avai- 
lable to the writer and he is de- 
tailing the information hereun- 
der: 

Writes the OXFAM 67/68 re- 
port... ““The sands of time are 
running out. Almost daily, we 
are warned that unless we act 
swiftly, it will be too late, and 
within a decade or so we shall 
witness the most appaling fami- 
ne in human history. Posterity 
will judge our generation, not 
on what we said, but on what 
we did...”’ 

Sheet 3.02 of an Oxfam pamph- 
let says’ ‘‘... the rate of popula- 
tion increase is now almost in- 
comprehensible. The present po- 
pulation of the world is being ad- 
ded to at the rate of over 60 mil- 
lion people a year. If our numbers 
continue to expand at this rate, 
we shall be some 7,000 million 
persons at the turn of the cen- 
tury - twice the number of to- 
day’s half-hungry world’’... 

Showing the gigantic and hope- 
less task facing mankind, this sa- 
me pamphlet goes on to say “... 
Presently, our world has some3!'4 
billion acres under cultivation and 
this includes tree crops. This is 
one acre (including trees!) for 
each person now on earth. To 
maintain the current one person/ 
one acre ratio until the end of 
the century, under present po- 
pulation growth rates, would re- 
quire putting 2% billion more 
acres to the plow... It simply 
isn’t there, so the task is IMPOS- 
SIBLE;”’ the argument has be- 
come academic. 

How about improved farm pro- 
duction techniques and better fer- 
tilizers and more effective pesti- 
cides? Won’t this help? Says 
OXFAM sheet 4.02’... The con- 
cept that application of science 
to the problems of food produc- 
tion can provide satisfactory diets 


GUPPIES 


I\/ONDER HOW 
wT FEELS TO UE 
IN THAT LOVELY 
GRASS -.- - 


for a world population increasing 
at a rate of 2 per cent per year is 
an impractical myth that does 
great harm... even with impro- 
ved methods and knowledge, food 
production in the developing a- 
reas is at the same per capita le- 
vel today as it was before 1939... 
total food production in the de- 
veloping areas in 1966 increased 
by littke more than 1 per cent; 
however, vis a vis population 
increases of between 2 and 4 per 
cent in these same areas, the 
food available for each person was 
tragically less than it has been for 
the last decade. Hundreds of 
thousands more people died from 
hunger and protein malnutrition. 
And while thousands died, other 
thousands, particularly children, 
went blind because of Vitamin A 
deficiency. Professor Ritchie Cal- 
der, after pointing out the nutri- 
tional maiming of the nervous 
system, mind and emotions at- 
tributable to severe protein calo- 
rie deficiency among children, 
concludes *... by our present ne- 
glect of nutritional deficiencies 
we are already perverting the so- 
ciety of 1984... by 1975 the total 
number of children in the world 
is expected to exceed 1400 mil- 
lion, 1130 million of them in the 
developing areas. (Where food 
production is not keeping pace 
and protein deficiency is high). 

The Toronto Star, in 1965 and 
1966, ran a series of articles en- 
titled ‘‘The Hunger Story”’’ and 
selected excerpts are given be- 
low: 

“...We are fast approaching the 
greatest catastrophe in world his- 
tory. Great areas of the earth are 
on the threshold of famine. Hun- 
dreds of millions - even BIL- 
LIONS - of people in under- de- 
veloped areas will suffer malnu- 
trition, starvation or even death... 
There are too many people, and 
there is too little food. The ratio 
grows more out of balance every 
year. Half the people of the world 
suffer constant hunger or malnu- 
trition, or both. Every day some 
10,000 men, women and children 
die of starvation or malnutrition... 
As population soars, per capita 
production of food is actually 
going down!”’ 

..The immediate danger is in 
Asia, Africa and Latin America. 
In just 20 years the population of 





those continents may increase 75 
per cent - or by 900,000,000 peo- 
ple. India and Pakistan will be the 
first to reach famine state. China 
will have to feed well over one 
billion people by 1975. 

**... Many nations have been 
(just) saved from disaster by huge 
grain shipments from the United 
States and other food surplus 
countries. India imports 7,000,000 
tons of grain each year - but it 
is not enough. China imports 
6,500,000 tons of wheat a year - 
it is not enough. The Soviet U- 
nion was forced to import 9,800,000 
tons of wheat and flour this year 
(1965) from Western Nations. But 
this is only a stop-gap solution. 
The food surplus of the West can- 
not keep pace with the population 
boom. If the United States were 
to donate its entire food surplus 
for one year to the world’s hun- 
gry, it would mean only two tea 
cups of food once every 17 days 
for each person”’. 

“... the food gap grows more 
desperate daily. The under-deve- 
loped areas of the world - Asia - 
Africa, Latin America - are ona 
collision course with famine’”’ 
Says Dr. Raymond Ewell, vice- 
president for research, State Uni- 
versity of New York at Buffalo: 
“If the present trend continues it 
seems likely that famine will 
reach serious proportions in In- 
dia, Pakistan and China in the 
early 1970’s, followed by Indone- 
sia, Iran, Turkey, the United A- 
rab Republic and severl other 
countries within a few years, and 
then be followed by most of the 
other countries of Asia, Africa 
and Latin America by 1980...’’. 

“*... Latin America is facing one 
of the most serious hunger pro- 
blems of any area in the world. 
Asits population soars, food pro- 
duction per capita is expected to 
be 11 per cent lower this year 
(1966) than it was before World 
War IJ. Latin America has the 
highest rate of population growth 
of any major region of the world. 
Between 1920 and 1960 Latin A- 
merican population went up 136 
per cent...’” Compared to 16% of 
the land under cultivation in the 
U.S., Latin America has less than 
5 per cent of its more than 7,700,000 
square miles under the plow. Vast 
areas of South America are im- 
penetrable rain forest, arid peaks 
and dry, rolling savanna. 

And here is some shocking news 
for our “‘Commie Friends’’ who’d 
rather be ‘‘Red than dead”’ (Per- 
sonally, I’d rather be ‘fed than 
Red’’.) Under the headline: 
“Spectre of Starvation over Reds”’ 
the Toronto Star says... The So- 


viet Union and its satellites in 
Eastern Europe have been able 
to provide enough food for their 
300 million inhabitants. But re- 
peated crop failures and reluctan- 
ce to switch capital from indus- 
trial development may place the 
spectre of starvation over the Red 
nations sooner than they expect. 
Farming methods oncollectivized 
farms have failed to keep pace 
with the growing food needs of 
the ever-expanding populations 
of Eastern Europe. As a result, 
Russia in recent years has been 
forced to rely on capitalist na- 
tions to provide grains and food- 
stuff. Measured in food output 
per person, the nations of Eas- 
tern Europe, including Russia, 
are slightly worse-off than they 
were 5 years ago... Last March 
the Kremlin launched a new fi- 
ve year $78 billion plan for a- 
griculture, obviously in a despe- 
rate attempt to salvage the na- 
tions farming system. But the 
capital investment is expected to 
fall far short of modernizing Rus- 
sian agriculture. Much more in- 
vestment will be needed, but it’s 
unlikely the Soviet leaders will 
trim other allocations - such as 
defense spending or the space 
program - to give agriculture 
its much needed financial boost. 
And for those, who are still not 
convinced there is the clincher... 
Suddenly, the age of agricultural 
surplus is gone - the end of a 
fantastic era. The spectre of fa- 
mine lies on the world horizon. 
The tons of wheat that have 
poured from the nation’s farms, 
threatening, it seemed at times, 
to drown all the U.S. in golden 
surpluses, are no longer piling 


up. 

U.S. wheat has fed a fifth of 
India, as well as Egyptians, Pa- 
kistani, Senagalese, Chileans and 
even Russians - people from 65 
countries. American surplus food 
has gone to hundreds of mil- 
lions of people, at a cost of more 
than $22 billion over a decade... 

Why the sudden end of the gol- 
den surplus? It seems that since 
increased technology continued 
to squeeze more and more food 
out of less and less land, that the 
U.S. government, faced with huge 
food surpluses which upset mar- 
ket prices, actually paid farmers 
not to put a certain percentage of 
their arable land into production 
that had been used to grow crops. 
The farmers are being paid about 
$1.3 billion for what they are not 
growing! This, in view of the qui- 
ckly approaching world famine, is 
incredible! 


However, Canada does not come 
off smelling like a rose either. 
We produce about 400-700 mil- 
lion bushels of wheat annually. 
Given good rainfalls and adequa- 
te fertilization, Canada could pro- 
bably raise production to a bil- 
lion bushels a year on existing 
grain land. How muchmore could 
be grown, if Canadian land still 
undeveloped were turned to grain 
production because of urgent 
need, is anybody’s guess. 

Nor does Canada cover itself with 
glory, whenit comes to give-away 
programs either. According to the 
Toronto Star, Canada’s bilateral 
food aid in 1964-65 amounted to 
only $1,300,000, $1,000,000 worth 
of rape seed to Pakistan and 
$300,000 worth of dried fish to 
the Dominican Republic! 





Multilateral aid, funnelled 
through the U.N. Food and A- 
griculture Organization’s World 
Food Program, amounted to 
$1,061,080. This breaks down to 
$12,939 worth of powdered skim 
milk, $513,452 of dried whole milk, 
$231,015 of cheese, $106,634 of but- 
ter oil, $33,054 of butter, $120,018 
of wheat flour, and $23,509 of oats. 

That, gentlemen, is the whole, 
sick story. In view of the fore- 
going, and taking into considera- 
tion that the national govern- 
ments of all nations know full 
well of what is going to come u- 
pon them, my concluding state- 
ment of that column still stands - 
hysterical or not. It said: The 
Allies hanged the top Nazis in 
1947 for shovelling 6 million Jews 
into the ovens and for committing 
other inhuman atrocities. Good! 
But who, we ask, will hang all 
the world’s politicians in 1975? 
By doing nothing now, they will 
have become responsible for the 
most hideous slaughter in all the 
history of mankind! 


ART MAGAZINE 
GAINS MOMENTUM 


The new magazine named On 
Guard being published by Glen 
Arthur Harding is expected to 
be on the stands by February 
3rd..The Paper asked Mr. Har- 
ding about On Guard’s pur- 
pose and he told us that he 
wanted to see a new approach 
in the publication of amateur 
works by local students, facul- 
ty and other motivated writers 
and poets. 


The initial circulation of 500, 
financed by the Evening Stu- 
dents Association is expected to 
be self-supporting by the se 
cond issue planned for March 
distribution. ‘The price, 25 
cents, has been established as 
a nominal low tarifffor a break- 
even return on thefirst issueand 
provide capital for subsequent 
endeavours. 


HARE 
KRISHNA 
IN ZONE 


The Hare Krishna Move- 
ment, known as the Inter- 
national Society for Krishna 
Consciousness, is presenting 
- chanting and dancing in 
ectasy to the Hare Krishna 
and other Mantra’s in the 
Zone Meditation Room on 
January 16th. The event will 
run from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. 

Indian musical instru- 
ments will accompany the 
lecture on the Bhagavad Gita 
and participants are invited 
to bring their instruments. 





f | FEEL A 
TERRIBLE, TERRIBLE 
PAIN RUNNING 
THROUGH My 


cont’d from page-l 


volvement on all related 
committees and structures 
within the university. 


Further work is yet to be 
done to finalize this new 
approach and to more spe- 
cifically delineate technica- 
lities. The new structural 

roposal can be outlined as 
ollows in chart form: 


This structure will enable 
evening and day students to 
have their local self-govern- 
ment retained. In no way 
will this be a competitive 
relationship - rather, it will 
be a preservation of effec- 
tive representation for the 





Council on 
Student 


















Science 
Council 


EVENING 
STUDENTS 
ASSOCIA TION 


day or evening students par- 
ticular interests, while ena- 
bling joint cooperation for 
both groups in areas of com- 
mon concern and mutual 
interests. The Council on 
Student Life was formed to 
serve these ends and its 
responsibilities were made 
as broad as possible in or- 
der to cover all areas of stu- 
dent involvement. 


ESA president, Bill O’Ma- 
hony informed THE PAPER 
in an interview immediate- 
ly after the meeting that 
he was “...completely de- 
lighted with the outcome as 
it clearly indicates that in 
the university there is still 
democratic process’. ESA 


SENATE 


Arts 
Council 


GEORGIAN SNOOPIES 
JOIN UP AND GET HIGH 


$2.50 (SERIES) 


Commerce 





Arts Representative, Ross 
Miles also stated that the 
outcome was an “...indica- 
tion that the Evening Stu- 
dents’ Association has now 
been put on a par with the 
Students’ Association. This 
includes effective legal re- 
cognition by all echelons 
of the university communi- 


ty’’. 


THE PAPER will be close- 
ly following upcoming mee- 
tings of all committees and 
related bodies to ensure that 
evening and day students 
are kept up-to-date on de- 
velopments affecting their 
interests and the future of 
their government. 







STUDENTS’ 
ASSOCIA TION 


INSURANCE 


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SPECIAL LIFE INSURANCE 
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Tel. 843-5016 


35MM. INTERNATIONAL SERIES 
FREE: 2 GUEST PASSES 


TICKETS: RECORD CENTER INC. CRESCENT & DEMAISONNEUVE 


JANUARY 5TH 


Av Hasard Balthasar (France Sweden 


1966) 


A beautiful and heart-warming allegory 
of the fates of a farm girl and her don- 
key against the background of the harsh 


JANUARY 19TH 


Cul-de-Sac (Britain 1966) 


Roman Polanski’s comedy of two gangs- 


ters on the run. 


January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 15 


CAN HISTORY TEACH 


A great people, along with 
their glorious culture, 
perished - not all at once, 
not noticeably, over many 
years - slowly, methodical- 
ly. 

There were many reasons 
for the fall of this great 
people. These are the major 
ones: 

- Moral decay among citi- 
zens 

- Stifling taxes 

- Too many handouts that 
weakened the poor; too many 
luxuries that weaknened the 
rich 

- Few children among the 
well-to-do and educated; ma- 
ny children among the poor 
and ignorant 


- Constant drain of pre- 
cious metals 

Rising costs of public 
works | 

- Too much leisure time 
spent at games and amuse- 
ments 

- A yearly rise in crime 
rates 

- A decrease inpatriotism 


For these reasons, point 
out historians, did Rome de- 
clineand finally fall in the 
fifth century. 


Can we learn something 
from these reasons? 


Reprinted Courtesy The 
Suburban Mirror . 





THE 24rd PSALM 


The State is my shepherd, I 
need not work, 

It alloweth me to lie down 
on good jobs; 

It leadeth me beside still 
factories, 

It destroyeth mine initiative; 
It taketh me in the paths of a 
parasite for politics’ sake. 
Yea, though I walk through 
the valley of laziness and 
deficit spending, 

I will fear no evil, for the 


SKI 





(MODERNIZED) 


Government is with me. 

It prepareth an economic 
Utopia for me out of the 
earnings of my grand chil- 
dren. 

It filleth my head with secu- 
rity; 

My inefficiency runneht over, 
Surely, the State shall care 
for me all the days of my 
life. . 

And I shall dwell in a fool’s 
paradise forever. 


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La Terra Trema (Italy 1945) 


world of today with its brute sensuality, 
injustice and hypocrisy. 


The Gospel According to St. Matthew 
(Italy) 


A film by Pier Paolo Pasolinoacommu- 
nist poet and film director. 


“for the finest charcoal burgers and hotdogs” 
A masterpiece of the Italian neo-rea- 
list school. The struggles of a family of 
Sicilian fishermen that speaks for the 
dignity and endurance of men. 


1653 ST. CATHERINE WEST 
NORTH SIDE-WEST OF GUY ST.