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— The Postgrad 


Published quarterly by The Association of Alumni, Sir George Williams College, 
1441 Drummond Street, Montreal 25, Quebec, Canada. Advertising office, 1063 
Beaver Hall Hill, Montreal 1. Tel. UN. 6-4628. Authorized as Second Class Mail, 
Post Office Department, Ottawa. Printed for the publishers by Rapid Press Ltd., 
Montreal. 


Editor: Bos Hayes, B.A. 

















VoLuME 11, NumsBer 1 EASTER ISSUE Marcu 1955 
CONTENTS 
An Informal Affair 3 
The Principal's Page . < 5 
Your GradeRUndi tne vite a! a utrte ts ie OM as oa FS aes 6 
President's Page . 7 
LosiSAlumni i.e Mead ae’ Y (aes Welt © ah bey eles His s3 
Rostardd: Patter 5) Fo, hoe Sect ee gi Ges an ae at s6 
A Wheelchattilm Rloniddiy seed) G. Se ee SNPR ee Lan tae SRA 


Note: Read our Special Anniversary Supplement in this issue. 


° 
% x v 
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Greenshields & Co Inc 


Underwriters and Distributors 


0, 
Canadian Security Issues 


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MonrTREAL 





Easter 1955 1 

















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RREBONNE:-P-@ 





AN INFORMAL AFFAIR 


ALUMNI EASTER DANCE 
TO BE OF “OLD COLLEGE TYPE” 


NE THING has been made very clear as a result of the questionnaires 

returned to date—almost without exception our Alumni members greatly 
desire to attend a good old college-type informal dance. Probably the most pleasant 
memories many of us have of Sir George are directly connected with a Christmas 
Ball or a Spring Prom and probably many of us have come to think regretfully 
of college dances as things of the past. 

However, this is not necessarily so, after all other college alumni sponsor regular 
annual or semi-annual dances which are taken for granted and indeed would be 
sorely missed if removed from the social scene. It is our aim then to fall in line 
with the generally accepted and definitely agreeable practice. Though nothing 
definite has been decided yet our Association of Alumni may sponsor two dances 
per year, an informal dance in the spring and a semi-formal ball around Christmas, 
for example. The final decision, of course, rests with you, the members of the 
Alumni. 

In any event steps have been taken to get the ball rolling for this year. The 
Ballroom of the Mount Royal Hotel has been reserved, the orchestra and entertain- 
ment have been booked and ideas concerning decorations and what-have-you are 
being aired, weighed and at time of writing, discarded (something practical and 
inexpensive is BOUND to materialize sooner or later). 

It was hoped at first to make this a semi-formal affair, however, two facts called 
for a change of mind: 

1. The evening of the dance is too close now to allow for extensive 
preparations. 

2. The distaff side has probably already budgeted all surplus funds for 
use in obtaining Easter finery. 

Thus is has been decided to make this dance one of informal attire with a cabaret 
set-up and with dancing from 9:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m. punctuated by two shows 
totalling one and a half hours entertainment — all for $3.00 a couple. 

So prepare for a very pleasant evening on Friday, April Ist, come doubly, in a 
group or part of a multitude — but come! 

You’ll be very welcome. Dick MacDonald and Gerry Miller, Co-Chairmen of 
the Social Committee. 


mence on Monday, September 26th. 

The last examination day in the cur- 
rent academic year, 1954-55 will be 
Saturday, May 14th. 


Academic Year 
To Begin Week 


Earlier Than Usual 


The Faculty Council of Sir George 
Williams College has announced that 
the next academic year will commence 
one week earlier than usual. The sum- 
mer term will run from Tuesday, May 
31st to Friday, September 2nd. The 
winter session for 1955-56 will com- 


Easter 1955 


ry 


The academic year has not been short- 
ened, but it has been advanced one week. 
This decision by the Faculty Council was 
made so that Sir George Williams Col- 
lege would be more in line with other 
Canadian and American universities and 
also so that students would be able to 
decide upon summer plans as soon as 


possible. 
3 








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4 The Postgrad 


THE PRINCIPAL’S PAGE 


COLLEGE CORNERSTONE 
CEREMONY IN APRIL 


— ‘A FAMILY AFFAIR’ — 





by DR. K. E. NORRIS, Principal 
Sir George Williams College 


HE structural steel rises apace, and by the time these words appear, the entire 

skeleton of the new college building will have taken shape. The dreams of 
thousands of Georgian alumni have now taken unto themselves form, and by this 
time next year the college will be housed in the building which has been its subject 
of conversation for the past twenty years. 


The date of delivery of the new building has now been set as January 1956, and 
the moving into the building will be completed in the second term of the academic 
year 1955-56. The summer session of 1956 will be held in the new classrooms, while 
the changes in the old building, which will be postponed until the new building 
is completed, will get under way. It is to be hoped that they will not cause too much 
trouble, although some inconvenience is inevitable. 


The laying of the cornerstone will be a family affair and will take place quietly 
about the end of April this year. It is not yet known who will lay the stone, but 
an announcement will be made in this matter in the near future. 


In the meantime, the college is enjoying a reasonably good year. Extracurricular 
activities seem to be flourishing and to be taking place with more “aplomb” than 
ever before. Things, which would have seemed impossible 20 years ago, take place 
now without any apparent feeling that they are out of the ordinary. But maybe 
they are not! Perhaps all that is needed is boundless energy and unawareness of 
difficulties. After all, this is 1955; which in itself was impossible twenty years ago. 


Our Cover 


COLLEGE’S CARNIVAL QUEEN: Shown in full regalia on our cover 
this issue is pretty, 21-year-old Joy Ward, who was named queen of this 
year’s annual winter carnival. Chosen by a popular vote of the student body, 
Joy, a fourth year Arts student, was crowned by Dorothy Martin, queen of 


the Georgian’s 1954 carnival. The lovely queen, dressed in a fur-trimmed 
velvet robe and holding the traditional sceptre, was the star of the two-day 
extravaganza. Joy plans to head for Florida after the Spring exams. But 
only for a vacation. On her return she’s going to teach art. Right now she 
spends her Saturdays at Crawford Park School as an instructress to 52 
youngsters on the subject. All our best wishes to you Joy. 





Easter 1955 5 


FROM 1950 ON... 


THE GEORGIAN GRAD FUND 
NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT 


HE GRAD FUND was organized in 1950 following a survey made of alumni 
associations by Dr. Howard Dundass in Canada and the U.S. 

It was organized at that time with the prime purpose of providing a “living 
endowment” for the students of Sir George Williams College by the graduates. Its 
aim was to provide additional funds: 

1. To help equip laboratories, lecture rooms, and the library which the 
usual budget would not otherwise provide for. 
2. To be used by the Principal and Dean to defray extraordinary expendi- 
tures not covered by the general funds. 
3. To help the Executive of the Association of Alumni in budgeting and 
financing of activities for you, the members. 
At that time, a specific fee was suggested and a membership card issued. 

In 1951, the fee was abolished, the card no longer issued and all requests were 
’ made with voluntary contributions as the basis. 

In 1952, the Grad Fund was forgotten to allow direction of all energies into the 
Building Fund for a new building to house the College. 

Now, in 1955, with the main part of the Building Fund completed, the Grad 
Fund is to be revitalized with the same purpose and aims as in 1950 and requests 
for donations to be on a voluntary basis as in 1951. In addition, in 1955, since the 
Building Fund is still short of its objective, an appeal is being made at this time 
for donations to this important cause as well. 

Your alumni executive would certainly appreciate your wholehearted support 
in making the Fund a great success not only by the size of your individual donations 
but by the number of all your donations. All contributions, large and small, will be 
most gratefully and graciously accepted. 

In submitting contributions don’t forget to specify how the money is to be used 
— Grad Fund and/or Building Fund, making cheques payable to Sir George 
Williams College (Grad Fund or Building Fund) and mail to Association of Alumni, 
Sir George Williams College, 1441 Drummond Street, Montreal. All contributions 
are deductible, of course, for income taxe purposes. — Dr. David Zacharin, Grad 
Fund Chairman. 


Secretary Resigns 111 YEARS AGO 


Miss Agnes Roche, secretary of the 
alumni association, has resigned from 
this position. Her successor has not yet after careful thought and considerable 
been named. Sincere thanks go out to 
her from the executive for her fine ee s 
work during her term of office. objectives, set requirements for member- 


On June 6, 1844, twelve young men, 
discussion decided upon certain specific 


ship in their society and formally adopted 
I Boy. 2 Girls the name “The young Men’s Christian 


Mrs. D. Haig Staniforth, the former Association.” This therefore has become 


giana ite poe DL unpre Sg the official date of the founding of the 


for Susan and Janet. first YMCA. 


6 fhe Postgrad 








Rn ae SY Pe Se cee Oe EE AF TU eet weet Te oe 


THE PRESIDENT’S PAGE 


ALUMNI ACTIVITIES 
SHOWING “NEW LIFE” 


by LEONARD ROSENBERG 
President, Association of Alumni, Sir George Williams College 


T IS ALWAYS pleasant to be able to open a letter with an optimistic viewpoint. 
Fortunately, circumstances surrounding the present Alumni activities allow this 
very attitude. 


There will shortly be published in each issued of The Postgrad a scheduled list 
of coming events organized by your executive. This program is quite ambitious. 
Nevertheless, the executive feels that if our group is to continue being successful 
at accomplishing its objectives an ambitious program is necessary. 

The major coming event is the Easter cabaret style dance at the Mount Royal 
Hotel on April 1st. I can only point out its objective in this letter, the results will 
be the dance itself. It is your executive’s intention to arrange for more social events 
of this nature where you may relax with your old friends and possibly make new ones 
at a reasonable cost in an impeccable (may I say “elite”) atmosphere. The dress 
will be informal. I look forward to seeing the majority of you at this Alumni Easter 
Dance — it should be pleasant to be back in circulation if you have fallen out 
lately and just as pleasant for those who are still in trim. 

Following this event is the Graduates Reception on June 3, after last year’s 
success, will be held in the Champlain Room of the Mount Royal Hotel. 

Along with these larger events a number of small committees are actively 
functioning and all appear to be helping your Alumni Association toward attaining 
its objective, which if I may repeat them again are: 

1. a broader cooperation among graduates. 

2. helping the college to improve its facilities and position by any means 
at our disposal, and 

3. lending a helping hand to undergraduates in whatever form it is re- 
quired or requested. 

May I be humdrum for a moment and say I know you are busy, can’t find a 
baby-sitter, have to work late, haven’t got time — but the busiest man accomplishes 
most and has a broader smile at the end of the day. So tie your baby in the high 
chair, lock your wife in the kitchen, take yourself to the basement and jot us a line. 
Comments, criticisms or suggestions — we would like to hear from still more of you. 


Bernard Dezwirek 
Fesigns As 
8.U.8. President 


Bernard Dezwirek, popular Georgian 
student and originator of the American 
Exchange program, has resigned as pre- 
sident of the S.U.S. His successor is 
Ron Gilbert, former vice-president. 

An active worker in extra-curricular 


Easter 1955 


affairs in the college, Bernie was social 
chairman of the 1952-53 executive, vice- 
president of the 1953-54 $.U.S. and was 
elected president last year with more 
votes than his two opponents combined. 
He was also originator of the Georgian 
Trophy for NFCUS, the Student Council 
Award and the Clubs Trophy. 

Other executive members include: 
Les Melia, vice-president and Jim Small- 
man, third year representative. 


7 


COLLEGE RECEIVES $72,000 GRANT 
FROM QUEBEC GOVERNMENT 


Nx GEORGE WILLIAMS COLLEGE was one of five Quebec universities 
to receive grants from the provincial government in January. The amount was 
$72,000. 

The grants, listed in the budgetary estimates tabled by Finance Minister Gagnon 
in the Legislature, extend for a third year the Quebec Government’s policy of 
giving the universities more money than they would receive were they allowed 
to share in the federal aid-to-universities scheme. 

Dr. K. E. Norris described the grants as “very good news.” 

“Tt will be of material assistance in helping us to balance our budget. We are 
just preparing the budget now, so the grant comes at a very opportune time,” 
he said. 

The extension of the grants came as good news to all the universities because, 
in announcing last year’s awards, Premier Duplessis made no commitments for 
the future. It was, in fact, stated that future grants would depend on a solution 
to the question of distribution of tax revenues between the province and the 
Federal Government. 

Quebec universities shared in the federal aid to universities launched for the 
1951-52 sessions on the lines of recommendations of the Massey Commission but 
the federal grants were cut off by Quebec in 1952-53. 

The other grants were: McGill, $750,000; University of Montreal, $600,000; 
Laval University, Quebec, $525,000; Bishop’s University, Lennoxville, $25,000. 





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Easter 1955 


1,500 MILES AWAY 


Letter From 
A °5I Grad 


809 Lane, 
Topeka, Kansas. 
Dec. 5, 1954. 


Dear Whoever-O pens-T his: 


This is just to let you know that I 
haven't forgotten SGWC and will con- 
tribute to the fund as soon as I begin 
working. As you may, or may not know 
Tve been studying occupational therapy 
at Washington University Medical School 
in St. Louis. 

Right now I’m half-way through 
clinical training and having a great time 
travelling about the country. I spent the 
summer in Denver — climbing moun- 
tains, gold-panning, etc., and am now in 
Topeka at the Menninger Foundation, 
training in psychiatry. Dr. Bridges would 
be interested to know that I met Dr. 
Gardner Murphy — the great white 
father of psychological research. Treat- 
ment here is based on psychoanalysis 


which is based on the Freudian School. : 


It’s been interesting here but I’m 
anxious to leave next month for Califor- 
nia to complete my training. I'll be two 
months each at San Francisco Children’s 
Hospital (January-February) and “The 
City of Hope,’ Duaste, Los Angeles. 

In each city I have been inquiring 
about evening courses. Surprisingly 
enough, most universities and colleges 
give extension courses that are creditable 
towards a degree. This seems to be a 
common practise, although of fairly 
recent years. 

I was pleasantly surpriséd in St. 
Louis to have a fellow alumnus look me 
up. He was Ross Thomas (B.A. °48) 
and working for his Ph.D. in clinical psy- 
chology at Washington University clinics. 
We were the only graduates of SGWC 
in St. Louis at that time and it was most 
enjoyable to have someone to talk to 
about home. 

The Postgrad still comes through 
regularly so I manage to keep up with 
the news although 1,500 miles from 
Montreal. I was especially pleased to see 


10 


Our Best Wishes... 


A JOB WELL DONE: When Joyce Beddows, 
our favorite alumni secretary, leaves this 
May to get married she’s going to be missed 
by all the executive—in fact by all alumni 
members who have come in contact with 
her during the past years. A hard worker, 
Joyce always had the interests of the associa- 


tion at heart and her cheerful personality 


won her many friends in the college. There’s 
not much more we can say except to wish 
both her and lan all the best in the coming 
years. 





GEORGE WILLIAMS 


George Williams, for whom our college 
is named, was born on a farm near 
Dulverton, county of Somerset, in 1821. 
He founded the YMCA and more than 


anyone else “lived, worked, gave and 


prayed for ‘the young men of his genera- 
tion.” 


that Len Rosenberg is our new president 


cand Dick MacDonald pushing social 


activities as he did when an under- 
graduate. : 

Keep up the good work, kids, Ill 
be around to visit the new SGWC one 
of these years. 


Yours truly, 
Maureen Gordon (B.A. 51) 


The Postgrad 

















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The Postgrad 


GEORGIANS ARE PERUVIANS 
IN UN COUNCIL DEBATE 


USSIA clashed with the United States in the United Nations Security Council 
in February but it was all in the spirit of good clean fun. 

It happened in Montreal when a model security council session, realistic in 
virtually every detail, was staged in the YWCA building, 1355 Dorchester St. W. 

Representatives of nine Canadian schools and colleges, one American college, 
and the local branch of the United Nations Association, played the roles of 
the 11 security council members in a dramatization of a typical UN debate. 

There were “vetoes” and cries of “point of order” and bitter wrangles over 
procedure but nobody walked out—not even the Russian delegates depicted by 
students from St. Lawrence University, NY. 

Four languages, English, French, Spanish and Russian, were used in_ the 
spirited debate presided over by council president Rene Pouliot, who in real life 
is technical adviser to the International Civil Aviation Organization in Montreal. 

Among the groups taking part in the debate were Assumption College, Windsor, 
Ont., (Belgium); Sir George Williams Day College (Peru); Otoreke School, Que. . 
(Brazil); United Nations Association (Turkey); University of Toronto (United 
Kingdom) ; University of Montreal (France) ; Sir George Williams Evening College 
(Iran) ; Royal Military College Kingston (New Zealand) ; and Macdonald Teachers 


College, which served as special representatives. 





‘Lost Alumni’ 


- 1939 - 
Edgerton Brockman Brace, B.A. 


- 1940 - 


Lawrence Archibald Hall, B.Sc. (Com.) 
Allan Callahan Kennedy, B.Sc. (Com.) 


- 1942 - 
Roderick Darrell Hayes, B.A. 


- 1944 - 
Harry Franzus Garfinkle, B.A. 
Sarah Rivelis, B.A. 

- 1946 - 


Feruccio Ariano, B.Sc. 
James H. Morrison, B.Sc. (Com.) 
Mrs. Mae Dorothea Prestwidge, B.A. 


- 1947 - 
Charles Alexander Forrest, B.Sc. 
Neville St. Claire Rose, B.A. 
Henrik Verdier, B.Sc. 


- 1948 - 


Ralph Arsenault, B.Sc. 
Morris John Brown, B.A. 
John Williams Drew, B.A. 
Gunther Ehrlich, B.Sc. 
Najeeb Said Shibley, B.Sc. 


s—40 


- 1949 - 
Kenneth Haldimand Barnard, B.Sc. 


- 1950 - 
Williams Hamilton Adcock, B.Com. 
Vernon Norman Bartlett, B.Sc. 
Robert David Baxter, B.Sc. 
Robert Chorley Lancaster, B.Com. 


- 1951 - 
Jack Abrams, B.Sc. 
Donald George Ballantyne, B.Sc. 
John Angus Cameron, B.Sc. 
Estelle Leibovitch, B.C. 
Peter Nesfield F. Nixon, B.Com. 
Ava Singer, B.A. 


- 1952 - 
Jean Joseph Brunet, B.Com. 
William Garfield MacKay, B.Sc. 
Donald Joseph Murray, B.Sc. 
Robert H. Nabours, B.Sc. 


- 1953 - 
William Miller, B.A. 
Talbot Osward Paul, B.Sc. 
Mrs. Margaret Wooley, B.A. 


- 1954 - 
William John A. Bishopric, B.A. 
Raymond Charles Walker, B.A. 


s—3 





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s—4 5 The Postgrad 


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Easter 1955 





Pasigrad Patter 


Plaudits To People . . . Congrats to Dave Zacharin and his committee for the 
job they did on the récent Grad Fund booklets which were mailed out to all 
alumni members. Now you know what we’re “aiming at,” and now all we have to 
do is wait for those contributions to start pouring in. Your help is badly needed 
and remember your donation can be deducted from your income tax . . . Dick 
Macdonald doing a great job with his preparations for the “social event of the 
season” on April Ist to be held in the Champlain Room of the Mount Royal Hotel. 
The dance, with a floor show thrown in for good measure, shapes up as the biggest 
“do” in alumni history with more than 250 couples expected. It’s going to be a 
great chance for graduates to renew old acquaintances. We won't tell you any more 
now, but you'll be hearing from Dick before very long. Keep that date in mind... 


All About People . . . Victor Horowitz, B.Sc. 47, B.A. ’48, has been granted his 
Ph.D degree in the field of guidance and counselling at Michigan State University. 
He’s also a member of the university’s staff and on their board of examiners. . . 
Millicent Wells, a 51 grad, awarded a Master of Science (Library Science) from 
Syracuse University — that was in August, but good news in this case travels slow. . . 
Dave Flanagan, class of ’52, has his B.A. with honors in history from the University 
of Dublin... Fred: Hubscher, B.A. ’48, now associated with a Montreal law firm 
after receiving his Doctorate in Laws in France and England —he was formerly 
government attorney with the departments of defence production, national defence 
and external affairs in Ottawa — he’s living at 5245 Cote St. Luc road... Jerry 
Sinel down in Miami for a stretch but reported back that the weather was cool — 
we noted that he got a tan anyway... 


You'll be hearing from Social Chairman Dick MacDonald soon... 


Add More People . . . Jim Bornstein married to Mitzie Stattner at the Temple 
Emanu-El in Montreal .. . Pete Dorman, we used to call him “Moose”, to middle- 
aisle it in March with Doreen Snyder out St. Lambert way... Congratulations to 


Pat Judge — he’s to be ordained May 19. . . Did you know that Joey Pal of Les 
Alouettes is a student at the college? — he was given a silver tray by the boys in 
recognition of his great season on the gridiron . . . Barbara Ann Burnside, class of 
°54, married to Donald Marsden in December at the bride’s home in Madoc, Ont. — 
Ted Edmonds, of last year’s class, was the best man . . . Fred Walker Jr. married 
to Barbara Eve Heselton, of England, in St. Peter’s Church, Town of Mount Royal 
... The Braithwaites now three — Nancy, Laurie and Vicki, two months. . . 


All About Us... Another milestone in the college’s history was marked recently 
with the graduation of Henry Williams, B.Sc. ’54 — has was Grad No. 2,000. Dean 
Hall reports the total now stands at 2,113 . . . This year’s convocation to be held 
on Friday, June 3 with the annual grad reception to follow in the Mount Royal 
Hotel — you'll hear more about that from your social committee . . . Joan Codere 
and Emmett Martin planning their wedding in April — Joan will be remembered 
from her girls basketball days . . . Gerald Schwartz and Gloria Blutstein engaged 
... Our ex-president Gord Donaldson recipient of gift for his fine work with the 
alumni — It couldn’t happen to a better guy . . . Jean Des Rosiers, well-known- 
man-about-the-corridors during his days at college, married to Micheline Valois 
on Feb. 5 — best wishes to you both .. . 


Alumni Dance and Floor Show — April 1—It’s A Must... 
(Continued on page s—8) 
s—6 The Postgrad 


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Easter 1955 s—7 


Postgrad Patter... 
(Continued from page s—6) 

And from our roving reporter. Ken MacKeracher, here’s what’s happened to the 
college’s newest grads ... McGill has claimed members of the Class of ’54 in various 
ways . . . Don Ayre class veep taking a history post-grad there with the aim of 
returning to Sir George on the staff . . . Tony Lugar in experimental psychology 
up there, and intends to tie the knot this summer with Rex Moore of Halifax... 
Silvia Vogel is busy running seminars for McGill undergraduates in sociology while 
the School of Social Work has claimed Bon Lazanik of the University Settlement, 
Marjorie Bedoukian, Gloria Miller, Ken MacKeracher, Connie Anastassidis and 
Rod Manson of the Catholic Boys Services . . . Caryl Gatehouse, class co-secretary, 
has returned from a tour of Europe and is now bunking with former Winter Carnival 
Queen Dorothy Martin at MacDonald. 


Ken Goes In . . . The divinity schools are trying to reform some of the boys... . 
among them are Class Valedictorian Rod Booth recently back from the continent, 
Howie Fraser of woodchopping fame, George Allan, Gord McWillie, Al Duncan, 
and Arch McCurdy who spent the summer as an army padre . . . Pat Caplan, 
Annual co-editor, writes The Georgian from England these days . . . Herb Vool, 
her partner in crime is at present a man of leisure . . . Did you notice that this 
year’s annual is dedicated to Mr. Clarke — there couldn’t have been a better 
choice . . . Hugh Kirby, he grew a beard just for his grad picture . . . is doing 
post-grad psychology at Toronto while Norm Hefler is at the School of Social 
Work there — Norm married his Katie this spring... 


Bill Leet and Ted Small are both with the Guardian Trust and rumor has it 
that Bill intends to tie the knot with Norma McKenzie this Sept. . . . Bob Fraser 
is still peddling his ‘johnie’ mops with the hope of wedding Ann Bowie this summer 
... Bill “Calypso” Fergus has been accepted in medicine in the British West Indies... 
The ‘Y’ has claimed Doug Allan now a community boys work secretary in Winnipeg 
and Tony Lugar and Buz Bezanson are with the ‘Y’ here in town. . . Tony is at 
Central and Buz at Verdun . . . Chuck “Drums” Griffiths, Gil Playfair and former 
classmate Jim Mair all married now and with the Toronto ‘Y’. Edna just about 
washed away Chuck’s building in Etobicoke... 


Keep this date open — Friday, April 1st... 


And On... Bob Pringle recently married Down Leidstone and at present with 
Canada Packers .. . Barry Holt busy at the Bell . . . Dick Cormier up to his usual 
tricks and with Cockfield Brown... Last reports are that Dave McCredy is playing 
hockey — did anyone expect anything else... Lorne “Arch” Ingham former Athletic 
treasurer working on his C.A. and with Sharp-Millen . . . Howie Easton very 
pleased with his job in the C.N.R. ...They finally gave Geoff Turner a car to drive 
instead of car tickets . . . Nancy Beveridge is still at the college with the hope of 
breaking into the business world in the spring. Ask her about the summer she 
spent — eh Chiefy . . . Bob Swail is back from his army station in Germany and 
should have a few tales to tell . . . He joins Fred Harford, John Hall and Dave 
Brown in the world of finance . . . Guy “50 million Frenchmen can’t be wrong” 
Gagnon writes from Columbia — says its the greatest thing since his ulcer . . . 
Al Hudon breaking the ground for future Georgians at Babson Institute . . . Frank 
Sumeraj Milhalovic recently planned marriage and was given the stag to end all 
stags we hear . . . Rick Curry in business but finding time to coach his freshman 
brother Dave . . . Andy Lizzott is off to Chicago for a company training plan — 
watch that boy go places... 


More of °54 ... Sir George ’54 has added John Kosorwich, Gerald Ellis, David 
Toye, and Hugh Tolan to the McGill Law School . . . Jim Clinton and Sam 
Dworkin are working toward that coveted C.A. . . . George Stead is with Simpson’s 


(Continued on page s—1!1) 


s—8 The Postgrad 


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s—10 The Postgrad 


Postgrad Patter... 
(Continued from page s—8) 


Sears in Montreal... Ron Boulainne studying to be a teacher at the Jacques Normal 
School . . . Emily Clyke teaching at the School for Retarded Children. Barbara 
Burnside reported very happy with John Price Jones Company . . . Jacques Cloutier 
in the rubber and plastics division of Northern Electric . . . John Berthoia and 
Carol McCallum, both ’54 grads, looking at trousseaus in preparation for the big 
day. John is with the Steel Company of Canada and Carol with the Bell . . . That’s 
all for now, see you next time—Ken. 


You’ve got a date — April 1 at the Mount Royal Hotel... 


Herb Jackson in Saskatoon, happy to report another son, Tommy . . . Ronnie 
Edwards spent a few hours in Montreal when his plane was grounded, he was on his 
way to Galt, Ont. from Moncton. Ron can be seen on Moncton T.V. Station repre- 
senting ‘Y’ sports . . . A recent Hi-Y Conference in St. John, N.B. had four Sir 
George Grads as leaders — Bob Butler, Doug Flower, George Sinclair and Ron 
Edwards... Gord Clark has transferred from the Sydney, N.S. Y.M.C.A. to Toronto 
Central Branch... Lloyd Ring and his wife, off to Paris this summer for the 
International ‘Y’ Conference... 


Bernice and Clint Robertson welcomed their second addition to the family — a 
boy . . . Midge and Stan Holmes — their first — also a boy... Herb and Olive 
(Dinsdale) Shannon expecting the stork sometime in April . . . Dick Thompson 


transferred from Brantford to Ottawa with the Industrial Acceptance Corp. .. . 
Gord McFarlane re-named executive assistant with the Montreal Parks and Play- 
grounds Assoc. . . . Our deepest sympathies to Al Clark who lost his mother in 
February... Pat Smith, class of 53, married to Jim Walker in March... Barbara 
Horsburgh and Don Richardson to middle-aisle on April 2... Keith and Marilyn 
Wray proud parents of two girls... Two of Mr. Worrell’s secretaries, Eleanor Grant 
and Carol Smith, sporting engagement rings — Eleanor to marry Bill Shaver in 
October and Carol to Philip Smith in May... By the way Henry and Thora 
(Lewis) Worrell infanticipating in May... 


Art Jordan now Executive Secretary of North Toronto Y.M.C.A. . . . John 
Patterson back in Montreal with the Steel Company of Canada after spending two 
years in the Maritimes as salesman for them . . . Miss Sybil Ross completed her M.A. 
at Columbia University last summer and is now Secretary of the Group Work Section 
of the Montreal Council of Social Agencies . .. Sandy Kier, the new Physical Director 
of Central Y.M.C.A., who has been playing outstanding basketball for the Georgians, 
is a graduate of George Williams College in Chicago... Ed Lee is now with Shell 
Oil and the Commanding Officer of Sir George’s C.O.T.C. . . . Kayo Weightman 
is head “ink mixer” with the Levy Ink Co. Ltd. . . . Bill Wright Class of *50 with 
Canada Copper... 


Two film nights planned for April 2 and 16, featuring Story of Emile Zola and 
All Quiet on the Western Front respectively — they'll be held in the Willingdon 


Room at 7.30 p.m. — for only 10 cents — it’s all the work of our social committee... 
This year’s college winter carnival a tremendous success and the queen was really 
“a queen”... Congrats to Dave M. Brown, now with the public relations dept. at 


Northern Electric, who recently tied the knot with Irene Hyer — both were familar 
faces around the college. They'll be living in Ville St. Laurent... Margaret Webb, 
B.A. ’42, Canadian editor for Groller Publishing House in New York... John “The 
Lawyer” Hannan and Bunty MacEwan engaged . .. Thomas Q. Hecht off on another 
junket to Europe — back in the Spring... A daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Cyril 
Berman — she was the former Edith Weiser — they’ve named her Felice Marla... 


Watch for further news on that cabaret dance — it’s on April1... 


(Continued on page s—13) 


Easter 1955 s—I1 


Degrees Granted 


To 68 Georgians 


R. K. E. NORRIS, principal of 

the college announced in January 
that degrees have been granted to the 
following 68 persons who will be suitably 
recognized at the convocation exercices 
to be held in the early spring: 

Associate in Commerce: K. J. Fellows 
and K. J. Petruch. 

Associate in Science: M. Yuhasz. 

Bachelor of Commerce: D. N. Char- 
ness, J. A. M. Derenne, J. P. Dufour, 
S. Erdile, M. Friedman, E. M. Hahn, 
L. E. B. Harvey, P. G. J. Johnston, R. E. 
Nauss, M. Plawiuk, O. Revenko, B. W. 
Robertson, J. E. Robidoux, G. H. Ste- 
vens, and D. A. Williams. 

Bachelor of Science: E. E. Beamish, 
J. L. Bertoia, G. M. Furuya, J. Gordon, 
J. L. Hall, C. S. Harris, K. V. Lapinas, 
R. A. Lapinas, A. S. MacLean, J. 
N. McTear, J. M. Merakian, D. J. 
Mondor, B.A.; M. Muller, T. Oike, 
C. Pinsky, K. F. Robertson, S. Sved, 
J. T. Tittel, John A. Weary, Mrs. M. G. 
Vogel, R. J. Wekselman and G. L. A. 


Wilkinson. 

Bachelor of Arts: Miss Mary H. 
Angelakis, Miss T. I. Auf der Maur, 
G. F. Bissett, Miss Ilse-Marie F. Brink, 
D. McK. Brown, B. Com., Miss J. P. 
Caplan, M. Coviensky, Miss B. M. De 
St. Croix, I. I. Finkelberg, Miss E. M. 
R. Goulet, D. M. Harris, I. W. HayGlass, 
A. Hudon, B. Com., Miss M. C. Knox, 
W. M. K. McGurk, P. A. Mondor, T. A. 
M. Moorhouse, Mrs. G. Pilkington, Mrs. 
F. Pomp, G. Porges, Miss E. C. Put, 
T. G. Sampson, M. Shrier, O. P. Sykora, 
Jr., Keith M. White, BSc. 


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s—12 


The Postgrad 


Postgrad Patter... 
(Continued from page s—11) 


Find the mistake on the back cover of the grad fund booklet you got?... Our 
sympathies to Clinton H. Davis, B.Sc. ’37, who.lost his wife in November... Also 
to the family of Mrs. James W. Ogilvy, the former Georgina Kathryn Martin, who 
graduated in 1942, on her sudden death ... Bill Williamson asks to be remembered 
to Dean Hall and Mr. Patterson — He’s credit manager for Simpsons-Sears in 
Sudbury and Mr. and Mrs. are expecting an addition to the family come September 
next... Jane Hammond, our favorite reporter, now on the women’s dept. of The 
Star from the social page... Aside to Shirley Pope: Sorry we couldn’t get together 
on your recent trip to Montreal... Bill Watson and Fay Bartlett married in Trinity 
Memorial Church... 


Lots of Names .. . Our hats are off to you fellows who passed their final C.A. 
exams, particularly Henry Galler, who was second in the class and was awarded 
the Lieutenant Governor’s Silver Medal, the Institute Prize for 2nd highest standing 
and Students’ Society prize for highest marks in auditing — others deserving of 
praise are: Albert Ferrari, Maurice Gold, Jacob Grey, John Mortimer Grogan, 
Ove Billeskov Jansen, Walter McPherson, Leonard Rosenberg — alumni prez — 
and Victor Morton — Sir George education pays off again!... Where are all our 
teachers? — Bob Overing is at Macdonald High, Lou Rosseart — Beaconsfield, 
Trevor Phillips — St. Eustache High, Tod Andrews — Valleyfield, Steve Montague 
— Chambly County, Ruth Johns — Lakeside Heights, and Gerald Miller — 


Summerlea. 
Your night to howl — Mount Royal Hotel — April 1... 


To Those Who Volunteered for Postgrad Work . . . We’re sorry we haven't got 
in touch with you since that alumni meeting in November — but believe us, we 
haven’t forgotten you. The thing is it’s practically impossible to arrange a time 
for a meeting. Now we ask you to just dig up anything of interest which you think 
this mag could use and ship it in to us. If you just keep your eyes end ears open 
there’s a wealth of news of interest to grads all around you. — So to Gyles D’Artois, 
Muriel Gold, Fred Harford, Gord McFarlane and Ken MacKeracher our thanks 
and let’s hear from you... 


Alumni Secretary Joyce Beddows to become Mrs. Ian Paterson as of May 21 
in the Church of St. Columba — they'll live in Ottawa — a long way from the 
alumni office — No more ‘Lost Alumni’ eh, Joyce . . . Bob Pallen at the University 
of Western Ontario awarded a $900 fellowship frim CIL . . . Bob Kouri elected 
a board member at the 7th annual meeting of the Rosemount ’Y’ — still don’t 
know how he does all he does . .. Emma Holic copped the city title with her Unity 
Boys Club junior girls basketball team — she explains her’s was the only squad in 
the loop — it doesn’t explain anything to us... Grads R. B. Burnell and L. Humber, 
both Sc. 53, working towards their doctor of philosophy degrees in chemistry at 
the U. of N.B.... Frank Burton, B.A. ’51, now a senior student at the Diocesan 
Theological College and expects to graduate with B.D. degree in the Spring — last 
summer he served at the Indian Mission at Shanattawa, Manitoba... 


We want to see ya on April 1 at the dance of the year... 


Ben Schlesinger in Toronto reports... Says he met John Goldenberg in Haiti... 
Gerry Bloom, B.A. 52, working on master’s thesis in psychology . . . Charles Clark, 
class of ’51, master’s grad in history there... Bill Johnstone and Art Jordan with 
the ’Y’... Dr. Roby Kidd heads the Canadian Association for Adult Education .. . 
Freddie Kirkwood — a popular fellow, especially in a certain frat house... Sara 
Lesser still in Japan with the Red Cross, but expected home soon . . . Reg Smith, 
B.A. ’52, pretty proud of his young offspring . . . Ben also reports “no real chapter 


(Continued on page s—1!4) 


Easter 1955 s—13 


Postgrad Patter... 
(Continued from page s—1]3) 


of alumni there — what about it George Barker” . . . Couldn’t read some of those 
names, Ben — How about a typewriter next time . . . Our hats are off also to 
co-editors Herb Vool and Pat Caplan for their Corridors ’54, the college annual — 
the best in some years — at least since we put it out — Those kind words from 
Dean Hall on The Postgrad were much appreciated . . . Have you filled out and 
returned that social questionnaire sent to you, if not, doit now... 


Edward Dewath would like to hear from fellow grads — now a project engineer 
with the Fluor Corp. Ltd. in sunny California — his address is 3209 Palo Verde ave., 
Long Beach, 8 . . . 49 grad Gordon Henry chairman of the international division 
of ‘Y’ maintenance campaign — he’s at Charles E. Frosst and Co. . . . Dean Hall 
named vice-president of the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada, Montreal Centre 
_.. Nice to hear from Stan Matthews, ex-Postgrad editor — now director of public 
relations and assistant to the secretary of the Ohio Council of Churches in Columbus 
— he’s going to be kept busy editing the Council’s Ohio Christian News and dealing 
with newspapers, TV and radio stations throughout the state — his new address 
is 536 Richards road, Columbus . . . Mickey McFall, B.Com. ..49, father of two 
girls, 9 and 2 years .. . John A. Howell, B.Sc. ’53, back in town from the Windy 
City... 

; ... Stop The Press . . . Gerry Miller of the alumni social committee tells 
us the April Ist dance at the Mount Royal Hotel will be held in the ballroom on the 
ninth floor, instead of the Champlain Room as planned — the reason: It wiil 
accommodate the 250 couples expected and there’ll be more room to stage the two 
floor shows — complete with a chorus line — see you there. . . 





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s—l4 The Postgrad 


FINANCIAL PLIGHT OF 
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES 


HAT IS the solution to the finan- 

cial plight of Canadian universi- 
ties? Here are comments by two men 
prominent in the field of Canadian uni- 
versity education. These statements ap- 
peared in the December 18, 1954 “issue 
of “The Financial Post” and we believe 
they will be of interest to all those- who 
are close to this field—The Editor. 


Dr. R. C. WALLACE, former prin- 
cipal, Queen’s University: “The situa- 
tion calls for additional scholarship as- 
sistance as well. as additional grants to 
the universities. For more students do not 
enrich — they impoverish — university 
exchequers. 

“There has been an encouraging rise 
in the quality of students entering gov- 
ernment research—defense and industrial 
— in recent years. The numbers are not 
increasing to the extent that is desirable 


and necessary. 

“Tt will be wiser policy to strengthen 
our existing universities than to create 
new centres, for quality will be maintain- 
ed at a higher level and the cost will be 
less. So much depends on the ability of 
the staff. As a rule — to which there are 
marked exceptions — the ablest men are 
to be found in the old established institu- 
tions. 

“The whole responsibility does not 
rest on government. The time has come 
when industry should do much more to 
support our universities. Their success 
depends ultimately on the quality of the 
men that they can employ. That, in 
turn, depends on the universities. For- 
tunately, industry is beginning to realize 
this inescapable fact — but only just 
beginning. Here too ad hoc scholarships 





(Continued on page s-16) 








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Easter 1955 


s—I5 


Financial Plight... 
(Continued from page s-15) 


are not enough. There is need for direct 
and unrestricted support to the uni- 
versities. 

“It would be unfortunate if it were 
felt that more and better trained re- 
search scientists would, alone, meet the 
situation. The times call for able men, 
disciplined in the humane cultures, who 
will give wisdom and insight in our 
critical times. These, too, the universities 
must supply, for in the long run they may 
prove to be as significant as, and probably 
more influential than, the specialists in 
science. I do not think that the univer- 
sities are likely to overlook this act.” 


Dr. F. CYRIL JAMES, principal, 
McGill University: “With your insistence 
that Canada and its universities should 
do more to understand the mentality of 
Russia, both through a knowledge of its 
language and the regular reading of its 
publications, I wholeheartedly agree. I 
also think that your emphasis on the fact 
that proportionately twice as many young 
men and women attend university in 
Russia as is the case in Canada, is 
striking. 

“You realize already that, both per- 
sonally and officially, I am deeply aware 
of the, fact that Canadian universities 
need vastly larger resources in order to 
be able to undertake effectively the 
work that they would like to do, but 
I do not think that this problem can be 
completely solved by the creation of 
additional scholarships. 


“Scholarships are essential 
there are many young Canadians of 
outstanding ability who are prevented 
from attending university by conditions 
of family finance, but even if every 
bright lad or lass received a scholarship 
to enable him to attend university, the 
universities of Canada would still be 
financially embarrassed in view of the 
fact that fees pay only a part of the 
cost of education. If government aid 
was to be provided for universities along 
the lines that you suggest, it would be 
necessary as was the case with the D.V.A. 
scheme immediately after the war, for 
each scholarship to carry with it the 
payment to the university attended by 
the student of a supplementary grant.” 


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The Postgrad 


Central ‘Y°’ Changes 
To Tie-in With 
New College Plan 


N INCREASE in membership and 

much greater attendance at all 
activities, and an announcement of pro- 
‘posed alterations, were the highlights of 
reports submitted at the 49th Annual 
Meeting of the Central YMCA, held 
recently in Budge Hall. 


A. W. Kemball, executive secretary 
of the branch, in his report said “The 
end product of our work is people. The 
quality of our work with people will 
determine how nearly we approach the 
attainment of our goal as stated in the 
purpose of the YMCA: The Young 
Men’s Christian Association we regard 
as being in its essential genius, a world 
wide fellowship of persons, united in 
common loyalty to Jesus Christ for the 
purpose of developing Christian person- 
ality and building a Christian society.” 


The executive secretary said the chapel 
was opened daily for meditation. In 
advance of the Lenten season the Y.M. 
C.A. booklet ‘‘Fellowship of Prayer” was 
distributed, as were copies of the Y.M. 
C.A.—Y.W.C.A. Week of Prayer book- 
lets. During the Week of Prayer Dr. D. 
J. Wilson and the late Dr. F. C. Woodley 
conducted worship services in the Chapel. 


He said that the triangle of the Y.M. 
C.A. has meant warm friendships, guid- 
ance and aid in emergencies throughout 
the world, for many years. This is the 
World Service program of the ‘Y’. 
Secretaries now work in 77 countries, 
training and teaching leaders in the 
principles of the Christian and demo- 
cratic way of life. 


Mr. Kemball noted that there had 
been a considerable increase in the use 
of the Central library by the boys and 
resident members. 


W. A. Pritchard, chairman of the 
board of management extended sincere 
thanks to board members, committee 
members, leaders and staff, all of whom 
he stated, have assisted in making pos- 


Easter 1955 


sible “this practical Christian Service to 
the people who have been served during 
the year.” 


The financial statement showed an 
income of $103,048.54, with expenditures 
of $151,387.68. Excess of expense over 
receipts was $48,339.14. The allocation 
to Central Branch from the Annual 
Finance Campaign was $46,283.00, leav- 
ing an operating deficit of $2,056.41. 


Announcement was made that after 
much study and consultation plans were 
now completed for the renovation and 
alteration of Central branch facilities. 
Anticipating the completion of the new 
Sir George Williams College building, 
and recognizing that there would still 
be great use made by Sir George students 
of the Central ‘Y’ facilities, also recog- 
nizing the necessity of tying in Central 
renovations with the erection of the new 
building, it was felt that this spring a 
start could be made on necessary altera- 
tions to the branch, which will include 
a complete renovation and re-arrange- 
ment of the physical department facilities 
to provide more adequate locker room 
and exercise space, in addition two new 
handball courts will be added. The main 
lobby will disappear, with structural 
changes being made to provide direct 
entrance to the building from Drum- 
mond Street, new members lounge and 
an enlarged table tennis space, with 
re-arranged reception area. 


It was also announced that special 
plans would be made to celebrate the 
50th anniversary of the Central Branch. 


Program statistics indicated there had 
been greatly increased activity in all 
departments. In the Youth Division the 
development of the HI-Y and N-Y clubs 
in suburban areas was noted as a forward 
step. 


Named to the board of management 
were: J. B. Angevine, G. D. Birks, L. 
Bray, F. E. H. Gates, H. L. Lee, C. D. 
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Richards, Dr. C. H. Skitch, C. A. Smith, 
R. S. Sneyd, A. R. Tunis, Dr. D. J. 
Wilson. 


s—I7 


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s—I8 The Postgrad 


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21 


Ss 


Easter 1955 


The Postgrad 


20 


Ss 


IT’S FOR YOU 


A LETTER FROM DAVE 


Association of Alumni 
February 25, 1955. 


Dear Grad: 


A folder has already informed you, as members of the Association of Alumni, 
that the Sir George Williams College Grad Fund is being reactivated now that the 
main Building Fund Campaign is past. The aims of the Grad Fund are: 


1. To aid the Administrative Officers in financing out of the ordinary expenses. 


2. To permit your Association of Alumni Executive and Chairmen of Activities 
to plan a fuller and more varied social and educational program for the year. 


No limits, either maximum or minimum, have been set so that each individual 
may set his own. Individuals contributing $100 or more will certainly be welcome, 
but let this not deter those of you who, though your spirit suggests $100 cannot feel 
free to contribute more than five or ten dollars at this time. All contributions will 
be welcome and as there is still an outstanding objective of $3000,000 required to 
complete the Building Fund, in remitting, please specify how you wish the money 
to be divided between the Grad Fund and the Building Fund. 


A dream is finally being fulfilled. More space and time is being allotted to your 
College in the daily papers, on the radio, and on television. Work is progressing on 
a building distinct from our parent institution, the Central YMCA. Plans ade being 
formulated for a more varied and extensive social and educational program for 
members of the Association of Alumni for the coming year. About this last point, 
you will be hearing more later. But remember that with accomplishment, indepen- 
dence and pride, goes responsibility as well. We can show that we remember our 
responsibility by contributing as generously as we know how to the GEORGIAN 
GRAD FUND and the BUILDING FUND. 


Let the postman be your canvasser. Send in your donation NOW. Make cheques 
payable to Sir George Williams College (Grad Fund) and mail to Association of 
Alumni, 1441 Drummond Street, Montreal. 


With thanks. 
Sincerely, 
DAVE ZACHARIN, 
Chairman, 
Grad Fund Committee 





TRADE MARK REGISTERED U.S. PAT. OFF, 


CORRECTS ACOUSTICS — 


ADDS TO THE APPEARANCE 
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s—22 The Postgrad 


SECOND VISIT: 


GEORGIANS PLAY HOST | 
TO AMERICANS AGAIN 


HIRTY-THREE American exchange students left for home this month with 
the feeling that Montreal is a wonderful place to visit. 


Petite Patricia Devine, a student at the University of Rochester and a member 
of the group brought here by the undergraduate society of Sir George, expressed 
the sentiments of all the visitors when she said: ‘“‘We have had a wonderful time. 
We thank you from the bottom of our hearts.” 


The last event of the crowded schedule was a “‘Canadian evening” at Oka, 
where the students were treated to outdoor games, barn dancing and a hayride. 


The visiting students from seven New York state colleges visited around the city, 
attended lectures and went to Ottawa to visit the Parliament Buildings. 


Ronald Cline, a sophomore at Union College, Schenectady, New York, said: 
“It has been a wonderful experience for me and I would not have missed it for the 
world. During my visit here I have seen and heard many wonderful things about 
your country and I have gained valuable knowledge. 


“T find that Montreal is really a wonderful place to be,” he added. “T’ll take 
it over New York any time. There you’re just another person walking around. Here 
everybody welcomes you with open arms and does everything possible to make you 
feel at home.” 

“IT know I speak for my fellow students as well when I say that I was thrilled 
by the beauty of your Parliament Buildings in Ottawa,” he said. 


Cline said that at first he found Montreal traffic was quite hectic “but I am 
getting used to it by now. I guess it’s no worse than any other city of the size.” 












it’s from Birks 
means so much to the recipient of a gift 
in the famous Blue Box. 


For four generations, the gift in the Birks Blue 
Box has been given with pride ... received with 


pleasure. 
Birks Diamonds— Challenger Watches 
English Bone China—English Leather B | R K S 
Birks Sterling—Regency Plate. ta sd EPs 





Easter 1955 s—23 


A WHEELCHAIR IN FLORIDA 


or 


YOU BET YOUR LIFE 


by BERNARD DUBE 


ONG automobile trips should be 

taken in small doses in order to 
absorb at least a little of what you see 
and feel that is new. My trip to Florida 
during my holiday was completed a little 
faster than I would have hoped and it 
was only a month afterward that I was 
able to pick out of the blur of my 
experiences certain scenes and events 
that are worth remembering. 


Longer and more eventful automobile 
trips have been taken by members of 
that hearty band of hand-control drivers 
who dash about the continent. But my 
little 4,500 mile ride meant a lot to me 
and I’m still trying to pay it off. 


To begin with, I suddenly awoke last 
summer to the realization that since I 
would never finish paying for my con- 
servative green sedan anymay, I might 
as well never finish paying for a flashier 
model. So I traded the sedan for a plush 
cream coloured convertible with green 
leather upholstery, with the idea that 
one should go to the poorhouse as com- 
fortably and dashingly as possible. 


Thus equipped, and with my vacation 
pay in loose change in my watch pocket, 
I set out on August 22nd accompanied 
by a fellow worker at the Montreal 
Gazette, named Russell (Tiger) Gilliece. 
Mr, Gilliece does not own a wheelchair, 
has no particular use for one, preferring 
to get about the old-fashioned way, 





THE WRITER 


Bernie will be remembered for the 
traffic jams he caused along the college’s 
corridors during his days at Sir George. 
A member of “The Georgian” Staff, he 
was in irregular attendance at classes 
during 1949-50-51. He is now author of 
a column in the Montreal Gazette — 
TViewing with Bernard Dube. 


s—24 


without the least concern for the wear 
and tear on his feet. 


He is also a very good newspaperman 
with a great fund of stories, but he has 
never been interested enough to learn 
how to drive a car. So... between us 
we had one driver, six sport shirts, a 
wheelchair, a tie, eight beer can openers, 
three pairs of sun glasses, a gasoline 
credit card, a deck of cards and the 
morning paper. 

We got away around 11 a.m. which, 
considering the manner in which we 
celebrated our going-away the night 
before, was pretty good. We took the 
shortest route to New York, were waved 
through the U.S. customs without my 
having to get out of the car, and found 
ourselves late that night in a dirty motel, 
of uncertain reputation, somewhere in 
New Jersey. 

That night, spent uncomfortably in the 
cramped quarters of that dirty motel, 
with both of us in irritable moods, in 
beds two feet apart, taught me lesson 
number one of that very educational trip. 


After putting up with each other for 
12 hours of hard driving, two travellers 
should allow themselves the luxury of 
sleeping in separate rooms, and should 
not wait until late at night to look for 
motels. 

Afterwards, things went more smooth- 
ly. We made it a practice of stopping 
when it got dark and spending a little 
time looking for decent motels. At the 
time we were travelling it was between 
seasons and we found the welcome mat 
spread out for us, wheelchair and all, 
wherever we stopped. Prices were rea- 
sonable. We paid from $3.00 to $4.50 
each for individual motel rooms, equip- 
ped with air conditioning systems, tile 
bathrooms, plush rugs and ice water. 

I never thought I would welcome ice 
water so much in my life. If you want to 


The Postgrad 


be hospitable “down south” — meaning 
south of the state of Delaware, you greet 
visitors with a pitcher of ice water. Man! 
It gets hot down there. And that is lesson 
number two. 


If you travel south in the warm 
seasons, be sure to bring along a water 
container and keep it filled always. We 
wasted hours stopping every 60 miles or 
so to quench our thirst with various 
Yankee beers (pale, anaemic stuff beside 
ours) and soft drinks and fruit juices 
but were always left a little thirsty. We 
got water when we stopped for meals 
but I refused to get out every hour to 
mooch a glass of water in restaurants 
and, quite understandably, restaurants 
do not supply pitchers of water to be 
taken out to cars. 


I suffered most from thirst on the way 
back. We passed through Richmond, 
Virginia, when the temperature reached 
a record of 103 degrees. At one place 
we stopped, I drank four paper cups of 
grape juice and two soft drinks and I was 
still thirsty. A little further on, we got 
water, finally, and then I was all right 
for the rest of the day even though the 
sun slanted down harshly on the open 
car. 


It’s a good idea, too, to bring along a 
yard rule. Many modern motels have 
bathroom doors that are about one inch 
too narrow for wheelchairs. With a rule 
handy, you can get the motel manager to 
measure the door and save your getting 
out of the car unnecessarily, if the door 
cannot accommodate a wheelchair. Mo- 
tel managers have seen wheelchairs before 
and, if not, they are an adaptable bunch 
and you'll find them understanding and 
helpful. Don’t be afraid to trouble them 
or to move to another motel if the 
accommodations don’t suit you. You’re 
the customer and you must please your- 
self first. And the rest of a night spent in 
a suitable motel more than makes up for 
the trouble you take. 


On the way to Miami, we averaged 
400 miles a day, under a warm, late 
summer sun that gave us each a good 
tan by the time we reached our destina- 
tion. The ride down along the coast 
takes you through wonderful country 
that runs back green and rich from the 


Easter 1955 _ 


wide, smooth highways. Excepting the 
state of Georgia where the roads were in 
decrepit condition, somewhat resembling 
Quebec’s back roads, we rode on flat 
and smoothly curved highways with 
speed limits of 55 and 60 m.p.h., and no 
one will trouble you if you hit 65 or 70 
on open stretches. (We did a little better 
than that, but don’t tell anybody). 


Food in U.S. restaurants is a little more 
expensive than in Canada but there’s a 
wonderful variety (most states have 
their specialties) and you can’t go 
wrong if you stop at roadside inns or 
restaurants catering to truck drivers. 


After four and a half days on the road, 
and one flat tire, we pulled into Miami 
Beach a little road-weary but eager. 


Russ and I each took separate motels, 
a few miles from each other, and went 
our separate ways. He just wanted to 
get some sun, some salt-water swimming 
and ogle the girls, while I had friends 
to see. 


We got together a couple of times 
with a third fellow who had driven down 
from Montreal, and played miniature 
golf, went to archery ranges and spent 
an afternoon deep-sea fishing. We were 
four on our deep-sea venture, the fourth 
member being a fair young lass. The 
afternoon at sea set us back $40 for the 
group, but was more than worth it. 


We had a thirty foot fishing yacht to 
ourselves. The captain and his assistant 
handled me and the wheelchair with ease 
and good humour. I had no trouble 
shifting from the wheelchair to one of the 
comfortable fishing chairs. A fishing rod 
fits snugly into a holder attached to the 
chair. You just hang onto the line and 
pray for luck. 


We were at sea, about six or seven 
miles off the sandy shore, from 1:00 to 
5:00 p.m., and came back with two 
dolphins and a kingfish. We had struck 
a bad day, fish-wise, and the captain 
seemed embarrassed. But we did come 
near hooking a long shark which kept 
circling the boat. I think we all enjoyed 
that outing most. I certainly did. We 
came off the boat regretting we had not 
planned to fish more. 

(Continued on page s-26) 


s—25 


A Wheelchair... 
(Continued from page s-25) 


I changed motels twice in the Miami ° 


area, spending three days in Miami 
Beach and then crossing over to spend 
seven days on the outskirts of Miami 
proper. Motels in the Miami area come 
a little steeper, averaging $5.00 to $6.00 
for single occupancy. 

The service is impeccable. Maids clean 
up after you go out and you come back 
at night to a fresh, clean room. Most 
motels also have a pool and various lawn 
games to while away time and energy 
between meals. 


I stayed alone because I wanted to 
see how I would make out by myself. 
I think everyone in a wheelchair, if he 
possibly can, should do it once in a 
while. It’s a good feeling to know that 
you can make out by yourself, and it’s 
good for those close to you to know it too. 


Although I was alone in my motel, my 
holiday was by no means spent in 
solitude. I visited friends in the Miami 
area, went on picnics on the beaches, 
toured the Everglades National Park, 
inspected the monkey and snake exhibits, 
spent a couple of evenings testing tequila 
in Spanish-style cafes, and drove around 
town watching the show of _bare- 
shouldered damsels (secretaries from up 
north) and slicked up young tycoons 
(clerks from up north), shooting the 
bankrool on the annual fling. 


Miami Beach is a nest of hotels with 
more colours than a rainbow set shoulder 
to shoulder on a long strip of sand. It has 
an artificial but pleasant atmosphere of 
“shoot the works, you only live once.” 


The only black mark in my memory 
of Miami Beach is a night I almost spent 
marooned on a beach. I had a dinner 
invitation for seven o’clock and having 
nothing to do from 5:30 on, I drove onto 
the beach, put the top down and _ pro- 
ceeded to absorb the sun. A sudden 
torrential downpour softened the beach 
so that when I tried to move the car I 
sank in up to the axles. To make a long, 
sad story short, I phoned my apologies 
about 2:00 a.m. and didn’t exactly re- 
ceive an enthusiastic response. Which 
only goes to show that you can overdo 
this business of convincing people thai 
they don’t have to worry about you and 


.$—26 


International ‘Y°’ 
Branch Reports 


Year of Progress 


YEAR of progress has been re- 

ported by the International Branch 
of the Young Men’s Christian Associa- 
tion in Montreal. 

Highlights of the year were record 
attendance in English and French classes, 
successful participation in both the 
World Service and annual maintenance 
campaigns, and a record attendance in 
branch activities by all members. 

During 1954, the International ‘Y’ 
operated 236 different groups, which 
met 3,247 times with a total attendance 
of 55,380. 

The work at the branch is featured 
by emphasis on “citizenship” for New 
Canadians. Through various classes, im- 
migrants are given the opportunity of 
learning Canadian history, geography 
and government processes. Many mem- 
bers of the branch received Canadian 
citizenship last year. 

At the annual meeting, L. D. Howick, 
W. G. Lambert, L. D. Richardson, G. 
Spiliotopoulos and Eldon Wegg were 
named to the branch’s advisory board. 

Members of the board of management 
are Dr. J. S. Astbury, Miss Karen Bulow, 
D. G. Currie, R. J. Dawson, W. N. 
Fingland, George Grivakis, James Haw- 
kins, E. A. Headmanak, Gordon Henry, 
W. D. Howick, Alex. D. Kabbash, E. 
King, J. Knecht, Miss Trudy Kuhnert, 
Miss Ruth Low, George Nakash, F. W. 
Tetley, Erle Ulley (chairman), Ray 
Wade, L. A. Wilkinson, Gordon Yuen, 
Donald Drennan and Henry Myshak. 





that you’re perfectly capable of caring 
for yourself. 

Our funds were getting low, we had a 
good tan, and enough of Miami, so we 
headed back. We took only four days 
on the longer inland route, reaching 
Montreal late at night after I had driven 
550 miles on the last day. We didn’t rush 
back because we were homesick. But a 
Canadian can stand only so much of that 
stuff Americans call beer. (Written ori- 
ginally for “The Caliper,” Journal of 
The Canadian Paraplegic Association. ) 


The Postgrad 
\ 


\ 


WELLINGTON 7362 


PHILIP T. R. PUGSLEY, C.A. 
OF 
PAYNE, PATTON & PUGSLEY 
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 


1509 SHERBROOKE WEST -— MONTREAL 


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Branch: 4233 ST. DENIS ST., MONTREAL 


Cable Address: ‘'Fleural" 
Tel. HArbour 2266 
HUGESSEN, 
MACKLAIER, CHISHOLM, 
SMITH & DAVIS 


ADVOCATES - BARRISTERS 


507 Place d’Armes Montreal 





Easter 1955 












Compliments of 


Clinique St-Louis 


2150 SHERBROOKE ST. W., Apt. 2 MONTREAL 
WILBANK 3113 











SAY IT WITH FLOWERS 


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PARKING SERVICING 


—Since 1906— Res. HArbour 0825 


GEORGE J. MOORE REG’D 


Ammonia Refrigeration Service 


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3517 JEANNE MANCE ST. 


s—27 


MONTREAL =|} © 


ALUMNI MEETING 
BRINGS OUT 


RESIDENT LEN ROSENBERG 
told an alumni meeting in Novem- 
ber it was his hope that the association 
would start the new season “off with a 
bang.” More than 40 graduates attended. 


In his opening remarks Len pointed 
out that the association began back in 
1936 and now had a membership of 
about 2,000 graduates. He said that all 
graduates of the college are considered 
members of the alumni association upon 
graduation. 












Ken Campbell, representative to the 
board of governors, said the college 
building would be ready by 1956. He 
reported that the college building 
fund had not reached its objective of 
$3,300,000—only $2,988,879 has been 
collected. The association itself had 
achieved 125 per cent of their ob- 
jective. 


The purpose of the association, he 
explained, was two-fold — first, to allow 
the members to help each other and 
secondly, to help the college. He stressed 
that financial help from the association 
to the college was “most important”. 


Treasurer Alec Fineberg had some 
encouraging words for the members. In 
a short report he said the association 
was in “a good financial position”, with 
a bank balance of $1,100 — $500 of 
which was expendible. 

Alec also explained that there was 
also the sum of $200 in the bank which 
had been given by the Class of 751, 
which would be used to purchase new 
office equipment for the alumni office 
when it moves into the new college 
building. 

Bob Hayes, Postgrad Editor, stated 
that the Thanksgiving issue of the maga- 
zine was the largest to date. The Post- 
grad, he said, was making money, but 
not the association. It was pointed out, 
however, that any, profit made by the 
magazine was used by the association to 


s—28 


GOOD IDEAS 


meet their expenses or to sponsor any of 
its activities. 


Fred Harford presented a number of 
suggestions for improving the Postgrad, 
and it is hoped in future issues that 
some of them will be carried out. 


A suggestion by Donald Ayre that 
copies of the Postgrad be distributed 
among undergraduates of the college was 
well received. (Later that week more 
than 200 copies were placed in “Geor- 
gian” newsstands in the college and it 
hoped that this practice will be con- 
tinued. ) 


Don said the students should know 
that the Association of Alumni “does 
exist and they may be more interested 
in becoming active members upon grad- 
uation.” 

Herb Shannon suggested that The 
Postgrad be mailed to executive students 
in their senior year at the college, in 
order to stir up their interest in the 
association. 


Dave Zacharin, grad fund chairman, 
gave a brief history of the fund and 


















Nancy Beveridge put forth a perti- 
nent question at the meeting. 

She asked the association tf it spon- 
sored any scholarships among under- 
graduates in the college. The answer 
was no. However many of those at- 
tending seemed to think it was a 
good idea. It was agreed that the 
guestion would be discussed at a 
future meeting of the executive. 

We of The Postgrad sincerely hope 
something will be done here. 


announced that a printed folder will 
soon be going out to graduates to solicit 
badly-needed funds. 

Ken MacKeracher asked 
head “exactly what the fund is.” Dave 


the fund 


said the association was trying to “re- 
vive” regular contributions. Frank Stan- 


nard pointed out that if each grad 


The Postgrad 


would donate $3 the association would 
benefit by $6,000 annually. This, he 
said, would enable the association to 
sponsor scholarships and other benefits. 
Fred Harford said he was certain grad- 
uates “could give much more than they 
are giving.” 

The president said contributions 
during 1954 were “not worth mention- 
ing.” 

Dave Brown said that upon receiving 
his degree from the college, each grad- 
uate should be asked to contribute to 
the association. He felt that each 
graduate should donate $10 and _ that 
the personal approach was the best way 
of collecting the amount. He said he 
would like the “contribution” to be 
compulsory. 


Miss Phoebe Prowse suggested the 
graduates should be informed as to 
what their money was to be used for. 
She said a specific purpose should be 
decided upon and then the graduates 
asked for their contributions. 


Maurice Gold said he and Maurice 
Miller were anxious to form an ac- 
countants study group and urged that 
other grads interested contact the alumni 
office for further particulars. 

Mr. Gold told the president that one 
very important fact was that the group 
would endeavour to help students in 
the college. He said he hoped special 
lectures could be held. 

Gerald Miller said he knew teachers 
who were also interested in forming a 
study group, but knew of no specific 
leader. The president said it was hoped 
a meeting would be help among those 
anxious to form various study groups. 

It was urged that class reunions be 
held and those interested use the alumni 


facilities to organize their activities. (Due’ 


to space limitations in our Christmas 
issue we were unable.to print this report 
until now. Our apologies—The Editor.) 


SGWC IN 1931 


In 1931 Sir George Williams College 
had available 30 classrooms, two science 
laboratories, a science lecture room and 
a general lecture room, all with adequate 
lighting and ventilation. 


Easter 1955 








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Granite supplied 
for 
new addition of building 
by: 


SCOTSTOWN GRANITE 
co. LTD. 


Sub. P.O. Pont-Viau 
Montreal 9, P.Q. 
MO. 4-3521 





s—2?: 


“4 VOICE FROM THE PAST” 


(Submitted by Norman Manson, Class of '37) 


HE following letter, which was a family possession for some eighty years, bears 

so strongly on Canadian history, that I thought it would be of interest to the 
rest of you. In order that it might not be too tedious in its references, I have deleted 
such passages as had no bearing on the events on which it dwells. In its shortened 
form, it represents an actual eye-witness account of the riots which rocked Montreal 
in 1849, and which resulted in the immediate removal of Parliament from Montreal. 
For the next nine years, the Government met alternately in Toronto and Quebec, 
until the late Queen Victoria, in her sagacity, settled upon a rather small and 
unimportant city called Ottawa as an ideal choice for a national capital, sufficiently 
far removed from the commercial centers to enable Parliament to concentrate 
upon the business of government without needless distractions. The actual letter 
was written by a certain Henry Rose, then living in Montreal, to my grand-uncle 
residing in Glasgow, Scotland. It is dated May 7, 1849, and starts with references 
to economic conditions in general prevailing in America. 

“_..my wife, Ann, expects to see you and your ‘fixings’ out here yet, beside her, 
and so would I, but I am sorry to say that at the present I can offer you no 
favorable encouragement. Here, everything is unsettled, of which I shall inform you 
anon. I saw a gentleman the other day who was in New York, and he states that 
he never saw them so dull. All over the country the same tale is told, but I expect 
some improvement will take place soon. At present, the Yankees are emigrating 
to California, and the inhabitants of this province are emigrating to the States, and 
all are talking of moving somewhere, but no decision in the matter. But matters 
will, and must, take a turn soon — and I hope before you are ready for emigrating 
to be able to give you good encouragement. On this subject I shall say no more 
at present. I will now give you some news of the place, which, ere you get this, 
will be causing a noise in Great Britain. I will begin at the beginning.” 

“On Wednesday, the 25th day of April, last week, the Governor-General, the 
Earl of Elgin, went to the Legislative Council, to give his sanction to several bills 
which had passed both Houses, but it was not known that among those was the 
‘Rebellion Losses Bill’, a Bill in its passing through the House caused considerable 
noise. over the whole province. This Bill was for the indemnification of the losses 
sustained by the French-Canadian Rebels during the last rebellion. The introduction 
of such a Bill was too much for the Loyal British of Canada, — and its sanction 
by the Governor-General was the signal for the following outburst of indignant 
feeling, — when the Clerk, in reading over the several Bills, came to the notorious 
one already mentioned, he read it in a low tone, with the intention of attracting 
as little attention as possible. The galleries no sooner saw what was enacting, than 
they hissed, groaned, shouted, and rushed out. The news spread like wild-fire over. 
the city — a crowd soon gathered opposite the Parliament House. His Excellency 
made his appearance in the street to go home, and was hailed with hisses, groans, 
etc., and drove off amid a shower of rotten eggs and stones. He and his attendants 
were covered with the savory liquor. But the day had not yet ended, the people 
not yet satisfied. It was about six o’clock when Lord Elgin received the kindly 
greeting I mention. By seven o’clock an intimation was in everybody’s hands, — 
that a meeting would be held in the Place d’Armes. I was walking the streets from 
that time until the meeting was over. Before eight, the fire engines were parading 
the streets, their bells all ringing, followed by immense crowds of people, some 
crying ‘Fire!’, others hurrahing, and making as much noise as possible. Such 
excitement! Such running! I never witnessed the like. The engines were got out for 
gathering the people. The Place d’Armes was found to be too small, — a large 


s—30 The Postgrad 


square opposite the French church, — 
and the meeting was held in the Champ 
de Mars, the military parade ground. 
Several gentlemen addressed the as- 
sembled mass. After several resolutions, 
condemnatory of Lord Elgin’s conduct, 
and speeches made, the cry ‘to the 
House!’ was raised, and thither they 
bent their steps. The Judicature Bill for 
Lower Canada was under discussion at 
the time. The mob made an attack on 
the House, and ere five minutes had 
elapsed, scarcely a single square of glass 
remained whole in the large and exten- 
sive building. Members fled in all direc- 
tions. About a dozen of the mob armed 
with sticks entered the Assembly Cham- 
ber, and one of them sat himself in the 
Speaker’s chair, and formally dissolved 
the present Parliament. They then com- 
menced their work of destruction, — 
gas globes, benches, seats, everything 
was sent to smash. The cry of fire 
sounded in the air, and they too had to 
escape for their lives. In a very short 
time the whole building was in a blaze, 
and it is supposed it must have been 
fired in several places, so rapid was the 
progress of the fire. Fire engines were 
on the spot, but too late; in fact, it is 
said the firemen would not use them, or 
make any exertions until too late. The 
military were sent for, and they too came 
too late. All was destroyed, — the valu- 
able library, fine paintings (with the 
exception of a magnificent painting of 
the Queen, which was rescued), the 
Archives of the province, all irretrievably 
lost. I believe there were some books in 
the library of which there is not another 
copy extant. I never saw anything like 
the fire, — so awfully grand — the 
whole scene is indescribable. I saw it 
burning. The ascending flames lit up the 
whole town, while the tin-covered spires 
and roofs of the city seemed all lit up 
with the same brilliancy. The cavalry 
prancing around the building Seeping 
the crowd back, the glittering of the 
bayonets of the infantry, the dense mob 
of people that filled every street and 
avenue leading to the place, the people 
whispering and talking low — every- 
thing — all formed a scene never before 
witnessed in this province. Thus ended 
the 25th of April, but the work of des- 


truction is not complete. The next 


Easter 1955 


evening, the mob attacked the house of 
Lafontaine, the proposer of the Bill. 
Several attempts were made to set it on 
fire, but each time it was put out, but 
his furniture was sent to smash, — the 
feathers of the beds and pillows were 
all strewed in the streets, part of his fine 
library destroyed, and everything they 
could get their hands on destroyed. Some 
out-buildings however were set fire to 
and burned. The military were there 
also, but what could they do? They came 
too late, as is always the case. The next 
evening several other members’ houses 
were attacked, and their windows smash- 
ed all to atoms. Their families took the 
precaution of removing during the day, 
knowing that it would be their turn 
next. On Saturday, the gentlemen who 
were put in jail were liberated in time, 
or the people would have had them out 
by force. The prisoners were the speak- 
ers at the meeting on Wednesday night, 
very respectable men they were too. They 
addressed the mob who accompanied 
them from their prison. One of those 
days, Friday or Saturday, — I don’t 
remember which, — the Government 
armed a large lot of French-Canadians 
— their old enemies during the last 
rebellion. On the same evening there 
were tremendous gatherings, vowing and 
threatening to burn every French-Cana- 
dian house in the city. Happily for 
Montreal, some gentlemen addressed the 
exasperated mob, and promised that they 
would be disarmed next day, and the 
people dispersed quietly. If they had not 
disarmed, the worst act of the drama 
would have been enacted. But they were 
disarmed. On Monday his Excellency 
visited the city for the purpose of re- 
ceiving an address of confidence and 
condolence by the Legislative Assembly. 
He was escorted by a party of cavalry, 
but on passing through St. James and 
Notre Dame streets, was greeted with 
groans by a great concourse of people 
who had been waiting for him. Here he 
got another pelting of eggs and stones, 
by which his carriage windows were 
broken. Colonel Bruce, his brother, who 
accompanied him received a severe con- 
tusion. This gentleman is now on his 
way to England, having left here a few 
days ago. For why, is not known. When 
(Continued on page s-33) 


s—3) 








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s—32 The Postgrad 


A Voice... 


(Continued from page s-31) 


he reached the Government House, the 
people closed around it as close as the 
military would permit, waiting his coming 
out. It was most amusing to see the 
manoeuvers of the military and mob 
at this time. When the military moved, 
they moved, following every motion they 
made. Gibes were played off at no small 
rate by the crowd on the soldiers, who 
seemed to take it all in good part. On 
leaving Government House, His Excel- 
lency took an unusual departure, and 
the mob, who finding: themselves dis- 
appointed, appropriated every convey- 
ance they could get, and gave him 
chase, — cabs, calaches, carts, etc., to 
meet the demand, and we have gener- 
ally a good number of these at every 
corner of the city. His Lordship, how- 
ever, did not get off so easily. The mob 
soon overtook him, and his escort, and 
he again suffered another disgraceful 
attack. The back of his carriage was 
completely smashed in, and I can’t tell 
you what else. Such a spectacle! a 
Governor-General of Canada hunted 
through the streets of Montreal as if he 
had been a wild beast! During all these 
scenes, the soldiers never made an attack 
on the people. Several Scotch Societies. 
both here and in Quebec, have erased 
his name from their minutes as patron 
or in whatever else capacity he stood to 
them, passing resolutions to that effect 
and which have appeared in the public 
papers. It was reported by Telegraph 
on Monday evening that a deputation 
of Canada might be expected next 
morning by the John Munn Steamer 
from Quebec to present an address of 
confidence to him. The banks along the 
river side were crowded at an early 
hour, with a party of military to keep 
the peace on Tuesday morning. They 
landed, however, about 3 miles below 
Montreal and found their way into town 
as they best could, as they learned the 
state of the city. Nothing worth relating 
occurred. During all this time news was 
coming in from the Upper Provinces of 
similar risings. The Governor-General’s 
effigy was burnt in several places. One 
day we were fully in the expectation of 
seeing the Glengarry Highlanders — 


Easter 1955 


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some thousand of them — in town to 
help the British. Happily they were not 
required as the Canadians were dis- 
armed, — and the town again assumed 
a more quiet appearance. A numerously 
signed petition has been sent home from 
Montreal praying Her Majesty to recall 
the Governor. Several petitions have 
also been sent from the Upper Province 
to the same effect. We will have quiet- 
ness until an answer is returned from 
England. If favorable, — well. But if 
otherwise — we have had only ‘the 
beginning of the end’ as the Yankees 
say. We may have annexation before 
long. You see I have filled the letter 
with a vengeance . . . as I have given 
you enough for three . . . I thought the 
present most interesting to you.” 


In the meantime, I remain, 

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s—34 : The Postgrad 


Northmount ‘Y°’ 
Membership 
Up By 240 


T THE THIRD annual meeting of 

the Northmount ‘Y’, the first in 
their new building, A. I. MacIntyre, 
chairman of the board, reported that 
the new facilities were being extensively 
used, He said membership had increased 
by 240 members in 1954. 


J. M. Ferguson, Executive Secretary 
of the Branch said that in addition to the 
program carried on in the building, 
extensive use was made of churches, 
schools and homes in all the commu- 
nities. He said the building has been 
designed to serve as a “nerve centre” 
from which the ‘Y’ would operate to 
provide program for the youth of St. 
Laurent, Town of Mount Royal and 
Cartierville. He pointed out that during 
the year over 72 regularly scheduled 
groups had met and that attendance at 
all activities had increased over 20,000 
for a total of 49,320 people. 


Mr. MacIntyre expressed his apprecia- 
tion to the volunteer leaders who had 
given so generously of their time during 
the year. He said that the youth of the 
three communities were fortunate that 
these volunteers had taken such an active 
interest. 


The financial report of the branch 
showed an expenditure of $16,110.67 
during the year. Income from program 
activities and membership was $6,260.54 
and the branch received $10,500.00 from 
the Maintenance Campaign. 


Mr. Ferguson in his report emphasized 
the importance of the club work which 
was carried on with the boys and girls 
in St. Laurent, Town of Mount Royal 
and Cartierville. He said that 22 different 
clubs carrying on Gray-Y, Junior HI-Y 
and HI-Y programs with volunteer lead- 
ers operated during the year. These 
clubs, he explained, provided the boys 
and girls with opportunities or growth 
and experience in the democratic and 
Christian way of life. 


Easter 1955 


Study of Ethnie 
Groups Urged By 
College Historian 


HE PROPOSED Canada Council, 

a government-supported body to sti- 
mulate growth in Canada, has a part to 
play in the integration of ethnic groups 
in Canadian life, Prof. Paul Yuzyk, Uni- 
versity of Manitoba historian, declared 
in an address in February. 


He was speaking to students at the 
college at the opening of “Ukranian 
Week.” During the week the college’s 
Ukranian students presented the culture 
they brought to Canada to the other 
students through addresses, folk songs 
and dances, and literature. 


Prof. Yuzyk said that the council, if 
and when it is formed, could contribute 
to integration by initiating a study of the 
various ethnic groups in this country. 


Prof. Yuzyk, a Ukranian Canadian 
himself, noted that among Canada’s 400, 
000 Ukranians (three per cent of the 
population) there are four M.P’s, 16 
M.L.A.’s and two mayors (Edmonton 
and Windsor, Ont.). This record in 
political life has been matched by their 
contribution to other aspects of life, he 


added. 


On behalf of the Ukranian Students’ 
Club he presented a collection of about 
40 books on Ukranian culture to the 
Sir George Williams College library. 


Members elected to the board were: 
R. Bowes, W. Barton, C. W. P. Brown, 
K. Chisholm, J. F. Davies, A. C. Forman, 
Mrs. A. M. Finlayson, G. C. Garner, 
Mrs. W. N. Hall, W. N. Hall, N. Har- 
tenstein, R. Hills, E. H. Heeney, J. 
Holden, A. M. Jones, C. H. Knapp, 
H. D. Lang, A. I. MacIntyre, G. F. S. 
Mann, M. Marcus, L. Martin, L. Mul- 
hern, R. Mumby, P. V. Oppernheimer, 
J. Wood, G. A. Price, J. R. Logan, F. C. 
Rayment, Mrs. A. C. Sharpe, K. Shaw, 
L. M. Shetler, D. L. Stewart, Mrs. A. M. 
Thompson, Mrs. A. E. Tompkins, Maj. 
Gen. E. C. Weeks, F. B. Wilson, R. B. 
Winsor. 


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s—36 The Postgrad 


College Facts... 


DAY DIVISION 


The Day division of Sir George Wil- 
liams College began in 1932, with first 
and second year courses. 


FIRST DEGREES 


In May, 1936 a small Science class 
graduated from the college — the first 
degrees to be granted. 


* * * 
COLLEGE LIBRARY 


Extensive alterations and additions 
were made to the college library in 1937 
— making it one of the best in the 
country. There were 12,000 volumes on 
the shelves. 

* * * 


18 DEGREES IN °39 


Enrollment in the college and Schools 
during 1938-39 reached 1,749 — the 
largest in history — 1,355 men and 394 
women. That term 18 bachelor’s degrees 
were awarded. 

eta eae 


NOW IT’S 8.000 


Enrollment in the college and_ its 
schools in 1937 totalled 1,238. 


* * * 
ENROLLMENT 


The total enrollment of the college in 
1937 was 371 students: 133 in the col- 
lege day division and 238 in the evening 
division. 

* * * 


No. 2 — NINE GRADS 


Sir George’s second graduating class 
in 1937 included six degrees in Bachelor 
of Arts, two as Bachelor of Science and 
one as Bachelor of Commerce. 


: * * * 
FOUR-YEAR COURSE 


During the academic year 1936-37 the 
college began to offer the full four-year 
course in arts, science and commerce. 


Easter 1955 





























St. James Street in the Montreal business 


district seen from the corner of McGill Street 


s—37 


ae 
eee 





Bird’s eye view of the City of Montreal 





279 Groups 
Organized at 
Southwestern 


WO HUNDRED and seventy nine 

groups with an attendance of 
60,112 were organized at the South- 
western Branch of the Y.M.C.A. during 
the last year, it was reported at the 
annual meeting last night. 


Executive Secretary J. M. MacConnell 
said that recent renovation and additions 
to the branch building had provided 
greatly improved facilities for the mem- 
bers. 


s—38 


Elected to the board of management 
were D. R. Armstrong, Mrs. N. B. 
Ashton, A. Baburek, Rev. W. J. Baxter, 
W. B. Charlton, F. Clark, T. Collins, 
D. Cumming, A. Cunningham, E. O. 
Dalgleish, E. Davies, C. Desgroseliers, 
W. E. Dryburgh, C. Dutton, F. Firmin, 
W. Ford, Dr. H. E. Grant, H. E. Hayden, 
H. Hadley, L. Hastings, R. Holmes, 
J. Jamieson, L. K. Jones, R. Jones, H. 
Keith, W. Kemp, J. W. MacGillivray, 
A. MacFarlane, G. MacKenzie, Mrs. 
George Murray, D. Martin, G. Minshull, 
Mrs. J. Penniston, F. B. Peterson, H. 
Phillips, E. Snook, W. R. Stenhouse, 
D. T. Turnbull, A. Tzventarny, W. Weir, 
Mayor Edward Wilson and A. Yuill. 


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Oil Community ‘Y° 
Reports Good Year 


HE MONTREAL EAST “Y” was 

aptly called “the community ‘Y’ in 
the oil community” by J. N. Sills, Board 
Chairman, in his report to the sixth 
annual meeting of the Branch. 


Mr. Sills said that during the year 
the membership had increased to 640 
persons and attendance at programs 


to 12,764. 


L. Ring, secretary, said the Montreal 
East ‘Y’ was deeply indebted to the 
various community organizations who 
had co-operated by providing space to 
groups throughout the year. 


Of special interest was the in-the-city 
summer ‘Camp Tawasi” which operated 
during July and August. The Longue 
Pointe Ordinance Depot swim pool was 
used by the campers. A nature lore 
program was carried on and 160 young- 
sters were members of the camp. 


Mr. Ring, noted the extensive club 
program which was in operation and 
listed fourteen physical activity classes 
that had been organized for the members. 


Mr. Sills said a large proportion of 
the ‘Y’ program was supervised by volun- 
teer leaders who met regularly with the 
club and groups. He stressed that the 
Y.M.C.A. was an organization controlled 
by the members through an elected 
Board of Management. Each group was 
given the maximum of autonomy for its 
own operation. 


The board of management was con- 
gratulated by Mr. C. Gorrie of the 
Montreal Y.M.C.A. for the excellent 
report it had presented. Rev. A. S. C. 
Ritchie conducted the devotional ser- 
vices. 


Elected to the board were: L. N. Sills, 
chairman; D. J. Edmonds, vice-chair- 
man; J. Wray, vice-chairman; H. Jamie- 
son, finance chairman; Rev. A. S. C. 
Ritchie, W. Kydd, G. Fraser, Milton 
Pogson, A. Bond, G. MacLean, E. C. 
Arthur, R. C. Roright, E. Ingram, T. J. 
Fields, A. V. Delcloo, Miss O. Lane, W. 
Zukowski, K. Seaman, W. H. Seaman, 
W. R. Sparks, A. S. Morse, L. T. Brain- 
erd, A. E. Park. 


Easter 1955 


College Dean Takes 
Role in Musical 


The dean of women at American 
University is taking a leave of absence 
to play a song-and-dance role in a mu- 
sical comedy. 


“Making the decision was a little 
difficult,’ Dean Marguerite Shaw con- 
fessed today. “I was a little worried 
about the reaction in the supposedly 
austere academic circles.” 


But, she added with a bright smile, 
“the reaction wasn’t at all like that. 
Everybody wished me well. Academic 
circles aren’t as austere as you’d ima- 
gine.” 

Miss Shaw, a resident of South Paris, 
Me., has never before acted profession- 
ally. She did dramatic work at college 
and played for two seasons with a little 
theatre group. 

But she’s all signed up, nevertheless, 
to go on a nationwide: tour as Mabel, the 
bookkeeper, in the national company of 
“The Pajama Game,” a musical which 
has been playing to: full houses on 
Broadway. 

“I'm a little surprised . . . a little 
overwhelmed,” Miss Shaw said. “But I 
know it’ll be fun.” 

Her great thespian opportunity was 
provided by her sister, Reta Shaw, who 
is playing Mabel in the Broadway play 
now. Reta told her the producers were 
having trouble casting the role and 
Marguerite suggested — “facetiously,” 
she said — that she’d try out. 


Sure enough she did and sure enough 
she landed the part. It’s a comedy part 
with one big song and dance number. 
“T’m a little young for the part,” Miss 
Shaw said. “The woman is 50 or 60 
and J’ll have to gray my hair.” 


Ist SUMMER CLASS 


In 1942 the first summer session at 
Sir George was conducted as part of the 
general acceleration in Canadian colleges 
to hasten the graduation of men needed 
for national service. 


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The Postgrad 


College Students 
Prove “Too Lively” 


im Scotland 


OLLEGE STUDENTS may be the 

same the world over, but when 
their high spirits get the better of them, 
they can be a source of annoyance to 
the rest of the community. It can happen 
just as easily in Montreal as in Glasgow 
or Aberdeen. 

In Scotland some authorities are 
worried. Students holding their rectorial 
elections and their annual charities week 
have ben proving just a little too lively. 

In Glasgow the undergraduates staged 
some too-hectic battles on the main con- 
course of the city’s Central Station, and 
endangered members of the public. And 
a girl student posed in a bikini costume 
on the cenotaph in the city’s main square. 

There have been public protests about 
these happenings. People are asking if 
the students aren’t going “over the 
score.” 

Another stunt in Glasgow was to 
invade leading theatres and music-halls, 
capture the principal stars, and hold 
them for ransom. 

At Aberdeen, where there was a 
“baton” clash between police and stu- 
dents during the University rectorial 
celebrations, the Secretary of State for 
Scotland has called for a full report 
from the police. And the students have 
also signed a mass petition calling for 
an inquiry. 

The Students’ Representative Council 
has issued a strong criticism of the way 
in which the city police handled the 
situation. They deplore the fact that 
batons were used and demand a full 
investigation. 

The main trouble arose after the 
installation of Admiral Sir Rhoderick 
McGrigor, the First Sea Lord, as Rector 
of the University. In the melee two 
students were knocked out. 





ALUMNI 
EASTER DANCE 
APRIL I 





Easter 1955 


Need tor Leaders 
Great, Meeting Told 


HOMAS DRANFIELD, Rosemount 

‘Y’ Board Chairman, told the seventh 
annual meeting that a vital club program 
for youth had been carried on over a 
wide geographical area during the past 
year. He said that this “program in 
dispersal” had been a deliberate policy of 
the ‘Y’ in their attempt to provide ade- 
quate and helpful activity for the youth 
within the area of their home neigh- 
borhood. 


The annual report stressed the im- 
portance of volunteer leaders for this 
type of program. It was noted that some 
44 regularly-scheduled groups had been 
in operation and supervised by volunteer 
leaders. 


Cameron MacLeod, branch secretary, 
said emphasis of the program was on 
human values. He said that of primary 
importance was the recognition that each 
person had their own potential that 
could be developed by small group 
activity. The training in the democratic 
way of life which Y.M.C.A. members 
received as they participated in these 
groups, supervised by volunteer leaders, 
was of great value in moulding their 
character. 


Finances of the branch were presented 
and showed a total expenditure of $10,- 
209. 


The Executive Secretary said the need 
for leaders was great. He stated: “Persons 
who accepted the challenge and respon- 
sibility of guiding children in their group 
relations, soon realize that club activities 
can work two ways. It may mause chil- 
dren to do useful or harmful things. It 
may cause them to form good attitudes 
towards persons and property or bad 
attitudes. It may result in worthwhile 
habits, interests and skills, or it may lead 
to worthless habits, cheap interests and 
no skills at all.” 


Mr. McLeod told the meeting that if 
they did not supply the leadership, then 
youth would find it for itself. The results 
could be unfortunate or satisfying, de- 
pending on the response to this challenge. 


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1,650 STUDENTS IN 


NIGHT ELEMENTARY 


AND HIGH SCHOOL 


Cy ecas of the Sir George Wil- 
liams High School announced the 
names of students who successfully com- 
pleted their studies during the past aca- 
demic year in June. 

In making the announcement, A. 
Saunders, headmaster, said that more 
than 1,650 students attended classes in 
the Evening Elementary and High 
School. During the summer months, he 
said, another 400 would attend the 
school. 

The names of successful students are 
listed. below. Those marked with an 
asterisk have one more subject to com- 
plete. 

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Promoted to Eighth Grade: Anna 
Androns, A. Avery, Helen Babij, J. 
Blais, L. A. Bouvier, E. Bolland, N. 
Burnham, H. F. Chadwick, K. Cliffe, 
E, M. Comeau, E. Courtney, R. A. 
Croft, D. Deans, L. Durant, Olive Dun- 
can, Joyce Donnison, G. Esdon, J. A. 
Frampton, Elfie Ganz, K. F. Ganz, J. 
Giannakis, B. Gozansky, Noreen Hawley, 
G. Hennecke, Fleurette Hurst, Joan 
Mary Imhoff, Kathleen Irvine, J. B. 
Knight, A. Kokanovic, R. Langlois, R. 
M. Laporte, R. J. Leger. 

D. Leng, G. G. Leonardo, K. Lunny, 
S. Macdonald, K. G. Mackenzie, S. 
Marmor, Myrtle Martha Mosher, Lili 
Matyas, Margaret Mary McMahon, 
Edna Margaret Menges, A. Michalko, 
R. J. Milburn, J. A. Nichol, J. R. Noel, 
J. W. O’Brien, T. Paguin, R. E. Pearl, 
J. Pugh, Lumina Quirion, S. Roscoe, W. 
Sharples, R. D. Shelton, F. E. Shirlow, 
Bessie Shuster, J. Thompson, Mary 
Elizabeth Walker, Winnifred Caroline 
Wardell, Margaret Alice Wynd, N. 
Young. 

Promoted to Ninth Grade: *L. 


Bell, K. D. Bindon, R. T. Bolland, J. 
Boode, *Dorothy M. Bourgaize, Sandy 
Campanelli, D. Capito, A. Carson, Mil- 
dred Emma Corbett, *G. L. Darlington, 
E. Davis, W. Freestone, Rosemary Fri- 
berg, T. Huber, R. F. Jobba, Natalie 
Ann Kiwauskas, *Jacqueline Pauline 


Easter 1955 


Lacroix, *R. Lapointe, N. D. Littlejohn, 
*K. B. Mackenzie, R. Marcil. 

R. J. Nowlan, A. J. Parkinson, J. H. 
Pearson, E. Perron, *Beverley Poirier, 
G. L. Price, M. R. Quinn, R. Quirion, 
W. F. Rae, N. D. Richardson, N. Slach- 
ta, *R. Solomon, *Z. H. Thompson, J. 
Ursina, *G. A. Tougas, *H. T. Van 
Derwerff, J. T. Vermeersch, *B. Ville- 
neuve, K. J. Waldron, *Z. Yakubosky. 

Promoted to 10th Grade: Helen 


Edith Alcock, F. H. Bailey, Jeannette 
M. Blandis, *Lillian Blumenfeld, *E. A. 
Campanelli, M. Charlebois, *R. W. 
Chidley, *J. L. Collin, Lillian Comis, 
*E. Daoust, *Denise Desroches, S. F. 
Drake, D. Egerton, Jenny Mary Four- 
nier, *A. M. Fortin, *A. Gee, *J. Gej- 
dos, J. E. Gibson, *Merrill Greig, Z. J. 
Cyrusznski, *Sheila May Hammond, *G. 
Haydock, *T. Kowalchuk, M. Kudlak, 
R. A. Laurin, P. N. S. Leblanc, *Enid 
May Livingstone, *P. J. Lunny. 

Eleanor Mildred Mackenzie, D. Mal- 
lette, *K. R. Marchant, E. H. Margin- 
son, *H. W. McCullough, E. C. Migdol, 
*P. O’Connell, J. P. O’Sullivan, S. Pa- 
linsky, *R. Petit, *F. Petit-Clerc, J. Pit- 
man, *Justine Genevieve Poitras, H. 
Reich, *R. Reymond, A. H. Rydberg, 
Iris Shlapack, *L. Silverberg, *E. Sonne, 
D. A. Spriggs, *Tobita Tamilia, *E. 
Varkel, F. G. Wall, R. Ward, J. L. 
Warner, *A. J. Weir, *R. G. Wicks, H. 
P. Wood, *N. J. Wynd. 

Promoted to 11th Grade: Petrina 
G. Ariano, Nellie June Ashton, R. J. 
Austin, R. G. Aldroft, *J. Bercovitch, 
*T. Berwanger, G. Bouchard, *R. G. 
Bouchard, R. Brinker, B. H. Burwash, 
*Patricia E. Bynes, D. W. Clark, *T. A. 
Currie, *Eugenie Daoust, Marie Claire 
Daoust, J. C. Decaen, J. B. Denman, A. 
F. Dome, *Gloria Rosemary Don, G. A. 
Donaghue, Shirley Mary Duncan, *R. 
J. Dunphy, S. Durst, Judith Irene Eis- 
ner, *R. F. Emo, T. A. Eshiger, D. F. 
Evans, J. E. Faltus. 

R. Feltham, *M. J. Fenion, *Jacque- 
line M. Finlayson, T. M. Friend, W. 

(Continued on page 16) ; 


15 


1.650 STUDENTS... 


(Continued from page 15) 


Georgette, *J. R. Giroux, R. P. Godin, 
K. F. Grattan, M. J. Hart, Mary Hasulo, 
D. J. Henderson, *R. J. Higgius, *Te- 
resa Clair Hoffner, A. F. Ingham, J. H. 
Jackson, *F. T. Jaeger, J. R. Jourdenais, 
*G,. P. Jourdenais, *Helen Jurichko, *B. 
Klat, J. Konecny, H. N. Lalonde, A. A. 
Leonard, *J. S. Livingstone, M. Lixen- 
berg, *P. K. MacMillan, *Barbara Ellen 
MacNab, J. D. Malcolm. 


Theresa Blanche Martin, *Mona Mar- 
ton, P. S. Maslanka, *J. E. McMahon, 
E. J. Morris, *R. B. Morris, H. P. Mor- 
rison, E. F. Oke, *K. Osaka, *D. A. 
Pansieri, N. J. Pigeon, R. C. Quinn, *E. 
Reade, W. C. Reason, J. J. Rochette, 
*T. Rosenthal, *T. W. Ryan, J. 
Schmidt, Margie Schwartz, D. GC. 
Scott, *T. Scott, Ruth Margaret Seller, 
*Helen Isabel ‘Smith, sol PR Synitar, 
*Betty Smuklar, *J. Speirs, A. B. Stan- 
deven, R. A. Stowe, C. W. Tapley, *I. 
H. Tarr, *R. E. Taylor, Norma Oryn- 
thia Thresh, *Denise Vezeau, *C. H. 
Weir, J. I. Young. 


GRADUATES 


General Course: G. I. Bailey, M 
E. Barber, R. P. Beck, Marian Davis 
Bedoukian, Arna Judith Birns, E. C. 
Bishop, R. O. Black, Beverley Carose 
Burke, D. B. Cleland, F. F. d’Aragon, 
G. A. David, J. Druzin, Madeline Ernes- 
tine, Elaine Jenny Gatehouse, N. Getty, 
J. Gramas, J. E. Handy, S. A. Hewlett, 
T. L. Hood, Gerda Boesen Jacobsen, J. 
B. Kastner, K. A. Kevlahan, E. Landis, 
E. G. Maguire, A. R. McKeown, Mari- 
lyn Mary Mott. 

Audrey Mundy, R. E. Murphy, Doris 
Neuer, T. R. Orrell, R. J. Pettes, Linda 
Dorothy Pickersgill, E. J. Pilon, Mar- 
guerite Plouffe, Kathleen Dierdre Reus- 
ing, R. H. Rodgers, J. Schultz, M. J. 
Secchiardi, K. Shuster, M. Small, Bela 
Stift, A. Torchinsky, Lauretta Tremblay, 
Velia Rosa Vattovaz, M. Voticky, A. J. 
Waite, R. E. Wilson, Florence Norah 
Witham, D. Yearwood, W. D. Yeates, 
S. Zoltak. 


Mathematics-Science Course: Be- 
verley Lois Banks, R. G. Britt, E. P. E. 
Brown, R. W. Downie, N. B. Dyson, R. 
H. Flaherty, G. Gaskin, Eva Esther 


16 


Over 2,700 Students 
Get “Second Chance” 
In Evening Courses 


More than 2,700 students, employed 
with 133 different firms in the city, are 
taking advantage of a “second chance” 
to further their education at Sir George 
Williams College and its schools, Dr. 
K. E. Norris, principal, reported last 
month. 

In his yearly review, Dr. Norris said 
that 30 years ago the college, which was 
then confined only to the schools, en- 
rolled 600 students, compared to last 
100 per cent of the instruction in the 
evening high school and evening ele- 
mentary school is done by part-time 
teachers. 

“Too much credit cannot be given to 
the large numbers of men and women 
who have contributed at relatively low 
rates of remuneration to the instruction 
of thousands of evening students,” Dr. 
Norris said. 

The principal noted a large number 
of housewives had also taken advantage 
of night classes at the college and schools. 

In regard to the financing of the 
college’s operations, Dr. Norris said Sir 
George Williams and the schools operate 
within the hudget framework of the 
Montreal YMCA. The deficits of the 
college are met by an appropriation of 
the metropolitan office joint fund, which 
is itself dependent upon the annual 
maintenance campaign of the YMCA to 
be launched soon. 


Glynn, J. S. Goodbody, R. W. Harwood, 
A. G. Jardin, A. E. Koller, Rolanda 
Kursner, C. Legault, S. B. Macnab, 
Elizabeth Ann Mornan, J. C. Neave, 
J. J. Nosko, S. P. Olsen, D. H. Osborne, 
B. Rachielle, GC. A. Rennie, L. A. Rod- 
gers, J. W. Russell, F. A. Sleep, H. F. 
Soltendieck, H. Teesler, J. Vien, B. W. 
Wakefield, W. A. Weston, C. Westwood, 
Betty Marjorie Wilson, Sevrya Antha- 
nase Wypruk, W. Yacovitch. 


Commercial Course: Helen Bach- 


man, M. R. Derrig, J. C. Forsyth, Gla- 
dys Gaskin, R. A. Haley, S. W. Mathews, 
Colleen Ann Moore, S. Wugalter. 


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