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Volume 21 . Number 1 


Postgrad - 


ASSOCIATION ALUMNI | 
SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY 


April 1965 


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TABLE OF CONTENTS: 


Page 3 HENRY F. HALL BUILDING: PROGRESS REPORT No. lL 
Page 8 SIR GEORGE COMES OF AGE: First Graduate Courses 
Slated 
Page 11 GEORGIANS WILL BE SPORT-CONSCIOUS 
New Athletic Facilities in Building Planned 
Page 17 NEW COMMERCE CURRICULUM AT SGWU 
Page 18 POSTGRAD SPECIAL REPORT — The Recommendations 
of the Parent Commission: EDUCATION BREAK- 
THROUGH IN QUEBEC 
Page 21 COLUCCI, CHAPUT AND CORE 
Page 24 OUR GRADS IN THE WORLD Notes from the Executive 
Director’s Office 
Page 26 FACULTY MEMBERS ON U.S. VIETNAM POLICY 
Page 28 DR. HARRY JOHNSON: NORRIS MEMORIAL 
LECTURES — In Summary 
Page 30 SOCIOLOGY SUMMER SESSION PLANS 
Page 37 MELVIN BELLI SPEAKS TO UNDERGRADUATES 


Page 40 ON AND OFF CAMPUS — A Review of Activities 


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Postgrad 


VOLUME 21, NUMBER I 
SPRING ISSUE APRIL 1965 








Editor-in-Chief 
STANLEY ASHER (Arts ’53, M.A.) 


Financial Advisor 


MELVIN ZWAIG (Com. ’61, C.A.) 
(of Riddell, Stead, Graham & Hutchison) 


Advertising 


ARCHIE E. FILTEAU 


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
BOARD OF DIRECTORS: 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE: President, Nicholas 
Grycan (Com. °50); Ist Vice President, R. G. 
Thompson (Arts °53); 2nd Vice President, R. C. 
Jonas (Arts 43); Secretary, John Hannan (Com. 
53); Treasurer, Larry Nachshen (Com. °59); Past 
President, Gerald B. Miller (Arts °53). 





BOARD: J. G. Bradley (Com. °52); Ernest Brown 
(Com. °50); Guy Dumesnil (Com. °47); Robert 
Gariepy (Com. °57); Thomas Hecht (Arts °50); 
M. Bistriskey (Arts °58);M. Langelier (Com. *48) ; 
Les Melia (Arts °58); Roland Picard (Se. °46); 
Mrs. Ruth Tunis (Sc. °46); Glenn Wood (Arts °45):; 
V. Yates (Arts 52); Mel Zwaig (Com. ’61). 


EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR: John M. Ferguson 
(Arts °50). 


GRAD CLASS REPRESENTATIVE: Miss Helen 


Bahr. 


Published quarterly in April, June, September and 
December. Printed by Canadian Printing and 
Lithographing Co. Ltd., 5670 Chauveau St., 
Montreal 5. Authorized as Second Class Mail, 
Post Office Dept.. Ottawa. 


Address all communications to: POSTGRAD, 
ASSOCIATION OF ALUMNI, SIR GEORGE 
WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY. 1441 DRUMMOND 
ST., MONTREAL 25, QUEBEC. 





MEMBER AMERICAN ALUMNI COUNCIL. 





HENRY F. HALL BUILDING ... 


PROGRESS REPORT No. 1 


Two months ahead of schedule 


NEW BUILDING WILL 
HAVE INDOOR CAMPUS 


By Stephen Phizicky (from the Georgian) 


The Henry F. Hall building presently 
under construction and scheduled for 
completion in September of 1966, promises 
to be unique among Canadian University 
buildings, according to Associate Professor 
J. P. Petolas, Director of Development 
of the University. 


Professor Petolas said that the Hall 
building has been designed to provide not 
only adequate facilities for the student 
body and staff, but also incorporates 
provisions for modification and moderniza- 
tion if these should this prove necessary. 


The building situated on Burnside 
between Mackay and Crescent Sts., has 
been designed as a cube, ten stories high. 
It is intended to accommodate a maximum 
of 5,000 day and 10,000 evening Univer- 
sity students. 


Among the facilities of the Hall building 
are 11 auditoria incorporating the latest 
built-in audio-visual teaching equipment 
as well as a completely equipped profes- 
sional-style theatre. There will be five 
complete floors of Jaboratories consisting 
of one for physics, two for chemistry, one 
for engineering and one for biology. 
Several laboratories will be devoted exclu- 
sively to research, a field in which Sir 
George has been sorely lacking. 


One of the major additions to the Uni- 
versity will be greatly expanded library 
facilities. which will be located on the 5th 
and 6th floors of the Norris building. In 
addition, there will be several new libraries 
in the Hall building including a 20,000 
volume Freshman library and a 30,000 
volume Science library. 


Another innovation is the ‘indoor 
campus” on the Ist mezzanine floor, 
running the length of the building. Other 


student lounge facilities include a men’s 
common room. women’s Common room, 
mixed common room, recreational lounge 
(cards, chess, checkers, etc.) and reading 
lounge. 


Greatly expanded Student Government 
facilities will also be provided as well as 
many rooms that will be used solely for 
meetings of university clubs and providing 
special equipment for those clubs that 
need it. 


Mr. Petolas said that one of the major 
problems in the Hall building will be that 
of ‘Vertical transportation,’ that is, 
moving large numbers of students quickly 
and efficiently at peak periods between 
classes, on various floors, To that end it 
has been decided to use two sets of 
escalators (one up, one down) in addition 
to 2 elevators and a freight elevator. Es- 
calators were chosen for their speed and 
economy, as well as their ability to 
handle a large number of people in a short 
time. Naturally, there will be stairways 
for the energetic types. 


There has been no provision made for 
sports, facilities, though these may be 
added at a later date. 


Mr. Petolas went on to say that all 
these facilities have been designed in 
accordance with the specific needs of the 
University, and that he expects them to 
be more than adequate. He particularly 
stressed the fact that the Hall building 
has been designed from the “‘insideout’’ 
incorporating suggestions of the students 
and faculty and will be built around these 
rather than trying to work them in after- 
wards. Mr. Petolas said that although the 
university has no other definite plans for 
expansion, he feels that further growth 
is inevitable. 


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M. C. ZWAIG NAMED 
CLEAN-UP CHAIRMAN 


Melvin C. Zwaig, C.A. is Audit Supervisor at Riddell, 
Stead, Graham and Hutchison and is also a lecturer in account- 
ing, Extension Department, Commerce Faculty, McGill 
University. 


Mr. Zwaig was graduated from Sir George with a Bachelor 
of Commerce degree in 1959 and was admitted as a member of 
the Quebec Institute of Chartered Accountants in October 
1961. 


He lives on Clanranald Avenue, Montreal, with his wife, 
Marsha, and two sons Arnold and Brian Jay. 





Melvin C, Zwaig, C.A. 


Dear Alumnus: 


The overall University Campaign has raised $5,325,000.00 of its $7,000,000.00 
objective. With the goal still distant, both the University and the Campaign 
Officials are looking to all avenues and all possibilities in an attempt to realize this 
outstanding amount. 

To date, we, the members of the Association of Alumni, have not fulfilled 
our pledge. We have heard from only 30 per cent of our membership and have 
still to receive contributions of approximately $70,000.00 in order to achieve our 
$150,000.00 objective. 

Both as graduates of the University and as members of the Association of 
Alumni we have an obligation to our Alma Mater. 

What can you do to help realize our objective and liquidate our present 
obligation to the University? If you have not already been canvassed please 
complete and mail the pledge below. If you have been canvassed, volun- 
teer your help; we need your assistance on the second phase of the Alumni 
Division Campaign. You will receive a most cordial reception from John Ferguson 
and his charming staff. If you have already contributed, perhaps you can now 
increase your gift. 

With a little thought and effort on the part of each one of us we will have no 
difficulty in reaching our goal. In order to enhance our standing as an Association 
of Alumni on the Campus Community we must help the University achieve its 
goal. Iam confident we will not fail. 


Very truly yours, 
MELVIN C. ZWAIG, 
Clean-Up Chairman, Alumni Division 


SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY BUILDING FUND |." 








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SIR GEORGES COMES OF AGE 





FIRST GRADUATE COURSES SLATED 


Sir George Williams University will offer programmes leading to the degrees of Master of Arts in Art 
Education and the Master of Arts an English commencing in September, 1965, it has been announced today by 
the Principal, Robert C. Rae. The programmes will be available to day and evening students who have the 
required qualifications. 


The programme leading to the Master of Arts degree in Art Education will feature a close integration of 
studio work and theoretical studies. It will involve research in specialized areas of art education. Stress will be 
placed on individual and critical approaches to the teaching of art and seminars will be held to integrate the 
various areas of study. Requirements for admission include the possession of a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, or a 
Bachelor of Arts degree with some specialization in Fine Arts, or its equivalent and some experience in the teaching 
of art. The only other similar programme, in this field, available in Canada is offered at the University of British 
Columbia. 


The Master of Arts in English programme will require course work and the submission of a thesis to be 
chosen in consultation with an advisory committee. The graduate course work will take place in seminars or 
through guided reading assignments. At least one of the courses will be of a cross-disciplinary or interlingual 
nature. The requirements for admission include an honours degree in English or its equivalent and a comprehensive 
entrance examination. The Master of Arts degree in English is considered to be basic to any graduate development 


in an English-language university. 


.... and 
more to 


come 


The announcement of these two pro- 
grammes of graduate study is the logical 
outcome of the evolution of Sir George 
Williams University and careful, intensive 
study and planning for several years. In 
evolving a total strategy of development, 
which included the conception of the 
Henry F. Hall building which is now under 
construction, the introduction of advanced 
studies in appropriate areas was foreseen. 
A Committee on Academic Development 
has been in existence for some time and 
this body developed a comprehensive 
statement to set the framework for 
graduate study. These recommendations 
were approved by the University Council 
and the Board of Governors. A Board of 
Graduate Studies, under the chairman- 
ship of Dr. Samuel Madras, Dean of 
Science, was established in June, 1964, to 


Compliments of 


implement the recommendations. After 
careful study and review the two graduate 
programmes announced today were ap- 
proved and subsequently endorsed by the 
University Council and the Board of 
Governors. 

Two further programmes leading to the 
Master of Science degrees in Chemistry 
and Theoretical Physics had also been 
approved after rigorous examination of all 
the conditions necessary for the offering 
of advanced degrees. Although the Board 
of Graduate Studies is still satisfied that 
these programmes could have been effec- 
tively offered commencing in September, 
it has been decided to defer their introduc- 
tion until the full facilities of the Henry F. 
Hall building are available in the 1966-67 
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GEORGIANS WILL BE SPORT-CONSCIOUS 


Special Report 


ATHLETIC FACILITIES 
ARE COMING 
By D. John Lynn 


As a result of the dramatic expansion 
going on at Sir George at the present, there 
has been a growing demand for more 
adequate sports facilities. Students, partic- 
ularly the athletes, have been complain- 
ing about present inadequacies and disad- 
vantages for some time. 

The faculty has also recognized the need 
for expansion in this area, and the Athletic 
staff has been conducting surveys and 
making studies of other Canadian Uni- 
versity Athletic programs and facilities 
with a view to expansion. 

The board of governors is fully aware 
of this problem, and has set up priorities 
for essential facilities. The first is a new 
and up-to-date library, and the second is 
a sports plant. Both are necessary to any 
university on the move, but here at Sir 
George inadequacies in these two areas 
are particularly severe. 


With the construction of the H. F. Hall 
building we have established ourselves as 
a downtown University. The Library, the 
first priority item, will almost certainly be 
located downtown, and though there has 
been mention of sports facilities away 
from downtown along the projected 
subway route, present thinking favors a 
location in the present area. 


If this is the case, it will be located 
within a ten-minute walk of the Hall and 
Norris buildings. As the program will be 
geared to provide for the needs of a pro- 
jected day school enrolment of 7,000 
students, the sports centre would be 
accessible to the student who wants to 
participate in the intramural and recrea- 
tional programs. 


Although plans are still in the develop- 
ment stage, the plant under consideration 
will havea gymnasium and pool, both with 
adequate seating, as well as handball courts 
and practice rooms for other sports and 
activities. It would also house the medical 
centre, equipment rooms. Athletic offices, 
and other essential areas. 


Financing these facilities is another 
problem. At present, the Quebec govern- 
ment does not provide assistance to 
universities for the construction of athletic 
facilities. Although the Parent report, 
currently under consideration by govern- 
ment, strongly suggested a change in 
this policy, it would still require a cam- 
paign for funds. At present, Sir George is 
financing the Hall building with public 
subscriptions over a three-year period, 
and it would be difficult to embark on 
campaigns for library and Athletic facili- 
ties at the same time. And the prohibitive 
cost of land in the area suggests that these 
two ambitious projects would require a 
considerable sum of money. 

Costs cannot be estimated until present 
plans near their final stages. We must not 
lose sight of the fact that, in order to 
stagger construction, these facilities might 
be built in a complex, rather than in a 
single building. With all of these considera- 
tions no deadline has been set, but the year 
currently being mentioned as a_ possible 
target date for the sports centre is 1970, 
certainly not before. 





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11 


PRISM, UNDERGRADUATE 
QUARTERLY, PRAISED 
“Prism, from Montreal’s Sir George 

Williams University, is the only exciting 

‘news’ since The University of British 
Columbia’s Raven 10 and The University 
of Toronto’s J ARGO ’58-59.”’ 

Mr. Victor Coleman in an article printed 
in the January edition of THe CANADIAN 
Forum, a Toronto-based magazine on 
Arts and Letters, heaped praises upon the 
literary publication of this University. 
Prism was selected from the work produc- 
ed in the past years on the Canadian 
University scene and was examplified as 
being outstanding in field. The critic chose 
the much-sought ’63-64 copies of Prism 
as spearheading this show of quality. 

The fact that VoLtumME 63, with such 
eminent contributors as Gustafson, Birney, 
Bowering, and MacEwen is considered, in 
Mr. Coleman’s mind, as being collectively 
inferior to Prism, is indeed flattering. 

“Magazines like Prism,” he concluded, 
“not to be confused with UBC's magazine 
of the same name, are entirely justified in 
that they produce a standard for students 
in ensuing years; a standard that can, as 
in Prism’s case, be looked up to and 
saluted at all turns.” 


SGWU FORUM ON 
HISTORY OF MONTREAL 


Sir George Williams University pre- 
sented a series of six lectures by the Com- 
mittee on Canadian Studies. Each year, 
the Committee proposes to offer an 
interdisciplinary study of a Canadian 
region or theme. 


This year the topic was Montreal. Six 
lectures, each followed by a discussion 
period, were offered by specialists in 
various aspects of the city’s history and 
growth. 


Subjects covered were: The history of 


Vontreal, by Mr. Leslie Roberts, editor, 
writer and radio commentator; The Port 
of Montreal, by Mr. Brian Slack, Geog- 
raphy Department, Sir George Williams 
University; The Urban 
Montreal, by Prof. R. W. G. Bryant, 
Institut d’ Urbanisme, University of Mont- 
real; Ethnic Patterns in Montreal, by 
Vabbé Norbert Lacoste, Sociology De- 
partment, University of Montreal;; Civic 
administration of Montreal, by Mr. Thom- 
as Plunkett, Municipal Affairs Consul- 
tant; and Architecture of Montreal, by 
Prof. J. Bland, Director, School of Archi- 
tecture, McGill University. 


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14 


TRIMESTER PLAN 
AT GUELPH? 


Dr. J. D. MacLachlan, President of the 
University of Guelph, has announced that 
the University is interested in the year- 
round campus operation under the trimes- 
ter system. It is anticipated that the 
trimester programme will be offered in the 
Arts and Science courses of Wellington 
College which opens its doors in 1965. 
Special study committees are considering 
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Simon Fraser University has already 
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ON GRADUATES STUDIES... 


Two shelves and a dean 

Your neighborhood, wherever it is, is 
likely soon to be boasting and boosting a 
new university, and you will be expected to 
take an intelligent interest in its develop- 
ment as it grows, from the stage of opening 
its library with a shelf of textbooks and an 
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849-6012 


1965 PRODUCTION 
OF GEORGIAN PLAYERS 


A hard look at the easy life was the 
theme of this year’s major production by 
the Georgian Players of Sir George Wil- 
liams University. The work was Opera 
For a 2-Car Garage, an original play with 
songs by Montreal playwright Tevia 
Abrams, Music was arranged, composed 
and adapted by Max Layton, a young 
Montrealer who has sung in coffee houses 
in Canada and the United States. It was 
presented January 29 and 30 in Birks Hall 
of the University. 

The idea for the play was suggested by 
Victor Knight, well known theatre per- 
sonality, and director of the production. 
Based loosely on John Gay’s The Beggar’s 
Opera and Bertholt Brecht’s The Three 
Penny Opera, the new play is a scandalous 
glimpse into mid-century corporate life. 

The plot concerns the nationwide 
Indoor Games Unlimited, an organization 
deyoted to pleasurable pursuits, Peachum, 
the profiteering founder and Chairman of 
the Board, has been dipping his hands into 
the profits for many years. As the play 
opens, this dynamic senior executive is 
beginning to feel the reins of power slipping 
out of his grip. His daughter Polly, a sweet 


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NEW COMMERCE CURRICULUM 


The University Council, at a recent meeting, has approved an en- 
tirely new approach to education for business. Dean Lewis N. Greer and 
his colleagues, after intensified research, reached the conclusion arrived at 
by many research scholars of Business Education. The underlying philoso- 


phy may be summarized as follows: 


“Collegiate business education, largely a product of the twentieth 
century, is today a restless and uncertain giant in the halls of higher educa- 
tion. It enrolls considerably more male students than either engineering or 
mathematics and the natural sciences combined. In 1957-58, approxi- 
mately one of every six degrees granted in the United States was in busi- 


ness education.” 


Our analysis also indicates four propo- 
sitions that should be considered in under- 
taking the development of a program of 
“Education for Business”. These are: 

(1) Business education should educate for 
the whole career, and not primarily 
for the first job. 

(2) It should view the practice of business 
professionally, in the sense of relating 
it to what we have in the way of 
relevant, systematic bodies of 
knowledge. 

(3) It should emphasize the development 
of basic problem solving and organiz- 
ational skills and socially construc- 
tive attitudes, rather than memoriza- 
tion of facts or training in routine 
skills. 

(4) It should recognize that businesses in 
the decades ahead will need a higher 
order of analytical ability, a more 
sophisticated command of analytical 
tools, a greater degree of organiza- 
tional skill, and a wider capacity to 
cope with the external environment 
of business than has been true in 
the past. 


Before considering the foundation of 
our new curriculum, it is desirable to stress 
that the program reflects the appreciation 
of the view that, although the process of 
education for business may commence 
formally through a University, this is only 
the beginning of a lifetime of accumulating 
experience. It is not intended or possible 
that the program should provide a lifetime 
inventory of skills, attitudes and knowl- 
edge. It is specifically acknowledged that 
those interested in excelling in the business 
community will be involved in a lifetime 
educational process. This will be a conti- 
nuous program of intellectual development 
through general reading, specific business 
reading, formal education as individual 
needs become evident, and possible full 
time study in an executive development 
program offered in conjunction with a 
University. 


Therefore, the objective of our program 
is education for a creative role in business. 
It is a vocational objective as is education 
for engineering, law, medicine, etc. It is 
our intention that our objective be accom- 
plished by structuring a program which is 


multi-disciplinary, integrative and taught 
by a liberally educated faculty. 


The new course of study is a twenty- 
three credit curriculum and it may be 
divided into the following groupings: 


(1) Study in certain basic disciplines and 
tool subjects (notably literature and 
language skills, mathematics and 
statistics, psychology and sociology, 
legal institutions, economics and 
accounting). 


(2) Study of the application of these 
disciplines and tools to a core of broad 
functional aspects of the firm (finance, 
marketing, production and human 
resources). 

(3) a. Selected area of concentration 
(Honours economics; economics, 


accounting, finance, marketing and 
administration. ) 


OR 


b. A selection of five courses by the 
student from any Faculty. 


(4) The Business Policy course which 
attempts to integrate the experience 
obtained in the multi-disciplinary 
study of business. 


French Language 


The Business Community, as well as 
Governments, now express a preference for 
University graduates that are bilingual. 
We, therefore, advise all students to take 
advantage of the opportunities available 
during their years at this University to 
ensure that they are bilingual when they 
present themselves for employment upon 
graduation. 


(Continued on page 39) 








answer your neighbour’s call 


and GIVE to the 
Canadian Cancer Society 


FIGHT 


CANCER 
with 

a 

check up 
and a 
cheque 







17 


A POSTGRAD SPECIAL REPORT: 


EDUCATION BREAKTHROUGH IN QUEBEC 


THE PARENT COMMISSION RECOMMENDS... 


(Translated by Rosalind J. Murray) 


(From University Affairs, December, 1964) 


Msgr. Alphonse-Marie Parent, P.A., Chair- 
man of the Royal Commission of Inquiry on 
Education in the Province of Quebec. 


On March 24, 1961, the Government of 
the Province of Quebec established a Royal 
Commission of Inquiry on Education in 
the Province, and appointed the Commis- 
sion’s nine members on April 21. The 
Commission, which began its work on May 
25 of the same year, received more than 
300 briefs during public hearings held 
between November 1961 and July 1962 in 
seven or eight cities of the Province. Later 
in 1962 it visited various educational 
institutions and organizations at all levels 
in the other Canadian provinces and in the 
United States. In January and February 
1963, the Commission traveled to England, 
Scotland, France, Switzerland, Belgium, 
Holland, Germany, the Scandinavian 
countries, Moscow and Kiev. 


Upon its return the Commission released 
the first section of its report which, one 
year later, led to the establishment of a 
Ministry of Education and a Superior 
Council of Education, assisted by a Roman 
Catholic Committee and a Protestant 
Committee as well as by four Commis- 
sions representing the different educational 
levels. 


After more than 400 interviews and 
discussions, the Commission has just 
presented to the Government the second 
volume of its report, which deals with the 
structure and levels of the educational 
system. It consists of 400 pages and ten 
chapters, the seventh of which is devoted 
to higher education. The third volume of 
the report, soon to be released, will con- 
sider courses of study. The fourth will 
deal chiefly with local and regional school 
boards as well as the financing of educa- 
tion. The entire report will consist of 
approximately 1,200 pages. 


Educational levels 


One of the main concerns of the Com- 
mission was to define higher education 
more clearly and, by recommending the 


18 


co-ordination of higher education through- 
out the Province, to ensure parallel struc- 
ture for English-language and French- 
language institutions. 


The Commission thus proposes that, 
henceforth, higher education be regarded 
as all studies above the diploma of the 
13th year, and that the latter be awarded 
upon completion of six years’ elementary, 
five years’ secondary and two years’ post- 
secondary studies. Instruction at the 12th- 
and 13th-year levels will be the responsi- 
bility of a new type of institution called 
the ‘‘institute’’ and not that of the 
university. At the institute, students will 
prepare for university entrance (pre- 
university programme) or for employment 
(vocational programme). 

The 13th-year diploma or its equivalent 
will be required for admission to university. 
Depending upon the field of specialization, 
three or four years’ study will lead to a 
first degree, and two additional years to a 
second degree. Three years of study after 
a first degree will be required for a doc- 
torate. 

In French-language as well as English- 
language universities, studies at the same 
level and of identical duration will lead to 
equivalent degrees. The length of these 
programmes of study will be decided upon 
by the Ministry of Education in consulta- 
tion with the heads of the universities and 
the Superior Council of Education. 


At present, certain faculties of French- 
language as well as English-language uni- 
versities require a baccalaureate for admis- 
sion; others do not. Moreover, the bacca- 
laureate conferred by French-language 
institutions is not equivalent to the B.A. 
conferred by English-language institutions. 
To eliminate this anomaly and in fairness 
to all students, the Commission recom- 
mends that all faculties of all universities 
in the Province of Quebec admit their 
students after completion of the 13th year. 
In this way, both English-language and 
French-language students, at the age of 
22 or 23, may obtain a first degree after 
the 16th or 17th year of study. Invariably, 
the degree will represent the culmination of 


university training designed to prepare 
for careers. 


New university institutions 

The Commission’s terms of reference 
charged it with the task of studying the 
necessity and advisability of creating new 
universities, in the face of a rapidly grow- 
ing student population and in considera- 
tion of the geographic size of the Province. 
Although it decided not to propose the 
early establishment of new universities 
having the power to confer degrees to and 
including the doctorate, the Commission 
does, however, recommend the creation of 
new universities with limited charters, 
that is, with the authority to offer instruc- 
tion to the first degree and with the power 
to confer that degree. It is proposed that 
two such universities be established imme- 
diately in Montreal, one French-language 
and one for the English-speaking Catho- 
lics. 

In addition, the Commission recom- 
mends that centres of university study be 
established in three paired regions of the 
Province : the St. Maurice and Nicolet; 
the Saguenay and Lake St. John; the 
Lower Saint Lawrence and Gaspé. 

The Commission specifies the criteria 
which must be observed in setting up new 
universities and centres of university study. 
They deal with the required number of 
students, qualifications of teachers, and 
laboratory and library facilities. From a 
pedagogical point of view the centres of 
university study will be associated with 
parent universities, and instruction will 
be limited to one or two years of the first- 
degree course. Students may proceed from 
these centres to full-fledged universities to 
complete the first degree. 

It is suggested that the Commission for 
Higher Education appoint a committee, 
for a five-year term, to assist the new uni- 
versities during their period of organiza- 
tion. Similarly, the centres of university 
study would be assisted by committees 
named by their parent universities. 

The Royal Commission suggests, in this 
second volume of its report, that the Com- 
mission for Higher Education, in co- 
operation with the Division of Planning 
of the Ministry of Education, follow closely 
the evolution of higher education in the 


(Continued on page 22) 


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20 


COLUCCI, CHAPUT and CORE 


— Our Man at Large — 


A GEORGIAN REPORTS 
(by Joe Colucci) 
O CANADA 


Mr. Edmund Wilson, in his masterful 
survey of the Canadian zeitgeist, in ‘‘The 
New Yorker’’, noted that Marcel Chaput, 
separatist leader, used the hunger strike 
as a means of acquiring support and 
sympathy. 


As a member of CORE (Congress of 
Racial Equality) in Columbus, Ohio, I 
participated in a sit-in at the State House, 
in 1963, to urge the adoption of a Fair 
Housing Bill which never even came out 
of committee. Along with two other CORE 
members, I was eventually carried out of 
the State House by four stalwarts of the 
Highway Patrol. 


What linked these two similar but quite 
separate incidents, containing participants 
of different (by what degree I am no longer 
sure) social and political views, is the fact 
that Mr. Chaput and I shared the same 
laboratory for three years, during World 
War II, as assistants to two of Canada’s 
most important chemists, Dr. Richard 
Manske and Dr. Leo Marion, both of 
whom now have classical reputations in 
the complex field of alkaloid chemistry. 


Never before had the aseptic walls of 
Canada’s National Research Council, in 
Ottawa, reverberated at such high fre- 
quencies with the nowhere-going propul- 
sive fury of agnosticism and socialism 
(me) versus Christian belief and political 
conservatism (Mr. Chaput) in Canada’s 
two official languages. Never before had 
two scientific assistants strained the pro- 
fessional indulgence of their superiors to 
such limits as displayed by Drs. Manske 
and Marion towards our digressions. 


There were, of course, some moments 
of agreement. Mr. Chaput had (and I 
hope, retains) a beautiful tenor voice and 
I still remember with pleasure his noon- 
hour renditions of several arias from 
Gounod’s ‘Faust,’ especially the line, 
“A moi Vénergie des instincts puissants, 
Et la folie du ceur et du sang,’”’ which, to 
my way of thinking, characterized the 
nationalist spirit he evinced, although the 
context of the song evoked a hedonistic 
philosophy at odds with its interpreter’s 
Roman Catholicism. 


In our work we found ourselves mutually 
co-operative, with no discomfort, sharing 
the laboratory tasks and assisting each 
other in studying for eventual university 
acceptance. He learned some Italian from 
me and in return he polished up my 
French. 


But Mr. Chaput campaigned for the 
Bloc Populaire, whose political program, 
beyond French-Canadian nationalism, was 
vaguely semi-Fascistic and Salazar-orient- 
ed while I was involved with the C.C.F., 
a Labour Party-like organization which 
was—it seemed to me—fated to have never 
more than ten representatives in Parlia- 
ment. 


Mr. Chaput’s hero was Henri Bourassa, 
a fiery orator, primarily noted for his 
objection to Canada’s participation in the 
Boer War and for his successful campaign 
to defeat Liberal Prime Minister Sir 
Wilfrid Laurier in 1911. Mine was George 
Bernard Shaw. Mr. Chaput considered 
Shaw irrelevant to French-Canadian aspi- 
rations, I considered Bourassa irrelevant 
to the 20th century. 


Neither of us could foresee that in our 
respective admiration for Ghandi lay the 
bond between a sit-in in Ohio and a hunger 
strike in Quebec, twenty years later. 


Mr. Wilson’s concluding remarks linking 
French-Canadian nationalism and _ the 
world-wide resurgence of nationalisms to 
the attempts of the individual to retain 
his identity in a Big Brother bureaucracy 
seem to me to be somewhat too facile and 
I hope that in the no-doubt expanded book 
version of his articles, he will amend the 
assertions. 


Mr. Chaput, when I knew him, was 
much closer in spirit to the reactionary 
clergy of Quebec (with its strict control 
over the culture of French Canada) than 
to Archbishop Charbonneau of Montreal, 
whose liberal views and activities, and 
whose martyrdom were so succinctly out- 
lined by Mr. Wilson. Thus, the manifesta- 
tions of French-Canadian nationalism are 
politically more complex than can be 
explained by the revolt-of-the-Kafka-hero 
theory. 

Joseph Colucci, B.Sc. 49, B.A. 52 
886 Carolyn Avenue 


Columbus 24, Ohio. 


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21 


PARENT REPORT 
(Continued from page 18) 


coming years to decide when it would be 
appropriate to set up centres of university 
study in other regions, to convert into 
limited-charter universities centres of 
university study that meet prescribed 
requirements and to establish new univer- 
sities with unrestricted charters. 

Inasmuch as the State will necessarily 
have to provide considerable financial 
assistance’ to all new university institu- 
tions, the Committee recommends that 
the latter be constituted as special public 
corporations under a law endowing the 
State with the authority to appoint the 
majority of the members of the governing 
boards but at the same time recognizing 
the right of groups of educators or other 
persons involved in educational activity 
to nominate candidates. 


Training of teachers 

One of the recommendations with major 
significance for the universities is that 
outlined in the chapter on the training of 
teachers. The Commission recommends 
that the training—of one year’s or of three 
or more years’ duration—be the exclusive 
responsibility of the universities and the 
centres of university study. This means 


to ambitious young people. 





the opportunity 
for advancement. 


Inquiries welcomed at: 
Employment Office, 


that, if this recommendation is accepted, 
the French-language university institu- 
tions will soon have to open their doors to 
thousands of additional students and the 
faculties of education at these institutions 
will be among those having the heaviest 
enrolment. 


Research 


The Commission urges the Ministry of 
Education to do its utmost, by means of 
scholarships, assistance to libraries, etc., 
to ensure the growth and promotion of 
graduate study programmes, particularly 
at the larger universities. To this end, 
research must be recognized as an integral 
part of university life. The Government is 
invited to create a Provincial Research 
Council with the task of co-ordinating and 
subsidizing research in institutions of 
higher education. By so doing, it will help 
train a sufficient number of staff for the 
institutes and also for the universities 
which are threatened with a critical 
shortage of qualified staff within a few 
years. 

Continuing education 

In the chapter on continuing education, 

universities and centres of university study 


are encouraged to introduce changes and 
break new ground in the field of adult 


education and in their sphere of activity 
aimed at the cultural development of the 
general public. In the field of continuing 
education, as well as in education gener- 
ally, it is hoped that the compartmentali- 
zation practised by faculties and depart- 
ments will be broken down and that a 
more flexible structure will encourage and 
facilitate inter-disciplinary studies. 

Other recommendations 


There are four other recommendations 
among the 40 dealing with higher educa- 
tion to which I might draw attention: 


@ that the charters and statutes of uni- 
versities now in operation be revised to 
give their administration a character 
which is more democratic and better 
adapted to the needs of modern society, 
with respect particularly to the composi- 
tion and powers of governing boards and 
the appointment and duties of adminis- 
trative officers, and to permit greater 
participation by faculty members in 
administrative and academic decisions 
and by students in matters closely con- 
cerning them; 

@ that the academic year consist of two 
semesters of at least 15 weeks of classes 
each and that year-round university 
operation be studied; 

(Continued on page 39) 


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“SUPPLEMENTARY READING” 


UNDERSTANDING ED REPORT 
(From the ‘‘ Fatlt-Ye Times’’, Macdonald College, January 22, 1965). 


Introduction to an Education Students Method of Preliminary approach to 
Recommendations 193 through 402 of Part two of the second Report of the Quebec Royal 


Commission on Education. 


How to be able to discuss the Parent report intelligently without having to under- 


stand the whole thing. 


by Norman Asher, B.A.’63 


The 210 recommendations, contained in 
part two of the second report of the Quebec 
Royal Commission of Education, cover 
almost every conceivable aspect of elemen- 
tary and secondary school administration, 
curriculum, and teaching. For myself, a 
mere novice in the fascinating and complex 
business of education, and for my fellow 
students who are in the same pedagogical 
boat—a boat which has suddenly taken off 
on a very new but very carefully chartered 
course—there is a feeling that it is impor- 
tant for us to know all about this report, 
which is of such vital significance to the 
profession we are about to enter. 


However, it is obvious that a complete 
critical analysis of this momentous docu- 
ment, with its manifold broad interpreta- 
tions, would present a formidable task for 
even the most highly educated educators. 
How, then, are we beginners—the very 
people who are to be the most crucially 
affected by the report—to approach it? 


With this problem in mind, my col- 
leagues and I have thankfully hit upon a 
sure fire method for understanding the 
Report—a method so valid that we have 
written to the Quebec Dept. of Education 
suggesting that they incorporate this as a 
403rd recommendation. For some reason, 
our suggestion was not adopted, but here 
it is anyway, for the intended use of all 
prospective teachers who are readers of the 
Failt-Ye Times (I know at least three). 


The suggestion is simply that each Ed. 
Student:— 


1. Pick the particular topic in the field of 
education that he or she is most 
interested in and then; 


bo 


. Skim the Parent report searching for 
any points that refer to that topic; 

3. write a reasonably good summary of 
these above mentioned points; 

. memorize it, and 


. when asked by anyone what is your 
opinion on the Parent Report, recite 
your summary, remembering to quote 
at least one recommendation verbatim. 


u 


One such topic, most thoroughly dealt 
with by the Report, is the intellectual 
development of children and youth, and 
the educational guidance thereof. Pertain- 
ing to this, the implications of the Parent 
Report are that, henceforth, there will be 
a much greater emphasis on the so-called 
child-centered concept of education. This 
means, specifically, a system of edu- 
cation which is almost completely gov- 
erned by the needs and interests of the 
pupils—as opposed to the system of 
education which is much more greatly 
influenced by cultural, religious, and tra- 
ditional attitudes. Naturally, the logic 
behind this new and refreshing approach 
is that, since the youngsters of today are 
the leaders of tomorrow, their interests 
and the interests of our society coincide. 


This idea of education being directly 
geared to the needs of society is well illus- 
trated by the 193rd recommendation, 
that:— 


“|. . the time table include (a) arts and 
means of expression, (b) the natural and 
social sciences, (c) development of methods 
of thinking; and that this all-round devel- 
opment of the student, BE DETER- 
MINED BY THE VOCATIONAL GUI- 
DANCE SERVICE on the basis of the 
aptitudes and inclinations of the child for 
the career which he wishes to follow.” 


The idea here is that of the pupil, 
through the educative process, being led, 
guided, and directed through a lengthy 
series of learning experiences which will 
produce those changes in behaviour which 
will result in he or she acquiring the com- 
petence to take his or her place, not only 
as an adequately developed intellect and 
a well-adjusted member of society, but 
also as a skilled member of the Province’s 
Labour Force. 


RANDOM CLIPPINGS 


The Building Fund Committee, striving 
for an objective of $22,500, staged a series 
of blitzes from February 17 to March 22. 

The money was raised by selling 25,000 
boxes of Macdonald’s chocolate biscuit 
bars. 





I graduated (B.A.) from S.G.W.U. in 
1963. Thought you might be interested to 
know that we're moved to North Holly- 
wood, California, and that we have a year 
old son (native Californian). 

Eva Klein (Schwartz). 


ABRAHAM SCHWARTZBERG (Arts 
57), a teacher in the Young Israel Aca- 
demy of Montreal for 13 years, and lec- 
turer in the Adult Education Dept. of the 
Keren Hatarbut for 10 years, is also a 
lecturer in Hebrew at SGWU. Mr. 
Schwartzberg also has diplomas from the 
Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the 
Ecole Pédagogique de Paris. 





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23 


OUR GRADS IN THE WORLD — (collected by John Ferguson) 


NOTES FROM THE 
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S 
OFFICE 


ARNOLD SHUSTER, B.A. 754, 
B.Com. ’55, now living in Ste. Anne de 
Bellevue. His charming wife is expecting 
and will no doubt have their first by this 
time. Arnold is President of Atlantic 
Motion Picture Distributors in Montreal, 
was married in February ’64 and plans 
further study in the United States. Best 
wishes to all of you. 

R. G. (DICK) THOMPSON, B.A. 53, 
Vice-President of the Alumni Board of 
Directors, has been appointed Assistant 
Sales Manager, Eastern Area, Bathurst 
Containers Ltd. — Congrats Dick and a 
Happy Birthday to the twins. 

This is the time of year when many of 
our undergrads are looking for summer 
employment to help them through next 
year’s study programme. If you can assist 
in any way, please call me at the Alumni 
Office. 

Heard of SOPHIA TERK, B.A. ’38, 
through Dr. Hall. Sophia is living in Tel 
Aviv, Israel. Best wishes. 

JAMES A. CURRIE, B.Com. ’62, in 
Pharmaceutical Sales with Ames Co. and 
is still studying at Sir George. 

Congrats to IAN, B.Sc. ’55, and Mrs. 
DAVIDSON on the birth of a daughter 
Heather Lenore in January, their first. 
Ian is with the Department of Health in 
Toronto. 

LOUELLA GASOI, B.A. ’62, now Mrs. 
S. Lecker, and living in Belmont, Cali- 
fornia. 

VIRGINIA R. GENSER, B.Sc. ’54, 
now at the University of British Columbia 
working towards a M.Sc. 

ALLAN MARKS, Ist year Arts, son of 
Mrs. ESTHER S. MARKS, B.A. ’63, is 
now attending Sir George. The number of 


sons and daughters of grads attending 
S.G.W.U. seems to be increasing. 

JAMES H. GORDON, B.Com. ’62, is 
in Work Analysis with the T. Eaton Co. 
Glad to have you back. 

DAVID R. DIES, B.Sc.’64, now attend- 
ing MacDonald College and also Sir 
George, working towards an Arts degree 
and a teaching degree. 

A most interesting and pleasant letter 
from Mrs. M. Young, mother of Rev. 
RUSSELL M. YOUNG, B.A. ’58, Rev. 
Young is with the Canadian Mission in 
Seoul, Korea. 

GORDON SHAPIRO, B.A. ’55, drop- 
ped in to say hello and leave a cheque for 
the Building Fund. Gordon is News 
Editor for the C.B.C. Thanks Gordon. 

T. F. VERNON LEPAGE, B.Com. ’60, 
successfully passed his C.A. Exams last 
June and is now with Asbestos Co. in 
Thetford Mines. ‘ 

An interesting note from Dr. GEORGE 
DeZWIREK, B.A. ’57. He married Sylvia 
Bohbot of Casablanca, Morocco in Janua- 
ry 1964. He graduated from the Ottawa 
Medical College, interned at the Montreal 
Jewish General and is now Ist year 
Resident at Rockland State Hospital, 
New York. Son David Theodore was born 
in New York in October. Congrats and 
best wishes George. 

Pleasant visit from ALEC FINEBERG. 
Alec is now with United Investment Sery- 
ices, Quebec, Ltd., selling Mutual Funds. 
Nice seeing you. 

Dr. Hall informed me that he had 
received a card from Miss EMILY 
CLARKE, B.A. ’54. Miss Clarke has 
served with the Salvation Army in the 
Congo for several years. Very happy to 
hear of you. 

ROSS WHITE, B.A. ’61, and his wife 
Pam, B.A. ’61 (née Vallance) announce 
the birth of their daughter, Marcia 


Witwms ‘ 


Margaret, on Dec. 13/64. Birth weight 
3 Ibs. 2 oz!!! Sister for Jeffrey. Baby gain- 
ing weight well and is now home from the 
hospital. 

Ross is now teaching English Literature, 
grades 8-11, at William McMaster High 
School, McMasterville, Quebec and _ is 
working towards his Master of Education 
at Bishops University during the sum- 
mers. Pam is obviously busy at home. 
Congratulations and best wishes and 
thanks for the note. 


A most welcome letter from STAN 
KNIGHTS, B.Sc. ’42, enclosing generous 
donations from a few of the Ottawa Area 
Grads, Stan is our Campaign Chairman 
for that Area, and is with the Department 
of National Defence. Thanks Stan, and 
please drop in when in town. 

Thank you SHIRLEY POPE, B.A. ’50, 
for the note. Shirley has done considerable 
travelling since leaving Sir George. She 
received her B.L.S. from McGill and a 
M.A. in Library Science, University of 
Denver, and is presently Reference Libra- 
rian at the University of Wisconsin, 
Milwaukee. 

BURTON V. KELLY, B.Com. ’64, is 
now with the Royal Bank of Canada, St. 
Johns, Antigua, W.I. 


CARL A. BROWN, B.A. ’63, is now 
with “This Hour Has Seven Days”, 
C.B.0.T.-TV, Ottawa. 


Congrats to GLENN GRAY, B.A. ’58, 
on his recent appointment as Executive 
Secretary of the International Branch 
Y.M.C.A. in Montreal. Glenn was for- 
merly Assistant Secretary, Lakeshore. 


I hear that LLOYD WELTON, B.A. 
43, Executive Secretary of Westmount 
Y.M.C.A. will be leaving shortly to be- 
come the General Secretary of the Strat- 
ford, Y.M.C.A. Best wishes Lloyd. 


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25 


SIR GEORGE AND THE WORLD 


27 FACULTY MEMBERS 
SIGN PETITION AGAINST 
U.S. VIETNAM POLICY 


The following statement is a petition 
which was signed by the following mem- 
bers of the administration and faculty of 
Sir George Williams University. 


The continued United States bombings 
of North Vietnam pose the threat of 
nuclear war. A civil war has now been 
escalated into an international crisis of 
ominous proportions. 


The American air strikes against North 
Vietnam are a public confession of the 
failure of American Policies in South 
Vietnam. They signify that the United 
States cannot cope with a guerilla force 
operating amidst a friendly populace. The 
attack by guerilla forces on the Pleiku air- 
base in South Vietnam, and subsequent 
attacks, are an ugly but inevitable part of 
the war which has been going on there for 
years. It must not be forgotten that the 
origins of this war lie largely in the refusal 
of the South Vietnamese government to 


permit the holding of elections as provided 
for by the terms of the Geneva Agreement 
of 1954. This refusal, it must also be 
recalled, was supported by the American 
government. 


Guerilla attacks do not represent North 
Vietnamese intervention. As U.S. Senator 
Wayne Morse and many other American 
students of the Vietnamese war admit, the 
guerillas in South Vietnam largely equip 
and motivate themselves. 


The undersigned, members of the 
faculty, of Sir George Williams Univer- 
sity, support Prime Minister Pearson's 
expression of concern regarding America’s 
new strategy in Vietman. We urge that 
the Canadian Government use its mem- 
bership on the International Control Com- 
mission in Vietnam to stimulate the 
organization of peace talks. 


ALAN ADAMSON, Assistant Professor 
of History; HAROLD ANGELL, Assis- 
tant Professor of Political Science; PARIS 
ARNOPOLOUS, Lecturer in Political 
Science; WALTER AUSSERLEITNER, 
Lecturer in History; JACK BORDAN, 


Dean of Engineering; GABRIEL BRE- 
TON, Assistant Professor in Psychology; 
MICHAEL BRIAN, Assistant Professor 
of English; FRANK CHALK, Lecturer 
in History; D. B. CLARKE, Vice- 
Principal; NEIL COMPTON, Chairman 
of the Dept. of English; MICHAEL 
DAVENPORT, Lecturer in Economics; 
FERNAND FONTAINE, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Sociology; WYNNE FRANCIS, 
Associate Professor of English; CARL 
GOLDMAN, Assistant Professor of En- 
gineering; HUBERT GUINDON, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Sociology; W. R. 
HOOPER, Assistant Professor of Psychol- 


ogy ; MUHAMMAD Iqbal, Assistant 
Professor of Engineering; SIDNEY 


LAMB, Associate Professor of English; 
GEORGE LERMER, Lecturer in Eco- 
nomics; MARTIN LEWIS, Associate 
Professor of History; KURT JONAS- 
SOHN, Assistant Professor of Sociology; 
E. E. McCULLOUGH, Chairman of the 
Dept. of History; ALFRED PINSKY, 
Chairman of the Dept. of Fine Arts; 
HAROLD POTTER, Chairman of the 
Dept. of Sociology; STEPHEN SCHEIN- 
BERG, Assistant Professor of History; 
R. C. RAE, Principal; JANE STEWART, 


Associate Professor of Psychology. 


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Dr. Harry Johnson’s Series of Lectures 


for Norris Memorial — In Summary 


THE WORLD ECONOMY AT 
THE CROSSROADS— 


By Sid Abed 
(of the GEORGIAN) 


The first lecture involved the establish- 
ment, processes, and consequences of the 
IMF (International Monetary Fund) 
which was formed to secure stable currency 
levels. Dr. Johnson believes that this fund 
was “‘pushed aside’’ by the post-war dollar 
shortage problem. 

This, he feels, was a problem of confi- 
dence.”’ He said that this dilemma of 
liquidation was denied until a year ago 


when a “‘subterranean conflict’’ arose. 


Xurope, he stressed, believed that the 
U.S. had “sinned with liquidity,’ while 
the U.S. said they had need for this 
currency. 


LIBERAL SYSTEM OF TRADE 


By Pierre Wheeler 
(from the GEORGIAN) 


In his second lecture, Dr. Harry Gordon 
Johnson dealt with the evolution of the 
institution designed to reconstruct a 
liberal system of international trade—the 
proposed International Trade Organiza- 
tion set up by the Havana Charter, the 
failure of which to gain ratification in the 
US Senate led to the assumption of the 
same responsibilities by the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 

Before dealing with these subjects quite 
thoroughly, Dr. Johnson commented on 
some of the essential principles of the 
International Conventions governing the 
commercial policies of nations that had 
emerged from historical experience. 


“Government intervention in trade 
should take the form of the imposition of 
tariffs and trade should be non-discrimina- 
tory as between foreign nations.” 


He then proceeded to deal with the 
evolution of international arrangements 
and of GATT in relation to them and the 
two powerful political and economic units 
of the free world—the European Economic 
Community and the United States, on 
which Dr. Johnson commented. 


“It has become abundantly clear that 
they have different concepts of how the 


28 


international economy should be organized 
and managed. The rivalry between them is 
certain to produce some polarization of the 
rest of the countries of the free world about 
these two centers of political and economic 
power.” 


In closing, Dr. Johnson cautioned that 
American disappointment from the Ken- 
nedy Round, is likely to cause the United 
States to lose interest in further liberali- 
zation. 


The third in the series of the Kenneth E. 
Norris Lectures was concerned with “The 
responsibility assigned at Bretton Woods 
to the International Bank for Reconstruc- 
tion and Deyelopment.’’ This lecture was 
the last in a series of carefully organized 
lectures dealing with the theme, “The 
World Economy at the Crossroads.” 


In his first two lectures, Dr. Johnson 
traced the evolution of the economic sys- 
tem and “‘the problems pertaining thereto 
that have emerged in the post-war period.” 


In his last lecture, Dr. Johnson describ- 
ed in great detail how the International 
Bank for Reconstruction and Develop- 
ment, established for the purpose of post- 
war reconstruction, ‘‘had been brushed 
aside by the march of events, and the 
center of the stage has come to be occupied 
by economic relations between interna- 
tional power groups.’’ The result is the 
recently emerging economic struggle be- 
tween the U.S., the Common Market 
Countries and the Communist Bloc. 


The International Bank was designed to 
cope with the problems of the 1930's and 
with “‘forestalling a recurrence of the 
problems of that era’. Dr. Johnson went 
on to point out a particular cause for the 
great depression. He said, ‘‘The great 
depression can be attributed to a failure 
of monetary management—particularly 
failure of domestic monetary management 
on the part of the U.S. Federal Reserve 
system”’. 

The International Bank for Reconstruc- 
tion and Development was designed to 
provide ‘‘a stable source of long-term 
capital for development loans at reason- 
ably low interest.’’ Dr. Johnson comment- 
ed that the Bank was set up on “‘extre- 
mely conservative lines.”’ This fact tended 






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aes it 


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[en 


to command financial confidence in the 
face of the unhappy record of the imme- 
diate past. 

The IBDR was intended to play a major 
role ‘‘in a world economy shaped on the 
lines of the pre 1930’s world.’’ However, 
this role was altered by ‘‘the powerfully 
contagious appeal of national indepen- 
dence and self-determination which swept 
through Asia and Africa like wildfire and 
created a rash of new nations.’’ The second 
major alteration was the “‘cold war 
jockeying for political positions’? by the 
nations that were anxious to provide 
capital for political rather than economic 
returns. 


Dr. Johnson went on to say, ‘‘Economic 
development is not simply a matter of 
generating enough capital investment. It 
is a far more complex program of gener- 
ating the human skills and knowledge 
required for working with and managing 
capital.” 


Dr. Johnson closed the series by saying. 
“T have not undertaken in these lectures 
to propose solutions to the current 
problems of international economic organ- 
ization, but describe and 


explain them.” 


merely to 


ANOTHER GEM 
From the Georgian ‘“‘humor"’ page 


NOTED SAVANT WILL 
EXPLAIN UNIVERSE 


Dr. Reynhart Von Holmann-Pajeski, 
famed lecturer and philosopher has 
recently signed an agreement for three 
appearances at Birk’s Hall. During the 
course of these lectures, the good Dr., in 
his own words, “Will acquaint students 
with the elements of social reality in 
accordance with the little known theory 
of ecumenical diastrophism.” 

Dr. Holmann-Pajeski’s career is a 
history of brilliant intellectual achieve- 
ments, and continued frustration in the 
face of what he terms blind prejudice and 
overt hostility on the part of his more 
orthodox colleagues. 

“T remember as a boy,’’ Dr. Holmann 
Pajeski confided, ‘‘newly graduated from 
the gymnasium in Baden-Kassel, | wrote 
my first book. To me it was both a 
revelation and a cathartic experience. I 
poured out my heart and soul into what 
I believed to be no less than the divine 
truth. To my horror, my fellow students 
merely mocked me. It was a truly trau- 
matic experience.” 


Compliments 


of 


The book referred to by the Doctor 
was a collection of rather obscene poems 
and limericks entitled ‘‘The Osteological 
Procedures Inyolved in the Determination 
of the Post-Quadratic Calculus.” 

As his education was continued, the 
Doctor's intellect expanded to truly epic 
proportions. His next great work, written 
fifty years after the first, was entitled 
“Ethnographic Oscillation.’’ Here the 
Doctor attempted to analyze the universe 
in a few simple algebraic equations. Every 
subject known to man is covered, ranging 
from the elements of cultural diffusion to 
the preparation of a TV dinner. 

“Simply reading this book could drive 
men mad,”’ said the Doctor in his intro- 
duction. Still regardless of the irrefutable 
academicians 
everywhere simply mocked him. 


brilliance of this work, 


“Until I realized the truly neurotic 
derivation of their hostility, I simply 
couldn’t understand it,’’ said the doctor. 

Everything was in black and white, well 
documented and foot-noted in large, easy 
to read type. They even attacked my 
equations! Good Grief man, if X = Y2 
doesn’t mean God, what in hell does it 
mean ? 

(Continued on page 34) 


MOLSON’S 


BREWERY 





29 


HIGHLY-RATED SOCIOLOGY SUMMER SESSION 


Several leading international sociologists 
will teach at Sir George Williams Univer- 
sity next summer in a special session in 
sociology. The courses will run from July 
12 to Aug. 24. 


Among the visiting professors named 
yesterday are: Kurt H. Wolff, PhD, Dart- 
mouth Medical School, who will offer a 
course in medical sociology; Alfred R. 
Lindesmith, PhD, Indiana University, 
who will teach the sociology of deviance; 
Scott A. Greer, PhD, Northwestern 
University, who will present a half-course 
on the modern community; and Jan 
Szczepanski, PhD, University of Lodz, 
Poland, who will teach a course on caste 
and class studies. 


Kurt Jonassohn, assistant professor of 
sociology at SGWU who will direct the 
program, said yesterday, ‘‘These are top 
notch people in their field. The program 
is intended to be an intensive learning 
experience for carefully selected students. 
The courses will be identical to those 
offered for two terms; they will involve 
term papers, reading assignments and 
examinations. They are not an easy way 
to pick up university credits.” 


PLANS FOR 1965 


Associate Prof. Hubert Guindon, who 
will assist Prof. Jonassohn with the sum- 
mer program, said the studies have been 
established “to stimulate committed stu- 
dents and help promote the intellectual 
atmosphere.” 


“The summer program creates excellent 
contact between students and faculty and 
is deliberately designed to keep enrolment 
down.” 


This is the second summer Sir George 
has offered the special session in sociology. 
Last year 75 upperclassmen and profes- 
sional people enrolled in five courses. Of 
those, 21 came from outside of SGWU 
(from across Canada and the United 
States, Prof. Jonassohn said) and 17 had 
already graduated university, some with 
advanced degrees. 


Prof. Jonassohn said in addition to 
students in the social sciences, there was 
interest in the session among social 
workers, lawyers, doctors and _ psychol- 
ogists. 


Prof. Szczepanski will be one of the few 
Eastern European visiting teachers at a 
Canadian university. Among his works is 


the editing of a 19-volume series on the 
transformation of the class structure under 
the influence of socialist industrialization. 


Prof. Greer’s specialty is urban growth, 
problems and redevelopment. Prof. Linde- 
smith is a specialist in problems of drug 
addiction. A textbook on social-psychology 
which he co-authored is one of the most 
widely used in colleges and universities. 


Prof. Segal was formerly a fellow in the 
Harvard University program for the 
training of social scientists in medicine. 


Prof. Wolff, who taught at the Univer- 
sity of Rome as a Senior Fulbright Lec- 
turer, will be the third member of the 
sociology department at Brandeis to 
conduct a course at SGWU. 


His colleague, Prof. Lewis A. Coser, 
taught at the university last summer. 
Another colleague, Prof. Helen McGill 
Hughes, is visiting professor of sociology 
at Sir George this term. 


In addition to courses, last summer’s 
students were conducted on a number of 
field trips, including one to Labrador and 
outlying areas of this province. Similar 
tours are planned for next summer. 





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33 


LETTERS 
Dear Mr. Asher: 

As President of the Arts Faculty Asso- 
ciation of Sir George Williams University 
I receive your excellent publication, 
“Postgrad.”’ In your October issue I was 
heartened to learn that you included in 
your publication articles on present Day 
Student activities at Sir George. 

I am outlining the Arts Faculty Asso- 
ciation’s programs for the ’64-’65 academic 
year and trust that you will include some 
in your next issue. 

SPEAKERS FOR 1964-1965 
Melvin M. Belli—(former defence attor- 
ney for Jack Ruby, spoke on November 

7, 1964). 

Hon. Maurice Lamontagne—spoke on 

November 20, 1964. 

Hon. Judy LaMarsh—spoke November 

23, 1964. 

Hon. T. C. Douglas—spoke on December 

1, 1964. 

Hon. René Lévesque—spoke on February 

12, 1965. 

Hon. Guy Favreau—spoke on February 

22, 1965. 

Hon. Réal Caouette—spoke on February 

26, 1965. 

Hon. John Diefenbaker—spoke on March 

3, 1965. 


UN. 6-3656 


Hon. Claude Wagner—spoke on March 

5, 1965. 

In co-operation with the Ethnic Club the 
Arts Faculty Association has sponsored the 
First International Week at Sir George 
from February 27—March 6, 1965. Mr. 
Pierre Dupuy, Commissioner General of 
Expo ’67 opened the program with 
Principal Rae. 

There was a Ball, Sugaring-off party, 
International Dinner, Exhibits, and films, 
and a variety show (Jimmy Tapp as host). 

We also sponsored the First Internatio- 
nal Film Festival which took place January 
25, to January 29. 

We have also planned a tour of Expo ’67 
in late February. 

I would assume that the graduates of Sir 
George would be interested in some of 
these programs. For further details, and a 
more detailed account of the above please 
contact me at the university. 

I would sincerely appreciate your 
co-operation in this matter. 

Fraternally yours, 

Barry Beloff, President, 

Arts Faculty Association. 
P.S.—We are also embarking on the prop- 
er procedure to use in ensuring Sir George 
of a permanent university song. Any hints 
you may have on what mistakes may have 


NOTED SAVANT 
(Continued from page 29) 

Not to be confined to mere monographs, 
the doctor has expounded a good many 
revolutionary concepts which represent 
“Universal Truth, Reality and Art.’’ One 
of his most noted theories is that of 
Sanitary Determination.” In this difficult 
concept, the Doctor expounds that the 
true level of a civilization can only be 
determined by the methods employed in 
the elimination and distribution of body 
wastes. 

The success of Lyndon Johnson’s ‘‘Great 
Society,” said the Doctor, “‘is, in reality, 
based solely on the flush-toilet.”’ 

These, and other goodies, await the 
eager students who attend Doctor Hol- 
mann’s lectures on the 30th of this month. 

“Don’t be too sure of the date, though,”’ 
said the Doctor in his closing statement, 
“T am working on a theory now which 
will eliminate the present dating system. 
I am modelling it after that employed by 
the Moocacha Indians of West Yucatan, 
in which there is only one twenty-four 
hour day in the year, the rest being utilized 
solely for determining when the year will 
take place. 


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BOOKS IN REVIEW irom university attairs) 


THE MULTIVERSITY 

Clark Kerr’s The Uses of the University 
(Harvard University Press, 1963. 140pp. 
$2.75) traces the effects on American uni- 
versities of the far-ranging social demands 
made upon them over the past decades. 
His main purpose is to define the varying 
uses to which universities in the U.S. are 
put, as ‘instruments of national purpose’, 
and to identify the various dimensions in 
which the resultant institution, the ‘multi- 
versity’, operates. Kerr's readers cannot 
avoid being jarred in their thinking about 
the social role of the university. 


The multiversity is by definition a com- 
plex of universities held together by a 
loose administrative structure. As Presi- 
dent of the University of California, Kerr 
presides over a model of ‘multiversity’, 


with its annual operating expenditure of 


over $500,000,000, and capital expendi- 
tures over recent years around $100,000,- 
000; with its 40,000 employees, 100 
separate locations, 10,000 courses, 100,000 
full-time and 200,000 part-time students. 


Kerr makes many penetrating observa- 


For Young Men: — 


UNDERWRITING 
ADJUSTING 
ACCOUNTING 


tions on the new teaching and research 
functions of the university. Most impor- 
tant, however, he makes the reader aware 
of the range of uses to which institutions 
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In his introductory chapters the author 
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36 





JACK RUBY’S DEFENSE LAWYER ADDRESSES GEORGIANS 


BELLI DENOUNCES 
DALLAS JURY 


Melvin M. Belli, the man whose name 
became internationally known after his 
explosive defense of Jack Ruby, elaborated 
some of his controversial views before a 
capacity audience in Birks Hall on 
November 6th, 1964. 

Mr. Belli answered the question that 
was uppermost in many people’s minds: 
what was his motivation for taking the 
Ruby case ? 

“T've seen too many lawyers trying 
cases instead of individuals. Show me a 
lawyer who says he represents ethnic 
groups or unpopular causes and I'll show 
you a lawyer who has lost the spirit of the 
criminal law, who has lost the spirit of the 
civil law.’ 

He added, ‘‘that’s what I did, I repre- 
sented the individual Ruby, not any cause. 
I saw a little Jewish man in a city of 
Anti-Semites .. ."’ 

Mr. Belli also said he took the case 
because along with defending Ruby he 
had the opportunity to do something for 
the medicine. He said that the law which 
states that if a man knows the difference 


, 


between right and wrong he can be 
punished capitally, is an idiotic one. 

Mr. Belli stated that he tried the case 
the only honest way—the scientific way. 
“T ran into an extreme mental state, but I 
couldn't get in over to the jury.”” He added 
“the judge was reading a funny-book while 
I was explaining Ruby’s mental illness.”’ 


“The tragedy of the great American 
city’, Mr. Belli said, ‘‘is that the people 
believe themselves to be conscientious, but 
unconsciously they can’t give a fair trial.”’ 
He added, ‘“‘the people of Dallas are 
gracious people, but they are transistor- 
ized. They've got to show the world that 
they area law abiding people, and the way 
to do this is to send the man to the electric 
chair.” 

The lesson we can draw from this, Mr. 
Belli stated, lies in the lack of humility 
and the worship of materialism. He added 
that he felt sorry for Dallas. He said that 
while he was there he went to one of the 
churches to worship and was given a 
program. On the front was the balance 
sheet of the church with a small cross in 
the corner saying, ‘‘for God’s message, see 
inside’. It was this materialism, Mr. Belli 


said, that sat in the jury box. ‘Those 
people had to return the verdict they did.”’ 

Mr. Belli went on to talk about civil 
cases, especially those which involved 
personal injuries. He said that we must 
appreciate the dignity of man, the right 
that if a person suffers the loss of an eye 
or leg, he can adequately live afterwards. 
“The end result of justice in a criminal 
case’’, Mr. Belli said, ‘is the sentence; in 
the civil side the end result is the amount 
of the award.’’ Awards in Canada, he 
added, are % to 14 less than those in the 
U.S. In regard to this fact, Mr. Belli stated 
that he doesn’t think juries and judges in 
Canada feel that we are entitled to the 
same kind of justice as American are. 

Following a brief question and answer 
period, Mr. Belli was presented with a 
plaque by Arts Faculty President Barry 
Beloff, commemorating his appearance at 
Sir George University. 

A question period followed this discus- 
sion at which time Mr. Belli expressed his 
views on a wide range of contemporary 
issues. He began first by discussing the 
whys of Barry Goldwater’s success in the 


(Continued on page 39) 


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NEW COMMERCE 
CURRICULUM 


(Continued from page 17) 


Service to Business Organizations 


At the present time there are fifteen 
organizations interested in courses offered 
at Sir George because they have educa- 
tional programs leading to a certificate or 
they assist their members in their efforts 
to continue their education. 

We are now working with these organi- 
zations with a view to offering a much 
more comprehensive program beginning 
in 1966. 

There is a tremendous challenge to this 
University and the Business leaders to 
provide the opportunities for young people 
to keep abreast of the rapid changes in our 
dynamic economy. 


PARENT REPORT 
(Continued from page 22) 


@ that the recently formed Committee 
of Rectors or Principals become a perma- 
nent committee, with terms of reference 
broadened to embrace all aspects of uni- 
versity development, including the exami- 
nation of university budgets prior to their 
submission to the State; 


@ that, in addition to maintaining a 
Division of Higher Education within the 
Ministry of Education, the Government 
establish an Office for the Development 
of Higher Education, a legally autonomous 
body the primary function of which would 
be to make recommendations to the State 
concerning the size of grants to be ac- 
corded institutions of higher education. 


*Translated from the French by Rosalind 
J. Murray. —Report of the Royal Commis- 
sion of Inquiry on Education in the 
Province of Quebec, Part Two, A—‘‘Struc- 
tures and Levels of Education.” Quebec, 
Queen’s Printer, 1964. $2.00. 


JACK RUBY’S LAWYER 


(Continued from page 37) 


Republican party. Being organized like 
President Kennedy was in 1960 and 
having an abundance of wealth were the 
key reasons he attained so much power. 
However, Mr. Belli warned that President 
Johnson, although a master politician, 
ought not to interpet the election results 
as being a complete mandate for power, 
for the 2-party system is the essence of 
democracy. 


As for himself, Mr. Belli said he had no 
practical ambitions. “I can be a brain 
surgeon; I can be a pilot; I can be most 
anything. My own discipline is much 
more interesting.”” Having the facility to 
change his viewpoint is what enables the 
lawyer to remain objective. 


Mr. Belli also spoke of Mark Lane’s 
views of the Warren Report. “He has 
damaged the United States. If the Warren 
Report can’t be believed, then we're in a 
pretty sorry state!’’ 


PROFESSORS’ SALARIES, 
1964-65 


An advance release by the Dominion 
Bureau of Statistics shows that the 
median salary of full-time teaching staff 
in all ranks at 17 representative univer- 
sities is $9,668, which is 6.2% higher than 
last year. 


The advance in salaries was greatest in 
the Western Provinces and least in Central 


Canada. 


Medians by rank are: dean, $17,361; 
professor, $14,163; associate professor, 
$10,634; assistant professor, $8,390; lec- 
turer or instructor, $6,747. 


SGWU ADMINISTRATOR — 
ALSO POP SINGER 


(from the GEORGIAN) 
By Sid Abed 


What’s your line? Assistant Director of 
Admissions or Singer? When recently 
asked this question, Mr. Tom Swift 
replied, “both”. 


At the moment, Mr. Swift is Assistant 
Director of Admissions at Sir George. As 
a hobby he has made several records. 
“Blue and Lonely” which made the 
Ottawa hit parade, was his first effort. 
The record is done in a “pop style” and is 
on the Allied label. 


Mr. Swift graduated from Sir George in 
1962. In his third and fourth years, he 
worked as an evening supervisor in the 
Admissions office. He has his B.A. and is 
a psychology major. In addition, he is 
starting work shortly on his Master’s 
Degree in University Administration. 


While going to Sir George, Mr. Swift 
appeared in all the variety shows and 
anywhere else his singing talents were 
required. After graduation he was offered 
a recording contract by Allied Records, but 
chose University Administration instead. 


His second record, “I’m Going to Try”’ 
—a true Georgian effort—appeared on the 
London label, and was well received. It 
seems that the group was composed of 
Georgians and that the sound engineer 
had taken night courses at Sir George. Mr. 
Swift’s manager, Bill Finkleberg, is a 
Georgian, who also composes, arranges 
and plays. 


When not singing, Mr. Swift, is a mem- 
ber of the Junior Committee of the Mont- 
real Symphony Orchestra. He would ulti- 
mately like to go back to singing in the 
“Andy Williams style’, but owing to his 
tight schedule as an administrator he 
unfortunately has to forego this pleasure. 


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39 


ON AND OFF CAMPUS — A Review of Activities 


WINTER CARNIVAL HELD 


Sir George Williams University’s Winter 
Carnival turned out to be one of the major 
events this year. Carnival Week took place 
during the first week of February, starting 
on Tuesday, the 2nd and ending on Satur- 
day, the 6th. 

The Carnival got underway on Tuesday 
with “Gala Night’, on the Plaza of the 
Place Ville Marie. The festivities started 
at approximately 7:30 p.m. with the 
crowning of the Carnival Queen. Fireworks 
anda street dance accompanied this event. 
The Queen was awarded a trip for two to 
Tampa, Florida and also a ski-week for 
two at the Chantecler in the beautiful 
Laurentian Mountains. 

Wednesday night, February 3, featured 
the Variety Show at the St. Denis Theatre, 
For the first time in Montreal, direct from 
Chicago, was presented the original satiric 
“The Second City Revue’. They were 
acclaimed as one of the top revues in the 
United States, and had completed a 
successful appearance on the Jack Paar 
Show. Ross Smith of CKGM and Capital 


Records served as Master of Ceremonies 
of the Show, which opened with the Counts 
Four. Entertainment continued with Sir 
of London 
worthwhile 


George's own ‘‘Newlanders”’ 
Records. It was a show 
attending. 

On Thursday, February 4th, there was 
a giant parade with floats and masses of 
Sir George students. The Queen and Prin- 
cesses led the parade and ended at 
the lower campus of McGill University, 
where the students got a chance to ‘‘flex 
their biceps”’ in a snowball game (football 
played in the snow with no equipment). 


JFK FUND 

The Students’ Undergraduate Society 
has established a John F. Kennedy Me- 
morial Library Fund. 

The campaign for funds which will be 
conducted by the universities, colleges and 
high schools of the Montreal area, has been 
organized in connection with a fund raising 
drive for the Memorial Library in Boston. 

The appeal for contributions will con- 
tinue for four months, with the hope of 


raising $25,000 for the fund. 

Robert Kennedy is expected to be in 
Montreal sometime in March at which 
time he will be presented with the check. 

All contributions may be submitted to 
the Student Receptionist in a sealed 
envelope marked John F. Kennedy 
Memorial Library Fund. 


UN ENGROSSED 
WITH HUMAN RIGHTS 
by Sid Abed 
(of the GEORGIAN Staff’) 

On February 11, delegates from fifty 
colleges met at the Helene de Champlain 
restaurant on Ile St. Helene for the second 
meeting of the University Model United 
Nations. 

Mr. JACQUES Y. MORIN, President 
of UMUN and introductory speaker is a 
law professor at the University of Montreal 
and has also been involved with the 
promotion of human rights. He is a mem- 
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Mr. JOHN P. HUMPHREY, Director 
of Human Rights in the U.N. described 
the UN stand on human rights. “There 
has been no more revolutionary develop- 
ment in the history of international law 
and relations than the present engrossment 
of the UN with human rights’, he said. 
He went on to say that one of the principal 
purposes of the Charter was to ‘‘achieve 
international co-operation in promoting 
and encouraging respect for human rights 
and for fundamental freedoms.”’ 

Mr. Humphrey said that international 
law has always considered human rights 
were always within the exclusive jurisdic- 
tion of the states and not therefore a 
matter for international action. 

The covenant of the League of Nations 
did not have anything to say about human 
human rights because the great powers 
which wrote the covenant and ran the 
League were unwilling to accept the inter- 
ference of an international organization on 
a matter which they considered was their 
own domestic business. 

The main reason for the downfall of the 
League of Nations was its inability to cope 
with the ‘atrocious violations of human 
rights in Nazi Germany and other coun- 
tries.” This fact demanded the establish- 
ment of some kind of international ma- 


chinery for the promotion of human rights 
and “became one of the war aims of the 
Allied powers.” 

When the Charter of the United 
Nations was adopted, it contained seven 
specific references to human rights, which 
include the prevention of discrimination 
and the protection of minorities; the pre- 
vention and punishment of genocide; 
freedom of information and the abolition 
of slavery and of forced labour. 


MODEL PARLIAMENT VIEWS 

Key men in the University’s political 
clubs were questioned by THE GEORGIAN 
regarding their policies in the Model 
Parliament held the week of February 16. 

Both the Liberal and New Democrat 
spokesmen felt that there was no possi- 
bility of the Government falling even 
though the Liberals are in a minority. Mr. 
David Bercuson, speaking for the NPD 
attributed this to the fact that David 
McGuire, Prime Minister if the Model 
-arliament is a ‘‘Progressive Liberal who 
will introduce progressive legislation which 
we will be able to support.” 

Harvey Kalnitsky of the Liberal Club 
announced the Whigs’ intention to intro- 
duce several Government Bills including a 
Bill on National Defense which would 





establish a permanent Canadian Battalion 
for UN peace-keeping operations and 
limiting Canadian Military intervention 
to that conducted through the UN. 

The Government also intended to intro- 
duce a Medicare Bill as well as White 
2apers on External Affairs and Immigra- 
tion. Mr. Kalnitsky stated his confidence 
in the passage of all Government Bills. 

Leader of the opposition, Mike Maloney 
of the PC club stated that he felt an 
NPD-PC coalition was possible. Neither 
Prime Minister McGuire nor Mr. McGuire 
felt that this was possible. 


SEMINAR on LATIN AMERICA 


The sixth annual Seminar on Interna- 
tional Affairs, this year entitled ‘Latin 
America: Evolution or Revolution’, fea- 
tured five main speakers, during Novem- 
ber. 

John D. Harbron, editor of the Execu- 
tive; Adolf A. Berne, U.S. State Depart- 
ment consultant; Hugh M. Wilson, 
manager of the International Division of 
the Toronto-Dominion Bank; His Excel- 
lency Ricardo H. Pueyrredon, Argentine 
Ambassador to Canada; and Robert J. 
Alexander, Professor of Economics at 
Rutgers University, N.J., are all authori- 
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