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6 " r REPORT 

OF THE 



Minister of Education 



Province of Ontario 



FOR THE YEAR 



1916 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 





TORONTO: 
Printed and Published by A. T. WILGRESS, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 17 



Printed by 
WILLIAM BRIGGS 

Corner Queen and John Streets 
Toronto 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

REPORT OF THE MINISTER 5 

Teachers who have Enlisted for Overseas Service 13 

APPENDICES 

Appendix A. — Report of the Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools.. 21 

Appendix B. — Reports of the Inspectors of Continuation Schools 25 

Appendix C. — Reports of the Inspectors of High Schools 33 

Appendix D. — Report of the Director of Industrial and Technical Education. . 52 

Appendix E. — .Report of the Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes . . 67 

Appendix F. — Public Libraries, Literary and Scientific Institutions, etc 103 

Appendix G. — Statistics of Public, Separate, Continuation and High Schools: 

Summary of Statistics 

I. — Elementary Schools ' 123 

II. — Secondary Schools , 125 

III. — General: Elementary and 'Secondary Schools 126 

Comparative Statistics 1867=1915 

I. — Public Schools (including Separate Schools): 

1. School Population, Attendance 127 

2. Classification of Pupils 128 

3. Teachers' Certificates 129 

4. Salaries and Experience 130 

5. Receipts and Expenditures 131 

Cost per Pupil 131 

II. — Roman Catholic . Separate Schools 132 

III. — Protestant Separate Schools 132 

IV. — Continuation Schools 133 

V. — Collegiate Institutes and High Schools: 

1. Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc 134 

Cost per Pupil , 134 

2. Classification of Pupils, etc 135 

VI. — Teachers' Institutes 136 

VII.— Departmental Examinations, Normal School Attendance, etc 137 

Public Schools 

I.— Table A.— 'School Population, Total and Average Attendance, etc 138 

II.— Table B — Reading Classes—Pupils in the various branches of instruction 142 

III. — Table C. — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Experience 158 

IV. — Table D. — School Houses, Prayers, Maps, etc 164 

V. — Table E. — Financial Statement 168 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

I.— Table P. — Financial Statement 176 

II.— Table G.— Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Attendance, Pupils in the various 

branches of instruction, Maps, etc 182 

Continuation Schools 

I. — Table H. — Financial Statement 194 

II-~ Table I. — Attendance, Pupils in the various branches of instruction, etc... 200 

III.— Table J.— Miscellaneous, Schools under Public 'School Board, Equipment, etc. 212 



[3] 



THE KEPOBT OF THE No. 17 



Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 

I. — Table K. — Financial Statement 218 

II. — Table L. — Attendance, Pupils in the various branches of instruction, etc... 230 

III. — Table M — Miscellaneous, Schools under Board of Education, Equipment, etc. 244 

Miscellaneous 

Table N. — Protestant Separate Schools 256 

Table 0. — Report on Kindergartens 257 

Table P.— Report on Night Schools 258 

Table Q. — Report on Truancy 258 

Table R. — General Statistical Abstract 262 

Appendix H. — Teachers' Institutes, Financial Statement, 1915 264 

Appendix I. — Fifth Classes, 1915-1916 268 

Appendix J.— Manual Training and Household Science Centres, 1916 274 

Appendix K. — The Library of the Department 282 

Appendix L. — Rural School Libraries, 1915-1916 284 

Appendix M. — Cadet Corps, 1916 286 

Appendix. N. — Superannuated Teachers, 1916 287 

Appendix O. — Financial Statements of the Faculties of Education 288 

Appendix P. — List of Inspectorates and Inspectors 291 

Appendix Q. — Admission of Candadates to Collegiate Institutes and High 

Schools, 1916 296 

Appendix. R. — Junior Public School Graduation Diploma Examination, 1916 .. 301 

Appendix S. — Autumn Model Schools, 1916 302 

Appendix T. — List of Certificates Issued by the Department, 1916 303 

Appendix U. — Lists of Associate Examiners, and Continuation and High School 
Principals and Assistants: 

I. — Associate Examiners, 1916 314 

II. — Principals and Assistants of Continuation Schools, 

January, 1917 318 

III — Principals and Assistants of Collegiate Institutes and 

High Schools, January, 1917 330 

Appendix V. — Provincial (Normal and Model Schools 364 

Appendix W. — Report of the 'School for the Deaf 369 

Appendix X. — Report of the School for the Blind 383 



REPORT 

OF THE 

MINISTER OF EDUCATION 

FOR THE YEAR J916 



To His Honour 
Colonel the Honourable Sir John S. Hendrie, K.C.M.Gk, C.V.O., etc., 
LieuUnmt-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

May it Please Your Honour: 

I present to Your Honour the Eeport of the Department of Education for 
the year 1916. It includes the school statistics for the calendar year 1915 and 
the usual reports from certain officials connected with the educational work of 
the Province. 

The War and the Schools 

It is a source of pride and satisfaction to me to be able to report once more 
that the educational system of Ontario, despite the strain and sacrifice entailed 
by the Great War on all classes of our people, is in a sound and flourishing 
condition. Not only have the male teachers enlisted freely in defence of the 
Empire, as will be seen in the list appended to this report, but the total number 
of such enlistments is creditable considering the small proportion of men in the 
teaching profession and the fact that many more who desired to offer their ser- 
vices have been prevented by age, by physical disability, or by special circum- 
stances. It should be noted that the women teachers have done their part with 
zeal and fidelity by exertions in behalf of various forms of patriotic work, and in 
addition have carried out successfully the duties of teaching the war in the classes 
according to the programme laid down in the Eegulations. 

The gallantry and fortitude shown by Canadian soldiers on the battlefields 
bear testimony both to the noble example set by our teachers during many years 
and to the efficiency of their instruction in the virtues of courage, faith and loyalty. 
The people of Ontario will not forget the share taken by the schools in preparing 
the youth of the country in mind and character, to meet and sustain the severe 
test imposed by the war. 

[5] 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Pupils and Farm Production 

That the war has occasioned some dislocation in school work was to be 
expected. The provision made in 1916 to withdraw pupils of suitable age from 
school to assist in the work of the farms of the Province has been continued 
during the present school year. The necessity of maintaining and increasing the 
production of food as an important factor in winning the war is the justification 
for this exceptional measure. It is the duty of the Department to see that the 
education of the young is not interfered with to any greater degree than is 
absolutely required for the purpose in view. When the war ends the pupils now in 
the higher classes of the schools must face the battle of life under conditions 
which will demand the best training if they are to succeed. The Department 
feels that it should have the support of the community in providing a curtail- 
ment of school courses for those only who can actually assist in farming operations 
for the increase of production and in preventing the abuse of a privilege which 
might work lasting injury to the present generation of pupils. The number of 
candidates recommended in 1916 for promotion and for certificates by school 
Principals in accordance with the provisions made was 2,028, and it is probable 
that the number so recommended in 1917, under the amended Regulations, will 
be considerably larger. 

The Supply of Text=Books 

The Department has found itself confronted with a problem of unusual 
difficulty in connection with the supply of text-books. The prices of paper and of 
all other materials entering into the manufacture of books, have increased, from 
various causes, to almost unprecedented figures. The control or regulation of the 
supply of so necessary an article as paper in carrying on the work of the schools 
is not within provincial jurisdiction. The attention of the Federal authorities 
has been called to the serious situation now existing. To impose an additional 
burden upon parents at this juncture, in the shape of higher prices for text-books, 
is something to be avoided by any practicable measure. The supply as well as 
the cost of text-books would be placed in jeopardy should existing conditions grow 
more acute, and to resort to a foreign country for the production of books 
hitherto issued here would be detrimental not only to the domestic publishing 
firms, but injurious to the interests of the labour which is equally concerned in 
the preservation of the book-making industry at home. Schoolbooks, however, 
have, in my opinion, a claim for consideration superior to other forms of publica- 
tion, and any serious interruption to their production is not to be contemplated. 
Pending such action as may be possible by the Federal authorities, I am conferring 
with the publishers of books, the contracts for which expire in the month of 
June, 1917, and which it is desirable to continue for at least another year. I 
believe that the publishers will face the whole situation in a spirit of fairness 
and with a recognition of the patriotic needs of the time. In any event the 
prices of former text-books calling for renewal will not be increased during the 
school year 1917-1918. 

The Elementary Schools 

The school statistics for 1915 which appear in detail in this report furnish 
tangible evidence of the growth of the educational system. In. connection with 
the elementary schools three factors of marked significance are pre-eminent: 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



increased attendance, the larger number of more highly trained teachers employed, 
and the continued rise in the salary scale. The enrolled attendance was 58,580 
more than in 1905, and the increase in 1915 is true of both rural and urban 
schools. During the ten-year period, 1905 to 1915, the average salary, taking 
rural and urban schools together, has increased from $514 for male teachers and 
$348 for female teachers to $902 and $613 respectively. The facts may be briefly 



summarized in 


the following 


table : 


















1905 


1914 


1915 


Increase for ten 
years 




Male 


Female 


Male Female 


Male, 


Female 


Male 


Female 


Rural Schools 


$ 
402 

800 

514 


$ 
311 

413 

348 


$ 
614 

1276 

875 


$ 
543 

686 

604 


$ 
621 

1310 

902 


$ 
549 

696 

613 


$ 
219 


$ 
238 


Urban Schools 


510 283 


All Schools 


388 


265 









The total school expenditure during the ten years period has increased from 
$6,161,236 to $14,267,476. The amount paid in salaries lias increased from 
$3,669,230 to $7,614,110. The Legislative grants have risen from $414,004 in 
1905 to $849,872 in 1915. 

The employment of teachers with higher certificates is another striking proof 
of educational progress. In 1915 there were 11,850 teachers in the elementary 
schools exclusive of kindergarten and night school teachers. More than eight 
thousand of these have received Normal School training and more than one 
thousand hold first class certificates. The improvement in ten years may be set 
forth as follows: 



— 


First Class 


Second Class 


Third Class 


Others 


1905 


580 

878 

1051 


4018 

7387 
8025 


3248 
1771 
1520 


1722 


1914 


1510 


1915 


1254 







These statistics for the decade under review show that the number of teachers 
with first class and second class certificates has almost exactly doubled and that 
teachers with lower grade certificates have decreased in number from about 5,000 
in 1905 to about 2,700 in 1915. This is a remarkable proof, if such were needed, 
that the substitution of Normal trained for Model trained teachers has been 
successful. The reports from inspectors to county councils and to this Depart- 
ment record the satisfaction with which the change is regarded, indicating as it 
does that the work of the elementary schools is carried on with greater efficiency 
than during the previous decade. The supply of teachers shows no signs of 
falling below the number required annually. There were under training in 
January, 1917, in the seven Normal Schools of the Province, 1,266 students, of 
whom 1,129 were women and 137 were men. In addition, 27 students were 



8 THE EEPOET OF THE No. 17 

taking the kindergarten-primary course at the Toronto Normal School. The 
attendance at each school at the date named was: 

Hamilton 192 Ottawa 185 

London 189 Peterborough 176 

North Bay 125 Stratford 163 

Toronto 236 

In order to prevent overcrowding in any school and to equalize the attendance 
so as to obtain the best educational results it is necessary to enforce the Regulation 
requiring students to attend the school situated nearest their own homes. 

The elementary schools, which are attended by the vast majority of the pupils, 
show in many respects a steady average improvement. While there are districts 
which do not exhibit any unusual progress, there is, on the whole, a gratifying 
upward tendency. The war has given a marked stimulus to the work done in 
history, geography and literature. The teachers have been diligent in inculcating 
the lessons of patriotism illustrated so potently by the great trial through which 
the British Empire is passing in its splendid effort on behalf of liberty, humanity, 
and civilization. Wherever possible the erection of new school buildings has been 
postponed until the war is over. 

Continuation Schools 

There are at present 132 Continuation Schools in the Province and the work 
done in them, as will be seen in the reports of the inspectors, ensures their hold 
upon the localities which they serve. The expenditures in 1915 amounted to 
$310,794 as compared with $294,125 in the previous year. The amount spent in 
teachers' salaries was $219,660 as compared with $208,386. The enrolled atten- 
dance increased from 6,069 to 6,800. Nearly half the pupils are the sons and 
daughters of farmers. There are 238 teachers in these Continuation Schools, 
68 per cent, women and 32 per cent. men. The average salaries of the assistants 
remain practically stationary while that of the principals decreased by $13. The 
average salaries are $1,086 for principals, $742 for women assistants and $708 
for men assistants. Ten years ago the average salary for all teachers in Con- 
tinuation Schools was $573, 

High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 

The 160 High Schools and Collegiate Institutes had an enrolled attendance 
of 38,426 pupils in 1915, or 1,960 more than in the preceding year. The total 
expenditure amounted to $2,470,974. The cost per pupil for teachers' salaries 
decreased from $40.49 to $38.32, other maintenance expenses from $17.35 to 
$14.30, while the expenditure on sites and buildings decreased from $36.62 to 
$11.68 per pupil owing chiefly to the practical completion in the preceding year 
of large buildings in the City of Toronto the cost of which was included in the 
statistics of that year. The attendance was derived from the following classes in 
the proportions stated below: Commercial, 21.86 per cent.; Agriculture, 28.88; 
Law, Medicine and the Church, 5.49 ; Teaching, 1.74 ; the Trades, 18.78 ; Labour- 
ing occupations, 7.67; and other classes, 15.57. 

In these schools there are 1,020 teachers, 55 per cent, men and 45 per cent, 
women. Ten years ago the percentages were 77 and 23 respectively. At that 
time the average salaries were $1,303 for principals, $1,091 for men assistants 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



and $762 for women assistants. They are now $1,813, $1,634 and $1,109 res- 
pectively. These salaries, however, show a decrease of $23 in the case of principals 
and $2 in the case of men assistants as compared with the preceding year. The 
women received an average increase for the year of $5. 

The great advance made by these secondary schools in the past decade may be 
seen in the following table: 



Year 


Schools 


Teachers 


Attendance 


Teachers' 
salaries 


Government 
Grants 


Value of Total 
Equipment Expenditure 


1905.... 
1915.... 


140 
160 


689 
1,020 


28,661 
38,426 


$ 
666,547 

1,472,673 


$ 
154,953 

191,374 


$ 
256,815 

715,175 


$ 
1,004,498 

2,470,974 



Pensions for Teachers 

A measure providing superannuation allowances for the teachers of Ontario 
is now before the Legislature and should become law in the near future. There 
is a well-founded belief that legislation of this kind will do much to impart 
stability to the teaching profession and to retain within its ranks a due proportion 
of male teachers. A difference of opinion has existed and probably still exists, 
among the younger teachers as to whether or not they should contribute any portion 
of their salaries toward superannuation allowances. This opinion, natural enough 
on the part of those who have no desire to make teaching their life calling, has 
been given the consideration it deserves, and the bill provides for the return of con- 
tributions to those who have taught at least five years. I wish to bear testimony 
to the unselfish and enlightened attitude of the teachers as a body in accepting 
cheerfully their share of the obligations which are imposed upon them and upon 
the Province by the bill. Amendments to it may be required from time to time, 
as experience may suggest, and the Department will have from the first the assist- 
ance of an advisory commission, with representatives of the teachers upon it, in 
the administration of the law. The adoption of this measure may well be regarded 
as marking an important stage in the educational progress of Ontario. 



Provincial Control of Schools 

The decision of the Imperial Privy Council, in the appeals arising out of the 
Ottawa Separate School Board litigation, has confirmed the judgments previously 
rendered by the Courts of Ontario that the Legislature has complete control over 
the administration of all schools in the state system. That any other view could 
be taken of the rights and powers of the Province over its own schools is difficult 
to imagine. Obedience to properly constituted authority and respect for law are 
the fundamental principles of the British system of government the world over, and 
this Province having decided many years ago that elementary education is com- 
pulsory, the manner and the form in which this law shall be framed are clearly 
within the competence of the Legislature and should be obeyed by school boards. 
This policy the Department of Education must carry out so that the public 
interest in adequate elementary training for all future citizens may be fully main- 



10 THE KEPORT OF THE No. 17 



tained. The necessity of imparting a knowledge of the English language, which 
is the only official language of Ontario, to all pupils in the schools of the state, does 
not admit of doubt or argument. The Legislature having unanimously affirmed 
this policy and having declared that English is the language of the schools, the 
duty of the Department is plain. The law can be enforced without injury to the 
feelings, prejudices, or preferences of any element in the Province, and it is by 
this spirit that the administration of education should be, and is, inspired. The 
Imperial Privy Council having also decided that the Act to administer the Ottawa 
separate schools was defective in some respects, these defects will be remedied in 
accordance with the judgment of the highest court and the law re-enacted. 

Schools for Deaf and Blind Children 

The reports of the Ontario School for the Deaf at Belleville and the Ontario 
School for the Blind at Brantford will be found in the appendices. The attend- 
ance at the Belleville school is the largest in the history of the school, namely, 143 
boys and 132 girls. The work of the classes is highly satisfactory and the training 
of the pupils in oral methods continues to produce good results. The supply of 
teachers has been rendered more difficult by the enlistment for the war of two 
members of the staff, and the illness of others. As the teachers of deaf children 
require special training not needed by teachers of pupils who can hear, the problem 
of staffing this school is always exceptional. The Principal, Dr. Coughlin, has met 
the situation successfully, and the impression produced by the work of the school 
upon competent instructors in our public schools, like the members of the Frontenac 
and Kingston Teachers' Institutes, whose visit is recorded in the Principal's 
report, illustrates the efforts being made to keep up the standard of training and to 
fit the pupils, as far as possible, to take their places as ordinary members of the 
community. 

The resignation of Principal Gardiner of the School for the Blind in July, 
1916, after a long term of service, owing to a desire to resume his literary work 
during the closing years of his career, furnished the occasion for a thorough 
enquiry into the work of this school with a view to making such changes in the 
administration, discipline and branches of training as might be required. A com- 
missioner with the necessary powers was appointed and the person selected, Mr. 
Norman B. Gash, K.C., of Toronto, investigated the conditions, upon which he has 
recently reported after full investigation of the school and similar schools in the 
United States. Before this inquiry could be finished, action was required and it 
was decided to place the school for the time being more directly under the control 
of the Department. The Deputy Minister was accordingly instructed to exercise 
personal supervision of the school and Mr. Clarkson W. James, Departmental 
Secretary, was appointed Acting Principal. This arrangement has worked well. 
Changes in the teaching staff, additions to the equipment, and enlargement of the 
courses for vocational training have been made. The discipline of the pupils is 
much more satisfactory and the work of the. school is progressing well. The Gov- 
ernment has invited Sir Charles Fraser, Principal of the Halifax School for the 
Blind, and justly noted for his experience and success in the education of blind 
persons, to visit Brantford as the guest of the Province, in order that his advice 
may be available in the complete re-organization of the school. The invitation has 
been accepted. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 11 

Industrial and Technical Training 

An instructive survey of the progress made by Ontario during the past five 
years in industrial and technical education will be found in the report of Dr. F. W. 
Merchant, Director of Industrial and Technical Education. The Superintendent 
of Education, Dr. John Seath, was instructed in 190-9 to investigate and report 
upon the systems of technical education in the chief countries of Europe and in 
the United States. Based upon the elaborate and valuable report made by him in 
due course the Industrial Education Act of 1911 was passed. The municipalities 
were empowered to establish schools for such instruction and to provide for them 
by taxation. Provision was subsequently made for assistance in the shape of 
Legislative grants. The expansion has been remarkable. Thus far 42 have been 
established. Only two urban municipalities where the population exceeds 8,000 
have not established schools and most of the small towns that are industrial centres 
have taken action. There are seven day schools, four being full time industrial 
schools, and three technical departments of high schools. The attendance of pupils 
this year exceeds 20,000, despite the war which has greatly interfered with the 
attendance. The total grants by the Legislature for industrial classes amount 
now to $211,548. The future progress of the system throughout the Province 
depends in considerable measure upon the prospect of federal grants following the 
precedent set in the grants already paid to encourage agricultural training. The 
whole problem is discussed in his report by Dr. Merchant with special reference 
to its bearing upon national conservation, the need of providing education for the 
young after the age of 14, and the urgency of vocational training if the state is to 
make the best use of its resources. To the conclusions thus stated, I adhere and, 
as on former occasions, express the hope that the National Government, occupied 
as it is with the pressing burden of the war, will yet find the time and opportunity 
to encourage a form of educational development of vital consequence to the future 
of Canada. 

Agricultural Training 

The efforts of the Department to give the teaching of agriculture its rightful 
place in the schools are "being energetically carried out by Dr. Dandeno, the In- 
spector of Elementary Agricultural .Classes and his report shows that satisfactory 
progress is being made. The field of work is extensive and there are many 
obstacles to a complete realization by the people at large of what the subject means 
to the welfare of the Province. The providing of teachers qualified to do the work, 
the adjustments of the school curricula, the co-operation of the trustees and parents 
and the promotion of intelligent public opinion which is so valuable in all branches 
of education, call for time and patience. In the meantime the practical projects 
comprised in school and home gardens, school fairs, and experimental work of 
every sort arising out of the course in nature study are being encouraged with 
success and the portion of the federal grant assigned to this Department is being 
employed to good purpose. The extension of the course given to teachers-in-train- 
ing in the Normal Schools must, when greenhouses are provided, greatly tend to 
qualify teachers for carrying on the work in the schools. The release of pupils 
from the high schools to help in farm production during the war, to which allusion 
has already been made, serves to impress upon the Province the fact that agri- 
culture is the basis of its prosperity and that a knowledge of the subject is of 
value to all, even to those whose lot is cast in urban centres. 



12 ) THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Public Libraries 



The success of the Public Library movement continues under the new In- 
spector, Mr. W. 0. Carson, and his report shows that here too the war has had a 
stimulating and not a depressing effect. The importance of special training for 
library workers will be emphasized in future and better facilities provided for the 
Provincial training school conducted by the Department. 

Enlisted Teachers 

I append a list of the teachers, as far as obtainable, who have joined the army, 
including the names of those who have already given up their lives for the Empire. 

Respectfully submitted, 

R. A. Pyne, 

Minister of Education. 
March 1st, 1917. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OP EDUCATION 



13 



ONTARIO TEACHERS WHO HAVE ENLISTED 
FOR OVERSEAS SERVICE 

According to the reports received to date from Inspectors and Principals, 
teachers have enlisted for Overseas Service from the several grades of schools, as 

follows : 

Those who have made the Supreme Sacrifice: 

High Schools 2 

Public Schools 6 

Total 8 

Other Enlistments Reported: 

High Schools 62 

Public Schools 286 

Normal School Students who did not complete their Courses 27 
Special and Temporary Teachers 21 

Total 404 

Teachers Reported "Killed in Action" or "Missing" 

According to the reports received at the Department, the following teachers, on 
active service, have made the Supreme Sacrifice: 



Name. 


Cert. 


School Where Last Engaged 


Charlton, Wm. L 


I 


S. S. No. 7, MoGillivray .... 


Chidley, Philip F 

Ferguson, Wilbert R 


II 
II 


Student, North Bay, N.S. . . . 
Student, North Bay, N.S. ... 


Govenlock, Thos. E 


H7sX~ = 


St. Catharines C. I 


Kerr, Frank L 


ii 


Student, North Bay, N.S. . . . 


Lee, Harry E 


I 


Annette St., Toronto 


Metcalfe, Geo. A 


ii 

Spec, Pr. 


S, 0. No. 2, Neelon 


Wood, F. H 


Malvern Ave. C. I., Toronto. 





Report 



Killed, Belgium, 

20/7/16. 
Killed, 25/4/16. 
Killed, Zillabeke, 

3/6/16. 
Killed, Cource- 

lette, 30/9/16. 
Killed, Somme, 

Sept., 1916. 
Killed, October, 

1916. 
Killed, June, 1915 
Reported Missing, 

12/6/16. 



High and Continuation School Teachers who have Enlisted for Overseas Service 



Name 



Cert. 



School Where Last Engaged 



Overseas Record 



Amos, H. E., B.A., D. Psed 
Atkinson, W. D. T., B.A.. 
Bramfitt, Geo. N. . . 
Brokenshire, M. C. . 
Brown, Arthur R. . 
Butson, Wm. G. . . . 
barter, Chetwynd S. 
Cline, Geo. A., B.A. 



H.S.A. 
Spec. 
H.S.A. 
H.S.A. 
H.S.A. 
H.S.A. 
H.S.A. 
Spec. 



Grimsby H. S. (Prin.) 

Collingwood C. __I 

University Schools, Toronto. 

Lindsay C. I 

Watford H. S 

Bowmanville H. S 

Lakefield C. S. (Prin.) 

University Schools, Toronto 



Awarded Legion 
of Honour. 



c 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



High and Continuation School Teachers who Have Enlisted for Overseas Service.— Con. 



Name 


Cert. 


School where last engaged 


Overseas Record 


Cook, Leslie B 


H.S.A. 


Sarnia C. I. 


Wounded, Somme, 




8/9/16. 


Cowles, John P., B.A 


HJS. Pr. 


Dunnville H. S. (Prin.) 




Crerar, John S., B.A 


H.S. Pr. 


Port Rowan H. S. (Prin.).. 




Currie, John E 


H.S.A. 
H.S.A. 
Spec. 


Bruce Mines C. S. (Prin.) . . 

Stratford C. I 

Oakwood C. I., Toronto 




Day, John W 




Dunkley, A. W., M.A 




Ewing, Chas., M.A 


H.S.A. 


Wingham H. S 




Fielding, E.L., B.A 


H.S.A. 


Brantford C. I 




Foley, Roy iS., B.A 


H.S.A. 


Central Technical, Toronto . . 




Glenn, E. H. 


H.S.A. 


Grand Valley C. S. (Prin.).. 




Grandy, Frederick N 


H.S.A. 


Barrie C. I 




Griffin, Selwyn P., B.A. . . 


H.S.A. 


Harbord C. I., Toronto 




Hagarty, E. W., M.A 


Spec. 


do C. I., Toronto (Prin.) 
(Returned to Teaching) 




Hartry, R. R 


H.S.A., M.T. 


Chatham C. I 




Harvey, J. Irvine 


H.S.A. 


Chatham C. I 




Hill, Kenneth S., B.A 


- H.S.A. 


Madoc H. S 




Hiscox, Wm. F 


H.S.A. 


iStratford C. I 




Hughes, Hugh L 


H.S.A. 


Princeton C. S. (Prin.) 




Jackson, J. Sandfield, B.A. 


Spec. 


Listowel H. S 




Jeffrey, H. G. IS 


H.S.A. 


Streetsville H. S 




Jenkins, Jas. T., B.A 


Spec. 


Oakwood C. I., Toronto 




Jewitt, Oliver V., B.A. . . . 


Spec. 


Chatham C. I 




Jolliffe, Ernest H., B.A. . . 


H.S.A. 


Cen. Technical Sch., Toronto 




Keith, Geo. W., B.A 


Spec. 


Parkdale C. I., Toronto 




Lamb, Walter J., M.A. . . . 


Spec. 


Harbord C. I., Toronto 




Lower, A. R. M„ B.A 


Spec. 


University Schools, Toronto. 




McCamus, Wm. R., B.A. . . 


Spec. 


Leamington H. © 




McDonald, Jas. H., B.A. . . 


H.S.A. 


Almonte H. S 




McGarvin, M. J., B.A 


Spec. 


Hamilton C. I 




McLellan, J. A 


H.S.A. 


Kenora H. S 




McQuarrie, Geo. B., M.A. . . 


Spec. 


Oakwood C. I., Toronto 




McQueen, James 


Spec. 


Cen. Technical Sch., Toronto. 




Manning, Harold G., B.A. . . 


Spec. 


University 'Schools, Toronto. 




Marshall, Geo. A 


H.S.A. 


Gait C. I 




Michell, Wm. C., B.A. . . . 


Spec. 


Riverdale C. I., Tor'to (Prin.) 




Nesbitt, Robt. N 


H.S.A. 


St. Catharines C. I 




O'Neill, A. E., B.A 


Spec. 


Lindsay C. I 




Odell, J. W., B.A 


Spec. 


Cobourg C. I 




Osborne, Baron 


Phys. Dir. 
Spec. 


Kitchener C. I 

Beamsville H. S. (Prin.) ... 




Pentland, Geo. E., M.A. . . . 




Rochat, Paul, M.A 


H.S.A. 


Harbord C. I., Toronto 

• 


Croix de Guerre, 
wounded, 


Shier, Walter 


H.S.A. 


Leamington H. S 


Nov., 1914. 


Snider, Egerton E., B.A. . . 


Spec. 


Port Hope H. S. (Prin.) ... 




Spencer, Watson G., B.A.. 


H.S.A. 


Sudbury H. S 




Staples, Wm. E., B.A. . . . 


H.S.A. 


Guelph C. I 




Symington, Jas. B 


H.S.A. 


Napanee C. I 




Tanton, Francis 


H.S.A. 

Spec. 


Ingersoll C. I 

Mt. Albert C. S. (Prin.) .... 




Tanton, John, B.A 




Wallace, Andrew 


H.S.A. 


Sarnia C. I 




Watson, E. H. A., B.A. .. 


Spec. 


Riverdale C. I., Toronto 




White, Orville R 


H.S.A. 


Goderich C. I 




Willoughby, H. A. G., M.A. 


Spec. 


Chatham C. I 




Worden, Ernest 


H S.A. 


Guelph, C. I 

St. Mary's C. I. (Prin.) 




Wright, Wm. J., M.A 


Spec. 





1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



15 



Public School Teachers who have Enlisted for Overseas Service 



Name 




School where last engaged 



Overseas Record 



Adams, Robt. L 

Aiken, A. W 

Anderson, Fred. F... 
Archibald, A. W. 

Archibald, S. W 

Armstrong, H. E. 

Atkinson, W. L 

Atkinson, Wm 

Baker, Albert L 

Baker, Elmer B. . . . 
Barber, Percy L. . . . 

Barragar, David 

Bean, Howard 

Bell, Alex. M 

Bell, James Gilbert . 
Bennie, Robt. E. . . . 

Betterley, A. € 

Bigelow, Lewis H. . . 

Bingle, Thos 

Blaney, Robert 

Bonham, Robert L. . 
Boothby, Royal A. . . 
Boulding, Chas. R. 

Brown, Fred 

Buchanan, Wm. P. . . 
Burns, John Ed. . . . 

Burt, Arthur C 

Byrnes, Chas. F. . . . 

Call, George W 

Cameron, Ewart D. . 
Cameron, Robert C. 
Campbell, E. Grant 
Campbell, Goldie T. 

Campbell, Gordon A. 
Campbell, R. J 

Campbell, Wilfred A. 
Cannon, Gerald Wm. 

Carpenter, T. T 

Carr, James B 

Carruthers, 0. K. 
Cavanagh, Wm. R. . . 
Champagne, Elmo E. 

Chard, Tom 

Christie, Oliver 

Clark, Alan 

Clark, William 

Collier, Wm. Benson 
Conover, Reginald . . 

Copp, Leo W 

Corneil, Fred. M. . . . 
Cousins, Archie R. . 
Coutts, Wallace M. . 
Craig, J. J 

Cullis, John T 

Daniel, T. Edward . 



II 


Student, Hamilton N. S 




II 


S.S. 1, St. Joseph 




II 


Student, North Bay N. S 




I 


Dufferin, Toronto 




I 


Massey 




I 


Carlton, Toronto 




I 


Brock Avenue, Toronto 




II 


S.S. 3, Buchanan 


V 


II 


Student, London N. S 




II 


Student, Ottawa N. S 




I 


Essex Street, Toronto 


Wounded Somme, 
Sept. 15, 1916. 


II 


Queen Mary, Belleville 




II 


Breslau 




III 


S.S. 4, Egremont 




III 


Student, North Bay N. S 




III 


S.S. No. 4, Pelee Island 




II 


Saskatchewan 




III 


Student, Peterborough N. S.. 




II 


King George, Brantford 




II 


Frankland, Toronto 




II 


Alberton 




II 


Student, Hamilton N. S 




I 


Alexander Muir, Toronto 




II 


Havelock 




I 


Carlton, Toronto 




II 


S.S. No. 8, Herschel 




II 


Essex Street, Toronto 




II 


S.S. No. 3, S. Himsworth 




II 


Dickson, Gait 




III 


S.S. No. 4, Huron 




I 


Winchester Street, Toronto.. 




III 


S.S. No. 6, North Cayuga 




Dist. 


S.S. No. 5, Tudor Lake 


Twice slightly 
wounded. 


II 


S.S. No. 5, Ancaster 




II 


Petrolea (Returned to teach- 
ing) 




II 


Student, London N. S 




III 


S.S. No. 2, Ryerson 




M.T. 


Manning Avenue, Toronto... 




II 


S.S. No. 2, Scott 




I 


Manning Avenue, Toronto... 




I 


Balaclava, St. Thomas 




II 


Hammond 




III 


S.S. No. 17, Artemesia 




II 


Student, North Bay N. S 




II 


Student, Toronto N. S 




I 


Frankland, Toronto 




II 


Queen Mary, Hamilton 




II 


S.S. No. 9, Nottawasaga .... 




11 


S.S. No. 5, Smith 




II 


S.S. No. 2, Cavan 




II 


Student, Hamilton N. S 




II 


S.S. No. 3, Tossorontio 




Insp. 


Wellington Co., South (Re- 
turned to inspectoral 
duties) 




II 


S.S. No. 2, Harvey 




I 


Dewson School, Toronto .... 





16 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Public School Teachers who have Enlisted for Overseas Service — Continued 



Name. 



Cert. School where last engaged. 



Overseas Record 



Davey, Stanley H 


II 


Student, Hamilton N. S 




Davis, Melville, B.A 


III 


S.S. No. 7, Lochiel 




Dav Cyrus F 


II 
III 


S.S. No. 2, 11 East Zorra . . . 
S.S. No. 4, Belmont 




De Cou, Edward 




Dewart, John A 


II 


S.S. No. 4, Stamford 




Dickson, Arch. C 


I 


Grace Street, Toronto 




Dickson, Frank 


II 


King Edward, Brantford .... 


Seriously wound- 
ed Dec. 15, 1916. 


Doherty, W. J 


I 


Givens Street, Toronto 






II 


S.S. No. 2, Matilda 




Dougall, Roswell P. I. ... 


II 


U.S.S. No. 1, Hay & Stanley. 






I 


Woodville 




Dudgeon, Clarence A 


II 


Student, North Bay N. S 




Duffin, Freeman J 


III 

III 

III 

II 


S.S. No. 6, Widdifeld 

S.S. No. 6, Charlottenburgh.. 

S.S. No. 8, 'Sullivan 

Alex. Muir, Sault Ste. Marie. 




Dunlop, John J 




Durst Wilfrid 




Eaid Chas R 


Discharged — de- 




veloped tuber- 








culosis. 


Elliott, Arthur . «• 


I 


Pape Avenue, Toronto 


Wounded Cource- 








lette — invalid- 








ed home. 


Elliott, Fred. W 


I 


Bolton Avenue, Toronto 


Shell shock, 
Courcelette. 


Elliot, Wm. Ralph 


III 


S.S. No. 2, Faraday 


Recommended for 
Military Cross, 
Dec. 20, 1916. 


Entwhistle, Robt. G 


II 


Almonte P. S 




Evans, Joseph H 


II 


Student, Hamilton N. S 




Fathers, I. E. J 

Ferguson, Robt. I. 


III 


S.S. No. 3, Dalton 




III 


S.S. No. 4, Chandos 




Fick Ellis L 1 


I 
I 


Pauline Ave. School, Toronto 
S.S. No. 7, Nottawasaga .... 




Fiddis, Gordon H 




Firth, Alexander 

Fleming, Earl 


II 


Orangeville 




I 


Balaclava, St. Thomas 




Forsyth, Gordon 

Foster Thos 


I 


Dufferlh, Toronto 




II 
III 

I * 


S.S. No. 5, Huron 




Francis, Arthur 


S.S. No. 7, Brock 

Kent, Toronto 




Frisby, Walter C 

Fuller, Robert M 




II 


U.S.S. No. 4, Fullarton & 








Downie 




Fydell, M. R 


I 


York Street, Toronto 




Galpin, Hubert B 


I 


Talbot Street, London 




Garrett, Fred 


III 
II 


Student, London N. S 

S.S. No. 5, East Oxford 




Geddes, John R. 




Geddes, Norman 


II 


S.S. No. 8, Hullett 




Gibson, Edward Lyle 


II 


King George, Hamilton 




Given, Reginald F 


III 


S S No 9, Oso 




Glover, Winfred A 


II 
III 


S S No. 7, Madoc 




Gollan, Donald S 


S.S. No.~20, Osnabruck- 




Gollan, Ian A 


III 
II 


No 8, Wolford 




Goorlwillie, Chas. A 


S.S. No. 11, Osgoode 




Goodyear, Hedley J 


I 


Regal Road, Toronto 




Grant, Wm. Hardy 


II 


S.S. No. 1, Torbolton . . . 




Grassie, Wm. E 


II 


S.S. No. 8, Grimsby 




Gray, Joseph E : 


I 


McMurrich, Toronto 




Gray, William G 


II 
III 


Student, London N. S 

S.S. N« 11, Bentinck 




Grierson, Nathan B 




Grieve, Wm. P 


I 


Perth Avenue, Toronto 




Haig, Allister P 


I 


Regal Road, Toronto 




Halladay, Guy B 


III 


S.S. No. 1, Bastard 





1916 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



« 



Public School Teachers who have Enlisted for Overseas Service— Continued 


Name 


Cert. 


School where last engaged 


Overseas Record 


Halliday, Clarence P 

Hamilton Wm John 


I 

Insp. 

II 

II 

I 

II 

III 

III 

II 

III 

I 

II 

III 

II 

II 

I 

II 
II 
II 
II 

I 
I 

II 

Dist. 

I 

II 
I 

II 
I 
I 

II 

II 
II 
IL. 
II 
II 
II 
I 

II 

III 

I 

II 

III 

III 

I 

III 

I 

III 

I 

II 

II 

I 

II 

I 

I 

III 

I 

II 


Ottawa, Normal Model 

Distr. Div. No. 2 




Hardy, Albert E 


Student, Peterborough N. S.. 
Mossley 








Harkness, Andrew E 


S.S. No. 10, Essa 




Hayunga, Geo. H 

Harris, Max C 


Student, Ottawa N. S 

S.S. No. 1, Ryerson 

S.S. No. 11, Uxbridge 

S.S. No. 3, W. & E. Flamboro 

S.S. No. 11, Sunnidale 

Pauline Avenue, Toronto . . . 
King Edward, Brantford . . . 
S.S. No. 13, Ameliasburgh... 
Bloomington • 




Harvey, Norman 




Henderson, James G 

Higham, Harry 




Hill, Jos. P 

Holdsworth, John A 

Holmes, Leslie T 




Honey, S Lewis 




Hoover, Robt 


S.S. No. 7, McKillop 

Palmerston Ave., Toronto . . . 

Brighton 

Shallow Lake School 

Student, Stratford N. S 

S.S. No. 17, Haldimand 

Glenallan 




Houston, Wm. John 

Hunter, George A 

Hunter, W. L 

Irwin, W. R 

Isaac, Benoni 


Shell shock, 
Sept., 1916. 


Jennings, F. C 


Johnstone, Lloyd 


King Edward, Toronto 

Central, Brantford 




Joyce, Walter, B.A 




Kavaner, George F 

Kerruish, Hubert B 

Kerruish, Maxwell 


S.S. No. 13, Storrington 

Jesse Ketchum, Toronto 

Paris 




Kilty, Clarence G 

Kinchsular, Redmond 

King, Alex. F 

Kirk, Wm. F 

Knowles, Albert F 


Frankland, Toronto 

S.S. No. 16, Walpole 

Wi throw Avenue, Toronto... 

Jesse Ketchum, Toronto 

S.S. No. 4, Dymond 

(Returned to teaching) . . . 
Port Rowan 


• 


Knox, Frank A 


James Street, Orillia 

Student, Peterborough N. S.. 

King George, Hamilton 

Cold Springs . . . 




Latimer, Robt. H 

Laurie, Stuart M 

Lean, J. Erwin 




Leslie, James A 


Student, Hamilton N. S 

S.S. No. 5, Lash 




Leslie, Wm. B 




Lott, C. W 


Student, Stratford N. S 

U.S.S. No. 9, Portland 

Clinton Street, Toronto 

Student, Hamilton N. S 

S.S. No. 13, North Orillia... 

Student, Cornwall M. S 

Dufferin School, Toronto .... 
S. S. No. 10, Charlottenburgh 

Dewson Street, Toronto 

S.S. No. 8, Finch 




Lowden, Henry fc 

Lowry, Robt. J 

Lyall, Victor A 




Macaulay, Alex. M 

MacDermid, Lynden E. . . . 

MacDonald, T. A 

MacEwan, James V 

Macklin, Garnet E 




Macpherson, Donald S 

McCallum, Archie P 

McCartney, T. Gerald 

McClinton, James 

McCorkell, Ignatius J... 


Annette Street, Toronto 

Student, London N. S 

Student, Peterborough N. S.. 

McMurrich, Toronto 

S.S. No. 5, Mara 




McCullough, J. L 

McGill, Geo. W 


Manning Avenue, Toronto . . . 
Withrow Avenue, Toronto... 

S.S. No. 2, Egremont 

Strathcona, Toronto 

S.S. No. 11, Huron 




McGirr, Ernest J 




Mcintosh, Herman W 

Mcintosh, Robt. W 


Rejected — medi- 
cally unfit. 


2 E. 







18 



THE HEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Public School Teachers who have Enlisted for Overseas Service— Continued 



Name 


Cert. 


School where last engaged 


Overseas Record 


McKay, George 


II 
II 
II 
Dist. 
Ill 
II 

I 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
III 
II 

I 

II 
II 
II 
II 

I 
II 
II 
II 
II 

I 

I 

II 
II 
II 
III 
III 
II 

I 
II 
II 

I 

II 

II 

III 

II 

II 

ILS. Spec. 

Ill 

I 

I 

II 

III 

II 

I 

II 
II 
II 

I 
II 

II 
II 
II 
II 

I 
II 

I 
III 


Student, London N. S 

Student, Stratford N. S 

Student, London N. S 

S.S. No. 6, Brunei 




McLachlan, H. T 

McLaren, James A 


Recommended for 
Military Medal; 
wounded Sept. 
27, 1916. Inva- 
lided home 


McMillan, Dan. A 

McNaughton, H. R 

McPhail, Alex. H 

Manning, Chas 


Student, Ottawa N. S 

S.S. No. 7, Sombra 


Grace Street, Toronto 

S.S. No. 4, Saltfleet 


Markle, John F 


Student, Hamilton N. S 

Student, Stratford N. S 

Student, London N. S 

S.S. No. 7, Seymour 

Student, Ottawa N. S 

S.S. No. 8, Saltfleet 




Martin, Angus 

Martin, Joseph F 

Masson, H. Victor K 

Meredith, Dalton H 

Merritt, Roland 




Might, Percy G 


Lansdowne, Toronto 

Matheson 




Milliken, Thos W 




Minion, Harvey L 


S.S. No. 1, Laird 




Mitchell, Harold L 

Moore, Geo. W 


S.S. No. 16, E. Zorra 

Student, Hamilton N. S. ... 
Rose Ave., Toronto 


s 


Moore, Harry C 




Morwick, Edward 

Moss, Eldrin W 


S.S. No. 6, North Grimsby . . . 
Paris 




Mossey, Clifford W 

Mossop, Neron F 

Muir, Geo 


S.S. No. 18, Yarmouth 

S.S. No. 4, Harley 

Sackville St., Toronto 

Pauline Ave., Toronto 

South Central, Peterborough. 
S.S. No. 1, Tisdale 




Muir, Peter M 




Munro, Jos. E. R 

Myers, Jacob Raymond . . 

Myrick, Walter G 

Nayler, Edwin T 

Nayler, John B 




Ottawa 




S.S. No. 7, Herschel 

S.S. No 8, Herschel & Faraday 

S.S. No. 1, Maclrvine 

Dovercourt, Toronto 

Student, London N. S 

S.S. No. 7, Mornington 

King George, Peterborough . . 

S.S. No. 4, Burford 

R.R. No. 10, Oneida 

Student, London N. S 

S.S. No. 6, Adjala 


Wounded, 
October, 1916. 


Neill, Millard L 

Nicholson, R. W 

Norton, Clarence L 

Orr, Henry L 




Park, Maurice H 

Parkhill, Geo. E 

Parkinson, Clair 


Rejected — defec- 
tive eyes. 


Patterson, John A 

Peacock, Wilfrid E 




Percival, Samuel E 


S.S No. 1, Oxford 




Pickering, Howard V 

Pilkey, Clifford G 

Pilkey, John H 

Pike, Abraham B 

Posliff, Alfred L 


Normal School, Stratford . . . 
Student, Peterborough N. S . . 
S S No 9, York 




Victoria Industrial, Toronto . 
Wingham 




Power, Albert E 

Poyser, Beecher D 

Prouter, H. J 


Coe Hill 

Student, Ottawa N. S. 

Essex St , Toronto 




Quackenbush, Hubert A. . 


S S No 3, Fitzroy 




Quackenbush, James G. . . 


Morewood 




Ramage, Chas. C 

Rattle, W F 


S.S. No. 3, Egremont 

McCaul Toronto 




Rawson, Clark M 


S.S. No. 11, Verulam, Vic- 
toria E 




Reid, Adam E 


S.S. No. 5, Greenock 

S S No. 2, Louth 




Reid, Russell 




Richards, Harold C 

Richardson Geo P . 


Student, Hamilton N. S 

Huron St Toronto 




Robinson, Robert H 


St Helen's, Ont 




Rorke, John A 


Port Carling 




Ross, Alex. M 


Norway, Toronto 




Ross, Kenneth 


S.S. No. 12, E. Gwillimbury.. 





1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



19 



Public School Teachers who have Enlisted for Overseas Service— Continued 



Name 




Overseas Record 



Ross, Percy J. 
Rowe, Geo. F. . 
Russell, Angus 
Ryan, Arthur E. 
Sabine, Alden T. S 
Sagar, Edward J. 
Sarles, Roy M. . . 
Scott, Cyrus W. . 

Scott, F. M 

Scott, Geo. B. G. 
Scott, Lloyd J. . . 

Scott, W. Frank . 
Scott, Walter . . . 
Seator, G. John . . 
Shaver, Stanley M 



Short, Thos. A. 
Simmons, Wilfred L 
Smillie, Leonard A 
Smillie, Wm. R. . 
Smith, Arnold . 
Smith, Eugene 
Smith, James M 
Smith, John A. 
Spence, Clarence C. 
Spence, Frank A. . . 
Spenceley, Harold 
Springett, Walter . 
Stephenson, Walter H 
Stewart, Alex. E. 
Stewart, Richard A. W 
Stothers, John C. . 
Strader, Edward . 
Stratton, Hubert V. 
Tamblyn, Wm. J. W 
Thompson, Clinton C. E 
Tiffin, Jos. A. . . 
Toogood, Wilfred A 
Trout, H. Bernard 
Vallentine, Harold J 
Vickery, C. A. 
Wagar, Ernest T. 
Wagner, Russell 



Walden, Wilbert 
Warnica, Roy W. 
Warren, Harold A. 
Watson, Stanley A 

Watt, Jas. H 

Welland, Fred. J. 
Welland, Jos. F. . 
West, Randolph H. A 
Wheable, Geoffrey A. 
Wheatley, Jas. A. 
Wheeler, H. A. .. 
Wholton, Thos. H. 
Weir, Arthur G. . 
Wilson, John S. . 
Wright, Richard J 
Young, J. Perry . 
Young, W. Frank 



III 

II 

II 

II 

Dist. 

II 

II 

I 

I 

III & M.T. 

Ill 

I 

II 

III 

Dist. 

Ill 
II 
II 
II 
II 
Dist. 
Ill 
II 
II 

I 
Dist. 
II 
II 
II 
II 

I 
II 
II 

I 
JI 
II 
II 
II 

I 

I 

III 

II 

II 
II 
II 
II 

I 
II 
II 

I 

I 
Dist. 

I 

II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 



|No. 2, Egremont 

'Ottawa 

No. 2, Colchester S 

Student, Hamilton N. S. 

S.S. No. 2, O'Connor , 

Cainsville 

Bancroft 

Hillcrest, Toronto. 
Queen Alexandra, Toronto. 
Winchester St., Toronto. 
S.S. No. 27 & 11 Elizabeth 

town & Yonge 

Earl Grey, Toronto 

Cornwall Model School 

S.S. No. 1, Blake 

U.S.S. 1, 18, 21, Williamsburg, 

Winchester - Springs 

S.S. No. 5, Houghton 

Student, Hamilton N. S 

Comber 

S.S. No. 8, Burford 

S.S. No. 1, Whitney 

S.S. No. 3, Olden 

S.S. No. 13, Bentinck. 

Student, London N. S 

Student, London N. S 

Kent School, Toronto 

S.S. No. 2, Guilford 

Student, London N. S 

S.S. No. 10, Ekfrid 

S.S. No. 6, Saugeen 

Central, Barrie 

Ryerson, Toronto 

S.S. No. 13, Matilda 

S.S. No. 18, Sombra 

Howard, Toronto 

Scott St., St. Thomas 

S.S. No. 3, Scott 

Tillsonburg 

S.S. No. 1, St. Joseph 

Orde St., Toronto 

Dufferin, Toronto 

S.S. No. 14, N. Fredericksburg m 
U.S.S. No. 1, Saugeen, Arrar 

& Elderslie 

S.S. No. 1, Huron 

S.S. No. 2, Howland 

S.S. No. 25, Waterloo 

West Ward, Orillia 

John Fisher, Toronto 

Dickson School, Gait 

St. Andrew's, Gait 

Shirley St., Toronto 

Chesley Ave., London 

Utterson 

S.S. No. 1, Tisdale 

King George, Hamilton 

Student, Hamilton N. S 

S.S. No. 3, Bentinck 

S.S. No. 22, Malahide 

S.S. No. 10, Windham 

S.S. No. 19, Townsend 



Discharged — 
illness. 



Rejected — medi- 
cally unfit. 



Wounded at St. 

Julien. 
Wounded before 

Regina trench, 

Somme. 



20 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Normal School Students 

The following students enlisted before the completion of their Normal School 
Course: — 



Name 


Normal School 


Name 


Normal School 


Avery, Geo. M 


Stratford. 

Peterborough. 

Stratford. 

North Bay. 

Peterborough. 

Peterborough. 

Toronto. 

Stratford. 

Peterborough. 

Stratford. 

Stratford. 

Peterborough. 

North Bay. 

Peterborough. 


MacMillan, Dan. A 

Martyn, Eugene F 

Morley, Gordon J 

Nimmo, Lester G 

Penrice, Alvin R 

Ravitch, Henry 




Bailey, Garnet R 

Bueglass, Ralph J 

Bullick, George 


Stratford. 
Stratford. 
Stratford 


Burwash, Herbert A 

Carley, Forest C 

Carson, Robert J 

Clinton, James H 

Cracknell, Arthur G 


Stratford. 
Stratford 


Robinson, Gabriel A 

Robison, Nelson R 

Ross, Walter V 


Peterborough. 

Stratford. 

Stratford. 


Duns-more, Joseph M 

Pindlay, R. Murray 


Shewfelt, Archibald G. . . 
Tait, Frank B 


Stratford. 
Hamilton. 


Garbutt, Harold A 


Taylor, Roy 


Hamilton. 


Hart, Enos 


Walton, Geo. R 


Stratford. 


Honey, Edgar M 





Non=Certificated Teachers 

The following teachers at the time of their enlistment were engaged in teaching 
under special conditions either as 

(1) Special teachers in Technical or Normal Schools; 

(2) Instructors in Drill or Physical Culture in High Schools or 

(3) Temporary teachers in Public or Separate Schools. 



Name 


Qualifica. 
tions 


School where last engaged 


Overseas Record 


Adams, A. H. S 

Alkenbrack, Ibri B 


Scotch 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Ph. Cult. 

Temp. 

A.R.C.A. 

Eng. 

Temp. 

Temp. 

Drill Inst. 

Ph. Cult. 

Temp. 

Drill Inst. 

Cadet Inst. 

Temp. 

H. Sc. 

Temp. 

Drill Inst. 

Mus. Bach. 

Temp. 

Cadet Inst. 

Drill Inst. 


Technical School, Toronto . . 
S S. No. 13, Miller 




Armstrong, Ed. W 

Beeson, James 


S S No 4, Dobie 




St. Thomas C. I 

S S No 1, Jaffray 




Brimble, Gerard 




Chester, John W 

Collins, Warren A 

Graham, Christopher J. . . 
Gregory, Wm 


Central Technical, Toronto.. 

S.S. No. 2, St. Edmunds 

S S No 6, Lindsay 




London C. I 




Huggins, S. J 

McCanh, Clarke W 

Mcintosh, James P 

Oxtaby, Wm. G 

Read, Arthur 


Ottawa C. I 

S.S. No. 2, Papineau 

Hamilton P. S 

Brantford C. I 

S.S. No. 2, Worthington 

Central Technical, Toronto. . 
S ,S No 6, Dilke 


Wounded at St. 
Julien. Invalided 
home. Returned. 


Robertson, Margaret .... 
Scott, Mason F 




Skinner, Jesse 


Hamilton N. S 




Stares, Henry A 

Toll, Charles E 


Hamilton N. S 

S.S. No. 3, E. & W. Flamboro. 

St. Catharines C. I 

Hamilton P. S 




Williams, John 




Witthun, William 





1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 21 



APPENDIX A 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC AND 
SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

To the Honourable R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my report upon the condition of the 
elementary schools throughout the Province. The information is derived from 
the Annual Reports of the Public and Separate School Inspectors in the various 
counties and districts. 

Agricultural Education 

During the year considerable progress has been made in Agricultural Educa- 
tion. Usually wherever classes in Agriculture have been introduced, they have 
proved successful, and have in many cases aroused a great deal of local interest 
in scientific Agriculture and in the beautification of grounds. In almost all cases 
where Agriculture has been introduced, School Fairs have been held. The attitude 
of the public towards Agricultural Education and School Pairs, is indicated by 
the following quotations: — 

Inspector J. F. McGuire. — It is a pleasure to Teport an increased interest on 
the part of trustees and teachers in the teaching of Agriculture. 

Inspector R. A. Paterson. — Each School Fair was well attended and was the 
centre of great interest on the part of both young and old. 

Inspector W. J. Eallett. — The teaching of Agriculture in the rural schools 
is meeting with great favour. 

Inspector A. Odell. — Five Fairs were held. They are very popular and are 
doing good work. 

Inspector J. W. Forrester. — Agriculture has made substantial progress during 
the year. 

Inspector A. A. Jordan. — In 1915 three schools taught the subject for the 
full year. In 1916, eighteen schools entered for the work. 

Physical Culture 

Very considerable progress has been 'made in this subject. In nearly all 
the Inspectorates, due attention is now being given to it. 

Inspector Gill. — Physical Culture work in the schools has improved since 
its inception. 

Inspector Hallett. — Physical Culture is very popular. The pupils take great 
delight in the exercises. 

Inspector L. Norman. — All take part in the course but the pressure of other 
work prevents it being taken up fully. 

Inspector Payment. — Physical Culture is being appreciated at its value in 
my schools. 

Inspector H. D. Johnson. — Physical Culture received proper attention in all 
the schools. This subject is well taught. 

Inspector Odell. — Nearly all the schools in the Inspectorate are taking up 
the prescribed course in the Strathcona Syllabus. 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Inspector McDowell. — Li all the schools in the Inspectorate there is some 
form of Physical Culture attempted. 

The above quotations will indicate that this subject is now receiving a good 
deal of attention in all classes of schools in the Province. The withdrawal, 
however, of a great number of teachers for service in the war, has decreased the 
number of available teachers holding Physical Culture certificates. 

Truancy 

The Reports of Inspectors show generally, that truancy is decreasing: — 

Inspector Tyller. — I have the pleasure of stating that in Guelph, truancy in 
the proper sense of the term, is a thing almost unknown. 

Inspector T. A. Craig. — The present scheme of reporting truants, within the 
compulsory age, is having good effect. 

Inspector Cole. — Truant officers have been appointed in all townships but one. 

Inspector Taylor. — A decided improvement is noted within the year. 

Notwithstanding the increased demands for the help of the children at home 
and on the farms, the conditions with respect to absences from school are 
greatly improving. 

It is evident, however, that before the conditions with regard to truancy can 
be regarded as satisfactory, it will be necessary for each municipality to secure 
the services of efficient truant officers and to make a serious effort to secure the 
enforcement of the law. It will soon be necessary for the Province to make 
fuller provision for the attendance at school of adolescents between the ages of 
fourteen and sixteen years. 

Art and Music 

These two subjects are receiving an increased amount of attention and a 
large number of teachers are being annually added to the list of those specially 
qualified to teach these subjects. 

Other Subjects 

In regard to the other subjects of the course, there is a manifest tendency 
to bring each subject into some direct and vital contact with the everyday life 
of the child, and the teachers are coming more directly to realize that their 
primary duty is to fit the child for future citizenship. 

Inspection 

Very considerable improvements have been made within the past five years 
in the methods of school inspection: — 

1st. The reports upon the condition of the schools are much more complete 
and now furnish valuable data for needed modifications in the school courses 
and in educational methods. 

2nd. A greater amount of time is given to the work of inspection, and a 
more serious conception of the value of adequate inspection is being entertained 
by the community at large, as a means of improving the efficiency of the schools. 

3rd. The work done by the Inspectors no longer consists merely in observing 
the work in the school room and reporting their impressions of the efficiency of 
the teacher and the progress of the pupils. Much more time is given by the 
Inspectors to teaching model lessons, and to inspiring in teachers and pupils a 
proper attitude towards Education in general. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 23 

4th. The Inspector has also increased his activities in the way of giving 
necessary information and advice to Boards of Trustees in regard to the enlarge- 
ment of school grounds, the modification of school buildings, and the erection 
of new schools. 

5th. In the majority of cases a very much closer contact has been set up by 
various agencies between the Inspector, local boards, and the parents. The home 
and the school are daily coming into closer contact. 

Consolidation 

The question of the consolidation of rural schools is coining to the front. 
During the year I have attended several meetings at the request of ratepayers 
interested in the subject. In general, the best opinion has been strongly in 
favour of the movement, notwithstanding the fact that it might entail larger 
expenditures than are required for the maintenance of rural schools, as at present 
constituted. There appears to be, at last, a very serious awakening to the obvious 
fact that the only question before the State is, what form of education is the 
most efficient, and no longer, what form of education is the least expensive. 
If the Legislature were prepared to support the movement by grants to be given: 
(a) for the conveyance of pupils, (b) for the erection of buildings, (c) for the 
number of schools consolidated, or for all three, upon some arranged schedule, I 
have no doubt that this movement, which seems to promise a great deal for 
educational efficiency, would be crowned with success. I shall be glad from my 
knowledge of the actual conditions to present a workable scheme for your 
consideration. 

Public School Manuals 

Within the school year ihe work of completing the list of Public School 
Manuals has been accomplished. A regulation has come into effect requiring that 
the full set be placed in every school in the Province. Formerly it was found 
that even the Normal trained teacher very soon got out of touch with the prin- 
ciples and methods of teaching acquired at the Normal School and that his in- 
creased experience did little more than supply the wastage thus incurred. The 
improvement brought about by the issue of these Manuals is very well set forth 
m a passage from the report of Inspector Elliott, which reads as follows: 

" I am pleased to note the general improvement in the teaching of the major 
subjects. This, I believe, is largely due to careful study of the Manuals issued by 
the Department of Education. Young teachers are here presented with a logical 
sequence of topics in the various subjects, together with proper methods of pre- 
sentation. As a result of their general use, I find a growing self-confidence in 
teachers, which materially strengthens the work of the school. The Department 
of Education is to be congratulated on the issue of these Manuals, which in a very 
practical way brings to the teacher the best work of the Normal School." 

Model Schools 

Three Model Schools, namely, the Guelph Model School, the Clinton Model 
School and the Chatham Model School, went out of operation last year, as the 
territory for which they furnished a supply of teachers had been fully covered 
by normal school graduates. A new Model School was opened at Port Arthur and 
successfully operated during the autumn of 1916 for the purpose of supplying 
training for teachers in the more remote districts of the Province. The growth of 
the Summer Model Schools at Sharbot Lake, Madoc, Bracebridge, Gore Bay, 



24 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Ottawa, Port Arthur and Sturgeon Falls will very soon render the issue of Tem- 
porary certificates unnecessary, and it will be possible for every school, even in the 
remotest districts, to secure a teacher who has had at least some professional 
training. 

Superannuation 

The teachers' superannuation scheme proposed by the present Legislature 
must be productive of the most beneficent results : — 

1st. The bill when it passes into law will allow a great many teachers to 
retire upon a living allowance who have been for some time anxiously awaiting 
the opportunity. 

2nd. The bill will also secure a much to be desired permanency in the 
profession. When the teacher realizes that superannuation awaits him and that 
he has a vested interest in his profession, he will not be so apt to take up other 
lines of work. 

In the measure proposed the Legislature has earned for itself the gratitude 
of the retiring teachers and also the commendation of everyone who is acquainted 
with the present educational needs of the Province. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Jno. Waugh, 

Chief Inspector. 
Toronto, March 14th, 1917. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



25 



APPENDIX B 

REPORTS OF THE INSPECTORS OF CONTINUATION 

SCHOOLS 

I. REPORT OF INSPECTOR MILLS 

To the Honourable B. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report on the Continuation 
Schools of my inspectorate. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

G. K. Mills. 
Toronto, December 30th, 1916. 

The schools in the eastern and northern part of the Province that have been 
under my supervision may be classified as follows : 

Grade A Schools, — having the full time of three teachers 1 

'Grade B Schools, — having the full time of two teachers 43 

Grade C Schools, — (a), having the full time of one teacher and at least half 

the time of a second teacher 8 

(b), having the full time of one teacher 17 

There are, therefore, sixty-nine schools in all, having one hundred and twenty- 
two teachers, eight of whom give only half time to Continuation School work. 

The Staffs of the Schools 

There are twenty men and forty-nine women principals, and four men and 
forty-nine women assistants. Eighteen of the principals and the same number of 
assistants are graduates of a University. During the past year there have been 
fifty-nine changes in the staffs of these schools. This constant changing of teachers 
has seriously affected the efficiency of many of the schools, but as there is now a 
plentiful supply of teachers, the inducement to make a change will be less. 

New Schools and Buildings 

During the year new schools have been established at ISTavan and South Porcu- 
pine, and the school at Kinburn, which had been discontinued for lack of suitable 
accommodation, was reopened in a very creditable building, modern in every par- 
ticular. The school at Manotick has been discontinued until suitable accommoda- 
tion can be provided. A fine new six-room school is being erected at Finch and 
another room has been added to the Continuation School building at Kenmore. 



26 THE KEPORT OF THE No. 17 



Some Common Difficulties 

1. ACCOMMODATION AND EQUIPMENT 

The conditions under which the work of Continuation Schools is carried on 
give rise to difficulties that, while by no means confined to these particular schools, 
are probably more frequent and more prominent. 

One difficulty is that of procuring suitable accommodation and sufficient equip- 
ment for the proper carrying on of the work of the school. The teachers are usually 
young, have had very limited experience and are timid about pressing for the needs 
of the school. The trustees have been accustomed only to Public Schools where 
the work is carried on without special accommodation and with little or no expendi- 
ture for equipment. A serious wag of the head and a grumbling remark about 
the inability of the section to stand the expense is sufficient to stand off the timid, 
inexperienced teacher. He does not know or has not nerve enough to point out that 
the Board receives an annual grant of sixteen per cent, of the value of all equipment, 
and thus it not only costs the section nothing but soon becomes a source of income 
to the school. He rather learns to get along somehow without necessary equipment 
and forms very bad habits of teaching. 

2. NEGLECT OF EQUIPMENT! 

Many teachers do not properly care for nor make sufficient use of the equip- 
ment provided. Maps are allowed to stand in the corner accumulating dust, and 
history and geography are taught without their assistance. The school library is 
seldom used to the extent that is intended. The dictionary and more particularly 
the encyclopaedia and gazetteer are rarely used, and pupils pass through the school 
unaware of the value of such works of reference. Too frequently notes dictated by 
the teacher take the place of practical work in botany and zoology and the 
laboratory tables and equipment show few signs of use. Such methods are the 
refuge of the weak or indolent teacher. 

3. EXAMINATION SUBJECTS 

The pressure of the work in these schools is responsible for a tendency on the 
part of a number of teachers to give scant attention to work that does not bear 
directly on examination. While there has been a decided improvement in this 
respect during the past year in such subjects as physical culture, supplementary 
reading and oral composition, it is with evident reluctance in many cases that 
adequate provision is made for such work. 

In a number of schools the subjects not required for Lower School examina- 
tion, as algebra, geometry, composition and literature, are dropped too soon after 
Easter in order that examination subjects may be stressed. As a result many of the 
pupils promoted to the Middle School are poorly prepared, particularly in the 
mathematical subjects, 'to keep up with the other members of the Middle School 
class. This condition has been accentuated during the past year by the intro- 
duction of the new text book in Algebra, and by a number of students who obtained 
promotion to the Middle School on Farm Labour certificates. Such a condition 
may be met very satisfactorily in schools where the staff is sufficiently large to 
provide for a- junior and senior division of the Middle School, but in schools with 
two teachers where all the work must be covered efficiently in one year a serious 
difficulty arises when pupils enter the Middle School with insufficient preparation. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 27 



4. WRITING AND NEATNESS OF WORK 

The last difficulty I shall refer to is that relating to the lack of good writing 
and neatness of work. These defects are by no means confined to Continuation 
Schools, but, since a very large proportion of the pupils in attendance at these 
schools come from rural schools, it may be expected that the standard of the work 
in this respect will be somewhat below that of the larger High Schools. The 
numerous classes of the rural school, the irregular attendance and manual labour 
of the pupils, and the frequent changing of teachers, all tend to reduce the standard 
of this work in these ungraded schools. That a very great improvement may 
be made in the writing and neatness of work of those pupils who come to Continua- 
tion Schools has been shown in many schools where the staff has worked together 
with this end in view. With a due amount of care to this very important part of 
school training it should be possible to extract the element of truth from the state- 
ment sometimes made by business men that, — " Your High School pupils cannot 
write decently and they are messy and sloppy in their work." 

Such Conditions not General 

It must not be supposed that the above conditions are general in these schools. 
When the conditions under which the work of these schools is carried on are properly 
appreciated the general standard of work is remarkably good. The great majority 
of the teachers are young, have a limited knowledge of the subjects and have had 
little experience. Each teacher is responsible for a greater number of subjects than 
is the case in larger schools. The pressure of the work is increased because of the 
more intimate relation these schools have with the people of the small communities 
in which they are located. However, when due allowance is made for all these 
factors it is evident that much of the poor work, as also the good, is due to similar 
methods in the schools that these young teachers have attended. 

Recent Improvements 

But in case I should be misunderstood and the opinion formed, from the 
difficulties and defects I have so unsparingly pointed out, that the work of these 
schools is of a very inferior kind, I must, in justice to the majority of the teachers 
and school boards, say that a marked improvement has been shown in all depart- 
ments of the work during the past few years. These schools have passed the ex- 
perimental stage and are now firmly established as an important part of the educa- 
tional system of the Province. They have proven their value to the small com- 
munities in which they have been established, and with few exceptions the people 
are willing to contribute freely to their support. The accommodations have been 
greatly improved. During the past five years twenty-two new school buildings 
have been erected in my division of the Province and four of these have become 
High Schools. Additions of one or more rooms have been made to five other 
schools and many old school buildings have been renovated and improved. Thirty- 
four schools have, during the year, been provided with suitable laboratory accom- 
modation so that pupils may carry on the work in Science experimentally, and with 
very few exceptions the accommodation for practical work in Science is now suitable 
and adequate for the present attendance. Nearly all school boards have made 
additions to the equipment and this is rapidly Hearing the required minimum in 
all schools and is much above it in some. There is now not only a sufficient supply 
of qualified teachers but school boards that advertise at a suitable time have many 
applications from which to choose. The work that may be attempted in these 



28 THE KEPOKT OF THE No. 17 

schools has been limited by regulation and the organization has thereby been greatly 
improved. The Summer Courses provided to give a suitable training for 
teachers of such special subjects as Art and Physical Culture have resulted in a 
great improvement in the work done in these departments, and, while these schools 
are not yet giving all the services to the communities that they may be made 
capable of giving, very rapid progress towards efficiency has been made. 

The Future of These Schools 

The accommodation, equipment, organization, academic and professional quali- 
fications of the teachers, and the provision for maintenance and control of these 
schools, leave relatively little to be desired under traditional ideas of secondary 
education. With a little adjustment here and there, and subject to the human im- 
perfections of teachers, inspectors and school boards, the system seems to have 
reached a condition of comparative perfection just at the moment when our whole 
system of public education must be greatly modified and extended. It is, perhaps, 
well that this side of our educational system is so well organized that it will need 
little attention for many years, while the industrial side will be requiring the best 
thought of statesmen and educational leaders. The end of the war will mark the 
end of a period in the world's history. The new era will be one of industry and 
commerce, not conducted in any haphazard way, but based on scientific principles 
and calling to its aid every achievement of art and science. The country that will 
make the most progress is the country that learns best how to use the abilities of 
her citizens and how to conserve human energy. At present the great majority of 
our youth are ill equipped for the work of life. More than eight out of ten receive 
no education after fourteen years of age, and many leave school at an earlier age. 
Vast numbers of our boys go into occupations that give no training worth while 
and lead no place, and when they reach manhood find themselves day labourers 
without opportunity to prepare for anything better. The waste of human ability is 
infinitely the greatest waste in any country. 

The statesman who would mould a nation must begin with the child. Legisla- 
tion dealing with middle life or old age is patchwork, good enough in its place and 
necessary under conditions, but the fundamental conditions of a nation's prosperity 
and progress lie in the education and training of its youth. The development of 
these Continuation Schools and of our whole system of public education has reached 
a point where it must become a conscious development toward an end that is deemed 
essential for the welfare of the individual and the -state. 

The function of our secondary schools is no longer to prepare teachers, or to 
give an introduction to the learned professions, or even to give a so-called cultural 
education. They may well provide for such for those so inclined, but their chief 
►function must be to provide an opportunity for every boy and girl to better fit 
himself for the pursuit of such worthy occupation as he may choose to follow in 
life. The standard of admission to any but the professional courses should no 
longer be an Entrance examination, but that of age and desire, and the desire 
should be quickened by the command of the state. 

It is at present impossible to consider special courses adapted to the needs of 
all trades. Such schools can be established only in the largest centres. The De- 
partment by its regulations and by a very liberal system of grants has made it 
possible, but, in my opinion, it should, within a very few years, be made obligatory 
for every two-teacher Continuation School and every High School having four 
teachers or less, to establish departments of Agriculture and Household Economy 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 29 

that will give a two years' course and winter courses in each department. Schools 
having a staff of more than six teachers should find it obligatory to establish de- 
partments in Technical Training and Household Economy, each giving a two or 
three years' course, while schools having a staff of between four and seven teachers 
should be given the right to select, but must select either of the above. In order 
to remove some of the difficulties in the way of such an obligatory scheme for in- 
dustrial training, provision should be made for educating and training a sufficient 
number of the best available teachers; a plan should be formulated whereby the 
burden of providing the necessary school accommodation will be distributed over 
the municipalities that derive benefit from such a school, and attendance at such 
classes, or at the present school courses, for the greater part of the time between 
the ages of fourteen and seventeen should be compulsory. 

Successful work in such courses should be given credit on University Matricula- 
tion examination, and a student should be able to enter many courses at the Uni- 
versities without having to face such subject's as Latin, French or German, or even 
Algebra and Geometry. I know this, to some, is heresy, but the time is near 
when it will be regarded as an accomplishment of greater mental and moral value 
to the individual as well as profit to the state to be able, with intelligent interest, 
to make a loaf of bread, to shoe a horse, or to feed pigs, than with suppressed 
objurgations or patient resignation to stumble over subjunctive moods in Latin, or 
to face deductions in geometry in silent wonder as to what it all means. 



II. REPORT OF INSPECTOR HOAG 

To the Honourable R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to submit for your consideration the following report on the 
Continuation Schools under my supervision for the year 1916. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. P. Hoag. 
Toronto, December 30, 1916. 

The Province of Ontario is divided into two districts for the purposes of in- 
spection of Continuation Schools. During the year 1916 I have been in charge 
of the western district, which consists of the counties of Peel and Simcoe, and all 
that portion of the Province lying west of these counties as far as the River Detroit 
and Lake Huron. In this district, during 1916, two new schools, Delhi in Norfolk 
County and Delaware in Middlesex County, have been opened and one school, 
Elmvale in Simcoe County, has been discontinued. The number and class of 
schools in the district in 1916, and the number of teachers employed is shown in 
the table herewith : 



30 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Grade of School. No. of Schools. Teachers. 

A — 3 teachers 3 9 

. B — 2 teachers 53 106 

C (1) — 1 teacher and half time of a second teacher ... 4 8 

(2) — 1 teacher 6 6 



Total 66 129 

In accordance with the Regulations, I visited each of these schools at least once 
during the school year. In several cases where proposed building operations or im- 
provements, or where the interests of the schools seemed to make such visits advisable, 
I visited schools two or three times. One school, Thorndale, I visited four times. 

Accommodations 

Notwithstanding the war, school boards have been ready to do all in their 
power to improve building and other accommodations, and appear to have exper- 
ienced little difficulty in securing the necessary money. 

Two school buildings, those at Elmvale and at Beeton, were destroyed by fire. 
Plans are being prepared fof new and modern buildings to replace those destroyed. 
At Creemore a by-law has been passed providing for the issuing of debentures for the 
erection on a new building to house both Public and Continuation Schools. The 
Continuation School building at Harrow has been completed and is now in occupa- 
tion by the school. Additions to the buildings at West Lome and Tavistock will be 
completed early in 1917. A science laboratory has been fitted up in the Brussels 
school and many minor improvements have been made in other schools. 

Equipment 

The Regulations of the Department require that the minimum value of the 
equipment for Continuation Schools shall be as shown in the table attached : 

Grade B Schools. Grade C Schools. 

Library $300 $150 

Scientific Apparatus 300 150 

Biological Specimens 50 25 

Maps, Charts, etc 50 25 

Art Models, Supplies, etc 50 50 

While a large number of the schools will be found to have provided equipment 
beyond the minimum required, there are some schools which are still under the 
minimum. Where the deficiency is in the value of scientific apparatus I have found 
difficulty in securing a great advance, as, owing to the war, prices of all scientific 
apparatus have advanced enormously and it is almost impossible to secure prompt 
delivery at any price. Very considerable additions to the equipment in the other 
departments of the schedule have however been made. I feel sure that within a 
very short time all our Continuation Schools will have reached the minimum stand- 
ard required for equipment. 

Qualifications of Teachers 

In my report for the year 1915 I stated that the supply of properly qualified 
teachers appeared to be adequate. This statement referred, of course, to the 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 31 



ordinary certificates, possession of which qualify teachers for positions on the stall's 
of Continuation Schools. The statement did not refer to the holders uf special 
certificates in Art, Physical Training, etc. The regulations issued in 1916 lequire 
school boards to have upon their staffs at least one teacher who is the holder of an 
Elementary Art certificate and, subject to the recommendation of- the Inspector 
concerned, at least one teacher who is the holder of an Elementary certificate in 
Physical Culture. As such certificates cannot be obtained during the year of 
attendance at the Faculty of Education, it follows that it is necessary for teachers 
to attend a summer school in order to qualify themselves for positions on the 
Continuation and High School staffs when the special certificates are required. 

I regret to report that in many cases school boards found it impossible to 
secure teachers who were holders of the special certificates required as a sufficient 
number of teachers did not attend the summer schools in 1916. Many teachers 
and boards claimed to be unaware of the regulation requiring the special certificates 
in Art and Physical Training, but in every case agreed to comply with the regula- 
tions after the summer of 1917. 

On account of the scarcity of teachers qualified in Art and Physical Training,, 
and in view of the promise in each case to take the summer course in 1917, I have 
recommended that Temporary Certificates in Art and Physical Training be granted 
to a number of teachers. But I feel sure that the need for granting temporary 
certificates in these subjects will not be apparent after September 1917. 

In view of the difficulty that has been found, however, I would respectfully 
suggest that attendance at a summer school in Art or Physical Training be required 
of every graduate of the Faculty of Education who desires to teach in a Continua- 
tion School. 

Again, during 1916 as during 1915, I have found holders of Public School 
(Interim) or High School Assistant (Interim) Certificates applying for and 
securing positions as Principals of Continuation Schools. In every case when this 
has occurred I have felt it my duty to insist that the board concerned secure a 
properly qualified teacher. It is true that the changes of teachers involved some- 
times causes loss to both pupils and teachers and inconvenience to the board, but I 
have found that only drastic action will prevent repetition of this violation of the 
regulations. If school boards would refuse to appoint to a position any teacher 
who does not fully describe the certificates held by him or her, or if the boards would 
submit names of applicants to the Inspector concerned before making an appoint- 
ment, much difficulty would be avoided. 

For the teacher who secures a position in the manner described above I have- 
no sympathy and little respect. In nearly every case the teacher has been wilfully 
ignorant of the regulations he was expected to know or he has deliberately sought 
to evade them. But as it is so difficult to show deliberate intention to violate 
regulations, it is impossible to recommend the cancellation of certificates, there 
therefore remains no course but to insist on the board securing another teacher. 

Conditions of the Schools 

I am pleased to be able to report that in the scholastic work of the schools 
advancement is being made. I feel that very considerable advance has been made 
in all school subjects both in methods of teaching and in results shown by the 
pupils. This is particularly true of Oral Reading and Geometry, to which I have 
referred in previous reports. Wherever teachers have insisted that all work read 
or spoken by pupils be uttered in a clear distinct tone, I have found good oral read- 



32 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

ing; wherever teachers have insisted that pupils draw carefully all figures and 
employ the eye to aid the mind, I have found satisfactory work in Geometry. 

In the practical work in Science, however, while there has been improvement 
during the year much remains to be done. In some cases I have found teachers 
performing experiments and pupils acting as interested spectators instead of the 
pupils performing the experiments themselves. I am glad to say that such teaching 
of science is rapidly disappearing. If it is true that " things seen are mightier than 
things heard," it is equally true that in practical work " we learn to do by doing." 

The War 

During the year the great war has been uppermost in the mind and heart of 
everyone. In our schools, teachers and pupils have followed the mighty struggle 
from day to day by means of maps, newspapers, and other publications. This has 
been done not so much as a preparation for the inevitable examination in History 
as from a sincere interest in the progress of our Empire's fight for the preservation 
of liberty. Then, also, every school has one or more names on its Honour Roll of 
those who have gone to do " their bit." The Principal of the Princeton Continua- 
tion School, Mr. Lloyd Hughes, and the Principal of the Grand Valley Continua- 
tion School, Mr. E. H. Glenn, have gone overseas to take their places with boys 
from their own and other schools. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 33 

APPENDIX C 
REPORTS OF THE INSPECTORS OF HIGH SCHOOLS 

I.— REPORT OF INSPECTOR WETHERELL 

To the Honourable E. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Eeport on the Col- 
legiate Institutes and High Schools in my inspectorate of the last school year. 

During the academic year 1915-1916 it was my privilege to visit the Collegiate 
Institutes at Brockville, Cobourg, Kingston, Lindsay, Morrisburg, Napanee, Ottawa, 
Perth, Peterborough, Picton, Eenfrew, Smith's Falls, Vankleek Hill, and the High 
Schools at Alexandria, Almonte, Arnprior, Athens, Avonmore, Belleville, Bowman- 
ville, Brighton, Campbellford, Carleton Place, Chesterville, Colborne, Cornwall, 
Deseronto, Gananoque, Hawkesbury, Iroquois, Kemptville, Madoc, Markham, More- 
wood, Newburgh, Newcastle, Norwood, Omemee, Oshawa, Pembroke, Plantagenet, 
Port Hope, Port Perry, Prescott, Eichmond Hill, Eockland, Stirling, Sydenham, 
Trenton, Uxbridge, Weston, Whitby, Williamstown, Winchester — 54 Schools. 

During the year I also visited the following Private Schools in connection with 
the requirements of Eegulation 37 as to Science, Art, Bookkeeping and Writing: 
Convent of Mary Immaculate, Pembroke; Convent of Notre Dame, Kingston; St. 
Joseph's Academy, Lindsay; St. Joseph's Convent, Toronto; Albert College, Belle- 
ville; Ontario Ladies' College, Whitby; Havergal Ladies' College, Toronto. 

Improved Accommodations 

During the year some important improvements have been effected in School 
Buildings. The new wing of the Perth Collegiate Institute, including a gymnasium 
and excellent laboratories, has been completed. In Ottawa the work of re-construc- 
tion necessitated by the disastrous fire of September,- 1915, has been completed. 
At the time of my visit to Ottawa last winter the Commercial Classes were housed 
in seven rooms of one of the Public Schools, but these classes since last September 
have had more comfortable and more central quarters in a new Commercial Build- 
ing. The Whitby Collegiate Institute Building has been re-constructed at a cost of 
$12,000. The Whitby Board has given a written guarantee that a new building for 
the Collegiate Classes will be erected on another site within a few years. The new 
wing of the Kingston Collegiate Institute has been completed and occupied. The 
new High School Building at Brighton has been erected and occupied since my visit 
to the Brighton High School in September, 1915. 

A large number of the Schools are facing the problem of constructing new 
buildings or of re-constructing old. In Eenfrew the very remarkable growth of the 
Collegiate Institute attendance has made the question of a new building imperative 
and pressing. In Belleville the Board, it is hoped, will soon implement a promise 
of long standing and provide High School accommodations worthy of the city. 
New buildings are also urgently needed in Almonte, Campbellford, and Carleton 
Place. Brockville, which liberally provided additional accommodations a few 
years ago, is again embarrassed by overflowing classes. The buildings at Madoc, 
Uxbridge, and Markham should be enlarged at the earliest possible date. 
3 E A 



34 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Physical Culture 

Perhaps in none of the other activities of the schools has such a transforma- 
tion been effected in recent years as in Physical Culture. Ten years ago not one 
High School in ten had any regular organization for bodily exercises, and even in 
the Collegiate Institutes the exercises were often of a merely nominal and per- 
functory kind. About seven years ago the course in- Physical Culture was made 
virtually obligatory in all High Schools, and about five years ago the teachers of 
Physical Culture began to receive special training in summer classes. Now a large 
proportion of the teachers of Drill and Calisthenics hold elementary certificates, 
and many hold specialist certificates. In many schools a very high degree of effi- 
ciency has now been attained, and in nearly all schools the standard of efficiency 
has been greatly elevated. 

While the general situation, then, in Physical Culture is highly satisfactory, 
it may seem ungracious to find fault with a few details. I would, however, seize 
this opportunity of passing some strictures on the procedure obtaining in a few 
schools. 

(1) In Collegiate Institutes, which are required to take up the course an hour 
and a half every week in each form of the Lower School and an hour every week 
in each form of the Middle and Upper Schools, there is a tendency to shorten the 
period of exercise to 15 or 20 minutes, although the allotted time as designated 
by the time-table is 30 minutes. The instructors declare, with some show of reason, 
that vigorous exercise for 15 or 20 minutes is all that the average pupil can stand. 
If this is so, and I am inclined to think that the contention is sound, the Regula- 
tion should be changed so as to call for 15 or 20 minutes every school day. After 
all, the only ideal system of Physical Culture is that which insists on daily 
exercise. 

(2) Another tendency too prevalent in Collegiate Institutes is the growing 
practice of allowing many Upper School pupils to omit the Physical Exercises 
altogether. The argument advanced is usually the plea that older pupils have been 
so well trained in the earlier years of their school career that they should be allowed 
to do as they please when they reach the Upper School. The teachers who plead 
thus fail to measure the purpose and worth of Physical Culture. The chief thing 
desired is not training but constant exercise, and collective training is only a con- 
venient medium for attaining the end in view. Moreover, the pupils who do the 
severest mental work, and who, accordingly, need physical exercises more than 
any others, are the very pupils who suffer injury from the mistaken kindness here 

condemned. 

(3) Another tendency which must be guarded against is the disposition to 
exempt too large a number of pupils under Regulation 16, (2), (c) : "No pupil 
shall be exempted/' etc. In a few schools last year I found that from three to 
eight per cent, of the pupils had been exempted on the recommendation of local 
physicians and that the Principals had weakly acquiesced. In one or two schools 
it was apparent even to a visitor that many of the exempted pupils would have 
been in better health if they had been required to join their fellow-pupils in drill 
and calisthenics. Too often, no doubt, the exemptions had their origin in the 
pupils' disinclination rather than their physical disability. One perplexed Prin- 
cipal exclaimed: "Well, how can I go counter to the direction of a medical cer- 
tificate?" As soon as a Principal is aware that an unwise local practitioner is 
wresting the control of the school from his hands and advising a deleterious course, 
he should courageously take measures to check the reprehensible practice. As a 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 35 

rule, not more than two or three pupils in every hundred are incapacitated for 
physical exercises of the milder varieties. 

Art 

The work in Art steadily, even rapidly, improves. The beneficial influences 
of the College of Art are radiating into every corner of the Province. The great 
increase in the number of Art Specialists in the last two or three years has proved 
a leaven of blessing in the secondary schools. In no fewer than nineteen of the 
schools of my District I was pleased last year to grade the character of the teaching 
in Art as " I ". 

The number of pupils taking Middle School Art has increased very rapidly 
under the fostering stimulus of the " bonus " inducement. It is a question whether 
the Special Grants (Regulations, Page 47), instituted ten or twelve years ago for 
the purpose of encouraging advanced work in Art, should now be continued. The 
advanced course would now seem to be able to stand alone without the support of a 
financial honorarium. There does not now appear to be any sufficient reason why 
the teacher of Art should be more highly favoured than the heads of the other 
departments. 

Spelling 

In a recent copy of a Toronto daily appears an exceptionally interesting article 
on the theory and practice of teaching spelling. As the views contained therein 
agree, in the main, with the convictions which I have reached after many years of 
experiment, I reproduce here a portion of the article, in the hope that I may help 
to correct some defective methods of teaching spelling which are too common in 
the schools: 

" There is, or at least there ought to be, no difference of opinion among people 
of common sense regarding the place assigned and the importance attached to the 
spelling of English words in the use of the English language. To prove the 
soundness of this assumption one need cite only the fact that inability to spell 
words correctly in writing is a formidable if not a fatal barrier to entrance into 
several kinds of useful and fairly well paid occupations. No business man in need 
of a stenographer, for example, would willingly and knowingly employ one whose 
early education has been neglected in this respect. ... If a pupil leaves 
school at from twelve to fourteen a bad speller he must be lacking in capacity, or 
have attended school irregularly, or have been badly taught. There is for the 
ordinary pupil no mystery at all and not much difficulty in the evolution of a good 
speller ; very much depends on the teacher of spelling. ... It goes a long way 
to clearing up an apparently difficult situation to bear in mind several propositions 
that are or ought to be indisputable commonplaces : Spelling is really writing, and 
the letters put together to make written words are varying marks, absolutely con- 
ventional, and learned as such only by imitation ; repeating the names of the letters 
that form a word is not ' spelling ' the word, and, except in the case of those who 
are defective in the faculty of remembering visible forms, it should not be practised 
in schools, because it is as a rule a waste of time. Practice in spelling lists of 
detached words of which many occur very rarely in ordinary life is, for the most: 
part, a useless exercise, because a large proportion of the errors made in spelling 
are due to the fact that the words are connected together to make sense, and the 
sense is always more important than the form. The most effective way to make 



3G THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



correct spellers is to make the pupils practise writing from dictation ordinary 
English words, making a piece of coherent text composed of a series of connected 
statements." 

The Teaching of History 

It may seem rather surprising that the competency of a teacher of History 
cannot be gauged by his academic standing, however splendid. The teachers of 
History, especially in the Collegiate Institutes, are among the best scholars in our 
schools, but the teaching of History, in very many institutions, leaves much to be 
desired. While it is true that the very best lessons I have heard have been taught 
by specialists, it is also true that specialists have taught some of the very worst. 
It is clear that scholarship must be strongly supported by various aids if the history 
lesson is to be effective. The main aids to success, often dismally absent, are three. 
Without careful daily preparation the teacher of History is lost in a quagmire of 
inaccuracy and uncertainty. Without enthusiastic zeal a deadly torpor seizes the 
class and nothing worth while is accomplished. Without variety, which rings con- 
stant changes in treatment and method, the judgment, the memory, the imagina-. 
tions of the pupils are not keyed up to their highest capacity and achievement. 
It is by no means rare that the inspector hears a scholarly teacher flounder help- 
lessly because of lack of serious preparation on the preceding evening. As to 
enthusiasm and zeal, they are mostly temperamental; and the teacher who lacks 
animation is to be pitied rather than censured. It may be, too, that lack of in- 
vention and initiative, which leads to monotonous methods, is largely due to causes 
beyond the reach of remedy. At any rate, the teacher who is well armed with this 
trusty triad of weapons — industry that never tires, zeal at a constant white heat, 
and sane versatility — will always succeed in interesting, in stimulating, and in 
instructing every pupil in his class. Confidence, altertness, and earnestness will 
thrive among pupils who are so fortunate as to have a teacher who possesses the 
three cardinal virtues I have named. But, oh! the inertia and languor which 
desolate a class whose teacher lacks the vital qualities. 

The New Commercial Regulations 

The new Commercial Regulations of 1915 reached the schools in September, a 
few weeks after opening day. Consequently, many Principals were obliged to 
revise their organization in October in order to satisfy the new requirements. Some 
Principals found difficulty in meeting the new demands at once. In schools with 
fully organized commercial departments the Principals should have summoned 
immediately the Advisory Commercial Committees in order to face the new situa- 
tion. A few Principals failed to see the advisability of taking this step, and they 
were consequently ill prepared for the tests of the Inspector. 

In my opinion, the new directions as to the accommodations and equipment 
of commercial departments are somewhat too complex and comprehensive for 
ordinary secondary schools, however suitable for the great Toronto School of 
Finance and Commerce. I would suggest that Regulation 4 (Pages 8 and 9), with 
appendix thereto, be simplified for the convenience of the Collegiate Institutes and 
High Schools. I find that most schools, a year after the issuing of these new 
directions, have taken no adequate steps toward carrying out the recommendations 
of Section 4. Certain minimum improvements should be made imperative. 






1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 37 

Oral Composition 

In my Eeport of 1915 I devoted considerable space to a discussion of the im- 
portance of English Composition (written), and I gave suggestions for the guid- 
ance of inexperienced teachers. On that occasion I promised to return at a later 
date to the subject of Oral Composition. 

The subject of Oral Composition is a comparatively new one in our schools. 
It was introduced for the first time about twelve years ago. Separate organi- 
zation of the composition classes for oral work came in a few years later still. 
Since the introduction of the subject very much real progress has been made by the 
earnest teachers of English. Much yet remains to be accomplished. The diffi- 
culties that harass the teacher of this variety of work in English Composition 
are innumerable and, in many cases, almost insuperable. 

All teachers will admit that the main purposes of the teaching of Oral Com- 
position are these: (1) To lead the pupils to strive to acquire a ready delivery; (2) 
to teach them to speak their mother tongue correctly; (3) to guide them to the 
most effective modes of oral expression of which they are capable, with due regard 
to the nature of the discourse and of the thoughts and sentiments of the speaker. 

(1) Beady Delivery. — "Conference maketh a ready man", says Bacon. By 
f conference " he means, of course, " conversation " or " oral discourse ". It is 
hardly necessary to say that Bacon does not mean one " conference " or two or six 
per annum, but oft-repeated conferences. In a word, the aim of the educator 
should be to lead his pupils to approach, as nearly as may be, in the class-room, in 
dealing with serious subjects, the degree of readiness which they constantly exhibit 
in their small talk on the street or in the freedom of their homes, when they are 
dealing with trifles light as air. Accordingly, every pupil should speak frequently, — 
every week, at any rate. 

(2) Correctness of Speech. — This should be insisted on absolutely. Therefore 
the teacher should retain full control of the class at all times. When the teacher 
hands the activities of the class over to the pupils, allows the immature pupils 
to act as critics, and takes little or no part in the discussions which follow the pupils 5 
efforts, almost nothing worth while is accomplished. The most glaring in- 
accuracies of speech and the most lamentable faults of delivery will go unnoticed 
amid the generous applause of the class. Even the formal debate leads to no good 
results if time is not found after the debate for thoughtful and adequate criticism. 

(3) Effective Modes of Expression. — The young teacher, in endeavouring to 
aid his pupils in this regard, is in great danger of imagining that uniform methods 
are desirable. Within the bounds of general uniformity there should be a wide 
latitude in methods. The individuality of the pupils should have free scope. Only 
eccentricities and actual lapses should be the subjects of criticism. 

The question of preparation for the Oral Composition hour is a difficult one. 
In my opinion, impromptu efforts are almost worthless in the class-room, as such 
efforts usually are in after life, in the pulpit, on the platform, and in parliament. 
In the class-rooms of our High Schools I have heard scores of Oral Composition 
lessons in which young pupils were allowed to expatiate extempore at will, and with- 
out a single exception I have always left the class-room with the conviction that 
the half-hour had been practically wasted. 

The question of the use of manuscripts or notes is not so difficult. In no case 
should a pupil be permitted to use his manuscript, for the exercise is an oral 
exercise. If the pupil wishes to marshal his thoughts or arguments, and even to 
garb them in elegant form, by writing out his address at leisure, he should be com- 



3b THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

. — i 

mended for his pains, but he should so thoroughly master his subject that he will 
need only a few notes when he addresses his class-mates. 

A very useful form of Oral Composition may be based on the Socratic method 
of question and answer. All the pupils of the class should be required to brood 
oyer, and, if necessary, to read about, a certain subject. At the hour appointed 
the teacher should call on a pupil to discuss with him before the whole class some 
phase of the topic. By well directed queries, couched in as few words as possible, 
the teacher should exhaust the pupil's store of information or ideas concerning the 
matter under review. With another pupil and then another successive phases of 
the topic will be discussed. This method will severely try the teacher's own know- 
ledge and skill and patience, but it will prove invaluable to the pupils, even to those 
who listen in silence to the " conference ", as their own time will come in some 
future lesson for similar catechising. 

Pitfalls in the High School Reader 

It may be of some service to the teachers of Reading if I call attention to a few 
of the pitfalls into which, during the last ten years, pupils have stumbled on the 
occasions of my inspection of the classes. The list is by no means exhaustive. 

(1) The notable example of the fatal facility of sing-song is, of course, 

"If the husband of this gifted well 
Shall drink before his wife." (Page 44 ) 

Notwithstanding the ridiculous nonsense produced by the rhythmical reading 
of the lines and the formal warning given in the Introduction (Page 12), I have 
in all these years heard only three or four pupils read the passage with proper pauses 
and emphasis. 

(2) "Our bugles sang truce, for the night-cloud had lowered 

And the sentinel stars set their watch in the sky; 
And thousands had sunk on the ground overpowered, 
The weary to sleep and the wounded to die." (Page 58 ) 

Nearly always the pupil reads the last word of the first line as if it meant 
" descended." One would think that its rhyming word " overpowered " and the 
general meaning would guide the reader aright. 

(3) Another signal example of the perils of sing-song occurs in "The Day 

is Done " : 

" A feeling of sadness and longing, 
That is not akin to pain, 
And resembles sorrow only 

As the mist resembles the rain." 

Here, of course, " only " modifies what follows, but it is nearly always by pupils 
grouped with " sorrow ". 

(4) The rhythm, too, is responsible for the very common misreading of these 

lines : 

" For a day and a night, a night and a day, 
Over the blue, blue round, 
Went on the chase of the pirate quarry, 
The hunt of the tireless hound." (Page 84 ) 

Very few readers of this stanza make " chase " the subject of " went on ". 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 39 

— * 

(5) A strange blunder is made in "Barbara Frietchie", lines 49-50: 

"And through the hill-gaps, sunset light 
Shone over it with a warm good-night." 

Nine pupils out of ten make the comma after " hill-gaps " an apostrophe 
and thus " sunset light " becomes the object of " through ", and " shone " is left 
without a subject. 

(6) The first two lines of "The Glove and the Lions" I have never heard 
a pupil read correctly, and I have heard at least 200 pupils read the lines. A 
moment's examination will show that " the court " is the subject of " sat looking 
on ", not the object of " on ". I have had difficulty in convincing some teachers 
that this can be the only proper interpretation, as is proved by line 17 of the poem — 
" King, ladies, lovers, all look on ". It is unfortunate, I admit, that the word 
f court ", sometimes meaning " an inclosed area ", should have been used here, a3 
a veritable trap lies before the unwary reader. I have never ceased wondering, 
however, that nobody has seen and avoided the pitfall. 

(7) There is a sentence in the lesson " From the Apology of Socrates" which 
confounds nearly all readers : 

" This is the prophecy which 1 utter before my departure to the judges who 
have condemned me." Almost always the sentence is read "my departure to the 
judges," although the first sentence of the paragraph shows that Socrates is speak- 
ing to the judges who have condemned him. It is a pity, of course, that Jowett. 
who knew well how to write good English, had not arranged the words in a better 
order : " This is the prophecy which, before my departure, I utter to the judges 
who have condemned me ". 

(8) Never once in ten years have I heard a pupil Tead correctly the famous 
passage from Macaulay's " Trial of Warren Hastings " : " The gray old walls 
were hung with scarlet. The long galleries", etc. Always the third and fourth 
sentences are murdered. The initial word " There " is read as a light expletive, 
and not, as it should be read, as an emphatic adverb, referring to the great hall of 
William Rufus. The force of the word " There " begins to dawn on the stumbling 
reader as he proceeds on his way through the paragraph, for five sentences in 
succession begin with the word " There ", and five sentences of the following para- 
graph for clearness and vividness carry on the same sentence-formation. 

The Pupils' Collections of Insects, Plants, and Woods 

The pupils in Science of the first year are expected to make collections of 
insects, and the pupils of the second year to make collections of plants and woods. 
These collections are now regularly made in all the schools, and, for the most part, 
the collections of insects and plants are admirable and meet the purpose intended. 
The collections of woods, however, are rarely satisfactory. In most schools the 
science master has been satisfied if his pupils have handed in ten specimens of wood 
in an early stage of growth — mere cuttings from twigs. The collection of such 
specimens is of no educational value whatever, as the bits of immature wood do 
not constitute a collection of economic woods. As the schools have now struggled 
with the problem of wood collections for six or seven years, and, in nine cases out 
of ten, have struggled in vain, I would suggest that, instead of insisting on in- 
dividual collections of woods, each school should be required to have in its museum 
approved specimens of all common economic woods, including all woods obtainable 
in the locality. The pupils should then be required to learn from these museum 
specimens to distinguish the different woods by the inspection of bark and grain. 



40 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Reading Rooms 

It seems strange that only four or five High Schools in the Province have 
Beading Rooms. Even the large Collegiate Institutes having separate library 
rooms have not fully organized Reading Rooms or Reading Room Sections in the 
Library. An adequate knowledge of current literature, current events, and current 
movements, can be obtained only by the constant reading of current magazines 
and journals, and these periodicals should be conveniently available for teachers 
and for pupils. Where no separate room is to be had, arrangements can easily be 
made for placing a reading table in each class-room. A half-dozen of the best 
English, Canadian, and American monthlies, and a few weeklies and dailies, would 
make a fair beginning. In addition to the educational value of the Reading Room 
there are very real advantages accruing. The most considerable of these advantages 
is the pleasant and profitable occupation of the pupils at periods of intermission, — 
the morning and afternoon recess, and the noon hour for those who bring their 
mid-day meal to school. The Illustrated London News, Punch, Harper's Magazine, 
or a Toronto daily, will be more attractive to mischievous pupils than the usual 
temptations of the idle spaces of the day. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Toronto, December 30th, 1916. J. E. Wetheeell. 



II. REPORT OF INSPECTOR SPOTTON 

To THE Honoueable R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sie, — I have the honour to report as follows upon the schools in my in- 
spectorate for the academic year 1915-16. 

During the year I inspected the Collegiate Institutes at Kitchener (Berlin), 
Brantford, Chatham, Gait, Ingersoll, London, Riclgetown, Sarnia, St. Mary's, St. 
Thomas, Strathroy, Stratford, Windsor, Woodstock, and the following in the City 
of Toronto, viz. : Harbord Street, Humberside, Jarvis Street, Malvern Avenue, 
Oakwood, Parkdale and Riverdale, 21 in number, and the High Schools at 
Amherstburg, Aylmer, Dutton, Essex, Forest, Georgetown, Glencoe, Hagersville, 
Leamington, Lucan, Oakville, Paris, Parkhill, Petrolea, Port Dover, Port Rowan, 
Simcoe, Streetsville, Tillsonburg, North Toronto, Vienna, Wardsville, Waterford, 
Watford, and the Toronto High School of Commerce, 25 in number, making a 
total of 46 schools. This list corresponds to the list of schools inspected by me 
in the previous year, with the addition of the High Schools at Aylmer, Dutton, 
Petrolea, Port Rowan, Simcoe and Watford. 

I also inspected, as in the previous year, the Night High Schools in Harbord 
Street and Jarvis Street in the City of Toronto, and the Evening Classes and three 
branch schools connected with the Toronto High School of Commerce. 

In my report of last year I explained that the private schools of the Province, 
at which candidates were being prepared for Departmental examinations, demand- 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 41 

L * * 

ing practical training and proper equipment for the work taken up, were invited 
to apply for an inspection, in accordance with the Regulations. Applications were 
received from sixteen of these schools, and as it was considered desirable, in the 
case of the first inspection, that one Inspector should visit all the private schools, I 
undertook this work by direction of the Minister. For the year 1915-16, however, 
the work of inspecting the private schools was divided up among the three Inspectors, 
and accordingly I visited and reported upon the following: St. Anne's School, 
Kitchener (Berlin) ; the Ursuline College, Chatham; St. Angela's College, London; 
St. Mary's Academy, Windsor; the Loretto Convent, Stratford; and Alma College, 
St. Thomas. 

As the ground traversed by me during the two years is so nearly the same, and 
the general conditions so little changed, my report for this year will necessarily 
contain little that is new. 

Accommodations 

The situation in regard to accommodations is practically the same as at last 
report. The improvements foreshadowed in regard to the Collegiate Institute at 
Windsor and the Toronto High School of Commerce have been pushed forward, the 
latter having been transferred from its temporary quarters in the old Clinton 
Street Public School to its splendid new home in Shaw Street, and work on the 
extensive additions to the former being in a satisfactory state of progress. At 
London, where the increasing congestion of classes had been a cause of anxiety, the 
proposition to erect another High School building in the eastern part of the city 
in order to afford relief, has been abandoned, for the present at least, in favour of 
the establishment of a fully equipped technical school in a more central situation 
The expectation is that, with the advantages of such a school prominently in view, 
many who would otherwise take the regular High School courses will be attracted 
by the industrial courses offered in the technical school, and the over-crowding of 
the Collegiate Institute will thus be relieved in a natural manner. The experi- 
ment is well worth trying and there can, I think, be no doubt about the success 
of the new school, but I believe that sooner or later additional High School accom- 
modation proper will have to be provided. Meantime the crowded commercial 
classes have been relieved by the opening of -branch classes in a suitable building in 
the eastern part of the city. I inspected this branch commercial school on the 
occasion of my visit to London, and found a satisfactory organization for a two 
years' course, under a staff of two very competent teachers. 

The need of improved accommodations to meet the natural expansion of a. 
considerable number of the schools is felt and acknowledged by the local authorities. 
With the development everywhere of the w T ork in Art, coinciding with the rapid 
increase in the number of teachers holding professional Art certificates, a natural 
desire is felt to have a special Art room set apart for instruction in this department, 
and, similarly, with the greatly increased attention to the work in Physical Culture, 
corresponding to the improvement in the qualifications of the instructors, the need 
of the space that would be afforded by an assembly room or a gymnasium, or 
better still, by both, is forced upon the attention of the authorities. And, apart 
from these special demands, the cases are by no means inconsiderable where more 
ordinary class-room space is essential to the thorough organization of the work. 
In some cases the laboratory is pressed into the service as a class-room — always an 
undesirable arrangement; in other cases the .highest form leads a nomadic existence, 
moving about from one room to another as the seats happen to be temporarily 



42 THE REPORT OP THE No. 17 

vacated; but in most cases of excessive attendance the pupils — sometimes to double 
the number that efficiency would recognize as sufficient — are crowded into one- 
room or another, with results that cannot possibly be satisfactory, no matter what 
may be the skill of the teacher. These difficulties, I have said, are felt and 
recognized, as I have found in conference with the authorities, and I am satisfied 
that were it not for the special conditions resulting from the war, and the feeling 
everywhere prevailing that all except the most necessary expenditures should be 
deferred, steps would be taken in most cases to provide the necessary remedies 
without unnecessary delay. 

As this report is being prepared, news comes of the destruction by fire of the 
recently completed Collegiate Institute building at Barrie. Some $80,000 had 
just been spent in improvements, and the reconstructed building was undoubtedly 
one of the most commodious in the Province. The total loss, including furnishings 
and equipment, is estimated at $100,000. The Barrie School is one of the oldest 
in the country, having been established as the Senior Grammar School of the 
County of Simcoe in 1843. Under the principalship of the Rev. W. F. Checkley, 
M.A., the school long enjoyed a very enviable reputation as a preparatory school for 
intending university students, and many men, subsequently prominent in many 
walks of life, received their early training there. The present writer feels a special 
interest in the fortunes of the school, having succeeded to the principalship in 
1868, and having continued in office for the twenty-three years following. The 
sympathies of the public will go out to the town, and especially to the Board of 
Education, to the staff and to the pupils in their misfortune. The energy of those 
immediately concerned will undoubtedly find means of carrying on the activities of 
the school pending measures for the erection and equipment of suitable new 
premises. It is satisfactory to know that the insurance on the burned building 
will form a very substantial offset against the loss. 

Reading, Spelling and Writing 

In accordance with the usual practice, I tested the Reading, Spelling and 
Writing of the Lower School pupils in all the High Schools and Collegiate Insti- 
tutes visited. In practically all cases I selected for the Reading test pupils who 
had had at least one year's training in the High School. Because of this year's 
training I fixed the standard of excellence at rather a high mark. I examined 
individually in Reading 1,237 pupils, and of these I estimated 52 per cent, as good, 

43 per cent, as fair, and 5 per cent, as poor, and I considered this, on the whole to 
be a creditable showing. In Spelling I confined my tests to first year pupils, with 
a view of forming an opinion as to the adequacy of the preparation in this subject 
previous to entrance to the High School. I examined 1,817 pupils, and of these, 
with a standard which I judged would be reasonable for entrance candidates, I 
estimated 39 per cent, as good spellers, 36 per cent, as fair, 22 per cent, as poor, 
and 3 per cent, as bad. This showing I considered might easily be improved upon. 
In Writing I examined 1,691 pupils of first year standing, and of these I estimated, 
using again what I considered a fair entrance standard, 41 per cent, as good, 46 per 
cent, as fair, and 13 per cent, as either poor or bad. In connection with the 
Writing, I may say that it is still quite apparent that sufficient care is not taken 
with the pupils previous to entrance to insist upon proper methods of holding the 
pen, and proper position in relation to the desk. In one school which I visited this 
year I found an exceptionally satisfactory showing in these particulars, and I have 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 43 



no doubt that this was to some extent owing to the fact that the teacher had pro- 
vided and kept constantly in view of the pupils a plaster cast of a hand holding a 
pen in a sensible way. 

Organization of Small Schools 

An important question has arisen in connection with the organization of the 
work in the smaller schools, more particularly those in which the staff consists of 
two teachers only. The Regulations provide for a limitation of the courses which 
may be taken up in these latter schools, Upper School courses being excluded, and 
Lower and Middle School courses being restricted within certain lines. All these 
schools make provision for first and second year Lower School forms and a Middle 
School form, three forms in all. As there are but two teachers, while there are 
three forms, the difficulty of constructing a satisfactory time-table is very con- 
siderable, and so it has happened that very commonly two classes of different 
grades (first year and second year classes, or second year and third year classes) 
are grouped together in some subjects for teaching purposes. Care has generally 
been taken in making these groupings to select .such subjects of study as appear 
best adapted for the purpose, and involving least injury to the pupils concerned by 
reason of the grouping, but an inspection of the time-table has not infrequently 
shown most objectionable combinations, and has revealed the fact that an undue 
proportion of time, considering the proportionate number of pupils involved, has 
been given up to the Middle School. This condition has, during the last year or 
two, been aggravated by the provision made in the Regulations for giving * bonus " 
marks at examinations for certain subjects such as Book-keeping and Writing, 
Manual Training, etc., not included in the obligatory examination list, and it has 
consequently become necessary to surround the introduction of these bonus subjects 
into the school curriculum with rigid safeguards. In particular, it is stipulated 
that adequate provision must first be made on the time-table for the prescribed 
subjects taken up, before the bonus subjects can be considered, and combinations 
of classes of the first and second years of the Lower School courses are forbidden. 

I have had occasion to take up with a number of principals the question of 
reconstructing the time-table so as to conform to the Departmental instructions, 
and I am glad to be able to say that I have met with a ready and sympathetic 
response. The principalship of a two-master school, however, is a difficult position 
requiring great tact and good judgment, and I confess that I feel in regard to 
every one of these schools that the comfort of all concerned would be greatly en- 
hanced and the general efficiency of the school vastly promoted by the enlargement 
of the staff to three just as soon as local conditions would permit. 

The War and the Schools 

All classes of the community have been affected by the war, and the schools are 
playing their part. Many teachers have given up their positions, and boys of the 
higher forms have left their desks to assist in the attainment of the righteous aims 
for which the Allies are fighting. The scarcity of farm workers, too, resulting 
from enlistment, suggested the possibility of the places of these workers being filled 
during the busy months by pupils attending the schools. In order to encourage 
enlistment and farm employment of eligible pupils, the Department, in March 
last, issued circulars announcing the conditions under which such pupils would 
be exempted from various examinations for which they might be preparing, and 
recommended " both the Inspectors and the teachers concerned to deal as liberally 






44 THE KEPOKT OF THE No. 17 

as practicable with the situation." The University Matriculation Board, also, at a 
meeting held early in April, decided "to accept for the examinations of 1916 the 
principle of the Regulations recently issued by the Minister of Education in respect 
of candidates who enlist for overseas service or who engage in farm work/'' and 
accordingly arranged to consider special applications for Pass Junior Matriculation. 
On the ground of farm employment the total number of applications dealt 
with, from High Schools and Collegiate Institutes was 1,632, and from Continua- 
tion Schools 341, 1,973 in all. Of these a total of 1,551 applications were favour- 
ably considered and certificates of standing granted. On the ground of enlistment 
395 applications for certificates were favourably considered. The principal exemp- 
tions were as follows : 

Lower School examination 637 

Middle School examination 154 

Middle School and Junior Matriculation 406 

Junior Matriculation 392 

Upper School, Parts I and II 9 

Upper School, Part I 97 

Upper School, Part II 99 

Provision is made by the Department and the Matriculation Board to con- 
tinue similar exemption arrangements for the examinations of 1917. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

Toronto, December, 1916. H. B. Spotton. 



III. REPORT OF INSPECTOR HOUSTON 

To the Honourable E. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I beg to submit for your consideration a brief report on the condition 
of the schools under my supervision during the school year 1915-1916. 

I have the honour to remain, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. A. Houston. 
December, 1916. 

Schools Visited 

During the year I had the pleasure of visiting the Collegiate Institutes at 
Barrie, Collingwood, Clinton, Fort William, Goderich, Guelph, Hamilton, Niagara 
Falls, Owen Sound, Orillia, Port Arthur, Seaforth, St. Catharines, and North Bay, 
and the High Schools at Alliston, Arthur, Aurora, Beamsville, Bradford, Brampton, 
Caledonia, 'Cayuga, Chatsworth, Chesley, Dundas, Dundalk, Dunnville, Durham, 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 45 

Elora, Fergus, Flesherton, Gravenhurst, Grimsby, Haileybury, Harriston, Kenora, 
Kincardine, Listowel, Markdale, Meaford, Midland, Mitchell, Mount Forest, New- 
market, Niagara Falls South, Orangeville, Parry Sound, Penetanguishene, Port 
Elgin, Sault Ste. Marie, Shelburne, Smithville, Sudbury, Thorold, Walkerton, 
Waterdown, Welland, Wingham, and Wiarton, a total of 14 Collegiate Institutes 
and 46 High Schools. 

In addition to these I also visited the following private schools in accordance 
with instructions received : The Loretto Academy, Guelph ; The Loretto Day School, 
385 Brunswick Avenue, Toronto ; The De la Salle Training School, 28 Duke Street, 
Toronto; The Loretto Academy, Hamilton; The Loretto Abbey, 403 Wellington 
Street, Toronto; Pickering College, Newmarket, and St. Joseph's Convent, 204 
Park Street, Hamilton. This makes a total of 66 schools which I had the pleasure 
of visiting during the year. 

As a tabulated statement of the grading of the various items in the accom- 
modations of these schools was given in last year's report, as well as statistics of the 
standing of the pupils in Reading, Writing and Spelling, I shall not deal with that 
side of the subject now. There has been no marked change in any respect, such 
as would justify any detailed statement of figures. 

Changes 

There are no new buildings or even substantial additions to report. The im- 
provements which were under consideration at the time my last report was written 
have been held in abeyance, owing to existing financial conditions, and the proba- 
bilities are that matters will remain in statu quo ante until a change comes which 
will justify the Boards in undertaking the necessary expenditure. The labour 
market has been so uncertain, the prices of material have been so advanced, and 
there have been so many other calls that it has been thought wise to postpone build- 
ing wherever possible, and the Department has demanded only such expenditure 
as was absolutely necessary for the proper training of the pupils. 

I find many changes in the staffs of the schools owing to the teachers having 
enlisted for overseas service. Amongst the principals who have donned khaki are 
Cowles of Dunnville, Wright of St. Mary's, Amos of Grimsby, Pentland of Beams- 
ville, and amongst the assistant masters are Grandy of Barrie, Atkinson of Colling- 
wood, Ewing of Wingham, Worden of Guelph, Vandersluys of Niagara Falls and 
Bell of Niagara Falls South, and no doubt there are others of whom I have no 
knowledge. I am pleased to learn that in the great majority of cases these teachers 
have been given leave of absence by their Boards, and their positions are waiting for 
them when they return. The teachers of the Province, whether High School or 
Public School, may well be proud of the fact that over 300 of their number have 
offered their services in fighting the battles of the Empire in support of the prin- 
ciples of righteousness, honour and justice. 

A very marked change is the decreased attendance, especially in the senior 
forms, as compared with the attendance of the preceding year. For a time after 
the war broke out the attendance in the schools increased, owing possibly to the 
general stoppage of the business machinery of the country and the consequent 
lessening of employment, but all that has since changed. The elder boys have nearly 
all enlisted. I was told of one form of Upper School boys which began in Sep- 
tember, 1915, with sixteen members, and closed in June, 1916, with two; the other 
fourteen were preparing for the front. The younger boys and many of the girls 
have dropped out of school to go to work; there is no lack of employment; many 



46 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

High School pupils are carrying on the work which had been done by those who are 
serving the Empire. Hundreds of pupils also took advantage of the opportunity of 
working on the farms, and having their certificates granted to them by the Depart- 
ment of Education or the Matriculation Board. 

English Composition 

I endorse every word said by Inspector Wetherell in his report last year as to 
the necessity of paying more attention to the matter of English Composition and of 
giving the subject the amount of time which its importance demands. I find a 
tendency to cut down the time given to Composition, especially in the Lower School, 
where it is not a direct subject of examination. Such a policy is but a temporary 
expedient to gain time and is fatal to future success. To give six lessons a week to 
Latin and two to English Composition cannot be defended on any ground. I am 
pleased to be allowed to give here the explanatory notes on the report on this subject 
furnished by Mr. Ogilvie of Fort William, and I trust it may be suggestive and 
helpful. 

Notes on Composition Report of Forms IV and V 

" Two periods are generally given to the writing of each Class Composition. ,In 
Form V the time-table is so arranged that there are two consecutive English 
periods on Tuesday. Advantage is often taken of this for class work. 

" The time spent by a pupil in and for the Composition classes is very small 
when compared with the time he really spends in composition — in expressing his 
thoughts in speaking and writing. There is a danger also that the pupil will look 
on Composition work as something which has no place beyond the walls of the class 
room, in either the work of the school or the work of the world. For these reasons 
I have tried to direct the pupil's composition outside of class as much as possible. 

"As an aid to the work in Composition I think that our school paper deserves 
special mention. It is most popular with the students who work hard to make it a 
success. As it is read before the Literary Society, and its best material is published 
in the city paper, the editor and sub-editors do their very best work and will not 
accept matter which is not worth while. Its essays, short stories, and special 
articles have been decidedly good. The paper gladly accepts good essays or short 
stories which have been prepared for Composition classes. Students like to have 
work appear in the paper and so do the classes. One department of the paper 
keeps in touch with ex-students of the school, particularly with the boys who have 
enlisted. This means much work, but the boys appreciate it. Every number of the 
paper contains four or five letters from the front. The whole school and community 
is, of course, interested in them. From the work of the paper this year I think that 
it is of value to the school and certainly of value to the work in Composition. 

" In the above classes the last Composition period of each week is generally given 
over to oral work. Not more than one or two class debates are planned for the 
year. The oral work is also correlated with Supplementary Reading. Each pupil 
is required to give two oral compositions based on books read. In the Literature 
and History classes pupils give reports on assigned topics and discussions are en- 
couraged. Students are also encouraged to take part in speaking and debating 
before the Literary Society. Credit is given for this. A student who gives a good 
oral composition before the Literary Society receives the same credit for it as if it 
were given in class. He is thus exempt from a similar piece of class work and is 
marked for the value of his work. (I am inclined to think that prepared speeches 
given in the Literary Society should receive a bonus over similar ones given in 
class.) 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 47 

" Each year we try to stress certain work in composition which is really done 
outside of class. Last year students from these forms presented " The Merchant of 
Venice." This year we have given special attention to the school paper and to 
speaking before the Literary Society. This work was ended by an evening debate 
on the Single Tax." 

In another Institute I found a plan of operation which appeared to me to have 
many excellences. No lessons were assigned for Friday afternoon; that half day 
was regularly given to examinations and to Composition. One full afternoon each 
month was assigned to English Composition, and this in addition to two other 
regular periods each week. This plan of giving a full afternoon allowed a style of 
work to be undertaken which could not be attempted under the usual division of 
time. The Principal assured -me that the results were eminently satisfactory, 
better than he had been able to secure in any other way. 

Elementary Science 

In connection with this subject I may be pardoned if I refer, as I did once 
before, to certain possible dangerous tendencies which I have noted at times in the 
work of the younger teachers, and from which I must confess even the older and 
more experienced are not altogether free. 

(1) Too much attention is often paid to isolated facts, and to the gaining of 
information on certain points, while the training of the observing and reasoning 
powers is forgotten, and there is a failure to encourage that spirit of investigation 
which is inherent in every child. 

(2) Any attempt to carry on the work without specimens, or with possibly one 
or two for a whole class, is bound to result in failure. Children can always be 
interested in life and action, development and function, but the opportunity must 
be given them. 

(3) There is a tendency to magnify the importance of the records at the ex- 
pense of the results; the records should be merely the pupil's own account of what 
he has done, the evidence that the course has been properly covered. 

(4) Outdoor work, the most interesting part of the whole course, is allowed to 
take a secondary place, or is given no place at all. 

In this connection I published two years ago an outline of outdoor work carried 
on by a very successful teacher. I am now allowed to give an outline of outdoor 
work as arranged by Mr. Madill, of Fort William Collegiate Institute. It is quite 
different from that given in the former report and a comparison of the two schemes 
in detail is somewhat interesting. 

ELEMENTARY SCIENCE. 

BOTANY 

First Year 

Outdoor Notes. 

September and October. 

One topic on a page. Notes showing date, place, identification, and brief description. 

Topic 1. Annuals, minimum 5, e.g., Sweet pea, nasturtium, mustard, etc. 

2. Biennials 3, e.g., Carrot, beet, turnip. 

3. Perennials 5, e.g., Clover, grass, trees, etc. 

4. Climbing and twining plants 2, e.g., Sweet pea, morning glory. 

5. Leaf arrangement for light.. 3, e.g., Maple, dandelion, buttercup. 

6. Seed dispersal 2, e.g., Dandelion, thistle. 



48 THE EEPORT OF THE No. 17 

Topic 7. Fruits, structure 5, e.g., Pea, shepherd's purse, grape, etc. 

" 8. Change of colour of leaf .... 3, e.g., Maple, poplar, etc. 

" 9. Time of falling of leaf 3, e.g., Maple, poplar, etc. 

" 10. Scars on trees and shrubs . . 2, e.g., Pine, rose. 

11 11. Winter buds 2, e.g., Poplar, lilac. 

A collection of leaves, pressed and 

mounted 20, e.g., Buttercup, clover, poplar, etc. 

April, May, June. 

Topic 1. Opening of buds, minimum . . 3, e.g., Poplar, lilac, willow. 

" 2. Time of leafing 3, e.g., Poplar, lilac, willow. 

" 3. Time of planting of seeds... 3, e.g., Sweet pea, radish, oats. 

" 4. Time of flowering of plants.. 3, e.g., Willow, marsh marigold, dandelion. 

" 5. Flowers visited by insects ... 2, e.g., Willow, dandelion. 

" 6. Seeds, shapes and markings.. 3, e.g., Bean, corn, morning glory. 

" 7. Spring flowering plants 3, e.g., Marsh marigold, violet, etc. 

ZOOLOGY 

First Yeab 

Outdoor Notes. 

September and October. 

One topic on a page. Notes showing date, place, identification, and brief description. 

Topic 1. Insects, minimum 4, e.g., A grasshopper, a fly, a butterfly, a bug. 

" 2. Spiders, webs 2, e.g., Grass, cobweb. 

3. Birds (1) Summer 6, 

Domestic 3, e.g., Goose, duck, pigeon. 

Wild 3, e.g., Gull, sparrow, woodpecker. 

(2) Winter 2, e.g., Grosbeak, snowbunting. 

A collection of Insects, mounted and 

named e.g., Monarch butterfly, sphinx moth, etc. 

I April, May, June. 

Topic 1. Insects, minimum 3, e.g., A mosquito, a beetle, a dragon fly. 

" 2. Fish 2, e.g., Bass, trout. 

" 3. Amphibians 1, e.g., A frog. 

" 4. Birds, wild. Arrival and Identi- 
fication 12, e.g., Robin, crow, song sparrow, canary, 

hawk, etc. 

BOTANY 

Second Year 

Outdoor Observations. 

September and October. 

One topic to a page. A more minute description than in First Year. 

Topic 1, Composites, minimum 4, e.g., Dandelion, aster, thistle, yarrow. 

2. Weeds 6, e.g., Mustard, shepherd's purse, plantain. 

" 3. Fungi 3, e.g., Mushroom, mold, shelf fungus. 

" 4. Nodules on roots 2, e.g., Clover, sweet pea. 

" 5, Climbers and twiners 2, e.g., Nasturtium, hop. 

6. Seeds of Weeds 4, e.g., Dandelion, thistle, mustard. 

" 7. Opening and closing, flowers, 

leaves 2, e.g., Dandelion, clover. 

Collection of: — 

1. Plants pressed and mounted: 

(1) Composites, minimum ... 4, e.g., Dandelion, aster, thistle, yarrow. 

(2) Weeds 6, e.g., Mustard, shepherd's purse, plantain, etc. 

2. Woods: Cut and mounted 10, e.g., Poplar, willow, pine, etc. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 49 

April, May, June. 

Topic 1. Trees: Height, branching, 

bark, etc., minimum 3, 1 shrub, e.g., rose; 1 evergreen, pine; 

1 deciduous, willow. 

" 2. Catkins on trees 2, e.g., Willow, poplar. 

■ 3. Ferns 1, e.g., Polypody. 

4. Fungi 1, e.g., Puffball. 

" 5. Plant Societies 2, e.g., A forest, roadside, garden, rock, pond, 

meadow, marsh. 
At least three plants in each society. 

A collection of plants with flowers. Those studied in class. Representatives of sev- 
eral orders. 

1. Trees, minimum 2, e.g., Willow, poplar. 

2. Monocotyledons 1, e.g., Trillium. 

3. Dicotyledons 9, e.g., Marsh marigold, violet, strawberry, etc. 

ZOOLOGY 

Second Year 

Outdoor Observations. 

September and October. 

One topic to a page. A more minute description than in First Year. 

1. Insects, minimum 4, e.g., A butterfly, a moth, a bee, a beetle. 

2. Spiders 2, e.g., Grass, cobweb. 

3. Birds 6, 

Domestic 2, e.g., A swimmer, a scratcher. 

Wild 4, e.g., A diver, a percher, a seed-eating, and 

an insect-eating. 

4. Mammals 6, 

Domestic 4, e.g., A one-toed, a two-toed, a four-toed, a 

five-toed. 
Wild 2, e.g., Rabbit, squirrel. 

April, May, June. 
A more special study of habits, etc., of a small number. 

1. Insects 2. Your choice. 

2. Fish 1. 

3. Amphibians 1. 

4. Reptiles 1. 

5. Birds -. 2. 

6. Other animals 3. 



e.g., A snake. 

e.g., Crayfish, clam, wood louse. 



Pictures 



I am pleased to note that as time goes on more use is being made of projection 
lanterns for the purpose of illustrating the work in class. Educators have been slow 
to recognize the educational value of pictures, and especially of the " movies." 
They aje here to stay, however, and our business should be not to condemn them 
but to enlist them for human service. Pictures are a universal language, and have 
always been used to convey information. Nowadays the alphabetic language and 
the picture language are supplementary; no text is looked upon as complete with- 
out both. Very often a failure in language work, either oral or written, is due to 
haziness of impression rather than to sheer lack of knowledge. In History, Science, 
Literature, Geography, pictures, whether from slides, cards, or films, will deepen and 
fix impressions, and make clear and definite that which without them might be 
cloudy or hazy. 
4 E, 



50 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

Moving pictures or pictures of any kind will save time, not waste it. Their 
main value is for information only, not for mind training, except in a limited 
sense, and in this connection they can be used in College, Collegiate or Kindergarten 
either to simplify or to amplify knowledge. Certain kinds of information may be 
had from films or pictures more correctly than from any lecture or text, and in one 
quarter the time, and many things can be taught in no other way. 

I find that a good lantern with a reflectroscope attachment is now an essential 
part of the equipment in most of the leading schools, and in a few cases I have 
found moving pictures in regular use. The outlay is not very great, and if a 
demand be created for slides or suitable films, producers will be quick to seize the 
opportunity of providing them. As a matter of fact a very good selection of films 
is now available, and they may be rented and changed from week to week as desired. 

Current Events 

This is a topic which often receives but scant attention, the more's the pity. 
Matters have improved somewhat since the study of the war has been made a 
specific requirement in the departmental and matriculation examinations, but 
there is still room for advance. There seems to be a difficulty in finding a place 
for it in the regular day's work. In one four-master school I found a plan in 
operation which solved two difficulties, namely, provision for a suitable amount of 
time in Physical Culture and also in Current History. The plan is peculiarly 
applicable in a school of three, four and five masters where the Physical Culture 
work has to be taken in the ordinary class rooms. The school was divided into two 
sections, senior and junior, each section containing both boys and girls. An 
ordinary 30 minute lesson period was assigned each afternoon to Physical Culture 
and Current Events. The boys of the junior section were taken by one teacher in 
one class-room, the girls of the same section in another class-room in Physical 
Training for one-quarter of an hour. During this quarter of an hour the prin- 
cipal took the whole senior section in a review of Current Events, Civics, War, eta 
Then the sections changed; the principal had the junior section for the second 
quarter hour, and the seniors had Physical Training. The Science master had the 
whole half hour for his own laboratory work. Thus every pupil had every day 
fifteen minutes of good lively work in Physical Culture, using wands, dumb-bells, 
etc., and every day the same time was spent in discussing current events. The plan 
worked admirably and the pupils did not become tired of either the Physical 
Culture or the work in History. 

Written Work 

In spite of all that has been said in reports and regulations, I still find in 
many classes whole books filled with practically dictated notes which the pupils are 
expected to memorize and which comprise all they are supposed to know of the 
subject in hand. This is especially the case in History and Geography, two subjects 
in which the authorized texts are of such a character that no dictation of notes 
should be necessary; the texts themselves are all the notes needed. The practice 
weakens the pupil's powers, destroys his initiative and self reliance, and is objection- 
able from any point of view. The " principle of ease " seems to be the only excuse 
for it ; it is the easiest way to cram the pupils for examination, and the same notes 
can be used year after year. 

There appears to be too much written class work done in nearly every subject 
and much too little oral work, in which the time could be more pleasantly and profit- 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 51 

ably spent. Speaking generally, it would be wiser to use written exercises for 
review work only, and oral exercises for the ordinary class recitations. There is a 
deadly monotony writing out proposition after proposition in geometry, for example, 
or in daily putting on the board work largely copied from the note books, or worse 
still, in writing work in scribblers, much of which is never seen by the teacher. 
A good oral exercise, well conducted, will arouse interest and stimulate the class to 
do their best ; it will enable the teacher to test the style of preparation ; he will find 
out who is doing the work himself and who is depending on others; he will know 
where to assist and where to reprove; he will have a thorough grasp of the whole 
situation so far as the members of the class are concerned, and will be in a position 
to act accordingly. 

Art and Physical Training 

The work in Art and Physical Culture continues to increase in excellence. 
(Year by year the advance in the quality of the work is most marked and fully 
justifies the regulation that these subjects should be taught only by those who have 
received special training. There are now a large number of very good Art Classes 
in the Middle School Forms, and the work in Physical Culture is making equally 
good progress considering the adverse conditions under which it must often be 
carried on, owing to lack of equipment and suitable accommodations. The summer 
schools have been well attended and the teachers are loyally endeavouring to fit 
themselves for the highest degree of efficiency in their particular branch of human 
service. 

The events of the past two years have drawn attention to the value of Physical 
Training as nothing else could have done. Teachers and parents alike are realizing 
its value and its importance as a means of developing the pupil's physical being and 
at the same time of arousing and training his mental and moral faculties. It not 
only preserves health and establishes mental and physical alertness and control, but 
it teaches habits of obedience, emphasizes the necessity of co-operation, and instils 
a love and respect for fair play and honourable dealing. The subject is now being 
given its proper place in our school time-tables and the character of the work done 
is generally creditable. Of the 60 schools mentioned in section I of this report, 
16 were given grade I in Physical Culture, 25 received grade I-II, 8 grade II, and 
11 were not formally graded, owing to technical difficulties rather than to the style 
of work. 

In the light of recent events Canadians can well understand the viewpoint of 
those who reason, " (1) Canada's greatest problem now and after the war is the 
character of Canada's citizens, (2) the quality of Canada's citizenship is deter- 
mined in the schools and teaching centres of Canada's youth, (3) training for 
citizenship should be obligatory, not voluntary, (4) one of the fundamental 
•duties of citizenship is Defence of Country, (5) hence, the necessity of impressing 
early upon Canada's young citizens the responsibility of citizenship, by making 
some system not only of physical but of military drill obligatory in every Can- 
adian school." 



52 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 






APPENDIX D 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF INDUSTRIAL AND 
TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

To the Honourable R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Report on Industrial 
and Technical Schools. 

Progress of Industrial and Technical Education 

The Industrial Education Act, which provides the authority under which the 
Industrial and Technical Schools of the Province are established, has now been in 
operation for live years. It is fitting, therefore, that I should review briefly in this 
Annual Report the progress of the development of the industrial and technical 
educational work undertaken under the direction of the Department of Education. 

In 1909 the Minister of Education, in response to the public interest awakened 
in technical education, commissioned Dr. Seath, the Superintendent of Education, 
to report upon a desirable and practicable elementary system of technical education 
in Ontario, after inquiry into those already existing in other countries. In accord- 
ance with his instructions he examined the systems in England, France, Scotland, 
[Germany, Switzerland, and the United States. Dr. Seath's report was pub- 
lished in 1910 and his recommendations were embodied in the Industrial Educa- 
tion Act passed by the Legislature in 1911. 

This Act empowered municipalities to establish, with the consent of the Min- 
ister of Education, industrial and technical schools and to provide for the support 
of such schools by general taxation. The Legislature voted a sum of money to 
assist municipalities in the maintenance of these schools. 

Progress as Shown by the Number of Schools Established 

The response of the municipalities was remarkable. Eight schools were estab- 
lished in the academic year 1911-12; seven additional in 1912-13; fourteen in 
1913-14; five in 1914-15; and, so far, eight new schools have been opened this year. 
At present there are only two urban municipalities with a population of over eight 
thousand that have not established schools, and one of these has provided sufficient 
money in the estimates to make a liberal beginning next autumn. Most of the 
smaller towns that are industrial centres have established schools. 

Seven municipalities have organized day schools, four of these being full-time 
industrial schools, and three being technical departments of High Schools. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION o3 

Progress as Shown by Attendance of Pupils 

The rapid growth of the work is also shown by the increase in attendance of 
pupils in the various subjects of instruction from year ta year. The following 
diagram shows graphically the attendance by subjects for the years indicated : 

1911-12 nViffil-MMl 3,750 

1912-13 ranBB» 4,960 

1913-14 — — — m — I P I 11,545 

1915-16 ■■■■^BHH^l^HHIHHra 17,532 

1916-17 mmmmmtammmamammmmm ■■■■— 20,126 

Progress as Shown by the Amount of Monev Spent by Municipalities in the 
Support of Industrial and Technical Schools 

The steady increase in the amount of money spent by municipalities in support 
of industrial and technical schools is one of the most obvious signs of the progress 
of industrial and technical education. During the last three years the following 
sums have been spent on salaries : 

Day Schools. 

1913-14 $54,013.98 

1914-15 58,566.99 

1915-16 93,738.61 

Night Schools. 

1913-14 57,104.02 

1914-15 64,524.02 

1915-16 78,251.20 

In addition, some of the municipalities have spent large sums on capital 
account in erecting buildings and providing equipment. Hamilton was the first 
to erect a building for the purpose of technical education. The building and 
equipment cost $100,000. The school, has now outgrown the building and the 
Board of Education has purchased at an expenditure of $75,000 a site on which it 
purposes to build a new school. Toronto opened last year a Technical School which 
cost for site, building, and equipment over $2,000,000. Two years ago London 
purchased a site for a new technical school and plans for a most complete building 
were prepared. The more important parts of the building, including class-rooms, 
workshops, laboratories, offices, etc., are being erected; later the building will be 
completed in accordance with the plans by adding an assembly hall, gymnasium, 
swimming baths, etc. The total cost of building, site, and equipment will in the 
end possibly amount to $350,000. At Windsor a new building is being erected 
in connection with the Collegiate Institute and the old building is being re- 
modelled. The completed building will have all modern appointments and will 
provide accommodations for both day and night industrial classes. The cost of 
the improvement will be $200,000. Ottawa this year purchased a property that had 
been utilized for college purposes. The building has been reconstructed for use 
as a vocational school in which both commercial and industrial classes are estab- 
lished. The cost of property and reconstruction amounted to over $200,000. 



54 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Progress as Shown by Legislative Grants Earned by Municipalities 

The liberality of the Legislative grants offered has been the chief inducement 
which has led municipalities to establish schools, and the opportunities for organi- 
zation made possible by the money supplied from these grants, coupled with the 
public demand for instruction of the kind offered, account for the establishment of 
so many schools in such a short period of time. The grants are apportioned to the 
schools on the basis of the amount paid for the salary of teachers, upon the accom- 
modations, and upon the equipment provided. 

The grant on salaries is apportioned as follows on the total salaries of the 
staff: In cities with a population of 150,000 and over, one-third; in other cities, 
one-half; in towns, two-thirds; and in villages, five-sixths. The maximum for day 
sphools is $5,000 and for night schools $3,000. 

On equipment there is an initial grant of 40 per cent, on the cost of new equip- 
ment provided in any year and 20 per cent, on the same equipment for each of 
three succeeding years, the maximum for day schools each year being $2,000 and 
for night schools $1,000. 

The grant on accommodations is apportioned under a scheme which takes into 
account the adequacy and the suitability of the school grounds, school buildings, 
class-rooms, workshops, laboratories, heating, lighting, etc. 

The progress of the industrial educational movement is shown by the grants 
earned under the above scheme. The following table gives the totals : 



Year 


Grants Paid for Day 
Industrial Classes 


Grants Paid for Night 
Industrial Classes 


Total Grants Paid for 
Industrial Classes 


1911-12 

1912-13 

1913-14 

1914-15 

1915-16 


3,400.00 
22,174.97 
26,841.15 
21,966.84 
24,313.49 

$98,696.45 


1,980.26 
14,953.51 
29,393.95 
32,644.94 
33,879.16 

$112,851.82 


5,380.26 
37,128.48 
56,235.10 
54,611.78 
58,192.65 




$211,548.27 



The apparent decrease in day school grants for 1914-15 and 1915-16 was due 
to a change in the basis of distribution. 

The Character of the Education in Industrial and Technical Schools 

The Industrial Education Act provides for the organization of: (1) Day 
Schools as follows: (a) General Industrial Schools and courses for instruction 
in such subjects as may form a basal preparation for the trades, including workshop 
practice; (&) Special Industrial Schools and courses for instruction in the theo- 
retical and practical work of particular trades; (c) Technical High Schools and 
High School courses; (d) Part-time Co-operative Industrial courses in which 
apprentices employed in the workshops may receive instruction bearing upon their 
trades; (e) Schools and Courses for instruction in the Fine and Applied Arts. 
(2) Night Schools, in which workmen and workwomen employed during the day 
may receive theoretical and practical instruction in their trades or callings. 

Since the Act came into operation schools of all the types provided for have 
been organized. 

Progress in Developing Day Industrial and Technical Schools 

Day Industrial schools have been established in Brantford, Hamilton, London, 
and Toronto with both general and special courses of study. Technical depart- 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 55 

ments are established in connection with the schools at Haileybury, Sudbury, and 
Sault Ste. Marie. Day schools for instruction in applied art are connected with 
the Technical Schools at Hamilton and Toronto. 

In the general industrial courses of the day schools about 50 per cent, of the 
time is given to practical industrial work and 50 per cent, to the academic subjects. 
The academic subjects provide for a training in English, industrial history and 
geography, and in the mathematics, science, and drawing fundamental to the 
industries. 

There has been a general extension of the practical work for boys. In the 
beginning it was confined mainly to woodwork. Forge shop practice, machine shop 
practice, printing, plumbing, automobile construction and operation, sheet metal 
work, etc., have been added. 

The practical subjects for girls include both the industrial subjects by which 
girls purpose to earn their own living and also the subjects which are connected 
with the activities of the home. In the beginning these subjects were mainly 
cookery and sewing, but they are being extended to include catering, home and trade 
dressmaking, millinery, home nursing, home economics, power machine operation, 
etc. 

Progress in Developing Technical Departments of High Schools 

High Schools were organized in the beginning to prepare students for entrance 
to the Universities and the professional schools, and the courses of study are still 
largely controlled by the entrance requirements of the Universities and the Normal 
Schools. Long ago it became manifest that the needs of the students who are not 
preparing for the professions could not be met fully by the fixed courses of study 
prescribed for matriculation. The first attempt to adapt the courses to meet the 
requirements of such students was through the establishing of commercial depart- 
ments in the High Schools. The success of these departments has amply justified 
their existence. 

Now there is evidently a corresponding demand for special technical classes. 
Take for example the case of Haileybury. Principal Wilson reported in 1914 that 
since the opening of the High School in 1910 he had enrolled 104 boys, and of these 
only two had completed University matriculation, while 68 had left the school to 
become directly associated with the mining industry and 24 others had taken up 
some commercial occupation directly connected with the same industry. It would 
appear from this statement that the need of a large majority of the boys in this 
town is for a specialized training rather than for the prescribed High School course. 
The mining department of the High School was organized to meet this need. A 
corresponding need in Sudbury had previously led to the establishment of the 
mining department of the High School in that town. The technical department of 
the Sault Ste. Marie High School was organized to provide special training for the 
young men who enter the steel industry of that city. 

The mining departments of the schools at Haileybury and Sudbury have been 
placed this year on a much more satisfactory basis. Additional accommodation is 
being provided for laboratory work and assaying at Sudbury and an additional 
teacher has been appointed ; a new building is being erected in Haileybury to pro- 
vide for a stamp mill and laboratory and class-room accommodation; an additional 
teacher will be appointed in this school also as soon as the building is completed. 
Practical courses of study, distinct almost completely from the ordinary Hign 
School courses, aTe adopted in both schools. A decided impetus has been given 



o6 THE BEPOKT OF THE No. 17 

to the work by the recognition that these courses have received from Queen's Uni- 
versity. Students who have completed the course either at Haileybury or Sudbury 
are admitted to standing in the School of Mining without examination. 

Progress in Developing Part=Time Courses 

Part-time co-operative classes for men engaged in the printing and plumbing 
trades, and for women who are house workers have been in operation for several 
years in the Toronto Technical School. The most important advance in the Pro- 
vince in the organization of the part-time system was made this year by the Tech- 
nical School at Hamilton. Principal Sprague, who has devoted a great deal of 
energy to outside organization work among the industries of the city, has succeeded 
in inducing the managements of eighteen different firms, covering most of tho 
important industries of the city, to enter into a plan of co-operation with the school 
in accordance with which their apprentices are allowed to attend the school one-half 
day a week and are paid for the time spent in the school. The instruction given 
is related to the needs of the apprentices in their trade work and, therefore, in- 
creases their efficiency as workers; hence both apprentices and employers profit by 
the scheme. 

Progress in Developing Night Schools 

The night industrial and technical schools have found a permanent place in 
the educational system of the Province. The schools which were first to be estab- 
lished, such as those at Brantford, Brockville, Hamilton, London, Stratford, and 
Windsor, have not only maintained their positions, but have been growing in use- 
fulness from year to year. The demand for new schools continues. Schools were 
opened this year at Arnprior, Cobourg, Chatham, Newmarket, Parry Sound, St. 
Catharines, Thorold, and Welland. 

In recent visits to schools in the United States I was struck by the increasing 
importance given to night class work. Those directing industrial education have 
come to recognize that the night schools furnish the only satisfactory means 
for the educational improvement of adults who are employed during the day. Part- 
time systems may apply to boys and girls from fourteen to sixteen years and to 
apprentices from sixteen to twenty, but the night schools open avenues for advance- 
ment to men and women at every stage. 

Our schools provide a very wide range of work in practically all departments 
of industrial and technical instruction. In fact, any course of instruction for 
which there is a demand will be supplied by the local advisory industrial com- 
mittees controlling the schools. A full list of the subjects taught will be found 
in the statistical tables at the end of this report. It will be observed that the most 
common subjects demanded by men are, architectural drawing, machine drawing, 
the reading of blue prints, shop mathematics, and shop practice in the various 
trades; women apply mostly for cooking, sewing and home dressmaking and 
millinery. 

The Effects of the War on the Progress of Industrial and Technical Schools 

The principals of all the schools report that the attendance of pupils would 
have been very much larger had it not been for war conditions. The effects are 
especially noticeable in night class attendance, because, as one would expect, those 
who have the determination to succeed by improving their educational attainments 
by taking advantage of night class instruction are among the first to enlist for 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 57 



overseas service. Classes were discontinued in two of the larger industrial centres, 
because practically all the students had enlisted, and in three of the smaller centres, 
because the purposes for which the classes were established had been fulfilled. 
The war also has retarded the establishment of new schools. The boards of several 
towns report that they are prepared to consider organization when the war is over. 
Considering the depressing effect of the war the general progress throughout 
the Province is the more remarkable. This is accounted for in part by the attend- 
ance of a large number of those engaged as munition workers, who come to the 
classes for special instruction directly in the line of the work in which they are 
engaged, and in part by the larger attendance of women, and of youths who have 
not reached the military age. 

The Problems of the Future 

We have acquired through our own experiments and those in other countries a 
fund of information regarding vocational educational needs and the best means of 
organizing to meet those needs. In some respects this is the most valuable result 
of our five years' experience, because it has furnished us with some very clearly 
defined problems for the future and has given us suggestions for the solution of 
these problems. 

The Necessity for Conserving Human Resources 

Most of these problems centre in or are in some way connected with the deter- 
mination of means for developing and conserving the human resources of the 
country. Whenever men of affairs meet to consider the industrial' problems that 
the pressure of times is forcing on the attention of the people, the emphasis in dis- 
cussions is being placed on the necessity of conserving the human power of the 
nation as the only means of making the most of our natural resources. *" The 
war has agitated every British country to its foundations. It has caused a search- 
ing of heart which the world has not known before in modern times. Among the 
most remarkable of its results has been the re-examination which each nation has 
been compelled to make with regard to its material resources. The gospel which 
we have been preaching for some years past has now been found to be the true 
gospel. It has been found by hard experience that national safety demands that 
the nation should not only possess resources but understand them and be able to 
utilize them economically. Whereas, a few years ago people listened to the dis- 
cussion of this subject with polite but somewhat academic interest, they now know 
that no subject is of more importance to the national well-being and that the lack 
of developed capacity to utilize every possible resource may in certain emergencies 
mean disaster. Therefore, though it be a time of war when thoughts of war and 
matters relating directly to its conduct occupy people's minds almost exclusively, 
yet it has become clear that our work is of the most far-reaching importance. 
Every consideration points to vigorous and aggressive action rather than to post- 
ponement or delay." 

I have quoted the foregoing because it is a forceful and clear expression of the 
present day attitude of our industrial leaders. The sections that I have taken the 
liberty of having printed in italics suggest the fundamental relation of material to 
personal resources; the one is conserved by the development of the other. To save 
our heritage in material things we must develop the ability to " sell more brains and 
less material." 

*From the address of Sir Clifford Sifton, Chairman of the Commission of Conserva- 
tion, at the Eighth Annual Meeting of the Commission. 



58 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

But the conservation of human power is, at root, an educational problem. 
Any improvement in the present working force can be brought about only through 
training. The resources of the future are to be found in the development to the 
fullest of the capacities for service latent in our youth. 

Losses in Human Resources 

One of the results of our experience in industrial education has been to give 
some appreciation of the wastage resulting from an imperfect utilization of these 
capacities. No accurate calculation has been made of the total of this wastage. 
We have estimated with a fair degree of accuracy our losses from partial and im- 
perfect cultivation of our lands; these have been calculated in terms of bushels of 
grain and tons of meat and dairy products; but the problem of summing up the 
immensity of our losses through failures to obtain the highest economic values 
from the cultivation of the talents in skill, in mental resourcefulness, and determina- 
tion of purpose in our children has never been solved. An exact solution of this 
problem, possibly, cannot be found, because some of the factors involved are not 
measured by physical standard. But our experiences are giving us an insight into 
the nature of these losses and the stages at which they occur. 

The study of the attainments of part-time and night school pupils, and the 
results of vocational and industrial surveys point to two outstanding sources of loss. 

(1) The loss which results from the failure of children to become equipped 
with a full common school education. 

(2) The loss which results from the failure of the youth to obtain an adequate 
vocational equipment for a life career in some useful trade or calling. 

Each of these sources of loss should be seriously investigated. 

Losses from Lack of Common School Training 

The minimum equipment in general education for boys and girls has never been 
standardized. Our present ideas are fairly well summed up in the requirements of 
the first four forms of the Public School Course of Study. This educational 
standard at least is not too high as a foundation for citizenship. Certainly those 
who fail to complete such a course find themselves seriously handicapped in any 
field of work offering opportunities for advancement. 

What percentage of Ontario children reach this standard ? What is the educa- 
tional status of those who fail to complete a full Public School course? These are 
questions which we should take steps to answer with a fair degree of accuracy; if 
the losses at this stage are as great as they appear to be we should determine the 
causes and find means to prevent them. 

Losses from Waste of Labour 

But the investigation should not stop with the determination of the educational 
status of those who leave school at the limit of compulsory attendance. What 
becomes of these children? Our experiences in connection with industrial educa- 
tion seem to point to the fact that a very large number of this class find their way 
into occupations that have but little promise for the future. The serious aspects 
of this question are set forth in a recent report of a British Royal Commission. 
After pointing out the tendency of the youth to enter " blind alley " occupations 
the report goes on to say, " We cannot believe that the nation can long persist in 
ignoring the fact that the unemployed, and particularly the under-employed and 
unemployable, are thus being daily created under our eyes out of bright young lives 
capable of better things, for whose training we make no provision. It is, un- 
fortunately, only too clear that the mass of unemployment is continually being 
recruited by a stream of young men from industries which rely upon unskilled boy 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 59 

labour, and turn it adrift at manhood without any general or special industrial 
qualification, and that it will never be diminished till this stream is arrested." 

Now, this process of the transformation of school boys into unskilled workers, 
described in this report, is going on in Ontario. What is the extent of the wastage 
from this source ? What can be done to prevent it ? What are the causes ? These 
questions involve both educational and economic problems that are being discussed 
very widely in other countries. 

The facts in the premises are being summarized somewhat as follows : 

(1) One of the chief results of systematic child study investigations has been 
to show the opportunities and the necessities for training the child during adolesc- 
ence, and to point out the evil effects, both to the child and to society, of educa- 
tional neglect during this period. 

(2) Manifestly the child of fourteen is not capable of choosing intelligently a 
vocation, because he lacks that knowledge and appreciation of values in himself and 
in the world's activities that would fit him to choose wisely his life work. 

(3) Moreover, very few forms of employment that promise to be satisfactory 
life vocations are open to children younger than sixteen years of age. The skilled 
trades have no place for learners under that age, and the age for admission to pro- 
fessional schools is usually higher. Consequently, the children between fourteen 
and sixteen years of age who are at work are engaged in " dead end " occupations. 
An investigation of the United States Bureau of Labour showed that of a certain 
number of children under sixteen years who left school for work, ninety per cent, 
entered industries in which the wages of adults were $10.00 a week or less. 

Now, if the child between fourteen and sixteen years is at the most critical 
stages of his life and needs guidance, control, and training, if he has not sufficient 
maturity to choose wisely a vocation, if industry has no permanent place to offer 
him, what shall we do with him ? When shall we allow him to leave school ? What 
kind of training shall we give him? When shall we allow him to go to work? 
Necessity for Extending Period of Education 

The only solution of the problem involved in finding answers to these questions 
appears to be in the extension of the period of education of the child from fourteen 
to sixteen years or even beyond this limit. 

The fundamental necessity of extending the period of the education of the 
youth is becoming recognized by the English-speaking nations. Opinion in Great 
Britain is fairly expressed in the following paragraph taken from an editorial in 
the London Times in which the work of committees to provide for educational re- 
construction is discussed : " How far we are from the ideal at present is shown 
by the fact that of the two and three-quarter million English children between the 
ages of twelve and sixteen only 1,100,000 get any further education after the age 
of thirteen. No change in the curriculum is going to make good citizens of the 
remaining 1,650,000 to whom no curriculum is applied. To alter these figures is 
the main task of the committees which are being set up. There are many other 
necessary reforms and lines of development; but all are subsidiary to this, and all 
are blocked until this obstacle is removed." 

But the experiments would appear to show that the extension of the school 
term will be effective in a large way in improving conditions only when each of the 
three following conditions is fulfilled: 

(1) That additional facilities be provided through full-time or part-time day 
schools for children beyond fourteen years of age in which vocational training with 
an industrial bias in urban centres and an agricultural "bias in rural centres is made 
an essential part. 



GO THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

(2) That attendance at part-time or full-time day schools be made compulsory 
for all children between fourteen and sixteen years of age. 

(3) That in the larger urban centres agencies be established to assist parents 
and pupils in selecting suitable vocations and courses of training. 

The reasons for demanding these conditions are not theoretical; they are based 
on experience; this is shown by the following considerations. 

Necessity for Vocational Dav Schools 

There is no gap between the Public Schools and professional or commercial 
life, because the High Schools lead directly to the University, the professional 
schools, and positions with business concerns, and a sufficient number, probably too 
many, are being led in these directions ; but a real chasm exists between the Public 
Schools and positions with promise in industrial activities, where the needs for 
skilled labour are great. The vocational day school has proved to be the only 
satisfactory means of bridging this chasm. 

Necessity for Compulsory Attendance 

Experiences show that even where suitable buildings, adequate equipment, and 
well-trained teachers are employed and where the courses of study are made voca- 
tional in character, the problem of securing the attendance of the children who have 
been in the habit of leaving school at fourteen years of age still requires to be 
solved. 

When the movement for vocational education began to gain strength about five 
years ago vocational schools were established at many of the industrial centres in 
the Eastern and Middle States. The attendance at such schools has, on the whole, 
been fair, but their organization has appreciably diminished the outflow of children 
at fourteen years of age from schools only in centres where 1 compulsory continuation 
school laws have been brought into operation. 

Although Toronto has provided ample accommodation in the Collegiate Insti- 
tutes, the High School of Commerce, and in the Technical School, and the best 
equipment available has been provided, yet, if we are to judge by the experience of 
other cities where compulsory part-time schools are in operation, the chances are 
that if the Adolescent School Attendance Act were put into operation at once and 
effectively enforced, from five to ten thousand children who need training would 
be brought into the schools. 

It is evident that some form of compulsion, either part-time or full-time, is 
necessary to meet the situation; but the opinions of men who have studied the 
problem from both educational and economic standpoints, appear to be fairly divided 
between the support of part-time schools and demands for raising the age limit for 
all pupils for full day attendance up to a higher level. Those who favour the 
part-time plan are fairly well agreed that to secure effective educational results at 
least one-half of the working time of the pupils should be devoted to attendance at 
a day school, but many go so far as to say that the part-time compulsory school 
should be regarded only as a temporary expedient. They contend that the time 
spent by the child between fourteen and sixteen years in industry is, on the whole, 
a loss to industry, and also, in most cases, a loss to the child. 

Necessity for Vocational Guidance 

The selecting of a vocation is becoming increasingly more perplexing to young 
people and their parents, and the need for some available form of assistance is 
urgent, especially in large industrial communities. Intelligent choice can be based 
only on a knowledge of the materials of choice. The youth, therefore, must learn 
something of trades and professions, their character and social value, their oppor- 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 61 



l- 



tunities, qualifications for admission, restrictions placed by labour unions or pro- 
fessional bodies, time and expense involved in preparation, permanency, healthful- 
ness, safety, remuneration, etc. 

But the opportunities for study are, under modern conditions, unfavourable. 
The occupations of our country in the earlier days were relatively few and simple, 
and were free to the inspection of all. The blacksmith, the weaver, and the shoe- 
maker welcomed a chat with the school boy. To-day the magnitude and com- 
plexity of industrial organizations and the minuteness of specialization in opera- 
tions would bewilder the youth, even if he had opportunities for observation, but 
these are denied, for the " No Admission " signs are posted everywhere. 

Parents naturally look to teachers for advice, but it is not reasonable to* expect 
the school to be completely responsible for the vocational guidance of the youth. 
Teachers should be competent to give general instruction on the industries of the 
country and the activities of the people, but they cannot be expected to have an 
intimate knowledge of the details of employments in our highly organized factory 
systems and business concerns; nor can they be expected to be familiar with in- 
dustrial statistics, labour conditions, and the hundred and one other problems of 
interest to young people preparing to enter upon their life work. Moreover, many 
of our teachers are young men or, more frequently, young women, just entering on 
their callings, and, therefore, lacking in that knowledge of life and sympathetic 
insight into human nature necessary to wise counsellors of the young. 

It is evident that, as in the case of medical inspection, a specialized service is 
necessary for the maintenance of any adequate system of vocational guidance. In 
fact, a department of vocational guidance is the logical completion of the idea ex- 
pressed in the department of medical inspection. The office of the one department 
is to conserve the life of the community; that of the other, to direct it into useful 
channels of service. 

Obstacles in Way of Advancement. Need for Federal Support 

Now, what stands in the way of fulfilling the conditions that have been des- 
cribed, and of carrying out a comprehensive scheme which will provide for the 
vocational education of all who have need of it? The main obstacle is lack of funds. 
It is useless to pass a compulsory attendance law unless school boards are prepared 
to provide the accommodation, equipment, and teachers necessary to take charge of 
the children brought into the schools by its enforcement. Local school tax rates 
are, as a rule, high, and boards are not inclined to undertake large expenditures. 
They have, as I have pointed out, been liberal in joining with the Department of 
Education in supporting night class instruction, because no large outlays are de- 
manded for buildings and equipment, and the returns are immediate, but the erec- 
tion and equipment of special buildings for day schools is another matter, and the 
people are naturally looking for support for work which they do not regard as 
purely local. 

The claims of the Province for Dominion support for industrial and technical 
education have been set forth on many occasions by the Minister of Education and 
it is unnecessary to repeat the arguments here. 

The Situation in the United States 

But it may be pointed out that the situation is not one met in Canada alone. 
In the United States it is being found that the State unit is too narrow to assume 
the responsibility for the support of schools which in a very peculiar sense are for 
the benefit of the nation at large. Appeals are being made for national support 
for vocational education. The Smith-Hughes Bill, which provides very liberally 



62 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

for the training of vocational teachers and the support of vocational schools, is now 
before Congress. The bill is receiving very general support and it is said to be 
certain to pass.* The arguments used in support of this bill are of interest to us 
not only because conditions in Canada and the United States are somewhat similar, 
but especially because they show the trend of thought and action in the country 
which, in many respects, must always be our chief competitor in the world's markets. 
The following are the arguments in support of the bill as formulated in short form 
by the Commission on National Aid to Vocational Education : 
National Grants are Needed. 

1. To make the work of vocational training possible in those States and local- 
ities already burdened with the task of meeting the requirements for general 
education. 

2. To help the States with their widely varying resources bear the burden of 
giving vocational education as a national service. 

3. To equalize among the States the task of preparing workers whose tendency 
to remove from place to place is increasing, making their training for a life work 
a national as well as a State duty and problem. 

4. To secure national assistance in solving a problem too large to' be worked 
out extensively and permanently save by the whole nation. 

5. To secure expert information from the agencies of the National Govern- 
ment, bringing to bear a country-Avide knowledge and viewpoint, which will put the 
work of the States on a scientific and businesslike basis. 

National Grants are Justified. 

1. By the interstate character of the problem of vocational education, due to 
the interstate character of our industries and the national character of State 
business and industrial life. 

2. By the national character of the problem, for it concerns all the people and 
is of nation-wide interest and importance. 

3. By the urgency of the case. The problem is pressing. The opportunity for 
highly skilled labour in all its foims was never what it is to-day. The nations of 
the world reach out to the United States and we to them. Our ability to seize 
this opportunity depends in large measure upon an abundant supply of highly 
skilled artisans in every line. The urgency is such that the States and cities can- 
not meet it if they would. The Nation must help if it is to be done in time. 

Provisions for Vocational Education of Returned Soldiers 
By an Act of the Legislature, the Soldiers' Aid Commission of Ontario was 
empowered to provide specially for the vocational education v of returned disabled 
soldiers. The Commission has appointed Mr. W. W. Nichol as Vocational Officer 
to take charge of this department of vocational education. He is working in 
harmony with the Dominion Military Hospitals Commission and the Ontario De- 
partment of Education. He is studying the needs of the men in the military 
convalescent hospitals and is making provision to meet these needs either through 
individual or class instruction in the hospitals themselves or through attendance at 
classes in commercial, technical, or other schools already established. 

Roughly, the work undertaken may be classified under the following heads : 

(1) Education in elementary and commercial subjects and light shop work 
in wood or metal undertaken by convalescents primarily for therapeutic reasons. 

(2) Education for convalescent patients for improvement in academic, com- 
mercial and industrial branches. 

*Since this Report was written the Smith-Hughes Bill has been passed by Congress 
without a dissenting vote. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



63 



(3) Re-education for soldiers so disabled by their military service that they 
cannot return to their former vocations. Such men are given training for new 
occupations suited to their condition and capacity. 

Classes have been established in connection with the convalescent hospitals in 
Toronto, Hamilton, London, and Ottawa, and are being organized in Kingston. 
Other classes will be provided in the same centres or in other centres as needed. 

The classes established in connection with the hospitals in Toronto provide for 
instruction in commercial subjects, civil service preparation, telegraphy, railroad 
standard train rules and traffic orders, carpentry, joinery, cabinet making, and 
general woodworking. Arrangements have been made with the Technical School 
by which returned soldiers are taking courses in the Toronto Technical School in 
motor mechanics, machine shop practice, electricity, mechanical drawing, printing, 
plumbing, industrial design, and painting and decorating. 

In Hamilton, elementary and commercial instruction is given in a class room 
in the convalescent hospital, and soldiers attend the Hamilton Technical School for 
instruction in mechanical drawing, machine shop practice, workshop mathematics, 
and electricity. 

In London, classes are formed in the convalescent hospital for instruction in 
elementary and commercial subjects, civil service preparation, telegraphy, wood- 
working, and cabinet making, and soldiers attend the London Industrial School for 
instruction in machine shop practice, mechanical drawing, electricity, industrial 
design, and trade carpentry. 

In Ottawa, all instruction is given in the hospital. Classes are provided in 
elementary subjects, woodworking, carpentry and joinery, mechanical drawing, 
auto mechanics, and in arts and crafts. 

At the end of January, 1917, there were 554 returned soldiers enrolled in the 
various vocational classes in military convalescent hospitals throughout the Province. 

Statistical Tables 

The appended tables give information regarding subjects of study and attend- 
ance in day and night Industrial and Technical Schools for the current academic 
year. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 



Toronto, February 17th, 1917. 



Your obedient servant, 

F. W. Merchant. 



TABLE I— ATTENDANCE AND COURSE OF STUDY— INDUSTRIAL AND 
TECHNICAL DAY SCHOOLS 


1 General 1 Special Te ™ ; <*$£*- j^ancT 
Schools | Industrial industrial *& : ind^Sal ' AroSd " 
Classes Classes Clasges | Clasges | Arts 


Brantford Industrial School 


9 










Haileybury, Mining Department oi 
High School . . 




23 
14 
46 






Hamilton, Technical and Art School . . . 
London, Industrial and Art School .... 


95 
64 


122 


73 


40 


Sault Ste. Marie, Technical Depart- 
ment of High School 


4 




Sudbury, Mining Department of High 
School 






23 

337 




Toronto, Technical and Art School . . . . 


446 


859 


41 


161 


Totals 


614 


981 443 


118 


201 



G4: 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE II— ATTENDANCE AND SUBJECTS OF STUDY— NIGHT 



Schools 


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2Brantford 




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9 


"i9 


21 
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8 












80 
28 


25 






58 
14 
99 
10 


... 


12 


10 


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3 Brockville 










9 






4 Chatham 






10 




















59 


5 Cobourg 






























6 Collingwood 










21 
13 
15 
12 
26 










13 
44 
18 
18 
9 
53 
17 
90 
















7 Cornwall 




















5 

9 

22 

6 






53 
35 
17 










8 Dundas 




























9 Fort William 




17 












10 












10 Gait 






















11 Goderich 


































12 Guelph 










1210 
33614 


13 








9 






21 




16 
125 


•• 


71 


13 Hamilton 




5 


25 


47 






7 


119;.. 




14 Ingersoll 




12 
16 
82 
11 
40 
37 
16 
9 
8 

24 
18 

83 
34 
18 

150 
11 












15 Kitchener 






16 
15 


16 








8 


11 


64 
52 


8 .. 
38|.. 


95 


27 

100 
12 










16 London 




34 




52 


63 


22 


96 






17 Newmarket 






18 Niagara Falls 






17 
11 


"l3 












61 

461 

47 


52 
15 














19 Ottawa 






3 






16 


•• 






188 








63 


20 Owen Sound 








21 Parry Sound 


























55 

28 










22 Pembroke 












12 
























23 Peterborough 
















58 


20 














24 Renfrew 




9 






























25 Sault Ste. Marie. . . 




















56 
45 
35 

297 


16 


68 


38 
30 
26 

626 










26 St. Catharines .... 




























27 Stratford 
















27 

49 

130 


37 


62 

1123 

41 

27 

107 










28Thorold 
























Toronto — 
29 Central 


2J 




141 
5 


149 




42 




18 


96 




243 


30 Humberside 




31 Oakwood 
































32 Riverdale 






10 


14 


8 
8 












27 
11 
16 
25 






22 

10 










33 Welland 
























34 Whitby 














11 


















35 Windsor 






7 


1 23 










99 
23 






R5 








70 


36 Woodstock 








14 






23 


... 




1 




26 






















1 




Totals 


21 


79 


266 


258111327 


130 


S6 249 


55 


2660 


849 


.1 
16 163 


1624 


40 


371 


10 


531 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



65 



INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNICAL CLASSES 



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230 
12 
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19 


35 


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16 52 71 








50 
16 
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194 
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17 .... 






















18 .... 




















19 .... 






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27 
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15 
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56 
62 
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36 


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26 


















27 








27 










82 










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28 


















29 70 

30 .... 


350 


24 


102 


30 


302 
17 
22 

37 


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87 


643 


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43 


516 
18 
40 
89 






44 


21 


15 38 

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19 


30 




20 




31 .... 










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56 
13 
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63 
24 












32 .... 




















33 .... 




















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111 

19 


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36 .... 




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122 


487 


24 


107 


30 


1 
1916 1208 19 


122 


707 


85 


2500 


i 

7 -9 


44 


21 


15 


500 


66 


J3 


10 


56 


11 



E 



66 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE II— ATTENDANCE AND SUBJECTS OF STUDY— NIGHT INDUSTRIAL 
AND TECHNICAL CLASSES— Concluded 



Schools 


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........ 




4 Chatham 


























1 




























1 


6 Collingwood 




























29 


7 Cornwall 




























8 Dundas 
























.... i ... . 


i 


9 Fort William 








30 








10 












10 Gait 


























11 Goderich. • 






























12 Guelph 


























16 


1 


13 Hamilton 


43 


14 


10 


3 














. . . . 






14 Ingersoll • • . . 



















. . . . i 


15 Kitchener 
































16 London 






10 






34 




















17 Newmarket 






18 






















18 Niagara Falls 






























19 Ottawa 




8 








5 




















20 Owen Sound 




























21 Parry Sound 








20 
























22 Pembroke 






















....!.... 






23 Peterborough 






























24 Renfrew 






















.... i 








25 Sault Ste. Marie 






























26 St. Catharines 
























........ 






27 Stratford . . 




























28 Thorold 
























— .... 






Toronto — 
29 Central 


58 


47 


44 





45 




309 


16 


45 


274 


68 


........ 

J. 


25 




30 Humberside 








31 Oakwood 






























32 Eiverdale 
























........ 






33 Welland . . 
























1 




34 Whitby 








30 






















35 Windsor 










1 


















36 Woodstock 
































1" 








1 












"T" 




Totals 


101 


69 


64 


101 


45 


39 


309 


26 


45 


274 


68 


81 


16 


25! 29 









1916 DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 67 



APPENDIX E 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF ELEMENTARY 
AGRICULTURAL CLASSES 

To the Honourable E. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D.^, 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sib, — I beg to submit for your consideration a report on Elementary Agri- 
cultural Classes in connection with the schools of the Province for the year 1916. 

I have the honour to be. Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

J. B. Dandeno, 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Glasses. 

January, 1917. 



The duties of the Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes include: (1) 
The inspection of Agricultural classes in Collegiate Institutes, High Schools, Con- 
tinuation Schools and in Normal Schools; (2) a general supervision of the teaching 
of Agriculture in the Public and Separate Schools including the approving of 
teachers' reports and trustees' statements; (3) attendance upon Teachers' Insti- 
tutes and taking part in the programmes as frequently as possible; (4) visiting 
Secondary Schools which have not yet introduced classes in Agriculture to discuss 
the situation; (5) addressing public meetings, such as township institutes, county 
trustees' associations, county councils and the like with the object of explaining the 
situation with respect to the teaching of Agriculture in the schools; (6) a super- 
vision of the Summer Courses for teachers at the Ontario Agricultural College. 

Rural Schools 

Agriculture as a subject for study in the primary schools of Ontario is not 
entirely new, at least in so far as its existence on the school programme is concerned. 
The need for such a subject was realized many years ago, and from time to time 
spasmodic efforts have been made 1 o graft it somehow into the course of study. The 
movement in behalf of Nature Study was one branch of the main idea, and, while 
this subject has a place df its own, there is no doubt ithat its influence, not only 
upon subject matter, but also upon methods of teaching, has had considerable in- 
fluence in favour of the introduction of Agriculture. 



G8 THE KEPOKT OF THE No. 17 

Book study and " tongue teaching " (telling, preaching at) for generations 
have wielded a tremendous influence towards shaping our views with reference, not 
only to methods employed in the education of the young, but also to the body of 
matter used as the chief part of the machinery of education. Old methods are 
difficult to uproot. Inherited prejudices die hard. To the great majority scholastic 
education is a thing apart from the occupations of the families concerned, and it is 
difficult to convince people that the only education really worth while in developing 
the individual on a sound basis is one in which the occupations of the individual 
are used in connection with the scholastic study. 

The Ontario system of education has definite set programmes with well defined 
steps of advancement for the individual, with well arranged examinations and with 
clear-cut scholastic values. These values have become, through a long period 0/ 
time, standardized so that they are regarded as being of commercial value or of 
money value. Farmers and others have grown up with this idea and they are slow 
to make any change in what they understand for that which is an innovation. 

The influences created by the introduction of Nature Study, the different view- 
point brought about by the laboratory method in Science, the changed attitude of 
the younger generation towards material progress, have all made the introduction 
of any new subjects, especially those dealing with material things, much more easj 
of accomplishment. But one of the most important factors, perhaps the chief 
factor, in bringing about the actual introduction of Agriculture into both Primary 
and Secondary schools was the appropriation of a portion of the Federal funds to 
be used in promoting Agricultural Education. 

This money which is administered by the Department of Education is used 
in various ways. But the chief object kept always in mind is, that the best results 
will be obtained by using the money to bring about directly the actual teaching of 
the subject in the schools. To accomplish this a part of the money is used in the 
training of the teacher, another part in payment for actual equipment to be used 
for instruction, another for the work of special inspection, and still another to 
boards and teachers for managing school gardens. The clause of the agreement 
between the Federal Government and the Province relating to the money set apart 
to be administered by the Department of Education reads as follows : 

" To encourage Agriculture, Manual Training as applied to work on the farm 
and Domestic Science in High, Public, Separate and Continuation Schools and in 
Universities to be available for grants and for travelling and living expenses of 
teachers and others in attendance at Short Courses or other educational gather- 
ings, in addition to services, expenses, and equipment, and to be paid on the recom- 
mendation of the Department of Education, $26,000." 

The regulations stating the conditions under which the classes in Elementary 
Agriculture and Horticulture are maintained, and the requirements for earning 
grants are set forth in the clauses taken from the Kegnlations : 

Pages 83-85; 14, (1), (a), (6) ; (2), (3), (4), (5) ; 15, 16, (1), (2). 

The sums apportioned to School Boards and teachers with the conditions under 
which they are payable, are shown in the following schedule: 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



69 



Schedule of Grants 

FORMS III, IV AND V 



Where, after 1915, the teacher 
holds a second class certificate but 
is not certificated in Agriculture 



Where the teacher holds an Ele- 
mentary certificate in Agriculture 
and Horticulture, or receives a cer- 
tificate during the year 





To the Board 


To Teacher 


To Trustees 


To Teacher 


Requirements 


For 

full 
year 


For 
winter 

and 
spring 
terms 


For 
fall 
term 


For 
full 
year 


For 
winter 

and 
spring 

terms 


For 
fall 
term 



A. First Plan 
Instruction. 

Instruction throughout the 
whole year, to be com- 
pleted satisfactorily, with 
requirements regarding 
pupils' records, teacher's 
report, trustees' state- 
ment, etc., fulfilled. 

Home Gardens. 

Home gardens or projects 
by pupils of Forms III, 
IV, and V supervised by 
the teacher. 

School Grounds. 

Well kept grass and flower 
plots, borders, screens, 
etc., at school for beau- 
tifying grounds and for 
instructional purposes. 



B. Second Plan 
Instruction. 

Instruction throughout the 
whole year to be com- 
pleted satisfactorily, with 
requirements regarding 
pupils' records, teacher's 
reports, trustees' state- 
ment, etc., fulfilled. 

School Gardens. 

(1) A "pupils' school farm or 
school garden at or near 
the school, having at 
least six square rods for 
experimental and obser- 
vation plots and con- 
tributing to the school 
Fair. 

(2) For other pupils of 
Forms III, IV, and V, 
not represented in the 
work on the six square 
rods, either additional 
plots in the school garden, 
or gardens or projects at 
home, supervised by the 
teacher. 

School Grounds. 

Well kept grass and flower 
plots, borders, screens, 
etc., for beautifying 
grounds and for in- 
structional purposes. 



Up to but 

^not exceeding 

$10.00 



Up to but 
.not exceeding 

$15.00 



$15.00 



$20.00 



$7.50 



$10.00 



$5.25 



$8.00 



Not 

exceeding 

$20.00 



Not 

exceeding 

$30.00 



$30.00 



$40.00 



$20.00 



$20.00 



$12. M) 



$16.00 



When the Teacher holds an Intermediate Certificate in Agriculture, the grant in addition to his salary 
shall be one-half more than that specified in the above schedule for the holder of an Elementary 
certificate. 



70 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



The Public and Separate Schools qualifying for grants commencing in 1903 
are given in the following table : 



Year 



No. 
of Schools 



Year 



No. 
of Schools 



With 
School Gardens 



With 
Home Gardens 



1903 


...J 4 

.... 7 

6 

...J 8 

:::: i! 
-I 16 


1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

*1916 


17 
33 
101 
159 
264 
407 
500 






1904 




1905 




1906 






1907 

1908 

1909 


208 
222 
280 


56 
185 
220 



Up to 1914, no distinctions were made in the reports respecting Home Gardens and 
School Gardens. 

Of these 407 schools teaching Agriculture in 1915, 100 were taught by teachers 
who held certificates in Agriculture and 307 were taught by teachers with Second 
Class certificates. 

The amount paid out during the calendar year 1915 was : 

To Public and Separate School Boards $2,818.64 

To teachers 6,560.88 



$9,379.52 

This amount was made up partly from the Federal appropriation and partly 
from the Legislative grants as follows: 

Amount paid to Boards and teachers from the Federal 

Appropriation $4,963.03 

Amount paid to Boards and teachers from the Legisla- 
tive Grant 4,416.49 



$9,379.52 



City Schools 



There is no doubt that pupils in cities and towns would profit very materially 
,by a course of study in Agriculture and Horticulture under a qualified teacher, 
providing suitable equipment were available, and providing the classes were in- 
structed regularly throughout the year. But Agriculture as a subject of study can 
be taken to good advantage only by pupils old enough to understand not only the 
meaning but also the application of the principles involved. Such pupils will be 
found only in the upper classes of the Public Schools, that is in forms III, IV 
and Y. 

At present, in the larger cities, Household Science and Manual Training 
occupy a considerable portion of the pupil's time, consequently Agriculture could 
scarcely be added even though the conditions mentioned above were supplied. In 
such schools Agriculture is not likely to be introduced for some time yet, at least 
not with a curriculum so generously filled as is our present one. But for graded 
schools in smaller cities and towns there is no good reason why some classes in Agri- 
culture should not be provided. For such schools, in forms III, IV and V, pro- 



*Estimated from the notifications sent in. All the reports have not yet been received. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 71 



vision could be made so that regular classes provided for by arrangement on the 
time-table could be taken and profitable instruction given according to the present 
regulations. But where more than one teacher gives instruction in Agriculture to 
the class which he has in charge, and the boards provide suitable equipment, grants 
should be available on a basis similar to that upon which the rural schools are now 
working. 

A large proportion of the topics in the course on Nature Study for the Public 
and Separate Schools may really be included under the heading Agriculture. If 
the teacher is so disposed he can, within the limits of the present course of study, 
give an Agricultural trend to much of the work there indicated. Therefore it 
may properly be said that Agriculture, in one sense, is already provided for under 
the present regulations. But it must not be forgotten that pupils who are in the 
first and second book classes are too young to appreciate the most rudimentary of 
Agricultural problems. They are old enough, however, to profit by lessons in 
Nature Study concerning their experience of rural life. And Nature Study should 
be so adapted to the environment of the pupils as to appeal to the activities of the 
child. Bird study might well include the fowls of the poultry yard. Insect study 
need not ignore the pests of the garden nor the vermin which prey upon animals. 
Useful plants may be used in the study of flowers, fruits and leaves. In fact the 
more practical the study the better, and it is often at this stage of life that the boy 
or girl gains a viewpoint and that ideals are born. Therefore, though the subject 
may be called Nature Study it can have a vast Agricultural import and wield a 
powerful influence in shaping the views and ideals of the individual. 

It is recommended that special consideration be given to graded schools where 
more than one qualified teacher carries on the work satisfactorily. Every teacher 
who is engaged in teaching a third, fourth or fifth book class and who fulfils the 
requirements respecting the teaching of Agriculture should receive a grant accord- 
ing to the present schedule. But no one should be allowed to teach this subject in 
a graded school who does not hold at least an Elementary certificate in Agriculture. 
The grant to the board should be made upon the same basis as that to rural schools, 
excepting that where there are more than three teachers engaged in conducting 
classes in Agriculture in one school not more than three times the grant which is 
now paid in a one-teacher school should be available. 

Special Training of Teachers in Agriculture 

By an arrangement between the Ontario Agricultural College and the Depart- 
ment of Education, a course of instruction in Elementary Agriculture suitable foT 
teachers of Public and Separate schools has been provided. This course covers two 
consecutive summer sessions of five weeks each. An important part of this course 
is practical school garden work, conducted by teachers of the staff of the Horti- 
cultural Department of the College. A considerable amount of individual help and 
instruction can be given at odd times to suit the arrangement of the student's 
programme, and the work is adapted as far as possible to enable the teachers to 
become acquainted with the methods of conducting gardens in rural schools. The 
gardens of the Macdonald Consolidated schools are available for illustration and 
for practice in management by the teachers. This is an unusually fortunate con- 
dition, because the teachers ha*ve an opportunity to follow up a garden which was 
prepared in the spring and which was, during the summer session, in a flourishing 
condition. 



72 THE BEPOKT OF THE - No. 17 

As a rule flat cultivation is desirable for school gardens, but where the plots 
are so situated that rains may do damage by washing, it is advisable, as was the case 
at Guelph this year, to raise the " beds " above the general level of the walks. 
However, in grim irony, there was no need to prepare for washing as there was bq 
rain to speak of during the five weeks' course. Dry seasons have to be met by 
farmers and it was shown that with proper management they oan be successfully 
met. The results of the work were very encouraging. Dry farming was of neces- 
sity undertaken, and was capable of practical illustration. 

The work of instruction is made as practical as possible with the object of 
having the teachers become acquainted with out-of-door methods of instruction. 
This has a double-edged effect in so far as it is healthful and practical. 

Upon the satisfactory completion of this two-summer course the teacher is 
given an Interim Elementary certificate in Agriculture which legally qualifies 
to teach the subject in the primary schools. This Interim certificate may be made 
permanent after the teacher has taught this subject successfully for two years. Any 
person who is legally qualified to teach in any of the schools in the Ontario system 
may be admitted to the course leading to an Elementary Certificate. 

Course of Study in Agriculture 

The course of study is arranged by months with a programme of topics reason- 
ably suitable for the different seasons. The work herein outlined is also set forth 
in blank form in the back of the teacher's register with space for record by the 
teacher of the subjects taught. The topics suggested are not intended to be 
taken as " cast iron." The teacher is expected to take into consideration the local 
conditions and to use his own judgment. 

In accordance with the ^Regulations teachers are required to record regularly 
on the blank form provided for this purpose in order to qualify for grants. This 
report signed by the teacher and endorsed by the inspector is to be sent to the De- 
partment of Education at the close of the calendar year. 

The work is to be made as practical as possible and the minimum amount of 
time to be given to class work is one hour per week. While it may be necessary 
occasionally to give some time to the work after school hours it is expected that the 
one hour per week shall have a place on the time-table. 

JANUARY 

Plant Studies — Investigation of district's forest-tree areas with maps and census — Trees 
represented in firewood and sawlogs — Arithmetical problems, on lumber, sawlogs and wood- 
piles — Plans for conserving local forests, reforesting waste lands or establishing a school 
arboretum — Value of ashes and saving of same for garden. 

Animal Studies — Breeds of farm animals with local surveys and references. 

Pupils* Progress Clubs — Organization for boys' work in poultry improvement (Poultry 
Club); and seed improvement (Corn, Oat, Barley or Potato Clubs), and for girls' work in 
home-cooking or sewing, growing and canning tomatoes or cultivating flowers (Tomato or 
Flower Clubs) ; winter reading in connection with these. 

Physical Science — Practical lessons on air and liquid pressures — Common pump, barom- 
eter, lactometer. 

FEBRUARY 

Plant Studies — 1. Germination tests of seed to be sown on local farms — Structure of 
little plants — Effects of light, heat and moisture on growth. 

2. Study of apple or other fruit tree twigs to learn age, markings, fruit 
and leaf buds, etc. 

Farm Crops — Study of structure of head of wheat and wheat grain — Comparison with 
oats, barley, corn — The legumes and their tubercles. 

Milk Studies — Determination of specific gravity — Estimation of fat with Babcock Test 
— Pupils' cow testing work at home — Cow Testing Associations under Department of 
Agriculture, Ottawa. 

Physical Science — Simple application of electricity and steam. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION" 73 

MARCH 

Plant Studies — Estimation of weed-seed impurities in seed to be sown locally; testing 
seed for germibility — Grading of seed samples under the Seed Control Act. 

Farm Work— Maps of home farms showing the proposed plans of cropping — 'Rotations — 
Systems of farming. 

Garden Work — Commencing seeds in boxes in windows or hot bed — Preparing stakes, 
labels, tools, window boxes, hanging baskets — Purchasing seeds, fertilizers, etc. — Settling 
plans for garden experiments. 

Soil Studies — A simple analysis — Classification of samples of soils — Water holding 
capacities — Effect of lime on clay — Soil maps of pupils' home farms — Local drainage schemes 
and possibilities. 

APRIL 

Plant Studies — Grafting and pruning — Practice on neglected trees — How to restore an 
old orchard. 

Farm, Garden and Orchard Work — Implements used in spring work — Their principles of 
construction — How and why used — Spraying outfits — Preparation and uses of fungicides and 
Insecticides. 

Farm Arithmetic — Problems based on actual local operations — cost of plowing, harrow- 
ing, seeding, rolling, cultivating. 

Garden Work (for April or May) — Preparing the ground, laying out plots, planting. 

MAY 

Plant Studies — Identification of weed seedlings in garden — 'Study of fruit blossoms and 
formation of fruit — Practice in proper method of planting fruit or shade trees. 

Arbor Day — Organization for school ground improvement — Local bee to clean, level, plant 
trees and shrubbery, mend fences and outbuildings, prepare garden, improve road in front 
of school — 'Sports and social. 

Animal Studies — Earthworm, bee, toad, beneficial birds, particularly in relation to 
agriculture. 

Garden Work — Class instruction and exercises in thinning, mulching and weeding — 
Studies of seedlings' development — Setting out of window boxes and hanging baskets. 

PLAN OF SCHOOL GARDEN, HOME PROJECTS, Etc. 

Showing location with respect to school — Area — Flower beds — Experiments and demon- 
strations — Vines and shrubbery planted — School ground improvement undertaken — Work 
undertaken by School Progress Club or pupils at home — Plans for supervising — How 
supervised and results of experiments. 

JUNE 

Plant Studies — Studies of flower structures, such as corn, wheat, potato, tomato — 
Spraying for pLajit diseases. 

Road Improvement — Principles of good road making — An ideal country road — Improve- 
ment of road in front of school. 

Class Excursion — Directed excursion to Agricultural College or other Experimental Farm 
for older pupils. 

Insect Studies — Work of common injurious insects such as cutworms, codling moth, 
oyster shell bark louse, cabbage butterfly and remedies. 

Garden Work — Leaving all garden work in good shape — Definite arrangements for the 
care and protection of the garden during holiday, for observations and necessary harvesting. 

SUMMER HOLIDAYS 

Indicating how the garden was cared for, and what work was done, also condition at 
school opening. 

SEPTEMBER 

Plant Studies — 1. Weed study excursion — 'Preparation of mounted collections — Seed 
collections — Identification tests — Methods of eradication. 

2. Pupils' selection of corn in standing crop for seed and exhibition. 

School Fair — Display of Progress Club's products (home made articles, poultry, potatoes, 
oat sheaves, etc., by boys, and sewing, cooking and canning by girls), garden produce, collec- 
tions, demonstration of experiments carried out at school — 'Judging and awarding of prizes 
of books, bulbs, etc. 

Insect Studies — The housefly, its structure, habits, life history and suppression — 
Estimation of damage by codling moth. 

Reading — Selection and purchase of agricultural books for school and home libraries. 
A Farmer's library — Winter's reading plans. 

OCTOBER 

Plant Studies — 1. Collection of apples and other fruits for competition and judging 
'- — Talk by local fruit grower — Testing pupils' ability to recognize 
varieties — Methods of packing and shipping. 
2. Collections of injured or imperfect fruit — Causes and remedies. 
Farm and Orchard Work — 1. Threshing — Storage of crops — Model (Barns — Silos — Esti- 
mates of yields — Determination of weights of bushels of 
grain. 

2. Fall preparation of soil — Implements used and problems 

on cost of plowing, etc. 

3. Fall pruning — 'Practice on neglected trees — Cover crops. 
Garden Work — Taking cuttings and plants from garden for school or home windows or 

wintering over — Planting bulbs in school border or forcing for winter bloom — Fall prepara- 
tion of school garden, cleaning, manuring, and plowing. 



74 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



NOVEMBER 

Corn Pair — Collections of selected corn for competition — 'Judging competitions — Reading 
prize essays. 

Farm Work — Wintering the farm animals — Good stabling and up-to-date appliances — 
Feeding — Care of poultry — >Best hen houses. 

Reading — Class debates, discussions on agricultural topics. 

Physical Science — Simple experiments on air. 

DECEMBER 

Animal Studies — Breeds of farm poultry — Visits to poultry or live stock shows — Survey 
and census of local poultry industry — (Marketing poultry. 

Reading — Reviews of subjects read up by pupils in books, papers or bulletins. 

Physical Science — Practical exercises with thermometers — Use of dairy thermometer — 
Weather records. 

Junior Public School Graduation Examinations, 1916 

AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

Note. — The candidate may take either four questions from A and two from B, or three 

from A and four from B. 



Values 

4X5 = 
20 



5 

3X5: 

15 



10 

10 

20 



20 



5 + 5: 
10 



5 + 5 
10 



5 + 5 
10 

5 + 5 
10 

2X5 
10 



Discuss potato growing, using the following heads: 
(a) The preparation of "seed" for planting. 
(6) The method of planting usually adopted in Ontario. 

(c) The protection of the growing crop against the potato beetle. 

(d) The protection against late blight (potato rot). 

(e) The method of harvesting and storing the crop. 



excluder, (iii) 



2. (a) Describe a good method of wintering bees. 
(6) What is meant by (i) swarming, (ii) queen 

brood chamber, (iv) comb honey, (v) drone? 

3. (a) Using illustrative drawings, give the life history of any one of 
the following insects: codling moth, tent caterpillar, cabbage butterfly. 

(&) Outline a suitable method of combating any two of these named. 

4. On May 15th a farmer buys 10 steers averaging in weight 655 lbs. 
each, at 5%c. per lb., and pays for them by borrowing the money at 1% per 
annum. He pastures this stock until November 15th, the steers making an 
average gain of 310 lbs. each. He then sells at 6c. per lb., and, out of the 
proceeds, repays the money borrowed. Assuming the cost of pasture and 
management to be 75c. a head per month payable on November 15th, find the 
farmer's net profit. 

5. Using the following heads, give a discription of any four of, — 
Perennial Sow Thistle, Wild Mustard, Purslane, Plantain, Canada Thistle, 
Dandelion: — 

(a) The method of seed distribution. 

(6) The characteristics by reason of which each weed persists as a 
pest. 

(c) The crops injuriously affected by each weed. 

(d) The method of combating each weed. 



B 



6. 



(a) Name two good fungicides used in spraying. 
(&) Name a fungus each is respectively adapted to check and des- 
cribe the mode of application. 

7. (a) What breeds of poultry are called European breeds, and what 
are called Asiatic breeds? 

(o) Give four characteristics of each of the two types. 

8. Describe, using diagrams, the mode of constructing (a) a hot bed, (6) 
a cold frame. 

9. (a) Describe two methods of conserving soil moisture. 

(d) Point out the chief benefits to be derived from tile drainage. 

10. Describe a good method of storing each of the following for winter 
use: — celery, cabbage, turnips, beets, parsnips. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 75 

Equipment for Teaching Agriculture 

The rural schools are, as a rule, quite bare of equipment for teaching either 
practical Nature Study or Elementary Agriculture. Maps, -a globe, a few books 
and charts, blackboard and crayons, constitute the general equipment. The intro- 
duction of Agriculture, however, makes it necessary to provide apparatus, much of 
which may be of a simple character, and some of it may (be used to advantage for 
demonstration in other subjects. Samples of grain for illustrations, weigh scales 
for weighing grain, cups for measuring, can be used for teaching Arithmetic as 
well as for Agriculture. Babcock milk testers, lactometer, egg-candling apparatus, 
and a varied assortment of test tubes, litmus paper, some reagents, dishes, plates, 
saucers, and the like, should be at hand in every school. For the garden a suitable 
supply of tools of the most modern kind should be secured. Pupils are always 
interested in using appliances which are known to be up-to-date. Aside from hoes, 
spades, digging forks, rakes and the like, a suitable combination wheel cultivator 
and seeder should be in every school where there is a school garden. 

The care of tools should be an important feature of school garden work, and 
time should be given to this feature of the work. When steel tools are put away for 
any length of time the steel, after having been cleaned, should be wiped with an 
oiled cloth. The oil prevents moisture and air from coming in contact with the 
steel, and keeps it bright and free from rust. The care of tools is not only an 
important matter in itself, but it leads to care in other things, and so reduces the 
loss in farming operations due to wear and tear. The teacher, who neglects to give 
attention to the care of tools, loses a large part of his opportunity for good in the 
school garden. This feature of Agricultural instruction is largely lost in the home 
garden plan because the teacher cannot give the matter close personal attention. 

In order to make the best use of school equipment it should 'be stored in a 
suitable case or cupboard convenient for use. Equipment to be effective must be 
ready to hand, and the teacher usually has very little time to devote to the 
preparation and the arrangement of it before the class is called. 

Agricultural books and periodicals are part of the equipment, and a few good 
books, and two or three periodicals should be in every rural school. And it must 
be remembered that books are to be used and not to be kept locked up in a case. 
Supplementary reading during spare periods can be taken from the books and 
periodicals on Agriculture, as well as from classical literature. The following 
list of books includes many that are particularly suitable to rural schools. Those 
in italics are perhaps the most suitable. 

List of Text Books and Supplies Recommended for Teachers and 
Students of Agriculture 



GENERAL AGRICUI.TUBE 

Elements of Agriculture Warren $1 10 

Agriculture for Beginners Burkett, Stevens & Hill 76 

Essentials of Agriculture ' Waters 125 

Rural Arithmetic Calfee 30 

Soil King 150 

Soil Hall » 160 

Beginnings in Agriculture Mann 75 

Farm Management Warren 176 

One Hundred Lessons in Agriculture Nolan 65 

First Principles of Agriculture Golf & Mayne 80 

Agriculture for Young Folks Wilson 80 

High School Agriculture Mayne & Hatch 100 

Elementary Principles .of Agriculture Ferguson & Lewis 100 

Principles of Agriculture Bailey 1 25 

Fundamentals of Agriculture .< Halligan i ^0 

Productive Farming : Davis 1 «« 



76 THE KEFORT OF THE No. 17 

Elements of Farm Practice Wilson $ 

Practical Lessons in Agriculture Lester S. Ivins 84 

Laboratory Manual of Horticulture George H. Hood 

Agriculture and Life Cromwell, A, D 150 

Agriculture Through the Laboratory and School Garden. ... Jackson, C. R., and 

Daugherty, L. S 1 50 

Agriculture Through Home and School Garden Stebbins, C A 1 00 

Elementary Exercises in Agriculture Dadisman, Macmillan Co. 50 

An Introduction to Agriculture Upham, Renouf, Mon- 
treal 75 

Elementary Agriculture Hatch & Hazelwood, 

Education Book Co... 75 

Elementary Agriculture for Schools McCaig 1 00 

Practical Lessons in Agriculture Ivins and Merrill 75 

AGRICULTURAL BOTANY 

Agricultural Botany Percival, Holt $2 50 

The Living Plant Ganong, Holt 

Mushrooms Atkinson, Holt 

Field, Forest and Garden Botany Gray 

Text Book of Botany Strasburger 

The Evolution of Our Native Fruits Bailey 

Plant Breeding Bailey 

FOdder and Pasture Plants Dept. Agriculture, Ot- 
tawa 

Farm Weeds Dept. Agriculture, Ot- 
tawa 

Our Native Trees . Keeler 

BACTERIOLOGY AND HEALTH 



Bacteria in Relation to Country Life Lipman . . 

Microbiology Marshall . 

Bacteria, Yeasts and Molds in the Home Conn . 

BEEKEEPING 

Beekeeping t Philips . 

How to Keep Bees for Profit > Lyon . . . 

Writing on Bees Alexander 

The A, B. G. and X, Y, Z, of Bee Culture Root . . . 



3 


50 


3 


50 


1 


80 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


00 




75 


1 


00 


2 


00 


$1 


50 


2 


50 


1 


00 


$1 


50 


1 


50 




50 


1 


75 



DAIRYING 

Milk and its Products: A Treatise Upon the Nature and 

Qualities of Dairy Milk and the Manufacture of Butter 

and Cheese Wing, H. H $1 50 

Dairy Cattle and Milk Production Eckles, C. H 1 60 

The Farm and Dairy > Sheldon, J .P 1 00 

Canadian Dairying Dean 90 

First Lesson in Dairying VanNorman ,. 50 

Questions and Answers in Butter Making Publow 50 

Farm Dairying Laura Rose 1 26 

Testing Milk and Its Product Farrington and Woll ... 1 25 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Elementary Entomology Sanderson and Jackson $2 00 

Insect Life . . . '. Comstock 175 

How to Know the Butterflies Comstock 2 25 

Manual for Study of Insects Comstock 3 50 

Insect Pests of Farm, Garden and Orchard Sanderson 3 00 

FARM ANIMALS 

Manual of Farm Animals Harper, M. W $2 00 

The Training and Breaking of Horses Harper, M. W. . . . 1 75 

Sheep Farming in North America Craig and Marshall 150 

Types and Breeds of Farm Animals Plumb 2 00 

Swine , Day 1 50 

The Horse £ a y } JO 

Judging Live Stock Craig 1 50 

FLOWERS AND ORNAMENTAL PLANTS 

Flowers and How to Grow Them Si^ d $ ? 5k 

Book of the Rose • Mel her 1 76 

Daffodils and Narcissus and How to Grow Them £ erley i in 



Flower Garden §!2f«H ' 

Home Horticulture ™3£?nl, ' 

Vines and How to Grow Them : McCullen 

Flower Guide Keea ■ ' 



1 10 
1 00 
1 10 



NATURE STUDY 



Public 



$0 19 
School Manual ir-'-y •••• ••■■• • •"•///. \ 50 



Nature Study and Life 5«?f® MO 

How to Teach Nature Study Dearness 



60 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 77 

Nature Study Silcox and Stevenson . . $075 



1 50 
75 



Nature Study and the Child Scott . 

Practical Nature Study Coulter 

Birds. Bees and Sharp Eyes Morley, M. W. 60 

Insect Book S. O. Howard. ..'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Moths and Butterflies 7 Dickerson, Mary C 180 

Plant Life, First Studies of Atkinson 60 

Stars, The Story Land of Pratt, Mara Li. ....... . 50 

Sylvan Ontario Muldrew .... 

Winter Sunshine Burroughs '. 50 

Principles of Plant Culture r". Goff, E. S 1 10 

Elementary Agriculture and Nature Study Brittain, Educational' 

:Book Co., Toronto ... 75 

Bird Neighbors. Blanchan Doubleday 3 00 

New Canadian Bird Book MacClement 2 50 

Hand Book of Nature Study Mrs. Comstock 3 00 

Nature Study and Elementary Agriculture Hamilton, McGill (Univ.) 50 

POULTRY 

How to Keep Hens for Profit Valentine $1 50 

Poultry Craft Robinson 125 

American Standard of Perfection 2 00 

Productive Poultry Husbandry Lewis 2 00 

RURAL ECONOMICS 

Challenge of the Country Fiske . ... 

Rural Life in Canada 'McDougall 

Principles of Rural Economics Carver . . 

Co-operation in Agriculture . Powell , . . 

An Introduction to the Study of Agricultural Economics. .. .Taylor . . 

CFECIAL CROPS 

Alfalfa Coburn . . 

Bean Culture Sevey .... 

A, B, C of Potato Culture Terry . . . 

Cabbages, Cauliflowers and Allied Vegetables Allen . 

Celery Culture Beatty . . , 

Mushrooms and How to Grow Them Falconer . 

New Onion Culture Grainer . , 

Tomato Culture Tracy . .. 



$0 


75 


1 


00 


1 


30 


1 


50 


1 


BR 


$0 


50 




50 




50 




50 




50 


1 


00 




50 




50 



SOILS AND FERTILITY 

The Fertility of the Land Roberts. I. P $1 50 

The Principles of Soil Management Lyon, T. L 175 

The Soil: Its Nature, Relations, and Fundamental Principles 

of Management King, F. H 1 50 

Fertilizers: The Source, Character and Composition or 

Natural, Home-made and Manufactured Fertilizers, and 

Suggestions as to Their Use for Different Crops and 

Conditions Voorhees 125 

Manure and Fertilizers Wheeler, H. J 160 

Soils and Fertilizers Snyder, H 125 

Rocks, Rock-weathering and Soils Merrill, G. P 4 00 

Crops and Methods for Soil Improvement Agee, Alva 1 25 

Soils and Plant Life Cunningham 110 

SCHOOL GARDENS 

School Gardens Meier, Ginn & Co 

Practical School Gardens » Elford, Oxford $0 70 

Among School Gardens Greene 1 25 

How to Make School Gardens Hemening, Doubleday... 1 00 

Children's Gardens for Pleasure, etc Sturgis & Walton 1 00 

Public School Garden Book Weed, Scribner 125 

Gardens and Their Meaning Wright, Ginn & Co.... 1 00 

Vegetable Gardening Watts 175 

Manual of Gardening Bailey 2 00 

Vegetable Gardening Green 100 

Garden Farming Corbett 2 00 

Landscape Gardening Waugh 100 

The Principles of Vegetable Gardening Bailey, L. H 1 50 

The Beginner's Garden Book French, Allen . . 1 00 

School and Home Gardens .' Meier, W. H. D 80 

BOTANICAL SUPPLIES 

Genus Covers, per dozen 20c. 

Plant Mounts, per dozen 10c. 

Drying Paper, per dozen .- 12c. 

Herbarium Labels, per hundred 15c. 

Dissecting Scalpels, each 20c. 

Bent Forceps, each 20c. 

Straight Forceps, each 20c. 

Dissecting Needles, each 5c. 

Adhesive Tape, spool 5c. 



78 THE REPORT OP THE No. 17 



Vials, per dozen 18 C . 

Clasps, per dozen <, „ 10c. 

Wood Seed Labels, per booklet of 48 5c. 

Wood Seed Box, fitted with Mounting Card, each 10c. 

GENERAL SUPPLIES 

Science Note Books, fitted with four special fillers, each 50c. 

Perpetual Note Books L. K, each 25c. 

Special Fountain Pen, and up |1 00 

Also Blotting Paper, Pens, Pencils, Ink, Erasers, Paper Fasteners, Rubber Bands, 
Compasses, Rulers, O.A.C. Pads, Note Paper and Envelopes, Blank Books, Eye 
Shades, etc. 

Waterman's Fountain Pen, and up $2 50 

ENTOMOLOGICAL SUPPLIES 

Standard Pins, No. 210, adopted by the United States and Canadian Governments, 

per dozen 18c. 

Stretching Boards, each 18c. 

Insect Boxes, each 65c. 

Labels, per hundred 10c. 

Riker Mounts, each — 15c, 19c, 23c and 40c 

Insect Nets, each 25c 

School Fairs 

The organization known as School Fairs is under the direct charge of the 
District Kepresentative of the Department of Agriculture of the county, in co- 
operation with the Public School Inspector. The chief object of this organization 
is to arouse an interest in experimental work at the homes of the pupils, and to 
educate the country boys and girls along practical lines, not only in home garden 
work, but also in business methods as well. 

As the organization develops it assumes usually the township as a unit with a 
centre located at some convenient point. At this centre the schools concerned 
assemble their produce for exhibition. The products may be from home gardens 
or plots, but it is intended as soon as the school garden progresses, to make 
competitions of products from the school gardens an important feature of the 
fair. As it is at present, there is some danger of having on exhibit, under the 
name of a pupil, material which represents the work of a too industrious parent 
or friend, rather than that of the pupil. This feature, though not so important 
as some suppose, will gradually become less in proportion as the school garden 
institution becomes more general, because the teacher will then be a directing 
force throughout the whole season during which the crop is grown. 

The Public School Inspector is expected to supervise the home projects by 
questioning the pupils and teacher, on the occasion of his visits, concerning the 
problems undertaken, and by giving advice and assistance to the teacher and 
pupils with reference to the fair. As - the Inspector is responsible for the schools 
under his charge, he is the person upon whom the Department of Education depends 
to see that the fair is made, as much as possible, an educational institution. He 
will assist and guide the District Representative towards that end. 

The live stock exhibits in a school fair may be made an important feature if 
properly managed. A colt or calf, halter- broken, groomed and handled by a pupil, 
is always interesting and instructive. Exhibits of poultry hatched and raised under 
the charge of a pupil, especially if eggs be obtained from some source which would 
indicate uniformity as to quality and breed, should form a very important factor in 
the fair. 

In order to secure uniformity as a basis of competition in plant products, it 
is necessary to see that the pupils have seed of the same kind. When this is the 
case, the competition is fair, and judging is made easier. In awarding prizes it is, 
as a rule, better to have the prizes small and numerous than to have a few prizes 
of greater value. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 79 

School Fairs are not obligatory on the schools, but trustees and teachers are 
invited to co-operate with the Inspector and the District Representative in managing 
and financing the organization. The details of arrangement may be made to suit 
those concerned. 

Where there is no District Representative, the burden of management will fall 
upon the individual schools, and especially upon the Inspector and the teacher. 
In such cases each township should have, either a trustees' association, or a town- 
ship teachers' association, or better still, an association of both combined. This 
would facilitate matters very materially, not only in the management of the school 
fair, but also in promoting rural improvement and uniformity in school matters. 

It is intended that the school fair movement shall be a school institution, 
and that it will not be absorbed by either the county fair or the township fair. 

Home Gardens 
Grants 

Where Agriculture is taught in the public school, either home gardens or 
school gardens are necessary in order that some practice in individual work may 
be had. Under the home garden plan, the grants to the school board are $15.00, 
if the work is in charge of a teacher holding an Elementary certificate in Agri- 
culture, and $10.00 if the teacher holds a Second Class certificate. In each case, 
reports have to be submitted to the Department of Education stating that the 
money has been spent. To the teacher conducting classes under the home garden 
plan, and holding an Elementary certificate in Agriculture the grant is $30.00, to 
the teacher holding an Intermediate certificate in Agriculture $45.00, and to a 
teacher holding a Second Class certificate $15.00. In all cases the requirements 
have to be fulfilled, and the regulations complied with to the satisfaction of the 
Public or the Separate School Inspector. 

Plans 

The work of the home garden is difficult to follow out, because it is necessary 
to visit the homes to give individual instruction and guidance. If it is followed 
up thoroughly, however, the results for good are important and far-reaching. 
Before practical work is commenced on a project, the matter should be discussed 
carefully with the pupil, and the teacher should see that the pupil has a good idea 
of the aim and purpose of the project, and of the method to be employed. This 
will require discussion and directed reading, and the likes and dislikes of the 
pupils should have the utmost consideration. Where several pupils undertake the 
same projects, the matter becomes simplified. 

General gardening problems of a simple character would be advisable at the 
start, and as the pupil advances more difficult problems may be undertaken. 

Visiting: 

It is a part of the teacher's duties to visit the pupils two or three times during 
the season, to discuss with them details of management, and to give instruction 
when necessary. The first visit should be made soon after the project has been 
started, and another in the Fall towards the close. Other visits should be made 
where possible. This work of supervising by the teacher should be productive of 
good results from the very fact that the teacher will, be able to see the pupil at 
his hoK»<^ and talk over matters of mutual benefit. In most cases the parents 



80 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

take a deep interest in the work of their children, and often can give the teacher 
good advice and assistance, not only for the work in connection with the project, 
but also for other features of school work. 

Where there is a county representative and a school fair organization, some 
of this work of visiting will fall upon his shoulders, but it should not be left 
entirely to him, because, quite frequently, some pupils of the classes do not under- 
take problems under his direction, and these would be left out of consideration 
unless the teacher should take the matter in hand, and follow it up. Moreover, the 
District Representative is unable to make more than one visit, or at most two 
visits, to the pupils, and this is unhappily, quite frequently, too meagre an amount 
of instruction. 

In many cases the home garden may be made supplementary to the school 
garden, and where this plan can he carried out much good will result, because it 
will link up the home and the school in such a way as to prove of benefit' to 'both. 
If seed selection is a part of the work of the school, the investigation may be 
continued at the home plot. In this way the tendency of education will be towards 
the farm rather than away from it. 

Beautifying School Grounds 
Requirements 

One of the requirements in connection with the teaching of Agriculture in the 
country schools is that attention shall be given to the ground and buildings. 
Many country schools present a neglected appearance, and are anything but 
beautiful and home-like. The blame for this does not lie altogether at the teacher's 
door, yet if the teacher assumes a leading part, parents and trustees are usually 
willing to give encouragement and sometimes to lend a hand. Pupils are always 
willing to give assistance, especially if time be taken from the regular programme. 
And by all means it would be a wise move to take time to engage in such an important 
educational function. 

Tree-Planting 

Trees are, without doubt, the most important feature in a landscape, and, 
therefore, if trees are not already on the ground, they should be planted under the 
direction of the teacher. The Department of Education has set apart Arbor Day — 
the first Friday in May — as a day to be devoted to ground improvement in general, 
and to tree-planting in particular. Where the school is located near a woods, trees 
may be dug up there, and removed to the school grounds, but this digging up is 
a difficult job, and requires considerable physical strength. Therefore it might be 
well to secure the services of an able-bodied man for this part of the work. 

In removing trees from the ground, too great care cannot be given to the work. 
The bark must not be wounded, and the roots should be cut off as clean as possible 
and some soil left adhering. The tree should be pruned back when lying on the 
ground, by cutting with a sharp cut each branch removed. If trees are to be 
transplanted in the summer when in full leaf, it is best to prune back before 
digging up, as this will prevent loss of water by transpiration during the time 
between digging up and re-setting. It will assist the tree to recover, if a cap made 
of burlap be placed about the tree top to prevent loss of water during the first few 
days of its life in the new position. The tree ought to be planted slightly deeper 
in its new abode than it was in the old, thus providing a little extra soil to act as a 



1916 DEPARTMENT OE EDUCATION 81 

ballast against injury by wind. A few stones placed on the ground near the trunk 
will assist not only in keeping the roots firm, but also in acting as a mulch to 
prevent loss of water by evaporation from the soil near the roots. 

Where it is not possible to secure trees from woods in the neighbourhood, it 
is then necessary to buy them from a nursery. In such cases attention has to be 
given only to the planting. The kind of trees to be used will depend upon the 
neighbourhood and its soil conditions, but as a general rule, for deciduous trees, 
the American Elm, Basswood, and Soft Maple, are easily grown and grow rapidly. 
Eor evergreens, the Norway Spruce and the Colorado Blue Spruce are available 
and grow readily in Ontario. Our own native Black Spruce and White 
Spruce are so subject to Gall Louse that they are difficult to raise. The Manitoba 
Maple (Box Elder) is easily grown, and grows very rapidly, but it is not a very 
good tree when it is grown and is short-lived. There is no good reason why 
Sweet Chestnut, Shell Bark Hickory, and Black Walnut should not be used here 
and there. They are very valuable trees and are becoming scarce in Ontario. For 
variety the Paper Birch, White Pine and White Ash make a good appearance. The 
trees to be avoided are Poplars and Willows (except for a wet boggy place). Oak, 
Beech and Ironwood grow too slowly. The Sugar maple is difficult to grow now, on 
account of borers which work around the trunk near the root, but this is one of the 
most magnificent tree?, and has heen grown with great success when 'borers were 
not so plentiful as now. 

Shrubbery 

Too little use has been made of shrubs for decorating school premises, and 
frequently, when they have been employed, little attention has been given towards 
locating them in suitable places on the grounds. If shrubs are properly placed they 
may be made very effective in improving the grounds. 

The kind of shrubs to be used will depend quite largely upon local conditions 
as to soil, climate, and general plan of the school. For damp ground there is no 
better shrub than the Red Osier Dogwood. In fact this shrub, a native of our 
sAvamps, will do well on almost any kind of soil. The swamp bush honeysuckle is 
a fast grower, and does well in clay land. So does the Black Elderberry, and 
several species of Viburnum. The Hazel makes a good dense shrub, and can be 
had from the woods. The Wild Rose should also have consideration. All the 
above mentioned are natives of Ontario, and make first-class decorative shrubbery. 
But, of course, there are many other beautiful shrubs which have been introduced 
from foreign countries, and which do well here, but a strong plea is made for our 
own shrubs, highly prized in other countries, but neglected here in Ontario. The 
common Barberry is an interesting shrub, but should never be used because of the 
part it takes in the promotion of wheat rust. 

In arranging for a location in which to plant shrubbery, the whole landscape 
is to be considered. As a general rule, shrubs should be used in corners, or as shields 
for outhouses, or for other places which should be shielded. In no case should 
a shrub be placed in the middle of an open space like a lawn or yard. 

Lilacs have long been favourites, and may be used where a high shrub is 
required. The Shad Bush or June berry is also a favourite where a high shrub is 
required. The common Arbor Vitae or cedar of our swamps, makes an excellent 
evergreen shrub, and is of the greatest service as a shield in both winter and 
summer. It grows readily with a moderate amount of care. 
6 e. 



M THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

School Gardens 

The School Garden movement is making steady progress, although a great 
variety of difficulties crop up here and there. At the time rural school grounds 
were set apart for school purposes and buildings established on them, school gardens 
were apparently never thought of; consequently, in many cases it is not easy to 
secure a suitable plot of land without encroaching upon the playground. The 
natural reluctance which teachers and School Boards have to adopting any new 
feature in education has a retarding influence. It is always easy to wait to see 
others start, and there is a natural reluctance against pioneering. In many cases the 
teacher is afraid of failure, and a failure in School Gardening would be too notice- 
able. Teachers are not long enough in one position and this is offered as an excuse 
for not only failing to start but also failing to carry on that which has been started. 
And trustees and parents in some cases assume the attitude that there is no need of 
a school garden, because the pupils can get plenty of gardening to do at home. 
Some parents say that the garden work at school interferes with the established 
school work and prevents rapid promotion. 

Of course many of the above difficulties and objections are passing away, and 
it is not to be expected that the introduction of School Gardens as an institution in 
Ontario will be accomplished all at once. The rapidity of introduction will be 
largely dependent upon the availability of qualified teachers. The supply of teachers 
who have certificates in Agriculture is increasing year by year and the outlook for 
the future is very promising. There is already some reason to hope for more 
permanency of position for the teacher due to the introduction and the maintenance 
of school gardens in the rural schools. 

The kind of crops to be grown will depend upon the local conditions, the size 
of the garden, and the character of the soil. As a rule some attention should be 
given to decorative plants, but while the war lasts every effort should be put forth 
to grow plants of value as foodstuffs, even though the total product of one school 
garden does not appear large in money value. 

Inspectors and Inspection 

The Public and Separate School Inspectors are expected to take an active part 
in promoting Agricultural Education, especially where the inspectorate covers rural 
districts. In many cases they have made an excellent start and are showing praise- 
worthy enthusiasm in assisting teachers and encouraging trustees to advance along 
the lines laid down. 

During the summer months of 1914 and 1915 young men having teaching 
experience in Public Schools, and under-graduate standing of two years at the 
Ontario Agricultural College were appointed to assist in the work of introducing 
Agriculture into the Public Schools. These young men of whom there were only a 
few in the whole Province, had a very large area to cover and, no doubt, expended 
a large amount of energy while they were engaged in the work, but as the summer 
vacation occurred during the middle of the time which might be used by these men, 
the results actually accomplished were scarcely warranted by the expense and effort 
put forth. These men were called Field Agents who acted as inspectors of 
the Agricultural classes and made reports to the Department of Education concern- 
ing the work. As the District Representative of the Department of Agriculture 
visited many of the rural schools to give assistance to the teachers and pupils along 
the same line, the teachers became somewhat confused. What with regular visits 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 83 

of the School Inspector, the occasional visit of the Field Agent, and of the District 
Representative, the teacher began to wonder what next. However, if a glance be 
given at the table showing the number of schools teaching Agriculture it will be 
seen that the numbers increased considerably during these years. The office of Field 
Agent was abolished in September, 1915. 

This work of inspection for two years performed by the Field Agent was, in 
September, 1915, assumed by the Public and Separate School Inspectors. In 
order to give these men some idea of the Agricultural situation a short course cover- 
ing two weeks was given them at the Ontario Agricultural College in July, 1915. 
Practically^ all the inspectors attended this short course and there is good reason 
to suppose that they received considerable profit from it. The report concerning 
the attitude of these men towards the work provided was very favourable indeed. 
No class at the College in all its history gave closer attention to the lectures and 
demonstrations, given. No body of men showed greater zeal for, or gave closer 
attention to, the subjects in hand. 

It must be realized by any one at all familiar with such work that to provide 
a course of two weeks which would in any way do justice to the professors con- 
cerned, to the subject undertaken and to the inspectors, is a task that might stagger 
the veriest enthusiast. The work on the whole was satisfactory to the Inspectors 
and quite creditable to the College staff, although at this season of the year the staff 
is frequently crippled by the unavoidable absence of some of its strong men. 

The suggestion is here thrown out that it would be a wise move for each in- 
spector who has rural schools under his charge to take one of the Summer Courses 
provided for teachers at the Ontario Agricultural College. If the Inspector is a 
Science Specialist he should take the Intermediate Course; if not, perhaps the 
Elementary Course would be more suitable to his needs. In either case he should 
aim to secure a certificate. Our system of education in Ontario tends towards 
certificates of one kind or another; and this is in many ways a good tendency, 
because the work leading towards something tangible, something definite, is likely, 
in the majority of cases, to be more thoroughly done, and the individual is likely 
to gain more from work laid out upon such a plan. If Inspectors could see their 
way clear to attend the teachers' courses there should be no need of further short 
courses for them. 

The regulations setting forth the duties of Inspectors respecting Agriculture 
are here given : 

Agriculture and Horticulture, Manual Training, and Household Science 

As is evidenced by the provisions of the Revised Regulations, the Minister desires 
that Ontario shall emphasize the teaching of Agriculture and Horticulture and the 
associated Nature'Study in both the rural and the urban schools, so far as is consistent 
with the claims of the essentials of a general education. For this purpose a larger share 
of the Federal grant is now available; and more generous grants than heretofore are 
open to both urban and rural schools whose Boards and teachers maintain classes in 
these subjects. 

The Inspectors should also note that, in addition to the classes in the Public and 
Separate Schools, for the efficiency and control of which classes they are responsible to 
the Minister of Education, short courses for farmers and their sons are conducted under 
the Minister of Agriculture by the District Representatives of his Department. As pre- 
scribed in the Revised Regulations, School Fairs will also be conducted as educational 
projects by the same officers, who have been instructed to associate with themselves for 
this purpose the Public and Separate School Inspectors and teachers concerned. Of 
such co-operation the Ministers of Agriculture and Education heartily approve. 

The attention of the Inspectors is also called to the special provisions in the Regula- 
tions for the establishment and maintenance in rural and village schools of courses in 
Elementary Manual Training and Household Science especially adapted to the require- 



84 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

ments of farm life. For some years at any rate the courses in Household Science will, no 
doubt, appeal more strongly to village and rural (School Boards, especially to the former, 
and there is no reason why in many of the schools under such Boards Household Science 
at any rate should not be taken up with the simple provision contemplated in Circular 
No. 3. When, in the judgment of the Inspector, the establishment of such classes is 
feasible, he should bring the subject before the Boards and should notify the Minister 
in order that the special Departmental Inspector concerned may follow up his action. 

It will also be the duty of the Public School Inspector to further to the best of his 
ability the interests of Agricultural Training, Manual Training, and Household Science 
teaching by conferring with the ratepayers and the township and county councils. 

It will hereafter be the duty of each Public and Separate School Inspector to inspect 
half-yearly the teaching of Agriculture and Horticulture in the schools of his inspector- 
ate, and to make a special report thereon to the Minister and the School Boards, on 
the form which has been supplied by the Department. This work he will perform either 
at his ordinary or at special visits, as he may find more convenient. 

In accordance with his promise in the same circular, the Minister now announces 
that in the case of schools which carry on throughout the school year the courses in 
Agriculture and Horticulture prescribed by the Regulations, he will make the Inspector 
an annual allowance of $6.00, payable in August, for each such school taught by a teacher 
with a certificate obtained on a Departmental examination in Agriculture and Horticul- 
ture, and of $4.00 for each such school taught, after 1915, by a Second Class teacher 
without the certificate in Agriculture and Horticulture, but with a knowledge of the 
subjects satisfactory to the Inspector, such payment being subject to the provision that 
the Inspector has performed satisfactorily to the Minister tjie duties prescribed above 
and in the Regulations. 

In order to satisfy himself in regard to the efficiency of the home projects, 
whether carried on partly under the guidance of the District Representative, or 
wholly under the supervision of the teacher the Inspector should require written 
reports from the teacher concerning each project, and he should make it his 
business to examine some of the pupils concerning individual projects. At each 
inspection he should see that the garden tools are properly cared for, and that the 
equipment has storeroom. Much of the success of the work in this regard will 
depend upon the attitude of the Inspector. Where school gardens are carried on 
it would be wise, as far as possible, to visit such schools either in spring or fall 
during the growing season. Of course if every school had a garden this would 
not be possible. At all events where a teacher is commencing the work it 
would be wise to keep in close touch with this teacher and this school until the 
work becomes established. Where a garden has made a good start and the school 
is in charge of a capable teacher one visit might be made during the growing season 
and the other in the winter time. By the exercise of some judgment this phase of 
the problem may be managed even if the number of schools be increased considerably. 

My duties do not include the direct supervision of Agriculture in the Public 
or Separate Schools. Notwithstanding this I should be glad to visit, in co-opera- 
tion with the Public or Separate School Inspectors as the case may be, as many such 
schools as time will permit. 

The following Public and Separate Schools were visited, some of them in com- 
pany with the Inspector: 

Ardtrea, Bethany, Blackstock, Guelph Separate School, Hampton, Janetville, 
No. 3 North Easthope, 'Orangeville, Orono, Smith's Falls Separate School, Stam- 
ford and Winchester. 

Of the above mentioned schools five (Orono, Hampton, Blackstock, Bethany 
and Janetville) are in the county of Durham in the Inspectorate of W. E. Tilley. 
Arrangements were made previously by the Inspector to visit these schools and hold 
meetings in these centres with the object of interesting teachers, trustees, parents 
and pupils in Agricultural education. Practically all the teachers of the rural 
schools were in attendance at one or other of the meetings and the turnout of 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 85 

trustees was very gratifying indeed, as all the rural schools were represented. The 
attendance at all the meetings was good and especially so at Hampton where the 
hall was filled. The places named above are merely hamlets in the county and 
many of those who attended had to drive ten miles over very badly drifted roads. 

In only one instance was there any objection offered to the introduction of 
Agriculture to the school programme. In this case the objection arose out of a 
misunderstanding which was easily explained away. The District Representative, 
Mr. Duncan, gave an address at each of two meetings — Orono and Bethany — on 
The School Fair. All the schools in Durham were organized for School Fairs 
in 1916. 

High Schools 

The following Collegiate Institutes, High Schools and Continuation Schools 
(Secondary Schools), were teaching Agriculture and qualifying for grants in 1915- : 
Clinton, Pieton, Smith's Falls and Vankleek Hill; Arthur, Bowmanville, Hagers- 
ville, Niagara Falls South, Oakville and Winchester; Cannington, Drayton, Exeter, 
New Liskeard and Ridgeway — 15 in all. These schools were' visited once during 
the fall term of 1915 and once again, during the spring term, of 1916 — 30 visits. 
During the fall term of 1916 the following schools were visited: Smith's Falls, 
Vankleek Hill, Niagara Falls South, Winchester, Cannington, New Liskeard and 
Ridgeway — 7 schools. 

The following schools commenced the work in September, 1916: Brockville, 
Renfrew, Geeorgetown, Essex, Kincardine and Whitby— 6 in all. Excepting Essex 
all these were visited during the fall term of 1916 — 5 1 visits, making a total number 
of visits to schools teaching Agriculture of 42. 

Owing to the enlistment in March of Mr. Butson who was teaching Agriculture 
in the Bowmanville High School, the subject was temporarily dropped because a 
teacher qualified for this work could not at the time be secured. This school 
carried on the work throughout the Lower and Middle Schools. The only other 
school attempting Middle School Agriculture is the Arthur High School. Both 
these schools have Upper School classes and most of the students in these classes 
have taken the advantage of the bonus privilege allowed for this subject and have 
used it with success for examination purposes. 

Whitby High School introduced Agriculture as a Department in September, 
1916, and has made a fair start. The School is located in an excellent farming 
district and has the advantage of the assistance freely given by Mr. Tipper, the 
District Representative of the Department of Agriculture, who is located at Whitby. 

It is proposed to visit the schools that are just commencing to teach Agriculture 
twice a year, and to visit those that have made a good beginning once a year. 
Because of the fact that the High School programmes are thought to be overcrowded, 
and that additional subjects are more or less of an added burden, not only to the 
staff, but also to the pupils, considerable sympathy and assistance are needed in 
order to give the subject a fair start. After a year or two it will be found that 
the subject can be adapted fairly well to even a crowded curriculum, and that 
many of the difficulties which loom up large at first will soon pass away. 

There are some 600 pupils receiving regular instruction in Agriculture in the 
secondary schools. The teachers^ are, for the greater part. Science Specialists who 
are well qualified to profit by the special courses of training in Agriculture re- 
quired for the Intermediate certificate, and also to ^ivo instruction in the subject. 



86 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

The course of study is well suited to both boys and girls, and from careful 
observations in this connection it is found that the girls not only take as great an 
interest in the work, but they also make progress equally satisfactory. In all the 
schools except one both girls and boys take the classes although the subject is 
optional. Niagara Falls South High School is the only one in which the classes 
are made up exclusively of boys. Domestic Science is also taken in this school and 
the programme is so arranged that Agriculture and Domestic Science come at the 
same hour. This arrangement is not made, it is understood, with the idea that 
Agriculture could not profitably be taken by the girls who take Domestic Science, but 
rather to meet the exigencies of the time-table. In view of the fact, however, that 
many of the girls now attending High Schools will, in the ordinary course of events, 
become teachers of rural schools where Agriculture is rapidly becoming established 
as a regular, though optional, subject, the need for some training along Agricultural 
lines is quite apparent. The period of adolescence of young women is really the 
High School period, and the influences of education stamp themselves with unusual 
permanence and power upon the mind at this stage of life, consequently, if Agri- 
cultural education is to make the maximum impression it must be taken at this 
time. 

Therefore, in order that the subject be made more effective in the rural school 
it should be a required part of the High School course at least for those who expect 
to become teachers in the Eural Schools. The vast majority of teachers of the rural 
schools are female teachers; hence the apparent necessity of having the High 
School programme so arranged that the girls may take the subject. It would be 
an improvement in many ways if Agriculture were obligatory for entrance to 
Normal Schools, for then in a few years all the incoming teachers would have had 
some training in Agriculture, even without the special courses offered, and would 
thus be able to manage classes and give instruction, with some measure of success, 
in Elementary Agriculture. Two other advantages stand forth as also quite 
apparent. (1) The two-year course, or four-year course of study of the subject in 
the High School would wield a powerful influence in shaping the attitude of the 
teacher towards rural life. (2) Very few lady teachers remain teachers all their 
lives. Sooner or later they " set up a smoke " for themselves and when they do the 
knowledge gained while studying Agriculture in the High School will, in nine 
cases out of ten, prove profitable and enjoyable. 

The following schools, not at the time taking Agriculture, were visited, nearly 
all by previous arrangements, with a view towards explaining the situation and dis- 
cussing with boards and teachers the conditions necessary to introduce and to main- 
tain the classes : 

Collegiate Institutes: Brantford, Napanee, Orillia, Ottawa, Peterborough, 
Renfrew, Ridgetown, Windsor; High Schools: Arnprior, Beamsville, Bracebridge, 
Dundalk, Durham, Essex, Leamington, Newburgh, Norwood, Orangeville, Port 
Elgin, Port Hope, Shelburne, Sydenham; Continuation Schools: Bath, Huntsville, 
Winona. 

The difficulties in the way of introducing Agricultural Classes into the Second- 
ary Schools, from the viewpoint of the principals and teachers of the schools are 
here indicated: (1) There is generally a too crowded programme in the Lower 
School. (2) Two hours a week implies four periods and this number does not 
lend itself to a convenient arrangement of the time programme. (3) Latin as a 
bonus subject has the advantage over Agriculture in that it leads to matriculation 
in the Middle School. (4) Art is fortified as a bonus in both the Middle and 



1916 DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 87 

Upper Schools because it is an obligatory course in the Lower School. (5) There 
are very few qualified teachers of Agriculture. 

All of these matters were discussed in detail with boards and teachers, and sug- 
gestions offered for a suitable arrangement. 

Almost without exception the principals of the different schools were favour- 
ably disposed towards Agriculture and seemed to realize its importance especially as 
a regular subject in the course for candidates for Normal Entrance and for a general 
education. 

The boards as a rule favoured the introduction of Classes in Agriculture and 
most of the individual members of boards were enthusiastic over the prospect. It 
should be mentioned that whether classes are organized or not will depend almost 
wholly upon the attitude of the principal of the school. No matter how favour- 
ably disposed towards the teaching of Agriculture the members of the board may 
be the matter is practically dependent upon the principal of the school and his 
staff of teachers. 

I would call attention especially to this one feature of the whole Agricultural 
problem, namely, the establishment of a good strong course in the Secondary 
Schools under well qualified teachers. This is the " King bolt " of the machine. 

Lower School Agriculture 

The Lower School Course of Study is fairly complete in itself, and is rounded 
out with a view to the probability that a large majority of the schools maintaining 
classes in Agriculture will take no more than this course. It is recognized that a 
considerable proportion of the students who enter the High Schools do not proceed 
further than the second year, and it is to this class of student that the work in 
Agriculture will appeal. In fact the High Schools should reach out for such 
students, especially from the country, and offer them a programme including Agri- 
culture. Fewer country boys and girls would then stop school when they pass the 
Entrance examination. The Lower School course covering two years would then 
meet the needs of the country pupils as it has never done before. We have blamed 
the country pupils for stopping school when they pass "the entrance," but the blame 
should be placed where it belongs, namely upon the school curriculum, and not 
upon the pupils. Where Agriculture has been introduced the results are already 
showing, although it will take time to change the views which people have inherited 
for generations regarding education. 

Our Colleges have been planned for the minority. They prepare pupils for the 
Professions. When Hawthorne graduated from College he wrote to his mother: 
"I cannot become a physician and live by men's diseases; I cannot be a lawyer 
and live by their quarrels; I cannot be a clergyman and live by their sins. I 
suppose there is nothing for me to do but write books." The majority, however, 
are not born with the silver spoon in the mouth, they have to earn a living. 
They are needed as farmers, mechanics and producers. On the tax bill or voter's 
list, when a man has no employment, when he cannot be classed as farmer, labourer, 
professional man, artisan or mechanic, he is classed as 1 a "gentleman." The idea 
back of this term is inherited from the past, and it was not conspicuously in the 
back-ground when college programmes were framed. The term is used probably for 
convenience largely, but there is hidden somewhere within it an idea that to work 
with one's hands in a regular systematic way, and make a living in so doing would 
put one in a class not under the heading "gentleman." Of course this idea is 
rapidily dying out, but it dies hard. 



88 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

The High School which provides a class in Agriculture in the Lower School 
is doing something to dignify in popular estimation, this important occupation. 
Though it may not be fitting pupils specially to become "gentlemen" in the term of 
the tax-bill, it is preparing them to a certain extent to occupy an important 
position in the community. Education dignifies any calling. Agriculture coupled 
up with the usual training afforded by the High School will stimulate the academic 
work, and it in turn will be stimulated thereby. 

It is not intended primarily to produce farmers by this training; nor is it 
expected that all those who have been brought up on the farm and take the course, 
will go back to the farm. The subject is placed on the programme as a part of the 
course of study suitable to a liberal education. It is suitable because it appeals to 
the pupil's experience. 

Home Projects are an essential feature of the High School course in Agri- 
culture, and in many cases with excellent results. Considerable latitude is allowed 
both teacher and pupil in making a selection. To carry out these projects with 
profit to the pupil, will require considerable individual instruction by the teacher 
and individual effort on the part of the pupil. From the very nature of the work, 
the pupil and teacher must become more intimately associated, and the pupil is 
sure to receive the individual inspiration, which to many people comes but once in 
life. The following Projects taken from Circular 13 (1) give a basis for selection. 



Suggested Home Projects for the Lower School 
On Gardening 1 

(1) To take charge of the home vegetable garden or part of it. 

(2) To establish, improve, or care for home lawns. 

(3) To grow one or more vegetables, such as tomatoes, beets, corn, beans for canning. 

(4) To grow one flower and one vegetable in a pupils' competition. 

(5) To set put and care for a strawberry, raspberry, or asparagus bed. 

(6) To set out and care for a row of currants or gooseberries. 

(7) To establish a perennial flower border. 

(8) To set out and train climbing rose, Boston ivy, or other climbers. 

(9) To test two varieties of a vegetable, such as arranged for by the Schools' 
Division of the Experimental Union. 

(10) To grow new kinds of vegetables. 

(11) To improve the back yard with grass plots, flower borders, and climbers on the 
fences. 

- (12) To establish a wild flower garden at home. 

On Pruit Growing-, Nursery "Work, etc. 

(1) To renovate an old orchard, or part of it. 

(2) To set out and care for one or more fruit trees or grapevines. 

(3) To care for one or more trees by pruning, scraping, spraying, and cultivating. 

(4) To experiment on thinning out fruit on heavily bearing tree. 

(5) To produce one's own fruit trees by raising seedlings and grafting on roots 
or budding. 

(6) To propagate currants, gooseberries and grape vines from cuttings. 

(7) To raise shade trees from seeds and nuts, e.g., horse-chestnuts, oaks, hickories, 
walnuts, maples, elms. 

(8) To propagate ornamental shrubbery, such as privet, bush hydrangea, roses, etc., 
from cuttings. 

(9) To buy ornamental shrubbery of one-year stock and care for ft in nursery lines 
until large enough to set out. 

(10) To get young evergreen and other tree seedlings from the woods and bring on 
in nursery lines to prepare for home plan-ting. 

(11) To get a colony of bees and learn to handle it. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 89 

On Production of Field Crops, Home Grown Seed, etc. 

(1) To compare thick and thin seeding of some common field crop. 

(2) To compare results from different dates of seeding. 

(3) To compare yields frpm same weights of large and small seed. 

(4) To compare yields resulting with different depths or different number of times 
of cultivation, say of corn. 

(5) To compare yields resulting from uses of different mixtures of chemical 
fertilizers. 

(6) To produce one's own mangel, turnip, or carrot seed. 

(7) To test and introduce a new variety of grain, alfalfa, clover, potato or other 
crop, such as recommended by the experimental stations. 

(8) To enter local competition in obtaining the best yields from one-tenth acre of 
corn, potatoes, turnips, etc. 

On Crop and Live Stock Improvement 

(1) Having joined the Canadian Seed Growers' Association, to commence practical 
seed selection and improvement. 

(2) To enter one of the Field Crop Competitions organized by the Ontario Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 

(3) To undertake one of the experiments offered by the Experimental Union, com- 
paring approved varieties of oats, barley, potatoes, etc. 

(4) To commence the selection of the best hills of potatoes, best heads of corn, best 
heads of oats and grow crops from these. 

(5) To purchase, plant, and care for choice seed from a leading seed grower for 
comparing with home-grown seed. 

(6) To secure eggs of some improved strain of poultry (e.g., O.A.C. Barred Rocks) 
and build up a pure flock. 

(7) Ta make individual milk tests for the home dairy herd in order to find out 
which cows are most valuable. 

On Farm Management and Improvement 

(1) To make a complete valuation of the farm and all its equipment, buildings, 
fences, drains, machinery, live stock, feed, fields and orchards. 

(2) To estimate the cost of producing the different crops grown, keeping accounts 
for each field. 

(3) To estimate the cost of raising pigs, chickens, cattle, sheep or horses. 

(4) To estimate the cost of producing milk and butter. 

(5) To carry out a system of book-keeping for the farm for a year. 

(6) To make a drainage survey of the farm with map showing location of old drains 
and new drains required. 

(7) To test a scheme of cultivation for the eradication of weed pest in a field. 

(8) To use split-log drag for improvement of roads about and on the farm. 

(9) To make a survey of the home woods, estimating the amount of mature or 
spoiling wood available for lumber or fire wood and making plans for restoration or 
improvement. 

(10) To conduct an experiment to find the results of following a system of rotation. 

On Farm Mechanics, Home Carpentry, etc. 

(1) To make utensils required on farm or in home, e.g., wood-box, book-shelf, milk- 
stool, saw-horse, poultry feed boxes, butter worker. 

(2) To put down cement sidewalks about home, making cement fence posts, water 
troughs, etc. 

(3) To use farmer's hand forge and learn to make simple blacksmithing repairs. 

(4) To build, repair, and readjust all farm gates. 

(5) To repair barns and sheds, replacing broken windows, floors, partitions, steps, 
etc. 

(6) To plan, make out bill for material, purchase, and build new poultry house, pig 
pen or shed. 

(7) To build in new ventilators in stables. 



<J0 THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 

One instance of a Home Project carried out in 1916, by a girl in the New 
Liskeard Continuation School, gives a good illustration of the nature of the work. 
But I wish to draw attention to the actual educational value of the study of those 
details necessary to the successful accomplishment of the" problem. The details 
were all associated, necessarily so of course, in such a way as to advance the student 
in other subjects: business management, elementary science, bookkeeping, etc. 
But after all the element of profit is one which gives an Agricultural cast to the 
Project that must appeal to all. 

" My home project was the raising of a colony of bees, and was decided on during 
the winter term of 1916. 

" As I did not know anything about raising bees, a good deal of reading was neces- 
sary and I found the O.A.C. bulletins on the subject very helpful; ' The A, B, C and 
X, Y, Z of Bee Culture/ by Root; ' The Honey Bee,' by Dadant, and ' Beekeeping,' by 
E. F. Phillips, gave many useful pointers as to general work of all seasons. 

" On February 22nd, 1916, I became a member of the Ontario Beekeepers' Associa- 
tion, and so received a monthly bee journal and reliable information as to crops, etc. 
Necessary bee supplies were then purchased from the Ham and Nott Supply Co. 

" On May 13th, 1916, one eight-frame Langstroth hive, containing colony of bees was 
purchased from a local beekeeper, and moved to summer stand in good condition, the 
queen having been introduced last fall. 

" First super was put on the colony May 24th, where the bees at once began to work. 

" On July 4th, at 11.50 a swarm issued and clustered on a small bush a few yards 
from the stand, and with the help of a girl friend, also inexperienced, they were hived. 
On the first day they drew out comb of four Hoffman frames, made wax for another and 
began work in the super. 

" On July 6th, 1916, I attended the demonstration held at the Rahn Bee and Honey 
Co.'s apiary, Haileybury. Mr. Rahn explained his method of raising queens and showed 
his special insulated hives, and many useful appliances — such as drone and queen traps 
and different types of feeders. He also explained his method of introducing queens." 

" Mr. Ager demonstrated many points in handling bees, and Dr. Sladen, Dominion 
Agriculturist of Ottawa, gave an address on the nectar producing plants of Northern 
Ontario, stating that the fireweed, alsike clover, Canada thistle and golden rod were the 
chief plants of importance. 

" On July 5th, 1916, I placed the second super on parent colony. On July 15th, 1916, 
an afterswarm issued from the parent colony, this was hived in a rough box, then I cut 
queen cells from parent colony, removed one frame of honey stores and returned the 
swarm July 22nd, 1916, first four sections of honey removed from parent colony, flavour 
and colour very good. 

"August 5th, 1916, first honey taken from swarm. 

" September 16th, 1916, last comb honey removed. 

" November 4th, 1916, bees were examined, and I found a good supply of brood has 
been reared and stores are plentiful. (During the whole season no feeding was done 
as bees stored sufficient.) 

" November 13th, 1916, the bees were put in the cellar with full width entrance 
space; this was screened with window screen wire so that bees cannot come out. The 
cellar was dark and well ventilated and the temperature was constant. This home 
project will be continued next year. 

" Results are: — 

(1) Some experience and pleasure. 

(2) 90 lbs. section and 10 lbs. extracted honey. (Net profit of $19.41.) 

(3) Two colonies of bees, in good condition. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



91 



Statement of Receipts and Expenditure for this home project: — 

Expenditure. 



1916. 
Month. Date. 
Feb. 22 — Ont. Beekeepers' Association membership fee 

1-f rame L. Hive 

1-frame Super 

2y 2 lbs. Med. Comb Foundation for section . . 

5 lbs. Brood 

" Beekeeping," by E. F. Phillips 

Bee-veil and smoker 

250 Sections in flat 

Postage and express 

May 13 — 1 8-frame L. Hive and bees 

July 1 — 7 Supers at 45 cents each 

Can of paint and Foundation wire 

1 Honey carrier with wire sides 



Total Expense 



$1 00 



12 18 



15 
6 50 
3 15 

90 

75 



$24 63 



Receipts and Estimated Value of Capital. 

Dec. — (Capital) — 2 colonies bees (parent colony and swarm) $13 00 

(Receipts)— 90 sections White Honey (75% No. 1) at 20 cents 18 00 

(Receipts) — 10 lbs. extracted honey (light), at 15 cents 1 50 

(Capital) — Stock supplies on hand, as supers, wax, tools, etc., at 10% 

depreciation t 11 54 

Total $44 04 

Expense 24 63 

Profit $19 41 

Winnifred Player. 

New Liskeard." 



Lower School Examination for Entrance into the Normal Schools and Faculties 

of Education, 1916 

AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 

Note. — Five questions will constitute a full paper. 

1. (a) Describe the two classes of poultry known as the Asiatic and the European. 
(&) Name the breeds belonging to each class. 

(c) Describe the process of hatching chicks with an incubator. 

2. (a) Give the life histories of any two of the following: — oyster-shell scale, tent 
caterpillar, codling moth. 

(&) Describe the spray-mixture used to combat successfully each of the three 
insects, respectively, and tell how and when it should be applied. 

3. (a) Show how the percentage of fat in milk may be accurately determined by the 
Babcock tester. 

(b) What is the chief use of this test? 

(c) How is milk pasteurized? 



4. It is required to build a concrete cylindrical silo with wall 1 foot thick, inside 
diameter 9 feet, and height 21 feet. How' many loads of gravel will be needed to build 
it, assuming that the cement and water occupy none of the space but enter the crevices 
of the gravel, and that the wagon box is 10 feet long, 3 feet wide, and 10 inches deep, 
inside measurements. 



93 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



5. (a) Indicate the points of contrast between a good dairy type and a good beef 
type of cattle. 

(ft) Name three breeds of cattle that are called beef breeds and four that are 
called dairy breeds. 

(c) Give the characteristics of each breed named. 

6. (a) Make a diagram showing the various parts of a bee-hive. 
(&) What is meant by (i) swarming, (ii) queen-excluder? 

(c) Indicate the chief functions of (i) the queen, (ii) the drone, (iii) the 
worker. 

7. (a) Point out the chief beneficial results to be derived from drainage of land. 
(&) What are the physical characteristics of soil which especially requires tile- 
drainage? 

(c) Describe the tile, and one good method of laying it. 



Middle School Agriculture 

Two High Schools — Arthur and Bowman ville — have undertaken and have 
carried on successfully all of the Middle School course in Agriculture. As is the 
case in the Lower School, this is a bonus subject which may be used, under certain 
conditions, in the Departmental Examination for Normal Entrance. It is not 
recognized at all in Matriculation. Latin may also be used as a bonus subject 
for Normal Entrance, and in addition it is accepted for Matriculation. As com- 
pared with Agriculture, Latin has, therefore, a great advantage, because many 
students, though taking the Normal Entrance course, wish to take the Latin, so 
as to have it count towards Matriculation, and thus take really two examinations 
at once. As two bonus subjects are not allowed at one examination, Agriculture 
cannot therefore be counted. Art may also be taken as a bonus subject for Normal 
Entrance. This, too, has an advantage over Agriculture, because Art is compulsory 
in the Lower School as part of the Normal Entrance course, while Agriculture is 
not; therefore all students who take part I of the Normal Entrance course while 
in the Lower School, 'are eligible and competent to take the Art of the Middle 
School, whereas, with regard to Agriculture, only those who have elected the 
subject in the Lower School may take it in the Middle School. Aside from the 
pure love of the subject there is, therefore, no inducement to the student to take it 
in the Middle School. 

If the regulations respecting the requirements for a course of study were 
amended so as to place the Physics, Chemistry, and Agriculture of the Middle 
School in a group, giving the student permission to present any two for either 
Normal Entrance with Matriculation, or for Normal Entrance alone, there would 
be no difficulty in securing classes in this subject for the Middle School. In fact, as 
soon as qualified teachers are available, Agriculture might well be made obligatory 
on all students taking the teachers' course. This might raise the question as to whether 
the large city Collegiate Institutes could carry on the work, and also as to whether 
there ought not to be two kinds of teachers' certificates, the one applying to city 
schools, and the other to rural schools. In fact, we may yet reach the stage where 
certain Normal Schools shall be especially fitted to train teachers for rural schools 
and others for city schools. 

The need for Agriculture as an essential part of the Course of Study for 
those who expect to teach in the rural schools requires little argument. To convince 
of the desirability of the subject as one of the list for Matriculation may, however, 
not be so easy. It is recognized by those who have had to do with the teaching of 
College students that it is not the list of subjects which the Matriculant presents for 
admission to the University, which ensures success afterwards in his college course, 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 93 

but ratheT the methods of study which the student has pursued, and the training 
given him by his instructor. It is more a problem of method than one of matter; 
more how than what. What the college professor wants is an unspoiled freshman, 
who has been trained to think, and not the matured pedant, who has an over- 
whelming regard for the importance of the smattering he has in a long list of 
subjects written large on his matriculation certificate. As a subject requiring 
thought and judgment, Agriculture, in comparison with any other on the curri- 
culum, can hold its own. It needs no apology. There is no subject so frequently 
requiring the application of that quality which comes under the term "gumption." 
If this is a desirable quality to develop, then Agriculture should have a place on 
the programme for college entrance. Boys brought up on the farm have abundantly 
held their own in the halls of learning, and it may be partly due to the training 
of the senses which they have had under the blue sky and in the green lanes and 
fields on the farm. They have also measured well up in a college course of study, 
tending more to gentility than to the sweat of the brow. Agriculture has to do 
with the training of the senses in a greater degree, perhaps, than has any other 
subject, and therefore might fairly lay claim to a place as an elective on a Matri- 
culation programme. 

Middle School Physics is not particularly productive of good results, especially 
for girls in this class. Some of them manage to pass the examinations, but the 
work is perfunctory because it is beyond the sphere of their experience. Especially 
for teachers, and for those who are not mechanically inclined, Agriculture has as 
many merits educationally, and is of as much importance practically as Middle 
School Physics. Elementary Physics is always interesting and worthy of a place 
on the programme, but this is cared for in the Lower School, and if the Lower 
School Physics were the only Physics which Matriculation students were required 
to take they would be at no disadvantage in their future college career. Some of 
the classes in Physics, which the student takes in his college course, are but a 
repetition of that covered in the Middle School of his High School Course. In 
fact it could scarcely be otherwise, because the High School course in Physics covers 
practically everything under the sun, — Heat, Light, Sound, Electricity, Magnetism, 
Properties of Matter and some Mechanics. 



Middle School Examination for Entrance into the Normal Schools, 1916 

AGRICULTURE AND HORTICULTURE 



FIRST PAPER 



1. (a) Outline the life history of any one of the following: — wheat rust, corn smut, 
black knot. 

(6) Point out the best method of controlling each of these three diseases, 
(c) State the composition of Bordeaux mixture and describe the method of 
making and applying it. 

2. Give, with drawings, the life histories of any two of the following: — codling 
moth, cabbage butterfly, buffalo moth, June bug. 

3. (a) Describe the work of the nodule-forming organisms which live in the roots 
of certain leguminous plants. 

(5) Discuss the relation of these organisms to soil fertility. 

4. (a) Give, as applied to bee-keeping, the meaning of the terms (i) swarming, (ii) 
^queen-excluder, (iii) foul brood, (iv) foundation, (v) royal jelly. 

(6) Outline the life history of the queen. 



94 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

5^ (a) Name the chemical elements necessary to plant life. 
(6) From what chemical compounds are these derived? 

(c) What is the special need for artificial fertilizers, and what are the three 
elements that such fertilizers are specially designed to supply? 

6. (a) Describe the following kinds of soil: — alluvial soil, clay loam, sandy loam. 
(6) What is meant by (i) mulching, (ii) dry farming, (iii) leaching? 

SECOND PAPER 

1. Describe the Babcock test for butter fat in cream. Give reasons for each step of 
the process. 

2. Give the characteristics of each of the two chief types of swine, and name two 
breeds belonging to each type. 

3. (a) Point out the characteristic features of any two of the following breeds of 
Bheep:— Cotswold, Merino, Oxford Down, Dorset, Leicester. 

(&) Point out the chief advantages and disadvantages of raising sheep on an 
ordinary Ontario farm with good land. 

(c) Give a short description of a farm which would be especially adapted to the 
raising of sheep. 

4. Discuss " rotation of crops " and its value to the farmer. Plan, giving reasons, 
a four-year rotation. 

5. (c) What is meant by (i) pedigreed stock, (ii) herd book? 

(&) What advantages may be derived from the use of pedigreed cattle as com- 
pared^ with grade cattle? 

6. (a) Discuss ihe advantages and disadvantages of Statute Labour as a method 
of securing good roads. 

(o) Give an account of the methods and aims of either of the following: — 
(i) The Egg Circle, 
(ii) The Beef Ring. 

7. (a) What are the advantages and disadvantages of a market in a small town 
(i) to "the town itself, (ii) to the surrounding country? 

(&) In a town without a market what inducements might be held out to the 
farmer to secure his trade? 

The Training of Teachers 

In order to qualify to teach Agriculture in the High Schools, Collegiate 
Institutes, or Continuation Schools, the teacher must hold an Intermediate 
Certificate in Agriculture. This certificate is obtained on the completion of the 
Summer Course covering two consecutive summers at the Ontario Agricultural 
College, Guelph. To enter this course the applicant must hold a teacher's certi- 
ficate qualifying him to teach Science in such a school, and should have had — 
though this is not essential — experience in teaching. This course runs concurrently 
with the course leading to an Elementary Certificate in Agriculture, and is adapted, 
as far as possible, to the needs of the High School teacher. 

It was begun in 1913, with an attendance of 23. The following, so far, have 
been granted certificates: 

1914. 

John A. Bell. Alex. R. McRitchie, B.A. 

Geo. A. Campbell. Alex. Pearson, B.A. 

Geo. A. Clark. Edmund Pubsley, B.A. 

J. B. Dandeno, A.M., Ph.D. Fred. .Sine, M.A., B.'Sc. 

James L. Mitchener, B.A. Arthur M. Woodley. 

Wm. J. Morrison, B.A. Wm. B. Wyndham, B.A. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 95 

1915. 

Wm. Bowden. John P. Hume, B.A. 

Wm. G. Butson. John A. Macdonald. 

Edward J. Corkhill, B.A. Geo. 0. McMillan, M.A., B.Psed. 

Robt. W. Fleming. Muriel A. Shook. 

Ohas. S. Gulston. Geo. B. Spark, B.A. 

1916. 

John G. Adams, B.A. Hugh «H. Graham, B.A. 

Edwin T. Bell, B.A. Hugh J. Haviland, B.A. 

Geo. W. Bunton, B.A. Gideon A. Miller, M.A. 

Geo. E. Copeland. W. A. Porter. 

Isabella E. T>obbie. Walter E. Shales, M.A. 

Wm. Donaldson, B.A. Daniel E. Smith, B.A. 

Clarence Elliott. Christopher 'Summers. 
F. V. Elliott. 

Under an arrangement made in 1912, the Ontario Agricultural College, the 
Department of Education, and the Universities of the Province, provided a Course 
of Study leading to the Degree of B.Sc. in Agr. It is intended that, to a large 
extent, the teachers of Agriculture in the Secondary Schools of Ontario should 
be the holders of this degree. (See Syllabus of the Courses and Examinations, 
circular 47 A. Sept., 1912; pages 3, 4, 5, 6.) 

Up to the present one man has received this Degree, — F. E. Foulds, in 1916. 
One man entered the third year of the Course in Sept., 1915. He enlisted in 
March, 1916, but was awarded his year. Mr. Foulds has also enlisted. So far, 
therefore, no teacher taking this course is available or in sight. Whether the course 
will, in the near future, become popular is very much in doubt, although, with the 
financial assistance offered during the course, and with the scope of privileges 
allowed in the teaching profession, it might be thought to be a very attractive course. 

Those who hold Intermediate Certificates in Agriculture are somewhat uneasy 
with respect to the permanency of their certificates in view of the following 
regulation : — 

"Until teachers with the qualifications prescribed in Regulation 7 (1) (a) 
(B.Sc. in Agr.) above are available, the Minister will accept the following as 
qualifications for the work in the Agricultural subjects of the Agricultural 
Department. 

(a) The Degree of B.S.A., with a Second Class Certificate. 

(b) An Intermediate Certificate in Agriculture. 

(c) A certificate of having completed the first course for an Intermediate 
certificate, with an undertaking by the holder thereof to complete the second 
course in the following year." 

It might be a good move to permit the holders of Intermediate certificates in 
Agriculture to become Specialists in Science and Agriculture providing they have 
(1) five years' experience in teaching, (2) a Degree in Arts, (3) a Science 
Specialist's certificate, and (4) that they have completed successfully a third 
summer session at the Ontario Agriculture College. And in order to keep up the 
supply of available teachers in Agriculture I should recommend that the holder 
of an Intermediate Certificate in Agriculture, who has five years' successful 
experience in teaching the subject in a High School, Collegiate Institute or Con- 
tinuation School, shall be granted a permanent certificate to teach Agriculture in 
any of these schools. 



96 THE KEPOBT OF THE No. 17 

Improved Accommodations 

From time to time new school buildings are required for both primary and 
secondary schools, and in order to make the most of the opportunity when a new 
building is to be located, there should be an architect who is expert in school struc- 
tures, and under the control of the Department of Education, and who would be 
available when required. Class rooms suitable for teaching Agriculture are not now 
a part of the accommodations, but when new schools are to be constructed this 
matter should have consideration. 

Two High School buildings have recently been burned down and now is the 
time to consider the matter of class rooms in such schools for the future. 

Eural schools are requiring new buildings constantly, but rural Boards of 
trustees have little or no knowledge of such matters. Problems of lighting, heating, 
ventilation and equipment are unfamiliar to them. If an expert were at the disposal 
of the Department of Education to plan, discuss and advise with boards, a new 
period of school building with standard requirements would be commenced. 

An expert would save the country many thousands annually, and what is still 
more important healthful and comfortable accommodation for pupils would be 
ensured. 

Consolidated schools will develop, though perhaps slowly, in Ontario, and ex- 
pert information will be required in regard to building accommodation. A pro- 
position is on foot now in Dufferin County for a consolidated school. If an expert 
were at hand valuable information would soon be available for those Boards of 
trustees concerned, enabling them to see the advantages of a modern building and 
to know the cost. 

The cost of maintaining such an expert might be borne by the Boards and the 
Department of Education under an arrangement economical to both. 

I earnestly recommend that such an expert be appointed and that he be easily 
available by the Inspectors of both primary and secondary schools. 

Normal Schools 

The Normal Schools have recently strengthened the Course of Study in Agri- 
culture and Horticulture by giving more time on the programme for this work, by 
adding equipment especially suitable for demonstration and for laboratory opera- 
tions, and by enlarging the grounds to be devoted to school gardens. Much remains 
yet to be done in the matter of providing equipment and laboratory facilities for 
individual work. The class-rooms which have been used in the past for Science 
classes, though useful for much of the work in Agriculture, are not altogether 
sufficient. When greenhouses are provided this situation will be very materially 
improved. 

For many years to come the burden of the work, both professional and non- 
professional, of instruction to Second Class teachers will fall upon the Normal 
Schools, consequently provision should be made for individual laboratory work in 
smaller groups with suitable equipment and in suitable class-rooms. 

In former years, even when the Normal School course occupied but a half 
year, a considerable amount of time was wasted in attempting instruction in non- 
professional subjects having little or no bearing upon the teacher's work thereafter 
in his own school. That may not be the case now, but it seems strange that time 
is still set apart for the non-professional phase of such subjects as Elementary 
Science, Algebra, Geometry, History, Literature, etc. These subjects are all 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 97 

taught — and well taught — in the High School course; therefore one might reason- 
ably suppose that the academic feature need not be included in the Normal School 
programme. Not so, however, with Agriculture, because it is not taken at all, with 
the exception of one school, in the Middle School of the High School course, and is 
not a required subject for " Normal Entrance/' After the subject is made obliga- 
tory for Entrance to Normal Schools then the time could be lessened, and only the 
professional features given attention to. 

The School Garden for Normal Schools 

The garden problem is one which has several difficulties, and those concerned 
with the actual work of teaching and of arranging a programme for classes in the 
Normal Schools which will fit in with the regular programme of studies in other 
subjects have a heavy task. The Normal School garden will always be subject 
to public criticism not always considerate and fair. The biggest fish are not 
necessarily caught with the finest looking fishing rod and tackle, nor is the showiest 
school garden necessarily indicative of the best results. It is generally the opposite 
and is often made without knowledge or judgment. " Patience and Perseverance " 
should be the motto on the " wall n of the garden. 

An arrangement is being made with Model Schools in connection with the 
older Normal Schools and with certain city schools located near the other Normal 
Schools, whereby class work will be done under the direction of a trained teacher 
of the Model (or city) school staff with his own pupils under the observation of the 
Normal School students. Under such an arrangement the teachers in training 
will receive what might be called professional instruction, and in the garden they 
will also receive some instruction in such Agricultural operations as have to do 
with the soils. The garden should be used as a sort of laboratory for the study of 
crops and soils especially during the season when outdoor work is possible. During 
the winter season the greenhouse should be used, and it must not be forgotten that 
this portion of the Normal School term forms a large proportion of the time. 

All the Normal Schools — Toronto, Ottawa, London, Hamilton, Peterborough, 
Stratford, and North Bay, were visited once in the fall term of 1915 and once 
during the fall term of 1916. 

The number of young men in attendance is not large, forming only about ten 
or fifteen per cent, of the total and this small proportion has become considerably 
less on account of the war. This has some direct bearing upon the promotion of 
Agriculture because the idea is as yet quite prevalent that Agriculture is a man's 
job, and the best results will not be attained unless the Agricultural classes are in 
charge of male teachers. Whether this is a correct view is not the chief concern 
now. The main point is that the lady teacher is a fact and is in charge. The 
situation, as it is, must be met, and so far the prospect is far from gloomy. It is 
even hopeful. Lady teachers of the right sort, w r ho have had some training in 
Agriculture, are not only carrying on the work but are, in many instances, making 
a brilliant success of it. 

After all there is no good reason why outdoor work, such as gardening, fruit 
growing, poultry keeping, dairying, beekeeping and the like, should not fall within 
the ambitions of a lady as much as factory work, counter work in a large depart- 
mental store, or even the making of munitions. The outdoor labour involved in 
farming is less monotonous and more healthful than the indoor work of factory or 
7 e. 



98 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

office. Farming is, no doubt, hard work, but, with modern appliances and manage- 
ment, and with a suitable subdivision of the several phases of Agriculture, it is not 
necessarily so. 

The training of teachers for Agriculture, therefore, in the Normal Schools may 
be regarded to a certain extent as a training of young women towards independence. 
When such teachers become managers of their own homes, as most of them will in 
the natural course of events, the training received and the knowledge gained in 
the subjects of Agriculture and Horticulture will then, in a great many cases, prove 
useful in the way of increasing their income, and also in the enlarged scope for 
enjoyment of life. 

The Course of Study in Agriculture is not yet all that could be desired as 
some important topics are omitted, but the list cannot include all the topics within 
the range of Agriculture and must end somewhere. Beekeeping might be on the 
list and more work in soils, fertilizers, insecticides and fungicides, but it is not 
the intention to require the teacher of Agriculture to follow out slavishly any set 
programme. He is given a fairly free hand, within reasonable limits, to map out 
his work so as to produce the best results. 

COURSE OF STUDY 
Agriculture and Horticulture 

The special object of the course in Agriculture is to prepare the teacher-in- 
training to train his pupils for the occupations of the farm and to broaden and 
deepen their sympathies with nature and rural life. 

. The course includes the following topics: 

Dairying: Care of milk and butter; Pasteurization, churning, separating; the 
use of the Babcock test and the lactometer. 

Poultry: Utility breeds; care of poultry; care, shipping, and marketing of 
eggs. 

Field Crops : Identification of seeds ; seed testing ; corn judging ; seed selection ; 
cover crops ; weed-seed impurities ; simple classification of soils ; principles and plans 
of drainage. 

Horticulture: Pruning; spraying; grafting; packing and shipping fruit; care 
of garden and house plants; making of hot-bed. 

Birds and Insects: Those of the most importance in their relation to 
Agriculture. 

Experimental Plots : Preparation and planting to illustrate the benefits of seed 
selection; the rotation of crops; growing improved oats, barley, alfalfa. 

School Gardens: The purpose of school gardens; the relation to nature study, 
agriculture, and horticulture; planning and plotting school gardens; work in the 
school garden by the teachers-in-training; observation and supervision of the work 
done by the pupils of the urban and rural Model Schools; care of the pupils' school 
gardens during the summer vacation; care of tools and machinery. 

School Grounds: Planning; planting of trees, shrubs, and ornamental plants. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 99 

Home Projects: Direction of pupils' home work; inspection of records in pupilsV 
note-books; inspection of home work by teachers. 

The average number of periods per week, including both the academic work 
and the methodology, shall be as nearly as practicable IV2 periods (40 minutes) 
per week throughout the session. 

The final standing of the teacher-in-training shall be determined by the staff 
on the combined results of his sessional records and the final examination. The 
maximum percentage shall be 50 for the sessional work and 50 for the final ex- 
amination. 

Books of Eeference : — 

Waters: The Essentials of Agriculture, 

Warren : Elements of Agriculture. 

Burkett, Stevens and Hill : Agriculture for Beginners. 

Instruction. — By special arrangement with the publishers, teachers-in-training may 
obtain at the Normal School copies of The Essentials of Agriculture at a reduced cost. 
The Principal will make an announcement on the subject as soon as the school opens. 

SUMMER COURSES 

Some years ago an arrangement was made between the Department of Educa- 
tion and the Ontario Agricultural College which provided for a spring course of 
ten weeks and also for a course covering two consecutive summer sessions of five 
weeks each. These were intended for teachers who expected to teach Agriculture 
in schools of Ontario. In 1914 the spring course was discontinued and now the 
courses are all offered during the summer vacation at a time when those who are 
engaged in teaching are free to attend. 

If a sufficient number of duly qualified teachers apply for admission the following 
courses will be provided by the Department of Education in co-operation with the 
Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph, leading to certificates as follows: 

(a) In Elementary Agriculture and Horticulture. 

(&) Intermediate certificates in Agriculture. 

(c) Certificates in Agriculture for teachers of Household Science. 

(d) Certificates in Farm Mechanics. 

All of the work pertaining to the above mentioned certificates is given at the Ontario 
Agricultural College, Guelph. 

So far no candidates have applied for either the course in Farm Mechanics or that 
for the Agricultural and Household Science teachers. These two courses are expected 
to be given to teachers engaged to teach in schools having departments in these subjects. 
In 1917 there will be at least two such schools. 

Qualifications for Admission 

The following are the qualifications for admission to the different courses, but a 
student whose attendance, conduct, or sessional work is unsatisfactory to the principal 
may be dismissed from the course at any stage: 

For the Intermediate Certificate in Agriculture 

(1) (a) To the course for the Intermediate certificate in Agriculture may be 
admitted applicants who hold professional certificates qualifying them to teach in High 
or Continuation Schools and whose academic preparation has fitted them to teach Science 
therein. 

For the Elementary Certificate in Agriculture 

(fc) To the course leading to an Elementary Certificate in Agriculture may be 
admitted applicants who hold professional certificates qualifying them to teach in the 
schools of the Provincial system. 



100 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



For the Certificate in Agriculture for Teachers of Household Science 

(c) To the special course in Agriculture may be admitted teachers who hold at least 
Ordinary certificates in Household Science. 

For the Certificates in Farm Mechanics 

(d) To the special course in Farm Mechanics may be admitted teachers who hold 
at least High iSchool Assistants' or First Class certificates. 

Applications for admission should be made to the Deputy Minister of Education, 
Toronto. 

Registration 

All applicants shall present themselves for registration not later than the first day 
of the session. 

Tuition Fee 

(1) All students duly admitted to a course under one of the provisions of Regulation 
4 (1) above, who are actually and regularly engaged as teachers in the schools of the 
Provincial system, will be exempt from the payment of tuition fees. 

(2) Other students duly admitted to a course under Regulation 4 (2) above shall 
each pay to the Principal on registration a tuition fee of $10. 

Allowances 

I. Agricultural Courses 

(1) (a) The travelling expenses as defined in Regulation (3) (a) below, and in 
addition the sum of $20, being an allowance for the cost of board and lodging during 
the preceding Summer Session, will be paid to any teacher who satisfactorily completed 
a summer course leading to a certificate in Agriculture, on the report of the Inspector 
concerned that instruction in Agriculture, as prescribed by the Regulations, has been 
given by said teacher in his school throughout the school year following the course. 

(&) No allowance for travelling expenses or for board and lodging will be made to 
students who reside in Guelph, or who live three miles or less therefrom. 

(2) Application for the above allowances shall be made to the Deputy Minister of 
Education on any day in June of the year following the course at the Agricultural 
College, with receipts showing expenditures for travelling expenses, in the case of 
teachers of Public and Separate Schools, through the Inspector concerned, and in the 
case of teachers of High Schools or Continuation Schools directly to the Deputy Minister 
of Education. 

(3) (a) The travelling expenses shall be those actually incurred by the teacher 
from and to his home or school as the Principal of the Summer School may report. No 
allowance will be made for meals, Pullman car seats, berths, or baggage transfers. 

(&) In order to secure the allowance for tran veiling expenses provided for above, 
each student shall obtain from the ticket agent a standard certificate or a receipt for 
fare paid by boat or railway on the purchase of one first-class fare to Guelph, as the same 
may be. This certificate the student shall deposit with the Principal on registration. 

Instruction. — The Principal of the iSummer School shall, on receipt thereof, forward 
the railway certificates or receipts to the Department of Education, together with a 
certified list of the students and the points from which transportation expenses are 
claimed. These certificates, after being recorded, will be returned to the Principal 
before the close of the session. 

II. Other Courses 

(4) The tuition fee will be returned to any teacher who paid the said fee under the 
provisions of Regulation 7' (2) above, who satisfactorily completed a summer course 
leading to a certificate, who has taught the subject of said certificate throughout the 
school year following in one of the schools of the Provincial system, and who makes 
application for the return of said fee at the time and in the manner prescribed in (2) 
above. 

Board and Lodging: 

9. (1) (a) Students who are admitted to the courses at the Agricultural College 
may obtain board and lodging in the College at Macdonald Hall for $20 for the course. 

f&l Application for rooms must be made on or before June 15th. Each application 
must be accompanied by $5.00, which will be allowed on the board bill or will be returned 
in the case of illness or other unavoidable cause of absence. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 101 

(c) Rooms will be reserved in the order in which the applications therefor are 
received, and on the acceptance of the application a list will be sent of the necessary 
equipment and of the rules of residence. 

(d) Teachers are advised to avail themselves of the opportunity of boarding in 
residence at the Agricultural College, as it will be found that association with other 
teachers from all over the Province is not the least valuable part of the course. More- 
over, such residence will enable them to take full advantage of the evening lectures, 
evening work in the gardens, etc. 

Certificates 

15. — (1) The professional certificates granted by the Department of Education on 
the examinations will be Interim and valid for two years from the date of issue and 
renewable under conditions satisfactory to the Minister, provided the holder is otherwise 
qualified to teach in the Provincial Schools. 

(3) On application to the Deputy Minister, Interim certificates will be made 
Permanent on the report of the Inspector or Inspectors concerned that the holder of 
such certificate has taught successfully the subjects thereof for at least two years in one 
or more of the Schools of the Provincial System. 

The courses for Public School teachers were organized in 1911 and those for 
High School teachers in 1913. Each of these two courses consists of two parts 
covered in consecutive years and each session of this two-year course extends through 
a period of five weeks. The classes are carried on at the Ontario Agricultural 
College under the control and direction of the Department of Education. 

The chief aim is to prepare teachers to give instruction in Elementary Agri- 
culture in the schools o£ Ontario. Our system of education in Ontario has been, 
for several years, undergoing important changes, not only in subject matter, but 
also in method and in viewpoint. Book study has its place, but its place is not the 
whole field. The introduction of Natural Science into the schools has had much to 
do with the change in method, and it has had something to do also with the changed 
attitude toward the actual subject matter. When so many people are directly and 
indirectly concerned with Agriculture, in one way or another, it is reasonable to 
suppose that a system of education in any country would not be complete without a 
place for Agriculture. It may be a slow process to engraft the subject permanently 
into the curriculum of the schools of Ontario, but it is the aim of the Department 
of Education to do so as rapidly as public opinion will permit. 

In order to make the instruction effective it is necessary to give pupils some 
practical exercises and demonstrations to illustrate the principles involved. The 
school garden can be used with advantage for this purpose, and it is expected that a 
properly managed school garden will take the place, to some extent, of a sort of 
laboratory, contributing to the advancement of the class instruction. 

At the College, during the first year of the Elementary classes, instruction and 
practice are given in this subject. The gardens of the Macdonald School are made 
use of under an arrangement with the trustees of the school and the Horticulture 
Department of the College. This arrangement provides practice in attending a 
garden which has had a good start as well as practice in planting a garden. 

It is expected that when teachers receive this training they will be able to 
manage gardens in their own schools. From year to year the number of schools 
is increased, and it is to be hoped that eventually all the public schools will bd 
equipped with some sort of a garden. 

The courses of training are necessarily short, but, as time goes on, and the 
subject is taken regularly in the High School, these short courses can become much 
more effective, for the work can then be more advanced, and the standard raised. 
At the present time there are about five hundred pupils taking the work in the 
High Schools and the number is rapidly increasing. 



102 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



The High School teachers are, for the most part, science specialists and well 
qualified to profit to the utmost by the instruction they receive in Agriculture. 
They are all trained teachers and know how to make the most of the time and 
opportunity. 

Owing to the fact that at present the subject has no standing as a matriculation 
subject, and is not required in the High Schools, its introduction will be necessarily 
very slow. There is no valid reason why Agriculture should not have consideration 
in the same way as other subjects on the examination scheme. 

Outdoor Exercises 

It very frequently happens that teachers, especially female teachers, fail in 
health and soon wear out. This is doubtless due in part to the indoor life which 
they live, and to the ordinary worry of school discipline and school work. Realiz- 
ing this, provision is made during the summer courses at the Ontario Agricultural 
College for regular outdoor sports. This is easily worked out here because practi- 
cally all the students board and room on the campus, and it is a simple matter for 
the students to assemble for outdoor games every evening. I am convinced that 
the health of the Summer School students is improved during these five weeks, not- 
withstanding the fact that serious study is carried on at the same time. But the 
chief advantage of this feature of the course is the results produced on both teacher 
and pupils after the teacher returns to the school. New games are learned and 
practiced, and the teachers have a splendid opportunity to become acquainted with 
one another. In all' my experience I have seen no place so well suited to a work of 
this kind as the Ontario Agricultural College. 

Summary of the Attendance 





Elementary 


Intermediate 




Year 


Part I 


Part II. 


Part I 


Part II. 


Total 




Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 




1911.. 
1912.. 
1913.. 
1914.. 
1915.. 
1916.. 


8 

16 
14 

8 

15 
11 


75 
65 
64 
55 
39 
99 


1 

2 
5 
5 
5 
9 


16 
23 
36 
27 
18 
31 


*23 
13 
17 
15 


4 
4 
1 
3 


14 

9 

14 


1 
1 


100 
106 
146 
126 
105 
183 



During the course in 1916 two interesting evening addresses were given to the 
students, one by Dr. Mills, former president of the College, and the other by Mr. 
Saunders, a bird student of London, Ont. Both these addresses were thoroughly 
enjoyed and appreciated by the students. Dr. Mills called attention in his address 
to three somewhat neglected phases of public school education — manners, slang and 
lack of respect for older folk. 

One afternoon was used entirely for games and sports as a sort of Field Day, 
and this is no unimportant feature of the regular work. 

* Seven of these were teachers from the Normal Schools. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 103 



APPENDIX F 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES, LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC 
INSTITUTIONS, ETC. 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

To the Honourable R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., M.P.P., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the work of your 
Public Libraries Branch for 1916, and the statistics, etc., of the Public Libraries 
of the Province for 1915, also a statement of the grants paid in 1916 to Public 
Libraries, and to Historical, Literary and Scientific Societies. 

First, permit me to express my appreciation of the encouragement accorded 
me and the sympathy shown toward the further development of the public library 
movement by yourself and the Deputy Minister during my first year as Inspector 
of Public Libraries. I wish to acknowledge the loyal spirit in which I have been 
assisted by the members of the staff of the Branch ; they have been faithful to their 
duties, and the year's work with them has been decidedly pleasant. 

I desire to record my gratitude to Mr. George H. Locke, Chief Librarian of the 
Toronto Public Library, for assistance given in connection with the library training- 
school. Mr. Locke and several members of his staff showed a splendid spirit of co- 
operation, and did all in their power to make the school a success. 

My thanks are due to the following librarians, library trustees and friends 
of the library cause for assistance in library institute work, the library school, and 
the Ontario Library Review: Dr. E. A. Hardy, Toronto; Mr. David Williams, 
Collingwood; Mr. J. Davis Barnett, Stratford; Mr. W. J. Sykes, Ottawa; the late 
Dr. C. C. James; Miss M. J. L. Black, Fort William; Mr. E. S. Caswell, Toronto; 
Mr. Fred. Landon, London; Miss Winifred Barnstead, Toronto; Miss Lillian 
Smith, Toronto; Miss Gertrude Boyle, Toronto; Miss Marion H. Baxter, London; 
Mr. H. B. Witton, Hamilton; Mr. Adam Hunter, Hamilton; Miss Caroline Wilson, 
Hamilton; Miss Norah Thomson, Owen Sound; Mr. Edgar M. Zavitz, Coldstream; 
Rev. Fr. Foley, London; Miss Marjorie Flanders, London; Miss Louise Gahan, 
London; Dr. H. W. Hill, London; and to the chiefs of departments and other 
assistants in the Toronto Public Library. 

I am pleased to report notable progress for the year in the free public libraries 
of the Province. The association libraries as a whole have not been advancing, but 
I hope to note an improvement as soon as the results of 1916 are obtainable. The 
internal work of the Branch has been attended to with promptness and satisfaction. 
The Legislative grants payable in 1916 were paid early in the year to all libraries 
with the exception of those that did not comply with the regulations. 

The features of the year's work that are worthy of special note are the pub- 
lication of the new quarterly, the Ontario Library Review and Boole-Selection Guide, 
the Short Course Library Training School, the book-selection institutes, and 
thorough library inspection. The phase of library work that received special 



104 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 17 

emphasis through the institutes and Review was book-selection, and I hope to hear 
of good results from this special effort. Comments on various matters that have 
received, and are receiving, special attention follow: 

The Public Libraries in War Time 

You will be pleased to hear that the Public Libraries of the Province have 
increased their expenditures by more than $100,000 since the last year before the 
war, and they have earned an increase of about ten per cent, in Legislative grants. 
The number of books read from public libraries by the people of Ontario shows an 
increase of nearly one and one-half million over the year 1913 — an increase of 
about one-third. The librarians state that while " light " literature is nearly as 
popular as ever, there is a noticeable increase in the reading of more serious books. 
It is a matter of congratulation that, notwithstanding the increased taxation 
necessitated by pressing demands and large personal subscriptions for Patriotic and 
Red Cross purposes, the people of Ontario have increased their expenditures for 
library books by nearly twenty per cent. People should read, and there are but two 
ways of securing reading matter, one by individual purchase, the other by co- 
operative purchase. The individual gets more for his money by the co-operative 
plan, and by purchasing in this way his power to meet other obligations is in- 
creased. The public library is being looked upon more and more as an educational 
force, and it would appear that the increase of expenditure, and more than corre- 
sponding increase in the patronage of the libraries, bear an eloquent tribute to the 
increasing confidence that is growing in favour of free libraries. 

Library Inspection 

Since my appointment in April I have inspected carefully the following 
libraries: Windsor, Leamington, AValkerville, Amherstburg, Sarnia, Fort William, 
Port Arthur, North Bay, Brighton, Caledon, Don, Port Carling, Gravenhurst, 
Huntsville, Bracebridge, St. Thomas, Stratford, Kitchener, Grimsby and Owen 
Sound, and have visited Peterboro', Ottawa, Hamilton, and London. The attention 
demanded by other phases of the work of the Branch rendered it impossible to 
make the number of visits that I should like to have made. Written reports will 
be sent as soon as it will be possible to use the 1916 reports of the libraries as a 
basis of criticism for expenditure, patronage, etc. Library inspection is a kind of 
intensive work that should contribute largely toward raising the standard of the 
libraries. In the twenty-five libraries visited, twenty of them require a considerable 
amount of expert advice regarding the development of their libraries. Library 
inspection is the only kind of work that the Department can do to deal with each 
library according to its own peculiar situation and problem. Association and 
institute meetings and printed matter can never take up any library's problems in 
a specific way. Library inspection is more essential to the free libraries than to the 
association libraries. The latter are small and their problem is to secure a small 
fund and buy a few good books for a limited number of readers; they are not in 
a position to give modern public library service, and the kind of assistance through 
which they can benefit can be given by correspondence and the Ontario Library 
Review. The average free library is in a position to extend its usefulness along 
lines upon which expert advice and criticism are of the greatest value. With the 
very limited time available for library visits your Inspector is of the opinion that 
free libraries have the first claim on his time. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 105 

In the near future I hope to submit a suggested policy for library inspection, 
and a general method for reporting on visits and for advising library boards. 

The matters for consideration in an inspection are as follows : — 

(1) The building, its plan and arrangement. 

(2) Departments: reference, circulating, children's, reading room. 

(3) Books: Comment on the collection as a whole. Suggestions regarding 
certain classes; expenditure on books. 

(4) Income. Expenditure; is it adequate and well proportioned? 

(5) Cost of maintenance in relation to patronage, population, plant, etc. 

(6) Patronage, its quality and quantity. 

(7) Service. 

(8) Classification. 

(9) Catalogue. 

(10) Equipment. 

(11) Whether the board is meeting its problem by making adequate provision 
for the needs of the community. 

(12) The librarian and staff. 

The Ontario Library Review 

The new library periodical and book-list was issued for the first time in July, 
1916. Through this publication your Public Libraries Branch will be able to 
assist 95 per cent, of the libraries to select better books than they have been placing 
on their shelves. It furnishes a good source for selection. It also serves as a 
means of communication between the Department and the libraries, and as an 
instructor to all holding official connection with our libraries. This work contains 
editorial notes and comment, papers by prominent librarians and trustees, announce- 
ments of institutes, training school, etc., notes and news of libraries, selected lists 
of books on special subjects, and the Booh-S election Guide, which gives a list of 
about one hundred books quarterly, giving author, title, publisher, date and price, 
and a descriptive, and sometimes critical, note on each book listed. A copy of this 
publication is mailed to each member of the Legislature, to every librarian and 
library trustee of the public libraries in Ontario, librarians of Provincial and edu- 
cational institutions, and a few friends of the library cause. It would be hard to 
estimate how much this publication will mean to the libraries of Ontario. By 
reason of a copy going to every trustee as well as to every librarian, every person 
holding official connection with a public library is reached with this publication. A 
large number of letters have been received commending the Minister for granting 
authority for the publication of this new quarterly. 

Short Course Library Training School 

A first-class type of short course training school was organized and directed 
by your Inspector of Public Libraries, and was held from September 11th to 
October 12th in the Dovercourt branch of the Toronto Public Library. The 
accommodation and facilities for practice work were furnished through the courtesy 
of the Toronto Public Library Board and the Chief Librarian, Mr. George H. Locke. 
The course as arranged conserved all of the limited time for the first essentials 
that are difficult to learn without a teacher. Persons without experience or library 
positions were not encouraged to take the course, as such a course is not a short-cut 



106 THE BEPORT OP THE No. 17 

to a library position for those without experience in the work. No fee was charged, 
and all necessary books and supplies were furnished free by the Department. The 
railway fares to and from Toronto were paid to all students who took the full 
course. No educational test was required, but candidates from town and city 
libraries were advised that they should have at least four years' high school training 
and a liberal education gained through general reading. 

Success and satisfaction attended the school. Thirty-one students attended, 
thirty of whom had had library experience. Special credit is due to Miss Winifred 
Barnstead of Toronto, chief instructor of the school, for the satisfactory and 
efficient manner in which she arranged and conducted her part of the work. 

Certificates were issued to all who were successful in the examinations. Each 
certificate stated that the student had attended the short course training school 
and had passed the examinations and practical tests. Three grades were assigned, 
" A," " B" and " C." Six students attained grade A ; seven, grade B ; and thirteen, 
grade C ; five did not qualify for certificates. 

Details regarding the school, including the names of the instructors and 
students, were published in the Ontario Library Review, and, therefore, do not 
require to be repeated in this report. 

District Library Institutes 

The first Library Institute was held ten years ago, and for the last seven years 
the whole Province has been divided into fifteen institute districts for the purpose 
of holding local annual meetings. Railway fare and hotel bill have been paid for 
one delegate from each library, to attend his institute meeting. The meetings have 
been interesting and have met with more or less success. No doubt the institutes 
have been helpful to a certain number, but I am free to confess that I have felt 
somewhat disappointed to find that the results have not proved more beneficial to 
the average libraries, and to the smaller libraries as a whole. The institutes cost 
approximately $1,500 a year, and are held at considerable labour on the part of the 
Public Libraries Branch. I am inclined to believe that the average library fails 
to put into practice the ideas gained at the institutes. This is probably due to the 
fact that in at least two-thirds of the libraries amateur management prevails, and 
that the whole library board of* a small library is not influenced sufficiently by the 
one delegate who attends the institute. 

The institutes held in 1916 were of a somewhat different type from those held 
formerly. Book-selection was the subject of instruction for the whole afternoon at 
fourteen of the meetings; the fifteenth was the Toronto district, where such 
instruction was not required. From all appearances, dealing with the one funda- 
mental subject and dwelling upon it was the proper method of conducting an 
afternoon session. The results of the 1916 institutes can be tested as the invoices 
of books purchased by libraries reach this office with the annual reports. Some of 
the meetings were held late in the fall, and the libraries had little time to use the 
ideas gained in book-selection. Eight of the institutes were held in the summer. 
Some improvement might have been expected in their work. After examining a 
large number of invoices from various libraries I was surprised at not finding more 
improvement over the previous year. A certain improvement was shown by several 
libraries which might be attributed to the Ontario Library Review. I may mention 
that there were a large number of very small libraries who bought either no books 
or an inadequate supply in the year 1915, but carried over large cash balances to 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 107 

1916. It was pointed out to them that their patrons were entitled to the books and 
that they were reducing their incomes by reason of their failure to expend more on 
books, which expenditure would bring .them larger. Legislative grants. The reports 
that have been received during 1917 show that, for eight out of ten of these libraries, 
the advice fell on deaf ears. I believe that institutes can do a great work, but we 
must throw greater weight into them by emphasizing essentials and supplementing 
the institute work through our bulletin, and through letters commenting on the work 
of each library, copies of the latter to be sent to each library trustee concerning the 
work of his own library. There are several of the prominent library workers in the 
Province deserving of commendation for addresses given to assist the Department 
in the 1916 institutes. 

Regulations are required to govern District Library Institutes; recommenda- 
tions will be submitted by your Inspector regarding this matter. 

Travelling Libraries 

The number of Travelling Libraries sent out in 1916 shows an increase of 
fifty per cent, over 1915, and still the circulation of these books should be much 
greater than it is at present. The whole collection of books requires to be classified, 
some withdrawals made, and all classes require to be made more representative. 
There is a large field for extending the usefulness of the Travelling Libraries in 
sparsely settled communities and other places where public libraries cannot be 
maintained. In 1916 nearly 2,000 new volumes were added to the collection. A 
larger number than that should be added each year for the next five or six years at 
the least to bring the collection to the strength and quality that should be worthy 
of such a library. The great need for this phase of our work is more room. The 
collection is crowded in a vault and three or four thousand books are packed in 
cases. More room is required so that the books can be assembled in book-stacks. 
The work of book-selection for Travelling Libraries will require considerable time, 
as every sub-section of the entire collection requires to be criticized in relation to 
what it should be. I hope that the day is not far distant when, through this, and 
the book-selection division, the Public Libraries Branch can furnish reading-lists 
to any residents of the Province who wish such information concerning books. 

Mr. W. E. Smith deserves credit for the promptness with which he has filled 
all applications for Travelling Libraries. There have been no delays. His judg- 
ment in the selection of Travelling Library collections has been most commendable 
considering the collection from which the books were selected. 

More room, a large number of better books, and new regulations are the 
desiderata in this division of our work. 

Regulations are required to govern the management of the Travelling Library 
system, and may I suggest that a small charge be made for cases lent to Study 
Clubs or to any persons or organizations that do not propose to lend the books to 
all in their communities who wish to borrow. 

Departmental Instructor and Demonstrator in Classifying and Cataloguing, ^p^ 
Lyj*.4krf Loan Systems, etc. 

Miss Patricia Spereman visited olexcn public libraries in the year 1916: 
Aylmer, Beachville, Exeter, Hanover, Mitchell, New Hamburg, Parkhill, Ridge- 
town. Wallaceburg, Seaforth, Zephyr. The shortest time given to one library was 
one week ; the longest time, two months. 



108 THE REPOKT OF THE No. 17 

In May, the list of applicants for Miss Spcreinan's services was revised. Every 
library on the list was asked if it was prepared to purchase the materials for 
classifying and cataloguing before December 31st, 1916, and also if it would agree 
to have its librarian take the instruction and complete the work throughout the 
library according to the methods demonstrated. There were about thirty libraries 
represented on the list, and only five of them notified the office that they would be 
ready for Miss Spereman during 1916; the remainder of the libraries would not 
agree to prepare for her services at any particular time, and, therefore, were taken 
off the list. 

No libraries are being listed for Miss Spereman's services until they agree to 
purchase supplies, take the instruction and continue the work. An attempt will 
be made to induce certain libraries to accept help in introducing the Decimal 
System of classifying and the modern method of cataloguing, and an approved loan 
system; efforts in this direction will be confined to the libraries where the need is 
greatest. In dealing with applications, libraries supported by public taxation should 
have first claim. 

Progress of Free Public Libraries 

In ten years the expenditure of free public libraries increased from $151,504 
to $521,125,' and the circulation of books from 1,807,122 to 4,436,995; the figures 
are for 1905 and 1915. The free libraries had $648,734 available for expenditure. 
They carried over cash balances to the total of $127,609. These figures speak for 
themselves. 

Association Libraries 

Unfortunately only a few of the association libraries have progressed during 
the last few years; on the whole they have not only been unprogressive, but they 
have lost ground. In 1906 we had 233 association libraries. We have 229 now. 
The expenditure of these institutions has dropped more than $14,000 in this time. 
The expenditure for 1906 was $47,152; for 1915 it was $32,790. The decline in 
these libraries is due to inefficient management, and chiefly to the habit of holding 
funds that should be expended on books. In 1915 the association libraries expended 
$32,790, and carried over cash balances amounting to $10,000; had the $10,000 
been expended on books, $5,000 more would have been earned in Government 
grants for 1916. The law of diminishing returns has been at work. In 1906 these 
libraries had $55,000 to expend. Their failure to make use of all of their funds 
reduced their incomes for the following year, and they have suffered through the 
same kind of failure every year since that time. The year 1906 is chosen for con- 
venience; the decline in these libraries began before that date. 

These libraries, as a whole, have very little excuse for complaining of lack of 
funds when they do not expend more than seventy per cent, of their incomes. The 
disappointing feature of the library institutes, which were organized chiefly for the 
benefit of the smaller libraries, is that the association libraries have declined in 
spite of the help given by the institutes. Notwithstanding the work of the insti- 
tutes and other means of assistance, these small libraries have been declining 
slowly but surely, although they have had the funds for gaining better results. 

For several years the chief library workers of the Province have been desirous 
of working out a plan for securing free library service for small communities and 
rural districts. So far, a satisfactory solution has not been devised. Whatever 
unit may be decided upon for taxation for library purposes — the township, the 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 109 

county, the school section, or something else, I doubt if efficient libraries will be 
realized if each police village, village, or unincorporated settlement is to act as 
a complete unit within itself. When small libraries are not in a position to employ 
a qualified librarian, there should be some sort of official connection with some 
library, institution or Governmental department that employs a qualified librarian. 
Regulations could be passed by the Department that would ensure better book- 
selection, and they could be made of such a nature that each association library 
would be required to buy books at the proper time, and within reasonable distance 
of their purchasing powers, but such regulations would smack too much of 
paternalism and would entail too much labour on the part of the Department. 

The workers in the association libraries are nearly all volunteers, and there 
is a continual change in the personnel of small library boards. Therefore, it is most 
difficult to induce progress through educational and persuasive means. Your 
Public Libraries Branch proposes to make strenuous efforts to strengthen the 
standing of the association libraries. If they gain better reputations they will be 
more likely to convince their communities of the value of a library and thus pave 
the way for passing free library by-laws. A poorly managed association library 
is liable to poison the mind of the people of its district so that they will not feel 
disposed to favour a free library by-law. 

At the present time association libraries receive grants from the Department 
on the same basis as free libraries. In unorganized settlements this is very neces- 
sary to ensure the lives of their small libraries, but in police villages, villages and 
towns, the association library with its privileges limited to those who pay amem, 
bership fee should not receive the same consideration as libraries that are free to all. 
A free public library is well within the reach of villages and towns, and the time 
has arrived when the Department might well take steps to bring about a change 
which will tend to convert village and town association libraries into free 
libraries. The amount realized by association libraries through membership fees 
is so slight that, in abolishing the fees, the loss would be so small, that very little 
financial assistance or taxation should be required from a police village, village or 
town to make an association library free to the people of its constituency. In un- 
organized settlements, the township extends over so much territory that it would 
be found difficult for people in a particular spot in a township to arrange for the 
passing of a by-law to give that particular spot alone free library service. A 
township scheme should provide for service for the whole township; in order to do 
this, four or five library stations would be required to serve the people of an 
average township; the difficulty of organizing an efficient system of this kind and 
of passing the necessary by-law is apparent; therefore the association library will 
be required for unorganized settlements for some time to come. During the 
year 1917, a further study of association libraries will be made with a view toward 
making recommendations for new legislation and regulations. 

May I state once again that about fifteen per cent, of the association libraries 
are to be highly commended, but the unsatisfactory ones are overwhelmingly in the 
majority. 

Carnegie Grants and Pledges 

There are about ninety public library buildings in the Province of Ontario 
that were built through gifts from the Carnegie Corporation. On the whole, the 
municipalities that have received Carnegie buildings have done wonderfully well, 
and are doing commendable work, and have spent more than the amount of their 



110 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 

pledges. When application is made to the Carnegie Corporation for a grant of 
money for a library, a municipal council is asked to enter into an agreement to 
expend annually an amount of money for library purposes amounting to not less 
than ten per cent, of the Carnegie gift. This is not an unreasonable request. 
Ten per cent, is the minimum amount for which a Carnegie library can be main- 
tained properly. Our best libraries expend annually for maintenance, from 
fifteen to twenty per cent, of the value of their buildings. 

The Carnegie Corporation registered a complaint with the Department that 
about twelve of the ninety libraries had failed to expend the ten per cent, annually. 
The complaint also stated that a few libraries had failed to report on their expendi- 
tures when requested to do so. The Public Libraries Act permits a maximum 
rate of taxation for public library service, but requires no particular minimum 
rate. The Department gives liberal grants to the libraries, and renders very 
valuable services, and so long as a library board gets its constituency value for 
monies expended, it would appear to be an undue interference with local rights to 
attempt to enforce a mandatory minimum expenditure. 

While the Department recognized that a pledge or contract made with any 
donor is a matter that rests entirely with the two parties to the contract, the 
Inspector of Public Libraries acted upon instructions and used persuasive means 
to encourage the few libraries referred to, first, toward keeping faith with 
the Corporation, and secondly, toward expending ten per cent, of the value of 
their buildings for the reason that, in maintaining a building at less than ten 
per cent, of its value, the two matters of the most vital concern (books and 
librarian's salary) would be the first to feel the effect of an inadequate expenditure. 
I am pleased to report that nearly two-thirds of the libraries complained of lived 
up to the pledge in the year 1916, notwithstanding the numerous enforced demands 
that are upon the people on account of the gigantic struggle in which our country 
is engaged. 

Book =SeIect ion by Public Libraries 

Our best public libraries deserve commendation for their excellent work in 
book-selection. The average public library in the Province has not attended to 
this funadmental phase of its work in a methodical manner, and the collections of 
books in the majority of the libraries are not as representative as they should be. 
The Book-Selection Guide section of the Ontario Library Review will be a help 
in solving the problem of better book-selection. The libraries that do not employ 
qualified librarians are not in a position to do the best work in book-selection, and 
only a few of the libraries possess the various guides to selection. In compiling 
the Book-Selection Guide, a survey is made of current publications; the best are 
listed and described; the recommended list is made from the point of view of 
libraries expending about $500 a year for books. 

With a few notable exceptions, the libraries are not in a good position to 
select the best books from the books of all time, the average library not being 
justified in maintaining a bibliographical library. We hope that your Public 
Libraries Branch will be so equipped in the near future that it can advise libraries 
in the purchase of books other than those of current publication, and in special 
classes of books in which libraries may desire recommendations. 

The Public Libraries Act permits grants up to fifty per cent, of the amount 
expended on books (conditionally) to a maximum purchase of $400 in a year. 
The only condition laid down is that fiction must not be purchased beyond a 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 111 

certain percentage of the amount expended upon other books. The Department 
has never deducted anything from its grant for inferior selection. The Legis- 
lative grant amounts to one-half of the expenditure made by those public libraries 
that do not exceed $100 in expenditure on books, and it seeing to your Inspector 
that the Department would be justified in securing a regulation that would permit 
the Department to reduce its percentage in computing the grant for any library 
whose book-selection is below a reasonable standard. Such a regulation would 
have the tendency to improve the selection by the libraries as a whole. With the 
absence of regulations regarding the purchase of books (of which the Department 
is expected to pay one-half the cost) the best judgment will not be used by a large 
number of libraries. I am certain that a rule could be passed that would not 
be considered a hardship by any reasonable library board, and the results would 
be in the best interests of the supporters of the libraries and of the Department 
of Education. 

Adequate Library Expenditure 

The problem of providing adequate library service for a community should 
be the first consideration with a library board. There appears to be no problem 
so little understood by trustees, and it is doubtful if one board in fifty has ever 
tried to determine what must be expended for books, librarian's services, etc., and 
what accommodation is required to serve a given population. Neglect to make 
inquiry on what should be a most obvious question is not confined to library 
boards alone. Whether or not a library board feels disposed to make an adequate 
expenditure to meet its problem, it should know precisely what expenditure is 
required to meet the problem of serving a certain population according to modern 
library ideas. There are boards in the Province trying to serve a population on 
not more than fifty per cent, of what is required, and they wonder why they are 
not successful. There are a number of boards expending less than a normal 
amount annually for books considering the circulation. They wonder why their 
collections of books are becoming shabby and why the libraries are not increasing in 
popularity. There are a few isolated cases where the total expenditure of the 
library is abnormally large compared with the patronage of the library, and several 
where the patronage is small compared with the population. 

Library boards require reports on the expenditure of their libraries in relation 
to their problems. Your Inspector feels constrained to devote as much time as 
possible in informing library boards regarding these important matters. In 
several instances during 1916 library boards have arranged to comply with the 
necessary conditions to meet their problems after being informed regarding the 
matter. In nearly every case it was only necessary to point out the desirable 
conditions, and the boards expressed satisfaction on being informed regarding 
the requirements to meet given cases. I trust that before long we will be able to 
publish in the Ontario Library Review a carefully considered paper on proportionate 
expenditure and necessary conditions to gain certain results. 

Professional Training 

More than two-thirds of the success of a library depends upon the librarian; 
therefore, professional training and regulations to ensure the appointment of the 
right type of librarians are essential for the best success of the libraries of the 
Province. When the modern ideas of the functions of libraries loomed up 
before the chief librarians of the English-speaking world, methods and means 



112 THE BEPOBT OF THE No. 17 

were wanting. There was discovered a great need of study, of equipment, of 
inventive ingenuity, of individual and collective experience, of practical and 
philosophical attainments that had never been dreamed of before. These dis- 
coveries gave form to a conception of library science, of a department of study 
that is entitled to scientific rank by reason of the importance of its results, the 
precision of its methods, and the range of i£s details. The development of library 
science is quite marked. Librarians need no longer labour with crude methods. 
They are the inheritors of the accumulated experience, ideas, and methods that 
have been put into operation through individual and co-operative effort. 

A short course library training school of one month is of some value, and of 
considerable value to those who have had experience in the use of modern 
methods, but efficiency on the part of librarians generally cannot be expected until 
a longer and more thorough course is established. A standard library school 
course covers one, and sometimes two academic years of about eight months each. 
No adequate course has been established as yet in Canada, and the need for some- 
thing better than a one-month course is apparent. By reason of a longer course 
being approved in principle, a sum has been voted in the supplementary esti- 
mates to augment the sum already in the estimates for library school purposes. 
I trust that permission will be granted to organize a longer course. 

I recommend for your consideration a plan of establishing a three months' 
course, the instruction to be confined entirely to the phases of librarianship that 
are difficult to master without a teacher. I believe that such a course, supple- 
mented with hints for private study and practice, would further tend to raise 
the standard of librarianship in the Province, and would be highly appreciated 
by library boards and librarians. I recommend that a short course, similar to the 
one held in 1916, form the first part of the three months' course, in order to 
provide a one month's course for those who may desire it or cannot spend a greater 
length of time in Toronto. The candidates who wish a three months' course will 
remain for the second and third months, which time will be devoted to an elabora- 
tion, extension and more intensive study of the subjects and practice dealt with 
in the first month or shorter course. 

A few of the librarians of the principal libraries of the Province have already 
expressed a desire to see such a school established. I recommend that the school 
be directed by the Department. The services of several specialists in the Province 
will be available for lectures and instruction. I have been assured by Mr. George 
H. Locke, Chief Librarian of the Toronto Public Library, that the Toronto Public 
Library Board and Chief Librarian will furnish ample facilities for practice work. 
Mr. Locke has been the first to suggest to a library board that a by-law or regu- 
lation be passed, making professional training compulsory on the part of 
appointees or candidates for positions. The following is a quotation from his 
annual report as presented to the Toronto Public Library Board for the year 
1916:— 

" One of the significant events of the year was the establishment of a Pro- 
vincial Library Training School for those who were in service in the Province 
but who had not been trained for that service. This was planned by Mr. W. 0. 
Carson, the lately appointed Inspector of Public Libraries for the Province, and 
we helped him by granting the use of the lecture-room of the Dovercourt Branch 
for the sessions of the School and our Branches for practice work. It was a sreat 
success from every standpoint and will develop no doubt into an established 
Librarv School with a longer term. If this were done I would recommend that 



1916 DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 113 

our Board co-operate with the Provincial Government so that candidates for posi- 
tions in our Libraries would be accepted only after they had passed the examina- 
tions of this Provincial School as well as our own examination." 

Other libraries will be likely to follow Toronto's lead by passing a similar 
regulation. 

Qualifications and Certificates for Librarians 

The time has come when librarians of our free libraries should possess quali- 
fications and certificates. The usefulness of public libraries is determined to a 
greater extent by the personal and professional qualification of the librarian than 
by any other factor. A first-class library can not be realized without a first-class 
librarian. 

People who are taxed for public library service should have reasonable assur- 
ance that they will receive a satisfactory kind of service, that the librarian and 
assistants will have qualifications in keeping with the class of library the people are 
taxed to maintain. 

With an inefficient librarian, expenditures for public library purposes are, to 
a great extent, a waste. 

Public library boards require the kind of assistance and guidance that certi- 
fication of librarians would give. Every fair-minded library trustee would 
welcome a regulation that would limit the appointment of librarians and assistants 
to the right type of persons. A regulation for demanding certificates for librarians 
would raise the standard of efficiency of the libraries and increase their, value as 
an educational force. It would give librarianship a higher professional standing, 
and tend to give the public library a higher place in public recognition. 

The regulations that I would recommend to govern for the next few "years 
would be of such a nature that no reasonable trustee or librarian could object to 
them. Present conditions would be considered and the regulations would be 
directed to bring about a higher standard of librarianship in a gradual and reason- 
able manner. Librarians at present engaged in the work would be given a reason- 
able length of time to qualify. Various standards of qualification would be 
adopted to provide a standard for libraries as classified according to the populations 
of municipalities where free libraries may be maintained. The educational and 
professional requirements for librarians of the smaller libraries would be nominal, 
and higher requirements would be demanded for larger libraries. 

A certain proportion of the assistants in larger libraries should have certain 
professional qualifications. A qualified librarian should have an efficient staff. 
An inefficient staff means unsatisfactory service and waste. Large libraries can 
not afford to pay a staff all of whom are trained assistants; they require a certain 
number of assistants who are entitled to the rank of clerks. A certain proportion 
of the members of a staff should be qualified; the regulations should provide for 
this. 

I have recommended a longer course library training school and provision 
for holding examinations and practical tests in librarianship. In the event of 
these recommendations being granted, and with the short course school, the De- 
partment will be in a position to provide the necessary means for librarians and 
assistants to obtain training to conform with any regulations that are likely to bo 
passed for a while, also the opportunity of examination for other librarians and 
assistants, who have received training or attained professional knowledge through 
experience and study. 
8 E, 



114 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



Grants for Special Libraries and Library Associations 

Ontario Library Association. — A grant of $400 was paid to this association. 
The Ontario Library Association held a meeting in April, 1916, which proved both 
interesting and profitable to a large number of our libraries. Several of the 
members assisted your Public Libraries Branch with District Library Institute 
work, and rendered service in many ways to the library cause in the Province. 
Through this association, the library workers of Ontario have become acquainted 
with one another, and through it many have received their inspiration and their 
vision of the possibilities of public libraries. Every library in the Province should 
be identified with this organization. 

Canadian Free Library for the Blind. — A grant of $500 was paid to this 
library. The librarian, Mr. Sherman C. Swift, reports progress for the year 1916. 
Five thousand nine hundred and ninety-eight books and pieces of music were on 
the shelves, and 9,440 volumes were circulated throughout the Dominion and New- 
foundland. The gain in circulation was 180 volumes. Four hundred and seventy- 
seven borrowers were on the register — a gain of 51. A grant of $600 was received 
from the Toronto Public Library Board. The report tells of several activities 
pertaining to the welfare of the blind of Canada, which work was done partly by 
the library and partly through appeals made by the library. 

The Reading Camp Association. — A grant of $2,000 was paid to this associa- 
tion. Mr. Alfred Fitzpatrick, B.A., superintendent, submitted a report of progress, 
in which he thanks the Department for the assistance given the association. The 
report shows that about forty camp schools were held, and literature was supplied 
to these and to dozens of other camps. 

The instructors keep the men in camp well informed in regard to the 
principles involved in the great struggle in Europe, and they keep them abreast 
with the news of the war by means of bulletins, maps, etc. A large number of the 
men in the camps have enlisted since the war began, and the camp instructors have 
assisted in recruiting; one instructor reported that eighteen men in his camp had 
enlisted. The work of the association was extended overseas among Canadian 
lumbermen. Thirty-eight former instructors have responded to the Empire's call, 
two of whom, Thos. G-arratt and P. F. Chidley, have made the supreme sacrifice; 
two others are prisoners in Germany. The war has caused a loss in income for the 
association, but Mr. Fitzpatrick expresses gratitude for the good subscriptions re- 
ceived which, he says, are handsome considering the extraordinary times in which 
we are living. 

I present herewith a statement of the statistics of the Public Libraries of the 
Province and a statement of the grants paid to Historical, Literary and Scientfic 
Institutions. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

W. O. Carson. 

Inspector of Public Libraries. 
Toronto, March, 1917. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



115 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Statistics, 1915 



Library. 



Population 



Total 
Expenditure 



Volumes j 

in | Circulation 
Library 



Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1916 



Acton — 

Ailsa Craig 

Amherstburg R. 

Arnprior 

Arthur R. 

Aurora 

Aylmer R. 

Ayr R. 

Barrie R. 

Beamsville R. 

Beeton j 

Belleville R.j 

Bothwell 

Bracebridge R. 

Brampton R. 

Brantford R. 

Brighton R. 

Brockville R. 

19 [Brussels R. 

Burk's Falls R. 

Campbellford R. 

Cardinal R. 

Carleton Place R. 

Chatham R. 

Ohesley R. 

Clifford 

Clinton R.j 

Collingwood R.j 

Cornwall R. 

Delhi R. 

Deseronto R. 

Drayton , R. 

Dresden R. 

Dundas R. 

Durham R. 

Elmira R. 

Elora R. 

Erin 

Essex R. 

Exeter R. 

Fergus R. 

Forest R. 

Fort Frances R. 

Fort William R. 

Gait R. 

Gananoque, R. 

Garden Island 

48 Georgtown R. 

49 Glencoe 

50 Goderich R. 

51 Grand Valley R. 

52 Gravenhurst 

53 Grimsby R. 

54 Guelph R. 

55 Hagersville R. 

56 Hamilton R. 

57 Hanover R 

58 Harriston R. 

59 Hensall R 



1,803 

586 
2,356 
4,300 
1,100 
2,600 
2,300 

910 
7,008 
1,100 

700 
12,620 

650 
2,938 
4,060 
26,300 
1,919 
9,428 

840 
1,050 
3,100 
1,200 
3,876 
12,863 
2,000 
1,000 
2/300 
6,361 
6,492 

900 
2,221 

700 

1,500 

4,652 

1,580 

2,300 

1,220 

526 

1,385 

1,608 

1,700 

1,495 

3,000 

20,853 

12,000 

3,684 

80 

2,000 

950 

4,676 

761 

2,200 

2,000 

16,735 

1,200 

100,461 

3,218 

1,490 

800 



$ c. 
395 60 
88 56 
1,955 53 
246 54 
297 17 
481 75 
852 01 
601 89 
1,605 72 
495 47 
147 13 
2,392 30 
188 23 
948 46 
1,314 43 
7,246 73 
271 01 
1,673 53 
480 04 
321 61 
941 55 
231 48 
462 69 
3,215 29 
411 05 
170 70 
856 80 
2,504 09 
939 06 
183 74 
391 24 
297 05 
448 71 
1,648 92 
597 56 
* 3,220 30 
723 01 
150 94 
721 35 
772 39 
1,103 88 
625 12 
1,335 26 
*16,265 38 
3,844 49 
972 97 
31 70 
828 77 
136 27 
1,160 48 
407 46 
80 28 
1,462 48 
4,584 43 
267 10 
*99,766 70 
663 76 
324 02 
349 77 



3,475 
2,898 
4,502 
3,382 
3,425 
3,937 
7,866 
3,689 
7,193 
4,822 
2,274 
8,468 
2,797 
5,064 
7,199 
28,701 
3,859 
13,955 
4,325 
3,137 
3,262 
2,656 
6,416 
9,478 
3,475 
4,640 
7,735 
8,470 
4,914 
2,113 
6,597 
3,737 
1,584 
8,368 
3,685 
4,241 
8,052 
2,819 
3,307 
4,869 
5,968 
4,100 
2,133 
7,632 
9,099 
5,145 
5,220 
3,473 
2,857 
5,553 
3,349 
2,731 
3,869 
17,404 
2,352 
54,306 
2.672 
3,319 
1,643 



6,866 
3,434 
16,836 
3,762 
2,751 
6,671 
13,932 
7,632 
32,157 
3,609 
1,860 
31,062 
3,400 
12,946 
28,502 
85,603 
4,522 
15,076 
5,856 
4,591 
15,471 
4,495 
12,446 
39,950 
4,551 
3,935 
19,473 
17,065 
10,977 
2,449 
8,062 
5,120 
6,229 
33,061 
8,414 
6,690 
7,152 
4,396 
6,299 
11,094 
10,080 
11,597 
10,066 
89,557 
46,720 
17,228 



9,424 

2,318 

19,672 

4,366 

1,398 

17,796 

68,000 

1,255 

363,012 

10,329 

10,750 

6,937 



$ c. 
98 26 
28 59 
70 94 

89 87 
98 52 
60 28 

227 77 

118 10 

177 72 

76 78 

35 13 
260 00 

42 91 
142 64 
260 00 
260 00 

49 80 
185 57 

68 85 
66 22 

90 15 

36 12 
98 14 

260 00 

96 00 

36 37 

207 74 

260 00 

136 89 

51 88 

69 84 
90 57 
23 75 

169 11 

72 96 

225 48 

129 59 

53 75 

93 08 

49 88 

150 86 

79 10 

217 42 

260 00 

260 00 

241 07 



137 25 

15 00 

155 70 

71 81 

18 92 

95 17 

260 00 

77 77 

260 00 

159 24 

131 92 

90 54 



116 



THE HEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued 
Statistics, 1915 



Library 



Population 



Total ' Volumes 
Expenditure u *^ 



Circulation 



Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1916 



Hespeler R. 

Ingersoll R. 

Kemptville R. 

Kenora R. 

Kincardine R. 

Kingsville R. 

Kintore R. 

Kitchener R. 

Lakefield R. 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Leamington R. 

Lindsay R. 

Listowel R. 

Little Britain R. 

London R. 

London (Branch) R. 

Lucknow R. 

Markdale R. 

Merrickville 

Merritton 

Midland R. 

Millbrook R. 

Milverton R. 

Mimico R. 

Mitchell R. 

Mount Forest R. 

New -Hamburg 

New Liskeard R. 

Newmarket R. 

Niagara Falls R. 

North Bay R. 

Oakwood 

Orangeville R 

Orillia R. 

Oshawa R. 

Ottawa R. 

Ottawa (Branch) R. 

Otterville 

Owen Sound R. 

Paisley R. 

Palmerston R. 

Paris R. 

Parkhill R. 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke R. 

Penetanguishene R. 

Perth R. 

Peterborough R. 

Picton R. 

Port Arthur R 

Port Carling R. 

Port Colborne 

Port Elgin R. 

Port Hope R. 

Prescott R. 

Preston R. 

Renfrew R 

Richmond Hill R 



2,740 
5,200 
1,160 
5.000 
2,368 
1,742 



19,266 

1,337 

696 

700 

3,300 

7,672 

2,600 

300 

58,055 

i]ooo' 

1,000 

1,000 

2,165 

6.375 

830 

895 

1,900 

1,706 

2,000 

1,612 

2,400 

3,604 

12,000 

9,855 

270 

2,468 

7,400 

8,900 

100,163 



500 

12,256 

775 

2,000 

4,383 

1,500 

4,000 

7,721 

4,000 

3,650 

20,426 

3,500 

14,307 

327 

No Report 

1,500 

4,700 

2,919 

4,600 

4,278 

930 



$ c. 
458 43 

1,329 00 
458 89 

1,545 38 
624 02 
484 94 
141 19 
15,833 05 
188 93 
184 56 
174 53 

1,111 27 

2,077 09 
552 11 
341 45 
15,030 10 
*2,108 91 
424 91 
358 95 
160 15 
134 83 

1,646 12 
348 40 
294 36 

1.440 26 
1,146 27 

783 71 

141 04 
1,329 82 

622 00 
3,285 02 
2,938 31 

110 35 
1,280-67 
1,844 62 

1.441 53 
25,889 27 



128 34 
2,662 95 

358 36 

828 54 
1,270 70 

180 83 

431 78 
1,792 33 
1,044 65 

951 73 
5,167 71 
1,655 28 
6,769 36 

184 28 

691 74 
1,380 80 

465 72 
1,178 12 

739 03 

282 04 



4,629 
5,708 
3,674 
4,850 
4,402 
2,942 
1,623 

14,860 
2,056 
1,987 
4,821 
4,252 
6,595 
4,449 
2,737 

39,277 
2,106 
3,187 
3,395 
3,567 
2,525 
6,564 
2,971 
2,508 
1,818 
5,647 
4,248 
4,040 
3,474 
4,576 

12,767 
4,553 
2,032 
6,454 
5,847 
4,415 

51,929 
2,348 
1,783 
6,411 
5,644 
2,875 

10,589 
3,004 
3,235 
3,757 
6,164 
4,070 

13,293 
6,708 

12,354 
2,398 

4,682 
6,700 
6,344 
8,726 
2,849 
4,331 



8,221 

17,780 

9,140 

12,362 

7,686 

11,362 

1,172 

43,695 

3,648 

4,648 

1,700 

23,634 

22,640 

9,220 

1,169 

206,981 

297 

5,454 

4,823 

2,398 

7,008 

35,300 

7,723 

2,921 

10,294 

7,687 

17,262 

9,033 

9,715 

11,719 

47,153 

26,843 

1,001 

15,844 

25,461 

21,480 

244,792 

12,825 

2,952 

35,833 

7,936 

7,407 

15,603 

2,250 

7,765 

17,851 

12,350 

15,890 

56,091 

20,840 

77,711 

2,149 

9,670 

17,160 

10,322 

18,080 

9,048 

6,772 



$ c. 

77 20 
195 07 
100 89 
137 78 

94 44 

62 46 

63 24 
260 00 

92 42 

47 79 

37 61 

176 36 

260 00 

67 92 

20 00 

260 00 

203 47 

163 05 

104 87 

15 00 

18 71 

79 44 

103 72 

49 97 

211 30 

70 46 
83 75 
45 40 

171 65 

107 58 

250 00 

260 00 

20 83 

244 18 

240 18 

207 17 

260 00 

139 43 

54 62 

260 00 

89 43 

51 09 

156 52 

39 37 

45 00 

260 00 

173 76 

64 99 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 

53 11 

71 62 
255 38 

72 01 
147 36 
117 70 

74 04 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



117 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Concluded 
Statistics, 1915 









Total 
Expenditure 


Volumes 




Legislative 


No. Library 




Populatio 

: 


m 
Library 


Circulation 


Grant paid 
in 1916 








$ c. 






$ c. 


119 Ridgeway 


...R. 


700 


140 97 


2,369 


2,057 


29 82 


120 St. Catharines 


...R. 


17,880 


! 3,830 08 


8,444 


36,549 


217 80 


121 St Mary's 


...R. 


4,000 
17,027 


1,099 89 
3,391 18 


8,428 
14,784 


21,691 
67,922 


172 38 


122 St. Thomas 


...R. 


260 00 


123 Sarnia 


...R. 


11,548 


3,229 23 


9,559 


44,027 


260 00 


124 Sault Ste. Marie ... 


...R. 


15,000 


1,978 43 


5,080 


32,794 


219 78 


125 Seaforth 


...R. 


1,925 


711 09 


6,570 


15,087 


126 22 


126 Shelburne 


. . .R. 


1,100 


596 77 


3,966 


6,786 


72 66 


127 iSimcoe 


...R. 


4,127 


j 1,459 88 


8,828 


19,600 


260 00 


128 Smith's Falls 


...R. 


6,138 


1,550 15 


6,173 


22,562 


205 46 


129 Stayner . 




1,009 
850 


88 55 
1 783 27 


2,248 
1,758 


3,468 
4,037 


19 86 


130 istirling 


...R. 


74 54 


131 Stouffviile 


...R. 


1,060 


359 33 


5,524 


10,096 


106 87 


132 Stratford 


...R. 


17,081 


2,501 03 


14,061 


55,183 


260 00 


133 Streetsville 


...R. 


600 


216 78 


2,819 


6,022 


85 94 


134 Sundridge 


...R. 


420 


66 57 


850 


1,110 


22 24 


135 Sutton West 


...R. 


800 


190 81 


1,520 


6,118 


84 30 


136 Tara 


...R. 


565 


237 53 


1,672 


4,203 


36 57 


137 Thorold 


...R. 


4,710 


1,090 64 


6,176 


7,266 


86 21 


138 Tillsonburg 


...R. 


3,000 


2,353 49 


4,041 


15,916 


197 60 


139 Toronto, Church St. 


. ..R. 


470,144 


17,389 60 


57,819 


98,647 


260 00 


140 " The Beaches . 


...R. 





. 9,834 91 


5,076 


61,278 


228 79 


141 : " College St. 


. R 


,,, . 




. 82,557 70 
. 5,636 62 
. 16,149 23 
. 6,562 66 
. 5,786 85 
. 5,938 03 


113,934 

7,017 

11,613 

4,075 

2,411 

14,460 


430,737 
41,552 

177,789 
38,734 
17,727 
61,978 


260 00 


142 " Deer Park . 






233 94 


143 " Dovercourt . 


. .R. 






260 00 


144 " Earlscourt 


p. 






220 57 


145 " Eastern . 







211 89 


146 " Queen & Lisgar.R. 






259 27 


147 " Municipal 








. 3,134 69 
. 5,353 80 


996 
5,244 


7,492 
25,295 


90 92 


148 " Northern .... 


...R. 




... 




213 30 


149 i " Riverdale ... 


...R. 







. 10,183 01 


14,058 


152,237 


260 00 


150 " Western 


...R. 







. 5,532 10 


9,393 


68,804 


232 50 


151 " Wychwood . . 


...R. 






. 3,087 50 


5,017 


23,537 


218 59 


152 " Yorkville .... 


...R. 






. 5,266 28 


11,480 


62,378 


260 00 


153 Trenton 


No Repoi 


t 








154 Uxbridge 


...R. 


1,800 


498 92 


6,577 


10,155 


70 34 


155 Walkerton 


...R 


2,950 


1,022 22 


4,132 


8,792 


119 28 


156 Walkerville 


...R. 


5,001 


2,933 45 


8,488 


32,687 


260 00 


157 Wallaceburg 


...R. 


4,107 


1,556 63 


7,114 


13,634 


254 77 


158 IWaterford 




1,140 


71 25 


1,229 


2,343 


10 00 


159 Waterloo 


...R. 


4,956 


1,749 87 


10,662 


20,455 


260 00 


160 jWatford 


...R. 


1,215 


461 15 


4,067 


5,918 


93 07 


161 Weston 


. . .R. 


2,186 
2,845 


1,636 08 
1,254 92 


4,040 
3,274 


14,508 
11,050 


184 54 


162 Whitby 


...R. 


107 42 


163 Windsor 


...R. 


24,162 


6,040 21 


22,345 


110,180 


260 00 


164 | Wingham 


...R. 


2,500 


903 95 


5,731 


11,188 


259 98 


165 Woodstock 


...R. 


10,084 


2,988 10 


11,038 


59,122 


260 00 


166 Wroxeter 




350 


189 35 


5,404 


1,991 


46 96 












. 521,125 43 


1,215,525 


4,436,995 


23,289 74 









♦Expenditure reported contains a substantial sum for extraordinary expenditure 
for Elmira, Fort William, Hamilton, Kitchener, London East Branch, and Toronto. 

Libraries with Reading rooms are marked " R." 

Population given is that furnished by the libraries, except where error was dis- 
covered. 



118 



THE BEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Statistics, 1915 



No. 


Library 


Population 


Total 
Expenditure 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circulation 


Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1916 


\ 


Admaston 


1,706 
360 

2,700 
No Report 
700 
425 
850 
768 
600 
250 

"366" 
400 


$ c. 

18 75 

29 00 

159 43 

41 85 
116 04 


1,499 
1,485 
4,175 

4,929 

2,625 

271 

1,400 

1,250 

1,533 

680 

1,130 

215 

681 

745 

1,770 

1,755 

694 

1,454 

2,467 

5,109 

1,513 

2,505 

3,157 

4,360 
2,518 

3,118 
1,032 
1,860 

802 
3,989 

901 
3,018 
1,971 

907 
2,498 
3,214 
1,851 
3,187 
2,238 

1,298 
2,483 
3,534 
4,919 
2,108 
1,908 
1,977 
3,018 
1,401 
677 
1,023 
1,511 
1,755 
2,488 
2,233 
2,366 


875 
1,402 
3,990 

4,058 
1,300 


$ c. 

5 00 

10 00 

41 01 


2 


Alma 


3 
4 


Almonte R. 

Angus 


5 


Alton 


10 00 
26 87 
10 00 


6 

7 


Arkona R. 

Assiginack 


8 


Athens 


125 03 

65 28 

4 41 

30 40 

195 01 

104 67 

13 02 
50 41 

113 53 
194 36 
213 44 

100 36 
118 12 
442 27 

60 55 
124 95 
220 33 

258 99 
189 65 

150 99 
178 12 
107 45 
178 77 
333 41 

14 40 
110 26 
106 50 

36 05 
95 83 
253 10 
146 62 
55 02 
67 11 

248 05 

103 19 
45 07 

635 87 
72 95 

168 61 
71 07 

205 46 
71 50 
79 13 
17 85 
85 06 

101 44 
136 23 

64 40 
95 46 


1,271 
1,192 
1,646 

132 
4,246 

644 

43 

1,073 

1,371 

1,720 

823 
2,020 
2,231 
12,300 
1,225 
1,332 
2,808 

4,637 
4,685 

2,931 
3,103 
2,783 
1,283 
2,398 

421 
1,251 
1,813 

822 
3,004 
3,600 
1,011 
5,462 

907 

1,091 
2,035 

523 
17 5 069 

860 
2,390 
4,038 
4,742 

912 
1,116 

852 

421 
2,156 
3,040 
1,079 
1,726 


40 91 


9 


Atwood 


20 35 
.43 92 
10 00 
33 92 
54 72 


10 
11 
12 
13 


Auburn R. 

Badjeros R. 

Bath R. 

Bayfield 


14 


Bayham 


10 00 


15 


Baysville 


141 
500 

1,050 

1,070 
400 
195 

1,450 

800 

720 

953 

No Report 

3,500 

2,110 
No Report 

1,755 
250 
258 
200 

2,200 
80 
500 
186 
151 
975 

370 

90 

No Report 

600 

375 

5,241 

1,000 
100 
320 
600 
150 
400 
800 
200 
500 
500 
180 


17 12 


16 


Beachville 


39 65 


17 

18 
19 
?0 


Beaverton R. 

Beechwood 

Belmont R. 

Belwood 


27 62 

115 58 , 

39 73 

52 59 


21 
22 


Blenheim R 

Bloomfield 


106 93 
10 00 


?3 


Blyth 


14 63 


24 
25 


Babcaygeon R. 

Bolton 


74 07 


26 

27 


Bowmanville R. 


42 22 
57 88 


28 


Brigden 




29 
30 


Brooklin 

Brownsville 


19 29 
54 25 


31 
32 


Brucefield 

Burgessville 


38 17 
33 91 


33 
34 


Burlington R. 

Burnstown 


51 97 
5 00 


35 


Caledon 


36 38 


36 
37 


Cambray 

Canfield 


40 75 
10 00 


38 


Cannington 


26 89 


39 


Cargill 


88 47 


40 


Cayuga . " 


23 90 


41 




10 00 


42 


Cheapside 


24 94 


43 


Chesterville 




44 
45 


Clarksburg R. 

Claremont 


58 25 
48 38 


46 


Claude 


25 07 


47 
48 
49 
50 


Cobourg R. 

Colborne R. 

Coldstream R. 

Coldwater 


136 72 
18 00 
72 24 
14 67 


51 
52 


Comber R. 

Copleston 


57 28 
15 00 


53 


Delta 


33 12 


54 


Depot Harbour 




55 


Don 


28 66 


56 


Dorchester 


21 00 


57 


Drumbo 


52 74 


58 


Duart 


10 00 


59 


Dungannon 


25 60 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



119 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES-Continued 
Statistics, 1915 



No. 


Library 


Population 


Total 
Expenditure 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circulation 


Legislatire 

Grant paid 

in 1916 


60 


Dunnville 


3,300 


$ c. 
458 51 
116 84 

104 64 
198 92 

93 59 

152 43 

34 60 
263 95 

82 30 
144 81 

88 44 

221 62 

243 27 

54 33 

84 59 

73 37 

33 12 

103 20 

147 00 

32 18 

116 32 

121 95 
127 22 
151 07 
215 11 
44 32 
25 45 

47 97 

73 68 

22 32 

77 58 

27 00 

280 04 

138 27 

109 30 

141 70 

114 76 

64 70 

141 52 

2,398 16 

81 49 

102 54 

79 97 

105 17 
6 05 

53 94 

35 00 
ed in 1916 

108 11 

106 72 
149 21 
250 97 

25 00 
31 50 


4,195 
2,467 
1,422 
4,661 
165 

4,132 
1,657 
4,877 
1,112 
3,766 

1,208 

3,815 

939 

383 

933 

335 

1,304 

2,863 

1,502 

1,529 

905 

1,655 
394 
1,761 
1.669 
1,220 
925 

1,779 
1,724 

427 
2,081 

737 
4,100 
1,518 
1,747 
2,710 
3,570 
1,575 
1,295 
7,455 
2,078 
2,562 

358 
1,233 
2,419 

886 

811 

670 
3,011 

947 
4,591 

800 
960 


12,397 

2,812 

782 

4,016 


$ c. 
142 50 


61 


Elmvale 


46 08 


6 9 


Elmwood 


450 
500 


33 22 


63 
64 


Embro R. 

Effio 


31 89 
47 50 


65 


Emsdale . * 


No Report 
780 


1,554 
4,392 
3,436 
1,779 
4,114 

1,074 

7,038 

1,561 

364 

920 

932 




66 


Ennotville 


62 30 


67 


Ethel 


10 00 


68 
69 
70 
71 


Fenelon Falls R. 

Flesherton R. 

Fonthill R. 

Fordwich 


1,025 
423 

700 
R eport 


36 84 
17 97 

48 93 


7? 


Forester's Falls 


35 11 


73 
74 
75 
76 


Fort Erie 


1,472 

700 
186 


34 26 


Frankford R. 

Fullarton R. 

Glamis 


56 87 
17 63 
20 01 


77 


Glanworth 


50 
200 
400 

212 

No Report 
400 

No Report 
983 


19 26 


78 


Glen Allan 




79 
80 
81 


Glen Morris R. 

Gore Bay R. 

Gore's Landing 


608 

2,682 

995 

1,520 

1,499 
1,269 
1,149 
2,909 
2,949 
513 

343 
1,382 

224 
2,498 

687 
6,144 
1,043 
3,000 
2,929 
1,469 

729 
1,411 
30,650 
3,042 
1,525 
1,002 

800 
1,641 
1,811 

586 

1,125 
2.002 
1,562 
1,831 


22 28 
15 00 

5 00 


82 


Gorrie 




83 
84 


Grafton R. 


47 98 


85 


Haliburton 


35 27 


86 




45 08 


87 


Harrington 


200 

2,648 

825 

250 

No Report 

350 

400 

315 

300 

100 

2,500 


47 01 


88 
89 


Harrow R. 

Hastings 


74 82 
10 00 


90 


Hawkesville 


5 00 


91 


Hepworth 




9? 


Highland Creek 


14 20 


93 


Hillsdale 


22 00 


94 


Hillview 


10 00 


95 


Holstein 


18 11 


96 


Honeywood 


10 00 


97 
88 


Huntsville R. 

Inwood 


67 82 
53 90 


99 


Iroquois 


800 

1,768 

520 

200 

70 

22,000 

450 

160 

180 

300 

213 


22 12 


100 


Islington 


53 36 


101 


Jarvis 


23 82 


102 


Kars 


13 58 

25 15 

260 00 

16 65 


103 


Kemble 


104 
105 


Kingston R. 

Kinmount 


106 


Kirkfield 


32 42 


107 


Kirkton 


35 11 


108 


Komoka 


31 39 


109 


Lake Charles 




no 


Lef roy 


13 53 


111 

112 


Linwood „ . . . 

Lucan 


450 

Reorganiz 

400 

1,100 

200 

202 

No Repor 

250 

300 


10 00 


113 


Lyn . R 


22 95 


114 


Madoc 


16 90 


115 


Mandamin 


64 69 


116 


Manilla 


76 60 


117 


Manotick 




118 


Maple 


15 00 


119 


Marksville 


762 


5 00 



120 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES— Continued 
Statistics, 1915 



No. 


Library 


Population 


Total 
Expenditure 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circulation 


Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1916 


120 
121 
122 


Martintown 

Meaford 

Melbourne 




600 
3,000 
350 
460 
980 


$ c. 
199 14 
746 44 
110 50 
197 01 

112 33 
49 24 

219 81 
95 36 
34 86 
40 96 
31 88 
10 10 

322 58 
38 25 

163 04 

106 00 
25 00 

942 08 

119 05 
127 94 

88 45 
72 10 
42 30 
332 78 
116 00 
94 82 

120 56 
286 05 
129 96 
685 75 

118 15 
251 43 

4 68 
66 82 

85 20 
116 89 

99 55 
205 31 

121 69 

113 72 

188 25 

189 54 
386 21 

86 80 
180 52 

74 73 
urned to Lib 

119 21 

241 05 

58 05 

110 10 

52 68 

123 41 

133 29 

554 21 

235 93 

85 33 

135 46 

163 09 


653 
4,332 
1,252 
1,091 
2,542 

783 
4,684 
1,720 
1,416 

763 

831 


3,070 

8,573 

1,324 

2,309 

1,296 

1,096 

4,909 

1,391 

727 

701 

560 


$ c. 
33 70 
88 80 
24 48 


123 


Metcalfe 


68 43 


124 


Mildmay 


29 37 


125 


MillgTOve ' \. . r 


34 26 


126 
127 


Milton 

Minden 


....R. 


2,053 

300 

350 

62 


52 30 
27 40 


128 


Monkton 


10 00 


1?9 


Mono Centre 


25 77 


130 


Mono Mills 


15 00 


181 


Mono Road 




5 00 


132 
133 


Morrisburg 

Morriston 


....R. 


1,600 


3,311 
1,387 
1,116 
1,176 
2,202 
7,759 

413 
2,226 
1,168 
1,038 
1,092 
7,267 
1,037 

399 
2,226 
3,344 
2,518 
5,335 
1,401 
1,113. 
1,633 

853 

262 
1,819 
2,077 
1,914 
1,046 
3,913 
2,565 
1,636 
2,161 
1,890 
1,962 

338 
rary for co 
2,764 

4,866 
2,488 
1,609 

670 
3,489 
1,498 

260 
5,363 
2,197 
2,159 
4,688 


4,859 
912 

2,400 
954 

1,138 

12,108 

810 

759 

4,951 

1,571 
830 

8,100 

1,674 


73 04 
10 72 


134 
135 


Mount Albert 

Mount Brydges . . . 


....R. 


550 

400 

130 

3,000 


48 14 
31 52 


136 


Nanticoke 


10 00 


137 
138 


Napanee 

Napier 


. ...R. 


175 42 

28 42 


139 
140 


Newburg 

Newbury 


....R. 


486 
380 
330 
305 

1,642 
276 

1,700 
400 

1,200 
826 

2,695 
700 
600 
550 
450 


46 25 
33 31 


141 
142 
143 


New Dundee 

Newington 

Niagara 


. . . .R. 
. ...R. 


37 43 
14 70 

109 54 


144 


Norland 


11 89 


145 


North Cobalt 


20 00 


146 


North Gower 


2,634 
11,528 
2,046 
8,373 
3,375 
1,345 


19 48 


147 
148 
149 
150 


Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville 

Odessa 


R. 

. ...R. 

R 


81 38 

29 40 

110 44 

39 45 


151 
152 


Omemee 

Orono 


....R. 


38 60 
10 00 


153 


Pakenham 


956 

675 

2,259 

1,373 

3,152 

1,686 

2,299 

3,364 

4,982 

3,145 

1,456 

2,360 

569 

rrection 

1,400 

4,007 
2,296 
1,640 
396 
1,501 
3,832 


10 00 


154 


Parkhead 


39 26 


155 


Pickering 


470 

90 

550 


38 11 


156 


Pinkerton 


28 12 


157 
158 


Plattsville 

Plympton 


....R. 


63 27 
40 55 


159 


Point Edward 


900 
1,400 
1,150 
1,200 

720 

650 
Report ret 

450 

No Report 

2,000 

650 

400 

800 

1,479 

700 
700 
480 


20 67 


160 


Port Credit 


48 58 


161 
162 
163 
164 


Port Dover 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Port Stanley 


. . . .R. 
. . . .R. 


55 81 

142 28 

25 68 

41 36 


165 


Powassan 


20 00 


166 


Princeton 




167 


Queensville 


44 56 


168 


Rainy River 




169 
170 


Ridgetown 

Ripley 


....R. 


76 96 
15 00 


171 


Rlversdale 


20 00 


172 


Rodney 


22 87 


173 


Romney 


54 62 


174 
175 


Runnymede 

Russell 

St. George 


...R. 
. . . .R. 


37 17 
10 00 


176 


2,958 
1,562 
1,694 
1,750 


33 01 


177 


St. Helen's 


35 64 


178 


Saltfleet , 


54 17 


179 


Scarboro' 


430 


78 19 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



121 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES—Concluded 
Statistics, 1915 



No. 


Library 


Population 


Total 
Expenditure 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circulation 


Legislative 

Grant paid 

in 1916 


180 
181 
182 


Schreiber R. 

Scotland R. 

Shedden 


1,100 
400 
350 
250 
100 
600 
380 

1,680 
400 
No Report 
300 
481 
350 
550 
No Report 

7,000 
700 

1,030 
913 
Reorganize 
900 
600 
755 
460 

1,726 
350 
600 
504 

1,365 


$ c. 
422 61 
174 19 

119 12 
133 95 

28 89 
209 97 

54 03 
155 43 

27 80 

79 94 

63 35 

433 46 

93 50 

684 90 
166 02 
280 13 
507 59 
dl9l6 

208 28 

120 44 

55 40 
215 45 
232 51 

75 60 

84 85 

5 00 

209 94 
127 45 

98 05 

50 00 

96 92 

104 65 

79 04 

71 51 

144 28 

110 00 

473 13 
46 81 
63 68 
69 00 
15 02 

364 00 
74 00 

209 86 

150 70 
68 45 

108 99 


1,303 

1,811 

2,048 

546 

302 

716 

305 

5,662 

1,053 

1,512 

1,603 

513 

1,545 

1,451 
1,649 
5,076 
4,331 

3,217 

3,060 

1,373 

340 


1,818 
1,335 
2,182 

501 

334 
3,762 

781 
5,540 

842 

832 
1.222 

987 
479 

3,491 
2,765 
7,416 
5,205 

2,170 

4,805 

805 

2,818 


$ c. 
33 36 
46 70 
32 00 
61 22 
10 00 
15 00 
19 63 
28 13 


183 


Shetland 


184 
185 
186 
187 
188 


Singhampton 


Smithville 


Solina 


Southampton 


South Mountain 


189 


South River 




190 


Speedside 


31 29 
13 63 
57 35 


191 


Springfield 


192 


Stevensville t , 


193 


Strathcona 


10 00 


194 


Strathroy 


195 
196 
197 
198 
199 


Sudbury R. 

Sydenham R. 

Tavistock R. 

Teeswater R. 

Thamesford 


50 69 
63 12 
73 50 
99 14 


200 
201 


Thamesville R. 

Thedford 


25 00 
49 38 


202 


Thornbury 


10 00 


203 


Thorndale 


71 68 


204 


Tilbury 


61 54 


205 


Tiverton 


992 
2,513 
1,140 
1,935 
2,469 
1,534 
1,705 
3,486 
1,208 

331 
1,220 
1,982 
1,447 

5,024 
2,584 
2,201 
1,176 

811 
3,181 
2,314 
1,578 
2,584 

159 
1,365 


1,340 
1,633 

178 
5,912 
2,185 
1,339 
1,200 
1,351 
1,827 

440 

642 
2,632 

673 

8,475 

2,958 

98 

1,019 

796 
5,071 

839 
4,754 

984 


14 80 


206 


Tottenham 


13 91 


207 


Trout Creek 




208 


Tweed 


38 56 


209 


Underwood 


57 49 


210 




500 

1,800 
280 
450 
701 
200 
250 
600 
No Report 

7,242 
800 
160 
651 
180 

2,050 
400 

1,044 
400 
600 
180 


42 37 


211 


Vankleek Hill 


10 00 


212 
213 


Victoria R. 

Victoria Mines 


43 58 

44 94 


214 


Victoria Road 


27 53 


215 


Walton 


27 61 


216 
217 
218 
219 
220 
221 


Wardsville R. 

Warkworth R. 

Waterdown R. 

Welland R. 

Wellesley 

Westford 


36 10 
11 52 

95 26 
10 00 


222 


West Lome 


15 45 


223 


White Lake 


5 00 


224 
225 


Wiarton R. 

Williamstown 


69 86 
30 68 


226 
227 

228 


Winchester R. 

Woodville R. 

Worthington 


43 32 

55 97 


229 


Zephyr 


889 


40 37 




Total 








32,790 17 


427,113 


510,287 


7,944 08 











Libraries with Reading rooms are marked "R." 
Population given is that furnished by the libraries, except where error was dis- 
covered. 



122 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



NOTES FROM PUBLIC LIBRARIES REGISTER 
Libraries Removed from the Register 

Eight libraries were removed from the register in 1915, but were counted in 
the summary of active libraries in the report from the Inspector's office as pub- 
iished last year. The names of these libraries follow : Belfountain, Bradford, Cal- 
lander, Copper Cliff, Elk Lake, Newboro, Richmond and Thamesford. 

Ten libraries closed in 1915 or 1914, and were removed from the official regis- 
ter of active libraries in 1916. They were as follows: Apple Hill, Carp, Dalhousie> 
Dundalk, Dunvegan, Mallorytown, Matilda, Rockwood, Sunderland, and Wood- 
bridge. 

A few libraries became inactive in 1915, but according to the Public Libraries 
Act they cannot be removed from the register until 1917. 

Libraries Reorganized 

Two Association Public Libraries-. Lucan and Thamesford filed reorganiza- 
tion papers in 1916. 

GRANTS TO HISTORICAL, LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTIONS 

The following Historical, Literary and Scientific Institutions, etc., duly reported 
according to the requirements of the Act, and received the undermentioned 
grants during the fiscal year ended October 31st, 1916. 



Name of Institution 



Grant 
Paid 



Brant Historical Society 

Elgin Historical and Scientific Association 

Essex Historical Society 

Huron Institute 

Kent Historical Society 

Kingston Historical * Society 

L'Alliance Francaise, Ottawa (including $100 arrears) 

Lennox and Addington Historical Society 

Lundy's Lane Historical Society 

London and Middlesex Historical Society 

Niagara Historical Society 

Ontario Historical Society 

Simcoe County Pioneer and Historical Society 

Thunder Bay Historical Society, Fort William 

Wentworth Historical Society 

Women's Canadian Historical Society of Ottawa 

Women's Canadian Historical Society of Toronto 

Women's Wentworth Historical Society 

Hamilton Scientific Association 

Canadian Institute (including $750 arrears) 

Club Litteraire Canadien Fransais, Ottawa . . . f 

L'Institut Canadien Francais d'Ottawa ' 

Ottawa Field Naturalists' Club 

Royal Astronomical Society, Toronto 

Society of Chemical Industry 

Ontario Library Association 

Reading Camp Association 

St. Patrick's Literary Association of Ottawa 

Canadian Free Library for the Blind 

Waterloo Historical Society 

United Empire Loyalists 

York Pioneers 



$ c. 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
400 00 
100 00 
200 00 
100 00 
200 00 
800 00 
100 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 
100 00 
300 00 
400 00 

!,250 00 
200 00 
200 00 
200 00 
600 00 
200 00 
400 00 

,000 00 
200 00 
500 00 
100 00 
200 00 
200 00 



W. O. Carson, 

Inspector of Public Libraries. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



123 



APPENDIX Q 

STATISTICS OF PUBLIC, SEPARATE, CONTINUATION 
AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

Summary 



I. ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 
a. Public Schools 

Number of Public Schools in 1915 

Increase for the year 32 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages in the Public 
Schools during the year (exclusive of Continuation, 
Kindergarten and Night School pupils) 

Increase for the year 10,026 

Average daily attendance of pupils 

Increase for the year 15,578 

Percentage of average attendance to total attendance .... 

Increase for the year 2.08 

Number of persons employed as teachers (exclusive of 
Continuation, Kindergarten and Night School 
teachers) in the Public Schools : men, 1,584 ; women, 
8,877; total 

Increase for the year 259 

Number of teachers who attended Normal School 

Increase for the year 607 

Number of teachers who attended Normal College or 
Faculty of Education 

Increase for the year 163 

Number of teachers with a University degree 7 

Increase for the year 35 

Average annual salary for male teachers 

Increase for the year $27 

Average annual salary for female teachers 

Increase for the year $9 

Average experience of male teachers 

Average experience of female teachers 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries 

Amount expended for Public School houses (sites and 

buildings) 

Amount expended for all other purposes 

Total amount expended on Public Schools 

Decrease for the year $442,123 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 

Decrease for the year $1.74 



6,063 



437,593 

291,127 

66.52 



10,461 
7,637 

966 

143 

$902 

$613 

11.84 years 

7.42 years 

$7,110,164 

$3,195,326 

$2,778,139 

$13,083,629 

$29.89 



124 THE KEPOET OF THE No. 17 



b. Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

Number of Koman Catholic Separate Schools in 1915. . 537 

Increase for the year 18 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages 67,481 

Increase for the year 1,210 t 

Average daily attendance of pupils 45,733 

Increase for the year 1,945 

Percentage of average attendance to total attendance. . . . 67.77 

Increase for the year 1.70 

Number of teachers 1,389 

Increase for the year 45 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $503,946 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $366,625 

Amount expended for all other purposes $313,276 

Total amount expended on R. C. Separate Schools .... $1,183,847 

Decrease for the year $141,369 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $17.54 

Decrease for the year $2.45 

c. Protestant Separate Schools 

Number of Protestant Separate Schools (included with 

Public Schools, a) in 1915 5 

Number of enrolled pupils 423 

Decrease for the year 12 

Average daily attendance of pupils 290 

Decrease for the year 6 

d. Kindergartens 

Number of Kindergartens in 1915 228 

Increase for the year 12 

* Number of pupils enrolled 18,730 

Average daily attendance of pupils 10,628 

Increase for the year 1,118 

Number of teachers engaged 396 

e. Night Public Schools 

Number of Night Schools in 1915-1916 30 

Increase for the year 2 

Number of pupils enrolled 1,794 

Decrease for the year 361 

Average daily attendance of pupils 675 

Increase for the year 24 

Number of teachers engaged 63 

Decrease for the year 4 

* See page 257. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 125 

II. SECONDARY SCHOOLS 
a. High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 

Number of High Schools (including 48 Collegiate Insti- 
tutes) in 1915 160 

Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools 38,426 

Increase for the year 1,960 

Average daily attendance of pupils 24,825 

Increase for the year 1,465 

* Number of teachers in High Schools 1,020 

♦Average annual salary, Principals $1,813 

Decrease for the year $23 

♦Average annual salary, Assistants $1,359 

Decrease for the year $14 

♦Average annual salary, all teachers $1,430 

Decrease for the year $15 

♦Highest salary paid $3,500 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $1,472,673 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $448,989 

Amount expended for all other purposes $549,312 

Total amount expended on High Schools $2,470,974 

Decrease for the year $973,966 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $61.30 

b. Continuation Schools 

Number of Continuation Schools, 1915 132 

Increase for the year 1 

Number of pupils in attendance 6,800 

Increase for the year 731 

Average daily attendance of pupils 4,274 

Increase for the year 462 

♦Number of teachers 238 

Increase for the year 1 

♦Average annual salary, Principals $1,086 

Decrease for the year $13 

♦Average annual salary, Assistants $740 

Decrease for the year $5 

♦Highest salary paid $2,000 

Amount expended on teachers' salaries $219,660 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $37,103 

Amount expended for all other purposes $54,031 

Total amount expended on Continuation Schools $310,794 

Increase for the year $16,669 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) $45.70 

Decrease for the year $2.76 

♦These statistics are based on Returns to the Department, dated January, 1916. 



126 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



c. Nigtit High Schools 



No. 17 



Number of Night Schools in 1915-1916 
Number of pupils enrolled 

Decrease for the year 

Average daily attendance of pupils . . . 

Decrease for the year 

Number of teachers engaged 

Increase for the year 



20 

b4 
6 



13 
2,354 

577 

90 



HI. GENERAL 



Elementary and Secondary Schools 



* Total population of the Province 

Pupils enrolled in elementary and secondary schools, 1915 

Increase for the year 

Average daily attendance 

Increase for the year 

Percentage of total population enrolled 

Total expenditure 

Average cost per head of total population in 1915 



6.722 



20,508 



2,625,800 
573,178 

377,839 

21 

$17,049,244 
$6.45 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) in all Schools 





1902 


1907 


1912 1914 


1915 


Sites and buildings 

Teachers' salaries 


$0 97 $2 86 
7 63 10 44 
2 80 4 40 


$5 90 

14 26 

5 34 


$10 58 

15 69 

6 54 


$7 06 
16 24 


All other expenses 


6 44 






For all purposes 


11 40 


17 70 


25 50 


32 81 


29 74 



Average Cost per Pupil (average attendance) in all Schools 





1902 1907 


1912 


1914 


1915 


Sites and buildings 


$1 70 

13 34 

4 89 


$4 86 

17 78 

7 50 


$9 63 

23 26 

8 71 


$16 78 
24 87 
10 37 


$10 71 


Teachers' salaries 


24 63 


All other expenses 


9 78 






For all purposes 


19 93 


30 14 


41 60 


52 02 


45 12 



"Estimated 



1016 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



127 



Comparative School Statistics, 1867=1915 

I. PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

These tables, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, for the purpose of comparison with previous 
years in which the Separate Schools were included with Public Schools, include 
Roman Catholic and Protestant Separate Schools. The tables A, B, C, D and E 
give the statistics of the Public Schools including Protestant Separate Schools; 
the statistics of the R. C. Separate Schools are given in Tables F and G; those 
of the Protestant Separate Schools appear in Table N ; the Kindergartens in Table 
; and the Night Schools in Table P. 

1. School Population — Attendance 

The school population of the Province (as ascertained by the assessors), and the 
school attendance, are given in the following table : 









u 


CM 


CM 


T3 






-4 


CO 3 i—i 

w> p 2 








T3 

p 


O 


U 

> 


p 

01 






p 

5 


£ C3 o 






p 
o 


p 


I© 


O 


•M 






g3 


b. +=> CO 


Year 




£ 

P 
P. 


P o 

« CO 


o 
H 


h3 
a> 

'o 
u 

a 

4) 


u 

CD 

B 
3 w 






a> 


tage of a 
ance to t 
ittending 








CO M 




CO 








3 a> 


a*& ™ 




o 
o 

J3 


o 

o 


=3 c« 


'p. 


'3 

p 


f-H Pi 

o3 p 
o ** 


CO 


CO 

•2 


* § 

£§ 






CZJ 


CO 


cu 


PL, 


Eh 


m 


o 


<J 


Oh 


1867.. 


5—16 


447,726 




a380,511 


621,132 


401,643 


213,019 


188,624 


163,974 


40.82 


1872.. 


5—16 


495,756 




a433,664 


/>20,998 


454,662 


238,848 


215,814 


188,701 


41.50 


1877.. 


5—16 


494,804 


i,430 


488,553 


877 


490,860 


261,070 


229,790 


217,184 


44.25 


1882.. 


5—16 


483,817 


1,352 


469,751 


409 


471,512 


246,966 


224,546 


214,176 


45.42 


1887.. 


5—21 


611,212 


1,569 


491,242 


401 


493,212 


259,083 


234,129 


245,152 


49.71 


1892.. 


5—21 


595,238 


1,636 


483,643 


391 


485,670 


253,091 


232,579 


253,830 


52.26 


1897.. 


5—21 


590,055 


1,385 


481,120 


272 


482,777 


251,677 


231,100 


273,544 


56.66 


1902.. 


5—21 


584,512 


1,001 


452,977 


110 


454,088 


232,880 


221,208 


261,480 


57.58 


1907.. 


5—21 


590,285 


691 


447,452 


75 


448,218 


229,794 


218,424 


266,503 


59.45 


1912.. 


5—21 


609,127 


471 


466,526 


r25 


c 467,022 


c 239, 187 


c 227, 835 


<• 291, 210 


62.35 


1914.. 


5—21 


636,616 


456 


493,329 


c53 


c 493,838 


c252,202 


c 241, 636 


c 319, 337 


64.66 


1915.. 


5—21 


643,975 


526 


504,505 


c43 c-505,074 

] 


c258,000 


c 247, 074 


c 336, 860 


66.69 



a 5-16. 

b Other ages than 5 to 16. 

c Continuation School attendance excluded. 

Note. — Kindergarten and Night School pupils are not included in above table. 

The increase in the enrolled attendance for the year was 11,236, and in the 
percentage of average to total attendance, the gain was 2.03. 



The following table compares the attendance and gives the percentages from 
rural and from urban municipalities for several years : 



Year 


Attendance in Rural 
Schools 


Attendance in Urban 
Schools 


1903 


260,617 or 57.88% of total 
242,247 or 54.05% of total 
227,263 or 48.66% of total 
228,225 or 46.21% of total 
231,681 or 45.87% of total 


189,661 or 42.12% of total 


1907 

1912 

1914 


205,971 or 45.95% of total 
239,759 or 51.33% of total- 
265,613 or 53.78% of total 


1915 


273,393 or 54.13% of total 





12S 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



2. Classification of Pupils 





-f= 


+»^d 








i •% 








M o 
o3 O 








jkM 


/«"N 




*.J 


P-.M 








t m 


u 




Mt2 








o.d 


< 


Year 


TJpH 




M 


M 


M 










«8 £ 
<u o 


n 


o 


o 

o 

pq 


PQ o 


a 
> 




CO 


-*J 1 — 1 

CO 


"3 




-d 


s* 


2 




1—1 


r-t 


CV3 


CO 


"* 


to 


Q 


1867 


* 79,365 


98,184 


83,211 


68,896 


71,987 


5,450 


1872 1 


*160,828 


100,245 


96,481 


67,440 


29,668 


57,582 


1877 


* 153, 630 


108,678 


135,824 


72,871 


19,857 


153,036 


1882 


*165,834 


106,229 


117,352 


71,740 


10,357 


176,432 


1887 


115,657 


76,704 


100,533 


108,096 


81,984 


10,238 


375,097 


1892 ; 


114,932 


73,015 


96,074 


99,345 


88,934 


13,370 


435,239 


1897 


110,567 


70,808 


91,330 


99,682 


89,314 


21,076 


448,444 


1902 


107,441 


69,062 


85,732 


90,630 


83,738 


17,485 


434,030 


1907 


112,552 


60,194 


84,622 


89,371 


85,752 


15,727 


394,735 


1912 


126,100 


67,368 


92,728 


88,811 


85,213 


t 6,802 


444,975 


1914 


131,306 


72,650 


100,798 


96,330 


85,867 


t 6,887 


473,524 


1915 


131,844 


72,898 


102.972 


100,023 


90,050 


t 7,287 


486,808 



Year 


-d 
p< 

U 

be 
o 

0) 


"55 

d 


d 

b <» 
SO cj 

3 2 

.2 'So 

CO >j 

Ph 


>> 

Fh 

o 

CO 

£ 

CO 

r Si 
d 


u 
o 

CO 

s 

d 
c8 

c3 

d 

c3 
O 


d 

.2 
'+* 

'CO 

o 

a 

o 


a 
a 

c3 


1867 


272, 173 
327,139 
375,951 
280,517 
316,791 
334,947 
342,189 
318,755 
336,073 
379,101 
414,373 
423,863 


47,618 
110,083 
168,942 
158,694 
203,567 
220,941 
233,915 
268,356 
274,493 
349,206 
388,282 
413,898 


"33,926 
71,525 
171,594 
215,343 
194,459 
249,324 
356,223 
393,929 
417,602 


161,787 

47,019 

59,694 

1150,989 

94,830 

106,505 

114,398 

106,282 

139,212 

163,861 

182,388 

178,453 


"37,*339 
43,401 

iii.'iii 

147,451 
169,627 
163,672 
195,266 
207,544 
227,581 
223,913 


147,412 
105,512 
226,977 
209,184 
270,856 
294,331 
316,787 
296,172 
357,969 
401,692 
437,436 
455,222 


147,412 


1872 


176.644 


1877 


226,977 


1882 


209,184 


1887 


270,856 


1892 


294,331 


1897 


316,787 


1902 

1907 


296,172 
222,745 


1912 


166,251 


1914 


151,519 


1915 


143,173 



The following table classifies the pupils in the various readers, as to rural and 
urban schools : 



Year 



First 
Reader 
Part I 

or 
Primer 



First 
Reader 
Part II 
or First 

Book 



Second 
Book 



Third 
Book 



Fourth 
Book 



Fifth 

Book or 

beyond 

Fourth 

Book 



Rural Schools 
Rural Schools 
Rural Schools 
Rural Schools 
Rural Schools 



Urban Schools (cities, 
towns and incorpor- 
ated villages) 



1904 
1907 
1912 
1914 
1915 

fl904 
1907 
1912 
1914 
1915 



60,784 
60,470 
62,712 
63,666 
63,697 

44,456 
52,082 
63,388 
67,640 
68,147 



36,941 
31,538 
30,293 
31,391 
32,103 

27,800 
28,656 
37,075 
41,259 
40,795 



47,930 
46,219 
43,775 
45,144 
45,816 

37,299 
38,403] 
48,953 
55,654 
57,156! 



50,297 
48,247 
42,450 
43,154 
44,058 

39,814 
41,124 
46,361 
53,176 
55,965 



47,289 
46,815 
44,049 
41,483 
42,599 

35,815 
38,937 
41,164 
44,384 
47,451 



9,892 

8,958 

13,984 

f3,387 

f3,408 

6,304 

6,769 

12,818 

13,500 

f3,879 



In 1st Reader. 



t Exclusive of Continuation School pupils. 



$ History. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



129 



3. Teachers' Certificates 



Year 



8 S 


0> 


0) 


CO 
CO 

■ — i 
O 


3^ 


ea 




-t^> 


fc 


s 


ft 


i—i 


4,890 


2,849 


2,041 


1,899 


5,476 


2,626 


2,850 


1,337 


6,468 


3,020 


3,448 


250 


6,857 


3,062 


3,795 


246 


7,594 


2,718 


4,876 


252 


8,480 


2,770 


5,710 


261 


9,128 


2,784 


6,344 


343 


9,367 


2,294 


7,073 


608 


9,893 


1,783 


8,110 


715 


10,757 


1,511 


9,246 


674 


11,546 


1,628 


9,918 


878 


11,850 


1,685 


10,165 


1,051 





icates, 

old 

oard, 


3achers 

ded 

chool 




S &cM 


*» gcc 


to 
to 


8^-S 




O 


i_i i — i <-< • 

* 2 o.g 


JO o ?_, 

d-O o 


-d 


^.Sois 


CO 


O 


£ 


386 


151 


666 


2,084 


578 


828 


3,926 


988 


1,084 


3,471 


971 


1,873 


3,865 


924 


2,434 


4,299 


873 


3,038 


4,465 


934 


3,643 


3,432 


1,031 


4,774 


3,452 


1,839 


4.587 


1,804 


1,860 


6,705 


1,771 


1,510 


7,565 


3,520 


1,254 


8,196 



~° h d 
O^ o 
_^ d-^3 

S § § 
* 



1867 

1872 

1877 

1882 

1887 

1892 

1897 

1902 

1907 

fl912 

11914 

11915 



454 

477 
304 
169 
553 
047 
386 
296 
887 
419 
387 
025 



614 

833 

1,010 



Note. — Kindergarten and Night School teachers are not included in above table. 

The number of men engaged in teaching in these schools in 1915 was 14.22 per 
cent, of the whole; in 1914 the number was 14.10 per cent. 

The number of teachers and the class of certificates, in the Public Schools 
alone, in each County and District of the Province, will be found in Table C of this 
Appendix, pages 158 to 161. 

The following table classifies the teachers and certificates as to rural and urban 
schools: 



Rural Schools, 1904 

Rural Schools, 1907 

fRural Schools, 1912 

fRural Schools, 1914 

fRural Schools, 1915 

Urban (cities, towns and incorporated 
villages), 1904 

Urban, 1907 

tUrban, 1912 

tUrban, 1914 

tUrban, 1915 



Teachers 



Total 



5,974 
6,038 
6,143 
6,276 
6,351 

3,580 
3,855 
4,614 
5,270 
5,499 



Male 



1,469 

1,201 

894 

948 

963 

606 

582 
617 
680 
722 



Female 



4,505 
4,837 
5,249 
5,328 
5,388 

2,974 
3,273 
3,997 
4,590 
4,777 



Certificates 



1st 

Class 



152 
180 
165 
230 
308 

483 
535 
509 
648 
743 



2nd 
Class 



1,944 
1,542 
3,002 
3,409 
3,839 

2,248 
2,345 
3,417 
3,978 
4,186 



3rd 

Class 



3,107 
3,079 
1,463 
1,470 
1,283 

289 
373 
341 
301 
237 



Other 

Class 



771 
1,237 
1,513 
1,167 

921 

560 
602 
347 
343 
333 



* For the years previous to 1912 the numbers who attended Normal College or the 
Faculty of Education are included in the preceding column. 

fExclusive of Continuation School teachers. 
9 E. . 



130 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



4. Teachers' Salaries and Experience 
Teachers' Salaries 









<v 




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< 


<«J 


< 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1867 


1,350 
1,000 
1,100 
1,100 
1,450 
1,500 
1,500 
1,600 
1,900 


346 
360 
398 
415 
425 
421 
391 
436 
596 


226 
228 
264 
269 
292 
297 
294 
313 
420 


-532 
628 
735 
742 
832 
894 
892 
935 
1,157 


243 
245 
307 
331 
382 
402 
425 
479 
592 


464 
507 
583 
576 
619 
648 
621 
667 
800 


240 
216 
269 
273 
289 
298 
306 
317 
406 






261 
305 
379 
385 
398 
383 
347 
372 
458 


189 
213 
251 
248 
271 
269 
254 
271 
379 






1872 








1877. 










1882. 










1887. 










1892. 










1897. 










1902. 










1907. 


659 


372 


907 


453 


1912. 


2,200 


788 


543 


1,320 


703 


977 


519 


779 


492 


566 


493 


1,141 


618 


1914. 


2,400 


875 


604 


1,484 


772 


1,033 


577 


840 


537 


614 


543 


1,276 


686 


1915. 


2,400 


902 


613 


1,502 


779 


1,067 


586 


840 


540 


621 


549 


1,310 


696 



Incorporated villages included from 1867 to 1902 inclusive. 



Increases in salaries in the cities, towns, villages and rural schools are shown 
in the above table. In Table 0, pages 158 to 16CK, the average salaries for 1915 of 
the Public School teachers of the various Counties and Districts are given separately, 
and summarized for the cities, towns and villages. This table also states the 
salaries paid to teachers according to the grade of certificate held, and illustrates 
to what extent the teacher with the higher certificate commands the higher salary. 
The average salaries for the Province are as follows : 

Male Female 

First Class certificates $1,433 $668 

Second Class certificates 830 647 

Third Class and District certificates 526 479 

Temporary certificates 454 408 

Teachers' Experience 

The length of service or experience of the teachers engaged in the Public 
Schools is also shown in Table C, where the numbers who have taught from less 
than one year up to forty years and over are given for each year, and where the 
experience of the teachers, according to the grade of certificate held, is given. 

The average experience in the Public Schools at the end of 1915 was as 
follows : 

Male teachers, 11.84 years. 
Female teachers, 7.42 years. 
All teachers, 8.09 years. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



131 



5. Receipts and Expenditures 





Receipts 


Expenditures 


Year 


5 

P 

d 

to 

M 

4) 


school grants 
jssments 


to" to 

TS co 

S3 

> p 


Pi 


CO 

CO 

la 

CO 


I 

r^H CD 

-Q o 


to 

ce 

Pi 

ft . 
c3 O 

» -^ 

CO 0) 

p . 
03 2? 


p 
ed 

"*-• CO 


2 

p 

p 


p 
p 




1 


S CO 

cc3 


lergy res 
balances 
sources 


4) 
O 
CD 
M 

. o 


"co 
to 

CD 

o 
o3 

01 


** 

ra o 

CO .£ 

CD o 

-*J CO 


2 p. 

>* CO 

■2 ^ 


cj3 M 
P <u 

Zto 

-M-P 

O o 


ft 

M 

0) 

3 

o 


p 

to 

CO 

ft 
to 




£ 


O 


H 


E- 


CC 


J 


M 


H 


O 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1867.! 187,153 


1,151,583 


331,599 


1,670,33511,093,517 


149.195 


31,354 


199,123 


1,473,189 


3 67 


1872. 225,318 


1,763,492 


541,460 


2,530,2701,371,594 


456,043 


47,799 


331,928 


2,207,364 


4 85 


1877. 251,962 


2,422,432 


730,687 


3,405,0842,038,099 


477,393 


47,539 


510,458 


3,073,489 


6 26 


1882.J 265,738 


2,447,214 


757,038 


3,469,990|2,144,449 


341,918 


15,583 


525,025 


3,026,975 


6 42 


1887.1 268,722 


3,084,352 


978,283 


4,331,357 2,458,540 


544,520 


27,509 


711,535 


3,742,104 


7 59 


1892. 283,791 


3,300,51211,227,596 


4,811,899 2,752,629 


427,321 


40,003 


833,965 


4,053,918 


8 40 


1897. 366,538 


3,361,562| 1,260,055 


4,988,155 2,886,061 


391,689 


60,585 


877,335 


4,215,670 


8 73 


1902.1 383,666 


3,959,91211,422,924 


5,766,50213,198,132 


432,753 


86,723 


1,107,552 


4,825,160 


10 62 


1907. 655,239 


6,146,825|2,455,864 


9,257,928 4,389,524 


1,220.820 


213,096 


1,732,739 


7,556,179 


16 85 


1912J 842,278 


9.478.887 3,936,887 


14,258,052|6,109,547 


2,777,960 


167,755 


2,218,698 


11,273.960 


24 14 


1914.1 760,845 


12,608,865 4,069,565 


17,439,275;7,203,034 


4,626,030 


167,283 


2,854,621 


14,850,968 


30 07 


1915.1 849,872 


ll,810,023|4,089,210 


16,749,105 7,614,110 


3,561,951 


177,038 


2,914,377 


14,267,476 


28 24 



The increase for the year in the amount paid as teachers' salaries was $411,076. 
The total expenditure decreased by $583,492. 

The expenditure per pupil of enrolled attendance decreased from $30.07 to 
$28.24, and from $46.50 to $42.35 per pupil of average attendance. 

These tables show the expenditure per pupil for the years as given below : 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 

1902 1907 1912 1914 1915 

Teachers' salaries $7.04 $9.79 $13.0-8 $14.58 $15.07 

Sites and buildings 0.95 2.72 5.95 9.37 7.05 

All other expenses 2.63 4.34 5.11 6.12 6.12 

For all purposes $10.62 $16.85 $24.14 $30.07 $28.24 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance) 

1902 1907 1912 

Teachers' salaries $12.23 $16.47 $20.98 

Sites and buildings 1.65 4.58 D.54 

All other expenses 4.57 7.30 8.19 

For all purposes $18.45 $28.35 $38.71 



1914 1915 

$22.55 $22.60 

14.49 10.57 

9.46 9.18 



$46.50 $42.35 



The expenditure per pupil (enrolled attendance) for 1915 in the Public 
Schools alone will be found in Table E, pages 174 and 175, and for the R. C. Separ- 
ate Schools in Table F, pages 180 and 181. The expenditure will there be shown 
as to rural schools, cities, towns, and villages separately. 



132 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



II. ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS 





Schools — Teachers 


Number of Pupils iu the various 


Branches of 






— Pupils 


Instruction 




Year 








J 








T3 




>> 

o 


u 
o 




d 

a> 

Pi 

o 

CO 


CO 
rl 

CD 

rd 

o 


CO 


■8 

6 


o 

"co 
o 
Pi 


r-t 

a 

B 


< 
d 


09 

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co >, 


CO 

a 

CO 


a 

rt 

rt 




rC| 

o 


e3 


Pi 




o 

CD 


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c3 


£W 


to 

d 


d 




W 


En 


Ph 


C5 


o 


O 


Q 


Ph 


H 


o 


1867 


161 


210 


18,924 


8,666 




5,688 






*2,571 




1872 


171 
185 
190 
229 


254 
334 
390 
491 


21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 


8,011 


7.908 


7,908 
11,174 
11,695 
18,678 






*3,548 

*9,812 

*10,124 

5,076 




1877 


13,15411 174 








1882 


13,900 
19,608 


11,695 
18,678 


7,548 
21,818 


2,033 

8,578 




1887 


7,931 


1892 


312 


662 


37,466 


26,299 


22,755 


22,755 


32,682 


11,056 


6,713 


11,483 


1897 


340 
391 


752 

870 


41,620 
45,964 


27,471 

29,788 


26,071 
27,409 


26,071 
27,409 


36,462 
41,952 


18,127 
14,687 


6,828 
7,544 


13,134 


1902 


15,035 


1907 


449 


1,034 


51,502 


34,874 


35,550 


23,185 


36.844 


23,552 


11,328 


19,971 


1912 


513 
519 
537 


1,237 
1,344 
1,389 


61,297 
66,271 
67,481 


50,449 
59,544 
61,227 


53,717 
61,054 


18,837|56,572 
19,807 62,641 


47,939 
48,831 


17,429 

21,988 

( 21,844 


28,138 


1914 


33,526 


1915 


i63,255 


|21,310 63,645 


59,361 


31,516 



'History. 









Receipts . 


and Expenditures 










Receipts 


Expenditures 


Year 


CD 


gel 

co 42 


CO 

U 
CO C3 

o 


CO 

_p 

'CD 


- CO 


■ 

XJ O 

rr* 2 


CO 

Pi 

H CO' d 
..-»-» CD 


CO 


CD 
rH 

H-=> 


p 



P 






rt r n CD 




o 


CO CD 


^rd CO 


SR d - 




^ 






si 

co d 


p.42 a 

'o d CO 
•S rt co 
d ^ CD 
p 00 co 


CD CD , 
^ CO o 


CD 
rH 

'rt 

o 


rdi§ 

is 


do £ 

rt co co 
co &c g 

£.Sr§ 


v< P S-i 
,jo rt P 


CD O 

rd P 

O -j 
rH A 


d 
o 

o *> 


CD 
P 

-r-> 
CO 

o 




hH 


§ 


PQ 


H 


Eh 


co 


J 


<1 


Eh 


O 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


I 


$ 


$ c. 


1867.. 


9,993 
12,327 


26,781 
41,134 


11,854 
15,349 


48,628 
68,810 


34,830 
45,824 






t7,889 
115,993 


42,719 
61,817 


2 26 


1872.. 






2 88 


1877.. 


13,607 


72,177 


34,482 


120,266 


70,201 


24,510 


2,811 


17,284 


114,806 


4 60 


1882.. 


14,382 


97,252 


55,105 


166,739 


84,095 


36,860 


1,303 


32,082 


154,340 


5 13 


1887.. 


16,808 


147,639 


65,401 


229,848 


112,293 


48,937 


3,624 


46,369 


211,223 


6 95 


1892.. 


21,043 


206,698 


98,293 


326,034 


149,707 


65,874 


2,922 


71,335 


289,838 


7 74 


1897.. 


26,675 


224,617 


84,032 


335,324 


168,800 


41,233 


5,786 


86,350 


302,169 


7 26 


1902. . 


30,472 


293,348 


161,683 


485,503 


210,199 


100,911 


6,158 


118,173 


435,441 


9 47 


1907.. 


40,524 


442,316 


308,540 
1577,713 


791,380 


281,484 


186,908 


15,991 


229,793 


714,176 


13 86 


1912.. 


51,846 


757,255 


1,186,814 


456,800 


308,193 


15,207 


263,024 


1,043,224 


17 01 


1914.. 


44,468 


903,988 


518,817 


1,467,273 


509,757 


445,696 


22,398 


347,365 


1,325,216 


19 99 


1915.. 


42,131 


879,903 


425,468 


1,347,502 


503,946 


366,625 


14.421 


298,855 


1,183,847 


17 54 



tlncluding all expenditure except for Teachers' salaries. 

An increase of 1,210 in the enrolment and a decrease of $141,369 in the 
expenditure in 1915 are noticed in the above tables. The expenditure per pupil of 
enrolled attendance decreased from $19.99 to $17.54. Detailed statistics in refer- 
ence to these schools -\vill be found in Table F and G, pages 176 to 193. 



III. PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
The following is a complete list of the Protestant Separate Schools of the 



Province: — No. 4 Grattan, No. 
Penetanguishene. 



2 Hagarty, No. 1 Tilbury North, L'Orignal, and 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



133 



They were attended by 423 pupils in 1915. The whole amount expended for 
their maintenance and permanent improvements was $9,536.58. One teacher held a 
First Class certificate, seven teachers held Second Class, and three held Third Class 
certificates. 

Complete statistics for these schools will be found in Table N, page 256. 

IV. CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

The following table gives statistics of the " Continuation Classes, Grade A," 
up to and including 1907. Thereafter they are known as " Continuation Schools." 
Formerly the statistics of these schools were included with the statistics of the 
Public and Separate Schools, consequently certain items for the years 1897-1907 
cannot be given. 





CO 

o 

j=i 
o 
c72 


CO 

o 
o 

o 

CO 

Fh 
03 

xi 

o 
c3 

1 

CD 
a 
o 


CO 

o 
o 

o 

CO 
M 

O 
& 

1 

1 

En 


CO 
1— 1 

o 
o 

-a 

o 

CO 

U 

<u 
xi 
o 

a> 
-+^ 

i 

CD 

u 


CO 

u 

o 

u 
<u 
X* 

B 


Eeceipts 


Expenditure 


Total value of Equip- 
ment 


CO 

■ft 

(3 

Ph 

«M 

O 

d 


Percentage of average 
attendance to total 
attendance 




Year 


a 
u 

CD 
> 

CO 


CO 

"3 

o 
M 

+=> 
o 
H 


Paid for 
Teachers' 
Salaries 


n3 
P 
CD 
ft 

M 


Pi 
ft 

fH 

CD 
ft 

co 
o 
O 


1897 . . 


27 

59 

91 

138 

131 

132 


20 
46 
65 
54 
32 
29 


7 
12 

24 
73 
91 

98 


1 
2 

11 
8 
5 


34 
73 
119 
226 
237 
238 


$ 

2,700 
8,350 
25,610 
64,081 
69,811 
63,529 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1,275 
1,856 
3,993 
6,094 
6,069 
.6,800 






1902.. 














1907 


295,261 
325,903 
344,898 


73,325 

4 202,875 
208,386 
219,660 


265,087 
294,125 
310,794 


26,345 
75,556 
75,457 
80,961 






1912... 
1914... 
1915... 


61.97 
62.81 
62.85 


$43.49 
48.46 
45.70 



Statistics in detail for 1915 in reference to the Continuation Schools will be 
found in Tables H, I, and J, pages 194 to 217. 

Average Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 

1912 1914 1915 

Teachers' salaries $33.*29 $34.34 $32.30 

Sites and buildings 2.58 5.44 5.46 

All other expenses . . / 7.62 8.68 7.94 

For all purposes $43.49 $48.46 $45.70 

Average Cost per pupil (average attendance) 

1912 1914 1915 

Teachers' salaries $53.71 $54.66 $51.39 

Sites and buildings 4.17 8.67 8.68 

All other purposes 12.30 13.82 12.64 

For all purposes $70.18 $77.15 $72.71 



134 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



V. COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

The following tables give comparative statistics respecting Collegiate Institutes 
and High Schools from 1867 to 1915 inclusive: — 









1. Receipts, 


Expenditure, Attendance, etc. 


* 












: 


Receipts 




Expenditure 




H 

CO CO 

co^ 

SI 






1 






~CO 


H3 

a 


2 




Year 




CO 
M 1 mH 


CO 

CO* 
CD 

«M 
O 


2 
ft 

o 


teache 

es 


c3 

CO 

CO &fi 


a 

a> 

ft 




CO--CO 


"ft 






^ "^ 




CO 


M-r 1 




M 






*H 




o 


CD c3 
•S 1 w 





u 


£3 


.22 


co 


CO 


a^ co 

U H O 


ft 




o 




O 


c3 


*&!& 


tj 3 


eg 




« s 2 






M 




a 


O 


'3 M 


•d-° 


o 





£^ 08 


CO 




OQ 


< 


CH 


Oh 


CM 


e« 


Ph 


Ph 


O 






$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 






$ C. 


1867.... 


102 


1591 54,562 


15,605 


139,579 


94,820 


*19,190 


124,181 


5,696 


55 


21 86 


1872.... 


104 


239i 79,543 


20,270 


223,269 


141,812 


*31,360 


210,005 


7,968 


56 


26 34 


1877.... 


104 


280j 78,762 


20,753 


357,521 


211,607 


*51,417 


343,710 


9,229 


56 


37 26 


1882.... 


104 


332j 84,304 


29,270 


373,150 


253,834 


*19,361 


343,720 


12,348 


53 


27 50 


1887 ... 


112 


398 


91,977 


56,198 


529,323 


327,452 


*73,061 


495,612 


17,459 


59 


28 38 


1892 . . 


128 


522 


100,000 


97,273 


793,812 


472,029 


*91,108 


696,114 


22,837 


60 


30 48 


1897.... 


130 


579 


101,250 


110,859 


767,487 


532,837 


*46,627 


715,976 


24,390 


61 


29 35 


1902.... 


134 


593 


112,650 


105,801 


832,853 


547,402 


44,246 


769,680 


24,472 


58.97 


31 45 


1907.... 


143 


750 


158,549 


138,396 


1,611,553 


783,782 


193,975 


1,213,697 


30,331 


60.94 


40 01 


1912.... 


148 


917 


209,956 


145,685 


2,414,128 


1,232,537 


327,982 


1,953,061 


32,273 


62.80 


60 51 


1914.... 


161 


1023 


260,955 


163,280 


4,531,534 


1,476,756 


1,335,308 


3,444,940 


36,466 


64.06 


94 46 


1915.... 


160 


1020 


191,374 


170,044 


3,007,833 


1,472,673 


448,989 


2,470,974 


38,426 


64.60 


64 30 



* 'Expenses for repairs, etc., included. 

There was an increase for the year of 1,960 in the enrolment of these schools. 

The expenditure per pupil of enrolled attendance decreased from $94.46 in 
1914 to $64.30 in 1015, and the total expenditure decreased by $973,966. This 
decrease in expenditure is chiefly under the heading, " Sites and Buildings." 

Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 



Teachers' salaries . . 
Sites and buildings . 
All other expenses . . 

For all purposes 



1902 



$ c. 

22 37 

1 81 

7 27 



31 45 



1907 



$ c. 
25 84 

6 39 

7 78 



40 01 



1912 



$ c. 
38 19 
10 16 
12 16 



60 51 



1914 



$c. 
40 49 
36 62 
17 35 



94 46 



1915 



$ c. 
38 32 
11 68 
14 30 



64 30 



Average cost per 


pupil (average attendance) 






1902 


1907 


1912 


1914 


1915 


Teachers' salaries 


$ c. 
37 93 

3 07 
12 34 


$ c. 
42 40 
10 49 
12 76 


$ c. 
60 81 
16 18 
19 37 


$ c. 
63 22 
57 16 
27 09 


$ c. • 
59 32 


Sites and buildings 

All other purposes 


18 08 
22 13 






For all purposes 


53 34 


65 65 


96 36 


147 47 


99 53 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



135 



2. Classification of Pupils, etc. 





English 


Mathematics 


Year 


.« g 
Tag 

1° 


a 
.2 

"an 

-d ° 

1° 
1° 


6 

• — I +3 


U 

o 


It? 

5 s 


CO 

3 

CO 

"-£» 
"fi 

CD 


h3 

£* 
W o 

9 CO 

:£! d 


3 


<x> 

a 

o 


1 

d 

o 
H 

EH 


1867 


5,467 
7,884 
8,819 
12,275 
17,086 
22,530 
19,591 
21,576 
26,415 
22,943 
24,252 
26,117 


4,091 
7,278 
8,772 
12,189 
17,171 
22,535 
24,195 
24,241 
29,383 
31,047 
34,759 
37,314 


io\649 

22,468 

24,176 

23,768 

*29,377 

*31,179 

*34,784 

*37,443 


5,264 
7,715 
9,158 
12,106 
16,962 
22,118 
13,747 
14,500 
22,820 
21,733 
24,377 
26,604 


14,768 
23,457 
24,463 
29,461 
31,588 


14,634 

17,513 

t9,106 

t 12, 220 

H7,010 

122,328 

20,304 

16,817 

23,570 

23,673 

26,031 

28,196 


5,526 
7,834 
9,227 
12,261 
16,939 
21,869 
19,798 
21,594 
26,813 
23,858 
25,344 
26,689 


2,841 
6,033 
8,678 
11,742 
16,904 
22,229 
24,105 
22,953 
26,937 
28,947 
32,687 
35,459 


1,847 
2,592 
8,113 
11,148 
14,839 
17,791 
16,788 
16,881 
23,054 
25,252 
23,203 
24,149 


141 


1872 


174 


1877 


359 


1882 


397 


1887 


1,017 


1892 


1,154 


1897 


1,652 


1902 


1,662 


1907 

1912 

1914 


2,000 
1,954 
2,285 


1915 


2,062 







English Literature. 



t History. 



2. Classification of Pupils, etc. — Continued 





Languages 


Science 


Year 


.2 




1 


d 

cS 

8 


CO 

o 

"55 

>> 

rd 


►» 

?-( 

CO 

a 

-d 
O 


d 

-♦^ 
o 


1867 


5,171 

3,860 

4,955 

4,591 

5,409 

9,006 

16,873 

18,884 

20,511 

23,508 

25,989 

28,597 


802 
900 
871 
815 
997 
1,070 
1,421 
631 
677 
611 
553 
691 


2,164 

2,828 

3,091 

5,363 

6,180 

10,398 

13,761 

i3,595 

17,310 

21,009 

23,797 

26,462 


34i" 

442 
962 
1,350 
2,796 
5,169 
3,280 
3,835 
4,911 
5,396 
4,606 


1,876 

1,921 

2,168 

2,880 

5,265 

6,601 

11,002 

12,758 

23,421 

24,984 

28,524 

29,208 


840 

1,151 

2,547 

2,522 

3,411 

3,710 

5,489 

5,860 

15,064 

16,418 

17,726 

18,876 




1872 




1877 




1882 




1887 


4,640 
6,189 
12,892 
9,051 
15,572 
17,070 
19,008 
20,927 


1892 


1897 


1902 


1907 


1912 


1914 


1915 





136 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



2. Classification of Pupils, etc. — Concluded 





u 

< 



o3 

m 

P 


d 
"o. 

<o 

CO 

■8 

o 

pq 


Destination of Pupils 


00 

M 


CO 

'o 
o 


Year 


0) 

§ 

CO 
3 


to 

d 

■+* 

d 
a 

be 
<3 


a 

o 

03 
4) 


o 

CO 

S3 

4> 

U 

■s 

a 

3 

53 


1867 


676 

2,176 

2,755 

3,441 

14,295 

16,980 

12,252 

10,721 

15,365 

17,387 

19,000 

21,101 


1,283 

3,127 

3,621 

5,642 

14,064 

16,700 

11,647 

11,334 

13,468 

16,533 

8,851 

10,391 








67 
28 
35 
37 

58 
77 
87 
82 
81 
82 
88 
85 


36 


1872 


486 
555 
881 
1,141 
1.111 
1,368 
1,573 
1,982 
2,178 
1,766 
1,879 


300 
328 
646 
882 
1.006 
1,153 
743 
803 
855 
819 
981 


"i',527* 
2,056 
1,238 
1,436 
1,490 
1,318 
1,449 


76 


1877 

1882 


69 
67 


1887 


54 


1892 


51 


1897 


43 


1902 


52 


1907 


62 


1912 


66 


1914 


73 


1915 


75 




1 



The statistics in detail of the various Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 
of the Province for 1915, will be found in Tables K, L, and M, pages 218 to 255. 



VI. TEACHERS' INSTITUTES 
This table presents the work of the Teachers' Institutes for thirty=nine years : 





CO 








Receipts 




Expenditure 




co 

d 
+-• 

'•& 

CO 




the P 

hool te 
















| CO 

2 d 


B 

o 

U CO 


B 

o 


CO 




CO 

d 


Year 


d 
"ca 

M 

<o 

o3 
co 
H 


CO 

b 

CO 

3 


Teachers in 
e. (High Sc 
not included 


<o be 

.&+» 

3 d 

O 0) 

4) cl 

* d 

d CO 


•w43 

^ cl 

si 


<o <u 
> co 
'co * M 

I "a 

M CO 

ga 

o 8 


o 

CO 

u 

§ 

o 

B 

03 


o 

13 


ft 
H 

<0 

<** 

§ 

o 

B 

a 




•8 


*M 

o 


«*H CO 
O CO 


g ► 


o| 


o3 


ga 


'eS 




d 


d 


d'P & 


4 M 


aa 


as 


o 


a« 


♦3 

O 




525 


£ 


fe 


<j 


"3 


H 


«3 


H 










$ c 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1877 ... 


42 


1,181 


6,468 


1,412 50 


100 00 


299 75 


2,769 44 




1,127 63 


1882..,. 


62 


4,395 


6,857 


2,900 00 


300 00 


1,088 84 


9,394 28 


453 02 


5,355 33 


1887.... 


66 


6,781 


'7,594 


1,800 00 


1,879 45 


730 66 


10,405 95 


1,234 08 


4,975 50 


1892.... 


69 


8,142 


8,480 


1,950 00 


2,105 00 


875 76 


12,043 54 


1,472 41 


6,127 46 


1897.... 


73 


7,627 


9,128 


2,425 00 


2,017 45 


901 15 


12,446 20 


1,479 88 


6,598 84 


1902.... 


77 


8,515 


9,367 


2,515 00 


1,877 50 


1,171 80 


13,171 26 


1,437 18 


7,188 45 


1907.... 


81 


9,319 


9,893 


2,850 00 


1,920 00 


1,671 32 


14,824 09 


654 16 


7,487 41 


1912.... 


83 


*9,913 


10,757 


3,800 00 


2,100 78 


1,961 10 


22,120 70 


1,359 24 


10,120 89 


1914.... 


87 


*11,684 


11,546 


5,650 00 


3,645 27 


3,044 40 


34,648 09 


2,358 06 


17,651 75 


1915.... 


87 


*12,152ill,850 


4,300 00 


3,288 57 


3,086 33 


34,567 39 


2,264 11 


20,241 29 



See Appendix H for details for 1915. 
•Registered attendance of members. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



137 



VII. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS, Etc. 

Table showing the Number of Teachers in Training at Provincial Normal 
Schools, and the Pupils at the Normal Model Schools 
in connection therewith, etc., 1877=1916 



Year 


No. of Normal 
School teachers 


No. of Normal 
School students 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten teachers 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten pupils 


1S77 


13 


257 


8 


643 


1882 


16 


260 


15 


799 


1887 


13 


441 


18 


763 


1892 


12 


428 


22 


842 


1897 


13 


407 


23 


832 


1902 


16 


619 


31 


958 


1907-08... 


*35 


428 


*38 


979 (1907) 
914 (1912) 


1912-13... 


*69 


986 


*38 


1915-16... 


*77 


1,609 


*40 


962 (1915) 


1916-17... 


*78 


1,293 


*43 


971 (1916) 



•Including those engaged in both a Normal and a Normal Model School. 
2. High School Entrance Examinations, 1877=1916 



Year 


No. of Candidates 
examined 


No. of Candidates who 
passed 


1877 


7,383' 
9,607 
16,248 
16,409 
16,384 
18,087 
22,144 
22,679 
24,353 
23,135 


3,836 


1882 


4,371 


1887 


9,364 


1892 


8,427 


1897 


10,502 


1902 


13 300 


1907 




15,430 


1912 


13,977 


1915 


17 325 


1916 


15,357 



3. Departmental Academic Examinations, 1916 



Examinations 


O 

I* 

r-H C 


Number passed 


Number of 
Appeals 

Number passed 
on appeal 


Total number 
passed 


a 

O 

u 
Ph 


SeniorPublic School Graduation 
Senior High School Entrance . . 

Model Entrance (June) 

English-French Model Entrance 

(June) 

Model Entrance (August) 

English-French Model Entrance 

(August) 

Lower School N.E. &F.E 

Middle School N. E. (June). . . . 
Middle School N. E. (August). . 
Upper School, Part I 


68 

75 

157 

84 
95 

10 

5,633 

2,990 

53 

538 

360 

3,385 

303 


16 

29 
52 

60 
62 

9 

2,710 

1,678 

22 

330 

242 

*1,952 

65 


1 
1 
1 






87 
69 


22 

8 
46 

8 










10 
7 

1 
1 
6 
2 


16 
29 
52 

60 
62 

9 

2,720 

1,685 

22 

331 

243 

1,958 

67 


23.52 
38.66 
33.12 

71.42 
65.26 

90.00 
48.28 
56.35 
41.50 
61 52 


Upper School, Part II 


67 50 


Junior Matriculation 


57 84 


Supplemental Matriculation . . . 


22.11 


Totals 


13,751 


7,227 


243 


27 


7,254 


52.75 



Number of Honour Matriculation Candidates 

Number of Scholarship Matriculation Candidates 



443 

82 



For the number of candidates granted standing under Regulations re Enlistment for Overseas 
Service and for Farm Employment, see page 6. 

^Obtained either complete or partial Junior Matriculation. 



138 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
I. TABLE A— SCHOOL POPULATION, ATTENDANCE, ETC. 



Rural Schools 



§ 

3 03, 

Eg 

r-H <U 
O fe 

02 



CD 

bo 

TS o3 

2 o 
co co 

Q, 03 



PS ° 
S d be 



co Co 

O O 
CO CO 



cic 

CD fl 



£* 



cq 



£ 

CMjTi CO 

<5 rt ft 



III 

& ^ s 

£ o3 o3 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dimdas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington. . . 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland & Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel • 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward ..... 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Kenora / 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound' 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay, etc. ...... 



Totals 299,440 390 213,831 



4,115 

8,045 

7,269 

3,368 

3,314 

6,169 

12,634 

5,562 

3,936 

10,961 

3,655 

2,770 

3,188 

8,324 

9,380 

9,311 

8,216 

4,189 

7,552 

4,248 

4,073 

9,356 

4,902 

8,789 

7,015 

7,053 

3,804 

6,863 

4,610 

12,070 

2,716 

9,939 

12,139 

4,687 

4,951 

5,734 

5,980 

7,116 

6,531 

15,922 

3,859 

531 

2,060! 

4,075| 

2,957! 

4,933 

1,375 

3,724 

3,077 

2,393 



L6 

10 

# 3 
13 

5 
9 
2 

13 
5 
7 
4 

32 
4 
4 

19 

17 

3 

4 

15 

12 

3 

5 



3,481 
5,792 



686 
690 
80*1 
274 
634 
446 
3,215 
7,813 
2,746 
1,617 
2,336 
6,789 
6,293 
6,561 
5,704 
3,113 
6,171 
3,296 
3,371 
6,707 
3,939 
6,882 
5,230 
5,250 
2,646 
4,514 
3,505 
3,384 
2,239 
6,139 
9,196 
2,839 
3,716 
3,965 
4,363 
4,693 
5,278 
13,117 
3,080 
443 
1,705 
3,136 
1,846 
3,844 
1,188 
2,438 
2,731 
1,989 



3,484 
5,792 
5,702 
2,690 
2,812 
4,274 
5,638 
4,459 
3,220 
7,826 
2,748 
1,630 
2,341 
6,798 
6,298 
6,593 
5,708 
3,117 
6,190 
3,314 
3,374 
6,711 
3,955 
6,894 
5,234 
5,255 
2,646 
4,514 
3,508 
3,397 
2,240 
6,161 
,209 
,852 
,719 
,971 
,374 
4,700 
5,284 
13,120 
3,092 
443 
1,706 
3,151 
1,856 
3,857 
1,190 
2,459 
2,750 
1,992 



1,795 


1,689 


2,274 


3,029 


2,763 


3,844 


2,894 


2,808 


3,500 


i,465 


1,225 


1,595 


1,493 


1,319 


1,932 


2,223 


2,051 


2,815 


2,991 


2,647 


3,471 


2,312 


2,147 


2,343 


1,731 


1,489 


1,833 


4,160 


3,666 


4,915 


1,479 


1,269 


1,787 


800 


830 


825 


1,262 


1,079 


1,393 


3,480 


3,318 


4,052 


3,322 


2,976 


4,282 


3,432 


3,161 


3,714 


3,037 


2,671 


3,747 


1,581 


1,536 


2,053 


3,166 


3,024 


3,700 


1,693 


1,621 


1,917 


1,733 


1,641 


1,856 


3,473 


3,238 


4,507 


2,068 


1,887 


2,489 


'3,638 


3,256 


4,200 


2,723 


2,511 


3,258 


2,768 


2,487 


3,451 


1,397 


1,249 


1,656 


2,427 


2,08? 


3,101 


1,772 


1,736 


2,060 



1,774 



141 

089 

646 

474 

918 

2,109 

2,343 

2,512 

2,619 

6,777 

1,570 

227 

878 

1,658 

931 

2,004 

607 

1,234 

1,402 

1,012 



,623 
,099 
,072 
,563 



1,378 



1,801 
1,862 
2,031 
2,188 
2,665 
6,343 
1,522 

216 

828 
1,493 

925 
1,853 

583 
1,225 
1,348 

980 



27 214,248llll ,269 102,979 130,406 60. 



2,040 
1,374 
3,508 
5,333 
1,701 
2,401 
2,768 
2,660 
3,094 
2,965 
7,921 
1,812 
221 
963 
1,699 
1,029 
2,b90 
623 
1,204 
1,314 
1,116 



65 
66 
61 
59 
69 
66 
62 
53 
57 
63 
65 
51 
59 
60 
68 
56 
66 
66 
60 
58 
55 
67 
63 
61 
62 
66 
62 
69 
59 
60 
61 
57 
58 
60 
65 
70 
61 
66 
56 
60 
59 
50 
56 
54 
55 
54 
52 
49 
48 
56 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



139 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS— Continued 
TABLE A— SCHOOL POPULATION, ATTENDANCE, ETC —Continued 



Cities 



d 
.S_ o> 

^xJ be 




d 




be 
o.S 








3 


rt d d 
*Zi d . 


M O) 


ft u 


CM & 


d 






£° 


«*H O 


d «a 


03 ac 
"d d 

d 


£ d 


* 2? 

H) TO 
O O 


d « 






3 


*•> O O) 

«• d 
<3 ft 3 


School 
betwei 
21 yea 


co co 

J^ t-l 

'q, d 
PL. * 


Pupils 
and 21 
age 


CO CO 
Q, d 

Ph * 


Total n 
pupils 
school 


CO 

>> 



CO 

3 


Averagi 
attend 
pupils 


Percent 

averag 

\ attend 


3,004 


.... 


1,846 


.... 


1,846 


957 


889 


1,239 


67 


4,964 




2,356 


.... 


2,356 


1,206 


1,150 


1,826 


77 


6,611 


.... 


3,819 




3,819 


1,956 


1,863 


2,808 


74 


2,163 


.... 


1,787 


.... 


1,787 


887 


900 


1,272 


71 


4,417 




2,529 


.... 


2,529 


1,263 


1,266 


1,896 


75 


2,939 


.... 


J, 773 




1,773 


907 


866 


1,350 


76 


4,277 




2,072 


5 


2,077 


1,038 


1,039 


1,602 


77 


22,609 




13,803 


1 


13,804 


7,018 


6,786 


10,133 


73 


6,005 


.... 


2,820 


.... 


2,820 


1,382 


1,438 


1,975 


70 


9,998 


.... 


8,363 




8,363 


4,204 


4,159 


5,843 


70 


2,057 




1,683 


.... 


1,683 


829 


854 


1,141 


68 


23,703 




8,987 


.... 


8,987 


4,410 


4,577 


6,442 


72 


5,047 




2,629 


.... 


2,629 


1,342 


1,287 


2,040 


78 


3,518 




2,166 


.... 


2,166 


1,072 


1,094 


1,594 


74 


3,722 .... 


2,324 


.... 


2,324 


1,158 


1,166 


1,615 


69 


3,863 .... 


2,457 


1 


2,458 


1,295 


1,163 


1,830 


74 


2,174 .... 


1,801 


.... 


1,801 


886 


915 


1,323 


73 


2,763 41 


1,790 


.... 


1,831 


935 


896 


1,379 


75 


3,990 .... 


2,113 


.... 


2,113 


1,100 


1,013 


1,708 


81 


82,193! 80 


60,670 


5 


60,755 


30,693 


30,062 


44,546 


73 


5,994 .... 


2,934 


. . . . 


2,934 


1,453 


1,481 


2,094 


71 


1,759L... 


1,413 


.... 


1,413 


701 


712 


1,039 


73 


207,770 


121 


132,135 


12 


132,268 


66,692 


65,576 


96,695 


73.10 


853 




64 




64 


30 


34 


42 


66 


306 




273 


. . . . 


273 


121 


152 


196 


72 


691 


.... 


340 




340 


172 


168 


254 


75 


570 


.... 


220 


. . . . 


220 


120 


100 


124 


56 


1,283 


.... 


587 


.... 


587 


305 


282 


419 


71 


490 




446 


. . . • 


446 


215 


231 


299 


67 


470 




402 


.... 


402 


216 


186 


280 


70 


65 




69 




69 


30 


39 


47 


68 


1,437 




1,127 




1,127 


561 


566 


801 


71 


371 




336 




336 


166 


170 


215 


64 


552 




18O 




180 


82 


98 


137 


76 


155 




126 


. . . . 


126 


73 


53 


84 


67 


677 




603 


.... 


603 


298 


305 


410 


68 


876 




624 


• • • • 


624 


285 


339 


451 


72 


781 




691 


.... 


691 


350 


341 


491 


71 


2,315 




1,428 


.... 


1,428 


739 


689 


1,064 


74 


155 




187 




187 


98 


89 


119 


64 


408 


i 


431 




432 


223 


209 


307 


71 


178 




138 


, 


138 


60 


78 


93 


67 


739 




577 


• • • • 


577 


284 


293 


426 


74 


1,009 


, , 


744 


• . . . 


744 


397 


347 


520 


70 


94 




104 




104 


70 


34 


57 


55 


702 




406 




406 


200 


206 


280 


69 


585 




405 




405 


208 


197 


312 


77 


1,223 




976 




976 


490 


486 


561 


57 


1,033 




548 




548 


255 


293 


417 


76 


550 


3 


316 


1 


320 


159 


161 


183 


57 


1,504 


.. 


1,163 




1,163 


562 


601 


848 


73 


743 




570 




570 


284 


286 


437 


77 


1,956 




605 




605 


285 


320 


458 


76 


625 




466 




466 


255 


211 


329 


71 


376 




308 




308 


153 


155 


201 


65 


260 




246 




246 


130 


116 


163 


66 


1,103 




774 


. . . . 


774 


392 


382 


536 


69 



1 Belleville 

2 Kitchener (Berlin) 

3 Brantford 

4 Chatham 

5 Fort William 

6 Gait 

7 Guelph 

8 Hamilton 

9 Kingston 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls 

12 Ottawa 

13 Peterborough 

14 Port Arthur 

15 St. Catharines 

16 St. Thomas 

17 Sarnia 

18 Sault Ste. Marie... 

19 Stratford 

20 Toronto 

21 Windsor 

22 Woodstock 

Totals 

Towns 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston . 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Aylmer 

8 Bala 

9 Barrie 

10 Blenheim 

11 Blind River 

12 Bothwell 

13 Bowmanville 

14 Bracebridge 

15 Brampton 

16 Brockville 

17 Bruce Mines 

18 Burlington 

19 Cache Bay 

20 Campbellf ord 

21 Carleton Place 

22 Charlton 

23 Chesley 

24 Clinton 

25 Cobalt 

26 Cobourg 

27 Cochrane 

28 Collingwood 

29 Copper Cliff 

30 Cornwall 

31 Deseronto 

32 Dresden 

33 Dryden 

34 Dundas 



140 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS— Continued 
TABLE A— SCHOOL POPULATION, ATTENDANCE, ETC. 



-Continued 



Towns — Continued 



pi 


a> 






CUD 






1 


O 0) 


be 






<H PJ 








School populati 
between 5 and 
21 years of ag 




£ 


rH 

u bJ3 


lis 






^ PI 




rO C<J 


O O 


pi ro 






a} c3 


CD $>> 



Pupils 
5 and 
of age 


CO 02 


Total n 
pupils 
school 


03 
O 

n 


en 

b 


Averag 
attend 
pupils 



35 Dunnville 

36':Durham 

37 Eastview 

38 Englehart 

39 Essex 

40 Ford 

41 Forest 

42 Fort Frances 

43 Frood Mine 

44 Gananoque 

45 Goderich 

46 Gore Bay . . 

47 Gravenhurst 

48 Haileybury 

49 Hanover 

50 Harriston 

51 Hawkesbury 

52 Hespeler 

53 Huntsville 

54 Ingersoll 

55 Iroqaois Falls . . . 

56 Kearney 

57 Keewatin 

58 Kenora 

59 Kincardine 

60 Kingsville 

61 Latchford 

62 Leamington 

63 Lindsay 

64 Listowel , 

65 Little Current . . . 

66 Massey , 

67 Matheson 

68 Mattawa 

69 Meaford , 

70 Midland 

71 Milton 

72 Mitchell 

73 Mount Forest 

74 Napanee , 

75 New Liskeard . . 

76 Newmarket 

77 Niagara 

78 North Bay -. 

79 Oakville 

80 Orangeville 

81 Orillia , 

82 Oshawa 

83 Owen Sound 

84 Palmerston , 

85 Paris , 

86 Parkhill 

87 Parry Sound 

88 Pembroke 

89*Penetanguishene . 

90 Perth 

9i Petrolea , 



605j 

463; 

1,372! 

321 

411! 
370! 
271 
531! 
85! 

1,000 
952 1 
241! 
446| 
906 1 
809 
352! 

1,709 
546 
623 

1,365 
101 
151 
300i 

1,527 1 
537 
464 
126 
690 

1,866! 
63l| 
384| 
257| 
116! 
526 
850 

2,107 
592 
362 
445 
645 
593 
677 
375 

2,449 
620 
587! 

2,208 

2,373 

3,205 
371 

1,005 
245 

1,201 

2,508 

1,156 
876 
935 





512 




512| 


... 


316 




316] 




346 .... 


346! 




225 .... 


225! 




3101.... 


310 s 




1051.... 


105! 




264!.... 


264 




2981.... 


298 




80 




80 




791 




791 




640 




640 




180 




180 




420 




420 




574 




574 




495!.... 


495 


5 


291!.... 


296 1 




218 




218! 




512 




512! 




504 




504| 




781 




781 1 




109 




109 




127 




127 




268 




268 




951 




951 




238 




238| 




402 




402 




69 




69 




579 




579 




1,010 




1,0x0 




410 




410 




308 




308 




172 




172! 




115 




115 




57 




57! 




543 




543! 




1,388 




1,388! 




463 




463! 




292 




292 1 




288 




288! 




555 




555! 




525 




525 




595 




595 




233 




233 




1,257 




1,257 




535 




535 




408 




408 




1,487 




1,487 




1,568 




1,568 




2,158 




2,159 




354 




355 




583 




583 




168 




168 




9741.... 


974 




8731 


873 




829!.... 


829 




389! 


389 




716! . . . . 


716 



264 
138 
170 
123 
154 

52 
134 
153 

38 
396 
310 

93 
214 
290 
238 
166 
115 
267 
255 
418 

60j 

62 
139 
467, 
1291 
224i 

38 
317 
518 
220 
138' 
107: 

70! 

29| 
285| 
672| 
214 
146 
139! 
268| 
248 
315 
120 
640 
276 
205 
744 
801 
1,071 
173 
292 

84 
497 
457 
430 
184 
371 



248 
178 
176 
102 
J56 

53 
130 
145 

42! 
395 
330 

87| 
206! 
284! 
2571 
130| 
103 
245 
249 
363 

49 

65 
129 
484 
109 
178 

31 
262 
492 
190 
170 

65 

45 

28 
258 
716 
249 
146 
149 
287 
277 
280 
113 
617 
259 
203 
743 
767 
1,088 
182 
291 

84 
477 
416 
399 
205 
345 



350 
233 
1971 
132 
230! 
59 
193 
213 
24 
595 
458 
137 
273 
400 
387 
210 
144 
385 
355 
558 
19 
80 
207 
705 
201 
268 
24 
426 
790 
301 
168 
97 
57 
37 
423 
969 
330 
221 
207 
367) 
323 
406 
159 
965 
357 
307 
1,066 
1,119 
1,626 
244 
430 
128 
654 
659 
547 
301 
535 



including Protestant Separate School. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



141 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS— Continued 
TABLE A— SCHOOL POPULATION, ATTENDANCE, ETC.— Concluded 



Towns — Concluded 


- 
School population 
between 5 and 
21 years of age 


Pupils under 
5 years of age 

Pupils between 
5 and 21 years 
of age 


! 

o o 

"q, & 


Total number of 
pupils attending 
school 


CO 

>» 
o 

pq 


Girls 


Average daily 
attendance 
of pupils - 


Percentage of 
average to total 
attendance 


92 Picton i 

93 Port Hope 


664 

1,081 
238 
516 

1,003 
500 

1,2L6 
488 

1,073 
913 
700 
362 

1,010 
140 

1,500 
487 
251 

1,423 
629 
842 

1,536 
458 
182 

1,013 
480 




444.... 
770!.... 
1861.... 
347.... 

717 

346 

524 

389 ... . 
74.... 
632 .... 
204 ... . 
265 : .... 
715 ... 


444 
770 
186 
347 
717 
346 
524 
389 
74 
632 
204 
265 
715 
116 
1,150 
367 
199 
863 
491 


237 
385 
98 
175 
365 
179 
260 

ie; 

44 
308 
103 
135 
363 

56 
510 
182 

93 
449 
262 
117 
354 
205 

69 
362 

80 
310 

85 
417 

64 
101 

79 
168 
367 
306 
3l7 

98 
645 
242 
242 
228 
187 


I 207 
385 

88 
172 
352 
167 
264 
222 

30 
324 
101 
130 
352 

60 
640 
185 
106 
414 
229 
119 
335 
197 

80 
314 

78 
263 

79 
346 

48 
129 

72 
134 
335 
322 
315 

97 
619 
242 
177 
260 
187 


312 
576 
127 
246 
552 
221 
373 
252 

56 
445 
170 
203 
499 

57 
944 
266 
147 
639 
396 
150 
466 
258 

99 
310 
108 
416 

55 
529 

66 
193 
106 
216 
491 
426 
482 
102 
833 
354 
279 
354 
287 


70 
75 


94 Powassan 

95 Prescott 


68 
71 


96 Preston 


77 


97 Rainy River 

98 Renfrew 


64 
71 


99 Ridgetown 

100 Rockland 


65 
76 


101 St. Mary's 


70 


102 Sandwich 


83 


103 Seaforth 


77 


104 Simcoe 


70 


105 Sioux Lookout 

106 Smith's Falls j 

107 Southampton | 

108 Stayner 


116 
1,150 
367 
199 
863 
491 
236 
689 
402 


.... 


49 
82 
72 
74 


109 Steel ton 


74 


110 Strathroy 


81 


111 Sturgeon Falls. 

112 Sudbury 


.... 


236 

689 


64 
68 


113 Thessalon 


402 


64 


114 Thornbury 

115 Thorold 

116 Tilbury 


±49 
676 

i58 


149 
676 
158 


66 
46 
68 


117 Tillsonburg 

118 Timmins 1 


715 .. . 

180 . . . 
1,121 ... 

139 . . . 

443 ... 

370 . . . 

620 . . . 
1,521 .... 
1,286 .... 
1,142 


573 .... 
164 ... . 
763 .... 
112 .... 
230 .... 
151 .... 
302 .... 
702 .... 
628 ... . 

632 

195 .... 
1,264 ... 


573 
164 
763 
112 
230 
151 
302 
702 
628 
632 
195 
1,264 
484 
4i9 
488 
374 


73 
34 


119 Trenton 


69 


120 Trout Creek 

121 Uxbridge 


59 

84 


122 VankleekHill 

123 Walkerton 


70 
72 


124 Walke,rville i 

125 Wallaceburg ' 

126 Waterloo 


70 
68 
76 


127 Webbwood 


220 
1,455 
580 
643 
739 
510 


.... 


52 


128 Welland 


65 


129 Weston 


484 
419 
488 
374 


.*• 


73 


130 Whitby ! 


67 


131 Wiarton 


73 


1 32 Wingham ! 


77 




. . . . 




Totals 


102,863 


IX 


> 64,928 

213,831 

132,135 

64,928 

26,130 


2 

27 

12 

2 

?, 


64,940 


32,820 


32,120 

102,979 
65,576 
32,120' 
12,942 


45,878 


70.64 


Totals 

1 Rural Schools ' 

2 Cities ! 


299,440 

207,770 

102,863 

33,902 


39C 

121 

iO 

5 


214,248 

j 32, 268 

64,940 

26,137 


111,269 
66,692 
32,820 
13,195 


130,406 
96,695 
45,878 


60.86 
73.10 


3 Towns i 


70.64 


4 Villages \ 


18,148, 69.43 






1 


5 Grand Totals, 1915 ... 

6 Grand Totals, 1914 


643,975 
636,616 


526 
456 


437,024; 
427,058 


43 
53 


437,593 
427,567 


223,976 
218,675 


213,617 

208,892 


291,127 66.52 
275,549 64.44 


7 Increases 1 

8 Decrease . 


7,359 


7C 


9,966 


"io 


10,026 


5,301 


4,725 


15,576 


2.08 




















9 Percentages ! 




.12 1 99.86i .Oil 


51.18 


48.81 


66.52 





142 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 





Reading 


Rural Schools 


u 

.1 

u 

Ph 


o 
o 

W 

CO 

rH 


M 

o 
o 

m 
a 

CM 


o 
o 

pq 

u 

CO 


o 

o 

pq 


2 o 
o o 

pq 


1 Brant 


892 

1,399 

1,701 

613 

678 

961 

1,668 

1,346 

1,047 

1,833 

667 

531 

652 

1,963 

1,201 

1,751 

1,261 

795 

1,553 

898 

870 

1,387 

994 

1,570 

1,339 

1,253 

644 

848 

982 

1,102 

570 

1,918 

2,416 

775 

905 

833 

1,279 

972 

1,510 

4,026 

1,087 

141 

551 

965 

839 

1,302 

363 

1,145 

1,032 

670 


479 
765 
737 
350 
322 
605 

1,047 
557 
391 
924 
372 
226 
310 
935 
790 
861 
841 
444 
809 
428 
478 
985 
496 
875 
630 
649 
330 
' 530 
483 
456 
295 
899 

1,211 
343 
451 
571 
550 
589 
740 

2,037 
391 
93 
246 
405 
252 
554 
168 
373 
407 
337 


621 

1,120 

1,132 

545 

534 

833 

1,144 

835 

754 

1,551 

506 

306 

386 

1,553 

1,318 

1,334 

958 

578 

1,163 

638 

644 

1,435 

999 

1,478 

1,013 

978 

479 

761 

828 

551 

453 

1,238 

2,078 

629 

795 

999 

762 

840 

898 

2,795 

593 

82 

315 

575 

312 

719 

214 

423 

535 

364 


773 

1,235 

931 

567 

579 

849 

1,005 

825 

548 

1,726 

568 

317 

452 

1,203 

1,327 

1,250 

1,248 

603 

1,118 

654 

666 

1,410 

823 

1,465 

967 

1,062 

558 

1,219 

595 

520 

435 

1,068 

1,687 

475 

691 

904 

882 

1,027 

1,078 

2,353 

503 

84 

282 

599 

272 

658 

227 

293 

443 

304 


672 

1,210 

1,186 

579 

626 

941 

763 

868 

460 

1,693 

590 

224 

525 

1,032 

1,420 

1,252 

1,277 

683 

1,500 

• 673 

649 

1,335 

618 

1,400 

1,200 

1,197 

615 

1,074 

577 

654 

442 

953 

1,696 

622 

774 

640 

859 

1,141 

980 

1,806 

467 

42 

307 

570 

170 

526 

184 

204 

323 

281 


47 


2 Bruce 


63 


3 Carleton 


15 


4 Dufferin 


36 




73 


6 Elgin 


85 


7 Essex 


11 




28 




20 


10 Grey 


99 




45 


12 Haliburton . . . , 


26 


13 Halton 


16 




112 




242 


16 Kent 


145 


17 Lambton . 


123 




14 


19 Leeds and Grenville 


47 


20 Lennox and Addington 


23 




67 


22 Middlesex 


159 


23 Norfolk 


25 


24 Northumberland and Durham 


106 
85 




116 


27 Peel 


20 




82 


29 Peterborough 


43 




114 


31 Prince Edward 


45 
85 




121 




8 




103 




24 


37 Welland 


42 




131 


39 Wentworth . , 


78 




103 
51 




1 




5 




37 




11 




98 


47 Rainy River • 


34 




21 




10 




36 








57,698 


29,017 


42,594 


41,328 


40,480 


3,131 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



143 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION 





+3 


-a 

Pi 

cm 
o 
a> 


*co 



2 
3 



O 

+3 

'<o 
o 

P. 

8 

o 


§ 


& 

o 

CO 

a 

CO 

% 
a 


u 

s 

CO 

3 

d 
5 

S 




< 


O 


S 


3- 


o 


O 


w 


O 


1 


3,400 


2,872 


2,976 


2,878 


3,083 


768 


1,280 


1,-316 


2 


5,536 


4,758 


4,572 


4,898 


4,792 


1,744 


1,954 


2,526 


3 


5,610 


4,711 


3,807 


5,131 


5,189 


1,432 


2,814 


2,995 


4 


2,566 


2,173 


1,559 


2,382 


2,275 


970 


1,099 


1,255 


5 


2,627 


2,156 


1,452 


2,314 


2,411 


978 


1,171 


1,244 


6 


4,224 


3,482 


3,649 


3,679 


3,691 


1,482 


1,692 


2,083 


7 


5,592 


3,587 


3,200 


4,102 


4,268 


1,684 


1,016 


1,840 


8 


4,459 


3,126 


3,179 


4,459 


4,459 


895 


1,722 


2,289 


9 


2,933 


2,251 


1,748 


2,620 


2,654 


633 


1,099 


1,416 


10 


7,422 


6,115 


4,747 


6,608 


6,631 


2,037 


2,870 


3,252 


11 


2,629 


2,046 


1,677 


2,282 


2,144 


1,140 


1,055 


1,283 


12 


1,337 


998 


775 


1,493 


1,119 


521 


469 


637 


13 


2,277 


1,701 


1,770 


2,035 


1,846 


742 


794 


960 


14 


6,453 


5,131 


5,692 


5,950 


5,8/1 


1,310 


1,709 


2,512 


15 


5,746 


4,924 


4,581 


5,289 


5,107 


2,128 


2,413 


2,852 


16 


6,449 


4,842 


4,423 


5,157 


5,600 


1,825 


2,399 


2,759 


17 


5,444 


4,224 


3,668 


5,139 


5,398 


1,430 


2,579 


2,688 


18 


3,009 


2,214 


1,231 


2,466 


2,322 


1,023 


1,065 


1,288 


19 


5,990 


4,762 


4,092 


5,102 


5,030 


2,204 


2,836 


2,939 


20 


3,204 


2,554 


2,262 


2,901 


2,811 


983 


1,521 


1,588 


21 


3,100 


2,529 


2,758 


2,690 


2,406 


1,226 


1,285 


1,647 


22 


6,535 


5,344 


5,085 


5,922 


5,864 


1,912 


2,766 


2,981 


23 


3,872 


3,154 


3,027 


3,392 


3,473 


676 


1,443 


1,625 


24 


6,438 


5,192 


4,753 


5,766 


5,581 


2,341 


2,375 


2,817 


25 


5,136 


3,575 


3,801 


4,161 


4,839 


1,399 


2,090 


2,127 


26 


5,050 


4,434 


3,170 


4,692 


4,881 


1,488 


2,020 


2,569 


27 


2,499 


1,887 


1,894 


2,273 


2,161 


678 


1,075 


1,197 


28 


4,433 


3,944 


4,445 


4,236 


4,221 


2,074 


1,824 


2,251 


29 


3,314 


2,718 


2,186 


2,736 


2,743 


849 


1,387 


1,607 


30 . 


3,251 


2,644 


2,601 


3,058 


3,023 


906 


1,460 


1,770 


31 


2,080 


1,819 


882 


1,934 


2,017 


611 


805 


850 


32 


5,916 


4,436 


2,987 


5,702 


5,487 


1,099 


2,812 


3,530 


33 


9,069 


7,825 


5,809 


8,356 


7,815 


2,593 


3,104 


3,921 


34 


2,735 


2,166 


1,734 


2,372 


2,328 


855 


1,151 


1,268 


35 


3,535 


3,002 


2,232 


3,303 


3,246 


991 


1,237 


1,365 


36 


3,971 


3,140 


3,508 


3,878 


3,854 


951 


1,125 


1,544 


37 


3,997 


3,195 


2,981 


3,311 


3,205 


1,249 


1,338 


1,513 


38 


4,171 


3,473 j 


3,117 


3,954 


3,751 


2,224 


1,886 


2,227 


39 


4,942 


3,765 


4,342 


3,836 


3,552 


1,640 


2,023 


2,217 


40 


12,759 


10,091 ! 


11,967 


12,146 


11,622 


2,990 


3,707 


4,864 


41 


2,687 


2,046 | 


' 1,853 


2,152 


2,069 


759 


722 


997 


42 


435 


* 369 


219 


396 


400 


99 


152 


161 


43 


1,522 


1,042 


665 


1,144 


1,186 


609 


507 


731 


44 


2,850 


2,190 


1,964 


2,598 


2,483 


1,104 


1,159 


1,445 


45 


1,358 


1,133 


818 


1,185 


1,304 


403 


282 


617 


46 


3,658 


2,680 


2,259 


2,958 


2,990 


848 


1,123 


1,440 


47 


1,049 


754 


662 


837 


867 


388 


321 


502 


48 


1,986 


1,533 


1,603 


1,742 


1,718 


585 


579 


919 


49 


2,519 


1,942 


2,103 


2,246 


2,240 


371 


715 


1,151 


50 


1,962 


1,865 


1,554 


1,779 


1,779 


450 


631 


691 




203,736 


162,514 


148,039 


181,640 


179,806 


60,297 


76,661 


92,266 



14.4 



THE BEPOBT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Rural Schools 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin , 

6 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton , 

14 Hastings , 

15 Huron , 

16 Kent , 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark , 

19 Leeds and Grenville , 

20 Lennox and Addington , 

21 Lincoln , 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk , 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario , 

26 Oxford , 

27 Peel , 

28 Perth . ,., 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell /, 

31 Prince Edward , 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma, 

42 Kenora 

43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 

45 Nipissing 

46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River . .• 

48 Sudbury 

49 Timiskaming 

50 Thunder Bay, etc 



Is 

.2 'So 



Totals. 



2,315 
4,286 
4,600 
2,034 
1,755 
3,368 
5,254 
4,454 
1,991 
6,012 
1,931 

973 
1,649 
5,628 
4,106 
4,678 
4,804 
2,091 
4,650 
2,705 
2,298 
4,883 
3,335 
4,559 
3,085 
4,238 
1,742 
3,743 
2,658 
2,628 
1,795 
5,361 
7,503 
1,977 
2,942 
3,117 
2,666 
3,536 
3,031 
9,505 
1,914 

386 

977 
2,190 
1,021 
2,386 

746 
1,484 
2,198 
1,859 



159,047 






3,179 
4.956 
5,115 
2,460 
2,434 
3,859 
5,304 
4,459 
2,660 
5,378 
2,487 
1,281 
2,128 
6,170 
5,431 
5,633 
5,604 
2,644 
5,552 
2,967 
3,023 
5,748 
3,632 
6,185 
5,007 
,708 
,347 
,333 
,033 
,035 
,919 
5,672 
8,507 
2,459 
3,249 
3,836 
3,917 



163 

015 

758 

430 

388 

493 

703 

1,181 

3,091 

983 

1,777 

2,226 

1,943 



188.462 






3,044 
5,063 
5,568 
2,555 
2,137 
4,048 
5,541 
4,459 
2,921 
7,009 
2,226 

953 
2,254 
6,277 
5,910 
6,264 
5,687 
2,877 
5,184 
3,205 
3,116 
6,262 
3,751 
6,312 
5,110 
4,838 
2.314 
4,509 
2,830 
3,213 
1,958 
6,035 
7,586 
2,795 
3,389 
2,627 
3,833 
4,216 
4,589 
13,013 
1,258 

323 

866 
2,379 
1,264 
3 ; 082 

852 
1,755 
2,284 
1,828 



191,369 



43 

111 
14 
22 
79 

125 
17 
47 
9 
75 
54 
11 
5 

208 

225 

136 
98 
9 
29 
10 
90 

298 
32 
87 
74 
63 
20 
32 
55 

167 
24 
48 

118 
2 

141 
41 
46 

143 

61 

79 

53 

1 



29 
16 
106 
19 
17 
18 
35 



3,242 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



145 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 



e3 
N 

< 


a 

o 




3 


+=> 

1 
e 

P o 
o o 


French (Primer to 
4th Book, incl.) 





CD 


I* 

So 

(D +3 






fl 
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fe 

eg 

PI 

<u 

£1 
a> 


Commercial 
Subjects 


2 

'p 


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< 


bo 


'0 

1 
Eh 

1 



a 






a> 
'0 

Ul 

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J0 
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en 





m 


1 


47 
52 
12 
26 
64 
79 
6 
16 
9 
71 
32 
25 
11 
88 

208 

119 

102 
16 
25 
13 
50 

133 
17 
72 
70 

106 
17 
24 
23 

110 
24 
77 

107 
3 

77 
16 
39 

116 

77 

82 

22 

1 


41 
34 

1 

16 
63 
50 

4 

"q 

36 
18 
21 

4 

57 

102 

58 

64 

5 
16 

5 
26 
31 

8 
36 
52 
46 

8 
20 
17 
38 

l 

3 
39 

2 

6 

15 
29 
64 
26 
71 

2 

1 


32 

13 

9 

19 

52 

19 

1 

4 

6 

20 

18 

1 

5 

10 

92 

6 

53 

7 

6 


29 
3 








38 

22 

9 

6 

63 

53 

1 

4 

3 

38 

26 

17 

2 

45 
151 
80 
82 
11 


39 

13 

9 


449 

859 
384 


255 


285 


2 


11 








3 






238 


315 


4 


1 
23 

""l 










5 








"35' 


406 

1,047 

241 


200 

1,161 

266 




6 


2 
723 




59 


7 
8 


1 




12 


q 


1 


129 
4 
2 






""9' 
2 
1 

"2 
90 
17 
13 
1 


581 
336 

81 


121 

147 




10 






19 


n 

i? 




1 


13 


13 


2 
2 

20 
5 

38 


1 






406 
556 
768 
885 
285 
325 
334 


285 
750 
260 
499 
233 
62 

" *149* 

80 

2.014 

429 

92 

1 

566 

"in 

57 

516 
1,159 


13 


14 






422 


15 

16 


219 

7 
1 
3 


6 




50 
6 


17 






70 


18 






20 


19 








20 












21 


5 
21 

6 
43 
13 
34 

1 
17 

9 
55 

6 

20 
11 

1 

7 

5 
14 
68 
69 
66 

2 










37 
65 

4 
22 
57 
58 

2 
11 

4 
92 

5 

34 
37 


73 

31 

2 

22 

26 

66 

5 

6 

6 

1 

8 

"28* 


306 

2,034 

296 

485 

39 
439 
401 
740 
127 
473 

63 
272 
324 

55 
132 
383 
288 
311 
954 
439 
593 




22 
28 


' '18* 
11 

7 
2 

"5' 

85 

3 

18 


2 

1 

14 




3 


451 
10 


24 
25 




3 


35 


26 








37 


27 








37 


28 


4 








29 






8 


30 
81 


873 




2 


72 


32 










33 








250 


15 


34 












35 


1 
3 


3 






8 
5 

15 
38 
63 
62 
21 
1 


7 
11 

"36' 
22 
16 


34 
344 
276 
273 
315 
255 
153 




36 




2 




37 








38 
39 


16 
36 
14 


13 
1 


1 




45 


40 






399 


41 










42 












43 




















44 


35 
9 
89 
26 
17 
6 
35 


18 
9 
66 
10 
15 
4 
35 


3 
19' 


"4* 
3 


1 
736 






24 
1 
76 
13 
11 
5 
30 


1 

"3 
2 
6 
1 

4 


42 
134 

14 
183 
149 

'"'36' 


73 
105 


37 


45 






23 


46 








47 








54 


18 


48 






616 
2 
1 








49 


4 
5 


1 
3 






60 




50 






2 










2,501 


1,299 


877 


356 


3,369 


8 


11 


1,452 


608 


17,649 


11,903 


2473 



10 E. 



1-16 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. IT 





II. T/ 


^BLE B- 


-NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 








Reading 






Cities 


u 

1 

CU 


o 
o 

ffl 

-(-» 

CO 

r-i 


o 
o 

cq 
d 

CM 


M 

o 
o 

« 

CO 


o 
o 

M 


3 
•<* 

a o 
p o 

&cq 


1 Belleville 


521 
378 

1,085 
370 
700 
391 
410 

2,845 
747 

1,559 
484 

1,571 
668 
523 
622 
618 
434 
539 
411 
13,121 

1,053 
432 


276 
398 
684 
303 
424 
245 
237 

2,121 
374 

1,248 
258 

1,276 
399 
399 
357 
293 
288 
291 
354 

8,024 
489 
204 


328 
607 
673 
333 
414 
415 
381 

3,674 
369 

2,139 
248 

1,999 
537 
537 
314 
514 
394 
309 
374 
13,787 
547 
183 


366 
580 
935 
494 
589 
414 
531 

2,707 
703 

1,833 
398 

1,678 
466 
411 
552 
558 
362 
386 
564 
13,797 
467 
269 


355 
393 
442 
287 
402 
308 
387 

1,992 
627 

1,584 
295 

1,869 
559 
296 
479 
475 
323 
306 
410 
11,190 
378 
325 




2 Kitchener (Berlin) 




3 Brantford 




4 Chatham 




5 Fort William . , 




6 Gait ^.. 




7 Guelph 


131 


8 Hamilton 


465 


9 Kingston 




10 London 




11 Niagara Falls 




12 Ottawa 

13 Peterborough 


594 


14 Port Arthur 




15 St. Catharines . . 




16 St. Thomas 

17 Sarnia 




18 Sault Ste. Marie 

19 Stratford .... 




20 Toronto ... 


836 


21 Windsor 

22 Woodstock 








Totals 

Towns 
1 Alexandria 


29,482 


18,942 


29,076 


29,060 


23,682 


2,026 


7 

59 

55 

60 

132 

113 

89 

28 

263 

96 

35 

29 

154 

197 

124 

447 

49 

147 

29 

105 

294 

42 

106 

97 

424 

108 

141 

268 

273 

140 

135 

119 

60 


13 

37 

67 

34 

70 

51 

63 

9 

149 

48 

42 

16 

85 

104 

162 

202 

18 

73 

41 

118 

120 

20 

60 

52 

158 

78 

31 

193 

93 

74 

61 

54 

36 


12 

59 

73 

41 

133 

74 

87 

8 

298 

79 

35 

29 

136 

113 

164 

191 

46 

81 

19 

132 

93 

9 

71 

57 

209 

134 

60 

203 

100 

86 

90 

38 

54 


20 

52 

89 

39 

141 

117 

82 

10 

207 

55 

33 

15 

123 

130 

137 

289 

47 

67 

16 

98 

151 

17 

91 

93 

117 

99 

41 

267 

50 

154 

98 

44 

63 


12 
66 
56 
46 

111 
91 
81 
14 

210 
58 
35 
37 

105 
80 

104 

299 
27 
64 
33 

124 
86 
16 
78 

106 
68 

129 
43 

232 
54 

151 
82 
53 
33 




3 Almonte 




4 Amherstburg . . 




5 Arnprior 




6 Aurora , . . 




7 Aylmer 




8 Bala 

9 Barrie 








11 Blind River 




13 Bowmanville 




14 Bracebridge 




15 Brampton 








17 Bruce Mines 




1 8 Burlington 




19 Cache Bay 








21 Carleton Place 




22 Charlton , 




23 Chesley 

24 Clinton 




25 Cobalt 




26 Cobourg 




27 Cochrane 


4 






29 Copper Cliff 








31 Deseronto 




32 Dresden 




33 Dryden 





1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



147 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 











2 


o 


M 


History 


>» 
U 
o 
-^ 

CO 

• i-H 

w 

P 






p. 




p* 


°5j 


ed 


a 


.1 






cud 
o 
e 


JO 




u 

-*-3 


o 
P. 

a 

o 


2 


p 


■3 

P 
c9 




< 


O 


S 


3 


O 


O 


m 


O 


1 


1,846 


1,325 


1,846 


1,412 


1,846 


355 


574 


782 


2 


2,356 


2,315 


2,356 


2,356 


2,356 


594 


973 


1,969 


3 


3,819 


3,819 


3,819 


3,819 


3,819 


419 


613 


606 


4 


1,787 


1,664 


1,787 


1,787 


1,787 


287 


1,018 


- 1,018 


5 


2,529 


1,829 


2,529 


2,529 


2,529 


402 


991 


991 


6 


1,773 


1,663 


1,773 


1,726 


1,726 


722 


437 


970 


7 


1,946 


2,011 


1,946 


2,074 


1,973 


774 


986 


1,199 


8 


13,639 


12,193 


13,785 


13,297 


13,402 


3,682 


5,350 


7,209 


9 


2,820 


1,857 


2,820 


2,820 


2,820 


627 


787 


752 


10 


8,363 


8,363 


8,363 


8,363 


8,363 


1,775 


3,639 


4,716 


11 


1,683 


1,542 


1,253 


1,683 


1,683 


341 


297 


426 


12 


8,987 


8,987 


8,987 


8,987 


8,987 


2,581 


3,382 


3,247 


13 


2,629 


2,629 


2,629 


2,629 


2,629 


559 


1,025 


1.562 


14 


2,166 


2,166 


2,166 


1,643 


2,166 


296 


707 


707 


15 


2,324 
2,349 


1,702 
2,058 




1,702 
2,300 


1,702 
2,349 


479 
461 


1,031 
715 


1,031 


16 


"'2,020 


972 


17 


1,801 


1,801 


1,801 


1,801 


1,801 


323 


862 


862 


18 


1,831 


1,831 


1,831 


1,831 


1,831 


363 


384 


665 


19 


2,113 


2,113 


2.113 


2,113 


2,113 


620 


657 


1,039 


20 


59,116 


58,140 


59,215 


59,056 


58,836 


20,321 


21,038 


27,650 


21 


2,934 


1,392 


2,934 


2,934 


2,934 


378 


845 


845 


22 


1,413 


981 




981 


981 


325 


325 


594 








130,224 


122,381 


125,973 


127,843 


128,633 


36.J684 


46,636 


59,8i2 


1 


64 


57 


64 


57 


57 


12 


45 


45 


2 


273 


273 


273 


273 


273 


66 


60 


100 


3 


340 


340 


261 


340 


340 


56 


259 


259 


4 


220 


160 


220 


160 


160 


85 


46 


85 


5 


587 


587 


587 


587 


587 


111 


246 


375 


6 


446 


333 


446 


446 


333 


91 


91 


91 


7 


402 


402 


402 


250 


402 


149 


313 


313 


8 


69 


48 


69 


48 


48 


48 


28 


28 


9 


1,127 


1,127 


1,127 


1,127 


1,127 


417 


407 


695 


10 


336 


240 


336 


336 


336 


58 


240 


240 


11 


180 


180 


145 


180 


180 


68 


180 


180 


12 


126 


126 


97 


97 


97 


37 


52 


52 


13 


603 


449 


603 


603 


603 


228 


263 


171 


14 


624 
691 


392 
405 




624 
567 


624 
567 


127 
104 


210 
72 


127 


15 


**69i* 


169 


16 


1,428 


1,428 


1,428 


1,428 


1,428 


299 


1,428 


1,428 


17 


187 


187 


187 


165 


187 


27 


120 


120 


18 


384 


284 


334 


384 


369 


83 


131 


131 


19 


138 


109 


138 


109 


109 


31 


12 


12 


20 


577 


577 


577 


577 


577 


124 


74 


228 


21 


744 

39 

406 


744 

61 

406 




744 
104 
406 


744 
104 
406 


86 
16 

78 


330 

16 

406 


330 


22 




61 


23 


"406* 


406 


24 


405 


405 


405 


405 


405 


106 


199 


199 


25 


976 


976 


976 


976 


976 


68 


976 


976 


26 


548 


444 


548 


362 


444 


129 


89 


40 


27 


320 


200 


320 


320 


320 


47 


88 


148 


28 


1,163 


934 


1,163 


967 


860 


424 


383 


506 


29 


570 
605 


279 
605 




570 
605 


570 
605 


104 
151 


54 . 
191 


104 


30 


"605' 


204 


31 


466 


270 


466 


338 


466 


82 | 


180 


180 


32 


308 


308 


308 


308 


308 


53 


97 


97 


33 


246 


200 


246 


186 


186 I 


96 ! 


96 


150 



US 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN tAe 



Cities— Concluded 


S 

.3 'Si 

w >» 
Oh 


H 


u 
la 

o 

'55 
>> 


be 

a 
ft 

<o 

4> 
M 

o 

o 

. m 


CO .^ 

■si 
H 

< 


2 

Ea 
< 


1 Belleville 


1,846 
2,257 
3,819 
1,787 
2,529 
1,726 
1,899 

12,409 
2,820 
8,363 
1,347 
8,987 
2,629 
2,166 
1,702 
2,335 
1,801 
1,777 
2,113 

56,894 

2,934 

981 


1,846 
2,356 
3,819 
1,787 
2,529 
1,773 
1,946 

13,357 
2,820 
8,363 
1,683 
8,987 
2,629 
2,166 
2,324 
2,349 
1,801 
1,777 
2,113 

56,818 
2,934 
1,413 


1,846 
2,356 
3,819 
1,787 
2,529 
1,579 
2,077 
13,702 
2,820 
8,363 
1 ,683 
8,987 
2,629 
2,166 








2 Kitchener (Berlin) 

3 Brantford 












4 Chatham . . 








5 Fort William 









6 Gait.. 






7 Guelph 


\""m 

465 


131 

465 




8 Hamilton 

9 Kingston .... 


465 


10 London 








11 Niagara Falls . 








12 Ottawa 


. 150 


594 


76 ' 


13 Peterborough . . 




14 Port Arthur 








15 St. Catharines .... 








16 St. Thomas 


2,416 
1,801 
1,831 
2,113 
58,695 
2,934 
1,413 








17 Sarnia 








18 Sault Ste Marie . 








19 Stratford . 









20 Toronto 


1,213 


836 


571 


21 Windsor 




22 Woodstock .. 



















Totals 


125,121 


127,590 


127,546 


1,959 


2,026 


1,112 






Towns 
1 Alexandria 


64 
273 
340 
220 
587 
446 
402 

48 
705 
240 
180 

52 
533 
392 
405 
1,428 
187 
233 

12 
577 
330 

61 
406 
405 
976 
228 
320 
1,046 
. 54 
605 
466 
308 
200 


64 
273 
340 
220 
587 
446 
402 
69 

1,127 
336* 
180 
126 
603 
624 
405 

1,428 
187 
334 
138 
577 
744 
39 
406 
405 
976 
228 
320 

1,103 
570 
605 
466 
308 ! 
246 I 


64 
273 

340 








2 Alliston 








3 Almonte 








4 Amherstburg . 


171 

587 

446 

402 

69 

1,127 

336 

180 

126 

603 

v 624 

691 








5 Arnprior 








6 Aurora 












402 




8 Bala 




9 Barrie 








10 Blenheim 








11 Blind River 








12 Bothwell 








13 Bowmanville 








14 Bracebridge 








15 Brampton 








16 Brockville , 


1,428 
187 
334 
138 








17 Bruce Mines 








18 Burlington 








19 Cache Bay 


12 






20 Campbellford 


577 74 






21 Carle ton Place. . 


744 
104 








22 Chariton 








23 Chesley 


406 
405 
976 
228 
320 








24 Clinton 


•% 






25 Cobalt ;..' 






26 Cobourg 








27 Cochrane 


47 


4 


4 


28 Collingwood 


1,163 
57 
605 
466 
308 
246 






29 Copper Cliff 








30 Cornwall . . 








31 Deseronto 








32 Dresden 








33 Dryden 









1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



149 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION-Continued 



5 

o 
B 

o 
<v 

O 


3 ' 


1 


i — J 
u o 

s ° 

r -^ 


o 

MS 
§1 


German (Primer 
to 4th Book, incl.) 


Elementary- 
Science 


Commercial 
Subjects 


2 

i 


bo 
£ 

a 

M 

Eh 

la 

rt 


2 » 


, J 




| ■ 1 






1,125 

J 20 

579 

1,415 

241 

155 

483 

1,653 

2,820 

1,116 


79 


*> 




1 








116 


3 














443 


4 

















925 


5 










i 




254 


6 


::: 













153 


7 










131 




564 


8 177 
9 











4 


465 


1,966 











479 


10 














1,228 


xy) 

H 




1 












12 .-. . , . 1 




! 




32 


594 




2,314 
140 
141 


2,978 


13 ...j 








130 


14 














164 


15 


















10 

16 










r 




494 


515 


17 
















18 
















95 

526 

50,551 

302 

325 


78 


19 















521 


20 234 
21 






75 








836 




21,550 












325 


















325 


















411 












36 ! 2,026 




64,595 


32,793 












1 




















2 






















3 






















4 




- 














15 


13 


5 




















6 






















7 






















8 




















24 


9 






















10 






















11 






















12 






















13* 






















14 






j 














15 






i 














16 




















17 






















18 






















19 























20 






















21 






















22 


















39 




23 





















24 






















25 






















26 






















27 4 












4 


4 




320 




28 














29 




















30 


















466 


264 


31 




















32 1 










1 


i" 




33 1 










....!![!!!.!!!! 







T50 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



'Including Protestant Separate School. 









Reading 






Towns— Continued 


J 


■a 

o 

m 

CO 


M 

o 
o 

n 

a 

CM 


M 
o 

o 

pq 

U 

CO 


o 
o 

pq 


3 

T3 o 

acq 

H 


34 Dundas 


217 

172 

108 

126 

106 

67 

44 

58 

72 

44 

190 

108 

33 

125 

119 

78 

61 

67 

81 

161 

142 

44 

36 

45 

279 

44 

113 

24 

165 

254 

94 

139 

51 

35 

5 

120 

427 

167 

43 

80 

144 

135 

164 

72 

314 

138 

87 

327 

540 

427 

105 

122 

31 

301 

227 

251 

92 

181 

76 


97 

69 

30 

58 

15 

56 

13 

46 

59 

7 

117 

59 

23 

60 

151 

62 

50 

24 

80 

84 

155 

28 

20 

45 

120 

33 

57 

12 

102 

132 

40 

55 

20 

8 

17 

88 

228 

51 

30 

40 

54 

83 

72 

36 

193 

70 

57 

249 

270 

288 

58 

99 

17 

122 

131 

127 

47 

114 

56 


143 
92 
76 


139 

83 

50 


178 

96 

52 

49 

34 

49 

14 

60 

59 

5 

135 

181 

35 

80 

70 

68 

59 

47 

83 

80 

142 

7 

15 

54 

159 

61 

43 

13 

108 

196 

106 

40 

45 

27 

20 

140 

189 

70 

91 

39 

418 

80 

71 

41 

224 

97 

109 

335 

219 

423 

50 

134 

36 

153 

167 

101 

100 

143 

105 




35 Dunnville 

36 Durham 




37 Eastview 


85 28 




38 Englehart 


35 

85 

22 

38 

57 

15 

175 

138 

44 

83 

138 

199 

59 

34 

151 

82 

135 

20 

21 

44 

223 

63 

60 

7 

102 

215 

63 

41 

25 

20 

9 

89 

287 

113 

43 

45 

136 

147 

134 

34 

253 

134 

77 

298 

253 

546 

85 

77 

40 

207 

132 

204 

95 

82 

109 


35 

53 

12 

62 

51 

7 

174 

154 

33 

72 

96 

88 

67 

46 

109 

97 

207 

10 

29 

80 

170 

37 

97 

12 

102 

213 

107 

33 

21 

23 

2 

106 

257 

62 

85 

84 

103 

80 

154 

50 

273 

96 

78 

278 

286 

475 

57 

151 

44 

191 

216 

146 

55 

196 

98 




39 Essex 




40 Ford 




41 Forest 




42 Fort Frances 




43 Frood Mine 


2 


44 Gananoque 




45 Goderich 




46 Gore Bay 


12 


47 Gravenhurst 




48 Haileybury 




49 Hanover 




50 Harriston 




51 Hawkesbury 




52 Hespeler 


8 






54 Ingersoll 




56 Kearney 


..... 






58 Kenora 








60 Kingsville 


32 




1 


62 Leamington 




64 Listowel 




66 Massey 


10 




2 


68 Mattawa 


4 


69 Meaford 

70 Midland 




72 Mitchell 








74 Napanee 




76 Newmarket 








78 North Bay 




79 Oakville 




80 Orangeville . . . 




82 Oshawa 




84 Palmerston , . . . 




86 Parkhill 




87 Parry Sound 




88 Pembroke 








90 Perth 








92 Picton 





1916 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



151 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 







•g 

B 
1 


.2 

'to 

8 


u 


8 



P. 

8 


u 

a 

B 
§ 
3 


m 

•H -M 






< 




3 











cS W 


34 


774 


557 


774 


664 


664 


317 


359 


462 


35 


512 
316 


392 
255 




233 
316 


512 
316 


137 
52 


95 
101 


138 


36 


264*' 


198 


37 


346 


346 


346 


346 


346 


49 


49 


77 


38 


225 


225 


225 


225 


225 


69 


69 


35 


39 


310 


243 


310 


243 


243 


102 


49 


102 


40 


61 
264 


48 
215 




48 
264 


48 
204 


26 

95 


14 
122 


26 


41 


264*" 


122 


42 


226 


226 


298 


110 


298 


59 


110 


167 


43 


36 


29 




29 


29 


7 


7 


14 


44 


791 


601 


"554" 


791 


791 


237 


135 


484 


45 


640 


640 


640 


628 


628 


383 


411 


411 


46 


180 


147 


168 


180 


180 


47 


68 


124 


47 


420 


334 


420 


420 


397 


160 


199 


229 


48 


574 


455 


574 


432 


574 


70 


166 


304 


49 


495 


495 


495 


495 


495 


68 


114 


156 


50 


296 


296 


296 


296 


296 


126 


59 


126 


51 


218 


218 


218 


218 


218 


47 


93 


151 


52 


512 

396 


512 

346 




512 
395 


512 
395 


91 
135 


91 
217 


200 


53 


504*' 


217 


54 


781 
109 


781 
109 




781 
109 


781 
109 


142 

7 


80 
65 


349 


55 


io9" 


65 


56 


106 
268 


71 
223 




106 
268 


80 
268 


21 
54 


38 
75 


15 


57 


268** 


178 


58 


951 


951 


951 


951 


951 


540 


540 


540 


59 


238 


238 


238 


238 


238 


61 


30 


31 


60 


402 


232 


163 


232 


232 


172 


75 


172 


61 


69 


45 


25 


65 


65 


26 


26 


32 


62 


579 


414 


579 


414 


414 


210 


108 


210 


63 


1,010 


1,010 


1,010 


1,010 


1,010 


196 


409 


624 


64 


410 


296 


390 


410 


324 


296 


245 


245 


65 


272 


272 


308 


184 


27 


40 


114 


202 


66 


172 


121 


144 


172 


172 


76 


121 


101 


67 


115 


115 


115 


115 


115 


29 


52 


72 


68 


57 


57 


57 


57 


57 


25 


24 


24 


69 


543 


423 


543 


543 


543 


140 


76 


246 


70 


1,388 


774 


1,388 


1,388 


1,388 


376 


183 


288 


71 


463 


463 


463 


463 


403 


70 


132 


194 


72 


292 


219 


292 


292 


292 


176 


91 


176 


73 


288 
555 


288 
555 




168 
555 


168 
555 


123 
221 


39 
555 


123 


74 


"555" 


555 


75 


525 


525 


463 


525 


525 


116 


271 


354 


76 


595 


431 


595 


595 


595 


71 


359 


359 


77 


233 


233 


233 


233 


233 


91 


91 


91 


78 


1,257 


1,257 


1,257 


1,257 


1,257 


224 


388 


382 


79 


535 


535 


535 


535 


535 


103 


397 


397 


80 


408 


355 


408 


408 


408 


148 


148 


148 


81 


1,487 


1,264 


1,487 


1,487 


1,487 


335 


513 


814 


82 


1,568 


829 


1,568 


925 


925 


• 219 


322 


207 


83 


2,073 


1,691 


1,661 


1,606 


1,803 


423 


594 


932 


84 


355 

583 


355 

, 583 




355 

583 


355 

583 


107 
134 


107 
583 


107 


85 


583" 


583 


86 


168 


168 


168 


168 


168 


36 


36 


36 


87 


974 


730 


974 


974 


974 


204 


483 


502 


88 


873 


873 


873 


873 


873 


167 


180 


155 


89 


829 


578 


829 


829 


829 


101 


253 


346 


90 


389 


389 


389 


297 


297 


100 


155 


155 


91 


567 


421 


400 


472 


716 


143 


339 


337 


92 


444 


368 


444 


444 


444 


105 


312 


312 



15? 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Towns— Continued 



a 

.2-3) 



9 

w 



1J 

< 



34 Dundas 


774 
512 
198 
77 
225 
310 
105 
264 
226 
36 
791 
538 
168 
420 
574 
495 
296 
218 
351 
315 
781 
109 
50 
268 
951 
238 
257 
32 
579 
1,010 
359 
202 
111 
115 
57 
543 
888 
463 
176 
288 
555 
525 
595 
233 
1,257 
535 
408 
1,487 
1,209 
1,776 
355 
583 
168 
974 
873 
829 
155 
337 
312 


774 
512 
316 
77 
225 
310 
105 
264 
298 
36 
791 
538 
168 
420 
574 
495 
237 
218 
512 
395 
781 
109 
127 
268 
951 
238 
232 
32 
579 
1,010 
410 
202 
157 
115 
57 
543 
1,388 
463 
292 
288 
555 
525 
595 
233 
1,257 
535 
408 
1,487 
1,568 
1,832 
355 
583 
168 
974 
873 
829 
389 
716 
368 


774 
458 
158 
346 
225 
310 
105 
264 








35 Dunnvilie 









36 Durham 








37 Eastview 








38 Englehart 








39 Essex 








40 Ford 








41 Forest 








42 Fort Frances 








43 Frood Mine 


80 
791 
640 
180 
420 
574 
495 
296 
218 

"504' 
781 
109 
127 
268 
951 
238 
.402 
52 
579 

1,010 
410 
202 
172 
115 
57 
543 

1,388 
463 
292 

, 81 
555 
525 
595 
233 

1,257 
535 
408 

1,487 

1,568 

2,159 




2 


2 


44 Gananoque 




45 Goderich 








46 Gore Bay 


12 


12 


12 


47 Gravenhurst 




48 Haileybury 








49 Hanover 








50 Harriston 








51 Hawkesbury 








52 Hespeler 


8 


8 


8 






54 Ingersoll 


80 












56 Kearney 


6 


6 


6 






58 Kenora 
















60 Kingsville 


32 


32 
1 


32 




1 


62 Leamington 












64 Listowel 
















66 Massey 


22 
2 

4 


22 
2 

4 


22 




2 


68 Mattawa 


4 


69 Meaford.. 




70 Midland . 
















72 Mitchell 
















74 Napanee 
















76 Newmarket 












233 




78 North Bay 




79 Oakville 








80 Orangeville 








81 Orillia 








82 Oshawa 
















84 Palmerston 










583 
168 
974 
873 
829 
389 
716 
444 








86 Parkhill 


36 






87 Parry Sound 






88 Pembroke 
















90 Perth 








91 Petrolea 








92 Picton 









'Including Protestant Separate School. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



153 



SCHOOLS— Continued 



VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 








u 

3 

o 

0> 

3 




d 

If 


u 


1 

is? 


•9-S" 


& 

d d 

a *8 


Ǥ CO 


4> 
H 

M 

*d 

1 


60 

d 


2 « 

0} 4) 

23 "3 
W 


34 






















35 






















36 






















37 






















38 






















39 


















67 




40 




















41 






















42 






















43 2 


2 










2 










44 


















45 






















46 


10 


9 








12 










47 
















48 






















49 






















50 






















51 






















52 8 












8 


8 








53 


















54 


















179 


170 


55 




















56 












6 










57 




















58 






















59 






















60 32 


30 










32 










61 


















62 






















63 


















386 

88 


386 


64 


















55 


65 




















66 4 


22 
2 


4 








22 
2 

4 


22 








67 2 










115 




68 4 
















69 




















70 






















71 






















72 






















73 






















74 






















75 






















76 






















77 






















78 
















- 


989 


268 


79 




















80 


















207 




81 




















82 






















83 






















84 




















85 


















67* 

88 




86 




















87 




















88 




















89 






















90 
















389 






91 
















600 

444 




92 





















15-i 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 









Reading 






Towns — Continued 


a 

Ph 


-o 

o 

pq 

^> 

cc 
1— I 


o 
o 

CM 


o 
o 

pq 


o 
o 


3 

3 ° 
? ° 

%cq 

eq 


93 Port Hope 


206 

41 

83 
140 
158 
131 
100 

21 
163 

52 

51 
162 

51 
340 

73 

43 
341 

94 

96 
207 
120 

34, 
235 

41 
131 

95 
222 

28 

77 

44 

77 
192 
163 

98 

67 
353 

71 
120 

93 

57 


131 
32 
29 

124 
37 
64 
41 
15 
81 
47 
40 

120 
25 

185 
35 
46 

132 
51 
22 

104 
69 
17 
72 
12 
78 
18 

134 
11 
26 
17 
43 

112 

104 
84 
24 

207 

111 
47 
70 
55 


113 
46 
79 

192 
57 

116 
90 
11 
78 
50 
60 

199 
20 

275 
94 
43 

176 

112 
43 

120 
72 
35 

149 
29 
94 
24 

133 
30 
32 
24 
61 

138 
81 

134 
41 

273 
99 
77 

101 
94 


171 

29 
43 

146 
49 
94 
86 
10 

163 
32 
62 

120 
15 

180 
99 
26 

131 

108 
55 

148 
71 
28 

126 
41 

100 
18 

179 
19 
57 
24 
69 

118 

152 

172 
32 

259 
96 
89 

126 
90 


149 

38 

113 

115 

19 

119 

72 

17 

147 

23 

52 

114 

5 

170 

66 

41 

83 

126 

20 

110 

70 

35 

94 

35 

170 

9 

95 

16 

38 

42 

52 

142 

128 

144 

31 

172 

107 

86 

98 

78 




94 Powassan 




95 Prescott 




96 Preston 




97 Rainy River 


26 


98 Renfrew 




99 Ridgetown 




100 Rockland 




101 St. Mary's 




102 Sandwich 




103 Seaforth 




104 Simcoe 




105 Sioux Lookout 




106 Smith's Falls 




107 Southampton 




108 Stayner 




109 Steelton 




110 Strathroy 




Ill Sturgeon Falls 




112 Sudbury 




113 Thessalon 




114 Thornbury 




115 Thorold 




116 Tilbury 








118 Timmins 








120 Trmt Creek 


8 






122 Vaukleek Hill 








124 Walkerville 




125 Wallaceburg 




126 Waterloo 








128 Welland 








130 Whitby 








132 Wingham 








Totals 


17,374 


9,688 


13,128 


12,905 


11,730 


115 






Totals * 
1 Rural Schools 


57,698 

29,482 

17,374 

6,837 


29,017 

18,942 

9,688 

3,730 


42,594 

29,076 

13,128 

5,321 


41,328 

29,060 

12,905 

4,983 


40,480 

23,682 

11,730 

5,012 


3,131 


2 Cities 


2,026 


3 Towns • 


115 


4 Villages 


254 






5 Grand Totals, 1915 


111,391 
111,815 


61,377- 

60,441 


90,119 
87,9i2 


88,276 
84,755 


80,904 
77,264 


5,526 


6 Grand Totals, 1914 


5,380 






7 Increases 




936 


2,207 


3,521 


3,640 


146 




424 
















9 Percentages 


25.45 


14.02 


20.59 


20.17 


18.49 


1.26 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



155 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Continued 

















h 


>> 

O 












a 

o 




o 


CO 






>3 




u 


u 


co 

3 


3 






cud 


.2 


3 
c3 


"eo 

o 
Pi 


a 


CO 


o3 




-t-3 


o 


S 


4> 


a 


c<3 


"go 


S3 




!h 


B 


J2 


;*5 


o 


U 


a 


c3 




< 


o 


S 


^ 


o 


O 


m 


O 


93 


770 


770 


770 


564 


433 


320 


80 


149 


94 


186 


145 


186 


186 


186 


67 


67 


67 


95 


347 


283 


347 


347 


347 


91 


71 


235 


96 


717 


717 


717 


717 


717 


261 


261 


115 


97 


346 


188 


346 


346 


346 


45 


188 


188 


98 


524 


393 


524 


524 


524 


119 


311 


311 


99 


389 


389 


389 


248 


389 


72 


208 


208 


100 


74 


74 


74 


74 


74 


17 


38 


38 


101 


632 


388 


388 


388 


632 


310 


147 


310 


102 


204 


204 


204 


204 


204 


23 


55 


55 


103 


214 


214 


265 


214 


214 


52 


114 


114 


104 


715 


715 


715 


715 


715 


114 


324 


308 


105 


116 


65 


90 


65 


65 


26 


3 


2 


100 


900 


690 


1,150 


1,150 


960 


610 


70 


80 


107 


367 


367 


367 


367 


367 


66 


259 


259 


108 


156 

863 


156 

863 




156 
863 


156 
863 


67 
83 


67 
55 


110 


109 


"863" 


79 


110 


491 


491 


491 


397 


491 


126 


448 


491 


111 


236 


236 


236 


236 


236 


20 


53 


22 


112 


689 


689 


689 


689 


689 


103 


115 


100 


113 


402 


272 


402 


272 


203 


70 


36 


34 


114 


149 


115 


149 


98 


98 


50 


35 


50 


115 


676 


369 


584 


584 


676 


369 


83 


220 


11(5 


158 


105 


158 


105 


158 


90 


105 


105 


117 


573 


442 


573 


573 


5/3 


173 


121 


132 


118 


164 
783 


69 
763 


164 
763 


164 
763 


164 
763 


27 
95 




69 


119 


'"95" 


274 


120 


112 


84 


112 


112 


112 


24 


112 


112 


121 


230 


230 


230 


230 


230 


38 


95 


95 


122 


151 


100 


151 


151 


151 


43 


37 


43 


123 


302 


302 


302 


244 


202 


84 


84 


89 


124 


702 


443 


702 


482 


482 


142 


142 


260 


125 


628 


465 


628 


628 


628 


128 


280 


361 


126 


632 


632 


632 


450 


632 


316 


90 


144 


127 


195 


121 


195 


195 


195 


31 


104 


104 


128 


1,264 


911 


1,264 


1,264 


1,264 


482 


482 


482 


129 


484 


302 


484 


484 


302 


203 


107 


144 


130 


374 


299 


419 


324 


299 


104 


157 


157 


131 


488 


325 


390 


395 


395 


93 


59 


93 


132 


374 


374 


374 


374 


374 


128 


168 


168 


63,878 


56,118 


57,730 


58,923 


59,877 


17,048 


23,845 


29 ,029 


1 


203,736 


162,514 


148,039 


181 ,640 


179,806 


60,297 


76,661 


92,266 


2 


130,224 


122,381 


125,973 


127,843 


128,633 


36,684 


46,636 


59,812 


3 


63,878 


56,118 


57,730 


58,923 


59,877 


17,048 


23,845 


29,029 


4 


25,325 


21,623 


21,863 


23,464 


23,651 


7,834 


9,467 


11,290 


5 


423,163 


362,636 


353,605 


391,870 


391 ,967 


121,863 


156,609 


192,397 


6 


410,883 


354,829 


329,851 


374,266 


376,382 


131,712 


160,400 


194,055 


7 


12,280 


7,807 


23,754 


17,604 


15,585 








8 . 












"*9!849" 


"3J9i" 


"i!658" 






1" 




9 


96.70 


82.87 


80.80 


89.55 


89.57 


27.84 


35.78 


43.96 



156 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
II. TABLE B— NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Towns— Concluded 


1 

OS 

'oq'5d 


1 

m 

H 


8. 

§ 

o 

<— i 

'53 
>» 

>4 
Ph 


B 

P. 

<u 
M 
M 
o 
o 

pq 


13 

ji 


t 

be 

5| 


93 Port Hope 


770 
186 
347 
261 
320 
411 
389 

74 
310 
204 
114 
715 

26 
860 
367 

67 
245 
491 
236 
689 
203 
149 
262 
105 
442 
164 
763 
112 
230 
151 
213 
298 
465 
316 
104 
911 
203 
239 
264 
374 


770 
186 
347 
717 
320 
524 
389 

74 
632 
204 
214 
715 

65 
740 
367 
110 
863 
491 
236 
689 
402 

98 
469 
105 
442 
164 
763 
112 
230 
151 
147 
702 
465 
632 
195 
1,264 
413 
259 
488 
374 


770 

186 
347 
717 
346 
524 
389 
74 
388 
204 
214 
715 
116 

1,150 
367 
156 
863 
491 
236 
689 
402 
149 
595 
158 
573 
164 
763 
43 
230 
151 
208 
702 
628 
632 
195 

1,264 
484 
384 
488 
374 ! 








94 Powassan 


67 






95 Prescott 






96 Preston 








97 Rainy River 




26 


26 


98 Renfrew 




99 Ridgetown 








100 Rockland 








101 St. Mary's 








102 Sandwich 








103 Seaf orth 








104 Simcoe 


68 






105 Sioux Lookout 






106 Smith's Falls 








107 Southampton 








108 Stayner 








109 Steelton 








110 Strathroy 








Ill Sturgeon Falls 








112 Sudbury 








113 Thessalon 


2 






114 Thornbury 






115 Thorold 








116 Tilbury 








117 Tillsonburg 








118 Timmins 


9 






119 Trenton 








8 


8 


8 


121 Uxbridge , 












123 Walkerton 








124 Walkerville 








125 Wallaceburg 
















127 Webbwood 








128 Welland 








129 Weston 
















131 Wiarton 








132 Wingham 
















Totals 


53,315 


61,167 


61,636 


489 


762 


127 






Totals 
1 Rural Schools 


159,047 

125,121 

53,315 

20,758 


188,462 

127,590 

61,167 

23,548 


191,369 

127,546 

61,636 

23,201 


3,242 

1,959 

489 

507 


2,680 

2,026 

762 

268 


2,501 


2 Cities 


1,112 


3 Towns 


127 


4 Villages 


230 






5 Grand Totals, 1915 


358,241 
345,098 


400,767 
389,914 


403,752 
389,636 


6,197 

8,899 


5,736 
5,362 


3,970 


6 Grand Totals, 1914 


3,194 






7 Increases 


13,143 


10,853 


14,116 


"2", 702* 


374 


776 


8 Decreases 
















9 Percentages 


81.86 


91.58 


92.26 


1.41 


1.31 


.90 



1916 



DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



157 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION— Concluded 





xi 






o 














o 
















^t< 


"*^ o 












tc 




8 

>> 


Ph o 


T3 
o 


^— ' o 


>• 


r o3 


<x> 
H 

2 


a 

g 




■•w 


>w o 


_ o 






2 a> 

oc/2 
O 








A& 


^^ 


%n 


3« 


2 rt 
oj'o 


-3 


o3 


3 


o o 


|5q 




g£ 


41 


& 

1 



93 








- 








I 






94 


















78 
234. 




95 
















! 


148 


96 
















j 




97 


17 


23 21 








26 








98 











' 






99 






















100 






















101 






















10? 























103 
























104 
























105 
























106 


















130 


325 


107 




















108 























109 






















110 




:::::::::::: 
















111 




i 
















IP 





















113 




















114 




















115 





















116 




















117 
















573 


364 


118 




:::::::::::: 














119 




















1?0 











8 










P1 




;:::::!':;:: 












199 




















1?3 




i 
















124 




! 












91 


98 


1?5 




1 


i 












1?6 










632 








59 


31 


127 








i 


~ 








128 






















1?9 






















130 






















131 






















132 











































73 


89 


34 




632 


126 


42 389 


5,856 


2,967 














1 
2 


1,299 

73 

152 


877 


356 


3,369 


8 


11 


1,452 

126 

206 


608 

/ 42 
34 


17,649 

"389" 
1,350 


11,903 

5,856 
1,598 


2,473 


3 


89 


34 

83 




632 


2,967 


4 


232 


8 


110 


5 
6 


1,935 
2,503 


1,088 
862 


473 
689 


3,676 
4,040 


16 

18 


643 

2,282 


1,820 
2,232 


2,710 
2,814 


19,388 
17,054 


83,952 
79,954 


38,343 
34,704 


7 




228 














2,334 


3,998 


3,639 


8 




216 




2 


















9 






.10 

















158 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 





II 


THE PUBLIC 
I. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 






Teachers 




Salaries 


Rural Schools 


© xl 




1 


o> g <X> 

<-| TO ■— ' 

.2?* d 


a) 2 to 

2J TO g 


1 Brant 


87 

175 

145 

93 

83 

118 

120 

148 

79 

229 

77 

61 

60 

193 

199 

139 

175 

126 

233 

118 

75 

198 

104 

210 

129 

130 

81 

120 

107 

99 

77 

162 

228 

82 

113 

101 

98 

152 

109 

259 

74 

17 

47 

109 

54 

130 

44 

58 

70 

57 


12 
29 
16 
12 
21 
15 
26 
20 
11 
43 
17 

6 

3 
35 
37 
12 
29 

9 
36 
12 
12 
30 
21 
38 
20 
26 
11 
20, 
18 
11 
11 
13 
48 

3 
16 
25 
18 
22 
16 
35 
14 

6 

10 
11 

5 

19 
13 
10 
]8 
18 


75 

146 

129 

81 

62 

1-03 

94 

128 

68 

186 

60 

55 

57 

158 

162 

127 

146 

117 

197 

106 

63 

168 

83 

172 

109 

104 

70 

100 

89 

88 

66 

149 

180 

79 

97 

76 

80 

130 

93 

224 

60 

11 

37 

98 

49 

111 

31 

48 

52 

39 


$1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

750 

900 

- 800 

1,000 

800 

650 

875 

900 

900 

700 

1,000 

1,000 

750 

975 

625 

800 

650 

850 

725 

750 

850 

800 

900 

800 

825 

650 

900 

750 

800 

900 

650 

750 

900 

1,200 

1,225 

1,100 

1,450 

750 

600 

700 

600 

600 

1,000 

850 

1,000 

1,150 

1,300 


$850 
750 


2 Bruce 


3 Carleton 


850 


4 Duff erin 


650 


5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 


715 

750 


7 Essex 


750 


8 Frontenac 


700 


9 Glengarry 


650 


10 Grey 


700 


11 Haldimand 


700 


12 Haliburton 


600 


13 Halton 


750 


14 Hastings 


750 


15 Huron 


1,050 


16 Kent 


750 


17 Lambton 


700 


18 Lanark 


675 


19 Leeds and Grenville 


700 




650 


21 Lincoln 


800 




725 


23 Norfolk 


700 


25 Ontario 


725 
700 


26 Oxford 


785 


27 Peel 


760 


28 Perth 


750 


29 Peterborough 


700 


30 Prescott and Russell 


800 


31 Prince Edward 


700 


32 Renfrew 


700 


33 Simcoe 


700 




750 


35 Victoria 


670 




750 


37 Welland 


800 


38 Wellington 


725 


39 Wentworth 


750 


40 York 


1,000 


41 Algoma 


700 


42 Kenora 


600 


43 Manitoulin 


650 




625 


45 Nipissing 


650 




700 


47 Rainy River 


700 


48 Sudbury 


700 


49 Timiskaming 


850 


50 Thunder Bay, etc 


900 






1 Totals, Rural Schools 


5,952 

2,711 

1,274 

524 


939 

409 

143 

93 


5,013 

2,302 

1,131 

431 


1,450 
2,400 
1,800 
1,825 


1,050 


2 " Cities 

3 " Towns 


2,000 
1,200 


4 " Villages 


875 






5 Grand Totals, 1915 


10,461 
10,202 


1,584 
1,536 


8,877 
8,666 


2,400 
2,400 


2,000 


6 Grand Totals , 1914 


2,000 








259 


48 


211 
























9 Percentages 




15.14 


84.85 







1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



159 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. 



Salaries — Continued 



Average 
salary of 
male 

' teachers 


Average 
salary of 
female 
teachers 

• 


Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with I Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, 
female 
teachers 
with I Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with II Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, 
female 
teachers 
with II Class 
certificates 


Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with III or 
District 
certificates 


1 


$702 
594 
652 
579 
677 
668 
656 
483 
536 
594 
628 
558 
650 
596 
650 
641 
643 
471 
522 
479 
690 
614 
615 
636 
632 
712 
648 
673 
546 
566 
562 
550 
631 
608 
628 
674 
697 
653 
743 
771 
572 
547 
466 
484 
515 
538 
609 
770 
643 
589 


$587 
576 
565 
578 
604 
588 
593 
450 
530 
565 
562 
377 
607 
531 
580 
618 
595 
468 
503 
463 
587 
581 
563 
567 
579 
598 
594 
594 
526 
505 
535 
476 
569 
552 
559 
598 
571 
597 
597 
613 
488 
484 
465 
408 
418 
451 
529 
475 
559 
579 




$616 
600 
650 
600 
550 
629 
644 
558 
550 
550 
600 


$732 
636 
675 
608 
681 
668 
678 
600 
600 
630 
621 
800 
650 
669 
653 
641 
649 


$584 $550 


2 
3 
4 
5 


$600 
600 
675 
600 


597 
587 
596 
605 
591 
605 


514 
600 
539 


6 




7 


s 


596 


8 
q 


800 


576 467 
587 512 


10 
11 
1? 


675 
900 


593 530 
576 581 
550 467 


13 




580 
610 
695 
626 
597 
600 
550 
562 
656 
590 
587 
830 
579 
652 
590 
625 


812 





14 
15 
16 
17 
18 


725 
662 
725 
656 


605 
582 
619 
599 
561 
563 
574 
590 
582 
574 
581 
590 
595 
602 
596 
577 
542 
564 
556 
594 
572 
595 
603 
567 
600 
600 
618 
587 
450 
575 
504 
567 
531 
589 
580 
630 
657 


497 
500 
550 
550 
504 


19 
?0 


700 


625 
600 
710 
614 
642 
648 
637 
706 
653 
673 
605 
733 
655 
694 
648 
637 
662 
670 
719 
673 
746 
767 
603 
550 
562 
600 
600 
720 
740 
810 
860 
640 


484 
521 


21 
?? 


600 


575 


23 
24 
25 
?6 


600 
633 
600 
787 
633 
675 
600 


540 
600 
625 


?7 




38 




39 


532 


30 


675 
625 
642 

578 


504 


31 




484 


3? 




518 


33 
34 


629 


603 
550 


35 




550 
600 
629 
627 
616 
631 


525 


36 


700 




37 


525 


38 
39 


875 

700 

1,350 


542 


40 
41 


550 
516 


4? 


!! 


545 


43 




650 


456 


44 




475 


45 






494 


46 

47 


750 
850 
800 
900 


600 


437. 
550 


48 
49 
50 


700 
700 
800 


800 
567 
610 








1 
?, 


621 
1,502 
1,067 

840 


549 
779 
586 
540 


703 
1,629 
1,212 
1,080 


616 
755 
583 
563 


669 
1,288 
1,040 

813 


591 
783 
588 
545 


526 


3 
4 


650 
400 


5 
6 


902 
875 


613 
604 


1,433 
1,411 


668 
674 


830 
834 


647 
645 


526 
553 


7 


27 


9 


22 






2 




8 


6 


4 


27 














9 








i 





1G0 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 





Salaries — Continued 




Rural Schools— Continued 


Average 
salary, 
female 
teachers 
with III or 
District 
certificates 


Average 
salary, male 
teachers 
with 

Temporary 
certificates 


Average sal- 
ary, female 
teachers 
with 

Temporary 
certificates 


Number who 
have ever 
attended a 
Model 
School in 
Ontario 


1 Brant 








10 


2 Bruce 


$481 
481 
541 
600 
508 
506 
428 
484 
517 
523 
396 
550 
470 
525 
565 
508 

459 
439 
512 
500 
498 
520 
492 
500 
481 
508 
495 
481 
469 
461 
508 
494 
486 
483 
554 
556 
543 
509 
488 
490 
463 
411 
442 
440 
557 
507 
521 
551 


$462 
450 


$418 
453 


23 


3 Carleton 


23 


4 Dufferin 


27 


5 Dundas 






17 


6 Elgin 






13 


7 Essex ... 




450 
352 
500 
417 


21 


; 8 Frontenac 


325 


96 


9 Glengarry 


38 


10 Grey 




95 


11 Haldimand 




27 


12 Haliburton 


350 


346 


20 


13 Halton 


13 


14 Hastings ... 


456 


413 
425 


89 


15 Huron 


62 


16 Kent 




14 


17 Lambton 






29 




450 
405 


403 
379 


57 


19 Leeds and Grenville 


119 


21 Lincoln 


52 

16 








25 


23 Norfolk . 






36 






479 
500 


67 


25 Ontario 




9 


26 Oxford.. 




18 


27 Peel 






2 








13 


29 Peterborough. 


358 


378 
429 


34 




51 


31 Prince Edward 




28 




372 
542 


393 
512 


103 


33 Sinicoe 


60 




36 


35 Victoria 




358 


31 






26 


37 Welland 






31 






525 


31 


39 Wentworth.. 




7 








77 


41 Algoma 




432 
494 
399 
370 
358 
407 
475 
401 
523 
531 


50 




550 
400 
445 


9 


43 Manitoulin 


30 




62 


45 Nipissing 


19 




500 
530 
450 
496 
433 


83 


47 Rainy River 


21 




20 


49 Timiskaming 


'27 




37 








476 
691 
545 
454 


454 


405 


1,904 


2 " Cities 


1,637 


3 " Towns 




662 
500 


. 611 


4 " Villages 




186 








5 Grand Totals, 1915 


479 
494 


454 
457 


408 
412 


4,338 




4,418 
















8 Decreases 


15 


3 


4 


80 


9 Percentages 








41.46 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



161 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC.— Continued 





Number who 
have ever 
attended 
the Normal 
College or 
F. of E. in 
Ontario 


Number of 
University 
Graduates 


Certificates 


Number who 
have ever 
attended a 
Normal 
School 
in Ontario 


05 d 
«j a 

1—1 


B* en 
cot 1 «J 

, m 'o 

'■d ^ d 
do^ 


en 

CO 

e3 
O 

u 

CO 




CO 


I 

B 

4) 


1 77 

2 136 

3 111 

4 61 

5 79 


8 
7 
7 
5 
3 
4 
9 
4 
1 
7 
3 


i" 

i" 


8 
7 
7 
6 
3 
6 
8 
4 
2 
7 
3 


77 

136 

108 

54 

79 

106 

91 

34 

32 

143 

53 

4 

53 

91 

174 

114 

150 

41 

97 

27 

63 

192 

76 

146 

108 

119 

69 

114 

53 

36 

41 

36 

151 

61 

79 

91 

85 

114 

94 

229 

15 

3 

4 

8 

7 

21 

7 

12 
21 
12 


2 

20 
17 
33 






3 
3 


9 
10 


1 




6 109 

7 89 

8 40 

9 35 

10 143 

11 54 

12 4 


6 

20 

39 

42 

75 

21 

10 

1 

42 

15 

5 

7 

37 

112 

38 

7 

1 

18 

43 

12 

1 

4 

3 

30 

36 

30 

76 

55 

20 

26 

3 

7 

21 
7 

13 
27 
5 
12 
35 
12 
44 
6 
17 
23 
20 






1 


39 
1 
1 


32 
2 
3 


18 


29 


13 54 


5 
8 
8 

20 

16 
2 
5 
7 
5 
5 
9 

13 
8 

10 

10 
3 
1 
6 
7 
4 

13 
1 
2 
8 
5 

17 
7 

17 


"i" 

"i" 

l 

3 

2 
3 
2 
2 


6 
8 
9 

20 

17 
2 
5 
6 
5 
5 
9 

13 
8 

10 
8 
3 
1 
6 
6 
3 

15 




14 95 

15 175 

16 115 

17 154 


29 


23 
1 






1 
10 

1 
13 




18 42 

19 100 

20 28 

21 71 


36 

18 
34 


2? 193 






23 80 


1 
2 




24 151 

25 112 


6 
1 


26 101 






27 69 






28 114 






29 63 

30 43 


9 


14 
21 


31 41 






32 38 

33 157 


25 


22 

7 


34 64 


1 
- 3 




35 81 

36 88 


"i" 

"2" 

3 


2 
7 
6 

16 
8 

17 


3 


37 87 






38 118 




1 


39 96 






40 231 






41 13 


22 
4 

23 
40 
12 
37 
13 
5 
3 
12 


10 


42 3 








5 


43 4 

44 9 


1 




1 


7 
26 


45 7 








23 


46 22 

47 7 

48 12 

49 22 

50 12 


4 
1 
2 
3 
2 




4 
1 
2 
2 
2 


24 
17 
22 
21 
11 


1 3,812 

2 2,251 


293 
513 
113 

47 


25 
103 

8 

7 


294 

540 

125 

45 


3,731 

2,158 

1,100 

450 


1,156 
13 
41 
23 


332 


439 


3 1,123 

4 451 


4 
5 


4 
1 


5 7,637 

6 7,030 


966 
803 


143 

108 


1,004 
846 


7,439 
6,859 


1,233 
1,461 


341 
298 


444 
738 


7 607 


163 


35 


158 


580 




43 




8 


228 


294 

















9 73. 


9.23 


1.36 


9.59 


71.11 


11.78 


3.26 


4.24 



11 E, 



162 



THE REPORT OP THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 



Experience 





Average experi- 
ence in years of 
male teachers 


Average experi- 
ence in years of 
female teachers 


Average experi- 
ence in years of 
all teachers 

Average experi- 
ence, male teach- 
ers with I Class 
certificates 


sxperi- 
iale 
with 
ertifi- 




Average e 
ence, fen: 
teachers 
I Class c 
cates 


1 Totals, Rural Schools 

2 " Cities 


8.15 
16.63 
19.02 
16.92 


4.18 
12.92 
10.18 

8.44 


4.81 6.55 
13.48 15.09 
11.18 21.01 

9.95 6.81 


3.44 

8.28 


3 " Towns 


6 62 


4 " Villages 


2 53 








5 Grand Totals, 1915 

6 Grand Totals, 1914 


11.84 
11.25 


7.42 
7.28 


8.09 13.88 
7.88 13.27 


5 . 97 

6.52 


7 Increases 


.59 


.14 


.21 .61 




8 Decreases 














9 Percentages 












1 ""r" 





THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 



Experience — Continued 





















CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO CO 






CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


u 


f-l 


t-t 


u 


t-t 


t-t t-t 




f-l^l >H 


u 


U 


t-t 


H 


t-t 


t-t 


u 


c3 


c3 


cS 


8 


c3 


c3 o3 




eS -^ e3 


c3 


o3 


a 


o3 


o8 


c3 


c3 


CO 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 1 CO 




<*> rr> **> 


CO 
1* 


CO 
1* 


co 


co 


co 


CO 


>< 


O 


rH 


CM 


CO 




>H 1 >H 
lO CO 




CMr^ co 


CO 


"* 


lO 


CO 


t^ 


OO 


o> 














1 Totals, Rural Sch's 


856 


596 


403 


305 


296 


203 


144 


97 


104 


73 


72 


34 


43 


5^ 


41 


2 " Cities .... 


125 


152 


141 


144 


160 


113 


129 


102 


107 


84 


80 


92 


95 


80 


75 


3 " Towns . . . 


113 


101 


83 


75 


86 


80 


54 


35 


44 


29 


29 


26 


40 


30 


29 


4 " Villages.. 


37 


65 


35 


31 


31 


31 


23 


12 


10 


12 


13 


12 


4 


6 


8 


5 Grand Totals, 1915 


1,131 


914 


662 


555 


573 


427 


350 


246 


265 


198 


194 


164 


182 


168 


153 


6 Grand Totals, 1914 


1,078 


772 


577 


689 


529 


395 


308 


240 


260 


182 


194 


204 


154 


179 


150 


7 Increases 


53 


142 


85 


*i34 


44 


32 


42 


6 


5 


16 






28 


"ii 


8 


8 Decreases 




40 




























9 Percentages 


10.81 


8.74 


6.335.3 


5.48 


4.08 


3.35 


2.35 


2.53 


1.89 


1.85 


1.57 


1.74 


1.61 


1.46 



1916 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



163 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC.— Continued 



Experience — Continued 



•^ °^ tH 
+3 V & >j 

Jf J s 

-2 ^ ^ ™ 

a co eS 23 

p £ £ S 



X^K 



bo w 



11 



*§ 



A ~^ 

"£ rP 03 

S <" t2,2 

» a «> * 






J-l CD 
CO +=> 

<u cd 

cm 
cd 



-P^ 



£ P 



CO CO 

So 



g CO •" -*3 03 

JS o co co +=> 



10.34 
19.21 
18.57 
18.29 



4.72 
13.45 
10.40 

8.96 






t! ¥ 1 

& a co-2 

co 2 «» , ?? 

S P CO tH ,2 

^ co *a ocp 



•-!< cd ft 



^a-s 



as 



Er-i«P 



£ s 



co co -tf 

M 2 !> >-i co 

0) <u ^ 5s g 

co 2 cd § 51 

b. P COrL CO 

JL CO ^EH o 



4.73 



21.25 
16.50 



3.76 
32.23 
13.86 

9.10 



2.17 



1.60 



5.25 
1.50 



1,183 
40 
52 
34 



=3 |>. 

-° O 
tH fe 

cd,£ 
co *^ 
>> P 

Si 



1,088 
87 
71 
45 



13.52 
13.80 



28 



8.51 
8.63 



.12 



4.84 
4.69 



4.48 
4.46 



.15 



.02 



2.17 
1.45 



1.64 
1.78 



1,309 
1,396 



.14 



87 



1,291 
1,365 



74 



12.51 [ 12.34 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC.— Concluded 



Experience— Concluded 



CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


to 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


u 


U 


tn 


u 


u 


tn 


tH 


u 


u 


tH 


tH 


tn 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH 


tH , 


cd 


cd 


cd 


cd 


a 


cd 


cd 


a 


cd 


cd 


a 


a 


cd 


a 


a 


cd 


cd 


cd 


a 


cd 


cd 


cd 


a 


03 & 


CO 


CO 


co 


co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


4) CO 


>H 


>H 


>* 


^ >H 


i~ 


>H 


>H 


>* 


>H 


PH 


>H 


>< 


>H 


!* 


i!* 


>H 


1* 


r>H 


>H 


>H 


r^ 


>H 


>HcS 


t^ 


OO 


OS 


O rH 


CM 


CO 


""* 


iO 


CO 


^ 


OO 


8 


o 


rH 


CM 


CO 


•«* 


IO 


CO 


t^. 


OO 


OS 


O tH 


lH 


rH 


rH 


CM CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CM 


CO 


OO 


|co 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


•<* O 


1 40 


36 


28 


44 


20 


25 


15 


14 


14 


16 


12 


6 


6 


14 


15 


10 


1 


7 


10 


3 


3 


6 


4 


13 


2 82 


60 


59 


40 


49 


48 


43 


51 


38 


24 


40 


56 


43 


51 


33 


30 


24 


23 


14 


22 


22 


7 


10 


[6 


3 25 


19 


22 


19 


19 


14 


14 


7 


20 


18 


15 


12 


7 


10 


11 


6 


8 


5 


8 


5 


2 


4| 4 


23 


4 7 


18 


8 


9 


7 


5 


1 


4 


4 


3 


4 


3 


6 


9 


3 


1 


6 


1 


5 


3 


1 


1 ... 


6 


5 154 


133 


117 


112 


95 


92 


73 


76 


76 


61 


71 


77 


62 


84 


62 


47 


39 


36 


37 


33 


28 


18 18 


78 


6 138 


122 


77 


103 


99 


86 


72 


75 


63 


76 


84 


72 


65 


63 


45 


42 


33 


35 


44 


23 


21 


15 


9 


68 


7 16 


11 


40 


9 




6 


1 


1 


13 






5 




21 


17 


5 


6 


1 




10 


7 


3 


9 


10 


8 .... 








4 






1 




15 


13 

1 




3 












7 






























1 



























9 1.47 


1.27 


1.12 


1.07 


.911.88 


.69 


.72 


.72 


.58 


.68? 


.73 


.59 


.8 
) 


.59 


.45 


.87 


.34 


.35 


.31 


.26Ll7 

1 


.17 


.74, 



161 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL 





School Houses 


School Visits 


Rural Schools 


CO 

o 
o 












CO 
O 


CO 

eg 


a 

CD 

B 
>> 


CO 

R" 


CO 

u 

CD 






«m 












O 


A 


P. 






U 






$ 






CD 

P. 


CO 

=3 


bfi 
U 














CD 


CD 




CO 


H 


<o 


A 








^i 





CD 


B 




d 


EH 





53 



a 




§ 


'E 


o 


fl 


a 

H 


be 
o 


t» 


t» 


>» 


>> 


-*3 
O 




fc 


pq 


03 


O 


£ 


J 


pq 


pq 


pq 


pq 


H 


1 Brant 


62 


49 


2 


1 


10 




158 


86 


27 


405 


676 


2 Bruce 


167 


113 


16 


1 


37 




346 


74 


19 


121 


560 


3 Carleton 


118 
92 
75 
104 
108 
144 


32 

63 

8 

84 
40 
13 


17 

4 

8 


6 
2 
2 


59 
23 
57 
20 
61 
106 


4 
'*5 


241 
188 
182 
264 
233 
334 


50 
60 
55 

119 
90 

115 


25 

29 
23 
29 
40 
39 


161 
92 
130 
192 
107 
82 


477 


4 Dufferin 


369 


5 Dundas 


390 


6 Elgin 


604 


7 Essex 


3 
20 


4 


470 


8 Frontenac 


570 


9 Glengarry 


75 


4 




3 


68 




195 


37 


26 


43 


301 


10 Grey 


222 

74 


128 
64 


50 


2 
2 


41 

8 


1 


449 
154 


120 
76 


72 
3 


199 
108 


840 


11 Haldimand 


341 


12 Haliburton 


59 


2 


3 




48 


6 


120 


63 


69 


195 


447 


13 Halton 


57 
178 
184 
131 
167 
121 
223 


30 
59 
117 
91 
94 
20 
63 


13 
14 

8 


5 
2 

4 


9 
102 
55 
40 
71 
84 
80 


i 

"5 

4 


129 
401 
396 
288 
352 
257 
442 


44 
160 
168 

71 
101 

66 

80 


7 

83 
49 
67 
81 
32 
27 


74 
1,062 
543 
230 
322 
321 
176 


254 


14 Hastings 


1,706 


15 Huron 


1,156 


16 Kent 


656 


17 Lambton 


1 

12 
73 


1 
1*3 


856 


18 Lanark 


676 


19 Leeds & Grenville. 


725 


20 Lennox and Ad- 
























dington 


111 


22 


7 


4 


77 


1 


230 


102 


32 


148 


512 


21 Lincoln 


64 

182 
98 


34 

142 

68 


7 


1 


22 

40 
19 




131 

386 
234 


84 

137 

68 


23 
50 
17 


579 
273 
149 


817 


22 Middlesex .... 


846 


23 Norfolk 


6 


5 


468 


24 Northumberland & 
























Durham 


203 


142 


10 


3 


48 




450 


218 


76 


475 


1,219 


25 Ontario 


117 

107 
74 

111 
99 


76 
90 
53 

91 

48 


1 
4 
7 
5 
3 


1 
1 

4 

" # 3 


39 
12 
10 
15 

40 


"5 


272 
287 
181 
309 

242 


82 
150 
108 
195 

66 


49 
36 
29 
163 
64 


153 
132 
147 
245 
147 


556 


26 Oxford 


605 


27 Peel 


465 


28 Perth 


912 


29 Peterborough 


519 


30 Prescott and Rus- 
























sell 


84 


10 




1 


63 


10 


177 


61 


45 


111 


394 







1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



165 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
HOUSES, PRAYERS, ETC. 



Maps and Globes 



Examinations, 
Prizes 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 
21 
22 
23 

24 
25 
26 
27 

28 
29 

30 







0Q 



.So 

as 



Lectures 



ft 

CO 

pq 



799 

1,948 

1,199 

916 

858 

1,168 

1,298 

931 

730 

2,544 

886 

470 

697 

2.100 

1,945 

1,563 

1,899 

1,010 

2,187 



1,057 
645 

2,176 
965 

2,119 
1,313 
1,3551 

967 
1,380 

770 



865 



75 


31 


14 


181 


79 


18 


119 


25 


19 


91 


16 


12 


95 


25 


7 


119 


33 


10 


118 


42 


16 


138 


38 


35 


80 


11 


13 


243 


32 


18 


89 


25 


5 


56 


10 


14 


64 


20 


15 


194 


80 


50 


198 


63 


26 


140 


123 


3 


177 


56 


33 


123 


45 


34 


224 


43 


29 


123 


20 


19 


79 


24 


7 


213 


87 


38 


104 


25 


16 


215 


68 


28 


122 


30 


15 


127 


41 


20 


77 


5 


12 


126 


68 


3 


98 


39 


21 


90 


14 


14 



25 



11 



C2 



d CO 

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d"3 
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7 

65 

103 

153 

29 

84 

68 

106 

104 

197 

13 

66 

40 

201 

216 

55 

101 

83 

69 

76 
50 
31 



95 
90 
25 
78 
68 
26 

113 



32 

82 
55 
40 
39 
57 
41 
52 
24 
77 
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35 
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95 
81 
83 
92 
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34 
39 
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108 
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141 

83 

82 

49 

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76 

114 

16 

187 

42 

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112 

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96 

62 

37 

139 

71 

136 
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73 
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32 

51 
27 
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21 
21 

13 



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62 

164 

117 

88 

71 

97 

86 

141 

66 

214 

74 

55 

56 

173 

180 

129 

165 

119 

198 

106 

63, 

182! 

81 

1871 
llll 
105 

73; 
104| 

85| 

79 



5 
3 
6 
6 

4 3 
3 

io 



166 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 



IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL 





School Houses 


School Visits 


Rural Schools — 
Concluded 


en 
o 

o 

03 

•8 
u 

B 

a 


o 

cq 


<3i 

d 
o 
-^ 
02 


& 

e 

1 


0> 

8 


bo 


2 

2 



p. 

t>» 
cq 


en 

CD 

en 

M 

cq 


a 

a 
S 

<u 

3 
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en 

a 



en 

f-i 
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O, 

u 

CO 


cq 


Is 

Eh 


31 Prince Edward . . . 

32 Renfrew. ... 

33 Simcoe 


76 

151 

208 
75 

104 
82 
78 

141 
75 

161 
72 
17 
45 

105 
51 

119 
43 
55 
64 
49 


35 
49 

140 
2 
74 
64 
47 
93 
53 

122 
9 


12 
1 
2 

4 

13 
6 

14 

1 
1 


1 

3 

17 

2 

"5 

4 
1 
2 
2 


28 

85 

49 

70 

26 

5 

20 

7 

7 

36 
56 
14 
30 
67 
39 
86 
31 
48 
54 
36 


""13 

"i 

"4 

3 

9 

15 

10 
3 

7 
7 


183 
356 
455 
184 
280 
212 
195 
339 
218 
311 
155 

27 

98 
212 

75 
247 

80 
100 
124 

90 


58 

111 

191 

19 

86 

168 

75 

136 

112 

235 

90 

32 

30 

86 

53 

123 

53 

79 

94 

123 


16 
62 
65 
18 
65 
19 
21 
59 
44 
71 
30 
5 
36 
65 
54 
59 
24 
55 


153 

138 
217 

92 
191 
404 
266 
224 
198 
243 
140 

17 

59 
155 

82 
264 
186 

28 


410 

667 

928 


34 Stormont 


313 


35 Victoria 


622 


36 Waterloo ' 


803 


37 Welland «, 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 


557 

758 
572 
860 


41 Algoma 

42 Kenora 


415 
81 


43 Manitoulin 

44 Muskoka 


3 
25 
3 
13 
1 
4 
3 
6 


2 

2 


7 
1 


223 

518 


45 Nipissing 


264 


46 Parry Sound 

47 Rainy River 

48 Sudbury 


2 


3 

1 


693 
343 
262 


49 Timiskaming 






66 64 

42 109 


348 


50 Thunder Bay, etc. 






364 










Totals 

1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 


5,382 
287 
233 
161 


2,596 
262 
176 
135 


391 

18 

18 

9 


110 

"2 

1 


2,158 

7 

37 

16 


127 


11,969 

5,418 

2,111 

907 


4,860 

2,148 

1,319 

467 


2,207 
415 
339 
194 


10,352 

13,594 

3,257 

813 


29,388 
21,575 


3 Towns 


7,026 


4 Villages 


2,381 


5 Grand Totals, 1915 . 

6 Grand Totals, 1914. 


6,063 
6,031 

32 


3,169 
3,126 


436 
441 


113| 

117 


2,218 
2,214 


127 
133 


20,405 

20,078; 


8,794 
9,185 


3,155 
2,933 


28,016 
28,840 


60,370 
61,036 


7 Increases I 


43 






4 


6 


327 


* 391 


222 






8 Decreases 


5 


4 i 


824 


666 










9 Percentages 




52.27 


7.19 


1.86 

1 


36.58 


2.09 


33.80 


14.56 


5.22 


46.41 









1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



167 



SCHOOLS— Continued 



HOUSES, PRAYERS, ETC.— Concluded 



Maps and Globes 


Examinations, 
Prizes 


Lectures 


P 
o 




CO 

3 


-p 

CO 


13 

1 


igious 
lergy- 
jves j 





















53 _2 


60 
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a 




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o 


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CO fa 


o S 




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CO ~ jo 
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p **^ 

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CO 

Pi 

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CO 

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CO 
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CO 

CO 


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CO.P 


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1* 


£~* 


31 


897 


79 


22 


6 


3 


1 


4 


6 


39 


43 


24 


76 


3 


32 


1,232 


166 


32 


44 


1 


9 


10 


222 


45 


56 


23 


147 


7 


33 


2,129 


210 


37 


15 




8 


8 


171 


79 


162 


42 


192 


8 


34 


732 

1,057 

963 


82 

105 

92 


14 

8 
48 










56 
22 

47 


40 
37 
62 


37 
63 
35 


19 
22 
31 


75 

94 

82 


1 


35 


4 
7 










36 




3 


3 


1 


37 


783 


85 


26 


14 


1 


3 


4 


68 


19 


58 


26 


77 




38 


1,646 


152 


30 


25 


2 


2 


4 


58 


80 


85 


39 


131 


6 


39 


795 


457 


26 


14 




8 


8 


100 


36 


52 


18 73 


2 


40 


1,642 


171 


56 


32 




8 


8 


252 


85 


125 


67 156 


6 


41 


591 


70 


16 


9 




1 


1 


76 


61 


62 


23 


70 




42 


74 


11 


6 


3 




3 


3 


14 




15 


2 


16 




43 


342 
979 


52 

107 


4 
17 










5 
141 


26 
46 


36 

82 


16 

9 


40 
103 




44 


19 


1 




1 


6 


45 


248 


39 


19 


8 


1 




1 


26 


7 


26 


6 


48 


6 


46 


1,111 


121 


33 


13 




8 


8 


126 


95 


113 


26 


119 


12 


47 


211 


39 


27! 13 




12 


12 


175 




43 


13 


43 


4 


48 


313 
393 
242 


49 
55 
36 


18 7 






. 


48 
44 
28 


8 
*2 


28 
57 
41 


4i 53 

14 61 

1 47 


7 


49 


3 
22 


3 
14 






5 


50 




24 


24 




1 


56,940 


6,076 


1,682 


814 


96 


227 


323 


4,185 


2,507 


3,614 


1 
1,423 5,134 


136 


2 


5,535 


550 


194 


174 


21 


70! 


91 


*30 


65 


255 


174 267 




3 


3,126 


343 


75 


35 


13 


110' 


123 


103 


88 


205 


55! 224 




4 


1,973 


240 


55 


21 


22 


84[ 


106 


181 


79 


114 


38 148 

i 


2 


5 


67,574 


7 ,209: 


2,006 1,044 


152 


491 ! 


643 


*4,499 


2,739 


4,188 1,690 5,773 


138 


6 


65,549 


7, 111; 


1,959 


1,043 


109 


520 j 


629 


6,727 


2,666 


4,179 


1,703 5,7691 177 


7 


2,025 


98 


47 


1 


43j 




14 




73 


9 


i 4 




8 












29 





2,228 




* 


13 


39 






1 
















9 


tll.14 

i 


tl.18 


33.08 


17.21 


23.63 


76.36 






45.17 


69.07 27.871 95.21 


2.27 



*In addition there were set out 16,414 plants, 849 shrubs and 12,620 bulbs. 
tTo each school. 



168 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 



V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


Rural Schools 


TO ■*» 

be H 

r— 1 


"e8 

1° 


CO CO 

P 3 _ o -+= 
eg fl .h to 

CO CD j^t -1 

|l25 


o> 8 

> o 

fH P 

& to 

W-Q^H co 
. .^ « 

>*'■& o o 

_S2rv 3 ° 
£W to co 


M -H O O 

r- 1 TO O Pt 

**-3p 


1 Brant 


$ c. 
5,807 91 

13,923 03 

11,323 42 
6,617 52 
8,304 77 
7,313 20 
7,859 48 

20,472 36 
6,203 53 

14,868 97 
4,781 46 

11,907 55 
3,952 83 

24,732 83 

12,361 04 
9,792 13 

11,495 81 
9,436 48 

16,172 14 
9,629 92 
5,697 88 

12,680 98 
7,030 60 

15,124 70 
9,129 68 
8,660 06 
5,156 75 
7,704 80 

14,291 59 
7,746 50 
4,597 27 

15,393 36 

15,388 76 
7,675 86 

13,279 93 
6,513 21 
6,166 87 

11,691 64 
8,032 21 

17,853 99 

14,821 65 
3,518 82 
9,686 47 

20,934 34 
7,530 02 

26,699 73 
8,488 69 

10,346 46 

14,357 94 

12,403 12 


$ c. 
24,269 84 
53,312 22 
40,821 48 
27,300 00 
25,356 31 
35,350 62 
35,886 62 
36,816 68 
23,295 50 
70,419 73 
23,627 80 

8,181 48 
18,331 73 
51,376 68 
61,620 05 
42,954 37 
53,166 69 
37,126 21 
70,380 51 
34,246 33 
22,435 26 
59,957 09 
31,570 69 
64,004 58 
39,068 90 
37,987 64 
23,608 19 
36,222 94 
26,138 20 
31,089 94 
23,815 27 
43,801 95 
68,543 52 
24,938 38 
31,979 35 
29,526 32 
31,882 33 
45,334 89 
33,190 34 
68,689 90 

5,595 50 
790 00 


$ C. 

36,109 SG 
61,938 46 
60,421 13 
32,482 19 
* 32,210 72 
50,255 30 
54,569 41 
28,221 20 
19,476 57 
77,934 81 
26,043 28 

7,362 21 
17,679 98 
55,739 34 
73,481 97 
65,402 84 
70,685 40 
23,123 91 
55,160 65 
25,443 67 
. 36,784 41 
74,777 48 
39,714 25 
70,120 45 
46,627 59 
58,355 98 
31,471 56 
54,736 23 
28,876 24 
23,665 97 
22,417 79 
36,218 86 
83,847 62 
23,944 76 
36,519 02 
47,253 33 
38,640 40 
55,970 67 
53,074 26 
143,756 59 
24,905 09 

6,050 92 
18,745 39 
17,415 58 
16,156 60 
31,387 14 
13,613 07 
23,014 54 
33,889 58 
27,283 62 


$ C. 

60,175 18 
80.839 50 
55,553 80 
28,537 41 
21,029 35 
84,343 03 
72,151 17 
47,351 22 
16,737 95 
80,015 92 
41,715 52 

7,488 62 
26,867 30 
80,635 86 
87,967 27 
100,256 33 
57,850 70 
27,120 44 
75,567 72 
30,931 17 
73,895 67 
86,237 64 
59,444 81 
72,080 40 
38,990 44 
82,888 58 
49,080 01 
49,698 56 
28,602 38 
39,389 82 
24,351 49 
52,799 18 
125,962 42 
17,520 31 
34,918 64 
76,125 73 
90,415 31 
83,950 48 
140,336 42 
376,543 44 
21,656 60 

2,432 68 

8,697 83 
18,848 54 

9,167 49 
22,672 27 

5,358 15 
21,001 89 
17,737 25 
11,391 36 


$ C. 

126,362 89 


2 Bruce 


210,013 21 


3 Carleton 


168,119 83 


4 Dufferin 


94,937 12 


5 Dundas 


86,901 15 


6 Elgin 


177,262 15 


7 Essex 


170,466 68 


8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 


132,861 46 
65,713 55 


10 Grey 


243,239 43 


11 Haldimand 


96,168 06 


12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 


34,939 86 
66,831 84 


14 Hastings . . . „ .... 

15 Huron 


212,484 71 
235,430 33 


16 Kent 


218,405 67 


17 Lambton 


193,198 60 


18 Lanark 


96,807 04 


19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 


217,281 02 
100,251 09 
138,813 22 


22 Middlesex 


233,653 19 


23 Norfolk 


137,760 35 


24 Northumberland & Durham. 

25 Ontario 


221,330 13 
133,816 61 




187,892 26 


27 Peel 


109,316 51 


28 Perth 


148,362 53 


29 Peterborough 


97,908 41 


30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 


101,892 23 
75,181 82 


32 Renfrew 


148,213 35 


33 Simcoe 


293,742 32 




74,079 31 


35 Victoria 


116,696 94 




159,418 59 


37 Welland 


167,104 91 




196,947 68 


39 Wentworth 


234,633 23 


40 York 


606,843 92 


41 Algoma 


66,978 84 


42 Kenora 


12,792 42 


43 Manitoulin 


37,129 69 




15,172 23 
2,256 00 

11,863 60 
8,065 25 
2,284 42 
5,758 66 
4,735 00 


72,370 69 


45 Nipissing 


35,110 11 


46 Parry Sound 


92,622 74 


47 Rainy River 


35,525 16 


48 Sudbury 


56,647 31 


49 Timiskaming 


71,743 43 




55,813 10 






Totals 


545,560 26 


1,604,147 19 


2,092,977 99 


2,825,331 25 


7,068,016 69 







1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



169 



SCHOOLS— Continued 



STATEMENT 



-■v — 

Expenditure 








CO 

a> 

QQ 


co 

Pi 

9 „r £4 


i 

8-H 










£-Qco 




*"■ *> *-* rn 

■sail 

last 

1^8 


__. _, i— 1 Q. 


CO 

© 

1 

cq 




$ c. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ C. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1 


53,451 90 


19,617 15 


1,365 85 


17,443 40 


91,878 30 


34,484 59 


2 


100,937 07 


12,022 23 


2,480 47 


30,430 17 


145,869 94 


64,143 27 


3 


81,936 29 


20,546 12 


1,087 79 


34,613 81 


138,184 01 


29,935 82 


4 


52,590 54 


3,379 78 


534 41 


13,745 99 


70,250 72 


24,686 40 


5 


51,195 30 


5,138 70 


1,295 64 


13,283 64 


70,913 28 


15,987 87 


6 


70,557 75 


19,642 61 


1,804 16 


24,532 07 


116,536 59 


60,725 56 


7 


71,421 24 


33,406 36 


995 57 


23,538 96 


129,362 13 


41,104 55 


8 


63,385 28 


13,492 73 


999 39 


16,458 48 


94,335 88 


38,525 58 


9 


40,444 87 


6,574 67 


793 23 


6,181 63 


53,994 40 


11,719 15 


10 


129,502 12 


15,304 80 


2,238 05 


35,541 35 


182,586 32 


60,653 11 


11 


43,829 36 


2,887 57 


618 43 


10,023 09 


57,358 45 


38,809 61 


12 


21,901 34 


1,093 10 


246 61 


4,234 47 


27,475 52 


7,464 34 


13 


36,232 42 


1,877 78 


885 93 


9,225 23 


48,221 36 


18,610 48 


14 


103,677 54 


7,998 51 


1,732 16 


27,223 06 


140,631 27 


71,853 44 


15 


116,949 75 


13,517 41 


1,509 75 


43,099 02 


175,075 93 


60,354 40 


16 


85,930 38 


26,707 77 


1,652 35 


24,514 88 


138,805 38 


79,600 29 


17 


106,050 77 


8,705 66 


2,477 60 


24,933 65 


142,167 68 


51,030 92 


18 


57,994 25 


2,834 21 


756 08 


10,537 67 


72,122 21 


24,684 83 


19 


114,704 35 


11,892 46 


900 07 


25,895 51 


153,392 39 


63,888 63 


20 


54,471 75 


3,136 74 


607 12 


13,239 53 


71,455 14 


28,795 95 


21 


44,945 82 


26,843 31 


1,057 75 


23,656 97 


96,503 85 


42,309 37 


22 


115,268 62 


14,756 98 


1,969 37 


31,564 18 


163,559 15 


70,094 04 


23 


59,305 09 


7,199 59 


1,044 53 


16,781 46 


84,330 67 


53,429 68 


24 


119,535 67 


18,332 51 


2,228 12 


24,988 88 


165,085 18 


56,244 95 


25 


75,464 86 


6,680 62 


1,236 90 


20,622 21 


104,004 59 


29,8.i2 02 


26 


79,897 96 


12,252 19 


1,666 07 


29,534 17 


123,350 39 


64,541 87 


27 


49,394 62 


10,766 92 


367 93 


15,468 70 


75,998 17 


33,318 34 


28 


72,369 65 


8,661 84 


2,210 67 


19,866 02 


103,108 18 


45,254 35 


29 


56,102 82 


3,132 01 


976 79 


11,034 63 


71 ,246 25 


26,662 16 


30 


50,009 75 


13,241 03 


773 35 


13,522 07 


77,546 20 


24,346 03 


31 


41,763 30 


7,081 49 


1 ,076 39 


7,886 70 


57,807 88 


17,373 94 


32 


76,162 15 


9,135 82 


1,386 00 


16,932 68 


103,616 65 


44,596 70 


33 


132,848 27 


30,053 77 


3,810 00 


31,905 85 


198,617 89 


95,124 43 


34 


44,641 03 


2,936 26 


853 21 


10,128 42 


58,558 92 


15,520 39 


35 


64,269 49 


11,119 23 


1 ,076 58 


17,485 47 


93,950 77 


22,746 17 


36 


62,565 22 


14,321 48 


1,348 02 


18,366 87 


96,601 59 


62,817 00 


37 


56,932 26 


39,613 88 


1,189 66 


12,776 10 


110,511 90 


56,593 01 


38 


91,197 09 


12,349 07 


1,789 28 


29,096 25 


134,431 69 


62,515 99 


39 


66,032 84 


68,269 82 


2,550 50 


22,819 90 


159,673 06 


74,960 17 


40 


159,482 74 


199,108 51 


3,989 53 


89,031 75 


451,612 53 


155,231 39 


41 


35,729 69 


8,994 37 


562 71 


8,401 72 


53,688 49 


13,290 35 


42 


6,772 96 


1,473 65 


127 80 


2,853 79 


11,228 20 


1,564 22 


43 


21 ,292 41 


1,438 39 


248 21 


5,417 48 


28,396 49 


8,733 20 


44 


44,190 25 


2,644 44 


914 07 


10,719 36 


58,468 12 


13,902 57 


45 


20,521 51 


2,317 48 


433 69 


4,808 12 


28,080 80 


7,029 31 


46 


57,643 66 


5,820 38 


1,389 34 


13,130 48 


77,983 86 


14,638 88 


47 


22,683 20 


4,157 23 


476 36 


5,133 24 


32,450 03 


3,075 13 


48 


28,620 16 


7,149 94 


524 80 


8,405 40 


44,700 30 


11 ,947 01 


49 


37,170 43 


12,613 96 


1,551 56 


14,211.52 


65,547 47 


6,195 96 


50 


30,246 32 


8,125 31 


1,548 50 


11,044 95 


50,965 08 


4,848 02 


3,280,224 11 


800,367 84 


65,358 35 


956,290 95 


5,102,241 25 


1,965,775 44 



170 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 







• 


1 
V. TABLE I 

?eipts 


HIE PUBLIC 
;— FINANCIAL 






Re 




Cities 


> 

'-§42 

cm *h 


co 

'S'S 

^ * B 

ft m £ 

2 O <D 
a c$ en 

q t* oo 




en .2 

ft_Q 

tL r- 1 •— 1 CO 

M r— 1 O O 

g£ 02 ft 


1 Belleville 


; $ c 

1.299 44 
2,127 40 

3.326 54 
1,551 95 
4,785 44 

1.327 47 

3.300 85 
15,952 70 

3,727 44 

11,213 82 

1,117 76 

11,107 36 

4,836 80 

3,017 26 

1,870 32 

2,669 90 

949 20 

2,060 86 

4,298 96 

93,812 96 

2,976 27 

1,273 90 


f $ c. 
32,669 86 
64,915 58 
97,795 44 
36,492 00 

103,662 97 
36,102 16 
46,852 18 

577,631 45 
59,000 00 

449,882 23 
49,400 00 

368,322 19 
79,900 00 
60,500 00 
65,256 12 
56,650 65 
30,386 54 
45,239 00 
59,620 00 
3,169,805 99 
78,711 77 
24,500 00 


1 $ C . 

6,130 81 

1 ,885 34 

3,605 57 

2,495 90 

929 12 

651 39 

609 00 

75,981 69 

17,834 62 

11 ,905 87 

317 67 

39,262 89 

3,492 42 

3,884 58 

15,787 26 

8,332 62 

2,005 11 

3,537 14 

2,651 79 

223,021 14 

31,141 25 

2,778 96 


' $ C. 

40,100 11 


2 Kitchener (Berlin) 


68,928 32 


3 Brantf ord 

4 Chatham 


104,727 55 
40,539 85 


5 Fort William 


109,377 53 


6 Gait 


38,081 02 


7 Guelph 

8 Hamilton 


50,762 03 
669,565 84 


9 Kingston 


80,562 06 


10 London. ... 


473,001 92 


11 Niagara Falls 

12 Ottawa 


50,835 43 
418,692 44 


13 Peterborough 


88,229 22 


14 Port Arthur 


67,401 84 


15 St. Catharines 

16 St. Thomas 


82,913 70 
67,653 17 


17 Sarnia 


33,340 85 


18 Sault Ste. Marie 


50,837 00 


19 Stratford 


66,570 75 


20 Toronto 


3,486,640 09 


21 Windsor 


112,829 29 


22 Woodstock 


28,552 86 






Totals 


178,604 60 


5,593,296 13 


458,242 14 


6,230,142 87 






Towns 
1 Alexandria 


30 64 
168 10 
189 20 
139 20 
279 58 

248 84 
302 12 
425 37 
759 26 
274 02 
298 31 

64 46 ; 
339 30 | 
705 11 
387 86 
1 ,370 28 | 
328 35 | 

249 84 I 
311 35 
404 58 j 
738 86 
351 67 
234 30 

1,283 22 
905 36 
488 94 
401 79 
776 90 
745 86 1 

1,393 00 
245 84 
239 02 


1,308 57 
4,400 00 
5,203 52 
4,182 10 
9,056 69 
6,400 00 
6,806 88 
590 00 
21,078 64 
4,589 15 
2,764 28 
960 50 
7,365 00 
7,682 50 
10,544 67 
26,000 00 | 
1 ,975 00 
6,451 04 
1 ,902 30 
9,173 67 
8,493 22 
1,500 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
24,218 87 
9,585 00 1 
4,808 56 ! 
27,084 00 
14,751 90 i 
10,864 45 | 
5,579 62 | 
4,750 00 


280 17 
868 49 
789 74 
355 94 

2,859 46 
124 11 

1 ,042 28 

262 42 
2,140 87 
2,178 99 

800 42 
170 95 
158 49 
172 24 
581 96 
316 20 
23 50 
53 72 
406 96 
440 85 
369 79 

263 59 

1 .304 67 
424 69 

1.305 33 
559 73 
174 15 
136 06 

7,550 31 

1,032 52 

28 49 

69 41 


1,619 38 


2 Alliston 


5,436 59 




6,182 46 


4 Amherstburg 


4,677 24 


5 Arnprior 


12,195 73 


6 Aurora 


6,772 95 




8,151 28 


8 Bala 


1,277 79 




23,978 77 


10 Blenheim I 


7,042 16 


11 Blind River | 


3,863 01 


12 Bothwell 1 


' 1 ,195 91 


13 Bowmanville j 


7,862 79 


14 Bracebridge 


8,559 85 




11,514 49 


16 Brockville 


27,686 48 


17 Bruce Mines 


2,326 85 


18 Burlington 


6,754 60 




2,620 61 


20 Campbellford 


10,019 10 


21 Carleton Place 


9,601 87 


22 Charlton 


2,115 26 


23 Chesley 


6,538 97 


24 Clinton 


6,707 91 


25 Cobalt 


26,429 56 


26 Cobourg 

27 Cochrane 


10,633 67 
5,384 50 


28 Collingwood 1 


27,996 96 
23,048 07 


30 Cornwall. 


13.289 97 


31 Deseronto 


5,853 95 


32 Dresden 


5,058 43 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



171 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



Expenditure 



c3 ^ 



-o 



73 CO 

■S.3 



3^| 

- S3 P t- 



a 



" S3 ^ H § 
.2 e8 o> *g 

*"* !2 J-l -*J CO M 

^ g CO ^rr*^ 

-Q Pt^ h O 

•^ <3 O P c3-P 



CDr-H 

^ <» U ,„ 

T3«E S CD 

P ^ CO 

C« CO o g 

^.tlTJ P, 

£ «3 « M 

£ftd S 



h3_, o 

P^rO 

g* ^^ CD 



d 



CQ 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 



$ c 
23,462 46 
38,199 50 
55,389 25 
27,387 07 
57,582 87 
27,817 44 
35,077 00 

237,101 67 
47,098 70 

158,033 52 
21,924 70 

252,206 92 
52,253 78 
42,535 12 
31,408 83 
41,930 55 
23,311 86 
30,055 29 
33,612 62 
1,359,135 81 
66,981 66 
20,745 79 



$ c. 

772 25 
17,343 95 
24,329 28 

766 71 
29,705 76 



412 20 

294,825 32 

14,309 85 

224,318 87 

15,483 80 

34,042 69 

2,173 85 

209 08 

31,215 12 

4,931 65 

1 ,429 85 

5,314 46 

14,859 15 

1,319,012 12 

19,537 34 



11 



$ c. 

162 24 

2,046 51 

3,061 30 

241 97 

3,704 76 

500 00 

250 00 

280 67 

538 68 

963 21 

648 79 



3,998 59 
1,322 38 

322 50 
2,026 14 

300 19 
2,710 65 
3,336 12 
35,823 46 
5,195 27 
1,379 38 



$ c. 
13,304 36 

9,915 54 
21,835 74 
12,144 10 
17,886 88 

8,463 27 
15,022 83 
68,734 09 
18,614 83 
89,454 77 

8,699 05 
109,102 47 
29,026 33 
22,334 57 
13,091 78 
18,764 83 

5,258 13 

12,287 03 

13,833 97 

768,074 39 

7,725 92 

5,547 65 



37 
67 

104 
40 

108 
36 
50 

611 
80 

472 
46 

395 
87 
66 
76 
67 
30 
50 
65 
,482 
99 
27 



$ c. 
,701 31 
,505 50 
,615 57 
,539 85 
,880 27 
,780 71 
,762 03 
,941 75 
,562 06 
,770 37 
,756 34 
,352 08 
,452 55 
,401 15 
,038 23 
,653 17 
,300 03 
,367 43 
,641 86 
,045 78 
,440 19 
,672 82 



$ e. 
2,398 80 
1,422 82 

111 98 



497 26 
1,300 31 



57,624 09 



231 55 

4,079 09 

23,340 36 

776 67 
1,000 69 
6,875 47 



3,040 82 
469 57 
928 89 

4,594 31 

13,389 10 

880 04 



2,683,252 41 i 2,054,993 30 



79,812 81 



1,289,122 53 6,107,181 05 



122,961 82 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 



1,160 00 
3,500 00 
4,198 96 
3,438 75 
7,038 00 
4,400 32 
5,605 00 
700 00 

16,894 00 
3,480 22 
2,467 68 
1,025 00 
5,755 00 
6,250 00 
7,311 80 

19,440 00 
1,730 00 
4,777 50 
1 ,780 00 
7,950 49 
7,408 75 
1,388 27 
4,011 80 
5,682 22 

14,183 90 
7,923 50 
3,562 00 

17,764 21 
7,290 15 
9,660 63 
5,043 50 
4,137 50 



6 15 

i , , 


25 38 




20 84 
42 00 
92 52 
32 00 




4 10 

429 70 
1,534 67 


216 14 





742 64 
2,242 94 


193 32 
50 00 




9 69 


455 20 
36 35 




65i 05 

219 43 j 

184 13 

97 33 


1,962 18 


235 74 




179 37 


185 55 


25 85 
69 73 
54 59 

547 16 
60 95 

171 94 
47 42 
16 00 


329 87 


6,i85 is 

133 55 

11 00 

192 38 

879 67 







144 00 


i 80 1 



409 58 
1,422 15 
1 ,632 01 

964 94 
2,405 40 

783 54 
1,127 13 

248 06 
4,236 13 
1 ,091 72 
1,379 63 

161 22 
1 ,652 59 
2,251 16 
2,945 29 

5.981 81 
378 91 

1,517 08 

725 95 

1,590 08 

1,867 04 

589 46 

1.982 57 
971 10 

5,401 35 
1,817 64 
1,438 83 
8,911 45 
3,354 88 
2,040 55 
777 05 
710 39 



1,601 11 

4,922 15 

5,851 81 

4,449 79 

9,965 62 

6,750 53 

6,732 13 

1,164 20 

22,066 09 

6,864 88 

3,847 31 

1,195 91 

7,862 79 

8,537 51 

10,908 14 

27,603 42 

2,293 04 

6,627 65 

2,505 95 

9,719 94 

9,461 34 

2,003 58 

6,393 97 

6,707 91 

26,317 59 

9,935 64 

5,183 77 

26,915 46 

11,540 70 

11,701 18 

5,820 55 

4,993 69 



18 27 

514 44 

330 65 

227 45 

2,230 11 

22 42 

1 ,419 15 

113 59 

1 ,912 68 

177 28 

15 70 



22 34 
606 35 
83 06 
33 81 
126 95 
114 66 
299 16 
140 53 
111 6*f 
145 00 



111 97 

698 03 

200 73 

1,081 50 

11,507 37 

1 ,588 79 

33 40 

64 74 



172 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



1 




Keceipts 




Towns—Continued 


tH* 


Aa co 

2 rt a> 

3 oJ CO 

B u w 

£«4 


► o 
W-O-d co 

£rTR C3 CO 


ftja 

IS s 

SrHrH CO 

^rH O O 

--h o3 o ft 


33 Dry den 


$ c. 
377 60 
483 14 
336 94 
170 56 
133 92 
278 85 
151 56 

56 25 
188 66 
503 31 
263 72 
391 58 
568 46 
379 85 
489 16 
637 14 
1,327 76 
165 38 

77 28 

516 96 

564 96 

1,083 35 


$ C. 

3,813 84 
10,900 00 
6,945 58 
3,950 00 
5,311 00 
2,975 50 
5,561 25 
2,068 00 
5,000 00 
6,076 70 

""*9!246'80* 

10,397 41 

2,560 05 

6,087 52 

10,383 00 

6,600 00 

3,732 52 

2,169 85 

8,996 00 

5,052 24 

13,038 63 

1,403 44 

2,339 44 

6,169 28 

18,450 18 

5,213 88 

6,799 79 

3,215 26 

9,075 00 

19,871 11 

5,719 00 

3,207 90 

2,675 00 

2,350 00 

1,000 00 

8,966 00 

48,023 00 

4,895 70 

35,067 00 

4,318 00 

8,760 00 

8,606 24 

8,000 00 

2,986 32 

37,124 72 

10,104 95 

7,825 48 

32,638 94 

24,649 28 

40,035 00 

4,016 22 

9,150 00 

2,900 00 

11,759 90 

17,702 64 

11,303 25 


$ C. 

273 54 
288 88 
549 88 
843 61 
402 56 
162 09 
355 55 
339 04 
338 19 

2,217 12 
676 39 

1,685 28 

50 

341 62 

130 13 

143 04 

1,219 89 

7 45 
4,351 87 
1,132 83 

626 69 

1,207 36 

24 18 

471 31 

1,216 24 
357 27 

1,214 61 

377 25 

335 35 

2 72 

3,775 66 

136 24 

32 57 

106 41 

847 69 

1,411 71 
826 05 
519 73 
26 83 
213 47 
235 38 
237 87 
142 09 

2,139 54 
380 55 

8,166 25 
765 19 
637 32 
13,022 49 
1 26 
190 61 
120 64 
893 08 
194 45 

1,228 33 

8 50 
1,402 45 


$ c. 

4,464 98 

11,672 02 


34 Dundas 


35 Dunnville 


7,832 40 


36 Durham 


4,964 17 


37 Eastview 


5,847 48 


38 Englehart 


3,416 44 


39 Essex 


6,068 36 


40 Ford 


2,463 29 


41 Forest 


5,526 85 


42 Fort Frances ." 


8,797 13 


43 Frood Mine 


940 11 


44 Gananoque 


11,323 66 


45 Goderich 


10,966 37 


46 Gore Bay 


3,281 52 


47 Gravenhurst 


6,706 81 


48 Haileybury 


11,163 18 


49 Hanover 


9,147 65 


50 Harriston 


3,905 35 


51 Hawkesbury 


6,599 00 


52 Hespeler 


10,645 79 


53 Huntsville 


6,243 89 




15,329 34 


55 Iroquois Falls 


1,427 62 




242 66 
481 54 

1,052 76 
237 66 
446 30 
310 51 
262 76 
687 98 
304 12 
436 66 
703 40 
270 04 
521 71 
362 04 
762 03 
221 02 
214 48 
176 20 
364 68 
580 64 
380 40 
175 56 

2,172 61 
313 76 
286 76 

1,789 00 
871 00 

1,694 06 
195 59 

1,044 83 
135 20 
866 21 
548 32 
432 95 


3,053 41 


57 Keewatin 


7,867 06 


58 Kenora. ... 

59 Kincardine 


19,860 21 
6,666 15 




7,623 34 


61 Latchford 


3,861 12 




9,340 48 


63 Lindsay 


24,334 75 


64 Listowel 


6,159 36 


65 Little Current 


3,677 13 




3,484 81 


67 Matheson 


3,467 73 




2,933 42 


69 Meaford 


10,154 09 


70 Midland 


49,304 76 


71 Milton 


5,143 55 


72 Mitchell 


35,494 95 


73 Mount Forest 


4,729 58 


74 Napanee 


9,362 55 


75 New Liskeard 


9,328 97 


76 Newmarket 


10,519 94 


77 Niagara 


3,542 43 




47,463 58 


79 Oakville 


11,183 90 


80 Orangeville 


8,749 56 


81 Orillia 


47,450 43 


82 Oshawa « 


25,521 54 


83 Owen Sound 


41,919 67 


84 Palmerston 


4,332 45 


85 Paris 


11,087 91 


86 Parkhill 


3,229 65 


87 Parry Sound 


13,854 44 


88 Pembroke 


18,259 46 


89*Penetanguishene 


13,138 65 



Including Protestant Separate School. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



173 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



Expenditure 






'o 
o 

■d 
o 

■31 


ft^ 

a * a « 

•1 d o 9 c3-Q 


i 

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8 

eg 
pq 


33 
34 


$ c. 

3,150 00 

8,905 77 

5,745 00 

3,376 25 

4,034 42 

1,849 22 

4,117 13 

1,218 54 

3,757 50 

4,840 50 

700 00 

7,878 55 

8,413 10 

2,522 50 

4,682 68 

8,369 28 

5,811 10 

3,042 50 

2,333 44 

7,670 00 

4,577 75 

9,601 15 

388 06 

1,152 00 

4,520 00 

14,712 80 

4,490 00 

5,325 00 

1,986 68 

7,436 37 

15,367 00 

.4,817 43 

2,355 00 

2,780 00 

1,590 00 

1,098 97 

6,852 14 

16,778 14 

3,895 00 

4,389 00 

3,355 00 

7,285 40 

6,423 86 

6,914 25 

2,458 96 

21,459 21 

6,785 00 

6,613 32 

19,771 00 

19,026 50 

30,692 65 

3,027 80 

7,659 00 

2,350 75 

10,261 03 

12,074 50 

8,315 25 


$ c. 
168 76 


$ c. 
49 04 


$ C. 

732 75 

2,496 26 

1.023 99 
1,449 64 

832 38 

708 13 
1,270 62 

583 63 
1,022 99 
2,664 06 

233 98 
2,233 19 
2,522 27 

576 09 
1,801 69 
2,686 94 
1,796 50 

821 76 

405 01 
2,227 77 

987 23 

5,282 73 

52 59 

328 81 
1,477 36 
4,052 14 
1,206 05 

1.024 85 
1,418 03 
1,798 90 
5,050 83 
1,123 21 

345 16 
645 07 

1,621 60 
372 19 

2,370 97 

5.647 84 
661 91 
834 47 

1,341 68 
1,548 26 

•1,595 21 

2,476 30 

745 56 

14,691 04 

1.648 65 
1,537 91 
4,546 29 
4,914 33 
7,398 67 

956 43 
3,010 05 

605 22 
2,897 18 
2,892 03 
3,815 18 


$ c. 

4,100 55 

11,402 03 

7,319 08 

4,882 50 

5,725 24 

3,299 64 

5,703 73 

1,957 87 

5,286 24 

8,626 38 

933 98 

10,667 81 

10,966 37 

3,098 59 

6.484 37 
11,109 49 

7,834 80 
3,905 35 
2,896 50 

10,010 79 
6,007 48 

15,129 58 
1,417 53 
3,028 23 
6,213 28 

19,293 12 
6,541 35 
7,489 55 
3,787 12 
9,338 02 

23,874 46 
6,082 11 

3.485 40 
3,425 07 
3,366 66 

1 .486 00 
9,223 11 

48.443 42 
4,952 89 

35.444 65 
4,696 68 
9,118 96 
9,298 97 
9,799 36 
3,288 48 

46,311 04 

8,609 43 

8,555 06 

26,491 56 

25,348 31 

39,440 43 

4,120 89 

10,669 05 

2,955 97 

13,766 58 

15,708 50 

12,669 65 


$ c. 
364 43 
269 99 


35 


550 09 




513 32 


36 


56 61 
196 84 

74 53 
315 98 


81 67 


37 

38 
39 


661 60 
667 76 


122 24 
116 80 
364 63 


40 


155 70 
445 75 

921 82 


505 42 


41 
42 
-43 


60 00 
200 00 


240 61 

170 75 

6 13 


44 


556 07 





655 85 


45 


31 00 




46 




182 93 


47 






222 44 


48 
49 
50 


29 05 
138 99 


24 22 
88 21 
41 09 


53 69 
1,312 85 


51 


158 05 
113 02 
400 52 
245 70 
777 19 

1,493 00 
105 00 
528 18 
845 30 

1,139 70 
308 42 
102 75 

3,456 63 

59 15 

726 08 


3,702 50 


52 




635 00 


53 
54 


41 98 


236 41 
199 76 


55 
56 
57 
58 


199 69 
54 42 


10 09 

25 18 

1,653 78 

567 09 


59 




124 80 


60 




133 79 


61 
6? 


73 99 


74 00 
2 46 


63 




460 29 


64 
65 
66 


82 32 
59 16 


77 25 

191 73 

59 74 


67 


155 06 




101 07 


68 


14 84 


1,447 42 


69 




930 98 


70 
71 
72 
73 


25,030 06 

383 74 

30,196 03 


987 38 
12 24 
25 15 


861 34 

190 66 

50 30 

32 90 


74 
75 
76 

77 


237 63 

1,196 75 

235 81 


47 67 

83 15 

173 00 

83 96 

1,298 26 

68 41 

403 83 

180 72 

1,388 17 


243 59 

30 00 

720 58 

253 95 


78 
79 
80 


8,862 53 
107 37 


1,152 54 

2,574 47 

194 50 


81 
82 
83 
84 


1,993 55 

19 31 

1,207 83 

136 66 


20,958 87' 

173 23, 

2,479 24 

211 56, 


85 




418 86 


86 






273 68 


87 


608 37 
500 98 
436 72 




87 86 


88 
89 


240 99 
102 50 


2,550 96 
469 00 



174 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



V. 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE E— FINANCIAL 







Receipts 




Towns — Concluded 


CO -^ 

3 9 

6X1 f-> 

A 4 


r-l 2 ® 

i« * a 

£ fl a> 

3 CO CO 


£% 

*> rt 

w ™ «_. 
. • += CD 

>>prj o a 

gfgcls 


CO .2 

+3 .— 1 
ftrO 

"§£ s 

h 3 o o 
r-^ co o ft 

£&w ft 


90 Perth 


$ c. 
242 48 

476 96 
382 94 
519 15 
340 47 
255 84 
512 96 
893 87 

1,496 40 
239 02 

30 64 
406 94 
173 38 
281 92 
456 31 
309 25 
1,044 98 
190 02 
125 56 
862 81 
359 92 
397 06 
788 91 
481 35 

92 92 
299 38 

79 10 
388 27 
208 41 
397 22 
285 04 
166 65 

85 92 
241 12 
893 88 
666 45 

477 96 
334 41 
903 90 
292 22 
279 40 
213 20 
299 66 


7,332 45 

12,000 00 

9,910 70 

10,815 92 

2,020 00 

6,107 33 

13,000 00 

6,750 00 

8,693 06 

4,750 00 

2,008 66 

11,568 55 

8,967 58 

5,469 53 

8,826 95 

10,576 63 

19,858 00 

4,747 83 

2,225 00 

19,753 19 

7,010 00 

4,420 84 

13,237 00 

4,206 62 

10,325 50 

15,621 28 

2,232 11 

8,000 00 

1,750 00 

11,192 00 

1,050 00 

4,400 00 

4,113 94 

4,862 06 

96,948 78 

11,465 07 

21,705 33 

2,056 29 

25,000 00 

5,711 95 

6,250 00 

6,613 62 

5,104 42 


$ c. 
234 99 
540 85 
277 32 
114 80 
921 09 

64 19 
607 68 
264 38 
699 10 

69 41 

64 55 
1,439 11 

2.983 44 
622 07 

1,625 00 

2,804 26 

437 66 

2,569 68 

4,180 02 

9 02 

260 60 

1,469 74 

5,116 96 

435 59 

111 68 

195 14 

934 96 

96 49 

1,999 57 

1.984 02 
364 00 
256 06 

1,387 76 

304 13 

2,386 45 

18,090 40 

504 66 

35 53 

24,405 32 

2,323 37 

214 55 

260 35 

771 26 


$ c. 
7,809 92 


91 Petrolea 


13,017 81 


92 Picton 


10,570 96 


93 Port Hope 


11,449 87 


94 Powassan 


3,281 56 


95 Prescott 


6,427 36 


96 Preston 


14,120 64 


97 Rainy River 


7,908 25 


98 Renfrew 


10,888 56 


99 Ridgetown 


5,058 43 


100 Rockland 


2,103 85 


101 St. Mary's 


13,414 60 


102 Sandwich 


12,124 40 


103 Seaforth 


6,373 52 


104 Simcoe 


10,908 26 


105 Sioux Lookout 


13,690 14 


106 Smith's Falls 


21,340 64 


107 Southampton 


7,507 53 


108 Stayner 


6,530 58 


109 Steelton 


20,625 02 


110 Strathroy 


7,630 52 


Ill Sturgeon Falls 


6,287 64 


112 Sudbury 


19,142 87 


113 Thessalon 


5,123 56 


114 Thornbury . . .'. 


10,530 10 


115 Thorold 


16,115 80 


116 Tilbury 


3,246 17 


117 Tillsonburg 


8,484 76 


118 Timmins 


3,957 98 


119 Trenton 


13,573 24 


120 Trout Creek 


1,699 04 


121 Uxbridge 


4,822 71 


122 Vankleek Hill 


5,587 62 


123 Walkerton 


5,407 31 


124 Walkerville 


100,229 11 


125 Wallaceburg 


30,221 92 


126 Waterloo 


22,687 95 


127 Webbwood 


2,426 23 


128 Welland 


50,309 22 


129 Weston 


8,327 54 
6,743 95 


130 Whitby 


131 Wiarton 


7,087 17 


132 Wingham 


6,175 34 






Totals 


61,646 61 

545,560 26 

178,604 60 

61,646 61 

21,928 75 


1,265,916 13 

3,697,125 18 

5,593,296 13 

1,265,916 13 

373,783 15 


170,638 51 

2,825,331 25 

458,242 14 
170,638 51 
209,530 00 


1,498,201 25 


Totals 
1 Rural Schools 


7,068,016 69 




6,230,142 87 


3 Towns 


1,498,201 25 




605,241 90 






5 Grand Totals, 1915 


807,740 22 
716,377 26 


10,930,120 59 
11,704,877 53 


3,663,741 90 
3,550,747 87 

112,994 03 


15,401,602 71 
15,972,002 66 


6 Grand Totals, 1914 




7 Increases 


91,362 96 






8 Decrease 


774,756 94 


570,399 95 








9 Percentages 


5.24 


70.96 


23.78 * 





Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance : Rural Schools, $23.81 ; Cities, $46.17 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



175 



SCHOOLS— Concluded 
STATEMENT— Concluded 


Expenditure 






•S3 


T3 

'B 
^ ° 

co o a> 

•to (O 

Sal 


ft 

a w.J? Nj o 

- •£ O 

2 ce <v Ml o 

« O 0) drr<^ 

t* jrj3 & s o 

.Q Pl+3 S o 
"^ c3 o a eSrO 


^ £> ^ ,« 

, rt fl) to 

5 -^ 2 

£ ri G M 


■A © 

■-d _. o 

0^r0 

4) CS O ,„ 

8.2.3 S 

°£Ph ft 

1 H 


CO 

a> 
o 



13 

PQ 


90 


$ C. 

5,594 00 
9,055 50 
7,165 26 
8,713 00 

2.180 45 
4,953 18 

10,610 00 
5,780 00 
7,545 00 
4,137 50 
1,220 09 
6,717 20 
3,520 80 
4,126 10 
7,970 50 
1,240 00 

16,599 00 

3.892 50 
2,280 00 

11,902 50 
5,886 28 
3,510 00 
9,849 50 
4,169 25 
1,800 35 

4.893 37 

1.575 00 
6,802 00 
1,600 00 

8.181 81 
1,240 00 
3,914 00 

2.576 15 
4,035 50 

14,202 65 
8,107 75 

11,755 38 
1,808 45 

16,290 75 
6,461 25 
5,356 75 
5,426 25 
4,545 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ C. 

2,133 17 

3,086 17 

2,210 18 

2.282 76 

538 53 

1,265 17 

2,623 03 

2,119 17 

3,180 08 

710 39 

291 44 

2,707 18 

1,573 42 

1,033 14 

2,932 83 

2,355 14 

4,503 38 

716 12 

505 20 

5,703 29 

1,272 52 

1,530 46 

3,224 13 

691 65 

538 55 

2,012 96 

387 49 

1,451 51 

1,131 47 

3,242 23 

374 20 

805 16 

368 20 

1,029 84 

6,616 86 

1,324 97 

3,430 65 

552 19 

6,701 46 

1,368 87 

1,116 85 

1,284 04 

1,174 97 


$ c. 
7,727 17 

12,767 26 
9,443 87 

11,362 55 
2,718 98 
6,325 95 

13,513 72 
7,899 17 

10,888 56 
4,993 69 
1,511 53 

13,414 60 
5,390 54 
5,626 25 

10,908 26 

12,335 51 

21,119 18 
7,313 93 
2,840 46 

20,504 06 
7,629 70 
5,114 29 

14,330 08 
4,860 90 

10,195 96 

15,877 30 
2,111 10 
8,417 78 
3,957 98 

11,481 61 
1,642 93 
4,740 16 
2,966 90 
5,169 31 

98,672 61 

29,213 70 

22,238 67 
2,407 91 

34,930 28 
7,830 12 
6,484 60 
7,087 17 
5,912 37 

1,375,413 28 

5,102,241 25 

6,107,181 05 

1,375,413 28 

498,793 36 

13,083,628 94 
13,525,751 79 


$ c. 
82 75 


91 
9? 


411 00 

68 43 

306 00 


214 59 


250 55 
1,127 09 


93 
94 


60 79 


87 32 
562 58 


95 
96 


47 60 
280 69 


60 00 


101 41 
606 92 


97 




9 08 


98 


161 48 
144 00 


2 00 
1 80 




99 
100 


64 74 
592 32 


101 


3,990 22 

296 32 

257 50 

4 93 

8,740 37 






10? 




6,733 86 


103 
104 


209 51 


747 27 


105 




1,354 63 


106 


16 80 
24 88 
55 26 


221 46 


107 

108 


2,680 43 


193 60 
3,690 12 


109 


2,898 27 
470 90 


120 96 


110 




82 


111 


73 83 
84 31 


1,173 35 


112 
113 


1,172 14 


4,812 79 
262 66 


114 
115 
116 
117 
118 


7,786 00 

8,909 32 

68 79 

161 77 

1,226 51 


71 06 

61 65 

79 82 

2 50 


334 14 

238 50 

1,135 07 

66 98 


119 


57 57 

28 73 


2,091 63 


120 




56 11 


^? l ^ 


21 00 


82 55 


m 


22 55 
103 97 
244 74 

879 17 
47 27 
98 00 


2,620 72 


123 




238 00 


124 
125 
126 
127 


77,608 36 

19,687 94 

6,173 47 


1,556 50 

1,008 22 

449 28 

18 32 


128 
129 


11,840 07 


15,378 94 
497 42 


130 




11 00 

226 88 

4 30 


259 35 


131 


150 00 

188 10 




132 


262 97 


1 
2 
3 
4 


837,152 62 

3,280,224 11 

2,683,252 41 

837,152 62 

309,535 29 

7,110,164 43 
6,693,277 10 


257,741 30 

800,367 84 

2,054,993 30 

257,741 30 

82,224 01 

3,195,326 45 
4,180,333 53 


12,640 07 

65,358 35 

79,812 81 

12,640 07 

4,805 43 


. 267,879 29 

956,290 95 

1,289.122 53 

267,879 29 

102,228 63 


122,787 97 

1,965,775 44 
122,961 82 
122,787 97 
106,448 54 


5 

6 


162,616 66 
144,885 46 


2,615,521 40 
2,507,255 70 


2,317,973 77 
2,446,250 87 


7 


416,887 33 




17,731 20 


108,265 70 




8.. 


985,007 08 


442,122 85 


128,277 10 








9 


54.34 


24.42 


1.24 


19.99 







Towns, $21.18; Villages, $19.08; Province, $29.89, 



176 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I. TABLE F— FINANCIAL 



Eural Schools 



Eeceipts 



o 



r-H <U 
C3 CO 
ft CO 



CO fl >H 



O 

Eh m 



1 Bruce 

2 Carleton 

3 Essex 

4 Frontenac 

5 Grey 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and Grenville 

12 Lennox and Addington . . . 

13 Middlesex 

14 Norfolk 

15 Northumberland & Durham 

16 Ontario 

Tj Peel . -. 

18 Perth I 

19 Peterborough 

20 Prescott and Russell 

21 Renfrew 

22 Simcoe 

23 Sfcormont, Dundas & Glengarry 

24 Victoria 

25 Waterloo 

26 Wellington 

27 Districts 



Totals 



Cities 

1 Belleville 

2 Kitchener (Berlin) 

3 Brantford 

4 Chatham 

5 Fort William , 

6 Gait , 

7 Guelph 

8 Hamilton , 

9 Kingston , 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls 

12 Ottawa 

13 Peterborough , 

14 Port Arthur 

15 St. Catharines 

16 St. Thomas 

17 Sarnia , 

18 Sault Ste. Marie .. 

19 Stratford 

20 Toronto 

21 Windsor 

22 Woodstock 



9 

16 

28 

11 

7 

6 

9 

7 

1 

3 

2 

2 

5 

1 

6 

1 

1 

7 

2 

92 

15 

4 

18 

2 

7 

6 

47 



315 



1 
2 
2 
1 
4 
1 
3 

11 
3 
9 
1 

33 
4 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
1 

33 
5 
1 



Jh c. 
711,44 
846 67 

,014 09 

,599 86 

409 59 

781 90 

880 51 

303 51 

76 37 

310 89 

255 91 

303 99 

285 84 

86 37 

889 44 

76 37 

73 87 

555 06 

135 24 

112 50 

,855 13 
325 72 

,152 17 
142 74 
417 02 
334 22 

,846 20 



19,782 62 



$ c. 
7,981 82 
9,884 16 
22,200 02 
4,846 57 
4,258 20 
2,761 25 
5,737 42 
5,473 72 

508 25 
1,341 32 

425 27 

687 57 
3,078 01 

851 94 
2,280 93 

319 62 

599 88 

5,186 72 

1,543 18 

60,069 61 

8,235 66 

5,542 40 

10,722 22 

1,337 41 

5,802 16 

3,583 40 

23,505 47 



198,764 18 



172 00 
437 00 
227 00 
220 00 
,260 17 
60 00 
274 00 
,160 67 
469 00 
665 00 
115 00 



Totals 126 



561 00 
670 17 
254 00 
144 00 
175 00 
519 17 
251 80 
,822 00 
685 00 
84 00 



14,225 98 



4,211 46 
12,509 47 

4,942 76 

6,951 78 
20,394 07 

1,417 96 
12,890 56 
30,660 23 
11,378 37 
21,300 57 

2,696 70 
85,636 50 
12,224 99 
10,489 11 

6,767 80 

5,618 56 

3,933 81 
13,293 62 

5,877 47 

161,788 00 

25,533 23 

1,572 13 



462,089 15 



$ c. 

5,615 52 

6,197 91 

10,455 86 

1,942 73 

2,138 77 

1,580 80 

3,215 94 

2,082 19 

682 08 

357 51 

146 63 

350 97 

1,334 10 

372 21 

469 23 

. 977 97 

162 72 

3,583 72 

439 53 

32,910 35 

8,192 22 

1,658 97 

4,403 28 

236 51 

5,585 76 

1,544 17 

12,495 86 



109,133 51 



624 44 

13,189 00 

1,266 11- 

6,271 24 

749 66 

583 14 

782 39 

11,673 94 

499 40 

1,278 98 

630 32 

19,994 70 

1,305 53 

13 46 

305 80 

777 62 

3,219 84 

3,547 91 

1,319 85 

62,540 51 

5,547 91 

394 69 



$ c. 

14,308 78 

16,928 74 

33,669 97 

8,389 16 

6,806 56 

5,123 95 

9,833 87 

7,859 42 

1,266 70 

2,009 72 

827 81 

1,342 53 

4,697 95 

1,310 52 

3,639 60 

1,373 96 

836 47 

9,325 50 

2,117 95 

93,092 46 

19,283 01 

7,527 09 

16,277 67 

1,716 66 

11,804 94 

5,461 79 

40:847 53 



327,680.31 



136,516 44 



5,007 90 
26,135 47 

6,435 87 
13,443 02 
22,403 90 

2,061 10 
13,946 95 
44,494 84 
12,346 77 
23,244 55 

3,442 02 

105,631 20 

14,091 52 

11,172 74 

7.327 60 
6,540 18 

7.328 65 
17,360 70 

7,449 12 

229,150 51 

31,766 14 

2,050 82 



612,831 57 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



177 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
STATEMENT, ETC. 



Expenditure 








a 

T3 a> 


A U o 










c3 c3 


1- 

•+2 o 


-31 
■SB'S 

&S2 


n 8 

M 
m 
=i 3 


* 


CO 




a 




ga 


£ M 


3** 


<* 


EH* 


pq 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


1 


7,410 52 


704 97 


75 11 


2,355 19 


10,545 79 


3,762 99 


2 


7,778 85 


1,654 75 


127 42 


3,758 87 


13,319 89 


3,608 85 


3 


17,618 03 


7,003 86 


657 52 


4,503 80 


29,783 21 


3,886 76 


4 


5,417 29 


480 29 


57 86 


1,582 23 


7,537 67 


851 49 


5 


3,622 61 


384 92 


14 21 


904 81 


4,926 55 


1,880 01 


6 


3,026 00 


255 32 


54 77 


989 08 


4,325 17 


798 78 


7 


5,147 35 


2,055 89 


112 13 


1,036 60 


8,351 97 


1,481 90 


8 


4,671 28 


118 48 


63 83 


996 78 


5,850 37 


2,009 05 


9 


605 60 


15 65 


16 85 


105 25 


743 35 


523 35 


10 


1,256 00 


383 65 


9 75 


114 68 


1,764 08 


245 64 


11 


600 50 
924 80 


5 00 
13 01 




62 39 
195 84 


667 89 
1,150 15 


159 92 


12 


i6*5o" 


192 38 


13 


2,790 00 


421 87 


60 41 


460 84 


3,733 12 


964 83 


14 


600 75 


95 39 


32 17 


206 34 


934 65 


375 87 


15 


2,925 00 


62 94 


5 85 


384 15 


3,377 94 


261 66 


16 


600 00 


246 25 


19 14 


133 80 


999 19 


374 77 


17 


500 00 


113 75 


11 00 


31 15 


655 90 


180 57 


18 


5,894 71 


747 37 


196 49 


1,550 89 


8,389 46 


936 04 


19 


1,150 00 


60 63 


84 00 


380 16 


1,674 79 


443 16 


20 


46,618 84 


10,506 46 


975 00 


9,197 29 


67,297 59 


25,794 87 


21 


8,215 64 


4,099 90 


157 33 


3,216 07 


15,688 94 


3,594 07 


22 


3,381 55 


1,375 23 


38 29 


1,604 48 


6,397 55 


1,129 54 


23 


10,548 82 


1,229 29 


196 88 


1,570 27 


13,545 26 


2,732 41 


24 


1,250 00 


44 70 


117 75 


118 35 


1,530 80 


185 86 


25 


5,297 00 


849 64 


77 85 


1,333 39 


7,557 88 


4,247 06 


26 


3,432 15 


146 00 


40 45 


519 57 


4,138 17 


1,323 62 


27 


21,300 01 


4,244 73 


194 30 


10,967 77 


36,706 81 


4,140 72 


172,583 30 


37,319 94 


3,410 86 


48,280 04 


261,594 14 


66,086 17 


1 


1,435 00 
6,540 00 
2,827 00 


1,300 00 

14,196 87 

2,392 13 




1,500 11 

5,229 68 

856 73 


4,235 11 

26,135 47 

6,139 06 


772 79 


2 


"168*92" 
63 20 




3 


"296*8i" 


4 


3,462 64 


770 38 


32 28 


1,222 06 


5,487 36 


7,955 66 


5 


14,286 99 
1,100 00 


5,691 05 
696 69 




2,425 86 
202 58 


22,403 90 
2,013 24 




6 


"13*97** 


"47*86" 


7 


4,500 00 


3,856 61 


175 64 


2,301 84 


10,834 09 


3,112 86 


8 


16,185 00 


14,451 37 


2,952 10 


7,774 92 


41,363 39 


3,131 45 


9 


6,057 89 
8,010 00 


685 77 
8,988 62 


119 09 
656 90 


5,484 02 
4,496 55 


12,346 77 
22,152 07 




10 


"i,'092'48" 


11 


1,550 00 


300 00 




780 00 


2,630 00 


812 02 


12 


19,245 00 


32,940 24 




46,009 03 


98,194 27 


7,436 93 


13 


8,708 00 
6,177 50 


105 70 
889 69 




5,277 82 
2,994 21 


14,091 52 
10,061 40 




14 




"i'.iii 34*' 


15 


3,375 00 


948 02 


"98*12" 


1,904 94 


6,326 08 


1,001 52 


16 


1,904 46 


2,920 39 


97 74 


969 91 


5,892 50 


647 68 


17 


2,635 00 


330 00 


15 00 


588 65 


3,568 65 


3,760 00 


18 


6,935 00 


3,233 03 


214 65 


3,921 70 


14,304 38 


3,056 32 


19 


2,962 00 


646 59 * 


93 96 


1,686 17 


5,388 72 


2,060 40 


20 


72,727 69 
10,036 72 


110,049 16 
2,164 35 


349 52 

284 89 


46,024 14 
13,008 60 


229,150 51 
25,494 56 




21 


6,27i*58** 


22 


900 00 


716 10 


105 52 


325 14 


2,046 76 


4 06 


201,560 89 


208,272 76 


5,441 50 


154,984 66 


570,259 81 


42,571 76 



12 E, 



178 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE F— FINANCIAL 




1 Alexandria .. 

2 Almonte .... 

3 Amherstburg 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie 

6 Bonfield 

7 Brockville . . 

8 Cache Bay... 

9 Charlton 

10 Chelmsford.. 

11 Cobalt 

12 Cobourg 

13 Cochrane 

14 Collingwood 

15 Cornwall 

16 Dundas 

17 Eastview 

18 Ford 

19 Fort Frances , 

20 Goderich 

21 Hanover 

22 Hawkesbury , 

23 Ingersoll 

24 Kearney 

25 Keewatin 

26 KenOra 

27 Lindsay 

28 Massey 

29 Mattawa 

30 Mount Forest. 

31 New Liskeard 

32 Newmarket . . 

33 North Bay . . . 

34 Oakville 

35 Orillia 

36 Oshawa 

37 Owen Sound . . 

38 Paris 

39 Parkhill 

40 Pembroke . . . 

41 Perth 

42 Picton 

43 Prescott 

44 Preston 

45 Rainy River . . 

46 Renfrew 

47*Rockland 

48 St. Mary's.... 

49 Sandwich 

50 Seaforth 



206 00 
86 00 
139 00 
191 00 
101 00 



185 00 


21 00 




125 00 



60 00 


358 00 


63 00 
i 


1 


148 17 


54 00 


38 00 


61 00 


' 126 42 


108 92 


156 17 


187 00 


931 23 


27 00 


120 17 


40 00 


766 17 


17 00 


100 00 


95 00 


82 00 


37 00 


31 00 


265 00 


146 00 


31 00 


94 00 


79 00 


91 17 


182 00 


44 00 


166 00 


47 00 



c. 
6,860 98 
1,001 64 
2,958 18 
5,467 32 

1.890 00 
912 54 

3,700 00 
450 00 
650 00 
2,143 57 
9,624 23 
1,700 00 
3,229 37 

2.891 67 
8,394 75 

455 74 
6,000 00 
2,165 47 
2,020 59 

884 03 

964 48 
6,095 35 
1,238 06 

685 45 

707 00 
4,750 00 
4, £24 78 
1,262 09 
2,350 00 

793 17 
1,300 00 

978 72 
16,712 00 

633 12 
2,529 58 
1,724 60 
2,048 82 

793 89 

580 26 
8,381 71 
1,646 42 

609 90 
2,568 03 
2,568 85 

466 26 
5,843 40 
5,358 00 
1,000 19 
3,703 96 

943 56 



$ c. 

1,309 73 

2,024 39 

1,965 93 

155 37 

896 33 

1,031 29 

"573*26' 

399 60 

65 67 

7,125 46 

1,172 56 

10,159 27 

80 82 

3,148 90 

1,108 45 

1,855 50 

174 67 

2,097 17 

205 31 

382 03 

327 29 

255 87 

360 80 

120 65 

918 53 

100 00 

931 41 

1,797 11 

382 00 

477 90 

830 14 

24,500 00 

458 60 

2,701 80 

495 69 

528 86 

6,924 47 

34 39 

3,345 13 

339 52 

751 73 

.3,601 44 

1,511 31 

1,101 46 

1,122 72 




$ c. 
8,376 71 
3,112 03 
5,063 11 
5,813 69 
2,887 33 
1,943 83 
3,885 00 
1,023 20 
1,070 60 
2,209 24 
16,749 69 
2,997 56 
13,388 64 
3,032 49 
11,901 65 
1,627 19 
7,855 50 
2,340 14 
4,265 93 
1,143 34 
1,384 51 
6,422 64 
1,554 93 
1,172 67 

936 57 
5,824 70 
5,111 78 
2,193 50 
5,078 34 
1,202 17 
1,898 07 
1,848 86 
41,978 17 
1,108 72 
5,331 38 
2,315 29 
2,659 68 
7,755 36 

645 65 
11,991 84 
2,131 94 
1,392 63 
6,263 47 
4,159 16 
1,658 89 
7,148 12 
5,358 00 
1,848 85 
8,340 24 
1,304 60 



*No report received; figures of preceding year. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



179 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT, ETC.— Continued 



«43 
S? * 



Expenditure 



!3 

T3 o 

c3 o oj 

«> ?3 

<U tUD £ 

05 ^ 



".3a 

9 S3 o 
£^-§ 

Jh % CO 



3* 



IS 



9 

10 

11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 



$ c. $ c. $ c. $ 

2,856 00 2,206 90 70 16 3,243 

1,650 00 281 46 10. 89 515 

1,850 00 2,204 54 33 55 931 

2,800 00 1,435 35 i 1,179 

1,260 00 43 23 17 32 555 

1,000 00 76 63 60 

2,400 00 400 00 1,085 

901 00 22 00 5 00 95 

485 00 346 50 134 10 96 

1,400 00 41 49 552 

6,220 00 3,925 30 4,152 

1,300 00 1,206 90 ' 432 

1,650 00 824 00 8,435 

1,425 00 187 60 77 84 1,252 

7,516 35 1,472 17 ' 2,873 

834 19 266 65 i ' 303 

3,436 00 3,485 33 110 60 785 

1,025 00 500 00 i 362 

1,380 00 1.184 60 46 45 600 

600 00 123 70 25 90 355 

660 00 15 93 165 

3,680 00 230 40 | 1,776 

612 00 124 50 31 43 346 

500 00 300 82 3 00 100 

550 00 17 90 195 

1,650 00 1,848 55 136 30 845 

3,050 00 351 50 1,529 

977 50 242 00 i 602 

2,017 00 1,047 57 34 15 841 

600 00 13 00 ! 217 

635 00 433 55 324 

585 00 406 69 5 6C 72 

8,823 75 146 00 32,919 

500 00 257 09 l Ill 

1,600 00 576 36 113 94 924 

1,037 50 222 25 99 86 251 

1,400 00 327 71 771 

600 00 6,35137 8 95 459 

563 00 62 

4,527 54 3,732 25 1,038 01 442 

1,400 00 218 00 18 00 362 

525 00 22 35 46 70 55 

1,408 33 1,025 30 705 

1,060 00 1,222 77 " 196 

400 00 1,102 16 15 95 74 

2,440 00 3,402 67 96 95 1,208 

3,900 00 598 00 210 00 650 

600 00 503 21 ! 158 

2,300 00 1,412 95 ! 853 

800 00 12 85 130 



c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


65 


8,376 71 




00 


2,457 35 




654 68 


63 


5,019 72 


43 39 


16 


5,414 51 


399 18 


67 


1,876 22 


1,011 11 


00 


1,136 63 


807 20 


no 


3,885 00 




00 


1,023 00 


20 


43 


1,062 03 


8 57 


89 


1,994 38 


214 86 


29 


14,297 59 


2,452 10 


71 


2,939 61 


57 95 


58 


10,909 58 


2,479 06 


43 


2,942 87 


89 62 


73 


11,862 25 


39 40 


21 


1,404 05 


223 14 


30 


7,817 23 


38 27 


83 


1,887 83 


452 31 


24 


3,211 29 


1,054 64 


50 


1,105 10 


38 24 


58 


841 51 


543 00 


25 


5,686 65 


735 99 


84 


1,114 77 


440 16 


00 


903 82 


268 85 


71 


763 61 


172 96 


55 


4., 480 40 


1,344 30 


36 


4,930 86 


180 92 


74 


1,822 24 


371 26 


63 


3,940 35 


1,137 99 


81 


830 81 


371 36 


02 


1,392 57 


505 50 


32 


1,069 61 


779 25 


74 


41,889 49 


88 68 


70 


868 79 


239 93 


62 


3,214 92 


2,116 46 


07 


1,610 68 


704 61 


51 


2,499 22 


160 46 


10 


7,419 42 


335 94 


37 


625 37 


20 28 


34 


9,740 14 


2,251 70 


00 


1,998 00 


133 94 


15 


649 20 


743 43 


87 


3,139 50 


3,123 97 


79 


2,479 56 


1,679 60 


80 


1,592 91 


65 98 


50 


7,148 12 
5,358 00 
1,261 96 




00 




75 


586 89 


27 


4,566 22 


3,774 02 


55 


943 40 | 


361 20 



180 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
I. TABLE F— FINANCIAL 





Number of Schools 




Receipts 


* 


Towns— Concluded 


93 

CO -*3 

'« 2 

•r— 1 CO 


CO 

* * a 

•n If M 

1^ 


- o3 P 

!»_, O 
(O T3 CO 
O O . 

d .n *-" 




o _ J 

P 4) 

J o 

2 s 

E-i 


51 Smith's Falls 




$ c. 


$ c. 

1,892 00 

5,529 45 

5,560 59 

21,775 07 

3,525 94 

2,126 08 

2,732 00 

1,700 00 

1,367 35 

1,449 42 

667 75 

3,388 82 

3,253 00 

357 60 

497 56 


$ c. 

35,471 29 

2,334 30 

370 00 

19,311 87 

6,366 41 

2,151 23 

967 64 

926 91 

328 88 

1,212 38 

91 59 

4,605 25 

28 37 

327 00 

731 4*4 


$ c. 
37 363 29 


52 Steelton... 


274 17 


8 137 9 ? 


53 Sturgeon Falls 


5 930 59 


54 Sudbury 


624 17 
124 00 


41 711 11 


55 Thorold 


10 016 35 


56 Tilbury 


4 277 31 


57 Timmins 


104 17 
101 00 


3,803 81 
2,727 91 


58 Trenton 


59 Vankleek Hill 


1,696 23 


60 Walkerton 


103 00 

59 00 

192 60 

105 00 

14 00 

35 00 


2,764 80 
818 34 


61 Walkerville 


62 Waliaceburg 


8,186 67 


63 Waterloo 


3,386 37 


64 Weston 


698 60 


65 Whitby 


1,264 00 






Totals 


80 

315 

126 

80 

16 


7,542 53 


203,284 36 


170,664 01 


381 490 90 






Totals 
1 Rural Schools 


19,782 62 

14,225 98 

7,542 53 

580 50 


198,764 18 

462,089 15 

203,284 36 

15,764 96 


109,133 51 

136,516 44 

170,664 01 

9,153 95 


327,680 31 


2 Cities 


612,831 57 


3 Towns 


381,490 90 


4 Villages 


25,499 41 






5 Grand Totals, 1915 


537 
519 


42,131 63 
44,467 71 


879,902 65 
903,988 11 


425,467 91 
518,816 99 


1,347,502 19 


6 Grand Totals, 1914 


1,467,272 81 






7 Increases 


18 










8 Decreases 


2,336 08 


24,085 46 


93,349 08 


119,770 62 








9 Percentages 




3.12 


65.29 


31.57 











Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance : Rural Schools, $15.00 ; Cities, $18.20 ; 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



181 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT, ETC.— Concluded 



Expenditure 




"ca » 

1-3 


i 

'B 

Ti o 
* £ <» 
o be g 
02 


*3 & OT 

£ S3 


fa 


§ 

r- 1 <U 

rt Pi 
o * 


CO 

o 

a 
M 


$ C. 

51 375 00 


$ C. 

36,271 00 
158 30 


$ C. 

440 79 
15 00 
25 75 

1,885 77 
42 20 


$ c. $ c. 
276 50 37.363 29 


$ c. 


52 3,420 00 

53 3 270 00 


3,155 91 

2,336 33 

2,900 15 

1,246 22 

442 81 

1,243 09 

1,019 55 

250 00 

930 53 

185 08 

848 14 

750 00 

30 00 

121 69 


6,749 21 
5,632 08 
34,947 78 
8,657 90 
2,431 90 
3,459 34 
2,646 54 
1,369 50 
2,342 81 

818 34 
4,122 38 
3,342 71 

690 00 
1,132 69 


1,388 71 
298 51 


54 7,207 50 

55 1,462 34 

56 1,586 50 


22,954 36 

5,907 14 

402 59 

831 25 

1,168 99 

69 50 

77 46 


6,763 33 
1,358 45 
1,845 41 


57 1,385 00 




344 47 


58 450 00 

59 1,050 00 


8 00 


81 37 
326 73 


60 1,300 00 

61 550 00 


34 82 
83 26 
27 98 
25 00 
15 00 


421 99 


62 1,250 00 

63 1,400 00 

64 625 00 

65 525 00 


1,996 26 

1,167 71 

20 00 

486 00 


4,064 29 

43 66 

8 60 

131 31 








117,246 50 


117,630 56 


5,274 27 


90,960 19 


331,111 52 


50,379 38 


1 172,583 30 

2 201,560 89 

3 117,246 50 

4 12,555 43 


37,319 94 

208,272 76 

117,630 56 

3,401 49 


3,410 86 

5,441 50 

5,274 27 

294 30 


48,280 04 

154,984 66 

90,960 19 

4,630 82 


261,594 14 
570,259 81 
331,111 52 

20,882 04 


66,086 17 

42,571 76 

50,379 38 

4,617 37 


5 503,946 12 

6 509,756 93 


366,624 75 
445,695 65 


14,420 93 
22,398 56 


298,855 71 
347,364 93 


1,183,847 51 
1,325,216 07 


163,654 68 
142,056 74 


7 










21,597 94 


8 5,810 81 


79,070 90 


7,977 63 


48,509 22 


141,368 56 








9 42.57 


30.97 


1.21 


25.24 













Towns, $19.27 ; Villages, $13.55 ; ProTince, $17.54. 



182 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 









Teachers 












Rural Schools 
% 


*-, 03 

-O O 

2 v 


03 


03 
1— 1 

eS 

i 


03 

u 

<S 

1— 1 
o3 

CO 

> 


B 

03 

>> 

u 

A 

CO 


No. who have ever 
attended a Model 
School in Ont. 


No. who have ever 
attended a Nor- 
mal Sch'l in Ont. 


No. who have ever 
attended the Nor- 
mal College or F. 
of E. in Ont. 


\L 

.£ 03 

1 ce 

JJ3C5 


co 

CO 

1oh3 
1—1 


CO 

J 



si 
1.1 


CO 

co 

t 

i CO 


O 

s 

CO 

Q 


1 Bruce 

2 Carleton 


15 3 

20 


12 

20 

35 

10 

7 

6 

9 

6 

1 

3 

2 

2 

5 

1 

6 
1 
1 
9 
2 


$ 

592 


1 $ 

469 
394 


1 
7 

19 

3 

....... 

2 

4 

"2" 
1 

1 

::::::: 

::i 

72 

4 

16 

"i" 
"is" 


7 
6 
11 
8 
7 
3 
6 
2 
1 


1 




1 


7 
6 
10 
7 
7 
3 
6 
2 
1 


1 

4 

20 

4 


2 


3 Essex 


36 
11 
7 
6 
10 
8 
1 
3 
2 
2 
5 
1 

6 
1 
1 

10 

2 

122 

21 
8 

25 
2 

12 
6 

56 


i 
i 

"i 

2 

"i 

"5 

1 

2 

"i 

"6 


500 
600 

"566 
650 

"600 


493 
485 
537 
475 
533 
567 
625 
450 
362 
462 
553 
600 

404 
600 
500 
661 
575 
379 
442 
422 

453 
625 
443 
584 
394 


1 


..... 


1 


1 


4 Frontenac 




5 Grey 










6 Hastings 








3 
2 

4 




7 Huron 


2 

1 


— 


2 

1 




8 Kent 




9 Lambton 




10 Lanark 


1 


.... 


1 


2 
1 

1 




11 Leeds & Grenville 




12 Lennox &Add'gton 


1 
4 

1 

5 
1 
1 
6 
2 
4 

14 
4 

8 
1 
5 
6 
1 








1 
4 

1 

4 
1 
1 
6 
2 
4 
13 
4 

5 
1 
5 
6 
1 




13 Middlesex 


1 


.... 


1 




14 Norfolk 






15 Northumberland 
and Durham 








2 




16 Ontario 










17 Peel 












18 Perth 


2 


.... 


2 


1 




19 Peterborough 




20 Prescott & Russell 


117! 490 
20 625 

8 








65 
4 


13 


21 Renfrew 










22 Simcoe 










23 Stormont, Dundas 

and Glengarry.. 

24 Victoria 


23 
2 

11 
6 

50 


487 
"766 
"508 


2 

1 


1 


3 


5 

1 


1 


25 Waterloo 






1 


26 Wellington 










27 Districts 


2 


.... 


2 


6| 19 






Totals 


399 


24 


375 


545 


438 


153 


115 


14 


1 


14 


108 


127 ! 36 






Cities 
1 Belleville 


6 
15 

9 

8 
19 

2 
11 
55 
15 
28 

4 

186 

27 

10 

10 

6 

7 
13 

8 

162 

26 

3 




6 
15 

9 

8 
19 

2 
11 


"767 
900 


217 
421 
267 
428 
600 
550 
409 
271 
361 
306 
387 
454 
343 
570 
350 
300 
376 
504 
369 
413 
392 
300 


5 
3 

7 

""9" 

1 

3 

25 

13 

1 

1 

114 

8 

! 
"2 

""2' 

5 

37 

5 

2 


4 
11 

I 

14 
1 
5 

17 

12 

23 

2 

16 

24 

8 

5 

6 

3 

7 

3 

115 

16 

3 








4 

10 
1 
8 
15 
1 
5 

17 

12 

23 

2 

73 

23 

1 

5 

6 

4 

7 

3 

101 

17 

3 


! 


2 Kitchener (Berlin) 








i 


3 Brantf ord 










4 Chatham 








1 


5 Fort William 

6 Gait 


2 


.... 


2 


i .... 
1! 


7 Guelph 








3"" 


8 Hamilton 

9 Kingston 


3 52 
1 14 


5 
1 
4 


3 
"2 


5 
1 

4 


2 


.... 


10 London 


"38 
"25 


28 
4 






11 Niagara Falls . . 


1 

58 




12 Ottawa 


148 fiQ7 






3 
2 


9 


13 Peterborough .... 

14 Port Arthur . 


27 

10 

10 

6 

7 

13 

8 

137 


' im 


2 
1 


.... 


2 .... 
8 


15 St. Catharines . . 






l!.... 


16 St. Thomas . , 




1 






17 Sarnia 


i.... 


18 Sault. Ste. Marie 








2! 1 


19 Stratford . , 










20 Toronto 


13 

1 


6 


14 

1 


....... 

5).... 


21 Windsor i 


26 

3 


5.... 


22 Woodstock 












. 


Totals 


630 


67 


563 676 


403 


243 


304 !' 


29 


12 


32 


341) 


91) 10 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



183 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 

23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 





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88 

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311 

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132 

130 

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33 
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208 j 175 



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454 
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20 

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392 


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604! 534 662 
45 43 62 

266 217 345 

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1,223! 1,270| 1,227 



500 

508 

1,204 

186 

146 

95 

212 

217 

27 

60 

12 

31 

59 

41 

83 

38 

18 

267 

62 

3,877 

485 

246 



98 1617,433 8.851J 8,58210,773 



/ 

57 

66 

62 

58 

55 

65 

62 

67 

62 

46 

53 

60 

65 

69 

83 
75 
68 

67 

65 
55 
64 

58 
70 
71 
58 
49 



107 

264 

573 

58 

39 

31 

65 

111 

2 

26 

7 

14 

16 

8 

22 

8 
4 

72 
13 

2,528 
228 
103 



401 
10 

108 

39 

1,142 



92 

162 

401 

27 

34 

17 

49 

82 

8 

13 



7 
5 

11 

8 

4 

59 

11 

1,069 

153 

90 

153 
12 
71 
18 

524 



178 

183 

359 

50 

61 

34 

59 

59 

5 

16 
6 

16 
16 
16 

24 
7 
9 

52 

19 

1,089 

152 

77 

196 
16 

103 
27 

393 



126 
173 
258 
54 
60 
39 
73 
45 
14 
19 



15 
26 
15 

22 

7 
3 

79 

21 

843 

163 

56 

168 
16 

123 
32 

280 



139 

104 

234 

107 

57 

52 

76 

49 

11 

20 

7 

13 
29 1 

H 

41 1 

16' 

4! 

88 j 

28 

384 

125 

57 



42 



84 



61.80 5,999 3,086 3,222 2,730 




..... 


1 

4 


*"*2 
1 


2 

"5 

40 
2 



302 
846 
478 
357 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,479 
773 

1,092 
185 

8,963 

1,188 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 

8,655 

1,499 
128 



144 
4471 
218 i 
174! 
598! 
71 
312| 

1,281 

455! 

550 

96 

4,124! 
6111 
241 j 
261 j 
138 ! 
139 
372 
198 

4,551 

778 

54 



158 
399 
260 
183 
538 
60 
239 

1,198 

318! 

542 

89 

4,839 
577 
237 
207 j 
1241 
171 j 
318 1 
158! 

4,1041 

721 

74 



234 
671 
361 
273 
777 
99 
423 

2,083 
527 
795 
146 

6,222 
870 
390 
332 
186 
250 
453 
283 

5,970 

907 

89 



77 

79 

75 

76 

68 

75 

77 

84 

68 

73 

78 

69 

73 

82 

71 

71 

81 

66 

79 

69[l,905 

61 f 443 

70 35 



68 

156 

148 

107 

461 

14 

142 

593 

168 

289 

38 

2,925 

283 

141 

95 

62 

60 

211 



38! 118j31,327 15, 81315 , 514j22,34ll71. 32 8,433 5,199| 5,990 5,811 4,5101,384(31,138 



58 

128 

73 

71 

248 

30 

104 

374 

134 

198 

18 

1,552 

175 

75 

58 

37 

49 

93 

55 

1,446 

2051 

18 



50 
210 

80 

45 
181 

46 
115 
361 
168 
178 

41 

1,800 

148 

95 
111 

37 

60 
177 

47| 

1,686; 

332 

22 



46 
185 
117 

61 
158 

21 

89 
506 
166 
190 

42 

1,399 

217 

92 
108 

51 

99 
121 

86 

1,747 

284 

26 



136 

341 

78| 

57 1 3 
154 



2,119j 277 



80! 

167 i 

60 1 

73 1 



20 
101 
363! 282 

137 ! 

172! 65 

46 

1,046| 241 
193! 172 

75 

96 

75, 

42 

88 1 

79 ! 

1,247! 624 
235 



654 

896 

1,766 

301 

252 

173 

326 

283 

40 

75 

12 

58 

97 

63 

121 
46 
24 

392 

92 

4,505 

841 

383 

990 

88 

483 

176 

1,506 



14,643 



302 
846 
478 
357 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,479 
773 

1,062 
185 

8,849 



27 



J, 143 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 
8.655 
1,499 
128 



184 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 

















h 






0) 




Rural Schools — 








d 




S 


09 

a 

e9 


d 




S 

d 

3 


be 


Concluded 


■a 

g 

em 


o 




'to 
o 
ft 


I 


a 

CO 


Is 

o 0> 

"55 'EJ 


3 


o 

"53 


ft 






48 

3 


a 


cd 


be 





b b 


-t^ 


t» 


o 






S 


o 




d 


c3 


-dffi 


1 


pd 


o 



Bruce .... 
Carleton . 
Essex. 
Frontenac 
Grey 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron 

8 Kent 

9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds & Grenviile 

12 Lennox & Add'tn. 

13 Middlesex 

14 Norfolk 

15 Northumberland 

and Durham.. 

16 Ontario 

17 Peel 

18 Perth 

19 Peterborough 

20 Prescott&Kussell 

21 Renfrew 

22 Simcoe 

23 Storm ont,Dundas 

and Glengarry 

24 Victoria 

25 Waterloo 

26 Wellington 

27 Districts 



654 

696 

1,313 

301 

252 

173 

326 

228 

40 

57 

10 

58 

97 

63 

121 
46 
24 

392 

92 

3,974 

823 

383 

775 

88 

483 

176 

1,445 



Totals...... 13,090 



Cities. 

Belleville 

Kitchener (Berlin) 

Brantf ord ' 

Chatham 

Fort William .... 

6 Gait 

7 Guelph I 

8 Hamilton 

9 Kingston 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls. .. 

12 Ottawa 

13 Peterborough .... 

14 Port Arthur 

15 St. Catharines. . . 

16 St. Thomas 

17 Sarnia 

18 Sault Ste. Marie. 

19 Stratford 

20 Toronto 

21 Windsor 

22 Woodstock 



302 

846 
478 
357 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,479 
773 

1,092 
185 

7,810 

1,143 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 

8,655 

1,499 
128 



654 
462 
1,310 
301 
252j 
173! 
326| 
219! 

40! 

73 

8 

58 
97 1 
63 

121 
46 
24 

392 

92 

3,509 

841 

383 

812 

88 

483 

176 

1,255 



654 

350 

1,428 

301 

252 

173 

326 

234 

40 

97 

10 

58 

97 

63 

121 
46 
24 

392 

92 

3,292 

831 

383 

741 

88 

483 

176 

1,506 



12,25812,258 



302 
846 
478 
357| 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,479 
773 

1,092 
185 

7,612 

1,188 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 [ 

8,655 

1,499 
128 



302 
846 
478 
357 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,479 
773 

1,092 
185 

7,603 

1,188 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 

8,655 

1,499 
128 



,654 

711 

1,595 

301 

252 

173 

326 

222 

40 

93 

10 

58 

97 

63 

121 
46 
24 

392 

92 

4,578 

846 

383 

899 

88 

483 

176 

1,753 



14,476 



302 
846 
478 
357 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,479 
773 

1,092 
185 

8,208 

1,188 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 

8,655 

1,499 
128 



151 

376 

577 

139 

58 

52 

78 

119 

11 

35 

3 

9 

32 

19 

42 

16 

4 

130 

28 

2,483 

256 

57 

• 281 

34 

78 

60 

762 



5,890 



80 

167 

60 

73 

88 

41 

101 

645 

137 

237 

46 

2,958 

365 

75 

96 

75 

42 

88 

79 

3,723 

388 

27 



Totals 130,129 29,976 29,967130,572 9,591110,490113,850 29,787130,437 30,261 841 



455 

204 

496 

172 

179 

124 

150 

71 

11 

29 

3 

22 
35 
19 



88 

30 

7 

180 

68 



455 

507 

637 

180 

179 

124 

176 

97 

25 

57 

8 

22 

58 

15 



30 
7 
203 
68 
872! 2,531 
396 415 
186 186 



308 

66 

302 

119 

368 



401 
66 
302 
119 
710 



4,960! 7,666 



126 i 

97! 
177i 
179 1 
427 1 

41 

305 

1,151! 

263! 

368 

88 

1,971 

730 1 

167! 

96 1 
200; 

42 1 

209 

212 

3,304i 

2841 

53! 



126 
167 
177 
179 
427 
41 
305 

1,151 

346 

444 

88 

4,795 
730 
167 
204 
200 
141 
209 
212 

3,304 

344 

93 



654 
585 
1,229 
301 
252 
173 
326 
185 
40 



58 
97 
63 

121 
46 
24 

353 

92 

3,845 

812 

383 

716 

88 

483 

176 

1,405 



12,581 



302 
846 
478 
357 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,167 
773 

1,027 
185 

7,972 

1,016 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 

8,655 

1,499 
128 



654 

576 

1,306 

301 

252 

173 

326! 

175 1 

40 

70 

16 

58 

97 

63 

121 

46 

24 

353 

92 

3,224 

840 

383 

771 

88 

483 

176 

1,121 



654 

605 

1,634 

301 

252 

173 

326 

268 

40 

97 



11,829 



58 
97 
63 

121 

46 

24 

392 

92 

3,131 

841 

383 

827 

88 

483 

176 

1,613 



12,785 



302 
846 
478 
357 

1,136' 
131, 
551 1 

2,167 
773! 

1,027| 
185| 

8,622' 

1,016 
478 
468; 
262 
310 
690 
356 

8,655 

1,499! 
128! 



302 
846 
478 
357 

1,136 
131 
551 

2,479 
773 

1,092 
185 

8,069 

1,016 
478 
468 
262 
310 
690 
356 

8,655 

1,499 
128 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



185 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 





1 

CD 

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French (Primer to 4th 
Book, inclusive) 


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18 


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1 11 11 


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12 

3 

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321 






116; 

27 46 


79 


95 

130 

256 

95 

77 

40 

110 

73 

17 

15 

13 

23 

65 

18 

44 
8 

10 
75 
17 
584 
141 
40 

116 
16 

98 

48 

185 


12 

17 

28 

10 

5 

5 

11 

8 

1 

2 

2 

2 

5 

1 

6 
1 
1 
8 
2 
88 
11 
5 

13 
2 

10 

7 
37 


7 
7 
5 
7 
1 

1 . 
3 
3 . 


14 


2 12 

3 3 

4 3 

5 1 


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3 
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632 
1,432 


12 


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4 










58 
61 




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1 


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23 
63 

57 










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14 


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1 . 




















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15 1 
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50 


17 




























18 42 

19 . 


40 


32 


39 


39 








39 


39 


91 

65 

391 

167 
















45 

447 

18 


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20 36 

21 39 


36 
52 


36 
52 


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47 

43 


5,757 

69 

313 

566 






36 
39 


6 
1 


37 
5 . 
2 

4 
1 . 

6 

2 . 
22 . 


67 








22 






12 


23 84 84 
24 


77 


45 


8 






84 





40 
88 






29 








88 
28 

"80 




25 4 












291 






75 60 
20 43 


3 


26 3 


3 


1 










1 


.... 




27 






2,141 






98 


282 
























252 


259 


226 


153 


155 


11,142 


11 


612 


213 


87 


1,613 


964 


297 


2,409 


300 


116 


217 




























18 
40 
19 
25 
15 
7 
13 

162 

38 

89 

3 

523 
27 
20 
23 
18 
24 
14 
18 

197 
38 
10 


2 

4 
2 
5 
2 
1 
3 

37 
7 

15 
1 

69 
5 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 

24 
7 
2 


1 . 




2 . 














690 








47 


50 




3 
























4 . 






























5 . 




























6 . 






















































"ii ! 

"*9 ! 




8 282 


157 


157 


157 


157 




81 


.... 


157 


125 






508 




9 








10 65 


65 


65 


33 


33 








35 


55 




















185 
3,597 

""20 


90 
60 
25 




12 282 


282 
172 


251 


62 
117 


292 


4,605 






23i 


125 


62 
35 


10 . 
4 . 

"2 .' 

3 . 

1 . 

33 . 

"i ! 




14 








15 
























16 






















47 


28 




























18 




















55 


25 

87 


30 
78 




19 






















20 416 


396 


295 


3Q0 


551 


525 
111 


55 


.... 


430 


171 






21 




■ 






22 




...1... 










































1,217 


1,072 


863759 


1,205 


5.24H 143 


690 


9961 498 


152 


4,008 


869 


1,341 197 


75 . 





186 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



• 




Teachers 








Towns 


X> O 

2 *> 


la 


4h 

B 

r? 


0> 

s 

is 


3 

d 

B 

to 

is 


> rfi B 

g C3.H 

'T 4) o 

IS™ o 


0} .S 

a _, 
S^ 

3 * 3 § 

apJJ 


Ills 

a g § 


a S 
°| 

tU) 


a 

s 

d 
£ co 

CO d 

33 
3"S 

CO 

r- 1 


a 
S 

CO 43 

P 


CO 

en 

a 

3 

CO 


■l-a 

CO 

S 


1 Alexandria . . . 


li 

3 

8 
8 
4 

2 

8 
2 
1 
4 
9 
4 
4 
2 

20 
3 

11 
4 
4 
2 
1 

18 
2 
1 
1 
6 
7 

t 

2 
1 
1 

17 
1 
4 
3 
4 
2 
1 

11 
4 
1 
4 
4 
1 
7 

15 
2 
7 
2 
5 
7 
9 


"*7 

"i 
.... 

"i 

i 

. . . . 


11 

3 
8 
8 
4 
2 
8 
2 
1 
4 
9 
4 
4 
2 

13 
3 

10 
4 
4 
2 
1 

18 
2 
1 
1 
5 
6 
2 
6 
2 
1 
1 

17 
1 
4 
3 
4 
2 
1 

11 
4 
1 
4 
4 
1 
7 

15 
2 
7 
2 
5 
7 
9 


[$ 

... 
... 

!.. 
. . . 

::: 

429 
600 

550 
950 

. ..] 


$ I' 

240 1 


3 
3 
4 
5 
2 




1 


1 

1 


3 

a 

4 

• 5 

2 

i 


1 




2 Almonte 


550 
244 
350 
350 
500 
312 
450 
550 
350 
522 
325 
412 
562 
396 
283 
280 
269 
375 
300 
675 
217 
300 
500 
550 
220 
350 
500 
308 
350 
650 
600 
523 
500 
400 
300 
350 
300 
550 
390 
350 
600 
325 
325 
450 
357 
260 
300 
329 
400 
300 
507 
363 


2 

4 
5 
1 
1 

4 








.... 


3 Amherstburg . 








1 




4 Arnprior 












5 Barrie 








1 




6 Bonfield 








1 




7 Brockville .... 


3 








3 

1 


3 




8 Cache Bay 








1 


9 Charlton 


1 
1 

1 
1 












1 


10 Chelmsford . . . 








...J-- 


1 

1 




11 Cobalt 


3 
3 








3 
3 


.... 


12 Cobourg 








.... 


13 Cochrane 




,.., 









14 Collingwood .. 


2 
13 

1 
11 

2 


2 
5 
1 




,.,. 




2 

4 

1 






15 Cornwall 








11 




1 Dundas 










17 East view . . 








" 




18 Ford 












1 


19 Fort Frances . . 




: 










20 Goderich 


1 


1 


.... 






1 






21 Hanover 








" 1 
4 




22 Hawkesbury . . 

23 Ingersoll . . . 


3 
1 


1 

1 
1 








1 
1 


2 


:::...;; 








24 Kearney . 












25 Keewatin. . 
















26 Kenora 




. .. 








, 






27 Lindsay . 


1 
1 
2 

"i" 
.„.. 

"i" 

"i" 

"4" 

1 

2 


5 








5 


1 

1 
1 




28 Massey . 








1 


29 Mattawa . . 


2 

1 
1 
1 

16 
1 

2 

1 

1 

I 

2 









"2 
1 
1 

1 

16 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 

6 
4 
1 
2 
2 




30 Mount Forest 











31 New Liskeard 












32 Newmarket 












33 North Bay.... 

34 Oakville . 








1 












35 Orillia . 












36 Oshawa . . 












37 Owen Sound 





1 


.... 






38 Paris . 






39 Parkhill 












40 Pembroke 








1 




41 Perth . 


1 


! 






42 Picton . . 




■ 








43 Prescott 


i 








44 Preston 


.'....' 








45 Rainy River 












2 

4 

1 
1 
1 

"i" 

6 


3 






3 






47*Rockland 








8 


3 


48 St. Mary's ..] '. 

49 Sandwich 


I < 

1 
4 
3 








I 

1 

4 i 

.... 3 ! 








2 




50 Seaforth 




1 






51 Smith's Falls 




1 








52 Steelton 






"e 


1 


53 Sturgeon Falls 


1....1 







*Figures of preceding year; no report received. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



187 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 























Reading 












CO 








e3 <u 

> c3 


























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First Reader, 
Part I, or Pri 


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cq 




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2 


i 

5 


560 


276 


284 


434 


77 


215 


50 


112 


107 


76 




560 


2 






134 
347 


66 
130 


68 
217 


119 
251 


88 
72 


27 

82 


14 
43 


30 
62 


38 
72 


25 
64 


"*24 


134 


8 




4 


347 


4 


2 


1 


430 


226 


204 


325 


75 


127 


52 


97 


85 


69 




430 


5 




2 


144 


73 


71 


105 


73 


29 


16 


37 


32 


30 




144 


fj 


2 


"*2 


144 
316 


66 
146 


78 
170 


72 

248 


50 

78 


39 
67 


20 
37 


63 
79 


14 
68 


8 
65 






7 




316 


8 




1 


153 


84 


69 


85 


55 


70 


43 


20 


18 


2 




153 


9 






49 
195 


20 
80 


29 
115 


26 
135 


53 
69 


21 
62 


6 
53 


6 
40 


9 
22 


5 
18 


2 


49 





?, 


1 


195 


1 


5 




643 


357 


286 


251 


39 


201 


132 


112 


120 


78 




269 


9, 




1 


159 


79 


80 


115 


72 


34 


18 


34 


35 


38 




159 


R 


4 




264 


124 


140 


148 


56 


46 


106 


54 


49 


9 




264 


4 






85 
1,021 


41 
493 


44 
528 


59 

737 


69 
72 


20 
346 


9 
194 


15 

203 


18 
165 


23 
113 




85 


5 


1 


4 


1,021 


fi 




2 


126 


68 


58 


84 


66 


31 


25 


23 


15 


32 




126 


7 






718 
229 


347 
121 


371 

108 


367 
139 


51 

» 60 


452 

82 


137 
55 


53 
52 


47 
21 


29 
19 




718 


8 


1 


1 


229 


9 


4 




189 


103 


86 


127 


67 


66 


41 


30 


27 


22 


3 


189 







1 


77 


37 


40 


64 


83 


14 


10 


10 


21 


22 




77 


1 






81 
1,094 


41 
536 


40 

558 


74 
851 


91 

78 


35 
334 


'10 
227 


20 
241 


7 

202 


9 
57 


"*33 


81 


2 


11 




1,094 


: j , 




1 


92 


44 


48 


69 


75 


20 


15 


15 


29 


13 




92 


4 


1 




50 


26 


24 


31 


62 


11 


10 


10 


13 


6 




50 


5 


1 




42 


20 


22 


23 


54 


10 


7 


13 


8 


4 




42 


6 


6 




248 


128 


120 


171 


68 


118 


32 


34 


42 


22 




248 


7 


1 




297 


149 


148 


236 


79 


51 


45 


69 


61 


71 




297 


8 






129 
345 


62 
184 


67 
161, 


63 

230 


48 
67 


65 
101 


17 

44 


25 
63 


10 
57 


12 

69 


"ii 


129 


9 




8 


345 


i) 




1 


60 


24 


36 1 


48 


80 


17 


10 


13 


12 


8 




60 


1 






60 
64 

797 
43 

168 


33 
44 
385 
15 
95 


27 

20 

412 

28 

73 


35 
45 

683 
29 

135 


58 
70 
86 
67 
80 


21 

13 

273 

9 

40 


10 

10 

121 

3 

11 


11 
13 

148 

8 

36 


8 

12 

160 

8 
34 


10 
16 
95 
15 

47 







60 


•> 






64 


:-', 






797 


4 






43 


o 


..::. 


2 


168 


8 




2 


123 


63 


60 


93 


75 


43 


20 


23 


27 


10 




123 


7 




1 


172 


92 


80 


121 


70 


32 


22 


51 


47 


20 




172 


s 




1 


75 


35 


40i 


57 


76 


16 


14 


17 


9 


19 




75 


9 






40 
628 


22 

330 


18 
298 


28 
439 


70 
70 


8 
196 


7 
89 


6 

104 


7 
118 


12 
121 




40 


) 


i 


3 


628 


1 






237 

40 

145 


118 
20 i 
75 


119 
20 
70' 


183 

23| 

118 


77 
57 
81 


46 
12 
32 


18 

7 

15 


61 

1 

29 


59 

9 

31 


53 
11 

38 





237 


> 






40 


5 


i 


I 


145 


4 




2 


201 


100 


101? 


144 


71 


46 


30 


58 


43 


24 




201 


5 


i 




35 


15 


20: 


26 


74 


15 


4 


6 


6 


41 




35 


fi 


i 


3 


389 


209 


180. 


295 


76 


125 


61 


53 


88 


62 




389 


7 


4 




922 


491 


431; 


575 


62 


417 


262 


142 


77 


24 




922 


S 





1 


66 


30 


36 


51 


77 


H 


10 


13 


8 


24 




66 


f) 






347 
68 


181 
43 


166 
25 ! 


210; 
36! 


60 
531 


178, 

18 


47 
8 


56 
14 


47 
14 


19! 
14 




169 







1 


68 


1 


1 




213 


105 


108 


69 


32 


59! 


38 


49 


40 


27 




213 


2 


2 


1 


357 


161 


196 


221, 


62 1 


99 


77 


65 


80 


36 


357 


3 


3 


. . . . .' 


541 


277! 


264 


329 


6ll 


243! 


97 


83 


65 


53 




541 



188 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Towns— Con. 







b 


& 






M 


-j^ 






3 


CO 


a 




09 


a 


'55 
o 

P. 


B 
B 


a 

to 




c9 


B 


eS 


W> 


a 


o 


u 


a 


c9 


O 


O 


m 


O 



.° .2 






1 Alexandria . . . 

2 Almonte 

3 Amherstburg . 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie 

6 Bonfield 

7 Brockville 

8 Cache Bay .... 

9 Charlton 

10 Chelmsford . . . 

11 Cobalt . ; 

12 Cobourg 

13 Cochrane 

14 Collingwood. .. 

15 Cornwall 

16 Dundas 

17 Eastview 

18 Ford 

19 Fort Frances . . 

20 Goderich 

21 Hanover 

22 Hawkesbury . . 

23 Ingersoll 

24 Kearney 

25 Keewatin 

26 Kenora 

27 Lindsay 

28 Massey 

29 Mattawa 

30 Mount Forest . 

31 New Liskeard. 

32 Newmarket . . . 

33 North Bay.... 

34 Oakville 

35 Orillia 

36 Oshawa 

37 Owen Sound . . 

38 Paris 

39 Parkhill 

40 Pembroke 

41 Perth 

42 Picton 

43 Prescott 

44 Preston 

45 Rainy River . . 

46 Renfrew 

47 Rockland 

48 St. Mary's.... 

49 Sandwich 

50 Seaforth 

51 Smith's Falls. 

52 Steelton 

53 Sturgeon Falls 



560 

134 

347 

430 

144 

113 

316 

140 

49 

195 

333 

159 

264 

85 

1,021 

126 

718 

229 

189 

77 

81 

1,094 

92 

50 

42 

248 

297 

47 

345 

60 

60 

64 

797 

43 

168 

123 

172 

75 

40 

628 

191 

40 

113 

201 

35 

389 

922 

66 

169 

68 

213 

357 

541 



560 
134 
347 
430 
144 



560 
134 
347 
430 
144 



« 316 



49 

195 

643 

159 

264 

85 

1,021 

126 

718 

229 

189 

77 

81 

1,094 

92 

50 

42 

248 

297 

129 

345 

60 

60 

64 

797 

43 

168 

123 

172 

75 

40 

628 

237 

40 

145 

201 

35 

389 

922 

66 

347 

68 

213 

357 

541 



316 

20 

49 

195 

333 

159 

218 

85 

1,021 

126 

319 

229 

189 

77 

81 

1,094 

92 

50 

42 

248 

297 

47 

345 

60 

60 

64 

797 

43 

168 

123 

172 

75 

40 

628 

237 

40 

145 

201 

35 

389 

86 

66 

169 

68 

143 

357 

541 



560 


76 


295 


295 


134 


25 


63 


63 


347 


88 


187 


158 


430 


69 


- 154 


430 


144 


30 


99 


99 


144 


113 


130 


130 


316 


65 


139 


217 


153 


38 


2 


63 


49 


16 


16 


22 


195 


90 


40 


80 


333 


306 


269 


333 


159 


38 


107 


107 


264 


9 


9 


98 


85 


23 


56 


56 


1,021 


113 


278 


278 


126 


70 


70 


70 


718 


399 


79 


402 


229 


92 


Iff 


40 


189 


28 


49 


49 


77 


22 


43 


53 


81 


9 


36 


36 


1,094 


533 


292 


. 533 


92 


13 


42 


42 


50 


19 


19 


19 


42 


12 


12 


12 


248 


64 


64 


98 


297 


71 


201 


201 


70 


12 


12 


12 


345 


80 


345 


345 


60 


8 


33 


33 


60 


10 


10 


18 


64 


28 


28 


28 


797 


255 


255 


255 


43 


15 


23 


23 


168 


47 


117 


117 


123 


10 


60 


60 


172 


20 


118 


118 


75 


19 


28 


28 


40 


12 


19 


25 


628 


121 


239 


239 


237 


112 


112 


173 


40 


11 


21 


21 


145 


69 


69 


69 


201 


24 


67 


125 


35 


10 


10 


10 


389 


150 


150 


150 


922 


922 


50 


922 


66 


24 


32 


32 


347 


66 


66 


169 


68 


14 


28 


42 


213 


67 


67 


67 


357 


116 


116 


181 


541 


53 


53 


166 



295 


560 


134 


134 


347 


347 


430 


430 


144 


144 



316 
153 

49 
195 
269 
159 
264 

85 

1,021 

126 

718 

40 
189 

77 

81 
1,094 

92 

50 

42 
248 
297 

47 
345 

60 

60 

64 
797 

43 
168 
123 
172 

75 

40 
628 
237 

40 
145 
201 

35 
389 
922 

66 
169 

68 
107 
357 
541 



316 

153 

49 

195 

269 

159 

264 

85 

1,021 

126 

718 

229 

189 

77 

81 

1,094 

92 

50 

42 

248 

297 

47 

345 

60 

60 

64 

797 

43 

168 

123 

172 

75 

40 

628 

237 

40 

145 

201 

35 

389 

922 

66 

3471 

68 

213 

357> 

541! 




560 
134 
347 
430 
144 



189 

77 

81 

1,094 

92 

50 

42 

248 

297 

79 

345 

60 

60 

64 

797 

43 

168 

123 

172 

75 

40 

628 

237 

40 

145 

201 

35 

389 

922 

66 

347 

68 

213 

357 

541 



36 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



189 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 







CD 

5 


B 
8 

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........ 




10 

7 

22 

12 

28 

10 

10 

11 

6 

15 

23 

13 

11 

18 

25 

13 

15 

7 

15 

17 

4 

41 

13 

8 

6 

36 

20 

6 

23 

10 

3 

12 

24 

2 

17 

9 

9 

6 

7 

32 

9 

8 

12 

12 

2 

16 

32 

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9 

10 

7 

17 
9 


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1 

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1 

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1 

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2 

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1 

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2 

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1 

3 

1 

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3 

9 

1 

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....!.--. 








3 22 


22 


8 


22 




82 






22 






14 


— 






4 






179 






5 


























6 










85 




















7 


















146 
153 


316 


.... 


i 
i 

i 
i 




8 










141 












9 2 


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10 






190 
425 








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11 
























12 
























i 




13 








222 


















14 


















21 

540 


20 


i 




15 








360 














16 












.... 








17 










713 
193 










718 


.... 






18 


















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i 
i 
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19 3 


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...... 








20 
























21 


























22 33 


33 


1 33 


.... 


33 


1,042 






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533 


.... 


4 


23 














24 






























25 


























i 

2 




26 










248 












202 






27 






















28 










120 












47 


.... 






29 11 


11 






















30 


















31 




























32 































33 


























2 


12 


34 


























35 


























1 


6 


36 




























37 






















120 


52 


1 
1 




38 
























39 




























40 










87 












628 


.... 






41 
























42 




















28 








43 




























44 




, 




















100 






45 










35 














1 
1 




46 


























47 










920 


















48 


























49 




























50 
























1 . 


51 






















15 


12 


....!.. 


52 










237 














53 


. . . . 


...: 
















'.Y..\.'.Y. 



190 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 





Teachers 


Towns — 
Continued 


-D O 

a, cs 
1* 


la 


a 


03 

1 

03 


a> 

i 

b 

03 


Number who have 
ever attended a 
Model School in 
Ontario 


Number who have 
ever attended a 
Normal School 
in Ontario 

Number who have 
ever attended the 
Normal Coll. or 
F. of E. in Ontario 


> 03 

•d a; 
d ^ 

bg 

so 


03 
03 

d 

6 

O 03 

Is 

Lafl 
03 »— 1 


03 
03 

A 
o 

° a 

03CVJ 

■al 

CM M 


03 

03 
* 

o 

CO 


*3 

o 

03 

Q 


54 Sudbury 


14 
4 

3 

4 


». . . 


14 
4 
5 
3 
4 
5 
4 
2 
5 
4 
1 
1 


$ 


$ 

525 
425 
350 
600 
250 

von 


6 

1 
3 
3 

1 


5 
1 


| 






6 
2 
1 


i 


55 Thorold 










56 Tilbury 








1 .... 


57 Timmins 










58 Trenton 


2 









2 


1 


59 Vankleek Hill . 


5 ... 










2 


60 Walkerton .... 


4 
2 

4 

1 
1 




. . . 3( 















61 Walkerville. . . 




275 
260 




1 

2 

1 

. 1 

1 








1 
2 
1 
1 
1 





62 Wallaceburg . . 


i 


1 




63 Waterloo 


. . . 350 
... 625 
. . . 525 


1 .... 


64 Weston 


I 






65 Whitby 


















. 


Totals 


325 

399 

630 

325 

35 


1 


315 


510 


364 


mi 


123 1 1 


1 


126 


66 12 


Totals 

1 Rural Schcols .. 

2 Cities 


2 
6 
1 


4 375 

7 563 

315 

35 


545 
676 
510 


438 
463 
364 
393 


153 
243 

mi 

12 


115 14 
364 29 


i 


14 
32 

1 


108 

341 

120 

17 


127 

91 

66 

3 


36 
10 


3 Towns 

4 Villages 


123 
17 


1 i 1 


12 








I 


5 Gd. Totals, 1915 

6 Gd. Totals, 1914 


1,389 
1,344 


10 
9 


11,288 
21,252 


628 
649 


463 
395 


509 
52n 


559 44 

535 3n 

1 


14 
9 


47 
32 


586 
528 


287 58 
310| 60 


7 Increases 


45 




3 36 


*2i 


8 


"yn" 


24 


14 


5 


15 


58 


! 


8 Decreases 




23 2 












i 




. .^. 




9 Percentages .... 




7.2 


J 92.72 


'"I 




36.64 


4n.24 


3.16 


1 


3.38 


42.19 


20.664.17 











1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



191 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Continued 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Continued 















CO 






Reading 






— 




c« 








co d 
















u 


H-3 


_ 














i 


*s 








► C3 


CO 

B 


Ph o 

&m 

cS en 
CO i—l 

PS n 

■+3 O 

Cfi .. 
M I— I 








M 
o 






b 

o 

a 
3 


d 
d^ 

g'S 


d 

Ph 

«H 

O 

a) 

9 


to 

>* 

o 




>> 

*3 «) 
^ d 

ce d 


o « 

CO H-=> 

be c3 

*H <~> 

« w 3 


c$ o 

CO - 

«~ 

-*3 M 


M 

o 
o 

m 

d 
o 
© 

CO 


o 
o 

Ph- 

JH 

3 


M 

o 
o 
Ph- 

u 
d 
© 


o 

P3. 

<« 

d 
o 

CO 


u 


54 
55 


& .& 


% 


PQ 


o 


«*- 


Ph 


£ 


£^ 


Ol 


, ^ 


flH 


i * 


< 






905 
226 


444 
127 


461 
99 


516 
139 


57 
62 


369 
53 


164 
35 


156 
49 


142i 74 




905 




2 


37 


52 


226 


56 


3 


297 


143 


154 


180 


60 


108 


49 


70 


39 


31 





152 


57 


3 


190 


85 


105 


85 


45 


37 


83 


51 


11 


8 


... 


190 


58 


1 


216 


101 


115 


127 


58 


60 


32 


40 


42 


42 




216 


59 


3 


236 


124 


112i 141 


59 


69 


27 


44 


44 


52 




23 6 


60 


4 


181 


101 


80 1 148 


81 


24 


21 


44 


41 


51 




181 


61 


1 


92 


48 


44 70 


76 


22 


12 


35 


16 


7 


92 


62 


2 


323 


150 


173 229 


71 


95 


59 


60 


55 


37 


17 323 


63 




9 


247 


125 


122 179 


72 


42 


41 


60 


49 


55 


247 


64 






59 
56 


28 
25 


31 36 
31 41 


61 
73 


14 
5 


10 
15 


9 

9 


14 
12 


12 
15 


59 


65 






1 56 








i 




66 


60 


17,180 


8,591 


8,58911,523 


67.07 


5,643 


3,007 


3,309 


2,923 


2,208 


90 16.339 


























1 




























1 


98 16 


17,433 


8,851 


8,582 


10,773 


61.80 


5,999 


3,086 


3,222 


2,730 


2,119 


277 14,643 


2 


38! 118 


31,327 


15,813 


15,514 


22,341 


71.32 


8,433 


5,199 


5,990 


5,811 


4,510 


1,384 31,138 


3 


66 i 60 


17,180 


8,591 


8,58911,523 


67.07 


5,643 


3,007 


3,309 


2,923 


2,208 


90 


16,339 


4 


5| 10 


1,541, 


769 


772 


1,096 


71.12 


378 


229 


332 


283 


309 


10 


1,525 


5 


207 204 


87,481 


34,024 


33,457 


45,733 


67.77 


20,453 


11,521 


12,853 


11,747 9,146 


1,761 


63,645 


6 


201 213 


56,271 


33,527 


32,744 


43,788 


66.07 


19,491 


12,209 


12,886 


11,575 8,603 


1,507 


62,641 


7 


6! 


1,210 


497 


713 


1,645 


1.70 


962 






172 543 


254 


1,004 


8 


i 9 














688 


33 
























9 


14.9014.68 


50.42 


49.58 


67.77 

1 




30.31 


17.07 


19.04 


17.4113.55 


2.61 


94.31 



192 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE Q— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, 



Towns— 












>> 

s 


u 

$ 

CO 


a 
ce 


t» 






Concluded 


>> 
p. 

cd 


o 




.2 

"55 
o 


u 

c3 


CO 

a 

CO 


a 

d 
.2? 


Is 

o a> 


2 




o 

a 


'& 

CO 

J4 




be 


co 




B 


o3 


co) 


ea 


co be 





CO 


M 






B 


3 


o 
O 




A 


ce 
o 




& 


Ph 


o 

pq 


54 Sudbury 


905 


905 


905 


905 


216 


216 


372 


905 


905 


905 




55 Thorold 


226 


226 


226 


226 


89 


52 


89 


226 


226 


226 




56 Tilbury 


297 


, 297 


152 


152 


70 


31 


140 


140 


140 


297 




57 Timmins 


190 


190 


190 


190 


17 


19 


133 


190 


190 


190 




58 Trenton 


216 


216 


216 


216 


42 


124 


124 


216 


216 


216 




59 Vankleek Hill. 


236 


236 


140 


236 


52 


96 


236 


236 


236 


236 




60 Walkerton .... 


181 


181 


181 


181 


51 


136 


136 


181 


181 


181 




61 Walkerville... 


92 


92 


92 


92 


23 


23 


23 


92 


92 


92 




62 Wallaceburg . . 


323 


323 


323 


323 


54 


54 


109 


323 


323 


323 




63 Waterloo 


247 


247 


247 


247 


55 


104 


104 


247 


247 


247 




64 Weston 


59 


59 


59 


59: 


26 


35 


35 


59 


59 


59 




65 Whitby 


56 


56 


56 


56j 


15 


36 


36 


56 


56 


561 56 


Totals 


16,488 


16,883 


14,741 


16,666' 


5,416 


5,824 


8,949 


15,685 


16,423 


16,142 


423 


Totals 


















Oft 






1 Rural Schools . . 


13,090 


12,258 


12,258 


14,476 


5,890 


4,960 


7,666 


12,581 


11,829 


12,785 


202 


2 Cities 


30,129 


29,976 


39,967 


30,572 


9,591 


10,490 


13,850 


29,787 


30,437 


30,261 


841 


3 Towns 


16,488 


16,883 


14,741 


16,666 


5,416 


5,824 


8,949 


15,685 


16,423 


16,142 423 


4 Villages 


1,520 


1,176 


1,531 


1,541 


413 


570 


1,051 


1,308 


1,503 


1,436 32 


5 Gd. Totals, 1915 


61,227 


60,293 \ 


58,497 


33,255; 


31,310 


21,844 


31,516 


59,361 ( 


30,192 


50, 624^1, 498 


6 Gd. Totals, 1914 


59,544 


58,4315 


37,559 


31,0541: 


L9.807 


21,988 


33,526 


18,8315 


59,854 


59,838 


1,215 


7 Increases 


1,683 


1,862 


938 


2,201 


1,503 






L0,530 


338 


786 


283 


8 Decreases 


144 


2,010 






















9 Percentages . . . 


90.73 


89.34 


86.68 


93.73 

I 


31.57 


32.37 


46.70 


87.96 


89.19 


89.83 


2.21 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



193 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS— Concluded 

PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC.— Concluded 



- 


d 
u 

_Q 
<D 

< 


-(J 
0> 

B 

o 


3 


o 

CQ 

1 
1 

! 


CO 

o'cq 

1-9 

n-' o 

.*« 
1- 


<* 

d^ 

3* 


.IS 

ll 






d 

'0 
CQ 

d 

OB 

a 


CQ 

•+» 
O 
0> 

1 

CQ 

3 i 
'0 

*-| 
<o 

S i 

1 



N 

d 

s 

d 
.2 

4 


9 

3 

c9 

M 

Eh 

d 

d 
oa 


a 

"3 

CQ 

1 

CO 

d 



Maps, Globes 
and Prizes 




3 S 


CQ 

P. 

a 
■a 

J 


« 1 
£ i 
| 

3 

O 
8 

55 


CO 




CQ 3 

jg 


Is 

P 


54 






[ 


674 












905 




19 
7 
7 
6 
7 

10 

13 

11 

7 

12 

10 

3 


4 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 






55 ... 




















56 






243 
















1 
1 




57 














190 








58 1 






















59 .... . 






198 
















""i 
1 

1 
1 

"i 


15 


60 




















61 




53 


















62 17| 171 10 


17 









17 












63 . . J 








205 








125 


122 




64 I. 




' 












6 


65 ! 






.... 












1 i 


... 




1 r 












88 88 


64 


39 44 


7,473 


.... 


205 


85 


2 


557 


4,363 


308 


839 


117 


28 


51 


1 252 

2 1,217 

3 88 

4 10 


i 259 
1,072 

88 
10 


226 

863 
64 
10 


153 

759 

39 

5 


155 

1,205 
44 
10 


11,142 
5,241 

7,473 
498 


11 

143 


612 
690 
205 


213 

996 

85 
9 


87 

498 

2 


1,613 
152 
557 
148 


964 
4,008 
4,363 

231 


297 
869 
308 
148 


2,409 

1,341 

839 

142 


300 

197 

117 

19 


116 

75 
28 

7 


217 

"si 

?6 










5 1,56711,429 

6 1,1991,410 


1,163 
1,135 


956 

723 


1,414 
1,180 


24,354 
24,451 


154 
111 


1,507 
1,397 


1,303 
1,074 


587 
638 


2,470 
1,963 


9,566 
5,093 


1,622 
1,772 


4,731 
4,706 


633 
629 


226 

198 


294 
329 


7 368 

8 .... 


19 


28 


233 


234 


"'"97 


43 


11C 


229 


'si 


507 


4,473 


"i50 


25 


4 


28 


"35 

t 




























9 2.30 


2.11 


1.72 


1.41 


2.09 


36.09 


.22 


2.2S 


1.93 


.86 


3.66 


14.17 


2.40 


*8.81 


*1.18 


42.08 .... 

1 



* To each School. 



13 B f 



194 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
I. TABLE H— FINAN- 



Continuation 
Schools 



Receipts 



Ex- 






Us 





u 




<x> 




2a 








o 




TS 


CO 


fl 


0) 
0) 


b9 


fe 


S g 


o 


§ 2 


o 




o 

cg 



Acton 

Agincourt . . 
Alvinston . . . 

Arkona 

Ayr 

Bancroft . . . 
Bath 

8 Beaverton . . 

9 Beeton 

10 Belmont 

11 Blenheim . . . 

12 Blind River, 



13 Blyth 

14 Bothwell ... 

15 Bowesville.. 

16 Bracebridge 



17 Bridgeburg . 

18 Bruce Mines 

19 Brussels.... 



20 Burk's Falls 

21 Burlington . . 

22 Cannington . 

23 Cardinal.... 

24 Carp 

25 Chapleau . . . 

26 Claremont . . 

27 Clifford .... 

28 Coldwater . 

29 Comber 

30 Cookstown . . 

31 Creemore . . . 

32 Delhi 

33 Drayton 



34 Dresden 



$ c. 
522 09 



35 Drumbo 

36 Dryden 

37 Eganville 

38 Eganville(R.C.S.S) 

39 Elmira 

40 Elmvale 



41 Ennismore. 

42 Erin 



43 Exeter , 

44 Fenelon Falls, 

45 Feversham . . , 

46 Finch 



539 96 
241 35 
453 26 
434 18 
271 93 
513 93 
521 46 
365 88 
543 95 
533 28 



352 35 
434 09 
220 35 

1,374 30 

496 78 
961 00 
525 68 

1,067 88 
524 38 

497 79 
436 85 

1,219 33 
503 12 
450 04 

506 03 

353 06 
415 87 
486 09 
329 92 
108 24 
647 41 

545 32 

331 73 

508 16 
275 00 
418 65 
251 90 
511 75 

458 23 
359 94 

643 00 

507 40 
223 29 
448 39 



$ c. 
522 09 



789 96; 
627 13 
453 26, 
434 18i 
421 93; 
613 93 
718 96 
,229 64 
543 95' 



$ c. 

1,000 00 
761 34 
790 64 
340 31 I 
829 29 i 

1,176 m 
425 00 
663 26 I 
933 80; 

3,300 OOl 

1,913 35! 
435 72! 



704 701 471 13 
434 09 992 50 
220 35 425 00 i 
2,267 51 



596 78 1,191 59; 
1,450 00 
325 00 



1,051 36 



524 38 
597 79 
586 85 
969 33 



550 04 j 
656 03 
538 06 
999 67 
486 09 
329 92 
208 24 
708 49 

545 32 

481 13 



275 00 
418 20 
251 90 
511 75 

458 23 
509 94 



1,413 77 

1,368 96 
885 48 
691 38 
600 00 

1,350 00 
600 00 
759 93 

1,200 00 
400 00 

3,527 66 
582 86 
130 87 

1,244 51 

1,196 17 

1,000 00 

986 16 

754 86 

561 52 

11,750 12 

1,117 51 

593 54 
604 04 



1,286 00 4,600 00 

507 40 1,456 40 

! 300 00 

672 58 502 53 



$ c. 


331 60 


72 00 


599 00 


84 00 


300 00 


'80*66 


507 00 


311 00 


283 30 


232 00 


31 00 


220 60 


165 00 


59 25 


637 25 


44i*50 


153 00 


367 50 


542 75 


329 50 


433 50 


232*66 


368 00 


250 00 


170 00 


343 20 


236 00 


20 00 


689 35 


184 12 


86 00 


23 00 


17 50 


139 00 


260 20 


98 50 


600 00 


205 00 


696 75 


112 00 


62 00 


434 50 



$ c. 
132 35 
530 51 

250 '23 
745 30| 

25 00 
422 58 
154 78 
240 80 
223 81 

54 00 



$ C! 

2,508 13 
1,363 85 1 
2,719 56 
1,543 021 
2,781 11 
2,070 24i 
1,621 44 
2,452 90 
2,726 02 
5,402 63 
3,287 25 
1,000 00 



$ c . 
2,010 00 

400 00 
2,010 00 

840 00 
1,685 00 
1,698 80 
1,180 00 
1,950 00 
1,975 00 
1,710 00 
1,900 00 

925 00 



9 79 1,758 57 1,425 00 
53 67 2,079 35! 1,675 00 
62 46 987 41 j 800 00 
l 4,279 06! 3,542 85 



248 81 

11 19 

752 26 



23 00 

J48*i2 
715 44 
405 31, 
20 85! 
135 22 
222 59 
409 60 



67 00 



2,533 96 
2,422 19 
3,095 80 

2,634 65 
2,785 22| 
2,546 81 
2,044 58 
4,970 28 
2,568 56 
2,237 39 
2,310 84 i 
2,476 34 
2,208 13 
5,252 64j 
1,478 70 
467 35 
3,356 76 



1,970 00 
1,830 00 
1,985 00 

2,100 00 
2,220 00 
1,890 00 
1,633 75 
3,070 00 



40 00 2,510 93 

387 95 2,286 81 

j 1,517 32 

1,322 36 

501 03 2,038 40 

' 12,514 12 

40 00 2,279 51 

2,110 00 

116 92 1,795 84 



416 87 
26 00 

265 11 
36 94 



7,642 62 

2,609 20 

850 40 

2,094 94 



,440 00 
,660 00 
,716 00 
,750 00 
,520 00 
,760 00 

1,220 00 
400 00 

2,750 00 

2,150 00 

1,400 00 
1,170 00 
1,105 00 
1,500 00 
1,251 00 
2,000 00 

1,650 00 
1,542 00 

3,125 00 

2,020 00 

790 00 

1,671 00 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



195 



SCHOOLS 

CIAL STATEMENT 



penditure 



*d eg 

c3 o 

SB 

•> d 

CO 03 

bo d 

d C§ CO 



°d 
cori 

CO » 

.51 8 

si 



i .2 

"a 

o 



o 

«d « d _- H 



«d c5 d -, ^ 

1 »- a a » 
8 9-S-i " 



c3 CO 



J 



d-d 



>;-* 




Sh 


a 




CD 


* 




d 






o 


CO 




+3 


d 


CO 


CO 


rrt 


0) 


CO 


I 


CO 


M 


a 

H 


«J 


o 
o 


M 


o 
o 






3 


5 




4H 


o 


UJ 







5« c. 


* c. 


194 76 




140 00 








11 95 




25 00 


18 00 


22 30 


8 11 




47 43 


2,892 76 


42 50 


821 37 


50 00 




75 00 




21 04 




14 75 


ii 22 




264 41 






198 26 


ios 66 


49 55 




16 00 



90 00 i 

67 08 

70 00 

175 00 



250 00 
19 45 



205 00 

6 55 

32 85 



13 20 



106 05 



35 
36 

37 

38 

39 10,754 95 

40 



400 00 



43 3,542 20 

44 

45 

*6 73 24 



80 00 
25 58 
65 00 



5 85 



43 25 
34 00 



43 80 
21*17 



37 23 



17 01 
184 68 



16 20 



13 92 
95*66 



$ c. 

12 00 
312 89 

25 00 

13 35 
182 70 
162 38 

39 20 

57 54 

12 27 

130 00 

105 74 



* c 
273 00 
283 85 
544 56 

70 05 
289 90 
139 24 
195 00 
414 95 
361 33 
248 72 
410 14 



41 04 
37 09 
93 80 

78 72 
59 47 



126 00 

72 00 

101 59 



46 60 

148 09 

73 59 



13 25 

69 70 

3 53 

35 52 



73 18 
134 66 

17 18 

37 16 
216 99 

98 16 

20 00 
90 77 

80 00 
251 78 



35 58 



288 55 
326 83 
120 20 
378 00 

286 98 
362 61 
348 86 

238 65 
400 56 
420 22 
235 83 
651 87 
673 56 
157 61 
403 50 
396 33 
232 95 
,276 00 
189 00 
42 65 
558 04 

323 70 

207 56 
106 61 
183 17 
218 56 
291 18 
165 15 

40 00 
149 15 

487 50 

242 42 

45 78 

262 17 



T3 

d 
a 
a 
X 

m 



Charges per year for 
Tuition 



$ c. 
2,295 00 
1,191 50 
2,719 56 

923 40 
2,157 60 
2,012 37 
1,457 20 
2,452 90 
2,396 03 
5,023 98 
3,287 25 
1,000 00 



1,734 59 

2,057 62 

971 51 

4,279 06 

2,533 96 
2,406 63 
2,349 86 

2,634 65 
2,785 22 
2,546 81 
2,044 58 
3,721 87 
2,369 41 
1,883 66 
2,310 84 
2,458 92 
1,759 50 
5,125 90 
1,478 70 
467 35 
3,356 76 

2,510 93 

1,680 74 
1,517 32 
1,322 36 
.1,940 40 
12,514 12 
2,279 51 



2,110 00 
1,795 84 

7,234 70 

2,609 20 

835 78 

2,041 99 



$ c.l 
213 13|Res. $5 ; non-res. $7. 
172 35 $10. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 

619 62 $10. 
623 51 $10. 
57 87 Free. 
164 24 Res. free; non-res. i$10. 

$10. 

329 99'Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 
378 65 Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
Res. 1st yr. free, other yrs. 
$20; non-res., 1st yr.i$10, 
other yrs. $30. 
$7.50. 

Res. free : non-res. $10. 
$5. 

Res. $2.50, $7.50, $10, $15; 
non-res. $10, $12 . 50 , $15, $20 
Free. 
15 56 Free. 



23 98 
21 73 
15 90 



745 94 



1,248 41 



199 15 Free. 
353 73|Res. F. 

,. I$10. 

17 42l$10. 



Res.F. I $5, II,$7.50,III,i$10; 

non-res. $10. 
$5. 
$10. 
$10. 
$10. 
Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 



I free ; all others $10. 



448 63 
126 74 



$10. 

$7.50. 

$10. 

Res. free ; 

Res. F. I 



non-res. $10. 
free, II, $9, III, 
$11.50; non-res. $13.50. 
Res. L. Sch. free, M. $5 : non- 



res. L. 
606 07 $5. 

Res. free 

Res. free 

98 00 Res. free 



M. $10. 



407 92 



14 62 
52 95 



non-res. $10. 

non-res. $10. 

non-res. $10. 
Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 
Res. F. 1 free, III, $10; all 

others $5. 
$20. 
F. I res. free, non-res. $5; 

all others $9. 
Res. F. 1 free; all others $10 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
$10. 
$10. 



196 



THE BEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
I. TABLE H— FINAN= 



Continuation 
Schools. — Con. 



Receipts 



o 



>> 



9 o 



CD 



1° 





*H 




0> 




^ 




-(-3 




o 




-a 


CO 


d 


<D 


c3 


r* 55 
fe 


2 s 


"o 


II 


O 


42 3 


■a 

02 



Ex- 



47 Fingal 

48 Fitzroy Harbour, 

49 Fort Frances . . , 

50 Frankf ord 

51 Gore Bay 

52 ^Grand Valley .., 

53 Hanover , 

54 Harrow 

55 Havelock 

56 Highgate 



57 Huntsville 



58 Jarvis 

59 Jockvale 

60 Kars 

61 Keewatin 

62 Kenmore 

63 Lakefield 

64 Lanark 

65 Lansdowne 

66 Little Current.. 

67 Lucknow 

68 Malakoff 

69 Manitowaning.. 

70 Manotick 

71 Maxville 

72 Melbourne 

73 Merlin 

74 Merrickville . . , 

75 Metcalfe 

76 Millbrook 

77 Milton , 

78 Mount Albert . 

79 New Hamburg 

£0 New Liskeard . 

81 North Augusta 

82 North Gower. . 

83 Norwich 

84 Odessa 

85 Oil Springs . . . 

86 Orono 

87 Paisley 



88 Pakenham .... 

89 Palmerston . . . 

90 Plattsville . . . 

91 Port Burwell . 

92 PortColborne. 

93 Powassan .... 

94 Princeton 



$ c. 
485 00 
432 53 
1,068 22 
162 22 
999 18 
502 34 
520 07 
238 73 
511 92 
518 18 

1,152 



269 52 


217 72 f 


423 97 


1,072 22 


451 59 


529 45 


462 07| 


199 15i 


506 90 


538 48j 


267 66 


444 86| 


217 82 


444 60 


451 99 


458 23 i 


434 75 


441 151 


494 80; 


541 59 


471 64 


539 15 


1 ,696 44 


452 62 


437 57 


475 91 


480 67 


521 06 


428 25 


497 04 


521 63 


534 95 


475 12 


485 18 


554 33 


472 90 


1 352 19 



$ c.j 

1 ,212 50 

432 53 



$ o.l $ 



299 92 



502 34 
780 08 
809 68 
511 92 
518 18 



469 52 
217 72 
423 97 



451 59 



529 45 


462 07 


349 15 


1,076 96 


592 66 


217 82 


666 90 


451 99 


958 23 


584 75 


441 15 


844 80 


541 59 


471 64 


539 15 


602 62 


437 57 


625 00 


630 67 


771 06 


728 25 


1,580 50 


521 63 


693 95 


775 12 


1,212 95 


654 33 


652 19 



500 00 

800 00 
2,271 30, 

976 05 
1,086 45i 

614 59; 
1,200 00 
3,676 59| 

829 87! 

701 13! 



c.| $ c.l 
76 85 j 194 00 



164 00 



530 18 
383 20 
156 00 
49 00 
92 00 
323 50 



153 42 



54 43 



1,391 32' 235 25 



477 46 
510 27 
865 23i 

2,030 72 
758 61 

1,502 75! 
800 00! 

1,172 22 
773 10 
810 00! 
495 00! 
447 42l 
520 03 
603 76 
805 00 
227 81 

1,201 94 
534 00 
400 00 

1,070 00 
500 00 

1,325 45 

1,775 16 
500 00 

1,000 00 

1,201 00 
750 00 
712 84 
884 60 

5,500 00 

1,400 00 
1,209 29 
500 00 
400 00 
1,000 00 
500 00 
882 75 



32 00 
1,494 03 

328 00 



33 00 
305 14 



127 50 




j 44 00 


204 07 






467 50 


361 50 


j 


289 45 


! 257 00 


920 15 


2 00 




25 00 





480 00 

39 00 

124 00 

29 10 

338 50 

317 00 

282 50 

94 00 

258 00 

'544*56 

304 00 

84 25 



246 00 



37 62 

192 50 

17 30 

37 55i 

216 21 

627 28 



81 37 
267 00 
125 00 
214 50 


"477*75 


586 00 

84 00 

300 00 


"i78*50 
34 00 



198 00 


117 00 


242 85 


182 57 


302 28 


112 00 


1,106 75 


116 94 


138 70 


62 30 


1,583 74 


i'567'42 


1,907 42 


10 50 


143 21 


724 18 


1,800 73 


299 02 


1,224 88 



$ c.l 


$ c. 


2,468 35! 


1,815 00 


1,982 48 


1,720 00 


3,339 52| 


2,240 00 


1,492 62 


471 50 


2,615 81! 


2,000 00 


2,035 47! 


1,570 00 


2,961 29' 


2,246 00 


4,774 00! 


1,160 00 


1,977 71| 


1,890 00 


3,555 02 


2,100 00 


3,107 43 


2,300 00 


1,344 00,' 


1,200 00 


1,193 78 


812 00 


1,713 17 


1,503 85 


3,102 94 


2,420 00 


2,490 79 


1,590 00 


2,851 10 


2,150 00 


2,901 29 


1,650 00 


1,722 52 


775 00 


1,305 OO! 


1,100 00 


2,943 06 


2,200 00 


1,586 82 


1,150 04 


1,033 58 


850 00 


1,022 32 


800 00 


2,269 97 


1,645 67 


2,653 26 


1,696 97 


1,926 77 


1,700 00 


2,513 44 


1,640 00 


1 ,791 30 


1,596 75 


1,982 45 


1,550 00 


2,880 25 


2,300 00 


2,049 56 


1,700 00 


2,600 00 


2,175 00 


4,578 35 


3,123 15 


1,918 18 


1,645 00 


2,095 21 


1,571 68 


2,631 21 


1,790 00 


3,570 08 


1,720 00 


2,219 46 


1,900 00 


3,608 52 


1,685 00 


8,055 29 


1,860 00 


4,936 68 


2,720 00 


2,532 69 


2,035 00 


2,193 45 


1 ,792 00 


2,822 31 


1,900 00 


4,009 39 


2,160 00 


1,450 42 


1,000 00 


3,146 01 


1,850 00 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



197 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
CIAL STATEMENT— Continued 



penditure 



13 £ 

* 2 

CO Pi 

SB 
- p 

CO CO 

2J» P 
g cj «j 

* si 





CO 


o 


a 


o 


o 


o 

CO 




o 






S 


*-l 


M 


c3 
ft 
CO 
M 


o 
o 
o 



£ ,3 

ftp 

O ftrg ft ~ 

.• d to ^ 

>> P *H 0< O 

-^ cd !> o3 ft 



9* 

c3 co 
X^P 

p p 



$ C.j 

82 04 
21 22 



$ c. 
18 52 



163 00 



62 83 



38 75 
17 50 

54 3,425 00 

55 

56 76 38 



25 30 
96 25 



57 364 71 



58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 



5 30 


4 51 


45 90 


30 89 


84 78 

"is'oo 




390 00 


45 19 
21 50 



33 00 



60 00 

105 48 

20 35 

50 00 



75 00 
190 00 



16 00 



133 06 

"9*44! 

143 91 

36 32 



70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 

80 
81 
82 
83 
84 

85 

86 238 06 

87 1,008 10 



2 15 



100 00 
11 75 



9 95 



85 00 
24 96 



50 00 
72 33 



88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 



75 45 
63 14 



9 75 
45 55 



29 80; 



117 00 



32 65 



0. 

7 20 

25 73 

357 40 

110 00 

356 25 

97 66 

43 51 



36 01 
92 65 



127 45 

100 00 
85 00: 
16 30 
55 71 
70 
92 37 

144 90 
36 76 
71 12 
35 04 
15 65 
4 60 
15 15 

100 00 

83 72 



75 60 
73 28 



62 86 
357 33 



36 00 

175 89 

32 62 

92 71 



44 00 



314 99 
139 63 
321 03 
300 00 
259 56 
303 76 
379 30 
189 00 
51 70 
759 47 



70 00 235 00 



144 00 
330 97 
204 02 
567 27 
465 60 
664 60 
292 60 
114 43 
105 00 
360 00 
120 13 
80 12 
114 30 
315 72 
712 87 
190 01 
341 20 
142 65 
216 30 
302 62 
173 03 
325 00 



967 12 
228 15 
346 17 
574 48 
454 06 
319 46 
551 72 
299 46 

340 79 
353 00 
214 34 
129 23 
400 10 
100 00 
199 81 



Charges per year for 
Tuition ' 



$ c. 


$ c. 


2,237 75 


230 60 


1,906 58 


75 90 


2,981 26 


358 26 


1,044 50 


448 12 


2,615 81 





2,035 47 




2,782 56 


178 73 


4,774 00 




1,977 71 




3,028 50 


526 52 


2,969 71 


137 72 


1,344 00 




1,193 38 


.40 


1,713 17 




3,102 94 




2,490 79 




2,851 10 




1,942 60 


958 69 


1,049 88 


672 64 


1,305 00 




2,780 00 


163 06 


1,581 95 


4 87 


1,006 18 


27 40 


965 00 


57 32 


2,053 76 


216 21 


2,572 89 


80 37 


1,926 77 




2,285 38 


228 06 


1,786 19 


5 11 


1,791 39 


191 06 


2,751 13 


129 12 


1,924 50 


125 06 


2,600 00 




4,183 94 


394 41 


1,873 15 


45 03 


1,917 85 


177 36 


2,575 08 


56 13 


2,344 63 


1,225 45 


2,219 46 




2,537 64 


1,070 88 


3,524 89 


4,530 40 


3,145 99 


1,790 69 


2,532 69 




2,182 23 


11 22 


2,091 65 


730 66 


2,685 46 


1,323 93 


1 ,217 00 


233 42 


2,093 81 


1,052 20 



Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

Free. 

Free. 

$10. 

Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 

Res. F. 1 free ; all others $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. $3 ; non-res. $6. 

Res. F.I free, II & III, $7.50; 
non-res. I $5, II & III, $10. 

Res. L. Sch. free, M. $10 ; non- 
res. L. $7.50, M. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $7.50. 

Res. F.I free; all 'hers $5. 

Free. 

Free. 

$12.50 

Free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

Res. free ; 

$10. 

Free. 

$7.50. 

$10. 

Res. free 
$7.50, M. 10. 

Free. 

Res. 1st yr. free; all others $10. 

Res. free; non-res. $7.50. 

Res. $3 ; non-res. $6. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

L. Sch. res. $5 ; non-res. $10 
M. $12.50. 

$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5. 

Res. $6 ; non-res. $12. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. $10 ; non-res. $15. 

Res. free; non-res. $4.50. 



non-res. $5. 



non-res. L. Sch. 



198 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
I. TABLE H— FINAN- 



Continuation 

Schools" 
—concluded 







CO 




-*J 




1 


2 


CJ 




o 


o 


n 

'So 


I* 



Receipts 



Ex- 



1 

1 



2 « 



CQ 



95 Richard's Lnd'g. 

96 Richmond 

97 Ridgeway 

98 Ripley 

99 Rodney 

100 Russell 

101 St. George 

102 Schomberg 



1033Diithaai?t:>i.... 

104 Spencerville . . . 

105 Springfield .... 

106 Stayner 

107 Stella 

108 Stouffville 

109 Sturgeon Falls 

110 Sutton 

111 Tamworth 

112 Tara 

113 Tavistock 

114 Teeswater 

115 Thamesville . . . 

116 Thessalon 

117 Thornbury 

118 Thorndale 

119 Tilbury 

120 Tottenham 



121 Tweed 

122 Wallaceburg . . 

123 Warkworth..., 



124 Webbwood 

125 West Lome 

126 Westmeath 

127 Westport 

128 Westport(R.C.S.S) 

129 Wheatley 

130 Winona 

131 Wolfe Island.... 

132 Wroxeter 



$ c.l 
433 50 
252 34 
507 60 
454 11 
472 61 
270 86 
528 05 
210 39 

541 49 
348 29 
370 75 
512 25 
205 04 

498 77 
567 38 
325 01 

479 55 
521 69 
492 57 
443 80 

480 90 
970 20 
468 57 
477 59 

499 06 
477 18 

507 32 
555 16 
530 55 

515 86 
257 33 

264 06 
361 13 
189 59 
484 84 
236 64 
178 93 
447 43 



252 34 
607 60 
1,443 25 
1,181 52 
970 86 
678 05 
210 39! 

1,082 98! 
498 29 
926 87) 
512 251 
355 04 
498 77 

"325'6i 

629 551 

1,043 38! 

642 57 I 
887 60! 
480 90 ! 

"702*85J 

"449*66! 
477 18! 

807 32| 
555 I61 
930 55 1 



643 32 
264 06! 
480 67 i 
197 29i 
484 84 
473 28 
178 93! 
894 86; 



$ c. 

600 00 

607 69 

1,409 80 

2,966 00 

408 17 

733 33 

1,027 72 

300 00 

772 33 

300 00 
1,002 52 
1,000 00 

150 00 

367 98 
1,245 07 
1,240 00 

878 63 

452 84 
918 25 
600 00 
682 00 

1,191 38 

8,869 11 

1,403 41 

850 00 

772 94 

708 12 
2,000 00 
1,406 25 

743 71 
300 00 
675 47 
805 09 
350 00 
663 08 

453 70 
400 00 
504 79 



$ c. 

37 50 

208 25 



634 00 
20 00 

170 00 
65 00 

109 50 

257 70 
210 00 
103 20 
338 50 
270 00 
689 25 
114 3D 
295 50 
255 25 
538 00 
225 50 
409 50! 
159 30 



$ c. 
691 52 



454 44 
23 85 

698 70 
22 61 

106 68 

42 60 

864 95 

944 14 

289 11 

59 98 

14 00 

259 70 

260 97 



53 48 
120 00 
499 94 

41 00 



304 00 




365 00 
187 00 
442 50 


614 09 
358 23 


275 00 
149 00 
511 00 


24 43 
384 17 
127 00 



230 08 



60 00 

52 90 

36 00 

460 00 



221 50! 
247 001 



43 00 
312 89 


5 57 

570 19 



1 Totals, 1915 63,529 40 68,445 34149,723 68 28,248 97 34,950 95 

2 Totals, 1914 69,811 42 70,197 74 120,196 1124,922 50 40,775 40 



3 Increases ! | 29,527 57 3,326 47 

4 Decreases I 6,282 02 1,752 40 

5 Percentages 18 . 42 




$ c. 
1,762 52 

1.320 62 
2,525 00 
5,951 80 
2,106 15 

2.843 75 

2.321 43 
936 96! 

2,697 lo' 
2,221 53l 
3,347 48! 
2,652 ll! 
1,040 06! 
2,068 77! 
2,186 45[ 
2,446 49 
2,242 98 
2,607 39 
2,398 89 
2,840 84 

1.844 10 
2,161 58 

10,344 53 
2,860 09 
2,343 35 
2,169 80 

2.322 19 
3,643 49 
3,505 35 

1,259 57 
1,430 73 
1 ,263 59 
1,742 79 
1,085 77 
2,092 76 
1,169 19 
1,549 55! 
2,094 08, 



$ c. 

780 50 
1,000 00 
2,430 00 
1,790 00 
1,742 80 
1,260 00 
2,000 00 

825 00 

1,950 00 
1,350 00 
1,690 00 
2,100 00 
800 00 
1,860 00 
1,000 00 
1,390 00 
1,717 18 
2,000 00 
1,985 00 
1,800 00 
1,500 00 
1,870 00 
1,824 80 
1,830 00 
1,650 00 
1,775 00 

1,900 00 
3,120 00 
1,980 00 

1,000 00 
952 00 

1,140 00 

1,575 00 
600 00 

1,850 00 
900 00 
737 98 

1,500 00 



344,898 34 219,660 27 
325,903 17208,385 64 



18,995 17 11,274 63 



Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance, $45.70; average attendance, $72.71. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION" 



199 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
CIAL STATEMENT— Concluded 



penditure 






_< 




1 1 CO 

U 4) .— I 


>» 






* . 




c3 a *> 


u 










a >»^ 


9 








t3 <i> 




a-P* o 


d CO M 








d > 

Mm 


i-H CO 


utilic a 
, etc., 
wingm 
ent for 
lture 


, statio 
ination 
xpense 


u 

d 




Charges per year 


•f-J 






for Tuition 


Buildings, S 
permanent 
ments 


°3 -2 

-a 
2 a 

3 s 


Library, scie 
atus, maps 
writers, dra 
and equipm 
physical cu 


School books 
fuel, exam 
and other e 


d 

Pi 

3 

o 
Eh 


CO 

1 , 

M 





95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 



$ c. 

5 60 

125 95 



174 49 



230 55 
49 40 



103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 

116 

117 7,785 79 

118 376 10 

119 50 00 

120 53 10 



158 40 



40 00 
63 32 



121 
122 
123 

124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 



76 00 
420*26 



7 00 
67 32 



23 45 



85 00 
63 63 
17 60 
68 71 



1 37,102 87 

2 33,050 74 



4,052 13 



11.94 



$ c. $ c. 
39 14 



5 25 



86 09 
30 37 



43 87 
150 00 



18 03 



22 83 

40 28 



15 00 
251 49 
100 00 



125 30 



51 

890 53 

89 66 

65 29 

8 90 



50 00 

12 80 
82 55 

51 03 
159 73 

44 01 

89 02 

109 00 

47 47 

13 85 
6 00 



17 80 



16 93 



60 90 



2,622 00 
2,225 86 



396 14 



.84 



55 35 
39 32 



42 00 
38 41 
25 00 
91 01 
119 99 
10 21 



9,056 14 
10,846 17 



1,790 03 



2.91 



$ c. 
127 98 

194 67 
80 00 

447 90 
263 35 

86 66 
190 55 

90 00 

680 39 
242 71 
270 85 
320 99 
140 63 
199 87 
663 02 
244 58 
396 74 
366 44 
309 36 
314 78 
236 77 
202 56 
624 94 
333 18 
217 13 
306 08 

239 97 

505 57 

1,049 74 

195 45 

207 89 

64 66 

105 93 

100 00 

66 75 

85 57 

758 57 

464 47 



42,352 96 
39,616 32 



2,736 64 



13.63 



$ c 
953 22 
,320 62 
525 00 
494 64 
106 15 
521 15 
315 85 
915 00 



2,630 39 
1,875 06 
2,986 87 
2,521 02 
1,005 92 
2,068 77 
1,706 89 
1,834 58 
2,126 72 
2,607 39 
2,345 39 
2,332 54 
1,844 10 
2,161 58 
10,344 53 
2,609 58 
1,971 26 
2,140 18 

2,215 97 
3,625 57 
3,505 35 

1,259 57 
1,227 21 
1,263 59 
1,742 79 
725 00 
2,092 76 
1,169 19 
1,524 36 
2,094 08 



310,794 24 
294,124 73 



16,669 51 



$ c. 
809 30 



3,457 16 

i ,'322 '60 

5 58 

21 96 

66 71 
346 47 
360 61 
131 09 

34 14 



479 56 
611 91 
116 26 



53 50 
508 30 



250 51 

372 09 

29 62 

106 22 
17 92 



203 52 



Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 
Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 
Free. 

Res. $10 : non-res. $8. 
Res. free ; non-res. $10. 
$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $12. 
F. I res. free ; non-res. $5 
others $10. 



all 



360 77; 
# 25'i^ 



$10. 

L. Sch. res. free ; all others $10. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

$20. 

$15. 

$10. 

$10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

Res. $5 : non-res. $10. 

1st yr. $5 ; other yrs. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Free 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

$10. 

$10. 

Res. 1st. yr. free; aJ] others 
$10. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. I $6, TI, $9, III, $15; non- 
res. $7.50, $10.50, $15. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. 1st yr.free; all others $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5. 

Res. free ; non-res. $5. 

Res. $10 ; non-res. $20. 

Free. 

$15. 

F.I $5, II, $7.50, III, $10. 



34,104 lOi 49 free; 83 not free. 
31,778 44| 49 free; 82 not free. 



2,325 66 



1 not free. 



37.12 free; 62.87 not free. 



200 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS AND 





Pupils 


Number of Pupils 
in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 


CO 


Continuation Schools ft 


CO 

pq 


CO 

3 


o 
u 

3 CO 


*d 
Q £ 

< 


'o 
o 

a 

GG 

u 

I 


'o 

1 

QQ 

3 


o 
o 
A 
o 
W 
u 

4> 
Pi 

a 


is 

. p o 

:S °cc 
t2 be-* 3 

2? d °— ' 


CO 

1 

*-» 
S 

co 

1 

o 

28 

10 

59 

5 

8 

14 
14 
7 
25 
18 
33 


- •-* 


1 Acton 


28 

6 

43 
11 
20 
17 
17 
34 
25 
22 
40 

7 

10 
29 

9 
47 
17 
10 
35 
21 
23 
36 
29 
33 
16 
18 
12 
16 
11 
32 
13 

7 

41 
38 

8 

2 
13 
32 
28 
21 
18 
19 
47 
19 

3 

29 
21 
14 
15 
15 
29 
38 


48 
12 
53 
6 
21 
23 
20 
43 
26 
36 
41 
16 
29 
. 26 
10 
102 
31 
19 
48 
32 
29 
47 
29 
46 
14 
22 
36 
21 
16 
29 
15 
12 
59 
41 
14 
14 
14 
48 
26 
27 
29 
35 
74 
34 
11 
42 
16 
15 
27 
21 
45 
42 


76 
18 
96 
17 
41 
40 
37 
77 
51 
58 
81 
23 
39 
55 
19 

149 
48 
29 
83 
53 
52 
83 
58 
79 
30 
40 
48 
37 
27 
61 
28 
19 

100 
79 
22 
16 
27 
80 
54 
48 
47 
54 

121 
53 
14 
71 
37 
29 
42 
36 
74 
80 


46 
17 
68 
9 
27 
23 
18 
46 
28 
52 
5C 



2? 

3e 

1C 

98 
3C 
1< 
& 
3( 
3c 
51 
3( 
52 
E 
26 
34 
28 
16 
33 
19 
16 
57 
50 
14 
11 
15 
54 
29 
23 
29 
35 
81 
37 
5 

40 
26 
16 
24 
23 
49 
54 


55 
18 
82 
17 
28 
37 
26 
45 
36 
40 
62 
23 
21 
43 
19 
117 
35 
21 
57 
48 
42 
47 
41 
55 
28 
30 
34 
25 
21 
45 
21 
19 
55 
51 
15 
16 
24 
53 
46 
41 
33 
39 
84 
40 
14 
52 
19 
19 
36 
31 
61 
54 


21 




48 
8 
37 
12 
33 
26 
23 
70 
26 
40 
48 
23 
28 
29 
4 
114 
39 
/ 17 
34 
44 
37 
24 
47 
34 
30 
24 
30 
26 
22 
29 
20 
14 
40 
45 
22 
12 
25 
40 
31 
18 
41 
34 
59 
42 
4 
30 
26 
13 
31 
16 
42 
58 


12 


2 Agincourt 




3*Alvinston 


14 




13 


4 Arkona 


8 


5 Ayr 


13 
3 
11 
32 
15 
18 
19 




5 


6 Bancroft 


11 


7 Bath 


5 


8 Beaverton 


2 


9 Beeton 


5 


10 Belmont 


8 


11 Blenheim 


15 


12 Blind River . . 




13 Blyth 


18 
12 




11 
26 
15 
35 

9 
12 
49 

9 

15 
59 
11 
45 


4 


14 Bothwell 


14 


15 Bowesville 


3 


16 Bracebridge 


26 
13 

8 
26 

5 

10 
36 
17 
24 

2 

10 
14 
12 

6 
16 

7 


6 


20 


17 Bridgeburg 


2 


18 Bruce Mines 


3 


19 Brussels 


11 


20 Burk's Falls 


4 


21 Burlington 


3 


22 Cannington 


15 


23 Cardinal 

24 Carp 


7 
12 


25 Chapleau . , 




26 Claremont 


16 

18 

11 

5 

32 
8 
5 

60 
34 


9 


27 Clifford 


7 


28 Coldwater 


4 


29 Comber 


3 


30 Cookstown 


8 


31 Creemore 


5 


32 Delhi 


2 




45 

28 

7 


. . .\ . . 


26 


34 Dresden 


12 


35 Drumbo . 




36 Dryden 


4 
2 
40 
23 
30 
6 
20 
62 
11 
10 
41 
11 
16 
11 
20 
32 
22 


2 


37 Eganville 

38 Eganville (R.C.S.S/*.. 

39 Elmira 


3 

27 

8 

7 

14 
15 
37 
13 




2 

20 
12 


40 Elmvale 


6 


41 Ennismore 


4 


42 Erin 


7 


43 Exeter 


21 


44 Fenelon Falls 

45 Feversham 


6 
7 


46 Finch 


19 
18 
10 
6 
5 
13 
26 




12 


47 Fingal 


4 


48 Fitzroy Harbour 

49 Fort Frances 

50 Frankf ord 


8 

10 

4 


51 Gore Bay 


13 


52 Grand Valley 


9 



* School opened in September. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



201 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 





Number of Pupils from Families whose 


















Head is occupied as below — 


Number of Fupils in the Various Subjects 


4) 
<D - 

a 
1 


H 

1 




SO 


.1 
1 


CO 

-3 

1 

Eh 


CO 

d 



•gs 


CO 

g 

'-+3 

P< 
d 
O 

O 

M 

4) 

O 


8 

c3 
Pi 
d 
O 
O 
O 

-♦* 
d 

1 

5 


a 

a 

CO 

3 




CO •*= 
O O) 

3g 


2 


CO 

be 
1 

76 


S 

CO 

a 
1 

i 

76 


I 

CO 

% 

m 

76 




CO 

i 
21 


! 

bo 


55 


0) 

M 

55 


S.J 

as 
<i 

55 


U 
f 

< 


1 


9 


31 


3 


1 


15 


3 


8 


6 


55 


76 


76 


2 


"is 


15 
35 


1 
1 








2 

20 




18 

82 


18 
96 


18 
96 


18 
96 


18 
96 


"ii 


18 
82 


18 
82 


18 
82 


18 


3 




"8 


"ii 


96 


4 


3 


9 


2 




2 


1 






17 


17 


17 


17 


17 




17 


17 


17 


17 


5 


5 
11 


21 
14 






11 
3 


4 
3 






28 
37 


41 

40 


41 
40 


41 
.40 


27 
23 


"i3 
3 


29 
37 


33 
37 


33 
37 


41 


6 


.... 


"2 


*4 




40 


7 


11 


16 


3 




2 


2 


3 




26 


37 


37 


37 


37 


11 


26 


26 


26 


37 


8 


8 


40 


2 




8 


7 


12 




60 


77 


77 


77 


77 


28 


60 


60 


60 


77 


9 


5 


30 


2 




3 


4 


2 




36 


51 


51 


51 


51 


15 


36 


36 


36 


51 


10 


3 
10 


50 

47 


1 

7 






1 

6 


3 




40 

38 


58 
51 


58 
51 


58 
51 


37 
32 


18 
13 


40 
38 
23 
19 


40 
38 


40 
38 


58 


11 




ii 


51 


12 


4 
2 








3 
10 


2 

5 


"ii 
2 




23 
21 


23 
26 


23 
26 


23 
26 


23 
16 


'"7 


23 
19 


23 
19 


23 


13 


"is 


**2 




26 


14 


3 


19 


1 




8 


9 


12 




43 


55 


55 


43 


47 


12 


43 


43 


43 


55 


15 


"33 


19 
45 














11 
117 


11 
143 


11 
143 


11 
143 


9 
81 


"26 


11 
117 


11 
117 


11 
117 


11 


16 


"0 




"40 


"4 


"2i 




143 


17 


8 

5 

15 


3 

18 
31 






20 


3 


13 

6 
3 




35 
21 
67 


48 
29 
83 


48 
29 
81 


48 
29 
81 


48 
29 
81 


13 

8 

26 


35 
21 
66 


35 
21 
66 


35 
21 

66 


48 


18 






29 


19 


"6 




"8 


"ii 


80 


20 


4 


14 


4 




9 


6 


15 




35 


40 


40 


40 


20 


5 


35 


35 


35 


40 


21 


3 


16 


4 




2 


4 


23 




42 


52 


52 


52 


52 


10 


42 


42 


42 


52 


22 


15 


39 


3 


"2 


11 


4 


7 


2 


47 


83 


83 


83 


60 


36 


47 


47 


47 


83 


23 


3 


17 


2 




12 


14 


8 


2 


41 


58 


58 


58 


58 


17 


41 


41 


41 


58 


24 


9 


60 


3 




2 


2 


3 




55 


79 


79 


79 


60 


24 


55 


19 


55 


79 


25 


7 




- 1 




21 




1 




28 


30 


30 


27 


12 


2 


28 


28 


28 


28 


26 


2 


'■"22 


5 




5 


"3 


3 




30 


40 


40 


40 


31 


10 


30 


30 


30 


40 


27 


6 


18 


5 




8 


4 


7 


! ! ! ! 39 


48 


48 


48 


41 


14 


39 


39 


39 


48 


28 


10 


10 


.... 


"i 


, , , , 


10 


6 


.... 30 


37 


37 


37 


37 


12 


30 


30 


30 


37 


29 


6 
4 
4 


13 
43 
11 








4 
3 
2 


4 
4 
2 


.... 21 


27 
61 

28 


27 
61 

28 


27 
61 

28 


18 
61 
28 


6 
16 

7 


21 
45 
21 


21 
45 
21 


21 
45 
21 


27 


30 






"l 

6 




45 
21 


61 


31 


"2 




28 


32 


7 
2 


7 
73 






3 
3 


1 
8 


1 
2 


"9 


19 
55 


19 
100 


19 
100 


19 
100 


7 
100 


"45 


19 
55 


19 
55 


19 
55 


19 


33 


"*3 




100 


34 


12 


39 


7 




13 


4 


4 




53 


79 


79 


79 


79 


26 


53 


53 


53 


79 


35. 




8 
4 
6 


2 




7 

3 

10 


5 
8 
2 






15 
16 

24 


22 
16 
27 


22 
16 
27 


22 
16 
27 


14 
11 

18 


7 
"*3 


15 
16 

24 


15 
16 
24 


15 
16 

24 


22 


36 


"i 
5 






16 


37 


"i 




"3 




27 


38 


17 


36 


2 




9 


4 


12 




53 


80 


80 


80 


80 


27 


53 


53 


53 


80 


39 


1 


19 


1 




19 


10 


1 


"*3 


46 


54 


54 


54 


54 


8 


46 


46 


46 


54 


40. 




33 
47 
30 
58 


1 


"i 


13 








41 
26 
39 

77 


48 

31 

54 

121 


48 

31 

54 

121 


41 

31 

31 

121 


36 

31 

54 

121 


7 

5 

15 

37 


41 

26 
39 

77 


41 
26 
39 
84 


41 
26 
40 
84 


48 


41 








31 


42 


17 
18 


"3 
2 






"*2 

14 


""2 

7 


"*8 


54 


43 




"i3 


114 


44 


5 


21 
11 
49 


1 




11 


15 

1 






34 
14 
52 


47 
14 
71 


47 
14 
71 


47 
14 
52 


47 

5 

42 


13 
"i9 


34 
14 
52 


34 
14 
52 


34 
14 
52 


47 


45. 


"2 

3 




14 


46 


2 


"2 




"is 


71 


47 


1 


22 


4 




3 


6 




"i 


29 


37 


37 


37 


37 


18 


19 


19 


20 


37 


48. 




20 


1 




4 




"2 
11 


2 
3 


22 


29 
42 


29 


29 


29 


10 


22 


22 


22 


28 


49 


"(3 


10 


3 




5 


"4 


36 


42 


42 


42 


6 


36 


36 


36 


42 


50 


4 


20 


1 


"i 


4 


2 


4 




31 


36 


36 


20 


21 


5 


31 


31 


31 


36 


51 


1 


30 


7 


1 


18 


7 


9 


"i 


68 


74 


74 


74 


44 


13 


68 


74 


68 


74 


52 


22 


37 


5 


— 


3 


6 


2 


5 


54 


80 


80 


80 


80 


26 


55 


54 


54 


80 



202 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 


Continuation Schools" 


u 
1 


■8 


d 

C3 


B 
$ 


I 


CS3 


1 




>> 
u 

'§ 
<V 
A 
O 


1 Acton 


45 
6 

46 
12 
27 
40 
37 
56 
33 
37 
51 
10 
16 
38 
9 
81 
37 
29 
66 
20 
29 
60 
32 
60 
10 
40 
41 
24 
18 
32 
15 
19 
48 
51 
14 
11 
21 
59 
29 
36 
22 
41 
79 
28 
5 

42 
31 
22 
17 
21 
44 
80 


56 
18 
30 
10 
25 
26 
18 
49 
50 
52 
43 
23 
19 
51 

8 

45 
48 
26 
39 
38 
49 
26 
43 
72 
27 
40 

7 

35 
22 
60 
20 

7 

80 
45 
15 
11 

9 
29 


4' 

21* 

1 


62 
18 
60 
13 
32 
30 
18 
48 
50 
56 
47 
23 
23 
52 

8 
98 
48 
28 
49 
38 
50 
52 
41 
76 
24 
37 
44 
36 
22 
61 
20 
19 
95 
77 
18 
16 

9 
29 


55 
18 
82 
17 
30 
37 
25 
60 
36 
40 
38 
23 
19 
43 
11 
123 
35 
21 
66 
35 
42 
47 
41 
55 
30 
30 
39 
30 
21 
45 
21 
19 
55 
53 
15 
16 
24 
33 
46 
41 
26 
39 
68 
34 
14 
52 
19 
22 
36 
31 
68 
54 


55 
18 
82 
17 
30 
37 
25 
60 
36 
40 
38 
23 
19 
43 
11 

123 
35 
21 
66 
35 
42 
47 
41 
55 
30 
30 
39 
30 
21 
45 
21 
19 

, 55 
53 
15 
16 
24 
33 
- 46 
41 
26 
39 
68 
34 
14 
52 
19 
22 
36 
31 
68 
54 


45 


2 Agincourt 


6 


3 Alvinston 


46 


4 Arkona 


12 


5 Ayr 


26 


6 Bancroft 1 


23 


7 Bath 


26 


8 Beaverton ► 


55 


9 Beeton 


51 


10 Belmont 


37 


11 Blenheim 


51 


12 Blind River 


10 


13 Blyth 


16 


14 Bothwell .' 


38 


15 Bowesville 


9 


16 Bracebridge 


81 


17 Bridgeburg 


48 


18 Bruce Mines 


24 


19 Brussels 


26 


20 Burk's Falls 


20 


21 Burlington 


29 


22 Cannington 


60 


23 Cardinal 


32 


24 Carp 


60 


25 Chapleau 


2 


26 Claremont 


16 




14 


28 Coldwater 


37 




14 


30 Cookstown 


32 




15 


32 Delhi 


7 




68 


34 Dresden 


51 




14 


36 Dryden 


11 




21 


38 Eganville (R.C.S.S.) 


65 
28 


40 Elmvale 


48 
27 
31 
59 
32 


"3' 


46 
28 
48 
78 
36 
14 
65 
22 
20 
39 
36 
69 
80 


27 




22 


42 Erin 


41 




80 


44 Fenelon Falls 


13 




5 


46 Finch 


65 
13 

20 
38 
36 
70 
70 




42 




31 


48 Fitzroy Harbour 


10 


49 Fort Frances 


13 


50 Frankf ord 


21 




44 


52 Grand Valley 


31 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



203 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 







Number of Pupils 


in the Various Subjects— Continued 




Special Courses 


to 

.2 
"ca 

e 


S 


be 
a 

A 
<D 

<v 
M 

a 

o 
o 

PQ 


1 

& 

§ 
& 


1 

I 

s 


< 


.8 1 


8 
B 

o 
O 


2 

't-4 

at 
< 


o 
o 

■a 

% 

U 

< 


1 


76 
18 
96 
17 
37 
40 
37 
77 
33 
58 
51 
23 
26 
38 
11 

143 
48 
29 
81 
53 
52 
83 
58 
79 
30 
40 
48 
37 
27 
61 
28 
19 

100 
79 
22 
16 
27 
80 
20 
48 
31 
54 

104 
47 
14 
71 
37 
29 
42 
36 
74 
79 


55 
18 
82 
17 
28 
17 
26 
60 
36 
40 
38 
23 
10 
43 
11 
62 
35 
'21 
67 
35 
42 
47 
31 
19 
28 
30 
7 

30 
21 
45 
21 
19 
55 
79 
15 
16 
24 
20 
46 
41 
26 
41 
84 
34 
14 
29 
19 
22 
36 
31 

"54* 








55 
18 
82 
17 
23 
37 
36 


76 
18 
96 
17 
41 
37 
37 
77 
51 
58 
51 
21 






2 










18 




3 










4 












5 


28 
20 








j 


6 








| 


7 








1 


8 




""!!!!!!!! I. 


60 






1 


q 








36 
40 
38 
23 
21 
43 
11 
122 
35 
21 
66 
35 
42 
47 
33 
55 
28 
30 
39 
30 
21 
45 
21 
19 
55 
53 
15 

24 
49 
46 
41 
26 
40 
67 
34 
14 
52 
19 
22 
36 
36 
69 
54 






10 










::::::i: 


11 












2 


1? 


23 










13 








I 


14 








55 
11 
117 
48 
29 
83 
40 
50 
83 
58 
79 
30 
40 
48 
37 
27 
61 






15 


9 
48 










16 











5 


17 












18 














19 














20 


35 












PI 












2? 










15 




83 








2 


24 














25 












26 














27 














28 


30 












29 












30 














31 














3?, 


19 
32 






19 
100 
79 
22 
16 
27 
80 
54 
48 








33 








55 




34 








35 














36 


11 

9 












37 












38 










17 


3ft 














40 














41 


26 












42 






54 
121 

47 








43 
44 


84 

34 

7 


17 


19 


17 


70 




45 












46 






71 
37 
29 
42 
36 
74 
80 








47 














48 


2 

36 












49 












50 










5 


51 


68 
54 












52 













204 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Pupils 


Number of Pupils 
in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 




Continuation Schools 
(Continued) 


CO 

pq 


CO 

'6 


u 

co 

3 CO 
r-H ft 


® a 

n 


1 

M 

1 


o 

co 

3 


I 

w 

t- 

CO 
ft 
A 
S 


. o 5 
coC/)£:3 

ft-^c! 

8 


1 

o 

4) 

w 

u 
O 


CO 

§^ 

CO s 
X co 

CO 

u u 
2 ft 

Xi CO 

°l 


53 Hanover 


33 
11 
18 
26 
25 
16 
14 
10 
20 
20 
23 
24 
12 
10 
40 
6 
7 
6 
22 
28 
22 
20 
14 
16 
41 
25 
20 
21 
21 
15 
38 
22 
19 
15 
26 
41 
38 
24 
11 
23 
10 
14 
4 

17 
24 
40 
25 
11 
20 
13 
26 
15 


44 
19 
31 
41 
45 
23 
11 
13 
19 
33 
45 
67 
20 
18 
51 
11 
18 
12 
43 
31 
18 
34 
34 
37 
60 
24 
30 
29 
22 
15 
41 
20 
28 
41 
46 
40 
43 
23 
24 
26 
18 
24 
8 
30 
24 
50 
36 
17 
1 26 

■a 19 

28 
18 


77 
30 
49 
67 
70 
39 
25 
23 
39 
53 
68 
91 
32 
28 
91 
17 
25 
18 
65 
59 
40 
54 
48 
53 
101 
49 
50 
50 
43 
30 
79 
42 
47 
55 
72 
81 
81 
47 
35 
49 
28 
38 
12 
J 47 
48 
9C 
61 
28 
46 
32 
55 
33 


46 
17 
31 
42 
52 
21 
12 
15 
23 
35 
52 
66 
15 
20 
60 
13 
13 
10 
40 
41 
24 
35 
28 
36 
66 
32 
33 
29 
27 
19 
48 
17 
30 
36 
49 
55 
45 
31 
18 
24 
16 
25 
11 
29 
31 
63 
38 
18 
23 
17 
33 
IS 


61 
23 
33 
49 
50 
39 
25 
14 
27 
35 
46 
45 
32 
28 
55 
13 
23 
18 
55 
38 
27 
40 
37 
35 
77 

( 39 
31 
35 
30 
16 
54 
32 
29 
32 
44 
53 
56 
37 
29 
49 
28 
26 
12 
26 
26 
61 
46 

! 28 
42 
32 
45 

! 25 


16 

7 

16 
18 
20 




68 
19 
42 
31 
55 
14 
19 
16 
39 
23 
50 
42 
25 
20 
54 
11 
11 
5 

31 
16 
21 
36 
23 
27 
55 
29 
36 
40 
18 
13 
32 
21 
33 
30 
34 
31 
47 
25 
29 
42 
19 
23 
10 
22 
25 
34 
33 
25 
39 
17 
49 
14 


9 
11 

7 

36 
15 
25 

6 

7 


6 


54 Harrow 


7 


55 Havelock 


5 


56 Highgate 


12 


57 Huntsville 


5 




9 








5 


60 Kars 


9 
12 
18 
22 
46 




3 






62 Kenmore 


30 

18 

49 

7 

8 

37 
6 

14 
13 
34 
43 
19 
18 
25 
26 
46 
20 
14 
10 
25 
17 
47 
21 
14 
26 
38 
5C 
34 
22 
6 
7 
S 

15 

2 

25 

22 

56 

28 

§ 

1 

U 

e 


6 


63 Lakefield 


6 


64 Lanark 


14 




5 


66 Little Current 

67 Lucknow 






4 


36 
4 
2 




12 


68 Malakoff 


1 


69 Manitowaning 

70 Mflnntiok 


4 
9 


71 Maxville 


io 

21 
13 

14 
11 
18 
24 
10 
19 
15 
13 
14 
25 
10 
18 
24 
28 
21 
25 
10 
6 


7 


12 


72 Melbourne 


12 


73 Merlin 


6 


74 Merrickville 

75 Metcalfe 


4 
7 


76 Millbrook 


12 


77 Milton 


10 


78 Mount Albert 

79 New Hamburg 

80 New Liskeard 

81 North Augusta 

82 North Gower 

83 Norwich 


9 
5 

10 
11 

7 
15 


84 Odessa 


8 


85 Oil Springs 


8 


86 Orono 


8 


87 Paisley 


15 


88 Pakenham 


12 


89 Palmerston 


13 


90 Plattsville 


10 


91 Port Burwell 

92 PortColborne 


5 
4 






5 


94 Princeton 


12 




5 


95 Richard's Landing .. 

96 Richmond 


2 


21 
22 

29 
15 




7 


97 Ridgeway 


6 


98 Ripley 


15 


99 Rodney 


12 


100 Russell 


• 3 


101 St. George 


4 




' 4 


102 Sohomberar 


> 6 


103 Southampton 

104 Spencerville 


10 

8 





; 4 

I 10 



1916 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



205 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
















Head is occupied as below — 






Number of .Pupils 


in the Various Subjects 


o 

<o 

B 
B 

o 
O 


8 

u 

< 


u 

o 

a ^ 

■d d 
2-d 
^O 

« CD 


1 
o 

03 
CD 

H 


CO 

o3 
U 

H 

e2 


CO 

g 

d c3 
"3 B 

zs d 


o 
'-+3 

P< 

o 
o 
o 

Fh 

CO 

,d 
O 


o 
o 
o 

o 

5 


B 

CO 

'a 

m 


o 

CO +3 

o <u 

BK 

2 d 
d* 3 


2 

d 

1 

CD 
-4-3 

CO 

J— 1 
J 


u 
o 

CO 

w 

I 

hi 

o3 

1 


b 

o 

CO 

a 

1 

*-£» 
'C 

pq 


b 

o 

-4-3 

CO 

a 

d 

CD 

1 


>> 

t 

9 

CD 

03 


o3 

CD 

M 


1§ 

si 

CD 3 

ia 

is 
< 


o3 

u 

< 


53 


18 


11 


6 




24 


5 


8 


5 


59 


75 


75 


75 


48 


16 


59 


59 


61 


11 


54 


5 


17 


1 


.... 


2 


2 


3 




23 


30 


30 


30 


19 


7 


23 


23 


23 


30 


55 


5 

5 

12 


11 
57 
10 


2 

2 
5 






25 


5 


1 


23 
49 
50 


30 
49 
70 


30 
49 
70 


30 
67 
70 


19 
67 
70 


9 

18 
20 


22 

49 

50r 


23 

49 
50 


23 

49 
50 


30 


56 


1 

1 


2 
17 


67 


57 


15 


4 


6 


70 


58 


3 


28 


1 


.... 


2 


3 


1 


1 


39 


39 


39 


39 


23 


• • • • 


39 


39 


39 


39 


59 


"i 


24 

18 

2 


.... 


.... 


1 
3 

20 








25 
14 
31 


25 
23 

39 


25 
23 
39 


25 
23 
39 


19 
19 
27 


"9 
12 


25 
14 
31 


25 
14 
31 


25 
14 
31 


25 


60 








23 


61 


17 






39 


62 


.... 


42 


i 


.... 


4 


3 


3 




39 


53 


53 


39 


36 


18 


39 


39 


39 


53 


63 


16 


23 






14 


12 


3 


.... 


44 


68 


68 


68 


68 


24 


44 


44 


44 


68 


64 


9 


51 


3 


.... 


12 


3 


10 


3 


45 


91 


91 


91 


91 


46 


45 


45 


45 


91 


65 


.1 


14 


1 




13 


1 


2 


.... 


32 


32 


32 


32 


15 




32 


32 


32 


32 


66 


1 


9 


2 


.... 


2 


14 






28 


28 


28 


11 


17 




28 


28 


28 


28 


67 


20 


41 


4 


.... 


15 


5 


• • • » 


6 


67 


91 


91 


91 


91 


36 


67 


91 


67 


91 


68 


*4 


17 
16 














11 
23 


13 
25 


13 
25 


13 
25 


9 
12 


2 
2 


11 
23 


11 
23 


11 
23 


13 


69 


1 




2 




2 


... 


25 


70 


1 


13 


1 


.... 


1 


2 






18 


17 


18 


18 


14 


• • • 


18 


18 


18 


18 


71 


9 


37 


6 


.... 


2 


1 


4 


6 


55 


64 


64 


55 


41 


9 


55 


55 


57 


64 


72 


3 


47 1 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


.... 


38 


58 


58 


38 


59 


21 


38 


38 


38 


58 


73 


.... 


23 


2 


, , . , 


4 


8 


.... 


3 


27 


40 


40 


27 


40 


13 


27 


27 


27 


40 


74 


5 


24 


3 


.... 


13 


6 


2 


1 


40 


54 


54 


54 


30 


14 


40 


40 


40 


54 


75 


2 


35 


2 


.... 


4 




2 


3 


37 


48 


48 


48 


34 


11 


37 


48 


37 


48 


76 


9 


31 


3 




6 


3 


1 


.... 


38 


53 


53 


53 


37 


18 


38 


53 


43 


53 


77 


17 


55 


4 


.... 


9 


9 


4 


3 


77 


101 


101 


101 


56 


24 


77 


77 


77 


101 


78 


10 


27 


1 


. . • 


6 


3 


.... 


2 


42 


47 


46 


4? 


42 


9 


42 


42 


42 


48 


79 


11 


15 


2 


1 


8 


5 


5 


3 


31 


50 


50 


50 


50 


19 


31 


50 


31 


50 


80 


10 


10 


2 


. • • • 


11 


5 


12 


.... 


35 


50 


50 


50 


29 


15 


35 


21 


35 


50 


81 




31 


1 


.... 


2 


1 


8 


• • • • 


30 


43 


43 


43 


28 


13 


30 


43 


30 


43 


8?, 


i 

12 


26 
46 


2 
2 






1 
3 


"*9 


"i 


16 
60 


30 

79 


30 
79 


24 
79 


20 
41 


14 
25 


16 
54 


16 
54 


16 
54 


30 


83 


1 


5 


79 


84 


1 


30 


4 


, , , 


2 


4 


1 


• . . . 


32 


42 


42 


42 


32 


10 


32 


32 


32 


4? 


85 


5 


25 






6 


7 


4 


.... 


37 


35 


36 


37 


40 


18 


37 


37 


37 


47 


86 


9 


31 


i 




.-4 


4 


6 


l 


32 


56 


56 


56 


39 


24 


32 


32 


32 


5fi 


87 


13 


42 


4 


. . • 


3 


1 


3 


6 


44 


72 


72 


72 


55 


28 


72 


72 


44 


17 


88 


.... 


61 


5 




7 


6 


2 


.... 


53 


74 


74 


74 


52 


21 


53 


53 


53 


74 


89 


9 


35 






16 


13 


7 


1 


56 


81 


81 


81 


81 


25 


56 


56 


56 


81 


90 


3 


23 


5 


2 


7 


2 


5 




40 


47 


47 


47 


24 


10 


40 


40 


40 


47 


91 


6 


10 






1 


13 


2 


3 


29 


35 


35 


35 


35 


7 


29 


29 


29 


35 


92 


8 


6 


i 


.... 


10 


9 


10 


5 


49 


49 


49 


49 


22 




49 


49 


49 


4f 


93 


4 


11 






5 


6 


2 


• • • . 


28 


28 


28 


28 


15 




28 


28 


28 


2? 


94 


5 


23 


2 


.... 


2 


3 


.... 


3 


26 


38 


38 


38 


35 


12 


26 


26 


26 


3? 


95 


3 
1 


7 
28 


"*2 




2 
2 








12 
36 


12 

47 


12 

47 


12 
47 


12 
37 


"21 


12 

26 


12 

47 


12 

26 


11 


96 


14 






4' 


97 


6 


23 






7 


4 


8 




26 


48 


48 


48 


48 


22 


26 


48 


26 


4? 


98 


18 


65 


3 




3 


1 






61 


9C 


9C 


9C 


78 


29 


61 


61 


61 


9( 


99 


15 


25 


2 




1C 


7 


2 


. . . . 


43 


61 


61 


33 


43 


13 


43 


43 


35 


5< 


100 


4 


10 


1 




-1 


7 


2 


. . . . 


28 


28 


28 


28 


28 




28 


28 


28 


?A 


101 


5 


31 






3 


5 


.... 


2 


44 


4fc 


45 


45 


18 


4 




41 


44 


45 


102 


5 

8 


21 
6 


.... 




2 
IS 






4 
1 


32 

45 


32 

55 


! 32 

» 55 


32 
55 


- 17 
» 31 


"io 


32 

45 


32 
45 


32 
45 


31 


103 


8 


18 


55 


104 


4 


23 






€ 


. . . . 


1 





25 


3c 


> 3c 


. 3e 


> 2c 


8 


25 


25 


25 


3i 



$06 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Continuation Schools — Con. 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects — Continued. 



3 



b 


>t 


cud 


d 


o 
o 


$ 

o 

cq 


61 


61 


23 


23 


23 


23 


49 


49 


50 


50 


39 


39 


25 


25 


14 


14 


31 


31 


37 


37 


44 


44 


45 


45 


32 


32 


28 


28 


66 


66 


11 


11 


23 


23 


18 


18 


55 


55 


38 


38 


27 


27 


40 


40 


37 


37 


35 


35 


77 


77 


42 


42 


31 


31 


35 


35 


30 


30 


16 


16 


54 


54 


32 


32 


37 


37 


32 


32 


44 


44 


81 


81 


56 


56 


40 


40 


29 


29 


49 


49 


28 


28 


26 


26 


12 


12 


26 


26 


26 


26 


61 


61 


43 


43 


28 


28 


42 


42 


32 


32 


45 


45 


25 


25 



53 Hanover 

54 Harrow 

55 Havelock 

56 Highgate 

57 Huntsville 

58 Jarvis 

59 Jockvale 

60 Kars 

61 Keewatin 

62 Kenmore 

63 Lakefield 

64 Lanark 

65 Lansdowne 

66 Little Current .... 

67 Lucknow 

68 Malakoff 

69 Manitowaning .... 

70 Manotick 

71 Maxville 

72 Melbourne 

73 Merlin 

74 Merrickville 

75 Metcalfe 

76 Millbrook 

77 Milton 

78 Mount Albert .... 

79 New Hamburg. . . . 
SO New Liskeard . . . 

81 North Augusta . . . 

82 North Gower 

83 Norwich 

84 Odessa 

85 Oil Springs 

S6 Orono 

87 Paisley 

$$ Pakenham 

89 Palmerston 

90 Plattsville 

91 Port Burwell .... 

92 PortColborne.... 

93 Powassan 

94 Princeton 

95 Richard's Landing 

96 Richmond 

97 Ridgeway 

98 Ripley 

99 Rodney 

100 Russell 

101 St. George 

102 Schomberg 

103 Southampton 

104 Spencerrille 



48 
19 
20 
27 
39 
39 
19 
19 
27 
36 
53 
91 
15 
17 
70 
9 
12 
12 
41 
44 
23 
30 
34 
39 
56 
48 
36 
29 
28 
20 
40 
32 
38 
39 
55 
52 
81 
24 
19 
49 
15 
35 
12 
37 
40 
78 
43 
18 
19 
17 
55 
23 



38 
29 
24 
24 
60 
34 
25 



40 



31 
38 
34 
74 
32 
18 
59 
13 
5 
7 

41 
45 
40 
40 
22 
41 
88 
38 



34 
39 
25 
59 
32 
12 
21 
38 
81 
48 
44 
27 
40 
25 
13 



16 
22 
54 
25 
28 
40 
22 
49 
22 



37 



71 
29 
30 
42 
57 
36 
25 



37 
36 
30 
88 
32 
20 
85 
13 
14 
17 
47 
45 
40 
36 
32 
46 
90 
40 
40 
50 
41 
28 
60 
32 
19 
55 
55 
81 
57 
47 
28 
38 
24 
14 
7 
24 
46 
68 
20 
28 
41 
19 
48 
22 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



207 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects— Continued 


Special Courses 


Physics 


| 


1 

I 
pq 


1 

§ 


I 
1 






3 





< 





■a 

-*» 
< 


53 77 


61 
23 
23 
49 
50 
39 








61 
23 
23 
49 
50 
39 
25 
16 
32 
37 
44 
45 
32 
28 
67 
11 
23 
18 
57 
41 
27 
40 
37 
42 
77 
42 
28 
35 
30 
16 
54 
33 
43 
32 
44 
53 
56 
40 
27 
49 
28 
38 
12 
26 
26 
70 
43 
28 
40 
32 
45 
25 


77 
30 
30 
67 
70, 
39 
25 
23 
39 
53 
45 
91 
32 
28 
91 
13 
20 
18 
65 
59 
40 
40 
48 
53 
101 






54 30 














55 30 


23 












56 67 












57 70 


50 












58 39 












59 25 


25 














60 23 


14 

27 


14 
27 












61 39 












62 53 












63 6 


"45" 
32 
28 
67 
11 
23 
18 
55 
38 
27 
40 
37 
38 
77 
42 
31 
21 
30 
16 
54 
32 
37 
32 
72 
53 
56 
40 
35 
49 
28 


11 
22 












64 91 












65 32 












66 28 


9 












67 91 












68 13 














69 ' 25 














70 18 














71 64 


24 
11 
10 
16 
14 
29 












72 59 












73 40 












74 30 












75 48 












76 53 










4 


77 101 












78 49 














79 50 








50 
50 
43 
30 
79 
42 
46 
56 
64 
81 
81 
47 
35 
49 
28 








80 50 


26 
15 








17 




81 43 








82 30 












83 79 














84 42 


15 












85 47 










7 


86 56 














87 72 


18 












88 74 












89 81 














90 47 














91 35 


24 












92 49 












93 28 














94 38 














95 12 


12 

26 
26 
61 
43 
28 
43 
32 
45 
10 
















96 47 


26 
26 

31 






47 

48 






■ 


97 48 










4 


98 90 










8 


99 43 






61 
28 
46 
32 
55 
33 








100 28 












101 45 














102 32 


32 












103 55 












104 33 


6 

























208 



THE KEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Pupils 


Number of Pupils 
in— 


Number of 
Pupils from — 


«> 


Continuation Schools — 
Continued 

l 




: 


1 

Eh 


P eg 

n 

r 




a 


.— 1 


1 

1 


1 — 1 


1 

U 

s 

ft 

p 


Municipalities 
forming C. S. 
District or from 
School Section 


DO 

i 

"-♦3 



m 

U 
0> 

1 




u u 

S a 

^^ 

1- 


105 Springfield 1 

106 Stayner , 

107 Stella 


15 
30 
11 
35 
5 

15 
20 
22 
20 
37 
23 
21 
28 
19 
15 
26 
18 
59 
34 
6 

12 
14 
1 16 
|- 16 
25 
11 
IC 
34 


14 
42 
19 


29 
72 
30 


18 
46 
17 
42 
10 
26 
52 
54 
35 
46 
49 
35 
41 
35 
22 
37 
45 
75 
45 
10 
20 
22 
28 
27 
32 
12 
11 
37 


22 
53 
25 
51 
19 
31 
56 
46 
34 
36 
36 
52 
51 
33 
30 
50 
57 
106 

i 48 
18 
32 
43 

| 30 
25 
38 
28 
14 
47 


- 7 

19 

5 

16 




16 
37 
19 
31 
14 
25 
28 
38 
33 
35 
38 
33 
25 
45 
19 
23 
23 
88 
25 
17 
27 
23 
24 
27 
34 
22 
11 
47 


13 4 
351 10 
111 3 


108 Stouffville ! 

109 Sturgeon Falls .... 


32 67 
14 19 
28 43 
45; 65 
58: 80 


36! 8 

5 1 2 


110 Sutton 


12 
9 
34 
11 
35 
21 
11 
13 
19 
7 

18 
11 
31 
27 




18 5 


111 Tamworth 

112 Tara 


37 
42 
12 
36 
19 
30 
39 
7 
18 


12 
15 


113 Tavistock 

114 Teeswater 

115 Thamesville 

116 Thessalon 

117 Thornbury 

118 Thorndale 

119 Tilbury 


25 
34 
34 
42 
36 
33 
22 
42 
50 
78 
41 
12 
20 
29 
25 
23 
• 28 


45 
71 
57 
63 
64 
52 
37 
68 
68 
137 
75 
18 
32 
43 
41 
39 
53 


2 

13 
8 
8 
13 
4 
7 


120 Tottenham 

121 Tweed 


451 9 
45| 16 


122 Wallaceburg 

123 Warkworth 

124 Webbwood 


491 15 

50 14 
1 1 


125 West Lome 







5; 4 


126 Westmeath 






20j 2 


127 Westport 

128 Westport (R.C.S.S.) 

129 Wheatley 


1 ii 

14 
15 




17[ 13 
12| 5 
19; 6 


130 Winona 


17j 28 

8 18 

25: 5S 


6 3 


131 Wolfe Island 

132 Wroxeter 


4 ;;.... 
1 121 


7 3 

12 3 








1 


1 Totals, 1915 

2 Totals, 1914 


2,80c 
2,474 


1 3,997! 6,80C 
\\ 3,595 6,06c 


I 4,274 
I 3,812 


5,02C 
! 4,34£ 


i 1,767 
1,704 


13 
2C 


4.01S 

3,662 


2,781 
2,407 


1,003 
952 


3 Increases 


32f 


) 402 731 


.1 462 


J 67? 


63 


"l 


357 


j 374 


51 


4 Decreases 








{ 


. . |. . 






5 Percentages 


41.2; 


I 58.771 


62.8? 


> 73.82 


V 25.98 


.1£ 


1 59.1C 


) 40.89 

j 






1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



209 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils from Families whose Head is occupied 
as below— 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 





£ 


° 
52 




55 


to 

g 


co 

g 


8 

1 

Pi 

1 


u 

B 

1 



J. 8 

O 4> 

p<^ 

aw 


g 

CD 


& 



CO 

a 




u 
S 

CO 


4> 
O 
i-i 
<V 

B 
B 

o 
O 


r— 1 

o 

«3 




| 

o 


1 


11 


Id 

8 

2 

4> 

o 


1 
S 




3 




3 

Hi 
3 


1 


w 

CO 

m 


S 

5 


105 4 


13 
30 






9 

7 


3 
12 






22 
53 


29 
72 


29 
72 


29 
72 


21 
44 


7 


106 18 


1 


i 


3 




19 


107 1 


26 
33 






3 
7 






. 


25 
57 


30 
67 


30 
67 


30 
67 


23 
47 


5 


108 10 


5 




2 


8 


2 


11 


109 .. 






1 


11 


i 

1 


7 



1 


"4 

2 


19 
31 
56 


19 
43 
65 


19 
43 
65 


19 
43 
65 


19 
30 
65 




110 4 


31 

36 


3 
5 


I? 


111 13 


1 


6 


9 


112 8 


44 


9 




12 


6 




1 


46 


80 


80 


80 


51 


34 


113 8 


19 


4 




11 





3 




39 


45 


45 


39 


39 


11 


114 4 


36 


1 




12 


6 




12 


36 


71 


71 


71 


50 


35 


115 8 


18 


3 




12 


2 


14 




36 


53 


53 


53 


40 


17 


116 13 


28 


1 




7 


5 


9 




52 


63 


63 


63 


35 


11 


117 4 


33 


7 




12 




3 


5 


64 


64 


64 


64 


44 


13 


118 2 


44 


2 




1 


2 


1 




40 


52 


52 


52 


38 


19 


119 9 


17 


2 




3 


1 


4 


1 


♦ 30 


37 


37 


37 


37 


7 


120 5 


38 


5 


2 


3 


7 


6 


2 


41 


68 


68 


68 


51 


18 


121 12 


33 


6 


3 


5 


3 


5 


1 


57 


68 


68 


68 


37 


11 


122 18 


33 


7 


1 


29 


25 


15 


9 


91 


137 


91 


137 


77 


3L, 


123 2 


65 
3 

24 
26 


6 

1 


.... 




2 






56 
18 
32 
43 


75 
18 
32 
41 


75 
18 
32 
43 


75 
18 
32 
43 


75 

18 
19 

28 


27 


124 4 






10 
3 
3 


.... 




125 5 










126 7 


i 




2 


3 




127 11 


20 


2 




2 


1 


2 


3 


30 


40 


40 


41 


20 


11 


128 4 


21 

20 








6 
3 


8 
12 




39 
38 


39 
53 


39 
53 


39 
53 


39 
53 


7 


129 9 


2 




7 


53 


130 2 


20 




1 


1 


2 




2 


28 


28 


28 


28 


28 




131 2 


5 
25 






8 
9 


"*4 


3 
10 


i 


14 
47 


18 
59 


18 
59 


18 
59 


18 

59 


4 


132 10 






12 










1 866 


3,392 


278 


29 


889 


603 


566 


177 


5,077 


6,634 


6,588 


6,457 


5,296|l,747 


2 803 


2,955 


280 


29 


791 


520 


529 


162 


4,435 


5,955 


5,968 


5,711 


4,8471,707 


3 63 


437 






98 


83 


37 


15 


642 


679 


620 


746 


449 


40 


4 ... 


2 




























12.73 


49.88 




.43 


13.07 


8.86 


?8.32 


2.60 


74.66 


97.55 


96.88 


94.95 


77.8825.69 



i ! 



210 



THE KEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number of Pupils in 


the Various Subjects 


—Concluded 


Continuation Schools— Con. 


| 

o 


bo 

J 


Is 

■si 

|l 


2 
1 
3 


b 

1 

o 


1 


a 

U 


.3 


105 Springfield 


22 
53 
25 
55 
19 
31 
56 
46 
39 
36 
36 
52 
64 
40 
30 
50 
57 
137 
56 
18 
32 
43 
30 
25 
38 
28 
14 
47 


22 
53 
30 
55 
19 
31 
56 
46 
39 
36 
36 
52 
51 
40 
30 
50 
31 
91 
56 
18 
32 
43 
30 
39 
38 
28 
14 
47 


22 
55 
25 
55 
19 
31 
56 
46 
39 
36 
36 
52 
51 
40 
30 
50 
57 
106 
56 
18 
32 
43 
30 
32 
38 
28 
14 
47 


• 

29 
72 
30 
67 
19 
43 
65 
80 
45 
71 
53 
63 
64 
52 
37 
68 
68 
122 
75 
18 
32 
43 
40 
39 
53 
28 
18 
59 


21 
44 
23 
47 
19 
13 
36 
51 
32 
71 
40 
35 
44 
38 
20 
51 
37 
77 
56 
10 
19 
28 
19 
28 
39 
13 
14 
38 


26 

50 
13 
59 
5 
38 
61 
20 

""io 

40 
3 
58 
49 
17 
43 
59 
38 
66 
17 
8 
24 
30 
33 
37 
28 
14 
48 






...... 



"ii 


28 


106 Stayner 


54 


107 Stella 


12 


108 Stouffville 


61 


109 Sturgeon Falls 


17 


110 Sutton 


39 


Ill Tamworth ' 


63 


112 Tara 


47 


113 Tavistock 


40 


114 Teeswater ' 


64 


115 Thamesville ' 


44 


116 Thessalon 


25 


117 Thornbury ' 


64 


118 Thorndale 


49 


119 Tilbury 


16 


120 Tottenham 


52 


121 Tweed 


61 


122 Wallaceburg 


104 


123 Warkworth 


69 


124 Webbwood 


17 


125 West Lome 


13 


126 Westmeath 


30 


127 Westport 


39 


128 Westport (R.C.S.S.) 

129 Wheatley 


33 
49 


130 Winona 


27 


131 Wolfe Island 


18 


132 Wroxeter 


50 








5,072! 

4,537) 


5,139 
4,612 


5,077 
4,438 


6,639 
5,922 


4,581 
3,935 


4,420 
3,846 


160 
177 


5,323 


2 Totals, 1914 


4,733 






3 Increases 


535 1 


527 


639 


717 


646 


574 


"ii 


590 


4 Decreases 




















5 Percentages 


74.58 


75.57 


74.66 


97.63 


67.36 


65. 


2.35 


78.27 







1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION, 



211 



SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Concluded 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects— Concluded 


Special Courses 


o 

'o 

o 


I 

o 

pq 


* 

co 

'§ 

O 


CO 

.2 
"co 

1 


bo 
1 


I 

A 
CD 

o 

W 


1 

1 


J 

I 
1 


-fa 
3 


53 ^ 


3 

3 

u 

o 
O 


1 

.2 

1 


1 

% 
a 

H 


105 22 

106 53 

107 25 

108 67 

109 19 

110 31 


22 
53 
25 


21 
44 

92 


29 24 








22 


29 
72 








72 

30 
67 
19 
31 
65 
80 
45 
71 


72 
25 
57 
19 
31 
56 
46 
39 
afi 


18 
7 






53 












25 
57 
19 
31 
56 
46 
39 











67 1 47 
19| 12 
31 1 30 
56| 36 
46 51 






6? 
19 
43 
64 
































111 56 














112 46 








80 
45 
71 
53 
63 
64 
52 
35 
68 
68 
137 
75 
18 
20 
43 
41 
39 


\\\\\ 






113 39 


39 
36 
36 


11 

50 
in 














114 36 








36 
36 
52 




' 


115 36 


531 36 
63j 52 
64 51 
K2i 40 












116 52 


K2l 25 


8 










1 


117 51 Kll 44 







51 

40 
30 
50 
57 
91 
62 
18 
32 
43 
30 
25 
40 
28 
14 
47 






118 40 


40' 38 












119 30 


30 20! R7' an 














120 50 


50! 68 
57! 37 
91 77 


681 50 

681 57 

122| 122 

75 56 


50 










4 


121 57 












122 91 


60 

56 

4 

20 


15 


15 


... . 






123 56 


56 
18 
32 
43 
an 


55 
10 
19 
28 
20 








124 18 


18 
32 
43 


18 
32 
43 













125 32 












126 43 













127 30 


41 ! an 














128 25 1 25 


28' 39 


39 
38 
28 


25 










129 38 38 


49 


53 
28 
18 
59 






53 
28 
12 
59 








130 28 28 i 28 














131 14. 14! 14 


14 
47 


8 












132 47 


47| 26 










5 
















1 5,042 

2 4,374 


5,042 4,186 
4,392! 3,923 


6,461 
5,777 


4,739 1,371 
4,260 935 


32 
49 


34 

42 


5,066 
4,385 


6,258 
4,327 


17 
26 


175 
167 


65 
61 


3 668 


650 J 263 
I 


684 


479 436 






381 


1,931 


....... 


8 


4 


4 


17 


8 




















5 74.14 


74.14 61.55 


95.01 


69.69 20.16 


.47 


.5 

i 
i 


74.5 


92.02 


.25 


2.57 


.95 



212 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— MISCELLANEOUS 



Continuation Schools 



1 Acton 

2 Agincourt 

3 Alvinston 

4 Arkona 

5 Ayr 

6 Bancroft 

7 Bath : 

8 Beaverton 

9 Beeton 

10 Belmont 

11 Blenheim 

12 Blind River 

13 Blyth 

14 Bothwell 

15 Bowesville 

16 Bracebridge 

17 Bridgeburg 

18 Bruce Mines 

19 Brussels 

20 Burks Falls 

21 Burlington 

22 CanniDgton 

23 Cardinal 

24 Carp 

25 Chapleau 

26 Claremont 

27 Clifford 

28 Coldwater 

29 Comber 

30 Cookstown 

31 Creemore 

32 Delhi 

33 Drayton 

34 Dresden 

35 Drumbo 

36 Dryden 

37 Eganville 

38 Eganville (R.C.S. S.) 

39 Elmira 

40 Elmvale 

41 Ennismore 

42 Erin 

43 Exeter 

44 Fenelon Falls 

45 Feversham 

46 Finch 

47 Fingal 

48 Fitzroy Harbour .... 

49 Fort Frances 

50 Frankford 

51 Gore Bay 

52 Grand Valley 



aw 

OH 



g-S 

SCO 

a 

■gfi 

m 



CO 



B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
C 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
F 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
F 
B 
B 
B 
B 
F 
F 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
F 
B 
S 
B 
B 
F 

BS 
B 
S 
B 
F 
B 
B 
B 
S 
F 
B 






•am 

r— I HI 

a>CO 
13 ® 

O A 
o <x> 

■gCQ 

CO 



Value of General 



261 
117 
252 
156 
161 

56 
160 
178 
226 
228 
436 
121 
152 
214 
176 
437 
212 
241 
319 
281 
178 
186 
211 
176 

69 
283 
219 
212 
160 
177 
163 

96 
402 
234 
•152 

83 
193 
416 
103 
149 
233 
141 
492 
211 
116 
306 
148 
163 
236 
170 
132 
226 



♦a 

as 

CO 



$ 

195 

85 

371 



« a 

£ p. 
ocO 



$ 

4 

30 
19 



146 11 
306 I 25 
105 |..., 
192 
270 
372 
441 
508 
161 
191 
174 
157 
617 
244 
376 
250 
349 
236 
285 
255 
220 
215 
309 
272 
346 
246 
343 
150 
77 
498 
351 
200 
111 
193 
301 
264 
457 
228 
345 
531 
297 
131 
335 
203 
198 
292 
266 
419 
351 



34 
L3 
12 



12 

6 

7 

36 

"6* 
6 

12 
25 
15 
12 



19 

10 

5 

19 

si' 

8 
11 



37 
50 ' 



14 

15* 

14 



p. 

^ ta 
%-% 

Jo 
o 



22 
71 
91 
25 
40 
36 
31 
54 
40 
43 
91 



86 
30 
30 
78 
22 
46 
80 
68 
96 
20 
63 
27 
12 
61 

117 
32 
63 
48 
7 
43 

108 
13 
54 
30 
39 
65 
25 
30 
49 
33 
85 
38 
18 
31 
54 
24 
61 
43 
64 
65 



s 

Eh 



35 
10 
35 

25 

17 

8 

24 
29 
35 
22 
52 
19 
34 
10 
16 
102 
13 
24 
35 
72 
32 
49 
37 
18 
14 
31 
57 
27 
30 
43 
10 
22 
52 
32 
27 
33 
22 
58 
29 
25 
34 
17 
85 
27 
10 
58 
30 
10 
34 
36 
10 
31 



100 



a 50 



240 



100 



3500 



P. 



"S&qo 



a 






22 ! 



1,240 
3 



500 



16 



2^ 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



213 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
INFORMATION 



Equipment 


Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


CO 
03 

u 

«. d 

O 


■8-a 

Is 

p-i d d 
a * S 

■go a 

Eh 


A 

■"is 

to o 1 ^ 
-d c3^ 


03 
-S 

+=> 

60 
S 

"oo 

d 

CO O) 

la 

-acq 

QQ 


xi 

5 3.3 

tc «g 2 

f — i to d 


03 


i 

CO fl CO 

•SJ1.S 


03 
o 
u 

03 

B 

B 

o 
O 


2 

a 

o 

etc 
«3 


u 
o 

0) 

a * 

sZ 

$ 


60 

d 
o 

03 

H 


CO 

03 

I 

H 

03 
,d 


CO 


.2 
'■** 
03 
Pi 

d 




h 

03 
O 


d 
.2 co 

P 

.d « 




d 


"•£ 

c3 
Pi 

d 

§ 



•*» 
d 



$ 

1 9 
2 


$ 

526 
313 
768 
363 
549 
205 
407 
671 
673 
773 

1,100 
313 
463 
428 
379 

1,262 

1,743 
696 
736 
806 
542 
546 
592 
453 
341 
719 
709 
617 
519 
617 
338 
242 
1079 
640 
458 
276 
447 

5,157 
429 
672 
556 
536 

1,293 
610 
293 
780 
451 
395 
637 
515 
640 
708 


"Y 


1 

1 






1.1 
1 1 


2 
3 


1 

1 
1 
9 


1 


3 


2 


1 

1 

9 

1 

"9* 


3 




3 .... 







2 


6 


*2 # 

4 


4 




4 .... 


i 










5 .... 












3 
1 
1 
4 
3 


4 


6 .... 


*"T 


1 








2 
1 
3 
2 
....„ 

1 
3 


3 

7 
3 
5 

1 
4 


"i" 

2 


1 
1 
2 

4 
4 
3 
1 

1 
3 


1 


7 .... 




1 


5 


8 18 






"3* 


8 




9 .... 


l 

i 








1 
1 

1 




10 5 


1 
1 
1 
1 




1 




11 .... 

12 .... 






3 


9 
2 


5 

"3' 
2 
3 
2 

8 
1 
3 
2 


2 

a 


13 .... 




1 






14 .... 










1 


15 .... 














4 
1 








3 


16 28 














3 

1 
1 




12 
2 
3 

11 
4 


"4' 
"2 


15 
1 
5 
2 
6 
2 
6 
2 
7 




17 .... 


i 
l 
i 
i 
i 


1 






1 




1 


18 .... 


1 
1 







19 45 


1 
1 








3 


20 .... 








1 


21 .... 








2 

1 
2 
6 


1 
2 
1 
3 




22 .... 


1 








3 
5 


4 
3 
2 


.... 




23 20 


.... 
.... 


1 




"2 


3 


24 .... 


i 








25 6 


1 








2 


a 


26 18 






4 
2 


1 
1 


1 


"1 


2 

"6* 
3 
6 


1 
3 
2 
1 
2 
5 




27 26 


i 










1 


3 


28 .... 


1 




1 






29 20 




2 
4 


1 
4 
2 




2 


— 
.... 




30 .... 


""i 

l 


1 
1 








5 


31 8 










2 


32 4 


.... 


1 








1 

1 






33 .... 


1 




1 


10 
6 


1 


7 

1 


3 

1 


4 
10 


4 


34 .... 






1 


35 20 


l 


1 
1 

1 




1 






a 


36 .... 




1 
2 
2 


1 








2 
5 
2 
3 

"'3' 

9 

8 


1 

12 

2 

1 



1 
2 


1 


37 .... 


1 

1 

.... 

1 


.... 
.... 










38 26 


1 


1 


4 


"2' 

6 
.... 


? 


39 .... 










40 .... 

41 12 




1 




2 
1 


9 

5 

3 

17 


2 

T 


1 
5 
1 
5 
3 


"?' 


42 .... 










43 .... 

44 .... 


""i" 
l 
l 


1 




.... 


1 


9 
1 


4 


45 18 


1 




1 
6 

1 
3 

1 






1 
1 

"3' 

3 


1 
2 

1 




46 .... 


1 






.._.. 


1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
6 


2 


?, 


47 .... 










1 


48 .... 


1 
1 












49 .... 






2 


i 


50 .... 








51 .... 




1 
1 




1 








.... 


5 
4 


■-j 




52 21 




2 


5 


2 


1 



214 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— MISCELLANEOUS 





o o> 

n 

|a 

CD r— 1 

i! 

cq 


■a* 

co a 
a> 3 
f-> o 
o 8 

< s? 

55 


=3 O 

P( 

O CD 


Value of General 


Continuation 

Schools 
— Continued 


1 


CO 

O cd 
« S* 

• 1— 1 CO 

"S ft 
a ft 

w 


CO 

a 

* b 

o.S 

■a 8 

CQ 


CO CO 




to 

'■d 


H 

< 


e 

s 

Eh 


1 
Pi 

■g'3 

a 3 

B *» 

■sj 

a. — 1 p 

3 O CD 

S-S 8 


1 +j 

eg p CD 

3 ® S3 

a s£ 
>» ft^ 

tt*3<§ 
*S ^ 
,2W * 
a .2 

CD t-t CO 

.&a£ 
p p ^ 


B 

CD 
CO 




3 CD 


53 Hanover 


B 
B 
C 
B 
B 
B 
B 
C 
B 
F 
B 
S 
B 
F 
B 
C 
F 
F 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
F 
C 
C 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
F 
B 
B 
B 
F 
F 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 


3 

"i 

2 
U 
11 

1 
2 
1 

i 
a 

2 

2 

2 

4 

IS 

1 

4 

1 
1 

10 
1 
1 

2| 
2 
H 
2k 
2 

"Y 

1 

"3* 

IS 
3 

11 
1 

4 
5 

£ 

2J 

3 

2 

2 

3 

1 

21 

21 

3 

7 

1 

5 




$ 

361 

140 

188 

225 

325 

221 

114 

160 

206 

159 

144 

352 

99 
122 
334 
100 
108 
140 
154 
192 
192 
308 
230 
864 
360 
315 
288 
334 
221 
211 
324 
222 
191 
158 

25 
215 
317 
117 
200 
287 
122 
256 

96 
136 
131 
259 
202 
179 
174 
139 
286 
152 


$ 

345 

171 

265 

260 

542 

175 

175 

146 

393 

289 

350 

323 

155 

116 

350 

125 

116 

190 

137 

195 

185 

258 

198 

330 

384 

277 

364 

351 

200 

170 

204 

311 

242 

198 

437 

312 

238 

351 

296 

428 

199 

159 

165 

174 

254 

227 

245 

204 

216 

130 

369 

236 


$ 
35 

"27 

"28 
6 

15 
11 

18 
10 

"8 
14 

"9 

'*8 
14 

"23 

"43 

50 

6 

18 

50 

"io 

"'9 

"si 

7 
12 

5 

"23 
12 

'"6 
"30 

"is 

5 


$ 

48 
17 
30 
45 
68 
31 
35 
37 
69 
38 
36 
55 
26 
52 
34 
17 
33 
39 
25 
31 
53 
28 
49 
71 
60 
37 
65 
81 
55 
29 
78 
69 
25 
21 
60 
37 
48 
25 
38 
72 
24 
9 
25 
16 
55 
23 
22 
63 
41 
38 
62 
35 


$ 

40 
17 
35 
39 
58 
24 
22 
25 
35 
13 
27 
41 
25 
49 
26 
4 
14 
10 
17 
23 
35 
23 
23 
50 
34 
35 
48 
37 
23 
27 
29 
39 
30 
14 
26 
57 
50 
27 
33 
39 
18 
20 
10 
22 
28 
18 
23 
34 
28 
21 
37 
31 


$| $ 


$ 
22 


$ 


$ 


54 Harrow 






55 Havelock 










56 Highgate 










57 Huntsville 


1 








58 Jarvis 










59 Jockvale 








? 


60 Kars 










61 Keewatin 








3 


62 Kenmore 








63 Lakefield 








...1.... 


64 Lanark 








. . . 1. . . . 


65 Lansdowne 








1 


66 Little Current .... 








| 


67 Lucknow 








| 


68 Malakoff 










69 Manitowaning 

70 Manotick 




















71 Maxville 












72 Melbourne 












73 Merlin 






17 






74 Merrickville 








75 Metcalfe 












76 Millbrook. . 












77 Milton 












78 Mount Albert 












79 New Hamburg .... 

80 New Liskeard . . 






















81 North Augusta.... 

82 North Gower 






















83 Norwich 






5 


... 


?, 


84 Odessa 








85 Oil Springs 

86 Orono . . 






















87 Paislev 












88 Pakenham . . . . 






















90 Plattsville 












91 Port Burwell 

92 Port Colborne 
















40 














94 Princeton 

95 Richard's Landing. 


























3 






97 Ridgeway 

98 Ripley . 


















99 Rodney 






6 






100 Russell 1 










101 St. George 

102 Schomberg 

103 Southampton 

104 Spencerville 






















60 













1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



215 



SCHOOLS— Continued 
INFORMATION— Continued 



Equipment 


Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


I 


ft 

o o 1 

r-l P 


3 

&C_. S 

"2.2 S 

CO o^ 
o£ £ 

s p 3 

co 


be 
cor-i; 

o 
CO 


1- 

rt <* 3 

§si 

CO 


CO 


CO > 

o f3 

co 


+3 



B a 

o « 

d'o 

IS 
o 


<u 

o 
O 


2 
3 

4 


o 

St 

so 

- 0) 

3- 



<X> 

H 


CO 

g 
J 

EH 


CO 

I 

S 
1 

1 s 




O CO 

c3 O 

0J0 

O 
•43 CO 

63 





O 
"■£» 

eS 






O 


$ 
53 28 
54.... 


$ 

87S 
345 
57C 
56S 
1,041 
457 
363 
379 
734 
509 
558 
784 
319 
348 
750 
246 
285 
394 
361 
463 
487 
640 
516 
862 
888 
670 
783 
853 
499 
437 
660 
641 
497 
391 
629 
628 
680 
520 
572 
866 
373 
467 
308 
351 
468 
527 
504 
484 
489 
331 
844 
459 




... 

1 


1 

1 
1 




1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

.1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1] 


1 

1 




1 


i 




5 


3 
] 
1 

"*2 


! . 

1 
3 
] 
1 
3 


3 
1 
7 
3 

"5 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
6 
5 
3 
4 


3 
3 


55 25 




1 

3 


i 

4 


3 


1 
2 
E 

2 

4 




56.... 








57 20 


1 
1 








3 


58.... 


1 
1 






3 

5 
4 


"2" 




59.... 


1 






60.... 






i 
l 

"i 

"i 

"i 

i 


1 
1 
1 

1 






1 
7 




61 10 






1 




3 

2 

7 


1 


1 


62.... 










q 


63 1 

64 5 


.... 


1 


1 


1 
6 
2 
1 
4 
1 




..... 


2 
3 
3 
1 
2 


1 
3 


65.... 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




1 








66 9 




2 
3 


. . . . 


1 
7 
3 
3 


""2 




67 6 








68.... 








69 5 








.... 


1 


1 
4 
4 
1 
3 
3 
4 
4 
8 
1 
2 




70 15 






» 


2 




?, 


71 20 


1 


.... 


2 




2 

5 
1 
3 
2 


.... 


1 
4 


2 


72 8 


7 
4 






73 5 


1 








74.... 


1 
1 
1 




* 1 


1 


'"i 
2 


2 
3 
1 

1 
2 


4 


75 16 


2 


.... 


7 


76 4 






4 
1 
3 
1 
5 


2 


77.... 






5 
3 
1 








78.... 
79.... 


"i 


1 




"i 


1 
1 


1 
1 


1 
3 
4 
3 
1 



.... 


80.... 


1 




1 


1 
1 


a 


81.... 


.... 


1 


1 
1 
1 


.... 




82.... 


l 
l 
l 

i 

i 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




1 
4 
2 
2 


7 


83 8 






1 




3 
3 

4 
3 

1 
3 

8 




84.... 








2 

10 
5 
3 
6 
4 
3 
1 


1 
1 

"i 

"2 


4 


85.... 






2 

1 

4 


1 
3 
6 
4 
3 
2 
3 
2 


.... 


i 


86.... 








87.... 
88 . . . . 


1 


.... 


4 
8 
2 
> 4 
1 
5 
3 
1 


"i 


89 15 


l 
l 

l 
l 
l 

l 

l 
l 

i 

l 
l 


1 








3 




90.... 






1 


91 ... . 


1 
1 
1 




1 


.... 


2 
3 






1 


92.... 






2 


93 10 








1 
4 
1 
1 
5 
6 
4 






1 


94.... 






1 


3 


.... 


.... 


3 


1 


95.... 












96.... 


1 
1 
1 










3 
1 
3 


"i 
2 

2 


4 


1 
7 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 
8 
1 






97.... 






1 
1 


1 
9 
2 




98.... 




1 


3 


99.... 


1 


i 


2 


100 4 


1 

1 
1 
1 






1 
9 
2 

1 
2J 


101 ... . 






1 


.... 


1 


1 


1 

Q 


1 
9 


102 3 


1 




103 15 






.... 


3 


""\ 


1 


104.... 




...J 




1 


4 



216 



THE BEPORT OP THE 



No. 17 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— i MISCELLANEOUS 





B. 

+3 CO 

gg 

aw 

ll 

1 




T3 
^ U 

<=> 5 
Sec 

I— < TO 

O Pi 
O 4) 

.gGQ 


Value of General 


Continuation Schools- 
Concluded 


b 

u 

3 


CO 

1 

O o3 
SI 

02 


co 

8.1 

"Si 

£ ft 
O02 

PQ 


73 

9 

to 

S QQ 

r 


CO 




CO 

u 

<o 

•*> 

I 


-A 

M 

CO 03 

ill 




Ml 
22,-3 

-*3 1—1 

A m ce 

1 2;fl 
S el "» ! 9 

ft 9 >» 3 
5. codn g 


3 

la 


105 Springfield 


B | 2 
B 1 1 
F i 3 
B 2 

5 ! l 
B ! 1 

b | u 

B 1 1 
B ! 1 

5 « 

b n 

B 2J 

5 * 

B 1| 
B 1 
B 3£ 
B ! 2 

1 * 
B 2 

b ; p 5 

B 1 

B ! 1 
B i 2 

C -:-- 




390 
171 

65 
172 
205 
157 
258 
183 
215 
192 
322 
285 
129 
265 
207 
274 
260 
344 
201 
134 
211 
146 
249 
197 
216 
140 

66 
450 


$ 

645 
369 
237 
253 
280 
158 
234 
267 
278 
271 
253 
297 
329 
302 
300 
345 
328 
250 
286 
224 
197 
169 
233 
201 
302 
197 
89 
325 


$ 

116 
6 

"ii 

"*9 
...... 

7 

17 
28 
17 

3 

"io 

...„ 

15 
39 


*56 
39 

2 
57 
41 
43 
33 
49 
47 
31 
14 
73 
67 
82 
26 
32 

3 

44 
41 
21 
40 
37 
36 
37 
16 
21 


$ 

47 

28 

8 

39 
39 
26 
28 
38 


$ 


$ 


$ 1$ 


$ 


106 Stayner 








107 Stella 








108 Stouffville 






!••■••• 


109 Sturgeon Falls 








110 Sutton 








Ill Tamworth 








112 Tara 






I 


113 Tavistock 








114 Teeswater 


17 
50 
26 
30 
36 
21 






. 


115 Thamesville 


1 






116 Thessalon 








117 Thornbury 






9! . . 


118 Thorndale 








119 Tilbury 


"■ 




5;.. 3 


120 Tottenham 


57 
24 
59 
50 








121 Tweed 








122 Wallaceburg 

123 Warkworth 


200 








124 Webbwood 


25 
29 
18 
25 
26 
29 
14 






1 


125 West Lome 






{ 


126 Westmeath 








127 Westport 






\"'"" 


128 Westport (R.C.S.S.) 

129 Wheatley 






1 ' 






"i 


130 Winona 


B 

F 
B 


2| 
3 






7 




131 Wolfe Island 








132 Wroxeter 


33 


52 


53 






11 












1 Totals, 1915 






125 
125 


27,779 
27,098 


35,184 
32,439 


1,483 
991 


5,722 
5,647 


4,002!700 
3,845|760 


3,500 
3,500 


1,911 
640 


13 


2 Totals, 1914 






12 11 










3 Increases 








681 


2,745 


492 


75 


157 






1,271 


..' 2 


4 Decreases 








60 






12 ... . 























5 Percentages 






94.7 


34.31 


43.45 


1.83 


7.06 


4.94 86 


4.32 


2.36 


.. 01 

















1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



217 



SCHOOLS— Concluded 
INFORMATION— Concluded 



Equipment Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


CO 
£> 
H 

o 


Total value of 
General Equip- 
ment 

Schools using 
authorized Scrip- 
ture Readings 


4) 

.5 
'53 
E3 

CO <u 

la 


Schools in which 
Passages are 
Memorized 




J* 

°£ i 


-*3 

§ 

is 


4> 

a 

o 
O 


Agriculture 

Law, Medicine or 
the Church 


J ; 

0> 

En 


co 
t 

s 

H 
xi 


CO 

g 

TO 

1 

O 


H 

•Sec 

s-s 
is 

O 


| 

e3 

Pi 

O 
O 

O 


$ 

105 7 


$ 1 
1,261 














1 
2 
3 
3 






3 


#,, *4 


2 

1 

1 

...... 

2 
1 
4 
2 
5 
1 
1 
7 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
1 

"5 

6 


2 


106 


613 
312 
521 
565 
398 
553 
546 
540 
514 
646 
698 
592 
712 
580 
718 
' 645 
912 
598 
404 
484 
385 
582 












2 


1 


6 
2 




107 






1 


108 ... . 










4 
3 


3 


109 


1 
1 






1 








1 
2 
3 
4 
2 


.... 




no 










3 


111 






2 
2 


2 

5 
1 

4 
. 5 

1 


1 


.... 


2 
4 
4 
5 
3 
2 
7 
1 
2 

" v 8 

6 
2 
1 
5 
1 
3 
2 
7 
3 
1 
1 




112 


"i 












113.. 




. 




114 










2 


5 


115 









2 
6 
2 

4 


.... 

2 

1 




116.... 


1 

"i 












5 


117.... 








3 


118 10 

119 15 




1 


1 
2 
1 


4 
2 
2 
2 

4 


1 
1 
3 

"*2 




120 10 


1 




5 
2 
5 
2 


2 
1 
1 




121 30 










2 
12 




122 15 








123 10 


1 

"i 










4 


124 ... . 


t 1 








3 


125 ... . 












2 
3 

1 










126 


1 




2 

1 





2 
3 

4 
2 


.... 


7 


127 ... . 




"i 


3 


128 4 465 


1 






129.... 570 






1 
3 
3 
5 


.... 


4 
1 
1 
2 




130 15 394 


1 
1 


1 






1 


4 


2 


131 15 170 


.... 


1 
5 


.... 




132 924 








" 


2 


3 
















1 667 

2 514 


80,961 
75,457 


54 
45 


82 
86 


l 
l 


132 
131 


30 
31 


20 
14 


152 
113 


304 
237 


44 
29 


315 
271 


82 
59 


340 
193 


308 
306 


178 
182 


3 153 


5,504 


9 








"i 


6 


39 


67 


15 


44 


23 


147 


2 




4 


4 




4 






























5 .82 




40.90 


62.12 


.76 


100. 


22.73 


15.15 


8.82 


17.64 


2.55 


18.28 


4.76 


19.73 


17.87 


10.33 



218 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FIN- 







V 


Re- 


Collegiate Institutes 


Legislative 
Grants 


Municipal 
Grants (county) 


Municipal 
Grants (local) 


1 Barrie 


$ c. 
1,103 93 
2,656 29 
4,574 48 
2,433 26 
1,703 50 
1,062 13 
1,205 62 
2,916 46 
3,353 95 
3,440 28 
1,430 29 
2,429 71 
1,984 56 
1,215 02 
1,491 84 
1,949 52 
2,001 64 
1,617 90 
1,718 53 
1,319 02 
2,039 86 
1,162 84 
* 3,752 75 
2,402 24 
1,558 24 
1,882 86 
1,992 21 
3,947 72 
1,447 51 

766 44 
1,190 76 
1,052 32 
1,389 10 
1,279 50 

953 60 
3,028 38 
2,893 32 

874 07 
1,538 08 
1,323 90 
1,459 40 
1,208 00 
1,157 30 
1,147 00 
1,253 64 

829 86 
1,310 50 
4,041 09 


$ c. 
2,727 22 
6,783 42 
2,882 32 
3,904 45 
4,562 40 
4,396 88 
3,675 19 
3,331 01 


$ c. 
6,859 96 


2 Kitchener (Berlin) 


14,233 88 


3 Brantford 


19,400 00 


4 Brockville 


11,000 00 


5 Chatham 


14,336 21 


6 Clinton 


2,300 00 


7 Cobourg 


5,950 00 


8 Collingwood 


10,667 00 


9 Fort William 


16,937 03 


10 Gait 


10,868 63 
3,449 12 


10,900 00 


11 Goderich 


2,000 00 


12 Guelph 


14,847 57 


13 Hamilton 




55,214 80 


14 Ingersoll 


2,077 32 

"o\698'5i" 
5,814 72 
3,851 51 
5,247 00 
1,809 79 


5,162 57 


15 Kingston 


33,708 95 


16 Lindsay 


10,809 47 


17 London 


84,157 54 


18 Morrisburg 


3,174 49 


19 Napanee 


4,853 00 


20 Niagara Falls 


18,458 00 


21 North Bay 


23,947 14 




2,381 26 


5,500 00 


23 Ottawa 


67,147 16 


24 Owen Sound 


5,752 11 
3,990 18 


12,520 00 


25 Perth 


5,879 78 




23,200 00 


27 Picton 


7,277 70 


6,000 00 




17,500 00 


29 Renfrew 


3,521 97 
1,859 71 
3,563 38 
2,729 15 
4,933 25 
2,228 28 
4,605 05 
1,292 74 
5,304 06 
2,246 35 


7,500 00 




3,900 00 


31 St. Catharines 


13,068 30 




7,415 00 


33 St. Thomas 


18,500 00 




12,319 10 


35 Seaforth 


2,150 70 


36 Smith's Falls 


11,566 38 


37 Stratford 


21,163 81 


38 Strathroy 


5,200 00 


39 Toronto, Harbord % . . 


18,817 99 






42,086 58 


41 Toronto, Jarvis 




43,989 13 






33,488 95 


43 Toronto, Oakwood 




46,170 77 






41,362 25 


45 Toronto, Riverdale 




45,171 86 




4,785 31 
5,272 01 
6,270 40 


3,000 00 


47 Windsor 


• 120,941 75 




11,000 00 








90,490 42 


140,092 40 


1,015,477 12 






1 Alexandria 


733 05 
538 58 
681 58 
668 19 

830 82 


733 05 
1,328 96 
1,339 18 
1,441 20 
2,467 93 


5,221 15 




1,500 00 


3 Almonte 


3,077 70 


4 Amherstburg 


2,019 02 


5 Arnprior 


5,496 91 







1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION" 



219 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
ANCIAL STATEMENT 



ceipts 








Expenditure 




School Fees 


Balances and 
other sources 


Total 
Receipts 


Teachers' 

Salaries 


Buildings, 
Sites and all 

permanent 
improvements 


Repairs to 

school acco - 

modation 


1 
2 
3 
4 


$ c. 
2,316 25 
3,267 90 
5,476 10 

788 00 
2,165 55 
1,401 50 

781 50 

644 00 


$ c. 
2,884 43 
2,573 42 
1,473 51 
1,981 50 

317 50 
2,319 80 
4,852 55 
2,510 69 
69 05 
3,134 68 
4,280 62 

995 27 

949 00 
2,572 70 

850 32 
1,774 73 
5,887 86 
4,909 60 
6,317 78 
3,820 16 
1,138 79 
2,846 50 

947 32 

557 94 
4,787 01 

484 63 
11,154 38 

824 09 
2,743 61 

378 74 

241 75 

584 51 
1,930 55 
1,309 39 
3,044 61 

152 00 
1,159 00 

375 49 

47,042 22 

11,668 97 

136,758 15 

3,174 84 

13,054 50 

58,575 00 

8,615 34 

5,016 68 

3,645 74 

662 30 


$ c. 
15,891 79 
29,514,91 
33,806 41 
20,107 21 
23,085 16 
11,480 31 
16,464 86 
20,069 16 
20,360 03 
32,254 04 
12,861 38 
22,786 05 
67,889 36 
12,013 11 
41,412 31 
24,249 98 

103,320 76 
13,553 50 
18,136 31 
25,406 97 
27,125 79 
14,610 44 
87,522 48 
23,593 29 
17,099 21 
27,874 24 
26,424 29 
22,271 81 
15,345 59 
7,819 24 
19,679 44 
13,511 98 
27,763 90 
17,136 27 
12,074 36 
16,777 70 
33,566 19 
10,067 91 
73,569 29 
58,812 45 

187,058 68 
39,262 79 
64,731 57 

105,314 25 
58,067 84 
13,641 85 

131,250 40 
23,901 29 


$ c. 

9,468 25 
17,355 00 
23,138 77 
13,341 24 
17,532 17 

7,530 00 

9,518 00 
13,350 00 
15,767 00 
21,149 29 

9,576 00 
16,535 02 
46,920 00 

8,510 00 
21,280 00 
17,866 88 
46,744 50 

8,482 32 
10,293 75 
13,315 00 
10,100 00 
10,750 00 
61,156 25 
18,800 00 

9,092 50 
21,343 87 
10,287 70 
13,190 00 
12,023 00 

6,190 00 
16,347 08 

9,350 00 
22,360 37 
12,322 56 

6,815 00 
11,936 50 
21,734 55 

6,240 00 
41,456 50 
31,576 50 
32,487 00 
17,553 22 
33,822 75 
34,086 09 
30,542 54 

7,002 50 
21,729 25 
16,015 00 


$ c. 
408 60 
334 52 
743 40 
54 00 


$ c. 
48 20 

440 33 
1,373 70 

240 30 
1,148 33 


6 

7 
8 

q 


1,701 33 

188 64 

23 65 

761 50 

315 49 


60 87 
163 81 
389 85 
190 11 


10 

11 


3,910 50 
1,701 35 
4,513 50 
9,741 00 
985 50 
5,361 20 
3,017 75 
5,459 00 


244 21 

418 00 


12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 


284 45 

572 65 

41 76 

14,608 52 

133 00 

- 31,872 36 


195 94 
887 14 
296 51 
548 41 
119 51 
550 83 
101 46 


19 




74 46 


51 12 


20 




7,792 76 


?1 




676 31 

107 80 

2,707 48 

546 27 


56 78 


22 
23 
24 
25 


2,719 84 

15,675 25 

2,361 00 

884 00 

2,306 75 


378 25 

526 86 

342 41 

34 81 


?6 


202 41 

328 25 
418 58 
249 45 




27 


74 83 


?8 




194 31 


29 
30 


132 50 

914 35 

1,615 25 

1,731 00 

1,011 00 


276 50 
149 09 


31 
32 
33 
34 


71 80 
936 19 
851 90 


128 87 
659 52 
582 96 


35 


1,320 40 

738 20 

3.046 00 

1,372 00 

6,171 00 

3,733 00 

4,852 00 

1,391 00 

4,349 00 

4,230 00 

3,027 00 

10 00 

80 40 

1,927 50 




411 64 


36 




174 45 


37 




859 69 


38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 


1,200 00 
3,869 26 
2,155 31 
2,143 54 
9,124 31 
1,908 46 

447 70 
6,088 68 

595 01 
21,312 22 


119 37 
3,195 08 
1,693 14 
2,359 36 
1,620 56 
4,097 63 
1,023 85 
3,320 05 
13 68 
1,742 94 
1,156 62 








117,129 04 


377,349 17 


1,740,538 15 


893,983 92 


108,059 26 


40,454 64 


1 




1,705 36 

621 74 

909 40 

41 00 

2,017 66 


8,392 61 
4,672 28 
7,029 86 
4,227 41 
10,813 32 


5,500 00 
3,400 00 
4,500 00 
3,106 32 
7,320 00 


148 27 


35 54 


2 


683 00 

1,022 00 

58 00 




3 


665 80 
153 75 

82 51 




4 
5 


7 50 
27 83 









220 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FIN- 





Expenditure — 


Collegiate Institutes — Continued 


Library .scientific 
apparatus, 
maps, etc., type- 
writers, drawing 
models and 
equipment for 
physical culture 


Art, manual 
training, house- 
hold science 
and agricultural 
department 
equipment 


School books, 
stationery, 
prizes, fuel, 
examinations 
and all other 
expenses 


1 Barrie 


$ c. 

1,275 68 

364 79 


$ c. 


$ c. 

3 010 44 


2 Kitchener (Berlin) 


319 33 


5 760 59 


3 Brantford 


7,225 15 


4 Brockville 


211 33 
237 25 
361 55 
96 81 
548 94 
479 26 
468 47 
127 20 
203 84 
208 58 
340 33 
537 68 
144 21 
944 15 




4,718 34 
3,469 05 
1 741 68 


5 Chatham 


571 49 

84 88 


6 Clinton 


7 Cobourg 


1,551 23 


8 Collingwood 


887 30 


4 134 23 


9 Fort William 


3,162 16 
8,641 87 
1,407 58 


10 Gait 

11 Goderich 


9 45 
734 73 


12 Guelph 


5,566 80 


13 Hamilton 




8,010 29 
2,790 36 


14 Ingersoll 




15 Kingston 




3,985 17 
3,232 59 


16 Lindsay 


201 42 
261 76 
891 91 
559 18 
336 00 


17 London 


21,046 76 


18 Morrisburg 


1,119 34 


19 Napanee 


240 24 
623 45 

71 71 
100 00 
540 58 

50 00 
120 64 
150 00 

416 77 

106 80 

46 62 


1,289 67 


20 Niagara Falls 


3,339 76 


21 North Bay 


11,185 95 


22 Orillia 




2,145 69 






22,519 16 


24 Owen Sound 




3,854 61 


25 Perth 


500 00 
25 00 

412 68 


3,345 90 


26 Peterborough 


5,406 74 




4,048 58 


28 Port Arthur 


5,254 53 


29 Renfrew 


2,689 84 


30 Ridgetown 




1,433 53 




94 69 


3,021 42 


32 St. Mary's 


307 93 
190 02 
245 07 
167 34 
210 00 
770 25 


2,039 48 




66 11 


3,712 54 


34 Sarnia 


2,298 43 






1,302 84 


36 Smith's Falls 

37 Stratford 


108 47 


4,118 19 
6,338 51 


38 Strathroy 




1,894 02 


39 Toronto, Harbord 

40 Toronto, Humberside 

42 Toronto, Malvern Avenue 


1,168 40 
1,498 53 
1,692 82 
1.329 77 
1,523 68 
1,097 54 
1,221 30 
79 68 
515 11 


84 55 
84 65 
84 55 
84 55 

376 92 
84 55 

995 43 


14,573 68 

21,804 32 

13,202 67 

9,550 38 


44 Toronto, Parkdale 

46 Vankleek Hill 


23,002 13 

9,999 52 

12,367 95 

921 59 




11 50 
249 60 


5,458 81 


48 Woodstock 


6,480 07 




' 




Totals 


21,451 75 


8,204 15 


299,174 14 


High Schools 
1 Alexandria . . 


220 18 




1,089 66 






721 82 


3 Almonte 


1 




514 12 


4 Amherstburg 


47 86 
) 48 21 




362 31 


5 Arnprior 




1,493 62 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



281 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
ANCIAL STATEMENT— Continued 



Continued 



Total Expendi- 
ture 



Balances 



Charges per year for Tuition 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 



$ c. 
14,211 17 
24,574 56 
32,481 02 
18,565 21 

22.958 29 

11.480 31 
11,518 49 
19,333 97 
20,360 03 
30,828 78 
12,263 51 
22,786 05 
56,598 66 
11,978 96 

40.959 78 
21,697 61 

101,420 36 
10,595 03 
12,508 42 
25,406 97 
22,090 75 

13.481 74 
87,450 33 
23,593 29 
13,093 85 
27,128 02 
15,240 24 
19,886 87 
15,345 59 

7,819 24 
19,663,86 
13,293 12 
27,763 90 
14,866 06 

8,696 82 
16,547 61 
29,703 00 

9,453 39 
64,347 47 
58,812 45 
51,969 94 
39,262 79 
64,731 57 
46,739 25 
54,535 95 

8,612 46 
50,769 83 
23,901 29 



1,371,327 86 



6,993 65 
4,121 82 
5,679 92 
3,677 74 
8,972 17 



$ c. 
1,680 62 
4,940 35 
1,325 39 
1,542 00 

126 87 



4,946 37 
735 19 



1,425 26 
597 87 



11,290 70 
34 15 
452 53 
2,552 37 
1,900 40 
2,958 47 
5,627 89 



5,035 04 

1,128 70 

72 15 



4,005 36 

746 22 

11,184 05 

2,384 94 



15 58 
218 86 



2,270 21 
3,377 54 

230 09 
3,863 19 

614 52 
9,221 82 



135,088 74 



58,575 00 
3,531 89 
5,029 39 

80,480 57 



$10. 

Res. $10 ; non-res. $15. 

Res. and Co. $10 ; others $30. 

$5. 

Res. 1st yr. free, thereafter $6 ; all others $10. 

Lower school $6 ; others $10. 

Res. free. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

Co. $10 ; res. and other Cos. $14. 

F. I $6 ; F. II $8 ; F's III and IV $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $20. 

Res. 1st yr. $2.50, thereafter $10 ; Wentworth Co. $40 ; 

Res. F. I free ; all others $7.50. [others $55. 

Res. 1st yr. free, other yrs. $10 to $30 ; non-res. $30 to $35. 

Res. $7.50 to $10 ; non-res. $7.50 to $20. 

Res. 1st yr. free ; other yrs. $10 ; outside Co. $30. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

Free. 

$10. 

Res. $10 to $25; non-res. $45 to $50. 

Res. F's I free, II, $8, III & IV, $12 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. L. Sch. $5, M. $8, U. $10 ; non-res. $25. 

Free. 

Free. 

Res. and Co. free ; others $25. 

Res. $6; Co. and others $10. 

$5. 

Res. 1st yr. in F. I $5 ; all others $10. 

Res. free; non-res. $10. 

Free. 

F. I $6, II, $8 ; others $10. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Res. 1st yr. free ; all others $10. 

Res. 1st yr. free ; all others $10. 



Res. F.I, free, II $9, III, $15, IV, $21, V, $27; non-res. 
I, $6, II, $15, III, $15, IV. $21, V, $27. 



369,210 29 



1,398 96 
550 46 

1,349 94 
549 67 

1,841 15 



Province free ; others $20. 

Free to res. and county. 

Res. 1st yr. free ; all others $7.50. 



17 free ; 31 not free. 



Free. 

Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 

Res. $2.50 ; non-res. $12.50. 

Res. free ; non-res. $10. 

Free. 



2%2 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 



High Schools— Continued 



Re- 



Legislative 
Grants 



Municipal 
Grants (county) 



Municipal 
Grants (local) 



6 Arthur 

7 Athens 

8 Aurora 

9 Avonmore .... 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville . . . 

12 Belleville 

13 Bowmanville . 

14 Bradford 

15 Brampton 

16 Brighton 

17 Caledonia 

18 Campbellford . 

19 Carleton Place 

20 Cayuga 

21 Chatsworth . . . 

22 Chesley 

23 Chesterville... 

24 Colborne 

25 Cornwall 

26 Deseronto 

27 Dundalk 

28 Dundas 

29 Dunnville 

30 Durham 

31 Dutton 

32 Elora 

33 Essex 

34 Fergus 

35 Flesherton 

36 Forest 

37 Gananoque 

38 Georgetown 

39 Glencoe 

40 Gravenhurst . . . 

41 Grimsby 

42 Hagersville 

43 Haileybury 

44 Harriston 

45 Hawkesbury . . . 

46 Iroquois 

47 KemptVille 

48 Kenora 

49 Kincardine 

50 Leamington. . . . 

51 Listowel 

52 Lucan 

53 Madoc 

54 Markdale 

55 Markham 

56 Meaford 

57 Midland 

58 Mitchell 

59 Morewood 

60 Mount Forest . . 

61 Newburgh 

62 Newcastle 

63 Newmarket . . . 

64 Niagara 



$ c. 


719 55 


1,456 17 


676 87 


454 95 


788 59 


372 41 


1,356 56 


885 33 


583 42 


893 07 


441 52 


609 66 


631 12 


591 59 


584 91 


425 17 


723 78 


509 66 


489 47 


2,862 84 


607 37 


422 01 


676 79 


789 25 


536 62 


1,283 97 


514 20 


1,953 91 


527 26 


536 71 


662 10 


717 55 


693 51 


576 72 


1,159 18 


600 31 


593 34 


6,429 04 


680 26 


485 66 


641 77 


734 22 


1,409 68 


805 54 


779 99 


708 14 


575 72 


651 41 


1,196 07 


665 99 


989 30 


811 98 


595 45 


471 49 


679 99 


490 62 


431 30 


1,627 32 


443 95 



$ c. 
1,191 87 
4,654 04 
1,910 78 
454 95 
3,198 74 
2,250 00 
3,607 68 
2,269 84 
1,851 10 
3,316 00 



299 33 

661 49 

854 42 

563 99 

895 17 

721 65 

2,119 98 

943 00 

1,088 63 

5,891 40 

607 37 

422 01 

,396 41 

,711 32 

194 36 

,056 43 

939 58 

,913 72 

738 39 

536 21 

2,095 79 

1,790 84 

1,921 22 

1,563 13 



1.796 70 
2,266 55 



1,753 16 
2,126 55 
3,165 29 
3,530 71 



2,486 65 
3,067 94 
3,086 55 
2,232 70 
3,530 78 
1,173 16 
3,006 55 
2,641 97 
1,117 55 
1,893 95 

471 49 
1,434 36 
2,700 00 

431 30 
4,285 81 
1,635 00 



$ c. 
1,381 90 
3,600 00 
2,500 00 
3,672 00 
2,230 16 
2,288 05 
13,202 72 
3,830 00 
1,000 00 
3,700 00 
1,300 00 
1,500 00 
3,780 33 
2,100 00 
4,000 00 
2,026 43 
2,470 00 
3,035 50 
1,482 00 
10,620 00 
3,050 00 

600 00 

4,100 00 

4,799 65 

16,185 67 

500 00 
2,000 00 
2,500 00 
1,900 00 
2,250 80 
1,500 00 
3,253 20 
2,416 26 

600 00 
2,225 00 
2,235 11 
1,850 00 
4,915 00 
2,540 51 
1,179 14 
2,000 00 
2,400 00 
7,331 50 
2,661 43 
4,500 00 
3,000 00 
1,000 00 
l t 300 00 
1,689 71 

850 Oft 
4,000 On 
4,000 00 
2,200 00 
3,129 92 
3,500 00 
2,475 00 
1,823 55 
2,800 00 
1,000 00 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



223 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



ceipts 



School Fees 



Balances and 
other sources 



Total 
Receipts 



Expenditure 



Teachers' 
Salaries 



Buildings, 
Sites and all 

permanent 
improvements 



Repairs to 
school ac- 
commodation 



6 
7 

8 
9 


$ c. 

810 58 

513 00 

1,018 00 


$ c. 

458 09 
4,486 02 

2.636 38 
1,238 99 

248 87 
449 87 
251 93 
176 21 
94 56 

1,304 22 
948 85 

3,785 70 
492 03 
906 29 
362 14 

1,436 91 

723 43 

60 00 

2,505 94 

3,545 08 

67 41 

922 93 

1,063 24 

3,434 30 
2 57 

2.637 36 
255 28 

2,187 97 

2,733 36 

498 86 

1,554 58 

180 78 

14 58 

603 53 

17 89 

231 87 

459 86 
16,643 15 

416 38 


$ c. 

4, 562 26 

14,709 23 
8,742 03 
5,820 89 
7,469 36 
5,360 33 

18,418 89 
7,449 53 
4,011 58 

10,608 29 
3,989 70 
9,118 09 
6,803 90 
6,721 87 

10,842 22 
4,895 91 
7,089 19 
4,548 16 
5,566 04 

22,919 32 
4,353 65 
2,913 55 
7,978 44 

12,734 52 

18,903 67 
9,341 76 
4,226 56 

10,555 60 
7,429 51 
4,146 83 
5,812 47 
6,081 37 
6,433 82 
4,128 38 
3,701 32 
4,863 99 
5,169 75 

29,703 19 
6,246 31 
3,791 35 
8,103 09 
8,398 91 
8,741 27 
8,639 02 
8,688 70 
8,616 34 
5,149 92 
6,614 49 
5,679 64 
6,356 72 
9,248 66 
7,541 48 
5,693 91 
4,688 98 
7,007 33 
7,036 95 
2,706 15 

11,205 09 
3,335 91 


$ c. 
3,300 00 
7,121 60 
4,720 00 
2,680 00 
6,195 00 
3,030 00 

14,603 17 
4,996 12 
3,210 00 
8,295 00 
2,640 00 
4,610 00 
5,170 04 
4,665 00 
3,710 00 
2,475 00 
4,983 22 
3,050 75 
2,458 34 

12,709 55 
3,219 43 
2,225 00 
5,800 00 
6,620 00 
3,300 00 
5,730 01 
3,210 00 
6,905 00 
4,230 00 
2,825 00 
3,750 00 
4,600 00 
5,072 45 
2,860 00 
2,825 00 
3,500 00 
3,650 00 
6,550 00 
4,945 64 
2,595 92 
5,200 00 
5,750 00 
4,428 55 
6,210 00 
6,673 35 
6,290 00 
4,210 00 
4,439 50 
3,270 71 
4,750 00 
6,933 30 
5,350 00 
4,530 00 
2,560 00 
4,570 02 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 
8,150 00 
2,040 00 


$ c. 

5 50 

414 14 


$ c. 
46 40 
89 75 

471 75 


122 05 
7 50 
506 50 
908 51 
711 63 


48 50 


LO 
1 


1,003 00 


76 23 
36 02 


L2 






L3 

A 


288 15 

482 50 

1,395 00 


207 25 
137 67 


L5 




55 76 


16 


24 00 




L7 


561 24 

46 00 

560 00 


85 70 


L8 




6 23 


L9 


680 86 
2,137 82 

* i ," 626 66 * * 

242 10 

16 42 

146 20 


200 50 
42 81 


51 

>9 


285 75 
1,052 00 


13 14 


| 


159 14 


ft 





25 59 


>5 




137 09 


>6 


21 50 
546 60 
742 00 


152 69 


>7 




2 95 


>9 


14 79 

719 97 

9,228 52 

492 17 


103 40 
86 28 


W) 




984 45 
864 00 




11 




to 


92 61 


*3 




1,122 05 


U 


530 50 
324 25 




100 83 


tf 




86 25 


*6 


197 67 
297 66 
262 62 




M 


139 00 

785 00 
299 25 




W 




W 


43 34 


to 




18 92 


11 




76 13 


42 





65 85 
154 35 


359 15 


13 
44 


1,716 00 
856 00 


34 08 
152 64 


45 


316 10 
114 55 




46 




2,296 03 
1,197 98 




47 


536 00 


97 62 


48 


1,917 94 




49 


1,510 50 


1,174 90 
340 77 
134 40 
447 50 

1,132 30 

1,203 20 
668 18 
591 39 
918 45 
220 01 
562 08 
510 98 

1,361 33 

20 00 

900 96 

256 96 


26 00 


50 




180 38 


51 


1,687 25 
894 00 




170 14 


52 




285 88 


53 




275 07 


54 
55 
56 


417 50 

1,166 00 

1,026 00 

693 50 

784 50 

54 00 

882 00 

10 00 


52 00 
97 51 


70 18 
259 08 


57 




125 18 


58 




260 45 


59 




8 15 


60 
61 
62 


1,057 10 

1,818 54 

162 50 

174 30 


52 95 

207 77 
55 64 


63 
64 


1,591 00 


615 51 











224: 



THE REPORT OF THE 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 



High Schools— Continued 



Expenditure- 



Library, scien- 
tific apparatus, 
maps, etc., type- 
writers, draw- 
ing models and 
equipment for 
physical culture 



Art, manual ; School books, 

training, house- stationery, 

hold science prizes, fuel, 

and agricultural examinations 

department and all other 

equipment expenses 



6 Arthur 

7 Athens 

8 Aurora 

9 Avonmore 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville — 

12 Belleville 

13 Bowmanville . . 

14 Bradford 

15 Brampton 

16 Brighton , 

17 Caledonia 

18 Campbellford . . 

19 Carle ton Place 

20 Cayuga 

21 Chatsworth.... 

22 Chesley 

23 Chesterville ... 

24 Colborne , 

25 Cornwall , 

26 Deseronto 

27 Dundalk 

28 Dundas 

29 Dunnville 

30 Durham 

31 Dutton 

32 Elora 

33 Essex 

34 Fergus 

35 Flesherton 

36 Forest 

37 Gananoque. . . . 

38 Georgetown... 

39 Glencoe 

40 Gravenhurst. . 

41 Grimsby 

42 Hagersville. .. 

43 Haileybury . . . 

44 Harriston 

45 Hawkesbury.. 

46 Iroquois 

47 Kemptviile . . . 

48 Kenora 

49 Kincardine. . . . 

50 Leamington .. 

51 Listowel 

52 Lucan 

53 Madoc 

54 Markdale 

55 Markham 

56 Meaf ord 

57 Midland 

58 Mitchell 

59 Morewood . . . 

60 Mount Forest. 

61 Newburgh .... 

62 Newcastle .... 

63 Newmarket .. 

64 Niagara 



$ c. 
48 26 
87 28 



6 25 
69 91 
53 00 
37 22 
43 88 



37 00 

88 35 

147 33 

107 60 

64 15 

6 00 

177 85 



38 50 
128 45 



81 39 
95 00 
91 43 



36 02 
18 75 
42 75 
81 18 
36 10 
145 61 
171 77 



11 40 
13 45 

58 35 
881 72 

29 86 
69 31 

59 80 
118 13 

50 00 

24 54 

116 13 

385 93 



187 59 
40 50 

114 12 
64 38 

112 54 



36 45 
35 15 

112 70 

113 53 



$ c. 

95 96 

700 00 



423 01 
55 41 



15 00 
'715*65* 

258*79' 



61 10 

98 00 



1,021 46 
4 15 



535 05 



$ c. 

1.046 05 
1,702 98 
1,264 59 
1,798 86 
1,120 72 
1,687 52 
2,446 98 
1,422 85 

638 17 
1,449 45 
1,288 70 

720 26 

1.004 55 
917 08 

2,729 30 

1,457 28 

271 98 

826 69 

638 67 

4.005 54 
950 80 
416 57 

1,875 70 
1,256 44 
1,182 53 

653 68 
573 98 
533 44 
838 17 
611 10 
684 90 

1,038 10 
926 98 
672 27 
783 88 

1.047 78 
799 59 

2,511 28 
1,034 60 

810 02 
880 13 
890 64 

2,344 78 
1,232 14 
1,334 40 
1,669 94 

654 04 
904 63 

1,013 28 

811 58 
1,411 88 
1,238 22 

774 16 
586 85 

1,020 83 
550 58 
452 86 

1,617 53 
400 91 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



225 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 




STATEMENT— Continued 




Continued 


Balances 






Total 


Charges per year for Tuition 




Expenditure 








$ c. 


| $ c. 




6 


4,542 17 


20 09 


$10. 


7 


10,115 75 


4,593 48 


Res. free ; Co. $5 ; others $30. 


8 


6,456 34 


2,285 69 


$10. 


9 


4,655 66 


1,165 23 


Free. 


10 


7,469 36 




Res. F. I $5 ; all others $10. 


11 


5,313 04 


47*29* ' 


Free. 


12 


1$,418 89 
7,437 14 




Free. 


13 


"12 '39" 


Co. free ; res. F. I free, II $6 ; all others $7.50. 


14 


3,985 84 


25 74 


F. I free ; all others $10. 


15 


9,800 21 


808 08 


$10. 


16 


3,989 70 




Free. 


17 


5,504 31 


"3*613*78" 


Co. free ; other Cos. $4.50. 


18 


6,328 15 


475 75 


Free. 


19 


6,571 04 


150 83 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 


20 


8,884 08 


2,158 14 


Free. 


21 


3,951 42 


944 49 


Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 


22 


6,453 05 


636 14 


L. Sch. $10 ; M. and U. $15. 


23 


4,278 68 


269 48 


Free. 


24 


3,177 52 


2,388 52 


Free. 


25 


17,126 83 


5,792 49 


Free. 


26 


4,322 92 


30 73 


Free. 


27 


2,725 91 


187 64 


$10. 


28 


7,888 89 


89 55 


Res. 1st yr. free ; all others $10. 


29 


8,789 12 


3,945 40 


Free. 


30 


13,711 05 


5,192 62 


Res. $7.50 ; non-res. $10. 


31 


7,591 51 


1,750 25 


$10. 


32 


3,912 61 


313 95 


Res. $5 ; non-res. $10. 


33 


8,838 03 


1,717 57 


Free. 


34 


5,211 75 


2,217 76 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 


35 


3,603 53 


543 30 


Res. F. I free, II $5, III $7.50 ; non-res. $10. 


36 


4,668 67 


1,143 80 


Free. 


37 


6,081 37 
6,433 82 




Res. free ; non-res. $5 . 


38 




$10. 


39 


3,575 61 


"552*77*' 


$10. 


40 


3,639 20 


62 12 


First yr. $5 ; other years $10. 


41 


4,637 38 


226 63 


Free. 


42 


4,994 04 


175 71 


Free. 


43 


10,229 43 


19,473 76 


Res. free ; non-res. $30. 


44 


6,162 74 


83 57 


Res. lstyr. free; all' others $10. 


45 


3,791 35 
6,254 48 




Free. 


46 


"i'Ms'si" 


Free. 


47 


6,856 39 


1,542 52 


Res. free ; Co. & adjoining Cos. $5 ; others $25. 


48 


8,741 27 
7,492 68 




Free. 


49 


"i'i46*34" 


Res. $8 ; non-res. $10. 


50 


8,304 26 


384 44 


Free. 


51 


8,516 01 


100 33 } 


Res. 1st yr. $7 ; ail others $10. 


52 


5,149 92 
5,806 79 




$10. 


53 


"soi'io" 


Free. 


54 


5,468 13 


211 51 


$10. 


55 


6,036 44 


320 28 


$10. 


56 


8,409 56 


839 10 


Res. F. I. $5 ; others $8 ; non-res $10. 


57 


6,825 94 


715 54 


Res. $5; non-res. $10. 


58 


5,564 61 


129 30 


Res. $6 ; non-res. $10. 


59 


3,155 00 


1,533 98 


Free. 


60 


6,700 90 


306 43 


Res. F. I free; all others $10. 


61 


5,613 34 


1,423 61 


Res. & Co. free ; others $10. 


62 


2,706 15 

11,205 09 

2,554 44 


] 


^ree. 


63 




510. 


64 


"isiii" ] 


^ree. 



15 E. 



226 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 



High Schools— Continued 



Re- 



Legislative 
Grants 



Municipal 
Grants (county) 



Municipal 
Grants (local) 



65 Niagara Falls South 

66 Norwood 

67 Oakville 

68 Omemee 

69 Orangeville 

70 Oshawa 

71 Paris 

72 Parkhill 

73 Parry Sound 

74 Pembroke 

75 Penetanguishene 

76 Petrolea 

77 Plantagenet 

78 Port Dover 

79 Port Elgin 

80 Port Hope 

81 Port Perry 

82 Port Rowan 

83 Prescott 

84 Richmond Hill 

85 Rockland 

86 Sault Ste. Marie 

87 Shelburne 

88 Simcoe ,\ 

89 Smithville 

90 Stirling 

91 Streetsville 

92 Sudbury 

93 Sydenham 

94 Thorold , 

95 Tillsonburg , 

96 Toronto, Commerce and Finance 

97 Toronto, North 

98 Trenton 

99 Uxbridge 

100 Vienna 

101 Walkerton 

102 Wardsville 

103 Waterdown 

104 Waterford 

105 Watford 

106 Welland 

107 Weston 

108 Whitby 

109 Wiarton 

110 Williamstown 

111 Winchester 

112 Wingham 



1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 



3 Grand Totals, 1915, 

4 Grand Totals, 1914, 



5 Increases. 

6 Decreases 



7 Percentages 



$ c. 
960 38 

1,226 94 

1,703 53 
423 73 
849 44 
995 69 

1,411 12 
583 67 

1,106 50 

1,751 82 
675 14 

1,280 74 
456 03 
433 47 
518 28 

1,697 88 
599 19 
423 59 
719 76 

598 80 
570 18 

3,626 97 
637 72 
845 27 
508 80 

2,079 83 
540 14 

1,933 98 

1,720 58 
529 34 
717 84 

1,957 51 
943 03 

599 26 
586 40 
411 16 

1,399 73 
409 16 

467 88 
570 07 
673 41 

1,395 26 
765 21 

1,293 88 
561 38 
779 87 

468 27 
811 10 



100,883 48 
90,490 42 



191,373 90 
260,954 79 



69,580 89 



6.36 



$ c. 

161 25 
1,840 83 
1,066 62 

654 03 
2,238 46 
2,139 85 
2,428 39 
1,675 26 



1,853 08 

675 14 

3,815 35 

1,352 56 

569 18 

1,338 30 

3,924 15 

2,578 98 

1,079 98 

719 40 

2,430 38 

2,701 62 



1,300 22 
4,249 99 
1,904 97 
3,272 70 
2,196 38 



5,126 00 

i ',972*69' 



1,166 77 
2,989 55 

856 16 
1,798 06 

741 87 

947 64 
2,045 86 
3,618 13 
4,110 40 
2,707 64 
2,282 20 
1,974 15 
1,645 09 

659 09 
3,420 57 



219,004 22 
140,092 40 



359,096 62 
358,137 66 



958 96 



11.94 



$ c. 
20,214 99 
1,695 53 
2,895 05 
1,202 53 
3,200 00 
6,750 72 
3,600 00 
1,800 00 
3,500 00 
9,361 17 
3,050 00 
2,800 00 
1,700 00 
2,081 94 
1,250 00 
3,858 11 
2,005 81 
1,552 55 
5,264 91 

800 00 
,006 75 
,901 54 

800 00 
,225 36 
,574 85 
1,340 17 

650 00 
8,000 00 



1 
11 

5, 
1 



3,100 00 

3,500 00 

265,779 82 

20,587 52 

4,000 00 

1,200 00 

700 00 

2,600 00 



3,453 00 
1,500 00 
1,800 00 

14,018 87 
1,750 00 

13,200 00 
1,500 00 
2,601 79 
5,500 00 
2,784 23 



657,952 62 
1,015,477 12 



1,673,429 74 
2,870,898 56 



1,197,468 82 



55.63 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



227 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Continued 



ceipts 




Expenditure 




School Fees 


Balances and 
other sources 


Total 
Eeceipts 


Teachers' 
Salaries 


Buildings, 
Sites and all 

permanent 
improvements 


Eepairs to 
school ac- 
commodation 


65 


$ c. 


$ c. 

2,296 75 

1,339 96 

61 00 

142 34 

553 79 

810 39 

1,465 05 

182 39 

656 21 

227 05 

989 17 

3,991 08 

1,191 34 


$ c. 

23,633 37 
6,603 26 
6,288 20 
2,535 88 
8,460 09 

10,806 65 
9,007 63 

5.146 57 
5,442 46 

13,193 12 
5,389 45 

11,887 17 
4,699 93 
3,109 59 
4,350 89 

11,231 50 
5,639 11 
3,080 12 
7,034 86 
4,767 18 
4,602 02 

20,788 83 
3,544 26 

10,624 29 
6,856 91 
7,722 12 
4,974 42 

16,543 35 

8,495 84 

4,091 99 

7,452 69 

298,684 15 

71,531 33 
8,951 46 
6,354 88 
3,423 71 
9,187 77 
2,476 53 
6,446 32 
4,740 32 
9,342 23 

42,832 15 
8,767 80 

19,979 66 
5,172 15 
7,465 23 

8.147 97 
9,036 59 


$ c. 
5,163 22 
4,302 44 
3,870 00 
2,050 00 
6,586 45 
8,540 00 
6,020 00 
3,920 00 
3,660 00 
9,150 00 
3,650 00 
6,383 32 
2,840 00 
2,200 00 
3,000 00 
9,637 97 
4,700 00 
2,205 65 
5,235 00 
3,240 00 
3,050 00 
14,660 00 
2,626 06 
7,540 00 
2,926 50 
5,058 21 
3,550 00 
9,880 00 
5,965 00 
3,260 00 
5,876 23 
35,502 75 
11,542 50 
4,479 95 
4,354 73 
1,810 00 
6,110 92 
1,850 68 
3,000 00 
3,292 76 
4,670 00 
6,960 00 
5,990 00 
5,941 89 
3,350 00 
5,077 50 
4,068 00 
6,723 86 


$ c. 
10,560 35 


$ c. 
510 38 


66 


500 00 
562 00 
113 25 
1,618 40 
110 00 
103 07 
905 25 
179 75 


14 14 


67 

68 


368 58 


8 75 


69 




213 76 


70 
71 
72 


62 91 
431 72 


185 98 
126 61 
206 46 


73 




830 50 
105 05 




74 


217 51 


75 . 




56 19 


76 




42 42 
200 00 


262 99 


77 . 






78 


25 00 
485 00 
841 50 
264 88 




79 


759 31 

909 86 

190 25 
24 00 

235 79 
87 00 

323 47 

3,100 32 

75 32 

133 56 
2,868 29 
1,029 42 
1,076 90 
6,477 37 
1,111 26 

462 65 

359 76 

27,418 57 

48,895 78 

3,185 43 

765 68 
1,456 39 
2,642 98 

979 60 
1,039 80 

624 39 

2,891 69 

23,307 62 

2,482 95 

2,940 33 

746 12 
2,438 48 
1,520 61 

802 19 






80 
81 
8? 


45 50 

"450'55" 
219 46 


131 73 
33 57 
65 62 


83 

84 


95 00 
851 00 


197 41 
133 68 


85 . 




36 81 


86 
87 

88 
89 . 


2,160 00 
731 00 
170 11 


38 15 

184 33 

1,535 25 

234 94 

131 34 


157 67 

102 55 

19 22 


90 


280 55 


91 


511 00 
132 00 
538 00 


14 50 


92 
93 
94 . 


234 75 

305 18 

86 40 

40 98 

215,847 32 

46,324 14 


437 31 
200 00 
4 46 30 


95 
96 
97 
98.. 


903 00 
3,528 25 
1,105 00 


18 40 
287 56 
558 78 
381 90 


99 
100 . 


813 25 


243 25 
62 80 

14 00 


80 57 


101 
102 


747 00 
345 90 
538 00 


41 40 
21 55 


103 
104 . 


411 75 


199 17 
103 84 


105 


359 00 




578 25 


106 


25,842 94 

345 23 

9,799 94 

46 38 

150 00 

499 75 

95 85 


213 62 


107 

108 


1,062 00 
263 25 
390 50 


190 89 


109 
110 


32 68 
14 00 


111 




855 10 


112 


1,218 50 


65 90 


1 
2 


52 914 90 
117,129 04 


236,539 65 
377,349 17 


1,267,294 87 
1,740,538 15 


578,689 58 
893,983 92 


340,929 41 
108,059 26 


14,335 02 

40,454 64 


3 

4 


170,043 94 
163,279 84 


613,888 82 
878,263 63 


3,007,833 02 
4,531,534 48 


1,472,673 50 
1,476,755 93 


448,988 67 
1,335,307 78 


54,789 66 
57,081 57 


5 


6,764 10 












6 


264,374 81 


1,523,701 46 


4,082 43 


886,319 11 


2,291 91 








7 


5.65 


20.41 




59.6 


18.17 


2.22 



228 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE K— FINANCIAL 



High Schools— Concluded 



Expenditure- 



Library, scien- 
tific apparatus, 
maps, i etc., type- 
writers, draw- 
ing models and 
equipment for 
physical culture 



Art, manual 
training, house- 
hold science 
and agricultural 
department 
equipment 



School books, sta- 
tionery, prizes, 
fuel, examina- 
tions and all 
other expenses 



65 Niagara Falls South 

66 Norwood 

67 Oakville 

68 Omemee 

69 Orangeville 

70 Oshawa 

71 Paris 

72 Parkhill 

73 Parry Sound . . .- 

74 Pembroke 

75 Penetanguishene 

76 Petrolea 

77 Plantagenet 

78 Port Dover 

79 Port Elgin 

80 Port Hope 

81 Port Perry 

82 Port Rowan 

83 Prescott 

84 Richmond Hill 

85 Rockland 

86 Sault Ste. Marie 

87 Shelburne 

88 Simcoe 

89 Smithville 

90 Stirling 

91 Streetsville 

92 Sudbury 

93 Sydenham 

94 Thorold e 

95 Tillsonburg 

96 Toronto, Commerce and Finance 

97 Toronto, North 

98 Trenton 

99 Uxbridge 

100 Vienna 

101 Walkerton = 

102 Wardsville 

103 Waterdown 

104 Waterford 

105 Watford 

106 Welland 

107 Weston 

108 Whitby 

109 Wiarton 

110 Williamstown 

111 Winchester 

112 Wingham 



1 Totals, High Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 



3 Grand Totals, 1915. 

4 Grand Totals, 1914, 



5 Increases. 

6 Decreases, 



7 Percentages 



$ c. 
1,193 91 



186 35 
29 47 
66 95 

291 44 
75 52 



36 27 
50 50 
93 95 



191 95 
29 33 
54 00 

109 13 
54 67 

109 64 

122 48 



419 04 

9 35 

273 35 



55 87 
7 10 



32 93 

23 73 

289 84 

1,457 57 

37 40 

65 58 

44 66 

112 99 

58 94 

35 00 



65 87 
44 50 
29 06 
273 65 
61 97 



10,986 82 
21,451 75 



32,438 57 
41,465 42 



9,026 85 



1.31 



$ c. 

207 48 

185 93 

9 20 



545 18 



10 25 



43 50 



927 01 



450 00 



33 95 
84 55 



611 50 



1,708 41 
478 10 
672 70 



58 43 



10,009 77 
8,204 15 



18,213 92 
34,082 24 



15,868 32 



$ 
3,209 
1,207 
1,845 

431 
1,299 
1,726 

944 

859 

870 
3,188 
1,296 
1,692 

499 

717 
1,060 
1,318 

778 

303 
1,218 
1,089 

615 
4,309 

515 
1,256 

526 
1,084 

406 
2,545 
1,017 

632 
1,437 
5,599 
8,701 
1,041 

928 

93 

1,293 

317 
2,800 

896 
1,376 
2,745 
1,340 
1,301 

842 
1,253 
1,474 
1,173 



144,695 54 
299,174 14 



443,869 68 
500,247 14 



56,377 46 



.73 



17.96 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



229 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
STATEMENT— Concluded 



Concluded 


Balances 




Total Expendi- 


Charges per year for Tuition 




ture 








$ c. 


$ c. 




65 


20,844 60 


2,788 77 


Free. 


66 


5,710 28 


892 98 


$6 


67 


6,288 20 




Ees. $5 ; non-res. 1st yr. $5, thereafter $8. 


68 


2,510 77 


"25'ii" 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 


69 


8,166 42 


293 67 


$10. 


70 


10,806 65 




Res. free; non-res. 1st yr. free, thereafteri$7.50. 


71 


8,143 61 


"864*02" 


Res. and Co. free ; others $20. 


72 


4,985 95 


160 62 


Res. F's. I and II $6, F's. Ill and IV $8 ; non-res. $10. 


73 


5,361 45 


81 01 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 


74 


12,697 05 


496 07 


Free. 


75 


5,052 98 


336 47 


Free. 


76 


8,485 27 


3,401 90 


Free. 


77 


3,539 23 


1,160 70 


Free. * 


78 


3,109 59 




Free. 


79 


4,090 11 


"260*78*' 


$6.50 


80 


11,231 50 




Res. $9 ; Co. free. 

F. I free; others $7.50. 


81 


5,620 95 


"is'ie" 


82 


3,080 12 




Free. 


83 


6,979 83 


"55*63" 


Res free ; non-res $5. 


84 


4,585 60 


181 58 


$10. 


85 


3,702 10 


899 92 


Free. 


86 


20,511 46 


277 37 


$10. 


87 


3,437 40 


106 86 


Res. 1st yr. free ; all others! $10. 


88 


10,624 29 




Res. free ; non-res. $10. 


89 


3,688 18 


3,168*73*' 


Free. 


90 


6,554 96 


1,167 16 


Free. 


91 


4,026 91 


947 51 


$10. 


92 


13,104 29 


3,439 06 


Res. free ; non-res. $10. 


93 


7,937 54 


558 30 


L. and M.'Schs. $5 ; U. Sch. $12. 


94 


4,057 84 


34 15 


Free. 


95 


7,396 71 


55 98 


L. &M. Schs. $7.50; U. $10. 


96 


257,560 91 


41,123 24 


1st and 2nd yrs. free ; others $15. 


97 


68,669 18 


2,862 15 


Res. I free, 11 $9, III $15, IV $21, V $27: non-res/ $6, 


98 


5,940 83 


3,010 63 


Free. [$15, $15, $21, $27. 


99 


5,672 37 


682 51 


Res. $5 ; non-res. $7.50. 


100 


2,011 10 


1,412 61 


Free. 


101 


8,184 49 


1,003 28 


Res. F. I free ; all others $10. 


102 


2,248 49 


228 04 


$7.50. 


103 


6,446 32 
4,293 14 




$10. 


104 


"447*18** 


Free. 


105 


6,624 76 


2,717 47 


Res. $10 ; non-res. free. 


106 


37,470 84 


5, 361?1 31 


Free. 


107 


8,344 56 


423 24 


$10. 


108 


17,782 20 


2,197 46 


Res.' $6; Co. $7.50; others $9. 


109 


4,316 21 


855 94 


$6. 


110 


6,523 58 


* 941 65 


Free. 


111 


7,229 60 


918 37 


Free^ 


112 


8,120 93 


915 66 


L. Sch. $6 ; M. $8 ; U. $10. 


1 


1,099,646 14 


167,648 73 


58 free ; 54 not free. 


2 


1,371,327 86 


369,210 29 


1/ free; 31 not free. 


3 


2,470,974 00 


536,859 02 


75 free ; 85 not free. 


4 


3,444,940 08 


1,086,594 40 


73 free ; 88 not free. 


5 






2 free. 


6 


"973*966*68" 


"549 ',735* 38" 


3 not free. 


7 






46.87 free; 53.12 not free. 



Cost per pupii, enrolled attendance, $64.30 ; average attendance, $99.53. 



£30 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



II. 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
TABLE L— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Collegiate Institutes 



Pupils 



1 Barrie 

2 Kitchener (Berlin) 

3 Brantford 

4 Brockville 

5 Chatham 

6 Clinton 

7 Cobourg 

8 Collingwood 

9 Fort William 

10 Gait 

11 Goderich 

12 Guelph 

13 Hamilton 

14 Ingersoll ..'. 

15 Kingston 

16 Lindsay 

17 London ' 

18 Morrisburg 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls '.'..' 

21 North Bay 

22 Orillia ..] 

23 Ottawa 

24 Owen Sound 

25 Perth \\ 

26 Peterborough . . 

27 Picton 

28 Port Arthur " 

29 Renfrew . . ' 

30 Ridgetown . .... 

31 St. Catharines 

32 St. Mary's 

33 St. Thomas ...i" 

34 Sarnia 

35 Seaforth 

36 Smith's Falls 

37 Stratford ..'. 

38 Strathroy 

39 Toronto, Harbord ....... 

40 Toronto, Humberside. .. 

41 Toronto, Jarvis 

42 Tjronto, Malvern Avenue 

43 Toronto, Oakwood 

44 Toronto, Parkdale 

45 Toronto, Riverdale 

46 Vankleek Hill 

47 Windsor 

48 Woodstock .'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Totals 

High Schools 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston | 

3 Almonte .',"*' 

4 Amherstburg ,.[[ 

5 Arn p rio r 



pq 



142 

200 
370 
177 
207 
111 
112 
130 
144 
238 

99 
253 
595 
112 
280 
199 
611 

59 
108 
155 
128 
169 
840 
211 
108 
223 
117 
111 
168 

80 
228 
115 
224 
176 

93 
135 
284 
107 
443 
307 
368 
127 
280 
310 
285 

91 
314 
207 



10,551 

62 
55 
63 
40 
95 



TO O 
<Dr2* 



Number of Pupils 
in — 



w 



Number of Pupils 
from — 



ho 

a •+- s 
.3 o 

"S ° 

a-? 



179 
168 
344 
204 
234 
133 
132 
180 
204 
230 
192 
285 
567 
122 
328 
274 
640 
72 
162 
159 
155 
217 
536 
245 
117 
272 
157 
110 
236 
112 
251 
137 
335 
215 
117 
210 
285 
109 
432 
346 
304 
156 
401 
371 
292 
150 
274 
279 



11,630 

96 
77 
75 
30 
134 



321 

368 
714 
381 
441 
244 
244 
310 
348 
468 
291 
538 

1,162 
234 
608 
473 

1,251 
131 
270 
314 
283 
386 

1,376 
456 
225 
495 
274 
221 
404 
192 
479 
252 
559 
391 
210 
345 
569 
216 
875 
653 
672 
283 
681 
681 
577 
241 
588 
486 



22,181 



158 
132 

138 
70 

229 



218 
240 
438 
230 
271 
168 
152 
205 
233 
305 
185 
328 
750 
148 
397 
316 
812 
89 
174 
211 
169 
241 
845 
299 
154 
337 
174 
145 
245 
133 
295 
173 
358 
251 
157 
226 
407 
155 
576 
426 
437 
176 
458 
452 
361 
152 
362 
298 



14,332 



96 
79 
90 
44 
151 



178 
237 
424 
236 
268 
152 
188 
202 
250 
336 
182 
336 
621 
147 
343 
301 
895 
79 
158 
216 
205 
240 
861 
247 
135 
328 
212 
181 
284 
142 
371 
153 
407 
270 
130 
209 
363 
112 
464 
405 
392 
189 
383 
392 
393 
177 
448 
317 



14,159 



124 
96 
83 
49 

140 



118 

107 

242 

112 

119 

57 

37 

84 

79 

87 

86 

146 

410 

78 

239 

117 

263 

42 

93 

79 

70 

121 

452 

158 

63 

115 

42 

32 

94 

32 

78 

67 

123 

99 

37 

110 

143 

87 

330 

189 

214 

74 

240 

244 

137 

42 

103 

113 



6,204 



25 
24 
48 
33 
54 
35 
19 
24 
19 
45 
23 
56 
131 

9 
26 
55 
93 
10 
19 
19 

,8 
25 
63 
51 
27 
52 
20 

8 
26 
18 
30 
32 
29 
22 
43 
26 
63 
17 
81 
59 
66 
20 
58 
45 
47 
22 
37 
56 



1,818 



11 



11 



172 
295 
536 
264 
291 
94 
150 
222 
338 
230 
169 
391 

1,027 
118 
520 
225 

1,044 
66 
126 
256 
232 
248 

1,228 
278 
108 
423 
118 
221 
140 
109 
327 
125 
401 
323 
105 
236 
413 
121 
875 
565 
650 
204 
649 
619 
555 
86 
427 
245 



16,565 



140 
58 
78 
48 

133 






Is 



145 

72 

160 

117 

139 

150 

93 

68 

9 

204 

113 

123 

95 

91 

85 

177 

204 

58 

136 

44 

28 

78 

88 

147 

112 

51 

153 



248 
77 

143 
73 

150 
65 
86 
44 

111 
94 



71 

3 

76 

32 

34 

16 

119 

158 

200 



4,740 



4 

1 

18 

ii 
"i 

20 

1 

34 

9 

24 

40 

25 

3 

71 

3 

7 

8 

14 
23 
60 
60 
31 
5 

21 
3 



16 
6 
9 

54 

8 

3 

19 

65 

45 

1 



17 

19 

3 

"28 
6 

36 
3 

41 

876 



9 

5 

27 



1916 



DEPAETMENT OF EDUCATION 



231 



AND 


HIGH 


I SCHOOLS— Continued 


















AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 
















Number of Pupils from Families whose Head 
is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils 


in the Various Subje«„s 


o 


H 

P 


4) 

U 
O 

I 


bfl 


CO 


CO 

p 

o 

*-£ 
cS 

P. 

P 
O 

o 

be 

P 


CO 

p 



o3 
Pi 
P 
O 


p 


o3 
Pi 

P 





1 

i 

o3 


p 

'■& 



P g 

8 S 
» 


e 

p 

o3 
U 


b 
s 

CO 

a 

p 


S 

CO 

3 


u 


CO 

s 


b 



CO 

a 




13 


*g 


P 
3 


c3 


p 


O 


P 



rd 
GO 


■§s 


,P 

CO 


08 

^3 


CO 


p 


s 


B 

o 
O 


< 


•3 


1 

EH 


En 


o 

c3 

h3 


4» 
O 


£ 
S 


p 


11 


p 

m 


o3 
P 
e3 
O 


pq 


'0 


^3 


1 58 


112 


21 


3 


43 


lb 


42 


26 


245 


310 


313 


173 


246 


102 


16 


2 137 


48 


35 


11 


70 


31 




36 


331 


346 


368 


285 


178 


95 


12 


3 171 


146 


64 


19 


167 


26 


"*47 


74 


395 


695 


695 


617 


429 


166 


29 


4 23 


78 


33 




123 


67 


31 


26 


288 


374 


374 


346 


319 


117 


14 


5 81 


153 


130 


""6 


83 


61 


23 


4 


213 


415 


415 


292 


292 


119 


28 


6 37 


129 


19 


6 


30 


19 


3 


1 


182 


235 


235 


182 


170 


59 


19 


7 31 


67 


15 


3 


62 


12 


34 


20 


208 


240 


240 


205 


240 


17 


10 


8 73 


92 


11 


3 


57 


31 


26 


17 


202 


307 


307 


147 


101 


84 


12 


9 119 


14 


3 


2 


126 


9 


71 


4 


211 


341 


340 


302 


291 


29 


11 


IS 140 


100 


26 


8 


133 


19 


38 


4 


346 


460 


460 


441 


325 


106 


27 


11 56 


119 


9 


4 


63 


9 


10 


21 


182 


285 


285 


268 


276 


96 


17 


12 134 


125 


28 


14 


93 


21 


94 


29 


336 


518 


518 


482 


345 


146 


39 


13 489 


109 


74 


31 


282 


49 


101 


27 


804 


1,122 


1,122 


1,052 


1,052 


429 


67 


14 55 


97 


5 


1 


27 


12 


25 


12 


192 


232 


232 


230 


158 


76 


5 


15 135 


91 


43 


21 


154 


31 


118 


15 


482 


590 


590 


410 


291 


210 


12 


16 55 


228 


14 


8 


65 


39 


46 


18 


320 


432 


439 


419 


427 


124 


30 


17 380 


174 


93 


32 


294 


76 


88 


114 


892 


1,198 


1,198 


591 


860 


263 


50 


18 9 


67 


6 


1 


30 


14 


3 


1 


90 


124 


124 


90 


70 


42 


10 


19 40 


114 


22 


4 


27 


28 


23 


12 


110 


263 


263 


143 


263 


74 


8 


20 69 


31 


9 


4 


51 


67 


59 


24 


145 


309 


309 


295 


309 


79 


6 


21 24 


27 


6 


3 


55 


21 


117 


30 


205 


283 


281 


178 


167 


69 


4 


22 95 


108 


20 


10 


58 


53 


28 


14 


215 


372 


372 


276 


250 


128 


12 


23 369 


87 


104 


52 


269 


69 


370 


56 


480 


1,343 


1,339 


937 


834 


179 


37 


24 112 


151 


17 


13 


93 


49 


21 




360 


445 


445 


411 


291 


132 


29 


25 21 


102 


9 


1 


42 


26 


24 




164 


221 


221 


198 


198 


34 


15 


26 88 


53 


30 


5 


59 


170 


45 


"45 


368 


487 


487 


368 


257 


128 


15 


27 • 35 


122 


9 


5 


34 


18 


40 


11 


226 


269 


269 


243 


185 


46 


7 


28 86 


5 


12 


1 


52 


20 


35 


10 


193 


219 


219 


135 


201 


35 


2 


29 70 


209 


9 


2 


8 


76 


24 


6 


284 


398 


398 


384 


362 


115 


24 


30 26 


84 


9 




12 




46 


15 


121 


170 


190 


170 


147 


32 


16 


31 195 


58 


7 


"h 


156 


"49 


6 


3 


371 


469 


469 


449 


449 


78 


18 


32 16 


126 


4 


2 


50 


22 


20 


12 


153 


153 


153 


146 


146 


67 


7 


33 204 


169 


27 


5 


75 


70 


9 




407 


550 


550 


467 


467 


123 


12 


34 102 


50 


26 


2 


89 


36 


72 


'"ii 


260 


381 


381 


357 


357 


97 


12 


35 18 


99 


7 


3 


45 


16 


12 


10 


125 


180 


180 


162 


101 


38 


35 


36 72 


80 


10 


3 


91 


42 


15 


32 


239 


334 


334 


319 


319 


71 


13 


37 172 


137 


14 


14 


124 


25 


34 


49 


462 


492 


566 


543 


420 


260 


31 


38 37 


90 


12 


3 


22 


12 


7 


33 


145 


204 


216 


211 


160 


89 


11 


39 350 


10 


45 


15 


350 




30 


75 


603 


870 


870 


750 


750 


400 


50 


40 118 


58 


42 


16 


139 


'"is 


210 


52 


467 


638 


638 


405 


624 


146 


16 


41 195 


27 


68 


27 


96 


27 


152 


80 


420 


640 


640 


302 


342 


182 


38 


42 132 


21 


14 


6 


64 


11 


13 


22 


203 


283 


283 


273 


273 


83 


7 


43 302 


30 


62 


31 


150 


8 


70 


28 


430 


675 


675 


620 


446 


179 


24 


44 203 


31 


52 


24 


152 


54 


132 


33 


392 


667 


667 


348 


417 


151 


23 


45 129 


25 


31 


16 


184 


30 


154 


8 


395 


576 


576 


492 


291 


144 


17 


46 18 


153 


13 




37 


13 


7 




174 


241 


241 


233 


233 


72 


12 


47 111 


33 


31 


"ib 


183 


91 


97 


'"32 


473 


580 


580 


409 


328 


82 


17 


48 88 


183 


20 


12 


92 


56 


27 


8 


256 


461 


461 


327 


392 


128 


27 


5,680 4,422 


1,270 


467 


4,761 


1,719 


2,699 


1,163 


14,765 


21,397 


21,528 


17,083 


L6,049 


5,721 


953 


1 10 


102 


3 


3 


13 


14 


9 


4 


140 


158 


158 


158 


158 


54 




2 27 


61 


7 




8 


8 


7 


14 


96 


132 


132 


132 


82 


36 




3 12 


67 


15 


""i 


29 


7 


5 


2 


87 


130 


130 


130 


83 


47 


'"i 


4 11 


21 


5 


3 


16 


4 


9 


1 


49 


70 


70 


69 


69 


21 




5 35 


59 


13 


1 


38 


37 


41 


5 


170 


227 


227 


170 


142 


81 


"I 



232 



THE KEPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
II. TABLE L— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Collegiate Institutes 



1 Barrie 

2 Kitchener (Berlin).. 

3 Brantford 

4 Brockville 

5 Chatham 

6 Clinton 

7 Cobourg 

8 Collingwood 

9 Fort William 

10 Gait 

11 Goderich 

12 Guelph../ 

13 Hamilton 

14 Ingersoll 

15 Kingston 

16 Lindsay 

17 London 

18 Morrisburg 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls 

21 North Bay 

22 Orillia 

23 Ottawa 

24 Owen Sound 

25 Perth 

26 Peterborough 

27 Picton 

28 Port Arthur 

29 Renfrew 

30 Ridgetown 

31 St. Catharines 

32 St. Mary's 

33 St. Thomas 

34 Sarnia 

35 Seaforth 

36 Smith's Falls 

37 Stratford 

38 Strathroy 

39 Toronto, Harbord... 

40 Toronto, Humberside 

41 Toronto, Jarvis 

42 Toronto, Malvern Av 

43 Toronto, Oakwood ... 

44 Toronto, Parkdale . . 

45 Toronto, Riverdale . . 

46 Vankleek Hill 

47 Windsor 

48 Woodstock 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects— Continued 



P. 

a 

■OH 

o 



Totals 

High Schools 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg . . . 

5 Amprior I 4 



11 
13 

1 

8 
34 
26 
12 
13 
12 

2 
24 

8 
21 
15 
13 
10 
16 
13 
21 

5 

50 
11 
38 

2 
21 
23 
15 
10 

6 
25 

809 



160 
237 
495 
286 
268 
180 
188 
202 
248 
371 
182 
336 
804 
192 
430 
323 
891 
79 
150 
194 
205 
279 
879 
360 
135 
368 
232 
195 
284 
139 
371 
146 
407 
260 
125 
239 
497 
156 
590 
489 
420 
190 
456 
392 
393 
177 
418 
279 



15,297 



140 
96 
83 
49 

170 



242 
237 
262 
195 
268 
178 
171 
147 
250 
341 
162 
224 
759 
192 
382 
289 
698 

79 
158 
190 
205 
207 
728 
360 

89 
368 
176 
135 
251 
121 
371 
153 
357 
260 
120 
173 
371 
145 
590 
439 
420 
190 
340 
217 
393 
177 
359 
311 



13,450 



140 
96 
88 
49 

170 



MM 



I ' 

o 
o 



245 
243 
456 
236 
268 
182 
208 
202 
250 
342 
192 
336 
839 
192 
481 
289 
889 

80 
165 
223 
205 
286 
953 
360 
135 
341 
232 
207 
289 
142 
329 
153 
407 
260 
125 
215 
423 
146 
590 
467 
420 

19 
342 
390 
393 
177 
448 
281 



15,053 



140 
96 
88 
49 

170 



301 
331 
687 
355 
327 
230 
218 
285 
249 
431 
285 
418 

1,135 
206 
452 
382 
982 
117 
264 
287 
204 
379 

1,262 
387 
221 
442 
208 
177 
397 
175 
464 
146 
529 
380 
190 
337 
553 
211 
860 
634 
645 
277 
670 
676 
569 
219 
447 
364 



19,965 



158 
132 
137 

48 
227 



247 
190 
386 
174 
240 
181 
90 
104 
131 
233 
170 
289 
894 
146 
372 
256 
653 
104 
149 
209 
153 
227 
758 
257 
132 
207 
151 
103 
232 
126 
213 
146 
238 
193 
148 
210 
300 
160 
860 
413 
472 
277 
460 
458 
389 
219 
239 
270 



13,229 



75 

82 
91 
45 

148 



19 
12 
33 
27 
35 
21 
10 
17 
17 
38 
18 
51 
109 
6 

10 
43 
87 
8 
9 
14 
5 
18 
98 
31 
22 
23 
11 
6 
21 
15 
21 
17 
13 
14 
38 
20 
33 
12 
65 
35 
50 
12 
27 
38 
40 
14 
20 
36 



1,339 



228 
175 
519 
349 
257 
168 
169 
231 
231 
307 
148 
386 
830 
166 
442 
189 
784 
103 
160 
253 
146 
274 
1,179 
208 
164 
341 
173 
162 
293 
23 
307 
157 
512 
273 
180 
198 
242 
160 
870 
443 
550 
260 
671 
561 
565 
151 
352 
235 



15,745 



151 
64 
92 
56 

148 



28 
102 
99 
38 
33 
21 
10 
24 
15 
57 
24 
66 
254 
21 
95 
33 
71 
17 
36 
34 
21 
41 
171 
37 
36 
62 
35 
22 
44 
1 
59 
18 
28 
24 
49 
22 
66 
19 
575 
137 
310 
72 
226 
212 
166 
4 
34 
45 



257 

268 
404 
315 
290 
205 
169 
239 
232 
306 
174| 
424 i 
1,1011 
166| 
428 ! 
313! 
894 
119: 



3,614 



260 

172 

313 

195 

165 

286 

141 

303 

184 

403 

270| 

182 

289| 

357 

186 

850 

523 

560 

260 

652 

590 

552 

161 

339! 



4 

21 

7 

7 

10 

"6 
3 
4 
4 
4 

31 

42 
3 
8 

71 
5 
5 



165 16 
199 1 
135'.... 
322| 1 
868 37 



9 
5 
9 
1 
8 
16 



4 
4 
5 

65 
20 
32 

'27 

29 

30 

4 

1 



325 24 



16,511 



154 
71 

110 
58 

225 



618 



1910 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



233 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects— Continued 



Special Courses 



o 

o 



I 




>> 


at 


d 
o 

cq 








>» 

ft 

O 

id 
$ 

CO 






205 
142 
252 
189 
202 
192 
132 

8 153 

9 185 

10 195 

11 112 

12 254 

13 885 

14 168 

15 138 

16 266 

17 690 

18 84 

19 140 

20 120 

21 73 

22 208 

23 526 

24 191 

25 106 

26 179 

27 151 

28 48 

29 210 

30 130 

31 224 

32 164 

33 280 

34 150 

35 20 

36 185 

37 290 

38 137 

39 480 

40 251 

41 360 

42 169 

43 326 

44 387 

45 407 

46 162 

47 292 

48 185 

10,995 



1 140 
2 

3 93 

4 48 

5 173 



205 
142 
252 
189 
202 
192 
132 
153 
185 
195 
112 
254 
869 
168 
138 
263 
690 

84 
140 
120 

73 
208 
526 
191 
106 
179 
151 

48 
210 
130 
224 
164 
280 
150 

20 
185 
217 
137 
480 
250 
360 
169 
326 
387 
407 
162 
292 
185 



10902 



140 
96 
93 
48 

173 



162 
108 
297 
152 
233 
192 

46 
234 
123 
112 
134 
249 
814 
145 
203 
240 
249 

43 
175 

77 

93 
182 
598 
310 

89 

90 
107 

35 
221 
117 
181 
129 
403 
170 

84 
206 
271 
102 
450 
183 
265 
174 
343 
229 
240 

89 
116 
136 



9,601 



34 
82 
44 
45 
154 



169 
237 
465 
284 
322 
199 
170 
235 
248 
286 
204 
405 
,086 
206 
415 
343 
273 

43 
175 
161 

93 
290 
930 
341 
173 
237 
194 

86 
353 
128 
382 
206 
403 
171 

90 
294 
330 
201 
650 
541 
380 
180 
641 
580 
545 
202 
304 
311 



6 

7 

9 

11 

12 

9 

12 

4 

5 

9 

18 

24 

1 

4 

13 

21 

5 

7 

5 

'ii 

13 

1() 

3 
11 

8 

'ii 

8 
7 

11 
9 
8 

20 
9 

20 
2 

20 



15,162 



450 



158 
132 
116 

68.... 
156 



90 
237 
121 
260 
182 
152 
145 
141 

95 
342 
162 
326 
498 
175 
277 
233 
890 

79 
165 
203 
129 

50 
802 
247 

89 
295 
175 
150 
260 
140 
131 
153 
256 
186 
130 
127 
218 
145 
450 
362 



160 
260 
217 
393 
145 
217 
163 



10,823 



140 
50 
67 
49 

170 



221 
73 

121 
55 
95 
92 
65 
61 
95 

114 
89 

199 



26 

80 

63 

240 

57 

140 

118 

48 

50 

198 

67 

82 

107 

62 

64 

94 

23 

28 

75 

407 

135 

130 

84 

72 

59 

220 

187 



160 
131 
217 
152 
20 
146 



5,022 



12 
50 
28 
49 
109 



14 
73 

121 
55 
95 
7 
65 
61 
94 

115 
51 

112 



26 
83 
63 

238 
15 
40 

122 
48 
50 

207 
35 
38 

107 
62 
64 
51 
20 

126 
27 

133 
95 
20 
36 
72 
10 



20 
146 



2817 



10 



16 
73 
63 
56 
95 
12 
65 
61 
95 

140 
20 

120 



26 
88 
64 

120 
11 
25 
86 
48 
50 

123 
35 
38 
49 
62 
64 
22 
20 
70 
4 
61 
95 
20 
36 
72 
10 



20 
149 



2,284 



206 
90 
248 
169 
176 
194 
115 
155 
180 
179 
118 
224 
790 
169 
142 
237 
650 
91 
150 
47 
70 
205 
855 
208 
99 
142 
194 
85 
291 
123 
229 
118 
250 
154 
135 
203 
268 
146 
490 
320 
352 
216 
321 
302 
362 
157 
174 
153 



10952 

140 
96 
95 
48 

170 



318 
366 
710 
379 
441 
244 
240 
310 
346 
465 
280 
528 

1,062 
234 
593 
459 

1,242 
127 
268 
314 
282 
380 

1,365 
456 
224 
482 
273 
221 
392 
190 
479 
250 
559 
385 
208 
345 
544 
208 
860 
642 
650 
283 
679 
676 
577 
241 
579 
475 


14 








13 




152 
127 


161 
152 


11 


121 

49 

95 

4 


.... 


16 

8 


"iio 


86 


*138 


27 






1 


61 

95 

114 

20 


— 


75 

96 

183 


106 
115 
180 


14 

2 

17 








8 






351 

84 


397 
61 


24 


26 

80 

63 

240 

"*35 
99 


— 










28 
























12 


















50 
213 
35 
36 
107 
62 
64 
56 
















157 


.... 


153 


203 




"45 


107 


143 


... 


89 


92 


*37 










126 

3 

133 

95 








17 







21 


.... 


97 


117 


19 








8 


36 


35 


78 
191 


119 
223 


*28 


























41 










12 










14 






237 


312 


34 






25 


"*20 
144 
101 


*157 


207 


233 


29 

8 


218 
135 


189 
167 


6 
17 


21,831 


2,397 


377 


2,666 


3,108 676 


158 
132 
137 
70 
225 




































33 






' ' 









234 



THE REPOKT OF THE 



No. 17 



II. 


TABLE L— 


COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
\TTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS AND 




Pupils 


Number of Pupils 
in — 


Number of Pupils 
from — 


High Schools — Continued 


CO 

>> 

o 


CO 

3 


CO 

$ 

o 


Q 2 

5^ 


o 

■a 

u 


o 
o 

o 

W 


'o 

o 

o 

W 

u 

CD 

Pi 

Pi 
£> 


CD.5P-*- 3 

^ffi'co 

5-3 § 


cog_ 
£ c3 
^ <u 


CO 

as 

CD (—4 

^ U 


6 Arthur 


35 
94 
60 
34 
75 
49 

171 
66 
50 
91 
39 
57 
86 
80 
46 
19 
65 
56 
33 

148 
59 
39 
72 
76 
56 
55 
45 
68 
74 
38 
67 
56 
76 
38 
20 
53 
48 
74 
56 
36 
70 
81 
53 
80 
59 

117 
59 
48 
26 
89 
84 
76 
60 
40 
76 
40 
18 

119 
16 


87 

136 

69 

42 

92 

39 

220 

69 

54 

113 

45 

76 

101 

137 

51 

46 

79 

71 

53 

208 

59 

55 

100 

102 

75 

65 

51 

79 

89 

54 

64 

92 

92 

75 

31 

83 

75 

75 

74 

40 

93 

140 

72 

149 

105 

113 

61 

102 

52 

74 

90 

62 

72 

32 

106 

65 

19 

136 

14 


122 
230 
129 

76 
167 

88 
391 
135 
104 
204 

84 
133 
187 
217 

97 

65 
144 
127 

86 
356 
118 

94 
172 
178 
131 
120 

96 
147 
163 

92 
131 
148 
168 
113 

51 
136 
123 
149 
130 

76 
163 
221 
125 
229 
164 
230 
120 
150 

78 
163 
174 
138 
132 

72 
182 
105 

37 
255 

30 


78 

154 
88 
63 

101 
41 

260 
98 
66 

126 
52 
84 

123 

146 
70 
42 

100 
79 
56 

243 
74 
54 

108 

116 
90 
80 
58 
91 

100 
68 
87 
92 

113 
73 
33 
78 
82 
96 
87 
44 

111 

145 
80 

161 
98 

162 
80 
94 
38 

103 

114 
89 
93 
48 

122 
70 
21 

153 
11 


78 

144 
70 
58 

105 
71 

248 
93 
59 
97 
51 
92 

125 

125 
.62 
46 
73 
88 
55 

227 
97 
64 

136 

100 
85 
67 
71 
92 
98 
49 
86 
87 

114 
62 
37 
99 
94 

133 
67 
61 

120 
95 
88 

119 

110 

130 
74 
75 
56 
90 

106 
88 
77 
46 
88 
86 
25 

179 
25 


35 
86 
43 
18 
42 
17 

108 
33 
45 
72 
33 
28 
62 
74 
21 
19 
53 
39 
31 

105 
21 
30 
30 
60 
46 
39 
25 
40 
51 
43 
35 
55 
33 
37 
14 
37 
29 
15 
25 
15 
30 
94 
37 
87 
44 
76 
34 
66 
22 
37 
44 
36 
55 
26 
78 
19 
12 
52 
5 


9 

"ih 

'"26 

""35 
9 

"35 

""is 

""is 

14 

"is 

"24 

6 

18 
""l4 

"is 

14 

"io 

6 

21 
14 

i 

38 

"l3 
32 

"23 

10 

24 

12 

9 

"*36 
24 

14 

""l6 

"24 


55 
96 
63 
65 
65 
30 

276 
80 
42 

108 
52 
54 

123 

136 
55 
53 
71 
57 
42 

191 
87 
35 

113 
93 
61 
31 
51 
56 
87 
69 
71 
96 
45 
30 
51 
51 
49 

149 
45 
36 
63 
66 

123 

224 
70 
79 

120 
46 
52 
36 
92 

119 
66 
49 

105 
14 
30 

100 
24 


63 

133 

65 


4 


7 Athens 


1 


8 Aurora 


1 


9 Avonmore 


11 .... 


10 AyJmer 


102 


11 Beamsville 


58' 


12 Belleville 


101 14 


13 Bowmanville 


551 


14 Bradford 


60l 2 


15 Brampton 


85l 11 


16 Brighton 


32 - ... 


17 Caledonia 


57 
56 
57 
42 
10 
53 
69 
44 
142 
16 
39 
59 
70 
70 
89 
45 


?2 


18 Campbellford 


8 


19 Carleton Place 

20 Cayuga 


24 


21 Chatsworth 


? 


22 Chesley 


?0 


23 Chesterville 


1 


24 Colborne 




25 Cornwall 


?3 


26 Deseronto 


15 


27 Dundalk 


?0 


28 Dundas 




29 Dunnville 


15 


30 Durham 




31 Dutton 




32 Elora 




33 Essex 


91 .... 


34 Fergus 


73! 3 


35 Flesherton 


22 

60 
29 
65 
71 


1 


36 Forest 




37 Gananoque 


23 


38 Georgetown 


58 


39 Glencoe 


1?, 


40 Gravenhurst . . . 




41 Grimsby 


59 

74 


?f> 


42 Hagersville 




43 Hailey bury 




44 Harriston 


36 

28 

96 

88 

2 

"78 
137 


49 


45 Hawkesbury 


12 


46 Iroquois 


4 


47 Kemptville 


67 


48 Kenora 




49 Kincardine 


5 


50 Leamington 


16 


51 Listowel 


14 


52 Lucan 




53 Madoc 


104 
26 

108 
77 
18 
63 




54 Markdale 




55 Markham 


19 


56 Meaf ord 


5 


57 Midland 


1 


58 Mitchell 


3 


59 Morewood 


23 


60 Mount Forest 


27 

90 

5 

135 

6 


50 


61 Newburgh 


1 


62 Newcastle 


2 


63 Newmarket 


20 


64 Niagara 





1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



235 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils from Families whose Head 
is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils 


iu the Various Subjects 






it 






CO 


CO 






c3 




& 

S 

CO 


b 


b 




CO 

o 
u 

I 

a 

o 
O 


u 

hi 




| 

! 

En 


CO 

co 
En 

CO 

Eh 


a 
bo.2 
.1-5 


I 

'-+3 
c3 
A 

CO 

rd O 

6° 


d 


d a 

2 3 


u 


l-J'g 
I'll 


CO 

t-i 

A 

CO t-> 


a 

d 

c3 

a 



CO 

a 

CO 

'-+3 

pq 


CO 

a 

d 
.2 
'0 

3 


*b 
** 3 


6 16 


66 






11 


3 


13 


13 


89 


120 


120 


117 


80 


39 


6 


7 25 


129 


"s 


"5 


29 


10 


19 


5 


144 


230 


230 


230 


230 


86 




8 10 


58 


3 


1 


10 


12 


33 


2 


113 


129 


129 


113 


113 


43 


"i5 


9 10 


52 


3 




4 


3 


4 




58 


76 


76 


76 


51 


18 


.... 


10 19 


98 


13 


""2 


19 


12 


4 




114 


167 


167 


147 


167 


42 


12 


11 8 


59 


4 


3 


9 


1 


. 2 


"2 


73 


88 


88 


88 


88 


17 


.... 


12 112 


86 


20 


8 


66 


17 


59 


23 


293 


384 


384 


270 


281 


50 


22 


13 12 


48 


6 


4 


30 


11 


8 


16 


93 


130 


130 


126 


126 


33 


4 


14 19 


60 


6 




8 


6 


2 


3 


59 


104 


103 


104 


104 


44 


.... 


15 33 


91 


21 


"2 


33 


11 


3 


10 


97 


190 


190 


169 


169 


72 


14 


16 14 


38 


9 




12 


7 


2 


2 


65 


84 


84 


84 


65 


33 


.... 


17 16 


56 


7 


""i 


16 


5 


12 


20 


92 


128 


126 


120 


74 


28 


7 


18 18 


58 


6 


2 


20 


36 


37 


10 


125 


187 


187 


187 


187 


62 


.... 


19 31 


84 


6 


2 


59 


9 


21 


5 


125 


216 


217 


199 


135 


74 


10 


20 10 


54 


9 


2 


6 


8 


8 




67 


97 


97 


67 


50 


29 


6 


21 5 


46 


1 


1 


2 




8 


"2 


55 


65 


65 


55 


41 


20 


.... 


22 28 


61 


8 


1 


19 


'*8 


16 


3 


73 


144 


144 


126 


90 


53 


9 


23 28 


64 


4 




14 


2 


3 


12 


88 


127 


127 


127 


79 


39 


.... 


24 6 


40 


5 




4 


15 


6 


10 


50 


86 


86 


55 


86 


31 


.... 


25 74 


109 


25 


""9 


76 


26 


36 


1 


227 


350 


350 


285 


285 


101 


19 


26 16 


41 
67 






20 
3 


32 

4 


9 

8 




97 
64 


118 
94 


118 
94 


118 
94 


118 
94 


21 
30 




27 6 


"4 


"2 


. • • » 


28 42 


43 


5 


1 


53 


11 


3 


"'ii 


151 


172 


172 


172 


172 


36 


6 


29 40 


85 


5 


2 


29 


7 


5 


5 


100 


173 


175 


160 


160 


58 


13 


30 11 


61 


7 


2 


14 


34 


2 




85 


131 


131 


131 


96 


46 


.... 


31 10 


76 


11 




14 


3 


6 




77 


120 


117 


77 


85 


45 


14 


32 13 


36 


1 


"i 


23 


11 


7 


"4 


71 


96 


96 


96 


96 


25 


.... 


33 35 


72 


9 


3 


17 


2 


8 


1 


100 


139 


137 


129 


68 


41 


7 


34 40 


73 


9 


6 


10 


13 


9 


3 


163 


163 


163 


149 


163 


51 


8 


35 5 


75 

48 


2 

6 


"3 


10 
12 








49 
86 


92 
126 


92 
126 


92 
121 


92 

84 


43 
35 




36 20 


"l5 


**8 


"l9 


'"5 


37 32 


53 


9 


1 


37 


5 




11 


87 


148 


148 


146 


146 


55 


2 


38 30 


66 


4 


1 


45 


14 


"5 


3 


127 


166 


166 


147 


147 


42 


10 


39 3 


92 


3 




3 


3 


4 


5 


62 


106 


105 


99 


102 


37 


6 


40 1 


4 




"i 


16 


18 


7 


4 


36 


51 


51 


51 


51 


14 


.... 


41 9 


67 


'*8 


1 


19 


16 


9 


7 


99 


136 


136 


136 


86 


371.... 


42 10 


71 


5 




23 


4 


8 


2 


101 


123 


123 


123 


123 


29 ... . 


43 34 


10 


12 


""3 


74 


2 


14 




117 


149 


149 


94 


79 


28 1 


44 25 


51 


6 


4 


10 


2 


30 


""2 


82 


122 


122 


104 


67 


371 29 


45 18 


31 


2 




13 




12 




61 


76 


76 


76 


47 


15.... 


46 10 


99 


5 


"6 


10 


'"14 


9 


'"io 


120 


163 


163 


102 


78 


37 1 7 


47 10 


151 


16 


1 


17 


7 


17 


2 


126 


210 


210 


194 


147 


99 21 


48 28 


3 


5 


2 


37 


26 


24 




100 


120 


120 


120 


120 


19.... 


49 28 


141 


12 


1 


20 


9 


15 


"3 


157 


229 


229 


193 


193 


49 


17 


50 31 


69 


10 




12 


8 


26 


8 


125 


161 


161 


159 


114 


49 


5 


51 45 


122 


11 


"5 


22 


13 


12 




157 


229 


229 


209 


209 


82 


23 


52 10 


92 


7 




6 




2 


'"*3 


74 


115 


115 


108 


77 


34 


12 


53 36 


89 


4 


"4 


4 


"8 


3 


2 


75 


145 


145 


141 


141 


66 


4 


54 11 


45 


2 




7 


4 


3 


6 


64 


78 


78 


78 


78 


22 




55 21 


88 


7 




9 


7 


21 


10 


111 


140 


140 


127 


127 


37 


"ii 


56 29 


82 


15 




25 


10 


13 




126 


167 


167 


147 


92 


52 


11 


57 21 


24 


4 


"2 


18 


33 


35 


"i 


104 


135 


134 


130 


130 


40 


5 


58 25 


65 


4 


2 


19 


5 


7 


5 


86 


132 


132 


132 


132 


55 


.... 


59 9 


39 


6 


2 


8 


4 


4 




53 


72 


72 


71 


71 


25 




60 40 


78 


11 


3 


19 


2 


13 


"i6 


88 


179 


179 


166 


166 


78 


"16 


61 2 


86 


3 


1 


4 


1 


7 


1 


86 


105 


105 


105 


105 


19 .... 


62 8 


16 


5 


1 


1 


4 


2 




28 


37 


37 


37 


28 


12 .... 


63 42 


85 


21 


6 


40 


26 


18 


'"ii 


162 


235 


238 


138 


138 


59 9 


f4 3 


9 


1 




5 


2 


6 


4 


27 


BO 


30 


24 


15 


5 .... 



236 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 





II. 


COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
TABLE L— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 






Number of Pupils 


n the Various Subjects — Continued 


High Schools — Continued 


s 

CO 

a 
e 


>> 
p. 

<3 




©•■♦3 

'"5 2 
gg 


4) 

< 


o 


s 

a 

o 

a 

o 


& 

3 
2 

^ 


B 

N 


a 

a 

►3 


A4 

CO 

a> 
u 


6 Arthur i 


5 


88 

144 

70 

58 

114 

73 

248 

93 

59 

97 

65 

92 

125 

125 

67 

55 

73 

88 

50 

180 

97 

64 

151 

100 

85 

77 

71 

100 

163 

49 

86 

87 

127 

62 

37 

99 

101 

115 

82 

61 

120 

126 

100 

157 

126 

157 

74 

75 

64 

90 

147 

104 

77 

53 

88 

86 

28 

185 

27 


88 

144 

70 

58 

114 

73 

248 

126 

59 

97 

65 

92 

53 

125 

67 

55 

73 

88 

55 

227 

97 

64 

151 

100 

85 

77 

71 

63 

163 

49 

86 

87 

85 

62 

37 

99 

101 

125 

82 

61 

72 

154 

100 

157 

126 

157 

74 

75 

64 

90 

167 

104 

77 

53 

88 

86 

28 

112 

27 


88 

144 

113 

58 

114 

73 

282 

93 

61 

97 

65 

92 

125 

131 

67 

55 

76 

88 

50 

250 

97 

64 

151 

100 

85 

77 

71 

102 

98 

52 

86 

87 

147 

62 

37 

99 

101 

132 

82 

61 

120 

154 

100 

157 

126 

157 

74 

75 

66 

90 

127 

104 

85 

53 

88 

86 

28 

182 

27 


1201 
230 
128 
76 
163 
88 
391 
132 
104 
192 

83 
128 
125 
216 

97 

65 
142 
127 

86 
307 
118 

94 
155 
171 
131 
119 

63 
139 
157 

92 
131 
148 
167 
107 

51 
136 
123 
146 
122 

76 
156 
211 
120 
215 
163 
229 
115 
145 

78 
140 
151 
138 
132 

72 
179 
105 

28 
238 

30 


87 

189 
98 
51 

163 
53 

287 

124 
82 

192 
62 
90 
72 

152 
56 
41 
90 
87 
62 

211 
66 
61 
81 

168 
96 
93 
49 
95 

157 
80 
84 

102 

115 
81 
30 
86 
61 

140 
85 
48 
84 

174 
79 

162 

111 

229 
84 

120 
56 

140 
96 
86 
90 
54 

179 
75 
28 

184 
15 


6 

"is 
"ii 
"35 

6 

"i6 
"7 

"is 

6 

"i3 

"26 

"*6 
16 

"id 

"io 

8 

"5 

4 
11 

8 

"20 

29 

"*7 
23 

"ii 
7 

23 
12 

4 

"l4 
18 
12 

"ii 
"ii 


24 .... 

209 ... . 

108 1 5 
52 .... 
78i 22 
87! 6 

196 20 
84 12 
75 .... 

180! 16 
32 ... . 

110 18 

155 


88 
221 
115 

49 
150 

88 
247 

89 

99 
190 

53 
125 
167 
180 

93 

51 
133 

94 

61 
270 
110 

60 
129 
170 

80 

75 

48 
138 
155 

53 
102 
107 
128 

40 

40 
130 

93 

97 
109 

58 
136 
205 

99 
197 
127 
221 

82 
122 

55 
150 
121 
127 
101 

49 
170 

90 

29 
198 

24 




7 Athens i 




8 Aurora 


3 




9 Avoumore ! 




10 Aylmer ' 


14 




11 Beamsville 




12 Belleville 


17 
3 


t 


13 Bowmanville 




14 Bradford 




15 Brampton 


16 




16 Brighton 




17 Caledonia 


6 




18 Campbellford 




19 Carleton Place 


10 
12 


198 

82 

29 

102 

75 

32 

191 

110 

60 

112 

156 

79 

72 

54 

123 

140 

52 

67 

111 

45 

33 

38 

129 

91 

91 

40 

70 

72 

147 

89 

99 

131 

170 

64 

89 

41 

123 

101 

117 

58 

49 

158 

52 

32 

199 

27 


"30 
"4 

"i3 

68 

"26 
1 

"ii 

"ii 

'"7 

22 

"ii 

17 

10 

6 
2 
27 
2 
2 

"*4 

8 
8 

7 

"7 

"ii 




20 Cayuga 




21 Chatsworth 




22 Chesley 






23 Chesterville 






24 Colborne 






25 Cornwall 


9 


3 


26 Deseronto 




27 Dundalk 






28 Dundas 


1 

9 




29 Dunnville 




30 Durham 




31 ■ Dutton 


4 




32 Elora 




33 Essex 


9 
6 




34 Fergus 




35 Flesherton 




36 Forest 


9 
3 

18 
5 


3 


37 Gananoque 




38 Georgetown 


3 


39 Glencoe 




40 Gravenhurst 




41 Grimsby . 






42 Hagersville 




1 


43 Haileybury 


20 




44 Harriston '. . 




45 Hawkesbury 




46 Iroquois 


6 




47 Kemptville 


3 


48 Kenora 




49 Kincardine 


12 

4 

18 

5 
5 




50 Leamington 




51 Listowel 


4 


52 Lucan 




53 Madoc 


1 


54 Markdale 




55 Markham 


22 

3 




56 Meaford 




"57 Midland 




58 Mitchell 




59 Morewood 






60 Mount Forest 


16 




61 Newburgh 




62 Newcastle 






63 Newmarket 




3 


64 Niagara 






1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



237 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects— Continued 





b 




0. 

(=1 


-*3 

CO 

a 

CO 


CO 

"55 
>> 


o 


,C| 


^d 


pq 


o 


PL, 



a 



O 

I 






.2 ^ 



Special Courses 









6 
7 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 



93 

144 

74 



135 
73 

257 
97 
59 

109 
48 
99 

125 

125 
79 



79 
79 
50 

186 
97 
64 

114 

105 
85 
81 
40 
90 

106 
49 
94 
80 

145 
66 
32 
99 

101 
36 
99 
61 

12? 

166 
63 

143 

124 

175 
82 
81 
64 

115 
87 

117 
77 

"96 
86 
28 

131 
22 



93 


52 


122 


144 


189 


230 


74 


103 


127 


58 


51 


76 


135 


136 


155 


73 


38 


42 


257 


210 


225 


97 


80 


131 


59 


82 


103 


109 


78 


109 


48 


35 


83 


99 


69 


128 


125 


134 


187 


125 


134 


216 


79 


54 


97 


55 


41 


65 


79 


101 


139 


79 


127 


127 


50 


55 


62 


186 


193 


300 


97 


66 


118 


64 


61 


94 


114 


47 


134 


105 


110 


112 


85 


96 


131 


81 


90 


119 


40 


49 


65 


90 


93 


139 


106 


157 


157 


49 


78 


92 


94 


44 


131 


80 


104 


148 


145 


71 


157 


66 


40 


45 


32 


18 


47 


99 


76 


126 


101 


92 


123 


36 


45 


130 


99 


76 


82 


61 


48 


76 


127 


75 


127 


166 


108 


207 


63 


80 


81 


143 


120 


116 


124 


116 


163 


175 


168 


228 


82 


82 


120 


81 


124 


144 


64 


33 


78 


115 


80 


140 


87 


86 


139 


117 


63 


131 


77 


90 


132 


53 


35 


71 


96 


125 


182 


86 


75 


105 


28 


28 


37 


131 


112 


225 


22 


12 


25 



12 



14 



144 
70 
25 

114 
73 

350 
93 
59 
97 
41 
92 
53 
64 
67 
55 
36 
88 
55 

227 
97 
64 

136 

100 
85 
77 
33 
63 

163 
49 
86 
74 
85 
62 
37 

'ioi 

115 

55 

61 

72 

148 

100 

179 

126 

130 

74 

75 

38 

90 

126 

70 

40 

53 

88 

86 

28 

135 

18 



42 

70 

25 

114 



52 



29 
86 
39 
48 
125 



62 
36 
36 
81 
40 
198 
41 
18 
64 
12 



14 

"27 
72 

89 

40 

176 

i30 

"06 

"96 
99 
70 
40 



28 

131 

20 



40 



39 



47 



18 



20 



10 



31 



75 



32 



29 1 

13 

. i 

12 



15 



11 



31 



33 
16 



33 
18 



91 


120 


144 


228 


76 


129 


58 


76 


114 


164 


73 


88 


240 


391 


93 


135 


59 


104 


92 


204 


51 


80 


92 


133 


125 


187 


132 


214 


67 


97 


55 


65 


73 


144 


82 


126 


50 


86 


146 


350 


97 


118 


64 


94 


142 


172 


99 


177 


85 


131 


77 


120 


28 


96 


85 


146 


98 


163 


49 


92 


90 


131 


84 


149 


85 


168 


62 


113 


37 


51 


97 


136 


101 


123 


54 


149 


82 


128 


61 


75 


124 


163 


147 


221 


65 


121 


178 


223 


130 


164 


154 


229 


74 


120 


118 


150 


64 


78 


90 


163 


96 


174 


114 


138 


77 


132 


53 


72 


88 


182 


86 


104 


28 


37 


141 


254 


20 


30 



40 



28 



103 



124 



47 



55 



11 



33 



115 



24 



10 

7 



21 

ii 



238 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
II. TABLE L— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Pupils 


Number of Pupils 
in— 


High Schools— Continued 


CO 

o 


to' 

s 


CO 

Is 
o 
Eh 


>> 

g CD 


o 
o 

u 


o 
o 

-s 


o 

J* 
o 
CQ 

u 

93 

P. 

P 


65 Niagara Falls South 


51 

48 
68 
17 

107 
97 
66 
58 
44 

119 
46 
80 
25 
24 
46 

107 
63 
22 
60 
67 
28 

148 
42 

101 
36 
52 
33 
83 
67 
44 
66 

239 
91 
84 
84 
23 
67 
23 
37 
34 
66 

126 
69 
52 
40 
52 
70 
96 


67 
59 
69 
32 

116 

125 
72 
89 
93 
88 
42 

118 
50 
27 
59 

131 
58 
25 
89 
63 
22 

155 
74 

128 
53 
78 
34 
77 
80 
43 
92 

344 

108 
92 
95 
24 
73 
38 
45 
43 
89 

144 
87 
74 
60 
76 
81 

123 


118 
107 
137 

49 
223 
222 
138 
147 
137 
207 

88 
198 

75 

51 
105 
238 
121 

47 
149 
130 

50 
303 
116 
229 

89 
130 

67 
160 
147 

87 
158 
583 
199 
176 
179 

47 
140 

61 

82 

77 
155 
270 
156 
126 
100 
128 
151 
219 


81 

69 

87 

31 

143 

141 

91 

99 

86 

130 

52 

123 

46 

32 

70 

156 

73 

30 

97 

80 

31 

206 

80 

145 

52 

94 

44 

94 

95 

54 

102 

375 

112 

113 

118 

30 

96 

41 

50 

49 

107 

167 

92 

70 

65 

92 

93 

162 


91 

80 

98 

31 

122 

167 

100 

110 

105 

131 

61 

133 

60 

43 

65 

152 

85 

29 

102 

95 

32 

218 

80 

130 

59 

86 

40 

113 

93 

66 

81 

260 

104 

115 

107 

31 

94 

33 

65 

51 

98 

188 

84 

83 

72 

67 

108 

113 


25 
27 

39 
18 
81 
37 
26 
30 
29 
64 
27 
47 
15 
8 
34 
73 
24 
18 
34 
35 
18 
70 
36 
87 
30 
38 
27 
38 
51 
21 
68 
167 
75 
56 
42 
16 
35 
28 
17 
26 
44 
63 
61 
28 
24 
53 
34 
68 


2 


66 Norwood 




67 Oakville 




68 Omeuiee 




69 Orangeville 


20 


70 Oshawa 


18 


71 Paris 


" 12 


72 Parkhill 


7 


73 Parry Sound 


3 


74 Pembroke 


12 


75 Penetanguishene 




76 Petrolea 


18 


77 Plantagenet 




78 Port Dover 




79 Port Elgin 


6 


80 Port Hope 


13 


81 Port Perry 


12 


82 Port Rowan 




83 Prescott 


13 


84 Richmond Hill 




85 Rockland 




86 Sault Ste. Marie 


1 


87 Shelburne 




88 Simcoe 


12 






90 Stirling 


6 






92 Sudbury 


9 




3 


94 Thorold 






9 


96 Toronto, Commerce and Finance 


156 
20 


98 Trenton 


5 




30 


100 Vienna 






11 


102 Wardsville 




103 Waterdown 




104 Waterford 




105 Watford 


13 


106 Welland 


19 


107 Weston 


11 


108 Whitby 


15 




4 


110 Williamstown 


8 


Ill Winchester 


9 


112 Wingham 


38 




7,154 
10,551 


9,091 
11,630 


16,245 
22,181 


10,493 
14,332 


10,366 
14,159 


4,723 
6,204 


1,156 


2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes 


1,818 




17,705 

17,001 

704 


20,721 

19,465 

1,256 


38,426 
36,466 


24,825 

23,360 

1,465 


24,525 

22,849 

1,676 


10,927 

io;54i 


2,974 


4 Grand Totals, 1914 


3,076 


5 Increases 


1,960 


386 




6 Decreases 


102 


7 Percentages 


46.07 


53.92 




64.60 


63.82 


28.43 


7.74 







1916 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



239 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Number of Pupils from — 


Number of Pupils from Families whose Head is occupied as below — 


Municipalities 
forming 
High School 
District 


r3 ^» o mh 

p. a >» Q 

•—> .2 +* i— i 

is g-c 


o 

si 

8« 


CD 

<o 

B 
B 

o 


U 
JO 

S 

< 


o 

so 


bo 

1 

<u 
Eh 


w 
03 

ea 

Fh 

Eh 


DQ 

A 

2 « 


| 

o3 
Pi 

E3 
O 
O 
O 

Fh 
0> 

53 
O 


a 


13* 
11 


65 75 


40 


3 


21 


f 46 


4 


1 


3C 




11 




66 46 


41 


20 


9 


6C 


< 





7 


11 


10 


6 


67 7] 


66 
13 




19 


52 

24 


4 


1 
1 


26 

7 


8 


9 
11 


18 


68 32 


4 


1 


69 115 


73 


35 


14 


119 


14 


1 


31 


7 


34 


3 


70 162 


50 


10 


45 


51 


7 


4 


83 


9 


19 


4 


71 96 


34 


8 


17 


45 


1C 


2 


32 


6 


22 


4 


72 60 


73 


14 


16 


78 


6 


5 


16 


12 


7 


7 


73 119 


18 
38 




10 
47 


8 
44 


8 
16 


3 
1 


25 
51 


40 
16 


35 
22 


8 


74 165 


4 


10 


75 74 


12 


2 


14 


14 


9 


1 


22 


10 


17 


1 


76 110 


86 


2 


48 


40 


5 




30 


19 


23 


33 


77 53 


19 


3 


6 


48 


2 




6 


6 


4 


3 


78 33 


15 


3 


10 


16 


1 


3 


3 


10 


8 




79 60 


43 


2 


14 


40 


2 




4 


12 


3 


30 


80 135 


103 
61 




36 
21 


80 
65 


11 

5 


4 
1 


36 
19 


51 
5 


13 
2 


7 


81 39 


21 


3 


82 18 


29 
23 




6 

38 


23 
24 






6 
33 


4 
12 


5 
16 


3 


83 124 


2 


8 


1 


17 


84 30 


98 


2 


5 


102 


3 




8 


10 


2 




85 28 


22 

38 




12 
65 


15 
23 


4 
16 


4 


7 
39 


9 
81 


2 
63 


1 


86 247 


18 


12 


87 35 


81 
127 




12 

48 


74 
106 


3 
11 


1 
1 


5 
43 


5 
12 


16 

4 




88 94 


8 


4 


89 29 


44 


16 


4 


49 


9 


2 


6 


4 


11 


4 


90 38 


92 

28 




17 
13 


85 
41 


12 

4 


2 
1 


2 
4 


6 


4 
2 


2 


91 23 


"l6 


2 


92 120 


38 


2 


26 


2 


7 




36 


14 


71 


4 


93 146 




1 


9 


90 


12 




19 


7 


7 


3 


94 64 


i9 


4 


17 


18 


1 


1 


41 


4 


5 




95 80 


44 


34 


33 


84 


7 


5 


15 


3 


9 


2 


96 568 


12 


3 


240 


18 


30 


10 


150 


18 


60 


57 


97 163 


36 

27 




70 
36 


33 
51 


11 

10 


6 


48 
35 


2 
30 


9 

10 


20 


98 114 


35 


4 


99 74 


100 


5 


34 


96 


9 


4 


15 


9 


6 


6 


100 43 





4 




35 


2 




2 


1 


7 




101 76 


59 


5 


32 


52 


4 


2 


26 


14 


5 


5 


102 21 


24 


16 


6 


36 


5 




4 


3 


4 


3 


103 81 




1 


12 


27 


5 


1 


10 


7 


10 


10 


104 28 


49 

84 

148 




6 

30 

. 73 


51 

83 

78 


5 

12 
19 


1 
**3 


7 

10 
73 


20 

13 


6 


1 


105 57 


14 
2 


106 120 


4 


7 


107 84 


60 


12 


19 


50 


9 


4 


22 


7 


25 


20 


108 80 


45 


1 


20 


35 


11 


4 


26 


17 


12 


1 


109 57 


27 


16 


15 


29 


2 




6 


16 


24 


8 


110 123 


2 


3 


12 


74 


11 




16 


7 


3 


5 


111 117 


31 


3 


21 


86 


7 




8 


8 


14 


7 


112 92 


106 


21 


46 


04 


14 


2 


26 


8 


16 


3 


1 9,374 


5,850 


1,021 


2,722 


6,676 


840 


201 


2,455 


1,229 


1,4 40 


682 


2 16,565 


4,740 


876 


5,680 


4,422 


1,270 


467 
668 


4,761 
7,216 


1,719 


2,6 99 


1,163 


3 25,939 


10,590 


1,897 


8,402 


11,098 


2,110 


2,948 


,39 


1,845 


4 24,925 


9,744 
846 


1,797 


7,761 


10,326 


2,099 


601 


7,276 


2,656 


, 17 


1,830 


5 1,014 
6 


100 


641 


772 


11 


67 


"60 


292 



222 


15 


7 67.50 


27.56 


4.93 


21.86 


28.88 


5.49 


1.74 


18.78 


7.67| 


10.77 


4.80 



240 



THE REPORT OP THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 



II. T/ 


^BLE L- 


-ATTEN 


DANCE, 


*PUPIL! 


5 IN TH 


E SCHOOLS 










Number of Pupils 


in the 


High Schools— Continued 

* 


c3 

B 
S 

CO 

bo 


'co'C 

B% 

-d d 

i— i rl 

bo o 


rd j* 

"bio:? 


b 

o 

CO 

B 



id 

O 


s 

CO 

s 

,d 

co 
'u 


O 

CO 

a 
1 

o 

4 


u 

o 

CO 

> 
S 

3 


65 Niagara Falls South 


91 

80 

98 

31 

121 

165 

92 

110 

105 

143 

61 

133 

60 

46 

75 

181 

94 

37 

122 

95 

32 

218 

80 

160 

59 

102 

51 

95 

121 

77 

116 

382 

104 

136 

143 

40 

94 

45 

65 

51 

98 

221 

84 

83 

72 

108 

108 

141 


118 
107 
137 
48 
210 
207 
138 
147 
137 
204 

88 
192 

75 

51 
105 
231 
110 

47 
146 
130 

50 
293 
116 
224 

89 
130 

67 
158 
146 

87 
156 
583 
189 
176 
171 

47 
135 

58 

82 

77 
147 
265 
148 
122 

98 
120 
146 
207 


118 
107 
137 

48 
210 
207 
138 
147 
137 
204 

88 
192 

75 

51 
105 
231 
110 

47 
146 
130 

50 
293 
116 
224 

89 
130 

67 
158 
146 

87 
156 
583 
189 
176 
171 

47 
135 

59 

82 

77 
147 
265 
148 
122 

98 
121 
146 
207 


117 

107 
137 

49 
200 
179 

50 
110 
105 
188 

88 
180 

75 

51 
102 
225 
109 

46 
145 
129 

50 
288 
116 
180 

55 
130 

45 
141 
145 

87 
155 
582 
179 
171 
161 

34 
130 

60 

82 

77 
142 
260 
145 

76 

72 
120 
144 
186 


117 

107 

87 

49 

135 

107 

76 

76 

137 

133 

88 

127 

75 

28 

77 

160 

61 

32 

59 

129 

50 

173 

86 

224 

64 

130 

51 

73 

96 

87 

155 

23 

118 

171 

161 

34 

130 

47 

50 

56 

100 

266 

145 

63 

54 

120 

151 

137 


26 
27 
39 
18 
84 
44 
26 
30 
29 
68 
27 
52 
15 
8 

40 
73 
25 
18 
35 
35 
18 
70 
36 
100 
30 
38 
27 
38 
52 
16 
74 
132 
75 
56 
51 
16 
35 
26 
17 
26 
44 
70 
84 
28 
24 
30 
34 
75 
4,758 
5,721 


1 


66 Norwood 




67 Oakville 




68 Omemee 




69 Orangeville 


8 


70 Oshawa 


4 


71 Paris 


12 


72 Parkhill 


7 


73 Parry Sound 


3 


74 Pembroke 


7 


75 Penetanguishene 




76 Petrolea 


9 


77 Plantagenet 




78 Port Dover 




79 Port Elgin 


6 


80 Port Hope 


8 


81 Port Perry 


6 


82 Port Rowan 




83 Prescott 


10 


84 Richmond Hill 




85 Rockland 




86 Sault Ste. Marie 


7 


87 Shelburne 




88 Simcoe 


9 


89 Smithville 




90 Stirling 


6 






92 Sudbury 


3 




2 


94 Thorold 




95 Tillsonburg 


7 


96 Toronto, Commerce & Finance 


132 
12 


98 Trenton 


5 


99 Uxbridge 


19 


100 Vienna 




101 Walkerton 


8 


102 Wardsville 




103 Waterdown 




104 Waterf ord 




105 Watford 


5 


106 Welland 


17 


107 Weston 


3 


108 Whitby 


10 


109 Wiarton 


2 


110 Williamstown 


6 


Ill Winchester 


4 


112 Wingham 


27 


1 Totals, High Schools 


11,352 
14,765 


15,917 
21,397 


15,915 
21,528 


14,505 
17,083 


12,147 
16,049 
28,196 
26,031 


742 


2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes . . 


953 


3 Grand Totals, 1915 


26,117 

24,252 

1,865 


37,314 

34,759 

2,555 


37,443 

34,784 

2,659 


31,588 
29,461 


10,479 
9,906 


1,695 


4 Grand Totals, 1914 


1,700 


5 Increases 


2,127 


2,165 


573 




6 Decreases 


5 


7 Percentages 


67.96 


97.10 


97.44 


82.20 


73.37 


27.27 


4.41 



1916 



DEPABTMENT OF EDUCATION 



241 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC.— Continued 



Various Subjects— Continued 





S 






CO 






b 








CO 


>, 




0^3 














9 
B 

o 


| 

g 

bo 


0> 


fcfi 

3 





3 


b 

B 



s 

1 


a 



a 




§ 


O 


M 


<* 


< 





H 


£ 


O 


65 


2 


98 


90 


98 


87 


87 


1 


71 


2 


66 


"8 


80 

98 

31 

122 


80 

98 

31 

122 


80 

98 

31 

121 


107 

134 

48 

214 


6E 

83 

32 

14S 




92 

93 

15 

177 




67 




4 


68 




69 


12 


34 


70 


3 


181 


165 


179 


144 


8? 


12 


171 


19 


71 


12 


100 


50 


100 


138 


88 


12 


60 


12 


72 


7 


110 


110 


110 


147 


87 


7 


64 


4 


73 


1 


105 


105 


105 


137 


137 


3 


110 


4 


74 


5 


179 


154 


164 


178 


110 


9 


157 


23 


75 


"i2 


61 
131 


38 
132 


61 

148 


88 
186 


50 
186 




81 
156 


15 

8 


76 


5 


77 




60 
46 
75 


60 
46 
75 


60 
46 
75 


75 

51 

105 


75 
28 
80 




47 
17 
90 




78 




1 


79 


6 


80 


9 


161 


152 


161 


230 


151 


8 


129 


37 


81 


6 


94 


93 


97 


116 


71 


9 


104 


11 


8? 


"l 


37 
122 


37 
80 


37 

126 


47 
145 


32 

88 




47 
145 




83 


10 


10 


84 


"6 


129 

* 32 

218 


95 

17 

218 


95 

32 

218 


129 

50 

293 


74 

31 

181 




67 

46 
108 


21 


85 




86 


11 


9 


87 


"9 


80 
160 


80 
*160 


80 
160 


116 

200 


86 
160 




20 
75 


29 
20 


88 


'9 


89 




59 
102 


59 
86 


59 
102 


89 
130 


64 
130 




47 
103 


5 


90 


6 


91 


"4 


51 

105 


51 

100 


52 
135 


66 
150 


48 
101 




56 
79 


5 
22 


92 


7 


93 


2 


121 


121 


121 


147 


97 


2 


110 




94 


"2 


77 
116 


77 
116 


77 
116 


80 
156 


51 

156 




63 

88 


10 
20 


95 


7 


96 


8 


382 
100 




546 
104 


546 
187 






518 
187 




97 


104 


187 


12 


45 


98 




136 


136 


136 


176 


124 


5 


108 


17 


99 


13 


143 


143 


143 


173 


125 


22 


132 


21 


100 


"6 


40 
94 


40 
94 


40 
94 


47 
125 


34 
92 




19 
19 




101 


9 


43 


10? 


**8 


46 
65 
51 

98 


45 
32 
51 

98 


46 
65 
51 

98 


61 

82 

77 

147 


45 

50 

56 

112 




37 

79 
66 

77 




103 






104 




8 


105 


5 


106 


6 


217 


217 


217 


244 


141 


17 


235 


25 


107 


8 


84 


84 


84 


154 


110 


6 


8 


7 


108 


6 


83 


83 


83 


122 


74 


11 


54 


vll 


109 


3 


72 


72 


72 


99 


60 


3 


59 




110 


7 


109 


87 


108 


124 


90 


7 


84 


9 


111 


6 


108 


108 


108 


146 


90 


4 


97 


2 


112 


15 


138 


137 


142 


208 


155 


27 


149 


25 


1 


492 


11,307 


10,505 


11,636 


15,494 


10,920 


723 


10,717 


992 


2 


809 
1,301 


15,297 


13,450 


15,053 


19,965 


13,229 


1,339 


15,745 


3,614 


3 


26,604 


23,955 


26,689 


35,459 


24,149 


2,062 


26,462 


4,606 


4 


1,221 


24,377 
2,227 


21,963 


25,344 


32,687 


23,203 


2,285 


23,797 


5,396 


5 


80 


1,992 


1,345 


2,772 


940 




2,665 




6 


223 


790 


7 


3.38 


69.23 


62.34 


69.45 


92.27 


62.84| 


5.36 


68.86 


11.98 



16 E, 



24:2 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
II. TABLE L— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 









Number of Pupils 


in the 


High Schools— Concluded 


.9 


•8 ■ 

05 


bo 


■o 

CS3 


$ 



H 

DO 

a 




CO 

*w 

>> 

M 
PL, 


S 



§ 

S 


65 Niagara Falls South, 


61 

97 

93 

30 

185 

136 

90 

79 

112 

137 

73 

145 

33 

34 

92 

148 

102 

47 

141 

91 

43 

259 

111 

125 

49 

121 

58 

93 

116 

64 

102 




73 

80 
64 


73 

80 
64 


33 

65 

83 

34 

148 

76 

61 

83 

60 

72 

50 

57 

47 

28 

80 

138 

68 

32 

56 

52 

50 

165 

86 

140 

64 

98 

39 

73 

98 

51 

156 

156 

165 

167 

72 

34 

78 

47 

50 

56 

115 

129 

75 

69 

41 

73 

97 

114 


85 

107 

128 

49 

214 

137 

100 

147 

108 

162 

88 

55 

75 

46 

105 

138 

102 

47 

134 

85 

50 

288 

116 

180 

87 

130 

52 

120 

146 

87 

156 

427 

165 

167 

173 

34 

104 

60 

82 

77 

147 

228 

153 

122 

99 

125 

147 

181 


2 


66 Norwood 




67 Oakville 




68 Omemee 




69 Orangeville 


4 

2 
4 

i 

"2 
i 


114 

103 
79 

115 

106 

125 
61 

142 
60 
46 
75 
89 

100 
37 

105 
63 
32 

221 
80 

160 
59 

102 
43 
53 

123 
41 

113 


114 

103 
79 

115 

106 

128 
61 

142 
60 
46 
75 
89 

100 
37 
10 
63 
32 

221 
80 

160 
59 

102 
43 
53 

123 
40 

113 


9 


70 Oshawa 




71 Paris 




72 Parkhill 


4 


73 Parry Sound 


1 


74 Pembroke 


1 


75 Penetanguishene 




76 Petrolea 


70 


77 Plantagenet 




78 Port Dover 




79 Port Elgin 




80 Port Hope 


3 


81 Port Perry 


3 


82 Port Rowan 




83 Prescott 


3 


84 Richmond Hill 




85 Rockland 




86 Sault Ste. Marie 


3 


87 Shelburne 




88 Simcoe 


8 






90 Stirling 








92 Sudbury 


9 




2 


94 Thorold 




95 Tillsonburg 




96 Toronto, Commerce and Finance. 






181 

150 

143 

22 

83 

50 

82 

66 

137 

177 

10 

96 

68 

120 

85 

143 


4 

i 

5 

1 

6 


100 
75 

125 
40 
82 
45 
65 
51 

106 

172 
94 
89 
75 

116 
7 

157 


100 
75 

125 
40 
82 
45 
65 
51 

106 

172 
94 
89 
75 

116 
7 

157 


8 


98 Trenton 






1 


100 Vienna 






5 


102 Wardsville 




103 Waterdown 




104 Waterf ord 




105 Watford 


8 


106 Welland 


3 


107 Weston 


4 


108 Whitby 


6 




3 


110 Williamstown 


7 


Ill Winchester 


7 


112 Wingham 


16 


1 Totals, High Schools 


12,086 
16,511 


73 
618 


9,856 
10,995 


10,025 
10,902 


9,275 
9,601 


14,046 
15,162 


447 


2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes .... 


450 


3 Grand Totals, 1915 


28,597 

25,989 

2,608 


691 
553 
138 


20,851 
19,008 


20,927 
19,008 


18,876 
17,726 


29,208 
28,524 


897 


4 Grand Totals, 1914 


809 


5 Increases 


1,843 


1,919 


1,150 


684 


88 


6 Decreases 




7 Percentages 


74.42 


1.79 


54.26 


54.46 


49.12 


76.01 


2.33 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION* 



243 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC, 



-Concluded 



Various Subjects— Concluded 










Special Courses 




d 

•B 


ba 

d 
'S 

<o 
M 
M 

o 
o 
M 


>> 

■g 

bjo 
o 
d 
$ 
M 


9 

"-+3 
'u 

1 

Pi 
>» 

En 


< 


1 

o 

i— i 

>> 


■a 

1 

a 
a 

o 


0> 

H 

d 

P 
o 

ho 

< 


d 
'd 

d 
d 


n3 
go 


"o 
o 

-d 
o 
W 

-a 
15 S 


65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 


78 

80 

50 

31 

110 

181 

80 

64 

72 

116 

38 

148 

60 

46 

75 

152 

93 

37 

80 

69 

17 

218 

80 

160 

25 

64 

51 

105 

121 

75 

41 

583 

100 

136 

143 

40 

94 

45 

32 

51 

98 

176 

65 

83 

84 

54 

56 

137 


54 

80 

8 

31 

109 
74 
32 

110 
15 
64 
56 
65 
60 
24 


31 


31 


65 
80 
59 
31 

101 
99 
78 

118 

105 
77 
61 

148 
60 
46 
81 
86 
95 
37 

105 
72 
32 

231 
86 

140 
59 

102 
57 
74 

121 
69 

120 
65 

100 
55 

143 
40 
73 
45 
65 
51 
98 

180 

104 
82 
81 

108 

127 

151 


118 
107 
137 

49 
221 
222 
138 
147 
137 
204 

88 
197 

75 

51 
105 
238 
108 

47 
149 
130 

50 
303 
115 
225 

89 
130 

67 
160 
147 

87 
158 

* *199 

176 

179 

46 

140 

60 

82 

77 

155 

263 

154 

126 

100 

128 

151 

216 


31 


41 




56 




8 


16 




60 


























12 
11 


74 

32 

7 


74 
32 
10 


74 














7 








8 








38 
15 


38 
22 


37 
6 






















































79 
















80 
81 


132 
57 
26 
25 
67 
17 
26 


71 


81 


71 








21 








82 
















83 


14 


18 












84 










5 


85 














86 


32 


32 












87 












88 


90 


10 


29 










35 


89 










90 


















91 


49 
26 


6 
26 


12 

26 












92 












93 












94 


28 




33 












95 










13 
23 


96 


583 

100 

15 


583 


323 


583 








97 








98 
















99 
















100 


31 
11 
















101 


11 


11 












102 












103 


32 
















104 
















105 
















1 
12 


106 


56 
55 
37 

23 
78 

56 

70 


50 


50 










107 










18 

10 

9 


108 














109 




35 










110 










111 








71 






19 
14 


112 











1 
2 


10,180 
10,823 


5,369 
5,022 


1,358 

2,817 


1,289 
2,284 


10,149 
10,952 


15,581 
21,831 


1,010 
2,397 


501 
377 


33 
2,666 


171 
3,108 


306 
676 


3 
4 


21,003 
19,306 


10,391 
8,851 


4,175 
3,717 


3,573 


21,101 
19,000 


37,412 
34,353 


3,407 
3,026 


878 
615 


2,699 
2,677 


3,279 
3,316 


982 
1,024 


5 


1,697 


1,540 


458 


89 


• 


3,059 


381 


263 


22 






6 


37 


42 


7 


54.65 


27.04 


10. 


9.29 


54.91 


97. 3t 


1 8.86 


2.28 


7.02 


8.53 


2.55 



244 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE M— MISCELLANEOUS 





g 2 
•Si 


Number of Acres in 
Playground 


O 

u 

l g 

3.2 
§| 


1 ~ 

«> rt 

>- O) 

S* *- 

< 


Value of 


Collegiate Institutes 


u 

M 

3 


B 

c3 
U 
c3 
Pi 
P. 
< 
o 

eg 
fl 

JO 

'o 


CO 

§ 

a 

i— i 
c5 
o 

"9 

i— i 

o 

n 


1 Barrie 


B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

S 
B&S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

S 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 

B 
B&S 

B 
B& S 

B 

B 

B 


3 

4f 
31 
3 

U 
3 
1 
2 

14 
U 
10| 
4| 
11 
2 
2 

3 

4 

3 

HI 
3 

51 
21 
2 

3 

4 

. 3 
4 

11 
21 
3 

21 
1* 

3 

4 

U 

2| 
21 
21 
4ft 
10 
9 
2J 
6 

H 

3 

5 

H 

4ft 

2J 

2£ 

1 


1 


I 


$ 

645 
1,730 

981 
' 997 
1,119 

961 
1,771 

800 
1,114 
1,200 
1,036 
1,087 
1,843 

865 
1,160 
1,795 
1,171 

622 
1,036 
1,072 

631 

790 
2,785 
1,582 
1.037 
1,171 

911 
1,044 

745 

806 

992 
1,025 
1,284 
1,009 

869 

608 
1,316 
1,107 
1,347 
2,033 
2,164 
1,245 
2,095 
2,235 
1,517 

804 
1,540 
1,391 


$ 

823 
1,439 
1,141 
1,279 
2,327 
1,116 
1,462 

836 

810 
1,573 

792 
1,905 
2,437 

935 
1,244 
1,522 
3,263 
1,275 

920 
1,137 
1,093 
1,005 
1,697 
1,568 
1,033 
1,069 
1,305 
1,782 

720 
1,267 
1,505 
1,434 
2,045 
1,404 

785 
1,406 
1,575 

907 
5,437 
3,106 
4,380 
2,417 
3,744 
3,282 
2,525 

985 
1,508 
1,543 


$ 

90 


2 Kitchener (Berlin) " 


201 


3 Brantford 

4 Brockville 


1 

"i" 


II 
I 

II 
II 


111 

103 


5 Chatham 


119 


6 Clinton 


75 


7 Cobourg 


162 


8 Collingwood 

9 Fort William 


l 
l 


........ 


76 
231 


10 Gait 


285 


11 Goderich 






107 


12 Guelph 


l 
l 
l 
l 
l 
l 
l 
i 


""'i'" 

II 
........ 

....... 

I 

I 
II 


169 


13 Hamilton 


219 


14 Ingersoll 


91 


15 Kingston 


82 


16 Lindsay \ 


252 


17 London 


172 


18 Morrisburg . . . , 


98 


19 Napanee 


101 


20 Niagara Falls 


86 


21 North Bay 


102 


22 Orillia 


47 


23 Ottawa '.. 


470 




l 
l 
l 

" i" 

l 


I 

II 
........ 

I 
II 


100 


25 Perth 


51 


26 Peterborough 


182 


27 Picton 


100 


28 Port Arthur 


5£ 


29 Renfrew 


99 


30 Ridgetown 


98 


31 St. Catharines 






190 




"i" 

l 

"i" 


II 
........ 

II 

I 


189 


33 St. Thomas 


150 




112 


35 Seaforth 


54 




103 


37 Stratford 


500 


38 Strathroy 






51 


39 Toronto, Harbord 


l 

l 
l 
l 

l 
l 
l 

"i" 

l 


....... 

........ 

......... 

I 
II 


1,308 


40 Toronto, Humberside 

41 Toronto, Jarvis 


374 
656 


43 Toronto, Oakwood 

45 Toronto, Riverdale 


239 
1,244 
372 
570 
108 


47 Windsor 


130 


48 Woodstock 


94 








30 


111,1611 


59,088 


80,763 


10,576 




B 
B 
S 
B 
B 






High Schools 
1 Alexandria 


1! 

4 

2 

li 

l 




II 


624 
379 
618 
233 
640 


619 
634 

457 
343 
608 


105 


2 Alliston 


54 


3 Almonte 


1 




30 


4 Amherstburg 




15 


5 Arnprior 


1 


I 


101 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



245 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
INFORMATION 



General Equipment 



Charts, Maps and 
Globes 


03 
O 

< 


CO 

1 

"a 

I 

H 


id P, 

a o< 

B **> 

"fa bp 

il 


Equipment of 
Gymnasium 
or Equipment for 
Physical Culture 


CO 

d 


2 
gf 

id a> 


CO 

8 

3 




d 
a> 

3 

A 

o 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
3 


$ 

113 

173 

419 

192 

263 

135 

219 

163 

166 

263 

103 

274 

407 

104 

233 

87 
321 
132 
226 
114 
164 
158 
189 
139 
148 

86 
248 
303 

95 
132 
150 
116 

74 
119 

78 

88 
171 

92 
212 
140 
167 
183 
249 
156 
127 

64 
228 
238 


$ 

86 

64 

108 

117 

85 

75 

98 

55 

213 

84 

77 

52 

100 

79 

60 

98 

122 

58 

101 

81 

151 

92 

200 

105 

50 

97 

102 

104 

87 

60 

79 

101 

130 

94 

82 

85 

71 

56 

109 

116 

103 

158 

112 

1-39 

100 

103 

116 

88 


$ 
250 

1,433 

1,117 
561 

1,250 
225 
910 
400 

1,320 

1,100 
400 
750 
250 
200 
720 
400 

1,290 
250 
420 
750 
300 
450 

1,695 
325 
200 
723 
740 
800 
300 
300 
535 
100 

1,140 
500 
375 
400 
850 
150 


$ 
1,200 
1,000 

10,000 
2,500 
2,500 
875 
3,000 
1,200 

16,000 


$ 

401 
613 
367 
413 
288 
68 
396 
217 
351 
153 
264 
972 
944 
304 
465 
508 
714 
279 
389 
355 
404 
288 
1,138 
244 
233 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 

3,608 


196 


5 


416 
311 
134 
177 
131 
355 
110 
40 
1,025 
183 
625 
774 
164 


7,270 
14,555 




23 


6,319 

8,128 


22 

5,000 




3,683 
13,373 

3,857 


g 




20,245 


10 


662 


25 


6,370 


11 


2,500 

2,800 

8,000 

800 

4,500 

4,000 

10,500 

980 

922 

10,000 

10,000 

1,800 

7,000 

3,000 

7,000 


5,462 


12 
IB 
14 
15 


100 
125 

35 

250 


75 

"is 


8,809 

15,099 

3,557 

8,499 


16 
17 





140 
500 
125 
119 
150 

15 
150 
325 

65 
127 
294 
718 
231 


9,052 
18,053 


18 
19 


150 


5 


3,974 
4,234 


20 




13,745 


21 






12,860 


22 






4,780 


23 
24 
25 
?6 


300 
100 
500 
150 

"i43 


"50 
25 


15,799 
7,228 

10,379 
3,822 


27 
28 
29 


5,000 

15,000 

5,000 

900 

8,000 

6,000 

1,518 

1,300 

600 

7,688 

2,000 

3,500 

10,000 


271 
444 
234 
256 
384 
506 
470 
240 
180 
58 
262 
377 


9,420 
19,904 

7,280 


30 


"i25 

40 


6 
6 




3,825 


31 
32 
33 


185 
40 

465 

180 
90 
84 

254 


12,151 
9,551 
7,276 


34 


1 


4,958 


35 






3,113 


36 






10,520 


37 
38 


500 




7,499 
6,240 


39 




20 


500 
415 
347 
200 
443 
307 
335 
65 
250 
227 


18,933 


40 


90 
115 


578 
250 
581 
499 
320 
565 
54 
444 




6,852 


41 
42 


7,000 

5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

3,200 

3,000 


677 


75 


15,934 
10,023 


43 


130 
25 
90 

260 
1,415 

550 


| 


18,516 


44 


! 


16,836 


45 
46 


300 


50 


16,179 
5,643 


47 


i; 


8,631 


48 


94! 


4,225 










8,421 


4,703 


26,554 


228,783 


17,741 


9,469 


380 


11,791 


456,269 


1 


64 
54 
39 

77 
97 


85 
35 
57 
23 
75 










1,497 


2 










1,156 


3 










25 


1,226 


4 


150 










841 


5 


i 








166 


1,687 



246 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE M— MISCELLANEOUS 





Value of Manual Training 
Department Equipment 


Value of Household 

Science Department 

Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


d 
53 

B 


Collegiate Institutes 


I 

o 

o 


1 

o 

o 


J 

u 
o 


ft 

o 

,4 

cog 

P o 


03 

IS 

** 

8* 


■on 

4 

8.2 

£^ 


u 

o 




1 Barrie 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


2 Kitchener (Berlin) 

8 Brantford 


914 
924 


215 

239 


647 
748 


628 
325 


1,647 
596 










118 








4 Brockville 








5 Chatham 


768 








1,392 










6 Clinton 












85 


75 


7 Cobourg 


















8 Collingwood 


















?k 


9 Fort William 




















10 Gait 


1,099 


299 






1,310 


103 


22 






11 Goderich 










12 Guelph 




















13 Hamilton 


















?5 


14 Ingersoll 


391 


179 


83 


399 


504 


65 








15 Kingston 








16 Lindsay 
















228 




17 London 


936 








785 


300 






18 Morrisburg 










200 
1,260 




19 Napanee 


















20 Niagara Falls 


















21 North Bay 




















22 Orillia 








































24 Owen Sound 


505 


350 






731 


12 








25 Perth 












26 Peterborough 




















27 Picton 
















131 




28 Port Arthur 


571 


240 






1,591 


483 


52 




29 Renfrew 










80 Ridgetown 




















31 St. Catharines 




1. 












54 


32 St. Mary's 


































230 


34 Sarnia 


















35 Seaforth 


















36 Smith's Falls 


1,359 


364 






582 






60 




37 Stratford 


200 










38 Strathroy 










39 Toronto, Harbord 




















40 Toronto, Humberside 


















46 




















42 Toronto, Malvern Avenue . . 




















43 Toronto, Oakwood 




















44 Toronto, Parkdale 








405 






















46 Vankleek Hill 










21 


47 Windsor 


















48 Woodstock 


787 


396 


835 


2,104 


915 


67 




22 


Totals 


11,622 


2,922 


2,513 


5,445 


12,548 


1,156 


146 


1,985 885 


High Schools 
1 Alexandria 


1 



2 Alliston 
















.... 


3 Almonte 
















...: 




188 















\ 5 Arnprior 


! 













'Tools and machinery for ail work. 



tHousehold Science Equipment. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



247 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
INFORMATION— Continued 


c3 p, co 


Religious and other 
Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


Total value of Sp 
Equipment as pe 
ceding nine colui 


i 

•£ co 

r-J 0> CO 

3 N <U 

° 2 <u 
*" ^ d 

GQ * 


<v 

-a 

I 

co 


CO 


a 

.9? J 
8S g 


d *-■ 
S3 £ 

o g 


coPU 


+3 

d 

<a 

S CO 

8.2 

CD O 

a* 


a 
u 
a) 

B 
B 

o 
O 


<u 
u 
3 

I— -1 

£ 

em 

< 


o 

B 


1 

1 

c3 

H 


CO 

H 

0> 


co 
1 

c3 
Pi 




Fh 

O 


Xi O O) 

bo -*? 
h3 co .5 

5Jrd^ 
.d 


1 

Pt 
d 




■+* 
d 


^§ 
£* 


1 














9 

22 

51 

11 

44 

3 

6 

9 

22 

54 

12 

24 

30 

16 

53 

24 

86 

1 

9 

4 

4 

19 

95 

33 

9 

24 

8 

27 

10 

6 

34 

6 

62 
25 


8 
6 
6 
5 
10 
14 
9 
2 
2 

11 

6 

11 

7 

18 
17 
17 
11 
1 

11 
1 

"*3 

10 

23 

5 

7 
26 

1 
18 

2 
10 

9 
10 

3 


8 
9 
1 
6 
10 

* # 3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

25 
1 

15 
1 

21 
4 
1 
5 
3 
2 

14 

11 
2 
7 
3 
1 
3 
2 
2 

"i2 
6 
2 

7 
20 


7 
11 
14 
20 
17 
14 

7 

11 
10 
15 
21 
23 
38 

4 
15 
30 
29 

8 
14 

3 

10 
18 
19 
40 
12 
17 
11 

1 
52 

5 

6 
14 
22 

9 

10 
15 
25 


6 
22 
19 
10 

7 
2 
1 

17 
5 
6 

2 

70 
7 
8 
3 

28 

"5 

10 
12 

8 
27 

5 

""22 
1 

4 

4 

10 

17 

1 

3 

15 


17 




8 


2 4,051 


1 


i 
i 




i 




24 


3 2,950 

4 


37 
12 

6 

19 
16 
23 

3 
19 

8 
40 
64 

7 
25 

9 
45 

3 

11 
22 
28 
22 
104 
28 
.8 
25 
15 
10 

6 

3 
29 

6 

7 
14 

4 
10 
30 
15 
21 
42 
151 
15 
21 
59 
15 

3 

29 
11 

1,117 

17 
5 
9 




2 

3 

9 

8 

1 

4 

7 

11 

13 

13 

I 

13 
6 

22 
2 
4 

10 

1 

10 
7 

"*'28 

7 

6 

2 

9 

23 

4 

10 

12 

1 

4 

5 

"'■46 

15 

15 

8 

9 

39 

34 

2 

5 

10 


6 
11 


5 2,160 

6 160 

7 


1 
1 

1 


i 
i 
i 




11 


8 23 






5 


9 




i 
i 






10 2,833 

11 


i 


21 

10 


12 






19 


13 25 

14 1,621 


i 
l 


i 




■8 


15 


i 




10 


16 228 








18 


17 2,021 


l 
i 






64 


18 200 


i 
i 
i 




2 


19 1,260 

20 






13 
12 


21 










2 


22 




i 








12 


23 


l 






56 


24 1,598 






15 


25 


l 






5 


26 






17 


27 131 








1 


28 2,937 


l 
l 

l 

i 






7 


29 


* 




R 


30 

31 54 

32 

33 230 

34 


i 
i 
i 

i 
i 




7 
27 

1 

10 


35 


l 


2 


36 2,365 










13 

30 
7 

80 
20 
15 
14 
18 
47 
40 
5 
56 
27 


5 
8 
5 

"*2 

2 

13 

"*4 

3 

7 

5 

11 


10 


37 1,800 








i 






38 


l 
l 

l 
l 

l 

i 


i 

i 
i 




14 


39 

40 46 

41 


20 
25 

"*9 

24 

13 

12 

1 

12 

3 

333 

1 
3 
2 


25 

42 

9 

7 

17 

18 

11 

6 

7 

24 


3 

8 

2 
14 

8 
5 


70 
14 


42 

43 2,749 

44 405 

45 4,228 

46 21 


i 

i 
i 
i 


. 


11 
15 
16 

28 


47 








15 


48 5,126 








19 


39,222 
1 


23 


25 




47 


2 


40 


1,224 


365 

7 
5 

"i 

3 


763 

5 
9 
3 
1 
10 


405 

2 
1 
2 
2 
2 


453 

3 
6 

4 

8 


693 

2 


2 


1 










7 

6 

2 

10 


9 


3 












4 188 

5 


1 


1 






1 
1 





£48 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE M— MISCELLANEOUS 





Brick or Stone 
School House 


a 

CO 

o 

-I 

H u 


u 
o 

« 

3 J 

zi o3 
^ o 

CO 3 

is 

1° 


1 4> 

1 13 

P 


Value of General 


High Schools 


eS 

u 

_Q 
3 


CO 

.2 ft 


CO 

ocn 


CO CO 

P. <o 




6 Arthur 


B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B&F 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 

1 

B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B&S 
B 
B 
S 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 


7 
2 
1 
2 
44 

"n 

5 
5 

1 
1 

I 
1 

14 

4 
3 

1 
2 

5| 
2 

'4|" 

I 

1 

4 
31 

t 
2 
2 
1 

44 
2| 
5 
4 

34 
5 
4 
2 

I 
2 
3 
4 

14 
2 

34 
1 






$ 

475 
653 
460 
211 
1,090 
399 
879 
672 
329 
561 
412 
523 
702 
916 
349 
307 
448 
378 
546 
772 
513 
222 
767 
569 
404 
377 
302 
451 
626 
321 
502 
754 
442 
564 
381 
325 
521 
751 
456 
508 
774 
459 
420 
673 
450 
455 
459 
467 
301 
477 
723 
565 
453 
368 
537 
571 
389 
483 
278 


$ 

781 
784 
583 
159 
943 
493 

1,528 
642 
422 
795 
720 
809 
820 
602 
425 
305 
531 
463 
625 
810 
560 
244 
992 
826 
425 
611 
379 
758 
530 
342 
512 
682 
539 
629 
393 
340 
630 

2,147 
472 
333 

1,238 
691 
647 
839 
726 
491 
586 
876 
311 
674 

1,281 
758 
648 
368 
631 
437 
334 
644 
212 


$ 
27 
35 
92 

"220 

12 

129 

130 

52 

75 

84 

77 

93 

68 

53 

47 

62 

9 

54 

105 

49 

21 

61 

111 

50 

78 

1,005 

91 

75 

52 

49 

102 

148 

68 

37 

48 

51 

90 

99 

52 

57 

33 

35 

71 

79 

98 

102 

105 

24 

102 

120 

107 

60 

53 

102 

10 

43 

89 

12 


$ 

69 


7 Athens 






64 


8 Aurora 

9 Avonmore 


.... 


ii 


109 
70 


10 Aylmer 


.... 

1 


ii 

"ii" 
ii 
ii 


268 


11 Beamsville 


81 


12 Belleville 


80 


13 Bowmanville 


52 


14 Bradford 


76 


15 Brampton 


65 


16 Brighton 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


"ii"' 


182 


17 Caledonia 


96 


18 Campbellford 


82 


19 Carle ton Place 


67 


20 Cayuga 


51 


21 Chatsworth 


51 


22 Chesley 

23 Chesterville 


.... 


ii 


175 
72 


24 Colborne 


1 


n 
ii 
ii 


60 


25 Cornwall 


149 


26 Deseronto 


87 




64 


28 Dundas 


1 
1 


""i" 


85 




70 


30 Durham 


78 








52 


32 Elora 


1 

"l 

"l 
.... 

"i" 

i 


'"if" 

'"if" 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 


50 


33 Essex 


73 


34 Fergus 


66 




54 


36 Forest 


95 


37 Gananoque 


88 


38 Georgetown 


106 


39 Glencoe 


61 


40 Gravenhurst 


64 


41 Grimsby 


98 


42 Hagersville 


82 


43 Haileybury 


77 


44 Harriston 


61 


45 Hawkesbury 


53 


46 Iroquois 


138 


47 Kemptville , 


i 
i 
i 


"'if"' 

ii 
ii 


68 


48 Kenora 


70 


49 Kincardine 


82 


50 Leamington 


120 


51 Listowel 


81 


52 Lucan 




ii 
ii 


53 


53 Madoc 


68 


54 Markdale 


48 




2J 
4J 
6J 

1 
3 
! 2| 

1 ** 
2 

2 

1 1 




ii 
i 
i 

ii 


99 


56 Meaf ord 


110 


57 Midland 


.68 


58 Mitchell 


170 


59 Morewood 


72 


60 Mount Forest 


i 

i 
i 


ii 
........ 


74 


61 Newburgh 


75 


62 Newcastle 


52 


63 Newmarket 


182 


64 Niagara 


72 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



249 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
INFORMATION— Continued 



Equipment 
















Value of Manual Training 
Department Equipment 




«a 

H 
< 


CO 

u 

<D 

ft 

Eh 


Gymnasium (not 
including equip- 
ment) 


Equipment of 
Gymnasium or 
Equipment for 
Physical Culture 


0) 


I 

< 


to 
<v 


•+3 




Total value of 
General Equip- 
ment 




■a 
1 






.9 
'3 

3 

-*3 

O 
O 


If 

'a 


ft 



6 


$ 

49 
80 
76 
35 
85 
36 
76 

103 
56 
76 
55 
62 
84 
68 
73 
51 
72 
40 
55 
84 
51 
36 
76 
60 
54 
77 
49 
50 
75 
52 
52 
77 
71 
51 
50 
65 
52 
* 87 
84 
63 
68 
64 
50 
87 
57 
81 
79 
76 
30 
50 
77 
85 
55 
50 

131 
55 
49 
89 
10 


$ 


$ 


$ 

50 
36 


$ 

15 


$ 


$ 


$ 
1,466 
1,752 
1,420 

481 
3,835 
1,033 
3,406 
2,090 
1,027 
1,679 
1,453 
1,567 
1,931 
1,756 
1,031 

774 
1,338 

962 
1,373 
3,095 
1,518 

597 
2,567 
2,103 
1,011 
1,239 
1,992 
1,626 
1,434 

863 
1,372 
2,539 
1,513 
1,424 
1,580 

996 
1,371 
3,587 
1,172 
1,055 
2,375 
1,395 
3,722 
3,187 
1,554 


$ 








7 








100 

100 

6 

125 










8 


















q 




















10 


140 


680 


105 
12 


179 


.... 










n 










1? 


540 
50 
20 








174 

309 

25 

60 










13 




47 
47 
22 


85 


.... 










14 










15 


25 


.... 










16 














17 






















18 












150 
35 
80 
13 
50 










19 




















20 




















21 




















22 




















23 




















24 






28 






5 

85 
50 










25 


1,070 
50 






20 










26 




158 
10 

48 

7 












27 














28 


375 
210 






3 


160 
250 










29 










30 














31 












44 










32 


205 




53 

27 

38 
22 
30 
31 
10 
55 














33 


50 


.... 


100 
35 
15 
25 

448 
58 
20 
25 
65 
35 

317 










34 














35 


















36 


50 

366 

65 




49 


.... 










37 










38 


50 


4 










39 










40 


120 
















41 










42 


















43 


80 




38 














44 














45 






5 






41 










46 


100 
















47 










80 










48 


"375 


800 
















49 


80 
47 
30 






180 

30 
25 
60 










50 














51 










1,283 
1,420 
1,682 

714 
1,462 
4,502 
1,921 
2,162 

948 
1,485 
1,198 

897 
1,887 

925 










52 


90 
















53 








54 


















55 












60 

435 

150 

39 

37 










56 


6 
95 


1,404 


550 


39 


50 


4 










57 










58 










59 














60 







10 














61 










50 
26 










62 




















63 


260 
90 


"l4 


114 
237 














64 















250 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III TABLE M— MISCELLANEOUS 





Value of Household Science 
Department Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


'o 

> a 


S5* 


High Schools 


Cookery, Sanita- 
tion and 
Hygiene 


Handwork and 
Machine Sew- 
ing 


* 

o 

S 

B 

3 


Total value of S 
Equipment as 
preceding nin 
columns 


6 Arthur 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 

126 
600 


$ 


$ 
126 


7 Athens 








600 


8 Aurora 










9 Avonmore 














10 Aylmer 














11 Beamsville 














12 Belleville 


857 


78 


50 






985 


13 Bowmanville 


309 




309 


14 Bradford 










15 Brampton 














16 Brighton 














17 Caledonia 














18 Campbellford 














19 Carle ton Place 














20 Cayuga 














21 Chatsworth 














22 Chesley 














23 Chesterville 














24 Colborne 














25 Cornwall 














26 Deseronto 




























28 Dundas 




























30 Durham 




























32 Elora 




























34 Fergus 
























36 Forest 




























38 Georgetown 




























40 Gravenhurst 














41 Grimsby 














42 Hagersville 








57 




57 












44 Harriston 




























46 Iroquois 




























48 Kenora 




























50 Leamington 














51 Listo wel 














52 Lucan 














53 Madoc 














54 Markdale , 








1,200 




1,200 












56 Meaf ord 




























58 Mitchell 




























60 Mount Forest 


- 


























62 Newcastle 




























64 Niagara 











1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



251 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
INFORMATION— Continued 



Religious and other Exercises 








Destination of Pupils 






Schools using 
authorized Scrip- 
ture Readings 


5 

'35 <u 

rd rt 1 


-d 
o 

d <S) .2 

m be m 

o to ca 
o ^ S 
-d <s <2 


h3 

d a> 

Pr e9 
o m 


Is 

o £ 
CO 


d 
§ to 

O *> 
fl.2 
4) O 

2 <x> 

a* 


o 
u 

o> 

B 
B 

o 

o 


4) 
U 

d 
+=> 
i— i 
d 
o 

be 

< 


f-4 

o 

<u 
d 


.1 




to 
<u 

OS 

t-l 

Eh 
<u 
i3 
H 


to 

d 

'■& 

P 
d 




u 

rd 
O 


to 


oof 


d 
d p, 

jj 

.15 


6 










i 
i 


3 
2 
2 


10 

12 

3 


3 
1 


4 

13 

2 

3 

10 


1 
5 
2 


1 

2 
12 


6 
3 
2 

1 
1 
10 

8 

"5 
2 

7 
2 
7 
3 

i 

2 

4 




7 1 






1? 


8 


1 




1 


9 






10 


10 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 








9 
4 
10 
3 
3 
3 
3 

4 

2 
1 
1 
3 
3 


19 
5 
3 
4 

10 
9 
5 

20 

14 

10 
6 
3 
4 
5 
3 
5 
5 

14 
3 

10 
5 
4 
5 
5 
1 
1 
5 
5 
3 

11 
1 
6 

17 

4 

3 

6 
8 
1 

15 
8 
9 
3 
4 

10 
4 
7 

6 

8 
3 
9 


1 

1 

'"3 
1 
3 

.... 


6 


3 

6 

31 

3 

5 

3 

1 

6 

10 
5 


1 


11 




i 
i 

i 
i 

i 


1 


12 1 

13 

14 

15 


6 

8 

6 

12 

4 
8 
7 

12 
4 


4 
4 

"5 
2 

4 

3 


1 

4 

4 

11 


16 


1 
1 






17 1 

18 1 




i 
i 
i 
i 


"k 


19 






8 


20 






3 


21 1 


i 
l 




8 


22 






2 
"*8 


11 
6 
3 

12 


2 
1 
1 

7 
6 

2 

7 
3 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 

i 

i 

3 

7 
1 
3 

i 

2 
2 
2 
1 

2 

1 
3 
5 
1 
1 
4 



"15 


6 

5 
9 
18 
7 
5 
6 
2 
5 
6 
7 
9 
8 

5 

13 

1 

6 

4 

10 

3 

16 

4 

6 

3 

14 

13 

9 

19 
10 
2 
9 
2 
5 
9 

18 
5 
3 
4 
3 
1 
8 
2 


2 


23 




i 


10 


24 1 








25 1 








i 


10 

7 

6 

7 

3 

4 

5 

10 

11 

2 

4 

10 

3 


4 
3 
2 
9 
2 
3 
1 

8 
5 


11 


26 








27 

28 


l 




1 


i 

i 
i 
i 


"*3 

"i 
2 
3 
4 
1 
2 
4 

"2 

1 
1 

'"4 
1 
1 
1 

"2 

2 
4 
1 
4 
2 
3 

"2 
1 


8 
2 
3 
12 
7 

"'8 
9 

12 

10 
4 
5 

13 
1 
5 
6 
2 
6 
2 
7 

13 
3 
8 
4 
8 
6 

24 
5 
7 

12 
8 
5 
5 

13 
8 
1 

12 
1 


"a 


29 1 

30 

31 


l 
l 
l 
l 




2 
3 


32 

33 1 




i 
i 
i 
i 


1 


34 








35 1 






2 
3 
4 
8 
2 
1 

11 
5 

K) 
1 
3 
4 

11 
5 
4 
4 
4 
5 
5 
8 
6 
3 
1 
3 
1 
6 
2 
4 
3 
5 




36 






3 


37 1 












38 1 

39 


l 
l 
l 
l 






i 


11 
1 


40 






2 

7 

""ii 
l 

3 
3 

7 

12 
3 
9 
5 
3 
6 
2 
8 
9 
3 
1 
1 
8 
1 
4 
10 
2 


1 


41 

42 




i 
i 
i 


4 
2 


43 








44 






1 


45 

46 


l 






i 
i 


1 
3 


47 1 


l 
l 
l 




7 


48 1 






6 


49 1 

50 




i 


4 


51 










3 


52 


l 

l 
l 










53 






3 


54 








55 




i 


10 


56 






2 


57 








i 
i 


6 


58 1 






2 


59 1 


i 






60 1 




i 

i 


4 


61 ] 








62 1 


i 
i 




?, 


63 

64 1 




i 


14 


3 


3 
6 



252 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE M— MISCELLANEOUS 





Brick or Stone 
School House 


a 

CO 

o 

U H 

<U bD 

15 


II 

§1 


Approved Schools — 
Grade I and Grade II 


Value of General 


High Schools 


1 


CO 

B 

ff-1 CO 

o 


co 

o P« 


§ 

P. 

go 


65 Niagara Falls South 

66 Norwood ■. 


B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 
B 
B 
S 
B 
B 
B 


2 

8 
4 

11 

4 

3 

4 

5 

11 

5 
8 

10 
2 
2 
2 

1* 

3 

21 

n 
i 

n 

6 

u 

6 

2i 
2 

1 
5 

2h 

121 
2i 
1 
4 

11 

I 

6i 
n 
n 

3 
3 
2 

3 
4 
1 
2 
3 

2% 
3 


"T 

i 
i 


I 

II 
II 


$ 

464 
416 
533 
341 
739 
762 
582 
524 
439 
590 
421 
550 
216 
474 
307 
944 
452 
399 
433 
444 
393 
701 
387 
649 
359 
455 
329 
589 
474 
320 
471 
1,559 
372 
626 
488 
506 
462 
301 
262 
524 
402 
388 
474 
638 
522 
462 
449 
500 


511 
558 
615 
337 

1,164 

1,260 
743 
804 
529 
948 
793 
762 
257 
419 
453 

1,012 
756 
433 
664 
546 
386 
856 
525 
870 
521 
495 
388 

1,625 
666 
616 
844 

2,024 
765 
627 
480 
337 
618 
328 
350 
626 
910 
971 
890 
949 
444 
599 
480 
773 


$ 

108 
63 
65 
50 
84 

138 
86 
38 
10 

116 

157 
39 
7 
16 
"42 
75 
29 
27 

101 
84 
66 
90 
26 

141 
20 
36 
50 

103 

110 
32 
85 

"188 
91 

77 

' ' '163 

44 
26 
44 
52 
60 
95 
49 
35 

102 
33 

101 


$ 

102 
81 


67 Oakville 


223 


68 Omemee 


58 


69 rangeville 


141 


70 Oshawa 


i 

i 
i 

.1 


I 
II 

■"if"" 

ii 
i 


194 


71 Paris 


118 


72 Parkhill 


45 


73 Parry Sound 


91 


74 Pembroke 


112 


75 Penetanguishene 


72 


76 Petrolea 


51 


77 Plantagenet 




21 


78 Port Dover 


i 


99 


79 Port Elgin 


108 


80 Port Hope 




..... 

i 

i 
i 

.... 

i 


ii 

'"ii" 

'"ii"' 
ii 

'"ii"' 


56 


81 Port Perry 


58 


82 Port Rowan 


61 


83 Prescott 


109 


84 Richmond Hill 


203 


85 Rockland 


77 


86 Sault Ste. Marie 


72 


87 Sheiburne 


109 


88 Simcoe 


171 


89 Smithville 


53 


90 Stirling 


i 


ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 


68 


91 Streetsville 


69 


92 Sudbury 


69 


93 Sydenham 


82 


94 Thorold 


125 


95 Tillsonburg 


i 

i 
i 
i 

"T 


ii 

:::::::: 




'"ii"' 


230 


96 Toronto, Commerce & Finance 

97 Toronto, North 


63 
58 


98 Trenton 


191 




110 


100 Vienna 


95 


101 Walkerton 


73 


102 Wardsville 


63 


103 Waterdown 


52 


104 Waterf ord 




73 


105 Watford 


i 


ii 


165 


106 Welland 


65 


107 Weston 


"T 


ii 


252 


108 Whitby 


100 


109 Wiarton 


63 


110 Williamstown 




ii 


73 


Ill Winchester 


65 


112 Wingham 




ii 


176 


1 Totals, High Schools 






47 
30 
77 
79 


7 I, 51 II 
111,1611 


56,726 
59,088 


74,164 
80,763 


8,562 
10,576 


10,281 


2 Totals, Collegiate Institutes . 






8,421 


3 Grand Totals, 1915 






181,6711 
151,6511 


115,814 
115,760 


i 154,927 
; 162,229 


19,138 
17,496 


18,702 


4 Grand Totals, 1914 






18,906 


5 Increases 








3 I, 2 II 


54 


""7,*302 


1,642 




6 Decreases 






2 


204 


7 Percentages 






48.12 


* 


17.48 


23.39 


2.89 


2.82 











11.25 per cent., Grade I ; 41.87, Grade II ; 46.87 not approved. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



253 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Continued 
INFORMATION— Continued 



Equipment 


Value of Manual^ 


raining 




S 

1 

Pi 


p p 

IS 
■a J 

GJ aq 


% s p 

°^;§ 

§ w pis 

5, >> o*-p 


0> 
P 


P ^ 


GQ 

s 

s 

o 

PL. 




Department Equiyu 


w 

o 
u 

< 


o 
-a 

o 
o 


bo 

P 

1 

2 

o 

o 


bo 

p 

o 


p 

o 

1* 


$ 

65 76 


$ 

350 


$ 
7,500 


$ 

454 


$ 


S 


$ 

25 

40 
75 
20 
30 
207 
63 


$ 

9,590 
1,214 
1,737 

895 
5,010 
3,389 
1,844 
1,814 
1,146 
2,269 
1,819 
1,472 

541 
1,060 
1,138 
2,880 
1,396 
1,002 
1,651 
1,405 

985 
2,351 
1,138 
2,055 
1,020 
1,172 
1,186 
5,631 
1,465 
1,326 
2,050 
3,932 
1,544 
1,779 
1,261 
1,028 
1,559 

809 

740 
1,385 
1,670 
9,955 
1,811 
2,798 
1,352 
1,719 
1,080 
1,779 


$ 


$ 


$ 




66 56 














67 58 


165 




3 

22 

292 

73 














68 67 
















69 60 


""622 

180 
350 


2,500 














70 83 




50 










71 72 












72 53 


















73 59 








3 


15 
90 
87 
20 










74 73 


300 
180 




40 
31 












75 60 




6 


12 










76 50 













77 20 






20 














78 52 




















79 59 


100 
495 




8 
39 
35 
21 
44 






61 
200 










SO 59 
















81 66 
















82 46 










15 
74 
61 
10 
150 
15 










83 76 


150 
















84 67 
















85 53 




















86 75 


380 




12 

26 


15 


.... 


426 


270 


212 


2,991 


87 50 






88 74 


150 
















89 50 




















90 60 








8 


50 

120 

40 

31 










91 50 


180 
200 
















92 89 


2,500 


416 

26 

5 

35 














93 76 














94 48 


180 
150 
















95 79 








156 










96 69 




217 












97 70 






61 




30 
70 










98 80 






94 












99 76 






30 

8 
7 
6 










100 57 










25 

16 










101 76 


100 
















102 51 
















103 50 


















104 53 






30 

15 

185 






35 

8 










105 73 


45 
200 
















106 86 


8,000 














107 67 




3 
5 


30 

' 157 

100 










108 59 


75 
50 


850 


73 

107 

• 10 

74 










109 56 










110 76 


200 














111 43 


i 










112 75 






"41 
9,469 


.... 


39 










1 7,099 

2 4,703 


9,109 
26,554 
35,663 
36,805 


226,783 


17,741 


617 
380 


11,791 


206,006 
456,269 


614 
11,622 


270 
2,922 


212 
2,513 


2,991 
5,445 


3 11,802 

4 14,482 


254,281 
251,280 


22,035 
21,786 


10,3671 997 
11,6041102 


18,549 
16,680 


662,275 
668,130 


12,236 
14,907 


3,192 
14,010 


2,725 
2,665 


8,436 
6,760 


5 




3,001 


249 


*i*237 


"l05 


1,869 








60 


1,676 


6 2,680 


1,142 


5,855 


2,671 


L0,818 




7 1.78 


5.38 38.39 


3.32 


1.56 


.15 


~2780 


23.13 


6.03 


5.15 


15.94 



254 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III TABL*E M— MISCELLANEOUS 





Value of Household Science 
Department Equipment 


Value of Agricultural 
Department Equip- 
ment 


Value of Art Equip- 
ment (Middle 
School) 


13 


High Schools 


Cookery, Sani- 
tation and 
Hygiene 


Handwork and 
Machine 
Sewing 


d f-> 


Total value of S 
Equipment as 
preceding nin 
columns 


65 Niagara Falls South 


$ $ 
5011 120 


$ 

3 


$ 
177 


$ 


$ 
801 


66 Norwood 




67 Oakville 


1 i 


154 




154 


680memee 










69 Orangeville 








75 


75 


70 Oshawa .' ! 








71 Paris j 








72 Parkhill ! 










73 Parry Sound ' --. 










74 Pembroke 












75 Penetanguishene 












76 Petrolea 






1,037 




1,037 


77 Plantagenet 








78 Port Dover 1 












79 Port Elgin 












80 Port Hope ! 












81 Port Perry 












82 Port Eowan 












83 Prescott 












84 Richmond Hill 












85 Eockland 












86 Sault Ste. Marie 

87 She] burne 


884 


80 




600 




5,463 
















89 Smithville 
























91 Streetsville 










7 


7 














93 Sydenham 














94 Thorold 














95 Tillsonburg 


























97 Toronto, North 
























99 Uxbridge 




























101 Walkerton 








1,400 




1,400 


102 Wardsville 










103 Waterdown 




























105 Watford 














106 Welland 














107 Weston 


























109 Wiarton 














110 Williamstown 














Ill Winchester 














112 Wingham 














1 Totals, High Schools 


2,242 
12,548 


278 


53 


6,911 


107 


13,678 






3 Grand Totals, 1915 


14,790 
16,213 


1,434 
2,806 


199 
202 


8,896 
9,452 


992 

772 


52,900 


4 Grand Totals, 1914 


67,787 


5 Increases 














6 Decreases 


1,423 


1,372 


3 


556 


14,887 


7 Percentages 


27.96 


2.71 


.37 


16.81 


1.87 









1016 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



255 



HIGH SCHOOLS— Concluded 
INFORMATION— Concluded 



Religious and other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


Cud 
CO <u 

£ o 


S 5 
3 cud 

'f-t c3 


cm 
1 a 

1 » 


.a £ 

H [fl » 

o dL ^ 


°,d 


o g 

mfU 
r— i 
°,d 


d 

CO 

§ CO 

a. 2 

d '-' 

3 <*> 
a * 

oH 
o 


o 
u 

B 

a 

o 
O 


pi 

611 
-5 


^ -d 


bo 

1 
§ 

Eh 


to 

£ 

En 

<u 

Eh 


CO 

1 

"-(-3 

e3 

It 
§8 


^^ CD 

-d 

5 MO 


d 

lis 

•- 1 d 


65 .. 


- 












10 

4 

5 

...... 

18 
6 
1 
8 
6 
3 
8 
1 
1 
3 

18 
7 
1 

11 


5 
2 
6 
1 
3 

10 
3 

5 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 

13 

13 

1 

3 
3 

12 
5 

8 

7 

1 


"i 

2 

"2 

1 


1 

8 
3 
4 
3 
5 


2 
1 
1 

'"i 
10 

I 

3 

4 


4 
2 
4 
3 

10 

4 

6 

7 

20 

10 

13 

6 

""2 
22 

9 
2 
4 
8 
5 
2 
• 14 
2 
9 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 

10 
5 
8 

10 
1 

11 
1 
7 

10 
7 
3 

16 
4 
5 

12 

13 

10 


4 
3 
4 
4 
5 
4 
2 
6 
3 
5 
2 
2 
-12 
2 


6 


66 


1 






"i 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 


67 .. 








68 






5 


69 






3 


70 






2 


71 


1 
1 
1 






9 


72 
73 


1 




"2 
"2 


4 
10 
10 


4 


74 .. 






5 


75 






5.... 
I 5 


6 


76 


1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 

1 


1 






14 


77 
78 


l 




7 


i 


6 
5 


79 .. 




1 
1 
1 


1 
3 

""2 

2 

2 

"2 

1 

"i 
5 
2 

"i 


7 




80 .. 


8j 9 
3 .... 

3.... 

3! 


3 

7 

"4 
6 

•3 
4 
1 

12 
7 

10 
3 
4 
1 
4 
2 
6 
4 

12 

"3 
2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
4 
2 
6 

2 

2 

10 


7 


81 






2 


82 






3 


83 








1 


9 


84 .. 




1 




5 
2 

11 
5 
9 
4 

11 
1 
2 

22 
1 
9 


1 
1 
2 

"7 

"7 

1 
5 

"*3 
1 
3 

"2 

5 

"2 

1 
1 
9 
1 
8 
1 

"i 


4 


85 .. 






1 
23 

2 

10 

1 

1 

4 

6 

3 

7 

4 

128 

13 

8 

2 




86 








1 


16 


87 .. 


"i 


1 
1 






88 
89 .. 


i 


1 


4 

7 


90 


l 

l 


1 






91 
92 .. 




1 
1 
1 
1 


6 


93 .. 

94 .. 

95 .. 




1 
1 




1 
2 

20 


96 .. 




1 


10 


97 


i 
i 

"i 


1 




7 
5 

11 
3 
2 
2! 

2 i 

4 

19 

11 

8 

4! 

2 i 
6 


2 
"i 


3 
6 
9 


10 


98 


i 


1 
1 


10 


99 .. 
100 .. 


1 
1 




3 
3 


101 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
2 

""3 
17 
1 
4 
2 
1 
5 
5 


2 

"i 

3 

2 


7 
5 
3 
4 

7 
7 
8 
5 


2 


102 .. 










2 


103 








104 .. 

105 .. 
106 

107 .. 

108 .. 


"i 


1 

1 




2 

9 

3 
2 


109 


i 


1 




2 


110 .. 


1 
1 
5 


" 6 

7 

19 


4 


Ill 


i 


1 
1 






112 ... 




1 


2 


1 
2 


39 
23 


54 
25 


1 


111 

47 


5 
2 


69 
40 


655 
1,224 


616 
365 


136 
333 


686 
763 


260 
405 


747 
1,117 


447 
453 


424 
. 693 


3 
4 


62 
68 


79 

77 


1 
1 


158 
160 


7 
14 


109 
113 J 


1,879 
1,766 


981 
819 


469 
371 


1,449 
1,318 


665 
426 


1,864 
1,348 


900 
766 


1,119 
1,494 


5 


2 










113 


162 


98 


131 


239 


516 


134 




6 


6 




2 


7 




375 


7 38.75 


49.37 


.62 


98.75 


4.37 


68.12 ; 


20.14 


10.52 

( 


5.03 


15.53 


7.13 


19.98 


9.65 


11.99 



256 



THE EEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE N— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 






a 

r-i o3 
. U 


>> 
u 


No. 1 

Tilbury, 
North 


L'Orig- 
nal 
Village 


Penetan- 
guishene 
Town 


CO 

"el 

O 

Eh 


Number of Schools 


1 
$ C. 

539 91 
57 41 
13 66 

765 61 
3 00 


1 

$ c 

312 6( 

163 8; 

12 21 

400 0( 

200 0C 


1 

$ c 

> 29 94 
I 28 84 
i 8 84 

> 516 0C 

> 50 9£ 


1 

$ c 

[ 61 3( 
6 0C 


1 

$ c. 

) 363 24 
1 302 00 


5 


Receipts : 

Balances from 1914 

Government grants 

Municipal grants 


$ c. 

1,307 05 

558 07 

34 75 


Municipal assessments 

Other sources 


561 7S 

2 07 


6,113 00 


8,356 36 
256 06 








Totals 


1,379 59 


1,088 72 


634 61 


631 12 


6,778 24 


10,512 29 






Expenditure: 
Teachers' salaries 


518 00 
150 00 

14 00 
54 12 


500 00 
169 39 

16 45 
229 00 


483 75 

1 75 


508 13 

4 50 
98 63 


4,040 00 
278 20 

69 50 
2,259 93 


6,049 88 


School sites and buildings . . . 

Libraries, maps, apparatus, 

etc 


599 34 
104 45 


Other expenses 


141 23 


2,782 91 






Totals 


736 12 


914 84 


626 73 


611 26 


6,647 63 


9,536 58 






Balances on hand 


643 47 


173 89 


7 88 


19 86 


130 61 


975 71 






Teachers : 
Male 










1 

6 

1 I; 6 11 

Male, $1,000 
Female, $558 


1 


Female 


1 

III 

$500 


1 
III 
500 


1 
III 
500 


1 

II 
500 


10 


Certificates 


1I;7II;3III 


Salaries 


1 male, $1000 




Av. Female, 
$535 


Pupils : 

Total number attending 

Boys 

Girls 


31 
13 
18 
17 

7 
4 
7 
8 
5 
31 
24 


50 
21 
29 
30 
11 
10 
13 
12 
4 

50 
39 


18 

7 

11 

13 

1 

4 

7 

2 

4 

18 

13 


19 
13 

6 
13 

4 • 

3 

4 

4 

4 
12 
12 
19 
12 
19 

8 

8 

4 
15 
19 
19 


305 

166 

139 

217 

58 

31 

81 

75 

60 

305 

247 

305 

305 

305 

60 

141 

141 

305 

305 

305 


423 

220 
203 


Average attendance 

No. in Primer 


290 
81 


" 1st Book 


52 


2nd " 


112 


3rd " 


101 


4th " 


77 


" in Art 


416 


" Geography 


335 


" Music 


324 


" Literature 


31 
31 
5 
20 
20 
31 
31 
31 


50 
50 
4 
29 
29 
50 
50 
50 


16 

16 

6 

6 

6 

18 

18 

18 


414 


" Composition 


421 


" Grammar 


83 


" English History 

" Canadian History.... 
" Physiology & Hygiene 

" Nature Study 

" Physical Culture 


204 
200 
419 
423 
423 


Brick or frame school house . . . '. 


?rame . 


Frame. 


Brick. 


Brick . 


Brick. 


3Bk; 2Fr. 


Number of maps 


8 


7 


10 


12 


20 


57 




Number of globes 


1 


1 


1 


1 


• 1 


5 





1016 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



257 



TABLE O— REPORT ON KINDERGARTENS 



Municipality 


to 

a 
s 




to 
M 
o 


to 
d 

s 


GO* 


6 

lag 


CO 
r— 1 

h 

PU d 

■g| 


** d 
II 


ft 3 






2 *> 




"to 

CO 


5* 




§ d 


c3 g 
-d<2 


Cities : 


i 








f 

$ 


$ 






$ c. 


Kitchener (Berlin). . 


4 


5 


4 


1 


700 


550 


313 


231 




Brantford 


7 


10 


7 




504 


450 


341 


244 


1 00 


Chatham 


3 

7 


6 
13 


3 
7 


3 

6 


567 
714 


325 
360 


212 

453 


120 
330 




Fort William 




Gait 


4 

5 
10 

4 
16 
19 

5 


4 

5 
19 

4 
28 
36 

6 


4 

5 
19 

4 
16 
19 

5 




656 
650 
618 
587 
809 
773 
650 


"537" 

549 
400 


139 
331 

1,345 
243 
947 

1,275 
433 


125 
169 
999 
135 
520 
751 
176 




Guelph 


""12" 

17 

1 




Hamilton 


1 00 


Kingston 


50 


London 




Ottawa 




Peterborough 


1 00 


Port Arthur 


4 


4 


4 




775 




215 


157 




St. Catharines 


4 


4 


4 




568 




191 


116 




St. Thomas 


5 


12 


5 


7 


690 


621 


215 


160 




Sault Ste. Marie .. 


2 


4 


2 


2 


675 


275 


139 


86 




Stratford 


5 
84 


6 
196 


5 

84 


1 
112 


490 
696 


450 
499 


413 
9,645 


183 
5,012 




Toronto 




Towns : 




Aylmer 


1 
1 
1 


2 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 


1 


490 
700 
500 


250 


110 
53 

49 


47 
30 
35 


1 00 


Barrie 




Campbellford 




Cobourg 


1 


2 


1 


1 


600 


300 


79 


47 




Collingwood 


2 


2 


2 




550 




84 


68 




Goderich 


1 


1 


1 




525 




83 


32 




Hespeler 


1 


1 


1 




525 




48 


37 




Ingersoll 


2 


2 


2 




525 




124 


51 


1 00 


North Bay 


1 

4 


2 
5 


1 
4 


1 
1 


625 

487 


575 
250 


66 
265 


36 
164 




Owen Sound 




Pembroke 


1 


2 


1 


1 


650 


550 


92 


61 






1 


1 


1 




625 




55 


33 




Preston 


i 


1 


1 




675 




69 


63 




Seaforth 


1 


1 


1 




500 




30 


25 


1 00 


Simcoe . . 


1 


1 


1 




425 




66 


33 




Tillsonburg 


1 


1 


1 




475 




50 


30 




Walkerville 


2 


2 


2 




625 




170 


77 




Waterloo . . . 


2 


2 


2 




650 




84 


69 




Welland . . . 


4 


2 


2 




625 




194 


96 




Wingham 


1 


1 


1 




475 




56 


.37 




Rural: 




No. 3 Brantford— 




















Grand View 


1 


1 


1 




500 




53 


43 


1 00 


Totals, 1915 


228 


396 


226 


170 


669 


490 


18,730 


10,628 




Totals, 1914 


218 


396 


216 


180 


657 


475 


25,554 


9,519 




Increases 


12 


10 


....... 


12 


15 


* 


1,118 




Decreases 






i 




1 









*This column shows an apparent decrease from the previous year owing to the 
pupils who were promoted before the close of the year to the Primary Form being 
counted only in such Primary Form. Formerly they were counted in the Kindergarten 
as well as the Primary Form. As the percentage of average to total attendance was 
fifty-six, the increase in the average attendance, 1,118, indicates an increase in the total 
attendance of about 2,000. 
17 E. 



258 



THE REPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



TABLE P— REPORT ON NIGHT SCHOOLS 
I. Night Public and Separate Schools 



Municipality 


O tO 

<u O 

9 ° 


to 
u 

o 


§■1 


Average 
Daily At- 
tendance 


Kitchener (Berlin) 


1 

2 
2 
1 
1 
22 
1 


2 
11 
7 
1 
1 

40 
1 


34 
320 
136 
102 

39 
1,126 

37 


24 
100 

72 

28 

5 

435 

11 


Fort William 


Hamilton 


Port Arthur 


St. Catharines 


Toronto 


Oshawa R.C. Sep. Sch 




Totals 


30 


63 


1,794 


675 



II. Night High Schools 






Municipality 


o to 

O o 
B ° 


to 

o 

ea 

a> 

Eh 


T3 
4) 


Average 
Daily At- 
tendance 


Brantf ord 


1 

1 
1 
1 

2 
1 
2 
1 
3 


3 
2 
1 
6 

13 
1 
3 
2 

59 


224 
22 
22 

105 

143 

21 

30 

78 
1,709 


32 
5 
9 

16 
47 
8 
25 
21 
414 


Collingwood 


Cornwall 


Hamilton 


London 


St. Thomas 


Sault Ste. Mare 


Stratford 


Toronto 




Totals 


13 


90 


2,354 


577 



TABLE Q— REPORT ON TRUANCY 



Cities 


No. of 

children 

otherwise 

employed 

during 

school hours 


No. of cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No. of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 

Magistrates 
or J. P's 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Belleville 






6 

53 

12 

168 

66 






158 

1 


Kitchener (Berlin) 


5 

10 
1 
2 


100 

4 

46 

21 


2 

7 
4 


1 






4 
45 


Fort William 




Gait . 


1 

11 
18 
3 
11 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
1 


1 
3 
6 
1 
11 
1 
1 


Guelph 


8 


85 

265 

3 

15 

18 
333 

46 


39 
1,093 

153 
75 
53 
70 
32 
7 
28 
57 
5 

222 
55 

128 
17 
35 


1 

1,348 

5 

90 

98 

4,313 

2 

682 


Hamilton 


Kingston 

London 


3 

12 
6 
6 


Niagara Falls 

Ottawa 




Port Arthur . . 


2 


2 
4 

1 




28 

103 

3 

222 


St. Thomas 


2 
5 

7 
1 




13 

5 

55 

76 

774 

115 


Sault Ste. Marie . . 


4 






Toronto 


7,877 
6 
2 


117 
3 
5 


3 
3 

1 i 


Windsor : 

WoodsLock 


6 
10 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



259 



TABLE Q— REPORT ON TRUANCY— Continued 



Towns 


No. of 

children 

otherwise 

employed 

during 

school hours 


No. of cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No. of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 

Magistrates 
or J. P's 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Towns 
Almonte 




14 


14 
12 
20 
61 
2 








Arnprior 










Aylmer 




20 
105 


1 
10 


1 
4 




Barrie 




100 


Blenheim 

Blind River 


2 


3 








11 


Bowmanville .... 

Bracebridge 

Brampton 


2 




25 

1 
21 






40 




4 








3 






Bridgeburg 




8 

20 

29 

6 

5 

5 

3 

5 

11 




8 


Brockville 




20 
9 

10 
5 
5 








Burlington 

Campbellford .... 


2 






4 


1 


1 




Carleton Place . . . 




25 


Chesley 










Cobalt 


6 








Cochrane 


5 

11 
15 

18 

15 

8 

1 

40 


1 
2 
3 
1 




5 


Collingwood 




2 
1 




Copper Cliff 




45 


Cornwall 




18 




Deseronto 






5 


Dresden 




10 
5 

40 
1 

22 
2 
6 
1 

25 








Dundas 


5 


5 
5 


5 




Dunnville 




Durham 






1 




2 


58 
5 
2 
4 

20 
5 

15 
8 

18 
7 
1 
8 
3 

12 

12 
3 






58 


Essex 


1 




2 


Forest . 






6 


Fort Frances .... 


1 








Gananoque 






2 


Goderich 








5 


Hanover 










15 


Harriston 




8 
9 

7 






8 


Hespeler 


3 






4 


Ingersoll . 






1 


Keewatin 






1 


Kenora 




104 
11 
15 








Leamington 










Lindsay 










Listowel 










Meaf ord 












Milton 


1 








1 


Mitchell 


1 
1 
8 










Mount Forest .... 




1 

8 






1 


Napanee 










Newmarket 








10 


Niagara 






2 
35 

3 

268 

15 

353 

5 

4 
55 
10 

1 
14 

7 

2 








North Bay 


3 


26 
3 

268 






140 


Oakville 






3 


Orillia 


3 


6 


6 




Oshawa 


30 


Owen Sound 


3 

1 


30 
5 
4 

55 

10 
2 

14 
7 

14 








Paris 


1 
1 
3 


1 
1 




Parkhill 




Parry Sound 






Pembroke 








Perth 










Port Hope 








14 


Prescott 








x 


Preston 









260 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. If 





TABLE Q— REPORT 


ON TRUANCY— Continued 




Towns. — Con- 
tinued 


No. of 

childrea 

otherwise 

employed 

during 

school hours 


No. of cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No. of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 
Magistrates 
or J. P's 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Rainy River .... 




5 


5 

12 
1 








Renfrew 








22 

2 

4 


Ridgetown 










St. Mary's 




20 
4 






Sandwich 


1 
2 


25 
153 

10 
4 
2 
6 
150 
3 
2 

10 
9 

86 
1 

17 

27 


3 
2 


3 
2 


Simcoe 




Southampton. . . . 


17 
4 
6 




Stayner 










Strathroy 


- 


..... 


1 


2 

20 
20 


Sturgeon Falls . . 




Sudbury 


12 


20 
3 
2 

12 






Thessalon 






Thornbury 










Thorold 








14 


Tillsonburg 








Trenton 


7 


86 

1 

23 

21 

4 

4 

8 

3 

368 

38 

40 

3 
4 






13 


Trout Creek 


1 


1 


Uxbridge 






Vankleek Hill . . 










Walkerville 








Wallaceburg .... 


2 


3 
20 

3 

105 

27 

31 

3 
4 

14 
4 

13 
5 
1 

15 








Waterloo 






2 


Webbwood 








Welland 

Whitby 


1 
2 
6 


2 


2 


1 


Wiarton 






46 
9 


Villages 
A.cton 






Ailsa Craig 








Ayr 








14 


Bayfield 


3 








Beamsville 


13 
5 

15 
1 

15 
9 
2 


2 

1 


2 

1 




Bloomfield 

Bobcaygeon 


5 


2 
4 


Bolton 






Bradford 







1 


Burk's Falls . . . 


15 

14 

2 








Caledonia ' 







5 


Cayuga 








Chesterville 






1 


Colborne 


2 
1 


4 
6 


6 

8 






4 


Coldwater 


1 






Courtright 




1 


Delhi 




4 
1 










Drayton 




1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
4 
30 
12 
2 
2 
2 
6 
3 
1 






Elo ra 










Elmira 




1 
4 
1 
2 
2 






1 


Embro 








Exeter 


1 






2 
2 


Fergus , 






Finch 








Fort Erie 




" 


4 


Georgetown .... 


2 


30 
2 
2 
2 
2 
6 
3 
1 


1 


1 


Glencoe 


12 
2 
1 

4 
6 


Grimsby 








Hagersville 


1 






Havelock 


2 




Holland Landing 






Humberstone .... 








Jarvis 









1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



261 



TABLE Q— REPORT ON TRUANCY— Concluded 



Villages. — Con- 
cluded 


No. of 
children 
otherwise 
employed 

during 
school hours 


No. of cases 

of truancy 

reported to 

the Truant 

Officers 


No of notices 

by Truant 

Officers to 

parents 

or guardians 


No. of com- 
plaints made 
before Police 
Magistrates 
or J.P's 


No. of con- 
victions 


No. of child- 
ren reported 
by Teachers 
as not attend- 
ing school 


Lakefield 




2 

4 
4 


2 

4 

1 

25 

8 

2 

12 

8 

77 
2 






Lucan 






1 ... 


Markdale 








! 2 


Markham 








25 


Maxville 




8 
2 








Merritton 


1 






2 


Millbrook 






12 


Milverton 




8 
4 
1 








Mimico 








Morrisburg 








2 


Newburgh 


1 






1 


Newcastle 


3 
9 
2 
4 
1 








New Hamburg.. 




9 
2 
2 






9 


New Toronto. . . . 










Norwich 

Norwood 


1 


1 


1 


1 
1 


Omemee 








5 


Port Co] borne. . . . 




25 


25 
2 

28 








Port Carling .... 










Port Dover 








28 




[ i 2 


2 






2 


Port Rowan 




1 


1 






1 


Port Stanley .... 









2 


Shallow Lake . . . 




30 • 
2 






25 


Shelburne 




1 






1 


Stirling 








2 


Sutton 




10 
2 


8 
2 

11 
5 
3 

13 






2 


Tavistock 








.... 


Thamesville .... 


3 


11 
5 








Victoria Harbour 






5 


Wardsville 









6 


Waterford 


.. 


9 
1 


2 






Winchester 








Woodville 




2 

3 

160 

7 

2 

12 
22 

6 

6 

20 
22 

13 






2 


Townships 
Barrie, S.S. No. 4 










3 


Brantf ord 


90 
22 


193 
80 








Burford 








Coleman, S.Ss. 3a 
and 3b 






50 


Denbigh, S.S.No.5 




9 
2 

9 






8 


Dumfries North. 


1 






1 


Kennebec, S. S. 
No. 3 








Kennebec, S. S. 
No. 7 










Morrison 


7 6 


2 




14 


Oso, S.S. No. 9 . . 




10 


Oxford West .... 


15 21 






1 










Totals 


310 11,414 


5,107 


261 


75 


8,778 



NOTE — Out of 303 urban municipalities in the Province, 60 reported no truants, while 68 
did not report at all ; the remaining 175 are reported above. 



262 



THE EBPOET OF THE 



TABLE R— GENERAL 

A General Statistical Abstract, exhibiting the comparative state and progress of 

Schools (Including collegiate institutes), from the year 1867 



No. 



Subjects compared 



1867 



1872 



1877 



Population 

School population between the ages of five 
and sixteen years up to 1882, five to 
twenty-one subsequently 

High Schools (including Collegiate Institutes) . 

Continuation Schools 

Public Schools in operation 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

Grand total of above schools in operation 

Pupils attending High Schools (including Col- 
legiate Institutes and Night High Schools) . 

Pupils attending Continuation Schools 

Pupils attending Public Schools (including 
Kindergarten and Night Public Schools) . . 

Pupils attending Roman Catholic Separate 
Schools 

Grand total of students and pupils attending 
High, Continuation, Public, and Separate 
Schools 

Amount paid for the salaries of Public and 
Separate School teachers 

Amount paid for the erection and repairs of 
Public and Separate School houses, and 
for libraries, apparatus, books, fuel, sta- 
tionery, etc 

Total amount paid for Public and Separate 
School purposes 

Amount paid for Continuation School teachers' 
salaries 

Total amount paid for Continuation School 
purposes 

Amount paid for High School (and Collegiate 
Institute) teachers' salaries 

Amount paid for erection and repair of High 
School (and Collegiate Institute) houses, 
maps, apparatus, prizes, fuel, books, etc . . 

Total amount paid for High School and Col- 
legiate Institute purposes 

Grand total paid for educational purposes as 
above 

Total Public and Separate School Teachers . . 

Male Teachers in Public and Separate Schools 

Female Teachers in Public and Separate 
Schools 

Continuation School Teachers 

High School and Collegiate Institute Teachers . 

Number of all teachers, as specified above. .. 



447,726 
102 



4,261 

161 

4,524 

5,696 



382,719 
18,924 

407,339 
$1,093,517 

$379,672 
$1,473,189 



$94,820 

$29,361 

$124,181 

$1,597,370 
4,890 
2,849 

2,041 



159 
5,049 



1,620,851 



495,756 
104 



4,490 

171 

4,765 

7,968 



433,256 
21,406 

462,630 
1,371,594 

835,770 
2,207,364 



141,812 

68,193 

210,005 

2,417,369 
5,476 
2,626 

2,850 



494,804 
104 



4,955 

185 

5,244 

9,229 



465f908 
24,952 

500,089 
2,038,099 

1,035,390 
3,073,489 



239 
5,715 



211,607 

132,103 

343,710 

3,417,199 
6,468 
3,020 

3,448 



280 
6,748 



Included in Public and Separate School attendances, f Included with 



1916 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



263 



STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 

Education in Ontario, as connected with Public, Separate, Continuation and High 
to 1915, compiled from Returns to the Department of Education 



No. 


1887 


1892 


1897 


1902 


1907 


1912 


1914 


1915 


1 




2,114,321 




2,167,938 




12,523,358 

609,127 
148 
138 

5,939 
513 

6,738 






2 
3 
4 


611,212 
112 


595,238 
128 


590,055 

130 

44 

5,574 

340 

6,088 


584,512 

134 

65 

5,671 

391 

6,261 


590,285 
143 
107 

5,819 
449 

6,518 


636,616 
161 
131 

6,031 
519 

6,842 


643,975 
160 
132 


5 
6 

7 


5,277 

229 

5,618 


5,577 

312 

6,017 


6,063 

537 

6,892 


8 


17,459 


22,837 


24,390 
*1,618 


24,472 
*2,190 


30,331 
*4,744 

413,510 


32,608 
6,094 


38,840 
6,069 


40,780 
6,800 


10 


462,839 


458,553 


453,256 


420,094 


429,030 


455,276 


458,117 


n 


30,373 


37,466 


41,620 


45,964 


51,502 


61,297 


66,271 


67,481 


12 


510,671 


518,856 


519,266 


490,530 


495,343 


529,029 


566,456 


573,178 


13 


2,458,540 


2,752,629 


2,886,061 


3,198,132 


4,389,524 


6,109,547 


7,203,034 


7,614,110 


14 


1,283,564 


1,301,289 


1,329,609 


1,627,028 


3,166,655 


5,164,413 


7,647,934 


6,653,366 


15 
16 


3,742,104 


4,053,918 


4,215,670 
Included 

with No. 13 
Included 

with No. 15 


4,825,160 
Included 

with No. 13 
Included 

with No. 15 


7,556,179 
Included 

with No. 13 
Included 

with No. 15 


11,273,960 
202,875 
265,087 


14,850,968 
208,386 
294,125 


14,267,476 
219,660 
310,794 


17 






18 


327,452 


472,029 


532,837 


547,402 


783,782 


1,232,537 


1,476,756 


1,472,673 


19 


168,160 


224,085 


183,139 


222,278 


429,915 


720,524 


1,968,184 


998,301 


20 


495,612 


696,114 


715,976 


769,680 


1,213,697 


1,953,061 


3,444,940 


2,470,974 


21 
22 
23 


4,237,716 
7,594 
2,718 


4,750,032 
8,480 
2,770 


4,931,646 
9,128 
2,784 


5,594,840 
9,631 
2,311 


8,769,876 

10,200 

1,813 


18,492,108 

11,128 

1,511 


18,590,033 

11,942 

1,628 


17,049,244 

12,246 

2,081 


24 
?5 


4,876 


5,710 


6,344 
t44 

579 
9,707 


7,320 

|86 

593 

10,224 


8,387 

fl40 

750 

10,950 


9,617 
226 
917 

12,271 


10,314 

237 

1,023 

13,202 


10,165 
238 


26 
27 


7,992 


9,002 


1,020 
13,504 



Public and Separate School teachers. {Census of 1911. 



264 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPEN= 

TEACHERS' 
FINANCIAL 





Total Registered 
Attendance of 
Members 




Receipts 




Name of Institute 


$ 

B 

Or* 


It 

Pi 
I 


CO 
0) 

"bo 
u 

8 


1 Algoma, East 


121 

36 

156 

112 

112 

129 

118 

120 

101 

109 

109 

60 

143 

55 

94 

104 

82 

99 

118 

35 

88 

106 

92 

54 

132 

125 

116 

50 

104 

131 

120 

143 

120 

106 

78 

93 

116 

96 

23 

29 

116 

106 

112 

74 

108 

3 

80 
95 
79 


$ c. 
50 00 
50 00 


$ c. 


$. c. 
29 25 


2 Algoma (Eastern Division) 




17 00 


3 Brant 






4 Bruce, East 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 

"56*66" 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
100 00 




5 Bruce, West 


10 00 


6 Carle ton, East 


60 50 


7 Carleton, West, and Lanark, East 


59 00 


8 Dufferin 




9 Dundas 


50 50 


10 Elgin, East 








11 Elgin, West 








12 Essex, North 


25 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 


50 00 

50 00 

5 62 

50 00 




13 Essex, South 


32 50 


14 Frontenac North, and Addington 


14 25 


15 Frontenac, South 


26 50 


16 Glengarry 


19 25 


17 Grey, East 


50 00 
50 00 

50 00 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 




18 Grey, South 


23 25 


19 Grey, West 


28 75 


20 Haliburton 




21 Haldimand 


50 00 

50 00 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
24 75 
67 50 
50 00 
50 00 




22 Halton 


26 75 


23 Hastings, Centre 




24 Hastings, North 


25 00 




25 Hastings, South, and Belleville 




26 Huron, East . c 


50 00 


57 50 


27 Huron, West 




28 Kenora 


50 00 
50 00 




29 Kent, East 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
65 70 
50 00 
50 00 


25 Q0 


30 Kent, West, and City of Chatham 


32 75 


31 Lambton, East 






32 Lambton, West 


50 00 
50 00 


27 50 


33 Lanark, West, and Smith's Fal]s 


25 20 


34 Leeds, East, and Brockville (No. 2) 


37 10 


35 Leeds, West (No. 1) 




17 75 


36 Leeds and Grenville No. 3 




25 00 




37 Lennox and Addington 




20 00 


38 Lincoln 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 


50 00 




39 Manitoulin, East 




40 Manitoulin, West 






41 Middlesex, East 


50 00 
50 00 


30 50 


42 Middlesex, West 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 


81 65 


43 Muskoka 




44 Nipissing, North 




18 55 




50 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 




46 Northumberland and Durham No. 1 




47 Northumberland and Durham No 2 




48 Northumberland and Durham No. 3 . 




49 Ontario, North 


19 75 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



265 



DIX H 



INSTITUTES 
STATEMENT 



Receipts —Continued 


Expenditure 




TO 3J 
QJ CO 

U 


co 

P. 

°3 
o 
to 

W 

3 

o 
Eh 


CO 

£ . 
.a* 

to « 

Cm 


w.2j3 

CD -*-» T!i 


CO 
B 

o 

1 

1 

DO 

a 


d 


CO 

1 


i 

2 


$ c. 
188 29 
9 54 
257 40 
165 68 
272 45 
102 52 
255 43 

67 29 
334 44 
412 00 

54 85 
178 30 

59 12 
18 67 
78 17 

197 10 
211 29 
321 81 
219 70 
172 12 
396 22 
149 80 
117 82 
170 22 

88 70 
227 63 
272 04 

47 65 
219 73 
289 57 
106 29 
209 21 
225 67 

94 86 
238 00 

96 37 

88 04 

94 19 
11 30 
11 88 

140 65 

78 63 

121 63 

60 22 

95 36 
74 55 
95 55 

133 11 
117 81 


$ C. 

267 54 
76 54 
257 40 
265 68 
382 45 
263 02 
364 43 
217 29 

384 94 
412 00 

54 85 
253 30 
191 62 

63 54 
204 67 
216 35 
311 29 
445 06 
348 45 
172 12 
496 22 
276 55 
167 82 
219 97 
156 20 

385 13 
322 04 

97 65 
344 73 
372 32 
156 29 
352 41 
350 87 
181 96 
255 75 
121 37 
108 04 

194 19 
61 30 
61 88 

221 15 
260 28 
171 63 
128 77 

195 36 
149 55 
145 55 
208 11 
162 56 


$ C. 

14 60 
5 35 
19 81 
74 95 
17 50 

10 09 
84 24 
34 81 

24 50 

11 50 

3 25 

7 30 
93 35 

4 31 

8 10 

9 49 

8 50 
10 34 

7 85 

5 75 
10 05 

9 50 

25 00 
17 01 
17 00 
10 00 
38 90 

9 17 

10 90 
7 96 
9 50 

7 45 

8 85 

9 00 

12 05 
8 70 

11 02 
14 47 

3 50 

52 

68 35 

28 45 

6 08 


$ c. 
41 00 


$ C. 

51 T 60 
14 65 

126 23- 
72 34 

115 45 
98 15 

143 25 
67 71 

210 25 
45 05 
24 86 
59 03 

47 25 
30 00 
97 70 

62 00 
75 75 
58 60 

197 55 
50 15 

43 95 
32 02 

44 30 

20 65 
85 40 

148 10 
272 64 

21 70 
16 00 

105 89 

142 33 

177 80 

182 02 

66 00 

137 50 

53 45 

57 55 

85 22 

28 55 
57 25 
32 25 

157 50 
52 05 
19 00 

63 35 

29 33 

48 10 
87 40 

117 25 


$ c. 

107 20 
20 00 

165 84 1 
169 69 ? 
132 95 

108 24 
276 47 
131 52 
234 75 

56 55 
28 11 
93 33 

140 60 

36 81 
111 30 

71 49 
116 10 
177 44 
290 65 

60 90 

54 00 

121 77 

80 30 

37 66 
146 90 
161 60 
322 04 

39 97 
46 90 
113 85 
151 83 
239 25 
232 87 
134 20 
182 55 

72 15 
.68 57 
102 41 

50 95 

57 77 
100 60 
185 95 

58 13 
19 00 

113 54 
41 36 
54 85 
98 03 

128 25 


$ c. 

160 34 

56 54 


3 
4 
5 


19 80 
22 40 


91 56 

95 99 

249 50 


6 




154 78 


7 

8 
q 


48 98 
29 00 


87 96 

85 77 

150 19 


10 




355 45 


11 




26 74 


12 
18 


27 00 


159 97 
51 02 


14 
15 
16 


2 50 
5 50 


26 73 
93 37 

144 86 


17 
18 
19 
20 
?1 


31 85 

108 50 

85 25 

5 00 


195 19 
267 62 
57 80 
111 22 
442 22 


22 
23 
?\ 


80 25 
11 00 


154 78 

87 52 

182 31 


25 

26 

?,7 


44 50 
3 50 

10 50 
9 10 

20 00 


9 30 
223 53 


28 
29 
30 


57 68 

297 83 
258 47 


31 




4 46 


32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 


54 00 
42 00 
59 20 
33 00< 
10 00 


113 16 
118 00 
47 76 
73 20* 
49 22 
39 47 


38 
39 
40 


2 72 

18 90 


91 78 

10 35 

4 11 


41 




120 55 


42 




74 33 


43 




113 50 


44 




109 77 


45 

46 


10 19 

12 03 

6 75 

10 63 

11 00 


40 00 


81 82 
108 19 


47 




90 70 


48 




110 08 


49 




34 31 



266 



THE REPOBT OF THE 



No. 17 



TEACHERS' 
FINANCIAL 





Total Registered 
Attendance of 
Members 


Receipts 


Name of Institute— Concluded 


-*3 

a 


is 


"cfl 
U 

a 


50 Ontario, South 


105 

215 

65 

61 

97 

205 

115 

115 

99 

58 

120 

150 

126 

109 

103 

129 

65 

140 

120 

146 

249 

139 

102 

98 

115 

86 

213 

1,193 

83 
46 

319 
68 

238 

364 

94 

77 

1,443 

104 


$ c. 


$ c. 
50 00 
50 00 


$ c. 


51 Oxford 

52 Parry Sound, East 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
25 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 


37 00 


53 Parry Sound, West 






54 Peel 


50 00 
75 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 


98 00 


55 Perth and Stratford 




56 Peterborough 


21 50 


57 Prescott and Russell 




58 Prince Edward 




59 Rainy River 


14 50 


60 Renfrew, North 


50 00 
50 00 
100 00 
50 00 
50 00 




61 Renfrew, South 




62 Simcoe, East 




63 Simcoe, North 


50 00 
50 00 




64 Simcoe, South- West 


22 00 


65 Stormont * 


11 25 


66 Sudbury 








67 Thunder Bay 






37 50 


68 Timiskaming 


50 00 

50 00 

100 00 




48 00 


69 Victoria 


50 00 
100 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 
50 00 


49 83 


70 Waterloo 


63 25 


71 Welland 




72 Wellington, North 


50 00 
50 00 
50 00 


24 00 


73 Wellington, South 




74 Wentworth 


49 00 


75 York, North 


25 50 


76 York, South 




85 25 


77 Ontario Educational Association* 


1,400 00 




596 50 


Cities 
78 Brantford 


25 00 
25 00 




79 Guelph 






80 Hamilton 




159 50 


81 Kingston 


"75*66' 


25 00 
50 00 
75 00 
25 00 
25 00 
350 00 
25 00 


16 75 


82 London 


70 75 


83 Ottawa 


95 00 


84 Peterborough 




46 00 


85 St. Catharines and Niagara Falls 


25 00 

350 00 

25 00 




86 Toronto 


699 00 


87 Windsor and Walkeryille 


25 50 






Totals, 1915 


12,152 
11,684 


4,300 00 
5,650 00 


3,288 57 
3,645 27 


3,086 3£ 


Totals, 1914 


3,044 40 






Increases 


468 






41 93 


Decreases 


1,350 00 


356 70 











* Statement for 1915-1916 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



267 



INSTITUTES— Concluded 
STATEMENT— Concluded 



Receipts— Continued 


Expenditure 




GO 

co o 

4) CO 

d » 

42 -d 


CO 

ft 

o 

H 


CO 

o 
Oh 

&2 S 
d jp 


3 8 g 

c3 d « 

3«* 


CO 

d 

o 

I 

% 

o 

CO 

s 


d 

. CD 

oh 


CO 

8 

d 


50 
51 
5? 


$ c. 
210 46 
193 03 

78 52 

4 88 

138 63 

322 71 

502 07 

53 61 
135 46 

66 10 
306 25 

91 50 
146 47 
117 62 

45 85 
236 61 

60 87 
132 47 

65 36 
288 09 
216 53 
248 35 
183 56 
112 20 
103 22 
195 65 
342 75 
922 98 

82 93 
38 65 
819 70 
55 58 
98 23 

2,811 28 

205 16 

47 45 

6,471 06 
91 78 


$ c. 
260 46 
330 03 
128 52 

54 88 
336 63 
422 71 
623 57 
153 61 
235 46 
130 60 
406 25 
191 50 

246 47 
217 32 
167 85 

247 86 
60 87 

169 97 
163 36 
437 92 
479 78 
298 35 
307 56 
212 20 
252 22 
271 15 
428 00 
2,919 48 

107 93 
63 65 

979 20 
97 33 

293 98 
2.981 28 

276 16 

97 45 

7,870 06 

167 28 


$ c. 

8 45 

9 15 

5 00 

6 60 
35 40 
12 02 
12 91 
14 93 

9 40 

5 50 

31 25 

7 43 
14 15 
17 60 

5 05 

14 99 

15 75 
11 60 

57 

15 96 

16 53 
10 92 
10 50 
14 64 
28 40 
51 20 
78 00 

1,520 37 


$ C. 

9 44 
18 00 


$ C. 

71 95 
110 20 

25 65 

20 25 

165 36 

103 55 

523 14 

25 70 

43 49 

60 05 

193 30 

138 70 

68 48 

65 55 

49 15 

110 85 

19 15 

68 50 
100 65 
188 82 
240 05 
118 18 

47 50 
93 40 

159 43 
47 55 
57 25 

971 67 

37 86 
30 06 

549 75 
55 80 

130 00 
2,175 10 

69 25 
24 56 

3,838 65 

72 50 


$ c. 

89 84 

137 35 

30 65 

30 60 

200 76 

115 57 

579 05 

40 63 

73 76 

65 55 

255 55 

169 13 

82 63 

83 15 
130 94 

227 34 
34 90 
80 10 

101 22 
284 71 
263 08 
141 10 
141 38 
108 04 

228 58 
137 00 
218 00 

2,492 04 

37 86 

38 58 
589 31 

94 06 

154 39 

2,278 34 

215 30 

39 88 
4,425 48 

78 25 


$ C. 

170 62 
192 68 

97 87 


53 
54 


3 75 


24 28 
135 87 


55 




307 14 


56 
57 


43 00 


44 52 
112 98 


58 
59 


20 87 


161 70 
65 05 


60 
61 
6? 


31 00 
23 00 


150 70 

22 37 

163 84 


63 




134 47 


64 
65 
66 


76 74 
101 50 


36 91 
20 52 
25 97 


67 




89 87 


68 




62 14 


69 
70 
71 
72 
73 


79 93 

6 50 

12 00 

83 38 


153 21 
216 70 
157 25 
166 18 
104 16 


74 
75 
76 

77 


40 75 
38 25 
82 75 


23 64 
134 15 
210 00 
427 44 


78 




70 07 


79 


8 52 

8 16 

8 68 

24 39 

58 24 

6 90 

5 49 

113 99 

5 75 




25 07 


80 
81 

82 


31 40 
29 58 


389 89 

3 27 

139 59 


83 
84 
85 
86 
87 


45 00 

139 15 

9 83 

472 84 


702 94 

60 86 

57 57 

3,444 58 

89 03 








23,892 49 
22,308 42 


34,567 39 
34,648 09 


3,074 01 
2,583 12 


2,264 11 
2,358 06 


14,903 17 
12,710 57 


20,241 29 
17,651 75 


14,326 10 
16,996 34 




1,584 07 




490 89 




2,192 60 


2,589 54 






80 70 


93 95 


2,670 24 













268 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



APPEN- 

FIFTH CLASSES, 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 



(In the case of rural schools the 
section number and the name of 
the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Algoma 

Brant 

Bruce, East 

Carleton, East 

Dundas 

Elgin, East 

Essex 

Frontenac, South 

Grey, East 

Grey, South 

Grey, West 

Haliburton 

Hastings, North and Parry Sound, 
S.-E 

Huron, East 

Huron, West 



1 McDonald Echo Bay 



8 Burford 
14 Carrick 
11 Fitzroy i 



Burford 

Mildmay 

Kinburn 



1 Mountain : South Mountain . 

22 Mountain Mountain Station 



4 Winchester 

9 Southwold 
1 Southwold 

Kingsville 

6 Kingston . 



Ormond 

Shedden 
Fingal . 



12 Artemesia & Glenelg, 
3 Euphrasia 



Neustadt — 

Shallow Lake 

1 Anson 



Kingsville 

Cataraqui 

Priceville 
Kimberley 



Neustadt 

Shallow Lake 
Minden 



South River South River 

Sundridge iSundridge . 

Trout Creek Trout Creek 



11 Grey Ethel ... 

7 Howick Gorrie . . 

17 Howick Fordwich 



Hensall 
Zurich 
5 Stephen Crediton 



Hensall 

7 Hay . . 



16 Stephen 

6 Usborne 

Bayfield 

8 Ashfield 

14 Stanley 



Kent, East 

Lambton, East (2) 



Dashwood . 
Woodham . 
Bayfield . - - 
Dungannon 
Kippen . . . 



313&4 Orford Duart . . 

32j U4 Raleigh and Harwich. Blenheim 



1 Euphemia 

S Euphemia 

7 Dawn . . . 

12 Dawn . . . 



Shetland 
Florence 
Croton . 
Dresden 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION • 



269 



DIX I 

1915=1916 


Teachers 


Pupils 


Grade of Fifth 
Class 


Total Value of 
Approved 
Equipment 




Name of Principal and Degree 


i—i 
.9 3 


CO 
r-j 
OS 

rH 


'a 

o 
d 
525 


la 


A 


B 


C 




1 H. R. Ponting 

2 Caroline B. Good 


II 

I 

11 
II 

11 
II 

II 

g 

I 

II 

I 
II 

11 

I 
11 

I 

II 
II 

II 

I 

II 

II 
II 

I 

II 
II 

I 

II 
II 

11 
II 

II 
I 

II 
II 


$ 
750 

920 

1,025 

700 

900 
700 
715 

750 

700 

1,300 

700 

725 
700 

700 

800 

700 

900 
750 
750 

650 
700 
775 

1,000 

1,000 

1,050 

1,000 

675 

1 700 

825 

725 

675 
750 

600 
800 
600 
600 


10 

17 

10 

9 

26 
9 

7 

5 
3 

19 

4 

12 
5 

8 

7 

9 

8 
16 

8 

4 
4 

7 

9 

15 
17 
20 
11 
11 
9 
3 

6 
2 

6 

16 
2 
3 


7 

11 
9 

7 

21 
6 
5 

2 
2 

13 

2 

6 
4 

7 

5 

5 

4 

10 

5 

2 
3 
6 

7 

11 
15 
15 
7 
9 
6 
2 

5 
2 

5 

11 

2 

2 


1 

1 

1 
1 
1 


1 


1 


$ c. 
144 74 

478 00 

247 34 

262 15 

233 16 
500 60 
273 86 

112 50 
128 95 

341 45 

82 90 

208 55 
320 95 

124 59 

82 08 

200 00 

259 21 

201 59 

134 77 

95 14 
182 04 
155 23 

242 00 
256 00 
371 00 
375 00 
80 00 
249 00 
220 00 
. 205 00 

191 91 
105 60 

110 00 

206 15 

88 79 

84 17 


$ C. 

138 28 
157 12 


3 John T. Kidd 


1 


.... 


78 07 


4 Leah Bechler 


88 05 


5 E. H. Thorpe 






115 98 


6 Perley S. Boyd 






102 92 


7 Margt. P. Chester 






91 94 


8 Oliver M. Stonehouse . . 

9 Libbie MacLennan 


1 


"l 


66 34 
51 99 


10 W. J. Elliott 


1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 




173 25 


1 1 Lilla J. Needham 

12 Earl G. Miller 






72 47 
107 88 


13 Kathleen McKee, B.A. . . 

14 Thos. H. Patterson 

15 Thos. M. Thomson 


1 
1 


.... 


99 87 

93 48 

120 23 


16 W. Macarthur 


1 


.... 


69 43 


17 S. G. Gilleland 


332 20 


18 E. K. Godfrey 






250 40 


19 Robert Ingram 

20 Edna McLelland 

21 Robt. S. McBurney 

22 Geo. H. Jefferson 

23 Wm. Mackay 


1 

1 
1 
1 


.... 


197 44 

46 88 
68 03 
70 05 

142 86 


24 Geo. S. Howard 






117 97 


26 Jessie L, Linklater 






149 73 


26 Geo. W. Shore 






128 32 


27 Nellie Medd 






66 77 


28 Violet E, Stevens 

29 Frederick Ross 

30 Wm. H. Johnston 


1 
1 


"i" 

"T 

i 


126 06 
75 69 
65 68 


31 Annie M. Blue 

32 Jas. R. Newkirk 





1 


60 73 

57 04 


33 Evelyn Long 


"i 




31 32 


34 Bert Currie 


94 06 


35 Mrs. P. Minshall 




i 
i 


29 47 


36 Ada McPherson 






27 98> 



270 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FIFTH CLASSES, 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools, the 
section number and the name of 
the township are given) 



Post Office 



Lambton, West 

Lincoln 

Manitoulin, etc 

Middlesex, East 

Middlesex, West 

Northumberland & Durham, No. 3 . 
Ontario, N. and Parry Sound, N. B. 



Ontario, South 

Oxford, North 

Oxford, South 

Parry Sound, South 

Peel , 

Perth, North 

Prescott and Russell 

Rainy River & Thunder Bay, E. 
Renfrew, North 



37 
38 
39 

40 
41 
42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 
48 
49 
50 

51 

52 
53 

54 

55 

56 



57 

58 
59 
60 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 
66 
67 



Courtright 
Wyoming 
11 Moore . . . 



2 Louth 

U2 Clinton and 3 Louth, 
11 Gainsborough 



Massey 

2 Delaware 

15 Caradoc 

U16 Murray & 18 Brighton 



Courtright 
Wyoming 
Brigden . . 



Jordan Station 

Vineland 

Wellandport . . 



Massey .... 
Delaware . . 
Mt. Brydges 
Wooler 



13 Brock 

U4 Brock 

5 Scott 

U4 North Himsworth and 
Ferris 

1 Nipissing 



4 (West) Pickering 
3 Whitby 



U8 and 4 Blandford and 
Blenheim 

10 Zorra, E 

U5 E. Nissouri and North 
Oxford 



Sunderland 
Manilla . . . 
Zephyr . . . 



Callender 
Nipissing 

Pickering 
Brooklin 



12 Dereham 



Bright . 
Innerkip 



Thamesford 
Brownsville 



Ul Chapman and Croft 

7 Humphrey 

Kearney 

1 McKellar 



Bolton 



Milverton 
U6 Logan . . 



2 Cumberland 

3 Cumberland 
5 Cumberland 



1 Schreiber . . 

5 Lash 

Rainy River 



6 Ross 

7 Westmeath 



Magnetawan 
Rosseau . . . 
Kearney . . . 
McKellar . . 



Bolton . . 

Milverton 
Monkton 



Vars 

Navan 

Cumberland 



Schreiber . . 

Emo 

Rainy River 



Forester's Falls 
Beachburg 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



271 



1915-1916— Continued 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and Degree 



Is 

o <v 



1—1 

H ^ 

Bee 



Pupils 






.rH 4J 

Q g 



5^ 



Grade of Fifth 
Class 



® 15 



ft 3 

ft o 1 



41 



39 
3° 



37 R. J. Leach 

38 Ella Sutherland 

39 Wm. E. Jarrott 

40 Stanley Henderson 

41 Geo. W. Clark 

42 Mrs. Jennie Misener 

43 Lillian Ord 

44 Esther Heatly 

45 Ella M. McDougall 

46 Vern Ames 

47 Edith Harvey 

48 Belle Shannon 

49 Julius Rynard 

50 Jos. A. Mahon 

51 Lewis E. Armstrong . . . 

52 Geo. E. Feirheller 

53 Frances Phelan 

■-! 

54 G. O. McKenzie 

55 Ethel Mossip 

56 A. W. Waring .?. . 

57 Wilfrid K. Cowan 

58 H. W., Edwards 

59 Lawrence Maguire 

60 Mrs. Mary Dipsam .... 

61 Nina I. MacLeod 

62 Peter O. Nelson 

63 Wm. R. Burnett 

64 Maggie Huggins 

65 Mary E. O'Toole 

66 Mabel Maxwell, B.A. . . . 

67 Anna V. Dorrance 

68 Geo. A. Evans w 

69 Mary C. Ryan 

70 Robt. L. Manning 

71 Jennie Page, B.A 

72 A. K. Sinclair 

*Grant for two years, 1915 and 1916. 



800 
700 
975 

750 
850 
800 

900 

650 

600 

850 

700 
675 
800 

700 
750 

800 
700 



700 
700 

700 

875 

725 
725 
675 
700 

900 

900 
750 

700 
800 
800 

1,300 

800 

1,200 

800 
700 



4 

5 

25 

5 

4 

4 

13 

10 

4 

7 



4 
7 

10 
•5 

10 

4 



17 

7 

4 

4 

13 



16 

4 

11 
23 
17 

17 
10 
16 

10 
9 



4 

4 

21 

3 
3 

3 



11 

5 
3 
3 
8 

27 

9 

2 

9 
18 

11 

13 

7 



$ c. 
223 65 
126 00 
296 32 

118 75 

446 76 
186 19 

484 37 

204 46 

227 36 

126 51 

114 25 
167 40 
210 80 

229 90 
156 44 

246 48 
87 57 



202 09 
383 83 

298 62 

342 22 

230 49 
206 26 
140 3i 
251 05 

294 65 

373 70 
116 42 

167 24 
224 67 
183 28 

116 26 
155 49 
511 81 

152 68 
213 64 



$ c. 

106 45 

93 61 

121 48 

65 08 
90 89 
64 04 

275 82 

59 11 

49 67 

67 56 

62 14 

58 60 
74 89 

214 00 
183 82 

108 44 
48 37 



69 77 
98 64 

107 54 

146 65 

153 20 
148 98 
178 84 
174 16 

>291 12 

151 44 
75 38 

85 23 
133 73 
133 39 

211 62 
255 42 
351 80 

91 57 
75 13 



272 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



FIFTH CLASSES, 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools th< 
section number and the name oi 
the township are given) 



Post Office 



Simcoe, East , 

Simcoe, S. W. 
Sudbury, etc. 



Victoria, West 77 

78 

Waterloo, North 79 

Waterloo, South 80 

81 

Welland 82 

Wellington, South 83 

84 
85 



Wentworth 



York, North 92 

93 
94 

York, West 95 

R. C. Separate Schools — 

Inspector Sullivan 96 

97 



Inspector Finn 

Totals 



98 

99 
100 



Victoria Harbour . . . Victoria Harbour 
12 Tay IWaubaushene . . . 



10 Essa Angus 

' 1 Wallbridge Byng Inlet. 



Woodville | Woodville — 

8 Mariposa j Little Britain 



16 Wellesley Welles-ley 

Hespeler \ Hespeler 

13 Wilmot Baden . . 



9 Bertie Stevensville 



6 Erin Hillsburg 

7 West Garaf raxa Belwood , 

Macdonald Cons i'O. A. C, Guelph 



5 Ancaster ! Ancaster 

3 Barton JMount Hamilton 

5 Beverly jTroy 

5 Saltfleet \ Stoney Creek . . 

3 Binbrook Binbrook 

7 West Flamboro jMillgrove 



11 King 

23 King 

12 Whitchurch 

Woodbridge 



Kettleby . . 

King , 

Bethesda . . 

Woodbridge 



2 Ashfield Kingsbridge 

2 Hibbert, McKillop andj 

Logan Dublin 

Wallaceburg I Wallaceburg 



7 Bromley ' [Douglas 

Mattawa iMattawa 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



273 



1915.1916— Concluded 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and 



73 John A. Gillespie 

74 Wm. McKaughan 



75 A. Edmund Harkness 

76 Angus W. Cameron . 

77 Geo. B. Rennie 

78 Chas. H. Lapp 



79 Helen MacGregor 

80 Jas. D. Ramsay . 

81 James Kerr 



82 Irene F. Foster 



83 R. R. McKay .. 

84 Mabel Money . . 

85 J. A. Macdonald 



86 Gordon A. Campbell 

87 William A. Neff . . , 

88 John Hay 

89 Lena M. Field 

99 Marjorie Boyle 

91 John A. Dalton 



92 Frances L. Clunas 

93 Walter Rolling . . 

94 Isaac Pike 



95 Russell Reid 



96 Sr. M. Eugenia 



97 Mother M. Dolores 

98 Mother M. Stella . 



99 Sr. M. Helen 

100 Sr. St. Andre Corsini 



Totals 



.2 § 

oitd 
O <o 



to 
1— I 



950 
1,000 

750 

1,000 

650 
750 

700 

1,400 
900 

800 

775 

725 

1,225 

900 
900 
800 
750 
650 
775 

690 
700 
710 

800 



650 

1,000 
400 

600 
600 



793 



Pupils 



17 
9 

11 

6 

6 
5 



36 

7 

35 

5 



931 






Grade of Fifth 
Class 



\B 



ft a< 

<3W 



14 
3 

7 

5 

3 
3 



3 
4 

10 

6 
2 

7 

2 
11 
3 
3 
2 
3 

3 
2 
3 



32 
6 

29 
3 



670 



1 
1 






1 


1 
1 

1 

1 

1 




1 






i 


1 

1 
1 




i 






i 






1 






l 


.., 


1 

1 
1 










i 




i 


1 


.... 


i 






i 






1 












46 


42 


12 



$ c. 
197 73 
170 58 

79 10 

83 53 

152 94 
138 97 

137 38 

346 23 
220 07 

155 02 

187 00 
107 00 
493 00 

275 08 
314 38 
255 52 
249 95 
226 55 
71 01 

155 32 

153 11 
170 05 

209 35 



656 87 

557 44 
474 36 

536 81 
209 43 



.2 § 

■tUG *-> 



$ c. 
139 00 
110 54 

63 43 

127 62 

79 64 
68 63 

53 27 

142 22 
114 84 

91 78 

72 82 

87 61 

153 90 

118 58 

121 16 

109 20 

97 87 

61 04 

62 73 

50 49 
56 82 
59 38 

131 31 



89 94 

141 13 

57 60 

96 74 

201 88 



til, 204 73 



* Average salary. 

tin addition there was paid on equipment, etc., the sum of $130.58 to schools that did not 
qualify as Fifth Classes in 1915-1916. 



18 E. 



274 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX K 

THE LIBRARY OF THB DEPARTMENT 

The Honourable R. A. Pyne, M.D., LL.D., 

Minister of Education for Ontario. 

Sir, — I respectfully submit the Report of the Library of the Department 
for 1916. A series of comparative tables are given to set forth the different services 
rendered by the Library, and to show its growth. 

The number of books loaned from year to year has increased rapidly, has 
indeed all but doubled in the past four years. It is especially gratifying to learn 
that the demand for books from places outside Toronto, has grown from fifty- 
eight centres in 1915 to ninety-eight in 1916. This phase of our work is proving 
very helpful to teachers and students, and deserves every encouragement. 

I must, again, draw attention to the crowded condition of the Library, and 
to the lack of reading and reference rooms for the 261 students in attendance at 
the Normal School. Because of this lack, these students are deprived of an 
opportunity to become acquainted with the various educational journals received 
from month to month, have no place in which to consult the many reference 
books which the Library contains, and have no facilities for making notes in 
connection with their studies. Ample space has been provided in all the other 
Normal Schools for this work. The rooms formerly devoted to these purposes, 
but given temporarily to the Workmen's Compensation Board, should be restored 
to the Library, and the students given an opportunity to profit by the large 
number of books and periodicals provided for them, but, in the main, not avail- 
able because of the conditions described. 

.. I have the honour to be Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 



Geo. E. Barnes, Acting Librarian. 



The Library, Toronto, January 4, 1917. 



TABLE A 
Number of Books Loaned, 1907=1916 



Books given out in 
the month of — 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


January 

February 


787 
831 
704 
691 
739 
456 
176 
124 
388 
805 
1,045 
352 


850 

883 

1,062 

661 

756 

388 

227 

120 

312 

1,011 

1,236 

707 


400 

1,180 

1,263 

464 

807 

315 

250 

96 

112 

356 

1,271 

247 


1,122 
893 
594 
630 
622 
395 
450 
119 
297 
682 

1,235 
495 


1,013 
975 

1,228 
438 
673 
381 
298 
76 
188 
289 

1,165 
379 


1,046 

1,138 

1,098 

719 

915 

398 

202 

130 

408 

330 

1,031 

533 


950 

1,126 

625 

1,004 

1,213 

956 

590 

132 

212 

560 

1,385 

1,154 


1,571 

1,715 

1,799 

738 

1,362 

602 

753 

447 

405 

1,819 

2,348 

2,371 


2,169 

2,063 

1,784 

1,385 

1,368 

582 

1,073 

658 

519 

1,482 

2,328 

1,631 


2,251 

2,387 


March 


2,799 


April 


1,324 


May 


1,591 


June 


617 


July 


1,126 


August 


611 


September 


578 


October 


1,686 


November 

December 


1,944 
1,230 


Totals 


7,098 


8,213 


6,761 


7,534 


7,103 


7,948 


9,907 


15,930 


17,042 


18,144 







1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



283 



TABLE B 
Number of Books Purchased in 1916 



General Works 4 

Philosophy 18 

Religion 2 

Sociology 129 

Philology 50 

Natural Science 37 



Useful Arts 36 

Fine Arts 128 

Literature 70 

History 122 



Total 



596 



TABLE C 
Number of Books Donated to the Library during the Years 1909=1916 



— 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


Text-Books 


15 

47 


21 

87 


27 
110 


15 

82 


21 

64 


13 
72 


55 
53 


20 


Miscellaneous 


44 






Totals 


62 


108 


137 


97 


85 


85 


108 


64 







TABLE D 
Number of Newspapers and Magazines Received during the Years 1911=16 



— 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


Number of daily and weekly newspapers received 

Number of magazines and other periodicals received . . 


96 
132 


96 
131 


96 
132 


96 
137 


103 
127 


104 
126 


Totals 


228 


227 


228 


233 


230 


230 







TABLE E 
Books, Magazines, etc., Bound During the Years 1904=1916 



1904 4905 


1906 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


81 


45 


217 


58 


148 


149 


171 


158 


207 


188 


255 


182 


70 



TABLE F 
Number of Periodicals and Magazines Loaned in 1916 




TABLE Q 
Number of Reference Books (loans not included) consulted during 1916 



284 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX L 

RURAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES, OCT. 1st, 1915, TO OCT. 1st, 1916 



Inspectorate 


No. of schools 
purchasing 
books to the 
amount of 
$10.00 dur- 
ing the year 


Total amount 
expended by 
such schools 
during the 
yearforbooks 
recommended 


A* 

co rt 
> d 

o u 

3l 


No. of rural 
public school 
libraries in 
inspectorate 


No. of libraries 
established 
during year 


Algoma 


5 

2 

3 

35 

8 

14 

17 

38 

24 


$ c. 

53 42 

22 35 

30 00 

483 13 

118 08 

211 86 

196 51 

653 62 

278 67 


$ c. 

40 07 

16 76 

22 50 

315 60 

76 49 

130 68 

145 66 

360 08 

192 92 


47 
78 
85 
83 
76 
77 
87 
74 
75 
29 
92 
70 
94 
73 
74 
66 
72 
71 
71 
67 
73 

88 
50 
84 
99 
32 
70 
63 
84 
81 
67 
75 
79 
64 
73 
77 
84 
101 
78 
78 
82 
63 
70 
62 
72 
63 
58 
48 
73 
72 
68 
44 
71 
54 
85 


3 


Brant, etc 




Bruce, East 




Bruce, West 




Carleton East 




Carleton West and Lanark East 

Dufferin 


3 

8 


Dundas 




Elgin, East 




Elgin, West 




Essex 


27 
9 

12 
1 
3 

43 
9 

19 


500 12 

110 47 
144 90 

11 89 

33 00 

606 71 

111 53 
217 99 


255 45 
78 98 

101 83 

8 92 

24 76 

400 71 
76 95 

157 44 


1 


Frontenac, North, and Addington . . . 
Frontenac, South 


1 
1 


Glengarry 




Grey, East 




Grey, South 




Grey, Wes^t 




Haldimand 




Haliburton 




Hal ton, etc 


8 
3 

27 
7 

31 
2 
5 

38 
2 
8 
3 

12 


104 73 
33 02 

396 74 
77 38 

408 63 
21 20 
79 55 

557 87 
21 90 
92 77 
41 59 

126 97 


67 40 

24 76 

244 54 

57 76 

269 91 

15 91 
47 50 

348 35 

16 43 
69 39 

25 75 
94 88 




Hastings, Centre 




Hastings, North, South Nipissing and 




Hastings, South 




Huron, East 


3 


Huron, West 




Kent, East 


3 
2 


Kent, West 




Lambton, East 








Lanark 




Leeds and Grenville, No. 1 




Leeds and Grenville, No. 2 


3 
11 


40 71 
118 81 


26 50 

89 09 








Lennox 




Lincoln and Pelham Tp 


39 
3 

11 
4 

19 
2 
4 
3 
8 
8 
1 

12 
5 
7 

15 


516 46 
48 88 

134 82 
42 44 

245 22 
28 95 
40 00 
57 00 
91 41 

104 62 
10 00 

142 13 
60 01 

115 70 

178 89 


339 64 
27 94 
90 25 
31 82 

168 70 
18 06 
30 00 
29 00 
67 86 
69 49 
7 50 

102 24 
41 58 
66 89 

127 60 




Mani touLn, etc 




Middlesex, East 




Middlesex, West 






I 


Norfolk 




Northumberland and Durham, No. 2 . 
Northumberland and Durham, No. 3. 
Ontario N., and Parry Sound, N. E. . 
Ontario, South 


"i" 

l 


Oxford, North 


l 






Parry Sound, South 




Peel 




Perth, North 




Perth, South 


6 

26 
12 

18 


89 61 
308 40 
147 69 
235 81 


49 42 
209 80 
101 32 
158 25 




Peterborough, East : 




Prescott and Russell . . . .- 


i 

2 







1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



285 



RURAL SCHOOL LIBRARIES, OCT. 1st, 1915, TO OCT. 1st, 1916.— Concluded 



Inspectorate 


No. of schools 
purchasmg 
books to the 
amount of 41 
$10.00 dur- 
ing the year 


Total amount 
expended by 
such schools 
during the 
year for books 
recommended 


i 
*^ 

CD d 
>■ e8 
o u 


No. of rural 
public school 
libraries in 
inspectorate 


No. of libraries 
established 
during year 


Prince Edward 


10 
1 
8 
2 
4 

11 
1 

22 

10 


$ c. 
114 14 

44 25 
104 83 

32 92 

53 95 
147 85 

10 01 
311 93 
152 22 


$ c. 
84 88 
10 00 
67 48 
18 11 
34 71 
94 77 
7 51 

199 64 
93 42 


71 
52 
74 
80 
57 
58 
72 
75 
43 
38 
72 
40 
40 
59 
49 
67 
65 
52 
65 
40 

31 
21 
48 
1 
32 




Rainy River and Thunder Bay E — 
Renfrew, North 




Renfrew, South 




Simcoe, East 




Simcoe, North 




Simcoe, South West 




Stormont 




Sudbury, North Nipissmg, etc 

Timiskaming 




Victoria, West 


16 
21 
15 
10 

7 

23 
22 
25 
28 

8 

30 


181 72 
301 40 
230 66 
129 01 
95 06 
323 81 
396 30 
354 86 
332 94 
113 08 

124 10 

92 82 

332 13 


131 76 

194 63 

142 28 

86 87 

65 06 

199 15 

209 87 

219 13 

234 45 

74 43 

110 00 

60 00 

300 00 




Waterloo, North, No . 1 


3 


Waterloo, South, No . 2 


1 


Welland 


1 


Wellington, North 


3 


Wellington, South 




Wentworth 




York, East 


2 


York, North 




York, West 


, 1 


Roman Catholic Separate Schools : 
Inspector Finn 




* ' ' Jones 


3 


Lee 




1 ' Power 




' ' Sullivan 


3 


38 26 


30 00 








Totals, 1915-1916 


926 
1,405 


12,522 41 
18,943 03 


8,209 48 
8,177 44 


5,248 
5,137 


46 


Totals, 1914-1915 


62 






Increases 






32.04 


111 




Decreases 


479 


6,420 62 


16 











286 THE REPORT OF THE No. 17 



APPENDIX M 

CADET CORPS, 1916 

Collegiate Institutes, High, Continuation, Public and Separate Schools having 
Cadet Corps with at least twenty members between the ages of 14 and 18 years in the 
case of Public and Separate Schools, and between 16 and 18 years in other cases. 

Collegiate Institutes: Barrie, Brantford, Brockville, Clinton, Cobourg, 
Collingwood, Fort William, Gait, Goderich, Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, 
Kitchener- Waterloo, Lindsay, London, Morrisburg, Napanee, North Bay, Orillia, 
Ottawa, Owen Sound, Perth, Peterborough, Picton, Port Arthur, Renfrew, Ridge- 
town, St. Mary's, St. Thomas, Sarnia, Seaforth, Smith's Falls, Stratford, Toronto 
(Harbord, Humberside, Jarvis, Malvern, Oakwood, Parkdale, River dale), Van- 
kleek Hill, Windsor, and Woodstock. Total, 44. 

High Schools: Belleville, Caledonia, Campbellford, Carleton Place, Essex, 
Fergus, Haileybury, Iroquois, Kemptville, Meaford, Mitchell, Mount Forest, NeAV- 
market, Oshawa, Parry Sound, Pembroke, Port Hope, Prescott, Sault St. Marie, 
Sydenham, Tillsonburg, Toronto (North, and Technical), Trenton, Watford, 
Welland, Wiarton. Total, 27. 

Continuation Schools: Cannington, Lakefield and Southampton. Total, 3. 

Public Schools: Belleville (2), Blenheim, Brantford (4), Brockville, Carleton 
Place, Chatham, Dresden, Dundas, Fort Frances, Fort William (5), Guelph (2)., 
Hamilton (9), Keewatin, Kenora, London, Midland, North Bay, Ottawa (12), 
Port Arthur (4), Port Hope, St. Catharines, St. Thomas, Shallow Lake, Stratford, 
and Toronto (49). Total, 104. 

R. C. Separate Schools: Hamilton, and Toronto (2). Total, 3. 

Total number of Cadet Corps, 181. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



287 



APPENDIX N 

SUPERANNUATED TEACHERS 
* Allowances Granted during 1916 



Regis, 

No. 



Name 



1254 
1255 
1256 
1257 
1258 
1259 
1260 
1261 
1262 
1263 
1264 



Age 



fBatchelor, Win. A 

Cowling, Robert 

Gray, Henry 

JSquair, J , 

JHarvey, Rowland 

JWitheril, Ebenezer Rufus 

JSmith, Wm. Henry , 

{Morton, Wm. Connor , 

Sinclair, Samuel Bower . , 
tKinney, Robt. M. D 

May, Wm. Fisher 



68 
60 
62 
65 
63 
63 
69 
65 
61 
77 
64 



Post Office 



Years 

of 
Service 



Belleville 

704 Logan Ave., Toronto '. '. 

760 Keele St., Toronto 

368 Palmerston Ave., Toronto 

Woodbridge 

199 Carlt jn St., Toronto . .' ! 

Port Dover 

6 Mapleside Ave., Hamilton 

Gordon Bay 

Box 335, Brockville ...'.' .' .' .' 
Mitchell 



Allowance 



24| 

43i 

35 

26 

421 

511 

441 

24 

55 

27 



$ c. 

84 00 
168 50 
304 50 
124 50 

91 25 
149 00 
156 50 
156 00 
168 00 
194 50 
185 00 



Summary for Years 1882=1916 



Year 



1882 
1887 
1892 
1897 
1902 
1907 
1912 
1915 
1916 



Number of 

Teachers 

on List 



422 

454 
456 
424 
407 
375 
297 
274 
266 



Expenditure 
for the Year 



Gross 

Contributions 

to the Fund 



$ c. 

51,000 00 

58,295 33 

63,750 00 

62,800 33 

64,244 92 

63,018 55 

§52,696 90 

§51,927 75 

§50,909 50 



$ c. 

13,501 08 

1,489 00 

1,313 50 

847 00 

1,073 50 

766 00 

§504 65 

§560 35 

§464 52 



Amount 

Refunded to 

Teachers 



$ c. 

1,660 10 

1,815 80 

786 86 

620 27 

722 78 

764 54 

§443 01 

§219 05 

§220 12 



31st ^obfr^ Were Withdrawn from the fund during the year ending 

-^ 

tPayment commenced September, 1915. 
IPayment commenced September, 1916. 
§For fiscal year ending 31st October. 



288 THE BEPORT OF THE No. 17 

APPENDIX O 

financial!statement of the faculties of education 

I.— UNIVERSITY^OF TORONTO FACULTY OF EDUCATION 
Financial Statement for the'Year Ended 30th June, 1916. 

Receipts 

Provincial Grant: 

Received on account thereof $6,000 00 

Balance for 1915-16 still due from Provincial Government 9,000 00 



Fees: 

Teachers in training $7,849 00 

Pupils in University Schools 23,106 50 



Expenditures 

1. Salaries. 

W. Pakenham, Professor of History and Science of Education 

(also Dean of Faculty), 12 mos. to 30th June $3,800 00 

Associate Professors, each 12 mos. to 30 June: 

H. J. Crawford, also Headmaster of University Schools... 3,200 00 

P. Sandiford 3,000 00 

Lecturers in Methods; also Chief Instructors, University 
Schools, each 12 mos. to 30th June: 

G. A. Cornish, Science 2,500 00 

J. T. Crawford, Mathematics 2,500 00 

O. J. Stevenson, English and History, 1st July to 31st 

August, at $2,300 (resigned) 383 32 

G. M. Jones, English (10 payments) 2,500 00 

W. C. Ferguson, French and German 2,400 00 

F. E. Coombs, Elementary Subjects 2,400 00 

S. W. Perry, Art and Commercial Work 2,200 00 

Assistant Instructors in University Schools: 

T. M. Porter, 12 mos. to 30th June 2,200 00 

H. A. Grainger, 12 mos. to 30th June 2,200 00 

J. A. Irwin, 12 mos. to 30th June 2,100 00 

J. O. Carlisle, 12 mos. to 30th June 2,000 00 

J. G. Workman, 12 mos. to 30th June 2,000 00 

W. J. Dunlop, 12 mos. to 30th June 1,900 00 

A. N. Scarrow, also Instructor in Faculty of Education, 

12 mos. to 30th June 1,900 00 

H. G. Manning, at $1,800 (war service, half pay) 900 00 

A. R. M. Lower, substitute for Manning, salary for 10 

teaching months 1,600 00 

G. A. Cline, at $1,800 (war service, half pay) 900 00 

C. L. Brown, substitute for Cline, salary for -10 teaching 

months , 1,800 00 

W. L. C. Richardson, 12 mos. to 30th June 1,800 00 

G. N. Bramfitt, also Instructor in Faculty of Education, 
at $1,800, 1st July to 30th September, $450; war service, 
half pay, from 1st October, $675 1,125 00 

D. J. Gray, substitute for Bramfitt, salary for 9 teaching 

months 1,350 00 

N. L. Murch, 12 mos. salary (10 payments) 1,700 00 

D. E, Hamilton, 12 mos. to 30th June 1,600 00 

E. L. Daniher, 12 mos. salary (10 payments) 1,500 00 

Miss L. L. Ockley, Instructor in Household Science (Ses- 
sional, paid also in Faculty of Household Science) . . 100 00 



$15,000 00 



$30,955 50 
$45,955 50 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION" 289 

Supervisors of Practice-teaching (Sessional): 

J. Jeffries, High Schools 100 00 

W. E. Groves, Public Schools 100 00 



Miss L. Swinarton, Stenographer in Dean's Office, 12 mos. to 

30th June 675 00 



$54,433 32 



2. Education Building and Department. 

(a) Maintenance- of Building: 

Fuel $1,122 84 

Light 433 34 

Water 142 52 

Caretaker's supplies 311 82 

Cleaning 1,171 68 

Repairs and renewals 85'5 67 

Engineer and caretaker, iS. Hunter, 12 mos. to 30th "June 1,200 00 
Firemen a^t $50 per month: 

R. Bullock, 4y 2 months 225 00 

J. Banford, 3y 2 months 175 00 

A. Bennett, 29 days 48 32 

Messengers: 

S. Green, 29 weeks, 4 days, at $4 per week 118 67 

A. Scott, 21 weeks, 4 days, at $4.75 per week (paid 

also as laboratory attendant under Department) . . 103 71 



(b) Maintenance of Department: 

Payment to City Board of Education for use of schools, 

22 rooms at $1.'50 a room $3,300 00 

Clerical and laboratory assistance 645 75 

Office expenses, printing, postage, class-room supplies and 

sundries 3,766 84 



$5,908 57 



7,712 59 



$68,054 48 



Note. — In the above statement no charge has been made upon 'the Faculty of 
Education for any portion of the general expenses of University administration, such 
as Library, Examination, etc. 

F. A. Moure:, Bursar. 
Toronto, 19th October, 1916. 



II.— UNIVERSITY OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE FACULTY OF EDUCATION 
Financial Statement for the Year~1916. 

TReceipts 

Surplus from 1915 $113 44 

Fees 1,808 00 

Ontario Government 12,000 00 

Overdraft 08 

$13,921 52 

„ Expenditures 

Salaries: 

Dean Coleman $3,700 00 

"W. E. Macpherson 2,750 00 

Arts Professors 125 00 

Summer School 300 00 

Willa Atkins 423 00 

Edna Booth 100 00 

Nora Strowger 50 00 

Victoria Wiltshire 50 00 

Alice King 100 00 

7,598 00 

19 E. 



290 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



Board of Education, as per agreement 

Travelling Expenses: 

W. E. Macpherson $22 25 

Dean Coleman 121 00 

W. G. Anderson 13 45 

R. H. Hicks 25 00 

Presiding Examiners 

Printing and Stationery: 

Paul Munro $27 50 

Jackson Press 163 55 

R. Uglow & Co 68 41 

C. W. Lindsay 40 00 

G. M. Hendry & Co 12 00 

M, Kirkpatrick 53 05 

Journal of Commerce 1 00 

British Whig Pub. Co 60 

Stamps 75 00 

Copp, Clarke Co 1 12 

Advertising, Queen's University Share 

Library, Miss L. Saunders 

Office Furniture and Equipment: 

R. J. Lindsay ....'. $1 64 

The Topley Co 2 55 

T. F. Harrison Co 8 75 

Sundries: 

Bell Telephone Co $40 55 

Express and Telegrams 5 70 



5,000 00 



181 70 
240 40 



442 23 
250 00 
150 00 



12 94 



46 25 



$13,921 52 



Audited and found correct, 



January 9th, 1917. 



R. E. Burns, C.A. 



1916 



DEPAKTMENT OF EDUCATION 



291 



APPENDIX P 

LIST OF INSPECTORATES AND INSPECTORS 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors Post Office 



Algoma District (in part); Cockburn 
Island; City of Sault Ste. Marie; 
Towns of Bruce Mines, Steelton, 
Thessalon 

Brant County; Town of Paris; Sections 
3, 8, 9, 14, 15, 17, 19, 21, 25 of Townsend 
Tp., Sections 1, 2, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 
of Windham Tp. and Village of Water- 
ford in Norfolk Co 

Bruce, East; Towns of Chesley, Walker- 
ton, Wiarton; Villages of Hepworth, 
Tara 

Bruce, West; Towns of Kincardine, South- 
ampton; Villages of Lucknow, Paisley, 
Port Elgin, Teeswater, Tiverton 

Carleton, East; Town of Eastview 

Carleton, West, and Lanark, East; Towns 
of Almonte, Carleton Place; Village of 
Richmond (Joint Inspectorate) 

Dufferin; Town of Orangeville; Villages 
of Grand Valley, iShelburne 

Dundas; Villages of Ohesterville, Iroquois, 
Morrisburg, Winchester 

Elgin, East; Town of Aylmer; Villages 
of Springfield, Vienna 

Elgin, West; City of St. Thomas; Villages 
of Dutton, Rodney, Port Stanley, West 
Lome (Joint Inspectorate) 

Essex; Towns of Amherstburg, Essex, 
Ford, Kingsville, Leamington; Vil- 
lages of Belle River, St. Clair Beach.. 

Essex, N. (in part only) 

Frontenac, South; Villages of Garden 
Island, Portsmouth 

Frontenac, North; and Addington (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Glengarry; Town of Alexandria; Villages 
of Lancaster, Maxville 

Grey, East; Towns of Meaford, Thorn- 
bury; Village of Flesherton 

Grey, West; Town of Owen Sound; Vil- 
lages of Chatsworth, Shallow Lake . . 

Grey, South; Towns of Durham, Han- 
over; Villages of Dundalk, Markdale, 
Neustadt 

Haldimand; Town of Dunnville; Villages 
of Caledonia, Cayuga, Hagersville, 
Jarvis 

Haliburton and Muskoka East; Town of 
Huntsville (Joint Inspectorate) 

Halton; Sections 12, 13, 14 and 15 
Beverly, 6 and 7 E. Flamboro, 9 and 
10 W. Flamboro; Towns of Burlington, 
Milton, Oakville; Villages of Acton, 
Georgetown 

Hastings Centre; Villages of Madoc, Mar- 
mora, Stirling, Tweed 

Hastings, South, and City of Belleville; 
Towns of Deseronto, Trenton (Joint 
Inspectorate) 



L. A. Green, B.A. 



T. W. Standing, B.A. 
John McCool, MA. . . 



W. F. Bald, B.A 

Thos. Jamieson, B.A 



Willis C. Froats, M.A., B.Paed. 

W. R. Liddy, B.A 

J. W. Forrester, M.A 

J. C. Smith, B.A 

John A. Taylor, B.A 

D. A. Maxwell, B.A., LL.B 

Ph.D 

W. J. Summerby 

S. A. Truscott, M.A 

M. R. Reid, M.A 

J. W. Crewson, B.A 

Samuel Huff, B.A 

H. H. Burgess, B.A 

N. W. Campbell, B.A 



Clarke Moses 
R. O. White 



James M. Denyes, B.A. 
J. E. Minns, B.A 



Sault Ste. Marie. 



Brantford. 

Walkerton. 

Port Elgin. 
Ottawa, 115 
Strathcona Ave. 

Carleton Place. 

Orangeville. 

Winchester. 

St. Thomas. 

St. Thomas. 

Windsor. 
North Bay. 

Kingston. 

Sharbot Lake. 

Alexandria. 

Meaford. 

Owen Sound. 

Durham. 

Caledonia. 
Minden. 



Milton. 
Madoc. 



H. J. Clarke, B.A Belleville. 



292 



THE KEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Continued 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors Post Office 



Jas. Colling, B.A. 



John Ritchie 



Rev. W. H. G. Colles 



J. H. Smith, M.A. 



N. McDougall, B.A. 



Henry Conn, B.A. 



F. L. Michell, M.A. 



Hastings, North; South Nipissing, and 
South-East Parry Sound Districts; 
Towns of Powassan, Trout Creek; Vil- 
lages of Bancroft, South River, Sund- 
ridge (Joint Inspectorate) 

Huron, East; Towns of Clinton, Seaforth, 
Wingham; "Villages of Blyth, Brussels, 
Wroxeter 

Huron, West; Town of Goderich; Villages 
of Bayfield, Exeter, Hensall 

Kenora District, and Thunder Bay 
(West); City of Port Arthur; Towns 
of Dryden, Keewatin, Kenora, iSioux 
Lookout (Joint Inspectorate) 

Kent, East; Towns of Blenheim, Both- 
well, Dresden, Ridgetown; Village of 
Thamesville 

Kent, West, and City of Chatham ; Towns 
of Tilbury, Wallaceburg; Village of 
Wheatley (Joint Inspectorate) 

Lambton, East (No. 2); Town of Pe- 
trolea; Villages of Alvinston, Arkona, 
Oil Springs, Watford 

Lambton, West (No. 1); City of Sarnia; 
Town of Forest; Villages of Court- 
right, Point Edward, Thedford, Wyom- 
ing 

Lanark, West; Towns of Perth, (Smith's 
Falls; Village of Lanark (Joint In- 
spectorate) 

Lanark, East (see Carleton West). 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 1); Town of 
Gananoque; Villages of Newboro, West- 
port 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 2); Town of 
Brockville; Village of Athens (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3); Town of 
Prescott; Villages of Cardinal, Kempt- 
ville, Merrickville (Joint Inspectorate) 

Lennox; Town of Napanee; Villages of 
Bath, Newburgh (see also Frontenac, 
N.) 

Lincoln, and Pelham Tp; Towns of Nia- 
gara, Thorold; Villages of Beamsville, 
Grimsby, Merritton, Port Dalhousie 
(Joint Inspectorate) 

Manitoulin Dist., Algoma Dist. (in part) ; 
Sudbury Dist. (in part); Towns of 
Blind River, Gore Bay, Little Current, 
Massey, Webbwood 

Middlesex, East; Village of Lucan 

Middlesex, West; Towns of Parkhill, 
Strathroy; Villages of Ailsa Craig, 
Glencoe, Newbury, Wardsville 

Muskoka, South and West, District; 
Towns of Bala, Bracebridge, Graven- 
hurst; Village of Port Carling 

Muskoka, East (see Haliburton). 

Nipissing, North (see Sudbury Dist.). 

Nipissing, 'South (see Hastings North). 

Norfolk; Town of Simcoe; Villages of 
Delhi, Port Dover, Port Rowan (see 
Brant Co.) 



John M. Field, B.A., Ph.D. 
J. Elgin Tom 



James G. McGuire, M.A. 



W. C. Dowsley, M.A. 



T. A. Craig 

E. J. Corkhill, B.A. 



W. W. Ireland, M.A. 



James W. Hagan, M.A. 
P. J. Thompson, B.A. . 



H. D. Johnson 



H. R. Scovell, B.A. . . 



Bancroft. 

Goderich. 
Goderich. 

Port Arthur. 
Chatham. 
Chatham. 
Petrolea. 

Sarnia. 
Perth. 

Brockville. 
Brockville. 
Kemptville. 
Napanee. 

St. Catharines. 



Gore Bay. 
London. 



Strathroy. 
Bracebridge. 



H. Frank Cook, B.A Simcoe. 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



293 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Continued 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Northumberland and Durham, West, No 
1; Towns of Bowmanville, Port Hope; 
Village pf Newcastle 

Northumberland and Durham, Centre, No. 
2; Town of Cobourg; Village of Mill- 
brook 



W. E. Tilley, M.A., Ph.D. 



Albert Odell 



T. R. Ferguson, M.A. 



R. A. Hutchison, B.A. 



J. L. Moore, B.A. 



Northumberland and Durham, East, No. 
3; Town of Campbellford; Villages of 
Brighton, Colborne, Hastings Robert Boyes 

Ontario, North; North-East Parry Sound; 
Town of Uxbridge; Villages of Beaver- 
ton, Cannington (Joint Inspectorate) . 

Ontario, South; Towns of Oshawa, 
Whitby; Village of Port Perry 

Oxford, North, and City of Woodstock; 
Villages of Embro, Tavistock (Joint 
Inspectorate) J. M. Cole 

Oxford, South; Towns of Ingersoll, Till- 
sonburg; Village of Norwich (Joint 
Inspectorate) R. A. Paterson, B.A. 

Parry Sound, South, District; Towns of 
Kearney, Parry Sound; Village of 
Burk's Falls 

Parry Sound, South-East (see Hastings, 
North). 

Parry Sound, North-West (see Sudbury). 

Parry Sound, North-East (see Ontario, 
North). 

Peel; Town of Brampton; Villages of 
Bolton, Streetsville 

Perth, North; Towns of Listowel, Mit- 
chell, St. Mary's; Village of Milverton. 

Perth, South, and City of Stratford 
(Joint Inspectorate) 

Peterborough, East; Villages of Havelock, 
Lakefield, Norwood 

Peterborough, West, and Victoria, East; 
Town of Lindsay; Villages of Bobcay- 
geon, Omemee (Joint Inspectorate) . . 

Prescott and Russell; Towns of Hawkes- 
bury, Rockland, Vankleek Hill; Vil- 
lages of Casselman, L'Orignal 

Prince Edward; Town of Picton; Vil- 
lages of Bloomfield, Wellington 

Rainy River District, Thunder Bay East, 
No. 1 Missanabie, No. 1 Chapleau; City 
of Fort William; Towns of Fort Fran- 
ces, Rainy River (Joint Inspectorate) . 

Renfrew, North; Town of Pembroke; Vil- 
lage of Cobden I. D. Breuls, B.A. 

Renfrew, South; Towns of Arnprior, Ren- 
frew; Villages of Eganville, Killaloe 

Station 

Simcoe, North; Towns of Barrie, Colling- 

wood, Penetanguishene 

Simcoe, iSouth; Towns of Alliston, Stay- 
ner; Villages of Beeton, Bradford, Cree 

more, Tottenham Edwin Longman 

Simcoe, East; Towns of Midland, Orillia; 

Villages of Coldwater, Victoria Harbour Isaac Day, B.A. 
Stormont; Town of Cornwall; Village of 
Finch 



W. J. Galbraith, M.A. 
William Irwin, B.A. . 



James H. Smith, B.A. 



Richard Lees, M.A. 



G. E. Broderick 



John Nelson, B.A. 



John E. Benson, M.A. 



C. McDowell, M.A. 



G. G. McNab, M.A. . . . 
Joseph L. Garvin, B.A. 



Bowmanville. 

Cobourg. 

Campbellford. 

Uxbridge. 

Whitby. 

Woodstock. 
Ingersoll. 
Parry Sound. 



James Froats, M.A. 



Brampton. 
Stratford. 
Stratford. 
Peterborough. 

Lindsay. 

Vankleek Hill. 
Picton. 

Fort William. 
Pembroke. 

Renfrew. 
Barrie. 

Barrie. 
Orillia. 
Cornwall. 



294 



THE KEPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Continued 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Sudbury District (in part), North Nip- 
issing and North-West Parry Sound; 
Towns of Bonfield, Cache Bay, Chelms- 
ford, Copper Cliff, Frood Mine, Mat- 
tawa, North Bay, Sturgeon Falls, .Sud- 
bury 

Thunder Bay (see Kenora and Rainy 
River). 

Timiskaming District, Towns of Charl- 
ton, Cobalt, Cochrane, Englehart, 
Haileybury, Iroquois Falls, Latchford, 
Matheson, New Liskeard, Timmins; Vil- 
lage of Thornloe 

Victoria, West; Villages of Fenelon Falls, 
Sturgeon Point, Woodville 

Victoria, Bast (see Peterborough West). 

Waterloo, N. (No. 1); City of Kitchener; 
Town of Waterloo; Village of Elmira. 

Waterloo, S. (No. 2); City of Gait; 
Towns of Hespeler, Preston; Villages 
of Ayr, New Hamburg 

Welland; Towns of Bridgeburg, Welland; 
Villages of Chippawa, Fort Erie, Hum- 
berstone, Port Colborne. (Thorold 
Town and Pelham Tp. are under Lin- 
coln Inspector). (Joint Inspectorate). 

Wellington, North; Towns of Harriston, 
Mount Forest, Palmerston; Village of 
Clifford 

Wellington, South; Villages of Arthur, 
Drayton, Elora, Erin, Fergus 

Wentworth, Town of Dundas; Village of 
A\ aterdown 

York, North; Towns of Aurora, Newmar- 
ket; Villages of Holland Landing, Sut- 
ton West 

York, West; Town of Weston; Villages of 
Mimico, New Toronto, Woodbridge 

York, East; Town of Lea side; Villages 
o2 Markham, Richmond Hill Stouffville. 



D. M. Christie, B.A. 



Sudbury. 



Bradford, 

Guelph, 

(Hamilton, 

do 
Kingston, 
London, 
Niagara Falls 
Ottawa, 

do 
Peterborough, 
Toronto, 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
do 
Windsor, 

Sandwich and 



City of 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do, and St. Catharines 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do, and Towns of 
Walkerville 



W. J. Hallett, B.A., B.Paed 
VV. H. Stevens, B.A 

F. W. Sheppard 

Lambert Norman, B.A. . . . 



John W . Marshall, B.A. . . . 
i 

Robt. Galbraith, B.A 

J. J. Craig, B.A 

J. B. Robinson, B.A., B.Paed, 



C. W. Mulloy, B.A 

A. L. Campbell, Mi. A 

A. A. Jordan, B.A. 

E. E. C. Kilmer, B.A 

Wm. Tytler, B.A 

W. H. Ballard, M.A 

Jas. Gill, B.A., B.Paed 

J. Russell Stuart 

C. B. Edwards, B.A 

D. C. Hetherington 

J. H. Putman, B.A., D.Paed . . 

E. T. Slemon, B.A., D.Paed . . 

A. Mowat, B.A 

R. H. Cowley, M.A., Chief Insp 

W. F. Chapman, B.A 

W. H. Elliott, B.A 

E. W. Bruce, M.A 

Jos. W. Rogers, M.A 

Geo. H. Armstrong, M.A., 

B.Paed 

Henry Ward, B.A 

D. D. Moshier, B.A., B.Paed. . 

Robt. Meade, M.A 



Haileybury. 
Lindsay. 

Kitchener. 

Gait. 

Welland. 

Mount Forest. 

Fergus. 

Hamilton. 

Aurora. 

Weston. 

Toronto, 43 Orch 
ard View Blvd. 
Brantford. 
Guelph. -^ 

Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 
Kingston. 
London. 
St. Catharines. 
Ottawa. 
Ottawa. 
Peterborough. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 

Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 

Windsor. 



1916 DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 295 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors — Concluded 

R.C. Separate School Inspectors 

J. F. Power, M.A Toronto, 33 Dalton Road. 

J. F. Sullivan, B.A London, 873 Hellmuth Avenue. 

Jas. E. Jones, B.A Ottawa, 104 Henderson Street. 

J. P. Finn, B.A Ottawa, 93 Fourth Avenue. 

W. J. Lee, B.A Toronto, 434 Brunswick Avenue. 

English=French Public and Separate School Inspectors 

W. J. Summerby North Bay. 

L. E. 0. Payment, M.A Ottawa, 12 Tormey iStreet. 

Thomas Swift Ottawa, 320 Cooper Street. 

J. S. Gratton Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools 

John Waugh, M.A., D.Paed Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Director of Industrial and Technical Education and Inspector of Normal Schools 

F. W. Merchant, M.A., D.Paed Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Assistant Ins pector of Industrial and Technical Education 

G. J. McKay, BjSc Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

High School Inspectors 

H. B. Spotton, M.A., LL.D Toronto, 426 Markham Street. 

J. A. Houston, M.A Toronto, 105 Roxborough Street West. 

I. M. Levan, B.A Woodstock. 

Continuation School Inspectors 

G. K. Mills, B.A Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

J. P. Hoag, B.A Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Manual Training and Household Science Inspector 

Albert H. Leake Toronto, 378a Markham Street. 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Education 

J. B. Dandeno, B.A., Ph.D Toronto, 73 Grosvenor St. 



296 



THE EEPOET OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX Q 



ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES TO COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

HIGH SCHOOLS 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1916 



Collegiate Institutes 



T3 




0> 




d 


t* 


| 


<t> 


c3 


w 


M 


c3 


w 


Ph 



High Schools — Continued 



Barrie 

Brantford 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Fort William 

Gait 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamliton 

Ingersoll 

Kingston 

Kitchener-Waterloo 

Lindsay 

London 

Morrisburg 

Napanee 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Orillia . 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Renfrew 

Ridgetown 

St. Catharines 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Seaf orth 

Smith's Falls 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Toronto, Harbord St 

Toronto, Parkdale 

Toronto, Jarvis 

Toronto, Humberside 

Toronto, Malvern Ave 

Toronto, Oakwood 

Toronto, Riverdale 

Toronto, admitted on Principals 

certificate 

Vankleek Hill 

Windsor 

Woodstock , 



Totals. 



High Schools 

Alexandria 

Alliston 



71 

189 | 
125 | 
133 

58 

96 

89 
119 
186 

92 
169 
436 

76 
234 
253 
117 
493 

27 

97 

93 
113 
124 
766 
210 
119 
212 j 

63 
136 
109 

60 
130 

75 
213 
164 

54 

96 
185 
115 
158 

63 

49 
121 

11 

76 
102 

1,961 

97 

253 

131 



64 

121 

102 

100 

40 

82 

75 

108 

163 

41 

142 

381 

54 

147 

197 

95 

389 

IS 

55 

69 

94 

94 

521 

150 

64 

177 

40 

86 

65 

36 

97 

51 

167 

118 

43 

70 

160 

78 

18 

28 

11 

62 

2 

29 
37 

1,961 

43 

202 



9,119 j 7,035 



81 
39 



Almonte 

Amherstburg . . 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens 

Aurora 

Avonmore 

Aylmer 

Beamsville .... 

Belleville 

Bowmanville . . 

Bradford 

Brampton 

Brighton 

Caledonia 

Campbellf ord . . 
Carleton Place 

Cayuga 

Chatsworth 

Chesley 

Chesterville . . . 

Colborne 

Cornwall 

Deseronto 

Dundalk 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Durham 

Dutton 

Elora 

Essex 

Fergus 

Flesherton 

Forest 

Gananoque 
Georgetown 

Glencoe 

Gravenhurst. .. 

Grimsby 

Hagersville 
Haileybury 

Harriston 

Hawkesbury . . 

Iroquois 

Kemptville .... 

Kenora 

Kincardine 

Leamington 

Listowel 

Lucan 

Madoc 

Markdale , 

Markham , 

Meaford ....'.., 

Midland , 

Mitchell , 



44 

52 

65 

49 

47 

53 i 

34 I 

77 

39 I 
109 

61 j 

45 | 

67 | 

94 

30 

74 

53 

49 

37 

50 

42 

26 
150 

32 

31 

67 

49 

62 

41 

40 

91 

71 

31 

39 

46 

44 

49 

34 

53 

32 

66 

30 

54 

26 

60 

47 

49 

57 

75 

62 

52 

32 

50 

81 

75 

70 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



297 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1916— Continued 



High Schools. — Concluded 


a 

a 

& 


a> 

CO 

CO 


Other Places. — Continued 


H3 
1=1 

a 


4> 
CO 
CO 

Oh 




10 
73 
57 
22 
58 
17 
45 
38 
62 
41 
43 
92 
46 
56 

158 
44 
60 
47 
31 
44 
74 
57 
23 
68 
46 
29 

136 
49 
72 
13 
55 
13 
68 
49 
31 
60 
19 
23 
43 
44 
31 
38 
24 
42 
41 
49 
75 

105 
59 
55 
28 
47 
50 


7 

51 
23 

8 
40 

9 

29 
28 
45 
20 
18 
69 
35 
31 
113 
34 
38 
28 
16 
26 
60 
36 
18 
38 
25 
14 
101 
25 
57 
11 
42 
12 
38 
26 
18 
29 

4 
11 
36 
30 
17 
33 
13 
21 
30 
38 
49 
69 
36 
28 
20 
34 
30 


Ameliasburg 


27 
25 
8 
7 
19 
16 
16 
15 
13 
22 
49 
38 
20 
20 
11 
52 
36 
16 
55 
25 
31 
12 
24 
14 
16 
68 
18 
14 
46 
16 
31 
24 
109 
30 
21 
11 
30 
43 
33 
16 
35 
42 
4 
7 
30 
33 
16 
19 
9 
36 
28 
31 
27 
22 
11 
28 
68 
22 
12 
26 
27 
14 
22 


13 




Ancaster 


12 




Angus 


2 




Apsley 


3 




Arkona 


9 




Ashton 


11 


Niagara Falls South 


Aultsville 


11 




Ayr 


10 




Ayton 


7 




Bailieboro' 


13 




Bancroft 


32 


Oshawa 


Barriefield 


19 


Paris 


Bath 

Battersea 


14 


Parkhill 


10 


Pembroke 


Bayfield „ 


10 


Penetanguishene 


Beachburg 


32 


Petrolea 


Beaverton 


18 


Plantagenet 


Beeton 


8 


Port Dover 


Belleville, County Centre 
Belle River 


26 


Port Elgin 


9 


Port Hope 


Belmont 


21 




Bethany 


7 


Port Rowan 


Billing's Bridge 


12 


Prescott 


Binbrook 


5 


Richmond Hill 


Blackstock 


11 


Rockland 


Blenheim 


40 


Sault Ste. Marie 


Blind River 


11 


Shelburne 


Bloomfield 


14 


Simcoe 


Blyth 


24 


Smithville , , 


Bobcaygeon 


14 


Stirling 


Bolton 


17 


Streetsville 


Bothwell 


12 


Sudbury 


Bracebridge 


61 


Sydenham 


Bridgeburg 


19 


Thorold 


Brigden 


11 


Tillsonburg 


Brownsville 


9 


Toronto, North , 


Bruce Mines 


13 


Toronto Technical 


Brussels 


36 


Trenton 


Burford 


16 


Uxbridge 


Burgessville 


12 


Vienna 


Burk's Falls 


21 


Walkerton , 


Burlington 


37 


Wardsville 


Burritt's Rapids 


1 


Waterdown 


Caistor Centre . 


6 


Water ford 


Cannington 


19 


Watford 


Cardinal 


3 


Welland 


Cargill 


12 


Weston 


Carp 


16 


Whitby 


Castleton 


6 


Wiarton 


Cataraqui 


19 


Wiiliamstown 


Chapleau 


15 


Winchester 


Charleston 


12 


Wingham 


Chester 


16 






15 


Totals 


5,825 


3,661 


Clifford 


10 




Cobalt 


17 




46 
33 
47 
29 


27 
26 
26 
20 


Cobden 


36 


Other Places 


Coboconk 


9 




Cochrane 


5 






15 


Acton 


Comber 


9 


Agincourt 


Coniston 


9 


Alvinston 


Cookstown 


3 



298 



THE KEPORT OP THE 



No. 17 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1916— Continued 



Other Places— Continued 


T3 


T3 
<u 
to 

CO 

ea 


Other Places — Continued 


§ 




o 

CO 

CO 


Copper Cliff 


17 
25 
19 
21 
19 
13 
20 
14 
17 
36 
58 
23 

6 

14 
31 
44 
17 
21 
51 
20 
14 
19 
24 
12 
11 
12 
10 
53 
45 
50 
28 

4 
12 
21 
14 
54 
60 
39 

9 

18 
53 
44 
31 
18 
19 
27 
22 
22 
19 
18 
36 
25 

5 

5 
26 
34 
11 
34 
15 
28 
26 
20 
23 


14 

13 

7 

13 
17 
6 
5 
5 
9 

26 

19 

15 

4 

7 

20 

34 

8 

13 

28 

10 

8 

11 

10 

7 

6 

7 

7 

41 

31 

32 

13 

2 

6 

6 

12 

30 

34 

24 

9 

9 

35 

27 

13 

13 

14 

16 

10 

13 

11 

12 

23 

14 

3 

1 

19 

18 

7 

19 
6 

14 

7 

12 

11 


Hepworth 


8 
36 
13 
17 
50 
17 
16 

8 

24 
19 
13 

6 

30 
14 
14 

3 

13 
12 
21 
35 
19 
15 
38 
10 
66 
57 
14 
22 

2 

13 
25 
14 
12 
18 
14 
101 
37 
27 
14 
10 
23 

1 
20 
19 
18 
27 
15 
36 
10 
22 
26 

7 
24 

6 

27 
28 
23 
20 
21 
34 
48 
59 
40 


5 


Courtright 


Highgate 


13 


Crediton 


Hillsdale 


11 


Creemore 


Homing's Mills « 


9 


Crosshill 


Huntsville 


31 


Cultus 


Innerkip 


6 


Cumberland 


Ivy 


5 


Dalkeith 


Janetville 


5 


Dashwood 


Jarvis 


16 


Delhi 


Jasper 


13 


Delta 


Jockvale 


4 


Demorestvilie 


Kars 


4 


Denbigh 


Keene 


18 


Dickinson's Landing 


Keewatin 


12 


Dixon's Corners 


Kenmore 


7 


Dorchester Station 


Killarney 


2 


Douglas 


Kilmaurs 


8 


Drayton 


Kimberley 


6 


Dresden 


King - 


13 


Dromore 


Kingsville 


28 


Drumbo 


Kinmount 


11 


Dry den 


Kintail 


7 


Dungannon 


Kirkfield 


25 


Eastview 


Kleinburg 


5 


Easton's Corners . . 


Lakefield 


36 


Echo Bay 


Lanark 


28 


Edgar 


Lancaster 


11 


Eganville 


Lansdowne 


11 


Elmira 


Latchf ord • 




Elmvale 


Laurel 


7 


Embro 


Lef roy 


17 


Embrun 


Lemonville 


6 


Emo 


Lion's Head 


6 


Englehart 


Little Britain 


15 


Ennismore 


Little Current 


10 


Erin 


London East 


77 


Exeter 


Lucknow . .* 


25 


Fenelon Falls 


Macdonald Consolidated, Guelph 
Madawaska 


16 


Fenwick 


9 


Feversham 


Magnetawan 


3 


Finch 


Manitowaning 


15 


Fingal 


Manley 


1 


Florence 


Manotick 


7 


Fonthill 


Maple 


10 


Fordwich 


Marmora 


8 


Fort Frances 


Marshville 


20 


Fournier 


Marsville 


10 


Frankford 


Massey 


13 


Galetta 


Matheson 


1 


Glen Allan 


Mattawa 


12 


Gore Bay 


Maxville 


9 


Grand Valley 


Medina 


3 


Haliburton 


Melbourne 


16 


Hall's Bridge 


Merivale . . . . , 

Merlin 


6 


Hamilton, County Centre 

Hanover 


16 


Merrickville 


11 


Harrington 


Metcalfe 


7 


Harrow 


Mildmay 


16 


Harrowsmith . . . 


Milford 


11 


Hastings 


Millbrook 


23 


Havelock 


Milton 


26 


Hawkestone • 


Milverton 


45 


Hensall 


Mimico 


31 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



299 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1916— Continued 



Other Places— Continued 



Minden 

Minesing 

Moorefield 

Moose Creek 

Mount Albert 

Mount Elgin , 

Mount Hope , 

Mount Pleasant 

Mount St. Patrick 

Mountain Grove , 

Mountain Station 

Navan 

Neustadt 

Newboro 

New Hamburg 

Newington 

New Liskeard 

Niagara Falls, County Centre.. 

North Augusta 

North Gower 

North Lancaster 

Norwich 

Oakwood 

Odessa 

Oil Springs 

Orono 

Osgoode Station 

Ohsweken 

Otterville 

Paisley 

Pakenham 

Palmerston 

Parry Sound 

Pefferlaw 

Pelee Island 

Pickering 

Plattsville 

Port Burwell 

Port Colborne 

Port Credit 

Port Dalhousie 

Port Stanley 

Powassan , 

Priceville 

Princeton 

Queensville 

Rainy River 

Ramsayville 

Randwick 

Richard's Landing 

Richmond 

Ridgeway 

Ripley 

Rockton 

Rockwood 

Rodney 

Rosemont 

Roseneath 

Russell 

St. George 

St. Helen's 

Sandwich 



21 
9 

19 
22 
30 
17 
21 
22 
30 
9 
16 
23 
12 
45 
26 
12 
62 
22 
19 
29 
24 
37 
13 
19 
52 
20 
10 
6 
17 
34 
38 
30 
72 
7 
4 
18 
27 
17 
37 
23 
75 
10 
40 
16 
15 
24 
14 
14 
8 
9 
19 
31 
32 
28 
32 
27 
17 
12 
43 
15 
28 
45 



Other Places— Continued 



'd 




22 




a 


T* 


8 


0> 
CO 


c3 


w 


X 


ci 


m 


Ph 



5 

10 

14 

19 

8 

9 

11 

18 

7 

9 

9 

7 

15 

21 

9 

28 

9 

7 

14 

14 

22 

9 

9 

26 

15 

5 

2 

11 

24 

20 

22 

44 

6 

2 

13 

14 

9 

21 

13 

44 

7 

21 

8 

7 

16 
11 
9 
3 
3 
7 

16 
23 
16 
22 
20 



7 
18 

9 
15 
21 



Schomberg 

Schreiber 

Scotland 

Selkirk 

Sharbot Lake 

Singhampton 

Sioux Lookout 

Solina 

Southampton 

South Indian 

South Mountain 

South Porcupine 

South River 

Sparta 

Spencerville 

Springfield 

Stayner 

Stevensville 

Steelton 

Stittsville 

Stony Creek 

Stouffville 

Strabane 

Stratton 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sunderland 

Sutton 

Tamworth 

Tara 

Tavistock 

Teeswater 

Thamesford 

Thamesville 

Thedf ord 

Thessalon 

Thornbury , 

Thorndale , 

Tilbury , 

Tiverton , 

Toronto, De La Salle Institute , 

Tottenham , 

Tweed , 

Uptergrove , 

Varna , 

Vernon 

Verona 

Victoria Harbour 

Vineland 

Wallaceburg , 

Warkworth 

Waubaushene 

Webbwood 

Wellandport 

Wellington 

Westboro' 

West Lome 

Westport 

Wheatley 

White River 

Whitevale 

Wilberf orce 

Wilkesport 



28 


1 « 


15 


7 


17 


7 


28 


10 


23 


10 


19 


10 


2 


1 


29 


14 


16 


10 


3 


3 


9 


6 


24 


5 


19 


13 


13 


6 


21 


7 


21 


8 


36 


20 


17 


8 


22 


18 


11 


5 


36 


25 


18 


11 


28 


18 


7 


6 


54 


28 


20 


14 


22 


16 


27 


9 


21 


13 


19 


15 


29 


16 


16 


7 


46 


30 


16 


5 


40 


21 


44 


21 


25 


10 


25 


19 


25 


19 


81 


38 


40 


20 


57 


36 


36 


16 


6 


3 


8 


4 


37 


13 


23 


17 


17 


11 


79 


47 


20 


12 


12 


11 


18 


15 


9 


5 


23 


11 


42 


24 


31 


25 


29 


9 


36 


17 


14 


7 


13 


8 


20 


5 


21 


5 



.00 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1916-Concluded 



Other Places — Continued 


pi 
B 


•-d 
en 


Other Places — Concluded 




^3 
en 
P-. 


Williamsburg 


24 
25 
25 
30 
17 
37 
8 

23 
26 
31 
18 
11 


14 
23 
22 
12 
11 
19 

6 

20 
13 
17 
15 

8 


Summary 
Collegiate Institutes 


9,119 
5,825 
8,191. 




Willowdale 




Winona 




Wolfe Island 




Woodbridge 


7,035 


Woodville 


High Schools 


3,661 


Worthington 


Other Places 


h 4,661 




Grand Totals, 1916 




Wyoming 


23,135 
24,353 




Yarmouth Heights 


15,357 


Zephyr 


Grand Totals, 1915 


17,325 




Decreases 






1,218 




Totals 


8,191 


4,661 


1,968 









Number of Candidates obtaining High School Entrance Certificates under the 
provisions of Circular No. 7 in reference to farm employment 



Inspectorate 



Algoma 

Brant 

Brantf ord 

Bruce, East 

Bruce, West 

Carleton, West 

Dufferin 

Dundas 

Elgin, East 

Elgin, West 

Essex 

Frontenac, North 

Frontenac, South 

Grey, East 

Grey, West 

Halton 

Hastings, C 

Hastings, N. (Parry Sound) 

Hastings, South 

Huron, East 

Huron, West 

Kent, East 

Kent, West 

Kingston 

Lambton, East 

Lambton, West 

Lanark, West 

Leeds, I 

Leeds II 

Leeds III 

Lennox and Addington 

London 

Haldimand 



No. of 
Certificates 



7 
29 

3 

2 

43 
23 
20 
65 
29 
33 
33 

7 

10 
31 

4 
27 

6 

13 
13 

6 

17 
45 
21 

4 
25 
23 

7 

17 
21 
21 

6 
13 



Inspectorate 



Manitoulin 

Middlesex, East 

Middlesex, West 

Norfolk 

Northumberland, I . . 
Northumberland, III 

Ontario, North 

Ontario, South 

Oxford, North 

Oxford, South 

Peel 

Perth, North 

Perth, South 

Peterborough 

Prescott ana Russell 

Renfrew, North 

Renfrew, South 

St. Catharines 

Simcoe, East 

Simcoe, South 

Simcoe, West 

Stormont 

Sudbury District I . . 

Victoria 

Waterloo, I 

Waterloo, II 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York, West 

York, North 



Total admitted 



No. of 
Certificates 



7 

37 
21 
21 
12 
24 
3 

12 
16 
28 
26 
48 
35 
10 
12 
21 
8 
1 

11 

15 

24 

5 

1 

9 

4 

7 

9 

34 

16 

12 

19 



1,140 



1916 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



301 



APPENDIX R 

JUNIOR PUBLIC SCHOOL GRADUATION DIPLOMA EXAMINATION, 1916 



Centre 


Ex- 
amined 


Passed 


High 
School 
Entrance 
allowed 


Centre 


Ex- 
amined 


Passed 


High 
School 
Entrance 
allowed 


Angus 


8 
6 
1 
5 

11 

15 
9 
6 
1 
3 
2 
1 

11 
2 
8 

11 
4 
5 
4 
3 
8 
3 

10 
5 
2 
5 
7 
4 
2 
5 
4 
4 

10 
2 
7 
7 

14 
5 
1 


5 
5 
1 
4 
9 
11 
8 
6 

I 

1 
1 
9 

"5* 

8 
4 
1 
3 
2 
7 
2 
9 


3 


Massey 


6 

10 
8 
6 
5 

81 
10 
4 
4 
6 
2 
2 
13 
9 
4 
1 
1 
8 
1 
6 
4 
12 
1 
3 

25 

4 
2 
3 
5 
4 
4 
3 


6 
9 
7 
3 
4 
65 
10 
3 
3 
3 
1 

"n 

8 






Navan 








Neustadt 

North Bay 

Oil Springs 

Ottawa 




Bayfield 


1 
1 
4 
1 




Blenheim 

Bolton 




Bracebridge 


Orillia 




Brigden 


Owen Sound 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Port Dalhousie . . . 

Priceville 

Renfrew 




Burf ord 






Burk's Falls 

Cataraqui 

Chatham 


1 

1 




Cobden 


1 
2 
2 
1 




Courtright 

Cumberland 


Schreiber 

Selkirk 




Dungannon 


Simcoe 


"o'i 
1 

3 
3 
8 

1 
2 

8 
1 
2 
2 

4 

I 

3 j 




Echo Bav 


Sparta 




Elmvale 


4- 
1 

1 


Strathroy 

Stratton 


2 


Emo 




Englehart 


Sudbury 


1 


Exeter 


Sunderland 

Thamesville 

Thessalon 

Tiverton 

Toronto (River- 
dale) 


1 


Fingal 


1 
1 


4 


Florence 




Fordwich . . 


1 


Fort Frances 


2 
1 
5 
3 
1 
4 
3 
3 
6 
2 
6 
7 

13 
1 






Fournier 


2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 


2 


Galetta 


Vankleek Hill .... 
Whitby 


3 


Glencoe 




Hall's Bridge 

Hensall 


Woodbridge 

Woodstock 

Wooler 


1 
1 


Ingersoll 


2 


Kincardine 


Zephyr 


1 


Kingsville 


Zurich 




Kinmount . 


Totals, 1916 

Totals, 1915 

Increase 




Kintail 




478 
530 


344 ! 
315 


77 


Lindsay 




115 




1 
1 




Magnetawan 




29 




Marmora 


Decreases 


52 


38 











Number of Candidates entitled to Junior Public School Graduation Diplomas 

under the provisions of Circular No. 7 in reference to 

farm employment 



Inspectorate 

Brant , 

Elgin East 

Essex , 

Grey East 

Huron West 

Kent East 

Middlesex East. 
Middlesex West, 



No. of 
Diplomas 
1 



Inspectorate 
Oxford South . 




No. of 
Diplomas 
2 


Peel 




2 


Prescott 




2 


Renfrew North 




1 


Simcoe East . . 




3 


York North... 




1 




Total 






26 



3'02 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



APPENDIX S 

AUTUMN MODEL SCHOOLS, 1916 



School 


Principal 


Attendance 


Extra- 
Mural 
Candidates 


Limited 
Third Class 
Cer tin-cat j s 

granted 


District 

Certificates 

granted 


No. 


Total Male 


Female 


failed 


Clinton . . . 
Cornwall . 
Kingston . 
Madoc .... 
North Bay 
Orjllia ... 
Pt. Arthur 
Renfrew.. 


C. D. Bouck 

G. R. Theobald . . 

W. F. Inman 

R.A.A.McConnell. 
A. C. Casselman.. 
C.L.T. McKenzie. 
J.H.W.McRoberts 
W. McG. Mitchell. 


23 
21 
24 
17 
16 
23 
5 
16 



1 
4 
4 

2 
1 
2 


23 
20 
20 
13 
16 
21 
4 
14 



4 
2 
1 
1 
2 

2 


23 
24 
26 
18 
14 
23 
5 
16 



1 


2 
1 








1 
1 

2 


Totals . 


145 


14 


131 


12 


149 


4 


4 









1916 



DEPARTMENT OP EDUCATION 



303 



APPENDIX T 

LIST OF CERTIFICATES ISSUED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF 
EDUCATION, 1916. 



I. Public School Inspectors 



Perney, Frank E., B.A., B.Paed. 



Sullivan, John F., B.A. 



II. High School Principals 



Althouse, John G., B.A. (Classics.) 

Arnold, Hubert G., B.A. 

Barrett, Wellington J. C, B.A. 

Beck, Clinton G„ B.A. 

Bissonnette, Florence, B.A. 

Bissonnette, Thomas H., M.A. 

Browne, Carl S., M.A. (Math, and Phys.) 

Bunton, George W., B.A. (Science.) 

Cameron, James G., B.A. 

Cameron, John Herbert, B.A. 

Campbell, George S., B.A. (Maths, and 

Phys.) 
Campbell, William A., B.A. 
Challen, Newton E., B.A. (Math.) 
Clarke, Bruce W., B.A. (Maths. & Phys.) 
Delmage, Edith R., B.A. (Math.) 
Ellis, Oscar F. W., B.A. 
Evans, George E., B.A. (Classics.) 
Farrington, Mabel C, B.A. 
Hall, Margaret M. S., B.A. 
Haydon, William J., M.A. (Science.) 
Kerr, Mrs. Winnabel E., B.A. 
Kilpatrick, Jessie S., B.A. 



Laing, Maybelle M., B.A. 

Lishman, Frederick R., B.A. 

Mabee, George E., B.A. (Classics.) 

MacKichan, Peter, B.A. 

(MoEachern, John G., B.A. (Eng. & Hist.) 

McGill, David H., M.A. (Science.) 

McLeod, Florence A., B.A. 

McNabb, Finlay, B.A. 

McRoberts, J. H. Wilberforce, B.A. 

Nesbitt, Mabel E., B.A. 

Ogilvie, Alvin I., B.A. (Eng. & Hist.) 

Scott, Ethel O., M.A. (Fr. and Ger.) 

Shales, Walter E., M.A. (Science.) 

Shales, William E., M.A. (Science.) 

Shaver, Charles A., B.A. 

Shurtleff, William M., B.A. (Commercial.) 

Simpson, Robert S., B.A. (Commercial.) 

Smith, John C, B.A. (Classics.) 

Vrooman, Agnes S., M.A. 

Walker, Arthur J., B.A. (Commercial.) 

Welsh, David A., B.A. 

Whitton, Frederick A., B.A. (Fr. & Ger.) 

Zavitz, Arthur S., B.A. (Math.) 



III. High School Assistants and Specialists 



Adams, Irene S., B.A. 

Allen, Lillian M., B.A. 

Althouse, John G., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 

Anderson, Franklin A. D. 

Atkin, Edith, B.A. (Mods. & Hist.) 

Austin, Prudence M. 

Bain, I^ary, B.A. (Mods. & Hist.) 

Baker, Sarah J. (Commercial.) 

Ball, Alice I. N., B.A. 

Barr, Annie E., B.A. (Mods. & Hist.) 

Beaman, Elsie K. 

Bell, Edwin T., B.A. (Science.) 

Bell, Mary. 

Bentley, Annie E., B.A. 

Black, Harriet E„ B. A. (Fr. & Ger.) 

Boyd, Agnes M., B.A. 

Broatch, Sarah A. 

Cameron, James. 

Cameron, J. Herbert, B.A. 

Carter, Clara L., M.A. 

Cavanagh, Theresa P. 

Cayley, Thomas M. (Phys. Cult.) 

Challinor, John L. 

Chisholm, Renwick J. 

Clarke, Lome H., B.A. (Math, and Phys.) 

(Phys. Cult.) 
Cook, Alta-Lind, B.A. (Mods. & Hist.) 
Corbett, Lewis H., M.A. (Mods. & Hist.) 



Coulter, Eva M., B.A. 

Cragg, Estella R. (Commercial.) 

Crawforth, Alma W., B.A. 

Daley, Mary iM. 

Davis, Pearl I., B.A. 

Devitt, Samuel G., B.A. 

deGuerre, Laura B., B.A. (Fr. & Ger.) 

Donnelly, Teresa G. 

Douglas, Leila I., B.A 

Eaton, .Ethel C. 

Edwards, Margaret A. 

Finch, lima M., B.A. 

Fleming, Rita M., B.A. 

Foley, Roy iS., B.A. 

Fraser, Charles G., M.A. 

Fraser, Mary A., B.A. 

Gilfillan, Viola, B.A. 

Gilroy, Emily I., B.A. 

Graham, Anna F. 

Grills, Margaret. 

Gulston, Charles S. 

Hall, Henry W. 

Hamer, Lottie E„ B.A. (Mods. & Hist.) 

(Phys. Cult.) 
Hamilton, Agnes I. 
Henry, V. Roland, M.A. (Science.) 
Holmes, Margaret, B.A. 
Hone, Arthur D., B.A. (Science.) 



(Fr. & Ger.) 
(Commercial.) 
(Math. & Phys.) 
(Science. ) 



3'04 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 17 



III. High School Assistants and Specialists— Con. 



(Phys. Cult.) 
(Phys. Cult.) 



(Science.) 



Howie, Mabel F. 

Hughes, Hugh L. 

Irwin, Norman A., B.A. 

Jenner, Madeline M., B.A. 

Kilty, Ruby I. 

King, Eva W., B.A. 

Kirk, Gladys R. 

Latour, Charles A., B.A. 

Locklin, Elva J., B.A. 

Lott, Edith A. 

Maher, Margaret. 

Marshall, Marcella T. (Commercial.) 

Martin, William H., B.A. (Science.) 

Mazinke, Henrietta E. 

Menzies, Leslie P., B.A. 

Millard, Lena. 

Mitchell, Lillian G. 

Moynihan, Mayme H. 

Macdonald, Frederick J., M.A. (Math. & 

Phys.) 
Maclntyre, Lillian. 
McClellan, John. 
McCrimmon, Leon R., M.A. 
McDonald, Evelyn, M.A. 
McGregor, Helen J. 
McKinley, Clara B., B.A. (Classics.) 
McMillan, Roy J. 
Nugent, Eleanor, B.A. 
O'Connell, Marguerite 

Ger.) 
Oldham, Ida M., B.A. 
Otto, George S., B.A. 
Peck, Maud M. 
Poirier, Mary H. 
Pridham, Clara I. (Commercial.) 



(Fr. & Ger.) 
E., B.A. (Fr. 



(Mods. & Hist.) 



(Phys. 
(Phys. 



Cult.) 
Cult) 



Quail, May F., B.A. (Fr. & Ger.) 
Readdie, George, M.A. (Fr. & Ger.) 
Redmond, Edith J., B.A. 
Reid, Hazel I., B.A. 
Reynolds, Myrtle V., B.A. 
Rice, Elsie M. 
Ross, Margaret E. 

Ross, Margery E„ B.A. (Mods. & Hist.) 
Russell, John W., M.A. (Math.) 
Ryereon, Catherine G. S., M.A. 
Salisbury, Orethia M. 
Shales, Walter E., M.A. 
Shales, William E M M.A. 
Smith, Donald G. 
Smith, Hilda C. H., B.A. 
Spence, Ruth E., B.A. 
Squire, William J. (Commercial.) 
Staples, Edna E. 
Stewart, James H. 

Taylor, Annie M. A., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Thomas, Neil J. (Art.) 
Tiplady, Evelyn C. (Commercial.) 
Tobin, Lilly S., B.A. 

Train, Florence B., B.A. (Math. & Phys.) 
Turvey, Ina M. 
vonGunten, Clarice L. 
Walker, Anson R. 
Warnock, Grace I. 
Weatherill, Helen E. 
Webster, Leah. 
'White, Margaret E. 
Whitton, Lillis P., B.A. 
Wilker, Milton J. 
Wilson, Mrs. Arietta. (Art.) 
Zuern, Maude E., B.A. (Classics.) 



B.A. 



M. (Commercial.) 



(Fr. & Ger.) 



IV. Permanent Elementary Certificates 



Challen, Newton E., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 
Clarke, Eleanor L., B.A. (Art.) 

(Phys. Cult.) 
Eaton, Ethel C. (Art.) 
Fleming, Jean H. (Art.) 
Fraser, Lulu B. (Phys. Cult.) 
Harris, L. Morwenna. (Art.) 
Hicks, Thomas J., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 



Johnston, Hally, B.A. (Art.) 

Millard, Lena. (Art.) 

Robinson, Sadie. (Art.) 

Ross, Margaret E. (Art.) 

White, Mabel R. (Phys. Cult.) 

Wickett, Laura E. (Art.) 

Willson, Blanche H., B.A. (Phys. Cult.) 



V. 

Rees, Llewellyn. 
Spence, Mrs. Carrie R. 



Permanent Supervisors in Vocal Music 

Tedd, Nellie E. 



VI. Permanent Intermediate Certificate in Agriculture and Horticulture 

Gulston, Charles S. 



Anderson, Corinne 
Adams, Ada. 
Annable, Nellie O. 
Agar, Shirlie V. 
Belyea, Emma B. 
Buchanan, Vera F. 
Ballard, Maxwell 
Booker, Alice K. 



VII. 

B.A. 



Permanent First Class Certificates 



R., B.A. 



Benger, Irene, B.A. 
Beyer, Grace I. 
Brisson,