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REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 



Province of Ontario 



FOR THE YEAR 



1925 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 







ONTARIO 



TORONTO 

Printed and Published by ClarksonJW. James, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

19 2 6 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



(3 



PAGE 

REPORT OF THE MINISTER vii 



APPENDICES 

^Appendix A — Report of the Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools. ... 1 

Appendix B — Report of the Director of Technical Education 8 

Appendix C — Report of the Inspectors of Continuation Schools 15 

Appendix D — Report of the Inspectors of High Schools 20 

Appendix E — Report of the Director of Rural School Organization 21 

Appendix F — Report of the Inspector of Manual Training and Household 

Science 25 

Appendix G — Report of the Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes 28 

Appendix H — Report of the Inspector of Public Libraries 35 

Appendix I — Report of the Inspector of Auxiliary Classes 47 

Appendix J — Report of the Provincial School Attendance Officer 50 

Appendix K — Report of the Director of Professional Training 55 

Appendix L — Statistics of Elementary and Secondary Schools: 

Summary of Statistics 

I. — Elementary Schools 58 

II. — Secondary Schools 59 

III. — General: Elementary and Secondary Schools 60 

Comparative Statistics, 1867-1924 

I. — Public Schools (including Separate Schools) : 

1 . School Attendance 61 

2. Classification of Pupils 62 

3. Teachers' Certificates 63 

4. Salaries and Experience 64 

5. Receipts and Expenditures 65 

Cost per Pupil 65 

II. — Roman Catholic Separate Schools 66 

III. — Protestant Separate Schools 67 

IV. — Continuation Schools 67 

V. — Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 68 

VI. — Vocational Schools 69 

VII. — Departmental and Matriculation Examinations, Normal School Attend- 
ance, etc 69 

VIII. — Professional Certificates 72 

[Hi] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS No. 11 



Public Schools 

PAGE 

I. — -Table A — Attendance and Pupils in the Various Branches of Instruction, etc 74 

II.— Table B— Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 83 

III. — Table C — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Experience 88 

IV. — Table D — School Houses, Medical and Dental Inspection, Libraries, etc 94 

V. — Table E — Financial Statement, Value of School Property 98 

Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

I. — Table F — Financial Statement, Value of School Property 108 

II. — Table G — Teachers, Salaries, Certificates, Attendance, Pupils in the Various 

Branches of Instruction, etc 114 

Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 121 

Continuation Schools 

I. — Table H — Financial Statement 126 

II. — Table I — Schools under Public School Board, Equipment, Destination of Pupils, etc. 134 

III. — Table J — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc 142 

IV. — Table K — Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 158 

Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 

I. — Table L — Financial Statement 174 

II. — Table M — Boards of Education, Equipment, Destination of Pupils, etc 182 

III. — Table N — Attendance, Pupils in the Schools and in the Various Subjects, etc 184 

IV. — Table O — Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 200 

Vocational Schools 

I. — Table P — Day Schools, Attendance, etc., Pupils in the Various Branches of 

Instruction, etc 216 

II. — Table Q — Day Schools, Attendance by Age, Sex and Grade 226 

III. — Table R — Day Schools, Value of Equipment, etc 230 

IV. — Table S — Evening Schools, Attendance, etc., Pupils in the Various Branches of 

Instruction 232 

V. — Table T — Day and Evening Schools, Financial Statement 234 

Miscellaneous 

Table U — Protestant Separate Schools 238 

Table V— Report on Night Schools 239 

Table W— General Statistical Abstract 240 

Appendix M— Fifth Classes, 1924-25 256 

Appendix N — List of Inspectorates and Inspectors 264 

("7\ Appendix O — Cadet Corps, 1925 269 

Appendix P — Financial Statement of the College of Education, 1924-25 270 

Appendix Q — High School Entrance Examination, 1925 272 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Appendix R— Superannuated Teachers 277 

Appendix S— Model Schools, 1925, 1924-25 278 

Appendix T — Report of the Principal of the Ontario Training College for 

Technical Teachers 279 

Appendix U — Report of the School for the Blind, 1924-25 283 

Appendix Y — Report of the School for the Deaf, 1924-25 296 



REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 

FOR THE YEAR 1925 



To His Honour Henry Cockshutt, Esq., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

Your Honour: 

I beg leave to present the Annual Report of the Department of Education 
for the year 1925. In the appendices are to be found the detailed reports of the 
various officials who supervise the educational work throughout the Province, 
and the statistical records give definite statements of the present condition of 
the school system. 

The year under review exhibits the awakened interest of the people in all 
matters that affect their schools. This word is used advisedly, because it cannot 
be too often emphasized that the schools belong to the people themselves, and 
that, given a reasonable degree of leadership and experienced advice, the advance- 
ment of education must now, as always, depend upon their efforts and not upon 
the activity of officialdom. The Ontario school system is well balanced as to its 
direction and control. The law confers upon the Minister and his Department, 
who derive all authority from the Legislature, certain defined powers, such as 
the training and certification of all teachers, the framing of the courses of study, 
the authorizing of text-books, and the apportionment of the legislative grants. 
What cannot be conveniently set forth in the several statutes is left to Regula- 
tions, each one of which is put in force by the order of the Lieutenant-Governor- 
in-Council, and must, by express provision of law, be laid before the Legislature 
annually a few days after the session has begun. Thus is ensured the democratic 
control of education and the avoidance of a mere bureaucracy performing its 
functions without adequate check and apt to grow out of touch with the wishes 
and needs of the people. 

The administration of the schools, their efficiency, and the expansion of 
their usefulness, as viewed by those most nearly concerned in the results secured, 
must depend upon the activity and intelligence of school boards, and it is but 
fair to say that the largest share of the credit due has been worthily won by these 
bodies. The Minister is not, however, limited to the discharge of statutory 
duties. Educational policy cannot stand still; those who have devoted their 
special qualifications to the study of education in all its aspects should point the 
way to improvement and suggest the means of attaining it. Actuated by this 
spirit the Department has sought to direct attention to fresh steps that ought 
to be taken for the benefit of the schools. Being informed of conditions char- 

[vii] 



viii THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

acteristic of the Province generally, and not of a few localities only, it is the 
Department's duty to present the facts for such action as may be possible and 
acceptable. The present cost of education is a subject for supreme consideration. 
There is no better investment than the money put into the maintenance of 
schools, but if there is overlapping, needless expense, wornout administrative 
machinery, or some other vital defect, the suggestion of a remedy should be 
placed before the people for their decision. No reform should, or could be, 
forced upon a self-governing community, but where costs have increased from 
any of these causes the actual information ought to be supplied for the guidance 
of popular opinion. For this reason, the bill suggesting the municipal unit of 
school administration in rural, as it exists now in urban centres, was placed 
before the Legislature and withdrawn. This affords ample opportunities for 
study, reflection and substantive criticism. The matter is one for discussion 
and without discussion no progress in education could be effected. Any plan 
to improve educational machinery and diminish taxation, has no relation to 
the consolidation of schools. The two questions are distinct. One is not involved 
in the other. The consolidation of schools will always be limited to certain 
localities and its efficacy is left to be determined by those localities. Their 
judgment is final and the law provides the method of procedure for voluntary 
action by bodies of ratepayers so minded. 

Another suggestion on which I welcome discussion, also, is the proposal to 
supply instruction in first year university work, both pass and honour courses, 
in such centres as are adequately equipped for the purpose and disposed to 
co-operate with the Department in providing it. The first consideration in this 
matter is the justice of the policy as it affects the whole community. I am 
unhesitatingly of opinion that, as far as practicable, there should be equality 
of opportunity. Those who reside near universities should not possess an undue 
advantage over those at a distance from them. Some such advantage there 
inevitably must be, but it ought not to exclude distant localities from all hope of 
university instruction in its preliminary grades, unless from the nature of the 
case decentralization is impossible. There are phases of the subject now under 
consideration which will determine the extent to which the change in contempla- 
tion can be made, but the aim to be kept constantly in view is the educational 
benefit of the whole Province, not of one section of it. Ontario has an immense 
area and the facilities for education cannot prudently or fairly be limited when 
a chance for extending them presents itself. The question of cost arises here, 
too, although it is not the primary consideration. The expense to the individual 
student and to the families involved is of importance, while the state itself, in 
its financial aid to all branches of education, must be governed by a due regard 
for the proportionate claims of elementary, secondary and university education. 
There are likewise related problems of far-reaching consequence to social life 
that should make any wise government pause before adding to the power of 
those economic forces that concentrate population in a few centres by neglecting 
the factors that will ensure, if left to operate, the healthy normal growth of all 
localities. I believe it, therefore, to be sound educational policy in this matter, — 

(1) To open up wider opportunities at diminished expense to students in 
all parts of the Province, to make a beginning in the university courses, and to 
test out their qualifications and fitness for such courses. At present, Toronto 
is the only centre at which pupils can reside at home and take a course in the 
provincial university. As a result, at least fifty per cent, of all the pupils in 
attendance at the various faculties of the University of Toronto come from the 
City of Toronto. Students from the other large centres of population should, 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION be 

as far as practicable, share the financial and other advantages of obtaining as 
great a portion as possible of their instruction at home or at schools where the 
expense is not as great as at Toronto. 

(2) To bring the students into closer personal contact with their teachers and 
to insure for them a greater measure of assistance and supervision in their studies. 

(3) To provide advanced training for young people who do not expect to 
be able to take a full university course. There are, doubtless, a large number 
of students who desire a college, rather than a university education, who would 
take full advantage of these courses if they were provided for them at convenient 
centres and at reasonable expense. Colleges offering such courses are popular 
in other parts of the Empire, and in the United States, and would, doubtless, 
fill a need here. 

The wisdom of extending educational opportunities is further illustrated by 
the effort to reach those with few, if any, school facilities. A special inquiry has 
been made for the purpose of finding out the number of children of school age 
in Ontario, situated in places so remote from a school that for the whole, or the 
greater part, of the year they are unable to secure any instruction. As this 
inquiry revealed the fact that a considerable number of children are situated in 
more or less isolated places, it was decided to provide Correspondence Courses 
for these children, wherever the circumstances would seem to indicate that such 
courses could be carried on with a reasonable degree of success. The Correspond- 
ence Courses have been inaugurated and at present there are 75 pupils receiving 
instruction by this means. The ages of these pupils range from 6 to 17 years 
and the lessons sent out cover all grades of Public School work from Primer to 
Fourth Book. These courses are not intended to interfere in any way with the 
attendance at school of those who are within reach of one, but are for the purpose 
of offering a means of education to those who would otherwise, through lack of 
school facilities, receive little or no school training. While the scheme has not 
been in operation long enough to judge of its success, the parents and children of 
the families being served seem to be taking up the work in a most earnest and 
enthusiastic manner. 

An interesting branch of this subject is the provision for elementary instruc- 
tion now being arranged for children whose parents reside at points along the 
two great lines of railway running to the west through the northern portion of 
the Province, the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National lines. These 
companies are co-operating with the Department in an enterprising and com- 
mendable spirit. Cars are being equipped for instruction of pupils, one portion 
of the car being fitted up as a school room, the other as living quarters for the 
teacher. The cars will be left for stated periods at certain central points, so as 
to concentrate as many pupils as possible for instruction, and moved on after 
an interval to other points, work being left for the children to do at home during 
the absence of the cars. The history of this Province, during its early years of 
settlement and development, when schools were few and many had to go without 
an education, conveys a lesson which should not be ignored by the present 
generation. Ontario still possesses pioneer settlements where some of the best 
citizens of a future day are growing up lacking the advantages that the older parts 
of the Province so highly prize, and the Department is resolved, as far as prac- 
ticable, to supply the educational need which, later on, school organization will 
be able to effect. 

The present situation in elementary education exhibits substantial evidence' 
of progress. The revised courses of study are reported as working well, an^ f . 
provisions for supplementary reading are leading to a wider acquainta^ e w 



x THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

good literature than was heretofore the case. A new list of books suitable for 
school libraries has been issued, and it is hoped that through the stimulus afforded 
by the advice of inspectors an improvement in this phase of school life may soon 
take effect, since the books in many libraries were not likely to inspire and attract 
pupils in the elementary grades. The number of elementary schools was 7,069 
in 1924, and the average attendance increased from 425,480 in the previous year 
to 433,872, a sign that the necessity for utilizing the schools is generally recog- 
nized. The supply of teachers is more than adequate, and the total number 
actually engaged is 15,508, the male teachers being over 12 per cent, of the 
whole. The total amount spent upon elementary schools was $33,018,064, 
a saving in cost having been secured by a less ambitious building programme. 
The cost per pupil of enrolled attendance dropped from $58 to $54. It should 
be noted that the decrease in the number of pupils attending the 5,004 rural 
schools, observed during recent years, continues, and a careful estimate shows 
that two schools in every nine have an average of ten pupils or less; two schools 
in every five, an average of fifteen or less; and only three schools in every eight, 
an average of more than twenty. It is clear that many schools are working 
below their capacity, and that both on educational and financial grounds reform 
of some sort is called for. This is one of the serious problems, which, by united 
effort, can be solved. The reports of the attendance officer for the Province and the 
report on rural school organization are worthy of consideration in this connection . 

The raising of the age for compulsory school attendance was one of the 
important steps in advance taken by Ontario. The latest information on how 
this law works is, therefore, significant and reassuring. Some time ago the 
attendance officers of all the larger urban municipalities were asked to indicate 
the attitude of parents of children affected towards the enforcement of the 
provisions of the Adolescent School Attendance Act, and also to indicate the 
feelings of the general public towards this Act. Answers were received from nearly 
all the large centres of population, and show an almost unanimous approval of the 
enforcement of the Act. Many favourable comments have been received from 
school inspectors and others to the effect that juveniles who formerly would have 
spent the years of their early adolescence in unnecessary employment, often 
intermittent and unprofitable, or in actual idleness, are now under systematic 
training and discipline. 

Special comments have come from small towns and villages with respect 
to the gradual disappearance of street corner gangs of juvenile idlers. For the 
part-time instruction of young persons who, on account of economic conditions, 
are unable to avail themselves of full-time instruction at public expense — to 
which, of course, they are as fully entitled as are those in a position to attend 
regularly, provision has been made in nearly all the large industrial centres. 
Manufacturing concerns and indeed all employers show a gratifying desire to 
co-operate. The City of Toronto, the largest urban centre, where the expense 
of education is closely supervised, wisely decided to make the necessary provision 
beginning September 1, 1925. The attendance branch of the Toronto board 
has found parents generally willing to conform to the law, and except for perhaps 
10 per cent, of the city firms employing juveniles, employers are arranging for 
the part-time attendance of their employees. 

The establishment in 1925 of the Ontario Training College for Technical 
Teachers is an event of importance in the development of this branch of the school 
S^itfm- , It was hoped at one time that by united effort on the part of all the 
P 1 vinces", v an institution for the whole Dominion might be set up, so as to avoid 
duplK t ' lQn \ n f instruction and needless expense, and this Province exhausted 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION xi 

every means to attain this end. For one reason or another, it was found impos- 
sible to secure common action and the existence in Ontario of day vocational 
schools with 544 teachers, and of evening vocational schools requiring 1,203 
teachers rendered constructive action indispensable. This condition entailed 
the employment of many teachers qualified to give practical instruction in such 
subjects as machine shop practice, drafting, dressmaking, motor mechanics, 
etc. — a new type of teacher, strong in knowledge of the subject and welcoming 
instruction in how best to impart the knowledge. Ontario desires to draw its 
supply of shop teachers from those actually successful in their own trade and 
crafts, and experience shows that training gives them the teaching skill required. 
Special conditions affect those long out of school and long engaged in work, but 
their maturity and practical knowledge offset other things. For them the courses 
must be brief and intensive and the ordinary teacher training school would be 
unsuitable. Accordingly the college was established at Hamilton, under Prin- 
cipal Gavin, who had formerly been Provincial Director of Technical Education, 
and arrangements made with the Hamilton educational authorities to have the 
regular day classes of the Hamilton Technical School used for practice and 
observation work by those attending the courses in the College. The result has 
been gratifying and the attendance secured during the three terms, the spring, 
the summer and the autumn, has been respectively 42, 101, and 15. 

It will be seen from the report of the Director of Technical Education that 
the development taking place in this branch of education warranted, in fact, 
imperatively called for, the establishment of the college. There were increases 
during the year in the number of schools or departments, in students attending, 
in teachers employed, and in buildings or extensions. There is a total enrol- 
ment of full-time day pupils of 11,595, and the pupils in evening class number 
35,675. The progress recorded during a five-year period is an illustration of 
the truth that the demand for educational training is in proportion to the multi- 
plication of occupations, the expansion of industrialism, and the dependence upon 
workers whose intelligence has been trained. 

Probably no department presents more striking conditions than that of 
secondary education. It should have been evident years ago that the elementary 
course, often dropped at the close of the fourth form, would soon be quite 
inadequate as a preparation for life of any sort, and that ambitious young 
Canadians would insist on more. The war brought heart-searching and reflec- 
tion, and the result was a decision virtually unanimous that the future held no 
place for the meagrely educated. Hence the addition of fifth class work to the 
public school in many places; the rapid increase of continuation schools; the 
enlargement of high schools. The abolition of fees was undoubtedly a factor 
also, but the movement had given evidence of vigorous life before that hap- 
pened. There is now an attendance of nearly 75,000 in the secondary schools 
The up-keep of the schools involves an annual expenditure of $7,819,101, and 
the investment throughout the Province is a sum of $22,002,463. The high 
school inspectors report the increased attendance in the upper school form of 
the high school and correctly argue from it the heavier responsibilities entailed 
upon staffs and school boards. 

The reports of the Public Libraries Branch, The Ontario School for the Deaf, 
with a registered attendance of 300, and The Ontario School for the Blind, with 
133 pupils, are encouraging and wholly satisfactory. 

Respectfully submitted, 

G. Howard Ferguson, 

Minister of Educ^< :i ' 0}1 - 



APPENDIX A 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC 
AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

Inspectoral Changes 

In July, 1925, Mr. D. A. Maxwell, B.A., Ph.D., after an active service 
extending over a period of almost half a century, retired from the Inspectorate 
of Public Schools of Essex County. By Inspector Maxwell's retirement the 
Department of Education loses one of its oldest and most experienced officials. 
The ability, industry and intelligent leadership which characterized his work have 
been long recognized in educational circles. He carries with him into his retire- 
ment the respect and best wishes of his fellow-workers. He was succeeded by 
Mr. W. L. Bowden, B.A., late Principal of the Port Rowan High School. 

Mr. G. H. Armstrong, M.A., B.Paed., an able and resourceful Inspector, 
resigned from the Toronto staff of Inspectors in June, 1925, after a service in 
the Toronto Schools of thirty-five years, the last thirteen years of which he 
served as Inspector. He was succeeded by Inspector P. F. Munro, M.A., 
B.Paed., late Principal of the Ryerson Public School, Toronto. 

During the past year Inspector John Ritchie retired from the Port Arthur 
Inspectorate after twenty-two years' service. His fidelity to duty and self- 
denying efforts are fully recognized in the face of the many difficulties and dis- 
comforts incident to pioneer work. He was succeeded by Inspector L. J.Wil- 
liams, B.A., who had charge of the Rainy River District for one year. In the 
rearrangement of the District Inspectorates Mr. Williams was transferred to 
the Thunder Bay District and was succeeded in the Rainy River District by 
Mr. C. F. Ewers, B.A., former Principal of Fort Frances High School. 

The reconstruction of Inspectoral units in Northern Ontario and the addi- 
tion of two Inspectors during the past year, have reacted favourably upon the 
general interests of education. Inspectors have been enabled to so adjust their 
plans of official visitation as to allow of longer or more frequent visits and more 
intimate personal contact with teachers, schools and boards of trustees where 
the need is greatest. It has also afforded them the opportunity to give fuller 
and more direct attention to problems of organization and administration which 
constitute so large a portion of their work. 

It is with regret that we record the death of the Reverend George Grant, 
who was one of the pioneer District Inspectors. From the year 1886 to 1903 
he shared with the late Inspector McCuaig the supervision of schools in Northern 
Ontario. His wholesome personality and faithful service have left their impress 
on the character and general movement of education in the North. 

Inspectoral Changes in Prospect 

In the county of York the four Public School Inspectors have under their 
supervision 759 teachers. There is pressing need for the services of a fifth 
Inspector here since, in addition to the regular duties, there is a large amount of 
administrative and organization work required in the suburban areas lying close 
to the City of Toronto. 

The two Inspectors for Kent county and the city of Chatham have a 
combined total of 256 teachers, the city accounting for sixty of this number. 

[i] 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 



In Lambton county and the city of Sarnia there are 271 teachers, Sarnia having 
fifty-three. In these cases the rural schools in the counties would alone provide 
two inspectorates of normal size and thus leave the city in each case as a separate 
inspectorate. With an Inspector devoting his full time services to each of the 
two cities, Chatham and Sarnia, excellent work could be accomplished. The 
cities of Welland, Guelph, St. Catharines, Peterborough and Kingston benefit 
greatly by having the full services of an Inspector for each. 

In each of the counties of Simcoe, Waterloo, Wentworth and Halton (joint), 
Huron, Peel, Lincoln and Middlesex East, the Inspectors have too great a 
number of teachers under their supervision. A rearrangement of the work in 
these counties with additional Inspectors appointed would be in the interests 
of the schools. 

In 1924 a re-division of Separate School inspectorates was made. The 
average number of teachers in charge of these Inspectors is still large and it 
may be that a further re-division of the Separate Schools will be necessary in 
the near future. 

In the city of Toronto there continues to be an insufficient number of 
Inspectors to meet effectively the needs of a large urban system. 

Local Interest in Schools 

When the work of the schools is brought to the attention of the public 
through exhibitions, school concerts, school fairs and other means, it is quite 
evident that on such occasions the people are keenly interested in their schools 
and are appreciative of the efforts of all who are connected with them. There 
is a danger, however, that this interest may become more or less spasmodic. 
It must be acknowledged that, in both rural and urban centres, the local school 
problems and needs do not receive a sufficiently continuous and close study on 
the part of parents and ratepayers. Neither are the more general educational 
problems always realized and studied without prejudice. 

With greatly increased numbers in the elementary and secondary schools 
in proportion to the population, with educational costs at a high level, and with 
the pressing need that schools meet the widest educational requirements for 
training toward the best type of citizenship in the future, it is very essential 
that the people be well informed about changes being made and proposed to 
be made in the interests of the schools. To permit a school to do less than its 
best work will mean a great loss to the community. To have the Province fail 
to make progress educationally through lack of interest and sometimes through 
prejudice will mean a greater loss. 

The intelligent leadership now being given by the more progressive Inspectors 
and teachers, by observant editorial writers in the press and by wise legislation, 
is tending greatly to dissipate prejudice and to stimulate interest in educational 
reforms. 

Supplementary Reading 

The new Courses of Study now being used tentatively, make greater 
provision for the subject of Supplen entary Reading throughout the different 
Forms of the Elementary schools. This change is a very desirable one, for it 
is felt sometimes that the graduates from the Public and Separate Schools, 
while able to make good standing at the completion of their Form IV work, 
have not learned to read good books for information and enjoyment. Observa- 
tion has shown that they are not as well informed through a wide reading of 
such books as they might be. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



In the more mechanical phases of the Elementary school courses pupils are 
responding very successfully in most schools. But in such subjects as Oral and 
Written Composition, Geography, History and Literature there is no doubt 
that a better result may be obtained when the subject of Supplementary Reading 
receives due attention. 

A survey of many of the libraries in rural schools reveals the fact that many 
of the books in them are not suitable for any of the pupils of elementary grades; 
many more do not serve to inspire pupils to read; and few libraries contain an 
adequate supply of good supplementary reading material for Primer, First 
Reader and Second Reader classes. 

The General Editor of Text Books has prepared a list of books suitable 
for school libraries which should be of great assistance to Inspectors, Teachers 
and Boards of Trustees when making additions to their libraries. 

Fifth Classes 

Owing to the increasing demand for secondary education, there has been 
in recent years a very rapid growth in the attendance of Fifth Class pupils in 
the Public and Separate Schools of the province. In 1920 the enrolled attendance 
of Fifth Class pupils was 6,168, while in 1923 the number had increased to 8,738. 
The number of schools qualifying for Fifth Class grants in 1921 was 105, but in 
1925 the number had increased to 205. 

The following is the regulation regarding instruction in Fifth Form subjects: 
"Pupils who have obtained High School Entrance certificates and such other 
pupils as are considered qualified by the Principal and Inspector, shall be entitled 
in both rural and urban schools to receive instruction in the subjects of the 
Fifth Form, except in a rural section or an urban municipality having a High 
or Continuation School." This Regulation is of great benefit to those who are 
not conveniently situated with reference to Secondary schools and the increased 
attendance in Fifth Forms shows that they are taking more and more advantage 
of it. 

Courses of Study 

The revised Courses of Study issued in a tentative form in September, 1924' 
have apparently met with very general approval on the part of Inspectors and 
teachers. 

The following are extracts from the Inspectors' Annual Reports for 1925: 

"The revised Courses of Study give general satisfaction and will undoubtedly 
promote increased proficiency." 

"The present Courses of Study have met with the approval ot' the teachers. 
All the better teachers welcome the increased emphasis placed on Supplementary 
Reading. The enforced study period has brought home to many the weakness 
of too much 'teaching.' Confining Entrance requirements to the work of the 
Senior Fourth Grade has lessened the pressure in this grade. There has been 
marked progress towards the elimination of 'cramming,' a consummation 
devoutly to be wished." 

Summer Courses 

The Summer Courses for teachers, conducted by the Department of Educa- 
tion, have become very popular and are largely attended. The staff of instructors 
i or these courses is composed of persons of proved ability and successful teaching 
experience who are able to cover a great deal of work in the short summer term. 
The Courses begin the first week in July and continue for five weeks. Certifi- 



4 THK REPORT OF THE No. 11 

cates are awarded to those who are successful in passing the tests and examina- 
tions held at the close of each course. 

There were 2,181 teachers in attendance at the various summer courses of 
1925 (exclu ive of the Summer Model Schools). This was an increase of 391 over 
the number n attendance the previous year. In the course in Art there were 
240, in Agriculture, 227; in Auxiliary Classes, 85; in French Conversation, 15; 
in Commercial work, 132; High School Assistants, 6; Household Science, 44; 
Kindergarten-Primary, 274; Manual Training, 21; Middle School, 113; 
Physical Culture, 459; School Nurses, 15; Vocal Music, 69; Vocation, 150; 
Upper School, 332. 

It reflects great credit on the teachers of the Province that so many of them 
are willing to spend the greater part of their holidays in attending summer 
courses, at their own expense, in order that they may become more proficient 
in their work. 

Supply of Teachers 

Since 1915 a Special List of schools in the districts and poorer parts of the 
counties (Circular 142) has been issued annually. For the schools listed therein 
Boards might legally engage teachers holding Third Class certificates without 
submitting the applications to the Department or to the Inspector concerned. 
The number of schools taking advantage of this Regulation was 1,024 in 1924, 
and 551 in 1925. As the Model Schools have been discontinued and as the 
supply of First and Second Class teachers now exceeds the demand and is likely 
to do so for some years to come, the number of schools on this Special List will 
be greatly decreased for 1926. 

Unexpired Third Class and District certificates will continue to be valid 
for schools unable to secure First or Second Class teachers, but only on the 
endorsement of the Minister after recommendation by the local Inspector. 

Interchange of Teachers within the British Empire 

Loyalty to the Empire has its main source in the teaching of the schools. 
Therefore the more our teachers know of the Empire the better they will be able 
to foster a true spirit of patriotism in the minds of the children whom they 
instruct. In this connection there was instituted some years ago a system of 
"Interchange of Teachers" which is being carried out very satisfactorily. In 
accordance with this plan, nineteen Ontario teachers were interchanged during 
last year, with teachers in England, Scotland, Australia and New Zealand. 
This movement, though still in its infancy, has great possibilities. The teachers 
from the Overseas Dominions are brought into contact with the schools and 
places of historic interest in the great cities of the old land; while those from 
the Motherland who go out to teach for a year in the schools of Canada or some 
other part of the far-flung Empire, gain a broadened outlook and a clearer con- 
ception of what is meant by the "Commonwealth of Nations." Ontario teachers 
may make arrangements for interchange through the Department of Education. 

Isolated Families 

During the latter part of the year 1925, a special enquiry was made through 
the Inspectors for the purpose of finding out the number of children of school 
age, in the Province, who are resident in places so remote from any school that 
they are unable to attend. This enquiry revealed the fact that a considerable 
number of children live in more or less isolated places and are therefore not 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



receiving an education. The problem of making some special provision for the 
education of these children will no doubt be solved at an early date. 

School Fairs 

The rural school fair has grown rapidly in the support and favour of rural 
people The pup Is of the schools have been inspired through the fairs to 
greater interest in their school work in general and in the subjects of Agriculture 
in particular. Inspectors and Agricultural Representatives are co-operating 
very successfully in stimulating greater interest in the fairs and in attempting 
to make the interest more sustained throughout the year. 

School Buildings 

Mr. George White, of the Public Works Department, the efficient Consult- 
ing Architect to the Department of Education, reports as follows: 

"The new Consolidated School at Byng Inlet, built from plans prepared 
by this Department, was completed, inspected and reported upon before 
final grants were paid. Plans were prepared for a Consolidated School at 
Paudash. The new English-French Training School at Embrun has been built 
and completed under the supervision of this Department. 

"The following school buildings have been examined and reported upon. 
In several cases, the buildings have been surveyed and sketch plans have been 
prepared for their alteration, extension or improvements to accommodations, 
and meetings have been held with the school Trustees: Neustadt; School 
Section No. 3, Proton; Orangeville; Victoria and Douglas Haig Schools, Brock- 
ville; and Port Rowan. 

"Plans have been submitted and have been reported upon for proposed 
new school buildings or alterations and extensions to existing buildings as follows : 
School Section No. 11, Ancaster; Arnprior; Ayr; Bagotsville; School Section 
No. 8, Bruce; School Section No. 11, Bertie, Ridgeway; School Section No. 7, 
Burgess and Bathurst; Comber; School Section No. 15, York, Fairbank; 
Fordwich; Ilderton; Lambeth; MacTier; Nakina; Oshawa; Port Arthur; School 
Section No. 6, Ramsay; Redditt; Richard's Landing; Riverside; School Section 
No. 3, Sandwich; Summerstown; Quibell; and Separate Schools at Chelmsford, 
Lindsay and St. Thomas. 

"The following School Boards have been supplied with plans or sketch 
plans for new buildings: Alliston; Amaranth; Arkona; Bagotsville; School 
Section No. 1, Caledonia; School Section No. 3, Casey; School Section No. 2, 
Cardwell; School Section No. 1, Charlottenburg; Carp; School Section No. 1, 
Cosby; Gwillimbury; Jaffray and Melick; Laurel; Little Current; Kingston; 
Massey; School Section No. 13, Melancthon; School Section No. 8, Monck; 
School Section No. 1, Nairn and Lome; Port Arthur; Quibell; Redditt; Separate 
School at Warren. 

"A number of school boards have also been advised on sanitary matters in 
connection with their schools." 

Inspectors' Reports 

The Inspectors' Annual Reports contain many valuable suggestions which 
receive careful consideration. The following extracts taken from the Annual 
Reports of 1925 indicate conditions that are more or less general, or movements 
that are going forward successfully. Many of the Inspectors note, during the 
year 1925, the rapid increase in the number of fully qualified teachers, the 



6 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

growing tendency of Boards to select successful, experienced teachers in spite 
of the fact that there s a surplus of teachers, the growth in the number of Fifth 
Classes, the increase in the proportion of pupils who reach High School Entrance 
standing and go forward to secondary schools, and the mprovement in regularity 
of school attendance. 

1. "Many of the schools in this Inspectorate have musical instruments, 
which aid materially in the improvement of the singing of the pupils. The list 
is as follows: Organs, 31; Pianos, 17; Yictrolas, 13. — Total, 61." 

2. "About half my rural schoo 1 s engaged a spec'al music teacher at a cost 
of $3.00 to $3.50 per hour once a week." 

3. "I have not reported on a Travelling Art Library which I have estab- 
lished. These pictures are in six books and consist of about 280 pictures. 
Special covers for the small pictures and special for the large ones had to be con- 
structed. They are now in the country schools but their success has yet to be 
determined." 

4. "This year also saw the first step taken in full co-operation with the 
Public Library. Three chools most distant from the Library were supplied 
with selected sets of books for is ue to the children under the direction of the 
Principals. Though the plan was n operation for only part of the year, it 
evidently stimulated the pupils to read. In one school of e'ght teachers over 
3,000 books were taken out. It is hoped to develop and improve the plan to 
serve all who do not live conveniently near the Public Library.' 

5. "At these meetings the peop'e were at first most uncompromising in 
their attitude of hostility towards the proposed Township Board bill. To-day 
they are not as hostile; they are more sympathetic towards it and are beginning 
to see some reasons why some such change is necessary. Sentiment is growing 
slowly in favour of the bill." 

6. "Nine echoo s have an attendance under ten. The attendance per 
teacher in the rural part of the Inspectorate was 16.5. One-half the teachers 
at present employed could do this work." 

7. "I have one school with (now) only one pupil, where the teacher receives 
$800 salary, while the Board receives (owing to the very low assessment of 
the Section) $500 as Government grants and $400 as Township grant. 
This is surely an unwise use of both Government and Township funds. This 
situation could not exist were there a Township Board to conserve educational 
funds and give close attention to the best interests of the child." 

8. "The rural schools have probably marked the limit of advance under 
the present method of administration. The adoption of a larger unit of admin- 
istration would admit of improvement in several directions that cannot be 
secured under the present system." 

9. "The prejudice against teaching Agriculture in schools has been over- 
come, and many who opposed this subject are now its advocates. Teachers are 
better instructed now and the people are better informed. The work of the 
Agricultural Representative has helped towards this end." 

10. "More attention is being given to the care of the school grounds and 
buildings. Many of the schools were redecorated during the summer vacation 
and in most of these the colours were well selected. There is, however, much 
to be desired in the beautification of the rural school grounds. Trees, shrubs 
and well-kept grass plots are not very expensive and yet they have a refining 
influence on the children and create a feeling of pride in the school on the part 
of children, teachers and ratepayers alike. It is a hopeful sign when the 
people point with pride to their school." 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



11. "In almost every instance the school ground has been mown." 

12. "Rura 1 horticultural societies have supplied the schools with bulbs and 
shrubs, free of cost, thus assisting and encouraging the teachers and the trustees 
to beautify the school grounds." 

General Remarks 

The Inspectors report favourably on the work being done in the schools by 
the school nurses and many Inspectors having mainly rural schools under their 
charge are anxious to see a further extension of the school nurse service. 

The combined efforts of the Inspectors and the Medical Health Officers are 
having a marked effect in bringing about better sanitary conditions at the schools. 

Various organizations have continued to give very helpful co-operation to 
the schools and their work is appreciated. Among these may be mentioned in 
particular, the Junior Red Cross Society, the Women's Institute, The Home and 
School Clubs, Mothers' Clubs, The Imperial Order of the Daughters of the 
Empire, and the Ontario Safety League. 

V. K. Greer, 

Chief Inspector of Public and Separate School; 



Toronto, January 31st, 1926. 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 



APPENDIX B 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

Progress During the Year 

The vocational schools of the Province made satisfactory progress during 
the past year. This is shown by the statistics, which indicate increases in the 
number of schools or departments, in the number of buildings or extensions, in 
the number of students in attendance, and in the number of teachers employed 
in vocational work. 

The total number of full-time day schools open throughout the school year 
is now twenty-five, including the College of Art. In addition there are day 
schools open during the months of January, February and March, in Kingston, 
Collingwood and Midland, giving instruction in navigation and marine engin- 
eering. 

New full-time day vocational departments were opened in Owen Sound. 
Port Arthur, Welland, Oshawa, North Bay and Brantford. The commercial 
departments of schools at these centres are now organized under the Technical 
Education Branch instead of under the High School Department. 

Evening schools were carried on in fifty-two places. 

The total enrolment of full-time day pupils was 11,595, an increase over 
the previous year of twenty-six per cent. 

The total enrolment of evening class pupils was 35,675, a decrease of 1 . 9 
per cent. However, during the year there was an increase in student-hours of 
attendance of 6.36 per cent. 

The total enrolment of part-time pupils was 1,739. 

The following tables show the progress of the vocational schools: 

Day Vocational Schools 

1920-21 1921-22 1922-23 1923-24 1924-25 

Number of full-time teachers 191 212 286 371 416 

Number of part-time teachers 60 51 88 108 

Number of full-time pupils on roll 2,600 5,344 6,987 9,184 11,595 

Average attendance of full-time pupils 2.123 4,260 5,518 7,209 9,263 

Number of part-time pupils on roll 907 574 988 1,837 1,739 

Aggregate student-hours of part-time pupils 40,997 37,776 60,972 177,638 237,378 

Number of special pupils on roll 1,019 1,604 1,427 1,798 1,875 

Aggregate student-hours of special pupils. .. . 223,570 351,214 24 3,074 235,082 242,685 

Evening Vocational Schools 

1920-21 1921-22 1922-23 1923-24 1924-25 

Number of teachers 909 1,075 1,097 1,193 1,182 

Total number of pupils 27,297 32,545 33,581 36,452 35,764 

Aggregate student-hours 1,119,287 1,176,039 1,298,746 1,413,302 1,503,248 

Summary of Expenditures by Municipalities 

1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 

Total $ c. $ c. $ c. $ c. $ c. $ c. 

Expenditures 659,072.82 1,347,905.04 1,585,086.36 1,871,614.21 3,957,136.88 3,105,235.11 
Legislative 

Grants 140,294.14 511,021.04 670,758.56 638,217.28 624,558.06 672,077.86 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



New Schools 

During the past year the building programme has not been so extensive as 
in the years 1923 and 1924. This was to be expected, since during those years, 
and to some extent in the years preceding those, the local school authorities had 
definitely provided for vocational education in most of the centres of the Prov- 
ince where the problem was a pressing one and where it was deemed advisable 
to supplement the educational work already established. Comparatively few 
similar centres now remain which have not already provided a building for 
vocational work. 

St. Thomas has erected a new building which occupies a central location 
in the east side of the city, and which will be devoted entirely to vocational 
education. The original intention of the Board was to use a part of the building 
for accommodating a few classes from the Collegiate Institute, but they finally 
decided to use the whole building for carrying on vocational work. In view of 
the efforts of the Principal, Dr. Arthur Yoaden, in promoting vocational educa- 
tion in St. Thomas, and because of his long and valued service in education in 
the city, the Board named the school "The Arthur Voaden Vocational School." 

The main part of the building, which includes administration offices, 
class-rooms, laboratories, rooms for commercial work and for household econ- 
omics, is three storeys in height, while the shop part of the building is one storey 
only. A departure from the usual type of construction has reduced the cost 
of construction considerably. This has been effected by using steel framework 
and hollow tile extensively. The front part of the building has been faced with 
brick, while the remainder of the walls is made of steel and tile. With this type 
of construction the Board has succeeded in erecting the building under contracts 
not in excess of $225,000.00. 

The Toronto Board of Education completed the erection of a unit of a new 
building known as the Eastern High School of Commerce. It was believed that 
this portion of a larger building would provide sufficient accommodation for a 
few years at least. So large was the enrolment when the school opened in 
September, 1925, that all class-room space was overtaxed and temporary arrange- 
ments had to be made to accommodate seven additional classes. It would 
appear that an enlargement of the building will be necessary at an early date. 

During the year another addition was made to the London Technical 
School. This is the second addition to the original building and provides six 
more class-rooms and a shop for the teaching of automobile mechanics. This 
addition relieves the congestion caused by increased attendance and is physical 
evidence of the steady growth of vocational education in the city of London. 

In Weston, one of the smaller places which undertook to carry on technical 
education, the attendance increased beyond all expectations, and to provide 
class-room and shop accommodation the Board completed a six-roomed addition 
to the vocational school. 

Niagara Falls completed an addition of four rooms to take care of the 
increased attendance. This addition provided much-needed class-room accom- 
modation and is evidence of an increased appreciation of the work done in the 
technical department of the school. 

Rural Evening Schools 

In addition to the enquiries concerning technical classes which have been 
received from various cities and towns in the Province during the past year, 
several enquiries have come from village communities. Part of the interest in 



10 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

vocational work aroused in some of these communities was due to the activity 
of Mrs. H. M. Aitkin, an officer of the Women's Institute. In other cases the 
interest was aroused by enquiring and public-spirited members of the district. 
It is becoming known that many of the courses of study available in cities 
and towns are suited to the needs of rural communities. The difficulty of 
obtaining well-qualified instructors is the only one which presents a serious 
obstacle. This difficulty was overcome by the employment of an itinerant 
teacher in the case of Beeton, Bond Head, Bradford, Cookstown and Tottenham. 
The Boards in these villages agreed to engage a teacher who w r ould give a day 
and evening in each village each week for ten w r eeks to instruct classes of employed 
persons in motor mechanics. 

The enrolment was as follows: 

Beeton 45 Cookstown 45 

Bond Head 46 Tottenham 45 

Bradford 77 

Under this plan the instructor carries an equipment with him and with the 
aid of some locally provided equipment is able to offer a theoretical and practical 
course of value to those in attendance. The classes have started with con- 
siderable enthusiasm, and this experiment would seem to point the way to a wide 
extension of vocational work in the Province, provided suitable local instructors 
are available. 

Schools and Industry 

Further progress can be reported in the co-operation between the technical 
schools and the industrial plants in the larger cities. Such organizations are 
also recognizing the value of the training given to boys in the industrial depart- 
ments of the schools. 

In the Annual Report for 1924 a description was given of the relations 
established between the technical schools and industrial plants at Hamilton, at 
Ottawa, and at Toronto. 

During the spring of 1925 the Ford Motor Company, after investigating 
the available supply of tool and die makers, decided to further supplement their 
apprenticeship system by accepting graduates from the shop department of the 
Windsor-Walkerville Technical School. These graduates are accepted in pref- 
erence to all other applicants for apprenticeship in the tool, die, and other 
departments. As a result of this recognition of the quality of the work done 
in the technical school, the firm accepted ten graduates in the tool and die 
departments and four in the electrical. These apprentices are paid at the rate 
of forty cents per hour for the first year, fifty cents per hour for the second 
year, and sixty cents per hour for the third year. Five cents per hour is held 
back during each year and is paid as a lump sum at the end of each year. 
There are other reasonable conditions in the agreement made with the apprentice, 
which is signed by the apprentice, his parent or guardian and the Ford Motor 
Company of Canada. 

Towards the close of the year a new apprenticeship agreement was drawn 
up by the management of the Rubber Machinery Shops of the Canadian Con- 
solidated Rubber Company, Limited, at Kitchener. Under this agreement the 
apprentices are required to attend the evening classes of the Kitchener- Waterloo 
Vocational School during the term of their apprenticeship. The agreement 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 11 

applied to the machinist, the pattern-making, and the tinsmithing trades. An 
outline of apprentice instruction in the machinist trade is as follows: 

OUTLINE OF APPRENTICE INSTRUCTION 
Machinist Trade (Four periods of 300 days each) 

First Period or Year — 

(a) At least one month in tool crib, learning tools' names, shapes, treatment and uses, 
also preliminary instruction in measuring tools as scale rules, calipers and micrometers. 

(b) Three months in auto tire mold finishing department, learning use of file and chisel 
on rough class of bench work. 

(c) Eight months in machine assembling department — consists of better class of bench 
work; helping on assembling; general drill press practice, learning the tap drill sizes; 
and screw and bolt threading on screw cutting machine. In this department the appren- 
tice learns by observation what constitutes good work coming from lathes, millers 
planers, and shapers. 

Second Period or Year — 

(a) Two months on plain milling machine. 

(b) Six months shaper work. 

(c) Four months planer work. 

Third Period or Year — 

The twelve months are put on lathes on all classes of this work from the smallest up 
to seventy-two inches in diameter. 

Fourth Period or Year— 

(a) Three months assembling machines, receiving instructions and doing the erecting and 
fitting on the best class of work. 

(b) Nine months in tool-room, consisting of universal milling machine practice, including 
gear cutting; internal, external, and universal grinder work; bench work on forming 
tools, templates, jigs, etc.; heat treatment of steels in gas furnaces, and general tool- 
room work where the apprentice does all the operations until the article or job is 
completed. 

During this nine months the apprentice is placed on special machines, boring mills 
and general machines in the absence of the regular operator. He may also be asked 
to help in the pattern shop and blacksmith shop. 

In General — 

During the whole course the apprentice is required to take at least two evenings a 
week in the winter months at the Kitchener- Waterloo Vocational School, the following 
subjects: 

Shop Mathematics, 

Mechanical Drawing, 

Business English, 

Advanced Machine Shop Practice (optional), 

Pattern-making and Foundry Practice (optional), 

Electricity (optional). 
The apprentice, either during the last part of fourth year or upon graduation, if he 
shows the interest and ability, may be taken in the Rubber Machinery Shops Draughting 
Room for several months. 

The graduate is considered a finished mechanic and is given journeyman's work and 
wages according to his proficiency. Usually he is placed on the work he prefers and is 
most suitable to him. 

Similar outlines with different content are in force for the two other trades 
mentioned. % 

This action of both companies is interesting, as it is another indication*of 
a re-establishment of an apprenticeship system and also of the value of the 
quality of the work done in technical schools. The plan also affords an outlet 
for the placing of the graduates in industry in increasing numbers. 

Part-time Education 

The latest phase of education for day pupils is part-time education, and 
associated with it is the Adolescent School Attendance Act, which, in this 
Province, dates from the year beginning September 1st, 1922. 



12 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

This Act extended the age for full-time attendance from fourteen years to 
sixteen years except for those exempted by certificates. In the case of these, 
attendance is compulsory for part time. Whatever may have been the need 
for education, for shelter, for guidance, for sympathetic repressive conditions 
for a child up to fourteen years of age, it is more important that he should have 
these when he is passing through the most trying period, when he is becoming 
psychologically and physiologically a new being with strange and new emotions. 
The finishing period of the child has become the starting point of the adolescent. 
Such a pregnant hour does not seem to be the right one to turn him loose or to 
permit him to escape from the forces which can do most for him in the few years 
yet remaining as his school life, to cease all concerted active responsibility for 
him at the brink of the widest chasm in his life, when the adolescent youth 
becomes a wage-earner, especially as at that period the need and possibilities of 
education are the greatest. 

The settled and accepted school policy of all our cities is to offer full-time 
education to all pupils whose circumstances permit attendance, free of cost, all 
the way through the elementary schools and all the way through the secondary 
schools. Even the cost of University education is partly borne by the state. 
We are not now saying to a boy whose circumstances do not permit full-time 
attendance, "Choose full attendance or no attendance; take all or nothing." 
We are not now telling him that we prefer that he should leave school altogether. 
We offer part-time education. 

In doing so for this large group of adolescents, Ontario is but doing what 
many other states are doing. Similar legislation has been passed in England, 
Scotland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Holland, France, Italy, Germany, 
Switzerland, Belgium, and the United States. Of special interest to Canada is 
the movement in the United States, since it is with the citizens of that country 
that our young people will have to compete in the industrial, commercial, and 
agricultural fields. Up to 1924 there were twenty-seven states in the union to 
the south of us which set about the organization of compulsory part-time educa- 
tion, and the end is not yet. 

It has been demonstrated that part-time education can prepare young 
people for employment; it can conserve the education already received prior to 
seeking employment, and it can ease the difficulty of adjustment to conditions 
found in the early years of employment and promote the fitness of youth as 
social units in the community. 

In some communities all the adolescents from fourteen to sixteen years of 
age are in school on a full-time basis. In other centres (the larger ones) a con- 
siderable number are in school on a part-time basis. Sarnia and St. Catharines 
may be cited as instances of the former. Toronto, Hamilton, London, and 
Kitchener are examples of the latter. In these cities an organization in the 
technical and commercial departments has been set up to provide part-time 
education to employed adolescents. Courses of study have been prepared, 
special teachers have been assigned to the work, and attendance and co-ordin- 
ating officers are co-operating to make the instruction effective. 

The action of those in authority in these cities is a commendable one. The 
latest city to provide part-time instruction is Toronto, which enrolled five 
hundred and thirty-six (536) pupils during the fall term of 1925 in the vocational 
(iepartments of the schools. 

It is gratifying to report that in the initial stages of the establishment of 
these classes there was relatively little opposition on the part of pupils, parents 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 13 

or employers in co-operating with the educational authorities in providing this 
additional educational service to the young people of the city. 

Reorganization of Staff 

The Staff of the Technical Branch was reorganized during the year. The 
changes were due to the appointment of the Director, Mr. F. P. Gavin, to the 
Principalship of the Ontario Training College for Technical Teachers and of 
the Organizers, Mr. M. A. Sorsoleil and Miss McKim, as his assistants on the 
Staff of the College. The Director was succeeded by Mr. D. A. Campbell, who, 
at the time of his appointment, was Principal of the Sarnia Collegiate Institute 
and Technical School. Prior to this appointment at Sarnia he was Director of 
Technical Education for Alberta. Miss A. M. Hamill, a teacher of Household 
Science at the Kitchener- Waterloo Vocational School, succeeded Miss McKim 
as Organizer of Women's Work. Mr. F. S. Rutherford remained on the Staff 
and was made Assistant Director of Technical Education. 

D. A. CAMPBELL, 

Director of Technical Education. 
Toronto, February 10th, 1926. 



14 



THE REPORT OF THE 



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OTTAWA TECHNICAL SCHOOL 
Graph showing the growth in enrolment of Vocational Evening Classe- 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 15 



APPENDIX G 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTORS OF 
CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

During 1925, for the purpose of inspection of Continuation schools, Ontario 
was divided into districts as follows: The Eastern District, which comprises all 
of Southern Ontario east of Toronto, that part of Northern Ontario ly'ng along 
the T. and N.O.R.R., and along the C.P.R. from North Bay to Sault Ste. Marie, 
and the Islands of Georgian Bay; the Western District, which comprises all of 
the Western Peninsula of Ontario, and the districts through which the main 
lines of the C.N.R. and C.P.R. run to Manitoba. Inspector Mills had charge 
of the Eastern District, and Inspector Hoag of the Western, until September 
1st, 1925, when the Inspectors interchanged districts. In the Eastern District 
there are one hundred and two schools; in the Western there are one hundred 
and four. These schools are situated at different distances from Toronto, 
varying from five miles to 1,200 miles. To inspect them, therefore, involves 
very much travelling, much of it over branch lines of railway, or by motor or 
other conveyance. 

Every school in the Province was visited once by an Inspector, and many 
schools, where local conditions made it necessary, were visited more than once 
during the year. In addition to the inspectoral visits to the established schools, 
the Inspectors made more than fifty visits to various places to discuss matters 
relating to Continuation schools, and particularly to explain to boards of trustees 
and to ratepayers the regulations and provisions connected with the establish- 
ing of such schools. 

A REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN THE PAST TEN YEARS 

Schools and Teachers 

The Report of the Minister of Education for 1914 gives the total number 
of Continuation schools as follows: 

Schools with three teachers 8 

Schools with two teachers 91 

Schools with one teacher 31 

Total number of schools 130 

Men teachers 73 

Women teachers 164 

Total number of teachers 237 

The Report for 1924 is as follows: 

Schools with four teachers 3 

Schools with three teachers , 35 

Schools with two teachers 100 

Schools with one teacher 61 

Total number of schools 199 

Men teachers 112 

Women teachers 284 

Total number of teachers 396 



16 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 11 

During this ten-year period, twenty-three Continuation schools became 
High Schools — Bracebridge, Bridgeburg, Burlington, Chapleau, Elmira, Exeter, 
Finch, Fort Frances, Hanover, Huntsville, Lakefield, Milton, Mimico, Xepean, 
New Liskeard, Norwich, Port Colborne, Shelburne, Thessalon, Timmins, Tweed, 
Wallaceburg, Walkerville. 

During the same period three schools, Devizes, Fitzroy Harbour and Webb- 
wood, were discontinued. Each of these was a one-teacher school; two were 
established previous to 1914, and one since that date. 

During 1925, Continuation schools were established at the following places: 
Chalk River, Coniston, Cooksville, Delta, Edgar, Elgin, Honeywood, Mount 
Pleasant, Scudder (9). Two of these employ two teachers, and the others, 
one teacher. 

A consideration of the above figures will show that from 1914 to the present 
date, one hundred and two new schools have been established and one has 
been discontinued. 

School Buildings 

During the same period, seventy-five new school buildings have been 
erected. In a few cases, the new building accommodates the Continuation 
school only, but, in most cases, the new building is for the purpose of providing 
suitable accommodation for both Public and Continuation schools. In thirty- 
three other centres, additions of one or more class-rooms have been made to 
school buildings, or a suitable building has been remodelled to fit it for Continua- 
tion school purposes. 

Attendance and Expenditures 

The Minister's Report for 1914 gives the total attendance at the Continu- 
ation schools as 5,544, while the report of 1924 gives the total attendance as 
9,337, an increase of 68.4 per cent. The teaching staff during the same period 
has increased 67 per cent. 

The total expenditure on Continuation schools reported in 1914 was $271,- 
702.96, of which teachers' salaries amounted to $190,463.59, while the total 
expenditure reported in 1924 was $969,483.18, of which the salaries amounted 
to $533,395.12. The increase in total expenditure was 256 per cent., while the 
increase in total expenditure for salaries was 180 per cent. 

Supply and Qualifications of Teachers 

There i.^ more than an adequate supply of teachers legally qualified to act 
as assistants in our Continuation schools, and at least an adequate supply of 
teachers legally qualified to act as principals of such schools. This is due 
partly to the industrial depression and partly to the change in the content of 
the course of study required for those students who are preparing to secure 
First Class Professional certificates. 

In the Report of the Continuation School Inspectors for 1924 appears the 
following paragraph : 

"Has the time not come for a forward movement in connection with quali- 
fications of teachers of Continuation schools? It is the opinion of the inspectors 
of these schools that it is very desirable to raise the academic qualifications of 
all teachers of Continuation schools so that the minimum of requirements will 
be at least a Professional First Class certificate, and in addition the equivalent 
of two years' work in the general course in Arts of the University. The inspectors 
believe that higher academic standing is more desirable at the present time 
than experience in Public schools, before entering upon the work of the Con- 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 17 

tinuation schools. There should, of course, be no relaxation in regard to the 
requirements for training in the special subjects of Art, Physical Culture, House- 
hold Science, etc. But after due notice to prospective students at the Normal 
schools, the inspectors believe that if the First Class certificate is restricted to 
Public schools, and that if a special certificate of qualification be granted to the 
holder of a First Class certificate who has covered the advanced academic work 
suggested, the teachers of the Continuation schools will be better qualified for 
the training of pupils of secondary schools." 

In accordance with the opinions expressed in the extract quoted above, 
the inspectors recommend that, for those teachers wishing to qualify for the 
principalship of any Continuation school in which the work of the Middle 
school is carried on, the requirements be raised so as to correspond to those for 
the second year of the course in Arts of the Universities. 

Problems Connected with the Establishment of New Continuation Schools 

The Inspectors feel that a statement of some of the problems connected with 
the establishment of new Continuation schools deserve mention, since the 
solution of these problems call forth much quiet and patient public service on 
the part of rural trustees, ratepayers and public school inspectors. 

Problems Confronting the School Boards 

The responsibility for establishing and carrying on a new school is usually 
assumed by a' single school section, although occasionally a union of sections is 
formed for this purpose. The school is frequently opened in temporary quarters. 
These quarters must be furn shed and provided with equipment for carrying 
on the work and the teacher's salary must be paid monthly. The schools open 
in September, but grants are not due until the following summer or autumn. 
To get money to carry on for the year until grants begin to come in without 
making a levy on the section that will arouse keen opposition to the school and 
harsh criticism of the school board from the ratepayers, is a problem few would 
cheerfully face. 

When two or three years' work has convinced the ratepayers that the school 
is a benefit to the community and that the cost to the section is small as com- 
pared with the advantages, the Board is next faced with the problem o pro- 
viding permanent accommodations. It s true that the county must pay its 
share of 80 per cent, o the cost of building, but even the remainder of the cost 
is no small undertaking for a single section or group of sections. 

To solve the above problems to the general satisfaction of the ratepayers, 
necessitates the exercise of more of the qualities of the financier and the diplomat, 
and more meekness, patience and persistence than trustees are usually given 
credit for possessing. Few men would undertake the task except from a strong 
conviction of the advantages to be derived by the rural children. 

Problems Confronting the Inspectors 

In order to give the ratepayers an opportunity to test the advantages of a 
Continuation school to the community and to convince them that the school 
will not be a serious financial burden, the Inspectors often find it advisable to 
recommend that permission be given to carry on in temporary quarters. When 
this is done, it is always on the definite understanding that at the end of two 
years, or at most three, the Board will take steps to provide suitable permanent 
accommodations. After the two or three years have elapsed, there is usually 



18 THE REPORT OF THE No, U 

a very decided and quite natural inclination on the part of some of the rate- 
payers to continue in the temporary quarters and to put off the erection of suitable 
accommodation as long as possible. Public meetings are necessary and for 
these the Public and Continuation School Inspectors are in constant demand 
to assist the Boards in presenting matters clearly and fully to the ratepayers. 
Besides the inspection of the schools and the almost daily meetings with the 
Boards and teachers after school hours, it is usual for each inspector to attend 
from twenty to forty public meetings each school year. That so many new 
schools have been established, new buildings and additions to old ones erected, 
and that there has been such an increase in expenditure for Continuation school 
purposes during the past ten years, are evidence that parents and ratepayers 
generally are deeply interested in a better education for the children. The 
progress made is all the more worthy of note when it is remembered that the 
period (1914 to 1924) includes four years of the War, during which little building 
was done. Such progress could not have been made without the hearty co- 
operation of the Public School Inspectors and earnest effort on the part of all 
those interested in the education of the children of rural districts. 

A Problem of County Councils 

Owing to increasing expenditure for roads and for other municipal purposes, 
as well as for the cost of schools, the tax rate is high in many rural districts. 
Some county councils, or members of those councils, feel there should be some 
way of limiting the responsibility of the county for the cost of educating pupils 
at High Schools or Collegiates in large towns and cities. This cost frequently 
reaches $150 or more per pupil and while those living near such schools receive 
advantage, there appears to be a certain unfairness in the case of ratepayers 
living at a long distance from high or continuation schools. Such ratepayers 
have to pay while they do not receive a benefit that corresponds fairly to that 
received by the ratepayers living near the school. 

In such an area should not county councils be given the right to say where 
Continuation schools shall be established and to prescribe the area that shall 
be served by any school? The county council would then not be responsible 
for the cost of educating any pupil who leaves the school in his area to attend 
another for any course given in the local school. 

The Trend of Continuation Schools 

For many years it had been hoped that when increased attendance neces- 
sitated the employment of a third teacher, the academic courses of Continuation 
schools might be confined to the Lower and Middle school work and that a two 
years' course in Household Science and Agriculture might be introduced. It 
was thought that with the introduction of a course in Household Science for the 
girls and in Agriculture for the boys, the content of the academic courses would 
be enriched and they might still be covered by the average pupil in four years. 

However, when the third teacher becomes necessary, the demand of the 
parents and trustees is for an extension of the academic course to include Upper 
School work. The possibility of having some Upper School work done if a third 
teacher is employed is a strong argument put forward by many members of 
School Boards in justifying the engagement of the third teacher. This state- 
ment makes a much stronger appeal than any argument about overcrowded 
class-rooms, whereas, any argument based on the necessity for some training in 
departments of Household Science or Agriculture would be received with scorn 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 19 

by many ratepayers. Whether the reason for the demand for Upper School 
work is due to the fact that the traditional High School course is the only one 
• for which credit is given in most University courses, or whether it arises from a 
lack of appreciation of the meaning and value of such courses, it is a fact that 
most parents are not yet interested in Household Science or Agriculture, but are 
quite interested in extending the High School course to include as much Upper 
School work as possible. 

Need for Extending Continuation Schools 

All ratepayers in the county must contribute to the cost of educating county 
pupils at High or Continuation Schools, and very many of these ratepayers 
live so far from these schools that their children derive very little benefit from 
them. A recent amendment to the Continuation Schools Act, whereby sur- 
rounding sections may contribute a specified sum, or a proportion of the cost, 
toward the establishment and maintenance of a school in another section, seems 
to provide a way whereby Continuation Schools may be brought within the reach 
of most ratepayers. If the provisions of this amendment could be brought to 
the attention of Boards located at a distance from secondary schoDls, there 
can be little doubt that many new schools in rural districts would result. Have 
we not reached the time when a secondary school should be carried on in each 
township? 

G. K. Mills, 
J. P. Hoag, 
Continuation School Inspectors. 

Toronto, December 31st, 1925. 



20 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 



APPENDIX D 



REPORT OF THE HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTORS 

During the school year 1924-25, your Inspectors visited the 50 Collegiate 
Institutes and the 133 High Schools of the Province and observed the work of 
1,657 teachers. In the year 1908-09, the first in which the work of inspection 
was in charge of three Inspectors, the comparative figures were as follows: 

Collegiate Institutes, 42; High Schools, 103; Total, 145. Number of Teachers, 795. 

It will be observed that in sixteen years the number of schools has increased 
more than 26 per cent, and the number of teachers has been more than doubled. 
It follows of necessity that the present Inspectors can spend now in inspection 
less than one-half of the time per teacher that was possible in 1908-09. Every 
available school day has been utilized, however, by your Inspectors in the work 
of inspection. No school nor teacher has been overlooked, but the endeavour 
has been to devote most time where there appeared to be special need. 

The increase in attendance is still marked, the attendance having been 
52,116 in 1924-25, as compared with 48,263 the year before. The most note- 
worthy feature of this continued increase, however, is the percentage increase 
in Upper School pupils compared with that in the Middle and Lower Schools. 
In the last three years the total increases in Lower, Middle and Upper School 
attendance have aggregated 4,532, 6,384, 1,795, respectively, and the percentages 
of those increases, 16.6, 65, 76. The aggregate attendance in the Lower School 
last year showed an increase of 1,451 or 4.7 per cent. In the Middle School 
the increase was 1,792 or 12.4 per cent., while in the Upper School it was 610 
or 17.3 per cent, of the attendance in the same division for the previous year. 

This large proportion of increase in attendance in the Upper School is most 
encouraging, but it carries with it heavier responsibilities for the staffs of the 
schools and for the School Boards concerned in making adequate provision 
for them. 

During the year the following new buildings have been completed and 
opened — Collegiate Institutes at Collingwood, Fort William, and Bloor Street, 
Toronto, and High Schools at Bracebridge, Caledonia, Chapleau and Grimsby. 
Additions have been erected and are in use at the Napanee, Orillia, and Hum- 
berside, Toronto, Collegiate Institutes, and at the Milton, Shelburne, Simcoe 
and Smithville High Schools. In addition to the above, new buildings are in 
course of erection in London East, Morrisburg, Malvern Avenue, Toronto, 
Pembroke and Petrolia. 

R. W. Anglin, 
I. M. Levan, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Toronto, January 1st, 1925. High School Inspectors. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



21 



APPENDIX E 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF RURAL 
SCHOOL ORGANIZATION 

1. One-roomed Rural Schools 

In 1924 there were in the Province 5,004 one-roomed rural schools, an 
increase of twenty-one over the prev ous year. The following table classifies 
these schools on the basis of average attendance: 

With Average 
Attendance of 
2 

3 or less 

4 « « 
c a a 

10" " '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

15 " " 

20 " " 

Over 20 



No. of Schools 


No. of Schools 


Total 


in Counties 


in Districts 


in Province 


9 


4 


13 


37 


20 


57 


65 


28 


93 


128 


43 


171 


689 


207 


896 


1,628 


374 


2,002 


2,6331 
1,676/ 


497\ 
198/ 


3,130\ 
1,874/ 



4,309 695 5,004 

Compared with the attendance figures for 1923, those for 1924 are not 
reassuring. The decrease in the number of pupils attending the one-roomed 
schools, which has been noted for several successive years, still continues. Two 
schools in every nine have an average of ten or less; two schools in every five 
an average of fifteen or less; five schools in every eight an average of twenty 
or less; and only tjiree schools in every eight an average of more than twenty. 
At least three thousand schools in the Province are costing too much to main- 
tain, and are working below their capacity. Several hundreds of these 
might be closed and their pupils redistributed in neighbouring schools with a 
great financial saving to the ratepayers and the government, and with great 
educational profit to the pupils. 

2. Cost of Maintaining Schools with Small Attendance 

The excessive cost of maintaining schools with low average attendance has 
been emphasized in my previous reports. The financial statistics of these 
schools for 1924 are as disturbing as those of former years. The following 
tabulated statement shows the cost of maintenance in 1924 of three groups of 
schools with low average attendance: 

Schools with Average Attendance of 1 to 5. 





No. of 
schools 


Total 
Aver- 
age 
At- 
tend- 
ance 


Cost 

to 

Locality 


Legislative 
Grants 


Total 
Cost 


Average 
Cost per 
Pupil to 
Locality 


Average 
Costper 
Pupil to 
Govern- 
ment 


Total 

Cost per 

Pupil 


Counties. . 
Districts.. . 
Province. . 


128 

43 

171 


528 
164 
692 


$74,538 96 
21,563 11 
96,102 07 


$52,671 91 
19,435 06 
72,106 97 


$127,210 87 

40,998 17 

168,209 04 


$141 17 
131 48 

138 88 


$99 76 
118 51 
101 20 


$240 93 
249 99 
243 08 






Sc 


hools with A 


verage Attendance of 6 to 10. 






Counties. . 
Districts.. . 
Province. . 


561 
164 

725 


4,629 
1,325 
5,954 


435,481 90 
100,238 90 
535,720 80 


214,322 40 

91,376 39 

305,698 79 


649,804 30 
191,615 29 
841,419 59 


94 08 
75 65 
89 98 


46 30 
68 96 
51 34 


140 38 

144 61 

141 32 






Sc 


hools with A 


verage Attendance of 1 to 10 






Counties. . 
Districts. . 
Province. . 


689 
207 
896 


5,157 
1,489 
6,646 


510,020 86 
121,802 01 
631,822 87 


266,994 31 
110,811 45 
377,805 76 


777,015 171 98 90 

232,613 46| 81 82 

1,009,628 63| 95 07 


51 77 
74 42 
56 85 


150 67 
156 24 

151 92 



2 D.E. 



22 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

The average cost of education per pupil in 1924 in all the rural public schools 
was $80.38. If this amount is compared with the figures in the above table, 
it is evident that, in the schools with an average attendance of five or less, the 
cost per pupil is three times as great, and in schools of ten or less, the cost is 
almost twice as great, as the average cost per pupil in all the rural public schools. 
It cost the Province in 1924 more than a million dollars to maintain nine hun- 
dred schools with less than seven thousand pupils. Such high costs for education 
are indefensible except in those instances where conditions make the maintenance 
of a small school unavoidable. 

3. The Consolidated Schools 

New consolidations were established during 1925 at Apsley, in Peterborough 
County, Quibell in Kenora District, and Pointe au Baril in Parry Sound Dis- 
trict. The consolidated school districts at Benmiller in Huron County, Taren- 
torus in Algoma District, and Jaffray-Melick in Kenora District, were dissolved 
under the provisions of Section 13 of the Schools Acts Amendments of 1924. 
In none of these cases had any steps been taken to establish a consolidated 
school. 

Twenty-seven consolidated schools aie now in operation in the Province. 
The reports received from them indicate that they are all working successfully. 
The transportation schemes are operating satisfactorily in every case. The 
vans seldom miss a trip even under the most adverse conditions of roads and 
weather. The pupils are conveyed in comfort to the school in the morning and 
to their homes in the evening. The percentage of average attendance is con- 
siderably higher than in the ordinary rural school because of the transportation 
system. 

Practically all the consolidated schools provide a secondary education 
either in the Fifth Form or in a Continuation School, unless a High School is 
readily accessible. Many of them also provide special instruction in Manual 
Training, Household Science, and Agriculture. The cost of maintenance per 
pupil of average attendance in the consolidated schools is $75.17. This is con- 
siderably lower than the average cost per pupil in all the rural public schools, 
viz., $80.38. It should be remembered, too, that the ordinary rural school 
seldom provides any measure of secondary education or any instruction in 
special subjects. The consolidated schools are therefore providing both an 
elementary and a secondary education at a lower cost per pupil than that at 
which the rural schools are providing merely an elementary education. 

The statistics of the consolidated schools will be found on pages 242-246 of 
this Report. 

4. Proposed Changes in Rural School Administration 

The outstanding event of 1925, so far as rural school organization is con- 
cerned, was the introduction in the Legislature of a Bill to establish Township 
Boards of Trustees. This bill embodies proposals that have been made for 
many years past for the improvement of the administration of the rural schools. 
The Bill was given its first reading by the Legislature, and was then withdrawn 
for further consideration at a future session. In the meantime, copies of the 
Bill have been widely distributed, accompanied by a circular letter from the 
Minister, setting forth the defects of the rural schools which the provisions of 
the Bill will remedy. All those interested in rural schools have been invited to 
study the provisions and to make constructive suggestions in regard thereto. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 23 

The Bill proposes to place the schools of each township under an adminis- 
tration similar to that which has been in successful operation in the urban 
municipalities for upwards of sixty-five years. Each township is to be divided 
into school areas coinciding in most cases with the present school sections, and 
corresponding to the wards of towns and cities. Each school area will elect its 
representative on the township board at the same time and place and under the 
same conditions as elections for municipal council are held. Each trustee will 
ordinarily hold office for two years. To ensure a measure of continuity for the 
board, provision is made for the retirement of only half of the members each year. 

As was to be expected, the submission of the Bill in tentative form for the 
consideration of the people directly concerned has aroused lively discussion 
throughout the Province. The matter has been debated at many meetings of 
trustees and ratepayers. At first, in the absence of definite knowledge of the 
Bill, sentiment was almost universally against its proposals. But as these 
proposals are gradually becoming better understood, and as their implications 
are being more clearly recognized, a perceptible change in public opinion is taking 
place. A tendency to consider the provisions of the Bill on their merits has 
now appeared, and there is little doubt that when their significance is fully 
realized, the initial opposition will disappear. A gratifying feature of the situa- 
tion is the support that is being given to the principle of the Bill in the editorial 
columns of influential journals. 

It is disappointing, however, to note, in many of the public discussions that 
have taken place, a lack of that constructive criticism which was the main 
purpose of its submission to the people. If the proposals were condemned, it 
was hoped that there would be presented either suggestions for their improve- 
ment, or alternative schemes which would remedy the admitted defects of the 
schools. It is obvious that mere condemnation of the Bill is of little avail 
in improving the existing school conditions. 

Considerable misapprehension as to the provisions of the Bill still exists in 
certain quarters. It has been frequently asserted that it is proposed to deprive 
the people of the control of their schools. It is difficult to understand how such 
an impression could arise. Nobody would suggest that the people of urban 
centres do not fully control their schools. How then can it be asserted that the 
same method of administration applied to the rural schools will deprive the people 
of control? Each municipality will exercise the same authority over its schools 
as it does over such other municipal matters as roads, bridges, drains, and public 
health. Nobody denies that these matters are under local direction and con- 
trol. In fact, under the township board scheme, local control over school mat- 
ters will be extended from the single school of the section to all the schools of 
the township, secondary as well as elementary. Local autonomy, so far as schools 
are concerned, will not in any way be lessened, but will in reality be augmented. 

It has also been stated that a section board of three trustees knows more 
intimately the needs of the local school than a township board could know them. 
Such a contention has little weight, when it is remembered that on a township 
board, each school area, which means in most cases each school section, will 
have its own elected representative, who may be trusted to keep the interests 
of his particular school before the board. Each representative will be able to 
see that the school in his area is kept on the same plane of efficiency with all 
the other schools in the township. 

In some quarters it seems to be assumed that the establishment of town- 
ship boards will mean that existing school buildings will be discarded and costly 
new buildings erected in their stead. No such proceeding is contemplated. 



24 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

Buildings that are still serviceable will continue to be used so long as there are 
sufficient pupils to attend them. To discard serviceable buildings would be to 
sacrifice one of the main purposes of the Bill, viz., to ensure economical manage- 
ment. Nor does the scheme necessarily involve the consolidation of the schools 
unless the people so decide. The type of school organization adopted in each 
township will be determined by the people themselves through their elected 
representatives without influence from without. 

The main charge brought against the township board scheme of admin- 
istration is that it will increase the cost of education. One of the main purposes 
of the scheme is to reduce costs. Elsewhere in this report, the excessive cost of 
the small school has been pointed out. Much of this unnecessary expenditure 
can be obviated under a township board by redistribution of pupils so as to 
secure schools of a reasonable size. Other reductions in cost will be secured 
through the standardization of buildings and through uniformity in the pro- 
vision of fuel, equipment, and supplies. 

The suggestion has frequently been offered that the adoption of the scheme 
should be made optional with the municipalities. Permissive legislation for the 
establishment of township boards is already provided by Clause 15 of the Public 
Schools Act, 1920. This clause gives to township councils the authority to unite 
two or more school sections, and to limit the number of trustees to six when all 
the sections in a township have been united. Though this clause has been in 
the Statutes for many years, there is only one township in the Province where 
a township board has been established in this way. There is, therefore, small 
hope that permissive legislation such as is suggested would be acted upon. If 
the benefits of the scheme are ever to be secured, it will have to be made com- 
pulsory and not permissive. 

When the Bill to Establish Township Boards of Trustees is made law, it 
will be possible for the people of rural communities to deal effectively with the 
present abuses and defects in the rural school situation. The pressing problem 
of the school of small attendance, with its consequent inefficiency and expensive- 
ness, will be on the way towards solution. The striking inequalities in school 
taxation will be remedied. Most important of all, the provision of facilities 
for secondary education and part-time courses will be made possible through 
the wider opportunity for financial co-operation among the people. The 
adoption of the township unit of administration in place of the present 
school section unit will result in substantial and general improvement in the 
educational status of the rural communities of this Province. 

W. J. Karr, 
Director of Rural School Organization. 

Toronto, February 12th, 1926. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 25 



APPENDIX F 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF MANUAL TRAINING AND 
HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE 

The General Situation 

Manual Training and Household Science in the schools of the Province 
have been conducted in much the same manner as in previous years. There 
are now in actual operation 121 Manual Training centres and 122 Household 
Science centres distributed amongst thirty-seven different towns and cities. 
The tendency to close centres owing to financial stringency and the need for 
economy is rapidly disappearing and centres that were temporarily closed are 
being reopened. It is gratifying to note in this connection the reopening of the 
Manual Training and Household Science centres in Port Arthur Collegiate 
Institute. 

The character of the work being done in the Manual Training room is 
showing marked improvement in several directions. More attention is being 
paid to the basic tool processes of all wood -working operations; a closer connec- 
tion is being made with the other school subjects; more consideration is being 
given to the finish of the objects made, better teaching methods are being 
adopted, much more use is being made of charts, illustrations, photographs, 
specimens of manufactured articles of raw materials which are supplied by many 
manufacturers on request, and Government Bulletins are being freely used. A 
recent publication by the Forestry Branch of the Department of Lands and 
Forests, Ontario, "The Forest Trees of Ontario," by J. H. White, of the Univer- 
sity of Toronto, would prove most useful to all Manual Training classes of the 
Province. This publication is well illustrated and contains a guide to the 
identification of the common timbers and trees. 

The teachers of cookery, general household management and sewing are 
also making progress in the manner of handling their subjects particularly in 
the direction of making them more directly applicable to the home. In the 
majority of cases the girls practise in the home the work done in the classroom 
and report to the teacher the success or failure of their efforts. Attention is 
being paid to the balanced meal and the economical purchase of food stuffs. 
The instruction is being largely based on the complete meal and the subject is 
being developed in connection with the social service of the school. Much 
attention is being paid to the health of the school girl, both in the matter of 
suitable dress and proper food, and in many cases the Household Science teacher 
and the School nurse can beneficially work together in this regard. 

Constructive Work in the Primary Grades 

A recent development of school organization is the rotary or self-contained 
school. In this type of school Manual Training and Household Science are 
taught by one teacher through all grades of the school and in this way a correlated 
course can be given from Grade I to Grade VIII throughout the school, resulting 
in much better work in the higher grades owing to the foundation for the instruc- 
tion laid in the lower grades. Children from outside schools do not attend the 
Manual Training and Household Science centres in these schools and in this 



26 THE REPORT OF THK No. 11 

way time is not lost in travelling from school to centre. In the Normal Schools 
and Summer Schools much attention is being paid to this elementary work. In 
the Rural School this elementary work is found particularly useful as seat or 
busy work, and owing to the grants being provided by the Department more 
trustees are becoming willing to undertake the small expense involved. The 
new curriculum providing as it does for the combination of Art and Constructive 
work, particularly for the lower grades is resulting in more Constructive work 
and the better application of the Art. 

The Rural School 

It is gratifying to be able to report continued progress in the installation 
of Manual Training and Household Science into the rural schools of the Province. 
There are now approximately 700 schools in which one or both these subjects 
are taught. The Household Science takes the school lunch as the centre of its 
instruction. In the majority of these schools one hot dish is served at the noon 
lunch to supplement the lunch that is brought from home. Every teacher in 
the Province who holds a Second Class certificate is qualified to teach this work, 
and inspectors, teachers, trustees and parents are generally of the opinion that 
in those schools where lunch is served the health of the children is improved, 
the problems of discipline are easier, and better work is accomplished in the after- 
noon where the lunch is eaten under proper conditions. The serving of the 
lunch under the supervision of the teacher also has the added advantage of pro- 
viding for the supervision of the pupils during the noon hour. 

The equipment provided for the Household Science generally consists of a 
two or three flame burner oil stove and a cupboard in which to store the cooking 
utensils. The Department's manual, "Household Science for Rural Schools," 
contains full details of suitable equipments which have been tried out in various 
schools and have proved suitable and successful. 

The equipment for Manual Training generally consists of one bench and a 
small cupboard to hold a set of tools. The Manual issued by the Department, 
"Manual Training," gives full details of this work. 

Summer Courses and Saturday Classes 

During the summer vacation the usual holiday courses were held for the 
purpose of qualifying for the Elementary certificate, which is valid in the Rural 
Schools of the Province. Both courses were given in the rooms of the Technical 
School, Hamilton, and the Manual Training course had a larger number of 
students than the course held in the previous year. 

The Saturday Classes for teachers in service held at Hamilton Normal 
School in previous years were continued and are meeting with increased favour. 
The students feel that they can put into immediate practice the lessons they 
receive, and that they can bring their problems for common discussion and 
solution. 

Training of Teachers 

In addition to the Summer Courses and Saturday Classes above mentioned 
which qualify for the Elementary certificate, we have a one-year course, given 
at the College of Education, for the purpose of qualifying Household Science 
teachers for the urban schools where Household Science rooms are equipped. 
This course is given by capable and efficient instructors who are well acquainted 
with the requirements and possibilities of the schools of the Province. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 27 

A one-year course has now been established at the Industrial Training 
College in Hamilton to qualify Manual Training teachers for urban schools. 
Recommendations are being made regarding the qualifications for the Specialist's 
certificate in Manual Training and the adoption of these recommendations will 
complete the required provision for training teachers for these subjects in all 
the schools of the Province. 

Albert H. Leake, 
Inspector of Manual Training and Household Science. 

Toronto, December, 1925. 



28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX G 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR 

OF 

ELEMENTARY AGRICULTURAL CLASSES 



Introductory 



Agricultural education in the different types of schools recognized by the 
Department of Education is advancing year by year in both quantity and 
quality — quantity referring to the number of schools and pupils concerned, and 
quality referring to the character of the work done. There is still a considerable 
element of opposition towards agriculture as a school subject here and there 
throughout the Province, but I am pleased to note that the magnitude of this 
element is decreasing year by year. Excellent work is being done in urban 
and suburban schools as well as in the rural schools. 

The following facts and figures show the situation at the present time: 
The number of Public and Separate Schools qualifying for grants each year, 
commencing in 1903, is given in the following table: 
Year 



1903. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 



No. of 


Year 


No. of 


schools 




Schools 


4 


1914 


264 


7 


1915 


407 


6 


1916 


585 


8 


1917 


989 


2 


1918 


. ... 1,020 


14 


1919 


. ... 1,408 


16 


1920 


. ... 1,648 


17 


1921 


. ... 1,804 


33 


1922 


. . . . 2,047 


101 


1923 


.... 2,288 


159 


1924 


. ... 2,285 




1925 


. . . . 2,509 



With School 


With Home 


Gardens 


Gardens 


208 


56 


222 


185 


324 


261 


466 


523 


588 


432 


618 


790 


702 


946 


690 


1,114 


796 


1,251 


843 


1,445 


831 


1,454 


783 


1,726 



Number of Ungraded Public Schools with classes in Agriculture, September, 
1924, to June, 1925: 



Inspectorate 

Brant and Norfolk. 

Bruce W r . . . . 

Bruce E 

,Carleton W 


No. 
of 

Schools 
. 18 

21 

31 

13 

11 

4 
60 
61 
61 
26 
18 
11 

2 

2 
66 
19 

3 

7 
21 


With 

Home 

Gardens 

15 

12 

19 

9 

4 

2 
41 
53 
38 
18 
11 

5 

2 

1 
59 

8 

3 
20 


With 

School 

Gardens 

3 

9 

12 

4 

7 

2 
19 

8 
23 

8 

7 

6 

'i 

7 
11 
3 
4 
1 


Inspectorate 

Halton and Went 
worth (in part).. . 

Hastings S 

Hastings N 


No. With 
of Home 
Schools Gardens 

, 27 22 
45 36 
1 1 
22 18 
63 56 
82 64 
75 21 

54 33 
74 56 
71 54 
41 31 

55 41 

43 37 

44 37 
31 25 

5 5 
11 7 
66 43 
81 38 


With 

School 

Gardens 

5 
9 

i 


Cochrane N. (Dist 
IX). 


Huron E 

Huron W 

Kent E 




7 
18 
54 


Dundas 

Elgin E 

Elgin W 


Kent W 

Lambton W . . 




21 
18 


Lambton E (2) 


17 
10 




Lanark E 




14 


Frontenac N 

Frontenac S 

Glengarry 

Grey W . 


Leeds & Gren. 
Leeds & Gren. 
Leeds & Gren. 
Lennox 


(3).. 
(2).. 
(1).. 


6 
7 
6 


Grey E 

Grey S 

Haldimand 


Lincoln 

Middlesex W. , 
Middlesex E.. 




4 
23 




43 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



29 



No. 
Inspectorate of 

Schools 

Muskoka District. . . 3 

Norfolk 49 

Nbld. & Durham (3) 7 

Nbld. & Durham (2) 52 

Nbld. & Durham (1) 56 

Ontario N 19 

Ontario S 12 

Oxford N 42 

Oxford S 7 

Peel 13 

Perth N 56 

Perth S 42 

Peterboro' W. and 

Victoria E 19 

Peterboro' E 17 

Prescott 1 

Prince Edward 35 

Renfrew N 5 

Renfrew S 43 

Simcoe E 8 

Simcoe N 3 

Simcoe S 9 



With 


With 


Home 


School 


Gardens 


Gardens 


3 




32 


17 


4 


3 


42 


10 


42 


14 


11 


8 


7 


5 


33 


9 


5 


2 


5 


8 


47 


9 


36 


6 


7 


12 


8 


9 


1 




29 


6 


5 




30 


13 


8 




3 




6 


3 



No. With W T ith 

Inspectorate of Home School 

Schools Gardens Gardens 

Stormont 67 64 3 

Victoria W 1 1 

Waterloo S 9 7 2 

Waterloo N 11 7 4 

Welland N 9 8 1 

WellandS 20 14 6 

Wellingtons 48 32 16 

Wellington N 9 7 2 

Wentworth N 34 23 11 

York W (No. 2).... 8 2 6 

York N. (No. 1).... 17 13 4 

York E. (No. 3) . . . . 18 14 4 

District Div. 1 1 1 

District Div. IV.. 1 . . 1 

District Div. V 4 2 2 

District Div. VI.. 1 . . 1 

District Div. VIII.. 2 1 1 

District Div. XI ... 13 9 4 

District Div. XII... 3 .. 3 

District Div. XIII.. 1 1 



Total 2.121 



1,515 



606 



Number of Graded Public Schools with classes in Agriculture, September, 
1924, to June, 1925: 



No. With With 

Inspectorate of Home School 
Schools Gardens Gardens 

Algoma 5 5 

Brantford City 7 6 1 

Brant & Norfolk X . 1 . . 1 

Bruce W 3 2 1 

Bruce E 2 1 1 

Carleton E 4 .. 4 

Carleton W 2 1 1 

Dundas 7 3 4 

Durham 1 . . 1 

Elgin E 6 2 4 

Elgin W 10 5 5 

Essex S 3 2 1 

Essex N 1 1 

Frontenac N. & Add 1 1 

Glengarry 1 1 

Grey S 2 2 

Guelph City 1 1 

Haldimand 1 1 

Halton.Went.iin pt.) 2 2 

Hastings, S 2 2 

Hastings, C 3 1 2 

Huron E 3 3 

Huron W 1 . . 1 

Kenora District ... 1 1 

Kent E 2 2 

Kent W 2 1 1 

Lambton W 4 4 

Lambton E (2) 2 1 1 

Lanark 1 l 

Leeds & Gren. (3) . . 3 1 2 

Leeds & Gren. (2). . 2 2 

Lennox 3 2 1 

Lincoln 8 3 5 

London City 15 15 

Middlesex W 2 1 1 

Middlesex E 3 1 2 

Norfolk 1 1 

Ontario S 3 1 2 



No. With With 
Inspectorate of Home School 

Schools Gardens Gardens 



Oxford N.. . 




2 

1 


1 


1 


Oxford S. . . 




1 


Ottawa Citv 




12 




12 


Peel 




3 


2 


1 


Perth N .... 




3 
6 

2 


■ 


3 


Perth S 




6 


Peterboro' City . . . 


1 


Peterboro' E 




2 


1 


1 


Prescott & Russell . 


2 


1 


1 


Prince Edward .... 


4 




4 


Renfrew N . 




1 
2 




1 


Renfrew S . . 




2 


Simcoe E . . . 




3 


2 


1 


Simcoe N. . . 




3 


2 


1 


Stormont . . . 




2 


2 




Waterloo S., 


No. 2 


1 




1 


Waterloo N . 




5 


1 


4 


Welland N . 




6 

1 
1 


2 
1 


4 


Welland S . . 




1 


Wellington N 




Wellington S 




5 


1 


4 


Wentworth . 




14 

8 


7 
8 


7 


Windsor .... 






York W. (2) 




6 


1 


5 


York S. (4) . 




11 


10 


1 


YorkN. (1). 




2 




2 


York E. (3). 




9 


5 


4 


Toronto .... 




4 


3 


1 


Toronto .... 




1 






District Div. 


IV.... 


1 






District Div. 


VII... 


2 




1 


District Div. 


VIII. 


2 




1 


District Div. 


XL... 


2 




2 


District Div. 


XII... 


2 




2 


District Div. 


XIV.. 


1 




1 


District Div. 


XV... 


1 






Total . . . 




254 


131 


123 



30 



THK REPORT OFlTHE 



No. 11 



Number of Separate Ungraded Schools with classes in Agriculture, Septem- 
ber, 1924, to June, 1925.: 



19 



Toronto. 
Power).. . . 



(Insp. 



Collingwood, Peter- 
boro' City, Silver- 
thorne. Toronto. 
(Insp. Lee) 4 



No. With With 
Inspectorate of Home School 

Schools Gardens Gardens 
London & Windsor 
Cities. (I nsp. 
Melady) 6 5 1 



Bruce, Huron, Perth, 
Waterloo, Welling- 
ton Cos., Kitchener, 
Mt. Forest, Owen 
Sound, Seaforth, 
Town of Waterloo. 
(Insp. Quarry) .... 

Cities of Brantford, 
Hamilton, Niagara 
Falls. (Insp. Sulli- 
van) 



12 



Inspectorate 

Almonte, Brockville, 
Campbellford, Co- 
bourg. (Insp. Finn) 

Carleton Co. (Insp. 
Jones) 

Renfrew Co., Egan- 
ville Village. (Insp. 
Payette) 

Thunder Bay and 
Algoma Districts. 
(Insp. Bennett) . . . 

Essex Co. (Insp. 
Beneteau) 



No. With With 
of Home School 
Schools Gardens Gardens 



Essex Co. 
Scanlan) . 

Total 



(Insp 



1 
60 



1 

29 



31 



Number of Separate Graded Schools with classes in Agriculture, September, 
1924, to June, 1925: 

No. With With No. With With 

Inspectorate of Home School Inspectorate of Home School 

Schools Gardens Gardens Schools Gardens Gardens 

Essex, Kent, Lamb- Frontenac, Hastings, 

ton, Middlesex. Lanark, Leeds and 

(Insp. Melady).. . . 11 6 5 Grenville, Lennox 

and Addington, 

Bruce, Grey, Huron, Stormont. (Insp. 

Middlesex, Norfolk, • Finn) 10 10 

Perth, Waterloo, 

Wellington. (Insp. Carleton, Glengarry. 

Quarry) 22 12 10 (Insp. Jones) 14 11 3 

Nbld. and Durham, Renfrew Co. (Insp. 

Peel, Peterboro', Payette) 3 3 

Simcoe, Victoria. — — — 

York. (Insp. Lee) 14 9 5 Total 74 51 23 

School Fairs 

The number of School Fairs is increasing year by year both in number and 
in popularity. These Fairs are nearly all conducted by the Agricultural Repre- 
sentatives co-operating with the Public School Inspectors and the teachers. A 
few are organized wholly by the teachers of a locality. 

High Schools 

Below are recorded the secondary Schools that are concerned with agricul- 
tural classes since 1922. Though there is a steady increase from year to year, 
this is diminished considerably on account of the fact that some schools have 
been compelled to discontinue at least temporarily owing to the difficulty in 
securing qualified teachers. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



31 



In the following table, "x" indicates that Agriculture was carried on during 

the term specified and "o" indicates that the work has either not yet been 
introduced or has been temporarily dropped. 

Collegiate Institutes— 1922 1923 1924 1925 

Barrie o o o o o o o x 

Brockville x x x x x x x x 

Clinton x x x x x x x o 

Cobourg x x x x x x x x 

Fort William o o o o o o o x 

Ingersoll o o o x x x x x 

Napanee o o o o o o o x 

**Renfrew x o x x x x x x 

St. Thomas x x x x x x x x 

Smith's Falls o o o x x x x x 

Strathroy o o o x x x x x 

High Schools — 

Amherstburg o o o x x x x x 

Arthur x x x x x x x o 

Athens x x x o o x x o 

*Beamsville x x x x x x x x 

Belleville x x x x x x x x 

Bowman ville x x x x x x x x 

Bracebridge o o o o o x x x 

Burlington o o o x x x x x 

Chesterville ,. o o o x x x x o 

Cornwall oo oo oo ox 

Dundas o o o o o o o x 

Essex x x x x x x x x 

Flesherton o o o x x o o x 

Haileybury x x x x x x x x 

Kincardine x x x x x x x x 

Leamington x x x x x x x x 

Madoc o o o o o o o x 

Midland o o o o o o o x 

Mitchell xo oo ox xx 

Nepean oo oo oo ox 

New Liskeard x x x x x x x x 

Niagara Falls South x x x x x x x x 

Oakville x x x x x x x x 

Port Hope x x x x x o o o 

*Port Perry x x x x x x x x 

Scarborough o x x x x x x x 

Simcoe oo oo oo ox 

Smithville oo oo oo ox 

Wardsville o o o x x x x o 

Waterdown o o o o o o o x 

Watford o o o o o x x x 

*Whitby x x x x x x x x 

Winchester x x x o o x x x 

Continuation Schools — 

*Drayton x x xx x x x x 

Fenelon Falls o o o o o x x x 

Lyndhurst o o o o o o o x 

Mindemoya o o o o o o o x 

Mount Brydges o o o x x x x x 

New Hamburg x x x x x x x o 

Palmerston o o o o o x x o 

Ridgeway x x x x x x x x 

Thamesford o x x x x x x x 

Wheatley o o o o o o o x 

Public and Separate Schools with Form V — 

Ancaster No. 5 x x o o o o o o 

Forester's Falls (6 Ross) o x x x x o o o 

Linwood R.C.S.S. No. 4 Wellesley. . oo oo oo ox 

Manor Park S.S. No. 22 Westminster oo ox xx'xo 

New Toronto Fifth Street School oo oo oo ox 

St. Anne's R.C.S.S., Kitchener oo oo oo ox 

Swansea x o o x x x x x 

*These Schools maintain Departments of Agriculture. 
**This School maintains a class under the Vocational Education Act. 



32 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

The following table gives the number of High Schools qualifying for grants 
since 1915: 

No. With W^hout No. With Without 

Schools Plots Plots Schools Plots Plots 

1915 1921 

Jan. -June 11 .. 11 Jan.-June 21 17 4 

Sept.-Dec 15 .. 15 Sept.-Dec 28 17 11 

1916 10T> 
Jan.-June 15 1 14 1922 

Sept.-Dec 20 1 19 Jan.-June 29 27 2 

1917 Sept.-Dec 30 27 3 

Jan.-June..... 20 7 13 1Q9 ^ 

Sept.-Dec 21 7 14 iy ^ 

1913 Jan.-June 26 22 4 

Jan.-June 21 ' 16 5 Sept.-Dec 33 24 9 

Sept.-Dec 26 18 8 1924 

T 1919 Tan.-June 37 26 11 

leprfoec::::: lo 23 \ S ^- R - * « > 2 

1920 1925 

Jan.-June 32 29 3 Jan.-June 44 30 14 

Sept.-Dec 25 24 1 Sept.-Dec 50 31 19 

Courses are provided at the Ontario Agricultural College covering two 
summers of five weeks each. These courses were introduced in 1913, and the 
following list gives the number of teachers who have so far qualified each year 
for an Intermediate Certificate in Agriculture: 

1914,12; 1915,10; 1916,15; 1917,15; 1918,9; 1919,21; 1920,25; 1921,24; 
1922, 33; 1923, 20; 1924, 15; 1925, 12. 

Below are the names of those teachers who qualified in 1925: 

Baird, Mary M. Flower, John. McGuire, A. W. 

Cameron, Murray. Godfrey, Helene G. Melady, Thos. E. 

Crossley, Edward L. Goldring, Cecil C. Muir, George. 

Deeley, Chas. F. Harvey, Winifred. Stenhouse, Rebecca. 

University Standing Summary, including Farm Mechanics and Specialists, 
with Degrees: 

McGill 2 Western 4 

Queen's 97 Victoria 3 

Toronto 47 

McMaster 18 171 

Without Degrees 118 

Normal Schools 

Teachers-in-training for First and Second Class certificates receive instruc- 
tion in Agriculture at the Normal Schools but, because of the fact that very 
few who enter the Normal Schools have had any training in Agriculture in the 
High Schools, the work is necessarily of a very elementary character. The 
accommodation in the Normal Schools for such work is very limited, and the 
Normal School teachers though working under this handicap are rendering very 
efficient services. 

Summer Courses 

The table given below shows the number of teachers in attendance at the 
summer sessions since 1911. Up to and including 1922, the expenses of those 
attending the Summer Sessions were paid by grants from the Government. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



33 



The following table shows the attendance at the Summer Sessions in Agri- 
culture since 1911 : 



Attendance at the Ontario Agricultural College Summer Courses in Agriculture 





Elementary 


Intermediate 


Inspectors 


Farm 
Me- 
chanics 




Year 


1 


II 


I 


II 


III 

Men 


Parts 
I and II 






Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Men 


Women 


Total 


1911 


8 
16 
14 

8 
15 
11 
15 

6 

16 
28 
62 
54 
12 

6 

9 


75 

65 

64 

55 

39 

99 

138 

187 

155 

125 

167 

175 

54 

37 

61 


1 

2 
5 
5 
5 
9 
7 
7 
6 

10 
36 
27 
20 
11 
8 


16 

23 

36 

27 

18 

31 

81 

119 

160 

135 

86 

151 

109 

40 

33 
















100 


1912 
















106 


1913 


23 

13 

17 

15 

9 

20 

9 

7 

24 

15 

9 

8 

24 


4 

4 

1 

3 

1 

11 

19 

25 

15 

12 

3 

4 

14 












146 


1914 


14 

9 

14 

13 

9 

7 

19 

16 

18 

9 

9 

6 










126 


1915 


1 
1 
2 

"n' 








105 


1916 








183 


1917 






10 

9 

10 

10 

7 


276 


1918 

1919 

1920 


9 


79 

86 

8 


456 
489 

374 


1921 


8 
15 
7 
5 
4 


7 
.... 

"5' 


428 


1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 


4 
4 

1 
3 


471 
228 
121 
167 



A considerable number of those who enter Part I of the Course leading to 
an Elementary certificate, for some reason or other, do not complete the course 
by taking Part II. The following figures show the percentage of shrinkage and 
concern the classes at Guelph only: 

Number completing 
Number taking Part I Part II Elementary 



Year 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 



Elementary 

83 

81 

76 

63 

54 
100 
158 
193 
171 
153 
229 
229 

66 

43 



Year 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 



the following year 
24 



41 

32 

23 

40 

88 

126 

166 

145 

122 

178 

129 

51 

41 



Decrease 
per cent. 

71 

50 

58 

63 

26 

12 

20 

14 

15 

20 

22 

44 

23 
5 



Attendance at the Whitby Ladies' College Summer Courses in Agriculture 



Year 
1919. 
1920. 
1921. 
1922. 
1923. 
1924. 



Part I 
Elementary 
70 
69 
80 
40 
8 



Part II 
Elementary 

46 
50 
78 
40 
Discontinued 



Totil 

70 

115 

130 

118 

48 



Attendance at the Northern Academy, Monteith, Summer Courses in Agriculture 



Part I 

Year Elementary 

1920 23 

1921 17 

1922 15 

1923 4 

1924 



Part IT 
Elementary 



Discontinued 



Total 
23 
25 
33 
11 



34 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

Attendance at Kemptville Agricultural School, Summer Courses in Agriculture 

Part I Part II 

Year Elementary Elementary Total 

1922 64 .. 64 

1923 27 27 

1924! 19 19 38 

1925 14 18 32 



J. B. Danpeno, 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Classes 



Toronto, December, 1925. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 35 



APPENDIX H 

REPORT OF THE 
INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Following is a report of the Public Libraries Branch for the year 1925, and 
the statistics, etc., of the public libraries of the Province for 1924; also a state- 
ment of the grants paid in 1925 to public libraries. 

Summary of Work of 1925 

1. Twenty new public libraries were established in the year 1925, bringing 
the total number to 496. 

2. The circulation of books from public libraries increased 608,831, the 
total circulation in the Province was 9,236,141, having doubled in ten years. 

3. While Ontario has a very large number of public libraries there are still 
a million people in the Province who are not within the reach of public library 
service. 

4. The Department's travelling libraries gave a service which marked a 
13 per cent, increase over 1924. 

5. The expenditure for books by public libraries has trebled in seven years. 
It now totals $186,755.95. 

6. Nine new library buildings were opened in 1925 — Kingston, Agincourt, 
Stevensville, Porcupine-Dome and Thornbury — with new branches in Hamilton, 
Ottawa, and two in London. 

7. The Ontario Library School trained 33 students for the library field. 

8. The Ontario Library Review vvas published February, May, August and 
November. A large number of educational institutions applied to be placed on 
the mailing list, including the high and continuation schools. 

9. The Public Libraries Act was amended by making provision for public 
library boards to pay a retiring allowance to any employee retiring by reason 
of advanced age, ill-health or other disability, and for boards in cities of more 
than fifty thousand to establish a fund for providing pensions for life insurance 
in the interest of the employees. 

10. The Inspector of Public Libraries continues to serve on the Commission 
on the Library and Adult Education. The final report will probably be issced 
late in the year 1926. 

11. Several public libraries are devoting special attention to boys and girls 
of high school age. 

12. The Department made an important ruling concerning pay duplicate 
or rental collections which were rr aintained in a few of our public libraries, 
with the result that the maintaining of such services has been declared contrary 
to Section 42 of the Public Libraries Act. 

The Function of the Modern Public Library 

The foundation upon which Ontario public libraries rest is the public's 
respect for intelligence and their faith in the power of thought. The mainten- 
ance of libraries has never been made compulsory by law; each communay has 
been free to decide for itself as to whether it will have a library or no library. 
The fact that 496 libraries are being maintained in Ontario through the tree will 



36 THE REPORT OF THE \u. 11 

of the people is surely substantial evidence that there is a wide-spread and 
deep-rooted faith in the power of thought throughout our Province. 

On casting a vote in favour of a public library, it is possible that the average 
elector had merely a general idea that a public library would be a "good thing" - 
for the town; it is possible that he saw in it a way of obtaining, by co-operative 
means, large book privileges that he could not hope to secure in a private way. 
Whatever his outlook might have been, he had faith in the power of thought, 
and in a library as a means of encouraging thought and healthful recreative 
reading, although he did not even dimly picture the possibilities of what we 
now term a modern public library with its variety and range of public services. 

Acting as servants of the people, librarians and boards established and 
maintained institutions as well as could be expected of pioneer workers during 
the early years of the free public library, when experience gave no hint as to 
the educational possibilities of such an institution nor of the extent to which 
library patronage could be induced. During the first several years the services 
were increased and elaborated by degrees, public response growing at a corres- 
ponding rate. Larger and more elaborate service and a corresponding patronage 
from the people have continued up until the present time. The use of public 
libraries in Ontario has grown more than 500 per cent, in the last twenty-five 
years and the people have increased their financial support by more than 600 
per cent, during the quarter century. This same period has seen the develop- 
ment of modern library science which has multiplied the value of libraries. 
It has seen the introduction and development of work with children, an elabora- 
tion of reference and research work, the professional training of librarians and 
assistants and the beginning of an adult educational movement through the 
agency of the public library. The idea of the function of a public library to-day 
differs widely from that of a comparatively few years ago. 

The function of the modern public library is to promote education through 
the agency of the printed page. The public library is universal in its appeal .. 
It is the most democratic of all public institutions, as it is open the year 'round 
to all persons, regardless of age, religion, racial origin, sex, educational standing, 
political party — it is all things to all men. Apart from its educational influence, 
the public library might well be valued if only on the ground that it is the one 
institution around which all may unite. 

The library promotes the advancement of reading and study through a 
service ever increasing in effectiveness, and employs every legitimate means for 
stimulating and encouraging the use of books in every realm of thought and 
knowledge. It begins with the children by offering through a well organized 
young people's department, the services of an especially trained children's 
assistant capable of giving the kind of direction needed in selecting from the 
best books written for the instruction and inspiration of youth. Strange as it 
may seem, boys and girls w^ere looked upon as intruders in the libraries of only 
twenty years ago. The development of this type of work is therefore very 
recent. Through the well-directed efforts of well educated, professionally trained 
assistants the story-hour is used for the youngest children, and the most recent 
development is the special provision made for the needs of boys and girls of 
high school age. 

A well selected, well balanced collection of books for the masses of the 
people offers opportunities for serious reading in a wide range of subjects. 
Opportunities are offered for all wishing to indulge in recreational reading 
through the literature of emotion and imagination. The modern library offers 
opportunities for those who wish to increase their earning power through works 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 37 

pertaining to their vocational interests. The consultation of books is encouraged 
through the reference department. 

For these several types of service the modern library provides trained 
librarians and assistants through whose efforts materials are acquired, and books 
and other printed matter organized, making the contents of the entire library 
easily available. Its field is not limited to rendering direct service to the public, 
opportunities are eagerly sought for co-operation with schools and other institu- 
tions interested in education, and also with other libraries. Notwithstanding 
the notable development of librarianship through professional schools, the 
scientific organization of library material, and advice and assistance to patrons, 
the feature that most strongly marks the difference between the old and the 
new is that the library of to-day is an active force. It is eager to promote its 
use, it attempts to bring all the people possible under its influence. 

The latest function of the modern library is that of developing systematic 
adult education by means and methods not commonly employed in the less 
formal readers' advisory and reference work. Quite recently leaders in the 
public library field have investigated and seen a new opportunity for serving 
the people through their own institution by promoting interest in systematic 
courses of study and in providing library assistance to other institutions engaged 
in adult education. 

Present Library Conditions in Ontario 

How do the public libraries of Ontario measure up with the highest 
standards? In order to describe the quality and variety of the work of the 
public libraries of Ontario it is necessary to consider them in classes: larger 
cities, smaller cities, large tow r ns, small towns, villages and rural districts. The 
larger the community, the greater are the opportunities for carrying out the 
functions of a modern public library as outlined above. The small libraries, 
especially those that cannot employ a full-time librarian, cannot offer an elaborate 
service, although opportunities through inter-library loans and Departmental 
advice can place them in a position to do more than is generally supposed. 
The smallest rural library can serve its community's regular needs and it should 
be in a position and should be eager to serve as an agency through which rural 
people may obtain special service through libraries with larger resources. 

Larger Cities 

The larger city libraries on the wmole are doing good work. A composite 
of the best features would undoubtedly serve as an excellent example of an 
institution and organization capable of performing, in the best way, all the func- 
tions of a modern public library. 

It is probable that I could name one of this class that would with very slight 
reservation measure up to the standards cited. Possibly I could mention more 
than one that w r ith present organization plus their programmes for the immediate 
future Will be carrying out the several functions of a modern public library. 
I do not wish to name an individual library or even suggest which of the larger 
libraries stands first in its class or w r hich stands last. One of these at least stands 
very high and one of them has much to do through organization and effort to 
arrive at a high level of merit. There has been an improvement among our 
larger libraries that encourages us, especially when we consider their present 
work against a background of ten years ago. In quantity, the service has more 
than doubled. In organization of material and quality of service there has been 
a marked improvement that could be stated in large figures if percentages of 



38 THE REPORT OF THE No 11 

improvement could be measured. These libraries have got closer to their possible 
patrons by the opening of nearly twenty branch or community libraries to 
supplement the work of the main libraries and that of the branches in existence 
in 1915. Expenditure for books has more than doubled in this period. These 
large libraries now employ 175 persons on their staffs. Of this number 125 
showed educational qualifications sufficient for entrance to the Ontario Library 
School and were trained in the Department's school. Ten years ago, the staffs 
were smaller, and less than ten per cent, had professional qualifications or the 
equivalent of such standing. 

Huge increases in support through taxation, large and ever increasing 
patronage and better qualified librarians have all contributed toward bringing 
the larger libraries nearer their possibilities. In all that has been done and is 
being accomplished now, the successes outweigh and almost overshadow the 
unfortunate conditions which obtain. This would be a matter of great satisfac- 
tion if too many of the shortcomings were not to be found in one place, and 
the importance of the application of one or two major principles not fully realized 
in possibly two or even three of these four or five larger libraries. While in 
quality and quantity we can say that the work done by these libraries is very 
good, a change of policy seems to be necessary in spots in more than one of the 
larger centres. The larger cities are not wanting for opportunities, they are 
working under the best public library legislation in the world. They are sure of 
financial support that will pay for good service of fair volume and can obtain 
even larger support by making a favourable impression on their respective 
municipal councils; a good library school has been provided for the training of 
librarians and assistants, and there are no regulations that state standards of 
service, every library being free to develop its own ideas. It is possible that a 
strong influence should be brought to bear to render it impossible for a large 
library or even a small one to make major mistakes in judgment in the matter 
of employing librarians and assistants. Good librarianship is the key to the whole 
situation. Qualified librarians mean good book-selection, good organization of 
material and intelligent distribution and advisory work. 

These four or five cities have at least twenty-five modern library buildings. 
We can take a visitor to more than one and more than two extensive systems and 
show excellent examples of wise book-selection. We can take him to one at least 
where the selection has not been reasonably good. We can take him to one at 
least where the expenditure on books is entirely inadequate, resulting in curtailed 
service and ill-proportioned selection. 

Scientific organization of material may be seen in its best form in at least 
one of our largest systems; it is good in two, and one library of this type is below 
a reasonable standard, but is now facing in the right direction. Neglect and 
indifferent work in this line invariably shift from incompetents to their successors, 
many years of hard work. The work of an incompetent library staff is most 
noticeable in organization of material, where the records stand as evidence of 
inefficiency. 

The patronage of these libraries is fairly large. It is quite large in two or three 
and just within sight of a reasonably high figure in the other two or three. 

These larger libraries begin with the boys and girls. W^ork with young people 
has been of recent development. I am pleased to say that it is to the credit of 
the larger libraries that all are giving good service in this branch of the work. 
No finer expression of modern library service to young people can be found on 
this continent than in one, and possibly more than one, of Ontario's larger 
libraries. It is a matter of satisfaction to know that a commission outside our 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 39 

Province has planned to visit a children's department in one of our large libraries 
in order to observe and learn from the excellence of the work that is being accom- 
plished. The libraries in the larger cities have all demanded special qualifications 
on the part of the children's librarians. Librarians and assistants who wish to 
qualify as specialists in this work are required to have training in general librar- 
ianship, and in addition they must have a good background of literary knowledge 
in general, and special knowledge of children's books. In book selection, it 
would be safe to say that children's librarians gain a much more intimate knowl- 
edge of their books than is possible in adult departments where the range of 
interests is much wider. The children's librarians in this type of library must 
study the art of story- telling in order to conduct the story-hours that form part 
of tie work of every mcdern children's department. They give a very personal 
service to the boys and girls, attempting in all cases to advise the young people 
as to the most suitable books for their purpose, and to develop in them a taste 
for the best in literature. The children's departments are undoubtedly doing a 
great w r ork toward developing a good Canadian citizenship. 

Reference work has always received considerable emphasis in our larger 
centres in proportion to the whole work done. It is doubtful if we could find on 
this continent libraries of equal size that lay even as much stress on reference 
work as cur larger cities are doing. We have but one large library that seems 
weak in this type of service, but, happily, means for strengthening the department 
are being carefully considered by the local board. These libraries have large 
collections of 1 ooks for consultation, generous selections of bound volumes of 
periodicals, the contents of which are made available through standard indexes. 
They organize and make available all kinds of government publications, pam- 
phlets, newspaper material, maps and pictures. With this well selected, well 
organized and well irdexed material, the trained reference librarians are in a 
position to offer assistance to all enquirers, including students, mechanics, 
professional men, business men, newspaper men, teachers, etc. These depart- 
ments enjoy a large patronage in all our larger cities. This phase of the work 
seems to present no difficult problems from the point of view of the Department. 
Wherever the work is not excellent, steps are being taken to make it so. 

Circulating work is the largest and most patronized elepartment in our 
libraries. It is where adults who want books for home reading are served. The 
patronage of these departments has grown tremendously in the last few years 
and we have plenty of evidence to show that the people are reading better books 
from year to year. It is safe to say that the larger cities on the whole are doing 
fairly good work along this line. While not depreciating much of the good work 
that is being done, a friendly critic must admit that these departments are falling 
far short of their possibilities. They need well selected books and they are being 
fairly well provided. The people are receiving courteous attention and, in odd 
cases, a certain amount of readers' advisory work is done. Unfortunately 
routine work receives too much of the attention of persons engaged in this 
department. The libraries and the Department should direct more attention 
toward encouraging readers' advisory work and larger services in the field of 
adult education. The libraries should so organize these services that one library's 
work can be made of benefit to the whole field. There are numerous opportunities 
for co-operation, each large library doing a work of its own, co-operating with 
other libraries and obtaining assistance from one central organization. Advice 
of specialists should also be used for the benefit of the people. The possibilities 
of the work are very great and a careful study of the matter should engage the 
attention of librarians and educators. 



40 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 11 

What must the large city libraries do before they can all carry out the 
functions of a modern public library? It has already been stated that we can 
find amongst these institutions examples of work that almost measure up to the 
highest standards. There is much to be desired in others. There are some people 
connected with libraries in the larger cities who need to do a lot of hard thinking 
in order to form clear ideas in regard to the functions of a modern public library. 
They need to learn what they have often been told, that to gain certain results 
they must pay the price. They must comply with certain necessary conditions 
to rise to a given standard. A proper budget is needed to make the work possible. 
Strange as it may seem,- many intelligent men do not seem to realize this obvious 
fact. Some of these same trustees need to learn that a library cannot do first 
class work without a first class staff. They have gone part way toward employing 
trained help but some of them have not gone far enough. Careful study of 
budgets and more careful consideration in making appointments would cure the 
backward tendencies in this small group of Ontario's large public libraries. 

Smaller Cities 

The smaller cities are about twenty in number. The service has increased 
considerably more than 100 per cent, in ten years. In 1916, they employed 57 
persons, six of whom were trained. Their workers now total 87, thirty-nine of 
them holding professional certificates. The new Public Libraries Act placed 
these libraries as well as all others in a position to conduct their affairs on an 
adequate scale. All in this class have enjoyed large increases in patronage. 
Twelve of them have made remarkable advances in quality of work. It is a matter 
of satisfaction to observe that 39 of the 87 persons employed in these libraries 
have been trained. The proportion is still too small and the distribution of the 
qualified assistants is not in every way satisfactory. We have three or four 
amongst them with staffs entirely composed of persons with professional training, 
and in other cases the proportion is in the ratio of one trained to four untrained. 
The influence of the Ontario Library School is now being felt in each of the twenty 
libraries of this class. 

Increased opportunities and better library assistants have brought the smaller 
cities to a much higher level than they occupied a few years ago. Eight out of 
the twenty have first class standing and are doing first class work or are on the 
road toward fulfilling the requirements of a modern public library. The remaining 
twelve might be classed as "good" or "fairly good." They have increased their 
service and they have strengthened their library staffs. Not more than three or 
four out of the twelve are likely to advance to a first class position under their 
present organization. While their standards of librarianship are higher than 
they were, they are not high enough. Some of them employ librarians who are 
simply fairly good, with no promise of improvement. Unfortunately the average 
library board is unable to distinguish between a first class librarian and one who 
is merely fairly good. I am pleased to state that not one of the smaller city 
libraries shows a class below that of fairly good. The best amongst our smaller 
city libraries, eight in number, have good buildings and furnishings. The 
majority of the eight have large and well selected book collections or are working 
intelligently toward that end. These libraries begin with the children, each one 
employing a specialist for this department. Good work is being done. Several 
of those classed as fairly good are doing rather good work in this department. 

Organization of material is seen in good form in about eight of the twenty 
smaller city libraries. Twelve of the twenty are defective in this phase of the 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 41 

work. The classification system is modern but it has not been accurately 
applied, and the catalogues, while useful in many ways, do not measure up to a 
reasonable standard. We would be in a happy position if hints for improvement 
would tend to solve the problem, but unfortunately the difficulty cannot be met 
in that way. Library technique is difficult to learn and it takes a comparatively 
lorg course of training to instruct persons to do efficient work in this department 
of librarianship. Fairly good librarians may do fairly good work in this line but 
the only way these libraries can become first class in organization of material 
is to employ first class librarians to do the work. 

The smaller city libraries direct considerable attention to reference service, 
although not more than half of them stress this class of work as it deserves. The 
eight included in first class, w T ith the addition of three or four of those mentioned 
as fairly good, are giving good reference service. All the small cities cannot be 
brought to a good standing in reference work, as they do not all employ librarians 
or assistants with sufficient ability to carry out the necessary requirements in 
organization. It is doubtful if many more than half of them can offer the right 
kind of personal service to enquirers. 

The circulating department represents the largest part of the work of 
these as it does of all other public libraries. Probably half the smaller city 
libraries are facing in the right direction in this work. Those of the other half 
are doing the best they can. Half of the better class are in a position to perform 
a good type of readers' advisory work and will undoubtedly play an important 
part in adult education through the library. The half that is considered as 
merely fairly gocd are giving and will probably continue to give courteous and 
obliging service to patrons, but there will be a marked difference between the 
influence of these libraries and those we have described as first class. 

Marked advance has been made amongst these libraries and, while many 
shortcomings cause us more or less concern, we have every reason to be gratified 
with the general condition. It is doubtful if persuasive means can bring about 
higher standing in the lower half of this group. It is the standard of librarianship 
that needs improving; and departmental regulations seem to be the surest means 
of attaining more desirable conditions. 

Larger Towns 

We are still within the field where qualified librarians can be employed ; and 
therefore referring to libraries that can carry out the functions of modern public 
libraries, although organization can be in no way elaborate, one person must 
serve in tw T o or more departments of the w r ork. By large towns I refer to these 
with a population of 5,000 or over. W 7 e have 24 such towns. In attempting 
to place a value on the quality of work accomplished by these libraries, one is 
impressed with the tremendous difference between the best and the least worthy. 

We have one town of 7,000 or 8,000 where building, furnishings, book selection, 
organization of material, general education and professional training of staff, 
and personal service to the public, all entitle it to a place in the front rank of 
Ontario libraries. The larger amongst this class employ two or three persons 
and the smaller only one librarian. Thirty-one persons are employed in these 
libraries, eight of whom have been trained, and twenty-three have no professional 
qualifications. The eight trained persons are employed in five libraries, three 
of them being in one towm. 

The statistics of this class also show very large increases in patronage and 
there has been a notable improvement in the quality of work. The Public 
Libraries Branch carries on a more or less aggressive campaign with the cities 



42 THE REPORT OF THK No. 11 

and large towns in encouraging first class librarianship, first, because they are in 
a position to make use of a library school, secondly, because the smaller towns 
are likely to be influenced by their larger neighbours. 

Including the one excellent library referred to above, there are six in this 
group that are entitled to first rank if we allow credit for recent progress and 
promise shown. Eleven are fairly good; and I regret to report that seven are 
comparatively poor. The six in the first rank present no problem. The eleven 
that are stated as being fairly good are giving a fairly large service, but there is 
little hope of gaining ground in quality of work except where changes are made 
in the librarians in charge. The seven that are doing comparatively poor work 
need a change of librarian and a change of outlook on the part of the hoards; 
their service is too scant and they should establish themselves on a larger and 
more satisfactory basis. 

Their opportunities for selecting books are more favourable than in the 
larger centres because they can know their clientele, and fit the selections to 
the patrons' needs in a way that is not always possible in a large city. As they 
are in a position to employ a trained librarian they should (at least six of them do), 
organize their books and other printed material in the best scientific manner. 
They are in a position to induce a larger per capita patronage than is possible in 
a larger centre. The patrons are within easy reach of the library and the library 
has very few competing attractions. 

Larger town libraries should give a high type of privileges to their people. 
The scope of the libraries is necessarily more limited than that of the cities, 
but apart from special cases, they can meet the needs of their communities. 
They can do excellent work with the children, they can offer reference service, 
not of an elaborate kind, but they can get close to their patrons and assist in 
an individual and personal way that is not always possible in the largest centres. 

The circulating departments in six cases are in a position to do readers' 
advisory work of a high order and will probably develop this service into a 
more elaborate form of adult education. The remaining eighteen require librar- 
ianship of a better type before they can do work worthy of their possibilities. 
The success of the best libraries of this group is due very largely to the persuasion 
and influence of the Public Libraries Branch. It is doubtful if the remaining 
three-quarters of this class will reach a high standard, if nothing more than 
persuasion is used. The eighteen libraries that are more or less below the line 
have profited more or less by advice from the Public Libraries Branch and for 
that reason are doing slightly better work and much more of it than they did a 
few years ago. Better librarians would solve at least 90 per cent, of the problem 
of bringing these institutions to a high level. 

Small Towns 

For convenience we have considered the small town as that with a population 
ranging from 2,000 to 5,000. There are 67 public libraries in places of this 
class. Nine of the boards employ librarians that have received a certain amount 
of formal training in librarianship. Two of these have had the benefit of the 
Ontario Library School as it is at present constituted. There is sufficient 
evidence at hand to show that any library in this class is in a position to employ 
a librarian with at least an elementary training. Nine librarians with training 
in a list of 67 is a very small proportion. In several cases, no doubt, boards 
have felt that the present course as given in the Ontario Library School covers 
a longer pericd and would cost the student from the small town more than the 
situation seems to justify. For some time I have thought that the Department 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 43 

should have a briefer elementary course for the benefit of libraries of this type 
and for teachers wishing to serve as teacher-librarians. The time has arrived 
when such a school should be organized. 

These libraries like those in the larger centres have been giving a larger and 
better service than they were ten or more years ago. Fifteen of the 67 are very 
good, six of this number being entitled to be called excellent; 31 are fairly good 
and 21 are hardly entitled to be called fair. A few of the libraries described as 
fairly good employ librarians who would profit by a junior course, and a brief 
course would quickly solve their problems. The remainder, possibly the majority, 
will never do more than fairly good work either with or without training. A com- 
plete change of librarians would be needed in the 21 of the lowest class. 

Library boards have always been free to select their librarians regardless of 
qualifications, and like many other public bodies, the boards do not feel disposed 
to make dismissals to provide room for qualified people. The process of bringing 
the great majority of this group up to the standard of some of the best will be 
slow, but it is easily within the range of possibility. Some attention has been 
directed to this end already by the Public Libraries Branch and more work will 
be done when a junior system of training can be offered. The best libraries in 
this class have small but well selected book collections. They apply modern 
library science in a simple form and they give good personal service in reference 
work, children's work, and circulating work. On the whole the 67 libraries 
in the small towns have a large patronage and with scarcely an exception, 
courteous assistance is offered to patrons. Practically all of the libraries maintain 
reading rooms which are supplied with well selected magazines and newspapers. 

People in towns of this size need some kind of book service from a central 
institution to fill special needs. 

Village and Rural Libraries 

Included in this class are towns with less than 2,000 inhabitants, villages 
and rural districts. We have about 325 libraries in these smaller communities. 
In proportion to population no country, state or province in the world excels 
Ontario in number of small public libraries. Scarcely a month passes without 
a new name being added to the list of village and rural libraries. In many ways 
difficulties arise amongst the smaller libraries. Certain services are possible in 
the small and large towns that cannot be given in these smaller communities. 

We are now dealing with a large group of libraries that cannot afford to 
employ a full-time librarian. The list includes places with a few hundred popu- 
lation employing a librarian three evenings a week, and possibly two afternoons, 
with the majority giving service of two or three hours, two or three times a week. 
The incomes are very small and the services quite limited. These little libraries 
are growing in use as well as in number. One cannot expect fine scientific organi- 
zation of material nor expert advisory work. Village and rural libraries can pur- 
chase well selected books and encourage their use. This is as far as the small 
unit can go. This type of library must also fight for its life. Its income is small 
and in many cases uncertain and the success of it depends not on qualified 
librarianship but on the interest and enthusiasm of a few local public-spirited 
people. 

The developing of village and rural library service is one of our most import- 
ant library problems. Experience has always proved that there is a greater per 
capita demand for library service in the small centres than in the cities. It is 



44 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

highly desirable to have better libraries in the small centres and a greater distribu- 
tion of them. A million of our people are not within reach of a library and prac- 
tically all of them live in villages and rural districts. We believe that library 
service should be available for every man, woman and child in the Province. 
It is not possible to state just when Ontario should adopt a comprehensive 
programme with the idea of reaching all the people of Ontario. The Public 
Libraries Act provides the necessary opportunities for communities wishing to 
take the initiative, but those who have given considerable thought to the librarv 
problem seem to be of the opinion that there should be more aggressive work 
along this line. 

Taking the situation as it exists, there are two noticeable weaknesses in 
our village and rural library system: (1) there is no centralized service offered 
for special students in the small centres, and (2) the administrative unit seems to 
be too small to bring about the best results. Centralized library service for 
filling special needs can be solved without much difficulty and at very little 
expense through existing libraries. Enlarging the administrative unit for small 
libraries presents a very difficult problem. The ideal system would be a county 
library plan for the administration of the small libraries of the county from a 
chosen centre. This system is being developed to a certain extent in Great 
Britain and in the United States. Ontario counties have not been accustomed 
to deal as counties with such problems and it will probably be several years 
before a countv library system can be made popular. It is doubtful if the Depart- 
ment should urge counties to establish large administrative units before there 
is evidence of fairly wide spread interest on the part of countv, village and rural 
leaders. In the meantime the best we can do is to encourage these small libraries 
to select the best books and to bring as many people as possible under their 
helpful influence. 

The school serving also as a library might engage the attention of the 
Minister. While it certainly is not the ideal method of providing free library 
service for all the people in rural districts it may prove to be the only practical 
method of gaining that desired end. 

The Department of Education and the Public Libraries 

It would be interesting to discover how much credit is due to the Department 
for the successes of our public libraries, and to what extent responsibilities can be 
laid at its door for the shortcomings and failures. In my opinion the Department 
is entitled to considerable credit for the improvement in quality and increase in 
quantity of library service; where there has been more or less lack of progress, 
there has been failure to make use of opportunities provided by the Department. 
It is possible that greater success and less failure might have resulted from more 
aggressive work with the libraries and from regulations demanding a high type 
of librarianship. 

Good legislation is the most important requirement for a public library sys- 
tem. Ontario has it. The Public Libraries Act contains all the necessary 
features of a first class library law. Its rate clause is unique, being the only one 
in the world based on population; this feature has been favourably commented 
upon by library authorities throughout the English-speaking world. The clause 
guarantees to a board an assured income that will pay for a fair volume of service 
of good quality; it is fair to both the libraries and ratepayers. Special provision 
is made for large and elaborate service, whereby the municipal council may 
increase the librarv's rate above the demandable maximum. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 45 

"Nine-tenths of the success of a public library depends upon the librarian," 
so it has been said. The success of our better libraries has been largely due to 
improved librarianship. The training school is maintained and directed by the 
Department. The expenditure of money and effort in this line produces more 
telling results than are realized from any other outlay of money or labour in the 
interest of libraries. Public libraries are encouraged to make use of our training 
classes. 

Cash grants to libraries have contributed a great deal to success amongst 
the smaller libraries. The Ontario grant policy has had much to do with the 
establishment of the majority of the very large number of village and rural 
libraries that operate in the Province. The maximum grant that can be earned 
by a single library looks small, forming as it does an insignificant part of a city 
library's income. But grants form a nice supplement to the local incomes of 
the majority of our libraries. While occasional criticism may be made of the 
size of our grants, they remain the largest government grants in the library world. 
The grants, while not large, are large enough. If more money were easily 
obtainable for public library purposes, it could be expended with much better 
effect for improved Departmental services than for larger cash grants to libraries. 

Book-selection advice is given regularly to every trustee, librarian and assist- 
ant in the Province through the book-selection section of the Ontario Library 
Review. The work of selection and description for our quarterly serves a large 
number of smaller libraries that are not in a position to give systematic attention 
to book-selection. 

Advice on library management and on innumerable problems that confront 
librarians and boards is freely given by the Public Libraries Branch. When time 
permits visits to libraries are made. This kind of service presents many difficul- 
ties. The average library asking advice on a major problem, is not capable of 
using it when it is given. It is not uncommon to be asked for an hour's instruction 
(the applicants believing it to be ample) for the solution of a problem requiring 
skill and knowledge that can only be gained through several months of training. 
We frequently meet with a board employing a third-rate librarian wanting a 
brief conference in the interest of library improvement that can only be accom- 
plished by a first class librarian. 

Very little time and money are expended in giving help that will not produce 
good results. We have found that the most profitable policy is to give advice by 
letter, where practicable, and to visit and give ample advice and help where con- 
ditions show promise of new and better efforts on the part of the library, and in 
cases where qualified people wish a conference on the solution of special problems. 
Intensive work with boards that are willing to take a forward march is much 
more valuable than visits to people who cannot or will not profit by advice. 

Ontario public library boards are free to develop their libraries as they see 
fit. They may give service of a high type or refrain from doing so — it is all in 
their own hands. This freedom to give good service or otherwise is probably 
responsible for many libraries being below the line in quality. Inferior librarian- 
ship seems to be the chief cause for indifferent library service and organization 
and, while persuasion may accomplish results here and there, it is doubtful if all 
of our libraries will reach a reasonably high standard within a reasonable time 
unless regulations governing the qualifications of librarians are put into force. 

The Public Libraries Branch keeps in continuous touch with library progress 
both at home and abroad and attempts to serve as a clearing-house of library 



46 THE REPORT OF THE No 11 

ideas. It is hoped that regulations that will ensure better librarianship where 
it does not exist at present, and facilities for encouraging better educational 
service through the libraries may be forthcoming before long. The Branch 
will do all within its power to develop the present library system, which is 
already admirable in many ways, to a level worthy of our people. 

Statistics 

I present on pages 247-255 a statement of the statistics of the Public 
Libraries of the Province. 

W. O. Carson, 

Inspector of Public Libraries. 

Toronto, March 15th, 1926. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 47 



APPENDIX I 

REPORT OF THE 
INSPECTOR OF AUXILIARY CLASSES 

Auxiliary Classes are for children who are "capable of mental development 
beyond that of a child of normal mentality of eight years of age, but who are 
from any physical or mental cause unable to take proper advantage of the 
ordinary Public or Separate school courses." 

The types, number and location of Ontario Auxiliary Classes for handi- 
capped children conforming to Departmental regulations are as follows: 
Sight-saving — Hamilton, 1; London, 1; Toronto, 3. 

Orthopedic — London, 1 hospital teacher; Toronto, 3 hospital teachers, 5 visit- 
ing teachers. 
Open Air and Forest Schools — Toronto Separate Schools, 2; Toronto Public 

Schools, 3, and 1 forest school. 
Preventorium — Hamilton, 1; London, 1; Toronto, 2. 
Lip-reading — Toronto, 1 ; and 1 visiting teacher. 
Institutional — Toronto, 3. 
Parental School— Toronto, 1. 

Training — Belleville, 1; Brantford, 1; Brockville, 1; Chatham, 1; Gait, 1; 
Guelph, 2; Hamilton, 8; Kitchener, 2; Lean ington, 1; London, 5; Mid- 
land, 1; Ottawa, 3; Oshawa, 1; Owen Sound, 1; Peterborough, 1; St. 
Catharines, 2; Stratford, 1; Toronto, 47; Windsor, 5; Walkerville, 1; 
Welland, 1; York County, 2. 
Promotion — Hamilton, 2; London, 2; Ottawa, 3. 
Special Industrial — Toronto, 19. 

This makes a total of 145 classes, of which 115 are for backward children, 
an increase of 22 classes during the past year. 

Surveys in connection with training classes have been held in the following 
places: Barrie, Hamilton, Lean ington, Ottawa, Oshawa, Port Hope, Silver- 
thorn, Swansea, Windsor, and in connection with orthopedic classes in London. 



DULL AND BACKWARD CHILDREN 
Auxiliary Training Classes 

Prior to 1925 emphasis was placed upon the most obvious and pressing 
problem of the establishment of auxiliary training classes for backward children 
between 50 and 75 I.Q. Experience in Ontario has demonstrated that in cities 
and towns these classes have come to stay. It is found that if thirty classes of 
forty children are reorganized into thirty classes with the most backward in one 
of these classes, the results will be more satisfactory to everyone without any 
additional cost. The more gifted children advance more rapidly when no 
pupil in the class is below 75 per cent, mentality, and teachers can more easily 
teach a larger class where no one is backward. Parents find their children advanc- 
ing more rapidly and happily under the new conditions and society is the gainer 
in that the children are being trained to more efficient citizenship. The back- 
ward child is the one who receives the greatest benefit from the reorganization. 
Children who have been for three or four years in the primer and have seemed 
unable to learn anything have learned to read and write. A child who had 



48 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

tried the second grade examination three times and failed badly each time, 
passed the examination at the end of one auxiliary class year, standing near the 
head of the list. Another boy who, prior to admission to the auxiliary class, 
was a notorious truant, attended the class every school day last year. Another 
with an I.Q. of 65 won the first prize in woodwork in competition with all the 
boys of his grade in the city schools. Scores of children pronounced incorrigible 
are reported as having found the nselves and as giving no trouble in the auxil- 
iary class. 

School boards are gaining a working knowledge of the situation. In several 
cases where classes were discontinued they have been re-established, so that in 
every school area where auxiliary classes have been established they are now 
in operation. The number of requests for surveys is increasing. Classes are 
being removed from basement to ordinary rooms, and there is a growing senti- 
ment in favour of using the term backward instead of such terms as feeble- 
minded when referring to such pupils. 

The success of auxiliary classes is mainly dependent upon the supply of 
teachers with special aptitude and preparation for the work. Ontario has been 
fortunate in securing an adequate number of such teachers. There were fifty- 
one teachers who in 1925 took the five weeks' Summer Course in intelligence test- 
ing and auxiliary class organization, manage nent and methods, making a total 
of 300 trained during the past six years. 

The teachers in Toronto and elsewhere throughout the Province hold 
monthly meetings for the study of auxiliary class problems. The auxiliary 
class teachers' Bulletin shows a steady growth. During the Convention a 
party of 100 teachers visited Orillia Hospital, while others visited special 
classes in Detroit and elsewhere at their own expense. The attendance at the 
O.E.A. Auxiliary Class Section has doubled. 

Adolescent Classes 

In 1924, Section 6 of the Vocational Education Act was amended to admit 
of adolescent Auxiliary Vocational Classes in the technical school panel. The 
Toronto school, established under this amendment, has increased to 230 boys 
and 180 girls. The girls take academic work and housework — laundry, cooking, 
sewing, home nursing, manicuring, etc. The boys are trained in academic 
work, woodwork, metal work, tailoring, shoemaking, masonry, painting, etc. 

It is not too much to say (after nearly two years of operation) that the 
results in this school have exceeded the most sanguine expectations and fully 
demonstrated the wisdom of the legislation which rendered such a school possible. 

This year a regulation has been approved which provides that in areas 
where (owing to lack of a technical school or for other reasons) such auxiliary 
vocational school is not provided, Promotion classes may be formed. These 
classes are within the public school panel, are for auxiliary training class chil- 
dren over thirteen years of age, contain from 16 to 24 pupils and receive 
$100 per year in addition to the grant to an auxiliary training class. There have 
been established three such classes in Ottawa, two in Hamilton, and two in 
London. The pupils spend two hours per day on vocational work. These 
classes are going forward successfully and have already shown that the pupils 
are able to achieve much better results than in the auxiliary training class. 

Physical Handicap 

During the past year there has awakened a vigorous and increasing interest 
in the amelioration of the lot of children with other forms of disability. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 49 

The Canadian Council on Child Welfare has issued a bulletin containing 
the history, purpose and plan of Ontario Auxiliary Classes. Realizing that every 
type of handicap presents a series of problems peculiar to that special form of 
abnormality, summer courses for training teachers of Lip-reading, Open Air, 
Orthopedic and Sight-saving classes were conducted this year for the first time 
in the history of the Province. The courses were for two weeks and full certi- 
ficates were granted only to those who had also taken the full five weeks' general 
course in intelligence testing, etc. The attendance was as follows: Lip-reading, 
8; Open Air, 8; Orthopedic, 9; and Sight-saving, 9. 

In London, after a Departmental survey, the first Sight-saving class in 
Ontario outside Toronto was established, and in September a class was estab- 
lished in Hamilton. 

The crippled or disabled child has received much attention from a nu nber 
of organizations and valuable propaganda work has been done. Toronto has 
appointed a visiting teacher in addition to the five previously on the staff and 
there are three bedside teachers in hospitals. London has appointed a hospital 
teacher and an orthopedic survey has been conducted by the Department. 
Speaking generally in every 1,000 children there is one crippled child who should 
be taken to school. 

The prohibitive cost of transportation has hitherto prevented the formation 
of an orthopedic class in Ontario. 

The Auxiliary Class Regulations have recently been amended by the addi- 
tion of a subsection under which the Ontario Government gives a grant of fifty 
per cent, of the cost of transportation of a child to an orthopedic class; maxi- 
mum, forty dollars per annum per child. Under this provision classes are being 
established in Toronto and Ottawa. 

In the effort to provide adequate educational facilities for handicapped 
children the policy of the Department has been to give grants to the extent of 
half the excess cost of education over that of the normal child. Responsibility 
and power are left in the hands of local school boards. Free surveys are made 
whenever requested. These surveys are conducted privately and the results 
treated as confidential. The advance in the number of such classes under this 
method during the past five years has been from 12 to 144, 

It can be clearly demonstrated that the cost to the state is less when a 
child is placed in an auxiliary class than when left in an ordinary class or at home, 
and the advantages to both the child and society are very great. 

In the light of the foregoing facts the time has come when the problem 
may wisely be attacked from the provincial standpoint to find out in a general 
way what are the existing conditions throughout the entire Province and what 
is best to be done. A large body of this desired information is already known 
by school inspectors and teachers. For the purpose of organizing this knowledge 
as a basis for future procedure the Minister of Education has decided to hold a 
series of conferences of Public and Separate School Inspectors preliminary to a 
general confidential survey of the Province. This survey will furnish those 
who administer affairs in each municipality in the Province with a working- 
knowledge of the abnormal children within their own area. 

It is hoped that as a result, in the not distant future, the appeal of every 
handicapped child, even in the remote areas of Ontario, will in some measure at 
least meet with a sympathetic and practical response. 

S. B. Sinclair. 
Toronto, December 31st, 1925. Inspector of Auxiliary Classes. 



50 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX J 

REPORT OF THE 
PROVINCIAL SCHOOL ATTENDANCE OFFICER 



In accordance with the requirements of the Provincial Statutes, school 
attendance officers were appointed for the year 1925 in all municipalities of 
the Province. In the urban municipalities, appointments are made by school 
boards, and 426 officers were appointed. In the rural municipalities appoint- 
ments are made by township councils, and 858 officers were appointed. In 
unorganized territory thirty-four additional officers were appointed voluntarily 
by local school authorities upon advice from this office. Usually in a rural 
municipality the same officer does duty for both public and separate schools. 
In an urban municipality the officers appointed by the school authorities do 
duty for the schools controlled by the respective boards. In each of thirty-four 
urban communities, however, the public and the separate school board united 
in naming the same individual for all schools. This action has prevented over- 
lapping of work and has ensured an even administration of the attendance laws 
within the municipality. 

The marked improvement in school attendance referred to in former reports 
continues. Parents are realizing more and more fully that the schooling deemed 
sufficient in their day is not sufficient for the children of to-day, as these children 
are growing up in an increasingly complex state of society. Parents who have 



Z50CC0 



£90000 



230000 



2eococ . 



2/0000 



FiQure. A/o I 
Enrolment ffural Elementary 3cljool& 



£00000 




/3/7 /9J8 >919 I9£° '92/ / 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



51 



been indifferent or negligent in the past are gradually being brought to see, by 
persuasion rather than by force, that irregular pupils cannot make satisfactory 
progress. They are beginning to recognize the wastage and loss in money 
expenditure when facilities for instruction are provided but children are allowed 
to disregard these facilities. 

Many of us are inclined to lose sight of the fact that teachers, school build- 
ings and equipment are of value only to the extent that pupils attend school, 
and thereby fail to appreciate the considerable monetary diminution in the value 
of school training due to maintaining teachers, buildings and equipment for pupils 



3fOOOO 



36oooo 



350 OOO 



34OO0O . 



33COOO . 



C>Z0OOO 



ZfJOOOO . 



&OOOOO 



rtyure No £, 
Enrolment Urban 
^.lementoru Ochoo/s 




'ft? 



1913 



J 9/ 9 



/920 



/&&/ 



/9&Z 



/92J 



f9Z.^ 



who, day by day, absent themselves. Since our annual expenditure upon 
elementary and secondary education is more than $45,000,000, it follows 
that a loss of even five per cent, by irregular attendance amounts to a yearly 
ineffective expenditure of over two and one-quarter millions of dollars. Average 
attendance can be raised by more than five per cent, if each pupil improves 
his average attendance by but one day a month. 

Few people are found who cavil at legitimate expenditure for purposes of 
education, for such expenditures are rated as investments rather than as expenses, 
and those who find fault with ineffective expenditures cannot be blamed. Money 
spent for purposes of education can be effective only for those who attend school. 



52 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 



Irregularity in attendance is not usually due to a criminal disregard for 
law, but to conditions which, for the moment, seem to the parent sufficient 
excuse for keeping the child from school. The attitude, therefore, of him who 
enforces attendance is more that of a sympathetic helper than that of a cold 
instrument of the law. The attendance officer first discovers the cause of non- 
attendance or irregularity and then tries to remove that cause or to show that 
the condition can be surmounted. For satisfactory development of the child 
in school there must be wholesome co-operation between the home and the 
school. Consequently, an enforcement of attendance through fear of legal 



wooco 



130000 . 



IZOOOO _ 



//OOOO . 



fOOOOO. 



riqure. No 3 



[Lnrolment - rourfh £>ook Clas&&& 




9COOO J_ 

i en 



I9I& 



1919 



1920 



I9ZI 



I9ZZ 



J9Z3 



I9Z4- 



penalties alone is not effective in producing the end desired, the harmonious 
development of the pupil. 

Generally speaking, attendance in urban municipalities is rather more 
satisfactory than attendance in rural districts. This is not wholly accounted 
for by rural conditions in stormy weather. There is the temptation during the 
spring's work and the harvest on the farm to make use of the labour of little 
children. In certain farming communities it is not uncommon to find that even 
children of ten years of age are kept out of school for long periods to work. It 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



53 



JOOOO . 



qooo 



8000 



7000 



6ooc 



Figure. No 1 
Enrolment Fifth Form C 7a s ses 



5ooo 



19/7 




73/3 f9l9 /9)so TSSi J32S I9&3 i92*h 



70 ceo 



60000 



60000 



WOOC 



Figure No. 5 
Enrolment Secondary Softools 




I9lf~& 1313-9 I9I9-20 I92.0-2I I92I-ZZ /9Z2-23 isksZ't AVj' 



/3/6V7 



3 D.E. 



54 THK REPORT OF THE No. 11 

is difficult in these cases to get locally appointed officers to take action. Another 
consideration which tends to give the urban child an advantage over the rural 
child is found in a more extended school life. Except in a relatively small 
number of cases the urban child is now going to school uninterruptedly until 
sixteen years of age. In many rural communities the reverse is true. 

Taking the Province as a whole there are, with the exceptions mentioned, 
scant grounds for dissatisfaction. Indeed, all signs are most hopeful that, in 
spite of any thoughtlessness or greed of parents, or any rapacity on the part of 
employers, every child will have not alone the facilities but the actualities of a 
good elementary education. Year by year the educational level of the Province 
is rising. More pupils are completing Form IV of the elementary schools, 
more Form V, more are entering the vocational and other secondary schools. 

The graphical illustrations on preceding pages will show how great the 
change is. 

Figure 1 refers to rural elementary schools only. Line B indicates the 
enrolment which might be expected from the changing population, taking the 
enrolment and population of 1917 as the starting point. Line A shows the 
actual enrolment. The School Attendance Act and The Adolescent School 
Attendance Act were enacted in 1919. The first named became operative 
almost at once, the latter in 1921. The amendment to The Adolescent School 
Attendance Act with regard to the adolescent sons and daughters of farmers 
was made in 1923. 

Figure 2 relates to urban elementary schools only. Line B indicates the 
enrolment which might be expected from the changing population, taking the 
enrolment and population of 1917 as the starting point. Line A shows the 
actual attendance. 

Figure 3 shows the increase in attendance in Form IV classes, from 91,989 
to 131,373 in seven years. As in the other figures, Line B indicates the enrol- 
ment expected due to changing population, while Line A indicates the actual 
enrolment. 

Figure 4 shows the increase in attendance in Form V classes, from 5,954 in 
1917 to 10,105 in 1924, or an increase of more than 71 per cent. 

Figure 5 shows the change in all secondary schools, vocational schools, 
collegiate institutes, high and continuation schools, from the school year 1916-17, 
with an enrolment of 37,302 to the school year 1924-25 with an enrolment of 
74,251. For purposes of comparison it may be interesting to note that the 
secondary school enrolment in the United States during the first quarter of this 
century increased from three-quarters of a million to three and one-quarter 
millions. (James F. Abel, in "Education in the First Quarter of the Twentieth 
Century," School Life, Volume XI, No. 5.) 

J. P. Cow t les, 
Provincial School A ttendance Officer, 

Toronto, December, 1925. 



DEPARTMENT OE EDUCATION 55 



APPENDIX K 

REPORT OF THE 
DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL TRAINING 

Owing to the very large number of young teachers who graduated last year 
from the various training schools, there is at present a rather generous supply 
of both High and Public School teachers in the Province. It is not unwelcome 
to note, therefore, that the enrolment of teachers-in-trainirg for the present 
session shows a decrease over that for last year. In the High School Assistants' 
Course the enrolment decreased by 48, in the Public School Second Class Course 
by 239, and in the Third Class Course by 192. It is matter for further congrat- 
ulation to note that while there is this substantial decrease in the number of 
candidates for Second and Third Class Certificates, the enrolment of candidates 
for the First Class Certificate has increased by 66. 

The marked decrease in the number of candidates for the Third Class 
Certificate during the past two years fully warrants the decision to discontinue 
the summer and autumn courses for .the certificate. 

The tables given below show in detail the attendance in the various courses 
at the several training schools. 

The College of Education 

The registration of teachers-in-training in the various courses is as follows: 

The Household Science Course 6 

The High School Assistants' Course 273 

The Specialists' Courses 109 

The First Class Public School Course 30 

The Elementary Art Course. . . .• 37 

The Elementary Physical Culture Course 194 

The Courses for Degrees in Pedagogy 127 

The teachers-in-training in the High School Assistants' course may be 
classified according to their university degrees as follows: 

Degree in Arts 253 

Degree in Science 2 

Degree in Applied Science 3 

Degree in Scientific Agriculture 15 

Degree in Commerce 1 

The registration in the various specialist courses is as follows: 

Classics 2 

English and French 14 

English and History 31 

French and German 12 

French and Spanish 8 

Household Science 3 

Mathematics and Physics 14 

Science 11 

Science and Agriculture 2 

Agriculture 12 

Of the degrees, four were conferred by universities in the British Isles, 
three by those in the Maritime Provinces, five by those in Quebec, and ten by 
those in the Western Provinces. 



56 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



The registration in the Graduate courses in education grows steadily. The 
summer session of 1925 was attended by 80 graduates and the regular session 
by 47, assembled from all parts of Canada. 

The lack of a suitable playfield for the students of the College and the 
University schools has been removed through the purchase of the premises of 
The Aura Lee Club, on Avenue Road. 

The Provincial Normal Schools 

The following table gives in detail the attendance in the various courses at 
the seven Provincial Normal Schools for the present session: 





Total 












School 


Attendance 


Male 


Female 


First Class 


Second Class 


Kindergarten-Primary 


Hamilton 


272 


34 


238 


91 


181 




London 


286 


44 


242 


118 


168 




North Bay .... 


335 


55 


280 




335 




Ottawa 


344 


43 


301 


79 


265 




Peterborough. . 


166 


17 


149 




166 




Stratford 


205 


46 


159 


55 


150 




Toronto 


671 


127 


544 


277 


351 


43 


Totals. . . . 


2,279 


366 


1,913 


620 


1,616 


43 



The following changes have been made in the staffs of the Normal Schools 
during the year: 

Miss Elizabeth Mitchell, appointed an assistant at the Ottawa Normal 
Model School in place of Miss Lilias Henderson, deceased. 

Miss E. Hodgins, appointed an assistant at the Toronto Normal Model 
School in place of Miss Elizabeth Cringan, resigned. 

Miss Norma M. Lindsay, appointed an assistant at the Toronto Normal 
Model School in place of Miss Edith B. Phillips, resigned. 

Miss E. J. Johnston, B.A., appointed temporarily to the staff of the North 
Bay Normal School. 

Mr. H. T. Dickenson, appointed instructor in Music at the London Normal 
School in place of Mr. C. E. Percy, resigned. 

Mr. W. B. Rothwell, appointed instructor in Music at the Stratford Normal 
School in place of Mr. J. Bottomly, deceased. 

A list of staffs of the Normal and Normal Model Schools is given in the 
register of Schools and Teachers for the Province of Ontario. 

Model Schools 

The following table shows the number of students who attended the Sum- 
mer Model Schools to train for Limited Third Class Certificates. No students 
were enrolled at the Autumn Model Schools at Kingston, Orillia and Renfrew 
for the past session. 

Summer Model Schools 
School Third Class 

Bracebridge 10 

Gore Bav 7 

Port Arthur 10 

Sharbot Lake 19 

Total 46 

The English-French Training Schools 

An event of interest during the past year in connection with the above 
schools was the building and opening of an additional training school at Embrun. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



57 



Classes in both the Junior and Senior Academic Courses were begun at the open- 
ing of the school in September. Mr. Joseph Bechard, B.A., a master at the 
Sturgeon Falls training school, was appointed Principal, and Miss Aline Fortier, 
Assistant. As will be seen from the table below, the number of students enrolled 
for the first session indicates the wisdom of the establishment of a training 
school at that centre. 

The following tables give the enrolment of students at the various centres 
for both the Regular and the Summer Courses: 

Regular Course— Session 1925-1926 



School 


Jr. Academic 


Sr. Academic 


Professional 


Total 


Embrun 

Ottawa 


69 

10 
66 


38 

20 

68 


41 
20 
26 

22 


107 

41 


Sandwich 


50 


Sturgeon Falls 

Vankleek Hill 


160 
22 






Totals 


145 


126 


109 


380 



Summer Course — 1925 



School 


First 
Professional 


Second 
Professional 


Academic 


Total 


Cochrane 


2 
39 

6 
2 


31 
24 
15 


3 

28 
9 


5 


Ottawa 


70 


Sturgeon Falls 

Vankleek Hill 


58 
26 






Totals 


49 


70 


40 


159 



A list of the staffs of the English-French Training Schools is given in the 
register of Schools and Teachers of the Province of Ontario. 

The Kindergarten-Primary Summer Courses 

In addition to the 43 students in training at the Toronto Normal School 
for the Kindergarten-Primary Certificate, 282 Public School teachers attended 
the Summer Courses of 1925 to qualify for the certificate as follows: 



School 


Part I 


Part II 


Total 


Hamilton 


21 
33 
23 
84 


17 
15 
11 

78 


38> 


London 


48 


Ottawa 


34 


Toronto 


162 






Totals 


161 


121 


282 







Teachers' Institutes 

Annual Conventions were held by the 97 Teachers' Institutes of the Prov- 
ince. Practically all of the County Conventions were visited by Departmental 
Lecturers chosen from the staffs of the Provincial Normal Schools and the 
College of Education. 

S. A. Morgan, 
Toronto, December 31st, 1925. Director of Professional Training. 



58 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 11 



APPENDIX L 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY 

SCHOOLS 

I.— ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

a. Public Schools 

Number of Public Schools in 1924 6,361 

Increase for the year 27 

Number of enrolled pupils of all ages in the Public Schools during the 

year (exclusive of Continuation and Night School pupils) 515,126 

Decrease for the year 4,145 

Average daily attendance of pupils 365,656 

Increase for the year 4,673 

Percentage of aggregate to possible aggregate attendance, i.e., per- 
centage of actual to possible attendance 87 . 68 

Decrease for the year .70 

Number of persons employed as teachers in the Public Schools, men, 

1,809; women, 11.550; total 13,359 

Increase for the year 109 

Number of teachers who ; ..ttended Normal School 11 ,489 

Increase for the year 467 

Number of teachers who attended Normal College or Faculty or 

College of Education 1,143 

Increase for the year 107 

Number of teachers with a University degree 162 

Increase for the year 12 

Average annual salary for male teachers $1,684 

Increase for the year $23 

Average annual salary for female teachers $1,138 

Increase for the vear $5 

Average experience cf male teachers 11.4 years 

Average experience of fern: le teachers 8.6 years 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $16,5 12,586 

Amount expended for public school houses (sites and buildings) $3,879,382 

Amount expended for all other purposes $9,049,371 

Total amount expended for Public Schools $29,441,339 

Decrease for the year __. $2,114,883 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 7. $57.15 

Decrease for the year $3.62 

b. Roman Catholic Separate Schools 

Number of Roman Catholic Separate Schools in 1924 708 

Increase for the year 20 

Number of enrolled pupils for all ages _ 93,524 

Increase for the year 2,473 

Average daily attendance of pupils 68,216 

Increase for the year _ 3,719 

Percentage of aggregate to possible aggregate attendance, i.e., per- 
centage of actual to possible attendance 89.06 

Increase for the year 442 

Number of teachers 2,149 

Increase for the year 96 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries $1,592,982 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $529,091 

Amount expended for all other purposes $1,446,652 

Total amount expended on R. C. Separate Schools _ $3,568,725 

Decrease for the year $733,408 

Cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) #38 ■ 15 

Derre s^ for the ve ir $9 . 09 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 59 



c. Protestant Separate Schools 

Number of Protestant Separate Schools (included with Public Schools, 

a), in 1924 5 

Number of enrolled pupils 435 

Decrease for the year 26 

Average daily attendance of pupils 300 

Decrease for the year 23 

d. Night Elementary Schools 

Number of Night Schools in 1924-25 24 

Increase for the year 2 

Number of pupils enrolled m 2,130 

Increase for the year 37 

Number of teachers engaged ^ 64 

Increase for the year 7 



II.— SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

a. High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 

Number of High Schools (including 50 Collegiate Institutes), 1924-25 183 

Number of pupils enrolled in High Schools 52,116 

Increase for the year . 3,835 

Average daily attendance of pupils 44,836 

Increase for the year 3,310 

Percentage of average attendance to total enrolment 86.03 

Number of teachers in High Schools 1,657 

Increase for the year 114 

Average annual salary, Principals $3,020 

Increase for the year $74 

Average annual salary, Assistants $2,278 

Increase for the year $30 

Average annual salary, all Teachers $2,360 

Increase for the vear $30 

Highest salary paid ' $5,000 

Amount expended for teachers' salaries, 1924 $3,716,940 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $1,909,020 

Amount expended for all other purposes $2,193,141 

Total amount expended on High Schools, 1924 $7,819,101 

Increase for the year $569,512 

Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance $150.03 

Decrease for the year $0 . 84 

b. Continuation Schools 

Number of Continuation Schools, 1924-25 198 

Increase for the year 9 

Number of pupils in attendance 10,545 

Increase for the year 1 ,208 

Average daily attendance of pupils 8,772 

Increase for the year 919 

Percentage of average attendance to total enrolment 83 . 19 

Decrease for the year .92 

Number of teachers 396 

Increase for the year 46 

Average annual salary, Principals $1,803 

Increase for the year $6 

Average annual salary, Assistants *. . $1,395 

Decrease for the vear $41 

Highest salary paid $3,400 

Increase for the year $100 

Amount expended on teachers' salaries, 1924 $590,085 

Amount expended for school houses (sites and buildings) $264,893 

Amount expended for all other purposes $241,307 

Total amount expended on Continuation Schools, 1924 $1,096,285 

Increase for the year $126,802 

Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance $103.96 

Increase for the year $0.13 



60 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



c. Night High Schools 

Number of Night High Schools in 1924-25 18 

Increase for the year 2 

Number of pupils enrolled 3,000 

Increase for the year 234 

Number of teachers engaged 118 

Decrease for the year 1 

d. Vocational Schools 

Number of Day Vocational Schools, 1924-25 27 

Increase for the year 3 

Number of full time pupils enrolled 11,595 

Increase for the year 2,41 1 

Average daily attendance of full time pupils 9,263 

Increase for the year 2,054 

Number of part time pupils in Day Schools 1,739 

Decrease for the year 98 

Number of special pupils in Day Schools 1,875 

Increase for the year " 77 

Number of full time teachers engaged in Day Schools 416 

Increase for the year 45 

Number of part time or occasional teachers engaged in Day Schools. 108 

Increase for the year 20 

Number of Evening Vocational Schools, 1924-25 52 

Decrease for the year 8 

Number of pupils enrolled 35,675 

Decrease for the year 777 

Number of teachers engaged 1,182 

Decrease for the year 11 

Amount expended on teachers' salaries, day and evening schools, 1924 $1,274,964 

Amount expended on school houses (sites and buildings) $586,697 

Amount expended for all other purposes $1,243,574 

Total amount expended on Day and Evening Vocational Schools, 1924 $3,105,235 

Decrease for the year $851 ,902 



III.— GENERAL 

Elementary and Secondary Schools 

Pupils enrolled in Elementary Schools, 1924 608,650 

Pupils enrolled in Night Elementary Schools, 1924-25 2,130 

Pupils enrolled in Secondary Schools, 1924-25 77,870 

Pupils enrolled in Night High Schools, 1924-25 3,000 

Pupils enrolled in Evening Vocational Schools, 1924-25 35,675 

Total Enrolment, all schools 727,325 

Increase for the year 5,275 

Percentage of total population enrolled 24.8 

Total expenditure $45,030,685 

Decrease for the year $3,003,879 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) in all Schools 





1902 


1907 


1912 


1917 


1922 


1923 


1924 


Teachers' salaries. . . 
Sites and buildings. 
All other expenses. . 


$7 63 
97 
2 80 


$10 44 
2 86 
4 40 


$14 26 
5 90 
5 34 


$17 97 
4 05 

7 72 


$29 80 
13 72 
15 49 


$31 14 

16 56 
18 82 


$32 57 

9 85 

19 49 


For all purposes. . 


11 40 


17 70 


25 50 


29 74 


59 01 


66 52 


61 91 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



61 



Comparative School Statistics, 1867-1924 

I. PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

These elementary school tables, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, for the purpose of comparison with previous 
years in which the Separate Schools were included with Public Schools, include Roman Catholic 
and Protestant Separate Schools. The tables A, B, C, D, and E give the statistics of the Public 
Schools, including Protestant Separate Schools; the statistics of the R. C. Separate Schools are 
given in Tables F and G; those of the Protestant Separate Schools appear in Table T; and 
the Night Schools in Table U. 

1. School Attendance 



Year 


3 

8 

c 
W 

"o 
u 

1 

s 

s 


en 

O 

DQ 


o 


-v 

c 

< 

O 


Percentage of Average At- 
tendance to Total Num- 
ber Enrolled 


Percentage of Aggregate to 
Possible Aggregate, i.e., 
Percentage of Actual to 
Possible Attendance 


1867 


401,643 
454,662 
490,860 
471,512 
493,212 
485,670 
482,777 
454,088 
448,218 
467,022 
527,664 
601,485 
610,322 
608,650 


213,019 
238,848 
261,070 
246,966 
259,083 
253,091 
251,677 
232,880 
229,794 
239,187 
266,255 
306,225 
310,964 
309,731 


188,624 
215,814 
229,790 
224,546 
234,129 
232,579 
231,100 
221,208 
218,424 
227,835 
261,409 
295,260 
299,358 
298,919 


163,974 
188,701 
217,184 
214,176 
245,152 
253,830 
273,544 
261,480 
266,503 
291,210 
342,571 
425,018 
425,480 
433,872 


40.82 
41.50 
44.25 
45.42 
49.71 
52.26 
56.66 
57.58 
59.45 
62.35 
64.92 
70.66 
69.71 
71.28 




1872 




1877 




1882 




1887 




1892 




1897 

1902 




1907 

1912 




1917 




1922 


86.F0 

87.80 
87.89 


1923 


1924 





In all these elementary schools the total possible aggregate attendance for 
the year 1924 was 96,878,984, and the actual aggregate was 85,150,426, or 87.89 
per cent, of the possible. In arriving at the possible aggregate, no deductions 
are made for illness, and all the school days for the year of a pupil once enrolled 
as well as all the school days of a child of compulsory school age (unless exempted 
by law) are counted, so long as they are residents of the school section, or until 
entered in a secondary school. Moreover, duplications of enrolment in 
the elementary schools owing to removals from one school section to another 
during the year, and as between elementary and secondary schools, do not 
enter into this calculation; neither does the fact that a pupil once on the roll (if 
only for a few days) is counted in the enrolment of the year; all of which 
enlarges the enrolment and keeps the*percentage of average attendance to 
total enrolment low— 71.28 for 1924. The percentage of actual to possible 
aggregate attendance (87.89), as given above, represents the true situation 
as to the regularity of the attendance in our elementary schools. 



62 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



2. Classification of Pupils 



Year 


a 

£ 

be 
u 

<L> 

-o 
c 

2 


c 

T3.5 

S3* 


<L> 


en I— i 


J4 
O 
O 

m 

C 
CM 


J4 

O 

o 
PQ 

-o 


J4 
O 

o 
CQ 

.c 


Wo 
o£ 

m-S 

o«* 

«•§ 


1867 








* 79,365 

*160,828 
*153,630 
*165,834 
76,704 
73,015 
70,808 
69,062 
60,194 
67,368 
73,996 
82,047 
81,356 
79.099 


98,184 

100,245 

108,678 

106,229 

100,533 

96,074 

91,330 

85,732 

84,622 

92,728 

106,034 

112,409 

114,300 

112,370 


83,211 

96,481 

135,824 

117,352 

108,096 

99,345 

99,682 

90,630 

89,371 

88,811 

105,062 

127,831 

134,135 

138,835 


68,896 

67,440 

72,871 

71,740 

81,984 

88,934 

89,314 

83,738 

85,752 

85,213 

91,989 

123,214 

128,331 

131,373 


71,987 


1872 








29,668 
19,857 
10,357 
10,238 


1877 








1882 








1887 






115,657 
114,932 
110,567 
107,441 
112,552 
126,100 
125,321 
121,634 
117,784 
111,816 


1892 






13,370 


1897 






21 076 


1902 






17 485 


1907 






15,727 


1912 






t6,802 


1917 


16,515 
13,233 
13,603 
12,792 


2,793 
12,057 
11,075 
12,260 


|5,954 


1922 


f9,060 


1923 


f9,738 


1924 


110,105 



Note. — Kindergarten attendance is not included for the years previous to 1917. 
*In 1st Reader. fExclusive of Continuation School Pupils. 

The following table classifies the pupils in the various forms as to rural and urban 
schools: 

Rural Schools 



Year 


Kinder- 
garten 


Kinder- 
garten- 
Primary 


First 
Reader 
Part I 

or 
Primer 


First 
Reader 
Part II 
or First 

Book 


Second 
Book 


Third 
Book 


Fourth 
Book 


Fifth 
Book or 
Beyond 
Fourth 

Book 


Totals 


1904... . . 






60,784 
60,470 
62,712 
58,290 
56,217 
54,831 
51,922 


36,941 
31,538 
30,293 
30,657 
32,701 
32,318 
31,509 


47,930 
46,219 

43,775 
44,407 
45,621 
45,528 
44,739 


50,297 
48,247 
42,450 
43,834 
49,657 
50.706 
51,596 


47,289 
46,815 
44,049 
41,321 
49,976 
51,135 
50,959 


9,892 

8,958 
t3,984 
f2,926 
t4,403 
f4,783 
t4,931 


253,133 


1907 . . . 






242,247 


1912 






227,263 


1917 . . 




75 
2,511 

2,375 
2,922 


221,510 


1922 . . . 




241,086 


1923 . . . 




241,676 


1924.... 




238,578 



1904 




Urban S( 


:hools (cit 
44,456 
52,082 
63,388 
67,031 
65,417 
62,953 
59,894 


ies, towns 
27,800 
28,656 
37,075 
43,339 
49,346 
49,038 
47,590 


and inco 
37,299 

38,403 
48.953 
61,627 

66,788 
68,772 
67,631 


rporated \ 
39,814 
41,124 
46,361 
61,228 
78,174 
83,429 
87,239 


tillages.) 
35,815 
38,937 
41,164 
50,668 
73.238 
77,196 
80,414 


6,304 
6,769 
t2,818 
f3,028 
t4,657 
f4,955 
15,174 


191,488 


1907 






205,971 


1912 






239,759 


1917 .... 

1922 .... 

1923 .... 

1924 .... 


16,515 
13,233 
13,603 
12.792 


2,718 
9,546 
8,700 
9,338 


306,154 
360.399 
368,646 
370,07 2 



fExclusive of Continuation School Pupils. 

The following table compares the enrolment and gives the percentages from 
rural and urban municipalities for several years: 



Year 


Enrolment in Rural 
Sehools 


Enrolment in Urban 
Schools 


1903.... 




260,617 or 57.88% of total 
242,247 or 54.05% 
227,263 or 48.66% 
221,510 or 41.97% 
241,086 or 40.08% 
241,676 or 39.59% 
238,578 or 39.19%, " 


189,661 or 42.12% of total 


1907 


205,971 or 45.95% 


1912 


239,759 or 51.33% 


1917 


306,154 or 58.02% 


1922 


360,399 or 59.91% 


1923 


368,646 or 60.40% 


1^24 


370,072 or 60.80% " 



Note. — Kindergarten attendance for years previous to 1916 not available for the above 
tables. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



63 



3. Teachers' Certificates, Etc. 



In 
V 

> 


tn 
u 
0) 

V 

H 

*o 
6 




13 

6 
<v 


CO g 

8*5 


vx 

en 

a 

U 

-o 

c 


tn 
oj 

U 

"E 


c 
bfl »- 

a* 


c 

Ih 

03 

i_ 
aj 

-a 

c 

3 


.s 

.'s 

*c3 
i_ 

H 
13 

3 
C 

s 


ID 

a 

c 

°o 
C/3 

1° 

0) 

co 

3 
O 

DC 


3 


§2 
6 g 

0-, 


£ a 

03 £ 

o-s 


T3 

u 

{5 

03 on 

■81 

. O 


Nor. Coll., F. of 
E. or College of 
Education 


1867 . 


4,890 

5,476 

6,468 

6,857 

7.594 

8,630 

9,351 

9,614 

10,170 

11,128 

12,762 

14,872 

15,303 

15,508 


2,849 
2,626 
3,020 
3,052 
2.718 
2,770 
2,784 
2,294 
1,783 
1,511 
1,317 
1,740 
1,842 
1,945 


2,041 

2,850 

3,448 

3,795 

4,876 

5,910 

6,567 

7,320 

8,387 

9,617 

11,445 

13,132 

13.461 

13,562 


1,899 

1,337 

250 

246 

252 

261 

343 

608 

715 

674 

1,106 

1,273 

1,335 

1,532 


2,454 

1,477 

1,304 

2,169 

2,553 

3,047 

3,386 

4,296 

3,887 

6,419 

8,784 

10,825 

11,365 

11,660 


386 
2,034 
3,926 
3,471 
3,865 
4,299 
4,465 
3,432 
3,452 
1,804 
1,317 
1,190 
1,066 
1,166 














151 

578 

988 

971 

924 

873 

934 

1,031 

1,336 

1,323 

603 

409 

359 

263 


666 

828 

1,034 

1,873 

2,434 

3,038 

3,643 

4,774 

4,587 

6,705 

9.203 

11,437 

12,070 

12 670 




1872. . 
















1877 
















1882. . 
















1887 . 
















1892. . 


"66 
213 

274 
330 


200 
223 
247 

277 
371 
310 

258 
182 
154 












1897.. 












1902.. 












1907. . 






503 
317 
292 
407 

413 
143 


*220 
213 
156 
156 
131 




tl912. . 






614 


tl917.. 
tl922.. 
tl923.. 
tl924. . 


33 
63 
70 
63 


38 
78 
83 
65 


1,053 

1,188 
1,108 
1,221 



fExclusive of Continuation School Teachers. 

The men engaged in teaching in these schools in 1924 formed 12.54 per cent, of the whole 
number. In 1923 they formed 12.03 per cent. 

The number of teachers and the class of certificates, in the Public Schools alone, in each 
County and District of the Province, will be found in Table C of this Appendix. 



The following table classifies the teachers and certificates as to rural and urban 
schools: 





Teachers 


Certificates 








1st 


2nd 


3rd 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Class 


Class 


Class 


5,974 


1,469 


4,505 


152 


1,944 


3,107 


6,038 


1,201 


4,837 


180 


1,542 


3,079 


6,143 


894 


5,249 


165 


3,002 


1,463 


6,455 


655 


5,800 


343 


4,232 


1,129 


7,034 


777 


6,257 


257 


5,180 


909 


7,159 


815 


6,344 


305 


5,417 


878 


7,270 


854 


6,416 


419 


5,704 


916 


3,580 


606 


2,974 


483 


2,248 


289 


4,132 


582 


3,550 


535 


2,345 


373 


4,985 


617 


4,368 


509 


3,417 


341 


6,307 


662 


5,645 


763 


4,552 


188 


7,838 


96^ 


6,875 


1,016 


5,645 


281 


8,144 


1,027 


7,117 


1,030 


5,948 


188 


8,238 


1,092 


7,146 


1,113 


5,956 


250 



Rural Schools, 1904 

Rural Schools, 1907 

♦Rural Schools, 1912 

♦Rural Schools, 1917 

♦Rural Schools, 1922 

♦Rural Schools, 1923 

♦Rural Schools, 1924 

Urban (cities, towns and incorporated villages) 
Schools, 1904 

Urban, 1907 

♦Urban, 1912 

♦Urban, 1917 

♦Urban, 1922 

•Urban, 1923 

"Urban, 1924 



In the rural schools in 1924 the men formed 11.74 per cent., and in the urban schools, 13.25 
per cent, of the number of teachers employed in each case. 



♦Exclusive of Continuation School Teachers. 



64 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



4. Teachers' Salaries and Experience 
Teachers' Salaries 





12 

a 

u 

a 


"c~j a; 


cu 


E 

■J" to 

K^ CU 

o3.tt 


41 

03 

E 

cu 

(4-1 

• en 

>, cu 
*-■ *n 


03 

a. 

o3 O 


CU 
03 

S3 

**h en 


03 g 

18. 


^•8 

E 2 

0) o 

<~ a 


-22 

03 

6 

Ui o3 

o3 u. 


03 

6 

cu 


lary, male 
all urban 

ary, female 
all urban 




OS 

en 


<" en 


en co 


o3 ^ 
m en 


w en 


Brf 


03 .. 
en m 


o3'" 


till 

w en 


tn 
„ cu w 


en _ 
cu en 


03 
en u 


r « co 


u 

a 


en 

CU 


So « 

21 


1) 5- 

2 o 


CU V-i 

03 -G 


CD »-i 

bflcu 

2-S 




CD *■" 

<D 03 


en u, en j, u, 

2 o rt 2*6 


■ti 8 <-> o 


5 o o 


cu Jr; en cu ft en 

2 o o 2* o 


> 


bfl 


v $ 


CU Oj 


cu o3 


O) 03 


CU 03 


cu o3 — 




3 > o3J3 


> o3x: 








> ?H 


> CU 


> 0) 


> cu 


> 0) 


> cu 


> <ut; 


- S cu- 




JZ cu o 

<£, -lj en 
* 


> CU CJ > cu u 




£ 


<^ 


< * J 


< * J 


<^ 


< ^ 


< ^ 


4 4 - 1 > < 


<^ M < *- » 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


>> 


1867.... 


1,350 


346 


226 


532 


243 


464 


240 






261 


189 






1872.... 


1,000 


360 


228 


628 


245 


507 


216 








305 


213 






1877.... 


1,100 


398 


264 


735 


307 


583 


269 








379 


251 






1882.... 


1,100 


415 


269 


742 


331 


576 


273 








385 


248 






1887.... 


1,450 


425 


292 


832 


382 


619 


289 








398 


271 






1892... 


1,500 


421 


297 


894 


402 


648 


298 








383 


269 






1897.... 


1,500 


391 


294 


892 


425 


621 


306 








347 


254 






1902... 


1,600 


436 


313 


935 


479 


667 


317 








372 


271 






1907.... 


1,900 


596 


420 


1,157 


592 


800 


406 


659 


37: 


I 458 


379 


907 453 


1912.... 


2,200 


788 


543 


1,320 


703 


977 


519 


779 


49: 


I 566 


493 


1,141 618 


1917.... 


2,500 


1,038 


650 


1.637 


795 


1,166 


628 


908 


57: 


5 686 


580 


1,425 731 


1922.... 


3.500 


1,644 


1,117 


2,269 


1,363 


1,767 


1,047 


1,393 


98( 


) 1,144 


987 


2,082 1,253 


1923... 


3,600 


1.661 


1,133 


2,263 


1.365 


1,819 


1,068 


1,407 


99* 


I 1,163 


1,006 


2,090 1,261 


1924... 


3,600 


1,684 


1,138 


2,321 


1,397 


1,806 


1,082 


1,386 


1,00 


[ 1.168 


994 


2,124 1,286 



Incorporated villages included from 1867 to 1902 inclusive 



Increases in salaries in the cities, towns, villages and rural schools are shown in the above 
table. _ In Table C the average salaries for 1924 of the Public School teachers of the various 
Counties and Districts are given separately, and summarized for the cities, towns and villages. 
This table also states the salaries paid to teachers according to the grade of certificate held, and 
illustrates to what extent the teacher with the higher certificate commands the higher salary. 
The average salaries for the Province are as follows: 



Male 



Female 



First Class Certificates. . . 

Second Class Certificates . 

Third Class and District 
Certificates 



1912 


1917 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1912 


1917 


1922 


1923 


$1,340 


$1,548 


$2,290 


$2,311 


$2,296 


$634 


$728 


$1,226 


$1,237 


757 


916 


1,434 


1,452 


1,444 


587 


673 


1,137 


1,147 


524 


562 


911 


897 


895 


458 


507 


855 


847 



1924 
$1,212 
1,146 

835 



Teachers' Experience 

The length of service or experience of the teachers engaged in the Public Schools is also shown 
in Table C, where the numbers who have taught from less than one year up to forty years and over 
are given for each year. 

The average experience in the Public Schools at the end of 1924 was as follows: 
Male teachers, 11.4 years. 
Female teachers, 8.6 years. 
All teachers, 9.0 years. 

Rural teachers (male and female), 5. 1 years. 
Urban teachers (male and female), 12.8 years. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



65 



5. Receipts and Expenditures 





Receipts 


Expenditures 




00 

c 


to 
*-> 

c 

u 

a« 

o a) 

-^ 6 

Bl 

— . CD 

a 1 


reserve funds, 
nces and other 
ces 


.2* 
'5 
o 


to 

,0) 
'u 

jS 

LO 

"to 


to 

C 
•— co 

—2 co 

-1 

C O 


u 

03 

a 
a . 

«J u 
in « 

1*8 

. I-" 
co Q, 


c 

•2 8 

CX a) 


3 

K3 
c 
a) 
a 






U T1 


>> ol fa 






cj O 


C co" 


<u 




c3 


co 

'So 


e c 

3 «J 


u. 5 o 


o 


4> 


co -H 


23 


go 


o 


> 


►J 


§ 


U 


f- 


H 


CO 


-J 


QSi 


H 




$ ' 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1867 


187,153 


1,151,583 


331,599 


1,670,335 


1,093,517 


149,195 


31,354 


199,123 


1,473,189 


1872 


225,318 


1,763,492 


541,460 


2,530,270 


1,371.594 


456,043 


47,799 


331,928 


2,207,364 


1877 


251,962 


2,422,432 


730,687 


3,405,081 


2,038,099 


477,393 


47,539 


510,458 


3,073,489 


1882 


265,738 


2,447,214 


757,038 


3,469,990 


2,144,449 


341,918 


15,583 


525,025 


3,026,975 


1887 


268,722 


3,084,352 


978,283 


4,331,357 


2,458,540 


544,520 


27,509 


711,535 


3,742,104 


1892 


283,791 


3,300,512 


1,227,596 


4,811,899 


2,752,629 


427,321 


40,003 


833,965 


4,053,918 


1897 


366,538 


3,361,562 


1,260,055 


4,988,155 


2,886,061 


391,689 


60,585 


877,335 


4,215,670 


1902 


383,666 


3,959,912 


1,422,924 


5,766,502 


3,198,132 


432,753 


86,723 


1,107,552 


4,825,160 


1907 


655,239 


6,146,825 


2,455,864 


9,257,928 


4,389,524 


1,220,820 


213,096 


1,732,739 


7,556,179 


1912 


842,278 


9,478,887 


3,936,887 


14,258,052 


6,109,547 


2,777,960 


167,755 


2,218,698 


11,273,960 


1917 


907,846 


12,193,439 


4,168,000 


17,269,285 


8,398,450 


1,987,644 


290,207 


3,435,534 


14,111,835 


1922 


2.Q76.712 


22,842,180 


12,805,773 


38,624,665 


16,690,982 


6,284,139 


480,483 


8,465,280 


31,920,884 


1923 


3,266,584 


23,855,879 


16,460,831 


43,583,294 


17,534,704 


7,497,509 


504,670 


10,321,472 


35,858,355 


1924 


3,392,552 


24,113,034 


12,630,296 


40,135,882 


18.105,568 


4,408,473 


518,989 


9,977,0 ? 4 


33,010,064 



The increase for the year 1924 in the amount paid as teachers' salaries was $570,864, while 
the decrease in the expenditure on sites and buildings was over three million dollars. The total 
expenditure decreased bv $2,848,291. The total value of equipment increased from $3,021,568 
to $3,357,006, and all other school property from $85,467,626 to $91,165,577. 

These tables show the expenditure per pupil for the years as given below: 
Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 

1902 1907 1912 1917 1922 1923 1924 

Teachers' salaries $7 04 $9 79 $13 08 $15 91 $27 75 $28 73 $29 75 

Sites and buildings 95 2 72 5 95 3 77 10 45 12 28 7 24 

All other expenses 2 63 4 34 5 11 7 06 14 87 17 74 17 24 

For all purposes 10 62 16 85 24 14 26 74 53 07 58 75 54 23 



Average cost per pupil (average attendance) 

1902 1907 1912 1917 1922 1923 1924 

Teachers' salaries $12 23 $16 47 $20 98 $24 52 $39 27 $4121 $4173 

Sites and buildings 1 65 4 58 9 54 5 80 14 78 17 62 10 16 

All other expenses 4 57 7 30 8 19 10 87 21 05 2^ 44 24 19 

For all purposes 18 45 28 35 38 71 4119 75 10 84 27 76 08 

The expenditure per pupil (enrolled attendance) for 1924 in the Public Schools alone will be 
found in Table E, and for the R. C. Separate Schools in Table F. The expenditure will there be 
shown as to rural schools, cities, towns, and villages separately. 



66 



THK REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



II. ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
1. Schools, Teachers and Attendance 



Year 



c 




CU 




a 




o 


to 


co 


u 

cu 


o 


JG 


o 


O 


J3 


d 


o 




m 


H 



a 

Oh 



o 



O 



|S 

TD oj 
bfl G 









TJ 




-a 




CU 




B 








OJ 


(Tt 


u 













+j 





c 




C3 




cu 


bio a> 





u 


«j 


bJO 






T| 




£i 


c 




CD 

o 


£ 


u 


> 


c 


3 


'J 


rt 


rt 


C 


Cu 









CO 
° <u U O 

cu -2 bo c 
b/0 o3 bo c<3 
o3 bfl oJ T3 
-m CU c 

cu bo75 i> 

*- o3 co o3 



1867 


161 


210 


1872 


171 


254 


1877 


185 


334 


1882 


190 


390 


1887 


229 


491 


1892 


312 


662 


1897 


340 


752 


1902 


391 


870 


1907 


449 


1,034 


1912 


513 


1,237 


1917 


548 


1,488 


1922 


656 


1,958 


1923 


688 


2,053 


1924 


708 


2,149 



18,924 
21,406 
24,952 
26,148 
30,373 
37,466 
41,620 
45,964 
51,502 
61,297 
70,048 
88,546 
91.051 
93,524 



15,376 
19,169 
21,342 
23,314 
26,420 
31,126 
35,036 
44,728 
45,891 
46,918 



14,997 
18,297 
20,278 
22,650 
25,082 
30,171 
35,012 
43,818 
45,160 
46,606 



8,606 
10,584 
12,549 
13,574 
16,866 
21,560 
24,996 
28,817 
33 500 
39,735 
46,919 
64,897 
64,497 
68,216 



45.47 
49.44 
50.29 
51.91 
55.52 
57.54 
60.05 
62.69 
65.04 
64.82 
66.98 
73.29 
70.83 
72.94 



2. Receipts and Expenditures 





Receipts 


Expenditures 


Year 


<u 
> 
•£ to 

# co a 
"3d to 


unicipal school 
ants and as- 
sessments 


alances, subscrib- 
ed and other 
sources 


to 

9* 
'53 
a 

e 

o 


~co £ 

cu C 

3 S 


bo 

.5 « 
2 8 

II 

« 2 

CO'T! 


ibraries, maps, 
apparatus, 
prizes, etc. 


co 

-* <u 

V CO 

3 C 
uZ cu 

- a 
w * 
i-i gj 

3 u 

CU J3 

cu C 


cu 

u 

3 

•5 
c 
cu 
a 

X 
CU 

"oj 

o 


a 

3 

a 
u 

CU 

a 

CO 

o 




J' 


S So 


PQ 


H 


H 


If) 


J 


tf «J 


H 


U 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ c. 


1867. 


9,993 


26,781 


11,854 


48,628 


34,830 






f7,889 


42,719 


2 26 


1872 


12,327 


41,134 


15,349 


68,810 


45,824 






f 15,993 


61,817 


2 88 


1877. 


13,607 


72,177 


34,482 


120,266 


70,201 


24,510 


2,811 


17,284 


114,806 


4 60 


1882. 


14,382 


97,252 


55,105 


166,739 


84,095 


36,860 


1,303 


32,082 


154,340 


5 13 


1887. 


16,808 


147,639 


65,401 


229,848 


112,293 


48,937 


3,624 


46,369 


211,223 


6 95 


1892. 


21,043 


206,698 


98,293 


326,034 


149,707 


65,874 


2,922 


71,335 


289,838 


7 74 


1897. 


26,675 


224,617 


84,032 


335,324 


168,800 


41,233 


5,786 


86,350 


302,169 


7 26 


1902. 


30,472 


293,348 


161,683 


485,503 


210,199 


100,911 


6,158 


118,173 


435,441 


9 47 


1907. 


40,524 


442,316 


308,540 


791,380 


281,484 


186,908 


15,991 


229,793 


714,176 


13 86 


1912. 


51,846 


757,255 


377,713 


1,186,814 


456,800 


308,193 


15,207 


263,024 


1,043,224 


17 01 


1917. 


63,127 


1,066,253 


370,346 


1,499,726 


635,089 


262,103 


24,836 


391,695 


1,313,723 


18 75 


1922. 


195,963 


2,154,985 


1,608,096 


4,049,044 


1,382,395 


1,059,531 


52,302 


1,164,491 


3,658,719 


41 32 


1923. 


217,621 


2,407,950 


2,173,846 


4,799,417 


1,526,180 


1,048,968 


55,020 


1,671,965 


4,302,133 


47 25 


1924. 


241,657 


2,591,048 


1.127,002 


3,959,707 


1,592,982 


529,091 


44,599 


1,402,053 


3,568,725 


38.16 



flncluding all expenditure except for teachers' salaries. 

In 1924 an increase of 2,473 in the enrolment and a decrease of $733,408 in the expenditure 
are noticed in the above tables. The expenditure per pupil of enrolled attendance decreased 
from $47.25 to $38.16. The total value of equipment increased from $257,411 to $272,570, 
and all other school property from $12,435,222 to $13,231,077. 

Detailed statistics in reference to these schools will be found in Tables F and G. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



67 



III. PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

The following is a complete list of the Protestant Separate Schools of the Province:— No 
Grattan, No. 2 Hagarty, L'Orignal and Penetanguishene (two schools). 



The whole amount expended for their main- 
113.76. Ten teachers held Second Class certi- 



They were attended by 435 pupils in 1924 
tenance and permanent improvements was $17 
ficates, and one held a Third Class certificate. 

More complete statistics for these schools will be found in Table T. 

IV. CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

The following table gives statistics of the "Continuation Classes, Grade A," up to and 
including 1907. Thereafter they are known as "Continuation Schools." Formerly the 
statistics of these schools were included with the statistics of the Public and Separate Schools, 
consequently certain items for the years 1897-1907 cannot be given. 







in 


jjn 


O 


cn 




^2 








o 




O 


CD 


cn 


> CD ■♦-» 








o 




-C 


*G 


J°3 


doc 








.£3 




o 


O 


a 


c v 




Year 




u 
cn 
u 




u 


cd 


3 
DU 


c o 








_G 


JZ 




O 


o 


cjo^ c 


^ E 




cn 




a 


<v 






+J CO , , 


^.2- 




O 
O 

J3 




6 


<v 
u 

_G 


s 

3 


JO 

E 

3 


g a; .2 
u Mo 

a> rt *■' 


_ 3 
03 CT 




W 


O 


H 


H 


£ 


'Z 


a. 


h 


1897... 


27 

59 

91 

138 

137 


20 
46 
65 
54 
36 


7 
12 
24 
73 
99 


' 1 

2 

11 

2 


34 

73 

119 

226 

241 


1,275 
1,856 
3,993 
6,094 
5,104 




$ 


1902.. 






1907 


' 6l'97 

73.15 


26,345 


1912 


75,556 


1917-18 


93,228 


1922-23 


181 
189 
198 


58 
57 
61 


104 
104 
100 


19 

28 
37 


323 
350 
396 


8,777 

9,337 

10,545 


82.42 
84.11 
83.19 


158,030 


1923-24 


180,325 


1924-25... 


189,589 











Receipts 






Expenditure 


Year 


Legislative 
Grants 


Municipal 

Grants 

(County and 

Local) 


Total 
Receipts 


Teachers' 
Salaries 


Sites and 
Buildings 


Total 
Expenditures 


1897 


$ 

2,700 

8,350 

25,610 

64,081 

65,733 

148,217 

159,720 

180,016 


$ 

"l77,l 33 

227,715 
543,872 
621,189 
688, .^52 


$ 

' 295,261 

360,431 

1,038,602 

1,105,370 

1,252.688 


$ 

' 73,325 
202,875 
228,362 
474,241 
533,395 
590,085 


' 15,750 
32,328 
243,630 
192,796 
264,893 


$ 


1902 




1907 




1912 


265,087 
324,621 
881,431 
969,483 
1,096,285 


1917 


1922 

1923 

1924 



Of the enrolled attendance for 1924-25, 6,°44 pupils were in the Lower School and 3,571 in 
the Middle School. The total attendance was made up of 4,725 boys and 6,270 girls. 



Average Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance 

1917 1922 

Teachers salaries $44 74 $54 03 

Sites and buildings 6 33 27 76 

All other expenses 12 53 18 63 

For all purposes 63 60 100 42 103 83 



1923 


1924 


$57 13 


S55 96 


20 65 


25 12 


26 05 


22 88 



103 96 



Statistics in detail for 1924-25 in reference to the Continuation Schools will be found in 
Tables H, I, J and K. 



68 



THK RKPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



V. COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

The following table gives comparative statistics respecting Collegiate Institutes and High 
Schools from 1867 to 1924, inclusive: 



Receipts, Expenditure, Attendance, etc. 





CO 

8 

O 


CO 
U 

O 


"a 


Percentage of average 
attendance to total 
enrolment 


Receipts 


Expenditure 


Year 


c 
? 

> 
"co 

*So 

<v 


.2* 

u 

ot 

O 

H 


CO 

'C 

-5 

C/) 
"to 
0) 
O 

a 

CD 

H 


CO 

to 

is 

'3 

-o 

c 

cd 
co 
<u 

c75 


0) 
U 

3 

**5 
c 
<u 
a 

X 

<u 
o 


1867 

1872 

1877 

1882 

1887 

1892 

1897 

1902 

1907 

1912 

1917 

1922 

1923 

1924 


102 
104 
104 
104 
112 
128 
130 
134 
143 
148 
162 
175 
183 
183 


159 

239 

280 

332 

398 

522 

579 

593 

750 

917 

tl,051 

tl,420 

fl,543 

fl,657 


5,696 

7,968 

9,229 

12,348 

17,459 

22,837 

24,390 

24,472 

30,331 

32,273 

t29,097 

f44,631 

t48,263 

f52,116 


55 

56 

56 

53 

59 

60 

61 

58.97 

60.94 

62.80 
t78. 15 
f84.74 
t86.04 
186.03 


$ 

54,562 

79,543 

78,762 

84,304 

91,977 

100,000 

101,250 

112,650 

158,549 

209,956 

184,088 

276,889 

328,014 

367,166 


$ 

139,579 

223,269 

357,521 

373,150 

529,323 

793,812 

767,487 

832,853 

1,611,553 

2,414,128 

3,051,684 

7,993,999 

8,381,349 

8,832,275 


$ 

94,820 

141,812 

211,607 

253,864 

327,452 

472,029 

532,837 

547,402 

783,782 

1,232,537 

1,554,049 

2,963,001 

3,392,901 

3,716,940 


S 

*19,190 

*31,360 

*51,417 

*19,361 

*73,061 

*91,108 

*46,627 

44,246 

193,975 

327,982 

277,544 

2,673,842 

2,260,346 

1,909,020 


$ 

124,181 

210,005 

343,710 

343,720 

495,612 

696,114 

715,976 

769,680 

1,213,697 

1,953,061 

2,418,975 

6,742,875 

7,249,589 

7,819,101 



* Expenses for repairs, etc., included. 

t For the school year ended six months after the calendar year specified 

The total value of the equipment in the Collegiate Institutes and High Schools increased 
during the year from $1,324,532 to $1,713,000 and all other school property from $16,122,086 
to $20,289,463. 



Average cost per pupil (enrolled attendance) 

1917 1922 1923 

Teachers' salaries $53 41 $66 39 $70 30 

Sites and buildings 9 54 59 91 46 83 

All other expenses 20 18 24 78 33 08 

For all purposes 83 13 15108 150 21 



1924 

$71 32 

36 63 

42 08 

150 03 



Number of Pupils in the three grades of schools in the Collegiate Institutes and 

High Schools 



Lower School 


1916-17 

20,190 

7,336 

1,571 


1921-22 

27,273 

9,794 

2,338 

39,405 

18,328 
21,077 


1922-23 

29,219 

12,210 

3,202 

44,631 

21,139 
23,492 


1923-24 

30,354 

14,386 

3,523 

48,263 

22,704 
25,559 


1924-25 
31,805 


Middle School 

Upper School 


16,178 
4,133 






Total enrolment 

Total number of boys. . 
Total number of girls. . 


29,097 

12,353 
16,744 


52,116 

24,529 

27,587 



The statistics of the various Collegiate Institutes and High Schools of the Province for 
1924-25 will be found in Tables L, M, N and O. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



69 



VI. VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 





Day Schools 


Evening Schools 


2 3 






*o 


to 




'a 


"5 




o£ 












Year 


o 

o 

m 

i 




— ,*o 

y 


6 

efl 


3 
a 

"u 


> o 

5 




•-* TO 

a c 


"o 

u 
<v 

s 

0) 


'5 

> 
W 


CO 

'a 
a 


o 


3 C 

si 


<u 

n 




o 
6 


O 1 " 

O d 


o^2 
o'g- 


O 

d 


li 


Oj3 

o rt 


O c/3 


"5-S 

o $ 


°8 


o 
6 


o 
6 


3§ 






£ 


£Q 


£ a 


Z 


H a 


z^ 


£ O 


i- 1 ^ 


£c/3 


2 


£ 


H bJO 


r-< a) 


1918-19 


11 


(not 
2,600 


know 


n) 


4.739 


(n 
kno 


ot 


1 SS 


S6 


16,733 
27,297 


611 


$ 


263,727 


1920-21 


13 


907 


1,019 


4,526 


wn) 


191 


51 


909 


2,958,681 


426,194 


1922-23 


16 


6,987 


988 


1,427 


9,402 


286 


51 


337 


51 


33.511 


1,097 


4,482,351 


676,906 


1923-24 


24 


9,184 


1,837 


1,798 


12,819 


371 


88 


459 


60 


36,452 


1,193 


7,645,762 


1,074,791 


1924-25 


27 


11.595 


1,739 


1,875 


15,209 


416 


108 


524 


52 


35,675 


1,182 


8,834,029 


1,134,513 







Receipts 






Expenditures 




Year 


Legislative 
grants 


Municipal 
grants 


Total 
receipts 


Teachers' 
salaries 


Buildings, 
sites and all 
permanent 
improve- 
ments 


Total 
Expenditure 


1918 

1920 

1922 

1923 

1924 


$ 
110,637 
511,021 
638,217 
624,558 
672,078 


$ 

329,049 

828,915 

831,862 

1,173,325 

1.778,049 


$ 
690,311 
1,489,496 
2,575,598 
4,369,533 
3.473,135 


$ 

246,077 

455,902 

787,370 

1,022,377 

1,274,964 


$ 

64,096 

514,919 

426,967 

2,006,419 

586,697 


$ 
493,200 
1,347,905 
1,871,614 
3,957,137 
3,105,235 



VII. DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATIONS, Etc. 



1. Table showing the Number of Teachers in Training at Provincial Normal Schools, 

and the Pupils at the Normal Model Schools in connection 

therewith, etc., 1877-1925 



Year 


No. of Normal 
School teachers 


No. of Normal 
School students 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten teachers 


No. of Normal Model 
School and Kinder- 
garten pupils 


1877 


13 

16 

13 

12 

13 

16 

*35 

*69 

*78 

*85 

*92 

* 92 

*92 


257 

260 

441 

428 

407 

619 

428 

986 

1,514 

1,815 

2,429 

2,452 

2,290 


8 
15 

18 

22 

23 

31 

*38 

*38 

*43 

*43 

*43 

*43 

*43 


643 
799 
763 

842 
832 
958 

979 (1907) 
914 (1912) 
938 (1917) 
1,070 (1922) 
1,112 (1923) 
1,191 (1924)1 
1,114 (1925) 


1882 


1887 


1892 


1897 


K02 


1907-08.. 

1912-13 

1917-18 

•1922-23 

1923-24 

1924-25 

1925-26 



Including those engaged in both a Normal and a Normal Model School. 



70 



THE REPORT OE THE 



No. 11 



2. High School Entrance Examinations, 1877-1925. 





u 

CD 








vlZ-V co 








-Q 








rO 5 Mrs 






Year 


s 

a « 

3'a 

o S 


Number 
granted 
certificates 


D 

o3 

G 

0) 

u 
u 

<u 
CU 


Year 


Total num 
examined i 
recommend 
by Principa 


Number 
granted 
certificates 


bfl 
cd 

c 
<u 
u 

CU 

CU 


1877 


7,383 


3,836 


51.95 


1907 


22,144 


15,430 


69.68 


1882 


9,607 


4,371 


45.49 


1912 


22,679 


13,977 


61.62 


1887 


16,248 


9,364 


57.63 


1917 


21,975 


15,751 


71.67 


1892 


16,409 


8,427 


51.35 


1922 


36,114 


27,560 


76.31 


1897 


16,384 


10,502 


64.09 


1924 


38,897 


32,340 


83.14 


1902 


18,087 


13,300 


73.53 


1925 


40,409 


31,619 


78.24 



3. Lower School Examination, 1925 

Statistics of Results by Papers. 



Subjects 



G cu 

r -1 o 



/, 03 

en C O 
% uV 

•3 ac 

TDQ C 
G „ oJ 
03 ofl X 

u.HW 



Number Granting Standing 



^ C o3 
G <W X 

O £W 



CU 

-G 

o 

03 4_> 

CU U 

C CU 



Appeals 



_X5 
o3 g 



11 

3 en 
^ en 



Per 
cent. 



English Grammar 

Canadian History. 

Geography 

Phvsiography 

Arithmetic 

Art 

Botany 

Zoology 

Agriculture and Horticulture, I 
Agriculture and Horticulture, II 
Latin Grammar 

Total 



10,07! 

17,756 

16,803 

12,673 

12,346 

14,13 

12,68 

10,723 

1,801 

1,245 

2,951 



1,167 

2,330 

1,353 

1,138 

1,997 

1,128 

1,254 

708 

241 

117 

294 



162 
665 
836 
507 
776 
506 
332 
224 
128 
8t 
128 



8,908 

15,426 

15,450 

11,535 

10,349 

13,009 

11,431 

10,014 

1,560 

1,128 

2,657 



9,071 

16,095 

16,287 

12,044 

11,127 

13,519 

11,763 

10,239 

1,688 

1,214 

2,787 



113,194 



11,727 



4,350 



101,46: 



76 



15 



105,834 



90.03 
90 . 65 
96.93 
95.04 
90.13 
95.63 
92.73 
95.50 
93.17 
97.51^ 
94.44 



Total Number of Candidates in June 34,155 

Total Number of Examination Centres 381 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



71 



4. Middle School Examination, 1925 

Statistics of Results by Papers 





Total 


Number 


Appeals 


Total 










Per cent. 


Subjects 


number of 


granted 


Total 


Number 


successful 


1925 




candidates 


standing 


number 


sustained 






English Composition. . 


11,955 


9,497 


101 


18 


9,515 


75.59 


English Literature. . . . 


11,287 


8,471 


183 


24 


8,495 


75.27 


British History 


12,597 


8,111 


252 


34 


8,145 


64.66 


Ancient Historv 


10,976 


6,977 


372 


103 


7,080 


64 . 50 


Algebra 


11,610 


8,917 


105 


31 


8,948 


77.07 


Geometry 


11,680 
10,795 


9,794 
7,983 


91 

178 


29 
49 


9,823 
8,032 


84.10 


Physics 


74.40 


Chemistry 


10,360 
6,661 


8,218 
5,001 


118 
98 


43 
9 


8,261 
5,010 


79 . 74 


Latin Authors 


75.22 


Latin Composition .... 


7,499 


4,930 


123 


27 


4,957 


66.30 


French Authors 


7,331 


5,391 


105 


22 


5,413 


73 . 84 


French Composition. . 


8,242 


5,073 


106 


18 


5,091 


61.77 


German Authors 


311 


241 


5 





241 


77.49 


German Composition . 


464 


297 


13 


4 


301 


62 . 30 


Greek Authors 


91 


75 


3 





75 


82.42 


Greek Composition. . . 


111 


94 


1 





94 


84.69 


Spanish Authors. . . 


110 


66 


4 





66 


60 . 00 


Spanish Composition.. 


120 


60 


1 





60 


50. CO 


Agric. and Hort. I . . 


304 


229 


14 


6 


235 


77.30 


i\gric. and Hort. II . . . 


277 


236 


4 


2 


238 


85.92 


Italian Authors 


4 


2 








2 


50. CO 


Italian Composition.. . 


4 


2 








2 


50 . CO 


Total 


122.789 


89,665 


1,877 


418 


90,083 





Total Number of Candidates writing Middle School Examinations. . . 23,706 
Total Number of Examination Centres 371 



5. Upper School Examination, 1925 

Statistics of Results by Papers 



Subjects 



English Composition. 
English Literature. . . 

History 

Algebra 

Geometry 

Trigonometry 

Botany 

Zoology 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Latin Authors 

Latin Composition . . . 

French Authors 

French Composition. 
German Authors. . . . 

German Composition 
Greek Authors. ..... 

Greek Composition. . 

Spanish Authors 

Spanish Composition. 

Italian Authors 

Italian Composition.. 
Problems 



Total 



Total 
number of 
candidates 



5,639 

5,057 

2,329 

2,841 

2,783 

2,528 

842 

853 

1,012 

934 

1,835 

1,889 

2,866 

2,826 

169 

166 

49 

51 

36 

33 

1 



56 



34,795 



Number 
granted 
standing 



4,384 

3,880 

1,641 

2,310 

2,043 

2,275 

633 

575 

801 

636 

1,484 

1,487 

2,599 

2,210 

142 

141 

45 

46 

24 

20 





2 



27,378 



Appeals 



Total 
number 



75 

75 

137 

53 

91 

17 

20 

34 

22 

25 

47 

44 

23 

84 

3 

4 

















53 



Number 
sustained 



28 

10 

48 

13 

31 

6 

9 

14 

5 

4 

13 

15 

8 

37 



1 

















241 



Total 
successful 



4,412 

3,890 

1,689 

2,323 

2,074 

2,281 

642 

589 

806 

640 

1,497 

1,502 

2,607 

2,247 

142 

142 

45 

46 

24 

20 





2 



27,619 



Per cent. 
1925 



78.24 
76.91 
72.52 
81.73 
74.52 
90.23 
76.25 
69.05 
79.64 
68.52 
81.58 
79.51 
90.96 
79.46 
84.03 
83 . 54 
91.84 
90.20 
66.67 
60.61 
00.00 
00.00 
03.58 



Total Number of Candidates writing in June 
Total Number of Examination Centres 



8,816 
281 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



VIII. Professional Certificates 

1. Table showing the Number and Classification of Professional Certificates issued 

by the Department in 1925 





<u 
o 

c 
a 
*o 
c 
<u 
*i 
a 
a 

6 


CO 

c 

01 
T3 

3 

W 

"3 

3 

S 
a 
U 

X 

W 


co 
V 

cd 

y 

<u 
_0 

o ^ 

•C S 


CO 

cu 

cd 

o 

_, *3 
1° 

w S 

■si 


— <u 

cd *j 

y <-> 

-l-> co 

c <3 

S3 

O.W 


CO 

to 
cd 

*J CJ 

2S 
StJ 

^ <u 
SO 

"£h CO 

<y co 


■d 

C co 

o « 
<u trf 

(LI ™ 

^l 

CU 4) 
CL.O 


CO 

<u 

u 

<U *j 

SO 

cu co 
-l-> cd 

►So 


CO 

cd 

U 

Ih 

2 CO 

HS 

■og 

II 

JO 


CO 

01 

ed 

si <-> 

3 "3 
CU In 
li CU 

WO 
^1 


pq 

<u 

•o 
ed 

u 

o 

.3 
C 

a co 

_cocx: 

C cu 

WO 


o 

<u 

2 

o 

Si 
U 

s 

<U CO 
> CU 

A« 
|l 

3 cu 
WO 


|o 

i>'5 

.22 5 

<u< 
HcS 

wS 


"8 

V 

•O CO 
<U 

!l 

O cu 

HO 


College of Education. . . 
Normal Schools 


288 
2429 

132 
217 


49 

455 

14 




275 




27 
512 
















302 




1650 


224 










2386 


English-French Model 
Schools 








22 
38 


26 

5 


85 
61 


31 


133 


Summer Model Schools. 














*45 


18Q 


Interim Certificates 
made permanent. . . . 




283 




234 




1172 




1689 


Other Certificates issued 








9 










9 






























Total number of certifi- 
cates 






283 


275 


234 


539 


1172 


1650 


278 


60 


31 


146 


31 


4699 










Total number of newly 
certificated teachers. . 








275 




539 




1650 


278 


60 


31 


146 




f2927 











*These previously held District Certificates. 
fGrand total of newly certificated teachers. 



Household Science 

Number of Interim Ordinary Certificates 23 

Number of Interim Specialist Certificates * S 

Number of Permanent Ordinary Certificates 12 

Number of Permanent Specialist Certificates 4r 

Manual Training 

Number cf Interim Ordinary Certificates 12 

Number of Interim Specialist Certificates 4 

Number of Permanent Ordinary Certificates 1 

Number of Permanent Specialist Certificates 7 

Kindergarten Certificates 

Number of Interim Kindergarten- Primary Certificates 39 

Number of Permanent Kindergarten-Primary Certificates 68 

Number of Kindergarten Directors' Certificates 10 

Art and Physical Culture Certificates (College of Education) 

Number of Interim Elementary Physical Culture Certificates 131 

Number of Interim Elementary Art Certificates 36 

Summer School Certificates 

Elementary Agriculture and Horticulture (Interim) 58 

Intermediate Agriculture and Horticulture (Interim) 12 

Elementary Art (Interim) 154 

Supervisors of Art (Interim) 48 

Specialists in Art (Interim) 22 

Auxiliary Classes (Interim) 35 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



73 



Elementary Commercial Subjects (Interim) 11 

Specialists in Commercial Subjects (Interim) , 10 

Elementary Household Science (Interim) 16 

Kindergarten-Primary (Interim) 96 

Elementary Vocal Music (Interim) 49 

Supervisors of Vocal Music (Interim) 13 

Elementary Physical Culture (Interim) 268 

Supervisors of Physical Culture (Interim) 65 

Specialists in Physical Culture (Interim) 54 

Elementary Manual Training (Interim) 5 

Note: — In addition to the above, 14 Interim Certificates in Elementary Physical Culture, 

62 Certificates in Agriculture and Horticulture, 1 in Vocal Music, 1 in Auxiliary Classes, and 
2 in sewing were granted, on pro tanto standing. 



2. Temporary Certificates Issued in 1925 



Inspectorates 


Number during 
1st half year 


Number during 
2nd half year 


Kent, West . . 


1 

2 

4 
1 
2 

1 
1 
3 

4 

1 
2 
3 

14 

14 

4 

57 




Prescott and Russell 


21 


Simcoe, North 


3 


District Divisions: 

No. I 




No. II 


2 


No. IX 


4 


English-French Divisions: 
No. IIA 


1 


No. IB 


1 


No. IIB 




R. C. Separate School Divisions: 
No. I 


4 


No. IV 




No. V 


2 


No. VI 




No. VII 


79 


No. VIII 


9S 


No. IX 


57 
226 


Totals 





Note.— One hundred and ninety-six of these teachers have had some professional trainini 



74 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 



Attendance 



Rural Schools 


^"3 

o •- 

££ 

O 3 


o 


in 

o 


:= o 

■a o 

i~ c .- 

oi v a 

>t{3 

< rtCu 


Percentage of actual 
aggregate to 
possible aggregate 
attendance 


1 Brant 


3,128 
4,576 
5,809 
2,097 
2,341 
3,877 
5,342 
3,963 
2,558 
6,129 
2,431 
1,435 
2,286 
5,818 
5,135 
5,882 
4,831 
2,673 
5,206 
2,723 
3,803 
6,577 
3,637 
6,141 
4,689 
4.475 
3,259 
3,951 
3,104 
2,776 
1,893 
5,286 
8,126 
2,676 
2,867 
4,063 
5,651 
4,219 
6,267 
26,185 
3,217 
2,204 
952 
1,470 
2,591 
2,041 
3,990 
2,024 
4,256 
2,786 
2,946 


1,566 
2.379 
2.980 
1,129 
1,212 
1 ,998 
2.782 
2,036 
1,330 
3,175 
1,263 

708 
1.219 
3,004 
2,666 
2,991 
2.518 
1,363 
2,639 
1,400 
2,000 
3,502 
1,878 
3,221 
2,394 
2,306 
1,719 
2,124 
1,610 
1,417 

998 
2,665 
4,180 
1,408 
1,490 
2,157 
2,964 
2,186 
3,268 
13,625 
. 1,655 
1,140 

535 

749 
1,360 
1,034 
2,013 
1,025 
2,170 
1,418 
1,458 


1,562 
2,197 
2,829 

968 
1,129 
1,879 
2,560 
1,927 
1.228 
2,954 
1,168 

727 
1,067 
2,814 
2,469 
2,891 
2,313 
1,310 
2,567 
1 ,323 
1,803 
3,075 
1,759 
2,920 
2,295 
2,169 
1.540 
1,827 
1,494 
1,359 

895 
2,621 
3,946 
1,268 
1,377 
1,906 
2,687 
2,033 
2,999 
12,560 
1,562 
1,064 

417 

721 
1,231 
1,007 
1,977 

999 
2,086 
1,368 
1,488 


2,100 
3,096 
4,090 
1,386 
1,605 
2,669 
3,415 
" 2,318 
1,564 
4,023 
1,732 

835 
1.471 
3,608 
3,622 
3,877 
3,278 
1,855 
3,453 
1,747 
2,521 
4,409 
2,303 
4,064 
3,112 
3,067 
2,118 
2,814 
1,956 
1,721 
1,283 
3,154 
5,247 
1,723 
1,997 
2,826 
3,882 
2,895 
4,112 
18,007 
1,917 
1,309 

532 

928 
1,512 
1,149 
2,367 
1,187 
2,680 

611 
1,798 


87 


2 Bruce 


84 


3 Ca r leton 


88 


4 Dufferin 


80 


5 Dundas 


87 


6 Elgin 


90 


7 Essex 


83 


8 Frontenac 


79 


9 Glengarrv 


79 


10 Grev . 


83 


11 Haldimand 


87 


12 Haliburton 


76 


13 Halton 


84 


14 Hastings 


82 


1 5 Huron 


82 


16 Kent 


83 


1 7 Lambton 


84 


18 Lanark . 


84 


19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 


83 
83 


21 Lincoln 


87 


22 Middlesex 


84 


23 Norfolk 


87 


24 Northumberland and Durham 


84 
84 


26 Oxford . . 


86 


27 Peel 


85 


28 Perth 


87 




82 




83 




83 


32 Renfrew 


77 




82 


34 Stormont . 


83 




86 


36 Waterloo . . 


88 


37 Welland 


88 


38 Wellington 


86 




86 


40 York 


87 




81 


42 Cochrane. 


83 




78 


44 Manitoulin 


85 


45 Muskoka 


78 


46 Nipissing 


77 


47 Parry Sound 


79 


48 Rainy River 


83 




84 


50 Timiskaming 


81 




82 








216,362 


112,027 


104,335 


140,945 


84.31 







DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



75 



SCHOOLS 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION 





c 

at 












M 

O 
O 

CQ 




v <u 

6"g 






PQ 


M 

O 
O 

« 


m 




CQ 


M 
O 
O 

PQ 


c 





3 at 


Oh 


to 








HI 

CQ 


1 


32 


566 


376 


512 


809 


821 


12 


2 


6 


823 


568 


845 


1,017 


1,168 


149 


3 


217 


1,079 


736 


956 


1,359 


1,405 


57 


4 


20 


393 


230 


396 


485 


529 


44 


5 




531 


263 


455 


484 


599 


9 


6 


9 


638 


462 


675 


937 


1,038 


118 


7 


53 


1,202 


870 . 


1,061 


1,106 


1,019 


31 


8 




937 


488 


687 


829 


995 


27 


9 




649 


297 


589 


497 


515 


11 


10 


"5 


1,131 


702 


1,033 


1,487 


1,594 


177 


11 




497 


278 


472 


529 


641 


14 


12 




373 


193 


211 


304 


260 


94 


13 




479 


263 


422 


499 


576 


47 


14 




1,388 


721 


1,083 


1,243 


1,232 


151 


15 




826 


507 


999 


1,156 


1,393 


254 


16 


13 


1,275 


762 


1,194 


1,165 


1,354 


119 


17 


12 


782 


619 


830 


1,058 


1,373 


157 


18 




523 


354 


434 


617 


663 


82 


19 




1,104 


570 


920 


1,101 


1,413 


98 


20. 




577 


356 


487 


572 


701 


30 


21 


49 


730 


478 


680 


962 


878 


36 


22 


19 


1,196 


784 


1,282 


1,479 


1,708 


109 


23 




797 


450 


695 


822 


831 


42 


24 


41 


1,217 


680 


1,229 


1,451 


1,384 


139 


25 




953 


602 


908 


1,088 


1,064 


74 


26 




812 


566 


853 


1,064 


1,106 


74 


27 


"77 


597 


404 


610 


723 


829 


19 


28 




629 


512 


643 


1,041 


1,041 


85 


29 


"32 


653 


373 


564 


687 


719 


76 


30 


166 


691 


321 


407 


451 


654 


86 


31 




367 


213 


287 


520 


435 


71 


32 


61 


1,232 


773 


988 


1,033 


1,113 


86 


33 




1,616 


990 


1,665 


1,835 


1,894 


126 


34 


ii 


615 


305 


518 


555 


641 


31 


35 


5 


480 


288 


577 


679 


736 


102 


36 


4 


801 


577 


813 


970 


862 


36 


37 


133 


1,290 


776 


1,036 


1,332 


1,063 


21 


38 




752 


474 


740 


929 


1,207 


117 


39 


143 


1,073 


789 


1.250 


1,550 


1,347 


115 


40 


503 


5,324 


4,260 


5,749 


5,860 


4,369 


120 


41 


6 


838 


449 


541 


645 


607 


131 


42 


52 


661 


353 


421 


389 


299 


29 


43 


39 


227 


156 


157 


205 


150 


18 


44 




339 


167 


235 


336 


325 


68 


45 




675 


287 


478 


563 


517 


71 


46 


109 


679 


309 


367 


291 


268 


18 


47 




1,043 


551 


762 


769 


723 


142 


48 


62 


421 


256 


412 


403 


345 


125 


49 


29 


1,381 


677 


749 


793 


556 


71 


50 


63 


686 


387 


530 


523 


548 


49 


51 


10 


766 


421 


537 


594 


592 


26 


1,981 


45,304 


28,243 


40,944 


47,796 


48,100 


3,994 



70 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 





Attendance 


Cities 


e c 
go 

.— 1 m 
O 3 

HO. 


to 

>> 

O 
M 


JO 

3 


n: o 

to v'q, 

>g 3 


c "3 *± 
p. ~ to a 
to a o 

to tj w 
CU to *j bo 


1 Belleville 


2,034 
5,016 
2,232 
4,420 
2,425 
2,865 

21,227 
3,207 
3,529 

10,085 
2,811 
3,201 

12,071 
2,489 
3,595 
2,950 
3,680 
2,636 
2,531 
3,813 
2,846 

91,364 
2,044 
7,929 
1,466 


1,009 
2,584 
1,145 
2,187 
1,220 
1,464 

10,663 
1,579 
1,779 
5,045 
1,434 
1,594 
6,021 
1,264 
1,841 
1,515 
1,827 
1,351 
1,311 
1,901 
1,449 

45,699 

1,011 

4,070 

704 


1,025 
2,432 
1,087 
2,233 
1,205 
1,401 

10,564 
1,628 
1,750 
5,040 
1,377 
1,607 
6,050 
1,225 
1,754 
1,435 
1,853 
1,285 
1,220 
1,912 
1,397 

45,665 

1,033 

3,859 

762 


1,470 
3,771 
1,643 
3,475 
1,872 
2,204 

16,232 
2,413 
2,758 
7,677 
2,141 
2,409 
9,184 
1,945 
2,745 
2,471 
2,788 
2,147 
1,933 
2,899 
2,318 

67,810 
1,529 
5,447 
1,100 


94 


2 Brantford 


94 


3 Chatham 


89 


4 Fort William 


92 


5 Gait 


92 


6 Guelph 


90 


7 Hamilton 


90 


8 Kingston ... 


92 


9 Kitchener 


92 


10 London 


91 


1 1 Niagara Falls . 


93 


1 2 Oshawa 


92 


13 Ottawa . 


90 


14 Owen Sound 


87 


15 Peterborough 


96 


16 Port Arthur 


94 




90 


18 St. Thomas 


91 


19 Sarnia 


92 


20 Sault Ste Marie 


91 


21 Stratford 


97 




88 


23 Welland 


92 


24 Windsor 


91 


25 Woodstock 


91 








202,466 


101,667 


100,799 


152,381 


89.77 






Towns 


73 
242 
376 
331 
495 
415 
449 
94 

1,542 
340 
158 
17 
110 
618 
521 
881 
516 

1,315 
149 
602 
140 
530 
312 
746 
168 
323 
299 
911 
759 
447 

1,238 


32 
125 
189 
165 
269 
219 
255 

35 
760 
164 

76 

10 

58 
348 
267 
433 
272 
696 

70 
299 

77 

258 

148 

" 371 

98 
156 
150 
494 
412 
232 
652 


41 
117 
187 
166 
226 
196 
194 

59 
782 
176 

82 
7 

52 
270 
254 
448 
244 
619 

79 
303 

63 
272 
164 
375 

70 
167 
149 
417 
347 
215 
586 


54 
181 
273 
237 
371 
322 
315 

74 

1,151 

256 

110 

7 

87 
496 
389 
677 
337 
1,036 
112 
426 
103 
370 
212 
607 
106 
249 
242 
683 
636 
280 
946 


89 


2 Alliston 


94 


3 Almonte 


93 




91 


5 Arnprior 


88 


6 Aurora . 


93 


7 Aylmer 


91 


8 Bala. . 


94 


9 Barrie 


88 


10 Blenheim . . 


90 


11 Blind River 


91 


12 Bonfield. 


84 


13 Bothwell 


89 


14 Bowmanville 


98 




92 


16 Brampton 


94 


17 Bridgeburg 


87 


18 Brockville 


93 


19 Bruce Mines 


87 


20 Burlington 


89 


21 Cache Bay 


87 


22 Campbellford 


83 


23 Capreol 


89 


24 Carleton Place 


95 


25 Charlton 


88 


26 Chesley 


95 


27 Clinton 


88 


28 Cobalt 


91 


29 Cobourg 


90 


30 Cochrane 


79 




89 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



77 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION (Continued) 



c 

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In 


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O 
O 

CQ 


M 

o 

o 
oa 

% 

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C 

o 
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CQ 


1 

2 

3 159 

4 289 

5 

6 133 

7 1,267 

8 118 

9 123 

10 821 

11 

12 47 

13 875 

14 177 

15 

16 

17 

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19 

20 82 

21 

22 7,246 

23 149 

24 605 

25 


336 
177 
139 
190 
175 
298 
138 
207 
127 
59 
22 
323 
37 
288 
193 
341 
144 

226 
241 

"25 
774 
178 


459 
593 
250 
630 
340 
441 

2,560 
621 
436 

1,300 
540 
623 

1,518 
345 
521 
371 
520 
.316 
368 
697 
339 
13,807 
395 

1,002 
86 


225 
648 
237 
600 
290 
335 

2,327 
360 
474 

1,104 
317 
472 

1,421 
273 
505 
416 
506 
309 
358 
505 
328 

9,650 
254 

1,022 
214 


400 
739 
294 
659 
557 
497 

5,089 
384 
804 

1,510 
479 
516 

1,540 
566 
592 
825 
557 
534 
471 
540 
438 
15,395 
423 

1,268 
222 


476 

1,419 
547 

1,109 
482 
707 

4,982 
850 
734 

2,747 
731 
738 

2.849 
537 
784 
701 
874 
643 
686 
912 
674 
22,659 
433 

1,701 
363 


474 

1,281 
568 
994 
566 
577 

4,395 
736 
751 

2,476 
685 
783 

2,922 
554 
905 
444 
882 
660 
648 
851 
826 
21,355 
365 

1,557 
403 


' 309 
623 

1,252 


12,121 


4,638 


29,078 


23,150 


35,299 


49,338 


46,658 


2,184 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 29 

8 

9 85 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 10 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 35 

30 

31 85 


43 
10 
92 

"82 

81 

153 

61 

44 

"41 


8 

43 

47 

72 

98 

91 

41 

12 

212 

76 

54 

7 

28 

93 

109 

84 

99 

155 

32 

57 

31 

60 

57 

114 

46 

44 

31 

248 

111 

115 

233 


11 
36 
42 
72 
77 
48 
44 
8 

200 
55 
16 
3 
20 
94 
59 
93 
55 

138 
24 
65 
20 

102 
67 

137 
14 
44 
69 

117 
94 

112 

134 


13 
38 
51 
67 
74 
85 
76 
8 

275 

41 

22 

3 

17 

147 

111 

158 
70 

159 
20 

106 
23 

110 
74 
80 
23 
80 
29 

182 

214 
68 

193 


23 
57 

106 
64 
80 
92 
79 
21 

338 
47 
34 

"24 
155 
122 
204 
127 
318 

32 
128 

36 
100 

57 
202 

50 

73 

65 
176 
166 

66 
302 


18 

68 
130 

56 
166 

99 
137 

20 
340 
121 

32 
4 

21 
129 
120 
260 

84 
392 

41 
175 

20 
114 

57 
213 

24 

82 
105 
188 

98 

86 
291 


"l5 

10 

"ll 



78 



THE report of thf 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 





Attendance 


Towns 


°1 

1- 

3 "a 

O 3 

HO. 


to 

>. 

O 

m 


5 


<u v CX 


Percentage of 
actual aggregate 
to possible aggre- 
gate attendance 


32 Copper Cliff 


661 
639 
401 
286 
390 
856 
595 
308 
364 
328 
323 
344 

1,198 
246 
817 
456 
442 
685 
131 
381 
348 
424 
451 
248 
149 
5S 
616 
563 
984 
347 
81 
293 

1,184 
298 
448 
103 
718 
104 

1,198 
378 
215 
87 
139 
55 
430 
355 

1,668 
453 

1,131 
218 
236 
545 
104 
552 
692 
765 
227 

1,644 
720 
472 

1,412 
251 


346 
335 
213 
148 
190 
406 
294 
164 
197 
166 
169 
193 
595 
137 
412 
231 
241 
346 

70 
202 
182 
225 
232 
116 

75 

26 
302 
297 
473 
166 

37 
155 
614 
165 
231 

56 
341 

51 
606 
195 
115 

43 

80 

22 
224 
155 
851 
223 
565 
100 
115 
268 

44 
295 
374 
393 
108 
834 
364 
238 
716 
133 


315 
304 
188 
138 
200 
450 
301 
144 
167 
162 
154 
151 
603 
109 
405 
225 
201 
339 

61 
179 
166 
199 
219 
132 

74 

29 
314 
266 
511 
18' 

44 
138 
570 
133 
217 

47 
377 

53 
592 
183 
100 

44 

59 

33 
206 
200 
817 
230 
566 
118 
121 
277 

60 
257 
318 
372 
119 
810 
356 
234 
696 
118 


534 
485 
277 
217 
293 
656 
441 
265 
276 
256 
220 
282 
712 
167 
596 
358 
323 
467 
108 
262 
247 
310 
391 
178 
118 

31 
485 
412 
664 
235 

56 
233 
907 
2^8 
359 

65 
537 

75 
93 S 
287 
147 

66 

78 

31 
383 
308 
1,340 
326 
822 
172 
182 
39' 

39 
422 
549 
627 
190 
1,39? 
505 
379 
1,114 
203 


95 


33 Cornwall 


94 


34 Deseronto 


94 


35 Dresden 


90 


36 Dryden 


91 


37 Dundas 


89 


38 Dunnville 


91 


39 Durham 


94 


40 Eastview. . , 


92 


41 Elmira 


94 


42 Englehart 


85 


43 Essex 


94 


44 Ford 


89 


45 Forest 


89 


46 Fort Frances 


91 


47 Gananoque 


93 


48 Georgetown 


95 


4 * Goderich 


85 


50 Gore Bay 


84 


51 Gravenhurst 


88 


52 Grimsbv 


88 


53 Haileyburv 


90 


54 Hanover 


94 


55 Harriston 


88, 


56 Hawkesbury 


84 


57 Hearst 


86 


58 Hcspeler 


95 


59 Huntsville. . . . 


88 


60 Ingersoll 


85 


61 Iroquois Falls 


92 


62 Kearney 


88 


63 Keewatin 


92 


64 Kenora 


77 


65 Kincardine 


85 


66 Kingsville 


91 


67 Latchford 


88 


68 Leamington 


93 


69 Leaside 


94 


70 Lindsay 


94 


71 Listowel 


91 


72 Little Current. 


95 


73 Massev 


93 


74 Matheson 


84 


75 Mattawa 


81 


76 Meaford 


94 


77 Merritton 


92 


78 Midland 


90 


79 Milton 


87 


80 Mimico 


92 


81 Mitchell 


94 


^2 Mount Forest 


94 


83 Napanee 


89 


84 Nesterville 


6; 


85 New Liskeard 


87 


86 Newmarket 


93 


87 New Toronto 


91 


88 Niagara 


93 


89 North Bay 


93 


90 Oakville 


90 


91 Orangeville 


94 


92 Orillia 


90 


93 Palmerston 


93 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



79 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



1* 



32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 

38 

39 

40 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 

47 

48 

49 12 

50 

5T 

5-2 

53 

54 

55 

56 

57 

58 

59 

60 52 

61 42 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

57 

76 

77 11 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 32 

90 

91 

92 

93 



47 
92 

41 



68 



42 

138 



78 
22 



91 

25 



44 



38 
43 



50 

84 



19 



64 



22 

73 



18 



168 

130 
83 
77 
39 
95 
73 
72 
38 
51 
89 
37 

212 
35 

126 
99 
61 

102 
26 
81 
45 



34 

30 

18 

5 

92 

134 

135 

34 

15 

50 

232 
51 
58 
19 
14 
25 

194 
76 
39 
26 
35 
12 
65 
53 

296 
83 

215 
29 
30 

160 
28 
82 

131 

135 
24 

331 

106 
65 

258 
21 



109 
79 
50 
46 
60 
89 

100 
35 
36 
46 
48 
47 

240 
34 

160 
36 
61 
70 
9 
52 
09 
77 
65 
44 
18 
10 
77 
75 

128 

50 

16 

5! 

216 

43 

69 

8 

135 

16 

173 

67 

37 
7 

24 

10 

00 

36 
239 

71 
157 

32 

27 

66 

18 

53 
111 
129 

37 
205 
108 

75 
185 

29 



116 

101 
87 
40 
94 

149 

142 
79 
68 
72 
85 
87 

265 
51 

137 
89 

121 

142 
37 
79 
43 
61 

102 
57 
33 
11 

151 

119 

154 

63 

6 

49 
223 

53 

83 

27 
137 

20 
240 

46 

36 

16 

31 
5 

70 

72 
411 

80 
238 

35 

50 

59 

16 

99 
134 
159 

51 
304 
109 

87 
305 

41 



102 
176 
97 
50 
75 
222 
148 
85 
96 
79 
48 
83 
221 
53 
191 
116 
96 
163 
29 
76 
85 
10*2 
131 
48 
37 
9 
128 
127 
253 
55 
14 
66 
290 
83 
111 
14 
135 
19 
302 
105 
58 
18 
16 
10 
113 
95 
465 
94 
243 
52 
67 
136 
29 
121 
153 
191 
68 
447 
180 
139 
353 



166 
153 
84 
73 
75 
209 
91 
37 
58 
80 
40 
48 
122 
73 
125 
116 
103 
174 
30 
93 
106 
93 
94 
69 
43 
20 
118 
108 
224 
60 
14 
77 
223 
68 
77 
29 
213 
24 
289 
84 
45 
20 
26 
11 
122 
69 
257 
125 
278 
70 
62 
124 
13 
133 
163 
107 
47 
303 
144 
106 
311 
43 



13 



16 



44 



80 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
I. TABLE A— ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE 





Attendance 


1 

Towns 


O ** 

„ 03 

a 


w 

>, 



CQ 


CO 




s 

X) CJ 

> a a 

< rtCu 


Percentage of 
actual aggregate 
to possible aggre- 
gate attendance 


94 Paris 


724 
159 
894 
993 

1,042 
457 
576 
535 
981 
796 
166 
379 
891 
451 
54 * 
309 
308 
44 
567 
995 
265 
776 
395 

1,200 
371 
168 
418 
266 

1,150 
424 
181 
611 
133 
534 

1,222 

1,089 
116 
226 
107 
273 

1,333 
729 
938 
153 
896 
465 
424 
322 


366 
76 
458 
502 
521 
239 
319 
260 
515 
412 

68 
180 
430 
241 
285 
138 
165 

30 
279 
493 
125 
389 
194 
617 
191 

S3 
204 
133 
572 
217 

89 
311 

62 
271 
632 
536 

63 
106 

58 
126 
683 
397 
450 

79 
434 
262 
225 
156 


358 

83 
436 
491 
521 
218 
257 
275 
466 
384 

98 
199 
461 
210 
255 
171 
143 

14 
288 
502 
140 
387 
201 
583 
180 

85 
214 
133 
578 
207 

92 
300 

71 
263 
590 
553 

53 
120 

49 
147 
650 
332 
488 

74 
462 
203 
199 
166 


578 

118 
787 
844 
762 
379 
442 
394 
725 
610 
116 
266 
676 
360 
390 
256 
177 

32 
446 
640 
187 
542 
309 
959 
276 
125 
328 
187 
890 
314 
131 
476 

97 
446 
827 
794 

73 
186 

85 
204 
937 
541 
730 
114 
631 
386 
325 
257 


93 


^5 Parkhill 


92 


r 6 Parrv Sound 


89 


97 Pembroke 


92 


98*Penetanguishene 


90 


99 Perth. . 


91 


100 Petrolia 


89 


101 Picton 


98 


102 Port Colborne 


91 


103 Port Hope 


93 


104 P^wassan 


87 


105 Prescott 


89 


106 Preton 


91 


107 Rainy River 


94 


108 Renfrew 


8S 


109 Ridgetown 


94 


110 Riverside 


91 


Ill Rockland 


87 


112 St. Marv's 


92 




90 


114 Seaforth 


92 




89 


11^ Sioux Lookout 


90 


117 Smith's Falls 


91 


1 18 Southampton 


90 


119 Stayner 


89 


120 Strathroy 


91 


121 Sturgeon Falls 


84 


122 Sudbury 


92 




90 


124 Thorn bury 


94 


125 Thorold 


89 


126 Tilbury 


89 




92 


128 Timmins 


89 


129 Trenton 


96 


130 Trout Creek 


81 


131 Uxbridge 


93 


132 Vankleek Hill 


93 


133 Walkerton 


93 


134 Walkerville 


91 




92 


136 Waterloo 


95 


137 Webbwood... 


91 


138 Weston 


89 


139 Whitby 


90 


140 Wiarton 


93 




90 






Totals 


73,321 


37,292 


36,029 


55,336 


90.62 








216,362 

202,466 

73,321 

22,977 


112,027 

101,667 

37,292 

11,827 


104,335 

100,799 

36,029 

11,150 


140,945 

152,381 

55,336 

16,994 


84.31 


2 Cities 


89.77 




90.62 


4 Villages 


89.20 






5 Grand Totals, 1924 


515,126 
519,271 


262,813 
265,073 


252,313 
254,198 


365,656 
360,983 


87.68 


6 Grand Totals, 1923 


88.38 








4,145 


2,260 


1,885 


4,673 




8 Decreases 


.70 






9 Percentages 




51.01 


48.98 


70.98 





including Protestant Separate School. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



81 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION (Continued) 





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180 


226 


146 




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136 




173 


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138 


270 


155 




98 






211 


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99 






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89 


92 


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101 


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108 


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102 




118 


151 


105 


178 


236 


193 




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79 


136 


220 


201 




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36 


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168 




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56 


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9 


3 


8 


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112 






106 


83 


72 


164 


142 




113 




227 




149 


152 


253 


214 




114 


41 




38 


41 


29 


62 


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115 




65 


83 


83 


196 


199 


150 




116 






72 


51 


90 


95 


56 


31 


117 






227 


154 


259 


247 


313 




118 




33 


34 


59 


42 


132 


40 


31 


119 






22 


21 


32 


43 


50 




120 






49 


62 


91 


119 


97 




121 






64 


44 


70 


40 


48 




122 






270 


155 


202 


338 


185 




123 




73 


25 


64 


71 


109 


82 




124 






27 


18 


41 


31 


45 


19 


125 






148 


88 


131 


164 


80 




126 






32 


9 


20 


33 


39 




127 




26 


73 


72 


130 


86 


147 




128 


27 


92 


283 


141 


266 


211 


202 




129 






216 


164 


150 


279 


280 




130 






35 


9 


16 


31 


23 


2 


131 






59 


36 


22 


55 


54 




132 






21 


11 


20 


24 


31 




133 






51 • 


18 


53 


82 


69 




134 




82 


229 


163 


254 


330 


275 




135 






160 


120 


92 


186 


171 




136 




113 


142 


99 


206 


178 


200 




137 






36 


18 


37 


17 


25 


20 


138 




37 


116 


89 


199 


227 


228 




139 


21 


36 


47 


59 


105 


96 


101 




140 






61 


58 


59 


120 


126 




141 






51 


34 


56 


95 


86 






671 


3,021 


12,103 


10,094 


13,776 


17,288 


16,109 


259 


1 




1,981 


45,304 


28,243 


40,944 


47,796 


48,100 


3,994 


2 


12,121 


4,638 


29,078 


23,150 


35,299 


49,338 


46,658 


2,184 


3 


671 


3,021 


12,103 


10,094 


13,776 


17,288 


16,109 


259 


4 




398 


4,139 


3,030 


4,535 


5,275 


5,355 


245 


5 


12,792 


10,038 


90,624 


64,517 


94,554 


119,697 


116,222 


6,682 


6 


13,603 


8,670 


95,924 


66,466 


97,316 


116,597 


113,984 


6,711 


7 




1,368 








3,100 


2,238 




8 


811 




5,300 


1,949 


2,762 






29 


9 


2.48 


1.95 


17.59 


12.52 


18.35 


23.24 


22.56 


1.30 



82 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



I. TABLE A 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS (Continued) 

ATTENDANCE AND PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF 
INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Concluded) 





Rural 
Schools 


Cities 


Towns 


Villages 


Totals, 
1924 


No. of Pupils admitted during the year to 












School for the first time (Pupils who pre- 












viously attended some other School in 














23,981 


22,758 


8,412 


2,360 


57 511 


No. of Boys who left School during the year 












to attend some other Public or Separate 












School in another School Section 


10,310 


6,155 


2,439 


925 


19 829 


No. of Girls who left School during the year 












to attend some other Public or Separate 














9,664 


5,884 


2,533 


856 


18 937 


No. of Bovs who left the 4th Book Class dur- 












ing the year to attend a Secondary School 












(Continuation, High or Vocational) 


3,748 


5,326 


2,105 


724 


11,903 


No. of Girls who left the 4th Book Class dur- 












ing the year to attend a Secondary School 












(Continuation, High or Vocational) 


4,481 


5,302 


2,422 


871 


13,076 


No. of Boys who left the 5th Class during the 












year to attend a Secondary School 


211 


18 


3 


17 


249 


No. of Girls who left the 5th Class during the 












year to attend a Secondary School 


325 


18 


12 


22 


377 


No. of Pupils who left to attend some Private 














152 


492 


S3 


12 


739 


No. of Pupils removed by death or disability 


237 


565 


140 


58 


1,000 


No of Pupils in Art 


208,985 


189,811 


71,805 


22,429 


493,030 
437,960 


No. of Pupils in Geography 


176,464 


178,327 


63,311 


19,858 


No of Pupils in Alusic 


188,541 


194,462 


69,568 


20,176 


472,747 
448,206 
471,072 




194,061 


165,685 


67,788 


20,672 
21,531 


No. of Pupils in Composition 


194,060 


187,702 


67,779 




60,668 


57,768 


19,891 


6,737 


145,064 
218,075 
241,061 
461,324 


No of Pupils in English History 


87,357 


90,584 


30,461 


9,673 


No of Pupils in Canadian Historv 


95,847 


100,032 


34 068 


11,114 


No. of Pupils in Physiology and Hygiene . . . 


189,475 


185,824 


65,807 


20,218 


No of Pupils in Nature Study . . . 


181,245 


177,541 


63 985 


20,424 


443,195 
497,603 


No. of Pupils in Physical Culture 


210,191 


193,833 


71,632 


21,947 


No. of Pupils in Bookkeeping 


157 


1,872 




49 


2,078 


No. of Pupils in Arithmetic and Mensuration 


1,657 


2,184 


118 


146 


4,105 


No. of Pupils in Algebra 


2,157 


1,382 


142 


119 


3,800 


No. of Pupils in Geometry. . . . 


690 


581 


79 


87 


1,437 
1,373 


No. of Pupils in Latin 


1,143 




113 


117 


No. of Pupils in German 


27 








27 


No. of Pupils in French (beyond 4th Book) . 


982 


42 


107 


93 


1,224 


No. of Pupils in French (Primer to 4th Book 












inclusive) 


3,055 




14 


222 


3,291 


No. of Pupils in Elementary Science 


1,431 


1,110 


129 


88 


2,758 


No. of Pupils in Commercial Subjects 


65 


2,122 






2,187 


No. of Pupils in Agriculture 


56,195 


9,441 


6,162 


3,866 


75,664 


No. of Pupils in Manual Training 


19,540 


98,735 


7,077 


1,669 


127,021 


No. of Pupils in Household Science 


9,690 


62,873 


2,314 


670 


75,547 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 





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IS 
H 

Ih 


Ih 

o 
u 


u 
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b 

Ih 


tC 
Ih 


,3 

4-> 


CD 

>N 

Si 
co 


c 




TD 


T3'£ 


-M 


O 


O 


o 


O 


o 


O 


O 


o 


r3 




C 


CO. 




e 


c 


c 


c 


G 


c 


a 


c 




2 




2 


r*H 


Cu 


s 


3 




3 
I— > 




3 




3 




a 


O 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



85 



— 

(2 


cm no 1 

^H CO 1 

cm ,-h 1 


2,223 
1,916 


oo 

PO O 


NO PO 1 

00 ON 1 

«H O 1 


1,165 
1,091 


On O 

-H O 


O f- 

-r o 

PN Csj 


•r-4 00 

cm r^. 

o_o_ 


CM -* 

On On 


NO -+l 
PO NO 


<* NO 1 

CM -* 1 


11,248 
10,681 


PO 
CM 


to 1 

M '. '. 1 

O 1 




















CM CN) 


CM CM 


Th 


^ 1 • • 

2 | 








• • 








nO 00 


• CN 


ro LO 


On to 

1 


CM 
















CM "* 


o o 


-r to 

CM CM 


PO 00 1 


-t -t 


PO -r- 1 
-f NO 


© 


00 






















NO ON 


CM O0 

O to 

CM i— I 


© 

NO 

PO 


en 

to 






ro cm 






PO CM 


O ^ 


^^ t^ 


O 00 

CM ^H 




OJ O 1 ON lO | Tf 

^H po to On 
rf PO r~~ 

! 


ce 






O CM 












CM On 

O vo 
PO CM 


'- 1 


no PO 


pm © 1 r^j 

!>• NO ^f 
»— i 


en 

r*5 




O CM 


CM NO 


PO --i 


t^ PO 


**-H 


PO NO 

CM ^H 


CM CM 


O On 
nOO 
CM PO 


ON O 


,-H PVJ 


"* O 1 -t< 

PO 00 -^ 
O_o0 C-_ 


tn 
u 
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cm 




00 *+ 


PO CM 


to CM 






,-H O 
CM »— 1 
PO PO 


On On 
-* 00 
CM CM 


"<* PO 

to -^ 

t-i CM 


PN NO 




On N 1 NO 
PO 00 1 PN 

i-T»~r cm" 


en 
In 




PO C 


NO CM 


^ r-~ 


PO 00 1 00 "— I 
CM tH 1 CM PO 

1 


to t— 

ON CM 
CM PO 


LO PO 

to i-( 

i-H CM 


OO 1 -TH 
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PO C^ I to 

PO PO NO 
CM CM ^ 


en 

O 


• • 1 l^fN 

• • PO PO 


-t ON 

rf On 




00 --H 1 CNN 

no On 1 to cn 
PO CM PO Tf 


,-H LO 

*-f On 


On to 
CM NO 


^H O 






NO *+ 
00 ^H 
CM PO 


© 
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cm" 


en 

Ih 

ON 


po i-h 


r-~ cm 

ON O 


NO 00 
CM CO 
PO CM 


On -* 
PO PO 


"* CM 
On ^h 
CM PO 


t-~ CM 

NO T* 

*-l CM 


On rh 

H CM 


"*"* 








■po vO 
© CM 
PO CM 
»—l i— 1 


On 
CM 
lO 

cm" 


e 

>> 

00 


t^ PO 


o — 

-t PO 
PO CM 


PO ON 

to t-» 

to -* 


00 r^ 
CM PO 


to PO 
On to 


ON NO 

CM CM 












NO NO 

PO c^ 


CM 

NO 

lO 

cm" 


en 
u 


PO o 
PO PO 


On — i 
00 00 
NO LO 


OtJh 
PO PO 


t» ON 


NO CO 


CM «H 












t-~ PO 
CM i-H 


© 

NO 

PO_ 

cm" 


03 
Ih 

NO 


O NO 

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Tf ON 

i-~ to 


PO On 

NO 00 


















PO PO 

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oo_ 


2 


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LO to 


r— to 

to PO 
CM CM 


















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© 
o 


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CU 
« 

> 

2 

o 

hi 
o 
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mo 


en jA 

cSo 


en tn 

cqO 


tn" tn 

CQO 


en tn 
q.3 

CQO 


en tn 

CQO 


tn tn 

CQO 


en tn 

°^ 

CQO 


en tn 

>,r 

0.3 

CQO 


en ^cn 

CQO 


tn tn 

°^ 

CQO 


tn tn 

CQO 


CM 

ON 

tn 

CU 

be 

> 

en 

e2 

C 
03 
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o 


cc! 

S 
"C 

°r 

c 

OJ 

hi 

aj 
bo 
u 

a 
2 


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s 

a, 


M 
O 

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CQ 
en 


M 

o 

O 

CQ 

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a 
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a> 
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u 

CU 

c/) 
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c/) 


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O 

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(2 



4 D.E 



86 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



*0 
0> 
3 

a 
+j 

a 
o 
U 

CO 

O 
O 

u 

CO 

u 

-' 

CQ 

& 

Oh 

H 







^O NO 


ON 00 


ro oo 


NO CO 


LO l^ 


LO co 


CO ON 


N. t^ 


■>* >o 


LO O 


^f CO 


tH so 


CN -rf 


NO 






O CO 


^ o 


co co 


On r- 


Ol LO 


LOt^ 


r-> t» 


On i* 


o o 


NO LO 




Tj*N 


ON 


t^ 




CO 


Tf co 


oo 


O CN 


CO PO 


CO "* 


CN lO 


oo 


r— On 


o >+ 


CN NO 


-t 00 


CN O 


O On 


CO 




































crj 


NO no" 


Tt< "* 


-* — < 


oo i^ 


co tN 


tJi co 


On On 


NO NO 


rH^f 


CN CO 






CO O 


"* 




(2 






CN CN 




















^ -* 


oo 






























CN 


































• i- 




■ • 
















. 


x* 00 


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00 T*1 


ro 




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CN 


CO 




S^ 
































co 


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r— 1 
































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l-H T-H 


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CN NO 


co O 


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oo 




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T-H T-H 




CN 


CO LO 


oo 




n 
































i— i 
































fl 






















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y— i 














NO CN 


t^- O 


CN O 


CN 00 


CO "* 


O' LO 


N co 


T-H CO 


<* 




>, 






















•H 


CO 


ON ON 


CO 


^-s 


NO 


























T-l -4 


CO 


































co 






















O ^N 


^^ 


CN NO 


00 








LO CO 


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ro ■<+ 


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T-H O 


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t^ NO 


CO t^ 


N X-^ 


r— lo 


CN 


9 


>* 










1— 1 


«"• 


rh CN 


N LO 


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00 OO 


t-i CN 


CN 


NO CN 


ON 


o 




















i-H 


T-H TH 






<* Tf 


CO 


C 
































o 


co 








LO T-l 


t-~ ^ 










T-l THH 


0O LO 


t-h ro 


ro oo 


o 


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t^- CN 


ro co 


O NO 


c^ t^ 


NO co 


LO CN 




o** 


CO N 


On CN 


ro 


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>> 










»H 










t-H LO 


i-H CN 




Tf TH 


•*> 


(3 


^ 




















CO co 






oo oo 


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CO 






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i-H 00 


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00 NO 


COO 


LO CO 


oo ro 


o 






o-io 


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t^ o 


t^ LO 




CO LO 


T-H CO 


N CN 


TfH ON 




CO CN 


NO 


tf 


^> 






i—i 


T-H 


CN T-l 


NO CO 


NO co 


N co 


LOCO 


^O 






looo 


co 
































o 


CO 














i— 1 tH 


CN CN 


coco 


CO rt< 






CN th 


oo 


Q 


CO 






CN tH 










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O CN 


T— 1— 1 


On lo 


^H T— 


i-H -rHH 


LO 








tH lO 


O NO 


Tf CN 


-<* 00 


O TjH 


N t— 


Tt< CN 


NO 00 


T_| 




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LO 


5 


X 






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NO 


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t— 


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ro 
















T|T^ 


co"-^ 


CN CN 






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ON 




























i-l i-H 


CN 


en 






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T-H ON 


00 NO 


LO CN 


£-» LO 


CN LO 


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i-l CN 




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o 






NO O 


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t^ T-l 


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CN On 


i-i co 


^o 


r^- oo 






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LO 


>> 






i—i i—i 


LO CO 


-rHON 


OO 


CO co 


CO N 


CN t^ 


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Tf NO 


o 


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T-l 


CN i-i 


rt* -t 


-* Tt< 


CN CN 








LOLO 


H 


o 


<rH 


























tH t-H 


CO 


R 


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CN CN 






NO O 


r- ro 


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t-- T-l 


T-H 




ro lo 


W 


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f-» CN 


CN 00 


LO O 


CO O 


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oo ro 


o 


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"tf o 


CO "+ 


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On CN 


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ro 

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00 


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ro 


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r-IN 


^NO 


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ON 


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X~- Tfl 


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LO 


en 




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o 


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co 


























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NO 


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ro 


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co 


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^ 


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o-- 


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CO 

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CQO 


cqO 


ffiO 


fflO 


mo 


CQO 


CQO 


CQO 


CQO 


cqO 


CQO 


CQO 


CQO 












J4 
o 
o 

a 


O 
O 

CQ 

-O 
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M 
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J* 
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co 

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w 
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CQ 
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3 


3 
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CQ 




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3 
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3 


CD 
CO 


3 


CO 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



87 



Totals 


1,018 
963 


24,357 
20,947 


t-H CN 

i-H CO 

CN O 
LO CO~ 


10,518 
9,116 


11,426 

9,884 


13,281 
12,406 


11,443 
10,666 


t~~ Os 

CN t— 

Os"os" 


CO CN 

© so 

Os"©" 


953 

1,355 


© ^ 
CN i* 
CN CO 


LO LO 

00^ 1-H 

f^Os" 
© Os 


©^ 
t—" 
© 

CN 


19 yrs. 
& over 


' ' 1 1 




• CN 




CO ■ | • i-i 1 -co 

: i : 1 : 
I I 


O "-+ 


CN © 


CO © 1 LT 

T-H T-t CO 

| 


LO 


u 

CO 

T— 1 




CN t-H 




• 




CN CO 1 i— i-l 1 CN • 


CN OS 
CN ^ 


CN ^f 
CN 


Tt OS 


co Os 1 co 

T-H 


en 
u 




Tf CN 


CN t-h 




cn cn 


Tf sO 1 00 00 1 lo co 
1 CO CN 1 ■«* LO 

I ! 
1 1 


lo © 1 co sO 
^CN | 

1 


O CN 
CN Tt> 


o ^ 

© Os 
CO CO 


CO 
© 


en 

I 




^ t-H 


CN ** 


sO CN 

1 


CO OS 
LO CN 


r^ © 1 lo co 1 OC* 
rjn SO © i-H i— i t^- 

! 


O0t^ 1 00ON 
OS © CN LO 


© OO 

i* sC 

! 


-H t^ 

CN -H 
O co_ 


00 
co 
°\ 
CN 


« 1 ' ' 

u • • 

M : : 
2 ! 


co OS 


O sO 
t— CO 


CN 00 
Cs co 


O LO 
LO CO 


LO CO 

00 sO 
CN i-H 


CN © 1 vO CO 

-H LO 1 -t OS 

sO co 00 lo 

! 


CN CO 

-H O 


CN CO 

i-H OS 

CN CN 


LO 1^ 

O OS 


O CN 
O t». 

t-H CO 

Tin" co" 


00 

CO 

LO 


en 




*•* 00 
co i-h 


sO oo 
CN LO 


vO sO 
— i© 
CN i-H 


r- so 
00 co 
CO CN 


© — 1 
CN i-H 
00 LO 


SO Tf 
i-H CN 

co Os 


r^ co 

Os © 


t^- 00 
i-HLO 

sfjvo 
CNCN* 


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CN co 


t^ i-H 

TjH SO 


t-HO 

CO to 

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CO 
co* 


en 

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2 




CN CO 
^O 

CN i-H 


CN i-H 
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© ** 
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CO T-H 


co so 
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LO J>- 

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CN CN 
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co Os 

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cncn" 


rO SO 
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cn"cn 


LO LO 

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iHH l-~ 

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Os"oo" 


OS 
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en 
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cn t-i 


CN SO 
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00 r~~ 

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sO 00 
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t-h ro 
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cn"cn" 


LO t~» 

rt^so 
CN CN 


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0C © 1 00 

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■^h"©" CN 
I— -H | CN 


en 

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CN O 

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CN LO 
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t^. LO 


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t-H 00 


t* LO 
1-H CN 
i- l_lO 

cn"i-T 


CO lo 
CN CO 
CN CO_ 
C0"CN 


1^ sC 
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sO t^ 

CN CN 


^H CO 
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CO © 

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to 
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co"co 


sO CO 
co_co_ 


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co"cn" 


lo oo 
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CN 00 

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LO©_ 

i-H CN 


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co © 






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s 

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to CO 

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Os t^ 

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i-H 00 

CN '- 

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cn"t-h" 


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co Os 
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CN 

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SO so 


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CQO 


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8£ 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 





Teachers 


Salaries 


Rural Schools 


C O 


3 


73 

E 


c3 

H 

to 

en 
CD 
-C CD 

.SP« 


J2 

CO 

8 .a 

Mg 


CO 

sis 

0) ** 
M <U 


u 

a 

la 


1 Brant . 


81 

173 

169 

92 

80 

124 

130 

149 

80 

227 

82 

60 

65 

195 

199 

147 

175 

126 

228 

119 

96 

208 

106 

214 

136 

128 

98 

117 

105 

97 

74 

168 

235 

84 

115 

102 

130 

154 

140 

572 

93 

65 

31 

52 

111 

64 

141 

66 

118 

81 

84 


2 
20 
24 

7 
19 
13 
20 

7 

4 
23 

6 

9 

4 
19 
24 

9 
10 

7 
22 

7 
13 
26 
10 
31 
14 
20 
11 
21 
17 

8 

8 
10 
30 
10 
11 
22 
24 
15 
16 
81 
14 
13 

7 
14 
14 

9 

28 
16 
21 
24 
18 


79 

153 

145 

85 

61 

111 

110 

142 

76 

204 

76 

51 

61 

176 

175 

138 

165 

119 

206 

112 

83 

182 

96 

183 

122 

108 

87 

96 

88 

89 

66 

158 

205 

74 

104 

80 

106 

139 

124 

491 

79 

52 

24 

38 

97 

55 

113 

50 

97 

57 

66 


$1,300 
1,300 
1,700 
1,200 
1,500 
1,500 
1,900 
1,000 
1.200 
1,425 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,400 
1,650 
1,400 
1,300 
1,100 
1,100 
1,000 
1,550 
2,000 
1,450 
1,450 
1,400 
1,400 
1,800 
1,400 
1,700 
1,300 
1,200 
1,500 
1,500 
1,100 
1,500 
1,538 
2,550 
1,800 
1,900 
3,000 
1,500 
2,600 
1,300 
1,500 
1,200 
1,500 
2,000 
1,800 
2,300 
2,800 
1,900 


$1,950 
1,200 
1,700 
1,100 
1,300 
1.350 
1,500 
1,150 
1,200 
1.200 
1,600 
1,300 
1,500 
1,400 
1,500 
1,425 
1,300 
1,200 
1,400 
1,200 
1,450 
1,450 
1,500 
1,225 
1,500 
1,300 
1,400 
1,350 
1,200 
1,200 
1,300 
1,200 
1,230 
1,200 
1,200 
1,350 
1,500 
1,200 
1,600 
2,250 
1,350 
2,200 
1,000 
1,300 
1,300 
1,000 
1,200 
1,700 
1,800 
1,500 
1,400 


$1,150 
1,118 
1,168 
1 ,050 
1 ,039 
1,148 
1,270 
900 
1,050 
1,082 
1,096 
833 
1 ,050 
1,055 
1,173 
1,136 
1,080 
950 
922 
861 
1,252 
1,125 
1,170 
1,053 
1,140 
1,171 
1,274 
1,132 
1,053 
987 
1,025 
1,110 
1,148 
975 
1,118 
1,201 
1,285 
1,167 
1,359 
1,591 
1,178 
1,317 
1,114 
950 
925 
1,039 
1,130 
1,047 
1,202 
1,264 
1,150 


$1,046 


2 Bruce 


977 


3 Carleton 


1,029 


4 Duffer in 


992 


5 Drndas 


973 




1,028 




1,062 




851 




937 


10 Grey 


986 


1 1 Haldimand 


1,030 


12 Haliburton 


805 


13 Halton 


1 ,053 


14 Hastings 


948 




1,001 


16 Kent 


1,006 


1 7 Lambton 


1,006 


18 Lanark 


933 




933 


20 Lennox and Addington 


894 
1,052 


22 Middlesex 


1,014 


23 Norfolk 


995 


24 Northumberland and Durham. . 


994 
998 


26 Oxford 


1,040 


27 Peel 


1,034 


28 Perth 


1,039 




951 


30 Prescott and Russell 


878 




976 


32 Renfrew 


949 


33 Simcoe 


1,005 


34 Stormont 


979 


35 Victoria 


974 


36 Waterloo 


1,038 


37 Welland 


1,079 


38 Wellington 


1,015 


39 Wentworth 


1,072 


40 York 


1,118 


41 Algoma 


937 


42 Cochrane 


1,168 




911 


44 Manitoulin 


838 


45 Muskoka 


807 


46 Nipissing 


876 




905 


48 Rainy River 


968 




992 


50 Timiskaming 


1,038 




1,001 








6,686 

4,492 

1,647 

534 


832 
687 
186 
104 


5,854 

3,805 

1,461 

430 


3,000 
3,500 
3,600 
2,000 


2,250 
3,500 
2,500 
1,550 


1,168 
2,321 
1,806 
1,386 


994 


2 Cities 

3 Towns 


1,397 
1,082 


4 Villages 


1,001 






5 Grand TotaJs, 1924 


13,359 
13,250 


1,809 
1,716 


11,550 
11,534 


3,600 
3,600 


3,500 
3,500 


1,684 
1,661 


1,138 


6 Grand Totals, 1923 


1,133 






7 Increases 


109 


'93 


16 






23 


5 


8 Decreases 








9 Percentages 




13.54 


86.45 











DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



89 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 










CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. 












Salaries 


(Continued) 






>. „ 


>;2 


b 03 


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<ajs£ 03 

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<u n O 




<ESs8 


<Ji ^ s 


<SZ% 


<£*% 


<b$q% 


<^&Q8 


<U&% 


<W£ 


<s.s 


1 


$.... 


$1,086 


$1,150 


$1,041 


$.... 


$.... 


$1,150 


$.... 


$-.. 


2 


1,300 


1 ,030 


1,126 


981 


800 


866 








3 


1,175 


1,078 


1,167 


1 ,03 1 




833 








4 


1,000 


1,200 


1 ,058 


989 












5 




900 


1 ,039 


974 












6 


1,000 


1,070 


1,160 


1,024 












7 


1,200 


1 ,083 


1,291 


1,068 


1,050 


995 








8 




1,000 


975 


931 


800 


750 








9 




900 


1,050 


942 




800 








10 




1,004 


1,104 


990 


*850 


857 








11 




1,045 


1,096 


1.028 












12 




1,150 


890 


875 


762 


738 








13 


- 1,000 




1,067 


1.053 












14 


1.400 


1.037 


1,109 


988 


921 


892 








15 


1,200 


1.047 


1,170 


999 












16 




1,092 


1,153 


1 .003 


1,000 


900 








17 




946 


1,080 


1,010 












18 




967 


960 


954 


925 


832 








19 


1,000 


986 


933 


942 


825 


812 








20 




980 


950 


944 


742 


755 








21 




1,013 


1,252 


1,063 




900 


900 






22 


1,550 


1,016 


1,090 


1,014 












23 




969 


1,170 


1,005 




825 








24 


1,100 


1,019 


1,050 


1,000 




836 








25 


1,000 


1,015 


1,178 


1,007 


1,000 


856 








26 


1 ,190 


1,048 


1,162 


1 ,038 


1,200 










27 


1,800 


1,037 


1,222 


1,034 












28 


1 ,025 


1,031 


1,137 


1,040 












29 




962 


1,104 


985 


817 


822 








. 


1,000 


1,117 


1,017 


945 


800 


775 








31 


1,000 


980 


1,029 


988 




800 








32 


1,400 


950 


1,057 


985 


900 


896 








33 


1,058 


1,008 


1,158 


1,012 


1,150 


917 








34 




1,050 


975 


977 












35 




1,050 


1,181 


1,001 


950 


809 








36 


1,100 


1,070 


1,223 


1,036 












37 


1,050 


1,060 


1,261 


1,078 






l',137 






38 


1,400 


1,033 


1,131 


1,014 












39 


1 .450 


1,125 


1,339 


1,069 






1,000 






40 


2,029 


1,161 


1,553 


1,116 






1,020 




1,450 


41 


1 ,300 


1 ,300 


1,169 


993 




858 








42 

43 


2,60 


1,850 


1,303 


1,169 


1,033 


978 


1,450 










1,120 


904 


1,100 


915 








44 


1,500 


1,150 


950 


931 


858 


766 








45 


975 


850 


1,04' 


870 


800 


764 








46 






1 ,056 


020 


900 


813 








47 


1 ,033 


1,000 


1,225 


937 


883 


814 








48 


,800 


1,300 


1,089 


989 


787 


871 








49 


800 


1,229 


1,306 


1,071 


887 


867 








50 


1,775 


1 ,300 


1,201 


1 .045 




860 








51 


1.275 


1,200 


1,104 


1,059 


1,267 


921 








1 
2 
3 
4 


1,332 


1 ,056 


1,182 


1,014 


895 


829 


1,082 




1,450 


2,477 


1 ,368 


2,059 


1,412 




1,130 


1,280 


1,360 


2,230 


2,128 


1,071 


1,752 


1,084 




1,033 


1,094 


979 


1,900 


1,294 
2,296 


1,013 


1,394 


1,006 




770 


1,075 






5 
6 


1,212 


1,444 


1,146 


895 


835 


1,238 


1,336 


2,196 


2,311 


1,237 


1,452 


1,147 


897 


847 


1,142 


1,331 


2,134 


7 














96 


5 


62 


8 


15 


"25 8 


i 


"2 


12 








9 


.... 


" 











90 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 

III. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 



Rural Schools 



Salaries (Continued) 


> 






•c « c 


to 






5 1 

J3 o 


hi 01 

-Sfe 


a 


OT3*3 

•=.2 o 


03 ~g rt 
MJS (1) 

«i J! y 






ber 
atten 
el Sc 
rio 


H 2 B 

0) 3 <u 






Num 
ever 
Mod 
Onta 


<6 


<££ 



-g ^ g Jg 

3 £ O C 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey. 

1 1 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Cochrane 

43 Kenora 

44 Manitoulin 

45 Muskoka 

46 Nipissing 

47 Parry Sound 

48 Rainy River 

49 Sudbury 

50 Timiskaming 

51 Thun d er Bay 

1 Totals, Rural Schools 

2 Cities 

3 Towns 

4 Villages 

5 Grand Totals, 1924 

6 Grand Totals, 1923 

7 Increases 

8 Decreases 

9 Percentages 



300 



1,300 

1,527 
1,467 


1,520 
1,523 


"3 



350 
000 

000 

000 
000 



058 



1,058 
942 



116 



700 

645 



300 
,000 

825 

700 
850 

800 



713 



713 
768 



55 



6 

18 

66 

16 

7 

7 

17 

3 

70 

10 

2 

8 

22 

21 

30 

14 

16 

12 

8 

13 

1 

22 

21 

6 

19 

14 

17 

9 

7 

6 

8 

71 

42 

12 

16 

27 

58 

22 

35 

11 

46 

5 

27 



892 

1,438 

335 

89 



2,754 
2,936 



182 



20.62 



78 

160 

165 

92 

80 

119 

115 

89 

78 

220 

79 

41 

65 

126 

194 

139 

172 

104 

210 

74 

90 

207 

104 

200 

127 

116 

85 

109 

86 

70 

70 

64 

215 

83 

91 

102 

127 

144 

134 

537 

76 

48 

14 

25 

52 

42 

101 

51 

68 

75 

51 



5,764 

3,708 

1,509 

508 



11,489 
11,022 



467 



86.0 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



91 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. 



(Continued) 





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3 

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cd 

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Certificates 




















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73 








1 










2 




6 


158 


"9 






















3 




10 


156 


3 






















4 




2 


90 
























5 




1 


79 
























6 




11 


113 
























7 




8 


111 


ii 






















8 




3 


79 


61 


6 




















9 




1 


77 


2 




















10 




14 


204 


8 


1 


















11 




10 


72 






















12 




2 


24 


"34 






















13 




1 


64 
























14 




9 


121 


"64 


1 




















15 




11 


188 
























16 




6 


139 


"2 






















17 




11 


164 
























18 




3 


100 


"23 






















19 




8 


201 


19 






















20 




5 


80 


32 


"2 




















21 




13 


81 


1 






















22 




16 


192 
























23 




8 


94 


"4 






















24 




11 


196 


7 






















25 




12 


115 


9 






















26 




21 


106 


1 






















27 




13 


85 
























28 




8 


109 
























29 




4 


81 


"is 


*4 


















1 


30 




7 


64 


5 


















21 


31 




6 


64 


4 




















32 




4 


101 


59 


4 


















33 




15 


206 


14 




















34 




2 


82 






















35 




6 


90 


"l8 




















36 




9 


93 






















37 . 




12 


114 










4 














38 . 




11 


143 
























39 




10 


128 










2 ' 














40 


1 


33 


530 










5 










1 


2 


41 




2 


56 


33 


2 


















42 




3 


48 


11 






1 












2 


43 






14 


12 


5 


















44 




3 


19 


30 




















45 




4 


40 


58 


"8 
















1 

2 


46 






40 


19 


3 
















47 




' 8 


95 


38 


















48 




4 


42 


12 


' 4 
















4 
2 

1 
1 


49 




8 


63 


36 


9 
















50 




5 


70 


3 


2 
















51 




3 


50 


20 


10 
















1 


4 


390 


5,504 


677 


62 


1- 


1 




1 


1 


37 


2 


151 


870 


3,099 


5 




25< 


1 144 


58 


62 




3 


6 


138 


1,420 


13 


' 2 


5 


1 10 


4 


3 




4 


1 
162 


33 


488 
10,511 


11 






I 








5 


1,431 


706 


64 


32 


154 


63 


66 


37 


6 


150 


1,245 


10,311 


741 


252 


26 


L 182 


70 


83 


105 


7 


12 


186 


200 






6 


I 








8 








"3 = 




188 




28 


"7 


"l7 


"68 


9 1 


.21 


10.71 


78.68 


5.2£ 


.48 


2.4. 


5 1.15 


.47 


.49 


.28 



92 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
III. TABLE C— TEACHERS, SALARIES, 





Number of 
teachers who 
at end of 
year had 
taught less 
than one 
year 


One year, 
but less than 
two years 


2 years, but 
less than 3 
years 


3 years, but 
less than 4 
years 


4 years, but 
less than 5 
years 


5 years, but 
less than 6 
years 


1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 


Male 

185 

20 

7 

4 


Female 
1,168 
88 

72 
19 


M. 
127 

38 
9 
6 


F. 

966 

112 

97 

37 


M. 
96 
30 

10 

8 


F. 

728 

132 

95 

42 


M. 

57 

21 

13 

2 


F. 
578 
178 
131 
46 


M. 

63 
61 
13 
12 


F. 
447 
195 
112 

27 


M. 
42 

27 
7 
8 


F. 

412 

??9 


3 Towns 


117 


4 Villages 


S6 






5 Grand Totals, 1924. . 


216 


1,347 


180 


1,212 


144 


997 


93 


933 


149 


781 


84 


794 


6 Percentages, Male. . . 

7 Percentages, Female. 


11.94 


liloo 


9.95 


10^49 


7.96 


8^63 


5.14 


8*08 


8.24 


6^76 


4.64 


6 '.87 





14 years, but 
less than 15 
years 


15 years, but 
less than 16 
years 


16 years, but 
less than 17 
years 


17 years, but 
less than 18 
years 


18 years, but 
less than 19 
years 


19 years, but 
less than 20 
years 


1 Rural Schools 

2 Cities 


Male 

5 

16 
3 
3 


Female 

48 

116 

38 

4 


M. 
10 

12 


F. 
39 

113 
26 
11 


M. 

8 

19 
2 


F. 

22 
111 

14 
4 


M. 
9 
9 


F. 

23 

75 

18 

4 


M. 

6 

16 

6 

1 


F. 
20 
66 
21 

5 


M. 

6 

15 

2 

2 


F. 
20 
6S 


3 Towns. . . . 


?S 


4 Villages .... 


7 






5 Grand Totals, 1924.. 


27 


206 


22 


189 


29 


151 


19 


120 


29 


112 


25 


117 


6 Percentages, Male. . . 

7 Percentages, Female. 


1.49 


l'.78 


1.22 


1.64 


1.60 


\'.3l 


1.05 


1^04 


1.60 


^97 


1.38 


1 ! 01 





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Male 


Female 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 




F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


1 Rural Schools 


8 


4 


7 


6 


6 


10 


5 




2 


10 


8 


6 


6 


2 Cities 


13 


32 


8 


25 


10 


42 


9 




34 


14 


36 


10 


33 


3 Towns 


5 
1 


13 
4 


3 
2 


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4 


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1 


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4 
1 




7 


3 


5 




7 


4 Villages 


?, 






5 Grand Totals, 1924.. 


27 


53 


20 


40 


21 


61 


19 


43 


27 


49 


16 


48 


6 Percentages, Male. . . 


1.49 




1.11 




1.16 




1.05 






1.49 




.88 




7 Percentages, Female . 




.46 




.35 




.53 






.37 




.42 




.42 



Average experience: Male teachers, 11.4 years; female teachers, 8.6 years; all teachers, 
9.0 years. Average experience, rural teachers, 5.1 years; urban teachers, 12.8 years. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



93 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

CERTIFICATES, EXPERIENCE, ETC. (Concluded) 









+-> 00 


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tJC 




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F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


M. 


F. 


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23 


382 


16 


223 


12 


188 


16 


130 


13 


124 


8 


58 


9 


67 


4 


51 


2 


34 


244 


51 


206 


34 


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24 


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24 


156 


17 


142 


16 


136 


16 


104 


3 


6 


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8 


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68 


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62 


3 


54 


3 


37 


4 


40 


3 


30 


4 


1 


35 


9 


22 


7 


17 


5 


15 


3 


9 


3 


10 


2 


10 


4 


6 


5 


64 


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84 


538 


62 


463 


51 


406 


43 


343 


31 


247 


31 


253 


27 


191 


6 


3.54 




4.64 




3.43 




2.82 




2.38 




1.71 




1.71 




1.49 




7 




6.61 




4.66 




4.oi 




3.52 




2.97 




2.14 




2.19 




1.65 



20 years, but 
less than 21 
years 


21 years, but 
less than 22 
years 


22 years, but 
less than 23 
years 


23 years, but 
less than 24 
years 


24 years, but 
less than 25 
years 


25 years, but 
less than 26 
years 


26 years, but 
less than 27 
years 


27 years, but 
less than 28 
years 


M. 

1 8 

2 6 

3 1 

4 2 


F. 

22 

71 

20 

1 


M. 

5 

7 
1 
1 


F. 
13 
69 
15 
13 


M. 
1 
13 

1 
1 


F. 
11 

73 
12 

5 


M. 

5 

10 
4 


F. 

22 

72 

10 

3 


M. 

7 

12 

4 


F. 

14 

53 

14 

4 


M. 

8 
8 
6 
1 


F. 
11 
58 
10 

8 


M. 

11 
4 

1 


F. 

4 
58 
14 

7 


M. 

5 

8 
5 
2 


F. 
15 
36 
15 

1 


5 17 


114 


14 


110 


16 


101 


19 


107 


23 


85 


23 


87 


16 


83 


20 


67 


6 .94 

7 


!99 


.77 


]95 


.88 


]87 


1.05 


!93 


1.27 


!74 


1.27 


]75 


.88 


'.12 


1.11 


!58 



34 years, but 
less than 35 
years 


35 years, but 
less than 36 
years 


36 years, but 
less than 37 
years 


37 years, but 
less than 38 
years 


38 years, but 
less than 39 
years 


39 years, but 
less than 40 
years 


CO 
CO <U 

>>o 

O u 
■* 


en 


M. 

1 8 

2 5 

3 3 

4 1 


F. 

29 
9 
1 


M. 

5 
3 

7 


F. 

3 
29 

8 


M. 

2 
7 
2 
1 


F. 
4 
34 

5 
1 


M. 

2 
6 

2 
1 


F. 

33 
6 


M. 

2 
4 


F. 

1 

35 

2 

3 


M. 
3 
4 
4 
1 


F. 

34 
2 


M. 
14 
19 

8 

7 


F. 

3 
62 
26 

7 


M. 
832 
687 
186 
104 


F. 

5,854 

3,805 

1,461 

430 


5 17 


39 


15 


40 


12 


44 


11 


39 


6 


41 


12 


37 


48 


98 


1,809 


11,550 


6 .94 

7 ... 


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.83 


'35 


.66 
. . . 


]38 


.61 


'34 


.33 


!35 


.66 


!32 


2.65 


!85 







94 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL HOUSES, MEDICAL 



Rural Schools 





School 


Houses 




Free Text 
Books 


A/ 














J3 


J3 4> 


<l> w 


en 












4_> CO 


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3 




<u 

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V- 


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6 8 




No. of 
Medica 
in force 



Medical and Dental 



CD ' 



> a 3 

^ OC/3 



SHs^ 



C/3£ 



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£ 3 

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»-< 3 

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II 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville. 

20 Lennox and Adding- 

ton 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and 

Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel " 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell. 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 



61 


48 


2 


168 


117 


15 


126 


43 


16 


91 


65 


3 


72 


6 


9 


106 


84 




111 


47 


4 


143 


13 


19 


75 


3 




221 


131 


52 


74 


61 




54 


5 


2 


58 


33 


13 


175 


62 


12 


184 


128 


8 


136 


105 




169 


96 


1 


122 


23 


11 


221 


65 


71 


111 


27 


2 


66 


36 


6 


184 


142 




99 


69 


6 


203 


138 


11 


118 


85 


1 


108 


91 


4 


78 


59 


6 


112 


99 


2 


99 


48 


3 


82 


10 




71 


36 


11 


158 


57 


1 


213 


156 


2 


75 


4 




103 


75 


4 


83 


64 


15 


84 


52 


4 


143 


99 


36 


79 


56 


14 



10 




1 


1 2 




32 










57 


2 








21 










55 










19 






1 7 




53 




1 


19 




107 


4 








69 






5 30 


13 


36 






120 


8 


10 










46 


1 


1 


3 


i 


7 










97 






33 




47 




1 


8 


7 


30 






3 8 


1 


70 










87 










84 










78 










23 










41 




i 


3 




18 










50 




l 


1 9 




32 










12 










11 










11 










41 


4 




22 




69 


2 


2 


2 82 




24 










90 


2 








39 






44 




67 










24 




i 


68 


3 


4 










23 




3 


3 




3 






13 


2 


8 











30 

3 



32 
4 



10 



31 

35 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND DENTAL INSPECTION, LIBRARIES, ETC. 



Inspection 


Religious Exercises 


Rural School Libraries 




<V i/j 


0) co 


<" JL 


TJ 


u C • j, 


CO 








J3 C 


JS.s 


►S 2 


CD 

C 




8 








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a-c 


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3 

OS 


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1 

6-° v 

25^ 


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o 

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°"& 

£ G is 


"3 2 "5 
o.S*o 

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2 2 

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o.ti 
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co 

^ E 

l! 


aj, 

arc 

.5 * 


■ 1 


I 


60 


25 


61 


1 


61 


17,839 


$8,737 


2 




167 


119 


167 




168 


44,050 


21,038 


3 


1 


112 


23 


124 




56 


10,389 


4,665 


4 




91 


10 


91 




91 


12,282 


4,613 


5 




72 




72 




70 


22,325 


9,189 


(> 




104 


93 


106 


"2 


105 


35,550 


15,132 


7 




96 


92 


104 


11 


110 


21,736 


11,615 


8 




127 


42 


142 


1 


143 


21,736 


8,511 


9 


*5 


48 


12 


75 


6 


75 


13,460 


3,972 


10 




213 


93 


221 




221 


37,479 


14,673 


11 




74 


28 


74 


6 


74 


16,917 


7,340 


12 




51 


26 


52 


24 


53 


7,619 


2,686 


13 




58 


18 


58 


1 


58 


13,965 


5,834 


14 1 


i ;; 


153 


49 


175 


44 


175 


45,998 


15,228 


15 1 


2 


180 


113 


184 




184 


36,716 


10,939 


16 


1 


127 


68 


136 


*43 


136 


31,765 


13,654 


17 




162 


84 


168 


1 


168 


40,408 


11,636 


18 




114 


54 


122 


1 


122 


20,965 


8,654 


19 




194 


35 


215 


1 


217 


40,664 


16,329 


20 




103 


23 


110 




107 


10,866 


5,082 


21 




66 


11 


66 




64 


22,738 


11,625 


22 




184 


152 


184 


1 


184 


32,174 


14,006 


23 




99 


34 


99 




99 


23,601 


8,410 


24 




194 


42 


199 


30 


201 


35,831 


13,392 


25 




118 


62 


118 


5 


118 


25,476 


11,651 


26 




101 


12 


82 


3 


106 


28,820 


11,367 


27 




73 


20 


76 




75 


13,359 


4,629 


28 




107 


29 


109 


'38 


112 


24,162 


9,414 


29 




81 


38 


94 


3 


96 


23,031 


7,063 


30 


*2 


50 


16 


82 


3 


81 


15,295 


5,256 


31 1 




67 


22 


71 




71 


11,817 


5,513 


32 




118 


34 


151 


*13 


158 


29,645 


10,212 


33 


*5 


178 


42 


212 


62 


193 


38,505 


15,004 


34 




71 


16 


75 


1 


75 


14,146 


5,478 


35 


10 


91 


3S 


102 


8 


102 


26,374 


8,658 


36 




80 


37 


83 


1 


83 


21,067 


4,948 


37 3 




80 


27 


81 


7 


78 


17,084 


6,321 


38 


2 


135 


41 


143 


10 


138 


25,832 


11,109 


39 3 




79 


39 


79 


1 


79 


36,959 


16.735 



96 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
IV. TABLE D— SCHOOL HOUSES, MEDICAL 



Rural Schools 





School Houses 




Free Text 
Books 














-Q 


•c & 


































o 
o 

J3 














(A 


c/5 

u 

CD 

£ 

3 


o 


a 
o 


0) 
0) 

u 

c 
o 


0) 

E 


ojO 

o 


6 Sj 


s ° 


£ 


CQ 


m 


U 


to 




££ 


£ o 



Medical and Dental 



J2 8 

o a 

o (« 

.c a 
y— • 

T3 O 



a 
c 3 
o Wi u 



o u 
•g &=o 



O 3.ti 



rt° 



<U C 3 •- 
J£.2 S.c 

O <U QJ (fl 

o So S 
^3^ 
"o « ° " 






40 York 

41 Aigoma 

42 Cochrane 

43 Kenora 

44 Manitoulin 

45 Muskoka 

46 Nipissing 

47 Parry Sound. . . . 

48 Rainy River. . . . 

49 Sudbury 

50 Timiskaming. . . 

51 Thunder Bay... 

1 Totals, Rural Schools 

2 Totals, Cities 

3 Totals, Towns. . . . 

4 Totals, Villages. . . 

5 Grand Totals, 1924 

6 Grand Totals, 1923 

7 Increases 

8 Decreases 

9 Percentages 



177 


144 


1 


3 


29 




28 


31 


86 


9 


1 


1 


65 


10 


1 


1 


46 


3 






40 


3 


2 


6 


28 


1 






23 


4 


3 


1 


50 


3 


2 


13 


31 


1 






104 


25 


2 


1 


68 


8 






63 


3 




1 


49 


10 


i 


1 


123 


14 


3 


5 


94 


7 


3 




57 


8 


1 


2 


33 


13 


9 


9 


88 


8 






78 


2 






64 


4 






58 


2 


13 


7 


76 


9 






52 


15 


2 


2 


5,598 


2,769 


376 


137 


2,225 


91 


74 


80 


337 


305 


17 




15 




233 


228 


265 


210 


18 


5 


31 


1 


24 


29 


161 


143 


4 


3 


11 




1 


4 


6,361 


3,427 


415 


145 


2,282 


92 


332 


341 


6,334 


3,393 


428 


136 


2,271 


106 


313 


550 


27 


34 




9 


11 




19 








13 






14 

1.45 




209 




53.87 


6.52 


2.28 


35.87 


5.22 


5.36 



577 

172 

31 

17 



797 
604 



193 



12.53 



101 

184 

29 

4 



318 
250 



68 



5.00 



23 
1 



211 

150 

85 

23 



469 
533 



64 



7.37 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



97 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND DENTAL INSPECTION, LIBRARIES, ETC. (Concluded) 



Inspection 


Religious Exercises 


Rural School Libraries 


n 
V 

m 
u 

a 

6 E 


No. of Schools where 
Dental Inspection is 
in force 


No. of Schools where 
Bible or selections 
therefrom used 


No. of Schools where 
passages are mem- 
orized 


No. of Schools opened 
and closed with 
prayer 


No. of Schools where 
religious instruction 
is imparted as per- 
mitted by the regu- 
lations 


en 

8 

u 
m 
_ >^ 

"o* 

. J3 

o.t! 


in 

B 


O o> 

3 OS 

II 


40 8 

41 

42 

43 

44 

45 

46 5 

47 

48 

49 

50 5 

51 


7 
1 
2 
1 

'5 

3 

5 
1 


173 
71 
38 
26 
47 

102 
50 

114 
49 
74 
60 
68 


114 
29 
11 
13 
17 
39 
25 
21 
24 
26 
11 
7 


159 
78 
44 
26 
49 

104 
63 

118 
55 
85 
64 
73 


14 

49 
2 
8 
2 

13 
4 

15 

*28 
2 
4 


173 
75 
34 
21 
47 

102 
53 

118 
44 
64 
55 
68 


57,502 

10,391 
6,375 
2,666 
5,200 

13,219 
5,079 

15,426 
5,474 
9,433 
9,776 
6,238 


$21,224 
4,240 
2,778 
1,688 
2,530 
5,773 
2,057 
6,595 
4,345 
3,967 
4,511 
2,570 


1 29 

2 62 

3 49 

4 22 


52 

246 

16 

4 


5,150 
334 
245 
149 


2,056 

210 

88 

60 


5,481 
333 
249 
157 


469 

113 

22 

23 


5,361 


1,115,424 


442,596 


5 162 

6 155 


318 
317 


5,878 
5,796 


2,414 
2,215 


6,220 
5,998 


627 
1,439 








7 7 
8 


1 


82 


199 


222 


812 









9 2.55 


5.00 


92.41 


3.79 


97.78 


9.86 









98 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Rural Schools 



Receipts 



.2 c 

tuo o3 
JO 



C C 3 
3 03 O 



a, -c 
'3 5 * 

Sob 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 DufTerin i 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarrv 

10 Grey 

11 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

3 1 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Cochrane 

43 Kenora 

44 Manitoulin 

45 Muskoka 

46 Nipissing 

47 Parry Sound 

48 Rainy River 

49 Sudbury 

50 Timiskaming 

51 Thunder Bay 

Totals 



$ c. 
22,821 58 
58,338 63 
63,146 61 
28,287 84 
30,222 34 
35,506 59 
35,230 30 
68,674 16 
27,919 26 
69,931 63 

24.814 57 
41,368 98 
18,094 86 
86,255 04 
53,624 72 
42,832 26 
49,314 07 
45,519 95 
87,735 53 
44,589 85 
30,945 83 
61,523 97 
34,151 34 
70,530 57 
42,691 92 
37,383 93 
30,467 71 
33,294 59 
45,695 29 
25,863 03 
22,875 15 
79,258 87 
74,586 32 
28,611 47 
37,130 34 
31,610 67 
45,334 66 
43,686 69 
49,034 12 

193,765 02 
51,958 65 
43,029 16 

17.815 95 
31,940 52 
57,749 32 
39,172 08 
91,598 03 
43,434 42 
71,458 95 
51,821 30 
51.679 35 



2,504,327 99 



$ c 

702 82 
2,787 10 
1,526 52 
1,912 77 

973 57 
2,464 33 
1,209 94 
1,617 90 

757 81 
2,511 34 
1,211 42 

841 68 

684 31 
3,320 77 
3,470 82 
1,646 36 
1,531 99 
1,228 02 
2,443 74 
1,807 22 
1,157 11 
3,024 36 
1,123 99 
2,417 38 
1,711 02 
1,508 58 

887 53 
1,410 27 

979 21 
2,180 76 

791 11 

1.842 45 
3,494 59 

787 84 
1,334 80 
1,136 78 
1,446 49 
1,655 57 
1,848 25 

3.843 75 



$ c. 
45,200 00 
93,100 00 
89,674 96 
50,320 86 
38,950 00 
70,600 00 

74.199 89 
47,970 54 
39,250 00 

126,132 70 
47,053 83 
16,104 09 
37,800 00 
78,714 80 

115,999 47 
80,600 01 

101,902 77 
61,160 00 

111,538 06 
49,373 00 
53,600 00 

119,636 00 
59,514 50 

115,609 00 
76,167 80 
72,240 00 

54.200 00 
69,400 00 
41,796 16 
42,156 11 
41,700 00 
67,420 58 

132,082 49 

40,678 87 

56,513 91 

57,242 00 

104,050 00 

89,397 80 

70,520 95 

247,067 12 

6,374 96 

273 57 

600 00 

5,875 00 

15,806 19 

2,135 00 

15,545 00 

6,675 00 

4,450 00 

9,847 67 

6,296 91 



69,232 27 



3,060,517 57 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



99 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

STATEMENT 



Receipts 



w °?1 

■M c 0) 

§•0.2 £ 

CO D 3 £-1 



« 5 

co 03 

53 %T3 3 



Ufe 



.2* 

'53 
o 
u 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 



$ c. 
51,706 71 
76,406 83 

102,704 78 
37,109 26 
34,604 33 
66,076 91 
93,066 91 
37,050 21 
31,129 88 

103,400 50 
40,984 48 
11,245 37 
39,656 43 
81,662 73 
86,999 57 
82,319 90 
91,602 35 
33,690 72 
72,398 46 
36,227 07 
74,860 79 

107,738 53 
43,719 49 

86.441 33 
63,559 40 
80,754 17 
63,306 71 
69,817 57 
38,682 19 
34,343 03 
24,606 30 
60,845 35 

108,216 70 

34.442 08 
45,723 81 
72,573 15 

109,543 73 
84,060 79 

117,832 66 

722,519 33 
69,187 90 
92,865 79 
25,220 11 
23,870 92 
39,814 33 
30,180 12 
66,528 93 
46,901 18 

112,396 83 
68,461 52 
68,519 74 



3,897,577 



$ c 
5,000 00 

15,783 ' 73 



5,362 


06 


30,701 


09 


9,945 


90 


4,059 


59 


2,296 


64 


9,086 


12 


1,940 


79 


4,000 


00 


14,744 64 


9,585 


44 


5,957 


90 


6,618 04 


2,733 


58 


3,400 


79 


14,102 


00 


8,713 


85 


116,569 


77 


10,000 


00 


37,056 


15 


17,056 


53 


1,500 


00 


33,482 


78 


14,080 43 


7,070 


72 



2,111 78 

"43,613 52 
327,004 51 

' 73,520 00 
13,166 13 

"l',359 '25 
1,229 49 

"l',66o 00 
6,904 29 
7,696 06 
9,255 60 



877,709 17 



$ 

96,276 

168,944 

111,183 

93,469 

58,032 

162,272 

156,091 

114,802 

54,767 

213,139 

109,531 

28,267 

74,162 

186,145 

195,458 

206,440 

119,156 

69,418 

185,176 

79,744 

133,619 

214,489 

137,053 

170,387 

135,517 

190,241 

131,759 

126,594 

77,211 

65,495 

69,402 

129,675 

235,344 

64,625 

71,795 

159,565 

129,017 

169,297 

200,876 

906,070 

47,310 

40,029 

13,585 

31,049 

61,074 

22,585 

64,062 

29,580 

59,806 

45,945 

36,376 



c. 
99 
64 
54 
11 
04 
05 
26 
67 
07 
55 
35 
48 
05 
44 
09 
92 
45 
80 
56 
60 
42 
70 
66 
44 
40 
44 
20 
05 
12 
14 
51 
30 
38 
05 
64 
74 
99 
22 
73 
88 
89 
75 
66 
62 
28 
53 
23 
33 
67 
03 
83 



6,451,927 49 



42 
11 

35 



$ c 
221,708 10 
399,577 20 
384,020 14 
211,099 84 
168,144 34 
367,620 97 
369,744 20 
274,175 07 
156,120 66 
524,201 84 
225,536 44 
97,827 60 
174,397 65 
450,843 
465,138 
419,797 
370,125 67 
211,017 49 
462,025 93 
211,741 74 
297,583 94 
520,514 56 
275,562 98 
454,099 57 
436,217 31 
392,128 12 
317,677 30 
317,573 01 
204,363 97 
171,538 07 
159,375 07 
372,525 33 
567,804 91 
176,216 03 
212,498 50 
322,128 34 
391,504 65 
388,098 07 
483,726 23 
2,400,270 61 
174,832 40 
249,718 27 
70,387 85 
92,736 06 
175,803 37 
95,302 22 
237,734 19 
127,590 93 
255,016 74 
183,771 58 
172,128 43 



16,861,292 37 



100 



THE REPORT OF THK 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Rural Schools 





Expenditure 






3 


Maps, 
, Prizes 
1 Books 


"(0 

■si 

He/) 


Sites and 
Building 
School Ho 


Libraries, 
Apparatus 
and Schoo 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


83,778 16 


12,357 69 


1,879 34 


169,930 55 


9,364 50 


2,973 68 


178,009 78 


36,594 41 


1,773 17 


90,752 54 


12,489 98 


1,086 20 


79,493 10 


6,052 49 


1,049 16 


128,996 11 


35,638 90 


3,745 73 


139,362 73 


24,593 54 


3,778 25 


125,815 15 


8,458 18 


1,058 02 


74,959 47 


7,544 75 


871 81 


228,326 58 


24,066 26 


3,008 20 


85,029 14 


10,223 88 


1,875 96 


45,343 52 


7,679 72 


669 49 


68,586 84 


13,159 04 


1,995 10 


186,767 97 


29,038 25 


3,608 60 


202,697 55 


18,007 57 


1,695 42 


156,863 62 


19,329 34 


3,097 51 


179,108 89 


15,605 51 


4,442 27 


118,435 00 


5,123 72 


2,067 48 


215,855 81 


14,571 88 


2,352 02 


105,900 41 


4,902 76 


781 97 


102,909 76 


19,492 11 


2,389 93 


215,171 37 


33,482 62 


3,213 77 


106,543 89 


8,540 05 


2,932 16 


215,623 83 


23,453 80 


4,668 55 


138,473 31 


133,568 47 


3,836 65 


134,819 46 


28,998 92 


3,818 85 


104,405 15 


52,332 12 


1,423 35 


121,588 83 


24,383 46 


1,435 08 


100,931 58 


6,362 31 


1,647 66 


86,784 58 


5,554 41 


759 82 


73,094 80 


2,515 52 


2,248 33 


165,111 38 


32,259 41 


1,874 72 


238,022 49 


34,768 01 


3,509 79 


82,444 12 


8,725 26 


851 04 


112,296 15 


7,918 49 


1,080 43 


110,616 25 


11,268 94 


1,408 96 


143,690 34 


13,261 37 


2,563 14 


156,083 89 


13,967 27 


2,390 35 


154,653 35 


50,356 26 


4,577 99 


703,486 97 


354,426 01 


29,267 16 


88,417 64 


8,744 89 


3,854 33 


75,439 30 


100,045 30 


2,543 81 


28,302 64 


18,034 55 


738 22 


45,198 21 


4,488 49 


1,095 68 


86,520 19 


14,359 91 


2,389 53 


55,484 00 


6,082 49 


864 53 


126,315 44 


21,840 87 


1,390 70 


65,171 62 


11,483 34 


3,568 83 


118,279 98 


23,679 25 


2,884 17 


85,132 84 


21,114 29 


3,330 02 


83,351 06 


21,272 32 


4,332 48 


6,788,377 34 


1,431,582 88 


146,699 41 



1 Brant 

2 Bruce 

3 Carleton 

4 Dufferin 

5 Dundas 

6 Elgin 

7 Essex 

8 Frontenac 

9 Glengarry 

10 Grey 

1 1 Haldimand 

12 Haliburton 

13 Halton 

14 Hastings 

15 Huron 

16 Kent 

17 Lambton 

18 Lanark 

19 Leeds and Grenville 

20 Lennox and Addington 

21 Lincoln 

22 Middlesex 

23 Norfolk 

24 Northumberland and Durham 

25 Ontario 

26 Oxford 

27 Peel 

28 Perth 

29 Peterborough 

30 Prescott and Russell 

31 Prince Edward 

32 Renfrew 

33 Simcoe 

34 Stormont 

35 Victoria 

36 Waterloo 

37 Welland 

38 Wellington 

39 Wentworth 

40 York 

41 Algoma 

42 Cochrane 

43 Kenora 

44 Manitoulin 

45 Muskoka 

46 Nipissing 

47 Parry Sound 

48 Rainy River 

49 Sudbury 

50 Timiskaming 

51 Thunder Bay 

Totals 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



101 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 


School 
tidings 
iture 






u 


0) 

u 

3 

c 

CD 

a 


c 




*0— , to 

G ;; <u 
rt S 2 


X 

W 








rt c 


— 


<D .[i, 


v a 




?, "*> 9* 


rt 


3 en 


* '3 




<y a x 


o 
H 




>W 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ 


$ 


1 


40,169 36 


138,184 55 


453,765 


17,563 


2 


52,166 42 


234,435 15 


422,801 


40,454 


3 


66,958 32 


283,335 68 


761,463 


22,204 


4 


21,809 46 


126,138 18 


196,642 


34,125 


5 


23,784 33 


110,379 08 


193,900 


20,250 


6 


54,040 29 


222,421 03 


515,249 


27,450 


7 


60,256 10 


227,990 62 


534,642 


27,593 


8 


31,591 02 


166,922 37 


211,975 


20,473 


9 


20,371 33 


103,747 36 


137,459 


10,001 


10 


77,568 21 


332,969 25 


504,126 


33,816 


11 


21,719 25 


118,848 23 


224,975 


15,453 


12 


21,607 16 


75,299 89 


82,443 


8,869 


13 


22,684 12 


106,425 10 


260,750 


14,405 


14 


50,585 21 


270,000 03 


422,057 


32,459 


15 


66,820 74 


289,221 28 


449,200 


31,603 


16 


43,796 12 


223,086 59 


668,450 


26,113 


17 


51,688 53 


250,845 20 


438,525 


33,212 


18 


17,874 13 


143,500 33 


207,335 


14,703 


19 


48,489 04 


281,268 75 


455,262 


40,788 


20 


29,863 21 


141,448 35 


164,978 


12,332 


21 


47,751 27 


172,543 07 


580,190 


28,889 


22 


63,519 25 


315,387 01 


614,984 


32,804 


23 


21,037 30 


139,053 40 


292,480 


17,333 


24 


44,156 68 


287,902 86 


514,705 


38,680 


25 


67,242 09 


343,120 52 


559,075 


25,264 


26 


64,296 91 


231,934 14 


425,822 


26,178 


27 


48,345 20 


206,505 82 


635,765 


19,975 


28 


37,540 64 


184,948 01 


449,400 


24,357 


29 


18,385 51 


127,327 06 


154,170 


12,713 


30 


16,509 54 


109,608 35 


195,906 


13,596 


31 


13,745 97 


91,604 62 


103,550 


13,710 


32 


59,826 47 


259,071 98 


487,650 


31,646 


33 


62,488 83 


338,789 12 


622,040 


46,566 


34 


26,207 81 


118,228 23 


219,085 


14,830 


35 


32,364 89 


153,659 96 


241,950 


16,875 


36 


38,861 70 


162,155 85 


301,520 


14,930 


37 


67,144 70 


226,659 55 


819,300 


17,502 


38 


57,406 03 


229,847 54 


410,305 


44,193 


39 


91,092 05 


300,679 65 


1,061,163 


32,971 


40 


871,681 56 


1,958,861 70 


5,621,874 


91,928 


41 


28,632 30 


129,649 16 


221,489 


14,554 


42 


54,664 59 


232,693 00 


363,423 


10,971 


43 


16,400 09 


63,475 50 


96,845 


4,631 


44 


14,486 46 


65,268 84 


122,790 


7,330 


45 


27,506 36 


130,775 99 


160,329 


14,303 


46 


15,880 83 


78,311 85 


102,449 


5,889 


47 


42,754 52 


192,301 53 


244,342 


18,162 


48 


35,540 26 


115,764 05 


255,590 


12,208 


49 


53,364 34 


198,207 74 


397,387 


13,340 


50 


56,060 64 


165,637 79 


284,677 


15,448 


51 


44,092 08 


153,047 94 


258,300 


12,095 


2,962,829 22 


11,329,488 85 


24,124,552 


1,177,737 



102 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
V. TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Cities 







Receipts 


















<U C 


0*5 

a 


.2 c 


nicipal 

nts 

unty) 


nicipal 
nts (Lo 

Assess- 
ts 




0) 

3 
C 


ergy Res 
nd, Bala 
d Other 
urces 


o 
"e3 


ba rt 


3<SO 


■3 E"2 8 




<U 

Q 




JO 


SoB 




UUu *c3 


o 
H 



1 Belleville 

2 Brantford 

3 Chatham 

4 Fort William . . . 

5 Gait 

6 Guelph 

7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener 

10 London 

11 Niagara Falls. .. 

12 Oshawa 

13 Ottawa 

14 Owen Sound . . . 

15 Peterborough . . . 

16 Port Arthur. . . . 

17 St. Catharines. . 

18 St. Thomas 

19 Sarnia 

20 Sault Ste. Marie 

21 Stratford 

22 Toronto 

23 Welland 

24 Windsor 

25 Woodstock 

Totals 

Towns 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg . . . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Aurora 

7 Avlmer 

8 Bala 

9 Barrie 

10 Blenheim 

11 Blind River 

12 Bonfield 

13 Bothwell.. 

14 Bowmanville . . . 

15 Bracebridge 

16 Brampton 

17 Bridgeburg 

18 Brockville 

19 Bruce Mines 

20 Burlington 

21 Cache Bav 

22 Campbellford... 

23 Capreol 

24 Carleton Place . . 

25 Charlton 

26 Chesley 

27 Clinton 

28 Cobalt 

29 Cobourg 

30 Cochrane 

31 Collingwood 

32 Copper Cliff.. . . 

33 Cornwall 



1,625 28 

6,057 08 

2.393 12 

4,445 95 

1,936 72 

3,031 88 

26,542 58 

4,724 26 

4,114 41 

11,541 91 

1,933 60 

2,346 83 

19,155 99 

2,538 47 

4,959 89 

3,562 13 

3,941 56 

3,645 12 

3,025 63 

4,005 86 

4,579 63 

130,283 10 

1,199 39 

10,361 72 

1,707 14 



263,659 25 



44 04 
1,783 45 
266 20 
172 56 
303 96 
267 



91 



548 o: 



1,314 28 

1,226 15 

2,130 00 

1,78) 00 

711 25 

603 86 

483 47 

466 71 

716 29 

496 64 

2,372 31 

1,916 30 

286 69 

1,500 00 

360 23 

4,062 80 

518 22 

3,530 66 

2,615 29 

2,316 04 

3,678 78 

561 05 

363 65 

773 24 

687 56 

1,689 60 



23 45 
263 89 



30 10 



50 00 
107 00 



44.79 



$ c. 

62,735 87 

216,329 96 

104,011 09 

184,856 31 

85,000 00 



98,375 
1,225,136 
115,500 
192,308 
618,421 
106,135 
106,272 
890,248 00 

83,600 00 
142,100 00 
168,913 85 
196,215 40 
109,000 00 
115,777 32 
153,545 
108,217 
5,533,190 

73,800 
433,311 

56.786 



11,179,786 91 



2,823 33 

5,300 00 

9,492 11 

12,535 32 

15,800 57 

14.050 00 

13,555 27 

3,500 00 

43,651 75 

9,300 00 

1,110 93 

126 76 

2,400 00 

17,700 00 

12,176 93 

29,726 66 

24,770 98 

60,515 00 

3,000 0C 

19,500 00 

3,015 66 

14,390 20 

7,760 28 

24,413 00 

4,886 07 

8,500 00 

6,800 20 

40,711 85 

21,479 50 

16,405 70 

39,566 91 

28,656 12 

23.736 67 



$ c. 
19,000 00 
13,385 54 



1,819 85 



314.434 08 



20,564 61 
261,306 54 

81,204 34 
100,883 81 



47,170 34 

218,653 52 



1,078,422 63 



3,000 00 



$ c. 

16,538 17 
973 41 

11.583 62 
637 60 
5,413 81 
1,393 03 
4,314 82 
4,269 45 
2,207 97 

59,017 47 
1,073 18 

39,433 57 

32,799 20 
5,620 73 

20,955 40 

3,684 83 

1,739 25 

422 15 

15,086 34 

3,726 85 

1,906 57 

1,466,239 08 

519 67 

36,603 71 
6,344 83 



1,742,504 71 



552 49 
2,332 79 

6.246 73 
976 44 

1,656 44 

126 45 

25 03 

137 48 

1,665 51 
11 60 

2,679 57 

777 06 

154 98 

310 20 

18,309 92 

2,772 91 

34 12 

289 40 

3,587 09 

1,178 93 
503 89 

2,765 66 
789 90 

1,701 91 

4,832 95 

4.247 28 
1,165 23 
6,265 25 

31 37 

1,715 53 

1,119 38 

595 60 

3,614 20 



99, 
236, 
117, 
191, 

92, 
102, 
1,570, 
124, 
219, 
950, 
190, 
248, 
942, 

91, 
168, 
176, 
201, 
113, 
133, 
161, 
114, 
7,176, 

75, 
698, 

64, 



c. 
899 32 
745 99 
987 83 
759 71 
350 53 
800 76 
427 48 
493 71 
195 52 
287 06 
346 12 
936 21 
203 19 
759 20 
015 29 
160 81 
896 21 
067 27 
889 29 
277 71 
703 52 
882 67 
519 06 
930 28 
838 76 



14,264,373 50 



3,419 
9,439 

16.268 
13,684 
17,760 
14,444 
14,128 

4,951 
46,543 
11,471 

5,570 

1,615 07 

3,158 84 
18,543 67 
33,953 56 
33,322 
25,301 
63,176 

8,503 
20,965 

5,019 
17,516 09 
12,612 98 
26,633 13 
13,249 68 
15,362 57 
10,326 26 
50,655 88 
22,071 92 
18,484 88 
41,459 53 
29,939 28 
29,040 47 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



103 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 


of School 
Buildings 
urniture 






In « 


T3 
c3 G_ en 




3 


=5 

**5 


c 
o E 




•S"§ 


"'•311 


c3 * fc+^.3 


■M'rtO S 


o3 <u 


<D -Ph 


<v D. 




o3j2 

He/) 


gf| 8 

C/)CQc/)2C 


'J < o £ S3 cq 


9> a; £ X 


2 a 

O X 


J3 <S-a 


JETS 
as cr 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 


$ c. 


$. 


$ 


1 


47,976 33 


18,320 00 




23,000 34 


89,296 67 


600,000 


10,000 


2 


158,767 60 


14,002 31 


5,564 67 


54,377 42 


232,712 00 


983,500 


32,450 


3 


79,107 39 


4,559 46 


835 52 


22,693 39 


107,195 76 


400,000 


10,250 


4 


146,275 30 


42 27 


2,691 10 


41,263 27 


190,271 94 


913,288 


45,294 


5 


68,173 05 


696 56 




19,808 39 


88,678 00 


500,000 


4,650 


6 


67,676 32 


95 33 


2,508*86 


32,520 25 


102,800 76 


168,000 


3,000 


7 


739,916 60 


138,642 24 


11,517 78 


555,424 00 


1,445,500 62 


3,821,412 


121,443 


8 


85,927 01 


4,455 97 


1,168 46 


32,942 27 


124,493 71 


550,000 


21,000 


9 


115,598 65 


5,654 34 


4,796 28 


81,765 05 


207,814 32 


713,000 


28,000 


10 


384,311 64 


193,991 93 


5,863 20 


347,051 83 


931,218 60 


2,738,095 


151,800 


11 


77,433 18 


80,815 20 




32,097 74 


190,346 12 


562,000 


9,935 


12 


75,855 37 


131,218 40 




40,708 28 


247,782 05 


600,000 


20,000 


13 


542,789 71 


4,406 34 


23,681*89 


342,274 41 


913,152 35 


2,400,000 


156,000 


14 


62,952 40 


2,838 00 


410 45 


23,987 77 


90,188 62 


200,000 


15,000 


15 


114,953 80 




5,938 76 


41,747 15 


162,639 71 


542,000 


20,000 


16 


87,579 68 


4,861 32 


4,611 27 


75,110 68 


172,162 95 


675,855 


3,250 


17 


110,793 71 


340 34 


1,355 12 


89,209 53 


201,698 70 


685,056 


7,700 


18 


72,286 24 


3,013 54 


72 00 


35,370 72 


110,742 50 


328,000 


18,000 


19 


78,004 46 


3,695 60 


2,191 42 


19,944 05 


103,835 53 


450,000 


5,969 


20 


106,201 00 


2,718 07 


541 52 


48,644 08 


158,104 67 


1,121,000 


11,400 


21 


68,871 82 


3,724 25 




40,241 58 


112,837 65 


476,500 


22,000 


22 


3,553,944 77 


736,438 14 


165,279*71 


2,228,974 17 


6,684,636 79 


15,196,142 


507,412 


23 


49,776 63 


935 20 


700 81 


23,267 68 


74,680 32 


228,426 


8,952 


24 


300,177 78 


217,241 50 


19,004 61 


161,449 53 


697,873 42 


2,825,000 


165,000 


25 


44,861 50 


323 04 


1,881 05 


12,088 45 


59,154 04 


370,000 


10,000 


7,240,211 94 


1,573,029 35 


260,614 48 


4,425,962 03 


13,499,817 80 


38,047,274 


1,408,505 


1 


2,190 00 


572 61 


15 00 


642 25 


3,419 86 


7,000 


500 


2 


6,190 00 


161 08 




2,574 76 


8,925 84 


50,000 


330 


3 


7,762 04 




"36605 


5,638 71 


13.766 80 


15,255 


412 


4 


9,820 28 


33726 




2,784 65 


12,942 19 


40,000 


2,500 


5 


12,915 00 






3,671 37 


16,586 37 


26,700 


496 


6 


10,340 00 


1,073 ' 50 


"8*79 


2,865 78 


14,288 07 


52,000 


1,000 


7 


10,539 50 


410 98 


70 00 


3,107 84 


14,128 32 


20,000 


700 


8 


2,500 00 


597 45 


232 51 


792 94 


4,122 90 


10,000 


300 


9 


33,476 50 


236 00 


2,139 08 


10,612 31 


46,463 89 


150,000 


4,000 


10 


7,349 97 




101 90 


3,301 55 


10,753 42 


35,000 


2,500 


11 


3,740 00 






1,657 69 


5,397 69 


12,000 


450 


12 


690 00 






60 00 


750 00 




175 


13 


2,075 00 






698 58 


2,773 58 


2*5,000 


2,400 


14 


12,730 00 


1,217*28 


498 07 


3,543 64 


17,988 99 


80,000 


948 


15 


11,044 11 


4,728 34 




18,132 98 


33,905 43 


50,000 


668 


16 


22,486 85 


1,260 43 


"896*86 


8,195 80 


32,839 94 


180,000 


7,000 


17 


15,497 74 


1,781 62 


231 85 


7,790 53 


25,301 74 


110,000 


3,250 


18 


39,609 00 


19 25 


3,049 44 


20,466 92 


63,144 61 


150,000 


5,600 


19 


3,900 00 


149 35 


32 61 


849 93 


4,931 89 


25,000 


383 


20 


14,251 15 


133 95 


223 50 


4,685 02 


19,293 62 


140,000 


450 


21 


3,451 50 




13 55 


637 37 


4,102 42 


5,708 


292 


22 


12,160 00 




75 99 


5,222 67 


17,458 66 


70,000 


3,000 


23 


9,250 00 


19080 


170 97 


2,898 62 


12,510 39 


50,000 


500 


24 


16,054 14 


1,431 00 


244 52 


7,148 80 


24,878 46 


65,500 


500 


25 


3,387 50 


516 50 




7,646 05 


11,550 05 


50,000 


2,419 


26 


8,100 00 


382 90 


35*50 


3,170 43 


11,688 83 


36,000 


812 


27 


8,170 00 






1,460 10 


9,630 10 


40,000 


250 


28 


22,115 60 


5,755*64 


4,330 ' 1 1 


13,270 92 


45,472 27 


181,000 


20,000 


29 


16,004 78 


800 00 


318 84 


4,186 14 


21,309 76 


125,000 


800 


30 


10,198 11 


110 00 


489 60 


5,021 16 


15,818 87 


42,000 


4,000 


31 


31,099 00 




3 50 


10,293 85 


41,396 35 


90,000 


5,000 


32 


23,202 65 




145 32 


5,075 57 


28,423 54 


100,000 


1,000 


33 


17,661 25 


835*95 




8,324 59 


26,821 77 


217,500 


7,500 



104 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



V. 



THE PUBLIC- 
TABLE E— FINANCIAL 



Towns 



Receipts 



03 W 

S?£2 

JO 



3 aj o 



Ids 

■rj w tn 



0) tfi 

0) c 

feoSg 



o 



34 Deseronto 

35 Dresden 

36 Dryden 

37 Dundas 

38 Dunnville 

39 Durham 

40 East view 

41 Elmira 

42 Englehart . . . . 

43 Essex 

44 Ford 

45 Forest 

46 Fort Frances. 

47 Gananoque. .. 

48 Georgetown . . 

49 Goderich 

50 Gore Bay 

51 Graven h u rst . 

52 Grimsby 

53 Haileyburv . . . 

54 Hanover 

55 Harriston . . . . 

56 Hawkesbury . 

57 Hearst 

58 Hesreler 

59 Huntsville 

60 Ingersoll 

61 Iroquois Falls 

62 Kearney 

63 Keewatin . . . . 

64 Kenora 

65 Kincardine. . . 

66 Kingsville 

67 Latchford 

68 Leamington . . 

69 Leaside 

70 Lindsay 

71 Listowel 

72 Little Current 

73 Massey 

74 Matheson 

75 Mattawa 

76 Meaford 

77 Merritton. . . . 

78 Midland 

79 Milton 

80 Mimico 

81 Mitchell 

82 Mount Forest. 

83 Napanee 

84 Nesterville . . . 

85 New Liskeard. 

86 Newmarket . . 

87 New Toronto 

88 Niagara 

89 North Bay . . . 

90 Oakville...... 

91 Orangeville . .. 

92 Orillia 

93 Palmerston . .. 

94 Paris 



$ c. 

2,514 10 
13 33 

6,105 75 
744 94 
392 30 

1,853 42 
216 98 
257 41 

7.622 00 

2,671 25 
592 40 

1,523 83 
784 78 
337 49 

2.691 00 
489 80 

5,582 00 

4,006 12 

2,562 56 

331 91 

339 82 

1,660 60 

100 00 

700 00 

465 00 

467 53 

1,634 50 

3,523 33 

1,399 70 

3.692 13 
1,127 24 

235 63 

331 66 

1,553 72 

497 09 

1,026 81 

830 50 

470 63 

1,990 00 

1,222 00 

1,603 00 

1,371 00 

319 66 

415 34 

1,110 64 

3,458 00 

768 65 

2,688 19 

1,728 00 

402 01 

580 00 

739 95 

404 53 

992 71 

1,752 26 

1,694 30 

432 72 

357 72 

2,218 27 

900 00 

524 22 



$ c. 
23 61 
13 33 



23 42 



25 74 



38 55 



52 57 



46 56 



23 55 

52 57 



213 00 

34 75 



41 82 



9,191 

9,186 

15,600 

21,700 

17,800 

8,846 

12,833 

10,000 

6,870 

12,000 

51,448 

6,500 

41,425 

1 7,905 

11.767 

20,500 

4,363 

9,402 

8,500 

22,304 

16,850 

5,141 

5,105 

2,700 

26,030 

12,243 

26,146 

4,978 

1,814 

8,171 

42,750 

10,324 

19,500 

2,216 

25,009 

7,914 

39,489 

11,200 

3,414 

1,783 

5,250 

1,223 

17,200 

20,185 

66,575 

11,272 

39,776 

8,118 

5,561 

14,195 

163 

18,300 

25,000 

47,292 

6,949 

82,234 

26,800 

14,692 

47,317 

6,138 

22,749 



* c. 



258,375 55 



9,400 00 



53,025 00 
2,447 54 



20,044 00 



56,075 00 



$ 


c. 


306 


91 


640 


12 


1,838 


44 


3,969 


78 


4,657 


29 


2,257 


86 


1,753 


13 


33,824 


39 


848 


00 


4,311 


91 


458 


98 


1,978 


22 


5,402 


25 


59 


11 


1,038 


76 


591 


04 


21,713 


95 


679 


83 


308 


41 


1,193 


61 


1 


31 


6,370 


35 


65 


11 


1,980 


18 


263 


64 


1,983 


08 


12,711 


27 


730 


58 


1,607 


42 


1,772 


97 


177 


10 


1,799 


00 


1,600 


39 


93 


09 


14,865 


36 


1,822 


28 


319 


06 


2,603 


65 


32 


05 


119 


27 


1,351 


22 


148 


17 


8,085 


41 


50 


80 


1,922 


60 


15,427 


07 


110 


50 


47 


00 


1,819 


16 


1,355 


09 


1,770 43 


6,107 


92 


1,407 


58 


773 


55 


2,924 40 


545 


14 


488 


82 


36,141 


62 


422 


74 


3,207 


47 



12,035 80 

9,853 32 
23,544 
26,414 
22,849 
10,723 
15,308 
12,010 54 
48,317 19 
15,519 25 
314,728 62 

8,508 55 
44,188 00 
23,645 02 
14,517 34 
22,028 56 
19,936 06 
35,122 24 
11,780 94 
22,944 79 
18,383 43 

6,856 34 
11,575 80 

3,465 11 
28,475 36 
12,974 31 
29,764 09 
21,212 94 

3,944 79 
13,471 46 
98,675 21 
13,184 56 
21,630 66 

5,370 11 
25,599 40 
23,853 48 
42,142 25 
11,989 69 

8,008 64 

3,038 01 



27 
43 
83 
75 
85 
48 



6,972 

3,945 
17,667 
48.729 
67,736 
16,653 
55,972 05 
10,940 94 

7,389 07 
16,416 51 

2,098 64 
20.810 38 



87,587 
49,905 

9,510 
86,853 
27,777 
15,539 04 
85,677 22 

7,503 04 
26.480 69 



45 
36 
14 
12 
86 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



105 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 


School 
ildings 
liture 










a, c • 

2 en 3 N o 


3 

3 


u 

3 


c 




~<« 


"° k„ 


M - 3 cr"C o 


T3 <u w 




<*- 3 e 


0) 




fc 8 


C bJO 

e3 G— SR 


.2 rtW^-g 


S.S-S | 


-a 


O ffl £ 


o £ 






-3 8 8 


h 53 t- .j-c/5 £2 
«» 5 4> "K -* 

u Q.J- C -n O 


« <u e x 


o X 


eg Ui 
3 en 


<u a 
.2*3 




He/) 


c/5CQcoK 


j<0 S rtffl 


&& rtW 


HW 


>CD rt 


>U 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ a 


$ c. 


$ 


$ 


34 


8,633 29 


1,441 86 




1,582 20 


11,657 35 


42,225 


1,775 


35 


6,630 00 


149 56 


"275*57 


1,337 36 


8,392 49 


30,000 


2,000 


36 


8,819 42 


820 80 


2,594 68 


7,431 74 


19,666 64 


54,600 


3,000 


37 


19,916 02 




117 63 


5,915 86 


25,949 51 


181,760 


5,760 


38 


13,186 89 


1,045 71 


59 98 


8,030 56 


22,323 14 


75,000 


500 


39 


7,724 01 


99 73 




2,032 42 


9,856 16 


12,000 


500 


40 


10,736 08 




"688*95 


1,935 21 


13,360 24 


34,200 


223 


41 


8,903 80 


253*45 




2,557 80 


11,715 05 


17,000 


1,000 


42 


6,780 00 


37,838 50 


"212*96 


3,372 62 


48,204 08 


58,000 


780 


43 


9,700 73 


1,570 55 


118 45 


2,974 60 


14,364 33 


45,000 


900 


44 


34,474 98 


200,220 22 


9,541 73 


27,524 47 


271,761 40 


515,000 


1,000 


45 


5,852 75 


300 80 


125 35 


1,935 67 


8,214 57 


70,000 


558 


46 


25,566 40 


4,962 26 


2,455 00 


10,172 37 


43,156 03 


160,000 


4,000 


47 


11,360 00 


15 00 


29 48 


10,349 76 


21,754 24 


30,000 


3,000 


48 


9,297 50 


400 60 




2,283 63 


11,981 73 


20,000 


1,000 


49 


14,355 50 




175 00 


7,498 06 


22,028 56 


45,000 


1,200 


50 


3,300 00 


15,656 98 




883 68 


19,840 66 


38,000 


350 


51 


9,360 00 


22,580 06 


347*00 


2,749 94 


35,037 00 


85,000 


900 


52 


8,945 25 




143 71 


2,127 95 


11,216 91 


40,000 


500 


53 


11,956 21 


"725 09 


62 05 


9,794 19 


22,537 54 


125,000 


461 


54 


13,516 77 


102 27 




4,019 22 


17,638 26 


52,000 


1,000 


55 


5,300 00 




"2518 


1,479 70 


6,804 88 


35,000 


2,500 


56 


4,058 79 


"237*86 




878 22 


5,174 87 


20,000 


5,000 


57 


1,450 00 


447 51 


'36 10 


864 80 


2,798 41 


3,000 


500 


58 


14,750 00 


504 05 




10,312 36 


25,566 41 


120,000 


3,000 


59 


9,312 47 


290 60 


' ' 160 38 


2,890 86 


12,654 31 


50,000 


3,000 


60 


19,866 00 




894 76 


7.150 64 


27,911 40 


225,000 


1,000 


61 


10,313 82 


"427 20 


72 75 


8,837 10 


19,650 87 


136,000 


3,000 


62 


2,340 00 






953 43 


3,293 43 


9,000 


300 


63 


8,222 50 


Y,464*21 


"28*67 


3,216 95 


12,932 33 


80,000 


1,500 


64 


29,415 11 


53,332 89 




15,798 75 


98,546 75 


135,000 


2,000 


65 


8,000 00 




" 152 04 


4,854 48 


13,006 52 


30,000 


2,500 


66 


14,362 50 


'2,614*74 


62 50 


4,545 30 


21,585 04 


150,000 


1,000 


67 


3,022 00 


14 75 


164 11 


963 01 


4,163 87 


7,000 


400 


68 


19,746 49 




311 69 


5,541 22 


25,599 40 


180,000 


1,400 


69 


3,918 00 


15,396 02 


459 01 


3,039 87 


22,812 90 


67,945 


2.600 


70 


29,240 50 


699 95 




8,337 90 


38,278 35 


240,000 


16,000 


71 


8,788 00 


914 61 


15*40 


2,153 25 


11,871 26 


65,000 


5,000 


72 


4,679 67 




6 20 


893 75 


5,579 62 


11,400 


600 


73 


2,530 00 






494 16 


3,024 16 


3,504 


991 


74 


3,520 00 


"45606 


300 25 


2,061 91 


6,338 22 


39,357 


361 


75 


2,282 75 




174 45 


312 34 


2,769 54 


2,000 


330 


76 


12,796 27 


2,03 i' 43 


83 72 


2,562 21 


17,473 63 


50,000 


6,000 


77 


10,961 46 


20,320 63 


732 84 


7,686 23 


39,701 16 


68,000 


3,000 


78 


39,397 98 


335 84 


89 90 


27,322 94 


67,146 66 


260.000 


20,000 


79 


11,480 00 




62 67 


4,527 51 


16,070 18 


30,000 


350 


80 


33,230 72 


3,772* 19 


656 55 


13,412 66 


51,072 12 


235,000 


3.200 


81 


8,200 00 






2,629 70 


10,829 70 


50,000 


600 


82 


5,500 00 




249*38 


1,496 69 


7,246 07 


30,000 


3,000 


83 


12,000 00 




42 80 


3,015 38 


15,058 18 


25,000 


500 


84 


1,265 00 




13 08 


283 69 


1,561 77 


12.000 


450 


85 


15,000 85 


243 69 


55 59 


5,510 25 


20,810 38 


80,000 


3,000 


86 


16,777 79 


64,374 74 


384 62 


6,050 30 


87,587 45 


200,000 


4,000 


87 


31,799 17 


1,138 24 


956 86 


14,844 21 


48,738 48 


210,000 


2,500 


88 


5,655 00 


407 14 


114 83 


2,066 40 


8,243 37 


16,000 


4.000 


89 


50,428 79 


4,490 43 


1,585 95 


28,234 42 


84,739 59 


350,000 


10,000 


90 


18,012 50 


756 94 


82 64 


7,142 20 


25,994 28 


125,000 


1,000 


91 


11,110 00 


203 47 


85 80 


3,266 95 


14,666 22 


50,000 


2,200 


92 


33,069 74 


2,116 13 


365 26 


14,716 31 


50,267 44 


132,000 


3,000 


93 


5,947 50 




27 38 


1,428 16 


7.403 04 


40.000 


1,058 


94 


17,990 00 


1,711 31 




4,584 00 


24285 31 


125,000 


1.000 



106 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



THE PUBLIC 











V. 


TABLE E— FINANCIAL 




Receipts 


Towns 


CO 

d en 
.2 c 

Sffi 

JO 


a >> 

3 rt O 


"c3 

u , 
— 9 en 

fell 

Q, tn 
'H to m 
.3 +■><? w 

^ 2^ § 


as 

0) 

_ 

3 

■4-» 

c 
a> 

OJ 

Q 


•- y 

<u c 
tn d 
<u~ u 

qj S"0 3 
-= 3 C o 
Ufa J3(/) 


."a 

o 

o 


95 Parkhill 


$ c. 

1,016 76 

1,120 32 

566 25 

836 43 

313 79 

331 57 

554 37 

600 00 

571 57 

1,924 50 

226 52 
587 29 

5,390 00 
1,643 56 
2,338 00 

179 98 
615 07 
456 19 

1,526 52 
493 45 

5,653 58 
893 27 

1,874 00 

1,135 53 
313 34 

227 99 
1,325 48 
4,030 00 
1,268 60 

416 22 

831 42 

400 22 

1,067 78 

928 66 

1,191 81 

2,260 14 

1,139 62 

195 93 

2,193 91 

424 93 

763 98 

2,565 66 

488 03 

1,038 73 

3,095 74 

266 02 


$ c. 
16 76 

50 ' 00 

39 81 

' 23 ' 53 

28 41 

18 42 

23 14 

29 63 
119 90 

1,458 30 


$ c. 

3,700 00 
35,800 73 
44,268 67 
27,738 56 
17,031 37 
18,000 00 
16,749 95 
25,025 00 
20,000 00 

3,700 00 
11,583 93 
35,681 67 
12,096 19 
14,500 00 

9,500 00 
16,140 51 

2,525 00 
27,734 36 
97,450 00 

8,276 06 
18,135 51 
10,538 16 
40,000 00 

8,246 96 

3,500 00 
12,775 00 
12,872 32 
53,500 00 

7,000 00 

3,518 83 
68,000 00 

3,520 63 
19,000 00 
77,127 13 
33,000 00 

2,000 00 

7,000 00 

4,613 64 

8,006 02 
80,500 00 
22,021 94 
53,076 27 

3,135 21 
34,053 94 
16,000 00 

9,300 25 
10,367 86 


$ 


c. 


$ c. 

127 58 

389 79 

3,400 23 

543 37 

225 95 

1,755 75 

294 25 

7,730 80 

19,607 26 

1,625 76 

278 02 

732 94 

86 22 

5,579 62 

564 68 

1,001 61 

32 05 

5,534 15 

791 33 

665 54 

438 44 

32 14 

3,411 90 

1,409 72 

3,581 25 

368 46 

2,945 25 

2,786 46 

507 04 

794 79 

444 69 

3,280 02 

346 32 

4,644 55 

755 41 

171 13 

1,238 06 

4,729 92 

528 26 

10,547 20 

7.584 53 

4,832 57 

1,880 25 

8,745 79 

353 96 

768 78 

173 38 


% c. 

4.861 10 


96 Parrv Sound. . 




3 7,310 84 


97 Pembroke 

98*Penetanguish'e. 
99 Perth 


40,759 


87 


88,995 02 
29,118 36 




17,571 11 


100 Petrolia 

101 Picton 

102 Port Colborne . 

103 Port Hope 

104 Powassan 


4,895 
62,916 


16 

00 


20,087 32 
22,493 73 
96,271 80 
40,228 83 




7,250 26 


105 Prescott 




\ 2,088 47 


106 Preston. . 




37,001 90 


107 Rainv River . 




17,572 41 


108 Renfrew 




21,723 18 


109 Ridgetown .... 

110 Riverside 




12,402 68 




17,142 12 


111 Rockland 




2,737 03 


112 St. Marv's 




33,883 58 


113 Sandwich 

114 Seaforth 


27,029 


16 


125,726 68 
10,507 93 






19,067 40 






16,223 88 


117 Smith's Falls 




44,305 17 


118 Southampton .. 

119 Stavner 




11,530 68 




8,240 31 


120 Strathroy 




13,456 80 


121 Sturgeon Falls. 

122 Sudbury 




16,045 56 


1,779 


31 


59,391 25 
11.537 04 


124 Thornbury .... 

125 Thorold 

126 Tilbury 

127 Tillsonburg 

128 Timmins 

1 7 9 Trenton 




5,610 63 


10,500 


00 


79,360 91 
7,650 49 


3,500 00 
38,721 04 


23,246 54 

121,560 50 

34.684 07 


130 Trout Creek .. . 

131 Uxbridge 

132 Yanklpek Hill 




3,362 94 




10,521 34 




10.512 81 


133 W'alkerton 

134 Walkerville.... 

135 Wallaceburg . .. 

136 Waterloo 

137 Webb wood. . . . 

138 Weston 

139 Whitby 

140 Wiarton 




8,850 11 




93,241 11 




30,031 40 


45,205 


42 


103,878 24 
7,581 12 




43,287 76 




17.392 69 




13.164 77 


141 Wingham 




10,807 26 


Totals 


186,852 37 


2,687,593 19 


637,673 


05 


414,296 30 


3,927.873 21 


1 Rural Schools. . . . 

2 Cities 


2,504,327 99 
263,659 25 
186,852 37 
196,055 51 


69,232 27 

1,458 30 
11,185 33 


6,958,095 45 

11,179,786 91 

2,687,593 19 

614,635 04 


877,709 

1,078,422 

637,673 

57,439 


17 
63 
05 
93 


6,451.927 49 

1,742,504 71 

414,296 30 

243,320 65 


16,861,292 37 
14,264.373 50 


3 Town s 


3,927.873 21 


4 Villages 


1.122.636 46 


5 Grand T'tls, 1924- 

6 Grand T'tls, 1923. 


3,150,895 12 
3,048,962 96 


81,875 90 
93,219 72 


21,440,110 59 
21,354,709 43 

85,401 16 


2,651,244 
4,249,259 


78 
76 


8,852,049 15 
10.037.725 73 


36,176.175 54 
38.783,877 60 


7 Increases 

8 Decreases 


101,932 16 


11,343 82 








1,598,014 98 


1,185.676 58 


2,607,702 06 


9 Percentages 


8.71 


.22 


59.26 


7 


33 


24.47 





including Protestant Separate School. 



Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance: Rural 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



107 



SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

STATEMENT (Concluded) 



_§ 8 
He/) 



$ c 

3,520 00 

21,976 54 

28,722 50 

19,743 80 

13,880 75 

13,871 00 

12,803 15 

24,665 00 

15,412 61 

4,040 00 

8,355 72 

23,794 34 

12,033 40 

14,932 38 

7,728 23 

6,004 56 

2,190 42 

16,367 85 

30,821 35 

6,839 25 

14,650 00 

10,496 95 

29,491 00 

8,320 00 

4,100 00 

9,802 98 

7,260 00 

38,318 70 

8,970 00 

4,006 84 

16,300 00 

3,460 00 

15,275 00 

38,579 61 

25,560 00 

2,090 00 

7,380 00 

3,400 00 

6,252 50 

55,877 25 

17,254 35 

30,105 78 

4,698 00 

23,511 28 

11,471 00 

10,293 75 

8,477 47 



1,907,823 95 



6,788,377 34 

7,240,211 94 

1,907,823 95 

576,172 78 



16,512,586 01 
16,008,523 98 



504,062 03 



56.08 



Expenditure 



o 
X)C/5 
C M 

4-> 3 O 

c/ScqE 



J<0 £ rtCQ 



0) 
3 

c a-n Q. 
a> a) ~ x 



■M Q. 

O X 



o tfi 

•c £ fa. 
c/)2.ti 

<u .to 
►?•- c 



$ 

107 



22,784 74 



249 

865 

5,775 

64,813 

20,490 

350 

426 

1,203 



1,400 18 



4,460 23 

12,285 66 

1,212 19 



2,059 91 

632 45 



269 07 

730 00 

2,453 06 

4,591 95 

294 00 

100 7 

43,000 00 

305 20 

2,500 00 

9,961 90 

442 50 

220 74 



8,732 75 

607 61 

42,129 35 

29 50 

1,965 29 



150 00 

29 55 



747,219 11 



1,431,582 

1,573,029 35 
747,219 11 
127,550 37 



3,879,381 71 
6,448,540 84 



2,569,159 13 



13.18 



$ c. 

112 10 

80 70 

39 90 
284 74 

40 45 



80 00 



1,340 23 

328 40 

70 91 



289 10 



30 37 



344 81 

270 82 

15 00 



530 49 
58 00 

270 28 
49 90 
14 00 



27 99 

476 46 

1,991-04 



22 00 



16 90 

24 80 

2,094 91 

20 70 

7,035 10 

72 87 

1,676 91 

206 07 

213 00 

191 99 



57,415 40 



146,699 41 

260,ol4 48 

57,415 40 

9,661 06 



474,390 35 
449,649 90 



24,740 45 



1.61 



$ c. 
1,043 93 
9,956 11 

35,095 54 
7,338 07 
3,400 25 
4,880 48 
3,663 64 
6,772 13 
4,325 52 
791 82 
3,306 00 
8,912 00 
5,205 21 
6,719 89 
4,603 99 
8,876 62 
406 53 

11,443 31 

72,986 07 
1,396 93 
4,417 40 
2,890 72 

11,253 32 

1,990 61 

972 48 

2,201 

2,733 

15,832 
1,765 
1,483 

19,138 59 

269 74 

4,767 

69,695 
8,399 
425 
1,879 
1,091 
2,157 

19,323 
5,574 

24,471 
1,758 

10,348 
5,706 40 
2,508 02 
1,926 86 



955,408 23 



2,962,829 22 

4,425,962 03 

955,408 23 

230,781 94 



8,574,981 42 
8,649,506 99 



74,525 57 



29 12 



$ c 

4,783 90 

32,013 35 

86,642 68 

27,366 61 

17,571 11 

19,616 48 

22,242 57 

96,250 53 

40,228 83 

5,261 82 

12,088 47 

35,249 97 

17,567 01 

21,723 18 

12,332 22 

16,570 46 

2,596 95 

32,271 39 

116,093 08 

9,478 74 

19,067 40 

15,792 39 

41,647 59 

10,325 61 

5,341 55 

13,264 98 

12,504 83 

59,013 32 

11,079 55 

5,605 44 

78,438 59 

4,062 93 

23,019 21 

120,228 07 

34,402 07 

2,757 88 

9,259 81 

4,508 36 

8,435 27 

86,028 44 

23,456 97 

103,742 09 

6,559 10 

37,501 70 

17,383 47 

13,164 77 

10,625 87 



3,667,866 69 



11,329,488 85 

13,499,817 80 

3,667,866 69 

944,166 15 



29,441,339 49 
31,556,221 71 



2,114,882 22 



$ 

12,350 

125,000 

382,000 

60,000 

57,000 

43,000 

22,000 

150,000 

100,000 

16,000 

65,000 

215,000 

29,446 

55,000 

40,000 

57,826 

4,000 

125,000 

468,500 

50,000 

75,000 

50,000 

185,000 

18,000 

42,720 

23,000 

40,000 

307,298 

29,000 

22,400 

175,000 

21,000 

50,000 

187,000 

175,000 

3,368 

22,000 

20,000 

20,000 

550,000 

140,000 

250,000 

15,000 

160,000 

95,000 

21,500 

50,000 



12,502,062 



24,124,552 

38,047,274 

12,502,062 

3,260,612 



77,934,500 
73,032,404 



4,902,096 



B 

o S 



$ 

177 

5,000 

5,250 

1,250 

1,300 

878 

1,500 

5,000 

665 

1,000 

8,000 

3,000 

5,500 

3,500 

3,500 

550 

300 

1,000 

13,725 

200 

657 

6,500 

30,000 

1,750 

193 

307 

530 

3,290 

460 

200 

450 

300 

600 

2.246 

6.000 

327 

500 

350 

2,700 

15,000 

900 

15,000 

517 

2,600 

3,650 

1,088 

250 



390,042 



1,177,737 

1,408,505 

390,042 

108,152 



3,084,436 
2,764,157 



320,279 



Schools, $52.36; Cities, $66.67; Towns, $50.02; Milages, $41.09; Province, $57.15. 



108 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE F— FINANCIAL 









Receipts 






Rural Schools 


0) 

> 

.2 a 

JO 


CO 

rj a 

u a, 

O £ 

ii 
f! 

3T3 
*5 rt 


CO 
<L> 
1* 

3 

■M 

c 

0) 
0) 

Q 


•a 8 

> C 3 
cn eJ O 

(3 <U U. 

a f* +3 


<-> 

c 

3 

o 
< g 

■M CJ 

O 0) 

He* 


1 Bruce 


$ c 
5,520 65 
3,380 61 
7,808 4J 
5,005 64 
3,108 8£ 
2,757 U 
3,980 34 
2,886 6£ 

319 91 
1,361 9: 

803 6< 
994 31 

1,604 o; 

320 0( 

2,968 2. 

824 0( 

249 9. 

5,548 6( 

1,961 V 

2,590 8. 

13,857 2 ( 

1,584 5, 

10,170 1 

1,216 6 

4,786 4 

2,326 3 

372 4 

81,237 8 


$ c 

15,601 4/ 

23,153 6/ 

39,082 8, 

[ 6,876 6 = 

> 6,095 14 
4,238 2i 

[ 8,160 3t 
$ 8,391 5t 
i 2,209 9 = 

> 1,845 4£ 

) 305 o: 

1,055 9: 
! 4,570 U 
) 1,116 6* 

5 3,938 3. 
i 1,354 9. 
5 1,230 9( 
) 15,642 41 
1 4,540 3< 

1 99,761 5 
) 15,827 9- 
5 8,335 7< 

7 22,075 8( 

2 3,101 5< 

3 10,386 
2 7,314 8 
5 2,140 6 
S 121,906 9 


$ c.l 

4,136 40 

12,753 35 

9,059 63 

........ 

> 9,791 85 
) 1,749 10 

I '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

» 

1 

5 

5 

) 

J 

) 

7 4,800 00 
1 

1 

> 

? ! ' 

a 

2 ! ' 

7 

5 80,488 09 


U856 28 

18,164 24 

30,205 80 

4,656 54 

5.668 95 

3,005 93 

5,175 10 

9,589 51 

2.300 62 

1.276 70 

981 84 

560 77 

2.699 11 

1.547 29 

867 44 

2,075 94 

896 38 

17,884 88 

1,216 55 

43,923 15 

21,134 68 

3,731 95 

24,051 80 

599 79 

9,978 13 

3,660 64 

20,016 19 

121,499 66 


S c 
38,114 80 


2 Carleton 

3 Essex 

4 Frontenac 


57,451 87 
86,156 70 
16,538 83 


5 Grey 

6 Hastings 

7 Huron .... 


14,873 57 
10,001 34 
27,107 68 


8 Kent 


22,616 85 


9 Lambton 

10 Lanark 

11 Leeds and Grenville . . 

12 Lennox and Addington . 

13 Middlesex 


4,830 52 
4,484 11 
2,090 56 
2,611 01 
8,873 29 


14 Norfolk 


2,983 97 


15 Northumberland and 

Durham 


7,774 04 


16 Ontario. . . 


4,254 87 


17 Peel 


2,377 23 


18 Perth 


39.075 96 


19 Peterborough 


7,718 71 


20 Prescott and Russell . . . 

21 Renfrew. . . 


151,075 54 
50,819 91 


22 Simcoe 


13,652 26 


23 Stormont, Dundas and 
Glengarry 


56,297 77 


24 Victoria .... 


4,918 00 


25 Waterloo .... 


25,150 64 


26 Wellington . . . 


13,301 78 


27 York 


22,529 31 


28 Districts.. 


405,132 58 






Totals .... 


169,547 3 


1 440,262 


8 122,778 42 


370,225 86 


1,102,813 70 






Cities 
1 Belleville. 


201 7 
464 1 
269 9 

1,342 8 
100 1 
448 5 

3,349 7 
507 1 
948 9 

1,628 9 
236 
143 3 

' 76 9 

973 7 
669 6 
421 5 
234 1 
258 2 

1,339 4 

448 2 

12,832 5 

1,757 t 
287 2 


2 8,042 6 

2 19,982 2 

8 16,137 2 

4 38,734 1 

3 3,228 5 

5 16,292 6 

1 110,361 7 

2 24,213 7 

9 40,720 8 
9 44,310 8 

2 11,235 9 

4 6,668 1 
243,945 6 

3 4,017 8 

7 24,485 9 

5 21,594 

6 28,150 8 

5 11,379 7 
9 10,432 1 
59,513 4 
9 18,087 C 

8 581,137 5 

6 138,334 5 

7 2,800 C 


9 

4 

4 

8 

7 

1 

4 

2 

2 

5 

8 

5 



5 10,000 0C 

9 

7 34,000 0C 

7 

2 

8 

7 

4 

7 

8 




1,258 83 

36,818 57 

5,856 02 

541 93 

969 07 

1,791 82 

44,291 24 

912 35 

5,459 30 

476 61 

6,514 00 

161 67 

35,587 22 

5,385 9t 

3,896 72 

1 5,193 92 

7,205 0C 

9,994 8 = 

5,335 71 

19,349 4 = 

1,098 41 

67,675 7C 

33,102 12 

648 OS 


9,503 24 


2 Brantford . . . 


57,264 93 


3 Chatham 


* 22,263 24 


4 Fort William 


40,618 95 


5 Gait 


4,297 77 


6 Guelph 


18,532 98 


7 Hamilton . . 


158,002 69 


8 Kingston 


25,633 19 


9 Kitchener . . . 


47,129 11 


10 London 


46,416 45 


11 Niagara Falls 

12 Oshawa .... 


17,986 00 
6,973 16 


13 Ottawa.. . . 


279,532 82 


14 Owen Sound 


19,480 74 


15 Peterborough 


29,356 48 


16 Port Arthur 


61,457 64 


17 St. Catharines 


35,777 43 


18 St. Thomas 


21,608 72 


19 Sarnia . . . 


16,026 18 


20 Sault Ste. Marie 

21 Stratford 


80,202 32 
19,633 74 


22 Toronto 


) 661,645 85 




173,194 36 


24 Woodstock 


) 3,735 36 






Totals 


28,941 C 


16 1,483.807 / 


3 44,000 0( 


)l 299,524 5( 


> 1,856,273 35 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



109 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

STATEMENT, ETC. 



Expenditure 


of School 
Buildings 
Lirniture 




eachers' 
ilaries 


.s 

« o 


ies, Maps, 
atus, 
and 
Books 


In <a 

4> a; 


c 

3 

ST? 


c 
o 6 


tfl o 


ibrar 
ppar 
rizes 
:hoo 


53 3 


3 8. 

o x 


Value 
Sites, 
and F 


<u a 


He/) 


c?5 co 


_)<0-,C/) 


<0* 


HW 


>w 



$ c. 

16,461 77 

23,702 05 

35,344 41 

10,154 53 

8,096 83 

5,832 05 

9,510 00 

9,318 S3 

1,060 00 

3,000 58 

1,189 50 

1,827 90 

5,120 20 

1,100 00 

5,694 37 

2,255 00 

1,000 00 

15,865 11 

5,201 85 

72,558 56 

25,920 45 

6,995 56 

33,942 42 

3,255 00 

13,872 50 

7,200 00 

1,631 80 

136,876 42 



463,987 69 



4 
12 

8 
22 

3 

9 
61 
11 
16 
20 

7 

4 
149 

2 

18 
11 
14 
. 3 

5 
26 

5 

277 

61 

1 



920 00 
973 75 
765 99 
078 08 
320 00 
823 85 
587 98 
784 34 
830 00 
348 34 
610 00 
268 24 
477 08 
215 00 
040 68 
830 00 
419 50 
555 42 
524 78 
542 
720 25 
835 66 
633 27 
691 25 



762,795 63 



$ c. 

6,997 13 

18,720 43 

19,116 22 

233 95 

1,434 

207 

10,889 

199 

7 



20 23 



150 00 
209 85 
199 60 

7 05 

233 20 

32 25 

12,021 62 

29 30 

8,547 05 

5,974 11 

809 15 

2,405 70 

104 69 

516 05 

43 05 

19,123 54 

77,244 73 



185,477 08 



171 00 

20,204 14 

512 31 

1,944 64 



50 40 

20,717 83 

3,309 37 

1,811 76 

2,768 72 

428 33 

203 89 

27,252 05 

15,500 00 



8,214 60 

5,229 54 

5,113 21 

790 82 

7,410 80 

1,369 67 

61,411 12 



16 80 



184,431 00 



# c. 
545 90 
630 26 
641 33 

52 15 
279 70 

21 29 
147 63 
291 37 

49 50 

16 54 



10 80 
91 69 
19 80 

50 60 
107 66 



637 18 

214 85 

1,001 95 

1,053 22 

93 46 

305 36 
37 00 
433 52 
188 90 
213 24 
4,878 16 



12,013 06 



1,378 81 

115 00 

80 00 

49 50 

636 67 

8,450 00 



494 55 

1,297 49 

20 00 



118 42 

70 00 

120 92 

372 17 

244 42 

378 12 

441 05 

1,019 45 

4,565 90 

1,743 96 



21,596 43 



$ c. 

3,697 39 

7,918 55 

15,237 52 

1,429 96 

1,141 54 

1,034 48 

3,122 82 



5,419 53 
1,404 75 
290 53 
122 55 
193 71 
1,684 51 
350 85 

750 66 

503 61 

376 
6,630 

878 

25,412 

5,092 



2,856 47 

7,964 43 

757 79 

3,214 39 

1,915 35 

1,268 96 

58,228 22 



258,897 95 



4,159 88 
16,708 23 

7,713 15 

16,516 23 

928 27 

7,693 20 
61,383 66 
10,539 48 
16,481 67 
21,333 80 

1,713 92 

2,419 19 
102,803 69 

1,279 49 
11,245 80 
41,156 20 

6,066 38 

3,873 04 

3,309 91 

18,735 81 

10,510 70 

317,833 17 

108,066 04 

2,027 31 



9 C. 

27,702 19 

50,971 29 

70,339 48 

11,870 59 



10,952 85 
7,095 02 
23,670 26 
15,228 92 
2,521 45 
3,327 88 
1,312 05 
2,182 41 
7,106 25 
1,670 25 



6,502 68 

3,099 47 

1,408 41 

35,154 10 

6,324 42 

107,519 94 

38,040 01 

10,754 64 

44,617 91 
4,154 48 

18,036 46 
9,347 30 

22,237 54 
377,227 53 



920,375 78 



9,250 88 
51,264 93 
17,106 45 
40,618 95 

4,297 77 
18,204 12 
152,139 47 
25,633 19 
35,617 98 
45,748 35 

9,772 25 

6,891 32 

279,532 82 

19,112 91 

29,356 48 

61,321 70 

26,087 59 

12,786 09 

10,003 63 

53,129 83 

18,620 07 

661,645 85 

171,443 27 

3,735 36 



794,498 22 1,763,321 28 



66,253 

71,016 

131,536 

14,013 

17,700 

12,500 

35,050 

56,000 

9,000 

6,000 

2,200 

3,350 

11,400 

4,000 

18,550 

5,700 

2,000 

52,150 

20,000 

215,741 

102,200 

38,500 

148,700 

6,600 

53,300 

20,200 

35,000 

502,572 



1,661,23: 



66,000 

90,000 

92,000 

260,000 

9,800 

55,000 

680,000 

183,000 

180,000 

285,000 

60,000 

50,000 

1,000,000 

30,000 

121,000 

105,000 

125,000 

40,000 

33,000 

280,000 

120,000 

3,027,659 

1,350,000 

20,000 



8,262,459 



$ 

3,717 

2,200 

4,914 

2,346 

1,395 

1.715 

2,612 

1,145 

215 

351 

269 

520 

819 

300 

1,200 

593 

198 

7,726 

985 

7,439 

5,335 

1,440 

5,513 
1 .368 
2.472 
1,130 
225 
14,428 



,ot 



800 
1,300 
3,427 
1,000 

250 
1,230 
9,700 
2,000 
2,000 
9.000 
1 .030 

4Q0 
25,173 

475 
8,000 
1,000 
3.300 
1,575 
1,600 
1,100 
1,900 
18.252 
13.328 

470 



108,400 



110 



THE REPORT OF THK 



Xo. 11 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE F— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


Towns 


> 

£?£ 

JO 


CO 

_ <« 

CO <u 

Q, en 

|| 


Debentures 


Balances, Sub- 
scribed and 
Other Sources 


c 

3 
O 

< % 

o <u 
He* 


1 Alexandria 


$ c. 

234 58 

136 61 

243 87 

270 93 

77 57 

1,165 00 

1,285 00 

270 08 

1,440 00 

113 77 

2,590 00 
577 50 
132 17 
109 77 

83 85 
547 99 

69 54 

428' 60 
81 56 

125 44 
61 01 
58 94 

139 40 

692 50 

42 52 

104 04 

2,935 00 

1,073 75 

481 00 

135 27 

231 61 

1,116 00 

1,070 00 

2,487 17 

53 88 
363 20 
309 64 

57 53 
830 26 

61 19 
169 04 

51 41 
366 54 
383 60 
130 98 

25 95 

98 01 
141 68 
525 00 
265 00 
122 50 


$ c. 
8,583 42 
1,733 58 
7,414 65 
9,751 78 
3,813 10 
4,993 38 
1,715 80 
7,487 14 
1,724 91 
1,935 43 
630 00 
2,315 46 

19,007 83 
4,300 00 

14,662 26 
3,250 00 

18,912 51 
2,634 10 

14,587 89 

41,621 60 
7,904 38 
2.375 00 
1,942 25 
2,693 23 
8,100 00 

22,693 90 
2.017 10 
1,337 01 
2.817 65 

11,996 10 

906 79 

800 00 

2,868 11 

7,850 60 

i 500 00 

1,375 00 

4,901 10 

2,006 00 

1,324 60 

3,500 00 

3,913 25 

29,986 50 

1,636 67 

5,103 00 

1,017 04 

758 72 

24,342 18 
4,111 47 
1,472 59 
4,305 02 
8,008 17 
1,156 02 

14.751 20 

11,378 20 


* c. 

1,096 91 

4,374 71 
1.190 85 

3,216 25 


$ c. 

342 00 

2,772 35 

193 59 
1,652 01 

668 56 

669 71 
1,545 29 
1,311 91 

49 40 

3,115 98 

2,240 38 

1,620 81 

73 19 

545 37 

836 23 

822 01 

936 98 

305 93 

953 90 

2,083 14 

11,914 25 

453 17 

9,488 78 

2,073 64 

169 15 

475 93 

314 17 

577 32 

2,454 16 

926 54 

183 16 

1,751 40 

1,853 98 

1,096 64 

150 32 

608 20 

1,608 66 

4,039 71 

4,078 77 

375 24 

3,514 53 

985 18 

5,632 03 

809 40 

301 26 

1,027 42 

1,571 24 

590 62 

214 70 

3,863 41 

297 89 

901 30 

194 55 


| $ c- 
9 160 00 


2 Almonte 


4,642 54 


3 Amherstburg 


7,852 11 


4 Arnorior 


11,674 72 


5 Barrie 


4,559 23 


6 Blind River. . 


6,828 09 


7 Bonfield 


4,546 09 


8 Brockville . . . 


9,069 13 


9 Cache Bav . . 


3,214 31 


10 Campbellford 


2,049 20 


1 1 Charlton .... 


3,745 98 


12 Chelmsford 


7,145 84 


13 Cobalt . . 


21,206 14 


14 Cobourg . 


4,505 36 


15 Cochrane . . 


15,317 40 


16 Collingwood . . 


4,170 08 


17 Cornwall. . 


20,282 51 


18 Dundas. 


3,640 62 


19 East view 


15,990 73 


20 Ford . . . 


43,004 10 


21 Fort Frances 

22 Gananoque 


10,069 08 
14,414 69 


23 Goderich . . . 


2,456 43 


24 Hanover . . 


12,240 95 


25 Haileyburv 


10,313 04 


26 Hawkesburv 


22,863 05 


27 Hearst. . . 


3,185 53 


28 HespeJer . . 


1,693 70 


29 Ingersoll.. 


3,499 01 


30 Iroquois Falls 

31 Kearney 

32 Keewatin 


21,759 97 
2,907 08 
1,464 16 


33 Kenora 

34 Lindsay . 


4,754 78 
9,936 19 


35 Little Current 


2,712 64 


36 Masse v . . 


2,595 32 


37 Mattawa 


7,996 47 


38 Merritton. 


3,668 54 


39 Mount Forest 


5,727 51 


40 New Liskeard 


9,079 26 


41 Newmarket. 


4,346 02 


42 North Bav . . 


34,331 29 


43 Oakville." 


2,683 04 


44 Orillia.. 


10,904 07 


45 Paris.. 


1,877 85 


46 Parkhill 


1,426 52 


47 Pembroke . . . 


25,753 20 


48 Perth 


5,813 69 


49 Picton... 


2,089 16 


50 Prescott . . 


4,617 73 


5 1 Preston .... 


12,013 26 


52 Rainy River . . . 


1,978 91 


53 Renfrew. . . . 


15,917 50 


54 Riverside 


14.911 50 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



111 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

STATEMENT, ETC. (Continued) 



Expenditure 


of School 
Buildings 
urniture 








c 
2 « 


a 

rt en 


n 


c 
a 
o 
£"° 


c 

u-. 4> 

o S 




• « at 
He/) 


«J o 

tfl o 

c75c/) 


£ a-C-g 


sa 


— c 

8. 

O X 


-is 2"o 


<u a 
.3 "3 




$ c 


9 c 


$ c 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ 


$ 


1 


5,020 00 





117 95 


3,742 17 


8,880 12 


30,000 


500 


2 


2,188 50 


50 00 


4 45 


466 75 


2,709 70 


5,000 


500 


3 


3,191 14 


1,738 85 


166 90 


2,551 23 


7,648 12 


38,000 


1,988 


4 


5,982 50 


1,253 79 


231 84 


3,239 39 


10,707 52 


43,000 


503 


5 


2,100 00 




25 00 


1,466 60 


3,591 60 


10,500 


800 


6 


4,328 98 


115 83 


40 35 


464 99 


4,950 15 


20,000 


400 


7 


2,083 15 


670 84 




184 16 


2,938 15 


4,000 


96 


8 


4,305 or 


2,180 51 


304 50 


2,246 50 


9,036 51 


75,000 


1,000 


Q 


1,537 50 


512 2c 


25 00 


1,079 55 


3,214 31 


3,000 


79 


10 


1,025 00 


41 20 


40 00 


943 00 


2,049 20 


3,000 


197 


11 


440 00 


2,570 80 


195 74 


106 50 


3,313 04 


3,431 


180 


12 


5,945 00 


67 00 


17 48 


699 01 


6,728 49 


2,500 


400 


13 


12,463 19 


1,234 52 


692 98 


6,815 45 


21,206 14 


34,100 


1 ,303 


14 


2,800 00 


294 10 


90 50 


1,209 21 


4,393 81 


17,500 


900 


15 


4,340 71 


2,182 46 


160 88. 


3,345 06 


10,029 13 


35,000 


1,000 


16 


1,950 00 


404 0( 




1,413 69 


3,767 69 


21,500 


500 


17 


12,589 90 




186 25 


5,269 59 


18,045 74 


85,000 


1,200 


18 


1,750 00 


553 7-; 


57 80 


630 89 


2,992 43 


5,000 


380 


19 


8,880 00 


589 60 




6,102 72 


15,572 32 


56,000 


166 


20 


13,400 00 


9,104 10 


2,000 00 


18,500 00 


43,004 10 


268,200 


27,300 


21 


2,506 25 


342 55 


196 40 


3,395 62 


6,440 82 


25,000 


500 


22 


2,317 50 


4,800 00 


49 00 


7,017 84 


14,184 34 


48.000 


1,000 


23 


1,060 00 


4 00 


64 54 


1,286 94 


2,415 48 


8,300 


425 


24 


1,027 50 


8,164 97 


14 1? 


1,931 44 


11,138 03 


21,000 


300 


25 


4,706 93 


592 24 


196 80 


4,568 17 


10,064 14 


50,000 


150 


26 


12,362 00 


824 67 




7,001 33 


20,188 00 


90,000 


1,600 


27 


1,350 00 


160 50 


113 4f 


1,552 82 


3,176 75 


2,000 


81 


28 


1,000 00 


228 00 




465 70 


1,693 70 


20,000 


700 


29 


1,745 00 


214 96 


13 45 


1,525 56 


3,499 01 


14,000 


672 


30 


8,620 00 


1,948 o; 


184 9; 


10,689 4< 


21,442 48 


60,000 


1,000 


31 


1,090 00 


85 00 


70 00 


176 66 


1,421 68 


1,500 


350 


32 


900 00 


100 00 


25 Of 


322 61 


1,347 65 


4,000 


100 


33 


1,687 50 


419 65 




1,788 31 


3.895 46 


40,000 


239 


34 


5,952 05 


105 00 


12 10 


1,114 5: 


7,183 67 


40,000 


2,400 


35 


1.962 64 


200 00 


50 00 


500 00 


2,712 64 


5,000 


1,000 


36 


1,845 00 


19 30 




311 45 


2,175 75 


4,000 


200 


37 


4,580 00 


662 74 


120 67 


2,493 46 


7,856 87 


17,100 


1,080 


38 


1.901 25 


32 00 


136 61 


462 51 


2,532 37 


25,000 


255 


39 


1,938 75 


2,260 35 


5 70 


214 08 


4,418 88 


4,500 


257 


40 


1,280 00 


5,073 50 


200 00 


2,366 53 


8,920 03 


17,622 


400 


41 


1,882 38 


188 77 


14 95 


985 73 


3,071 83 


6,000 


300 


42 


16,978 8C 


2,852 15 


220 00 


13,880 90 


33,931 85 


175,000 


1.500 


43 


900 00 


237 i: 




304 99 


1,442 16 


3.000 


90 


44 


2,533 93 


424 9< 


34*25 


1,789 59 


4,782 76 


5,000 


300 


45 


1,230 00 


143 80 


4 40 


499 65 


1,877 85 


15,000 


280 


46 


904 2! 




7 44 


383 38 


1.295 03 


3,000 


97 


47 


13,254 49 


55 00 


45 00 


12,002 20 


25,356 69 


120,000 


2.000 


48 


2,251 25 




91 00 


2,787 35 


5,129 60 


5,600 


600 


49 


800 00 


155 8-1 




265 31 


1,221 15 


4,000 


130 


50 


2,425 28 






1.923 94 


4,349 22 


20,000 


1,500 


51 


2,348 75 


3,327 42 


331 41 


2.046 56 


8,054 14 


48.000 


500 


52 


922 50 




93 98 


301 34 


1.317 82 


5.000 


150 


53 


5,908 50 


2,430 55 


397 44 


6,312 81 


15,049 30 


64,000 


600 


54 


3,186 67 




31 521 


< 0,169 32 


13.387 51 


45,000 


1.500 



112 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE F— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


Towns 


> 

03 CO 
.2 C 

JO 


co 

a c 
O B 

Si* 

(^ 03 


CO 

£ 

3 
C 

<D 
JO 

Q 


u 

O) 
-G 

•§o 

WD 

. c 

co oj 
C V O 

2*2 b 

*c5'H o 


4-> 

c 

3 
O 

E-o 

O 4> 


55 Rockland 


$ c. 

" 45 ' 65 

689 60 

616 00 

152 28 

1,000 00 

1,090 89 

2,209 75 

261 24 

146 25 

719 36 

137 85 

146 28 

193 07 

270 23 

74 01 

45 86 


$ 

12,320 71 
1,714 03 

30,500 00 
1,987 27 
4,171 15 

20,822 04 

58,232 32 
6,859 70 
9,371 74 

12,367 12 

56,058 77 
7,075 92 
2,953 75 
2,784 17 
3,626 SS 
7,556 51 

11,811 07 
4,009 13 
2,336 07 


$ c. 
36,000 00 

5,500 00 

10,978 00 


$ c. 

2,507 66 

1,068 77 

7,019 07 

2,735 09 

2,952 49 

13,212 75 

21,015 60 

25,519 09 

1 45 

2,267 80 

2,196 89 

7,639 68 

1,323 06 

4,478 02 

2,090 84 

2,151 95 

14,056 63 

777 03 

263 14 


* c. 
14,828 37 


56 St. Mary's 

57 Sandwich 

58 Seaforth 

59 Smith's Falls 

60 Sturgeon Falls 


2.828 45 

74,208 67 

5,340 36 

7,275 92 

35,034 79 


61 Sudbury 


85,838 81 


62 Tecumseh 


34,588 54 


63 Thorold 


9,634 43 


64 Tilburv 


14,781 17 


65 Timmins 


69,953 02 


66 Trenton 


14,853 45 


67 Yankleek Hill 


4,276 81 


68 Walkerton 


7,262 19 


69 Walkerville 

70 Wallaceburg 


5,864 00 
9,901 53 


7 1 Waterloo 


26,137 93 


72 Weston 


4,860 17 


73 Whitbv 


2,645 07 






Totals 


32,365 77 


629,484 04 


62,356 72 


200,512 47 


924,719 00 






1 Rural Schools 


169,547 34 
28,941 06 
32,365 7: 
10,803 25 


440,262 08 

1,483,807 73 

629,484 04 

37,493 95 


122,778 42 
44,000 00 
62,356 72 


370,225 86 

299,524 56 

200,512 47 

27,604 14 


1,102,813 70 


2 Cities 


1,856,273 35 


3 Towns 

4 Villages 


924,719 00 
75,901 34 


5 Grand Totals, 1924. . . . 

6 Grand Totals, 1923. .. . 


241,657 42 
217,621 07 


2,591,047 80 
2,407,950 35 


229,135 14 
1,172,257 00 


897,867 03 
1,001,589 12 


3,959,707 39 
4,799,417 54 


7 Increases 


24,036 35 


183,097 45 


943,121 86 


103,722 09 




8 Decreases .... 


839,710 15 








9 Percentages 


6.10 


65.44 


5.79 


22 67 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



113 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

STATEMENT, ETC. (Concluded) 







Expenditure 










c 

CD 

6 

a 






a 














U 

CCj 


2 . 


en 

a 












3 

en 


"3 3 


.51 S« 


jj 8 

-G en 


c 

3 

H 




Ji.s g 

OCQ 3 


3 

cr 
W 




o 
OS 


* o 

03 O 


m b w o 
co co a) S 


u 

— 3 


3& 

O X 




0) -[n 


"c3 




H 


(/}(/) 


j<a,c/5 


<Plh 


HW 




>C/3 cd 


> 




$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ C. 


$ 


c. 


$ 


$ 


55 


6,576 00 


2,534 10 


230 78 


5,487 49 


14,828 


37 


45,000 


1 ,300 


56 


1,075 00 


280 00 




506 72 


1,861 


72 


5,000 


300 


57 


8,000 00 


14,000 00 




48,003 20 


70,003 


20 


250,000 


5,500 


58 


1,966 08 


15 85 


57 69 


666 99 


2,706 


61 


6,900 


510 


59 


2,832 50 


557 49 


129 02 


3,756 91 


7,275 


92 


50,000 


550 


60 


14,371 65 


1,073 66 


420 88 


14,750 52 


30,616 


71 


95,000 


1,900 


61 


28,034 22 


25,079 95 


790 95 


27,258 01 


81,163 


13 


270,000 


2,500 


62 


6,215 50 


25,880 05 


55 75 


2,202 67 


34,353 


97 


110,000 


789 


63 


6,150 00 


179 20 


284 26 


2,600 65 


9,214 


11 


30,000 


2,200 


64 


2,450 10 


271 88 


47 90 


3,574 42 


6,344 


30 


90,000 


334 


65 


21,843 28 


8,556 56 


328 77 


38,301 39 


69,030 


00 


175,000 


1,350 


66 


2,495 75 




118 75 


6,948 44 


9,562 


94 


10,000 


473 


67 


2,225 00 


59 00 


114 72 


325 00 


2,723 


72 


20,000 


210 


68 


2,712 00 


3,553 97 


32 50 


867 76 


7,166 


23 


20,000 


1,500 


69 


1,750 00 


239 55 


142 71 


3,162 63 


5,294 


89 


25,000 


412 


70 


3,122 50 


67 60 


119 90 


4,549 00 


7,859 00 


30,000 


650 


71 


4,750 00 


12,665 00 


10 00 


6,104 83 


23,529 


83 


100,000 


995 


72 


2,609 50 


181 23 


12 20 


1,490 77 


4,293 


70 


29,700 


312 


73 


1,020 18 


52 75 




317 10 


1,390 


03 


5,000 


116 




331,878 96 


154,924 67 


9,978 52 


334,189 16 


830,971 


31 


3,141,953 


83,549 


1 


463,987 69 


185,477 08 


12,013 06 


258,897 95 


920,375 


78 


1,661,231 


72,570 


2 


762,795 63 


184,431 00 


21,596 43 


794,498 22 


1,763,321 


28 


8,262,459 


108,400 


3 


331,878 96 


154,924 67 


9,978 52 


334,189 16 


830,971 


31 


3,141,953 


83,549 


4 


34,319 68 


4,258 72 


1,010 72 


14,468 00 


54,057 


12 


165,434 


8,051 


5 


1,592,981 96 


529,091 47 


44,598 73 


1,402,053 33 


3,568,725 


49 


13,231,077 


272,570 


6 


1,526,179 94 


1,048,968 00 


55,019 50 


1,671,965 49 


4,302,132 


93 


12,435,222 


257,411 


7 


66,802 02 










795,855 


15,159 


8 




519,876 53 


10,420 77 


269,912 16 


733,407 


44 






9 


44.64 


14.82 


1.25 


39.29 

















Cost per pupi 
Villages, $28.45; Province 



enrolled attendance: 
.16. 



Rural Schools, $41.43; Cities, $39.45; Towns. $33.62; 



114 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN 





jn 

"o 

O 

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Teachers 


Rural Schools 


CO 

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£0 


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CO 

rt 

O 

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CO 

JSB 
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O 

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5 


1 Bruce 


11 

24 
29 
11 

8 
6 

7 
8 
1 
3 

2 

2 
5 
1 

6 
1 
1 

8 
5 

102 

18 
4 

25 
2 
7 
7 
2 
111 
417 

1 

3 
2 
6 
1 
3 

17 
3 
3 
9 
1 
1 

37 
1 
4 
4 
5 
1 
2 
7 
2 

36 

15 

1 

165 


16 

35 

41 

11 

8 

6 

9 

9 

1 

3 

2 

2 

5 
1 

6 

2 

1 

15 

5 

142 

28 

8 

40 

3 

13 

7 

3 

162 

584 


2 

i 
i 

' i 

' i 

i 
i 

i 

2 

' 2 

4 

"4 

22 


14 

35 

40 

10 

8 

6 

8 

9 

1 

2 

2 

2 
5 
1 

5 
1 
1 
14 
4 

140 

28 

6 

36 

3 

13 

7 

3 

158 


% 

100c 

1,000 
1,000 

Y,i66 
1,266 

900 

1,200 

1,000 
1,000 

575 

1,175 
970 

l'il5 


$ 

1,082 

713 

864 

905 

1,003 

950 

1,037 

1,022 

1,000 

875 

600 

900 
1,030 
1,100 

900 
1,000 
1,000 
1,043 
1,031 

534 
977 
750 

900 

1,067 

1,041 

1,029 

873 

860 

807 


"12 

23 
1 

' i 

' '3 

1 

"i 


103 
3 

3 

18 

"i25 
294 


11 
1^ 

17 

1C 

6 

5 
8 
5 
1 
3 

1 

2 
5 

1 

6 

2 

1 

10 

5 

4 

22 

5 

15 

2 
8 
5 
3 
23 


. . 


> 


2 


11 

U 

17 
10 
6 
5 
8 
5 
1 
3 

1 

2 
5 
1 

6 

2 

1 

10 

5 

4 

22 
5 

14 

2 
8 
5 
3 
22 


! 




2 Carleton 


7 

22 
1 


2 


3 Essex 


1 




1 




4 Frontenac. . . . 




5 Grey 


2 




2 




6 Hastings 

7 Huron . . 


1 




1 




1 




8 Kent 


3 




9 Lambton 










10 Lanark . . 












11 Leeds and 

Grenville. . . . 










T 


12 Lennox and 

Addington.. . 

13 Middlesex 




















14 Norfolk. 












15 Northumberl'd 












16 Ontario 












17 Peel 












18 Perth 


5 


1 


5 






19 Peterborough . . 

20 Prescott and 

Russell 

21 Renfrew 

22 Simcoe 






1 
3 


i 


1 
3 


83 
3 
3 

14 


18 


23 Stormont, Dun- 
das, Glengarry 


3 
1 

2 
2 


3 
"i 


6 

1 
2 
2 




25 Waterloo 






26 Wellington. . . . 

27 York. . 










28 Districts 


3 




3 


102 


22 


Totals 

Cities 
1 Belleville 


562 


1,011 


202 


26 


6 


29 


200 


239 


43 


8 
19 
13 
26 

4 
15 
92 
19 
28 
37 

8 

6 
244 

4 
34 
16 
16 

7 

9 

33 

11 

273 

67 

3 
992 


2 
1 

"8 
"44 

' '28 

7 

90 


8 
19 
13 
26 

4 
15 
90 
18 
28 
29 

8 

6 
200 

4 
34 
16 
16 

7 

9 

33 

11 

245 

60 

3 


2,000 
2,000 

' '960 

"852 

1,018 
1,200 


569 
764 
631 
813 
825 
600 
669 
539 
601 
441 
900 
717 
584 
554 
1,676 
709 
903 
500 
556 
814 
500 
624 
662 
500 


"5 

"3 
16 

2 
2 

"l54 

' 3 

4 

"42 
10 


7 
11 
13 
25 

4 
12 
68 
15 
23 
34 

6 

5 
99 

4 
29 
15 
11 

7 

6 

28 

10 

220 

62 

3 








7 
11 
13 
25 

4 
12 
68 
15 
23 
31 

5 

5 
70 

4 
29 
15 
11 

6 

6 

27 

10 

227 

59 

3 








3 


1 


3 












4 Fort William 












5 Gait.. 












6 Guelph 












8 
1 
5 
2 


5 
"l 


8 

5 
6 






8 Kingston 


1 










11 Niagara Fails. . 


1 












13 Ottawa 


5 


3 


5 


89 


2 


15 Peterborough. . 

16 Por^ Arthur 


3 


2 


3 












2 
1 
2 


' i 
1 


2 
1 
2 
1 






18 St Thomas 












20 S Ste Marie 


4 




21 Stratford 








22 Toronto 


6 


7 


19 

2 


3 
5 




24 Woodstock .... 








Totals 


902 


979 


675 


241 


717 


38 


21 


58 


686 


103 


2 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



115 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, AGE, SEX, AND GRADE, ETC. 











a-6 


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V 




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o 

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12 


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£ o 




c 
o 
o 


s 

H 


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3 



10 



35 



13 



02 



626 

1,553 

1,710 

235 

181 

151 

267 

362 

44 

67 

14 

23 
97 
44 

81 

93 

18 

558 

170 

5,726 
979 
379 

1,380 
121 
469 
190 

- 158 
6,520 



22,216 



329 

814 

886 

120 

87 

84 

127 

176 

22 

36 



11 

57 
21 

44 
42 
12 
259 
93 

2,913 
481 

178 

628 
64 

220 

88 

84 

3,292 



11,177 



297 

739 

824 

115 

94 

67 

140 

186 

22 

31 



12 
40 

23 

37 

51 

6 

299 

77 

2,813 
498 
201 

752 

57 

249 

102 

74 
3,228 



11,039 



456 

985 

1,173 

144 

123 

101 

206 

240 

37 

51 

10 

13 
66 

28 

54 

63 

12 

430 

116 

4,003 
653 
266 

908 

75 

362 

127 

64 

4,241 



15,007 



82.7 



198 



743 



941 



92 

534 

481 

54 

30 

26 

29 

109 

4 

.14 



5 

10 
10 

10 

7 

3 

64 

21 

1,947 

186 

91 

401 
14 
68 
31 
41 
2,332 



6.618 



81 
219 

255 
18 
22 
22 
22 
38 
4 



1 
9 
6 

11 

7 

1 

52 

23 

1,041 

89 
62 

186 
11 
51 
19 
38 

969 



3,266 



117 

274 

288 

27 

20 

30 

34 

63 

4 

13 



10 

6 

3 

62 

21 

1,112 

165 

50 

180 
23 
79 
24 
22 
1,150 



3,795 



155 

291 

387 

40 

38 

37 

73 

91 

14 

8 

1 

6 
32 
10 

17 

30 

6 

112 

43 

877 
208 

87 

204 
16 

137 
44 
35 

801 
3,800 



148 
221 
276 
89 
40 
31 
61 
56 
18 
25 



7 
35 
14 

28 

23 

5 

116 

62 

460 
164 



223 
17 
98 
44 
22 

485 



2,859 



359 
813 
546 

1,619 
190 
763 

4,019 
737 

1,328 

1,411 

416 

276 

10,228 

171 

1,317 
766 
758 
267 
370 

1,721 

492 

12,887 

3,131 
108 



185 
419 
284 
858 
87 
435 

2,105 
343 
675 
738 
217 
149 

4,915 
91 
641 
403 
360 
137 
200 
869 
248 

6,539 

1,614 
47 



174 

394 
262 
761 
103 
328 

1,914 
394 
653 
673 
199 
127 

5,313 
80 
676 
363 
398 
130 
170 
852 
244 

6,348 

1,517 
61 



290 
697 
405 

1,361 
151 
577 

3,194 
630 

1,053 

1,076 
313 
217 

7,392 
121 

1,029 
556 
605 
223 
299 

1,254 
382 

9,644 

2,144 
85 



88 
02 
85 
98 
oo 
90 
93 

01 

93 
93 
92 
89 
93 
86 
94 
94 
89 
04 
93 
92 
92 
ss 

01 
02 



44 

21- 

53 

57 
50 



82 
149 
143 
371 

34 
133 
724 
132 
193 
268 

39 

48 
2,054 

30 
219 
130 
173 

50 

68 
333 

85 

2,258 

762 

11 



28 
163 

73 
215 

29 
109 
596 
121 
195 
210 

63 

48 
2,149 

21 
184 

91 
119 

44 

58 
301 

69 

1,682 

530 

13 



70 



64 44,693 22,559 



22,134 33,698 91.28 



71 
190 

84 
233 

33 
> 152 
802 
114 
340 
206 

51 

69 
2,223 

38 
197 
135 
147 

36 

73 
332 

88 

2,546 

583 

19 



51718,489 7,111 8,762 9,810 7, 91012094 



89 
189 
125 
474 

56 
192 
829 
218 
287 
286 
144 

47 
1,842 

43 
235 
194 
188 

53 

79 

425 

137 

2,863 

780 

35 



89 
122 
121 
326 

38 
177 
682 
152 
281 
292 

75 

64 
1,225 

39 
270 
163 
131 

60 

57 

267 

113 

2,660 

476 

30 



116 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN 



Towns 



Teachers 







V 






rt 




3 


a 




s 


d> 




u 


i 




<a 


rt 






m 








13 


I 


2 


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> 

< 


> 
< 



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SO 



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SO 

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> o 



11 

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1 




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23 
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to C 


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fj 



1 Alexandria . . . 

2 Almonte 

3 Amherstburg . 

4 Arnprior 

5 Barrie 

6 Blind River. . 

7 Bonfield 

8 Brockville 

9 Cache Bay. . . 

10 Campbellford. 

11 Charlton 

12 Chelmsford... 

13 Cobalt 

14 Cobourg 

15 Cochrane. . . . 

16 Colling wood. . 

17 Cornwall 

18 Dundas 

19 Eastview 

20 Ford 

21 Fort Frances.. 

22 Gananoque. . . 

23 Goderich 

24 Hanover 

25 Haileybury.. . 

26 Hawkesburv. . 

27 Hearst 

28 Hespeler 

29 Ingersoll 

30 Iroquois Falls. 

31 Kearney 

32 Keewatin. . . . 

33 Kenora 

34 Lindsay 

35 Little Current, 

36 Massey 

37 Mattawa 

38 Merritton 

39 Mount Forest, 

40 New Liskeard. 

41 Newmarket.. . 

42 North Bay . . . 

43 Oakville 

44 Orillia 

45 Paris 

46 Parkhill 

47 Pembroke. . . . 

48 Perth 

49 Picton 

50 Prescott 

51 Preston 

52 Rainy River. . 

53 Renfrew 



12 

3 

9 
10 

3 

6 

3 

8 

2 

2 

1 

5 
15 

4 

8 

2 
26 

3 
15 
20 

5 

4 

2 

2 

7 
34 

3 

2 

3 

5 

1 

1 

6 

8 

3 . 



2 
2 
3 
2 

23 
1 

4 
2 
1 

19 
1 
4 
4 
6 
1 

12 



13 





$ 


$ 


12 




433 


3 




700 


9 




267 


10 




590 


3 




700 


6 




587 


2 


1,100 


700 


8 




528 


2 




750 


2 




500 


1 




1,072 


5 




1,160 


13 


1,250 


904 


4 




700 


8 




459 


2 




975 


21 


540 


576 


3 




567 


14 


1,600 


643 


20 




580 


5 




500 


4 




450 


2 




650 


2 




500 


7 




793 


21 


500 


276 


3 




667 


2 




500 


3 




567 


5 




1,440 
1,000 


1 




900 


6 




333 


7 


1,600 


843 


3 




633 


2 




900 


7 


1.650 


607 


1 


1,000 


950 


2 




950 


3 




427 


2 




950 


23 




701 


1 




900 


4 




606 


2 




600 


1 




800 


19 




692 


4 




462 


1 




800 


4 




562 


6 




450 


1 




900 


12 




517 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



117 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, AGE, SEX AND GRADE, ETC. (Con.) 



























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574 
126 
364 
406 
145 
343 
123 
290 
159 

83 

30 
215 
723 
157 
340 

62 
1,393 
136 
733 
1,018 
285 
194 

84 

100 

307 

1,309 

169 

47 
125 
172 

48 

29 
293 
333 

83 
104 
362 

81 

64 
133 

98 
1,304 

61 
215 

57 

33 
757 
188 

35 
159 
319 

49 
541 



288 
63 

157 

204 
76 

163 
68 

135 
78 
43 
14 

100 

396 
63 

204 
35 

708 
73 

316 

466 

135 
88 
40 
58 

161 

624 
76 
25 
67 
74 
27 
13 

147 

167 
40 
48 

171 
37 
33 
61 
59 

609 
29 

103 
33 
21 

412 

104 
11 
95 

155 
21 

284 



286 
63 

207 

202 
69 

180 
55 

155 
81 
40 
16 

115 

327 
94 

136 
27 

685 
63 

417 

552 

150 

106 
44 
42 

146 

685 
93 
22 
58 
98 
21 
16 

146 

166 
43 
56 

191 
44 
31 
72 
39 

695 
32 

112 
24 
12 

345 
84 
24 
64 

164 
28 

257 



438 

94 

279 

316 

109 

232 

87 

243 

115 

60 

11 

145 

502 

103 

280 

47 

1,117 

104 

564 

759 

212 

156 

66 

79 

205 

989 

90 

38 

101 

122 

28 

19 

225 

249 

51 

71 

237 

54 

48 

82 

79 

909 

42 

165 

48 

22 

496 

158 

26 

136 

251 

37 

387 



90 
96 

92 
90 

92 
70 
94 
96 
88 
87 
91 
72 
87 
84 
95 
89 
92 
89 
85 
92 
97 
88 
97 
91 
98 
92 
93 
89 
90 
92 
77 
97 
93 
90 
95 
74 
87 
81 
88 
93 
93 
94 
90 
87 
89 
74 
88 
94 
94 
84 
95 
77 
87 



124 
135 



51 



30 



106 
19 
43 
79 
25 

119 
36 
50 
85 
17 
7 

104 

51 

49 

62 

9 

445 
29 

307 

282 
81 
33 
22 
14 
48 

308 

49 

6 

11 

28 

5 

9 

60 

58 

22 

25 

107 

15 

6 

36 

19 

258 

17 

46 

9 

8 

248 
36 
8 
24 
57 
16 

128 



174 
17 
42 
83 
14 
72 
28 
39 
18 
7 
3 

13 
82 
16 
45 
10 

232 
15 

160 

209 
37 
24 
11 
11 
36 

180 
34 
7 
16 
22 
10 
4 
43 
34 
10 
15 
49 
13 
10 
21 
15 

233 

5 

25 

7 

9 

119 
24 
3 
20 
52 
4 
93 



84 
24 
52 
70 
34 
57 
21 
51 
30 
12 
5 
14 

201 

18 

48 

7 

270 
25 

113 

225 
51 
35 
13 
28 
51 

328 
32 
13 
18 
44 
3 
4 
89 
68 
13 
23 
62 
18 
10 
40 
15 

234 

8 

50 

12 

6 

83 

44 

7 

37 

71 

16 

93 



104 
18 
90 

124 
30 
50 
20 
68 
18 
15 
2 
51 

153 
38 
42 
13 

297 
31 
99 

196 
60 
43 
24 
27 
64 

275 
28 
11 
39 
36 
10 
6 
66 
74 
21 
18 
68 
17 
19 
25 
19 

316 

15 

42 

18 

6 

157 
44 
11 
34 
73 
8 

123 



106 
48 

105 
50 
42 
45 
18 
82 
8 
32 
13 
26 

103 

36 

8 

23 

149 
36 
54 

106 
56 
59 
14 
20 
57 

122 
26 
10 
41 
42 
7 
6 
35 
99 
17 
23 
53 
18 
13 
11 
30 

233 

16 

52 

11 

4 

150 

40 

6 

44 

66 

5 

104 



5 D.E 



118 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ROMAN CATHOLIC 
II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN 



Towns 



Teachers 



SO 



51 



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54 Riverside 


1 

2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

104 

417 

165 

104 

22 

708 

688 

20 


5 

19 
2 

16 
2 
6 
20 
31 
7 
8 
6 
27 
5 
5 
6 
5 
6 
7 
3 
1 




5 

19 
2 

16 
2 
6 
20 
31 
7 
8 
6 
27 
5 
5 
6 
5 
6 
7 
3 
1 


$ 


$ 

710 
387 
500 
469 
950 
458 
756 
923 
929 
750 
408 
969 
530 
450 
467 
350 
500 
679 
867 
1,000 


4 
10 

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16 

5 
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4 

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1 


4 
10 




55 Rockland 










56 St. Mary's 


2 
6 
1 
6 








2 
9 
1 
6 




57 Sandwich 

58 Seaforth 


1 




1 


6 




59 Smith's Falls. . 












60 Sturgeon Falls. 

61 Sudbury 








15 

12 

4 


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13 
1 
6 
1 

12 
4 


1 






13 
1 
6 
1 

12 
4 


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62 Tecumseh 






1 


63 Thorold 


1 




1 




64 Tilbury 


4 

4 


1 


65 Timmins 

66 Trenton 


1 




1 


8 


67 Vankleek Hill. . 








1 


? 


68 Walkerton .... 


3 
4 
6 
3 
3 
1 


1 




1 


3 
4 
5 
3 
3 
1 




69 Walkerville.... 




1 


70 Wallaceburg. . . 

71 Waterloo 




















72 Weston 












73 Whitby 






















Totals 


527 




25 502 


746 


646 


161 


236 


11 


4 


10 


238 


110 


33 


Totals 

1 Rural Schools. . . 

2 Cities 


584 
992 

527 
46 




22 562 

90 902 

25 502 

46 


1,011 
979 

746 


807 
675 
646 

783 


294 

241 

161 

12 


202 

717 

236 

26 


26 

38 

11 

3 


6 

21 

4 

3 


29 
58 
10 

4 


200 

686 

238 

25 


239 

103 

110 

8 


43 
? 


3 Towns 


33 


4 Villages 


1 


5 Grand Totals, 
1924 


2149 

2053 

96 


1 

1 


37 2,012 
26 1,927 


941 
921 


707 

736 


708 
652 


1,181 
1,048 


78 

72 


34 

32 


101 

90 


1,149 
1,054 


460 

325 


79 


6 Grand Totals, 
1923 


161 






7 Increases 

8 Decreases. . 




11 85 


20 


"29 


56 


133 


6 


2 


11 


95 


135 


"87 






























9 Percentages. . . . 




6. 


37 93.62 






32.94 


54.95 


3.63 


1.58 


4.70 


53.47 


21.4 


3 67 















DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



119 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

THE VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, AGE, SEX AND GRADE, ETC. (Con.) 





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205 

821 

53 

654 

72 

249 

1,264 

1,539 

287 

517 

289 

1,319 

265 

230 

251 

218 

355 

372 

118 

79 


101 
407 

22 
332 

38 
119 
667 
781 
150 
243 
141 
697 
131 

95 
122 
115 
164 
175 

64 

31 


104 
414 

31 
322 

34 
130 
597 
758 
137 
274 
148 
622 
134 
135 
129 
103 
191 
197 

54 

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138 
597 

39 
519 

61 
199 
826 
1,042 
215 
383 
241 
911 
195 
169 
208 
169 
221 
294 

74 

56 


68 
92 
88 
93 
94 
89 
94 
96 
87 
91 
97 
96 
93 
90 
83 
89 
91 
93 
82 
86 


' 16 

*i88 
213 


64 

257 

9 

169 

9 

40 

180 

222 

83 

88 

55 

437 

50 

68 

19 

40 

114 

60 

24 

14 


46 

176 

8 

51 

8 

38 

176 

196 

42 

126 

54 

254 

43 

27 

23 

43 

58 

58 

16 

10 


38 

234 

15 

219 

9 

43 

257 

323 

83 

80 

98 

253 

39 

42 

33 

48 

61 

53 

26 

15 


39 
88 
11 
85 
23 
46 

261 

322 
36 

153 
33 

282 
74 
48 
58 
52 
64 
97 
29 
21 


18 
50 
10 

101 
23 
82 

189 

263 
43 
70 
49 
93 
59 
45 
51 
35 
58 

104 
23 
19 




55 ... 




9 




56 ... 






57 ... 






99 


58 ... 

59 ... 


1 






60 




2 
3 


n 


61 






62 ... 

63 ... 

64 ... 


1 

1 




65 




2 




66 ... 

67 ... 

68 ... 

69 ... 


1 

2 
2 


"67 


70 ... 

71 ... 

72 ... 


1 
4 






73 ... 


















39 


97 


24,715 


12,273 


12,442 


18,040 


90.6 


764 


5,743 


3,928 


4,949 


5,078 


3,965 


288 


1 ... 

2 3 

3 ... 

4 ... 


11 
76 
39 

5 


62 
64 

97 
3 


22,216 

44,693 

24,715 

1,900 


11,177 

22,559 

12,273 

909 


11,039 

22,134 

12,442 

991 


15,007 

33,698 

18,040 

1,471 


82.7 
91.28 
90.6 
89.15 


941 

517 
764 


6,618 

8,489 

5,743 

342 


3,266 
7,111 
3,928 

277 


3,795 

8,762 

4,949 

310 


3,800 

9,810 

5,078 

450 


2,859 

7,910 

3,965 

417 


937 

2094 

288 

104 


5 3 

6 13 


131 
156 


226 
254 


93,524 
91,051 


46,918 
45,891 


46,606 
45,160 


68,216 
64,497 


89.06 
84.64 


2222 
2405 


21192 
21860 


14582 
14890 


17816 
16984 


19138 
17538 


15151 
14347 


3423 
3027 


7 ... 






2,473 


1,027 


1,446 


3,719 


4.42 








832 


1,600 


804 


396 


8 10 


25 


28 


183 


668 


308 
























9 .14 


6.09 


10.52 




50.16 


49.83 


72.94 




2.37 


22.66 


15.59 


19.05 


20.46 


16.20 


3.66 



120 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS (Continued) 

II. TABLE G— TEACHERS, SALARIES, CERTIFICATES, ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN 
THE BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, AGE, SEX AND GRADE, ETC. (Continued) 



No. of pupils admitted during the year to School 
for the first time. (Pupils who previously 
attended some other School in Ontario not 
counted) 

No. of Boys who left School during the year to 
attend some other Public or Separate School 
in s nother School Section 

No. of Girls who left School during the year to 
attend some other Public or Separate School 
in another School Section 

No. of Boys who left the 4th Book Class during 
the year to attend a Secondary School (Con- 
tinuation, High or Vocational) 

No. of Girls who left the 4th Book Class during 
the year to attend a Secondary School. . . . 

No. of Boys who left the 5th Class during the 
year to attend a Secondary School 

No. of Girls who left the 5th Class during the 
year to attend a Secondary School 

No. of pupils who left to attend some Private 
School or College 

No. of Pupils removed by death or disability 



Rural 
Schools 



2,491 



632 



667 



155 
203 

22 

77 

138 
156 



Cities 



5,450 



1,250 



1,081 



791 



58 



117 

376 
105 



Towns 



3,085 



518 



569 



339 



419 



19 

23 

211 
92 



Villages 



193 

40 

39 

40 

48 

3 

9 

18 
13 



Totals, 
1924 



11,219 
2,440 

2,356 

1,325 

1,428 

131 

226 

743 
366 



No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
of Pupils 
of Pupils 
of Pupils 
of Pupils 
of Pupils 
of Pupils 
of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 
No. of Pupils 



No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 
No 



n Art 

n Geography 

n Music 

n Literature 

n Composition 

n Grammar 

n English History 

n Canadian History 

n Physiology and Hygiene 

n Nature Study 

n Physical Culture 

n Bookkeeping 

n Arithmetic and Mensuration.. 

n Algebra 

n Geometry 

n Latin 

n German 

n French (beyond 4th Book) . . . 
n French(Primer to 4th Bk. incl.) 

n Elementary Science 

n Commercial Subjects 

n Agriculture 

n Manual Training 

n Household Science 



No. of Schools where Medical Inspection is in 
force 

Schools where Nurse Inspection with Medical 
Supervision is in force 

Schools where Nurse Inspection only is in force 

Total number of Nurses employed 

Schools where Dental Inspection is in force. . . 



20,728 

17,523 

19,976 

18,573 

19,787 

5,416 

5,221 

10,933 

19,467 

17,974 

20,965 

6 

463 

597 

496 

643 

27 

753 

14,707 

327 

6 

2,487 

996 

370 



46 

16 

7 

5 

23 



44,170 

43,923 

44,462 

44,611 

44,611 

12,816 

17,199 

22,422 

43,808 

43,021 

44,641 

181 

1,304 

1,274 

1,138 

1,557 



1,775 
6,646 
1,508 
396 
3,242 
30 
1,586 



49 

68 

48 
28 
60 



24,538 

22,520 

24,445 

23,540 

24,304 

5,231 

8,646 

11,547 

23,250 

23,407 

23,813 

32 

165 

174 

138 

188 

i99 

11,636 

151 

39 

1,548 

681 

53 



18 

10 

2^ 

25 

6 



1,869 
1,814 
1,829 
1,826 
1,826 
631 
728 
1,035 
1,851 
1,852 
1,837 

"57 
68 
70 
98 

"83 
518 

57 

'255 
"97 



91,305 

85,780 

90,712 

88,550 

90,528 

24,094 

31,794 

45,937 

88,376 

86,254 

91,256 

219 

1,989 

2,113 

1,842 

2,486 

27 

2,810 

33,507 

2,043 

441 

7,532 

1,707 

2,106 



114 

94 
78 
58 
89 



Schools with a Library 

No. of Volumes 

Value of Libraries 



293 

48,483 
$22,335 



151 

77,484 

$43,704 



88 

38,972 

$25,226 



18 

3,988 

$2,740 



550 
168,927 
$94,005 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



121 









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THE REPORT OF THE 



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O 
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CQ 

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0) 


J4 
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126 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No 11 



CONTINUATION 

I. TABLE H— FINAN 





Receipts 


1 


CO 

-4-> 




(O 

♦J 




u 

J3 




Continuation 


a 
u 

O 

0> 


a 
2 


C 

2 




O 

c 

cO 


en 


Schools 


O 


O 




9* 
"55 








a 


3 


en 

01 


0) 




y +j 


o^ 


C 


s <u 






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'to 


15 


So 


Q 


■ CO Ui 

PQ S 


(2 



1 Aberfoyle 

2 Acton !• . 

3 Agincourt 

4 Ailsa Craig 

5 Alvinston 

6 Arkona 

7 Ayr 

8 Bancroft 

9 Bath 

10 Beachburg 

11 Beaverton 

12 Beeton 

13 Belmont 

14 Blackstock 

15 Blenheim 

16 Blind River 

17 Blyth 

18 Bobcaygeon 

19 Bolton 

20 Bothwell 

21 Bowesville 

22 Bridgeburg 

23 Brooklin 

24 Brownsville 

25 Bruce Mines 

26 Brussels 

27 Burk's Falls 

28 Caledon East 

29 Cannington 

30 Capreol 

31 Cardinal 

32 Carp 

33 Claremont 

34 Clifford 

35 Cobden 

36 Cochrane 

37 Coldwater 

38 Comber 

39 Consecon 

40 Cookstown 

41 Copetown 

42 Creemore 

43 Dan forth Park 

44 Delaware 

45 Delhi 

46 Denbigh 

47 Devizes 

48 Dorchester 

49 Drayton 

50 Dresden 

51 Drumbo 

52 Dryden 

53 Eganville 

54 Eganville (r.c.s.s.) 

55 Elmvale 



$ c 
416 65 
898 50 
661 17 
859 55 
879 50 



893 80 
852 83 
825 91 

880 87 
902 89 
883 80 
907 05 
409 85 
922 85 

1,778 90 
877 80 
841 16 
891 70 

875 30 
433 65 
916 65 
419 19 
458 20 

2,556 88 
935 65 

1,792 92 
429 15 

881 78 
796 82 
854 57 

876 13 
902 53 
905 15 
431 81 

1,404 00 
915 40 
789 50 



897 10 
435 00 
900 10 
858 09 
883 30 
891 35 
726 85 
370 70 
966 35 
2,111 72 
889 85 
770 60 
2,272 00 
2,562 35 
741 97 
911 55 



$ c. 

416 65 

1,566 66 

1,323 82 

2,478 41 

3,943 77 

1,172 26 

893 80 

1,200 00 

1,695 25 
2,851 

2,196 38 

2,588 16 

2,135 77 

254 88 

1,521 58 



2,949 62 

1,276 46 

1,302 04 

1,538 14 

433 65 

8,276 41 

419 19 

557 26 



2,807 76 



410 24 
1,315 3 



1,862 81 

1,970 55 

3,823 52 

1,802 16 

986 54 



1,470 65 

789 50 

74 26 

897 10 

435 00 

3,844 38 

3,253 02 

1,768 19 

1,470 28 

1,199 46 

978 96 

3,103 32 

4,866 85 

3,259 81 

770 60 



1,132 10 

776 49 

1,884 92 



$ c 

798 20 
4,065 22 
1,247 49 
1,400 00 
1,180 30 

600 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 

900 00 
1,216 27 
2,253 81 

875 00 
2,432 60 
1,114 90 
3,910 00 
2,201 57 

948 38 
1,600 85 
4,147 42 
2,100 00 

701 40 
5,208 32 

1.513 70 
845 37 

1,704 00 
2,526 62 
2,754 10 
1,393 08 
1,176 46 
1,759 22 
2,450 10 
2,000 00 
1,651 33 
2,000 00 
1,108 46 
2,594 30 
2,144 12 
1,200 00 
561 16 
4,400 00 
1,324 06 

1.514 98 
5,700 00 
1,000 00 
1,518 59 



360 00 

1,000 00 

128 64 

2,179 64 

2,259 13 

2,805 72 

2,833 91 

700 00 

1,000 00 



401 98 



85 75 



653 84 

777 03 



2,556 61 



12,937 60 



10,000 00 



559 44 



24,000 00 



794 03 



20,259 76 



$ c. 

80 47 

99 67 

656 81 

1,391 91 
124 00 
274 08 

3,058 50 

1,442 80 

493 18 

17 07 

100 95 

1,994 30 
325 60 
538 91 
420 73 
802 33 
220 38 
84 91 

2,104 72 
255 78 



176 80 



4,592 27 
3,697 08 
1,227 19 
165 57 
1 00 
1,569 57 



1,509 49 

400 00 

1,765 68 



187 76 

19 37 

1,811 33 

312 61 

1,041 39 

626 42 

81 75 

1,338 73 

1,481 80 

61 60 

452 04 

749 10 

1,260 67 

85 40 

796 18 

907 11 



276 64 

979 21 

1,781 49 



$ c. 

1.711 97 
6,630 05 
4,291 27 
6,129 87 
6,127 57 
2,046 34 
5,846 10 
4,495 63 
4,000 09 
4,965 86 
5,454 03 

6.995 10 
6,578 05 
2,318 54 
9,331 77 
4,782 80 

4.996 18 
3,803 38 

21,383 48 
4,769 22 
1,568 70 

14,578 18 
2,352 08 

16,453 10 
7,957 96 
7,497 22 

4.712 59 
2,233 47 
5,502 56 
2,556 04 
5,167 48 
6,356 17 

30,777 38 
6,472 99 
2,526 81 
4,186 06 
4,549 54 
4,590 33 
948 03 
7,235 59 
2,820 48 
6,341 21 

11,149 84 
5,927 32 
3,941 82 
2,378 35 
2,458 76 

26,590 10 
7,192 61 
7,125 48 
4,707 44 
5,077 72 
6,805 00 
3,197 67 
5,577 96 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



127 



SCHOOLS 

CIAL STATEMENT 



Expenditure 



2*'g &-| 

^ » -o a 
S S " § fc 

f a> u O 

►J a-M fa fa o 



« g £ 

bo fa a> 

o h > 

• - <L> O 

~ a 
CQ bj.S 



O » 

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43 O 
W£ 
OT * 

o*o 

.If 

A) O 



C «S X 

.2.5 w 

M fa U> 

« X42 
£ ° 

111 






a 





$ c. 


$ c. 


1 


1,320 00 


66 85 


2 


5,280 00 


28 67 


3 


2,270 00 


265 87 


4 


3,237 00 


80 82 


5 


5,080 00 


98 70 


6 


1,500 00 


51 26 


7 


3,380 00 


233 00 


8 


3,101 29 


185 46 


9 


3,100 00 




10 


3,300 00 


253 04 


11 


4,100 00 




12 


3,200 00 


148 14 


13 


3,944 75 




14 


1,302 75 




15 


5,141 52 


2,541 37 


16 


3,540 00 




17 


3,200 00 


117 07 


18 


3,138 90 


138 50 


19 


3,071 25 


11,791 58 


20 


2,815 00 




21 


1,400 00 




22 


9,100 00 


745 75 


23 


1,500 00 




24 


1,885 00 


4,229 09 


25 


3,060 00 


84 10 


26 


4,547 50 


252 33 


27 


3,360 00 


362 60 


28 


1,440 00 




29 


2,900 00 




30 


1,500 00 


465 22 


31 


3,480 00 


312 90 


32 


3,760 00 




33 


3,340 00 


24,751 88 


34 


3,000 00 




35 


1,560 00 


800 00 


36 


2,800 00 




37 


3,281 00 


440 99 


38 


3,000 00 




39 


480 00 


314 08 


40 


4,878 00 


536 04 


41 


1,400 02 




42 


5,340 00 




43 


4,774 74 


752 80 


44 


3,040 00 




45 


3,140 00 


81 21 


46 


1,460 00 


85 80 


47 


780 00 




48 


3,360 60 


21,458 07 


49 


5,470 00 


278 79 


50 


5,150 00 


25 00 


51 


2,730 00 


207 48 


52 


3,348 75 


467 15 


53 


3,779 92 


1,789 32 


54 


1,800 00 


29 40 


55 


3,815 00 






$ c. 

12 00 
270 34 

91 13 

9434 



49 56 

99 01 

29 66 

287 94 



2 


00 


32 


68 




5 
9 

5 


95 
50 
30 




29 


34 



82 53 

44 10 

120 00 

41 22 



40 50 
36 75 
70 00 
12 83 









50 00 


45 
29 


00 
97 


13 


95 


30 
16 


55 
47 


95 


00 


42 


08 



c. 
46 00 
23 33 

226 56 
44 74 

323 76 

111 22 

280 91 

79 73 

500 20 

52 51 



16 93 



S3 38 
303 57 
476 

99 



85 
15 
24 65 
86 80 
277 08 
30 55 
52 04 

182 01 

183 00 
170 37 
118 13 
344 65 
109 31 
236 25 

21 22 
152 50 

99 19 
500 24 



53 00 

7 00 

45 84 

26 30 

1,304 97 

9 50 

' 5169 

4 00 
192 91 
270 98 
325 94 
111 08 
135 44 
675 61 
199 25 
169 63 



$ c. 


$ c 


167 49 


1,612 34 


969 35 


6,571 69 


1,359 52 


4,213 08 


674 05 


4,036 61 


530 77 


6,127 57 


267 10 


1,818 36 


532 36 


4,256 58 


927 97 


4,495 63 


314 35 


3,494 08 


863 06 


4,965 86 


1,202 51 


5,454 03 


2,004 78 


5,382 58 


2,210 89 


6,443 58 


302 09 


1,621 77 


1,646 88 


9,331 77 


1,242 80 


4,782 80 


444 06 


3,877 19 


222 41 


3,803 38 


5,563 66 


20,903 34 


1,485 42 


4,405 52 


134 55 


1,568 70 


2,497 72 


12,435 57 


575 00 


2,352 08 


10,308 46 


16,453 10 


817 92 


4,043 30 


818 40 


5,800 24 


699 72 


4,687 85 


169 75 


1,824 22 


1,062 29 


4,200 42 


205 05 


2,556 04 


1,265 27 


5,167 48 


1,801 09 


5,797 34 


2,664 28 


30,777 38 


667 46 


3,860 46 


30 87 


2,526 81 


627 45 


3,997 69 


703 28 


4,538 10 


347 50 


3,347 50 


100 95 


948 03 


792 71 


6,213 75 


774 74 


2,220 60 


924 91 


6,341 21 


797 81 


7,630 32 


1,639 24 


4,733 74 


690 64 


3,941 82 


414 58 


2,012 07 


152 15 


950 10 


1,578 52 


26,590 10 


1,142 29 


7,192 61 


1,069 56 


6,586 97 


697 54 


3,746 10 


1,031 38. 


5,077 72 


354 36 


6,599 21 


769 92 


2,840 65 


977 20 


4,961 83 



128 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

I. TABLE H— FINAN 





Receipts 


Continuation 
Schools 




CO 

c 
2 

I 

"tfl 

04 
<U 

-J 


CO 

C 

2 
O 

li 

3 o 


CO 

C 

2 
O 

"c3 

.2* 


CO 

<u 

3 
c 

CD 

X> 

CD 

Q 


fa 

9 

o 
*a 
a 

a 

CO 

h 

3S 


co 

.2* 

a 

V 

1 


56 Embro 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 

635 00 
1,371 45 

800 00 
1,668 99 
2,750 00 
2,000 00 
3,055 94 
1,068 58 

600 00 
2,500 00 
1,311 14 

900 00 
1,150 00 
2,314 00 
1,167 98 
1,933 65 

644 30 
3,336 69 
2,010 02 
2,332 75 


$ c. 
850 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1,485 00 
2,371 45 


57 Emo 


1,000 00 
857 62 
650 55 

1,821 30 






58 Ennismore 


2,337 22 
920 91 




35 08 

1,496 35 

346 53 

261 98 

53 55 

12 47 

646 12 

285 01 

652 56 

192 90 


4,029 92 


59 Erin 




4,736 80 
4,917 83 
2,261 98 
4,952 43 


60 Espanola 




61 Fairbank 






62 Fenelon Falls. . 


876 76 
429 10 
436 45 
908 16 
888 75 
436 00 
819 95 
886 72 

5,094 63 
898 60 
500 00 

2,898 62 
901 20 
893 34 
442 40 
866 45 
835 60 

3,102 47 
833 95 
610 80 

2,015 87 
456 14 
421 87 
453 50 
436 38 
874 34 

1,801 6C 
828 98 

722 90 
830 52 
1,701 18 
881 19 
881 12 
418 30 
411 65 
438 35 


966 18 
1,647 84 
1,571 91 
3,988 28 
2,040 66 
1,011 80 
1,639 90 
3,700 01 




63 Fen wick 




3,157 99 
3,254 48 


64 Feversham . . 




65 Finch 




7,681 45 
4,893 11 
2,540 70 
3,609 85 


66 Fingal 




67 Florence 




68 Fordwich 




69 Frankford . . 




5,146 96 


12,047 69 


70 Gore Bay 


10,000 00 


16,262 61 
7,254 67 


71 Grand Valley 


3,794 46 


627 96 

200 00 

4,424 45 


72 Haliburton 




1,344 30 


73 Hallville 


898 25 
3,148 75 
1,496 48 
1,357 87 
2,061 06 
1,681 76 


4,383 28 


15,941 29 
6,059 97 

4,722 57 
2,851 52 


74 Harrow 


75 Havelock 






76 Hepworth 




1,051 25 
5,467 46 
156 95 
141 75 
263 15 
493 93 


77 Highgate 


1,809 10 
2,386 98 
5,767 69 
1,000 00 
1,613 60 
2,601 94 
1,148 69 
1 125 79 




10,204 07 
5,061 29 
9,011 91 


78 Holstein 




79 Huntsville 




80 Ilderton 


1,771 77 
1,488 51 




3,868 87 


81 Inglewood 




4,206 84 


82 Iroquois Falls 




4,617 81 


83 Islington 


1,283 16 
442 29 

1,206 77 
436 38 

2,321 15 




302 71 


3,190 80 
1,989 95 


84 Janetville 




85 Jarvis 


604 24 
1,100 00 
2,000 00 
3,328 09 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 






2,264 51 
2,070 82 


86 Jockvale. . . 




98 06 

66 05 

70 00 

451 94 

70 30 

573 91 

250 42 

44 51 

2,160 76 

5,573 76 


87 Kars 




5,261 54 
5,199 69 


88 Keewatin 




89 Kenmore 


2,051 70 
824 94 




4,332 62 
4,905 82 
2,121 75 


90 Kinburn 




91 Kinmount. . 




92 KirklandLake.. .. 


1,625 00 
2,000 00 
2,400 00 
1,000 00 

900 00 
1,710 00 

624 15 
1,526 38 
1,611 01 
1,500 00 
3,004 88 
2,323 81 
3,647 07 
2,245 00 
1,275 00 




2,705 94 


93 Lambeth 


1,876 79 
2,355 72 
1,506 25 
507 97 
411 65 
1,095 88 




5,622 48 
7,797 67 


94 Lanark 




95 Lansdowne 




8,961 13 


96 Laurel 




1,826 27 
3,533 34 
2,158 38 


97 Lefroy 




1,000 04 


98 Lion's Head. . 




99 Little Britain 




920 25 
280 00 
865 29 


2,446 63 


100 Little Current 


1,658 14 
861 10 
864 16 
892 35 






3,560 25 


101 Lobo 


2,308 38 
1,041 87 
3,543 41 




5,534 77 
4,910 91 


102 Long Branch 




103 Lucknow 




1,275 69 


8,035 26 


104 Lynden 


14,000 00 


17,647 07 
6,324 69 


105 Lyndhurst 


616 05 

588 It 

538 96 

1,585 79 

631 38 


1,312 32 

589 62 

1,444 28 


2,151 32 

1,672 58 

1,045 17 

193 07 

601 17 

62 85 


106 Malakoff 




4,125 96 


107 Mallorytown 




3,028 41 


108 Manitowaning. . . . 


1,700 00 
2,155 92 
2,430 94 




3,478 86 


109 Manotick 


2,254 34 
2,811 61 




5,642 81 


110 Marmora 


908 95 




6,214 35 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



129 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
CIAL STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



.fss 

« <S 6 

*>£ | 

s >- > 

CQ 73.5 



J3 O 

2 S 
8*8 



9* o c c 
a £ S 5 

£ AM 

'J »"D 3 3 

QJ TO flj 

a; c .- 

• ,4J TO W 

jO u a o u 

fc-J O..M Cjtg 



.IS 



■SUB 

8 « u 

o . 

C^ S TO 



u 
3 

C 

a 





$ c 


56 


546 00 


57 


1,287 00 


58 


3,180 00 


59 


2,210 00 


60 


3,968 96 


61 


553 30 


62 


3,311 45 


63 


1,874 25 


64 


1,562 50 


65 


5,827 28 


66 


2,900 00 


67 


1,500 00 


68 


2,980 00 


69 


3,300 00 


70 


3,360 00 


71 


4,498 00 


72 


740 00 


73 


4,100 00 


74 


4,400 00 


75 


3,970 00 


76 


1,300 00 


77 


3,340 00 


78 


3,100 00 


79 


6,112 50 


80 


3,070 00 


81 


2,040 00 


82 


3,110 00 


83 


2,060 00 


84 


1,400 00 


85 


1,700 00 


86 


1,500 00 


87 


3,160 00 


88 


4,200 00 


89 


3,300 00 


90 


3,110 00 


91 


1,440 00 


92 


1,830 00 


93 


2,840 00 


94 


4,400 00 


95 


3,050 00 


96 


1,300 00 


97 


1,270 35 


98 


1,333 30 


99 


810 00 


100 


3,120 00 


101 


3,060 00 


102 


3,714 72 


103 


4,835 00 


104 


1,000 00 


105 


2,530 00 


106 


2,060 00 


107 


2,210 00 


108 


2,380 00 


109 


2,050 00 


110 


5,038 00 



$ c. 
864 00 

53 50 

'9350 
950 00 

903 28 
355 20 



143 50 

99 46 

100 00 

5,232 41 

12,000 00 





727 


64 


299 


87 




97 


31 


198 


90 


85 


00 



176 10 
182 88 
495 02 
105 00 
110 25 
38 18 
131 30 



47 02 

87 12 

537 58 

272 00 

238 00 

"202*25 

50 00 

100 00 

962 69 

150 00 

16 50 

424 00 

710 42 

16,096 25 

475 09 

131 94 



17 67 
55 00 



264 

25 


24 
00 


355 19 

38 00 

137 95 


2 


00 




35 


51 


160 


56 










21 65 
150 00 



9 00 

94 00 

30 00 

48 58 

219 07 

14*66 
24 20 

*34*64 

*i6*65 

"9 '66 



330 05 
95 16 



44 35 
121*20 



680 21 
108 90 

173*20 

466 68 

165 68 

310 53 

29 21 

71*42 
97 53 

228*44 
61 00 

364*43 
252 80 

220*44 
25 00 
65 26 

158 40 

140 60 
80 26 

186 50 

■50*84 
151 81 
158 03 

160*61 
39 81 



25 10 

124 18 
439 10 
214 97 

69 60 

125 00 
259 66 

68 84 



233 69 
8 00 

85 06 
608 98 

61 73 
319 78 
265 14 
165 51 
421 58 

122*70 
48 10 



$ c. 


$ c. 


74 18 


1,484 26 


140 00 


2,371 45 


399 91 


3,767 31 


2,420 60 


4,630 60 


222 97 


- 4,813 82 


254 00 


2,261 98 


434 07 


4,952 43 


214 55 


2,754 53 


161 79 


1,755 50 


1,545 39 


7,372 67 


832 10 


3,947 02 


457 80 


2,190 30 


529 85 


3,609 85 


894 47 


9,815 88 


841 61 


16,262 61 


1,768 27 


6,266 27 


239 87 


1,344 30 


6,317 86 


11,398 30 


1,360 10 


6,059 97 


510 48 


4,722 57 


353 00 


1,828 00 


508 49 


4,011 06 


482 32 


3,948 62 


1,149 30 


7,581 40 


324 77 


3,505 03 


1,272 29 


3,723 47 


1,105 86 


4,617 81 


584 94 


3,190 80 


95 56 


1,767 03 


272 03 


2,264 51 


244 53 


1,782 71 


622 19 


4,108 74 


959 88 


5,199 69 


952 97 


4,288 72 


685 75 


3,966 95 


145 53 


2,120 75 


104 66 


2,687 21 


519 31 


3,700 91 


220 92 


5,313 97 


1,342 02 


4,746 84 


255 18 


1,826 27 


981 67 


2,302 02 


585 01 


2,018 31 


440 25 


2,446 63 


282 25 


3,560 25 


1,292 55 


4,498 46 


163 21 


4,910 91 


1,205 07 


6,933 42 


231 04 


17,647 07 


588 52 


3,858 75 


639 41 


2,996 86 


396 83 


3,028 41 


288 63 


2,668 63 


582 67 


2,773 04 


479 00 


5,620 10 



130 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No 11 



CONTINUATION 

I. TABLE H— FIN AN 



Continuation 
Schools 



111 Massey 

112 Maxville 

113 Melbourne 

114 Merlin 

115 Merrickville 

116 Metcalfe 

117 Millbrook 

118 Milverton 

119 Mindemova 

120 Minden. .' 

121 Minesing 

122 Morriston 

123 Mount Albert. . . . 

124 Mount Brydges. . 

125 Mount Elgin 

126 Navan 

127 New Dundee 

128 New Hamburg. . . 

129 North Augusta. . . 

130 North Gower. . . . 

131 Odessa 

132 Oil Springs 

133 Onondaga 

134 Orono 

135 Otterville 

136 Paisley 

137 Pakenham 

138 Palmerston 

139 Pickering 

140 Plattsville 

141 Port Burwell 

142 Port Carling 

143 Port Credit 

144 Powassan 

145 Princeton 

146 Rainy River 

147 Richard's Landing 

148 Richmond 

149 Ridgeway 

150 Ripley 

151 Rockwood 

152 Rodnev 

153 Russell 

154 St. George 

155 Schomberg 

156 Schreiber 

157 Scotland 

158 Seeley's Bay 

159 Selkirk 

160 Singhampton 

161 Southampton. . . . 

162 South Mountain.. 

163 South Porcupine.. 

164 South River 

165 Sparta . 



Receipts 






S3 



$ c. 


$ c. 


1,705 50 




886 91 


3,948 19 


889 95 


4,478 77 


869 75 


2,124 48 


829 83 


1,409 52 


837 42 


1,453 82 


905 22 


3,534 10 


894 70 


2,465 11 


3,099 97 




1,278 84 





406 80 
889 00 
1,017 80 
877 85 
586 74 
425 20 
949 70 
884 05 
844 00 
855 28 
876 15 
427 30 
899 51 
403 70 
905 60 
874 84 
888 60 
902 04 
894 45 
870 80 



904 20 

1,863 96 

642 15 

2,278 90 

1,234 64 

845 60 

965 40 

898 05 

426 20 

885 85 

865 72 
876 10 
434 47 

1,352 00 

866 00 



763 15 



900 80 
890 94 
1,720 34 
849 12 
424 00 



406 80 

2,047 12 

3,383 25 

2,083 20 

1,967 43 

425 20 

1,664 37 

2,033 08 

1,399 84 

1,677 93 

1,359 51 

799 64 

2,376 88 

403 70 

2,712 63 

1,237 45 

1,940 19 

1,949 69 

1,987 27 

870 80 



4,034 49 
' 735 64 



1,631 66 
4,584 27 
3,118 14 
1,294 29 
1,636 25 
2,193 42 
2,273 94 
542 68 



2,543 93 



2,164 40 

450 00 

2,252 00 

3,139 70 



669 61 



££ 



02 



$ C. 

1,197 64 
1,716 86 
1,530 00 
1,000 00 
1,758 88 
1,500 00 
5,056 36 
3,918 33 
1,975 00 
1,159 24 
865 41 
600 00 
1,000 00 
1,000 00 

2.300 00 
600 00 
785 98 

2,002 65 
850 00 

1,880 00 
850 00 

2,406 08 

1,400 00 

2.301 78 
1,172 81 
1,573 77 
1,904 81 
1,039 91 
1,415 25 
1,668 86 
3,179 71 
1,674 61 
1,307 70 
2,000 00 
2,876 52 
3,013 14 
1,800 00 
1,972 18 
5,781 41 
1,600 40 
1,050 60 
2,800 00 
1,750 00 
2,250 00 



1,853 85 

2,007 60 

1,250 53 

1,000 00 

400 00 

2,419 04 

2,100 00 

6,410 00 

923 26 

1.379 05 



12,500 00 



1,294 94 



19,303 88 



18,364 45 
11,568 94 



14,817 09 



10,000 00 



$ c. 

93 10 

289 42 

288 83 

492 45 

651 99 

867 89 

817 48 

2 00 

1,069 

618 40 

450 00 

1,194 20 

43 20 

2,719 25 

4,648 29 

2,139 04 



104 19 
297 93 

2,100 67 
369 19 
909 08 

5,160 23 



69 35 

2,719 06 

141 91 

1,257 52 



2,532 02 



4,352 93 
1,236 29 
4,011 25 
2 00 
2,179 56 
2,932 50 



1,276 57 

264 15 

864 26 

853 73 

1,486 36 

1,264 76 

17 00 

4,411 25 



526 00 

137 49 

504 00 

2,358 00 

3 83 

15 13 

2 40 



$ c. 
2,996 24 
6,841 38 
7,187 55 
4,486 68 

17,150 22 
4,659 13 

10,313 16 
7,280 14 
6,144 83 
3,056 48 
1,315 41 
2,607 80 

3.979 32 
8,120 30 

11,204 28 

5.293 21 
1,636 38 
4,616 72 
3,871 32 
4,421 77 
5,483 88 
5,010 93 
3,536 02 

10,738 40 

1.980 21 
5,261 35 
6,736 16 
4,010 61 

24,828 38 

4,550 58 

25.817 78 

13,243 55 

10,599 32 

5,100 25 

8,265 56 

5.294 04 
5,214 20 

22,199 03 
11,331 08 
6,893 16 
3,035 24 
6,186 36 
5,662 87 
6,886 40 
2,241 91 
3,222 85 
19,828 78 
1,250 53 
4,453 55 
987 49 
6,075 84 
8,488 64 
8,134 17 
1,787 51 
2,475 06 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



131 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

CIAL STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



CO <u C 

C a; 

£2 6 

MP u 

a u > 

•3- a 



CQ * 



= 6 



O c« 
O B 
43 O 

Ot3 

-M O 

"(3 g 

a, o 



1 r bo-*- 1 

a o c c 

<" £ g fa 

'J I0T3 3 3 

a a o-u 
a) cd a; 

- fa a O u 



• w 

a c 
o o 

rt rt g 
w.E c 

5 w 

O ^ u 
<U43 

§51 








$ c. 


111 


2,110 00 


112 


5,070 00 


113 


3,720 00 


114 


3,120 00 


115 


3,300 00 


116 


3,200 00 


117 


3,790 00 


118 


3,520 00 


119 


3,038 10 


120 


1,866 67 


121 


520 00 


122 


1,280 90 


123 


3,440 00 


124 


3,900 00 


125 


3,280 00 


126 


2,154 75 


127 


1,300 00 


128 


3,600 00 


129 


2,960 00 


130 


3,200 00 


131 


2,930 00 


132 


3,200 00 


133 


1,332 93 


134 


4,052 50 


135 


1,400 00 


136 


4,265 00 


137 


3,365 00 


138 


3,340 00 


139 


3,000 00 


140 


3,400 00 


141 


3,140 00 


142 


850 00 


143 


5,239 00 


144 


2,980 00 


145 


2,500 00 


146 


4,080 00 


147 


2,240 00 


148 


2,978 00 


149 


5,300 00 


150 


4,427 80 


151 


1,340 00 


152 


4,700 00 


153 


3,300 00 


154 


4,270 00 


155 


1,500 00 


156 


2,580 00 


157 


2,943 00 


158 


440 00 


159 


3,430 00 


160 


520 00 


161 


3,710 00 


162 


3,265 00 


163 


3,380 00 


164 


1,519 21 


165 


1,549 05 



107 


00 




^2,500 
274 


00 
90 




247 


27 


286 
80 


79 
00 




220 


92 



115 


00 


300 00 


14 


25 


197 


61 


137 


80 


266 


97 


306 05 


57 


35 


52 


50 



19,178 88 

520 72 

18,803 40 

11,569 01 

1,874 64 



100 00 
17,926 08 



180 00 



8 00 

30 00 

8,212 75 

195 00 

286 65 

48 00 

391 80 

582 72 

331 36 

100 00 



$ 


c. 


285 


63 


320 00 



53 91 

179 76 

3,320 14 

15 16 

8 60 







142 


90 


31 


95 


50 00 
30 00 


237 


22 





74 70 
44 65 
21 85 
46 77 
96 69 
173 56 



204 01 
215 00 



262 79 
39 35 



67 70 



206 02 
39 87 
21 25 



45 30 



$ c. 
549 65 

1,008 27 

103 22 

39 20 

233 67 

805 06 



71 


20 


432 


04 


330 


90 



115 23 
217 49 
209 50 

17 25 

100 00 
62 62 
97 11 

66 80 

9 28 

150 80 

237 29 

140 31 

42 62 

150 37 

85 08 

1,247 75 



49 


11 


525 


60 


185 


84 


110 


00 


136 


43 


262 


54 


74 


79 


447 


09 


71 


08 


43 


42 


74 


36 


316 


67 


120 


11 


520 01 


22 


40 


359 


51 


403 


71 


268 


54 


255 


15 


70 


72 


129 


38 


53 


57 



$ c. 


$ c. 


336 59 


2,996 24 


1,378 75 


6,841 38 


2,340 63 


7,068 90 


720 35 


4,263 57 


1,031 02 


16,870 22 


802 64 


4,565 12 


5,443 15 


10,217 97 


440 00 


/,280 14 


1,120 53 


4,492 26 


749 17 


3,056 48 


177 72 


1,315 41 


454 43 


1,815 33 


344 96 


3,900 19 


1,596 44 


5,856 83 


3,637 21 


7,347 63 


923 04 


3,126 99 


221 38 


1,636 38 


566 72 


4,616 72 


717 52 


3,784 39 


736 40 


4,231 12 


388 48 


3,760 30 


589 66 


3,798 94 


427 07 


2,177 77 


758 35 


5,428 89 


337 90 


1,980 21 


879 38 


5,261 35 


524 48 


4,086 62 


414 90 


3,936 67 


1,122 45 


24,722 64 


629 86 


4,550 58 


1,950 57 


23,943 08 


298 94 


13,243 55 


2,533 13 


10,036 62 


505 00 


3,810 00 


653 67 


3,290 10 


951 50 


5,294 04 


196 22 


2,611 01 


847 86 


22,199 03 


5,697 21 


11,331 08 


2,174 03 


6,684 60 


606 07 


2,200 43 


1,265 81 


5,965 81 


402 80 


4,087 17 


2,616 40 


6,886 40 


232 77 


1,860 88 


83 79 


3,213 80 


858 80 


12,036 95 


50 00 


1,250 53 


104 24 


4,264 47 


129 70 


987 49 


1,114 84 


5,471 79 


1,264 91 


5,183 35 


4,180 40 


8,066 44 


214 73 


1,787 51 


231 87 


1,880 92 



132 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 
I. TABLE H— FINAN 





Receipts 


Continuation 
Schools 


en 

C 

03 
u 

o 

Js 

"co 

'Kb 

cu 


CO 

+-> 
C 
rt 
u 

o 
.a* 

JI 


CO 

-t-> 

d 

u 

o 

Is 
.2* 


to 

3 

C 
CU 
X> 
0) 

Q 


u 

cu 

-M 

o 
-o 

c 
a 

CO 
03 I* 


co 
+3 

.s* 
*s 

(J 

cu 
OS 


166 Spencerville 


$ c. 
870 48 
921 25 

1,652 35 
870 35 
848 47 
433 95 
802 75 

1,802 06 
858 76 
867 88 

895 51 

896 45 

902 90 
913 70 
901 72 
885 10 
906 85 

1,696 66 
391 85 
884 75 
437 65 
900 45 
420 62 

903 20 
1,097 30 

878 20 
451 49 
894 17 
761 78 
900 80 
457 95 
416 54 
870 29 
872 20 


$ c. 
1,769 22 
1,441 82 


$ c. 

850 00 

905 62 

500 00 

1,000 00 

800 00 

1,000 45 

1,274 01 

4,290 77 

1,500 00 

2,508 94 

2,065 53 

676 85 

1,727 96 

2,500 00 

2,530 76 

3.600 00 
2,481 17 

10,561 38 

2,602 50 

2,150 00 

491 42 

937 48 

1,856 04 

2.601 63 
5,732 34 
3,240 25 

624 08 
547 57 
1,400 00 
1,940 00 
1,565 74 
700 00 
3,000 00 
1,096 30 


$ c. 


$ c. 

1,767 28 

2,610 33 

1,315 87 

885 03 

864 12 

607 23 

60 45 

1,997 76 

1,075 58 

717 91 

193 16 

51 73 

3,066 19 

947 88 

37 47 

16,864 38 

117 60 

256 77 

1,057 13 

2,800 75 

1,557 17 


$ o 
5,256 98 


167 Springfield 




5,879 02 


168 Sprucedale 




3,468 22 


169 Stayner 


4,822 82 
800 00 
638 42 

2,152 80 




7,578 20 


170 Stella 




3,312 59 


171 Stevensville 




2,680 05 


172 Stouffville 




4,290 01 


173 Sturgeon Falls. . . . 




8,090 59 


174 Sunderland 


1,505 92 
1,207 94 
2,984 50 
2,556 88 
1,423 24 
3,505 53 
1,460 99 
1,954 08 
3,272 51 
18,214 34 

391 85 
2,578 84 
1,550 50 
2,547 48 

420 62 
2,838 42 

897 30 
2,202 64 

546 12 
1,718 80 

961 32 
3,891 11 

457 95 

824 38 
2,427 48 
1,654 23 




4,940 26 


175 Sutton 




5,302 67 


176 Tamworth 




6,138 70 


177 Tara 




4,181 91 


178 Tavistock 




7,120 29 


179 Teeswater 

180 Thamesford 




7,867 11 
4,930 94 


181 Thamesville 




23,303 56 


182 Thornbury 




6,778 13 


183 Thorn dale. . . 




30,729 15 


184 Thornton 




4,443 33 


185 Tilbury 




8,414 34 


186 Tiverton 




4,036 74 


187 Tottenham. . . 




4,385 41 


188 Wales 




1,368 84 

48 09 

1,863 48 

650 96 

35 31 

17 10 

1,501 91 

1,698 74 

1,170 59 

1 38 

38 72 

689 87 


4,066 12 


189 Warkworth 




6,391 34 


190 Wellington 




9,590 42 


191 West Lome 




6,972 05 


192 Westmeath .... 




1,657 00 


193 Westport 




3,177 64 


194 Westport (r.c.s.s.). 




4,625 01 


195 Wheatley 




8,430 65 


196 Winona 




3,652 23 


197 Wolfe Island... 




1,942 30 


198 Woodville 




6,336 49 


199 Wroxeter 




4,312 60 








1 Totals, 1924 

2 Totals, 1923 


180,016 27 
159,720 43 


323,128 99 
274,769 34 


365,223 20 
346,419 57 


190,108 62 
112,146 64 


194,211 40 
212,314 00 


1,252,688 48 
1,105,369 98 


3 Increases 


20,295 84 


48,359 65 


18,803 63 


77,961 98 




147,318 50 


4 Decreases 


18,102 60 
















5 Percentages 


14.37 


25.79 


29.15 


15.18 


15.50 





Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance: $103.96. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



133 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
CIAL STATEMENT (Concluded) 



Expenditure 



Teachers' Salaries 


Buildings, Sites, and 
all permanent 
improvements 


2 
S 

43.2 

ai 

If 

fi 


Library, scientific ap- 
paratus, maps, etc.. 
typewriters, drawing 
models and equipment 
for physical culture 


School books, station- 
ery, fuel, examinations 
and other expenses 


V 
Ih 

3 

4-> 

**3 
c 
<u 
a 

X 

« 
"c3 

H 


166 3,000 00 

167 3,300 00 

168 1,780 00 

169 4,540 00 

170 2,760 00 

171 1,320 00 

172 3,319 40 

173 3,380 00 

174 3,060 00 

175 3,640 00 

176 3,950 00 

177 3,100 00 

178 3,028 25 

179 4,390 01 

180 2,710 99 

181 3,627 82 

182 5,100 00 

183 4,320 00 

184 1,400 00 

185 3,155 00 

186 1,960 00 

187 3,280 00 

188 2,055 35 

189 4,734 25 

190 3,300 00 

191 4,719 00 

192 1,360 00 

193 3,000 00 

194 2,300 00 

195 5,021 75 

196 1,510 00 

197 1,500 00 

198 3,160 25 

199 2,940 00 


$ c. 
471 30 

"534" 13 

269 07 

68 53 

464 57 

' 817 69 

80 00 

163 70 

"l6633 
150 00 
111 99 

16,964 34 

24,854' 58 
152 64 
700 22 
1,034 84 
582 19 
407 10 
245 14 
724 83 
572 09 
75 00 

"55o'43 

494 78 

45 00 

49 85 

147 00 


$ c 

'"59'85 

"930 
51 50 
46 88 

"53171 
26 40 

"691 
12 00 

"258 46 
5 17 

412 99 

"21 80 

"7l"94 
105 06 


$ c. 

224 58 

15 00 

220 19 

399 24 

30 68 

64 45 

' 165 30 
436 21 
40 82 
25 00 
34 09 
130 67 
43 91 

"12304 

34 83 

184 35 

* i20 14 

368 69 

"11319 

"'3'88 
143 77 
195 10 

' 1220 

97 42 

252 04 

55 23 


$ c. 

649 07 
2,564 02 

430 09 

1,089 81 

59 20 

163 54 

961 31 
892 99 

1,625 02 

663 80 
1,158 05 

848 36 
2,652 97 

756 14 
1,894 62 

490 66 
1,419 67 
1,248 88 

163 97 
1,006 95 
1,041 90 

381 28 
1,060 07 
1,411 95 
4,004 88 
1,680 96 

218 12 
33 87 

704 46 

986 54 

962 97 
214 95 

2,676 10 
469 96 


$ c. 
4,344 95 
5,879 02 
2,964 41 
6,357 97 
2,918 41 
2,012 56 
4,290 01 
5,142 18 
4,811 90 
4,632 80 
6,075 97 
4,181 91 
5,856 22 
5,299 14 
4,748 28 

21,126 73 
6,778 13 

30,551 67 
1,751 44 
5,459 51 
4,036 74 
4,385 41 
3,891 21 
6,391 34 
8,142 90 
6,972 05 
1,657 00 
3,177 64 
3,755 99 
6,503 07 
2,602 11 
1,862 22 
6,235 39 
3,570 25 


1 590,084 58 

2 533,395 12 


264,893 00 
192,795 79 


12,018 91 
10,296 01 


31,511 04 
28,393 46 


197,777 13 
204,602 80 


1,096,284 66 
969,483 18 


3 56,689 46 

4 


72,097 21 


1,722 90 


3,117 58 


6,825 67 


126,801 48 


5 53.83 


24.16 


1.09 


2.87 


18.04 





134 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 





Schools under Pub- 
lic or Separate 
School Board 


Value of General 


Continuation Schools 


u 
u 


C rt 


in 

a 

Ctf CO 

^ XJ 

- O 

So 


CO 

"a; 
o 

< 


en 
u 

<u 

'u 

% 

<v 
a 
>> 

H 


— i to 

a c 

O CD 

'3d £ 

•2 & 
P3c/5 


u 

WO. 


Gymnasium, not 

including 

Equipment 

Museum 


u 

o 

il 


1 Aberfovle 


i 


$ 

162 
360 
310 
192 
318 
279 
382 
400 
301 
337 
404 
248 
478 
136 
457 
494 
485 
290 
427 
343 
204 
194 
251 
236 
425 
379 
161 
208 
131 
337 
307 
360 
294 
427 
189 
335 
427 
147 
90 
353 
245 
372 
403 
323 
290 
12-1 
129 
47. 2 
329 
273 
479 
570 
616 
414 
102 
215 


S 

152 
674 
435 
320 
442 
195 
370 
449 
320 
443 
676 
332 
619 
109 
651 
574 
445 
295 
342 
281 
163 
91 
433 
461 
3S3 
445 
140 
708 
240 
393 
339 
392 
490 
359 
167 
443 
548 
146 
25 
741 
130 
401 
510 
393 
621 
170 
410 
553 
544 
332 
624 
400 
432 
527 
85 
409 


$ 

85 
75 
120 
50 
56 
81 
83 

109 
82 
24 

111 
78 
51 
66 
71 
68 
99 
61 
72 
44 
68 
61 
51 
80 

103 

116 
54 
39 
46 
65 
89 
78 

112 
90 
65 
51 
82 
47 
68 
39 

134 
42 

146 
71 
95 
45 
91 
84 
44 

103 
79 
92 

108 
62 
90 
63 


44 
55 
54 
27 
55 
47 
56 
57 
33 
49 
48 
34 
48 
11 
61 
39 
92 
44 
61 
29 
41 
35 
57 
48 
53 
44 
19 
79 
46 
54 
34 
51 
39 
58 
40 
49 
62 
35 
23 
70 
20 
62 
52 
51 
73 
29 
38 
33 
52 
72 
69 
63 
68 
105 
28 
341 


"100 

125 


64 
56 
74 
60 
64 
57 
44 
64 
61 
23 
92 
62 
53 
28 
56 
61 
68 
52 
62 
56 
24 
34 
73 
67 
61 
76 
38 
46 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


2 Acton . . . 


46 

57 








3 Agincourt 

4 Ailsa Craig 

5 Alvinston . . 














65 
9 








6 Arkona. .... 








7 Ayr 

8 Bancroft . . 








66 








9 Bath. . . 








10 Beachburg 

1 1 Beaverton 


42 

72 














12 Beeton 








13 Belmont 










14 Blackstock 


31 
16 
59 
17 

23 








15 Blenheim. 








16 Blind River 








17 Blyth. . 








18 Bobcaygeon 

19 Bolton. 














20 Bothwell. . 


64 
4 








21 Bowesville 








22 Brooklin. . 








23 Brownsville 


30 

41 

123 

45 








24 Bruce Mines 








25 Brussels 








26 Burk's Falls 








27 Caledon East 








28 Cannington 

29 Capreol 


86 






6 








30 Cardinal 


100 


66 
65 
48 
39 
69 
69 
54 
60 
30 


30 








31 Carp. 








32 Chatsworth 


16 
20 
15 








33 Claremont 








34 Clifford. . 








35 Cobden . 








36 Cochrane 


52 








37 Coldwater 








38 Comber. 


43 








39 Consecon . . 








40 Cookstown 


' 524 


40 
37 
69 
39 
59 
46 
36 
47 
55 
55 
38 
77 
48 
82 
63 


9 








41 Copetown 

42 Creemore. . 








50 
91 
20 
40 
23 
19 








43 Danforth Park 








44 Delaware. . 








45 Delhi. . 








46 Denbigh . . 








47 Dorchester. 








48 Drayton 








49 Dresden . 


45 

7 

51 

36 

305 

86 

5 








50 Drumbo . . 








51 Dryden . 








52 Eganville 

53 Eganville (r.c.s.s.) 








3,000 


18 


4 


55 Embro . . 




. . 




56 Emo 




39 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



135 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. 



Equipment Religious and other Exercises 



> * 



out? 



0) <fi ' 

-G c 

-M O 

-G'-M 

O O 

Si 0> 

c 



S . S 



,G-Q 5 



en N 
arc 

&° 

CO r- 

« s 






-o 
o> 

c 



2^3 



en 

O «H 



.§■5 



So 

£ o> 
o x 



Destination of Pupils 



G G 
3 O 



b/)\P 



O fli s 



0> 




en 


X! 




G 


O 




O 


S 


Cfi 


rt 


T3 


O 


a 


G 


O 


3 


•J3 




73 J2 


W 


O 






u 

a> 


6 


o 



o a 

-G 3 



7 16 

8 .... 

9 .. . . 
10 

11 220 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 . 

21 .... 

22 .... 

23 .... 

24 .... 

25 25 

26 34 

27 .... 

28 227 



50 



18 



32 



29 .... 

30 .... 

31 .... 

32 .... 

33 18 

34 100 

35 82 
19 

10 



34 



507 

1,382 

1,065 

682 

1,000 

668 

951 

1,145 

797 

918 

1,748 

754 

1,299 

381 

1,312 

1,295 

1,224 

765 

996 

817 

504 

415 

895 

933 

1,173 

1,139 

412 

1,399 

463 

945 

834 

945 

1,012 

1,218 

612 

1,003 

1,179 

458 

206 

1,252 

566 

996 

1,765 

951 

1,165 

430 

734 

1,198 

1,069 

845 

1,379 

1,274 

4,662 

1,271 

313 

760 



10 



136 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



II. 



CONTINUATION 

TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 



Continuation Schools 



ja 














Value ol 


Ger 




















3 














<u 


■4_> 




Cu 














u 


O 




<u 














k 3 


c 










a 








3a 






Schools und 
lie or Separ 
School Boar 


>> 

u 

2 
3 


CO 

O 3 

<d a. 
•G a 


03 03 

.. o 

So 

U 03 


J2 

"a3 

o 
< 


1 

a 


03 C 
o 55 

'3d E 

S'o 

.2 g, 

We/) 


4J 3 

E rt 

•3* w 


Gymnasium 

including 

Equipment 


E 

3 
<u 

CO 

3 



ll 

03 Q 
3 u 

cr a) 
<£ 



57 Ennismore. . . . 

58 Erin 

59 Espanola 

60 Fairbank 

61 Fenelon Falls. 

62 Fen wick 

63 Feversham. . . . 

64 Finch 

65 Fingal 

66 Florence 

67 Fordwich 

68 Frankford. . . . 

69 Gore Bay 

70 Grand Valley . 

71 Haliburton. . . 

72 Hallville 

73 Harrow 

74 Havelock 

75 Hensall 

76 Hepworth .... 

77 Highgate 

78 Holstein 

79 Ilderton 

80 Inglewood. . . . 

81 Iroquois Falls. 

82 Islington 

83 Janetville 

84 Jarvis 

85 Jockvale 

86 Kars 

87 Keewatin 

88 Kenmore 

89 Kinburn 

90 Kinmount. . . . 

91 Kirkland Lake 

92 Lambeth 

93 Lanark 

94 Lansdowne. . . 

95 Laurel 

96 Lef roy 

97 Lion's Head. . 

98 Little Britain. 

99 Little Current 

100 Lobo 

101 Long Branch. , 

102 Lucknow 

103 Lynden 

104 Lyndhurst.. . .' 

105 Melakoff 

106 Mallorytown . . 

107 Manitowaning 

108 Manotick 

109 Marmora 

110 Massey 

111 Maxville 

112 Melbourne 



$ 

329 

317 

500 

363 

382 

231 

212 

547 

298 

162 

94 
332 
324 
438 
154 
335 
325 
475 
268 
185 
360 
241 
219 
149 
369 
281 
160 
251 
179 
367 
442 
328 
322 
218 
173 
254 
385 
349 

71 
144 
159 
175 
320 
302 
313 
382 

85 
287 
294 
228 
182 
283 
305 
385 
327 
368 



386 
352 
461 
181 
427 
214 
153 
737 
651 
227 
291 
384 
536 
505 
269 
396 
884 
430 
250 
206 
292 
418 
335 
281 
493 
160 
233 
209 
165 
407 
530 
523 
360 
234 
159 
419 
426 
426 
112 

99 
250 

84 
328 
434 
632 
656 
180 
400 
325 
305 
436 
345 
951 
400 
501 
495 



82 
34 
95 

120 
76 
63 
66 

117 
82 
78 
93 
80 
49 
85 
41 

130 
57 
89 
80 
50 
54 
90 
92 

107 

188 
78 
28 
58 
58 
68 

110 
30 
77 
87 

111 
93 
62 

124 
52 
30 
48 

150 
91 

117 
83 

102 
20 
25 
53 
23 
85 
38 
85 
56 
38 
83 



$ 
66 
57 
47 

156 
48 
52 
52 
72 
51 
53 
42 
45 
48 
80 
30 
31 
46 
41 
34 
60 
41 
28 
36 
34 
38 
57 
57 
55 
22 
57 
42 
55 
30 
77 
17 
40 
41 
42 
22 
22 
44 
44 
48 
68 
30 
51 
25 
40 
31 
54 
47 
50 
75 
1 

49 
26 



300 



40 


41 


$ 


$ 


$ 


51 








00 


40 








n 








S3 


29 








46 








SO 










SO 


69 
40 








S3 








07 








76 










68 


10 
17 








48 








48 


100 






47 




15 


M 


95 
101 

12 








64 








57 








6S 








73 










51 


32 
40 

27 








S8 








71 








76 






? 


S7 


88 
23 








K 








44 








48 


49 
10 
71 
17 

22 
24 








u 








44 








}0 








74 








SI 








61 








1S 


6 

75 
27 
11 








64 








56 








56 








ss 








?4 










41 


17 








SO 








41 


72 

2 

200 

21 








4S 








*4 








7S 








10 








}S 










48 










47 


15 
23 
20 








41 








4? 








61 








S4 


11 

84 
82 








6S 








42 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



137 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. (Continued) 



Equipment 



<3g'3 
o <y cr 



Religious and other Exercises 



0> CO 

gen 

co O 

COM 



U 

IS 
£ g 

— CO N 

gig 



55 

c 

°& 

co Ci 

■3 Oh 



J2fc 

•3 Oh 
SI 



cu 

£ a) 
o x 



Destination of Pupils 






« S 

3 O 

to co > 

o *-■ cu 



cu 




T3 




O 




§ 


en 






T3 


O 


C 


o 


a 


J3 


"rt J2 


ctf 


"1 
IS 


u 

cu 

o 



a 




3 


c 


W 


o 


£ 


si 




o a 


a> 


.fi 3 


J3 
-m 

o 





$ 

952 

876 

1,268 

909 

1,053 

609 

533 

1,666 

1,225 

617 

546 

924 

1,022 

1,266 

556 

1,024 

1,477 

1,119 

697 

627 

860 

884 

780 

649 

1,273 

644 

522 

670 

468 

1,024 

1,480 

1,042 

864 

690 

481 

945 

1,007 

1,013 

312 

319 

561 

503 

922 

968 

1,304 

1,300 

320 

787 

751 

708 

814 

785 

1,477 

924 

1,084 

1,144 



138 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 
II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 





Schools under Pub- 
lic or Separate 
School Board 


Value of General 


Continuation Schools 


u 

o3 

X> 


en 

a % 
<V ex 
% a, 


a 

o3 en 

« o 

go 


O 

U 
< 


en 
u 

a> 

'u 

a 


o3 C 

'So £ 
•2 S, 


cU 
IS 

•- en 
3 >, 




G 

•i*s 

S.S E 
g-v a 
S^*3 

o.sw 


S 

4) 

en 

3 


u 



U 

3-e 

cr <v 
<X 


113 Merlin. 




$ 

302 
263 
424 
426 
341 
223 
162 
174 

65 
453 
411 
186 
317 

92 
414 
399 
366 
362 
342 
135 
396 

61 
319 
362 
430 
313 
432 
367 
146 
491 
266 
371 
465 
259 
189 
404 
426 
188 
370 
335 
416 
227 

39 
330 

44 
300 
116 
532 
300 
546 
168 
195 
313 
502 
250 
190 


371 
344 
485 
430 
451 
605 
497 
109 
146 
467 
446 
311 
309 

70 
454 
377 
409 
379 
420 
143 
432 

56 
500 
495 
340 
806 
514 
606 
320 
547 
499 
312 
643 
238 
448 
729 
326 
125 
367 
304 
472 
166 

269 

62 

391 

89 

634 

603 

379 

98 

167 

357 

614 

232 

401 


$ 

50 
51 
57 

187 

159 
82 
54 
29 
33 

102 
63 
93 
43 
48 
63 
76 
72 
69 
36 
91 

121 
45 
71 
81 
85 

107 
67 
93 
17 

141 
54 
65 

104 

8 

81 

104 
62 
76 

200 
50 
74 
66 
65 
83 
65 
63 
3 
94 
70 
36 
76 
76 
40 

173 

133 
37 


$ 

58 
41 
63 
67 
32 
32 
48 
32 
44 
58 
45 
36 
25 
18 
51 
30 
50 
50 
54 
37 
57 
21 
63 
53 
71 
88 
76 
41 
20 
73 
34 
38 
21 
28 
50 
50 
58 
10 


$ 


$ 
49 
56 
55 
70 
89 
63 
89 
70 
32 
30 
59 


27 

' '55 
105 


vS 


s 


S 


114 Merrickville. . . 


64 






115 Metcalfe. . . 






116 Millbrook . 








117 Milverton . . 


50 








118 Mindemoya 

119 Minden. . 
















120 Minesing 

121 Morriston 


















122 Mount Albert . 










123 Mount Brydges. . . 

124 Mount Elgin 

125 Navan. 


84 














100 


74 
37 
82 
35 
52 
37 
56 
53 
52 
18 

107 
53 
56 
54 
58 
36 
63 
83 
59 
57 
44 
92 
64 
37 
79 

108 
53 


10 








126 New Dundee 








127 New Hamburg. . . . 

128 North Augusta 

129 North Gower 


16 
47 




















130 Odessa. . 


30 
17 








131 Oil Springs 

132 Onondaga 

133 Orono 














6 








134 Otterville 








135 Paisley. . 


31 
















137 Palmerston 


22 








138 Pickering 








139 Plattsville 










140 Port Burwell 










141 Port Carling 

142 Port Credit 


43 
21 














143 Powassan 










144 Princeton 


30 




8 




145 Rainy River 

146 Richard's Landing. 

147 Richmond 












26 

7 








148 Ridgeway 

149 Ripley 












1? 












151 Rodney 


15 
36 






4 


152 Russell 


72 

57 
57 










153 St. George 

154 Schomberg 

155 Schreiber 




74 
88 
12 
59 








37 














156 Scotland 

157 Seely's Bay 

158 Selkirk 


62 
9 
37 
41 
56 
7 
35 
20 
51 
59 
79 
51 
62 




29 














' 60 
' ' 145 


22 
31 

100 
61 
57 
39 
34 
53 

108 
69 
60 


12 








159 vSinghampton 

160 Southampton 

161 South Mountain.. . 

162 South Porcupine.. . 

163 South River 








9 

27 

7 


































165 Spencerville 

166 Springville 

167 Sprucedale 

168 Stayner 










20 
51 
18 





















DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



139 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. (Continued) 



Equipment Religious and other Exercises 



«j cu 

> * S 

— « ^ a, 

o <y & 



-rT-M ^ 



J3 
O 

c rt « 

•- en N 

O en B 

J3 £ cu 



T3 
cu 

C 

Cl, cu 

CO J-" 

•3 Oh 

2j= 



J2 cu 

■§* 
3'BI 



a» 

6 

cu 

s £ 

S'p 

O X 



Destination of Pupils 







. JL, ou 






en 






c S 


XI 




C 






P'*0_ 


o 




O 


0) 
Ih 

3 


en 

CU 


and 
inclu 
Schoo 


C 
03 


en 

"o 
o 

u 
C/3 


a 

3 
CU 


4-> 




en en > 

cu cu S 


*.3 


O 


3 
O 


H 


cu.-J 


CO 


Ih 

CU 


u 

< 


*5 


Coll 

vers 
the 


6 


O 



15 



113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 

163 .... 

164 .... 

165 64 

166 .... 

167 27 

168 .... 



11 



15 



10 



50 



857 

834 

1,139 

1,285 

1,122 

1,005 

850 

414 

320 

1,130 

1,132 

626 

788 

265 

1,080 

964 

949 

938 

925 

459 

1,079 

201 

1,091 

1,044 

1,004 

1,368 

1,191 

1,168 

609 

1,431 

912 

891 

1,287 

625 

858 

1,441 

963 

507 

1,009 

847 

1,093 

647 

116 

856 

180 

870 

290 

1,485 

1,105 

1,087 

401 

523 

886 

1,496 

958 

768 



140 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

II. TABLE I— SCHOOLS UNDER PUBLIC SCHOOL 





Schools under Pub- 
lic or Separate 
School Board 


Value of General 


Continuation Schools 


>> 
u 

aJ 
u 


CO 

3$ 


CO 

a, 

Si! 

> o 

So 

.21 

u 3 


jn 

•a 

o 

< 


co 
U 

<u 

1 

CD 


— . to 
03 C 
O 0) 

"So £ 

.2 g, 

Bffi 


u 
u 

O +j 

„ 3 

cU 
6 « 


Gymnasium, not 

including 

Equipment 


6 

3 
cu 

(O 

3 


J-g 
11 


169 Stella 




275 
141 
243 
499 
365 
349 
268 
341 
455 
476 
235 
481 
474 
365 
125 
330 
240 
544 
145 
464 
337 
330 
199 
350 
342 
394 
219 
124 
261 
377 


$ 

384 
176 
419 
730 
347 
449 
291 
501 
432 
490 
399 
407 
679 
391 
109 
375 
363 
516 

91 
680 
359 
445 
256 
442 
382 
276 
288 

60 
289 
375 


$ 

82 

102 

117 
89 

101 
78 
63 
75 
63 
89 

102 
79 
75 

113 
60 

129 

9 

88 

73 

106 
73 
64 
53 
38 
65 

185 
69 
68 
67 
80 


$ 

28 
50 
30 
64 
40 
29 
35 
60 
48 
46 
49 
70 
71 
51 
17 
47 
61 
93 
41 
59 
26 
69 
30 
35 
54 
66 
45 
28 
43 
52 


$ 


$ 
60 
72 
70 
73 
54 
48 
74 
45 
40 
99 
53 
35 
48 
47 
19 
90 
28 
54 
65 
69 
74 
56 
59 
71 
60 
36 
99 
38 
66 
45 


• $ 

55 


$ 


$ 


$ 


170 Stevensville 








171 Stouffville 


68 
74 
14 








172 Sturgeon Falls. . . . 

173 Sunderland 














174 Sutton 








175 Tamworth 


24 








176 Tara 








177 Tavistock 


20 
75 
28 
68 
29 
4 








178 Teeswater 








179 Thamesford 






14 


180 Thamesville 








181 Thornbury 

182 Thorndale 














183 Thornton 








184 Tilbury 


10 
6 

52 
12 
36 

"36 
10 
18 
37 
87 
16 
7 






14 


185 Tiverton 








186 Tottenham 








187 Wales 








188 Warkworth. . . 








189 Wellington 

190 West Lome 


7,000 










191 Westmeath. . . 






U 


192 Westport 








193 Westport (r.c.s.s.). 

194 Wheatley 














195 Winona 








196 Wolfe Island.... 








197 Woodville. . . 








198 Wroxeter 


13 
















1 Totals, 1924-25.... 

2 Totals, 1923-24.... 


178 
172 


60,206 
54,859 


74,882 
70,775 


15,199 
13,441 


9,269 

8,638 


1,454 
810 


10,673 
9,932 


5,067 
5,329 


10,164 
14,372 


26 

28 


84 
94 


3 Increases. . 


6 


5,347 


4,107 


1,758 


631 


644 


741 










4 Decreases. .... 


262 


4,208 


2 


10 


















5 Percentages 


89.9 


31.76 


39.50 


8.02 


4.89 


.77 


5.63 


2.67 


5.36 


.01 


.04 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



141 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BOARD, VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. (Concluded) 



Equipment 


Religious and Other Exercises 


Destination of Pupils 


en 
<U 
u 
3 

O 


"o 

o oj cr 
HOW 


0) ifl-n 

^ O =0 J 

cn o 2 ° 8 

Ijh^ 8 

o •-* _S o 

COCO'S tof 


g>| -3CU 
liS to £ 


T3 

to u 

c8"B 


c 
£ 

G * 

G Ql 

g » 

B'o 

6 S 

O X 


u 

u 

<v 

B 

£ 
o 

U 


(V 

u 

G 

o 

'u 
bJB 

< 


Cfi 

OJ 

OJ 

H 

Xi 

H 


a 5 
J3 

TD 2 

S-S'S 

in ifl te 


0) 

O 

C 
03 

"o3_2 

IB 

Zto 


J2 




CO 

6 


cn 

c 
.2 

ca 

a 
3 


O 

u 
xi 
O 


c 


3 '5 

a 

-3 3 

.t! <-> 


$ 

169 9 


$ 

893 

552 

947 

1,529 

971 

958 

755 

1,022 

1,073 

1,275 

880 

1,140 

1,376 

971 

330 

995 

719 

1,355 

439 

1,424 

7,869 

1,025 

634 

954 

1,030 

1,049 

736 

325 

726 

942 




1 

1 1 




1 










3 






1 


170 11 




3 
13 
2 
2 
5 

10 
8 


1 




3 
3 
4 
7 
3 
5 
3 
4 
2 
2 
6 
8 
4 
6 
4 
4 
1 
2 
2 
6 
10 
11 
1 
1 
2 

13 
5 
5 
2 


3 
1 
1 

6 
6 
1 

1 

" 1 

""2 

3 

1 
3 

6 




171 






4 

3 
1 
1 

1 
2 




1 

5 
3 
3 

7 
4 


1 


172 .... 

173 50 


i 


1 


3 

"2 
5 


"1 

8 


4 

5 


174 5 






3 


175 








176 








177 15 




1 






2 


178 


1 






1 


3 

2 
2 
1 
4 


3 


179 


i 








1 


180 




1 


2 
8 
2 
1 
3 
1 
5 


1 
2 


3 
' *3 




181 






4 


182 








8 


183 








1 


184 








3 

1 




1 


2 


185 12 








3 


186 8 

187 12 


..... 


1 
1 
1 




2 


2 


5 


188 10 


6 

2 
1 


- 




2 


8 




189 


5 
11 
1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 
7 




5 


190 25 






2 


1 


4 
1 
2 
3 

5 


2 


191 14 






2 


192 








"i 

1 


1 

"5 




193 90 

194 5 


l 


"i 


1 
3 


1 


1 


195 


2 
1 
5 




196 






1 
3 
3 








1 


197 










2 
2 




198 . 






1 


2 














1 2,565 

2 2,047 


189589 
180325 


152 
145 


6 197 

7 188 


25 
32 


61 
53 


223 
212 


619 
464 


112 
97 


95 
49 


340 
383 


699 
680 


368 
347 


355 
266 


3 518 

4 .... 


9,264 


7 .. 


9 
1 


..... 


8 


11 


155 


15 


46 


"43 


19 


21 


89 



















5 1.35 




76.77 3 


03 99.49 


12.63 


30.81 


7.93 


22.02 


3.98 


3.38 


12.10 


24.87 


13.09 


12.63 



142 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 


Continuation 
Schools 


a-* 

£o 

£t a> 

5 ** « 
3 a S 
2 o> 


o 

CQ 


CO 

3 


w c 
a> as 
bfl-O 

« 


2 £"5 
5.5 "S 

X « « 

It:* 

z£2 


o 

Is 

o o 


1 
cJJ.-. 

M 

o o 


o 
o 

.a 
o 

<u 
*a 

§ 


o 
o 
J3 
u 

C/) 

u 
<U 

a 
a 

£3 


a -2 
lit 

U CD 4- 

O.C.S£ 

IK 

U o c 


4-1 

u 

CO 'JT 

o o 
UU 


c 
3 

UJ 

c c 
•S.U 

3s 


M 

.2 

Cu 

u 
a 

•5 
O 


1 Aberf oyle 


12 
83 
61 
48 

114 
36 
68 
66 
44 
72 
99 
46 
79 
25 
94 
47 
57 
51 
73 
50 
11 
34 
31 
48 
76 
58 
24 
53 
16 
59 
85 
42 
56 
50 
36 
36 
53 
37 
11 
57 
11 
87 

124 
42 
75 
16 
52 

111 

105 
40 
47 
60 
73 
87 
26 
45 


2 
31 
29 
24 
49 
21 
30 
28 
20 
22 
50 
12 
29 
10 
37 
14 
22 
20 
23 
19 

5 

9 
15 
12 
38 
26 

3 
18 

5 
20 
36 
17 
22 
20 
18 
15 
29 

8 

3 
19 

5 
32 
50 
18 
33 

5 
17 
42 
41 
22 
19 
22 
32 
29 

7 
15 


10 
52 
32 
24 
65 
15 
38 
38 
24 
50 
49 
34 
50 
15 
57 
33 
35 
31 
50 
31 
6 
25 
16 
36 
38 
32 
21 
35 
11 
39 
49 
25 
34 
30 
18 
21 
24 
29 
8 
38 
6 
55 
74 
24 
42 
11 
35 
69 
64 
18 
28 
38 
41 
58 
19 
30 


11 
71 
45 
41 
94 
30 
58 
53 
40 
67 
82 
38 
67 
22 
84 
40 
52 
45 
54 
36 

9 
29 
26 
35 
69 
55 
22 
47 
14 
43 
78 
36 
47 
44 
30 
27 
39 
32 

9 
50 

9 
69 
95 
35 
64 
13 
41 
94 
90 
34 
38 
55 
66 
68 
22 
36 


5 
28 
23 
20 
36 
17 
14 
28 
14 
33 
34 
24 
26 
14 
28 
17 
20 
20 
29 
12 

5 
21 
15 
21 
18 
29 
16 
13 
11 
23 
24 
10 
16 
19 
21 
19 
21 
14 

5 
10 

4 
27 
80 
10 
29 
11 
14 
44 
37 
10 
18 
18 
22 
31 
26 
19 


5 
30 
24 
20 
28 
18 
25 
28 
14 
23 
34 
27 
26 
14 
32 
17 
19 
20 
29 
16 

5 
21 
15 
22 
19 
29 
14 
13 
11 
23 
27 
10 
16 
20 
21 
19 
23 
12 

5 
10 


7 
27 
20 
13 
39 
18 
17 
21 
11 
14 
14 

7 

17 
11 
32 
11 
15 
14 
22 
15 

6 
13 

9 
11 
27 
15 
10 
19 

5 
17 
22 
15 
16 
12 
15 
13 
13 
10 

5 
11 






9 
55 
28 
14 
28 
16 
57 
36 
17 
39 
54 
16 
40 

7 
50 
42 
24 
32 
33 
25 

7 
14 
23 
22 
42 
42 

8 
26 
16 
41 
35 
13 
20 
33 
21 
36 
23 
20 
11 
31 


2 

15 
30 
34 
54 
16 

' 30 
26 

32 
30 

"22 
18 
44 

"33 
16 
40 
16 

4 
20 

6 
11 
34 
16 
16 
26 


1 

13 
3 




2 Acton 


26 
17 
15 

47 






3 Agincourt 

4 Ailsa Craig .... 




5 Alvinston 

6 Arkona 


32 

4 

11 


... 


7 Ayr 


26 
17 
19 
35 
40 
12 
36 


ii 




8 Bancroft 




9 Bath 


1 

1 

14 

30 

17 




10 Beachburg 

1 1 Beaverton 

12 Beeton 

13 Belmont 

14 Blackstock ... 


i 


15 Blenheim 


30 
19 
23 
17 
22 
.19 








16 Blind River.... 

17 Blyth 


5 




18 Bobcaygeon. .. . 

19 Bolton 


3 


... 


20 Bothwell 

21 Bowesville . . . . 


9 


... 


22 Brooklin 








23 Brownsville .... 

24 Bruce Mines.. . 

25 Brussels 


7 

15 
30 
14 




2 
15 




26 Burk's Falls. . . 






27 Caledon East. . 






28 Cannington .... 

29 Capreol 


21 




1 


... 


30 Cardinal 

31 Carp 


19 
36 

17 
24 
18 




17 
50 
29 
36 
1 
15 


1 




32 Chatsworth .... 

33 Claremont .... 






34 Clifford 

35 Cobden 


16 




36 Cochrane 


4 
17 
15 

1 
36 








37 Cold water 

38 Comber 


29 
17 


1 




39 Consecon 






40 Cookstown .... 


26 






41 Copetown 


4 
27 
89 
10 
29 
11 
14 
44 
37 
12 
18 
18 
22 
31 
26 
19 


7 
24 
25 
17 
19 

5 

16 
29 
30 
12 
14 
18 
18 
29 




11 
35 
62 
14 
74 

8 
27 
30 
93 
22 
42 
43 
28 
35 

6 
22 








42 Creemore 

43 Danforth Park. 


36 
10 

15 

27 




33 
62 
28 
1 
6 
24 
81 
12 
18 
5 
17 
29 
52 
17 
23 


18 


1 


44 Delaware .... 






45 Delhi 






46 Denbigh 


2 




47 Dorchester .... 

48 Drayton 

49 Dresden 


22 
38 
38 
16 
15 
24 
33 
27 




1 


50 Drumbo 






51 Dryden 






52 Eganville 






53 do (r.c.s.s.) 

54 Elmvale 


13 


3 


55 Embro 


3 

.... 




56 Emo 


8 


18 


... 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



143 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, 



ETC. 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below 


No. of Pupils in the Various Subject* 




(U 


£ 

•4-j 


VIedicine, 
>try or the 
1 


bfl 


en 
0> 

Ih 


en 

too 

.5 '-M 


en 

C 

.2 

a 
3 


O 


3 

.2 

3 "cs 


u 

6 
6 

O 


KB 
Gji 


0) 

3 

2 

CO 


u 



en 

2 

3 
oj 


u 



■M 

en 

2 

CO 




6 
S 


3 


— .3 

►"II 


J3 
O 




3 a 
2 3 


Ih 

J3 


a 
-3 3 
±2 


.2 

"So 


.2 rt 
'Sac 


.2 
Ha 


•0" 

3 




o 


bo 


rt « J3 




J3 


cd 




^O 


G 


c 


c 


rt 


u 




U 


< 


JQU 


H 


H 


JO 


O 


w 


W-fl 


UJ 


U 


CQ 


1 


"s 


10 
31 








2 
1 






12 
23 


12 
83 


12 
83 






2 


4 




29 


12 


1 


31 


21 


3 


2 


37 


1 




1 


6 


13 


1 


44 


61 


61 


27 


13 


4 


3 

12 

1 

9 


33 
87 
24 
32 






4 

5 

6 

13 


8 
10 

"7 






13 

55 
18 

7 


48 

114 

36 

68 


48 

114 

36 

68 


23 
40 
18 
25 


10 


5 










27 


6 






2 
2 


3 

2 




7 


3 




1 


8 


15 


26 




2 


8 


6 


9 




14 


66 


66 


33 


13 


9 


"n 


26 
49 


2 
1 




4 
4 


4 

5 


8 

1 






44 

72 


44 

72 


14 
28 


17 


10 




11 


30 


11 


18 


44 


1 


1 


18 


6 


7 


4 




98 


98 


34 


30 


12 


2 

7 

1 

30 


35 
58 
20 

48 


2 




4 
11 

3 
5 


3 
1 

4 








46 
76 
23 
94 


46 

77 
23 
94 


27 
26 
14 
34 


8 


13 


2 
1 
3 


"2 


43 
9 
7 


16 


14 








15 


1 


1 


19 


16 


17 

7 
8 
4 


3 
34 
20 
42 


3 




12 
8 

10 
11 


6 
1 

7 
7 


6 

6 
2 






47 
57 
51 
73 


47 
57 
51 
73 


17 
20 
20 
31 


8 


17 


7 


9 


13 


18 






13 


19 


2 




5 




17 


20 


3 


23 


1 




6 


12 


4 


1 


22 


50 


50 


18 


11 


21 




9 

25 






2 

5 










11 
34 


11 
34 


5 
21 




22 


1 




1 


1 


1 


7 




23 


3 


18 




1 


1 


7 


1 




14 


24 


23 


13 


5 


24 




28 


1 




4 


5 


8 


2 


2 


48 


48 


24 




25 


16 


40 


3 




3 


12 


2 




26 


76 


76 


19 


i7 


26 


6 


15 


4 




15 


11 


1 


6 


8 


58 


58 


29 


. 9 


27 


2 
1 


15 

37 


2 
3 




4 
4 


4 






10 

7 


24 
53 


24 
53 


14 
13 




28 


2 


2 


20 


29 


2 
4 
2 








2 


10 
32 

12 
3 


3 






16 
59 
85 
42 


16 
59 

85 
42 


11 
24 
27 
14 




30 


25 
52 
33 








7 
14 
15 


10 


31 


1 


6 


10 
3 






24 


32 




1 


17 


33 


5 


40 


1 




3 


2 


3 


2 


16 


55 


55 


18 


13 


34 


16 

3 


29 
17 


3 




1 
3 






1 


14 
6 


45 
36 


44 
36 


20 
24 


12 


35 


9 


4 




36 


5 


3 


2 


1 


3 


6 


16 




3 


36 


36 


22 


4 


37 


9 


23 


2 




1 


5 


7 


6 


15 


53 


53 


22 


8 


38 


1 

4 


21 

7 
37 


2 






1 
1 
3 


13 

"8 






37 
9 

57 


37 

9 

57 


13 

9 

10 


8 


39 




1 
4 


1 


8 




40 


1 




20 


41 


2 
16 


9 
48 














2 
23 


11 

87 


11 

87 


5 
31 




42 


1 




7 


8 


4 


3 


23 


43 


20 








82 


14 


4 


4 


15 


124 


124 


89 


9 


44 


2 
8 


32 

45 


3 
4 


"2 


2 
8 


2 
5 


3 






42 

75 


42 
75 


14 
31 


15 


45 




1 


18 


46 


16 

5 


















16 

52 


16 

52 


11 
14 


3 


47 


22 


3 




10 


9 


3 




16 




48 


9 


82 


2 




6 


5 


1 


6 


28 


111 


111 


45 




49 




53 


3 




17 


16 


10 


6 


39 


104 


104 


39 


26 


50 


"7 
21 


26 
11 
18 


1 
1 
3 




13 
13 

5 








12 


34 
47 
60 


34 
47 
60 


11 
18 
17 


4 


51 


11 
4 


4 
6 




3 


52 


3 


18 


24 


53 


6 

7 


26 
51 


2 




2 
8 


8 
11 


29 

7 






73 
87 


73 
87 


38 
31 


19 


54 


3 


11 


32 


55 


1 
9 


19 

24 


1 




2 
3l 


2 
5 


2 






26 

441 


26 
44 


2 
20 




56 


2l 


.... 


1 


... . 

22l 


13 



144 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 
III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 



Continuation 
Schools 


>Y 

u 
O 
en 

X 
c 

'u 

c 

< 


>> 

a 

u 

O 

o 


a 

biO 

.2 
'55 
>» 


-v 
a 

.o.2 

<2 


2 

is 

< 


>> 

e 






u 

£ 


c 


H 


c 


c 


1 Aberfoyle. . . 




5 
28 

""21 
30 
18 
25 
28 
14 
26 
34 
34 

"ii 

32 
17 
19 
20 
29 
15 

5 
21 
14 
21 
20 
29 
14 
13 
11 
23 
28 
11 
15 
20 
21 
19 
24 
13 

9 
10 

4 
28 
57 
10 
29 
15 
14 
45 
37 
12 
31 
18 
38 
31 

2 


12 
30 
20 
14 
35 
18 
17 
21 
12 
11 
12 

7 
17 

9 
32 
11 
15 
16 
22 
11 

6 
13 

8 
11 
27 
16 
10 
19 

5 

18 
25 
15 
18 
12 
15 
14 
15 

9 
...... 

7 
24 
24 
16 
20 

5 

16 
30 
33 
12 
14 
19 

9 
29 

"7 


7 
29 
19 
16 
39 
18 
18 
21 
12 
12 
15 

7 
18 
11 
32 
12 
17 
22 
23 
17 

6 
11 

8 
11 
29 
17 
10 
18 

5 
22 
27 
17 
18 
16 
15 
14 
17 
13 

1 
11 

7 
24 
25 
16 
22 
13 
16 
32 
28 
11 
15 
24 

■■"35 

2 

10 


5 
52 
42 
30 
52 
18 
25 
28 
25 
63 
75 
27 
44 
16 
52 

7 
32 
31 
36 
27 

5 
21 
25 
27 
40 
40 
14 
44 
11 
32 
50 
17 
31 
29 
21 
19 
45 
14 

9 
38 

4 
53 
98 
24 
52 

12 
24 
69 
70 

17 
31 
55 
59 
56 

26 
30 


7 
47 
29 
23 
72 
18 
31 
33 
18 
23 
58 
27 
45 
10 
48 
13 
28 
29 
39 
24 

6 
13 
13 
16 
49 
25 
10 
40 

5 
31 
42 
33 
32 
22 
15 
18 
28 
18 


7 


12 
70 
48 
48 
72 
33 
57 
48 
31 
46 
61 
37 
58 
21 
55 
38 
18 
49 
22 
32 
11 
30 
14 
30 
54 
41 
23 
21 
16 
35 
55 
27 
38 
32 
30 
32 
45 
26 

9 
26 
11 
56 
116 
30 
55 

4 
46 
81 
68 
18 
35 
38 
49 
65 
25 
30 


12 


2 Acton 

3 Agincourt 


17 

13 

9 

31 


71 
44 


4 Ailsa Craig. . . . 


48 


5 Alvinston 


67 


6 Arkona 


32 


7 Ayr 


25 
10 
15 

5 
31 

9 
28 


48 


8 Bancroft 


52 


9 Bath 


33 


10 Beachburg 


28 


1 1 Beaverton 

12 Beeton 

13 Belmont 

14 Blackstock 


61 
42 
59 
20 


15 Blenheim 


21 
7 

17 
10 
16 
13 


54 


16 Blind River 


38 


17 Blyth 


23 


18 Bobcaygeon 


44 


19 Bolton 


30 


20 Bothwell 


25 


21 Bowesville. . . 


10 


22 Brooklin. . 




32 


23 Brownsville 


2 


16 


24 Bruce Mines. . 


30 


25 Brussels 


17 
9 


54 


26 Burk's Falls 


40 


27 Caledon East 


22 


28 Cannington 


19 


18 


29 Capreol 


16 


30 Cardinal 


6 
26 
11 
20 
14 


36 


31 Carp 


48 


32 Chatsworth 


25 


33 Claremont 


33 


34 Clifford 


28 


35 Cobden 


29 


36 Cochrane 


4 

14 

6 


19 


37 Coldwater 


46 


38 Comber 


30 


39 Consecon 


9 


40 Cookstown 


33 


29 
7 
48 
32 
26 
35 
5 
30 
60 
61 
20 
28 
37 
18 
56 


"2 


27 


41 Copetown 


8 


42 Creemore 


31 
7 
8 

13 

4 


59 


43 Danforth Park 

44 Delaware 


79 
26 


45 Delhi 


57 


46 Denbigh 


4 


47 Dorchester 


36 


48 Drayton 




85 


49 Dresden 


26 
10 
13 
18 
28 
20 


61 


50 Drumbo 


18 


51 Dryden 


38 


52 Eganville 


33 


53 Egansville (r.c.s.s.).. . 

54 Elmvale 


47 
65 




25 


56 Emo 


13 


18 




29 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



145 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 



3 

o 
o 
N 


c 

03 
O 

pa 


>> 

4-1 

*s 

0> 
XI 

u 




c 

"H. 

<y 
^d 

O 



xt 
a 
a 

u 

bjo 
O 
C 

<u 


be 

.2 

a> 


< 


u 

3 

U 

"53 
>> 

0^ 


ou 

3 
■*-> 

13 

JO 

< 


buO 

.5 

!s 

u 

H 

"3 

3 
c 


ft) 
u 

c 
ft) 

$ 

12 
"o 

ft) 
en 

3 
O 

X 


1 


12 
24 
44 
35 
8 
18 
42 
.... 
















11 

82 
61 
48 








•9. 


32 

60 

18 

"49 

23 


23 

11 

6 

28 


18 
8 
4 

31 








31 
24 
23 








3 














4 














5 














6 








19 
29 
30 
14 

28 
47 
28 
26 


36 
68 
66 
44 

72 








7 


10 
17 

7 
33 
32 

8 
19 


16 

16 

7 

11 

32 
7 

22 














8 














9 














10 








37 






11 


15 

43 
22 
32 
6 
34 
34 
21 
11 
11 
34 

"32 
27 

"24 
19 
16 
12 
22 
11 
16 
12 
36 

'■ '9 

"ll 
11 
24 
13 

"29 
16 
16 


35 
34 












12 








46 
79 

22 
94 
47 

57 








13 














14 














15 


32 
15 

30 

16 


18 
8 

14 

10 

10 

5 


17 
7 

13 
12 
11 
10 








32 
17 
27 
20 
31 

9 

5 
21 
20 
22 
19 
31 
14 
14 
11 
24 
28 
14 
15 
20 
22 
19 
22 
13 

9 
10 

4 
31 
18 
26 
30 
12 
14 
45 
28 

31 
36 
39 
31 
26 
24 








16 














17 














18 














19 








73 
50 
11 
34 
31 
46 
76 
58 
24 
53 
16 
59 
85 
42 
56 
50 
36 
36 
53 
37 
9 

57 
11 
87 
124 
42 
75 
16 
52 
111 
105 
34 
47 
60 
73 
86 
26 
45 








20 














21 














22 




















23 .. 


20 
2 

19 
45 


2 
4 

18 
7 


4 

4 

18 

6 














24 














25 














26 .. 














27 














28 


13 


20 


20 














29 














30 


17 

28 

16 
20 


14 
21 
16 
18 
13 


6 
14 

8 
17 
11 














31 














32 














33 














34 














35 














36 .. 


32 
36 
13 
9 
10 


4 

14 

9 


4 

5 
6 














37 .. 














38 














39 














40 


22 


20 














41 














42 


27 
14 
25 
21 


28 
7 
9 

16 


22 
7 
8 

16 














43 


75 


75 


75 








44 








45 














46 














47 


14 


12 


12 














48 








92 






49 


23 
22 

"24 
60 

"8 


22 

""l8 
19 
20 

"26 
20 


24 
4 
9 

18 
15 
23 


20 
9 
9 
20 
22 
21 












50 














.51 














52 














53 














54 














55 














56 


13 


18 















146 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number of 
Pupils from — 




W V 








T3 CU • 








£- c 


+j 






Continuation 








>> 

J? CU 


dmitte 
st Tim 
d'y Scr 


"o 
o 


o 
o 


*o " 
2 


r Sect' 
e Cont 
trict 


CU'C 

."HE 


c 

3 
O 

r ) M 
.Si 

c c 
.2,U 


m 

cu 


Schools 


mber o 
the Rol 
ar 




CO 




mber A 

the Fir 

a Secon 


u 


J3 
o 
t75 J-H 

u 

% 6 


ddle Scl 
per Sch 

l. Sec. o 
ming th 
too! Dis 


c . 

3 C 


o 

ctf 

u 

cu 

J3 




3 - CU 


O 


.-. 


> E 


-> u ^ 


o o 


O O 


*3 ' 


* Ti IsTi 


o o 


"° u 






2 o> 


03 


o 


<< 


£-.22 


H-!fc 


Jfe 


§ D 


UU 


< b 


o 


57 Ennismore 


50 


25 


25 


42 


16 


18 


12 


20 .. 


10 


32 


8 




58 Erin 


51 
50 


17 

20 


34 
30 


43 
41 


19 
17 


16 
18 


10 

12 


25 .. 
17 


24 
3 47 


26 

3 


1 




59 Espanola 

60 Fairbank 

61 Fenelon Falls . . 




49 


23 


26 


40 


40 


40 


9 




44 


5 






91 


37 


54 


85 


31 


36 


16 


39 .. 


59 


30 


2 




62 Fen wick 


43 


15 


28 


39 


19 


20 


13 


.10 .. 


17 


24 


2 




63 Feversham .... 


14 


7 


7 


13 


8 


8 


6 




8 


6 






113 
44 


55 
16 


58 
28 


96 

39 


44 
17 


46 

17 


22 
15 


45 .. 
12 .. 


28 
11 


85 
32 






65 Fingal 




1 


66 Florence 


25 


12 


13 


24 


10 


6 


19 




9 


9 


7 




67 Fordwich 

68 Frankford 


50 


21 


29 


43 


11 


12 


17 


21 . . 


21 


?9 






86 


36 


50 


72 


31 


31 


19 


36 .. 


25 


19 


42 




69 Gore Bay 


71 


28 


43 


62 


20 


22 


18 


31 .. 


41 


28 




2 


70 Grand Valley . . 

71 Haliburton. . . . 

72 Hallville 


86 


31 


55 


77 


33 


35 


11 


40 . . 


84 


2 






16 


6 


10 


13 


6 


8 


6 


2 . . 


15 






1 


64 


28 


36 


54 


19 


19 


18 


27 .. 


44 


12 


7 


1 


73 Harrow 

74 Havelock 


64 


34 


30 


41 


30 


31 


11 


22 . . 


41 


23 






59 


23 


36 


39 


26 


26 


11 


22 .. 


35 


21 


3 




75 Hensall 

76 Hepworth 

77 Highgate 

78 Holstein 

79 Ilderton 

80 Inglewood 

81 Iroquois Falls . . 


58 


25 


33 


52 


19 


19 


17 


22 . . 


58 








14 


9 


5 


12 


6 


6 


8 




12 


2 






60 


35 


25 


43 


13 


15 


23 


22 . . 


18 


42 






44 


22 


22 


40 


19 


19 


9 


16 . . 


23 


21 






40 


17 


23 


34 


11 


11 


11 


18 . . 


4 


36 






48 


22 


26 


40 


21 


22 


13 


13 . . 


25 


23 






56 


26 


30 


47 


23 


23 


12 


21 .. 


43 


11 


2 




82 Islington 


26 


16 


10 


21 


17 


17 


9 




25 




1 




83 Janetville 

84 Jarvis 


19 


7 


12 


18 


10 


10 


9 




6 


i3 






41 
12 


11 
6 


30 
6 


37 
11 


20 

7 


20 
12 


21 




16 

8 


22 

4 


3 




85 Jockvale 

86 Kars 




63 
51 

48 


16 
22 


47 
29 


56 
46 


17 

22 


17 

22 


13 
9 


33 .. 
20 . . 


22 
50 


40 
1 


1 




87 Keewatin 

88 Kenmore 




25 


23 


44 


12 


13 


14 


21 .. 


17 


28 


3 




89 Kinburn 


65 


25 


40 


55 


23 


23 


16 


26 .. 


26 


38 


1 




90 Kinmount 


23 


8 


15 


19 


11 


12 


11 




11 


3 


9 




91 Kirkland Lake. 

92 Lambeth 


40 

48 


24 
19 


16 
29 


29 


24 


26 


14 




40 








41 


16 


16 


11 


21 .. 


19 


29 




. . . 


93 Lanark 


76 


24 


52 


63 


16 


15 


28 


33 .. 


40 


35 


i 




94 Lansdowne .... 

95 Laurel 


58 
14 


22 

5 


36 
9 


34 


25 


24 


10 


24 


33 


25 






12 


6 


8 


6 




6 


7 




1 


96 Lefroy 

97 Lion's Head . . . 


34 
31 


10 
15 


24 
16 


29 


18 


18 


16 




31 


3 






24 


22 


23 


8 




17 


14 










98 Little Britain . . 

99 Little Current.. 


32 
47 


15 

18 


17 
29 


31 
37 


32 


18 


14 




9 


23 






16 


15 


20 


12 .. 


43 


4 










100 T nhn 


42 
71 


18 
38 


24 
33 


27 
54 


9 

36 


10 
37 


8 
16 


24 .. 
18 .. 


15 
60 


27 
11 






101 Long Branch . . . 










102 Lucknow 


97 


34 


63 


85 


35 


35 


33 


29 . . 


35 


33 


29 




103 Lynden 


31 


12 


19 


26 


13 


14 


7 


10 . . 


15 


16 










104 Lyndhurst 


48 


20 


28 


39 


11 


15 


14 


19 .. 


25 


23 










105 Malakoff 


16 


12 


4 


12 


3 


3 


7 


6 . . 


15 


1 










106 Mallorytown . . . 


39 


12 


27 


32 


13 


13 


18 


8 . . 


18 


21 










107 Manitowaning . 


33 


10 


23 


22 


13 


13 


8 


12 . . 


9 


23 




1 


108 Manotick 


49 


8 


41 


42 


16 


18 


11 


20 . . 


16 


33 










109 Marmora 


77 


37 


40 


65 


30 


30 


21 


20 


6 49 


25 


3 




110 Massey 


32 


13 


19 


30 


9 


8 


14 


10 . . 


30 




1 


1 


Ill Maxville 


119 


47 


72 


99 


34 


34 


29 


56 . . 


42 


47 


30 




112 Melbourne 


61 


21 


40 


54 


28 


28 


10 


23 .. 


21 


34 


6 


... 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



147 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below 


No. of Pupils in the Various Subjects 


S 

£ 
£ 
o 
U 


2 

3 

"3 

# o 

& 

< 


£ G 3 

JQU 


fcJO 

G 

CD 

H 


en 

<y 

XI 

In 

H 
.a 


en 

g 

Ofl O 

3 a 
2 3 

oj 

JO 


en 

G 

.2 

Oj 

a 
3 


O 

u 

0) 
-G 
+-» 
O 


g 
.2 

3 1« 
a 

-G 3 

£0 


u 

a! 

s 

£ 

oj 

O 

J! 
en 

*ti 

G 

u 


KB 

££ 

"Sd g 

G O 

td*+3 


u 

3 

«J 
u 

<v 

.S2 
Ho 

G 

w 


u 



en 

£ 

c 
'•& 

G 

a 
U 


>> 

u 



en 

s 

Xi 

.2 

"C 

CQ 


S7 


1 


49 
36 










1 
1 


' 1 


20 


50 

51 


50 
51 


15 

17 


17 


58 


1 




10 


1 


16 


S9 


5 
10 


3 
2 






29 
21 


6 

3 


7 
9 


' 1 


3 

7 


50 
49 


50 
49 


18 
40 


16 


60 


1 


2 




61 


15 


34 


4 




12 


6 


11 


9 


5 


91 


91 


35 


24 


6? 


3 
4 

7 


31 

9 

85 






4 




1 


4 


13 

8 

20 


43 

14 

113 


43 

14 

113 


21 

8 

46 


9 


6S 


1 
3 






64 




9 


2 


7 




24 


65 


2 


28 


1 




3 


2 


7 


1 


4 


44 


44 


17 


7 


66 


7 


16 
39 


1 








1 






25 
50 


25 
50 


6 
15 




67 




4 


6 


1 


11 


21 


68 


2 
12 


61 
21 






5 
10 


9 
13 


6 
9 


3 
2 


7 
6 


86 
71 


86 
71 


33 
23 


19 


69 


3 


1 


25 


70 


"l 
10 
13 


55 

2 

44 

29 


1 




10 

1 


20 
6 

10 
6 






37 


86 
16 
64 
64 


86 
16 
64 
64 


36 

8 

19 

31 


29 


71 


6 




2 


7? 








30 


17 


73 


1 




8 


4 


3 


10 


74 


10 

9 


18 
24 


1 
2 




27 
9 


3 
6 






10 
6 


59 

57 


59 

57 


26 
19 


12 


75 


8 




16 


76 


"*3 
3 


12 

45 
33 








2 
4 








12 

57 
44 


12 
60 
44 


4 
15 
21 




77 


1 
1 




1 
3 


6 

4 






14 


78 




23 


10 


79 


"5 


37 
18 


1 
1 






1 

13 


1 

7 


""2 


6 
15 


40 

48 


40 

48 


12 

22 


4 


80 




2 


4 


81 


5 


2 




2 


36 


3 


7 


1 


35 


56 


56 


31 


8 


82 


2 


6 


1 


1 


5 


3 


6 


2 




26 


26 


26 




83 


"0 

"9 
2 
2 
4 
4 
9 
1 
6 


16 
27 
12 
40 
2 
33 
57 
13 








1 

4 


"2 


2 


""21 


19 
41 
12 
63 
51 
48 
65 
23 
40 
47 
76 


19 
41 
12 
63 
51 
48 
65 
23 
40 
48 
76 


10 
20 
7 
20 
22 
13 
23 
11 
36 
16 
16 




84 






2 




85 








86 






12 
11 
4 
2 
1 
9 
3 
6 


""32 

7 

2 

4 

20 

5 


2 
4 






23 


87 








31 


15 


88 


2 




21 


89 






12 

5 
27 
27 

4 


10 


90 






1 

2 

6 

18 


"2 
1 




91 








92 


36 
36 






15 


93 


4 




23 


94 


18 


32 
13 

23 


2 




5 


1 






4 


58 
13 
34 
31 
32 


58 
13 
34 
31 
32 


26 
7 
18 
25 
18 


19 


95 


1 

6 

24 

1 






96 








5 
3 




16 

10 

3 




97 






4 
3 




98 




26 


1 


1 




99 


7 


9 


1 




9 


8 


8 


5 


14 


47 


47 


19 


5 


100 


1 
41 


36 

1 








2 
6 


2 
6 


1 

2 


4 


42 
71 


42 

71 


12 

37 


17 


101 


1 


2 


12 


12 


102 


17 


62 


1 




14 


1 


2 




29 


97 


97 


39 


19 


103 


6 
4 

"2 

2 

2 

21 

9 

13 


19 
35 
16 
37 
19 
36 
27 
8 
88 








4 
3 


2 
3 




2 

3 

2 


31 
48 
13 
39 
22 
49 
77 
32 
119 


31 
48 
10 
39 
22 
49 
77 
32 
119 


14 
19 

3 
13 

8 
20 
30 

8 
40 


8 


104 






3 


19 


105 






3 


106 














18 
6 


6 


107 






3 
6 
3 

7 


1 

1 

22 

3 


7 
4 


1 


12 


108 






19 


109 


4 
2 

8 






9 


6 


110 


9 

3 




23 


111 




6 


34 


112 


5 


42 






1 


3 


10 






60 


60 


31 


8 



148 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number 


of Pup 


Is in th 


e Various Subjects (Continued) 


Continuation Schools 


u 
O 
«> 

s 

c 
.22 
'o 
c 

< 


a 

a3 
u 
tut) 
O 

a> 

o 


a 

03 

So 
p g 
'55 

XI 

Oh 


c 

03 C 

1 2 

x « 


oS 
u 
Xl 
<u 
bio 

< 


u 

s 



<v 




0) 

S 

a 



H 


x 

c 
<u 
u 


.5 
"03 


57 Ennismore 


16 
8 
8 


"'"l7 
23 
40 
34 
20 

8 
46 
17 

6 

12 
31 
22 
37 

9 

""hi 

26 
19 

4 
15 
19 
11 
22 

2 
26 
10 
20 

8 
17 
22 
13 
23 
11 


12 

10 

8 

9 

20 

14 

6 

22 

14 

17 

17 

20 

22 

6 

5 

18 
11 
11 
20 
8 
23 
11 
12 
13 
37 

"9 
21 

4 
13 

9 
14 
16 
11 

4 
11 
26 
10 

7 
16 
11 
14 
21 

5 

16 
33 

7 
14 

7 
18 

9 
12 
20 
14 
26 

9 


12 
10 
15 

9 
19 
13 

6 
25 
16 
18 
17 
25 
24 
11 

5 

18 
11 
14 
20 

8 
15 
13 
13 
14 
12 

9 

9 
21 

4 
21 

9 

14 
20 
12 
12 
11 
26 
10 

6 

15 
14 
14 
24 

"is 

34 

7 

18 

7 

18 

9 

12 

21 

17 

30 

15 


28 
35 
32 
40 
67 
29 

8 
80 
25 

9 
24 
61 
55 
60 
16 
42 
43 
36 
16 

4 
51 
27 
20 
35 
39 
17 
10 
20 

8 
44 
39 
34 
10 
13 

""33 
40 
38 

7 

18 
23 
18 
24 
23 
50 
62 
19 
34 

6 
17 
19 
37 
44 
18 
61 
46 


24 
21 
24 

9 
42 
21 

6 
58 
18 
17 
33 
49 
44 
40 

8 
42 
25 
19 
17 

8 
29 
14 
20 
35 
26 

9 

9 
21 

4 
42 
17 
20 
11 
10 
40 
20 
42 
23 

6 

16 
11 
14 
24 
27 
27 
61 
16 
33 
11 
22 
15 
27 
37 
23 
71 
30 


"4 
"4 


23 
26 
31 
49 
54 
30 
14 
77 
28 
22 
32 
62 
40 
52 


22 


58 Erin 


23 


59 Espanola 


31 


60 Fairbank 


42 


61 Fenelon Falls 


30 
10 


56 


62 Fenwick 


22 


63 Feversham 


12 


64 Finch .... 


24 
5 


75 


65 Fingal 


28 


66 Florence. ... .... 


20 


67 Fordwich. ... .... 


14 
33 
22 
33 

2 
22 

9 
13 
13 


27 


68 Frankford 


56 


69 Gore Bay .... .... 


37 


70 Grand Valley 


52 


71 Haliburton 


8 


72 Hallville 


5 


50 
50 
37 
32 
12 
31 
30 
29 
34 
50 
26 
19 
35 
12 
44 
45 
40 
26 
17 
40 
17 
43 
47 
13 
30 
23 
32 
23 
13 
61 
62 
28 
24 
8 
35 
16 
42 
51 
21 
86 
49 


40 


73 Harrow .... 


46 


74 Havelock. ... .... 


35 


75 Hensall 


37 


76 Hepworth 


12 


77 Highgate 


16 

9 

8 

12 

17 


34 


78 Holstein 


30 


79 Ilderton 


28 


80 Inglewood 


31 


81 Iroquois Falls 


45 


82 Islington. . 


25 


83 Janetville. 




19 


84 Jarvis. ... .... 




29 


85 Jockvale. . 




12 


86 Kars 


27 
10 
12 
18 


49 


87 Keewatin ... 


32 


88 Kenmore. ... 


35 


89 Kinburn. . .... 


26 


90 Kinmount. . ... 


16 


91 Kirkland Lake 




40 


92 Lambeth .... .... 


11 
15 
16 


16 

16 

25 

6 

18 
23 
20 
16 
15 
37 
35 
14 
15 

2 
13 

8 
19 
33 

8 
35 
18 


24 


93 Lanark 


37 


94 Lansdowne . . 


46 


95 Laurel. 


12 


96 Lef roy ... 




30 


97 Lion's Head. . ... 




25 


98 Little Britain 




29 


99 Little Current . . .... 


9 

19 

7 

21 

10 

18 

3 

4 

8 

14 

11 

10 

40 

11 


24 


100 Lobo .... 


24 


101 Long Branch . 


61 


102 Lucknow 


66 


103 Lynden . 


22 


104 Lyndhurst 


24 


105 Malakoff 


7 


106 Mallorytown . 


24 


107 Manitowaning . 


14 


108 Manotick 


40 


109 Marmora 


49 


110 Massey . ... 


22 


Ill Maxville 


76 


112 Melbourne 


49 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



149 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 







Ni 


imber of Pupils in the Various Subjects 


(Continued) 








1 

"o 
o 

N 


c 

O 
CO 


u 

CO 

6 

.3 

u 


to 

*53 

a* 


C 

'a 

<u 

J* 
O 
O 

PQ 


a 
c 

CD 

ft 


b/0 

a> 

a 
>> 

H 


u 

< 


V 

u 

3 

-M 
"3 
(J 

IS 

"co 

>> 

Oh 


CD 
U 

3 



< 


bo 

.£ 

!s 

"c3 

u 

H 

3 
c 

03 




c 

"3 

<u 

CO 

3 
O 

X 


57 


30 

"9 

9 

14 

"0 
22 
31 
15 
17 
20 
15 
7 
13 

"ii 
11 

17 

"23 
11 
10 
35 
38 

"i9 
22 
12 

"15 

23 

40 

8 

24 

33 

1 

3 

29 

14 

20 

34 
20 

"j 

28 
20 
29 
44 

"28 


1 

27 

12 

. 40 

"20 

8 

46 

"8 
16 
31 

27 
37 

37 

31 
26 
19 
12 
16 
20 
12 

"2 
26 


17 

7 
12 


18 

18 

9 








18 

25 

43 
34 
21 

47 
17 

7 

12 
26 
24 

8 

8 

19 
31 
36 
19 
12 
41 

9 
12 
22 
38 
17 
10 
20 

8 
19 

""'13 
26 
15 
40 


49 
51 

5C 
49 

89 

42 








58 














59 


12 












60 






""38 


19 


21 


61 


28 
9 


34 
2 










62 












63 














64 


38 
5 


33 
9 








113 
44 

25 








65 














66 














67 


12 
30 
19 
30 
2 
25 
12 
12 
18 


11 
33 
26 
32 
2 
25 
10 
13 
10 














68 








86 
70 
91 








69 














70 














71 














72 








64 
64 
59 
57 
12 
60 
44 
40 
48 
56 
26 
19 
41 
12 






18 


73 














74 














75 














76 














77 


12 
10 
11 
8 
11 


13 
10 

7 
10 
12 














78 














79 














80 














81 


35 












82 










5 


83 


















84 


20 


















85 


















86 


30 

31 

27 
25 


26 
13 
12 
21 


24 
12 
12 
16 














87 


22 




25 


51 
48 
65 
23 
40 
45 
76 
58 
13 
34 








88 








89 














90 














91 




















92 


19 
14 

"n 

31 
4 
32 
20 
12 
37 
38 

"29 

"i 

20 
42 
35 


8 
19 
14 


19 
15 
11 














93 








43 
27 
13 
18 
29 
30 
16 
15 
37 
39 
14 
29 

2 

12 
12 
18 
25 

8 
40 
16 








94 














95 














96 


















97 


















98 












32 
47 
42 
71 
97 
31 
48 
16 
39 
24 
49 
77 
32 

60l 








99 


7 

15 

11 

29 

2 

19 

4 

4 

7 

11 

9 

10 

25 

12 


4 

17 

13 

25 

10 

19 

4 

5 

8 

13 

11 

9 

23 

15 














100 














101 














102 














103 














104 














105 












3 


106 














107 














108 














109 














110 














111 














112 






1 









6 D.E. 



150 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, 



CONTINUATION 

PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



Continuation 
Schools 



Attendance 



o o 



o 



O 



o 

c 

> s 
<< 



< 



S13 



o q 



Number of 
Pupils in — 



*-• — 

* u 

O O 



o 
o 

V 

<v a 
£ C 
o o 



Number of 
Pupils from- 



Mi 

ox. 22 

r^ C r-i 



c . 

o o 

UU 



c 

3 
O 
r \ v> 

.Si 

C C 

4) 3 

.2.CJ 
< o 



113 Merlin 

114 Merrickville . . . 

115 Metcalfe 

116 Millbrook 

117 Milverton 

118 Mindemoya 

119 Minden 

120 Minesing 

121 Morriston 

122 Mount Albert.. 

123 Mount Brydges 

124 Mount Elgin... 

125 Navan 

126 New Dundee.. . 

127 New Hamburg. 

128 North Augusta . 

129 North Gower. . . 

130 Odessa 

131 Oil Springs. . . . 

132 Onondaga 

133 Orono 

134 Otterville 

135 Paisley 

136 Pakenham 

137 Palmerston .... 

138 Pickering 

139 Plattsville 

140 Port Burwell . . . 

141 Port Carling. . . 

142 Port Credit .... 

143 Powassan 

144 Princeton 

145 Rainy River . . . 

146 Richard's L'd'g. 

147 Richmond 

148 Ridgeway 

149 Ripley 

150 Rockwood 

151 Rodney 

152 Russell 

153 St. George 

154 Schomberg. . . . 

155 Schreiber 

156 Scotland 

157 Seely's Bay.. . . 

158 Selkirk 

159 Singhampton. . . 

160 Southampton . . 

161 South Mountain 

162 SouthPorcupine 

163 South River. . . 

164 Sparta 

165 Spencerville 

166 Springfield 

167 Sprucedale 

1 68 Stayner 



75 


29 


46 


64 


22 


42 


39 


16 


23 


94 


46 


48 


83 


45 


38 


35 


13 


22 


31 


9 


22 


24 


6 


18 


15 


9 


6 


50 


15 


35 


62 


26 


36 


33 


11 


22 


33 


9 


24 


14 


7 


•7 


57 


30 


27 


52 


22 


30 


49 


17 


32 


54 


21 


33 


35 


9 


26 


11 


1 


10 


82 


37 


45 


23 


16 


7 


88 


36 


52 


45 


17 


28 


^>3 


40 


43 


38 


11 


27 


51 


30 


21 


38 


15 


23 


25 


5 


20 


103 


39 


64 


67 


21 


46 


35 


11 


24 


56 


18 


38 


25 


10 


15 


62 


20 


42 


85 


36 


49 


93 


44 


49 


33 


10 


23 


96 


45 


51 


44 


23 


21 


58 


17 


41 


20 


10 


10 


75 


27 


48 


42 


20 


22 


16 


6 


10 


67 


25 


42 


12 


7 


5 


51 


19 


32 


52 


26 


26 


37 


19 


18 


13 


9 


4 


25 


13 


12 


79 


26 


53 


45 


21 


24 


56 


19 


37 


108 


I 44 


64 



31 



42 


1 


20 




22 




9 




19 




22 




16 




25 




13 









75 
48 
18 
45 
34 
13 
11 

8 
15 
35 
50 
11 
33 

6 
39 
19 
24 
17 
25 
11 
29 
16 
44 
40 
54 
20 
15 
30 
18 
41 
33 
32 
56 
23 
21 
40 
28 
17 
55 
34 
47 
12 
75 
15 
10 
23 

7 
45 
14 
36 
13 
22 
28 
23 
17 
53 



2 

41 

45 

65 

16 

25 

8 

5 

6 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



151 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 





Number of Pupils from Families whose 




Number of Pupils in the Various 






Head is occupied as below 










Subjects 




o 

u 

£ 

E 
o 
U 


U 

3 

.2 

bo 

< 


3 -^ 

^>> 
— ^— > »— 1 

£ C 3 


c 
03 


U3 

-a 
H 

H 


en 

c 

bO 

,£) 
JO 


en 

3 

.2 

o3 

a 
3 


O 
u 
<u 

O 


a 

.2 

3 rt 
a 

-3 3 

ti <•> 


u 

a 

S 
S 

03 
u 

O 

3 


.J- <-> 

as 

§•8 

•S c 
.2 «5 

"bfl c 
3 
W43 


u 

3 

u 
_cn 

*ti 

3 
W 


u 



en 

s 

3 

.2 
H3 

cd 

3 
03 

u 




CO 

s 

+■> 

'C 

CQ 


in 


4 
8 


58 
31 








9 
6 


4 


"5 


12 

18 


7 = 
64 


75 
64 


33 
21 


13 


114 


2 




12 


16 


lis 


7 
15 


30 
59 


2 
3 












1 
9 


35 

72 


39 
68 


14 
26 


8 


116 




7 


6 


4 




23 


117 


8 


51 


4 


2 


12 


4 




2 




8^ 


83 


34 


23 


118 


4 


29 


2 












9 


35 


35 


11 


11 


119 


"2 

5 


24 
19 

4 
24 


3 








4 

2 
1 




7 


31 
24 
15 
5C 


31 
24 
15 
50 


15 
16 


6 


PO 




1 

2 
9 


2 
3 

5 




171 


1 

5 


"i 


2 
1 


15 




122 


21 


7 


123 


3 


46 


1 


2 


3 


3 


3 


1 


15 


62 


62 


27 


10 


1?4 


2 

"i2 


23 
29 
12 
18 


3 




1 


4 

2 
1 
9 






10 

2 
2 


33 
33 
14 
57 


33 
33 
14 

57 


10 

5 

7 

17 


7 


1?S 


2 




9 


1?6 






1 

7 




127 


1 


1 


4 


5 


20 


1?8 


2 
6 

"4 


43 
35 
44 
11 


1 
3 
1 
3 




6 








13 

8 

13 

10 


52 
24 
54 
35 


52 
24 
54 
35 


16 
14 
19 
12 


13 


1?Q 


1 
1 
1 


4 




14 


1S0 




8 
5 


10 


131 


11 




6 


13? 


"*3 


9 
62 










2 
5 




3 
21 


11 
82 


11 
82 


8 
31 




133 


2 




6 


4 


34 


134 


2 
2 


13 
45 


1 
6 




4 
10 


3 

25 








23 
88 


23 
88 


11 

24 




135 






28 


27 


136 


4 


30 


1 




1 


5 


3 


1 




45 


45 


15 


13 


137 


6 


28 


2 




19 


27 


1 




8 


83 


83 


37 


15 


138 


4 
1 


22 
36 


2 
2 




8 

7 


2 
2 






9 
15 


38 
51 


38 
51 


19 
10 


7 


139 


3 




17 


140 


10 


8 


2 




2 


10 


5 


1 


18 


38 


38 


7 


7 


141 


3 
25 


9 
34 






6 
15 


7 
9 






2 
25 


25 
103 


25 
103 


12 

47 


5 


142 


7 




9 


1 


16 


143 


20 


32 


3 




5 


7 








54 


54 


11 


23 


144 


2 
11 


24 
16 






4 
6 


2 
16 


3 
6 




6 

5 


35 
51 


35 
51 


13 

20 


10 


145 


1 




15 


146 


3 
6 


13 
41 






2 
6 


2 
3 


4 
1 


1 


""36 


25 
55 


25 
55 


12 
19 


9 


147 


5 




17 


148 


17 


41 


2 




13 


5 


2 


5 


13 


85 


85 


37 


22 


149 


14 

7 
8 


68 
17 
49 


1 

2 
3 




5 
6 
9 


5 
1 
8 






1 
10 
17 


85 
32 
96 


83 
32 
96 


30 
23 
36 


17 


150 








151 


10 


9 


32 


152 


5 

2 


18 
34 
14 


2 






10 

4 

1 


14 




8 

18 
13 


44 
58 
20 
75 
42 


44 
58 

20 
75 
42 


17 
20 
13 
53 
11 


10 


153 




15 
1 

73 
3 


18 


154 


2 
2 
4 










155 






8 


156 


4 


26 


1 


4 




5 


9 


157 


1 
4 
1 


10 
44 
10 

7 


1 
4 




2 

2 

1 

29 


2 
13 








16 
67 
12 
51 


16 
67 
12 
51 


12 
32 
11 

25 




158 






46 

1 

12 


13 


159 








160 


5 




8 


2 




11 


161 


"4 
4 

*4 


40 
2 
1 
20 
57 
32 


5 








7 
13 




4 


52 
37 
13 
25 
79 
45 


52 
37 
13 
25 
79 
45 


18 

13 
8 

10 
28 
17 


20 


162 




12 
1 


6 

7 


23 


163 








1 




164 


2 

5 




3 






165 




17 

3 






14 
12 


17 


166 


3 




3 


4 


167 


3 
22 


17 

53 








20 
6 


16 
17 




17 
42 


56 
108 


56 
108 


17 
30 


16 


168 


2 




8 


24 



152 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 


Continuation Schools 


u 

o 

+-> 

CO 

s 

'u 
C 

< 


>> 

a 

bo 

o 

o 


a 

bfl 

.2 
*55 
>> 

43 

fa 


-a 

G 

a a 

O.S 

6 3 


u 

42 
<L> 

bo 

< 


u 

E 
o 

o 


c 
o 
c 
o 
ba 

u 

H 


43 
o 
c 
■ <u 
u 
fa 


-J 


113 Merlin 


16 
21 
9 
18 
27 
14 
11 


33 
21 
15 
22 
16 
8 

" "l5 

6 

20 

27 

10 

5 

7 

17 
16 
14 
17 
8 
8 
30 
11 
24 
23 
35 
19 
10 
7 
15 
45 
11 
13 
19 
12 
16 
37 
27 
23 
36 
14 
16 
10 
51 
14 
15 
••■••• 

24 
16 
12 
8 
10 
28 
17 
40 
30 


12 

18 

13 

30 

16 

13 

5 

9 

15 

16 

15 

10 

10 

7 

18 

13 

12 

11 

9 

3 

22 

12 

28 

10 

13 

10 

15 

19 

4 

26 

16 

6 

15 

4 

14 

13 

22 

10 

17 

12 

16 

10 

15 

8 

4 

15 

1 

11 

11 

13 

5 

14 
22 
12 
23 
42 


' 21 
13 
29 
19 
13 
17 

8 
12 
16 
16 
10 
11 

7 
18 
13 
12 
12 
11 

3 
21 
12 
28 
10 
19 

8 
15 
20 
10 
29 
17 

6 
18 

5 

14 
13 
24 
10 
17 
12 
18 
10 

""l3 

4 

15 

1 

11 

30 

11 

5 

15 

22 

13 

20 

42 


45 

36 

28 

37 

58 

20 

23 

16 

6 

20 

27 

8 

11 

7 

35 

26 

12 

35 

17 

8 

54 

11 

44 

22 

48 

24 

36 

9 

21 

85 

18 

30 

35 

20 

36 

58 

50 

23 

24 

34 

30 

10 

60 

14 

12 

17 

11 

46 

23 

32 

8 

10 

29 

26 

14 

98 


25 
31 
22 
50 
42 
26 
13 

8 

9 
24 
15 

5 
13 

7 
36 
12 
35 
23 
19 

3 
46 
12 
49 
21 
31 
18 
17 
18 

7 
41 
31 
17 
28 
13 
35 
43 
51 
10 
28 
28 
32 
10 
19 
24 

4 
19 

1 
19 
20 

3 

5 

14 
33 
23 
15 
96 




42 
31 
30 
75 
62 
17 
19 
24 
15 
26 
40 


37 


114 Merrickville 


24 


115 Metcalfe 


30 


116 Millbrook 


57 


117 Milverton. . . . 


73 


118 Mindemoya. . . . 


13 


119 Minden 


13 


120 Minesing 


24 


121 Morriston. . . . 




15 


122 Mount Albert 

123 Mount Brydges 

124 Mount Elgin 

125 Navan 


8 
11 

1 
16 


31 
46 


"i 


6 
11 
46 
32 
21 
39 
33 
11 
47 
23 
43 
41 
40 
28 
51 
32 

8 
94 
32 
30 
32 
18 
30 
68 
54 
33 
15 
21 
45 
11 
62 
23 
15 
40 
12 
35 
32 
34 
13 
20 
11 
32 
40 
861 


5 


126 New Dundee 


12 


127 New Hamburg 

128 North Augusta 

129 North Gower. . 


14 
10 


45 
34 
21 


130 Odessa 


10 
9 


30 


131 Oil Springs 


33 


132 Onondaga 


10 


133 Orono 


23 


46 


134 Otterville.... 


23 


135 Paisley 


26 
14 
29 

9 

8 
12 

6 
20 
23 
10 
14 

7 
22 
22 
28 


37 


136 Pakenham 


32 


137 Palmerston 


50 


138 Pickering 


21 


139 Plattsville 


50 


140 Port Burwell 


26 


141 Port Carling 


10 


142 Port Credit 


87 


143 Powassan 

144 Princeton 


33 
31 


145 Rainy River 


28 


146 Richard's Landing. . . . 

147 Richmond 


19 
26 


148 Ridgeway 


33 


149 Ripley 


63 


150 Rockwood 


25 


151 Rodney 


23 
12 
12 


14 


152 Russell 


20 


153 St. George 

154 Schomberg 


48 
9 


155 Schreiber 


7 
10 


45 


156 Scotland 


21 


157 Seeley's Bay 


14 


158 Selkirk 


7 


31 


159 Singhampton 


12 


160 Southampton 

161 South Mountain 

162 South Porcupine 

163 South River 


11 
17 

8 


32 
34 
37 
10 


164 Sparta 




13 


165 Spencerville 


16 

9 

39 

221 


8 


166 Springfield 


32 


167 Sprucedale 




168 Stayner 


89 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



153 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 



8 
1 

N 


c 
a 




u 

CO 

a 

cu 

u 


to 

'co 

Oh 


.5 

'2L 

cu 

CU 

J*A 

O 
O 

PQ 


a 
2 



c 
a> 


.5 

CU 

a 
>^ 
H 


< 


2 

3 

U 

"c3 

# o 
"53 

Cu 


<u 
u 

3 

-M 

< 


.5 

!s 

H 

"c3 
3 
c 
cd 


cu 

c 
.Si 
'u 

in 

12 


cu 

CO 

3 
O 

X 


113 


18 
13 
51 
15 
14 
19 
24 
15 
35 


45 
21 
12 
4 
34 
11 


16 

9 

9 

20 

24 

12 

8 


12 
19 

t 
24 
22 
12 

9 








45 
24 
15 
22 


75 
64 
39 
81 
83 
35 
31 
24 
15 
50 
62 
33 
33 
14 
57 
52 
49 
54 
35 








114 














1 1 S 














116 














117 














118 








16 
17 

23 








119 














PO 














1?1 




















p? 




8 

4 

5 

11 


8 

9 

7 








35 
27 
11 
5 
7 
18 
16 
14 
20 
13 
8 
30 
11 
21 
15 
38 
29 
10 
7 
1 
45 
15 
13 
14 
12 








v^ 














P4 


12 

9 

14 


10 














PS 














P6 














VI 




18 

13 

18 

7 

6 


16 
13 
17 
10 
8 








34 






P8 


13 
12 
32 
12 

"22 
23 
28 

"12 
10 
15 
1 
5 
25 
15 
10 
35 
16 
14 


16 
12 

10 

11 
30 












PQ 














no 














131 














H? 














ns 


24 


24 








82 
23 
88 
44 
S3 
38 
51 
38 
25 
103 
67 
35 
54 
25 
55 
84 
92 
33 
96 
44 
58 
20 








H4 














ns 


24 
13 

"i9 
10 
25 
16 
45 
12 
19 

"l6 


18 

12 

22 

6 

8 

11 

6 

18 

26 

13 

6 
22 
19 
24 


18 
13 
22 

7 
15 
10 

6 
15 
17 

5 
12 

6 
13 
18 
27 














P6 














137 








33 






138 












139 














140 












141 













142 










143 








1 


144 














145 














146 














147 














148 








37 
27 
23 
36 
16 
20 
10 
68 
14 
12 
32 
11 
24 


50 




50 


149 


22 
33 
17 
12 
18 
10 
67 

"4 

42 
12 
35 
11 
23 
5 
22 
19 
29 
40 
42 


28 










150 














151 


36 
14 
16 
10 

23 
13 


28 
18 
13 


15 
16 
13 














15? 






14 








1S3 












154 














155 


8 
11 


8 
10 














156 








42 
16 
67 
12 
51 
52 
37 
13 
25 
79 
45 
56 
108 








157 














158 


7 


14 














159 














160 


'"is 
"s 


12 
18 

5 


12 
12 

8 














161 














162 








13 

8 
19 

27 
18 

" "30 








163 














164 


















165 


26 

"2 
30 


33 

8 

15 

21 


33 

7 

16 

22 














166 














167 


56 


...H 








168 














154 



THE- REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 







Attendance 






Number of 
Pupils in — 




IN 
P 


umber of 
jpils from- 




Continuation 
Schools 


en rt 

°| 

<L — 

■9"o 

Z c 


o 




CD o3 
bJO-c 

> t-> 

<< 


<.b C 

, [Jh O 

1- u 

i CD O 


o 
o 

o 

W M 

CD p 

o o 


o 
u 

u 
0J £ 

£ V- 

O O 


o 
o 

"o 

en 
JH 


o 


u 

i_ 
<u 

a 
a 
O 


Ms 

U <L> £ 

c -^ .22 

• P o 

u o o 


§£ 

c . 

a c 
o o 


c 
c c 

y ° 


09 

(Li 
O 

03 
CU 
t- 

O 


169 Stella 


25 
17 
84 
66 
64 
82 
76 
61 
75 

107 
49 
71 

105 
70 
26 
71 
46 
84 
23 
94 
60 
78 
21 
56 
68 
91 
29 
10 
67 
43 


9 
8 
28 
28 
24 
26 
24 
27 
38 
54 
19 
34 
43 
27 
10 
30 
21 
33 
11 
38 
24 
33 
11 
25 
23 
35 
5 
2 
32 
19 


16 
9 
56 
38 
40 
56 
52 
34 
37 
53 
30 
37 
62 
43 
16 
41 
25 
51 
12 
56 
36 
45 
10 
31 
45 
56 
24 
8 
35 
24 


,8 
12 
70 
55 
58 
58 
62 
53 
64 
91 
44 
61 
91 
60 
23 
49 
39 
44 
20 
75 
51 
68 
18 
47 
59 
74 
23 
7 
62 
32 


8 
17 
29 
25 
26 
19 
24 
19 
28 
42 
23 
33 
41 
22 
14 
27 
23 
27 
14 
35 
24 
19 
12 
14 
16 
39 
19 

5 
29 

9 


8 
13 
32 
28 
26 
27 
24 
19 
29 
42 
23 
34 
42 
23 
15 
33 
26 
27 
14 
36 
26 
19 
12 
12 
16 
39 
19 

6 
30 
10 


5 

4 
21 
17 
18 
17 
19 
14 
22 
31 
10 
18 
24 
15 
11 
17 
16 
17 

9 
31 
15 
31 

9 
10 
20 
25 
10 

4 
15 

8 


12 




4 
7 
38 
38 
27 
53 
31 
22 
75 
48 
28 
33 
31 
18 
18 
34 
16 
68 
11 
94 
46 
49 
12 
33 
29 
49 
19 


19 
10 
40 
28 
37 
29 
39 
34 


2 




170 Stevensville . . . . 




171 Stouffville 

172 Sturgeon Falls. . 


31 
21 
20 
38 
33 
28 
24 
34 
16 
19 
39 
32 




5 


1 


173 Sunderland .... 






174 Sutton 






175 Tamworth 

176 Tara 


6 

5 




177 Tavistock 




178 Teeswater 


59 
17 
38 
68 
50 
7 
26 
30 

12 






179 Thamesford 

180 Thamesville. . . . 


4 




181 Thornbury 






182 Thorndale 

183 Thornton 


2 
11 


i 


184 Tilbury 

185 Tiverton 


21 

4 

40 






186 Tottenham .... 

187 Wales 


16 




188 Warkworth 


27 
19 

28 








189 Wellington 


14 
29 

9 
18 
31 
42 

8 
10 
41 
24 






190 West Lome... . 






191 Westmeath .... 






192 Westport 

193 do (r.c.s.s.). 

194 Wheatley 


34 
32 
26 


1 


5 
8 




195 Winona 


2 
"4 




196 Wolfe Island . . 








197 Woodville 

198 Wroxeter.. . . 


22 

25 




22 
19 










1 Totals, 1924-25. 

2 Totals, 1923-24. 


10545 
9,337 


4,275 
3,713 


6,270 
5,624 


8,772 
7,853 


3,964 
3,579 


4,049 
3,662 


2,895 
2,704 


3,571 
2,971 


30 


5,774 
5,145 


4,190 
3,635 


561 
493 


20 

64 


3 Increases 

4 Decreases 


1,208 


562 


646 


919 


385 


389 


191 


600 


30 


629 


555 


68 


44 






























5 Percentages .... 




40.54 


59.45 


83.19 


37.59 


38.40 


27.45 


33.86 


.28 


54.76 


39.73 


5.32 


19 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



155 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils in the Various 
Subjects 


4) 
iU 

u 

QJ 

s 

s 

o 

u 


U 

3 
*3 

o 

'C 
bfl 

< 


3 +J 

ao 
4 £ 

03 ^-C 

JQU 


u 


to 

<v 

H 

-3 


03 

bfl § 
'u rt 

3 a 
2 3 

Xl 
rt 

JO 


to 

3 
t g 

a 

u 




u 

a) 
,3 

O 


3 
_o 

3 «$ 

a 

-3 3 
i~! 

^5 


u 

s 

£ 

O 

"bo 


1 
"55 'C 



U 
jn C 

"bfl c 

fl 

W*3 


D 

u 

3 
<V 

-3 
to 

"tii 

3 


u 



3 

'*S 
a 
3 
a 
U 




CO 

X 

-3 

"C 


169 . . 


21 

6 
55 

7 
44 
36 
53 
40 
27 
59 
29 
50 
59 
59 
21 
28 
37 
50 
15 
72 
32 
36 

9 
26 
43 
50 
21 

6 
50 
32 






2 
2 
7 

19 
4 
8 
9 
1 

11 
9 


2 
5 
2 

12 
2 
3 
4 
5 

28 

11 
8 
2 

20 
1 






■ 


24 
17 
84 
66 
64 
82 
76 
51 
63 

107 
49 
71 

105 
70 
26 
71 
46 
80 
23 
85 
60 
75 
21 
56 
68 
91 
29 
9 
67 
43 


24 
17 
84 
66 
64 
82 
76 
49 
64 

107 
49 
71 

105 
70 
26 
71 
46 
80 
23 
84 
60 
75 
21 
56 
68 
91 
29 
9 
67 
43 


13 
13 
36 
28 
29 
20 
27 
19 
29 
42 
25 
34 
45 
23 
15 
33 
29 
28 
14 
37 
27 
27 
12 
12 
18 
37 
20 
6 
32 
11 


4 


170 1 

171 14 

172 16 

173 4 

174 10 
175 

176 11 

177 1 

178 10 

179 11 


1 

2 

"l 
3 
1 

2 
4 
2 


' 1 


2 
3 

10 
6 

22 
6 
1 
3 
6 
1 


i 
1 
3 

' '3 
1 
1 

10 


17 
7 
32 
13 
5 
7 
3 

14 
42 


"21 
16 
15 
27 
23 
20 
9 
19 
16 


180 11 


3 
4 


"2 


5 

19 
5 




51 
20 
19 

5 
35 

6 
17 

1 

8 
13 
20 


14 


181 1 






21 


182 


5 

2 

15 


' 1 
"4 


19 


183 1 


"2 

3 

13 

2 
6 


1 

"l 
1 




184 10 

185 .... 


7 
2 

18 
3 


9 


14 

5 


186 


3 

""3 
7 
24 
8 
4 
4 
11 
3 
1 
1 




24 


187 

188 7 

189 8 


1 
5 

12 
1 
1 

11 

""5 


1 


' 22 
20 


190 7 

191 2 


3 
3 


"l 

1 


7 

3 

9 
6 
3 

"9 


26 


192 6 

193 7 


2 
5 
4 


4 
2 

25 
8 
9 

10 


15 

27 


194 15 






17 


195 2 








196 

197 1 

198 4 


V "'2 

1 


1 

i 


2 
4 

5 




"l9 
10 














1 1,129 

2 982 


5,807 
• 5,132 


293 
220 


42 
62 


1,282 
1,083 


1,048 
901 


752 

774 


192 

183 


2,106 
2,106 


10,372 
9,214 


10,364 
9,215 


4,209 
3,828 


2,322 
2,052 


3 147 

4 


675 


73 


"20 


199 


147 


"22 


9 




1,158 


1,149 


381 


270 
























5 10.71 


55.07 


2.78 


.40 


12.15 


9.93 


7.13 


1.82 


19.97 


98.35 


98.28 


39.91 


22.02 



156 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

III. TABLE J— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Number 


of Pupils in th 


e Various Subjects (Continued) 


Continuation Schools 


>> 

o 
+-> 
en 

X 

G 

.Si 
'o 

c 

< 


>> 

a 

u 
bfl 

O 

o 


a 

bfl 

>> 
PL, 


T3 

c 

a3 C 

y.2 

£ 3 


03 

J3 

< 


u 
<v 
B 
o 




>> 

<D 

E 

o 
c 
o 

'u 

H 


J3 

o 

c 
<v 
u 


c 


169 Stella 


6 


8 
13 
33 
28 
26 
18 
26 
20 
29 
42 
25 
34 
42 
23 
17 
33 
39 
27 
14 
38 
26 
21 
11 

""ii 

37 
20 


"i 

22 
17 
19 
18 
18 
14 
15 
32 
10 
19 
24 
20 
11 
19 
14 
17 

9 
32 
14 
26 

8 
22 
20 
28 
10 

3 
15 

9 


4 

4 
22 
19 
20 
17 
22 
14 
17 
33 
10 
18 
24 
20 
10 
19 

3 
21 

9 
35 
15 
30 
10 
10 
20 
25 
10 

4 
14 
16 


18 
13 
48 
43 
42 
35 
42 
51 
39 
60 
31 
11 
105 
47 
15 
44 
31 
31 
14 
45 
40 
69 
11 
26 
35 
58 
21 
6 
31 
30 


,5 

4 
47 
33 
33 
31 
33 
33 
28 
59 
23 
12 
50 
27 
11 
31 
20 
23 

9 
51 
33 
52 

8 
25 
46 
40 

8 

3 
32 
25 


'.'."i 


13 
12 
69 
48 
43 
37 
38 
36 
33 
78 
32 
53 
76 
12 
22 
47 
36 
10 
23 
68 
60 
37 
17 
41 
51 
66 
6 
9 
48 
29 


15 


1 70 Stevensville 


9 


171 Stouffville 


26 
16 
14 
18 
25 
11 
8 
22 
19 
11 
22 
17 


65 


172 Sturgeon Falls 


23 


173 Sunderland 


35 


174 Sutton 


41 


175 Tamworth 


34 


176 Tara 


37 


177 Tavistock 


33 


178 Teeswater 


80 


179 Thamesford 

180 Thamesville 


33 
60 


181 Thornbury 


68 


182 Thorndale 


13 


183 Thornton. ... 


20 


184 Tilbury 


14 

5 

34 


47 


185 Tiverton 


36 


186 Tottenham 


12 


187 Wales.... 


20 


188 Warkworth 


7 

4 

23 


68 


189 Wellington 


57 


190 West Lome 


27 


191 Westmeath. . 


20 


192 Westport 


17 
18 
15 


34 


193 Westport (r.c.s.s.) 

194 Wheatley 


53 
70 


195 Winona .... 


24 


196 Wolfe Island 




9 


197 Woodville 


17 
17 


31 
15 


50 


198 Wroxeter 


21 






1 Totals, 1924-25 

2 Totals, 1923-24 


2,324 
1,954 


3,861 
3,605 


2,901 
2,672 


3,045 
2,936 


6,302 
5,680 


5,081 
4,551 


. . 30 


7,082 
6,398 


6,682 
6,099 


3 Increases 


370 


256 


229 


109 


622 


530 




684 


583 


4 Decreases 
























5 Percentages 


22.04 


36.61 


27.51 


28.87 


59.76 


48.18 


.. .28 


67.16 


63.36 







DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



157 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Concluded) 







Number of Pupils i 


n the Various Subjects (Concluded) 








bo 

5 


c 



M 


u 
+-> 

CO 

*e 
u 


"en 
>> 


a 

'a. 
<v 
<v 
M 
M 
O 
O 


a 
a 
u 
bo 



c 

0) 


a 
>> 
H 


■M 
U 

< 


1-1 

3 

"3 

u 

_o 

'en 

Oh 


3 
"3 
'u 
< 


bfl 

a 
S 

H 

3 
a 

2 


0J 

u 

c 
.Si 

'0 

C/5 

.3 

& 

3 

HI 


169 


13 
17 
22 
30 
44 
12 
19 
14 
16 
29 




5 


9 








8 


24 
17 
84 
66 
64 








170 














171 


32 
17 

"24 
24 
21 
29 
44 


24 
20 
14 
17 
18 
21 
12 
24 


23 
20 
13 
18 
19 
19 
11 
21 








33 
30 
26 
19 
26 
19 
29 
29 
25 








17? 














173 














174 














175 








76 
61 
69 

107 
49 
71 

105 
70 
26 
71 
46 
84 
23 








176 














177 














178 














179 








48 






180 


19 
24 
14 
23 
18 

"23 
42 
15 
29 
8 
22 

"25 

10 

9 

15 

17 


34 
43 
24 
16 
36 
42 
44 


7 
21 
16 


14 
18 

27 












181 








43 
24 








18? 














183 














184 


10 

5 

29 


15 
4 

27 








19 

27 
27 
17 
37 
27 
22 
11 








18.S 














186 














187 














188 


31 
26 
22 
12 

38 
35 
19 


11 
18 
21 


13 
10 
20 














189 








60 
78 
21 
56 
68 
91 
29 
10 
67 
43 








190 














191 














19? 


18 
21 
22 


20 
10 
16 














193 








18 
35 
19 

7 
33 

8 








194 














195 














196 


















197 


.32 
2 


18 
18 


18 
17 














198 




























1 
2 


3,325 
2,856 


3,089 
3,269 


2,248 
1,861 


2,180 
1,800 


200 
49 


79 
39 


126 
61 


4,014 
3,578 


9,780 
8,882 


332 
244 


19 
20 


97 
42 


3 
4 


469 


"180 


387 


380 


151 


40 


65 


436 


898 


88 


1 


55 






















5 


31.53 


29.29 


21.32 


20.67 


1.89 


.75 


1.19 


38.06 


92.74 


3.15 


.18 


.92 



158 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF 





Lower School, Form I 




Boys 


Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


w 


u 

<v 
>> 
cn 


cn 

u 

a 

CD 
re 


en 

CD 
>> 


Vh 

10 


en 
1* 

03 
CD 


u 

<L> 
>^ 


en 
d 

00 


en 

O 


en 

03 
CD 

O 
CN 


CD 
> 

O 

C 
03 


en 
u. 
o3 
CD 


en 
u 

a 

CD 
CN 


en 

03 
CD 
>» 


en 

Ih 

03 
CD 
>» 


CO 
Ih 

o3 
CD 

>> 
10 


en 

u 

a 

CD 


1 Aberfoyle 






2 

3 
5 
2 
2 
6 
2 
1 
3 






















3 

7 
3 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
3 
5 
1 
1 
9 
3 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 

i 

2 

"2 
3 
4 
5 
3 
2 
1 
7 
1 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 


"s 

2 
3 
3 
1 
3 
1 
1 
7 
6 
9 
5 
1 
6 
5 
1 
2 
7 
2 

"4 
3 
8 
1 
6 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
5 

"3 
1 
1 

"2 
1 
2 

15 
2 
5 
3 
6 

11 
8 
2 
2 

.4 
3 
5 
8 
4 
2 


"2 

3 

1 
4 
1 
3 

"2 
4 
6 
3 
2 
4 
3 
2 
3 
7 
2 

"3 
2 
6 
2 
4 

3 
1 
4 
5 
2 
2 
2 
1 

' '5 
5 
2 

' 4 
18 

' 6 
2 
2 
3 
5 
2 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
2 
1 




2 Acton 




2 


2 
2 
6 
5 
1 
2 
3 


2 
4 
2 
4 
4 
4 
2 
2 
3 
6 
4 
1 
2 
6 




1 












2 


1 


3 Agincourt 














S 


4 Ailsa Craig 


















1 


2 


1 


5 Alvinston 






2 












^ 


6 Arkona 


2 
1 


1 

1 

2 
















1 


7 Ayr 
















3 
' 1 


1 


8 Bancroft 


3 
3 
1 

5 


1 




1 




1 


i 


6 


9 Bath 




1 


10 Beachburg 


1 




1 
1 










? 


1 1 Beaverton .... 




1 
1 

4 


6 
1 

"i 

5 
5 
2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
5 
3 
4 
2 
4 


1 










S 


12 Beeton 




1 
1 










1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 


? 


13 Belmont 


















1 


14 Blackstock 




1 

2 


1 












1 


15 Blenheim 






3 

2 

2 
2 
4 
1 

"l 












4 


16 Blind River 




















17 Blyth 






1 
2 
3 
4 


2 
4 












1 




18 Bobcaygeon 




1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 












1 


19 Bolton . . . 
















? 


20 Bothwell . . 




1 


1 












1 
1 

3 

1 


? 


21 Bowesville 
















22 Brooklin 


















1 
2 


1 


23 Brownsville.. 




2 

"4 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 
1 
2 
3 
2 
















24 Bruce Mines. 




1 
1 














25 Brussels.. . 




1 

"i 

l 


2 
3 
1 














2 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 




26 Burk's Falls. . 


2 
















27 Caledon East. 


















28 Cannington 




















29 Capreol 




2 
1 

4 
1 

2 

' "l 


'"•3 

1 

"2 
1 
4 
4 

7 


1 
4 
















30 Cardinal 






2 












? 


31 Carp 


1 


2 














32 Chatsworth 
















7 


33 Claremont . . 




















2 




34 Clifford . . . 




1 

2 


2 
2 
1 

"l 














3 


35 Cobden .... 




1 












1 
2 


4 


36 Cochrane . . . 














5 


37 Cold water. . 






1 


1 












? 


38 Comber 


















7 


39 Consecon .... 






1 


1 

2 


















40 Cookstown 






1 


1 
1 
1 


















41 Copetown . 






2 
1 
9 
2 
6 
1 
1 
3 

10 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
4 




















42 Creemore . . . 






4 
21 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
3 

' "l 
1 
4 
4 
1 
3 


2 

4 
1 
2 














5 
2 
1 


4 
16 
2 
2 
3 


2 


43 Danforth Park 


1 


1 
1 
1 


1 












1 


44 Delaware .... 














45 Delhi 




2 
1 


1 














46 Denbigh . . 
















47 Dorchester . 




2 
4 

2 
















1 


48 Drayton .... 




6 
2 
2 
1 

2 
1 
1 


1 

2 














1 
2 


10 

3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
4 
5 
4 


2 


49 Dresden . . 














1 


















1 








1 
1 
1 


1 














5 






1 

1 
1 












2 
3 
3 
1 

' '2 


1 


53 Eganville (r.c.s.s) . . 

54 Elmvale . . 


1 














3 












1 


3 






















2 


1 
1 
















1 




57 Ennismore 


1 

















DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



159 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 


Girls 




if 

u 

si 

> 


a 

u 

- 


K 

r 
-> > 


9 

lb 

K 

£ 

. > 

c 


a 

o 

-a 

c 

■ ca 

Pi 


cr 

>- 

s 

> 


V 

u 
a 

a, 
* > 


Cfl 

CU 


co 


ca 

o3 

10 






! 

CO 

u 

<JJ 
>> 

00 


CO 

0* 


Cfl 

u 

> 

O 


<U 
> 

O 

C 

03 


CO 

u 

03 

CD 
> 


CO 
Ih 

03 

QJ 


cfl 

Ui 

03 
cu 
>> 


Cfl 

U 

03 
0) 


Cfl 

03 
cu 


Cfl 
Ih 

03 
CU 

>^ 




Cfl 

U 

03 
CU 


CO 

cu 

00 


co 

Ih 

o3 

cu 


co 

cy 

O 


V 

> 


XJ 

c 

o3 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 


2 
"l 

i 

5 

i 

i 
i 
i 

"i 

l 

l 

"i 
i 

2 

1 


"l 

1 

i 
i 
i 


1 

1 




1 




i 


1 

2 

1 

i 
l 

l 

l 
"2 

"2 

"2 

"1 


"2 

2 
1 
5 

".4 

"l 
3 

1 

"2 

2 
1 

"'2 
1 

6 
2 

"i 

1 
4 
3 

"2 
3 
2 

i 

i 

1 
2 
4 

i 

' "2 
3 

"i 

1 

1 

2 


"5 

5 
3 
3 
3 

1 

1 

2 

"8 
2 
7 

2 
2 
2 

1 
1 

"2 
1 
4 
3 

6 

1 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 

"2 


"2 
1 

"4 

2 
1 
3 
1 

i 

1 
1 
2 
4 

1 
3 

2 

"2 

3 

3 

i 
1 
1 

1 

2 

"i 

2 
1 

"i 


' 2 

2 
1 
1 
4 

"l 

i 

i 
"1 
"i 

i 

"3 
1 

"2 
1 

i 

1 
2 

2 

"2 

1 
2 
2 

1 


1 

"1 

"1 
1 

"\ 
"1 

"1 


i 
i 








:: 

i 
1 
i 

i 


2 
3 
2 

1 
2 
5 

' i 
1 

3 
1 
1 
4 

1 

i 

1 

i 

2 

1 
1 

4 

1 
1 

"2 

5 

4 


2 
6 

5 

"3 
2 
3 

' 2 
3 
4 

"2 
3 

2 
2 

5 
2 

3 

"3 
3 

2 
4 

3 

' i 
4 

'4 

' i 

5 
2 
2 

1 

"i 

6 
3 
4 
3 

"3 

6 

1 
2 
4 
3 

2 
4 


2 
3 

1 

7 
4 
2 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 

2 

1 

2 
3 
5 
4 

' '5 
1 
4 
3 

"2 
4 
3 
2 
3 

' 2 
4 
1 
1 
3 

' "2 

3 

2 

' '5 

' 3 
1 
5 
6 
6 
2 
2 
3 
5 
7 

1 


5 
2 
1 

5 

"3 
4 
3 

*2 
1 
4 


"i 

2 
4 

1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 


.. 

i 

i 

i 

1 

i 
4 

i 
1 

i 
i 
i 
i 

1 
i 

'2 


i 
i 

i 


i 




15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 


5 

i 

3 

1 

1 
4 
2 
2 

1 

7 
3 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 

"2 

"3 
4 

1 

"3 
4 
3 
1 
3 
3 
2 
1 

"3 

1 


7 

1 

"2 
2 
2 
2 

1 
1 

3 

"i 
"i 

"2 

"2 
4 

"1 
2 
1 
2 

' "2 

2 
4 
2 

"i 

1 

"1 


•- 


41 




1 


"1 
2 
5 

i 

3 
1 

1 
1 
2 




42 
43 
44 

45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 


3 
3 
2 
6 
1 

' 2 
3 
5 
1 
4 
2 
5 

"l 

2 


3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
4 
4 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


. . 


57 


1 







160 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


tn 
u 

cu 


in 

CU 


u 
rt 
cu 
>> 


(A 
U 


CD 

l-i 

<U 
1 ^ 


tn 

In 

cu 

OO 


tn 

<v 
>> 

On 


cu 
o 


u 

cu 
> 

o 

G 


en 
u 

o3 
cu 
>> 
C5 


tn 
u 
03 
CU 
>> 


tn 
i_ 
03 

CU 

>1 


tn 
u 
03 
cu 


tn 
u 

03 
CU 

>> 


•j. 
u 

a 
<v 

oo 


tn 

cu 
>> 

ON 


tn 

Ih 

03 
CU 

© 


In 

CU 
> 

o 
-a 

c 

03 


1 Aberfoyle 






































2 Acton 




1 


2 


5 
3 
2 
3 


2 
6 

1 
5 


1 










2 


4 


3 
2 
2 
8 


4 

4 
3 

8 


1 


1 






3 Agincourt . . 








1 
1 




1 


4 Ailsa Craig. . 




1 
1 


1 

6 


' i 


1 

2 








2 

2 


1 
3 








5 Alvinston 






1 


5 






6 Arkona 












7 Ayr 




1 


1 


5 


4 

3 
1 

5 

10 
3 
2 


i 

i 

i 

4 


1 








1 


3 
3 
1 
7 
3 
2 
6 


7 
3 
4 
7 
6 
3 
6 


1 

2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
7 


1 
4 
2 
2 
2 








8 Bancroft 






1 










9 Bath 






2 
3 
3 


1 
1 

5 
1 
5 


3 








2 
2 
1 






10 Beichburg. . . 










1 


3 


1 




1 1 Beaverton .... 




1 


1 








12 Beeton. . 
















13 Belmont. . . . 




1 


3 


1 




1 






2 


2 








14 Blackstock. 










15 Blenheim. . . 








2 
2 
4 


4 

1 
3 
1 
2 

3 


1 

1 
1 

2 
1 












1 

1 
2 
2 
2 


8 

5 
4 
3 
3 


9 

3 
3 
6 
3 


5 

1 

' 4 
1 








16 Blind River 










1 








1 
1 


i 

2 




17 Blyth 






1 
1 

"l 






1 

2 


1 


18 Bobcaygeon 
















19 Bolton. . 




1 

1 






1 
1 






20 Bothwell. . . 










1 




1 




21 Bowesville 










22 Brooklin 






































23 Brownsville 






1 
1 




















3 
4 

1 


2 
8 
3 


2 

1 
3 








24 Bruce Mines 






2 
6 
3 


2 
1 
2 






1 








2 
1 






25 Brussels. . . . 




1 


2 


1 








4 
2 






26 Burk's Falls. 














27 Caledon East 




























28 Cannington 




1 


1 


4 














2 


6 


2 


4 


1 








29 Capreol . . 






















30 Cardinal. . , 






1 

4 


1 
4 
4 

3 


1 

6 

1 

3 


1 


1 




1 








2 

7 
1 

2 


2 

7 
4 

1 


6 
2 
4 

1 


3 
1 

2 


1 




3 1 Carp 










4 
2 




32 Chatsworth 
















1 




33 Claremont 








1 










2 




34 Clifford . . . 






3 










35 Cobden . . . 
















36 Cochrane 






1 
4 


1 


1 
3 














1 














37 Cold water 






3 

1 










1 


"l 


1 

5 

1 

11 


1 
1 


1 
1 




2 


38 Comber. 
















39 Consecon 




























40 Cookstown . . 








4 


2 


4 


1 








1 


3 


5 


3 


1 


1 




41 Copetown . 
















42 Creemore 




1 


1 

1 
2 
3 


1 


5 


4 










1 

2 


4 

2 
2 
4 


9 

4 
5 

5 


5 
1 


4 


1 






43 Dan forth Park 
















44 Delaware 






1 
4 


1 


2 
2 
















2 


45 Delhi. . 






1 








2 


2 


3 






46 Denbigh 


















47 Dorchester 






1 
2 
1 
1 
4 


2 
4 

2 
4 
1 
2 
8 
1 


2 

7 

1 
1 
2 
5 
4 


i 

2 
1 
1 
2 
2 


1 

1 










4 

2 

2 
1 
4 


1 
3 

5 

6 
6 
4 


7 
8 

1 
6 

5 
4 
3 


4 
6 








48 Drayton . 












1 


3 






49 Dresden . . 
















50 Drumbo 


















1 




















52 Eganvi'le 


1 












3 
2 
3 












5 
3 












1 
2 






54 Elmvale 




1 












2 




2 




















1 


1 


1 
3 l 


2 
1 
















3 


5 
3 


4 

3 


1 
2 








57 Ennismore 


4 


2 


i ... 






1 


...1 







DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



161 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Upper School 


"o 

Ih 

CD 

£ 
^ CO 

_ >» 

03 O 
O w 


o 
<v 

£ 

3 

Z en 
— u 

03 •-< 

SO 




Boys 


Girls 






GO 

u 

o3 

4) 


CO 

u 

a 

to 


(0 

U 

oJ 
0) 

SO 


CO 
CD 


CO 

03 

<U 

>. 


co 

03 

OS 


CO 

03 
CD 

O 


Ih 

5 

X3 
C 
03 


1 

o3 


Cfl 

03 

cd 

iO 


to 
03 

vO 


en 

oi 

o> 

>> 


75 
CO 

>^ 

OC 


en 

o3 
CD 

ON 


co 

03 
<u 
>^ 
O 


0) 

o 

G 
03 


03 

03 C 
O w 


1 


































2 
31 
29 
24 
49 
21 
30 
28 
20 
22 
50 
12 
29 
10 
37 
14 
22 
20 
23 
19 

5 

9 
15 
12 
38 
26 

3 
18 

5 
20 
36 
17 
22 
20 
18 
15 
29 

8 

3 
19 

5 
32 
50 


10 
52 
32 
24 
65 
15 
38 
38 
24 
50 
49 
34 
50 
15 
57 
33 
35 
31 
50 
31 

6 
25 
16 
36 
38 
32 
21 
35 
11 
39 
49 
25 
34 
30 
18 
21 
24 
29 

8 
38 

6 
55 
74 


12 


2 


































83 


3 


































61 


4 


































48 


5 


































114 


6 


































36 


7 


































68 


8 


































66 


9 


































44 


10 


































72 


11 






1 


1 


1 




1 








3 


3 


1 








99 


12 














46 


13 


































79 


14 


































25 


15 


































94 


16 


































47 


17 


































57 


18 


































51 


19 


































73 


20 


































50 


21 


































11 


22 


































34 


23 


































31 


24 


































48 


25 


































76 


26 


































58 


27 


































24 


28 


































53 


29 


































16 


30 


































59 


31 


































85 


32 


































42 


33 


































56 


34 


































50 


35 


































36 


36 


































36 


37 


































53 


38 


































37 


39 


































11 


40 


































57 


41 


































11 


42 


































87 


43 


































124 


44 


































18 24 


42 


45 


































33 
5 

17 
42 
41 
22 
19 
22 
32 
29 
7 
15 
25 


42 
11 
35 
69 
64 
18 
28 
38 
41 
58 
19 
30 
25 


75 


46 


































16 


47 


































52 


48 


































111 


% 


































105 


































40 


51 


































47 


52 


































60 


53 


































73 


54 


































87 


55 


































26 


56 


































45 


57 


































50 



162 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 









Lower School, Form I 










Boys 


Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


<L> 


en 

Im 

03 
<V 


en 

Ih 

o3 




en 
u 

a 


en 
10 


en 

ed 
a> 
>> 
so 


en 
aj 
>> 


00 


en 
1- 

a. 


en 

03 



CD 
> 
O 

-v 
c 

a3 


en 

03 
CI) 

>> 


en 

03 
<U 
>> 


en 

o3 
a; 
>> 


en 
t- 
o3 


en 
u 
03 
<U 
>» 
10 


en 

u 
03 
<D 
>. 


58 Erin 






1 

2 
2 
2 
4 

4 
1 
1 

3 
2 
5 
1 
1 
1 


3 

2 
10 
6 
1 
1 
10 
3 


2 

6 
2 
2 

2 

7 
2 


1 
2 
1 
2 


1 














2 
4 

5 
3 
3 

' '4 
3 


4 

3 

10 
6 
3 

4 
2 


2 
1 
3 
6 

2 
5 
2 




59 Espanola 




1 












2 
1 
3 
4 

2 
5 
2 
2 




60 Fairbank 


















61 Fenelon Falls 


1 
1 


1 

1 
3 
1 
2 
1 












1 


3 


62 Fen wick 














63 Feversham 


















64 Finch 




2 


1 










1 
1 
1 




65 Fingal 














66 Florence 


















67 Fordwich 




2 
8 
3 
6 
2 
3 
7 
3 
1 

' *4 
2 
2 
4 
4 
3 
1 
3 

' 3 

2 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 
9 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 


1 

2 
2 


2 
1 
3 












2 
6 

5 
8 
1 

" "2 


2 
2 
3 
4 
1 
4 
3 
4 
4 

2 
3 
3 
5 
3 
2 
3 
4 

6 

8 


2 
3 
1 

5 

"l 

4 
5 

2 
1 

1 
1 
4 
4 

"4 

1 
2 
6 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
4 

1 

"3 
3 
1 
1 

2 

5 

"'l 
4 
9 
4 
1 
4 
2 
6 
2 




68 Frankford 




1 

1 












1 


T 


69 Gore Bay 


















70 Grand Valley 




2 
1 
1 










2 


3 




71 Haliburton 




' 1 
3 
6 

1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 


1 

2 
7 
1 
1 














72 Hallville 








1 








1 
1 


? 


73 Harrow 














? 


74 Havelock 






1 
1 


1 












75 Hensall 






3 
1 
2 
4 
1 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 

1 
3 
6 










4 


3 




76 Hepworth 




1 
3 
1 


1 












77 Highgate 
















1 
1 


1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
3 

1 
2 
3 
1 




78 Holstein 




1 


2 






1 








79 Ilderton 










80 Inglewood 




2 














1 




81 Iroquois Falls 




4 

1 














S 


82 Islington 


















2 




83 Janetville 




















84 Jarvis 




1 
1 


2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 

"2 

1 
1 
















2 
1 




S5 Jockvale 




1 


1 










9 




."86 Kars 














87 Keewatin 




1 
















88 Ken more 




1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
















4 


89 Kinburn 




2 














5 

1 
1 


5 
3 
2 
5 
2 
5 
1 
4 
5 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 


3 

2 
9 
3 
4 
5 
2 
7 
2 
6 
1 
1 
8 
5 
6 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 

"7 
6 
5 
3 




90 Kinmount 










1 






91 Kirkland Lake. . 




4 












92 Lambeth 


















93 Lanark . . . 


1 


"2 
















94 Lansdowne 














4 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 


? 


95 Laurel . . . 




















96 Lefrov . . . 




















1 


97 Lion's Head 




2 
1 
2 


1 

1 
3 
1 

8 
8 
2 
1 
1 
S 


1 














1 


98 Little Britain 


















99 Little Current . . 




1 

' *3 
3 

2 
2 














? 


100 Lobo . . . 




1 














101 Long Branch . . 




1 














1 


102 Lucknow. . . 




1 
1 












2 


1 


103 Lvnden 










1 








104 Lvndhurst . .. . 






2 








1 


3 


1 


2 


105 Malakoff. . 


















106 Mallorvtown . . 






1 
















2 


3 




107 Manitowaning 






2 

1 
5 


2 




1 










1 


108 Manotick. . 








1 

3 












1 
4 

1 
3 
8 
3 
2 


? 


109 Marmora.. 






2 
1 
2 
2 
2 


4 


1 












2 


1 


110 Massey 


1 


2 
4 
2 
1 












? 


1 1 1 Maxville . . , 


5 
3 
4 
3 


2 
1 
5 
4 


1 
1 

"2 


1 










1 


2 
3 
4 

1 


1 


112 Melbourne 














113 Merlin 




1 
1 










1 




114 Merrickville 












1 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



163 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 


Girls 




CO 


to cr 

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1 

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59 










. . 2 




60 


1 . 


1 






1 




61 








. . 2 




62 








1 




63 












1 
6 
3 

5 

"2 
2 


1 

3 

1 

1 

' "2 




64 










1 




65 














66 














67 










1 1 




68 


? 










69 




1 










70 








1 


1 


71 














72 


1 . 
1 


. 1 










2 

2 
3 
2 
2 
1 
2 
5 
5 
1 
2 
2 




73 












74 


4 














75 










. . 3 


3 
1 
5 
2 




76 














77 










2 




78 














79 






1 








80 










2 

"3 

1 




81 










1 




82 














83 














84 














85 
86 




. . . 












87 


1 










2 
1 
4 


1 
2 

' "1 

5 




88 


1 












89 














90 














91 










3 


2 




92 












93 










1 


2 
5 
1 


2 
3 
1 
1 
1 
3 




94 














95 














96 


1 












97 




1 










98 










2 




99 










1 




100 














2 

6 

3 




101 
















102 












2 




103 














104 










1 


1 


3 
2 




105 














106 
















107 


? 
















108 


7 












3 
3 

5 
2 
1 
1 




109 


1 ] 










1 

2 
2 
1 
1 




110 








] 




111 


1 








3 




112 














113 


1 












114 


1 1 










.J 







164 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No 11 



IV. 



CONTINUATION 
TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF 



















Middle 


Sch 


ool 


















Boys 


Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


u 

o3 


en 
u 

o3 

CD 
>> 


en 

<u 
>> 
to 


(A 

a> 

>> 
vo 


en 

R) 
>> 


en 

OO 


en 

Ih 

03 
0) 
>^ 

ON 


en 




> 

O 

C 
03 


en 

0! 
<v 
>> 


en 

o3 
0) 

<* 


en 
u 

03 

iO 


en 
i_ 
03 
<U 
>> 


en 

s_ 

03 

o> 


en 

03 
<3J 

00 


en 

ON 


en 

u 

03 
0) 

O 


1- 
o» 
> 
c 

c 

03 


58 Erin. . 






1 

4 


1 
2 


1 


1 

1 


1 

1 










3 
2 


6 

2 


6 

3 


4 


1 


1 
















1 




60 Fairbank 














61 Fenelon Falls. . 




3 


2 


5 
2 


2 
1 


5 


1 




2 




2 
4 


3 
2 


5 
1 


5 


4 








62 Fenwick. . 










63 Feversham 




























64 Finch 






4 

2 


2 
4 


4 


4 


2 








6 
1 


6 
1 


15 
1 


1 

1 


1 


1 


"l 




65 Fingal 














66 Florence 




















67 Fordwich. . . 




1 


1 
2 
1 
2 


2 
6 

1 
5 


2 
3 

2 
3 


2 
2 
4 
3 


1 
2 

"i 


1 
' '2 


1 
1 
1 






1 
5 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
5 


3 
4 

2 
5 

' "5 
3 
4 
6 


4 
3 

5 

9 
1 

1 
4 

5 


' '4 

5 
5 


"2 

3 
3 


2 
1 

1 




68 Frankford . . . 




1 


1 

1 




69 Gore Bay 






? 


70 Grand Valley . 






1 


71 Haliburton . . 














72 Hallville . 










4 
1 

2 
2 


4 
3 
2 
1 






1 
1 




1 


2 
2 
2 


3 
1 
1 
1 


3 


1 


73 Harrow. . . 






2 


2 

3 

3 


1 






74 Havelock 












75 Hensall. . . , 






2 


1 








1 




76 Hepworth 


















77 Highgate. . 




3 


4 
1 
1 
1 
2 


1 
2 
3 
2 
3 


1 
1 

2 

"2 


2 
2 
2 
1 








2 


1 


1 
1 

2 


5 
3 
1 

2 

5 


2 
1 
1 

5 
1 










78 Holstein 




1 

1 






3 
5 
1 
4 




1 




79 Ilderton. . 
















80 Inglewood 














1 

2 






81 Iroquois Falls 














1 


1 




82 Islington. . . . 


















83 Janetville. . 






































84 Jarvis 






































85 Jockvale. . . , 






































86 Kars . 




1 


1 

5 
3 
1 


3 
1 
3 
3 


1 

3 
1 
4 


2 
3 


1 








2 

2 
1 
1 


3 
4 
5 

2 


11 

2 
3 
5 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1 


87 Keewatin 












88 Ken more 




1 






1 




3 
3 










89 Kinburn 




1 


1 




2 


2 




1 


90 Kinmount 














91 Kirkland Lake 






































92 Lambeth. . 






3 
3 
2 


2 

5 


1 

3 


1 












3 

5 
6 


7 
6 

5 


3 

7 
5 


'"2 


1 






93 Lanark 




1 










1 
1 




94 Lansdowne 




3 




1 








1 




95 Laurel. 
















96 Lefrov . . 






































97 Lion's Head 






































98 Little Britain. . 






































99 Little Current 






1 
1 
1 


1 
6 

2 
3 


' "2 
' "l 




1 








1 


1 
4 
2 

5 
4 
2 


5 
1 

9 
2 
3 


5 
2 
4 
6 

"3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 
9 
1 
4 
3 






1 


1 


100 Lobo. 


1 








1 


2 
4 
1 
2 

3 






101 Long Branch 


2 


1 


1 










102 Lucknow 




1 








2 






103 Lynden 




1 
1 
1 


1 
1 












104 Lvndhurst 








2 


4 
3 
















105 Malakoff 






1 
1 
















106 Mallorytown 
















1 


3 
















2 










3 

7 
4 


3 

3 


1 

■ 2 


1 


108 Manotick 










1 

5 














4 
3 
3 
8 
5 
6 
4 




109 Marmora 








1 
1 

3 
3 
5 
3 


1 


1 


2 








1 

10 
3 
3 

1 


1 


110 Mas^ey 






3 

5 
1 

2 






2 
2 
1 




111 Maxville. . 




4 
1 
1 


6 
2 
3 
1 


1 

2 

1 








1 

2 


4 
1 
1 

5 


2 
1 

2 
2 


1 




112 Melbourne 




1 




1 




113 Merlin 








114 Merrickville 




2 


i . . . 






2 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



165 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Upper School 


O 

<v 
.a 

s 

Z en 
p_ >> 

rt O 
-MCQ 
O m 
H 


o 
u 

CJ 

£ 

■sS 

SO 




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Girls 






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en 

rt 

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en 

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en 
u 

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en 
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u 

> 

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C 
rt 


H 


58 


































17 
20 
23 
37 
15 

7 
55 
16 
12 
21 
36 
28 
31 

6 
28 
34 
23 
25 

9 
35 
22 
17 
22 
26 
16 

7 
11 

6 
16 
22 
25 
25 

8 
24 
19 
24 
22 

5 

10 
15 
15 
18 
18 
38 
34 
12 
20 
12 
12 
10 

8 
37 
13 
47 
21 
29 
22 


34 
30 
26 
54 
28 

7 
58 
28 
13 
29 
50 
43 
55 
10 
36 
30 
36 
33 

5 
25 
22 
23 
26 
30 
10 
12 
30 

6 
47 
29 
23 
40 
15 
16 
29 
52 
36 

9 
24 
16 
17 
29 
24 
33 
63 
19 
28 

4 
27 
23 
41 
40 
19 
72 
40 
46 
42 


51 


59 
















1 








1 


1 








50 


60 




























49 


61 


































91 


62 


































43 


63 


































14 


64 


































113 


65 


































44 


66 


































25 


67 


































50 


68 


































86 


69 


































71 


70 


































86 


71 


































16 


72 


































64 


73 


































64 


74 


































59 


75 


































58 


76 


































14 


77 


































60 


78 


































44 


79 


































40 


80 


































48 


81 


































56 


82 


































26 


83 


































19 


v 84 


































41 


85 


































12 


86 


































63 


87 


































51 


88 


































48 


89 


































65 


90 


































23 


91 


































40 


92 


































48 


93 


































76 


94 


































58 


95 


































14 


96 


































34 


97 


































31 


98 


































32 


99 


































47 


100 


































42 


101 


































71 


102 


































97 


103 


































31 


104 


































48 


105 


































16 


106 


































39 


107 


































33 


108 


































49 


109 






1 














1 


1 


1 


1 






1 


77 


110 


















32 


111 


































119 


112 


































61 


113 
























1 










75 


114 
































64 



166 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 

IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 





Lower School, Form I 




Boys 


Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


03 


en 

<V 
>> 


Cfl 

Ih 

CD 

>% 

CO 




en 

OJ 
0) 

10 


Cfl 

OS 
0) 

^0 


03 


Cfl 

03 
oj 
>. 
00 


73 

03 

0) 

>> 


Cfl 

03 
0) 

O 




ID 
C 
03 


I 

Cfl 
Ih 

03 
CD 


en 

o3 

01 


Cfl 
Ih 

03 
0) 

r*5 


Cfl 

Ih 
CD 


en 

Ih 

03 
0) 
>-> 


en 
03 

<d 

>> 




115 Metcalfe 






1 

3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
2 
4 
1 


1 
1 

10 


1 
4 

2 


















1 

2 
3 


4 

3 

7 
2 
1 
2 


2 
5 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
3 


1 


116 Millbrook 




1 
1 


' 3 


3 
1 














3 


117 Milverton 


































? 


119 Minden 






1 
1 


2 
1 
















2 
1 


3 


3 


120 Minesing 




















4 


121 Morriston 




1 

2 
1 
1 


















1^2 Mount Albert 


1 
1 


2 
5 
2 
1 

5 

1 

3 
2 


1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
2 
2 
















1 


1 

1 
2 
2 


6 

2 

1 

1 
3 
5 
1 
7 
1 
2 
4 
2 
6 
2 
6 
5 

4 
1 

11 
2 
3 
1 
2 
4 

10 
3 
4 
7 
2 
3 
1 

10 
3 
1 
4 
2 
9 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 
2 
4 
7 
4 
2 
6 




123 Mount Brydges 

124 Mount Elgin 


2 


1 












3 
















125 Navan 




























3 
2 
1 


















1 




127 New Hamburg 




















2 


3 
4 
2 
4 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 
3 
1 




1 28 North Augusta 




















2 
2 
4 

1 




129 North Gower 










1 














130 Odessa 






2 


1 




































4 












1 












2 


2 
3 




133 Orono 

134 Otterville 


1 


2 


2 
5 
2 
1 
2 


4 
3 

7 


5 












3 


1 
















135 Paisley 




1 


3 


1 

1 
2 














1 
1 
1 
3 
1 


2 
4 
7 
4 
1 




















2 








9 

2 
1 

1 


3 
1 














2 


138 Pickering 
















1 




139 Plattsville 




2 


2 
2 


1 














140 Port Bnrwell 


















141 Port Carling 






1 
1 
1 
1 

4 
1 
1 
6 
3 


1 














1 
5 
1 
1 


2 
2 
5 
2 
3 
2 
3 
1 
8 
4 
4 
2 
4 
1 
8 
1 

3 
1 
2 
2 

1 


5 
6 
1 
2 
3 
2 
3 
5 
1 

' '5 




142 Port Credit 




6 


5 
1 
3 
1 


7 

' *2 

1 
3 
7 
3 
3 
4 
1 
2 
2 
3 

' '3 
3 

5 

1 














? 






2 














1 






1 




















1 
2 

1 
4 
1 


1 












4 


146 Richard's Landing. . . . 


1 














1 
2 


I 












1 










1 
6 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
7 
1 


3 










1 


149 Ripley 




2 
1 












2 
5 
1 
2 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
2 


















1 


? 






3 












2 


152 Russell 


1 


1 






























3 
1 
4 
3 
2 
9 

"4 
1 


2 


154 Schomberg 


1 


1 
















1 




4 

2 

3 
1 

2 
2 
4 


4 












3 


156 Scotland 

157 Seeley's Bay 

158 Selkirk 


1 




1 










1 


1 
1 
1 












3 




4 
1 

1 














1 






1 
1 

2 














1 


















1 




161 South Mountain 




2 
2 
1 
2 

1 
1 
















1 
2 






















2 
1 














1 




164 Sparta 






3 
3 
4 
1 
2 


1 
6 
2 
4 

3 














1 

7 
1 




1 

1 










1 


3 










1 


2 
2 
6 










1 
6 
6 

i 

5 


2 




























1 














4 
1 

5 

2 


1 


169 Stella 


















2 








3 


2 




















171 Stouffville 








1 




1 












3 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



167 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 





























Lower School, F 


orm I 


[ 


















Boys 


Girls 




cn 
u 

TO 

CU 

> 


u 

TO 

o 

00 


cn 

TO 
cu 
>, 


cn 

S- 

n 
u 

>. 

o 


cu 
> 
o 

1 

ci3 


X 
CU 


cn 

V- 

TO 
CU 

CN 


03 


cn 

to 

<V 


03 

03 
CU 

to 


cn 

o3 
cu 
U*. 


U5 

03 


in 

03 
00 


V- 


X 

u 

rt 


>, 

C 


> 
O 

-0 
c 

o3 


cn 

TO 




cn 
u 

~ 


cn 
u 

03 
<L> 

rr> 


cn 
03 


cn 

o3 
D 

10 


cn 
u 

TO 

CU 

►>> 


cn 

03 
<V 
>> 


cn 

TO" 
CU 

00 


cn 

1- 
03 
0) 




CO 

J-c 

TO 
CU 
>~. 

O 
CN 


u 

CU 

> 


*T3 
C 

TO 


115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 


1 

1 
1 

3 

i 

"i 

i 
l 

2 

i 

i 
i 


"l 

2 

1 
1 


1 

1 
1 

1 


i 


1 




1 

"l 

1 
1 


1 

1 

' 1 

2 

i 

1 

' "l 

1 

3 
1 

1 

2 

"2 

' "l 

1 

i 
"i 


3 
1 
1 

"2 


1 

5 
4 
1 

' 1 
2 
1 

2 


6 
6 

' 2 
1 
1 
1 


1 

6 
1 
2 
1 

i 

2 


i 

' '2 






1 




1 
1 


' "2 

1 

2 

' "2 


2 
2 
1 

1 

"2 
2 
3 
4 
1 
2 
4 
3 
1 

1 


1 

5 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 
2 
3 

1 

i 
3 

5 

3 


2 

4 
1 
4 
1 
2 

' 5 
2 
1 


1 

3 
1 

' "2 


1 
1 




1 
1 




125 


1 

' "2 
1 

1 

"3 
2 
6 
1 
2 
4 
2 


3 
1 
2 
3 

1 

*3 

4 

"l 
2 
1 

2 
6 






126 


2 
1 

' '2 

3 
1 
5 

2 

4 
1 
1 
5 
2 
4 

"3 
3 
1 
2 
4 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 

"l 

"2 

3 

' '2 
2 

' '2 

11 

1 

"5 


1 

3 

' 2 

1 
1 

1 

"3 

1 

1 

3 
3 
1 

2 
2 

"3 


1 

"2 

1 
i 

'2 

2 

'2 


i 




127 
128 : 
129 
130 
131 
132 


3 

1 

2 

i 

1 
1 


i 
1 
1 


1 




1 




1 

1 
1 

i 
1 

1 
1 


1 

2 

2 
2 

4 
1 
1 

' '2 

' '2 

5 

"2 

2 

i 

1 

i 
1 
2 

' '2 

1 

1 

2 

2 

i 




133 
134 
135 
136' 


1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
1 
1 

1 
4 
3 

*4 



3 
4 
2 
1 
3 
4 

"4 
2 
1 

2 

' 2 
2 

' '5 
1 
2 
2 

' '3 


3 
2 
9 
2 
2 
2 
1 
3 

10 

2 
2 

' '2 

1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 

' '3 
4 
3 
1 
1 
2 
4 

8 
9 

"5 




137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 


1 

1 
1 

1 

3 

1 

' "3 

'3 
1 
1 

1 

i 
1 

1 

1 

1 
2 

2 

3 

1 
9 
1 

' "2 


1 

"2 
1 

' "2 
i 

'i 

2 

2 
2 
1 
1 


"1 

i 

i 
1 






143 
144 
145 
146 
147 
148 
149 
150 
151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
168 
169 
170 
171 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

3 

3 
2 
2 
1 

"2 

' '2 

' '2 
1 
2 

1 


2 
1 
2 
1 
3 
3 
4 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
4 

2 

"3 
2 

2 
2 
3 

i 

4 
3 

1 
1 





168 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 
IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF 





Middle School 




Boy 


s 








Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


CO 

o3 
0) 
>> 
<o 


co 
u 
a 
<u 
>> 
•<* 


co 
u 

<v 
>^ 
to 


CO 

u 

o3 
V 

SO 




co 

a3 
D 

;>> 

OO 


CO 

03 
0) 


co 

0) 

a> 

o 
eg 


CU 

> 
o 

o3 


co 

o3 
0) 

CO 


CO 

u 
03 

<* 


CO 

03 

a> 

lO 


CO 

03 

a; 


co 

03 
0) 


CO 

o! 

CU 
00 


CO 
Ih 

03 

CU 

>> 

On 


CO 

u 

o3 
CU 

>> 

o 


U 

a> 

> 
o 

c 

03 


115 Metcalfe 






2 


2 
3 

1 


1 

4 

5 
2 
2 


2 
4 
2 

2 










1 


1 
4 

7 
1 
2 


1 

6 
9 
1 
4 


1 

2 
2 
2 
2 


3 


1 


1 
1 




116 Millbrook 
















117 Milverton 




1 


5 


1 








1 










2 




1 






7 


119 Minden 






1 
















120 Minesing 


























121 Morriston 






































122 Mount Albert 








3 
1 
1 
1 














1 


2 
1 

2 

7 


3 

5 
2 
1 


6 

5 
3 
3 










123 Mount Brydges 








2 
1 


1 
1 
1 










2 
1 
3 


1 

2 


2 




124 Mount Elgin 








1 












125 Navan 














2 




126 New Dundee 






















127 New Hamburg 






1 
4 


5 
6 
3 
2 
3 


1 

2 
2 
3 


4 












2 
2 

3 
2 
2 


4 
2 
2 
4 
4 


3 

2 

2 

2 


3 
2 
3 
1 
2 








128 North Augusta 














1 


2 
3 






129 North Gower 






3 


4 












130 Odessa 






2 








1 




T 
























132 Onondaga . 


























133 Orono 




3 


1 


5 


2 


1 




1 






1 


7 


4 


4 


2 








134 Otterville 










135 Paisley 






1 
3 
4 


7 
3 
8 
1 
1 


2 
1 
2 
1 
4 
2 


3 
2 
2 












2 
5 
5 
1 


6 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
2 
5 
9 
3 
2 

5 


4 
2 

4 


9 


2 
1 
2 












3 












137 Palmerston 






1 












138 Pickering 




1 




1 


3 




139 Plattsville 




7 




2 




6 

4 
3 
4 
6 
1 
5 
2 

9 


2 
1 
1 
2 
3 
4 
2 
1 

3 


1 


1 




140 Port Burwell 






2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 








2 
1 
5 
4 
2 
2 
1 

3 




141 Port Carling 
























142 Port Credit 






5 
2 
1 
3 

5 


3 
2 
I 
3 
1 

4 


3 
5 




1 






1 
1 








143 Powassan 






2 
1 
1 






144 Princeton 










1 
















1 














1 

3 








1 
1 


1 






















148 Ridgeway . . 






1 






149 Ripley. . 




1 






















151 Rodney. . 








8 
3 
3 


6 

2 
1 


3 


3 




1 






3 
4 

5 


8 
2 

5 


6 


2 


1 


1 




152 Russell 




2 
1 


4 
2 




3 








1 










2 


2 
































1 


2 

1 


















1 
3 


2 
3 


2 
2 


1 
2 








156 Scotland 




3 


3 


1 


1 




































158 Selkirk 




1 




2 




4 




1 






2 


6 


3 


1 


2 


















160 Southampton . 








4 
2 

1 


4 

2 


1 

2 
1 


1 


"l 


1 






1 

3 
2 


2 

7 
4 


3 
1 


2 
2 






1 








1 

2 




2 










1 




































































165 Spencerville 


1 


2 


3 
2 


1 
3 

3 
3 

2 


5 










1 


1 


4 

2 
2 


8 
4 
9 
6 
4 


6 

3 


1 




1 




1 








1 
















1 






1 




168 Stayner 








5 
1 


3 


1 


3 






4 

1 


10 


1 
2 




169 Stella 




1 










1 


























171 StourTville 







































DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



169 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

PUPILS BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Upper School 


"o 

CU 

e 

Z en 

"rt o 


'o 

V- 
CU 
X> 
£ 

3 
Z en 

I 5 






Boys 


Girls 








en 

CU 


u 
03 
CU 

\0 


CU 


en 
u 

o3 

00 


en 

03 
<U 

On 


CO 

1_ 

03 
CU 

>^ 

O 


U 

<U 

O 

-a 
c 

03 
CN 


en 
u 

a 


en 

u 

03 
CU 

;>, 

ID 


03 
0) 

SO 


en 

Vh 

o3 

CU 


en 

I* 

03 
CU 
>> 

00 


to 

03 
CU 

>-> 

On 


CO 

03 

III 

>•. 

O 
CN 


CU 

> 

o 
-o 

c 

03 

CN 


CU 
XI 

Z-o 


115 


































16 

46 

45 

13 

9 

6 

9 

15 

26 

11 

9 

7 

30 

22 

17 

21 

9 

1 

37 

16 

36 

17 

40 

11 

30 

15 

5 

39 

21 

11 

18 

10 

20 

36 

44 

10 

45 

23 

17 

10 

27 

20 

6 

25 

7 

19 

26 

19 

9 

13 

26 

21 

19 

44 

9 

8 


23 
48 
38 
22 
22 
18 

6 
35 
36 
22 
24 

7 
27 
30 
32 
33 
26 
10 
45 

7 
52 
28 
43 
27 
21 
23 
20 
64 
46 
24 
38 
15 
42 
49 
49 
23 
51 
21 
41 
10 
48 
22 
10 
42 

5 
32 
26 
18 

4 
12 
53 
24 
37 
64 
16 

9 


39 


116 






3 
















4 












94 


117 






























83 


118 


































35 


119 


































31 


120 


































24 


121 


































15 


122 


































50 


123 


































62 


124 


































33 


125 


































33 


126 


































14 


127 


































57 


128 


































52 


129 


































49 


130 


































54 


131 


































35 


132 


































11 


133 


































82 


134 


































23 


135 


































88 


136 


































45 


137 


































83 


138 


































38 


139 


































51 


140 


































38 


141 


































25 


142 


































103 


143 


































67 


144 


































35 


145 


































56 


146 


































25 


147 


































62 


148 


































85 


149 


































93 


150 


































33 


151 


























1 








96 


152 
































44 


153 


































58 


154 


































20 


155 


































75 


156 


































42 


157 


































16 


158 


































67 


159 


































12 


160 


































51 


161 


































52 


162 


































37 


163 


































13 


164 


































25 


165 


































79 


166 


































45 


167 


































56 


168 


































108 


169 


































25 


170 






















1 






17 


171 




..1... 








..X.. 




...1... 




...I. J... 




28 1 


56 


84 



170 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 
IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 















Lower School, Form I 














Boys 


Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


en 

o3 
<v 
>> 


en 
CD 

CN 


en 
u 

03 
<D 
>^ 

CO 


en 

03 
CD 


en 

Ih 

03 
CD 


en 

03 

CD 


en 

03 
CD 


to 

u, 
03 
0) 
>> 

00 


en 

03 
CD 
>> 

C3\ 


en 

03 

O 
CN 


CD 

O 

C 
oj 

CN 


en 

03 
CD 


en 
Im 

0} 
CD 
>\ 


ca 

hi 
03 

CD 
CO 


en 

Ih 

03 

CD 
>> 


CO 

u 

03 
CD 

>> 
»o 


CD 


172 Sturgeon Falls 






4 
3 
2 
1 
1 
4 
3 
1 
8 
4 
5 


4 
3 
2 
3 
4 
3 
6 
6 
5 
4 
3 
5 
5 
3 
5 
1 
3 
2 
4 

' 3 
4 

1 


2 
2 
3 
3 
1 

"9 
2 
3 
3 


4 

1 
2 
3 














1 

2 

1 

"2 

2 

1 


3 

8 
5 
2 
2 
8 
4 
4 


6 

4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
7 
5 
4 
9 
5 
1 
2 
3 
3 

2 

7 
5 
2 
4 
2 


2 
2 

2 
4 
2 
2 
7 
1 
7 
6 
3 
2 
5 
1 
3 


? 






















174 Sutton 




2 


1 












4 






1 








1 


? 


176 Tara 












? 




1 


3 


2 
2 












1 
















? 






1 














3 






2 
3 


1 


1 












? 






1 
2 










2 

1 

2 


5 
3 
3 
5 
3 
5 
2 
4 
2 
2 


3 


182 Thorndale 














1 






1 
4 
3 
2 

"7 
4 
1 
4 
2 
1 
3 


1 
4 
4 
1 
2 
















184 Tilbury 


1 
1 


1 

2 
2 
4 

' i 
i 


1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
6 
2 
1 
1 
3 
4 
1 














S 












1 


1 

2 
2 
4 

1 

2 


? 














? 


187 Wales 


















188 Warkworth 
















4 

2 

"3 




189 Wellington 

190 West Lome 


1 
1 
1 


1 














1 














2 


191 Wpstmpath 


1 
1 














1 


192 Westport 
















1 
2 
1 
2 


1 


193 Westport (r.c.s.s) 

194 Wheatley 
















6 




3 


2 












10 

8 
1 
5 


9 
5 
4 
7 
4 


2 


195 Winona 




i 














1 


196 Wolfe Island 






1 
1 


















197 Woodville 




i 


4 


6 

2 


3 
2 














1 


2 
2 




198 Wroxeter 













































DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



171 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Concluded) 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 


Girls 




so 

o 

>> 

IS 


09 

rt 

OJ 

>> 


CO 

>. 


CD 

>. 

O 


0) 

> 

o 

C 


CO 

u 
CU 


en 

in 

0) 
>. 
CN 


to 
u 
03 
CU 
>. 
r*3 


co 

<U 
>> 


CO 

rt 
to 


CO 
*-, 

rt 
0) 


CO 

rt 
<u 


CO- 
Ih 

rt 
CU 

00 


CO 

Ih 

rt 
CD 

On 


CO 

rt 
I) 
>i 

O 


OJ 

> 



C 


rt 

CU 


CO 

u 

CN 


co 
u 

CU 


co 
u 


CO 

a 

CU 

10 


co 
rt 


co 

03 
CD 


09 
U 

CU 
30 


CO 

rz 
V 


CO 
Ih 

n. 
V 

>■ 

O 

CN 


U 
CU 

> 



T) 
C 

rt 

CN 


17? 


i 
i 

"i 

"i 
i 

i 


i 

i 

i 


i 








1 
1 

1 


"i 

"i 

' "i 

"i 

i 

2 
2 

"i 

2 

*2 

i 

1 


1 

2 

' 3 
2 
3 
1 

' 3 

3 

1 
5 
1 
1 

1 
2 

"3 

"i 


3 
1 

2 
3 
1 
5 
3 
3 
2 
5 
5 

"i 

5 
2 

2 
3 

1 

"2 
4 

"i 

1 
1 


1 

3 

"2 
1 

3 
8 

"2 

' "l 
1 
2 
2 

1 
1 

"l 
6 

"2 
2 












1 


1 
'3 


2 

"i 

"1 
1 

"2 
1 

2 

"i 

' "2 

' '4 
1 

"i 


1 

3 
2 
5 
3 
4 
1 
1 
5 
2 
4 

"4 
3 
2 
3 

9 

2 
2 

6 
4 

1 
1 


5 
1 
5 
2 
2 
6 
3 
3 
3 
6 

' 3 
4 
4 
3 

2 
8 
2 
1 
4 
4 
2 


"4 

2 
6 
2 

"5 
1 
1 

3 
1 
2 

"l 

1 
1 

5 

i 

1 
2 
2 
2 


1 
"4 

"i 

3 
2 

"2 
1 

1 

' i 

1 


'2 
1 

1 


"2 

"l 


'3 




173 
174 
175 
176 
177 
178 
179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 
193 
194 
195 
196 


' 1 

1 
1 

"7 

"3 

2 

1 

1 
"2 


"l 

"i 
"1 




"i 






197 
198 


2 
2 


3 
2 





172 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



CONTINUATION 
IV. TABLE K— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


Continuation 
Schools 


CO 
Ih 

03 

<v 
>^ 


Cfl 
u 

Oj 
CD 


en 
u 

o3 

CD 


CO 

>> 


Cfl 

u 
<D 


Ih 

OS 

o> 

00 


Cfl 

Ih 

0) 

ON 


Cfl 

u 
03 
<L> 

O 


C 
T3 
C 
03 

CM 


CO 

<d 


Cfl 

03 
CD 

>> 


Cft 
03 


Cfl 

03 
vO 


Cfl 

03 
CD 
>> 


Cfl 
Ih 

03 
CD 
>> 
OO 


CO 
Ih 

O! 
CD 
>^ 

O 


Cfl 

Ih 

03 
CD 
>> 
O 


Ih 

CD 
> 
O 
•V 

C 

a 

CN 


172 Sturgeon Falls 






1 
1 

2 


4 
2 
3 
1 
6 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
4 


1 

' "l 

2 
7 
3 
1 
2 

"2 


1 

3 
1 

3 
1 
1 
4 
1 
3 
6 
2 


' i 




1 




1 

2 

1 


2 
3 
3 
2 
4 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
5 


4 

"7 
7 
6 
4 
9 
2 
3 
7 
4 


4 

5 
9 

10 
1 

3 

7 
3 
2 

7 
7 


1 

2 
4 
5 
1 






1 


173 Sunderland 






1 
1 

2 






174 Sutton 




1 


1 
1 








7 


175 Tamworth.. 






176 Tara 






1 
6 
3 






1 
1 




177 Tavistock 


1 


1 
















178 Teeswater 


2 








1 
3 
2 
4 
6 


1 


1 


1 


179 Thamesford 












2 
3 
2 
1 




180 Thamesville 




1 

2 
1 


2 
1 
2 
















181 Thornbury 

182 Thorndale 


1 


2 






1 


1 












183 Thornton 


















184 Tilbury 




1 
1 
1 




3 


1 


2 


"i 


1 






2 
1 
1 


2 
' "l 


5 

1 

12 


1 


2 




1 




185 Tiverton 






186 Tottenham 




2 


4 


4 








2 


6 


4 


1 




1 


187 Wales 






188 Warkworth 




2 


2 
1 

3 


1 
2 
4 


2 

1 
3 




1 








1 

1 
1 


2 
3 
2 


4 

7 
6 


5 
1 
4 


5 
2 


2 






189 Wellington 






1 








190 West Lome 




2 


3 












191 Westmeath 




















192 Westport 






1 
2 
1 


4 
3 
1 


5 
2 
3 


4 

1 
1 


2 




3 






3 
4 
1 


4 

7 

7 


5 
5 
6 


"4 
2 


3 
2 






193 Westport (r.c.s.s.).. 








2 
2 




194 Wheatley 




2 














195 Winona 


















196 Wolfe Island 






































197 Woodville 






2 
3 


1 
1 


4 
3 


1 


1 




1 




' '2 


2 
2 


2 
7 


5 
1 


"2 


1 


1 


1 


198 Wroxeter 


i 


3 











SUMMARY OF 


PUPILS 




11 yrs. 


12 yrs. 


13 yrs. 


14 yrs. 


LOWER SCHOOL 
Form I 


Boys. 


29 


139 


385 


532 


Girls. 


31 


227 


508 


707 


LOWER SCHOOL 
Form II 


Boys. 




12 


103 


232 




Girls. 


1 


25 


159 


415 


MIDDLE SCHOOL 


Boys. 






7 


63 






Girls. 






13 


115 






UPPER SCHOOL 


Boys. 
Girls. 


































TOTALS BY SEXES 


Boys. 


29 


151 


495 


827 


Girls. 


32 


252 


680 


1,237 


GRAND TOTALS. 15 


24-25. 


122 


806 


2,350 


4,128 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



173 



SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Concluded) 



Middle School 


Ih 

<U 

6 
3 
/5 en 

— , >- 

£1(8 

H 


1*4 

o 

CU 

£ 

3 

Z en 
— 'u 

I 5 






Boys 


Girls 






u 
ei 

<u 


en 
u 

0) 


en 
u 

a 


<u 
>> 


en 

a 
<u 

00 


tn 
Ih 
Rj 
<U 

>> 

ON 


(0 
It 

oj 
0) 

o 

CN 


> 
O 

c 

CN 


HI 
<U 

>> 


en 

Ih 

03 
<U 

>> 


en 

0) 
>^ 


CO 

Ih 

o3 


en 
Ih 

03 
oo 


en 

03 
0) 
>*> 
On 


en 

rt 

CU 

o 

CN 


cu 

o 
-o 

c 

CN 


<u 

3 a, 
£o 

i 1 


172 


































28 
24 
26 
24 
27 
38 
54 
19 
34 
43 
27 
10 
30 
21 
33 
11 
38 
24 
33 
11 
25 
23 
35 
5 
2 
32 
1 19 


38 
40 
56 
52 
34 
37 
53 
30 
37 
62 
43 
16 
41 
25 
51 
12 
56 
36 
45 
10 
31 
45 
56 
24 
8 
35 
24 


66 


173 


































64 


174 


































82 


175 


































76 


176 


































61 


177 


































75 


178 


































107 


179 


































49 


180 


































71 


181 


































105 


182 


































70 


183 


































26 


184 


































71 


185 


































46 


186 


































84 


187 


































23 


188 


































94 


189 


































60 


190 


































78 


191 


































21 


192 


































56 


193 


































68 


194 


























1 








91 


195 
































29 


196 


































10 


197 


































67 


198 


































43 



BY AGE 


, SEX AND GRADE 










15 yrs. 


16 yrs. 


17 yrs. 


18 yrs. 


19 yrs. 


20 yrs. 


21 yrs. 
and over 


TOTALS 


398 


193 


48 


9 


2 


2 


2 


1,739 


515 


216 


69 


21 


9 


3 


4 


2,310 


384 


273 


123 


28 


3 


2 


1 


1,161 


505 


385 


173 


49 


14 


6 


2 


1,734 


226 


382 


336 


222 


70 


31 


29 


1,366 


381 


644 


539 


316 


124 


43 


30 


2,205 




5 


1 


1 




1 


1 


9 


1 


8 


6 


5 






1 


21 








1,008 


853 


508 


260 


75 


36 


33 


4,275 


1,402 


1,253 


787 


391 


147 


52 


37 


6,270 


4,820 


4,212 


2,590 


1,302 


444 


176 


140 


10.545 



174 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 



Collegiate 
Institutes 



Receipts 



.2 a 



JO 



So 



us 

"S c 

So 



"J £ 

to 3 



mo 



1 Barrie 

2 Brantford. . . . 

3 Brockville. . . . 

4 Chatham 

5 Clinton 

6 Cobourg 

7 Collingwood . . 

8 Fort William . . 

9 Gait 

10 Goderich 

11 Guelph 

12 Hamilton, Cen 

tral 

13 Ingersoll 

14 Kingston 

15 Kitchener- 

Waterloo. . . 

16 Lindsay 

17 London 

18 Morrisburg. . . 

19 Napanee 

20 Niagara Falls. 

21 North Bay... . 

22 Orillia 

23 Ottawa 

24 Owen Sound. . 

25 Perth 

26 Peterborough . 

27 Picton 

28 Port Arthur... 

29 Renfrew 

30 St. Catharines. 

31 St. Mary's... . 

32 St. Thomas. . . 

33 Sarnia 

34 SaultSte. Marie 

35 Seaforth 

36 Smith's Falls. . 

37 Stratford 

38 Strathroy 

Toronto : 

39 Harbord. . . . 

40 Humberside. 

41 Jarvis 

42 Malvern 

43 North 

44 Oakwood . . . 

45 Parkdale . . . 

46 Riverdale. . . 

47 VankleekHill. 

48 Walkerville. . . 

49 Windsor 

50 Woodstock. . . 

Totals 



$ c. 
1,913 50 
2,664 25 
2,020 24 
1,692 50 
1,491 50 
1,879 50 
2,125 50 
5,906 42 
2,568 25 
1,338 00 
1,813 23 

5,008 41 
1,677 36 
1,683 50 

2,012 16 
1,967 50 
2,887 33 
1,628 50 
1,759 86 
2,053 25 
7,828 40 
1,728 77 
1,966 50 
2,298 25 
1,749 50 
1,417 50 
2,035 50 
3,711 00 
2,062 00 
2,059 50 
1,782 50 
2,230 33 
2,541 
5,942 
1,624 50 
1,932 50 
1,855 00 
1,972 47 

2,671 83 
1,696 50 
1,795 50 
1,893 50 
2,189 33 
3,307 50 
1,683 50 
3,245 50 
1,739 50 
2,717 75 
3,706 41 
2,187 50 



21,662 91 



$ c 

13,378 87 

11,711 97 

8,301 20 

11,185 58 

8,893 93 

8,930 20 

9,096 43 



27,656 31 

6,491 32 

12,804 63 

18,596 06 
7,291 99 
9,424 33 

11,591 71 
21,442 14 
19,672 80 

5,874 98 
10,303 41 

4,479 08 



7,538 79 

14,282 25 

9,548 79 

12,928 90 

2,569 00 

12,359 29 



20,853 58 

20,578 53 

7,712 31 

11,159 01 

4,738 28 



10,692 31 
9,641 14 
7,378 04 

10,671 39 



10,511 11 

12,862 50 

10,712 70 

16,574 94 



440,439 80 



$ c 
15,624 62 
54,476 05 
28,300 00 
24,679 44 
7,700 00 
16,000 00 
17,697 51 
34,982 41 
13,215 26 
12,000 00 
41,267 87 

146,845 00 
17,469 00 
50,000 00 

28,975 25 

14,080 59 

219,496 26 

6,398 51 

8,869 38 

19,458 53 

46,519 31 

19.499 42 
160,071 60 

32,813 50 
15,035 94 
53,200 00 
7,300 00 
49,823 10 

12.500 00 
58,640 96 
11,000 00 
55,000 00 
30,703 94 
39,708 04 

4,983 27 
30,000 00 
52,791 07 

4,200 00 

275,845 47 
113,370 81 
158,270 07 

69,554 57 

81,144 53 
112,174 99 

95,579 63 

118,866 21 

5,250 00 

55,000 00 
113,741 34 

30,276 24 



2,690,399 69 



S 



18,459 24 



51,985 83 
57,900 00 
46,877 98 



8,000 00 



41,864 17 



13,168 78 
20,000 00 



88,139 80 

1,685 30 

5,254 13 

594 82 



2,379 23 



28,648 35 



384,957 63 



" $ c 
2,989 06 
6,369 27 

629 16 
8,727 99 

482 85 

10,564 84 

2,882 69 

352 31 
5,313 60 
6,240 79 
1,037 77 



14,495 33 
1,474 76 

2,425 58 

3,023 09 
2,354 14 
4,318 41 
1,927 30 
8,043 72 
6,310 61 
2,652 44 
9,300 23 

27,924 59 

11,830 81 
6,924 05 
5,629 93 

11,402 91 
1,343 02 
4,437 72 

97,541 75 
2,096 65 
2,451 70 

38,406 51 

2,977 09 

4,112 75 

906 84 

398 91 

648 42 



135,807 

52,663 

223,849 

11,144 

13,877 

11,932 38 

206 25 

53,522 43 

14,158 92 

12,040 95 

7,440 87 

5,327 97 



15 
21 
11 

35 



$ c- 
33,906 05 
93,680 78 
39,250 60 
46,285 51 
18,568 28 
37,374 54 
31,802 13 
41,241 14 

100,739 25 
83,970 11 

103,801 48 

184,944 80 
27,913 11 
63,533 41 

45,602 21 

39,844 37 
254,374 80 
15,829 29 
28,976 37 
32,301 47 
57,000 
38,067 
246,109 
56,491 
36,638 39 
62,816 43 
33,097 70 
54,877 12 
39,853 30 
191,989 52 
42,591 46 
70,841 04 
76,390 23 
48,627 24 
21,412 83 
42,480 48 
62,423 02 
17,492 28 

502,464 68 

169,416 53 

389,168 84 

83,187 87 

97,211 03 

127,414 87 

97,469 38 

178,013 37 

31,659 53 

82,621 20 

164,249 67 

54,366 65 



862,922 15 



4,500,382 18 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



175 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
STATEMENT 



Expenditure 



8(. 

rt,2 
He/) 


Buildings, Sites 
and all perman- 
ent improve- 
ments 


J -a 

s-g 

fa 

Q. O 


Library, scientific 
apparatus, maps, 
etc, typewriters, 
and equipmentfor 
physical culture 


Art, manual 
training, house- 
hold science and 
agricultural dept. 
equipment 


School books, 
stationery, prizes, 
fuel, examina- 
tions, and all 
other expenses 


V 

u 

3 

-, c 

O X 

Hfcd 


1 


$ c 
26,897 00 
62,390 23 
27,956 00 
30,994 45 

13.419 32 
21,270 00 
21,720 00 
32,761 94 
35,040 81 
14,388 00 
31,577 66 

112,257 02 
18,950 00 
51,540 83 

22,585 58 
30,532 48 
147,186 97 
12,601 80 
17,647 50 

22.420 00 
31,946 51 
22,945 75 

155,415 70 
33,368 00 
17,979 00 
45,830 00 
18,460 00 
32,993 90 
22,228 04 
51,711 76 
18,143 75 
54,763 00 
36,904 76 
37,245 00 
16,226 83 
31,286 50 
39,672 33 
13,327 30 

86,785 02 
90,495 65 
81,320 00 
54,164 00 
66,452 00 
110,056 77 
78,364 86 
87,849 12 
13,512 85 
32,137 00 
85,162 59 
37,399 52 


$ c. 

282 60 

18,772 00 


$ c 
552 10 

2,836 30 

459 81 

821 96 

99 54 

1,979 41 
126 46 
176 85 

2,274 80 
12,512 63 

3,242 10 


$ C 
655 82 


$ c. 


$ c. 
4,739 17 
9,682 25 
8,692 51 
7,845 17 
2,602 17 
4,697 10 
6,412 14 
7,193 25 
7,626 00 
3,671 67 
62,677 S3 

48,652 80 
4,017 53 
6,772 35 

12,602 70 

6,636 96 

82,664 23 

2,744 04 

4,864 30 

8,161 25 

17,921 00 

6,716 79 

64,142 05 

8,536 10 

5,317 62 

14,841 28 

3,648 46 

17,648 90 

13,539 06 

86,816 80 

4,053 60 

11,027 84 

32,953 03 

10,666 12 

2,488 57 

6,742 44 

14,345 82 

2,960 67 

276,009 11 
15,350 41 
23,331 55 
13,243 23 
15,745 02 
12,915 26 
13,737 94 
17,334 59 
2,777 86 
26,731 62 
53,177 78 
13,50/ 60 


$ c. 
33,126 69 


? 




93,680 78 


3 


1,351 59 
512 37 
316 81 

2,099 15 




38,459 91 


4 


734 26 




40,908 21 


S 




16,437 84 


6 

7 


924 53 

584 75 

100 30 

55,076 12 

49,479 58 


14 40 
31 95 


30,984 59 
28,875 30 


8 


1,008 80 
306 35 

53 72 
459 21 

345 32 
642 37 

581 71 

389 77 
169 05 

2,947 38 
367 55 
593 48 
653 48 

1,412 51 

582 96 


41,241 14 







100,324 08 


10 




80,105 60 


11 




97,956 80 


1? 


113 48 
174 00 
944 50 

959 12 
664 12 

18,418 31 




161,368 62 


13 
14 


763 37 
706 03 

906 60 
367 14 

3,148 46 
115 90 
243 32 

1,066 74 
604 68 
226 06 

5,357 79 

1,178 98 
782 71 

1,198 62 


227 00 


24,774 27 
60,545 42 


15 




37,443 77 


16 




38,369 75 


17 
18 


9 45 


254,374 80 
15,829 29 


10 






23,348 60 


?0 






32,301 47 


21 


5,115 45 
367 14 

17,203 73 
10,229 47 




57,000 15 


?,? 




30,838 70 


23 




242,119 27 


74 


3,178 80 
1,033 30 




56,491 35 


25 




25,112 63 


76 






61,869 90 


77 


378 00 
688 50 




116 55 


22,603 01 


78 


2,127 49 
255 31 
636 34 
285 55 
628 56 
151 86 
391 26 
401 10 
190 83 

1,280 27 
777 07 

2,759 83 
6,251 45 
3,350 46 
3,669 61 
2,498 24 
2,146 14 
2,609 91 
9,563 74 
130 00 
437 00 
4,992 98 
1,191 70 


1,418 33 
198 54 
923 63 
108 56 

' 1,233 18 


54,877 12 


79 


250 00 


36,470 95 


30 


42,655 16 

19,783 71 

3,614 23 

5,147 40 


182,743 69 


31 




42,375 17 


32 
3,S 


807 41 


70,841 04 
76,390 23 


34 




48,302 38 


3.S 




597 30 




19,713 80 


36 


824 20 
1,119 00 


12 30 


39,056 27 


37 


800 00 


57,217 42 


38 


94 68 


17,159 72 


39 


76,639 25 

55,305 88 

259,609 64 

11,434 16 

11,930 15 

807 89 

2,430 55 

61,632 25 

109 95 

729 57 

17,246 56 

1,524 00 


604 76 

718 67 
1,524 96 
496 70 
585 62 
631 52 
326 12 
560 59 


442,797 97 


40 




168,122 06 


41 
42 


1,854 53 


370,991 14 
83,007 70 


43 
44 
45 


' 85729 


97,211 03 

127,414 87 

97,469 38 


46 

47 


720 35 


177,660 64 
16,530 66 


48 
49 
50 


1,119 27 
2,769 98 

222 55 


779 60 

899 78 
347 36 


61,934 06 

164,249 67 

54,192 73 


2,258,285 10 


753,753 51 


88,475 06 


34,501 78 


7,022 65 


1,111,183 54 


4,253,221 64 



176 



THE REPORT OE THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


High Schools 


3 c 
JO 


c 

3 
— O 

a u 
ft" - ' 
'D.2 

So 


■ai 

a 5 ? 

id 


CO 

V 

M 

3 

e 

1 

P 


• "§8 

W 3 
V O 
U CO 

S u 

PQ o 


CO 

a 
1 

V 

K 

"c3 

■4-> 

o 
H 


1 Alexandria. 


$ c. 
1,547 00 
1,299 19 
1,438 05 
1,863 83 
1,749 00 
1,471 80 
1,180 04 
1,839 26 
1,179 01 
1,686 99 
6,275 72 
3,093 41 
1,843 50 
2,566 84 
1,000 64 
1,788 21 
1,248 96 
1,579 45 
1,816 43 
1,422 07 
1,732 50 
1,777 14 
1,495 25 
2,402 66 
804 16 
1,504 47 
1,296 64 
1,298 20 
1,859 53 
1,203 84 
1,033 54 
1,513 49 
1,751 72 
1,322 05 
1,253 48 
1,162 07 
1,042 36 
2,081 10 
1,399 05 
1,421 96 
1,388 88 
1,269 12 

10,833 83 
1,655 00 
1,629 15 
1,114 26 
2,438 80 
1,533 25 
1,540 12 

17,338 75 
1,510 71 
1,217 77 
1,390 16 
1,235 74 
1,378 01 
1,447 52 
3,380 80 


$ c. 
1,356 31 
7,380 01 
3,875 91 
5,979 53 
9,088 01 
6,859 66 

10,431 86 
5,748 91 
2,029 15 
1,686 99 

20,097 09 
9,883 17 
7,049 67 

1,187 24 

11,159 66 
4,096 59 
7,449 80 
7,675 27 
7,587 52 
6,936 22 

12,434 77 
3,292 26 

" 1,458 "98 
5,833 18 
3,801 93 
4,222 48 

13,612 26 
2,336 38 
3,965 33 
5,313 99 

11,503 79 
4,765 89 
9,675 80 
3,364 31 
3,889 41 

12,704 65 
8,652 37 
5,567 48 
1,482 39 
7,206 87 

4,470 43 
7,155 26 
5,379 29 


$ c 
10,300 00 
3,500 00 
5,336 79 
9,762 25 
16,341 40 
4,194 82 
5,155 75 
9,300 00 
6,400 00 
3,500 00 


$ c. 


$ c. 
1,042 73 

539 16 
5,839 72 

819 48 

1,654 66 

1,081 89 

23,130 90 

2.659 03 
3,076 29 
7,459 49 

323 71 

511 16 

409 58 

93 40 

5,920 78 

1,103 48 

870 51 

11,542 40 

645 32 

6,120 37 

15,539 93 

20,312 03 

1,713 61 

1.038 11 
1,740 42 

2.660 46 
2,320 45 
7,701 88 

15,634 12 

488 48 

749 86 

1,814 90 

3,361 29 

1,421 33 

532 50 

258 89 

879 21 

1,073 28 

7,688 08 

4,125 86 

3,384 24 

2,745 60 

1,036 88 

614 48 

1,642 42 

1,598 93 

13 18 

491 80 

1.039 03 
3,343 43 

11,594 50 
43,433 17 
651 56 
590 00 
4,368 20 
537 32 
175 00 


$ c- 
14,246 04 


2 Alliston . . 




12,718 36 


3 Almonte 




16,490 47 


4 Amherstburg. . . 

5 Arnprior 

6 Arthur 




18,425 09 




28,833 07 




13,608 17 


7 Athens 

8 Aurora 

9 Avon more . . . 


32,800 00 
7,293 37 


72,698 55 
26,840 57 
12,684 45 


10 Aylmer 




14,333 47 


11 Beamsville 




26,696 52 


12 Belleville 


30,992 02 
9,300 00 
9,712 77 
5,000 00 
9,500 00 
2,500 00 
274 22 
9,000 00 




44,479 76 






18,602 75 


14 Bracebridge. . . . 

15 Bradford 

16 Brampton 

17 Brighton 

18 Burford 




12,373 01 


49,462 34 


62,571 00 
23,551 35 




8,716 06 




20,845 87 


19 Burlington 

20 Caledonia 




19,137 02 


2,901 67 
44,833 66 
16,500 00 


18,031 63 


21 Campbellford. . 

22 Carleton Place. 

23 Cayuga 

24 Chapleau 

25 Chatsworth 


7,700 00 
9,300 00 
7,143 00 
12,000 00 
2,562 96 
6,300 00 
3,278 90 

3.499 30 
21,000 00 

6,000 00 

2.500 00 
11,100 00 
10,000 00 

2,778 21 
1,200 00 
6,000 00 
3,000 00 
8,400 00 
3,934 12 
5,500 00 
6,439 50 
4,500 00 
8,000 00 
8,540 87 
4,690 54 
2,350 00 
5,162 40 
7,000 00 
4,200 00 
11,735 36 
85,251 00 
8,500 00 
4,775 00 
4,036 27 
3,500 00 
4,460 96 
16,020 70 


76,742 31 
60,323 14 
13,644 12 




15,440 77 




6,566 52 


26 Chesley 

27 Chesterville 




16,298 11 




10,697 92 


28 Colborne 




16,721 86 


29 Cornwall 


18,269 99 


70,375 90 
10,028 70 


31 Dundalk 




8,248 73 


32 Dundas 




19,742 38 






26,616 80 






10,287 48 


35 Dutton 




12,661 78 






10,785 27 


37 Elora 




8,810 98 


38 Essex. . . . 


3,000 00 


27,259 03 


39 Exeter 


21,673 62 


40 Fergus 




16,615 30 




12,695 01 


42 Forest 




15,721 59 


43 Fort Frances . . . 

44 Gananoque. . . . 

45 Georgetown 


7,301 72 


27,172 43 
15,280 78 


4,520 66 


19,638 03 
10,442 48 






7,614 38 


48 Grimsby 

49 Hagersville .... 

50 Haileybury. . . . 

51 Hamilton, Delta 

52 Hanover 


6,251 03 
7,395 99 




15,276 08 




14,175 14 




32,417 54 


764 35 
1,217 77 
3,944 84 
2,772 34 
5,709 42 
5,900 89 


693,883 79 
10,000 00 


793,004 35 
64,386 71 
10,761 56 


54 Hawkesbury. . . 

55 Iroquois 

56 Kemptville. . . . 




8,634 35 




14,955 63 




12,346 69 




19,576 50 











DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



177 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 



£ w » O 

"■2 « S ti S 
<u c b <i> — 
"3 .Ms 
M . s a.& " 
hid r? 3"c3 

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O X 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 



S c 

10,180 00 

10,000 00 

9,980 00 

9,400 00 

18,670 00 

9,666 58 

8,380 00 

14,517 50 

6,680 00 

10,390 50 

14,340 00 

36,064 90 

13,333 12 

8,677 33 

5,700 00 

18,020 00 

5,800 00 

6,370 00 

11,658 00 

9,472 50 

13,333 00 

14,848 00 

8,020 00 

7,080 00 

^3,568 70 

11,008 50 

5,900 00 

6,660 00 

25,800 00 

6,100 00 

6,178 81 

14,149 52 

12,713 53 

7,997 13 

9,050 00 

6,900 00 

5,832 50 

13,418 72 

11,920 00 

10,457 75 

6,827 80 

8,820 00 

12,505 64 

12,070 00 

10,520 00 

7,290 00 

6,100 00 

10,633 00 

10,016 60 

12,054 98 

27,879 98 

8,707 12 

8,160 00 

6,200 00 

8,600 00 

10,480 00 

14,125 40 



$ c. 
76 89 

230 26 
1,800 00 
1,218 65 
2,016 92 

897 18 

52,484 55 

1,019 25 

153 38 

123 33 
1,048 41 



344 95 

2,152 71 

32,114 75 

200 00 

660 16 



1,157 29 

973 55 

57,435 52 

36,503 98 

1,030 38 

866 03 



1,370 00 
69 90 



28,176 81 

28 00 

405 50 

1,759 90 

89 16 

118 40 



373 96 



4,887 70 

82 38 

65 65 

225 23 

366 53 

509 20 

173 50 

4,810 01 

394 99 

74 00 



4 80 

534 70 

29,259 63 

43,110 64 

622 00 

9 24 

236 58 

416 15 



$ 
377 



29 
604 

67 
343 

36 
196 
148 
368 
650 
554 
498 



113 
300 
45 
267 
172 



2,034 
190 



54 60 
3 20 
652 95 
172 69 
141 90 
141 42 
1,568 39 

30 27 
286 75 
136 54 
112 55 

25 96 



386 72 
986 39 

78 25 
391 07 

31 80 
328 15 

42 40 
347 29 
800 71 
958 08 

38 75 
357 46 
258 35 
635 22 



3 60 

219 45 

475 73 

75 46 

123 38 



$ c. 
37 50 



934 29 



52 00 
21 65 



29 53 

554 42 

19 12 

140 14 

768 59 

1,591 20 



65 80 
437 92 
130 77 
430 18 
175 25 



100 00 
84 36 

218 01 
95 00 



337 65 



164 93 
379 82 
128 03 
179 06 
42 83 
97 00 
111 68 



332 58 

49 42 

32 57 

145 42 

1,146 73 

466 09 

679 10 



72 06 
283 80 



133 25 
11,885 68 

74 05 
190 50 
192 93 

95 48 



250 00 



15 55 
98 16 



398 79 
,780 11 
194 65 
101 75 



46 75 



102 43 
13145 



139 74 
2,299 35 



9 32 



$ c 
2,803 77 
2,101 20 

541 53 
5,479 22 
4,974 06 
2,571 81 
1,544 51 
10,999 50 
1,812 03 
3,421 38 
9,704 45 
6,061 23 
4,091 31 

391 75 
23,051 
3,323 62 
2,046 12 
3,420 16 
5,212 55 
5,635 53 
3,478 44 
3,774 30 
4,302 14 
7,293 78 
1,021 90 

881 75 
2,099 06 
3,635 71 
5,375 83 
1,876 08 
1,166 95 
3,101 78 
5,679 14 
1,880 34 
1,683 98 
1,838 20 
1,283 50 
6,930 47 
1,958 25 
1,992 62 
1,486 15 
1,979 26 
8,761 
2,223 90 
2,828 21 
1,503 94 
1,286 95 
1,897 56 
2,626 40 
10,471 51 
331,167 36 
2,312 85 
1,569 61 
1,756 45 
1,754 48 
1,231 10 
5,431 64 



$ c. 
13,475 99 
12,331 46 
12,350 78 
17,886 63 
25,728 40 
13,547 06 

62.565 57 
26,732 40 

8,794 38 
14,333 47 
26,696 52 
44,479 76 
18,602 75 
12,092 13 
62,571 00 
21,843 62 

8,552 23 
10,123 02 

18.638 07 
16,212 35 
76,711 53 
55,492 38 
13,352 52 
15,394 41 

4,678 16 
14,131 21 

8,383 40 
10,437 61 
59,831 71 

9,572 47 

7,946 46 
19,677 77 
18,746 40 
10,287 48 
10,802 77 

9,209 16 

7,614 40 
26,325 71 
14,371 46 
12,956 51 

8,735 00 

11.639 36 
22,965 69 
15,280 78 
19,638 03 
10,147 01 

7,571 76 
13,171 82 
12,906 15 
23,969 40 
402,492 00 
54,208 26 

10.761 56 
8,634 35 

10.762 00 
12,250 63 

19.566 36 



178 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 



High Schools 



Receipts 



m c 

'Go a 

JO 



26 



c 5 



58 Kincardine. . . 


$ c. 
1,761 15 


59 Kingsville. . . . 


1,605 03 


60 Lakefield 


1,014 37 


61 Leamington. . . 


1,885 50 


62 Listowel 


1,606 16 


63 Lucan 


1,246 90 


64 Madoc 


1,454 59 


65 Markdale 


1,029 45 


66 Markham. . . . 


1,284 97 


67 Meaford 


1,595 04 


68 Midland.. 


1,798 50 


69 Milton 


1,572 34 


70 Mimico 


1,430 03 


71 Mitchell 


1,301 52 


72 Norwood 


840 44 


73 Mount Forest. 


1,314 88 


74 Nepean 


1,639 08 


75 Newburgh. . . . 


1,997 41 


76 Newcastle .... 


864 83 


77 NewLiskeard. 


2,531 62 


78 Newmarket. . 


1,585 14 


79 Niagara 


1,092 17 


80 Niagara Falls, 




- South 


2,219 18 


81 Norwich 


1,428 12 


82 Norwood . . 


1,315 99 


83 Oakville.. . 


2,004 50 


84 Omemee .... 


895 07 


85 Orangeville. . . 


1,754 93 


86 Oshawa. . 


1,539 51 


87 Paris 


1,670 00 


88 Parkhill. . . 


1,376 31 


89 Parry Sound. . 


2,877 44 


90 Pembroke. . 


1,419 30 


91 Penetang'h'ne: 


1,377 68 


92 Petrolia 


1,352 10 


93 Plantagenet. . 


872 67 


94 Port Colborne. 


1,589 96 


95 Port Dover. . 


1,133 98 


96 Port Elgin .... 


1,027 56 


97 Port Hope 


1,640 90 


98 Pert Perry 


4,034 73 


99 Port Rowan.. . 


870 02 


100 Prescott 


1,465 30 


101 Richmond Hill 


1,470 55 


102 Ridgetown 


1,488 05 


103 Rockland 


1,062 64 


104 Scarborough . . 


2,023 45 


105 Shelburne. . . 


1,150 31 


106 Simcoe 


1,558 33 


107 Smithville 


1,016 81 


108 Sterling 


1,496 20 


109 Streetsville. . . 


1,001 78 


110 Sudbury 


9,149 28 


Ill Sydenham. . . . 


1,440 32 


112 Thessalon .... 


3,065 92 


113 Thorold. 


1,454 97 



$ c 
7,709 42 
4,975 65 
1,338 05 
9,799 82 
6,681 55 
7,699 65 
5,252 48 
1,662 57 
6,744 67 
4,920 26 
2,758 55 
1,486 80 
5,809 01 
4,802 15 

885 02 
4,473 99 



4,059 
1,411 


08 
00 


18,640 
2,871 


36 

54 



7,080 31 

5.565 38 
8,486 24 
1,882 03 

8.566 03 
6,157 45 
7,684 27 
5,873 90 



2,935 17 

1,377 68 

7,915 87 

1,999 57 



1,166 61 
3,213 62 
6,628 29 
5,656 64 
2,034 00 
2,595 20 
9,992 32 
6,477 84 
3,377 29 
7,174 84 
4,412 0C 
8,903 43 
6,479 16 
7,535 35 
4,217 70 



10.700 00 
"l" 764 33 



$ 

7,891 

7,000 

5,900 

15,000 

5,800 

2,800 

3,400 

5,245 

2,350 

6,500 

17,943 

12,800 

4,000 

5,300 

3,011 

4,000 

18,000 

1,334 

2,429 

12,625 

12,500 

4,225 



35,000 00 
8,433 35 
3,302 54 

13.000 00 
2,506 87 
7,100 00 

37.001 61 
5,000 00 
2,969 33 
9,429 77 

23,593 96 
7,091 28 

10,000 00 
4,314 64 

14,675 00 
4,209 82 
1,900 00 

10,935 27 
3,200 00 
2,387 84 
8,870 59 
5,000 00 
5,900 00 
2,911 23 

17,186 89 
5,021 00 
4,939 99 
6,000 00 
3,950 00 
2,400 00 

24,691 36 



8,857 64 
9,500 00 



$ c. 
1,000 00 



15,000 00 

31,921 20 

5,606 91 



154,173 32 
35,805 00 



146,540 15 



15,000 00 



7,948 68 



286,250 86 
14,530 10 



23,150 00 



$ c. 
2,974 29 
2,061 09 

205 35 
5,324 84 

384 20 

621 31 

120 58 
3,355 40 

884 63 
1,427 59 
2,457 83 

445 12 
4,599 06 
2,247 83 
8,485 58 

582 55 

1,331 02 

3,036 01 

68 50 

294 96 
1,482 63 
1,345 80 

14,164 36 

5,182 89 

1,421 26 

210 45 

681 41 

1,643 39 

673 84 

17,915 09 

233 49 

53 58 

1,146 45 

669 84 

4,488 94 

6,740 44 

1,316 80 

95 90 

3,654 68 

1,675 17 

1,026 01 



246 64 

776 45 

274 30 

2,030 20 

408 15 

170 12 

230 40 

12,376 35 

6,017 81 

1,004 81 

4,532 81 

199 10 

8,285 64 

686 33 



$ c. 
21,336 01 
15,641 77 
8,457 77 
32,010 16 
14,471 91 
12,367 86 
10,227 65 
11,292 51 
26,264 27 
46,364 09 
30,565 60 
16,304 26 

170,011 42 
49,456 50 
13,222 99 
10,371 42 

167,510 25 

10,426 51 

4,774 14 

15,451 58 

49,208 13 

9,534 51 



59,332 22 
22,124 67 
11,605 17 
23,701 19 

5,965 38 
19,064 35 
331,623 27 
46,799 46 
10,453 03 
12,360 79 
29,094 88 
10,516 48 
23,756 91 
13,927 32 
17,581 76 

6,606 31 

9,795 86 
20,879 63 
13,917 38 

5,291 86 
13,177 73 
17,239 32 
14,410 19 

9,381 36 
26,793 33 
10,753 43 
15,632 15 
49,022 32 
18,999 36 

8,624 29 
38,373 45 
12,339 42 
20,209 20 
13.405 63 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



179 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Continued) 



Expenditure 





to C 


o M 






o c 




'fiu I 


■sj 




dings, 

all pe 
improv 
ts 


* J o 


« cd 


•a a 


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and 
ent 
men 





<S&e\§„ 

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to Cfl 4J 

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9 ,J 3 £ 



"i <-> cars to 

o a .S g 
115 S S 



O X 



58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 



$ c 

12,180 00 

11,316 50 

5,531 25 

18,252 00 

12,923 51 

7,988 50 

7,962 96 

5,720 00 

8,190 00 

12,018 60 

15.399 00 
12,676 50 

7,125 85 
8,470 00 
4,000 00 
8,067 50 

13,635 62 
5,260 00 
3,700 00 
6,811 96 

19,981 00 
5,440 00 

15,663 32 
9,668 50 
7,947 15 

16,672 40 
3,780 00 

14,780 00 

38,015 82 

10,960 50 
8,120 00 

10,064 34 

20,369 38 
7,760 00 

13,180 00 
5,360 00 

12,120 00 
5,660 00 
5,680 00 

16,085 31 

10.400 42 
4,240 00 

10,280 00 

12,000 00 

10,100 00 

5,200 00 

14,940 00 

8,143 00 

12,871 00 

6,550 00 

9,605 00 

5,900 00 

25,220 00 

9,645 00 

6,040 00 

10,530 00 



tf c 

776 01 

1,550 68 

2,123 65 

133 07 



119 70 

11,702 80 

29,590 14 

3,964 63 



.52,902 94 
3,512 56 



148,086 71 



353 43 
1,449 22 



6,957 78 
815 37 
185 55 
445 22 
128 31 



247,881 S3 



381 78 



1,802 32 

82 61 

1,500 00 

400 00 

1,526 15 

1 50 



430 91 
489 04 
367 31 
110 25 
393 92 



60 00 
1,246 58 
1,017 10 



21,459 50 
"23100 



12,225 89 
158 61 



57 
321 



967 08 
195 88 
183 00 

35 55 
310 68 

52 07 
130 12 
243 64 

98 46 

76 25 



9 15 



302 85 
16 50 

348 67 
3,032 47 

303 00 

589 37 

319 25 

78 32 

419 59 



118 45 
427 18 
25 27 
8 70 
307 08 
284 18 
262 63 



144 20 
160 40 



31 29 

365 55 
54 31 



88 07 

575 00 

3,706 09 

1,225 18 

64 85 

347 72 

79 24 

3 00 

299 46 



> c. 

9 48 

30 34 



968 13 

158 63 

192 85 

69 73 



109 85 

422 17 

1,405 99 

109 13 



5 35 



140 44 
35 52 
75 82 

199 83 
60 52 

386 26 

991 87 
274 91 

75 65 
521 44 

95 00 
297 08 



16 92 

184 72 



105 22 



347 44 



21 96 

78 33 

78 73 
160 61 

33 22 
118 28 
1,870 13 
295 83 
308 29 
670 89 

29 51 



377 38 

2,201 46 

13 90 



50 40 



$ c 
77 30 



23 15 



907 29 



207 42 
58621 



597 16 



214 09 



$ 


c. 


2,993 


09 


2,422 


41 


787 


68 


3,782 


10 


1,193 


89 


3,930 


49 


1,752 


89 


1,058 


26 


1,876 


80 


1,859 


52 


9,552 


34 


3,360 


65 


478 


71 


3,705 


15 


906 


77 


1,650 


48 


3,659 


16 


767 


04 


628 


39 


4,250 


72 


17,809 


34 


1,478 


51 


14,881 


98 


5,450 


81 


1,812 


73 


3,130 


42 


1,442 


15 


2,659 


61 


44,586 


10 


2,443 


54 


1,707 


61 


1,989 


37 


6,381 


69 


2,258 


47 


2,353 


24 


1,002 


99 


3,925 


33 


922 


85 


1,140 


04 


1,921 


83 


2,033 


97 


651 


33 


2,282 


34 


2,408 


99 


3,3C0 


42 


1,042 


60 


9,637 


S3 


1,331 


37 


2,161 


52 


7,716 


55 


2,656 


29 


890 


65 


7,021 


59 


2,445 


58 


1,940 


31 


2,363 


81 



12 
13 
93 



16,093 S3 
15,641 77 

8,442 58 
24,102 38 
14,471 91 
12,317 99 

9,821 13 

7,208 64 
21,931 52 
44,020 55 
30,565 60 
16,244 74 
160,583 75 
15,687 71 

4,912 

9,727 
165,521 

6,365 41 

4,774 14 
13,967 69 
40,883 33 

7,607 77 

39,291 74 
16,528 84 
10,099 40 
21,775 28 

5,445 46 
17,855 14 
330,910 93 
13,446 23 
10,402 81 
12,360 79 
28,942 79 
10,363 71 
17,033 24 

7,110 43 
17,571 48 

6,606 31 

6,898 37 
18,660 98 
13,841 60 

5,291 86 
12,790 87 
16,704 33 
14,061 80 

6,665 20 
26,709 39 
10,609 05 
15,607 52 
39,432 14 
13,486 47 

7,463 88 
34,790 77 
12.183 72 
20,209 20 
13.402 28 



180 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
I. TABLE L— FINANCIAL 





Receipts 


High Schools 


> 
JO 


s 

3 
— O 

a o 

.2- 
'o .2 

' 5 5 

So 


■a J 

So 


<u 

In 

3 

C 
u 

CI 

P 


5 o 
m 5 

4) O 

w to 

5 »• 

a &> 
OQo 


03 

a 
To 

u 

<v 
& 

"3 

o 
H 


114 Tillsonburg. . . 


$ c. 
1,925 65 
3,680 72 

1,540 17 
1,889 06 
1,475 28 
1,750 35 

615 85 
1,538 42 
1,527 76 

947 30 
1,231 59 
1,160 86 
1,308 28 
1,824 90 
1,769 50 
1,819 49 
1,537 85 
1,441 99 
1,743 06 
1,533 17 


$ c. 
8,857 20 


$ c 

8,000 00 

23,000 00 

36,184 14 
8,806 00 
3,500 00 

93,879 10 
1,250 00 
6,000 00 

10,615 00 

926 43 

5,700 00 

2,900 00 

5,300 00 

22,079 41 
2,657 06 
7,721 35 
4,500 00 
7,743 61 
5,500 00 
4,624 00 


$ c 


$ c. 
2,282 65 
1,855 22 

193 52 
4,877 05 
5,611 36 
5,697 00 
2,288 98 
2,894 18 

320 43 

368 82 
1,151 08 

756 26 
6,243 71 

884 94 
12,541 89 

848 91 
2,717 36 

916 44 
3,688 18 
3,748 20 


$ C 

21,065 50 


115 Timmins 


116,672 70 


145,208 64 


116 Toronto, 

Davenport. . 




37,917 83 


117 Trenton 


4,912 18 
7,853 56 
7,497 01 
2,131 64 
6,756 74 
4,509 59 
2,667 19 
1,829 31 
4,389 98 
5,916 20 
10,217 53 
17,477 40 
6,591 61 
6,529 82 
1,296 69 
5,307 70 
9,178 66 




20,484 29 


118 Tweed 




18,440 20 


119 Uxbridge 




108,823 46 


120 Vienna 




6,286 47 


121 Walkerton. . . . 




17,189 34 


122 Wallaceburg. . 




16,972 78 


123 Wardsville.... 




4,909 74 


124 Waterdown. . . 




9,911 98 


125 Waterf ord . . . . 

126 Watford 


1,000 00 


10,207 10 
18,768 19 


127 Welland 




35,006 78 


128 Weston 




34,445 85 


129 Whitby 




16,981 36 


130 Wiarton 




15,285 03 


131 Williamstown . 




11,398 73 


132 Winchester. . . 




16,238 94 


133 Wingham 




19,084 03 








1 Totals, High 

Schools 

2 Totals, Collegiate 

Institutes 


245,502 71 
121,662 91 


689,358 91 
440,439 80 


1,204,650 95 
2,690,399 69 


1,745,366 12 
384,957 63 


447,013 94 
862,922 15 


4,331,892 63 
4,500,382 18 


3 Grand Totals, 
1924 


367,165 62 
328,013 90 


1,129,798 71 
958,760 08 


3,895,050 64 
3,386,184 26 


2,130,323 75 
1,918,668 21 


1,309,936 09 

1,789,722 55 


8,832,274 81 


4 Grand Totals, 
1923 


8,381,349 00 






5 Increases 


39,151 72 


171,038 63 


508,866 38 


211,655 54 




450,925 81 


6 Decreases 


479,786 46 
















7 Percentages 


4.16 


12 79 


44 10 


24.12 


14.83 











DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



181 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
STATEMENT (Concluded) 



Expenditure 



*co 


Buildings, Sites 
and all perman- 
ent improve- 
ments 


O co 

2 c 
•5.2 

O-O 

+ J o 

&i 


Library, scientific 
apparatus, maps, 
etc., typewriters, 
and equipmentfor 
physical culture 


Art, manual 
training, house- 
hold science and 
agricultural dept. 
equipment 


School books, 
stationery, prizes, 
fuel, examina- 
tions, and all 
other expenses 


Total 
Expenditure 


$ c 

114 14,860 00 

115 12,108 54 

116 31,843 00 

117 14,270 00 


$ c. 

174 99 

89,216 10 


$ c. 
24 45 
76 60 

948 39 
307 99 

148 83 


$ c 
225 63 
7,588 65 

427 61 

115 00 

215 23 

54 21 


$ c. 


$ c. 

4,472 80 

33,572 05 

4,698 83 
5,274 34 
1,935 66 
7,311 88 
531 25 
2,944 85 
2,899 28 
547 53 
505 82 
1,263 14 
2,542 55 
7,691 89 
8,342 47 
3,239 65 
1,826 76 
1,564 74 
1,753 97 
1,898 25 


$ C. 

19,757 87 




142,561 94 




37,917 83 






19,967 33 


118 8,629 00 

119 10,555 00 

120 2,900 00 

121 10,646 11 

122 12,253 81 

123 3,770 00 


483 84 
90,879 10 
250 00 
120 00 
345 78 
105 95 
2,372 00 


11,412 56 




108,800 19 


50 00 
144 62 

86 92 

57 79 

4 00 

228 14 

92 10 

1,290 14 

605 46 

210 16 

261 49 




3,731 25 


12 50 
37 16 




13,868 08 




15,622 95 


262 47 


4,743 74 


124 6,620 00 

125 5,948 00 


179 41 
14 44 


9,681 23 




7,453 72 


126 9,960 00 

127 23,080 00 

128 21,331 94 






12,594 65 


219 29 


2,208 64 

147 70 

463 71 

50 25 

140 33 

39 99 

59 00 




34,489 96 




30,427 57 


129 12,740 00 






16,653 52 


130 9,620 00 


890 08 
235 00 
119 50 
608 25 




12,648 58 


131 8,450 00 




10,390 07 


132 9,700 00 

133 13,940 00 


474 4*1 
920 97 


13 00 


12,100 93 
17,426 47 








1 1,458,654 40 

2 2,258,285 10 


1,155,266 65 
753,753 51 


39,468 19 
88,475 06 


48,694 38 
34,501 78 


8,446 82 
7,022 65 


855,348 90 
1,111,183 54 


3,565,879 34 
4,253,221 64 


3 3,716,939 50 

4 3,392,900 62 


1,909,020 16 
2,260,346 06 


127,943 25 
104,766 80 


83,196 16 
104,116 45 


15,469 47 
12,844 99 


1,966,532 44 
1,374,613 64 


7,819,100 98 
7,249,588 56 


5 324,038 88 

6 




23,176 45 




2,624 48 


591,018 80 


569,512 42 


351,325 90 


20,920 29 












7 47.53 


24.41 


1.63 


1.06 


.20 


25.15! 



Cost per pupil, enrolled attendance: $150.03. 



7. D.E. 



182 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
II. TABLE M— VALUE OF EQUIPMENT, DESTINATION OF 



Collegiate 


High 




Institutes 


Schools 


Total 


$83,644 


$79,974 


$163,618 


154,491 


123,071 


277,562 


13,172 


17,818 


30,990 


6,983 


10,203 


17,186 


29,097 


27,453 


56,550 


13,645 


13,383 


27,028 


42,974 


22,565 


65,539 


695,995 


251,954 


947,949 


3,376 


769 


4,145 


1,345 


88 


1,433 


21,217 


12,334 


33,551 


$1,065,939 


$559,612 


$1,625,551 


$25,882 


$149 


$26,031 


8,005 




8,005 


1,465 


37 


1,502 


7,536 




7,536 


25,520 


3,215 


28,735 


3,454 


447 


3,901 


690 


36 


724 


2,221 


8,794 


11,015 


$74,773 


$12,676 


$87,449 


$1,140,712 


$572,288 


$1,713,000 


$13,349,691 


$6,939,772 


$20,289,463 



General Equipment: 

Library 

Scientific Apparatus 

Charts, Maps and Globes 

Art Models 

Typewriters 

Biological Specimens 

Equipment for Physical Culture 

Gymnasium (not including equipment) 

Museum 

Aquarium, Herbarium, etc 

Pictures 



Total Value of General Equipment, 1924-1925 



Manual Training Department Equipment: 

Woodwork 

Woodturning 

Forging 

Machine Shop Practice 



Household Science Department Equipment: 

Cookery, Sanitation and Hygiene 

Handwork and Machine Sewing 

Laundry Work 



Agricultural Department Equipment: 
Value 



Total Value of Special Equipment as per above 
eight items 



Total Value of all Equipment, 1924-1925. 



Value of School Sites, Buildings and Furniture, 
1924-1925 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



183 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 



PUPILS, BOARDS OF EDUCATION, ETC. (Concluded) 



Collegiate 


High 


Institutes 


Schools 


33 


S3 


51 


132 


1 


4 


44 


96 


1,966 


863 


499 


962 


611 


381 


952 


399 


693 


805 


1,634 


965 


1,349 


941 


1,069 


616 



Totals 



Religious and Other Exercises: 

Number of Schools in which Bible or Selections 

therefrom are used 

Schools opened with Prayer 

Schools closed with Prayer 

Commencement Exercises 

Destination of Pupils: 

Commerce 

Agriculture 

The Trades 

Colleges and Universities, including the Law Sch. 

Normal and Model Schools 

Other Schools 

Other Occupations 

Without Occupation 



116 

183 

5 

140 



2,829 
1,461 
992 
1,351 
1,498 
2,599 
2,290 
1,685 



Boards of Education: Barrie, Brantford, Brockville, Chatham, Collingwood, Fort William , 
Guelph, Hamilton, Ingersoll, Kingston, Lindsay, London, Morrisburg, Napanee, Niagara Falls, 
Orillia, Owen Sound, Perth, Peterborough, Port Arthur, Renfrew, St. Catharines, St. Thomas, 
Sarnia, Smith's Falls, Stratford, Toronto, Walkerville, Windsor, Woodstock. — Total, 30 Boards 
and 38 Collegiate Institutes. 

Almonte, Arnprior, Beamsville, Belleville, Bracebridge, Bradford, Bridgeburg, Brighton, 
Caledonia, Campbellford, Carleton Place, Cayuga, Colborne, Dundas, Dunnville, Elora, Exeter, 
Fergus, Fort Frances, Gananoque, Gravenhurst, Grimsby, Hawkesbury, Huntsville, Kempt- 
ville, Kenora, Kincardine, Listowel, Midland, Mount Forest, Newburgh, Newcastle, New 
Liskeard, Niagara, Norwood, Oakville, Omemee, Oshawa, Paris, Parkhill, Parry Sound, Pem- 
broke, Petrolia, Port Colborne, Port Dover, Port Perry, Port Rowan, Prescott, Richmond Hill, 
Shelburne, Simcoe, Stirling, Thessalon, Toronto (Davenport), Uxbridge, Vienna, Wallaceburg, 
Wardsville, Watford, Weston, Whitby, Wiarton— Total, 62 Boards and 62 High Schools. 



184 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number 
Pupils 




s 53 










E 


a 






S 


8c5 


Collegiate 










«5o 
•sS-8 


o 


1 








5 >> u 

lal 


Institutes 


PL,** 

l-i 

0,2 

£5 


CO 

>. 

O 

CQ 


u 
5 


M c 

2 c 
> 2 

« 


!r! co d 

its 


o 

o 

x; 
o 

CO 

u 
cu 

! 


*o 

o 

.c 
o 
CO 
H 

% 

3 


o 
•a 

3 


o 
o 
.s 
o 
CO 

Ih 

CU 

a 
a 
D 


■sSts 
site 


265 

8?& 


1 Barrie 


483 
1,035 


229 
490 


254 
545 


414 
908 


138 
339 


152 
359 


123 

276 


134 
316 


74 

84 


307 
847 


174 


2 Brantford 


180 


3 Brockville 


478 


227 


251 


409 


155 


170 


132 


139 


37 


357 


121 


4 Chatham 


398 


214 


184 


337 


143 


168 


77 


103 


50 


248 


148 


5 Clinton 


183 


75 


108 


166 


41 


44 


42 


58 


39 


97 


86 


6 Cobourg 


273 


128 


145 


238 


85 


100 


89 


62 


22 


166 


107 


7 Collingwood .... 


277 


122 


155 


230 


93 


98 


81 


76 


22 


212 


52 


S Fort William . . . 


475 


199 


276 


414 


163 


173 


119 


157 


26 


423 


50 


9 Gait 


430 

222 


197 

86 


233 
136 


393 
195 


97 
61 


105 
71 


109 
59 


172 
67 


44 

25 


203 
145 


165 


10 Goderich 


76 


11 Guelph 


461 


228 


233 


427 


140 


141 


108 


178 


34 


356 


90 


12 Hamilton, Cent'l 


1,328 


583 


745 


1,147 


565 


583 


279 


335 


131 


1,159 


161 


13 Hamilton, Delta 


711 


314 


397 


62C 


326 


336 


186 


189 




638 


71 


14 Ingersoll 


231 


114 


117 


199 


71 


83 


75 


56 


17 


165 


37 


15 Kingston 


806 


380 


426 


693 


235 


256 


216 


295 


39 


649 


150 


16 K'ch'ner-W't'loo 


291 


139 


152 


265 


88 


90 


69 


74 


58 


239 


40 


17 Lindsay 


489 


212 


277 


424 


150 


156 


107 


145 


81 


292 


147 


18 London 


1,612 


742 


870 


1,409 


417 


473 


446 


547 


146 


1,375 


225 


19 Morrisburg 


172 


73 


99 


143 


59 


64 


45 


47 


16 


84 


87 


20 Napanee 


282 


104 


178 


258 


79 


114 


69 


66 


33 


117 


164 


21 Niagara Falls. . . 


248 


148 


100 


214 


95 


95 


58 


77 


18 


208 


21 


22 North Bay 


394 


202 


192 


329 


139 


157 


106 


99 


32 


363 


13 


23 Orillia. 


406 
2,139 


178 
1,173 


228 
966 


352 
1,823 


116 
665 


143 
780 


108 

553 


123 
675 


32 
131 


289 
2,011 


82 


24 Ottawa 


94 


25 Owen Sound. . . . 


575 


275 


300 


488 


186 


193 


161 


177 


44 


427 


133 


26 Perth 


333 
597 


142 

272 


191 

325 


281 
540 


119 
213 


127 
250 


86 
179 


95 

133 


25 
35 


169 
542 


154 


27 Peterborough. . . 


45 


28 Picton 


260 


97 


163 


222 


74 


88 


82 


72 


18 


129 


131 


29 Port Arthur 


372 


181 


191 


344 


146 


146 


100 


107 


19 


347 


25 


30 Renfrew 


425 


180 


245 


402 


149 


156 


137 


96 


36 


209 


213 


31 St. Catharines. . 


585 


301 


284 


506 


176 


199 


157 


190 


39 


431 


148 


32 St. Mary's 


317 


140 


177 


280 


93 


110 


76 


109 


22 


175 


104 


33 St. Thomas 


813 


39C 


423 


752 


294 


282 


267 


169 


95 


596 


204 


34 Sarnia 


465 
502 


250 
226 


215 

276 


409 

450 


106 
146 


123 
151 


129 
138 


165 
188 


48 

25 


346 

442 


116 


35 Sault Ste. Marie 


44 


36 Seaforth 


252 


117 


135 


227 


60 


62 


46 


100 


44 


112 


126 


37 Smith's Falls. . . 


470 


190 


280 


402 


152 


156 


108 


169 


37 


355 


115 


38 Stratford 


716 


371 


345 


640 


260 


283 


156 


233 


44 


608 


89 


39 Strathroy 


228 


119 


109 


202 


69 


71 


48 


85 


24 


106 


122 


40 Toronto,Harb'rc 


934 


575 


359 


772 


258 


273 


251 


326 


84 


930 




41 " Humberside 


1,133 


573 


560 


964 


378 


407 


309 


343 


74 


1,092 


41 


42 " Jarvis 


1,120 


703 


417 


896 


350 


394 


248 


386 


92 


1,117 




43 " Malvern . . . 


668 


329 


339 


560 


252 


271 


171 


186 


40 


663 


4 


44 " North 


768 


392 


376 


677 


241 


245 


179 


293 


51 


729 


39 


45 " Oakwood... 


1,386 


731 


655 


1,284 


502 


414 


334 


508 


130 


1,212 


169 


46 " Parkdale... 


942 


525 


417 


851 


277 


268 


241 


356 


77 


935 


1 


47 " Riverdale. . . 


1,055 


569 


486 


924 


342 


370 


233 


387 


65 


1,051 


2 


48 VankleekHill... 


205 


88 


117 


171 


66 


66 


36 


78 


25 


65 


110 


49 Walkerville 


311 


164 


147 


270 


122 


124 


107 


75 


5 


231 


80 


50 Windsor 


870 


475 


395 


810 


287 


348 


239 


260 


23 


755 


112 


51 Woodstock 


580 


273 


307 


372 


183 


248 


113 


168 


51 


308 


256 


Totals 


30,706 


15,205 


15,501 


26,703 


9,961 


10,736 


7,863 


9,644 


2463 


25,032 


5,124 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



185 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 



of 

from — 


Number of Pupils from Families whose Head 
is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils in the 
Various Subjects 




O 

c 

3 

55 


V 

0; 

s 

B 




0) 

It 

3 

< 


v % 

oTO 
.fiu 

- >» 

(4 to 


M 

OJ 

to 
H 


S 

•d 

H 

EU 

J3 

H 


CO 

>.. c 

Mo 

.5 '-5 

S a 

3 a 

.S3 
36 


CO 

a 
.o 

a 

3 
O 
u 
O 
u 

01 
JS 






0, 
3 


O 

3 


J3 


5 

S 

a 

2 
O 

Xi 
C 


8 

.2 
1 
ft 

ds 

JAM 

•2& 

fa 


01 
3 

2 

3 

J3 
.2 

1 


>> 

Ih 
O 
co 

£ 

3 

1 
C 

a 




co 

s 

.3 
.2 
"■** 


1 


2 


63 


116 


27 


6 


72 


41 


106 


52 


159 


435 


434 


147 


84- 


2 


8 


203 


126 


42 


5 


255 


184 


128 


92 


66 


917 


971 


353 


197 


3 




73 


102 


20 


7 


124 


95 


50 


7 


111 


463 


463 


168 


sa 


4 


' 2 


46 


153 


10 


8 


77 


71 


30 


3 


80 


379 


379 


165 


48 


5 




16 


84 


8 




18 


27 


28 


2 


39 


160 


159 


43 


23 


6 




22 


81 


16 


"-3 


87 


10 


32 


22 


69 


253 


251 


69 


31 


7 


13 


80 


52 


9 


2 


109 


18 


4 


3 


71 


238 


234 


102 


47 


8 


2 


247 


48 


22 


3 


83 


27 


31 


14 


120 


450 


450 


175 


86 


9 


62 


158 


85 


32 


4 


112 


14 


24 


1 


6 


409 


409 


105 


103 


10 


1 


35 


80 


8 


1 


48 


13 


34 


3 


39 


212 


212 


73 


33 


11 


15 


156 


60 


18 


10 


108 


28 


73 


8 


110 


448 


448 


145 


100 


12 


8 


390 


101 


72 


21 


501 


167 


39 


37 


273 


1,189 


1,273 


359 


209 


13 


2 


345 


42 


25 


13 


213 


34 


17 


22 


179 


711 


711 


245 


125 


14 


29 


48 


55 


1 


4 


65 


24 


15 


19 


60 


218 


222 


83 


3& 


15 


7 


98 


128 


47 


40 


185 


72 


217 


19 


201 


730 


742 


300 


154 


16 


12 


89 


22 


40 


8 


71 


21 


24 


16 


10 


270 


271 


45 


40 


17 


50 


117 


163 


27 


8 


87 


53 


29 


5 


37 


386 


409 


104 


107 


18 


12 


513 


192 


96 


43 


392 


35 


300 


41 


275 


1,528 


1,523 


478 


372 


19 


1 


16 


79 


13 




35 


24 


5 




23 


162 


160 


67 


35 


20 


1 


60 


140 


7 


■0 


35 


19 


5 


"lO 


51 


253 


269 


105 


41 


21 


19 


79 


18 


12 


3 


58 


26 


37 


15 




248 


248 


95 


43 


22 


18 


159 


16 


10 


5 


106 


19 


64 


15 


' 121 


358 


358 


100 


64 


23 


35 


122 


93 


17 


6 


98 


47 


15 


8 


136 


378 


377 


140 


51 


24 


34 


542 


111 


112 


40 


403 


198 


630 


103 


24 


1,624 


1,984 


939 


739 


25 


15 


131 


130 


16 


10 


150 


55 


46 


37 


73 


560 


555 


166 


95 


26 


10 


51 


145 


10 


5 


55 


36 


24 


7 




333 


333 


145 


62 


27 


10 


157 


43 


26 


10 


181 


48 


86 


46 


"246 


587 


537 


249 


61 


28 




42 


111 


7 


2 


38 


34 


20 


6 


75 


245 


245 


84 


41 


29 




47 


52 


15 


8 


99 


60 


52 


39 


98 


353 


353 


146 


75 


30 


"3 


84 


202 


12 


4 


29 


76 


12 


6 


46 


425 


425 


116 


166 


31 


6 


246 


89 


26 


8 


144 


19 


24 


29 


60 


546 


547 


199 


114 


32 


38 


31 


143 


12 


1 


50 


36 


17 


27 


25 


300 


300 


110 


67 


33 


13 


211 


165 


12 


10 


234 


90 


71 


20 


35 


775 


780 


285 


151 


34 


3 


118 


70 


31 


1 


172 


21 


26 


26 


94 


426 


427 


123 


89 


35 


16 


106 


40 


29 


6 


146 


47 


122 


6 


151 


479 


479 


151 


144 


36 


14 


38 


138 


7 


1 


35 


23 


6 


4 


44 


220 


218 


61 


63 


37 




82 


88 


5 


4 


120 


152 


16 


3 


91 


455 


455 


156 


102 


38 


'l9 


139 


92 


14 


8 


328 


11 


68 


56 


15 


660 


674 


212 


111 


39 




14 


123 


7 


3 


38 


6 


9 


28 


16 


225 


225 


72 


37 


40 


' "4 


300 


2 


75 


20 


300 


75 


100 


62 


524 


892 


892 


313 


179 


41 




366 


6 


23 


28 


220 


73 


331 


86 


546 


1,121 


1,121 


417 


218 


42 


' 3 


224 


56 


55 


56 


336 


90 


168 


135 


12 


1,045 


1 ,045 


380 


218 


43 


1 


233 


6 


29 


10 


190 


6 


148 


!46 


194 


658 


658 


271 


95 


44 




369 


21 


43 


13 


165 


22 


85 


50 


45 


750 


758 


243 


168 


45 


"5 


425 


26 


89 


329 


31 


46 


407 


33 


275 


1,358 


1,356 


407 


280 


46 


6 


413 


8 


44 


17 


285 


34 


116 


25 


241 


898 


898 


275 


219 


47 


2 


417 


4 


48 


14 


328 


59 


124 


61 


240 


1,055 


1,055 


365 


209 


48 


30 


21 


127 


7 


2 


9 


7 


17 


15 


35 


205 


205 


68 


52 


49 




34 


6 


6 


2 


151 


: 7 


101 


' 4 


107 


311 


311 


124 


39 


50 


""3 


195 


23 


30 


11 


300 


47 


193 


71 


299 


8$e 


86e 


334 


176 


51 


16 


90 


262 


38 


20 


60 


80 


24 


6 
1,451 


34 


398 


401 


130 


93 


550 


8,261 


4,325 


1,407 


849 


7,536 


2,527 


4,350 


5,881 


28,565 


29,076 


10,207 


6,174 



186 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS, 







Number of Pupils in 


the Various Subjects (Continued) 




Collegiate 


>> 

O 


o 




>. 


■§ 






>> 










Institutes 


at 


.22 






o.2 


















X 


K 


.c 


rt 






>. 


6 












4-> 




a 


bo 


g 2 




is 


o 






c 






a 








S 3 




<v 


c 


x 




rt 






"o 

< 


u 

•a 
o 


s 




0) 

>> 
PL, 




J3 
M 
< 


8 

o 
u 

O 


o 
.£? 


c 


C/3 


| 


.5 


1 Barrie 


96 


42 


146 


118 


122 


364 


295 


50 


258 


1 


22 


375 


2 Brantford 


141 


48 


312 


217 


434 


504 


370 


49 


842 


2 


46 


664 


3 Brockville 


82 


16 


137 


' 121 


174 


254 


212 


33 


436 




/ 


341 


4 Chatham 


82 


22 


162 


70 


154 


165 


188 


29 


322 




8 


265 


5 Clinton 


67 


30 


53 


39 


46 


129 


101 


19 


104 




9 


111 


6 Cobourg 


28 


16 


92 


63 


64 


140 


51 


8 


260 




14 


206 


7 Collingwood . . . 


44 


16 


111 


67 


66 


172 


116 


15 


196 




4 


207 


8 Fort William. . . 


68 


11 


173 


120 


178 


375 


226 


18 


434 






407 


9 Gait 


76 
42 


16 
20 


103 

73 


111 

48 


95 
85 


235 
107 


194 
127 


27 
10 


371 
119 




9 

18 


391 


10 Goderich 


127 


11 Guelph 

12 Hamilton, Cent'l 


80 


21 


143 


110 


109 


355 


239 


22 


434 






450 


107 


70 


540 


251 


467 


783 


434 


81 


1,107 


46 


20 


907 


13 Hamilton Delta 


75 


1 


334 


182 


271 


404 


372 




628 






529 


14 Ingersoll 


20 


8 


64 


49 


76 


96 


116 


13 


196 




3 


165 


15 Kingston 


100 


18 


272 


168 


302 


601 


398 


35 


738 


10 


8 


504 


16 K'chner-W't'loo 


78 


18 


45 


90 


88 


200 


145 


31 


238 




14 


241 


17 Lindsay 

18 London 


88 


30 


132 


100 


149 


280 


252 


40 


392 






344 


238 


64 


461 


399 


445 


1,016 


765 


101 


1,490 




71 


1,483 


19 Morrisburg. . . . 


18 


9 


67 


47 


48 


164 


79 


11 


101 




14 


82 


20 Napanee 


27 


20 


92 


55 


70 


147 


132 


29 


190 




2 


152 


21 Niagara Falls. . 


31 


2 


95 


58 


58 


180 


100 


7 


248 




5 


232 


22 North Bay.. . 


41 


21 


132 


74 


176 


176 


138 


30 


341 




11 


224 


23 Orillia 


66 
234 


21 

77 


lt)5 
544 


81 
511 


165 

537 


163 
1,356 


177 
945 


17 
109 


377 
2,020 


62 


13 
62 


292 


24 Ottawa 


1,596 


25 Owen Sound. . . 


80 


27 


128 


151 


170 


273 


259 


32 


318 




19 


437 


26 Perth 


46 

57 


11 
16 


79 

245 


73 
101 


135 
212 


148 
330 


114 
205 


9 
30 


295 
409 




8 
19 


268 


27 Peterborough.. 


405 


28 Picton 


52 


9 


85 


48 


106 


139 


103 


11 


232 






167 


29 Port Arthur.. . . 


40 


12 


146 


98 


98 


274 


226 


18 


367 




9 


369 


30 Renfrew. . . 


62 


28 


116 


92 


126 


202 


106 


28 


319 






303 


31 St. Catharines.. 


81 


11 


199 


157 


135 


354 


238 


15 


515 




8 


502 


32 St. Mary's 


88 


12 


98 


74 


74 


232 


180 


15 


210 




21 


214 


33 St. Thomas. . . . 


79 


51 


285 


267 


365 


282 


201 


37 


701 




14 


570 


34 Sarnia 


76 


23 


123 


129 


129 


240 


233 


19 


426 


6 


15 


426 


35 Sault Ste. Marie 


74 


12 


151 


138 


138 


229 


281 


17 


370 




23 


379 


36 Seaforth 


96 


17 


61 


46 


49 


113 


127 


45 


152 




2 


173 


37 Smith's Falls.. . 




19 
29 


146 
211 


91 

128 


125 
212 


257 
224 


283 
286 


11 
19 


398 
504 




10 

5 


396 


38 Stratford 


81 


475 


39 Strathroy 

40 Toronto, Harb'd 


54 


17 


70 


46 


48 


126 


108 


26 


145 






145 


152 


32 


277 


253 


339 


521 


468 


36 


901 




115 


887 


41 Humberside.. 


125 


25 


407 


309 


546 


782 


482 


50 


1,054 




56 


885 


42 Jarvis 


175 


47 


380 


258 


160 


688 


525 


82 


1,035 


65 


298 


990 


43 Malvern 


93 


25 


271 


171 


193 


404 


321 


35 


653 




35 


644 


44 North 


108 


10 


105 


196 


180 


495 


288 




734 


6 


89 


695 


45 Oakwood. . . . 


210 


56 


203 


325 


281 


785 


531 


85 


1,360 


_ 


120 


1,365 


46 Parkdale 


143 


24 


275 


242 


243 


561 


445 


50 


934 




119 


847 


47 Riverdale. . . . 


182 


38 


361 


237 


246 


646 


466 


51 


1,015 




52 


997 


48 Vankleek Hill. . 

49 Walkerville 


41 


20 


66 


36 


40 


135 


132 


23 


158 






154 


28 




107 


107 


108 


152 


142 


3 


297 




8 


235 


50 Windsor 


100 


12 


334 


252 


225 


611 


408 


14 


789 




62 


. 724 


51 Woodstock. . . . 


74 


43 


132 


104 


107 


280 


225 


26 


341 




26 


451 


Totals 


4,326 


1,243 


9,449 


7,278 


9,159 


17,849 


13,555 


1,571 


26,474 


198 


1,493 


24,398 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



187 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 





Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 


> (Continued) 




Special Courses 


1 


>> 

M 
O 

"0 

O 
N 


c 
cd 


PQ 


>> 

u 

4-1 

CO 

a 

u 

£3 
U 


W 


'33 
>> 
S 

CL, 


.5 
% 
s 

M 

M 




PQ 


>> 

£3 

a 

aj 
u 

Bo 



c 


a 

% 

V 

a 
>» 

H 


< 


0) 

3 

"3 


1 

3 
>> 
2 

Cl, 


'0 

V 

6 
6 

O 


V 
u 

3 

*3 

M 

< 


s 

'S 
"3 
H 

"c3 

3 

3 

n 


u 
3 

<u 

2 


Xi 

<u 
m 

3 
O 

a 


1 


12 
4 
9 
1 
3 

"i 

i 

"i 


104 

192 

38 

89 

9 

29 

74 

120 

81 

43 

107 

258 

179 


163 

223 

62 

169 

8 

31 

84 

172 

89 

44 

145 

384 

243 


73 

221 

66 

107 

25 

33 

44 

96 

83 

34 

100 

167 

75 

26 

182 

85 

105 

417 

40 

45 

45 

45 

52 

300 

115 

61 

77 

36 

58 

67 

126 

44 

194 

100 

72 

75 

102 

130 

71 

166 

184 

158 

106 

89 

272 

166 

180 

50 

311 

173 

92 


63 

136 

72 

102 

52 

63 

62 

69 

126 

51 

185 

256 

133 

44 

138 

56 

140 

255 

27 

48 

43 

75 

72 

837 

93 

43 

121 

31 

95 

73 

199 

73 

196 

88 

130 

104 

159 

83 

51 

203 

187 

185 

132 

221 

283 

161 

215 

38 

10 

95 

121 








72 

125 

98 

50 

45 

56 

76 

57 

80 

38 

143 

259 

119 

61 

143 

62 

54 

320 

62 

S3 

27 

62 

79 

587 

125 

81 

43 

58 

150 

64 

80 

76 

281 

123 

71 

65 

60 

126 

70 

78 

147 

72 

279 

115 

208 

147 

185 

68 

124 

327 

131 


480 
1,009 
474 
392 
180 
269 
276 
475 
425 
198 
457 

1,328 
704 
226 
730 
282 
440 

1,573 
169 
276 
248 
377 
394 

2,122 
570 
323 
477 
244 
372 
420 
584 
315 
801 
465 
475 
250 
451 
557 
228 
910 

1,093 

1,095 
664 
753 

1,380 
919 

1,040 
203 
311 
791 
562 










2 
3 


219 
65 


217 
65 


221 
66 


219 


"98 


307 


328 


4 


115 


101 


5 








"56 
39 


74 
74 




6 

7 


43 


42 


43 


"84 

110 

49 


68 
95 


8 








105 


Q 












54 


10 


29 


28 


10 


37 






11 








12 

n 


194 


194 




194 
91 

32 
115 


"67 


173 
79 
67 


198 
127 


14 


32 
135 


30 
135 


32 
135 


73 


1S 


4 
2 
9 
31 
6 

"5 
10 

40 

"7 
6 
3 
1 
1 
7 

"5 

13 

3 

33 

"3 

"8 
32 
14 

" 1 

"3 

20 


153 
90 
88 

276 
47 
44 
12 
64 
74 

175 

105 
65 
44 
48 

103 
15 
96 
70 
25 

130 
64 
64 
2 
97 
2 
52 
95 
47 

171 
61 

114 
62 
82 
36 

107 
61 

129 


250 

44 
130 
360 

58 

77 

27 
102 

80 
245 
108 

78 
166 

59 
152 

15 
204 
110 

30 
129 

89 

91 

35 

130 

2 

78 
150 

63 
271 
110 
182 
294 
187 

60 
124 

78 
144 




16 








17 








60 








18 










225 


254 


19 


17 


24 


16 








?0 


40 








71 










50 


8 


?? 


73 
83 

162 
37 
52 

152 
52 


80 
83 
39 
40 
55 
147 
50 


80 

S3 

"40 

61 

152 

55 


77 
83 






73 








74 








25 
76 


40 

58 

152 

55 




141 


121 


27 
78 




113 


80 


79 








30 








49 


12 




9 


31 










3? 


32 
139 

5 














33 
34 


145 
6 


72 
4 


154 


373 


121 
70 


161 
53 


35 








36 
















37 


44 

113 


44 

111 


44 
113 


44 
113 


187 
"l25 






38 
39 


190 


123 


40 


209 










41 














47 


335 
140 
120 
157 
126 
170 














43 














44 














45 










296 


264 


46 












47 










310 


265 


48 












49 












114 
287 
241 


117 


50 












152 


51 


89 


89 


89 


89 




241 


305 


4,293 


6,329 


5,741 


6,495 


3,024 


1,624 


1,316 


6,112 


29,757 


1,797 


1,010 


3,142 2,997 



188 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IH. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of Pupils in — 


Number of 
Pupils from— 




n 








u 

o 


S 


g 






S 


ss 


High Schools 


o,2 


09 
O 

PQ 


CO 

3 


w 

S c 

> JS 

« 


111 

3 V O 


o 

o 
w 

1 


£ 

o 

u 

<u 

I 

•J 


o 
o 
.c 
u 
w 

.22 

3 


o 
o 

Ji 
y 
W 

O) 

a 
a 


Jj 

HJSSM 

■a wis 

3 M.S3 

S.5Q 


£S2 
as % 

155 

s fl 
52 g 


1 Alexandria 


142 


50 


92 


118 


59 


78 


29 


28 


7 


133 


7 


2 Alliston 


176 


60 


116 


136 


50 


55 


40 


58 


23 


64 


96 


3 Almonte 


149 


60 


89 


137 


48 


56 


40 


41 


12 


106 


42 


4 Amherstburg. . . 


108 


56 


52 


98 


36 


37 


31 


29 


11 


55 


53 


5 Arnprior 


321 


124 


197 


277 


97 


104 


78 


108 


31 


199 


80 


6 Arthur 


147 


50 


97 


116 


31 


44 


49 


44 


10 


52 


95 


7 Athens 


111 


59 


52 


96 


35 


35 


25 


46 


5 


30 


81 


8 Aurora 


201 


72 


129 


176 


58 


60 


56 


75 


10 


102 


99 


9 Avonmore 


58 


27 


31 


54 


21 


21 


11 


16 


10 


44 


12 


10 Aylmer 


177 


93 


84 


143 


60 


69 


40 


43 


25 


67 


108 


11 Beamsville 


194 


75 


119 


163 


66 


77 


57 


44 


16 


53 


139 


12 Belleville 


502 


211 


291 


417 


174 


184 


134 


145 


39 


365 


110 


13 Bowmanville. . . 


199 


92 


107 


170 


58 


60 


52 


63 


24 


119 


80 


14 Bracebridge. . . . 


167 


65 


102 


134 


46 


48 


52 


67 




110 


57 


15 Bradford 


113 


54 


59 


100 


35 


36 


32 


45 




28 


81 


16 Brampton 


263 


124 


139 


247 


96 


90 


71 


81 


21 


134 


119 


17 Bridgeburg 


105 


46 


59 


74 


40 


45 


21 


23 


16 


63 


42 


18 Brighton 


84 


28 


56 


69 


39 


37 


17 


30 




38 


44 


19 Burford 


74 


33 


41 


61 


23 


27 


19 


28 




74 




20 Burlington 


190 


97 


93 


163 


68 


68 


50 


55 


17 


99 


75 


21 Caledonia 


177 


73 


104 


164 


54 


54 


36 


57 


30 


65 


77 


22 Campbellford.. . 


206 


76 


130 


175 


57 


62 


56 


59 


29 


123 


66 


23 Carleton Place. . 


262 


118 


144 


220 


87 


87 


73 


89 


13 


162 


59 


24 Cayuga 


121 


48 


73 


101 


42 


42 


25 


33 


21 


46 


73 


25 Chapleau 


98 


49 


49 


85 


50 


52 


20 


26 




94 


4 


26 Chesley 


150 


61 


89 


128 


50 


50 


29 


55 


16 


86 


46 


27 Chesterville. . 


92 


34 


58 


77 


27 


40 


17 


35 




37 


49 


28 Colborne.. . 


113 


38 


75 


96 


36 


36 


24 


42 


11 


56 


57 


29 Cornwall... . 


383 


173 


210 


321 


105 


115 


121 


114 


33 


199 


158 


30 Deseronto. . . 


89 


50 


39 


75 


46 


46 


24 


19 




61 


24 


31 Dundalk 


135 


44 


91 


108 


42 


42 


36 


50 


7 


55 


52 


32 Dundas 


211 


92 


119 


182 


76 


88 


59 


49 


15 


130 


81 


33 Dunnville. . . 


145 


75 


70 


109 


43 


45 


36 


52 


12 


80 


57 


34 Durham 


114 


41 


73 


100 


45 


47 


26 


41 




60 


53 


35 Dutton 


142 


62 


80 


125 


36 


36 


34 


43 


29 


36 


104 


36 Elmira 


122 
91 
167 
184 
190 
89 


56 
32 
54 
87 
79 
47 


66 

59 
113 

97 
111 

42 


106 
80 
141 
161 
166 
74 


39 
32 
58 
46 
49 
24 


38 
33 
72 
48 
51 
24 


31 
25 
48 
33 
62 
18 


38 
33 
28 
69 
59 
38 


15 

"l9 
34 

18 
9 


62 
50 
61 
61 

81 
73 


51 


37 Elora 


41 


38 Essex 


104 


39 Exeter 


119 


40 Fergus 


102 


41 Flesherton 


16 


42 Forest 


153 
141 


78 
48 


75 
93 


125 
114 


54 
44 


58 
51 


37 
38 


48 
34 


10 

18 


71 
110 


82 


43 Fort Frances. . . 


31 


44 Gananoque 


205 


86 


119 


173 


60 


58 


71 


71 


5 


149 


46 


45 Georgetown 


168 


78 


90 


139 


58 


73 


39 


40 


16 


95 


49 


46 Glencoe 


159 


60 


99 


137 


49 


50 


44 


52 


13 


54 


97 


47 Gravenhurst. . . . 


87 


22 


65 


70 


38 


38 


25 


24 




66 


21 


48 Grimsby 


159 


73 


86 


134 


63 


55 


42 


37 


25 


85 


53 


49 Hagersville 


122 


47 


75 


91 


39 


39 


41 


29 


13 


45 


76 


50 Haileybury 


211 


94 


117 


170 


68 


83 


58 


55 


15 


92 


118 


51 Hanover 


129 


52 


77 


106 


62 


55 


27 


39 


8 


101 


26 


52 Harriston 


127 


59 


68 


105 


26 


30 


29 


49 


19 


67 


44 


53 Hawkesbury. .... . 


97 


33 


64 


74 


29 


33 


24 


40 




49 


30 


54 Huntsville 


116 


41 


75 


101 


36 


45 


25 


46 




74 


42 


55 Iroquois 


122 


49 


73 


107 


37 


35 


37 


42 


8 


42 


78 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



189 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. 



(Continued) 







Number of Pupils from Fa 


milies whose 




Number of Pupils 


n the Various 








Head is occupied as below— 








Subiects 








o 






Q 3 








s 



s 
.2 
d 


Ut 


s 
.2 

"35 


3 








to 

3 

3 


8 


U 

3 


.So, 


60 




3 

60 O 


a 
3 




a 
3 


O 


6 
6 

03 






h 


4-1 

13 




s 

3 


>. 

u 



CO 

S 




U% 


<u 


a 


£° 


_C 




'C "S 


O 


3 


JA 


J3J3 


.a 


CO 








a 

6 


3 


*$ 


2 

o 

03 


a; 


3 a 
2 3 


in 





.2 

"3) 




.2 


OJ 

3 


co 






o 


60 


rt w 


<u 


.3 


3 


*J 


I 


c 


C 3 


3 


rt 






OQ 


U 


< 


-)•£ 


H 


H 


JO 


O 


W 


Wrt 


W 


O 


pq 


1 


2 


16 


85 


6 


2 


14 


4 


12 


3 


29 


142 


142 


72 


21 


2 


16 


15 


105 


1 




9 


20 


3 


23 


42 


170 


170 


53 


30 


3 


1 


19 


48 


2 


' "l 


16 


42 


14 


6 


36 


144 


143 


56 


38 


4 


42 


15 
73 


53 
67 


1 

13 


1 


20 

52 


4 
62 


14 
49 






105 

282 


105 

292 


42 
103 


30 


5 


' '5 


"77 


63 


6 




13 


96 




1 


3 


16 


17 


1 


42 


144 


145 


47 


24 


7 




10 

4 


80 
107 


' *5 
4 


1 


12 
36 


4 

28 






7 
57 


111 
201 


111 
201 


35 
63 


17 


8 


10 


11 


43 


9 


' 2 


1 


35 


3 


1 


4 


2 


12 





10 


54 


51 


21 


14 


10 


2 


20 


98 


4 




17 


20 


18 




40 


168 


168 


73 


19 


11 


2 


15 


109 


12 


"s 


10 


11 


26 


6 


38 


169 


167 


49 


35 


12 


27 


106 


102 


21 


4 


155 


19 


69 


26 


110 


467 


480 


187 


81 


13 




37 


84 


7 


2 


30 


26 


5 


8 


50 


177 


177 


56 


39 


14 




39 


41 


1 


2 


21 


33 


17 


13 


52 


153 


153 


52 


35 


15 


4 


4 


84 


7 


3 


8 


2 


5 




28 


98 


100 


36 


32 


16 


10 


56 


105 


16 


7 




58 




21 


32 


243 


243 


95 


62 


17 




53 


10 






10 


18 


12 


2 


23 


102 


102 


44 


23 


18 


' *2 


6 


44 


' i 




6 


2 


11 


12 


37 


84 


84 


37 


12 


19 




1 


52 


2 




8 


3 


5 


3 


20 


74 


74 


28 


14 


20 


16 


17 


85 


12 


"l 


25 


17 


29 


4 


49 


185 


185 


69 


55 


21 


35 


25 


86 


4 




12 


20 


20 


10 


57 


177 


177 


53 


34 


22 


17 


43 


68 


6 




24 


20 


19 


26 


67 


191 


193 


61 


42 


23 


41 


43 


87 


6 




47 


35 


33 


11 


62 


240 


240 


78 


51 


24 


2 


7 


67 


4 


2 


20 


9 


9 


3 


41 


107 


108 


43 


22 


25 




9 


1 




1 




7 


78 


2 


20 


98 


98 


52 


9 


26 


18 


37 


59 


' 4 




"25 


9 


6 


10 


30 


150 


150 


52 


39 


27 


6 


25 


37 


1 




2 


2 


25 




7 


92 


92 


28 


21 


28 




18 


48 


10 


"l 


13 


16 


4 


""3 


25 


104 


110 


38 


24 


29 


26 


64 


97 


25 


5 


103 


51 


33 


5 


77 


352 


329 


116 


70 


30 


4 
28 


20 
10 


20 
95 


2 
3 






21 
11 


26 
4 




16 
42 


89 
135 


89 
135 


43 
43 


14 


31 


"2 


10 


31 


32 




20 


85 


4 


1 


17 


21 


51 


"l2 




201 


204 


90 


12 


33 


"8 


21 


59 


2 


2 


33 


8 


20 




"35 


140 


139 


44 


29 


34 


1 


22 


52 


2 




14 


17 


5 


' "l 


26 


114 


114 


53 


20 


35 


2 


7 


81 


6 


"3 


19 


11 


10 


5 


35 


130 


134 


40 


34 


36 


9 




42 


3 


1 


24 


37 


10 


5 


38 


110 


110 


42 


27 


37 




15 


39 


3 




18 


14 


1 


1 


25 


91 


91 


33 


33 


38 


' 2 
4 


46 

28 


90 

108 


10 
3 


1 

2 


7 
23 


13 
8 






48 
38 


162 
169 


162 
167 


74 

48 


19 


39 


'9 


' 3 


35 


40 


7 


35 


92 


4 




26 


1 


24 


8 


63 


182 


180 


62 


38 


41 




19 

17 


56 
82 


2 
4 


1 

2 


9 
13 






2 
9 


"l6 


88 
147 


88 
147 


29 

52 


15 


42 


"ii 


5 


19 


43 




21 


35 


4 




21 


39 


20 


1 


50 


141 


141 


36 


23 


44 


10 


37 


56 


7 




25 


62 


9 


9 


58 


205 


205 


64 


33 


45 


24 


25 


44 


14 


"<5 


42 


10 


14 


13 




156 


156 


68 


28 


46 


8 


26 


102 


6 


1 


5 


10 


2 


7 


"44 


153 


153 


50 


20 


47 




25 


19 


1 




14 


16 


12 




38 


87 


87 


38 


18 


48 


21 


37 


52 


7 


1 


27 


5 


18 


"i2 


35 


146 


150 


52 


37 


49 


1 
1 


10 
41 


73 

7 


5 
6 






14 
63 


17 
31 


3 
6 


40 
48 


115 
197 


115 
197 


45 

75 


20 


50 


"3 


"54 


22 


51 


2 


26 


22 


3 


3 


19 


34 


11 


11 




118 


117 


54 


20 


52 


16 


27 


48 


6 


1 


19 


4 


19 


3 


"26 


116 


115 


25 


32 


53 


18 


26 


33 


12 




14 


10 


2 




14 


90 


92 


33 


26 


54 




17 


34 


1 




7 


24 


30 


"3 


41 


116 


116 


40 


32 


55 


2 


16 


72 


4 




8 


8 


14 




25 


120 


120 


37 


35 



190 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



High Schools 



Number of Pupils in the Variois Subjects (Continued) 



« C 

v 2 





>. 






































>> 

h 


i 

o 






a 




a 






3 


a 


g 


g 


a 


s 


8 
o 


H 




a) 

a 


1 



1 Alexandria. 

2 Alliston . . . 
3 
4 

5 
6 



Almonte 

Amherstburg. . 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

7 Athens 

8 Aurora 

9 Avon more. . . . 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville. . . . 

12 Belleville..... 

13 Bowrranville. . 

14 Bracebridge. . . 

15 Bradford 

16 Brampton. . . . 

17 Bridgeburg. . . 

18 Brighton 

19 Burford 

20 Burlington 

21 Caledonia. . . . 

22 Campbellford . 

23 Carleton Place 

24 Cayuga 

25 Chapleau 

26 Chesley 

27 Chesterville. . . 

28 Colborne 

29 Cornwall 

30 Deseronto .... 

31 Dundalk 

32 Dundas 

33 Dunnville. . . . 

34 Durham 

35 Dutton 

36 Elmira 

37 Elora 

38 Essex 

39 Exeter 

40 Fergus 

41 Flesherton. . . . 

42 Forest 

43 Fort Frances. . 

44 Gananoque. . . 

45 Georgetown. . . 

46 Glencoe 

47 Gravenhurst . . 

48 Grimsby 

49 Hagersville. . . 

50 Haileybury. . . 

51 Hanover 

52 Harriston 

53 Hawkesbury. . 

54 Huntsville. . . . 
Iroquois 



55 



11 



13 



13 



68 
53 
51 
34 

103 
45 
34 
62 
20 
68 
60 

135 
56 
50 
37 
95 
44 
37 
25 
68 
51 
59 
80 
39 
52 
50 
35 
36 
97 
45 
35 
88 
44 
45 
37 
38 
33 
72 
48 
53 
25 
53 
51 
52 
65 
50 
38 
52 
39 
73 
55 
27 
33 
38 
37 



31 
40 
41 
30 
77 
49 
24 
58 
1 
4 

40 
113 
50 
55 
28 
62 
22 
17 
19 
50 
45 
56 
72 
20 
20 
32 
14 
24 
83 
25 
36 
60 
36 
26 
36 
30 
25 
49 
36 
64 
18 
34 
28 
49 
31 
44 
23 
35 
35 
58 
27 
23 
24 
27 
38 



33 
45 
40 
32 
77 
42 
29 
56 
21 
41 
85 

201 
48 
52 
31 
62 
29 
14 
18 
54 
43 
67 
72 
30 
20 
31 
18 
24 

166 
26 
37 
61 
38 
26 
37 
30 
25 
51 
36 
64 
19 
40 
54 
77 
39 
44 
25 
36 
35 
65 
31 
33 
24 
24 
33 



104 

102 
90 
68 

262 
89 
31 

143 
51 

123 
74 

253 

105 

128 
70 

115 
85 
67 
47 

136 
87 

121 

121 
73 
66 
91 
75 
97 

227 
62 
95 

147 
89 
96 
89 
69 
66 
32 

110 
90 
57 
98 
70 
89 
97 

115 
38 

108 
65 

138 
76 
64 
59 
32 
73 



54 
91 
72 
40 

189 
91 
24 

117 
23 
94 
83 

195 

104 

111 
58 

124 
55 
67 
37 
77 
90 
98 

155 
57 
33 
87 
41 
52 

182 
32 
87 

101 
81 
52 
83 
69 
25 
33 
73 

105 
50 
69 
69 
90 
64 
76 
24 
58 
47 
93 
70 
51 
37 
18 
61 



10 



113 

142 

131 

88 

252 

46 

80 

153 

43 

78 

99 

401 

113 

86 

100 

238 

71 

65 

19 

168 

123 

128 

208 

63 

69 

88 

55 

86 

264 

78 

82 

205 

99 

57 

70 

95 

75 

86 

78 

106 

42 

120 

90 

150 

112 

92 

73 

129 

56 

180 

106 

68 

73 

75 

85 



12 



10 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



191 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects 


(Continued) 




Special Courses 


1 

J 


>. 

w 
o 

1 


>> 

a 

O 

pq 


to 

a 

J3 
O 


.§ 

"3 
>» 


M 

C 

'3. 

<u 
35 
A 
M 
O 
O 

m 


>> 

ft 

2 

O 

c 


M 
C 

"S 

<u 
0, 
>. 
H 


< 


3 

"3 
u 

*c3 
,0 

'w 

>. 

a. 


"3 
•g 

t> 

B 
B 

O 


S 

3 

3 
< 


M 

C 

•s 

'rt 

H 

*rt 

3 
C 

CO 

2 


V 


c 

Cvl 

3 

T3 

*o 
at 

03 

3 
O 

X 


i 


31 

40 
38 

2 
86 

3 
28 
56 
13 
48 

7 
73 

4 
53 
25 

'""22 
14 

' 6 
52 
48 
85 
28 
20 
38 

"24 
94 
24 
36 
59 
44 
26 
46 
44 
25 

""46 
36 
14 
30 
27 
101 
24 
44 
23 
35 
40 

"25 
32 
14 
22 
32 


76 
49 
55 

3 
112 

3 

3 
62 
20 
73 

7 
69 

4 

1 
38 
157 
44 
37 
27 

6 
61 
47 
75 
37 
20 
63 

""36 
90 
45 
42 
89 
53 
47 
46 
46 
33 

"66 
51 
24 
56 

34 

""28 
50 
38 
52 
43 

"55 
37 
33 
44 

37 


14 
38 
21 

"52 

5 

24 

21 

13 

31 

9 

103 

42 

65 

30 

85 

11 

15 

15 

"47 
36 
44 
32 
12 
64 
12 
21 
52 
8 
35 
22 
57 
25 
37 
21 

"21 
48 
40 
25 
31 
38 
36 
32 
20 
18 
31 
24 
23 
28 
42 
15 
22 
10 


14 
42 
34 

5 
72 








64 
50 
55 
35 
106 
37 
34 
64 
25 
67 
41 
117 
41 
33 
38 
95 
42 
14 
26 
68 
43 
67 
81 
27 
44 
50 
36 
36 
57 
42 
43 
88 
44 
45 
37 
30 
33 
72 
49 
44 
42 
58 
25 
52 
39 
50 
28 
50 
39 
40 
80 
25 
33 
22 
36 


142 
176 
149 
106 
291 
146 
111 
199 
55 
174 
192 
502 
192 
165 
111 
263 
105 
82 
74 
181 
177 
204 
255 
121 
98 
150 
92 
113 
374 
85 
135 
211 
143 
144 
139 
120 
91 
165 
184 
188 
89 
153 

"205 
165 
159 
87 
159 
120 
211 










2 
















3 
















4 


8 




8 


10 


95 






5 






6 










130 
33 






7 


34 
51 
15 
28 
9 
102 
33 
66 
17 
6 
16 
17 
24 
60 
35 
44 
76 
26 
13 
49 
25 
27 
72 
13 
34 
32 
36 
27 
37 
27 
33 
12 
44 
45 
22 
36 
34 
33 
• 28 
32 
3 

14 
35 
46 
10 
37 
30 
25 
26 












8 












9 
















10 
















11 

12 ... 

13 3 


43 
92 


43 
102 


43 
102 


45 
102 


108 

121 

102 

47 


13 


30 
116 


14 












15 












16 3 
















17 
















18 
















19 
















20 










102 






21 












22 


19 


18 


22 










23 










24 
















25 
















26 
















27 










41 






28 












29 


81 


81 


81 


81 








30 








31 
















32 
















33 4 
















34 
















35 
















36 
















37 
















38 


36 


37 


40 




120 






39 6 






40 
















41 
















42 
















43 


27 
28 
26 


27 
28 

27 


27 
28 

28 


27 
28 








44 








45 








46 










47 
















48 
















49 
















50 










84 






51 












52 ... 








126 

97 

116 

122 










53 
















54 
















55 
























1 


1 



192 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



III. 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of 
Pupils in — 


Number 
Pupils 












it 

o 


S 


g 






S 


CO £ 

1) 


High Schools 


"S. <u 
£5 


>> 

O 

pq 


o 


<< 


IIS 

< i 

3 D U 


o 
w 

1 


B 

o 

"o 
o 

u 
u 

1 


o 
o 

JS 
u 
in 

3 


o 
o 
£ 
u 
W 

Ih 
V 

a 
a 


3 M.22 


Isi 

3^rt 

hSu 

-w.tJ <u 
O *H 


56 Kemptville .... 


193 


86 


107 


159 


58 


64 


54 


50 


25 


87 


86 


57 Kenora 


194 


86 


108 


178 


65 


87 


63 


39 


5 


189 


5 


58 Kincardine. . . . 


186 


87 


99 


155 


42 


51 


41 


69 


25 


97 


89 


59 Kingsville 


146 


51 


95 


124 


55 


60 


42 


31 


13 


80 


65 


60 Lakefield 


95 


34 


65 


76 


37 


39 


29 


31 




58 


41 


61 Leamington. . . 


271 


128 


143 


238 


87 


105 


83 


71 


"l2 


175 


102 


62 Listowel 


218 


10C 


118 


174 


68 


74 


53 


54 


37 


98 


106 


63 Lucan 


124 


50 


74 


106 


28 


40 


35 


41 


8 


43 


81 


64 Madoc 


104 


51 


53 


80 


27 


27 


27 


37 


13 


48 


55 


65 Markdale 


104 


44 


60 


91 


32 


32 


24 


35 


13 


72 


31 


66 Markham 


144 


62 


82 


90 


40 


37 


35 


41 


31 


37 


86 


67 Meaford 


179 


80 


99 


158 


49 


57 


48 


57 


17 


107 


69 


68 Midland 


277 


122 


155 


247 


90 


102 


99 


64 


12 


230 


44 


69 Milton 


195 


69 


126 


162 


80 


84 


56 


48 


7 


74 


119 


70 Mimico 


167 


63 


104 


143 


70 


77 


43 


36 


11 


105 


60 


71 Mitchell 


147 


71 


76 


126 


4C 


41 


34 


55 


17 


84 


60 


72 Morewcod 


52 


28 


24 


42 


12 


13 


13 


26 




42 


3 


73 Mount Forest. . 


165 


70 


95 


143 


51 


58 


39 


45 


"23 


77 


45 


74 Nepean 


206 


97 


109 


187 


84 


86 


42 


66 


12 


193 


8 


75 Newburgh 


96 


39 


57 


72 


22 


28 


30 


38 




27 


69 


76 Newcastle 


41 


19 


22 


34 


17 


17 


15 


9 




32 


9 


77 New Liskeard.. 


118 


48 


70 


99 


57 


60 


28 


30 




94 


22 


78 Newmarket. . . . 


306 


136 


170 


271 


93 


101 


89 


97 


' 19 


157 


146 


79 Niagara 


68 


28 


40 


58 


27 


28 


21 


19 




58 


10 


80 Niagara Falls.S 


195 


114 


81 


169 


63 


64 


63 


62 


"6 


118 


71 


81 Norwich 


141 


56 


85 


124 


47 


50 


30 


52 


9 


63 


72 


82 Norwood 


118 


53 


65 


107 


40 


40 


29 


39 


10 


57 


38 


^3 Oakville 


217 


86 


131 


188 


44 


49 


58 


96 


14 


122 


82 


84 Omemee 


59 


29 


30 


49 


15 


15 


17 


27 




30 


23 


85 Orangeville. . . . 


201 


75 


126 


161 


66 


69 


48 


63 


"l\ 


96 


60 


86 Oshawa 


570 


280 


290 


450 


246 


280 


142 


126 


22 


503 


49 


87 Paris "."... 


176 
129 


82 
53 


94 
76 


151 
107 


53 
37 


61 
41 


50 
34 


48 
44 


17 
10 


127 

48 


46 


88 Parkhill 


60 


89 Parry Sound. . . 


185 


88 


97 


153 


69 


77 


49 


40 


19 


165 


20 


90 Pembroke 


283 


159 


124 


248 


73 


74 


109 


86 


14 


247 


34 


91 Penetang'shene 


126 


54 


72 


110 


50 


57 


34 


34 


1 


120 


5 


92 Petrolia 


205 


104 


101 


185 


65 


70 


43 


64 


28 


104 


100 


93 Plantagenet . . . 


76 


26 


50 


61 


21 


22 


21 


33 




49 


25 


94 Port Colborne. 


157 


69 


88 


137 


63 


73 


47 


32 


"5 


92 


65 


95 Port Dover... . 


76 


31 


45 


61 


27 


27 


21 


28 




59 


11 


96 Port Elgin 


95 


37 


58 


87 


41 


43 


24 


28 




49 


46 


97 Port Hope 


249 


108 


141 


207 


112 


82 


75 


77 


"l5 


162 


87 


98 Port Perry 


114 


52 


62 


88 


32 


46 


22 


29 


17 


62 


47 


99 Port Rowan . . . 


56 


17 


39 


48 


17 


18 


19 


19 




20 


36 


100 Prescott 


169 


71 


98 


146 


50 


56 


, 48 


60 


"5 


117 


51 


101 Richmond Hill. 


189 


91 


98 


162 


75 


76 


43 


56 


14 


44 


145 


102 Ridgetown .... 


164 


66 


98 


137 


44 


65 


40 


39 


20 


58 


104 


103 Rockland 


42 


23 


19 


37 


10 


12 


13 


17 




37 


2 


104 Scarborough . . . 


196 


81 


115 


161 


75 


82 


58 


37 


"l9 


184 


9 


105 Shelburne 


117 


41 


76 


98 


32 


40 


35 


27 


15 


38 


76 


106 Simcoe 


229 


106 


123 


203 


67 


68 


61 


76 


24 


112 


116 


107 Smithville 


87 


39 


48 


71 


30 


32 


24 


26 


5 


37 


46 


108 Stirling 


140 


50 


90 


128 


38 


41 


27 


63 


9 


48 


91 


109 Streetsville 


95 


38 


57 


79 


35 


35 


20 


35 


5 


34 


54 


110 Sudbury. .'.'... 


286 


129 


157 


216 


94 


116 


76 


82 


12 


199 


85 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



193 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



of 




Number of Pupils from Families 


whose 


Number of Pupils in the 


from- 






Head is occupied as 


3elow- 








Various Subjects 




u 

o 

.22 
3 

3 

fc'S 

X! K 

OQ 


V 



<D 



6 

O 


3 

< 


H O 

Q 3 

M X 

aJU 

OX! 


bfl 

c 
S 

H 


CO 


H 

X) 

H 


co 
M§ 

u a 
5 a 
2 3 
.0 

cd U 
JO 


eg 

a 
# o 

a 

3 
O 
O 

O 
Ih 
<U 

Xi 

O 


a 


a 
3 


O 

•u 

3 
O 
XI 

1 


Ih 

a 
6 

e 

O 

Xi 

CO 

"3) 
3 

i W 


3 
# o 

'co 
O 

is 

V 

XiX! 

•2Ph 


3 

Ih 

X) 

a 
W 


>> 

Ih 

O 
co 

3 

3 

3 
rt 
O 


>» 

Ih 
O 
03 

s 

x: 

to 

•c 

CO- 


56 


20 


27 


92 


10 


5 


19 


11 


15 


14 


63 


176 


176 


64 


35 


57 




30 


6 


2 


4 


59 


50 


28 


15 




191 


192 


87 


21 


58 




32 


86 


5 




26 


8 


10 


19 




174 


175 


47 


60 


59 


' 1 


35 


68 


1 


' 2 


22 


1 


17 




' 43 


139 


140 


62 


15 


60 




6 


51 


5 




10 


14 


9 


' '4 


26 


85 


99 


39 


16 


61 


' 4 


33 


127 


6 




45 


43 


2 


15 


98 


250 


251 


88 


54 


62 


14 


38 


98 


9 




42 


16 


12 


3 


48 


178 


187 


74 


35 


63 




13 


77 


2 




15 


7 


9 


1 


31 


118 


117 


41 


29 


64 


1 


13 


55 


5 


1 


12 


9 


7 


2 


24 


101 


101 


37 


28 


65 


1 


25 


54 


1 


1 


16 


4 


3 




25 


104 


104 


35 


32 


66 


21 


21 


69 


6 


1 


11 


12 


14 


"io 


35 


132 


135 


41 


19 


67 


3 


19 


68 


14 


3 


26 


19 


28 


2 


. 63 


167 


171 


56 


37 


68 


3 


45 


33 


5 


1 


84 


69 


24 


16 


66 


268 


268 


60 


52 


69 


2 


19 


118 


5 


1 


7 


40 


5 




49 


195 


195 


84 


32 


70 


2 


43 


18 


12 


2 


31 


40 


15 


6 


42 


167 


167 


75 


24 


71 


3 


20 


51 


6 


3 


52 


7 


4 


4 


43 


146 


146 


43 


26 


72 


7 


2 


44 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 




13 


50 


50 


14 


20 


73 


43 


26 


90 


7 




24 


2 


6 


10 


40 


161 


161 


67 


50 


74 


5 


17 


49 


6 


"3 


44 


29 


55 


3 


39 


200 


200 


88 


38 


75 




4 


63 


1 




12 


4 


4 


8 


28 


96 


96 


32 


20 


76 


" 2 


8 
40 


21 

18 


2 
2 




2 
26 


8 
8 






15 

28 


. 40 
118 


40 
118 


61 


8 


77 


"23 


1 


30 


78 


3 


37 


98 


13 




67 


54 


24 


13 


101 


288 


286 


99 


57 


79 




10 


18 


3 


1 


12 


14 


7 


3 


20 


68 


68 


28 


12 


80 


" 6 


33 


43 


7 


1 


71 


18 


20 


2 


64 


188 


192 


64 


30 


81 


6 


13 


74 


7 


2 


14 


19 


3 


9 


28 


130 


130 


53 


29 


82 


23 


16 


62 


3 


1 


12 


18 


5 


1 


28 


110 


109 


46 


24 


83 


13 


59 


78 


9 


5 


38 


4 


7 


17 


57 


207 


209 


61 


39 


84 


6 

45 


5 
28 


37 
95 


2 
12 


1 


14 

27 








17 

82 


59 
169 


59 

172 


15 

70 


13 


85 


"6 


" 30 


"3 


38 


86 


18 


71 


61 


27 


"4 


149 


195 


36 


27 


340 


545 


545 


276 


60 


87 


3 


26 


50 


6 


1 


54 


11 


28 




33 


170 


170 


61 


33 


88 


21 


14 


75 


2 


1 


16 


6 


15 




28 


126 


127 


38 




89 




78 


23 


3 


1 


29 


27 


15 


"9 


25 


185 


185 


77 


"33 


90 


"l 


25 


34 


12 




70 


40 


98 


4 


27 


273 


274 


74 


53 


91 


1 


24 


6 


3 




32 


25 


36 




58 


125 


125 


56 


32 


92 


1 


17 


86 


4 


' 1 


62 


22 


13 




40 


205 


205 


70 


33 


93 


2 


11 


44 


2 




7 


2 


4 


"<5 


18 


76 


76 


22 


5 


94 




30 


10 






18 


47 


42 


10 


40 


152 


153 


75 


26 


95 


6 


20 


22 




' 2 


11 


15 


4 


2 


21 


76 


76 


27 


17 


96 




11 


44 


"3 




11 


18 


3 


5 


24 


94 


94 


67 


9 


97 




13 


88 


5 




25 


64 


49 


4 


107 


249 


249 


107 


48 


98 


'5 


34 


49 


6 


1 


11 


2 


1 


10 


45 


99 


106 


43 


7 


99 


1 


9 

6 


20 
47 


6 
4 


"2 


7 
45 


10 

27 


4 

37 






56 
165 


56 
165 


19 

55 


11 


100 


' 1 


'"22 


37 


101 




60 


57 


4 


3 


50 


13 


1 


1 


119 


188 


188 


76 


40 


102 


"l 


29 


98 


4 




10 


5 


8 


10 


18 


146 


146 


57 


26 


103 


3 


5 


11 


....... 




13 


10 


3 




12 


42 


42 


12 


13 


104 


3 


67 


28 




' "3 


61 


9 


19 


"2 


31 


185 


185 


82 




105 


3 


22 


77 


2 




5 


9 


2 




31 


113 


113 


36 


""25 


106 


1 


. 47 


103 


9 


' "a 


49 


10 


2 


"5 


61 


217 


217 


68 


40 


107 


4 


16 


56 




2 


7 


4 


1 


1 


22 


85 


85 


34 


18 


108 


1 


12 


109 


' *4 


2 


5 


4 


4 




10 


134 


134 


44 


41 


109 


7 


. 22 


50 


1 




2 


11 


8 


' 1 




95 


95 


35 


31 


110 


2 


55 


7 


10 


4 


68 


51 


78 


13 


""62 


241 


243 


96 


42 



194 



THK REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 







Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 




High Schools 


>> 

o 

CO 

pi 

c 

.a 

'o 

a 

< 


>. 

i- 
o 

CO 

5 

c 

Ih 

CU 

-o 
o 

2 


>> 

a 
a 

u 

bo 


<u 
O 


>> 

Xi 

a 
a 

u 

M 

# o 

"co 
>. 

Si 
Oh 


cu 2 
S3 


a 
u 
JO 

0) 

bo 
< 


>> 

In 

u 

S 


01 




H 
V 

s 


c 


M 

H 


c 

V 

u 


'2 

a 
a 

V) 


c 
cd 
S 

(U 
O 


c 
a 


56 Kemptville. '. 


15 
18 
35 
32 
25 
30 
20 
22 
24 
28 
21 
48 
22 
39 
18 
34 
16 
38 
59 
17 
5 


18 
5 

15 
3 

"i 

41 

9 

10 

7 
17 
15 

4 

7 
5 
7 

" " 9 
6 


61 
72 
43 
62 
38 
98 
70 
35 
17 
34 
37 
51 

100 
63 
77 
41 
14 
53 
85 
27 
17 
60 
81 
28 
64 
49 
40 
58 
15 
61 

228 
25 
37 
69 
82 
56 
70 
22 
70 
27 
43 

107 
21 
19 
51 
76 
55 
12 
64 
33 
68 
34 
45 
35 
97 


53 

46 
38 
43 
25 
65 
53 
31 
27 
24 
35 
49 
66 
48 
45 
34 
13 
30 
46 
29 
32 
29 
66 
21 
63 
27 
21 
51 
17 
28 
99 
52 
37 
49 
88 
32 
43 
21 
39 
21 
24 
48 
23 
16 
44 
33 
36 
14 
37 
31 
61 
22 
26 
20 
64 


54 
98 
48 
46 
26 

102 
53 
28 
21 
26 
39 
50 
66 
55 
45 
35 
13 
48 
43 
31 
32 
28 

134 
20 
63 
33 
32 
56 
17 
60 

275 
36 
32 
45 
35 
35 
48 
21 
41 
21 
24 
48 
17 
19 
48 
33 
39 
17 
88 
32 
60 
19 
28 
21 
65 


130 

183 

134 

98 

61 

141 

131 

79 

31 

67 

79 

160 

195 

127 

108 

70 

32 

103 

122 

60 

5 

118 

141 

62 

110 

95 

80 

159 

44 

89 

389 

112 

91 

107 

160 

91 

115 

35 

105 

44 

85 

94 

107 

38 

96 

139 

96 

24 

139 

103 

132 

42 

85 

69 

169 


111 

83 

103 
75 
54 

126 

116 
58 
24 
59 
80 

102 

117 
73 
72 
27 
28 
92 
55 
54 
38 
28 

142 
10 
97 
66 
50 

132 
36 
55 

160 
82 
38 
73 

141 
40 
80 
42 
60 
15 
15 
97 
60 
38 
75 
96 
73 
24 
84 
13 

119 
40 
58 
37 

129 


12 
5 

18 
12 

"l2 

21 

3 

8 

4 

18 

15 

8 

3 

7 

7 

16 
9 

"l3 

"5 

6 

8 

12 

"l2 

20 

12 

6 

" 4 

1 

15 

"0 

""5 
9 

6 
11 
11 

" "9 

7 

11 

4 

8 

5 

7 


153 

125 

124 

122 

62 

224 

174 

95 

60 

66 

97 

113 

177 

160 

142 

80 

26 

114 

182 

64 

35 

116 

274 

60 

184 

97 

94 

129 

33 

153 

372 

106 

79 

123 

263 

109 

125 

50 

140 

64 

76 

181 

95 

31 

125 

177 

96 

26 

117 

86 

164 

85 

38 

84 

200 






151 


57 Kenora 

58 Kincardine . . . 




9 


129 
125 


59 Kingsville .... 

60 Lakefield 




4 


104 

71 


61 Leamington.. . 

62 Listowel 




2 


174 
145 


63 Lucan 






94 


64 Madoc 






46 


65 Markdale 






68 


66 Markham .... 






107 


67 Meaford 






96 


68 Midland 






167 


69 Milton 






157 


70 Mimico 






121 


71 Mitchell 






71 


72 Morewood .... 






26 


73 Mount Forest. 






112 


74 Nepean 

75 Newburgh .... 




2 


155 
59 


76 Newcastle .... 






28 


77 New Liskeard . 






116 


78 Newmarket . . . 

79 Niagara 


48 
5 
33 
30 
19 
28 
17 
21 
41 
25 
41 
20 
35 
10 
35 
33 
12 
10 
9 
40 
34 
18 
34 
17 
28 
4 
40 
23 
33 
17 
30 
14 
35 


11 

3 

..... 

7 
8 

"l6 

6 

9 

6 

..... 

"l6 

""3 

""5 

11 

... .. 

3 
12 

" 8 

11 

10 

4 

13 

2 

2 


5 


11 


211 
54 


80 Niagara Falls.S 






182 


81 Norwich 






80 


82 Norwood 






103 


83 Oakville 






151 


84 Omemee 






40 


85 Orangeville . . . 

86 Oshawa 

87 Paris 




... 2 

17 

4 


149 
373 
103 


88 Parkhill 


75 


89 Parry Sound . 






125 


90 Pembroke 

91 Penetang's'ne. 

92 Petrolia 




6 


219 

53 






130 


93 Plantagenet.. . 

94 Port Colborne 






47 






120 


95 Port Dover . 






56 


96 Port Elgin .... 

97 Port Hope .... 

98 Port Perry .... 

99 Port Rowan. . 






76 




11 
3 


194 
88 
32 


100 Prescott 






103 


101 Richmond Hill 






175 


102 Ridgetown 

103 Rockland... 




1 


86 
12 


104 Scarborough . . 

105 Shelburne. 




12 


131 
70 


106 Simcoe 






160 


107 Smithville.. 






50 


108 Stirling 

109 Streetsville . . 






52 






84 


110 Sudbury 




13 


158 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



195 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 





Number of Pupils in 


the Var 


ious Subjects (Continued) 




Special Courses 


1 


M 

O 

§ 


c 
o 

m 


>> 

b 

CO 

1 

<U 
XS 
O 


to 

.CJ 

'35 
>> 

h 

Oh 


a 

a 
u 
<u 
M 

O 


a 

03 
M 



c 
<u 

00 


to 

c 

"C 
SS 

<u 
a 
>> 
H 


< 


u 
u 

3 

"3 
u 

0. 


!j3 
'0 
S3 

a 
a 

u 


0) 
3 

CJ 

"h 

3 
< 


be 
a 

'c 

'c3 
u 

h 

"c3 

3 
3 
a 

a 


u 


a 

■0 
*o 
ja 

<u 

2 


56 


54 
23 

9 
40 
26 

1 
65 
26 
16 
24 
42 
52 
66 
50 
12 

5 
12 
31 
39 
16 
32 


55 
18 

9 
65 
39 

1 
89 
38 
20 
36 
44 
65 
60 
77 
15 

6 
14 
55 
95 
19 


20 
31 
48 
17 
28 
33 
55 
38 
27 
30 
36 
40 
30 
31 
29 
38 
15 
29 
24 
19 
6 


42 
21 
58 
27 
25 
51 
35 
39 
27 
28 
33 
46 
41 
44 
13 
38 
19 
42 
35 
18 
7 
8 
61 
4 

23 

57 

20 
19 

25 

24 

45 

30 

35 

30 

71 

32 

53 

12 

23 

18 

14 

39 
1 

12 

33 

43 

20 

15 

44 

16 

46 

15 

37 

16 

65 








It 
4/ 
5t 
39 
74 
74 
39 
19 
36 
38 
44 
60 
69 
12 
34 
14 
56 
83 
25 


» 193 
192 
186 
146 
99 
271 
213 
124 
104 
104 
144 
177 
277 
195 
165 
147 
52 
161 
205 
96 










57 1 


52 


52 


52 


52 








58 


9C 






59 













60 
















61 


46 


46 


46 


46 


13$ 






62 






63 ... 
















64 ... 
















65 ... 
















66 
















67 
















68 


75 


75 


75 


75 








69 








70 


25 














71 








77 






12 ... 












73 
















74 
















75 ... 
















76 ... 
















77 








60 
60 
27 
49 
50 
39 
43 
17 
31 
31 
20 
43 
35 
74 
33 
69 
23 
72 
27 
41 
18 
13 


118 
297 

68 
191 

141 
118 
215 

59 
200 
561 
176 
124 
185 
280 
126 
205 

74 
151 

76 

93 
249 
113 

56 
169 
188 
164 

41 

77 
117 
229 

87 
140 

94 
274 


"62 


114 




88 


78 2 


64 
20 

1 
45 

25 


64 

28 

1 

70 

40 


48 
13 
24 
47 
31 
39 
15 
38 
66 
39 

"35 
40 

3 
50 
25 
21 
10 
16 
50 

3 

14 
34 
17 
33 
16 

5 
23 
42 
25 
40 
34 

43 


63 


62 


64 




79 








80 ... 










145 




76 


81 










82 
















83 


27 


27 


27 


27 


79 






84 ... 


16 
72 
172 
26 
35 
20 
88 
30 
43 
21 
39 
21 
24 
18 
7 
36 
29 
30 
15 
14 
7 
31 
60 
23 
22 
55 
69 


17 

* 103 

61 
42 
70 
74 
58 
70 
22 
71 
27 
41 
57 
7 

"50 
71 
16 
11 
5 
40 
68 
32 
44 

"99 






85 ... 


26 

176 

20 


32 

176 

20 


32 

176 

30 


32 
176 








86 3 








87 1 








88 ... 










89 ... 
















90 ... 


30 


30 


30 


30 








91 ... 








92 ... 
















93 ... 
















94 ... 
















95 ... 
















96 ... 
















97 20 


50 


50 


50 


50 








98 ... 


62 




25 


99 ... 










100 ... 








28 










101 ... 










102 ... 


16 






17 
16 
42 
38 
70 
25 
41 
20 
98 










103 ... 














104 4 


52 


52 


52 


52 


77 






105 






106 ... 
















107 ... 
















108 ... 
















109 ... 
















110 ... 

































196 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III, TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 





Attendance 


Number of Pupils in — 


Number 
Pupils 




c J3 

° 2 








o 


a 


g 






S 


ss v 


High Schools 


i2>| 

'5 <u 

3J3 


m 

O 
0Q 


OB 

3 


« 


i*8 


o 

o 
W 
u 

I 


1 
M 

o 

J 


o 
o 

JS 

o 
w 

s 


1 

A 

o 
W 

H 

<U 

a 


Municipalities For 
ing High School 
District 


2&tJ 

IS? 
IBS 

O &K 


111 Sydenham 


147 


53 


94 


120 


41 


50 


33 


52 


12 


146 




112 Thessalon 


114 


38 


76 


98 


42 


48 


23 


43 




89 




113 Thorold 


120 


54 


66 


103 


48 


48 


36 


' 29 


7 


92 


23 


114 Tillsonburg.... 


230 


111 


119 


201 


81 


93 


48 


77 


12 


138 


36 


115 Timmins 


157 


72 


85 


127 


77 


75 


45 


30 


7 


120 


37 


116 Toronto — 
























Davenport. . 


231 


136 


95 


206 


43 


44 


56 


100 


31 


231 




117 Trenton 


248 


112 


136 


213 


79 


87 


64 


83 


14 


178 


15 


118 Tweed 


134 


58 


76 


110 


36 


36 


46 


36 


16 


49 


83 


119 Uxbridge 


182 


84 


98 


170 


53 


53 


41 


61 


27 


72 


102 


120 Vienna 


25 


11 


14 


17 


8 


8 


6 


11 




24 




121 Walker ton 


118 


60 


58 


105 


33 


36 


35 


29 


18 


64 


54 


122 Wallaceburg... 


201 


85 


116 


177 


70 


74 


60 


53 


14 


130 


39 


123 Wardsville 


58 


24 


34 


49 


22 


22 


18 


18 




18 


24 


124 Waterdown 


105 


46 


59 


99 


4C 


42 


24 


39 




83 


18 


125 Waterford 


86 


36 


50 


77 


32 


39 


23 


24 




34 


41 


126 Watford 


145 


56 


89 


122 


42 


42 


34 


52 


17 


67 


73 


127 Welland 


262 


132 


130 


213 


108 


119 


55 


69 


19 


161 


98 


128 Weston 


374 


171 


203 


316 


123 


123 


82 


141 


27 


148 


217 


129 Whitby 


179 


90 


89 


158 


52 


61 


48 


51 


19 


125 


54 


130 Wiarton 


146 


59 


87 


119 


53 


53 


47 


39 


7 


88 


43 


131 Williamstown. . 


98 


44 


54 


87 


25 


30 


25 


38 


5 


97 


1 


132 Winchester 


141 


6C 


81 


129 


48 


5C 


25 


51 


15 


58 


75 


133 Wingham 


209 


90 


119 


18<: 


51 


52 


58 


70 


29 


98 


87 


1 Totals, High 






\\ 
















Schools 


21,410 


9,324 


12,086 


18,133 


7,017 


7,576 


5,630 


6,534 


1670 


12,478 


7,899= 


2 Totals, Collegiate 












fc 












Institutes 


30,706 


15,205 


15,501 


26,703 


9,961 


10,736 


7,863 


9,644 


2463 


25,032 


5,124 


3 Grand Totals, 












r 










1924-1925 


52,116 


24,529 


27,587 


44,836 


16,978 


18,312 


13493 


16178 


4133 


37,510 


13023" 


4 Grand Totals, 






S 


















1923-1924 


48,263 


22,704 


25,559 


41,526 


16,103 


17,599 


12755 


14386 


3523 


34,772 


11906 


5 Increases 


'3,853 


1,825 


2,028 


3,310 


875 


713 


738 


1,792 


610 


2,738 


1,117 


6 Decreases 








































31.04 


7.93 


71.97 




7 Percentages 




47.07 


52.93 


86.03 


32.58 


35*. 14 


25.89 


24.99- 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



197 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Continued) 



of 
from 


— 


Number of Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below — 


Number of Pupils in the 
Various Subjects 


M 

O 
co 

jo 

d 

32 

IS 
S3 


g 

a 
a 

o 
U 


V 
u 

3 

"3 

_o 
"C 

< 


c-5 
Q 3 

.So, 

I s . 

C4 to 

J '5 


M 
3 

3 

CD 

H 


CO 

a 
H 

•G 

H 


co 
MO 

2 a 
2 s 
a o 
JO 


S 

o 

'3 

a 

3 
U 

o 

O 

<L> 

SI 

6 


G 
O 

*3 

a 

o 
o 

O 

3 
O 

I 


a 
a 

O 
•m 

"m 

3 

W 


c 
.2 

"to 

o 

ft 

(S3 

.3.3 
•-Ph 

t-g 


V 

t- 

3 

rt 
u 
tu 

3 

X! 
to 

"bb 

3 

w 


>» 

M 
O 
co 

X 

a 
.2 
•3 
a 

3 
rt 
U 


o 

co 

s 

CO 

•a 
*c 

n 


in 


1 


10 


105 


3 


1 


15 


5 


6 


2 


21 


147 


147 


47 


30 


112 


25. 


13 


25 




1 


22 


25 


28 




71 


114 


114 


52 


30 


113 


5 
56 


15 
70 


13 
85 






71 
33 


11 
26 


7 


3 

2 


48 
93 


115 

222 


115 
221 


48 
89 


32 


114 


12 


2 


57 


115 




27 


6 


5 


1 


57 


49 


12 




8 


155 


155 


78 


17 


116 




135 




6 


9 


25 


18 


12 


26 




226 


231 


45 


72 


117 


55 


50 


75 


6 


2 


62 


35 


7 


11 


87 


240 


240 


87 


45 


118 


2 


25 


61 


4 


2 


23 


5 


9 


5 


38 


128 


126 


37 


35 


119 


8 


23 


93 


2 


2 


30 


12 


12 


8 


54 


165 


168 


56 


42 


1?0 


1 


"30 


23 
48 








2 
7 






8 
40 


25 
108 


25 
109 


8 
35 


4 


121 


6 




8 


16 


3 


22 


122 


32 


45 


63 


6 


2 


30 


44 


9 


2 


7 


182 


182 


74 




V3 


16 

4 

5 


9 
11 
14 


36 
70 
47 


5 
4 
4 




8 

11 

9 








18 


53 
105 

85 


53 
99 

85 


22 
46 
39 


13 


1?4 


6 
9 


3 
2 




7 


125 


1 


62 


12 


126 


5 


20 


82 


8 


1 


15 


16 


2 


1 


34 


137 


133 


42 


37 


127 


3 


83 


59 


9 


3 


66 


33 


8 


1 


54 


260 


259 


123 


46 


128 


9 


61 


82 


18 


6 


104 


19 


55 


29 


43 


374 


374 


129 


95 


129 




38 


52 


11 




26 


10 


22 


20 


34 


162 


163 


58 


31 


130 


15 


43 


47 


3 


2 


26 


8 


8 


9 


38 


146 


146 


48 


30 


131 




3 


80 


2 




6 


2 




5 


29 


93 


93 


29 


18 


132 


8 


14 


88 


4 




12 


9 


10 


4 


78 


81 


75 


54 


24 


133 


24 


31 


91 


8 




32 


38 


5 


4 


56 


189 


189 


51 


37 


1 


1,033 


3,596 


7,985 


723 


176 


3,520 


2,603 


2,050 


757 


5,291 


20,331 


20,384 


7,544 


4,008 


2 


550 


8,261 


4,325 


1,407 


849 


7,536 


2,527 


4,350 


1,451 


5,881 


28,565 


29,076 


10,207 


6,174 


3 


1,583 


11,857 


12,310 


2,130 


1025 


11056 


5,130 


6,400 


2,208 


11172 


48,896 


49,460 


17,751 


10,182 


4 


1,585 


11,169 


11,913 


2,037 


637 


10204 


4,520 


5,811 


1,972 


9,687 


46,249 


46,643 


17,590 


10,219 


5 




688 


397 


93 


388 


852 


610 


589 


236 


1,485 


2,647 


2,817 


161 




6 


2 


























37 






























7 


3.04 


22.75 


23.62 


4.09 


1.97 


21.21 


9.84 


12.28 


4.24 


21.44 


93.82 


94.90 


34.06 


19.54 



198 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
III. TABLE N— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE SCHOOLS 



High Schools 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Continued) 





"O 














>> 
a 


c 
o.2 






£ 








rt 






>, 


a 








M 


2 2 






o 






e 


o 


S 3 


s 




c 






fl 




as 


■s 


s 

o 



.1 

C 


3 


c 


I 


Ph 


< 


o 


H 


£ 


W 


O 



111 Sydenham. 

112 Thessalon . 

113 Thorold... 

114 Tillsonburg 

115 Timmins. . 

116 Toronto — 

Davenport 

117 Trenton. 

118 Tweed. . 

119 Uxbridge 

120 Vienna.. 

121 Walkerton.. 

122 Wallaceburg 

123 Wardsville.. 

124 Waterdown. 

125 Waterford. 

126 Watford... 

127 Welland... 

128 Weston.... 

129 Whitby. . . 

130 Wiarton... 

131 Williamst'n 

132 Winchester 

133 Wingham.. 

1 Totals, High 

Schools. . . . 

2 Totals, Colle- 

giate Instit's 

3 Grand Totals, 

1924-25 .... 

4 Grand Totals, 

1923-24 

5 Increases 

6 Decreases. . . . 

7 Percentages . . 



41 
13 

48 
34 
27 
46 
11 
7 
43 
11 
26 
12 
38 
34 
72 
22 
32 
19 
48 
29 



3,520 
4,326 



7,846 
7,231 



615 



1,016 
1,243 



2,259 
1,782 



477 



46 
44 

48 
86 
75 

43 
84 
32 
50 
8 
35 
74 
22 
49 
37 
42 
119 
126 
32 
48 
29 
50 
51 



7,097 
9,449 



16546 
16190 



356 



36 
17 

35 
55 
46 

85 
64 
36 
41 
5 
35 
32 
18 
12 
21 
34 
58 
81 
41 
40 
28 
25 
57 



5,178 
7,278 



12456 
11734 



722 



33 
32 
37 
56 
47 

61 
64 
35 
45 
5 
38 
53 
19 
25 
22 
40 
61 
81 
72 
38 
30 
30 
59 



6,023 
9,159 



15182 
13688 



1,494 



81 

83 

79 

181 

75 

144 

139 

105 

134 

17 

65 

74 

34 

67 

49 

102 

52 

288 

101 

146 

67 

88 

76 



13,153 
17,849 



31,002 
19,600 



11,402 



76 
56 
39 
104 
45 

134 

108 
67 
87 
16 
55 
76 
39 
51 
35 
62 
32 

195 
72 

135 
54 
65 

136 



12 



9,710 
13,555 



23,265 
21,620 



15.05 4.3331.7523.9029.13 59.49 



1,645 



1,108 
1,571 



2,679 
2,111 



568 



44.64 



5.14 



92 

81 

110 

187 

143 

231 
208 
120 
140 
8 

79 

109 

28 

78 

48 

128 

221 

346 

127 

67 

86 

105 

165 



11 



25 



15,506 
26,474 



41,980 
38,832 



3,148 



80.55 



28 
198 



226 
197 



29 



10 



192 
1,493 



1,685 
1,701 



43 



16 



3.23 



92 

78 

86 

210 

137 

231 
188 

81 

122 

8 

73 
107 

39 

80 



121 

219 

327 

118 

71 

85 

98 

121 



14,379 
24,398 



38,777 
36,250 



2,527 



74.41 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



199 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AND IN THE VARIOUS SUBJECTS, ETC. (Concluded) 



Number of Pupils in the Various Subjects (Concluded) 


Special Courses 


M 

V 

u 

O 


M 

O 

"o 
o 
N 


>> 

c 
o 


>» 

M 

co 

E 
u 

O 


CO 

"co 

>> 

£S 

Oh 


to 
c 

"3. 

cu 

id 
3 

8 
m 


>. 

A 

a 

i 

o 

c 
cu 


a 
1 


< 


u 

3 

"3 
o 

13 

*35 
>> 

E 


3 

u 

<v 

a 
s 

o 
U 


cu 
u 

o 

'S 

< 


c 

;a 

"rt 
u 

H 

13 

3 
C 
rt 


CU 
CJ 

3 
cu 

•o 
"3 

cu 

CO 

3 
O 

w 


111 


37 
18 

37 
50 
45 
36 

64 
45 
40 
5 
33 
32 


51 
35 

48 
92 
77 
44 
87 
47 
51 
8 
43 
64 


40 
32 

"46 
12 
57 
70 
20 
37 
10 
14 
53 


43 
16 

25 
42 
23 
56 
35 
26 
41 
8 
23 








55 


147 
114 

120 
230 
157 
231 
248 
132 
182 

25 
117 
200 

58 
105 

86 
141 
262 










112 
















113 








29 
49 
75 
46 
36 
35 
40 
4 
23 
40 
23 
67 










114 
















115 


6 


5 


6 


6 








116 








117 
















118 


12 


12 


12 










119 










120 
















121 


11 
30 














122 


31 


22 










123 




51 






124 


15 
62 
18 
55 
84 
9 
38 
33 


46 

""ii 

119 

136 

8 

40 

34 


27 
16 
36 
48 
75 

4 
30 
19 

4 
40 


25 
21 
45 
23 
145 
35 
20 
22 
12 
45 












125 
















126 








73 




54 






127 












128 








125 
20 
39 
29 






89 


117 


129 


33 


32 


33 


177 

143 

96 

140 


33 


76 




130 






131 
















132 










100 






133 


75 


70 








52 
























1 47 

2 305 


4,437 
3,293 


5,620 
6,329 


3,876 
5,741 


4,189 
6,495 


1,110 
3,024 


1,065 
1,624 


1,086 
1,316 


5,650 
6,112 


20,202 
29,757 


934 
1,797 


2,046 
1,010 


102 
3,142 


452 
2,997 


3 352 

4 320 


8,730 
8,402 


11,949 
11,708 


9,617 
8,477 


10,684 
9,160 


4,134 
3,728 


2,689 
2,305 


2,402 
2,152 


11,762 
11,847 


49,959 
46,309 


2,731 

2,287 


3,056 
2,215 


3,244 
3,514 


3,449 
3,690 


5 32 


328 


241 


1,140 


1,524 


406 


384 


250 


""85 


3,650 


444 


841 






6 


270 


241 


























7 .68 


16.75 


22.93 


18.45 


20.50 


7.93 


5.16 


4.61 


22.57 


95.86 


5.24 


5.86 


6.22 


6.62 



200 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





















Lower School, 


Form 


[ 












Boys 


Girls 


Collegiate 
Institutes 


u 

> 

© 


tn 
u 

a 

<L> 


in 
u 

a 


CO 

u 

ed 

CD 

>> 


to 

u 
o3 
<v 


w 
u 

RJ 

CD 
>> 


tn 
u 

a 



en 

u 


tn 

Ih 

a 
<v 

00 


tn 

Ih 

oJ 
CD 

On 


tn 

Ih 

o3 
O 


u 

<d 

> 


T3 
C 

Oj 


tn 

Ih 

rt 

OJ 

>, 

O 


tn 

Ih 

03 
CD 


tn 

Ih 

<d 


tn 

oi 

CD 


tn 
u 
03 

<* 


tn 
u 

a 

<D 

to 


tn 




1 Barrie. . 




3 
1 


5 

12 
6 
6 
2 
4 
1 
9 
1 
1 
3 
6 
5 
5 

15 

7 

5 

21 

"4 

2 
1 
3 
49 
4 
7 
6 
3 


17 

64 

15 

36 

3 

7 

4 

22 

20 

1 

11 

40 

19 

13 

29 

13 

13 

53 

8 

9 

15 

14 

9 

100 

21 

11 

25 

7 

7 

1 

22 

22 

19 

23 

18 

12 

17 

53 

7 

36 
57 
23 
25 
27 
71 
35 
54 
7 

18 
54 
32 


27 
53 
24 
19 

6 
13 
25 
16 
15 
12 
22 
94 
50 
11 
39 

9 
20 
79 

7 
10 
21 
30 
21 
128 
37 
15 
36 
14 
32 
18 
37 
21 
30 
15 
12 
14 
22 
55 
18 

51 
54 
68 
48 
33 
66 
59 
76 
7 
21 
66 
31 


18 
36 
14 
22 

3 

12 
12 
10 
10 

6 
20 
61 
44 
10 
24 

9 
14 
43 
12 
10 
17 
20 
12 
87 
26 

7 
36 

6 
27 
23 
28 
11 
35 
17 
17 

3 

15 
32 

7 

56 
38 
86 
34 
28 
34 
24 
37 
4 
12 
37 
23 


9 

21 
9 

8 
1 
7 

10 
1 
2 
3 

12 

32 

13 
4 

14 
3 
8 

15 
1 
6 
7 

25 
9 

37 

14 
6 

13 
4 
8 

16 

11 
2 

19 
5 
8 
4 
8 

10 
4 

19 
19 

38 
14 

9 
10 

8 
12 

2 

2 
10 

8 


1 

4 

5 
2 










1 


2 

1 
1 

3 

1 


5 

13 
6 

10 
2 
2 
4 
6 
3 
1 
4 
9 
4 
2 

15 
3 

12 

3 

5 
2 
2 
6 
44 
2 
8 
7 
7 


17 
42 
23 
27 
9 
9 
5 
41 
24 
15 
13 
54 
16 
15 
39 
17 
29 

7 
13 

9 

7 
15 
83 
14 
26 
31 
13 

5 

4 
31 
16 
23 
20 
19 

9 
18 
50 

6 

20 
54 
27 
26 
29 
71 
46 
66 
10 
25 
48 
38 


26 
64 
30 
16 
16 
16 
12 
26 
20 
15 
27 
140 
97 
13 
34 
19 
26 

8 
18 
14 
21 
26 
121 
34 
22 
42 
21 
26 
26 
28 
16 
36 
13 
40 
9 
35 
32 
12 

36 
69 
51 
39 
39 
64 
40 
51 
8 
18 
59 
41 


11 

38 

18 

9 


9 


2 Brantford 












1S 


3 Brockville 














13 


4 Chatham 




4 
1 












4 


5 Clinton 
















6 Cobourg 




4 
1 
1 
1 
2 


1 










22 
13 
25 

5 

9 
21 
94 
55 

7 
26 

5 
17 

9 
17 

5 

13 
19 
68 
24 

9 
30 

5 
25 
29 
21 

8 
34 
10 
19 

6 
23 
15 
14 

29 
42 
50 
41 
30 
29 
13 
24 
4 
11 
20 
25 


? 


7 Collingwood 




1 
3 










1 

3 


9 


8 Fort William 




1 










6 


9 Gait . . . 












3 


10 Goderich . . 




1 














5 


11 Guelph. . 
















6 


12 Hamilton, Central 




1 


3 
5 
1 
4 
1 














42 


13 Hamilton, Delta . 












1 


20 


14 Ingersoll 
















7 


15 Kingston. . 




1 

"3 
3 
2 
3 
1 


1 










3 

1 
1 


8 


16 Kitchener- Wat'loo. 


1 

1 










3 


17 Lindsay 

18 London 












5 


2 
3 
1 

3 
2 

12 
5 

10 
4 
1 
3 

10 
1 
1 

10 
3 
4 

' '4 

1 
1 

4 
1 

7 
8 
1 














19 Morrisburg . 








4 


20 Napanee 


1 












1 


6 


21 Niagara Falls. 












1 


22 North Bay 




1 

1 
1 
1 












13 


23 Orillia 








1 






2 
8 
1 


13 


24 Ottawa 


2 


4 


27 


25 Owen Sound 


1 








6 


26 Perth . . 






5 


27 Peterborough.. 






1 












10 


28 Picton. . . 
















4 


29 Port Arthur. . 
















10 


30 Renfrew . 




















1 
5 
6 
4 
5 
4 
1 
4 
18 


17 






1 


8 
3 
5 
6 
1 


1 












5 


32 St. Mary's. . 












3 


33 St. Thomas. . 






3 












36 


34 Sarnia.. . . 




1 










3 

2 


1 


35 Sault Ste. Marie. . . 




"l 


1 








5 


36 Seaforth 






2 


37 Smith's Falls 






1 

14 

1 

2 

18 

8 

1 

16 

20 

14 

19 

9 

6 

18 

15 












5 


38 Stratford 


















3 


39 Strathroy 












1 








Toronto : 
40 Harbord . 








1 








5 
31 

3 
10 
14 
31 
18 
13 

7 

5 

19 
14 


12 






4 






1 


7 
1 
1 


8 


42 Jarvis 




1 




1 


"i 


21 


43 Malvern 






19 


44 North 




1 

3 








13 




1 












2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 


11 


46 Parkdale. . 


2 
"l 


1 

1 
1 










3 


47 Riverdale 




3 
1 
1 
2 
1 


1 








7 


48 Vankleek Hill 




3 


49 Walkerville 












4 


50 Windsor 




2 












9 


51 Woodstock 








1 






10 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



201 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
AGE, SEX AND GRADE 





Lower School, Form II 




Boys 








Girls 






co 

Ih 


CO 

Ih 


u 


CO 


Ih 

> 

o 

n 


09 

CU 


u 
cu 


CO 

cu 


CO 

03 


CO 

u 

03 
cu 


CO 

u 

03 
cu 


CO 

u 

CU 


CO 

03 
0) 


CO 

Ih 

CU 


u 

a 


cu 
> 
O 

c 


Ih 

CU 


en 
Ih 

a 

CU 


CO 
Ih 
Oj 

CU 

>> 


CO 
Ih 

03 
CU 


CO 

Ih 
03 
CU 


CO 
Ih 
Cd 
CU 


CO 
Ih 

03 
<U 


en 

03 
CU 


CO 
Ih 

cu 


CO 
Ih 

03 
CU 


u 

cu 

> 

C 




r^ 


CO 


ON 


o 






co 


rr> 


«* 


10 





t--. 


00 








03 


- 


es 


CO 


^ 


10 


\o 


r- 


CO 


O 



01 


03 

CM 


1 


1 










1 


3 


6 


18 


9 


11 


5 


2 










1 


7 


8 


21 


17 


9 


4 




1 




2 


3 


1 












8 


42 


40 


25 


9 


1 










2 


15 


48 


51 


28 


6 


1 








3 


6 












1 


1 


13 


28 


15 


6 


1 


2 










7 


18 


20 


13 


6 


1 








4 


2 














4 


10 


8 


10 


3 


1 










1 


2 


13 


12 


11 


2 










5 


















7 


7 


6 
















5 


2 


10 


3 


2 










6 


1 














1 


3 


17 


9 


7 


3 


1 




1 






3 


9 


12 


10 


11 


1 


1 






7 


3 














1 

5 


3 
14 


8 
24 


13 
11 


5 
2 










1 


1 


3 
6 


10 

14 


13 

22 


12 

17 


5 
4 


4 


2 






8 












9 




1 












3 

5 


17 

3 


17 

7 


10 

1 


4 
4 








1 




3 


6 
3 


23 
12 


21 
13 


6 
4 


1 

3 






i 




10 










11 


1 






1 








5 


11 


20 


9 


7 


4 












5 


10 


20 


12 


5 










12 


6 


1 










3 


1 


30 


42 


33 


6 


3 


2 


1 








8 


23 


60 


42 


19 


3 


2 


1 




13 


7 












1 


4 


10 


27 


33 


8 


2 












2 


19 


37 


31 


8 


4 








14 


4 












3 


3 
10 


12 

27 


9 

28 


3 
19 


1 
2 








1 
1 


i 


2 
3 


9 
9 


13 
37 


14 
34 


4 
21 


3 
12 


*5 


1 
1 






15 


2 


1 






16 














1 


2 


3 


10 


/ 


4 




1 


2 








5 


19 


10 


4 




1 








17 


2 














4 


9 


23 


12 


1 


1 


1 










4 


16 


11 


14 


9 


1 






1 


18 


8 






















































19 














1 




3 


7 




3 


1 












1 


8 


12 


7 


2 










20 


4 


3 


i 


i 


i 






2 


5 


5 


5 


4 


1 










3 


2 


8 


11 


14 


5 


3 






1 


21 
















2 


8 


11 


7 


4 


1 










2 


2 


4 


10 


6 


1 










22 


4 


2 






i 






1 


6 


9 


12 


10 


4 


3 










4 


7 


16 


19 


6 


5 


3 


1 




23 


3 


1 














14 


13 


14 


1 


2 










1 


5 


12 


16 


25 


3 


2 








24 


8 


1 










8 


35 


83 


82 


66 


23 


9 










8 


23 


73 


62 


48 


25 


6 


1 


1 




25 


3 














1 


16 


18 


12 


10 


4 


1 










4 


26 


38 


22 


8 






1 




26 


1 














3 


4 


13 


14 


1 


2 










2 


5 


11 


17 


10 


4 










27 


4 


4 




l 








4 


17 


22 


15 


9 


3 










1 


8 


18 


31 


21 


16 


7 


4 


1 


2 


28 


2 


1 












6 


6 


12 


6 


3 




I 


1 






1 


6 


15 


5 


6 


6 


6 






1 


29 


3 
















3 


16 


19 


9 


2 














5 


17 


19 


8 


2 








30 


10 


1 












1 


6 


13 


22 


9 


6 


1 










2 


9 


28 


26 


12 


2 








31 














1 




17 


25 


23 


4 


3 










1 


3 


29 


28 


17 


4 


2 








32 


i 














5 


7 


11 


2 


3 












2 


12 


12 


15 


6 


1 










33 
34 


15 
1 


13 










2 


8 

7 


31 
17 


53 
28 


31 
6 


11 
2 


2 


1 








1 
1 


10 

7 


36 
19 


44 
22 


28 
14 


9 

5 


1 








35 


1 














5 


10 


18 


17 


8 


3 










1 


4 


16 


21 


24 


7 


3 






.1 


36 










i 




i 


2 


5 


3 


4 


1 




1 








1 


6 


11 


8 


3 












37 


4 












'2 


2 
8 


8 
20 


19 
24 


11 

5 


1 
1 








1 






7 
14 


13 
32 


17 
29 


16 
16 


12 
4 


1 

1 








38 










39 




















3 


12 


7 


6 














1 


3 


12 


3 


1 








40 


2 














1 


39 


58 


35 


17 


3 


1 










5 


20 


28 


33 


7 


4 








41 


3 




l 








5 


23 


41 


53 


38 


9 




1 








1 


19 


38 


41 


30 


8 


2 








42 


8 


1 










2 


9 


36 


42 


47 


16 


5 


1 


1 


1 






3 


18 


36 


17 


10 


4 








43 


4 












1 


6 


13 


24 


19 


5 














9 


25 


43 


19 


6 








1 


44 


. 4 


1 












5 


39 


31 


19 


7 














7 


19 


27 


20 


5 










45 




1 










5 


24 


64 


55 


20 


5 


2 




1 


2 




3 


10 


49 


50 


26 


12 


5 






1 


46 


1 














15 


50 


37 


25 


7 






1 






1 


11 


30 


39 


16 


7 


1 


1 






47 


4 












1 


14 


34 


51 


21 


5 












2 


14 


30 


34 


20 


7 










48 


1 












1 


2 


4 


5 


4 




1 


1 










1 


5 


8 


2 


2 










49 














2 


6 


18 


16 


9 


1 


2 










3 


10 


19 


6 


9 


4 


1 


1 






50 


2 


1 










1 


14 


36 


43 


28 


7 


2 










1 


5 


43 


37 


12 


6 


1 


1 


1 


1 


51 


3 


2 












7 


16 


16 


9 


6 


1 












7 


21 


16 


10 


4 











202 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. U 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


Collegiate 
Institutes 


u 
t& 

o 

>> 


CO 

u 

CD 


CO 

u 
o3 
<v 
>> 


CO 

u 

a 
<d 
>^ 


co 

u 

a 

CD 


CO 

t-H 

o3 

CD 

>* 


to 
u 

03 
CD 

>> 

00 


CO 

u 

CD 


CO 

03 

CD 

>» 




u 

CD 
> 
O 

c 

03 

CN 


co 

u 

03 

CD 
>> 

CO 


CO 

03 

CD 


CO 
Ix 

03 

CD 

10 


co 

03 
CD 


CO 

v* 
03 
<U 
>, 


CO 

H 

o3 

1 

00 


CO 

u 

03 

3 
>> 




CO 

C 

03 

CD 

O 
CN 


1! 



•0 

e 

03 

CN 


1 Barrie 






2 

12 
1 

2 
1 


8 
31 
10 
11 

9 


13 

44 

16 

12 

4 

5 

5 

23 

27 

9 

28 

41 

19 

11 

34 

11 

14 

85 

5 

8 

15 

7 

9 

101 

21 

12 

21 

5 

13 

8 

27 

12 

31 

27 

32 

16 

27 

41 

5 

63 

58 
58 
32 
48 
85 
67 
62 
7 
9 
41 
28 


24 
32 
22 
10 

3 
12 

8 
13 
10 

6 
23 
48 
27 

5 
33 
12 
14 
68 

3 

3 
12 
17 
15 
76 
27 
13 
13 

8 

19 
10 
29 
11 
25 
22 
24 

4 
10 
23 

9 

51 

37 
94 
27 
28 
53 
44 
46 
3 

14 
30 
18 


8 

16 

12 

9 

2 

9 

7 

5 

5 

4 

15 

26 

27 

3 

21 

10 

29 

2 

7 

5 

8 

12 

47 

15 

2 

5 

3 

6 

9 

11 

2 

8 

10 
12 
8 
12 
12 
10 

39 

9 

41 

18 
12 
13 
23 
25 
1 
5 

13 
12 


3 
4 

8 
1 


1 

2 

2 

1 


2 


' 1 


4 

12 
1 
4 
4 

2 

4 

12 

4 

2 
4 
5 
2 
■ 2 
11 
3 
8 

1 
6 
6 


11 

45 
15 
10 
11 

1 

6 
16 
20 

9 
17 
26 
15 

3 
31 

8 
25 

6 
9 

8 
6 
9 

62 

18 

10 

8 

16 

3 

1 

9 

12 

23 

22 

8 

5 

8 

43 

1 

16 
33 

9 
10 
30 
67 
35 
59 
14 

8 
24 
21 


20 
57 
21 
23 
14 
9 
17 
30 
35 
13 
28 
59 
31 
11 
45 
18 
27 

5 

10 
11 
13 
18 
91 
32 
20 
35 
14 
21 

6 
31 
22 
30 
19 
36 
12 
31 
33 

4 

42 
53 
35 
35 
54 
75 
39 
45 
6 
12 
42 
29 


27 
40 
16 
12 

7 
12 
12 
22 
26 

8 

19 
50 
33 

6 
39 

6 
13 

9 

7 
8 
13 
11 
63 
33 
23 
14 
9 
24 
14 
27 
17 
27 
19 
27 
25 
52 
19 
21 

45 
44 
43 
25 
34 
48 
37 
39 
9 
5 
31 
21 


13 

13 

8 
4 

"5 
6 
7 

10 
3 

13 

21 

10 

3 

16 
5 
8 

2 
4 
1 

14 
9 

41 
9 
2 
8 
5 
7 

22 

17 
9 
6 
3 

17 
6 
5 
2 

12 

17 

13 

34 

5 

14 

17 

18 

15 

9 

1 

10 

11 








2 Brantford 

3 Brockville. . . 


1 




4 
4 
1 
1 
4 
2 
2 
4 
2 
6 
13 
2 


2 
1 


i 


4 Chatham 




1 
1 




5 Clinton 








6 Cobourg. . . 










2 

"l 

1 

"3 

2 


1 


7 Collingwood 






1 
4 
4 

2 
3 
4 


6 

15 

21 

6 

9 

20 

13 

9 

28 

3 

6 

49 

3 

7 

6 

5 

11 

78 

12 

7 

9 

1 

4 

2 

20 

10 

12 

17 

12 

7 

6 

30 

2 

25 
40 
27 
20 
23 
71 
42 
39 
6 
11 
33 
18 


1 

3 
1 
2 
7 
14 
5 
1 
7 
2 
2 
8 
2 

"2 

4 

10 

32 

3 

"5 

3 
4 
4 
4 
2 
4 
4 


"i 

1 


1 






8 Fort William 




1 


? 


9 Gait 




? 


10 Goderich . . . 








11 Guelph 






4 
1 

2 


1 
3 




1 


12 Hamilton, Central. 

13 Hamilton, Delta. . . 






1 
1 


14 Ingersoll. . . 






2 

10 
3 
7 
10 
1 
4 
1 
1 
1 
29 
1 
1 
4 
1 




15 Kingston 






4 


1 


4 


8 
1 

5 

3 


2 
1 
1 
3 
2 


1 


16 Kitchener- Wat'loo* 




1 


1 


17 Lindsay 


1 
"l 


2 


1 

1 

i 


2 


18 London 






19 Morrisburg . . . 








20 Napanee. . 








21 Niagara Falls. 




1 








22 North Bay. . 




6 

4 
6 

1 

' 3 

i 
1 




3 
7 

14 
3 


1 
1 
3 


1 


23 Orillia 






2 

1 

' "i 
2 

1 


"2 


4 
23 

2 
2 
4 
6 




24 Ottawa 




7 


1 


25 Owen Sound 






26 Perth . 










27 Peterborough 






1 
3 
4 
9 

5 
1 
1 
5 
6 
3 
7 
1 
9 

5 
3 
11 
1 
5 
5 
4 
6 
2 

"3 


1 

"2 
7 

1 




28 Picton. . . 








29 Port Arthur.. 








30 Renfrew 








2 




" 4 
6 
2 
8 
4 
4 


1 






1 
1 


2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
7 


? 


32 St. Mary's 


l 








33 St. Thomas 




i 

1 
1 
2 

2 
2 

"2 
2 
3 

1 
1 

1 




34 Sarnia 




2 


2 


"2 


"1 




35 Sault Ste. Marie. . . 








1 


1 




37 Smith's Falls 


5 
3 
4 

10 
8 

12 
3 

10 

11 
5 

11 
4 
3 

10 
3 


4 
1 
1 

3 
1 
5 
1 
1 
5 
2 
4 

"2 
3 
1 








38 Stratford 


1 




11 


"5 

"6 

"i 

' '4 


2 


11 




39 Strathroy 


2 


Toronto : 
40 Harbord 






5 

17 

5 

5 

21 

29 

16 

15 

5 

1 

9 

2 


"3 

"i 

"2 

2 


3 

17 

3 

4 

12 

22 

18 

15 

5 

2 

6 

4 




41 Humberside. . . . 




5 
2 




42 Jarvis 






43 Malvern. . 






44 North 




1 
2 

1 




45 Oakwood 




1 


46 Parkdale 




3 


47 Riverdale 




1 


48 Vankleek Hill 




4 
1 




49 Walkerville 






50 Windsor 



























DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



203 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Upper School 



Boys 



Girls 



in 


» 


O 


u 


CQ 


o 



20 



2 

5 

13 

7 
21 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 
16 
6 
9 
3 
1 
1 
5 
5 
6 
20 
8 
4 
6 
3 
6 
2 

13 
14 
11 

6 
10 
18 
14 
13 

3 

'5 

5 



7 

20 

9 

6 

8 
1 
6 
3 
4 

'5 

22 



229 
490 
227 
214 

75 
128 
122 
199 
197 

86 
228 
583 
314 
114 
380 
139 
212 
742 

73 
104 
148 
202 
178 
1,173 
275 
142 
272 

97 
181 
180 
301 
140 
390 
250 
226 
117 
190 
371 
119 

575 
573 
703 
329 
392 
731 
525 
569 
88 
164 
475 
273 



254 
545 
251 
184 
108 
145 
155 
276 
233 
136 
233 
745 
397 
117 
426 
152 
277 
870 
99 
178 
100 
192 
228 
966 
300 
191 
325 
163 
191 
245 
284 
177 
423 
215 
276 
135 
280 
345 
109 

359 
560 
417 
339 
376 
655 
417 
486 
117 
147 
395 
307 



483 

1,035 
478 
398 
183 
273 
277 
475 
430 
222 
461 

1,328 
711 
231 
806 
291 
489 

1,612 
172 
282 
248 
394 
406 

2,139 
575 
333 
597 
260 
372 
425 
585 
317 
813 
465 
502 
252 
470 
716 
228 

934 

1,133 

1,120 
668 
768 

1,386 
942 

1,055 
205 
311 
870 
580 



204 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 



High Schools 



Lower School, Form I 



Boys 



Girls 



1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

Almonte 

Amherstburg. . 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens 

8 Aurora 

9 Avonmore. . . . 

10 Aylmer 

11 Beamsville 

12 Belleville..... 

13 Bowmanville. . 

14 Bracebridge. . . 

15 Bradford 

16 Brampton. . . . 

17 Bridgeburg. . . 

18 Brighton 

19 Burford 

20 Burlington 

21 Caledonia. . . . 

22 Campbellford . 

23 Carleton Place 

24 Cayuga 

25 Chapleau 

26 Chesley 

27 Chesterville. . . 

28 Colborne 

29 Cornwall 

30 Deseronto .... 

31 Dundalk 

32 Dundas 

33 Dunnville. . . . 

34 Durham 

35 Dutton 

36 Elmira 

37 Elora 

38 Essex 

39 Exeter 

40 Fergus 

41 Flesherton. . . . 

42 Forest 

43 Fort Frances. . 

44 Gananoque. . . 

45 Georgetown. . . 

46 Glencoe 

47 Gravenhurst . . 

48 Grimsby 

49 Hagersville. . . 

50 Haileybury. . . 

51 Hanover 

52 Harriston 

53 Hawkesbury. . 

54 Huntsville. . . . 

55 Iroquois 

56 Kemptville. . . 

57 Kenora 



10 


7 
6 
2 
2 
4 
6 
3 
1 


1 

3 












2 


2 


10 
13 

8 
3 

19 
5 
2 
8 
4 
7 
5 

31 
3 
5 
9 
9 
9 
3 


s 


1 










6 












2 

2 

13 

1 


s 


1 
1 
1 


1 












7 










3 


4 












3 






1 








? 


3 


2 










3 


3 












7 


3 
5 
6 
7 
4 
4 
8 
4 
2 
3 
5 
4 
5 
3 
4 
3 
2 
3 
2 
4 
7 
6 
5 
3 
3 


2 
3 

2 


1 














8 


1 


1 










?? 








4 

"i 
4 
1 


10 












1 


s 














s 



















2 


2 












s 












9 


2 
3 

1 














1 


4 


1 












14 














4 
7 
5 

12 
5 
4 
7 
3 
7 

13 
5 
9 
6 
6 
8 
2 
8 
6 

11 
9 

10 
7 

11 
4 
9 
9 
9 
5 
7 
2 

15 
4 
1 
7 
3 
7 
8 
9 


? 
















6 


1 
1 
1 
1 














2 

8 


3 


1 
2 








1 


2 


S 








7 










1 


1 
6 


6 


1 










4 












? 
















3 
5 
4 
1 
3 
2 
5 
4 
3 
2 
3 
4 
3 
1 
3 
2 


16 
















6 
















S 
















s 


1 












1 


7 












^ 














1 
2 


? 














} 


2 














? 












1 


2 


8 


2 
1 

2 
1 
5 
2 
5 
2 
4 
1 
6 
2 
5 
4 
2 

"4 
1 
8 
3 




1 








? 












? 














1 


? 














7 


1 
1 
1 














S 














7 


1 












8 












4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 
2 
2 
3 


9 
















S 
















7 
















s 


"i 


1 

























6 














1 














2 


1 


1 












s 














1 














2 


2 


Q 


6 
3 


1 










8 















16 


10 


7 


6 


11 


11 


5 


6 


8 


10 


4 


13 


7 


7 


14 


12 


4 


2 


13 


11 


16 


9 


36 


23 


6 


8 


5 


8 


5 


3 


14 


10 


12 


5 


6 


8 


2 


6 


8 


11 


15 


5 


18 


9 


9 


9 


4 


7 


13 


5 


9 


7 


7 


6 


3 


6 


24 


14 


6 


6 


5 


7 


24 


13 


6 


5 


8 


7 


3 


3 


4 


5 


4 


3 


16 


8 


12 


3 


15 


3 


1 


2 


10 


1 


8 


8 


12 


5 


12 


9 


12 


6 


5 


8 


7 


4 


3 


6 


13 


15 


8 


14 


4 


3 


8 


3 


5 


15 


5 


2 


5 


7 


14 


19 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



205 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 









Lower School, Form II 






Boys 


Girls 












u 






















Ih 






















u 




en 
u 

a 


CD 
In 

a 
<v 


CO 

u 

03 

CD 


CO 

1* 

>> 


o 

n 




en 

Ih 

CD 


en 

Ih 

03 
O) 
>> 


CD 

>> 


en 

Ih 

.oj 


CO 

oj 
<D 


2 
a 

>> 


oj 
o> 


to 

1m 

CD 
>. 


en 
In 

oj 
<D 
>> 


> 

o 

c 


Ih 

03 
CD 
>> 


en 

Ih 

cj 
CD 
>. 


Oj 
CD 


en 

In 

Oj 
CD 
>> 


2 

cd 

<D 
>> 


en 

Ih 

CD 


en 
Ih 

Oj 
CD 
>> 


en 

S3 

0) 


en 
<D 


en 
u 
oj 
CD 






t-^ 


00 


ON 


o 


oj 


^ 


cn 


fO 


T* 


lO 


vO 


t^ 


00 


On 


O 


oj 


^ 


CM 


fO 


tJ« 


lO 


NO 


t^. 


CO 


On 


O 












CN 






















CM 






















c*« 


1 


2 
















11.. 


4 


2 
















1 


5 


7 


6 


3 








2 


6 


i 
















6 


6 


5 


1 
















6 


5 


7 


1 


3 






3 
















1 


2 


4 


5 


1 














5 


5 


8 


8 




1 








4 


















1 


3 


4 


3 


2 


i 


i 








1 


4 


5 


3 


2 


1 








5 


4 


i 












10 


4 


16 


4 


4 












2 


8 


8 


16 


5 


1 










6 


1 




i 




1 








2 

3 


5 

7 


4 
3 


1 


1 


l 


l 








1 


3 
4 


9 

3 


8 
1 


8 
2 


4 






1 


7 






2 




8 


i 
















2 


9 


7 


3 


1 














2 


12 


14 


4 


2 








9 
















1 


1 


2 


2 
















1 




2 


1 




1 








10 


i 


i 












3 


4 


6 


4 


2 


1 












2 


3 


7 


3 


4 


1 








11 


2 






2 










3 


5 


7 


1 












1 


1 


5 


7 


13 


5 


7 


1 


I 




12 




l 










1 




12 


21 


9 


1 












1 


4 


18 


29 


16 


17 


2 


1 


1 


1 


13 


2 














1 


10 


5 


6 


1 












1 


3 


12 


11 


1 


1 










14 








2 








1 


6 


3 


4 


1 












1 


7 


15 


4 


7 


2 


1 








15 


















3 


4 


8 


4 














1 


2 


6 


2 


2 










16 


3 
















6 


13 


7 


4 


2 














8 


16 


8 


6 


1 








17 














1 




3 


4 
















1 


2 


5 


3 


2 












18 


3 


l 
















1 




































19 


2 


l 
















2 


4 


3 
















1 


1 


5 


2 


1 








20 


3 


l 












2 


9 


10 


2 


2 














4 


7 


8 


5 


1 










21 
















2 


2 


5 


3 


1 
















4 


8 


9 


2 










22 
















1 


2 


3 


5 


3 


1 












1 


11 


9 


17 


3 










23 
















1 


7 


15 


5 


1 


1 


l 








1 


5 


12 


13 


7 


1 


3 








24 


1 
















3 


5 


2 




2 












1 


3 


2 


5 


1 


1 








25 


1 


















3 


2 


2 














1 


3 


4 


3 












26 






1 












1 


6 


4 


1 
















2 


6 


5 


4 










27 


7 














2 


1 


2 


1 
















1 


2 


2 


5 


1 










28 


1 
















3 


2 


2 
















? 


7 


6 


1 




1 








29 




i 


1 


1 






2 


4 


16 


20 


6 


3 




2 








1 


5 


21 


20 


11 


7 


2 


1 






30 












1 




1 


5 


4 


1 


5 














1 


1 


3 


1 


1 










31 


















1 


4 


4 


2 




1 










2 


6 


7 


3 


6 










32 


i 


i 












1 


5 


7 


4 


1 














1 


3 


6 


19 


10 


1 


1 






33 


2 












1 


3 


5 


2 


4 


1 














6 


11 


2 




1 










34 


1 
















3 


5 


5 
















2 


1 


7 


3 












35 
















1 


5 


4 


3 
















3 


9 


3 


4 


2 










36 


















6 


4 


1 
















1 


9 


5 


4 


1 










37 














1 


4 


3 




















2 


8 


4 


3 












38 


2 
















5 


3 


5 


1 














5 


8 


8 


5 


5 


2 


1 






39 




i 












6 


5 


6 


1 
















4 


3 


6 


1 


1 










40 














2 


2 


7 


5 


9 


1 


2 












7 


14 


8 


4 


1 










41 














, , 


1 


2 


1 


4 


1 












1 


1 


1 




5 


1 










42 


i 














1 

3 


5 
4 


6 

5 


5 
2 








t 
i 








1 

1 


7 
5 


7 

4 


3 

5 


1 

4 


3 








43 


1 








44 


1 






1 






1 


2 


2 


10 


6 


4 


2 










1 




1 


7 


14 


12 


6 


3 






45 


1 














1 


3 


5 


3 


1 


1 












3 


8 


6 


7 


1 










46 


















7 


6 


7 


2 
















11 


5 


6 












47 


2 














1 


1 


2 


1 














1 


3 


2 


5 


6 


3 










48 
















2 


4 


5 


4 


1 


1 












4 


7 


8 


5 


1 










49 


2 


i 










1 


3 


3 




6 


2 


1 














5 


7 


6 


6 






1 




50 


1 




1 










2 


9 


10 


4 


4 












1 


1 


9 


8 


8 


2 










51 


















1 
6 


1 
4 


2 
2 


1 
3 






i 










3 
4 


5 
3 


6 
3 


6 

1 


1 








52 








3 




53 


















2 


2 


2 


1 


1 












1 


4 


9 


2 












54 


2 
















3 


3 


3 


1 
















5 


4 


1 


3 


2 








55 
















1 




8 


3 




1 










1 


1 


9 


1 


9 


3 










56 


1 


i 














1 




4 


8 


5 


i 










1 


6 


9 


10 


2 


5 


2 






57 


1 
















4 


10 


7 


4 














2 


5 


11 


10 


4 


3 


2 


i 





206 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


High Schools 


CO 

u 

a 
o 


>> 


u 


CO 

u 

a 
n> 
>> 




co 

u 
o3 
0) 
>^ 


>> 

OO 


CO 

W 

OJ 

>> 

0\ 


CO 

u 

0) 
>> 

O 


g 


c 


co 

c3 

CD 
>> 

CO 


CO 

u 

03 


CO 
Ih 

03 

9i 

>> 
10 


CO 

u 

O) 
>> 

VO 


CO 

u 

03 


CO 

0) 

>> 

OO 


CO 

03 


CO 

oJ 
<U 
>> 

O 


> 

O 

C 


1 Alexandria 






1 


"2 
8 
4 
7 
5 
1 
6 
5 
7 
7 
23 
11 
5 
4 
10 
1 

"i 

10 

9 

8 
11 

3 
5 
5 
3 
5 

20 
3 
7 
6 
6 
4 
4 
4 
4 
1 

10 
9 
5 
7 
2 
9 
6 
4 
3 
7 
5 
8 
4 
8 
4 
3 
4 
3 
4 


2 
6 
5 
2 
6 
3 
6 
6 


4 
2 
3 

5 
5 
5 
6 
4 


1 

5 


2 

2 








1 
1 

3 
2 
7 
3 
1 
7 
3 
3 
1 

14 
5 
5 
8 

10 
6 


1 

7 
6 
5 

20 
3 

11 
7 
1 
8 
8 

24 

18 
3 
5 

16 
1 

5 

10 
13 
14 

4 
3 
7 
5 
5 

21 
4 

12 
2 
8 

12 

10 
6 
7 
8 

16 

15 
6 

14 
6 

15 
5 
7 
4 
5 
6 

12 
3 
9 
3 
9 
5 
4 
3 


10 
2 
7 
2 

24 
5 
7 

18 

"5 
5 

12 

11 

14 

6 

8 

3 

4 
5 
11 
14 
4 
3 
7 

12 

14 

2 

9 

11 

4 
8 
3 
7 
4 
4 
4 
5 
1 
1 
3 

10 
4 

13 
4 
6 
6 
8 
8 
5 
7 

10 
7 

11 
3 


1 

18 
5 
1 

11 
8 
4 

11 
1 
1 
4 

12 
1 

14 
2 
6 
1 

9 

8 
6 
3 
3 
1 
8 
6 
5 
5 
1 
8 
6 
2 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
2 
4 
4 
2 
4 
9 
2 
6 
2 
2 
4 
3 
7 
5 
4 
4 
5 
4 
4 


3 
8 
1 

2 
5 

7 
1 
2 
1 


1 

5 


1 


2 Alliston 














3 Almonte 






3 

4 

10 

"l 

3 
1 
5 
3 

20 
3 

' 5 
5 
7 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
6 
4 
3 
2 
5 

ii 










4 Amherstburg. . 




1 

2 
1 


1 
3 
4 
4 
3 












5 Arnprior 




1 


1 


1 


5 




6 Arthur 






7 Athens. . 




4 

2 












8 Aurora 




4 




"l 


1 

3 


1 




9 Avonmore 






10 Aylmer 


1 


1 
2 
2 

1 


6 
4 

17 
7 
5 
2 
9 
6 
4 
6 

12 
5 
7 

14 
5 
6 
3 
3 
2 
8 
4 
2 

13 
7 
4 
1 
2 
5 
2 
7 
9 
8 
1 
1 
7 
3 
5 
4 
3 
3 
5 
9 
4 
3 
5 
4 
5 
9 


4 

"7 
3 
2 
6 
8 
1 
3 
1 

"6 

4 
4 

2 


2 
2 
4 








1 1 Beamsville 


"l 


1 
1 




2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 


2 
4 

2 
1 

"2 


1 

1 

"2 


? 


12 Belleville 




1 


13 Bowman ville 






14 Bracebridge 




8 
1 
3 


2 






? 


15 Bradford. . . 




2 




16 Brampton. . . 












17 Bridgeburg. . . . 




1 












18 Brighton. . . 


















19 Burford 






1 
4 


1 

2 






2 
1 

2 
3 

1 


"i 


1 


20 Burlington 










1 
5 


4 
4 
3 
9 
4 
3 
1 
8 
3 

13 
2 
6 
2 
4 
3 
4 
3 
4 
5 

10 
9 
3 
9 
5 




21 Caledonia 








22 Campbellford . 






1 

2 


1 










23 Carleton Place 




3 

1 


3 




2 
1 
2 


1 




24 Cayuga . . . 




1 


25 Chapleau. 














26 Chesley . . . 






8 
1 
1 

4 
2 
1 
3 
2 

"l 

4 
1 
3 
2 


3 


4 






4 

"7 

4 


3 

1 

"i 




27 Chesterville 




2 
1 

5 






1 
1 

2 

"2 

3 

10 




28 Colborne. . . 














29 Cornwall 




4 


1 




1 
1 


2 


30 Deseronto . . . 






31 Dundalk. . 


1 




"3 

7 
3 
4 

5 


2 
1 
2 
1 

1 












32 Dundas 


"l 

1 
1 


1 


"i 

1 


1 
1 






33 Dunnville 


2 


2 


1 


34 Durham 




35 Dutton 




3 
2 


















37 Klora . . . 










3 
1 
4 


2 






38 Kssex. 






1 
9 

3 

1 
6 

2 
1 

7 
2 

"2 

*6 

' 4 
3 
1 
1 
3 
3 


1 


1 


"1 




39 Exeter. . . 




3 
2 
2 
1 


1 

2 

"i 

2 


"2 
2 
1 
2 




40 Fergus . . . 


1 










41 Flesherton 


2 
3 

2 
7 

9 


1 

1 
4 

1 
1 


1 






2 
1 
1 


1 


42 Forest.. 






43 Fort Frances 




2 






1 

2 


3 






1 










5 

1 

2 


4 
1 
4 
6 
1 
8 
2 
9 
8 
5 
5 
2 
51 




46 Glencoe . 








1 


3 
1 










1 

1 
3 
1 
1 
1 












3 












49 Hagersville 












i 


1 




50 Haileybury 




2 
2 
2 
1 
4 
3 
9 
3 


' 3 


1 
































1 
3 

"3 

1 


1 


"i 




53 Hawkesbury 

54 Huntsville 

55 Iroquois. . 


2 
1 








1 
1 




2 
1 

2 




' 3 
1 


1 


'4 


1 
2 




56 Kemptville. . . . 








57 Kenora 




3 


1 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



207 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 







Upper School 






co 

>> 




co 

2 


_cy 


Boys 


Girls 




u 
C 

W 


CO 
U 

>* 


co 
u 
a 

CU 


co 
u 

o3 

0) 


co 
u 

<u 


co 

u. 

Sj 
0) 
>s 

00 


tn 

aJ 

CU 
On 


tn 
u 

a 
<u 




u 
cu 

> 


-0 

C 

a 
csi 


tn 

u 

cu 


CO 

u 

03 
cu 

>» 


CO 

U. 

03 
CU 

>> 


CO 

u 

a 

0) 


CO 

1_ 

03 
cu 

00 


CO 

u 
03 
cu 
>> 

as 


to 

u 

03 
CU 




u 

cu 

> 


-a 

c 

03 

CNI 


6 



H 


1 










1 
1 


1 


1 

2 








1 
1 
1 
3 
6 
1 


1 

5 
2 
2 
7 
1 


1 

3 
1 
1 
1 
4 


1 
1 
1 


1 

4 


50 
60 
60 
56 

124 
50 
59 
72 
27 
93 
75 

211 
92 
65 
54 

124 
46 
28 
33 
97 
73 
76 

118 
48 
49 
61 
34 
38 

173 
50 
44 
93 
75 
41 
62 
56 
32 
54 
87 
79 
47 
78 
48 
86 
78 
60 
22 
73 
47 
94 
52 
59 
33 
41 
49 
86 
86 


92 

116 

89 

52 

197 

97 

52 

129 

31 

84 

119 

291 

107 

102 

59 

139 

59 

56 

41 

93 

104 

130 

144 

73 

49 

89 

58 

75 

210 

39 

91 

118 

70 

73 

80 

66 

59 

113 

97 

111 

42 

75 

93 

119 

90 

99 

65 

86 

75 

117 

77 

68 

64 

75 

73 

107 

108 


142 


2 






1 
3 
2 
3 
1 
2 
1 
2 
4 
1 
3 
5 


4 

2 
1 
5 

' i 

"a 

4 
5 
3 








176 


3 




1 






1 


149 


4 


1 
1 
1 

' i 

1 
2 


1 

1 








108 


5 

6 


1 


1 






1 

1 


4 




1 


321 
147 


7 






2 
2 

1 






111 


8 














1 
2 
5 
5 

10 
4 


4 


1 






201 


9 1 


2 






1 




1 

5 
3 

2 
2 


58 


10 


3 


1 






177 


11 


"l 


3 








194 


12 .:. 

13 


2 


1 


1 
1 






6 

7 


5 
1 


2 

1 


1 


502 
199 


14 






167 


15 
































113 


16 


' "l 


1 
4 


5 
1 


2 
1 


2 


1 








1 
3 


5 
2 


3 
2 


1 






263 


17 






1 


105 


18 
















84 


19 
































74 


20 




1 


4 

7 
2 


"3 
3 
2 
1 


"2 
4 

1 


1 










4 
6 
5 
6 
6 


5 

7 
6 
2 
8 


1 
3 

"2 


2 

"2 
1 




190 


21 








4 

1 


177 


22 






3 








206 


23 






1 






262 


24 


1 


2 








1 


121 


25 
















98 


26 






1 


3 


1 


1 










2 


2 


3 


3 




150 


27 














92 


28 






3 
5 


2 
3 


3 
1 












2 
6 






1 
1 


' 1 


113 


29 
30 


1 






3 




2 


2 


4 


4 


383 
89 


31 










2 
2 










1 


3 
1 


1 
1 
1 








135 


32 






1 
3 


5 


1 
1 


1 






2 


1 




211 


33 




5 






2 


145 


34 


















114 


35 


4 

2 


' 1 


2 
2 


3 
3 


4 








3 


1 
2 


9 

2 


2 
1 


1 




1 


142 


36 

37 




1 




122 
91 


38 








3 
3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
1 


3 
4 

1 

"3 










2 
3 


5 
4 
7 
1 


5 
3 
3 


"l 




1 
1 


167 


39 1 
40 


3 


3 


2 
4 


2 


2 




2 


184 
190 


41 






3 


1 












1 


89 


42 






3 
1 








153 


43 


1 


2 




1 






4 


5 
2 

2 
2 


1 




3 


141 


44 






205 


45 


2 


1 


3 


2 


1 
1 




1 
1 


3 
4 


168 


46 


2 


1 


1 


159 


47 














87 


48 




3 


3 


2 
1 
2 
1 
1 


2 










3 
3 
1 

3 


5 
1 
2 
2 
3 


4 
3 
3 
1 
4 


3 

"2 

2 






159 


49 




1 


1 


2 




1 


122 


50 




1 


4 


211 


51 


1 


1 








129 


52 


1 


2 


3 








127 


53 














97 


54 
































116 


55 
56 




1 


1 


1 
1 
1 


4 


' "l 


1 

2 






1 
1 
1 


"7 
1 


1 
3 
1 


1 

2 
1 


2 
1 


' i 


122 
193 


57 






194 



208 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Lower School, Form I 




Boys 


Girls 


High Schools 


tn 
u 

8 

o 


CO 

u 

a 
<u 


u 

a 

0) 

>> 


tn 
u 

<v 
>» 


tn 
u 
r) 

<v 
>> 


en 

o> 
>> 

to 


tn 

s_ 

<u 
>> 




CO 

u 

a 
<u 
>» 


tn 
u 

00 


tn 
u 

a 


tn 

u 

a 
<u 
>. 




u 

> 



a 

a 


in 
u 

a 





tn 
u 

<u 
>> 


tn 

a 


en 


tn 
u 


tn 
u 

a 

<3J 

>> 
to 


tn 
u 

0J 


58 Kincardine 








7 
3 
4 
6 
8 
3 
2 
2 
2 
5 
8 
5 

10 
8 
1 
9 
7 
1 
2 
7 
4 
4 
7 
6 
2 
2 
4 
10 
28 
15 
4 
2 
9 
5 
3 
3 
5 
2 
4 
2 
5 
1 
4 
5 
5 
2 

11 
3 
7 
2 
6 
9 
16 
2 
1 
4 
1 8 


6 
4 
3 
9 

14 
6 
5 
6 
5 
8 

14 

12 

11 
6 
2 
6 

13 
1 
4 
5 

15 
3 

13 
4 
5 
7 
3 
4 

44 
5 
6 
8 

11 
9 

25 
1 

12 
4 
8 
8 
7 
3 

12 

17 
8 

13 
6 

11 
5 
5 
1 

13 
8 
5 
4 

14 


8 
8 
6 

14 
5 
1 
2 
1 
8 
5 

11 
7 
5 
4 
2 
6 
9 
8 
1 
6 
6 
4 
5 
2 
5 
6 
1 
5 

33 
6 
7 

25 
5 
6 
2 
1 

13 
2 
3 

12 
5 
2 
2 
7 
8 
5 
5 
1 
7 

'"2 
1 
13 
8 
4 
6 
17 


6 
4 
3 
7 
2 
3 
2 
1 
1 
9 
11 
















1 

3 
1 
6 
8 
6 
4 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
4 


2 
2 
4 
9 

11 
3 
2 
2 
1 
7 
3 
3 

16 
8 


7 
8 
7 

17 

16 

8 

2 

8 

8 

14 

21 

24 

15 

3 


8 

16 

6 

11 

7 

4 

4 

3 

3 

4 

15 

18 

8 

2 

2 

6 

10 

8 
22 
2 
4 
6 
5 
8 


6 










1 














8 


60 Lakefield 






1 

1 
1 

2 














^ 








6 

1 


3 












8 


62 Listowel 














1 

2 




63 Lucan 


1 














j 


64 Madoc 














3 


65 Markdale. . . 




1 


2 
1 
1 
1 














1 
"l 


? 


66 Markham 




1 








1 




4 


67 Meaford. . 












? 


68 Midland.. 






3 












7 


69 Milton. . . . 


















13 


70 Mimico. . 






4 

4 
1 
2 
2 
1 


2 


2 














1 


71 Mitchell.. 


















t 


72 Morewood 






1 

2 

5 


2 














? 


73 Mount Forest 




















9 

8 

7 
4 
5 

11 
11 
9 
6 
2 
9 
23 
8 
4 


14 
20 

3 

13 

21 
6 

10 
9 
7 

13 
1 

18 

49 
9 
6 

11 
9 
6 

26 
2 

12 
3 
9 

12 
7 
3 
8 

16 
9 


4 


74 Nepean . . 




1 


2 












2 


1 

1 
2 

"2 
7 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
4 
3 


6 


75 Newburgh 
















76 Newcastle . 






2 
2 
8 


















77 New Liskeard 






1 
2 


2 
2 














6 


78 Newmarket 


















13 


79 Niagara 
















1 


1 


80 Niagara Falls, S. 

81 Norwich . 




2 


5 
3 
2 


2 














2 
















1 


82 Norwood . . 






1 

1 


















83 Oakville 






1 














3 






1 


' 2 

10 

3 

2 












1 
1 
1 




85 Orangeville . 




5 

11 

4 














11 

35 
3 
6 

19 

11 
6 
1 
2 

11 
3 
5 

15 
1 
2 

10 
8 
5 
3 

10 
6 
8 
3 
3 
3 

13 
7 

12 
6 
7 


2 


86 Oshawa 




4 
1 

2 


6 


1 










27 


87 Paris 












3 


88 Parkhill 


















1 


89 Parry Sound 




4 
10 

5 
5 

"4 
2 
3 
9 
1 

"3 
6 
4 
1 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
















8 


90 Pembroke. . 






4 


2 
1 

1 
1 












1 


3 
2 


7 
4 
5 
4 
6 
7 
6 
4 
3 
3 
7 
6 
8 


1 


91 Penetanguishene. 
















9 


92 Petrolia. 




















1 


93 Plantagenet 




1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
3 














3 
2 

"2 
1 
5 
1 
4 
2 
4 


3 


94 Port Colborne. 














1 
1 


4 


95 Port Dover . 


















2 


96 Port Elgin 


















2 


97 Port Hope 






3 
4 
1 


1 












\3 


98 Port Perry. . 














1 
1 


5 


99 Port Rowan . . 


















100 Prescott 
















3 


101 Richmond Hill 






1 
2 
1 














7 


102 Ridgetown 


















7 


103 Rockland 




















104 Scarborough .... 

105 Shelburne 




2 


2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
3 
8 
1 














1 

1 
1 
2 
1 
5 
8 


15 
8 

12 
8 

12 
6 

17 
5 
1 

10 
9 


14 
8 

17 
6 
6 
6 

20 
8 
6 
8 

15 


5 














1 

1 


2 


106 Simcoe 










1 




'I 






107 Smithville 








108 Stirling 






1 










109 Streetsville 


















i 


110 Sudbury 






3 

5 

. 4 

3 

1 


1 












1 
1 


3 


















5 








2 












7 


113 Thorold 








1 










1 
1 


2 
13 


3 


114 Tillsonburg 




2 


5 








1 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



209 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 
AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Lower School, Form II 



Boys 



Girls 



3 
6 

2 

8 
6 
2 
4 
3 
3 
4 
9 
8 
4 
2 

'3 
9 
5 

4 
12 

2 
9 
4 

9 
1 
5 
9 

'3 
10 

18 
8 
5 
3 

8 
2 
3 
6 
2 
1 
8 
1 
3 
1 
7 
2 
4 
2 
3 



3 
4 
4 
6 
7 
7 
1 
4 
7 
5 

12 
8 

11 
3 
3 
6 
6 
2 

i 

4 

7 
1 
8 
3 
4 
6 
4 
8 

19 
11 
6 
4 
5 
1 

4 
2 
4 
6 
9 
8 
1 
9 



10 
4 
8 

10 

10 

5 

3 

5 

9 

11 

22 

9 

9 

5 

2 

5 

5 

5 

'3 
21 

: 6 
1 

4 

12 
3 
9 

29 
9 
5 
8 

15 
7 

12 
2 
4 
4 
4 

16 
2 
4 
5 

10 

10 
1 
5 
9 
9 
3 
5 
3 

10 
3 
5 
4 
9 



6 

14 
3 
9 
4 
1 
3 
3 
3 
6 

14 
10 
5 
3 
1 
4 
4 
4 
6 
2 

15 
4 
3 
6 
3 
11 

"6 
9 
4 
5 
7 

11 
3 
4 
2 

12 
2 
4 

10 
3 
6 
6 
7 
2 
3 

11 
6 
4 
1 
3 
1 
5 
9 
4 
9 
4 


3 

3 
5 

16 
2 
3 
1 
3 
3 
2 
8 
3 
1 

"2 
2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
4 
4 
1 

"2 

"5 

8 
2 
2 
3 
8 
3 
2 
1 
10 

"2 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 

"i 
3 
3 

5 
1 

1 

"<5 
3 

1 
1 
2 


3 

2 

3 

1 

3 

1 

2 

1 

i 

1 

i 

1 

'2 

2 

1 

'2 
'3 
i 

1 


i 
1 

1 
1 
i 


i 

'2 


i 
i 

2 

i 

i 



210 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



IV. 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 

TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





Middle School 




Boys 


Girls 


High Schools 


in 
u 
rig 

CD 

>> 
cs 


<v 
>> 


u 
a 

CD 


CO 

55 

<v 

to 


co 

CD 




CO 
Ih 

OJ 

a> 
>> 


CO 

u 
>> 


CO 

u 

<v 
>> 

ON 


co 

aJ 

O 


CD 
> 
O 

C 

C<1 


co 

u 

a 

e*5 


co 

i-i 

aJ 

<u 

>N 


CO 

cti 

CD 

>» 
10 


CO 

Ih 

CD 
vO 


CO 

CD 


CO 

a 

CD 
OO 


CO 

c3 

CD 

Os 


co 

u 

CD 
O 


u 

CD 
> 
O 

-O 

C 

3 


58 Kincardine 






2 


2 
1 
3 
5 
4 
4 
5 
1 
2 
2 
3 
5 
1 
2 


13 

1 

2 
5 
7 
4 
3 
5 
2 
8 
9 
2 
3 

10 
3 
2 
8 
1 


8 
4 

15 
5 
3 
6 
4 
3 
4 
7 
8 
4 
5 
2 
3 

11 
1 
3 
5 

16 
3 

10 
7 
4 
9 
2 
5 

15 
3 
2 
7 
5 
4 
2 

"5 
2 
2 
5 
4 
1 
4 
10 
3 

"2 

12 
1 
5 
1 
8 
5 
5 
6 

12 


5 
3 
3 
5 
1 
3 


2 
"2 


2 

"l 

2 


1 

2 
2 
4 




1 


3 

2 
4 
1 
7 
5 
3 
3 

"5 
6 
7 
8 
3 
1 
7 
3 

2 
1 
7 
1 
6 
6 
3 

11 
2 
6 

19 

10 
6 
4 

12 
1 
6 
2 
1 
5 
2 

10 
5 
4 
4 
6 
3 
1 

10 
3 
4 
4 

10 
9 
4 
1 
3 
2 
9 


7 
3 
3 

10 

13 

4 

2 

9 

15 

17 

7 

10 

6 

8 

2 

9 

10 

7 

10 
4 
9 

12 
5 
9 
6 

24 

30 
2 
9 

11 

10 
6 

18 
4 
3 
6 
8 

16 
5 
6 

12 
8 

10 
4 
5 
2 

12 
7 

16 
4 

17 
8 
9 
3 

10 


9 
9 

5 
8 

11 
8 
9 
3 
5 
6 
8 
7 
4 
7 
4 
4 

13 

1 
8 

11 
3 
3 
6 
6 

19 
3 
6 

12 
7 
6 
8 
9 
6 
8 
6 
4 
4 
2 
5 
1 
4 

12 
6 
5 
1 
2 
4 

14 
3 

11 
6 
5 

13 
5 
7 

13l 


9 

3 
5 
7 
2 
3 
3 
4 
6 
5 
7 
2 
1 
11 
2 
3 
6 

1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
5 
4 
12 
1 
2 
4 
2 
3 
2 
3 
7 
2 
4 
4 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 
3 
2 
4 
2 
3 
3 
7 
1 
3 
2 
9 
7 
9 
1 
4 


4 

1 
1 
5 




1 








2 


60 Lakefield 










2 










1 

3 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 
2 


1 












1 
3 
















1 


2 
3 






64 Madoc 






1 






1 




65 Markdale 












2 

2 
1 
2 










2 
7 
4 
4 
2 
5 
3 
2 
2 
4 


1 




1 










67 Meaford 






1 

"i 

2 
2 

1 
1 


"i 
"1 




68 Midland 






5 

2 


1 


1 




1 


69 Milton 








70 Mimico. . 










1 




3 
2 
1 
4 
3 




71 Mitchell 










72 Morewood.. 








2 
3 


2 
2 


2 
2 


' i 




I 


73 Mount Forest. . 






1 


1 
10 

2 












75 Newburgh 






1 




1 










1 










77 New Liskeard 






2 

2 


2 
4 

2 
7 
5 
5 
5 
2 
6 
9 
6 
3 


2 

13 
2 

13 
3 
3 
7 
3 
4 

21 
8 
5 
3 

15 
2 

22 
3 
4 
5 
3 

15 
3 
1 
8 

10 
2 
4 
5 
3 

16 
3 

11 
4 

11 
3 






1 

2 


"3 
1 


1 
3 

1 




78 Newmarket. . 






8 

"3 
1 
3 
7 
2 
4 
8 
1 
2 
4 
9 
3 

"i 

3 
2 
2 
3 
1 

"i 

5 
2 
2 
1 

"7 
2 


3 
1 

1 

"4 
2 
1 
1 


3 


2 


1 


2 


79 Niagara 








80 Niagara Falls, S. . 

81 Norwich. . 






5 
3 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 


1 


1 


1 
1 
1 

2 


3 

' 2 

4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 




1 

1 
2 


1 




82 Norwood 








83 Oakville 




1 




























1 
1 
1 
2 






86 Oshawa 






1 
1 


i 


1 

2 




87 Paris 








88 Parkhill 






1 




89 Parrv Sound 






1 
2 








90 Pembroke 




1 


3 


9 
1 

4 
5 
1 
2 
1 
8 
2 
1 
7 
2 
4 

"3 
6 
2 
3 
3 
3 
5 
6 




2 




4 


2 
4 






91 Penetanguishene.. 

92 Petrolia 






2 
























1 


4 


3 
4 


' 1 




94 Port Colborne 








1 


1 






95 Port Dover 
















96 Port Elgin 








2 






1 
1 


1 
5 
2 




2 


1 


97 Port Hoop 




1 


4 
1 




98 Port Perry 




2 






2 






99 Port Rowan 






1 








100 Prescott 






1 
1 
1 
1 

2 






2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 


5 
1 
3 
1 
2 




1 


101 Richmond Hill 






1 


1 
1 




1 




102 Ridgetown. . 










103 Rockland 














1 
1 










10S Shelburne 




1 


2 


' 1 
1 










1 






107 Smithville 




1 


" 1 

1 
2 




"2 
1 
6 
2 




108 Stirling 




1 
1 
3 
2 
4 
1 
1 






109 Streetsville 

1 10 Sudburv 


i 


1 

2 












1 


1 


1 
1 

6 

5 
4 


2 
1 
1 


3 

1 




2 




111 Sydenham . 


1 


1 












113 Thorold 










3 
9 








1 

2 




114 Tillsonburg 




1 


4 


4 


2 1 




i 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



211 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 



Upper School 


en 

O 


3 






Boy 


s 




Girls 




u 
c 

w 


en 

a! 


U 

03 

IT) 


en 
u 

03 
<V 
>. 


03 
CD 
>^ 


en 

03 
O 
>> 

00 


03 
On 


03 

O 
CN 


u 

> 



XI 

c 

03 

CN 


en 

03 


en 
u 

03 

<y 
>> 

10 


en 

In 

03 
<V 
>> 


en 

u 
03 


en 

In 

03 
0) 
>» 

00 


en 

Ui 

03 


en 
u 

a 




u 

> 

O 

T3 
C 
03 

CN 


6 



H 


58 




1 

1 


"3 


2 
1 




4 


3 
1 






4 
1 


4 
1 


6 

2 


"l 


1 


' '2 


87 
51 
34 

128 

100 
50 
51 
44 
62 
80 

122 
69 
63 
71 
28 
70 
97 
39 
19 
48 

136 
28 

114 
56 
53 
86 
29 
75 

280 
82 
53 
88 

159 
54 

104 
26 
69 
31 
37 

108 
52 
17 
71 
91 
66 
23 
81 
41 

106 
39 
50 
38 

129 
53 
38 
54 

111 


99 
. 95 

65 

143 

118 
74 
53 
60 
82 
99 

155 

126 

104 
76 
24 
95 

109 
57 
22 
70 

170 
40 
81 
85 
65 

131 
30 

126 

290 
94 
76 
97 

124 
72 

101 
50 
88 
45 
58 

141 
62 
39 
98 
98 
98 
19 

115 
76 

123 
48 
90 
57 

157 
94 
76 
66 

119 


186 


59 




146 


60 




99 


61 






1 
11 

2 


"9 

2 


' 1 


1 
1 


3 






2 
1 


"8 
1 
1 
1 

5 
2 

"2 
3 
2 


3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
5 


2 
1 






271 


62 


1 


1 


218 


63 








124 


64 






5 


1 


2 








1 






104 


65 1 




1 

1 

2 


2 
9 

2 
3 
1 

2 
2 


4 

4 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 






3 
4 
1 

1 


104 


66 
67 


3 
2 

2 


' i 
1 






1 


1 


1 


1 


144 
179 


68 ... 
69 


1 






1 


1 






277 
195 


70 ... 




1 












2 








167 


71 ... 


2 










2 




1 


147 


72 ... 
















52 


73 ... 


1 


1 


4 
1 


2 
1 


2 


2 
1 








4 
3 


6 

2 




2 
2 






165 


74 ... 


1 










206 


75 ... 






96 


76 ... 
































41 


77 ... 
































118 


78 ... 






2 


3 


3 


3 








2 


1 


3 


1 


1 




306 


79 












68 


80 ... 




1 
3 
1 


"l 

1 
1 


1 
1 
3 
3 


2 










1 


"2 
1 
2 


1 
1 

1 
3 








195 


81 ... 










1 






141 


82 


2 
4 








1 




118 


83 




1 












217 


84 




















59 


85 ... 






3 
2 
4 
2 
2 
1 


5 
4 
1 
2 
3 
1 


3 
4 


1 

1 








1 

1 
2 
1 


3 
3 
3 
1 

7 


3 
1 

3 
1 
5 
3 


"3 
"l 


2 

"i 




201 


86 ... 




3 
2 

1 








570 


87 ... 


1 








176 


88 ... 


3 


1 
1 








129 


89 ... 








185 


90 ... 






1 
1 








4 


1 




283 


91 ... 














126 


92 ... 






7 


4 


3 


1 






1 


4 


5 


3 






205 


93 ... 
















76 


94 ... 








1 


1 










1 


1 


1 








157 


95 ... 






















76 


96 ... 
































95 


97 ... 






1 
2 


4 
1 


1 

1 












1 
1 


4 
2 


2 
1 


2 




249 


98 ... 

99 ... 


1 


1 




2 


1 




• 4 


114 
56 


100 ... 








1 
1 
3 












1 
1 
1 


2 
4 
5 


1 
1 

2 








169 


101 ... 




1 
1 


4 

2 


1 
1 










1 

1 






189 


102 

103 ... 


2 






2 


164 
42 


104 ... 




1 




4 












1 
4 


6 

5 
2 


4 
1 
6 


2 
1 

2 


1 
"i 


"2 


196 


105 ... 










2 


117 


106 ... 






1 
1 


3 

1 


5 

i 

"1 


4 
1 






229 


107 ... 










1 


1 


87 


108 ... 






6 

1 


1 




1 




140 


109 ... 






2 
2 


1 
2 
1 


1 










95 


110 ... 




4 










2 
1 


' 1 


1 




286 


Ill ... 




1 




2 


4 


2 


147 


112 ... 








114 


113 ... 






1 

1 


1 


1 
1 










1 

2 


"4 


2 
1 




1 
1 




120 


114 ... 


1 


1 






230 



212 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 





















Lower 


School, 


Form ] 














Boys 


Girls 


High Schools 


CO 

u 

Oj 
Cu> 

O 


CO 

u 

cd 

CD 


CO 

u 

a 

CD 

>» 

CN 


en 
u 

a 

CD 

>» 

CO 


CO 
It 

cd 

CD 

>> 


CO 

u 
cd 

CD 
>% 

lO 


CO 

u 
cd 

CD 

>» 


CO 

u 

a 

CD 

>> 


CO 

u 

a 

CD 
>> 

oo 


CO 

u 

a 

CD 
On 


CO 

u 

Cd 

CD 

o 


u 

CD 
> 

o 

C 

a 

CN 


CO 

u 
cd 

CD 

O 


co 

cd 

CD 
>> 


CO 

u 
cd 

CD 

>N 

CN 


CO 

u 

a 

CD 
>> 

CD 


CO 

In 

cd 

CD 
>, 


to 

u 
cd 

CD 

>> 
lO 


CO 

u 

cd 

CD 


115 Timmins 






4 
1 
3 
3 

4 


10 
6 
8 
4 
7 
1 
4 

11 
2 
3 
5 
9 

13 

21 
9 
2 
7 
1 
1 


9 
5 

17 
7 
9 
2 
3 

13 
2 
9 
4 
3 

14 

16 
8 
4 
5 
9 

11 


9 
10 

5 
3 
5 
2 
7 
4 
3 
5 
8 
4 
18 
8 
7 
7 
4 
8 
5 


4 
4 

7 

1 
2 
3 


2 

"i 














6 
1 

4 
2 
6 


10 

6 

17 

8 

7 


11 

5 

12 
2 
8 


8 
1 
9 

5 
4 


1 


116 Toronto, Dav'np't 

117 Trenton 






1 












3 












4 


118 Tweed 
















1 




119 Uxbridge 




















120 Vienna 




















1 


121 Walkerton 






1 
6 














1 


"*5 
1 
2 
3 
5 
5 

16 
5 
1 
1 
5 


1 

10 

2 

7 
4 
5 
22 
24 
8 
2 
5 
6 
4 


6 

15 

4 

9 

3 

8 

15 

13 

4 

9 

1 

2 

12 


7 
4 
4 
3 
2 
1 
7 
8 
7 
7 
2 
8 
7 


? 


122 Wallaceburg 




1 


"i 


1 










3 


123 Wardsville 














1 


124 Waterdown 




















? 


125 Waterford 






2 
2 
5 

10 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 


2 
1 
5 
1 
6 
3 
1 
5 
6 














1 


4 


126 Watford 






l 

4 












3 


127 Welland.. . . 






1 












4 


128 Weston 




1 










4 


1 


129 Whitby 




1 
3 


1 
1 








1 


? 


130 Wiarton 












8 


131 Williamstown . . . . 
















3 


132 Winchester. . . . 




















3 


133 Wingham 




















4 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



213 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Continued) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Continued) 













Lower School, Form II 










Boys 


Girls 




to 
u 

Cd 

cu 


CO 

u 
cd 
cu 


to 

u 


tn 

5 

CD 


CU 

> 

O 


CO 

o 


to 

Ih 

Cd 

a 
>> 


to 

>> 


CO 

cu 


to 
cd 

CU 

>> 


CO 

1-1 
Cd 

cu 
>> 


to 

Ih 

a 

CD 


to 

Ih 

cd 

cu 


to 

Ih 

cu 


CO 
Ih 

cd 

a 


cu 

> 


c 


cd 

CU 

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115 


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116 


1 














5 


10 


7 


12 


2 














2 


5 


11 


2 












117 














1 


2 


3 


8 


8 


4 


2 














10 


14 


6 


6 










118 
















2 


2 


5 


3 


2 


1 




1 






1 


4 


7 


7 


4 


4 


1 


i 






119 


i 


i 










1 


■ 2 


3 


4 


2 


1 














4 


7 


7 


3 


7 










120 






















1 






















2 


3 










121 


l 














2 


2 


7 


6 




1 










1 




3 


8 




3 


1 


i 






122 


i 














5 


5 


3 


3 


1 




1 


1 








5 


10 


13 


9 


3 




1 






123 




1 












1 


1 




2 


2 


















4 


4 


2 


2 








124 


2 
















5 
3 


4 
4 


2 
1 


"l 














' i 


6 

2 


6 
6 








1 






125 


4 




1 




126 
















3 


5 


1 


1 


2 














3 


11 


6 


1 


1 










127 


5 


i 












1 


15 


7 


1 














1 


3 


14 


9 


2 


2 










128 
















7 


9 


7 


6 


3 












1 


10 


21 


12 


4 


2 


1 








129 


*3 


i 
i 








i 




3 
3 
1 
1 


6 

5 
2 
2 


3 
4 
3 
3 


4 

7 

"3 


3 
2 
1 
3 


1 

2 








1 




5 


11 

2 
8 
7 


7 
6 
2 
2 


2 
7 
4 
1 


1 

4 


.3 
i 


i 






130 






1 
1 




131 




1 


3 
1 




132 










133 
















1 


3 


1? 


% 


5! 


1 












... 5 




8 


5 


1 


1 







8 D.E. 



214 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND 
IV. TABLE O— ATTENDANCE OF PUPILS BY 



High Schools 



Middle School 



Boys 



Girls 



115 Timmins 

116 Toronto, Dav'np't 

117 Trenton 

118 Tweed 

119 Uxbridge 

120 Vienna 

121 Walkerton 

122 Wallaceburg 

123 Wardsville 

124 Waterdown 

125 Waterford 

126 Watford 

127 Welland 

128 Weston 

129 Whitby 

130 Wiarton 

131 Williamstown . . . . 

132 Winchester 

133 Wingham 



4 


2 




1 




3 


2 


7 


i? 


3 
3 


1 
1 








1 
2 


10 


11 






1 


9 


4 


2 
4 










1 

2 


6 


10 




1 


1 




5 


1 


1 
"l 


1 
1 

1 












6 










■» 


5 






1 


4 


6 




1 


2 




4 






1 


4 














6 


1 


"l 


1 
1 








2 
4 


? 


9 






1 


3 


11 


2 
7 


"l 


1 

1 








9 


14 




4 


4 


14 


6 


5 




1 






1 


3 


3 


3 


1 




1 






2 


? 


2 


4 


1 
3 








^ 


3 




1 




8 


n 


5 


?. 


?, 


2 






1 



3 


1 


17 


7 


15 


13 


3 


5 


9 


9 


4 


2 


5 


4 


7 


7 


1 


3 


4 


2 


9 


5 


12 


11 


11 


11 


26 


14 


8 


6 


(» 


10 


8 


3 


9 


11 


9 


9 



SUMMARY BY AGE, 





10 yrs. 


11 yrs. 


12 yrs. 


13 yrs. 


14 yrs. 


LOWER SCHOOL 
Form I 


Boys . . . 


8 


82 


612 


1,964 


2,744 


Girls. . . 


7 


110 


764 


2,268 


3,082 




Boys. . . 




5 


72 


475 


1,500 


LOWER SCHOOL 
Form II 






Girls. . . 




4 


87 


619 


1,840 










Boys. . . 






4 


53 


425 


MIDDLE SCHOOL 








Girls. . . 






1 


64 


498 












Boys. . . 










7 


UPPER SCHOOL 












Girls. . . 










6 














TOTALS BY 
SEXES 


Boys. . . 


8 


87 


688 


2,492 


4,676 


Girls. . . 


7 


114 


852 


2,951 


5,426 


GRAND TOTALS, 


1924-25 


15 


201 


1,540 


5,443 


10,102 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



215 



HIGH SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

AGE, SEX AND GRADE (Concluded) 



Upper School 


en 



O 

6 

O 

H 


en 

O 

"o 
6 


H 




Boys 


Girls 




Ih 

c 
W 


en 


CO 

Ih 

CTJ 
<v 

>> 


2 
a 


en 

u 

a 
<u 
>> 


tn 

Ih 

a 

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u 

a 
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cu 


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al 
cu 
>> 

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cu 

>> 


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Ih 

aj 

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cu 
> 


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115 


















2 

1 


1 

5 

1 

2 
1 


1 

4 
2 
4 
3 


2 

5 
3 
2 
4 


1 
1 
1 
1 






72 

136 

112 

58 

84 

11 

60 

85 

24 

46 

36 

56 

132 

171 

90 

59 

44 

60 

90 


85 
95 

136 
76 
98 
14 
58 

116 
34 
59 
50 
89 

130 

203 
89 
87 
54 
81 

119 


157 


116 
117 
118 


"2 


3 

1 

" 1 


4 
3 

1 
3 


5 
2 
2 

7 


' 1 

2 


1 
' 1 


i 
1 




"3 


2 
"2 


231 
248 
134 


119 






182 


120 








25 


121 






5 
1 


3 

2 


1 
1 










1 

1 


4 
3 


2 
3 


1 

2 




1 


118 


122 












1 


201 


123 












58 


124 
































105 


125 
































86 


126 
127 




1 
1 
1 
2 


1 

3 
9 

2 


"5 
5 
4 
1 


"2 
2 
1 
1 


1 


1 
1 




2 


1 

2 
1 

1 


1 
2 
6 
3 
1 
2 
3 


4 

2 
3 
2 
1 

"2 


4 
1 




1 


145 

262 


128 






374 


129 


1 
1 








2 

1 


1 
1 

1 




179 


130 








146 


131 






1 

2 








1 

3 


98 


132 




1 


2 






1 




1 


141 


133 




4 




209 



SEX AND GRADE 



15 yrs. 


16 yrs. 


17 yrs. 


18 yrs. 


19 yrs. 


20 yrs. 


21 yrs. 
and over 


TOTALS 


2,023 


962 


252 


45 


6 


5 


4 


8,707 


2,097 


931 


259 


60 


11 


9 


7 


9,605 


1,961 


1,395 


543 


160 


39 


15 


13 


6,178 


2,215 


1,576 


710 


187 


45 


15 


17 


7,315 


1,325 


2,216 


1,896 


1,003 


402 


157 


85 


7,566 


1,598 


2,631 


2,166 


1,092 


395 


109 


58 


8,612 


67 


243 


548 


585 


348 


162 


119 


2,079 


59 


337 


666 


551 


285 


97 


53 


2,054 


5,376 


4,816 


3,239 


1,793 


795 


339 


221 


24,530 


5,969 


5,475 


3,801 


1,890 


736 


230 


135 


27,586 


11,345 


10,291 


7,040 


3,683 


1,531 


569 


356 


52,116 



216 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

TABLE P— ATTENDANCE, NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 





2 
fa 

O en 

u fc 

g 03 

*H 




S 
fa 



.2 <d 

4-> o3 

£^ 

u, O 

Jo 


Attendance of F 


ull Ti 


me Pupils 


Attendance of 
Part Time Pupils 


Schools 


+-> 3 s 

°faJ2 


03 


03 

3 
fa 


1 s_ 
<, CD 

Q <d 



2 & 

u 

T3 <D 

T3 2 

d.2 ^ 


c 

CO 05 

>^ 03 

a > 

u- O 


c 


u 

CD 
2 

II 




JO 

*3 

2 

cu 

fa 


1 Chatham 


6 


3 


3 


2 
2 
4 

5 

' *5 
3 
1 

9 

2 
2 
2 
5 
6 
12 
6 
2 
4 
5 

'"7 
7 
1 
5 
3 
5 

3 


171 


71 


100 


103 


86 


195 








2 Collingwood. . . . 








3 Fort William . . . 


7 
7 
9 
3 
62 
1 

14 
30 


4 
4 
4 
2 
44 
1 

8 
23 


3 

3 

5 

1 

18 

6 

7 


241 
295 

273 

56 

1,236 

42 

512 
819 


127 
144 
145 

31 
977 

42 

258 
378 


114 
151 

128 

25 

259 

254 
441 


195 
245 
232 

39 
855 

42 

437 
610 


123 
159 

123 
27 

340 
18 

256 

472 


193 
191 
188 
189 
193 
78 

190 

187 








•4 Gait 








5 Guelph 








6 Haileybury 








7 Hamilton 

8 Kingston 


749 


366 


383 


9 Kitchener- 
Waterloo 

10 London 

11 Midland 


166 
123 


65 
49 


101 
74 


12 Niagara Falls. . . 


7 

9 

27 

1 

3 

4 

14 

13 

11 

5 

73 

52 

26 

1 

10 

28 


4 

"l8 

' 1 

6 

8 

8 

2 

52 

37 

20 

"4 

16 


3 
2 
9 
1 
3 
3 
8 
5 
3 
3 
21 
15 
6 
1 
6 

12 


202 

71 

592 

118 

112 

70 

387 

360 

271 

156 

1,841 

1,951 

680 

76 

263 

800 


91 

8 

328 

80 

35 

22 

151 

146 

141 

92 

1,383 

596 

516 

14 

113 

392 


111 
63 

264 
38 
77 
48 

236 

214 

130 
64 

458 
1,355 

164 
62 

150 

408 


155 

52 

434 

101 

98 

62 

295 

292 

193 

122 

1,419 

1,809 

486 

64 

187 

736 


105 

23 

332 

214 

64 

42 

163 

107 

186 

74 

617 

933 

493 

44 

166 

314 


190 
189 
194 
189 
198 
188 
190 
189 
195 
186 
192 
188 
192 
189 
197 

193 








13 Niagara Falls, S. 








14 Ottawa 

15 Owen Sound. . . . 


52 


47 


5 


16 Port Arthur. . . . 








17 Renfrew 








18 St. Catharines. . 








19 Sarnia 








20 SaultSte. Marie. 








21 Sudbury 








22 Toronto, Central 

23 " Commerce.. 


591 


160 


431 


24 " Riverdale.. 

25 Welland 


58 


13 


45 


26 Weston 








27 Windsor- 

Walkerville. . . 
















1 Totals, 1924-25 . 

2 Totals, 1923-24. 


416 
371 


269 


147 


108 

88 


11,595 
9,184 


6,281 
4,712 


5,314 
4,472 


9,263 
7,209 


5,481 
4,859 




1,739 
1,837 


700 
741 


1,039 
1,096 








3 Increases 


45 






20 


2,411 


1,569 


842 


2,054 


622 










4 Decreases 








98 


41 


57 


























5 Percentages .... 












54.17 


45.83 


79.88 


47.27 







10.25 


59.74 

















DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



217 



SCHOOLS 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 







Attendance o 


f Special Pupils 


Number of Full Time Pupils from Families whose 
Head is occupied as below 






c 
o 












0J 

*r - , - J 




T3 


a 

3 


to 

C 

o 


c 




tO 

u 

3 
O 

X 

c 
<u 

3 


u 
X> 

B 

332 




£ 

<L> 


to 

3 
O 

c 

~o 

3 
C/) 


o 

0) 

p 

a 

o 
EJ 


3 

"C 
< 


.a o 

o _ 
.-33 


.5 
IS 

o 

H 


g 
a 

.*-■ lO 
H 3 

H 


u 
u 

o 
.s 

3 to 


a 

3 

o 
o 
O 
u 

O 


3 
O 

u 

o 

3 

o 

1 


1 




53 


1 


52 


1,663 


18 


32 




1 


51 


30 


22 


17 


9 




31 


31 




5,540 


















s 












56 

58 

41 

7 

161 


6 
39 
20 

' 3 
33 


1 
1 
1 


"i 

3 


62 
146 

85 

8 

468 


76 
34 
89 

25 
180 


40 
15 
25 
11 
349 




4 












1 


S 












9 


6 












2 


7 


117,900 


336 


174 


162 


22,043 


8 


11 


26 


8 
























42 
91 




9 


11,412 


29 




29 


542 


31 


36 


16 


6 


264 


41 


27 


10 


15,974 


114 


80 


34 


54,174 


108 


58 


11 


5 


344 


124 


125 


44 


11 




44 


44 




8,965 


















1? 










40 
6 

35 


13 
14 
11 




1 


85 

29 

148 


26 

13 

144 


22 

9 

162 


15 


n 














14 


7,722 


436 


4 


432 


15,145 


2 


1 


89 


1S 












28 
10 


17 
20 






45 
34 


17 

18 


2 
18 


9 


16 




4 




4 


574 


4 




8 


17 












13 
86 


36 
39 


3 


2 


2 
147 


14 
40 






18 




92 




92 


2,472 


42 


33 


19 












4 
39 


33 
4 


2 
5 


1 


112 
88 


77 
106 


104 
17 


27 


20 




74 


50 


24 


22,040 


12 


21 




9 




9 


552 


17 


2 


2 


1 


33 


49 


44 


8 


22 


74,170 


513 


54 


459 


99,981 


619 


12 


38 


13 


616 


61 


203 


279 


71 












530 
68 


4 
10 


19 
11 


5 


834 
296 


38 
17 


331 

246 


190 


24 


10,200 


14 


10 


4 


3,400 


32 


9S 












13 
33 


7 
15 


1 

5 




43 
135 


12 
19 






26 




21 




21 


1,384 


37 


19 


27 




105 




105 


4,210 


193 


24 


6 


4 


300 


111 


102 


60 


1 


237,378 


1,875 


448 


1,427 


242,685 


2,214 


488 


136 


55 


4,375 


1,361 


2,059 


907 


2 


177,638 


1,798 


442 


1,356 


235,082 


1,917 


432 


135 


65 


3,694 


884 


1,333 


724 


3 


59,740 


77 


6 


71 


7,603 


297 


56 


1 




681 


477 


726 


183 


4 


















10 




































5 












19.09 


4.21 


1.17 


.47 


37.73 


11.74 


17.76 


7.82 











218 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 
I. TABLE P— ATTENDANCE, PUPILS IN THE VARIOUS 



Schools 



Religious and 






bo 








Other Exercises 


a; 
u 

3 

cu 




a 
in 

d 

G 




co 

o 

*> 
U 

T3 




ere the 
elections 
used 


,G 

<u 

c 

CD 


G 

cu 

s 


> t- o 
O.Q qj 


a 


B (0 


."ti 




O 




G 


>> 


Q 

J2 a; 
o >, 

O oS 


2 $ 
S-S3 


ca 


bo 

'-5 
1 


"35 
O 
a 

S 


6 


ol 
O 


±s 

a 

03 

c 

bo 
O 




oCL, 
c/5 


^w 


G 




o 
(J 


u 

O 


X 


CU 

o 



Chatham 

Collingwood 

Fort William 

Gait 

Guelph 

Haileybury 

Hamilton 

8 Kingston 

9 Kitchener-Waterloo. 

London 

Midland 

12 Niagara Falls 

13 Niagara Falls, South 

14 Ottawa 

15 Owen Sound 

16 Port Arthur 

17 Renfrew 

18 St. Catharines 

19 Sarnia 

20 SaultSte. Marie.... 

21 Sudbury 

22 Toronto, 



10 

11 



Central. . . . 
Commerce. 
Riverdale. 



23 Toronto, 

24 Toronto, 

25 Welland 

26 Weston 

27 Windsor- Walkerville. 

Totals, 1924-25... 



16 



24 



21 



142 



236 

265 

224 

56 

1.087 



490 
802 



202 

71 

594 

118 

112 

70 

378 

308 

274 

146 

1,841 

1,951 

692 

76 

263 

800 



11.198 



142 



143 



551 



256 
752 



58 
594 

118 
75 
62 



1,841 



692 

76 



5.360 



156 



236 

274 

180 

56 

1.080 



490 

802 



202 

71 

594 

118 

112 

70 

378 

308 

258 

146 

1,841 

1,951 

692 

76 

263 

800 



11.154 



145 



56 
106 



896 



256 

527 



28 
594 



70 

88 

1,020 

1,087 

692 

44 



213 



5,822 



90 



238 

175 

177 

48 

1,040 



419 

528 



187 

28 

594 

49 

75 

51 

378 

360 

238 

130 

:,841 

,951 

692 

76 

263 

633 



10,261 



116 



162 

162 

91 

48 

906 



256 

537 



105 



594 
40 

75 

51 

194 

58 



82 

1,294 

1,087 

692 

66 

199 

670 



7,485 



146 



237 
285 
270 
41 
764 



354 
632 



146 

38 
594 

65 
112 

38 
198 
172 
258 

96 

1,604 

1,737 

692 

76 
263 
213 



9,031 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



219 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 






2 
< 


>> 

u 

<u 

G 
o 

<U 

O 


u 
CU 

S 
o 
s 
o 
.a 5 

H 


en 
U 

03 

S 
0) 

.3 

a 

.3 
E/5 


b0 

3 

"3. 

a 

. 3 
o3 

bfl 

a 

'>» 

a> 
> 

3 


en 
.° 

'en 

Oh 

15 

<u 
3 




jo 

O 
CU 

3 


en 

_y 

'3 

a 

O 

<v 

2 

T3 

*a 
a 
< 


- — \ 

*c3 

u 

cu 

s 
1) 



>> 

en 

s 

cu 

.3 

u 


•*2 
"C 

en 

3 

-a 

s 

Ui 

en 

s 

cu 

u 


-a 

3 
03 

bo bfl 


-0 
a 

>> 

>> 

2 ° 

CU 

3 cu 


bfl 

3 

'$ 

a 

u 

Q 
"c3 
'3 

03 
.3 
O 
V 

2 


-a 

3 

OJ 

bfl 

3 

'£ 

Q 

3 « 
.3 So 


3 
'§6 

03 

u, 

Q 
13 

Ih 

3 

U 

CU 

■*-> 

IS 



< 


8 
03 

u 

Q 

*03 

cu 
cu 

C/3 


1 99 


46 


2 


23 




46 






23 








46 








2 


















3 237 


27 


27 


89 
95 
99 

"271 




201 
113 


89 
95 


81 


29 


8 






89 
95 
99 

31 

857 








4 128 












5 85 


37 

13 

360 


"\3 

6 


















6 31 


13 


56 
360 


12 




39 

76 


13 


13 


31 








7 448 


857 


857 


330 


8 














9 214 


46 
181 


"31 


14 
193 




490 
240 


155 
298 




214 
62 


14 

55 






185 
315 


"315 


32 
12 




10 229 








11 








12 178 


13 










13 






67 






88 




41 




13 




















14 477 


77 
25 




320 




274 
68 


77 


15 


97 








259 

68 


'""68 


259 
19 


?59 


15 28 










16 112 






















17 24 






11 
113 
126 




11 






















18 






121 
95 


121 
93 










98 
126 
127 

28 
1,075 




15 
126 




19 102 


34 

89 

35 

1,433 


"5 

17 

413 




169 
197 
69 
1,604 
527 
680 


34 
32 
73 
1,453 
96 
680 










20 










21 97 


"851 


5 


"259 

96 

147 


17 
110 

i22 


"98 

28 


16 
73 


34 








22 1,503 

23 1,393 

24 570 


162 


85 





570 


81 










499 








25 . . . 


















26 






75 




75 
247 


75 




20 

155 








75 
274 








27 290 


144 


43 










16 






















6,245 


3,130 


638 




18 


5,427 












65 








589 



220 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

I. TABLE P— ATTENDANCE, NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Schools 


u 

O 

o 

in 

CD 

.£ 
'J3 

o 

o3 


u 

1 

bX> 

J-c 

O 


bfl 

.s 

13 

<L> 

d 

a> 
3 


J* 
i* 

o 

-a 
d 

o 


bo 

d 

l-l 

1 

O 
O 

<u 
c 
<u 




d 

U 

C 
a3 tJJO 

Is 


d 
03 

d 

O) 
Oh 


d 

is 

'3 

fl c 

o3.2 

>, u 

Sfi 

<u en 

30 


be 

d 
S 

3 


# d 
"C 

a> 

d 

'So 
d 
W 

S 

03 
0) 


bfl 

.s 

O) 

d 

'bfl 

d 

W 

O) 

.s 

03 

2 


c 
.2 

bo 

*> 
03 


1 Chatham 


46 








46 
















2 Collingwood 




















31 


3 Fort William 


89 
95 

78 


28 
95 






61 
129 

78 


20 

129 




20 










4 Gait 














5 Guelph 


















6 Haileybury 






















7 Hamilton 


750 








1,026 


1,026 


1,026 


1,026 


3 








8 Kingston 












42 


9 Kitchener- Waterloo 


214 

332 


14 








214 
333 


14 












10 London 






333 












11 Midland 
















17 


?7 


12 Niagara Falls 


90 








47 




28 


41 








13 Niagara Falls, South. . . . 
















14 Ottawa 


186 
68 








248 
68 


62 
68 


"68 


62 
68 










15 Owen Sound 


68 














16 Port Arthur 














17 Renfrew 


11 
86 
93 

127 


11 




11 


11 
93 
89 

127 
67 

737 


ii 

15 

82 

127 














18 St. Catharines 














19 Sarnia 


93 








82 










20 Sault Ste. Marie 














21 Sudbury 




















22 Toronto, Central 


1,105 


305 


29 


305 


205 


205 


46 


518 


78 






23 Toronto, Commerce. . . . 






24 Toronto, Riverdale. . . . 


408 








496 
















25 Welland 






















26 Weston. . 


106 

128 








106 

162 


75 


75 


75 










27 Windsor- Walkerville . . . 






131 






























Totals, 1924-25 


4,012 






















100 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



221 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



"0 

a 

.5 
"C 

u.a 

■M <-> 

o 03 

3^ 


O 

o 

CQ 

X> 
C 

a 
a.S 

'-2X3 
G G 

*C3 


.5 

_G 


O 

X 

G 
cd 
«n 

X) en 
O 0) 

s.s 

I 5 


fcJO 

c 
a 

u 

Q 
>» 

u 

a 

a 

e 

5 


G 
O 

<u 

a 

O 

-M 

G 
o3 

a, 

<L) 

o 


>> 

X> 

3 

& 

3 

*Q 
U 


o 

-3 
C/5 

XJ 

G 

bfl 

.9. 


G 
.£f 

'55 

<u 

Q 

is 

'u 
w 
3 

x> 

G 


bo 

.s 

i_ 
cn 

_3 


G 

03 
u 

Q 

0) 

3 

.2f 
e 
< 


bo 

G 

03 
Q 

55 


bfl 

G 

2 

Q 

<£! 


bfi 
G 

X3 

o 

2 


>* 

Ih 

o 


bo 

c 

*> 

t-l 

03 

U 

X) 

o 

o 


Ih 

o 
+•> 

Ih 
< 


1 








95 




20 






















2 




























3 61 






28 
95 
98 




























4 95 










75 


75 




















5 98 




























6 






23 
576 


























7 270 


648 




403 




115 


115 


115 


115 


115 


115 


115 










8 










9 14 






97 




























10 323 


309 






























11 
































12 


































13 


































14 178 


97 




203 


20 




20 
10 


20 
10 


20 


















15 






10 












16 




























17 






11 




























18 






32 
19 


























19 95 






89 




19 






















20 
























1? 


21 


































22 549 

23 




591 


236 


834 
152 
692 


81 


175 
152 
692 


138 
133 
692 


252 
"692 


187 
70 


79 


99 


44 


133 


91 


5 


19 


24 412 


329 




164 








41 








25 
















26 








20 




20 






















27 189 


























































5 




2,284 


1,383 


591 


1,424 


2,463 


81 


1,298 


1,183 


1,079 


372 


196 


224 


159 


174 


91 


31 



222 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

I. TABLE P— ATTENDANCE, NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 



Schools 


en 

en 

a 
3 

c 
*c3 
an 


u 

< 

O 
en 

2 


C 
O 

o 

u 


to 
.5 

"a 

a> 

0) 

en 

3 
O 

E 


en 

O 

a 

o 
c 
o 
o 
W 

s 

o 


.s 

"en 

t_ 

3 

6 
o 
£ 


en 

O) 

h 

-v 
a 

a 
<u 

a 

CD 

"Sb 

X 


en 
en 

Q 

T3 

C 

b0 c 
<u S 


V 

s-S 

CU a! 

£ a 

oo 

Oh 


In 

C 
3 


u 

1 


O 

aj 

-a 

C 
>-. 

Ih 

a> 
"O 


1 Chatham 






20 


20 


20 


20 


20 


20 




20 






2 Collingwood 










3 Fort William 


























4 Gait 






72 
94 

25 
233 


72 
13 
25 
11 


72 
" 25 


18 
13 
25 
36 


18 

"25 
561 


72 

13 

25 

232 


"l3 


18 






5 Guelph 










6 Haileybury 












7 Hamilton 










234 




8 Kingston 












9 Kitchener-Waterloo. . , 






160 

285 




160 
129 




' 92 


190 

321 






65 

51 




10 London 










147 


11 Midland 












12 Niagara Falls 






13 


13 


13 




13 


13 




13 


13 




13 Niagara Falls, South. . 








14 Ottawa 






189 
10 


88 
10 


88 
10 


61 
10 


61 
10 


184 
10 






270 
10 




15 Owen Sound 












16 Port Arthur 












17 Renfrew 






9 

87 
77 
97 
55 
585 


9 

"77 


9 

32 

77 






9 

96 

101 

73 

55 

544 




9 

32 


9 

96 

81 




18 St. Catharines 




9 


32 


32 

77 

60 

9 

366 




19 Sarnia 






20 Sault Ste. Marie. . 




25 








21 Sudbury. . , 




10 

55 


55 
380 


10 
80 




10 
115 






22 Toronto, Central 

23 Toronto, Commerce 


5 


116 


458 


17 


24 Toronto, Riverdale. . . 






163 






163 


163 


178 






168 




25 Welland 
















26 Weston 






97 

310 


97 


97 


20 

28 




20 
310 




20 


20 
310 




27 Windsor- Walkerville . . 
























Totals, 1924-25 


5 


150 


2,581 


500 


1,167 


516 


1,507 


2,466 


13 


237 


1,785 


164 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



223 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Continued) 



Xi 
O 

e 
u 




J5 

"3 

a 


c 

aJ 

£ 

o 


'2 

B 

B 
o 
U 


u 

'§ 

o 

c 
o 


two 

.s 

'u 


bJO 

C 

"a 

O 
O 

CQ 


a 

5b 



c 

C/3 


Bfl 

.5 
i* 

<D 

a 


u 

s 



a 
O 




a 




'c 
'c3 

H 

13 

'en 
>^ 


13 
tin 


3 
3 


but) 

< 


1 


52 








41 




157 


94 


104 


105 






161 


46 






~> 










1 










70 

88 
48 


28 
31 
48 


152 

175 

98 


152 
178 
160 


147 
180 
161 


152 
197 

157 






241 
292 

158 

56 

1,111 


82 






4 


103 

112 

34 

175 
















S 


















6 


















7 


45 






28 


65 


596 












288 


551 




8 


















Q 


185 
101 








47 
130 


63 
90 


202 
335 


129 
172 


187 
320 


252 
347 






235 
819 








10 


96 










486 






11 














P 










47 

11 

106 

10 

37 

50 

116 

179 


18 
14 
61 

"4 
20 
67 

179 


76 

28 
387 

40 
112 

50 
205 
215 
226 

46 


94 

60 
240 

40 
112 

50 
229 
215 
123 

74 


100 

66 
278 

40 
112 

50 
191 
215 
123 

74 


49 

70 

134 

40 

37 

50 

233 

215 

123 

74 






202 

70 

592 

118 
112 
68 
387 
360 














12 














14 


190 








387 






1S 
















16 


75 


















17 
















11 


18 


104 
215 












96 






19 
















?0 


















?1 


3 

515 

1,799 

231 

76 








28 

"679 

"66 

60 

124 


8 
374 
152 
175 

"59 
132 






153 
1,841 
1,951 

707 
76 

263 

773 


18 
249 

555 






?? 


181 




71 


10 


13 






?S 


1,923 


1,951 


1,951 


864 






?4 






41 










?S 






76 
161 
385 


76 

60 

327 


76 
161 
372 


76 
161 

474 












?6 


















77 














104 


























3,970 


322 


12 


112 


1,965 


1,588 


5,645 


4,536 


4,908 


3,810 


10 


13 


10,746 


2,311 


551 


11 



224 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

I. TABLE P— ATTENDANCE, NUMBER OF PUPILS IN THE 





>> 

4=1 

a 

u 

.2 
>> 


rt two 

b£ G 

G X 
CQ 


c 

-a o 

G 4J 

P o 

£ g 
°H 

u 1 ^ 


Occupation of Part Time and 


Schools 


M 

G 

*-> 
O 


CO 

0) 

•a 

CTJ 

U, 

H 
a 

J-c 

1 

-a 
o 

!■ 


to 
a) 

•a 

H 

# G 

is 

'3 
CQ 


to 

<u 

E- 

'C 

cu 

s 


u 

H 


CO 

.Si 
"C 

3 
G 

o 

"s 

0) 

u 


to 

a> 

oj 

H 

> 

o 
E 

o 

3 
< 


bJD 
T3 G 

19 


CU 

a 

Cu 

c c 

n^ 

a, c3 

Cm 






















































3 Fort William 


























4 Gait 














































































7 Hamilton 








51 


24 


32 


31 


64 


2 


3 


50 






















1 

8 


3 

7 






2 
4 






2 
7 




10 London 








3 


4 


2 


1 


1 


11 Midland 






























































14 Ottawa 




22 


22 
















42 
























16 Port Arthur 






















































117 
















































20 Sault Ste Marie 








15 
















12 


21 Sudhurv 
























22 Toronto, Central 








12 


12 


39 


31 




13 


47 


32 








57 


57 










2 


1 


1 






2 


1 




2"> Wei land 






























































































Totals, 1924-25 
































1 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



225 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. (Concluded) 



Special Pupils on Entering School 



C 

t o 

a 

3 
o 
u 
O 
be 
C 

'S 

§ 


w 

-a 

Ih 

,3. 

o 


C 

bo-2 
.5 3 

S 3 

2 ° 


< 

bf So 

s-g 


T3 
C 

f-a 

a «3 

O) O/O 

-* 2 

^j c 


.9* 

C 
£ 

m 


.Is 

'0 

U 

2 w 

C C 

S.2 

u 3 
0) 

6° 


3 

.2 

bfl 
< 



> to 

r3 O 

c t> 

$s 


c 

TO 

S 2 


a> 
u 

1 

a> 

3 
O 


en 
u> 

<L> 

a 

(U 
03 

3 
O 

E 


C 

a 
3 
u 




l_ 

<L> 

6 


a 
.2 

OS 

a 

3 


a 
O 

+-» 
3 
O 


i 






















50 


' '31 


3 


2 
























3 


























4 




























5 




























6 




























7 

8 


24 


110 


5 




17 


2 


3 


72 


12 


241 


12J6 


179 


37 


9 


17 

8 


14 
7 


"3 


1 

4 








56 
21 


3 
4 


11 

54 


48 


37 

3 

44 




10 3 

11 




2 


8 


83 


12 


























13 




























14 




5 
















12 


204 


86 


139 


15 




















16 


























4 


17 




























18 




















2 


71 


13 


6 


19 






















20 


15 


15 










5 










6 
6 

52 


6 


21 
















1 
130 


2 


22 




15 


150 




45 








382 


80 


64 


23 












24 












1 










41 


3 


20 


25 






















26 




















2 


19 

105 






27 


















































3 


64 


166 


158 


5 


62 


b 


16 


149 


401 


402 


795 


460 


364 



226 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

II. Table Q.— Attendance of 





1st Year 




Boys 


Girls 


Schools 


to 

l_l 

CD 
>> 

O 


CD 


en 

a 

V 
CN 


en 
>^ 

CO 


en 

lH 

CD 
■stf 


en 

oj 

CD 
>. 


en 

U 

oj 
CD 

- 


en 
u 

o5 
CD 
>. 


en 

05 

V 

>> 

OO 


en 
i- 
05 
(D 
>> 
O 


en 
u 

c^ 
CD 
>. 
O 


> 



C 
RJ 


en 
Ih 

05 


en 

n 

CD 


en 

oJ 
CD 

>> 


en 
u 

■ 05 

CD 
>. 


en 
u 

05 

CD 


en 

Ih 

05 
CD 


en 
u 
«5 
CD 


1 Chatham 








1 

13 

15 

3 

2 

79 

30 

23 

6 

3 

25 

13 


16 

25 

40 

8 

5 

156 

47 

76 

13 

1 

59 

22 

4 

3 

23 

19 

15 

12 

143 

103 

114 

3 

30 

47 


11 

27 
25 
15 
9 
137 
37 
74 
10 

59 
13 

8 

7 

32 

19 

51 

14 

277 

98 

121 

2 

18 

65 


7 

10 

9 

9 

2 

65 

7 

28 

15 

'53 

6 

11 

4 

14 

12 

22 

10 

268 

69 

26 

1 

5 

40 


4 
3 
1 
1 

22 
2 
4 
3 

14 
4 

"2 

2 

2 

7 

1 

43 

14 

12 

"l 

4 


1 

"7 
' '3 

' '3 


1 
1 
3 

1 

i 


i 
i 
i 


"l 

' 2 
"l 




1 
1 

1 


2 
2 
4 
1 

13 
9 

12 
4 
2 
9 

' 3 
3 
4 

2 
2 
8 
6 


8 

9 

20 

4 

1 

26 

30 

41 

8 

6 

21 

2 

3 

2 

23 

15 

8 

8 

8 

26 

5 

22 

30 


15 

22 

34 

13 

5 

44 

56 

94 

29 

5 

57 

8 

9 

5 

35 

17 

17 

10 

32 

36 
12 

28 
53 


15 
20 
11 
15 

5 
35 
21 
90 
16 
10 
52 

5 
19 

9 
34 
20 
28 
10 
89 

38 

8 

22 

43 


10 


2 Fort William 






2 
2 


8 


3 Gait 






6 


4 Guelph 






12 


5 Haileybury 








2 


6 Hamilton 






30 
6 
6 


9 


7 Kitchener-Waterloo.... 
& London 




1 


8 
23 


9 Niagara Falls. . . 






1 


10 Niagara Falls, South 








1 


11 Ottawa 






1 

2 


25 


12 Owen Sound 






1 


13 Port Arthur 






15 


14 Renfrew 










6 


15 St. Catharines 






2 

2 


6 
13 

3 

8 

19 
65 
90 

3 

14 
15 


21 


16 Sarnia 


1 


1 


6 


17 Sault Ste. Marie. . . . 


2 
1 
15 
5 
3 






20 


18 Sudbury 






4 
4 
10 
18 
1 
4 
3 


7 


19 Toronto, Central 






78 


20 Toronto, Commerce. . . . 








21 Toronto, Riverdale. . . . 




5 


10 


22 Welland 




6 


23 Weston. 




1 


8 


24 Windsor- Walkerville. . . 




1 






14 











DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



227 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

Full-Time Pupils by Age, Sex and Grade 



2nd Year 



Boys 



Girls 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 



5 

2 

6 
1 
5 
1 
8 

's 

2 
6 

'2 
2 
8 
8 
34 
10 
4 
1 
3 
5 


1 

3 
4 

1 

"2 
1 

'8 
1 

i 

1 


'3 
i 

1 


1 
i 






1 

11 
11 

i 

"2 

4 


' 2 
1 

' 1 

37 
4 
4 

2 

"1 
1 
1 
3 

8 
9 

"2 


2 
5 
6 

11 

2 

104 

25 

31 
1 
2 

14 
7 

"4 

8 

5 

3 

26 

29 

32 

1 

4 

22 



15 
22 
3 
79 
36 
28 
11 

'25 

8 

2 

1 

18 

12 

9 

10 

49 

44 

37 

1 

18 

44 



13 

5 

13 

15 

3 

49 

18 

12 

12 

1 

22 

1 

4 

1 

23 

14 

9 

7 

103 

36 

31 

2 

10 
56 



20 



11 



12 



17 



2 
7 
1 

1 
6 
34 
3 
1 
2 
4 



2 
1 

44 
27 
17 
10 

"5 
4 

"2 

9 

9 

4 

2 

12 

97 

10 

2 

3 

33 



5 

7 

13 

10 

2 

24 

30 

31 

6 

15 

19 

5 

3 

6 

16 

15 

9 

1 

18 

144 

18 

7 

5 

54 



13 

15 

12 

13 

1 

7 

10 

19 

9 

3 

16 



3 

14 
13 

12 
5 
34 
79 
10 
7 

13 
44 



9 
4 
3 

7 

"4 
1 
3 
4 
4 
7 

10 
3 
9 
7 
6 
3 

25 

29 
5 
1 
7 

15 



228 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

II. Table Q.— Attendance of 





3rd Year 




Boys 


Girls 


Schools 


co 

u 

<d 
Us 


CO 

u 

a 

CD 


CO 

CO 

CD 


CO 

a 




CO 

u 

0) 


co 

u 

a 

CD 
>> 

00 


co 

u. 

Gj 

CD 


CO 

u 

C\j 

CD 
>> 

O 
CN 


u 

CD 
> 
O 

-0 
c 

CM 


CO 

Ih 

CD 


co 

CD 


CO 

03 

CD 
>> 


CO 

u 

o3 

CD 


CO 

It 

03 
CD 
>-> 


co 
i_ 

CD 
>> 
00 


co 

03 

ON 


CO 
Ih 

03 
CD 

O 
CN 


CD 
> 
O 

a 

a 

CN 


1 Chatham 






































2 Fort William 






3 
3 

1 


2 

2 
14 

2 
36 
18 
10 

8 


3 
3 

21 
1 

16 
5 
4 
4 


4 
2 
9 


2 


3 


2 






6 
4 

7 


8 
14 

8 

1 

3 
14 

21 
9 

7 
5 


4 
10 

8 


2 
3 
6 


3 
1 






3 Gait 














4 Guelph 




3 


4 






1 




3 


1 


5 Haileybury 










6 Hamilton 




10 

2 
7 
1 


19 

9 

13 


16 

1 

"2 


11 
1 

1 
1 


7 


13 




"l 

6 

1 
1 
2 


4 
9 

18 
2 
3 
9 


2 

7 
9 

5 
2 
8 


2 
3 

1 

"2 


2 
1 
1 

2 

1 
1 


1 


1 




"4 




8 London . . . 






1 
1 


1 


1 


9 Niagara Falls 








10 Niagara Falls, South 

1 1 Ottawa 














1 


11 


6 


7 


1 




1 










12 Owen Sound 








13 Port Arthur. . 






































14 Renfrew. . 






1 
3 

8 

"l 
14 

12 


2 
3 

8 
3 

'53 

21 
















4 

8 

11 

1 

1 

10 

45 


3 

20 

15 

3 

2 

8 

93 


2 
19 

8 
2 
3 
8 
35 


1 

12 

1 

3 








15 St. Catharines. . 






2 
8 
2 
4 
32 
20 


2 
2 
2 
3 
28 
16 


2 
2 


1 








2 
3 

1 


1 

' i 


1 


16 Sarnia 




1 
1 
1 
6 






2 


1 


17 Sault Ste. Marie.. 










T 


18 Sudbury 




2 

27 

1 


18 
1 


1 
3 
1 


" 1 


2 

7 

13 




19 Toronto, Central. . . 

20 Toronto, Commerce. 


7 


13 
19 


10 

2 




5 


21 Toronto, Riverdale. 










22 Welland 






















2 
3 
3 


5 

3 

17 


2 
11 

18 


1 

5 
24 










23 Weston 






















3 
15 


2 
2 






24 Windsor- Walker ville 




1 


6 


15 


15 


9 


3 




2 






2 



SUMMARY OF PUPILS 







10 yrs. 


11 yrs. 


12 yrs. 


13 yrs. 


14 yrs. 


1st YEAR PUPILS.. 


Boys. . . 


1 


8 


97 


449 


984 


Girls. . . 




6 


128 


516 


898 










Boys. . . 






30 


77 


344 


2nd YEAR PUPILS 








Girls. . . 






8 


104 


306 












Boys. . . 








11 


34 


3rd YEAR PUPILS 










Girls. . . 








4 


43 














Boys. . . 










2 


4th and 5th YEARS 












Girls. . . 










3 














TOTALS BY SEXES 


Boys. . . 


1 


8 


127 


537 


1,364 


Girls. . . 




6 


136 


624 


1,250 








GRAND TOTALS, 19 


24-1925 


1 


14 


263 


1,161 


2,614 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



229 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 

Full Time Pupils by Age, Sex and Grade (Concluded) 



4th and 5th Years 


<u 

03 


03 
cu 




Boys 


Girls 


CU 


CO 

u 

a 


CO 

u 

oj 
<v 
>> 


co 

1-4 

o3 
CU 

NO 


CO 

o3 
CU 
>> 


en 

u 

cu 

oo 


CO 

cu 

ON 


CO 

u 

a 
cu 

o 


cu 

> 

O 

c 

CN 


to 

>-. 

oj 
cu 
>> 


co 

oj 
cu 

to 


co 

Vh 

03 
cu 


co 


co 

Jh 

03 
0> 
>■> 

00 


CO 
lH 

03 
0) 

ON 


co 
u 

a 
<u 

o 

CN 


u 
cu 

> 
o 

C 
c3 

CN 


o w 


1 
































71 
127 
144 
145 

31 
977 
258 
378 

91 

8 

328 

80 

35 

22 
151 
146 
141 

92 

1,383 

596 

516 

14 
113 
392 


100 

114 
151 
128 

25 
259 
254 
441 
111 

63 
264 

38 

77 

48 
236 
214 
130 

64 

458 

1,355 

164 

62 
150 
408 


171 


2 
































241 


3 
































295 


4 
































273 


5 








1 

4 
2 
2 
























56 


6 




3 
1 
6 


6 

2 
4 


4 
"o 


2 
1 

2 


1 










2 
4 

5 


1 

2 
3 






1,236 
512 


7 




2 
1 


' 4 


3 

7 


4 
9 


1 

2 


"2 


8 
9 


5 


819 
202 


10 
































71 


11 




3 


3 




1 










1 


10 


3 


1 






592 


12 








■ 








118 


13 
































112 


14 
































70 


15 
































387 


16 




3 






3 








3 


6 


17 


11 


4 


1 


4 


360 


17 














271 


18 


1 

2 

2 


1 
36 

3 


1 
35 


1 

24 


22 


1 
1 




















156 


19 2 
20 


15 




4 

8 


9 
10 


5 
9 


8 
3 


4 
1 


"l 


1 


1,841 

1,951 

680 


21 








22 
































76 


23 
































263 


24 


1 


4 


2 


6 


3 


1 


1 




1 


7 


5 


3 




1 




800 



BY AGE, SEX AND GRADE 



15 yrs. 


16 yrs. 


17 yrs. 


18 yrs. 


19 yrs. 


20 yrs. 


21 yrs. 
and over 


TOTALS 


1,129 


693 


146 


41 


8 


3 


4 


3,563 


781 


344 


122 


24 


5 


2 




2,826 








485 


460 


176 


92 


26 


12 


18 


1,720 


473 


368 


166 


55 


21 


8 


5 


1,514 


104 


203 


147 


97 


57 


31 


22 


706 


167 


265 


162 


86 


34 


7 


13 


781 


11 


60 


62 


45 


45 


8 


17 


250 


20 


43 


59 


39 


16 


6 


7 


193 


1,729 


1,416 


531 


275 


136 


54 


61 


6,239 


1,441 


1,020 


509 


204 


76 


23 


25 


5,314 


3,170 


2,436 


1,040 


279 


212 


77 


86 


11,553 



230 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



DAY VOCATIONAL 

III. TABLE R— VALUE 









Value of Equipment 






Schools 


u 

2 

Si 

3 


CO 

u 

CtJ 

J3. 

u 

-a 

c 
a 

CO 

a 


CO 
CD 

* o 


CO 

*o 

O 

H 

•d 
a 

cd 
co 

<L) 

# G 

IS 
O 

cd 

2 


CO 

3 

2 

a 
a 
< 
o 

IS 

c 
# cu 

*o 

m 


CO 

C 

bJO £ 

C 3 


jn 

"a3 

*T3 
O 

3 

bo 

C 

Q 


1 Chatham 


$ 

334 
325 
132 


$ 
12 
29 


$ 

341 
250 

1,254 


$ 

13,493 
15,377 


1,152 

300 

4,449 


$ 
250 
19 


$ 

9 


2 Collingwood 




3 Fort William 




4 Gait 












3,749 

942 

10,838 


13,203 

1,076 

74,291 


"508 

19,288 

103 

7,519 

7,679 

371 

9,151 


532 

176 

2,055 

96 

336 

1,144 

32 

695 




6 Haileybury 


244 

1,336 

136 

335 

1,278 

295 

56 

109 

456 


125 
470 
216 

571 

9 
43 




7 Hamilton 


2,268 






9 Kitchener- Waterloo 

10 London 


6,099 


18,547 
40,224 


25 
898 


11 Midland 




12 Niagara Falls 


8,231 


20,212 




13 Niagara Falls, South .... 

14 Ottawa 




135 

(Valuati 

150 

(Valuati 

218 

119 

95 

42 

585 

455 

106 

* 143 


6,970 

on incom 


15,081 
plete) 


7,945 


702 


163 






16 Port Arthur 










17 Renfrew 




on incom 
2,660 
7,871 
4,554 
8,630 
44,060 


plete) 
17,304 
28,207 
12,957 
11,109 
97,849 








18 St. Catharines 


316 

922 

400 

500 

4,479 

3,815 

876 

519 

74 

858 


1,572 
1,549 
4,340 
5,865 

30,664 

4,875 

6,839 

614 

843 

11,005 


205 

1,095 

363 

381 

3,052 

"412 
244 
236 

1,890 


210 


19 Sarnia 


11 


20 Sault Ste. Marie 

21 Sudbury 


75 


22 Toronto, Central 


706 
120 


24 Toronto, Riverdale 

25 Welland 


"640 
3,005 

8,723 


44,694 
1,318 
7,657 

75,936 


760 


26 Weston 




27 Windsor- Walkerville . . . . 




1 Totals, 1924-25 


17,795 
14,720 


3,523 
2,748 


118,817 
109,797 


508,535 
485,673 


126,631 
120,089 


13,915 
13,221 


5,245 


2 Totals, 1923-24.. . 


4,465 


























4 Percentages. . 


1.57 


.31 


10.47 


44.82 


11.16 


1.23 


.46 







DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



231 



SCHOOLS (Continued) 
OF EQUIPMENT, ETC. 



Value of Equipment 




C 

01 

G 
$0 

v c 

>l 

in 


O M 

S E 
5 w 

CX en 

3 u 
CO 


u 

O 

a <" 

y 
"is 


h 


s.s 

<+* CO 

.2-6 

3 O 

era 


u 
3 

rv'c/5 


c 
v _. 

C <u 

'a'u 
cr a) 
M cu 

«-> , . 

II 

O 


a s 

« E 
> a 

3"! 


-a 

c 

o 2 t 
•S3 a 


$ 

1 1,854 

2 


$ 

488 


$ 

34 


$ 


13 


$ 


$ 

9,990 
115 


$ 

27,970 

1,038 

22,254 

2,218 

19,564 

12,718 

133,565 

551 

45,817 

61,801 

743 

46,635 

1,571 

36,150 


50,000 


3 790 


252 










237 000 


4 










2,218 


500,000 


5 1,549 

6 1,607 

7 3,867 

8 


516 

227 
1,562 






15 




831 








7,813 
8,302 


20,000 
1,193,053 


1,383 




48 


7,857 


9 653 
10 4,241 
11 


510 

1,565 

36 

332 


394 

274 


1,625 


11 


2,296 
424 


9,092 
1,878 


546,984 

439,241 

9,817 

176,897 


12 812 
13 


18 


20 




355 


6,710 

1,462 
1,930 


14 1,328 
15 


1,324 


57 




43 


16 


450,000 


16 










444 


1,198 


1,792 


13,000 


17 












18 645 

19 1,049 


670 

375 

457 

454 

3,673 


16 
31 


3,681 




1,550 
1,601 


14,480 
22,577 
11,404 
11,658 
53,293 


43,527 
65,407 
35,884 
40,066 

247,831 

11,525 

73,018 

6,186 

20,744 

175,938 


300,425 
615,123 


20 1,314 

21 1,233 

22 4,493 

23 






286,408 

273,063 

1,760,387 

775,448 


7 
349 


54 
1,798 


58 
156 


' 2,674 
2,260 
1,429 


24 2,505 








89 


15,308 
2,229 
6,832 

72,521 


35,460 
635 


25 396 


226 

577 
1,089 






26 410 

27 1,817 


"i93 


31 


70 
406 


1,009 
1,357 


170,768 
979,489 


1 30,563 

2 26,635 


14,333 
13,183 


2,756 
2,744 


7,209 
3,520 


909 
566 


23,272 
21,515 


261,010 
255,915 


1,134,513 
1,074,791 


8,834,029 
7,645,762 


3 3,928 


1,150 


12 


3,689 


343 


1,757 


5,095 


59,722 


1,188,267 


4 2.69 


1.26 


.24 


.64 


.08 


2.05 


23.01 













232 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No 11 



EVENING VOCA 













IV. TABLE S— ATTENDANCE, 1 


PUPILS 


IN THE 




Teichers 


Attendance 










M CO 


co 1-1 

a 


c 


c 


■a 


•fl<2 


-i.'t; 


U. (0 


to d 
bo£ 


u to 

CD U 


Schools 


1M 0} 

3 H 


13 


73 
S 


bo a> y 
bo °^ 


3 +j 


a 


£ 


JS e 

i-, 


rt bo 

c 

■3*§ 


b rt 

s 5 

to O 


.bm 
£.sS 

'aa.23 


*1 

~ £ - 

'3.2 ° 
b;xj u 


a a 

O to 

> rt 

|I 

S u 


& ^^ 
eu to u 

bo °^" 




fc 


S 


& 


< 


2 


M 


b 


£ 


a, 


3 
Oh 


Dh 


z 


< 


1 Amherstburg. . . 


3 


1 


2 


44 


43 


9 


34 


43 


38 


3 


2 


45 


1,246 


2 Barrie 


7 
17 


5 
9 


2 

8 


650 
1,146 


104 

337 


35 
136 


69 
201 


80 
118 


104 

288 






49 
47 


8,820 
12,814 


3 Belleville 


"43 


"'6 


4 Brantford 


22 


12 


10 


1,818 


525 


180 


345 


316 


355 


120 


50 


98 


21,264 


5 Brockville 


17 


11 


6 


1,267 


343 


117 


226 


213 


258 


70 


15 


47 


11,027 


6 Burlington 


9 


5 


4 


698 


146 


54 


92 


106 


94 


50 


2 


46 


7,180 


7 Chatham 


17 


8 


9 


860 


337 


110 


227 


253 


240 


47 


50 


60 


10,280 


8 Collingwood .... 


7 


2 


5 


381 


135 


16 


119 


130 


113 


18 


4 


43 


4,250 


9 Dundas 


12 


7 


5 


1,098 


183 


67 


116 


78 


148 


27 


8 


116 


9,888 


10 Elmira 


7 


4 


3 


858 


94 


24 


70 


41 


87 


6 


1 


42 


5,944 


11 Espanola (Mer- 


ritt & Baldwin) 


4 


1 


3 


328 


56 


24 


32 


38 


28 


6 


22 


44 


2,385 


12 Fairbank(15 Yk) 


7 


3 


4 


630 


161 


69 


92 


22 


60 


99 


2 


94 


8,688 


13 Fort William. . . 


21 


14 


7 


1,125 


406 


210 


196 


302 


237 


107 


62 


58 


13,630 


14 Gait 


17 
4 


8 

1 


9 

3 


1,268 
456 


511 
108 


230 

2 


281 
106 


370 
51 


309 
90 


188 
15 


14 

3 


130 
189 


16,728 
3,800 


15 Goderich 


16 Guelph 


36 


14 


22 


3,400 


1,120 


417 


703 


775 


791 


268 


61 


76 


44,093 


17 Hamilton 


85 


55 


30 


7,204 


1,657 


1,066 


591 


1,317 


706 


594 


357 


94 


79,968 


18 Hespeler 


7 


2 


5 


418 


133 


19 


114 


35 


71 


37 


25 


40 


4,230 


19 Ingersoll 


7 


5 


2 


519 


134 


70 


64 


98 


96 


35 


3 


58 


4,521 


20 Iroquois Falls. . . 


8 


3 


5 


510 


87 


39 


48 


44 


79 


1 


7 


49 


2,890 


21 Kitchener- 




























Waterloo 


46 


31 


15 


2,946 


1,294 


623 


671 


168 


942 


79 


273 


88 


45,786 


22 London 


42 


33 


9 


4,320 


1,205 


684 


521 


1,035 


771 


326 


108 


92 


51,784 


23 Midland 


6 


3 


3 


3,165 


134 


24 


110 


134 


115 


16 


3 


152 


3,165 


24 Niagara Falls. . . 


16 


9 


7 


1,636 


550 


330 


220 


477 


312 


198 


40 


91 


7,820 


25 North Bay 


12 


7 


5 


1,162 


254 


145 


109 


173 


184 


42 


28 


50 


12,476 


26 Oshawa 


11 


6 


5 


573 


280 


166 


114 


230 


151 


80 


49 


124 


16,376 


27 Ottawa 


80 


32 


48 


9,796 


4,681 


1,186 


3,495 


1,727 


4,052 


474 


155 


136 


152,957 


28 Owen Sound. . . 


17 


5 


12 


1,072 


448 


132 


316 


257 


422 


21 


5 


66 


11,009 


29 Pembroke 


10 


6 


4 


660 


201 


72 


129 


75 


153 


8 


40 


92 


7,864 


30 Perth 


17 
17 


7 
11 


10 
6 


798 
1,204 


211 
409 


70 

191 


141 
218 


85 
280 


195 

271 


10 

123 


6 
15 


38 

72 


6,214 
13,926 


31 Peterborough. . . 


32 Port Arthur 


14 


9 


5 


1,234 


355 


114 


241 


119 


210 


62 


83 


82 


58,137 


33 Preston 


10 


3 


7 


1,058 


218 


59 


159 


122 


155 


59 


4 


82 


13,448 


34 Renfrew 


9 


3 


6 


602 


232 


26 


206 


173 


194 


18 


20 


92 


6,116 


35 St. Catharines.. 


34 


20 


14 


2,438 


920 


406 


514 


639 


555 


251 


114 


110 


33,320 


36 St. Thomas. . . . 


17 


8 


9 


1,800 


535 


191 


344 


117 


377 


139 


19 


72 


69,550 


37 Sarnia 


18 

18 


13 
11 


5 

7 


1,787 
876 


463 
282 


274 
146 


189 
136 


305 
260 


316 
158 


96 

68 


51 
56 


92 

44 


18,003 
10,242 


38 Sault Ste. Marie 


39 Smith's Falls. . . 


8 


4 


4 


670 


127 


64 


63 


127 


99 


20 


8 


48 


7,410 


40 South Porcupine 

41 Stratford 


1 




1 


114 


25 


22 


3 


9 






25 


57 


1,258 


16 


io 


6 


1,282 


466 


184 


282 


379 


"333 


"iis 


18 


114 


22,712 


42 Sudbury 


16 


7 


9 


1,231 


338 


136 


202 


295 


202 


60 


76 


47 


12,624 


43 Timmins 


14 


9 


5 


1,170 


305 


262 


43 


267 


107 


56 


142 


51 


8,474 


44 Toronto, Central 


172 


124 


48 


9,526 


6,130 


2,730 


3,400 


3,324 


3,559 


1952 


619 


119 


288,974 


45 " Commerce. 


67 


57 


10 


5,352 


3,074 


1,455 


1,619 


2,182 


1,857 


994 


223 


118 


129,445 


46 " Riverdale . 


62 


44 


18 


6,690 


2,041 


1,031 


1,010 


2,041 


1,105 


814 


122 


119 


73,160 


47 Vellore(9 




























Vaughan) .... 
48 Wallaceburg. . . . 


2 


2 




45 


27 


27 






25 


2 




18 


1,260 


5 


3 


"2 


88 


92 


36 


"56 


'"72 


69 


14 


"9 


44 


4,744 


49 Welland 


9 


5 


4 


956 


177 


78 


99 


122 


87 


66 


24 


45 


8,840 


50 Weston 


16 


8 


8 


1,280 


318 


98 


220 


40 


205 


108 


5 


160 


11,850 


51 Windsor- 




























Walkerville. . . 


71 


45 


26 


8,393 


2,914 


1,780 


1,134 


2,186 


1,581 


897 


436 


115 


110,340 


52 Woodstock 


15 


9 


6 


2,602 


349 
35675 


128 


221 


203 


216 


122 


11 


86 


10,318 


Totals 


1182 


714 


468 


101204 


15764 


19911 


22053 


23170 


9024 


3481 




1503248 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



233 



TIONAL SCHOOLS 

VARIOUS BRANCHES OF INSTRUCTION, ETC. 



Number of Pupils in English Literature 2,194 

Reading 1,878 

Composition and Spelling 3,167 

Grammar 2,884 

History and Civics 320 

English for non-English Speaking Per- 
sons 1,375 

Geography 490 

Civil Service 224 

Arithmetic 3,052 

Algebra 960 

Geometry 627 

Trigonometry 1 74 

Shop Mathematics 496 

Surveying 17 

Electricity, Theory 879 

Electricity, Applied 1.205 

Applied Mechanics 85 

General Chemistry 439 

Chemistry of the Trades and Industries 176 

Metallurgy and Assaying 28 

Mineralogy and Geology 32 

Mechanical Drawing 863 

Machine Drawing and Design 305 

Architectural Drawing 490 

Structural Steel Design 23 

Sheet Metal Drawing 99 

Machine Shop Work 905 

Forge Work 115 

Oxy-Acetvlene Welding 178 

Sheet Metal Work 12 

General Wood Working 720 

Cabinet Making and Joinery 439 

Carpentry and Building Construction. 396 

Pattern-making 40 

Bricklaying 81 

Painting and Decorating 139 

Plumbing 336 

Steam and Gas Engines, and Power 

Plants. . . 557 

Marine Engineering 59 

Navigation 13 

Textile Working 54 

Pulp and Paper Making 7 

Printing and Bookbinding 219 

Photography, Photo-engraving and 

Lithography 40 

Automobile Mechanics 2,474 

Telegraphy 127 

Elementary Drawing 344 

Colour Study 392 

Lettering 285 

Show Card Writing 717 

Industrial Design 129 

Illustrating 87 

Drawing and Painting from Antique. 90 

Drawing and Painting from Still Life. 75 

Drawing and Painting from Life 121 

Modelling 41 

Wood Carving 201 

Basketry 699 

Pottery.. . j 121 

Metal Work and Jewellery 5 

History of Art 86 



Cooking 3,349 

Housekeeping 66 

Home Economics 814 

Home Nursing 707 

Hygiene and Dietetics 393 

Sewing and Dressmaking 3,915 

Power Machine Operating 106 

Laundry 52 

Millinery 2,906 

Embroiderv and Lace-making 404 

French. . 975 

Spanish 109 

Physical Culture 1,626 

Advertising 81 

Bookkeeping 2,375 

Business Law 182 

Penmanship 1,303 

Stenography- 3,216 

Salesmanship 187 

Typewriting 3,086 

Agriculture 52 

Fancy Knitting 16 

Music 172 

Horology 30 

Interior Decorating 86 

Lip Reading 14 



Occupation of Pupils on Entering 
School: 

Textile Industries 455 

Chemical Industries 156 

Sheet Metal Work . 255 

Machine Shop Work 1,617 

Forge Work 126 

Foundry Work 209 

Leather Work 223 

Cabinet-making and Joinery 342 

Carpentry and Building Construction. 727 

Painting and Decorating 193 

Plumbing 404 

Power Plant Operating 150 

Electrical Work 700 

Printing or Bookbinding 474 

Photography, etc 41 

Other Trades 3,320 

Art and Design 74 

Women at Work in Factories 1,676 

Women at Work in Shops and Stores. 2,336 

House Workers 1,979 

Housekeepers 4,212 

Other Occupations 12,892 

Without Occupation 3,114 

Total 35,675 



234 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



VOCATIONAL 

V. TABLE T— 



Day and Evening 
Schools 



Receipts 



Legislative 
Grants 



Local 

Municipal 

Grants 



School 
Fees 



Debentures 



Balances 

and Other 

Sources 



Total 
Receipts 



1 Amherstburg 

2 Barrie 

3 Beamsville 

4 Belleville 

5 Brantford 

6 Brockville 

7 Burlington 

8 Chatham 

9 Cobourg 

10 Collingwood 

11 Dundas 

12 Elmira 

13 Espanola 

14 Fairbank 

15 Fort William 

16 Gait 

17 Goderich 

18 Guelph 

19 Haileybury 

20 Hamilton.. 

21 Hespeler 

22 Ingersoll 

23 Iroquois Falls. . . . 

24 Kenora 

25 Kingston 

26 Kitchener- 

Waterloo 

27 London 

28 Lindsay 

29 Midland 

30 Niagara Falls. . . . 

31 Niagara Falls, S. . 

32 North Bay 

33 Oshawa 

34 Ottawa 

35 Owen Sound 

36 Pembroke 

37 Perth 

38 Peterborough 

39 Port Arthur 

40 Port Hope 

41 Preston 

42 Renfrew 

43 St. Catharines.. . . 

44 St. Thomas 

45 Sarnia 

46 Sault Ste. Marie. . 

47 Smith's Falls 

48 South Porcupine. 

49 Stratford 

50 Sudbury 

51 Swansea 

52 Timmins 

53 Toronto, Central, 

and Riverdale. 



$ 


c. 


490 


75 


907 


88 


751 


50 


2,967 


02 


2,571 


33 


2,337 


21 


730 


14 


5,385 


69 


722 


25 


1,704 


66 


1,366 


26 


836 


53 


563 


79 


1,210 


50 


11,639 


36 


7,664 


73 


963 


00 


28,593 


35 


10,168 39 


117,318 


94 


965 


25 


1,679 


64 


935 


66 


677 


57 


118 


62 


20,137 


04 


45,666 


71 


307 


87 


1,511 


33 


8,934 


37 


4,107 


61 


2,310 


08 


659 


37 


46,280 


84 


2,039 


24 


1,852 


00 


1,233 


25 


2,561 


26 


2,081 


71 


1,348 


50 


1,594 


70 


6,299 


72 


45,333 


20 


2,687 


58 


14,937 


19 


33,074 01 


1,454 


00 


411 


00 


2,202 


16 


14,498 


41 



292 68 
608 95 

87,682 12 



$ c 
137 75 
400 00 



1,405 61 

1,983 28 

1,500 00 

219 86 

6,500 00 



1,017 

1,020 

543 


58 
00 
89 





18,161 28 

16,484 74 

199 07 

33,150 00 



222,444 00 
192 93 
500 00 
337 45 
229 30 
439 78 

52,678 92 

93,747 08 

30 00 

891 58 

18,771 35 

7,000 00 

698 26 



116,766 44 

47,800 00 

451 99 



1,300 00 

9,114 70 

49 71 

720 53 

6,200 00 

39,792 08 

1,424 16 

53,110 00 

34,563 18 

221 10 



$ 



c. 



234 00 

54 00 

158 00 

994 00 



257 00 

369 00 

115 00 

360 00 

460 00 

198 00 

65 00 

95 00 

280 00 

474 50 

272 00 

1,073 02 



10,212 94 
212 50 
156 00 
256 00 
135 00 
120 00 

2,114 00 

3,522 37 

86 00 

472 00 

570 00 



350 00 
795 50 
9,701 50 
132 00 
158 50 



309 66 
154 00 
145 00 



335 90 

11,429 04 

659 90 

1,640 00 



1,840 06 

15,400 00 

112 19 

1,286 67 

597,066 88 



173 00 



506 00 



55,000 00 



96,391 85 



99,747 30 
32,847 31 



43,113 35 



,000 00 



1,286 00 
35,416 67 



S c. 
822 04 



266 03 

12 08 

6,384 15 

1,236 75 



5 33 

55 

1,518 60 

1,144 75 



392 64 
332 75 
292 65 
7,399 98 
5,451 10 
188 16 
497 90 
674 08 



17 00 

8,050 81 

27,137 20 

918 11 



71 60 

57 18 



3,701 61 

1,636 36 

38 77 

20 25 

1,773 25 

703 10 



239 00 

589 76 
23,591 16 



16,315 59 
1,423 78 



363 86 

964 49 

5,927 32 



241 17 
129,262 44 



S c. 
628 50 
2,363 92 
805 50 
4,530 63 
5,548 61 
4,103 24 
1,219 08 

73,638 84 
2,074 00 
3,082 24 
2,851 59 
1,578 97 
2,147 39 
2,450 25 

30,080 64 

121,408 46 

1,766 82 

63,109 02 

17,568 37 
355,426 98 
1,558 84 
2,833 54 
2,203 19 
1,041 87 
695 40 

182,728 07 

202,920 67 

1,341 98 

2,874 91 

28,347 32 

11,164 79 

3,358 34 

5,156 48 

174,385 14 

50,010 01 

2,482 74 

3,006 50 

4,874 02 

11,350 41 

1,543 21 

2,554 23 

13,425 38 

163,258 83 

4,771 64 

94,002 78 

69,060 97 

1,675 10 

947 86 

5,006 71 

36,331 73 

404 87 

3,422 79 

849,428 11 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



235 



SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Expenditure 



Teachers' 
Salaries 


Buildings, 

Sites and all 

Permanent 

Improvements 


Repairs 
to School 
Accommoda- 
tions 


Library, 

Maps and 

Charts, All 

Apparatus and 

Equipment 


School Books, 

Stationery, 

Prizes, Fuel, 

Examinations 

and all Other 

Expenses 


Total 
Expenditure 


1 


$ c 
608 50 
1,260 00 
671 00 
3,934 00 
4,209 36 
3,209 00 

1.063 50 
8,011 82 
1,221 00 
2,001 00 
2,193 98 
1,198 50 
1,085 00 
1,463 00 

21,869 67 

18,270 60 

1,147 00 

29,035 87 

10,219 25 

155,970 42 

1,120 00 

1,658 00 

1,300 00 

886 00 

650 00 

49,718 94 

87,633 96 

906 00 

1,900 00 

20,156 45 
6,910 00 
3,160 00 
3,030 50 

99,483 50 
8,588 75 

2.064 00 
1,626 00 
3,459 00 
5,390 25 
1,351 00 
2,300 00 
7,353 44 

29,339 24 

3,850 00 
40,658 27 
23,305 00 

1,468 25 
403 00 

2,753 80 

21,887 00 

361 00 

2,829 20 

303,062 09 


$ c. 


$ c. 


$ c 

20 00 

5 00 


$ c. 


S c. 

628 50 


? 






1,028 69 


2,293 69 


3 






671 00 


4 


105 00 






491 63 

1,226 00 

620 51 

30 79 

4,825 94 
711 34 
640 31 
328 55 
365 19 
93 01 
296 00 

5,523 88 

5,276 42 
519 82 
284 98 

4,762 90 
156,750 03 
386 84 
656 97 
903 19 
117 71 


4,530 63 


5 




88 50 


5,523 86 


6 






3,829 51 


7 






61 25 

8,681 08 

111 34 

186 93 

15 00 


1,155 54 


8 


52,120 00 




73,638 84 


Q 




2,043 68 


10 


200 00 




3,028 24 


11 




2,537 53 


1? 




15 28 


1,578 97 


13 


73 00 


40 98 


1,291 99 


14 




1,759 00 


15 
16 


86 30 

62,337 29 

100 00 

385 90 


176 46 


2,424 33 
35,524 15 


30,080 64 
121,408 46 


17 




1,766 82 


18 




22,868 77 


52,575 52 


1Q 


103 45 
9,041 47 


15,085 60 


20 
?1 


19,788 45 
52 00 


3,692 79 


345,243 16 
1,558 84 


?? 






2,314 97 


?3 








2,203 19 


?4 






38 16 
45 40 

9,091 48 
12,696 84 


1,041 87 


7-S 






695 40 


26 
27 
?8 


26,983 83 
39,977 37 


1,813 30 
2,391 86 


91,661 56 

50,587 76 

155 75 

366 44 

7,435 46 

181 90 

144 33 

414 08 

29,371 87 

6,220 87 

106 00 

1,338 00 

751 26 

845 17 

192 21 

232 16 

1,321 99 

31,117 13 

640 24 

12,870 57 

19,750 20 

72 00 

102 79 

665 31 

9,160 33 


179,269 11 

193,287 79 

1,061 75 


?9 


89 44 




519 03 

755 41 

36 90 

54 01 


2,874 91 


SO 




28,347 32 


31 






7,128 80 


3? 






3,358 34 


33 


1,700 00 
39,635 15 
11,479 04 




5,144 58 


34 

35 
36 


1,755 24 
871 11 


4,139 38 

20,414 85 

312 74 

40 00 

64 73 

1,733 45 


174.385 14 

47,574 62 

2,482 74 


37 




2 50 


3,006 50 


38 




4,274 99 


39 
40 


756 54 


2,625 00 


11,350 41 
1,543 21 


41 


6 07 




16 00 
2,039 13 
2,419 91 

281 40 
7,236 82 
2,313 13 

134 85 


2,554 23 


47 




10,714 56 


43 
44 


85,365 51 


312 43 


148,554 22 
4,771 64 


45 
46 


7,721 09 


227 80 
463 20 


68,714 55 
45,831 53 


47 




1,675 10 


48 






505 79 


49 


6 60 
583 00 




35 30 

1,441 82 

43 87 

404 09 

23,731 00 


3,461 01 


50 
51 


203 82 


33,275 97 
404 87 


52 






189 50 

357,048 74 


3,422 79 


53 


39,072 74 


9,256 43 


732,171 00 



236 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



VOCATIONAL 

V. TABLE T— 





Receipts 


Day and Evening 
Schools 


Legislative 
Grants 


Local 

Municipal 

Grants 


School 
Fees 


Debentures 


Balances 

and Other 

Sources 


Total 
Receipts 


54 Toronto, Com'rce. 

55 Vellore 


$ c. 

44,687 53 

97 50 

807 30 

2,118 97 

13,601 69 

730 50 

53,199 45 
1,458 00 


$ c 

228,520 34 

49 67 

182 70 

420 59 

28,349 23 

278 65 

111,769 73 
575 01 


$ c. 
10,737 62 


$ c. 
219,255 26 


$ c 

32,457 31 

42 50 


$ c 

535,658 06 
189 67 


56 Wallaceburg 

57 Welland 


120 00 

342 00 

1,144 00 




1,110 00 






2,881 56 


58 Weston . . . 




10,689 28 


53,784 20 


59 Whitby. . 




1,009 15 


60 Windsor- 

Walkerville. . . . 

61 Woodstock 


6,560 80 
358 50 


27,744 75 


42,284 88 


241,559 61 
2,391 51 










1 Totals, 1924 

2 Totals, 1923 


672,077 86 
624,558 06 


1,778,049 32 
1,173,324 87 


105,770 92 
84,050 45 


582,099 82 
1,505,850 91 


335,137 32 
981,748 44 


3,473,135 24 
4,369,532 73 


3 Increases 


47,519 80 


604,724 45 


21,720 47 








4 Decreases 


923,751 09 


646,611 12 


896,397 49 












5 Percentages 


19.35 


51.19 


3.04 


16.76 


9.65 







DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



237 



SCHOOLS (Concluded) 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Expenditure 



Teachers' 
Salaries 


Buildings, 

Sites and All 

Permanent 

Improvements 


Repairs 
to School 
Accommoda- 
tions 


Library, 

Maps and 

Charts, All 

Apparatus 

andEquipment 


School Books, 
Stationery, 
Prizes, Fuel, 
Examinations 
and all Other 
Expenses 


Total 
Expenditure 


54 143,133 77 

55 130 00 


$ c 
141,472 26 


$ c. 
3,390 44 


$ c 

413 85 

49 67 

11 25 


$ c 
119,777 98 


$ c. 

408,188 30 

179 67 


56 924 00 






174 75 

186 56 

11,466 75 

180 00 

89,054 70 
129 00 


1,110 00 


57 2,695 00 






2,881 56 


58 21,496 62 

59 824 00 


5,744 28 
5 15 




10,812 12 


49,519 77 
1,009 15 


60 94,668 26 

61 1,887 00 


50,851 09 


334 35 


5,413 83 
375 51 


240,322 23 
2,391 51 










1 1,274,963 76 

2 1,022,376 69 


586,697 10 
2,006,419 48 


32,984 14 
33,779 46 


180,836 05 
350,085 44 


1,029,754 06 
544,475 81 


3,105,235 11 
3,957,136 88 


3 252,587 07 








485,278 25 


• 


4 


1,419,722 38 


795 32 


169,249 39 


851,901 77 








5 41.06 


18.89 


1.06 


5.82 


33.16 









238 



THE REPORT OE THE 



No. 11 



TABLE U— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 





No. 1 
Grattan 


No. 2 
Hagarty 


L'Orignal 
Village 


Penetan- 

guishene 

Town 


Totals, 
1924 


Number of schools , 


1 


1 


1 


2 


5 


Receipts: 

Balances from 1923 .... 


$ c. 

594 37 

303 74 

15 50 

1,641 71 


$ 

191 
593 

10 
503 
318 


c. 
32 
00 
50 
26 
35 


$ c. 

180 43 

310 84 

7 33 

1,109 04 

7 47 


$ c. 
393 86 

527 35 

13,500 00 


$ c. 
1,359 98 


Government grants .... 


1,734 93 


Municipal grants . .... 


33 33 


Municipal assessments 


16,754 01 


Other sources 


325 82 










Totals 


2,555 32 


1,616 


43 


1,615 11 


14,421 21 


20,208 07 






Expenditure: 

Teachers' salaries 


1,000 OC 

85 78 

8 60 

505 13 


950 

37 

3 

421 


00 
95 

75 
04 


960 00 

6 25 


8,888 30 


11,798 30 


School sites and buildings 

Libraries, maps, apparatus, etc. . . 
Other expenses 


129 98 


196 91 

3,957 44 


209 26 


92 61 


4,976 22 






Totals 


1,599 51 


1,412 


74 


1,058 86 


13,042 65 


17,113 76 






Balances on hand 


955 81 


203 


69 


556 25 


1,378 56 


3,094 31 






Teachers: 

Male 








1 

7 

8 II 

1 male, 

$2,000 

Ave. female 

$1,021 


1 


Female 


1 

II 
$1,000 


1 
III 
$900 


1 
II 

$800 


10 


Certificates 


10 II 1 III 


Salaries 


1 male, 




$2,000 

Ave. female 

$985 


Pupils: 

Total number attending 


15 

12 

13 

6 

4 

4 
6 
6 
1 

27 
27 
27 
27 
27 
7 
17 
17 
27 
27 
27 
12 


34 
19 
15 
20 

8 
3 
9 
6 
8 


18 
9 
9 

10 
4 
3 
4 
2 
5 


356 
181 

175 
257 
54 
49 
86 
89 
78 


435 


Boys 


224 


Girls 


211 


Average attendance 


300 


No. in Primer 


72 


No. in 1st Book 


59 


No. in 2nd Book 


103 


No. in 3rd Book. ... 


103 


No. in 4th Book 


97 


No. beyond 4th Book 




No. in Art 


34 
34 
34 
34 
34 
8 
23 
23 
34 
34 
34 
14 


12 

10 

13 

10 

10 

4 

8 

8 

13 

12 

13 


356 
356 
356 
356 
356 

78 
167 
167 
356 
167 
356 

78 


429 


No. in Geography 


427 


No. in Music 


430 


No. in Literature 

No. in Composition 


427 

427 


No. in Grammar 


97 


No. in English History 


215 


No. in Canadian Historv.. . 


215 


No. in Physiology and Hygiene. . . 
No. in Nature Studv 


430 
240 


No. in Phvsical Culture 


430 




104 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



239 



TABLE V— REPORT ON NIGHT SCHOOLS 
I. Night Elementary Schools 





Number of 
Schools 


Teachers 


Pupils 
Enrolled 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Barwick Consolidated 


1 
1 
1 
1 

18 
1 

1 


1 
2 
1 
1 
56 
1 
1 


19 
24 ' 
12 
16 
2,015 
17 
27 


17 


New Toronto 


12 


Nicholson, S.S. No. 1 


9 


Himsworth North, U.S.S. No. 4. . . 


6 


Toronto 


1,023 


Wood bridge 


14 


York S.S. No. 28 


8 


Totals, 1924-25 


24 


64 


2,130 


1,089 







II. Night High Schools 



School 


Number of 
Schools 


Teachers 


Pupifs 
Enrolled 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Burlington 




16 

2 

14 
2 
6 
3 
1 
55 
3 
8 


9 
37 
11 
9 
58 
13 

599 
37 

107 
10 

123 

36 

10 

1,749 

29 

163 


6 


Chapleau • 


8 


Espanola (Continuation School) 


4 


Fort William 


8 


Gait 


9 


Hailevburv 


5 


Hamilton 


336 


Kitchener- Waterloo 


8 


London 


44 


Oshawa 


7 


St. Catharines 


10 


St. Thomas 


5 


Stratford 


9 


Toronto 


328 


Whitby 


6 


Windsor 


70 






Totals, 1924-25 


18 


118 


3,000 


863 







240 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



TABLE W— GENERAL 

A General Statistical Abstract, exhibiting the comparative state and progress of 

and Vocational Schools from the year 1867 



No. 


Subjects Compared 


1867 


1872 


1877 


1882 


1887 


1 


Population 




1,620,851 
104 




1,926,922 
104 




2 


High Schools (including Collegiate 
Institutes) 


102 


104 


112 


3 


Continuation Schools 




4 


Vocational Schools (Day) 












5 


Public Schools 


4,261 
161 

4,524 
5,696 


4,490 
171 

4,765 
7,968 


4,955 

185 

5,244 
9,229 


5,013 
190 

5,307 
12,348 


5,277 


6 

7 


Roman Catholic Separate Schools . . . 
Grand total of above schools in opera- 
tion 


229 

5,618 


8 
9 


Pupils attending High Schools (in- 
cluding Collegiate Institutes and 

Night High Schools) 

Pupils attending Continuation Schools 
Pupils attending Day Vocational 
Schools 


17,459 


10 












11 


Pupils attending Evening Vocational 












12 


Pupils attending Public Schools (in- 
cluding Kindergarten and Night 
Schools) 


382,719 
18,924 

407,339 
$1,093,517 
$1,473,189 

$ 


433,256 
21,406 

462,630 
1,371,594 
2,207,364 


465,908 
24,952 

500,089 
2,038,099 
3,073,489 


445,364 
26,148 

483,860 
2,144,449 
3,026,975 


462,839 


13 


Pupils attending Roman Catholic 
Separate Schools 


30,373 


14 


Grand total of students and pupils 
attending High, Continuation, Vo- 
cational, Public and Separate 
Schools 


510,671 


15 
16 


Amount paid for the salaries of Public 
and Separate School Teachers .... 

Total amount paid for Public and 
Separate School purposes 


2,458,540 
3,742,104 


17 


Amount paid for Continuation School 




18 


Total amount paid for Continuation 


$ 










19 


Amount paid for High School (and 
Collegiate Institute) Teachers' sal- 
aries 


$ 94,820 
$ 124,181 

$ 


141,812 
210,005 


211,607 
343,710 


253,864 
343,720 


327,452 


20 
21 


Total amount paid for High School 

and Collegiate Institute purposes. . 

Amount paid for Vocational School 


495,612 


22 


Total amount paid for Vocational 


$ 










23 


purposes as above 


$1,597,370 
2,849 
2,041 
4,890 


2,417,369 
2,626 
2,850 
5,476 


3,020 
6,468 


3,062 
6,875 




24 


Male Teachers in Public and Separate 
Schools 


2,718 


25 


ate Schools 




26 


Total Public and Separate School 
Teachers 


7,594 


27 






28 


High School and Collegiate Institute 
Teachers 


159 


239 


280 


332 


398 


29 






30 


Number of all Teachers, as specified 
above 


5,049 


5,715 


6,748 


7,189 


7,992 



* Included in Public and Separate School attendances, t Included with 

year ended six months after 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



241 



STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 

Education in Ontario, as connected with Public, Separate, Continuation, High 
to 1924, compiled from Returns to the Department of Education. 



No. 


1892 


1897 


1902 


1907 


1912 


1917 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1 


2,114,321 
128 


130 
44 


2,182,947 

134 
65 


143 
107 


12,527,292 

148 
138 




x2,933,622 

175 

181 

16 

6,289 

656 






2 
3 
4 


162 

137 

11 

6,103 

548 


183 

189 

24 

6,334 

688 


183 
198 


5 
6 


5,577 
312 


5,574 
340 


5,671 
391 


5,819 
449 


5,939 
513 


6,361 
708 


7 


6,017 


6,088 


6,261 


6,518 


6,738 


6,961 


7,317 


7,418 


7,474 


8 
9 


22,837 


24,390 

*1,618 


24,472 
*2,190 


30,331 

*4,744 


32,608 
6,094 


1f33,024 
95,104 


946,340 

98,777 


951,027 

99,337 


955,116 

910,545 


10 












113,674 


119,402 


912,819 


915,209 

935,675 

517,256 


11 












914,597 


933,511 


936,452 


12 


458,553 


453,256 


420,094 


413,510 


429,030 


458,436 


515,202 


521,364 


13 


37,466 


41,620 


45,964 


51,502 


61,297 


70,048 


88,546 


91,051 


93,524 


14 


518,856 


519,266 


490,530 


495,343 


529,029 


584,883 


701,778 


722,050 


727,325 


15 


2,752,629 


2,886,061 


3,198,132 


4,389,524 


6,109,547 


8,398,450 


16,690,982 


17,534,704 


18,105,568 


16 
17 

18 


4,053,918 


4,215,670 
Included 

with 
No. 15 
Included 

with 
No. 16 


4,825,160 
Included 

with 
No. 15 
Included 

with 
No. 16 


7,556,179 
Included 

with 

No. 15 

Included 

with 
No. 16 


11,273,960 
202,875 
265,087 


14,111,835 
228,362 
324,621 


31,920,884 
474,241 
881,431 


35,858,355 
533,395 
969,483 


33,010,064 

590,085 

1,096,285 


19 


472,029 


532,837 


547,402 


783,782 


1,232,537 


1,554,049 


2,963,001 


3,392,901 


3,716,940 


20 


696,114 


715,976 


769,680 


1,213,697 


1,953,061 


2,418,975 


6,742,875 


7,249,589 


7,819,101 


?A 














787,370 


1,022,379 

3,957,137 

48,034,564 


1,274,964 

3,105,235 

45,030,685 


?.?, 














1,871,614 


23 


4,750,032 


4,931,646 


5,594,840 


8,769,876 


13,492,108 


16,855,431 


41,416,804 


24 


2,770 


2,784 


2,311 


1,813 


1,511 


1,317 


1,740 


1,842 


1,946 


25 


5,710 


6,344 


7,320 


8,387 


9,617 


11,445 


13,132 


13,461 


13,562 


26 
27 


8,480 


9,128 
f44 


9,631 
f86 


10,200 
fl40 


11,128 
226 


12,762 
241 


14,872 
323 


15,303 
350 


15,508 
396 


28 
29 


522 


579 


593 


750 


917 


1,051 
132 


1,420 
286 


1,543 
371 


1,657 
416 


30 


9,002 


9,707 


10,224 


10,950 


12,271 


14,1861 


16,901 


17,567 


17,977 



Public and Separate School Teachers. JCensus of 1911 
the calendar year specified. xCensus of 1921. 



9Figures for the School 



242 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS 



No. 

1 
2 
3 
4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 
11 
12 
13 
14 

15 
16 

17 

18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 

24 
25 

26 
27 



Barwick. . . 
Burriss. . . . 
Byng Inlet 
Charlton . . 



Consolidated 
School 



Dorion 

Falls View 

Gooderham 

Grant 

Grantham 

Hudson 

Humber Heights. 

Katrine 

Macdonald 

Mallorytown 



Sections Consolidated 



4, 11, 12, Barwick, Rainy River Dist 

1,2, Burriss, Rainy River Dist 

2, Wallbridge; 1 Henvey, Parry Sd. Dist 

2, 4, Dack, Town of Charlton, Timiskam- 
ing Dist 



1, 2, 3, Dorion, Thunder Bay Dist. 
7, 9, Stamford, Welland Co 

2, 4, 5, Glamorgan, Haliburton. . . . 

3, 15, Nepean, Carleton Co 

5, 6, Grantham, Lincoln Co 

Hudson Tp., Timiskaming Dist. . . 
5 Etobicoke (3 Sections), York Co. 
1, 5, Armour, Parry Sound Dist. . . 
dY 2 , 7, Guelph, Wellington Co 



4, 5, 6, Front of Yonge; 19, Front of 
Escott, Leeds Co 



Mindemoya. 
Morley 



Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain. 

Paudash 

Savard 

Sundridge 

Tamworth 



Tweed .... 
Wellington 



West Guilford. 
Wilberforce. . . 



1, 4, Carnarvon, Manitoulin 



Assessment 



7, Morley; 9, Morley and Dilkie; 1, Long 
Sault, Rainy River Dist 



1, 2, 3, Nipigon, Thunder Bay 

1, Carling; 3, Macdougall, Parry Sound. 

9, 12, 13, 14, Mountain, Dundas Co 

1, 6, 7, Cardiff, Haliburton Co 

1, 2, Savard; 2, Robillard, Timiskaming. 

6, 4, Strong, Vill. of Sundridge, Parry Sd 

3, 6, 10, Sheffield; 28, Camden, Lennox 
and Addington 



3, 5, Hungerford, Tweed Vill., Hastings Co 

11, 14, 15, 10, Hillier; 8, 10, Hallowell 
Wellington Village 



2, 3, Guilford, Haliburton 

2. 6. Monmouth; 8, Cardiff, HaliburtonCo 



$129,806 

158,540 

72,940 

148,420 

88,316 

3,270,198 

28,930 

601,875 

406,250 

224,800 

447,271 

49,528 

427,500 

234,144 
125,955 



No. of 
Class- 
rooms 



Area of 
Grounds 
in acres 



247,955 


5 


463,770 


4 


228,000 


2 


341,250 


6 


16,860 


2 


160,380 


2 


201,299 


4 


255,570 


5 


813,408 


6 


1,215,000 


9 


46,745 


2 


46,801 


2 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



243 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Continued) 





Conveyances 
Horse-drawn 
(h) 
motor (m) 


Owned by 
Contractors 

(C) 
or Section 

(S) 


Length 

of 
Routes 
in miles 


No. of 

Pupils 

Conv'y'd 


Drivers' Daily 
Wages 


Average Cost per 
Day per Pupil 
Transported 


No. of 

Pupils 

in 


No. 


To Sect. 


To Govt 


Fifth 
Class 


1 


2(h) 


c 


(2)4 


33 


(2) $2.50 


$0.08 


$0.09 


13 


2 


5 (h); 1 (rri) 


c 


1H-6M 


72 


$0.75-15.00 


.10 


.15 


6 


3 


1 (h) 


c 


2 


22 


$3 . 75 


.07 


.10 


3 


4 


4(h) 


S(2) 

C(2) 


2-6K 


98 


$0 . 50-$4 . 50 


.05 


.07 


5 


5 


4(h) 


S 


4-5M 


67 


$2.75-$3.87 


.07 


.11 




6 


Kh); 1 (m) 


c 


4-7 


70 


$6.10-$11.53 


.17 


.08 




7 


2(h) 


c 


5-6 


45 


$3.75-$4.00 


.07 


.10 


7 


8 


Km) 


S 


23^ 


14 


$0.57 


.03 


.01 




9 


Km) 


c 


3 


40 


$3.75 


.07 


.03 


1 


10 
11 


2(h); l(m) 
2(h) 


S (2h) 
C(m) 

S 


4-8 


72 
52 


$3.00-$4.00 
$4.00-$4.50 


.06 
.11 


.09 
.05 




12 


2(h); 1 (m) 


c 


23^-5 


32 


$1.50-$4.00 


.10 


.16 




n 


Street Cars 
4(h) 










.04 

.08 


.02 
.05 




14 


c 


2-5^ 


59 


$1.00-$2.50 




15 


3(h) 


c 


4^-8 


63 


$2.00-$3.00 


.06 


.09 




16 


5 (h) Winter 
4 (m)Summer 


c 


5-9 


86 


$2.75-$4.25 


.08 


.13 


15 


17 

18 


2 (h); 2 (m) 
2(h); 2(m) 


S(lm) 
C (lm), (2h) 
C 


2-5 
9 


24 

58 


$4.50-$7.50 
$16.16 


.20 
.11 


.30 

.17 


1 
8 


19 


7(h); 1 (m) 


c 


ms 


147 


$0.80-$4.50 


.09 


.07 




20 
21 


1 (h) 
5(h) 


c 

s 


3 


4 

75 


$2.90 
$1.00-$4.75 


.30 
.12 


.42 
.18 


1 
4 


22 


Kh); 1 (m) 


c 


6 


10 


$3.50 


.14 


.21 


27 


23 


5(h) 


S (3) 
C(2) 


33^-5 


43 


$0 . 50-$2 . 23 


.12 


.17 




24 


3 (h); 2 (m) 


S (2m) 
C (3h) 


3^-73^ 


104 


$2.00-$3.60 


.09 


.04 




25 


2 (h); 3 (m) 


C 


3^-7 


141 


$3.75-$5.00 


.13 


.06 




26 


5(h) 


c 


1Mp4 


44 


$1.13-$2.85 


.07 


.10 


7 


27 


Kh) 


s 


5 


21 


$3.75 


.07 


.11 


2 



244 



THE REPORT' OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Continued) 



No 



Consolidated 
School 



Barwick. . . 
Burriss. . . . 
Byng Inlet. 
Charlton . . 



Dorion. . . . 
Falls View. 



9 
10 
11 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 

18 
19 

20 
21 
22 
23 

24 

25 

26 

27 



No. in 
Con- 
tinuation 
School 



Gooderham. 
Grant 



Grantham 

Hudson 

Humber Heights. 



Katrine 

Macdonald . . 
Mallorytown. 
Mindemoya. . 

Morley 

Nipigon 



Nobel 

North Mountain . 

Paudash 

Savard 

Sundridge 

Tarn worth 



Tweed .... 
Wellington 



West Guilford. 
Wilber force. . . 
Totals . . . 



35 
35 



65 



76 



59 



Certificates 

of 

Teachers 



Salaries 



(1) 1,(2)11 
(3)11 

(1) 1,(2)11 

(3)11 

(2) II 

(2) 1,(5)11 

(2)11 

(1) 1,(2)11 

(1) 1,(5)11 
(1) I,(DII 
(6)11 

(DII 

(1) 1,(3)11 

(2) 1,(2)11 

(3) 1,(1)11 

(1) 1,(2)11 
(4)11 

(2)11 

(2) 1,(4)11 

(2)11 
(2)11 
(4)11 

(3) 1,(2)11 

(6)11 

(3) I, (5) II 

(2)11 
(2)11 



$2,000,1,200 
1,000 
1,400,1,100 
900 
1,100 
(2) 1,000 
1,435 
(2) 1,000 

1,200, 1,000 

2,650 1,350, 
(2) 1,300 
1,150 
(2) 1,050 

900, 800 

1,600 

(2) 1,200 
M.T.$6 wk. 

1,500, 1,100 
(4) 1,000 
1,100,1,000 

2,000 

(3) 1,150 
1,100,1,000 
1,200 

1,800,1,150 
1,050, 1,000 
1,600,1,300 
1,100, 900 
1,700, 1,400 
(2) 1,000 
1,700, 1,200 
1,100 
1,400 
(2) 1,200 

1,150 
1,700,1,200 

2,300, 1,800 
1,500,1,300 

(2) 1,100 
1,000, 850 

1,400, 1,000 

1,575,1,200 

950, 900 

2,000, 1,350 

1,200,1,100 

1,000 

1,800 

(3) 1,100 

(2) 1,000 
2,000, 1,300 

1,125 

(3) 1,100 
(2) 1,000 

900, 800 

900, 800 



No. of 

Pupils 

Enrolled 



96 

79 

120 

130 

80 
247 

90 
99 

270 

98 

254 

44 
134 
120 
119 
115 
128 

60 
196 

33 

76 
169 
180 

252 

293 

63 
76 



Average 
Attend- 
ance 



3,621 



88 
70 
95 
95 

62 
213 

65 

83 

230 
62 

218 

34 
112 
101 
102 

97 
106 

55 
166 

23 

56 
124 
146 

226 

230 

50 
61 



Cost of 



Teach- 
ers' 
Salaries 



$4,200 00 
3,390 00 
3,100 00 
3,435 00 

2,145 00 
9,850 00 

1,700 00 
4,458 37 

6,650 00 
2,100 00 
7,115 00 

1,200 00 
4,875 00 
4,900 00 
5,100 00 
4,000 00 
4,950 00 

2.900 00 



Trans- 
porta- 
tion 



$1,000 00 

3,310 55 

397 50 

1,913 07 

2,489 72 
3,320 00 

1,507 15 
373 72 

745 00 
1,941 50 
1,975 00 

1,394 85 
175 00 
1,440 00 
1,769 00 
2,873 60 
2,400 00 

3,000 00 



,860 00 4,505 23 



2,970 



1,850 00 
2,340 00 
4,625 00 
6,650 00 

7,040 00 

9,725 00 



587 20 
4,393 55 

650 00 
1,247 00 

3,366 16 

5,350 00 



1,700 00 1,690 00 



1.700 00 



750 00 



12055837 54,56480 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



245 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Continued) 



Maintenance 



Other 
expenses 



$996 

661 
1,108 
2,408 
1,717 
3,605 

395 
4,982 
1,959 

728 
5,003 

251 
2,203 
2,729 
1,105 
1,896 
2,418 

823 
2,656 

316 
1,287 

800 
2,090 
2,258 
2,727 

463 

525 



Total 



48,118 88 



$6,196 
7,362 
4,605 
7,756 
6,351 

16,775 
3,602 
9,814 
9,354 
4,769 

14,093 
2,846 
7,253 
9,069 
7,974 
8,770 
9,768 
6,723 

16,022 
2,753 
8,021 
6,075 
9,987 

12,664 

17,802 
3,853 
2,975 



Legislative Grants 



Salaries, 
Equip- 
ment, 
Accom- 
modation 



223,242 05 



$1,860 00 
1,626 00 
1,840 00 
1,604 00 
1,150 00 
3,148 00 
1,010 00 
1,184 00 
1,880 00 
1,000 00 
2,310 00 

650 00 
1,570 00 

810 00 

970 00 
1,890 00 
2,170 00 
1,310 00 
1,410 00 

590 00 
1,096 00 
2,190 00 

810 00 
2,132 00 
1,860 00 

845 00 

982 00 



39,897 00 



Transpor- 
tation 



$600 00 

2,006 19 

238 50 

1,151 72 

1,493 71 

1,005 90 

916 05 

34 20 

223 20 

1,141 50 

530 85 

836 73 

52 50 

540 00 

1,061 40 

1,724 33 

1,416 00 

1,800 00 

2,027 58 

352 32 

2,505 50 

390 00 

823 02 

870 60 

1,605 00 

870 00 

454 95 



26,671 75 



Fifth 

Class 



;315 14 
251 62 



130 00 



75 40 



335 06 



177 78 



130 00 

275 80 



80 71 



1,771 51 



Continu- 
ation 
School 



629 66 
1,780 02 



902 43 



884 19 



898 03 



5,094 33 



Agr., 
Man., 

Tr., 
Hous. 

Sc. 



3 79 



20 00 
60 00 



345 00 
20 00 



42 00 
60 00 



20 00 
90 00 



12 40 



30 00 

209 99 

80 00 



10 00 



1,003 18 



Special 

on 
Salaries 



$300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
300 00 
200 00 
660 00 
200 00 
200 00 
600 00 
200 00 
600 00 
100 00 
400 00 
400 00 
400 00 
300 00 
400 00 
200 00 
600 00 
200 00 
200 00 
400 00 
500 00 
600 00 
800 00 
200 00 
200 00 



9,760 00 



Total 



$3,075 14 
4,187 60 
2,378 50 
3,185 72 
2,863 71 
4,873 90 
2,201 45 
1,763 20 
2,723 20 
2,341 50 
3,440 85 
1,586 73 
2,064 50 
2,439 66 
4,211 42 
4,249 39 
3,986 00 
3,507 78 
5,030 01 
1,142 32 
3,943 90 
3,255 80 
3,047 21 
3,812 59 
5,243 03 
1,995 71 
1,646 95 



84,197 77 



9D.E 



246. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONSOLIDATED SCHOOLS (Concluded) 



No. 



Consolidated 
School 



Net Cost of 

Maintenance 

to Section 



Net Cost 

to Section 

per Pupil 

of Enrolled 

Attendance 



Net Cost 

to Section 

per Pupil 

of Average 

Attendance 



Cost to 

Government 

per Pupil 

of Average 

Attendance 



Total Cost 

per Pupil 

of Average 

Attendance 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

5 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 



Barwick 

Burriss 

Byng Inlet 

Charlton 

Dorion 

Falls View 

Gooderham 

Grant 

Grantham 

Hudson 

Humber Heights 

Katrine 

Macdonald 

Mallorytown 

Mindemoya 

Morley 

Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain . 

Paudash 

Savard 

Sundridge 

Tamworth 

Tweed 

Wellington 

West Guilford . . . 
Wilberf orce 



$3,121 36 
3,174 78 
2,227 33 
4,570 93 
3,488 27 

11,901 10 
1,400 96 
8,050 90 
6,631 24 
2,428 00 

10,652 48 
1,259 56 
5,189 02 
6,629 62 
3,762 80 
4,520 64 
5,782 20 
3,216 07 

10,992 13 
1,610 99 
4,077 53 
2,819 20 
6,939 79 
8,851 69 

12,559 87 
1,857 77 
1,328 05 



$32 51 

40 18 
18 56 
35 16 
43 60 
48 18 

15 56 
81 32 
24 56 
24 77 

41 94 

28 63 

38 72 

55 25 
31 62 

39 31 
45 18 
53 60 

56 08 
48 82 
53 65 

16 68 
38 55 
35 12 

42 87 

29 48 

17 47 



$35 47 

45 35 
23 45 
48 12 
56 26 
55 87 

21 56 
97 00 
28 83 
39 16 
48 86 
37 05 

46 33 

65 64 

36 89 

46 60 
54 55 
58 47 

66 22 
70 04 
72 81 

22 73 

47 53 
39 17 
54 60 

37 16 
21 77 



$34 94 
59 82 

25 03 
33 53 
46 19 
22 88 
33 87 

21 21 
11 84 
37 77 

15 79 
46 67 
18 43 
24 15 
41 29 
43 81 
37 60 
63 78 
30 30 
49 66 
70 43 

26 26 
20 87 

16 87 

22 80 
39 91 

27 00 



Totals $139,044 28 



38 40 



46 82 



28 35 



$70 41 

105 17 

48 48 

81 65 

102 45 

78 75 

55 43 

118 21 
40 67 

76 93 
64 65 
83 72 
64 76 

89 79 
78 18 

90 41 
92 15 

122 25 
96 52 

119 70 
143 24 

48 99 
68 40 

56 04 

77 40 
77 07 
48 77 



75 17 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



247 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 



No. 


Library 


Read- 
ing 
Room 


Popula- 
tion 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circula- 
tion 


Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 


Amount 

expended 

on Books 

in 1924 


1 


Acton 




1,872 
526 
2,520 
2,800 
4,20C 
1,160 
2,400 
2,198 
808 

7,216 

1,165 

957 

800 

12,495 

nualrepo 

650 

2,419 

4,970 

28,010 

1,450 

9,119 

950 

972 

3,100 
1,250 
4,328 

800 

14,100 

1,720 

511 
1,922 
6,237 
8,401 

726 

nual repo 

613 

1,434 

ized in 

5,120 

1,585 

2,400 
1,170 
452 
1,640 
1,527 

1,765 

1,427 

3,839 

22,220 

12,880 
3,469 

75 
2,121 

880 


$ c. 
509 78 
219 85 
996 55 

2,374 49 
878 59 
368 76 
759 49 

1,455 63 
666 44 

3,762 27 

777 01 

237 84 

6 92 

6,201 22 

rt for 1924 

269 55 

1,437 06 

2,339 84 

14,009 76 

466 36 

4,962 72 

817 55 

338 40 

2,039 68 

233 07 

789 64 

196 44 

8,604 40 

633 88 

170 59 

1,808 32 

3,848 88 

2,590 60 

641 93 

rt for 1924 

551 89 

853 82 

1925 

3,324 88 
1,082 87 

1,263 88 
1,006 50 

339 01 
988 25 

1,085 96 

910 10 

964 88 

1,905 31 

16,353 52 

2,479 76 

69,44 32 

2,120 06 

56 80 

1,519,76 

716 03 


4,397 
3,576 
4,764 
5,250 
4,989 
4,188 
4,185 
9,559 
4,476 

9,738 
5,704 
2,233 
2,664 
14,376 

3,252 
5,770 
7,204 

35,951 
4,687 

14,340 
4,797 
3,256 

4,222 
3,170 
8,426 
2,044 

15,955 
3,093 
4,463 
9,239 

11,608 
6,767 

3,082 

3,840 
2,032 

7,962 
4,332 

6,094 
8,439 
3,493 

4,452 
5,044 

5,110 
4,377 
4,586 
34,531 
3,733 

12.538 

7,911 

5,000 

3,833 

760 


13,936 

4,451 

16,661 

13,952 

4,136 

6,968 

11,843 

19,808 

7,823 

55,492 

15,105 

1,639 

2,525 

78,068 

4,202 

16,375 

22,818 

160,737 

9,391 
47,469 

5,720 

2,091 

28,289 

3,485 

15,775 

1,260 

76,759 

6,892 

6,024 

20,930 

18,780 

15,013 

6,320 

6,061 

1,737 

40,001 
12,632 

11,750 
9,158 
5,312 
9,718 

11,081 

12,819 
16,349 
19,609 
129,666 
35,214 

52,768 

30,775 

391 

15,388 

7,700 


$ c. 

69 92 

58 91 

199 06 

73 89 

143 17 

74 62 
147 66 
255 0C 

75 80 

260 00 

128 96 

29 23 

25 00 

260 00 

47 48 
212 64 
260 00 
260 00 

72 89 
260 00 
158 39 

25 00 

248 52 

38 00 

164 66 

28 06 

260 00 

122 75 

21 56 

260 00 

260 00 

134 59 

169 03 

158 78 
51 75 

260 00 
229 95 

202 19 

144 50 
113 23 
144 31 

97 i; 

86 68 
116 53 
206 6C 
260 0( 
260 00 

260 00 
258 05 
21 38 
139 90 
101 31 


$ c. 

181 88 


2 

3 


Ailsa Craig 

Almonte 


R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 


85 80 
442 92 


4 

s 


Amherstburg 

Arnprior 


208 91 
286 35 


6 


Arthur 




109 20* 


7 


Aurora 


R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 


251 94 


8 


Aylmer 


506 38 


9 


Ayr 


82 07 


10 


Barrie 


772 31 


11 
17 


Beamsville 

Beaverton . . . 


190 53 
49 88 


13 


Beeton 






14 


Belleville 


R.R. 

No an 


2,133 62 


15 


Belmont 




16 


Bothwell. . 


112 62 


17 
18 
19 
70 


Bracebridge 

Brampton 

Brantford 

Brighton .... 


R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 


317 99 

507 48 

2,285 97 

143 10 


21 
11 


Brockville 

Brussels 


1.309 39 

77 65 


13 


Burk's Falls 

Campbellford 

Cardinal . . 




24 


755 32 


26 
77 


Carleton Place. . . . 
Cayuga 


324 41 
64 07 


78 


Chatham 


R.R. 
R.R. 


1,877 67 


79 


Chesley 


97 25 


30 


Clifford 


56 76 


31 


Clinton 


R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 

No an 

R.R. 

R.R. 

Organ 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 


466 57 


32 
33 


Collingwood 

Cornwall . . . 


436 00 
486 03 


34 


Delhi 


294 54 


35 
36 
37 


Deseronto 

Drayton 

Dresden 

Dryden ... . 


213 31 


38 




39 


Dundas 


649 06 


40 


Durham 


569 17 


41 
47 


Elmira 

Eiora 


260 02 
192 6G 


43 


Erin 


215 86 


44 


Essex 


R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 


210 95 


45 


Exeter 


210 91 


46 


Fergus. . . . 


137 57 


47 


Forest 


93 25 


48 
49 
50 

51 


Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Fort William Br'ch 

Gait 


438 74 

1,841 09 

803 96 

1,164 90 


52 
53 
54 

55 


Gananoque 

Garden Island .... 

Georgetown 

Glencoe 


960 27 

21 80 

316 15 

184 36 



248 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 (Continued; 



No. 


Library 


Read- 
ing 
Room 


Popula- 
tion 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circula- 
tion 


Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 


Amount 

expended 

on Becks 

in 1924 


S6 


Goderich 


R.R. 
R.R. 


4,224 

708 

1,80G 

2,134 

19, 219 

1,107 
122,238 

ranch, O 

2,881 
1,325 

790 
2,83.8 

315 

300 
5,100 

1,200 
6,669 
2,113 

21,621 
2,217 

24,805 

1,250 

600 

601 

4,000 

7,935 

2,500 

300 

61,867 


$ c. 

2,629 52 

961 33 

329 OS 
1,876 33 

10,105 43 

926 83 

70,602 13 

3,385 84 

pened in 19 

1,831 05 

1,339 95 

311 54 

2,341 35 

283 40 

52 35 
2,477 03 

646 39 

3,619 39 

809 68 

13,475 42 

1.684 84 
12,883 73 

402 54 

143 65 

227 28 

1,561 62 

3,338 20 

1,512 30 

328 14 

25,403 05 

2,601 74 

2,942 04 

2,129 68 

869 19 

700 25 

330 58 
1,444 84 
3,596 35 

408 36 
828 70 
787 07 
3,108 82 
790 87 
896 40 

770 15 
663 18 

2.685 56 
893 14 

1,804 70 
9,556 25 
5,265 07 
1,116 07 
783 10 

2,190 93 


6,652 

3,501 

84^ 

5,331 

23,460 

3,015 
63,140 
14,426 
25 

4,445 
4,573 
2,532 
5,923 
571 

766 

7,553 

4,467 
5,426 
4,636 

24,820 
4,518 

20,800 

1,878 
2,057 
2,993 
6,507 

10,282 
6,027 
2,541 

48,157 
9,106 
4,747 
3,311 
3,406 

3,560 
3,514 
3.182 
10,451 
3,128 
5,471 
3,839 
5,424 
5,912 
4,950 

1,808 
3,213 
6,460 
4,531 
1,656 
21,267 
7,882 
3,969 
1,189 

6,029 


25,084 

4,417 

1,541 

21,689 

148,004 

3,322 
415,601 
156,993 

16,258 
29,368 

4,242 
17,246 

6,100 

895 
27,487 

10,348 

30,003 

3,138 

205,892 

13,732 

98,178 

9,560 

2,471 

2,475 

24,796 

36,410 

11,692 

3,706 

238,429 

47,327 

27,915 

35,623 

9,848 

6,031 
3,523 
9,375 

46,023 
7,635 

13,529 
7,312 

29,855 
4,880 

13,840 

10,432 

8,140 

17,066 

9,545 

9,054 

86,478 

45,599 

15,752 

8,111 

24,143 


$ c. 

260 0C 

87 23 

99 81 

219 25 

260 0C 

257 18 
260 00 
260 00 

248 45 
135 98 

61 27 
251 82 

36 96 

10 00 

257 71 

46 62 
260 00 

71 15 
260 00 
255 00 
260 00 

106 74 
38 41 
20 00 

244 45 
260 00 
170 82 

80 39 
260 00 
260 00 
200 00 
200 00 

44 43 

68 91 
46 46 
85 80 
260 00 
133 81 
128 14 
123 92 
211 77 
119 83 

81 76 

115 64 
83 56 

245 82 
180 92 
200 00 
260 00 
260 00 
189 97 

68 97 

210 26 


$ c. 
500 03 


57 
S8 


Grand Valley 

Gravenhurst 


133 23 
156 03 


SQ 


Grimsby 


R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
treet B 
R.R. 
R.R. 


407 50 


60 


Guelph 


2,432 53 


61 
6? 


Hagersville 

Hamilton 


408 00 
9,992 59 


63 
64 

6S 


Hamilton Branch. . 
Hamilton, Locke S 
Hanover 


3,121 19 
318 49 


66 

67 


Harriston 

Hensall 


217 35 
126 05 


68 
69 


Hespeler 

Hillsburg 


R.R. 


303 45 
59 50 


70 


Ignace . . . 






71 


Ingersoll 


R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 


688 45 


72 

7S 


Kemptville 

Kenora 


140 25 
440 98 


74 

75 
76 

77 

78 
7Q 


Kincardine 

Kingston 

Kingsville 

Kitchener 

Lakefleld 

Lanark 


100 07 
3,855 65 

483 78 
3,001 89 

143 85 
56 15 


80 


Lancaster 




31 29 


81 

82 
8S 


Leamington 

Lindsay 

Listowel 


R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 


372 29 
941 13 
295 09 


84 

8S 


Little Britain 

London 


80 20 
4,879 47 


86 

87 


London, East 


677 66 
717 57 


88 


London, Southeast. 
Lucknow 

Markdale. . 






686 94 


89 
00 


R.R. 
R.R. 


905 

922 
900 
2,570 
7,346 
740 
2,400 
1,055 
5,231 
1,731 
1,755 

650 

1,490 

3,000 

3,327 

4,200 

15,895 

13,011 

1,317 

768 

3,626 


51 80 
105 21 


91 


Merrickville 


103 98 


92 

m 

94 
OS 


Merritton 

Midland 

Millbrook 

Milton 


R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 


225 08 

1,001 21 

172 48 

279 68 


96 
97 


Milverton 

Mimico 


R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 


209 22 
866 81 


08 


Mitchell 


171 46 


99 

100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 

109 


Mount Forest 

Newcastle 

New Hamburg. . . . 

New Liskeard 

Newmarket 

New Toronto 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville 


164 70 

163 16 

111 39 

714 41- 

273 64 

1,005 23 

2,261 67 

1,022 52 

306 28 

110 32 

369 03 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



249 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 (Continued) 



Library 



Oakwood 

Orangeville 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Ottawa, Boys and 

Ottawa, East 

Ottawa, South. . . 

Ottawa, West 

Otter ville 

Owen Sound 

Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene. . 

Perth 

Peterborough .... 

Picton 

Porcupine-Dome. . 

Port Arthur 

Port Carling 

Port Colborne. . . . 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan 

Prescott 

Preston 



Renfrew. 
Richmond H: 

Ridgeway. . , 
Rittenhouse. 
Russell 



St. Catharines. . 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Saltfleet 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. 
Sault Ste. Marie, V\ 

Schreiber 

Seaforth 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls.. . . 
South River. . . . 

Springfield 

Stayner 

Stirling 

Stouffville 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Streetsville 

Sudbury 

Sundridge 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 
Girls 
Opene 

R.R. 

R.R. 



R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
No an 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



Popula- 
tion 



250 

2,658 

8,000 

16,000 

117,239 

House O 

d in 1925 



600 
11,935 

793 
1,900 
4,184 
nual repo 
3,300 
9,190 
4,000 
3,750 

21,661 
3,135 
1,900 

16,351 
454 
3,961 
1,500 
4,344 
1,200 
735 
2,608 
5,660 

5,037 
1,235 

700 
Rural 

700 

21,810 
4,009 

17,152 
4,763 

15,588 

22,062 

' 1,208 

1,980 

1,100 

4,118 

7,000 

600 

400 

966 

900 

1,115 

18,888 

2,587 

600 

9,567 

475 



Total 


Volumes 


Expendi- 


in 


ture 


Library 


$ c. 




219 32 


2,252 


2,163 37 


7,511 


3,728 16 


9,235 


6,201 60 


9,466 


63,125 00 


90,526 


pened in 19 


25 


2,377 18 


5,086 


3,123 01 


7,597 


217 22 


2,543 


5,227 48 


12,182 


510 52 


6,216 


1,942 45 


3,672 


1,989 39 


13,241 


rt for 1924 




1,319 17 


4,651 


3,314 22 


8,424 


1,808 03 


7,246 


2,345 30 


5,559 


10,825 85 


21,912 


2,458 24 


8,096 


272 77 


329 


11,135 21 


18,378 


387 46 


2,295 


1,473 15 


3,688 


1,183 68 


5,921 


1,832 46 


8,345 


460 94 


3,246 


218 17 


2,135 


1,751 05 


8,549 


3,874 81 


9,091 


3,029 10 


6,687 


408 80 


5,066 


316 33 


2,897 


125 09 


893 


232 09 


876 


11,267 44 


18,280 


1,241 39 


10,888 


8,758 54 


18,538 


713 97 


3,948 


8,917 42 


18,225 


8,518 27 


12,251 


1,935 54 


2,782 


450 62 


1,133 


1,059 86 


6,653 


841 58 


5,122 


5,824 08 


11,800 


3,348 01 


8,245 


137 30 


1,204 


157 93 


2,035 


230 64 


2,283 


891 96 


3,337 


839 58 


5,754 


7,895 09 


18,724 


1,234 07 


10,280 


365 77 


3,148 


2,128 76 


3,444 


80 50 


1,114 



Circula- 
tion 



1,605 

19,144 

39,484 

77,378 

299,634 



23,396 

30,020 

3,576 

43,390 

10,255 

8,619 

34,002 

23,653 
28,750 
14,970 
18,783 
118,116 
28,293 

2,447 
83,422 

4,731 
18,634 
11,269 
28,453 

7,039 

1,798 
22,109 
31,465 

45,092 

6,893 

4,023 

232 



135,473 
25,059 
100,074 
26,586 
75,748 
75,005 
12,621 

8,098 
20,552 

8,666 
28,486 
27,737 

1,150 

3,820 



7,585 
16,88 
100,396 
49,708 

5,274 
24,684 

1,486 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 



$ c. 

51 99 
214 84 
157 55 
260 00 
260 00 



255 85 

260 00 

61 65 

260 00 

109 99 
179 84 
260 00 

168 50 
260 00 
249 89 
260 00 
260 00 
260 00 

39 80 
260 00 

95 49 
243 15 
154 40 
120 10 
117 44 

46 47 
171 43 
260 00 

260 00 
90 71 
41 86 
60 01 



260 00 
126 70 
260 00 
108 11 
260 00 
260 00 
231 75 
72 56 
165 35 
134 07 
260 00 
215 75 

29 93 
24 77 
32 35 

165 93 
122 79 
260 00 
151 93 
66 34 
260 00 

30 87 



Amount 

expended 

on Books 

in 1924 



$ c. 

67 50 

348- 69 

264 95 

2,403 48 

8,402 52 



435 60 

482 63 

109 48 

1,365 42 

145 52 
271 83 
459 08 



453 

1,107 
421 
619 

2,252 
657 S3 
132 00 

1,923 76 

99 38 

731 50 

262 07 

252 60 

63 31 

76 59 

354 95 

672 52 

778 27 

89 22 

121 36 

89 66 



2,746 57 
146 98 

1,424 24 
354 07 

1,514 07 

2,184 22 
847 11 
159 12 
228 01 
241 34 
346 
943 



12 
19 



68 60 
31 48 
36 23 

312 35 

183 22 
2,250 36 

273 57 
89 05 

576 55 
48 75 



250 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Concluded) 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 (Concluded) 



Library 



Sutton West 
Swansea. . . . 



Tara 

Tavistock 

Teeswater 

Thorold 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg 

Timmins 

Toronto — Beaches 

Boys and Girls. 

Church 

College 

Deer Park 

Dovercourt. . . . 

Earlscourt 

Eastern 

High Park 

Municipal 

Northern 

Queen & Lisgar 

Riverdale 

Western 

Wychwood .... 

Yorkville 

Trenton 



Uxbridge. 



Walkerton 

Walkerville 

Wallaceburg. . . . 

Waterford 

Waterloo 

Watford 

Welland 

Weston 

Whitby 

Windsor 

Windsor Branch 

Wingham 

Woodstock 

Wroxeter 



Totals 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



R.R. 



R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

No an 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 

R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 
R.R. 



R.R. 
R.R. 



Popula- 
tion 



891 
1,99C 

537 

1,080 

804 

5,303 

nual repo 

3,986 

12,000 

549,429 



5,900 

1,389 

2,350 
8,558 
4,149 
1,040 
6,596 
1,023 
8,962 
3,965 
3,300 
42.638 



2,421 

10,114 

317 



1,643,475 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



$ c. 
316 43 
767 51 

497 29 

1,693 99 

1,102 05 

2,344 H 

rt for 1924 

2,070 10 

2,751 99 

15,844 74 

22,910 75 

22,217 36 

101,676 52 

12,681 13 

23,670 18 

17,038 27 

11,807 77 

14,801 90 

2,362 38 

12,229 94 

11,323 17 

21,037 02 

14,188 76 

12,606 55 

11,660 55 

4,155 77 

714 19 

1,892 15 
9,287 05 
2,735 88 

646 42 
3,700 36 

796 17 
3,511 03 
2,907 22 
1,350 67 
23,001 08 
3,449 67 
1,306 56 
5,138 30 

281 99 



933,443 43 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



2,302 
1,080 

2,349 
5,791 
5,336 
7,861 

4,958 
727 
14,524 
12,215 
58,560 
191,659 
14,875 
22,704 
14.632 
11,240 
17,395 

2,007 
12,062 
19,327 
20,930 
16,988 
14,280 
17,883 

5,946 

7,229 

5,817 

12,851 
5,558 
2,062 

12,998 
4,926 
6,083 
6,212 
4,616 

37,665 
3,267 
7,978 

13,900 
6.304 



1,887,434 



Circula- 
tion 



8,345 
4,698 

3,637 
6,344 
8,111 
9,423 

25,687 

11,785 
157,485 
247,888 

90,123 
456,343 
109,023 
284,005 
214,175 
132,649 
180,306 
9,000 
118,475 
108,016 
274,325 
134,489 
111,660 
114,505 

45,904 

11,218 

14,427 
74,607 
31,563 

9,180 
27,603 
12,403 
33,833 
37,525 
17,098 
180,960 
47,005 
14,178 
59,525 

2,698 



8,500,973 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 



$ c 
104 78 
200 00 

118 25 

61 03 

100 74 

111 64 

260 00 
246 25 
244 16 

236 68 
260 00 
260 00 
238 50 
260 00 
242 28 

237 46 
252 28 
157 41 
223 86 
242 29 
260 00 
255 0C 

232 00 
244 70 
252 8£ 

86 61 

226 22 
260 0C 
260 0C 
100 42 
260 0C 
95 17 

233 08 
249 07 
206 94 
260 00 
200 0C 

259 58 

260 00 
74 32 



34,320 04 



Amount 

expended 

on Books 

in 1924 



70 
80 
46 



$ c. 
174 42 
618 15 

203 99 
135 50 
188 67 
313 02 

248 68 

962 98 
1,912 50 
3,202 
1,423 
10,601 
1,598 25 
2,532 95 
2,181 30 
1,991 15 
1,760 70 

255 00 
2,390 40 
1,509 90 
2,879 55 
1,951 80 
1,340 70 
1,431 60 

580 13 

144 05 



372 45 

1,776 59 

496 26 

219 51 

353 57 

147 51 

1,021 16 

977 67 

367 76 

4,414 63 

1,141 62 

426 35 

986 02 

108 65 



165,220 68 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



251 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 



Library 



Admaston 

Agincourt 

Allen ford 

Alliston 

Alma 

Alton 

Angus 

Arkona 

Assieinack 

Athens 

Atwood 

Auburn 

Badjeros 

Bala 

Bancroft 

Bath 

Bayfield 

Bayham 

Baysville 

Beachville 

Beechwood 

Belwood 

Birch Cliff 

Blenheim 

Bloomfield 

Blyth 

Bobcaygeon .... 

Bolton 

Bowmanville. . . . 

Bridgeburg 

Brigden 

Bronte 

Brooklin 

Brougham 

Brownsville 

Brown's Corners. 

Brucefield 

Burgessville 

Burlington 

Burnstown 

Caledon 

Cambray 

Camden, East. . . 

Canfield 

Cannington 

Capreol 

Carlisle 

Cargill 

Chalk River. . . . 

Chatsworth 

Cheapside 

Chesterville 

Claremont 

Clarksburg 

Clarkson 

Claude 

Cobourg 

Cochrane 

Colborne 

Coldstream 

Coldwater 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



R.R. 



R.R. 



No an 



No an 



R.R. 



R.R. 



Popula- 
tion 



R.R. 



No an 
Organ 



R.R 

Organ 



R.R 
No an 



R.R. 
No an 
Organ 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



200 

450 

542 

1,321 

250 

419 

420 

450 

nual repo 

750 

600 

250 

Rural 

300 

800 

350 

400 

nual repo 

168 

nual repo 

Rural 

182 

2,017 

1,650 

600 

670 

913 

650 

3,500 

2,600 

nual repo 

ized in 1 

Rural 

115 

250 

ized in 1 

200 

200 

2,600 

nual repo 

500 

300 

200 

700 

900 

nual repo 

ized in 1 

200 

400 

303 

500 

1,030 

320 

600 

200 

37 

5,200 

3,000 

1,000 

100 

600 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



$ c 

20 00 
372 00 
178 21 

2,225 25 

35 00 

128 70 

77 58 

185 07 

rt for 1924 

171 03 
83 49 

170 89 

21 90 
128 65 
372 01 
233 05 
175 16 

rt for 1924 

96 78 
rt for 1924 

172 85 
253 62 
312 91 
895 47 

132 65 
76 88 

374 55 
269 21 
754 39 
580 14 

rt for 1924 

925 

133 75 

87 22 
366 81 

925 

70 96 
177 37 
658 75 

rt for 1924 
119 20 
140 10 

97 17 
118 07 
236 91 

rt for 1924 

925 

244 59 
238 71 
153 56 

88 24 
371 79 
142 26 
439 26 

76 43 
425 29 
1,192 25 
188 67 
142 35 
125 94 
136 61 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



1,471 
2.510 
660 
1,289 
1,537 
5,321 
1,025 
2,952 

2,365 
1,360 
1,869 
812 
666 
1,319 
1,281 
1,213 

1,458 

1,865 
2,960 
1,301 
5,903 
1,401 
2,467 
3,898 
2,629 
5,959 
3,270 



3,460 

551 

1,826 

1,930 

1,244 
5,461 

3,370 

2,662 
2,225 
1,002 
2,450 



3,624 

302 

1,576 

2,741 

1,144 

3,062 

2,875 

672 

3,812 

5,736 

906 

2,254 

2,186 

2,961 



Circula- 
tion 



400 

7,019 

2,574 

11,719 



1,426 
1,221 
1,750 

3,548 
1,487 
1,502 
549 
756 
5,393 
3,796 
3,789 

2,866 

1,797 
1,803 
2,605 

15,426 
3,375 
1,623 
3,970 
5,700 

17,559 
7,837 



2,388 

822 

4,090 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 



$ c. 
25 00 

160 94 
55 83 

153 71 
50 00 
21 63 
20 13 

34 63 

38 63 
23 65 
50 34 

35 00 
20 07 
73 29 
50 68 
45 21 

25 58 

97 39 

52 73 

91 35 

165 07 

37 72 

16 00 

112 34 

61 25 

108 12 

63 32 



20 98 
22 90 
72 44 



1,851 


10 00 


1,663 


23 33 


28,509 


163 28 


1,236 


15 00 


932 


51 14 


2,386 


35 00 


2,553 


52 33 


4,236 


40 28 


3,343 


93 75 


1,475 


40 70 


3,700 


30 11 


1,054 


30 45 


3,513 


55 40 


2,488 


22 26 


6,460 


110 29 


1,173 


31 42 


342 


70 00 


12,591 


181 32 


2,840 


74 29 


773 


39 87 


2,115 


53 75 


7,049 


17 20 



Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1924 



$ 


c. 


262 


50 


104 


47 


260 09 



37 90 
22 98 
53 58 

119 39 

27 30 
66 05 



51 00 

225 16 

59 35 

73 41 

67 75 

124 55 
102 10 

227 77 

147 07 
86 85 
23 62 

148 30 
151 71 
282 59 
250 95 



33 75 

66 00 

141 37 



40 39 
363 02 



92 05 
63 06 
77 60 
92 76 



157 74 
60 31 
91 84 
59 81 

153 90 
41 00 

224 26 
49 94 



381 99 

155 62 

25 85 

68 38 

35 66 



252 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 (Continued) 



No. 


Library 


Read- 
ing 
Room 


Popula- 
tion 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circula- 
tion 


Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 


Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1924 


6? 


Comber 


R.R. 


600 

500 

Rural 

200 

3,500 

300 

575 

600 

400 

700 

150 

500 

400 

Rural 

760 

Rural 

3,500 

900 

200 

320 

Rural 

500 

500 

nual repo 

Rural 

3,800 

550 

929 

360 

450 

1,000 

225 

1,610 

1,500 

900 

nual repo 

Rural 

500 

nual repo 

250 

650 

200 

350 

250 

1,000 

nual repo 

800 

Rural 

200 

750 

nual repo 

5,405 

nual repo 

nual repo 

1,000 

620 

300 

334 

300 

100 

Rural 


$ c. 

290 73 

81 58 
254 58 

49 41 
1,044 42 

78 58 
250 97 

49 10 
173 31 

120 55 
135 46 
264 36 
142 04 

63 50 
295 10 
155 03 
902 51 
791 15 
113 74 
171 12 
154 14 
180 28 
242 31 
rt for 1924 
184 10 
1,144 97 
154 70 
277 59 
161 18 

121 22 
256 05 
107 56 

87 76 

315 25 

341 82 

rt for 1924 

74 75 

241 06 

rt for 1924 

153 91 

173 39 

115 85 

71 61 

131 32 
222 95 

rt for 1924 

220 00 

217 48 

95 98 

491 95 

rt for 1924 
104 28 

rt for 1924 

rt for 1924 
434 47 

132 27 
104 70 

17 70 

146 80 

67 30 

52 92 


2,643 

1,950 

700 

1,169 

3,917 

256 

593 

349 

1,488 

1,581 

1,993 

1,562 

3,235 

2,115 

2,036 

2,873 

7,045 

3,301 

678 

2,842 

1,853 

4,494 

1,253 

5,459 
4,013 
1,631 
5,374 
1,178 
1,320 
5,514 
2,427 
1,711 
4,447 
1,315 

1,148 
771 

3,219 
925 
1,782 
2,237 
1,392 
354 

1,916 
1,666 
2,243 
2,300 

831 

1,195 
1,922 

2,428 

656 

2,467 

1,027 

60 




$ c. 
83 51 
10 00 
101 75 
15 00 

195 56 
26 45 
45 99 
13 95 
43 34 
53 83 
36 89 
70 21 
41 44 

20 00 
64 48 
48 58 

200 00 

196 89 
10 00 

26 27 
34 99 

27 75 
55 38 

55 12 
93 01 

29 58 

72 12 
47 53 
25 42 
70 55 
15 00 

21 17 
63 22 
51 65 

15 00 

30 83 

20 00 

36 57 
23 71 
18 93 
43 98 
60 17 

38 27 

73 60 
10 00 

77 72 

15 00 

45 84 

23 38 
10 00 

5 00 

29 50 

24 89 

30 00 


$ c. 
113 97 


63 


Cookstown 


2,080 
2,957 
890 
12,930 
2,100 
2,334 


36 26 


64 


Copetown 




202 93 


6S 


Copleston 




21 16 


66 


Copper Cliff 




592 81 


67 


Craighurst 




50 03 


68 


Creemore 




99 20 


69 


Delaware 




15 95 


70 


Delta 




2,896 

2,582 

655 

2,303 

2,894 

543 

4,298 

3,706 

23,844 

13,074 

1,443 

4,415 

2,726 

4,510 

2,700 

1,308 
5,250 
2,168 
9,960 
2,314 
1,910 
6,620 
3,439 
1,344 
4,530 
4,573 

1,436 
2,145 

893 
1,065 
1,213 
1,088 
1,413 
1,359 

2,928 
2,241 
1,079 
5,262 

1,042 

4,185 
1,876 

975 
1,092 
2,992 
1,165 

367 


88 99 


71 


Depot Harbour. . . . 




111 87 


7? 


Don 




62 26 


73 


Dorchester 




168 49 


74 


Drumbo 




93 79 


7S 


Duart. . 






76 


Dundalk 




186 73 


77 


Dungannon 




91 03 


78 


Dunnville 




543 41 


79 


Dutton 


R.R. 


398 63 


80 


East Linton 


76 96 


81 


Elmvale 




49 05 


8? 


Elmwood 




96 44 


83 


Embro 


R.R. 


40 80 


84 


Emo 


98 74 


85 


Emsdale 


No an 




86 


Ennotville 


101 00 


87 


Espanola 




302 84 


88 


Ethel 


R.R. 
R.R. 


27 85 


89 
90 


Fenelon Falls 

Fenwick 


98 14 
108 40 


91 


Flesherton .... 




44 38 


97 


Fonthill 


R.R. 


70 44 


93 


Fordwich 


28 05 


94 


Forester's Falls. . . . 




46 12 


95 


Fort Erie 




157 90 


96 
97 


Frankford 

Fullarton .... 


R.R. 

No an 


46 80 


98 


Glamis 


35 00 


99 


Glan worth 




40 87 


100 
101 


Glen Allen 


No an 




102 




R.R. 




103 


Gore's Landing. . . . 


37 95 


104 


Gorrie 




36 62 


105 


Grafton . . . 




112 07 


106 


Granton . . 




171 85 


107 

108 


Haileybury 

Haliburton 


No an 


122 24 


109 


Harrietsville 




151 04 


110 


Harrington 




50 15 


111 


Harrow 


R.R. 
No an 


89 85 


11? 


Hastings 




113 






114 
115 
116 


Hawkesville 

Hepworth 

Highgate 


No an 
No an 


93 35 


117 
118 


Highland Creek. . . 
Hillsdale 




38 06 
59 26 


119 


Hillview 




2 70 


1?0 


Holstein 




34 70 


121 


Honey wood 




38 40 


122 


Humber Bay 




12 50 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



253 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 (Continued) 



No. 


Library 


Read- 
ing 
Room 


Popula- 
tion 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circula- 
tion 


Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 


Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1924 


123 
1?4 


Huntsville 

Ilderton 


R.R. 

Organ 


2,460 

ized in 1 

400 

500 

350 

900 

2,000 

1,800 

550 

500 

Rural 

350 

400 

ized in 1 

400 

270 

300 

200 

300 

250 

Rural 

ized in 1 

301 

380 

nual repo 

Rural 

nual repo 

250 

650 

ized in 1 

230 

1,056 

200 

250 

250 

nual repo 

1,000 

nual repo 

435 

1,000 

376 

100 

900 

2,700 

210 

nual repo 

nual repo 

500 

Rural 

300 

300 

57 

nual repo 

120 

350 

1,416 

250 

500 

475 

200 

200 


$ c. 
392 45 
925 

106 60 

10 38 
72 35 

246 86 

1,012 09 

266 85 

107 37 
227 94 
107 80 

2 50 
146 25 
925 

129 55 
167 06 
193 29 
146 79 
123 37 

11 79 
179 56 

925 

34 88 
69 06 

rt for 1924 
119 34 

rt for 1924 
103 30 
334 68 

925 

133 69 
296 04 
212 36 
337 66 

rt for 1924 

491 77 

rt for 1924 

155 49 

564 56 

170 25 

100 00 

275 60 

892 19 

112 02 

rt for 1924 

rt for 1924 

290 79 

2 00 

63 01 

77 31 

9 12 

rt for 1924 

77 99 

79 69 

394 24 

46 56 

300 96 

151 13 

229 88 

48 93 


4,578 

1,754 

280 

1,731 

2,243 

1,622 

3,487 

200 

4,084 

1,931 

406 

1,568 

1,852 

2,161 

128 

775 

1,663 

2,146 

480 

204 
1,115 

104 

907 
2,017 

1,263 
3,303 
1,818 
5,614 
1,902 

2,896 

1,233 
1,172 
1,267 
714 
854 
6,640 
1,382 

1,316 

931 

2,198 

1,564 

968 

1,553 
497 
3,667 
1,580 
1,950 
1,209 
814 
2.621 


3,843 

1,473 

1,480 

609 

4,025 

9,109 

7,182 

447 

3,012 

768 

500 

874 

4,775 
1,647 


S c. 

77 68 

39 68 
15 00 
15 00 
56 96 
200 00 
79 84 
39 89 
48 50 

34 73 

35 00 
35 30 

15 00 

44 70 

118 72 

18 77 
23 72 
10 00 
76 30 

12 17 

19 26 

47 92 

25 17 
58 26 

38 25 
46 91 
70 88 
90 54 
50 00 

97 67 

21 67 
126 74 

27 36 
10 00 

28 70 
157 52 

26 12 

85 45 
5 00 

10 00 

11 08 

10 00 

23 37 

11 16 
99 13 
10 00 

86 65 
33 88 

24 69 
10 00 


$ c. 
84 10 


1?5 


Inglewood 


67 45 


1?6 


Inkerman . . 






1?7 


Inwood 






178 


Iroquois 




117 16 


179 


Iroquois Falls 




653 80 


130 


Islington 




131 80 


131 


Ivanhoe 




90 02 


132 


Jarvis 




79 69 


133 


Kars 




62 65 


134 


Kearney . . 






135 


Kemble 




46 90 


136 
137 


Kimberley 

Kinmount 


Organ 


22 10 


138 


Kintore 




87 84 


139 


Kirkfield 




150 94 


140 


Kirkton 




1,548 

2,129 

473 

879 

245 
1,665 


32 05 


141 


Komoka 




60 62 


14? 


Lake Charles 






143 


Lakeside 




174 81 


144 


Lakeview 


Organ 




145 


Lambeth 


15 00 


146 


Lefroy 




41 77 


147 


Lin wood 


No an 




148 


Londesboro' 


110 89 


149 
150 


Long Branch 

Lome Park 


No an 


983 
3,699 

1,761 
6,026 
1,692 
3,343 


73 67 


151 


Lucan 




91 66 


15? 


Luton 


Organ 
R.R. 




1S3 


Lyn 


9 20 


154 


Madoc 


44 31 


155 


Mandamin 




110 13 


156 


Manilla 




143 87 


157 


Manotick. . 






1S8 


Maple 


No an 


5,193 

1,564 
6,150 
1,877 
4,267 
2,510 
12,982 
1,358 

2,442 
1,480 
1,098 
1,435 
881 

1,508 
1,600 
3,256 
1,398 
4,036 
2,000 
3,062 
476 




159 


Markham 


269 71 


160 
161 


Markstay 

Marksville 


No an 


58 68 


162 


Marmora 




276 58 


163 


Martintown 




80 20 


164 


Matilda 




37 10 


165 


Maxville 




50 98 


166 


Meaford 


R.R. 


263 24 


167 


Melbourne 


44 02 


168 


Metcalfe 


No an 
No an 




169 


Mildmay 




170 


Millbank 


148 27 


171 


Millgrove. . 






17? 


Minden .... 






173 


Monkton . . . 






174 


Mono Centre . 






175 
176 


Mono Mills 

Mono Road 


No an 


33 25 


177 


Moorefield 




20 75 


178 
179 


Morrisburg 

Morriston 


R.R. 


67 51 


180 
181 
18? 


Mount Albert 

Mount Brydges. . . 
Mount Hope 


R.R. 
R.R. 


142 13 

6 31 

61 16 


183 


Nanticoke 







254 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 .(Continued) 



Library 



Read- 
ing 
Room 



Popula- 
tion 



Total 


Volumes 


Expendi- 


in 


ture 


Library 


$ c. 




1,102 82 


9,158 


63 42 


738 


166 97 


2,412 


47 32 


1,302 


157 45 


1,403 


78 76 


1,119 


57 10 


664 


480 60 


10,050 


62 86 


1,610 


rt for 1924 




162 16 


2,558 


75 00 


2,155 


206 57 


1,903 


rt for 1924 




925 




50 00 


1,359 


41 56 


830 


71 59 


268 


67 09 


749 


187 05 


2,108 


110 34 


2,044 


186 33 


2,927 


99 12 


2,011 


rt for 1924 




485 87 


3,911 


rt for 1924 




925 




340 16 


2,647 


264 63 


1,624 


265 64 


2,231 


125 05 


2,486 


rt for 1924 




925 




144 83 


369 


299 13 


4,897 


125 20 


2,580 


22 75 


1,564 


187 37 


1,062 


124 15 


4,494 


189 77 


729 


320 10 


3,558 


430 39 


5,819 


82 20 


2,612 


1,425 02 


1,638 


168 07 


5,635 


16 00 


246 


241 87 


2,197 


126 08 


1,391 


160 66 


2,312 


189 25 


1,566 


34 40 


1,371 


154 40 


1,450 


47 43 


667 


223 08 


784 


rt for 1924 




338 87 


4,127 


5 15 


801 


36 25 


1,161 


184 58 


268 


61 25 


1,160 


59 93 


1,763 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 



Amount 

expended 

on Books 

in 1924 



Napanee. . 
Napier. . . . 
Newburgh . 
Newbury, 



R.R. 



New Dundee 

Newington 

New Lowell 

Niagara 

Norland 

North Cobalt 

North Gower. . . . 

Odessa 

Omemee 

Orono 

Osgoode 

Oxford Mills 

Pakenham 

Palermo 

Park Head 

Pickering 

Pinkerton 

Plattsville 

Plympton 

Point Edward 

Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Lambton . . . 

Port Stanley 

Powassan 

Princeton 

Queensville 

Rainy River 

Rebecca 

Richard's Landing 

Ridgetown 

Ripley 

Riversdale 

Rodney 

Romney 

Rossdale 

Runnymede 

St. George 

St. Helen's 

Sandwich 

Scarborough 

Scarborough Bluffs 

Scotland 

Shakespeare .... 

Shedden 

Shetland 

Singhampton .... 

Smithville 

Solina 

Sombra 

Sonya 

Southampton . . . 

Southcote 

South Mountain. 
South Woodslee. 

Sparta 

Speedside 



R.R. 



R.R. 



No an 



R.R. 
R.R. 

No an 
Organ 



R.R. 



No an 



No an 
Organ 



No an 
Organ 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



R.R. 



No an 



3,000 

200 

432 

300 

385 

310 

Rural 

1,577 

376 

nual repo 

350 

700 

600 

nual repo 

ized in 1 

300 

1,400 

100 

250 

600 

Rural 

600 

310 

nual repo 

1,250 

nual repo 

ized in 1 

973 

700 

400 

300 

nual repo 

ized in 1 

100 

1,951 

800 

400 

706 

340 

ral 

3,800 

600 

Rural 

7,035 

2,000 

1,000 

400 

250 

400 

350 

100 

500 

Rural 

220 

nual repo 

1,535 

Rural 

225 

250 

250 

250 



Rui 



15,700 
435 
2,003 
2,155 
3,897 
1,562 



17,139 
2,690 

1,816 

' 1,752 

660 



766 
1,141 
3,192 
1,248 
2,759 
1,889 

8,223 



4,987 
3,843 
2,270 
3,335 



844 
7,783 
2,640 
1,701 



1,834 
1,642 
5,042 
2,628 
1,450 
22,106 
2,350 

187 
1,234 
1,308 
1,532 
3,395 

340 
3,661 

344 
1,294 

7,243 
361 

1,350 
738 
406 
611 



$ c. 

148 37 

28 48 

40 93 

10 00 

57 71 

19 73 

20 00 
136 25 

14 71 

19 13 

15 00 

57 46 



20 00 
25 00 
30 67 
10 43 
38 30 
14 66 
53 79 
35 63 

65 68 



78 89 
84 70 
60 16 
31 58 



59 02 

77 25 

40 43 

10 00 

24 07 

48 90 
69 86 
51 64 

49 89 
20 51 

180 66 

58 21 

55 00 

39 85 

15 00 

20 95 

63 02 

20 43 

22 96 

26 71 
90-65 

57 44 

10 00 

10 00 

42 66 

25 00 
15 09 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



255 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES (Continued) 
Showing Statistics, 1924, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1925 (Continued) 



No. 


Library 


Read- 
ing 
Room 


Popula- 
tion 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circula- 
tion 


Legisla- 
tive Grant 
paid in 
1925 


Amount 
expended 
on Books 

in 1924 


245 
746 


Sprucedale 

Stevensville 


Reorg 


anized in 

350 

200 

126 

ized in 1 

675 

500 

805 

575 

1,800 

anized in 

250 

350 

300 

400 

600 

398 

1,400 

375 

nual repo 

1,646 

Rural 

Rural 

1,600 

400 

Rural 

219 

600 

nual repo 

600 

ized in 1 

150 

890 

nual repo 

ized in 1 

1,853 

300 

1,072 

anized, 1 

448 

380 

nual repo 

630 

1,500 


$ c. 

1925 

417 52 
505 55 
137 12 
925 

236 11 
165 31 
327 52 
173 39 
47 63 

1925 

382 87 

162 48 

108 63 

23 10 

59 29 

60 57 
363 16 

180 38 
rt for 1924 

372 07 

181 25 
159 02 
157 82 

67 59 

53 39 

223 20 

137 25 

rt for 1924 

196 73 

925 

37 11 
260 04 
rt for 1924 
925 

470 03 
36 98 
251 82 
925 

145 45 

298 28 

rt for 1924 

89 41 

147 55 


1,139 

1,777 
307 

2,007 
3,196 
2,762 
101 
1,897 

1,471 
698 
1,599 
295 
2,674 
1,284 
2,737 
1,146 

1,840 
509 
4,069 
1,714 
440 
1,516 
2,509 
1,875 

2,872 

2,210 
1,550 

3,966 

2,551 
2,200 

2,660 
990 

1,700 
531 


1,716 
865 
724 

3,429 
4,250 
2,471 


$ c. 

42 33 
22 23 

40 20 

36 18 
33 87 

83 45 

60 13 
15 00 

77 31 
51 96 

15 00 
10 00 
10 00 
12 03 
75 94 
53 05 

84 85 
53 80 
25 95 
66 87 

16 82 
10 00 
57 52 
15 00 

30 10 

10 00 

61 41 

' 118 57 

17 01 

41 99 

50 00 
119 77 

17 34 
17 17 


$ c. 

63 77 


747 


Strathcona 




45 00 


248 


Stratton 




83 84 


249 
250 

751 


Sunderland 

Sydenham 

Thamesford 


Organ 
R.R. 


41 48 
49 93 


252 
753 


Thamesville 

Thedf ord 


R.R. 


56 25 

125 73 


754 


Thessalon 




2,050 


10 35 


255 
756 


Thornbury 

Thorndale 


Reorg 


196 55 


257 


Thornhill 




856 
2,251 

458 
1,905 
1,007 
9,906 
1,444 

2,020 
1,670 
1,019 
2,057 
1,157 
1,874 
2,266 
919 

1,655 

139 
3,028 

4,456 

748 
4,488 

1,764 
1,520 

1,783 
843 


95 43 


758 


Tiverton 




53 69 


759 


Tobermorv 




4 05 


760 


Tottenham 




1 43 


761 


Trout Creek 




22 72 


767 


Tweed 




137 31 


263 
264 

765 


Underwood 

Unionville 

Vankleek Hill 


R.R. 
No an 


107 79 
156 57 


766 


Varna 




121 04 


267 


Victoria 




94 07 


768 


Victoria Mines. . . . 




76 89 


769 


Victoria Road 




26 84 


770 


Walton 




31 46 


771 


Wardsville 




138 53 


m 


Warkworth 




35 75 


273 

774 


Waterdown 

Wellesley 


No an 


69 57 


275 
776 


Wesley ville 

Westf ord 


Organ 


29 50 


777 


West Lome 




130 02 


278 
279 
780 


White Lake 

Whitevale 

Wiarton 


No an 
Organ 
R.R. 


142 58 


781 


Williamstown 


32 78 


282 
283 
784 


Winchester 

Woodbridge 

Wood ville 

Worthington 

Wyoming 

Zephyr 


R.R. 

Reorg 
R.R. 
R.R. 
No an 


117 83 


285 
286 

787 


158 53 

32 33 


?88 


Zurich 




29 80 




Totals 










166,498 


53,911 14 


501,289 


735,168 


11,781 83 


21,535 27 











Twenty new libraries were added during 1925. 

Five were added during 1925 to the list of Free Public Libraries: Dryden, Ottawa East 
Branch, and Ottawa Boys and Girls; Hamilton Locke Street Branch; and Boys and Girls Branch, 
Toronto. 

Fifteen Association Libraries were organized during the year. These are: Bronte, Brown's 
Corners, Carlisle, Ilderton, Kimberley, Lakeview, Luton, Osgoode, Port Lambton, Rebecca, 
Sprucedale, Sunderland, Wesleyville, Whitevale and Woodbridge. 

Sprucedale, Sunderland and Woodbridge were formerly closed Association Libraries. 



256 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPEN 
FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Algoma 



Brant and North Norfolk (in part) 

Bruce, East 

Bruce, West 

Cochrane 

Dundas 

Elgin, East 

Elgin, West 

Grey, East 

Grey, South 

Haliburton and East Muskoka. . . . 



Halton and Wentworth (in part) 
Hastings, Centre 



Huron, East. 
Huron, West 



Kenora, etc 

Kent, East. 
Kent, West 



1 

3 

2 

4 

1 

1 

5 

19 

11 

U. 3 

14 
3 
6 
2 
1 

4 

3 

10 

U.12 
3 

U. 4 

2 

1 
10 

3 
13 

9 

10 

13 

2&5 

10 

1 

2 
11 

7 

15 

U. 8 

7 

5 
U.16 

6 



Hilton Beach 

Korah 

Laird and Tarbutt 

Laird and McD 

McDonald 

Tarbutt 

Brantford 

Town send 

Windham 

Amabel 

Mildmay 

Huron 

Greenock 

Kincardine 

Kendry 

O'Brien 

Matheson 

Winchester 

Southwold 

Aldborough 

Artemesia 

Euphrasia 

Euphrasia 

Neustadt 

Brunei 

Glamorgan Consolidated 

McLean 

Minden 

Guilford Consolidated. . . 

Stanhope 

Trafalgar 

West Flamboro' 

West Flamboro' 

Hungerford 

Huntingdon 

Huntingdon 

Hungerford 

Rawdon 

Grey. 



Ho wick 

Howick 

Ashfield 

Hay 

Stephen 

Stephen 

Usborne 

West Wawanosh 

Bayfield 

Ignace 

Sioux Lookout. . 

Chatham 

Romney 



Hilton Beach 

Sault Ste.Marie,R.R. 

MacLennan 

Bar River 

Echo Bay 

MacLennan 

Mount Pleasant 

Waterford, R.R. 1. . . 

Vanessa, R.R. 2 

Allenford 

Mildmay 

Lucknow, R.R. 3. . . . 

Chepstow , 

Armow 

Smooth Rock Falls.. 

Kapuskasing 

Matheson 

Winchester, R.R. 1. 

Southwold 

Wardsville 

Priceville 

Kiinberley 

Heathcote 

Neustadt 

Newholm 

Gooderham 

Baysville 

Carnarvon 

West Guilford 

Boskung 

Bronte 

Dundas, R.R. 4 

Puslinch, R.R. 3.. . . 

Bogart 

Moira 

Crookston 

Thomasburg 

Springbrook 

Ethel 

Gorrie 

Clifford, R.R. 1.... 

Dungannon 

Zurich 

Crediton 

Dashwood 

Woodham, R.R. 1. . 

Lucknow 

Bayfield 

Ignace 

Sioux Lookout 

Tupperville 

Coatsworth 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



257 



DIX M 
1924-25 



Teachers 






Pupils 


Grade of 
Class 


Name of Principal, and 
Degree, if any 


e « 

.2 rt 
in us 

It 

o,rj 


ON 

lb 

a § 


en 

'3, 

3 
Oh 

*o 

6 


>, 

Q y 

** c 

a) rt 

<< 


A 


B 


C 


1 R. A: Davey 


IT 


$ 

1,000 
1,500 
1,200 
1,400 
1,300 
1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,100 
1,200 
1,150 
1,175 
1,000 
1,000 
1,900 
1,500 
1,400 
1,000 
1,100 
1,500 
1,200 
1,100 
1,100 
1,400 
800 
900 
1,000 
900 
900 
750 
1,500 
1,400 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,200 
1,400 
1,100 
1,375 
1,650 
1,000 
1,200 
1,400 
1,350 
1,400 
1,500 
1,025 
1,200 
1,300 
2,100 
1,100 
1,175 


7 
7 
4 
3 

13 
6 
5 
4 
2 
16 
4 
2 
5 
4 
7 
7 
8 
3 
3 
13 
14 
8 
3 
4 
4 
7 
4 
3 
8 
3 

10 

10 

12 

10 

8 

3 

7 

3 

4 

3 

4 

12 

19 

14 

8 

11 

8 

7 

6 

25 

6 

4 


4 

5 
2 
2 

11 
4 
5 
3 
2 

13 
3 
2 
4 
3 
4 
6 
7 
3 
2 

11 

10 
7 
2 
4 
3 
5 
3 
2 
6 
3 
8 
7 
9 
6 
5 
2 
5 
2 
4 
3 
3 
9 

17 

11 
6 
8 
6 
6 
4 

17 
3 
4 




1 
1 
1 




2 Harry Robbins 

3 George Cornell 

4 Robt. J. Wiggins 

5 James Perdue 

6 Annie Donovan . 


i 




1 


i 


7 Helen MacLachlan.. 


1 
. ... 






8 W. Frank Young 

9 Mrs. Revah E. Hill.. . . 
10 Maude Colwell 


1 
1 




11 Hamilton Ballagh 

12 C. G. McNay. . 


1 


. . 


13 Elizabeth T.'Clifford. 






1 


14 Gladys M. McCosh. .. 

15 Mildred V. Roberts. . . 

16 Catherine Allison 

17 Herbert C. Sweetnam.. 

18 James H. Watson 

19 Florence B. Harvev. . . 

20 Allastair McColl. 

21 Laura J. McFarlane. . . 

22 Catherine G. Peters. . . 

23 Delia Agnew 

24 H. M. Ermel 






1 


... 

1 

1 

.... 

.... 

... 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

.... 


1 

.... 

1 
1 
1 
1 
. ... 

1 
.... 

i 

i 

.... 

i 

r 

i 




25 Elizabeth Larson 

26 Mary Border 

27 Henry Henderson 

28 Mabel Collins 

29 Wilma Dyer 




30 Gordon Ball 




31 Margaret E. Currie. . . 

32 Verna J. McLaughlin.. 

33 Jessie Currie 




34 Elizabeth McGrath 

35 Mary McWilliams 

36 Vera Clute - 




37 Frank Weekes 

38 Gladys Danford 

39 Wilfred C. Bisbee 

40 Gordon Jefferson 

41 Earla M. Longman. . . . 

42 Frederick Ross 

43 Melville Milliken 

44 Merton Morley 

45 Peter B. Moffatt 

46 Lila McCulloch 

47 Elizabeth Murdie 

48 P. J. Bigelow 




49 Clarence J. Gillespie.. . 

50 Harry O. Gudgin 

51 Velma Gregory 

52 Addie Proctor 


1 




i 





3 +* 
rt <u <u 
> | E 

2 a 3 

oacr 



.8 c 

JO 



$ c. 

115 60 

49 40 

230 14 
155 70 
252 24 

67 70 

73 40 

94 86 

216 75 

298 05 

566 80 

62 50 
186 37 
141 42 
411 70 
332 62 

153 85 
498 09 
300 47 
461 80 
201 53 
275 25 
160 20 
210 42 

86 65 
123 97 

90 50 

91 00 
159 06 

53 00 
232 94 
388 82 
222 92 
201 18 
129 45 
189 94 
210 27 
146 38 
240 31 
240 H. 

63 71 

231 00 

307 00 
467 00 
442 00 

308 00 
259 00 
500 00 
505 00 
382 00 
349 54 

154 78 



$ c. 
222 82 
139 88 
176 02 

141 14 
180 44 
123 54 

142 34 

74 49 
86 68 

127 63 

144 75 

61 25 

66 22 

69 14 

194 70 

337 52 

310 78 

149 31 
118 75 

150 75 
110 15 

92 53 

80 52 

121 04 

127 34 

75 40 
163 10 

64 10 
80 71 

60 30 
131 42 

123 91 
112 29 

155 12 
147 95 

128 29 

156 05 

124 64 
89 03 
89 02 

61 37 
133 10 
141 70 
155 40 
170 30 
165 20 
135 90 
138 20 
211 00 
393 60 

85 45 
80 48 



258 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Lambton, East. 



Lambton, West. 
Lanark, West. . . 



53 

54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 

60 

61 
62 

63 

64 
65 
66 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 1 67 

68 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 3 69 

Lincoln 70 

Manitoulin, etc 71 

Middlesex, East 72 

73 
74 

Muskoka, South and West 75 

76 
77 

Nipissing, etc 78 

79 

8C 

Northumberland and Durham, No. 1.81 

82 

83 

Northumberland and Durham, No. 3.84 

Ontario, North 85 

86 
87 

Oxford, North 88 

89 
90 

Oxford, South 91 

Parry Sound, South 92 

93 

94 

95 

Parry Sound, East, etc 96 

Ml 97 

m 98 

Perth, North 99 

100 

Peterborough, East 101 

102 
103 

Prescott and Russell 104 

105 
106 
107 
108 
109 



U. 7 Brooke. . . . 

19 Dawn 

23 Enniskillen 
1 Euphrasia. 



11 



15 

U. 7 
11 

1&5 



Euphrasia 

Warwick 

Warwick 

Courtright 

Moore 

7 Sombra 

12 Bathurst 

U.ll Drummond 

Drummond 

Elmsley, North 

Bastard 

Newboro 

Oxford 

10 South Grimsby 

1 Rutherford . . . 

7 Biddulph 

14 & 9 N. and S. Dorchester. . . 

22 Westminster 

Bala 

8 Monck 

Stephenson 

McConkey 

Nipissing 

Mattawa 

Darlington 

Darlington 

Darlington 

16 & 18 Murray and Brighton. . 
U. 4 Brock 

5 Scott 

7 Uxbridge 

U.8 &4Blandfordand Blenheim 
4 Zcrra, West 

6 Zorra, East 

6 Dereham 

1 Chapman and Croft 



9 

. 1 

1 

11 
16 
20 



7 Humphrey. 

1 McKellar 

Nobel Consolidated. 

4 Himsworth, North.. 

Kearney 

Sundridge 

10 Elma 

U. 6 Logan 

3 Dummer 

2 Otonabee 

4 Otonabee 

2 Cumberland 

4 Cumberland 

5 Cumberland 

U.10 Plantagenet, North. 

1 Plantagenet, South. 
L'Orignal 



Alvinston, R.R. 4. 
Dresden, R.R. 3.. 
Petrolea, R.R. 3.. 
Florence, R.R. 2.. 
In wood, R.R. 1 . . 
Watford, R.R. 8.. 
Watford, R.R. 5.. 

Courtright 

Brigden 

Sombra 

Fallbrcok 

Balderson 

Lanark, R.R. 1... 

Perth, R.R. 5 

Delta. 

Newboro 

Burritt's Rapids. . 
Smithville, R.R. 1 

Killarney 

Granton 

Belmont, R.R. 1.1 

Manor Park 

Bala 

Milford Bay 

Port Sydney 

Loring 

Nipissing , 

Mattawa 

Hampton 

Enniskillen 

Hampton 

Wooler 

Manilla 

Zephyr 

Gocdwood 

Bright 

Harrington, West., 

Hickson , 

Mt. Elgin, R.R. 2. 

Magnetawan 

Rosseau 

McKellar 

Nobel 

Callander 

Kearney 

Sundridge 

Atwood 

Monkton 

Warsaw 

Lang 

Keene 

Vars , 

Leonard, R.R. 1... 

Cumberland 

Pendleton , 

Riceville 

L'Orignal 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



259 



1924-25 (Continued) 



Teachers 



Name of Principal and 
Degree if any 







Pupils 


Grade of 
Class 








>> 






















_ 


lO 




'5 












a, 

3 


Cg jh 








.9 «j 

en <x3 


T- 1 

"3 £ 


CU 


A 


B 


C 


o C 




6 


£S 








DhU 


<w 


£ 


<< 









■—i ti G 

rt 5 £ 
>>B 

5 a 3 

oao* 



Hs c 

JO 



53 Lorenda Field 

54 Hazel Feargue 

55 Eulalie Mackey 

56 Margaret E. Campbell. 

57 Helen D. Johnston. . . . 

58 Melvin Lucas 

59 Dorothy Wordsworth. . 

60 Clifford J. Nixon 

61 Wm. E. Jarrott 

62 Edna Hurley 

63 Annie E. Wallace 

64 Bessie McLennan 

65 H. H. Loucks 

66 Wilhelmine James 

67 Olive R. Russell 

68 B. Frank Bolton 

69 Catherine G. Sled 

70 Mrs. Ethel Aikenhead. 

71 E. J. Orendorff 

72 Elsie Ferguson 

73 Kathleen Robb 

74 Francis Tanton, B.A.. . 

75 Ralph Shaw 

76 Ernestine M. Sellers. . . 

77 Margaret Maclnnes. . . 

78 J. Ross Lawrence 

79 Robt. A. Kennedy 

80 Gladys Dan ford 

81 F.J. Groat 

82 Laura Andrew 

83 R. J. McKessock 

84 Mary G. Teal 

85 Mrs. Wm. Townshend. 

86 Julius Rynard 

87 J. Kidd 

88 Geo. A. Smith. 

89 Jean McLeish 

90 Percy McCorquodale. . 

91 KarlS. Koyle 

92 Godfrey Grunig. . 

93 C. E. Stuart 

94 Clarissa M. Harrett. . . 

95 G. L. Ketcheson 

96 Roy W. Warnica 

97 Jos. R. Teasdale 

98 Lome Skuce 

99 Thos. G. Ratcliffe 

100 John H. Geoghegan. . 

101 Alex. B. Currie 

102 Jennie E. Barrie 

103 Blanch Ellis 

104 Carmaletta M. Darling 

105 Sarah A. Durant 

106 Donald A. Baldwin.. . . 

107 Grace E. Surch 

108 Reita Kelso 

109 Sr. Louis Alphonse. . . . 



$ 

1,000 

1,000 

900 
1,175 
1,100 
1,100 
1,000 
1,300 
1,300 
1,075 
1,000 
1,100 
1,100 

950 
1,250 
1,200 
1,100 
1,300 
1,500 
1,200 
1,100 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 
1,050 
1,300 
1,200 
1,300 
1,100 
1,025 
1,100 
1,200 
1,500 
1,350 
1,200 
1,075 
1,050 
1,200 
1,400 
1,700 
2,000 
1,100 
1,700 
1,700 
1,500 
1,575 
1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
1,100 
1,100 
1,200 
1,050 
1,200 
1,100 
.1,100 
1,000 



2 

2 

4 

6 

4 

2 

3 

7 

14 

3 

3 

4 

5 

3 

15 

7 

4 

10 

9 

17 

4 

20 

12 

3 

3 

5 

5 

3 

5 

4 

5 

11 

9 

7 

7 

4 

12 

4 

10 

14 

14 

19 

8 

11 

23 

27 

3 

6 

7 

15 

22 

8 

4 

12 

9 

5 

6 



2 
2 
3 
4 
2 
2 
2 
5 

12 
2 
2 
2 
5 
3 

10 
6 
3 
9 
8 

15 
3 

17 

11 
2 
3 
4 
5 
2 
4 
2 
4 
9 
9 
6 
6 
3 
8 
3 
9 

n 
n 
1.5 



$ 


c. 


87 


98 


40 


00 


60 


00 


204 


15 


142 


68 


93 


00 


41 


00 


216 


54 


502 


13 


96 


75 


73 


69 


69 


77 


71 


75 


73 


59 


151 


45 


226 


90 


305 


07 


238 


44 


171 


00 


383 


15 


206 


94 


250 


06 


186 


26 


106 


81 


112 


70 


162 


67 


367 


32 


202 


28 


213 


70 


189 


00 


115 


55 


361 


55 


353 


31 


311 


43 


164 


35 


265 


71 


139 


13 


157 


04 


284 


38 


550 


72 


230 


21 


364 


34 


238 


93 


293 


00 


336 


00 


289 


00 


209 


97 


247 44 


90 


00 


87 


00 


98 


00 


217 


23 


320 00 


263 


04 


235 


00 


206 


12 


354 


34 



$ c 

63 80 
59 00 

61 00 

75 42 
69 27 

64 30 

84 10 
121 65 
103 92 

74 68 
72 37 

76 98 

62 18 
62 36 

150 15 
162 27 

95 50 
103 84 
304 20 
145 57 

85 69 
160 00 
237 24 

151 36 
132 54 
162 54 
203 46 
250 26 

86 37 
81 70 
66 56 

144 14 

142 29 

89 24 

81 44 

93 87 

78 91 

80 70 

138 44 

210 74 

266 04 
285 18 
177 78 
278 60 

267 20 
275 80 

86 00 
89 74 
74 00 

118 70 

119 80 
131 72 

97 00 
136 30 
113 50 

85 61 
175 43 



260 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



FIFTH CLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Rainv River 110 

111 
112 
113 
114 

Renfrew, North .115 

116 

Simcoe, East 117 

118 
119 
120 

Simcoe, South 121 

122 
123 

Sudbury (in part) 124 

125 

Sudbury (in part) and Algoma (in 

part), etc 126 

127 
128 
129 

Timiskaming, South 130 

131 
132 
133 
134 

Victoria, West 135 

136 
137 
138 

Waterloo, North 139 

Waterloo, South 140 

Welland, North 141 

Wellington, South 142 

143 

Wentworth 144 

145 
146 
147 

York, No. 1 148 

149 
150 

York, No. 2 151 

152 
153 

York, No. 4 154 

R.C. Separate Schools: — 

Inspector Beneteau 155 

156 
157 

Inspector Bennett 158 

159 

Inspector Finn 160 

161 
162 



Burriss Consolidated. . . . 

Morley Consolidated. . . . 

Mine Centre 

Barwick Consolidated. . . 

3 Devlin and Burriss 

3 Buchanan 

6 Ross 

Port McNicoll 

Victoria Harbour 

12 Orillia 

12 Tay 

10 Innisfil 

3 Sunnidale 

4 Sunnidale 

2 Denison and Drury 

Webbwood 

1 Creighton and Snyder. . . 

2 Neelon 

1 Nicholson 

1 Wickstead 

Charlton Consolidated. . 
Englehart 

1 James 

Latchford 

Savard Consolidated. . . . 

U. 1 Bexley 

8 Eldon 

12 Mariposa 

7 Ops 

16 Wellesley 

Hespeler 

4 Thorold 

6 Erin 

4 Nichol 

5 Ancaster 

3 Binbrook 

2 East Flamboro 

7 Beverly 

9 Georgina 

4 Whitchurch 

23 King 

11 Etobicoke 

New Toronto 

Woodbridge 

22 York 

Belle River 

Sandwich 

1 Tilbury, North 

2 Hagar 

1 Morley 

5 Finch 

5 Bagot 

16 Cornwall 



Burriss 

Stratton 

Mine Centre 

Barwick." 

La Vallee 

Chalk River 

Forester's Falls 

Port McNicholl 

Victoria Harbour. . . 

Severn Bridge 

Waubaushene 

Stroud 

Brentwood 

New Lowell 

Worthington 

Webbwcod 

Creightcn Mine. . . . 

Coniston 

Nicholson's Siding. . 

Hornepayne 

Charlton 

Englehart 

Elk Lake 

Latchford 

Charlton 

Coboconk 

Kirkfield 

Oakwood 

Reaboro' 

Wellesley 

Hespeler 

Port Robinson 

Hillsburg 

Guelph, R.R. 5 

Ancaster 

Binbrook 

Aldershot 

Troy, R.R. 1 

Pefferlaw 

Newmarket, R.R. 3. 

King 

H umber Bay 

New Toronto 

Woodbridge 

Swansea 

Belle River 

Sandwich 

Pointe aux Roches. . 

Markstay 

Stratton 

Crysler 

Calabogie 

St. Andrews, West. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



261 



1924-25 (Continued) 



Degree if any 



Teachers 






Pupils 










>N 












pal and 
inv 


"3 u 
'55 u 

coy3 


ON 


a 

3 
Oh 


Q y 




2 >* 

3 U 


"o 


2 « 




o >-• 

C <u 


g c3 


6 


> C 




CuU 


<C/5 


2 


<< 



Grade of 
Class 



3 *« 

•a T3 c 

OJ 5 £ 

— o a 
o ao* 



i2^ 
.2 c 

JO 



110 John S. Gay 

111 May Bishop 

112 Fanny MacKenzie. . . 

113 Marvin T. Cathcart. . 

114 Julia M. Hanch 

115 Lester Brown 

116 Miller Thomson 

117 L. C. Armstrong 

118 G. A. Chisholm 

119 Ruby Kilpatrick 

120 Wallace Tanner 

121 J.W.Latimer 

122 Vincent J. Noonan. . . 

123 Mrs. Mary Monaghan 

124 Ethel C. Lush 

125 Sidney D. Geiger 

126 Ursula M. Black 

127 John T. Kidd 

128 J. G. Crawford 

129 R. W. Umphrey 

130 James Harkness 

131 Wm. L. Lowell 

132 Christine Howlett. . . . 

133 Fred Sloman 

134 Marv Watson 

135 M. L. Curtis 

136 John Watson 

137 M. N. Murchison 

138 Scott J. Hutchison. . . 

139 Wm. H. Hartman.... 

140 James D. Ramsay.. . . 

141 Jessie Kelso 

142 Harry E. Tate 

143 C. Isabel Stewart. . . . 

144 Frank W. Davis. . 

145 Wm. F. Orchard 

146 Catherine Owens 

147 Stuart M. Robinson. 

148 Howard M. Saul 

149 Effie Murchison 

150 Walter Rolling 

151 Kenneth C. Little.... 

152 Isabella L. Ball 

153 Geo. W. Shore 

154 John A. Short 



155 Sr. M. Ambrosia, B.A. 

156 Sr. Elizabeth Theresa. 

157 Sr. Bernice 

158 Marg. T. O'Donnell... 

159 Jeanette MacRae. 

160 Sr. M. Philomena 

161 Sr. M. Beatrice 

162 Sr. M. Victory 





$ 






II 


1,400 


8 


6 


I 


1,700 


15 


13 


II 


1,500 


3 


2 


I 


2,000 


10 


9 


II 


1,400 


8 


5 


I 


1,300 


6 


5 


I 


1,500 


16 


12 


I 


1,800 


7 


6 


II 


1,850 


16 


14 


I 


1,300 


16 


15 


II 


1,500 


7 


4 


II 


1,250 


15 


12 


II 


1,200 


3 


2 


I 


1,200 


4 


3 


II 


1,500 


10 


9 


I 


1,800 


13 


11 


II 


1,800 


4 


4 


II 


1,800 


13 


12 


II 


1,200 


4 


4 


II 


1,300 


6 


5 


II 


1,400 


14 


5 


II 


1,500 


12 


9 


II 


1,200 


5 


4 


I 


1,200 


6 


4 


II 


1,400 


4 


3 


II 


1,200 


8 


6 


II 


1,100 


6 


4 


II 


1,450 


9 


7 


II 


1,500 


8 


8 


II 


1,375 


6 


4 


II 


2,000 


7 


^ 


I 


1,200 


7 


5 


II 


1,400 


9 


7 


I 


1,000 


3 


2 


I 


1,800 


4 


3 


II 


1,300 


4 


2 


II 


1,400 


3 


2 


II 


1,100 


3 


2 


I 


1,100 


11 


10 


II 


1,100 


6 


5 


II 


1,300 


3 


2 


II 


2,200 


16 


11 


I 


1,300 


38 


29 


II 


1,700 


18 


16 


I 


2,350 


12 


9 


1 


900 


18 


15 


I 


450 


17 


16 


II 


900 


6 


6 


II 


900 


8 


6 


II 


900 


3 


2 


II 


1,000 


6 


5 


II 


1,100 


18 


15 


II 


1,500 


36 


30 



$ 


c. 


158 


05 


379 


74 


85 


35 


1,163 


15 


216 


24 


140 


00 


283 


67 


286 


30 


357 


00 


221 


80 


268 


59 


131 


66 


221 


78 


37 


37 


186 


40 


654 


00 


206 


23 


530 


37 


132 


95 


34 


50 


146 


60 


161 


81 


153 


99 


"324 


35 


286 


84 


275 


01 


112 


60 


279 


00 


300 


00 


214 


08 


311 


76 


160 00 


419 


80 


300 


23 


154 


52 


148 


97 


366 


00 


155 


00 


222 


00 


196 


05 


738 


72 


391 


46 


234 


34 


453 


62 


204 


00 


150 


28 


147 


48 


113 


34 


85 


63 


345 


32 


717 


68 



$ c. 

251 62 
335 06 
127 08 
315 14 
168 94 
124 00 
137 37 
193 63 
175 00 
132 18 

136 86 
123 17 

72 64 

93 74 

257 28 

420 00 

261 24 
310 72 
153 84 
226 90 
130 00 
309 32 

252 36 
280 80 
130 00 

97 44 

93 14 

88 55 

121 26 

137 90 
160 00 
155 41 

96 18 

78 00 
101 39 

91 76 
80 06 

79 90 
101 00 

80 50 
77 20 

152 91 
213 00 
179 03 
158 43 



200 26 
75 80 

139 50 
130 04 
118 56 
142 49 
156 58 



262 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



FIFTH GLASSES 



Inspectorate 



Name of School 

(In the case of rural schools the 

section number and the name 

of the township are given.) 



Post Office 



Inspector Gratton 163 

Inspector Jones 164 

165 
166 

Inspector Lee 167 

168 

Inspector Melady 169 

Inspector Payette 170 

171 
172 
173 
174 
175 
176 
177 

Inspector Quarry 178 

179 
180 
181 
182 
183 
184 
185 
186 
187 
188 
189 
190 
191 
192 

Inspector Scanlan 193 



2 

15 
10 

3 

4 

U. 4, 

1 

2 

7 



U. 1 

6 

5 

2 

U. 6 

1 

U. 6 

U. 2 

U. 3 

4 

13 

4 

11 

3 

1 



Neelon 

Charlottenburgh 

Lancaster 

Lancaster 

Mara 

Emily 

2 Maidstone & Rochester 

Brougham 

Bromley 

Bromley 

Cobalt 

Kearney 

Killaloe 

Mattawa 

Westmeath 

Mildmay 

Carrick 

Carrick 

Normanbv 

Ashfield. .' 

Stephen 

Wawanosh, West 

Ellice 

Hibbert 

Hibbert 

Mornington 

Waterloo 

Wellesley 

Wellesley 

Arthur 

Caldwell 



Coniston 

St. Raphael, West.. 
Dalhousie Sta., P.Q, 

Lancaster 

Brechin 

Lindsay, R.R. 5. . . . 

Woodslee 

Mount St. Patrick. . 
Eganville, R.R. 3... 

Douglas 

Cobalt 

Kearney 

Killaloe 

Mattawa 

La Passe 

Mildmay 

Formosa 

Deermerton 

Ay ton 

Goderich, R.R. 3.. . 
Parkhill, R.R. 8. . . . 

Auburn, R.R. 2 

Sebringville, R.R. 1. 

Dublin 

St. Columban 

Britton, R.R. 1 

Breslau, R.R. 1 

Linwood 

St. Clements 

Kenilworth 

Verner 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



263 



1924-25 (Concluded) 



Teachers 


Pupils 


Grade of 
Class 


Total Value of 

Approved 

Equipment 




Name of Principal and 
Degree if any 


"<3 „, 
.2 rt 

V) U 
en <£j 

OhCJ 


ON 

3 u. 


"a 

3 
PL. 

*o 
6 


>> 

<ti a> 

<< 


A 


B 


C 


JO 


163 Corinne Calderone 


I 

I 

I 

II 

II 

I 

II 

II 

II 

I 

I 

II 

I 

I 

II 

II 

I 

II 

I 

I 

II 

II 

I 

I 

II 

II 

II 

I 

I 

I 

II 


$ 

1,400 
1,500 
1,500 
1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,000 

850 
1,100 
1,200 
1,400 
1,000 

850 
1,650 
1,200 
1,000 
1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,100 
1,200 
1,100 
1,200 
1,300 
1,000 
1,200 
1,100 
1,200 
1,100 
1,200 

900 


9 

37 

28 

11 

10 

19 

6 

23 

6 

57 

4 

3 

28 

19 

12 

10 

12 

6 

21 

22 

10 

3 

23 

70 

7 

5 

5 

7 

5 

26 

11 


8 

31 

24 

9 

6 

12 

5 

17 

5 

44 

3 

2 

26 

16 

9 

9 

11 

4 

17 

20 

10 

3 

21 

65 

6 

3 

5 

6 

4 

22 

10 








$ c. 

218 61 
894 60 

1,404 35 
331 50 
343 54 
300 35 
206 84 
296 78 
91 88 
692 33 
255 80 
150 70 
428 59 
585 62 
124 69 
617 00 
315 00 
199 00 
132 00 
925 00 
262 00 

81 00 
1,166 00 

807 00 
153 00 

82 00 
197 00 
183 00 

219 00 
147 00 
304 29 


$ c- 
263 72 


164 Sr. M. Fiorina, B.A. 






181 46 


165 Sr. M.Jerome, B.A. . . 

166 Sr. M. Hilda, B.A. 






185 00 






197 45 


167 Percv J. Kennedy 

168 M. Mary O'Connell... 

169 Mother M. Eileen 

170 Sr. St. Jerome 

171 Teressa McElligot 

172 Sr. M. Margaret, B.A. . 

173 Thos. J. Houghton. . . . 

174 Catherine Lambatus. . . 






138 15 






159 05 


1 




85 68 
139 68 




1 


64 19 






182 95 






324 06 




1 


209 70 


175 Sr. M. Nativity 

176 John A. Donohue, B.A. 






203 74 






417 98 


177 Annie Cunningham.. . . 

178 Sr. M. Bredelia 


1 




77 47 
185 90 


179 Sr. M. Chrysologa 

180 Sr. M. Gertrude 






138 70 






129 90 


181 Katherine Bergin 

182 Sr. M. Isabel, B.A 






148 20 






185 00 


183 Sr. M. Dominic 






136 20 


184 Raymond Redmond . 




1 


63 10 


185 Sr. M. St. Alban 








185 00 


186 Sr. M. Dolores, M.A. . 






183 80 


187 Jos. P. Moylan 






125 30 


188 Mildred Clifford 




1 


63 20 


189 Sr. M. Eileen 






129 70 


190 Helen Hayes. . . . 






153 30 


191 Sr. M. Josepha 






131 90 


192 Sr. M. Bernadetta,B.A. 






124 70 


193 Sr. Marie Edmie 






270 56 










Totals, 1924-25. . . 




*1,260 
*1,297 


1,878 
1,723 


1,495 
1,400 


93 

87 


69 

67 


31 

22 


50,403 11 
46,334 99 


f28,201 11 
26,083 75 


Totals, 1923-24. . . 








Increases 






55 


95 


6 


2 


9 


4,068 12 


? 117 36 


Decrease 




37 

























* Average salary. 

t In addition, there was paid on equipment the sum of $194.93 to schools that did not 
qualify as Fifth Classes. 



264 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX N 

LIST OF INSPECTORATES AND INSPECTORS 



Inspectorates 


Public School Inspectors 


Post Office 


Algoma District in part; City of Sault Ste. 

Marie; Village of Hilton Beach 

Brant and Norfolk in part; Town of Paris; 

Village of Waterford (Joint Inspectorate) . 
Bruce East; Towns of Chesley, Walkerton, 

Wiarton; Villages of Hepworth, Lion's 

Head, Mildmay, Tara 


D. T. Walkom, B.A 


Sault Ste. Marie. 


T. W. Standing, B.A 


Brant ford. 


John McCool, M. A 


Walkerton. 


Bruce, West; Towns of Kincardine, South- 
ampton; Villages of Lucknow, Paisley, 
Port Elgin, Teeswater, Tiverton 

Carleton, East 


W. F. Bald, B.A., LL.B 

T. P. Maxwell, B.A 


Port Elgin. 
Ottawa. 


Carleton, West; Town of Eastview; Village 
of Richmond 


R. C. Rose, B.A 

L. A. Marlin, M.A 


Ottawa, 


Cochrane District, North, Thunder Bay in 
part; Towns of Cochrane, Hearst, Timmins 

Dufiferin; Town of Orangeville; Villages of 
Grand Valley, Shelburne 


247 Powell Ave. 
Cochrane. 


W. R. Liddy, B.A 


Orangeville. 
Winchester. 


Dundas; Villages of Chesterville, Iroquois, 
Morrisburg, Winchester 


Hiram B. Fetterly, M.A 

J. C. Smith, B.A 


Elgin, East; Town of Aylmer; Villages of 
Springfield, Vienna 

Elgin, West; City of St. Thomas; Villages 
of Dutton, Rodney, Port Stanley, West 
Lome (Joint Inspectorate) 


St. Thomas. 


John A. Taylor, B.A 


St. Thomas. 


Essex (No. 1); Towns of Essex, Kingsville, 
Leamington 


W. L. Bowden, B.A 

Thos. Preston, B.A 

S. A. Truscott, M.A 


Kingsville. 


Essex (No. 2); Towns of Amherstburg, Ford, 
Riverside, Tecumseh 


Sandwich. 


Frontenac, South; Village of Portsmouth. . . 
Frontenac, North, and Addington (Joint In- 
spectorate) 


Kingston. 
Sharbot Lake. 


M. R. Reid, M.A 


Glengarry; Town of Alexandria; Villages of 
Lancaster, Maxville 


J. W. Crewson, B.A 


Alexandria. 


Grey, East; Towns of Meaford, Thornbury; 
Village of Flesherton 


Samuel Huff, B.A., B.Paed 

H. H. Burgess, B.A 


Meaford. 


Grey, West; City of Owen Sound; Villages 
of Chatsworth, Shallow Lake. . 


Owen Sound. 


Grey, South; Towns of Durham, Hanover; 

Haldimand; Town of Dunnville; Villages of 

Caledonia, Cayuga, Hagersville, Jarvis. . . 

Haliburton and East Muskoka; Town of 


Robert Wright, B.A 


Hanover. 


J L Mitchener, B.A 


Cayuga. 
Fenelon Falls. 


Geo. E. Pentland, M.A 

James M. Denyes, B.A 

A. W. McGuire, B.A 


Halton and Wentworth in part; Towns of 
Burlington, Georgetown, Milton, Oakville; 
Village of Acton (Joint Inspectorate) 

Hastings, Centre; Villages of Deloro, Madoc, 
Marmora, Stirling, Tweed. . 


Milton. 
Tweed. 


Hastings, South, and City of Belleville; 
Towns of Deseronto, Trenton; Village of 
Frankford (Joint Inspectorate) 


H. J. Clarke, B.A 


Belleville. 


Hastings, North; Village of Bancroft 

Huron, East; Towns of Clinton, Seaforth, 
Wingham; Villages of Blyth, Brussels, 
Wroxeter 


Jas. Colling, B.A 


Bancroft. 


John M. Field, B.A., Ph.D 

f . Elgin Tom 


Goderich. 


Huron, West; Town of Goderich; Villages of 
Bayfield, Exeter Hensall 


Goderich. 


Kenora District and Thunder Bay District 
in part; Towns of Dryden, Keewatin, 
Kenora, Sioux Lookout. . 


S. Shannon, B.A , 


Kenora. 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



265 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors (Continued) 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Kent, East; Towns of Blenheim, Bothwell, 
Dresden, Ridgetown; Villages of Erieau, 
Highgate, Thamesville 

Kent, West, and City of Chatham ;Towns of 
Tilbury, Wallaceburg; Village of Wheatley 
(Joint Inspectorate) 

Lambton, East (No. 2); Town of Petrolia; 
Villages of Alvinston, Arkona, Oil Springs, 
Watford 

Lambton, West (No. 1); City of Sarnia; 
Town of Forest; Villages of Courtright, 
Point Edward, Thedford, Wyoming (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Lanark, East (No. 1); Towns of Almonte, 
Carleton Place; Village of Lanark 

Lanark, West (No. 2); Towns of Perth, 
Smith's Falls (Joint Inspectorate) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 1); Town of 
Gananoque; Villages of Newboro, Westport 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 2); Town of Brock- 
ville;Village of Athens (Joint Inspectorate) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3); Town of Pres 
cott; Villages of Cardinal, Kemptville, 
Merrickville (Joint Inspectorate) 

Lennox; Town of Napanee; Villages of Bath, 
Newburgh (see also Frontenac, North) . 

Lincoln; Towns of Grimsby, Merritton, 
Niagara; Villages of Beamsville, Port 
Dalhousie 

Manitoulin District; Algoma District in part; 
Towns of Bruce Mines, Gore Bay, Little 
Current, Thessalon 

Middlesex, East; Village of Lucan 

Middlesex, West; Towns of Parkhill, Strath 
roy; Villages of Ailsa Craig, Glencoe, New- 
bury, Wardsville 

Muskoka, South and West, District; Town 
of Bala, Bracebridge, Gravenhurst;Villages 
of Port Carling, Windermere 

Muskoka, East (see Haliburton). 

Muskoka, North (see Parry Sound, East). 

Nipissing District and Parry Sound in part; 
Towns of Bonfield, Cache Bay, Mattawa 
North Bay, Sturgeon Falls , 

Norfolk; Town of Simcoe; Villages of Delhi 
Port Dover, Port Rowan (see Brant Co.) . 

Northumberland and Durham, West (No. 1) 
Towns of Bowmanville, Port Hope; Village 
of Newcastle 

Northumberland and Durham, Centre (No 
2); Town of Cobourg; Village of Millbrook 

Northumberland and Durham, East (No. 
3); Town of Campbellford; Villages of 
Brighton, Colborne, Hastings 

Ontario, North; Town of Uxbridge; Villages 
of Beaverton, Cannington 

Ontario, South; City of Oshawa; Town of 
Whitby; Village of Port Perry (Joint In 
spectorate) 

Oxford, North, and City of Woodstock 
Villages of Embro, Tavistock (Joint In 
spectorate) 

Oxford, South; Towns of Ingersoll, Tillson- 
burg; Village of Norwich (Joint Inspect- 
orate) 



Rev. W. H. G. Colles 
J. H. Smith, M.A.... 
J. J. Edwards, B.A... 



Henry Conn, B.A 

J. C. Spence, B.A., B.Paed. 

Thos. C. Smith, M.A 

James F. McGuire, M.A.. . 
W. C. Dowslev, M.A 



T. A. Craig 

E. J. Corkill, B.A. 



Geo. A. Carefoot, B.A. , B.Paed 



James W. Hagan, M.A. 
P.J. Thompson, B.A... 



J. H. Sexton, B.A 

J. H. W. McRoberts, B.A. 



P. W. Brown, B.A... 
H. Frank Cook, B.A. 

E. E. Snider, B.A.. . . 
J. W. Odell, B.A 



Robert Boyes 

T. R. Ferguson, M.A. 



R. A. Hutchison, B.A. 

J. M. Cole 

R. A. Paterson, B.A.. 



Chatham. 
Chatham. 
Petrolia. 

Sarnia. 

Carleton Place. 
Perth. 
Westport. 
Brockville. 

Kemptville. 
Napanee. 

St. Catharines. 



Gore Bay. 
London. 



Strathroy. 
Bracebridge. 

North Bay. 
Simcoe. 

Port Hope. 
Cobourg. 

Campbellford. 
Uxbridge. 

Whitby. 

Woodstock. 

Ingersoll. 



266 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors (Continued) 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Parry Sound District, West, and Muskoka 
in part; Town of Parry Sound; Village of 
Magnetawan 

Parry Sound, East; Muskoka, North; and 
Nipissing South; Towns of Kearney, 
Powassan, Trout Creek; Villages of Burk's 
Falls, South River, Sundridge 

Peel; Town of Brampton; Villages of Bolton, 
Port Credit, Streetsville 

Perth, North; Towns of Listowel, Mitchell, 
St. Mary's; Village of Milverton 

Perth, South, and City of Stratford (Joint 
Inspectorate) 

Peterborough, East; Villages of Havelock, 
Lakefield, Norwood 

Peterborough, West, and Victoria, East; 
Town of Lindsay; Villages of Bobcaygeon, 
Omemee (Joint Inspectorate) 

Prescott and Russell; Towns of Hawkesbury, 
Rockland, Vankleek Hill; Villages of 
Casselman, L'Orignal 

Prince Edward; Town of Picton; Villages of 
Bloomfield, Wellington 

Rainy River District; Towns of Fort Frances, 
Rainy River 

Renfrew, North; Town of Pembroke; Village 
of Cobden 

Renfrew, South; Towns of Arnprior, Ren- 
frew; Villages of Braeside, Eganville, 
Killaloe Station 

Simcoe, North; Towns of Barrie, Colling- 
wood, Penetanguishene 

Simcoe, South; Towns of Alliston, Stayner; 
Villages of Beeton, Bradford, Creemore, 
Tottenham 

Simcoe, East; Towns of Midland, Orillia; 
Villages of Coldwater, Port McNicoll, 
Victoria Harbour 

Stormont; Town of Cornwall; Village of 
Finch . 

Sudbury District in part, Algoma in part; 
Towns of Blind River, Massey, Sudbury, 
Webbwood 

Sudbury District in part, Algoma in part, 
Parry Sound in part; Towns of Capreol, 
Copper Cliff 

Thunder Bay District 

Timiskaming District, North, and Cochrane 
District in part; Towns of Englehart, 
Iroquois Falls, Matheson 

Timiskaming, South; Towns of Cobalt, 
Haileybury, Latchford, New Liskeard; 
Village of Thornloe 

Victoria, West; Villages of Fenelon Falls, 
Sturgeon Point, Woodville 

Victoria, East (see Peterborough, West). 

Waterloo, North (No. 1); City of Kitchener; 
Towns of Elmira, Waterloo (Joint In- 

Waterloo, South (No. 2)';' City of Gait; 

•Towns of Hespeler, Preston; Villages of 

Ayr, New Hamburg (Joint Inspectorate). . 

Welland, North; City of Niagara Falls; Town 
of Thorold; Villages of Chippawa, Fonthill 
(Joint Inspectorate) 



J. L. Moore, B.A. 



R. O.White 

W. J. Galbraith, M.A. 
William Irwin, B.A... 
James H. Smith, B.A. 
Richard Lees, M.A... 



R. F. Downey, B.A., B.Paed.. . 



Archibald McVicar, M.A. 

F. P.Smith, M.A 

C. F. Ewers, B.A 

I. D. Breuls, B.A 



G. G. McNab, M.A., D.Paed.. 
Joseph L. Garvin, B.A 



Edwin Longman. 



Isaac Day, B.A 

James Froats, M.A., B.Paed. 

D. M. Christie, B.A 



Robert Gillies, B.A. 
L. J. Williams, B.A. 



(Inspector to be appointed) 



D. G. Smith, B.A.... 

E. W. Jennings, B.A. 



F. W. Sheppard 

Lambert Norman, B.A. 
John W. Marshall, B.A. 



Parry Sound. 

North Bay. 

Brampton. 

Stratford. 

Stratford. 

Peterborough. 

Peterborough. 

Vankleek Hill. 

Picton. 

Fort Frances. 

Pembroke. 

Renfrew. 
Barrie. 

Barrie. 

Orillia. 
Finch. 

Sudbury. 



Sudbury. 
Port Arthur. 



Haileybury. 
Lindsay. 

Kitchener. 
Gait. 



Niagara Falls. 
269 River R'd. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



267 



List of Inspectorates and Inspectors (Continued) 



Inspectorates 



Public School Inspectors 



Post Office 



Welland, South; Towns of Bridgeburg, Port 
Colborne; Villages of Fort Erie, Humber- 
stone 

Wellington, North; Towns of Harriston, 
Mount Forest, Palmerston; Village of 
Clifford 

Wellington, South; Villages of Arthur, Dray- 
ton, Elora, Erin, Fergus 

Wentworth; Town of Dundas; Village of 
Waterdown 

York (No. 1); Towns of Aurora, Newmarket; 
Villages of Holland Landing, Sutton West.. 

York (No. 2); Towns of Mimico, New 
Toronto, Weston; Village of Woodbridge. 

York (No. 3); Villages of Markham, Rich- 
mond Hill, Stouffville 

York (No. 4); Town of Leaside; Village of 
Forest Hill 



James McNiece, B.A. 



Robt. Galbraith, B.A 

J. J. Craig, B.A 

Jno. B. Robinson, B.A., B.Paed, 

C. W. Mulloy, B.A 

A. L. Campbell, M.A 

W. W. A. Trench, B.A 

A. A. Jordan, B.A 



Brantford, City of 

Fort William and Port Arthur, Cities of. 



E. E. C. Kilmer, B.A. 
W. A.Wilson, B.A... 



Guelph, 


City of 


Hamilton, 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Kingston, 


do 


London, 


do 


do 


do 


Ottawa, 


do 


do 


do 


Peterborough, 


do 


St. Catharines 


, do 


Toronto, 


do . 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Welland, 


do 


Windsor, 


do 



Wm. Tytler, B.A., LL.D 

W. H. Ballard, M.A 

Jas. Gill, B.A., B.Paed 

Frank E. Perney, B.A., B.Paed. 
E. T. Seaton, B.A., D.Paed. . . . 

Russell Stuart 

A. Wheable, B.A 

C. Stothers, M.A., B.Paed. . 
H. Putman, B.A., D.Paed.. . . 

T. Slemon, B.A., D.Paed.. . . 

Mowat, B.A 

C. Hetherington 

H. Cowley, M.A., Chief In- 
spector 

Jos. W. Rogers, M.A 

D. D. Moshier, B.A., B.Paed.. . 
N. S. MacDonald, B.A., D.Paed 

W. E. Hume, B.A., D.Paed 

Miss A. E. Marty, M.A., LL.D. 
P. F. Munro, M.A., B.Paed. . . 
John Flower, B.A 



Welland. 

Mount Forest. 

Fergus. 

Hamilton. 

Aurora. 

Weston. 

Richmond Hill. 

Toronto, 63 
Orchard View 
Boulevard. 

Brantford. 
Port Arthur 
387 Ambrose St. 
Guelph. 
Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 
Hamilton. 
Kingston. 
London. 
London. 
Ottawa. 
Ottawa. 
Peterborough. 
St. Catharines. 

Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Toronto. 
Welland. 



Sandwich and Walkerville Towns. 



J. E. Benson, M.A Windsor. 



R.C. Separate School Inspectors 

J. F. Power, M.A Toronto, 33 Dalton Rd. 

J. F. Sullivan, B.A London, 873 Hellmuth Ave. 

Jas. E. Jones, B.A Ottawa, 104 Henderson Ave. 

J. P. Finn, B.A ; Peterborough. 

W. J. Lee, B.A Toronto, 434 Brunswick Ave. 

J. M. Bennett, M.A Toronto, 47 Browning Ave. 

Vincent C. Quarry, B.A Parkhill, R.R. 8. 

Thomas S. Melady, B.A Stratford, 197 Albert St. 

H. J. Payette, B.A North Bay, 173 Main St. W. 



268 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

English-French Public and Separate School Inspectors 

J. S. Gratton Toronto, 7 Glenholme Apartments, 

cor. Glenholme and St. Clair Ave. 

Jno. C. Walsh, B.A., B.Paed Ottawa, 135 Blackburn Ave. 

James Scanlan, B.A Toronto, 41 Harvie Ave. 

Joseph Lapensee, B.A Plantagenet. 

D. M. Eagle and A. J. Beneteau (Act. Insps.). .Sandwich. 

Public and Separate Schools 

V. K. Greer, M.A., Chief Insp Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

W. I. Chisholm, M.A., Assistant Chief Insp.. .Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 
J. B. McDougall, B.A., D.Paed., Assistant 

Chief Inspector Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Neil McDougall, B.A., General Inspector Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

High School Inspectors 

I. M. Levan, B.A Toronto, 144 Balmoral Ave. 

Geo. F. Rogers, B.A Toronto, 104 Glencairn Ave. 

R. W. Anglin, M.A Toronto, 76 Hogarth Ave. 

Continuation School Inspectors 

G. K. Mills, B.A Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

J. P. Hoag, B.A Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Manual Training and Household Science Inspector 

Albert H. Leake Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 

Inspector of Elementary Agricultural Education 

J. B. Dandeno, B.A., Ph.D Toronto, 215 St. Clair Ave. W. 

Inspector of Auxiliary Classes 
S. B. Sinclair, M.A., Ph.D Toronto, Parliament Buildings. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 269 



APPENDIX O 
CADET CORPS, 1925 

Collegiate Institutes, High, Public and Separate Schools having Cadet Corps 
with at least twenty members between the ages of 12 and 18 years in the case of Public 
and Separate Schools, and between 16 and 18 in other cases. 

Collegiate Institutes: — Barrie, Brantford, Brockville, Chatham, Gait, 
Goderich, Guelph, Hamilton (2), Lindsay, Niagara Falls, North Bay, Orillia, 
Ottawa, Owen Sound, Perth, Picton, Port Arthur, St. Catharines, St. Mary's, 
Seaforth, Smith's Falls, Strathroy, Toronto (Harbord, Humberside, Jarvis, 
Malvern, Oakwood, Parkdale, Riverdale), Walkerville, Windsor and Woodstock. 
Total 33. 

High Schools: — Amherstburg, Aurora, Brampton, Campbellford, Corn- 
wall, Dunnville, Haileybury, Kenora, Leamington, Midland, Mitchell, Oshawa, 
Parry Sound, Prescott, Scarborough, Stirling, Tillsonburg, Toronto (Davenport), 
Welland, Westboro (Nepean). Total 20. 

Vocational Schools: — Chatham, Hamilton, Ottawa, Sarnia, Toronto 
(Central, Technical), Total 5. 

Continuation Schools: — Brussels, Dryden, Teeswater. Total 3. 

Public Schools: — Arthur, Aylmer, 3 Barton, Belleville (4), Bowmanville, 
Brampton (2), Brockville (3), Campbellford, Chatham (3), Coniston (2 Neelon), 
Dundas, Eganville, Fort Frances, Guelph (2), Hallville (North Mountain Con- 
solidated), Hamilton (22), Havelock, Keewatin, Kenora, Kingston (5), London 
(18), Millbrook, Mimico, Orangeville, Ottawa (17), Paris, Parry Sound, Peter- 
borough (6), Port Arthur (4), Port Hope, St. Catharines (7), St. Mary's, St. 
Thomas (5), Stratford (5), Sudbury (5), Thurlow, Toronto (70), Trenton (2), 
Walkerton, Walkerville (2), Waubaushene (12 Tay), 22 Westminster, Windsor 
(5), Westboro (2 Nepean) (2), Woodbridge, 7 East York. Total 211. 

R. C. Separate Schools: — London, Toronto (26). Total 27. 

Total number of Cadet Corps, 299. 



270 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX P 



ONTARIO COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR YEAR ENDING 30th JUNE, 1925 

Expenditures for salaries and maintenance for the year ending 30th June, 1925, as 

detailed below $173,815 94 

Legislative Grant received therefor $145,785 00 , 

Fees received 37,931 00 

$183,716 00 
Amount unused 9,900 06 

$183,716 00 $183,716 00 

Balance on hand, 30th June, 1924 $18,317 52 

Expended therefrom for purchase of Aura Lee Athletic Grounds. . . . 17,276 27 

1,041 25 
Amount unused of Grant for 1924-25, as above 9,900 06 

Balance on hand, 30th June, 1925 $10,941 31 



Expenditures 



Salaries 



Professors: 

W. Pakenham, Dean, at $6,000 $5,850 00 

P. Sandiford, Educational Psychology, at $5,000 4,875 00 

Associate Professors: 

G. A. Cornish, Science, at $4,375 4,265 62 

J. T. Crawford, Mathematics, at $4,375 4,265 62 

G. M. Jones, English and Historv, at $4,375 4,265 62 

W. C. Ferguson, French and German, at $4,375 4,265 62 

F. E. Coombs, Elementary Subjects, at $4,375 4,265 62 

Assistant Professors: 

W. E. Macpherson, at $4,190 4,085 25 

J. O. Carlisle, Classics, at $4,100 3,997 50 

Miss L. L. Ockley, Household Science, at $3,400 3,315 00 

Lecturers, also Instructors in Universitv Schools: 

S. W. Perry, Art and Commercial Work, at $3,875 3,778 13 

A. N. Scarrow, Manual Training, at $3,660 3,568 50 

G. N. Bramfitt, Music, at $3,450 3,363 75 

F. Halbus, Phvsical Training, at $2,825 2,754 37 

Miss A. E. Robertson, Instructor in Household Science, at $2,600 2,535 00 

Instructors in University Schools: 

J. G. Althouse, Headmaster, at $4,375 4,265 62 

G. A. Cline, at $3,550 3,461 25 

E. L. Daniher, at $3,325 3,241 88 

H. A. Grainger, at $3,875 3,778 13 

J. A. Irwin, at $3,875 3,778 13 

W. J. Lougheed. at $3,875 3,778 13 

J. H. Mills, at $3,875 3,778 13 

N. L. Murch, at $3,325 - 3,241 88 

C. E. Phillips, at $2,900 2,827 50 

T. M. Porter, at $3,875 3,778 13 

W. L. C. Richardson, at $3,450 3,363 75 

J. F. Van Every, at $3,500 3,412 50 

W. H. Williams, at $3,875 • 3,778 13 

J. G. Workman, at $3,760 3,666 00 

J. B. Dandeno, Special Instructor in Agriculture 300 00 

G. W. Cochrane. Assistant Swimming Instructor (9 nos.), at 

$1,000, of which $250 paid in University Physical Training, 

and $500 from receipts of Cafeteria 250 00 



Superann'tion 
Payment reservation, 
to under 7 Geo. 

Officer V, Cap. 58 



150 


00 


125 


00 


109 


38 


109 


38 


109 


38 


109 


38 


109 


38 


104 


75 


102 


50 


85 


00 


96 


87 


91 


50 


86 


25 


70 


63 


65 


00 


109 


38 


88 


75 


83 


12 


96 


87 


96 


87 


96 


87 


96 


87 


83 


12 


72 


50 


96 


87 


86 


25 


87 


50 


96 


87 


94 00 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 271 

Supply Teachers at $7.50 to $10 per day: 

Miss N. Elliott, 10 days $100 00 

S. W. Hann, 8V£ days . 63 75 

R. M. Law, S}4 davs 63 75 

K. B. Conn, 8 days 60 00 

Miss M. Wingfield, 7 davs 52 50 

S. R. Bvles, 3V 2 days 26 25 

W. T. A. Hastie, 3 days 22 50 

J. W. Bell, 2 davs 15 00 

W. J. A. Stewart, 2 days 15 00 

Clerical Staff: 

Miss L. Swinarton, Secretary 1,600 00 

Miss E. G. Seldon, Clerk. . ." 1,200 00 

Additional Clerical Assistance: 

Miss G. Potter, 50 wks., 1 day, at $17 to $18.50 per week 944 37 

Miss E. Woodliffe, 5 davs 20 00 



8114,332 88 2,810 24 

114,332 88 



Retiring Allowances: $11/, 143 12 

Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Association, contribution of College for 

year ending 30th June, 1925, to fund for retiring 2,081 88 

Charges on Investment: 

Accountant, Supreme Court of Ontario, proportion of annual payment on 

debenture issue of 1909 for interest and sinking fund 10,000 00 

Maintenance of Building: 

Fuel $3,170 88 

Light 1,741 84 

Water 776 13 

Telephone Service 162 76 

Caretaker's supplies 744 78 

Cleaning 4,606 39 

Repairs and renewals 2,843 48 

Grounds 999 89 

Engineer and Caretaker 1,800 00 

Firemen 639 95 

Nightwatchmen 1,468 56 

Maintenance of Instruction: 18,954 66 

Use of City Schools $14,626 66 

Use of Rural Schools 337 93 

Laboratory assistance and Pianist's services 124 00 

Office supplies, including office furniture, printing, postage and 

contingencies 1 ,068 75 

General supplies and apparatus for classroom use, etc 3,161 33 

Library assistance, books and periodicals 1,655 30 

Physical training, including rent and care of grounds and rink, 

Field Day sports, etc 842 3 1 

Summer Session: 
Instructors: 

F. E. Coombs 300 00 

Arthur Hope 400 00 

W. E. Macpherson 300 00 

W. Packenham 120 00 

P. Sandiford , 300 00 

Graduate Seminar: 

J. G. Althouse 200 00 

After-hour Course for High School Assistants: 

J. O. Carlisle 95 00 

F. E. Coombs 90 00 

G. A. Cornish 100 00 

J. T. Crawford 150 00 

W. C. Ferguson 75 00 

G. M. Jones 185 00 

W. Pakenham 95 00 

P. Sandiford 110 00 

Publication of "The School," University Press 750 00 

Graduate Scholarship in Education : 

Miss M. E. Grant 500 00 

Refund of deposit paid for dispensation from teaching in Ontario: 

Gordon Pook 50 00 

25.636 28 



Certified correct, $173,815 94 

F. A. Moure, 
Toronto, 19th March, 1926. Bursar. 



272 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX 
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1925 



Collegiate 
Institutes 



T3 C 




V O 


ta 






w ° 43 


■jin g 




rt c.9 


bo S- C 


.,_> <u £ 


Number 
certificat 
Principal 
recomme 


mber 
partm 
amina 


3 <U X 


£QW 



13 

en rf - 

CU 0) 4-) 

^ £ 2 

6 3 c 



Barrie 

Brantford 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Fort William 

Gait 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Ingersoll 

Kingston 

Kitchener 

Lindsay 

London 

Morrisburg 

Napanee 

Niagara Falls. . . 

North Bay 

Orillia 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound .... 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur 

Renfrew 

St. Catharines. . . 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Seaforth 

Smith's Falls 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Toronto 

VankleekHill... 

Walkerville 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



Totals . 



380 

62 

138 



163 
165 



174 
1,067 



144 

222 



546 



477 



221 



41 



109 
95 



160 



5,316 



68 
552 
119 



10,326 



123 

51 

100 

148 

68 

113 

131 

186 

151 

87 

79 

412 

95 

144 

194 

148 

305 

52 

117 

134 

149 

209 

721 

260 

200 

140 

75 

233 

176 

277 

111 

220 

183 

87 

55 

152 

233 

81 

880 

63 

17 

124 

91 



107 

10 

79 

83 

45 

76 

101 

116 

120 

67 

58 

118 

88 

96 

153 

135 

166 

37 

69 

110 

120 

146 

516 

205 

162 

94 

64 

186 

126 

233 

83 

200 

133 

40 

38 

130 

171 

54 

230 

49 

16 

105 

59 



7,575 4,994 



High Schools 



a c 

d O 



bJO 



0) -^ 



Is 



TO (^ 

at 
"0 £ 

c o 



u £ 2 

it 8 
J&S3 



T3 

82 e 

aj c O 

JS-S3 



Alexandria 

Alliston 

Almonte 

Amherstburg. . . 

Arnprior 

Arthur 

Athens 

Aurora 

Avon more 

Aylmer 

Beamsville 

Belleville 

Bowmanville. . 

Bracebridge 

Bradford 

Brampton 

Bridgeburg 

Brighton 

Burford 

Burlington 

Caledonia 

Campbellford. . 
Carleton Place 

Cayuga 

Chapleau 

Chatsworth . . . 

Chesley 

Chesterville. . . 
Colborne 

Cornwall 

Deseronto 

Dundalk 

Dundas 

Dunnville 

Durham 

Dutton 

Elmira 

Elora 

Essex 

Exeter 

Fergus 

Flesherton 

Forest 

Fort Frances. . 

Gananoque 

Georgetown . . . 

Glencoe 

Graven hurst. . 

Grimsby 

Hagersville — 

Haileybury. . . 

Hanover 

Harriston 

Hawkesbury. . 



113 



24 



101 
61 
66 

140 

118 
66 
32 
55 
26 
89 
56 
28 
66 
99 
57 

140 
62 
79 
58 
91 
63 
70 
98 
36 
49 
64 
61 
45 
44 

185 
19 
68 

109 
73 
56 
62 
61 
57 
89 
40 
106 
22 
71 
73 
71 
53 
73 
46 
45 
48 
60 
91 
53 
31 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



273 



HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1925— Continued 



High Schools — Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


High Schools — Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


Huntsville 




84 
28 
66 
89 
65 
71 
63 

150 

125 
55 

101 
44 
62 

140 

112 

114 

122 
90 
10 
55 

100 
59 
21 

101 
87 
33 
94 
44 
40 
80 
27 
49 

142 
85 
67 

118 

193 
80 
63 
52 

105 
45 
48 
85 
57 
25 
72 
41 
80 
41 

100 
41 

121 
37 
53 
46 

147 
55 
66 


50 
17 
49 
71 
54 
48 
34 

118 
99 
34 
77 
35 
54 
76 
94 
88 

103 
70 
6 
42 
59 
38 
17 
74 
72 
28 
82 
28 
27 
67 
20 
42 
92 
61 
42 
92 

173 
63 
42 
38 
78 
29 
37 
67 
42 
22 
55 
28 
62 
36 
87 
32 
97 
27 
39 
39 

140 
41 
40 


Thorold 




67 
76 

109 
30 
77 
55 
15 
56 

129 
18 
45 
62 
49 

115 

117 
42 
66 
69 
59 
51 


62 


Iroquois 




Tillsonburg 




58 


Kemptville 




Timmins 




86 


Kenora 




Trenton 


54 


10 


Kincardine 




Tweed 


70 


Kingsville 




Uxbridge 


16 


40 


Lakefield 




Vienna 


13 


Leamington 




Walkerton 




49 


Listowel 




Wallaceburg 




104 


Lucan 




Wardsville 




13 


Madoc 




Waterdown 




40 


Markdale 




Waterford 




41 


Markham 




Watford 




39 


Meaford 




Welland 


28 


S3 


Midland 




Weston 


98 


Milton 




Whitby 




30 


Mimico 




Wiarton 




65 


Mitchell 




Williamstown . . 




39 


Morewood 




Winchester 




51 


Mount Forest 




Wingham 




42 






Totals 






Newburgh 




395 


9,435 


7,220 










New Liskeard . . 




Other Places 
Aberfoyle 




36 
45 
32 
34 
9 
50 
53 
45 
18 
17 
27 
17 
27 
23 
24 
22 
19 
89 
48 
17 
10 
32 
15 
25 
49 
24 
26 
55 
57 
26 
13 
19 
26 




Newmarket 






Niagara 






Niagara Falls South.. . 




21 


Norwich 




Acton 




42 


Norwood 




Agincourt 




19 


Oakville 




Ailsa Craig 




23 


Omemee 




Alfred 




3 


Orangeville 




Alvinston 




25 


Oshawa 


125 


Ameliasburg 




41 


Paris 


Ancaster 




27 


Parkhill 




Angus 




9 


Parry Sound 




Apsley 




9 


Pembroke 




Arkona 




8 


Penetanguishene 




Attercliffe Station .... 




12 


Petrolia 


29 


Aultsviile 




19 


Plantagenet 


Ayr 




18 


Port Coljaorne 




Ayton 




23 


Port Dover 




Bailieboro 




14 


Port Elgin 




Bala 




15 


Port Hope 




Bancroft 




62 


Port Perry 




Barriefield 




32 


Port Rowan 




Barwick 




8 


Prescott 




Bath 




8 


Richmond Hill 




Battersea 




15 


Ridgetown 




Bayfield 




9 


Rockland 




Beachburg 




22 






Beaverton 


10 


29 


Shelburne 




Beeton 


17 


Simcoe 




Belgrave. 




18 


Smithville 




Belleville, Co. Centre. 
Belle River. . . 


59 


18 


Stirling 




26 


Streetsville 




Belmont. . . . 




23 


Sudbury 




Bethany 




10 


Sydenham 




Billing's Bridge 




12 


Thessalon 




Binbrook 




15 



274 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1925— Continued 



Other Places — Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


Other Places — Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


Biscotasing 




9 

10 
117 
29 
21 
31 
44 
47 
25 
13 
10 
41 
28 
16 
29 
58 
19 
40 
12 

7 

14 
21 
12 
20 
11 
20 
27 
19 
20 
28 
33 
16 
53 
13 
13 
33 
37 
25 
30 
22 
139 
55 
30 
33 
19 
50 
28 
41 

8 
33 
61 
33 
15 
22 
18 
32 
24 
32 
21 


9 

8 

96 

18 

21 

24 

33 

33 

15 

13 

2 

26 

23 

10 

23 

44 

14 

30 

7 

6 

5 

7 

8 

10 

6 

9 

15 

13 

17 

22 

28 

14 

36 

9 

9 

25 

26 

20 

19 

17 

118 

43 

17 

17 

13 

23 

13 

16 

4 

23 

50 

12 

5 

11 

16 

26 

20 

16 

8 


Dash wood 




18 
24 
74 
62 
18 

2 

6 
24 
31 
59 

7 
30 
28 
63 
13 
17 
46 
31 
14 
49 

6 
32 
79 
33 
46 
15 
61 
29 
10 
25 
35 
27 
53 
32 
15 
142 
62 
39 
39 
47 

4 
24 

7 
32 
142 
21 
25 
27 
20 
11 
22 
23 
17 
11 
52 

7 
33 
39 
11 


12 


Blackstock 




Delaware 




18 


Blenheim 


Delhi 




57 


Blind River 




Delta 




40 


Bloomfield 




Demorestville 




13 


Blyth 




Denbigh 




1 


Bobcaygeon 




Desbarats 




2 


Bolton 




Dickinson's Landing. . 




13 


Both well 




Dixon's Corners 




13 


Bourget 




Dorchester Station .... 




39 






Dorion Consolidated. . 




4 






Douglas 




28 


Brooklin 




Drayton 




21 


Brownsville 




Dresden 




45 


Bruce Mines 




Dromore 




11 


Brussels 




Drumbo 




12 


Burgessville 




Dryden 




18 


Burk's Falls 




Dungannon 




16 


Burridge 




Dunsford 




13 


Burriss 




Eastview 




34 


Burritt's Rapids 




Easton's Corners 




3 


Byng Inlet 




Echo Bay 




14 


Caistor Centre 




Echo Place 




57 






Edgar 




11 


Callander 




Eganville 




30 






Elk Lake 




6 






Elmvale 




3S 




Embro 




16 






Embrun 




8 






Emo 




18 


Carp 




Englehart 




22 






Ennismore 




18 






Erin 




37 






Espanola 




2C 






Ethel 




13 






Fairbank 




124 






Fenelon Falls 




32 






Fen wick 




27 






Feversha m 




15 


Clifford 




Fingal 




33 


Cobalt 




Flinton 




3 






Florence 




14 






Foleyet 




t 






Fonthill 




24 






Ford 




106 






Fordwich 




14 






Forester's Falls 




15 






Ft. William (District) . 
Fournier 




13 








12 






Frankford 


15 


t 






Galetta 


12 






Glen Allan 




19 






Golden Lake 




17 






Gooderham 




4 






Gore Bav 




31 






Gowganda 




3 






Grand Vallev 




18 


Cumberland 




Grantham Consolid't'd 
Haliburton 




34 






10 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



275 



HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1925— Continued 



Other Places — Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


Other Places — Con. 


Number granted 
certificates on 
Principal's 
recommendation 


Number taking 

Departmental 

Examination 


Number passed 

Departmental 

Examination 


Hall's Bridge 




21 

88 
13 
33 
19 
14 
58 
21 
20 
34 
20 
38 
20 

9 
25 
15 
24 
69 

3 

9 
27 
13 
30 
40 
24 

8 
29 
24 
13 

9 
11 

6 
40 
33 
12 
59 

5 
16 
19 
21 
13 

109 
7 
22 
30 
39 
41 
26 
31 
49 
16 
11 
11 
32 
19 
16 

158 
20 


11 
61 
13 
20 
13 
11 
15 

9 
15 
21 
15 
29 

5 

3 
16 

8 
20 
61 

2 

9 
18 
11 
27 
35 
21 

6 
23 
12 
10 

7 

8 

4 
19 
25 

8 
41 

4 
12 

5 
17 

9 

96 

4 

17 

22 

14 

28 

10 

14 

23 

6 

9 

8 

26 

15 

11 

115 

13 


Lucknow 




40 

49 
21 
16 
29 
44 
21 
19 
23 
56 

8 
52 
12 
30 
14 
32 
35 
13 
22 
21 
55 
22 
39 
30 
53 
23 
31 
92 

3 

14 
27 
19 
15 
15 
34 
17 
20 
36 
86 
19 
36 
57 
26 

4 
24 
13 
19 
20 
46 
72 
26 
112 

6 
11 
18 
10 
15 
20 


97 


Hamilton, Co. Centre 




Macdonald Con- 
solidated, Guelph. . . 






Harrington 




33 


Harrow. . . . 




McKellar 




1 9 


Harrowsmith 




Madawaska 




c 


Hastings 




Magnetawan 




16 


Havelock 




Mallorvtown 




39 


Hawkestone 




Manito waning 




16 


Hearst 




Manley 




10 


Hensall ; 




Manotick 




16 


Hepworth 




Maple 




37 


Highgate 




Markstay 




7 


Hillsdale 




Marmora 




90 


Hilton Beach 




Marsville 




1 i 


Holstein 




Massey 




19 


Hornpayne 




Matheson 




Q 


Horning'sMills 




Mattawa 




90 


Humewood (York Co.) 
Ignace 




Maxville 




90 


Medina 




Q 


Ilderton 




Melbourne 




16 


Inglewood . . 




Merivale 




1 3 


Innerkip 




Merlin 




44 


Iroquois Falls. . . . 




Merrickville 




1 c 


Islington ........ 




Merritton 




31 


Ivy 




Metcalfe 




10 


Janetville 




Mildmay 




43 


Jarvis 




Milford 




17 


Tasper 




Millbrook 




18 


Jockvale 




Milverton 




80 


Kapuskasing 




Minaki 




o 


Kars 




Minden 




Q 


Kearnev 




Mindemoya 




17 


Keene 




Minesing 




16 


Keewatin 




Moncklands 




12 

7 


Ken more 




Monteith 




Killaloe Station 




Moorefield 




18 






Moose Creek. . . . 




1 c 


Kilmaurs 




Mount Albert 




10 


Kimberley 




Mount Brydges. . 




24 


Kinburn 




Mount Dennis. . 




73 


King : . . . . 




Mount Elgin 




16 


King George School 




Mount Hope 




20 


(York County) 


Mount Pleasant 




50 


Kinmount 




Mount St. Patrick 




14 


Kintail 




Mountain Grove 




A 


Kirkfield 




Murillo 




16 


Kirkland Lake 




Nakina 




7 


Lanark 




Navan 




19 


Lancaster . 




Neustadt . 




10 


Lansdowne 




Newboro' . . 




26 


Lansing 




New Hamburg. 




60 


Latchford 




Newington . . 




20 


Laurel 




New Toronto . . . 




87 

3 

U 


Lemonville 




Nicholson .... 




Lion's Head 




Nipigon . . 




Little Britain 




Nipissing . 








Nobleton . . 




A 


London East 




North Augusta 




12 
16 


Loring 




North Gower 





76 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1925— Continued 



Other Places — Con. 



North Lancaster 

North Monaghan 

North Mountain .... 

Oakwood 

Odessa 

Oil Springs 

Orono 

Oshweken 

Osgoode Station 

Otterville 

Paisley 

Pakenham 

Palmerston 

Pefferlaw 

Pelee Island 

Pickering 

Plattsville 

Plevna 

Port Arthur (District) 

Port Burwell, 

Port Carling 

Port Credit 

Port Dalhousie 

Port McNicoll 

Port Stanley 

Portsmouth 

Powassan 

Priceville 

Princeton 

Queensville 

Quibell 

Rainy River 

Ramsay ville 

Rand wick 

Ravenna 

Richard's Landing. . . . 

Richmond 

Ridge way 

Ripley 

Rockton 

Rockwood 

Rodney 

Rpsemont 

Roseneath 

Rosseau 

Russell 

St. David's 

St. George 

St. Helen's 

Sandwich 

Sault Ste. Marie 

(Technical School) . . 

Schomberg 

Schreiber 

Scotland 

Searchmont 






Is 



v?-> 



S3"§ S 

Co 



bo 

+-> CD -M 

u S 2 

c 5 c 

^^ * 



52 rt e 

2 5.2 

v* 6 S 



93 



36 
33 
12 
16 
25 
36 
42 
34 
17 
22 
25 
23 
31 
22 
16 
31 
25 

8 
46 
18 
41 
86 
71 
13 
15 
13 
34 

9 
15 
37 

2 
73 
16 

7 
10 
23 
28 
41 
40 
23 
36 
36 
14 
34 
14 
44 
30 
21 
22 
101 

70 
29 
33 
43 
8 



25 

9 

10 

14 

17 

17 

35 

9 

12 

16 

23 

17 

18 

18 

7 

29 

22 

5 

28 

16 

28 

75 

68 

12 

11 

13 

19 

6 

13 

18 

1 

44 

9 

4 

2 

8 

22 

32 

32 

19 

16 

27 

9 

18 

11 

34 

21 

20 

17 

82 

37 
16 
23 
35 
3 



Other Places— Con. 



2° 

If 

la 



CO i. 



S o 



£8£ 



Secord School (York 

County) 

Selkirk 

Severn Bridge 

Sharbot Lake 

Sioux Lookout 

Singhampton 

Smooth Rock Falls... 

Solina 

Southampton 

South Finch 

South Indian 

South Mountain 

South Porcupine 

South River 

Sparta 

Spencerville 

Springfield 

Sprucedale 

Stayner 

Stella.... 

Stevensville 

Stittsville 

Stony Creek 

Stouffville 

Strabane 

Stratton 

Stroud 

Sturgeon Falls 

Sudbury (District).. 

Sunderland 

Sundridge 

Sutton 

Tamworth 

Tara 

Tavistock 

Teeswater 

Thamesford 

Thamesville 

Thedford 

Thornbury 

Thorndale 

Thornloe 

Tilbury 

Tiverton 

Tottenham 

Trout Creek 

Tupperville 

Uptergrove 

Utterson 

Varna 

Verner 

Vernon 

Verona 

Victoria Harbour. . . 
Vineland 



bo 
rt e .2 

u s s 

•° 3*3 



107 
39 
21 
11 

23 
12 
12 
16 
20 
46 

9 
22 
24 
18 
29 
37 
35 
18 
46 

7 

18 
38 
60 
27 
26 
21 
36 
76 
33 
25 
24 
40 
53 
62 
34 
45 
29 
41 
34 
57 
47 
17 
58 
39 
45 
17 
21 
29 
24 
12 
18 

8 
39 
15 
56 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



277 



HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION, 1925— Concluded 



Other Places— Con. 



o3§ 



bfl 






o E 

.5 o 



Wainfleet 

Warkworth 

Warren 

Warsaw 

Waubaushene 

Webbwood 

Wellandport 

Wellington 

West Guilford 

West Lome 

Westmeath 

Westport 

Wheatley 

Whitevale 

White River 

Wilber force 

Wilkesport 

Williamsburg 

William Burgess 
School (York Co.) 



C — 
rt C. 



5 £ 
a as 



£QW 



T3 

CD — i 

-° is '5 

S3 c 



30 
50 

18 
30 
10 

9 
15 
32 

7 
44 
30 
42 
20 
17 

8 
12 
22 
17 

91 



27 

37 

5 

14 

6 

5 

7 

28 

2 

28 

19 

24 

21 

15 

5 

9 

13 

3 

86 



Other Places— Con. 



~v 






n 


o 









r 


ul 




4-J 


n 







rt 


Ih 

fc/j 




J/2 




E 


u 
id 


03 

.2* 

u 

c 


0/ 

£ 

E 

n 


3 


Ih 


• p 


y 


£ 


u 


Oh 





II § 

S aoj 
►Hi! * 



Winchelsea 

Winona 

Wolfe Island 

Woodbridge 

Woodville 

Wooler 

Worthington 

Wroxeter 

Wyoming 

Yarmouth Heights. 

Zephyr 

Zurich 



Totah 



Collegiate Institutes , 

High Schools 

Other Places 



Grand Totals, 1925. 



196 



10,326 
395 
196 



10,917 



12,482 



7,575 

9,435 

12,482 



29,492 



CD — i 

« c 

u E JH 

c S '§ 
5 a * 



12 
19 
19 
31 
31 
31 
14 
28 
16 
40 
4 
13 



8,488 



4,994 
7,220 
8,488 



20,702 



APPENDIX R 
SUPERANNUATED TEACHERS 

(Ryerson Superannuation Scheme) 
Summary for Years 1882-1925 



Year 


Number of 

Teachers 

on List 


Expenditure 
for the Year 


Gross 
Contributions 
to the Fund 


Amount 

Refunded to 

Teachers 

or to the Estates 

of Teachers 


1882 


422 
454 
456 
424 
407 
375 
297 
245 
159 
154 
134 
120 


$ c. 

51,000 00 

58,295 33 

63,750 00 

62,800 33 

64,244 92 

63,018 55 

t52,696 90 

148,232 00 

t55,799 75 

f52,655 00 

147,578 50 

143,559 00 


$ c. 

13,501 08 

1,489 00 

1,313 50 

847 00 
1,073 50 

766 00 

t504 65 

f353 60 

f4 00 

"\ik "so 


$ c 
3,660 10 
3,815 80 


1887 


1892 


786 86 


1897 


620 27 


1902 


722 78 


1907 


764 54 


1912 


f443 01 


1917 


t810 92 


1922 


t73 80 


1923 




1924 


|222 17 


1925 


tio 00 



The annual allowance to each Superannuated Teacher was increased by the Legislature in 
1920. Payments are at the rate of $11 per year of service instead of at $6 as formerly, 
t For fiscal year ending 31st October. 



10 D.E. 



278 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX S 
MODEL SCHOOLS 

I.— Summer Model Schools, 1925 





Principal 


Attendance 


Extra- 
mural 


3rd Class 
Certs. 


Certs, for 
one year 




Male 


Female 


Total 


Bracebridge 

Gore Bay 

Port Arthur 

Sharbot Lake 

Cochrane 

Ottawa 

Sturgeon Falls. . . 
VankleekHill... 


E. E. Ingall 


3 

1 
2 
2 

"l 


7 
6 
8 

17 
5 

80 

52 
25 


10 

7 

10 
19 

5 

82 

52 
25 


4 

1 


9 

7 
10 
19 

27 
32 
15 




C. D. Bouck 




W. B. Johnson 

R. A. A. McConnell... 

J. B. McDougall 

C. H. Edwards 

J. M. Kaine 


3 
32 
15 


Jno. Hartley 


' 6 


Totals 


10 


200 


210 


5 


119 


56 







II.— English-French Model Schools, 1924-1925 

Professional Course 



School 


Principal 


Attendance 


Extra- 
mural 


Certificates 




Male 


Female 


Total 


Grade B 


Grade C 


District 


Ottawa 

Sandwich 

Sturgeon Falls. 
VankleekHill. 


C. H. Edwards 

D. M. Eagle. . . 
J. M. Kaine. . . 
Jno. Hartley. . . 


"2" 

2 


29 
19 
41 
40 


29 

21 
43 
40 


1 
6 

5 

2 


8 

11 

4 

2 


21 
16 
19 
32 


is 

4 


Totals. . . . 








4 


129 


133 


14 


25 


88 


19 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 279 



APPENDIX T 

REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE ONTARIO 
TRAINING COLLEGE FOR TECHNICAL TEACHERS 

The Ontario Training College for Technical Teachers began its first term 
in Hamilton on April 20th, 1925. The purpose of this institution is to train 
teachers of shop or vocational subjects for technical schools, and manual training 
teachers for public and high schools. 

The establishment of this training college marks the carrying out of the 
last of the important recommendations made by Dr. Seath in 1911, in his valuable 
report on "Education for Industrial Purposes." 

The following figures give evidence of the growth of the vocational schools. 
In the year 1924-25 the number of full-time day schools was twenty-seven, with 
an enrolment of 11,595 full-time day pupils, and 3,614 part-time or special 
pupils. Evening vocational classes were carried on in 52 places, with an enrol- 
ment of 35,675. 

The number of teachers employed in the day schools was 524, and in the 
evening schools, 1,182. A large proportion of these teachers, possibly one-half, 
are teachers of practical or shop subjects, such as machine shop practice, drafting, 
dressmaking, motor mechanics. Thus there has appeared in the teaching body 
an entirely new type of teacher, for the training of which no provision had been 
made. 

The introduction into the teaching body of teachers of practical subjects 
has raised two problems, viz., how to obtain them, and how to train them. 

One method of obtaining shop teachers is that used to obtain academic 
teachers, viz., to train young people, looking forward to shop teaching, in the 
content of the trade or shop subject, in suitable institutions of a secondary 
school or college grade. For example, a young student, ambitious to be a 
machine shop teacher, would take a four or five years' course in a suitable school, 
in the operations, processes and fundamental principles of the machinist trade, 
and in related subjects such as English, mathematics, science and drafting. He 
would then take a course in the principles of education and methods of teaching 
in some suitable teacher-training institution. This method is much used in 
many parts of the United States. 

Another method is to recruit such teachers from the trade and industry 
where they have obtained, under actual trade conditions, training in the content 
of the trade concerned. 

Teachers obtained under the first method have a good all-round general 
education, a fairly good acquaintance with the operations and processes of the 
trade, a good knowledge of related fields and their bearing on the fundamental 
principles of the trade, and probably bring to their teaching a desirable pro- 
fessional attitude. On the other hand, they are not skilled and experienced 
craftsmen, looked up to and respected by the working members of the craft. 

Teachers obtained under the second method are acquainted with the actual 
working conditions of the producing shop, know the standards of skill and speed 
required in the trade, and if properly selected, are masters of their trades or 
crafts, and esteemed as such by their fellows. 

Ontario has decided on the latter method of obtaining technical teachers. 

10a D.E. 



280 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

It is evident that teachers recruited from industry need, in addition to their 
trade training, knowledge of, and skill in, the art of teaching. The belief that 
a man who knows his subject can therefore teach it to others is no longer held 
by anyone who knows anything of the learning process. In recent years, due 
to the rapid growth of technical schools, we have had many untrained persons 
in charge of shop instruction, and the difference in teaching skill between them 
and the regularly trained teachers would convince anyone of the value of 
teacher-training. 

In the development of teacher-training work in Ontario the following 
general principles have been recognized and accepted. 

(1) Training in the art of teaching is necessary, and every teacher in the 

state-supported schools should be trained in the principles of education 
and the methods of teaching. 

(2) All teacher-training schools are government institutions under the 

direct control of the Minister of Education. A sufficient supply of 
trained teachers is so vital a factor in the success of the school system 
that the government has assumed full responsibility for the supply 
and for the standard of training. 

(3) Academic and professional training should be separated. The teacher- 

in-training is expected to be familiar with the content of his subject 
before he goes to the teacher-training institution. 

(4) Practice teaching under actual class-room conditions should form 

an important part of the training. "Learn to do by doing" applies 
to teaching as well as to music or golf. 

These principles have been established through seventy-five years of pro- 
gressive developments in the training of academic teachers. They have been 
accepted as fundamental in the organization of a scheme of teacher-training 
for shop or vocational teachers. The decision to recruit teachers of shop or 
craft subjects from trade and industry is a recognition of the third principle. 

In attempting to formulate a scheme of training for vocational teachers, 
based on the foregoing principles, the question of training these teachers along 
with the regular academic teachers must be considered. In dealing with this 
question certain factors must be taken into account: 

(1) Persons recruited from the trades, unlike those in attendance at Normal 

Schools or Colleges of Education, have been out of school for a num- 
ber of years and, as a consequence, have lost to some extent the habit 
of study. On the other hand, they have a background of experience 
and maturity which perhaps offsets in value the study habits of the 
student-teachers in the regular training schools. 

(2) The facilities for practice teaching in the training schools for academic 

teachers are not suitable. 

(3) The time factor is important. Skilled craftsmen are mature people, 

probably married and with dependent families, and already in good 

wage-earning positions. Either the time arrangements of the period 

of training must be as short and as conveniently arranged as possible, 

or the teachers-in-training must be subsidized to take the course. 

Consideration of the factors of maturity, facilities for practice teaching, 

and the time factor make it desirable that shop teachers shall be trained in a 

school specially organized for the purpose. 

The length of the course has been fixed at twenty weeks, ten of which are 
to be taken either in the autumn or in the spring term, and ten of which are to 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 281 

be taken in two summer sessions of five weeks each. During the ten weeks 
period, observation and practice teaching form the chief part of the work. 
During the summer sessions, the work consists largely of theoretical work, trade 
analysis and the preparation of courses of study. 

This period of twenty weeks appears to be the minimum of time needed to 
give the required training. The distribution of time has been made such as it 
is, to enable teachers already in service to take the course with the least possible 
absence from their schools during the school year. 

The subjects of study included in the curriculum are: 

English. 

Principles of Teaching. 

History, Principles and Problems of Vocational Education. 

School and Class Management and School Law. 

Trade Analysis and Courses of Study. 

Study of Industries. 

Methods of Teaching Industrial Subjects. 

Practice Teaching. 

Vocational Guidance. 

Shop Plans and Equipment. 

Mechanical Drawing. 

Costume Design. 
Due to the limitations of time, the work taken up in the theoretical subjects 
is carefully selected to meet the needs of the student-teachers concerned. Time 
does not permit of any extended study of general psychology, of the history of 
education in other countries, or of general principles of school administration. 
Observation work and practice teaching under actual class-room conditions 
are recognized as important elements of teacher-training. The regular day 
classes of the Hamilton Technical Institute are used for this phase of the work. 
Each student is required to submit a stated number of reports on model 
lessons taught by critic teachers, and to prepare lesson plans for and teach a 
stated number of assigned lessons. Near the end of the term, each student- 
teacher takes complete charge for two whole days of a given shop. He assembles 
and dismisses the classes that come to the shop, keeps the register and other 
records, gives out supplies, carries on the instruction of the classes, and in general 
takes the place of the regular teacher. 

In Canada and in the United States vocational education is a development 
of the last twenty years. Public interest and support has been a matter of 
perhaps not more than ten years. Many of the problems connected with it are 
new, and as yet in the field of debate and discussion. 

It is desirable that technical teachers should know what are these problems, 
and become acquainted with at least a part of the considerable body of literature 
that has grown up around them. In order to do this, each student- teacher is 
given a topic dealing with some problem or phase of vocational education, and 
required to make the investigation necessary to make a report on the topic. 
The topics are so selected as to require, on the part of the students, considerable 
reading, study, and investigation, including in some cases inquiries among 
industries. When completed, the essay of about 3,000 words is read by the 
writer to the whole group, and made a subject of discussion. The debates in 
many instances are most enlightening, inasmuch as they disclose unsuspected 
backgrounds of experience and knowledge, and powers of criticism and judgment, 
both on the part of the group to criticise, and of the writer to defend his thesis. 



282 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

The enrolment at the Training College for the sessions of 1925 was as 

follows : 

Men Women Total 

Spring Session 28 14 42 

Summer Session 53 48 101 

Autumn Session 10 5 15 

The organization outlined in the foregoing paragraphs provides for the 
training of full-time day teachers. There remains, however, a large number of 
evening class teachers of technical subjects who need instruction in the methods 
of teaching. The majority of these are employed in their regular callings 
during the day time, and give an evening or two a week to evening class work. 
In many cases they are the only persons in the community sufficiently versed 
in their callings to give instruction, and often do so, as a matter of public duty, 
and at the earnest solicitation of the Principal. It is out of the question to 
expect persons teaching in evening classes only to give up time and money to 
take such a training course as may be required of full-time day teachers. 

It is proposed, however, to give to such teachers some assistance in the 
work of teaching. The sessions of the Training College are so arranged that 
there is a ten weeks term in the autumn and a ten weeks term in the spring. 
This schedule is made for two reasons. First, as already stated, to make the 
period of training as short as possible and the time arrangements as convenient 
as may be for local school authorities. There is, however, another reason. 
During the months of January, February and March the members of the staff are 
available for field work. It will be part of their work to visit centres in which 
graduates of the Training College are at work in order to afford them further 
assistance in the selection, organization and presentation of their subjects. At the 
same time, they will conduct for evening class teachers, short, intensive, itinerant 
courses of say, one or two nights a week in conveniently located centres. Each 
subject of the course is made up of a small number of topics, each topic forming 
a unit of instruction in itself. The method of the course is by discussion and 
round table conference rather then by lecture. Such topics as the following 
are taken with these evening class teachers: how to arrange the subject matter 
in a suitable learning order; how to teach a lesson; the different methods of 
presentation; how to keep records and make reports; how to determine the 
needs of the pupil and to adjust the course to meet those needs, etc. From this 
work it is hoped that there may result a better adaptation of the evening classes 
to the needs of the community, an improvement in the teaching methods, and 
consequently a greater efficiency in the evening class programme. 

F. P. Gavin, 

Principal. 
Hamilton, February 28th, 1926. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 283 



APPENDIX U 

ONTARIO SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

The Attendance 

The average attendance for the session which ended June, 1925, was 131. 
School opened in September, 1924, with 129 in attendance. Before the end of 
the school term in June, 1925, four new pupils entered, making a total attend- 
ance of 133, of whom eighty-three were boys and fifty girls. 

The number of pupils registered for the twelve months of the official year, 
from October 31st, 1924, to the same date in 1925, was 157; just four less than 
in the preceding year. The total registration at the opening of the school in 
September, 1925, was 135. 

At the opening of the school in September, 1925, twenty-two pupils had not 
returned, of whom nineteen were boys and three girls. Of these, six graduated; 
six had too much sight and returned to public school; three remained home to 
receive treatment for their eyes; three were unsuitable; two remained out on 
account of ill health; one died; and one did not return for reasons unknown. 

There were nineteen new pupils when school reopened, coming from the 
Provinces of Ontario, Manitoba, Alberta, and Saskatchewan. 

Staff 

There were no changes in the teaching staff during the year. Miss Scace 
was appointed Matron and her position as Boys' Nurse was taken by Mrs. 
Emma Thompson. 

Health of Pupils 

An epidemic of scarlet fever broke out in the month of February and 
fifteen pupils had to be transferred to the isolation ward of the Brantford Gen- 
eral Hospital. The Medical Health Officer of Brantford applied the Dick test 
to all the pupils in the school, and the results form an interesting part of Dr. 
Marquis's report contained elsewhere. There were also several cases of chicken- 
pox, but these were of a very mild type. 

Upon the advice of the school physician several pupils had their tonsils 
removed during the summer vacation and there has been a marked improvement 
in their general health as a result. 

A young lad named Allen Clarke, whose home was in Toronto, died during 
the spring term of cerebral trouble caused by a tumour resulting from a fall in 
his early childhood. 

Improvements in Main Building 

The interior of the main building was much improved during the summer. 
The wood work and walls were painted throughout. The boys' washroom and 



284 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

lavatory were taken out and replaced with new ones, modern and up-to-date 
in every respect. 

New apparatus was added also to the playground, and additional lockers 
in the boys' hall. 

June Concert 

The programme presented by the pupils at the closing of the summer session 
in June always attracts a large gathering, and last June was no exception. The 
reputation which our concerts have enjoyed for many years was well sustained 
by the literary, dramatic, gymnastic and musical numbers presented. Many 
visitors from outside were present and expressed themselves as highly gratified 
with what they saw. 

Social Evenings 

One of the delights of our pupils is when they are able to entertain their 
friends in the city to a social evening. They are so frequently the recipients 
of favours of different kinds at the hands of their friends that they enjoy the 
pleasure of reciprocity in kind. And it is, in my opinion, an essential feature 
of our pupils' education that they be given an opportunity to meet their friends 
in a social way. Education is many-sided, and the side which develops self- 
confidence, poise and personality should not be overlooked. Dances held in 
the gymnasium followed by a lunch served in the club room give the boys and 
the girls in their different turns the privilege of sharing in some of the pleasures 
which are not an unimportant feature of the training of young people of the 
present age. I have pleasure in vouching for the manly bearing and dignified 
behaviour of our pupils on these occasions. 

Talented Pupils 

It is always a matter of surprise to our visitors to learn that the pupils of 
the school follow the same course of study as in the public and separate schools. 
All subjects prescribed by the school curriculum are taught except Art, and the 
textbooks in general are all the same, but printed, of course, in Braille. 

Blind children hold their own remarkably well with seeing pupils. In an 
essay-writing competition this year one of the little girls in the Junior Third 
Class won a thirty-five dollar prize for a description of an imaginary trip around 
the world, and two others received fifty dollars for prize messages written to 
Queen Mary. 

The Alumni Meeting in June 

The members of the Alumni Association held their biennial convention in 
the school again this year, and carried through the best arranged programme 
since their organization. They assembled to the number of 140 from various 
parts of the Province and as on previous occasions the meeting of old friends 
was a genuine delight. 

Miss Nesbitt, of Walkerton, was a graceful presiding officer, and after the 
opening invocation struck a very high note in her presidential address. She 
emphasized the importance to the blind of meeting together in conventions, for 
they usually stand alone in their own communities. Their aim should be to 
discover their own particular gifts and to use them diligently, as the things that 
cost most eventually bring into people's lives the most joy. The secret of being 
companionable to others is first to be pleasant company for ourselves. Miss 
Nesbitt warned her comrades against going through life with a wail, and urged 
them to sound a note of encouragement always. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 285 

Mr. Albert Lott, of Brussels, had been awarded the prize by the executive 
for the best poem to be used as an Alumni song. Tunes were submitted for this 
song and judged by the Alumni, the choice going to the composition of Miss 
Florence Wright, of Harrow. This song was sung at the opening of all the 
sessions and always with great heartiness, the words being reminiscent of school 
days and the air most tuneful. 

Mr. Askelon Leppard, of Queensville, a farmer of forty years' experience, 
spoke on the topic, "Is it wise for the blind to spend much time in intellectual 
development." Mr. Leppard in his address revealed a mind richly stored with 
the treasures of literature. He elaborated upon the value of a cultured and well- 
informed mind to the man who had to devote a lifetime to tasks of manual 
labour. He spoke of the philosophic mind thus developed and its power to 
resist the invasion of despair and discouragement so common to the lot of the 
blind. The blind, he said, could not pursue travelled roads, but had to hew 
out their own particular paths. 

Mr. Viets, a very successful blind life underwriter, of Toronto, spoke most 
interestingly of how the blind make a success as insurance salesmen. Insurance 
is sold by a combination of the brain and the tongue, and he gave instances of 
the success of many who had entered upon this field of labour. 

Miss Mary Common, of Gait, spoke of piano tuning as a desirable vocation 
for blind girls and gave as evidence her own successful experience. 

Miss Ethel Charlton, daughter of the Hon. W. A. Charlton, gave an address 
upon "Courage," which was one of the most inspiring of the convention. The 
salient points of the address were: "Courage is the mainspring of our spiritual 
life. It is for us to remember that our deficiency is only physical. Yet the 
majority of people are more dependent on their sight than on any other sense. 
What happens when the electric light of a city fails? The sighted are simply 
lost until it returns, and usually go to sleep in the meantime. This is too often 
the viewpoint that the sighted take towards us, and because of this attitude, 
it is a temptation for us to relax our efforts, for nothing is more precious than 
the sympathy of others. But to indulge in idleness means death. If the world 
withholds recognition and appreciation, let us not despair, for this has been 
the fate of better men and women than ourselves. If our efforts are crowned 
with success, let us rejoice, but it is not from this that our real strength comes. 
It comes from the divine fire within us." 

Excellent addresses were also given by Mr. Robert Stewart, of Hamilton, 
on piano tuning, and Mr. Herbert Treneer, of Toronto, on music teaching. 

Interspersed with these papers were musical selections by Messrs. Charles 
Duff, H. Treneer, Miss Kathryn Sells, and others, in which the organ, the 
piano, the violin and the human voice all showed the result of an artistic training 
and experience. 

Mr. Rafter, graduate of Queen's University and editor of the local newspaper 
in Arthur, gave a brief impromptu address in which he emphasized the value of 
the Alumni gatherings and spoke glowingly of the feeling of friendliness being 
developed between the ex-pupils and the officials of the school. 

A resolution was passed asking that the Annual Report of the school should 
be published again in separate form and sent to the members of the Alumni 
and the parents of the pupils attending the school. The meeting was brought 
to a close with the election of Herbert Treneer as president; Miss Enid Loop as 
first vice-president; and Mr. I. Knapp, of Windsor, as second vice-president. 

W. B. Race, 
Brantford, December, 1925. Superintendent. 



286 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

PHYSICIAN'S REPORT 

I beg leave to submit my report as physician to the school for the year 
ending October 31st, 1925. 

The session was a very strenuous one in the Hospital owing largely to 
epidemics of scarlet fever, chicken-pox and influenza. Exclusive of the scarlet 
fever cases, which were taken care of in the Brantford General Hospital, there 
were 162 bed patients aggregating 796 days in bed. In referring to the scarlet 
fever outbreak, I wish to express my appreciation for the assistance and co- 
operation given us by Dr. W. Hutton, M.O.H. for Brantford, who carried out 
the Dick tests and serum treatments. The results were most gratifying. I 
am including a paragraph from his annual report: 

"An epidemic of scarlet fever at the Ontario School for the Blind, which started January 
20th, gave us an opportunity to demonstrate the value of the Dick test in picking out those 
who were liable to take the disease. One hundred and ten pupils were tested on January 28th. 
Seventy-two were Dick negative and therefore not liable to contract scarlet fever. Thirty- 
eight were Dick positive and therefore liable to contract the disease, and from this group eight 
additional children developed scarlet fever. The Dick negative group remained free from 
disease. On February 16th, we injected the Dick positive group with preventive serum and this 
practically ended the epidemic, as there was only one additional case, and the school thereafter 
remained free of disease." 

The following is a list of disabilities including one death: — Scarlet fever, 13 
cases; Chicken-pox, 14 cases; Fractures, 2 cases; Minor injuries, 4 cases; 
Jaundice, 1 case; Bronchitis, 1 case; Pneumonia, 1 case; Influenza, 118 cases; 
Tonsilitis, 10 cases; Cerebral tumour, 1 case — fatal. 

The single death during the year occurred in a child who developed an 
acute condition in an old standing trouble. I cannot close my report without 
drawing your attention to the very excellent and painstaking character of 
the work done by Miss Wright, the nurse in charge of our Hospital. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. A. Marquis. 
Brantford, January 12th, 1926. 



DENTISTS REPORT 

I have the honour to submit the following report for the year ending October 
31st, 1925: 

During the term the teeth of all the pupils have been examined and 
attended to. 

Thirty pupils required almost no attention. Eight girls and twenty-one 
boys needed but very little, just