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REPORT 



OF THE 



Minister of Education 

Province of Ontario 



FOR THE YEAR \ 



1937 



PRINTED BY ORDER OF 

THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY OF ONTARIO 

SESSIONAL PAPER No. 11, 1938 




ONTARIO 





TORONTO 
Printed and Published by T. E. Bowman, Printer to the King's Most Excellent Majesty 

1938 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



PAGE 

EPORT OF THE MINISTER 1 



Aa 



APPENDICES 
PART I 



ppendix A — Report of the Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools 5 

Appendix B — Report of the Chief Inspector of Secondary Schools 16 

Appendix C — Report of the Director of Professional Training 21 

Appendix D — Report of the Director of French Instruction on the Schools At- 
tended by French-Speaking Pupils 24 

Appendix E — Report of the Principal of the Ontario Training College for Tech- 
nical Teachers 31 

Appendix F — Report of the Inspector of Agricultural Classes 35 

Appendix G — Report of the Inspector of Auxiliary Classes 40 

Appendix H — Report of the Director of School Attendance 49 

Appendix I — Report of the Inspector of Public Libraries 52 

Appendix J — Report of the Superintendent of the Ontario School for the Deaf . . 67 

Appendix K — Report of the Superintendent of the Ontario School for the Blind . 78 

Appendix L — Report of the Provincial Supervisor of Music 90 

PART II 

Statistics of the Provincially-Con trolled Schools of Ontario 

Summary for 1936 98 

Average Costs per Pupil-Day, 1936, and Comparison with 1935 99 

Distribution of Pupils by Age, Sex and Grade, May, 1937 101 

Comparative Statistics, 1912-1936— 

I. — Elementary Schools: 

A — Public and Separate Schools 103 

B — Roman Catholic Separate Schools 106 

C — Protestant Separate Schools 106 

D — High School Entrance Examination Results 106 

E— Fifth Classes 107 

II. — Secondary Schools: 

A — Continuation Schools 107 

B — Collegiate Institutes and High Schools 108 

C — Vocational and Senior Auxiliary Schools 109 

III. — Teachers and Training Schools: 

A — Normal and Normal-Model Schools 110 

B — Departmental Summer Courses Ill 

C — Trend in grade of Teachers' Certificates in English-French Schools Ill 

D — Professional Certificates Issued during the Last Ten Years 112 

E — Teachers' Institutes 112 

IV. — Enrolment and Population: 

A — Adolescent Enrolment and Exemptions 112 

B — School Enrolment and Provincial Population 113 

V. — Comparative Summaries: 

A — Pupil Movement 113 

B — Pupils, Teachers, and Teachers' Salaries 114 

C — General Statistical Abstract 115 

Detailed Statistics — 

I. Elementary Schools: 

A. Public and Separate Schools — 

Table 1 — Enrolment and Attendance 116 

Table 2 — Attendance Efficiency by Various Periods 122 

Table 3 — Admissions, Transfers, Retirements, Exemptions 122 

Table 4 — Classification of Rural Schools by Teachers and Attendance 123 

Table 5— Fifth Classes (Grades IX and X) 124 

[iii] 



iv TABLE OF CONTENTS No. 11 

Detailed Statistics — Continued 

PAGE 

Table 6 — Distribution of Teachers and Certificates 128 

Table 7 — High School Entrance Examination Results 130 

Table 8 — Agriculture, Music, Manual Training and Household Science in 

Rural Schools 136 

Table 9 — Educational and Health Equipment 139 

Table 10— School Health Inspection 146 

B. Public Schools- 

Table 11— Age-Grade Distribution 152 

Table 12 — Efficiency Tests applied to City Schools 155 

Table 13 — Promotion and Retardation, Cities 156 

Table 14 — Teachers' Salaries — Highest, Lowest, Average 159 

Table 15 — Teachers' Salaries — Range 161 

Table 16 — Trend in Lower Salaries of Rural Teachers 162 

Table 17 — Percentage Teacher Turnover in Rural Schools 163 

Table 18— Financial Statistics . 164 

Table 19 — Percentage Analysis of Current Expenditures, in Cities and Large 

Towns 183 

Table 20— Consolidated Schools 184 

Table 21— Low Attendance Schools 188 

Table 22— Protestant Separate Schools 190 

C. Roman Catholic Separate Schools — 

Table 23— Age-Grade Distribution 191 

Table 24— Financial Statistics 194 

Table 25— Teachers' Salaries 202 

II. Secondary Schools : 

A. General — 

Table 26 — Classification of Academic Pupils by Subjects of Study 204 

Table 27 — Admissions and Destinations of Pupils 206 

Table 28 — Departmental Examination Results 207 

Table 29— Teachers' Salaries— Range 211 

B. Continuation Schools — 

Table 30 — Enrolment, Attendance, Grading 212 

Table 31— Age-Grade Distribution 215 

Table 32— Financial Statistics 216 

C. High Schools and Collegiate Institutes — 

Table 33 — Enrolment, Attendance, Grading 224 

Table 34— Financial Statistics 228 

Table 35— Age-Grade Distribution 236 

D. Vocational Schools — 

(1) Day Schools: 

Table 36 — Enrolment, Attendance, Grading 238 

Table 37— Age-Grade Distribution 240 

Table 38— Classification of Students by Subjects of Study 241 

Table 39— Financial Statistics 242 

(2) Night Schools: 

Table 40— Teachers and Pupils 244 

Table 41— Classification of Pupils by Subjects of Study 246 

III. Senior Auxiliary Schools: 

Table 42 — Enrolment, Attendance, Grading 248 

Table 43 — Age-Grade Distribution 248 

Table 44— Financial Statistics 248 

IV. Miscellaneous: 

Table 45 — Professional Certificates Issued during 1937 250 

Table 46 — Classification of School Centres by Counties and Districts 251 

Table 47 — Inspectors and Inspectorates 255 

Table 48 — Departmental Publications 262 

V. Graphs: 

Graph I— The Ontario School System 9b 

Graph II— Unit Cost of Education 100 

Graph III— Average Salary of a Public School Teacher in Each Province 158 

Graph IV — Comparison of Secondary School Enrolment 203 

PART III 

Report of the Committee of Enquiry into the Cost of Education 265 



REPORT 

OF THE 



Minister of Education 



FOR THE YEAR 1937 



To The Honourable Albert Matthews, LL.D., 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of Ontario. 

Your Honour, — 

I beg leave to present to your Honour the Report of the Department of 
Education for the year 1937. 

The revision of the Courses of Study for the first six grades of the elementary 
school, and the establishment of a new course for the pupils of Grade IX, the first 
year in secondary schools, were two important changes in the educational system 
of Ontario during the period under review. The revised programme for Grades 
I to VI was drawn by a committee of teachers who, in the course of their work, 
examined curricula of other systems, studied reports of educational investiga- 
tions, and consulted teachers and inspectors in every part of the province. Special 
indebtedness is acknowledged to the reports of the Consultative Committee of 
the Board of Education, Great Britain. Purposely flexible, the courses permit 
choice of topics, within reasonable limits by the teacher, and encourage habits 
of initiative and self-dependence upon the part of the pupil. 

The revised course for Grade IX is common to all pupils entering the second- 
ary schools. The year is regarded as an exploratory period during which the pupil 
may find the course for which he is best adapted. The introduction of practical 
courses in Shop Work for boys and Home Economics for girls is an outstanding 
feature of the revision. For pupils who will leave school at the end of Grade X, 
as many do, complete units of work are planned in certain subjects. As a result, 
pupils whose course is limited to two years may work with a goal, receive a better 
training, and realize the satisfaction that attends definite achievement. 

Emphasis upon the "newness" of the revised programme would be mislead- 
ing. The aim of the committees carrying out the work has not been novelty. 
Their concern has been the pupil's physical and intellectual development and the 
formation of sound character. They have endeavoured to present opportunities 
to those ends, and have made their selection in the light of the best available 
educational opinion. The courses of study in previous use served well in their 
day, and the teachers of those courses did faithful and devoted work. It has been 

in 



2 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

a deep satisfaction to find the teaching body keenly alive to the changing needs, 
and eager to co-operate in adapting the curriculum to meet them. Boards of 
Trustees have lent substantial aid by providing equipment and accommodations, 
particularly for such courses as Home Economics, Shop Work, and Agriculture. 
Home and School Clubs and other organizations have led the way to better 
understanding by arranging for addresses and discussions on current educational 
trends. These proofs of active interest have been welcomed in the Department. 
In September, 1938, it is planned to proceed with new courses for Grades 
VII and VIII in the elementary schools, and for Grade X in the secondary schools. 
All phases of the revised programme are under constant review by teachers, 
principals, and inspectors, and such changes will be made from time to time as 
experience shows advisable. 

Teacher Training 

The enrolment at the Normal Schools for the 1937-38 session was 1,087, 
approximately the same as that for 1936-37. It is a matter of at least partial 
satisfaction to report that the accumulated surplus of elementary teachers 
trained in previous years is gradually being absorbed, but the fact must also be 
interpreted as a warning that a scarcity of teachers may occur within a few years 
unless rising salaries make the teaching profession more attractive to the gradu- 
ates of our secondary schools. 

The Director of French Instruction points out in his report that 79.46 per 
cent, of French-speaking teachers now hold First or Second Class teaching certi- 
ficates, a marked increase since 1929 when only 25.11 per cent, of the group were 
so qualified. The improved situation is a tribute to the faithful work of the 
teachers themselves, and to the useful service of the University of Ottawa 
Normal School. 

Attendance at Departmental summer courses showed an increase of more 
than one-third over the enrolment of the previous year. More than 6,500 teachers 
were registered in these classes, while another large group was served by courses 
offered by the universities. The steadily improving qualifications of the teaching 
staff will find their reflection in the work of the schools. 

The appointment of a Supervising and Helping Teacher in Carleton County 
in September, 1937, marked the beginning of another effort to assist teachers-in- 
service. Administrative duties make it impossible for local inspectors to devote 
their full time to the improvement of classroom work. By enlarging the in- 
spectoral area in Carleton County, and by appointing a Helping Teacher to work 
with the Inspector, it has been found possible to give increased supervision — 
particularly to new and inexperienced teachers. The success of this plan may 
lead to its adoption in other suitable areas. 

Organization 

The problem of rural schools with fewer than ten pupils enrolled has con- 
tinued to receive attention. Such schools operate at high cost per pupil, and 
provide less satisfactory educational opportunities than schools with greater 
attendance. Twenty-eight schools with low enrolments were closed during 1937, 
bringing the total number closed during two years to fifty-eight. The pupils on 
the whole will receive better training in neighbouring schools at a saving in cost 
to the province and local communities. 

Interest in possible larger units of school administration is evident here and 
there throughout the province. Twelve township school areas are now in opera- 
tion, and it would appear that further areas will be formed by local authorities 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



as the ratepayers come to appreciate the advantages of the larger unit. The 
formation of a township school area does not imply consolidation of schools. 
Under the larger unit the schools continue as they are unless a change is desired 
by the trustees and the people themselves. 

Poliomyelitis 

The epidemic of infantile paralysis or poliomyelitis during the autumn of 
1937 was responsible for a number of pupils being confined to hospitals or their 
homes during lengthy periods of convalescence. Under the direction of the 
Inspector of Auxiliary Classes, prompt measures were taken to meet this situa- 
tion. Home instruction units, visiting teacher classes, hospital classes, or cor- 
respondence courses provided for the educational care of 276 of these cases. The 
Department of Education acknowledges with gratitude the splendid co-operation 
received from hospitals, the Ontario Society for Crippled Children, and school 
boards in meeting this educational emergency. 

Examinations 

The emphasis upon external examinations has been decreasing in recent 
years. The practice of granting standing to students with good term records has 
gradually been extended to include all Departmental examinations from High 
School Entrance to Normal School graduation. During 1937, a further step was 
taken by the abolition of final Departmental papers in Lower School subjects. 
Pupils in the first two years of the secondary schools are now granted standing 
upon the basis of their principals' recommendations. 

School Libraries 

It has been said that the three factors of greatest importance in the school 
are the child, the teacher, and the book. A significant outcome of the curricular 
revision has been the increased supplementary reading done by pupils in both 
elementary and secondary schools. Guidance to teachers and trustees in the 
selection of helpful titles has been given by book lists included in the study pro- 
grammes. Publishers have co-operated by providing book-displays at summer 
schools and Teachers' Institutes. Boards of Trustees have made a special effort 
to increase their library purchases on the recommendation of their Principals and 
Inspectors. As a result, the bookshelves of our schools are lengthening, and 
readable and usable books are proving their worth as teaching aids. Tribute 
must also be paid to the public libraries in many centres where a sharp increase 
in junior circulation has occurred and where special efforts have been made to 
meet the call of the schools. 

Text-Books 

During the year 1937 the new Life and Literature Readers, Books One and 
Two, were authorized to replace the former Fourth Book. The new Readers 
provide a separate book for each of Grades VII and VIII, and together they 
contain more than twice the amount of reading material available in the former 
book. It is hoped that the increased number of selections and the appended 
book lists will encourage extensive reading on the part of the pupils. 

The Second Reader in use in Grades III and IV has been authorized for the 
past fifteen years. During this time definite advances has been made in reading 
books for children, and it is evident that a change is advisable. It is planned to 
introduce two Readers to replace the present book in September, 1938. 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



A year ago I drew attention in my report to the need of separate Arithmetic 
text-books for the elementary grades, in order to provide a more generous range 
of material suitable for each grade level, to present problems more closely con- 
nected with community life, and to bring classroom practice in line with the 
results of recent research in the subject. In September, 1937, new Junior Arith- 
metics for Grades III and IV were authorized for use in the schools. The series 
will be extended to serve Grades V and VI in September, 1938. 

Report on Educational Costs 

The Report of the Committee appointed in May, 1935, to enquire into the 
cost of education in the Province of Ontario appears as an appendix in the pages 
that follow. The members of the Committee were: D. McArthur, Deputy 
Minister of Education, Chairman; G. F. Rogers, Chief Inspector of Secondary 
Schools, Vice- Chairman; E. C. Desormeaux, Ottawa Separate School Board; 
V. K. Greer, Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools; W. T. Kernahan, 
Toronto; E. L. Longmore, formerly Mayor of Timmins; B. B. Patten, Secretary, 
vSt. George Continuation School; and John Stuart, Clerk of Middlesex County. 
Mr. J. D. Campbell, Assistant Chief Inspector of Public and Separate Schools, 
acted as Secretary. The Committee sat in various centres throughout the prov- 
ince, hearing representations from municipal and school officials, teachers' and 
other organizations, and private citizens. The information thus secured was 
supplemented by study of Departmental records. As the work proceeded, the 
findings of the Committee proved of value to the Department when subjects 
contained in the reference came up for consideration. The province is indebted 
to the members of this Committee for their painstaking survey of a pressing 
problem. Their final report submitted on March 25, 1938, merits the close stud}' 
of all who are interested in educational administration. 

Conclusion 

In the appended reports and statistics will be found detailed information 
concerning the various branches of the educational service of this province. 



Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. Simpson, 

Minister of Education. 



Toronto, December 1, 1938. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



APPENDIX A 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC 
AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 



The Provincial Inspectoral Staff, 1937 

I. Resignations: 

Mr. J. M. Kaine, B.A., retired from active service in the capacity of Public 
School Inspector for the District of Timiskaming in August, 1937. He had a 
wide and varied experience in many classes of schools. Educated in the Gorrie 
Public School and in the Clinton and Harriston High Schools, he turned to teaching 
as a profession, and took his training courses in the Ottawa Normal School and 
the School of Pedagogy at Hamilton. After a rural experience of nine years in 
Huron County, he became Principal of the Model School at Sault Ste. Marie and, 
at a later date, Supervising Principal of the city schools. In 1911 he graduated 
from Queen's University, and thereafter was appointed to the position of Principal 
of the English-French Model School at Sturgeon Falls, under the Department of 
Education. He was called from time to time into special service as instructor in, 
or principal of, Summer Schools at Sault Ste. Marie, Sturgeon Falls, and Port 
Arthur. Two years ago he assumed charge of the inspectorship of Timiskaming, 
where he was able to bring to bear his practical attainments and wise judgment 
derived from his many-sided contacts with schools of varied character. He was 
always a friend of the aspiring pupil, a safe counsellor to boards and parents, and 
he gave unsparingly of his time and effort to the promotion of the highest ideals 
in the cause of education. 

Dr. N. S. MacDonald, B.A., was born in the County of Durham, receiving 
his public school training in Union School Section No. 2, 22 Clarke and Darlington. 
He later attended the Bowmanville High School, from which he graduated with a 
Senior Leaving certificate and Honour Matriculation standing. His first pro- 
fessional training as a teacher was received in the Port Hope Model School. He 
began his work as a teacher in the rural schools of his native county. On gradu- 
ating from the Normal College in Hamilton in 1899 he was appointed Principal 
of Richmond Hill Public School. One year later he was given a position on the 
Toronto Public School staff, and in 1907 became Principal of Duke Street School. 
In subsequent years he held similar positions in Cottingham School, Bolton 
Avenue School, Dufferin School, and Ryerson School. In the meantime he 
graduated from Queen's University and also obtained his degree of Doctor of 
Pedagogy from the University of Toronto. In 1918 he was appointed a Public 
School Inspector to succeed the late Mr. W. F. Chapman, B.A. He retired from 
his duties as inspector on August 31st, 1937. Dr. MacDonald possesses those 
qualities of mind and heart which made him an inspiring, progressive, co-opera- 
tive, and very efficient teacher and inspector. His abilities and his sympathetic 
understanding of the teacher and her problems won him the confidence and 
esteem of teachers and pupils in the schools in which he served as teacher, as 
principal, and subsequently as inspector. Dr. MacDonald has been frequently 
a member on Departmental Committees. His judgment on provincial educa- 
tional problems was always valued highly. 



6 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

Mr. Alexander Mowat, B.A., who had been inspector of public schools in the 
City of Peterborough for nearly thirty years, retired on July 31st, 1937, lacking 
but one year of half a century in educational work. Few persons who enter the 
teaching profession have a record of so long, so faithful, and so successful experi- 
ence. Mr. Mowat was born in Scotland. He came to Canada with his parents 
when only six years of age. They settled in Haldimand County, where Mr. 
Mowat received his early education. Later he attended the Port Rowan High 
School and the Aylmer Collegiate Institute. After graduating from a Model 
School be began his work as a teacher in the rural schools of Haldimand County. 
Three years later he entered the University of Toronto and graduated therefrom 
in 1891. His experience as a high school teacher included principalships in the 
Meaford High School, the Seaforth Collegiate Institute, and the Brockville 
Collegiate Institute. In these positions he rendered excellent service, acquiring 
the reputation, which he well merited, of being an outstanding teacher and an able 
administrator. He served the public schools of the City of Peterborough faith- 
fully and well for thirty years and will be remembered not only in that city but 
throughout the province as one of the educational leaders of his day. 

J. H. Putman, B.A., D.Paed., LL.D., resigned as Chief Inspector of the 
Ottawa Public Schools on September 28th, 1937. He had occupied this position 
over a period of twenty-seven years, beginning on September 1st, 1910. Dr. 
Putman was a native of Gainsborough Township in Lincoln County and received 
his early elementary and secondary education in the home area. He later attended 
the Lincoln County Model School at B earns ville, obtaining his Third Class cer- 
tificate. After two years of teaching experience in School Section No. 12 Seneca, 
Haldimand County, he attended the Toronto Normal School. For the following 
three years and six months he served as Principal of the Ancaster Village Public 
School. His next experience was as Principal of the Eglinton Public School in 
the town of North Toronto (later the John Fisher Public School, Toronto). In 
1894 Dr. Putman was appointed to the Ottawa Normal-Model School staff and 
later to a Mastership in the Normal School. In 1899 he graduated in Arts from 
Queen's University. In 1907 he received his Bachelor of Pedagogy degree, and 
in 1910 the Doctor of Pedagogy degree, from Queen's University. During his 
experience as Chief Inspector of the Ottawa Public Schools the annual reports 
from his office have shown that there has been continuous progress in these schools 
from every point of view. Inspectors and educational leaders within Ontario and 
throughout Canada have eagerly sought these reports as indicating the best 
accomplishment and the leading trends in the field of elementary education. 
It is difficult in a short space to record the outstanding services rendered to the 
cause of education by Dr. Putman, but the following are among the positions 
filled by him: — 

1. A representative of Ontario teachers for a number of years on the 
Teachers' and Inspectors' Superannuation Commission. 

2. A member of a Commission investigating the school system of British 
Columbia. 

3. President of the Inspectors' Section of the Ontario Educational Asso- 
ciation. 

4. President of the Ontario Educational Association. 

5. Secretary of the Canadian Educational Association. 

In 1935 Dr. Putman was honoured by the University of Toronto with the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws. As teacher, Normal School master, and 
inspector, and as an educational leader, speaker and writer, Dr. Putman rendered 
a great service to the cause of education in Ottawa, Ontario, and Canada. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



Mr. J. H. Smith, B.A., retired from active service as an inspector on August 
31st, 1937. He was born in the Township of Ellice, Perth County, received his 
early education in a rural school in that township, obtained his secondary school 
education in the Mitchell High School, and his first professional training in the 
Mitchell Model School. His first years of experience as a teacher were spent in 
the rural schools of the county, and after graduating from the Ottawa Normal 
School he returned to continue the work in his native county. Again, when he 
graduated from Queen's University with honours and from the Ontario College 
of Education, he came back to Perth County. In 1907 he was appointed Prin- 
cipal of the Model School in Stratford and in the following year became Inspector 
of Public Schools in that city. In 1910 his inspectorate was enlarged to include 
five townships in the south of the county. In this field of educational work he 
devoted his efforts unstintingly, faithfully, and with entire satisfaction to all, 
until his resignation in August, 1937, several years before the compulsory age of 
retirement. Mr. Smith was engaged for forty-five years in educational service, 
and thirty years of that period were given to inspectoral duties. Mr. Smith was 
a man of great energy, always willing to assist his teachers and boards and to 
co-operate fully with the Department. He was known as the teachers' friend and 
counsellor. He left his schools greatly improved, due to his efforts and leadership, 
and those who worked with him look back with pride to the splendid educational 
service which he rendered for so many years. 



II. Appointments: 

The following appointments were made to the provincial staff of inspectors 
during the year 1937. 

1. Ottawa: Dr. McGregor Easson, B.A., Public School Inspector, Ottawa, 

to succeed Dr. J. H. Putman as Chief Inspector of the Ottawa Public 
Schools. Dr. Easson's new duties began on September 28th, 1937. 

2. Ottawa: Mr. Robert Westwater, B.A., B.Paed., Principal of York Street 

Public School, Ottawa, to succeed Dr. McGregor Easson, duties be- 
ginning November 1st, 1937. 

3. Peterborough: Mr. Keith S. Wightman, B.A., B.Paed., Principal of 

Central Public School, Peterborough, to succeed Mr. Alexander 
Mowat, B.A., as Public School Inspector for the City of Peterborough, 
duties beginning August 1st, 1937. 

4. Toronto: Mr. J. Lindsay McCullough, B.A., B.Paed., Principal of Park 

Public School, Toronto, to succeed Dr. N. S. MacDonald, B.A., on 
the Toronto staff of Public School Inspectors, duties beginning Sep- 
tember 1st, 1937. 

5. Dufferin: Mr. Alvin F. Hansuld, B.S.A., Principal of Central Public 

School, Port Arthur, to Dufferin (in part) and Peel (in part), to suc- 
ceed Mr. W. R. Liddy, B.A., duties beginning September 1st, 1937. 
This inspectorate had been vacant for a year. 

6. Glengarry: Mr. Zac. S. Phimister, B.A., B.Paed., from the staff of Law- 

rence Park Collegiate Institute, Toronto, to the inspectorate of 
Glengarry (in part) and Prescott (in part), to succeed Mr. G. N. 
Edwards, B.A., B.Paed., duties beginning September 1st, 1937. 



THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 



7. Huron East: Mr. John Hartley, Assistant to the Chief Inspector of 

Public and Separate Schools, Department of Education, to the in- 
spectorate of Huron East, to succeed Dr. John M. Field, M.A., with 
residence at Clinton, duties beginning January 1st, 1937. 

8. District Div. X: Mr. F. S. Rivers, B.A., B.Paed., Master in the North 

Bay Normal School, to act as inspector for one year in District Divi- 
sion X, Timiskaming North and Cochrane (in part), duties beginning 
September 1st, 1937. This inspectorate had been vacant for a year. 

9. District Div. XI: Mr. W. L. Lovell, B.A., Science Master in Kirkland 

Lake High School, to District Division XI (Timiskaming, in part), 
to succeed Mr. John M. Kaine, B.A., duties beginning September 1st, 
1937. 

10. R.C.S.S. Div. II: Mr. Laurier Carriere, B.A., Principal of Garneau 

Separate School, Ottawa, to R.C.S.S. Division II to succeed Mr. 
Adelard Gascon, B.A., with residence at Sudbury, duties beginning 
September 1st, 1937. 

11. R.C.S.S. Div. XIX: Mr. Lucien Laplante, B. A., of the Ottawa Separate 

School staff, to a new Roman Catholic Separate School inspectorate 
to be known as Division XIX, composed of separate schools in Ottawa 
and along the Ottawa River from Ottawa to North Bay. His duties 
began on November 1st, 1937. 

III. Transfers: 

Mr. G. N. Edwards, B.A., B.Paed., who was appointed to the inspectorate 
of Glengarry (in part) and Prescott (in part) in 1931, was transferred to the in- 
spectorate of Perth South and City of Stratford, duties beginning September 
1st, 1937. 

Superannuation of Inspectors 

At the regular session of the Legislature in 1937, amendments were made to 
The Teachers' and Inspectors' Superannuation Act and to The Public Service 
vSuperannuation Act to permit some 67 Public and Separate School Inspectors to 
transfer from the former to the latter scheme of superannuation. The amend- 
ments required that all contributions in behalf of the inspector, by the Govern- 
ment and by the inspector himself, be transferred from the Teachers' Fund to the 
Public vService Fund; that each inspector at the time of superannuation should 
receive credit for his full experience as an inspector; that at the time of super- 
annuation the inspector receive the amount of pension calculated either on the 
basis of the Teachers' scheme or on the basis of the Public Service scheme, which- 
ever is the larger at the time of superannuation ; that each inspector pay into the 
Public Service Fund any additional amount required to make his contributions 
complete to date for the period of service credited ; that every public and separate 
school inspector appointed by the Minister of Education in future be required to 
transfer to the Public Service scheme immediately on his appointment. This 
privilege of transfer was greatly appreciated by the inspectors, for it made possible, 
for each inspector's widow, a pension to the date of her death of an amount equal 
to one-half of the pension due to the inspector at the date of his retirement. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



A Supervising and Helping Teacher 

Section 117 (1) of The Public Schools Act states that, "Subject to the regu- 
lations it shall be the duty of every public school inspector to bring about improve- 
ment in the work done in the classrooms by inspiring the teachers and pupils 
and by sympathetically assisting the teachers to improve their practice." 

In Ontario, officials of the Department of Education as well as the inspectors 
themselves have constantly believed that the local inspector, because of exacting 
office and administrative duties, has not been able to do full justice to the im- 
provement of the work being done in the classroom and at the school. 

On September 1st, 1937. the inspectorate of Mr. T. P. Maxwell, B.A., was 
enlarged to include all of the County of Carleton except the City of Ottawa, 
and at midsummer, 1937, the Minister appointed a Supervising and Helping 
Teacher in Carleton County. In this extended area the supervision of the work 
of 154 teachers was required. Miss Florence E- Johnstone, of the staff of Hilson 
Avenue Public School, Nepean Township, was appointed to work with Mr. Max- 
well as the Supervising and Helping Teacher. During the current school year, 
September, 1937 — June, 1938, the work of this special teacher has been more or 
less experimental, but the following results are already evident: — 

1. More assistance is being given to new and inexperienced teachers. 

2. Newer phases of work, such as Health Teaching, Social Studies, Games, 
the selection of pupils requiring special training, the introduction of the 
new programme of studies, the better use of the school library, etc., are 
receiving more attention. 

3. The inspector has more time to meet teachers in groups, to plan the work 
of the inspectorate, to assist teachers and trustees through bulletins, and 
to visit more thoroughly a limited number of schools. 

It is too early to determine to what extent it may be advisable to have an 
inspector with a helping teacher supervise and inspect the schools in each county 
area; but there is no doubt that their combined services in the larger area will 
have a greater value to the schools than would be the case by the reduction of 
the number of schools under each inspector. 



The New Programme of Studies, Grades I to VI 

The committee composed of Mr. Thornton Mustard, M.A., B.Paed., of the 
Toronto Normal School staff, and Mr. Stanley A. Watson, B.A., Principal of 
Keele Street Public School, Toronto, continued its work on the new programme of 
studies for Grades I to VI. After making a preliminary draft of the proposed new 
courses, the committee went through the province in April, May, and June, and 
met Normal School staffs, inspectors, principals, and teachers, in 'groups, obtain- 
ing suggestions and criticisms from them with respect to the new courses. In 
early July a first edition of the courses was printed and distributed to each 
teacher in attendance at the summer schools and to the staffs in charge of these 
summer courses. Again, the proposed courses were subject to much discussion 
and criticism, and further modifications were made. In the latter part of August 
the programme was printed and sent to all teachers of the elementary school 
grades. 



10 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

At the Teachers' Institutes held during the autumn term, members of the 
committee, officials of the Department, and the local inspectors spoke and led 
further discussions relating to the changes. As the year closed it was felt that the 
new courses had been well received and that better work would be done in the 
elementary grades because of (i) the greater emphasis on the child's active parti- 
cipation in the work of the school, (ii) the greater element of choice given to the 
teacher, (iii) the increased supplementary reading done by the pupils, and (iv) the 
emphasis upon internal tests rather than external examinations of uniform type. 

It is most gratifying to note the willing co-operation of boards of trustees in 
providing funds for the purchase of books and equipment. It is safe to estimate 
that the year 1937 was a record one in Ontario for the purchase of library books 
and school equipment. 

Correspondence Courses 

At the outset it may be stated that the correspondence courses as at present 
conducted are one of the greatest achievements of the Ontario Department of 
Education. The following are admitted to these courses: — 

1. Those who are out of reach of a school for the whole of the school year. 

2. Those who are out of reach of a school in the winter but who can attend 
during the fall and early summer. 

3. Those who are within reach of a school but who are physically unable to 
attend. There are about three hundred such pupils. 

4. Children of missionaries of Ontario serving in foreign countries. 

5. Persons in Ontario Sanatoria. There are about one hundred and fifty 
admissions from this group. 

6. Other cases considered on their merits. 

A number of schools with a small attendance have been closed, and in some 
cases the children have been enrolled in the correspondence courses when the 
school was closed. In other cases transportation has been stopped for the winter 
months and the pupils have been enrolled in the correspondence courses. In all 
these cases, about 150 have been added to the roll. From this, and the whole 
history of the correspondence courses, it will be seen that the Government saves 
each year very considerable sums of money by having the correspondence courses. 

From the examination of our records we find that during the school year 
September 1st, 1937, to January 15th, 1938, we have enrolled 2,400 in our corre- 
spondence courses. To these might be added those in the Sanatoria, which would 
bring the total enrolment up to 2,500. The fact that we are daily in receipt of 
letters of appreciation from those making use of the correspondence courses, such 
letters numbering thousands, would indicate that the lessons are thorough and 
satisfactory. 

Railway School Cars 

The Railway School Car has proven itself perfectly adapted to its purpose 
of carrying education and social betterment to scores of smaller communities 
scattered along the railway lines in Northern Ontario. Not only have hundreds 
of children received a training for life which would otherwise have been denied, 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 11 

but the entire social and even domestic life of these settlements has changed under 
its influence. The following extracts from teachers' reports verify the truth: — 

After nearly seven years of service one is able to look back and compare conditions as they 
were at the beginning with those that now exist. Except in very rare cases there has been steady 
improvement in both social and economic conditions. In many homes we find radios and other 
facilities for enjoyment that delight frugal parents. We see a certain optimism and energy of 
outlook that is born of small successes hardly but steadily gained. In the children we find a healthy 
attitude to life imbibed from school car influence. 

A. D. Clement, Teacher, C.N.R. School Car No. 3. 



The attitude of parents and children has made our duty a pleasant one. Back of this local 
co-operation is the usual sympathetic spirit of the Department of Education through its supervisor, 
the splendid generosity of the Ontario Car Schools' Auxiliary of Toronto, and the consistent 
courtesy and help of the railway officials and emplo^*^ all of whom have made the experience 
a very happy one. 

Henry Antoniak, Teacher, C.P.R. School Car No. 2. 



They are among the best pupils I have ever taught and we expect great things in life from 
them. As proof of this, Rene Thibault, who received his entire education on the School Car, after 
reaching the University of Ottawa Normal School in eight years, is now teaching Senior IV Grade 
in Blind River School. Odilon, his brother, came second highest among twenty-two competitors 
in the Civil Service examination, got his High School Entrance and two years of high school with 
the school car and is now in a good position in Sudbury Post Office. Agatha Chene of Kinogama 
is receiving exceptional honour in Washington School of Art. A former pupil has completed a 
course in Radio Engineering and is building up his finances as a sectionman to go into this business 
in Sudbury. The two Clement boys are with a diamond drill crew steadily, and a number of others 
are employed in the nickel mines. All of our graduates are giving a good account of themselves; 
none are unemployed. 

W. H. McNally, Teacher, C.P.R. School Car No. 1. 

This is direct and convincing evidence of the unique service rendered by the 
school car and its faithful teachers in a field where the chances of the children 
were otherwise utterly hopeless. 

Exchange Teachers 

For the school year 1936-37, 44 teachers from Ontario are on exchange, either 
with overseas teachers or with teachers in other provinces of Canada. This is 
the same number as were on exchange for the two previous school years, and is 
the largest number of exchange teachers from the province since the exchange 
system was started some twenty-five years ago. The exchange is, no doubt, of 
great benefit to the teachers and also to the children in their schools. 

The Ontario teachers at present on exchange are from Toronto, York County, 
Tarn worth, Ingersoll, Stamford Centre, Kitchener, Port Credit, Whitby, London, 
Port Colborne, Burlington, Windsor, Riverside, Kingston, Cobalt, Leamington, 
Arnprior, St. Catharines, and Thorold. 

Summer Courses 

The enrolments for summer courses, as follows for each of the past two 
years, indicate the determination on the part of the teachers to advance their 
qualifications and to prepare themselves for the teaching of the special subjects 
which are being introduced each year in a larger number of the elementary schools : 



12 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



1936 



1937 



Agriculture 

Art 

Auxiliary Classes 

Commercial 

Education 

English-French 

Farm Mechanics 

Health Teaching 

High School Assistants . 

Household Arts 

Household Science 

Kindergarten-Primary . . 

Manual Training 

Music (a) Vocal 

(b) Instrumental. 

Oral French 

Physical Education .... 
General Shop Work .... 

Special Shop Work 

Upper School 

Vocational Courses 



1,121 
292 
134 
216 
668 
253 

25 
176 

51 



279 
102 
542 
11 
46 
252 



637 
70 



Total. 



4,875 



1,336 
321 
130 
258 
1,385 
224 

23 
213 

64 

48 
365 
320 
231 
693 

73 

57 
199 

16 
120 
449 

73 



6,598 



The Medical and Dental Inspection of Schools 

There has been, during the last year or two, evidence of increasing interest 
in that aspect of the school programme which is related to health and hygiene. 
The importance assigned to health teaching by the revised course of study has 
focussed the attention not only of teachers but also of trustees and others on 
this subject. 

The necessity for a readily acceptable scheme of school health supervision is 
manifest. This service has established its merit in the urban centres where there 
is an almost insistent demand for its extension to the secondary schools, yet but 
5 per cent, of the rural schools have any type of health supervision from physician, 
nurse or dentist. It would seem reasonable that a serious effort should be made 
to capitalize on the previously mentioned interest, and attempt to evolve some 
plan of ensuring for these rural children the known advantages of this service. 
When such a programme is devised and proven practicable, it should be possible 
to initiate it in the rural and small urban municipalities without the necessity 
of first securing the unqualified support of every trustee in the area to be served. 



Rural School Fairs 

The very serious outbreak of infantile paralysis, or poliomyelitis, which 
occurred throughout Ontario during September and October unfortunately made 
it necessary first to postpone and later to cancel over half of the Rural School 
Fairs which had been organized in the spring of 1937 as a joint project of the 
Departments of Education and Agriculture. 

Thirty-seven thousand, six hundred and two children from 1,585 schools 
made 121,877 entries in the 244 School Fairs which were held, while 93,984 
children from 3,025 schools would have taken part in the 289 Fairs which were 
cancelled. In some cases, however, these children had prepared their entries 
in art and writing, and these were judged. The fear of infection reduced the 
attendance of children at the Fairs held to 44,317, and of adults to 56,984. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 \L3 

Seeds were distributed in the spring to the school children, and in a number 
of school sections the home plots were judged. Though somewhat handicapped 
by lack of qualified judges, nevertheless an attempt was made at each Fair to 
lay stress upon educational contests and features bearing on some phase of agri- 
culture. 

Fifth Classes 

For more than half a century fifth classes have been conducted successfully 
in many of the ungraded schools throughout the province. Formerly, when Third 
Class certificates were issued by the Department of Education or by the County 
Model School Boards, many teachers obtained their academic standing for a 
certificate of that grade in a rural school in charge of a male experienced teacher. 
In more recent years many students have taken the first two years of high school 
work in fifth classes. They passed on the subjects of the lower school examination 
and were admitted to the middle school. So successfully has the fifth class work 
been done, even in the ungraded school, that the Department of Education made 
it an essential part of the elementary school course, and further made it a com- 
pulsory part of the work of the elementary school where properly qualified pupils 
desired the work to be taken. 

An estimate of the work which has been done in recent years in the fifth 
classes can be ascertained from the following data pertaining to the school year 
1936-37. In the public and separate schools of the province there were no fewer 
than 1,715 fifth classes. Of these, 161 were Grade A classes; 170 were Grade B 
classes ; and 249 were Grade C classes, and in the aggregate they received special 
legislative grants to the amount of $70,366.70, an increase over the preceding 
year of $10,455.66. The enrolment in the 1,715 classes was 4,568 which, if placed 
in one school with 40 pupils to a class would require 114 classrooms for accommo- 
dation. The pupils trained in fifth classes passed upon approximately 27,000 
papers of the lower school examination in the year 1937. 

With the introduction, however, of the new and compulsory courses of study 
in Manual Training and Household Science for Grade IX (Junior Fifth Class), 
the Department of Education feels that this work cannot be successfully done in 
ungraded schools, but anticipates that the work can be taught satisfactorily in the 
Grade A and Grade B fifth classes where at least two teachers are employed. It 
would appear, therefore, in the years to come, that Grade C classes as well as 
those fifth classes which were not graded will disappear. The Department is 
anxious that as many pupils as possible may be able to obtain instruction in fifth 
class work, and to that end is strongly in favour of several sections in a township 
being grouped under one board of trustees so that adequate provision for the 
teaching of Agriculture, Manual Training and Household Arts may be made 
in each community. 

School Savings and The Penny Bank of Ontario 

The Department has continued to give active support to the teaching of 
thrift through the Penny Bank of Ontario. There are now 506 schools making 
use of the Penny Bank, an increase of seven schools during the year. The children 
of these schools had a total deposit at the end of the year of $1,308,825, an in- 
crease of more than $36,000 over a year ago. 

Deposits are taken once a week in the classroom and the money is sent to a 
local chartered bank where the ledgers are kept and withdrawals are made. 
Emphasis is laid on regular depositing rather than upon the amount deposited. 



14 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

Habit formation is the immediate purpose of school savings. It is noteworthy 
that at the end of December, 1937, 45 schools had 80 per cent, or over of their 
pupils making deposits each banking day for the two preceding months. This is 
a record achievement to date. 

Purposeful saving and wise spending are emphasized in the classroom lessons 
which the Penny Bank furnishes the schools. The pupil is encouraged to compare 
the value of spending small sums for short-lived gratifications with the value of 
accumulating those small sums until they will purchase some more permanent 
and more useful article. Lessons in foresight and self-control become an im- 
portant by-product of the school savings programme. 

The Closing of Small Schools 

In this report for the calendar year 1936 it was stated that 26 schools with 
low enrolment had been closed during the year 1936, and that 65 others with an 
attendance of eight or fewer were under consideration for closing at midsummer, 
1937. 

Twenty-eight schools were closed as at June 30th, 1937, bringing the total 
number of small schools closed to that date to 58. In one or two cases schools 
have been reopened because of increased enrolments, but in the other cases the 
schools continue closed and a better educational service is being rendered to the 
pupils by having them attend larger neighbouring schools. A considerable saving 
in money, both to the local ratepayers and to the Government in the form of 
legislative grants, has been made. 

Further reports are to be made by the inspectors on 34 small schools during 
the spring term of 1938, and the boards of trustees of these schools have been 
notified that if the enrolment in June, 1938, is not greater than eight, it may be 
necessary for the Minister to take official action towards the closing of the schools 
as provided for under Section 86 (1) of The Public Schools Act. 

Regular Legislative Grants to Public and Separate Schools 

A change in the bases upon which the regular annual legislative grants to 
public and separate schools were apportioned was made to take effect in the year 
1931. The purpose of the change was to give the necessary assistance to those 
schools where the need was greatest. The new bases recognized (i) average 
attendance, (ii) relation of aggregate salaries to the equalized assessment of the 
section, (iii) the expenditure on capital expenditure made by the board of trustees 
during the next preceding calendar year in the case of those schools where the 
equalized assessment is less than $50,000, (iv) an allowance for maintenance to 
those schools which have an assessment of less than $50,000 per classroom, (v) 
in the case of rural schools a grant on the certificate of the teacher, (vi) a grant 
on the approved expenditure of a board on instructional equipment or on repairs 
to school buildings. Minor changes were made in one or more of the bases from 
time to time, but in the main the bases have been retained 

The grants to public and separate schools have been apportioned on these 
bases for the years 1931 to 1937 inclusive, with the exception that in five of these 
seven years it was found necessary to reduce the aggregate amount apportioned 
by the following percentages. In 1932 the reduction was 10 per cent.; in 1933, 
20 per cent.; in 1934, 10 per cent.; in 1935, 15 per cent.; in 1936, 10 per cent. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 15 

The amounts apportioned to public and separate schools for the different 
years were as follows: — 

1930 $3,686,301.00 

1931 $3,753,499.00 

1932 $4,102,448.00 

1933 $3,847,696.00 

1934 $3,356,313.00 

1935 $2,510,154.00 

1936 $3,013,917.00 

1937 $3,396,190.00 

The sum apportioned in 1932 was the largest amount for any one of the 
seven years, although there was a reduction of 10 per cent, in the aggregate 
amount apportioned. As the grants for this year were based upon the data for 
the calendar year 1931, the salaries of teachers in the rural sections and smaller 
urban centres were still high, and the grants on salaries were large. The amount 
apportioned in 1935 is the smallest amount of the seven years. The grants of 
this year were based on the data for the year 1934, when the salaries of teachers 
were lowest and where section 6 (a) of Instructions No. 12 operated in a large 
percentage of the number of schools. In the year 1936 there was an increase of 
almost $500,000 in the grants given, and in 1937 there was an additional increase 
of over $382,000. It is hoped that it may be possible to increase further the 
amount apportioned in legislative grants to the elementary schools in order that 
the local school tax burden in poor areas may be further relieved. 

Conclusion 

The elementary schools of the province have continued to receive benefit 
from the active interest of parents, trustees, and many organizations. The co- 
operation of all is needed in order that the best work may be accomplished. 
Teachers, inspectors, and officials appreciate this co-operation and are greatly 
assisted by it. The splendid co-operation given by the inspectors during the past 
year in the introduction of the new programme of studies is greatly appreciated. 
Through their zealous leadership the teachers, the trustees, the parents, and the 
general public have had an earlier and more thorough understanding of the 
changes being introduced. 

A number of the inspectors have been asked to assume partial duties for an 
inspector who has been absent through illness or on special leave, or to share 
duties where an inspectorate remained vacant. In every case the inspectors 
have assisted most willingly and faithfully. 

The Ontario Public and Separate School Inspectors have many difficult 
problems to solve. Few of these problems, relative to the total number in any 
year, reach the Department of Education for final decision. This fact is a constant 
testimony to the tactful and efficient work of the inspectoral staff. 

I am indebted to Dr. J. T. Phair, Chief Medical Officer, Department of 
Health; to Mr. R. S. Duncan, B.S.A., Director of Agricultural Representatives; 
to Mr. J. R. Littleproud of the Ontario Penny Bank, and to my colleagues in the 
Department of Education for contributions to this report. 

V. K. Greer, 

Chief Inspector. 
Toronto, March 15th, 1938. 



16 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 



APPENDIX B 

REPORT OF THE CHIEF INSPECTOR OF SECONDARY 

SCHOOLS 

I have the honour to submit herewith the reports of the High and Continu- 
ation School Inspectors and the Director of Vocational Education, for the school 
year 1936-37. 

Geo. F. Rogers, 

Chief Inspector of Secondary Schools. 
October 20th, 1938. 



1. Report of the High and Continuation School Inspectors 

There are in the province 70 Collegiate Institutes, 156 High Schools and 
206 Continuation Schools. Of the Collegiate Institutes, 55 have staffs of 15 or 
more teachers and 30 have 25 or more. Of the High Schools, 113 have 5 or more 
teachers and 27 have 10 or more. There are 69 Grade A Continuation Schools 
with 3 or more teachers, and 129 Grade B two- teacher schools, in 20 of which the 
assistant teacher devotes only half time to high school work. There are 8 Grade 
C one-teacher schools doing work to the end of Grade X and inspected by the 
Public School Inspectors. During the school year 1936-37, 2,930 teachers were 
employed, showing an increase of 45 over the number in 1935-36. The total 
enrolment of pupils in all grades for the year was 76,023, showing a decrease of 
1,340 from that of the preceding year. 

Inspection 

The Inspectors visited the schools at least once, and in many cases twice, 
during the year. They discussed the organization and phases of administration 
with the Principal. After observing the regular work of the school in classrooms, 
laboratories, and gymnasia, they met the teachers individually and in groups 
according to subjects, thus affording an opportunity of discussing problems 
peculiar to a teacher or relevant to a subject. Quite often at the close of the 
inspection the staff as a whole convened for general discussion and usually a 
meeting was arranged with the Board or representatives of the Board. 

It is a pleasure to be able to speak highly of much of the work observed in 
the various departments in our schools. Teachers are recognizing more and more 
that while they are teaching subjects they are also training pupils. There is more 
insistence upon a satisfactory standard of neatness in written work. The pupil 
is participating and sharing responsibility in the lesson to an appreciably greater 
extent. More attention is being given in the classroom to such phases of school 
training as posture, enunciation, and oral expression. During the year under 
review, the schools were looking forward to a major change in the courses of study. 
Boards were concerned with accommodations and equipment, principals with 
organization, and teachers with their preparedness to teach the subjects. Never- 
theless, a spirit of optimism prevailed, as well as a willingness to co-operate in 
effecting a successful revision of the secondary school curriculum. 

It would be most difficult to find a body of men and women more interested, 
more progressive, more conscious of their responsibilities, and more loyal to their 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 17 

profession than our secondary school teachers. Their desire for higher attain- 
ment is evidenced by the large number attending summer classes in Music, Art, 
Commercial Work, French, Agriculture, Health and Physical Education, General 
Shop Work, and Home Economics. The benefit derived from these courses is 
being passed on to the pupils and can be seen quite plainly in the character of 
work being done. The number of experienced teachers in our Continuation 
Schools who are improving their academic standing and obtaining university 
degrees is also worthy of mention. 

At this time, when* courses of study are being revised, we feel that reference 
should be made to the assistance and co-operation given by the principals of our 
schools. With an understanding of local conditions and local problems they have 
shown adaptability, initiative and good judgment. In addition to their executive 
and administrative duties they are spending more time each year in the class- 
rooms and by regular supervision are doing much towards raising the standard 
of work in our secondary schools. The fact that we have so many efficient, 
smoothly running schools is a credit and a compliment to our principals. 

It is encouraging to note the keen interest that Boards of Trustees and 
Boards of Education are taking in the work and progress of the schools for which 
they are responsible. In the course of their regular duties, the Inspectors have 
had the privilege of meeting a great many boards during the past year. They 
have found them fair-minded, willing to co-operate, and seeking to provide the 
best possible educational facilities for their young people. Generally speaking, 
members of school boards recognize the great part that the school is playing in 
training young men and women for intelligent and useful citizenship, and realize 
the importance of having a good secondary school in the community. 

This report would not be complete without reference to the secondary school 
teachers who have retired during the past year. Many of them have had dis- 
tinguished records and have been leaders in the profession to which they have 
devoted the greater part of their lives. Their retirement from active service will 
provide opportunities for well-earned leisure and a freedom which they have not 
known since they first assumed their duties in a classroom. 

R. W. Anglin, 
A. J. Husband, 
W. A. Jennings, 
A. G. Hooper, 
J. P. Hoag, 
S. D. Rendai,l. 
R. H. Wallace. 
Toronto, August 31st, 1938. 

2. Report of the Director of Vocational Education, School Year, 1936-37 

As a consequence of the decision of the Department to introduce Shop Work 
for boys and Home Economics for girls as part of the general secondary school 
curriculum, the time of the Vocational Inspectors during the past year has been 
largely devoted to the work of the special committees appointed to make recom 
mendations regarding new courses of study. 

The introduction of this practical work as a definite part of the curriculum 
will be received with keen satisfaction by the smaller high schools and continti 
ation schools, in which there has been a long-standing demand for practical 
courses similar to those enjoyed by the larger centres of population The aim of 



18 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

the new courses is not vocational, but rather of an exploratory nature. The 
objective kept constantly in mind has been to prepare courses which would give 
pupils the opportunity , while pursuing their academic studies of the first year, 
to discover in themselves any latent aptitude for practical work in the industrial, 
commercial, or Home Economics spheres, with the two-fold purpose of (a) arriv- 
ing at an intelligent appraisal of the direction in which each pupil's further edu- 
cational development should be guided and (b) of providing reliable data upon 
which to base occupational or vocational counsel. To this end the Inspectors 
have co-operated with the other members of the respective committees and their 
recommendations have been presented from time to time. 

Special Teacher Training 

In preparation for the introduction of the new general course in Grade IX , 
including these two special subjects, attention has been focussed on the develop- 
ment of practical courses in Shop Work, Home Economics, and Commercial 
practice suitable for teachers who have not had the advantage of previous in- 
dustrial or commercial experience. It is hoped by successive summer courses 
to qualify such teachers sufficiently for part-time instruction, and by longer and 
more intensive training (probably a one-year course at the Training College for 
Technical Teachers) to prepare them to give effective instruction in a full-time 
programme of considerable practical value. 

Vocational Schools 

There has been no change in the character of the instruction provided for 
vocational students. A modification of the time-table in the practical work of 
the first year may be expected as a result of the various recommendations which 
are being submitted by the special committees. Attendance at evening classes 
has increased slightly over the past year, there being a distinct indication of a 
revival of many evening classes which were discontinued as a result of the eco- 
nomic depression. Day school enrolment, on the other hand, has slightly de- 
creased. The quality of instruction in the schools has been well maintained, and 
the work of the students continues to give satisfaction. A spirit of hearty co- 
operation exists among principals, teachers, and inspectors, and the student body 
as a whole responds readily to improved methods of instruction. 

In the practical courses for both boys and girls, the unit method of instruc- 
tion is being adopted, and, so far, has proved a successful method of instruction 
in these subjects. By this method, unit sheets are prepared by the teacher, and 
are handed to the students. These units of instruction provide a problem to be 
solved; the necessary drawing or illustration; and references from which the 
student may obtain the required information. This procedure has the distinct 
advantage of allowing students to proceed through the course with the guidance 
of the teacher at a rate dependent only upon their individual capacity for learning 
and their application to the work. 

Building Projects 

The town of Cornwall called attention in the fall of 1935 to the over-crowding 
of the collegiate institute, and suggested a survey for the purpose of ascertaining 
the advantages of introducing vocational training there. An Inspector of this 
Branch visited Cornwall in June, 1936, and reported that industrial classes were 
badly needed. Eventually the Collegiate Board decided to establish day and 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



19 



evening vocational classes in a suitable addition to the existing school, and the 
Department's approval was sought and obtained to proceed with the building. 
The new addition was planned to include a Machine Shop, a Wood and Electric 
Shop, a Drafting room, three Commercial class rooms, three Industrial class 
rooms, a Sewing room, and a Home Economics laboratory, as well as an audi- 
torium and gymnasium, at an approximate cost, including equipment, of $240,000. 
Of this, the Department will pay 25 per cent, by way of grant under the Voca- 
tional Regulations. It has recently become necessary for the approval of the 
Municipal Board to be first obtained before debentures may be issued for any new 
building projects. In the case of Cornwall, no difficulty is anticipated, and it is 
now planned to have the new building completed and equipped for occupation 
in September, 1939. 

Another important building project under consideration is the demolition 
of the present technical school in Ottawa, and the substitution of an up-to-date 
building, in an endeavour to meet the demand for larger facilities for this class 
of work in the City of Ottawa. Departmental officials were called into consulta- 
tion and, following a survey, representations were made to the City Council to 
obtain the necessary funds. The cost of the new building is estimated at $500,000. 
The debenture issue, as in the case of Cornwall, will have to be approved by the 
Ontario Municipal Board. As the proposed school will be built on the present 
site, the existing Shop accommodation will remain available for instruction in 
Shop courses. The demand at present is for a central unit which will accommo- 
date the 1,400 boys who are in attendance at this school. In addition to class- 
rooms, provision is made for a Machine Shop and Motor Mechanics Shop, a 
Home Economics laboratory, and a Chemistry laboratory. Accommodation 
will be provided also for Printing and for Art work, and a new library is included 
in the plans. It will be some time before the building is completed, but it is 
expected that the centre unit will be ready for occupancy in September, 1939. 

The following is a comparative table of statistics which presents at a glance 
a complete picture of what is being achieved in the field of vocational education. 



1922-23 



1935-36 



1936-37 



Number of Schools — Day 

" — Evening . 

Number of Pupils — Day 

" — Evening... 

Number of Teachers — Day. . . . 

" — Evening 

Government Grants 

Municipal Expenditure (Net) . . 



16 

51 

9,402 

35,511 

337 

1,097 

$638,217 

$1,233,397 



60 

28 

35,915 

24,360 

1,449 

766 

$1,112,078 

$4,079,358 



60 

32 

34,766 

25,750 

1,447 

808 

$959,611 

$4,334,667 



Home Economics and Manual Training in Elementary Schools 



Since the retirement of Inspector Leake as Inspector of Household Science 
and Manual Training, the organization and inspection of this work have been 
taken over by the Inspectors of the Vocational Branch. The inspectoral work, 
however, has not received the attention it requires on account of a limited staff. 
In the near future, a grading grant is likely to be substituted for the present 
grant based on salaries, and the appointment of an additional Inspector would 
facilitate the grading of schools for grant purposes. 



20 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

It may be said that interest in these optional subjects has been sustained in 
the urban centres; but from the nature of the inquiries made and the reports 
received from local Inspectors covering the work of rural areas, it would appear 
that there is an over-measure of concern, on the part of teachers, regarding the 
grants obtainable rather than for the advantages which might accrue to the 
pupils. It is planned at no distant date to recommend the discontinuance of 
special grants to teachers, and to encourage the organization of these classes by 
increasing the grants to the Boards. New Regulations are already under con- 
sideration, in which it is proposed to eliminate grants heretofore paid to un- 
qualified teachers. It might be wise to serve notice in the new Regulations that 
grants to teachers will eventually be discontinued entirely. In the event of Shop 
Work and Home Economics being made compulsory in the secondary schools, 
as is contemplated in the recommendations of the special committees studying the 
new courses, the Regulations regarding the optional work carried on in elementary 
schools will require to be segregated from the compulsory features applicable to 
secondary schools. 

F. S. Rutherford, 
Director of Vocational Education. • 

Toronto, October 20th, 1938. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 21 



APPENDIX C 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PROFESSIONAL 

TRAINING 

1 . Normal School Admissions 

The total registration in the eight Provincial Normal Schools for the 1937-38 
session was practically the same as that for 1936-37. Approximately eleven 
hundred students were admitted in each of these years. The numbers now gradu- 
ating would appear to be insufficient to fill the vacancies in the elementary schools 
caused by ordinary retirements. Fortunately the accumulated surplus of teachers 
trained in previous years has served, up to the present, to compensate for the 
deficiency in the source of supply. Obviously we are approaching a period of 
scarcity of teachers unless the number of students entering the Normal Schools 
begins soon to increase. One favourable symptom in the situation is a distinct 
rise in the salaries paid to teachers, especially in rural schools. It may confidently 
be expected that, when salaries reach a more generous figure, more young men and 
women will be attracted to the profession of teaching. 

2. Increased Provision for Practice Teaching 

Greater facilities for practice teaching were provided in the Normal Schools 
two years ago and were extended during the 1937-38 session. Provision is now 
made whereby each teacher-in-training spends five or six full weeks in the practice 
schools. The individual weeks for practice are spaced at intervals, and a period 
of three weeks' instruction in the Normal School follows each week of teaching 
in the practice school. The teacher-in-training has opportunity to teach not only 
single lessons, as under the former plan, but also several groups of lessons in the 
same subject or in different subjects. He also has opportunity to take complete 
charge of a classroom for half a day during each of the weeks he spends in the 
practice school. This plan throws him to a greater extent upon his own resources 
and tends to develop initiative and originality. It gives him a clearer idea of the 
problems involved in teaching and managing a school, and doubtless fits him 
better for taking charge of a school after his graduation. The scheme could not 
have been successful without the whole-hearted co-operation of the critic teachers 
in the practice schools. 

3. Revised Courses of Study 

The Normal School course of study has been revised and in its new form will 
go into effect during the 1938-39 session. In this revision the members of the 
staffs of the training schools gave valuable assistance in the form of suggested 
changes in the former course. Some rearrangements, additions, and deletions of 
subject matter have been made to bring the programme into harmony with the 
recently revised curriculum of the elementary schools. It has not been necessary, 
however, to change the fundamental principles of the course. As a matter of fact, 
the essential features of the revised elementary course have long been recognized 
in the Normal Schools as the requirements of any courses suitable for children. 
Education through activity is a principle that has always been approved and 
practised. The use of the child's experiences from his contact with his environ- 
ment as a basis for his interpretation of new experiences has long been regarded 



22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



as the primary law of learning. The cultivation of desirable interests and atti- 
tudes has always engaged the attention of the best teachers. The inseparability 
of factual knowledge from appreciation and conduct has always been considered 
an elementary psychological principle. The correlation and integration of the 
facts of the different school subjects have always been persistently advocated. 
The necessity of continuous and thorough training in language in all its phases 
has been from the earliest times an educational axiom. The project (or the enter- 
prise, as it has been recently designated) has been used as an educational agency 
for at least three decades. 

The preparation of teachers-in-training for the presentation of the revised 
course of study for the elementary schools will, therefore, not involve the creation 
of any new philosophy of education. The basic principles formulated by educators 
in the past are still applicable. It will be the duty of the Normal Schools to assist 
their students in the proper application of these principles in the revised elemen- 
tary course, and to guard them against fallacious beliefs that are not implied in 
the course itself but may arise from extravagant statements of enthusiasts who 
regard the course as wholly new and revolutionary. 

4. Summary of Attendance at the Normal Schools 



School 



Number of Students 



1937-38 



Men Women Total 



1936-37 



Total 



Hamilton 

London 

North Bay 

Ottawa 

University of Ottawa (1st) 

(2nd) 

Peterborough 

Stratford 

Toronto (First Class) 

" (Kindergarten Primary) 



20 
21 
8 
23 
12 
34 
14 
21 
43 



110 
119 

57 
105 

14 
138 

72 

74 
182 

20 



130 
140 

65 
128 

26 
172 

86 

95 
225 

20 



Total 



196 



891 



1,087 



108 
89 
88 

141 
27 

193 
80 
96 

246 
14 



1,082 



5. Changes in Staffs 

Since my last report several changes have occurred in the Normal School 
and the Model School staffs. 

In June, 1937, Miss Ambia L. Going, B.A., Instructor in Art in the Peter- 
borough Normal School, died after a long illness. Her death was a great loss to 
the staff. She was an efficient and inspiring teacher. Her place has been filled 
by Miss Constance Wagar. 

At the end of the 1936-37 session, Sugden Pickles, Manual Training In- 
structor in the London and Stratford Normal Schools, retired after thirty-four 
years of service. Mr. Pickles was one of a group of teachers who came out from 
England at the beginning of the century to introduce into Ontario what was at 
that time a new educational activity. He was a pioneer in the manual training 
movement in Canada, and he shares in the credit which its success has brought. 
A. F. Hagerman, formerly of the Peterborough Normal School staff, succeeded 



' DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 23 

Mr. Pickles, and W. F. Strieker has added the manual training work at Peter- 
borough to similar duties at Hamilton. 

J. H. Davidson, B.A., B.Paed., Mathematical Master in the Hamilton Nor- 
mal School for the past sixteen years, retired at the close of the past session. He 
had a long and varied experience in the primary and secondary schools of the 
Province, and entered the Normal School well fitted for training teachers, a work 
in which he has been eminently successful. His place will be taken by J. V. 
Mclntyre, B.A., B.Paed., of the Peterborough Normal School. 

Miss Elizabeth Cluff, B.A., retired in June from the staff of the Normal 
Model School at Ottawa where she has given efficient and devoted service for 
thirty years. 

Mrs. Helen Mayberry, Art Instructor at the Stratford Normal School, retired 
at the close of the recent session. She was appointed to the staff at the opening 
of the school in 1908 and has given excellent service ever since that time. 

David Whyte, B.A., B.Paed., Principal of the Toronto Normal School, un- 
expectedly announced his resignation in July. He entered the service of the 
Department in 1909 as Science Master in the Toronto Normal School, and was 
for three years Principal of the Hamilton Normal School. In 1929 he was trans- 
ferred to the principalship at Toronto, and in that capacity has ably maintained 
the traditions of the senior training school of Ontario. His premature retirement 
will be much regretted throughout the Province. 

6. The Passing of Duncan Walker 

Duncan Walker, B.A., late Director of Professional Training, died at his 
home in Peterborough on July 21. Mr. Walker had had a long and distinguished 
career in the field of education. After some years' teaching experience in the 
public and high schools, he was appointed inspector of the public schools of 
Peterborough. After the reorganization of the training school system of the Pro- 
vince in 1907, he was mathematical master in the London Normal School for a 
year, and on the establishment of the Peterborough Normal School in 1908, he 
was appointed the first principal. This position he held with marked success 
for twenty-one years. In 1929 he was made Director of Professional Training, 
and under his supervision many improvements were made in the training of 
teachers. He will be held in affectionate memory by many thousands of teachers 
who came under his instruction, by members of the training school staffs, and by 
his former colleagues in the Department of Education. 

In concluding this report, I wish to pay a well deserved tribute to the efficiency 
and devotion of the members of the training school staffs, including the critic 
teachers of the practice schools. Their sincere and enthusiastic co-operation in 
carrying out the policies of the Department of Education in the training of 
teachers is worthy of all praise. 

W. J. Karr, 

Director of Professional Training. 

Toronto, July 30th, 1938 



24 THE REPORT OF THE No, 11 

APPENDIX D 

REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF FRENCH INSTRUCTION 
ON THE SCHOOLS ATTENDED BY FRENCH- 
SPEAKING PUPILS, 1937. 



Appointments and Transfers 

The writer was appointed Director of French Instruction in April, 1937, 
and entered upon his new duties on June 1st, 1937. Mr. A. J. Beneteau, B.A., 
the former incumbent of the office, was transferred to the teaching staff of the 
University of Ottawa Normal School. Mr. Beneteau, who formerly had been 
Assistant-Master in the Sandwich Teachers' Training School, has acquired 
through his many years of association with the schools attended by French- 
speaking pupils, a fund of knowledge and experience which should be of great 
value in the training of French-speaking student-teachers. 

Mr. Adelard Gascon, B.A., was transferred from R.C. Separate Division II 
and District Division VII, Part II, Sudbury, to R.C. Separate Division VII, to 
begin duties on September 1st, 1937, with residence in Windsor. 

Mr. Laurier Carriere, B.A., formerly principal of Garneau School, Ottawa, 
was appointed to R.C. Separate Division II and District Division VII, Part II. 
He began his duties on September 1st, 1937, with residence in Sudbury. 

Mr. Lucien Laplante, M.A., formerly on the teaching staff of the University 
of Ottawa, was appointed to R.C. Separate Division XIX and District Division 
XII, Part II, with residence in Ottawa. His duties began on November 1st, 1937. 

Improvement in the Qualifications of Teachers 

A continued improvement in the qualifications of French-speaking teachers 
was observed during 1937. The following table shows the marked progress that 
was achieved in this regard since 1929. 

Total number of teachers under French-speaking in- 
spectors, Nov. 1937 1,281 

Total number of teachers holding I or II class cer- 
tificates, Nov. 1937 1,018 

Total per cent, of teachers holding I or II class cer- 
tificates, Nov. 1937 79.46 

Total per cent, of teachers holding I or II class cer- 
tificates, Nov. 1936 74.94 

Total per cent, of teachers holding I or II class cer- 
tificates, Nov. 1929 25.11 

It is expected that in September, 1939, approximately 90 per cent, of the 
schools attended by French-speaking pupils will be in charge of graduates of the 
TJniversity of Ottawa Normal School holding First or Second Class certificates. 
At that time, it is hoped, it may be possible to discontinue the use of the circular, 
Instructions No. 20, which sets forth the conditions under which certificates 
lower than Second Class may be extended and temporary certificates issued for 
French-speaking teachers. 

Age-Grade Distribution of Pupils in Elementary Schools 

The following tables present a compilation of the French-speaking School 
Inspectors' Annual Age-Grade Summary Reports for May, 1937: — 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



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28 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



Table No. 2 — Analysis of Age-Grade Distribution in Relation to Ideal Age Spread in 
Rural and Urban Separate Schools Attended by French-Speaking Pupils, May, 1937 



GRADE 


Under 
Ideal Age Spread 


Within 
Ideal Age Spread 


Over 
Ideal Age Spread 




Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


I 


3 


0.03 


6,562 
2,260 
1,215 
2,235 
2,619 
2,417 
1,934 
1,888 
579 
493 


53.28 
36.52 
36.13 
47.77 
49.94 
54.56 
56.62 
62.58 
72.84 
74.47 


5,750 
3,929 
2,147 
2,433 
2,615 
2,004 
1,460 
1,076 
186 
142 


46.69 


II 


63.48 


Ill 






63.87 


IV 


10 
12 
9 
22 
54 
30 
27 


.21 
.22 
.20 
.64 

1.78 
3.77 
4.08 


52.02 


V 


49.84 


VI 


45.24 


VII 


42.74 


VIII 


35.64 


IX 


23.39 


X 


21.45 






Totals 


167 


.37 


22,202 


50.34 


21,742 


49.29 







Note: — The above figures are for Separate schools only. There are also 3,183 French- 
speaking pupils (May, 1937) attending Public schools under the supervision of French-speaking 
i nspectors. Similar information for these Public schools will be given in subsequent annual reports. 

Table No. 3 — Grade-Enrolment Distribution in Schools Attended by French-Speaking 

Pupils, May, 1937 

(a) Separate Schools 





Rural 


Urban 


Rural and Urban 


Grades 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


I-IV 


10,438 

5,550 

352 


63.87 

33.98 

2.15 


16,106 

10,560 

1,105 

192 


57.60 

37.77 

3.95 

.68 


26,544 
16,110 

1,457 
192 


59.92 


V-VIII 


36.37 


IX-X 


3.28 


Auxiliary 


.43 











Note: — For detailed statistics, see Table 1 (a), (b) and (c). 

(b) Public Schools 





Rural 


Urban 


Rural and Urban 


Grades 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


I-IV 


1,530 

758 
4 


66.75 

33.07 

.18 


525 

353 

13 


58.92 

39.61 

1.47 


2,055 

1,111 

17 


64.55 


V-VIII 


34.91 


IX-X 


.54 







(c) Separate and Public Schools 





Rural 


Urban 


Rural and Urban 


Grades 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Percent. 


I-IV 


11,968 

6,308 

356 


64.23 

33.86 

1.91 


16,631 

10,913 

1,118 

192 


57.64 

37.83 

3.87 

.66 


28,599 

17,221 

1,474 

192 


60.23 


V-VIII 


36.27 


IX-X 


3.10 




.40 











DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1U37 29 

A study of the foregoing statistical information reveals the following facts : — 

1. The number of pupils enrolled in Grades I to IV constitutes more than 
60 per cent, of the total school enrolment. 

2. Nearly 50 per cent, of the total enrolment in the Separate schools is 
made up of pupils who are over the ideal age spread for their grades. This re- 
tardation is especially noticeable in Grades I to IV. 

3. While the age of the pupils enrolled in Grades V to X is more in keeping 
with the ideal age spread for the various grades, it would seem that this enrolment 
is made up of a selected group of pupils, the others having dropped out gradually 
before reaching the higher grades of the school. The fact that a considerable 
number of pupils leave the public or separate schools, especially after Grade 
VIII, to enter secondary schools or private institutions such as colleges and 
convents, explains to a certain extent the relatively small enrolment in Grades 
IX and X. 

French-speaking teachers and inspectors as well as the members of the 
teaching staff of the University of Ottawa Normal School were made cognizant 
of the above statistics. At teachers' conventions and at conferences of inspectors 
and Normal School masters held during the year, causes underlying this unfortu- 
nate situation in schools attended by French-speaking pupils were thoroughly 
studied and remedial measures suggested and adopted. 

The importance of a careful and systematic training of the children in the 
use of their mother-tongue by means of frequent and well selected oral and 
written language exercises cannot be stressed too strongly throughout the ele- 
mentary school course and more particularly in the lower grades of the school. 
Progress in the other subjects of study depends largely upon the pupils' pro- 
ficiency in speaking, reading, and writing their mother-tongue clearly and ac- 
curately. The necessity of a greater number of suitable text-books, both for the 
pupils and the teachers, in order )to attain the desired objectives in schools 
attended by French-speaking pupilp is well recognized. Provision should be 
made in the near future, therefore,' to ensure the revision of the texts now in use 
and the preparation of other books required by French-speaking pupils and 
teachers. In the meantime, teachers and inspectors should spare no effort to 
supplement their present equipment with the best available conversation ex- 
ercises, reading selections, pictures, and appropriate library books. 

It is hoped that subsequent annual reports will reveal much improvement in 
the general attainments of French-speaking pupils, as shown by their age-grade 
distribution in the elementary schools. 

Secondary School Classes 

Besides the 1,474 pupils enrolled in Grades IX and X of the elementary 
schools, there are 872 French-speaking pupils pursuing their studies in the Lower, 
Middle and Upper School departments of High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 
in which advanced courses in French Grammar, French Literature and French 
Composition are being offered. Approximately 500 students are taking these 
same courses in private schools and colleges. While there is room for improve- 
ment in the general results obtained in French in these secondary school classes, 
it is evident that on the whole a sincere effort is being put forth by teachers and 
students to achieve as much success as possible under the present circumstances. 



30 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

University of Ottawa Normal School 

In the spring of 1937, there was a total enrolment of 219 teachers-in- training 
in the University of Ottawa Normal School. Out of the 26 students enrolled in 
the First Class course, 20 were successful in obtaining their certificates. The 
Second Class course was attended by 193 students, 118 of whom were awarded 
their teaching certificates. It is hoped that the number of French-speaking 
students seeking First Class certificates will increase materially within the next 
few years. 

Robert Gauthier, 
Director of French Instruction. 

Toronto, April 29th, 1938. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 31 

APPENDIX E 

REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE 
ONTARIO TRAINING COLLEGE FOR TECHNICAL 

TEACHERS 



As no report of the activities of the Training College has been made since 
that for the summer session of 1935, this report will deal with the period since 
that time. 

The Training College was closed during the winter session of 1935-36. It 
reopened again in the summer of 1936. 

Summer courses were offered in 1936 in the following departments, with the 
following enrolment: 

Vocational Certificate Courses 43 

Sewing and Dressmaking 33 

Elementary Manual Training 84 

Specialist Manual Training 18 

Elementary Household Science 158 

Total 336 

In September 1936 the regular course leading to the Ordinary Vocational 
Certificate, valid in a Technical School, opened with 24 students in attendance. 

In 1936-37, as in previous years, applicants who had an Elementary Certi- 
ficate in Manual Training were granted credit for the autumn term of the year 
course for the Intermediate Certificate. A sufficient number of applicants with 
this qualification appeared during the autumn of 1936, to require the re-establish- 
ment of the course for the Intermediate Certificate in January, 1937. The course 
began January 4th with 19 students in attendance. 

Saturday classes in the work leading to the Elementary Manual Training 
Certificate, Part I, were offered during the school year 1936-37. The classes 
began October 24th and continued to May 8th, with an enrolment of 50. 

Summer Sessions, 1937 

One oi the important changes made in the new curriculum announced in 
1937 was the provision of practical or shop work in the schools. For boys this 
practical work includes manipulative experiences in tools and materials ; for girls 
it includes experiences in sewing, cooking and home management. As this provision 
requires on the staff of each school, at least of each secondary school, one or more 
teachers capable of giving instruction in practical work, and as nearly all certifi- 
cated manual training teachers and household science teachers were already 
engaged in full time instruction, there promised to be a scarcity of teachers of 
these subjects. Accordingly provision was made for a considerable increase in 
the number who would take in 1937 the summer courses in manual training and 
in household science. Classes were offered in these subjects in Ottawa as well 
as in Hamilton. A special course in general shop work, designed to meet the 
immediate needs of teachers in the smaller schools, where part-time service in 
shop work would be required, was offered. 



32 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

In addition to the classes in manual training and household science the usual 
summer school classes for vocational teachers were offered. 

The enrolment in the summer school of 1937 was substantially greater than 
had been planned for, and additional accommodation and staff had to be ob- 
tained during the first days of the summer session. The enrolment was as follows : 

Summer Sessions, 1937 

(a) Manual Training 

1. Hamilton 

Elementary Manual Training, Part 1 113 

Elementary Manual Training, Part II 63 

General Shop, Part 1 16 

Special Course in Shop Work, Part 1 120 

Specialist Manual Training 18 

2. Ottawa 

Elementary Manual Training, Part 1 29 

Elementary Manual Training, Part II 8 

(b) Household Science 

1. Hamilton 

Elementary Household Science, Part 1 151 

Elementary Household Science, Part II 95 

2. Ottawa 

Elementary Household Science, Part 1 108 

Elementary Household Science, Part II 11 

(c) Vocational Course 

Specialist 29 

Ordinary Permanent 7 

Special 3 

Special Course "B", Part 1 25 

Special Course "B", Part II 9 

Total 805 



School Year, 1936-37 

The total enrolment for the school year 1936-37 was as follows: 

Ordinary Vocational Certificate— Year Course 24 

Intermediate Manual Training Certificate — Year Course. . 19 
Elementary Manual Training Certificates, Part I, Satur- 
day Classes 50 

Summer Session, 1937 805 



Total 898 

Duplications 77 

Individuals 821 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 33 

In the school year beginning in September 1937 courses for the following 
certificates were conducted: 

Ordinary Vocational Certificate, 
Intermediate Manual Training Certificate, 
Elementary Manual Training Certificate, Part I, 
Elementary Household Science Certificate, Part I. 
The manual training and household science classes were held on Saturday 
and in Hamilton and Ottawa. 

The General Shop 

The primary or chief value of practical work, industrial arts, manual training, 
or whatever it may be called, is to give meaning to and understanding of the 
things about us, the materials, the tools, the mechanical devices, and the inven- 
tions, met with in everyday life. It provides an opportunity, too often not 
available to the urban-bred boy, to exercise his instinctive tendency to use tools, 
to make things, to explore environment, to be inquisitive about materials and 
machines. It provides an enrichment of experience similar to that obtained from 
sports, extra-curricular activities, visits to factories and exhibitions. In pioneer 
days, adolescents obtained this experience, part of a real education, out of school. 
In these days of a complex society, with mass production methods and differenti- 
ated specialized occupations, children, and especially children brought up in 
towns and cities, are denied realistic practical experiences. One is not really 
educated who has not some understanding of the industrial arts and crafts, some 
idea of the methods of production, distribution and use of the material things 
about him. Manual training is a part of the general education of all pupils. 

It has some secondary or incidental values which should not be confused 
with its primary purpose. Manual training may have exploratory, consumer, 
handyman, avocational or prevocational values. Perhaps the most important 
from the point of view of the school is the exploratory or finding value, the 
discovery of the presence of certain interests and aptitudes, or, of no less im- 
portance, the discovery of their absence. 

If shop work is to meet the objectives set out it must provide practical 
experiences in a wide range of activities. Accordingly the new manual training 
course offers manipulative experiences in the fields of woodwork, machine shop 
practice, motor mechanics, electrical work, sheet metal work and farm mechanics. 

This concept of practical work means a different kind of shop and a different 
kind of teacher, than that required by the traditional manual training course, 
in which tool work was confined largely to wood. The new shop should be 
equipped with tools, materials, and machines representative of the fundamental 
operations or processes of the chief industrial occupations. 

The General Shop Teacher 

The new general shop course has involved some changes in the courses of 
training for manual training teachers. In order to avoid increasing the number 
of kinds of certificates by issuing a new type called General Shop Certificate it 
was thought advisable to retain the title Manual Training Certificate, and to 
revise the course of training for these certificates. Courses for the following types 
of certificates are now provided. 

1. Elementary Manual Training Certificate, Type A, valid for teaching 
shop work in the smaller secondary schools where the teacher will be engaged 



34 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

part-time in teaching shop work. This course includes work in mechanical draw- 
ing, woodwork, metal work, motor mechanics and electrical work, and takes 
two summer courses of 200 hours each. 

2. Elementary Manual Training Certificate, Type B, valid for teaching 
manual training in rural schools. This course is the old elementary course, and 
takes two summer courses of 125 clock hours each. 

3. Intermediate Manual Training Certificate, valid for full-time positions 
in Public, Separate, Continuation and High Schools. The course for this certi- 
ficate takes one school year, and includes training in all the shop activities that 
may be found in a general shop. The requirement for admission is an elementary 
certificate, either Type A or B. 

Provision has been made for admitting to this course graduates of an 
approved four year industrial course in a Technical School. Students admitted 
under this provision are required to take a second year in the Training College, 
used for teacher training and general education. 

4. Specialist Certificate, valid in Collegiate Institutes. The Course for 
this certificate takes three summer sessions of 200 hours each, and includes 
further training in cabinet-making and wood finishing, in machine shop practice, 
motor mechanics, electrical work, and art metal work. Extension courses in the 
new activities are provided for teachers who obtained specialist certificates under 
the former requirements. 

To provide facilities for training general shop manual training teachers, a 
new shop was fitted up at the Training College during the autumn of 1937. This 
new shop is equipped with benches, tools and machines to give some training in 
machine shop practice, sheet. metal work, motor mechanics, electrical work, 
forging, acetylene welding and farm mechanics. Mr. J. A. G. Easton was ap- 
pointed shop director in charge of the new shop course in September, 1937. 

Supply of Teachers 

The supply of vocational teachers for the technical schools is barely equal 
to the demand. During the past year technical schools have had some difficulty 
in finding suitable certificated teachers in certain fields. In some cases they have 
had to make temporary arrangements to employ uncertificated craftsmen. The 
number of pupils in the technical school has been increasing rapidly without a 
commensurate increase in the number of teachers. Many of the technical schools 
are understaffed. Local school authorities are aware of the situation but for 
want of money are not able to meet it. As soon as the schools are provided with 
more funds there will be a sharp demand for more shop teachers. The visibile 
supply will not meet the demand. 

In the case of manual training or general shop teachers there are few avail- 
able for full-time positions. As soon as the schools feel free to establish the 
general shop course of the revised curriculum, a large number of qualified teachers 
will be needed, both for the part-time and for the full-time general shop teachers. 
Here again it appears that the supply will not meet the demand. 

F. P. Gavin, 

Principal. 

Hamilton, May 1st, 1938. 



D EPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 35 

APPENDIX F 

REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF AGRICULTURAL 

CLASSES 



Some thirty-five years have passed since the first movement to introduce 
Nature Study and School Gardening in several schools in Eastern Ontario was 
started under the Macdonald scheme, and it is nearly twenty-five years since the 
programme of agricultural instruction in elementary schools in which special 
grants were provided for boards and teachers was first introduced. During these 
years a marked change in the attitude of trustees and parents towards such 
instruction has taken place and the courses as now outlined are generally approved 
and taught in practically all elementary schools, although for the school year 
1936-37 special grants were claimed in but 70.4 per cent, of the schools. This 
pioneer work of the past has made possible the inclusion of practical agricultural 
topics in the new courses for Grades I to VI which were introduced in September, 
1937, and has marked the completion of the objective of those who first promoted 
the introduction of these studies in 1903 and 1913, i.e., provision for teaching facts 
related to Nature Study, Gardening and Agriculture as a part of the regular course 
in the elementary schools. 

The qualifications of teachers today are much superior to those of earlier 
years. All teachers now receive instruction in these subjects in the Normal School 
course, and more than half of those teaching hold a special certificate in Agricul- 
ture. More attention is being given to practical activities in which pupils, under 
the direction of the teacher and with the approval and co-operation of school 
boards, are making improvements in the appearance of the school grounds by 
caring for the lawn, and planting flower and shrubbery beds. Many schools, 
both urban and rural, provide a school garden programme which is of great 
interest and value to the pupils and which is fully approved by boards and 
parents. In many districts, Inspectors have systematically urged the purchase 
of a lawn mower and its use by pupils at the school. In several inspectorates a 
definite programme for the improvement and beautification of school grounds 
has been undertaken. It is evident that, in many cases, trustees and people of 
the community fully realize that the school is a community responsibility and that 
in appearance and appointments it should represent the best ideals of the com- 
munity. Beautification of school grounds is also increasing because, when one 
school shows what can be done, others seek to equal it. 

The School Fair programme conducted jointly by the Departments of Agri- 
culture and Education provides an Achievement Day on which boys and girls 
may display the product of the garden and field, live stock, poultry or other 
projects, in competition with pupils from their own and other schools. These 
fairs are a meeting place for parents and older people of the district and have, 
in the past, done a great deal to fostef the development of agricultural education 
in the elementary school. Many of the projects related to school fair activities 
may be carried out as a part of the school programme and provision is made in 
the course of studies for these activities. In many instances pupils who find an 
interest in exhibiting at the School Fair continue this interest in Club work among 
Junior Farmers and Junior Farm Women,, and, later, in the Rural Fall Fairs 
and larger central exhibitions. 



36 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



Agricultural instruction in the schools is gradually convincing farmers that 
there is a science of agriculture and that it is a field of endeavour worth studying. 
But the change has come slowly and gradually and it has taken more than one 
generation to bring about the present development. 

In Grades VII and VIII the optional character of the courses in Agriculture is 
being maintained and an effort will be made to emphasize, even more than in the 
past, the practical applications of the topics studied. 

In secondary schools a marked advance has been made during the year in 
the introduction of agricultural courses. Twenty-one schools introduced Agri- 
cultural Science of Grade IX in September. In practically every case the board 
has provided the special equipment necessary for teaching the topics on dairying 
and poultry, and has also provided tools and a suitable area for a school garden. 
This increase is most gratifying as it indicates a greater realization of the need of 
instruction in Agriculture in schools serving rural areas. In all schools taking the 
work, an effort is being made to lay stress upon the practical phases which will 
be of value to many of the boys and girls taking the subject. 

Two years ago, seeds of four legumes and twelve grasses were distributed 
to all the schools having school gardens. Each kind of seed was sown in a row 
about one rod long. Seeds were not allowed to mature, the purpose of the experi- 
ment being to determine the comparative growth of each variety. Some good 
results have followed. Additional seeds have been supplied where needed, and 
more than two-thirds of the schools have had a part in this project. 

The subsequent paragraphs of this report deal with the progress of Agricul- 
tural instruction in the elementary schools, secondary schools, summer schools 
and the Normal Schools. 



Public and Separate Schools 

The number of schools which have met the requirements of the Regulations 
and qualified for grants for Form III, Form IV, and Form V, since 1903, is given 
in the abbreviated table following: 



Year 


Number of 
Schools 


With School 
Gardens 


With Home 
Gardens 


1903 


4 
159 
264 
1,648 
3,395 
4,906 
5,201 
5,534 
5,065 






1913 






1914 


208 
702 
1,059 
1,344 
1,594 
1,619 
1,580 


56 


1920 


946 


1928. ....... 


2,336 


1932 


3,562 


1934 


3,607 


1936 


3,915 


1937 


3,485 







The figures for 1937 are based on the number of reports received at the 
Department for the school year ending June 30th, 1937, and show that agricul- 
tural instruction was given in 70.4 per cent, of all the elementary schools and in 
74.1 per cent, of all rural schools and 50.7 per cent, of all urban schools. The 
decrease in 1937 as compared with 1936 is due to changes in the Regulations 
effective from January 1st, 1936, when grants to uncertificated teachers were 
withdrawn. As a result, in many schools served by such teachers, no report was 
made, though the courses in Agriculture as detailed in Circular 56F were followed. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



37 



For the past two years improvement of school grounds has been encouraged, and 
a higher standard for school gardens required. The decrease in the number of 
school gardens in 1937, as compared with 1936, is due to the above factors. 

The following table shows the number of certificates held by teachers 
engaged in the work for the years given: 



Year 


Elementary 


Elementary 
Parti 


Intermediate 


Intermediate 
Parti 


Totals 


1934 


1,552 
1,957 
2,092 
2,351 


86 
106 
208 
502 


144 
163 
188 
218 


10 
16 
22 
42 


1,792 


1935 


2,242 


1936 


2,510 


1937 


3,113 



It will be noted that reports were received in 1934 from 5,201 schools in which 
1,792 teachers were certificated, and that, for 1937, reports were received from 
5,065 schools in which 3,119 teachers were certificated. This noteworthy increase 
in certificated teachers over a four-year period is partly due to the fact that each 
year a larger number of boards are requiring teachers who hold certificates in 
Agriculture. 

In addition to the courses for Form III and Form IV, Agriculture of the 
Lower School course was taken in fifth classes of 585 schools under the Regulations 
for Public and Separate Schools. The Lower School courses taught by a teacher 
holding an Intermediate Certificate are taken under the High School Regulations 
in the following schools: Britt Consolidated; S.S. No. 7 Biddulph, Granton; 
Elizabeth Ziegler Public School, Waterloo; R.C.S.S. No. 6 Ellice and Logan, 
Kinkora; General Mercer Public School, Toronto; Hespeler Public School; 
Innerkip Public School; Mayfair Public School, No. 5 Sandwich East; Mono 
Mills Public School; Central School, Port Arthur; Port McNicoll Public School; 
Port Stanley Public School; St. Michael's Separate School, Cobourg; St. Peter's 
Separate School, Peterborough; St. Raphael's West Separate School; Victoria 
Public School, Kitchener; R.C.S.S. No. 8 Windham, La Salette; Tecumseh 
Public School. 

Secondary Schools 

Instruction in Agriculture in secondary schools is provided under three 
schemes as stated below and may be taken in those schools which meet the re- 
quirements of the Department of Education. 

1. Optional classes in Lower and Middle School as a part of the course for 
Normal Entrance or Matriculation. 

2. Department of Agriculture under the High Schools Act. 

3. Department of Agriculture under the Vocational Education Act. 

Under scheme (1) above, Agriculture was taught during the year in the 
schools listed below. Under (a) are the schools in which Lower School courses 
only are taken, and under (b) both Lower and Middle School courses. 

Collegiate Institutes 

(a) Clinton, Cornwall, Goderich, Ingersoll, Oshawa, Perth, *Seaforth, York 
Memorial, Vaughan Road. Total, 9. 

(b) Barrie, Belleville, Brockville, Cobourg, East York, Fort William, 
Kitchener, Lindsay, Napanee, Orillia, Picton, Port Arthur, Renfrew, Runnymede, 
Scarborough, Smith's Falls, Stamford, Strathroy. Total, 18. 

^Introduced Agriculture in September, 1937. 



38 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



High Schools 

(a) *Alexandria, *Arthur, Bracebridge, * Chester ville, Cobalt, Durham, 
Englehart, Essex, Etobicoke, *Flesherton, *Forest, *Gananoque, Kapuskasing, 
Kemptville, *Lakefield, Lucan, *Madoc, Markham, Mattawa, *Maxville, Mea- 
ford, Merritton, *Morewood, *Mount Forest, Niagara-on-the-Lake, *Omemee, 
*Orangeville, Port Credit, Shelburne, *Streetsville, Tilbury, Trenton, Wingham. 
Total, 33. 

(b) Alliston, Amherstburg, Athens, Beamsville, Bowmanville, Brighton, 
Burford, Burlington, Caledonia, Cayuga, Dundas, Dunnville, Elmira, Fergus, 
Fort Frances, Grimsby, Hagersville, Haileybury, Iroquois, Kincardine, Kings- 
ville, Leamington, Listowel, Markdale, Midland, Milton, Mitchell, Nepean 
(Westboro P.O.), Newburgh, New Liskeard, Norwich, Norwood, Oakville, Petro- 
lia, Port Elgin, Port Perry, Ridgetown, Ridgeway, Rainy River, Saltfleet (Stoney 
Creek P.O.), Simcoe, Smithville, Stirling, Tweed, Waterdown, Waterford, Wat- 
ford, Whitby, Winchester, Uxbridge. Total, 50 

Continuation Schools 

(a) Ailsa Craig, Ayr, Beaverton, Bothwell, Burk's Falls, *Chatsworth, Cold- 
water, Eganville, Fordwich, *Grand Valley, *Harrow, *Inglewood, Melbourne, 
Merlin, *Thamesville, *Tiverton. Total, 16. 

(b) Agincourt, Brooklin, Brownsville, Comber, Drayton, Drumbo, Embro, 
Florence, Ilderton, Little Britain, Lobo (Ilderton R.R. No. 2), Lynden, Lynd- 
hurst, Merrickville, Mindemoya, Mount Albert, Mount Brydges, Mount Elgin, 
Mount Pleasant, New Dundee, New Hamburg, Orono, Pelham (Fenwick P. O.), 
Princeton, St. George, Sparta, Sundridge, Tamworth, Teeswater, Thamesford, 
Wheatley, Woodville. Total 32. 

A summary of the above shows that Agriculture is now taken in twenty-seven 
Collegiate Institutes, eighty-three High Schools, and forty-eight Continuation 
Schools. During the year the work was introduced in one Collegiate Institute, 
thirteen High Schools, and six Continuation Schools. Both Lower and Middle 
School courses are taken in one hundred schools. 

The following abbreviated table shows the development in this phase of 
instruction since its beginning in 1913 and the number of schools now taking 
the work. 



Year 


Collegiate 
Institutes 


High 
Schools 


Continuation 
Schools 


Total 


1913 




1 
13 
23 
44 
54 
61 
67 
68 
83 


1 
4 
4 
23 
33 
36 
40 
43 
48 


2 


1918 

1923 


8 
8 
14 
24 
25 
26 
26 
27 


25 
35 


1928 

1933 

1934 


81 
111 
122 


1935 


133 


1936 


137 


1937 


158 







One hundred and ninety-six teachers are engaged in giving instruction in 
Agriculture. Of this number, one hundred and three hold the Specialist certificate, 
eight-one being graduates of the Ontario Agricultural College. 

The following schools are taking work under the scheme indicated in (2) 
above: Drayton, Elmira, Listowel, Port Perry, Wheatley, and Whitby. Addi- 
*Introduced Agriculture in September, 1937. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



39 



tional time is given to Agriculture and practical phases of the subject are stressed. 
At Port Perry and Whitby provision is made for Shop Work for boys and Home 
Economics for girls. These activities will be provided for in the new school being 
erected at Elmira. 

Under (3) above, the following schools are qualifying for grants under the 
Vocational Education Act : Beamsville, Kemptville, Renfrew, Ridgetown, Stam- 
ford and Simcoe. In several of these schools additional shop equipment has been 
purchased to provide for additional activities in the new General Shop Courses. 
In all a very satisfactory type of work is being done and the courses offered are 
meeting the needs of the pupils and the approval of trustees and parents. 

Summer Courses 

The attendance at the Summer Courses in Agriculture at Guelph and Kempt- 
ville in 1937 surpassed all previous records as shown in the tables below. The 
course for the Specialist certificate was not given. In spite of large classes which 
taxed accommodations, the character of the work done was quite satisfactory and 
the results of a standard equal to those of previous years. 

The following table shows the attendance at the Summer Courses for the 
past five years: 

Attendance at the Ontario Agricultural College, Guelph 



Year 


Elementary 


Intermediate 


Inspectors 


Farm 
Mechanics 


Total 


I 


II 


I 


II 


III 


1933 

1934 

1935 


107 
112 
188 
414 
368 


123 

95 

112 

223 

408 


35 
38 
61 
79 

88 


39 
45 
46 

72 
79 


' 12"' 


3 
1 
2 
3 
3 


13 
17 


320 
320 
409 


1936 


24 
23 


815 


1937 


969 







Attendance at the Agricultural School, Kemptville 



Year 


Part I 
Elementary 


Part II 

Elementary 


Total 


1933 


26 

19 

116 

220 

187 


30 

28 

40 

110 

202 


56 


1934 


47 


1935 


156 


1936 


330 


1937 


389 







Normal Schools 

Instruction in Agriculture at the Normal Schools is a part of the regular 
course for a First Class Certificate and is taken by all students, but does not lead 
to a special certificate. Facilities for instruction in practical phases of the work 
in gardening and other topics are provided and a good course is given as far as the 
time allotted on the Normal School programme will allow. 

Graduates of the Normal Schools who are engaged in rural schools should, 
however, qualify for a special certificate at the first opportunity by attendance 
at Summer Courses and it is evident from the large enrolment in Summer Courses 
in the past two years that many teachers are doing so. 



Toronto, June 1st, 1938. 



Norman Davies, 

Inspector of Agricultural Classes. 



40 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX G 
REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF AUXILIARY 

CLASSES 

Statistical Information for the School Year, 1936-37 

Training Classes. — For backward and psychopathic children and those 
who cannot successfully pursue the ordinary grade work, but who can be trained 
and whose mental age is not less than the legal school age. 



Centre 



Number 

of 
teachers 



Enrolment 

at 
inspection 



Boys 


Girls 


15 


1 


12 


3 


12 


3 


17 


14 


11 


4 


11 


2 


6 


10 


12 


5 


36 


15 


120 


57 


57 


31 


sses) 




8 


8 


18 




16 


6 


22 


11 


sses) 




13 


3 


59 


53 


18 


2 


36 


17 


17 




13 


5 


58 


40 


13 




16 


14 


13 


4 


16 




11 


5 


sses) 




12 


5 


11 


5 


46 


17 


16 


13 


9 


8 


14 


5 


9 


5 


13 


3 


7 


9 


15 


2 


13 


6 


627 


327 


110 


71 


10 


5 


11 




9 


8 


43 


22 


sses) 




220 


147 


1,851 


971 



May 

Enrolment 

1935 



Percentage 
cared for in 

training, pro- 
motion and 

special indus- 
trial classes 



Grants 



Barrie 

Belleville P.S 

Belleville S.S 

Brantford 

Chatham 

Fort Frances 

Fort William 

Gait 

Guelph 

Hamilton P.S 

Hamilton S.S 

Hawkesbury S.S 

Ingersoll 

Kingston S.S 

Kirkland Lake 

Kitchener P.S 

Kitchener S.S 

Lindsay 

London P.S 

London S.S 

Niagara Falls 

North Bay 

Oshawa 

Ottawa P.S 

Ottawa S.S 

Owen Sound 

Pembroke 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Port Arthur P.S 

Renfrew 

Ridgetown , 

St. Catharines , 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Smith's Falls 

Stratford 

Sudbury P.S 

Sudbury, S.S 

Swansea 

Toronto P.S 

Toronto S.S 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wt'lland County, 
S.S. No. 6, Stamford 

Windsor P.S 

Windsor S.S 

York Countv 



3 
10 

5 
(See Pro 

1 

1 

1 

2 
(See Pro 

1 

7 

1 

3 

1 

1 

6 

1 

2 

1 

1 

1 
(See Pro 

1 

1 

3 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
52 

9 

1 

1 

1 
4 
(See Pro 
24 



16 
15 
15 
31 
15 
13 
16 
17 
51 

177 
88 
motion Cla 
16 
18 
22 
33 
motion Cla 
16 

U2 
20 
53 
17 
18 
98 
13 
30 
17 
16 
16 
motion Cla 
17 
16 
63 
29 
17 
19 
14 
16 
16 
17 
19 

954 

181 
15 
11 

17 
65 

motion Cla 
367 



1,166 

1,997 

447 

3,918 

2,030 

1,021 

3,379 

1,705 

2,548 

21,603 

4,680 

1,219 

738 

866 



4,076 
1,684 

943 
9,198 
1,520 
2,605 
1,632 
3,750 
10,861 
11,459 
2,039 

959 
2,851 

461 
2,423 

460 

295 
3,540 
1,930 
2,449 
2,947 

963 
2,270 
1,607 
1,378 

662 

82,453 

12,340 

1,058 

1,958 

2,925 

12,525 

6,741 

6,623 



1.40 
.75 

3.35 
.79 

1.48 

1.27 

1.36 

.99 

2.00 

16 

62 

94 

17 

08 



1.67 
1.01 
1.70 
2.41 
1.32 
2.03 
6.13 

.48 
3.05 

.50 



47 
77 
56 
47 
65 
70 



1 
1 

3 
1 
3 

5.42 

2.91 

1.50 

2.53 

2.17 

1.45 

.70 

.99 

4.21 

2.87 

2.78 

2.85 

1.42 

.56 



.58 

1.11 

.71 

5.78 



164 



2,822 



$203.46 
230.49 
284.34 
411.20 
200.00 
200.00 
221.41 
222.84 
600.00 

1.822.02 
833. 17 



235.53 
251.13 
310.42 
450.00 



282.80 
1,788.81 
245.54 
596.47 
238.59 
216.54 
1,035.53 
189.91 
479.43 
235.92 
209.48 
178.62 



180.50 
232.05 
689.27 
496.05 
247.91 
193.19 
227.43 
208.43 
79.11 
173.54 
244.80 
9,578. 79 
1,681.58 
225.00 
151.74 

198.64 
870.68 



5,583. 15 



$33,435.51 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



41 



Promotion and Special Industrial Classes. — For children thirteen years of age 
and over who are eligible for a training class. 



Centre 



Number 

of 
teachers 



Enrolment 

at 
inspection 



Boys 



Girls 



Grants 



Chatham 

Fort William 

Hamilton P.S 

Hawkesbury S.S 

Kitchener P.S 

Kitchener S.S 

London P.S 

North Bay 

Ottawa P.S 

Ottawa S.S 

Port Arthur 

St. Catharines 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudbury S.S 

Toronto P.S 

Toronto, Church Street 

Windsor P.S 

Windsor S.S 

York 



1 
2 

18 

2 
2 
1 
5 
4 

11 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

53 

11 
3 
2 

1 



15 

30 

363 

48 

35 

17 

100 

83 

233 

44 

40 

40 

45 

45 

41 

1,198 

302 
74 
48 
16 



128 



2,817 



15 

14 

251 

24 
19 
17 
59 
42 

130 
20 
20 
21 
24 
27 
21 

609 

302 
55 

48 
16 



1,734 



16 
112 

24 
16 



41 
41 

103 
24 
20 
19 
21 
18 
20 

589 



19 



$317.79 

628.52 

Paid by Tech. 

Education Br. 

778.00 

687.37 

278.87 

1,849.96 

1,444.20 

2,892.76 

1,048.64 

718.19 

667.98 

702.01 

635. 10 

553.37 

Paid by Tech. 

Education Br. 

1,675.22 

933.51 

706.48 

391.41 



1,083 



$16,909.38 



Oral, Lip-Reading, Hard-of -Hearing and Speech Classes. 



Centre 


Number 

of 
teachers 


Enrolment 

at 
inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Hamilton 


1 

1 

1 

12 


201 

99 

9 

895 






$175.00 


Kitchener 








Ottawa 






666 60 


Toronto 






3,630.42 










15 


1,204 






$4,472.02 









Sight-Saving Classes. — For children whose sight prevents them from making 
satisfactory progress or whose eyes would be impaired by using ordinary text- 
books. 



Centre 


Number 

of 
teachers 


Enrolment 

at 
inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Hamilton 


1 
1 
1 
5 


15 
13 
16 
67 


8 
10 

4 
46 


7 

3 

12 

21 


$176.00 


London 


225.00 


Ottawa 


190.17 


Toronto 


892.15 








8 


111 


68 


43 


$1,483.32 



42 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



Orthopedic Classes. — For disabled children. 



Centre 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Enrolment 

at 
Inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Kitchener (Visiting teacher) 


1 
1 
5 
9 
5 


16 
20 
75 
134 
70 


9 

9 

45 

57 

37 


7 
11 
30 
77 
33 




Ottawa 


$858.72 


Toronto 


3,845.37 


Toronto (Visiting teachers) .... ... 




York 










21 


315 


157 


158 


$4,704.09 



Open Air Classes. — For delicate, anaemic, or undernourished children. 
Classes are held in parks, or in class-rooms with one side open to the sun and air. 



Centre 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Enrolment 

at 
Inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Toronto P.S 


9 
2 


353 
60 


137 
22 


216 
38 


$822.71 


Toronto S.S 


353.20 








11 


413 


159 


254 


$1,175.91 



Hospital and Sanatorium Classes. — For children in hospitals, sanatoria, wards, 
or homes for the incurable. 



Centre 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Enrolment 

at 
Inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Brantford 


1 
1 
1 
2 
5 
1 


18 
40 
28 
42 
104 
24 


6 
24 
10 
22 
46 
10 


12 
16 
18 
20 
58 
14 


$40.96 


Hamilton .... 


78.94 


Kitchener 


173.30 


London 


177.36 


Toronto 


147.95 


Windsor 


71.70 








11 


256 


118 


138 


$690.21 



Institutional Classes. — For inmates of children's homes, shelters, orphan- 
ages, etc. 



Centre 


Number 

of 
Teachers 


Enrolment 

at 
Inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Toronto 


1 


24 


14 


10 


$41.01 








1 


24 


14 


10 


$41.01 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



43 



Rural School Home- Instruction Units. — For crippled children who cannot 
attend school. 



Inspectorate 


Number of 
teachers 


Enrol, at 
inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Elgin 


6 
1 

2 
1 
1 
7 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
36 
9 


11 

1 
2 
1 
1 
8 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
41 
9 


4 


7 
1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
1 


$300.88 


Frontenac N. and Addington (in part) . . 
Halton . 




1 




Hastings N. and Renfrew (in part) .... 
Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) and Lanark 
Ontario 








3 


152.50 


Oxford 


50.00 


Perth 


1 
1 
1 
1 


8.40 


Prince Edward 


5.14 






20.35 




1 

2 

21 

4 






16.50 


York 


20 
5 


948.64 




61.59 




72 


83 


37 


46 


$1,564.00 



Rural Sight-Saving Units. 






County 


Number of 
teachers 


Enrol, at 
inspection 


Boys 


Girls 


Grants 


Addington 

Brant 

Bruce 


2 
3 
6 
3 
4 
4 

16 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
7 
5 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
5 
2 
9 

11 
2 

23 
5 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
2 


2 
3 
6 
3 
4 
4 

21 
3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
7 
5 
2 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
5 
3 
9 

11 
2 

23 
5 
1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
3 
2 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
10 
3 
1 
2 
1 

"4" 

2 
1 
1 

2 






1 
4 
1 
2 


2^60 


Carleton . . 


12.95 


Dundas. . . 




Elgin 

Essex 




11 




Frontenac 

Grey 


10.10 


Hastings 

Huron 










Kent 


1 
3 
3 
1 
2 


2.25 


Lambton 

Leeds and Grenville 


28.80 


Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Northumberland and Durham 


.50 
14.50 


Ontario 


1 
2 




Oxford 






Peel 


1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
7 
8 
1 
15 
3 
1 
2 




Prescott and Russell 




2.00 


Prince Edward 






Simcoe 


1 
2 
2 
3 
1 
8 
2 




Stormont 




Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 


7.65 
3.21 


York 

District Division I 


16.25 
44.65 


District Division V 




District Division IX 


3 
1 
1 


18.15 


District Division X 




District Division XV 






R.C. District Division II 


1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 




R.C. District Division III 


1 




R.C. District Division V. 




R.C. District Division X 


1 




R.C. District Division XIV 




R.C. District Division XV 


1 
1 




R.C. District Division XVI 










150 


156 


96 


60 


$163.61 



44 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



Rural Training Units. 



Inspectorate 



Number of 
teachers 



Enrol, at 
inspection 



Boys 



Girls 



Grants 



Dundas and Grenville (in part) 

Elgin East and City of St. Thomas. . . 

Glengarry (in part) and Prescott (in 
Part) 

Grey North and Bruce North 

Huron West 

Kent (No. 1) 

Kent (No. 2), Elgin West 

Eambton West (No. 1) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) and Lan- 
ark (in part) 

Lincoln (in part) 

Northumberland and Durham (No. 3) 
and Hastings (in part) 

Oxford North and City of Woodstock 

Prescott and Russell (No. 1) 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew North 

Simcoe Centre 

Simcoe East and Muskoka (in part) . . 

Simcoe South, York (in part) and Peel 
(in part) 

Waterloo (No. 1) 

York (No.6) 

District Division V 

District Division VIII 

District Division IX 

District Division XII 

District Division XIII 

R.C. District Division X 

R.C. District Division XV 

R.C. District Division XXI 



28 
23 

6 
19 

2 
25 
31 
10 

22 

28 

1 
1 
18 
12 
8 
4 
9 

2 
2 
1 
2 

22 
1 
1 

11 
8 

18 
1 



88 
70 

24 

57 

3 

71 
83 
53 

96 
197 

2 
1 
32 
38 
17 
6 
31 

6 

4 

1 

6 

82 

1 

1 

37 

59 

87 

7 



60 
52 

15 
43 
3 
49 
54 
33 

60 
138 

1 
1 
24 
27 
12 
4 
22 

5 

4 

1 

2 

61 

1 

1 

22 

47 

59 

3 



28 
18 

9 
14 



22 
29 
20 

36 
59 



11 
5 
2 
9 



4 
21 



15 
12 

28 
4 



$138.83 

48.70 

139.97 

7.13 

197.08 

48.68 

4.39 

189.23 
215.85 

1.55 

5.91 

140.54 

17.76 



16.18 



7.23 
169.41 



53.40 

126.76 

97.11 



316 



1,160 



804 



356 



$1,625.71 



Urban Organization 

In addition to the classes mentioned above the following new auxiliary 
classes were opened during the latter half of 1937: 

Opportunity Classes. — Grimsby, 1; Kirkland Lake, 1; Penetanguishene, 1; 

Ottawa Separate Schools, 2; Woodstock, 1. 
Partial Opportunity Classes. — Cobden, 1; Listowel, 1. 
Handicraft Classes. — Guelph, 1 ; Midland, 1 ; Ottawa Separate Schools, 1 ; 

Windsor, 1; Woodstock, 1. 
Handicraft School for Boys. — York Township, 4 teachers. 
Visiting Teachers. — Fort William, 1; Hamilton, 4; Toronto, 3; Windsor, 1; 

York Township, 1; East York, 1. 
Hospital Classes. — Hamilton, 1 ; Toronto, 2. 

During the year, Brampton, Grimsby, Listowel, Midland, Penetanguishene, 
Southampton, Woodstock, the Brantford Separate Schools and the Guelph 
Separate Schools were surveyed for purposes of auxiliary education. With the 
exception of several of the larger towns, including Brockville, Cornwall, and Tim- 
mins, all of the more important urban centres throughout the province have under- 
taken the provision of some form of auxiliary education. In many places initial 
forms of organization have been extended through the establishment of handi- 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



45 



craft classes for senior boys and for senior girls, and the formation of visiting 
teacher, hospital, sight-saving, and speech-correction classes for physically 
handicapped children. 

Rural Organization 

Complete surveys of the following rural inspectorates were carried out by 
Miss DeLaporte and myself in conjunction with the Inspectors concerned. 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Number 
of Cases 



Bruce East, Grey (in part) and Huron (in part) 

Elgin East 

Frontenac North and Addington (in part) 

Lambton (No. 1) 

Lincoln (in part) 

Northumberland and Durham (No. 3) and Hastings (in part) 

Oxford North 

Perth North and Wellington (in part) 

Renfrew North 

Simcoe East and Muskoka (in part) 

R.C. District Division X 



J. M. Game 
J. C. Smith 
T. R. McEwen 
H. B. Galpin 
G. A. Carefoot 
A. A. Martin 
G. M. Mather 
A. E. Nelson 
N. Campbell 
J. A. Gibson 
J. C. Walsh 



81 

122 

59 

97 

180 

49 

57 

66 

67 

127 

76 



In all, 984 pupils were examined and advisements made concerning their edu- 
cational welfare. For the large majority of those who were found to stand in 
need of assistance, special educational facilities have been provided through the 
establishment of opportunity units for backward children, sight-saving units for 
children suffering from serious visual defects after receipt of adequate medical 
attention, home-instruction units for sick and crippled children, and speech- 
correction units for children handicapped by serious speech defects. 

.Up to the present time 21 rural inspectorates have been completely, and two 
partially, surveyed and organized. Many auxiliary units of various types have 
been established through incidental contact in other, as yet unsurveyed, inspector- 
ates. There are in operation 113 home instruction units, 182 sight-saving units, 
97 speech correction units and 1,327 opportunity units. More than two hundred 
sick or crippled children in rural areas who cannot attend school are being looked 
after by means of correspondence courses. 

The home-instruction and sight-saving units are working out most success- 
fully. The former have been the means of bringing hope and happiness to the 
unfortunate children concerned. The latter have enabled many previously re- 
tarded children to catch up and advance with their age grades. Owing to lack of 
a suitable hand-book of training procedure, only a moderate degree of success 
has attended the organization of speech correction units. It is hoped to remedy 
this defect sometime during 1938. Nevertheless, even with the tentative efforts 
now being put forth, many boys and girls have been enabled to enter into the 
reading and discussion activities of their classes and to overcome the dislike for 
school which usually attends serious speech handicap. Reports from Inspectors 
concerned would indicate that about 50 per cent, of the pupils for whom oppor- 
tunity units have been established are readjusted in reading, spelling, and arith- 
metic to regular grade work, and return to their classes to pursue more or less 
profitably the ordinary school course. About 25 per cent., largely senior pupils, 
continue the modified course of study and through success in such activities as 
draughting, woodwork, knitting, and sewing become reconditioned in their 
attitude towards school, and renew their efforts to master the fundamental 
academic subjects. 



46 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

Arrangements have been completed for surveying the following rural in- 
spectorates in 1938. 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Brant and Norfolk 

Bruce West 

Middlesex East and Elgin (in part) 

Oxford South and Norfolk (in part) 

Peterborough East 

Simcoe South, York (in part), Peel (in part) 

Waterloo (No. 1) 

Wellington South 

Algoma (in part) 

Algoma (in part), Nipissing (in part), Parry Sound (in part), Sudbury (in part) 

Haliburton and Muskoka (in part) 

R.C. District Division XII 



Walter Joyce 
G. C. Dobson 
D. G. Smith 
J. W. Hagan 
L. W. Copp 
W. H. Carlton 
H. E. Elborn 
G. G. McNab 
D. T. Walkom 
L. L. Skuce 
A. F. Brown 
L. J. Langan 



It is expected that, by the end of 1938, one-third of rural Ontario will have 
been surveyed, and provision made for children needing special help. 

vSummary — Urban and Rural Organization. 

I. Physically Handicapped Number of Children 

1. Schools for the Blind and Deaf 436 

2. Urban Organization * 2,554 

3. Rural Organization 392 

3,382 

II. Mentally Handicapped: 

1. Urban Organization 5,889 

2. Rural Organization 1,327 

7,216 



10,598 



The number of physically and mentally handicapped children throughout 
the Province of Ontario who are in receipt of special educational facilities and 
instruction is equal to the total Public and Separate School population of the 
City of London. 

Poliomyelitis 

Prompt measures were taken by the Department to meet educational emer- 
gencies arising out of the Polio, epidemic this autumn. Grants to home-instruction 
units, visiting teacher classes and hospital classes were augmented. Hospitals 
throughout the province were supplied with forms upon which to report all Polio, 
cases. Circular letters were sent out to all Inspectors and to such Boards as 
employed visiting teachers, setting forth the method and desirability of establish- 
ing home-instruction units, visiting teacher classes, or correspondence courses 
for victims of the disease during their lengthy periods of convalescence. The 
names of all cases within each inspectorate were forwarded as soon as received 
from the hospitals or from the Ontario Society for Crippled Children. Through 
the whole-hearted co-operation of Inspectors and School Boards, provision was 
made, by one or other of the three methods mentioned above, for the educational 
care of a number of adults and all school-age children as rapidly as they arrived 
home. At present 276 cases are being looked after, and no work done by the 
Department is received with more grateful appreciation. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 47 

New Courses of Study 

"If that method works so well with backward children why wouldn't it be 
a good method to practise in the regular grades?'* is a question which has fre- 
quently been asked auxiliary class teachers during the past several years. 

In a very real sense auxiliary classes throughout the Province have been 
experimental laboratories. As the kindergarten was instrumental in spreading the 
gospel of 'happy learning' through the kindergarten-primary into the primary 
grades, so the auxiliary class has assisted in establishing the value of 'direct 
learning', 'active learning' and 'attitudinal training' throughout the schools. 

Inasmuch as the programme of studies has been simplified and more direct 
methods of presentation advanced, the New Courses will definitely be to the 
advantage of backward children in the grades. Unfortunately, however, no 
curriculum can miraculously efface the relative disadvantage suffered by the 
physically and mentally handicapped in the matter of school progress. The 
crippled, the deafened, the blinded will always stand in need of special attention. 
The boy with an intelligence quotient of 70 will be seven chronologically before 
he is five mentally and will not be able to read with facility on a "Mary-John- 
and-Peter" level much before ten. He will have to repeat classes, or, if promoted 
on an age basis, will strand through lack of skill in reading, especially since the 
presentation of arithmetic and the social sciences has now been placed more 
largely on a reading basis. He may survive in the grades somewhat longer, but, 
sooner or later, will require modified training and specialized teaching if he is to 
profit through school attendance. 

The general introduction of the New Courses is likely, therefore, to result 
in an increased placement in auxiliary classes of eight and nine-year-old children 
who, after two or three years of school experience, have failed to acquire the art 
of reading, but may, after a certain period of special teaching, be returned to 
regular classes for slow but profitable grade progress. In the past, one of the 
chief difficulties to be surmounted in returning a pupil to grade has been the 
knowledge requirements demanded in history and geography. Even after a pupil 
had been readjusted in the fundamentals, reading, writing and arithmetic, and 
rehabilitated in his attitude towards school and society, the grade teacher would 
sometimes object to his return on the ground of his ignorance of townships and 
post offices, counties and county towns, etc. Now that emphasis in the social 
science has been shifted from knowledge to interest, and the course, particularly 
in the first three grades, differs but little both as to content and method from that 
of the ordinary auxiliary class, it is hoped that readjustment may become an 
increasingly important function of the special class. With this thought in mind 
the former name 'Training Class' has been changed to 'Opportunity Class' in 
recently issued regulations, as an indication that the door of the room should, 
in the future, swing both ways. 

There would also appear to be the same need as formerly for the establish- 
ment of handicraft classes for adolescent boys and girls who are not book-minded, 
who cannot, with profit, attend a vocational school, and who tend to become 
school and social problems as a result of inability to function successfully in grade 
subjects, requiring the use of text-books and supplementary reading. 

Publications 

The 'Special Class Teacher', a magazine devoted to the interests of special 
education and published by the Auxiliary Class Section of the O.E.A., has enjoyed 



48 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



another prosperous year. Its subscription list extends south, east, and west, far 
beyond Ontario. Its efficient and progressive staff turns out a periodical whose 
general articles on various phases of special education are nicely balanced by a 
wealth of practical suggestions from teachers engaged in actual field work. 

'Junior Draughting' by H. O. Lydford of the North Bay Boys' Handicraft 
School fulfills a long standing need for an elementary course in shop-drawing, 
adapted more particularly to the requirements of boys in the public and separate 
schools who later will have scant opportunity of attending technical schools. The 
book comprises a two- to four-year course, depending upon the age and ability of 
the student and provides general training in mathematical thought, skill in con- 
structive planning and a working knowledge of shop forms and designs. Objective 
material has been selected from a boy's world of experience and many of the 
drawings can be put to immediate use in the work rooms of a craft school. It is 
hoped that other auxiliary class teachers may put into book form the advanced 
and carefully worked out ideas which so many are now practising in their class 
rooms. In an age of foolscap philosophy there would seem to be wide room for 
guidance derived from real experience and tested in classroom laboratories. 

Books I and II of the Canadian Speller were reproduced this year in 24 point 
type by the publishers, W. J. Gage & Company, using a new photo-engraving 
process. Each volume is printed on sight-saving paper and bound with wire-o 
binding which permits the book to be turned back when in use. This is the first 
time that a regulation text-book has ever been reproduced in large type and the 
pupils and teachers in sight-saving classes are finding it a great boon. It is hoped 
that two of the senior readers may be enlarged in the same way during 1938. 

Organization 

All teachers of auxiliary classes are specially trained in a five weeks' summer 
course. In 1937 a tri-part course was given: (I) and (II) for teachers having at 
least an Interim Second Class Certificate and two years' successful teaching 
experience in the province, who wished to qualify as teachers of; (i) training and 
promotion classes, (ii) speech correction and lip-reading classes. (Ill), a general 
course for teachers who wished to improve their professional standing and prepare 
themselves for dealing with problem children in regular grade rooms. Seventy-six 
took the first course, 25 the second and 29 the third. 

Brief courses were given in each of the eight Provincial Normal Schools to 
acquaint teachers-in-training with methods of dealing with auxiliary type pupils, 
especially in rural schools. The many inquiries received by the Department from 
recently graduated teachers concerning the educational welfare of exceptional 
children in their charge is evidence of interest aroused by these Normal School 
talks. 

A ninth Auxiliary Class Teachers' Association was organized this year to 
embrace the special class teachers of the Niagara Peninsula. The monthly or bi- 
monthly meetings of these associations have been the means of affording fresh 
stimuli to a group of workers whose special type of duty tends to limit their 
normal professional contacts. 



H. E. Amoss, 
Inspector of Auxiliary Classes. 



Toronto, March 16th, 1938. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



49 



APPENDIX H 
REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SCHOOL ATTENDANCE 



"School life is to a large extent the reflection of the home life of the com- 
munity." If the people are prosperous and happy, that prosperity and happiness 
are shown in the school. If conditions are the reverse, the school, too, suffers in 
various ways. Comparative attendance statistics indicate that absences in a 
community may increase with the activity there, if the community is prosperous, 
or with the lack of activity there, if the district is less fortunate. In sections where 
the tobacco industry flourishes, where canning is prominent, where fruit-growing 
occupies the attention of the farmer, or where the potato is the chief crop, there 
we find more absence due to Home Help, as the assistance of children is often 
needed in harvesting the crops. Where the people are not so happily situated, 
there we have losses due to Privation, Truancy and Parental Neglect. One can, 
in many cases, read the weather conditions throughout the Province from the 
losses due to Physical Obstacles, while epidemics leave their marks in the Illness 
column. 

With our present system of recording, it is a difficult task to increase the 
percentage of attendance, as certain losses, while they may vary from year to 
year, can neither be eliminated nor greatly reduced. 

Elementary Schools 

In 1935-36 there were 6,377 Public Schools and 793 Separate Schools; in 
1936-37 the Public Schools numbered 6,347 and the Separate Schools 812. The 
decrease in the number of Public Schools is attributable to the closing of some of 
the very small rural schools. The children in such cases attend neighbouring 
schools, with increased educational benefit to themselves. 

Secondary Schools 

The total number of secondary schools remained unchanged, the increase 
of one in the Collegiate Institute group and two in the ranks of the High Schools 
being offset by the decrease of three in the number of Continuation Schools. At 
present there are 69 Collegiate Institutes, 156 High Schools, 208 Continuation 
Schools, 58 Vocational Schools and 5 Special Industrial Schools — a total of 496. 

Enrolment 

A comparison of enrolments in the various schools for the past two years 
is of interest. 



1935-36 



1936-37 



Increase or 
Decrease 



Public Schools 

Separate Schools 

High Schools and Collegiate Institutes 

Continuation Schools 

Vocational and Special Industrial Schools — 

Day Classes 

Night Classes 



460,785 

101,152 

67,899 

9,464 

35,418 
24,360 



699,078 



455,365 
100,348 

67,088 
8,996 

36,256 
25,930 



693,983 



5,420 dec. 
804 dec. 
811 dec. 
468 dec. 

838 incr. 
1,570 incr. 



5,095 dec. 



50 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



This shows a decrease in total enrolment for the year of 5,095, the only increase 
being in the Vocational and Special Industrial Schools. 

Table No. 1 

(Showing percentage attendance since 1933) 



Class of School 


1933* 


1934* 


1934-35f 


1935-36f 


1936-37f 


Increase in 

percentage 

over 1935-36 


City Schools 


92.21 
92.92 
92.47 
89.30 
87.98 
92.40 
89.09 
91.17 


92.82 
93.28 
92.49 
89.68 
87.69 
92.84 
89.35 
91.56 


91.70 
92.77 
91.57 
89.29 
87.33 
91.94 
88.97 
90.83 


91.87 
91.62 
91.39 
88.17 
86.29 
91.64 
87.85 
90.27 


92.49 
92.67 
91.83 
87.65 
87.22 
92.49 
89.34 
90.91 


.62 

1.05 

.44 

.52(dec.) 
.93 
.85 
1.49 
.64 


Town Schools 


Village Schools 


County Rural Schools 

District Rural Schools 

All Urban Schools 


All Rural Schools 


All Elementary Schools .... 



^Calendar Year. 



fAcademic Year. 



School Leaders in Attendance 



In 1934-35 



City of Fort William 
Town of Chelmsford 
Village of Port Perry 
County of Waterloo . . 
District of Sudbury . , 



Per 
cent. 



95.33 
97.77 
96.68 
94.32 

88.77 



In 1935-36 



City of Gait 

Town of Chelmsford 
Village of Port Perry 
County of Waterloo . 
District of Nipissing . 



Per 
cent. 



95.34 
96.85 
96.51 
93.41 
89.17 



In 1936-37 



City of Gait 

Town of Palmerston. 
Village of Port Perry 
County of Waterloo . 
District of Algoma. . , 



Per 
cent. 



96.10 
96.22 
96.98 
93.54 
89.04 



Table No. 2— Public Schools, 1936-37 




Average 
Attendance 


Percentage 
Attendance 


Loss in days 
per pupil 


Rural 


160,473 
246,483 


89.16 
92.28 


19 98 


Urban 


14.92 


Table No. 3— Separate Schools, 1936-37 




Average 
Attendance 


Percentage 
Attendance 


Loss in days 
per pupil 


Rural . . 


20,864 
71,310 


90.72 
93.51 


17.46 


Urban 


12.21 




Table No. 4— Totals, 1936-37 






Average 
Attendance 


Percentage 
Attendance 


Loss in days 
per pupil 


Rural 


181,337 
317,793 


89.34 
92.55 


19.70 


Urban 


14.32 










Table No. 5— All Elementary Schools, 1936-37 




Average 
Attendance 


Percentage 
Attendance 


Loss in days 
per pupil 


Public 


406,956 
92,174 


91.05 

92.87 


16.98 


Separate 


13.42 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



51 



Table No. 6 — Distribution of Losses 



Days lost through 



1936-37 



1934-35 

(per cent.) 



1935-36 

(per cent.) 



1936-37 
(per cent.) 



Illness 

Home Help 

Parental Neglect . 
Physical Obstacles 

Truancy 

Privation 

Irregular Closing . . 
Other Reasons 



5,941,664 

827,571 

537,847 

237,508 

25,704 

94,780 

414,359 

1,004,134 



66.09 

8.48 

5.48 

2.63 

.27 

.98 

3.44 

12.63 



62.96 

7.67 

5.10 

4.39 

.24 

.95 

6.96 

11.73 



9,083,567 



100.00 



100.00 



65, 

9 
5 

2, 

i. 

4. 



41 
11 
92 
62 
28 
04 
56 
11.06 



100.00 



Of the above losses, 6,845,284 were lawful; 2,238,283 were unlawful. 



Table No. 7 



Schools 


Enrolment 


Percentage 
Attendance 




1935-36 


1936-37 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Continuation 


9,464 
67,899 

35,418 
24,360 

Kft 77Q 


8,996 
67,088 

36,256 
25,930 

fi9 IRft 


90.90 
93.51 

*92.08 


91.94 


High School and Collegiates 


94.28 


Vocational and Special Industrial 

Schools — Day 

— Night 


















137,141 


138,270 


*92.79 



*Day schools only. 



On the whole, attendance in the Province is quite satisfactory, the percentage 
being 90.91 for all elementary schools. 



Toronto, June 28th, 1938. 



R. D. KEEFE 

Director of School Attendance. 



52 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

APPENDIX I 
REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



1. The Library Situation in General 

In view of the growth of the adult education movement in this country, and of 
the impact of European fascist and communistic ideologies upon democratic 
civilizations, the public library as an enlightening element in the intellectual life 
of the community has become of more profound significance to-day than ever 
before. 

This report upon the library situation in Ontario is made from partial knowl- 
edge only. Since my appointment I have studied the reports of all the libraries, 
but thus far I have been able to visit only 111 of them. Taking stock of what we 
have in the province — and I am afraid that we have little cause to feel satisfied 
with it — the following facts emerge : — 

(a) Population of Ontario— 3,431,683. 

(b) Number of libraries — 226 (free) and 274 (association). 

(c) Population served (in theory) — 2,184,000. 

(d) Circulation of books— 13,387,000, or 3.9 books per capita. Only 
866,000 of this represented the circulation of association libraries, which are 
almost entirely rural. 

(e) Municipal appropriations for free libraries in 1936 — $1,063,000, or 
about 30c. per capita. 

(f) Legislative grants paid in 1937 — $37,500, or approximately 3 per cent, 
of the total expenditures of the public libraries. 

(g) Closed libraries — 142. 

The briefest of these facts is possibly the most significant — 142 closed 
libraries. The cause of death appears to have been, in every case, malnutrition. 

The per capita book circulation is disturbingly low. It is still more disturb- 
ing when we recognize, as its cause, the lack of adequate book facilities in the 
rural districts, where 1,335,000 people look to the village libraries for service. 
Yet the per capita use of books should normally be greater in the smaller centres 
than in the larger, as will be seen by comparing the figures for five libraries of 
different sizes: — 

Brantford 8 books per capita. 

Belleville 8 " 

Campbellford 10 " 

Bancroft 12 " 

Newcastle 21 " 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 53 

The fundamental reason for the low provincial average is, undoubtedly, the 
lack of funds with which to provide good book-stocks and skilled librarians to 
handle them. Nor is this condition peculiar to the association libraries alone. 
In a number of cases the boards of free public libraries are not securing even the 
minimum municipal appropriation of fifty cents per capita to which they are 
entitled under the Act. 

For example, in the reports for 1937 which were received up to March 24, 
1938, I find that only 14 out of 49 are obtaining as much as the minimum muni- 
cipal appropriation. The figures on a per capita basis are as follows: — 

One library receiving $1.00 — Flora. 

Two libraries receiving between 70c and 80c: Beamsville (70); Brussels (80). 

One library receiving between 60c and 70c — Amherstburg (63). 

Ten libraries receiving between 50c and 60c: Aylmer (50) ; Barrie (50) ; Brace- 
bridge (51); Brockville (59); Chatham (53); Dundas (50); Fort William (56); 
Gait (50); Kitchener (50); Port Rowan (50). 

Thirteen libraries receiving between J+Oc and 50c: Ayr (46) ; Brampton (44) ; 
Brantford (41); Burk's Falls (42); Campbellford (48); Clinton (42); Collingwood 
(44); Durham (43); Elmira (47); Ingersoll (46); Lindsay (49); North Bay (43); 
Peterborough (49). 

Eight libraries receiving between 30c and 40c: Belleville (37) ; Chesley (35) ; 
Clifford (35); Markdale (32); Mount Dennis (32); Parry Sound (36); Smith's 
Falls (35); Stayner (30). 

Twelve libraries receiving between 20c and 30c: Ailsa Craig (28) ; Almonte (25) ; 
Arthur (28) ; Aurora (26) ; Brighton (24) ; Cardinal (20) ; Cornwall (22) ; Fort 
Erie (29); Lanark (26); Oakwood (23); Pembroke (25); Timmins (21). 

Two libraries receiving less than 20c: Bothwell (16); Cayuga (14). 

This summary, while not by any means complete, may be taken as repre- 
sentative of the free library situation. It should be noted, however, that certain 
centres are under supervision, with controlled budgets. These include Pembroke, 
Mount Dennis, Fort Erie, and North Bay (limited supervision). 

Two urgent calls for special service have been made upon our libraries in 
recent years. The first came with the depression when many people turned to 
books because of enforced leisure or reduced budgets. The second has arisen 
with the introduction of the new curriculum in our schools. Although handi- 
capped in many cases by inadequate funds, most of the libraries I have visited 
are doing what they can to co-operate in the matter of book service to school 
children under the new programme of studies. But, frankly, the libraries do not 
feel that they are meeting the added needs of the children, or that they can ever 
hope to do so upon their normal budgets. Not only is the book expense bearing 
heavily upon them, but in some cases, also, more staff assistance has been re- 
quired for the junior library. It has been obtained only at the cost of reducing 
the service to adults. 

This is all a great pity, since the new curriculum offers libraries the greatest 
opportunity they have ever had to capture the imagination of children, to bring 
them to the book-shelves, and to establish once and for all, in those who are 
capable of becoming readers, the library habit. 



54 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



2. Grants to Libraries 

Schooling is not in itself an end. The continued education, voluntarily, of 
such portion of the adult population as is capable of absorbing it must be an 
essential part of the general scheme of education. The association library is as 
much an anachronism as would be a privately owned fire department. In the 
public library lies the only universal answer to adult education ; but at the same 
time the free public library is in a state of partial paralysis through financial 
starvation. What can be done about it? 

In the first place, the present minimum local appropriation of 50 cents per 
capita, where it is obtained, offers just about enough subsistence to enable a 
library to keep alive. It certainly does not permit of expansion in keeping with 
the needs of the day. In the second place, additional local support of libraries, if 
it were possible to obtain it, would only add a further burden to the one source of 
revenue which seems already over-burdened — real property. 

The solution, I believe, can only be reached through increased legislative 
grants to libraries — materially increased grants. But on conditions, certainly. 
To libraries that obtain the minimum 50 cents from the local authorities and 
spend it wholly on library service, that employ as chief librarian and as a certain 
portion of the staff, trained and qualified persons, and that meet other require- 
ments of inspection — to these, I suggest a grant of 20 per cent, of their total 
expenditures. This may seem a sharp increase, and it might be necessary to set 
a maximum grant to any one library, but I am trying to present a principle, not a 
minutely detailed scheme. 

Let us glance at what we are doing at present. Taking the ten libraries 
reported as receiving the 50-cent appropriation, consider the following facts: — 



Centre 



Population 



Total 
Expenditure 



Grant 



Amount 



Per cent, of 
Expenditure 



Aylmer 

Barrie 

Bracebridge. . 
Brockville 

Chatham 

Dundas 

Fort William t 

Gait 

Kitchener. . . . 
Port Rowan . . 



1,980 

8,054 

2,581 

9,874 

16,215 

5,002 

24,371 

13,958 

32,862 

660 



$1,162.76 
4,719.30 
1,604.98 
5,920.14 
9,162.84 
2,931.93 

16,193.04 
8,518.96 

14,920.00 
302.63 



$140.35 
155.21 
141.05 
159.00 
159.00 
156.50 
319.00* 
159.00* 
159.00* 
39.80 



12 
3 
8 
3 
2 
5 
2 
2 
1 

13 



* Exclusive of $50 special grant for trained librarian. 
|Has one branch library. 



Thus, legislative grants range from 1 per cent, in the case of the largest 
community listed, to 13 per cent, in the case of the smallest. Under a 20 per 
cent, grant on expenditures, and forgetting for a moment the possible need to 
set a maximum figure, the grants to these ten libraries would be as follows: — 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



55 



Centre 


Grant on 
20 per cent, plan 


Grant on 
present plan 


Aylmer 


$232.55 

943.86 

320.99 

1,184.02 

1,832.80 

586.38 

3,238.60 

1,703.79 

2,984.06 

60.52 


$140.35 


Barrie 


155.21 


Bracebridge 


141.05 


Brockville 


159.00 


Chatham 


159.00 


Dundas 


156.50 


Fort William 


319.00 


Gait 


159.00 


Kitchener 


159.00 


Port Rowan 


39.80 









The principle behind the proposed plan is, of course, incentive. At the 
present time the $50 grant payable to libraries employing a trained librarian is 
not sufficient to induce some boards to pay the necessary salary. If they saw 
that worth-while assistance would be forthcoming if they accepted the oppor- 
tunities offered by the Act, provided more books, employed a trained librarian, 
and gave the people real library service, then I believe that progress would be 
certain. Public opinion would demand it. 



3. County Library Associations 

Our library system has developed by progressive steps — private libraries to 
mechanics' institutes, to local associations, to free collections, to co-operation. 
I am convinced that the chief hope for our small rural libraries now lies in the co- 
operative system known in the province as "county library association". Four 
such associations are now operating, namely, Lambton, Middlesex, Elgin, and 
(the newest-comer) Oxford. All report progress on the slightest of budgets, and 
the libraries concerned are enthusiastic about the results. In Lambton, which is 
the oldest organization, all 18 libraries are members. Middlesex has 21 members 
out of a possible 27. Elgin has 7 out of 10, with the prospect of others being 
added soon. Oxford has 6 out of 19. 

By means of radio talks, articles in the Ontario Library Review, interviews 
with local papers, special meetings, and constant encouragement to library 
boards, and individual library workers, the Branch is doing everything it can to 
promote the movement. I am hoping that 1938 will see the inauguration of an 
association in Waterloo County. People in Lennox and Addington, Leeds- 
Grenville, and Peterborough Counties are also becoming increasingly interested. 

In view of the importance of this movement, the limited time I have to 
spend on it, and the amount of organization which it requires, I do feel most 
keenly the need of a county and regional supervisor whose duty it would be, 
under direction of the Branch, to promote, organize, and guide these co-operative 
schemes throughout the province. As I have said, four additional counties are 
stirring. Interest is also evident in the country at the head of the lakes. If a 
well-qualified person were available to give active assistance in such areas, I 
believe it would only be a matter of a few years before rural Ontario would be 
busily engaged in helping itself out of its present library situation. 



56 THE REPORT OF THE Xo. 11 



4. Training of Librarians 

Next to the problem of financial support, the thing that impresses me most 
forcibly is the need that exists for some kind of elementary training of librarians 
in charge of small libraries. There are exceptions of course, but I refer chiefly 
to free libraries in places of 1,000 population or less, and to almost the whole body 
of association libraries. The librarians, in most cases, are conscious of their 
handicap and would willingly seek assistance. A short summer course in con- 
nection with the Library School in Toronto has been suggested, but the small 
salaries of many librarians make such a plan impracticable unless their expenses 
were paid. 

The answer to the problem appears to be in taking training to the library. 
A travelling library instructor might go into a district, take up quarters in a 
central town, bring in as many village librarians as possible, and instruct them for 
three weeks in the elements of library work. A period of three weeks is suggested 
because many librarians are on part-time, and instruction could be given only on 
a three, or at most a four-day-a-week basis, and for such hours as would permit 
them to return home at night. Not all librarians could or would attend such a 
course, but I am convinced that most would do so — eagerly. 

The travelling instructor, if appointed, should devote first attention to areas 
in which the county association people could be reached, since they are in the 
forefront of the new development in rural service. It might be possible, also, to 
combine the duties of the county library association supervisor with that of in- 
structor in charge of the travelling library school. This, however, could only be 
determined by experiment. 

5. The Travelling Libraries 

The difference of opinion among library authorities as to the ultimate value 
of travelling libraries is not likely to be settled in this generation. Situated as 
we are, however, with weak public libraries in the rural districts, and with so 
many schools, clubs, and study-groups beyond reach of regular library service, I 
believe that our travelling libraries fill, partially at least, a most pressing need. 
The statistics follow: — 

Libraries sent out during 1937 : 

To Schools 210 

. To Public Libraries 228 

To Women's Institutes 73 

To Farmers' Clubs, etc Ill 

Total 622 

Book Circulation: — 

Boys' and girls' 26,437 

Adult non-fiction 15,277 

Fiction 22,726 

Total 64,440 

Increase over 1936 7,383 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 57 

The value of our travelling libraries would be increased if the system were 
operated more nearly after the pattern of the normal public library, which per- 
mits each borrower to choose his book. The recipient of a travelling library has 
no choice. He takes fifty books just as they are sent, and if they happen to be 
books without interest for his borrowers, or if they have had them before, then 
the box sits in a corner until it is time to send it back. Very often, no more boxes 
are asked for. It is not suggested that any travelling library can give its readers 
the same scope in selection as can the adequate public library, but much could be 
accomplished by having our collection catalogued, and by issuing to readers, at a 
nominal charge, annotated catalogues with quarterly or half-yearly supplements. 
I know that printed catalogues get out of date and that they are expensive, but 
I do not know of anything else that could possibly serve the end I have outlined. 

Travelling libraries might also be used as a basis for developing a reference 
service to the smaller libraries and to individuals beyond reach of a library. 
Canada is one of the few civilized countries without a national library. The 
Province of Ontario might consider providing some such service for itself. A 
provincial library might be developed, having for its three branches, (1) the 
Legislative Library for the use of parliament, (2) travelling libraries for general 
reading in outlying districts, and (3) reference service and inter-library loans to 
the province. I do believe that the benefits of such a programme would prove 
both broad and enduring. 

Angus Mowat, 
Inspector of Public Libraries. 

Toronto, March 24, 1938. 



58 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Showing Statistics, 1936, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1937 



Library- 



Popula- 
tion 



lunicipal 


Bor- 


Apprn. 


rowers 


$ c. 




066 47 


785 


130 00 


194 


600 00 


688 


2,000 00 


930 




No 


368 41 


158 


750 00 


792 


1,000 00 


1,100 


350 00 


428 


3,865 92 


4,291 


850 00 


731 




No 


100 00 


201 


5,500 00 


4,481 


190 00 


296 


100 00 


129 


1,276 58 


874 


2,200 00 


2,374 


12,000 00 


12,268 


360 00 


313 


5,737 00 


7,139 


600.00 


223 


350 00 


482 


1,300 00 


1,279 


300 00 


140 


500 00 


354 


100 00 


126 


8,300 00 


4,237 


650 00 


502 


150 00 


99 


800 00 


700 


2,150 00 


950 


2,500 00 


1,988 


850.00 


258 


330 00 


342 


799 40 


291 


550 00 


302 


2,500 00 


2,218 


800 00 


853 


1,025 00 


1,142 


802 92 


546 


100 00 


140 


700 00 


894 


950 00 


867 


200 00 


262 


1,008 58 


579 


325 00 


550 


800 00 


650 


1,800 00 


3,201 


In 


eluded 


2,050 00 


3,016 


14,600 00 


9,604 


In 


eluded 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
Paid in 
1937 



Amount 
Expended 
on Books 



Total 

Expendi 

ture 



Acton 

Ailsa Craig. . 

Almonte 

Amherstburg. 
Arnprior. . . . 

Arthur 

Aurora 

Aylmer 

Ayr 



Barrie 

Beamsville. . 
Beaverton . . 

Beeton 

Belleville 

Belmont. . . . 
Bothwell . . . 
Bracebridge . 
Brampton . . 
Brantford . . 
Brighton. . . 
Brockville. . 
Brussels. . . . 
Burk's Falls . 



Campbellford . . 

Cardinal 

Carleton Place . 

Cayuga 

Chatham 

Chesley 

Clifford 

Clinton 

Collingwood . . 
Cornwall 



Delhi . . . 
Drayton . 
Dresden . 
Dryden . 
Dundas . 
Durham. 



Elmira. 
Elora. . 
Erin . . . 
Essex . . 
Exeter . 



Eenelon Falls 

Fergus 

Fonthill 

Forest 

Fort Erie, Main . . . 

South Br 

Fort Frances 

Fort William, Main 

Ward Four Br. . . 



1,993 

452 

2,431 

2,784 

1,050 

2,850 

1,980 

770 

8,054 
1,200 

600 

14,578 

600 

647 

2,581 

5,400 

30,107 

1,500 

9,874 

750 

818 

2,800 

1,450 

4,275 

700 

16,215 

1,759 

430 

1,900 

5,500 

12,681 

1,700 
567 
1,535 
1,639 
5,002 
1,792 

2,075 
1,195 
469 
1,800 
1,629 

1,051 
2,785 
1,000 
1,586 
5,900 

5,509 
24,371 



5,165 
4,174 
4,777 
7,007 
annual 
3,767 
6,153 
16,413 
5,235 

11,842 
8,518 
annual 
2,626 

16,225 
1,906 
3,213 
6,800 
6,632 

41,643 
5,153 

17,803 
5,120 
2,645 

7,799 

3,239 

6,751 

2,745 

25,065 

5,397 

5,010 

10,895 

12,824 

11,063 

3,684 
4,108 
3,488 
3,467 
9,837 
6,244 

6,718 
9,648 
3,430 
4,417 
5,751 

5,000 

6,389 

* 7,843 

2,760 

10,124 

in figures 

7,582 

43,136 

in figures 



10,866 

3,593 

20,128 

28,150 

report for 

5,407 

23,006 

24,454 

8,054 

84,374 

22,430 

report for 

1,304 

113,968 

4,449 

4,725 

19,178 

43,279 

244,520 

13,272 

78,643 

5,037 

5,524 

30,451 

2,470 

15,650 

3,131 

123,756 

16,698 

3,363 

17,629 

23,578 

44,707 

12,225 

4,879 

8,908 

9,241 

44,111 

10,890 

11,193 

18,620 

2,673 

6,173 

21,256 

14,707 

17,740 

6,552 

15,052 

46,301 

of Main 

33,035 

182,253 

of Main 



$ c. 

76 37 

44 44 

105 39 

101 26 

1936 

120 55 
126 57 
140 35 

121 03 

205 21 
133 83 
1936 



209 00 

60 48 
78 53 

141 05 

148 15 

209 00 

77 72 

159 00 

90 47 

53 87 

196 26 

61 90 

94 09 
15 95 

209 00 
131 84 

35 71 
194 75 

99 32 
159 00 

120 50 
65 01 

121 44 

95 91 
156 50 

122 43 

147 52 
124 62 
20 33 
101 21 
120 95 

22 69 

128 35 

83 83 

55 74 

248 52 

Library 

133 75 

419 00 

Library 



$ c. 
222 60 
65 93 
244 01 
264 34 

162 02 
525 85 
391 87 
158 06 

1,474 06 
380 85 



1,763 25 

67 59 

125 73 

344 52 

516 06 

3,779 73 
238 46 

1,070 07 
131 84 

60 94 

555 98 
103 84 
224 22 

81 82 

1,819 48 

350 15 

75 00 
337 75 
202 33 
749 28 

217 28 

61 97 
210 18 
340 10 
494 60 
385 80 

200 58 
278 31 
49 94 
228 47 
372 98 

25 59 
292 99 
144 10 

73 23 
903 05 

402 57 
2,492 18 



$ e. 
833 29 
214 27 
795 11 
2,210 62 

519 55 
1,080 53 
1,162 76 

786 13 

4,719 30 

1.042 33 

106 90 

7.097 34 

360 97 

277 55 

1,604 98 

2,505 99 

13,382 40 

576 30 

5,920 14 

868 01 

408 39 

1,740 49 
404 53 

095 45 

146 99 

9,162 84 

879 35 

252 23 

1,530 59 

2,448 13 

2,827 70 

939 45 

425 92 

1,014 08 

729 57 

2,931 93 

1,000 78 

1,228 90 

1,199 17 

160 51 

822 65 

1,218 61 

231 70 

1,426 67 

407 78 

1.043 51 
2,170 81 

1,975 74 
16,193 04 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



59 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



Library- 



Popula- 
tion 



Municipal 
Apprn. 



Bor- 
rowers 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


7,338 


12,313 


1,874 


6,439 


1,298 


4,817 


495 


3,800 


2,050 


6,799 


200 


1,147 


180 


3,238 


335 


2,595 


1,934 


7,475 


10,956 


35,503 


362 


4,945 


33,488 


143,701 


eluded 


in figures 


1,319 


5,392 


810 


6,274 


233 


2,916 


512 


6,577 


215 


2,174 


53 


853 


2,800 


9,225 


634 


4,186 


3,810 


7,531 


891 


5,762 


15,397 


33,029 


513 


7,082 


9,462 


36,907 


250 


2,265 


202 


2,654 


165 


3,116 


1,802 


8,983 


1,659 


16,671 


868 


6,655 


112 


3,586 


386 


1,233 


26,474 


103,764 


eluded 


in figures 


365 


5,237 


325 


3,768 


1,080 


6,995 


254 


1,842 


791 


7,038 


4,500 


25,023 


139 


3,320 


764 


6,808 


255 


5,633 


3,084 


6,159 


402 


4,972 


5,739 


5,434 


920 


7,740 


341 


4,206 


625 


4,303 


1,220 


10,901 


1,014 


5,864 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
Paid in 
1937 



Amount 
Expended 
on Books 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Gait 

Gananoque 

Georgetown 

Glencoe 

Goderich 

Gore Bay 

Grand Valley . . . 
Gravenhurst. . . . 

Grimsby 

Guelph 

Hagersville 

Hamilton, Main. 

Kenilworth Br. 

Locke St. Br. . . 

Mountain Br.. , 

Hanover 

Harriston 

Hensall 

Hespeler 

Hillsburg 

Ignace 

Ingersoll 

Kemptville 

Kenora 

Kincardine 

Kingston 

Kingsville 

Kitchener 

Lakefield 

Lanark 

Lancaster 

Leamington 

Lindsay « . . . . 

Listowel 

Little Britain 

Little Current 

London, Main 

East Br ) 

South Br 

South East Br. . . 

Lucknow 

Markdale 

Meaford 

Merrickville 

Merritton 

Midland 

Millbrook 

Milton 

Milverton 

Mimico 

Mitchell 

Mount Dennis. . . . 
Mount Forest 

Newcastle 

New Hamburg. . . . 

New Liskeard 

Newmarket 



13,958 

3,305 

2,250 

750 

4,300 

800 

550 

2,000 

1,976 

21,178 

1,246 
153,608 



3,100 
1,325 

719 
2,861 

500 

327 
5,100 

1,250 
8,182 
2,548 

24,372 
2,500 

32,862 

1,300 

600 

650 

5,000 

7,158 

2,872 

235 

1,100 

76,252 



1,062 

802 
2,719 

800 
2,613 
7,000 

715 
1,800 
1,005 
7,000 
1,577 
10,005 
1,815 

675 
1,400 
2,985 
3,748 



$ c . 

6,979 00 

1,800 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

1,900 00 

225 00 

700 00 

400 00 

1,200 00 

10,589 00 

550 00 
67,793 00 

In 

900 00 
550 00 
194 18 
1,748 10 
216 95 

62 66 
2,200 00 

550 00 
4,000 00 

900 00 
13,000 00 

600 00 
13,840 98 

262 31 

200 00 

200 00 

1,800 00 

3,400 00 

1,000 00 

100 00 

136 00 

41,300 00 

In 

530 00 

261 57 
1,350 00 

350 00 
1,396 31 
3,333 43 

250 00 

500 00 

678 94 
3,640 00 

600 00 
3,155 00 

907 50 

337 50 

750 00 

1,400 00 

1,025 00 



94,372 

33,916 

12,476 

13,109 

27,724 

2,566 

5,744 

13,777 

33,023 

240,203 

10,101 
705,603 

of Main 

22,393 

22,475 
9,225 

16,993 
5,608 

1,673 
50,185 

11,536 
56,314 
17,527 

259,622 
9,944 

249,529 

8,289 

7,537 

2,261 

25,960 

62,892 

26,172 

3,905 

3,107 

583,721 

of Main 

14,896 

7,861 
26,224 
15,400 
20,093 
72,391 
11,370 
10,332 

9,606 
55,587 
13,384 
56,045 
14,613 

14,476 

9,202 

23,227 

28,842 



209 00 
159 00 
134 70 
110 01 

158 20 
91 50 
43 81 
47 27 

138 34 

159 00 

131 37 
572 95 

Library 

131 62 
87 82 
80 02 

192 62 
39 86 

9 00 
209 00 

156 12 
159 00 
116 87 
209 00 
56 39 
209 00 

89 12 

75 00 

19 00 

142 40 

159 00 

129 26 

69 95 

64 74 

659 00 

Library 

118 21 

89 50 

159 00 

42 88 

54 45 

152 40 

93 62 

49 52 

69 52 

154 00 

118 13 

253 87 

104 86 

139 25 
133 72 
145 52 
127 96 



$ c. 

1,914 68 

1,069 21 

330 21 

236 77 

546 30 

99 40 

66 89 

143 01 

711 01 

3,066 49 

208 10 
9,047 30 



601 37 
119 71 
159 90 
409 49 
71 20 

22 90 
933 93 

308 40 
827 54 
330 49 

3,497 80 
105 84 

4,207 37 

80 75 
143 29 



591 04 

1,306 50 

451 86 

58 97 

135 96 

11,694 93 



216 16 

198 58 
595 90 
101 63 
152 54 
504 56 
167 14 
238 27 
187 47 
1,223 00 
250 82 
603 82 
196 83 

362 52 
319 22 
822 39 
502 31 



$ c. 

8,518 96 

2,677 03 

1,132 12 

636 09 

2,466 21 

302 00 

1,050 61 

562 40 

2,052 52 

11,649 97 

645 10 

73,732 48 



1,299 33 
1,095 38 

309 20 
2,282 03 

294 34 

78 20 
2,798 25 

808 83 

4,424 11 

1,164 75 

15,865 69 

738 35 

14,920 33 

405 90 

300 07 

124 58 

2,010 06 

3,975 80 

1,310 98 

304 22 

193 96 

43,432 53 



856 61 

682 10 

1,633 59 

347 65 

1,508 20 

3,430 96 

432 64 

673 04 

784 53 

4,112 80 

858 52 

3,277 33 

1,308 62 

935 80 

860 94 

2,263 45 

1,163 95 



60 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



Library- 



Popula- 
tion 



Municipal 
Apprn. 



Bor- 
rowers 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


1,384 


10,204 


7,079 


28,585 


eluded 


in figures 


7,628 


15,710 


363 


5,539 


235 


1,515 


1,500 


8,976 


110 


2,563 


248 


1,306 


600 


9,168 


4,789 


10,659 


11,969 


15,685 


21,348 


136,042 


eluded 


in figures 


149 


3,698 


3,933 


18,407 


232 


7,273 


650 


4,889 


1,610 


14,680 


617 


3,701 


818 


7,191 


3,300 


14,356 


355 


8,224 


596 


9,059 


4,305 


28,643 


263 


1,499 


2,093 


9,511 


803 


3,399 


5,240 


16,076 


221 


2,927 


2,112 


6,852 


554 


5,226 


1,655 


11,574 


722 


3,793 


147 


2,378 


1,500 


12,408 


1,714 


10,009 


2,725 


13,781 


313 


4,905 


278 


1,821 


9,727 


29,252 


336 


1,753 


321 


1,875 


1,694 


7,361 


7,002 


25,730 


1,676 


5,563 


9,207 


23,055 


7,450 


17,797 


eluded 


in figures 


322 


1,354 


382 


3,533 


327 


6,211 


2,859 


13.957 


2,366 


12,812 


242 


1,162 



Circula- 
tion 



Legisla 

tive Grant 

Paid in 

1937 



Amount 
Expended 
on Books 



Total 

Expendi 

ture 



New Toronto 

Niagara Falls, Main 

Drummond Br 

North Bay 

Norwich 

Norwood 



Oakville 

Oakwood 

Oil Springs 

Orangeville 

Oiillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa, Main 

Boysand Girls Br. 

Edinburgh Br. . . 

Rideau Br 

South Br 

West Br 

Otterville 

Owen Sound 



Paisley 

Palmerston 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Parry Sound .... 

Pembroke 

Penetanguishene. 

Perth 

Peterborough . . . 

Petrolia 

Picton 

Porcupine-Dome . 
Port Arthur .... 
Port Carling. . . . 
Port Colborne . . . 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan .... 

Prescott 

Preston 



Renfrew 

Richmond Hill. 
Rittenhouse . . . 



St. Catharines . . 
St. Edmunds.... 

St. Jacobs 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Saltfleet Twp 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

West Br 

Schreiber 

Seaforth 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Smith's Falls. . . . 
South River. . . . 



8,497 
18,526 

15,207 

1,091 

753 

3,950 

250 

500 

2,764 

8,808 

24,692 

141,903 



2,395 
13,000 

729 
1,617 
4,315 
1,000 
3,390 

10,326 
4,045 
4,184 

23,044 
2,600 
3,450 
4,521 

20,405 
506 
6,196 
1,267 
4,320 
1,125 
660 
2,942 
6,294 

5,366 

1,265 

500 

27,600 

475 

562 

4,023 

16,128 

6,161 

18,230 

23,627 

1,190 
1,800 
1,100 
5,614 
7,775 
825 



$ c 

4,200 00 

9,107 13 

In 

6,124 97 

700 00 

400 00 

2,100 00 

120 00 

150 00 

2,000 00 

3,600 00 

7,900 00 

66,357 75 



218 91 
6,000 00 

300 00 
1,042 50 
1,900 00 

531 70 
1,300 00 
2,163 00 
1,200 00 
1,950 00 
11,200 00 



2,650 00 

900 00 

13,400 00 

312 49 

1,454 97 
832 00 

1,900 00 
700 00 
160 00 

1,471 00 

3,000 00 

2,450 07 
456 84 
103 56 

13,417 00 



300 

1,500 

9,673 

1,200 

11,014 

10,000 

310 
954 
700 
2,750 
3,500 
125 



57,344 

201,210 

of Main 

99,878 

14,203 

5,805 

25,205 

5,630 

12,235 

22,061 

76,289 
143,585 
374,186 



of Main 



4,686 
105,723 

8,743 

9,049 
44,440 

4,827 
25,676 
38,674 
16,804 
24,313 
168,557 

9,237 

39,944 

15,906 

113,969 

5,501 
29,518 
11,185 
26,435 
10,710 

1,855 
24,540 
65,125 

53,794 
7,125 
3,735 

288,662 

4,443 

3,345 

16,339 

164,595 

31,276 

150,951 

108,689 

of Main 

10,897 

13,423 

9,506 

51,764 

41,860 

3,932 



$ 

193 75 
393 70 
Library 
209 00 
118 75 

60 80 

115 24 
41 56 
49 55 
154 02 
204 00 
209 00 
852 61 



Library 



105 32 
209 00 

68 51 
89 98 

154 25 

82.91 

99 00 

209 00 

75 17 

159 00 

209 00 

65 31 

209 00 

101 62 

209 00 

71 30 

151 10 

78.45 

209 00 

92 35 

39 80 

140 92 

209 00 

156 77 

77 49 
75 65 

209 00 

20 41 

29 37 

122 00 

209 00 

99 00 

209 00 

329 00 

Library 

106 36 
126 92 
131 37 
209 00 
159 00 

69 14 



$ c. 
1,412 8; 
3,440 93 

880 95 
289 49 

74 85 

430 93 

70 57 

133 54 

402 50 

1,002 35 

2,619 65 

10,917 86 



172 65 
1,683 08 

68 07 
131 66 
597 17 
149 00 
621 26 
415 22 
118 24 
700 55 

2,403 14 
247 60 
742 02 
307 55 

4,300 89 
89 96 
583 64 
109 81 
592 37 
158 32 
44 51 
462 52 
822 20 

855 41 
151 92 
115 20 

3,519 75 

33 07 

43 21 

262 39 

3,040 22 

386 02 

2,693 47 

2,531 78 

187 40 
341 87 
356 74 
1,003 29 
1,094 26 
111 62 



$ c. 

4,589 56 

11,576 96 

6,633 94 

899 35 

478 11 

2,441 30 

166 88 

215 36 

2,295 20 

4,460 12 

9,249 95 

69,985 23 



392 15 
6,519 20 

427 39 
1,673 32 
2,320 56 

668 00 
1,759 87 
2,415 96 
1,390 79 
2,231 23 
12,768 93 

451 45 

2,511 08 

1,132 03 

15,587 26 

381 31 
1,682 59 
1,999 55 
2,801 74 

929 04 

302 63 
1,675 43 
3,441 28 

3,180 91 
493 29 
162 57 

14,333 04 

222 36 

491 72 

1,534 01 

10,895 48 

1,300 09 

11,547 95 

11,008 89 

454 62 
1,349 23 

861 43 
4,102 74 
3,770 99 

187 70 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



61 



FREE PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



No. 


Library 


Popula- 
tion 


Municipal 
Apprn. 


Bor- 
rowers 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circula- 
tion 


Legisla- 
tive Grant 
Paid in 
1937 


Amount 
Expended 
on Books 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 








$ c. 








S c. 


$ c. 


$ c. 


170 


Springfield 


375 


75 00 


161 


2,459 
1,882 
5,153 
6,350 


3,287 

4,583 

11,010 

12,017 


32 14 


54 15 


161 81 


171 


Stayner 


1,000 
935 


300 00 


293 


79 80 


129 47 


385 01 


172 


Stirling 


556 45 


419 


132 14 


299 74 


901 37 


173 


Stouffville 


1,155 


560 00 


663 


78 84 


99.98 


763 58 


174 


Stratford 


17,615 

2,911 

675 


8,813 00 

1,000 00 

300 00 


5,574 

1,311 

399 


27,955 
6,903 
2,896 


170,011 

17,354 

6,426 


176 10 


2,396 87 


10,095 07 


175 


Strathroy 


146 00 


322 73 


1,225 99 
306 71 


176 


Streetsville 


47 10 


11 00 


177 


Sudbury 


24,440 
600 


4,008 94 
90 45 


2,371 
234 


7,056 
1,835 
4,162 


43,225 
3,309 
5,551 


159 00 


712 47 


5,022 47 
182 53 


178 


Sundridge 


51 52 


95 98 


179 


Sutton 


806 


350 00 


492 


76 57 


150 20 


485 78 


180 


Swansea 


5,000 


750 00 


744 


5,369 


20,062 


99 00 


347 45 


1,052 93 


181 


Tara 


500 


275 00 


128 


3,073 
6,604 
6,091 
3,604 


3,890 

10,723 

5,599 

9,538 


49 06 


69 92 


381 37 


182 


Tavistock 


1.100 


660 00 


338 


93 58 


187 60 


1,124 88 
687 52 


183 


Teeswater 


837 


627 75 


168 


58 03 


200 70 


184 


Thamesville 


870 


250 00 


604 


106 39 


200 07 


440 17 


185 


Thorold 


5,000 


2,100 00 
No 


722 


6,942 
report 
6,469 


19,646 
for 1936 


134 43 


257 99 


2,265 36 


186 


Tilbury 


annual 






187 


Tillsonburg 


3,453 


1,500 00 


1,361 


32,415 


111 82 


402 14 


1,993 83 


188 


Timmins 


20,869 


5,300 00 


6,679 


15,343 


94,097 


159 00 


2,680 13 


6,985 74 


189 


Toronto, Main 


638,271 


464,034 00 


182,638 


422,518 


3,676,975 


2,405 78 


60,593 20 


488,417 35 


190 


Beaches Br 


















191 


Boysand Girls Br. 


















192 


Danforth Br 


















193 


Deer Park Br. . . . 


















194 


Dovercourt Br. . . 


















195 


Downtown Br. . . 


















196 


Earlscourt Br.... 


















197 


Eastern Br 


















198 


Gerrard Br - 




In 


eluded 


in figures 


of Main 


Library 






199 


High Park Br.... 


















200 


Northern Br 


















201 


Queen-Lisgar Br. 


















202 


Riverdale Br. . . . 


















203 


Runnymede Br. . 


















204 


Western Br 


















205 


Wychwood Br. . . 


















206 


YorkvilleBr t 


















207 


Trenton 


6,720 

1,325 

2,424 
4,860 


2,600 00 
500 00 


3,191 
378 


12,148 

7,803 

9,342 
6,705 


44,712 

13,162 

21,823 
36,303 


154 00 


764 54 


3,131^77 
691 45 


208 


Uxbridge 


108 93 


176 24 


209 


Walkerton 


1,200 00 
2,430 00 


760 


144 29 


426 90 


2,009*72 
2,937 15 


210 


Wallaceburg 


1,926 


137 35 


787 00 


211 


Waterf ord 


1,200 


600 00 


320 


2,277 


8,603 


48 90 


154 14 


616 30 


212 


Waterloo 


8,266 
941 


4,373 00 
600 00 


2,719 
300 


16,894 
5,358 

13,034 

10,752 
5,912 

85,298 


63,081 
10,221 
74,815 
61,922 
22,013 
539,199 


209 00 


920 72 


4,809 12 

918 71 


213 


Watford 


83 37 


185 06 


214 


Welland 


10,540 

5,020 

3,870 

101,568 


5,183 00 

2,571 16 

1,926 76 

41,300 00 


2,949 

3,442 

1,499 

39,097 


153 12 


1,462 85 


5,835 89 

2,868 35 

1,828 30 

42,615 35 


215 


Weston 


185 12 


361 93 


216 


Whitby 


134 47 


499 06 


217 


Windsor, Carnegie . . 


1,247 84 


10,787 03 


218 


Willistead Br. . . . 


















219 


J. Richardson Br. 


















220 


Hugh Beaton Br. 


















221 


Sandwich Br. . . . 




In 


eluded 


in figures 


of Main 


Library 






222 


Pr. Edward Br. . . 


















223 


Victoria Ave. Br. 


















224 


J. E. Benson Br.. 


















225 


Wingham 


2,115 


1,000 00 


1,050 


8,918 


11,444 


154 00 


315 93 


1,230 50 
6,258 32 


226 


Woodstock 

Total 


11,040 


5,550 00 


3,260 


22,009 


91,592 


209 00 


2,109 25 




1,992,603 


1,064,382 76 


630,127 


2,414,840 


12,520,676 


28,057 88 


215,891 30 


1,175,357 26 







62 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 
Showing Statistics, 1936, and Legislative Grants Paid in 1937 



No. 


Library 


Popula- 
tion 


Bor- 
rowers 


Volumes 

in 
Library 


Circula- 
tion 


Hours 

Open 

per 

Week 


Legisla- 
tive Grant 
Paid in 
1937 


Amount 
Expended 
on Books 


Total 
Expendi- 
ture 


1 




500 
300 
1,400 
600 
607 
400 
400 
700 
600 
250 

250 
300 
970 
400 
100 
395 
500 


134 
62 

106 
30 

123 
96 
52 

190 
82 
37 

31 

61 

244 

127 

30 

61 

31 

31 

31 

35 

124 

202 

154 

135 

No ann 

106 

61 

30 

386 

90 

110 

33 

47 

57 

42 

116 

52 

56 

289 

104 

30 
50 
67 
49 
43 
32 
52 
34 
30 
37 
99 
42 
75 
65 
68 
93 

No ann 
31 

No ann 


4,678 
1,398 
1,889 
3,677 
1,584 
1,315 
3,097 
4,904 
1,538 
2,011 

907 
1,491 
3,824 
1,766 
1,050 
1,636 
2,814 
2,709 

295 
3,597 
3,001 
7,546 
2,587 
3,196 
ual report 
4,868 
3,110 

621 
8,393 
2,956 

688 
1,513 
2,902 
1,431 
1,178 
1,864 
2,005 
1,889 
5,384 

478 

3,299 
1,378 
1,388 
3,395 
2,271 
850 
4,146 
3,704 
1,192 
559 
2,617 
1,671 
3,114 
1,113 
3,719 
4,272 

ual report 
3,313 

ual report 


6,012 
2,820 
4,259 
771 
5,997 
1,765 
3,812 
3,555 
1,336 
1,195 

483 

1,282 

11,559 

2,571 

563 
2,236 
1,695 

841 

681 
1,130 
6,763 
9,909 
6,898 
7,051 
for 1936 
3,723 
1,800 

739 
21,790 
5,696 
2,369 
1,835 
2,040 
1,938 
1,556 
3,797 

791 

1,830 

20,612 

2,114 

1,034 
1,300 
3,312 
2,183 
1,085 
4,847 
3,685 
1,333 
1,804 
1,526 
6,678 
2,696 
1,978 
1,943 
2,208 
4,164 

for 1936 
156 

for 1936 


4 
78 
7M 

9 
2 
5 
3 

84 
5 

38 
10 
11 
78 
78 

2 

4 
54 
40 
56 

22 

9V 2 

10 
2H 
19 
33 

8 
7 

IX 

10 

72 

2M 

4^ 
19 

6 

8 

2 

2 

4 

6 
14 

2 
78 
15 

4 
78 

2 

6 
66 
20 

2 
12 
22 


$ c. 
121 77 

10 54 
39 00 

11 40 
20 00 

30 28 
57 70 

33 32 
48 02 

10 00 

11 70 

35 04 
88 25 
.31 29 

20 44 
16 61 
14 72 

34 12 
10 00 
27 73 
48 53 

112 22 
76 87 
94 93 

71 38 

14 48 
25.37 

151 95 
16 75 
10 00 

36 17 
32 42 

20 57 
10 00 

31 94 

10 00 

15 43 
110 93 

22 02 

9 00 
22 57 

11 99 

10 00 

11 79 

21 09 

35 33 

16 08 
24 68 
10 00 
26 42 


$ c. 

205 15 

8 25 

89 42 

25 00 


$ c. 
312 46 


2 




56 01 


3 




2?6 88 


4 


Alton 


80 71 


5 
6 


Alvinston 

Apple Hill 


283 95 


42 41 

65 65 

122 36 

30 52 


60 06 


7 




190 90 


8 




180 11 


9 




113 97 


10 




103 02 


11 




20 25 

82 21 

213 15 

56 62 
62 42 

45 57 
19 65 
60 15 
10 00 
34 73 
66 43 

232 38 
122 14 
204 37 

72 67 

70 21 

40 93 

408 96 

46 64 

1 97 
74 89 
55 75 

57 40 

2 15 
33 32 
22 50 
16 53 

322 13 
29 97 


47 38 


12 


Bala 


194 15 


13 




347 50 


14 
15 


Bayfield 


147 95 

134 89 


16 




77 63 


17 




80 05 


18 




94 23 


19 




500 

191 

3,175 

1,650 

2,700 

600 


16 72 


20 




134 28 


21 


Birch Cliff 


254 71 


22 




817 83 


23 




194.30 


24 




394 23 


25 


Blyth 




26 




987 
582 
200 
4,000 
1,000 
500 
500 
500 
200 
350 
250 
300 
150 
3,600 
450 

300 
1,250 
1,200 

2,740 
200 
720 
781 
170 


283 10 


27 


Bolton 


122 89 


28 




76 44 


29 




992 90 


30 




124 98 


31 




66 00 


32 




92 40 


33 
34 


Brooklin 


157 40 
94 45 


35 
36 


Brown's Corners 


42 13 
163 91 


37 




67 76 


38 




141 85 


39 




805 85 


40 




72 25 


41 




53 06 


42 




56 96 
45 25 


92 62 


43 




57 67 


44 
45 




67 05 




21 56 
31 60 
33 05 

24 75 
27 31 

25 00 
45 73 
23 30 

31 98 

32 37 
52 14 

167 04 

14 55 


64 00 


46 


Canfield 


83 42 


47 




151 74 


48 


Cargill 


111 44 


49 




74 89 


50 




500 
2,200 
303 
200 
1,010 
451 
400 


53 60 


51 




239 71 


52 
53 




90 89 




10 72 
16 13 
41 07 
69 40 

8 00 


67 38 


54 




182 95 


55 




129 63 


56 




372 59 


57 






58 


Claude 


40 


22 86 


59 


1 Cobalt 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



63 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



Library 



Popula- 
tion 



Bor- 
rowers 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Hours 

Open 

per 

Week 



Legisla 

tive Grant 

Paid in 

1937 



Amount 
Expended 
on Books 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Cobourg 

Cochrane. . . 
Colborne . . . 
Coldstream . 
Cold water. . 
Comber .... 
Coniston 
Cookstown . . 
Copleston. . 
Copper Cliff. 
Cottam. 
Courtright . . 
Creemore. . . , 



Delaware 

Delta 

Depot Harbour , 
Dorchester. . . . 

Drumbo 

Dundalk 

Dungannon. . . . 

Dunnville 

Dutton 



Eagle River. 
East Linton 
Elmwood. . . 

Embro 

Emo 

Englehart. . 
Ennotville. . 
Espanola . . . 
Ethel 



Fenwick 

Flesherton 

Fordwich 

Forester's Falls . 

Frankf ord 

Fulton 



Glamis 

Glan worth 

Glen Allan 

Glen Morris . . . 
Gore's Landing. 

Gorrie 

Grafton 

Granton 



Haileybury 

Haliburton 

Harrietsville 

Harrington 

Harrow 

Harrowsmith. . . 

Havelock 

Hepworth 

Hickson 

Highgate 

Highland Creek . 

Hillsdale 

Hilton Beach . . . 



5,000 

3,500 

1,000 

100 

650 

600 

1,600 

550 



4,000 
300 
335 
631 



400 
350 
500 
500 
646 
500 
4,011 
800 

100 



250 

460 
1,268 
1,200 

600 
2,000 

300 

2,700 



240 
800 
800 
800 

100 
500 
500 
200 
200 
300 
200 
450 

2,886 



90 
125 
967 
150 
1,300 
340 
250 
600 
925 
250 
410 



278 

102 

165 

33 

84 

48 

67 

31 

No ann 

1,373 

85 

241 

50 

No ann 

71 
82 

106 
33 
80 
68 
54 

205 

12 
No ann 

117 
65 
48 
52 
62 

151 
74 

36 
No ann 
74 
30 
164 
30 

37 
79 
56 
30 
52 
45 
52 
84 

202 
Re- 
61 
35 
66 
33 
58 
53 

182 
84 
37 
32 
71 



6,503 
7,655 
2,323 
2,489 
2,675 
4,357 
1,710 
2,271 
ual report 
7,386 
2,423 
854 
1,362 

ual report 
1,942 
3,194 
2,761 
5,162 
2,555 
2,645 
10,025 
5,140 

88 

ual report 
2,603 
5,123 
1,679 
954 
4,521 
4,497 
1,471 

2,576 
ual report 

871 
2,687 
3,068 

526 

985 
2,418 
1,221 
3,242 
2,279 
1,700 
2,521 
1,405 

4,696 

organized 

3,001 

2,629 

2,575 

874 

587 

817 

1,389 

2,513 

2,065 

2,619 

2,343 



18,871 

9,985 

9,595 

976 

3,710 

3,320 

797 

1,080 

for 1936 

12,286 

2,289 

5,038 

3,336 

for 1936 

1,574 
3,062 
4,544 
1,492 
2,713 
4,169 
1,460 
10,265 

30 
for 1936 
2,514 
6,958 
4,644 
2,369 
743 
3,409 
2,666 

1,678 

for 1936 

3,847 

577 
5,955 

705 

1,013 
3,412 
1,789 
1,014 
585 
2,105 
2,573 
3,058 

10,072 

March 

1,926 

1,176 

4,604 

1,639 

737 

937 

2.380 

4,275 

1,093 

434 

2,314 



16 

6 

12 

84 

3 

4 

14 
10 



16 
1 
74 
18 
63 
54 
20H 
14 



6M 
78 

2Y 2 

2 

2 
13 

7K 

10 
70 

8 
8 



18 
72 

1 

6 

7 
72 

18K 
11th, 
60 
54 

9 

4 

4 

6 
15 

4 
6 



$ c. 
72 88 
63 12 
69 59 
47 48 
60 00 
74 66 
39 20 
10 00 

8 68 
55 73 

28 28 

29 88 



16 66 
32 78 
34 72 
10 00 
40 50 
54 65 
39 08 
92 05 



22 25 

23 27 

17 25 

18 33 
27 00 
26 31 
30 11 

15 00 

10 00 

10 00 

103 50 

17 09 

21 40 

47 71 
10 00 
30 27 

58 45 

10 00 
45 47 
21 62 

33 97 

1937 

36 08 

25 28 

52 62 

11 75 
10 00 
10 00 

59 67 
17 75 
10 00 

16 63 
29 13 



$ c. 

262 94 

140 32 
98 32 
37 08 
13 75 

113 14 

70 66 

2 50 

235 90 

118 62 

34 28 

56 55 



13 39 
72 60 
54 92 



54 81 

90 95 

47 42 

177 46 



32 34 
40 61 
25 00 
66 04 
24 00 
37 35 
17 38 

72 23 



20 00 

135 50 

25 12 

64 26 
63 54 
24 70 
29 71 
90 65 
10 03 
93 23 
62 33 

110 41 

51 55 
44 67 
56 13 
10 35 
33 51 



136 06 
11 44 



23 24 
50 99 



$ c. 
922 79 
289 83 
259 59 
136 84 
56 00 
344 34 
108 12 
43 76 

840 13 
207 76 
105 41 
191 43 



115 75 

105 76 

166 96 

113 10 
164 36 
169 98 
353 42 
621 70 

4 90 

105 61 

164 87 
68 61 

83 11 
185 79 

84 94 
169 90 

93 20 

82 81 

70 18 

337 91 

29 51 

128 23 

165 23 
46 18 

177 99 
111 63 

58 68 
163 96 

129 07 

501 73 

114 68 
91 41 

339 33 

102 35 

33 51 

52 35 

197 46 

224 77 

42 00 

59 88 
207 47 



64 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



No. 



118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
124 

125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 

133 

134 
135 
136 
137 
138 
139 
140 
141 
142 
143 

144 
145 
146 
147 

148 
149 
150 

151 
152 
153 
154 
155 
156 
157 
158 
159 
160 
161 
162 
163 
164 
165 
166 
167 
16S 
169 
170 
171 
172 
173 

174 
175 
176 



Library 



Popula- 
tion 



Bor- 
rowers 



Volumes 

in 
Library 





Hours 


Circula- 


Open 


tion 


per 




Week 


2,228 


84 


667 


84 


for 1936 




4,852 


2 


5,487 


12 


16th, 1937 




1,806 


8 


3,958 


14 


4,100 


2 


for 1936 




3,166 


10 


2,147 


6 


11,690 


7^ 


for 1936 




1,100 


72 


3,475 


sy 2 


1,804 


sy 2 


1,900 


2 


1,321 


3 


1,989 


2 


761 


3 


4,219 


74 


4,895 


19 


26,477 


12K 


3,878 


27 


1,842 


72 


4,818 


84 


2,624 


8 


1,379 


4 


1,039 


5y 2 


1,030 


84 


1,284 


iy 2 


2,389 


sy 2 


8,485 


sy 2 


5,564 


4 


2,177 


31 


1,115 


4^ 


for 1936 




10,441 


12 




5 
4 


1,460 


1,526 


36 


1,248 


8 


460 


5 


1,035 


12 


386 


1 
2 


1,279 


for 1936 




for 1936 




767 


69 


7,161 


8 


966 


60 


2,962 


sy 2 


981 


6 


1,782 


4 


927 


3 
32 


2,798 


17,360 


28 


1,289 


78 



Legisla 

tive Grant 

Paid in 

1937 



Amount 
Expended 
on Books 



Holstein 

Honey wood . . 
Hornepayne . 
Humber Bay. 
Huntsville. . . 
Hyde Park . . 
Hyndford . . . 



Ilderton 

Ingle wood. . . . 
Inkerman . . . . 

Inwood 

Iroquois 

Iroquois Falls. 

Islington 

Ivanhoe 



Jarvis , 

Kars 

Kearney , 

Kemble , 

Kimberley 

Kinsale , 

Kintore , 

Kirkfield 

Kirkland Lake , 

Kirkton 

Komoka 



Lakeside 

Lambeth 

Lefroy 

Linwood 

Londesborough . 
Lome Park. . . . 
Lucan 



Madoc 

Mandaumin. . . 

Manilla 

Manotick 

Markham 

Marmora 

Martintown 

Maxville 

Maxwell 

Melbourne , 

Mildmay 

Millbank 

Mill Grove 

Minden , 

Monkton , 

Mono Road 

Moorefield 

Morrisburg 

Morriston 

Mount Albert. . . 
Mount Brydges. 
Mount Elgin. . . 
Mount Hope. . . 



250 
100 



2,250 
2,995 



400 



500 
200 



200 

900 

1,300 



550 

530 

300 
265 
250 
375 
100 
2,150 
200 
18,000 
180 
200 

80 
500 
2,950 
500 
150 
900 
615 

1,000 
400 
200 

1,050 



1,009 
600 
742 
300 
200 
764 
500 
150 
300 



Nanticoke . 
Napanee. . 
Napier. . . . 



300 
1,400 
200 
700 
550 
130 
1,380 

200 

3,416 

150 



30 

59 

No ann 

181 

151 

Organiz 

132 

65 

42 

No ann 

114 

55 

157 

No ann 

30 

94 

37 
19 
58 
65 
51 
67 
77 
770 
125 
39 

144 
60 
36 
47 
30 
61 

100 

195 

51 

112 

59 

No ann 

472 

35 

38 

42 

59 

142 

59 

17 

38 

No ann 

No ann 

35 

143 

49 

70 

37 

51 

24 

30 

253 

36 



2,592 
1,399 

ual report 
2,703 
4,512 

ed April 
1,260 

1,702 
1,634 

ual report 
1,728 
2,962 
5,561 

ual report 
823 

3,979 

2,216 
1,068 
1,950 
888 
1,014 
2,696 
1,860 
4,085 
1,712 
2,129 

1,672 
2,228 
1,865 
791 
477 
2,017 
2,164 

4,396 
2,436 
6,619 
2,115 
ual report 
3,065 
1,580 
1,395 
429 
1,515 
1,566 
1,787 
1,377 
2,419 
ual report 
ual report 
1,041 
4,457 
2,120 
2,123 
1,310 
1,243 
1,374 

1,950 

8,667 
961 



$ c. 

10 00 

20 07 

49 67 

35 46 

20 00 

21 48 
17 55 

20 00 
32 45 

105 20 

16 95 

21 74 
21 15 



16 30 
12 57 

16 59 
62 93 
42 27 
99 00 
28 96 
15 00 

47 16 

25 59 
14 92 

17 30 

18 44 
20 04 
32 20 

26 70 
46 70 
80 19 

9 00 

100 79 
10 00 



10 00 
15 00 
15 00 
14 00 



18 24 



10 69 
87 89 
24 49 
35 04 
24 00 
20 17 



$ c. 

6 00 

22 53 

88 96 
140 89 

85 01 

15 72 

27 10 

25 03 

46 35 

318 81 

31 14 
50 01 

22 99 

28 52 

19 30 

20 10 
78 66 

108 49 

83 77 

809 99 

47 82 



79 57 
40 15 

32 27 
20 04 
43 43 

33 06 
15 00 

72 75 

58 25 

134 39 

36 10 

248 37 



10 00 
36 09 
16 06 



10 72 

146 75 

5 00 



14 24 
18 48 



34 96 
111 02 

38 18 
45 58 
6 25 
19 74 
21 87 

4 00 
510 35 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



65 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



Library 



Popula- 
tion 



Bor- 
rowers 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Hours 

Open 

per 

Week 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
Paid in 
1937 



Amount 
Expended 
on Books 



Total 
Expendi- 
ture 



Newburg. . . . 
Newbury. . . . 
New Dundee. 
Newington . . 
New Lowell . . 

Niagara 

Norland 

North Gower , 



420 
250 
350 
274 
200 



Odessa. . 
Omemee. 
Orono. . . 
Osgoode. 



431 
350 

700 
500 
500 
800 



Palermo 

Park Head . . . 

Pickering 

Pinkerton .... 

Plattsville 

Plympton .... 
Point Edward. 
Port Credit.. . 
Port Dover. . . 
Port Lambton 
Port Stanley.. 

Powassan 

Princeton 



150 
600 



400 



Queensville . 



Rebecca 

Richard's Landing. 

Ridgetown 

Ridgeway 

Ripley 

Rodney 

Romney 

Rossdale 

Runnymede 



1,200 

1,500 

1,600 

1,000 

750 

700 

350 

300 

200 



1,983 
900 



776 

1,456 

150 



St. George 

St. Helens 

Scarborough .... 

Schomberg 

Scotland 

Shedden 

Sheguiandah .... 

Shetland 

Singhampton. . . . 

Smithville 

Solina 

Sombra 

Southampton . . . 

Southcote 

South Mountain. 
South Woodslee . 

Sparta 

Sprucedale 

Stevensville 

Strathcona 

Stratton 

Sunderland 

Sydenham 



600 
200 
400 
300 
400 
400 
200 
300 
401 
500 
300 
400 
1,935 



250 
250 
250 
300 
400 
350 
123 
500 
650 



50 
82 
43 
38 
No ann 
167 
52 

32 
74 
70 
65 

No ann 
37 

109 
30 

176 
30 
56 

440 

237 
47 

129 
55 
50 

30 

47 
No ann 
263 
238 
No ann 
99 
76 
36 
No ann 

110 
36 
41 
35 
88 
34 
43 
50 
30 
49 
37 
32 

250 
No ann 
46 
35 
54 
37 
37 
30 
32 

105 



3,113 
2,212 
1,668 
1,890 
1,076 
ual report 
3,019 
1,470 

1,624 
1,824 
2,401 

1,287 

ual report 
1,054 

2,853 
2,071 
1,120 
2,154 
4,633 
5,687 
3,899 
843 
3,463 
2,188 
2,597 

2,101 

846 
ual report 
6,511 
3,754 
ual report 
2,450 
5,156 
1,741 
ual report 

7,468 
2,699 
7,083 

650 
2,554 
2,945 

394 
1,825 

555 
2,185 
1,131 
1,363 
7,064 
ual report 
1,102 
1,308 
1,376 

872 
1,643 
2,268 
1,018 
2,192 
2.862 



4,885 
1,834 
4,164 
1,511 
575 
for 1936 
2,362 
2,823 

1,432 
2,383 
3,940 
5,188 

for 1936 

1,160 

2,010 

682 

1,875 

4,816 

2,717 

8,722 

10,360 

1,825 

4,352 

876 

5,080 

1,750 

2,126 

for 1936 

14,920 

4,896 

for 1936 

3,550 

2,737 

3,980 

for 1936 

2,269 

586 

1,879 

1,251 

1,930 

780 

652 

2,932 

226 

3,082 

465 

776 

4,851 

for 1936 

3,207 

1,799 

2,267 

1,493 

1,402 

935 

1,167 

3,877 

4,418 



78 
11 

4 
22 

2 

4 

5V 2 
27 
72 
16^ 



8 



S4 



7S 
42 



2 

2B.M 

18 
6H 
72 
13 
84 

5 



78 

4 
79 

1 

4 

2 

2V 2 

12 



$ c. 

20 50 
16 08 

37 07 

15 00 

16 74 

10 00 

38 30 

22 15 
54 32 

21 85 

39 44 



10 00 
40 39 
20 47 
15 00 
28 03 

10 00 
20 00 

115 19 
28 40 
36 98 
26 13 
69 92 

11 45 
46 84 

137 27 



51 01 
45 34 
42 55 



56 99 
16 48 
20 70 

15 70 

16 30 
15 00 

25 20 
12 75 
10 00 
48 05 
14 64 
31 41 
55 84 

10 00 
37 23 
31 64 

28 48 
24 16 
30 02 

26 52 
20 41 

57 71 



i c. 
25 11 
44 65 
38 72 



18 93 



10 00 
50 00 



72 05 
69 51 

73 24 



9 75 

29 09 

22 31 

587 62 

32 06 



75 94 

131 59 

27 68 

62 19 
39 35 

121 94 

22 1 

100 38 

416 75 
93 93 

106 67 
69 33 

63 11 



88 56 

20 94 
35 38 

27 37 
10 90 
25 00 

28 50 
4 00 
1 56 

116 17 

21 33 
27 07 

217 47 



84 58 
30 28 
42 13 
13 86 
40 04 
55 70 
86 01 
55 61 



145 37 

85 85 

120 05 

133 58 

77 13 

49 00 
110 32 

129 25 
203 94 
115 06 

84 45 



53 31 

160 23 
91 37 
704 96 
121 58 
28 50 
236 50 
482 28 
102 74 
318 99 
121 86 
238 01 

63 67 

155 90 

695 32 
378 36 

209 09 
110 03 

182 57 



223 34 

47 69 
71 98 

104 98 

167 91 

159 09 

123 71 

85 15 

15 76 

237 22 

36 97 

120 33 

318 04 

48 40 
170 26 
132 25 

63 56 
213 69 

83 70 
174 38 
139 45 
284 42 



66 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



ASSOCIATION PUBLIC LIBRARIES 



Library- 



Popula- 
tion 



Bor- 
rowers 



Volumes 

in 
Library 



Circula- 
tion 



Hours 

Open 

per 

Week 



Legisla- 
tive Grant 
Paid in 
1937 



Amount 
Expended 
on Books 



Thamesford 
Thedford... 
Thessalon. . 
Thornbury . 
Thorndale . . 
Thornhill.. . 
Tiverton . . . 
Tottenham . 
Tweed 



Underwood . 
Unionville. . 



Vankleek Hill. 

Varna 

Victoria 

Victoria Road . 
Vittoria 



Walton 

Wardsville 
Warkworth . . . 
Waterdown . . . 

Wellburn 

Wellesley 

Wellington . . . 
West Lome . . . 
White Lake . . , 
Whitevale. . . . 

Wiarton 

Williamstown . 
Winchester. . . 
Woodbridge. . 
Woodville 

Wroxeter 

Wyoming 



Zephyr. 
Zurich . 



Elgin County 

Lambton County. . 
Middlesex County. 
Oxford County 
Howick Township . 
Total 



500 
600 

1,750 
782 
300 
600 
250 
539 

1,350 

300 
500 

1,600 
500 



249 
500 
940 
250 
500 
900 
800 



300 
1,766 



1,029 
800 
425 
400 
520 

650 



192,086 



89 
83 
44 
117 
40 
58 
67 
59 
98 

43 
85 

50 

44 

36 

No ann 

Organ 

No ann 

36 

90 

52 

45 

121 

217 

69 

No ann 

57 

154 

No ann 

53 

51 

68 

115 

297 

43 
No ann 



1,373 
1,979 



Or 



2,793 
2,248 
897 
2,194 
2,950 
3,996 

2,004 
2,606 

1,249 
1,440 
3,520 
ual report 
ized, Octo 

ual report 
2,878 
2,625 
2,031 
540 
2,832 
3,120 
2.107 

ual report 
1,881 
4,257 

ual report 
2,659 
3,857 
2,555 
6,497 
2,780 

2,060 
ual report 

131 

3,394 

969 

ganized Ja 

480 



21,733 



5,541 
8,576 
1,151 
5,707 
3,361 
1,419 
3,731 
1,362 
4,005 

2,653 
3,579 

3,225 

1,058 

597 

for 1936 

ber 19th, 

for 1936 
3,416 
4,321 
2,644 
565 
3,768 
11,252 
4,019 

for 1936 
2,425 
3,202 

for 1936 
3,020 
3,305 
1,871 
3,615 
9,490 

1,168 
for 1936 

380 

33,236 

12,917 

nuary 14t 



615,642 



866,387 



6 
15 

6 
16 
12} 

2V 2 

4 
42 

5H 

72 
2 



1937 



2 

3H 
11^ 
9 

5 
30 



h, 1937 



$ c. 
54 08 
57 83 



80 00 
18 00 
38 75 

23 17 

24 74 
46 14 

27 62 
51 95 

34 51 
49 57 
15 00 



24 83 

18 10 
37 05 

25 23 

27 25 

23 18 

24 44 

41 11 
70 03 

16 75 

19 93 

28 95 
33 16 

104 76 

13 47 



228 44 

700 00 

420 00 

70 00 

36 67 



9,463 69 



% c. 

114 23 
79 31 
10 45 
95 54 
16 83 
51 75 

90 44 
66 87 

91 60 

54 09 
106 16 

58 85 
91 28 



48 88 
73 94 
79 93 

45 47 

18 16 
125 20 

20 03 

61 12 
97 06 

30 86 

46 83 

19 20 
46 64 

171 52 

39 14 



137 32 
803 91 
405 20 



49 62 



17,336 70 



48,029 34 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



67 



APPENDIX J 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ONTARIO 
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF 



I have the honour to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Ontario 
School for the Deaf for the year ending March 31st, 1938. 

Attendance 

Enrolment by months: — 

Boys Girls Total 

April, 1937 149 141 290 

May 149 141 290 

June 149 141 290 

September 124 128 252 

October 137 139 276 

November 137 139 276 

December 137 139 276 

January, 1938 139 141 280 

February 141 142 283 

March 142 142 284 

Average Attendance for the year — 280. 



Enrolment by counties and districts: 

Algoma 8 pupils 

Brant 6 

Bruce 3 

Carleton 11 

Cochrane 4 

Duff erin 1 

Dundas 3 

Durham 2 

Elgin 1 

Essex 25 

Frontenac 7 

Grenville 1 

Grey 2 

Haldimand 2 

Haliburton 1 

Halton 3 

Hastings 7 

Huron 2 

Kenora 3 

Kent 6 

Lanark 3 

Leeds 6 

Lincoln 2 

Middlesex 9 



Muskoka 2 pupils 

Nipissing 4 " 

Norfolk 2 " 

Northumberland , . . 2 " 

Ontario 4 " 

Oxford 5 " 

Parry Sound 3 " 

Peel 1 " 

Perth 2 " 

Peterborough 3 " 

Rainy River 4 " 

Renfrew 7 " 

Russell 1 " 

Simcoe 6 " 

Sudbury 7 " 

Thunder Bay 8 " 

Timiskaming 16 " 

Victoria 1 " 

Waterloo 11 " 

Welland 7 " 

Wellington 5 " 

Wentworth 13 " 

York 55 " 



Enrolment by cities :- 
counties and districts). 

Brantford 4 pupils 

Fort William 4 

Hamilton 13 

Kingston 5 

Kitchener 4 

London 8 

Oshawa 3 



(These pupils are also included in the enrolment by 



Ottawa 8 pupils 

Peterborough " 

St. Catharines 1 " 

Sault Ste. Marie 4 " 

Toronto 40 " 

Windsor 22 " 



68 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

Thirty-six pupils left during the year, and thirty-four pupils were admitted 
for the first time. 

The ages of pupils leaving school were: — 

21 years 1 pupil 15 years 2 pupils 



20 
19 

18 
17 
16 



3 pupils 14 " 2 

5 " 13 " 4 

3 " 12 " 1 

5 " 9 " 1 

9 " 

Total 36 pupils 



Of the ten pupils leaving school before they were sixteen years of age, five 
are attending other schools, two left the Province of Ontario, and three are at 
home. 

Ages of new pupils on date of admission: — 

5 years 5 pupils 10 years 5 pupils 

6 " 5 " 11 " 2 " 

7 " 5 " 12 " 1 " 

8 " 3 " 13 to 20 years 5 " 

9 " 3 " 

Total 34 pupils 

Classification 

The school is organized in three departments — junior, intermediate, and 
senior. The academic standing of the various groups as compared with hearing 
children is: — 

Junior School: 

3 rooms Junior I Preparatory 

3 rooms Junior II Preparatory 

4 rooms Junior III Preparatory 

1 room Junior IV Grade I 

Intermediate School: 

Intermediate A. 1 Grade II 

Intermediate A. 2 Grade III 

Intermediate A. 3 Grade IV 

Intermediate A. 4 Grade V 

Senior School: 

Senior A. 1 ' Grade VI 

Senior A. 2 Grade VII 

Senior A. 3 Grade VIII 

Senior A. 4 Grade IX 

Dr. H. E. Amoss, Inspector of Auxiliary Classes, inspected the School during 
the first week of March. The following excerpts regarding classification are 
quoted from his report: — 

Deaf children enter the school, not only without language, but without conception of the 
meaning of language, either as a vehicle of communication or as a medium of thought. Three 
years (preparatory) are devoted to the inculcation of an art possessed by every hearing child on 
his entrance to school. 

Children who enter school late in life (after 9 or 10 years of age) and who have become habi- 
tuated to using imaginative in contradistinction with symbolic or language thought-processes, 
and children who are mentally retarded do not, as a rule, absorb language readily, either as reading 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 69 

or thinking. In other respects their mental development is fairly normal. In the intermediate 
and senior schools it has been deemed desirable to class such pupils in what are termed vocational 
groups, in order that they may, by yearly promotion, be brought into contact with more mature 
aspects of vocational training, mathematics, and the social studies, and not suffer undue retarda- 
tion in all departments through lack of facility in language. 

Using accomplishment in the reading and writing of English as a basis for 
classification, the pupils, in comparison with hearing children, might be graded 
as follows: — 

Preparatory 125 pupils Grade V 12 pupils 

Grade 1 34 " Grade VI 8 " 

Grade II 29 " Grade VII 15 " 

Grade III 28 " Grade VIII 10 " 

Grade IV 17 " 

Total 278 pupils 

The following age-grade table is based on the classification in academic 
and vocational groups: (See table on page 68.) 

Attendance and Course of Study 

A pupil should complete the course of study in twelve years, i.e., four years 
in junior school, four years in intermediate school and four years in senior school. 
The length of time pupils have been in attendance is given in the following at- 
tendance-grade table. It is obvious that if a deaf child does not remain in school 
long enough to complete the course, his education is inadequate. Should he, 
however, be unable to make satisfactory progress, due to late entry or lack of 
ability, it is not advisable for him to continue in school. (See page 69 for attend- 
ance grade table.) 

Ontario School Ability Examination 

As stated in my report last year the Ontario School Ability Examination is 
of inestimable value in determining the eligibility of candidates for admission. 
It is also of value in determining the proper grading of pupils. One hundred and 
sixteen pupils in the junior school have been re-tested during the present school 
year, and the results are given below in a form to be compared with Terman's 
classification of intelligence. 

Intelligence Quotients : 

Above 140 1 

120- 140 9 

110- 120 11 

90- 110 52 

80- 90 24 

70- 80 12 

50- 70 7 

116 

While every effort is made to teach all of these pupils speech, lip-reading, 
written language, silent reading and arithmetic, and while all possible aids are 
used to this end, the capabilities of the children are always kept in mind. Hence, 
when they have attained the age of twelve years, they are promoted, regardless 
of accomplishment, to the intermediate school, where they have opportunity to 
learn manual training or household science and where the academic subjects are 
presented by several teachers. 



70 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



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72 THE REPORT OF THE No, 11 

Hearing and Speech in Deaf Children 

In January, 1937, The Medical Research Council of England issued a bulletin 
on the Hearing and Speech in Deaf Children by Dr. Phyllis M. T. Kerridge. This 
report describes the results of an investigation made by Dr. Kerridge into the 
hearing and speech defects of a group of school children in London, England. 
Dr. Kerridge's conclusions are in agreement with those of other investigators. 
They demonstrate that the speech of most deaf children is improved by the use 
of amplifiers, but that the benefit obtained by the children is roughly proportional 
to their amount of hearing, although it is affected also by their intelligence. 
This is recognized in all schools for the deaf and indicates the importance of 
keeping accurate records of the degree of deafness of all pupils. 

The degree of deafness of one hundred and seventeen pupils of the junior 
school, as determined in recent months by the use of a I. A. audiometer is given 
in the following table. The ear having the greater amount of residual hearing is 
used for record purposes. 

90% to 100% loss of hearing 19 pupils 

80% to 89% 



70% to 79% 

60% to 69% 

50% to 59% 

40% to 49% 

30% to 39% 

20% to 29% 



36 pupils 


24 


<< 


24 


<< 


8 


ti 


5 


it 





" 


1 


<f 



Total 117 pupils 

It is possible that the pupil with a hearing loss of less than 30 per cent, may 
soon re-enter a school for hearing children. Dr. Kerridge states: — 

It is a rough rule that if a child can hear a conversational voice 20 feet away from a teacher 
he can continue his education in the ordinarv school. If he can hear less than 20 feet away, but 
more than 2 feet away, he is suitable for a school for the partially deaf; and he if cannot hear as 
far as 2 feet, he should be educated in a school for the deaf. 

Possibly thirteen of the pupils listed above would be classified, according to 
Dr. Kerridge, in the "partially deaf" group, and these are the pupils who receive 
the greatest help from amplifiers of sound. 

Dental Survey 

When school is closed in June for the summer vacation, a report is sent to 
the parents regarding the condition of their children's teeth, and the parents are 
asked to have all dental work done during the summer months. It is regrettable 
that most of the children return to school in September with their teeth in the 
same condition as when they left in June. 

As a dental survey was being made in Belleville in March, 1937, under the 
direction of Dr. Harry S. Thompson, Field Secretary of the Canadian Dental 
Hygiene Council, a partial survey of the teeth of our pupils was made by one of 
the local dentists at that time. One hundred and twenty-one pupils were exa- 
mined and these children had four hundred and forty-three defects. Some 
children had as many as nine and ten defects and in many cases the teeth should 
have been extracted. 

There has never been any provision for dental treatment of our pupils except 
to have teeth extracted if a child were suffering from toothache. That dental 
care should be provided for these children either when they are at home during 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 73 

the summer months or during the school year is very evident. Many schools for 
the deaf have established dental clinics as the most satisfactory way of solving 
this problem. It might, however, be less expensive to have the work done in the 
office of a local dentist. 

Excerpts from the Report of Dr. H. E. Amoss Who Inspected the School 
During the First Week of March 

Plant 

"1. Farm buildings are in good shape. A new barn to replace the horse barn, 
recently burned, and to extend dairying operations, should place the farm on a 
more profitable basis. 

2. The two vocational buildings have almost served their day. The floors 
are rough, uneven, and broken. When a new vocational building is being planned, 
provision should be made for a modern gymnasium of which the school stands 
sorely in need, especially during the between seasons when outside play for the 
pupils is not possible. 

3. The laundry has recently been furnished with a new mangle and a new 
extractor. The drying equipment is antiquated but should give fair service for 
some time yet. 

4. The main building is well kept. Attention is drawn to the need of new 
boiler facilities. The two at present in use are not adequate to meet the heating 
requirements of the additional plant (junior residence) without driving to such 
an extent that the fire brick linings are burned away each year. A refrigerating 
system is badly needed in the kitchen, both from the viewpoint of health and 
economy. 

5. The children are well-fed, healthy, clean, and neatly clothed, 

6. Owing to the care exercised by Doctors Tennent and Chant, and Miss 
Fitzgerald, school nurse, as well as the entire staff, the pupils this year have 
presented a remarkably clean bill of health. 

Discipline throughout the school is excellent, and a happy school spirit is in 
evidence. The staff supports the Principal loyally in all his undertakings. 

7. Athletic activities throughout the school are being exceptionally well 
handled, the boys' by Mr. Cunningham, the girls' by Miss Connell, supported 
by the whole-hearted co-operation of the staff. From the viewpoint of training 
in health and the disposition of children after school hours during inclement 
weather, the school stands in need of adequate gymnasium facilities. It is noted 
that several recent graduates have obtained positions largely through their pro- 
ficiency in sport activities. 

Vocational courses are well handled throughout the senior school. 

The vocational guidance instruction provided by Mr. Lally is a very real factor 
in the life of the school providing as it does a vital link between isolated institu- 
tional life and the actual world. A questionnaire is being sent out to all graduates 
for the purpose of discovering actual opportunities of employment. The deaf 
stand in great need of a placement officer to assist in making approach. 

8. Very satisfactory progress is being made in academic training. Arith- 
metic is well handled throughout the school. Reading has very greatly improved 



74 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

during the past two years, due to decreased formal language drill and increased 
reading practice. One of the great handicaps to progress in reading is the fact 
that the usual primer and intermediate readers do not discriminate sufficiently 
between easy and difficult constructions. For example "It is a cat" presents 
much greater difficulty to a deaf child than "The man rides a bicycle," or "The 
girl makes a dress" is harder than "The girl sews a dress". It is possible that such 
difficulty might be overcome in part by preparing readers or reading sheets 
beginning with specific nouns and adjectives and employing at first only active 
verbs. The chief aim in view is to get the child not to read language but to think 
in language. It is conceivable that much of the difficulty in speech training and 
lip-reading has root in the inability of the child to carry on thought processes 
in language." 

School Calendar 

April 14th — A banquet for the junior championship teams was held. Pen- 
nants were presented to the captains of the winning teams in Softball, football, 
hockey and volley-ball. The Midgets who won the championship in competition 
with city teams in the Ki-Y league were honoured. 

April 21st — A banquet was given to the senior and intermediate champion- 
ship teams. Boys' teams who were winners in Softball, hockey, volley-ball, and 
rugby, and girls' teams who were winners in volley-ball, Softball, and badminton 
were included. 

April 28th — Dr. Percival Hall, President of Gallaudet College, Washington, 
U.S.A., visited the school. He was accompanied by Mr. E. G. Peterson, Principal 
of the Saskatchewan School for the Deaf, Reverend Alexander MacGowan, 
Minister of the Evangelical Church of the Deaf, Toronto, and Mr. David Peikoff, 
Secretary, Ontario Association of the Deaf. 

May 12th — Coronation Day. The pupils joined the children of Belleville 
in celebrating the Coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. The 
school and residences were artistically decorated with flags and bunting for the 
occasion. 

June 1st — Field Day. Boys and girls competed in all types of field sports. 

June 5th — Pupils competed with hearing children in the Bay of Quinte 
district. The junior individual championship was won by one of our girls, Anna 
Hedden, and the junior girls' group championship was awarded to the O.S.D. 

June 8th — Closing exercises were held on the school campus. Approximately 
one thousand guests were present to enjoy the entertainment provided by the 
children. Later in the evening the visitors inspected the vocational work of the 
pupils placed on exhibit in the assembly room and classrooms. 

June 14th — Certificates, prizes, diplomas, and medals were presented to 
the pupils in the assembly room. 

Special prizes for general proficiency were donated for the first time by the 
Ontario Association of the Deaf. The presentation was made by Mr. R. E. 
McBrien, B.A.Sc, a graduate of the school. The recipients of these prizes, to be 
known as Princeps Alumnus and Alumnae Prizes, were Russell Manning and 
Helen Hallman. 

October — Hallowe'en parties were given by the teachers to the junior, inter- 
mediate, and senior pupils respectively. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 75 

November 16th; — Pupils entertained the members of the Commercial Trav- 
ellers' Association in Hotel Quinte. 

December 2nd — Annual bazaar was held 

February 11th — Annual ice races on school rink. 

February 12th— Annual ice-carnival on school rink, followed by refresh- 
ments, in the assembly room. 

Fees for Food and Sustenance 

Since the opening of the school in 1870 parents have been required to pay a 
fee of $50.00 per annum for each child towards the cost of his food and housing. 
In many schools for the deaf, including some schools in Canada, parents are not 
required to pay anything towards the maintenance of the child in school. To 
obtain exemption from the payment of this fee in the Ontario School for the Deaf, 
parents have been required to submit a remission of fees form signed by the 
mayor or reeve of the municipality in which the parents live, stating that they 
are unable to pay. At the beginning of the school year 1937-38 the policy was 
adopted of requiring parents to submit a remission of fees form for each school 
year. For the present school year parents of 68 pupils have paid the usual fee, 
198 have submitted certificates, and, up to April 1st, 18 had failed either to pay 
or to submit certificates. 

Vocational and Social Questionnaire 

With the co-operation of the Ontario Association of the Deaf a questionnaire 
was sent to deaf men and women in Ontario to determine what work they are 
doing and what pay they are receiving. The purpose of the questionnaire is to 
determine ways and means in which the school can co-operate with the adult deaf 
in assisting them to find employment. It is also hoped that the answers received 
will be of assistance in determining the help that can be given through vocational 
guidance and the vocational training most suitable for the deaf. A complete 
report is not available but sufficient answers have been received to indicate the 
difficulties in the way of the deaf finding jobs after leaving school. 

Handbook of Information 

During the year a new Handbook of Information concerning the work of the 
school was prepared by the Superintendent and printed in the school print-shop. 
Copies were sent to all school inspectors and to all hospitals in Ontario. 

Report of the School Physician 

At the time for school opening in September there were in Ontario scattered 
cases of anterior poliomyelitis. As our children come from all parts of the Pro- 
vince^ the question of delay in opening of school was considered. As there seemed 
no reason to think that the epidemic, as far as we locally were concerned, would 
subside in a month or so, it was decided to open school at the usual time. 

In our junior residence we had a special nurse to supervise the children. 
Pupils in all residences were closely watched and any elevation of temperature 
or evidence of the slightest illness was reported. Those so suffering were imme- 
diately sent to the hospital. No children were allowed to leave our own school 
grounds. No visitors were allowed, and our staff co-operated in every way as far 
as quarantine was possible. We were fortunate in having no cases of poliomyelitis . 



76 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



The total admissions to hospital, for the school year, were 426. These in- 
cluded: 24 cases mumps, April 14th, 1937 to June 25th, 1937; 24 cases chickenpox 
November 29th, 1937 to January 30th, 1938; 28 cases measles, January 16th, 
1938 to March 7th, 1938. An epidemic of gastro-intestinal infection was respon- 
sible in January for admittance of a large number for some two or three days. 
There was one case of appendicitis, which required operation. 

The children entering school for the first time were given diphtheria and 
scarlet fever immunization. Those who had not been vaccinated against smallpox 
were vaccinated. 

The outdoor department of the hospital was busy, as usual. 

R. W. Tennknt, 

Physician. 

Bursar's Report 
Cost per Pupil, School for the Deaf, Year ending March 31, 1938 



Heading of Expenditures 


Total expenditures 
year ending 
March 31, 1937 


Yearly cost per 
pupil ending 
March 31, 1937 


Weekly cost per 
pupil ending 
March 31, 1937 


Total expenditures 
year ending 
March 31, 1938 


Yearly cost per 
pupil ending 
March 31, 1938 


Weekly cost per 
pupil ending 
March 31, 1938 


Medicine and medical comforts . 

Groceries and provisions 

Bedding, clothing and shoes. . . . 
Fuel, light, power and water. . . . 
Laundry, soap and cleaning. . . . 

Furniture and furnishings 

Farm expenses 


478.04 

22,194.01 

657. 19 

13,484.21 

1,782.03 

1,126.75 

2,781.17 

2,221.20 

1,606.66 

776.30 

1,824.21 

2,681.26 

675.56 

86,014.99 


1.64 

76.01 

2.25 

46.18 

6.10 

3.86 

9.52 

7.61 

5.50 

2.66 

6.25 

9.18 

2.31 

294.57 


.03 
1.46 
.05 
.89 
.12 
.08 
.18 
.15 
.10 
.05 
.12 
.18 
.04 
5.66 


512.61 

23,318.45 

894.56 

15,076. 17 

1,393.75 

457.21 

2,777.05 

2,245.90 

2,126.45 

827.27 

2,030.16 

3,177.19 

894.59 

86,066.47 


1.83 

83.28 

3.20 

53.84 

4.98 

1.63 

9.92 

8.02 

7.59 

2.95 

7.26 

11.35 

3.19 

307.38 


.04 
1.60 
.06 
1.03 
.10 
.03 
.19 


Repairs and alterations 

School supplies and equipment. . 
Maintenance of motor vehicles. . 
Contingencies 


.15 
.15 
.06 
.14 


Vocational supplies 


.22 


Travelling expenses 


.06 


Salaries and wages 


5.91 






Total expenditures 

Revenue 
Pay Pupils 


138,303.58 

3,438.08 

6,203.72 

71.78 

460.56 

684.72 

6,338.21 


473.64 


9.11 


141,797.83 

3,326.00 

5,515.90 

64.55 

324.82 

475.06 

6,661.15 


506.42 


9.74 


Farm 

Canadian 

Industries 




Miscellaneous 




Perquisites, Pay List 








Total 


17,197.07 


16,367.48 









Average number of pupils, 1936-37 term, 292. 
Annual cost per pupil, $473.64. 
Weekly cost per pupil, $9.11. 



Average number of pupils, 1937-38 term, 280. 
Annual cost per pupil, $506.42. 
Weekly cost per pupil, $9.74. 



C. B. McGuirb, 

Bursar. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 77 

Conclusion 

Appreciation is expressed to the Minister, the Deputy Minister, and all 
officials of the Department of Education and other Departments of the Govern- 
ment for sympathetic co-operation in the work of the school. The members of 
the teaching staff have been faithful and efficient. Teaching deaf children is 
exacting work, requiring physical stamina and exceptional teaching ability. Out- 
of-school responsibilities, such as teaching on Sunday morning, study duty, and 
shopping duty, make special demands on the teachers' time. That the teachers 
perform their many duties so cheerfully is acknowledged with grateful thanks 

W. J. Morrison, 

Superintendent. 

Belleville, April 23rd, 1938 



78 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



APPENDIX K 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE ONTARIO 
SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND 



Foreword 

"The function of a headmaster is simply to make people realize that there 
are other things in the world." — Norwood of Harrow. 

The curriculum is to be thought of in terms of activity and experience, rather 
than of knowledge to be acquired and facts to be stored. 

One must realize that schools do vastly more than turn out scientists, or 
mathematicians, or geographers, or merchants, or industrialists. Schools must 
see to it that the individual characteristics and personalities are expanded while 
character is developed. 

It is a great thing not to bemoan your fate, even in the face of tremendous 
handicap. 

"I am the master of my fate, 
I am the captain of my soul." 

"He profits most who serves best." — 

Rotary International. 

Enrolment 





Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Enrolment January 1, 1937 

Admitted January 1, to June, 1937 


78 

4 

15 


66 

2 

10 


144 
6 


Admitted September, 1937 


25 






Left in June, 1937 


97 
16 


78 
8 


175 
24 






Admitted September, 1937, to January 1, 1938 


81 



70 
1 


151 
1 


Left September, 1937, to January 1, 1938 


81 
1 


71 



152 
1 






Enrolment, January 1, 1938 


80 


71 


151 







Graduates and Withdrawals 



Age 


No. 
Pupils 


Reason for withdrawal 


9 

11 
13 
14 
15 


1 
2 
1 

1 
2 


Transfer to a school for the seeing. 

Transfer to schools for the seeing. 

Epilepsy. 

Transfer to a school for the seeing. 

Transfer to Collegiate Institute, Toronto. 

Returned homesick to the prairies. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



79 



Graduates and Withdrawals— Continued 



Age 


No. 
Pupils 


Reason for withdrawl 


16 


4 


Two to schools for the seeing. 

One, epilepsy. 

One, transferred to Virginia School for the Blind. 


17 


2 


One, to employment. 

One, transfer to Nazareth Institute, Montreal. 


18 


1 


Transfer to Pennsylvania Institute for the Blind. 


19 


2 


One, to employment. 

One, to employment on farm at home. 


20 


2 


Both to employment. 


21 


3 


Two to employment. 

One transfer to Technical School, Hamilton. 


22 


1 


To employment. 


23 


2 


Both to employment. 


25 


1 


To employment. 



To summarize the above detail, we have transferred eight pupils to schools 
for the seeing. Three of these pupils improved in their seeing score sufficiently 
to enable them to read ink print. The other five were admitted because low 
mentality led to a misconception of their seeing score, and in one case at least, 
the child was admitted to relieve a bad social condition. In all, there were six 
transfers to other schools, three to High Schools for the seeing, two to High Schools 
for the Blind, and one to Elementary School for the Blind. Two epileptics. One 
boy, homesick, went home to the Prairies. One boy (M.D.) remained at home. 

All ten graduates of the year are employed. 

New Pupils in Age Groups 



Aee No ' 
Age Pupils 

7 years 5 

8 " 1 

9 " 3 

10 " 2 

11 " 1 




Aee No ' 

Age Pupils 

17 years 3 

*18 " 1 

f20 " 1 

J21 " 2 

§25 " 1 



*Brain tumour case. 

"jThis boy had dropped out in June, 1936, but when Christmas came and he still had no 
employment, he asked to come back and finish the year, which he did. He is now operating a con- 
cession stand at the BurTalo-Ankerite Mines. 

JOne boy and one girl, both with M.D. rating, were admitted for training in social living as 
a preparation for some work which the C.N.I.B. might find for them. The training of the girl, 
we think has been successful, but with the boy, we think it was a failure. 

§This Ottawa young man was admitted for a four months' term by special permission of the 
Minister, in order that he might have an intensive training, prior to being employed in his native 
city. 



Enrolment by Grades, January 1, 1938 



Grade 1 


17 


Grade 7 

Grade 8 

Grade 9 

Grade 11 


14 


Grades 2 and 3 


13 


24 


Grade 4 

Grade 5 


13 

15 

13 


17 

15 


Grade 6. . 


Grade 12 


10 




Total 


151 



80 


THE REPORT OF THE 




No. 11 


Enrolment by Provinces 




1936 


1937 


Ontario 


101 

19 

9 

15 


111 


Alberta 


18 


Manitoba 


8 


Saskatchewan 


14 






Mental Ratings of New Pupils 



I.Q. 



No. 
Pupils 



140 plus 

120-140 3 

110-130 2 

90-110 13 



I.Q. 


No. 
Pupils 


75-90 


11 


50-75 


3 



Total 32 



May I call your attention to that part of my last year's report dealing with 
the non-educable and the more retarded child, and also the paragraph on epi- 
leptics. I do think that our Government authorities should plan to provide for 
these groups who do not fit into any existing type of school, and who are incapa- 
citated for functioning happily in any normal seeing family group. 

You will note three pupils in the above table, all in the deficient bracket. 
They are making some progress academically, and are learning to react co- 
operatively in a social group. Otherwise, the spread of ratings conforms fairly 
well to the normal curve. 

High School Department 

During the past two years we Have been organizing and preparing ourselves 
for recognition as a high school of approved standing. Our organization as above, 
shows classroom grades IX, XI, and XII. We have added Miss Anne Hodge, 
B.A., (Toronto University), Specialist in French and Spanish, to our High School 
staff. This year, we are to have an official High School inspection 

New Course of Study 

The introduction of the new course of study has made little change in our 
programme. For the past three years we have striven for pupil activity, develop- 
ment of personality and individuality, — in short, development of the whole child. 

We are handicapped, however, in not being able to get as great a spread of 
reading material for individual study as is available to the seeing pupil. Further, 
we are handicapped by not being able to purchase all the good material available 
in Braille that we need. From time to time, however, we are adding such of the 
best as our finances allow. 

Health and Physical Education 

It is significant that the Child Welfare Committee of the League of Nations, 
at their meeting in April, 1933, passed the following resolution: "Great stress 
should be laid upon the physical development of blind children, both as a part 
of their educational training in school, and also by means of games, recreational 
activities, and camping, which can be carried on in association with normal 
children, under the direction of such societies as the Girl Guides, Boy Scouts, and 
the Junior Red Cross." 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



81 



Again, English educational leaders state in a report: "The blind child, as 
we see him at the beginning of his school life, is too often lacking in confidence 
and neuro-muscular control. He frequently has 'blindism' habits. His joints are 
usually lax, and his muscles flabby, and it is still more deplorable that he often 
has no joy in movement, and his emotional and muscular energy find a blind alley 
output in finger tappings, head shakings, body rockings, etc., . . . unless care 
is taken, all those orthopedic defects associated with this condition, — flat feet, 
weak ankles, curvature, knock knees, etc., — lie in wait for him too." 

It would give the writers of the above great joy to see our students skating, 
— six days a week, and generally more than once a day. True, we have to combat 
the deficiencies quoted above. Our six, seven, and eight-year-olds, however, all 
skate fairly proficiently at the end of their first winter. Our school rink has been 
in operation now for three years. I think it is not overstating the case to say that, 
largely due to this healthful exercise, we have established an all-time low record 
for days spent in hospital during the past winter. 

Every pupil in the school has a daily period in physical education. The work 
covered includes games, camp groups in song and story, formal gymnastics, field 
games, and eurhythmies. 

In May, 1937, we had an international school meet in field and track ath- 
letics with the Batavia, New York, School for the Blind. The Ontario School for 
the Blind bettered their opponents in all events except one, and won the challenge 
cup. 

In June, our senior boys' and senior girls' groups each spent a long week-end 
at Camp Thayendanegea. They indulged in general camp life of games, evening 
camp fires, etc., and did their own cooking and other camp housekeeping duties. 



Music 

In our Music Department, we have given instruction as shown in the follow- 
ing table: — 

Piano Ill pupils 

Orchestral Instruments (Woods, strings, brass and percussion) 44 pupils 

Individual Vocal 9 pupils 

Organ 5 pupils 

Choral (in 3 separate groups) Whole School 

Musical Theory (for Toronto Conservatory examinations) ... 53 pupils 

The following is a list of candidates who sat for Toronto Conservatory of 
Music examinations during the past year, with their standings: — 



Form Standing 

Elizabeth Gliddon Honours 

Leo Carroll 1st Class Honours 

Tina Biluk Honours 

Helen Self Honours 

History — Grade V 

Elizabeth Gliddon 1st Class Honours 

Tina Biluk 1st Class Honours 

Helen Self Honours 

Geraldine McGregor 1st Class Honours 

Mildred Philpott Honours 

Harmony — Grade V 

Leo Carroll 1st Class Honours 

Piano — Grade X 

Tina Biluk Honours 

Oliver Bell Honours 



Theory — Grade II Standing 

Annie Simons Honours 

Olive Lucas Honours 

William Clarke Honours 

Robert Berry Honours 

Alice Allen Honours 

Mildred Philpott 1st Class Honours 

Margaret Pawluk 1st Class Honours 

Counterpoint — Grade IV 

Margaret Pawluk 1st Class Honours 

Laura Tompkins 1st Class Honours 

A.T.C.M.— Piano 

Doris Wood Honours 

February Examinations 

Counterpoint 

Leo Carroll 1st Class Honours 

Theory — Grade II 

Laura Tompkins 1st Class Honours 



82 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

At the Annual Musical Festival at Stratford, in April, 1937, we had the fol- 
lowing winners: — 

Violin Duet — Open Geraldine McGregor and 

Augustin St. Germain Silver Medals 

Violin Solo — Open Augustin St. Germain Gold Medal 

Piano — Open Geraldine McGregor Silver Medal 

Miss Geraldine McGregor, in addition to winning the silver medal in open 
piano competition, was awarded a scholarship of fifty dollars. This scholarship is 
given to the candidate who shows most promise in his or her particular department. 

At the Second Annual Brantford Musical Festival, held in May, our pupils 
won twenty-six prize awards. 

In our Musical Department, we give piano training to every child after the 
first year. We continue this instruction throughout his school life, provided that 
he is making any appreciable progress. We find that all of our pupils are anxious 
to take training in music. 

Industrial Shop 

Our classes in the Industrial Shop are divided into 4 grades: — 

Grade I — Teaching of chair caning, pith seating of chairs, and rubber mat 

making. 
Grade II — Fundamentals in reed work. Teaching of the use of tools for 

wood- work, and making of special projects such as flower baskets, 

window-boxes, etc. 
Grade III — Repairing of furniture and individual projects. 
Grade IV — Assembly speed-tests — for assembly we use nuts and bolts, 

hinges and Yale door locks. These tests are of fifteen minutes' 

duration. The objectives are those set up in industrial plants 

by sighted men at their life's work. 

The following are some of the projects turned out during the past year: a 
milk stool for the farmer's use, foot-stools for school sitting rooms, hospital table, 
fernery, repairing of class-room table, making of loose-leaf note-book covers, book 
case for a classroom, dressing table for bedroom, clothes baskets for laundry, 
waste paper-towel receptacles, making of stage scenery, test-tube holders, waste- 
paper baskets, patrol Scout boxes, chesterfield suite complete, hospital tea-tables, 
jardinieres, repairing and painting of ladders, book-case, tray for chemistry class, 
medicine cabinets, etc. 

The organization of our industrial classes is as follows: — 

Grade 1 19 pupils 

Grade II 14 " 

Grade III 9 " 

Grade IV 8 " 

50 pupils 
Extra-Curricular Life 

Our students live so busily out of school hours, that I sometimes ask myself 
whether I should curtail these activities. Both Catholic and Protestant Senior 
groups meet weekly, much after the fashion of church young people's groups. 
Senior boys' and girls' clubs meet weekly. These meetings vary from the fun and 
frolic of a purely social hour to a formal meeting addressed by a guest speaker. 
These clubs have arranged social dances and skating parties throughout the school 
year. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 83 

The intermediate and junior students' clubs centre about the Scouts and 
Guides. Guiding at the Ontario School for the Blind has brought joy and pleasure 
to twenty-nine Guides and fifteen Brownies. Its programme of intelligence, 
health, handcraft, and service has been carried out with all the fun and spirit 
of adventure of the more fortunate Guides and Brownies. The year's activities 
have included public rallies, school demonstrations, picnics, hikes, tobogganing 
and skating. At all times, the daily "good turn" has been much in evidence, to 
say nothing of the general enthusiasm of these girls. Miss Esther Murray is in 
charge of the two groups. 

This is the third year that Scouting has been an active organization for the 
intermediate boys at the school. The Troop consists of eighteen members, divided 
into three patrols. Most of these were well on in Second Class Scouting, and many 
have passed Proficiency Badges. The O.S.B. Troop participates in all inter-troop 
activities with the city troops, such as Apple Day, jamborees, hiking, weiner 
roasts, toboggan parties, etc. This is the second term that Cubs have been active 
in our school. The Cub Pack consists of twenty juniors who take their Cubbing 
seriously, and do their best to live up to the high standards set for Cubs. One of 
the senior students, a former Scout, has been given the leadership of the pack. 

During the year, we have gone out to serve others, as follows: Concert 
numbers given by ten of our pupils at the Masonic Hall, for a meeting of the 
Masons. 

A group of our senior girls took part in a church concert, proceeds to go to 
the Missions. 

Two of our pupils sang at the Queen's Alumni dinner. 

One of our boys read the scripture lesson at a meeting of the Upper Canada 
Bible Society. 

Our A. Y. P. A. group entertained another A. Y. P. A. group from the city. 

A piano class group gave a demonstration at a meeting of the Bellview 
Home and School Club. 

One of our boys, Donald Westbrook, an organist, gave ,a joint recital in the 
city with a talented young singer from the city. 

On many occasions, our pupils have taken part in programmes of Brant 
Avenue United Church groups. 

Two of our pupils played at Wellington Street Church. 

A full evening's concert was given at the First United Church, Gait. Fifty 
pupils took part in the programme, which included a variety of musical numbers, 
a gymnastic display of pyramid building, and a one-act play. 

Three pupils attended the Paris Lions Club meeting and gave vocal and 
instrumental numbers. 

A three-quarter hour programme of musical numbers was presented at St. 
James Church. 

Our pupils contributed musical numbers in the annual broadcast for the 
C. N. I. B. Tag Day. 

Two pupils sang at morning service of First Baptist Church. 

Three pupils went to Central Presbyterian Church to give musical numbers 
at the morning service. 

Several of our pupils contributed concert numbers at different sessions of 
the Convention of Workers for the Blind, held at the Royal York, Toronto, 
June 28th to July 2nd. 



84 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



Three pupils gave musical numbers at Marlborough Street Church. 

Our Guide Troop took part in the services held by the civic authorities at 
the cenotaph on Armistice Day. 

We put on a full evening's concert consisting of various musical numbers 
at the Burford United Church. 

Three of our pupils contributed musical numbers at the Perth County Music 
Teachers' Federation meeting in Stratford, at which our Mr. F. Lord was speaker. 

A musical programme at the Brantford Branch of the C. N. I. B. was given 
by a group of our senior pupils. 

A musical programme at Elm Avenue Church was given by two of our pupils. 

Some of our senior pupils took part in the Lions Club Christmas cheer 
broadcast. 

Every child attending Brant Avenue Church contributed a gift on "White 
Sunday." There were 105 pupils in this group. 

Library Report 

Mr. Little has acted as Librarian during the past year, and submits the 
following report on reading done: — 

Reading by Classes 



Class 


Volumes 
1935-6 


Volumes 
1936-7 


High School Classes 


151 
141 


141 


Grade VIII 


125 


Grade VII (no Class in 1936-37) 


244 


Grade VI 


179 

151 

154 

3 


188 


Grade V 


136 


Grade IV . 


110 


Grades III and II 


37 






Totals 


779 


981 







The above schedule shows an increase of 25.6% for this year over last year 
in the number of volumes read. The card system inaugurated last year is working 
very satisfactorily. 

Canadian National Institute for the Blind and Student Placement 

During the past three years 13 boys and 10 girls have left our school through 
graduation. With the exception of two girls who preferred to remain at home, 
and another whose services were required at home, all of these students are now 
earning their own livelihood. What a record during these difficult times! I 
cannot speak too highly of the fine co-operation accorded to us by Capt. K. A. 
Baker and his staff at the Canadian National Institute for the Blind. 

At the close of the school year, the C. N. I. B. sent Capt. E. A. Baker, Mr. 
J. Clunk, Mr. H. Turner, and Mr. A. H. Weir to give a course of four lectures to 
our graduating students. They discussed fully and frankly with the graduating 
class the situation they would face upon leaving school. Many valuable sugges- 
tions were given, and difficulties were anticipated and explained. 

It gives our students a great sense of security to be able to look forward 
hopefully to graduation days. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 85 



School Plant 

During the past two years, the exteriors of our dormitories and houses have 
been painted. New, modern laundry equipment has been installed during the 
past year. This has greatly facilitated our laundry work. I beg to recommend 
that during the coming year our main building be decorated inside and outside. 
Our street fences need repair and partial replacement. We need a flag pole. 

During the year, our regular male staff have brightened our school-home by 
sanding and refinishing the floors of several class-rooms and doing such wall 
decoration as time would allow. 

Acknowledgments 

I wish to make the following acknowledgments of kindnesses shown to our 
students during the year: — 

To Brantford Music Club for invitations to twenty pupils to attend their 
Recital. 

To Knox Presbyterian Church for the invitation to the Merry Makers' Club 
to attend their "Scotch Soiree". 

To Dr. R. C. Wallace of Queen's University for an address to our pupils. 

To Mrs. McCrae for the entertainment of our senior girls. 

To Mrs. Lewis for the entertainment of our senior girls. 

To Brant Avenue Church for various invitations to church suppers, church 
plays, entertainment by young people's groups, etc. 

To Alfred Street and Arctic Arenas for invitations at various times for our 
pupils to enjoy the rink skating free of charge. In one case the entire school 
was invited, and the rink closed to all outsiders. 

To Salvation Army Headquarters for inviting fifty pupils to dinner and enter- 
tainment. Our pupils assisted in the entertainment. 

To Hydro Electric officials for taking nine of our pupils, prize winners in an 
essay contest on "Hydro", to Niagara Falls, for a visit to the power plants. The 
visit included entertainment at dinner by the Hydro officials. 

To the Schubert Choir for invitations to their Concert. Thirty-five pupils 
attended. 

To Rev. and Mrs. Uren of Brant Avenue Church who entertained pupils at 
supper parties in their home several times. 

To the Collegiate Institute for invitations to our senior pupils to attend their 
annual play. 

To Mr. E. Moule, manager of the Capitol Theatre, for invitations to attend 
special talking picture productions. 

To Miss Betty Barclay, exchange teacher from Scotland, for a talk to our 
pupils in the Assembly Hall. 

To Central Presbyterian Church for invitations for ten pupils to their Church 
Social. 

To Mr. E. S. Dunton, Paris,. for the use of "Camp Thayendanegea" for two 
week-end camps for our senior boys and senior girls. 



86 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

To the Organists' Convention for invitations to thirty pupils to attend their 
Recital at Grace Church. 

To Grace Church Brownie Troop for the entertainment of our Brownie 
Troop. 

To various teachers at Brant Avenue Sunday School for entertainment of 
our pupils at their homes. 

To the manager of Brant Theatre for permission for our pupils to attend 
special talking picture productions free of charge. 

Reports 

I attach herewith, reports from Dr. J. A. Marquis, Physician, Dr. Norman 
Bragg, Ophthalmologist, Dr. J. R.Will, Dentist, and Mr. G. H. Ryerson, Bursar: — 

Report of Physician 

The following is my report on the health of the students and staff at the 
Ontario School for the Blind, for the year ended January 1st, 1938: — 

Total number of patients 148 

Total number of hospital days 1,220 

Infectious diseases 37 

(a) Chicken Pox 24 

(b) Measles 8 

(c) Scabies 2 

(d) Conjunctivitis 3 

Infections and Boils 4 

Colds ; 26 

Influenza 51 

Laryngitis 1 

Toxoid reactions 2 

Sore Throats 6 

Glycosuria 1 

Varicose Ulcers , 1 

Pneumonia (1 Pneumonia and Measles) 2 

The past year has been a very satisfactory one from the standpoint of health. 
The Dominion-wide epidemic of Poliomyelitis caused the postponement of the 
opening of the school, and as students come from a wide area over four provinces, 
I thought it advisable to have a further quarantine of ten days at the school, 
after the students had assembled. No case of Poliomyelitis appeared among these 
151 pupils. 

An epidemic of chicken pox developed early in the fall, and among 83 pupils 
who had not had chicken pox, there were only 24 cases. This is the first time in 
a number of years that this epidemic has occurred at the school. Measles were 
quite prevalent throughout the City of Brantford this fall, but only 8 cases 
developed at the Ontario School for the Blind. These two contagious diseases 
occurred simultaneously, and again our inadequate hospital facilities were taxed. 

Colds and influenza account for the major part of this year's sickness and to 
combat this we are continuing to give the children cod liver oil during the winter 
months. About ten pupils in all, who had not formerly been vaccinated, were 
vaccinated at the school, and toxoid injections against diphtheria were given to 
all new pupils. 

A complete physical examination was given to every student, and a compari- 
son of this year's findings with last year's shows gratifying results. In practically 
every case the child's physical condition shows a marked improvement. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



87 



A vigorous physical programme, including ice skating daily during the 
skating season, tobogganing, swimming, hiking, is followed at the school, — all 
of which tends to build up these children's resistance. It is satisfying to note the 
following figures in comparison with those of 1936: — 




1937 



Total number of infectious diseases 

Total number of patients 

Total number of hospital days .... 



37 

148 

1,220 



All of which I have pleasure in submitting. 

J. A. Marquis, 

Physician. 

Report of Opthalmologist 

I have the honour to report on the eye examinations of the new pupils enter- 
ing the Ontario School for the Blind for the year 1937-8. This class numbers 29 
pupils, 15 of whom are boys, and 14 girls. The results of the examination are as 
follows : — 

New Pupils 



Condition of Sight 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Limited vision in both eyes 

Limited vision in one eye 

Quantitative light perception in both eyes 

Quantitative perception of light in one eye, none in other. 
Without light perception in either eye 



15 
4 
5 
3 
2 



Totals 



15 



14 



29 



In presenting our report for last year, we drew attention to the fact that the 
number of pupils admitted to the school whose classification was group 4 and 5, 
was lower than had been noted for some years previously. We are gratified to 
note a still further reduction in these groups as found in this year's class. The 
remainder of the pupils had a higher average degree of sight than in former years. 



Diseases Causing Blindness 



Ophthalmia Neonatorum and Keratitis 

Iritis, Uveitis, and Sympathetic Ophthalmia . 
Congenital Cataract and Dislocation of Lens. 

Fundus Lesions, Retino- Choroiditis 

Optic Atrophy 

Myopia 

Congenital Glaucoma and Buphthalmus 

Anirida and Amblyopia 



Totals . 



Male 



15 



Female 



14 



Total 



29 



From a study of the above chart, one or two very significant facts are noted. 
Firstly, in the case of preventable conditions causing blindness, (groups 1 and 2), 
we find only four cases as compared with twelve of last year. Such a marked 



88 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

reduction in this type would seem to indicate that there are fewer of these un- 
fortunate cases actually occurring than formerly. Secondly, by comparison with 
reports of former years we notice that there is a gradual increase in groups 3, 4 
and 6, which may be classed as of congenital origin, and which, unfortunately, 
are not conditions that may be prevented. We are at a loss to suggest a reason 
for this increase. In group 7, congenital glaucoma and buphthalmus, there are 
no cases this year whereas it is usual for three or more cases to be presented each 
year. 

As formerly, we conducted a very thorough ocular examination of every 
pupil in the School. This is a most helpful service because we find that by detecting 
incipient conditions, by changes of refraction, and by advice as to the use of the 
eyes, etc., we have been able to conserve or improve the degree of sight of many 
pupils materially. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Norman W. Bragg, M.D. 



Report of Dentist 

During the school year all of the pupils have had their teeth examined and 
attended to where necessary. 

One hundred and sixteen fillings were inserted for the boys and eighty-six 
for the girls. 

Twenty-three boys and twenty-two girls required no fillings and twenty-two 
boys and twenty-three girls needed only one each. 

For the boys, fifteen permanent and twenty-two deciduous teeth were 
extracted, while the girls had six permanent and eleven deciduous teeth removed. 

A large part of this work, especially the extracting, was done for new pupils. 

With few exceptions, the pupils take very good care of their teeth. 

J. R. Will, 

Dental Surgeon. 

Bursar's Report 

Financial Statement 

Expenditures 

Salaries and Wages $53,659. 41 

Travelling Expenses 164. 71 

Medical Department 418. 03 

Groceries and Provisions 11,622. 24 

Bedding and Clothing 836. 46 

Fuel, Light, Power and Water 9,260. 16 

Laundry, Soap and Cleaning 1,024. 04 

Furniture and Furnishings 580. 84 

Farm and Garden 1,720. 71 

Repairs and Alterations 1,038. 34 

School Supplies 1,838. 97 

Dental and Oculist Services 393 . 75 

Motor Conveyances 26. 35 

Contingencies 1,345. 87 

Total $83,929.88 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 89 



Casual Revenue Returned to Department 

Perquisites $6,051 . 89 

Farm Account 2,130. 20 

Pigs sold 305. 79 

Calves sold 5. 00 

Chickens sold ! 42. 79 

Eggs sold 29. 95 

Western Fees 10,800. 00 

Total 19,365.62 

Summary 

Total Expenditure $83,929. 88 

Less Casual Revenue returned to Department 19,365. 62 

Actual Expenditure $64,564. 26 

Certified correct, 

G. H. Ryerson, 

Bursar. 



Appreciation 

May I express my appreciation to you, personally, and to the officials of your 
Department for the splendid co-operation and encouragement they have given 
us in our year's work. 

At the same time, may I assure you that the teaching and house staffs at the 
Ontario School for the Blind have given faithful and loyal service throughout 
the year. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 

H. J. Valiant yne, 

Superintendent. 

Brantford, February 21, 1938. 



90 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

APPENDIX L 

REPORT OF THE PROVINCIAL SUPERVISOR 

OF MUSIC 



There has been a gratifying increase in the number of schools receiving 
regular music instruction. Almost all elementary schools make some provision 
for the subject, the majority under skilled supervision of qualified teachers. The 
secondary schools are generally including Music as part of the new Programme of 
Studies, the number qualifying for special grants being as follows: — 1935, 17; 
1936, 24; 1937, 46. 

The public, the teachers, and the students are being gradually acquainted 
with the attitude of the Department concerning music instruction. During the 
year I have had the opportunity of addressing the following groups: — 15 Trustee 
Boards, 9 Service Clubs, 16 Teachers' Meetings, and 15 School Assemblies. 

Music Festivals. — Music Festivals, both competitive and non-competitive, 
continue to spread throughout the Province, and to stimulate interest. Fifteen 
new Festivals were organized in 1937, bringing the total in Ontario to approxi- 
mately 40. I attended 24 and adjudicated at 13. 

Radio. — A series of eight radio programmes was sponsored during March 
and April by the Department of Education with the co-operation of the Canadian 
Broadcasting Corporation. Choral numbers by children from the elementary 
and secondary schools were broadcast from Toronto, Hamilton, Ottawa, Windsor, 
and Kitchener. 

On the Wednesday evening following Easter, in connection with the Ontario 
Educational Association, a concert was given in Massey Hall, Toronto, featuring 
the Provincial High School Orchestra, directed by I. W. Lomas, Hamilton; the 
Provincial High School Chorus, directed by P. G. Marshall, Simcoe; and the 
Provincial Public School Chorus, directed by G. R. Fenwick, Toronto. Approxi- 
mately five hundred children from all parts of Ontario formed the various groups. 
An added feature was the singing of the Provincial Mother Singers of the Home 
and School Association. 

Teacher Training. — The summer sessions in Music at Toronto and London 
continued to grow in attendance and in the breadth of the courses offered. Com- 
parative attendance figures are as follows: — 

1935— Toronto, 264; London, 145. Total, 409. 
1936— Toronto, 362; London, 191. Total, 553. 
1937— Toronto, 481; London, 238. Total, 719. 

Statistics. — The following statistical information concerns the school-year 
ending June 30th, 1937, and includes only those schools earning special grants for 
the teaching of Music. Many others provide a music course but are not at present 
qualifying for the grant. 

In some parts of the Province redistribution of Inspectorates during the past 
few years makes it difficult to show the development of Music in those areas. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



91 



City Inspectorates 



Total No. 
of Rooms 



Rooms with Music 



1934-35 



1935-36 



1936-37 



Brantford 

Chatham 

Hamilton 

Kitchener 

London 

Ottawa 

Peterborough 

St. Catharines 

Sarnia 

Toronto 

Welland 

Windsor 

Totals 

County Inspectorates 

Brant and Norfolk (in part) 

Bruce East 

Bruce West , 

Carleton East 

Carleton West 

Dufferin and Peel , 

Dundas and Grenville 

Elgin East and St. Thomas , 

Essex (No. 1) , 

Essex (No. 2) 

Frontenac North 

Frontenac South (No. 1) , 

Frontenac South (No. 2) and Kingston 

Glengarry , 

Grey East 

Grey North and Owen Sound , 

Grey South , 

Haldimand , 

Halton 

Hastings Centre 

Hastings North and Oshawa , 

Hastings South and Belleville 

Huron East 

Huron West 

Kent (No. 1) 

Kent (No, 2) 

Lambton (No. 1) 

Lambton (No. 2) 

Lanark West 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 1) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 2) 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) 

Lennox and Hastings South 

Lincoln 

Middlesex East 

Middlesex West 

Norfolk 

Northumberland and Durham (No. 1) . 
Northumberland and Durham (No. 2) . 
Northumberland and Durham (No. 3) . 

Ontario North 

Ontario South 

Oxford North and Woodstock 

Oxford South 

Peel 

Perth North 

Perth South and Stratford 



56 

546 

107 

245 

286 

76 

91 

64 

2,053 

52 

315 



54 

546 

107 

210 

286 

76 

91 

21 

2,053 

12 

315 



8 

55 

546 

107 

242 

286 

76 

91 

10 

2,053 

12 

315 



9 

56 

546 

107 

245 

286 

76 

91 



2,053 
' 3i5 



3,990 



3,771 



3,801 



3,784 



110 

98 
112 
115 

96 
113 
107 
130 
124 
127 

84 

91 
104 

96 
113 
113 
116 
106 
126 

99 
130 
116 
110 
124 
130 
111 
107 
110 
115 

93 
104 
150 
101 
111 
119 
122 
121 

98 
100 
112 

98 

97 
100 
110 
140 
109 
114 



38 

15 

8 

40 



68 
4 
25 
37 
23 



19 

78 



39 
72 
2 
19 
82 
26 
81 
54 
25 
28 
27 
35 
12 
20 
43 
45 
7 
7 
1 
54 
55 
14 
72 
93 
42 
50 
29 
56 
46 
56 
114 
49 
90 



47 
26 
31 
49 
16 
98 
4 
27 
20 
38 



23 

80 



47 
90 
2 
20 
80 
26 
81 
58 
45 
28 
89 
43 
12 
26 
45 
38 
7 
3 
1 
55 
66 
30 
67 
97 
61 
71 
27 
56 
49 
74 
100 
73 
93 



58 
55 
71 
50 



83 
5 
47 
24 
47 
16 
35 
80 
19 
67 
93 
52 
35 
95 
27 
86 
44 
47 
59 
95 
80 
39 
34 
71 
49 
20 
8 
18 
84 
78 
41 
77 
98 
85 
77 
50 
62 
90 
88 
102 
90 
91 



92 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 





Total No. 
of Rooms 


Rooms with Music 


County Inspectorates 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 


Peterborough East 


103 

97 

89 

1 

18 

9 

96 

114 

114 

113 

121 

25 

115 

109 

114 

84 

111 

107 

118 

123 

109 

111 

119 

120 

118 

149 

142 

154 

187 

163 


46 
22 


66 
26 


64 


Peterborough West 


55 


Prescott and Russell (No. 1) 


8 


Prescott and Russell (No. 2) 








Prescott and Russell (No. 3) 








Prescott and Russell (No. 4) 








Prince Edward 


17 
17 
12 


29 
29 
12 


26 


Renfrew North 


18 


Renfrew South 


23 


Simcoe Centre 


71 


Simcoe East 


63 


66 


36 


Simcoe North 




Simcoe South 


15 
9 


23 
11 


64 


Simcoe West 


22 


Stormont 


33 


Victoria West 


45 
84 
46 

111 
9 
23 
21 
80 
21 
31 
63 
44 

116 
44 
64 


64 
54 
76 
110 
13 
28 
35 
80 
28 
35 
76 
122 
105 
87 
77 


65 


Waterloo (No. 1) 


54 


Waterloo (No. 2) and Gait 


84 


Welland East and Niagara Falls 


97 


Welland South 


23 


Welland and Lincoln and Haldimand 


49 


Wellington North 


71 


Wellington South and Guelph 


84 


Wentworth 


38 


York (No. 1) 


41 


York (No. 2) 


120 


York (No. 3) 


122 


York (No. 4) 


132 


York (No. 5) 

York (No. 6) 


87 
86 


Totals 


8,340 


2,803 


3,371 


4,295 






District Inspectorates 

Division I 

II 

Ill and Fort William 


97 

102 

123 

133 

118 

111 

121 

18 

89 

134 

143 

90 

117 

2 

29 

97 

93 

94 

90 


11 
29 
19 
25 


12 
3 

108 

27 


26 
37 
95 


IV and Port Arthur 


32 


V and Sault Ste. Marie 


57 


VI 


7 


28 


29 


Division VII (No. 1) and Sudbury 


6 


VII (No. 2).. 








VIII 




8 
44 
71 


11 


IX 


40 

62 


82 


X 




XI 


55 


XII (No. 1) and North Bay 


50 


46 


46 


XII (No. 2) . . 




XII (No. 3) . 








XIII 

XIV 


16 


16 


12 
3 


XV... 


10 


10 


10 


XVI 


16 










Totals 


1,801 


269 


373 


517 


Separate School Inspectorates 
Division I 


124 
123 
159 
95 
135 
159 
122 


26 
16 


43 

7 


24 


II 

Ill 


7 
27 


IV 








V 






27 


VI 






24 


VII 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 193; 



93 







Total No. 
of Rooms 


Rooms with Music 


Separate School Inspectorates 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1936-37 




VIII 


108 
144 
156 
153 
132 

346 

135 

132 
150 
215 
118 
112 
112 






29 




IX 


2 

81 

4 

27 

320 

58 


9 

87 

135 

31 

324 

52 
5 


34 




X 


101 




XI 


122 




XII 


36 




XIII1 

XIV / 

XV 


333 

62 




XVI 

XVII 

XVIII 

XIX 

XX 

XXI 


9 






47 










































Totals 


2,930 


534 


693 


882 




Grand Totals 


17,061 


7,377 


8,238 


9,478 







Respectfully submitted, 



Toronto, May 9, 1938. 



G. R. Fenwick, 

Provincial Supervisor of Music. 



PART II 

Statistics 

of 

The Provincially-Controlled 
Schools of Ontario 



96 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



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DEPARTMENT. OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 97 



NOTES 

1. Grades IX and X studies are taken in many elementary schools. 

2. Auxiliary classes, junior and senior, are provided for handicapped pupils. 

3. Academic secondary schools are graded as (1) Collegiate Institutes, (2) High Schools, (3) Con- 

tinuation Schools. Under the Regulations all may provide the same courses, but the 
minimum staff requirements differ. 

4. The following entrance requirements apply to the Technical Training College: 

(a) a general education equal to at least two years' secondary school work. 

(b) journeyman's qualifications in the trade concerned. 

(c) an age range of 23-38 for men and 21-35 for women. 

6. The following conditions apply in order to secure the following permanent certificates: 

(a) An Elementary School Teacher's First Class Permanent Certificate 

1. be the holder of an interim first class certificate. 

2. have 3 years' successful teaching experience. 

3. complete a summer course in Education, provided by the Department, after 2 years' 

teaching experience. 

4. complete an Ontario University course of at least one year in subjects approved by the 

Minister of Education, one of which shall be English, and whose content is at 
least a year beyond that of Upper School. A maximum exemption of 4 University 
subjects, of which English shall not be one, may be obtained through special 
certificates in elementary school subjects, obtained by attendance at summer or 
winter sessions. 

(b) A High School Assistant's Permanent Certificate 

1. be the holder of an interim High School Assistant's certificate. 

2. have 2 years' successful teaching experience in an Ontario secondary school (academic), 

or in Grades IX or X of an elementary school. 

(c) A Vocational School Teacher's Permanent Ordinary Certificate 

1. be the holder of an interim Ordinary certificate. 

2. have 2 years' successful teaching experience in an Ontario day Vocational school. 

3. complete a special summer course in English, mathematics and science, or hold middle 

school standing in these subjects. 



98 



THE REPORT OF THE 



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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



99 



AVERAGE COSTS PER PUPIL-DAY, 1936, AND COMPARISON WITH 1935 

A — Elementary Schools 





Subdivision 


Gross Cost per Pupil-Day 

(in cents) 


Legis 
Sh 


lative 


Type 


Current 1 


Capital 2 


Total 


are 




1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


1936 


1935 


Public 


All Rural 


26.22 
50.22 
26.17 
37.96 
26.41 
30.69 
22.34 
34.25 
28.98 


24.40 
50.06 
24.24 

25.87 
30.79 
22.24 
34.55 
28.29 


1.95 
3.82 
1.48 
6.20 
4.98 
6.54 
3.94 
7.69 
4.77 


1.25 

4.65 

4.55 
5.96 
3.32 
7.03 
4.11 


28.17 
54.04 
27.65 
44.16 
30.28 
37.23 
26.28 
41.94 
33.75 


25.65 

28.89 

30.42 
36.75 
25.56 
41.58 
32.40 


6.41 
14.73 
6.29 
13.21 
6.90 
1.53 
1.86 
1.23 
3.40 


5.68 




Low Attendance .... 
Ordinary Rural .... 

Consolidated 

Large Fully-Graded 
All Urban 


14.63 
5.59 

6.27 
1.48 




Town 

City 

All Public 


1.86 
1.18 
3.13 


R.C. Separate. . 


All Rural 


20.36 
17.52 
16.65 
17.83 
18.14 


19.24 
16.56 
15.96 
16.73 
17.15 


2.54 
4.16 
2.41 
4.96 
3.77 


2.64 
4.74 
2.36 
5.82 
4.28 


22.90 
21.68 
19.06 
22.79 
21.91 


21.88 
21.30 
18.32 
22.55 
21.43 


8.20 
1.87 
3.41 
1.07 
3.25 


7.77 


All Urban 


1.75 




Town 

City 


3.39 
.95 




All Separate 


3.07 









B — Secondary Schools 



Continuation.. . 



All 

High 

Collegiate 

All 

Purely Technical .... 
Purely Commercial . . 
Combined Vocational 

(Com. and Tech.) 
All 



44.90 



42.55 



7.70 



6.74 



52.60 



49.29 



11.33 



9.84 



High Schools 
and Collegiate 
Institutes. . . . 



47.87 
53.65 
51.54 



46.72 
52.86 
50.55 



10.38 
12.84 
11.94 



9.95 
13.74 
12.32 



58.25 
66.49 
63.48 



56.67 
66.60 

68.87 



7.23 
2.08 
3.96 



6.29 
1.91 
3.56 



Vocational . 



94.96 
57.15 
63.33 

64.31 



94.00 
62.13 
62.91 

70.68 



25.64 

U4.87 

21.77 

19.03 



26.62 

U4.36 

20.49 

19.60 



120.60 
72.02 
85.10 

83.34 



120.62 
76.49 
83.40 

90.28 



23.08 

5.89 

20.63 

15.10 



22.63 
13.82 
22.63 

19.34 



C — Special Schools 



Senior 
Auxiliary 



All. 



90.53 



89.83 



9.04 



8.73 



99.57 



98.56 



16.18 



20.14 



l General Maintenance. 2 Debt Charges. fSome Municipalities in default. 



100 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



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104 



THE REPORT OF THE 



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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



105 



4. Teachers' Salaries 5 











Male 












Female 








Year 


High- 




Average 




High- 
est 






Average 
































est 


Pro- 
vince 


City 


Town 


Vill- 
age 


Ur- 
ban 


Rural 




Pro- 
vince 


City 


Town 


Vill- 
age 


Ur 
ban 


Rural 




$ 


S 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


S 


1912 


2,200 


788 


1,320 


977 


779 


1,141 


566 


2,000 


543 


703 


519 


492 


618 


493 


1917 


2,500 


1,038 


1,637 


1,166 


908 


1,425 


686 


2,200 


650 


795 


628 


573 


731 


580 


1922 


3,500 


1,644 


2,269 


1,767 


1,393 


2,082 


1,144 


3,325 


1,117 


1,363 


1,047 


986 


1,253 


987 


1927 


3,875 


1,667 


2,310 


1,749 


1,407 


2,107 


1,147 


3,500 


1,152 


1,465 


1,095 


1,012 


1,336 


970 


1932 


3,800 


1,665 


2,282 


1,682 


1,355 


2,075 


1,050 


3,600 


1,150 


1,587 


933 


970 


1,387 


867 


1935-36.. 


3,000 


1,376 


2.180 


1,390 


1,157 


1,922 


848 


3,700 


1,035 


1.531 


951 


849 


1,348 


710 


1936-37. . 


5,000 


1,332 


2,193 


1,323 


952 


1,820 


,834 


3,700 


1,041 


1,531 


1,031 


918 


1,390 


705 



Public School Teachers only. 



5. Teachers' Experience* 
Average Number of years' Teaching Experience 



Year 


Male 


Female 


All 


Rural (Male 
and Female) 


Urban (Male 
and Female) 


1912 


11.81 

14.70 

12.14 

10.49 

9.88 

9.40 

9.88 

9.76 


7.41 

7.67 

8.40 

8.87 

9.91 

10.96 

11.56 

12.58 


8.06 

8.44 

8.87 

9.11 

9.90 

10.64 

11.19 

11.51 






1917 






1922 


5.10 
4.92 
5.77 
6.19 
6.72 
7.30 


12.61 


1927 


13.25 


1932 


13.88 


1934 


14.99 


1935-36t 


15.73 


1936-37+ 


15.83 







: Public School Teachers only. "("Calculated as at June for the last two years; previous to that, at December. 



6. Percentage of Male Teachers' 



Year 


Rural Schools 


City Schools 


Town Schools 


All Schools 


1912 


15.10 
10.54 
11.64 
13.90 
16.64 
21.18 
21.91 
23.14 


14.88 
10.75 
14.18 
16.90 
19.49 
21.15 
23.51 
22.17 


12.30 
10.34 
10.22 
12.63 
15.70 
18.04 
17.88 
21.12 


14.86 


1917 


10.81 


1922 


12.55 


1927 


15 06 


1932 


17.77 


1934 


21.01 


1935-36 


21.71 


1936-37 


22.77 







*Public School Teachers only. 



7. Receipts, Operating Expenditures, Capital Outlays 
(Public and Separate Schools) 





Receipts 


Operating Expenditures 




Year 


Legislative 
Grants 


Local 
Assess- 
ments 


Township 
Grants 


County 
Grants 


Total 
Receipts 


Currentl 


CapitaU 


Total 


Capital 
Outlays 


1912.... 
1917.... 
1922.... 
1927.... 
1932.... 
1934.... 
1935 ... 
1936.... 


S 

842,278 
907,846 
2,976,712 
3,404,647 
3,847,696 
3,237,520 
3,013,917 
3,165,834 


$ 
( 

10,565,886 
19,801,609 
22,362,305 
24,061,895 
23,067,938 
21,568,079 
23,075,287 


S 
9,478,887 
( 1,627, 
2,976,288 
3,174,245 
3,034,008 
2,444,439 
2,477,500 
3,009,216 


$ 

) 

552 ) 

64,281 

84,990 

128,491 

97,889 

117,681 

151,645 


$ 
14,258,052 
17,269,285 
38,624,665 
41,586,106 
41,600,894 
35,718,448 
33,583,735 
35, 042, 418 


$ 
not se 

27,380,826 
24,904,102 

25,372,263 
25,316,116 


$ 
parated 

4,807,200 
4.403,659 
4,007,155 
4,020,098 


$ 

♦8.328,245 

♦11,833,989 

♦25,176.262 

♦30,256,018 

32,188,026 

29,307,761 

29,379,418 

29,336,214 


$ 

2,945,715 

2,277,851 

6,764,622 

4,543,152 

1,906,782 

622.371 

525,460 

925,766 



lGeneral Maintenance. 2Debt Charges. 

♦Includes Temporary Loan Repayments. 



106 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



B. 



ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
1. Schools, Teachers, and Pupils 



♦Percentage of actual aggregate to perfect aggregate attendance. 
-{•Commencing with 1932 the figure given is the May enrolment. 



Year 


No. of 
Schools in 
operation 


Teachers 


Pupilsf 


Boys 


Girls 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Attendance , 
Efficiency, 
Percentage 


1912 


513 

548 
656 
724 
764 
779 
793 
812 


1,237 
1,488 
1,958 
2,388 
2,739 
2,817 
2,892 
2.941 


61,297 

70,048 

88,546 

101,072 

99,198 

101,513 

101.152 

101,010 


31,126 
35,036 
44,728 
51,101 
50,524 
51,128 
51,261 
51,536 


30,171 
35,012 
43,818 
49,971 

48,674 
50,385 
49,891 

48,812 


39,735 
46,919 
64,897 
74,820 
89,804 
92,334 
91,545 
92,773 




1917 




1922 


84.98 


1927 


87.39 


1932 


*91.50 


1934-35 


*92.84 


1935-36 


♦92 24 


1936-37 


*92.73 



2. Average Number of Years' Teaching Experience 



Year 


Male 


Female 


All 


Rural (Male 
and Female) 


Urban (Male 
and Female) 


1930 


5.87 
5.26 
6.05 
6.11 
5.37 
5.76 
6.27 


9.81 
10.06 

9.98 
10.29 
10.44 
10.94 
11.83 


9.53 
9.33 
8.77 
9.94 
9.88 
10.49 
11.23 


6.31 

6.52 
6.39 
6.74 
6.36 
7.00 
7.91 


10.67 


1931 


10.80 


1932 


10.89 


1933 


11.12 


1934 


10.42 


1935-36* 


11.79 


1936-37* 


12.44 



♦Calculated as at June for the last 2 years; previously, at December. 

3. Receipts, Operating Expenditures, Capital Outlays 





Receipts 


Operating Expenditures 




Year 


Legislative 
Grants 


County and 
Local Grants 

and 
Assessments 


Total 
Receipts 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Capital 
Outlays 


1912 

1917 

i922 

i927 

1932 

i934 

i935 

1936 


$ 
51,846 
63,127 
195,963 
296,277 
535,111 
540,481 
544,895 
564,019 


$ 
757,255 
1,066,253 
2,154,985 
2,889,495 
2,955,779 
2,851,075 
2,784,007 
2,850,799 


$ 
1,186,814 
1,499,726 
4,049,044 
5,100,879 
5,720,395 
4,769,335 
4,424,782 
4,560,246 


$ 
not se 

3,108,449 
2,937,104 
3,045,498 
3,149,164 


$ 
parated 

709,450 

824,407 
760,448 
585,933 


$ 

*719,824 

♦1,026,784 

*2,546,886 

*3,946,031 

3,817,899 

3,761,511 

3,805,946 

3,735,097 


$ 

323,400 

286,939 

1,111,833 

671,241 

888,821 

159,570 

99,785 

159,760 



: Contains Short Term Loag Repayments. 



C. PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

The following is a complete list of the Protestant Separate Schools of the Province: — No. 1 
Grattan, No. 2 Hagarty, L'Orignal, and Penetanguishene (two schools). 

They were attended by 258 pupils in 1936. The whole amount expended for their main- 
tenance and permanent improvements was $10,564.19. There were nine teachers, of whom six 
held First Class certificates and three held Second Class. 



D. HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAMINATION RESULTS 





Candidates 


Successful Candidates 


Percentage 
of those 


Year 


Number 


Percentage 
of Sr. IV 

May 
Enrolment 


By Recommendation 


By Writing 


Total 


attempting 

the written 

test who 




Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Per cent. 


were 
successful 


1912. . 


22,679 
21,975 
36,114 
44,121 
50,280 
54,991 
55,307 








13,977 
15,751 
19,656 
24,381 
21,604 
16,785 
16,514 


61.63 
71.67 
54 . 43 
55.26 
42.97 
30.52 
29.86 


13,977 
15,751 
27,560 
37,451 
40,718 
46,320 
46,969 


61.63 
71.67 
76.31 

84.88 
80.98 
84.23 
84.92 


61.63 


1917 . 








71.67 


1922 




7,904 
13,070 
19,114 
29,535 
30,455 


21.88 
29.62 
38.01 
53.71 
55.06 


69.67 


1927 

1932 

1936 

1937 


78.05 
91.82 
95.23 
96.84 


78.51 
69.32 
65.94 
66.45 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



107 



E. FIFTH CLASS 





Number 

of 
Schools 
Conduct- 
ing Fifth 
Class 
Work 


Fifth 
Class 
Enrol- 
ment in 

these 
Schools 


Number 
of Fifth 
Classes 
Quali- 
fying for 
Legis- 
lative 
Grant 


Enrol- 
ment in 

Quali- 
fying 
Fifth 

Classes 


Grading 


Distribution of Qualifying Classes, 
with Average Enrolment per Class 




Year 


A 


B 


C 


Public 


Separate 


Legis- 


Counties 


Districts 


No. 


Aver. 
Enrol. 


lative 
Grant 




No. 


Aver. 
Enrol. 


No. 


Aver. 
Enrol. 




1924-25.. 


468 
760 
1,316 
1,553 
1,672 
1,715 




193 
254 
418 
587 
565 
580 


1,878 
2,231 
2,790 
4,746 
4,266 
4,188 


93 
92 
111 
149 
154 
161, 


69 
98 
115 
154 
164 
170 


31 
64 
192 
284 
247 
248 


108 
128 
210 
331 
311 
328 


7.8 
6.9 
5.3 
7.1 
6.6 
6.7 


46 
78 
139 
149 
137 
144 


8.7 
6.3 
4.9 
5.4 
5.3 
5.6 


39 

48 

69 

107 

117 

108 


16.0 
17.7 
14.5 
14.7 
12.6 
11.1 


$28,396 


1927-28.. 




35,739 


1930-31.. 
1933-34.. 
1935-36.. 
1936-37.. 


6,618 

7,323 

11,577 

11,621 


55,562 
62,211 
61,966 
70,367 



II. SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

A. CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 

1. School and Pupils 





No. of 
Schools 




Classification of 


Enrol- 
ment 


Boys 


Girls 


Attendance 
Efficiency 
Percentage 


Enrolment Distribution 


Year 


Teachers Employed 


Lower 
School 


Middle 
School 


Upper 
School 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


No. 


% 


1912 


138 
137 

181 
207 
219 
219 

211 
208 


54 
36 
58 
54 
13 
14 
15 
12 


73 
99 
104 
119 
154 
144 
140 
139 


11 
2 
19 
29 
42 
49 
46 
46 








6,094 
5,104 
8,777 
9,654 
11.070 
10,852 
9,464 
8,935 


2,499 
1,989 
3,569 
3,944 
5,060 
4,616 
3,996 
3,750 


3,595 
3,115 
5,208 

5,710 
6,304 
6,236 
5,468 
5,185 


61.97 
73.15 
82,42 
83.48 
90.15 
93.27 
90.90 
91.94 


4,166 
3,858 
6,316 
6,238 
6,791 
6,324 
5,552 
5,352 


68.36 
75.59 
71.96 
64.61 
59.76 
58.27 
58.66 
59.90 


1,879 
1,246 
2,461 
3,328 
4,263 
3,966 
3,460 
3,202 


30.83 
24.41 
28.04 
34.48 
37.51 
36.55 
36 . 56 
35.84 


49 


.81 


1917-18.. 










1922-23.. 












1926-27.. 
1932-33.. 
1934-35.. 
1935-36.. 
1936-37.. 


5 
6 
9 

7 
8 


3' 
1 

1 
1 


1 

2 
2 
2 


88 
310 
562 

452 

381 


.91 
2.73 
5.18 

4.78 
4.26 



Commencing with 1932-33, enrolment is that of May instead of the entire year, and attendance efficiency 
is based on the percentage of actual to perfect aggregate, instead of average attendance to enrolment. 



2. Teachers, Salaries and Experience 





Teachers 


Salaries 










Percentages 






Percentages 


Highest 


Average 






















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1920-21... 


255 


47 


57 


18.43 


22.35 


71 


184 


27.84 


72.15 


3,000 


1,800 


1,700 


1,579 


1,229 


1,424 


1,356 


1,215 


1926-27... 


422 


57 


28 


13.51 


6.64 


137 


285 


32.46 


67.54 


3.550 


2,300 


1,950 


1,769 


1,332 


1,548 


1,383 


1,318 


1931-32... 


490 


93 


45 


18.98 


9.18 


167 


323 


34.08 


65.92 


3,550 


2,400 


2,400 


1,824 


1,372 


1,577 


1,378 


1,332 


1934-35... 


502 


222 


97 


44.22 


19.32 


220 


282 


43.82 


56.18 


3,100 


1,600 


1,800 


1,466 


1,069 


1,242 


,1,091 


1,056 


1035-36... 


482 


253 


101 


52 . 49 


20.95 


227 


255 


47.10 


52.90 


2,500 


1,700 


1,520 


1,427 


1,048 


1,214 


1,076 


1,031 


1936-37... 


478 


272 


118 


56 . 90 


24.69 


235 


243 


49.16 


50.84 


2,700 


1,800 


1,600 


1,427 


1,048 


1,213 


1,080 


1,031 


1937-38... 


504 


290 


126 


57.54 


25.00 


249 


255 


49.40 


50.60 


2,800 


1,700 


1,950 


1,468 


1,074 


1,243 


1,098 


1,061 



Average number of years' teaching experience in Secondary School work as at June, 1938: 
Male 8.41; Female, 2.86; All, 5.58. 



108 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



3. Receipts, Operating Expenditures, Capital Outlays 





Receipts 


Operating Expenditures 




Year 


Legis- 
lative 
Grants 


County 
Grants 


Town- 
ship 
Grants 


Local 

Assess- 
ments 


Total 
Receipts 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Capital 
Outlays 


1912 

1917 

1922 

1927 

1932 

1934 

1935 

1936 


$ 

64,081 
65,732 
148,217 
199,388 
220,773 
199,076 
174,764 
189,917 


$ 

60,352 
72,541 
218,323 
363,285 
448,355 
394.365 
337,820 
330,338 


$ $ 

f 116 780 ) 

J 155,173 1 

1 325,548 

1 350,819 

95,579 276,524 

83.823 329.281 

84.713 208,258 

102,785 229,027 


S 

295.261 
360,431 
1,038,646 
1,363,646 
1,459,579 
1,535,623 
1.196,847 
1,200,074 


S 

not se 

944,342 
821,209 
755,835 
752,383 


$ 

>arated 

141,697 
154,559 
119,710 
129,016 


$ 
238.226 
279,558 
611,425 
950.376 
1,086,039 
975,768 
875,545 
881,399 


26,861 
45,063 
267,006 
17i,628 
31,631 
54,364 
40.347 
22,442 



COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
1. Schools and Teachers 





Schools 


Teachers 




M 

V 0J 

d 3 


V) 

"5 

o 
ja 
u 
CO 




en 

.2 3 
'be.-, 


o 
o 

J3 
U 

CO 




CO 


CO 

.S2 

"5 


Percentage 




a 
9 


Percentage 


Year 




i/i 
n 
ed 




a 




«■§ 


A 


d 


•Sti 


J3 


d 


> d 




>T3 






a 




S 




©►2 


ho 

s 


O 

H 


"35 


3 


o 


P 


Q, 

CO 




a 

CO 




o 




o 


1920-21.. 


47 


121 


168 


664 


543 


1,207 


895 


629 


74.15 


73.81 


587 


620 


48.63 


51.34 


1926-27. . 


56 


136 


192 


1.025 


774 


1,799 


1,547 


1.326 


85.99 


73.71 


837 


962 


46.53 


53.16 


1030-31 . . 


65 


142 


207 


1,201 


933 


2,134 


1.924 


1,588 


90.16 


74.41 


962 


1,172 


44.85 


55.47 


1934-35. . 


68 


144 


212 


1,420 


941 


2,361 


2.235 


1,850 


94.66 


78.35 


1,171 


1,190 


49.59 


50.41 


1935-36.. 


68 


154 


222 


1.416 


987 


2,403 


2,277 


1.873 


94.76 


77.94 


1,231 


1,172 


51.23 


48.77 


1936-37.. 


69 


156 


225 


1,442 


1,010 


2,452 


2.344 


1,903 


95.59 


77.61 


1,273 


1,179 


51.92 


48.08 


1937-38.. 


70 


156 


226 


1.530 


1,051 


2,581 


2,450 


2,019 


94.92 


78.23 


1.355 


1,226 


52.50 


47.50 



2. Teachers' Salaries and Experience 



















(a) 


Salaries 




















Highest 


Average 




Coll. Inst. 


High School 


Coll. Inst. 


High School 


Combined Coll. Jnat. 
and High School 


Year 








































_ 


+t 


+, 


_ 


,jj 




_ 


+j 


+J 




— 


4J 


+j 




_ 


^j 


+j 


^ 




d 


a 


. o 


a 


a 


-. o 


d 


o 


-. o 




d 


a 


. o 




rt 


a 


a 


a 




a 


«j 


JJ « 


o, 


3 


« CD 


a 


d 


JJ d 




a 


d 


H d 




a 




d 


*i d 







1.1* 


«i* 


o 






5 




2 w 




8 




8 « 




o 






* •» 




a 


2<: 


u eo 


a 


5 8 


S " 

1> 0) 


.5 




b-a 

01 CO 


- 


.2 


$ 


H-a 

U CO 




# a 


(O 
CO 


rt 2) 
1 






& 


fe< 


ft 


fe<J 


Ph 


fe< 


< 


PL, 




< 


a, 
$ 


< 


fa< 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


s 


1920-21 


4,500 


3,500 


3,375 


4,375 


3,375 


3,125 


3,203 


2,478 


1,863 


2,251 


2,315 


2,142 


1,550 


1,843 


2,563 


1,987 


2.390 


1,705 


1926-27 


5,000 


4,400 


3.375 


4,100 


3,500 


2,750 


3,759 


2,767 


2,327 


2,621 


2,865 


2,142 


1 ,909 


2,123 


3,120 


2,320 


2,622 


2,113 


1930-31 


5,000 


4.500 


3,600 


6,000 


3.500 


2,800 


3.994 


2.890 


2,414 


2,716 


3,086 


2,385 


2,004 


2,243 


3,365 


2,418 


2,756 


2,200 


1934-35 


5,350 


3,700 


3,600 


4,200 


2,800 


2,700 


3,624 


2,565 


2,205 


2,457 


2,567 


1,723 


1,632 


1,798 


2,907 


2.125 


2,355 


1.937 


1935-36 


4,625 


3,700 


3,600 


4,200 


2,800 


2,700 


3,564 


2.546 


2,206 


2,449 


2,509 


1,659 


1,600 


1.759 


2,832 


2,099 


2,304 


1.919 


1936-37 


4,800 


3.700 


3,600 


4,200 


2,600 


2,700 


3,587 


2,524 


2,203 


2,439 


2,492 


1,668 


1,582 


1,749 


2,828 


2,087 


2,288 


1.906 


1937-38 


5,000 


3,700 


3,600 


4,300 


2,860 


2,700 


3,715 


2,549 


2,247 


2,475 


2,535 


1,709 


1,616 


1,784 


2,900 


2,129 


2,316 


1,954 



(b) Average number of years' teaching experience in Secondary School work, as at June, 1938. 



Male 



Female 



Both 



Collegiate Institute Teachers 

High School Teachers , 

Both 



12.11 

8.57 

10 80 



12.11 

8.57 

10.43 



12.11 

8.57 
10.66 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 193; 



109 











3. Pupils 




















Attendance 


Enrolment Distribution 










Year 


Enrol- 
ment 


Boys 


Girls 


Efficiency 
Percentage 


Lower School 


Middle School 


Upper School 












Number 


Per cent. 


Number 


Percent. 


Number 


Percent. 


1912 


32,273 


14,846 


17,427 


62.80 


19,829 


61.44 


9,842 


30.50 


2,602 
1,571 


8.06 


1917-18 


29,097 


12,353 


16,744 


78.15 


20,190 


69.39 


7,336 


25.21 


5.40 


1922-23 


44,631 


21,139 


23,492 


86.03 


29,219 


65.47 


12,210 


27.35 


3,202 


7.18 


1927-28 


55,805 


26,788 


29,017 


85.65 


34,700 


62.18 


16,395 


29.38 


4,710 


8.44 


1932-33 


68,603 


34,606 


33,997 


91.90 


36,827 


53.68 


22,939 


33 43 


8,837 


12.88 


1934-35 


67,395 


33,096 


34,299 


93.49 


35,993 


53.41 


23,134 


34.32 


8,268 


12.27 


1935-36 


67,899 


32,910 


34.989 


93.51 


36,377 


53.57 


23,560 


34.70 


7,962 


11.73 


1936-37 


67,088 


32,057 


35,031 


94.28 


36,186 


53.94 


23,747 


35.40 


7,155 


10.66 



Commencing with 1932-33, enrolment is that of May instead of the entire year, and attendance efficiency 
is based on the percentage of actual to perfect aggregate instead of average attendance to enrolment. 

4. Receipts, Operating Expenditures, Capital Outlays 





Receipts 


Operating Expenditures 




Year 


Legislative 
Grants 


County 
Grants 


Local 
Assess- 
ments 


Total 
Receipts 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Capital 
Outlays 


1912 


S 
209,956 
184,088 
276,889 
484,978 
464,882 
424,286 
441,344 
480,484 


$ 

287,719 

364,052 

790,518 

1,475,538 

1,955,045 

1,789,453 

1,496,264 

1,459,859 


$ 
1,439,324 
1,582,128 
3,099,826 
4,154,487 
5,789,253 
5.625.903 
5,326,796 
5,507,312 


$ 
2,414,128 
3,051,684 
7,993,999 
9,755,761 
9,739,616 
9,005,315 
8,793.398 
8 655,564 


$ 

not se 

6,802,931 
6,232,661 
6,272,830 
6,249,430 


s 

parated 

1,498,770 
1,521,997 
1,528,119 
1,447,793 


1,576,964 
2,105,661 
3,972,161 
7,108,527 
8,301,701 
7,754,658 
7,800,949 
7,697,223 


$ 

376.097 


1917 


313,314 


1922 


2,770,714 


1927 


1,691,779 


1932 


388,291 


1934 


151,447 


1935 


236,057 


1936 


489,227 







C. VOCATIONAL AND SENIOR AUXILIARY SCHOOLS 

1. Schools, Teachers and Pupils 

(a) Day Vocational Schools 





Num- 
ber 
of 
Schools 


Pupils 


Teachers 


Year 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 
and 
Special 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Tech- 
nical 


Com- 
mercial 


Full- 
Time 


Part- 
Time 
and 
Occa- 
sional 


Total 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


1918-19... 
1922-23... 
1926-27... 
1930-31... 
1935-36... 
1936-37. . . 


11 
16 
36 

58 

58 
58 


4,379 
6,987 
16,560 
28,112 
34,406 
33,409 


'2,415 

4,355 
3,225 
1,012 
1,357 


4,379 
9,402 
20,915 
31,337 
35,418 
34,766 


3,012 

4,447 

9.595 

14,976 

17,845 

17,225 


1,727 
4,955 
11,320 
16,361 
17,573 
17,541 


17,354 
16,698 


18,064 
18,068 


155 

286 

579 

1,000 

1,188 

1,186 


51 
150 
277 
261 
261 


155 

337 

729 

1,277 

1,449 

1,447 


*361 
760 
910 
938 


*218 
517 
539 
509 







(b) Evening Vocational and Day Sr. Auxiliary 










E 


vening Vocational Schools 


Sr. Auxiliary Day Schools 


Year 


Number 

of 
Schools 


Puoils 


Teach- 
ers 


Num- 
ber 
of 
Schools 


Fult-Time Pupils 


Full-1 


ime Teachers 




Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 


Fe- 
male 


Total 


1918-19... 


36 
51 
60 
71 
29 
32 


7,403 
15,125 
17,582 
25,119 
11,205 
13,002 


9,330 
18,386 
20,335 
22,948 
13,155 
12,748 


16,733 
33,511 
37,917 
47,440 
24,360 
25,750 


611 

1,097 

1,297 

1,647 

766 

808 
















1922-23... 
















1926-27. . . 
1930-31... 
1935-36. . . 
1936-37. . . 


2 
4 
5 
5 


473 

829 
842 
811 


296 
529 
723 

642 


769 
1,358 
1,565 
1,453 


14 
32 
35 
35 


12 
23 
36 
33 


26 
55 
71 
68 



110 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



2. Teachers' Salaries 





Salaries* 


University Graduates 
and Specialists 




Vocational Schools 


Special Industrial Schools 


Grad- 
uates 


Per 
cent. 


Spe- 
cia- 
lists 




Year 


High- 
est 


Average 


High- 
est 


Average 


Per 




Prin- 
cipal 


Male 
Assist. 


Fe- 
male 
Assist. 


All 


Prin- 
cipal 


Male 
Assist. 


Fe- 
male 
Assist. 


All 


cent. 


1918-19... 
1922-23... 
1926-27. . . 
1930-31... 
1935-36. . . 
1936-37... 


6,600 
6,600 
4,625 
4,800 


4,168 
4,132 
3,637 
3,674 


Data 
Data 
2,606 
2,601 
2.425 
2,455 


not av 

not av 
2,305 
2,381 
2,156 
2,182 


ailable 
ailable 
2,562 
2,574 
2,377 
2,409 


3,500 
3,900 
3,400 
3,500 


3,000 
2,950 

2,967 
3,058 


2,130 
2,188 
2,347 
2,447 


1,891 
2,064 
2,209 
2,198 


2,091 
2,197 
2,332 
2,380 


403 

799 

1,055 

1,067 


59.79 
65.55 
68.10 
68.57 


319 
580 
905 
901 


47.33 
47,58 
58.42 
57.90 



*Ineludes full-time and part-time teachers. 



3. Receipts, Operating Expenditures, Capital Outlays 





Receipts 


Operating Expenditures 




Year 


Legislative 
Grants 


County 
Grants 


Local 
Assess- 
ments 


Total 
Receipts 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Capital 
Outlays 


1918 


$ 

110,637 

638,217 

813,581 

1,144,052 

1,163,173 

1,001,040 


f 1.32S 


$ 
049 1 


$ 
690,311 
2,575,598 
4,276,707 
9,233,601 
6,074.280 
6,078,126 


$ 
not se 

4,197,206 
4,305,307 
4,317,055 


$ 

parated 

735,796 
1,150.766 
1,215,185 


$ 

388,791 
1,307,396 
3,100,185 
4,933,002 
5,456,073 
5,532,240 


104,409 


1922 


\ 831,861 \ 

1 1,997,011 J 

207,927 I 3.634.260 


564,218 


1926 


399,205 


1930 


3,167,392 


1935 

1936 


243,886 
231,817 


4,086,053 
4,249,760 


40,417 
36,312 



III. TEACHERS AND TRAINING SCHOOLS 
A. ATTENDANCE, NORMAL AND NORMAL-MODEL SCHOOLS 

Number of Teachers in Training at Provincial Normal Schools, and the Pupils at the Normal-Model 

Schools in connection therewith 





Normal 


Norma 




Year 


*Teachers 


Student-Teachers 


1-Model 




**Total 


M 


F 


1st Class 


2nd Class 


K-P 


*Teachers 






1st 
Yr. 


2nd 
Yr. 


1st 
Yr. 


2nd 
Yr. 


1st 
Yr. 


2nd 
Yr. 


fPupils 


1927-28. .. 
1930-31... 
1933-34... 
1935-36. .. 


88 
86 
93 

88 
89 
88 


1,568 
1,555 
2,778 
1,237 
1,082 
1,087 


234 
309 
723 
299 
245 
196 


1,334 

1,246 

2,055 

938 

837 

891 


620 
702 
1,231 
1,237 
875 
895 


'"l2 
488 


912 
808 
732 


3" 
275 


36 
29 
37 
19 
14 
20 


15 


43 
42 
42 

38 
38 
40 


1,207 

1,202 

1,217 

969 


1936-37.. . 
1937-38... 




193 

172 




923 



^Includes those engaged in both a Normal and a Normal-Model School. 
fCalendar year enrolment. 
**Includes January enrolments. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



111 



B. DEPARTMENTAL SUMMER COURSES ENROLMENT BY SUBJECTS 

IN RECENT YEARS 

(The Summer Courses are conducted by the Department of Education for the benefit of Teachers who 

desire to spend a part of their summer vacation in an effort to improve their academic and professional 

standing, and thus to become more efficient in carrying on with a modernized curriculum.) 



Courses 


Centre 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 




Guelph, Kempt- 


272 

215 

69 

44 

185 


295 

265 

63 

67 

184 


363 

232 

93 

57 

215 


487 
261 
158 
63 
307 


513 
353 


378 

183 

66 


350 
192 

78 


566 
223 
109 


1,121 
292 
134 






1,336 


Art 




321 






130 


Cadet Corps 










238 


194 


175 


175 


216 
668 
253 

25 
176 

51 


258 






1,385 




See below 

Guelph 


450 


845 


678 


700 


806 


372 


305 


329 


224 




23 


Health Teaching 














45 
84 


53 
79 


84 
87 


213 


High School Assistant's 




9 


37 


38 


67 


99 


64 




48 


^Household Science 

Kindergarten-Primary 


See below 

London, Toronto, 

Ottawa 

Hamilton 


69 

317 
44 
39 

138 


76 

267 
55 
12 

191 


88 

256 
84 
13 

225 


87 

308 
64 
11 

276 




24 

169 
32 


28 

205 
33 


55 

208 
62 


158 

279 
102 


365 

320 
231 


Middle School 






Toronto, London 




152 


196 


409 


502 
11 
46 

252 


693 




73 






48 

363 

21 


102 
377 

48 


69 
255 

57 

37 
33 
32 


80 

351 
61 

56 
34 
32 




62 

314 

20 


59 
271 

15 


48 
271 

17 


57 




See below 


199 






Refresher Courses in English 














45 






34 
























Shop Work — General 

Special 


















16 






















120 




See below 

Hamilton 


705 
210 


803 
184 


906 

347 
22 


910 

305 

19 


203 


695 

120 

12 


701 

78 
20 


610 
81 


637 

70 

6 


449 




73 
















Total 


3,198 


3,917 


4,099 


4,637 


J2.212 


2,922 


2,872 




5,039 


6,598 









1937 Centres: Education — Ottawa, Kingston, London, Toronto. 

Physical Education — Lake Couchiching (Women); Kingston (Men). 

Upper School — Ottawa, Windsor, Port Arthur, Kingston, Toronto, London, North Bay. 

English-French — Ottawa, Windsor, Sturgeon Falls. 
*Type C, Hamilton; Part 1 only at Ottawa; Type B and Type A at Toronto. 
tPart 1 only of Type B at Ottawa. 
+In the interests of economy a curtailment was made in the number of courses offered. 



C. TREND IN GRADE OF TEACHERS' CERTIFICATES IN SCHOOLS 

IN WHICH FRENCH IS A SUBJECT OF INSTRUCTION 

WITH THE APPROVAL OF THE MINISTER 







First Class 


Second Class 


Third Class 


District 


Temporary 


Permanent 
Ungraded 


Vear 


of 
Teachers 


Num- 


Per 


Num- 


Per 


Num- 


Per 


Num- 


Per 


Num- 


Per 


Num- 


Per 




ber 


cent. 


ber 


cent. 


ber 


cent. 


ber 


cent. 


ber 


cent. 


ber 


cent. 


1929-30... 


1,087 


30 


2.76 


243 


22.36 


537 


49.40 


44 


4.04 


205 


18.86 


28 


2.58 


1930-31... 


1,154 


47 


4.07 


283 


24.52 


526 


45.58 


32 


2.78 


245 


21.23 


21 


1.82 


1931-32... 


1,108 


72 


6.50 


319 


28.79 


442 


39.89 


25 


2.26 


232 


20.94 


18 


1.62 


1932-33... 


1,203 


94 


7.81 


349 


29.01 


*526 


43.72 


13 


1.09 


202 


16.79 


19 


1.58 


1933-34... 


1,202 


117 


9.73 


465 


38.69 


449 


37.35 


6 


.51 


145 


12.06 


20 


1.66 


1934-35... 


1,236 


142 


11.49 


580 


46.93 


387 


31.31 


5 


.41 


105 


8.49 


17 


1.37 


1935-36... 


1,257 


155 


12.33 


710 


56.48 


293 


23.31 


4 


.33 


81 


6.44 


14 


1.11 


1936-37... 


1,277 


179 


14.02 


778 


60.92 


243 


19.03 


4 


.31 


59 


4.62 


14 


1.10 


1937-38... 


1,292 


216 


16.72 


856 


66.25 


144 


11.15 


2 


.16 


68 


5.26 


6 


.46 



*Due to the number of second-class teachers with provisional standing who were required to return to the 
Normal School to complete their qualifications this year. 



112 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



D. 



PROFESSIONAL CERTIFICATES ISSUED BY THE DEPARTMENT 
DURING THE LAST TEN YEARS IN THE FOLLOWING 



Year 


tHigh 
School 
Prin- 
cipal 


High 

School 

Assistant 


First 
Class 


Second 
Class 


English 
French 




Voca- 
tional 


fKin- 

der- 

garten 


Kinder- 
garten 
Primary 




A 


B 


A 


B 


A 


B 


Grade 
B 


Grade 
C 


Dis- 
trict 


A 


B 


Di- 
rector 


A 


B 


1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 


42 
48 
49 
49 
33 
35 
57 
71 
89 
86 


266 
327 
365 
432 
487 
576 
555 
498 
477 
303 


316 
393 
361 
357 
363 
381 
411 
417 
425 
405 


751 

702 

669 

693 

944 

1,268 

1,211 

1,410 

1,283 

1,011 


496 
607 
336 
294 
309 
229 
481 
163 
308 
654 


943 
734 
703 
775 
955 
714 
705 
596 
225 
149 


1,260 

1,145 

600 

235 

136 

74 

258 

31 

122 

184 


39 
66 

48 
45 
*62 
*71 
*91 
*40 


22 

12 

4 


20 
17 

8 


41 
34 
37 
44 
112 
78 
48 
34 
12 
43 


43 
24 
34 
34 
53 
43 
65 
64 
35 
27 


13 

15 

19 

11 

8 

8 

5 

8 


168 
133 
131 
124 
148 
103 
127 
109 
96 
134 


49 
59 
62 

83 


1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 




9 

10 
13 

8 


99 
50 
32 
36 
33 


1937 








52 













A = Interim. 

*Now called Third Class. 

^Extensive reduction in summer courses in 1932. 



B =Interim certificates made permanent. 
fPermanent certificate. 



E. TEACHERS' INSTITUTES 





Teachers' 
Institutes 


*Members 


Elemen- 
tary 

School 
Teachers 

in the 
Province 


Receipts 


Expenditures 


Year 


Legis- 
lative 
Grants 


Municipal 
Grants 


Members' 
Fees 


Receipts 
from all 
sources 


Libraries 


Total of 
all ex- 
penditures 


1912 

1917 

1922 

1927 

1932 

1935 


83 

94 

95 

99 

109 

110 

t88 


9,913 
12.460 
12,910 
15.249 
16,789 
17,450 
13,498 


11,128 
12,762 
14,872 
16,345 
17,340 
17,472 
17,536 


$ c. 
3,800.00 
5,475.00 
6,900.00 
5,600.00 
5,975.83 


$ c. 
2,100.78 
3,701.62 
4,459.27 
4,656.02 
4,125.07 
1,569.72 
1,039.85 


$ c. 
1,961.10 
3,821.23 
6,540.84 
7,322.62 
7,748.04 
9,870.28 
8,192.82 


$ c. 
22,120.70 
27,712.01 
39,759.89 
44,547.01 
46,422.77 
36.713.61 
29,314.84 


$ c. 
1,359.24 
3,173.12 
5,743.50 
8,092.97 
6,244.99 
4,129.16 
5.730.76 


$ c 
10,120.89 
13,977.20 
25,810.37 
25,535.76 
21,274.51 
18,409.85 


1936 


18.00 


15,877.99 



^Registered attendance of members. fSome of drop due to union meetings of hitherto separate Institutes. 



IV. ENROLMENT AND POPULATION 

A. ENROLMENT AND EXEMPTIONS OF PUPILS OF ADOLESCENT 
AGE (14 AND 15 YEARS) 





Total 

Enrolment, 

Pupils of 

Adolescent 

Age 

t 


Boys 


Girls 


Exemptions under the Adolescent Act 


Grand 
Total 




Year 


Home Permits 


Employment 
Certificates 


Percentage 

of 
Adolescents 




Urban 


Rural 


Total 


Urban 


Rural 


Total 


Exempted 


1926 

1930 


89,567 
83,821 
82,106 
102,470 
102,741 
101,994 


45,445 
42,754 
42,038 
52,138 
52,109 
52,016 


44,122 
41,067 
40,068 
50,332 
50,632 
49,978 


959 
984 
1,190 
1,292 
1,475 
1,435 


420 
385 
306 
391 

787 
703 


1,379 
1,369 
1,496 
1,683 
2,262 
2,138 


3,901 

2,831 
1,300 
1,748 
1,996 
2,244 


424 
320 
276 
297 
294 
244 


4,325 
3,151 
1,576 
2.045 

2,280 

2,488 


5,704 
4,520 
3,072 
3,728 
4,542 
4.626 


6.37 
5.39 


1934 


3.74 


1935 


3.64 


1936 


4.42 


1937 


4.34 



tMay enrolment. 



JDrop in numbers due to depression. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



113 





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114 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No 11 



B. PUPILS, TEACHERS, AND TEACHERS' SALARIES IN PROVINCIALLY- 
CONTROLLED SCHOOLS (1912-1936) 

(1) Pupil Enrolment 



Year 


Public 
Schools 
(D&E) 


Separate 
Schools 


Continuation 
Schools 


High Schools 

and Collegiate 

Institutes 

(D&E) 


t 

Vocational 
Schools 
(D&E) 


1912 


429,030 
458,436 
515,202 
521,364 
517,256 
520,528 
528,425 
535,691 
537,786 
543,927 
472,564 
476,892 
484,896 
483,405 
465,171 
461,362 
455,966 


61,297 

70,048 

88,546 

91,051 

93,524 

95,300 

97,248 

101,072 

103,342 

105,518 

91,925 

95,974 

101,552 

101,513 

101,591 

101,152 

101,010 


6,094 

5,104 

8.777 

9,337 

10,545 

9,944 

9,654 

10,079 

9,843 

9,368 

10,039 

11,104 

11,364 

11,070 

10,852 

9,464 

8,935 


32,608 
33,024 
46,340 
51,027 
55,116 
57,059 
56,352 
59,692 
60,238 
61,038 
62,041 
68,579 
71,492 
70,724 
70,283 
70,029 
68,921 




1917 


18,271 
42,913 
49,271 
50,884 
53,700 
59,118 
63,609 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 . 


68,323 
73,526 


1929 


1930* 


80 135 


1931 

1932 


81,666 
70 798 


1933 


57,261 
59,171 


1934 


1935 


61,387 


1936 


62,159 







t(2) Teaching Staff 



1912 


9,891 
11,274 
12,914 
13,250 
13,359 
13,545 
13,723 
13,958 
14,016 
14,204 
14,494 
14,766 
14,601 
14,456 
14,518 
14,580 
14,595 


• 1,237 
1,488 
1,958 
2,053 
2,149 
2,188 
2,293 
2,388 
2,433 
2,528 
2,568 
2,693 
2,739 
2,764 
2,817 
2,892 
2,941 


226 
241 
323 
350 
396 
408 
422 
454 
460 
455 
481 
490 
493 
494 
502 
482 
478 


917 
1,051 
1,420 
1,543 
1,657 
1,739 
1,799 
1,875 
1,955 
2,047 
2,134 
2,240 
2,307 
2,295 
2,361 
2,403 
2,452 




1917 

1922 


132 

286 


1923 


371 


1924 


416 


1925 


530 


1926 


605 


1927 . 


660 


1928 


795 


1929 


893 


1930 


1,055 


1931 


1,168 


1932.. 


1,229 


1933.. 


1,221 


1934 


1,229 


1935 

1936 


1,259 
1,254 







(3) Teachers 


' Salaries 






1912 


$5,652,747 
7,763,361 
15,308,587 
16,008,524 
16,512,586 
16,898,259 
16,920,874 
17,221,594 
17,642,202 
18,048,873 
18,461,628 
18,690,679 
18,279,370 
16,493,058 
16,148,538 
16,586,817 
16,328,612 


$456,800 
635,089 
1,382,395 
1,526,180 
1,592,982 
1,670,852 
1,683,383 
1,784,722 
1,848,359 
1,950,091 
2,041,344 
2,145,571 
2,160,976 
2,121,813 
2,155,44^ 
2,124,920 
2,281,520 


$202,875 
228,362 
474,241 
533,395 
590,085 
595,629 
617,546 
653,770 
682,879 
689,711 
727,748 
757,889 
732,837 
658,558 
607,017 
570,006 
578,460 


$1,232,537 
1,554,049 
2,963,011 
3,392,901 
3,716,940 
3,986,032 
4,161,903 
4,330,079 
4,530,035 
4,830,853 
5,057,646 
5,340,900 
5,355,751 
5,026,466 
4,906,551 
4,968,005 
4,936,744 




1917 


$246,076 § 


1922 


787,370 


1923 


1,022,377 


1924 


1,274,964 


1925 


1,525,632 


1926 


1,781,065 


1927 


1,982,571 


1928 


2,298,614 


1929 


2,676,633 


1930 


3,062,874 


1931 


3,547,777 


1932 


3,605,249 


1933 


3,253,995 


1934 


3,362,919 


1935 


3,425,849 


1936 


3,423,555 



D & E— Day and Evening. §1918. 

*May enrolment instead of entire year's enrolment, 
Commencing with 1930. 



tFull-Time Day Staff, 
jlncluding Senior Auxiliary 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



115 



C. GENERAL STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 

Showing the Comparative State and Progress of Publicly Controlled Education in Ontario from 

1917 to 1936 





1917 


1922 


1927 


1932 


1935 


1936 




2,560,453 


2,792,482 


2,966,465 


3,239,437 


3,321,618 


3,350,139 






Number of Schools — 

Public 


6,103 

548 

137 

162 

11 


6,289 

656 

181 

175 

16 


6,426 

724 

217 

197 

42 


6,424 

764 

220 

207 

67 


6,413 
793 
211 
222 

58 
5 


6,347 




812 




208 


High 


225 




58 




5 














Total 


6,961 


7,317 


7,606 


7,682 


7,702 


7,655 






Enrolment of Pupilst — 

Public (Day and Evening) 

R.C. Separate 


458,436 
70,048 

5,104 
33,024 

3,674 
14,597 


515,202 

88,546 

8,777 

46,340 

9,402 

33,511 


535,691 
101,072 
10,079 
59,692 
24,513 
39,096 


484,896 
101,552 
11,364 
71,492 
36,938 
33,860 


461,362 

101,152 

9,464 

70,029 

35,418 

24,360 

1,609 


455.966 
101,010 




8,935 


High (Day and Evening) 


68,921 
34,766 




25,750 




1,643 














Total 


584,883 


701,778 


770,143 


740,102 


703,394 


696,991 






Number of Teachers — 


11,274 
1,488 

241 
1,051 

132 


12,914 
1,958 

323 
1,420 

286 
1,097 


13,9-58 
2,388 

454 
1,875 

831 
1,276 


14,601 
2,739 
493 
2,307 
1,480 
1,173 


14,580 

2,892 

482 

2,403 

1,478 

766 

71 


14,595 


R.C. Separate 


2,941 




478 


High. . . 


2,452 




1,447 




808 






68 














Total 


14,186 


17,998 


©20,667 


@21,812 


©21,897 


©21,644 




Net Municipal Expenditures* — 

Public 

R.C. Separate 


$ 

11,953,393 
1,250,596 

258,888 
2,234,887 


$ 

25,481,416 

3,562,756 

734,214 

6,465,986 

1,233,397 


$ 

27,073,528 

4,320,995 

922,616 

8,315,328 

2,939,171 


$ 

25,057,542 

3,282,788 

865,306 

7,836,819 

4,421,097 


$ 

23,104,450 

3,261,051 

700,781 

7,359,605 

4,082,345 

. 210,555 


$ 

22,999,302 

3,171,078 




691,482 


High 


7,216,739 




4,317,722 






213,478 














Total 


15,697,764 


37,477,769 


43,571,638 


J41, 463,552 


138,718,787 


138,609,801 






Legislative Grants — 

Public 


$ 

844,719 
63,127 
65,733 

184,088 


$ 

2,780,749 

95,963 

147,217 

276,889 

638,217 


$ 

3,318,071 
368,230 
230,977 
443,727 

1,036,441 


$ 

3,312,585 
535,111 
220,733 
464,882 

1,554,734 


$ 

2,469,022 

544,895 

174,764 

441,344 

1,109,091 

54,082 


s 

2,601,815 




564,019 
189,917 
480,484 




High 


Vocational 


959,611 


Sr. Auxiliary 




41,429 














Total 


1,157,667 


4,040,035 


5,397,446 


6,088,046 


4,793,198 


4,837,275 




Teachers' Salaries — 


$ 

7,763,361 
635,089 
228,362 

1,554,049 


$ 

15,308,587 

1,382,395 

474,241 

2,963,011 

787,370 


$ 

17,221,594 

1,784,722 

653,770 

4,330.079 

1,982,571 


S 

18,279,370 

2,160,976 

732,837 

5,355,751 

3,605,249 


$ 

16,586,817 

2,124,920 

570,006 

4,968,005 

3,260,836 

165,013 


$ 


Public 


16,328,612 

2,281,520 

578,460 

4,936,744 






High 




3,260,422 


Sr. Auxiliary 




163,133 














Total 


10,180,861 


20,915,594 


25,972,736 


30,134,183 


27,675,597 


27,548,891 





XOntario Municipal Statistics figure. 

♦Less Legislative Grants. 

^Operating Expenditures. 

Financial figures cover the calendar year specified. Commencing with 1935 all other data covers the school 
year ended six months after the calendar year specified. Previous to this, elementary school data covers the 
calendar year. 

tMay enrolment, commencing with 1932. 

©Without duplication. 



116 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 1— ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE, 1936-37 











Average Attendance i 


Days Lost per Year 


Attendance 




May Enrolment 


per Pupil of 


Efficiency 


* RURAL 














May Enrolment 


Percentage 


SCHOOLS 




























Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




(Counties) 
Addington .... 
Brant 


578 


51 


629 


493 


46 


539 


21.92 


16.45 


21.48 


88.14 


91.24 


88.38 


1,933 




1,933 


1,714 




1,714 


17.32 




17.32 


90.57 




90.57 




3,087 


484 


3,571 


2,646 


458 


3,104 


19.69 


i2.47 


18.71 


90.04 


96.50 


90.80 




3,232 


1,370 


4,602 


2,787 


1,232 


4,019 


18.73 


17.51 


18.37 


89.59 


90.78 


89.96 




1,524 




1,524 


1,230 




1,230 


25.31 




25.31 


87.19 




87.19 




1,742 


31 


1,773 


1,563 


30 


1,593 


17.49 


i2.oi 


17.40 


90.75 


93.66 


90.81 




2,023 




2,023 


1,745 




1,745 


20.72 




20.72 


88.47 




88.47 




2,915 
4,423 


1*607 


2,915 
6,030 


2,487 
3,820 


Y,4o6 


2,487 
5,280 


18.72 
19.43 


'13/61 


18.72 
17.80 


88.77 
89.58 


'92160 


88.77 




90.39 




3,203 


171 


3,374 


2,648 


144 


2,792 


26.45 


29.16 


26.59 


85.67 


87.56 


85.77 


Glengarry 

Grenville 


1,808 


691 


2,499 


1,516 


686 


2,202 


-28.09 


20.66 


26.03 


55.26 


82.19 


63.02 


1,284 




1,284 


1,079 




1,079 


26.09 




26.09 


86.10 




86.10 


Grey 


4,965 

1,888 


105 


5,070 
1,888 


4.277 
1,073 


95 


4,372 
1,673 


17.16 
17.31 


i7.80 


17.17 
17.31 


90.41 

86.85 


90.19 


90.40 


Haldimand. . . . 


86.85 


Haliburton .... 


1,216 




1,216 


1,029 




1,029 


24.89 




24.89 


83.88 




83.88 


Halton 


1,716 




1,716 


1,497 




1,497 


20.63 




20.63 


88.86 




88.86 


Hastings 


4,658 


170 


4,828 


3,965 


iso 


4,115 


22.85 


20.66 


22.78 


87.58 


88.83 


87.62 




4,287 


189 


4,476 


3,793 


178 


3,971 


17.07 


13.30 


16.91 


90.91 


98.34 


91.23 


Kent .... 


4,781 
3,984 


428 
37 


5,209 
4,021 


4,070 
3,459 


373 
35 


4,473 
3,494 


20.73 
20.78 


21.92 
27.76 


20.84 
20.84 


88.80 
88.99 


88.20 
86.75 


88.76 


Lambton 


88.98 


Lanark 


2,010 


45 


2,055 


1,714 


39 


1,753 


18.76 


31.31 


19.04 


89.77 


84.08 


87.66 




2,647 


25 


2,673 


2,260 


17 


2,277 


22.92 


48.00 


23.17 


87.75 


72.19 


86.97 


Lennox 


1,658 


14 


1,672 


1,409 


11 


1,420 


25.35 


28.36 


25.38 


86.61 


84.54 


85.91 


Lincoln 


2,728 




2,728 


2,461 




2,461 


17.37 




17.37 


90.87 




90.87 


Middlesex .... 


4,746 


71 


4,817 


4,141 


63 


4,204 


20.20 


18.62 


20.17 


90.13 


90.25 


90.14 


Norfolk 


3,664 


125 


3,789 


3,004 


106 


3,110 


24.45 


29.55 


24.62 


86.54 


84.16 


86.46 


Northumb'rl'd 


2,549 


63 


2,612 


2,182 


55 


2,237 


22.94 


19.84 


22.87 


87.54 


89.42 


87.58 


Ontario 


3,448 


60 


3,508 


2,994 


55 


3,049 


19.42 


27.33 


19.58 


89.58 


86.52 


89.53 


Oxford 


3,659 




3,659 


3,178 




3,178 


16.78 




16.78 


90.87 




90.87 


Peel 


2,519 
3,267 


4 
316 


2,523 
3,583 


2,136 
2,765 


3 

297 


2,139 
3,062 


22.14 
15.98 


15.75 
14.47 


22.13 
15.85 


88.19 
91.11 


9L84 
92.52 


88.19 


Perth 


91.23 


Peterborough. . 


2,274 


95 


2,369 


1,931 


74 


2,005 


20.53 


18.02 


20.42 


87.29 


89.24 


87.36 


Prescott 


1,144 


2,145 


3,289 


966 


2,133 


3,099 


21.87 


16.28 


18.22 


87.98 


91.24 


90.12 


Prince Edward 


1,475 




1,475 


1,263 




1,263 


21.97 




21.97 


88.15 




88.15 


Renfrew 


4,104 


655 


4,759 


3,392 


580 


3,972 


26.68 


i9.io 


25.64 


85.39 


89.62 


85.97 


Russell 


738 


2,174 


2,912 


642 


2,061 


2,703 


21.27 


17.09 


18.15 


88.73 


91.77 


91.01 


Simcoe 


5,724 


282 


6,006 


4,819 


182 


5,001 


24.39 


12.32 


23.83 


87.89 


90.84 


87.97 


Stormont 


2,500 


534 


3,034 


1,843 


491 


2,334 


23.16 


16.30 


21.95 


86.08 


91.59 


87.17 


Victoria 


1,975 


63 


2,038 


1,814 


55 


1,869 


21.19 


16.48 


21.04 


88.69 


91.12 


88.76 


Waterloo 


3,446 


431 


3,877 


3,053 


384 


3,437 


12.21 


8.19 


11.76 


93.28 


95.59 


93.54 


Welland 


2,862 




2,862 


2,480 




2,480 


20.03 




20.03 


89.29 




89 . 29 


Wellington .... 


3,417 


128 


3,545 


2,965 


117 


3,082 


19.34 


i2.58 


19.10 


89.67 


93.08 


89.79 


Wentworth.. . . 


3,517 


78 


3,595 


3,152 


72 


3,224 


17.88 


11.04 


17.73 


90.35 


94.14 


90.43 


York 


6,649 


1,953 


8,602 


5.804 


1,778 


7,582 


18.43 


16.10 


17.91 


90.52 


91.49 


90.74 


Totals and 


























Averages. . . . 


127,967 


14,596 


142,563 


109,859 


13,460 


123,319 


20.49 


16.63 


20.09 


87.23 


91.07 


87.65 


(Districts) 
Algoma 


2,750 


88 


2,838 


2,528 


74 


2,602 


24.37 


30.27 


24.56 


89.13 


84.29 


89.04 


Cochrane 


2,064 


3,161 


5,225 


2,258 


2,743 


5,001 


26.15 


18.56 


21.56 


86.81 


88.40 


87.78 


Kenora 


1,083 


31 


1,114 


910 


28 


938 


23.48 


14.19 


23.23 


87.36 


92.46 


87.51 


Manitoulin. . . . 


1,215 




1,215 


1,046 




1,046 


22.68 




22.68 


88.23 




88.23 


Muskoka 


2,083 


85 


2,168 


1,762 


59 


1,821 


24.06 


57.35 


25 . 37 


84.83 


69 . 97 


84.23 


Nipissing 


1,862 


1,521 


3,383 


1,536 


1,326 


2,862 


25.26 


17.26 


21.66 


86.44 


90. 6C 


88.30 


Parry Sound . . 


2,881 




2,881 


2,343 




2,343 


24.66 




24.66 


86.24 




86 . 24 


Rainy River. . . 


1,648 


76 


1,724 


1,359 


65 


1,424 


29.48 


30.08 


29.51 


84.37 


84 . 57 


84.38 


Sudbury 


3,354 


2,061 


5,415 


2,821 


1,790 


4,611 


23.70 


20.25 


22.40 


87.33 


89.10 


88.00 


Temiskaming. . 


2,315 


1,426 


3,741 


1,952 


1,295 


3,247 


29.86 


15.85 


24.51 


83.31 


92.62 


87.22 


Thunder Bay. . 


2,885 


30 


2,915 


2,366 


24 


2,390 


25.49 


18.27 


25.42 


86.08 


89.74 


86.11 


Totals and 


























Averages. . . . 


24,140 


8,479 


32,619 


20,881 


7,404 


28,285 


25.39 


18.88 


23.70 


86.39 


89.51 


87.22 


All Rural . . . 


152,107 


23,075 


175.182 


130,740 


20,864 


151,604 


21.27 


17.46 


20.76 


86 . 87 


90. 50 


87.36 



* Exclusive of large fully graded rural public schools listed below. 
LARGE FULLY GRADED RURAL PUBLIC SCHOOLS 











Average 


Days Lost 


Attend- 








May 


Daily 


per Year 


ance 


County 


Township 


School 


Enrol- 


Attendance 


per pupil 


Efficiency 






vSection 


ment 


for the 
Year 


of May 
Enrol- 
ment 


Per- 
centage 


Brant 




3 
2 


280 
1,029 


356 
934 


14.51 
14.96 


92.38 


Carleton 


Nepean 


92.13 


Essex 


Sandwich, East 


5 

U. 5, 6 

10 


463 
257 
426 


434 
235 
395 


12.79 
20.75 
15.43 


93 . 29 




89.47 


Ontario 


Whitby, East 


92.11 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



117 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 1— ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE, 1936-37 



County 


Township 


School 
Section 


May 
Enrol- 
ment 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 

for the 

Year 


Days Lost 
per Year 
per pupil 
of May 
Enrol- 
ment 


Attend- 
ance 
Efficiency 
Per- 
centage 


Peel 


Toronto 

Monaghan, North 


7 

2 

4 

6 

7 
11 

3 

2 

3 

5 

8 

11 

16 

Twp. 

7 
26 
27 

3 
10 
12 
13 
15 


491 

378 

293 

475 

303 

285 

651 

297 

387 

312 

320 

464 

498 

11,106 

1,926 

2,357 

1,701 

1,436 

882 

814 

420 

557 


436 

328 

267 

428 

286 

251 

620 

275 

341 

259 

272 

441 

444 

10,367 

1,779 

2,172 

1,587 

1,323 

803 

744 

376 

504 


20.31 
18.30 
14.38 
12.39 
13.15 
20.65 
11.73 
6.96 
14.11 
16.33 
18.83 
12.62 
21.41 
12.52 
12.41 
15.15 
12.33 
16.88 
17.16 
15.63 
14.53 
16.27 


90.24 


Peterborough 

Welland 


90.05 
92.50 






93.35 






93.17 




Bertie 


88.89 






94.00 




Thorold 


96.25 


York 




92.39 






90.81 






89.77 






93.60 






88.99 




York 


93.49 




York, East 


93.48 






92 15 






93 59 




York, North 


91 33 






91. 10 






91.87 






92.11 






91.48 








Totals and Averages, 




28,808 


26,555 


14.02 


92 71 








(Districts) 


1 

2 
U. 4 

1 
U. 1 
U. 2 

1 


638 
686 
259 
204 
296 
1,723 
200 


586 
650 
225 
187 
283 
1,516 
176 


12.32 
9.23 
26.69 
13.06 
10.29 
16.32 
22.12 


94 23 






95.20 


Parry Sound 




86 21 


Sudbury 




93 18 


Temiskaming 

Thunder Bay 


Snider and Creighton . . . 
Tech and Lebel 


94.73 
91.19 
88 52 












4,006 


3,623 


14.51 


92 24 




Averages 






Grand Totals and 




32,814 


30,178 


14.08 


92.65 



URBAN SCHOOLS 



Cities 


May Enrolment 


Average Attendance 
for the Year 


Days Lost per Year 

per Pupil of 

May Enrolment 


Attendance 
Efficiency 
Percentage 


Pub- 
lic 


Sep- 
arate 


Total 


Pub- 
lic 


Sep- 
arate 


Total 


Pub- 
lic 


Sep- 
arate 


Total 


Pub- 
lic 


Sep- 
arate 


Total 


(Counties) 

Belleville 

Brantf ord 

Chatham 

Gait 


1,882 
3,827 
2,000 
1,713 
2,545 

21,067 
2,830 
4,079 
9,076 
2,574 
3,775 

10,021 
2,023 
2,823 
3,529 
1,885 
2,417 
2,212 

81,263 
1,906 

12,354 
1,396 


439 

732 
586 
239 
930 

4,618 
880 

1,686 

1,511 

484 

430 

11,288 

165 

1,005 
791 
244 
498 
462 
12,220 

7,094 
153 


2,321 
4,559 
2,586 
1,952 
3,475 

25,685 
3,710 
5,765 

10,587 
3,058 
4,205 

21,309 
2,188 
3,828 
4,320 
2,129 
2,915 
2,674 

93,483 
1,906 

19,448 
1,549 


1,726 
3,640 
1,841 
1,578 
2,344 

19,307 
2,541 
3,860 
8,332 
2,440 
3,500 
9,045 
1,871 
2,598 
3,233 
1,773 
2,272 
2,094 

73,478 
1,743 

11,345 
1,249 


415 

688 

550 

226 

844 

4,403 

684 

1,647 

1,407 

462 

409 

10,534 

153 

934 

709 

230 

462 

412 

11,053 

6,600 
143 


2,141 
4,328 
2,391 
1,804 
3,188 

23,710 
3,225 
5,507 
9,739 
2,902 
3,909 

19,579 
2,024 
3,532 
3,942 
2.003 
2.734 
2,506 

84,531 
1,743 

17,945 
1,392 


15.24 
9.85 
12.60 
7.05 
13.28 
14.26 
19.79 
11.10 
17.18 
10.39 
15.88 
20.21 
14.12 
14.47 
15.10 
9.84 
13.51 
10.95 
15.59 
15.14 
11.66 
16.43 


13.63 

7.81 
18.39 

7.98 
11.54 

8.35 
14.70 

5.31 
13.90 
11.38 
14.81 
12.60 
11.26 
13.22 
15.19 
15.20 
12.11 

7.76 
12.92 

*ii!65 
19.00 


14.94 
9.52 
13.91 
7.16 
12.81 
13.30 
18.58 
9.58 
16.70 
10.54 
15.75 
16.18 
13.90 
14.14 
15.12 
10.44 
12.61 
10.42 
15.33 
15.14 
11.65 
16.76 


91.99 
94.88 
93.60 
96.12 
93.09 
92.56 
91.11 
94.19 
91.34 
94.63 
91.74 
89.70 
92.54 
92.50 
91.99 
94.86 
93.47 
94.37 
91.88 
92.07 
93.77 
91.35 


92.85 
95.81 
90.00 
95.72 
93.76 
95.32 
92. IS 
97.12 
93.06 
94.09 
92.46 
93.20 
94.01 
93.03 
91.81 
92.13 
93.70 
95.59 
92.66 

'93i82 
89.97 


92.16 
95.03 
92.74 
96.10 
93.26 
93.06 
91.83 
95.05 
91.59 
94.55 
91.82 
91.54 
92.77 
92.64 
91.96 
94.55 
93.52 
94.61 
91.98 
92.07 
93.79 
91.21 


Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

Kitchener 

London 

Niagara Falls. . 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound.. . 
Peterborough. . 
St. Catharines. 
St. Thomas. . . 

Sarnia 

Stratford 

Toronto 

Welland 

Windsor 

Woodstock. . . . 


Totals and 
Averages 


177,197 


46,455 


223,652 


161,810 


42,965 


204,775 


14.91 


12.19 


14.35 


92.27 


93.51 


92.53 


(Districts) 
Fort William . . 

North Bay 

Port Arthur. . . 
Sault vSte. 

Marie 

Sudbury 


3,291 
1,512 
2,412 

3,011 

1,756 


1,204 

1,478 

704 

1,427 
1,528 


4,495 
2,990 
3,116 

4,438 
3,284 


3,033 
1,404 
2,221 

2,698 
1,539 


1,091 

1,338 

631 

1,270 

1,308 


4,124 
2,742 
2,852 

3,968 

2,847 


11.82 
13.79 
15.61 

18.44 
22.21 


15.85 
10.66 
13.22 

16.26 
11.54 


12.90 
12.40 
15.07 

17.74 
16.98 


93.77 
92.84 
92.50 

90.40 

88.38 


91.57 
94.60 
92.76 

91.23 
93.37 


93.18 
93.44 

92.57 

90.66 
90.73 


Totals and 
Averages 


11,982 


6,341 


18,323 


10,895 


5,638 


16,533 


15.95 


10.59 


15.19 


91.79 


92.52 


92 . 03 


All Cities. . . 


189,179 


52,796 


241,975 


172,705 


48,603 


221,308 


14.98 


12.01 


14.41 


92.24 


93.41 


<>2.49 



118 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 1— ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE, 1936-37 











Average Attendance 


Days Lost per Year 


Attendance 




May Enrolment 


for the Year 


per Pupil of 


Efficiency 
















May Enrolment 


Percentage 




Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




(Counties) 


























Alexandria. . . . 


34 


458 


492 


27 


423 


450 


17.32 


14.28 


14.49 


90.19 


92.47 


92.31 


Alliston 


248 




248 


<?3( 




230 


13.76 




13.76 


92.85 




92.85 


Almonte 


269 


106 


375 


251 


10( 


351 


13.19 


7.87 


11.97 


93.11 


95.80 


93.74 


Amherstburg. . 


207 


345 


552 


194 


311 


505 


9.35 


8.04 


8.74 


95. 1( 


95.34 


95.25 


Arnprior 


410 


382 


792 


374 


344 


718 


16.20 


13.46 


14.88 


91.58 


92.68 


92.10 


Aurora '. 


413 




413 


386 




386 


16.26 




16.26 


91.74 




91.74 


Ayltner 


387 




387 


344 




344 


13.21 




13.21 


92.87 




92.87 


Earrie 


1,180 


122 


1,302 


987 


110 


1,097 


17.46 


16.14 


17.34 


90.25 


91.39 


90.36 


Blenheim 


312 


28 


340 


285 


20 


305 


12.16 


17. 6C 


12.61 


93.55 


88.65 


93.21 


Both well 


81 




81 


77 




77 


13.92 




13.92 


93. 0C 




93.00 


Bowmanville. . 


549 




549 


504 




504 


13.21 




13.21 


93. OS 




93.03 


Brampton 


729 




729 


,67C 




670 


14.44 




14.44 


92.53 




92.53 


Brock ville 


1,249 


232 


1,481 


1 111 


21£ 


1,330 


14.64 


15.57 


14.77 


92.55 


92.01 


92.40 


Burlington. . . . 


511 




511 


467 




467 


12.94 




12.94 


91.04 




91.04 


Campbellford. . 


432 


77 


509 


378 


70 


448 


21.24 


15.80 


20.43 


88.82 


91.60 


89.25 


Carleton Place. 


662 




662 


611 




611 


14.39 




14.39 


92.58 




92.58 


Chesley 


232 




232 


216 




216 


10.22 




10.22 


94.63 




94.63 


Clinton 


212 




212 


198 




198 


11.73 




11.73 


93.90 




93.90 


Cobourg 


690 


197 


887 


613 


180 


793 


15.18 


13.46 


14.80 


92.17 


92.58 


92.08 


Collingwood. . . 


827 


33 


860 


726 


26 


752 


20.76 


28.69 


21.06 


89.06 


83.92 


88.54 


Cornwall 


894 


2,557 


3,451 


811 


2,422 


3,233 


16.36 


16.17 


16.22 


91.46 


91.77 


91.69 


Deseronto. . . . 


214 




214 


189 




189 


22.93 




22.93 


88.15 




88.15 


Dresden 


212 




212 


196 




196 


18.59 




18.59 


90.57 




90.57 


Dundas 


636 


109 


745 


561 


102 


663 


13.51 


12.12 


13.43 


92.95 


93.24 


92.69 


Dunnville 


476 




476 


444 




444 


12.01 




12.01 


93.74 




93.74 


Durham 


264 




264 


233 




233 


11.50 




11.50 


93.60 




93.60 


Eastview 


227 


1,222 


1,449 


196 


1,173 


1,369 


23.17 


7.54 


9.92 


83.99 


95.93 


94.67 


Elmira 


34.3 




343 


323 




323 


7.71 




7.71 


95.93 




95.93 


Essex 


296 


38 


334 


268 


33 


301 


14.40 


18.18 


14.72 


92.42 


90.85 


92.40 


Forest 


181 




181 


161 




161 


16.37 




16.37 


91.34 




91.34 


Fort Erie 


959 




959 


876 




876 


18.97 




18.97 


90.27 




90.27 


Gananoque. . . . 


403 


135 


538 


362 


125 


487 


19.80 


17.10 


19.25 


91.08 


90.89 


90.05 


Georgetown. . . 


314 




314 


271 




271 


16.36 




16.36 


90.70 




90.70 


Goderich 


567 


66 


633 


523 


60 


583 


15.22 


16.40 


15.38 


92.14 


90.55 


91.99 


Grimsby 


295 




295 


277 




277 


15.77 




15.77 


93.38 




93.38 


Hanover 


452 


77 


529 


428 


66 


494 


12.62 


9.87 


12.70 


93.54 


94.36 


93.65 


Harriston 


192 




192 


185 




185 


10.83 




10.83 


94.12 




94.12 


Harrow 


188 




188 


174 




174 


11.90 




11.90 


93.76 




93.76 


Hawkesbury.. . 


128 


1,230 


1,358 


118 


1,163 


1,281 


17.14 


10.55 


11.17 


92.82 


94.27 


93.95 


Hespeler 


485 


31 


516 


446 


29 


475 


8.66 


10.74 


8.79 


95.35 


94.35 


95.28 


Ingersoll 


730 


84 


814 


662 


73 


735 


15.04 


16.54 


15.20 


91.98 


92.11 


91.87 




355 




355 
413 


332 
360 




332 
360 


12.08 
22.74 




12.08 
22.74 


93.71 

88.11 




93 71 


Kingsville 


413 




88.11 


La Salle 


37 


171 


208 


25 


164 


189 


27.24 


11.47 


14.28 


82.86 


94.07 


92.38 


Leamington. . . 


767 


91 


858 


732 


88 


820 


10.75 


19.13 


11.41 


94.48 


90.66 


94.17 


Leaside 


338 




338 


296 




296 


15.92 




15.92 


91.40 




91.40 


Lindsay 


957 


185 


1,142 


868 


167 


1,035 


14.87 


18.11 


15.11 


92.17 


91.29 


92.03 


Listowel 


335 




335 


310 




310 


13.23 




13.23 


93.10 




93.10 


Meaford 


317 




317 


297 




297 


14.62 




14.62 


92.52 




92.52 


Merritton 


337 


76 


413 


300 


69 


369 


13.98 


14.86 


14.15 


92.47 


92.16 


92.41 


Midland 


798 


419 


1,217 


749 


402 


1,151 


15.20 


7.61 


12.90 


92.03 


94.75 


93.37 


Milton 


273 




273 


236 




236 


20.56 




20.56 


88.34 




88.34 


Mimico 


1,077 


309 


1,386 


1,005 


282 


1,287 


11.07 


13.11 


11.52 


94.24 


90.08 


93.97 


Mitchell 


221 




221 


204 




204 


13.70 




13.70 


92.87 




92.87 


Mount Forest. 


187 


47 


234 


178 


44 


222 


8.88 


9.48 


9.01 


95.12 


94.94 


95.31 


Napanee 


449 




449 


384 




384 


21.51 




21.51 


88.49 




88.49 


Newmarket. . . 


526 


49 


575 


499 


45 


544 


12.43 


11.59 


12.40 


93.49 


93.19 


93.52 


New Toronto. . 


1,134 




1,134 


1,048 




1,048 


15.09 




15.09 


92.06 




92.06 


Niagara 


183 




183 


163 




163 


19.80 




19.80 


89.64 




89.64 


Oakville 


506 


49 


555 


474 


45 


519 


15.72 


13.19 


17.51 


90.97 


93.12 


91.15 


Orangeville... . 


329 




329 


300 




300 


14.44 




14.44 


91.93 




91.93 


Orillia 


1,230 


180 


1,410 


1,147 


163 


1,310 


14.44 


24.51 


15.23 


92.41 


87.49 


92.16 


Palmerston... . 


198 




198 


185 




185 


7.05 




7.05 


96.22 




96.22 




501 
131 


51 

21 


552 
152 


473 
119 


47 
20 


520 
139 


8.11 
16.48 


8.75 
34.00 


8.17 
18.91 


95.73 
91.43 


95.40 
84.50 


95 70 


Parkhill 


90.36 


Pembroke 


931 


940 


1,871 


866 


873 


1,739 


13.34 


11.25 


12.29 


93.09 


93.99 


93.54 


Penetangtii- 


























shene 


900 




900 


806 




806 


17.79 




17.79 


90.49 




90.49 


Perth 


431 
369 


153 


584 
369 


401 
354 


142 


543 
354 


15.25 
13.14 


12.46 


14.42 
13.14 


92.52 
93.38 


93.43 


92.53 


Petrolia 


93.38 


Picton 


453 


52 


505 


422 


47 


469 


13.92 


15.15 


15.07 


92.22 


91.96 


92.20 


Port Colborne. 


1,398 




1,398 


1,290 




1,290 


14.49 




14.49 


92.47 




92.47 


Port Hope 


649 




649 


606 




606 


11.30 




11.30 


94.10 




94.10 


Prescott 


334 


93 


427 


299 


86 


385 


21.96 


11.57 


19.94 


88.74 


93.32 


89.71 


Preston 


705 


311 


1,016 


635 


301 


936 


8.48 


7.40 


8.16 


95.18 


96.11 


95.58 


Renfrew 


430 


615 


i.045 


405 


545 


950 


14.18 


5.17 


8.88 


92.57 


97.02 


95.12 


Ridgetown. . . . 


273 




273 


253 




253 


14.37 




14.37 


92.56 




92.56 


Riverside 


565 


506 


1,071 


547 


478 


1,025 


13.16 


11.40 


12.32 


93.28 


94.12 


93.67 


Rockland 


21 


496 


517 


19 


490 


509 


34.45 


14.49 


15.30 


84.06 


92.84 


92.46 


St. Mary's 


415 


53 


468 


383 


47 


430 


12.60 


18.33 


13.25 


93.43 


90.33 


93.08 


Seaforth 


202 


51 


253 


181 


49 


230 


12.91 


10.91 


12.50| 


91.97 


94.341 


93.31 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



119 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 1— ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE, 1936-37 



Towns 



(Counties) 



Simcoe 

Smith's Falls. . 

Southampton. . 

Stayner 

Strathroy 

Tecumseh 

Thornbury. . . . 

Thorold 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg. . . 

Trenton 

Uxbridge 

Vankleek Hill . 

Walkerton 

Wallaceburg. . . 

Waterloo 

Weston 

Whitby 

Wiarton 

Wingham 

Totals and 
Averages. . . . 

(Districts) 

Bala 

Blind River. . . 

Bonfield 

Bracebridge. . . 
Bruce Mines. . 
Cache Bay 

Capreol 

Charlton 

Chelmsford . . . 

Cobalt 

Cochrane 

Coniston 

Copper Cliff. . . 

Dryden 

Englehart 

Fort Frances . . 
Frood Mine . . . 

Gore Bay 

Gravenhurst. . . 
Haileybury. . . . 

Hearst 

Huntsville . . . . 
Iroquois Falls. . 
Kapuskasing. . 

Kearney 

Keewatin 

Kenora 

Latchford 

Little Current . 

Massey 

Matheson 

Mattawa 

Nesterville. . . . 
New Liskeard. 
Parry Sound . . 

Powassan 

Rainy River. . . 
Sioux Lookout. 
Smooth Rock 

Falls 

Sturgeon Falls. 

Thessalon 

Timmins 

Trout Creek. . . 
Webbwood .... 

Totals and 

Averages.. . . 

All Towns.. . 

Villages 
(Counties) 

Acton 

Ailsa Craig 

Alvinston 

Arkona 

Arthur 

Athens. , 

Ayr. 



May Enrolment 



Pub- 
lic 



915 
944 
169 
127 
418 
74 
114 
546 
144 
539 
937 
252 
63 
195 
583 
1,047 
664 
457 
286 
240 



46,479 



71 
209 



439 

103 

71 

380 



407 
401 

94 
527 
352 
285 
976 

22 
127 
404 
247 

93 
475 
210 
374 

58 

232 

1,087 

86 
126 

84 
139 

37 

60 
451 
645 
175 
159 
315 

121 
208 
292 
2,090 
81 
125 



12,927 



59,406 



284 
60 
94 
78 
124 
109 
93 



Sep- 
arate 



171 



552 



393 

271 



208 



217 
203 
482 
427 
219 
51 



15,641 



377 

178 



149 



28 
264 
322 
301 

386 



333 



220 
193 



243 



23 

44 

262 



46 
102 



354 

"si 




7,695 



Total 



915 
1,115 
169 
127 
418 
626 
114 
939 
415 
539 
1,145 
252 
280 
398 
1,065 
1,474 
883 
508 
286 
240 



62,120 



71 
586 
178 
439 
103 
220 
380 
117 
264 
729 
702 
480 
527 
352 
285 
1,309 

22 
127 
404 
467 
286 
475 
453 
374 

81 

276 

1,349 

86 
172 
186 
139 
391 

60 
532 
645 
175 
201 
452 

319 
1,307 

292 

4,403 

81 

125 



20,622 



23,336 82,742 



70 



284 
60 
94 
78 
194 
109 
93 



Average Attendance 
for the Year 



Pub- 
lic 



800 
876 
157 
113 
381 

57 
104 
519 
129 
515 
906 
235 

56 
173 
543 
983 
606 
427 
274 
225 



42,583 



64 
175 



395 
95 
59 

360 
70 



364 
379 

88 
487 
321 
266 
888 

19 
102 
368 
212 

89 
467 
197 
355 

56 
216 
994 

75 
112 

72 
106 

32 

53 
404 
556 
148 
148 
312 

116 
181 
278 
2,099 
71 
106 



11,955 



54,538 



264 
52 
86 
71 

115 
98 
85 



Sep- 
arate 



162 



508 



361 
250 



199 



199 
199 
392 
409 
192 
47 



14,561 



353 
152 



129 



19 
235 
308 
275 
365 



299 



192 
150 



236 



23 

38 

231 



37 



307 
*74 




2,195 



6,991 



21,552 



70 



Total 



800 
1,038 
157 
113 
381 
565 
104 
880 
379 
515 
1,105 
235 
255 
372 
935 
1,392 
798 
474 
274 
225 



57,144 



64 
528 
152 
395 

95 
188 
360 

89 
235 
672 
654 
453 
487 
321 
266 
1,187 

19 
102 
368 
404 
239 
467 
433 
355 

79 

254 

1,225 

75 
149 
160 
106 
339 

53 
478 
556 
148 
186 
431 

296| 
1,129 

278 

4,294 

71 

106 



18,946 



76,090 



264 
52 
86 
71 

185 
98 
*5 



Days Lost per _ 
per Pupil of 
May Enrolm 



Year 
nt 



Pub- 
lic 



12.65 
13.98 
11.35 
15.85 
14.11 
15.71 
11.76 
10.97 
13.47 
13.94 
10.23 
12.71 
14.23 
19.17 
14.45 
8.31 
15.52 
14.77 
11.77 
10.36 



14.39 



21.36 
13.45 



17.10 
14.31 
16.76 
15.89 
21.09 



18.77 
10.86 
11.27 
16.56 
18.60 
11.40 
13.11 
16.52 
12.69 
15.74 
21.74 

9.32 
16.09 
14.20 
11.26 

9.46 
10.36 
14.40 
23.42 
22.40 
22.12 
21.01 
30.70 
19.32 
16.56 
16.44 
20.40 
18.50 
18.87 

8.77 
24.17 
21.92 

9.70 
21.62 
28.45 



15.37 



14.60 



12.88 
15.65 
14.52 
12.96 
17.55 
25.58 
8.86 



Sep- 
arate 



12.13 



12.31 



9.83 
12.75 



19.11 



13.31 
10.23 
17.46 
8.77 
14.33 
12.37 



12.46 



16.19 
9.00 



18.77 



25 . 50 

7.87 

11.30 

15.00 

9. 



9.81 



15.02 
12.00 



15 



12.00 
12.25 
10.95 



11.33 
20.42 



21.13 
i4.'90 



14.55 
15.15 



13.94 
16.00 



9.88 



12.59 



12.50 



11.82 



Total 



12.65 
13.69 
11.35 
15.85 
14.11 
12.72 
11.76 
10.49 
13.00 
13.94 
12.09 
12.71 
13.52 
14. 
15.82 
8.44 
15.22 
14.53 
11.77 
10.36 

13.90 



21.36 
15.21 

9.00 
17.10 
14.31 
18.45 
15.89 
21.94 

7.87 
15.47 
14.12 
10.15 
16.56 
18.60 
11.40 
12.27 
16.52 
12.69 
15.74 
18.58 
11.75 
16.09 

9.88 
11.26 
10.21 
10.66 
13.75 
23.42 
19.45 
21.24 
21.01 
22.08 
19.32 
16.32 
16.44 
20.40 
17.71 
17.74 

12.91 
17.39 
21.92 
9.79 
21.62 
28 . 45 



14.31 



14.00 



12.88 
1 5 . 65 
14.52 
12.96 
16.59 
25.58 
8.86 



Attendance 
Efficiency 
Percentage 



Pub- 
lic 



93.02 
92.79 
94.08 
91.56 
91.30 
90.01 
93.74 
94.36 
92.80 
92.96 
94.07 
93.46 
92.42 
89.92 
93.15 
95.62 
91.95 
92.47 
94.02 
95.67 



92.46 



88.77 
92.88 



91.09 
92.62 
90.14 
91.99 

87.86 

90ii6 

94.40 

94.12 

91.49 

90.50 

92.20 

93.01 

91.10 

92.45 

91.75 

88.21 

95.19 

91.40 

92.73 

94.20 

95.16 

94.57 

92.44 

87. 

88.54 

88.1 

87.59 

83. 

89.88 

91.26 

90.99 

88. 

90.65 

90.17 

95 . 46 
87.44 
89.09 
94.87 
88.73 
83.52 



92.26 



92.42 



92.72 
91.52 
92.45 
93.14 
90.40 
86.54 
95.22 



Sep- 
arate 



93.72 



93.42 



94.66 
93.20 



92.74 



92.94 
94.38 
89.96 
95.39 
92.39 
93.48 



93.40 



91.68 
94.70 



89.81 



84.17 
95.55 
94.15 
91.90 
94.79 





94 


59 




91 
92 

96 


54 
41 

77 


91 
93 
93 


94 
17 
84 


93 

88 


17 

82 


88 


42 


92 


12 



92.21 
91.72 



92.31 
91.05 



94.81 



93.21 



93.34 



94 . 25 



120 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 1— ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE, 1936-37 



— 






Days Lost per Year 


Attendance 




May Enrolment 


Average Attendance 


per Pupil of 


Efficiency 






for the Year 


May Enrolment 


Percentage 


Villages 




























Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


vSep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 




lic ( 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




(Counties) 

Bancroft 

Barry's Bay... 
Bath 


237 




237 


208 




208 


23.50 




23.50 


87.78 




87.78 


28 


250 


278 


23 


237 


260 


29.17 


10.13 


12.05 


84.67 


94.51 


93.50 


54 
184 




54 
184 


41 
170 




41 
170 


16.07 
18.33 




16.07 
18.33 


90.30 
90.68 




90.30 


Beamsville. . . . 


90.68 


148 




148 


128 




128 


17.25 




17.25 


90.03 




90.03 




102 




102 


92 




92 


13.34 




13.34 


92.93 




92.93 




17 


178 


195 


12 


160 


172 


13.05 


10.31 


10.62 


91.18 


94.56 


94.10 




84 




84 


80 




80 


19.61 




19.61 


89.99 




89.99 


Blyth 

Bobcaygeon. . . 


87 




87 


68 




68 


16.62 




16.62 


90.09 




90.09 


149 




149 


138 




138 


15.44 




15.44 


91.78 




91.78 


80 




80 


67 




67 


12.35 




12.35 


92.91 




92.91 




131 




131 


119 




119 


13.34 




13.34 


92.95 




92.95 




101 




101 


94 




94 


22.03 




22.03 


89.15 




89.15 


Brighton 


215 




215 


197 




197 


18.86 




18.86 


90.38 




90.38 


92 




92 


81 




81 


12.36 




12.36 


93.18 




93.18 




190 




190 


184 




184 


8.13 




8.13 


95.69 




95.69 


Cannington . . . 


102 




102 


88 




88 


13.83 




13.83 


92.58 




92.58 


274 




274 


247 




247 


10.88 




10.88 


94.13 




94.13 






264 


264 
109 


"ioi 


266 


266 
131 


'i2."47 


7.00 


7.00 
12.47 


93!5i 


96.66 


96.00 


Cayuga 


109 


93.51 


47 




47 


42 




42 


10.79 




10.79 


94.14 




94.14 




145 


43 


188 


133 


40 


173 


12.90 


9.27 


12.10 


93.20 


95. i6 


93.63 


Chippawa 

Clifford 


183 




183 


164 




164 


11.83 




11.83 


92.54 




92.54 


74 




74 


68 




68 


9.07 




9.07 


95.20 




95.20 


Cobden . . 


95 




95 


87 




87 


18.50 




18.50 


90.60 




90.60 




167 




167 


148 




148 


17.17 




17.17 


94.07 




94.07 




153 




153 


138 




138 


16.80 




16.80 


91.23 




91.23 


Courtright .... 


65 




65 


53 




53 


22.49 




22.49 


87.60 




87.60 


83 




83 


64 




64 


18.45 




18.45 


89.10 




89.10 


Delhi 


282 
59 




282 
59 


252 
52 




252 
52 


19.30 
16.25 




19.30 
16.25 


89.94 
91.36 




89 . 94 




91.35 




73 




73 


68 




68 


13.57 




13.57 


93.02 




93.02 




102 




102 


93 




93 


11.58 




11.58 


93.81 




93.81 




122 




122 


112 




112 


14.96 




14.96 


92.26 




92.26 


Eganville 


103 


133 


236 


93 


i05 


198 


18.49 


9.56 


13.45 


90.42 


93.87 


92.29 


176 
59 


26 


202 
59 


157 
54 


24 


181 
54 


13.41 
14.68 


13.34 


13.40 
14.68 


92.79 
92.35 


93.19 


92.85 




92.35 




41 




41 


42 




42 


12.07 




12.07 


94.35 




94.35 


Erin 


72 
218 




72 

218 


64 
199 




64 
199 


24.70 
12.25 




24.70 
12.25 


87.50 
93.39 




87 . 50 




93.39 




135 




135 


122 




122 


12.95 




12.95 


88.71 




88.71 


Fergus 


400 


21 


421 


382 


17 


399 


9.13 


15.05 


9.42 


95.28 


9L43 


95.08 


94 




94 


73 




73 


15.00 




15.00 


90.45 




90.45 




74 




74 


65 




65 


10.20 




10.20 


94.21 




94.21 


Fonthill 


163 




163 


147 




147 


18.39 




18.39 


90.47 




90.47 


Forest Hill 


1,153 


60 


1,213 


995 


51 


1,046 


17.55 


22.53 


17.74 


91.54 


88.38 


90.28 




161 




161 


146 




146 


12.96 




12.96 


93.11 




93.11 




155 




155 


129 




129 


15.91 




15.91 


91.17 




91.17 


Grand Valley. . 


87 




87 


79 




79 


6.35 




6.35 


96.55 




96.55 


Hagersville. . . . 
Hastings 


238 




238 


223 




223 


8.12 




8.12 


95.71 




95.71 


109 


64 


173 


101 


57 


158 


18.26 


21.86 


19.59 


90.51 


88.66 


89.82 


195 




195 


177 




177 


18.69 




18.69 


90.36 




90.36 




86 




86 


78 




78 


15.19 




15.19 


91.99 




91.99 




67 




67 


61 




61 


20.75 




20.75 


89.51 




89.51 




523 




523 


478 




478 


16.46 




16.46 


91.45 




91.45 


Iroquois 

Jarvis. 


118 




118 


106 




106 


12.25 




12.25 


93.41 




93.41 


89 




89 


58 




58 


7.34 




7.34 


95.87 




95.87 


195 




195 


160 




160 


13.47 




13.47 


92.17 




92.17 


Killaloe 


49 


106 


155 


47 


95 


142 


16.93 


11.08 


13.44 


91.77 


93.43 


92.86 




269 




269 


169 




169 


16.70 




16.70 


91.30 




91.30 




112 




112 


99 




99 


14.59 




14.59 


92.13 




92.13 




53 


129 


182 


42 


110 


152 


4.92 


18.46 


18.22 


89.50 


SO. 84 


89.75 




85 




85 


77 




77 


18.89 




18.89 


90.31 




90.31 


Long Branch. . 


843 




843 


760 




760 


17.40 




17.40 


90.96 




90.96 


L'Orignal 


194 




194 


169 




169 


12.22 




12.22 


93.12 




93. 12 


104 




104 


93 




93 


15.52 




15.52 


92.36 




92.36 




134 




134 


127 




127 


10.48 




10.48 


94.54 




94 . 54 




219 




219 


207 




207 


12.65 




12.65 


93.52 




93.52 




112 




112 


103 




103 


12.85 




12.85 


93.16 




93.16 




131 




131 


116 




116 


8.70 




8.70 


95.17 




95.17 




190 


44 


234 


168 


44 


212 


13.85 


11.70 


13.45 


92.52 


94.00 


92 . 85 


Maxville 


125 




125 


103 




103 


13.Q7 




13.97 


88.04 




88.04 




127 




127 


115 




115 


15.24 




15.24 


91.97 




91.97 


Mildmay 


66 


105 


171 


55 


106 


161 


9.61 


5.53 


7.10 


94.37 


97.18 


96. 14 


Millbrook 


111 




111 


99 




99 


18.16 




18.16 


90.02 




90.02 




132 




132 


122 




122 


13.20 




13.20 


92.80 




92.80 


Morrisburg. . . . 


231 




231 


212 




212 


10.59 




10.59 


94.21 




94.21 




94 




94 


94 




94 


10.80 




10.80 


94.73 




94.73 




72 




72 


61 




61 


16.60 




16.60 


90.79 




90.79 


Newburgh .... 


62 




62 


61 




61 


25.53 




25.53 


88.30 




88 . 30 


Newbury 


75 




75 


64 


64 


14.31 


14.31 


92.16 


yz. jo 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



121 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 1— ENROLMENT AND ATTENDANCE, 1936-37 









Days Lost per Year 


Attendance 




May Enrolment 


Average Attendance 
for the Year 


per Pupil of 


Efficiency 


Villages 




May Enrolment 


Percentage 




























Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 


Pub- 


Sep- 


Total 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




lic 


arate 




(Counties) 


























Newcastle . . . 


77 




77 


72 




72 


22.31 




22.31 


89.11 




89.11 


New Hamburg 


203 




209 


20< 




203 


7.26 




7.26 


96.26 




96.26 


Norwich 


177 




177 


165 




163 


14.76 




14.76 


92.33 




92.33 


Norwood .... 


141 




141 


127 




127 


9.72 




9.72 


94.70 




94.70 


Oil Springs. . . . 


64 




64 


5? 




58 


17.51 




17.51 


90.91 




90.91 


Omemee 


97 




97 


89 




89 


11.4c 




11.43 


93.95 




93.95 


Paisley 


117 




117 


102 




102 


17.82 




17.82 


90.45 




90.45 


Point Edward . 


188 




188 


178 




178 


17.01 




17.01 


91.56 




91.56 


Port Credit . . . 


306 




306 


277 




277 


15.67 




15.67 


91.82 




91.82 


Port Dalhousie 


195 


73 


266 


185 


66 


251 


15.54 


10.85 


14.25 


92.19 


94.38 


92.69 


Port Dover. . . 


284 




284 


245 




245 


16.61 




16.61 


90.75 




90.75 


Port Elgin 


171 




171 


159 




159 


14.46 




14.46 


92.23 




92.23 


Port McNicol. 


225 




225 


213 




213 


11. 5C 




11,50 


94.06 




94.06 


Port Perry 


158 




158 


155 




155 


5.94 




5.94 


96.98 




96.98 


Port Rowan . . . 


86 




86 


8C 




80 


20.36 




20.36 


89.82 




89.82 


Port Stanley . . 


107 




107 


100 




100 


23.47 




23.47 


88.43 




88.43 


Portsmouth. . . 


104 


48 


152 


87 


44 


131 


20.53 


11.31 


17.62 


88.67 


93.91 


90.35 


Richmond .... 


74 




74 


66 




66 


15.00 




15.00 


92.07 




92.07 


Richmond Hill 


266 




266 


245 




245 


16.11 




16.11 


91.71 




91.71 


Ripley 

Rockcliffe 


40 




40 


35 




35 


21 33 




21 33 


88 99 




88.99 


126 




126 


99 




99 


25.57 




25.57 


85^43 




85.43 


Rodney 


116 




116 


100 




100 


13.78 




13.78 


92.41 




92.41 


St. Clair Beach 


47 




47 


36 




36 


21.12 




21.12 


87.69 




87.69 


Shallow Lake. . 


75 




75 


64 




64 


12.05 




12.05 


93.31 




93.31 


Shelburne 


128 




128 


113 




113 


21.76 




21.76 


88.68 




88.68 


Springfield .... 


82 




82 


73 




73 


10.03 




10.03 


94.52 




94.52 


Stirling 


153 




153 


140 




140 


17.15 




17.15 


91.17 




91.17 


Stonev Creek. . 


242 




242 


209 




209 


13.60 




13.60 


92.48 




92.48 


Stouffville 


172 




172 


156 




156 


11.40 




11.40 


93.11 




93.11 


Streetsville 


144 




144 


134 




134 


10.96 




10.96 


93.72 




93.72 


Sutton 


226 




226 


192 




192 


20.61 




20.61 


88.91 




88.91 


vSwansea 


646 


35 


681 


595 


30 


625 


16.05 


15.00 


16.04 


91.76 


91.29 


91.74 




61 
132 




61 
132 


53 




53 
.124 


7.02 
9.33 




7.02 
9.33 


96.02 
95.11 




96.02 


Tavistock 


124 




95.11 


Teeswater 


85 


37 


122 


79 


30 


109 


10.35 


13.00 


11.36 


94.56 


92.08 


93.85 


Thamesville. . . 


149 




149 


129 




129 


10.78 




10.78 


93.77 




93.77 


Thedf ord 


94 




94 


81 




81 


14.76 




14.76 


91.96 




91.96 


Tiverton 


41 




41 


38 




38 


7.41 




7.41 


96.08 




96.08 


Tottenham. . . 


82 




82 


73 




73 


14.45 




14.45 


92.25 




92.25 


Tweed 


185 


104 


289 


171 


102 


273 


17.34 


i2.09 


16.39 


89.18 


92.73 


90.01 


Victoria 


























Harbour. . . . 


221 




221 


209 




209 


17.88 




17.88 


90.93 




90.93 


Vienna . 


62 




62 


43 




43 


24.23 




24.23 


84.96 




84.96 


Wardsville .... 


49 




49 


37 




37 


42.29 




42.29 


78.05 




78.05 


Waterdown . . . 


142 




142 


130 




130 


9.69 




9.69 


94.82 




94.82 


Waterford .... 


187 




187 


180 




180 


17.01 




17.01 


91.62 




91.62 


Watford 


139 




139 


126 




126 


15.48 




15.48 


91.90 




91.90 


Wellington .... 


242 




242 


211 




211 


16.90 




16.90 


94.70 




94.70 


West Lome . . . 


158 




158 


139 




139 


11.72 




11.72 


93.57 




93.57 


Westport 


68 


87 


155 


67 


77 


144 


14.55 


12.54 


13.41 


92.94 


92.99 


92.97 


Wheatley 


141 




141 


123 




123 


12.96 




12.96 


92.90 




92.90 


Winchester. . . . 


181 




181 


175 




175 


11.60 




11.60 


94.15 




94.15 


Woodbridge. . . 


177 




177 


146 




146 


13.04 




13.04 


92.48 




92.48 


Woodville 


50 




50 


46 




46 


18.66 




18.66 


90.52 




90.52 


Wyoming 


65 




65 


62 




62 


16.48 




16.48 


91.86 




91.86 




























Averages... . 


21,129 


1,773 


22,902 


18,927 


1,731 


20,658 


15.22 


5.49 


14.17 


91.67 


93.71 


91.84 


(Districts) 


























Burk's Falls.. . 


167 




167 


159 




159 


12.43 




12.43 


93.70 




93.70 


Hilton Beach. . 


55 




55 


52 




52 

77 


11.11 
18.00 




11.11 
18.00 


94.31 
90.54 




94 31 


Port Carling. . . 


86 




86 


77 








90.54 


Port Sydney. . 


27 




27 


24 




24 


12.63 




12.63 


93 . 23 




93.23 


Rosseau 


41 




41 


35 




35 


26.92 




26.92 


85.42 




85.42 


South River . . . 


175 




175 


161 




161 


14.22 




14.22 


92.61 




92.61 


Sundridge 


143 




143 


129 




129 


20.28 




20.28 


89.54 




89.54 


Thornloe 


17 


30 


47 


16 


23 


39 


15.32 


13.07 


13.82 


91.83 


92.16 


91.97 


Windermere. . . 


19 




19 


15 




15 


26.39 




26.39 


85.95 




85.95 


Totals and 


























Averages .... 


730 


30 


760 


668 


23 


691 


16.21 


13.07 


16.08 


91.62 


92.06 


91.97 


All Villages. . 


21,859 


1,803 


23,662 


19,595 


1,754 


21,349 


15.25 


5.62 


14.52 


91.66 


93.68 


91.83 


All Urban... 


270,444 


77,935 


348,005 


246,838 


71,909 


318,392 


14.92 


12.21 


14.32 


92.24 


93.40 


92.49 


Grand Totals 


455,365 


101,010 


556,375 


407,756 


92,773 


499,729 


16.98 


13.42 


16.34 


90.52 


92.73 


90.91 


Year 








3,246 


1,228 


3,674 


1 97 




1.77 


.68 


.49 


64 
















for Year. . 


5,420 


142 


5,562 










.89 











22 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 2-PERGENTAGE SUMMARY OF ATTENDANCE EFFICIENCY BY 

VARIOUS PERIODS OF THE SCHOOL YEAR, 1936-37 





Public Schools 


Separate Schools 


Public and Separate Schools 




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Rural Schools 


8.97 


9.03 


12.21 


65.97 


3.82 


6.79 


7.86 


13.02 


64.78 


7.55 


8.73 


8.90 


12.30 


65.83 


4.24 


Urban " 


5.39 


5.10 


8.69 


76.82 


4.00 


4.09 


4.67 


8.84 


73.62 


8.78 


5.10 


5.01 


8.72 


76.12 


5.05 


City 


5.39 


5.00 


8.63 


77.22 


3.76 


4.33 


4.62 


8.37 


74.15 


8.53 


5.16 


4.92 


8.58 


76.56 


4.78 


Town " 


5.21 


4.95 


8.92 


75.90 


5.02 


3.63 


4.79 


10.18 


73.06 


8.34 


4.78 


4.91 


9.26 


75.13 


5.92 


Village " 


5.85 


6.38 


8.51 


75.96 


3.30 


3.08 


4.50 


6.17 


67.13 


19.12 


5.60 


6.21 


8.30 


75.17 


4.72 


All 


6.87 


6.73 


10.14 


72.32 


3.94 


4.73 


5.44 


9.84 


71.51 


8.48 


6.49 


6.50 10.09 


72.18 


4.74 



TABLE 3— ADMISSIONS, TRANSFERS, RETIREMENTS, EXEMPTIONS DURING 

THE SCHOOL YEAR, 1936-37 





Public Schools 


Separate Schools 


Both 




Rural 


Urban 


Total 


Rural 


Urban 


Total 




22,383 
1,205 


33,198 
2,469 


55,581 
3,674 


3.003 
194 


9,539 
624 


12,542 
818 


68,123 
4,492 


From outside the Province . . . 


Totals 


23,588 


35.657 


59,255 


3,197 


10,163 


13,360 


72,615 




Transfers (a) to another section or muni- 


18,364 

201 
728 


14,554 

1,164 
1,970 


32,918 

1,365 
2,698 


1,461 

25 

188 


3,072 

195 
390 


4,533 

220 
578 


37,451 


(b) to Special Industrial, Craft 

School, or Auxiliary Class 

(c) Beyond the Province 


1,585 
3,276 


Totals 


19,293 


17,688 


36,981 


1,674- 


3,657 


5.331 


42,312 




Retirements(a) On reaching 14th birthday, 
from: 


98 

124 

623 

1,624 

400 

26 
84 
509 
1,798 
634 
143 
592 


108 
13 
78 

110 
11 

26 
57 
639 
1,561 
171 
212 
669 


206 
137 

701 

1,734 

411 

52 

141 

1,148 

3,359 

805 

355 

1,261 


21 

75 
230 
289 

18 

4 
24 
121 
223 
76 
101 
115 


3 
16 

40 

82 
15 

13 
70 
320 
653 
231 
66 
325 


24 

91 

270 

371 

33 

17 
94 
441 
876 
307 
167 
440 


230 




228 


Form III 


971 


Form IV 


2,105 


Form V 


444 


(b) Between 14th and 16th 
birthday, from: 


69 




235 


Form III 


1,589 


Form IV 


4,235 


Form V 


1,112 


(c) By death 


522 


(d) By disability 


1,701 






Totals 


6,655 


3,655 


10,310 


1,297 


1,834 


3,131 


13 441 






Exemptions: Pupils who attended no school 
during the year owing to: 


51 

332 
246 

20 

25 

1 66 

234 

301 


30 

16 
114 

11 

4 

68 

20 

28 


81 

348 
360 

31 

29 

233 

254 
329 


6 

11 
21 

8 
14 
14 
56 
81 


5 

3 
36 

4 
2 

44 
3 

55 


11 

14 
57 

12 
16 
58 
59 
136 


92 


Taking Departmental Cor- 
respondence Course 


362 

417 


Physical Disability: 

(a) Blind 


43 


(b) Deaf 


45 




291 


Distance from School 


313 

465 






Totals 


1,374 


291 


1,665 


211 


152 


363 


2,028 







DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



123 



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124 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND 
TABLE 5— FIFTH 



(A) Public Schools 


No. of Schools 
Conducting Fifth 
Class Work 


Fifth Class 
Enrolment in 
These Schools 


Number of 
Qualifying 
Fifth Classes 


Enrolment in 
Qualifying 
Fifth Classes 


Average 
Per Class 


Grading 


Legis- 
lative 


of the County 
Inspectorates 


Enrol- 
ment 


Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


A 


B 


C 


Grant to 

Qualifying 

Classes 


Brant and Norfolk (in 
part) 


8 

18 

31 

9 


27 

37 
63 

29 


2 

8 
6 
2 


20 

25 

23 
14 


10 

3.2 

3.8 

7 


8.5 

2.8 

3.08 

6.35 




1 
2 


1 

6 
6 
2 


$262.40 


Bruce East, Grey (in part), 

and Huron (in part) 

Bruce West 


466.57 
389.61 


Carleton East 


253.48 


Carleton West and Lanark 
East 




Dufferin (in part) and Peel 
(in part) 


18 

7 

8 
11 

2 

26 

22 
15 

12 

36 

16 
20 

14 

9 

23 

14 

8 

20 

41 

18 

23 
19 
19 
18 
14 
13 

15 

21 
5 

14 

6 

15 

16 


76 

18 

23 
127 

3 

80 

52 

32 

31 
65 

28 
53 

45 
20 
42 

28 
15 
57 
116 
40 

60 
50 
33 
32 
45 
27 

23 

37 

81 

44 
11 
31 

75 


8 

2 

1 
6 


57 

10 

11 
120 


7.1 

5 

11 
20 


5.8 

4.5 

6.3 
16.6 


2 

1 
2 


1 
1 


5 

1 


565.64 


Dundas and Grenville (in 
part) 


138.84 


Elgin East and City of St. 
Thomas . 


170 91 


Essex North, (No. 1) . . . . 
Essex South, (No. 2) and 

Kent (in part) 

Frontenac North and Add- 

ington (in part) 

Frontenac South, (No. 1) 

and Lennox (in part) . . 
Frontenac South, (No. 2) 

and City of Kingston . . 
Glengarry (in part) and 

Prescott (in part) 

Grey East 


4 




738.60 


4 

2 

3 

6 
15 

1 

9 

8 
3 
6 

1 
1 
8 
11 
3 

7 
3 
3 
4 
2 
1 

1 

3 

5 

5 

1 
4 

9 


33 

22 

24 

26 
42 

8 
44 

32 
12 
25 

7 

6 

46 

79 

21 

33 
25 
35 
10 
26 
12 

2 

13 
81 

34 
5 

21 

64 


8.2 
11 
8 

4.5 

2.8 

8 
4.9 

4 
4 
4.1 

7 
6 

5.7 
7.1 

7 

4.7 
8.3 

11.6 
2.5 

13 

12 

2 

4.3 
16.2 

6.8 

5 

5.2 

7.1 


6.6 
9.5 
6.5 

3.7 

2.4 

7.3 
4.3 

3.5 

3 

3.1 

6.5 
4.8 
4.7 
6.1 
4.5 

3.7 

5.5 

8.7 

2 

9.9 

9.2 

1.8 

3.7 
13.3 

5.7 

4.4 
3.9 

5.6 


1 
1 

1 

i 

2 

5 

2 
1 

2 

"2 
1 

"3 

2 

1 

3 


4 
1 

3 

2 

1 
2 

4 

5 

1 

"i 
4 
2 

3 
2 

"2 

1 
1 

3 
"4 

1 


2 

3 
13 

"7 

4 
2 
1 

"5 
2 
1 

2 

"i 
2 

1 

2 

1 

5 


323.67 

244.51 

294.40 

347. 68 
773.59 


Grey North and Bruce 
North 


122.90 


Grey South 


536.11 


Haldimand (in part) and 

Wentworth (in part) . . . 

Halton 


604.22 
285.24 


Hastings Centre 


552.60 


(in part) and City of 
Oshawa 


86.64 


Hastings South 


165.68 


Huron East 


465.80 


Huron West 


1,176.98 


Kent vSouth, (No. 1) 

Kent East, (No. 2) and 

Elgin (in part) 

Lambton West, (No. 1).. 
Lambton East, (No. 2) . . . 
Lanark West 


246. 18 

626.69 
332.03 
362.95 
198.72 


Leeds and Grenville, No. 1 
Leeds and Grenville, No. 2 
Leeds and Grenville, No. 3 

and Lanark (in part) . . . 
Lennox and Hastings South 

(in part) 


383.89 
164.55 

69.90 

227.48 


Lincoln (in part) 

Middlesex East and Elgin 
(in part) 


584.53 
541.70 


Middlesex West 


107.42 


Norfolk (in part) 

Northumberland and Dur- 
ham, No. 1 


324.84 
886.50 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



125 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

CLASSES (GRADES IX AND X), 1936-37 



(A) Public Schools 


No. of Schools 
Conducting Fifth 
Class Work 


Fifth Class 
Enrolment in 
These Schools 


Number of 
Qualifying 
Fifth Classes 


Enrolment in 
Qualifying 
Fifth Classes 


Average 
Per Class 


Grading 


Legis- 
lative 


of the County 
Inspectorates 


Enrol- 
ment 


Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


A 


B 


C 


Grant to 

Qualifying 

Classes 


Northumberland and Dur- 
ham, No. 2 


27 

8 

18 
4 

5 

5 


63 

15 

56 
11 

27 

25 


13 

1 

8 

1 

4 
4 


49 

5 

42 
6 

26 

23 


3.7 

5 

5.2 
6 

6.5 

5.7 


3.2 

3.9 

4 

4.8 

5.5 

4.7 


1 
1 
2 


1 

6 

1 

4 
1 


11 

1 
1 

1 


596.75 


Northumberland and Dur- 
ham, No. 3 and Hastings 
(in part) 


67.40 


Ontario North and York 
(in part) 


865.69 


Ontario South 


92.43 


Oxford North and City of 
Woodstock 


415.44 


Oxford South and Norfolk 
(in part) 


432.02 


Peel (in part) and York (in 
part) 




Perth North and Welling- 
ton (in part) 

Perth South 


26 
12 
32 

26 

15 


61 
18 
73 

43 

66 


5 
3 

8 

4 
5 


25 

8 

34 

22 

45 


5 

2.7 
4.2 

5.4 

9 


4.2 
2.2 
3.9 

4.9 

6.7 


"l 
4 


5 

"i 

3 

1 


"3 
3 

1 


464.05 
183.23 


Peterborough East 

Peterborough West and 
Victoria East 


627.42 
299.65 


Prescott and Russell, No. 1 

and Carleton (in part) . . 

Prescott and Russel, No. 2 


632.70 


Prescott and Russell, No. 3 
Prescott and Russell, No. 4 


1 


14 


1 


14 


14 


13.3 


1 






172.66 


Prince Edward 


22 
27 
27 
15 

15 


57 
71 
59 
55 

102 


4 
14 

2 
10 

6 


19 
73 
13 
51 

88 


4.9 
5.6 
6.5 
5.1 

14.7 


3.8 
5.3 
4.1 

4.2 

12 


1 

1 
1 
4 

2 


"2 

"i 

4 


3 
11 

1 
5 


330.22 


Renfrew North 


959.97 


Renfrew South 


124.82 


Simcoe Centre 


733.81 


Simcoe East and Muskoka 
(in part) 


770. 17 


Simcoe North 




Simcoe South, York (in 
part) and Peel (in part) . 

Simcoe West, Grey|(in part) 
and Dufferin (in part) 

Stormont 


16 

30 
11 
23 
20 

4 


39 

58 
34 
81 
128 
75 


10 

14 
2 
4 
9 
2 


34 

43 
24 
38 
46 
73 


3.4 

3 

12 
9.5 
5.1 

36.5 


2.71 

2.6 

9 

8.1 

4.4 

31.47 


1 

"2 
4 
1 
2 


1 
1 

"5 


8 
13 

"3 


672.00 

858.84 
188.31 


Victoria West 


659.46 


Waterloo, No. 1 


736.92 


Waterloo, No. 2 


340.79 


Welland East 




Welland South . . . 


1 

8 
23 

17 
11 

7 


22 

20 
54 

49 
46 
19 


1 

5 
6 

7 
4 
3 


22 

15 
25 

42 
31 
15 


22 

3 

4.1 

6 
8 
5 


17.6 

2.3 
3.4 

4.7 
6.9 
4.2 


1 

"i 


2 
2 

3 

4 
1 


3 

4 

4 

"i 


178.58 


Welland (in part), Lincoln 
(in part) and Haldimand 
(in part) 


275.63 


Wellington North 

Wellington South and City 
of Guelph 


317.03 
484.50 


Wentworth 


390.40 


York, No. 1 


332.03 


York, No. 2 




York, No. 3 






















York, No. 4 






















York, No. 5 






















York, No. 6 


1 


163 


4 


163 


41 


39 


4 






215.00 


Totals, (A) 


1,061 


3,263 


328 


2,182 


6.7 


5.5 


68 


108 


152 


$27,440.97 







126 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND 
TABLE 5— FIFTH CLASSES (GRADES IX AND X) 1936-37 



(B) Public Schools 


No. of Schools 
Conducting Fifth 
Class Work 


Fifth Class 
Enrolment in 
These Schools 


Number of 
Qualifying 
Fifth Classes 


Enrolment in 
Qualifying 
Fifth Classes 


Average 
Per Class 


Grading 


Legis- 
lative 


of the District 
Inspectorates 


Enrol- 
ment 


Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


A 


B 


C 


Grant to 

Qualifying 
Classes 


Division I 


26 
42 
16 
16 
22 
25 
22 
2 
34 

22 

22 


65 
160 

29 
165 

55 
111 

61 
4 

87 

137 

69 

77 


8 
12 
5 
6 
4 
17 
8 
1 
9 

18 

13 
3 


43 
73 
14 
42 
22 
100 
33 
3 
51 

99 

59 
18 


5.3 

6 

2.8 

7 

5.4 

5.9 

4.2 

3 

5.6 

5.5 

4.5 
6 


4.8 
4.8 
2.5 
5.2 
4.2 
5.1 
3.2 
2.5 
5 

4.3 

3.5 
5.2 


1 
3 

2 

"6 
1 

3 

2 

1 


4 
4 

"i 

2 
2 
1 
1 
2 

4 

3 
2 


3 

5 
5 
3 
2 
9 
6 

"7 

11 

8 


$1,708.00 
2,551.30 

570.40 
1,215.44 

603.80 
3,941.12 
1,573.32 

138. 14 
1,319.78 


do II 


do III 


do IV 


do V . 


do VI 


do VII, Part I 

do VII, Part II ... . 
do VIII 


do IX 


do X 


3,225.82 


do XI 


2,202. 12 
673.94 


do XII, Parti 

do XII, Part II 


do XII, Part III . . . 






















do XIII 


44 
35 
38 
33 


137 

108 
94 
68 


6 

6 

16 

12 


66 
58 
64 
60 


11 
9.6 
4 
5 


8.5 
8.2 
3.3 
4 


1 

2 


5 

4 

1 

_3 

39 


15 

7 

_8l 


1,551.66 
1,649.04 
2,734.80 
1,468. 12 


do XIV 


do XV 


do XVI 




Totals, (B) 


440 


1,427 


144 


805 


5.6 


4.5 


24 


$27,126.80 


(C) Public Schools of the 
City Inspectorates 














— 




Kitchener 


2 

11 

1 


292 

1,796 

275 












Toronto 


















Windsor 


















Totals, (C) 


14 


2,363 


















(D) R.C. Separate School 
Inspectorates 














1 
3 
1 
4 
4 
2 
6 
6 
6 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
6 
5 


2 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 

"l 
4 

"3 

1 
3 


"i 
2 

"2 
3 

8 




Division I 


7 

11 

11 

9 

9 

8 

8 

8 

17 

12 

5 

13 

4 

6 

20 

21 

6 

6 

6 

7 

6 


79 

92 

35 

88 

37 

199 

376 

61 

370 

215 

437 

215 

510 

27 

290 

246 

480 

571 

98 

84 

58 


3 
5 
3 
9 
5 
3 
6 
7 
10 
4 
1 
6 
1 
2 
10 
16 


14 
58 
27 
88 
27 
41 

121 
79 

120 
45 
34 
37 
18 
26 

144 

117 


4.6 
11.6 

9 

9.8 

5.4 
13.9 
20.1 
11.3 
12 

11.2 
34 

6.1 
18 
13 
14.4 

7.3 


4.6 

10.9 

7.2 

7.5 

4.7 

11.8 

17.7 

9 

9.6 

9.9 

29.37 

5.2 

12.3 

10.9 

11.9 

6.4 


626 56 


do II ... . 


1,187.72 
. . 690 02 


do III 


do IV 


1,628 60 


do V 


1,141.20 
454 86 


do VI 


do VII . . 


757 14 


do VIII 


909.33 


do IX 


1,421.70 


do X 


660.65 


do XI 


815.00 


do XII 


569.63 


do XIII 


91.60 


do XIV 


162.00 


do XV 


1,338.65 


do XVI 


1,705.43 


do XVII . 




do XVIII 


















do XIX 


6 
6 
5 


98 
67 
40 


16.3 
11.1 

8 


14.7 
10.4 

7 


6 
5 
5 


"i 




845.30 


do XX 


751.88 


do XXI 


. . 671.66 


Totals, (D) 


200 


4,568 


108 


1,201 


11.1 


9.4 


69 


23 


16 


$15,798.93 


Grand Totals 


1,715 


11,621 


580 


4,188 


7.0 


6.0 


161 


170 


249 


$70,366.70 


Increases for the year .... 
Decreases for the year. . . . 


43 


44 


15 








7 


6 


2 


$10,455.66 


78 


.5 


.6 















Legislative grants for equipment only, to schools whose Fifth Classes have qualified in past 
years, but not this year, $1,628.73. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



127 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

LOWER SCHOOL STATISTICS, FIFTH CLASSES, 1937 





Number 
of 
Candi- 
dates 


Candidates 
Recommended 


Candidates Writing 


Aegro- 
tat 


Total 
Number 
Success- 
ful 


Per cent. 


Subjects 


Total 

Number 


Percent. 
Recom- 
mended 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Passing 


Percent. 
Passing 


1937 


1936 


English Grammar.. . 
British History 


4,126 
5,032 
4,703 
3,133 
3.381 
4,160 
2,513 
1,734 
1,723 
547 
649 


2,373 

2,817 

2,766 

1,856 

1,663 

2,563 

1,378 

994 

965 

312 

415 


57.58 
55.98 
58.81 
59.24 
49.19 
61.61 
54.83 
57.32 
56.01 
48.22 
63.94 


1,744 

2,201 

1,923 

1,270 

1,710 

1,583 

1,131 

735 

753 

231 

234 


1,153 
891 
982 
502 

1,016 
964 
819 
610 
266 
162 
171 


66.11 
40.48 
51.07 
39.53 
59.42 
60.90 
72.41 
82.99 
35.33 
70.13 
73.08 


9 

14 

14 

7 

8 

14 

4 

5 

5 

4 


3,535 
3,722 
3,962 
2,365 

2,687 
3,541 
2,201 
1,609 
1,236 
478 
586 


85.67 
73.97 
84.24 
75.49 
79.47 
85.12 
87.58 
92.80 
71.74 
87.39 
90.29 


85.03 
84.25 
85.01 


Physiography 


80.86 
71.63 


Art 


85.48 




89.55 




90.68 


Agriculture I 

Agriculture II 

French Grammar. . . 


78.33 
84.00 
93.54 


Totals 


31,701 


18,102 




13,515 


7,736 




84 


25,882 













Total Number of Candidates 8,717 



GROWTH OF FIFTH CLASSES IN RECENT YEARS 













Grading 


Distribution of Qualifying Classes 
with Average Enrolment per Class 






Number 

of 
Schools 
Conduct- 
ing Fifth 
Class 
Work 


Fifth 


Number 
of Fifth 


Enrol- 






































Class 
Enrol- 
ment in 
These 


Classes 
Quali- 
fying for 
Legis- 


ment in 
Quali- 
fying 
Fifth 


A 


B 


C 




Public 


Separate 


Legis- 
lative 


Year 


Counties 


Districts 






Grant 




Schools 


lative 
Grant 


Classes 














No. 


Aver. 
Enrol- 






No. 


Aver. 
Enrol. 


No. 


Aver. 
Enrol. 




1921-22.. 


431 




125 


1,338 


54 


54 


17 


85 


9.9 


?3 


11.3 


17 


24.1 


$16,040 


1924-25.. 


468 




193 


1,878 


93 


69 


31 


108 


7.8 


46 


8.7 


39 


16.0 


28,396 


1927-28.. 


760 




254 


2,231 


9? 


98 


64 


128 


6.9 


78 


6 3 


48 


17 7 


35,739 
55,562 


1930-31.. 


1,316 


6,618 


418 


2,790 


Ill 


115 


192 


210 


5.3 


139 


4.9 


69 


14.5 


1933-34.. 


1,553 


7,323 


587 


4,746 


149 


154 


284 


331 


7.1 


149 


5.4 


107 


14.7 


62,211 


1934-35.. 


1,716 


10,732 


541 


4,332 


149 


155 


237 


306 


6.4 


124 


5.5 


106 


12.6 


56,643 


1935-36.. 


1,672 


11,577 


565 


4,266 


154 


164 


247 


311 


6.6 


137 


5.3 


117 


12.6 


61,966 


1936-37.. 


1,715 


11,621 


580 


4,188 


161 


170 


249 


328 


6.7 


144 


5.6 


108 


11.1 


71,995 



128 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 6— DISTRIBUTION OF TEACHERS AND CERTIFICATES, 1936-37 

(a) Rural 





TEACHERS 


CERTIFICATES 


UNIV. 
GRADS 




Public 


Separat 


e 


First 
Class 


Second 
Class 


Third 
Class 


Dis- 
trict 


Per. 
Un- 
grd. 


Tern 
por- 
ary 


P. 


S. 




Tot. 


M. 


F. 


Tot. 


M. 


F. 


P. 


S. 


P. 


S. 


P. 


S. 


P. 


S. 


S. 


S. 




Counties 
Addington 


33 

79 

170 

162 

92 

81 

100 

125 

148 

152 

78 

74 

225 

83 

62 

70 

198 

202 

156 

180 

123 

149 

89 

97 

207 

111 

115 

147 

130 

104 

119 

113 

56 

74 

173 

34 

246 

90 

113 

109 

163 

155 

109 

838 


7 
12 
38 
34 
15 
30 
31 
27 
20 
32 
17 
19 
58 
15 
21 

5 
39 
44 
18 
34 
17 
16 
11 
22 
41 
34 
29 
37 
31 
28 
19 
28 

3 
23 
32 

9 
44 
11 
27 
33 
41 
28 
18 
219 


26 

67 

132 

128 

77 

51 

69 

98 

128 

120 

61 

55 

167 

68 

41 

65 

159 

158 

138 

146 

106 

133 

78 

75 

166 

77 

86 

110 

99 

76 

100 

85 

53 

51 

141 

25 

202 

79 

86 

76 

122 

127 

91 

619 


1 




1 


17 
40 

100 
68 
52 
33 
56 
77 
68 
64 
28 
29 

117 
60 
25 
36 

117 

130 
81 
99 
53 
52 
40 
54 

116 
60 
80 
75 
80 
52 
78 
73 
22 
35 
73 
18 

116 
41 
62 
72 
91 
96 
55 

354 


1 

"3 
5 

"i3 

4 

12 

"4 

' i 

5 
6 

1 

' i 

'"3 
1 

2 

1 

i 

10 
2 
9 

"i2 
4 

"5 

2 
4 

"3 

1 

6 


16 
38 
70 
94 
40 
48 
44 
48 
79 
86 
50 
45 
98 
23 
37 
34 
80 
72 
75 
81 
68 
97 
47 
43 
91 
50 
52 
72 
50 
52 
41 
39 
26 
39 
99 
16 
128 
49 
51 
37 
62 
59 
54 
455 








































15 
, 43 


1 
3 


14 
40 


12 
30 














1 




Carleton 




7 








1 


] 












2 




2 


1 




1 










2 

1 




Durham 




































53 
10 

28 


1 
2 
3 


52 

8 

25 


39 

6 

11 


1 


1 














Frontenac 

Glengarry 


2 








1 
1 

1 






4 




I 




3 




8 


1 


7 


4 
















Haldimand 

Haliburton 














1 
1 
2 
2 
















































Hastings 


7 

10 

16 

2 

3 

2 


"4 


7 
10 
12 
2 
2 
2 


6 

5 

10 

1 
3 
2 

1 


1 








































3 


1 


Lambton 

Lanark 
















2 












1 
1 

1 
1 
















Lennox 

Lincoln 

Middlesex 

Norfolk • 

Northumberland 

Ontario 




































5 
3 
5 
2 


"i 


5 
3 
5 

1 


2 
2 
3 

1 
















1 


























1 




































1 
16 

5 
84 


"ii 


1 
16 

5 
70 






















6 

3 

37 


















Peterborough. . . 

Prescott 

Prince Edwaru. . 

Renfrew 

Russell 


1 
7 
















35 








4 
















28 
75 

9 
17 

3 
13 


3 
12 

1 
1 
2 


25 

63 

8 

16 

1 
13 


16 
37 

8 
11 

1 
8 


1 
' '2 










1 
1 






33 

1 
1 








1 
2 
1 


1 










Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 






























1 






















7 

3 

52 


"2 


7 

3 

50 


3 

2 

45 










1 




2 
5 
9 


1 










2 












1 


















Totals ..... 


6,134 


1,317 


4,817 


528 


52 


476 


3,145 


122 


2,935 


316 


16 


83 


2 




3 


8 


41 


9 


Districts 

Algoma 

Cochrane 


102 
113 

41 

50 
106 

78 
141 

74 
138 
131 
122 


34 
42 
18 
18 
38 
17 
46 
25 
40 
37 
41 


68 
71 
23 
32 
68 
61 
95 
49 
98 
94 
81 


3 

88 
1 


"26 
1 


3 
62 


63 
61 
25 
12 
58 
28 
66 
42 
46 
66 
81 


2 
6 

1 

"2 
3 

1 
1 
13 
8 
1 


39 
49 
16 
38 
48 
37 
74 
32 
80 
63 
41 


1 
43 














1 
1 


1 


2 


34 




1 




4 




Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Parry Sound 

Rainy River. . . . 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming. . . 
Thunder Bay. . . 




















2 
49 

1 

3 
65 
46 

1 


1 

9 

. . ._. 

15 

4 


1 
40 

1 

2 
50 
42 

1 




















29 

"2 
32 
30 


11 
1 


14 






1 


4 


1 
3 
















11 
1 


15 

5 








6 
3 


4 
1 


4 




































Totals 


1,096 


356 


740 


259 


57 


202 


548 


38 


517 


137 


26 


68 




1 


1 


17 


11 


5 


Grand Totals. 


7,230 


1,673 


5,557 


787 


109 


678 


3,693 


160 


3,452 


453 


42 


151 


2 


1 


4 


25 


52 


14 



SPECIAL RURAL SCHOOL TEACHERS 

York County — 2 Kindergarten Directors; 9 Kindergarten Primary; 2 Manual Training; 2 Household Science; 

7 Auxiliary Class; 4 Exchange teachers from Overseas. 
Other Kindergarten Primary — Brant 1; Cochrane 1; Welland 5. 
Other Music Teachers — Elgin 6; Essex 1 ; Grey 2; Haldimand 4; Hastings 3; Kent 8; Lambton 3; Lincoln 4; 

Middlesex 11; Northumberland 6; Norfolk 1; Peterborough 6; Prince Edward 1; Russell 1; 

Simcoe 1; Victoria 4; Welland 2; Wellington 3. 
Other Auxiliary Class Teachers — Welland 1. 
Other Special Teachers — Cochrane 1; Temiskaming 1; Total 103. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



129 



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130 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND 
TABLE 7— HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAM- 



-Public Schools of the 
City Inspectorates 



May 
Enrol- 
ment, 
Forms 
I Jr. to 
IV Sr. 
(incl.) 



High 
School 

En- 
trance 
Can- 
di- 
dates 



Recom- 
mended 
Candidates 



Num- 
ber 



Per 

cent. 



Writing 
Candidates 



Num- 
ber 



Num- 
ber 
suc- 
cess- 
ful 



1 Brantford 

2 Chatham 

3 Hamilton 

4 Kitchener 

5 London 

6 Ottawa 

7 Peterborough 

8 St. Catharines 

9 Sarnia 

10 Toronto 

11 Welland 

12 Windsor 

Totals 

B— Public Schools of the 
County Inspectorates 

1 Brant, and Norfolk (in part) 

2 Bruce East, Grey (in part), Huron 

(in part) 

3 Bruce West 

4 Carleton 

5 Dufferin (in part) and Peel (in part) 

6 Dundas, and Grenville (in part) 

7 Elgin East and City of St. Thomas 

8 Essex North 

9 Essex South and Kent (in part) 

10 Frontenac North and Addington (in part) 

1 1 Frontenac South and Lennox (in part) . . 

12 Frontenac South and City of Kingston. . . 

13 Glengarry (in part) and Prescott (in 

part) 

14 Grey East 

15 Grey North and Bruce North 

16 Grey South 

17 Haldimand (in part) and Wentworth 

(in part) 

18 Halton 

19 Hastings Centre 

20 Hastings North, Renfrew (in part) and 

City of Oshawa 

21 Hastings South and City of Belleville. . . 

22 Huron East 

23 Huron West 

24 Kent South 

25 Kent East and Elgin (in part) 

26 Lambton West 

27 Lambton East 

28 Lanark 

29 Leeds and Grenville West 

30 Leeds and Grenville Centre 

31 Leeds and Grenville East and Lanark 

(in part) 

32 Lennox and Hastings South (in part) 

33 Lincoln (in part) 

34 Middlesex East and Elgin (in part) 

35 Middlesex West 



3,368 
1,733 

18,514 
3,231 
7,802 
8,711 
2,511 
2,979 
2,370 

69,353 
1,751 

11,093 



394 
211 

1,857 
400 

1,133 

1,135 
243 
285 
290 

7,874 
165 

1,436 



322 
120 

1,565 
269 
698 
738 
150 
169 
189 

5,811 
81 

1,007 



81.72 
56.87 
84.27 
67.25 
61.60 
65.02 
61.73 
59.30 
65.18 
73.80 
49.09 
70.12 



72 

91 
292 
131 
435 
397 

93 

116 

101 

2,063 

84 
429 



17 

29 
115 

53 
259 
221 

70 
106 

75 
811 

54 
136 



133,416 



15,423 



11,119 



72.09 



4,304 



1,946 



3,173 

2,258 
2,336 
3,654 
2,078 
2,660 
3,927 
3,969 
4,091 
1,511 
2,140 
2,999 

2,092 
2,383 
3,445 

2,826 

2,565 
3,410 
2,327 

4,862 
4,237 
2,264 
2,919 
4,294 
2,764 
2,810 
2,439 
4,201 
1,898 
2,306 

1,967 
2,272 
3,104 
3,142 
2.300 



318 

225 
259 
478 
299 
302 
447 
448 
412 
154 
207 
384 

167 

287 
328 
309 

265 
421 
194 

488 
442 
313 
314 
399 
349 
304 
238 
642 
205 
274 

224 
227 
395 
414 
325 



166 

67 
103 
195 

91 
100 
338 

86 
129 

61 

72 
207 

61 

95 

217 

106 

104 
235 

81 

218 

291 

139 

176 

191 

213 

65 

64 

199 

84 

107 

81 

82 

230 

191 

60 



52.20 

29.78 
39.77 
40.79 
30.43 
33.12 
75.61 
19.19 
31.31 
39.61 
34.78 
53.90 

36.52 
33.10 
66.16 
34.30 

39.24 
55.82 
41.75 

44.67 
65.84 
44.40 
56.05 
47.87 
61.03 
21.38 
26.89 
30.99 
40.97 
39.06 

36.16 
36.12 
58.23 
46.13 
18.46 



152 

158 
156 
283 
208 
202 
109 
362 
283 
93 
135 
177 

106 
192 
111 
203 

161 

186 
113 

270 
151 
174 
138 
208 
136 
239 
174 
443 
121 
167 

143 
145 
165 
223 
265 



96 

115 

100 

206 

114 

135 

51 

299 

231 

69 

95 

146 

84 
147 

80 
144 

129 

122 

95 

197 

98 

127 

101 

99 

77 

149 

118 

354 

75 

106 

96 

94 

113 

165 

202 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



131 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

INATION RESULTS BY INSPECTORATES, 1937 



Successful Candidates 







Per 


Per 






Destination 






Average 












Total 


cent, 
of 


cent, 
of 


Ag 


e 


Secondary 
School 


Fifth Class 


Retired from 
School 


Su 


ccessful 


Total 


May- 
































Appli- 
cants 


Enrol- 
ment 


Years 


Mos. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


1 


339 

149 

1,680 

322 


86.04 
70.61 
90.47 
80.50 


10.06 
8.60 
9.07 
9.96 


13 
13 
14 
13 


11 

8 

6 


299 

147 

1,359 

63 


67.55 
98.66 
80.89 
19.56 






40 

2 

321 

15 


32.45 


2 






1.34 


3 






19.11 


4 


"244* 


'75.'78* 


4.66 


5 


957 
959 


84.46 
84.49 


12.26 
11.00 


14 
13 


ii 


843 
945 


88.09 
98.54 






114 
11 


11.91 


6 


"3 




1.15 


7 


220 

275 

264 

6,622 


90.53 
96.49 
91.03 
84.09 


8.76 

9.23 

11.13 

9.55 


14 
14 
13 
14 


2V 2 

1 
11 

2 


196 

246 

262 

5,442 


89.09 
89.45 
99.24 
82.18 






24 

29 

2 

707 


10.91 


8 






10.55 


9 






.76 


10 


"'473' 


"7.U 


10.68 


11 


135 
1,143 


81.81 
79.59 


7.71 
10.30 


13 
13 


10 

8 


116 

n.r. 


85.92 






19 
n.r. 


14.08 


12 


n.r. 






13,065 


84.71 


9.79 


14 


9,918 


83.19 


720 


6.04 


1,284 


10.77 


1 


262 


82.39 


8.26 


13 


10 


194 


74.04 


11 


4.20 


57 


21.76 


2 


182 


80.89 


8.06 


13 


5 


105 


57.69 


38 


20.88 


39 


21.43 


3 


203 


78.38 


8.69 


13 


6 


135 


66.50 


36 


17.73 


32 


15.77 


4 


401 


83.89 


10.97 


13 


10 


392 


97.75 


3 




6 


1.50 


5 


205 


68.56 


9.86 


13 


8 


130 


63.41 


31 


'l5.'i2* 


44 


21.47 


6 


235 


77.81 


8.83 


12 


11 


175 


74.47 


12 


5.10 


48 


20.43 


7 


389 


87.02 


9.90 


13 


11 


321 


82.52 


12 


3.08 


56 


14.40 


8 


385 


85.94 


9.70 


13 


10 


197 


51.16 


121 


31.43 


67 


17.41 


9 


360 


87.38 


8.80 


13 


9 


269 


74.72 


9 




82 


22.78 


10 


130 


84.41 


8.60 


n.r 




54 


41.53 


60 


46.' 15' 


16 


12.32 


11 


167 


80.67 


7.80 


13 


11 


94 


56.29 


35 


20.96 


38 


22.75 


12 


353 
145 


91.93 

86.82 


11.77 
6.93 


13 
13 


11 
9 


293 
83 


83.00 
57.24 






60 
35 


17.00 


13 


27 


18.62 


24.14 


14 


242 


84.32 


10.15 


13 


10 


157 


64.87 


42 


17.35 


43 


17.78 


15 


297 


90.55 


8.62 


14 


1 


212 


71.39 


20 


6.73 


65 


21.88 


16 


250 


80.90 


8.84 


13 


6 


122 


48.80 


43 


17.20 


85 


34.00 


17 


233 


87.92 


9.08 


15 


8 


201 


86.26 


18 


7.72 


14 


6.02 


18 


357 


84.80 


10.46 


13 


11 


280 


78.43 


4 




73 


20.44 


19 


176 


90.72 


7.56 


14 




117 


66.48 


16 


"9.69' 


43 


24.43 


20 


415 


85.04 


8.53 


13 


8 


330 


79.51 


33 


7.95 


52 


12.54 


21 


389 


88.00 


9.18 


14 


1 


347 


89.20 


39 


10.02 


3 


.78 


22 


266 


84.98 


11.74 


13 


9 


193 


72.56 


31 


11.65 


42 


15.79 


23 


277 


88.21 


9.49 


13 


11 


151 


54.51 


60 


21.66 


66 


23.83 


24 


290 


72.68 


6.75 


13 


10 


209 


72.07 


22 


7.59 


59 


20.34 


25 


290 


83.09 


10.49 


13 


7 


223 


76.89 


24 


8.27 


43 


14.84 


26 


214 


70.39 


7.61 


13 


10 


148 


69.16 


28 


13.08 


38 


17.76 


27 


182 


76.47 


7.46 


13 


7 


113 


62.08 


31 


17.03 


38 


20.89 


28 


553 


86.14 


13.16 


14 


1 


429 


77.57 


59 


10.66 


65 


11.77 


29 


159 


77.57 


8.38 


13 


9 


124 


77.99 


19 


11.94 


16 


10.07 


30 


213 


77.74 


9.23 


14 




171 


80.28 


29 


13.61 


13 


6.11 


31 


177 


79.02 


9.00 


14 


5 


109 


61.58 


31 


17.51 


37 


20.91 


32 


176 


77.53 


7.74 


13 


7 


117 


65.34 


22 


12.50 


37 


22.16 


33 


343 


86.83 


11.05 


13 


10 


258 


75.22 


60 


17.49 


25 


7.29 


34 


356 


85.99 


11.33 


14 




277 


77.81 


14 


3.93 


65 


18.26 


35 


262 


80.61 


11.39 


13 


*8 


207 


79.00 


12 


4.58 


43 


16.42 



132 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND 
TABLE 7— HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAM- 



B— Public Schools of the 
County Inspectorates 



May 
Enrol- 
ment, 
Forms 
I Jr. to 
IV Sr. 
(incl.) 



High 
School 

En- 
trance 
Can- 
di- 
dates 



Recom- 
mended 
Candidates 



Num- 
ber 



Per 
cent. 



Writing 
Candidates 



Num- 
ber 



Num- 
ber 

suc- 
cess- 
ful 



36 Norfolk (in part) 

37 Northumberland and Durham West. . . . 

38 Northumberland and Durham Centre. . . 

39 Northumberland and Durham East and 

Hastings (in part) 

40 Ontario North and York (in part) 

41 Ontario South 

42 Oxford North and City of Woodstock.. . 

43 Oxford South and Norfolk (in part) .... 

44 Peel (in part) and York (in part) 

45 Perth North and Wellington (in part).. . 

46 Perth South 

37 Peterborough East 

48 Peterborough West and Victoria East. . . 



49 Prescott and Russell, No. 

50 Prescott and Russell, No. 2 

51 Prescott and Russell, No. 3 

52 Prescott and Russell, No. 4 

53 Prince Edward 

54 Renfrew North 

55 Renfrew South 

56 Simcoe Centre 

57 Simcoe East and Muskoka (in part) 

58 Simcoe North 

59 Simcoe South, York (in part), Peel (in 

part) 

60 Simcoe West, Grey (in part), Dufferin 

(in part) 

61 Stormont 

62 Victoria West 

63 Waterloo North 

64 Waterloo South and City of Gait 

65 Welland East 

66 Welland South 

67 Welland (in part), Lincoln (in part), 

Haldimand (in part) 

68 Wellington North 

69 Wellington South and City of Guelph . . 

70 Wentworth 



71 York, No. 

72 York, No. 

73 York, No. 

74 York, No. 

75 York, No. 



76 York, No. 6 
Totals. . . . 



Dii 



C— Public Schools of the 
District Inspectorates 

rict Division No. 1 

2 



3 

4 

5 

6 

7 (part 1). 



4,208 
2,600 

2,187 

2,934 
2,724 
2,666 
3,094 
3,637 
5,540 
3,069 
3,401 
2,342 
2,344 
1,772 
30 
588 
195 
1,906 
2,859 
2,924 
3,094 
3,717 
954 

3,533 

3,230 
3,166 
1,432 
3,553 
3,781 
4,561 
4,217 

3,322 
2,924 
3,804 
3,674 
3,753 
5,118 
5,380 
5,447 
7,322 
5,788 



431 
317 
266 

308 
320 
362 
413 
356 
470 
336 
470 
274 
315 
137 
4 

42 
9 
212 
287 
297 
379 
453 

60 

366 

281 
294 
162 
341 
474 
542 
404 

303 
375 
458 
441 
453 
514 
615 
714 
799 
638 



175 

84 

162 

102 

91 

173 

225 

204 

230 

72 

213 

100 

160 

22 



40.60 
26.50 
60.90 

33.12 
28.43 
47.79 
54.48 
57.30 
48.93 
21.42 
50.11 
36.49 
50.79 
16.06 



16.67 



140 
112 

57 
196 
193 

26 

114 

97 
61 
76 
180 
359 
220 
156 

97 
103 
275 
216 
153 
290 
496 
489 
571 
278 



66.04 
39.02 
19.19 
51.71 
42.60 
43.34 

31.15 

34.52 
20.74 
46.91 

52.78 
75.73 
40.59 
38.61 

32.01 
27.46 
60.04 
48.98 
33.77 
56.42 
80.65 
68.49 
71.46 
43.57 



256 
233 
104 

206 
229 
189 
188 
152 
240 
264 
257 
174 
155 
115 
4 

35 
9 

72 
175 
240 
183 
260 

34 

252 

184 
233 
86 
161 
115 
322 
248 

206 
272 
183 
225 
300 
224 
119 
225 
228 
360 



161 

181 

74 

163 
158 
133 
146 

93 
202 
200 
191 
113 
111 

93 
1 

27 
3 

35 
141 
168 
121 
199 

24 

163 

141 
186 

65 
129 

93 
254 
177 

125 
207 
146 
149 
201 
171 
89 
160 
166 
287 



234,413 



26,149 



11,880 



45.51 



14,269 



10,276 



2,990 
2,574 
3,742 
3,662 
3,865 
3,401 
3,867 



330 
310 
496 

487 
446 
297 
421 



102 
125 
374 
344 
283 
131 
233 



30.90 
40.32 
75.40 
70.63 
63.45 
44.10 
55.34 



228 
185 
122 
143 
163 
166 
188 



163 

112 

61 

46 

58 

126 

149 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



133 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

INATION RESULTS BY INSPECTORATES, 1937 



Successful Candidates 



















Destination 










Per 


Per 


Average 






























Total 


cent, 
of 


cent, 
of 


Age 


Secondary 
School 


Fifth Class 


Retired from 
School 


Su 


ccessful 


Total 


May- 








































Appli- 
cants 


Enrol- 
ment 


Years 


Mos. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


36 


336 


77.96 


7.98 


13 


10 


247 


73.51 


28 


8.33 


61 


18.16 


37 


265 


83.60 


10.19 


13 


10 


194 


73.21 


46 


17.35 


25 


9.44 


38 


236 


88.72 


10.79 


14 


9 


176 


74.58 


36 


15.25 


26 


10.17 


39 


265 


86.04 


9.03 


14 




188 


70.94 


7 


2.64 


70 


26.42 


40 


249 


77.81 


9.14 


13 


9 


168 


67.46 


31 


12.44 


50 


20.10 


41 


306 


84.53 


11.47 


13 


6 


256 


83.66 


9 


2.94 


41 


13.40 


42 


371 


89.83 


11.99 


13 


8 


298 


80.33 


23 


6.20 


50 


13.47 


43 


297 


83.42 


8.17 


13 


8 


219 


73.74 


13 


4.38 


65 


21.88 


44 


432 

272 


91.91 
80.95 


7.80 
8.86 


14 
13 


1 
7 


361 
124 


83.56 
45.59 






71 
112 


16.44 


45 


"36" 


13.23' 


41.18 


46 


404 


85.96 


11.88 


13 


7 


388 


91.72 


26 


6.15 


9 


2.13 


47 


213 


77.74 


9.09 


13 


5 


145 


68.08 


35 


16.43 


33 


15.49 


48 


271 


86.03 


11.56 


13 


5 


210 


77.43 


34 


12.54 


27 


10.03 


49 


115 


83.94 


6.49 


13 


10 


77 


66.96 


24 


20.86 


14 


12.18 


50 


1 
34 


25.00 
80.95 


3.34 

5.78 


13 
13 


11 
10 


1 
20 


100.00 

58.82 










51 


"i3' 


38.23 


T 


"2. 95* 


52 


3 
175 


33.34 
82.55 


1.54 
9.18 


14 
13 


11 


2 

108 


66.67 
61.71 


1 

34 


33.34 
19.43 






53 


"33' 


'i8.'86' 


54 


253 


88.15 


8.85 


13 


6 


186 


73.51 


37 


14.62 


30 


11.87 


55 


225 


75.76 


7.69 


13 


11 


144 


64.00 


29 


12.88 


52 


23.12 


56 


317 


83.64 


10.24 


14 


2 


232 


73.18 


38 


11.99 


47 


14.83 


57 


392 


86.53 


10.54 


13 


4 


255 


65.05 


47 


11.99 


90 


22.96 


58 


50 

277 


83.33 
75.68 


5.24 

7.84 


14 
13 


6 
10 


32 
231 


64.00 
83.39 






18 
19 


36.00 


59 


27 


9.74 


6.87 


60 


238 


84.70 


7.37 


13 


11 


162 


68.06 


41 


17.23 


35 


14.71 


61 


247 


84.01 


7.80 


13 


7 


200 


80.97 


32 


12.95 


15 


6.08 


62 


141 


87.04 


9.84 


13 


9 


70 


49.64 


50 


35.46 


21 


14.90 


63 


309 


90.61 


8.69 


13 


7 


122 


39.48 


96 


31.06 


91 


29.46 


64 


452 


95.36 


11.95 


13 


9 


300 


66.37 


40 


8.85 


112 


24.78 


65 


474 


87.45 


10.39 


13 


10 


435 


91.77 


3 


.63 


36 


7.60 


66 


333 
222 


82.42 
73.27 


7.90 
6.68 


14 
13 


11 


298 
170 


89.49 
76.57 






35 
49 


10.51 


67 


3 


1.35 


22.08 


68 


310 


82.67 


10.60 


13 


5 


217 


70.00 


30 


9.68 


63 


20.32 


69 


421 


91.92 


11.07 


13 


9 


330 


78.38 


34 


8.07 


57 


13.55 


70 


365 


82.77 


9.93 


14 




282 


77.26 


25 


6.84 


58 


15.90 


71 


354 
461 


78.14 
89.69 


9.43 
9.01 


14 
14 




268 
411 


75.70 
89.16 






86 
47 


24.30 


72 


3 


".65 


10.19 


73 


585 
649 
737 
565 


95.12 

90.89 
92.24 

88.55 


10.87 

11.91 

10.06 

9.76 

fe 


13 
13 
14 
14 


11 

11 

1 

5 


531 
590 
674 
506 


90.77 
90.90 
91.45 
89.56 






54 
59 
63 

59 


9.23 


74 






9.10 


75 






8.55 


76 






10.44 










22,156 


84.73 


9.45 


14 


1 


16,765 


75.60 


1,983 


8.94 


3,427 


15.46 


1 


265 


80.30 


8.86 


14 




216 


81.51 


36 


13.58 


13 


4.91 


2 


237 


76.45 


9.21 


13 


11 


131 


53.27 


83 


35.02 


23 


11.71 


3 


435 


87.70 


11.62 


13 


11 


394 


90.58 


19 


4.37 


22 


5.05 


4 


390 


80.08 


10.64 


14 




159 


40.77 


167 


42.82 


64 


16.41 


5 


341 


76.46 


8.82 


13 


10 


262 


76.83 


45 


13.19 


34 


9.98 


6 


257 


86.53 


7.55 


14 


1 


167 


64.98 


71 


27.62 


19 


7.40 


7 


382 


90.73 


9.88 


14 


6 


268 


70.15 


79 


20.68 


35 


9.17 



134 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



TABLE 7 



THE PUBLIC AND 
HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE EXAM- 











May 
Enrol- 
ment, 
Forms 
I Jr. to 
IV Sr. 

(incl.) 


High 
School 

En- 
trance 
Can- 
di- 
dates 


Recom- 
mended 
Candidates 


Writing 
Candidates 


C— Public Schools of the 
District Inspectorates 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber 


Num- 
ber 
suc- 
cess- 
ful 


Per 
cent, 
suc- 
cess- 
ful 


8 


n a 
a a 

it a 
it it 

it it 


' 7 (part 2) 

' 8 


413 
2,385 
4,128 
4,138 
2,489 
3,226 
37 

658 
2,387 
2,072 
2,205 
1,912 


21 
235 

585 
228 
243 
330 






21 
169 
289 
134 
139 
181 


11 

111 

204 

92 

88 

136 


52.38 


9 


66 
296 

94 
104 
149 


28.08 
50.59 
41.23 
42.79 
45.15 


65.68 


10 


' 9 


70.59 


11 


' 10 


68.65 


12 


' 11 


63.30 


13 
14 


' 12 (parti) 

' 12 (part 2) 

' 12 (part 3) 

' 13 


75.13 


15 


19 
247 
204 
247 
172 






19 
153 
116 
137 
137 


15 
116 

83 
99 
83 


78.94 


16 


94 

88 

110 

35 


38.05 
43.14 
44.53 
20.35 


75.81 


17 


' 14 


71.55 


18 


' 15 


72.26 


19 


' 16 


60.58 








Totals . 




50,151 


5,318 


2,628 


49.42 


2,690 


1,753 


65.17 






D— R.C. Separate i 
1 R.C. Seoarate Div 


School Inspectorates 
sion No. 1 


3,818 
3,704 
4,191 
2,652 
3,701 
5,935 
3,901 
3,516 
3,766 
5,308 
4,953 
4,139 
13,226 
3,975 
4,007 
4,232 
6,430 
3,045 
3,796 
3,550 


325 
266 
226 
149 
271 
543 
216 
300 
369 
559 
502 
512 
1,492 
405 
385 
531 
480 
214 
207 
190 


273 

119 

112 

53 

124 

388 

105 

131 

140 

385 

390 

259 

1,088 

183 

178 

288 

255 

51 

79 

24 


84.00 
44.73 
49.56 
35.57 
45.75 
71.45 
48.61 
43.67 
37.94 
68.88 
77.69 
50.58 
72.92 
45.18 
46.23 
54.24 
53.13 
23.83 
38.16 
12.63 


52 
147 
114 

96 
147 
155 
111 
169 
229 
174 
112 
253 
404 
222 
207 
243 
225 
163 
128 
166 


48 

97 

41 

78 

109 

129 

79 

103 

204 

107 

48 

175 

136 

163 

167 

172 

122 

88 

80 

111 


92.31 


2 " 




i i 

i I 
t I 
I i 

t i 

t i 


" 2 


65.98 


3 " 


" 3 


35.96 


4 " 


" 4 


81.25 


5 " 


" 5 


74.15 


6 " 


" 6 


83.22 


7 " 


" 7 


71.17 


8 " 


" 8.... 


60.94 


9 " 


" 9 


89.08 


10 " 


" 10 


61.49 


11 " 


" 11 


42.85 


12 " 


" 12 


69.17 


13 " 

14 " 


" 13 and 14... 
" 15 


33.66 
73.42 


15 " 


" 16 


80.67 


16 " 


" 17 


70.78 


17 " 


" 18 


54.22 


18 " 

19 " 


" 19 

" 20 


53.98 
62.50 


20 " 


' ' " 21 


66.86 








Totals . 
Grand 




91,845 


8,142 


4,625 


56.80 


3,517 


2,257 


64.18 


Totals 




509,825 


55,032 


30,252 


54.97 


24,780 


16,232 


65.50 






Increases for the ye 
Decreases for the v 


>ar 




1,147 


1,032 


.74 


120 






ear . . 








5,490 










115 


.79 












« 





SUMMARY 

(This includes, in addition to the above, results of candidates from private sources.) 

Enrolment Senior Fourth Grade on the last school day in May, 1937 57,112 

Number of High School Entrance Candidates: 

Recommended by Principal on Group II 30,455 

Number taking written test Group II 24,852 

55,307 

High School Entrance candidate percentage of 1937 Senior Fourth Enrolment 96. 84% 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



135 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

INATION RESULTS BY INSPECTORATES, 1937 



Successful Candidates 





Per 
cent. 

of 
Total 
Appli- 
cants 


Per 
cent. 

of 
May 
Enrol- 
ment 


Average 
Age 


Destination 


Total 


Secondary 
School 


Fifth Class 


Retired from 
School 




Years Mos. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
cent. 


8 11 

9 177 

10 500 

11 186 

12 192 

13 285 

14 


52.39 
75.31 

85.47 
81.58 
79.01 
86.36 


2.66 
7.42 
12.11 
4.49 
7.71 
8.83 


14 3 

13 5 
14 

14 3 
14 5 

13 11 

14 8 
14 2 

13 9 

14 1 
14 2 


2 
71 
312 
154 
139 
237 


18.18 
40.11 
62.40 
82.79 
72.39 
83.16 


4 
67 
78 
27 
50 
37 


36.36 
37.85 
15.60 
14.51 
26.04 
12.98 


5 

39 

110 

5 

3 

11 


45.46 

22.04 

22.00 

2.70 

1.57 
3.86 


15 15 

16 210 

17 171 

18 209 

19 118 


78.95 
85.02 
83.82 
84.61 
68.60 


2.28 
8.80 
8.25 
9.48 
6.17 


2 

75 

87 

127 

54 


13.33 
35.71 
50.87 
60.76 
45.76 


12 
77 
37 
61 
38 


80.00 
36.66 
21.63 
29.18 
32.20 


1 
58 
47 
21 
26 


6.67 
27.63 
27.50 
10.06 
22.04 


4,381 


82.38 


8.73 


14 


2,857 


65.21 


988 


22.55 


536 


12.24 


1 321 

2 216 

3 153 


98.76 
81.20 
67.70 
87.92 
85.98 
95.21 
85.18 
78.00 
93.22 
88.01 
87.25 
84.76 
82.04 
85.44 
89.61 
86.62 
78.54 
64.95 
76.81 
71.05 


8.41 
5.83 
3.65 
4.94 
6.29 
8.71 
4.71 
6.65 
9.13 
9.27 
8.84 

10.48 
9.25 
8.70 
8.61 

10.86 
5.86 
4.56 
4.19 
3.80 


13 11 

14 5 

13 6 

14 1 
14 5 
14 1 
13 9 
13 8 
13 10 

13 6 

14 1 

13 11 

14 2 
13 7 
13 9 

13 10 

14 6 

13 11 

14 7 
14 6 


244 

96 

149 

20 

205 

320 

60 

141 

110 

232 

214 

318 

822 

209 

229 

92 

36 

39 

118 

78 


76.01 
44.44 
97.38 
15.27 
87.98 
61.89 
32.60 
60.25 
31.97 
47.16 
48.86 
73.27 
67.16 
60.40 
66.37 
20.00 
9.55 
28.06 
74.21 
57.78 


53 

83 


16.51 
38.43 


24 
35 


7.47 
16.20 


4 131 

5 233 


110 

22 

144 

106 

57 

177 

167 

217 

80 

210 

114 

89 

351 

341 

108 

31 

34 


83.97 
9.44 
27.86 
57.61 
24.36 
51.45 
33.94 
49.54 
18.43 
17.16 
32.94 
25.79 
76.30 
90.45 
77.70 
19.49 
25.18 


1 


.76 


6 517 

7 184 

8 234 

9 344 

10 492 

11 438 

12 434 

13 1,224 

14 346 

15 345 

16 460 

17 377 


53 
19 
36 
67 
94 
7. 
38 
192 
23 
27 
11 


10.25 

10.33 

15.38 

19.47 

19.10 

1.60 

8.75 

15.68 

6.64 

7.82 

2.39 


18 139 

19 159 

20 135 


1 

8 

23 


.72 

5.03 

17.04 


6,882 


84.52 


7.49 


13 8 


3,732 


54.22 


2,494 


36.24 


659 


9.57 


46,484 


84.47 


9.12 


14 


33,272 


73.35 


6,185 


13.63 


5,906 


13.02 


917 




.28 


































.09 






395 


.53 











Number of candidates successful on written test on Group II: 

By Regulation 10— (1) and (2) 15,039 



(3) and (4) 

(5) 

(6) 

(7) 



682 
355 
217 
221 



16,514 

Total number of successful candidates 46,969 

Percentage of all candidates who were successful 84. 92% 

(55.06% by Principals' recommendation and 29.86% by passing written test.) 



136 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 8— NATURE STUDY AND AGRICULTURE, VOCAL MUSIC, MANUAL 
TRAINING AND HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE IN RURAL SCHOOLS 





V) 





ja 

o 

to 

"3 

u 

3 
02 

*o 
u 

•O 

E 

3 


Schools which qualified for a Special Legislati 


ve Grant* for the teaching of 




Number 


Per cent. 


County Inspectorates 


(J 3 t« 


— o 
eJ'ffl 

y 3 


< 


2 
q 

s -a 






g'l 


u 

< 




iJ C 

1-8 

WOT 


Is 


Brant and Norfolk (in part) . . . 
Bruce East, Grey (in part), 


76 

79 
81 
61 
65 
90 
71 

51 
64 
72 

76 

79 

36 

82 
94 
54 
81 

77 
60 
72 

42 
35 

78 
88 

87 
76 
83 
87 
71 
73 
66 

85 

78 
44 

94 
95 
75 

63 

77 


49 

77 
78 
46 
43 
58 
69 

35 
61 
53 

50 

38 

16 

80 
80 
50 
53 

55 
38 
58 

16 
33 
65 
68 

84 
72 
62 
75 
51 
58 
51 

82 

66 
35 

74 
94 
59 

60 

40 


29 

41 

45 

8 

67 

5 

4 

5 

15 

11 

29 

12 

15 
49 

28 
22 

18 
33 
11 


1 

2 
1 


14 

25 
4 
14 
13 
18 
10 

1 


1 

2 
1 
5 

7 


64.5 

97.5 
96.4 
75.4 
66.1 
64.4 
97.2 

68.6 
95.4 
73.6 

65.8 

48.2 

44.4 

97.6 
85.1 
92.6 
65.4 

71.5 
63.3 
80.6 

38.1 
94.4 
83.4 
77.3 

96.6 
94.8 
74.6 
86.2 
71.8 
79.5 
77.3 

96.5 

84.6 
79.6 

78.7 

99 

78.6 

95.2 

52 


38.2 

51.9 
55.6 
13.1 


1.3 


18.5 

31.6 
4.9 
22.8 
20 
20 
14.1 

2 


1.3 
2.5 


Bruce West 


1.2 




8.2 






Dufferin (in part) and Peel .... 
Dundas, and Grenville (in part) 
Elgin East and City of St. 
Thomas 


74.5 

7 

7.8 

7.8 

20.8 

14.5 

36.7 

33.2 

18.3 
52.1 
51.8 
27.2 

22.4 

55 

15.4 


3.1 

1.4 


9.9 






Essex South, and Kent (in part) 
Frontenac North, and Adding- 


2 

8 

1 

3 

12 
19 
11 
13 

10 
9 

1 

3 
5 
4 
1 


2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

8 
4 
1 

2 
2 


2.8 

10.5 

1.3 

8.3 

14.6 
20.2 
20.4 

16 

13 
15 

1.5 

7.1 

14.3 

5.1 

1.1 


2.8 
1.3 


Frontenac South, and Lennox 
(in part) 




Frontenac South and City of 




Glengarry (in part) and Prescott 
(in part) 


1.2 


Grey East 




Grey North and Bruce North. . . 
Grey South 


1.8 
1.2 


Haldimand (in part) and Went- 
worth (in part) 


10.4 


Halton 


6.7 




1.5 


Hastings North, Renfrew (in 

part) and City of Oshawa .... 

Hastings South 




8 
18 
28 

58 
50 
27 
17 
7 
31 
18 

7 

10 
31 

58 
25 
32 

61 

63 


1 


22.8 
23.1 
31.8 

66.6 
55.8 
32.6 
19.5 
9.9 
42.5 
27.3 

8.2 

12.8 
70.4 

61.7 
26.3 
42.7 

96.8 

81.8 


2.8 


5.7 






Huron West 


2.3 


Kent South and Elgin West (in 




Kent East and Elgin (in part).. 


3 


3 

3 

7 

16 

12 

18 

8 

10 
15 

3 
2 
4 

17 

11 


1 
3 

2 

1 
10 

3 

1 
1 

1 


6.8 


3.9 

3.6 

8 

22.5 

16.4 

27.3 

9.4 

12.8 
34.1 

3.2 
2.1 
5.3 

26.9 

14.3 




Lambton East 


1.2 




4.2 


Leeds and Grenville, No. 1 . . . . 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 2 . . . . 

Leeds and Grenville, No. 3, and 

Lanark (in part) 


2.3 


Lennox and Hastings South (in 


1.3 


Lincoln (in part) 


2.3 


Middlesex East and Elgin (in 
part) 


3.2 




1 


Norfolk (in part) 


1.3 


Northumberland and Durham, 
No. 1 


1.6 


Northumberland and Durham, 
No. 2 









DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



137 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 8— NATURE STUDY AND AGRICULTURE, VOCAL MUSIC, MANUAL 
TRAINING AND HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE IN RURAL SCHOOLS 



County Inspectorates 



Northumberland and Durham, 

No. 3, and Hastings (in part) . 
Ontario North and York (in 

part) 

Ontario South 

Oxford North and City of 

Woodstock 

Oxford South and Norfolk (in 

part) 

Peel (in part) and York (in part) 
Perth North and Wellington (in 

Part) 

Perth South 

Peterborough East 

Peterborough West and Victoria 

East 

Prescott and Russell, No. 1 . . . . 
Prescott and Russell, No. 2. . . . 
Prescott and Russell, No. 3 . . . . 
Prescott and Russell, No. 4 . . . . 

Prince Edward 

Renfrew North 

Renfrew South 

Simcoe Centre 

Simcoe East and Muskoka (in 

Part) 

Simcoe North 

Simcoe South, York (in part), 

Peel 

Simcoe West, Grey (in part), 

Dufferin (in part) 

Stormont 

Victoria West 

Waterloo, No. 1 

Waterloo, No. 2 

Welland East 

Welland South 

Welland (in part), Lincoln (in 

part) and Haldimand (in part) 

Wellington North 

Wellington South, and City of 

Guelph 

Wentworth 

York, No. 1 

York, No. 2 

York, No. 3 

York, No. 4 

York, No. 5 

York, No. 6 

Counties 



44 



4,726 



Schools which qualified for a Special Legislative Grant* for the teaching of 



Number 



%m< 



3,756 






1,725 



°'o 



45 



14 



16 



14 



581 



££ 



140 



Per cent. 



■S'S'C 

ed r; bo 



96.2 

26 
56.6 

94.8 

84.8 
64.6 

98.9 
100 
80.6 

94.9 
89.4 



62 

89.4 
100 
69.7 

95.5 



62.1 

56.4 
92.1 
92.7 
92.9 
32.1 
100 
65.3 

54.1 

88.4 



98 

93 

91 

100 

100 

100 

92 

90 



79.5 



>2 



71.8 

42.5 
40 

75.8 

72.9 
72.9 

77.6 
53.3 
50 

41.4 
7.6 



11.3 



65.2 



15.9 



46 

21.8 
6.6 
72.4 
23.2 
17.9 
26.6 
17.4. 

31.1 
59.4 

34.6 

24.6 

13.9 

50 

80 

87.5 

53.8 

18.7 



36.5 



4.2 



3.6 



13.3 



1.3 



1.8 
3.3 



27.8 
80 
100 
15.4 
12.5 



9.5 



S'3 



17.9 

16.4 
6.7 

17.6 

16.9 
8.3 

2.4 

2.2 

19.4 

12.1 
6.1 



7 
13.3 
8.5 
9.1 

18.2 
16.7 

11.5 

7.7 

5.3 

1 

7.1 

7.1 

20 

21.7 

8.1 
20 

20 

50.8 

11.1 

38.9 

10 

12.5 



12.5 



12.3 



138 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 8— NATURE STUDY AND AGRICULTURE, VOCAL MUSIC, MANUAL 
TRAINING AND HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE IN RURAL SCHOOLS 





o 
o 

o 

tn 

u 

3 

« 

'o 

X- 
V 

E 

3 


Schools which qualified for 


a Special Legislative Grant* for the teaching of 




Number 


Per cent. 


District Inspectorates 


4) 

"3 3. 


° 3 


u 

< 


T3 



J3 <U 
11 o 
to 
3 ii 

WW 


03 3 




S'l 


< 




©•8 

a! 


§1 




39 
61 
48 
53 
42 
51 
55 
17 
66 
45 
55 
47 
56 
2 
29 
66 
63 
59 
69 


17 
46 
10 
23 
29 
36 
28 
2 
60 
20 
28 
28 
26 










43.6 

75.4 

20.8 

43.4 

69.1 

70.6 

50.9 

11.8 

91 

44.4 

50.9 

59.6 

46.4 










II 


2 


1 


1 
8 
10 
5 
3 
5 


i 
i 


3.3 


1.6 


1.6 

16.7 

18.9 

11.9 

5.9 

9.1 




" " III 


2.1 


IV 




2 




3.8 


2 


" " v 




VI 


3 

2 


3 


5.9 
3.6 


5.9 




VII, Part I. . . 
VII, Part 2... 
VIII 








26 
10 
9 
10 
17 


i 

i 

i 






39.4 
22.2 
16.3 
21.3 
30.4 




IX 


2 
5 

1 


6 


4.4 
9.1 
2.1 


10.9 


2.2 


x 




XI 


2.1 


" " XII Part 1 


1.8 


" " XII Part 2 












XII, Part 3... 

XIII 

XIV 






















33 
51 
52 
19 


1 
1 


1 


7 
4 

7 
18 


i 

i 


50 

81 

88.2 

27.5 


1.5 
1.6 


1.5 


10.6 

6.4 

11.9 

26.1 


1.5 


" " XV 


1.7 


XVI 


1 




1.4 












923 


479 


18 


13 


140 


7 


51.9 


1.9 


1.4 


15.2 


.76 






All Rural Public Schools. . . 


5,649 


4,235 


1,743 


58 


721 


147 


74.9 


30.9 


1.0 


12.8 


2.60 


R.C. S.S. Inspectorates 


7 
19 
48 
44 
27 

9 
10 
27 
32 
19 

1 
17 

7 

4 
29 
24 
10 


4 






1 




57.2 






14.3 




" II 


1 




5.3 






" III 
















" IV 






















" V 


2 

7 


1 
1 


1 

1 






7.4 

77.8 


3.7 
11.1 


3.7 
11.1 






VI 


1 




11.1 




" VII 




VIII 


10 

26 

7 

1 

14 

1 

1 

20 

11 

8 


2 
3 
3 

1 
7 
2 
1 
2 
1 


1 
1 


2 

14 

5 




37 

81.3 
36.8 
100 
82.4 
14.3 
25 
69 

45.8 
80 


7.4 
9.4 

15.8 
100 

41.2 

28.6 

25 
6.9 
4.6 


100 

4.6 


7.4 
43.7 
26.3 




IX 




x 




" XI 




XII 


2 

1 
4 
2 


1 
• 


11.8 
14.3 
100 
6.9 


5.9 


XIII 




XIV 




XV 


















" XVIII 


















" XIX 


50 
43 
50 






















" XX 


2 
3 










4.7 
6 










" XXI 




































R.C. Separate Schools 


477 


117 


25 


4 


32 


1 


24.9 


5.3 


.85 


6.8 


.21 




6,126 


4,352 


1,768 


62 


753 


148 


71.1 


28.9 


.10 


12.3 


2.4 







♦To Board, or Teacher, or both. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



139 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 9— EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH EQUIPMENT, 1936-37 








Number of 
Schools in 
Operation 


Number of Schools in which the 

following Educational Equipment 

is supplied free to Pupils 


Number of Schools supplied 
with the following Equipment 


Rural Schools 


School 
Readers 


Other 
Textbooks 


Pupils' 

Work 

Supplies 


Physical 
Training or 
Recreational 
Equipment 


Agricultural 
Equipment 


First Aid 
Equipment 




Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


In Counties 


27 

61 

165 

115 

89 

71 

94 

105 

113 

139 

72 

69 

218 

72 

50 

60 

178 

183 

136 

169 

120 

136 

83 

64 

181 

101 

106 

119 

106 

73 

112 

95 

49 

71 

161 

25 

215 

76 

100 

84 

82 

142 

73 

190 


1 
. ..„ 

23 
. . „ 

"28' 
10 
17 














2 
16 
39 
33 
32 
13 
32 
50 
29 
13 

3 

9 
52 
22 

4 
17 
47 
62 
45 
56 
36 
12 

4 
2.5 
75 
46 
33 
34 
46 
23 
42 
35 

1 
15 
21 

4 
37 

8 
25 
49 
23 
49 
24 
112 


. „. 

2 

. . .2 

... 

.. . . . 

. . . . 

' '2' 

... 

3 
1 

1 

10 


7 
20 

119 
69 
73 
46 
66 
82 
62 
37 
40 
41 

108 
38 
15 
30 
68 

143 

107 

111 
75 
78 
13 
38 

152 
58 
51 
40 
95 
52 
65 
49 
11 
19 
91 
16 

107 
17 
44 
63 
40 

101 
47 

129 


1 

' io' 

9 

"l 

4 

4 

. _ . 

6 

4 

1 

. . . 

1 

■ '4' 
1 
5 
1 

i' 

3 

4 

2 

. . . . . 

2 
3 
3 

5 

'3' 
1 

8 


7 
47 
82 
54 
31 
31 
59 
79 
69 
65 
19 
28 

106 
42 
13 
46 
73 
85 
85 
95 
55 
55 
49 
49 

112 
57 
73 
75 
69 
47 
54 
44 
6 
45 
52 
10 

103 
33 
54 
46 
68 
60 
63 

147 




Brant 


1 




1 




10 

10 

6 

3 

3 

11 

15 

9 

4 








3 










1 


7 


Dufferin 


1 




5 








2 
7 
5 


. „ . 


2 

8 
5 






Elgin 






11 








1 




2 
















Grey 


7 






2 




7 














Hali burton 

Halton 


. . .„ 

7 
10 
2 
3 
2 
1 


2 
2 
8 
2 
2 
2 


1 


3 
3 
9 
3 
2 
3 




2 

8 

20 

30 

2 

15 

11 

1 

1 

12 

4 

3 

26 




"2 


Huron 

Kent 


2 
1 




2 




1 




























1 
3 








5 

2 
5 
1 






2 


Norfolk 






2 


Northumberland. . . 


6 


1 


7 
1 
1 
4 
2 
1 




1 


Oxford 








10 
5 

2 

7 






Peel 

Perth 


1 

7 

5 

60 


2 
2 

1 


1 
2 
4 


. _ . 


Peterborough 

Prescott 


3 




















19 

51 

4 

9 

2 

7 

' V 

i 

14 




3 






4 

1 

10 












4 


Simcoe 


2 




3 




1 




1 




1 

• -J- 

4 


. „. 


1 
5 


. .„ 


8 
25 
15 
33 

4 
66 


... 

. . . „ 






2 


Welland 

Wellington 


.... 
1 


York 


38 


4 


41 


1 


13 






Totals, Counties 


4,750 


327 


97 


21 


124 


2 


403 


9 


1,355 


41 


2,733 


109 


2,542 


71 


In Districts 
Algoma 


91 
73 
35 
47 
92 
70 

118 
61 

101 
74 

108 


2 
62 
1 
1 
2 
39 

"3' 

36 

12 

1 


12 

13 

3 

19 

2 

3 

3 

13 

15 

7 

36 


"35' 
.... 

.... 

5 


8 

14 

3 

19 

2 

3 

4 

13 

14 

8 

34 


"33' 
.. . . 

. „. 

3 


8 
15 

3 

2 
49 

2 
14 
10 
11 
11 
37 


"i9 - 

... 

. . . . 

1 


28 
11 
10 

9 
22 

5 
29 
18 
14 
17 
26 


. ... 

2 


39 
25 
16 
33 
73 
22 
45 
25 
28 
46 
26 


2 

. . „ 

2 


55 
36 
22 
32 
48 
15 
38 
19 
21 
38 
63 


1 




8 




1 


Manitoulin 


i 




1 


Parry Sound 

Rainy River 


... 

1 


Temiskaming 

Thunder Bay 




Totals.Districts. . 


870 


159 


126 


42 


122 


38 


162 


22 


189 


7 


378 


5 


387 


14 


Totals, Rural 
Schools 


5,620 


486 


223 


63 


246 


40 


565 


31 


1,544 


48 


3,111 


114 


2,929 


85 


Percentages, 

RuralSchools. . . . 






3.97 


12.96 


4.38 


8.23 


10.05 


6.38 


27.47 


9.88 


55.36 


23.46 


52.12 


17 49 











140 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 9— EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH EQUIPMENT, 1936-37 





Urban Centres in which one or 

more of the following Items of 

Educational Equipment 

is supplied free to Pupils 


Urban Centres whose Schools 

are supplied with one or more 

of the following Items 

of Equipment 


Cities 


School 
Readers 


Other 
Textbooks 


Pupils' 

Work 

Supplies 


Physical 
Training 
or Recre- 
ational 
Equipment 


Agri- 
cultural 
Equipment 


First 

Aid 

Equipment 




Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


In Counties 
Belleville . 














X 




X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 

X 


x 


Brantford 


X 




X 




X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




x 


Chatham 




X 


X 


X 


Gait 


X 




X 




X 


Guelph 




X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 

X 

X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 


X 


Hamilton 


X 
X 
X 




X 




X 




x 


Kitchener 




X 
X 




X 


London 


X 


Niagara Falls 






X 


Oshawa 














X 


Ottawa 


X 




X 




X 




X 


Owen Sound. . 


X 


Peterborough . . 














X 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas. 


X 




X 




X 
X 




X 
X 


Sarnia 










X 


Stratford. . 










X 

X 


X 


X 


Toronto 


X 




X 




X 


Welland 




Windsor 


X 
X 

X 


X 


X 

X 

X 


X 


X 
X 

X 


X 


X 


In Districts 

Fort William 

North Bay 


X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 


X 

X 
X 
X 


X 
X 


Port Arthur . . 










X 

X 




X 


SaultSte. Marie.... 


X 




X 




X 
X 






















Totals, Cities . . 


12 


1 


12 


1 


19 


2 


24 


16 


23 


22 


27 


25 




44.44 


3.85 


44.44 


3.85 


70.37 


7.69 


88.88 


61.54 


85.18 


84.61 


100.00 


96.15 


Towns — Counties 
Alexandria 


















X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




X 




Alliston 










X 

X 




X 






Almonte . . 










X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


Amherstburg. . 












X 
X 
X 


X 


X 


Arnprior 














X 


















Aylmer 
















Barrie. . 


















X 
















X 
X 
X 






X 
X 


X 


Bowmanville . . 






X 








X 


X 
X 




Brampton 








X 






Brockville . . 


X 


Burlington. . 
















Campbellford . 




















X 


X 


Carleton Place .... 






















Chesley . . 














X 










Clinton . . 
















X 
X 






Cobourg 


















X 


X 


X 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



141 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 9— EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH EQUIPMENT, 1936-37 








Urban Centres in which one or 

more of the following Items of 

Educational Equipment 

is supplied free to Pupils 


Urban Centres whose Schools 

are supplied with one or more 

of the following Items 

of Equipment 


Towns 


School 
Readers 


Other 
Textbooks 


Pupils' 

Work 

Supplies 


Physical 
Training 
or Recre- 
ational 
Equipment 


Agri- 
cultural 
Equipment 


First 

Aid 

Equipment 




Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


In Counties 
Collingwood 










X 






X 
X 




X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


Cornwall . . 












X 

X 


X 


Deseronto 
















Dresden 






















Dundas . . 














X 
X 


X 


X 
X 


X 


X 


Dunnville 
















Eastview 










X 






Elmira . 












X 




X 






Essex 














X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


Forest 


















X 




Fort Erie 


X 




X 




X 










Gananoque 




X 


X 


X 




X 


Georgetown 
















Goderich 


















X 
X 


X 




Grimsby 




















Hanover 


















X 


Harriston 


















X 




Harrow 




















Hawkesbury 
















X 








Hespeler 
















X 


X 


X 


Ingersoll 














X 


X 


X 


Kincardine 
















Kingsville 
























La Salle 














X 
X 
X 


X 

X 

X 


X 

X 
X 

X 


X 
X 


X 


Leamington 














X 


Leaside 


X 








X 






Lindsav 


X 


Listowel 














X 




Meaford 
















Merritton 






















X 


Midland 


X 




X 










X 


X 




X 


Milton 








X 




Mimico 














X 


X 
X 
X 


X 


X 


Mitchell 
















Mount Forest 










X 




X 


X 




Napanee 












Newmarket 














X 
X 
X 




X 
X 


X 


X 


New Toronto 










X 






Niagara 












Oakville 




















X 


Orangeville 










X 




X 


























X 


Palmerston 


















X 
X 

X 
X 


X 
X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




Paris 














X 


X 


X 


Parkhill 




X 












Pembroke 








X 




X 


Penetanguishene 
















Perth 














X 
X 


X 


X 
X 


X 


x 


Petrolia 
















Picton 














X 


Port Colborne 














X 






Port Hope 














X 


X 

X 


X 




Prescott 














X 



142 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 9— EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH EQUIPMENT, 1936-37 





Urban Centres in which one or 

more of the following Items of 

Educational Equipment 

is supplied free to Pupils 


Urban Centres whose Schools 

are supplied with one or more 

of the following Items 

of Equipment 


Towns 


School 
Readers 


Other 
Textbooks 


Pupils' 

Work 

Supplies 


Physical 
Training 
or Recre- 
ational 
Equipment 


Agri- 
cultural 
Equipment 


First 

Aid 

Equipment 




Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


In Counties 
Preston 


X 




X 




X 




X 
X 
X 


X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 
X 


X 
X 

X 
X 


X 


Renfrew 


X 


Ridgetown 
















Riverside 


X 




X 








X 


Rockland 




X 






X 


St. Mary's 
















X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


Seaforth 










X 






X 


X 


Simcoe 
















Smith's Falls 
















X 


X 
X 


X 


X 


Southampton 














X 




Stayner 
















Strathroy 


















X 
X 

X 


X 
X 




Tecumseh . . . 
















X 


X 


Thornbury 


















Thorold 


















X 


Tilbury 
















X 




X 


Tillsonburg. . 


















Trenton 










X 




X 
X 


X 


X 
X 


X 




Uxbridge. . 












Vankleek Hill.. . 
















Walkerton .... 














X 


X 


X 


X 
X 

X 




Wallaceburg. . 














X 


Waterloo 










X 
X 




X 

X 




X 

X 


X 


Weston 










X 


Whitby . . . 












Wiarton 














X 
X 




X 




Wingham . . 
















In Districts 
Bala 














X 
X 






X 


Blind River. . 






















X 


Bracebridge 










X 




X 


X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


X 
X 
X 
X 




Bruce Mines 












Capreol .... 




















Charleton . . 
















X 
X 


X 


Chelmsford 
















X 


Cobalt 


X 

X 




X 
X 




X 




X 


X 
X 


X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


Cochrane 


X 


Copper Cliff 




Coniston 














X 


X 


X 
X 


X 
X 


X 


Dry den 
















Knglehart. . 
















Fort Frances 

Gore Bay 


X 




X 




X 






X 


X 


Gravenhurst 


















X 
X 

X 
X 


X 




Haileybury 
















X 


X 


Hearst .... 










X 






X 


Huntsville. . . 






Iroquois Falls 
















X 


Kearney. . 












Keewatin. . 




















X 
X 




Kenora .... 














X 


X 




X 


Latchford 
















Little Current 




X 










X 


X 


X 


X 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



143 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 9— EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH EQUIPMENT, 1936-37 





Urban Centres in which one or 

more of the following Items of 

Educational Equipment 

is supplied free to Pupils 


Urban Centres whose Schools 

are supplied with one or more 

of the following Items 

of Equipment 


Towns 


School 
Readers 


Other 
Textbooks 


Pupils' 

Work 

Supplies 


Physical 
Training 
or Recre- 
ational 
Equipment 


Agri- 
cultural 
Equipment 


First 

Aid 

Equipment 




Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


In Districts 
Massey 


















X 








Mattawa. . 


















X 
X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


Matheson . . 














X 
X 
X 


X 


X 
X 




New Liskeard • 














X 


Parry Sound. 
















Powassan 






















Sioux Lookout 














X 






X 




Smooth Rock Falls . . 








X 








X 


X 


Sturgeon Falls 








X 
X 




X 

X 






Timmins 


X 




X 






X 


X 


X 


Trout Creek 




Webbwood 














X 


































Totals, Towns 


10 


3 


11 


2 


26 


1 


60 


36 


75 


45 


123 


58 


Percentage, Towns. 


7.04 


3.90 


7.75 


2.60 


18.31 


1.30 


42.25 


46.75 


52.82 


58.44 


86.62 


75.32 


Villages — Counties 
Acton 






















X 
X 




Ailsa Craig 
























Alvinston 


















X 
X 
X 






Arkona 
























Arthur 


















X 


X 
X 
X 




Athens 




















Ayr 














X 




X 
X 
X 
X 






Bancroft 
















Barry's Bay 


















X 






Beamsville 














X 
X 




X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




Beaverton 
















Beeton 






















Belle River 


















X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


X 


Bloomfield 














X 






Blyth 
















Bobcaygeon 














X 
X 






Bradford 
















Braeside 
















Brighton 




















Brussels 


















X 
X 
X 
X 






Caledonia 














X 
X 






X 

X 




Cayuga 
















Chatsworth 
















Chesterville 
















X 


X 


X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


X 


Chippawa 














X 
X 
X 




Clifford 
















X 
X 
X 






Colborne 










X 






Coldwater 












Courtright 




















Creemore 
























Delhi 
























Drayton 


















X 
X 
X 

X 






Dutton 


















X 


X 
X 

x 




Eganville 













X 


X 
X 




Elora 




i 




X 




X 



144 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 9— EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH EQUIPMENT, 1936-37 





Urban Centres in which one or 

more of the following Items of 

Educational Equipment 

is supplied free to Pupils 


Urban Centres whose Schools 

are supplied with one or more 

of the following Items 

of Equipment 


Villages 


School 
Readers 


Other 
Textbooks 


Pupils' 

Work 

Supplies 


Physical 
Training 
or Recre- 
ational 
Equipment 


Agri- 
cultural 
Equipment 


First 

Aid 

Equipment 




Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


In Counties 
Embro. . 














X 




X 
X 




X 

X 
X 
X 
X 




Erin . . . 
















Exeter. . . 




















Fenelon Falls . . 














X 










Fergus . . 










X 
X 
X 
X 






X 




X 


Flesherton. . 


















Fonthill 










X 


X 
X 
X 


X 


X 
X 




X 


x 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




Forest Hill 


X 




X 




X 


Frankford 




Glencoe . . . 
















X 






Grand Valley . 














X 
X 






Hagersville 
















X 
X 






Hastings . . 
















Havelock . 














X 
X 
X 
X 






X 




Hens all 
















X 
X 






Hepworth 
















X 

. .X 




Humberstone . 
















Iroquois. . 




















X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
. X 




Jarvis. . 
























Kemptville . . . 














X 
X 




X 






Lakefield. . 
















Lanark . . . 
















X 
X 






Lion's Head 














X 
X 
X 
X 
X 






Long Branch 

L'Orignal 


X 




X 




X 














Lucknow 
























Madoc. . . 








































X 
X 








Markham 














X 




X 


X 
X 




Marmora. . . . 
















Maxville 


















X 
X 
X 




Merrickville . 


















X 


X 

X 
X 
X 
X 




Mildmay . 
















X 


X 


Millbrook . 


















Milverton 


















X 






Morrisburg 














X 
X 






Neustadt . . 
















X 
X 
X 
X 






Newboro 
















Newburgh 














X 






X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




Newbury . 
















Newcastle 




















New Hamburg 
























Norwich . 














X 
X 










Norwood. . 
















X 
X 






Oil Springs 
















Paisley 




















Point Edward. . 














X 
X 




X 
X 


X 




Port Credit 










X 






Port Dalhousie 












Port Dover 






















Port Elgin . 
























Port McNicoll 














X 




X 






Port Perry 

















DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



145 



THE PUBLIC AND SEPARATE SCHOOLS 

TABLE 9— EDUCATIONAL AND HEALTH EQUIPMENT, 1936-37 





Urban Centres in which one or 

more of the following Items of 

Educational Equipment 

is supplied free to Pupils 


Urban Centres whose Schools 

are supplied with one or more 

of the following Items 

of Equipment 


Villages 


School 
Readers 


Other 
Textbooks 


Pupils' 
Work 

Supplies 


Physical 
Training 
or Recre- 
ational 
Equipment 


Agri- 
cultural 
Equipment 


First 

Aid 

Equipment 




Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


Pub. 


Sep. 


In Counties 
Port Rowan 






















X 
X 
X 
X 




Port Stanley 










X 








X 


















X 






Richmond Hill 
















X 
X 
X 
X 






Ripley . . 














X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 






Rockcliffe 


X 




X 




X 






X 
X 








St Clair Beach 
















Shallow Lake 
















X 




X 
X 
. X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 




Shelburne . 
















Springfield 






















Stirling 














X 




X 
X 
X 






Stoney Creek 
















StoufFville 


































X 






Sutton . 
















X 
X 
X 
X 


X 
X 






X 




X 




X 


X 


X 
X 
X 


X 


x 


Teeswater 




Thamesville 
















Thedf ord 
















Thornloe .... 














X 


X 






x 












X 










Tweed . . 












X 

X 
X 


X 


X 


X 




Victoria Harbour .... 






































Wardsville 
















X 






Waterdown. .... 










X 






Waterford 


















Watford 


















X 

X 

X 

X 

X. 

X 

X 

X 






Wellington 














X 
X 






West Lome 
















Wheatley 
















Winchester 




















Woodbridge 




















X 




Woodville . . .... 




















Wyoming. 














X 






X 

X 
X 




Districts 
Burk's Falls . . ... 


























X 
X 








X 
X 

X 






Port Carling 

Port Sydney 












X 
X 
















X 
X 




South River 












Sundridge 


















X 
X 






Windermere 




















X 
























Totals, Villages 


4 




4 




16 


2 


61 


8 


81 


12 


109 


8 


Percentage, Villages. . 


2.67 




2.67 




10.67 


9.57 


40.67 


38.10 


54.00 


57.14 


72.67 


38.10 


Totals, Urban 

Municipalities. . . 


26 


4 


27 


3 


61 


5 


145 


60 


179 


79 


259 


91 


Percentages, Urban 
Municipalities. .. 


8.15 


3.23 


8.46 


2.42 


19.12 


4.03 


45.45 


48.37 


56.11 


63.71 


81.19 


73.39 



146 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND 
TABLE 10— SCHOOL HEALTH 



Municipalities in which 
School Medical or Nursing 

Service is Sponsored by 
the Local Board of Health 



No. of 

School 

Children 

Enrolled 

t 



Personnel 



Reg. 
Nurse 



Time 



M.D. 



D.D.S. 



Time 



IT 



6-22 

£8o 



Cities Schools 

1 Brantford P. & S. 

2 *Hamilton P. & S. 

3 Fort William S 

4 *Kitchener P. & S. 

5 *North Bay P. & S. 

6 *Oshawa P. & S. 

7 Ottawa S 



4,918 
24,544x 



3M 
32 



6Ht 



Not 
1,388 



asked for 



8 Port Arthur P. & S. 

9 *St. Catharines P. & S. 

10 *St. Thomas P. & S. 

11 *Sarnia P. & S. 

12 *Stratford P. & S. 

13 *Toronto P. & S. 

14 ♦Woodstock P. & S. 

Suburban 

1 *York, East P. & S. 

Towns 

♦Bowman ville P 

♦Burlington P 

♦Cochrane P. & S. 

Cornwall P. & S. 

♦Dryden(A) P 

6 ♦Dundas(B) S 

7 ♦Elmira P. & S. 

8 ♦Fort Frances P. & S. 

9 ♦Haileybury P. & S. 

10 ♦Ingersoll P. & S. 

11 ♦Kirkland Lake (Teck Twp.) ... P. & S. 

12 *Lindsay P. & S. 

13 ♦Midland P. & S. 

14 *New Toronto P 

15 *Oakville(c) P. & S. 

16 ♦Orillia P. & S. 

17 ♦Paris P. & S. 

18 ♦Penetanguishene P. & S. 

19 ♦Perth P. & S. 

20 Port Colborne P 

21 ♦Renfrew P. & S. 

22 ♦St. Mary's (Oct. 1-Dec. 31) . . .P. & S. 

23 ♦Simcoe P 

24 ♦Strathroy P 

25 ♦Timmins P. & S. 

26 ♦Wallaceburg P. & S. 

27 ♦Weston P. & S. 

Villages 

1 ♦Forest Hill P 

2 ♦Swansea P 

Part Time 

1 ♦Gananoque P 

Rural Units 

1 ♦Ayr, North & South Dumfries.. P 

2 Etobicoke Twp., Lambton 

Mills, Islington P 

3 Tecumseh and E. Sandwich. . .P. & S. 

4 + York North Twp P. & S. 



Totals. 



5,737 
3,038 
4,455 

11,593 
3,080 
4,366 
2,118 
2,869 
2,579 

96,154 

1,553 

6,173 

541 

525 

701 

3,706 

438 

117 

383 

1,357 

449 

810 

3,186 

1,042 

1,228 

1,190 

945 

1,629 

630 



607 

1,474 

1,007 

466 

860 

416 

4,774 

1,011 

894 

1,152 
650 

560 

758 

750 

1,798 
2,666 



2 
4 

13 
2 
5 
2 
3 
2 
107 



2Ht. 



f.t. 



H 



X 

X 
X 
1 

34 



7f.t. 
27p.t. 



M 



Not 
404 
567 

1,441 

367 

471 

192 

443 

269 
9,563 

279 

841 

62 

49 

78 
599 

62 

14 

36 

88 

57 

88 
568 
120 
175 
157 

73 
163 

64 



75 
180 
121 



H 



H 



86 

52 

914 

127 

144 

80 
82 

72 

115 

116 
234 



2^t. 



211,897 21,076 



asked for 
174 
20 pres. 
90 kinder. 



♦Generalized service of which school nursing service is a part. fChild Welfare Branch Estimate. 

Jin D.D.S. column means some dental work done by service clubs or other private agencies. 

(A)Assisted by Red Cross. (B)Salary paid by private individual. 

(c)Includes S.S. 12, 13, 16, 18, Trafalgar Twp. (Part time service). 

(x)Includes High School. (z)Total termination. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



147 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
INSPECTION, 1937 



No. of defects 
(other than 
dental) requir- 
ing correction 
found, 1937 


4> , l> 

otl'S 


•o a 


O p 

III 


No. excluded 
on account of 
communicable 
disease 


No. of Grade 
VIII children 
completing 
course during 
year, 1937 


No. of these 
leaving with 
uncorrected 
defects other 
than dental 


a 
o 
'35 

> 


bo 

a 

X 


a 
o 
H 


<U U) 

> a 

tL'l 

(3 2 « 


u 
u 

6 


1 


409 




852 


515 


This in 


formation 


was 


not 


asked 


for. 




2 31,700 

3 


5,528 


14,801 


6,302 


1,554 


This in 


formation 


was 


not 


asked 


for. 




4 938 


353 


3,543 


2,000 


633 


This in 


formation 


was 


not 


asked 


for. 




5 389 


45 


770 


418 


16 


295 


95 


7 


3 


78 


26 


ii 


6 51 




1,158 


667 


90 


442 


112 


14 


1 


146 


39 


92 


7 420 


158 


3,936 


1,070 


133 
















8 217 


39 


322 


85 


118 


315 


71 


10 




39 


9 


13 


9 531 


40 


657 


829 


110 




12 


79 


4 


76 


31 


26 


10 237 


122 


463 


335 


37 


248 


49 


3 


2 


27 


8 


15 


11 242 


75 
111 




493 
370 


144 
50 


299 
304 


88 
59 


11 
12 


2 


67 

45 


28 
5 




12 191 


472 


1 


13 12,723 


1,991 


66,656 


40,202 


1,353 


12,600app. 


This infor 


mation 


was 


not 


asked 


for. 


14 132 


129 
245 


274 
1,458 


246 
408 


27 
373 


205 
659 




5 

21 


1 
6 


38 
43 


16 
25 


1 


1 598 


105 


10 


1 38 




110 


63 




58 


17 


1 




11 


1 


4 


2 74 


16 

2 

120 


258 

57 

395 


50 

45 

350 


22 
42 


62 

80 

269 


9 






8 


9 




3 47 








4 223 


75 


12 


15 


25 


14 


34 


5 75 


4 


236 


66 


48 


40 


19 


2 




10 


1 


13 


6 5 


4 

7 

25 


19 
127 
792 


19 

50 

172 


91 
30 


5 

44 

168 


2 
25 
43 










2 


7 22 






8 
37 


8 
26 


9 


8 64 


1 


2 


8 


9 81 


30 


92 


38 


55 


46 


11 


3 


1 


8 


1 


2 


10 130 


29 


32 


29 


32 


62 


19 


8 


3 


8 


5 


2 


11 261 


91 


449 


201 


120 


204 


39 


12 


3 


13 


6 


3 


12 106 


33 
12 


167 
615 


30 

151 


19 
9 


65 
32 


8 
28 






5 

21 


3 
4 




13 56 


2 




1 


14 109 


33 


780 


197 


33 


91 


59 


3 




33 


2 


4 


15 40 


40 

2 

25 


519 

1,280 
82 


204 
56 
52 


29 


43 


5 






5 






16 54 










17 54 


121 


58 


7 




1 


1 


2 


3 


18 
























19 9 


9 
12 


433 
80 


68 
35 


20 
15 
















20 77 


108 


21 


3 




12 


11 


4 


21 106 


16 


550 


138 


168 


133 


57 


11 




34 


10 


7 


22 89 


43 
1 


8 


4 

260 

35 

61 


2 

14 

144 

15 
















23 128 


81 

43 

501 


14 

3 

163 






14 

3 

81 


2 


3 


24 17 


39 
131 








25 145 


16 


11 


35 


20 


26 58 


25 


95 


66 


143 


56 


25 


2 


1 


18 


5 


13 


27 244 


18 


37 


36 




96 


26 


2 




2 


1 


21 


1 30 


19 


785 
310 

409 


106 
99 


5 
26 

14 
















2 303 


76 
41 


5 
10 






5 

8 






1 5 


2 


1 


3 




1 124 


65 

42 


313 

469 

181 


147 

310 

58 


28 

126 
53 
















2 75 


72 
140 


8 
51 






8 
17 


8 
14 




3 109 


10 


1 


9 


4 96 




40 


5 


6 
































51,423 


9,968 


104,400 


57,478 


6,583 


18,041 


1,340 


252 


58 


954 


358 


331 



148 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND 
TABLE 10 -SCHOOL HEALTH 



Municipalities in which 
B School Medical or Nursing 
Service is Sponsored by 
the Local School Boards 


No. of 

School 

Children 

Enrolled 

t 


Personnel 


4> 

3 mm- 

"s-S-S 


lese 
physi- 
lina- 
are 


Reg. 
Nurse 


M.D. 


Time 


D.D.S. 


Time 


No. of t 
who had 
cal exar 
tion bef 
entering 


Cities 
1 Belleville 


Schools 
. .P 


1,827 
2,000 
3,207 
2,038 
2,573 
2,866 
9,200 
1,238 
2,597 
9,914 
2,240 
2,780 
3,069 
2,100 
2,217 
1,907 
22,865x 

11,106 

1,260 

1,286 

745 

857 

1,380 

1,121 

936 

1.509 

565 
325 
530 
306 
898 
982 


1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
6 
1 
2 
5 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
10 

7 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

H 

y 2 

H 
H 

H 






1 
t 


H 


209 
190 
359 
228 
319 
303 

Not 
116 
327 

Not 
231 

Not 
375 
373 
375 
193 

Not 

Not 

132 

171 


29 


2 Chatham. . 


. .P.. . 






19 app. 


3 Fort William 


. .P 






4 Gait 


. .P. &S. 
. . P 


1 


H 


t 

X 

Hosp. 

6 


clin. 

H 




5 Guelph 




6 Kingston 


. . P 










. . P 


1 






8 London 


..S 




9 Niagara Falls 

10 Ottawa 


. .P. &s. 
. . p 






: 

i 

y 2 


H 
K 

f.t. 
p.t. 

H 

H 


46 


1 


full 






. .P. &S. 

. .p 


83 


12 Peterborough 


1 


V2 


l 
X 

X 
X 
X 

2 

1 

6 

X 
X 




13 Sault Ste. Marie 


. . p 






. . p 










. .s 








16 Welland 


.p 








17 Windsor 


.p. . . . 


1 
3 

1 


f.t. 
p.t. 




Suburban 
1 York Twp 


.p 




Towns 
1 Barrie 


.P. &s. 
.p 




2 Brockville 










.p. . . 






38 




. p 






X 
X 




119 
165 
189 
106 
155 

109 
26 
68 
38 
95 

104 


86 




.P. &s. 
. p 






15 








55 




.s 










33 


8 Waterloo 


.P. &s. 
.p 






X 




104 


Part Time Services 
1 Brant Co 








2 Brockville 


.s 






X 


H 




3 Etobicoke, Humber Bay 


. p 

.p 












X 




5 


5 Guelph 


s 










.s 






X 




10 




. p 








8 Scarboro Twp., S.S. No. 13. . 

9 Scarboro, No. 15 


. p 

.p 


500 
600 

213 


H 

y 2 
h 










71 
40 
36 


2 










14 




p 












11 Trafalgar (n) 












12 Trenton 


p.. . 


1,000 app. 


H 






X 




110 


18 


13 Wiarton 


p.. . 








Rural Units 
1 Carleton Co.,(Nepean Twp.).. 


. p 

.p 


1,363 
1,142 
1,650 
1,935 
1,476 

1,712 
1,477 

775 
1,040 
2,474 

526 

1,688 


2 

H 

l 










113 
119 
207 
236 
180 

191 
97 
66 
79 

106 
74 

236 
















.p 






X 








.P. &s. 
.p 








5 Peel Co., (Brampton) 










30 


6 Welland Co., (Stamford, Wil 


.p 






X 
X 




24 


7 Welland Co., (Thorold) 

8 Welland Co., (Fort Erie) . . 


.P. &s. 

. p 

.p 

.p 














9 WellandCo., (Fort Erie N.)... 
10 Wentworth Co 










33 






X 






11 York Co., (Etobicoke pt.) .... 


.p 






33 


12 York Co., (Scarboro, S.S. 
No. 10, 12) . . 


p . 










12 
















Totals 


118,015 












7,036 


689 



tChild Welfare Branch Estimate. 

Jin D.D.S. column means some dental work done by service clubs or other private agencies. 
(x)Includes High School. (z)Total termination. 

(d) S.S. 12, 13, 16, 18, included in report for Oakville. (See page 000.) 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



149 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
INSPECTION, 1937 



No. of defects 
(other than 
dental) requir- 
ing correction 
found, 1937 


«) - 

otJ'g 
. v Z 




lis 


No. excluded 
on account of 
communicable 
disease 


No. of Grade 
VIII children 
completing 
course during 
year, 1937 


No. of these 
leaving with 
uncorrected 
defects other 
than dental 


c 
> 


a 

V 


jn 

'55 

a 
o 


V bo 

> a 

<u 2 m 


u 
V 

6 


1 123 


35 


1,330 


572 




184 


38 


4 


2 


30 


2 




2 140 


104 


684 


410 


25 


162 


8 


3 


1 


4 


5 




3 401 


89 


553 


279 


331 


340 


76 


20 


2 


58 


25 


9 


4 175 


57 


184 


191 


20 


215 


15 




2 


13 




2 


5 221 


60 
132 


179 
2,241 


179 
522 


49 
332 


240 
325 


74 
54 






8 
33 


4 
5 


1 


6 353 


5 




24 


7 2,136 


93 


4,110 


4,086 


867 


This in 


formation 


not 


asked 


for. 






8 62 


24 


327 


95 


108 


154 


16 


3 




10 


3 




9 284 


139 


503 


268 


130 


340 


29 


6 


1 


16 


11 




10 3,520 


3,645z 


2,264 


1,571 


359 


This in 


formation 


not 


asked 


for. 






11 147 


45 


1,391 


497 


135 


180 


67 


2 


1 


39 


30 


2 


12 383 


141 


1,813 


752 


80 


This in 


formation 


not 


asked 


for. 






13 166 


34 


288 


288 


779 


284 


105 


17 


1 


67 


13 


7 


14 199 


136 


902 


456 


250 


234 


75 


8 


8 


23 


20 


18 


15 28 


3 

17 


267 
149 


176 
149 


20 
56 


146 
147 


3 
26 






2 
19 


1 
6 




16 123 


2 


1 


3 


17 1,549 


605 


4,613 


4,199 


498 


This in 


formation 


not 


asked 


for. 






1 1,448 


181 


7,759 


5,268 


129 


This in 


formation 


not 


asked 


for. 






1 60 


19 


74 


31 


308 


150 


17 


1 


1 


11 


6 


1 


2 63 


35 
34 




196 
284 


363 
12 
73 


103 
40 
80 


24 

2 

19 


8 


1 


12 


3 


2 


3 29 


40 

667 




4 127 


2 


1 


14 


7 


7 


5 165 


64 


754 


329 


74 


126 


34 


5 


1 


24 


11 


10 


6 471 


81 


770 


468 


399 


110 


9 


2 




7 


7 




7 72 


11 


738 


46 


249 


40 


20 


3 


1 


4 


3 


9 


8 113 


59 


326 


323 


33 


177 


37 


7 


3 


33 


4 


2 


1 41 


21 


79 
62 


30 
32 


42 
28 
















2 15 


43 


4 


1 




3 




9 


3 45 


13 
16 

39 


100 
203 
150 
246 


37 

143 

6 

182 


7 

6 
27 


41 
35 
75 
86 


10 
3 






10 

2 


10 

1 




4 • 23 








5 8 








6 131 

7 


23 


5 


1 


10 


3 


17 


8 49 


41 
6 


35 
128 
150 


10 
40 
35 


6 


30 

39 

9 




2 


2 


5 




2 


9 18 






10 26 


1 






1 


1 




11 








12 26 


16 


128 


122 


22 


70 


10 


2 


1 


5 


2 




13 
























1 101 


39 


160 


80 


157 


151 


36 


8 




23 


12 




2 87 


35 


163 


113 




91 


16 




1 


15 


13 


1 


3 306 


101 


268 


115 


24 


136 


28 


4 




12 


12 




4 210 


70 


225 


225 


72 


127 


29 


3 




26 


22 




5 




404 

422 
620 


155 

306 
256 


76 

36 
17 


129 

180 

187 


44 

3 
45 


4 


1 


39 

3 

28 


11 

3 
10 


10 


6 45 


36 
29 




7 80 


5 


2 


13 


8 62 


14 


67 


33 


15 


19 


7 


1 




5 


5 


1 


9 64 


29 


411 


165 


103 


82 


13 


4 




6 


3 




10 167 


67 
69 


279 
265 


209 
109 


220 
57 


63 
51 


18 
17 












11 119 


1 


2 


5 


5 


4 


12 241 


28 


678 


78 


29 


145 


83 


27 


4 


72 


60 


11 


14,427 


6,512 


38,169 


24,116 


6,623 


5,566 


1,138 


165 


41 


697 


339 


165 



150 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC AND 
TABLE 10— SCHOOL HEALTH 



Municipalities in which 
C School Nursing Service is paid 
for by School Boards, and 
given by V.O.N. 


No. of 

School 

Children 

Enrolled 

t 


Personnel 


s 

u 

■S-fi.3 

oft 


No. of these 
who had physi- 
cal examina- 
tion before 
entering 


Reg. 

Nurse 


M.D. 


Time 


D.D.vS. 


Time 


Municipality Schools 
1 Braeside P 


104 
79 
755 
640 
215 
450 
447 
200 
600 
191 
700 
415 
175 
512 


1 
2 


X 

nurses' 


"x 

X 

X 
X 

X. 

X 

X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 
X 


t 




11 

8 
91 
76 
41 
46 
54 
35 
98 
23 
80 
60 
20 
58 


10 


2 Broughdale and Manor Park. . .P 

3 Cobalt P. & S. 


2 


X 




6 














6 Huntsville P 






26 




X 








26 










10 Point Edward P 












50 


12 Walkerton (Sept. 1937) P. & S. 

13 Westminister Twp P 

14 Whitby P. & S. 














t 












5,483 












701 


120 
















1 Hespeler P. & S. 

Private Agency Sponsoring Nursing Service 


485 

675 
733 


1 

1 
1 


" 


X 


t 

X 




44 

130 
89 






2 South Porcupine P 
















1,408 












219 


















Municipalities in which 
D School Nursing Service is given 


















1 Apsley P., 15 


233 
170 


X 
X 










37 


7 


2 Armstrong and Ignace P., 2 


























225 

252 


X 
X 










36 
26 




5 Coe Hill P.. 14 


























195 


X 






























185 












30 


30 


















1,401 
511 


X 
X 














12 Lion's Head P.» 18 










87 




































203 


X 










33 


27 


16 Quibell 












17 Rainy River P-» 12 


280 
107 


X 
X 






X 




22 
10 


8 








10 
















160 
273 
296 


NoPu 

X 
X 


blicHe 


alth 


Nurse 


at pre 


sent, Dece 
30 
20 


mber, 1937 


21 Whitney . .P-, 8, S., 1 




























24 Toronto Twp., Port Credit P., 4 


480 


X 










52 
















4,971 












383 


82 
















• Grand Totals 


342,259 










29,459 2.230 










tChild Welfare Branch Estimate. 

Jin D.D.S. column means some dental work done by service clubs or other private agencies. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



151 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
INSPECTION, 1937 



No. of defects 
(other than 
dental) requir- 
ing correction 
found, 1937 


<« v-co 

3 82 

oti-g 


oco 

2 a* 


0*0 
OS 

ill 


No. excluded 
on account of 
communicable 
disease 


No. of Grade 
VIII children 
completing 
course during 
year, 1937 


No. of these 
leaving with 
uncorrected 
defects other 
than dental 


n 
.2 

> 


bfi 

S 

CO 

V 


c 
o 
H 


> a 
« d rt 

1) 2 4J 

o «^ 


43 



1 13 


1 

83 

16 

2 

10 

14 

22 

5 

28 

5 

3 

19 


161 

12 

270 

138 

150 

20 

78 

29 

115 

72 

36 

32 

57 

40 


14 

10 

250 

43 

5 
16 
57 
22 
35 
23 
42 

6 
13 
33 


42 

3 

56 

2 
16 
20 
11 
17 
41 


11 
7 
79 
56 
20 
41 
35 
26 
75 
19 
97 


2 
2 
5 

15 
5 
6 
1 
4 

15 
4 
8 






2 
1 
4 
15 
5 
6 






2 2 


1 
1 








3 180 






4 28 


1 




5 26 








6 16 

7 20 


2 
1 




2 




8 49 




4 
7 
3 
4 






9 73 
10 30 


6 




1 
2 


1 
1 


11 29 

12 30 


3 






13 4 


7 


14 

57 


1 
18 






1 
5 






14 25 






4 


13 










525 


208 


1,210 


569 


215 


537 


86 


14 




57 


10 


15 


1 47 


21 

27 


74 

403 
335 






61 

60 

38 


27 

27 
16 


2 

1 

1 




14 

20 
12 






1 32 

2 297 


209 
65 


25 
10 


1 


15 

8 


329 


48 


738 


274 


35 


98 


43 


2 




32 


1 


23 


























1 7 


7 


157 


15 


20 


32 














2 














3 
























4 18 


2 
30 




25 


3 


25 
8 


8 


2 
2 




4 





2 


5 120 


100 




6 
















7 94 




110 




















8 




















9 




40 






16 














10 




















11 181 


2 


140 
156 


15 
50 


17 
















12 30 
















13 


















14 
























15 10 




64 




3 


21 


4 


2 




2 






16 






17 41 

18 


19 


76 
49 


32 

1 


47 


21 
5 


11 


4 




3 


3 


3 


19 
















20 
























21 10 


1 


46 
160 


8 
16 


















22 13 

23 




24 


9 


1 




6 


1 


3 


24 67 


3 


45 








































591 


64 


1,143 


162 


90 


152 


32 


11 




15 


4 


8 


67,342 


16,800 


145,734 


82,599 


13,546 


24,455 


2,666 


446 


99 


1,769 


712 


542 



152 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



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2^ o 



.•§,1 



rt^^Os fari fa ^45 

§|||§3.S8 



156 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 13— PROMOTION AND RETARDATION, CITIES, FOR 

-Percentage promoted in each grade. B — Percentage in grade one year 





Kindergarten 


Kindergarten-Prim. 


Grade I 


Grade II 


Cities 


A 


B 


C 


A 


B 


C 


A 


B 


C 


A 


B 


C 


Belleville 








93.62 
95.12 
85.81 
98.17 
95.79 


93.62 
95.12 
85.81 
97.91 
95.83 


6.38 
4.88 
14.19 
1.83 
4.21 


70.57 
88.89 
91.37 
81.27 
91.15 
88.72 
82.36 
90.27 
89.19 
83.61 
87.09 
90.00 
82.88 
89.18 
85.99 
78.46 
89.04 
84.88 
81.99 
87.33 
86.29 
93.19 
92.20 
82.25 
86.97 
84.13 
91.05 


65.93 
88.38 
91.75 
78.51 
90.65 
88.36 
80.66 
89.82 
88.64 
85.24 
89.43 
88.89 
82.47 
87.93 
89.04 
77.45 
88.52 
83.33 
81.38 
87.20 
83.75 
92.64 
91.18 
80.64 
85.14 
84.45 
87.83 


29.43 
11.11 

8.63 
18.73 

8.85 
11.28 
17.64 

9.73 
10.81 
16.39 
12.91 
10.00 
17.12 
10.82 
14.01 
21.54 
10.96 
15.11 
18.01 
12.67 
13.71 

6.81 

7.80 
17.75 
13.03 
15.87 

8.95 


90.48 
90.53 
89.01 
97.07 
86.85 
93.27 
87.44 
90.43 
"94.67 
86.42 
91.70 
88.70 
91.28 
91.25 
93.73 
89.46 
94.94 
89.58 
90.71 
93.59 
93.48 
95.14 
96.94 
92.32 
88.39 
82.11 
97.15 


90.61 
89.88 
89.23 
96.65 
85.42 
93.11 
86.54 
90.22 
94.51 
86.32 
91.73 
89.22 
90.39 
90.57 
93.77 
89.18 
94.89 
88.61 
90.39 
94.06 
92.97 
95.34 
96.53 
92.12 
87.64 
81.37 
95.90 


9.52 










9.47 




87.84 
98.71 


87.84 
99.13 


12.16 
1.29 


10.99 


Fort William 


2.93 


Gait 


13.15 


Guelph 


99.62 
94.39 


99.61 
94.12 


.38 
5.61 


6.73 










12.56 




84.91 


84.48 


15.09 


9.57 




87.25 
94.96 


87.74 
94.97 


12.75 
5.04 


5.33 




72.22 
95.92 


72.56 
95.65 


27.78 
4.08 


13.58 




8.30 


North Bay 








11.30 




100.00 
82.34 
100.00 


100.00 
77.30 










8.72 




17.66 








8.75 










6.27 








97.43 
80.94 
96.91 


97.42 
77.30 
96.77 


2.57 

19.06 

3.08 


10.54 


Port Arthur 








5.06 










10.41 


St. Thomas 








9.29 
















6.41 


Sault Ste. Marie 








99.04 


99.04 


.96 


6.52 


Stratford 


97.63 


97.56 


2.37 


4.86 










3.06 




83 . 33 
94.68 


94.68 


5.32 








7.68 


Welland 


95.55 
75.92 


95.29 
75.58 


4.45 
24.08 


11.61 




17.89 




91.62 


9i.62 


8.38 


2.85 












Average this year 


86.91 


87.40 


13.09 


88.37 


88.02 


11.63 


83.75 


82.79 


16.25 


90.28 


89.90 


9.72 


Average last year 


86.44 


85.32 


13.56 


90.07 


90.38 


9.93 


80.18 


78.78 


19.82 


85.13 


84.46 


14.87 


Increase for the year. . . 


.47 


2.08 








1.70 


3.57 


4.01 




5.15 


5.44 


















.47 


1.70 


2.36 








3.57 






5.15 





















Cities 



Belleville 

Brantf ord 

Chatham 

Fort William 

Gait 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

Kitchener 

London 

Niagara Falls . . . 

North Bay 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound .... 
Peterborough . . . 

Port Arthur 

St. Catharines. . . 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste. Marie. 

Stratford 

Sudbury 

Toronto 

Welland 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



Grades III and IVf 



95.66 
95.60 
83.09 
94.23 
95.59 
96.48 
91.09 
91.87 
96.49 
89.86 
91.86 
91.23 
91.88 
88.31 
92.76 
93.78 
96.63 
95.38 
92.47 
85.32 
86.63 
91.09 
97.15 
93.66 
95.70 
77.67 
91.88 



B 



96.87 
94.64 
81.65 
94.21 
98.00 
96.39 
90.71 
91.15 
96.18 
90.69 
91.64 
87.96 

? 
87.31 
92.86 
93.35 
96.04 

? 
91.82 
83.85 
85.41 
90.60 
97.05 
93.39 

? 
75.58 
94.58 



4.34 
4.40 

16.91 
5.77 
1.41 
3.52 
8.91 
8.13 
3.51 

10.14 
8.14 
8.77 
8.12 

11.69 
7.24 
6.22 
3.37 
4.62 
7.53 

14.68 

13.37 
8.91 
2.85 
6.34 
4.30 

22.38 
8.12 



Grade V 



89.30 

89.96 

81.42 

93.00 

99.50 

90.4 

87.17 

91.03 

91.68 

87.4 

89.56 

82 . 68 

83.96 

90.89 

86.67 

85.32 

94.40 

85.24 

92.42 

83.63 

91.40 

S9.81 

98.13 

88.00 

87.79 

91.31 

93 . 06 



B 



89.62 
88.78 
76.29 
91.93 
99.47 
89.86 
85.45 
90.94 
90.81 
87.31 
89.31 
82.35 
81.63 
90.19 
87.15 
84.55 
93.70 
83.47 
91.30 
81.72 
90.32 
89.07 
98.06 
86.94 
88.95 
91.00 
94.73 



10.70 
10.04 
18.58 

7.00 
.50 

9.58 
12.82 

8.97 

8.32 
12.55 
10.44 
17.32 
16.04 

9.11 
13.33 
14.68 

5.60 
14.75 

7.58 
16.37 

8.60 
10.19 

1.87 
12.00 
12.21 

8.69 

6.94 



Grade VI 



90.81 
91.99 
84.34 
92.35 
98.51 
92.72 
86.18 
92.43 
89.29 
87.53 
88.95 
85.02 
85.29 
92.50 
87.67 
89.60 
92.96 
90.02 
92.56 
83.82 
89.92 
92.77 
99.08 
90.03 
89.20 
93.51 
92.71 



90.20 
91.99 
82.90 
91.76 
98.48 
92.68 
84.50 
92.17 
88.77 
87.88 
88.58 
85.72 
83.44 
91.94 
87.44 
89.72 
92.40 
88.30 
91.40 
81.60 
88.41 
92.27 
99.06 
89.26 
88.15 
92.77 
92.37 



9.19 

8.01 

15.66 

7.65 

1.49 

7.28 

13.81 

7.57 

10.71 

12.47 

11.05 

14.98 

14.71 

7.50 

12.33 

10.40 

7.04 

9.97 

7.44 

16.18 

10.08 

7.23 

.92 

9.97 

10.80 

6.49 

7.29 



Grade VII 



91.52 
88.29 
81.63 
90.62 
96.79 
90.27 
83.46 
86.53 
85.15 
87.59 
91.85 
89.15 
85.78 
88.50 
87.56 
89.77 
92.00 
86.97 
87.55 
77.91 
88.89 
89.45 
95.30 
85.39 
85.83 
85.57 
78.22 



B 



91.47 

87.53 

79.32 

89.61 

96.70 

89.63 

80. 

86.76 

83.69 

87.06 

91.72 

88.89 

83.51 

87.02 

86 . 80 

86.46 

91.54 

85.75 

85.84 

75.09 

86.70 

88.63 

95.14 

83.96 

84.76 

84.98 

79.25 



8.48 
11.71 
18.37 

9.38 

3.21 

9.73 
16.53 
13.47 
14.85 
12.41 

8.15 
10.86 
14.22 
11.50 
12.44 
10.23 

8.00 
13.02 
12.45 
22.09 
11.11 
10.55 

4.70 
14.61 
14.17 
14.43 
21.78 



Average this year. . . . 
Average last year. . . . 
Increase for the year . 
Decrease for the year. 



91.97 



91.33 



.03 



.66 



87.75 



11.34 



89.83 



89.09 



10.17 



84.91 



83.93 



82.19 



16.07 



85 . 64 



84.60 



14.36 



82.06 



80.56 



4.73 



4.19 



4.49 



4.16 



4.35 



13.78 



17.94 



4.19 



4.16 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



157 



SCHOOLS 

THE SCHOOL YEAR COMMENCING SEPTEMBER, 1937 

or less who were promoted in one year. C — Percentage not promoted. 





Grade VIII 


Grade IX 


Grade X 


Average 


Cities 


A 


B 


C 


A 


B 


C 


A 


B 


C 


A 


B 

87 . }> 9 
90.92 
82.51 
91.57 
89.39 
92 . 75 
86.69 
89.80 
87.31 
85.16 
89.75 
88.99 
88.58 
87.88 
91.39 
88.25 
87.90 
82.47 
89.59 
84.57 
88.41 
91.93 
96.70 
86 . 3C 
90.12 
84.13 
80.79 


C 


Belleville . 


92.29 
87.41 
75.00 
91.05 
98.89 
92.02 
88.36 
94.50 
76.11 
85.09 
81.21 
94.96 
83.12 
87:61 
92.90 
85.25 
82.99 
98.07 
92.41 
87.82 
82.55 
91.04 
99 . 53 
82.48 


91.11 
86 . 58 
70.59 
91.42 
98.89 
92.06 
87.35 
94.26 
75.77 
84.53 
81.79 
94.70 
81.43 
87.16 
92.81 
85.67 
81.25 
98.01 
93.37 
86.85 
80.53 
89.88 
99.51 
81.41 


7.71 
12.59 
25 . 00 

8.95 

1.11 

7.98 
11.63 

5 . 50 
23.89 
14.91 
18.79 

5.04 
16.88 
12.39 

7.10 
14.75 
17.01 

1.92 

7.59 
12.18 
17.45 

8.96 

.47 

17.52 














85 . 33 
91.00 
83 . 58 
92.08 
90.00 
92.86 
87 . 54 
97.69 
87.88 
87.54 
89 . 45 
88.85 
86.75 
88.90 
90.93 
88.31 
88.84 
83.90 
90.30 
85 . 79 
89.56 
92.48 
96.94 
87 . 30 
90.02 
84.87 
83.38 


14 67 
















9 00 
















16 42 


Fort William 














7 92 


Gait. . 














lO 00 


Guelph 














7.14 




12 46 
















2 31 




78.26 


77.04 


21.73 


73 . 68 


73.68 


26.32 


12 12 




12 46 
















10 55 
















11 15 
















13 25 
















11 10 
















9 07 
















11 67 


Port Arthur 


76.43 


75.40 


23.57 






« 


11 16 










16 10 


St Thomas 














9 70 
















14 21 


vSault Ste Marie 














10 44 
















7 52 
















3 05 




87.05 


86.78 


12.0.: 


80.80 


79.83 


19 20 


12.70 


Welland.. 


9 98 




89.32 
91.62 


88.93 
90.66 


10.68 
8.38 


75.21 


73.00 


21.79 


90.57 


94.62 


9.43 


15.13 




16 62 


















Average this year 


85 . 65 


84.97 


14.35 


83.43 


82.95 


16.57 


82.51 


82.46 


17.49 


87.59 


87.02 


12.41 


Average last year 


84.05 


83.27 


15.95 


81.44 


80.95 


18.56 


75 . 50 


74.47 


24.50 


83.17 


82.02 


16.83 


Increase for the year. . . 


1.60 


1.70 




1.99 


2.00 




7.01 


7.99 




4.42 


5.00 










1.60 






1.99 






7.01 






4 42 























REASONS FOR NON-PROMOTION (PERCENTAGES) 











G 

^ tn 
3= 3 
'.fl- 
ea O 

"8 a 

*•* 


01 

bo O 

•S g 
— 3 


be 

c 

Is 

is 


Irregular or inter- 
rupted attendance 
for reasons other 
than ill-health 


0/ 

| 

5 „ 
K.S 

38 


o 

a 

O 

« o 

4w 


Physical Defects 


is 

3 

O, e* 
tn E 

- OJ 

.2 a 


3 
S 

J| 

c 
d 
Hi 


3 
.be 
'5 

u 
O 
fe 

'2A2 

.31 

3.57 

".'58 
1.34 

'".U 
1.09 
1.30 

.66 
1.78 

.90 




Cities 




bo 

_s 

a 

V 

S3 


j3 
o 
ti 

V 

0, 
CO 


a 

u 
,0 

4) 

Q 


<v 
v\ 

3 
cS 

u 
<u 

6 




s 

ill 


Belleville 

Brantford 

Chatham 

Fort William. . 
Gait. 


39.23 
47.75 
66.88 
43.65 
78.25 
39.54 
44.47 
51.43 
50.86 
53 . 35 
43.30 
66.88 
21.01 
43 . 07 
43.65 
47.26 
60.89 
77.84 
63.28 
58.93 
40.14 
55.62 
45.31 
65.72 
66.25 
49.75 
47.83 


8.46 
8.41 
6.31 
2.78 
1.71 

16.29 
8.39 

10.61 
4.13 
5. 55 
5.20 
6.62 
2.77 
6.88 
8.84 

10.98 
7.01 
3.22 
7.34 
6.92 
9.86 
5.62 

12.50 
8.42 
4.02 
7.13 
6.96 


1.54 
2.40 
4.10 
1.98 

'2.31' 

1.60 

1.23 

1.08 

.85 

2.60 

.66 

.69 

2.59 

1.10 

2.13 

2.21 

.76 

.56 

1.35 

1.41 

.63 

i.*43" 

.31 

1.19 

.87 


8.08 
3.30 
2.84 

.79 
1.14 
6.39 
5.31 
6.93 
2.17 
3.49 
2.16 
1.98 

.89 
5.68 
6.08 
7.01 
4.43 
2.65 
5.65 
1.80 
5.28 

.63 
6.25 
5.45 
2.17 
6.20 
6.09 


4.23 

8.41 

.63 

2.38 

5^24 
3.11 

2.04 
1.74 
3.39 
3.46 
8.61 
2.87 
2.69 
8.29 
3.66 
3.69 
.76 
1.13 
2.10 
2.46 
3.75 
3.13 
3.67 
3.41 
1.36 
6.96 


12.69 
14.11 
13.88 
16.27 

3.43 
16.86 
19.05 

9.79 
17.17 
15.34 
18.61 

2.67 

8.32 
12.96 
18.23 

9.45 
10.33 

6.63 
16.38 
10.84 
15.14 
18.12 

4.69 

4.93 
14.24 
13.07 
12.18 


.38 
.60 
.31 
.40 

.58 

.96 
.81 
.65 
.56 
.87 
1.32 

'.'46 


.38 
.60 

i.'i9 

1.14 
.58 
.46 
.41 
.44 
.57 


.38 
.60 

.40 

.58 

.58 

.71 

2.45 

.22 

1.03 

1.73 


'.'30 
.31 
.79 


'.'36 

i!59 


8.09 

3.90 

1.92 

21.83 

9.74 

9.89 

10.11 

8.57 

18.06 

10.25 

17.31 

5.97 

59.62 

11.96 

9.94 

13.12 

7.01 

4.17 

1.13 

15.06 

7.39 

12.50 

14.06 

2.80 

4.64 

9.68 

9.57 


7.69 
3.90 
1.92 
1.98 
2.85 
1.16 
1.98 
4.08 

.86 
2.38 
1.30 
3.31 

.99 
1.00 
3.32 
1.52 

.37 

.57 


8.85 

3.30 

.59 

.40 

.58 


Guelph 

Hamilton 

Kingston 

Kitchener 

London 

Niagara Falls. . 
North Bay. . . . 

Oshawa 

Ottawa 

Owen Sound . . 
Peterborough. . 
Port Arthur. . . 
St. Catharines. 
St. Thomas . 


.58 
.12 

.44 
.09 


'.'88 
.42 

'.'37 
1.30 
1.32 

.49 
2.39 


"i.si 

1.23 

1.74 

1.69 

.86 


.09 
.20 
55 


.29 
.20 


.10 


.19 
8.97 


'.'37 

.57 

1.13 

i!66 
1.24 


.30 
.74 

'.'30 
.35 


4.27 
.37 
.19 

1.13 
.30 

1.06 
.63 






.30 
2.21 
1.51 




.37 

.19 
.56 


'.'38 

.56 

.60 

1.06 

.63 

3.13 

1.45 

1.24 

2.80 

1.72 


".*56 
1.15 


Sarnia 

vSault Ste. Marie 
Stratford 


1.20 

2.11 

.63 

*'!<K) 

.31 

2.37 

5.22 


.30 
8.45 


.30 
4.23 


vSudbury 

Toronto 

Welland . 


10.93 

.38 

2.17 

2.04 

.87 




.75 


.36 


1.10 
.31 

.68 
1.73 


.16 

.31 

1.09 


2.48 
62 


Windsor 


.68 


.25 


2.71 










Aver, this year. 


57.13 


7.62 


1.49 


4.82 


3.34 


10.48 


.65 


.26 


.90 


.15 


1.17 


6.66 


1.46 


.95 


2.92 


Aver, last year. 


54.45 


7.52 


1.53 


4.87 


3.52 


11.03 


.72 


.41 


.92 


.19 


.96 


5.88 


1.42 


1.23 




Inc. for year. . 


3.68 


.10 


















.21 


.78 


.04 






















.28 




Dec. for year. . 






.04 


.05 


.18 


.55 


.07 


.15 


.02 


.04 











: Half yearly promotion system. 



tGrades III and IV require longer than one year in several centres. 



158 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



W 



AVERAGE YEARLY SALARY OF RURAL AND URBAN 



OMITTED 
& 15 



10- 



TEACHERS IN EACH PROVINCE, 1936 




B.C ALTA SASK. MAN. ONT QUE. QUE. N.B. N.S. RE.I. 

PROT. R.C. 



— Source, Annual Survey of Education in Canada, 1930 



GRAPH III. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



159 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

TABLE 14— TEACHERS' SALARIES, 1936-1937 
Highest, Lowest, Average 





Male 




Fe 


male 








Highest 


Lowest 


Average 


Highest 


Lowest 


Average 


Rural Schools* 


All 


With 
First 
Class 
Certi- 
ficate 


With 
Second 
Class 
Certi- 
ficate 


All 


With 
First 
Class 
Certi- 
ficate 


With 
Second 
Cass- 
Clerti 
ficate 


Counties 

Addington 

Brant 


750 

1,260 

1,100 

2,000 

1,000 

1,000 

900 

1,200 

1,300 

1,100 

900 

700 

1,125 

950 

900 

1,100 

1,575 

1,125 

1,100 

1,250 

800 

800 

775 

1,475 

1,600 

1,050 

1,000 

1,200 

1,075 

1,300 

1,000 

1,150 

800 

1,200 

850 

1,000 

1,800 

1,100 

1,085 

1,200 

1,650 

1,755 

1,600 

2,000 


500 
500 
500 
525 
500 
550 
500 
500 
550 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
600 
500 
500 
600 
500 
500 
500 
500 
550 
500 
500 
525 
500 
500 
550 
500 
500 
721 
500 
500 
600 
500 
550 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
550 


666 
797 
637 
883 
662 
691 
685 
669 
745 
681 
678 
577 
649 
669 
626 
728 
729 
641 
763 
651 
609 
628 
584 
984 
673 
684 
669 
724 
764 
861 
680 
703 
775 
675 
634 
750 
759 
815 
653 
844 
919 
667 
889 
928 


650 
657 
646 
756 
722 
666 
684 
662 
665 
700 
733 
569 
665 
619 
607 
756 
759 
634 
761 
595 
578 
583 
546 
843 
643 
671 
637 
691 
754 
882 
653 
666 
721 
697 
647 
771 
764 
847 
656 
859 
774 
618 
877 
908 


683 
992 
627 
967 
601 
713 
685 
679 
861 
664 
652 
584 
626 
770 
644 
616 
645 
656 
766 
757 
637 
686 
627 
1,055 
704 
734 
692 
774 
777 
830 
756 
804 

"658" 
621 
700 
754 
796 
648 
812 

1,077 
755 
911 
972 


850 

1,000 

900 

1,260 

775 

850 

1,000 

850 

1,350 

950 

800 

1,100 

900 

900 

900 

1,200 

1,200 

1,050 

850 

1,080 

700 

900 

1,000 

1,305 

1,500 

1,200 

900 

1,100 

900 

1,260 

850 

850 

1,000 

825 

850 

800 

1,440 

1,250 

1,250 

925 

1,130 

1,035 

1,400 

1,300 


500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
450 
400 
500 
500 
500 
550 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 


661 
707 
617 
679 
614 
617 
640 
616 
700 
607 
611 
591 
592 
642 
580 
723 
637 
596 
663 
594 
568 
540 
572 
757 
633 
631 
628 
657 
650 
755 
615 
610 
613 
600 
590 
637 
665 
625 
627 
692 
776 
632 
751 
753 


700 
670 
615 
675 
595 
576 
623 
610 
674 
554 
603 
582 
573 
630 
588 
672 
627 
585 
638 
578 
544 
597 
557 
682 
610 
583 
600 
614 
624 
767 
591 
604 
592 
594 
594 
635 
639 
598 
627 
668 
746 
608 
692 
700 


619 
743 




618 


Carleton 

Dufferin 


681 
641 
640 


Durham 

Elgin 


659 

627 




724 


Frontenac 

Glengarry 

Grenville 

Grey 


611 
616 
597 
644 


Haldimand 

Haliburton 

Halton 


675 
576 
772 


Hastings 

Huron 

Kent 


651 
614 

687 


Lambton 


613 
582 




513 




585 




867 


Middlesex 

Norfolk 


661 
674 


Northumberland 


667 
697 


Oxford 


694 


Peel 


786 


Perth 


658 


Peterborough 

Prescott 

Prince Edward.. . 
Renfrew 


622 
631 
604 

589 
646 




688 


Stormont 

Victoria 

Waterloo 

Welland 

Wellington 

Wentworth 

York 


649 
627 
738 
810 
672 
799 
807 






Counties 


2,000 


500 


719 


703 


739 


1,440 


400 


639 


623 


660 


Districts 


1,200 
1,500 
1,800 
950 
1,200 
1,200 
1,500 
1,100 
1,800 
1,800 
1,800 


500 
500 
600 
500 
500 
500 
550 
650 
600 
550 
600 


767 
906 
1,033 
707 
736 
725 
785 
777 
963 
843 
909 


755 
918 

1,033 
742 
721 
700 
821 
803 

1,082 
882 
885 


787 
904 
1,033 
690 
762 
770 
745 
745 
936 
798 
911 


1,000 
1,200 
1,200 
1,000 
1,008 
950 
1,000 
1,500 
1,150 
1,500 
1,200 


500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
450 
500 
500 
500 
500 
600 


661 

788 
802 
659 
671 
693 
653 
762 
760 
722 
787 


660 

772 
777 
725 
670 
650 
665 
760 
764 
691 
782 


662 


Cochrane 


808 
840 


Manitoulin 

Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Parry Sound .... 

Rainy River 

Sudbury 

Temiskaming. . . . 
Thunder Bay 


644 
672 
712 
644 
764 
765 
745 
802 


Districts 


1,800 


500 


870 


845 


821 


1,500 


450 


718 


718 


718 


Counties and 
Districts. . . . 


2,000 


500 


745 


734 


759 


1,500 


400 


650 


635 


607 


Largefully-graded 
Rural Schools . 


3,100 


800 


1,429 


1,315 


1,574 


2,400 


700 


1,120 


1,046 


1,158 


All Rural 

vSchools 


3,100 


500 


834 


813 


861 


2,400 


400 


705 


672 


736 


Decreases in Ru- 
ral Schools for 
the Year 


25 




14 


16 


7 


297 




5 


(Inc.) 3 


4 



* Fxclusive of large fully-graded rural schools. 



160 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

TABLE 14— TEACHERS' SALARIES, 1936-37 

Highest, Lowest, Average 





Male 


Female 




Highest 


Lowest 


Average 


Highest 


Lowest 


Average 


City Schools* 


All 


With 
First 
Class 
Certi- 
ficate 


With 
Second 
Class 
Certi- 
ficate 


All 


With 
First 
Class 
Certi- 
ficate 


With 
Second 
Class 
Certi- 
ficate 


(Counties) 

Belleville 

Brantf ord 

Chatham 

Gait 


2,200 
2,450 
2,385 
1,900 
2,250 
3,205 
2,375 
3,000 
3,000 
2,087 
2,287 
3,800 
2,050 
2,550 
2,450 
2,100 
2,400 
2,000 
3,800 
1,850 
2,916 
2,200 


900 

1,050 

1,045 

1,000 

850 

1,058 

860 

1,300 

1,000 

850 

756 

1,000 

832 

807 

950 

750 

1,000 

830 

1,500 

1,100 

850 

800 


1,529 
1,877 
1,583 
1,577 
1,421 
1,933 
1,823 
1,817 
1,969 
1,493 
1,440 
2,319 
1,584 
1,966 
1,919 
1,513 
1,773 
1,592 
2,603 
1,505 
1,675 
1,500 


1,643 
1,889 
1,747 
1,650 
1,133 
1,915 
1,846 
1,587 
1,839 
1,493 
1,194 
2,300 
1,465 
1,929 
1,653 
1,337 
1,586 
1,452 
2,602 
1,512 
1,615 
1,500 


1,363 

1,423 
1,631 
1,730 
1,102 
1,690 
2,662 
2,571 
1,612 
1,725 
2,170 
1,620 
2,550 
2,092 
2,100 
2,012 
2,000 
2,767 
1,475 
1,720 


1,300 
1,475 
2,295 
1,400 
1,300 
1,876 
1,567 
1,500 
1,800 
1,969 
1,600 
2,900 
1,272 
1,445 
1,550 
1,600 
1,700 
1,400 
3,700 
1,350 
1,677 
1,235 


850 
900 
945 

1,000 
800 
900 
760 
600 
800 
750 
650 
800 
712 
807 
800 
750 
850 
800 
900 

1,000 
800 
750 


1,056 
1,308 
1,252 
1,150 
1,120 
1,325 
1,216 
1,213 
1,289 
1,178 
1,140 
1,804 
1.020 
1,328 
1,239 
1,106 
1,269 
1,224 
1,852 
1,198 
1,276 
994 


1,065 
1,193 
1,195 
1,100 
1,103 
1,228 
1,224 
1,133 
1,079 
1,109 

923 
1,650 

901 
1,236 
1,120 
1,036 
1,175 
1,002 
1,652 
1,195 
1,096 

928 


1,043 
1,378 
1,283 
1,166 
1,135 
1,451 
1,217 
1,263 
1,532 
1,218 
1,243 
2,001 
1,119 
1,404 
1,316 
1,178 
1,294 
1,298 
1,989 
1,207 
1,341 
1,093 




Hamilton 

Kingston 

Kitchener 


Niagara Falls .... 




Owen Sound 

Peterborough. . . . 
St. Catharines . . . 
St. Thomas 


Stratford 


Welland 

Windsor 

Woodstock 


Counties 


3,800 


750 


2,231 


2,264 


1,955 


3,700 


600 


1,552 


1,389 


1,670 


(Districts) 
Fort William .... 

North Bay 

Port Arthur 

Sault Ste. Marie. . 
Sudbury 


2,682 
2,075 
2,550 
2,250 
2,200 


975 
871 
990 
900 
1,000 


1,815 
1,508 
1,563 
1,591 
1,675 


1,685 
1,743 
1,571 
1,560 
1,475 


2,118 
1,156 

1,765 
1,875 


1,615 
1,350 
1,530 
1,995 
1,300 


585 
872 
950 
600 
900 


1,357 
1,055 
1,303 
1,225 
1,105 


1,389 
1,028 
1,293 
1,091 
938 


1,504 
1,095 
1,372 
1,273 
1,209 


Districts 


2,682 


871 


1,656 


1,613 


1,811 


1,995 


600 


1,238 


1,208 


1,209 


All Cities . . • 


3,800 


750 


2,193 


2,223 


1,928 


3,700 


600 


1,531 


1,376 


1,647 


Towns 


3,500 


650 


1,323 


1,250 


1,409 


2,200 


400 


1,031 


1,226 


975 


Villages 


5,000 


700 


952 


972 


933 


2,950 


500 


918 


875 


944 


All Urban 
Schools 


5,000 


650 


1,820 


1,937 


1,394 


3,700 


400 


1,390 


1,320 


1,413 


All Schools 
(Rural and 
Urban) 


5,000 


500 


1,332 


1,425 


1,066 


3,700 


400 


1,041 


931 


1,075 


Decreases for 






44 


67 


37 






6 


20 


8 















Average Salaries of Other Teachers: Manual Training, $2,322; Household Science, $1,838; Kindergarten 
$1,281; Auxiliary Class, $1,718; Music, $1,628; Art, $2,000; Physical Training, $2,23S, Third Class, $663 
District, $1,035. 

This Table has reference to full-time teachers only. Supervisors are included. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



161 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



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70 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



163 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Table 17 — Percentage Teacher Turnover in Rural Schools 



Group 


County or District 


1928 


1929 


1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


10 year 
Average 


Metropolitan Area: 


1 York 


14.2 


18.5 


17.7 


13.4 


9.1 


12.1 


10.3 


9.6 


11.3 


11.7 


12.6 






Toronto-Hamilton- 
Niagara Area: 


2 Welland 

3 Wentworth .... 

4 Lincoln 

5 Brant 

6 Peel 

7 Halton 


30.6 
20.4 
37.9 
36.8 
30.4 
35.4 


34.2 
31.9 
27.7 
31.2 
32.0 
40.0 


29.5 
31.3 
37.9 
36.3 
31.1 
24.6 


34.0 
33.3 
30.9 
25.0 
33.3 
29.8 


19.0 
26.8 
20.0 
21.2 
17.0 
19.4 


19.5 
21.5 
16.2 
41.8 
34.3 
34.3 


17.1 
12.3 
23.5 
16.5 
19.6 
17.1 


13.7 
18.7 
18.1 
16.5 
18.3 
20.0 


17.5 
12.9 
21.6 
17.7 
23.3 
22.9 


17.8 
18.3 
16.5 
19.0 
23.1 
22.9 


22.8 
23.1 
24.8 
26.2 
26.2 
26.5 


Lower Average 
Group: 


8 Middlesex 

9 vStormont 

10 Glengarry 

11 Ontario 

12 Dundas 

13 Northumberl'd. 

14 Carleton 

15 Durham 


31.7 
37.6 
31.3 
24.1 
39.5 
34.5 
36.8 
32.0 


27.9 
•37.2 
35 . 5 
40.7 
27.2 
44.4 
37.2 
40.0 


36.8 
29.1 
30.0 
36.0 
32.1 
32.2 
33.1 
35.0 


27.6 
27.9 
27.5 
34.9 
21.0 
29.6 
31.1 
28.0 


24.6 
25.6 
20.0 
17.8 
35.4 
27.0 
26.4 
30.0 


28.8 
29.4 
33.8 
26.7 
35.0 
27.0 
27.6 
34.0 


20.9 
27.1 
26.6 
28.8 
19.7 
21.7 
21.0 
24.4 


23.2 
12.7 
20.3 
24.9 
24.7 
18.3 
26.7 
18.0 


26.7 
23.3 
21.5 
24.6 
24.7 
22.5 
22.1 
29.0 


28.0 
28.9 
32.0 
20.4 
22.2 
25.2 
25.3 
25.0 


27.6 
27.8 
27.8 
27.9 
28.1 
28.2 
28.7 
29.6 


Average Group: 


16 Elgin 

17 Oxford 

18 Huron 

19 Waterloo 

20 Essex 


41.1 
35.6 
34.0 
31.1 
42.5 
42.0 
39.0 
40.8 
25 . 5 
30.3 


38.7 
32.0 
48.5 
45.6 
34.4 
39.3 
40.3 
33.6 
36.1 
42.7 


26.8 
37.7 
33.7 
41.7 
36.8 
45.8 
41.5 
35.3 
45.4 
41.6 


28.4 
31.8 
29.2 
33.0 
32.7 
29.8 
28.4 
37.8 
35.2 
41.4 


27.4 
26.9 
22.7 
28.0 
26.3 
27.4 
31.7 
35.8 
39.8 
29.6 


27.4 
29.4 
31.1 
35.5 

28.8 
36.5 
43.9 
35 . 
33.3 
38.8 


29.0 
23.1 
25.2 
23.6 
28.4 
25.4 
30.5 
35.0 
26.0 
35.9 


24.6 
22.3 
29.2 
24.8 
21.3 
22.9 
29.3 
17.5 
26.4 
25.3 


26.6 
26.2 
34.8 
25.0 
31.9 
27.8 
35.0 
35.0 
34.6 
27.2 


29.6 
36.9 
33.4 
26.6 
41.2 
31.8 
25.3 
35 . 3 
40.6 
36.6 


30.0 
30.2 
31.1 
31.4 
32.4 




21 Bruce 


32.9 




22 Haldimand .... 

23 Perth 

24 Norfolk 

25 Lambton 


33.8 
34.1 
34.4 
34.9 


Higher Average 
Group: 


26 Grenville 

27 Victoria 

28 Kent 


46.8 
42.6 
38.9 
40.0 
47.2 
38.2 
51.0 
46.2 
49.4 
36.5 
44.8 
58.6 
40.8 
46.7 


40.3 
49.1 
40.6 
42.3 
42.6 
45.0 
43.7 
50.5 
51.1 
45.2 
44.8 
33.7 
44.1 
51.0 


46.7 
47.4 
40.6 
47.4 
42.2 
44.5 
41.9 
47.5 
42.3 
44.6 
46.9 
48.3 
46.3 
43.7 


27.4 
38.3 
40.6 
43.5 
36.7 
43.3 
31.3 
39.1 
43.5 
34.7 
34.2 
33.7 
48.4 
42.7 


28.0 
25.4 
27.4 
28.6 
26.4 
32.6 
38.9 
29.6 
33.3 
35.2 
29.8 
26.0 
32.2 
31.3 


40.0 
31.6 
38.8 
43.5 
37.2 
36.7 
35.3 
34.4 
34.0 
43.3 
55.6 
44.4 
39.2 
40.8 


21.3 
26.5 
36.3 
22.7 
29.1 
30.1 
43.1 
31.9 
30.6 
33.8 
31.4 
36.8 
29.0 
40.1 


32.9 
36.5 
22.9 
47.7 
28.8 
29.1 
27.0 
30.0 
31.2 
27.1 
27.8 
29.9 
26.1 
26.8 


23.7 
35.7 
37.2 
29.9 
35.9 
28.9 
20.7 
33.1 
31.6 
30.7 
38.2 
32.2 
37.8 
33.7 


40.6 
29.2 
34.0 
37.4 
39.8 
37.8 
37.6 
32.0 
32.7 
46.0 
26.5 
28.1 
40.2 
33.8 


35.1 
35.3 
35.6 




29 Wellington .... 

30 Peterborough . . 

31 Simcoe 

32 Leeds 


36.2 
36.6 
36.6 
37.0 




33 Grey 


37.4 




34 Cochrane 

35 Prince Edward. 

36 Russell 

37 Lennox 

38 Dufferin 

39 Hastings 


37.4 
37.7 
38.0 
38.1 
38.4 
39.0 


District Group: 


40 Lanark 

41 Timiskaming... 

42 Renfrew 

43 vSudbury 

44 Prescott 

45 Thunder Bay. . . 

46 Muskoka 

47 Frontenac 

48 Parry Sound . . . 

49 Manitoulin .... 

50 Rainy River. . . 

51 Algoma 

52 Addington 

53 Haliburton .... 

54 Kenora 

55 Nipissing 


43.6 
62.1 
52 . 6 
41.5 
36.2 
60.9 
57.4 
60.8 
59.5 
58.9 
52.0 
52.7 
78.1 
59.7 
69.5 
52 . 1 


46.8 
52.1 
52.0 
52.7 
55.2 
61.3 
55.5 
59.2 
65.6 
51.0 
73.0 
65.6 
65.6 
73.5 
64.9 
67.1 


40.6 
59.4 
54.0 
53.0 
47.7 
63.4 
60.1 
61.4 
61.4 
49.1 
52.7 
47.0 
54.8 
68.8 
52.7 
66.2 


50.0 
45.8 
45.9 
40.9 
40.7 
44.5 
53.6 
56.8 
52.5 
39.2 
50.0 
58.0 
61.3 
46.1 
50.0 
68.9 


40.8 
33.0 
37.2 
30.6 
46.5 
35.0 
35.2 
38.6 
40.7 
53.0 
49.4 
41.3 
40.0 
42.9 
60.5 
43.3 


55.5 
40.6 
50.3 
44.6 
37.9 
46.2 
50.0 
47.4 
48.6 
41.1 
37.4 
49.0 
45.2 
65.6 
35.0 
52.6 


37.3 
30.3 
33.9 
45.1 
40.7 
37.0 
33.0 
40.3 
39.8 
39.2 
41.9 
49.5 
45.2 
35.5 
50.0 
46.1 


30.9 
33.9 
33.7 
33.1 
36.9 
31.5 
34.5 
29.6 
36.9 
45.2 
51.3 
35.3 
40.6 
38.7 
51.2 
48.2 


33.1 
33.3 
33.5 
45.9 
41.1 
32.2 
36.7 
28.9 
31.7 
39.2 
33.3 
39.2 
21.2 
46.9 
34.1 
50.7 


34.9 
34.3 
36.4 
46.4 
51.8 
38.5 
34.9 
37.5 
35.4 
44.0 
35.2 
52.9 
42.4 
37.1 
53.6 
41.1 


41.3 
41.5 
43.0 
43.2 
43.5 
44.6 
45.0 
46.1 
46.3 
46.4 
47.4 
48.9 
40. J 
51.7 
51.8 
53 . 7 


Average, All Co 
Average, All Di 
Grand Average . 




36.5 


38.9 


37.8 


33.0 


26.5 


31.7 


26.0 


23.1 


25.5 


29.0 


30 8 






54.9 


59.8 


55.8 


49.6 


41.6 


44.7 


38.2 


37.6 


36.9 


39.8 


45 6 






39.1 


41.9 


40.4 


35.3 


28.6 


33.6 


27.8 


25.2 


28.7 


30.6 


33.0 



164 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Rural Schools 

(exclusive of 

large fully graded 

rural schools) 


Equalized 
Assessment 
per 
Class-room 


No. 
of 
Class- 
rooms 


Ave. 
Daily 
At- 
tend- 
ance 


c O 
<U cfl o 
bO-C u 

2 C " 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


Section 
Levy 

(Current 
and 

Capital) 


Town- 
ship 
Grant 


County 
Grant 


Legis- 
lative 
Grant 


Counties 


$ 






«v 




$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


1 Halton 


292,114 


70 


1,475 


21.00 


282,876 


31,856 


32,606 


1,589 


10,565 


2 Perth 


256,638 


119 


2,671 


22.44 


535,526 


37,659 


56,258 


3,347 


18,622 


3 Wentworth.. 


249,195 


109 


2,992 


27.45 


570,313 


79,409 


45,172 


1,704 


17,203 


4 Middlesex. . . 


218,214 


208 


4,023 


19.34 


766,282 


80,737 


95,636 


3,282 


29,140 


5 Brant 


218,058 


73 


1,720 


23.56 


327,762 


38,357 


33,120 


1,579 


11,023 


6 Kent 


198,848 


154 


4,045 26.27 


773,507 


74,657 


73,175 


4,271 


26,280 


7 Elgin 


197,237 


125 


2,434 


19.47 


466,539 


49,128 


57,540 


2,058 


16,403 


8 Essex 


193,832 


137 


3,646 


26.61 


699,817 


72,349 


58,833 


2,868 


19,814 


9 Oxford 


193,342 


130 


3,107 


23.90 


596,175 


55,157 


58,502 


3,452 


21,377 


10 York 


188,848 


198 


5,549 


28.02 


1,099,589 


193,288 


62,305 


3,251 


38,134 


1 1 Huron 


176,204 


202 


3,712 


18.37 


711,930 


54,642 


90,616 


4,901 


26,405 


12 Norfolk 


175,986 


109 


2,960 


27.16 


563,984 


31,336 


45,280 


2,056 


17,675 


13 Waterloo.... 


174,067 


109 


2,957 


27.16 


566,407 


54,962 


47,840 


2,965 


19,756 


14 Wellington. . 


173,562 


154 


2,927 


19.00 


571,857 


48,083 


69,627 


4,441 


22,838 


15 Welland. . .. 


155,173 


92 


2,459 


26.73 


471,353 


45,041 


56,417 


1,647 


21,737 


16 Lambton 


150,004 


180 


3,425 


19.00 


659,243 


49,480 


81,799 


1,050 


21,436 


17 Peel 


149,555 


96 


2,536 


26.41 


489,327 


91,451 


46,092 


3,136 


24,653 


18 Lincoln 


149,191 


82 


2,434 


29.68 


470,409 


56,770 


39,092 


2,444 


20,052 


19 Simcoe 


144,574 


245 


4,889 


19.95 


917,986 


73,656 


111,717 


9,084 


47,650 


20 Prince Edw'd 


143,482 


74 


1,254 


17.00 


239,457 


14,162 


35,040 


1,455 


11,188 


21 Ontario 


142,454 


138 


3,052 


22.11 


584,582 


76,760 


61,261 


2,042 


22,952 


22 Victoria 


141,040 


113 


1,695 


15.00 


327,253 


37,083 


49,440 


1,345 


20,147 


23 Stormont . . . 


134,238 


90 


1,875 


20.83 


358,116 


25,952 


38,152 


1,204 


14,597 


24 Bruce 


125,652 


166 


2,600 


15.66 


488,246 


38,664 


73,491 


4,192 


30,002 


25 Dufferin .... 


123,052 


92 


1,368 


14.87 


262,092 


24,498 


43,810 


1,569 


14,232 


26 Haldimand.. 


122,367 


83 


1,630 


19.64 


311,297 


22,502 


38,670 


1,654 


13,873 


27 Carleton 


118,766 


136 


2,696 


19.82 


516,275 


69,445 


59,216 


1,448 


24,400 


28 Durham 


117,137 


100 


1,744 


17.44 


326,480 


28,986 


44,862 


1,598 


19,557 


29 Northumbl'd 


102,593 


115 


2,134 


18.56 


413,944 


29,295 


50,908 


2,023 


22,551 


30 Dundas 


97,556 


81 


1,551 


19.15 


298,820 


24,842 


36,183 


1,362 


14,535 


31 Grey 


94,925 


225 


4,212 


18.72 


792,311 


49,740 


100,887 


6,703 


33,926 


32 Glengarry... 


90,573 


78 


1,494 


19.15 


282,651 


19,577 


34,013 


1,043 


14,015 


33 Russell 


89,222 


33 


669 


20.27 


130,447 


9,674 


14,040 


1,677 


7,176 


34 Lennox 


86,350 


87 


1,359 


15.62 


260,159 


12,195 


37,426 


446 


11,850 


35 Prescott .... 


84,179 


50 


955 


19.10 


182,412 


8,761 


22,019 


1,112 


9,390 


36 Lanark 


81,004 


125 


1,686 


13.48 


321,055 


19,176 


50,417 


1,191 


21,622 


37 Hastings .... 


73,803 


198 


3,850 


19.44 


750,095 


49,086 


63,010 


5,161 


57,693 


38 Grenville.... 


72,656 


73 


1,089 


14.92 


208,053 


17,619 


32,830 


716 


13,858 


39 Leeds 


70,548 


149 


2,263 


15.12 


431,539 


30,173 


60,945 


956 


29,674 


40 Renfrew .... 


64,493 


173 


3,184 


18.40 


624,863 


33,772 


62,642 


3,390 


38,044 


41 Peterborough 


60,925 


101 


2,206 


21.84 


416,193 


32,260 


33,304 


2,053 


33,878 


42 Frontenac . . . 


40,908 


152 


2,590 


17.04 


497,313 


27,431 


41,780 


2,118 


48,352 


43 Addington. . . 


21,651 


31 


534 


17.22 


103,185 


3,532 


8,204 


732 


12,483 


44 Haliburton . . 


16,274 


65 


993 


15.27 


187,100 


10,935 


10,803 




31,442 


Totals and Averages 


145,354 


5,320 


108,644 


20.42 


20,854,820 


1,934,158 


2,264,982 


106,315 


1,002,200 


Districts 

1 Thunder Bay 


48,963 


115 


2,206 


19.18 


413,678 


89,373 


5,662 




55,267 


2 Cochrane . . . 


48,434 


77 


1,971 


25.60 


349,934 


60,620 


812 




44,230 


3 Muskoka. . . . 


46,144 


106 


1,786 


16.85 


339,532 


47,640 


14,938 




44,403 


4 Temiskaming 


44,392 


79 


1,778 


22.51 


329,826 


64,407 


7,758 




33,180 


5 Algoma 


39,541 


103 


1,946 


11.72 


368,944 


65,983 


6,383 




38,662 


6 Rainy River . 


32,955 


74 


1,377 


18.60 


262,277 


61,746 


4,916 




41,301 


7 Sudbury .... 


32,952 


115 


1,890 


16.43 


357,213 


70,822 


4,316 




71,858 


8 Kenora 


32,748 


41 


883 


21.51 


162,468 


29,453 


6,457 




27,621 


9 Manitoulin. . 


29,054 


50 


1,007 


20.14 


193,366 


20,522 


5,754 




23,532 


10 Parry Sound. 


28,030 


133 


2,449 


18.41 


449,042 


56,183 


14,908 




64,237 


11 Nipissing 


22,523 


77 


1,594 


20.70 


295,295 


25,901 


2,552 




36,014 


Totals and Averages 


37,440 


970 


18,887 


19.47 


3,521,575 


592,650 


74,456 




480,305 


II n 


128,713 


6,290 


127,531 


20.28 


23,576,395 


2,526,808 


2,339,438 


106,315 


1,482,505 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



165 



SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day (cents) 


Debenture Debt 




Current 


Capital 


Cur- 


Capit- 


Total 


To 
Sec- 


To 
Town- 


To 
Coun- 


To 
Gov- 


Total 


Per 
Class- 








rent 


al 




tion 


ship 


ty 


ern- 




room 




$ 


$ 








Levy 


ment 


$ 


$ 


1 


78,921 


864 


27.90 


.30 


28.20 


11.26 


11.53 


.56 


3.73 


24,408 


349 


2 


114,783 


777 


21.43 


.14 


21.57 


7.03 


10.50 


.62 


3.48 


777 


6 


3 


129,862 


22,321 


22.77 


3.91 


26.68 


13.92 


7.92 


.30 


3.02 


127,460 


1,169 


4 


196,812 


6,817 


25.68 


.89 


26.57 


10.54 


12.48 


.43 


3.80 


41,932 


201 


5 


79,124 


4,879 


24.14 


1.49 


25.63 


11.70 


10.10 


.48 


3.36 


14,569 


199 


6 


158,561 


9,720 


20.50 


1.26 


21.76 


9.65 


9.46 


.55 


3.40 


29,495 


191 


7 


113,530 


6,508 


24.33 


1.39 


25.72 


10.53 


12.33 


.44 


3.51 


41,878 


335 


8 


144,884 


11,507 


20.70 


1.64 


22.34 


10.34 


8.40 


.41 


2.83 


168,493 


1,230 


9 


134,704 


7,208 


22.59 


1.21 


23.80 


9.25 


9.81 


.58 


3.58 


21,470 


165 


10 


250,170 


19,077 


22.75 


1.73 


24.48 


17.57 


5.66 


.29 


3.47 


439,281 


2,218 


11 


171,410 


3,914 


24.08 


.55 


24.63 


7.67 


12.73 


.69 


3.71 


25,747 


127 


12 


103,414 


777 


18.33 


.14 


18.47 


5.55 


8.02 


.36 


3.13 


4,554 


41 


13 


119,586 


9,081 


21.11 


1.60 


22.71 


9.70 


8.44 


.52 


3.49 


82,824 


760 


14 


145,193 


916 


25.39 


.16 


25.55 


8.41 


12.17 


.77 


3.99 


3,524 


22 


15 


113,079 


11,980 


23.99 


2.54 


26.53 


9.55 


11.97 


.34 


4.61 


152,523 


1,657 


16 


151,056 


6,805 


22.91 


1.03 


23.94 


7.50 


12.40 


.16 


3.25 


833 


4 


17 


133,140 


30,169 


27.20 


6.16 


33.36 


18.69 


9.42 


.64 


5.04 


260,319 


2,711 


18 


114,237 


11,849 


24.28 


2.52 


26.80 


12.07 


8.31 


.52 


4.36 


39,747 


484 


19 


235,022 


5,515 


25.60 


.60 


26.20 


8.02 


12.17 


.99 


5.19 


56,559 


231 


20 


64,808 


2,197 


27.06 


.92 


27.98 


5.91 


14.63 


.61 


4.67 


10,685 


144 


21 


134,789 


27,344 


23.06 


4.67 


27.73 


13.13 


10.47 


.35 


3.92 


212,392 


1,539 


22 


100,550 


4,676 


30.72 


1.43 


32.15 


11.33 


15.11 


.41 


6.16 


50,614 


448 


23 


79,161 


8,462 


22.10 


2.36 


24.46 


7.24 


10.65 


.34 


4.08 


61,435 


682 


24 


143,679 


916 


29.43 


.19 


29.62 


7.92 


15.05 


.86 


6.14 


13,234 


80 


25 


80,374 


3,864 


30.67 


1.47 


32.14 


9.35 


16.71 


.60 


5.43 


13,999 


152 


26 


76,084 
134,938 


'16,833' 


24.44 
26.14 


"3.'26 


24.44 
29.40 


7.23 
13.45 


12.42 
11.47 


.53 

.28 


4.46 
4.73 






27 


" 127,637' 


"'938' 


28 


94,573 


2,273 


28.97 


.70 


29.67 


8.88 


13.74 


.49 


5.99 


15,414 


154 


29 


104,459 


802 


25.23 


.19 


25.42 


7.08 


12.30 


.49 


5.45 


20,859 


181 


30 


71,910 


4,741 


24.06 


1.59 


25.65 


8.31 


12.10 


.45 


4.86 


18,026 


222 


31 


189,339 


3,251 


23.90 


.41 


24.31 


6.28 


12.73 


.85 


4.28 


23,901 


106 


32 


63,212 


1,503 


22.36 


.53 


22.89 


6.93 


12.03 


.37 


4.95 


9,564 


123 


33 


31,341 


1,515 


24.02 


1.16 


25.18 


7.41 


10.76 


1.28 


5.50 


8,247 


250 


34 


63,935 




24.57 




24.57 


4.69 


14.38 


.17 


4.55 






35 


41,584 




22.80 




22.80 


6.30 


26.72 


.61 


5.14 






36 


90,526 


97i 


28.19 


'.'30 


28.49 


5.97 


15.70 


.37 


6.73 


'""8,385" 


' 67' 


37 


172,935 


6,144 


23.05 


.82 


23.87 


6.54 


8.40 


.69 


7.69 


28,931 


146 


38 


61,208 


578 


29.42 


.28 


29.70 


8.47 


15.78 


.34 


6.66 


2,179 


30 


39 


120,563 


4,456 


27.93 


1.03 


28.96 


6.99 


14.12 


.22 


6.87 


30,972 


208 


40 


131,758 


1,987 


21.08 


.32 


21.40 


5.40 


10.02 


.54 


6.09 


22,933 


132 


41 


102,682 


4,465 


24.67 


1.07 


25.74 


7.75 


8.00 


.49 


8.14 


38,442 


380 


42 


122,368 


2,648 


24.60 


.53 


25.13 


5.51 


8.40 


.42 


9.72 


25,510 


168 


43 


27,027 


1,143 


26.19 


1.11 


27.30 


3.42 


7.95 


.71 


12.10 


12,760 


412 


44 


50,041 


1,267 


26.74 


.68 


27.42 


5.84 


5.77 




16.80 


7,040 


108 


5,041,332 


272,720 


24.17 


1.31 


25.48 


9.27 


10.86 


.51 


4.80 


2,299,552 


432 


1 


148,067 


12,684 


35.79 


3.07 


38.86 


21.60 


1.37 




13.36 


94,039 


818 


2 


114,370 


4,455 


32.68 


1.27 


33.95 


17.32 


.23 




12.64 


32,707 


424 


3 


102,925 


2,891 


30.31 


.85 


31.16 


14.03 


4.40 




13.08 


15,370 


145 


4 


100,766 


6,648 


30.55 


2.01 


32.56 


19.52 


2.35 




10.05 


35,358 


447 


5 


105,080 


10,167 


28.48 


2.75 


31.23 


17.88 


1.73 




10.48 


59,643 


579 


6 


93,487 


16,956 


35.64 


6.46 


42.10 


23.54 


1.88 




15.75 


149,026 


2,014 


7 


143,029 


11,378 


40.04 


3.18 


43.22 


19.82 


1.21 




20.11 


141,374 


1,229 


8 


58,679 


3,864 


36.12 


2.37 


38.49 


18.13 


3.97 




17.00 


36,811 


898 


9 


46,462 


2,487 


24.02 


1.29 


25.31 


10.61 


2.97 




12.17 


26,103 


522 


10 


132,550 


3,755 


29.51 


.84 


30.35 


12.51 


3.32 




14.30 


27,100 


204 


11 


84,586 


1,673 


28.64 


.57 


29.21 


8.77 


.86 




12.19 


38,173 


496 


1,130,001 


77,158 


32.08 


2.19 


34.27 


16.83 


2.11 




13.63 


655,704 


676 


6,171,333 


349,878 


26.17 


1.48 


27.65 


10.72 


9.92 


.45 


6.29 


2,955,256 


470 



166 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



Large Fully Graded Rural Schools 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



County- 



Township 



& 



«« 2 

C/3 O 

N <U 

a a 

a* <u 

W 6 



M a 



a 

a a 

'3 * 






a -•-; 

0h< 



a 
a.tj 

5° 



O 



o 

a 

c 
U 



Brant 

Carleton 

Essex 

Lincoln 

5 Ontario 

6 Peel 

7 Peterborough. 

8 Welland 

9 " 

10 " 

11 " 

12 " 

13 " 

14 York 

15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 



Brantford . . 
Nepean ... 
Sandwich E 
Grantham. 
Whitby E. . 
Toronto 
Monaghan N 
Stamford . 



Bertie.... 
Crowland . 
Thorold . . 
Etobicoke 



York... 
York E. 



York North 
Scarboro. . . 



3 

2 

5 

U5,6 

10 

7 

2 

4 

6 

7 
11 

3 

2 

3 

5 

8 

11 

16 

Twp 

7 
26 
27 

3 

10 
12 
13 
15 



$102, 

132, 

53, 

80, 

57, 

73, 

64, 

107, 

75, 

51, 

176, 

102, 

240, 

138, 

79, 

108, 

68, 

49, 

76 

96 

70 

108 

137 

67 

48 

147 

21 



,794 
,287 
,174 
,930 
,281 
,894 
,233 
,064 
,150 
,775 
,596 
,861 
,749 
,243 
,358 
,794 
,567 
,263 
,458 
,351 
,684 
,637 
,811 
,313 
,173 
,790 



7 
27 
11 

8 
10 
12 
10 

8 
12 

9 
10 
19 
10 
11 

7 

9 
14 
14 
311 
44 
61 
45 
36 
23 
23 
10 
16 



248 
921 
451 
242 
436 
430 
318 
261 
419 
270 
263 
644 
292 
331 
261 
274 
442 
473 
10,313 
1,784 
2,160 
1,578 
1,296 
799 
767 
376 
505 



35 
34 
41 
30 
44 
36 
32 
33 
35 
30 
26 
34 
29 
30 
37 
30 
32 
33 
33 
41 
35 
35 
36 
43 
33 
38 
32 



47,560 

176,055 

85,815 

45,098 

76,330 

83,006 

60,697 

50,017 

80,215 

51,681 

50,321 

123,624 

56,133 

63,693 

50,209 

52,682 

85,017 

90,990 

1,969,835 

340,887 

441,779 

303,051 

250,205 

153,535 

146,850 

73,818 

100,131 



$6,983 

34,628 

8,294 

3,800 

12,638 

23,686 

7,449 

2,581 

4,769 

10,447 

19,264 

16,295 

2,900 

12,297 

6,277 

10,373 

21,324 

10,569 

432,650 

59,362 

77,283 

61,994 

37,985 

30,763 

26,032 

18,913 

32,016 



$2,400 
8,550 
4,124 
2,500 
3,720 
3,900 
3,520 
9,999 

15,066 
5,250 
3,800 
8,200 
8,600 
3,040 
2,400 
3,040 
4,800 
4,800 



$162 
662 

1,118 
288 
126 
516 
590 
160 
638 
436 
162 



810 
134 



13,500 

18,600 

14,250 

11,850 

6,750 

7,050 

3,300 

5,328 



9,234 
1,212 
2,034 

888 



648 
265 



Totals and Averages . 



86,602 



777 



26,554 



34 



5,082,244 



991,572 



178,337 



20,083 



District 

1 Cochrane 

2 

3 

4 

5 



Parry Sound. 
vSudbury 



6 Temiskaming. 

7 Thunder Bay 



Tisdale . 



Himsworth . 
Chapleau . . . 
Snider &C. 
t fTeck & O, 
\Teck & L 
Schreiber. . . 



1 
2 

U4 
1 

Ul 

vi) 

U2/ 
1 



73,671 
119,897 

19,527 
103,304 
113,355 

84,742 

79,423 



526 
562 
241 
198 
266 

1,594 

179 



101,087 

112,295 

46,290 

38,084 

54,668 



37,320 
40,000 
2,995 
14,948 
18,139 



1,480 



680 



304,566 69,627 
34,208 7,764 



Totals and Averages . 



86,652 



110 



3,566 



32 



691,198 



190,793 



2,160 



86,608 



887 



30,120 



34 



5,773,442 



,182,365 



180,497 



20,083 



Tn default. 



■[Interest only. 



JSchool area of Kirkland Lake. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



167 



SCHOOLS 

STATISTICS, 1936 



d 
a 
u 




Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- Day 
(in cents) 


Debenture 
Debt 


o 
Is. 

'So 
u 


a 
u 

g 

3 
U 


"S, 
o 


4-1 

d 
u 
P 

B 

o 


13 
'8. 
O 


*0S 


d 

.2 
'-3 
u 

& 
o 
H 


a, 

"J3 

to 

d 

d 


d 
d 
o 
O 


► 

o 
O 


13 
■*-> 
o 


6 
o 
o 
u 
co 

CO 


1 SI, 934 


$ 9,801 


$2,471 


20.61 


5.19 


25.80 


14.68 


5.04 


.34 


4.07 


$12,546 


$1,792 


2 9,010 


47,957 


5,980 


27.24 


3.40 


30.64 


19.67 


4.86 


.38 


5.12 


32,216 


1,193 


3 4.185 

4 3,966 


17,807 
11,912 


* 


20.75 






9.66 


4.80 


1.30 


4.88 


176,411 


1,604 


4,142 


26.41 


9.18 


35.59 


8.42 


5.54 


.64 


8.79 


19,210 


2,401 


5 2,856 


11,266 


7,358 


14.75 


9.64 


24.39 


16.56 


4.87 


.16 


3.74 


75,473 


7,547 


6 4,495 


19,938 


10,784 


24.02 


12.99 


37.01 


28.53 


4.70 


.62 


5.41 


115,635 


9,636 


7 3,695 


13,669 


2,487 


22.52 


4.10 


26.62 


12.27 


5.80 


.97 


6.09 


19,995 


1,999 


8 2,594 


13,872 


1,364 


27.73 


2.73 


30.46 


5.16 


19.99 


.32 


5.19 


28,896 


3,737 


9 6,204 


21,891 


2,994 


27.29 


3.73 


31.02 


5.94 


18.78 


.79 


7.73 


67,385 


5,615 


10 2,774 

11 1,865 


18,583 
14,844 




35.96 




35.96 


20.21 


10.16 


.84 


5.37 






10,894 


29.50 


21.65 


51.15 


38.28 


7.55 


.32 


3.70 


102,120 


10,212 


12 5,001 


25,461 


9,495 


20.59 


7.68 


28.27 


13.18 


6.63 




4.04 


66,780 


3,515 


13 2,358 


19,837 


7,150 


35.33 


12.73 


48.06 


5.16 


15.32 




4.20 


71,233 


7,123 


14 3,223 

15 3,446 

16 3,725 


18,616 
12,213 
17,919 


* 


29.23 






19.31 


4.77 


1.27 


5.06 


53,289 


4,844 


* 


24.32 






12.50 


4.78 


.27 


6.86 


40,538 


5,791 


143 


34.01 


.27 


34.28 


19.69 


5.77 




7.07 


83,013 


9,223 


17 6,340 


26,075 


6,612 


30.67 


7.77 


38.44 


25.08 


5.64 




7.46 


104,184 


7,442 


18 8,262 

19 166,364 


23,724 
557,919 


* 


26.07 






11.61 


5.27 




9.08 


116,019 


8,287 


65,672 


28.33 


3.33 


31.66 


21.96 




.47 


8.45 


2,181,689 


7,015 


20 17,500 


67,870 


19,184f 


19.91 


5.62 


25.53 


17.41 


3.96 


.35 


5.13 


346,206 


7,868 


21 32,771 


102,789 


24,046f 


24.78 


5.80 


30.58 


18.63 


4.48 


.49 


7.90 


404,581 


6,632 


22 17,793 


73,912 


22,441 f 


24.39 


7.40 


31.79 


20.46 


4.70 


.29 


5.87 


433,459 


9,632 


23 10,709 


58,490 


7,097 


23.38 


2.83 


26.21 


15.18 


4.74 




4.28 


265,021 


7,361 


24 7 958 


31,865 


* 


20.75 






20.04 


4.40 


.42 


5.18 


174,038 


7,567 


25 8,483 

26 2,184 

27 5 112 


30,289 
16,591 
24,092 


* 


20 62 






17.72 


4.80 


.18 


5.78 


117,557 


5,111 


* 


22 47 






25.62 


4.47 




2.96 


82,239 


8,223 


* 


24.06 






31.97 


5.32 




5.10 


99,778 


6,236 










344,807 


1,309,202 


210,314 


25.76 


4.93 


29.90 


19.51 


3.51 


.39 


6.78 


5,290,511 


6,809 


1 10,882 


43,891 


5,320 


43.42 


5.26 


48.68 


36.92 


1.46 




10.76 


52,766 


2,931 


2 8 213 


43,281 




38.54 




38.54 


35.62 






7.31 






3 7,841 


10,616 


1,475 


22.93 


3.18 


26.11 


6.47 


1.47 




16.94 


14,629 


1,829 


4 2,831 


11,774 


5,448 


30.91 


14.30 


45.21 


39.25 






7.43 


87,178 


12,454 


5 2,524 

6 19,250 


13,421 




24.55 




24.55 


33.18 






4.61 






83,172 


* 


27.31 






22.86 






6.32 


124,813 


2,713 


7 2,294 


9,500 


709 


27.77 


2.07 


29.84 


22.70 






6.70 


1,498 


250 










53,835 


215,655 


12,952 


31.20 


5.90 


33.07 


27.60 


.31 




7.79 


280,884 


2,553 


398,642 


1,524,857 


223,266 


26.41 


4.98 


30.28 


20.48 


3.14 


.35 


6.90 


5,571,395 


6,281 



168 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Cities 


County 


Assessed 
Popula- 
tion 


No. of 
Class- 
rooms 


Equal- 
ized 
Assess- 
ment 
per 
Class- 
room 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


Group A 
1 Toronto 


York 


645,462 


1,909 


$ 
487,080 


73,491 


38.50 


14,183,763 


Group B 

2 Hamilton 

3 Ottawa 


Wentworth 

Carleton 

Essex 


154,020 

141,903 

101,435 

73,091 


527 
260 
308 
244 


292,592 
477,734 
241,364 
316,760 


19,904 
9,045 

11,363 
8,332 


37.77 
34.79 
36.89 
34.15 


3,722,627 
1,754,847 


4 Windsor . . . 


2,178,006 


5 London 


Middlesex 


1,603,251 






Totals and Averag 


es, Group B.. . . . 


470,449 


1,339 


332,210 


48,644 


36.33 


9,258,731 


Group C 

6 Kitchener 

7 Brantford 

8 St. Catharines. . . . 


Waterloo 

Brant 

Lincoln 


32,650 
31,232 
26,834 
24,692 
23,513 
23,072 
21,455 


100 

106 

90 

86 
67 
77 
62 


207,228 
245,768 
235,825 
179,950 
253,395 
282,911 
193,480 


3,838 
3,648 
3,238 
3,421 
2,473 
2,527 
2,291 


38.38 
34.41 
35.98 
39.78 
36.91 
32.82 
36.95 


727,106 
700,516 
615,322 


9 Oshawa 

10 Kingston 

1 1 Peterborough 

12 Guelph 


Ontario 

Frontenac 

Peterborough . . . 
Wellington 


660,311 
470,045 

485,247 
444,444 


Totals and Averag 


es, Group C . . . . 


183,448 


588 


230,401 


21,436 


36.45 


4,102,991 


Group D 

13 Niagara Falls 

14 Sarnia 

15 Stratford 

16 St. Thomas 


Welland 

Lambton 

Perth 

Elgin 


18,747 
18,230 
17,555 
16,088 
15,910 
14,509 
14,119 
13,100 
11,040 
10,540 


64 
68 
60 
55 
54 
48 
46 
56 
35 
53 


255,563 
240,302 
207,308 
239,375 
234,430 
193,280 
228,550 
136,012 
203,119 
186,674 


2,379 
2,266 
2,123 
1,721 
1,862 
1,718 
1,595 
1,858 
1,227 
1,815 


37.17 
35.34 
35.38 
31.29 
34.48 
35.80 
34.67 
33.18 
35.05 
34.24 


454,299 
436,020 
403,082 
330,003 


17 Chatham 

18 Belleville 


Kent 

Hastings 

Waterloo 

Grey 

Oxford 

Welland 


353,882 
330,017 


19 Gait 


307,836 


20 Owen Sound 

21 Woodstock 

22 Welland 


354,895 
234,417 
348,536 






Totals and Averag 


es, Group D . . . . 


149,838 


539 


220,567 


18,564 


34.44 


3,552,987 


Totals and Averag 


es, Counties. . . . 


1,449,197 


4,375 


380,179 


162,135 


37.01 


31,098,472 


Group E 
23 Sudbury 


District 

Sudbury • 

Thunder Bay . . 

Algoma 

Thunder Bay . . . 
Nipissing 


24,440 
24,231 
23,627 
20,045 
15,161 


43 
89 
78 
71 
47 


207,742 
284,310 
229,803 
342,115 
155,713 


1,483 
3,000 
2,696 
2,154 
1,464 


34.49 
33.37 
34.56 
30.33 
31.15 


283,337 


24 Fort William 

25 Sault Ste. Marie . . 

26 Port Arthur 

27 North Bay 


537,158 
517,685 
412,862 
279,714 


Totals and Averag 


es, Group E . . . . 


107,504 


328 


255,356 


10,797 


32.91 


2,030,756 


Totals and Averag 


es, All Cities .... 


1,556,701 


4,703 


371,473 


172,932 


36.77 


33,129,228 



Cities in Counties : Group A — Cities with population over 200,000. 

" " " Group B— " " " " 50,000 and under 200,000. 

" " " Group C— " " " " 20,000 " " 50,000. 

" " " Group D— " " " under 20,000. 

Cities in Districts: Group E. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



169 



SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Tax Levy 
Receipts 


Legis- 
lative 
Grants 

$ 


Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (Cents) 


Debenture Debt 


(Current 

and 
Capital) 

$ 


Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


Tax 

Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


1 6,697,817 


135,575 


5,560,272 


1,138,196 


39.20 


8.02 


47.22 


47.22 


.95 


14,327,304 


7,505 


2 1,262,877 

3 950,214 

4 582,279 

5 693,491 


32,003 
38,750 

17,074 
18,537 


1,023,049 
875,963 
619,027 
585,305 


274,641 

170,341 

* 

139.475 


27.48 
49.92 
28.42 
36.51 


7.38 
9.71 


34.86 
59.63 


33.92 
54.15 
26.73 
43.25 


.86 
2.21 

.86 
1.15 


1,439,147 

3,100,716 

3,508,746 

843,293 


2,731 
11,926 
11,392 


8.70 


45.21 


3,456 


3,488,861 


106,364 


3,103,344 


584,457 


33.51 


8.25 


39.83 


37.68 


1.15 


8,891,902 


6,640 


6 251,101 

7 222,375 

8 205,390 

9 193,235 

10 149,668 

11 180,373 

12 107,601 


20,051 
14,263 
9,656 
10,696 
6,315 
8,674 
6,809 


211,076 
204,127 
184,065 
145,284 
128,846 
160,346 
101,193 


52,208 
36,068 
33,833 
54,305 
27,510 
34,282 
11,824 


29.02 
29.14 
29.91 
22.00 
27.42 
33.04 
22.77 


7.18 
5.15 
5.50 
8.22 
5.85 
7.06 
2.66 


36.20 
34.29 
35.41 
30.22 
33.27 
40.10 
25.43 


34.53 
31.74 
33.38 
29.26 
31.84 
37.17 
24.21 


2.76 
2.04 
1.57 
1.62 
1.34 
1.79 
1.53 


600,021 
286,300 
258,024 
337,335 
310,480 
467,150 
92,169 


6,000 
2,701 
1,978 
3,922 
4,634 
6,066 
1,486 


1,309,743 


76,464 


1,134,937 


250,030 


27.66 


6.09 


33.75 


31.92 


1.86 


2,351,479 


3,999 


13 120,639 

14 138,376 

15 131,848 

16 102,236 

17 98,977 

18 103,259 

19 79,891 

20 79,502 


5,289 
8,043 
6,728 
4,540 
6,183 
4,033 
4,129 
7,387 
2,674 
5,450 


111,090 

131,535 

105,709 

90,398 

102,712 

77,040 

80,098 

86,856 

54,060 

100,664 


15,418 
23,246 
30,412 
10,471 

5,020 
31,737 

7,391 


24.45 
30.17 
26.22 
27.39 
29.02 
23.34 
26.02 
24.47 
24.00 
28.88 


3.39 
5.33 
7.54 
3.17 
1.42 
9.62 
2.40 

'4^20 
5.83 


27.84 
35.50 
33.76 
30.56 
30.44 
32.96 
28.42 
24.47 
28.20 
34.71 


26.55 
31.74 
32.71 
30.98 
27.97 
31.29 
25.95 
22.40 
23.82 
32.95 


1.16 
1.84 
1.67 
1.38 
1.75 
1.22 
1.34 
2.08 
1.14 
1.56 


288,967 
160,372 
175,011 

37,844 

5,020 

415,954 

25,344 


4,515 
2,358 
2,917 

688 

93 

8,665 

551 


21 55,830 

22 114,829 


9,850 
20,310 


95,660 
277,646 


2,733 
5,238 


1,025,387 


54,456 


940,162 


153,855 


26.46 


4.81 


30.79 


28.86 


1.53 


1,481,818 


2,749 


12,521,808 


372,859 


10,738,714 


2,126,538 


34.53 


7.44 


41.97 


40.27 


1.20 


27,052,503 


6,183 


23 70,797 

24 234,203 

25 215,258 

26 179,601 

27 89,362 


3,915 
9,432 
7,147 
5,958 
7,115 


68,636 
185,373 
141,851 
133,780 

77,258 


8,916 
59,755 
81,508 
54,129 
22,738 


24.22 
34.51 
27.40 
32.40 
27.62 


3.15 
11.12 
15.74 
13.11 

8.12 


27.37 
45.63 
43.14 
45.51 
35.74 


24.99 
43.60 
41.58 
43.50 
31.94 


1.38 
1.76 
1.38 
1.44 
2.54 


205,604 
813,000 
647,130 

327,838 
135,613 


4,781 
9,134 
8,296 
4,617 
2,885 


789,221 


33,567 


606,898 


227,046 


29.88 


11.18 


31.06 


38.86 


1.65 


2,129,185 


6,491 


13,311,029 


406,426 


11,345,613 


2,353,584 


34.25 


7.69 


41.94 


40.18 


1.23 


29,181,688 


6,205 



170 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Towns 


County 


Assessed 
Popula- 
tion 


No. of 
Class- 
rooms 


Equal- 
ized 
Assess- 
ment per 
Class- 
room 
$ 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


Group A 

1 Cornwall 

2 Pembroke 

3 Brockville 


Stormont 

Renfrew 

Leeds 


12,681 
10,326 
9,903 
8,808 
8,266 
8,126 
7,623 
7,116 
6,876 
6,852 
6,848 
6,690 
6,440 
6,294 
6,196 


22 
26 
34 
31 
31 
31 
26 
27 
30 
8 
30 
22 
21 
15 
32 


328,947 
135,400 
192,197 
176,366 
215.460 
169,107 
158,113 
181,063 
123,729 
45,843 
136,606 
212,982 
149,265 
246,676 
141,476 


831 
882 

1,103 

1,158 
985 

1,037 
849 
853 

1,002 
191 

1,021 
864 
872 
638 

1,266 


37.77 
33.92 
32.44 
37.36 
31.77 
33.45 
32.65 
31.59 
33.40 
23.87 
34.00 
39.27 
41.52 
42.53 
39.56 


158,683 
169,507 
205,212 
224,657 
189,124 
198,073 
162,989 
163,752 
192,533 
36,558 
196,165 
150 510 


4 Orillia. 


Simcoe : . . 


5 Waterloo 

6 Barrie 


Waterloo 

Simcoe 


7 Smith's Falls 


Lanark 


8 Lindsay 


Victoria 

York 


9 Mimico . 


10 Eastview 

1 1 New Toronto .... 


Carleton 

York 


12 Midland 


Simcoe 


13 Trenton 

14 Preston 


Hastings 

Waterloo 

Welland 


167,487 
123 394 


15 Port Colborne . . . 


243,194 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Group A 


119,045 


386 


179,172 


13,552 


35.11 


2,581,838 


Group B 

16 Hawkesbury 

17 Fort Erie 

18 Simcoe 


Prescott 

Welland 

Norfolk 

Peel 

Simcoe 

Essex 


5,922 
5,655 
5,614 
5,568 
5,498 
5,340 
5,332 
5,139 
5,063 
5,028 
5,017 
4,959 
4,757 
4,660 
4,564 
4,336 
4,315 
4,275 
4,227 
4,184 
4,061 
4,023 
4,001 


4 
35 
20 
20 
20 
20 
12 
20 
19 
20 
15 
15 
15 
15 
16 
15 
15 
16 
11 
12 
24 
13 
11 


181,132 
138,168 
213,544 
173,493 
121,757 
176,113 
177,560 
142,726 
138,305 
183,905 

99,355 
115,027 
175,473 
101,764 
158,770 
120,217 
195,801 

91,343 
140,466 
125,844 

52,566 
171,910 

75,945 


122 
884 
794 
648 
703 
719 
416 
659 
643 
627 
533 
523 
579 
545 
589 
514 
470 
624 
387 
395 
825 
420 
434 


30.50 
25.26 
39.70 
32.40 
35.15 
35.95 
34.66 
32.95 
33.31 
31.35 
35.53 
34.86 
38.60 
36.33 
36.81 
34.26 
31.33 
39.00 
35.18 
32.91 
34.38 
32.31 
39.45 


23,551 
169,884 
151,682 


19 Brampton 

20 CoUingwood 

21 Leamington 

22 Renfrew 

23 Ingersoll 

24 Cobourg 

25 Weston 


125,159 
134,642 
138,107 


Renfrew 

Oxford 


79,470 
125,893 


Northumberl'nd 
York . . 


122,300 
120,545 


26 Riverside 


Essex 


101,905 


27 Thorold 


Welland 

Wentworth 

Kent 


99,773 


28 Dundas . . 


110,607 


29 Wallaceburg 

30 Port Hope 

31 Goderich 

32 Paris 


104,244 


Durham 

Huron 

Brant 


112,504 
98,790 
90,239 


33 Carleton Place . . 


Lanark 


120,426 


34 Arnprior 

35 Perth 


Renfrew 

Lanark 


74,448 
75,955 


36 Penetangu ishene . 

37 St. Mary's 


Simcoe 

Perth 


156,998 
74,988 


38 Dunnville 


Haldimand 


83,423 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Group B 


111,538 


383 


145,531 


13,053 


34.08 


2,495,533 


Group C 
39 Oakville 


Halton 


3,868 
3,778 
3,702 
3,639 
3,611 
3,526 
3,481 
3,281 
3,061 
3,061 
2,942 
2,911 
2,879 


14 
12 
13 
14 
14 
15 
12 
10 
12 
11 

9 
11 

7 


249,118 
173,752 
165,000 
217,378 
171,992 
101,957 
242,535 
156,440 
92,985 
103,455 
142,427 
153,392 
224,638 


489 
431 
521 
462 
483 
485 
411 
328 
407 
372 
302 
397 
191 


34.93 
35.92 
40.07 
33.00 
34.50 
32.33 
34.25 
32.80 
33.91 
33.82 
33.58 
36.09 
27.28 


93,327 


40 Whitby 


Ontario 

Oxford 


82,267 


41 Tillsonburg 

42 Burlington 

43 Bowmanville .... 


100,044 


Halton 


88,968 


Durham 

York 


92,803 
92,976 


45 Picton 


Prince Edward . . 
Leeds. . . . 


74,847 


46 Gananoque 

47 Hanover. . 


63,168 


Grey 


79,831 


48 Napanee 

49 Prescott 

50 Strathroy 

51 Amherstburg .... 


Lennox. . . ... 


71,606 


Grenville 

Middlesex 

Essex 


58,031 
75,848 
37,652 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



171 



SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Tax Levy 
Receipts 


Legis- 
lative 
Grants 

$ 


Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (Cents) 


Debenture Debt 


(Current 

and 
Capital) 

$ 


Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


Tax 
Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


1 47,040 

2 36,838 

3 51,600 


1,168 
2,024 
2,861 
2,845 
3,001 
2,843 
2,696 
1,891 
3,800 
1,099 
3,980 
1,740 
2,068 
1,230 
3,757 


33,244 
38,792 
54,259 
47,232 
51,791 
43,367 
39,145 
33,527 
47,263 
10,587 
57,512 
32,262 
31,779 
25,397 
49,872 


10,766 

* 


20.95 
22.88 
26.44 
21.02 
27.38 
21.89 
24.02 
20.47 
24.55 
28.95 
29.32 
21.43 
18.97 
20.58 
20.51 


6.78 


27.73 


29.64 
21.73 
25.14 
21.63 
36.00 
21.72 
21.54 
22.53 
22.12 
26.26 
27.33 
20.56 
19.11 
25.47 
28.56 


.74 
1.19 
1.39 
1.27 
1.58 
1.43 
1.65 
1.15 
1.97 
3.00 
3.75 
1.16 
1.23 
1.00 
1.54 


130,635 
52,642 


5,938 
2,024 


2. 22 
10.03 
1.93 
1.49 
3.47 


26.44 
23.24 
37.41 
23.82 
25.51 
23.94 


4 48,602 

5 68,084 

6 43,021 

7 35,116 

8 36,903 

9 42,595 

10 9,600 

11 53,765 

12 30,951 

13 32,009 

14 31,433 

15 69,458 


4,979 
18,973 
3,825 
2,438 
5,678 

* 
* 
* 

3,009 

6,359 

24,458 


61,151 

227,379 
48,302 
16,667 
21,438 

249,920 
15,055 

206,492 

69,180 

62,715 

8,578 

139,048 


1,972 
7,334 
1,558 
641 
794 
8,330 
1 882 










6,883 
3,144 
2,986 
572 
4,345 






1.80 

5.15 

10.06 


20.77 
25.73 
30.57 


637,015 


37,003 


596,029 


80,485 


23.09 


4.38 


27.47 


24.67 


1.43 


1,309,202 


3,391 


16 3,553 


314 
2,781 
1,300 
1,828 
2,009 
1,659 

308 
2,063 
1,508 
1,622 
2,121 
1,970 
1,174 
2,129 
1,243 
1,510 
1,413 
1,587 
1,054 

404 
4,182 
1,043 
1,671 


6,191 
51,463 
24,591 
29,786 
27,892 
25,922 
17,696 
28,089 
25,024 
29,162 
21,810 
23,586 
19,664 
19,949 
19,174 
20,422 
23,764 
17,665 
13,499 
17,393 
25,130 
19,764 
16,769 




26.29 
30.29 
16.21 
23.80 
20.71 
18.77 
22.27 
22.31 
20.46 
24.19 
21.40 
23.63 
17.78 
19.14 
17.04 
20.67 
26.33 
14.66 
18.13 
22.90 
16.00 
26.25 
20.10 


1L65 
6.67 
7.78 
.12 
4.31 
2.95 

12.61 
4.92 


26.29 
41.94 
22.88 
31.58 
20.83 
23.08 
25.22 
34.92 
25.38 


15.09 
40.05 
23.93 
30.21 
18.83 
21.33 
23.96 
33.84 
25.03 
21.80 
18.94 
21.97 
22.19 
20.63 
20.79 
20.78 
24.04 
16.05 
21.79 
23.71 
12.71 
25.74 
23.34 


1.34 
1.64 

.86 
1.46 
1.49 
1.20 

.39 
1.64 
1.23 
1.34 
2.08 
1.97 
1.06 
2.04 
1.10 
1.52 
1.56 
1.32 
1.42 

.53 
2.66 
1.39 
2.00 






17 68,040 

18 36,302 

19 37,817 

20 25,360 

21 29,465 

22 19,042 

23 42,607 

24 30,614 

25 26,286 


19,790 

10,121 

9,741 

168 

5,952 

2,342 

15,872 

6,016 

* 

* 
* 

5,864 
2,077 
4,587 
1,534 


212,297 

109,540 

61,853 

1,493 

75,280 

8,304 

52,746 

25,158 

90,262 

180,201 

97,110 

36,498 

53,949 

37,534 

5,506 


6,065 
5,477 
3,092 
74 
3,764 

69? 
2,637 
1,324 
4,513 
1,201 
6,474 
2,433 
3,596 
2,345 

367 


26 19,304 






27 21,918 






28 24,544 

29 21,506 

30 23,387 

31 20,534 

32 21,700 


5.30 
1.99 
4.08 
1.55 

"!57 

5.41 

2.40 

.19 

'3.' 92 


23.08 
21.13 
21.12 
22.22 
26.33 
15.23 
23.55 
25.30 
16.19 
26.25 
24.02 


33 19,327 

34 16,223 

35 18,007 

36 19,965 

37 19,300 


688 
4,035 
1,821 

304 


7,199 
41,502 

7,200 
11,850 


450 

3,773 

600 

493 


38 19,469 


3,269 


31,751 


2,886 


584,270 


36,896 


524,405 


94,181 


21.01 


3.88 


24.89 


23.41 


1.48 


1,147,233 


2,995 


39 31,64? 

40 22,448 

41 17,751 

42 28,256 

43 20,367 

44 24,105 

45 18,424 

46 11,857 

47 15,135 

48 14,313 


872 

883 

1,049 

827 

1,003 

1,575 

1,163 

650 

1,711 

1,281 

901 

899 

718 


21,517 
16,965 
17,361 
20,974 
20,446 
22,325 
18,032 
13,936 
14,859 
14,896 
12,342 
14,163 
11,971 


10,842 
7,088 
2,462 
8,056 
2,367 
5,605 
2,024 
1,257 
1,634 


23.05 
20.62 
17.35 
23.58 
22.03 
24.01 
24.09 
22.06 
18.62 
20.80 
21.27 
18.67 
31.79 


11.62 
8.61 
2.46 
9.05 
2.55 
6.03 
2.70 
1.99 
2.04 

4] 58 


34.67 
29.23 
19.81 
32.63 
24.58 
30.04 
26.79 
24.05 
20.66 
20.80 
25.85 
18.67 
31.79 


33.90 
27.28 
17.74 
31.76 
21.94 
25.92 
24.61 
18.77 
18.96 
19.99 
24.57 
17.93 
32.04 


.93 
1.07 
1.05 

.93 
1.08 
1.69 
1.55 
1.03 
2.14 
1.79 
1.55 
1.18 
1.91 


44,574 
53,038 
11,148 
63,549 
19,878 
50,360 
20,392 
57,979 
8,037 


3,183 
4,419 

857 
4,539 
1,420 
3,357 
1,699 
5,798 

670 


49 14,257 

50 13,600 


2,657 


10,846 


1,205 


51 12,063 




4,613 


659 









172 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Towns 


County 


Assessed 
Popula- 
tion 


No. of 
Class- 
rooms 


Equal- 
ized 
Assess- 
ment per 
Class- 
room 
$ 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 


Pupil- 
Days 

Attended 


52 Hespeler 

53 Campbellford .... 

54 Listowel 


Waterloo 

Northumberl'nd 
Perth 


2,861 
2,849 
2,819 
2,758 
2,720 
2,719 
2,543 
2,479 
2,468 
2,432 
2,431 
2,350 
2,282 
2,189 
2,115 
2,063 
2,054 


14 

12 

9 

10 

11 

11 

9 

9 

9 

2 

7 

6 

11 

8 

8 

8 

1 


125,000 
109,496 
173,227 
133,567 

95,363 

68,182 
173,156 
138,211 

84,557 
366,469 
126,907 

99,861 
198,164 
201,736 
111,356 
238,486 

88,640 


436 
319 
275 
364 
358 
311 
282 
289 
332 

63 
248 
161 
343 
282 
230 
323 

23 


31.14 
26.58 
30.55 
36.40 
32.54 
28.27 
31.33 
32.11 
36.66 
31.50 
35.42 
26.83 
31.18 
35.25 
28.75 
40.37 
23.00 


83,745 
61,426 
55 031 


55 Aurora 


York 


70,047 
68 870 


56 Petrolia 


Lambton 

Grey 


57 Meaford 


59 465 


58 Merritton 

59 Orangeville 

60 Kincardine 


Lincoln 

Dufferin 

Bruce 


54,039 
55,905 
63,745 
12,412 
47,897 
30 734 


61 Tecumseh 


Essex 


62 Almonte 


Lanark 


63 Walkerton 


Bruce 


64 Kingsville 


Essex 


65,962 


65 Georgetown 


Halton 


52,520 


66 Wingham 


Huron 


44,230 


67 Elmira 


Waterloo 

Russell 


62,038 


68 Rockland 


4,448 








Totals and Avera 


ges, Group C 


85,872 


299 


155,740 


9,918 


33.17 


1,903,882 


Group D 
69 Aylmer 


Elgin 


1,995 
1,992 
1,983 
1,976 
1,965 
1,926 
1,865 
1,816 
1,815 
1,798 
1,785 
1,766 
1,766 
1,755 
1,717 
1,586 
1,577 
1,563 
1,483 
1,468 
1,410 
1,320 
1,288 
1,287 
1,273 
1,255 
999 
997 
918 
782 
744 
642 


10 
4 
8 
9 
8 
2 
7 
8 
5 
8 
8 
6 
8 
8 
7 
4 
5 
5 
7 
6 
6 
7 
3 
6 
5 
5 
4 
3 
5 
1 
3 
2 


182,541 
114,735 
106,493 
155,781 
405,086 
106,930 
109,924 

63,551 
167,675 
127,937 
238,305 
121,572 

73,760 
126,453 
107,568 
142,400 
188,546 
173,222 

95,489 

93,274 
136,875 
135,978 

85,529 

68,593 
176,971 
100,278 
210,250 
172,176 
164,295 
402,088 

72,500 
104,542 


324 
128 
259 
301 
264 
29 
191 
226 
172 
260 
251 
209 
263 
273 
171 
163 
187 
163 
217 
197 
181 
227 
53 
186 
187 
163 
110 
110 
170 
24 
95 
75 


32.40 
32.00 
32.37 
33.44 
33.00 
14.50 
27.30 
28.25 
34.40 
32.50 
31.37 
34.83 
32.63 
34.12 
24.44 
40.75 
37.40 
32.60 
31.00 
32.83 
30.16 
32.43 
17.67 
31.00 
37.40 
32.60 
27.50 
36.67 
34.00 
24.00 
31.67 
37.50 


62,155 


70 Tilbury 


Kent 


24,589 


71 Ridgetown 


Kent 


49,582 


72 Grimsby 

73 Leaside. . 


Lincoln 

York 


57,506 
50,794 


74 Alexandria 

75 Clinton 


Glengarry 

Huron 


5,687 
36,753 


76 Durham 


Grey 


43,242 


77 Mount Forest . . . 

78 Essex 


Wellington 

Essex 


33,213 
49,741 


79 Milton 


Halton 


47,980 


80 Chesley 

81 Wiarton 

82 Blenheim 

83 Seaforth 


Bruce 

Bruce 

Kent 

Huron 


39,558 
50,589 
52,301 
32,957 


84 Forest 

85 Mitchell .... 


Lambton 

Perth 


31,241 
37,481 


86 Niagara 

87 Uxbridge 

88 Dresden 

89 Palmerston 

90 Alliston 


Lincoln 


31,203 


Ontario 

Kent 

Wellington 

Simcoe 


42,285 
37,728 
34,324 
43,676 


91 VankleekHill.... 

92 Deseronto 

93 Harriston 

94 Southampton. . 


Prescott 

Hastings 

Wellington 

Bruce . . 


10,202 
34,276 
35,971 
30,037 


95 Stayner 


Simcoe 

Middlesex 

Essex . ... 


21,027 


96 Parkhill 

97 Harrow . . 


20,020 
32,977 


98 La Salle 


Essex 

Grey 

Kent 


4,438 


99 Thornbury 

100 Bothwell 


18,273 
14,462 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Group D . . . 


48,512 


183 


142,999 


5,829 


31.85 


1,116,268 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Counties. . . . 


364,967 


1,251 


157,981 


42,352 


33.85 


8,097,521 


Districts 

Group E 

101 Timmins 


Cochrane 


20,869 


48 


107,564 


1,807 


37.64 


344,532 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



173 



SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Tax Levy 
Receipts 


Legis- 
lative 
Grants 

$ 


Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (Cents) 


Debenture Debt 


(Current 

and 
Capital) 

$ 


Current 

$ 


Capital 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


Tax 
Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


52 22,560 

53 11,427 


1,501 

1,080 

600 

1,195 

1,242 

924 

748 

779 

850 

227 

614 

693 

635 

584 

1,610 

569 

100 


19,235 

14,403 

10,792 

15,512 

15,239 

13,772 

14,578 

12,863 

10,045 

2,679 

9,226 

8,563 

13,236 

12,326 

11,177 

10,890 

848 


6,277 


22.97 
23.44 
19.84 
22.14 
22.13 
23.16 
26.97 
23.00 
15.76 
21.58 
19.26 
27.86 
20.07 
23.47 
25.27 
17.55 
19.06 


7.49 
T98 

".19 
'7.13 

".24: 


30.46 
23.44 
21.82 
22.14 
22.32 
23.16 
34.10 
23.00 
16.00 


26.94 
18.60 
19.42 
20.40 
21.01 
22.70 
29.95 
21.91 
14.86 
16.69 
16.20 
25.65 
18.04 
23.62 
19.13 
15.38 
14.18 


1.79 
1.75 
1.09 
1.70 
1.80 
1.55 
1.38 
1.39 
1.33 
1.83 
1.28 
2.25 

.96 
1.11 
3.64 

.92 
2.24 


21,210 


1,515 


54 10,690 

55 14,300 


1,089 


9,136 


1,015 


56 14,474 


129 






57 13,500 


881 
30,799 


80 


58 16,181 

59 12,252 


3,853 


3,422 


60 9,470 

61 2,072 


151 

* 


8,500 
16,042 


944 
8,021 


62 7,760 


.84 


19.26 

28.70 




63 7,883 


259 

* 

807 






64 11,920 


75,280 


6,843 


65 12,407 


1.54 
'".9Q 


25.01 
25.27 
18.51 
19.06 




66 8,463 






67 9,540 


595 






68 631 














429,748 


27,483 


415,171 


57,152 


21.81 


3.13 


24.94 


22.57 


1.44 


506,262 


1,693 


69 11,393 

70 4,061 

71 9,334 


1,260 

564 

1,565 

1,408 

879 

288 

1,356 

1,525 

712 

834 

612 

1,071 

1,886 

1,188 

1,327 

696 

713 

571 

787 

777 

661 

838 

543 

867 

574 

1,173 

260 

389 

. 595 

66 

345 

626 


11,668 
4,599 
10,155 
13,014 
16,726 
2,843 
8,624 
7,786 
6,051 
8,543 
9,187 
8,729 
10,376 
10,004 
8,336 
6,483 
7,039 
6,737 
7,962 
6,285 
7,294 
9,076 
3,388 
5,592 
6,122 
6,768 
4,154 
3,570 
5,810 
1,849 
2,983 
2,852 


1,203 

384 


18.77 
18.70 
20.48 
22.63 
32.93 
49.99 
23.46 
18.00 
18.22 
17.17 
19.14 
22.06 
20.51 
19.13 
25.31 
20.75 
18.78 
21.59 
18.83 
16.65 
21.25 
20.78 
33.20 
16.31 
17.02 
22.53 
19.76 
17.83 
17.62 
41.67 
16.32 
19.72 


1.93 
1.56 

.93 


20.70 
20.26 
20.48 
23.56 


18.33 
16.51 
18.82 
20.14 
33.23 
49.34 
25.75 
12.83 
16.86 
14.35 
14.84 
16.14 
15.73 
18.64 
23.67 
12.80 
22.58 
23.01 
18.44 
13.37 
19.22 
17.74 
27.44 
14.00 
15.81 
19.66 
15.72 
15.98 
14.86 
42.49 
13.38 
14.17 


2.03 
2.29 
3.15 
2.44 
1.73 
5.08 
3.69 
3.52 
2.14 
1.68 
1.27 
2.70 
3.73 
2.27 
4.03 
2.23 
1.90 
1.83 
1.86 
2.06 
1.92 
1.92 
5.32 
2.53 
1.60 
3.90 
1.24 
1.94 
1.80 
1.49 
1.89 
4.33 


12,036 

385 


1,203 
96 


72 11,582 

73 16,879 


534 

* 


534 
102,113 


59 
12,764 


74 2,806 


5^34 


49.99 
28.80 
18.00 
18.22 




75 9,465 

76 5,549 


1,965 


21,000 


3,000 


77 5,600 








78 7,140 


* 
725 


13,512 
5,722 


1,689 


79 7,124 

80 6,386 


1.51 

"!90 
.89 
.91 

"o\ 50 
1.97 

2.H 

'2! 49 
2.73 
1.12 

10.96 


20.65 
22.06 
21.41 
20.02 
26.22 
20.75 
24.28 
23.56 
18.83 
16.65 
21.25 
22.95 
33.20 
18.80 
19.75 
23.65 
30.72 
17.83 
17.62 


715 


81 7,957 

82 9,750 

83 7,800 

84 4,000 


457 
464 
298 


4,113 

3,199 

598 


514 
400 

85 


85 8,464 

86 7,180 

87 7,800 


2,064 
615 


13,102 
1,534 


2,620 
307 


88 5,046 








89 6,597 








90 7,748 

91 2,800 


948 


7,552 


1,079 


92 4,800 

93 5,687 

94 5,907 

95 3,305 

96 3,200 


852 

981 

338 

2,304 


4,356 

5,008 

1,999 

24,115 


726 
1,002 

400 
6,029 


97 4,900 








98 1,886 


* 


20,064 


20,064 


99 2,445 




16.32 
19.72 




100 2,050 
















206,641 


26,956 


230,605 


14,132 


20.66 


1.40 


22.06 


18.51 


2.41 


240,942 


1,317 


1,857,674 


128,335 


1,766,210 


245,950 


21.81 


3.46 


25.27 


22.94 


1.58 


3,203,639 


2,561 


101 93,829 


7,385 


87,895 


27,855 


25.51 


8.09 


33.60 


27.23 


2.14 


215,160 


4,482 



174 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Towns 


County 


Assessed 
Popula- 
tion 


No. of 
Class- 
rooms 


Equal- 
ized 
Assess- 
ment per 
Class- 
room 
$ 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


Group F 
102 Kenora 


Kenora 


7,962 
5,509 
4,993 
3,539 
3,404 
3,395 
3,351 
3,022 
2,865 
2,700 
2,622 
2,621 
2,589 
2,019 


28 
28 

6 
15 
12 
15 
11 
11 
12 
11 

7 

6 
10 

3 


156,303 
143,322 
207,713 
310,154 
106,066 
108,481 
233,982 

85,383 
131,528 

97,985 
154,996 

69,156 
100,924 

96,863 


1,045 
872 
197 
544 
379 
556 
336 
376 
400 
437 
225 
202 
384 
88 


37.32 
31.13 
32.83 
36.26 
31.58 
37.06 
30.54 
34.18 
33.33 
39.72 
32.14 
33.66 
38.40 
29.33 


199,606 
166,612 
37,701 
98,715 
72,497 
106,651 
64,542 
71,994 
76,536 
82,295 
42,837 
38,989 
73,029 
16,889 


103 Fort Frances .... 

104 Sturgeon Falls. . . 


Rainy River .... 
Nipissing 


105 Copper Cliff 

106 Cochrane 

107 Parry Sound 

108 Kapuskasing. . . . 

109 Cobalt 

110 New Liskeard. . . 

111 Huntsville 

112 Haileybury 

113 Blind River 

114 Bracebridge 

115 Coniston 


Sudbury .... 

Cochrane ....... 

Parry Sound .... 

Cochrane 

Temiskaming . . . 
Temiskaming . . . 

Muskoka 

Temiskaming . . . 

Algoma 

Muskoka 

Sudbury 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Group F . . . . 


50,591 


175 


149,469 


6,041 


34.52 


1,148,893 


Group G 

116 Gravenhurst 

117 Mattawa 

118 Sioux Lookout. . . 

119 Capreol 

120 Dryden 

121 Thessalon 

122 Keewatin 

123 Rainy River 

124 Iroquois Falls. . . 

125 Englehart 

126 Little Current . .. 

127 Cache Bay 


Muskoka 

Nipissing 

Kenora 

Sudbury 

Kenora 

Algoma 

Kenora 

Rainy River .... 

Cochrane 

Temiskaming . . . 

Manitoulin 

Nipissing 


1,996 
1,906 
1,877 
1,745 
1,588 
1,583 
1,490 
1,304 
1,300 
1,173 
1,123 
1,065 


11 
1 
9 

10 
8 
8 
7 
5 
6 
8 
4 
2 


76,765 

113,074 

76,866 

82,387 

187,854 

76,611 

201,039 

102,683 

317,449 

56,518 

64,298 

82,626 


361 

28 
270 
384 
287 
277 
219 
158 
182 
256 
118 

61 


32.82 
28.00 
30.00 
38.40 
35.87 
34.62 
31.28 
31.60 
30.33 
32.00 
29.50 
30.50 


69,379 
5,288 
51,553 
73,184 
55,725 
53,351 
41,825 
30,196 
34,962 
28,947 
22,693 
12,456 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Group G . . . 


18,150 


79 


109,796 


2,601 


32.92 


479,559 


Group H 

128 Smooth R'ck F'lls 

129 Powassan 

130 Gore Bay 

131 Hearst 


Cochrane. . . . 
Parry Sound . 
Manitoulin. . 
Cochrane .... 




921 

810 
739 
708 
682 
458 
412 
403 
366 
352 
325 
312 
298 
201 
158 


4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
4 
3 
2 
2 
4 
1 
2 
2 
3 
1 


121,566 
71,330 
83,756 
50,295 
29,862 
32,399 
81,600 
47,564 

245,713 
62,513 
34,007 
37,415 
26,794 
32,674 

163,402 


104 

150 

94 

84 

71 

115 

104 

81 

61 

104 

54 

68 

53 

70 

19 


26.00 
37.50 
31.33 
27.00 
23.66 
28.75 
34.66 
40.50 
30.50 
26.00 
54.00 
34.00 
26.50 
23.33 
19.00 


20,127 
28,670 
18,169 
15,210 


132 Massey 


Sudbury 




13,747 


133 Webbwood. . . 


Sudbury 




20,169 


134 Bruce Mines 


Algoma 




20,088 


135 Trout Creek 

136 Bala 


Parry Sound . 
Muskoka. . . . 




15,535 
11,367 


137 Matheson. . . 


Cochrane .... 




21,039 


138 Nesterville . . . 


Algoma 




10,394 


139 Latchford 

140 Kearney 

141 Charlton 

142 Frood Mine 


Temiskaming 
Parry Sound . 
Temiskaming 
Sudbury .... 




12,979 

10,233 

13,628 

3,820 










Totals and Averages, Group H . 




7,145 


41 


70,687 


1,232 


30.05 


235,175 


Totals and Averages, Districts . 




96,755 


343 


125,050 


11,681 


34.06 


2,208,159 


Totals and Averages, All Towns . . . 


461,722 


1,594 


150,895 


54,033 


33.90 


10,305,680 



flncludes High School. 

Counties 
Group A — Towns with population over 6,000. 

" B— *' " " " 4,000 and under 6,000. 

" C— " " " " 2,000 " " 4,000. 

" D— " " " under 2,000. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



175 



SCHOOLS 



STATISTICS 


1936 




















Tax Levy) 
Receipts t.p^q- 


Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (Cents) 


Debenture Debt 


(Current 

and 
Capital) 

$ 


lative 
Grants 

$ 


Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


Tax 
Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


102 50,288 

103 54,965 

104 3,683 


2,211 
2,777 

421 
1,035 
1,789 
1,641 
2,816 
6,058 
1,259 
1,132 

790 

715 
1,050 

730 


40,556 
44,044 

9,423 
25,847 
20,474 
23,126 
23,537 
25,508 
19,548 
13,600 
12>465 

7,040 
12,526 

6,156 


11,988 
16,809 
2,089 
2,220 
2,567 
3,153 
8,600 


20.32 
26.43 
25.00 
26.18 
28.24 
21.68 
36.47 
35.43 
25.54 
16.52 
29.10 
18.05 
17.15 
36.45 


6.00 
10.08 
5.54 
2.25 
3.54 
2.96 
13.33 

'5] 92 

.27 

3.34 

i'oi 


26.32 
36.51 
30.54 
28.43 
31.78 
24.64 
49.50 
35.43 
31.46 
16.79 
32.44 
18.05 
18.19 
36.45 


25.19 
32.98 
9.77 
27.53 
28.39 
21.25 
49.94 
26.72 
29.89 
15.49 
31.93 
14.33 
16.71 
38.94 


1.11 
1.67 
1.12 
1.05 
2.47 
1.54 
4.36 
8.41 
1.65 
1.37 
1.85 
1.83 
1.44 
4.32 


94,674 
107,185 


3,381 
3,829 


105 27,178 

106 20,584 

107 22,667 

108 32,230 

109 19,238 


15,263 

23,751 

33,719 

105,575 


1,017 
1,979 

2,248 
9,597 


110 22,874 

111 12,750 


4,537 

222 

1,431 


18,857 


1,571 


112 13,678 

113 5,589 


3,898 


557 


114 12,205 

115 6,577 


759 


3,111 


311 










304,506 


24,424 


283,850 


54,375 


24.71 


5.33 


30.04 


26.50 


2.13 


406,033 


2,320 


116 15,722 

117 946 


2,077 

105 

3,136 

1,986 

1,403 

1,235 

677 

1,463 

609 

2,486 

929 

424 


14,190 

1,089 

12,417 

13,100 

11,920 

8,069 

9,344 

9,802 

12,120 

11,012 

4,177 

2,143 


5,271 


20.45 
20.59 
24.09 
17.90 
21.39 
15.12 
22.34 
32.46 
34.67 
38.04 
18.41 
17.20 


7.60 

'9! 60 
6.81 
8.42 
2.43 

10.00 

'9I18 
16.14 


28.05 
20.59 
33.69 
24.71 
29.61 
17.65 
32.34 
32.46 
43.85 
54.18 
18.41 
17.20 


22.66 
17.89 
26.86 
21.84 
26.63 
16.64 
29.84 
26.18 
32.62 
43.34 
13.66 
13.93 


2.99 
1.99 
6.08 
2.82 
2.52 
2.31 
1.62 
4.84 
1.74 
8.59 
4.09 
3.40 


28,123 


2,557 


118 13,850 

119 15,329 

120 14,843 

121 8,876 

122 12,483 

123 7,905 


4,950 
4,779 
4,693 
1,301 
4,183 


44,782 
17,070 
43,559 
4,553 
24,323 


4,976 
1,707 
5,444 
569 
3,475 


124 11,406 

125 12,546 

126 3,100 


3,211 
4,671 


$79,734 
45,630 


13,289 
5,704 


127 1,735 














118,741 


16,530 


109,383 


33,059 


22.81 


8.08 


30.89 


24.76 


3.45 


287,774 


3,642 


128 3,921 


594 
1,181 

474 
1,078 

806 
1,553 

815 

963 

491 
1,551 

243 
1,041 
1,299 
2,744 

104 


6,937 

4,446 
3,047 
4,096 
2,953 
4,127 
4,425 
2,199 
3,357 
6,310 
867 
2,682 
2,088 
6,089 
1,500 


* 

2,033 

778 


34.46 
15.50 
16.77 
26.93 
21.48 
20.46 
22.03 
14.15 
29.53 
29.99 
8.34 
20.66 
20.40 
44.68 
39.26 






19.48 
25.61 
17.06 
20.96 
19.25 
13.39 
29.42 

7.81 
26.39 
27.35 

5.77 
17.98 

6.94 
10.06 
34.21 


2.95 
4.12 
2.61 
7.08 
5.86 
7.75 
4.06 
6.20 
4.32 
7.37 
2.34 
8.02 
12.69 
20.14 
2.72 


45,600 

26,439 

132,691 


11,400 


129 7,343 

130 3,100 

131 3,188 


7.09 

4.28 

1! i2 

6!62 
*i!89 


22.59 
21.05 
26.93 
22.60 
20.46 
28.05 
14.15 
29.53 
31.88 
8.34 
20.66 
20.40 
44.68 
39.26 


6,610 
10,897 


132 2,647 

133 2,700 


154 


617 


206 


134 5,910 

135 1,214 


1,210 


13,367 


4,456 


136 3,000 








137 5,756 

138 600 


398 


1,893 


473 


139 2,334 








140 710 








141 1,371 








142 1,307 
















42,101 


14,937 


55,123 


4,573 


23.44 


2.13 


25.57 


17.90 


6.35 


120,607 


2,942 


559,177 


63,276 


536,251 


119,862 


24.28 


5.48 


29.76 


25.3? 


2.87 


1,029,574 


3,002 


2,416,851 


191,611 


2,302,461 


365,812 


22.34 


3.94 


26.28 


23.45 


1.86 


4,233,213 


2,656 



t V11 of this debt is chargeable to the High School. 

Districts 
Group E — Towns with population over 10,000. 

" F— " " " " 2,000 and under 10,000. 

" G— " " " " 1,000 " " 2,000. 

" H— *' " " under 1,000. 



176 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Villages 



County 



Assessed 
Popula- 
tion 



No. of 
Class- 
rooms 



Equal- 
ized 
Assess- 
ment per 
Class- 
room 
$ 



Ave. 

Daily 

Attend- 



Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



Group A 

1 Forest Hill. . . . 

2 Swansea 

3 Rockcliffe Park 



York.... 
York. .. 
Carleton 



9,147 
5,504 
1,140 



30 

20 

5 



410,458 
172,138 
473,324 



940 

592 

99 



31.33 
29.50 
19.80 



180,655 

114,248 

18,829 



Totals and Avera 



ges, Group A 



15,791 



55 



288,285 



1,631 



29.65 



313,732 



Group B 

4 Long Branch . 

5 Fergus 

6 Humberstone . 



York 

Wellington 
Welland... 



4,099 
2,785 
2,563 



20 
10 
14 



771,362 

172,508 

53,891 



753 

380 
480 



37.65 
38.00 
34.28 



145,361 
73,011 
91,932 



Totals and Avera 



ges, Group B 



9,447 



44 



91,877 



1,613 



36.66 



310,304 



Group C 

7 Acton 

8 Port Credit 

9 Delhi 

10 Port Dover 

11 Exeter 

12 Cardinal 

13 New Hamburg. . . 

14 Port Dalhousie. . . 

15 Brighton 

16 Morrisburg 

17 Caledonia 

18 Hagersville 

19 Lakefield 

20 Tweed 

21 Richmond Hill... 

22 Port Elgin 

23 Madoc 

24 Point Edward . . . 

25 Waterford 

26 Beamsville 

27 Havelock 

28 Chippawa 

29 Kemptville 

30 Norwich 

31 Stouffville 

32 Elora 

33 Port Perry 

34 Shelburne 

35 Markham 

36 Iroquois 

37 Lucknow 

38 Chesterville 

39 Arthur 

40 Fenelon Falls 

41 Victoria Harbour 

42 Barry's Bay 

43 Tavistock 

44 Winchester 

45 L'Orignal. 

46 Eganville 

47 Bradford 

48 Bobcaygeon 

49 Milverton 

50 Beaverton 

51 Bancroft 

52 Colborne 



Halton 

Peel 

Norfolk 

Norfolk 

Huron 

Grenville 

Waterloo 

Lincoln 

Northumberl'nd 

Dundas 

Haldimand 

Haldimand 

Peterborough . . . 

Hastings 

York 

Bruce 

Hastings 

Lambton 

Norfolk 

Lincoln 

Peterborough . . . 

Welland 

Grenville 

Oxford 

York 

Wellington 

Ontario 

Dufferin 

York 

Dundas 

Bruce 

Dundas 

Wellington 

Victoria 

Simcoe 

Renfrew 

Oxford 

Dundas 

Prescott 

Renfrew 

Simcoe 

Victoria 

Perth 

Ontario 

Hastings 

Northumberl'nd 



1,993 
1,755 
1,701 
1,665 
1,629 
1,471 
1,464 
1,459 
1,420 
1,416 
1,370 
1,345 
1,337 
1,311 
1,268 
1,267 
1,253 
1,252 
1,250 
1,208 
1,208 
1,187 
1,178 
1,174 
1,155 
1,138 
1,124 
1,114 
1,112 
1,068 
1,068 
1,067 
1,052 
1,051 
1,043 
1,034 
1,034 
1,029 
1,012 
994 
989 
987 
987 
976 
970 
954 



161,599 

163,527 

128,442 

234,408 

120,350 

82,943 

150,667 

105,088 

118,566 

139,743 

41,667 

75,000 

64,774 

136,309 

97,564 

85,641 

88,746 

67,220 

219,816 

150,195 

46,115 

145,327 

65,000 

131,783 

111,282 

137,731 

127,897 

114,013 

151,183 

147,955 

80,438 

112,450 

176,092 

139,322 

24,500 

59,457 

126,625 

151,808 

25,338 

125,148 

217,543 

130,180 

160,288 

161,983 

23,283 

134,796 



272 
271 
240 
238 
201 
249 
197 
173 
203 
209 
185 
218 
215 
168 
242 
141 
214 
184 
187 
173 
172 
169 
151 
162 
154 
145 
156 
119 
113 

94 
114 
126 
115 
118 
213 

22 
114 
165 
171 

87 
127 
140 
108 
123 
206 
145 



34.00 
33.88 
34.28 
34.00 
33.50 
41.50 
32.83 
28.88 
33.83 
34.83 
30.83 
36.33 
35.83 
28.00 
34.58 
28.20 
35.66 
36.80 
37.40 
34.60 
34.40 
33.80 
30.20 
32.40 
30.80 
29.00 
31.20 
23.80 
37.66 
18.80 
28.50 
31.50 
28.75 
29.50 
35.50 
22.00 
28.50 
33.00 
24.44 
29.00 
31.75 
35.00 
27.00 
41.00 
34.33 
36.25 



51,866 
52,495 
46,028 
45,306 
38,280 
47,085 
38,467 
32,016 
39,150 
40,231 
35,225 
42,006 
41,163 
31,641 
46,646 
27,103 
41,202 
35,611 
35,805 
33,153 
33,245 
32,507 
29,046 
31,176 
29,405 
27,746 
30,160 
23,036 
21,378 
20,845 
21,985 
23,973 
22,007 
22,288 
40,916 
4,206 
21,151 
31,768 
32,681 
16,884 
24,033 
26,218 
21,623 
22,078 
39,436 
27,863 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



177 



SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 


1936 












Tax Levy 
Receipts 
(Current 

and 
Capital) 

$ 


Legis- 
lative 
Grants 

$ 


Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (Cents) 


Debenture 


Debt 




Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


Tax 
Levy 

Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 

Class- 
room 

$ 


1 
2 
3 


105,229 
47,846 
13,002 


3,698 

5,547 

465 


80,940 
42,114 
11,952 


37,213 
12,345 

4,248 


44.80 
36.86 
63.47 


20.59 
10.80 
22.56 


65.39 
47.66 
86.04 


58.25 
41.88 
69.04 


2.05 

4.85 
2.47 


488,805 

113,254 

76,200 


16,293 

5,663 

15,240 


166,077 


9,710 


135,006 


53,806 


43.03 


17.15 


60.18 


52.93 


3.09 


678,259 


12,331 


4 
5 


41,507 
12,100 
21,373 


3,693 
1,284 
4,015 


26,993 
12,349 
20,130 


16,799 


18.57 
16.91 
21.89 


11.56 
QA2 


30.13 
16.91 
28.01 


28.55 
16.57 
23.24 


2.54 
1.75 
4.37 


175,165 


8,758 


6 


5,623 


59,416 


4,244 


74,980 


8,992 


59,472 


22,422 


19.16 


7.22 


26.38 


24.16 


2.90 


234,581 


5,332 


7 
8 

q 


8,400 
19,010 
5,500 
6,493 
5,729 
5,522 
8,293 
6,646 
7,679 
7,003 
5,725 
6,436 
5,600 
9,178 
9,799 
5,075 
4,834 
7,468 
5,028 
5,889 
5,234 
9,429 
5,794 
5,806 
6,357 
4,975 
8,455 
5,535 
2,935 
4,239 
4,120 
4,680 
3,475 
2,952 
3,900 
584 
3,999 
7,350 
3,225 
5,219 
4,200 
5,386 
4,038 
6,501 
4,700 
5,638 


931 

1,652 

870 

505 

832 

1,350 

829 

1,250 

765 

1,122 

2,072 

1,727 

1,730 

2,968 

1,752 

752 

1,591 

1,623 

553 

771 

2,158 

864 

2,709 

639 

881 

798 

771 

815 

334 

564 

852 

693 

336 

368 

3,036 

105 

426 

685 

2,079 

406 

421 

821 

545 

274 

2,370 

547 


9,303 
14,061 
8,095 
7,857 
6,507 
6,791 
7,449 
7.768 
6,276 
8,721 
7,906 
7,981 
8,911 
11,994 
10,309 
5,810 
7,887 
7,154 
6,571 
6,859 
6,056 
8,396 
6,719 
6,486 
5,848 
5,904 
6,472 
5,977 
3,812 
4,949 
4,254 
5,011 
4,380 
4,137 
7,267 
681 
4,458 
5,864 
4,772 
3,493 
4,744 
5,996 
4,694 
4,138 
5,411 
5,101 


422 
5,230 


17.93 
26.79 
17.59 
17.34 
16.99 
14.42 
19.36 
24.26 
16.03 
21.67 
22.44 
19.00 
21.65 
37.91 
22.10 
21.43 
19.14 
20.08 
18.35 
20.69 
18.21 
25.83 
23.13 
20.80 
19.88 
21.28 
21.46 
25.94 
17.83 
23.74 
19.35 
20.90 
19.90 
18.56 
17.76 
16.19 
21.07 
18.45 
14.60 
20.69 
19.74 
22.87 
21.71 
18.75 
13.72 
18.30 


.81 
9.96 

Too 

2.13 
5.56 

i!23 

2. 76 
1.28 

6^36 

L58 
3.17 
1.39 
1.22 
6.12 
1.79 
5.82 
2.26 
.91 

'h'.oi 
o]ii 

13! 08 

12^47 
2.12 


18.74 
36.75 
17.59 
22.25 
16.99 
14.42 
20.36 
26.39 
21.59 
21.67 
22.44 
20.23 
21.65 
40.67 
23.38 
21.43 
19.14 
26.44 
18.35 
20.69 
19.79 
29.00 
24.52 
22.02 
26.00 
23.07 
27.28 
28.20 
18.74 
23.74 
24.36 
20.90 
19.90 
18.56 
17.76 
16.19 
21.07 
24.59 
14.60 
33.77 
19.74 
22.87 
21.71 
31.22 
15.84 
18.30 


16.19 
36.21 
11.95 
14.33 
14.96 
11.72 
21.55 
20.76 
19.61 
17.40 
16.25 
15.32 
13.60 
29.01 
21.00 
18.72 
11.73 
20.97 
14.04 
17.76 
15.74 
29.00 
19.94 
18.62 
21.62 
17.93 
28.03 
24.03 
13.72 
20.33 
18.74 
19.52 
15.79 
13.24 

9.53 
13.88 
18.90 
23.13 

9.87 
30.91 
17.47 
20.54 
18.67 
29.45 
11.92 
20.23 


1.79 
3.15 
1.89 
1.12 
2.17 
2.87 
2.15 
3.90 
1.95 
2.79 
5.88 
4.11 
4.20 
9.38 
3.75 
2.77 
3.86 
4.57 
1.54 
2.32 
6.49 
2.66 
9.32 
2.05 
3.00 
2.88 
2.56 
3.54 
1.56 
2.70 
3.87 
2.87 
1.52 
1.65 
7.42 
2.50 
2.01 
2.16 
6.36 
2.40 
1.75 
3.13 
2.52 
1.25 
6.00 
1.96 


2,447 
50,087 


306 
6,261 


10 

ii 


2,223 


11,982 


1,711 


i? 








13 
14 
15 
16 


385 

681 

2,179 


2,312 
5,944 

14,824 


385 

991 

2,471 


17 








18 
19 


516 


516 


86 


20 
21 

2? 


871 
598 


4,867 
12,765 


811 
1,823 


23 








24 


2,265 






25 






26 








27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 


526 

1,029 

404 

380 

1,799 

497 

1,755 

520 

194 


4,553 
3,937 

19,615 
359 

11,398 
3,595 

20,267 

10,410 
1,109 
2,500 
2,998 


911 
787 

3,923 
72 

2,279 
719 

4,053 

2,082 
369 
500 


37 

38 


1,101 


749 


39 








40 








41 








42 








43 








44 

45 


1,951 


25,370 


5,074 


46 

47 


2,209 


15,992 


5,330 


48 








49 








50 
51 

52 


2,752 
836 


30,951 
12,552 


10,317 
2,092 



178 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Villages 



County- 



Assessed 
Popula- 
tion 



No. of 
Class- 
rooms 



Equal- 
ized 
Assess- 
ment per 
Class- 
room 
$ 



Ave. 

Daily 

Attend- 



Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



53 Marmora 

54 Watford 

55 Stirling 

56 PortMcNicoll. 

57 Waterdown . . . 

58 Wellington 

59 Frankford 

60 Teeswater 

61 Stoney Creek . . 

62 Sutton 

63 Portsmouth . . . 

64 Hastings 

65 Fonthill 

66 Markdale 

67 Paisley 

68 Thamesville. . . 

69 Brussels 

70 Glencoe 

71 Dutton 

72 Merrickville . . . 

73 Ayr 

74 West Lome . . . 

75 Woodbridge. . . 

76 Cannington. . . 

77 Norwood 

78 Mildmay 



Hastings 

Lambton 

Hastings 

Simcoe 

Wentworth 
Prince Edward . . 

Hastings 

Bruce 

Wentworth 

York 

Frontenac 

Northumberland 

Welland 

Grey 

Bruce 

Kent 

Huron 

Middlesex 

Elgin 

Grenville 

Waterloo 

Elgin 

York 

Ontario 

Peterborough . . . 
Bruce 



948 
941 
935 
933 
875 
872 
845 
837 
833 
831 
824 
811 
803 
802 
792 
788 
787 
778 
776 
776 
770 
769 
763 
761 
753 
750 



46,336 
104,175 
123,429 

84,714 
255,436 
261,436 

90,974 

95,325 
199,647 
142,527 

91,244 
129,608 
121,172 
112,277 
121,312 
109,043 
123,033 
171,867 
192,454 

68,750 
139,000 
168,522 

99,295 
142,280 

70,279 

75.661 



168 
121 
138 
221 
124 
216 
143 

82 
219 
190 

80 

90 
149 

93 
102 
139 

92 
122 
109 
141 

90 
127 
128 

95 
117 

54 



33.60 
30.25 
34.50 
55.25 
31.00 
36.00 
35.75 
27.33 
36.50 
38.00 
40.00 
45.00 
29.80 
31.00 
34.00 
34.75 
30.66 
30.50 
27.25 
35.25 
30.00 
31.75 
32.00 
31.66 
35.40 
27.00 



32,150 
23,405 
26,637 
42,959 
23,977 
37,204 
27,577 
15,875 
40,052 
30,878 
15,391 
17,370 
28,666 
17,802 
19,598 
26,713 
17,533 
23,307 
20,964 
21,770 
17,285 
24,428 
24,601 
18,571 
22,595 
10,297 



Totals and Avera 



ges, Group C 



77,892 



341 



122,067 



11,059 



32.43 



2,105,738 



Group D 

79 Belle River.... 

80 Maxville 

81 Port Stanley... 

82 Rodney 

83 Wheatley 

84 Millbrook 

85 Westport 

86 Hensall 

87 Newcastle 

88 Cayuga 

89 Athens 

90 Port Rowan . . . 

91 Bloomfield 

92 Dundalk 

93 Alvinston 

94 Cobden 

95 Killaloe Station 

96 Streetsville 

97 Creemore 

98 Blyth 

99 Lanark 

100 Lucan 

101 Lancaster 

102 Beeton 

103 Cold water 

104 Thedford 

105 Grand Valley.. 

106 Omemee 

107 Bolton 

108 Drayton 

109 Tottenham .... 



Essex 

Glengarry .... 

Elgin 

Elgin 

Kent 

Durham 

Leeds 

Huron 

Durham 

Haldimand . . . 

Leeds 

Norfolk 

Prince Edward 

Grey 

Lambton 

Renfrew 

Renfrew 

Peel 

Simcoe 

Huron 

Lanark 

Middlesex .... 
Glengarry .... 

Simcoe 

Simcoe 

Lambton 

Dufferin 

Victoria 

Peel 

Wellington . . . 
Simcoe 



748 
741 
741 
724 
724 
723 
720 
719 
675 
674 
669 
666 
663 
652 
643 
637 
636 
636 
631 
624 
623 
613 
608 
605 
589 
585 
582 
579 
569 
566 
540 



159,450 

105,924 

247,956 

212,671 

107,604 

121,232 

92,500 

111,933 

106,092 

32,500 

56,997 

182,582 

217,343 

108,113 

120,167 

96,859 

48,636 

153,450 

151,296 

105,917 

64,907 

162,848 

111,091 

96,125 

63,000 

81,000 

116,423 

224,525 

104,634 

213,791 

101,244 



15 
116 
109 
91 
122 
97 
68 
79 
80 
95 
100 
81 
81 
90 
82 
88 
50 
129 
65 
64 
97 
85 
38 
93 
137 
82 
80 
88 
69 
70 
77 



15.00 
29.00 
27.25 
30.33 
30.50 
32.33 
34.00 
26.33 
26.66 
23.75 
25.00 
27.00 
27.00 
30.00 
27.33 
22.00 
25.00 
32.25 
21.66 
21.33 
32.33 
42.50 
19.00 
23.25 
34.25 
41.00 
26.66 
44.00 
23.00 
35.00 
25.66 



2,760 
22,188 
20,832 
17,518 
23,428 
18,585 
13,323 
15,235 
15,376 
19,660 
19,224 
15,615 
15,355 
16,936 
15,841 
16,227 

9,719 
24,537 
12,641 
12,372 
18,579 
16,566 

7,252 
17,962 
25,960 
15,851 
15,464 
16,888 
13,327 
13,623 
14,751 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



179 



SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Tax Levy 
Receipts 


Legis- 


Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (Cents) 


Debenture Debt 


(Current 

and 
Capital) 

$ 


lative 
Grants 

$ 


Current 


Capital 

$ 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


Tax 
Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


53 4,180 


1,403 
483 
677 

2,099 
381 

2,643 
700 
313 
853 
495 
554 
352 
984 
785 
578 
541 
438 
362 
386 

1,002 
320 
395 
948 
387 

1,228 
487 


5,860 
4,333 
5,303 
9,977 
6,412 
10,678 
4,531 
3,126 
9,351 
5,986 
2,654 
2,411 
6,633 
4,754 
3,615 
4,562 
3,474 
4,425 
4,576 
4,585 
3,132 
4,003 
5,003 
3,328 
6,136 
1,992 




18.23 
18.51 
19.53 
23.22 
26.74 
28.70 
16.43 
19.69 
23.34 
19.38 
17.24 
13.88 
23.14 
26.70 
18.45 
17.07 
19.81 
18.99 
21.82 
21.06 
18.12 
16.38 
20.33 
17.92 
27.15 
19.34 


'2^02 
1.93 

19! i9 
14.79 

7.48 
9.37 

2. 04 

6!64 
5.05 

L72 

5. 26 
4.64 


18.23 
20.53 
21.46 
23.22 
45.93 
43.49 
23.91 
29.06 
23.34 
19.38 
17.24 
13.88 
25.18 
26.70 
25.09 
22.12 
19.81 
20.71 
21.82 
26.32 
22.76 
16.38 
20.33 
17.92 
27.15 
19.34 


13.00 
19.11 
17.69 
17.46 
40.05 
41.59 
16.57 
30.05 
22.66 
23.02 
12.99 
11.37 
14.42 
22.41 
21.85 
21.95 
14.51 
14.24 
20.57 
20.50 
20.12 
16.62 
10.45 
15.72 
13.95 
13.02 


4.36 
2.06 
2.54 
4.88 
1.59 
7.11 
2.54 
1.97 
2.13 
1.60 
3.60 
2.02 
3.44 
4.41 
2.95 
2.61 
2.50 
1.56 
1.84 
4.60 
1.85 
1.62 
3.85 
2.08 
5.43 
4.72 






54 4,473 

55 4,713 

56 7,500 


473 
513 


2,709 
2,158 


677 
539 


57 9,602 

58 15,474 

59 4,569 

60 4,772 

61 9,077 

62 7,110 


4,602 
5,504 
2,064 

1,488 


18,811 
93,568 
17,432 
13,441 


4,702 
15,594 

4,358 
4,480 








63 2,000 








64 1,976 








65 4,134 

66 3,991 


585 


2,075 


415 


67 4,282 

68 4,546 

69 2,545 


1,301 
1,046 


7,946 
6,225 


*2,648 
1,556 


70 3,320 

71 4,313 


400 


26,900 


6,725 


72 4,465 

73 3,479 

74 4,060 


1,146 
802 


12,896 
5,703 


3,224 
1,901 


75 2,572 








76 2,920 








77 3,152 








78 1,341 
















395,419 


69,936 


429,770 


51,247 


20.41 


2.43 


22.84 


18.78 


3.32 


481,214 


1,411 


79 1,689 


40 
570 
683 
241 
379 
509 
365 
441 
590 
1,659 
681 
222 
388 
550 
277 
896 
399 
591 
321 
288 
522 
249 
320 
367 
911 
430 
309 
274 
414 
215 
362 


1,186 
3,797 
6,596 
3,084 
3,629 
3,881 
2,205 
3,138 
3,728 
5,448 
4,042 
2,791 
3,380 
3,744 
2,764 
4,580 
1,533 
5,335 
3,163 
2,676 
2,616 
2,564 
1,689 
3,499 
4,640 
1,638 
2,900 
2,695 
3,306 
2,834 
3,146 




42.97 
17.11 
31.66 
17.60 
15.49 
20.88 
16.55 
20.60 
24.24 
27.71 
21.02 
17.87 
22.01 
22.10 
17.45 
28.22 
15.77 
21.74 
25.02 
21.62 
14.08 
15.48 
23.29 
19.48 
17.87 
10.33 
18.75 
15.95 
24.80 
20.80 
21.33 


'5] 87 

L95 
'6! 88 
'5! 62 

3! 63 

"!88 


42.97 
17.11 
31.66 
17.60 
15.49 
20.88 
16.55 
20.60 
24.24 
33.58 
21.02 
17.87 
22.01 
22.10 
19.40 
28.22 
22.65 
21.74 
30.64 
21.62 
14.08 
15.48 
23.29 
23.11 
17.87 
10.33 
18.75 
16.83 
24.80 
20.80 
21.33 


61.21 
15.04 
27.27 
16.01 
17.32 
18.66 
22.50 
17.47 
20.97 
24.89 
16.64 
13.50 
23.73 

9.45 
19.93 
20.34 
13.88 
21.97 
28.68 
18.68 

9.96 
10.41 
30.76 
22.49 
14.39 

7.28 
17.48 
15.51 
25.39 
16.68 
19.31 


1.47 
2.57 
3.28 
1.37 
1.62 
2.74 
2.74 
2.89 
3.84 
8.44 
3.54 
1.42 
2.53 
3.25 
1.75 
5.52 
4.10 
2.41 
2.54 
2.33 
2.81 
1.50 
4.41 
2.04 
3.51 
2.71 
2.00 
1.62 
3.11 
1.58 
2.45 






80 3,337 








81 5,702 








82 2,805 








83 4,060 








84 3,469 








85 2,997 








86 2,662 








87 3,225 








88 4,894 

89 3,200 


1,154 


4,283 


1,071 


90 2,108 








91 3,644 








92 1,600 








93 3,158 

94 3,302 


309 


8,519 


2,839 


95 1,349 

96 5,390 


669 


9,372 


4,686 


97 3,625 

98 2,311 


711 


7,381 


2,460 


99 1,850 








100 1,725 








101 2,231 








102 4,040 

103 3,735 


653 


6,607 


1,652 


104 1,155 








105 2,703 








106 2,620 

107 3,384 


149 


299 


149 


108 2,272 








109 2,848 










180 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 18— FINANCIAL 



Villages 


County 


Assessed 
Popula- 
tion 


No. of 
Class- 
rooms 


Equal- 
ized 

Assess- 
ment per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 


Ave. 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


110 Wyoming 

111 Jarvis 

112 Newburgh 

113 Erin 


Lambton 

Haldimand 

Lennox. . ... 


516 
504 
479 
476 
475 
472 
471 
452 
451 
449 
446 
442 
441 
421 
415 
408 
392 
378 
365 
365 
360 
337 
321 
318 
316 
286 
276 
258 
249 
238 
219 
100 


2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
o 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 


82,500 

60,000 

58,991 

209,095 

69,898 

65,400 

101,984 

137,663 

67,090 

139,950 

119,389 

152,173 

183,957 

58,872 

74,750 

124,029 

188,250 

62,300 

145,368 

111,851 

44,497 

63,549 

91,357 

55,500 

36,787 

115,428 

105,499 

160,865 

108,881 

100,958 

78,065 

325,856 


61 

94 
60 
67 
99 
63 
49 
50 
91 
53 
61 
37 
56 
75 
70 
68 
70 
52 
70 
49 
59 
64 
40 
39 
55 
55 
62 
33 
39 
52 
44 
35 


30.50 
31.33 
30.00 
33.45 
33.00 
31.50 
24.50 
25.00 
30.33 
26.50 
30.50 
18.50 
28.00 
37.50 
35.00 
34.00 
35.00 
26.00 
23.33 
24.50 
29.50 
32.00 
20.00 
19.50 
27.50 
27.50 
31.00 
33.00 
19.50 
26.00 
22.00 
35.00 


11,947 
18,132 
11,612 
12 987 


Wellington 

Renfrew. ........ 

Lambton 

Bruce 


114 Braeside 

115 Oil Springs 

116 Tara 


18,928 

12,208 

9,419 

9,845 

17 367 


117 Ailsa Craig 

118 Neustadt 


Middlesex 

Grey 


119 Embro 


Oxford 


9,736 
11,651 


120 Flesherton 


Grey 


121 Ripley 


Bruce . .... 


7,159 
10,883 
14,549 
13,539 


122 Clifford 

123 Lion's Head 


Wellington 

Bruce . . . 


124 Arkona 


Lambton 

Carleton 

Stormont 

Leeds 


125 Richmond 

126 Finch 


13,960 
14,147 


127 Newboro 


9,970 


128 Springfield 

129 Woodville 

130 Hepworth 

131 Shallow Lake 


Elgin 


13,526 


Victoria 

Bruce. . .... 


9,078 
11 445 


Grey 


12,492 


132 Chatsworth 


Grey 


7,723 


133 Bath 


Lennox 


7,508 


134 Deloro 


Hastings 

Lambton 

Middlesex 

Bruce 


10,271 


135 Courtright 

136 Newbury 

137 Tiverton. 


10,572 

12,060 

6,376 


138 Wardsville 

139 Erieau 


Middlesex 

Kent 


7,680 
10,003 


140 Vienna 

141 St. Clair Beach.-. 


Elgin 

Essex 


8,344 
6,715 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Group D.. . . 


32,201 


159 


113,656 


4,420 


27.80 


852,484 


Totals and Avera 


ges, Counties. . . . 


135,331 


599 


132,879 


18,723 


31.26 


3,582,258 


Group E 

142 vSouth River 

143 Burk's Falls 

144 Sundridge 

145 Port Carling 

146 Rosseau 


Districts 
Parry Sound .... 
Parry Sound .... 
Parry Sound .... 

Muskoka 

Parry Sound .... 

Algoma 

Muskoka 

Temiskaming . . . 
Muskoka 


825 
798 
543 
499 
315 
211 
146 
140 
107 


5 
4 
3 
3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


45,159 
93,725 
77,303 
119,141 
65,000 
28,940 
81,426 
14,840 
61,145 


152 
159 
127 
76 
39 
57 
19 
17 
26 


30.40 
39.75 
42.33 
25.33 
19.50 
28.50 
19.00 
17.00 
26.00 


29,264 
30,423 
24,393 
14,641 

7,477 


147 Hilton Beach. . . . 

148 Windermere 

149 Thornloe 

150 Port Sydney 


10,751 
3,618 
3,449 
4,991 


Totals and Averages, Group E . . . . 


3,584 


22 


69,787 


672 


30.54 


129,007 




138,915 


621 


130,643 


19,395 


31.23 


3,711,265 


Totals and Avera 
Municipalitie 


ges, All Urban 
s 


2,157,338 


6,918 


299,031 


246,360 


35.61 


47,146,173 






Totals and Avera 
(Rural and L 


ajes, All Schools 
Frban) 


3,345,895 


14,095 


209,657 


404,011 


28.66 


76,496,010 







County Villages: Group A — Suburban Villages. 

" B — Villages with population over 2.000. 

" C— " " " from 750 to 2,000 

" D— " " " under 750. 

District Villages' Group E 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



181 



SCHOOLS 

STATISTICS, 1936 



■ 


Tax Levy 
Receipts 

(Current 

and 
Capital) 

$ 


Legis- 
lative 
Grants 

$ 


Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (Cents) 


Debenture Debt 




Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


Tax 
Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 


Per 

Class- 
room 

$ 


110 


2,000 
2,510 
1,600 
5,363 
2,659 
1,160 
2,288 
1,750 
2,250 
2,040 
2,531 
2,000 
1,488 
1,746 
1,199 
3,311 
2,114 
1,197 
3,876 
2,846 
1,498 
761 
2,212 
1,300 
2,200 
1,645 
739 
899 
342 
3,158 
1,390 
904 


364 
635 
448 
186 
517 
419 
230 
197 
604 
245 
299 
298 
191 
388 
709 
161 
211 
673 
197 
156 
474 
369 
302 
411 
966 
314 
169 
121 

81 
589 
254 

61 


2,153 
3,615 
2,161 
2,810 
3,081 
2,612 
2,796 
2,005 
2,543 
2,239 
2,386 
2,107 
1,752 
1,941 
1,876 
1,870 
2,088 
2,227 
2,333 
3,257 
1,782 
2,058 
2,767 
2,034 
3,022 
2,020 
1,594 
1,209 
1,273 
2,880 
1,829 
1,047 




18.03 
19.94 
18.61 
21.64 
16.28 
21.39 
29.68 
20.36 
14.64 
23.00 
20.48 
29.44 
16.10 
13.34 
13.85 
13.39 
14.76 
22.34 
17.24 
35.87 
15.57 
16.47 
35.83 
27.09 
29.42 
19.11 
13.22 
18.96 
16.57 
28.79 
21.92 
15.44 


12! 05 

s!oi 

"3^88 
12^79 
13^20 

7! 58 


18.03 
19.94 
18.61 
33.69 
16.28 
21.39 
29.68 
20.36 
23.25 
23.00 
20.48 
29.44 
19.98 
13.34 
13.85 
26.18 
14.76 
22.34 
30.54 
35.87 
15.57 
16.47 
35.83 
27.09 
29.42 
19.11 
13.22 
18.96 
16.57 
36.37 
21.92 
15.44 


16.74 
13.84 
13.78 
41.30 
14.05 

9.50 
24.29 
17.77 
12.95 
20.95 
21.72 
27.93 
13.67 
12.00 

8.85 
23.72 
14.94 
12.01 
28.65 
31.35 
13.09 

6.09 
28.64 
17.31 
21.42 
15.56 

6.13 
14.10 

4.45 
31.57 
16.65 
15.02 


3.05 
3.50 

3.86 
1.43 
2.73 
3.43 
2.44 
2.00 
3.48 
2.51 
2.57 
4.16 
1.76 
2.67 
5.24 
1.15 
1.49 
6.76 
1.46 
1.72 
4.14 
2.95 
3.91 
5.48 
9.40 
2.97 
1.40 
1.90 
1.05 
5.89 
3.04 
.91 






111 




15,200 


5,066 


11? 






113 
114 


1,564 


13,117 


6,558 


115 








116 








117 








118 
119 


1,496 


20,181 


6,727 


1^0 








P>1 








122 
1?3 


422 


4,000 


2,000 


194 








125 
1?6 


1,786 


21,396 


10,698 


197 








128 
1?9 


1,799 


19,791 


6,597 


130 








131 








13? 








133 








134 








135 








136 








137 








138 








139 
140 


758 


5,000 


2,500 


141 
















153,693 


25,472 


170,922 


9,906 


20.05 


1.16 


21.21 


18.03 


2.99 


122,806 


772 


790,169 


114,110 


795,240 


155,588 


22.20 


4.34 


26.54 


22.06 


3.19 


1,516,860 


2,532 


142 
143 


6,948 

5,150 

2,700 

4,230 

1,909 

584 

1,145 

267 

649 


1,930 
1,223 
1,843 
361 
862 
640 
500 
860 
302 


5,023 
6,310 
4,375 
3,174 
2,635 
1,858 
1,508 
1,113 
1,452 


2,690 


17.16 
20.74 
17.93 
21.68 
35.24 
17.29 
41.68 
32.27 
29.09 


9.19 

'8.33 
3'll 


26.35 
20.74 
17.93 
30.01 
35.24 
20.40 
41.68 
32.27 
29.09 


23.74 
16.93 
11.07 
28.89 
25.53 

5.44 
31.66 

7.74 
13.00 


6.59 

4.02 

7.55 

2.47 

11.53 

5.96 

13.84 

24.93 

6.05 


8,925 


1,785 


144 








145 
146 


1,220 


10,985 


3,662 


147 

148 


334 


4,016 


2,008 


149 








150 














23,582 


8,521 


27,448 


4,244 


19.77 


3.29 


23.06 


18.28 


6.60 


23,926 


1,087 


813,751 


122,631 


822,688 


141,625 


22.17 


3.82 


25.99 


21.93 


3.30 


1,540,186 


2,480 


16,541,631 


720,668 


14,470,762 


2,861,021 


30.69 


6.54 


37.23 


35.09 


1.53 


34,955,087 


5,053 


20,250.804 


2,601,815 


22,166,952 


3,434,165 


28.98 


4.77 


33.75 


26.47 


3.40 


43,481,738 


3,085 



82 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
INDEX TO TABLE 18— FINANCIAL STATISTICS, 1936 



TOWNS 



VILLAGES 



Alexandria 74 

Alliston 90 

Almonte 62 

Amherstburg 51 

Arnprior 34 

Aurora 55 

Aylmer 69 

Bala 136 

Barrie 6 

Blenheim 82 

Blind River 113 

Bothwell.. 100 

Bowmanville 43 

Bracebridge 114 

Brampton 19 

Brockville 3 

Bruce Mines 134 

Burlington 42 

Cache Bay 127 

Campbellford 53 

Capreol 119 

Carleton Place 33 

Charlton 141 

Chesley 80 

Clinton 75 

Cobalt 109 

Cobourg 24 

Cochrane 106 

Collingwood 120 

Coniston 115 

Copper Cliff 105 

Cornwall 1 

Deseronto 92 

Dresden 88 

Dryden 120 

Dundas 28 

Dunnville 38 

Durham 76 

Eastview 10 

Elmira 67 

Englehart 125 

Essex 78 

Forest 84 

Fort Erie 17 

Fort Frances 103 

Frood Mine 142 

Gananoque 46 

Georgetown 65 

Goderich 31 

Gore Bay 130 

Gravenhurst 116 

Grimsby 72 

Haileybury 112 

Hanover 47 

Harriston 93 

Harrow 97 

Hawkesbury 16 

Hearst 131 

Hespeler 52 

Huntsville Ill 

Ingersoll 23 

Iroquois Falls 124 

Kapuskasing 108 

Kearney 140 

Keewatin 122 

Kenora 102 

Kincardine 60 

Kingsville 64 

La Salle 98 

Latchford 139 

Leamington 21 



Leaside 73 

Lindsay 8 

Listowel 54 

Little Current 126 

Massey 132 

Matheson 137 

Mattawa 117 

Meaford 57 

Merritton 58 

Midland... 12 

Milton 79 

Mimico 9 

Mitchell 85 

Mount Forest 77 

Napanee 48 

Nesterville 138 

New Liskeard 110 

Newmarket 44 

New Toronto 11 

Niagara 86 

Oakville 39 

Orangeville 59 

Orillia 4 

Palmerston 89 

Paris 32 

Parkhill 96 

Parry Sound 107 

Pembroke 2 

Penetanguishene. . . 36 

Perth 35 

Petrolia 56 

Picton 45 

Port Colborne 15 

Port Hope 30 

Powassan 129 

Prescott 49 

Preston 14 

Rainy River 123 

Renfrew 22 

Ridgetown 71 

Riverside 26 

Rockland 68 

St. Mary's 37 

Seaforth 83 

Simcoe 18 

Sioux Lookout 118 

Smith's Falls 7 

Smooth Rock Falls . 128 

Southampton 94 

Stayner 95 

vSturgeon Falls 104 

Strathroy 50 

Tecumseh 61 

Thessalon 121 

Thornbury 99 

Thorold 27 

Tilbury 70 

Tillsonburg 41 

Timmins 101 

Trenton 13 

Trout Creek 135 

Uxbridge 87 

VankleekHill 91 

Walkerton 63 

Wallaceburg 29 

Waterloo 5 

Webbwood 123 

Weston 25 

Whitby 40 

Wiarton 81 

Wingham 66 



Acton 7 

Ailsa Craig 117 

Alvinston 93 

Arkona 124 

Arthur 39 

Athens 89 

Ayr 73 

Bancroft 51 

Barry's Bay 42 

Bath 133 

Beamsville 26 

Beaverton 50 

Beeton 102 

Belle River 79 

Bloomfield 91 

Blyth 98 

Bobcaygeon 48 

Bolton 107 

Bradford 47 

Braeside 114 

Brighton 15 

Brussels 69 

Burk's Falls 143 

Caledonia 17 

Cannington 76 

Cardinal 12 

Cayuga 88 

Chatsworth 132 

Chesterville 38 

Chippawa 28 

Clifford 122 

Cobden 94 

Colborne 52 

Coldwater 103 

Courtright 135 

Cceemore 97 

Delhi 9 

Deloro 134 

Drayton 108 

Dundalk 92 

Dutton 71 

Eganville 46 

Elora 32 

Embro 119 

Erieau 139 

Erin 113 

Exeter 11 

Fenelon Falls 40 

Fergus 5 

Finch 126 

Flesherton 120 

Fonthill 65 

Forest Hill 1 

Frankford 59 

Glencoe 70 

Grand Valley 105 

Hagersville 18 

Hastings 64 

Havelock 27 

Hensall 86 

Hepworth 130 

Hilton Beach 147 

Humberstone 6 

Iroquois 36 

Jarvis Ill 

Kemptville 29 

Killaloe 95 

Lakefield 19 

Lanark 99 

Lancaster 101 

Lion's Head 123 

Long Branch 4 

L'Orignal 45 

Lucan 100 

Lucknow 37 



Madoc 23 

Markdale 66 

Markham 35 

Marmora 53 

Maxville 80 

Merrickville 72 

Mildmay 78 

Millbrook 84 

Milverton 49 

Morrisburg 16 

Neustadt 118 

Newboro 127 

Newburgh 112 

Newbury 136 

Newcastle 87 

New Hamburg 13 

Norwich 30 

Norwood 77 

Oil Springs 115 

Omemee 106 

Paisley 67 

Point Edward 24 

Port Carling 45 

Port Credit 8 

Port Dalhousie .... 14 

Port Dover 10 

Port Elgin 22 

Port McNicol 56 

Port Perry 33 

Port Rowan 90 

Port Stanley 81 

Port Sydney 150 

Portsmouth 63 

Richmond 125 

Richmond Hill 21 

Ripley 121 

Rockcliffe Park 3 

Rodney 82 

Rosseau 146 

St. Clair Beach. ... 141 

Shallow Lake 131 

Shelburne 34 

South River 142 

Springfield 128 

Stirling 55 

Stoney Creek 61 

Stouffville 31 

Streetsville 96 

Sundridge 144 

Sutton 62 

Swansea 2 

Tara 116 

Tavistock 43 

Teeswater 60 

Thamesville 68 

Thedford 104 

Thornloe 149 

Tiverton 137 

Tottenham 109 

Tweed 20 

Victoria Harbour. . . 41 

Vienna 140 

Wardsville 138 

Waterdown 57 

Waterford 25 

Watford 54 

Wellington 58 

West Lome 74 

Westport 85 

Wheatley 83 

Winchester 44 

Windermere 148 

Woodbridge 75 

Woodville 129 

Wyoming HO 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



183 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



TABLE 19— PERCENTAGE ANALYSIS OF CURRENT EXPENDITURES IN CITIES, 
AND IN TOWNS OVER 6,000 POPULATION, FOR THE YEAR 1936 



Cities 


Assessed 
Population 


Teachers' 
Salaries 


Plant 
Operation 


Plant 
Main- 
tenance 


Adminis- 
tration 


Instruc- 
tional 

Equip- 
ment 


Auxiliary 
Agencies 


Toronto 


645,462 
154,020 
141,903 
101,435 
73,091 
32,650 
31,232 
26,834 
24,692 
24,440 
24,231 
23,627 
23,513 
23,072 
21,455 
20,045 
18,747 
18,230 
17,555 
16,088 
15,910 
15,161 
14,509 
14,119 
13,100 
11,040 
10,540 


73.77 

81.82 
75.13 
71.36 
65.91 
79.75 
75.11 
71.26 
71.73 
74.56 
78.27 
71.90 
71.91 
74.80 
75.25 
73.37 
74.54 
74.03 
78.94 
75.76 
78.48 
72.63 
72.89 
74.09 
72.34 
72.06 
65.22 


9.48 
10.74 
10.84 
15.17 
10.03 
10.51 
12.35 
12.27 
15^61 
15.54 
13.72 
16.40 
12.41 
11.74 
13.49 
15.77 
13.15 
14.36 
14.76 
12.94 

9.16 
19.31 
13.12 
12.73 
12.54 
16.00 
15.74 


6.19 
3.31 
5.75 
4.54 
8.55 
2.26 
7.62 
6.70 
7.95 
3.60 
1.85 
3.81 
6.76 
4.88 
5.24 
4.39 
6.43 
3.97 
2.59 
4.70 
7.33 
4.67 
3.77 
4.47 
3.10 
5.19 
10.50 


5.50 
1.72 
2.16 
3.35 
6.09 
2.31 
1.54 
2.29 
3.23 
2.36 
1.55 
3.44 
4.33 
1.57 
3.02 
2.49 
2.23 
2.64 
1.93 
2.21 
1.28 
1.33 
2.78 
2.21 
1.80 
1.40 
5.02 


2.73 
1.99 
3.16 
2.96 
3.81 
3.43 
3.38 
4.02 
1.34 
1.66 
2.27 
2.81 
2.47 
3.51 
2.94 
3.07 
.89 
2.76 
1.78 
4.24 
2.17 
1.97 
4.43 
3.41 
3.99 
5.13 
1.96 


2.33 


Hamilton 


.42 


Ottawa 

Windsor 


2.96 
2.62 


London 


5.61 


Kitchener 


1.74 


Brantford 




St. Catharines 

Oshawa 


3.46 
.14 


Sudbury 


2.28 


Fort William 

Sault Ste. Marie . . . 
Kingston 


2.34 
1.64 
2.12 


Peterborough 

Guelph 


3.50 
.06 


Port Arthur 

Niagara Falls 

Sarnia 


.91 
2.76 
2.24 


Stratford 




St. Thomas 

Chatham 


.15 

1 58 


North Bay 

Belleville 


.09 
3 01 


Gait 


3 09 


Owen Sound 

Woodstock 

Welland 


6.23 

.22 

1 56 






Average, Cities. . . 




75.68 


11.05 


5.71 


3.56 


2.82 


1 18 








Towns 
Cornwall 


12,681 
10,326 
9,903 
8,808 
8,266 
8,126 
7,623 
7,116 
6,876 
6,852 
6,848 
6,690 
6,440 
6,294 
6,196 


82.21 
68.37 
70.60 
68.63 
72.53 
71.36 
81.58 
75.61 
75.62 
71.71 
66.60 
72.85 
74.89 
76.93 
79.90 


13.88 
16.32 
21.74 
15.58 
12.00 
16.74 

9.48 
17.66 
13.40 
21.37 
16.61 
14.94 
14.78 
14.38 

9.53 


.46 
5.72 
1.92 
9.09 
8.47 
4.11 
4.42 
4.01 
3.45 
1.87 
4.58 
3.74 
4.72 
2.67 
3.29 


2.05 
2.59 
.81 
1.82 
1.19 
2.13 
1.68 
1.24 
2.23 
2.86 
2.99 
4.32 
1.50 
1.37 
4.67 


1.00 
3.99 
2.83 
4.88 
2.86 
3.02 

.97 
1.23 
1.17 

.15 
3.20 
2.03 
2.26 
2.82 
2.61 


40 


Pembroke 


3 01 


Brockville 


2 10 


Orillia 




Waterloo 


2 95 


Barrie 


2 64 


Smith's Falls 

Lindsay 


1.87 
25 


Mimico 


4 13 


Eastview 


2 04 


New Toronto 

Midland 


6.02 
2 12 


Trenton 


1.85 
1.83 


Preston 

Port Colborne 






Average, Towns.. 




73.73 


/ 

14 90 4 42 


2.21 


2.51 


2 22 











184 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 20— CONSOLIDATED 



Consolidated 
School 



County 

or 
District 



Sections 
Consolidated 



Assess- 
ment 



Barwick 

Burriss 

Byng Inlet 

Charlton 

Dorion 

Falls View 

Gooderham 

Grant 

Grantham 

Hudson 

Humber Heights 

Katrine 

Macdonald 

Mallorytown. . . . 

Mindemoya 

Morley 

Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain 
Pointe au Baril. 

Quibell 

Savard 

Sundridge ...... 

Tarn worth 

Tweed 

Wellington 

West Guilford.. 
Wilberf orce .... 



Rainy River 

Rainy River 

Parry Sound 

Temiskaming 

Thunder Bay 

Welland ♦ 

Haliburton 

Carleton 

Lincoln 

Temiskaming 

York 

Parry Sound 

Wellington 

Leeds 

Manitoulin Island .... 

Rainy River 

Thunder Bay 

Parry Sound 

Dundas 

Parry Sound 

Kenora 

Temiskaming 

Parry Sound 

Lennox and Addington 

Hastings 

Prince Edward 

Haliburton 

Haliburton 



4, 11, 12 Barwick 

1, 2, Burriss 

2 Wallbridge, 1 Henvey 

2, 4 Dack, Charlton Town 

1, 2, 3 Dorion 

7, 9 Stamford 

2, 4, 5 Glamorgan 

3, 15 Nepean 

5, 6 Grantham 

Hudson Township 

5 Etobicoke (3 schools) 

1, 5 Armour 

6}4 7Guelph 

4, 5, 6 Front of Yonge, 19 Front 
of Escott 

1, 4 Carnarvon 

7 Morley, 9 Morley and Dilke, 

1 Long Sault 

1, 2, 3 Nipigon 

1 Carling, 3 MacDougall 

9, 12, 13, 14 Mountain 

1, 2 Harrison 

1, 2 Wabigoon, 1 Redvers 

1, 2 Savard, 2 Robillard 

6, 4 Strong, Sundridge Village . . . 

3, 6, 7 Sheffield, 28 Camden 

3, 5 Hungerford, Tweed Village . . 

10, 11, 14 Hillier, 9, 10 Hallowell, 
Wellington Village 

2, 3 Guilford 

2, 6 Monmouth, 8 Cardiff 

Totals 



$102,290 

99,420 

62,230 

98,034 

88,406 

4,822,847 

33,153 

516,485 

441,750 

157,310 

554,707 

57,170 

422,050 

239,020 

86,400 

175,013 

483,372 

215,978 

322,675 

274,000 

77,336 

76,790 

231,918 

334,011 

742,477 

1,568,615 

41,511 

27,745 



$12,276,023 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



185 



SCHOOLS 

SCHOOLS, 1936-37 



No. 


No. of 
Teachers 


Grade of 
Certificate 


Enrolment 


No. 
Conveyed 


Average 
Attendance 


%of 
Perfect 
Aggt. 


No. in 
Fifth 
Class 


No. in Con- 


I 


II 


tinuation 
School 


1 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
8 
3 
3 
8 
2 
7 
1 
4 
4 
4 
3 
5 
2 
7 
1 
2 
2 
5 
3 
6 
9 
2 
2 


2 
3 
3 
1 
3 
5 

1 

7 

6 
1 

3 
3 

1 
5 
1 
4 

1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 
4 
1 
1 


1 

2 

3 
3 
2 
1 
2 
1 

4 

1 
1 
2 

1 
3 

1 
2 
1 
5 
5 
1 
1 


86 

66 

140 

94 

95 

331 

85 

150 

257 

83 

308 

30 

135 

143 

111 

120 

173 

67 

178 

45 

59 

105 

195 

181 

209 

318 

85 

42 


23 
50 
37 
55 
90 
84 
50 
15 
54 


63 
49 

121 
70 
71 

286 
69 

102 

235 
62 


90.13 
89.38 
93.62 
87.86 
75.40 
93.17 
88.79 
90.41 
89.47 
86.04 
90.81 
87.87 
95.00 
94.12 
92.62 
87.21 
93.83 
88.73 
91.47 
77.67 
85.09 
83.09 
89.54 
93.35 
91.18 
94.70 
88.29 
92.45 


6 
4 

7 
6 
6 




?, 




3 




4 




5 




6 




7 


7 




8 




9 


20 

1 




10 




11 


68 
16 




12 


25 
112 
127 

91 

92 
133 

52 
141 

26 

43 

75 
171 
103 
172 
283 . 

72 

39 






13 






14 
15 


78 
39 
80 
21 
44 

113 
40 
34 

105 
35 
57 




67 


16 
17 

1.8 


13 

10 

2 
1 
5 


25 


19 
20 


56 


21 
22 




23 
24 
25 


43 
61 


26 
27 


162 




76 


28 


17 




12 




108 


65 


43 


3,891 




3,158 


90.22 


88 


340 









186 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



THE PUBLIC 
TABLE 20— CONSOLIDATED 



Consolidated 
School 



Cost of Operation 



Teachers' 
Salaries 



Transpor- 
tation 



Total 
Current 



Capital 
Charges 



Gross 
Cost 



Barwick 

Burriss 

Byng Inlet 

Charlton 

Dorion 

Falls View 

Gooderham 

Grant 

Grantham 

Hudson 

Humber Heights 

Katrine 

Macdonald 

Mallory town 

Mindemoya 

Morley 

Nipigon 

Nobel 

North Mountain 
Pointe au Baril. . 

Quibell 

Savard 

Sundridge 

Tarn worth 

Tweed 

Wellington 

West Guilford... 
Wilberforce 

Totals 



$2,473.73 
2,500.00 
3,200.00 
2,400.00 
2,550.00 
9,754.32 
1,420.00 
3,606.50 
7,369.89 
1,500.00 
7,378.00 
950.00 
4,545.50 
4,340.00 
3,722.90 
2,300.00 
4,857.00 
2,450.00 
6,750.00 
1,000.00 
1,500.00 
1,862.40 
4,950.00 
2,500.00 
5,365.00 
8,950:00 
1,300.00 
1,700.00 



$780.00 
2,234.85 

873.00 
1,929.75 
2,070.00 
1,550.00 
1,580.15 

410.47 
1,000.00 
1,839.75 

526.24 

767.54 

134.14 
2,085.00 
1,031.40 
2,782.20 
1,824.57 
2,700.00 
3,439.80 
1,298.85 
2,202.00 
3,826.27 

946.59 
1,229.40 
4,255.30 
3,420.00 
1,225.00 

460.80 



$4,675.39 
5,739.87 
6,633.82 
6,135.62 
6,200.67 

19,450.42 
3,337.76 
7,237.67 

11,710.01 
4,284.91 

12,026.35 
1,876.24 
6,795.97 
9,145.76 
6,009.29 
5,977.86 

10,795.88 
6,481 . 20 

12,730.08 
3,452.62 
4,416.99 

10,312.18 
7,716.75 
4,712.40 

10,904.36 

16,553.03 
2,939.44 
3,039.79 



$1,598.32 

1,452.98 

348.74 



983.71 



6,192.47 



2,615.55 

1,555.00 

1,220.52 

1,887.86 

805.86 

4,383.28 

596.39 

697.52 

1,002.62 



871.80 
8,256.62 



103,195.26 



48,423.07 



211,192.33 



34,469.26 



$6,273.71 
7,192.85 
6,982.56 
6,135.62 
7,184.38 

19,350.42 
3,337.76 

13,430.16 

11,710.01 
4,284.91 

12,026.35 
1,876.24 
6,795.97 

11,761.31 
7,564.29 
7,198.38 

12,683.74 
7,287.06 

17,113.36 
4,049.01 
5,114.51 

11,314.80 
7,716.75 
4,712.40 

11,776.16 

24,809.65 
2,939.44 
3,039.79 



245,661.59 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



187 



SCHOOLS 
SCHOOLS, 1936 



-37 



Legislative Grants 


Cost per Pupil of Average 
Attendance 


No. 


General 


Transpor- 
tation 


Special on 

Salaries 

and 

Equipment 


Fifth Class 
& Continu- 
ation 
School 


Total 


To 

Section 


To 
Govern- 
ment 


Total 


1 


$1,968.45 


$468.00 


$300.00 


$320.00 


$3,056.45 


$50.31 


$47.49 


$98. 10 


2 


2,038.56 


1,340.91 


300.00 


316.28 


3,995.75 


65.24 


81.54 


146.78 


3 


3,215.29 


523.80 


300.00 


231.82 


4,270.91 


22.41 


35.30 


57.71 


4 


1,444.36 


1,157.85 


333.75 


273.14 


3,209.10 


41.36 


45.35 


86.71 


5 


1,968.36 


1,242.00 


300.00 


201.48 


3,711.84 


48.50 


51.85 


100.35 


6 


1,589.42 
1,280.00 


465.00 
948.09 


800.00 
230.00 




2,854.42 

2,588.73 


57.59 
10.79 


9.96 
37.32 


67.55 


7 


130.64 


48.11 


8 


756.49 
2,562.30 


117.09 
300.00 


300.00 
800.00 




1,173.50 
3,816.24 


119.23 
33.49 


11.41 
16.17 


130.64 


9 


153.94 


49.04 


10 


526.22 
2,740.02 


1,103.75 
366.30 


200.00 
700.00 




1,829.97 
3,806.32 


39.07 
31.43 


29.12 
14.56 


68.19 


11 




45.99 


^? l 


367.84 
1,210.14 


459.08 
40.24 


100.00 
400.00 




926.92 
1,650.38 


37.97 
45.58 


37.08 
14.62 


75.03 


13 




60.20 


14 


424.87 


781.88 


404.80 


915.45 


2,527.00 


72.71 


19.90 


92.61 


15 


915.59 


618.84 


400.00 


1,653.54 


3,587.97 


43.70 


39.42 


83.12 


16 


902.12 


1,640.52 


300.00 




2,842.64 


46.92 


30.62 


77.54 


17 


834.19 


1,113.04 


540.00 


1,272.96 


.3,760.19 


66.79 


28.15 


94.94 


18 


797.81 


1,620.00 


200.00 


278.28 


2,896.09 


83.08 


54.80 


137.88 


19 


812.42 


1,446.90 


700.00 


922.15 


3,881.45 


93.57 


27.45 


121.02 


20 


299.96 


779.31 


100.00 




1,179.27 


110.29 


45.32 


155.61 


21 


1,129.75 


1,321.20 


200.00 




2,650.95 


60.37 


56.10 


116.47 


22 


1,241.29 


2,295.76 


200.00 


246.00 


3,983.05 


97.73 


53.09 


150.82 


23 


934.00 


567.94 


300.00 


1,702.28 


3,504.22 


23.55 


20.36 


44.91 


24 


823.53 


1,089. 17 


300.00 


906.02 


3,118.72 


15.47 


30.28 


45.75 


25 


1,243.04 


1,642.61 


600.00 




3,485.65 


48.20 


20.26 


68.46 


26 


1,144.37 


1,025.00 


900.00 


923.54 


3,992.91 


73.55 


14.11 


87.66 


27 


785.30 


735.00 


200.00 


131.00 


1,851.30 


25.64 


15.07 


40.71 


28 


1,065.42 


347.52 


200.00 


290.38 


1,903.32 


28.77 


48.19 


76.96 




35,021.11 


25,556.75 


10,608.55 


10,868.88 


82,055.29 


51.80 


25.98 


77.78 



188 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



(A) Distribution 



THE PUBLIC 

TABLE 21— LOW ATTENDANCE 





Average Attendance 


Counties 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


Total 


Addington 




1 






3 


2 


3 
1 
6 
4 
8 
1 
2 
3 


4 


1 


1 
1 
7 
3 
6 
2 
4 
2 


15 


Brant 








2 


Bruce 








1 

1 


3 
2 
2 
1 


5 
2 
3 

1 


6 
1 
2 

'4'* 

4 


8 
5 
5 
3 
1 
4 


36 


Carleton 




2 




20 


Dufferin 




26 


Dundas 










8 


Durham 






2 


2 
1 


15 


Elgin 








1 


15 


Essex. . 










Frontenac 




1 


3 


3 


2 


4 
3 
3 
5 


6 


7 
5 
8 
9 
4 
7 


7 
4 
2 
10 
1 
3 
3 
5 
9 
1 
6 
6 
8 
4 

"4" 

"2" 

2 

1 

2 

4 

2 

3 

4 
11 


7 
1 
2 
3 
2 
3 
3 
10 
8 

"9" 
7 
12 
3 
2 
7 
1 
8 
4 
2 
1 
2 
4 
3 
2 
4 
1 
5 
4 
4 
1 


40 


Glengarrv 




13 


Grenville 






2 


1 


3 
1 


21 


Grey 




1 


34 


Haldimand . . 








7 


Haliburton . . 




1 


1 


1 


3 


1 


3 


23 


Halton. . 




6 


Hastings . 








3 


2 
3 


1 
3 


5 
6 


2 
3 


28 


Huron 






1 


33 


Kent 






1 


Lambton 








1 
3 
1 
1 


1 

6 
5 

1 


"o" 

4 
2 


5 
6 
5 
1 


4 
6 
6 
3 
1 
6 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
5 
3 


26 


Lanark 




2 


2 
2 


44 


Leeds 




43 


Lennox 




1 


16 


Lincoln 




3 


Middlesex. . 






1 


1 


2 


5 


4 


30 


Norfolk . . 






3 


Northumberland 












1 
5 


T 


12 


Ontario . . 












14 


Oxford . 










1 


5 


Peel 






1 






2 

1 
3 

2 

2 


7 


Perth. . 










1 
2 
1 
2 
4 


9 


Peterborough . . 








2 
5 


3 

"s" 

1 


18 


Prescott 






1 


17 


Prince Edward. . . . 






18 


Renfrew 








1 
1 


24 


Russell 








2 


Simcoe. . 








1 
1 

3 


2 
1 
5 


4 

1 
7 


3 
3 
4 
1 


6 
1 
6 


21 


Stormont . 










11 


Victoria 






2 


1 


32 


Waterloo 






2 


Welland 












1 
2 


1 
3 


2 


Wellington 




1 








1 
1 


3 
1 
1 


3 


13 


Wentworth. . 










2 


York 
















1 






















Totals 




10 


18 


30 


53 


78 


101 


125 


149 


154 


718 








Districts 
Algoma . . 












2 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
4 
1 
2 
1 
1 


3 


1 


3 

1 


"3" 

2 
2 
1 
2 
4 
5 
3 
3 
2 


9 


Cochrane . 












5 


















3 


Manitoulin 










1 
1 
1 

6 


2 

1 
5 
2 
1 
1 
2 


4 
11 
1 
6 
1 
4 
1 
2 


2 

4 
3 
5 
7 
4 
1 
5 


12 


Muskoka 








2 
2 
1 


22 


Nipissing 






1 
1 


12 


Parry Sound 






32 


Rainy River. . . . 






16 


Sudbury 






1 
1 






15 


Temiskaming . . 










8 


Thunder Bay . 








1 


13 














Totals 






4 


5 


10 


18 


17 


31 


35 


27 


147 










Grand Totals . 





10 


22 


35 


63 


96 


118 


156 


184 


181 


865 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



189 



SCHOOLS 

SCHOOLS, CALENDAR YEAR, 



1936 






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190 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
Table 22— PROTESTANT SEPARATE SCHOOLS, 1936 





S.S. 1 

Grattan 

(Renfrew) 


S.S. 2 
Hagarty 
(Renfrew) 


L'Orignal 

Village 
(Prescott) 


Penetang- 

uishene 

Town 

(Simcoe) 


Totals 


Number of Schools 


1 


1 


1 


2 


5 






Receipts: 

Balances from 1935 


$ c. 

155 81 
129 01 
618 25 

97 


$ c. 

7 14 
266 86 

410 00 


$ c. 

467 57 
157 40 
400 00 

7 41 


$ c. 

261 26 

619 38 

7,430 00 

2 65 


$ c. 

891 78 
1 172 65 


Section Levy 


8,448 25 


Township Grant 


410 00 


Other Sources 


11 03 






Totals 


904 04 


684 00 


1,032 38 


8,313 29 


10,933 71 






Expenditures: 

Teachers' Salaries 


500 00 
320 40 


500 00 
371 00 


600 00 

86 10 


5,817 00 
2,369 69 


7,417 00 


Other Disbursements 


3,147 19 






Totals 


820 40 


871 00 


686 10 


8,186 69 


10,564 19 






Balance on hand Dec. 31, 1936 


431 24 


12 39 


346 28 


126 60 


916 51 


Cost of Education per Pupil- 
Day (in cents) 


36.02 

1 

I 
$500 00 


22.49 

1 
I 
$500 00 


53.31 

1 
I 
$600 00 


25.33 

1 
5 

3(1), 3(11) 
$5,760 00 


26 63 


Teachers : 

Male 


(av.) 
1 


Female 


8 


Certificates 


6(1), 3(H) 


Salaries (Regular) 


$7,360 00 






Pupils : 

Total Enrolment 


33 
17 
16 
24 


17 

6 

11 

13 


9 
5 
4 

8 


199 
112 

87 
157 


258 


Boys 


140 


Girls 


118 


Average Attendance 


202 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



191 



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192 



THE REPORT OF THE 



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194 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE 24— FINANCIAL 



Rural Schools 


Equalized 

Assess- 
ment per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


No. of 
Class- 
rooms 


Average 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance 


Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


School 

Section 

Levy 

S 


County 
Grant 

$ 


Legis- 
lative 
Grant 

$ 


Counties 
1 Norfolk 


166,968 

160,656 

151,205 

140,928 

135,357 

131,202 

130,107 

124,399 

124,274 

124,079 

114,675 

110,357 

109,184 

108,778 

94,403 

88,646 

76,469 

75,662 

64,295 

63,202 

60,414 

58,262 

54,955 

54,434 

49,544 

45,231 

44,696 

40,051 

24,023 

22,896 

43,904 

17,718 


2 

15 

5 

14 

2 

10 

1 

5 

7 

3 

1 

53 

16 

13 

2 

9 

10 

8 

3 

84 

7 

5 

44 

17 

28 

75 

52 

2 

2 

1 

28 

4 


102 
434 

53 
376 

36 

171 

9 

63 
118 

53 

41 

1,436 

329 

400 

59 
267 
144 

94 

43 

1,996 

152 

58 

1,256 

200 

602 

2,088 

1,756 

36 

17 

11 
598 

56 


51.00 
28.93 
10.60 
26.85 
18.00 
17.10 

9.00 
12.60 
16.85 
17.67 
41.00 
27.09 
20.56 
30.77 
29.50 
29.66 
14.40 
11.75 
14.33 
23.76 
21.71 
11.60 
28.54 
28.57 
21.50 
27.84 
33.77 
18.00 

8.50 
11.00 
21.36 
14.00 


15,278 

82,104 

10,701 

71,225 

6,938 

35,001 

1,615 

11,846 

22,515 

9,971 

7,771 

270,312 

62,331 

73,976 

11,512 

50,632 

27,233 

17,108 

8,210 

377,245 

28,782 

9,320 

243,055 

37,993 

114,064 

396,576 

333,136 

7,785 

2,910 

2,177 

110,447 

10,878 


2,447 

10,952 

2,768 

16,466 

1,308 

4,786 

645 

1,985 

3,206 

1,958 

1,200 

36,075 

8,926 

7,961 

509 

7,021 

5,527 

3,779 

1,564 

40,377 

3,621 

2,547 

27,169 

2,816 

10,900 

31,738 

14,094 

712 

537 

226 

15,021 

168 


172 

498 

53 

1,104 

5 

831 

38 

105 

234 

156 

132 

4,282 

957 

602 

125 

197 

182 

236 

113 

2,494 

151 

56 

379 

244 

1,333 

1,823 

1,198 

"46' 
800 
172 


446 


2 Bruce 

3 Middlesex 

4 Kent 


3,632 

482 
2,702 


5 Lambton 

6 Huron 


346 
2,376 


7 Peel 


156 


8 Peterborough .... 

9 Wellington 

10 Victoria 


732 

1,285 
617 


11 Addington 

12 Essex 


596 

10,757 


13 Perth 


4,529 


14 Waterloo 

15 Ontario 


2,688 
436 


16 Simcoe 


2,152 


17 Frontenac 

18 Grey 


2,026 
1,164 


19 Lanark 


797 


20 Prescott 


12,985 


21 Hastings 

22 Northumberland . 

23 Carleton 

24 Stormont 

25 Renfrew 


1,638 

910 

10,885 

1,915 
12,265 


26 Russell 


14,053 


27 York 


32,832 


28 Dundas 


281 


29 Leeds 


501 


30 Lennox 


371 


31 Glengarry 

32 Wentworth 


7,631 
1,186 


Totals and Averages. . 


73,192 


528 


13,054 


24.72 


2,470,647 


269,009 


18,718 


135,372 


Districts 

1 Thunder Bay .... 

2 Cochrane 

3 Temiskaming. . . . 

4 Rainy River 

5 Nipissing 

6 Kenora 


44,645 
30,048 
28,086 
27,687 
19,382 
18,100 
17,378 
17,150 
15,200 
7,530 


1 

88 

46 

3 

47 

1 

65 

1 

2 

3 


22 

2,539 

1,130 

69 

1,318 

28 

1,748 

17 

56 

90 


22.00 
28.86 
24.56 
23.00 
28.04 
28.00 
26.90 
17.00 
28.00 
30.00 


4,188 

500,614 

232,713 

12,976 

250,142 

5,450 

329,881 

3,377 

10,715 

17,467 


637 

67,870 

45,248 

1,405 

17,309 

270 

24,829 

295 

126 

556 




337 
63,643 
29,669 

1,935 
26,600 

1,135 


7 Sudbury 

8 Parry Sound 

9 Muskoka 

10 Algoma 


46,653 

359 

1,565 

2,893 






Totals and Averages. 


24,096 


257 


7,017 


27.30 


1,367,523 


158,545 




174,789 


Totals and Averages 
All Rural 


57,119 


785 


19,763 


25.18 


3,781,153 


427,554 


18,718 


310,161 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



195 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day 
(in cents) 


Debenture 
Indebtedness 


Other Forms 
of Debt 


Current 

$ 


Capi- 
tal 
$ 


Cur- 
rent 


Capi- 
tal 


Total 


School 
Sec- 
tion 

Share 


Coun- 
ty 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 
Class- 
room 


Total 

$ 


Per 
Class- 
room 

% 


1 


2,752 

15,366 

3,226 

15,546 

1,433 

10,842 

905 

4,200 

5,297 

2,669 

1,598 

52,056 

18,793 

12,915 

1,650 

8,954 

7,740 

5,491 

2,135 

54,065 

5,671 

3,882 

37,461 

7,701 

25,624 

52,964 

82,429 

1,373 

1,029 

705 

27,518 

1,716 


"735 
*3,249 

4,728 
1,690 

"878 

' 1,562 

"608 

2,378 

631 

37,674 

' 1,738 


18.01 
18.72 
30.14 
18.22 
20.65 
30.98 
49.89 
35.46 
23.53 
26.77 
20.56 
19.26 
30.15 
17.46 
14.33 
17.68 
28.42 
32.10 
26.00 
14.33 
19.70 
41.65 
15.41 
33.79 
22.46 
13.36 
24.74 
17.64 
35.36 
32.38 
24.92 
15.77 


""90 
"4.56 

"l.'75 
2.71 

"i.73 

""ii 

"'.'25 

2.09 

.16 

11.31 

"l.57 


18.01 
19.62 
30.14 
22.78 
20.65 
30.98 
49.89 
35.46 
23.53 
26.77 
20.56 
21.01 
32.86 
17.46 
14.33 
19.41 
28.42 
32.10 
26.00 
14.74 
19.70 
41.65 
15.66 
33.79 
24.55 
13.52 
36.05 
17.64 
35.36 
32.38 
26.49 
15.77 


16.02 
13.34 
25.87 
23.12 
18.85 
13.67 
39.98 
16.76 
14.24 
19.64 
15.44 
13.35 
14.32 
10.76 
4.42 
13.87 
20.30 
22.09 
19.05 
10.70 
12.58 
27.33 
11.18 
13.33 
9.56 
8.00 
4.23 
9.15 
18.45 
10.38 
13.60 
1.54 


1.13 

.61 

.50 

1.55 

.07 

2.37 

2.40 

.89 

1.04 

1.56 

1.70 

1.58 

1.54 

.81 

1.09 

.39 

.67 

1.38 

1.38 

.66 

.52 

.60 

.16 

1.04 

1.17 

.46 

.36 

"2.11 

.72 
1.58 


2.92 
4.42 
4.50 
3.79 
4.99 
6.79 
9.69 
6.18 
5.71 
6.19 
7.67 
3.98 
7.27 
3.63 
3.79 
4.25 
7.44 
6.80 
9.71 
3.44 
5.69 
9.76 
4.48 
9.83 

10.75 
3.54 
9.86 
3.61 

17.22 

17.04 
6.91 

10.90 






100 
1,012 


50 


2 
3 


2,207 


147 


67 


4 
5 


924 


66 


23 


2 


6 






1,406 


141 


7 








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10 










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12 
13 
14 


57,430 
14,746 


1,084 
922 


900 
7,340 


17 
459 


15 










16 










17 






125 


13 


IS 








19 






22 

4,867 


7 


20 
21 


11,585 


138 


58 


22 






145 


29 


23 








24 






324 

9,157 

2,351 

13,800 


19 


25 

26 

27 
28 


12,530 

3,888 
365,000 


448 

518 

7,019 


327 

31 

265 


29 










30 










31 
32 


3,700 


132 


200 
265 


7 
66 










475,706 


55,871 


19.25 


2.26 


21.51 


10.89 


.76 


5.48 


472,010 


894 


42,037 


80 


1 


1,078 

109,718 

62,485 

2,789 
44,676 

1,169 

66,692 

658 

1,541 

3,409 


' 17,73i 

8,907 

290 

2,846 

209 

10,147 


25.74 
21.92 
26.85 
21.50 
17.86 
21.45 
20.21 
19.48 
14.38 
19.52 


"3.54 
3.83 
2.23 
2.62 
3.83 
3.08 


25.74 
25.46 
30.68 
23.73 
20.48 
25.28 
23.29 
19.48 
14.38 
19.52 


15.21 

13.56 

19.44 

10.83 

6.92 

4.95 

7.53 

8.74 

1.18 

3.18 




8.05 
12.71 
12.75 
14.91 
10.63 
20.83 
14.14 
10.63 
14.61 
16.56 










2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


152,349 

117,692 

7,287 

17,514 

2,508 

99,139 


1,731 
2,559 
2,429 
373 
2,508 
1,525 


24,935 

11,728 

136 

14,393 


283 

255 

45 

306 


7 
8 


17,510 


269 


9 










10 






25 


8 










294,215 


40,130 


21.51 


2.93 


24.44 


11.59 




12.78 


396,489 


1,543 


68,727 


267 


769,921 


96,001 


20.36 


2.54 


22.90 


11.31 


.50 


8.20 


868,499 


1,106 


110,764 


141 



196 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE 24^FINANCIAL 



Cities 



Counties 



Equaliz'd 
Assess- 
ment 
per 
Class- 
room 
$ 



No. 

of 
Class- 
rooms 



Average 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance 



Average 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 



Pupil -Days 
Attended 



Trustee 
Levy 

(includ- 
ing De- 
benture) 

$ 



Legisla- 
tive 
Grant 



Toronto 

St. Thomas . . 
Niagara Falls 
Chatham. . . . 
London 

6 Kingston .... 

7 Owen Sound . 

8 Hamilton. . . . 

9 Kitchener. . . 

10 Stratford 

11 Guelph 

12 Sarnia 

13 Windsor 

14 Brantford . . . 

15 Woodstock. . 

16 Gait 

17 Peterborough 

18 Belleville.... 

19 Oshawa 

20 Ottawa 



York 

Elgin 

Welland 

Kent 

Middlesex . . . 
Frontenac. . . 

Grey 

Wentworth . . 
Waterloo. . . . 

Perth 

Wellington.. . 
Lambton. . . . 

Essex 

Brant 

Oxford 

Waterloo .... 
Peterborough 
Hastings. . . . 

Ontario 

Carleton. . . . 



Totals and Averages 



1 Fort William. . . . 

2 Port Arthur 

3 Sudbury 

4 North Bay 

5 Sault Ste. Marie. 

Totals and Averages 
Totals and Avera 

Towns 

1 Collingwood .... 

2 Barrie 

3 Mount Forest. . . 

4 Lindsay 

5 Hespeler 

6 Waterloo 

7 Orillia 

8 Dundas 

9 Prescott 

10 Picton 

11 Oakville 

12 Seaforth 

13 Leamington 

14 Whitby 

15 Parkhill 

16 Merritton 

17 Preston 

18 Ingersoll 

19 Smith's Falls.... 

20 St. Mary's 

21 Brockville 

22 Renfrew 

23 Trenton 

24 Campbellford . . . 

25 Cobourg 

26 Paris 



{Districts) 
Thunder Bay 
Thunder Bay 

Sudbury 

Nipissing. . . . 
Algoma 



ges, All Cities 

Counties 

Simcoe 

Simcoe 

Wellington.. . 

Victoria 

Waterloo. . . . 
Waterloo .... 

Simcoe 

Wentworth. . 
Grenville. . . . 
Pr. Edward. . 

Halton 

Huron 

Essex 

Ontario 

Middlesex. . . 

Lincoln 

Waterloo. . . . 

Oxford 

Lanark 

Perth 

Leeds 

Renfrew 

Hastings. . . . 

North'd 

North'd 

Brant 



176,929 

166,632 

154,121 

129,450 

128,003 

112,847 

109,949 

107,055 

102,350 

100,754 

95,771 

93,415 

90,974 

90,175 

85,767 

85,070 

84,292 

83,533 

82,487 

81,413 



304 
6 
11 
14 
49 
24 
4 

129 
49 
13 
21 
15 

184 
18 
4 
5 
31 
13 
10 

327 



11,274 
220 
455 
330 

1,557 
805 
159 

4,372 

1,611 
445 
814 
464 

6,241 
686 
142 
220 
920 
407 
412 
10,805 



37.09 
36.67 
41.36 
23.57 
31.77 
33.54 
39.75 
33.89 
32.87 
34.23 
38.76 
30.93 
33.90 
38.11 
35.50 
44.00 
29.68 
31.31 
41.20 
33.04 



2,153,301 

43,254 

86,474 

106,667 

259,467 

152,043 

30,124 

839,487 

302,483 

83,430 

155,057 

87,304 

1,173,410 

129,800 

26,653 

41,647 

174,966 

76,548 

78,537 

2,063,755 



593,428 
6,600 
14,400 
13,404 
54,020 
25,424 
4,656 

145,500 
60,376 
15,870 
21,123 
16,205 

158,133 
24,003 
2,753 
5,125 
26,348 
12,026 
10,335 

406,684 



114,978 



1,231 



42,339 



34.39 



8,064,407 



1,616,413 



158,993 

106,518 

70,107 

63,478 

35,380 



1,090 
642 
1,925 
1,362 
1,067 



40.37 
35.67 
34.37 
38.91 
27.36 



186,833 
120,531 
364,176 
254,703 
205,169 



39,733 
21,040 
76,697 
42,109 
38,183 



78,501 



175 



6,086 



34.78 



1,131,412 



217,762 



110,438 



1,406 



48,425 



34.44 



9,195,819 



1,834,175 



168, 

133 

120 

117, 

115 

109 

107 

101 

101 

98 

98 

97 

91 

90 

88 

87 

86 

84 

81 

79 

78, 

78, 

76, 

76, 

74, 

73, 



307 
139 
014 
201 
898 
871 
379 
522 
187 
928 
391 
115 
193 
,577 
000 
697 
945 
046 
303 
500 
551 
410 
475 
162 
235 
500 



31 

103 

42 

172 

29 

392 

153 

101 

84 

42 

47 

51 

89 

47 

26 

68 

313 

74 

157 

49 

224 

557 

188 

65 

173 

47 



31.00 
25.75 
21.00 
24.57 
29.00 
35.63 
30.60 
33.67 
21.00 
21.00 
23.50 
25.50 
29.66 
23.50 
26.00 
34.00 
34.78 
24.67 
26.16 
24.50 
28.00 
37.13 
31.33 
32.50 
34.60 
23.50 



5,613 
20,779 

7,976 
30,150 

5,869 
77,324 
28,996 
19,508 
15,888 

8,065 

9,265 
10,011 
16,824 

8,980 

7,090 
12,959 
60,094 
13,930 
29,546 

9,428 
41,054 
104,233 
36,071 
12,488 
32,856 

8,964 



500 
3,485 
1,277 
5,924 
1,267 

12,129 
2,483 
3,351 
3,910 
1,052 
1,973 
1,487 
1,670 
1,740 
606 
2,808 
9,031 
2,928 
4,155 
1,856 
7,060 

18,939 
5,555 
1,389 
4,160 
1,034 



21,117 

574 

963 

702 

2,668 

1,576 

249 

5,760 

3,552 

734 

2,104 

738 

6,539 

1,220 

244 

447 

2,163 

630 

808 

23,913 



76,701 



2,440 
1,303 
7,992 
3,815 
6,286 



21,836 



98,537 



90 
146 
111 
679 

58 
708 
382 
133 
281 

69 
116 
420 
221 
106 

99 
217 
897 
289 
403 
148 
832 
1,105 
670 
187 
330 
169 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



197 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day 
(in cents) 


Debenture 
Debt 


Other Forms of 
Debt 


Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Trustee 
Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 

Class- 
room 

$ 


Total 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


1 456,383 


163,868 

1,698 
11,092 

"750 
30,923 

5,483 
5,080 

3,347 

* 

7,240 
1,673 

2,000 
112,952 


21.19 
16.34 
18.70 
11.04 
18.63 
17.97 
12.45 
15.59 
18.22 
14.72 
12.54 
15.50 
14.52 
15.84 
13.16 
11.27 
16.26 
17.60 
11.78 
19.02 


7.61 

'Y.59 

4.27 

2*49 
3.68 

"e>!57 
3.28 

3.83 

* 

5.58 
"i"02 

"2.55 
5.47 


28.80 
16.34 
18.70 
12.63 
22.90 
17.97 
16.94 
19.27 
18.22 
21.29 
15.82 
19.33 

'2l!l2 
13.16 
15.29 
16.26 
17.60 
14.33 
24.49 


27.56 
15.26 
16.65 
12.57 
20.81 
16.72 
15.46 
17.33 
19.96 
19.02 
13.62 
18.56 
13.47 
18.49 
10.33 
12.31 
15.06 
15.71 
13.16 
19.71 


.98 

1.33 

1.11 

.66 

1.03 

1.04 

.83 

.69 

1.17 

.88 

1.36 

.85 

.56 

.94 

.92 

1.07 

1.24 

.82 

1.03 

1.16 


1,807,000 


5,944 






2 7,068 


2,200 
8,000 


367 


3 16,172 






727 


4 11,772 


26,000 
139,363 


1,857 
2,844 




5 48,345 

6 27,315 


7,948 
842 


162 
35 


7 3,751 


7,500 
510,000 


1,875 
3,953 




8 130,846 

9 55,110 


38,250 

152,520 

5,000 

4,000 

2,400 


297 
3,113 


10 12,278 

11 19,447 


70,000 


5,385 


385 
190 


12 13,531 

13 170,335 


46,860 

2,331,547 

177,600 


3,124 
12,671 

9,867 


160 


14 20,561 

15 3,508 


3,600 


200 


16 4,694 

17 28,445 


23,429 


4,686 


1,200 

11,185 

5,700 


240 
361 


18 13,472 






438 


19 9,251 








20 392,602 


1,369,750 


4,189 


532,397 


1,628 


1,444,886 


346,106 


17.92 


5.02 


22.94 


20.04 


.95 


6,509,049 


5,288 


775,242 


630 


1 34,223 


10,959 

5,013 

18,341 

10,703 

7,027 


18.32 
17.37 
19.42 
13.78 
16.34 


5.86 
4.16 
5.04 
4.20 
3.44 


24.18 
21.53 
24.46 
17.98 
19.78 


21.27 
17.46 
21.06 
16.53 
18.70 


1.31 
1.08 
2.19 
1.50 
3.08 


129,000 
34,038 
354,342 
105,037 
127,000 


4,778 
1,891 
6,328 
3,001 
3,256 






2 20,939 

3 70,719 

4 35,092 


4,800 
166 


267 
3 


5 33,370 


650 


17 


194,343 


52,043 


17.18 


4.60 


21.78 


19.25 


1.93 


749,417 


4,282 


5,616 


32 


1,639,229 


398,149 


17.83 


4.96 


22.79 


19.95 


1.07 


7,258,466 


5,162 


780,858 


561 


1 1,702 


4,359 

2,408 

"837 
8,915 
4,816 


30.32 
19.95 
20.50 
27.77 
22.54 
13.42 
21.37 
9.03 
27.60 
17.48 
23.81 
26.41 
14.79 
22.48 
10.44 
16.56 
17.79 
24.76 
16.68 
21.00 
22.39 
13.40 
18.82 
16.84 
13.71 
25.35 


'h'.M 

"SA5 

"2.04 

8.55 

13.35 


30.32 
19.95 
20.50 
27.77 
22.54 
19.06 
21.37 
9.03 
27.60 
17.48 
23.81 
26.41 
14.79 
22.48 
10.44 
16.56 
17.79 
24.76 
24.83 
21.00 
24.43 
21.95 
32.17 
16.84 
13.71 
25.35 


8.91 
16.77 
16.01 
19.65 
21.59 
15.69 

8.56 
17.18 
24.61 
13.04 
21.30 
14.85 

9.93 
19.38 

8.55 
21.67 
15.03 
21.02 
14.07 
19.69 
17.20 
18.17 
15.40 
11.12 
12.66 
11.54 


1.60 
.70 
1.39 
2.25 
.99 
.92 
1.32 
.68 
1.77 
.86 
1.25 
4.20 
1.48 
1.18 
1.40 
1.67 
1.49 
2.07 
1.37 
1.57 
2.03 
1.06 
1.86 
1.50 
1.00 
1.89 










2 4,146 






813 


203 


3 1,635 








4 8,374 










5 1,323 






1,500 
1,000 


1,500 


6 10,378 

7 6,195 


78,461 


7,133 


91 


8 1,761 






7,600 


2,533 


9 4,385 








10 1,410 










11 2,206 






700 


350 


12 2,644 








13 2,488 










14 2,019 










15 740 










16 2,146 










17 10,692 






23,350 


2,594 


18 3,449 








19 4,927 


21,673 


3,612 






20 1,980 






21 9,193 


8,367 

127,000 

91,511 


1,046 

8,467 

15,252 






22 13,970 

23 6,787 

24 2,103 


1,500 
2,100 


100 
350 


25 4,503 










26 2,272 











In default. 



198 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE 24— FINANCIAL 



Towns 



Counties 



Equaliz'd 
Assess- 
ment 
per 
Class- 
room 
$ 



No. 

of 
Class- 



Average 

Daily 
Attend- 



Average 

Daily 
Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 



Pupil -Days 
Attended 



Trustee 

Levy 
(includ- 
ing De- 
benture) 
$ 



Legisla- 
tive 
Grant 



32 
33 



37 
38 
39 



27 Gananoque . . . 

28 Amherstburg. , 

29 Thorold 

30 Newmarket. . . 

31 Mimico 

Perth 

Goderich 

34 Tilbury 

35 Cornwall 

36 Walkerton. . . . 

Arnprior 

Riverside 

La Salle 

40 Wallaceburg . . 

41 Weston 

42 Hanover 

43 Almonte 

44 Pembroke 

45 Midland 

46 Essex 

47 Alexandria. . . . 

48 Tecumseh . . . . 

49 Vankleek Hill. 

50 Blenheim 

51 Eastview. . . . . 

52 Hawkesbury. . 

53 Clarkstown. . , 

54 Rockland 



Totals and Averages . 



59 
60 
61 
62 
63 



69 
70 
71 

72 
73 



55 Little Current 

56 Fort Frances 

57 Cochrane 

58 New Liskeard 

Coniston 

Iroquois Falls 

Kenora 

Sioux Lookout 
Timmins 

64 Hearst 

65 Blind River 

66 Rainy River 

67 Sturgeon Falls 

68 Haileybury 

Charlton 

Kearney 

Chelmsford 

Mattawa 

Keewatin 

74 Cache Bay 

75 Smooth Rock Falls 

76 Cobalt 

77 Massey 

78 Bonfield 



Leeds .... 
Essex 
Welland. . 

York 

York 

Lanark. . . 
Huron. . . 

Kent 

Stormont. 
Bruce. . . . 
Renfrew. . 
Essex .... 
Essex. . . . 

Kent 

York 

Grey 

Lanark . . . 
Renfrew. . 
Simcoe. . . 
Essex .... 
Glengarry 
Essex .... 
Prescott. . 

Kent 

Carleton. . 
Prescott. . 
Russell. . . 
Russell. . . 



Totals and Averages 
Totals and Averages 



{Districts) 
Manitoulin . 
Rainy River 
Cochrane . . . 
Timiskaming 
Sudbury. 
Cochrane 
Kenora. . 
Kenora. . 
Cochrane 
Cochrane 
Algoma. . 
Rainy River 
Nipissing. . . 
Temiskaming 
Temiskaming 
Parry Sound . 

Sudbury 

Nipissing. . . . 

Kenora 

Nipissing. . . . 
Cochrane. . . 
Timiskaming 

Sudbury 

Nipissing. . . , 



All Towns 



71,062 
68,096 
66,696 
65,289 
64,767 
61,706 
60,113 
58,507 
55,679 
54,505 
51,694 
49,719 
46,538 
46,205 
44,966 
44,583 
39,517 
39,374 
36,816 
35,587 
34,651 
32,577 
32,005 
28,664 
27,366 
25,947 
23,023 
18,685 



56,578 



87,214 
77,103 
72,596 
71,333 
51,829 
51,493 
47,070 
46,709 
43,052 
38,697 
37,952 
37,760 
36,633 
32,561 
29,060 
25,283 
24,899 
23,121 
24,617 
21,493 
18,392 
18,220 
17,927 
9,770 



40,565 



51,368 



124 
294 
371 

48 
258 
143 

56 
265 
2,330 
189 
369 
472 
167 
419 
187 

67 

96 
903 
392 

34 
426 
396 
191 

15 

871 

1,173 

395 

479 



31.00 
29.40 
46.37 
24.00 
43.00 
28.60 
28.00 
29.50 
42.36 
31.50 
33.55 
33.71 
33.40 
34.91 
37.40 
33.50 
24.00 
34.73 
39.20 
17.00 
32.77 
24.75 
31.83 
15.00 
37.87 
39.10 
35.91 
31.93 



23,352 
55,335 
69,920 
8,624 
50,073 
27,273 
10,691 
50,345 

445,030 
35,498 
68,713 
88,757 
31,119 
79,690 
35,590 
12,760 
18,335 

170,436 
74,169 
6,428 
81,181 
71,116 
36,048 
2,915 

164,720 

220,065 
74,432 
91,519 



2,760 
7,938 
7,820 
2,289 
6,898 
4,324 
1,291 
6,190 

41,503 
2,991 
7,157 

13,102 
2,416 
6,341 
4,678 
2,293 
1,099 

14,333 
3,108 
347 
7,388 
8,356 
2,271 
129 

12,416 

17,533 
5,524 
7,735 



425 



14,454 



34.01 



2,739,095 



301,999 



205 



630 



32 
284 
252 

71 
356 
227 
226 
118 
1,952 
139 
337 

38 
905 
199 

18 

26 
249 
340 

35 
151 
172 
313 

92 
147 



6,679 



21,133 



16.00 
31.55 
31.50 
23.67 
35.60 
32.43 
29.43 
29.50 
33.66 
27.80 
30.63 
19.00 
37.71 
28.43 
18.00 
26.00 
35.57 
37.78 
17.50 
37.75 
28.67 
31.30 
30.67 
29.40 



32.58 



33.54 



6,077 
53,835 
50,459 
13,407 
67,369 
43,035 
42,675 
22,734 
390,406 
27,819 
66,040 

7,288 

176,476 

37,657 

3,498 

4,738 
46,942 
77,320 

6,609 
29,751 
34,459 
58,892 
17,080 
28,975 



1,313,541 



4,052,636 



260 

9,634 

9,285 

4,700 

14,442 

16,038 

4,227 

1,900 

87,394 

3,448 

9,758 

1,915 

25,085 

6,250 

825 

381 

1,125 

4,151 

442 

1,745 

7,228 

8,427 

1,234 

786 



220,680 



522,679 



302 

472 

826 

203 

844 

635 

162 

2,010 

6,639 

978 

1,139 

1,133 

1,394 

2,207 

526 

306 

763 

4,301 

2,303 

1,313 

1,905 

3,726 

1,284 

265 

5,187 

7,409 

2,574 

3,392 



63,064 



1,564 

706 
1,374 

499 
3,753 
2,305 

827 

1,827 

20,457 

3,342 

2,650 

486 
4,673 
1,888 

689 

307 
4,393 
4,405 

347 
1,384 
5,784 
6,963 
1,114 
3,398 



75,135 



138,199 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



199 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 





Expendil 


.ures 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day 
(in cents) 


Debent 
Debt 


are 


Other Forms of 
Debt 


Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Trustee 
Levy 
Share 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 

Class- 
room 

$ 


Total 

$ 


Per 

Class- 
room 

$ 


27 


4,137 

7,728 

8,502 

2,225 

8,504 

6,570 

2,008 

9,422 

55,525 

6,221 

10,579 

15,504 

4,005 

10,712 

6,808 

2,111 

3,772 

23,987 

10,067 

2,147 

8,668 

16,928 

4,153 

840 

21,349 

31,247 

10,039 

11,386 


2,408 
1,730 

3,158 

2,064 

3,207 

373 

1,453 

2,530 

"500 

* 


17.72 

13.97 
12.16 
25.80 
16.98 
24.09 
18.78 
18.71 
12.48 
17.52 
15.40 
17.47 
12.87 
13.44 
19.13 
16.54 
20.57 
34.91 
13.57 
33.40 
10.68 
23.80 
11.52 
28.82 
12.96 
14.20 
13.49 
12.44 


10.31 
3.13 

6^31 

"i'.ib 

* 
* 

4.02 

1.05 

11.39 

3.41 

".62 

* 


28.03 
17.10 
12.16 
25.80 
23.29 
24.09 
18.78 
22.81 
12.48 
17.52 
15.40 

17'46 
20.18 
27.93 
20.57 

16.98 
33.40 
11.30 

li^52 

28.82 
12.96 
14.20 
13.49 
12.44 


11.82 

14.35 
11.18 

26.54 

13.78 

15.86 

12.08 

12.30 

9.33 

8.43 

10.42 

14.76 

7.76 

7.96 

13.14 

17.97 

6.00 

20.86 

4.19 

5.41 

9.10 

11.75 

6.30 

4.43 

7.54 

7.97 

7.42 

8.45 


1.30 

.85 
1.18 
2.35 
1.69 
2.33 
1.52 
3.99 
1.49 
2.76 
1.66 
1.28 
4.48 
2.77 
1.48 
2.40 
4.17 
6.26 
3.11 
20.42 
2.35 
5.24 
3.56 
9.09 
3.15 
3.37 
3.46 
3.71 


21,673 


5,418 






28 


33,000 


3,300 


2P 








30 






3,360 
62,200 


1,680 


31 






10,367 


32 








33 






1,500 


750 


34 








35 










36 


8,991 


1,499 






37 


2,400 


218 


38 


184,101 

68,873 


13,162 
13,775 




39 






40 






41 






562 


112 


42 


24,700 


12,350 




43 


3,153 
287 
21,000 
8,800 
6,250 
4,503 


788 


44 
45 
46 


54,944 
14,252 


2,113 
1,425 


11 
2,100 
4,400 


47 
48 
49 


3,000 
74,189 


231 
5,741 


481 
281 


50 










51 






9,590 

90,683 

15,458 

300 


417 


52 






3,023 


53 

54 


55,000 
6,000 


5,000 
400 


1,405 
20 


418,572 


38,758 


20.53 


1.63 


22.16 


14.81 


3.09 


842,735 


1,983 


301,609 


710 


55 


2,623 
7,494 
9,766 
3,978 

15,438 

15,505 
5,295 
3,621 

77,220 
5,703 

11,914 
1,810 

30,274 
8,560 
1,218 
918 
8,984 
9,502 
1,140 
3,063 

12,493 

. 13,618 

2,965 

2,998 


4,880 
1,590 
1,072 

4,254 

" 1,891 
24,386 

* 
681 

* 

1,169 
813 

1,315 

1,444 


43.17 
13.92 
19.35 
29.67 
22.92 
36.03 
12.41 
15.93 
19.78 
20.50 
18.04 
24.84 
17.15 
22.73 
34.82 
19.38 
19.14 
12.29 
17.25 
10.30 
36.25 
23.12 
17.36 
10.35 


"9^07 
3.15 
7.96 

"9^89 

*8!32 
6.25 

* 

9.34 

* 

* 

"2.49 
1.05 

' 2.23 

"4'98 


43.17 
22.99 
22.50 
37.63 
22.92 
45.92 
12.41 
24.25 
26.03 
20.50 

34.18 

'34.82 
19.38 
21.63 
13.34 
17.25 
10.30 
36.25 
25.35 
17.36 
15.33 


4.28 

17.90 

18.40 

35.01 

21.44 

37.27 

9.91 

8.36 

22.39 

12.39 

14.78 

26.28 

14.21 

16.60 

23.59 

8.04 

2.40 

5.37 

6.69 

5.87 

20.98 

14.31 

7.22 

2.71 


25.75 
1.31 
2.72 
3.72 
5.57 
5.36 
1.94 
8.04 
5.24 

12.01 
4.01 
6.67 
2.65 
5.01 

19.72 
6.48 
9.36 
5.70 
5.26 
4.65 

16.79 

11.82 
6.52 

11.73 










56 
57 


89,649 
22,000 


9,961 
2,750 


8,828 


981 


58 


300 


100 


59 








60 










61 


23,355 

37,823 
244,687 


3,336 
9,456 
4,219 






62 
63 
64 


1,650 
1,090 
5,000 


412 

188 

1,000 


65 


29,972 

7,287 

114,413 

20,924 


2,725 
3,644 
4,767 
2,989 




66 

67 


136 


68 


68 






69 






70 










71 

72 


23,403 
5,932 


3,343 
659 


2,566 


367 


73 


420 


210 


74 








75 










76 

77 


13,240 


1,324 


50 


5 


78 


21,664 


4,333 


750 


150 


256,100 


43,495 


19.50 


4.21 


23.71 


16.80 


5.72 


654,349 


3,192 


20,790 


101 


674,672 


82,253 


16.65 


2.41 


19.06 


12.90 


3.41 


1,497,084 


2,376 


322,399 


512 



In default. 



200 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE ROMAN CATHOLIC 
TABLE 24— FINANCIAL 



Villages 


Counties 


Equaliz'd 
Assess- 
ment 
per 
Class- 
room 
$ 


No. 
of 
Class- 
rooms 


Average 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance 


Average 
Daily 

Attend- 
ance 
per 
Class- 
room 


Pupil -Days 
Attended 


Trustee 

Levy 
(includ- 
ing De- 
benture) 
$ 


Legisla- 
tive 
Grant 

$ 


1 Forest Hill 

2 Arthur 


York 

Wellington.. . 

Essex 

Wellington... 

Lincoln 

Leeds 

York 

Hastings. . . . 

Bruce 

North'd 

Wellington... 

Bruce 

Dundas 

Renfrew 

Hastings. . . . 
Frontenac. . . 

Renfrew 

Glengarry. . . 

Renfrew 

Russell 


465,033 
102,805 
89,603 
86,289 
81,398 
74,038 
72,405 
71,076 
70,000 
66,258 
64,614 
64,579 
61,136 
50,444 
42,165 
3^,064 
38,982 
32,045 
29,441 
28,804 


1 

3 
7 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 
2 
1 
3 
2 
4 
2 
1 
7 
4 
5 
10 


54 

72 

153 
19 
67 
76 
31 

115 
33 
54 
16 

101 
44 

103 
41 
45 

236 

108 
93 

301 


54.00 
24.00 
21.85 
19.00 
33.50 
38.00 
31.00 
38.33 
33.00 
27.00 
16.00 
33.67 
22.00 
25.75 
20.50 
45.00 
33.85 
27.00 
18.60 
30.10 


10,350 
13,987 
27,805 

3,691 
12,736 
14,940 

5,953 
21,620 

6,058 
10,248 

3,079 
19,036 

8,364 
19,521 

7,804 

8,622 
47,175 
20,213 
17,380 
48,493 


6,800 
2,264 
5,634 
608 
3,132 
1,700 

2,005 

702 

1,185 

487 

2,081 

1,251 

1,532 

1,034 

435 

3,058 

1,156 

1,777 

2,802 


75 
323 


3 Belle River 

4 Elora 


616 
102 


5 Port Dalhousie. . . . 

6 Westport 


647 
199 


7 Swansea 


365 


8 Tweed 


740 


9 Teeswater 

10 Hastings 

1 1 Fergus 

12 Mildmay 


158 

536 

84 

1,040 


13 Chester ville 

14 Eganville 


505 
526 


15 Marmora 


547 


16 Portsmouth 

17 Berry's Bay 

18 Lancaster 

19 Killaloe 


268 
3,386 
1,881 
2,458 


20 Casselman 


2,074 


Totals and Averages 


61,743 


62 


1,762 


28.42 


327,075 


39,643 


16,530 




{Districts) 
Temiskaming 




21 Thornloe 


30,940 


1 


21 


21.00 


4,358 


432 


592 






Totals and Averages — All Villages 


61,254 


63 


1,783 


28.30 


331,433 


40,075 


17,122 


Totals and Averages 
Municipalities . 

Totals and Average 
(Rural and Urt 


— Urban 


91,232 


2,099 


71,341 


33.99 


13,579,888 


2,396,929 


253,858 


3— All Schools 
>an) 




81,947 


2,884 


91,104 


31.59 


17,361,041 


2,824,483 


564,019 



INDEX TO TABLE 22 



Towns 

Alexandria 47 

Almonte 43 

Amherstburg 28 

Arnprior 37 

Barrie 2 

Blenheim 50 

Blind River 65 

Bonfield 78 

Brockville 21 

Cache Bay 74 

Campbellford 24 

Charlton 69 

Chelmsford 71 

Clarkstown 53 

Cobalt 76 

Cobourg 25 

Cochrane 57 

Collingwood 1 

Coniston 59 

Cornwall 35 



Dundas 8 

Eastview 51 

Essex 46 

Fort Frances 56 

Gananoque 27 

Goderich 33 

Haileybury 68 

Hanover 42 

Hawkesbury 52 

Hearst 64 

Hespeler 5 

Ingersoll 18 

Iroquois Falls 60 

Kearney 70 

Keewatin 73 

Kenora 61 



La Salle 39 

Leamington 13 

Lindsay 4 

Little Current 55 

Massey 77 

Mattawa 72 

Merritton 16 

Midland 45 

Mimico 31 

Mount Forest 3 

New Liskeard 58 

Newmarket 30 

Oakville 11 

Orillia 7 

Paris 26 

Parkhill 15 

Pembroke 44 

Perth 32 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



201 



SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Expenditures 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day 
(in cents) 


Debenture 
Debt 


Other Forms of 
Debt 


Current 

$ 


Capital 

$ 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Trustee 
Levy 
vShare 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Total 

$ 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


Total 

$ 


Per 
Class- 
room 

$ 


1 


1,908 
3,021 
5,316 

761 
4,015 
1,790 
1,635 
3,622 

854 
1,842 

732 
3,893 
2,100 
3,143 
1,789 

940 
8,306 
5,210 
5,589 
7,601 


1,840 

1,743 

3i7 

"740 

U56 

""523 

1,955 

"523 
733 


18.43 
21.60 
19.12 
20.62 
31.52 
11.98 
27.46 
16.75 
14.10 
17.97 
23.77 
20.45 
25.11 
16.10 
22.92 
10.90 
17.61 
25.78 
32.15 
15.67 


17.78 


36.21 


65.70 
16.19 
20.26 
16.47 
24.59 
11.38 

"9i27 

11.59 

11.63 

15.84 

10.93 

14.96 

7.85 

13.25 

5.05 

6.48 

5.72 

10.22 

5.78 


.72 
2.31 
2.22 
2.76 
5.08 
1.33 
6.13 
3.42 
2.61 
5.23 
2.73 
5.46 
6.04 
2.69 
7.01 
3.11 
7.18 
9.1 
14.14 
4.28 


20,000 


20,000 






9 


"o!27 

"2" 49 

i2]43 

"o\07 
"o!70 

"iiii 

1.51 


21.60 
25.39 
20.62 
34.01 
11.98 
39.89 
16.75 
14.10 
17.97 
23.77 
26.52 
25.11 
16.10 
29.62 
10.90 
21.75 
25.78 
35.16 
17.18 






3 

4 


16,207 


2,315 


1,000 


143 


^ 






182 


91 


6 








7 


8,000 


8,000 






8 


880 

1,500 

500 


293 


q 






1,500 


10 






250 


11 








12 
13 


8,092 


2,697 


37 
. . 3,000 


12 
1,500 


14 










15 
16 


3,008 


1,504 


1,657 
25 


829 
25 


17 


37,157 


5,308 




18 






19 
20 


3,138 
24,979 


628 
2,498 


6,056 
2,000 


1,211 
200 


64,067 


9,530 


19.59 


2.91 


22.50 


12.12 


5.05 


120,581 


1,945 


16,837 


272 


?1 


1,275 




29.26 




29.26 


9.91 


13.58 


1,111 


1,111 












65,342 


9,530 


19.71 


2.88 


22.59 


12.09 


5.17 


121,692 


1,932 


16,837 


267 


2,379,243 


489,932 


17.52 


4.16 


21.68 


17.65 


1.87 


8,877,242 


4,229 


1,120,094 


534 


3,149,164 


585,933 


18.14 


3.77 


21.91 


16.27 


3.25 


9,745,741 


3,379 


1,230,858 


427 



Towns — Continued 

Picton 10 

Prescott 9 

Preston 17 

Rainy River 66 

Renfrew 22 

Riverside 38 

Rockland 54 

St. Mary's 20 

Seaforth 12 

Sioux Lookou , 62 

Smith's Falls 19 

Smooth Rock Falls 75 

Sturgeon Falls 67 

Tecumseh 48 

Thorold 29 

Tilbury 34 

Timmins 63 

Trenton 23 



INDEX TO TABLE 22— Continued 

Vankleek Hill 49 

Walkerton 36 

Wallaceburg 40 

Waterloo 6 

Weston 41 

Whitby 14 



Villages 

Arthur 2 

Barry's Bay 17 

Belle River 3 

Casselman 20 

Chesterville 13 

Eganville 14 

Elora 4 



Fergus 11 

Forest Hill 1 

Hastings 10 

Killaloe 19 

Lancaster. 18 

Marmora 15 

Mildmay 12 

Port Dalhousie 5 

Portsmouth 16 

Swansea 7 

Teeswater 9 

Thornloe 21 

Tweed 8 

Westport 6 



202 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE ROMAN CATHOLIC SEPARATE SCHOOLS 
TABLE 25— TEACHERS' SALARIES, 1936-37 





Male 


Female 


Rural Schools 


High- 
est 


Average 


High- 
est 


Average 


All 


First 
Class 
Teach- 
ers 


Second 
Class 
Teach- 
ers 


Third 
Class 
Teach- 
ers 


All 


First 
Class 
Teach- 
ers 


Second 
Class 
Teach- 
ers 


Third 
Class 
Teach- 
ers 


Counties 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 


$ 

800 

1,100 

900 

650 

1,200 

800 

1,700 

800 

1,050 

1,200 

1,000 

600 

720 

500 

600 

550 

700 

650 

600 

675 

1,200 

600 

1,000 

1,200 

1,000 

900 

1,300 

700 

800 

800 

850 

1,140 


$ 

700 

782 

681 

475 

736 

569 

889 

560 

673 

817 

812 

550 

610 

475 

600 

500 

633 

540 

600 

675 

878 

580 

574 

751 

545 

756 

801 

700 

692 

607 

566 

963 


$ 

800 
633 
680 

" 708 ' 
562 

1,050 
617 
600 
650 
761 
500 

"'606' 
483 
700 
575 

"675' 

870 
600 
825 
816 
820 

' "840' 
700 
750 
633 
637 
728 


$ 

600 

823 

684 

650 

745 

560 

700 

515 

686 

985 

729 

600 

610 

475 


$ 




700 
800 


700 
700 




700 
750 


666' 




Carleton 


668 
300 




700 
850 
850 

487 


700 
675 
700 

487 








700 












Glengarry 

Grey 


650 

487 


825 


500 


533 
























Kent 


825 


730 


730 














600 


600 




600 




































525 
600 
517 
600 




Norfolk 






























700 


700 


700 








Peel 








Perth 












892 
567 
600 
707 
578 
793 
812 




















1,020 
750 
775 
900 
750 
850 


690 


S40 


812 


525 


451 






Russell 


597 


765 


511 
900 
750 
625 




490 




500 




750 
737 


"850' 


500 








661 

550 

425 

1,000 
































York . . . 


1,425 


1,425 




1,425 












1,425 


702 


805 


769 


522 


1,700 


705 


755 


734 


519 






Districts 












1,000 
1,200 


967 

741 


1,000 
1,000 


900 
810 






1,200 

1,000 

750 

900 


828 

1,000 

750 

772 


850 

1,000 

750 

856 


896 


692 


670 












650 
1,000 

500 

850 
1,200 
1,300 

800 


650 
781 
500 
775 
823 
926 
800 


650 
750 
500 
700 
937 
1,060 
800 








687 


692 


747 


627 








800 
1,000 


800 
1,000 


1,000 


800 
1,000 




850 
851 
939 






700 




750 
























1,400 


840 


950 


879 


692 


1,300 


810 


898 


872 


675 






All Rural Schools 


1,425 


773 


880 


825 


603 


1,700 


736 


780 


772 


587 


Cities 


2,375 
800 


885 
725 


862 
725 


1,040 


743 


1,800 
1,800 
1,400 
1,800 


722 
730 

804 

727 


676 
783 

775 
714 


740 

727 
813 
738 


529 


Villages 

All Urban Schools 


570 






547 


For the Province 


2,375 


858 


893 


921 


650 


1,800 


729 


730 


746 


577 


Increase for Year 


75 


15 


9 




41 




13 








17 


2 


4 

















DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



203 




204 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 







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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



207 



TABLE 28— DEPARTMENTAL EXAMINATION RESULTS, 1937 
(a) June Lower School 





Number of 
Candidates 


Candidates 
Recommended 


Candidates 
Writing 


s 

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Im 
W> 
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Appeals 


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Subjects 


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1936 


English Grammar 
British History. . . 

Geography 

Physiography. . . . 

Arithmetic 

Art 


18,675 

22,675 

22,037 

18,193 

18,762 

19,024 

11,609 

9,491 

7,723 

4,765 

863 


14,820 

17,523 

18,244 

14,380 

13,996 

16,190 

9,251 

8,052 

6,183 

4,130 

547 


79.36 
77.28 
82.79 
79.04 
74.60 
85.10 
79.69 
84.84 
80.06 
86.67 
63.38 


3,845 
5,137 
3,771 
3,805 
4,758 
2,817 
2,353 
1,432 
1,533 
631 
316 


2,011 

1,301 

1,840 

924 

2,068 

1,483 

1,225 

994 

331 

280 

232 


52.30 
25.33 

48.79 
24.28 
43.46 
52.64 
52.06 
69.41 
21.59 
44.37 
73.42 


10 
15 
22 

8 
8 
17 
5 
7 
7 
4 


19 

39 

24 

22 

15 

19 

8 

7 

5 

1 

1 


ii 

23 

11 

10 

12 

8 

3 

5 

3 


16,852 

18,862 

20,117 

15,322 

16,084 

17,698 

10,484 

9,058 

6,524 

4,414 

779 


90.24 
83.18 
91.29 
84.22 
85.73 
93.03 
90.31 
95.44 
84.47 
92.63 
90.27 


90.07 

87.77 
90.38 
87.10 
81.76 
92.46 


Botany 


90.40 




94.17 


Agriculture I . . . . 
Agriculture II . . . 
French Grammar 


86.69 
91.75 
93.77 


Totals 


153,817 


123,316 




30,389 


12,689 




103 


160 


86 


136,194 













Total Number of Candidates 46,489 



Total Number of Centres. 



.605 



(b) June Lower School Fifth Glasses 

(included in (a) above) 





Number 

of 
Candi- 
dates 


Candidates 
Recommended 


Candidates Writing 


Aegro- 
tat 


Total 
Number 
Success- 
ful 


Per cent. 


Subjects 


Total 
Number 


Per cent. 
Recom- 
mended 


Total 
Number 


Number 
Passing 


Per cent. 
Passing 


1937 


1936 


English Grammar. . . 
British History 


4,126 
5,032 
4,703 
3,133 
3,381 
4,160 
2,513 
1,734 
1,723 
547 
649 


2,373 

2,817 

2,766 

1,856 

1,663 

2,563 

1,378 

994 

965 

312 

415 


57.58 
55.98 
58.81 
59.24 
49.19 
61.61 
54.83 
57.32 
56.01 
48.22 
63.94 


1,744 

2,201 

1,923 

1,270 

1,710 

1,583 

1,131 

735 

753 

231 

234 


1,153 
891 
982 
502 

1,016 
964 
819 
610 
266 
162 
171 


66.11 
40.48 
51.07 
39.53 
59.42 
60.90 
72.41 
82.99 
35.33 
70.13 
73.08 


9 
14 
14 
7 
8 
•14 
4 
5 
5 
4 


3,535 
3,722 
3,962 
2,365 
2,687 
3,541 
2,201 
1,609 
1,236 
478 
586 


85.67 
73.97 
84.24 
75.49 
79.47 
85.12 
87.58 
92.80 
71.74 
87.39 
90.29 


85.03 

84.25 
85 01 


Physiography 


80.86 
71 63 


Art 


85.48 
89 55 






90 68 


Agriculture I 

Agriculture II 

French Grammar. . . 


78.33 
84.00 
93.54 


Totals 


31,701 


18,102 




13,515 


7,736 




84 


25,882 













Total Number of Candidates 8,717 



208 



THE REPORT OF THE 



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210 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



(e) August Middle School 





Number 
of can- 
didates 


Number 
Passing 


Per 

Cent. 
Passing 


Appeals 


Total 
number 
success- 
ful 


Per Cent. 


Subjects 


Total 
number 


Number 
sustained 


1937 


1936 


English Composition . . . 

English Literature 

Canadian History 

Ancient History 

Algebra 


29 
27 
39 
28 
28 
42 

12 

13 


21 
17 
23 
18 
19 
26 

5 

8 


72.41 
62.96 
58.97 
64.29 
67.86 
61.90 

41.67 

61.54 


2 
1 
3 
3 

4 
1 


2 

1 


23 

17 
23 

18 
19 

27 

5 

8 


79.31 
62.96 
58.97 
64.29 
67.86 
64.29 

41.67 

61.54 


37.78 
67.50 
56.25 
75.86 
63.64 


Geometry 


69.44 


Special French Litera- 
ture 


88.89 


Special French Compo- 
sition 


58.82 






Totals 


218 


137 




14 


3 


140 













Total Number of Candidates 116 



Total Number of Centres 6 



(f) August Upper School 



Subjects 



55*8 



•°.S 

as 

3$ 



E'5> 



Z& 



U.5 



Appeals 






n 



K<n 



.■2§ 



3 3 
fcffi 



Hco 



Per Cent. 



1937 



1936 



English Composition 

English Literature 

Modern History 

Algebra 

Geometry . . 

Trigonometry 

Botany 

Zoology 

Physics 

Chemistry 

Latin Authors 

Latin Composition 

French Authors 

French Composition 

German Authors 

German Composition 

Special French Literature . . 
Special French Composition 

Totals 



179 

219 

240 

128 

220 

262 

276 

256 

93 

88 

31 

43 

95 

116 

2 

2 

59 

54 



179 

219 

240 

128 

220 

262 

276 

256 

93 

88 

31 

43 

95 

116 

2 

2 

59 

54 



114 

161 

113 

106 

105 

195 

220 

193 

.55 

57 

16 

20 

49 

73 

2 

1 

47 

43 



63.69 
73.52 
47.08 
82.81 
47.73 
74.43 
79.71 
75.39 
59.14 
64.77 
51.61 
46.51 
51.58 
62.93 
100.00 
50.00 
79.66 
79.63 



115 

161 

119 

107 

105 

197 

222 

195 

56 

57 

16 

21 

50 

76 

2 

1 

47 

43 



64 . 25 
73.52 
49.58 
83.59 
47.73 
75.19 
80.43 
76.17 
60.21 
64.77 
51.61 
48.84 
52.63 
65.52 
100.00 
50.00 
79.66 
79.63 



58.84 
77.62 
62.63 
59.37 
38.57 
54.72 
67.56 
76.74 
55.91 
63.75 
54.76 
70.45 
56.62 
77.64 
80.00 
40.00 
71.64 
69.15 



2,363 



2,363 



1,570 



120 



20 



1,590 



Total Number of Candidates 1,482 



Total Number of Centres 17 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



21 i 



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212 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 
TABLE 30— ATTENDANCE, GRADE ENROLMENT, ENROLMENT BY AREAS, 1936-37 







ATTENDANCE 


GRADE ENROLMENT 


ENROLMENT 
BY AREAS 


SCHOOLS 




c 

a 

"o 

k 

3 

W 




jy 


>> 

• - <u !S 

ft" u 
S?S5 


V 

« e >> 


X 


X 


R 


R 


R 


a 

3 

c 


ft 

3 
PL, 


c 

V 

'35 




u 




>> 


£ 


S 


2^^ 


KtJtE 


T3 


•a 


•d 


X) 


•d 




C 
3 


bS 




3 


S 




><X 







Ih 

o 


O 


O 


E 




0) 

Ct! 


O 

V 


^ 


(Counties) 






























Acton 


A 


76 


35 


41 


80 


95.14 


18 


25 


15 


14 


4 


55 


17 


4 


Agincourt 


A 


103 


46 


57 


104 


95.88 


30 


27 


29 


9 


8 


41 


02 




Ailsa Craig 


B 


63 


31 


32 


52 


92.89 


20 


18 


12 


13 




26 


37 




Allenford 


B 


33 


20 


13 


32 


96.75 


6 


11 


7 


9 




19 


11 


3 




13 

A 


22 
55 


12 
25 


10 
30 


19 
53 


92.15 
95.13 


9 
15 


5 
19 


4 
9 


4 

6 


6 


16 
26 


6 
27 




Alvinston 


2 




C 

B 


21 
18 


5 
9 


16 
9 


21 
18 


91.51 
91.91 


10 

6 


11 
5 








8 
12 


12 
5 


1 


Aultsville 


4 


3 




1 




B 
B 
B 


47 
42 

27 


21 
20 
11 


26 

22 
16 


41 
40 
22 


95.41 
93.91 

83.79 


13 
14 

7 


12 
16 

8 


11 
5 
5 


11 

7 

7 




28 
14 
27 


10 

28 


9 


Bath 




Beachburg 




Beaverton 


A 


100 


40 


60 


94 


93.39 


28 


14 


15 


28 


15 


50 


49 


1 




B 
B 


44 
49 


15 
19 


29 
30 


43 
46 


88.58 
91.35 


10 
17 


12 
14 


6 
11 


16 

7 




25 
25 


19 
24 




Belmont 








13 


7 


6 


12 


94.03 


9 


4 








5 


8 




Blackstock 


A 


45 


22 


23 


43 


94.48 


9 


9 


10 


9 


8 


9 


36 




Blyth 


B 
A 


33 
48 


10 
16 


23 
32 


31 
43 


94.39 
89.32 


11 
16 


11 
14 


7 
9 


4 

7 


" 2 


18 
25 


15 
18 




Bobcaygeon 


5 


Bolton 


B 

A 


27 
47 


7 
20 


20 

27 


25 

47 


87.32 
94.49 


10 

18 


7 
10 


3 

8 


7 
8 


3 


13 
14 


14 
19 




Bothwell 


14 




C 

B 


6 
36 


1 
17 


5 
19 


5 
40 


91.45 
78.29 


o 

8 


1 

15 








4 
13 


2 
23 




Brooklin 


6 


7 






Brownsville 


B 


37 


11 


26 


39 


96.21 


18 


6 


7 


6 




14 


14 


9 




A 
B 


90 
26 


40 
11 


50 
15 


78 
24 


94 . 35 
94.89 


30 

13 


27 
6 


10 
1 


16 
6 


7 


54 
10 


35 

16 


1 


Burgessville 




Caledon East .... 


B 


39 


19 


20 


36 


90.39 


11 


7 


16 


5 




22 


17 




Cannington 


B 


47 


23 


24 


46 


88.31 


9 


11 


8 


19 




26 


19 


2 


Cardinal 


A 


66 


30 


36 


74 


96.87 


24 


18 


13 


5 


6 


53 


12 


1 


Carp 


A 
B 


93 

22 


35 

6 


58 
16 


78 
21 


90.21 
94.86 


31 
12 


25 
3 


19 
3 


18 
4 




46 

7 


47 
15 




Castleton 




Chalk River 


B 


17 


11 


6 


11 


79.20 


6 


8 




3 




17 






Chatsworth 


B 


26 


11 


15 


25 


93.62 


7 


7 


5 


7 




14 


12 




Claremont 


B 


33 


11 


22 


34 


93.26 


11 


7 


10 


5 




21 


12 




Clifford 


B 
C 
B 


26 
20 
41 


7 

9 

22 


19 
11 
19 


24 
19 
37 


94.35 
94.16 
87.19 


12 

8 
8 


9 
12 
13 


3 


2 




7 
15 
20 


10 

5 

21 


9 






Coldwater 


8 


12 








A 
B 


73 
31 


34 
10 


39 
21 


73 
29 


95.01 
91.14 


25 

8 


19 
• 11 


5 

7 


17 
5 


7 


36 
12 


37 
18 




Consecon 


1 


Cookstown 


B 


49 


22 


27 


44 


89.84 


16 


15 


11 


7 




39 


10 




Cooksville 


B 


38 


13 


25 


39 


93.89 


19 


7 


7 


5 




25 


13 




Creemore 


A 


53 


25 


28 


51 


95.06 


14 


17 


5 


9 


8 


25 


27 


1 


Cumberland 


B 


22 


9 


13 


20 


97.32 


7 


3 


6 


6 




20 


2 




Delaware 


B 


24 


11 


13 


21 


91.46 


7 


4 


7 


6 




13 


11 




Delhi 


B 
B 
B 
B 


53 
29 
16 
33 


23 

7 
9 

7 


30 
22 

7 
26 


48 
31 
15 
35 


88.49 
91.69 
94.80 
91.54 


19 
14 

4 

8 


15 
6 
4 

11 


10 

5 
4 

8 


9 
4 
4 
6 




30 

12 

9 

14 


23 

17 

5 

16 










2 


Dorchester 


3 




A 
A 
B 
B 


58 

129 

28 

37 


21 
45 
10 
12 


37 
84 
18 
25 


57 

126 

27 

36 


93.16 
92.38 
90.27 
94.01 


19 
47 
10 
11 


16 
29 

7 
14 


8 

29 

4 

6 


15 
6 

6 


" 'is 


16 

56 
17 
32 


42 

58 

11 

5 






15 






Eganville 




Eganville (R.C.).. 


A 


60 


31 


29 


53 


89.11 


15 


22 


8 


5 


10 


43 


16 


i 




A 
B 
A 
B 


62 
52 
50 
29 


24 

19 

16 

6 


38 
33 
34 
23 


58 
47 
52 
28 


88.67 
96.48 
90.11 
92.13 


16 
20 

16 

7 


16 

13 

9 

4 


9 

5 

13 

7 


21 
14 
11 
11 


. 


23 
29 

16 

8 


39 
23 
34 
10 












Ennismore 


11 




A 


42 

74 


20 
29 


22 
45 


37 
69 


93.03 
94.02 


13 
18 


11 

17 


11 
21 


7 
7 


11 


20 
41 


14 
33 


8 


Fenelon Falls .... 




Feversham 


B 


26 


12 


14 


23 


90.46 


8 


7 


5 


6 




11 


15 






B 
B 
B 
B 


28 
24 
19 
39 


13 

17 

7 

12 


15 

7 

12 

27 


27 
23 
17 
40 


87.48 
92.04 
87.18 
93.94 


10 

1 

10 

14 


7 
8 
3 
8 


5 

10 

3 

8 


6 
5 
3 
9 




12 

14 

8 

9 


16 
10 
11 

28 








Flinton 




Florence 


2 


Fordwich 


B 


20 


8 


12 


19 


90.19 


7 


4 


5 


4 




8 


10 


2 


Forrester's Falls. . 


B 


26 


10 


16 


25 


89.77 


7 


8 


2 


9 




14 


12 




Frankford 


A 


66 


29 


37 


70 


94.94 


27 


20 


8 


5 


6 


38 


14 


14 


Grand Valley .... 


A 


47 


14 


33 


52 


96.23 


16 


5 


6 


13 


7 


29 


18 




Haliburton 


B 


22 


14 


8 


19 


82.78 


11 


4 




7 




20 


2 




Hallville. . 


A 
A 
B 
B 


49 
79 
33 
32 


21 
31 
10 

16 


28 
48 
23 
16 


45 
76 
34 
36 


92.35 
92.92 
93 . 62 
91.81 


13 

21 

6 

9 


12 

23 

13 

9 


8 

12 

9 

6 


9 

12 

5 

8 


7 
11 


24 
33 
20 
12 


12 

46 

13 

6 


13 






Hensall 




Hepworth 


14 


Highgate 


B 


29 


15 


14 


32 


89.20 


11 


9 


4 


5 




14 


15 






B 

B 


19 
23 


7 
10 


12 
13 


19 
22 


90.61 
84.29 


8 
9 


7 
5 


2 
3 


2 
6 




13 
12 


6 
11 




Honey wood 





DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



213 



THE CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 
TABLE 30— ATTENDANCE, GRADE ENROLMENT, ENROLMENT BY AREAS, 1936-37 







ATTENDANCE 


GRADE ENROLMENT 


ENROLMENT 
BY AREAS 


SCHOOLS 




a 

e 

"o 

u 
c 
W 

>> 
cfl 

% 


£ 


_0J 

E 


cfl o nj 

Cfl 4) -i_l 


III 

a> ai u 


u 
T3 


X 


0) 

•d 

cfl 


•a 

cfl 


V 


a 

c 
12 

'35 


'a 

3 

P4 
>> 

3 


a 

<v 

JO 

h 







% 


fa 


i** 




o 


O 


O 


O 


O 


Ol 


O 

O 


^ 


(Counties) 






























Uderton 


B 


56 


24 


32 


54 


90.92 


26 


16 


6 


8 




18 


38 




Inglewood 


B 


35 


10 


25 


31 


88.42 


15 


13 




7 




14 


21 




Janetville 




12 


6 


6 


11 


96 03 


8 


4 








3 


9 




B 
C 


50 
15 


23 
6 


27 
9 


52 
14 


95.66 
94.29 


17 

8 


8 

7 


17 


8 




23 
9 


22 
1 


5 




5 


Kars 


B 


37 
27 


15 
12 


22 
15 


37 
25 


89.58 
91.29 


12 
8 


10 

7 


6 
9 


9 
3 




13 
11 


24 
16 




Kenmore 




Kinburn 


B 


45 


15 


30 


44 


92.92 


13 


12 


8 


12 




10 


35 




Kinmount 


B 


35 


11 


24 


26 


82.20 


12 


9 


10 


4 




33 


1 


1 


Lambeth 


B 


41 


15 


26 


40 


96.02 


11 


10 


9 


11 




16 


25 






B 
B 


55 
32 


23 
13 


32 

19 


54 
37 


96.31 
94.68 


22 
11 


13 
6 


7 
8 


13 

7 




26 
17 


29 

15 




Lansdowne 






C 
B 
B 


12 
23 
31 


7 
12 
17 


5 
11 
14 


11 

24 
29 


93.24 
94.02 
89.11 


4 

6 

13 


8 
6 
6 








5 

6 

19 


7 
17 
12 






9 

7 


2 
5 






Lion's Head 




Little Britain .... 


B 


38 


23 


15 


37 


92.18 


17 


5 


11 


5 




15 


23 






B 


46 


26 


20 


39 


93.53 


16 


13 


11 


6 




10 


36 




Long Branch 


A 


230 


104 


126 


230 


93.48 


78 


87 


34 


16 


15 


111 


59 




Lynden 


B 


22 


9 


13 


25 


88.58 


5 


6 


6 


5 




6 


15 


1 


Lyndhurst 


B 


24 


15 


9 


24 


88.49 


8 


6 


3 


7 




8 


16 




Malakoff 




9 


2 


7 


8 


88 22 


3 


5 


1 






5 


4 




B 


61 


17 


44 


58 


86.81 


20 


16 


11 


14 




20 


41 






B 


53 


11 


42 


54 


87.57 


17 


12 


15 


9 




19 


34 






B 


35 


15 


20 


33 


92.19 


5 


14 


7 


9 




15 


20 






A 
B 


62 
56 


21 

25 


41 
31 


58 
57 


91.49 
93.53 


16 
14 


15 
19 


12 
14 


10 
9 


9 


24 
26 


37 
19 


1 




11 




B 


52 


25 


27 


46 


90.92 


19 


13 


8 


12 




28 


24 






A 


69 


34 


35 


68 


94.29 


14 


15 


21 


11 


8 


27 


42 






A 


81 


36 


45 


73 


94.02 


20 


19 


15 


16 


11 


47 


34 






B 
B 


23 

17 


8 
6 


15 
11 


13 

17 


87.37 
91.85 


8 
6 


7 
3 


4 
3 


4 
5 




23 
10 








7 




Mount Albert. . . . 


B 


34 


10 


24 


37 


93.10 


11 


7 


11 


5 




12 


12 


10 


Mount Brvdges. . . 


B 


57 


27 


30 


56 


91.01 


19 


18 


9 


11 




20 


37 




Mount Elgin 


B 


45 


20 


25 


46 


92.21 


13 


11 


11 


10 




15 


30 




Mount Pleasant. . 


B 


31 


11 


20 


30 


89.39 


10 


10 


5 


6 




24 


5 


2 




B 
B 


27 
31 


14 
14 


13 

17 


27 
32 


87.49 
95.96 


8 
13 


6 

8 


4 
6 


9 
4 




22 
9 


5 

18 




New Dundee 


4 


New Hamburg . . . 


B 


63 


31 


32 


63 


94.34 


22 


20 


11 


10 




53 


8 


2 


North Augusta. . . 


B 


27 


10 


17 


25 


92.28 


15 


4 


5 


3 




9 


14 


4 




B 


37 


18 


19 


36 


89.63 


14 


10 


4 


9 




19 


18 






B 


34 


13 


21 


33 


87.66 


12 


11 


5 


6 




12 


18 


4 


Oil Springs 


B 


31 


5 


26 


31 


94.92 


11 


11 


7 


2 




23 


8 




Onondaga 




12 


5 


7 


10 


89 51 


6 


6 








9 




3 


A 


58 


28 


30 


54 


92.98 


17 


14 


11 


8 


8 


22 


36 




Otterville 


B 


25 


14 


11 


24 


89.10 


14 


4 


5 


2 




14 


11 






A 
B 


64 
37 


21 
11 


43 

26 


63 
33 


92.35 
93.44 


14 
16 


17 
10 


12 

8 


3 
3 


18 


42 
20 


22 
12 




Pakenham 


5 


Palmerston 


A 


71 


29 


42 


71 


93.97 


17 


25 


10 


11 


8 


53 


8 


10 


Pelee Island 

Pelham 




12 


7 


5 


10 


85 53 


8 




2 


2 




12 






A 
B 


119 

48 


51 

24 


68 
24 


115 

47 


95.03 
88.05 


35 

13 


42 
23 


24 
9 


7 
3 


11 


26 
20 


79 
28 


14 


Pickering 




Plattsville 


A 


50 


21 


29 


48 


92.58 


12 


9 


14 


6 


9 


14 


32 


4 


Port Burwell 


B 


30 


8 


22 


29 


89.48 


11 


8 


1 


10 




19 


9 


2 




A 

B 


213 
33 


94 
14 


119 
19 


219 
32 


94.87 
92.67 


84 
14 


66 
10 


42 

7 


10 
2 


11 


185 
20 


18 
13 


10 


Princeton 




Richmond 


A 


77 


35 


42 


74 


93.09 


24 


25 


11 


13 


3 


23 


54 






A 
B 


39 

48 


18 
18 


21 
30 


42 

47 


96.39 
94.30 


7 
17 


10 
13 


9 
9 


6 
9 


7 


22 
25 


17 
19 




Rockwood 


4 




B 

A 


58 
79 


25 
35 


33 
44 


54 
65 


90.04 

87.79 


14 
16 


15 
16 


20 

25 


9 
11 


"ii 


33 

54 


24 
13 


1 


Russell 


12 


St. George 


A 


60 


25 


35 


59 


94.22 


22 


16 


8 


7 


7 


46 


7 


7 


Schomberg 


B 


47 


21 


26 


43 


88.83 


16 


13 


9 


9 




16 


17 


14 


Scotland 


B 


34 


14 


20 


31 


84.87 


13 


10 


6 


5 




15 


8 


11 


Seeley's Bay 


B 


29 


15 


14 


27 


95.81 


9 


9 


7 


4 




17 


8 


4 


Selkirk 


B 


46 


25 


21 


48 


89.92 


22 


8 


8 


8 




14 


32 




Severn Bridge. . . . 


B 


23 


9 


14 


23 


93.67 


8 


7 


4 


4 




4 


8 


ii 


Singhampton .... 


B 


18 


6 


12 


17 


91.00 


3 


4 


5 


6 




10 


4 


4 


Southampton .... 
South Mountain. . 




46 


21 


25 


46 


94 19 


13 


11 


17 


5 




46 






Ii 


47 


22 


25 


48 


95^64 


14 


17 


9 


7 




35 


10 


2 


Sparta 


B 


22 


8 


14 


22 


96.57 


10 


7 


3 


2 




9 


13 




Spencerville 


A 


73 


37 


36 


60 


91.16 


30 


15 


14 


14 




27 


46 




Springfield 


B 


33 


16 


17 


33 


94.89 


12 


7 


13 


1 




14 


19 






A 
U 
A 


74 
17 
39 


27 

4 

14 


47 
13 
25 


71 
15 
38 


93.81 
87.63 
96.02 


19 

4 

14 


19 
3 
9 


10 

4 

10 


15 
6 
2 


ii 

4 


37 

4 

21 


37 
13 
18 




Stella 




Stevensville 




Stouffville 


A 


84 


38 


46 


78 


91.79 


25 


26 


11 


21 


1 


40 


35 


9 



214 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONTINUATION SCHOOLS 
TABLE 30— ATTENDANCE, GRADE ENROLMENT, ENROLMENT BY AREAS, 1936-37 







ATTENDANCE 


GRADE ENROLMENT 


ENROLMENT 
BY AREAS 


SCHOOLS 


— 


c 
u 

E 

o 

a 

w 

>> 


u 


4) 

£ 


™ U ij 


41 

"is- 
III 

1) (U o 




X 

i 


>< 
<u 
si 


Pi 

i) 

■a 


•a 


jn 

'a. 

3 

C 
II 

y 


a 

3 

>. 

s 

3 


c 
<u 

.12 

'35 
<u <» 

£.- 




'J 


S 


^ 




$<* 







E 

O 


O 


u 

o 


O 


s 


O 

O 


£* 


(Counties) 






























Sunderland 


B 


43 


15 


28 


38 


76.43 


13 


9 


9 


12 




19 




24 


Sutton West 


A 


76 


33 


43 


74 


84.20 


22 


13 


16 


20 


5 


49 


26 


1 


Tarn worth 


A 


69 


35 


34 


51 


89.33 


23 


9 


17 


12 


8 


33 


26 


10 


Tara 


B 


34 


12 


22 


31 


96.46 


12 


11 


7 


4 




13 


15 


6 


Tavistock 


B 


56 


23 


33 


56 


94.29 


15 


16 


19 


6 




37 


7 


12 


Teeswater 


A 


61 


27 


34 


55 


90.67 


13 


15 


10 


8 


15 


31 


30 




Thamesford 


B 


57 


19 


38 


56 


95.40 


21 


22 


7 


7 




26 


29 


2 


Thamesville 


A 


70 


32 


38 


71 


92.67 


34 


16 


8 


12 




34 


36 




Thedford 


B 


24 


7 


17 


22 


92.50 


12 


2 


6 


4 




10 


13 


1 


Thornbury 


A 


97 


41 


56 


92 


93.82 


25 


26 


17 


12 


17 


41 


56 




Thorndale 


B 


30 


15 


15 


28 


92.44 


14 


10 


4 


2 




16 


14 




Thornton 


B 


29 


8 


21 


26 


90.98 


11 


9 


4 


5 




11 


18 




Tiverton 


B 


23 


10 


13 


23 


88.16 


5 


6 


10 


2 




14 


9 




Tottenham 


B 


68 


21 


47 


64 


75.84 


21 


16 


15 


16 




21 


41 


6 


Wales 


B 


38 


22 


16 


36 


89.49 


11 


8 


9 


10 




7 


31 




Warkworth 


A 


48 


19 


29 


54 


95.47 


15 


13 


10 


6 


4 


17 


31 




Wellesley 


B 


14 


8 


6 


13 


95.07 


6 


3 


3 


2 




14 






Wellington 


A 


76 


32 


44 


71 


93.11 


22 


19 


16 


16 


3 


61 


15 




West Lome 


B 


33 


11 


22 


31 


92.47 


12 


7 


10 


4 




26 


7 




Westmeath 


B 
B 


14 
42 


7 
10 


7 
32 


15 
40 


87.77 
92.85 


7 
15 


1 
9 


3 

7 


3 
11 




14 
27 






Westport 


11 


4 


Westport (R.C.).. 


B 


35 


13 


22 


35 


94.19 


19 


6 


3 


7 




19 


11 


5 


Wheatley 


A 


67 


27 


40 


66 


91.88 


29 


18 


9 


11 




37 


21 


9 


Wilberforce 


C 

C 
B 


12 
12 
56 


8 

7 

31 


4 

5 

25 


11 
11 
54 


89.57 
90.79 
93.88 


4 

6 

20 


3 

6 
11 


5 






11 
12 
25 


1 




Wolfe Island 








Woodville 


8 


17 




31 




Wooler 


B 


40 


20 


20 


34 


94.17 


13 


13 


8 


6 




16 


24 




Wroxeter 


B 


30 


8 


22 


30 


94.62 


8 


7 


10 


5 




10 


20 




Wyoming 


B 


30 


12 


18 


28 


93.22 


10 


8 


7 







13 


17 






C 


17 


5 


12 


18 


94.71 


7 


10 








14 


3 














Totals 




7,967 


3,336 


4,631 


7,649 


92.02 


2,610 


2,154 


1,521 


1,333 


349 


4,119 


3,442 


406 








(Districts) 






























Blind River 


A 


61 


27 


34 


57 


93.58 


21 


14 


15 


3 


8 


59 


2 




Bruce Mines 


B 


37 


18 


19 


35 


95.16 


13 


7 


9 


8 




26 


11 




Burk's Falls 


A 


51 


13 


38 


47 


95.21 


12 


13 


13 


9 


4 


38 


13 






B 

B 


51 

37 


25 
15 


26 
22 


52 
34 


97.22 
93.63 


24 
13 


17 
10 


7 
7 


3 

7 




51 

27 






Emo 


10 




Espanola 


A 


70 


24 


46 


72 


94.42 


31 


15 


9 


12 


3 


61 


9 




Fraserdale 


c 


8 


1 


7 


8 


95.28 


5 


1 




1 


1 


7 




1 


Hornepayne 


B 


23 


8 


15 


25 


91.73 


9 


9 


4 


1 




23 






Little Current.... 


B 


30 


14 


16 


26 


90.79 


10 


7 


3 


10 




29 


1 






B 

B 


34 
9 


16 
2 


18 

7 


32 
9 


91.31 
90.02 


10 
6 


15 


7 
1 


2 
2 




34 
6 






Manitowaning . . . 


3 




Massey 


H 


22 


7 


15 


21 


91.33 


6 


4 


8 


4 




17 


5 




Milford Bay 




16 


8 


8 


15 


93.13 


4 


4 


2 


6 




16 






Mindemoya 


B 


27 


11 


16 


29 


94.76 


8 


4 


10 


5 




20 


7 




Nipigon 


B 


25 


12 


13 


20 


82.84 


14 


5 


4 


2 




25 






Port Carling 


B 


18 


7 


11 


18 


83.51 


7 


5 


3 


3 




16 


2 




Powassan 


B 


66 


24 


42 


65 


83.29 


20 


20 


17 


9 




35 


29 


2 


Red Lake 


C 


8 


4 


4 


8 


91.81 


2 


3 


1 


2 




8 






Richard's Landing 


B 


34 


21 


13 


28 


82.54 


8 


11 


7 


8 




32 


2 




Schreiber 


A 


90 


43 


47 


96 


92.98 


28 


28 


17 


9 


8 


89 


1 




Sioux Lookout . . . 


A 


114 


46 


68 


114 


88.88 


39 


27 


15 


25 


8 


113 


1 




Smooth Rock Falls 


B 


34 


20 


14 


32 


93.66 


13 


9 


10 


2 




27 


7 






B 
B 


35 

17 


19 
6 


16 
11 


32 
16 


95.17 

87.42 


8 
3 


7 
6 


7 
1 


13 

7 




35 
14 






Sprucedale 


3 




Sundridge 


B 


39 


17 


22 


39 


90.62 


15 


9 


8 


7 




33 


6 




White River 


c 


12 


6 


6 


11 93.92 


4 


5 


3 






12 
















Totals 




968 


414 


554 


941 


91.30 


333 


255 


188 


160 


32 


853 


112 


3 








Grand Totals . . 




8,935 


3,750 


5,185 


8,590 


91.94 


2,943 


2,409 


1,709 


1,493 


381 


4.972 


3,554 


409 














1.04 














































Decrease for year . 




529 


246 


283 


361 




103 


97 


148 


110 


71 


326 


156 


47 








41.97 


58.03 


96.14 




32.94 


26.96 


19.13 


16.70 


4.26 


55.65 


39.78 


4.57 











DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



215 



2 i 

2 § 
u 5 

§ s 

2 3 

H « 

Z w 
O O 

3 





CO 




OS 




OS 


CO 




>— i 










(V) CO 


^tf 


o 


c 


OS 


f- 










*§ « 


OS 


^ 


t^ 


<* 


CO 










OS ••-> 
«-" O 

OH 


<N 


CN 


i-H 


rH 






























(0 


to oc 


) CO CO 


i-l 0C 


) i-H O 


1 l> rf 


« o to 

) »o 00 


to 




eo c 


) OS rH 


OS i- 


H 00 r- 


< -^ cr 


CO 


"3 


CO cc 


OS -* 


CO c 


^ to O 


> ^H O 


• ^ ^t 


OS 


+j 
















o 


i— T i— 


i-H* 


r- 


h" 




co" io 


oo" 


H 
















co <u 

t- > 


CM CN 


CO CM 


CO o 


i co «r 


) CT> W 


) O CD 


CO 












CM t-i 


CO 


>>o 
















»H U. 
















CM O 
















to 


<N 


fH T*4 


CO tr 


> OS IT 


) <M CC 


> »0 CM 


t> 










r— 


i 1-H 1- 


i cM tJ< 


CD 


© 
















CM 
















? 


^ 


l> 00 


rt< a 


j H C 


> co a 


> CO CO 


CM 








rH r- 


< T* t. 


CO CN 


i a> cm 


CM 












»-< 


CM 


OS 
















tH 
















F 5 


00 CC 


to i-i 


OS f- 


< i-l CN 


oo a 


^H OS 


o 


R 




CM CO 


CO CC 


> co a 


tF t> 


»o to 










1—4 r- 




CM CO 


CO 


00 
















rH 
















s? 


00 o 


CM CO 


o a 


) to l> 




CO OS 


to 




CO tT 


CM rH 


to l> 


. t^ b. 


CO oc 


) -h oo 


o 








rH CN 




to CO 


c| 


t^. 














r-T 


»H 
































2 


CO to 


"tf CM 


OJ CM 


o tc 


CO CN 


CM CO 


00 




IO t-H 


Ttl O 


T* |> 


00 CC 


i-i CN 


3 CO 


rH 


i-t »H 


CM CO 


CM CC 


i-l CN 




o> 


CD 












1-i* 


rH 


i— t 
















CO 


CM tH 


os b- 


tO i- 


O r- 


rH CN 


l> to 


CM 


H 


co oo 


CM i-l 


00 C 


tjh a 




00 OS 


00 


>» 


CO CO 


co to 


i-l CO 






00 CM 


rH 


to 












i-H 


cnT 


T-i 








i 








tn 


l> 00 


O i-i 


T* CO 


i— i t<» 






CM OS 


,_, 


u 


00 00 


i-i IO 


^ t* 








T* »H 


CO 


>> 


Tt< iO 


CM CO 










t>. <3 


t>^ 


-* 














rH 


t-T 


♦"• 


















to 


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1 CM OS 


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00 Tj< 


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u 


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to t> 










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1 














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to CO 




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iH 




















to 
H 


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iH 






















i— 1 
























to CO 


co co 


CO V 


CO c/ 


to cr 


CO vt 








^ t: 


>» "C 


>> % 


^> T 


5? "C 


^» 1h 








O ••: 


O -S 


O ••: 


o «s 


o •? 


O 'S 








n O 


n o 


pq C 


pq C 


pq C 


pq O 














































tn 




























W 




























X 
W 

03 


3 

3 




H 






M 


l-H 
»— ( 


h- 1 


^ 


O 




X 


X 


X 


X 


PP 


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w 


w 


» 


w 


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P 




Q 


Q 


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< 


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M 


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c 






C 




C 






C 




H 




O 





216 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONTINU- 
TABLE 32— FINANCIAL 



Schools 



Average 

Daily 

Attendance 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



Expenditures 



Current 



Capital 



Legistative 
Grant 



County 
Grant 



{In Counties) 

1 Acton 

2 Agincourt. 

3 Ailsa Craig .... 

4 Allenford 

5 Alton 

6 Alvinston 

7 Arkona 

8 Aultsville 

9 Ayr 

10 Bath 

11 Beachburg 

12 Beaverton 

13 Beeton 

14 Belmont 

15 Bethany 

16 Blackstock. . . . 

17 Blyth 

18 Bobcaygeon. . . 

19 Bolton 

20 Bothwell 

21 Bowesville 

22 Brooklin. 

23 Brownsville. . . . 

24 Brussels 

25 Burgessville 

26 CaledonEast. . 

27 Cannington. . . . 

28 Cardinal 

29 Carp 

30 Castleton 

31 Chalk River. . . 

32 Chatsworth 

33 Claremont 

34 Clifford 

35 Cobden 

36 Coldwater 

37 Comber 

38 Consecon 

39 Cookstown 

40 Cooksville 

41 Creemore 

42 Cumberland 

43 Delaware 

44 Delhi 

45 Delta 

46 Denbigh 

47 Dorchester. 

48 Drayton 

49 Dresden 

50 Drumbo 

51 Eganville 

52 Eganville (R.C.) 

53 Elgin 

54 Elmvale 

55 Embro 

56 Ennismore 

57 Erin 



96 
105 
49 
29 
20 
61 
19 
17 
53 
43 
25 
98 
45 
48 
12 
41 
32 
61 
30 
37 
6 
44 
38 
68 
22 
36 
46 
63 
77 
20 
17 
30 
34 
20 
23 
46 
71 
26 
44 
42 
51 
20 
26 
48 
32 
14 
35 
60 
107 
26 
31 
56 
59 
40 
61 
29 
38 



17,977 

19,608 
9,208 
5,560 
3,651 

11,177 
3,498 
3,257 

10,406 
8,361 
5,018 

17,017 
8,619 
9,155 
2,303 
7,612 
6,126 
9,354 
5,595 
6,991 
1,054 
8,326 
7,100 

13,388 
4,102 
6,935 
9,022 

12,229 

15,019 
4,028 
1,906 
5,921 
6,490 
3,690 
4,354 
8,731 

14,003 
5,053 
8,128 
7,997 
9,666 
3,784 
5,123 
9,014 
6,123 
2,611 
6,521 

10,984 

20,563 
4,779 
6,153 

10,428 

11,557 
7,582 

10,749 
5,301 
6,523 



$5,049 
7,421 
3,194 
2,685 
2,937 
4,446 
1,228 
2,766 
3,390 
2,948 
2,930 
5,717 
3,339 
3,031 
1,276 
4,674 
2,869 
4,453 
3,259 
3,590 
1,190 
3,339 
3,286 
4,506 
3,442 
2,968 
3,579 
4,773 
5,210 
3,086 
2,224 
3,391 
2,879 
2,755 
1,992 
3,245 
4,986 
2,127 
3,192 
3,489 
4,847 
2,083 
2,781 
3,296 
3,091 
1,928 
2,586 
6,060 
6,733 
3,565 
3,669 
3,899 
4,728 
3,807 
4,967 
2,228 
4,189 



$2,246 



1,162 
655 
567 
914 



1,000 
430 
653 



669 

876 

1,204 

1,087 

422 



1,376 



1,604 
677 
637 

2,179 
944 

1,863 



1,651 

784 



1,341 
1,308 



1,105 
712 

458 



116 
1,673 



584 



1,445 

537 

1,994 



874 



$919 
1,034 
1,016 
824 
867 
912 
216 
849 
898 
905 
768 
978 
881 
867 
194 
903 
880 
955 
872 
870 
189 
913 
972 
904 
811 
843 
896 
863 
895 
905 
737 
898 
823 
768 
200 
962 
996 
795 
810 
903 
916 
606 
778 
907 
789 
721 
767 
1,550 
898 
995 
937 
760 
917 
912 
1,024 
681 
916 



$3,012 



1,748 
2,061 

979 
2,920 

576 
1,139 



1,880 

768 

3,806 

1,811 

867 



3,109 
1,195 
1,633 
3,005 
1,716 
14 
2,221 



2,044 

1,809 

1,558 

2,383 

1,454 

2,907 

2,330 

737 

1,538 

823 

2,184 

908 

1,720 

2,528 

960 

970 

764 

2,191 

794 

2,033 

3,035 

922 

909 

767 

3,898 

4,365 

1,209 

1,297 

1,410 

2,946 

1,416 

4,077 

941 

2,776 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



217 



ATION SCHOOLS 

STATISTICS, 1936 



Township 
Grant 



Local 
Levy 



Cost of Education per Pupil-Day (cents) 



Current 



Capital 



Total 



Legis- 
lative 
Share 



County 
Share 



Town- 
ship 
Share 



Local 
Levy 
Share 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 



$6,268 



432 

800 



680 
465 



800 



750 

400 

1,270 



424 



480 
800 

775 



800 
800 



1,085 

1,790 

745 



639 



1,050 
451 

1,163 
750 



185 
800 



712 



775 



800 



120 
750 



1,000 



$2,846 
' 1,962 



567 

1,065 

317 

457 

1,122 



1,212 
1,552 



223 



1,880 
2,816 

200 
1,772 

401 
1,376 

405 
1,135 

802 

677 
1,216 
4,360 

944 



712 
2,402 

784 

815 

2,612 

1,828 



666 
1,105 
1,486 

674 



725 



1,673 
227 

2,747 
393 

1,037 
766 



537 
6,254 



3,463 



28.08 
37.84 
34.68 
48.29 
80.44 
39.79 
35.11 
84.92 
32.58 
35.26 
58.39 
33.59 
38.74 
33.11 
55.40 
61.40 
46.83 
47.60 
58.24 
51.35 
112.86 
40.10 
46.28 
33.66 
83.92 
42.80 
39.66 
39.03 
34.69 
76.61 
116.68 
57.28 
44.36 
74.68 
45.76 
37.18 
35.61 
42.10 
39.28 
43.63 
50.14 
55.05 
54.28 
36.57 
50.48 
73.84 
39.66 
55.17 
32.74 
74.60 
59.63 
37.39 
40.91 
50.21 
46.22 
42.03 
64.22 



12.49 



12.61 
11.78 
15.53 

8.18 



19.92 
2.53 

7.57 



8.79 
14.30 
12.87 
19.42 

6.03 



16.52 



39.12 
9.77 
7.06 

17.82 
6.28 

46.25 



25.43 
21.26 



15.37 
9.34 



13.82 

7.37 

12.10 



4.47 
25.66 



2.84 



12.50 

7.09 

18.55 



13.39 



40.57 
37.84 
47.29 
60.07 
95.97 
47.97 
35.11 
84.92 
32.58 
35.26 
78.31 
36.12 
46.31 
33.11 
55.40 
70.19 
61.13 
60.47 
77.66 
57.38 
112.86 
56.62 
46.28 
33.66 
123.04 
52.57 
46.72 
56.85 
40.97 
122.86 
116.68 
57.28 
69.79 
95.94 
45.76 
52.55 
44.95 
42.10 
39.28 
57.45 
57.51 
67.15 
54.28 
36.57 \ 
50.48 
78.31 
65.32 
55.17 
35.58 
74.60 
59.63 
37.39 
53.41 
57.30 
64.77 
42.03 
77.61 



5.11 

5.27 
11.03 
14.82 
23.74 

8.16 

6.17 
26.07 

8.64 
10.82 
15.30 

5.75 
10.22 

9.48 

8.42 
11.86 
14.36 
10.21 
15.58 
12.44 
17.93 
10.96 
13.69 

6.75 
19.77 
12.16 

9.93 

7.06 

5.96 
22.47 
38.67 
15.16 
12.68 
20.81 

4.59 
11.02 

7.12 
15.74 

9.97 
11.29 

9.48 
16.01 
15.18 
10.06 
12.89 
27.63 
11.77 
14. 13 

4.37 
20.82 
15.23 

7.29 

7.94 
12.03 

9.53 
12.85 
14.05 



16.75 



18.98 
37.06 
26.81 
26.13 
16.47 
34.97 



22.48 
15.30 
22.36 
21.01 
9.48 



40.84 
19.51 
17.46 
53.70 
24.54 
1.37 
26.69 



15.27 
44.11 
22.47 
26.41 
11.89 
19.35 
57.84 
38.67 
25.98 
12.68 
59.19 
20.88 
19.71 
18.05 
19.00 
11.94 
9.56 
22.67 
20.98 
39.70 
33.67 
15.06 
34.82 
11.77 
35.49 
21.23 
27.14 
21.00 
13.52 
25.50 
18.68 
37.93 
17.75 
42.57 



32.48 



7.77 
21.91 



20.88 
4.47 



7.58 



45.54 

9.61 

10.91 



19.50 
11.54 



7.22 
44.43 
39.08 



17.32 



7.50 

8.93 

14.31 

9.38 



4.89 
15.62 



11.63 



11.88 



16.74 



1.04 
9.89 



18.86 



15.83 
21.31 



15.52 

9.53 

9.07 

14.03 

10.79 



15.94 




8.i9 


7.12 
18.00 


17.37 
16.68 


9.69 



30.69 
30.11 

3.57 
25.34 
38.04 
16.53 

5.70 

8.48 
19.56 

9.77 
13.48 
35.65 

6.28 



12.03 
37.01 
21.26 
18.73 
29.91 
13.06 



8.20 
13.82 

22.75 
17.81 



11.84 



25.66 
2.07 

13.36 
8.22 

16.80 
7.35 



7.09 
58.18 



53.10 



218 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONTINU- 
TABLE 32— FINANCIAL 



Schools 



Average 

Daily 

Attendance 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



Expenditures 



Current 



Capital 



Legistative 
Grant 



County 
Grant 



(In Counties) 

58 Fenelon Falls. . 

59 Feversham .... 

60 Fingal 

61 Fitzroy 

62 Flinton 

63 Florence 

64 Fordwich 

65 Forester's Falls. 

66 Frankf ord 

67 Grand Valley . . 

68 Haliburton 

69 Hallville 

70 Harrow 

71 Hensall 

72 Hepworth 

73 Highgate 

74 Holstein 

75 Honey wood. . . . 

76 Ilderton 

77 Inglewood 

78 Jarvis 

79 Jockvale 

80 Kars 

81 Kenmore 

82 Kinburn 

83 Kinmount 

84 Lambeth 

85 Lanark 

86 Lansdowne. . . . 

87 Laurel 

88 Lefroy 

89 Lion's Head . . . 

90 Little Britain . . 

91 Lobo 

92 Long Branch. . . 

93 Lynden 

94 Lyndhurst 

95 Malakoff 

96 Mallorytown. . . 

97 Manotick 

98 Melbourne 

99 Merlin 

100 Merrickville . . . 

101 Metcalfe 

102 Millbrook 

103 Milverton 

104 Minden 

105 Minesing 

106 Mount Albert. . 

107 Mount Brydges 

108 Mount Elgin. . . 

109 Mount Pleasant 

110 Navan 

111 New Dundee. . . 

112 New Hamburg. 

113 North Augusta. 

114 North Gower. . 



78 
21 
26 
29 
14 
36 
20 
29 
92 
52 
19 
42 
70 
35 
44 
30 
21 
23 
45 
30 
49 
14 

122 
29 
44 
29 
38 
57 
42 
11 
29 
29 
37 
41 

242 
26 
27 
9 
49 
52 
38 
60 
59 
43 
68 
68 
20 
17 
40 
52 
41 
31 
37 
32 
66 
21 
38 



13,935 
4,190 
5,027 
5,670 
2,687 
6,854 
3,734 
5,563 

13,012 
9,751 
3,673 
7,951 

13,670 
6,629 
8,191 
5,999 
4,035 
4,267 
8,703 
5,713 
9,285 
2,603 
7,712 
5,473 
7,724 
5,308 
7,419 

11,033 
7,792 
2,132 
5,627 
5,759 
7,097 
7,761 

46,571 
5,098 
4,975 
1,603 
9,125 

10,086 
7,038 

10,629 

10,854 
8,236 

12,740 

13,128 
3,611 
3,285 
7,607 

10,237 
7,690 
6,025 
6,031 
6,291 

12,163 
3,824 
7,659 



$7,028 
2,377 
2,466 
2,910 
1,852 
3,403 
2,840 
2,060 
5,030 
4,429 
2,367 
5,667 
5,564 
3,178 
2,767 
3,242 
2,857 
2,800 
3,463 
2,788 
3,697 
1,131 
2,707 
3,162 
4,040 
1,525 
3,222 
2,977 
3,060 
1,067 
3,018 
2,379 
3,191 
3,918 

13,768 
3,165 
3,359 
1,850 
3,952 
3,299 
3,378 
4,461 
3,700 
2,864 
4,993 
5,610 
1,714 
1,823 
4,181 
3,145 
3,733 
3,631 
3,062 
3,084 
3,474 
2,580 
2,585 



$3,054 
547 



722 
2,064 



772 
1,461 
1,604 



1,107 
963 

585 
840 



932 



633 

401 

682 

1,805 



4,472 
963 



1,307 
979 



573 



2,587 
2,236 



1,629 



1,616 

1,827 

363 

1,003 

435 

225 



$921 
727 
746 
840 
533 

1,045 
850 
574 
917 
904 

1,400 

1,476 
918 
876 
774 
839 
874 
792 
968 
641 
772 
*152 
813 
874 
894 
510 
786 
896 
840 
*127 
832 
755 
863 
973 
914 
932 
913 
519 
915 
855 
912 
883 

1,000 
839 
918 
921 
945 
550 

1,094 
805 
902 
934 
790 
889 
945 
715 
781 



$1,499 
1,358 
1,318 

985 
2,245 
2,025 

980 
3,171 
2,194 



1,621 
3,467 
2,381 
1,913 
1,884 
1,511 
1,374 

915 

1,821 

2,219 

62 

713 

874 
2,536 

510 
2,745 

282 
1,354 

821 
1,984 
1,887 
2,209 
2,344 
8,386 

875 
1,572 

519 
2,791 
3,240 
2,283 
2,846 
2,588 

839 
4,699 

238 



550 
3,609 

773 
1,867 
3,102 

984 



905 
1,076 

781 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



219 



ATION SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 



Township 
Grant 



Local 
Levy 



Cost of Education per Pupil-Day (cents) 



Current 



Capital 



Total 



Legis- 
lative 
Share 



County 
Share 



Town- 
ship 
Share 



Local 
Lew 
Share 



$800 
800 
750 



800 
640 



525 
960 



561 
800 
775 
800 
640 



450 
800 
1,127 
800 
492 
800 



680 
450 
800 



800 
750 



637 
506 



806 

800 

1,120 



800 



150 
720 
1,000 
800 
800 
800 
866 
775 



680 
750 



$5,386 



120 



144 



2,564 
1,529 

847 
2,956 
2,704 

188 



247 
585 
840 



932 

1,248 

297 



300 



183 

401 

677 

1,118 



8,918 
963 



1,307 
979 



754 



1,463 

3,849 

810 



331 

436 

1,616 



763 
1,003 
2,627 

234 



50.43 
56.74 
49.07 
51.32 
68.92 
49.65 
76.06 
37.03 
38.66 
45.42 
64.44 
71.27 
40.70 
47.94 
33.78 
54.04 
70.81 
65.62 
39.79 
48.80 
39.82 
43.43 
35.11 
57.77 
52.30 
28.73 
43.43 
26.98 
39.27 
50.03 
53.63 
41.31 
44.97 
50.48 
29.56 
62.08 
67.52 
115.38 
43.31 
32.71 
48.00 
41.97 
34.09 
34.77 
39.19 
42.73 
47.47 
55.49 
54.96 
30.73 
48.54 
60.27 
50.77 
49.03 
28.56 
67.47 
33.76 



21.92 
13.08 



19.34 



15.86 



21.02 
18.38 
11.73 



13.52 
16.05 
14.50 
19.69 



16.31 



29.69 

7.13 

11.84 

25.44 



9.60 
18.90 



14.32 
9.71 



5.28 



20.31 
17.03 



21.41 



21.01 

30.32 

6.02 

15.94 

3.58 

5.90 



72.35 
69.82 
49.07 
51.32 
68.92 
49.65 
95.40 
37.03 
54.52 
45.42 
85.46 
89.65 
52.43 
47.94 
47.30 
70.09 
85.31 
85.31 
39.79 
65.11 
39.82 
43.43 
35.11 
57.77 
52.30 
28.73 
43.43 
26.98 
39.27 
79.72 
60.76 
53.15 
70.41 
50.48 
39.16 
80.98 
67.52 
115.38 
57.63 
42.42 
48.00 
41.97 
39.37 
34.77 
59.50 
59.76 
47.47 
55.49 
56.37 
30.73 
69.55 
90.59 
56.79 
64.97 
32.14 
73.37 
33.76 



6.61 
17.35 
14.84 
14.81 
19.84 
15.25 
22.76 
10.32 

7.05 

9.27 
38.12 
18.56 

6.72 
13.21 

9.45 
13.99 
21.66 
18.56 
11.12 
11.22 

8.31 

5.83 
10.55 
15.97 
11.57 

9.61 
10.59 

8.12 
10.78 

5.95 
14.79 
13.11 
12.17 
12.54 
1.96 
18.29 
18.35 
32.41 
10.03 

8.48 
12.96 

8.31 

9.21 
10.19 

7.21 

7.02 
26.17 
16.74 
14.38 

7.86 
11.73 
15.51 
13.10 
14.13 

7.77 
18.70 
10.20 



35.78 
27.02 
23.25 
36.66 
32.75 
54.23 
17.62 
24.37 
22.50 



20.39 
25.36 
35.92 
23.36 
31.41 
37.46 
32.20 
10.52 
31.87 
23.90 

2.39 

9.25 
15.97 
32.83 

9.61 
37.00 

2.56 
17.43 
38.46 
35.26 
32.77 
31.13 
30.20 
18.01 
17.17 
31.60 
32.41 
30.59 
32.12 
32.44 
26.78 
23.84 
10.19 
36.88 

1.81 



16.74 
47.44 
7.55 
24.28 
51.50 
16.32 



7.44 
28.14 
10.21 



19.09 
15.91 
13.23 



21.42 
11.50 



14.29 
12.07 



21.11 
14.22 



11.27 
9.66 



12.80 
31.57 



7.99 
11.37 
10.54 



9.71 



4.15 
21.92 
13.15 

7.81 
10.40 
13.28 
14.36 
12.32 



17.78 
9.79 



38.65 



4.47 



3.86 



19.71 
15.68 
23.09 
37.18 
19.78 
2.84 



9.35 


4.12 


19.83 


14.51 


18.16 


19.69 


9.19 




11.20 


16.31 




13.44 


17.29 


11.41 


10.37 




20.59 




10.36 




9.27 




10.78 






2.72 


8.73 





8.58 

7.13 

11.76 

15.75 



19.15 
18.90 




14.32 
9.71 




6.95 


11.48 
29.32 
22.44 


4.35 

4.26 

21.01 



12.65 
15.94 
21.60 
6.12 
10.93 



220 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONTINU- 

TABLE 32— FINANCIAL 



Schools 



Average 

Daily 

Attendance 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



Expenditures 



Current 



Capital 



Legistative 
Grant 



County 
Grant 



{In Counties) 

115 Odessa 

116 Oil Springs 

117 Orono 

118 Otterville 

119 Paisley 

120 Pakenham 

121 Palmerston .... 

122 Pelee Island 

123 Pelham 

124 Pickering 

125 Plattsville 

126 Port Burwell. . . 

127 Preston 

128 Princeton 

129 Richmond 

130 Ripley 

131 Rockwood 

132 Rodney 

133 Russell 

134 St. George 

135 Schomberg. . . . 

136 Scotland 

137 Seely's Bav 

138 Selkirk 

139 Severn Bridge. . 

140 Singhampton. . . 

141 Southampton. . 

142 South Mountain 

143 Sparta 

144 Spencerville 

145 Springfield 

146 Stayner 

147 Stella 

148 Stevensville 

149 Stouffville 

150 Sunderland 

151 Sutton West. . . 

152 Tamworth 

153 Tara 

154 Tavistock 

155 Teeswater 

156 Thamesford 

157 Thamesville. . . . 

158 Thedford 

159 Thornbury 

160 Thorndale 

161 Thornton 

162 Tilbury 

163 Tiverton 

164 Tottenham 

165 Wales 

166 War k worth .... 

167 Wellesley 

168 Wellington 

169 West Lome 

170 Westmeath 

171 Westport 



40 
34 
60 
24 
70 
34 
67 
10 

115 
46 
44 
28 

230 
80 
61 
49 
47 
50 
65 
61 
43 
35 
28 
43 
22 
18 
43 
50 
20 
61 
35 
70 
17 
38 
73 
88 
79 
51 
36 
54 
63 
51 
83 
20 
93 
27 
31 
84 
25 
71 
41 
55 
15 
71 
36 
15 
40 



7,373 
6,278 

11,190 
4,523 

13,612 
6,245 

13,103 
1,772 

22,260 
8,941 
8,206 
5,404 

43,291 

16,654 

11,904 
8,783 
8,631 
9,272 

12,782 

11,443 
8,322 
6,473 
5,452 
8,115 
4,356 
3,397 
7,887 
9,344 
3,891 

11,423 
6,555 

13,111 
3,325 
7,224 

14,281 
8,271 

15,668 

10,025 
6,779 

10,517 

11,613 
9,919 

11,007 
3,691 

17,056 
5,274 
5,697 

15,671 
4,742 

13,632 
7,551 

10,423 
2,840 

12,410 
7,122 
2,975 
7,875 



$3,539 
2,965 
5,661 
2,921 
5,226 
2,878 
5,178 
2,045 

14,797 
3,590 
4,803 
3,724 

13,932 
3,740 
4,644 
4,781 
3,308 
3,604 
4,678 
6,056 
3,591 
3,176 
3,072 
2,947 
2,961 
2,301 
3,586 
3,559 
3,381 
4,775 
2,845 
5,150 
1,632 
5,470 
5,626 
3,094 
5,552 
5,919 
3,574 
3,385 
6,672 
3,503 
5,406 
2,965 
6,824 
3,017 
3,037 
5,517 
2,627 
3,150 
2,969 
4,884 
2,041 
5,826 
2,817 
2,208 
2,772 



$1,138 
1,339 



407 

3,852 

1,488 



1,304 
6,473 



1,250 

430 

1,548 



1,626 



1,156 
962 
591 
181 
435 
225 
284 
405 



1,799 
2,304 



2,006 
1,799 



3,233 



1,126 
1,311 
1,045 
1,203 



650 



398 



173 
2,752 



$905 
840 

1,008 
831 
916 
865 
900 
532 

1,064 
912 
914 
915 
895 

1,064 
897 
906 
908 
911 
893 

1,115 
824 
889 
817 
775 
850 
575 
985 
910 
941 
881 
831 
914 
478 
915 
912 
894 
922 
945 
792 
908 

1,047 
950 
910 
739 
915 
810 
908 
977 
765 
824 
875 
902 
607 
923 
862 
655 
900 



$1,698 
680 
3,424 
1,765 
3,069 
1,343 
1,574 



921 
2,206 



1,823 
895 
1,382 
3,991 
3,112 
1,951 
1,151 
1,592 
2,412 
1,913 
4,390 
2,183 
1,594 
850 
976 
2,274 
1,717 
2,536 
2,220 
2,033 
3,821 



3,479 
5,054 
1,387 
5,462 
3,854 
1,979 
1,377 
4,738 
1,986 
3,454 
2,216 
3,573 
1,308 
1,596 
3,033 
1,914 
1,586 
1,835 
2,983 
607 
3,473 
862 
262 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



221 



ATION SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 





Township 
Grant 


Local 
Levy 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day (cents) 




Current 


Capital 


Total 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


County 
Share 


Town- 
ship 
Share 


Local 
Levy 
Share 


115 


$800 
248 

1,120 
800 




48.00 
47.23 
50.59 
64.58 
38.40 
46.08 
39.52 
115.44 
66.47 
40.15 
58.53 
68.92 
32.18 
22.46 
39.01 
54.43 
38.33 
38.87 
36.60 
52.93 
43.15 
49.06 
56.35 
36.32 
67.98 
67.74 
45.47 
38.09 
86.90 
41.80 
43.40 
39.28 
49.08 
75.73 
39.40 
37.41 
35.44 
59.04 
52.72 
32.19 
57.45 
35.32 
49.11 
80.33 
40.01 
57.21 
53.31 
35.21 
55.40 
23.11 
39.32 
46.86 
71.87 
46.96 
39.55 
74.23 
35.20 


io. i7 

29.60 

"23.00' 
17.30 
16.64 

24.14 
14.95 

" 10.50' 

4.90 
17.94 

14.'2l' 

" 17.87' 

17.66 

7.29 

4.16 

12.81 

2.85 

3.04 

10.41 

"27 .44' 
17.58 

"27.77' 
12.60 

20.' 63 

9.70 

13.22 

9.49 

32.59 

"ii.'ii 

"5.27' 
"6.09' 

22.18 

:::::::: 


48.00 
47.23 
60.76 
94.18 
38.40 
46.08 
39.52 

138.44 
83.77 
56.79 
58.53 
93.06 
47.13 
22.46 
49.51 
59.33 
56.27 
38.87 
36.60 
67.14 
43.15 
66.93 
74.01 
42.61 
72.14 
80.55 
48.32 
41.13 
97.31 
41.80 
70.84 
56.86 
49.08 

103.50 
62.00 
37.41 
56.07 
59.04 
52.72 
32.19 
67.15 
48.54 
58.60 

112.92 
40.01 
57.21 
64.72 
35.21 
55.40 
23.11 
44.59 
46.86 
77.96 
69.14 
39.55 
74.23 
35.20 


12.27 

13.38 

9.01 

18.38 

6.73 

13.85 

6.87 

30.02 

4.78 

10.20 

11.14 

16.94 

2.07 

6.39 

7.54 

10.32 

10.52 

9.83 

6.99 

9.75 

9.90 

13.74 

15.00 

10.27 

19.53 

16.93 

12.49 

9.74 

24.20 

7.71 

12.68 

6.97 

14.38 

12.66 

6.39 

10.81 

5.88 

9.43 

11.68 

8.63 

9.02 

9.58 

8.27 

20.02 

5.36 

15.36 

15.94 

6.23 

16.13 

6.04 

11.59 

8.65 

21.39 

7.44 

12.13 

22.02 

11.43 


23.03 
10.83 
30.60 
39.04 
22.55 
21.51 
12.01 

"4.I4' 
24.67 

33.74' 
2.07 
8.30 
33.53 
35.43 
22.60 
12.41 
12.45 
21.08 
22.99 
67.83 
40.05 
19.64 
19.53 
28.73 
28.83 
18.38 
65.20 
19.43 
31.01 
29.14 

48.16 
35.39 
16.77 
34.86 
38.44 
29.20 
13.09 
40.80 
20.12 
31.38 
60.04 
20.95 
24.80 
28.01 
19.35 
40.36 
11.63 
24.30 
28.62 
21.39 
27.99 
12.13 
8.81 


10.85 

3.95 

10.01 

17.69 

"l2.'8l' 

"36." i2' 

5.03 

8.95 

13.65 

14.80 

"4.80' 

8.69 
4.80 

"9.' 79' 

9.61 

11.59 

23.39 

9.86 

"l7.66' 

""7.'28" 
5.14 
8.40 

44.03 
19.38 

""9." 67' 

"7.' 98' 

"8.07' 

14.93' 

16.69 

13.16 

.76 




116 
117 
118 
119 


$640 
2,084 
1,339 
1,770 


10.19 
18.62 
29.60 
13.01 


120 


800 




121 


2,702 
886 

1,527 

1.488 
600 

1,484 
17,399 


20.62 


122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 
128 


640 
1,120 

800 
1,120 

800 

800" 

"750" 
445 


50.01 
6.86 

16.64 
7.31 

27.46 

40.19 


129 
130 
131 
132 
133 


1,790 
1,430 
1,203 
1,000 
1,000 
1,626 


15.03 
16.28 
13.94 
10.79 

7.82 


134 
135 


1,120 
800 
750 

1,275 
800 


14.21 


136 
137 
138 
139 


307 
963 
591 
982 
799 
657 
284 
405 
500 
1,799 
2,304 


4.75 
17.66 

7.29 
22.53 


140 
141 


600 


23.52 
8 33 


142 
143 
144 
145 


680 
200 
960 


3.04 
10.41 

4.38 
27 44 


146 




17 58 


147 


1,464 
1,400 




148 
149 


700 
1,799 


9.69 
12 60 


150 


800 




151 


2,118 
600 
211 
1,000 
1,505 
1,311 
1,545 
1,203 
2,324 


13 52 


152 
153 . 


800 


5.99 
3 11 


154 


9 51 


155 


12 96 


156 
157 . 

158 
159 


800 
"550 


13.22 
14.04 
32.59 
13 63 


160 


880 
750 
119 




161 
162 
163 . 


650 
1,357 


11.41 

8.66 


164 


638 


"'9.01' 
11.24 
11.28 

"25.' si' 


4.68 


165 


680 

1,120 

320 




166 






167 
168 . 


406 
3,859 
1,440 


14.33 
31 12 


169 ... 


20 21 


170 


768 




171 . 


1,871 


23 76 











222 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE CONTINU- 
TABLE 32— FINANCIAL 





Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


Expenditures 


Legistative 
Grant 




Schools 


Current 


Capital 


County 
Grant 


{In Counties) 
172 Westport (R.C.).. • 


35 
60 
11 
9 
43 
40 
30 
33 
20 


6,571 

11,736 

2,095 

1,727 

8,870 
6,941 
5,587 
6,456 
3,679 


$2,990 
6,104 
1,485 
1,481 
3,395 
3,417 
2,467 
2,564 
1,252 




$881 

1,499 

1,043 

166 

1,025 

763 

734 

656 

190 


$914 


173 Wheatley 




4,748 


174 Wilberforce 




175 Wolfe Island 




609 


176 Woodville 

177 Wooler 


$1,568 


2,249 
4,369 
1,196 

1,827 
124 


178 Wroxeter 




179 Wyoming 


524 


180 Zurich 








Totals and Averages 


8,111 


1,501,148 


665,967 


121,119 


152,013 


330,338 


{In Districts) 
1 Blind River 


55 
35 
56 
54 
22 
67 

7 
22 
26 
36 
12 
27 
15 
26 
16 
23 
65 
27 

7 
86 
112 
27 
33 
18 
42 
14 


10,660 
5,896 

10,601 
9,971 
4,034 

12,486 
1,280 
4,365 
5,126 
7,029 
2,370 
5,084 
2,929 
5,050 
3,115 
4,319 

12,244 
5,117 
1,207 

16,130 

20,608 
5,111 
5,898 
3,534 
7,737 
2,531 


5,106 
2,883 
4,361 
5,778 
3,127 
5,592 
2,224 
3,223 
3,133 
2,671 
1,958 
2,583 
2,323 
2,885 
2,738 
2,522 
3,680 
1,831 
1,569 
6,401 
5,471 
5,667 
2,572 
1,501 
2,984 
1,533 


(in default) 
605 


1,848 
1,650 
1,873 
1,820 
1,827 
1,836 

*333 
1,771 
1,705 
1,303 
1,249 
1,458 
1,397 
1,689 
1,309 
1,219 
1,900 
1,082 

*288 
1,824 
2,252 
1,813 
1,621 
978 
1,859 




2 Bruce Mines 




3 Burk's Falls 




4 Coniston 






5 Emo 


260 




6 Espanola 




7 Fraserdale 






8 Hornepayne 






9 Little Current 






10 MacTier 


943 




11 Manitowaning . . . . 




12 Massey. . 






13 Milford Bay 


464 
823 
205 




14 Mindemoya 




15 Nipigon 




16 Port Carling 




17 Powassan 


1,307 




18 Richard's Landing. 




19 Red Lake 






20 Schreiber 


2,752 




21 Sioux Lookout. . . . 




22 Smooth Rock Falls. 






23 South River 


538 




24 Sprucedale 




25 Sundridge 






26 White River 














Totals and Averages 


930 


174,432 


86,416 


7,897 


37,904 








Grand Totals 

and Averages . . . 


9,041 


1,675,580 


752,383 


129,016 


189,917 


330,338 


Increases for the year. . 








9,975 


15,153 














Decreases for the year. . 


822 


100,403 


3,452 






7,482 











*Legislative Grant not received till 1937. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



223 



ATION SCHOOLS 
STATISTICS, 1936 





Township 
Grant 


Local 
Levy 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day (cents) 




Current 


Capital 


Total 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


County 
Share 


Town- 
ship 
Share 


Local 
Levy 
Share 


172 




$650 
2,615 


45.50 
52.01 
70.89 
85.76 
38.28 
49.23 
44.16 
39.73 
34.04 


" 17.' 68' 
'8.13' 


45.50 
52.01 
70.89 
85.76 
55.96 
49.23 
44.16 
47.86 
34.04 


13.41 
12.78 
49.80 

9.61 
11.56 
11.00 
13.14 
10.18 

5.18 


13.92 
40.46 

"35!29' 
25.36 
62.94 
21.41 

28.32 
3.36 


"6.09* 

18.53 

3.98 

19.51 

14.32 

"i3.'05" 


9.89 


173 




22.29 


174 
175 
176 
177 

178 
179 


$127 
320 
353 

1,354 
799 








1,157 


13.04 






1,000 
450 


15.49 


180 


480 


12.23 


88,981 


190,336 


44.36 


8.07 


52.43 


10.13 


21.01 


5.93 


12.68 


1 


3,900 




47.90 
48.89 
41.14 
57.95 
77.52 
44.79 

173.73 
73.84 
61.12 
38.00 
82.62 
50.81 
79.31 
57.13 
87.90 
58.39 
30.06 
35.78 

130.02 
39.68 
26.55 

110.88 
43.61 
42.47 
38.57 
60.57 


"i6.'27" 
'6.' 45' 

"lZA2 

"io\84' 

16.30 

6.58 

"l0.'o7" 

" 17.06' 

"9.12* 


47.90 
59.16 
41.14 
57.95 
83.97 
44.79 

173.73 
73.84 
61.12 
51.42 
82.62 
50.81 
95.15 
73.43 
94.48 
58.39 
40.73 
35.78 

130.02 
56.74 
26.55 

110.88 
52.73 
42.47 
38.57 
60.57 


17.34 
28.00 
18.67 
18.25 
45.29 
14.70 
26.02 
40.57 
33.26 
18.54 
52.70 
28.68 
47.70 
33.45 
42.02 
28.22 
15.52 
21.15 
23.86 
11.31 
10.93 
35.47 
27.49 
27.67 
24.03 




36.59 




2 


1,676 
2,509 
• 4,106 
1,100 
3,400 


28.43 


3 








23.67 


4 








41.18 


5 
6 


300 




7.44 


27.27 
27.23 


7 










8 


1,446 






33.13 




9 


800 
2,016 

500 
1,661 

927 
1,923 
1,626 


15.61 


10 
11 
12 


300 
200 




4.27 

8.44 


28.68 
21.10 
32.67 


13 
14 
15 


266 
250 




9.08 
4.95 


31.65 
38.08 
52.20 


16 


1,340 




31.03 




17 


2,462 
319 


20.11 


18 
19 


400 




7.82 


6.23 


20 
21 


4,445 


2,752 
3,100 
4,035 
1,484 




27.56 


17.06 
15.04 


22 


"957" 






78.95 


23 






25.16 


24 




27.08 




25 


1,157 
1,138 


14.95 


26 








44.95 














13,804 


38,691 


49.54 


4.53 


54.07 


21:73 




7.91 


12.18 


102,785 


229,027 


44.90 


7.70 


52.60 


11.33 


19.71 


6.13 


13.67 


18,072 


20,769 


2.35 


.96 


3.31 


1.49 


.69 


1.37 


1.94 











































224 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
TABLE 33— ATTENDANCE, GRADE ENROLMENT, ENROLMENT BY AREAS, 1936-37 



COLLEGIATE 
INSTITUTES 



Counties 



Barrie 

Belleville 

Brantford 

Brockville 

Chatham 

Clinton 

Cobourg 

Collingwood 

Cornwall 

Gait 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton — Central 
Delta .... 
Westdale . 

Ingersoll 

Kingston 

Kitchener-Waterloo 

Lindsay 

London — Central. . 
Sir A. Beck. 

South 

Morrisburg 

Napanee 

Niagara Falls 

Orillia 

Oshawa 

Ottawa — Glebe 

Lisgar . . . 

Owen Sound 

Pembroke 

Perth 

Peterborough 

Picton 

Renfrew 

St. Catharines. . . . 

St. Mary's 

St. Thomas 

Sarnia 

Scarborough 

Seaf orth 

Smith's Falls 

vStamf ord 

Stratford 

Strathroy 

Toronto — Bloor. . . 

Harbord 

Humberside. . 

Jarvis 

Lawrence Park 

Malvern 

North 

Oakwood 

Parkdale 

Riverdale 

Vankleek Hill 

Windsor — Kennedy 
Patterson . . 
Walkerville 
vSandwich. . 

Woodstock 

York Twp — 

Runnymede 
Vaughan Rd 
Memorial. . 
York E. Twp — 

York East . 
York N. Twp. — 

York North 

Totals 

Districts 

Fort William 

North Bay 

Port Arthur 

Sault Ste Marie 

Totals 

Totals, All Collegi- 
ate Institutes. 



ATTENDANCE 



538 
567 
796 
478 
511 
154 
319 
286 
495 
314 
213 
608 
1,028 
837 
772 
266 
872 
557 
420 
1,010 
609 
643 
141 
208 
454 
474 
556 
1,618 
1,038 
404 
258 
275 
499 
145 
282 
901 
334 
651 
655 
301 
138 
442 
438 
768 
183 
658 
1,203 
1,300 
969 
628 
987 
1,231 
1,045 
915 
1,079 
175 
91.3 
924 
761 
431 
438 

746 
931 
429 

849 

272 



40,340 

726 
457 
369 

762 



2,314 



246 
282 
372 
226 
267 

68 
145 
135 
275 
147 

91 
314 
544 
412 
382 
104 
433 
279 
196 
478 
305 
313 

60 

90 
212 
194 
269 
821 
527 
200 
127 
134 
249 

61 
124 
424 
144 
307 
325 
180 

53 
202 
176 
424 

73 
420 
759 
645 
502 
315 
534 
627 
582 
514 
630 

61 
462 
419 
387 
199 
201 

400 
525 
271 

484 

143 



20,470 

351 
212 
162 
372 



1,097 



292 
285 
424 
252 
244 

86 
174 
151 
220 
167 
122 
294 
484 
425 
390 
162 
439 
278 
224 
532 
304 
330 

81 
118 
242 
280 
287 
797 
511 
204 
131 
141 
250 

84 
158 
477 
190 
344 
330 
121 

85 
240 
262 
344 
110 
238 
444 
655 
467 
313 
453 
604 
463 
401 
449 
114 
451 
505 
374 
232 
237 

346 
406 
158 

365 

129 



19,870 

375 
245 
207 
390 



1,217 



Si}-* 



503 
500 
821 
473 
482 
156 
297 
295 
475 
322 
214 
549 
986 
830 
752 
261 
809 
555 
406 
938 
603 
626 
140 
192 
434 
477 
596 
1,592 
1,016 
344 
232 
256 
4 

145 
259 
921 
331 
643 
642 
303 
134 
434 
390 
787 
182 
635 
1,147 
1,230 
893 
642 
953 
1,115 
1,019 
832 
966 
174 
921 
906 
765 
429 
436 

697 
917 

427 

806 
289 



38,970 

704 
393 
352 

725 



2,174 



41 41 O 



93.49 
93.94 
95.65 
95.47 
91.76 
95.87 
94 . 43 
95.03 
96.12 
94.39 
93.72 
94.77 
95.92 
96.10 
94.13 
86 . 73 
94.39 
96.49 
95.32 
94.65 
94.76 
92.16 
92.89 
94.24 
96.41 
93.29 
95.66 
95.04 
93.69 
94.44 
95.49 
97.18 
97.36 
96.10 
92.90 
95.11 
93.89 
93.61 
94.46 
94.38 
89.56 
94.71 
96.52 
96.61 
94.59 
94.90 
96.06 
95.07 
94.38 
95.21 
93 . 32 
92.83 
95.12 
95.04 

93 . 75 
94.43 
97.25 
96.56 
96.89 
96.56 
89.21 

94 . 59 
94 . 63 
95.04 

93.80 

95.23 



94.67 

96 . 54 
94.27 
94.91 
92.51 



94.47 



GRADE ENROLMENT 



199 

187 

242 

183 

152 

43 

75 

96 

170 

86 

73 

177 

275 

272 

204 

103 

232 



130 

236 

160 

164 

33 

54 

161 

159 

196 

455 

251 

102 

83 

75 

122 

42 

51 

372 

106 

164 

222 

116 

43 

141 

116 

265 

58 

191 

334 

318 

229 

264 

262 

236 

257 

226 

291 

38 

267 

301 

242 

145 

130 

191 

277 
167 

347 

113 



11,672 



241 
129 



216 



586 



116 
107 
196 

73 
116 

30 



120 

61 

62 

153 

255 

194 

186 

78 

208 

176 

81 

252 

160 

153 

41 

48 

107 

118 

124 

359 

229 

89 

52 

78 

124 

29 

90 

183 

61 

152 

162 

65 

27 

111 

96 

180 

44 

166 

263 

314 

226 

224 

230 

290 

236 

203 

256 

34 

232 

258 

188 

112 

106 

175 
224 
106 

249 

66 



,638 

169 
116 
112 
181 



578 



C 



87 

110 

162 

109 

113 

26 

91 

60 

91 

69 

36 

108 

230 

148 

170 

37 

210 

201 

91 

230 

151 

136 

18 

35 

98 

104 

136 

338 

238 

79 

70 

54 

118 

22 

58 

125 

84 

154 

117 

55 

23 

94 

115 

115 

35 

140 

273 

249 

230 

140 

222 

264 

207 

227 

255 

42 

214 

165 

182 

89 

102 

202 
195 

78 



44 



8,587 

160 

89 

132 

169 



550 







71 

83 

101 

53 

89 

25 

56 

34 

67 

72 

23 

91 

156 

116 

120 

25 

120 

93 

62 

178 

89 

107 

19 

33 

63 

58 

70 

280 

189 

57 

27 

41 

64 

26 

42 

145 

43 

107 

104 

32 

19 

61 

68 

111 

20 

95 

184 

247 

172 



173 

274 

218 

159 

174 

32 

130 

145 

90 

56 

64 

109 

138 

53 

89 

32 



6,144 

78 

70 

70 

113 



331 



O 



65 
80 
95 
60 
41 
30 
29 
30 
47 
26 
19 
79 
U2 
107 
92 
23 
102 
87 
56 
114 
49 
83 
30 
38 
25 
35 
30 
186 
131 
77 
26 
27 
71 
26 
41 
76 
40 
74 
50 
33 
26 
35 
43 
97 
26 
66 
149 
172 
112 



100 

167 

127 

100 

103 

29 

70 

55 

59 

29 

36 

69 
97 
25 

48 

17 



4,299 



83 



269 



ENROLMENT 
BY AREAS 



X 



371 
430 
634 
393 
359 
71 
227 
236 
306 
236 
158 
422 

1,009 
825 
744 
222 
738 
517 
291 
864 
527 
559 
68 
93 
450 
368 
484 

1,600 
941 
316 
227 
145 
394 
65 
159 
749 
198 
477 
512 
288 
69 
344 
250 
697 
92 
658 

1,200 

1,296 
951 
613 
987 

1,189 

1,039 
914 

1,079 
38 
843 
918 
647 
411 
334 

570 
837 
423 

840 

198 



35,110 

666 

406 
369 
680 



2,121 



166 

115 

133 

85 

152 

82 

92 

39 

178 

52 

55 

173 

19 



28 
32 

132 
39 
99 

146 
79 
83 
73 

111 
1 
67 
63 
13 
89 
78 
30 

122 
90 
80 

123 

151 
77 

165 

141 
7 
66 
52 
75 
64 
87 





3 


3 


1 


18 




15 




42 




5 


1 


1 




90 


47 


70 




6 




114 




20 




103 


1 


174 


2 


93 


1 


6 




9 




74 




4,647 


583 


60 




24 


27 



77 



161 



i ft 



42,654 



21,567 



21,087 



41,144 



94 . 66 



12,258 



10.216 9,137 



475 4,568 37,231 4,808 615 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



225 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

TABLE 33— ATTENDANCE, GRADE ENROLMENT, ENROLMENT BY AREAS, 1936-37 



HIGH 
SCHOOLS 



ATTENDANCE 



Counties 




Alexandria 


127 


Alliston 


145 


Almonte 


118 


Amherstburg 


131 


Arnprior 


281 


Arthur 


124 


Athens 


89 


Aurora 


171 


Avonmore 


71 


Aylmer 


162 


Bancroft 


61 


Beamsville 


150 


Blenheim 


174 


Bowmanville 


274 


Bradford 


111 


Brampton 


300 


Brighton 


109 




88 
281 


Burlington 


Caledonia 


173 


Campbellford .... 


184 


Carleton Place . . . 


208 


Cayuga 


97 


Chesley 


120 


Chesterville 


132 


Colborne 


107 


Deseronto 


85 


Dundalk 


89 




269 
207 


Dunnville 




99 
118 
129 
65 
77 
229 
278 


Dutton 


Elmira 


Elora 






Etobicoke 




154 
204 




Finch 


94 

77 


Flesherton 


Forest 


120 
274 


Fort Erie 


Gananoque 


164 


Georgetown 


121 




127 
163 


Grimsby 


Hagersville 


154 


Hanover 


152 


Harriston 


79 


Havelock 


74 


Hawkesbury (Eng.) 


83 


(Fr.) 


134 


Iroquois 


111 


Kemptville 


131 


Kincardine 


137 


Kingsville 


185 


Lakefield 


97 



46 
60 
50 
51 
120 
40 
32 
74 
43 
48 
25 
59 
67 

111 
51 

111 
38 
36 

129 
78 
80 
89 
30 
58 
44 
35 
35 
39 

109 
91 
42 
41 
59 
25 
30 
85 

142 
68 
83 
36 
46 
50 

118 
57 
39 
50 
60 
69 
63 
33 
26 
37 
69 
55 
54 
55 
94 
43 



81 

85 

68 

80 

161 

84 

57 

97 

28 

114 

36 

91 

107 

163 

60 

189 

71 

52 

152 

95 

104 

119 

67 

62 

88 

72 

50 

50 

160 

116 

57 

77 

70 

40 

47 

144 

136 

86 

121 

58 

31 

70 

156 

107 

82 

77 

103 

85 

89 

46 

48 

46 

65 

56 

77 

82 

91 

54 



« o 2 

Sis 



130 

132 

123 

129 

293 

127 

83 

165 

65 

162 

58 

138 

173 

269 

110 

312 

97 

82 

280 

181 

184 

208 

99 

121 

132 

107 

85 

92 

279 

214 

96 

118 

134 

63 

74 

224 

263 

144 

200 

92 

75 

116 

234 

165 

126 

125 

156 

158 

137 

81 

73 

77 

129 

112 

135 

149 

156 

91 



v <u o 



93.43 

91.50 

95.95 

91.18 

90.31 

86.08 

91.16 

94.00 

92.53 

96.91 

89.31 

92.02 

95.16 

87.52 

95.88 

96.09 

94.84 

93.85 

94.30 

97.71 

94.30 

94.65 

96.40 

96.72 

94.65 

93.53 

95.36 

87.96 

94.13 

95.87 

93.78 

92.04 

94.31 

94.92 

95.42 

92.46 

94.03 

95.92 

93.11 

95.48 

90.30 

92.67 

95.52 

94.20 

93.94 

95.72 

93.92 

94.20 

87.32 

96.22 

92.44 

93.86 

97.61 

95.49 

92.18 

94.56 

97.72 

93.19 



GRADE ENROLMENT 



46 


29 


45 


26 


30 


31 


43 


30 


102 


67 


35 


22 


32 


18 


37 


46 


17 


20 


49 


30 


18 


17 


36 


31 


43 


61 


•85 


65 


30 


22 


108 


67 


38 


24 


36 


16 


106 


62 


59 


43 


50 


44 


65 


47 


26 


29 


32 


27 


36 


25 


30 


27 


30 


22 


19 


20 


103 


73 


67 


59 


31 


29 


22 


24 


57 


25 


34 


13 


12 


16 


82 


58 


93 


72 


41 


40 


47 


63 


27 


21 


20 


14 


32 


30 


129 


56 


67 


35 


48 


21 


30 


29 


43 


41 


40 


37 


51 


52 


24 


21 


18 


21 


30 


21 


52 


29 


30 


26 


45 


22 


53 


26 


70 


47 


26 


82 



14 
15 

8 
23 
34 
23 
10 
27 
19 
26 
12 
32 
21 
33 
16 
29 
17 

8 
37 
27 
32 
25 
10 
18 
15 
16 

9 

9 
29 
24 

8 
21 
14 

6 
18 
20 
35 
23 
29 

8 
10 
17 
28 
20 
11 
24 
20 
21 
10 

9 

8 
12 
27 
13 
17 
IS 
15 
10 



ENROLMENT 
BY AREAS 



118 
52 
83 
74 

204 
48 
26 
76 
51 
70 
48 
41 
68 

198 
38 

161 
60 
88 

141 
56 
97 

134 
34 
65 
57 
47 
48 
36 

169 

118 
69 
38 
79 
40 
56 

106 

265 
71 

126 
20 
71 
68 

254 

120 
78 
41 
92 
73 
97 
48 
58 
53 

121 
46 
49 
80 

122 
56 



8 

88 

28 

57 

56 

75 

63 

95 

7 

92 

13 

109 

105 

76 

71 

128 

48 



106 
77 
84 
58 
63 
40 
62 
60 
30 
43 

100 
79 
30 
79 
37 
23 
14 

123 
3 
78 
72 
74 
6 
51 
20 
32 
33 
74 
71 
70 
32 
28 
14 
18 
10 
05 
08 
55 
63 
39 



226 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

TABLE 33— ATTENDANCE, GRADE ENROLMENT, ENROLMENT BY AREAS, 1936-37 



HIGH 
SCHOOLS 



Counties 
Leamington 

Listowel 

Lucan 

Lucknow 

Madoc 

Markdale 

Markham 

Marmora 

Maxville 

Meaford 

Merritton 

Midland 

Milton 

Mimico 

Mitchell 

Morewood 

Mt. Forest 

Nepean 

Newburgh 

Newcastle 

Newmarket 

Niagara 

Norwich 

Norwood 

Oakville 

Omemee 

Orangeville 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Penetanguishene 

Petrolia 

Plantagenet 

Port Colborne. . . 

Port Credit 

Port Dover 

Port Elgin 

Port Hope 

Port Perry 

Port Rowan . . . . 

Prescott 

Richmond Hill. . 

Ridgetown 

Ridgeway 

Rockland 

Saltfleet 

Shelburne 

Simcoe 

Smithville 

Stirling 

Streetsville 

Sydenham 

Thorold 

Tilbury 

Tillsonburg 

Trenton 

Tweed 

Uxbridge 

Vienna 



ATTENDANCE 



304 

214 

80 

101 

116 

67 

182 

100 

116 

173 

141 

352 

149 

749 

140 

34 

111 

474 

60 

44 

251 

73 

132 

99 

250 

48 

155 

220 

102 

152 

192 

109 

276 

348 

75 

86 

224 

129 

27 

171 

189 

149 

117 

99 

177 

150 

284 

91 

100 

56 

136 

287 

97 

255 

252 

126 

102 

33 



140 

74 

34 

36 

48 

32 

77 

51 

51 

80 

72 

158 

63 

391 

58 

19 

40 

200 

30 

21 

113 

28 

63 

43 

103 

18 

73 

100 

37 

62 

82 

36 

112 

133 

34 

29 

96 

61 

8 

77 

87 

60 

48 

41 

93 

70 

116 

42 

44 

24 

63 

131 

49 

98 

101 

52 

43 

14 



Q c 



ft" <" 



164 

140 

46 

65 

68 

35 

105 

49 

65 

93 

69 

194 

86 

358 

82 

15 

71 

274 

30 

23 

138 

45 

69 

56 

147 

30 

82 

120 

65 

90 

110 

73 

164 

215 

41 

57 

128 

68 

19 

94 

102 

89 

69 

58 

84 

80 

168 

49 

56 

32 

73 

156 

48 

157 

151 

74 

59 

19 



300 

214 

69 

95 

192 

58 

179 

100 

107 

175 

147 

374 

149 

765 

138 

29 

111 

441 

56 

33 

262 

76 

128 

96 

252 

48 

151 

224 

99 

149 

180 

110 

278 

334 

78 

86 

221 

125 

24 

181 

172 

148 

114 

95 

191 

129 

268 

91 

102 

51 

134 

299 

100 

258 

243 

123 

101 

30 



I <u u 



91.86 

94.23 

93.75 

92.72 

91.77 

95.74 

88.65 

92.23 

92.65 

96.27 

95.14 

93.88 

92.59 

96.01 

96.60 

87.28 

97.40 

93.96 

93.88 

80.10 

95.69 

92.87 

93.23 

95.84 

95.27 

94.27 

94.62 

94.05 

93.11 

92.23 

87.71 

95.50 

96.04 

91.79 

93.48 

92.95 

95.44 

95.50 

88.21 

94.26 

93.34 

95.12 

92.90 

91.45 

92.39 

94.04 

94.10 

93.69 

95.79 

92.81 

95.65 

94.07 

93.94 

94.92 

97.45 

92.48 

95.11 

92.67 



GRADE ENROLMENT 



100 
68 
31 
19 
40 
13 
49 
36 
25 
64 
44 

126 
50 

310 
34 
12 
39 

154 
20 
19 
81 
19 
29 
21 
74 
20 
43 
70 
37 
53 
56 
22 

108 

125 
30 
23 
73 
35 
11 
65 
65 
33 
34 
21 
76 
26 
83 
28 
22 
20 
33 
118 
35 
89 
85 
33 
24 
17 



42 
20 
23 
24 
18 
38 
25 
16 
41 
49 

101 
36 

207 

28 

7 

25 

110 
13 
13 
68 
25 
40 
26 
79 
14 
19 
59 
19 
36 
43 
20 
70 
96 
23 
17 
66 
34 
6 
33 
53 
32 
32 
22 
48 
37 
60 
26 
27 
12 
20 
92 
24 
55 
56 
31 
22 



59 
47 
14 
21 
22 
12 
40 
13 
25 
32 
36 
62 
20 
127 
27 
7 
13 
109 
14 
6 
47 
15 
24 
19 
33 
4 
35 
38 
16 
38 
38 
30 
57 
52 
11 
13 
45 
17 
6 
38 
28 
34 
22 
32 
25 
37 
59 
12 
21 
13 
33 
27 
23 
49 
47 
27 
21 
8 



33 

30 
9 

17 

22 

14 

18 

15 

33 

15 
8 

33 

27 

63 

26 
4 

18 

50 
9 
6 

35 
9 

27 
17 

44 
10 
28 
20 
16 
25 
28 
27 
25 
40 
11 
17 
18 
23 
4 
22 
22 
26 
22 
24 
18 
30 
46 
10 
14 
11 
25 
29 
6 
25 
38 
18 
20 
2 



ENROLMENT 
BY AREAS 



91 
32 
45 

67 

67 

54 

44 

31 

123 

108 

289 

71 

384 

58 

14 

68 

427 

13 

27 

139 

54 

53 

37 

150 

22 

94 

161 

39 

136 

109 

69 

187 

83 

51 

42 

168 

64 

14 

126 

66 

80 

86 

69 

153 

75 

165 

59 

43 

20 

133 

249 

52 

143 

202 

54 

50 

30 



97 
102 
48 
16 
49 



104 
55 
36 
50 
33 
57 
78 

365 
82 
13 
21 
46 
46 
16 

105 
19 



56 

100 
20 
47 
53 
51 
16 
82 
38 
89 

265 
23 
44 
52 
61 
13 
45 

123 
69 
31 
30 
24 
74 

117 
32 
57 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



227 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
TABLE 33— ATTENDANCE, GRADE ENROLMENT, ENROLMENT BY AREAS, 1936-37 





ATTENDANCE 


GRADE ENROLMENT 


ENROLMENT 
BY AREAS 


HIGH 
SCHOOLS 


c 
t> 

8 

"o 

u 

c 
W 
>, 


3 


E 

<u 

to 




u 

SiJ 

oJ S 
to 


V 

•a 

u 




V 

•0 

d 

O 


X 

<u 
-0 

<A 
u 




H 

V 

•a 
a 

u 

O 


u 
•d 

03 

u 




in 

'S 

to 
c 

V 

■0 
'55 

V 

(4 


1 

a 

3 
to 

c 
3 

O 


c 

V 

IS 

'35 


Counties 

W'alkerton 

Wallaceburg 

Wardsville 

Waterdown 

Waterf ord 

Watford 


115 

22.5 
21 
154 
123 
117 
367 
355 
181 
115 
115 
143 
137 


50 

94 

8 

68 

49 

53 

190 

178 

72 

36 

47 

60 

40 


65 

131 

13 

86 

74 

64 

177 

177 

109 

79 

68 

83 

97 


111 
236 
21 
171 
117 
115 
357 
338 
185 
104 
110 
136 
143 


93.23 
92.93 
91.23 
95.93 
93.97 
94.96 
94.75 
94.45 
95.06 
93.37 
93.44 
94.79 
96.68 


41 

69 

6 

46 

42 

31 

105 

103 

58 

39 

32 

44 

41 


24 
56 
5 
32 
25 
24 
98 
93 
39 
30 
26 
33 
24 


26 
50 
7 
33 
27 
23 
79 
78 
32 
18 
29 
22 
41 


11 
30 
3 
20 
17 
16 
47 
42 
20 
15 
17 
21 
16 


13 
19 

23 
12 
23 
38 
39 
32 
13 
11 
24 
15 


64 

154 

6 

128 

37 

41 

256 

224 

122 

78 

113 

56 

69 


50 

49 

11 

14 

83 

70 

111 

121 

59 

19 

2 

61 

66 


22 
4 

12 
3 
6 








10 


Whitby 


18 


Williamstown .... 

Winchester 

Wingham 


26 
2 


Totals 


20,162 


8,612 


11,550 


19,960 


93.91 


6,454 


4,900 


3,926 


2,671 


2,211 


11,989 


7,336 


837 


Districts 
Bracebridge 


176 

99 

143 

160 

157 

93 

62 

204 

64 

65 

77 

117 

99 

144 

80 

355 

265 

54 

196 

204 

112 

224 

342 

114 

438 

100 
128 


74 
53 
61 
72 
66 
27 
23 
92 
24 
31 
22 
50 
42 
61 
35 
159 
152 
28 
63 
72 
52 
120 
143 
50 
194 

43 
69 


102 

46 

82 

88 

91 

66 

39 

112 

40 

34 

55 

67 

57 

83 

45 

196 

113 

26 

133 

132 

60 

104 

199 

64 

244 

57 
59 


173 

96 

137 

161 

160 

90 

57 

200 

62 

67 

73 

126 

105 

143 

72 

345 

265 

52 

175 

199 

106 

219 

326 

113 

425 

101 
125 


94.47 
94.43 
92.80 
93.22 
95.54 
92.23 
91.87 
91.25 
96.43 
89.45 
93.49 
91.91 
97.03 
96.03 
93.94 
96.02 
92.67 
95.51 
82.24 
80.16 
. 94.26 
88.39 
93.61 
93.48 
94.85 

95 . 29 
96.10 


52 
40 
59 
61 
61 
36 
18 

17 
28 
32 
36 
47 
55 
35 
117 
109 
14 
41 
54 
34 
75 

39 
162 

39 
41 


41 
21 
30 
29 
38 
17 
21 
58 
17 
15 
12 
25 
21 
34 
21 
99 
66 
18 
51 
42 
20 
53 

103 
24 

119 

31 
30 


34 
25 
31 
35 
26 
15 
13 
93 
12 
13 
14 
28 
21 
34 
16 
57 
49 
11 
60 
54 
31 
46 
116 
25 
80 

20 
20 


18 
10 
12 
20 
21 

8 

8 

• 32 

10 

4 
10 
17 
10 
13 

8 
59 
29 

4 
23 
31 
20 
29 
83 
10 
44 

10 
16 


31 

3 

11 

15 

11 

17 

2 

21 

8 

5 

9 

11 

8 

23 
12 

7 
21 
23 

7 
21 
40 
16 
33 

21 


100 

85 

134 

125 

133 

75 

60 

171 

48 

50 

62 

84 

40 

124 

77 

335 

265 

49 

118 

179 

102 

147 

245 

82 

426 

83 
128 


76 
14 

6 
35 
24 
18 

2 
33 
16 
13 
15 
33 
59 
18 

3 
18 




Chapleau 

Cobalt 


3 


Cochrane 




Englehart 

Fort Frances 

Gore Bay 

Gravenhurst 

Haileybury 

Huntsville 

Iroquois Falls. . . . 

Kapuskasing 

Keewatin 


2 

2 
2 






Mattawa 

New Liskeard .... 

Parry Sound 

Rainy River 

Sturgeon Falls. . 


4 
70 
22 
10 
66 
83 
32 

17 


1 

8 
3 

11 
14 


Thessalon 

Timmins 

Tisdale Twp. — 
So. Porcupine . 


12 








Totals 


4,272 


1,878 


2,394 


4,173 


92.37 


1,302 


1,056 


979 


559 


376 


3,527 


687 


58 


Totals all 

High Schools 


24,434 


10,490 


13,944 


24,133 


93.64 


7,756 


5,956 


4,905 


3,230 


2,587 


15,516 


8,023 


895 


Grand Totals .... 


67,088 


32,057 


35,031 
42 


65,277 


94.28 

.77 


20,014 
512 


16,172 
703 


14,042 
516 


9,705 


7,155 


52,747 


12,831 


1,510 


Decreases for vear 


811 


853 


514 


329 


807 


732 


68 


11 










Percentages 


47.78 


52.22! 97 30 




29 83 


24.11 


20.93 


14 47 


10.66 


78.62 


19.13 


2.25 



























228 



THE REPORT OF THE 



Xo. 11 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 

TABLE 34— FINANCIAL STATISTICS, 



Collegiate Institutes 



Average 

Daily 

Attendance 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



Expenditures 



Current 



Capital 



Legislative 
Grant 



County 
Grant 



(In Counties) 

1 Barrie 

2 Belleville 

3 Brantford 

4 Brockville 

5 Chatham 

6 Clinton 

7 Cobourg 

8 Collingwood 

9 Cornwall 

10 Gait 

1 1 Goderich 

12 Guelph 

13 Hamilton (3) 

14 Ingersoll 

15 Kingston 

16 Kitchener 

17 Lindsay 

18 London (3) 

19 Morrisburg 

20 Napanee 

21 Niagara Falls 

22 Orillia 

23 Oshawa 

24 Ottawa (2) 

25 Owen Sound (1937) 

26 Pembroke 

27 Perth 

28 Peterborough 

29 Picton 

30 Renfrew 

31 St.Catharines 

32 St. Mary's 

33 St. Thomas 

34 Sarnia 

35 Scarborough 

36 Seaforth 

37 Smith's Falls 

38 Stamford 

39 Stratford 

40 vStrathroy 

41 Toronto (10) 

42 Vankleek Hill 

43 Windsor (4) 

44 Woodstock 

45 York Twp. (3) 

46 York North 

47 York East 

Totals and Averages 

(In Districts) 

1 Fort William 

2 North Bay 

3 Port Arthur 

4 SaultSte. Marie... . 

Totals and Averages 
All Collegiate Institutes 



504 
156 
939 
538 
510 
156 
301 
281 
449 
352 
241 
569 

2,578 
247 
808 
542 
409 

2,262 
157 
185 
409 
490 
392 

2,602 
371 
222 
217 
96 
143 
263 
655 
333 
652 
632 
297 
137 
443 
367 
798 
205 

9,816 
172 

3,211 
443 

2,080 
280 
119 



37,803 



702 
395 
350 
773 



2,220 



94,391 
88,672 

156,094 

107,097 

100,589 
28,660 
58,996 
53,195 
88,129 
64,561 
44,069 

104,765 

481,826 
48,130 

147,185 

105,235 
77,333 

407,190 
29,821 
36,531 
79,472 
95,169 
73,989 

473,673 
69,925 
43,598 
53,142 
89,460 
27,705 
48,185 

123,317 
60,886 

120,119 

115,192 
57,879 
25,424 
82,852 
71,567 

148,883 

34,714 

,800,477 

31,668 

602,807 
81,906 

389,476 
52,269 

149,332 



$ 
34,697 
43,793 
61,061 
47,589 
45,733 
13,474 
29,075 
25,045 
31,355 
39,840 
21,267 
49,804 

260,778 
23,239 
68,392 
43,488 
34,322 

239,872 
15,177 
20,384 
37,657 
32,979 
53,036 

284,312 
35,609 
18,380 
19,690 
52,951 
12,907 
22,195 
68,725 
22,349 
55,541 
55,937 
28,681 
14,082 
34,459 
36,317 
57,487 
17,811 
1,238,447 
16,472 

294,370 
39,732 

165,567 
25,393 
63,106 



$ 
11,752 



11,495 
26,078 



2,515 
1,524 

8,587 
7,775 
7,821 
3,991 
21,663 
94,177 



5,573 

10,749 

5,393 

84,033 

4,553 

2,482 

5,353 

5,496 

30,873 

74,190 



(in default) 
3,191 
4,706 
1,991 
6,610 
21,159 
3,896 
3,839 
21,773 

(in default) 



4,553 

7,844 

11,986 

2,602 

323,362 

1,036 

2,893 

3,603 

55,885 

6,040 

(in default) 



$ 
2,019 
1,960 
3,173 
2,440 
1,719 
1,974 
2,013 
1,979 
2,004 
1,981 
1,943 
1,773 
8,123 
2,200 
1,850 
1,073 
2,045 
6,385 
1,924 
2,093 
1,914 
2,185 
2,041 
4,005 
1,951 
2,015 
2,014 
2,046 
2,020 
2,079 
1,943 
1,871 
1,863 
1,974 
1,650 
1,581 
1,942 
2,103 
2,644 
3,490 
20,096 
1,777 
9,387 
2,157 
6,074 
1,975 
2,123 



7,281,241 



3,935,360 



910,149 



135,943 



132,739 
74,668 

68,474 
143,216 



68,610 
31,207 
41,711 
54,337 



35,445 

8,375 

10,244 

24,300 



7,642 
4,749 
4,014 
7,991 



419,097 



195,865 



78,364 



24,396 



S 

16,006 



10,493 
9,885 
9,504 

14,530 

7,982 

27,781 

7,138 

8,743 



2,105 



14,166 



10,199 

13,696 

259 

13,656 



6,227 

6,728 

11,704 

6,505 
22,508 
14,554 



15,874 

13,777 

11,666 

8,775 

6,216 

20,334 

5,047 

12,042 



12,794 

7,763 

9,632 

113,871 

13,911 

23,063 



501,371 



40,023 



7,700,338 



4,131,225 



988,513 



160,339 



501,371 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



229 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

DAY SCHOOLS, 1936 



Local 
Levy 

(Current and 
Capital) 



Cost of Education per Pupil- Day (Cents) 



Current 



Capital 



Total 



Legis- 
lative 
Share 



County 
Share 



Local 
Levy 
Share 



Debenture 
Debt 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 



$ 
27,893 
33,781 
56,393 
60,079 
32,372 

4,000 
14,513 
23,133 

7,775 
35,181 
15,213 
58,270 
331,845 
19,535 
61,881 
48,303 
22,207 
281,428 

6,561 

6,388 
39,768 
20,806 
67,608 
335,157 
24,000 

9,734 
10,967 
49,506 

5,410 

1,029 
63,302 
17,296 
40,681 
59,643 
14,455 

3,683 
31,054 
11,081 
62,692 

6,500 
,575,050 

3,000 

245,168 

31,406 

116,385 

16,700 

32,301 



36.76 
49.39 
39.12 
44.43 
45.46 
47.01 
49.28 
47.09 
35.58 
61.71 
48.26 
47.54 
54.12 
48.28 
46.47 
41.32 
44.38 
58.91 
50.89 
55.80 
47.38 
34.65 
71.68 
60.02 
50.93 
42.16 
37.05 
59.19 
46.59 
46.06 
55.73 
36.70 
46.24 
48.56 
49.55 
55.39 
41.59 
50.74 
38.61 
51.31 
68.78 
52.01 
48.83 
48.51 
42.51 
48.58 
42.26 



12.45 

7^36 
24.34 



8.77 

2.58 
16.14 

8.82 
12.11 

9.06 
20.68 
19.54 



3.79 

10.21 

6.97 

20.64 

15.27 

6.79 

6.73 

5.77 

41.73 

15.66 



6.00 

5.26 

7.19 

13.72 

17.16 

6.40 

3.19 

18.90 



5.49 
10.96 

8.05 

7.49 
17.96 

3.27 
.48 

4.40 
14.35 
11.55 



49.21 
49.39 
46.48 
68.77 
45.46 
55.78 
51.86 
63.23 
44.40 
73.82 
57.32 
68.22 
73.66 
48.28 
50.26 
51.53 
51.35 
79.55 
66.16 
62.59 
54.11 
40.42 
113.40 
75.68 
50.93 



43.05 
64.45 
53.78 
59.78 
72.89 
43.10 
49.43 
67.46 



55.39 
47.08 
61.70 
46.66 
58.80 
86.74 
55.28 
49.31 
52.91 
56.86 
60.13 



2.14 
2.21 
2.03 
2.28 
1.71 
6.89 
3.41 
3.72 
2.27 
3.06 
4.40 
1.69 
1.68 
4.57 
1.25 



1.02 
2.64 
1.56 
6.45 
73 
41 
29 
76 
85 
79 
62 
79 
29 
29 
31 
58 
07 
55 
1.71 
2.85 
6.21 
2.34 
2.94 
1.78 
10.05 
1.12 
5.61 
1.56 
2.63 
1.56 
3.78 
1.42 



16.96 



9.80 
9.83 
33.16 
24.63 
15.00 
31.52 
11.05 
19.84 



4.37 



18.32 



34.20 

37.49 

.32 

14.35 



8.91 
15.43 
22.02 



23.48 
46.71 
11.80 



13.22 
11.96 
20.15 
34.51 

7.50 
28.41 

3.39 
34.69 



40.40 

1.28 
11.76 
29.23 
26.61 
15.44 



29.55 
38.10 
36.13 
56.09 
32.18 
13.96 
24.60 
43.49 

8.82 
54.49 
34.53 
55.62 
68.87 
40.58 
42.04 
45.90 
28.71 
69.11 
22.00 
17.48 
50.04 
21.86 
91.37 
70.75 
34.32 
22.32 
20.64 
55.33 
19.53 

2.14 
51.33 
28.41 
33.87 
51.78 
24.97 
14.48 
37.48 
15.48 
42.10 
18.72 
87.48 

9.47 
40.67 
38.34 
29.88 
31.95 
21.63 



$ 
116,678 



>314,980 
220,476 



86,000 

14,321 

104,313 

*84,813 

13,693 

44,880 

*428,650 

769,421 



70,700 
125,626 

48,515 
561,014 

53,931 
*41,500 
106,338 

55,739 
407,955 
862,923 



214,175 

22,222 

37,038 

2,419 

104,831 

358,333 
46,178 
20,428 
67,942 

262,028 



78,889 

102,154 

18,214 

4,306,879 

3,108 

1,964,971 

35,800 

1,061,035 

209,713 

186,015 



4,028,041 



54.05 



12.50 



66.55 



1.87 



6.89 



55.32 



13,624,980 



97,047 
33,391 
48,684 
70,600 



51.69 
41.79 
60.91 
37.94 



26.70 
11.22 
14.96 
16.97 



78.39 
53.01 
75.87 
54.91 



5.76 
6.36 
5.86 
5.58 



73.11 
44.72 
71.10 
49.30 



484,250 
71,175 
32,659 

287,500 



249,722 



46.74 



18.70 



65.44 



5.82 



59.59 



875,584 



4,277,763 



53.65 



12.84 



66.49 



2.08 



6.51 



55.55 



14,500,564 



230 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
TABLE 34— FINANCIAL STATISTICS, 



High Schools 



(In Counties) 

1 Alexandria 

2 Alliston 

3 Almonte 

4 Amherstburg 

5 Arnprior 

6 Arthur 

7 Athens 

8 Aurora 

9 Avonmore 

10 Aylmer 

11 Bancroft 

12 Beamsville 

13 Blenheim 

14 Bowmanville 

15 Bradford 

16 Brampton 

17 Brighton 

18 Burford 

19 Burlington ...... 

20 Caledonia 

21 Campbellford . .. . 

22 Carleton Place . . . 

23 Cayuga 

24 Chesley 

25 Chesterville 

26 Colborne 

27 Deseronto 

28 Dundalk 

29 Dundas 

30 Dunnville 

31 Durham 

32 Dutton 

33 Elmira 

34 Elora 

35 Embrun 

36 Essex 

37 Exeter 

38 Etobicoke 

39 Fergus 

40 Finch 

41 Flesherton 

42 Forest 

43 Fort Erie 

44 Gananoque 

45 Georgetown 

46 Glencoe 

47 Grimsby 

48 Hagersville 

49 Hanover 

50 Harriston 

51 Hawkesbury (E. F.) 

52 Iroquois 

53 Kemptville 

54 Kincardine 

55 Kingsville 

56 Lakefield 

57 Leamington 

58 Listowel 

59 Lucan 



Average 

Daily 

Attendance 



137 
122 
142 
119 
305 
129 

91 
170 

74 
150 

54 
191 
168 
264 
103 
323 

89 

72 
296 
179 
180 
205 

98 
121 
130 

94 

81 

85 
270 
210 

97 
114 
136 

57 

74 
212 
143 
251 
198 

93 

77 
113 
194 
170 
118 
122 
150 
153 
127 

80 
200 
124 
133 
148 
167 

95 
309 
196 

63 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



25,114 
26,239 
23,739 
23,245 
57,214 
23,752 
13,617 
31,368 
13,402 
29,084 
10,470 
37,956 
32,417 
49,179 
19,639 
61,256 
17,494 
13,400 
55,721 
35,112 
34,587 
38,278 
19,223 
23,750 
24,418 
18,787 
15,840 
17,034 
52,502 
39,628 
18,852 
22,367 
24,628 
10,430 
13,441 
39,654 
27,108 
49,051 
38,717 
17,433 
15,108 
21,851 
36,631 
33,109 
23,295 
22,359 
28,847 
28,722 
24,581 
14,885 
37,628 
23,215 
26,219 
26,603 
27,177 
17,411 
57,735 
38,507 
12,357 



Expenditures 



Current 



$ 

10,673 

10,315 

13,068 

11,693 

21,535 

8,825 

9,129 

16,965 

7,630 

13,938 

2,377 

14,368 

13,539 

24,034 

8,933 

29,151 

7,593 

9,653 

27,050 

16,258 

20,091 

19,380 

9,917 

11,868 

7,919 

7,945 

6,482 

7,804 

18,239 

20,637 

10,821 

10,634 

12,605 

6,388 

4,645 

12,983 

10,807 

27,597 

17,669 

8,874 

7,923 

11,206 

20,246 

16,338 

12,675 

10,012 

14,044 

13,612 

14,664 

7,742 

20,529 

11,362 

13,649 

13,382 

12,064 

10,234 

18,135 

14,778 

8,679 



Capital 



1,720 
5,583 
8,033 
3,992 
885 
3,473 
7,293 



225 



7,934 
4,674 
7,447 
3,784 
7,392 
1,307 
5,268 
11,170 
10,986 
8,462 
8,256 
6,103 



307 
3,446 



325 
9,219 
1,842 
3,179 
3,708 
240 
497 



(in default) 
882 
8,252 
6,505 



3,209 

(in default) 



1,260 



7,483 
3,049 
4,816 



2,007 



89 
(in default) 



2,473 
1,376 



Legislative 
Grant 



$ 

1,407 
1,513 
1,894 
1,723 
1,828 
1,278 
1,664 
1,880 
1,245 
1,644 
682 
1,925 
1,795 
2,128 
1,403 
1,914 
1,372 
1,584 
2,065 
1,893 
1,894 
1,906 
1,583 
1,495 
1,172 
1,356 
1,170 
1,127 
1,932 
1,802 
1,732 
1,643 
2,239 
1,075 
1,337 
1,885 
1,389 
1,921 
1,912 
1,263 
1,310 
1,597 
1,888 
1,701 
1,630 
1,299 
2,105 
1,905 
1,773 
1,306 
2,610 
1,697 
3,821 
1,795 
1,685 
1,331 
1,925 
2,297 
1,293 



County 
Grant 



$ 

756 
7,078 
6,573 
9,074 

13,130 
5,888 
6,153 

15,621 

4,482 

8,495 

811 

1,215 

11,679 

14,231 
1,403 

22,151 
5,112 
6,454 

15,512 
9,156 

13,697 

10,725 
7,076 
5,224 
5,237 

12,862 
2,564 
4,742 
3,527 

10,308 
4,609 
8,109 
3,717 
3,447 
2,380 
7,239 
5,995 

19,495 

11,172 
6,265 
4,172 
5,877 

12,850 
3,334 
6,624 
5,736 

10,801 
7,436 
6,197 
3,464 
3,916 
8,289 

13,056 
6,051 
5,221 
4,748 
9,512 
7,962 
4,971 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



231 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
DAY SCHOOLS, 1936 





Local 
Levy 

(Current and 


Cost of Education per Pupil-Day (Cents) 






Current 


Capital 


Total 


Legis- 
lative 


County 
Share 


local 
Levy 


Debenture 
Debt 




Capital) 








Share 


Share 




1 


$ 

4,975 

3,670 


42.49 




42.50 


5.60 


3.01 


19.81 


$ 


2 


39.31 


"o\55" 


45.86 


5.76 


26.97 


13.98 


Vl',600 


3 


10,137 


55.05 


23.52 


78.57 


7.98 


27.69 


42.70 


70,954 


4 


8,344 


50.30 


34.55 


84.85 


7.41 


39.03 


35.89 


37,010 


5 


12,492 


37.64 


6.98 


44.62 


3.19 


22.95 


21.83 


46,517 


6 


2,626 


37.15 


3.73 


40.88 


5.38 


24.78 


11.05 


1,062 


7 


3,473 


67.04 


25.51 


92.55 


12.22 


45.19 


25.51 


33,634 


8 


6,822 


54.08 


23.24 


77.32 


5.99 


49.80 


21.75 


82,021 


9 


2,080 


56.93 




56.93 


9.29 


33.44 


15.52 




10 


5,007 


47.92 


m '"'M" 


48.69 


5.65 


29.21 


15.97 


' 1,086 


11 


878 
4,986 


22.70 
37.85 




22.70 

58.75 


6.51 
5.07 


7.74 
3.20 


8.38 
13.14 




12 


"26.' 96" 


*60,456 


13 


4,673 


41.76 


14.42 


56.18 


5.54 


36.02 


14.41 


36,136 


14 


15,720 


48.87 


15.14 


64.01 


4.32 


28.94 


31.96 


86,206 


15 


4,913 


45.48 


19.27 


64.75 


7.15 


7.15 


25.01 


41,111 


16 


14,391 


47.59 


12.06 


59.65 


3.12 


36.16 


23.49 


68,025 


17 


2,308 


43.40 


7.47 


50.87 


7.84 


29.22 


13.19 


8,895 


18 


6,377 


72.03 


39.31 


111.34 


11.82 


48.16 


47.58 


44,500 


19 


18,170 


48.55 


20.04 


68.59 


3.70 


27.83 


32.61 


120,967 


20 


7,221 


46.30 


31.29 


77.59 


5.39 


26.08 


20.57 


40,176 


21 


8,462 


58.08 


24 .46 


82.54 


5.47 


39.50 


24.46 


84,537 


22 


17,106 


50.63 


21.57 


72.20 


4.98 


28.02 


44.69 


87,933 


23 


7,227 


51.58 


31.75 


83.33 


8.23 


36.81 


37.59 


36,617 


24 


4,200 


49.97 
32.43 
42.29 




49.97 
33.69 
60.63 


6.29 
4.80 

7.22 


22.00 
21.45 
68.46 


17.68 




25 


' i ! 26 " 

18.34 




26 


625" 


"3!33" 


' 17448 


27 


3,000 
2,025 


40.92 
45.81 




40.92 

47.72 


7.39 
6.61 


16.19 
27.83 


18.94 
11.89 




28 


i.9i 


' 1,300 


29 


13,719 


34.74 


17.55 


52.29 


3.67 


6.72 


26.13 


86,674 


30 


10,842 


52.08 


4.65 


56.73 


4.55 


26.01 


27.36 


8,021 


31 


7,379 


57.40 


16.86 


74.26 


9.19 


24.45 


39.14 


19,799 


32 


4,442 


47.54 


16.58 


64.12 


7.34 


36.25 


19.86 


47,539 


33 


6,740 
2,351 


51.18 
61.24 


.97 
4.76 


52.15 
66.00 


9.09 
10.30 


15.09 
33.05 


27.37 
22.54 




34 


3,595 


35 


1,998 
3,932 


34.56 
32.74 




34.56 


9.95 
4.75 


17.71 

18.25 


14.87 
9.91 




36 




79,857 

8,291 


37 


3,382 


39.87 


"3i25 


"43!l2" 


5.12 


22.11 


12.48 


38 


13,171 


56.26 


16.82 


73.08 


3.92 


39.74 


26.85 


116,227 


39 


9,505 


45.64 


16.80 


62.44 


4.94 


28.85 


24.55 


86,959 


40 


1,569 
2,308 
7,709 


50.90 
52.44 
51.28 




50.90 
52.44 
65.96 


7.24 

8.67 
7.30 


35.93 
27.61 
26.89 


9.00 
15.28 
35.28 




41 






42 


"ii!68 


28,448 


53 


16,233 


55.27 






5.15 


35.08 


44.31 


140,554 


44 


12,150 
5,089 


49.34 
54.41 




"49134' 
59.82 


5.14 
7.00 


10.07 
28.43 


36.70 

21.84 




45 


"o\4i" 


6,760 


46 


2,494 
8,461 


44.77 
48.68 




44.77 
74.62 


5.80 
7.30 


25.65 
37.44 


11.15 
29.33 




47 


"25\94" 


83,683 


48 


6,849 


47.39 


10.62 


58.01 


6.63 


25.89 


23.85 


30,600 


49 


11,816 


59.65 


19.59 


79.24 


7.21 


25.21 


48.07 


52,839 


50 


2,395 

12,331 

3,507 


52.01 
54.56 
48.94 




52.01 
54.56 

57.58 


8.77 
6.93 
7.30 


23.27 
10.41 
35.70 


16.09 
32.77 
15.10 




51 






52 


"8!64" 


5,466 


53 


5,929 


52.06 




52.06 


14.58 


49.80 


22.61 


21,500 


54 


5,308 


50.30 


""33" 


50.63 


6.75 


22.74 


19.95 


2,500 


55 


5,159 


44.39 






6.20 


19.21 


18.98 


47,870 


56 


4,278 
9,218 


58.78 
31.41 




"58^78" 
35.69 


7.64 
3.33 


27.27 
16.47 


24.55 
15.96 




57 


"k'.2s" 


4l',2i8 


58 


5,876 


38.38 


3.57 


41.95 


5.97 


20.68 


15.26 


11,135 


59 


2,450 


70.23 




70.23 


10.46 


40.23 


19.82 











232 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 

TABLE 34— FINANCIAL STATISTICS, 



High Schools 



(In Counties) 

60 Lucknow 

61 Madoc 

62 Markdale 

63 Markham 

64 Marmora 

65 Maxville 

66 Meaford 

67 Merritton 

68 Midland 

69 Milton 

70 Mimico 

71 Mitchell 

72 Morewood 

73 Mount Forest. . . 

74 Nepean 

75 Newburgh 

76 Newcastle 

77 Newmarket 

78 Niagara 

79 Norwich 

80 Norwood 

81 Oakville 

82 Omemee 

83 Orangeville 

84 Paris 

85 Parkhill 

86 Penetanguishene 

87 Petrolia 

88 Plantagenet 

89 Port Colborne. . 

90 Port Credit 

91 Port Dover 

92 Port Elgin 

93 Port Hope 

94 Port Perry 

95 Port Rowan 

96 Prescott 

97 Richmond Hill. 

98 Ridgetown 

99 Ridgeway 

100 Rockland 

101 Saltfleet 

102 Shelburne 

103 Simcoe 

104 Smithville 

105 Stirling 

106 Streetsville .... 

107 Sydenham 

108 Thorold 

109 Tillsonburg 

110 Trenton 

111 Tweed 

112 Uxbridge 

113 Vienna 

114 Walkerton 

115 Wardsville 

116 Water down. . . . 

117 Waterford 

118 Watford 



Average 

Daily 

Attendance 



105 

89 

86 

156 

95 

107 

155 

135 

389 

148 

735 

134 

34 

111 

463 

61 

35 

262 

78 

120 

104 

43 
142 
228 

91 
143 
185 
115 
270 
327 

74 

93 
267 
143 

24 
184 
159 

72 
119 
111 
185 
134 
259 

96 

97 

70 
138 
296 
236 
255 
133 
120 

29 
111 

76 
124 
128 
114 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



19,861 
20,040 
10,955 
30,811 
18,656 
19,574 
30,572 
24,857 
73,978 
28,943 
138,994 
25,191 

6,172 
21,118 
85,241 
11,729 

6,568 
51,007 
14,775 
23,276 
19,155 

8,358 
27,345 
41,912 
16,969 
27,094 
36,504 
20,786 
53,025 
61,169 
14,350 
16,824 
50,492 
24,671 

4,509 
34,570 
30,904 
13,198 
23,319 
20,039 
36,093 
25,256 
48,702 
17,105 
18,962 
11,697 
25,286 
54,729 
44,174 
47,990 
24,823 
22,735 

5,458 
21,803 

4,239 
31,567 
24,516 
20,995 



Expenditures 



Current 



$ 

6,349 

9,240 

7,310 

14,090 

7558 

8,192 

15,714 

11,074 

25,135 

13,362 

44,846 

11,252 

5,151 

9,560 

30,821 

7,232 

4,116 

27,358 

9,700 

11,869 

11,115 

No Records 

3,395 

14,025 

19,555 

7,730 

9,320 

17,172 

8,043 

25,789 

25,522 

6,029 

8,850 

23,524 

13,468 

3,847 

15,538 

17,581 

15,439 

12,382 

7,130 

14,651 

9,800 

26,871 

8,199 

11,572 

6,789 

10,172 

20,707 

18,163 

20,884 

9,983 

9,825 

3,492 

13,915 

2,619 

16,154 

11,685 

9,794 



Capital 



$ 

906 
2,820 



2,072 

590 

1,331 

3,531 

6,072 

(in default) 

7,117 

16,308 



15,064 



9,820 

861 

2,833 



Available 
149 
460 

2,786 



1,496 
8,706 
2,006 
12,255 
13,073 
5,113 



2,439 
3,008 



6,783 
7,034 



7,537 



6,419 
2,732 
7,661 
1,924 
1,251 



(in default) 
2,613 
4,231 
3,138 
6,330 



4,293 
1,765 
3,209 



Legislative 
Grant 



$ 
1,078 
1,499 
1,203 
1,687 
1,012 
1,167 
1,961 
1,741 
1,953 
1,737 
1,914 
1,745 
1,073 
1,328 
1,942 
1,287 

843 
2,001 
1,527 
1,645 
1,429 

742 
1,740 
1,983 
1,390 
1,467 
1,980 
1,428 
1,863 
1,913 
1,112 
1,301 
1,872 
3,302 

801 
1,833 
1,858 
1,804 
1,912 
1,197 
1,762 
1,680 
1,875 
1,364 
1,708 
1,073 
1,413 
1,946 
1,878 
1,956 
1,619 
1,757 

791 
1,525 

707 
2,033 
1,578 
1,821 



County 
Grant 



$ 
3,575 
5,602 
5,068 
10,044 
3,550 
6,342 
6,838 
1,441 
9,852 



43,838 
7,660 
2,365 
3,545 

13,580 
5,515 
1,998 

24,260 
4,090 
7,394 
7,591 

1,229 

5,263 

12,866 

4,213 



10,355 
4,566 

17,705 

29,861 
3,520 
4,819 

14,069 
7,538 
2,228 
4,514 

18,327 
7,876 
9,389 
3,098 
6,730 
5,216 

24,255 
4,234 
7,402 
3,607 
8,725 

10,551 
1,592 
3,203 
6,530 
8,605 
1,808 
6,647 
707 
6,501 
9,325 
6,057 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



233 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 
DAY SCHOOLS, 1936 



Local 
Levy 

(Current and 
Capital) 



Cost of Education per Pupil-Day (Cents) 



Current 



Capital 



Total 



Legis- 
lative 
Share 



County 
Share 



Local 
Levy 
Share 



Debenture 
Debt 



60 

61 

62 

63 

64 

65 

66 

67 

68 

69 

70 

71 

72 

73 

74 

75 

76 

77 

78 

79 

80 

81 

82 

83 

84 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 

98 

99 

100 

101 

102 

103 

104 

105 

106 

107 

108 

109 

110 

111 

112 

113 

114 

115 

116 

117 

118 



$ 

2,760 

2,820 

2,000 

2,228 

4,479 

2,831 

12,031 
9,895 

13,185 
7,117 

16,759 
2,975 
2,517 
4,400 

31,564 
500 
1,274 
9,820 
6,458 
5,630 
1,500 



31.97 
46.10 
66.73 
45.73 
40.51 
41.85 
51.40 
44.55 
33.98 
46.17 
32.26 
44.67 
83.45 
45.27 
36.16 
61.66 
62.67 
53.63 
65.65 
51.00 
58.02 



4.56 
14.07 



6.72 

3.16 

6.80 

11.55 

24.42 



36.53 
60.17 
66.73 
52.45 
43.67 
48.65 
62.95 
68.97 



24.59 
11.73 



17.67 



19.25 

5.83 

12.17 



70.76 
43.99 
44.67 
83.45 
45.27 
53.83 
61.66 
62.67 
72.88 
71.48 
63.17 
58.02 



5.42 
7.48 

10.98 
5.47 
5.42 
5.97 
6.42 
7.00 
2.64 
6.00 
1.38 
6.93 

17.38 
6.29 
2.27 

10.97 

12.83 
3.92 

10.34 
7.07 
7.46 



18.00 
27.95 
46.26 
32.60 
19.03 
32.40 
22.37 
5.80 
13.32 



31.54 
30.41 
38.32 
16.78 
15.93 
47.02 
30.42 
47.56 
27.68 
31.76 
39.62 



13.90 
14.07 
18.26 

7.23 
24.01 
14.46 
39.35 
39.81 
17.82 
24.59 
12.06 
11.81 
40.78 
20.83 
37.03 

4.26 
19.40 
19.25 
43.71 
24.19 

7.83 



$ 

1,500 
29,277 



6,965 

2,359 

10,327 

31,503 

70,415 

112,828 



226,775 



158,070 



59,500 

5,896 

24,362 



1,596 
7,487 
9,586 
2,714 
8,571 

12,706 
4,711 

12,755 
7,255 
7,798 
3,550 

10,213 

5,308 

817 

15,829 
5,323 
4,570 

10,019 
2,339 

11,430 
5,100 
9,148 
5,124 
2,251 
1,550 



9,099 
7,613 

19,559 
4,519 
5,500 
1,200 
5,700 
343 

12,023 

" 4,700 



40.62 
51.29 
46.66 
45.56 
34.40 
47.04 
38.69 
48.64 
41.72 
42.01 
52.60 
46.59 
54.59 
85.31 
44.95 
56.88 
116.98 
53.10 
35.58 
40.59 
38.80 
55.17 
47.93 
61.02 
58.04 
40.22 
37.83 
41.12 
43.51 
40.21 
43.21 
63.99 
63.82 
61.80 
51.17 
47.66 
46.65 



1.78 
1.68 
6.65 



5.52 
23.85 

9.65 
23.11 
21.37 
35.63 



4.83 
12.19 



19.62 
22.76 



32.32 



17.79 
10.81 
15.73 
11.24 
6.59 



42.40 
52.97 
53.31 
45.56 
39.92 
70.89 
48.34 
71.75 
63.09 
77.64 
52.60 
51.42 
66.78 
83.51 
64.57 
79.64 
116.98 
85.42 
35.58 
58.38 
49.61 
70.90 
59.17 
67.61 
58.04 
40.22 



5.91 

8.81 
12.64 

27.84 



13.60 

7.20 

15.28 



47.03 
52.32 
52.85 
71.05 
63.99 
63.82 
61.80 
64.77 
54.86 
61.93 



8.87 
6.36 
4.73 
8.19 
5.42 
5.42 
6.87 
3.52 
3.13 
7.75 
7.73 
3.71 

13.38 

17.76 
5.30 
6.01 

13.67 
8.20 
5.97 
4.88 
6.65 
3.85 
7.97 
9.00 
9.17 
5.59 
3.55 
4.25 
4.07 
6.52 
7.72 

14.51 
6.99 

16.69 
6.44 
6.44 
8.67 



14.70 
19.24 
30.70 
24.83 



28.37 
21.97 
33.39 
48.82 
24.53 
28.65 
27.86 
30.55 
49.41 
13.06 
59.30 
59.68 
40.26 
15.46 
18.65 
20.65 
49.80 
24.75 
39.03 
30.84 
34.50 
19.28 
3.60 
6.67 
26.30 
37.85 
33.13 
30.48 
16.69 
20.59 
38.04 
28.85 



19.09 
27.38 
22.87 
15.99 
31.64 
34.81 
22.66 
24.05 
11.86 
54.34 
21.10 
18.18 
21.51 
18.12 
45.79 
17.22 
34.63 
42.97 
11.67 
31.67 
20. 19 
18.78 
29.95 
11.87 
13.26 



16.62 
17.23 
40.76 
18.20 
24.19 
21.99 
26.14 
8.10 
38.08 



298 

1,651 

60,708 



4,488 



30,091 

106,022 

171,932 

3,505 



32,219 
32,427 



88,884 
81,245 



95,913 



53,322 

54,642 

*79,795 

12,191 

6,353 



73,930 
25,787 
39,408 
6,276 
67,143 



22.38 



90,551 
40,327 
35,306 



234 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE COLLEGIATE INSTITUTES 
TABLE 34— FINANCIAL STATISTICS, 



High Schools 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


Expenditures 


Legislative 
Grant 


County 




Current 


Capital 


Grant 


(In Counties) 
119 Welland 


378 
374 
182 
129 
114 
132 
136 


73,767 
70,779 
35,507 
22,587 
20,302 
24,839 
25,209 


$ 
39,054 
37,622 
20,271 
9,128 
9,253 
12,121 
14,972 


$ 
7,329 
(in default) 
4,135 
1,255 


$ 
1,879 
1,778 
3,677 
1,370 
1,306 
1,609 
1,664 


$ 


120 Weston 


25,531 

11,066 

4,771 

740 


121 Whitby 


122 Wiarton 


123 Williamstown 


124 Winchester 

125 Wingham 


420 


7,458 
8,062 






Totals and Averages 


19,204 


3,628,017 


1,694,385 


379,026 


204,677 


958,488 


(In Districts) 

1 Bracebridge 

2 Capreol 


171 

93 

137 

171 

148 

91 

54 

95 

65 

75 

62 

124 

104 

139 

73 

275 

288 

53 

212 

214 

123 

213 

254 
333 
100 
407 


31,899 
20,020 
26,404 
31,391 
29,073 
17,365 
11,978 
34,397 
12,117 
14,117 
12,132 
23,311 
19,756 
24,947 
14,164 
51,895 
56,948 
10,070 
41,870 
39,495 
22,566 

42,016 

48,944 
64,759 
18,368 
77,023 


11,961 

8,150 

15,391 

15,248 

15,363 

9,236 

6,016 

21,850 

4,598 

8,596 

11,688 

10,214 

14,956 

20,964 

6,339 

24,333 

37,956 

3,605 

21,751 

14,758 

8,611 

31,642 

17,929 

33,933 

6,703 

42,029 


6,108 
2,604 
3,440 
(in default) 
4,012 


6,904 
2,133 
3,597 
4,506 
4,452 
2,408 
2,078 
5,878 
2,148 
2,615 
3,220 
4,020 
12,632 
4,487 
2,173 
3,733 
3,995 
1,404 
7,264 
3,697 
2,612 

9,394 

6,969 
5,237 
3,439 
4,473 




3 Chapleau 




4 Cobalt 




5 Cochrane 




6 Dryden 




7 Englehart 


" 18,160 " 
1,037 




8 Fort Frances 




9 Gore Bay 




10 Gravenhurst 




1 1 Haileybury 






12 Huntsville 


2,970 
5,620 




13 Iroquois Falls 




14 Kapuskasing 




15 Keewatin 






16 Kenora 


10,275 
6,800 




17 Kirkland Lake . . . . 




18 Mattawa 




19 New Liskeard 


435 
1,040 




20 Parry Sound 




21 Rainy River 




22 Schumacher \ 

23 South Porcupine. . / 

24 Sturgeon Falls .... 


7,180 






25 Sudbury 


310 
1,012 
9,251 




26 Thessalon 




27 Timmins 








Totals and Averages 


4,084 


797,020 


423,820 


80,254 


115,468 








Totals and Averages 
All High Schools. . . 


23,288 


4,425,037 


2,118,205 


459,280 


320,145 


958,488 


Collegiate Institutes 
and High Schools . 


63,311 


12,125,375 


6,249,430 


1,447,793 


480,484 


1,459,859 


Increases for the year. . . 










39,140 
















Decreases for the year. . 


1,903 


282,861 


23,400 


80,326 




36,405 









flncluded in Public School figures. 

* Combined figure for High School and Vocational School. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



235 



AND HIGH SCHOOLS 

DAY SCHOOLS, 1936 



Local 


Cost of Education per Pupil- Day (Cents) 




Levy 

(Current and 
Capital) 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


County 
Share 


Local 
Levy 
Share 


Debenture 
Debt 


$ 

119 34,553 

120 5,297 

121 8,541 

122 4,255 

123 10,048 


52.94 
53.15 
57.09 
40.41 
45.57 
48.79 
59.39 


9.94 


62.88 


2.55 
2.51 
10.35 
6.06 
6.43 
6.48 
6.60 




46.84 
7.48 
24.05 
18.83 
49.49 
9.74 
19.25 


% 
71,200 


36.07 
31.16 
21.12 
3.65 
30.02 
31.98 


*187,188 


11.64 
5.55 


68.73 
45.96 
45.57 
50.48 
59.39 


44,159 

12,599 

2,424 


124 2,420 

125 4,852 


1.69 


2,525 






841,211 


46.04 


10.45 


56.49 


5.64 


26.42 


23.19 


4,301,112 


1 11,116 


37.49 
40.70 
58.29 
48.57 
52.84 
53.18 
50.22 
63.52 
37.94 
60.89 
96.34 
43.82 
75.70 
84.03 
44.75 
46.88 
66.65 
35.80 
51.95 
37.37 
38.16 

75.31 

36.63 
52.40 
36.50 

84.44 


19.14 
13.01 
13.02 


56.63 
53.71 
71.31 


21.64 
10.65 
13.62 
14.35 
15.31 
13.87 
17.35 
17.09 
17.72 
18.52 
26.55 
17.25 
63.94 
17.98 
15.34 
7.19 
7.01 
13.94 
17.35 
9.36 
11.57 

22.36 

14.24 
8.09 

18.73 
8.40 




34.85 
40.85 
55.82 
35.38 
50.30 
42.61 
37.57 
90.36 
34.14 
42.85 
63.80 
26.81 
41.07 
73.97 
36.71 
55.44 
73.61 
12.79 
38.06 
31.72 
26.56 

90.68 

22.40 
36.77 
23.34 
83.96 


71,129 


2 8,179 

3 14,740 

4 11,105 

5 14,625 




16,603 




39,933 




39,756 


13.80 


66.64 
53.18 
50.22 

116.32 
46.50 
60.89 
96.34 
56.56 

104.15 
84.03 
44.75 
66.68 
78.59 
35.80 
52.99 
40.00 
38.16 

92.40 

36.63 

52.88 
42.01 
91.62 




33,326 


6 7,400 

7 4,500 












8 31,082 


52.80 
8.56 




122,822 


9 4,137 

10 6,050 

11 7,740 

12 6,250 

13 8,114 




16,333 












12.74 

28.45 




18,353 




150,740 


14 18,453 




42,000 


15 5,200 








16 28,775 


19.80 
11.94 




144,600 


17 41,917 




72,934 


18 1,288 






19 15,935 


1.04 
2.63 




2,602 


20 12,527 

21 5,994 




2,081 


23} 38,100 
24 10,962 


17.09 








7,000 


25 23,810 

26 4,287 


.48 
5.51 
7.18 




11,555 
30,572 




27 46,052 




107,791 








388,338 


53.18 


10.07 


63.25 


14.49 




48.72 


830,130 






1,229,549 


47.87 


10.38 


58.25 


7.23 


2.17 


27.79 


5,131,242 


5,507,312 


51.54 


11.94 


63.48 


3.96 


12.04 


45.42 


19,631,806 


180,516 


.99 




.61 


.40 




2.49 


947,745 














.38 






.02 



















236 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



03 




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ffl 


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238 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE VOCATIONAL 
TABLE 36— DAY SCHOOLS— TEACHERS; PUPILS; MAY 





o 
o 

A 
O 
(fi 



CI 

a 
>> 




Teachers 








Full- 
Time 


Part-Time 

and 
Occasional 


Corr 


plete May Enrolment 


Schools 


_4) 

IS 


IS 
E 
u 

to 




"8 

B 

V 

to 


IS 



13 

2 


15 

c 

V 

to 


v C.S 

to<to 


Counties 


AC 
A.AGR. 
ACT 
ACT 
AC 
CT 
AC 
ACT 
ACT 
ACT 
COM. 
ACT 

T 
ACT 

N 
ACT 
CT 
AC 
ACT 
ACT 

T 

COM. 

ACT 

AC 

AC 

ACT 

AC 

ACT 

A.AGR. 

ACT 

CT 

ACT 

AC 

AC 

ACT 

AC 

T 

T 

COM. 

COM. 

CT 
COM. 
CT 
ACT 
ACT 
CT 
AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 
AC 




2 


2 

4 

4 
10 

3 
. .... 


1 
3 
2 
8 
2 
1 
3 


55 

59 

366 

527 

68 

481 

151 

170 

238 

397 

931 

739 

1,404 

436 

17 

608 

1,756 

94 

399 

403 

1,514 

1,229 

314 

123 

112 

379 

117 

137 

67 

313 

423 

531 

245 

95 

272 

173 

2,850 

1,461 

1,807 

1,571 

1,078 

985 

2,035 

445 

371 

1,678 

149 

464 

97 

191 

335 

350 


21 

42 

176 

268 

21 

255 

53 

71 

113 

203 

194 

378 

1,005 

204 

17 

303 

896 

17 

239 

193 

1,444 

272 

144 

49 

48 

191 

45 

83 

31 

116 

216 

253 

67 

50 

166 

59 

1,721 

1,029 

525 

430 

750 

244 

904 

225 

218 

996 

44 

115 

22 

37 

84 

76 


34 

17 

190 

259 

47 

226 

98 

99 

125 

194 

737 

361 

399 

232 


89.88 
87.48 
92 91 




3 Belleville 


8 

8 

2 

8 

2 

1 

7 

7 
13 
21 
44 
11 

1 
12 
41 

"io' ' 

10 

36 

22 

5 

"i" 

11 
1 

1 


5 
7 
1 
8 
2 
2 
5 
5 

16 
7 

15 
6 

6 

13 
3 
3 
5 
2 

19 
6 
1 
1 
8 
1 
3 




95 31 




94 77 


6 Chatham 


92.36 
94.44 
95.60 
93 45 


7 Cornwall 


8 Fort Erie 


9 Gait 


2 


3 

1 


10 Guelph 


93 17 




95 62 


12 '* Westdale 


11 
1 


5 

1 


93 24 




93 00 




92.75 




1 
5 


" 5 " 


16 Kitchener 


305 

860 

77 

160 

210 

70 

957 

170 

74 

64 

188 

72 

54 

36 

197 

207 

278 

178 

45 

106 

114 

1,129 

432 

1,282 

1,141 

328 

741 

1,131 

220 

153 

682 

105 

349 

75 

154 

251 

274 


95 16 




93 33 




3 

1 
3 
2 


3 


90 68 


19 Niagara Falls 


96 69 


20 Oshawa 


95.95 
91 55 


21 Ottawa, Technical 


22 " H.S. of Commerce. .. . 


93 82 


23 Owen Sound 


7 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
4 
5 
1 
4 
4 
7 
3 
2 
9 
2 


2 
1 
1 
1 

3 

7 
2 

"4' 
5 
2 
3 
1 
4 
2 


88 57 


24 Pembroke 


92 92 


25 Perth 


96 43 


26 Peterborough 


95 78 


27 Picton 


93 61 


28 Renfrew 


94 33 


29 Ridgetown 


91 30 


30 St. Catharines 


13 

9 
11 

1 

"3" 

2 
66 
53 
29 
38 
44 
26 
49 
10 
11 
41 

2 

6 

1 

3 

4 

3 


8 

8 

6 

2 

1 

3 

4 
28 
13 
17 
14 

9 
10 
28 

8 

8 
18 

3 

8 

"0" 
2 


91.79 


31 vSt. Thomas 


94.17 


32 Sarnia 


90.24 




93 01 




93.97 




95.65 


36 Stratford 


95.62 


37 Toronto, Central Technical 

38 " Danforth " 

39 " Central H.S. of Com. . . 

40 " Eastern " 


93.19 
92.18 
93 99 






91.21 


41 " Western Technical. . . . 


1 


2 


90.69 
88.73 


43 " Northern Vocational. . . 

44 Welland 


3 
2 


5 
1 

1 


91.25 
95.43 


45 Weston 


86.01 


46 Windsor 


96.62 


47 Woodstock 


2 

6 
1 
3 
1 
5 


1 
3 

2 
3 
1 
3 


86.67 


48 York, East 


92.11 


49 " North 


94.41 


50 York Twp., Runnymede 

51 " Vaughan Road 

52 " " York Memorial 


91.04 
92.46 
93.21 


Totals 




708 


357 


138 


102 


31,210 


15,323 


15,887 


93.18 








Districts 


AC 
CT 
AM 
ACT 
CT 
CT 
CT 
ACT 


1 
18 

2 
10 
15 
12 
19 

7 


1 
10 

5 

11 

7 


3 


5 


127 
601 
72 
476 
726 
680 
604 
270 


53 
312 

72 
281 
388 
337 
312 
147 


74 

2S9 

' 195' ' 
338 
343 
292 
123 


90.68 


2 Fort William 


86.68 




2 

1 


2 
2 


91 . 13 


4 North Bay 


93 . 08 




94.39 


6 Sault Ste. Marie 




1 


88.98 




83.76 




3 


2 


3 


91.95 






Totals 




84 


37 


8 


13 


3,556 


1,902 


1,654 


S9.44 








Grand Totals 




792 


394 


146 


115 


34,766 


17,225 


17,541 


92.79 












21 




7 










.71 
















Decreases for the year 






23 




7 


652 


620 


32 


























49 . 55 


50.45 





















Type of school: 



-act — Composite (academic, commercial and technical.) 
ac — Combined academic and commercial. 

ct — Combined Vocational (commercial and technical.) 

a. agk. — Academic, and Vocational Agricultural School. 



com. — Commercial. 
T — Technical. 
n — Navigation. 
am — Academic, and 

Mining School. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



239 



SCHOOLS 

ENROLMENT, ATTENDANCE, GRADE DISTRIBUTION, 1936-37 



Pupils 





Full-T 


ime May Enrolment 


Grade Distribution of F 


ull-Time Pupils 


Complete Enrol- 
ment by Areas 


*c5 
o 
H 


V 


6 

o 

ft 


B 


"cd 
a 
.2 

u O 


•a 

cfl 

c 

O 


X 

C3 
U 

O 


u 

CS 

O 


>< 

V 

cd 
u 

O 





.*2 
'0 

CI 

a 

CO 


a 
5 

y 

'55 
V 





a 

V 

1 T) 

O (U 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

<>9 


55 

59 

366 

527 

68 

481 

151 

167 

238 

397 

931 

739 

1,249 

407 

17 

608 

1,756 

94 

399 

403 

1,447 

1,229 

262 

123 

112 

379 

111 

137 

67 

313 

423 

531 

245 

95 

272 

173 

2,373 

1,457 

1,717 

1,485 

1,077 

985 

1,778 

441 

371 

1,678 

149 

464 

97 

191 

335 

323 


21 

42 

176 

268 

21 

255 

53 

71 

113 

203 

194 

378 

893 

193 

17 

303 

896 

17 

239 

193 

1,412 

272 

118 

49 

48 

191 

41 

83 

31 

116 

216 

253 

67 

50 

166 

59 

1,641 

1,027 

491 

405 

750 

244 

814 

222 

218 

996 

44 

115 

22 

37 

84 

69 


34 

17 

190 

259 

47 

226 

98 

96 

125 

194 

737 

361 

356 

214 

"305 

860 

77 

160 

210 

35 

957 

144 

74 

64 

188 

70 

54 

36 

197 

207 

278 

178 

45 

106 

114 

732 

430 

1,226 

1,080 

327 

741 

964 

219 

153 

682 

105 

349 

75 

154 

251 

254 


53 
52 
300 
629 
75 
333 
186 
161 
267 
397 
967 
769 

1,358 

405 

13 

705 

1,303 

85 

382 

485 

1,137 

1,213 

224 

94 

100 

372 

113 

118 

75 

357 

442 

557 

249 

82 

234 

182 

1,777 
976 

1,399 

1,610 

1,014 
904 

1,627 
455 
402 

1,696 
152 
488 
88 
170 
357 
338 






29 

27 

81 

147 

36 

66 

41 

23 

83 

91 

265 

216 

268 

135 


26 
9 
55 
78 
13 
52 
44 
11 
40 
42 

132 
93 

155 
65 








42 

13 

258 

421 

58 

335 

95 

162 

179 

357 

919 

708 

1,374 

363 

17 

540 

1,452 

45 

354 

342 

1,335 

1,187 

281 

112 

55 

274 

66 

100 

25 

263 

327 

417 

239 

44 

173 

154 

2,745 

1,423 

1,776 

1,571 

1,041 

975 

2,020 

214 

91 

1,549 

122 

461 

57 

148 

298 

350 


12 
46 

108 
98 
10 

146 
56 
8 
41 
38 
12 
31 
26 
72 


1 


"is" 


23 
192 
220 










6 
15 




32 

52 

19 

142 


8 


48 

"32' 
198 

....„ 

140 

" 53' 


140 

66 

129 

85 

176 

458 

307 

547 

173 

17 

264 

575 

34 

186 

195 

462 

465 

103 

42 

26 

197 

52 

46 

31 


33 






4 
6 










24 
88 
41 
43 
66 
34 


18 
2 


35 

48 

7 


' '8* 


' 4 
1 








182 

414 

24 

120 

131 

358 

395 

68 

40 

29 

118 

31 

40 

20 

143 

116 

139 

82 

32 

67 

53 

538 

427 

437 

385 

280 

274 

376 

144 

96 

512 

27 

121 

34 

48 

102 

75 


103 

190 

15 

70 

77 

289 

288 

38 

23 

21 

61 

28 

24 

16 

90 

65 

87 

42 

20 

85 

26 

351 

202 

263 

235 

138 

131 

249 

67 

39 

418 

14 

62 

17 

38 

49 

48 


9 
123 


"'8' 


43 

306 

21 

23 


65 

286 
45 
28 
51 

174 
40 
29 
11 
56 

101 
51 
37 
40 
49 
92 

114 
4 
51 
53 
14 
36 
36 


3 

18 
4 






17 






10 


163 

81 

20 

4 


55 


67 


5 

2 




33 
14 
36 


4 


3 




4 












27 








2 


30 


31 
63 
59 




49 
36 


1 


31 
32 
33 


"VI2 

' - 9i' 
"64' 


143 

246 

121 

43 

75 

66 

933 

683 

633 

726 

467 

408 

581 

222 

205 

614 

68 

224 

46 

60 

154 

173 


4 






2 


31 










35 


45 






46 


36 




28 

11 

17 

199 

59 

21 

124 

257 

4 

29 

"35' 
38 


5 


37 
38 
39 
40 


234 

114 

144 

80 

66 

48 

178 

4 

2 

111 

5 

19 


134 
14 

41 

"'i4' 
"'73' 

"'23' 


69 

2 

31 


41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
19 


9 
9 

"23l' 
279 
38 
27 
3 
40 
42 
37 


28 

1 

15 

j 

91 


"iO 






45 
17 

27 


1 


51 
52 


13 
















29,952 


14,897 


15,055 


27,917 


820 


12,102 


7,986 


4,794 


1,773 


370 


2,107 


27,927 


2,882 


401 


1 


127 
601 
72 
461 
726 
596 
604 
270 


53 
312 

72 
279 
388 
285 
312 
147 


74 
289 

"i82 - 
338 
311 
292 
123 


133 
618 
73 
381 
574 
450 
505 
286 


"'65' 


67 
305 

34 
172 
238 
196 
393 
111 


35 
141 

19 
163 
218 
127 
145 
119 


15 

57 
11 
84 
117 
65 
57 
40 






10 


113 
535 
35 
405 
689 
627 
473 
220 


66' 

35 
54 
37 
50 
75 

317 


14 


9 


98 

8 






3 






2 


4 




42 

"4i' 


17 


5 
6 

7 


80 

102 

9 


73 


3 
56 


8 






50 












3,457 


1,848 


1,609 


3,020 


65 


1,516 


967 


446 


297 


73 


93 


3,097 


142 


33,409 


16,745 


16,664 


30,937 


885 


13,618 


8,953 


5,240 


2,070 


443 


2,200 


31,024 


3,199 


543 








266 






134 














72 




























997 


771 


226 




161 


290 






176 


115 


389 


269 


436 














50.12 


49.88 


92.60 


2.65 


40.76 


26.80 


15.68 


6.20 


1.33 


6.58 


89.24 


9.20 


1.56 



240 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



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CN 


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OH 




CO 


00 


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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



241 



THE VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 

TABLE 38— DAY SCHOOLS— CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS BY 
SUBJECTS OF STUDY, 1936-37 



SCHOOLS 


J3 
09 

"5b 

c 


CO 

.- 
E 

<u 
cS 

3 


o 

c 

'o 


c 

cS 
J; en 


a 
u 
u 

ft 


u 

.5 

Xi 
W> 

3 

d 
u 

Q 


M 

O 

O 

CO 




to 4) 

h 





•*2 
'8 

i" 

F ^ 

o£ 


n 
C 

3 

a 


*C 

bo 

< 


Counties 


55 
60 
364 
527 
68 
481 
151 
152 
238 
102 

1,435 
884 
703 
371 
565 

1,659 

94 

399 

382 

1,380 

1,229 

188 

94 
112 
183 
105 
109 

67 
313 
423 
531 
238 

93 
227 
173 

2,373 

1,457 

1,077 

1,807 

1,485 

985 

1,778 

437 

328 

1,745 

113 

444 

97 

191 
335 
296 


26 

60 
364 
484 

68 
433 
110 
152 
238 

74 

1,429 
691 
724 
410 
475 

1,551 

73 

399 

403 

1,380 

831 

148 

57 

82 

182 

77 

77 

50 

307 

423 

531 

168 

93 

272 

120 

2,314 

1,428 

1,059 

1,299 

1,169 

837 

1,778 

331 

302 

1,768 

149 

445 

63 

98 
220 
248 


60 
296 
426 

36 
334 

66 

23 
141 

62 

1,408 
458 
698 
229 
475 

1,062 

34 

359 

254 

1,380 

747 

55 

40 

26 

180 

79 

63 

65 

182 

387 

397 

176 

73 

75 

92 

2,501 

1,386 

1,009 

1,209 

' 1,188 

713 

1,393 

424 

305 

1,448 

68 

464 

46 

108 
276 
173 


55 


20 












55 

60 

199 

•276 

68 

342 

151 

152 

140 






36 
155 
221 

**'i67 


42 
147 
260 

21 
233 


23 
43 
49 


18 
79 

193 
47 

112 


18 
133 
193 

"ii2 


60 


Belleville 


331 
408 

32 
315 
129 
152 
238 

29 

1,374 
799 
697 
362 
570 

1,330 

56 

375 

403 

1,380 

796 

80 

92 

112 

181 

76 

43 

44 

311 

352 

472 

236 

63 

142 

119 

2,051 

1,324 

1,063 

1,518 

1,441 

861 

1,552 

376 

328 

1,448 

114 

464 

97 

146 
318 
248 


"74 

25 

14 

128 

129 

"i2 

133 




















Fort Erie 


""87 
30 

1,000 


67 

87 


"i3 


85 
54 


"54 




Gait 








Hamilton— 


1,053 


626 


342 
602 
187 
166 
298 
383 


396 

"i50 
166 
298 
400 


179 
931 
332 
248 
412 
815 
94 
180 
236 








Westdale 


155 
"240 


260 
202 
201 
656 


290 
168 
201 
719 
7 
219 
183 

1,412 


190 

20 

138 

234 


















1 




495 

783 

"95 
29 


219 
182 

1,230 












116 
908 


116 


116 




Ottawa — 






430 
89 


430 
89 


1,229 
170 
123 
112 
219 
111 
89 
20 
205 
216 
207 
244 

' "i85 
173 

257 






63 


66 


65 








Perth 
















133 


i82 


37 

75 


154 


34 














31 

30 

70 

166 

221 






31 








39 

38 

113 

111 

38 

" "38 

1,127 
969 
721 
156 


36 

38 

113 

81 


""38 
113 
107 


64 


St. Catharines 

St. Thomas 


"is 

161 
130 

"i45 

229 

395 

427 

1,362 

1,276 

406 

1,119 

" 903 

108 

426 

94 

52 
318 
296 


70 

182 
221 


"72 








12 




10 

75 

1,512 
719 
706 


49 
75 
23 

1,548 
733 
706 


44 


44 


89 




95 


Stratford 


43 

601 
324 
273 


564 
334 
306 




Toronto — 

Central Technical. . . 




Western " 


140 

1,807 
1,485 
985 
960 
218 
125 
706 
149 
464 
97 

191 
335 
323 
















Western " 
Welland 


'"4ii 

179 

181 

1,043 


18 

411 

182 

201 

1,043 


" " 284 

48 

52 

201 


39 
496 
218 

70 
208 

62 


49 

496 

49 

98 

208 
















York East 










York North 














York— 

Runnymede 

Vaughan Rd 




















































Totals 


29,103 


26,470 


23,144 


25,503 


10,194 


10,151 


10,864 


6,543 


6,001 


4,995 


16,415 


424 






Districts 


117 
580 
75 
427 
651 
472 
553 
270 


127 

592 
75 
353 
539 
458 
553 
270 


"517 
95 
295 
624 
333 
453 
196 


27 
592 

52 
409 
607 
415 
532 
227 






39 
266 
95 
78 
304 
260 
255 
134 


32 
38 


55 
123 


'"i44 


69 
209 




Fort William 


135 

27 

"i6i 

115 

71 
62 


260 

95 

251 

304 

228 
252 
134 








North Bay 


102 

162 


30 

180 

105 

201 

67 


228 
180 
105 

""67 






Port Arthur 


195 

308 

301 

69 




Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudbury 












Totals 


3,141 


2,967 


2,513 


2,861 


571 


1,524 


1,431 


334 


761 


724 


1,151 








Grand Totals 


32,244 


29,437 


25,657 


28,364 


10,765 


11,675 


12,295 


6,877 


6,762 


5,719 


17,566 


424 



242 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE VOCATIONAL 
TABLE 39— FINANCIAL STATISTICS, 



Schools 


Average 

Daily 

Attendance 


Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 


Expenditures 


lative 
Grant 


County 
Grant 




Current 


Capital 


(In Counties) 


93 

73 
157 
622 

59 
310 
183 
104 
263 
382 
1,383 
947 
743 
408 
645 
1,303 

87 
412 
282 

2,272 

212 

81 

96 

372 

109 

115 

36 

468 

447 

547 

246 

79 

244 

190 

1.813 

1,531 

1,096 

850 

1,371 

1,565 

1,037 

862 

463 

429 

1,861 

166 

204 

341 

313 

530 

74 


17,419 

14,107 

58,466 

119,988 

11,590 

58,916 

35,953 

19,603 

49,201 

70,359 

235,677 

182,854 

144,766 

74,365 

125,204 

251,025 

17,116 

79,929 

53,283 

417,064 

40,089 

15,852 

19,320 

79,703 

21,007 

21,097 

7,097 

88,089 

84,484 

99,657 

47,071 

14,858 

47,711 

36,002 

345,951 

292,688 

209,194 

162,117 

260,011 

297,464 

198,359 

164,828 

90,392 

82,541 

344,315 

32,253 

37,696 

64,487 

59,560 

98,663 

13,885 


$ 

7,525 
7,245 
39,861 
54,007 
11,722 
42,661 
14,437 
11,043 
35,325 
40,198 

197,474 
79,071 

106,660 
53,786 
69,247 

164,565 

8,966 

42,342 

46,475 

258,422 

33,239 

8,210 

8,025 

56,639 

8,433 

14,075 

13,244 

67,246 

52,753 

62,450 

20,726 

5,512 

24,831 

14,907 

409,962 

244,209 

179,931 

150,653 

197,234 

190,611 

146,232 

124,957 

51,625 

52,078 

169,242 

16,135 

18,476 

28,662 

24,369 

44,494 

6,754 


2,168 

2,096 

10,230 

12,165 


$ 

1,708 

4,552 

17,591 

14,562 

930 

17,359 

1,203 

1,271 

18,885 

18,005 

36,776 

6,390 

15,221 

21,417 

20,765 

36,129 

1,467 

8,671 

19,393 

34,047 

16,642 

1,739 

727 

19,806 

692 

6,376 

4,703 

13,256 

17,650 

10,196 

1,449 

3,468 

4,227 

2,495 

68,962 

53,049 

58,272 

58,869 

19,652 

19,161 

13,400 

12,675 

14,278 

12,236 

23,066 

1,010 

1,882 

3,065 

2,279 

3.176 

745 


$ 
2 953 






3 Belleville ' 














11,621 

(in default) 

27,285 

4,351 

65,881 

53,180 

88,174 

23,963 

16,303 

40,951 

1,168 

4,222 

25,441 

51,063 

21,437 


9 391 




11,333 


8 Fort Erie 


6 125 


9 Gait 


5 385 


10 Guelph 












13 Westdale 


















6 44."> 


18 Niagara Falls 


3,433 






20 Ottawa — Technical 1 

21 Commerce J 

22 Owen Sound (1935) 




3,034 


23 Pembroke 


3,364 


24 Perth 


1,064 
23,720 

'"" 2,987" 


3,901 






26 Picton 


4,913 


27 Renfrew 


500 


28 Ridgetown 


4,636 


29 St. Catharines 


20,174 

19,585 

18,848 

(in default) 

433 

7,844 

2,996 

103,421 

44,343 

50,358 

57,739 

35,338 

46,553 

42,321 

48,288 

7,364 

(in default) 

15,819 


13,319 


30 St. Thomas 


7,141 


3 1 vSarnia 


11,927 


32 Scarborough 


9,689 


33 Simcoe 


1,385 


34 Stamford 


12,000 


35 Stratford 


1,262 


36 Toronto — Central Technical 




37 Danforth " 




38 Western " 
















42 Western 




43 Northern 




44 Welland. . . 




45 Weston 


43,130 


46 Windsor 








48 York Twp. — Runnymede. . . . 

49 Vaughan Road. . 

50 York Memorial . 

51 York East 


5,6i5 

8,371 
11,053 
(in default) 
1,606 


9,523 
14,602 
15,498 
22,930 


52 York North 


3,698 






Totals and Averages 


30,416 


5,772,499 


3,736,946 


1,036,939 


799,013 


231,817 


(In Districts) 


95 
601 

60 
288 
366 
554 
491 
469 
272 


24,903 
117,161 
11,783 
10,671 
71,155 
107,420 
94,849 
89,102 
52,610 


12,169 
82,029 
11,451 
5,898 
38,832 
68,866 
43,874 
47,312 
37,923 




3,435 
37,501 

9,878 




2 Fort William 


45,606 
3,996 
1,046 
21,227 
33,569 
27,391 
10,494 
11,765 




3 Haileybury . . . 




4 Kirkland Lake (4 months) . . . 

5 North Bay. . . . 




25,221 
34,936 
18,500 
13,246 
17,881 




6 Port Arthur. . 




7 Sault Ste. Marie 




8 Sudbury 












Totals and Aveirges 


3,196 


579,654 


348,354 


155,094 


160,598 






Grand Totals and Averages. . 


33,612 


6,352.153 


4,085,300 


1,192,033 


959,611 


231,817 


Increases for the year 


3,619 


601,789 


20,888 


64,709 










Decreases for the year 










149,480 


12,069 















^Combined School. 



DEPARTMENT FO EDUCATION FOR 1937 



243 



SCHOOLS 

DAY SCHOOLS, 1936 





Local 

Levy 




Cost of Education pe 


r Pupil-Day (cents) 








Current 


Capital 


Total 


Legis- 
ative 
Share 


County 
vShare 


Local 
Levy 

S!;are 


Debenture 
Debt 


1 

2 
3 


$ 
5,671 
1,080 
25,809 
41,784 
10,600 
25,904 


43.20 
51.36 
68.18 
45.01 
101.14 
72.41 
40.16 
56.33 
71.80 
57.13 
83.79 
43.24 
73.68 
72.33 
55.31 
65.56 
52.38 
52.97 
87.22 

61.96 

82.91 
51.79 
41.54 
71.06 
40.14 
66.71 

186.61 
76.34 
62.44 
62.66 
44.03 
37.10 
52.04 
41.41 

118.50 
83.44 
86.01 
92.93 
75.86 
64.08 
73.72 
75.81 
57.11 
63 . 09 
49.15 
50.03 
49.01 
44.45 
40.92 
45.10 
48.64 


12.45 
14.86 
17.50 
10.14 


55 . 65 
66.22 
85.68 
55.15 
101.14 
92.13 
40.16 


9.81 
32.27 
30.09 
12.14 

8.02 
29.46 

3.35 

6.48 
38.38 
25 . 59 
15.60 

3.50 
31.24 
28.80 
16.58 
14.39 

8.57 
10.85 
36.40 

8.16 

41.51 

10.97 

3.77 

24 . 85 

3.29 

30.22 

66.27 

15.05 

20.89 

10.23 

3.08 

23.34 

8.86 

6.93 

19.93 

18.12 

27.86 

36.31 

7.56 

6.44 

6.76 

7.69 

16.73 

16.04 

11.29 

3.13 

4.99 

4.75 

3.83 

3.22 

5.37 


16.95 


32.56 
7.66 
44.14 
34.82 
91.46 
43.97 


$ 
*1 16,678 
60,457 




*487,600 




*314,980 






24,497 


6 

7 


19.72 


15.94 
31.52 
32.78 
10.94 


52,774 
*84,813 


8 


8,117 

35,082 

31,959 

217.709 

122,971 

142,474 

44,042 

59,738 

156,551 

3,006 

37,722 

65,835 

253,663 

34,592 

3,317 

3,656 

58,220 

2,582 

9,600 

3,765 

65,332 

45,196 

51,631 

9,848 

517 

11,474 

15,673 

472,732 

252,145 

176,606 

158,346 

212,633 

218,880 

171,696 

158,703 

34,694 

7,328 

124,128 

15,068 

9,775 

15,035 

15.858 

15,720 

4,440 


(in default) 

55.46 

6.18 

27.95 

29.08 

60.91 

32.22 

13.02 

16.31 

6.82 

5.28 

68.79 

12.24 

53 . 47 


41.41 
71.30 
45.42 
92.38 
67.25 
98.42 
59 . 22 
47.71 
62.36 
17.56 
47.19 
123.56 

60.82 

86.28 
20.92 
18.92 
73.05 
12.29 
45.50 
53.05 
74.17 
53.50 
51.81 
20.92 

3.48 
24.05 
43.53 
136.65 
86.15 
84.42 
97.67 
81.78 
73.58 
86.56 
96.28 
38.38 

8.88 
36.05 
46.72 
25.93 
23.31 
26.63 
15.93 
31.98 


70,277 


9 
10 


127.26 
63.31 

111.74 
72.32 

134.59 

104 . 55 
68.33 
81.87 
59.20 
58.25 

156.01 

74.20 

136.38 
51.79 
47 . 05 

100.82 
40.14 
80.87 

186.61 
99.24 
85.62 
81.57 


181,472 

*428,650 


11 




291,638 


12 




543,000 


13 




1,086,579 


14 




366,803 


15 




142,802 


16 




•319,755 


17 
18 
19 


37.65 
4.30 


*4 1,500 

79,793 
*407,956 


20\ 
21/ 
22 
23 




555,495 


7.57 
21.22 
20.19 


242,000 


24 
25 


5.51 
29.76 


7,407 
306,400 


26 


23.39 

2.37 
65.32 
15.12 

8.45 
11.97 
20.58 

9.32 
25.15 

3.51 




27 
28 


14.16 


52,415 


29 
30 
31 


22.90 

23.18 

18.91 

(in default) 

2.91 
16.44 

8.32 
29.89 
15.15 
24.07 
35.62 
13.59 
15.65 
21.34 
29.30 
14.49 
(in default) 

4.59 


*358,333 

228,964 

58,815 

*262,029 


33 
34 
35 
36 


40.01 
68.48 
49.73 

148.39 
98.59 

110.08 

128.55 
89.45 
79.73 
95.06 

105.11 
71.60 


*79,795 

78,889 

*102,154 

1,783,295 


37 




415,266 


38 




545,457 


39 




684,624 


40 




397,494 


41 




526,315 


42 




466,687 


43 




586,101 


44 




210,058 


45 


52.25 


*227,188 


46 


53.74 
50.03 
62.31 
57.43 
59.48 


888,801 


47 






48 
49 
50 
51 


13.30 
12.98 
18.56 
(in default) 
11.57 


25.26 
22.64 
26.02 
23.24 
26.63 


*297,570 

*386,161 

*377,303 

184,451 


52 


60.21 


55,746 


3,668,907 


64.74 


18.26 


83 . 00 


13.84 


4.02 


63.56 


15,467,237 


1 


8,691 
94,910 
3,159 
7,033 
33,392 
70,208 
51.217 
37,629 
32,214 


48.87 
70.01 
97.19 
55 . 27 
54.57 
64.11 
46.26 
53.10 
72.08 




48.87 
108.94 
131.11 
65 . 07 
84.40 
95.36 
75.14 
64.88 
94.44 


13.79 
32.24 
83.83 




34.90 
81.01 
26.81 
65.91 
46.93 
65.36 
54.00 
42.23 
61.23 


*122,822 


? 


38.93 
33.92 
9.80 
29 . 83 
31.25 
28.88 
11.78 
22.36 




525,798 


3 




50,147 


4 




72,934 




35.45 
32 . 52 
19 . 50 
14.87 
33.99 




290,774 


6 




750,520 


7 




199.900 


8 




206.449 


9 




145,293 










338,453 


60.10 


26.76 


86.86 


27.71 




58.39 


2,364,637 










4,007,360 


64.31 


19.03 


83.34 


15.10 


3.65 


63.09 


17,831,874 




124,491 














4,200,238 






















0.37 


.57 

1 


6.94 


4.24 


.59 


4.43 









244 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE VOCATIONAL 

TABLE 40— 





Teachers 


Students 




Male 


Female 


Enrolment 


Schools 


13 


11 

o w 


13 

1 


o^ 
£.5 


13 
O 

H 


13 

3 


o 

13 
S 

w 


Counties 
1 Barrie 


4 
8 
2 
6 
9 
10 
24 
1 
7 

25 

11 

6 

6 

17 

10 

13 

7 

90 
49 

42 
31 
26 
57 
8 
10 
42 

4 
1 
2 
3 


1 
7 
1 
2 
8 
7 
20 
1 
6 

15 

10 

5 

2 
11 

9 
13 

6 

56 
39 

39 
26 
26 
46 
7 
9 
29 

4 
1 
2 
3 


4 
3 
2 
2 
2 
6 
9 
3 
5 

12 
9 
5 
4 
7 
3 
8 
4 

31 
26 

19 
4 
3 

29 
5 
7 
9 

2 
2 

1 


2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
5 
5 
1 
2 

2 
7 
4 
1 
2 
3 
5 
2 

8 
4 

1 
3 
1 
20 
2 
7 
8 

2 
1 
1 


112 
415 

83 
187 
409 
546 
976 

39 
335 

1,642 
1,093 
302 
176 
781 
463 
470 
336 

3,642 
2,059 

1,835 
1,321 
1,339 
2,598 
524 
454 
2,019 

153 

98 

68 

152 


51 
258 

37 
111 
202 
320 
528 

12 
210 

536 
300 
119 
51 
391 
305 
261 
158 

2,068 
1,046 

935 

552 

607 

1,109 

. 282 

255 

1,424 

64 
43 
32 
90 


61 


2 Chatham 


157 


3 Dunnville 


46 


4 Gait 


76 


5 Kingston 


207 


6 Kitchener- Waterloo 

7 London 


226 

448 


8 Napanee 


27 


9 Niagara Falls 

Ottawa : 

10 Technical 

1 1 Commercial 

12 Owen Sound 


125 

1,106 
793 
183 


13 Pembroke 


125 


14 Peterborough 


390 


15 Sarnia 


158 


16 St. Catharines 

17 Stratford 


209 

178 


Toronto : 

18 Central Technical 

19 Danforth Technical . . . 

20 Western Technical 

and Commerce 

21 Central Commerce . . . 

22 Eastern Commerce . . . 

23 Northern Vocational . . 

24 Welland 


1,574 
1,013 

900 
769 
732 
1,489 
242 


25 Weston 


199 


26 Windsor 


595 


York Township: 
27 Vaughan Road 


89 
55 


29 York Memorial 

30 East York 


36 
62 






Totals 


531 


411 


226 


106 


24,627 


12,357 


12,270 






Districts 
1 Fort William 


15 
16 


11 
11 


11 

9 


7 
6 


656 

467 


354 
291 


302 


2 Port Arthur 


176 






Totals 


31 


22 


20 


13 


1,123 


645 


478 






Grand Totals 


562 


433 


246 


119 


25,750 


13,002 


12,748 






Increases for the Year 


33 


26 


9 


16 


1,390 


1,797 


407 






































77.04 




48.37 




50.49 


49.51 











DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



245 



SCHOOLS 

NIGHT SCHOOLS, 1936-37 



Students 


* 3 


d 




Beginners 




Student Nationality 


en 
















O 


g 














O 
O 














3 1 


















<D<} 


w>£ 


3 








a 






$g 


g*3 


a 






JU 


*o 


A 


P 


SfS 


is S 


M-i 


O 


13 


3 


3 
1 


Vi 




u O 


o »d 


O 

6 


h* 


<$ 


Ph 


O 


m 


o 


< 


£ 


£ 


1 88 


38 


50 


109 


3 




7,891 


48 


8 


2 315 


180 


135 


346 


40 


29 


17,802 


43 


10 


3 70 


32 


38 


78 


3 


2 


4,302 


40 


8 


4 151 


88 


63 


153 


27 


7 


6,916 


80 


8 


5 357 


175 


182 


346 


55 


8 


10,244 


42 


16 


6 260 


164 


96 


477 


17 


52 


23,490 


80 


25 


7 755 


375 


380 


817 


111 


48 


45,908 


78 


35 


8 23 


6 


17 


36 


3 




2,339 


35 


4 


9 211 


126 


85 


235 


56 


44 


14,792 


40 


14 


10 936 


325 


611 


1,467 


127 


48 


59,834 


86 


48 


11 836 


248 


588 


995 


68 


30 


43,452 


88 


41 


12 216 


75 


141 


301 


1 




9,997 


45 


12 


13 91 


31 


60 


170 


4 


2 


82 


41 


10 


14 476 


239 


237 


693 


72 


16 


27,673 


91 


31 


15 398 


265 


133 


382 


70 


11 


18,484 


36 


15 


16 314 


180 


134 


360 


88 


22 


19,857 


83 


31 


17 194 


94 


100 


303 


25 


8 


12,544 


74 


24 


18 1,801 


1,042 


759 


2,468 


628 


546 


175,998 


108 


189 


19 






1,570 


427 


62 


100,044 


87 


95 


20 1,139 


561 


578 


1,518 


248 


69 


82,077 


86 


85 


21 874 


329 


545 


1,121 


95 


105 


49,337 


87 


82 


22 877 


392 
606 


485 
814 


1,117 
2,266 


198 
270 


24 
62 




87 
86 


57 


23 1,420 


116,818 


136 


24 316 


178 


138 


415 


39 


70 


22,344 


42 


22 


25 287 


149 


138 


376 


67 


11 


6,730 


40 


31 


26 1,760 


1,432 


328 


1,266 


347 


406 


68,708 


80 


64 


27 131 


53 


78 


127 


21 


5 


5,725 


42 


10 


28 88 


37 


51 


92 


5 


1 


4,444 


42 


6 


29 55 


25 


30 


54 


13 


1 


3,172 


42 


6 


30 131 


75 


56 


125 


24 


3 


6,292 


44 


6 


14,570 


7,520 


7,050 


19,783 


3,152 


1,692 


967,296 




1,129 








1 486 


255 


231 


513 


76 


67 


28,780 


37 


28 


2 305 


188 


117 


374 


43 


50 


19,365 


80 


29 


791 


443 


348 


887 


119 


117 


48,145 




57 


15,361 


7,963 


7,398 


20,670 


3,271 


1,809 


1,015,441 




1,186 








3,192 


2,567 


625 


1,193 
































90 


287 


69,220 




52 














*59.65 


51.84 


48.16 


80.27 


12.70 


7.03 

















'of total enrolment. 



246 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



TABLE 41 



THE VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 

NIGHT SCHOOLS— Classification of Pupils by Subjects of Study 



Architecture, Machine Drawing 
and Design: 

Mechanical Drawing 605 

Architectural Drawing 214 

Sheet Metal Drawing 170 

Electrical Drawing 7 

Machine Drawing and Design.. . 129 

Watchmakers' Drafting 20 

Blue Print Reading 15 



II. Art and Design: 

Lettering and Showcards 

Colour Study 

Illustrating 

Industrial Design 

Modelling 

Still Life Drawing 

Elementary Art 

Life Drawing . 

Antique Drawing 

Perspective 

Costume Drawing and Design. 

Painting and Decorating 

Leather Work 

Pottery 

Woodcarving 

Interior Decorating 

Crafts 

History of Art 

Block Printing 

Art Metal Work 



340 

344 

164 

177 

49 

113 

133 

276 

93 

27 

111 

40 

18 

26 

31 

362 

9 

34 

9 

39 

III. Chemistry and Geology: 

Chemistry 251 

Chemistry for Nurses 25 

Industrial Chemistry 194 

Cereal Chemistry 21 

Photography 28 

Physiography . . .• 9 

Geography 56 

Mineralogy and Geology 19 

Prospecting 21 

IV. Mathematics: 

Arithmetic 649 

Mensuration 133 

Shop Mathematics 362 

Algebra 369 

Geometry 230 

Trigonometry 152 

Textile Calculations 24 

V. Physics and Electricity: 

Electricity 510 

Applied Mechanics 29 

Radio and Wireless Telegraphy. 16 

Radio 348 

Armature Winding 40 

VI. Engineering: 

Aviation 61 

Diesel Engines 161 

Power Plant Operation 258 

Stationary Engineering 228 

Heating and Ventilation 24 

Navigation 18 

VII. Shop Work: 

General Woodworking 411 

Carpentry and Building Constr'n 145 
Joinery and Cabinet Making. . . 187 



Plumbing 115 

Paperhanging 14 

Machine Shop Work 1,323 

Acetylene Welding 690 

Pattern Making 124 

Auto Mechanics 1,080 

Radio Service 25 

Watchmaking 39 

Electrical Wiring 348 

Electrical Construction 56 

Draughting 45 

Blue Print Reading 51 

Aircraft 463 



VIII. Printing: 
Printing . . 



174 



IX. Commercial Work : 

Writing 505 

Typewriting 5,589 

Stenography 4,449 

Bookkeeping 1,994 

Rapid Calculation 35 

Business Correspondence 193 

Business Forms 374 

Commercial Law 83 

Office Routine 283 

Filing 82 

Economics 21 

Salesmanship 176 

Business English 26 

Business Management 19 

Business Machines 859 

Insurance 524 

Advertising 333 

Accountancy 27 

X. Domestic Science: 

Cooking 2,136 

Housekeeping 16 

Home Economics 23 

Home Nursing 182 

Hygiene and Dietetics. . . 145 

House Management 25 

XI. Domestic Art: 

Sewing and Dressmaking 3,140 

Millinery. 222 

Embroiderv and Lacemaking ... 106 

Textiles 30 

Drafting and Design 77 

Knitting 36 

XII. English: 

English for New Canadians 145 

Reading 281 

Composition and Spelling 687 

Literature 174 

Grammar 412 

Current Events 22 

Public Speaking 64 



XIII. 



Foreign Languages: 
French 



288 

XIV. Miscellaneous: 

Orchestra Music 32 

First Aid 98 

Swimming 513 

Physical Training 577 

Lip Reading 25 



248 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



THE SENIOR 
TABLE 42— SCHOOLS, 



Schools 



Full-Time 
Teachers 



Male Female 



Full-Time 
Enrolment 



Male Female 



Aver- 
age 
Daily 
Attend- 
ance 



Attend- 
ance 
Effici- 
ency 
Per- 
centage 



Hamilton — Boys' Handicraft. 
— Girls' do 



10 



230 



105 



Toronto — Boys' Special Industrial 

— Girls' do do (Groves). 

Girls' do do (Bolton). 



25 



581 



15 
11 



287 
250 



217 
99 

485 
249 
195 



86.40 
88.61 

84.76 
86.27 
84.98 



Totals 



35 



33 



811 



642 



1,245 



85.75 



*One part-time teacher in addition. 

TABLE 43— AGE-GRADE DISTRIBUTION 




Age 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


First Year 


Boys 
Girls 




7 
5 


144 
95 


132 
116 


60 




26 


Second Year 


Boys 
Girls 




3 


95 

8 


108 

85 


69 




86 












Boys 
Girls 






9 


86 
5 


24 


Third Year 










164 














Boys 
Girls 










3 


Fourth Year 






























Boys 
Girls 












Fifth Year 




























Totals by Sexes 


Boys 
Girls 




10 
5 


248 
103 


326 
206 


156 




276 


Grand Totals 






15 


351 


532 


432 


TABLE 44— FINANCIAL 



Schools 



Pupil- 
Days 
Attended 



Expenditures 



Current 



Capital 



Hamilton — Boys' Handicraft. 
Girls' do 



Toronto — Boys' Special Industrial 

Girls' do do (Groves) 

Girls' do do (Bolton). 



47,775 
20,306 

98,212 
48,941 
40,753 



$32,136 
13,472 

92,578 
53,065 
40,504 



$ 81 
130 

12,976 

242 

9,723 



Totals and Averages . 



255,987 



231,755 



23,152 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



249 



AUXILIARY SCHOOLS 

TEACHERS, PUPILS, ETC., 1936-37 



Year Classification of 
Full-Time Enrolment 


Part- 
Time 
Enrol- 
ment 


Beginners 

admitted 

during 

the 

year 


Retirements during the Year 
while in 


1st 

Year 


2nd 
Year 


3rd 

Year 


4th 

Year 


5th 

Year 


1st 
Year 


2nd 
Year 


3rd 

Year 


4th 
Year 


5th 
Year 


107 


117 
37 

185 
81 
69 


16 
13 

117 

92 

104 








146 
65 

281 
168 
133 


39 
11 

49 
2 
2 


83 
30 

79 

"10" 


16 
10 

127 

116 

93 






55 












246 
112 

77 


33 
2 




2 

22 


43 
6 


29 
2 














597 


489 


342 


35 




24 


793 


103 


202 


362 


49 


31 



OF FULL TIME PUPILS, MAY, 1937 










16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 and Over 


Totals 


YearTotals 


7 


2 
1 




1 






353 
244 




1 








597 














27 












302 

187 




7 




1 








489 














6 

36 


1 
4 


2 


2 


2 


1 


133 
209 


342 














8 
1 


10 
1 


6 


3 


1 


2 


33 
2 


35 






























































48 
45 


13 
6 


8 
1 


6 


3 


3 


821 
642 














93 


19 


9 


6 


3 


3 


1,463 





STATISTICS, 1936 





Local 
Levy 


Cost of Educal 


ion per Pupil-Day (Cents) 




Legislative 
Grants 


Current 


Capital 


Total 


Legis- 
lative 
Share 


Local 
Levy 
Share 


Debenture 
Debt 


S4,555 


$29,502 
12,842 

95,774 
54,203 
50,079 


67.26 
66.34 

94.26 

108.42 

99.39 


.17 
.64 

13.21 

.49 

23.86 


67.43 
67.98 

107.47 
108.91 
123.25 


9.53 
11.90 

21.54 
15.45 
14.08 


61.75 
63.24 

97.52 
110.75 

122.88 




2,417 




21,158 
7,562 
5,737 


132,996 

2,273 

56,932 


41,429 


242,400 


90.53 


9.04 


99.57 


16.18 


94.69 


192,201 



250 



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THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



253 





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254 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



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DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



255 



TABLE 47— INSPECTORS AND INSPECTORATES, AS OF 
DECEMBER 31, 1937 

A— ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



V. K. Greer, M.A., Chief Inspector, Public and Separate Schools. . . 

J. D. Campbell, B.A., Assistant Chief Inspector, Public and 
Separate Schools 

J. B. MacDougall, B.A., D.Paed., Assistant Chief Inspector, Public 
and Separate Schools 

Neil McDougall, B.A., General Inspector, Public and Separate 
Schools 

Robert Gauthier, B.A., Ph.L., Director of French Instruction 

H. E. Amoss, B.A., D.Paed., Inspector of Auxiliary Classes 

L. Helen De Laporte, B.A., B.Paed., Assistant Inspector of Auxili- 
ary Classes 

R. D. Keefe, B.A., Provincial School Attendance Officer 

G. R. Fenwick, Mus. Baa, Provincial Supervisor of Music 

N. Davies, B.A., Inspector of Agricultural Classes 



Parliament Buildings, 
I Toronto. 



(1) Urban — Public 



Inspectorate 


Inspector 


Address 


Brantford, 


City of 


Russell Reid, B.A , B.Paed 

H. A. Tanser, M.A., B.Paed., 

Superintendent of Schools 

Frank E. Perney, B.A., B.Paed., 

Superintendent of Schools 

Jas. Gill, B.A., B.Paed 


Brantford. 


Chatham, 
Hamilton, 


do 

City of 


Chatham. 

) 

> Hamilton. 


do 


do 


do 
Kitchener, 
London, 


do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


E. T. Seaton, B.A., D.Paed 

H. J. Prueter, B.A., D.Paed 

G. A. Wheable, B.A., Superinten- 
dent of Schools 


Kitchener. 
^London. 


do 
Ottawa, 


J. C. Stothers, M.A., B.Paed 

McGregor Easson, B.A., D.Paed., 
Chief Inspector 






do 


\- Ottawa. 


do 


Robert Westwater, B.A., B.Paed.. 

K. S. Wightman, B.A 

Henry Conn, B.A 


Peterborough. 
Sarnia. 


Peterborough, 
Sarnia, 


do 

do 


St. Catharines 
Toronto, 

do 


do 

do 

do 


C. A. Brown, M.A., B.Paed 

C. C. Goldring, M.A., D.Paed., 
Superintendent of Schools 

W. E. Hume, B.A., D.Paed 

P. F. Munro, M.A., D.Paed 

A. G. Leitch, B.A., B.Paed 

G. W. McGill, M.A., D. Paed. . . . 

D. D. MacDonald, B.A., D.Paed. 
H. E. Cavell, M.A., B.Com., 

B.Paed 


St. Catharines. 


do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


do 

do 

do 

do 

do 


Toronto. 




do 

do 

do 




do 

do 

Welland, 


A. W. R. Doan, M.A., D.Paed. . . 
J. L. McCullough, B.A., B.Paed.. 
John Flower, B.A . . 


Welland 


Windsor, 


do 

do 


G. S. Campbell, B.A., Superin- 
tendent of Schools 


[Windsor. 


do 


A. R. Davidson, B.A 











256 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



(2) County — Public 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Address 



Brant and Norfolk (in part) ; Town of Paris; 

Bruce East; Grey (in part); Huron (in 
part); Towns of Chesley, Walkerton, 
Wiarton ; Villages of Mildmay, Tara .... 

Bruce, West; Towns of Kincardine, South- 
ampton; Villages of Lucknow, Paisley, 
Port Elgin, Ripley, Teeswater, Tiverton . 

Carleton; Town of Eastview; Villages of 
Rockcliffe Park, Richmond 

Dufferin (in part) ; Peel (in part) ; Town of 
Orangeville; Villages of Grand Valley; 
Shelburne 

Dundas; Grenville (in part); Villages of 
Cardinal, Chesterville, Iroquois, Morris 
burg and Winchester 

Elgin East; City of St. Thomas; Town 
of Aylmer; Villages of Port Stanley, 
Springfield, Vienna 

Essex, North; Towns of Amherstburg 

Essex, Harrow, Riverside, Tecumseh; Vill- 
age of Belle River 

Essex, South; Kent (in part); Towns of 
Kingsville, Leamington, Tilbury; Village 
of Wheatley 

Frontenac, North, and Addington (in part) 

Frontenac, South (in part); and City of 
Kingston 

Frontenac, South (in part) ; Lennox (in part) 
Villages of Bath, Portsmouth 

Glengarry (in part) and Prescott (in part) 
Town of Alexandria; Villages of Lan- 
caster, Maxville 

Grey, East; Towns of Meaford, Thornbury ; 
Village of Chatsworth 

Grey, North, and Bruce, North; City of 
Owen Sound; Town of Wiarton; Villages 
of Hepworth, Lion's Head, Shallow Lake. 

Grey, South; Towns of Durham, Hanover; 
Villages of Dundalk, Flesherton, Mark- 
dale, Neustadt 

Haldimand (in part) and Wentworth (in 
part); Villages of Caledonia, Cayuga, 
Hagersville, Jarvis 

Halton; Towns of Burlington, Georgetown, 
Milton, Oakville; Villages of Acton, 
Streetsville 

Hastings, Centre; Villages of Deloro, 
Madoc, Marmora, Stirling, Tweed 

Hastings, North; Renfrew (in part); City 
of Oshawa ; Village of Bancroft 

Hastings, South, and City of Belleville; 
Town of Deseronto; Village of Frank- 
ford 

Huron, East; Towns of Clinton, Seaforth, 
Wingham; Villages of Blyth, Brussels. . . 

Huron, West; Town of Goderich; Villages 
of Exeter, Hensall 

Kent, East; Elgin (in part) ; Towns of Both- 
well, Ridgetown; Villages of Dutton, 
Rodney, Thamesville, West Lome 

Kent, South ; Towns of Blenheim, Dresden, 
Wallaceburg, Tilbury; Village of Erieau. 

Lamb ton, East; Town of Petrolia; Villages 
of Alvinston Arkona, Oil Springs, 
Watford 



W. Joyce, B.A 

J. M. Game, B.A., B.Paed. . 

G. C. Dobson, B.A., B.Paed 
T. P. Maxwell, B.A 



A. F. Hansuld, B.S.A 

W. J. Stewart, B.A., B. Paed 

J. C. Smith, B.A 

D. M. Eagle 



W. L. Bowden, B.A 

T. R. McEwen, B.A., B.Paed. 



F. P. Smith, M.A... 
S. A. Truscott, M.A 



Z. S. Phimister, B.A., B.Paed. 
S. A. Morrison, B.A 



J. J. Wilson, B.A... . 
G. E. Pentland, M.A 
J. L. Mitchener, B.A. 



James M. Denyes, B.A 

A. W. McGuire, B.A 

C. F. Cannon, B.A., B.Paed. 



H.J. Clarke, B.A 

John Hartley 

E. C. Beacom, B.A 

A. B. Lucas, B.A., B.Paed 

G. A. Pearson, B.A 



J. J. Edwards, B.A 



Brantford. 



Walkerton. 



Kincardine. 

Ottawa. 

39 Glen Ave. 

Orangeville. 



Winchester. 

St. Thomas. 

Windsor, 165 
California Ave. 

Kingsville. 
Sharbot Lake. 

Kingston. 

Kingston. 

Alexandria. 
Meaford. 

Owen Sound. 

Hanover. 

Cayuga. 

Milton. 
Tweed. 
Oshawa. 

Belleville. 

Clinton. 

Goderich. 

Chatham, 
Chatham. 

Petrolia. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



257 



(2) County — Public 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Address 



Lamb ton, West; Town of Forest; Villages 
of Courtright, Point Edward, Thedford, 
Wyoming 

Lanark; Towns of Almonte, Carleton Place, 
Perth, Smith's Falls; Village of Lanark. . 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 1); Town of 
Gananoque; Villages of Newboro, West 
port 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 2); Town of 
Brockville ; Village of Athens 

Leeds and Grenville (No. 3) and Lanark 
(in part); Town of Prescott; Villages of 
Cardinal, Kemptville, Merrickville . . . 

Lennox and Hastings, South (in part); 
Towns of Deseronto, Napanee; Village of 
Newburgh 

Lincoln (in part); Towns of Grimsby, 
Merritton, Niagara; Villages of Beams- 
ville, Port Dalhousie 

Middlesex^ East; Elgin (in part); Village of 
Lucan 

Middlesex, West; Towns of Parkhill, Stra- 
throy; Villages of Ailsa Craig, Glencoe, 
Newbury, Wardsville 

Norfolk (in part) ; Town of Simcoe ; Villages 
of Delhi, Port Dover, Port Rowan, Water- 
ford 

Northumberland (No. 1); Towns of Bow- 
manville, Port Hope; Village of New- 
castle 

Northumberland, and Durham (No. 2); 
Town of Cobourg; Village of Millbrook . . 

Northumberland, and Durham (No. 3); 
Hastings (in part); Towns of Campbell- 
ford, Villages of Brighton, Colborne, 
Hastings, Stirling 

Ontario, North, and York (in part) ; Town 
of Uxbridge; Villages of Beaverton, 
Cannington, Sutton West 

Ontario South; Town of Whitby; Village 
of Port Perry 

Oxford, North, and City of Woodstock; 
Villages of Embro, Tavistock 

Oxford, South, and Norfolk (in part); 
Towns of Ingersoll, Tillsonburg; Village 
of Norwich 

Peel (in part) and York (in part); Town 
of Brampton; Villages of Port Credit, 
Long Branch, Swansea 

Perth, North, and Wellington (in part); 
Towns of Listowel, Mitchell; Village of 
Mllverton 

Perth, South, and City of Stratford; Town 
of St. Mary's 

Peterborough, East; Villages of Havelock, 
Lakefield, Norwood 

Peterborough, West, and Victoria, East; 
Town of Lindsay; Villages of Bobcay- 
geon, Omemee 

Prescott and Russell, Part I and Carleton 
(in part) ; Towns of Hawkesbury, Rock- 
land Vankleek Hill, Village of L'Original 
(Prot. Sep. Sch.) 

Prescott and Russell, Part II 



H. B. Galpin, B.A., B.Paed. 
R. A. A. McConnell, B.A. . . 

James F. McGuire, M.A . . . 
W C. Dowsley M.A 

Gordon Young, B.A 

M. R. Reid, M.A . .. 



Geo. A. Carefoot, B.A., B.Paed 
D. G. Smith, B.A 



J. H. Sexton, M.A... 
H. Frank Cook, B.A. 



E. E. Snider, B.A 

J. W. Odell, B.A 

A. A. Martin, B.A., B.Paed. 



T. R. Ferguson, M.A 

R. A. Hutchison, B.A 

Geo. M. Mather, B.A 

J. W. Hagan, M.A 

M. R. Fydell, B.A 



A. E. Nelson, B.A 

G. N. Edwards, B.A., B.Paed. 
L. W. Copp, B.A., B.Paed 

R. F. Downey, B.A. B.Paed. 



C. B. Routley, B.A 

F. Choquette, B.A 



Prescott and Russell, Part III, Village of 
L'Original (P.S.) 



J. S. Gratton . . 



Sarnia. 
Perth. 

Gananoque. 
Brockville. 

Kemptville. 

Napanee. 

St Catharines 
London, 

155 Thornton 

Ave. 

Strathroy. 

Simcoe. 

Port Hope. 
Cobourg. 

Brighton. 

Uxbridge, 

Whitby. 

Woodstock. 

Ingersoll. 

Brampton. 

Stratford. 
Stratford. 
Peterborough. 

Peterborough. 



Russell. 
Ottawa, 

121 Frank'St. 

Plantagenet. 



258 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



(2) County — Public 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Address 



Prescott and Russell, Part IV; Glengarry 
(in part) 

Prince Edward ; Town of Picton ; Villages of 
Bloomfield, Wellington 

Renfrew, North; Town of Pembroke 
Village of Cobden 

Renfrew, South; Towns of Arnprior, Ren- 
frew; Villages of Barry's Bay, Braeside, 
Eganville, Killaloe Station 

Simcoe, Centre; Towns of Barrie, Pene 
tanguishene (Prot. Sep. Sch.) 

Simcoe, East; Muskoka (in part); Towns of 
Midland, Orillia; Villages of Coldwater, 
Port McNicoll, Victoria Harbour 

Simcoe, North; Town of Pene tanguishene 
(P.S.), 



Joseph Lapensee, B.A 

C. E. Stothers, B.A., D.Paed 
Norman Campbell, M.A 



Colin W. Lees, B.A., B.Paed. 
W. R. McVittie, B.A 



SSimcoe, South; York (in part); Peel (in 
part); Town of Alliston; Villages of Bee- 
ton, Bolton, Bradford, Tottenham 

Simcoe, West, Grey (in part); Dufferin 
(in part) ; Towns of Collingwood, Stay 
ner ; Village of Creemore 

Stormont; Town of Cornwall; Village of 
Finch 

Victoria, West; Villages of Fenelon Falls, 
Woodville 

Waterloo, North; Towns of Elmira, 
Waterloo 

Waterloo, South; City of Gait; Towns of 
Hespeler and Preston; Villages of Ayr 
New Hamburg 

Welland, East; City of Niagara Falls; 
Town of Thorold; Village of Chippawa.. 

Welland, South; Towns of Fort Erie, Port 
Colborne ; Village of Humberstone 



J. A. Gibson, B.A., B.Paed. 
H. J. Payette, B.A 



W. H. Carlton, B.A., B.Paed 



W. F. Smith, B.A., B.Paed.. 
James Froats, M.A., B.Paed 
E. W. Jennings, B.A 

H. E. Elborn, M.A., B.Paed. 



Lambert Norman, B.A. 
John W. Marshall, B.A 



James McNiece, B.A. 



Welland (in part) ; Lincoln (in part) ; Hal 
dimand (in part) ; Town of Dunnville 
Village of Fonthill 



Wellington, North; Towns of Fergus, Har- 
riston, Mount Forest; Palmerston; Vil- 
lages of Arthur, Clifford, Drayton, Elora. 

Wellington, South; City of Guelph; Village 
of Erin 

Wentworth; Town of Dundas; Villages of 
Waterdown, Stoney Creek 



W. A. Marshall, B.A., B.Paed.. . . 

L. P. Menzies, B.A., B.Paed 

G. G. McNab, M.A., D.Paed. . . . 
Jno. B. Robinson, B.A., B.Paed. . 



York (No. 1); Towns of Aurora, New- 
market; Villages of Markham, Wood- 
bridge 

York (No. 2); Towns of Mimico, New 
Toronto, Weston 



York (No. 3) 

York (No. 4) 

York (No. 5) 

York (No. 6) ; Town of Leaside ; Villages of 
Forest Hill, Richmond Hill, and Stouff- 
ville 



R. H. Roberts, M.A 

J. E. Wilkinson, B.A., B.Paed. 
W. A. Fydell, B.A., B.Paed. . . 



A. L. Campbell, M.A . 
W. W. A. Trench, B.A 



R. Gillies, B.A 



Plantagenet. 

Picton 

Pembroke. 

Renfrew. 
Barrie. 

Orillia. 
Chatham. 

Bradford. 

Collingwood. 
Finch. 
Lindsay. 
Kitchener. 



Gait. 

Niagara Falls. 
851 River Road. 

Welland. 
65 Bald St. 



Welland, 
18DennistounSt.S. 



Fergus. 

Guelph. 

Hamilton, 

153 Main St. W. 



Toronto, 2 Glen 

Elm Ave., 

Toronto, 12, 

34 Chudleigh Ave. 

Toronto, 

8 Olympus Ave. 

Weston. 

Richmond Hill. 



Toronto, 13, 
41 Harris Ave. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 



259 



(3) District — Public 



Inspectoral 
Division 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Address 



Kenora and Thunder Bay (in part) 
Towns of Dryden, Keewatin, Kenora 
and Sioux Lookout 



II 

III 
IV 
V 
VI 

VII, Part I 

Part II 
VIII 

IX 
X 

XI 

XII, Part I 

Part II 

Part III 
XIII 



Rainy River; Towns of Fort Frances, 
Rainy River 

Thunder Bay (in part); City of Fort 
William 

Thunder Bay (in part); City of Port 
Arthur 



Algoma (in part); City of Sault Ste. 
Marie; Village of Hilton Beach 

Algoma (in part); Nipissing (in part); 
Parry Sound (in part); Sudbury (in 
part); Towns of Capreol, Coniston, 
Copper Cliff 



S. Shannon, B.A 

W. K. Eade, B.A., B.Paed 

L. J. Williams, B.A 

W. J. Judd, B.A 

D. T Walkom, B.A 



L. L. Skuce, B.A., B.Paed. 



Kenora. 

Fort Frances. 

Fort William. 
Port Arthur. 
Sault Ste. Marie 

Sudbury. 



Algoma (in part); Sudbury (in part); 
City of Sudbury ; Towns of Blind River 
Frood Mine, Massey, Webbwood .... 



Sudbury (in part) 



Algoma (in part); Manitoulin; Towns of 
Bruce Mines, Gore Bay, Little Cur- 
rent, Nesterville, Thessalon 

Cochrane (in part) ; Towns of Cochrane, 
Hearst, Smooth Rock Falls, Timmins. 

Cochrane (in part), and Temiskaming 
(in part); Towns of Englehart, Iro- 
quois Falls, Matheson 

Temiskaming (in part) ; Towns of Charl- 
ton, Cobalt, Haileybury, Latchford, 
New Liskeard ; Village of Thornloe 

Nipissing (in part) and Parry Sound (in 
part); City of North Bay; Towns of 
Cache Bay, Mattawa, Sturgeon Falls 



Nipissing (in part) . 



XIV 



XV 



XVI 



Nipissing (in part) ; Sudbury (in part) . . 

Muskoka (in part) ; and Nipissing, South 
(in part); Parry Sound, East; Towns 
of Kearney, Powassan, Trout Creek; 
Villages of Burk's Falls, South River, 
Sundridge 



Muskoka (in part), and Parry Sound, 
West; Town of Parry Sound; Village 
of Rosseau 



0. M. MacKillop, B.A., 
B.Paed 


Sudbury. 


L. Carriere, B.A. . 


Sudbury. 


N. R. Wightman, B.A 


Gore Bay. 


W. F. Hiscocks, B.A 


Monteith. 


F. S. Rivers, B.A., B.Paed.. 


Kirkland Lake 


W. L. Lovell, B.A 


Haileybury. 


P. W. Brown, B.A 


North Bay. 


L. Laplante, M.A 


Ottawa, 


C. Charron, B.A 


644 Cumber- 
land Ave. 
Sturgeon Falls 



J. R. Pickering, B.A., 
B.Paed 



J. L. Moore, B.A. 



Muskoka (in part); Towns of Bala, 
Bracebridge, Gravenhurst; Villages of 
Port Carling, Windermere 

Haliburton and Muskoka (in part); 
Town of Huntsville 



G. S. Johnson, B.A . . 
Albert Brown, B.A. . 



North Bay 

Parry Sound. 

Bracebridge. 
Haliburton. 



260 



THE REPORT OF THE 



No. 11 



(4) Separate 



Inspectoral 
Division 



Inspectorate 



Inspector 



Address 



Districts of Algoma, Kenora, Manitou- 
lin, Rainy River, Sudbury (in part), 
Thunder Bay; Cities of Fort William, 
Port Arthur, SaultSte. Marie (in part), 
Sudbury (in part); Towns of Fort 
Frances, Keewatin, Kenora, Little 
Current, Rainy River, Sioux Lookout 

Districts of Nipissing (in part) ; Sudbury 
(in part) ; Cities of Sudbury (in part), 
Sault Ste. Marie (in part); Towns of 
Blind River, Chelmsford, Coniston, 
Massev 



W. J. Greening, B.A. 
B.Paed 



L. Carriere, B.A. 



District of Cochrane (in part); Towns 
of Cochrane, Hearst, Iroquois Falls, 
Smooth Rock Falls 



Districts of Nipissing (in part); Parry 
Sound (in part); Sudbury (in part); 
Towns of Bonfield, Cache Bay, 
Kearney, Sturgeon Falls 

Districts of Cochrane (in part) ; Temis- 
kaming (in part) ; Towns of Charlton, 
Cobalt, Haileybury, New Liskeard, 
Timmins ; Village of Thornloe 

Counties of Essex (in part); Lamb ton; 
Cities of Sarnia, Windsor (in part); 
Towns of Amherstburg, Essex, Leam- 
ington, Riverside (in part) 

County of Essex (in part) ; Cities of Wind- 
sor (in part) ; Towns of La Salle, River- 
side (in part) ; Village of Tecumseh . 

Essex (in part) ; Kent, Muskoka District ; 
Simcoe Co. (in part); City of Chat 
ham; Towns of Barrie, Blenheim, 
Collingwood, Midland, Orillia, Til 
bury, Wallaceburg; Village of Belle 
River 



R. Masse, B.A 



C. X. Charron, B.A. 



R. R. Maurice, B.A. 



T. S. Melady, B.A 



A Gascon, B.A. 



H. J. Payette, B.A 



Counties of Bruce, Huron, Middlesex 
Norfolk, Perth; Cities of London 
Stratford, St. Thomas, Woodstock 
Towns of Goderich, Ingersoll, St 
Mary's, Seaforth, Walkerton, Park- 
hill; Villages of Mildmay, Teeswater 

Counties of Grey, Waterloo, Wellington ; 
Cities of Brantford, Gait, Guelph, 
Kitchener, Owen Sound; Towns of 
Hanover, Hespeler, Mount Forest, 
Paris, Preston, Waterloo; Villages of 
Arthur, Elora, Fergus 

County of Wentworth ; Cities of Hamil 
ton, St. Catharines; Town of Dun 
das 



V. C. Quarry, B.A 



J. C. Walsh, B.A., B.Paed. 



J. V. Scanlan, B.A. 



Port Arthur, 
288 Harrington 
Ave. 



Sudbury, 
10 Beech St. 



Cochrane, 
Court House. 



Sturgeon Falls. 



Haileybury. 



Windsor, 1509 
Dufferin Place 



Windsor, 614 
Mill St. 



Chatham, 48 
Robertson Ave. 



London, 

293 Wolfe St. 



Kitchener, 
St. Mary's Sch. 
Young St. 



Hamilton, 
208 Holton Av. 
S. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 
(4) Separate 



261 



Inspectoral 
Division 



Inspectorate 



Counties of Northumberland and Dur- 
ham, Ontario, Peel, Peterborough, 
Victoria, York (in part) ; Cities of Nia- 
gara Falls, Oshawa, Peterborough; 
Towns of Campbellford, Cobourg, 
Lindsay, Merritton, Mimico, New- 
market, Oakville, Picton, Thorold, 
Trenton, Weston, Whitby; Villages of 
Hastings, Port Dalhousie 

City of Toronto (in part) ; York (in part) ; 
Villages of Forest Hill, Swansea 

City of Toronto (in part) ; York (in part) 

Counties of Frontenac, Hastings (in 
part); Glengarry (in part); Lennox 
and Addington, Stormont (in part); 
Cities of Belleville, Kingston; Towns 
of Alexandria (in part), Brock ville, 
Cornwall (in part), Gananoque, Pres- 
cott; Villages of Chesterville, Mar- 
mora, Tweed, Portsmouth 



W. J. Lee, B.A 



Counties of Lanark, Leeds, Renfrew (in 
part); Nipissing District (in part); 
City of North Bay (in part); Towns 
of Almonte, Arnprior, Pembroke (in 
part); Perth, Renfrew, Smith's Falls; 
Villages of Barry's Bay, Eganville, 
Killaloe Station, Westport 

County of Carleton (in part) ; City of 

Ottawa (in part) ; Town of Eastview 

(in part) 



City of Ottawa (in part), Clarkstown. . . 

Counties of Carleton (in part) ; Renfrew 
(in part) ; Nipissing (in part) ; Cities of 
North Bay (in part) ; Ottawa (in part) ; 
Towns of Mattawa, Pembroke (in 
part) 



Counties of Carleton (in part) ; Dundas 
Russell (in part) ; Stormont (in part) 
Town of Eastview (in part) ; Village of 
Casselman 



Counties of Prescott (in part) ; Russell 
(in part) ; Towns of Cornwall (in part) ; 
Rockland ; Village of Lancaster 

Counties of Glengarry (in part); Pres 
cott (in part) ; Russell (in part) ; Stor 
mont (in part); Towns of Alexandria 
(in part) ; Hawkesbury ; Vankleek Hill 



Inspector 



L. J. Langan, B.A. 



J. M. Bennett, M.A., Ph.D 



Toronto, 325 
Rose Park Dr. 

Toronto, 434 
Brunswick Ave. 
Toronto, 47 
Browning Ave. 



C. P. Matthews, B.A. 
B.Paed 



J. T. Anderson, B.A 

F. J. McDonald, M.A 
B.Paed 

C. A. Latour, B.A 



L. Laplante, M.A. 



F. Choquette, B.A. 



J. S. Gratton. 



Joseph Lapensee, B.A. 



Address 



Kingston, 98 
William St. W. 



Renfrew. 



Ottawa, 860 
Echo Drive 

Ottawa, 67 
Osgoode St. 



Ottawa, 644 
Cumberland Av. 



Ottawa, 121 
Frank St. 



Plantagenet. 



Plantagenet. 



B— SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

F. Rogers, B.A., LL.D.— Chief Inspector 



Secondary School Inspectors 

R. W. Anglin, M.A. J. P. Hoag, B.A. 
A. J. .Husband, B.A. S. D. Rendall, B.A. 
W. A. Jennings, B.A. R. H. Wallace, M.A. 
A. G. Hooper, M.A. 



Vocational School Inspectors 

F. S. Rutherford, B.A.Sc. L- S. Beattie, B.A. 
Miss A. M. Hamill, B.A. A. M. Moon, B.A.Sc. 
Miss A. W. Cameron, B.A. Norman Davies, B.A. 
Miss E. D. McKim, B.A. 



Address of above Secondary School Inspectors — Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 



262 THE REPORT OF THE No. 11 

TABLE 48— PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

Reports 

1 . Report of the Minister 

2. Report of Staffs of Public and Separate Schools 

3. Report of Staffs of Collegiate Institutes, High Schools, Continuation Schools, Vocational Schools, 

Normal Schools and Normal- Model Schools 

4. Report of the Committee of Enquiry into the Cost of Education in the Province of Ontario (1938) 

5. Sixth Report of the Actuary on the Condition of the Teachers' and Inspectors' Superannuation 

Fund (1937) 

Acts* 

/. The Department of Education Act (1934) 

2. The Public Schools Act (1936) 

3. The Separate Schools Act (1936) 

4. The High Schools Act (1938) 

5. The Continuation Schools Act (1938) 

6. The Vocational Education Act (1930) 

7. The School Attendance Act (1938) and The Adolescent School Attendance Act (1938) 

8. The Boards of Education Act (1938) 

9. The School Sites Act (1934) 

10. The Auxiliary Classes Act (1936) 

11. The Public Libraries Act (1928) 

12. The University Act (1928) 

13. The School Law Amendment Acts (1936) (1937) (1938) 

14. The Community Halls Act (1927) 

15. The Teachers' and Inspectors' Superannuation Act (1936) 

Regulations 

1. General Regulations, Public and Separate Schools (1937) 

2. Regulations of the High Schools and Collegiate Institutes (1938) 

3. Regulations of the Continuation Schools (1938) 

4- Recommendations and Regulations for the Establishment, Organization, and Management of 
Vocational Schools, and Vocational Departments in Continuation Schools, High Schools 
and Collegiate Institutes (1936) 

5. Regulations, Examinations, and Courses of Study of the Normal Schools (Cir. 23 )(1938) 

6. Special Regulations and Courses of Study of the University of Ottawa Normal School (Cir. 23-B) 

(1938) 

7. Extracts from the Statutes for Use in the Normal Schools (1936) 

8. Regulations for the Administration of the Consolidated Schools (Cir. 40) (1935) 

9. Regulations for Auxiliary Classes (Cir. A.C. 6) (1937) 

10. Regulations respecting the Application of the School Attendance Act and the Adolescent School 

Attendance Act (Cir. A.A.I) (1932) 

11. Suggestions to Attendance Officers (Cir. A. A. 5) (1930) 

12. Regulations respecting Medical and Dental Inspection of Public and Separate Schools (Cir. 56-D) 

(1928) 

13. Instructions to School Inspectors re the Apportionment of the Legislative Grant among the Public 

and Separate Schools (Instr. 12) (1938) 

14. Regulations respecting Special Departmental Grants to Public and Separate Schools (Cir. 56) 

(1936) 

15. Regulations respecting Special Departmental Grants in Agriculture for Public and Separate 

Schools (Cir. 56-E) (1936) 

16. Regulations for Inspectors' Certificates (Cir. 37) (1936) 

17. Instructions to Presiding Officers and Candidates regarding the Annual Departmental Ex- 

aminations (Instr. 5) 

18. Regulations of The High School Entrance Examination (Cir. 48) 

*Price 25c. each. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FOR 1937 263 

PUBLICATIONS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION— Continued 
Regulations — Continued 

19. General Regulations for Teachers' Institutes (Cir. 60) (1930) 

20. Regulations respecting Permanent Certificates {Kindergarten-Primary, Second Class, First Class) 

(Cir. 72) (1988) 

21. Recommendations and Regulations for the Establishment, Organization and Management of 

Manual Training Courses in the Collegiate Institutes, High, Continuation, Public and 
Separate Schools (1986) 

22. Recommendations and Regulations for the Establishment, Organization, and Management of 

Manual Training Courses in Public and Separate Schools (1988) 

23. Recommendations and Regulations for the Establishment, Organization, and Management of 

Home Economics Courses in Public and Separate Schools (1938) 
24- Recommendations and Regulations for the Establishment, Organization, and Management of 

Home Economics and Manual Training General Shop Courses in Secondary Schools and 

in Grades IX and X of the Public and Separate Schools (1938) 
25. Regulations relating to Subjects of Study for Grades IX and X (Lower School and Fifth Classes) 

in Collegiate Institutes, High, Vocational and Continuation Schools and Public and Separate 

Schools (1938) 

Courses of Study 

1 . Programme of Studies for Grades I to VI of the Public and Separate Schools (1938) 

2. Programme of Studies for Grades VII and VIII of the Public and Separate Schools (1938) 

3. Courses of Study for Grades IX and X (Lower School and Fifth Classes) in Collegiate Institutes, 

High, Vocational, and Continuation Schools, and Public and Separate Schools (1938) 
4- Courses of Study, Middle and Upper School, and Examinations of the High Schools, Collegiate 
Institutes and Continuation Schools (1988) 

5. Suggested Courses of Study for Commercial High Schools and Departments established under the 

Vocational Education Act (1932) 

6. Courses of Study and Examinations in Schools Attended by French- Speaking Pupils (Cir. 46) 

(1938) 

7. Courses in Agriculture for Public and Separate Schools (Cir. 56-F) (1935) 

8. History Course for Grade VII of the Public and Separate Schools (1937) 

9. Music in Rural Schools (1937) 

10. An Introductory Course in Music Appreciation through Listening, for Elementary Schools (1938) 

11. Operettas, Music Plays, Cantatas (1938) 

Text Books 

/. Text Books Authorized and Recommended, and Text Book Regulations for Public, Separate, 
Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes (Cir. 14) (1938) 

2. Text Books Authorized and Approved for Vocational Schools (Cir. 52) (1938) 

3. Supplementary Reading for Departmental Examinations (Cir. 58) (1938) 

4- Suggested Books for Supplementary Reading in English Literature, Grades IX and X (1938) 

5. Suggestions for Teachers of Latin in the Use of the Ontario High School Latin Book for Teaching 

the new Grade X and XI Courses (1938) 

6. Teachers' Manuals, etc. (1937) 

7. Upper School Requirements in Modern Languages (Cir. 69) (1936) 

8. A Graded List of French Supplementary Reading Books (Prepared for Schools which are At- 

tended by French- Speaking Pupils, and in which French is a Subject of Instruction with the 
Approval of the Minister) 

Miscellaneous 

1 . General A nnouncement of Summer Courses 

2. School Year and Holidays (Form 94) 

8. Bible Readings for Schools (3 Volumes) 

4- Selected Scripture Readings 

5. Teachers' Library for Rural Public and Separate School Teachers (1938) 

6. Health Handbook for Teachers in Public and Separate Schools (1938) 



PART III 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Committee of Enquiry into 
the Cost of Education 

IN THE 

Province of Ontario 



For purpose of reference, page numbering of the original 
Report has been retained in the following Appendix 



265 



LETTER OF TRANSMISSION 

The Hon. L. J. Simpson, M.B., LL.D., 

Sir, 

I have the honour to submit herewith the Report of the Committee appointed 
to enquire into the cost of education in the Province of Ontario. Since the con- 
clusion of the public meetings of this Committee, much information has been 
obtained from the records of the Department of Education relating to the ques- 
ions submitted to the Committee. From time to time, informal, interim reports 
have been made dealing specifically with subjects contained in the reference. 
The report now submitted is the final report, containing the conclusions reached 
by the Committee and the recommendations which it has thought wise to make. 
I have the honour to be, Sir, 

Your obedient servant, 
Duncan McArthur, 

Chairman, Committee of Enquiry. 
Toronto, March 25th, 1938. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 

OF ENQUIRY INTO THE COST OF EDUCATION IN THE 

PROVINCE OF ONTARIO 



I. INTRODUCTION 



The subjects to which the Committee was instructed to direct its enquiry- 
were the following: 

1. The cost to the Province and to the local municipalities of the education 
provided in the primary and secondary schools of the Province. 

2. The methods employed to obtain the revenue necessary to pay the cost 
of such primary and secondary education. 

3. The equity of the distribution of the burden of taxation levied for school 
purposes as between different forms of property and as between the 
several municipalities and areas forming units for purposes of taxation. 

4. The equity of the distribution of the cost of education as between the 
Province, the county, the local municipality, and the school section or 
district. 

5. The adequacy of the existing units of administration for school purposes. 

6. The adequacy of the existing system of Provincial grants for the various 
types of both primary and secondary education. 

7. Consideration of the best means of providing for the cost of school build- 
ings and permanent improvements. 

8. The cost of special vocational training and of the training of teachers 
for primary and secondary schools, and the cost of the inspection of 
such schools. 

9. Any other matter relating to the cost of primary and secondary education 
not specified above. 

The Committee held twenty-four sessions in the following places: Toronto, 
Hamilton, Ottawa, Cornwall, Kingston, Port Arthur, Fort William, Sudbury, 
North Bay, Stratford, London, Windsor, and Peterborough. Notice of the public 
meetings of the Committee was given in the press, and an invitation to attend the 
meetings was extended to those who desired to make submissions to the Com- 
mittee relating to the subjects of enquiry. Members of the Committee were 
much impressed by the interest manifested in the problems associated with 
education in all the centres at which meetings were held, and, in particular, by 
the careful consideration which had been given to these problems by members 
of boards of education, school trustees, and members of county councils. The 
Public and Separate School Inspectors of the Province gave the Committee most 
valuable information relating to the elementary schools of their inspectoral 
districts as well as the opinions which they had formed as a result of their ob- 
servation of the operation of the elementary school system. 

The Committee decided to supplement the information obtained at the 
public meetings by statistical data relating to the cost of elementary and second- 
ary education, furnished by county and township clerks and Public and Separate 
vSchool Inspectors. Through the co-operation of these public officials, there was 



placed at the disposal of the Committee valuable information which could not 
have been obtained by any other means. 

The Committee decided to make an intensive study of the cost and methods 
of financing public, separate, and secondary schools in certain areas which it was 
considered would present the various types of problems to be found throughout 
the Province as a whole. These areas are as follows: 

(a) Counties: Carleton, Dufferin, Hastings, Lincoln, Middlesex, 

Prescott and Russell, Prince Edward, Simcoe, 
and York. 

(b) Districts: Four Townships — to include two organized and 

two unorganized townships in each of the public 
and separate school inspectorates. 

(c) Urban Centres : Cobalt, Hamilton, Oshawa, Ottawa, Peterbo- 

rough, Port Arthur, St. Thomas, Sudbury, Tim- 
mins, and Woodstock. 

Minutes of each meeting of the Committee were taken by Mr. J. D. Camp- 
bell, the Secretary of the Committee. These minutes, which are attached to this 
Report, as Appendix A, do not contain a verbatim report of the statements made 
before the Committee, but indicate in a general manner the content of the in- 
formation submitted to the Committee. A summary of this information is 
annexed to this Report as Appendix B. 

The plan adopted in the preparation of this Report is to present, first, an 
analysis of the information submitted to the Committee, secondly, an examina- 
tion of this evidence in the light of the further information obtained from muni- 
cipal and other officials and from the records of the Department of Education, 
and, thirdly, the conclusions and recommendations of the Committee. 

II. AN ANALYSIS OF THE EVIDENCE SUBMITTED TO 
THE COMMITTEE 

This evidence may properly be divided into three categories indicating the 
subjects considered: (a) General, (b) Secondary Education, i.e., that of High 
Schools and Collegiate Institutes, Vocational Schools and Continuation Schools, 
(c) Elementary Education, i.e., that of Public and Separate Schools. 

(a) General 

Such criticism of the cost of education in general as was presented to the 
Committee was directed to the following features of the educational system: 
(1) The increase in the burden of taxation attributable to the support of educa- 
tion ; (2) the unequal distribution of the cost of education between (a) urban 
and adjoining suburban areas, and (b) urban and rural municipalities; (3) the 
unequal distribution of the cost of education between real estate and other 
forms of property; and (4) the relatively small contribution made to the support 
of education by the Province. Associated with these criticisms was the con- 
viction that inequalities in the burden of taxation made it practically impossible 
to provide equal opportunities for education to children residing in different 
sections of the Province. 

The impression was created that complaints regarding the high cost of edu- 
cation which came from urban centres were prompted to a greater degree by a 
desire to reduce the total burden of taxation than by a conviction that an ade- 
quate return was not being obtained from the expenditures being made for 



education. At a time when municipal expenditures were being increased, particu- 
larly by reason of the burden imposed by unemployment relief, it is but natural 
that municipal councils should seek to reduce the cost of other public services, 
including education, as a means of preventing an unnecessary increase in the 
tax rate. Inasmuch, further, as the burden of municipal taxation has been 
placed largely on real estate, protests growing out of the imposing of a high tax 
rate have been directed to a system of financing public services which has made 
it necessary for real estate to assume what is deemed to be an unfair share of the 
load of taxation. 

The representations made to the Committee regarding the inequality in the 
distribution of the cost of education between urban and rural municipalities 
related particularly to the cost of education of secondary school pupils residing 
in rural municipalities and attending urban schools. It was suggested, further, 
that too great a portion of the burden of capital expenditures for secondary 
schools was transferred to the residents of rural municipalities, who, by reason 
of their remoteness from urban centres, were unable to take the same advantage 
of facilities for secondary school education as could those residing nearer to the 
centres at which the schools were located. This phase of the problem will be 
considered more fully in connection with the representations made regarding 
secondary education. 

Complaints regarding inequality in the distribution of the cost of education 
have arisen chiefly in areas where different types of property have been associated 
together in the maintenance of schools. Particularly has this been true when 
farm lands have been combined with small urban centres in the same unit of 
taxation. Difficulties have arisen in the determination of an equitable basis 
for the assessment of properties of different types. The assessment of a hundred- 
acre farm in close proximity to a village, for example, has been as great as that 
of several residences in the village. From the standpoint either of ability to pay 
or of the benefits derived, it would be difficult to justify the imposition of the same 
burden of taxation on a single farm and on several village properties. Complaint 
was made to the Committee that, while in determining the basis of assessment 
for urban properties income and business "turn-over" were considered, the taxes 
paid by a farmer were fixed by the amount of his capital, regardless of the extent 
of his earnings. This condition, as well as the existence of distinct differences in 
the methods of assessing property in adjoining townships and in adjoining 
counties, prompted suggestions made to the Committee that a Province-wide 
equalization of assessments is essential to an equitable distribution of the cost 
of education. 

The attention of the Committee was directed to the great differences in the 
tax rates for school purposes in neighbouring school areas. In these instances 
the educational services provided were practically of the same extent and quality, 
and the methods of assessment were uniform. The differences in the tax rate 
were due to wide differences in the value of the assessable property available for 
the support of education. This defect, in turn, was attributed to the organization 
as school areas of districts which, if they did not originally, came subsequently to 
consist of taxable properties of widely different value. In many such cases the 
original definition of the boundaries of school areas may have been defective in 
providing a financial foundation too narrow to support the structure of taxation, 
while in other instances subsequent changes in the value of property have altered 
materially a scheme of taxation which may have been adequate originally. Ex- 
amples of this type of problem are found in the older settlements of central and 
western Ontario, but more particularly in the mining and other "single-industry" 



districts of Northern Ontario, where the completion of the life span of an industry- 
has effected serious changes in the value of property and the sources of taxation. 

As a solution of this type of problem, suggestions were made to the Com- 
mittee of some form of redistribution of school areas with a view to enlarging the 
basis of taxation to include all districts served by the educational system. Asso- 
ciated with this were suggestions of the wisdom of creating larger units of ad- 
ministration as a means, not only of the spreading of the cost of education more 
uniformly, but of effecting economies in the operation of schools. 

A special condition of a kindred character which has accompanied the 
growth of several of the cities of the Province was brought to the attention of the 
Committee, especially in relation to the suburban areas adjoining the cities of 
Toronto, Ottawa, St. Catharines, Windsor, Peterborough, and London. The 
increase of population in these cities has involved an extension of settlement 
beyond the boundaries of the city into adjoining township municipalities. Two 
distinct types of problems have developed from these conditions. In certain 
instances the overflow from the city has taken the form of the migration of persons 
in receipt of incomes distinctly above the average who are seeking residences 
with more extensive grounds than could ordinarily be obtained in the city and 
with the advantages associated with living in the country. Lower land values, 
the imposition of building restrictions — which would ensure the formation of an 
"exclusive" community — and the prospect of low assessment and taxation have 
contributed to the relatively rapid growth of a special type of suburban resi- 
dential area. The formation of such a district, located within a township 
municipality, possessing a high assessment relative to that of farm lands and 
relative to its population, has resulted in the creation of a different type of prop- 
erty from the agricultural land of the township. These areas frequently cut 
across the boundaries of school sections and create a diversity of interest between 
the rural and the suburban population. The relatively high assessment and the 
ability to pay taxes associated with such a district make it an attractive source of 
revenue to the township. Such conflict of interest as develops usually takes the 
form of a desire on the part of the township to employ the resources of the 
suburban area for purposes of taxation, and the desire of the suburban area to 
maintain a separate and independent existence and to provide a type of education 
more costly than that desired by the rural areas. 

More frequently, however, the extension of settlement beyond the boundaries 
of the city has been due to the migration of wage-earners in search of cheap houses. 
This type of movement has resulted in the rapid development of thickly popu- 
lated districts with houses assessed definitely lower than the average assessment 
of similar houses within the city. The birth-rate in such areas has been higher 
than the average, usually, and the demand for educational facilities has been 
urgent. Because the population belongs largely to the wage-earning class, its 
ability to pay taxes is dependent on conditions of employment within the city. 
This type of district, as is illustrated in the cases of the suburban areas adjoining 
the cities of Toronto and Windsor, was among the first to suffer from the decline 
of employment in the late 1920's. Here the burden of unemployment relief 
became greatest, at a time when the necessity for providing facilities for education 
became most acute and the ability to pay taxes had reached a minimum. Again, 
the combination of two distinct types of property within the limits of a rural 
township organization has created a problem of special difficulty. Where these 
conditions prevail the township and the school section have been required to 
assume a burden beyond the capacity of their resources. It was represented to 
the Committee most effectively that the children of parents living in these 



suburban areas were placed under a severe handicap in their efforts to obtain an 
education. The solution of this problem suggested to the Committee involved 
the separation of the urban areas from the agricultural areas of townships ad- 
joining cities and the annexation of such urban areas to the cities. 

Several suggestions were made to the Committee looking to a reduction in 
the total cost of education. The proposal was made by several persons who 
appeared before the Committee that attendance, and thereby costs, might be 
reduced by refusing to admit to school children under six years of age and by 
reducing the age of compulsory attendance from sixteen to fifteen years. Objec- 
tion was taken, likewise, to the right claimed by parents of sending children to a 
secondary school when grave doubts existed regarding the ability of such children 
to derive benefit from the training provided. To reduce the attendance of that 
type of student, it was proposed that fees should be charged for admission to the 
senior grades of the secondary school, or that fees should be charged for "re- 
peaters", which is another method of requiring that free education should be made 
dependent on a proper application to the work of the classroom and on evidence of 
a reasonable progress. 

A further suggestion was made that expenditures proposed by local boards 
of trustees or by boards of education might be reduced if municipal councils were 
given the power to modify the estimates submitted by the educational authority. 
Members of boards of education, on the other hand, contended that their election 
as trustees by the ratepayers of the municipality placed on them a definite 
responsibility for the management of educational affairs. A request was made 
to the Committee that it should recommend that provision be made for the 
appointment of a board of independent arbitrators to settle disputes which 
might arise between municipal councils and boards of education relating to the 
amount of money which should be raised for educational purposes. 

Various suggestions were made to the Committee with a view to reducing 
the burden of taxation on real property by discovering new sources of revenue. 
The imposition of special taxes on corporations was proposed, and, with a general 
agreement approaching unanimity, the increase in Provincial grants for purposes 
of education was urged upon the Committee. 

(b) Secondary Schools 

Much of the criticism of the cost of education which was submitted to the 
Committee was directed to the system of secondary education. Suggestions 
were made to the Committee that unwarranted expenditures had been made with 
respect to two items of cost, namely, the cost of school buildings and the amount 
of teachers' salaries. Statements were made that urban boards of education, in 
particular, had incurred unnecessary expenditures in the construction of second- 
ary schools. Such criticism was directed, not to the extent of the accommodation 
provided, but to the quality of the construction and to the provision of "frills", 
such as swimming pools and unnecessarily elaborate equipment. 

Criticism of the salaries paid to secondary school teachers was not extensive. 
The fact that such salaries had been reduced generally throughout the Province, 
in many instances by more than thirty per cent., was recognized. The contention 
was made, on the other hand, that the salaries of secondary school teachers were 
too high in comparison with the salaries of public school teachers, and that the 
reductions which had been made were not as extensive as the reduction in the 
earnings of the average ratepayer. 

It was suggested to the Committee that school boards should not be com- 
pelled to provide instruction for pupils either below or above the age of sixteen 



whose records in the secondary school indicated clearly that they were deriving 
little, if any, benefit from their studies. The vesting in some authority of the 
right to determine whether a particular pupil should be permitted to continue in 
attendance at a secondary school was urged on the Committee. The contention 
was made that the right to attend at least the senior grades of a secondary school 
should not be granted automatically, but should be determined on the basis of 
the previous record of the student. If a selection were made of the pupils to be 
admitted to the secondary school, or at least to the senior grades, the total at- 
tendance could be reduced, and a consequent reduction effected in the cost of 
education. 

The Committee was asked to consider the wisdom of authorizing boards of 
education to charge fees for pupils attending the grades beyond the Lower School, 
that is, for the work of the third, fourth, and fifth years. A modification of this 
proposal was made in the suggestion that fees might be charged those students 
who were repeating the work of the previous year. 

With a view to avoiding the necessity of undertaking new capital expendi- 
tures for the provision of accommodation for secondary school students, it was 
suggested to the Committee that the "staggered" organization of classes might 
be adopted more widely than it is at the present time. The purpose of this plan 
is to provide additional accommodation through a greater use of school buildings 
by extending the number of hours during which instruction is given each day. 
As the system is operated in the Central Collegiate Institute in London, twelve 
periods of instruction are provided in each school day. All students of the 
first year are given group time-tables, and students of subsequent years are given 
individual time-tables. The claim was made by Principal Miller of the London 
Central Collegiate Institute that the accommodation of the school building had 
been increased by over eighty per cent. Principal Miller contended that the 
scheme was more than a device for the saving of money, and that it possessed 
advantages of distinct educational value in reducing retardation, in reducing the 
amount of school work to be done at home, and in compelling the student to 
assume a larger measure of responsibility in connection with his own work. 

The suggestion most frequently made to the Committee of a means for the 
reduction of the cost of secondary education was a reorganization of the courses 
of study in such a manner as to place the first year, or the first and second years, 
of secondary school work in the panel of the elementary school. This proposal 
was based on the assumption that the cost of instruction, in Fifth Classes of a 
public school, even if greater than that of the higher grades of the public school, 
would be distinctly less than that of the lower grades of the secondary school. 
Inasmuch as the attendance in the first two years of the secondary school is 
greater than in subsequent years, the withdrawal of these pupils would make it 
possible to effect a substantial reduction in the total cost of education. 

The experience of the Board of Education of Kitchener was quoted in sup- 
port of this proposal. In that city, all pupils undertaking the work of the first 
year of the secondary school, except those proceeding to commercial or technical 
courses, receive their instruction in the elementary school at a cost of $75.00 per 
pupil, which is substantially lower than the cost per pupil in the secondary school. 
In the City of Ottawa, five public schools centrally located provide instruction 
for the Entrance classes. The work of these schools is organized on the rotary 
plan, and instruction is given by teachers specially qualified in the several sub- 
jects. The opinion was expressed by Dr. J. H. Putman, Senior Public School In- 
spector for Ottawa, that this work was being done in a satisfactory manner, and 
that the public schools of the city were capable of providing accommodation for 

6 



pupils undertaking the work of the first two years of the secondary schools. In 
his judgment the work of these grades could be offered under more favourable 
conditions in the elementary schools than in the collegiate institutes. 

It is significant that criticisms of the cost of secondary education have been 
accompanied by suggestions regarding changes deemed desirable in the courses 
of study pursued in secondary schools. Criticism was presented to the Com- 
mittee of the emphasis placed on the so-called academic subjects, and suggestions 
were made that more extensive facilities should be provided for a type of training 
designed to equip young people more adequately to undertake the practical 
responsibilities of the positions they will occupy on leaving school. Emphasis 
was placed especially on the advantages to be gained from providing compulsory 
training in Home Economics for a period of two years for all girls enrolled in 
secondary schools. Of almost equal importance, it was suggested, was the pro- 
vision of Manual Training for boys, not necessarily of a vocational character, 
but of a nature to enable them to discover the extent of their skills in the manual 
crafts. The introduction, likewise, of more extensive courses in Agriculture in 
secondary schools serving rural communities was urged upon the Committee. 
In particular, the extension to other parts of the Province of the type of course in 
Agriculture now provided in the Ridgetown High and Vocational School was 
suggested as likely to be of definite benefit to rural communities and as tending 
to ensure a greater equality in the educational opportunities afforded to rural 
and urban children. 

It must be observed, however, that changes of this character, as a rule, 
involve an increase in the cost of education, inasmuch as the courses of study 
desired involve the use of more expensive equipment than is required for the 
academic courses. The inference may be made, therefore, that the interest of the 
public is not directed to the cost of education alone but to the character and 
extent of the benefits derived from education. 

Another feature of the cost of education to which the attention of the Com- 
mittee was directed was the difference in the cost per pupil in secondary schools 
located within the same county. In the Counties of Leeds and Grenville, for 
example, the cost of secondary education varied from 26.2 cents to 99 cents per 
pupil per day. Complaint was made that taxpayers residing in one section of 
the county and sending their own children to a secondary school with a relatively 
low cost per pupil were compelled to contribute to the cost of education of chil- 
dren residing in another part of the county attending a secondary school where 
the cost per pupil was much higher. These differences in cost were found to be 
due in large measure to differences in the debenture indebtedness of the respective 
schools. The cost of construction of many of the older schools had been paid 
entirely or was represented by a very small annual payment, whereas the cost 
of newer schools, constructed at a time when the cost of building was relatively 
high, was represented by a much larger annual payment on account of debentures. 
Another factor entering into the differences in the cost of secondary education 
within the same county is the difference in salaries paid to teachers — the salaries 
being paid in cities being distinctly higher than those paid in towns and villages. 
The suggestion was made to the Committee, both by school trustees and by 
teachers' organizations, that definite schedules of salaries should be introduced, 
based on the qualifications and experience of the teachers. 

The criticism of the system of secondary education presented to the Com- 
mittee most frequently related, not primarily to the total cost or the cost per 
pupil, but to the inequitable distribution of the cost between different groups 
of ratepayers. Complaints of this character were related to two different situations. 



One group was concerned with the differences in mill rate in adjoining 
areas required for the provision of educational services broadly similar in charac- 
ter. The other group related to differences in the benefits derived by persons 
residing in different parts of the same county from a tax imposed uniformly 
throughout the county. In the first case the services rendered were equal in 
character, but the cost to individual ratepayers differed widely; in the second 
case the costs to the ratepayer were the same, but the services rendered were 
different. 

The cause of complaint by reason of great differences in the mill rate was 
generally attributed to differences in assessment, and these, in turn, either to 
differences in the extent of the territory forming the unit responsible for the 
maintenance of the school, or, as occurred more frequently, to differences in the 
character of the taxable property in the respective areas of administration. This 
situation has already been discussed. The remedy proposed was such modifi- 
cation, or extension, of the boundaries of secondary school areas as would provide 
property of sufficient value to support the burden of taxation required to provide 
the necessary educational facilities without imposing an intolerably high mill rate. 

The second complaint related particularly to the method of payment of the 
cost of education of secondary school pupils residing in a county, but not in a 
secondary school district, and who attended a secondary school located in a 
village, town, or city, within the county. It was represented to the Committee 
that the residents of areas adjoining the urban centre in which the secondary 
school was located enjoyed opportunities for sending their children to school 
which were denied to those who resided at a greater distance from the school, 
but that the cost of education of all county pupils was distributed equally, 
according to the relative assessment of each municipality, on all the ratepayers 
of the county regardless of their place of residence. The Township of Dover, in 
the County of Kent, was quoted as an example of a township which possessed no 
secondary school, but was obliged to pay, according to its assessment, equally 
with other townships in the county the cost of educating all county pupils. 
Slightly different was the case of the Burford High School District, which edu- 
cated no county pupils but paid the cost of educating its own secondary school 
pupils, and, likewise, contributed to the cost of educating county pupils attending 
other s