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| — EDMONTON'S 


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As a supporter of 258 arts groups in Canada, we are well aware 
of the importance of New York as a world hub for drama, music, 
exhibitions and the arts in general. That’s why we’ve chosen a 

five-day trip to the Big Apple as a prize in this fantastic contest. 


What’s more during your trip you’ll get to meet and greet one 
of our Arts Grant recipients, Ensemble Musical Répercussion, 
and enjoy an exclusive performance arranged just for you. 


OMale OFemate 

First Name: i Last Name: ; 

Address: Apt; 
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¢ Exclusive performance by Arts Grant recipient 
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* 4 nights in a unique hotel near Central Park 

¢ An exciting range of New York eating experiences 

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¢ VIP access to some of New York’s hottest bars and clubs 
* $1,000 US spending money 


Just fill out the form for your chance to win and get 
to know the Big Apple to the core. 


To enter you must be 19 years or older and a smoker. 








du Maurier Arts 


Aaa ies ESE ae cee Province: ~ Postal Code: 
Work Phone #: ( ) - Home Phone #: ( 


E-mail Address: ae 


Mathematical skill-testing question: ( X 5) + 0+2)-4= 


Once completed, please return this form by April 30, 2001, to. 
295 Hymus Blvd., Pointe-Claire, QC, HOR 6As. 2 Sl Ae 

| am a smoker 19 years of age or older and | consent to receiving information about ; 

du Maurier Ltd., its affiliated companies and their activities. By doing so | agree that my 
name may be added to the du Maurier itd. database with the understanding that this 
information will be used for statistical and marketing purposes. My Personal information. — 
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I can still enter'the contest mentioned herein. ORT 13% 


Today's date: i I Date of birth: 


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= + UPFRONT 


Leats blowing 


Toronto franchise limps into play-off 
spot, much to Dougie’s dismay 


The finger has been pointed and 
is wrapped around Oscar, a small 
man with no genitalia who, I bet, 
doesn’t go into the corners or come 


back to cover his own end: Of course 


when you're that tiny . 

Really, what can I say about last 
week? Not much. Nephew Kenny is 
now travelling the number two, 
heading east to Manitoba. He got a 
job offer to be a massage therapist at 

a pet hotel somewhere on Portage 
and Main, an opportunity he could 

P not pass up. After humming a cou- 
e of bars of Midnight Train to 
Georgia we hugged and I slipped 
hima $25 gift certificate to The 
Leather Ranch. I’m gonna miss you, 
kid. 

Okay, hockey talk. Well, my head 
is abuzz about the élite eight. 
Gretzky and Co. predictably went 
with a very stellar cast, although I 
think naming Stephen Soderbergh 
as your fifth defenceman is a little 
risky. There hasn’t been a good rear- 
guard who wears geeky glasses 
since Al Arbour. 

| think I'm gonna take the sum- 
mer off because I have finally found 
an actor to star in my movie, Vincent 
Price: The Legend Behind The Mask. 
As soon as Bob Dylan finishes his 





INSIDE 


March 29 - 


tour in Australia and poi 
he is going to fly to the Badlands to 


begin filming my charming little tale 


about a bantam coach gone serk 
Co-starring Florence Henderson as 
frustrated-yet-charming hockey 
mom (her son is 35 and not quite 
self-actualized), with special guest 
former } sriffin sideman, Jack 
Sheldon, as town mayor Alastair 
Waxmar ” tells the story of a 
frozen puck, young bucks and no- 
good luck. Watch for the DVD ver- 
sion sometime in 2003. 

Now if I could vote one team off 
this year’s playoffs it would be the 
Toronto Maple L Sadly, they 
have floundered all year, ripped by 
rumours, incomplete because of 


injuries and they are now only seven 


nes ahead of the Boston Bruins. 
Pat Quinn will gag on something 

thick, long and brown (and he hasn‘t 

done this since his military service 

da boys in blue are packing golf 

clubs instead of suitcases come mid- 
April. 


April 4, 2001 


@ Is Alliance Atlantis a dupe in a Whyte Avenue shell game? 
@ MGHIT has had it up to here with suburban spraw! 


@ The Sidetrack’s Andrew White has a big : 


@ Post-punk lads Moneen reinvent rock in th 


own Image. 


@ Johnny Dowd puts the “urgent” in insurgent country. 


ON SCREEN . 


B Say itisn’t dreck: gross-out comedy by the numbers. 
@ Claire Denis’ Beau Travail gets the job done. 
@ Why do retrograde sexist twits think they’ re so cutting edge? 


@ The Edmonton Opera lights up for Bizet’ 
WB Siblings say the damedest things in Studio Theatre's Three Sisters. 


@ When in Cowtown, drop in on comfort-café Jojo Bistro. 


USTINGS..............- 
® Now with more FREE STUFF ! 


RED MEAT 


This darned nite-lite is 
too bright. | can't seem 





to fall asleep with it on. 





minuscule flyspeck spatula 


Oh, Wally...can't you just ignore it 
until after we're done making love? 


BLUELINER Soderbergh 


Now, like the winner who has 45 
seconds to thank ev e, | have to 
go. So, I like my bars, | don’t drive 
cars, anyone, anyone but the Dallas 
Dougie Tokaryk 
saying what have I, what have |, 
what have I done to deserve this? 
Listen to Big Dougie Tokaryk’ 
On the Cake Wednesday m 
during Clockwork Orange Juice, 6-9 
a.m. on CJSR FM 88 






= A documentary 
maker tackles the 
prickly issue of 
sour-gas drilling 
and its effects on 
the lives of rural 
ig Albertans 
PS 


TRUE BLUES 
Singer Shemekia 
Copeland has 
more than a right 
to sing the blues 
— she has a need 
to let it all out on 
stage . 


HOT TOPIC 
So you think 
you're a red-hot 


Josey’s sex quiz 
and find just how 
good you really 
are 


P33 


from the secret files of 


Max cannon 


Hmm...must’ve dozed 
off anyhow, seeing as 
| don't recall a naked 
lady being in my bed. . 






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lounge 


whisky grill 


439.3388 
8111 105 street 
“taste the spirit” 


Thurs., Mar. 29 
Run 
DMC CD 
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Hi-balis All Night 


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Mar. 30 & 31 


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Tues., April 3 
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by Andrew HANON 


Dejoch Keller had had his way, 
there wouldn't have been a press 
conference to announce who will 
run next year’s Local Heroes film 
festival. Not yet, anyway 

“We were working on the 
National Screen Institute’s 
timetable,” he said this week. “They 
wanted to make the announcement 
on the last day of this year’s festival, 
so that’s what we did.” 

Ever since, Keller has-been field- 
ing phone calls and e-mails from 
media and members of Edmonton's 
film community, demanding infor- 
ration about the 2002 festival. They 
want dates, locations, information 
about accommodation. 

Problem is, he doesn’t have any 
answers. 

On March 23, NSI chair Carol 
Vivier and festival director Bill 
Evans introduced Keller and his 
new group, the Edmonton 
International Film Feszival Society, 
to the local media. After running 
Edmonton’s Local Heroes festival 
for the past 14 years the institute 
wanted out of the festival business in 

order to concentrate on its mandate: 
providing film and television profes- 
sionals with training and resources. 

Evans struck a committee to find a 
successor, which included members 
from the Edmonton Arts Council, 
_ the film commission and FAVA, a 


’ 





_____UPFKUN 


the relative: 


JOSH KELLER chairman of the Edmonton International Film Festival Society board, will be 
front and centre at next year’s Local Heroes festival. With the National Screen Institute, 


that we had set up a couple years 
ago, and they decided to take a look 
at it,” he explained. It wasn’t long 
before the committee had decided 
that EIFFS (pronounced “eefs,” 
reporters at the press conference 
were informed) was handed the 
torch. 

“Tt all happened very fast,” Keller 
said. “NSI only announced a few 
weeks ago that it was leaving.” 


MOVING QUICKLY 

NSI wanted to assure the commu- 
nity as soon as possible that 
Edmonton’s film festival would be 
left in good hands. The press confer- 
ence was hurriedly called to ease 
any fears that Local Heroes would 
founder in the wake of the institute’s 
departure. 

But that was ail that could be 
revealed. At this point, there is no 
more information because the new 
board has yet to meet. Keller, who is 
chairing it, plans to get everyone 
together in mid-April and immedi- 
ately start making some decisions. 

“We have a lot of work cut out for 
us,” he said. Office space must be 
found, furnished, and staff hired. 
Other festivals must be scouted in 
order to book films. At the same 


clear that EIFFS will be on the 
i ry of a larger organi- 
urkina vaca 



































on its own. 

“If we need 10 pencils, we've got 
to go out and buy 10 pencils,” Keller 
explained. “We can’t just borrow 
them from somewhere else.” 


NOT REINVENTING THE WHEEL 

Some members of Edmonton's 
film-making community are worried 
about what changes the committee 
will imposeon the festival. NSI is, 


quote 


“I don’tthink we're going to be 
reinventing the wheel here. We 
already have a template from 
whichwecan build,” 

JoshKeller 


~—tinqusdte 


after all, dedicated to nurturing new, 
local talent, so naturally the festival 
has reflected that. Local Heroes has 


which has run Local Heroes for the past 14 years, out of the picture, the local film 
community wonders what new direction, if any, the festival will take. 


pen here,” Keller said. 

While no decisions have been 
made, Keller is positive the public 
will notice little difference between 
this year’s festival and next year’s. It 
will continue to grow and evolve but 
he doesn’t foresee any drastic 
changes in direction or focus. 

“I don’t think we're going to be 
reinventing the wheel here,” he said. 
“We already have a template from 
which we can build.” 


ARCHITECT 

Interestingly, Keller is one of the 
designers of that template. Up until 
1999, Local Heroes was largely an 
industry convention, made up most- 
ly of seminars and presentations for 
filmmakers and others within the 
industry. * 

In 1998 there were only five fea- 
ture films shown for public con- 
sumption. 

The following year, however, the 
festival part of Local Heroes leapt 
forward, exhibiting 40 titles. The fes- 
tival director who steered the change 
was none other than Keller. 

He left the festival after that year, 
with Evans taking over in 2000. 
Keller's only explanation for his 
departure was “creative differ- 
sea He refused to elaborate fur- _ 








hands. He approached the institute, 
but no agreements were reached. 
The idea was put on the back burn- 
er, but Keller kept the society's name 
registered and when NSI made its 
decision to leave town, he dusted off 
the plan again. 

One of the advantages Keller's 
organization had over any newcom- 
ers is that, while it might have been 
inactive, the society has been around 
for two years, which sits well with 
government granting bodies. The 
Edmonton Arts Council, one of 
Local Heroes’ principal backers, 
endorsed Keller's group, which 
weighed heavily in the NSI decision 
to give EIFFS the green light. 


LINGERING QUESTIONS 
While Keller has a pretty good 

idea of where things are headed in 
general, he’s not yet in any position 
to discuss specifics. One of the big 
question marks the new board will 
have to grapple with is the fate of the 
Local Exposure contest. That 
immensely popular portion of the 
festival allowed local amateur film- 
























on 














ee UPFRONT 


We’re here for 
good, 
Alliance vows 


Given that major cinema opera- 
iors are closing movie theatres left, 
right and centre across North 
America, Old Strathcona’s commu- 
nity watchdogs are incredulous with 
aplan to build a six-screen art house 
on Whyte Avenue. 

But the company behind the cine- 
ma is so confident that Whyte 
Avenue is the perfect place for their 
venture they’ ve already signed a 25- 
year lease that includes a “no-dark” 
clause. The neighbours are con- 
cerned that Westcorp’s plan to rede- 
velop the Varscona Hotel’s parkade 
and add a cinema on top will set the 
neighbourhood on a slippery slope 
that ultimately will destroy its his- 
toric ambience. Westcorp wants City 
Hall to relax height restrictions for its 
movie-house plan and argues that its 
design, which puts shops on the 
street level of the parkade and gives 
the entire structure a facade based 
on the area’s architecture, will actu- 
ly improve the street’s ambience. 
resently commercial buildings can 
e no taller than 14 metres, with the 
xception of hotels, which are 
lowed to be 23-metres-tall. 
lestcorp plans the building to be 
-metres-tall. 

The neighbours and business peo- 
ple who showed up at the Varscona 
Hotel this week to hear Westcorp 
present its case are adamantly 
opposed to any plan that will bend 
any of the rules that they themselves 
formulated in Old Strathcona’s Area 
Redevelopment Plan. Some went so 
far as to suggest that the movie- 
house plan is just a ruse in order to 
get support for an overheight com- 
mercial building. With more than 
10,000 theatre screens closing across 
the continent, they argued that it 
wouldn’t be long before this cinema 
shut its doors and the landlords 
would be clamouring for poeta 
to convert the space for other com- 
mercial uses. 

But Leonard Schein, CEO of 
Alliance Atlantis, which signed a 
lease on the project two years ago, 
said his company isn’t inthe same 
financial mess that Cineplex Odeon 
got itself into. Asked about the 
recent dosure of Whitemud 
Crossing, a suburban art house the- 
atre, Schein said that more than any- 
thing, it was a victim of bad planning. 

“We never would have opened a 
theatre in that location,” he said. 
“Whyte Avenue is completely differ- 
ent.” 

He added that cinemas account for 
one half of one per cent of Alliance's 
revenues, so even if the Whyte 
Avenue project hits rough times, the 
company has deep enough pockets to 
carry it. 

_ Whyte Avenue is the only location 
in Edmonton where Alliance is con- 
sidering opening a cinema, Schein. 
added. +o" 


stp 








s=20 
= 


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MEMBERS of the Clearwater Coalition fought sour-gas drilling near 
Rocky Mountain House for two years. The battle is the subject of a docu 
mentary airing on CBC television next week. 








IN BRIEF 





mentary on the controversy over 
sour-gas wells that she fully appreci- 
ated the other side of the coin. The 
documentary, which airs next week 
on CBC's The Nature of Things, 
chronicles one small rural communi- 
ty’s two-year fight to prevent Shell 
Oil from drilling a sour-gas well in 
their midst. 

“It’s not just environmental 
extremists anymore,” Whiting told 
SEE. “It’s everyday people. When 
we made this we wanted to find 
characters everyday viewers would 
be able to empathize with.” 

The characters, members of the 
Clearwater Coalition in Rocky 
Mountain House, are like those 
found all over rural Alberta. One is a 
high-school teacher. Another is a 
second-generation farmer. Another 
is the local veterinarian. 

To her credit, Whiting avoids 
turning the story into an Erin 
Brockovich-type struggle between 
cardboard-cutout, salt-of-the-earth 
folk and a sprawling, amoral multi- 
national conglomerate. She also por- 
trays Shell’s representatives as real 
people, members of the same com- 
munity trying to do their jobs. Their 
efforts to build community support 
are shown as genuine. 

In the end, however, what comes 
across is growing fear of sour-gas 
wells. What differentiates them from 
the relatively safe sweet-gas wells is 
the presence of hydrogen sulfide, of 
which even trace amounts in air can 
be deadly for people and animals. 
Some farmers blame sour-gas wells 
on their p for the declining 
health of their livestock. 

Oil companies say their methods 
of pumping the wells make the risk 
negligible, but critics suggest even 
the slightest hint of risk is too much. 
Presently there are more than 5,000 
sour-gas wells across the province. 

Last week, much to ee 

rise, the Energy Utilities Board 
aie Shell's application for the 
well. Whiting credits the people for 


Alberta Job Corp. building on 120 
Street at the end of March 
However, Alberta Infrastructures 
the company that manages all pub- 
lic property in the province, has 
agreed to allow the organization to 
stay on a month-to-month basis 
The ihuman Society was told last 
November that its lease would not 
be renewed because the huge ware 
house was needed for government 
use. An extension was granted in 
March, but the society was unable 
to find suitable space close enough 
to the city centre 

By mid-March, artist Wallis 
Kendal, who runs the program, still 
had no idea where the program 
would be on April 1. However, he 
told SEE this week that Alberta 
Infrastructure has let them stay, but 
they must be prepared to leave with 
one-month’s notice. 

“The only thing we know for 
sure is that we'll be here until the 
end of April,” he said. 

As it stands now, Kendal sus- 
pects their best hope is to find a 
generous private citizen with ware- 
house space to spare who's willing 
to help young people straighten out 
their lives. The human program 
has produced amazing results, with 
former street kids becoming pub- 
lished poets, being accepting into 
art schools across the country and 
displaying their work at the 
Edmonton Art Gallery. One was 
chosen as a YWCA Woman of 
Distinction. 

— Andrew Hanon 


Correction 
An editorial article entitled “Last 

call for traffic cops,” published in the 
Jan. 18-24, 2001 edition of SEE 
Magazine, commented on a trial in 
which Edmonton lawyer Bruce Gunn 
challenged the standards used by the 
Edmonton Police Service in connec- 
tion with its roadside alcohol screen- 
ing devices. The article suggested that 
one particular officer, Const. 
Chomchuk, had failed to meet 


a eee 
ewan eS 
14 days of use once over a two-year 

























life, love and fomily from one of America’s 


finest songwriters. Adv. tickets at the Sidetrack 


and Ticketmaster. 8 pm, $12 
bicRock $3.75 pints 


Panama Red 


this roots rock jam band rides again! 9 pm, $5 


Soul Sacrifice - A Santana Celebration 


from Woodstock to 


big band featuring percussionist Tilo Paiz and members of Bomba, Tacoy 
Ryde and Maracujah. Tix on sale now $10 adv. $12 door, 9 pm 













Killer Comedy Show by the Comedy Factory — DJ Dudeman; 


Band: Mustard Smile © 8 pm, $5 


Welcome 


Sidetrack 20th 


The BIG party. Featuring a secret special “Blind Date” with one of t 
country’s best live acts. Don't ask. ..IT’S A SECRET! 9 pm, $15 (limited 
advance and at the door tickets available at the Track) a= 


Fred Eaglesmith 


with guest Bob Kemmis. 9 pm, $10/adv., $12/door 


Presented by the Edmonton Folk Music Festival 
and CKUA Radio. Bob Kemmis, Anne Loree, Stew 










































Presented by the Edmonton Folk Music Festival. 
An evening of vividly detailed narratives about 












































/Miolly’s Reach/The Quitters 


E-town's best and brightest rock/pop acts kick our 20th anniversary 
week off in style with an all ages, licensed show. 8 pm, $7 








































































_________OPINIO 





SEE 
‘ a, 
2 ore, 


SEE Magazine is: 
Publisher/Sales Director 
Gord Nielsen 
gnielsen@see.greatwest.ca 
Editor 
Andrew Hanon 
ahanon@see.greatwest.ca 
Entertainment Editor 
Scott Lingley 
slingley@see.greatwest.ca 
Contributing Editor 
Kevin Wilsor 
kwilson@see.greatwest.ca 
Listings 
Salena McDougall 
Advertising 
Erica Ash, Anita Eagles, Linda Ha 
Mark (Ski) Malinowski 
National Advertising 
Jan Frolic 
Magazine Network 
jan@magnetwork.com 
(416) 538-1584 
Inside Sales 
Brett Ferry 
Distribution 
Shane Bennett 


Contributing writers: Doug Tokaryk, Darren 
Zenko, Peter North, Kirby, Tom Murray, Gary 
McGowan, Dj Spilt Milk, Gilbert A. Bouchard, 
Andrea Rabinovitch, Jacqueline Janelle, Greig 
Bethel, Stephen Notley, Dave Alexander, S 

Sharplin, Josey Vogels, Dan Savage 





Issue # 379 
March 8 - 14, 2001 
Pee W bet 
Na BE, 
2 Time Winner for 
Best Music re operacs v CAN 
SEE Magazine WS: 


Edmonton's issues, arts and 
entertainment weekly, is a division of 
Gazette Press Ltd. and is available free of 
charge at over 900 locations. Submissions are 
welcome, either by post, fax, e-mail or hand 
delivered. No part of this publication may be 
reproduced, stored or transmitted without 
the expressed permission of the publisher. 

. 


CANADA POST CANADIAN 


. 









+}——__) 






Arts still 
e e 
a low priority 

Editor, SEE: 

The Professional Arts Coalition of 
Edmonton congratulates all the new 
and re-elected MLAs and extends 
special greetings to the newly 
appointed cabinet. It is encouraging 
to see new faces around the cabinet 
table and that the cabinet has been 
expanded in response to Albertans’ 
emerging priorities. 

While the new structure of the 
cabinet reflects changing times and 
changing priorities, it is unfortunate 
that a Ministry of Culture was not 
included in this round. There has not 
been a Ministry of Culture since the 

early 90s. The importance of such a 
ministry, to Albertans, cannot be 
ignored. The Economic 
Development Edmonton study 2000 
states that Edmonton region arts and 
cultural organizations spend 


Yb | 
arf \ 


w/ 


SHOCK WARNINGS ON CIGARETTES ARE WORKING... 
AS COLLECTAPLES SO ADD THIS ONE! 


place. Our newly elected govern- 
ment and Premier Klein need to 
embrace the economic and cultural 
importance that the arts create in 
Alberta. One way to do that would 
be to resurrect a Ministry of Culture 
that would establish clear policy 
guidelines and increased financial 
support for artistic and cultural ini- 
tiatives in this province. 

While it is encouraging to see the 
priority afforded to Alberta’s aging 
population with the creation of a 
separate ministry for seniors, the 
addition of parks and protected 
areas (from the environment min- 
istry) and the Boards and 
Foundation of Persons with 
Developmental Disabilities, 
Michener Centre and Premier's 


Chretien 
ethically- 
challenged 


Editor, SEE: 

Just a brief note to add my voice 
to a growing citizens’ clamour for 
restoring decency in government 
and political office in our country. 

The Chretien regime is a tired one, 
an ongoing vacuum of waste, con- 
tinuing corruption and political 
patronage, bringing the highest 
office in the country to disrepute. 

The Shawinigan scandal is the lat- 
est doings by a supposed national 
leader who has run out of ideas and 
whose moral compass seems to have 
been lost quite awhile ago. 

Weare no longer talking about 
“the little guy from Shawinigan” 
here. The man has become a national 
buffoon, an international embarrass- 
ment and one can hardly make a 








SEE*POV 


Tories could use 
a business lesson 
from BC’s NDP 


Abverians pride themselves on 
their entrepreneurial spirit. This is 3 
place where things can happen, 
where a can-do attitude, a little inge. 
nuity and some good, old-fashion, 
(insert belief system of choice here 
work ethic can open up a whole 
world of possibilities. Right? 

Isn't the Alberta Advantage all 
about enabling people to realize 
their dreams? And with a little luc} 
won't those dreams translate into 
jobs for other people? Isn’t that what 
our Conservative government 
stands for? Presumably, most 
Albertans, who keep re-electing 
more Tories every time we go to the 
polls, share that less-is-more philoso- 
phy about governance. We want 
government to interfere in our lives, 
jobs and pocketbooks as little as pos- 
sible. It’s that hands-off approach 
we're told, that will keep attracting 
new business to this province. 

And we're inclined to agree. We 
want low taxes, and conversely, as 
few subsidies for business as possi- 
ble. Corporate welfare bums do not 
create wealth — they simply Hoover 
out of our pockets. 

But subsidies aren’t the only way 
to entice business to Alberta. The 
Tories are quite amenable to tax 
credits for businesses which provide 
jobs for Albertans. 

But for some reason, they don’t 
seem willing to extend that philoso 
phy to the film industry. Alberta's 
once-thriving film industry has been 
declining ever since the government 
shut down its motion picture devel 
opment corporation more than five 
years ago. Most of that business has 
oozed across provincial borders to 
B.C. and Saskatchewan, even though 
neither jurisdiction provides direct 
subsidies. Why? Because they have a 












ice aE eae approximately $40.3 million annual- Council on the Status of Persons case for him to stay on. One canonly | |... credit system, which gives incen- 
PPC ARON SALE is ROI DUCT ne local goods and services. These __ With Disabilities (from Health and hope that his associates in the PMO sea erie ee i vaodar a 
; expenditures and the expenditures Wellness) seriously impact a min- will see through the lies and decep- jobs created. 
We do everything we can to ensure our listings of visiting patrons result in a total istry that is already overloaded. tions their boss has created. : It’s not a hand-out. It doesn’t cost 
are complete. However artists and venue net impact of $82.5 million on the On behalf of PACE, I congratulate The bottom line here is that if Mr. taxpayers a dime but it produces tax 
— live oa Soo aye world pee t Greater Edmonton Region. the Hon. Gene Zwozdesky on his Chretien has any moral (ethical) fab- revenue by creating jobs. 
iene With this in sang, asia While the arts generate significant appointment as the Minister of Tic left — he should do the hon- It’s a hands-off system that seems 
urge you to phone ahead. economic return, that pales in. com- Community Development and we ourable thing and resign. He will do tailor-made for Alberta's business- 
. parison to their contribution to quali- look forward to working with him. the country, parliament and all elect- friendly atmosphere, yet the Tories 
#222, 6625-109 St. ty of life in this province. By encour- __» , odit Janes _cdofficials ithe land a great serview: | 4 rrcectwaiiiigene aleeielin 
ee A eee aging creativity, a more vital work vice-president, PACE by doing so. B.C. the film industry is worth more 
Dex aed, ake tied | force that can respond to the ve ee ae teo Campos | ‘than $1 billion annually. That's a lot 
E-MAIL: infoOsee greatwest-ca demands of the new economy is in onton Ca he of taxpayers. 
° line too much poison’s gotten into as fucking cool as you think it is. _ children might be (brace } ) 
LR Anxie your system. I just wish I was still a lespecially love how, when talk- diverted from becoming criminals in 
little kid, so that before bedtime I ing about the LRT, planners and the first place if this kind of fundrais- 
: 7 opal pretend was alee em such keep ing to how it's going _ ing fervor were applied to, 
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Or, = it’s ? fe number two... ah, screw the the die the first in pallet 
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time to get the hell out of town, at look, another clue. I mean, what the 
















GUY IN 
TOWN 


hell is wrong with you people? Like 
over in Belgravia, talking crap about 
een ae oe attract 

wrong kind of people to your 
neighbourhood. Everyone 


Ma! 


ce 





; .....)' ||) <a 


by Scott LINGLEY 


M aybe the name Sarah Harmer is new to 
you. Maybe you just heard one of her songs 
for the first time on pop radio and you're 
thinking, “My, what an accomplished new- 
comer. I wonder if she is Canadian?” 

The short answer to your question is, 

“Duh.” Harmer has been travelling around, 
honing her songcraft for over a decade, first 
her old band Weeping Tile and, more recently, 
touring behind two solo efforts, the most 
recent being the Juno-nominated You Were 
Here. So if you're just reading her name for the 
first time here, you should really try to pay 
more attention. 

“I've been on the road the past six years or 
so fairly steadily. I’m definitely coming to a 
time where a couple of weeks off would be 
really, really good,” Harmer says from her 
hotel in San Francisco. Not that she’s com- 
plaining. 

“Everything's kind of fallen into place in 
much the way I hoped it would. It’s amazing 
now you adapt to things really quickly. I’ve 
seen to San Francisco before but Id never real- 
y played here before this year and now I've 
been here three or four times and you really 
ust get used to new environments. You can 
never really anticipate what it’s going to be 
like, touring to different cities and meeting 
new people, but it’s been good.” 

The Toronto-based singer-songwriter is on 
rer way to a well-earned break at the end of 
April, but until then, she'll be on the road with 
ner band, accomplishing what few Canadian 
artists seem to able to attain these days — suc- 
cess on both sides of the border. It all started 
when American roots label Rounder Records 
picked up Harmer’s first solo turn, Songs for 
Clem, for stateside distribution. After Harmer 
released You Were Here, Rounder picked it up 
right away and Universal Music, Rounder’s 
Canadian distributor, saw that they were on to 
agood thing. The mega-label picked up You 
Were Here, which Harmer had been selling 
from the stage up until that point, and Harmer 
found herself with prime gigs, like an opening 








Forbert refurbished 


Sturdy singer-songwriter journeys through his 
‘past to find material for latest release 







by Craig ELLIOTT 


} 


H e’s Steve Forbert and when he 
was seven- Id, he didn’t 
have any idea at all about what he 
wanted to be when he grew up, 
but three years later, after he heard 
the B ing Mr. 
Tambourine Man, he knew exactly 
whathe wanted todo. 











sa 


i 





The Highway Kind 


Sarah Harmer reaps rewards of living life out of a suitcase 





hee 


ROAD WARRIOR PRINCESS Sarah Harmer’s knowledge of touring life is profound, and 


. 


about to become moreso as her summer schedule fills up with live dates 





slot on a Billy Bragg tour. Harmer says touring 
is just a complement to the hard work her 
labels are doing to get her name out there. 

“In San Francisco, for example, I did my 
own show here last November and this time 
there was double the people at the show, it 
was packed house. There are awesome venues 
this town and great furniture.” 

The increased prestige of major label sup- 
port hasn’t shielded Harmer and her stalwart 
sidepeople from the monotony and routine 
hazards of the road. On their way to the west 









after 30 years of making records, the first thing you hear is that 
the Rolling Stones would be so they’re more innocent, not as 
misguided as to try programmed world-weary. Which makes 
drums and dirty words to keep up _ sense for everybody, unless 
with the times? But I digress.” they‘re crazy. There's that 
You'll get no such spasms from _ and then there's the, 
rock-solid, two-feet-on-the-ground ‘Wow! What youthful 
Steve Forbert. For his Jatest album, _ vitality and enthusiasm!’” 
he returned to his earliest recorded His own fans and fans of 
history for inspiration. the Malet should appreci- 
“It’s really kind of an interesting —_ ate the Forbert-penned liner 
Steve Forbert €xperiment,” Forbert says of the notes. “I had those kicking 
Thursday, March 29 time spent si oughold == around in my head for a long, 
‘ tapes for Alive on Arrival, Jackrabbit __ time,” he says. “It was pretty 
at the Sidetrack Café jim, Little Stevie Orbit and Steve  _ easy to write them because by 
Forbert and refurbishing some of the time I tried to get it downon 
the long-abandoned music. Young, _ paper, I knew the stories that I 
Guitar Days is the 20-track end wanted to repeat arid the peo- 
result of his exploration. ple I wanted to mention and the 
club scene that l wanted to 


-telease songs, go out and reap the —_here, but 
rewards. And as far as that goes, 
when Forbert can get the bulk of pis eis 5 
last year’s Evergreen Boy recorded —_record with 20/20. 
is] 


that suggest 
imple plan 


ete re 
ae ae 


one of the best 


coast this time out, the band spent part of a 

day with a conked-out van in the middle of the 
Mojave Desert. But transportation calamities 
aside, the repetitive motion disorder of gigging 
in a new town every night puts demands on 
one’s mental stamina. 

“Just to make sure your socks are clean and 
you packed everything — it’s quite a routine to 
ul all your shit into a hotel and get ready to 
do a show and you log all those miles on the 

pe 
And while Harmer’s discovery of America 


y 


NATASHANICHOLSON 








Sarah Harmer 
with Royal City 
and Joel Kroeker 
Wednesday, April 4 
at Myer Horowitz Theatre 


r the most 


has been 
part, she’s still a bit wary of the planet's reign- 


a salutary experience fc 


ing Uiberculture. 

I'm trying to limit my amount of television- 
watching, because there’s a lot of cheapness in 
the culture, that’s for sure.” 

Harmer’s thoughts turn homeward when 
she’s talks about the sorts of artists she sees 
doing great things lately. The fact that it’s so 
hard to make a living as a creative person in 
our home and native land is all the more 
inspiring for the sheer number of talented peo- 
ple Canada continues to prodtce. 

“| find it inspiring, people's will to pursue 
whatever voices are in their head and the con- 
fidence to distill that and put it on record — 
musically I’m talking about people like Leslie 
Feist and Royal City and Oh Susanna and my 
friend Howie Beck — people who make some- 
thing out of nothing, who have that little germ 
of confidence in themselves to just go with it 
and see what they attract. It’s exciting to see 
people in one’s own time who are observing 
their environment and society at large and 
putting that to melody and expressing it to 
music. It’s a beautiful thing.” 

As for her own future, Harmer has no short- 
age of projects to get her through the spring 
and summer months. 

“I'm going to Europe in May and I'll be 
doing the Cowboy Junkies tour this summer 
and I’m going to try to get in some record- 
ing... It’s hard to know where to put your time 
sometimes. Like, | want to tour and travel but I 
also want to put in a garden so that’s what I’m 
going to do when I get my two weeks off in 
April in May.” 




















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ye) RS ee ae A 6 <a 
True Blue 


Singer Shemekia Copeland has real blues 
feeling — and she makes deliveries 


These are a lot of singers in their 
early 20s in the music biz these days, 
but not too many like blues power- 
house Shemekia Copeland, who 
makes her second ee in 
Edmonton on Saturday, March 31 at 
the Shaw Conference Centre with 
opening act Rusty Zinn. 

You know how you can tell 
Shemekia apart from other young 
women making waves in the music 
biz? She's not wearing a halter top. 

“| think it’s terrible,” Copeland 
says of the current state of pop 
music. “Sometimes I wake up and | 
think, oh my god, I can’t believe 
there’s another day of this crap . . 

‘I really think the whole record 
industry decided, you know what, 
we're gonna play us a joke on these 
people, we're g going to see how stu- 
pid these people really are and what 
they’re willing to go out and buy. So 
they get a bunch of girls, put some 
makeup on ‘em, make ‘em into 
superstars and people go buy it. If 
we're not buying it for ourselves 
we're buying it for our kids, paying 
$15 or $20 for a CD of nothing but 
crap.” 

But the young vocalist, whose 
recent accomplishments include a 
Grammy nomination and five W.C. 
Handy Blues Award nominations 
for her latest album, Wicked, has 
some advice for more soundly 
investing your money. 


Shemekia Copeland 
with Rusty Zinn 
Saturday, March 31 

at the Shaw Conference 
Centre 


your kids to 
see live music, take them to a music 
festival or something. I'm not saying 
bore them to death. I’m 22-years-old; 
bring them to see somebody like me. 
I'm singing contemporary blues, 
soul, R&B. . . I'm not going to try to 
bore anybody to death. A lot of 
young people come to the show and 
they dig it. 

What your kids and you so des- 
perately need to be exposed to is the 
bright flame of a blues legacy being 
handed from blues lege Johnny 
Copeland. If you know anything 
about blues monton, you prob- 
ably know that Shemekia was greet- 
ed with a chorus of dropping jaws at 
last year’s Bluesfest. The reason, she 
says, is simple. She’s the real thing. 

“One thing I can say about me is I 
have a need to do this. My dad 
always used to tell me, nobody 
wants to hear anybody singing for 
an extra buck, they want to hear you 
sing because you need to sing and if 


you weren't singing you'd be sick. I 
don’t know if I could honestly think 
that anybody out there doin’ this 
pop stuff, dancin’ and whatever else, 
has those same feeling about music 
that I do.” 

Since she first took the stage with 
her father, bluesman Johnny Clyde 
Copeland, at the tender age of15, her 
abilities have been honed over two 
solo albums and countless live dates 
as she has travelled ceaselessly 
through North America and Europe 
over the past few years. Though 
loves going anywhere to perform, 
she says it’s the other side of the 
pond where audiences show the 
most love. 

“When I go to Europe, I could 
almost be Tina Turner, because peo- 
ple respect the art form so much. If 
you go to a city with, like, 5,000 peo- 
ple, 3,500 will be at your show 
because the rest are either babies or 
old people who can’t get out.” 

That doesn’t mean Copeland 
pre fers one audience to another. 

“T like all places — wherever they 
like blues music, that’s where I want 
to be. I just love blues fans in gener- 
al, because they’ re all good people, 
no matter where they are in the 
world.” 

Copeland's immediate plans are 
for more touring. She figures on 
being around the blues world a long 
time, so she’s in no hurry to make 
her next move. Expanding her 
sound to include more influences 
seems like a natural part of the 
process, but Copeland knows she 
can’t escape her birthright. 

“No matter what I sing, it sounds 
like blues anyway,” she laughs. 
“And I think that’s a great thing. I 
really do. But definitely want to try 
different styles, different flavours — 


BLUE DIVA Shemekia Copeland _ 
promises a non-boring live show. 


SS 


but it will probably only be differe 
flavours.” 

Nor is Copeland too concerned 
about finding a wider audience for 
her music, which takes in many 
streams of American music. For this 
kind of music, there will always be 
an audience, she says. 

“You know why? Because the 
blues is like jazz, it doesn’t have an 
age. You can be young, you can be 
old, youwcan be short, you can be tall 
you can be'fat, you can be skinny 
and it doesn’t matter, you know, as 
long as you put good music out 
there.” 





LIVE SATURDAY, MARCH 31 «© SHAW CONFERENCE CENTRE 


Ti 
vocal power 


and teal 
pmnatOn, 
hovsterous soul and 
swaggering hives. 


This woman 
Knows 
e tI 
























’ o&Hsound 


ne 


@r ile 
Lhe | 


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Pr) 
( 














GORDON RITCHIE’S new CD, Circle of Stones, is an indie success story. 











Harping on quality 


Local musician knows his business 


I. this city we've all come to associ- 
ate the phrase “very independent” 
with a certain television station, but 
it's also applicable to any number of 
local artists who create and distrib- 
ute their own music. 

Like any other business venture, 
there are varying degrees of success 
but one musician who seems to be 
on the right traek is Celtic harpist 
and composer Gordon Ritchie. 

Some fans of the instrument may 
recognize Ritchie’s name via an asso- 
cation with his annual production 
of A Child’s Christmas In Wales, oth- 
ers from his appearances in any 
number of concert settings. It was 
only a couple of months ago that the 






début disc, Circle of Stones, a 14- 
piece collection that is both wonder- 
fully conceived and pristine-sound- 
ing. 

What makes this particular indie 
disc stand out from so many others 
that come in waves and head out on 
the tide just as quickly? Gordon 
Ritchie understands who he is, what 
it is about his art that has brought an 
audience to his door, and what he 














Learn more about the h 


wanted to convey to new 
his music, whi mbines tr 
al and original compositions 

‘The reason Ci f Stones is 
largely comprised of solo perfor 


S is because I wanted to con 


mance 
vey that this is my music e hearc 
lots of harp recordir nany 
which are amazing w rks, Dut not 
many find the artist taking 
stand,” said Ritchie last week, just 
prior to heading off to the West 
Coast for a series of five 
You'd th 
that a new recording arti 
want to produce a piece of work that 


hows 


nk it would be a given 





st would 


he or she could eproduce on a stage 
faced with 


nightmare or financial bu 


without bein stical 





but Ritchie ca 
uch everything one 


hears on the album ina live 


isn’t always the case, 
deliver pretty m 
sething 
Audiences certainly won't feel short- 
changed when he shows up solo, as 
only three tracks feature guest 
artists 
Collins joined Ritchie on an original 
titled Aislinn; Hiromi Takahashi's 
oboe hangs in the mix of Quand t 

} 


Former Juba vocalist Kelly 


Dors and cellist Christine Hansen 
was called upon to add her cello to 
Mist of Cape Breton. 

Mist of Cape Breton was written 
a couple of years ago when I flew 
out to Nova Scotia and then made 
my way to Cape Breton. | literally 
drove into a mist and poof, a melody 
was there immediately. I just had to 
hang onto it,” recalled the harpist, 
who also wrote a couple more tunes 
during that trip. 

Two other individuals helped 
Ritchie achieve his goal — engineer 
Colin Lay, whose experience in these 
kinds of projects is second to none in 
this part of the world; and graphic 
designer Dawn Woolsey, who can 
take credit for conceiving a very 
striking cover that delivers a strong 
and focused identity. 

This isn’t going to be one of those 
stories where the new artist ends up 
with 682 of 1,000 discs sitting in the 
basement and they stay there for the 
next decade. Ritchie is an artist who 
understands his audience, can draw 
a bead on a potential audience and, 
most poke keeps the process 
that surrounds the creative compo- 
nent relatively simple. 


— 





f Oin M At 
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Sarah Harmer 


ee MSI 





Rhythm Remedy 


Rumours of drummer Tom Doran’s 
retirement are greatly exaggerated 


l.. a family affair. Drummer Tom 
Doran and his wife Denise bought 
and began operating Remedy, the 
licensed cappuccino bar on 109 
Street, a year ago. They were first 
tumed on to the place during Jazz 
City the previous year, when Doran 
and guitarist Bobby Cairns were 
booked to play there by Bobby’s son 
Jason. 

The two long-associated artists 
play Remedy again this Saturday 
night, with bassist Mike Lent. 

Denise Doran likens this gig to her 
husband's second retirement come- 
back. However, Tom maintains, 
“When you're a musician, you never 
really retire. Once a musician, 
always a musician — it’s always 
there.” 

Edmonton-born and raised, 
Doran is a jazz icon who was self- 
taught out of necessity 

“There weren't any schools back 
then,” laughs Doran. “Maybe the 
Yardbird on the weekend. There 
may have been a couple of schools, 
actually, but they were too far away 
and too expensive.” 

His self-instruction was obviously 
highly successful. Doran went on to 
play with Senator Tommy Banks, 
the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra, 
Lenny Breau, David Foster — the list 
goes on and on, and reads like a 
who's who of jazz artists. 

In the late 1970s, Doran per- 








formed at an Edmonton institution, 
The Old Bailey Lounge downtown 
on Jasper Avenue, with The Jury. 

“Yes, with Mo (Marshall) and 
Wes (Henderson), that was a good 
little band. It was a year and a half 
— | think it would still be there if it 
hadn’t burned down.” 

There was a retirement in the ‘80s, 
which fortunately turned out to be 
just a hiatus. “I did retire for eight or 
nine years. We were busy, hada 
glass company, were raising a family 
and there wasn’t enough time to go 
around so I drifted out of playing. 
All the really good gigs kind of all 
dried up — the recording industry, 
the TV industry — so it wasn’t a 
money-making industry. You did it 
for the love of the art. 

“We had a bookstore a long time 
ago; it was actually Edmonton’s first 
metaphysical bookstore and we 
started selling crystals out of that 
store. Then that grew and grew until 
we started making the crystals, like 
the crystal animals you see in jew- 
ellery stores. It was big business for 
us; we sold to the American and 
Canadian shopping networks. You 


Sweet har-Moneen 


Ontario rockers rewrite the rulebook and 
squander their savings on a three-band tour 


by Tom MURRAY 


Sin elated after a sold-out show in 
Winnipeg, guitarist / vocalist Kenny 
Bridges of Ontario rockers Moneen 
is more than happy to talk about the 
release of his band’s first full length 
Smallman Records release, The 
Theory of Harmonial Value. 

Bridges, along with bassist Chris 
Soras, guitarist / vocalist Chris 
Hughes and drummer Peter Krpan, 
has been on a 40-date tour along 
with labelmates Choke and 
Layaway Plan, a tour that has 
swerved through parts of the U.S. 
and Canada and will wind its way 
through Edmonton March 31 at 
Pleasantview Community Hall for 
an all-ages show and April 3 for the 
resurrection of the infamous Choke 


Moneen 
with choke 
Saturday, March 31 at 


Pleasantview Hall 
Tuesday, April 3 at New 
City Likwid Lounge 





altogether. We took it as more just a 
theory on how not to be afraid, to try 
different things, and to keep your 
mind open. That's why we used the 
idea on the CD, it’s what we got out 
of it. I mean, we don’t know any- 
pa about math. I'm the worst at 


Bridges is persuasive and a fast 
talker, so it’s not that hard to 
the notion. Besides, it’s a hell of an 
first EP, Smaller Chairs for the Early 


1900s, the new album is assured and 








because, in the end, it’s all up to you 


—~ 


see, I never really got away from ¢),, 

creative element. Even in the wor! 

force, I still was creating, just in Jif. 
rent medium.” 

The Dorans appear to have all {}, 
bases covered in running a place | 
Remedy, from jazz, the perennia| 
hip genre, to cutting-edge new | 
erages like the bubble tea with sau, 
they’ ve just added to their drink 
menu. 

“Tt’s more than what it appears to 
be,” he says. “It’s been kind of fy 
and as long as we're doing this 
might as well have some music j 
here. It’s not a bad little venue fo; 
music.” 

It is a little venue at 100 seats. \\ 
should safely assume that Doran 
Cairns and Lent will have the joint 
jumping. 

“This group works best as a tric 
Mike is such a great bass player to 
work with, such big ears,” says 
Doran. “In this, everybody really |is. 
tens to each other pretty intently 
When it’s happening, it really hap- 
pens.” 

The trio is good to go, ready for 
two sets and will go for three. 

The material choice for the night's 
song list cuts a wide swath. 

“We'll play lots of different 
things,” explains Doran. “Bobby has 
some originals, (there’s) a lot of 
tunes that everybody plays, but we 
take them in a bit of a different direc. 
tion from time to’time. We stay in 
the framework of the. music Bobby 
grew up with, swing and bebop, but 
maybe take it a few other places 
along the way.” 

Go with them at Remedy Café 
(8631-109 St.) on Saturday, March 31 
at 9 p.m. 

Cover charge is a mere $5. 


“This album, compared to the EP, 
is a little different. We were a little 
scared on this that people weren't 
gonna get it, or that it was too soon 
to make such a drastic change from 
the EP. We're so new that no one has 
really pigeonholed us anyways, so 
we could do what we want. If we 
want to do a Beach Boys kind of 
thing, like we do.on some of the 
songs, we will.” 

Bridges has the unshakeable opti- 
mism of a kid in love with the possi- 
bilities of his band and his life. And 
he should; if rock music ever taught 
us anything, it was that you could 
reinvent yourself in any way you so 
desired if you had the imagination 
or the guts. So a dumb cracker truck 
driver could swivel his hips on tele- 
vision and a.nation would reel in 
astonishment, or a group of teenage 
English petty criminals could launch 
a subculture based ea eal 
guitars and spiky hair, It’s some- 
thing you know in your bones to be 
true, that you can laugh at the world 


f 











______CDREVIEWS 


TEMPORARY SHELTER | 


B JOHNNY DOWD 
@ TEMPORARY SHELTER 
@ KocH RECORDS 


Not much is known about the 
late-blooming Dowd, but this is the 
erstwhile Texan’s third album deal- 
ing with subjects ranging from 
vengeance to murder to hopeless- 
ness. It is not the most accessible 
album — the first few listens reveal 
little more than a strange mix of gal- 
loping swamp rock, ambient key- 
boards and spoken-word vocals. The 
stark and chilling beauty of this 
album stems from the lyrics and 
from the mood-matching form each 
song assumes, courtesy of Dowd’s 
talented, unconventional band. 
Temporary Shelter is incantatory. For 
once, something labelled “insurgent 
country” may be exactly that. 

—Dr. Sean Sanders 











@ KEELY SMITH 
 KeeLy SINGS SINATRA 
® ConcorD Jazz 


Or so she imagines. But the truth 
s, you can’t just “sing” Sinatra with- 
out sounding unimaginative in com- 
parison (Tony Bennett and Johnny 
Hartman excepted). No disrespect to 









Smith; she’s a damn good singer 
with commendable (if conservative) 
taste in swing and torch music clas 
sics. Unfortunately, there just doesn't 
seem to be much point to this album 
Each song choice merely shows up 
the difference between ar tistry and 
craftsmanship. If Sinatra captured 
the ruminative mood of a generation 
so aptly with It Was A Very Good 
Year, Smith merely reflects a blankly 
nostalgic quality that Sinatra, even at 
his nadir, would gag on. On the 
opposite end, I’ve Got You Under 
My Skin seems almost pale in com- 
parison to the playful, swinging 
mood of the beloved original. Smith 
does have the requisite phrasing to 
hold her own; she has too much skill 
to wreck it the way Bono did a few 
years back. Thank God for small 
mercies. 


—Tom Murray 





@ THE BLACK HALOS 
MB THE VIOLENT YEARS 
B Sus Por 


Do you know the story about the 
punk rock girl who finds what she 
believes to be an excellent, highly 
interesting stone? It’s black and 
square and it fits perfectly in her 
palm, but with its coarse feel and 
sharp edges and corners, she has to 
be careful when she carries it in her 
spare change pocket. She thinks she 
can make it better by chipping off 
the corners. Then, perhaps a few 
weeks in her dad‘s rock tumbler 
will make it better still, maybe the 
best stone ever! 

When it first emerges from the 
tumbler, all polished-up, feature- 
less, shiny and smooth, the stone 
seems perfect. But only a few days 
later, while the punk rock girl fishes 





around in her pockets for bus fare 
the rock falls into the snow. St 
doesn’t even notice 


Craig Elliott 














B TAKAKO MINEKAWA 
@ Max: On: 
@ Emperor NorTON RECORDS 


Minekawa, a seemingly endless 
font of dense collage-electronica 
EPs, returns with a fugitive record- 
ing in Maxi On!, one that manages 
to be both chirpy and dour, daffy 
and terse, edgy and lulling and 
utterly mesmerizing. Repetition is 
the key element here, a shifting, 
landscape of atonal sounds config- 
uring themselves into music, which 
often sounds like a death duel 
between two toy store robots. 
Twittering, bleeping, tinging, clat 
tering, it’s all here, Minekawa’s 
teeny tiny vocals perched precari- / 
ously on top. 

The sense that the multiple layers 
of her wee voice might suddenly 
evaporate at any moment works ' 
perfectly on songs like Brioche, 
which leaves you to ponder the lyri- 
cal notion, “1 cherish our 
brioche/ And I swell our brioche ” 
over and over again. 

Music — all music — is constant- 
ly disintegrating, the notes fading 





into air and something about 
Minekawa’s ethereal ditties 
telegraphs that straight to your 
brain stem. Even as Picnic at Loose 
Rock cavorts on the spot, repeating | 
the same plunky four-bar loop for 
six minutes, it’s ebbing and flowing, | 
threatening to crumble into non- 
existence. 

And then, man, it’s just gone. | 





—Scott Lingley 








Wave to the engineer 


Andrew White keeps the Sidetrack’s live calendar chugging along 


by Gary McGOWAN 





Name: Andre\ hite 


med 


Known for: Holdir 


x the estex 


ror 





th 


Next gig: The Track is live seven 
nights a week.On Tuesday, April 3 
the club will celebrate its 20th 
anniversary. A still-secret m 


act will take to the s 











music 
evening to mark the occasion. The 
city holds its breath ir ticipation 
(Some tickets are still available.) 
Life-changing experience: 
Becoming a father. A lot of peopk 
wonder why they were put on 
Earth. All I had to do was become 
Sybil’s dad to find out 


If you weren't in the music busi- 
ness, what would you want to do: | 
always saw myself being a back 
room political mover and shaker 
My dream job would have been t 
work for the U.S. State Department 
in the late 1950s and early 1960s on 
the Southeast Asia desk. I'd love to 
have seen the whole Vietnam thing 
unfold. I'm just fascinated by it 


Influences: The promoter Bill 
Graham; Neil Aspinall, who was the 
Beatles’ road manager and is still the 
president of Apple Corporation; my 
mother and Jimmy Page. 


Favourite movie: It's a tie 
between Dogina and Brazil. 


Best party you ever attended: My 
daughter's second birthday party. 
She’ll be four in June but the second 
birthday was the best because it was 
the first one where she was aware of 
what the celebration was all about. 


Superstitions: I won't use the 
word “shutout” when Tommy Salo 
is actually headed for one. | always 


| talk to a friend of mine who passed 


away before I go on stage. 


House of Payne 
Apnil 2-7 


Frankie Lee 


iv 


i> 


ee 


Rhodes 





FREQUENTY ASKED QUESTIONS 





Most important thing you ever 


learned: Do the gig you're doing — 
not the one you think you should be 
doing, 


Advice you give other people: 
Sometimes | tell young people not to 
uth 





waste their \ 


Favourite thing about spring: The 
smell. It’s a combination of rebirth 
and decay 


Gig from hell: It happened in 
Kerrobert, Sask. the day after the 
1987 tornado. I was working for the 
audio company that was doing 
sound at the show. We got to the site 
and set everything up. At 7 p.m. that 
evening everyone in charge of 
administering the show dropped 
acid. At the end of the evening they 
wouldn't let us tear down, because 
they wanted to keep using the sys- 
tem to play music so they could 
keep tripping. They actually threat- 
ened us with physical violence if we 
touched anything. We were there for 
an extra four hours 


IS DRINKING A PROBLEM? 
A.A. CAN HELP! 


424-5900 


NELLY 
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“Whoa Nelly” 


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Album of the 
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Weekdays 
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available online at www.ckua.com 


Brought fo you in partnership with 
the Alberta Heritage Community Foundation, 
the Alberta Historical Resources Foundation, 


and CRUA Radio Network, 


@ VARIOUS ARTISTS 
@ CONNECTED: THE JOHN 
ACQUAVIVA MIX 

M YUL REcoRDsS 


Bux in 1989, when Canadian 
techno gurus John Acquaviva and 
Ritchie Hawtin released their first 
single on Canada’s first techno 
label, Plus 8, John Acquaviva had 
already been DJing for almost 10 
years. Now 10 years, a hundred 


CURRENT EVENTS 
AND CLUB NIGHTS 

Black Dog Freehouse 10425-82 Ave. 439- 
1082 TUE: Digital Underdog — hip hop w/ 
Sonny Gnmezzzzzz and quests; SUN: What 
the Hell? — house, hip hop, downtempo w/ 
Tryptomene. 

Backroom Vodka Bar 10324-82 Ave. 436- 
4418 MON: Atmosphere — downtsmpo 
w/DJ Deluxx and guests; WED. DJ Calus and 
Robert Alan; THUR: Fresh and Funky w/ DJ 
Deluxx and guests; FRI: Pilot Episode w/ 
Tripswitch and Simon Locke SAT: Bustin’ 
Chops Hip hop w/ DJ Tanner and Megatorce. 
Climaxxx — The Gallery 10018-105 St. FRI: 
DJ Trevyy B, Charlie Mayhem, Juicy and 
Quests; SAT: Resident DJ James Gregory, 
Crunchee, Jay McNabb, Ikaro, Thunder Dave. 
Ciub Caliente 10815 Jasper Ave. THUR: 
Element Thursdays Lt. trie and MC Degree, 
alternating w/ Christopher & Brian Wells; FRI: 
Funktion Fridays (R&B); SAT: Latin 
Saturdays w/ DJ Alex (salsa, merengue); 
SUN: DJ Invinceable (Ladies Night) $200 
Cash Giveaway, No Cover, Free Poot All 
Ni 


ight. 
Cristal Lounge 10336 Jasper Ave. SAT: Red 
Hot Saturdays (Hip hop & R&B). 
Deviin's 10507-82 Ave. SUN: DJ Calus and 
Robert Allen. f 
Evar After 0148-105 St. THUR; Ladies Night 
w/ Slav and Guests, FRI: Resident James 
Gregory, Bounce, and guests, SAT: Resident 
Donovan and 3 
Lush 100304 -102 St. 424-2951 TUE: Triple 
Threat w/ Anthony Donahue and guest Dus; 
WED: Classics w/ DJ Loki (upstairs), Ariel & 
Roel (downstairs); THUR: Trademark w/ DJs 
Tryptomene and Spilt Milk; March 29: DJ 
Krysis {acid techne trom Calgary), April 5: 
Rob Solo (Ottawa); FRI: Lift w/ DJ Anthony 


releases on a dozen labels, and not 
quite a million gigs later, 
Acquaviva is still DJing seven 
nights a week. Currently, John 
spends most of his time DJing in 
Europe, playing in Germany and 
Spain regularly, but still finds time 
to play all over Canada and his 
home-away-from-home, Detroit. 
His DJ sets are a mishmash of 
disco-influenced house and Detroit- 
influenced techno, with many sur- 
prises found in every set. Recently, 
when Acquaviva was playing at 
Lush, I was impressed to see John 
using an interesting trinket that 
allowed him to hook up a laptop 
computer to the tone-arm on the 
turntable. 

John Acquaviva’s Connected mix 
CD is now out on Montreal-based 
electronic label YUL Records. The 
CD is a solid mix of tech-house and 
techno with 20 years of program- 
ming experience behind it. The 
mixes are expectedly flawless and 
the tracks flow from one to another 


CLUB NIGHTS 


Donahue, Stone and Derkin; downstairs — 
DJ Blue Jay; SAT: Turbo w/Tripswitch; March 
31: Cary Chang. 

New City Suburbs 10167 -112 St. 493-1212 
FRI: Freedom Fridays w/ res. DJs Nicky 
Miago, Jakob, Donovan, and Lickety Split 
SUN: Dee’Pornge — Deep House w/ Cool 
Hand Luc. 

Parliament 10551-82 Ave. TUE: Anthem: 
drum and bass w/ DJ Celcius + guests 
THUR; Shake — house and techno w/ DJs 
Geoffrey J and Solo (main):and DJ Junior 
Brown and MC Curtisy (upstairs) FRI: Fevah 
Fridays w/ DJ Ice and DJ Kwake (main) and 
Code Red (upstairs); SAT: High Society with 
DJ Junior Brown and special guests (deep 
sexy house grooves — main); SUN: Sunday 
Sessions —- downtempo grooves and chilled’ 
beats. 


Sublime (21 and up preferred) 10147-104 


St. (after hours, doors downstairs .at 2 a.m.) : 


905-8024 : FRI: Rotating mich ae including 
AKA Vass, J Rowley, Desolate, Donavan, 
Geoffrey J; SAT: Resident Manny Mulata and 


rosary chet Gage jo 


and Lickety 
Therapy (after hours: midnight-6 a.m.) alley — 
entrance, 10028 -102 St. 903-7666 FRI: DJs 
Latitude, Tripswitch, Cool Hand Luc, and 


quests; SAT: DJ Dragon, Allas, Saki & 
Stacks. : 


Wired for Sound w/ Dd Tomek (pr : 
house, Tsp unk haa house). Iara 





as if they are made for each othe, 
He starts off with some om ler 
from labels such as Rillis, 13 
United, and Chicago's Afterho yur 

Lenjoy listening to Acquaviva 
progress through different track 
some technoish and some more 
housey, including the techno-sideq 
Plus 8 release Electric Deluxe and 
the pumpir’ house track Touch }\j 
on Kosmo Records. Although all 
the tracks have great merit, [ have 
particular love for the 11th track o; 
his mix, Force, coming from China 
most outstanding techno sensatio 
Technasia. This happy-yet- haunt 
ing techno track is so phenomenal | 
would buyany CD that has this 
tune on it, regardless. The 
Acquaviva mix finishes off nicely 
with some harder-edged vocal 
house by T.R.G Man, some sax, 
house from Lego, and a deeper 
Definitive Records (Acquaviva’s 
main label) tune legends to wrap it 
up on the Canadian tip. 

—DJ Spilt Milk 


SUN: Breakfast at Tiffany's w/ Tiffslip and 


guests. 

EVENTS 
Spring Break infamy Saturday, March 31 
Marty McFly, Dragon, Shortee, Derkin, Lao 
Skuttle, Neil K., EQ Tweaker, Mike Trance 
Seth, Topaz, Will Cosby and more. Tickets 
are $25 in advance, $30 at the door, available 
@ Foosh or from 908-7490. 


Speed 2 Saturday March 31 in Red Deer, w, 
Aaron Liberator, Tryptomene, Xu, Dragon 
Crunchee, Thunder Dave, LP, Duff, Storie, 
and Devilish. Tix at Foosh, DV8 and Gravity 
(Red Deer). ‘ 

XN 
Fehrenheit presents Connected Saturday 
March 31@ Max Bell Gentre (Calgary), w/ DJ 
Sneak, Jimmy Van M, Big League Chew, Ann 
Savage, Tryptomene, Fever, Domenic G, Spilt 
Milk, Delerious. Tix @ Foosh, Feroshus. 


Spring Fevah Saturday, April 7, 
w/Brainbashers (UK), Groaverabber 


_ (Vancouver), S' 
Gundam, Phatcat, Ghetto FX, Tryptomene, 
Spilt Milk, Crunchee, Neil K .Tix available @ 
Dik i Colour Blind, DV8, Farside. 
Four Twenty, Friday April 20, “w/ Tryptomene, 
Phatcat, Skoolee, Red1knight, Francis Teg, 
Spilt ver Cool Hand at Refun, Wheezel, 


- apri28, w/ Sally 


Strange Ideas Productions presents 


STERE |. 


LOOKING FOR 


BANDS! 


: Wa acts (no covers, cane for 





________ONSTAGE._ 


Hard to peg 


Alzheimer’s explored eyes patient s ey 


by Andrea RABINOVITCH 


Few artists defy categorization as 
much as Dulcinea Langfelder. Are 
her works dance pieces, dramas or 
multi-media performances? The 
answer, it seems, is all of the above. 

For one night only, Thursday, 
March 29, she brings her multi-disci- 
plinary work Victoria to the Arden 
Theatre. The show manages to inte- 

te dance, theatre, music, video 
ind lighting in a way that is both 
moving and entertaining. 

Victoria is a 90-year-old woman 
confined to a wheelchair. Oh, and 
she also has Alzheimer’s. It might 
sound like an impossible premise for 
alive performance, but remember 
who we're dealing with. 

‘It’s interesting because thi 
has been very, very successful,” 


Langfelder as Victoria 


commented Langfelder from her 
home in Montreal. “It is not an easy 
piece to promote because of the sub- 
ject matter and it’s not easily pegged. 
It’s very abstract, very visual, very 
funny and very-sad.” 

The triple-threat artist, who's a 
native New Yorker but has lived in 
Montreal for 20 years, claimed that 
she spent “hours in a wheelchair in a 
hospital gown staring in the mirror, 


CANDIDO CARBONE 


Victoria 

by Dulcinea Langfelder 
& Co. 

Arden Theatre, 
Thursday, March 29 at 
7:30 pm. 


looking at the end of my life 

While she was doing this, her 
father became terminally ill. “I held 
his hand ‘til the very end and kept 
wondering what y 
mind, what he mig’ 
ing.” 

Compelled to bring the piece to 


going on in his 
nave been feel 


to create the work from Victoria’s 
point of view 
“The last thing I wanted to do was 
g piece. Sitting 
with someone dying, looking fr 
the outside is scary. Whe 
their head, it’s less scary. It 
follow Victoria into her world.” 
Langfelder’s an agnostic (“I don’t 
know what happens”) so the piece 
deals with death and the spirit 
religion. A male orderly joins her 
onstage but Langfelder claims there 
are four characters: Victoria, the 
wheelchair, the orderly and the 
audience. The wheelchair is used as 
a partner ina tango; the orderly is 
used as juxtaposition to Vi 
inner w orld; and the audien 
ited in through direct address 
ncorporated into the writing. 
She sees the audience and at various 
times takes them for visitors, 
patients and _as.an audience that 
she’s performing for. My intention is 
to get the audience to not look at her 
from the outside and that’s how I get 
them over the fear.” 


Sister act 


Chekhov work brought to life at Timms 


by Gilbert A. BOUCHARD 
EE oo 


I. would be really hard to pick a 
better play to end the 2000/2001 
Studio Theatre season than Anton 
Chekhov's Three Sisters, say the trio 


of actresses portraying the titular sib- 
lings. Not only is this University of 
Alberta production marking the cen- 
tennial of this provocative, ae 
mounted drama by the genii 
Russian playwright, it’s ae a oe 
full of theatrical references to life 
— and oe ces 

lesire — som vel see on 
the minds of one 3 fine arts 
degree students who ) comprise the _ 
Studio ensemble, _ 


Three Sisters 

Studio Theatre 

March 29-April 7 

at the Timms Centre for 
the Arts 


fleeing their provincial garrison 
town for the bright lights of 
Moscow. 

Rounding out the sisterly eee 
is Rachael Johnston (as Masha, the 
oldest) and Jessica Lowry (playing 
Olga, the middle daughter), another 

of closure and coincidence 


Canadian Music Week Deals 


«rs. starting bid $2500 
starig bid $750 each 
} starting bid $1000 ea. 
starting bid $2200 
starting bid $1300 


The Oedipus Project is a beautiful 
merging of technology and forms with 


the ancient tale of Oedipus the king. 


ject 


Call Northern Light 
Theatre for tickets 

(780) 471-1586 gos 
nit@telusplanet.net 


° LYNDA 
ADAMS 

° TIM 
FOLKMANN 
* SANDHANO 
scHuLtze — Will 


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Men of Respect 


Two social climbing hicks generate lots of 
laughs in Ron Chambers’ play 


by Kevin X. WILSON 


R.. Jenkins is fairly bursting to tell 


you the story. He can’t contain his 
laughter as he sketches the saga of 
Hork and Saul: 
get involved in selling illegal fire- 
works. I's the big dream job that 
they’ ve been waiting for.” 
Workshop West's artistic di 
is talking about Ron Chambe 
Respectable, opening March : 
Citadel's Rice Theatre. But this 


much as Jenkins will say about the 


story. He doesn’t want to spoil the 
trip 
“It’s a funny, funny, funny play 

: sa panic. It rolls along as these 

vo guys get deeper and deepe 
ot is thing that’s above them. TI 
are lots of twists and turns. You 
think it’s one thing at one moment 


12405-107 Avenue™ 
Edmonton ® 482-2213 


Purchase your tickets 
alslas for the Vancouver 


“These two rednecks 


Respectable 

Workshop West 
directed by Ron Jenkins 
March 2 -April 8 

at the Citadel’s Rice 
Theatre 


hambers’ work will be familiar 
to Edmonton audiences — most 
ssy’s 
> 1999 Fringe 
new to Jenkins, 
acts the new production. 
derson gave me the script 
ear. | knew about Ron but ! 
vt read any of his stuff. When I 
d this play, I just killed myself 


laughing.” 

Jenkins now considers Chambers 
a national treasure, blessed with furi- 
ous wit and unique style. “He's got a 
distinctive voice, which everyone 
will hear when they come to the 
play. (His characters) change their 
minds on a word. His dialogue and 
his care for the characters are differ- 
ent from anything that I’ve come 
across ina long time. I also think 
he’s unique in the way that he sees 
the world. He writes from his own 
place.” 

That place reserves room for those 
who are overlooked and under- 
respected. “Ron has a great affinity 

for the down-and-outers, the guys 
who are just trying to make their 

vay in the w orld. He has respect for 


brings us back to Saul and 
Hork. Actor Chris Bullough is inti- 
mately familiar with the latter. “He’s 
just an innocent kind of guy who's 
trying to be successful. He doesn’t 
have a lot of money and he’s trying 
to find happiness by finding a job 
and buying a house. He’s not happy 
and he’s trying to figure out how to 
become happy, and he thinks that 
this is the way to go. Saul is a real 


Simply Steel 


go-getter. ‘We're going to get our 
piece of the pie,’ is what he tells 
Hork.” 

Trying to carve out that slice, the 
pair test the vast commercial 
promise of beauty cream and phone 
sex. Smell palooka? Bullough says 
that Hork is comic, not contemptible. 
“The biggest challenge was just 
putting myself in his shoes. I’ve 
always had food. I’ve always had a 
place to live. He's close to poverty. 
The only thing he has is his truck. 
He's looking for a place to call his 
own, something that we take for 
granted.” 

Jenkins is proud of his experi- 
enced cast, which includes Frederick 
Zbryski, John Ullyatt and Stephanie 
Wolfe. “They're willing to go any- 
where. They support the playwright; 
they’ re willing to help Ron tell his 

». They'll go down the road for 


Bullough is equally enthusiastic 
about working with Je “The 
guy has an amazing work ethic. His 
standards are so high that he makes 
you want to do the best work that 
you've ever done in your life. We 
laugh our heads off in rehearsal and 
then I go home and try to do as 


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FRED ZBRYSKI just wants respect. 


much work as I can, because he 
demands that. And he’s an actor 
himself. He understands what I’m 
going through. He’s easy to talk to 
and very open-minded. When 
you're in an environment like that 
you want to work your ass off.” 


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GOT A SMOKE? The Edmonton Opera presents Bizet’s Carmen. 





Carmen still smokin’ 


Bizet’s opera a shock to the health-conscious 


by Gilbert A. BOUCHARD 


| er for the savage realism 
with which it shocked opening night 
crowds in Paris 126 years ago, ; 
Georges Bizet’s Carmen hasn't lost 
any of its edge. If anything, the clas- 
sic opera’s subject matter — the 
over-controlling boyfriend, the 
struggle for female sexual autonomy 
and even the semiotics of women 
smoking and the ethics of product 
placement — has grown more con- 
troversial with time, as Edmonton 
audiences will discover afresh when 
this seminal opera opens a three- 
show run this Saturday. Carnien is 
being directed by the Edmonton 
Opera’s own artistic director, 
Michael Cavanagh. 

Despite decades of health educa- 
tion warning against the dangers of 
smoking and a growing social dis- 
comfort with the practice, the trans- 
gressive yet sexy image of the 
strong-willed Carmen puffing away 
on stage is still as potent for opera- 
goers in 2001 as it was for Victorian 
fans, says Linda Hutcheon. 

Hutcheon, a Toronto-based liter- 
ary theorist, along with her husband 
Michael (a medical doctor), has writ 
ten Opera: Desire, Disease, Death, a 





to have an affair with dashing 





Escamillo, the bullfighter 

It’s interesting that the op 
would also equate a tra ‘gressive 
stror voman with tok acco 
really two discourses rolled 
on 








give ’ 
passions evoked over tobacc 
pany sponsorships and medi: 
advertising 

Hutcheon notes the cigar f : 
that serves as the Opera's main set 
ting was a very real historica 
\ess and preminent feature ir 
Seville, hence a ver t 
placement for its 19th centur 1 
ence. The facto s alsc 


tourist attraction al t 
opera was written, especially am« 
len 


ticular 





factory workers rol! the 






female 
ars on their exposed and sweaty 
thighs 

For Cavanagh, producins 

rot “just dusting off of a museum 
piece, Dut the creation of a powe rful 
dramatic work filled with “wonder 
fully realized characters” that are 





Carmen 
Edmonton Opera 
March 31, 8 p.m. 

April 3 & 5, 7 :30 p.m. 

at the Jubilee 
Auditorium 


50th very passionate and “not 


- ys very nice Carmen s 
obsessed lover and eventual mur 
derer, Don José, might very well be 
the original media depic tion of a 
stalker, notes the e 
“It’s a wonderful archetypal slice 

of human life,” concludes Cavanagh 
“That's the great power of opera 
seeing other people give voice to 


loquent directo 


work exploring the role of death, ill- 

ness and health-related practices like 

smoking in the operatic canon. 
“Young women today start smok- 


i Ultimately it delivers the goods.” 
ing for the same reasons Carmen 





deep human emotion that you share 





smoked,” Hutcheon said of the deep 
association in life, as in art, between 
female sensuality and the demon 
weed. 

At the core of the attraction is the 
contradictory push-pull of the smok- 
ing woman seen simultaneously 
breaking the rules but doing so ina 
legal fashion. This “push-pull” con- 
tradiction is directly reflected in the 
character of Carmen, who has a 
seductive push-pull personality that 





Now for listings anywhere 





extends past her smoking to her rela- in North America. 
tionship with the officer Don José — 

aman she allows to serve jail fame 

on her behalf and converts to a life of ® 
crime as a smuggler, yet dumps how sth TELUS 
unceremoniously when she decides 


Come improve your game. 


Mie de BALL SHOT 


SIX SH@STERS 










Noy a 

Ori 

a oD 
(MoU Geariag aay TD) | 





Li wwhoy action & entertainmen 


For bookings call 922- 3989 











Intellectually Stimulating 
Spiritually. Nurturing 










If you are on a spiritual journey that embraces an 
inique creative expression of your Spirit, 


| —_— » the t 
then the Centre for Spiritual Ayvareness 18, the place for you. 


' i. : 

| We are a new-thought church that offers a home for 

| those who are seeking to live a more prosperous, creative 

and meaningful life. 

) Each Sunday you will hear an inspiting and motivational 
message that can transform and énhanee your life. 





For moréinformationy Visit Gur website 
or joimus Sundays.at 11:00 a.m. 


www.centreforspirit.com 


Centre for Spiritual Awareness 


7621 - 101 AVE. 469-1909 


Edmonton’s Largest New Thought Church 





Workshop West Theatre Presents 


Respectable 


Guns, rednecks, fireworks... 


and a new way of thinking. 


Theatre in the Citadel ' 


pril 8, @ BP 








cist 


FM88 


CJSR needs... 
DJ's 


Broadcast Journalists 
Production Techs 


Fund Raisers 


Help in the Library 
and Promotions 



















C a was a flat circular platform about and gave me a thorough rub : 
Fi nd out h Ow you can get waist-high. jwae a it were small ae eh , 
. as uarter-circle seats, each with its Then she told me to roll over a 
involved at CJSR FM88. ee little sink. I sat on the bench and did the same to my back. E 
and doused myself in the warm When she was done soaping me t 
water with the bucket provided. up and scrubbing me down, she t 
I was alone in the room. I rinsed me in warm water, C 
looked up through the small sky- wrapped me in a clean towel, and e 

Available at light on the ceiling and relaxed, strode out, throwing the old towel 
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‘ording myself: si nude ona e was very professi é 
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N ON WHYTE IN ST. ALBERT gurgling beside me. errant appendage. I 
ew 0 u Nn e & r 10724- 82 Avenue #60, 19 Bellerose Dr. My romantic reverie crumbled I'm still not sure if I paid extra ‘ 
439-20/20 459-20/20 into small pieces a moment later for that. f 
fs 


Orientation Meeting 
Sunday, April 8 at 2 p.m. 
in the Function Room 

in the basement» 


of the SUB 











by Jacqueline JANELLE 


A big part of looking good in the 
navel-gazing days of summer is to 
have a healthy glow. Radiant skin 
means drinking lots of water and 
exfoliating — that is, scrubbing 
away all those dead skin cells that 
cling to your legs, making them 
look dull. How people choose to 
scrape off that epidural detritis 
varies considerably. 

The short list offers two basic 
choices: ‘do it yourself or ‘pamper 
yourself — by having someone 
else who's trained in the art of 
smooth skin, remove dead cells for 
you. | here are plenty of spas in 
town to choose from, each offering 
a unique experience. But I doubt 
any will give you the experience I 
had in the Middle East. 

I had been travelling in Turkey, 
and decided my trip wouldn’t be 
complete without the experience 
of a Turkish bath. I waited until | 
was in Istanbul, the last week of 
my holiday. The bathhouse, 
according to my guidebook, was 
once graced by the presence of the 
queen of sumptuous skin: Marilyn 
Monroe. 

After my initial mistake of going 
in through the men’s entrance, I 
stepped into a shady room. It was 
laid out similar to a mosque; a rec- 
tangular entrance area opening 
onto a dome-shaped inner room. 

































































eats 










The sound of water echoed from 
within. 

The attendant, in a crisp white 
uniform, waited behind the recep- 
tion desk. She was a solid woman 
in her mid-50s. 

She spoke no English; I still had 
not managed to get my mouth 
around Turkish, so we switched to 
hand signals. She asked me which 
treatment I wanted by pointing to 
a wooden menu board with a 
comprehensive list of available 
restorative therapies. 

I noted the prices increased 
incrementally as she moved down 
the list. 

All were in gold paint, none 
were in English. I opted for some- 
thing from the middle hoping I 
could buy a ‘spa experience’ with- 
out blowing the rest of the Turkish 
lire that was to see me to the end 
of the week. 

First she directed me into a 
small, ornately carved wood pan- 
elled room. It had a hook, a chair, 
and a bed; it was very pleasant 
despite it’s simplicity. I removed 
all my clothes, hung them on the 
hook, wrapped a soft white towel 
around myself and was led into 
the dome. 

The dome, or bathing room, 
was unnervingly decrepit. The 
paint was peeling in the corners 
and there was a hint of mildew in 
the air. 

In the middle of the room there 


but 
ace. 


INSTYLE st 
The magic touch 


Spas are an ancient tradition, but you might 
be more comfortable in the modern kind 






























Hands-on healing 
a 


when the attendant walked into 
the dome wearing nothing but a 
pair of black lace panties, nipples 
on her pendulous breasts dangling 
at five and seven o'clock. She 
made SouthPark’s Mrs. 
Choksondik look pert: 

Suddenly being completely 
naked didn’t feel so good. She told 
me to lie on the elevated platform 
Her breasts, larger than my thighs, 
rolled comfortably on her belly. 
She put a loofah mitt on each hand 


















Conservative dress? Never. 

Blundstones crave liberal quantities 
of mud, rain, sleet and snow. And 
_ _ with no laces, they're radically easy — 
to use. Change your attire. Get 











No experience necessary. 








y 










THE PAINTING DAISIES know clothing is big part of on-stage presence. 


Sound styles 


The music industry has long had 
an influence on fashion trends 


by Jacqueline JANELLE 


The music industry has always had 
the power to dictate fashion, from 
Madonna’s plastic bangles in her 
‘Virgin’ days to Christina Aguilera’s 
obnoxious hair colours. Our clothing 
styles often emulate what the people 
behind the microphones and guitars 
are wearing. I talked with 
Edmonton’s Painting Daisies about 
the power and importance of what 
they wear on stage; from their 
dream outfit to the worst thing they 
ever put on. 

Rock and Roll cultivates an image 
of irreverence, and the Daisies are no 
exception. I met the band in a down- 
town coffee shop the day before a 
month-long road trip through the 
States. When asked about packing 
for the trip, Daisy Groff laughed and 
said the hard thing about living out 





| 


—~ 





a 
ie 


of a suitcase is that it limits choice. 
On the other hand, the great thing is 
you play a different town each night, 
so the audience never knows you've 
borrowed the bass player's outfit 
from the night before. 

The band members readily accept 
that what you're wearing matters 
almost as much as the music. You 
can’t just show up in jeans and a T- 
shirt and expect to blow the audi- 
ence away. It’s part of the package 
you're delivering, if you want the 
audience to listen to the music then 
you have to make the show worth 
watching, maintains Rachelle 
VanZanten. 

This doesn’t mean prancing 
around half naked — although 
Daisy has been known to take off 
her shirt, though only if everyone in 
the audience removes theirs first. For 
the band it means being ‘dressed’. 
Wearing clothes that say something 


y ever wore on stag 


quick to mentior 


Her stage gear rarel 
vinyl! pants, white T-shi 
and boots 


sonalities that make 
Rachelle would opt 
long and flowing 
my feminine side 
years. I even bo 

In the other corner we have Daisy 
in dress pants, white undershirt, sus- 
penders and boots. Carolyn 
choose “anything expensi 
finally settled on a chain mail 
evening gown, studded with rhine- 
stones — not an entirely practical 
choice. As for Kim: “If Kim had the 
money, she'd upgrade to real leather 
— that’s about all she’d change — 
and a Harley, she’d get herself a 
Harley,” offered Carolyn. 

Several of the band members 
were surprisingly supportive of the 
Britneys.of the music world: If you 
have a great navel you might as well 
show it. People formulate an opinion 
of you the moment you're on stage, 
argued Daisy. You're seen as an 
object, a commodity, and an accessi- 
ble one. You can’t change that fact; 
the fun is in making it work to your 
advantage. 

The Painting Daisies are on tour 
but will perform back home in 
Edmonton May 4. Their latest CD is 
Fortissimo. 


www.paintingdaisies.com 


" quickreflex 
\ 






Let’s TALK 
Asout Sex! 


SEE Columnist DAN SAVAGE 
answers your sex-related questions! 


Got a Question? E-mail Dan at 
see@greatwest.ca, fax him at 432-1102 
or write him at SEE Magazine, No. 222, 
8625-109 St., Edmonton AB, T6G 1E7. 













% 






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Ain. springtime in the mountains. It’s the 
time of the year when the days grow longer, 
the sun stronger, and ski bums in search of 
the season’s last hurrah start their annual pil- 
grimage to the Mecca of North America’s ski 
scene. 

Whistler-Blackcomb, located in B.C.’s mas- 
sive Coast Mountains, is the place to be‘for.a 
springtime fling. I feel drawn there as well. 
The local ski hill here in Golden, like others 
around western Canada, is shutting down 
the lifts but it feels like the season is just get- 
ting going. 

During my pilgrimage last May, I woke up 
to 30 centimetres of fresh pow. I spent the 
day doing laps of Whistler's Peak Chair until 
I could doit no more. And remember, that 
was in May. I lived in the Mecca for a couple 
of years in the mid-90s and always looked 
forward to spring. What a great time to work 
on my goggle tan, I would think to myself. 
Anyhoo, I’m sure you've heard all about the 
Whistler-Blackcomb behemoth, so I’ll just 
gloss over the heady stats. 

More than a vertical mile of skiing — that’s 
more than 5,000 feet, the most in North 
America. Twelve alpine bowls. Three glaci- 
ers. Two-hundred-plus marked runs. Thirty- 
three lifts to get you there as quickly as possi- 

Vas] hate to admit it, 














Ground Zero 


Whistler-Blackcomb goes off each and every spring 









Festival takes over the Mecca from April 13- 
22 for 10 days of debauchery both off and on 
the mountains. 

The WSSF is promoted as “the biggest 
winter sports event in North America.” And 
it might very well be. (Why does everything 
have to be “big” in the Mecca?) 

International ski and snowboard events, 
pro photographer showdowns, film pre- 
miéres, a Big Air exhibition under the spot- 
lights and ten days and nights of outdoor 
concerts. I’m out of breath just writing about 
it and sometimes I wonder if it’s Whistler or 
Disneyland. The skookum spring fling ends 
with the old school Westbeach Classic, which 
includes halfpipe snowboarding, a skate jam 
and $25,000 in big prize money. 

It's 24/7 in the Mecca at this time of the 
year. Last spring, Whistler-Blackcomb attract- 
ed more skier visits than all of Colorado. The 
Mecca saw more than two million total pil- 
grims last year. ‘ 

The Mecca can be overwhelming if you let ; 
it. But if you go to keep it real — if you're afte 








there for the mountains — there should be no Du 
problems keeping your sanity and perspec- hay 
tive. [have a long history of spring skiing at tur 





Whistler. My dad first introduced me to the 
pleasures of slush bumps when I was an 
impressionable adolescent. 

That experience changed my life. For the 
first time, I saw ski bums who were in love 
“ith the mountains. And J instantly knew 
tat I was too. 











olden, B.C.-based freelance writer Greig 
fhel “ ept it real” i Whistler for two lost y 









THE SPY WHO DUNKED ME Daryl Sabara and Alexa Vega are Spy Kids, 
but they sure the heck aren’t the whole movie. 


No adults, please 


: James Bond meets Pee Wee's Playhouse and 


SNOGREENS =e) 





silliness wins the day in Spy Kids 


3 by Stephen NOTLEY 

y Rover Rodriguez started out as a 
pretty good asskicker of a filmmak- 

5 er. His début feature, El Mariachi, 
amazed people not only because it 

ut as a superbly choreographed, 

vs martly filmed, instantaction classic, 

ds but also because he made it for 

ich something like $8,000. 

ay He went on to make Desperado, a 
movie that not only introduced a 
willing world to the charm and 

- delight of Salma Hayek but also 

e 


gave Antonio Banderas his all-time 

4 coolest role as one of the legendary 
gun-masters of movie history. 

let Rodriguez sort of hit the skids 

after that, though films like From 


geo Dusk Till Dawn and The Faculty still 
3 have their charms. And now, unfor- 
at tunately, he’s got kids. 

e 


by Darren ZENKO 


L s get this out of the way early. 
Whatever else you read or hear 
about Claire Denis’s Beau Travail, 
one thing is certain: if scene after 
scene after scene of sweaty, ultra- 
athletic, shirtless military Euro-beef- 
cake is what you're after, this is the 
movie to see. Above and surround- 
g, all other aspects of the film, near 
to the point of distraction, is what 
amounts to a rapid-fire slide show of 
a ‘ine-ad : 






















Spy kids 
starring Antonio 
Banderas 

opens Friday, March 30 
Cineplex Odeon 

**x (out of five) 


Children, sadly, can often have 
kind of a syrupy effect on a filmmak- 
er’s work. Witness George Lucas, 
who at one time was an energetic, 
rule-breaking young director, and 
now, well... Jar Jar. Spy Kids isn’t 
the humiliating sop to Rodriguez’s 
children that Star Wars: Episode One 
was to Lucas’s, but it’s still a pretty 
kiddy movie. 

Of course, that’s what it’s sup- 


Desert death spiral 


Legionnaire flick Beau Travail is no jest 






Beau Travail 
March 30-April 1. 
Metro Cinema 
Zeidler Hall, Citadel 
Theatre 

**x1/2 (out of five) 


Sergeant Galoup has made his life. A 
Legionnaire’s Legionnaire, he’s an 
exe es of all the Legion claims to 






posed to be. And certainly 
Rodriguez brings his traden 


energy and cartoony actior 


screen with as much verve a 
ever has. But at time: 
squeaky clean and produced 
looks like it could be a Disney 
movie 

Spy Kids has the kind of aff 
incoherency of a movie like 
Gadget. Antonio Banderas and th 
sweet Carla Gugino play st 
nave kids, TI ma S 





sion, get captured, and the kids ha\ 
0 rescue them. Okay, fine 

And for the first part, it’s pretty 
good. There's a great over-the-top 


wedding flashback where assault 





helicopters buzz in like wasps, blast 
ing away at the happy couple. The 


movie is stuffed to the gills with 

craZy spy gadgets, secret doors jet 
packs, you name it. All pretty cool 
though after a while the digital-nes 


of it all starts to unfocus the eyes 

But then we get to the bad guys 
and their whole thing is about weird 
Pee-Wee Herman-esque mutated 
freaks and bizarro robots whose 
arms, legs and heads are just 
thumbs. Admittedly, it’s a pretty 
non-Disney touch, but it doesn’t 
exactly mesh with the spy stuff, 
either. And this Playhouse esthetic 
kind of takes over the movie, which 
is a shame because the high-tech spy 
stuff is better. 

There’s a thin emotional thread 
about the idea that all the family 
members have been keeping secrets 
from each other, but it mostly 
amounts to the occasional d ialogue 
toss-in. And, unfortunately, the story 
has to focus on the kids and they’re 
just not as good or as entertaining:as 
Banderas and Gugino 


While it’s not terrible or anythitigs 


itjust seems less and less substantial 


as it goes along, more silly andukid=s 
like. And fiot in a great way, unfor- 
tunately. 

So in all likelihood, this isn’t the 
kind of movie an adult would really 
want to see on his or her own initia- 
tive. 

As a sit-still device for a child, 
though, it’s got more than enough 
coloured light to do the job. 





single conversation involves a 
Legionaire instructing a Russian 
comrade in the et words for 
various pieces of underwear. 

A story told with nothing but tone 
and image should get boring, fast — 
most hack directors would simply 
end up with 80 minutes of two 
dudes glaring at each other and 10 
minutes of fistfight. Denis is no hack. 
Once you figure out what she’s 
doing (this takes a few minutes), 
Beau Travail's homoerotic death spi- 
ral becomes a million times more 
gripping than any cop-buddy “1 
don’t like you and you don’t like 
me” garbage. And when Galoup’s 
resentment of Sentain finally crystal- 
izes in action, the moment is natural, 
unforced, powerful. 


African dust and rock are often stun- 


ning. Shooting in 
location, 





Ps 


Featuring _ 
Brian Copping 
Randy Brososky 
Stewart Burdett 
Directed by 
Robert Loucks 













































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__________ONSCREE 











CHRIS KLEIN (centre) models the look first sported by Cameron Diaz in 
There’s Something About Mary. Oh, and he’s wearing a crotch restraint. 





Say it isn’t funny 


Farrelly formula fails in faux-incest flick 


by Dave ALEXANDER 





P.,, attention, for the secrets of 
popular Hollywood comedy shall be 
revealed. 

First get a pen and paper. Okay, 
now make four columns labeled: 
Sex, Animal, Disability, and Body. 
The first three columns are fairly 
self-explanatory; simply list exam- 
ples of each word, such as “fellatio” 
under Sex, “cow” under Animal, 
and “amputation” under Disability. 
The last column, The Body, is a bit 
different as it covers a larger range, 
including fluids such as blood or 
semen, abnormalities like warts, or 
simply different parts (face, nipples, 
etc.) 


HARD-DRIVE 






Say It Isn’t So 
starring Heather 
Graham and Chris Klein 
now playing 

Cineplex Odeon 

* (out of five) 


« Now you need characters. This is 
a minor detail; just be sure to have a 
guy, his love interest, and some 
parental figures. Most importantly, 
ensure that none of them are much 
smarter than a fruit bat, otherwise 
they won't be fun to ridicule. 

Next, simply pick examples from 


Geers 







will be relocating to the 


Student’s 
Union Building 
Bookstore. 


ereat time 


CHRIS HELCERMANAS-BENGE 






your lists and put them togethe ;, 
various combinations to create a 
slew of mishaps and embarrassi; 
situations. This will be your pio 
Keeping in mind that subtlety anq 
coherence are your biggest ener je. 
you've got yourself a popular 
Hollywood comedy without my 
effort at all. 

Chris Klein, of American Pie f2; 
stars as Gilly Noble, an animal co). 
trol officer who falls for Jo Wing fie, 
(Heather Graham), an inept hairsi,,|. 
ist who cuts off part of his ear during 
a trim. After the bloody accident,” 
they fall in love, much to the disa, 
proval of Jo’s parents who want |, 
to reconcile with a wealthy ex- 
boyfriend. Sally Field plays Valdi: 
an unpleasant mother who berat 
her equally unpleasant wart-faced 
and wheelchair-bound husband 

Despite parental disapproval 
Gilly and Jo are on the fast track io 
married life. Their dreams are sha} 
tered when it is revealed that Jo 
parents are also Gilly’s parents \y 
gave him up for adoption. Jo retu; 
to Beaver, Oregon and her ex- 
boyfriend, while Gilly remains, | 
ing in shame as the “sister fuck: 

When the real adoptive son 
returns, Gilly sets off to reclaim |; 
however, Valdine attempts to cove; 
it up so her daughter can marry rich 
When Gilly arrives in Beaver, he i 
hunted by the police and local thugs 
who, along with Jo, still believe that 
the two are related. Gilly’s only 
friend is legless bush pilot (Orlando 
Jones), who aids him in setting the 
record straight while avoiding both 
arrest and bodily harm. ~ 

The plot revolves around scenes 
of Gilly gluing apubichair beard io 
his face, Jo’s drooling father having 
strokes and getting attacked by bees, 
Dig losing his artificiallegs, and 
Gilly getting his entire arm:stuck 
inside the anus of a cow. Notice the 
various outrageous combinations of 
Sex, Animal, Disability, and Body 

Those of you paying close atten- 
tion may be thinking “This sounds 
tasteless and overbearing.” Of 
course it is —the moreso, the better. 
The last thing you want to do is have 
a character get his arm stuck in a 
cow’s ass and then simply pull it 
out. He should eventually get it out 
after a drawn-out public humiliation 
and then stick it back in again on 
purpose. This is comedy. 


Se@ond 
idl: 


Book: 



















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irsty] 
uring 
it 





y rich 
e is 

thugs 
that 


undo 
the 
both 


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dy 
ten- 
nds 





etter. 
3 have 


ONSCREEN 





Triumph of the Lambs 


DVD reinforces disturbing power of serial killer classic 


by Scott SHARPLIN 





H.; it really been 10 years since 
silence of the Lambs brought the 
thriller genre back from its ugly hell 
of Nightmare on Elm Street sequels? 
The time that’s passed, and the glut 
of disappointing rip-offs that have 
followed in its wake, serves to prove 
what a remarkable film it was. The 
five Oscars are a good sign as well. 

| remember watching Lambs in the 
theatre and trying to steady myself 
as | walked through the lobby. 
Revisiting the film over the years, 
i've been able to put a bit more dis- 
tance between myself and it, and 
view it as the cinematic masterpiece 
itis. From Foster’s nuanced portray- 
al of an eager female in a profession 
of hard-nosed males, to Hopkins’ 
electric screen presence to the dead- 


on pacing of the film’s last third, 
there is nothing in this package to be 
criticized. 









Silence of the Lambs 
starring Jodie Foster 
and Anthony Hopkins 
now available on DVD 


Of the two DVD versions of Lambs 
available, the clear winner is the 
Criterion Collection Special Edition, 
which boasts a phenomenal transfer 
and mind- -blowing extra features. 

The running audio commentary 
features Hopkins, Foster, and 
Demme along with FBI consultant 
John Douglas, who coached the 
actors on procedural details and was 
the inspiration for Scott Glenn’s 
character, Jack Crawford. Foster 
traces Clarice Starling’s character 
transformation by citing Joseph 
Campbell's Hero Myth, which seems 
a bit disproportionate at first, but 
quickly becomes convincing. 
Douglas points out which FBI 
sequences of the film are accurate 
and which are Hollywoodized. 

The disc also features lengthened 
versions of seven scenes from the 
film, including a close-up of the tele- 
vangelist video forced upon Lecter. 
There’s also a running film-to-story- 
board comparison, and two FBI- 
related extras: a “crime classification 
manual,” and Voices of Death, a short 
collection of quotations from real-life 
serial killers. 

Like the film itself, these morbid 
extras are hard to look at and impos- 
sible to look away from. 





A word to wise guys 


Smut is smut, no matter how ironic the tone 


by jodi RAMER 


Cee 


ee to a preview of the 
upcoming wankfest Tomtcats, a sick 
ening sense of deja vu overcame me. 
It struck me, again, that we're suffer- 
ing from a pernicious strain of cul- 
tural nostalgia. Blame it on postmod 
ernism or the feminist backlash, it’s a 
nostalgia for Porky's, of all things, for 
the days when guys could celebrate 
their rambunctious idiocy with nary 
astern look — except from parents 
and school principals, those obvious- 
ly beyond square 

Well I, myself, am just that square 
Of course Texpec t losers to be losers: 
the deficient jerkoffs targeted by 
Tomcats haven't changed since the 
heyday of scatologically-driven teen- 
flicks. What's alarming is when this 
hicksville mentality is parlayed 
through guys whom you'd like to 
believe are smarter than all that. 

Case in point: last week's Jimmy 
Grimble review (“One too many” 
March 22, SEE). I've got to give Fish 
Griwkowsky some credit for twist- 
ing out — from a kid’s movie, no 
less — every possible opportunity 
for some infantile sexual reference. 
This review proved even more fruit- 
ful in this way than his take on 
porn star documentary The Girl Nex 
Door — but it wouldn't be nearly so 
dexterous to generate some smut out 
of that topic, now would it? 

Let me make clear that smut isn’t 
the issue here. It’s the guy who 
proudly flaunts his affinity for porn 
stars and Maxim magazine who 
worries me. See, the problem is the 
stance. Does this sound familiar? 
Determinedly boyish and naughty, 
candid about his sexual preoccupa- 


tions, brimming with playful lewd- 
ness, smugly cynical and hyper 
clever, irritable and irreverent, self 
denigrating and selfmportant 
Trouble is, you‘re flattering your 
self, fellas, if you think such ironic 
posturing is pushing the erwelope 
This stuff isn’t transgressive, If S 
plain old-fashioned reactionary driv- 
el dressed up as urban hipsterism 
No fragile, politically-correct little 
world of mine has been shattered 
here. I’m offended because mindless 
sexist humour of this kind is such 
old news. Guess what: it’s not cute, 
it’s embarrassing, and such humour 
comes at the expense of women — 
not because we're uptight victims 
who can’t handle being the target of 
lust, but because you're showing 
your retarded affiliations with the 
redneck, the “good ol’days,” and the 
primordial sludge, and you're drag- 
ging us down with you 
This is a plea, then, not for censor- 
ship but for editorial choice. Editing 
ona personal level, and on a cultura! 
level. The media landscape only con- 
tains so much space for discourse: a 
responsible approach would aim for 
salutary, progressive, challenging 
and genuinely irreverent material 
Irony should be critically incisive, 
not an excuse for empty — and often 
retrogressive — rhetoric. | wouldn't 
mind so much, seeing a smart guy 
say some dumb things, if Il weren't 
well aware of the contingent of 
deadbeats and downright danger- 
ous misogynists who can enthusias- 
tically rally behind such words 
They may not get the detached tone, 
but I'm afraid they're getting the gist 
ot it. Which is that immaturity and 
sexism go hand-in-hand; give me the 
real man who won't revel in either, 








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1 location only t 
: Expires April 15, 2001 ! 
. 4 





1866 get 3web 


free Internet for life 





www.get3web.com 


________FILMCAP 





Check our showtimes chart in the list- 
ings section 


Billy Elliot The tale of a working class kid 
who has to get past his family’s objec- 
tions to study ballet avoids the usual sen- 
timental quicksand and pontificating 
about everyone's special talent, opting 
instead for believable characters, non- 
glamourous settings and focusing on the 
costs of a unique, irrepressible gift. Chief 
among first-time director Stephen 
Daldry’s virues is patience; he makes you 
wait with the characters for the resolu- 
tions they seek, thereby enhancing the 
drama — a sure sign of respect for the 
audience. ** «x (KW) 


Chocolat Unlike most insta-feel-good 
films of this nature, which offer a pre- 
dictable recipe, this confection offers 
something more than the standard false 
sentiment. Chocolathas charm. Juliette 
Binoche plays a muse-like dispenser of 


= 


epic, but the sweep is spiritual rather than 
political or military. Under Ang Lee’s mas- 
terfully restrained direction it's dense with 
drama and beauty. Chow Yun-Fat is a 
retiring warrior who is giving away his 
nearly-magical sword, Green Destiny. He 
entrusts its safe shipment to Michelle 
Yeoh, but the weapon is stolen by a mys- 
terious kung-fu burglar. At the heart of 
the story is a young aristocrat, Zhang Zi- 
yi, bound to an arranged political mar- 
riage, possessed of a secret past and — 
wait for it — wildly talented at kung fu. 
This movie will appeal to fans of kung fu 
flicks, lovers of fine cinema and everyone 
in between. *&%% x (DZ) 


Down to Earth A heavily recycled plot is 
not necessarily the downfall of this come- 
dy featuring Chris Rock. There’s just too 
much Chris Rock, to the point where the 
fine supporting cast — including Eugene 
Levy, Chazz Palmintieri and Jennifer 
Coolidge — are shunted to one side to 





BENICIO DEL TORO might have a cool name, but his character in Snatch 
dresses like a cross between Al Pacino and Father Guido Sarducci. 





chocolate and earthy wisdom who has 
just arrived in a staid, conservative French 
village. Alfred Molina plays the patient- 
but-hardly-tolerant mayor who quietly 
battles her for the souls of the locals. The 
heart of this movie is with its female char- 
acters, who bring a nuanced valence to 
the life lessons the film offers. %*%*+% (JR) 


Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon Not 
your usual chop-socky fair, this film is an 









make room for Rock's shrill stand-up 
routine. Top this off with amateurish 
direction and Down to Earth appears to 
crash and burn. ** (DA) 


Enemy at the Gates War is hell in Jean- 
Jacques Annaud’s new WWII filck, until 
you get in close. Then it’s just a bunch of 
English actors — or worse, American 
actors acting English — pretending to be 
Russian and scrambling over a large, 






The Great West Saddlery Building 
10137 - 104 Street, Edmonton, AB T5J 029 


Latitude 53 society of artists Gallery Hours: Tu-Fr 10-6, Sa 11-5 
P) (780)423.5353 F) (780)424.911 eM) latitude53@compusmart.ab.ca 














LATITUDE 53 


April 6-31 


Image Theatre 
presents 


Orphans 


March 27-April 7, 8 pm 
Tickets & info 477-0828 


Hannamari Jalovaara 


Opening Reception April 6, 8 p.m, 


Copper 
Dreams 


impressive film set. The awful splendour 
is intact on a grand scale, but the prob- 
lems of a few people, as Rick pointed out 
in Casablanca, don't amount to a hill of 
beans in this world. The flat characteriza- 
tions aren't enough to drive the melodra- 
matic elements of the plot, and the action 
gets a little repetitive as a Russian sniper 
and his Nazi opposite number hunt each 
other through the ruins of Stalingrad. 
Fans of people getting shot in the head, 
however, will find much to enjoy. *%** 
(SL) 


Exit Wounds Steven Seagal (his parents 
pronounce it Segal, by the way) returns to 
the big screen, which is just about wide 
enough to contain the puffy action star. 
Squeezed in around him are many of the 
same people responsible for Romeo 
Must Die, acting out a ridiculous plot 
about a dot-com millionaire (DMX) 
revealing police corruption using spy- 
cams and the Internet. A little tasty wire- 
rok aside, it’s interchangeable with any of 
Seagal's pre-1992 starring vehicles, 
which you can catch on TBS practically 
any night of the week. * 1/2 (AH) 


Finding Forrester Sean Connery is the 
reclusive, brilliant writer. Robert Brown is 
the improbably talented teenager of 
colour from a disadvantaged background. 
Watch what happens when Gus Van Sant 
has the former come to the aid of the lat- 
ter, as well as emerging into the light of 
day himself, for an uplifting, everybody- 
wins ending. The biggest problem is 
Forrester plays out like a rigged experi- 
ment, with the protagonist so prodigious- 
ly gifted and their opponents so patently 
wrong-headed that all the complexity — 
that stuff that makes humans interesting 
— gets washed away in a tide of plati- 
tudes and pat answers. But really, it could 
have been worse. *** (KW) 


Hannibal You've probably already heard 
how gruesome the sequel to Silence of 
the Lamb&is, but it’s stomach-turning for 
reasons far removed from its generous 
gore. Serial killer Hannibal Lecter 
(Anthony Hopkins) is the apparent hero 
of this one, and a superhero at that. 
Director Ridley Scott utterly fails to create 
an atmosphere of horror, or construct 
any meaningful relationships between his 
characters. They're just set up as deserv- 
ing victims of Lecter’s shrewd judgment 
and duly dispatched. Far from being 
exciting or edgy, Hannibal is just a big- 
budget gross-out with its heart firmly in 
the wrong place and no brains at all. Very 














CERTIFIED 
PERSONAL 
TRAINER 








WE ALL SCREAM FOR SHRAPNEL Jude Law stars in Enemy At the Gates, Who. 


a big-budget rendering of the career of Russian war hero Vassili Zatsiey. Wav 
—— 
T 


disappointing for fans of the first instal- 
ment. No stars (SL) 


Heartbreakers Fans of Jennifer Love 
Hewitt’s breasts rejoice! This film was 
conceived with you in mind. 
Unfortunately, most of the other elements 
of the film are mishandled, with A-list 
actors like Gene Hackman going to waste, 
overused sight gags being rehashed yet 
again, and.a near fatal lack of comic tim- 
ing brought to bear in the film's drawn- 
out third act. It just goes to prove thatald 
Hollywood maxim: cleavage is easy; com= 
edy is hard. **1/2 (SN) 


In the Mood for Love Nobody can do 
beautiful and sad the way Wong Kar-wai 
can. This beautifully scripted film is about 
the loss of innocence, as neighbours who 
discover their spouses are cheating 
together commiserate and fall in love 
without ever revealing their feelings. Here 
the interference of real feeling is a threat 
rather than a release. Meticulous visuals 
and fine performances by Maggie Cheung 
and Tony Leung heighten the melancholy 
a thousand fold, but like the memories of 
a long forsaken true love, this film leaves 
you heavy in the heart, in the best possi- 
ble way. tke (MS) 


O Brother, Where Art Thou? Homer's 
Odyssey gets the Coen brothers treat- 
ment, as three escaped convicts voyage 
through the wild and fantastical environs 
of the American South of the 1930s. 
Because goofiness reigns supreme, the 
story doesn’t really hold together as a 
unified plot, but the Brothers and their 
cast mine so much comedic gold out of 


each wild scenario, it makes the scattered - 


narrative forgivable. If the film suffers, it's 
in comparison to the Coen brothers previ- 
ous output. But a lesser Coen brothers 
movie knocks the spots off a lot of direc- 
tors’ best efforts. *%*%*-1/2 (DA) 


Snatch This British heist flick is excellent, 
another experiment in form and unpre- 
dictability that's made the first part of 
2001 better than last year’s box office 
offerings all put together. As with director 
Guy Ritchie’s previous film, Lock Stock 
and Two Smoking Barrels, a small army 
of quirky characters drives the premise. 
Quick stylish cuts, great music and a 
sense of constant jagged doom help the 
show along too. Go see this and 0 
Brother, Where Art Thou in the same day 
and you'll never complain about the gov- 
pele de the Lge or blueballs eS ; 


work and there are moments that are 
downright embarrassing. The wit the film T 
evinces is often sharper than what passes 
for “adult” comedy these days. There are 
worse ways to spend your movie-going 
dollar. **% (LW) 




























Saving Silverman This movie is as dumb 
as you think it is. Two dumb-asses are 
losing their dumb-ass friend to his mega- 
bitch fiancée, so they plot to break them 
up. It’s like the director just said, “OK, 
guys, we don’t have the script rewrites 
yet, so go wild!” There’s a lack of comic 
timing, a lack of script and a lack of direc- 
tion. No stars (MS) 


Traffic Steven Soderbergh’s latest tri- 
umph weaves several plotlines into a 
complex story about the U.S.’s war on 
drugs. A huge cast portrays the paralle! 
stories of Mexican cartels, importers, the 
FBI, Mexican state cops and a new 
American anti-drug overlord. The film is 
carefully constructed and controlled, but 
also smart, playful and crammed with 
great performances. %%&%**1/2 (MP) 


3000 Miles to Graceland A clever con- 
Cept degenerates into a bloody mess as 
Elvis impersonators enact a risky heist 
during a convention in Vegas. Leads 
Kevin Costner and Kurt Russell do their 
level best — Russell even sings — but 
there’s just not enough of interest to sus- 
tain the concept, which makes the film a 
long trip indeed. *%* (AH) 


15 Minutes Everybody wants their 15 
minutes of fame. That's the premise 
behind 15 Minutes, a film that suffers 
from an identity crisis. Director John 
Herzfeld just couldn't decide whether his 
film should be ourright satire, witty social 
commentary or straight-up action flick. 
Robert DeNiro plays a media-friendly cop 
on the trail of two publicity-hungry killers 
who are videotaping their escalating 
crime-spree.Most of 15 Minutes strives 
to comment on society's preoccupation 
with violence and revenge, but the vary- 
ing tone and gaping plot holes let its 
intentions as social 

action flick. 1/2 (0A) 


You Can Count On Me tlt a prt 
of a real family, not just a melodrama 
about acute dysfunction. Linney 






















































RESTAURANTS 

























by Gilbert A. BOUCHARD 





J) ne of my editors here at SEE 
»<ked me the other day how often I 
bte out. The answer — on average, 
including deli-take out and fast food 
is about four times a week. 
Sounds like a lot, but there are peo- 
ne who eat out more. Also, it 
jyould be hard to eat out less and 
have enough of a sense of the scene 
) write what I do. 
The eating out part is just the 
becinning though. 

The other side of the coin is a fair- 
jy intense (albeit deeply amateur) 





ECLECTIC 


four Rooms Edmonton Centre, 426- 
4767 — Hip yet comfortable dining 

'€ — Wioom(s) serves a goodly selection of 
appetizers, specifically designed with the 
intention of allowing patrons to experi- 
ment/share in a controlled manner. 



































&S  Mperfect before taking in a downtown art 

Mic @event with friends. Scooby picks include 

direc: WPpotstickers, Satay Skewers and the 
Tibetan Stir-fry. Overall rating: x**. 

: Dadeo Restaurant 10548A-82 Ave., 433- 

5 930- Okay, | realize that Dadeo serves 

a ainly the one cuisine (Cajun/ Creole/ 

on southern), but it’s under eclectic cause 

Hel is sO darn-cool_and one of the perpetual 

he Whighlights of the Whyte scene. A visit to 
this 50s era railroad-style diner isn’t com- 

NIS Wolete without a chicken Po'Boys or a 

but BPhearty Combo Fabio (the St. Louis 

hh -Biivs/fried chicken combination plate). 

P) overall rating: **. 
‘Luna Loca across from University 

ON BHospital on 112 St. and 84 Ave.: An 

45M instant Scooby Review Gang favourite. 

‘St WB casual service, good selection of upscale 

. oups, entrees and desserts and fair trade 

Te" WB coffee in a funky minimalist setting. 

Dut WP Overall rating: kk 

SUS" HR Rivo Tapas Restaurant 9707-110 St.— 

M4 WB Anew kid on the block, it’s certainly taken 
off with a bang. Great river valley view, 

5 huge appetizer selections (something for 
absolutely everybody) and exceptionally 

; attentive service. Did | mention the room 


itself is a total delight? Overall rating: 
otek, 

Joey Tomato’s Mediterranean Grill 
Jasper & 112 St. 420-1996 — Boasting a 
001 new post-modern look, this decided- 
\y accessible eatery does the eclectic 
Uptown dining scene with an enviable 
gusto, Whether you're wanting to scarf a 
quick pizza or split an entree, settle down 
for a formal dinner or high-tension busi- 
fess lunch, Joey's will accommodate. 
Overall rating: x4. 










Madison’s Grill 
Ave bet {( 


Comfort food 


The ideal dining situation is to feel like every 
meal was designed specifically for you 






Jo Jo Bistro 
Price Range: xxx 
Value: xxx * 
Food: x ** 
Service: *xx* 
Overall: *«** 








dedication to home cooking and 
keeping track of larger food trends 
(including author interviews and 
cookbook reviews) that allow me the 
broadest context when it comes to 


REVIEWS 





and only some of the best service staff in 
Edmonton make for a memorable dining 
event every time out. Overall rating: 
tok Ik. 

Hotel Macdonald Harvest Room, 10065, 
100 St., 429-6424: This splendid 
Edwardian eatery is an River City staple 
for fine dining, especially high teas and 
brunches. Endless dedication to quality, a 
kitchen that can turn even the simplest 
dish into a culinary experience and one of 
the best views in town make a visit worth 
the pricey tab. Overall rating: **«*&*& x, 


Fast Foop (Sit-DowNn) 


Garage Bar & Grill 10242-106 St., 423- 
5014 —Named for the fact it's housed in a 
renovated garage, the Garage is one of 
those lunch-time secrets for downtown 
fast-food junkies in the know. A wonder- 
ful selection of diner-style dishes, sand- 
wiches and finger foods and big ol’ burg- 
ers that are as unpretentious as they are 
substantial and tasty. Overall rating: 
tok, 

The Funky Pickle 10441-82 Ave., 433- 
3865 — Okay, once again | exaggerate — 
The Funky Pickle is not so much “sit- 
down” as curb-side and/or take-out: so 
sue me. A Funky Pickle pizza means 
wholewheat dough, real cheese (includ- 
ing Asiago and Feta), fresh vegetables 
and ingredients and real attention to detail 
=no wonder it's such on Old Strathcona 
institution. Overall rating: x**«*. 
White Spot 3921 Calgary Trail South: A 
B.C. car-hopping tradition comes to 
Edmonton. Big juicy burgers and well- 
done fast food staples are specialty, 
served ina aesthetically-pleasing, family~ 
friendly dining room. Overall rating: 
kr. 


VEGETARIAN/HEALTH 


Savoy's Health Café 11010 - 51 Ave., 
437-7718 — Don't let the 
‘Anglophile name fool you, this 

diner specializes in 


Southgate-adjacent = ; 
some totally decadent Indian food. A little 

the way, but worth the trip. Overall 
Het fatal ; 


-, 433-9702 








talking about restaurant offering 
and something to « ompare, After all, 
an you say you “eat out” if yo 
never eat in? 

It’s that balance — home cookin 


that re 
this column possible at 





and eating out 


ally 1 






also one of the reasons I kinda go 
squirrelly when I'm on the road and 
have no choice but to eat nothing but 


restaurant ofterings 
What usually 


make sure I work in a homecookine- 


NOrkS for me 1s to 


friendly restaurant in my rotation 





every couple of days. By this I do not 


mean what is typically advertised as 
‘home-style” o 


Wi 


restaurants. \ 
ments have their place, what I mean 
are those restaurants that take a 


even “family 


tile those establish 


deeply personal approach to their 
cuisine: more specials than menu 
items, hand-prepared everything, 
and a real knack for serving food 
that falls in the comfort-food camp 
— but always with a unique twist 


Okay, the tofu beef kinda freaked me out 
but aside from that a spendid dinning 
experience. Friendly staff, lovingly pre- 
pared dishes in a casual store-front set- 
ting. Overall rating: ***. 


COFFEE HOUSES AND Puss — 


Ceili’s Irish Pub and Restaurant just off 
109 St. and 104 Ave., 426-5555 — A 
might fine Celtic eatery across the street 
from the downtown GMCC. Fave dishes 
include: The Five Counties Dip (home- 
made guacamole, salsa, black bean 
sauce, Sour cream and aged cheddar) 
and the massive Corned Beef and 
Cabbage Boxty (golden potatoey and 
dripping with a rich creamy corned 
beef/cabbage goodness). Overall rating: 
Ye a on 

Remedy 8631-109 St, 433-3096 — | real- 
ly not a Starbucks kinda guy — for me it's 
the independent coffeehouse with atti- 
tude, like Remedy (in the same building 
that houses See's offices). Great coffee, 
cool accouterments and a tidy lunch, 
snack and dessert menu. Tres urban. 
Overall rating: &*&*&*. 

Bagel Tree 10354-82 Ave.: One of the 
few establishments that is even more 
cool that Whyte's white-hot buzz. An 
eatery that does the deli tradition right 
from its bohemian vibe to the hearty 
smoked meat sandwiches and home- 
made desserts and soups. You almost 
expect to see Leonard Cohen scribbling 
away in the corner. Overall rating: 
tk. 


INTERNATIONAL 


Grub Med 119 Street and 37 Ave., 436- 
1988 —A bit of a drive and slightly hid- 
den, but worth the effort. Funky room, 
REALLY great Greek friendly service to 
boot. Overall rating: **«**. 

New Asian Village 10143 Saskatchewan 
Dr., 433-3804 ~ The grand-daddy of 
Edmonton Indian food owned by the end- 
lessly personable Harmeet Kapur, the 
New Asian Village is impossible to sum 
up in 50 words. From the 260 internation- 
al and local beers to the a full menu page 
of different breads (Tandoori, fried and 
grilled Nan breads of all descriptions), 
this is a joint that’s a 

right. Overall rating: 









The kind of place where you can 


individual hand of the cook 













m in Calgary, | a put 
ial French Dining 





» of my list of friendly din- 
me start by say 

asual” they don’t mez 

tidy raulway-Ccar I 

7 Street is < 








bistro tradition (comfort food, just 
people automatically 


ot what most 
ect). W 
ered (to my amused dis 


ent) that the kitchen had 


visited on a Monday 
and disecx 
appoint 
been nailed hard on the weekend 

out of their featured 


ARRRGH. Oh well, that’s the 
downside to a dedication to hand- 
building dishes: you run out. So, Ray 
and | move on. I start with the daily 
soup (cream of asparagus) while 
Ray has a tuna tartar appetizer that 
comes wrapped in smoked salmon. 
Both appetize s blow us away: the 
oup is ethereally velvety and Ray’s 
decadently buttery. 
1 pretty basic soup really, and 
vhat eatery doesn’t have a smoked 
salmon dish, but done to perfection. 
Same deal with the Cassoulet (a 
stew of sorts, lamb chops, spicy 
sausage, duck breast in place of the 
bsent confit served over a bed of 


una/ salmon 














tomatoes and garlic slow-roasted 
hite beans), a dish that melts away 
your cares bit by bit with every bite 
and swig of mid-range Spanish red 
we were tippling, 
Nothing super fancy, but a trio of 
subtle than not, done 


dishes 


JoJo Bistro: 17th Ave, Calgary 





mention nursed many a Whyte avenue 


and was totally more 

terrine (pate) and also the duck leg with impressive confidence. 
confit bistro staples. Double 

ing: «** 


BRUNCH & BREAKFAST FAVOURITES | 


just off Jasper 
esp ct that I've had 
some way-above-average dinners in this 
super-classy Edwardian-era dining room 
the brunch is to totally die for. From the 
piping-hot selection of just baked buns 
and muffins to hefty entrees that should 
have the decadence cops smashing down 
the door. You'll never leave de Ville any- 
thing short of satiated, Overall rating: 
tot Ok 
Albert's Family Restaurant 10370-82 
Ave., 439-6609 — it’s been here for more 
that 30 years and spawned a chain, not to 






GIGANTIC PIZZA 
SLICE $1.87 «csr 





























Get yer arse in 
fer the best 
East Coast 

food n’ drink in 
Edmonton 



















Friggin’ Happy Hour 
12-7 Daily 
$4.95 Lunch Specials 
Monday-Friday 










hang-over. Hearty basic breakfasts that 
won't break your budget and a people- 
watcher's paradise given the room’s wild- 
ly eclectic clientele. Overall rating: **«*. 
Sweetwater Café 12427-102 Ave.: Still 
haven't forgiven this restaurant's move 
from Whyte Avenue. Love the weekend 
brunch: huge portions and the whole 
wheat pancakes are to die for. Overall 
rating: ke *. 









Bul-Go-Gi House 8813-92 Street: A senti- 
merital favourite here for this reviewer: 
the first restaurant | ever ate at in 
Edmonton 20 years ago. Still here and 
still serving some of Edmonton's best 
Korean food. Overall rating: **&*«*. 


STaccato'S” 


SOUP, STEW & CHILI BAR 
YOU ARE WHAT 


YOU EAT! 
Complete ingredients for each 
menu item provided. 
New Location Commerce Southgate 
Mall 









PHONE: 430-9003 FAX: 432-1102 E-MAIL: info@see.greatwest.ca 





____LISTING 








SEVEN ease 
DAY S SRLCRSc 





Chitresh Das is a 
celebrated kathaka 
—a dancer who tells 


(Singer/Songwriter). Advanced tickets $12 available at at 
the Sidetrack and Ticketmaster 451-8000. 

TIN PAN ALLEY Ann Vriend Trio (Jazz), 

URBAN LOUNGE Spy Girl & Northern Star 10 p.m. $5 





BAR-B-BAR & GRILL Mister Lucky (Blues/Roots). 
BLUES AT THE HILL Thomas Alexander (Blues) 

BLUES ON WHYTE James Armstrong (Blues). 

BONNIE DOON HALL exit303 and DJ Blubber 7 p.m. $10 
door, call 466-0390. 

CASINO EDMONTON Whiskey Junction. 


THUR Y 


BLUES AT THE HILL Groove Alliance. 

BLUES ON WHYTE James Armstrong (Blues). 
CASINO YELLOWHEAD Allan & Raymond. 
CEILI’S David Gallagher 








Stollery Center. Live music with King Ring Nancy a, 
Twentyfold. Doors 7 p.m. bands begin 9:30 p.rr 
RUMORS PUB The Rory Collins Band 

SECOND CUP 123 St.-102 AVE.Thom Golub 8 p i 
SHERLOCK HOLMES CAPILANO Sam August 


| 2 Ay RIDAY SHERLOCK HOLMES DOWNTOWN Dave Hieber: 
SHERLOCK HOLMES WEM Tim Becker 
Pi CK OF THE WE E ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Leona and Rhino (Roots), SHERLOCK HOLMES WHYTE AVE.TBA 


SIDETRACK CAFE Panama Red 9 p.m. $5 (Roots/p 

TIN PAN ALLEY Ann Vriend Trio (Jazz). 

UNCLE GLENN’S PUB Thirst & How! Band. 

URBAN LOUNGE Mustard Smile 10 p.m. $5 (Rock 
YARDBIRD SUITE Terrain tribute to Pat Metheny Doors » 
p.m. Show 9:00 p.m. Members $6 Guests $10 (Jaz>) 





stories through DRAKE HOTEL Alberta Crude (Country) CASINO YELLOWHEAD Allan & Raymond ZENARI'S Rhonda Withnell Trio 8 p.m. (Jazz) 
movement — who THE DRUID Cool Blue Method 9 p.m pina hr bet paed 2 hie 

J FOUR ROOMS RESTAURANT Don Bemer Trio 9 p.m. rude (Country; 
PALER eS. , (Jazz) : ECCO NEIGHBORHOOD PUB The Posterboys. SATURDAY x 

arch 31 at 730 p.m. KINGSKNIGHT PUB Chunk with Son of Man (Rock), EXPRESSIONZ CAFE Stevie Ray Johnson/Bissett & Watt. ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Leona and Rhino (Roots) 
at the Provincial LION'S HEAD PUB Richard Blaze. HORSESHU COCKTAIL CLUB Hurricane Jane (Rock). BAR-B-BAR & GRILL Mister Lucky (Blues/Roots) 
Museum Theatre NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Chevrolet Bar & Johnathan J.J.’S PUB Done Deal (Classic Rock). _ BLACK DOG Loose Acoustik Hair of the Dog 3 to 6 
102 Avenue and 128 Inc. $5 KINGSKNIGHT PUB Harlequin with the Kings (Rock) BLUES AT THE HILL Thomas Alexander (Blues) 

(102 - OTTEWELL PUB Jim Whiffen LION & CROW PUB Hoffman and Brown 9 p.m. BLUES ON WHYTE James Armstrong (Blues), 


Street), all through 
the kind auspices of 
the Edmonton Raga- 
Mala Society. The 
dancer is joined by 
top-ranked tabla 
player Swapan 
Chaudhuri, 


LION'S HEAD PUB Richard Blaze 

NICHOLBY'S Derek Sigurdson 

OTTEWELL PUB Juke Joint 9:30 p.m. (Blues), 

R & B CLUB Bobby Cameron, 

REOLAS CAMPUS PUB The Exceptions & Deep Fine 
Grind $3 (Heavy Rock) 

THE REV Breach of Trust with D-Tribe and New Nation. 
ROCK N' “R” Charity fundraiser for Baby Erica and the 


R & B CLUB Alex Herriot’s House Rockers. 

RISING SUN CAFE Billy Joe Greene Doors 8 p.m. Show 9 
p.m. Members $5 Non-Members $8. 

SHERLOCK HOLMES CAPILANO Sam August 
SHERLOCK HOLMES DOWNTOWN Dave Hiebert 
SHERLOCK HOLMES WEM Tim Becker 

SHERLOCK HOLMES WHYTE AVE. Derrick Sigurdson. 
SIDETRACK CAFE Steve Forbert 8 p.m. $12 











CASINO EDMONTON Whiskey Junction. 

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Allan & Raymond 

CEILI’S David Gallagher. 

THE DRAKE HOTEL Alberta Crude (Country) 

ECCO NEIGHBORHOOD PUB The Posterboys. 
FOUR ROOMS The Alterations Trio 9 p.m. (Jazz) 
FOX AND HOUNDS Truth, Hiatus and Femur (Rock) 
HORSESHU COCKTAIL CLUB Hurricane Jane (Rock 
J.D'S PUB Hoffman & Brown 9 p.m. (Pop/Rock) 
J.J.’S PUB Sugarbush (Blues/Rock). 











L - - KINGSKNIGHT PUB Harlequin with the Kings (Rock CALI 
far Saskar on LION'S HEAD PUB Richard Blaze REM 
vocal and harmoni- NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Lure with drool $6 (Rock CLIN 
um and Swapnamoy NICHOLBY’S Derek Sigurdson. REM 
Banerjee on sarod. OTTEWELL PUB Juke Joint 9:30 p.m. (Blues) CRIS 
2 tit 5 >. R & B CLUB Bobby Cameron. REM 
Tickets are just $12 REMEDY Bobby Calms Trio with Mike Lent and Remeays I DEVI 
$15 from 484-8470. own Tom Doran Doors 8:30 p.m. Music 9 p.m. $5 fstin 
REOLAS CAMPUS PUB Indian Police, Necronaut. Esoteric EVAF 


—___THURSDA 


Neil Simon’s Last of the Red Hot Lovers, directed by Ron Pedersen, 
opens at 8 p.m at the Varscona Theatre (10329-83 Ave.). Tickets for this 
comedy, about a middle-aged restaurateur who thinks he might still have 
some wild oats in him, are available by calling 433-3399. The show runs 

























A quick & easy guide to Live Music in Edmonton 


(see a comprehensive guide under Live Music in Listings) 







Friday(30) | Saturday (31) 


BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE Laose Acoustik 
Whyte Avenue Hair of the Dog 
: 3-6 pm 










Mind $3 (Heavy Rock/Metal). 

ROCK N' “R” Charity fundraiser for Baby Erica and the 
Stollery Center. Live music with King Ring Nancy and 
Twentyfold. Doors 7 p.m. bands begin 9:30 p.m 
RUMORS PUB The Rory Collins Band 

SHERLOCK HOLMES CAPILANO Sam August 
SHERLOCK HOLMES DOWNTOWN Dave Hiebert 
SHERLOCK HOLMES WEM Tim Becker. 

SHERLOCK HOLMES WHYTE AVE. Derrick Sigurdson 


until April 8. SIDETRACK CAFE Soul Sacrifice 9 p.m. $5 
——— STARS El Chupacabra, Bee Feeders, Chicken Snails 
—___FRIDA Roadshow Doors 9 p.m. 





The Ink Man Cometh. Literary 
punk Henry Rollins showcases his 
way with words at 7:30 p.m. in the 
the Myer Horowitz Theatre (SUB 
Bldg., U of A campus). The former 


with his shirt on. Tickets for an inti- 
mate evening with the Tattooed One 



















meee 
Se 
ono a 


DRAKE HOTEL 








TIN PAN ALLEY Rimshot (R & B). 

UNCLE GLENN'S PUB Uncle Glenn's 14 year Anniversan 
Party Kennedy Johnson Trio. 

URBAN LOUNGE Mustard Smile 10:p.m.$5 (Rock) 
YARDBIRD SUITE River City Big Band Doors’8 p. 
Show 9 p.m. Members $6 Guests $10 (Big Band Jazz 


Piano). 
SIDETRACK CAFE Variety Night with Killer Comedy Snow 
by the Comedy Factory 8 p.m., DJ Dudeman and live 








front man for Black Flag and Rollins —— SUNDAY a Open 
Band will be seated, reading aloud, CEILI'S IRISH PUB SECOND CUP DOWNTOWN Dave Shepherd 8 p.m. (Jaz MM met 






are $24.50 from Ticketmaster. Ave music with Mustard Smile $5 (Rock). 

——_SATURDA ee ies Truth, Hiatus & | [WQS 
Percussion maestro Tilo Paiz leads Soul Sacrifice, a super-band with ee Ee Femur Leonid al Le a of Payne (Blues). 
members of jBomba!, Tacoy Ryde and jMaracujah!, plus a slate of guest Done Deal Soaarbuah TRC LRU CAReeee 
vocalists, all of whom pay tribute to the music of Carlos Santana. Call the ” 451-918C i Aen u8 LION'S a Richard Blaze. 
Sidetrack Café (421-1326) for a $10 advance ticket, or you can take your WINCTOCMEM Chunk & Son of |Harlequin & ari & HOLMES DOWNTOWN Tim Becker . 
; ; aa reg? SHERLOCK HOLMES WHYTE AVE.Ouff Robison 
chances at the door. si The Kings The Kings SHERLOCK HOLMES WEM Sam August. + 
tue 


= SUNDA EEE Eee 


Festival season starts early with the Festival of Resistance Against the 
Free Trade Area of the Americas, from 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Queen 
Alexandra Community Hall (10425 University Ave.) The People’s Action 
Network are offering workshops to activists bound for the FTAA, 
Conference in Québec City. Don’t miss part one of this festival, on 
Saturday, which features dozens of speakers and music by Cool Blue 
Method and the Lion for Real. 


-. @ MONDAYS Se eee 


James Cagney stars in the Gay Nineties romp The Strawberry Blonde 
at 8 p.m. in the Provincial Museum Auditorium (102 Avenue 128 Street). 
Seats are $2-$5. Next up from the Edmonton Film Society —a Billy Wilder 
retrospective. Sweet! 


2 UESDAY 2 Se Se 


Heard any good poetry lately? Stroll of Poets poets Jan Twardowski, 
Alice Major, Pierette Requier and Delvina Grieg are going to try to read 
you some at 7 p.m. at the Backroom Vodka Bar (10324-82 Ave.). 


LS WED IFES Dayo oe ee eee 










SN Chevrolet Bar & Love With Drool 
Johnathan Inc. 
DJ Ice & Kwake —_| DJ Junior Brown 
Bobby Cameron | Bobby Cameron 
Breach of Trust, D-Tribe 
& New Nation 











PARLIAMENT 






Geoffrey J and 
Solo 





Alex Herriot’s House 





UMORS 






CAFE Bf 
fe Steve Torbert 


Calgary's House of Payne (featur- +r : cs 
ing drumming ace/ vocalist George entei ete Trio 
Payne) blows into town on a spring - 
breeze, here to remind you that 
Bluesfest is just five months away. 





el: 
=| 5 


SIDETRACK CAFE Fred Eaglesmith with quest Bob 
Kemmis 9 p.m. $10 Advanced available at The Sidetrack. 
$12 Door. 

URBAN LOUNGE Aurther Funkarelli 10 p.m. $5. 


BLUES ON WHYTE House of Payne (Blues). 

LION'S HEAD PUB Richard Blaze. 

LONGRIDERS Ray Griff (Country). 

NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Choke with Moneen and 
Layaway Plan and choneen $6 Advance available at 
Blackbyrd Myoosik & Freecloud, $8 door. 
SHERLOCK HOLMES DOWNTOWN Tim Becker. 
SHERLOCK HOLMES WEM Sam August. 
SIDETRACK CAFE 20th Anniversary Party! Featuring 2 
special “Blind Date" with one of the country's best live 
acts. It's a secret! 9 p.m. $15 limited advance tickets 
available at The Sidetrack Cafe. ‘ 
URBAN LOUNGE Bomba 9 p.m. $3 (Latin). 


BLUES ON WHYTE House of Payne (Blues). 
Walbaum. | 





















FOUR ROOMS RESTAURANT The Mo Lefever Trio 9p.m. _to Saturday. 
\JON’s HEAD PUB Richard Blaze . 
yew CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Kick Off Party for CJSR 
cpowease with Janis Figure with parkade $5 

PUB Jimmy Whiffen . 

FRLOCK HOLMES CAPILANO Chuck Belhuimer 
SHERLOCK HOLMES DOWNTOWN Tim Becker 
SHERLOCK HOLMES WHYTE AVE. Dutt Robison 
gHRLOCK HOLMES WEM Sam August 
SIDETRACK CAFE Singer/Songwriter Night with Bob 
xemmis, Anne Loree, Stew MacDougall, Gord Matthews, 
his Smith, Mark Sterling, Ben Sures 9 p.m., $7. 

TW IN PAN ALLEY Don Berner Trio (Jazz) 
BAN LOUNGE Grush 10 p.m. $3/$5 (Rock). 


Daniels DJs. 
GAS PUMP 10166-114 St 488-4841 — Newly re 
ed. Thursday-Saturday DJ Christian 


Fort Rd. 472-9898 — Wednesday: Win 
host Chris Knight from Power 92: Thursday 
with hot male entertainment 

ILLUSION RESTAURANT AND NIGHTCLUB 1754/ 
Jasper Ave. 447-0777 — Tuesday: Twist Night musi 
from the ‘50s, ‘60s and 70s with DJ Venus Y 
Wednesday: Stand-Up Comedy Jam featu 

















#. ai formers, 9 p.m., $2 cover; Saturday: Club Dance with 
COMEDY CLUBS® = Venus 9 p.m 
INFERNO DANCE & RETRO NIGHTCLUB 9920-62 A\ 
JHE COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Calgary Trail North 469- 408-2877 


4999— March 29, 30, 31: MC, comedian Clark Thursday Ladies night $.50 draft al It long. 









































GALLERY LOUNGE Mayfield Inn, 1615-109 Ave. 484 
0821, ext. 6629— Every Thursday-Saturday CHOT’s Don 





GREENHOUSE NIGHTCLUB Neighborhood Inn 13103 





adies Night 


pe 


DJ 





anes i‘ Ct 





GUY DAVIS — Th M 


"la F 
HENRY ROLLINS = 


ts $24.50 p! 




























4 i 
a fobertson and The Comedy Factory Improv Players. JUICE DANCE LOUNGE Bourbon Stree West Edmonta ss ages o— Fk halen yp 
: YK YUK’S Bourbon St, WEM 481-9926 — Tuesday Mall— SIN Tuesday: ladie: ay: $2 drinks al : : aC 
April 3: The Battle of Alberta Comedians with SEE night. Friday: 99 cent hibails until 10 Boy OF 
Hagazind's Anita Eagles and Brett Ferry as a guest judges. prey ELECTRIC ROADHOUSE West Edmonton REAL FX . 
lall 483-3289 i aap Ls : 
ALTERNATIVE Sit THE RUM JUNGLE Phase 11 West Sdmonton Mall eine Gallia oi 
Direct from Las Vegas. Thursday ve acts TROOPER ; : re 
ps THE ATTIC 10407-82 Ave. 433-1969 — Every Friday and Saturday:. Indu ocean se sa oy 
Wednesday: House Music Nite with DJ Philler, 99 cent hi- RUMORS PUB 9006-132 Ave. 473-7410— Monday or Red's . : a2 
palls, $2 pints til 11 p.m. Every Thursday: Student Nite Free Pool Tournament; Tuesday: T-Bone and Mug-0 Bi 
with OJ Funshine, $2.75 pints & hi-balls all night. $10 Thursday: All You Can Eat Spaghe 1d Mug- : 
BACKROOM VODKA BAR 10324-82 Ave. (upstairs) 436- $5.95; Friday: House DJ; Saturday: House Band The 
4419— please see REMIX listings. Tomatoes Jam 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., Band 9 p.m.; Sunday 
BUDDY'S 11725-B Jasper Ave. 488-6636 — Monday: DJ Free Pool and Happy Hour All Day 
Alero; Tuesday: DJ Handy; Wednesday: DJ Handy, RUNWAY NIGHTSPOT Leduc /nn 986-4018 
Thursday: DJ Alvero; Friday: DJ Arrowchaser’s retro and Wednesday-Saturday DJ Vincenz 
). new music; Saturday; DJ Handy's retro and new music, SMOK'N JOE'S 615 Hermitage Road 476-6122 
k) every 4th Saturday DJ Arrowchaser. Country dancing, Wednesday: Retro-nite, $1.50 drinks; Thursday: Ladies 
pool tournament 4 p.m; Tuesdays Pool toumament 8 nite, $0.50 Hi-balls; Friday: Stop h nite; Saturday Free SARAH HARMER 
p.m. cash give-a-way, $100 six times a night; Sunday: Industry Myer Horow 
k CALIENTE NIGHT CLUB 10875 Jasper Ave.— please see _ nite, 99-cent shooters, $1.50 drinks City. Tickets $16.50 to $ 
REMIX ine “re pn ye 69 8232-103 St. 439-6969 — Wednesday 000 : 
ock CLIMAXX - THE GALLER) - t— please see aturday "70s and '80s dance music. 
AEMIX listings. THE JOINT ROCK ROOM 2554 West Edmonton Mall strstr | Sst = a els 
CRISTAL LOUNGE 10336 Jasper Ave. — please see 8882-170th St. Wednesday Ladies Night. the Winspear ( 
REMIX listings. TREMORS NIGHT CLUB 12864-137 Ave. 457-3636 — Student tickets $15 
medys Mag DEVLINS 10507-82 Ave. 437-7489 — please see REMIX Thursday: 50-cent Mug of Draft 8 p.m.Close; Friday: Mr Box Office 428-1414 
listings. Exotic Edmonton 2000 Contest. Crazy drink specials! — Friday, April’6, 8 p.t 
=soleric Ig EVAR AFTER 10148-105 St— please see REMIX listings. Saturday: Big prize giveaways, Power Hours, 8-10 p.m acue erarian oi — 1 oe ri St. w “ 
FOX & HOUNDS PUB 10125-109 St 423-2913 — 
1the Monday: Raw with DJ Beatmaster B88, New School Punk, 
nd Hard Core; Tuesday: DJs Cory and p.r dougless, Punk; 
Wednesday: Chuck Rack, p.r. dougless, : 
extreme/explicit/exciting altemative mix; Thursday: 
(Thistdays) Metal by Orgasmatron. Live music every 
Friday and Saturday. 
K2 12345-118 Ave. 454-5396 — Wednesday: R &B. Hip 
son Hop and Reggae with DJ Sadal: Friday and Saturday: Top Ai 3 3 
40, Hip Hop and R&B with Du S, right, class, let’s settle down. We have a lot of ground to cover in 
$ ipa St. 438-1907 — Friday: Alex DJ; today’s FREE STUFF class. You, in the back. Is that note something you'd 
urday: R 
LUSH 10030A -102 St 424-2951 please see REMIX list: like to share with the rest of us? I thought not. Everyone, eyes forward. 
versary Mab ings No looking at each other's papers. The test begins . . now! 
MAMBO 10018-105 St. Jasper Ave. — March 29 Party: 
’ There will be drink special all night tong, plus-a hot DJ, a 
n along side a live MC to keep everyone pumped with the 1. One of ig hoi of Hieiwand shea nib naeowete.: 
an) gp slsttracks including R-& B, rave, top 40 and the latest That's right, Planet of will be re-released this summer. You can 













singles to hit the market. $5 cover. 

NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE 70167 112 St. 413-4578— 
Open everyday at 7 p.m. Monday” Metal Mondays, 80's 
metal with OJ Red Dawn, Kold Beer, wings specials all 
mght; Tuesday: Tage Team Tuesdays No cover, beat the 
clock bottled beer & hi-ball specials, maximum rock & roll 
with DJ-Jailhouse Rob & weekly guest; Wednesday: Skate 
rock and New Alternative with DJ Shone; Live Thursday: 
Live bands; Friday: DJ Buster Friendly spinnin’ the hits, 


wina movie 





Do you like a good story? Do you like good dancing? 


poster. Allgen toe to do is call the SEE contest hotline (430- 
9043) between | and 1:15 p.m. on Friday and give us the name of the aetor 
who played the circus owner who became Cornelius’ foster father in the 
sequel Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. If you get our answering machine, 

_ call again. You can't win FREE STUFF if you've won in the last 30 days. 


? Then you'll love 


pn med every tise ane ati Saoriey: the Edmonton Raga-Maia Society’s Kathak Dance Concert this 
ve a i louse 
Piped Along J at the Provincial Museum featuring Chitresh Das. You couid win a pair of 








NEW CITY SUBURBS 10167 -112 St. 493-1212— 
Wednesday: Inquisiton Goth & Industrial with DJ nik 


tickets. All you have to do is call the SEE contest hotline (430-9043) 
between 1 and 1:15 p.m. on Friday and tell us which country Kathak 


roleelya; Thursday: xxxClassixxx Classic Alternative with Ki ted in. If you get our orc ia a You 
DJ Eddie Lunchpail & Simon LeBondage; Friday: Fredo : Inst 30 days, 
Frys wih Nita Tie Nosy Sado een Malnkt cin FREE STUFF you ‘ve won inthe 
and weekly quests; Saturday: Saturdays Suck with DJ 
) Blue Jay & nik rofeelya, alternative, punk. ‘Nex cold waiadoeble pest Rocali at thie Glamnbate Teds, 








PARLIAMENT 10551-82 Ave.please see REMIX listings... 
THE ROOST 10345-104 St. 426-3150 — Monday: DJ 
Jazz, Tuesday: DJ Jazz; Wednesday: DJ Balance; 
Thursday: Ascension with OJ Da Da; Friday: DJ Weena 
Love (downstairs); DJ XTC (upstairs); Saturday: DJ Hill 
and quest (downstairs); DJ Code Red (upstairs); Sunday 
Retro (downstairs), fessive house (upstairs). 
SAVOY BAR 10401-82 Ave. — Thursday: the sounds of 
deep house with Marcus; Sunday: the best in French pop 
with Deja DU. 

x. \ ~~ ean erro 
see 

THERAPY 10028-102 St. (alley entrance) — please see 


REMIX fi 
se Av. 4259757 — plese se 


eet ee 


TRADE # 
FEMIX listings. 


“Ally w cpave todos call the SEE contest hotime (490-5083) 
1 pm cn siya ge te eee es 
a Ss seh bask atuarbae pC 





‘between 1 and 


* 





eal ape’ 





ee 8 eee 


Good Friday, April 13, 2 p.m., Winspear Centre. 
5, Student/Senior $30 available at the 
ar Box Office 428-1414 
q woe $s PASSION Saturday, April 14,3 p.m 
( ted C 10086 MacDonald Dr 
ent/Senior available at TIX 


King's University College Concert and Chamber 
Choirs, Tickets $10 4 Adult $7 Student/Senior available Tic 
King's Univ 


F ore infor 









on the Sq $21 
LISA BROKOP & TARA LYN HART — 


9.8f Winspear { Tickets 





ursday, Apri 


entre 

















VIRGINIA RODRIGUES — Monday, Apr 8p available at 428-1414 
inspec World at the Winspear Concert NELLY FURTADO Sunday, April 22, Doors 6:30 
S ats $2: 29 availa’ I the Winspear f 30 p.m., Winspear Centre. Ti - 
fice 4 44 available at The W 
U2 —M A tre Box Office 42 
) algar Gen PRO-CORO CANADA ~ ay, April 23, 2 p.m 
$4 ). Re f k $4 Winspear Ce e Pacific Baroque Orchestra 
85. Gold Circle $ kets $35, $ ient/Senior available at 
PRO CORO CANADA MONTEVERD!'S 1610 VESPERS Winspear B 414 


\ ss 





ie 
FAMILY LIVING PROGRAMS 


MARCH 2001 WORKSHOPS FEATURING: 


Parenting the Blended Family 

( Parenting Fundamentals For Men 

Mourning Yesterday, Embracing Tomorrow 

other workshops piease call: 
105 Street 


6=> 


\ For more information on these and 
420-6080 or vist our office at 10709 - 





A Program of Catholic Social Services 







































PHILIPPE CASSARD, PIANO 
April 8, 2 pm 

Grzegorz Nowak, conductor 
Weber Der Freischiitz: Overture 


Mozart Piano Concerto No. 21 
Mendelssohn Symphony io. 4 “Italian” 


Philippe Cassard 



































HE IVA i 
MARIO GALEAN!, PIANO 
April 20 & 21, 8 pm 

Viadimir Valek, conductor 


Estacio Flights of Fancy 
Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 5 “Emperor” 
Dvorak Symphony No. 5 

































Te VIA a 
BORIS BELKIN, VIOLIN 
May 4&5, 8 pm 
Grzegorz Nowak, conductor 
Rimsky-Korsakov Capriccio Espagno! 
Shostakovich Violin Concerto No. 1 
Tehaikovsky Symphony Wo. 5 






______LISTING 


AC/DC — Wednesday, April 25, 2001, Doors 6:30 
p.m., Show 7:30 p.m., Skyreach Centre with special 
guests Slash's Snakepit. Tickets $55.50 & $75.50 
plus s/cs available at all Ticketmaster outlets 451- 
8000. 

GODSMACK & ECONOLINE CRUSH — Thursday, 
April 26, Time TBA, Northlands Agricom, with 
Kardinal Offishall. Tickets $27.50 plus s/cs available 
at Ticketmaster 451-8000. 

MATCHBOX TWENTY — Saturday, May 5, Doors 
6:30 p.m., Show 7:30 p.m., Skyreach Centre with 
guests Lifehouse. Tickets $49.50 & $39.50 plus s/cs 
at all Ticketmaster outlets 451-8000. 

PLACEBO — Sunday, May 6, Doors 7:30 p.m., Show 
9 p.m., Red's in WEM, with guests Idlewild. Tickets 
$17.50 + s/cs at all Ticketmaster outlets 451-8000 or 
from Red's 487-2066. 

JANN ARDEN & TERRI CLARK— Saturday, May 19, 
2001, Winspear Centre. Tickets $35, $40, $50 and 
$100 VIP tickets (includes prime seating and a private 
preconcert reception with Arden & Clark). plus s/cs. 
All proceeds to the East Africa Maternal/Newborn Aid 
Society to purchase medical supplies and equipment. 
RITA CHIARELLI & SUE MEDLEY — Friday, May 25, 
7:30 p.m., Festival Place, Sherwood Park, Blues on 
the Edge Series. Tickets $16.50 Cabaret, $15 Adult, 
$12.50 Student/Senior or $42 for the Blues on the 
Edge Series package. 

NAZARETH — Thursday, June 7, The Joint. Tickets to 
be announced 

BACKSTREET BOYS — Saturday, August 4, Doors 6 
p.m., Show 7 p.m., Skyreach Centre with Shaggy. 
Tickets on sale Saturday, March 24, 9:30 a.m. avail- 
able at Skyreach Centre Box Office and all 
Ticketmaster outlets 451-8000 
ALABAMA — Friday, October 5, 2001, Skyreach 
Centre. Tickets $55, $45 and $37.50 plus s/cs on sale 





& L 4 


ANASAZI CAFE & BAR 10525 Jasper Ave. 423-3232 
ATLANTIC TRAP AND GILL 77 Ave. Calgary Trail South 
A32-4611 
THEATTIC 10407-82 Ave. 433-1969 

‘AXE MUSIC 11931 Wayne Gretzky Dr. North 471-2001 
BACKROOM VODKA BAR 10324-62 Ave, 436-4418 
BAGEL TREE 103-82 Ave. 439-9604 

- BARRY T'S GRAND CENTRAL STATION 6771-104 St 
438-2582 

BETTER BE ROCK 8214-775 St 481-9988 

BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE 16625 Stony Piain Road 474- 


7751 
_ BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave. 439-1082 
‘BLIND DUCK PUB 10416-118 Ave 479-7193 
‘BLUES AT THE HILL 14203 Stony Plain Ad. 454-3063 
_ BLUES ON WHYTE 10329-82 Ave. 439-5058 
BONNIE DOON HALL 9240-93 St 466-0202 
(CAFE AMANDINE 8711-82 Ave 465-1919 
) CALIENTE NIGHT CLUB 10815 Jasper Ave. 425-0850 
" CASINO EDMONTON 7055 Argyll Road 463-9467 - 
CASINO EDMONTON Yellowhead Tr.424-9467 - 
_ CEILI'S IRISH PUB AND RESTAURANT 10338-109St. 


431-9694 t 


CHAPTERS STRATHCONA 10504-82 Ave. 435-1290 
CHAPTERS WESTSIDE 9952-170 St. 487-6500 

| CHAPTERS WEM 8882-170 St 487-6500 
CLIMAXX - THE GALLERY 0018-105 St c 
“CLUB 2000 LIVE 108-Kingsway Ave. 479-4266 

THE COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Caigary Trail North 


COOK COUNTY SALOON 8010-103 St. 432-2665 
COSSACK INN 307 First Ave., Spruce Grove, 962-3844 
_ COUNTRY SALOON 70780-180 St. 481- 
CRISTAL LOUNGE 10336 Jasper Ave. 426-7521 

- DEWLINS 10507-82 Ave. 437-7489 
DONNA AT THE CITADEL 10177-99 St 429-2338 
‘DOWNTOWN STUDY HALL PUB 10345-1086 St 428- 
4268 


DRAKE HOTEL 3945 - 118 Ave, 479-2929 

THE DRINK 2940 Calgary Tras! South 430-4567 

THE DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave. 454-9928 

DUSTER’S PUB 6402-118 Ave. 474-5544 

gpa ag 11803-86 St. 477- 
9 

"ARL’S TIN PALACE 11830 Jasper Ave. 488-6582 







MUDDY WATERS 221: 
THE MUD HUT 9003-135 Ave. 477-5043 








iin 


ALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL 1016-106 St.488-5900 — 
Until April 21: Celebrating Chalke, Past and Present by 
John Chalke. Discovery Gallery: Featuring objects made 
from wood created by some of Alberta's top craftspeople 
Come and see the expert craftsmanship of Jim Farr, 
Robert Shiell and others. Hours: Mon. - Sat.10 a.m. - 5:30 
p.m. 

ART BEAT GALLERY 8 Mission Ave., St. Albert 459-3679 
— Until April 6: Gallery artists with an emphasis on floral 
paintings to celebrate Spring. April 7 to 29: Moved by the 
Spirit An exhibit of spiritual work inspired by a diversity of 
cultural backgrounds. Hours: Monday-Wednesday, 
Friday: 10 am.-6 p.m., Thursday: 10 a.m.-9 p.m., 
Saturday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday, Holiday: noon-4 p.m 
ARTRA ART GALLERY 15607-100 A Ave. 489-1028 — 
Until March 31: Works by Tracy Gardner. 

THE BAGEL TREE 103-82 Ave. 439-9604 — Until May 6: 
Fresh Paint : works by Edmonton high school students. 
BUGERA/KMET GALLERIES 12310-Jasper Ave. 482-2854 
— Until Apni 7: New work by gallery artists as well as a 
preview of work from the upcoming exhibition From 
Garden to Table by Jane Adams and Jamie 

CENTRE D’ARTS VISUELS DE L'ALBERTA 20, 8627 - 91 
St. 461-3427— Until April 4: Group show featuring a 
selection of pieces among the 120 different artists repre- 
sented at this gallery. April 6 to April 17: Meli Melo Tom 
Morin's photographs, Herman Poulin’s three dimensional 
artwork, Roland Soucy’s acrylics and Gilbert Parent's 
crafts. Opening Reception: April 6, 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 
with artists in attendance. Hours: Monday to Saturday, 10 


JUBILEE AUDITORIUM 11455-87 Ave. 427-2760 
JUICE DANCE LOUNGE Bourbon Street West 
Edmonton Mall 444-5999 

K2 12345-118 Ave. 454-5396 

KEEGAN’S 3458-99 St. 435-4065, 
KINGSKNIGHT PUB 9221-34 Ave. 423-2599 
‘L.B.’S PUB 23 Athins Dr. St. Albert 460-9100 

LION & CROW 367 St Albert Trai, St. Albert 460-8044 
LION'S HEAD PUB Coast Terrace Inn 4440 Calgary 
Trail Soth 431-5815 

LONGRIDERS SALOON & ROCK STAGE 71733 7BSt. 
479-7400 = 

LUNA LOCA RESTAURANT 8409-112 St. 439-2425 
LUSH 10030A-102 St 424-2851 fe 
MAMBO BAR & GRILL 10018-105 St: 425-0933 
MEZZA LUNA LATIN CLUB 10238-104 St. 423-5862 
eee 1O511A-82 Ave. 439. 


111 ST. 433-4390 © 


Pach mH RESTAIOT 10041. 1708, 486 : 


PARLIAMENT 10551 Whyte Ave 4945368 
PRECINCT 55 5552 Calgary Trail South 432-5550. 
SUS ae ornare, al: 


RAZR LER 10 St. sepa pone he 


8 BCLUB 9271-34 Ave 490-5460. 
_- REMEDY 9631-109 St, 433-3096 : 
REOLA'S CAMPUS PUB 10805-105 Ave. 44-1072 ES 


aN RESTAURANT 5707-110ST 482-7277 


ROCK Ni “R” 5450-Caigary Trait 437-9185 

THE ROOST 10345-104 St 426-3150 

THE RUM JUNGLE Phase 17 West Ecariortoy Mat 
486-9494 

RUMORS PUB 9908-132 Ave. 47-7410 i 
‘SECOND CUP JASPER AVE. 10303 Jasper Ave.424- 


7468 

SECOND CUP 123 ST_-102 AVE. 12336-102 Ave: 451- 
7574 

SECRETS BAR & GRILL 10249-107 St 990-1818 





am. to 5 p.m.; closed Sunday. 

DOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY 10332-124 St. 488-4445 — 
Until March 31: Spring Show 2001 New acquisitions and 
new works by Gallery Artists. 

EDMONTON ART GALLERY 2 Sir Winston Churchill 
Square 422-6223 — Until May 21: Metamorphosis 
Calgary artist Marion Nicoll started out as a landscape 
painter but made her name as an abstract artist 
Metamorphosis celebrates the work of a true pioneer of 
modern art in Canada. Until May 21, 2001: An Eclectic 
Vision: Alberta Art from the 1930s to the 1970s : this 
exhibition looks at the work of pioneering artists who 
paved the way for local and regional artists. Until Spring 
2001: An Elephant in the Forest: a new children’s exhibi- 
tion about the forest and animals in the art and life of 
Emily Carr. Until May 3, 2001: New Eyes is an interactive 
and fun exhibition space about art:and travel. Spring 
Break Classes and Camps - Art Safari March 26 to 30: Art 
excursions for ages 4 to 12, March 29 & 30: Art Gateway 
workshop for ages 13 to 17 with Nasty Spyder Bites. 
Discover new art materials and expand your skills with 
pencil, paint, plaster, clay video or the photocopier with 
the guidance of Paul Freeman. Book your art excursion 
today by calling 422-6233. Hours: Monday to Wednesday 
and Friday 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday 10:30 am. to 8 
p.m.; Saturday, Sunday and holiday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Admission: $4 Adult, $2 Student/Senior, $1 ages 6-12, 
children under 6 free. Free on Thursday after 4 p.m. 
EDMONTON SPACE & SCIENCE CENTRE 1 1211-142 St. 
452-9100 — March 30 to April 1: International 
Astronomy Days. Weather permitting, members of the 
Royal Astronomical Society of Canada will set up tele- 
scopes near the Observatory between 7 p.m. and mid- 
night. On both Friday and Saturday night a variety of 
RASC member owned telescopes will be set up at Gazebo 
Park in Old Strathcona and along the Promenade over- 
looking Victoria Park (southside of 100 Ave. west of 119 
St.) Exhibit: Dino Den Exhibit In the North gallery uncover 
feal fossils and bones just like a paleontologist in the 
Alberta Badlands. The Dino Den Exhibit is included in the 
purchase of General Admission. Hours: Tuesday to 
Sunday, 10 a.m; to 6 p.m.; The Dino Den Dig Hours: 
Saturday, Sunday & Holidays: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday 
to Friday: 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. 

ELECTRUM DESIGN STUDIO AND GALLERY 12419- 
Stony Plain Rd. 482-1402 — Japanese ceramics by 
Yasuo Terada & Bizan, Drawings and watercolours by 
Frank Haddock. Also showing Gold & Sitver jewellery by 
Wayne Mackenzie and Janet Stein, Wood boxes by John 
Morel and Henry Schlosser. Hours: Tuesday to Saturday, 
10am. to5 p.m. 

FAB GALLERY 3-98 Fine Arts Building, University of 
Alberta, 492-2081 — Until April 1: Evidence Solo 
Exhibition of Etchings by Fuki Hamada, Foreign Guest 
Artist in Residence, Department of Art and Design. 
Japanese artist Fuki Hamada presents a series of powerful 
and highty personal print works produced over the last 
four years including prints finished as part of her residen- 
cy at the University of Albert which begin in September 
2000. Until April 1<traces Senior and first year graduate 
student print exhibition. Hours Tuesday to Friday 10 a.m. 
to 5p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Closed Monday, 
Saturday and statutory holidays. 

FINDERS KEEPERS INTERIORS EXTERIORS 8239-104 
St. 436-5854 — Photo-Synthesis Photo art. Open daily 
10a.m.to6p.m. 

FORT DOOR 10308-81 Ave. 432-7535— March: Eskimo 
Soapstone Bear Carvings by L. Echallok Inukshuk. 
Carvings by J. Takatak. April: Eskimo soapstone carvings 
by Lydia Qumak, soapstone carvings by E. Porter. 
FRINGE GALLERY 10516 Whyte Ave 432-0240 — Until 
March 31: Pantheon Ross Bradley, Harcourt House 
Group Show, Mixed Media. April 2 to 30: Works by Jill & 
Linda Jill Hiscox & Linda Ould. Mixed Media. Hours: Mon 
to Sat., 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

FRONT GALLERY 12312 Jasper Ave. 488-2952 — Until 
March 31: Watercolour landscapes by Francis Alty Arscott 
& Porcelain Vessels by Heather Edwards. Hours: Tues. to 
Sat. 10a.m. to5 p.m 

GALLERY 124 10240-124 St. 488-4575 — March 31 to 
April 18: Tender Years a new exhibit of paintings by Carl 
Michael Oleinyk. In these oil paintings, he uses the trip- 
tych fro consisiting of three dissimilar sized canvases to 
emphasize the "whole" and to the parts of that whole. 
Opening Reception: Saturday, March 31, 2p.m. to 4 p.m. 
Hours; Tues to Sat 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sun 12-3 p.m. 
wwwi.gallery124.com. 

GENERATIONS GALLERY 5471-57 St. Stony Plain— 
Until May 7: The Artists of Fifth Dimension Studio present 
Art and Healing Journeys. Their visual interpretation of 
healing is as diverse as the artists themselves. . Opening 
Reception: April 1, 1 to 4 p.m. 

GRANT MACEWAN COLLEGE VISUAL COMMUNICATION 
DESIGN PROGRAM Grant MacEwan City Centre Campus, 
10700-104 Ave. — April 2 to 7: Graduate Exhibition The 
show features concept presentations in three ares of 
design specialization: visual presentation, illustration, and 
digital media. Works are also on display at the Old 
Husdon Bay building downtown. Reception: Thursday, 
April 5, 5:30 to 8:30 p.m., The MacEwan Room. 
GRASSLAND GALLERY Westgate Centre, 17010-90 Ave. 
483-5997 — New selection of artwork by local artists, 
World Games celebration, works by Henn Plisson, and 


Brent Heighton. 
HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY 3rd floor, 10215-112 St. 
426-4180 — Until March 31: Clotted Bodies and Other 
Ghostly Matters by Lissa Robinson. Clotted Bodies, and 
Other Ghostly Matters Is a tale of velvet appendages and 
the absent bodies, which haunt them. Limit by Duncan 
Johnson. As a painter and conceptualist, Johnson has 
been working on a new series of paintings that challenge 
and confront the nature of painterly abstraction. April 5 to 


May 5: The Pain of Trees P. Roch Smith's work's centres 
forename pare, Honan patho 






Gender Roles and-Clothing Communication The exhibit 
explores how clothing throughout the 20th century, 
reflects gender roles in Canadian Society. Hours: Monday 
to Friday: 7 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., 
Sunday, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. 
INTEGRATION PILATES & OPEN SPACE INC. 10565-1714 
St 421-9853— Recent drawings & paintings by Dale 
Smith 
KAMENA GALLERY 5718 Calgary Trail South, 944-9497 
— Hours: Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
LATITUDE 53 10187-104 St. 423-5353 — Until April 17, 
8 p.m.: Image Theatre presents Orphans by Lyle Kessler. 
Information and tickets 477-0828. Hours: Tues.-Fri 10 
a.m. to 6 p.m. Sat. 11 a.m. to. 5 p.m. 
LUNA LOCA 8409-112 St. — Until March 31: Social 
Graces Sculptures made from found objects by Francis 
A Willey. March 31 to April 31: Retrospective Vision Ink 
drawings, Dreambooks, Photography, Paintings and 
Sculpture by Francis A. Willey. Opening Reception: March 
31, Dinner, Art and Music $15 tickets for meal, after 8 
p.m. free. Music by IDO. 
MCMULLEN GALLERY East entrance, University of 
Alberta Hospital, 8440-112 St.— Until March 31: 
Exhibiting artists: Julian Brezden, Bernard Hippel, Dick 
Der, Ruby Mah, and Robert von Eschen. Hours: Monday- 
Friday: 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday-Sunday: 1-8 p.m. 
MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM 5 St. Anne St, St. Albert 
459-1528 — Until March 31: Tunit, the Palaeo-Eskimo 
This exhibit, from the Museum of Civilization, explores the 
history and culture of the Palaeo-Eskimo that occupied 
Arctic Canada for three thousand years before the Inuit. 
They have left a legacy of carving which is unique and 
intriguing. March 29 to April 19: A series of workshops on 
genealogy every Thursday evening, 3rd Floor Board 
Room of St. Albert Place, 5 Saint Anne St, St Albert, 7 to 
10 p.m. Register at the Musee Heritage Museum. Hours: 
Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m. to'5 p.m. Sun. 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. 
THE NORTHERN ALBERTA WOOD CARVERS ASSOCIA- 
TION Westmount Junior High Schoo! Gymnasium, 
11125-131 St — Saturday, April 7 & Sunday, April 8, 10 
a.m. to 5 p.m.: 18th Annual Wood Carving Show, Sale 
and Competition. Admission by donation. For more infor- 
mation call Theirry at 416-2341. 
PARIS MARKET 10363-104 St. 424-2511 —Open 
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday, Noon to 5 p.m.: 
Artisans and antiques, fine art and furniture, curiosities 
and collectibles! 
PROFILES PUBLIC ART GALLERY 19 Perron St, St. 
Albert 460-4310 — April 4 to 28: George Tosczak This 
Edmonton painter creates the aura of a child's imaginative 
world in his whimsical landscapes through an exploration 
of his own roots. Opening Reception: April 4, 7 p.m. to 9 
p.m. George Tosczak Lectures: Thursday, April 19, 6 p.m. 
to 8 p.m. and Wednesday, April 25, 1 p.m. to.3 p.m. All 
lectures are free of charge. Pre-registration required. pro- 
files@icrossroads.com. 
PROVINCIAL MUSEUM 12845-102 Ave. 453-9100 — 
Until March 30: Spring Break Special Event, 10 a.m. to 
3:30 p.m. Activities included with admission: Fresci paint- 
ing, Clay seal making, grain crushing, wagon builiding, 
cuneiform writing. Extended Hours! Weekdays 9 a.m. to 9 
p.m., Weekends 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 7 to July 2: Art out 
of Sudan The Sudan, Africa's largest country, has an 
ancient history much like Egypt reaching into the coun- 
try's heart along the Nile. This rich past along with the 
influences of over 500 tribal groups, diverse cultures and 
religions, contrasted with harsh deserts, swamps and 
Savannah of the South, have molded a distinct and cultur- 
ally complex country. The Muslim artists have taken this 
richness and developed art that is intricate, colorful, deli- 
cate and visually distinctive, unlike anywhere else.. April 8: 
Slide Show and Exhibitoin Tour, 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Meroe 
to Now , from ancient history to contemporary art in 
Sudan. The slide show will highlight the artist exchange in 
Sudan and Kenya tht the exhibition grew out of. Following 
the slide show, Ray Dirks, the Curator of Art out of Sudan, 
will be available to answer any questions, Until May 13: 
Syria: Land of Civilizations This exhibition of cultural trea- 
sures from Syna includes 400 artifacts reflecting over 12, 
000 years of human history. Artifacts range from two 
tonne figures to delicate gold jewellery. Although chosen 
to illustrate themes in civilization rather than purely for 
their artistic merit, individual pieces are likely to stagger 
Western audiences unprepared for Syria's cultural her- 
itage. Permanent Exhibition: The Syncrude Gallery of 
Aboriginal Culture: Permanent Exhibition: The Bug 
Room : This invertebrate display lets visitors get up close 
and personal with live, exotic insects from around the 
world. Hours: 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission: $9.50 
Adult, $7.50 Seniors, $5 Youth, Free for children 6 and 
under, $25 Family. Tuesdays are half price. 
REMEDY 8631-109 St., 433-3096 —Photoflo—a 
group exhibit by the staff photographers of The Gateway, 
the U of A’s campus newspaper. 
RICHARD DIXON STUDIOS Bay 105 Eaton Centre, main 
/evel— A working artists studio/gallery presenting paint- 
ings related to the history and mythology of Western 
Canada. Also showing works by Dean McLeod, Randy 
Wieme and Scottish artist Allan McKillop, Mall hours 
except Sunday (closed). 
ROWLES & COMPANY 10130-103 St. 426-4035 — 
Featuring watercolour florals by John Freeman and 
acrylics by Angela Grootelaar. New blown glass Fish ina 
Bag by Brian Kelk and Fruit Bowls by Ontario glass artist 
Cheryl Takacs. Also exhibiting acrylic abstract paintings 
by David Seghers, and rain by Elaine Tweedy and 
Audrey Pfannmuller. New Renaissance Period Garden 
‘Scenes by Steve Mitts, showing at the Harvest Room, The 
Hotel MacDonald. Hours: Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m.; Saturday, 12p.m. to 5 p.m. 
SCOTT GALLERY TOst1-124 St 488-3619 — Until April 
d Faulder. New 
























































Art glass available 

SPECIAL-T GALLERY 436 Riverbend Square, 437-1; 
— Until April 30: My World by Elaine Tweedy ang F;,, 
Flowers Joan Todd and Rosann Janzen. Exhibitio, 
Sale. Elaine Tweedy is a multi-media artist with a Passion 
for nature. Joan Todd is a potter that specializes jn 
sional Raku pots with hand formed porcelain flowe, 
Hours: Monday to Wednesday 10 to 6 p.m., Thursy, 
and Friday 10 to 9 p.m., Saturday 10 to 5 p.m 
STANLEY A. MILNER LIBRARY 7 Sir Winston Ch, 
Square — Until March 31: Daily Existentialism pa), 
by Claudia Perenzalez. * 
THE STUDIO GALLERY 143 Grandin Park Plaza 29 >), 
Winston Churchill Ave., St. Albert 460-5990 — |), 
March 31: Art Forurn Fine art in the pure form. 
Representing distinctive works by 16 gallery artists s; 
casing the finest oils, watercolours, mixed media ang 
sculpture. Hours: Monday - Friday: 10 a.m.-6 p.m, 
Saturday: 10 am.-5 p.m. 

STRATHCONA PLACE ART GALLERY 10831 Unive;s), 
Ave. 433-5807 — Until April 5: Spring Debut of tiye 
Members of the Arts and Crafts of the Centre. Apr 
May 3: Join Linda Nelson and Penny Lamnek in celoty-3¢ 
ing their unique friendship of 25 years exploring art 
together. Opening Reception: Wednesday, April 14, 6.29 
p.m. Gallery viewing hours 9:00 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mo 

to Friday. 

SUN & MOON VISIONARIES ABORIGINAL ARTISANS 
10518-82 Ave. — \iona C. Cardinal's artist exhibition any. 
tled Flowers in Flight. llona has chosen flowers and featp. 
ers as metaphors of herself: flowers being strong yet del, 
Cate and feathers as a representation of her Abongina 
heritage and a metaphor for flight expressing the start o 
take-off of one's life, a new beginning. 

SUSSEX GALLERIES 290 Saddleback Rd. 988-2266 — 
An inspiring collection of pastels, acrylic paintings 
watercolours, Japanese Chigri-e , Oriental Ink. Ne 
by Joyce Bowerman, Gwen Burroughs, Louise C 
Fran Cuyler, Cecile Derkatch, and others. 
VANDERLEELIE GALLERY 10344-134 St. 452-0286 
Until April 3: Saturation a solo exhibition of landscape 
and still life paintings by Vancouver artist Bobbie Bu 
Hours: Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. vag@vander. 
leelie.ab,ca. 

WEST END GALLERY 12308 Jasper Ave. 488-4992 - 
Until March 31; New collection of figurative works by 
Claudette Castonguay and others. April 7 - 19: Spring 
new works on paper and acrylic by Nixie Barton. Hours 
Tues, to Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
www.westendgalleryltd.com; e-mail 
westendgallery@powersurfr.com . 

ZIEGLER HUGHES GALLERY & SERENDIPITY FRAMING 
9860-90 Ave. 433-0388 — Anahuacalli Mexicar 
Jewellery and Art, featuring works by Canadian and 
Mexican artists and artisans. New works by Christopher 








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pm. 











































STTIN 
ART GUFFAW Horizon Stage, 1001 Calahoo Road 
Spruce Grove— Sunday, April 1, 2 p.m.: Jim Jackson 
introduces Mr. Art Guffaw, an employment challenged 
house painter who is afraid of colour and cannot draw 4 
straight line. This new family performance brings to !ife a 
circus of fine art using original puppetry, magic, juggling, 
giant soap bubbles and many, many art jokes. Pre-event 
activities include martial arts demonstrations by Silent 
River Kung Fu and arts and crafts in the lobby at 1 p.m 
Tickets $8 available at Horizon Stage Box Office 962-995 
or Ticketmaster. 
CAMELOT Manitoba Theatre Centre, Theatre Calgary, 
Shoctor Theatre, Citadel Theatre 425-1820 — Until Apri 
8, 8 p.m.: This magical story centres on a shining place 
known as Camelot, where a mythical monarch momen- 
tarily held a court of perfect knights and ladies, until! lel! 
into decay. Weekdays $45 to $32, Friday and Saturday 
$50, Sunday Matinee and Evening $41 to $32. For tickets 
call Camelot Box Office at 425-1820. 
CARMEN Edmonton Opera, Jubilee Auditorium — Marc 
31, 8 p.m., April 3 & April'5, 7:30 p.m.: Edmonton Operas 
2000-2001 season ends with Bizet's masterwork, 
Garmen. Spine-tingling music, action-filled plot, and cha 
acters unsurpassed for their fiery temperament and dra 
matic intensity. Tickets $19 to $78 available at the 
Edmonton Opera Box Office at 429-1000 or Ticketmaster 
451-8000. Seniors and Students receive discounts 07 
Tuesdays and Thursdays. 
THE DAY NEVER ENDS Jubiliations Dinner Theatre, 
Upper Level, Phase II, WEM— Until April 15: This s@ 
“ive to air” shooting of of everyone's favorite musical 
soap opera. In tonight's episode, one of the lead charac- 
ters will be written out of the show, nat even the cast vil 
know who unt the final scene. Advance tickets $55.95 
plus GST. To make reservations call 484-2424, Show 
runs until April 15. 
DIE-NASTY The Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave. — 
Edmonton's long running, live improvised soap oper? 
strides into its 10th year presenting a season set inthe 
glorious days of Roman Empire circa 67 A.D. Mondays 
THE GIZMO GUYS Arden Theatre, 5 St. Anne St, St 
Albert— April 1,1 pam, and 3:30 pam: The Games f 





































Stopher 


sto lifea 
Juggting 


lONIGHT AT THE OASIS /Sis Dance Productions, 
ival Place Theatre, Sherwood Park — April 2, 7:30 
m., A Middle Eastem bellydance performance. Tickets 
+40 available at Isis Dance Studio 439-6960 and 
Toxetmaster 449-3378. General seating. 
yoTes FROM UNDERGROUND Sound and Fury Theatre. 
Scene Studios, 8212-104 St.— April 5 to 7, April 12 to 
m.: Anall-new stage adaptation of Dostoevsky's 
versial exploration of the dark side of humanity, 
From Underground, This highly theatrical one-man 
duction stars Michael Murdock, a U of A Drama pro- 
fessor and one of Edmonton's most distinguished actors. 
Notes From Underground ‘s a wide-ranging monologue, 
exploring ideas of alienation, class division, religion, love, 
the hazards of thinking too much, April 8, Pay-what- 
n, April 10, 2 for 1. Tickets $10 Adult, $8 
sjudent/Senior available at TIX on the Square 420-1757 
THE OEDIPUS PROJECT Norther Light Theatre, La Cite 
francophone, 8627-91 St. 471-1586 — April 4 to 15,8 
A multidisciplinary adaptation of the Oedipus myth, 
ch will use the idea of image-based theatre and 
yond to the increasing use of visual storytelling tools in 
; mediums as the Internet, film, and television. Tickets 
udent, $16 Adult. Tickets available through 
mm Light Theatre 471-1586 and TIX on the Square 
-1757. 
THE OLDEST DANCE: A HISTORICAL JOURNEY OF 
BELLY DANCE Edmonton's Middle Eastern Dance 
unity, John L. Haar Theatre — Friday, April 13, 8 
‘aschelei Marangoni and Lana Shepherd present an 
ig of excellent dancing, hypnotic music and exciting 
inment, See dances from ancient Egypt, Phoenicia, 
»y, Morroco, India, Spain and more. Advance tickets 
ailable by calling 903-7418, $20 at the door. 
RESPECTABLE Workshop West Theatre, Rice Theatre, 
del Theatre —Until April 8, 8 p.m., matinees on 
urdays, March 31, April 8: Respectable |s a black com- 
edy about Hork and Saul, two down-on-theor-luck red- 
necks who try and get “respectable” through a somewhat 
shady fireworks distribution plan. A play by Ron 
Chambers, Respectable is part mystery, part meditation on 
ectability and consumerism. Tickets range from $10 
(Preview) to $25 (Opening Night) available at TIX on the 
Square 420-1757 or from Workshop West Theatre 477- 
The play is not suitable for children and there is an 
explicit language warning. 
ROMEO & JULIET The Citadel Theatre, MacLab Theatre 
— Previews March 31, April 1,3 & 4, 8.p.m., Opening 
Night Thursday, April 5, until April 29, 8 p.m.: Retold and 
reworked over the years, nothing still compares with 
Shapkespeare’s original words. Tickets $22 to $28.50 
previews, Opening night $55, Weekdays $22 to $35, 
Frday/Saturday $40, Sunday Matinee & Evening $22 to 
$31, available at te Citadel Box Office 425-1820. 
SIX SINGULAR SENSATIONS Kompany, Jagged Edge 
Theatre Space , 3rd floor in Edmonton Centre, 10205- 
101 St Tuesday through Friday, April 17 to 21st, 
4210 p.m., Friday, April 20 & Saturday, April21, 8 p.m.: 
An entertaining and eclectic performance sprinkled with 
theatrical moments, sizzling song and dance, all perfor- 
mances by One Man Wonder Tom Delbello! Evening per- 
formances will be followed by an open stage. Tickets $8 
and an optional lunch special'ts $5. Advanced tickets 
available at TIX on the Square 420-1757. 
0071/2 THE SPY WHO SCHTICKED ME Celebrations 
Dinner Theatre, 13103 Fort Road, 448-9339— Until May 
19 A James Bond musical comedy spoof. Ticket prices 
starting at $29.95 and up. 
STARTER HOME Jagged Edge Theatre Lunchbox Theatre 
)ntil Mateh 31, Tuesday through Friday at'12:10 p.m., 
Friday and Saturday Evening 8 p.m.: Vanessa and Wayne 
ae in love and ready to live together. They find the perfect 
starter home for rent, but they’s not'sure about the landla- 
tty-Lyn, who seems to tangle herself in their new 
ite Starter Home is the comedy premiere written by 
Edmonton playwright Katherine Koller. Tickets $8, $7 
Senior. Double toonie Tuesdays. Box lunches $5. For 
servation information call 463-4237. 
THEATRESPORTS Rapid Fire Theatre, Varscona Theatre 
— 11 p.m: Enjoy Theatresports every Friday! 
THREE SISTERS Studio Theatre, Timms Centre for the 


29 to April 7, 8 p.m., Matinee Thursday, April 5, 
p.m.: Three Sisters by Anton Chekhov. Olga, Masha 
and Inna are three young women searching for a new life. . 
But with each passing day, their longings tug at the order 
of their everyday existence, until they see their lives begin 
{0 unravel. Enlightening, inspiring and entertaining, Three 
Sisters is a classic tale of unrequited love, dashed dreams. 
and the struggle to believe in a better future. Tickets $5 for 
eview, available at the Timms Centre Box Office from 
Noon to 5 p.m. 492-2495. 
VICTORIA Dulcinea Langfelder & Co., The Arden Theatre, 
8! Alber — March 29, 7:30 p.m.: Victoria is a multidisc- 
Dinary creation that uses dance, theatre, music, video and 
‘genious lighting to whisk the audience into the world of 
50-year-old nursing home resident in the advanced 
of Alzheimer's. Tickets $20 Adult, $18.50 


enjoy refreshments. Free admission. 

EDMONTON SPORT COUNCIL'S ANNUAL GENERAL 
MEETING The Royal Glenora Club, 11160 River \ 
Road — 7:00 p.m.: Dr. Robert Steadward, membe: 
International Olympic Committee and President of the 
International Paralympic Committee, will speak. Anyone 
interested in the future of sport in Edmc 
attend. For more information call 496 

GLOBAL VISIONS FILM FESTIVAL FUN 

Arts Barns, 10330-84 Ave. —7 p.m. C 

equinox and global citizenship with a packed 

films, music, food and spirits. 

Edmonton premiere screenings 

Democracy Looks Like , a collaborati 

telling the real story of what happe 

Seattle during the 1999 WTO protest 

the Streets 12 

filmed in 1988, and seen at the ias' 

Festival, are doing today. The 

local favourite Wendy Mch 

tabla master Uday (Ram 

life time world rhythm coll 

sentation of the night is the Ac 

umentary Genghis Blues. The infamc 

Roadshow wind up the night. Tickets $ 

Student/Low income available at Black! 

call 414-1052. 


Sherbanluk's first novel The 

Canadian evironmentalist tells a 

disaster 

ORLANDO BOOKS GUEST AUTHOR: PAULA GUNN 
ALLEN Orlando Books, 10123-82 Ave. 432 3—7:30 
p.m.: Paula Gunn Allen reads from her recent work. Paula 
Gunn Allen is a Native-American poet, novelist, critic and 
educator whose workks include Life is a Fatal Disease. 


SIXTH BIENNIAL 2001 WATERWALKER FESTIVAL 


able at Mou 
$10 Doo: 
BOOKSTOCK 2001 BENEFIT CONCERT 
Rubber Soul: T 


m., to benefit 


METRO CINEMA 


ti, whe: 
train under the 
ter Sergeant Galloup. Their 


srupted one day 


9 about hir 


favor of the 
her great theme - 50 desire. Denis 


bes Galloup's de! of imperialism: 


Celebrate 
the Music of 


from Woodstock 
to Supernatural 


All-Star Ensemble: 
Allende, Malaika Barriffe, Bill Hobson. 
Christian Mena, Dennis Meneely, 
Barrie Nighswander, Tilo Paiz, 
Duane Smith, Jimmy Whiffen 


Saturday, 


March 31 
Sidetrack Cafe 


10333-112 Street 





_____ LISTING 





without a real “home” for far too long, he's become a 
monster unfit for life. Admission $5 members, $7 new 
members; Senior/Student $4 members, $6 new mem- 
bers. Call 425-9212 for more information. 

ORLANDO BOOKS DIALOGUE AMONG CIVILIZATIONS 
Orlando Books, 10123-82 Ave. 432-7633 — 7:30 p.m 
Dialogue among civilizations through poetry with Bert 
Almon, £.D. Blodgett, Olga Costopoutes, Nigel Darbasie, 
Marilyn Dumont, Shawna Lemay and Alice Major. MC. 
Douglas Barbour. Join poets around the world in a cele- 
bration of the written word 


SATURDAY ~~ 


BOOKSTOCK 2001 BENEFIT CONCERT Stanley A. Milner 
Library — Rubber Sout: The Canadian Tribute to the 
Beatles, 8 p.m., to benefit the Edmonton Public Library's 
Bookstock 2001 Campaign. Advance tickets $10 Adult at 
Ticketmaster 451-8000 or $12 Door 

CITY FARMER'S MARKET 97 St. & 00 Ave. — 7 a.m. to 
2.p.m. Always fresh, great selection, entertainment, over 
100 years of service, free parking 

FESTIVAL OF RESISTANCE AGAINST THE FREE TRADE 
AREA OF THE AMERICAS The People's Action Network 
(PAN), Queen Alexandra Community Hall, 10425- 
University Ave. — 11-30:a.m. to 5:30 p.m.: An all day 
educational teach-in featuring a dozen speakers from 
across Canada presenting topics including civil nghts vio- 
lation in Quebec, and the impacts of the FTAA on indige- 
nous peoples, the global South, labour and women 
Saturday night is the Gala Against Global Greed featuring 
local bands Cool Blue Method, Lion for Real and guests. 
KATHAK DANCE RECITAL Ecmonton Raga-Mata Society 
Provincial Museum Theatre — 7:30 p.m.: Chitresh Das is 
avisionary and teacher who brought Kathak dance to 
North America. His cultural breakthrough comes in teh 
form of storytelling through gestures, rhythm cycles and 
beats. Tickets are $12- $15 by calling Shreela at 484-8470 
or Brad at 448-4827 

METRO CINEMA Zoidler Hall, Citadel Theatre. 9828-101 A 
Ave 425-9212—7 p.m. & 9:00 p.m. Beau Travail 
(France, 2000). Admission $5 members. $7 new mem- 
bers; Senior/Student $4 members, $6 new members. See 
Friday listings for details. Cait 425-9212 for more informa- 
tion. 








SPRING FLEA MARKET & CRAFT SALE The King's 
University College. 9125-50 St — 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 
p.m. Tables available for $15. Free admission and park- 
ing. For more information contact the College at 465- 
3500. 


NDAY 


FESTIVAL OF RESISTANCE AGAINST THE FREE TRADE 
AREA OF THE AMERICAS The People’s Action Network 
(PAN), Queen Alexz Community Hail, 10425- 
University Ave. — 11:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.: A fool's Day 
Training, with workshops in non-violent civil disobedi- 
ence, consensu, legal nights, medica! aan, de-escala- 
tion, and onentations to Quebec City. Over fitt 
Edmonton-area activists involved with People's 's Action 
Network will be travelling to Quebec City to take part in 
protests. 

JAZZ AND REFLECTIONS Altchie United Church, 9624-74 
Ave. — 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.: An afternoon of jazz and 
reflection with the Kent Sangster Trio. Collection at the 
door. 

METRO CINEMA Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828-101 A 
Ave. 425-9212 —7 p.m. & 9:00 p.m.: Beau Travail 
(France, 2000). Admission $5 members, $7 new mem- 
bers; Senior/Student $4 members, $6 new members. See 
Friday listings for details. Call 425-9212 for more informa- 
tion. 

WASKAHEGAN TRAIL ASSOCIATION FREE GUIDED 
HIKE Hike approximately 10 km. Meet 10 a.m., at 
Superstore’s big tlag, Stoney Plain Road and 173 St. 
Bring your own weiners and buns for cookout after hike. 
The WTA is a group of avid hikers that welcomes non- 
members on all their outings. For more information tele- 
phone Dave 962-6234 or visit www. boreal.net/wta. 


MONDAY a 


EDMONTON FILM SOCIETY SCREENING Provincial 
Museum Theatre, 102 Ave.-128 St —8 p.m.: The 
Strawberry Blonde (1941) Director: Raoul Walsh A 
change of pace for the dynamic Cagney and one of the 
most evocative period pieces about the innocent “Gay 
Nineties,” A dentist muses about his infatuation for a 
stunningly beautiful woman after marrying the bland but 


a 








THEIMIAXMeExPERIENCE® 


A 
HIVERC” 


S 





8712-109 SIREET © 433.0728 


CHOCOLAT © 6 
nightly 7:00: mot Sat/Sun 2:00. Suggestive scenes - 
THE CRIMSON RIVERS 18a 


nightly 9-30. Gory 


10337 - 62 AVENUE © 433-0728 


CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON Mig F6 
nightly 7:10, 9:30; mat Sat/Son 2:15. Violent scenes 


10337 - 82 AVENUE © 433-0726 _ 


INTO THE ARMS OF STRANGERS PG 
nightly 7:00 & 9:20; mat Sat/Sun 2:00. 


7828-1014 AVENUE (ZEIDLER HALL. CTADEL THEATRE) © 425-9212 


BEAU TRAVAIL MA 
March 30-Apnl |, 7-00 & 9:00. 


GRANDIN THEATRES 


GRANDIN MALL, SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL AVE.. ST. ALBERT © 458-9872 
MATINEE: CHILD (13 & UNDER) $4, ADULT S4 50, SENIOR (65+) $4 
EVENING: CHILD $4, ADULT $7.50. SENIOR $4: TUESDAYS ALL DAY S4 


RUGRATS IN PARIS G 
mat 1:40, 4:00. 7 . _< 2 
SAY IT ISWT SO 188 
nightly 7:30, 9:40. Ee . 
RECESS: SCHOOL'S OUT 6 
mot }:00, 3:20; sighty 7:00 — 

EXIT WOUNDS 18a 
IO. 5. 

THE MEXICAN 148 
rat }:20, 3:50; rightly 6:50, 9-20. Coarse longuoge. ’ 
SOMEONE LIKE YOU 14a 


Fri, Sat, Sun 1-10, 3:15, 7:10, 9:15. No passes. 


TOMCATS 
Fa, Sof, Sun 1:30, 3:30, 720, 9:30. Crude contemt. Mo posses. 


CINEPLEX ODEON 





EATON CENTRE CINEMAS 


IRD FLOOR PHASE fi, 101 SI. & 102 AYE. © 421-7020 


SOMEONE LIKE YOU o= 4A 
FT 200430, 7:00,910. 
TOMCATS on 18a 
Frethurs 2:10, 500, 7:40, $50, Cre coer 






SPY KIDS on Fe 
Fetus 150,420,640, 900, : 
THE MEXICAN on 4A 
Frithues 1:30, 4:40, 7:20. Cooe lorguoge. 


















A 
Frethurs 1:00, 4:00, 6:50, 9-45. Graphic wor vience aa 
HEARTBREAKERS ors 4A 
Fhe 1:20, 4:10, 7-30, 10:10 : 
SAY IT ISN'T SO on 184 


pet he 4:50, 7-10, 9:30. 








= 
i Sexe Spe: ay nd 


‘otis 0 ba ia $0. Cem ge de 
PG 


| fats 10,350, 620,920 vasome 
VILLA GE TREE MALL 











West 
Edmonto 
Mall 


© DISNEY ENTERPRISES, INC 
_@IMAK CORPORATION 


SHOWTIMES MARCEL 


14a 
bere roe SorSun 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30; Mon-Thers 6:30. Gory 
volence. 





HEARTBREAKERS = 148 
FA 7:10, 9:50; SotSon 1:30, 4:30. 7:10, 9:50; MowThus 7:10. 
‘1S MINUTES 18a 
FreSun 9:40. , Ae Sh. Sa cee 
SEE SPOT RUN PG 
Fr, Mon-Thurs 7:20; Sot-Sun 1:45, 4:45, 7:20. ae . 5) 





DOWN TO EARTH 

Fri 720, 10:00; SakSun 1-45, 4:45, 7-20, 10:00; Mon-Thurs 7:20. 
Coarse longuoge % tthe ME 
HANNIBAL 188 
Fri, Mon-Thurs 6:50; SotSun 1:00, 4:00, 6:50. Gory violence, dishubing 
foie ~~ . 
TRAFFIC 14a 
Fri 6:30, 9:30; SotSun 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30; Mon-Thurs 6:30 


< 





Fn 6:50, #10, SatSun 1:15, 4:15, 


}Sun 1:15, 4 9:10; Mone Ths 6:50._ 
SAVE THE LAST DANCE 

Fri 7:00, 9:50; SotSun 1:20, 4:30, 7:00, 9:50; Mor Thurs 7:00. 
Coorse language iss i 

MISS CONGENIALITY PG 
FreSun 10:00. _ =. J See e 
CHOCOLAT °G 
Fri 6:40, 9:10; SorSun 1:00, 3:45, 6:40, 9:10; Mon Thurs 6:40. 
Suggestive scenes 4 
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON 

Fi 6:40, 9°20; SoPSun 12:45, 3:45, 6:40, 9:20; Mon-Thurs 6:40, 
Violent scenes 





3 


WEST EDMONTON MALL, PHASE Ill ENTRANCE 2 © 444-1829 
_BOX OFFICE OPENS NIGHTLY 6:15 © OPEN MATINEES SAT/SUN 1:30 


SOMEONE LIKE YOU on waa 
FreTiurs 2:00, 4:20, 7:00, 9:10. Mo passa pers. 
GLADIATOR rs “a 
Frrthors 3:00, 6:15, 9°20. Gory vielen aS 
SAY IT ISM’T SO ox 18a 
FreThees 2:50, 4:50, 7:40, 10:00. == 
THERE'S ONLY ONE JIMMY GRIMBLE os °G 
Frethars 2:30, 7-20. SS eee 
THE BROTHERS on: 14a 
Forties 2:40, 5:00, 7:30, 10:10, Coorse language, moy offend 
15 MUMUTES 18a 
foetus 4 





CAST AWAY 
Fehrs 3:10, 630, 9-30 








= 
FerThues 2:10, 4:35, 7:10, 9:40. Suggestive scenes. 


© BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU? on g PG 
FrbThers 2:20, 4:30, 6:40, 9:00. 


CLAREVIEW TOWN CENTRE 


4201 137 AVENUE © 477-0600 








SPY KIDS om 
FreThurs 1:30. 4:15, 6:50, 9:10. Mo passes. 








TOMCATS ors 

FooThuss 1:45, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40: Gude content. ° 
SOMEONE UKE YOU on 

Sees S012 2 None. 
ENEMY AT THE GATES 


ieaes 0 a Fa ‘joo Grophic wor violence 








loving girl-next-door. The tale is brought vividly to life by a 
great cast 
Admission $5 Adult, $4 Senior. Student, $2 Child, 8 film 
series $25. 
NOON HOUR ORGAN RECITAL SERIES Convocation Hall, 
University ot Alberta — The concert will feature Dr. 
Marnie Giesbrecht, Professor of Organ Studies, University 
of Alberta and Admission is free. Bring your lunch 
SING FOR FUN The Lynne Singers 435-4838— 
Everyone welcome to join Women's Chorus and Men's 
Chorus. No auditions necessary. Learn the basics of theo- 
fy, sight reading, ear training, vocal technique in a tun and 
supportive atmosphere. For more information call Lynne 
435-4838. 
WOMEN AND NORTH INDIAN MUSIC: CALCUTTA TO 
CANADA University of Alberta, Centre for 
thnomusicology, Fine Arts Building 2-7 Studio 27 — 8 
p.m.: This multi-media, multidisciplinary performance 
continues the work of ethnomusicologists as cultural 
bridge builders among communities, disciplines, and 
media by celebrating women and performance. Featuring 
a concert by sitarist Amelia Maciszewski and tabla player 
Uday Ramdas, foilwed by a screening of Maciazewski's 
ethnographic video Our Stories, Our Songs: Musical 
(Auto)biographies of North Indian Women. Donations 
welcome. 


TUESDAY : 


FOUR STORMY NIGHTS IN APRIL POETRY READING 
SERIES Backroom Vodka Bar, 10324-82 Ave. —7 p.m. 
A poetry reading by Stroll of Poets. Readers include: Jan 
Twardowski (read by Anna Mioduchowska and Myrna 
Garanis), Alice Major, Pierette Requier, and Delvina Greig. 


WEDNESDAY : 


SPECIES ODYSSEY 2001 Tory Lecture Theatre, Room 
82, University of Alberta —7 p.m.: Canada has over 360 
species at risk and still NO federal legislation to protect 
endangered species and their habitats. Join the Defenders 
of Wildlite ad keynote speaker David Schindler, Professor 
of ecology at the U of A, on an endangered species slide 
show presentation. Admission is free. 

UPWARD BOUND TOASTMASTERS CLUB OPEN HOUSE 





THE MEXICAN ors 
ForThurs 1:15, 3:50, 6:30. Coorse language. 
SEE SPOT RUN on PG 
Féthes Tey S10 Cee ot, SL Oat 2 
HANNIBAL on 18A 
FreThurs 6:40, 9-50. Gory violence, disturbing scenes a 
TRAFFIC on: 14a 
FriThurs 1:00, 4:00, 7:05, 10:00. Coarse language, drug use 





WEST EDMONTON MALL, PHASE | ENTRANCE 44 © 444-1331 
BOX OFFICE OPENS NIGHTLY AT 6:15 PMA. 
OPEN FOR MATINEES SAFSUN AT 12:30 PM. 
FRI, MON-THURS. CINESAVE TUESDAY — ALL SEATS $1.50 
SAT_& SUN. CINESAVE TUESDAY — ALL SEATS $2.50 











MONKEYBONE 14a 
FoThurs 2:15, 4:30, 630,900. 
THE WEDOING PG 
FreThurs 2:30, 4:45, 7:30, 9:45, a. 

VALENTINE 14a 
Firthurs 2:45, 5:00, 7:45, 10:10. Violent scones. ; 
THE PLEDGE 14a 
Fits 91S ‘s 3 

THE GIFT 148 


FriThurs 10:00. Violent scenes 


Stanley Milner Library, 7 Sir Winston Churchill Square , 
Room 7—7:30 p.m. to 9: 30 p.m. Every Wednesday 
September through June. For more information call 
Michael at 429-9789. 


THURSDAY ; 


DROP-IN ART FOR THE ABSOLUTELY TERRIFIED OR 
THE TINY BIT TIMID Edmonton Art Gallery, 2 Sir Winston 
Churchill Square — The Edmonton Art Gallery is offering 
adult drop-in classes every Thursday evening. Call 422- 
6223 for more information. 

DROP-IN FRENCH CONVERSATION La Cité francaise, 
room 202, 8527-91 St. 469-0399 — Every Thursday, 7 - 
9 p.m: Organized by Alliance francaise d'Edmonton, a 
Non-profit organization geared to broadcasting the French 
culture and lanquage. Free for students and members of 
the Alliance 

PARADIGM ESTEEM TEEN FASHION SHOW Red's, WEI 
—7 p.m.: Paradigm Esteem is a new 8-week program 
that teaches teenagers self-esteem, self-appreciation, 
along with modelling and ramp techniques to instill inner 
and outer confidance. The program's fnst fashion show 
features performers D'Arcy Greaves and Kori Thorowsky. 
Funds raised allow Paradigm Esteem to sponsor inner city 
teens that otherwise would not have the funds to partici- 
pate in such a program. 


THURSDAY 


INDIGO BOOKS SPRING ‘BREAK ACTIVITIES Indigo 
Books Music & Cafe, 1837-99 St. 432-4488 — March 26 
to 30, daily at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.: Scavenger hunts, 
Teddy Bear Tea, unique craft activities, games, and story- 
time. Indigo is the place to be. A detailed schedule is avail- 
able at the Kids’ department. 

YOUTH DROP-IN CENTRE Castle Downs YMCA, 11510- 
153 Ave., 476-9622 — 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.: Pool. Ping- 
Pong Tournament. YMCA Members free, $3 Non- 
Members. 


SATURDAY wee 


ART CLASSES FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH Edmonton 
Art Gallery 2 Sir Winston Churchill Square — Students 











30-APRIL “5s, 2001 | 


BILLY ELLIOT ors 
FriThurs 4:10, 9:10, Coarse language. 


FAMOUS PL 





ounp! 


PARAMOUNT 


10233 JASPER AVENUE © 428-1307 
$8.75 GENERAL ADMISSION © $5.25 CHILDREN & GOLDEN AGE 
SA.25 WEEKDAY MATINEES © $6.50 WEEKEND 8 HOLIDAY MATINEES 
EXIT WOUNDS mx 188 
Fri Mon Tue Wed Thu 7:00, 9:15; Sot Sun 2:15, 4:30, 7:00, 9:15 


BIG DIF 




















—___WEST-EDMONTON MALL aH 
CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON PG 
daily 1:20, 4:15, 8:10, 10:55. Violont scones 2 
ENEMY AT THE GATES 

faa, Hen be, Web hy 1250, 350, 650,750, 950, 1040, Sot 
1250, 3:50, 6:50, 9:25, 9:50. Grophic wor violenco 
EXIT WOUNDS 180 
tdity 4:00, 5:45, 9:30. " Ald 
HANNIBAL 188 


Fri, Sot, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 1:10, 4:45, 7.45, 10:45; Sun 1:10, 10:45. 
Gary violence, detutbiing scenes 
HAUNTED CASTLE IN 3D PG 
Fri 3:15, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30, 10:45; Sat, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 2:00, 








Fre Thurs 2:00, 4:00, 7:15 


SOUTH EDMONTON COMMON 


CALGARY TRAIL & 23RD AVENUE © 436-0585 








18A 
TOMCATS on a he eR 
FieThurs 2:00. 4:20. 7:10, 9:40. Crude content 7 
188 


TOMCATS ux 
ForThues 1:00, 3:20, 5:40. 8:00, 10:20. Crude content. 









HEARTBREAKERS 
doily 1:30, 4:30, 7:10, 7:40, 10:00, 10:30. 











RECESS: SCHOOLS OUT ie one 
daily 12:45, 3:00, 5:15. 3 ives 
SEE SPOT RUN PG 
daly 1:50. criti l 

SPY KIDS 


Fri, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thy 12: 
1:00, 2:50, 3:20, 5-10, fo. 
THE MEXICAN 14a 
Fri, Sat, Sun, Mon, Tue 1:15, 4:20, 8:15; Wed 1:15, 4:20, Thu 1:15, 
4:20, 7:00; late show 11:00. Coarse language. 












TOM CATS 18A 
ee 4:10, 7:20, 10:20, Crude content, 








on VE40, 345, 7-00, 10:15. Course language, drug use 


WWF: WRESTLEMANIA X-SEVEN 
Sun 5.00. 





SILVERCITY IMAX 
WEST EDMONTON MALL 





FeeThurs 220, 5:30, 830. 
IN THE MOOD FOR LOVE os 

Foethurs 1:15, 7:35. 

SAY IT ISW'T SO os 

freThurs 2:39, 5:20, 8:10, 10-40. 

THERE'S ONLY ONE JIMMY GRIMBLE ox 
Frethurs 1:40, 6:45. 































THE DEEP waxs0 
45, 15S Sun Nn. , Wed Th 1245, 548/8015 





3000 MILES TO GRACELAND at VA 
Te EES Pes Sore eer Cee 
saath ~~ 


roe. 725 925 mm a 725925" 












































can try their hand at drawing, painting, mask ma, 
ter-casting, cartooning and more. Just drop in ; 
Saturday aftemoons, 3 to 5 p.m. Work with prof: 
artist Paul Freeman and try your hand at drawir 
sculpture, painting and more. All it costs is $5. 
are included. 

ART-VENTURES Profiles Public Art Gallery, 19 
St. Albert, 460-4310— 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 pr 

art classes every Saturday for children, ages 5 to 4 
Programs run on a donation basis. 

WHO NEEDS CARTOONS? Indigo Books Music 2 
1837-99 St 432-4488 — Every Saturday, 11 a 
provides a unique alternative to Saturday morn) 
toons, with animated stories, fun crafts, and a fre 
or jam sandwich from the indigo Cafe. 





EGGSTRODINARY EASTER POOL PARTY Macé\, 
Centre for Sport and Wellness, 108St-104 Ave 

to 5 p.m.: Enjoy egg, noodle and bunny relay race 
ie decorating and face painting. Admission $10.5¢ 
family. For more information call 497-5300. 


TUESDAY © 


YOUTH DROP-IN CENTRE Castle Downs Yiy 
153 Ave., 476-9622 — 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.: Pool. P 
Pong, Air Hockey, Foosball, and Shuffle board. Yc, 
Members free, $3 Non-Members. 









WEDNESDAY 


ARMY CADET RECRUITMENT St. Luke's 132 













— Every Wednesday, 6:30 - 9 p.m.: Free sports, act 
camping, rifling, wall climbing and orienteering Foy nore ae 82 
information call Doug at 483-7985. tab! 
que 
ee siz 
THURSDAY : oar 
YOUTH DROP-IN CENTRE Castle Downs YMCA, 115 Bee 
153 Ave., 476-9622 — 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.: Pool. Ping- Ase 
Pong Tournament. YMCA Members free, $3 Non- — 
Members. ST 
Oak 





© BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU? PG 


























Sigiely 2:10:9-30 ia I ee 

RECESS: SCHOOL’S OUT: 6 Sla 
doily 1:50, 4:00 2 SL. A 

SEE SPOT RUN PG 

oily 2:05, 4:15, 6:45; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 6:45 

SWEET NOVEMBER PG 


nightly 9:15. Mature theme 


117 AVENUE & GROAT ROAD © 4558726 
‘56.50 GENERAL ADMISSION $3.00 CHILDREN & GOLDEN AGE 
$4.00 MATINEES & $3.00 TUESDAY 



















CHOCOLAT PG 
Fri, Sat, Sun 1:40, 4:20, 7:00; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 7:00, 9:30 — 
Suggestive scenes ah = GU 
HEARTBREAKERS 14a 

Fri, Sot, Sun 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:40; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thy 6:50, 9:40. 

SOMEONE LIKE YOU 4A 








Fri, Sat, Sun 1:50, 4:05, 7:20, 9:50; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu 7:20, 9:50. No 
[a 

SPY KIDS. 
Fri, Sot, Sun 2:00, 4:30, 7:10, 9:20; Mon, Tue, Wed, Thy 7:10, 9:20. 









pc 





















CINEMARK THEATRES 






MOVIES 12 & CINEMA CITY 12 
MOVIES 12: 130 AVENUE & SO STREET © 472.9779 
“CINEMA CITY: 3633-99 STREET © 463-5481 (FRESAT MIDNIGHT SHOWS) 
THE WEDDING PLANNER PG 
Sot/Sun 11:40; daily 2:20, 4:10, 7:15, 9:30; Lote nite Frj/Sot 11 50. 
VALENTINE 14a 
Sat/Sun 12:05; daily 2:15, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40; Lote nite Fri/Sot 12:30. 
Violence scenes, 






































THE PLEDGE 14a 
Sot/Sun 11:05, daily 1:45, 4:15, 7:05, 9:45, Lote nite Fri/Sot 12:20 _ 
THE GIFT 14a 





‘Sat/Sun 11:10; daily 1:35, 4:48, 7:25, 9:55; at oll 














FINDING FORRESTER PG 
$e 1190 40 (20,10 94:58 











Sain 119, day 155, 4:25, 2:05, 9:35; Lote nite Fri/Sot po 
EMPEROR'S NEW GROOVE __ 6 
Sat/Sun 11:30; daily 1:25, 3:20, 5:25, 7:30. 
SUGAR AND SPICE 14a 
Sat/Sun 11:25; doily 1:20, 3:15, 5:10, 7:45, Yom on 






















11:55_ 









CALL (780) 430-9003 











BLUES FESTIVAL 2000. T's 
available at Mothers Music only. 
$14.99 





MOVING Overseas! Jkea Black 
and White: wall-units, bookcases, 
sofa, bed, computer desks, 
tables, lamps. Many unique anti- 
que pieces. Designer clothes 
size 7-8 Sewing machine, 
permanent make up kits $950, 
terrra-cotta pots, dishes. Call 
452-0635. 


















ST. ALBERT Lot, must sell 46 
Oakridge Dr. in beautiful 
Oakmont. 36 ft. wide building 
pocket $47, 900. call 990-9657. 


Wild (am eae ies 


U2 TICKETS for April 10 in 
Calgary. $180 for both. Call 
Melanie 479-2641. 







MUSICIANS AVAILABLE 











BASS player looking to join 
original band. Infl. Melvins, old 
Manson and Tool. Have gear. 
Chris 987-5237. 





BASS player seeks other 
musicians to form band. Infl. 
Coal Chamber, Type-O-Negative, 
Slayer. Serious players call 
Adam 488-5983. 


DRUMMER 20 ents exp. wants 
to jam) e, will do fill- 
1950's to present rock no 
metal, some vocals. Local work 
Hy only. Call 461-0252 before 9pm. 











GUITARIST available. Metal, 
Punk. Serious inquiries only. 
With own gear. 453-2577. 


























GUITARIST looking to join or 
form alt-rock group. Influences; 
Radiohead, Coldplay, Moist. Call 
Michael @ 450-1892. 


"| DON'T want to Drink & Drive 
fo more" By Drummer Dale 
100.3FM Grr Grr Grr Grr the Bear 
has been playing it 5 years, 
alcohol related music. !'m looking 
{0 go on the road. 450-4221 





First 15 words.............°5.00 
Extra words ............. 
Bold/Centred....... 


Buy 4 Weeks and 
GET 2 MORE FREE! !* 


OFFICE HOURS: Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 
Deadline: Tuesday @ 3:00 p.m. 

Email: see@greatwest.ca 

Prepayment required, Rates subject to change. 
*Excludes Adult Listings 












FAX (780) 432-1102 





MUSICIANS WANTED — % 


AUDITIONS for FEMALE singer 
with hot modern R&B vocals to 
complete line up in local 4 Gir! 
R&B/Pop group 18-23. Some 
dancing abilities & attractive 
looks, any nationality. Don at 
JOYCECOM records 489-7462 


BASS player needed for part time 
Folk/Roots band. Infl, Emmy Lou 
Harris Neil Young 
tooga@powersurfr.com. Call 
433-3111 


BASS player with vocals needed 
for Christian rock band. Sean 
471-5621 


CALLING ALL BANDS! Covers 
and original. If you've got talent 
I've got gigs. Your Mission 
should U choose. Get the city 
Rocking again!!! Call 440-2197 


CANADIAN rock band looking for 
lead singer. Must have front man 
status 417-5526. 


CELLO player needed for song 
Project in March. Must have exp. 
to help compose original song 
recording exp., just need talent 














Call 487-5538 

DRUMMER WANTED. For 
original Band Call Desi 
919-8783 





DRUMMER and Bass player 
wanted for original project. Infl. 
Tool, Deftones, ect. Call Brock 
472-5766 or 475-4852. 


DRUMMER and guitarist wanted. 
Ages 14-19. Infl. Slayer. TypeO, 
Pantera. Travis 451-6556 or 
919-3537. 


DRUMMER DALE now has new 
band, Feu) for beautiful, 
healthy blonde haired oer0 girls, 
18-29 with great figures. Must be 
single. 450-4221. 


DRUMMER needed for Christian 
tock band. Sean 471-5621 


DRUMMER tequired — for 
established rock band. Cover/ 
original, currently working on CD 
recording & live experience a 
must. Don 975-8426. 


ENDSVILLE is looking for 2 
guitarists. Infl. At the Drive In, 
Chilli Peppers, Queens of the 
Stone Age. Liam 463-9005 or 
Scott 437-5509. 


EST. female Pro singer w/studio 
seeks partners to collaborate on 
original cd. Release planned for 
Fall 2001. Serious 905-8780 


EX Fatmans Belly frontman look- 


~ ing for musicians/frontmen as 
wel 


For a hard rock, funk, 
rap band. Call 916-1340 





ist areal for all original 
d Rock band. Gigs are 
bptce 








0 r for 
Blues infl. 





LEAD Guitar player wante 
immediately fo Co- 
untry/Rock/Blues ban: 


800-661-5210 ex 
689-4610 

LOOKING FOR a | 
blonde-hair, good | 
great healthy figu 
Singer. Must be 
Drummer Dale at 4 


LOOKING for 
played with Am 
1997/98 - small k 
FooFighters/Jane's 
level drummer join pro-al 





mmer that 
and around 














band searching for rock ar 
immortality Mes 436 
SHAG 

feedbackcrimson @ yahoo.ca 

















thing. If you can rap w 

Urgently call Sheila 419. 2 
ROCK band seeking 
profess d singer 
Strong ng 
ability + equired f original 


Project. Mike 463- 9680 
STUDY HALL PUB 103% 





ie 106st 









by Grant Mac. Needs 1-3 piece 
Band. Must be willing to play for 
door cover or have own 


followers. 428-4268 


SUBMISSIONS for Pure Heavy 
CD compilation featuring 
Edmonton Heavy Rock/Metal 
acts is coming to a close. Don at 
JOYCECOM Records 489-7462. 


THE ATLANTIC Trap and Gill 
has dropped anchor n 
Edmonton! We are looking for 
bands/musicians to play at our 
venue. Specializing in east co- 
ast/celtic style music. Please 
drop by and see us at 7704-104 
street or give us 4 call 432-4611 








THE future of metal is at our 
hands. All we need now is the 
voice. Agg. concept metal band 
needs dedicated angst vocalist 
Satin loves you. 990-1744 





TURTLE Crossing needs female 
background/lead singer. 20's- 
30's, responsible easy-going for 
original folk, pop, country rock 
428-3493. 


WANTED drummer to form metal 
punk band. Singer / songwritter 
ability prefered. Mark 919-8869. 
tourtyfathoms @ hotmail.com. 


WANTED MatureDrummer 
Rehearsal space, experienced 
vocals, lead and rhythm guitars 
fro project and weekly jams. 
Rock! Dan 477-1382 Eric 455- 
3706. 


WANTED NATIONAL steal or 
dobro player for one studio 
session. Call 479-8957. 


ArTisT TO ARTIST 


ACTOR looking for involvement 
in a Fringe 2001 project. Grant 
Mac. graduate. Janice 488-2166. 


ALBERTA Foundation for the 
Arts wants artistists to submit 
slides of artwork. Deadline 
April 1, 2001. Applications at 
427-9968 or 310-0000. 


ATTENTION funky food vendors! 
Have delicious cuisine ideas or a 
unique menu? Sign up for the 
Works 2001 Food Expo. 426- 
2122, www.theworks.ab.ca. 


ATTENTION stiltwalkers! 
Stiltwalk? Want to learn? Call 
Randall @ 431-0265 or email: 


looking for lead singers, under- 





studies, soloists for restaging of 
tablished musical. Brian at 


pe 
rae 














ne mentorship of 











NIGHT 
Theatre 
early April Sin 
Apts. Bob 454-8606. 
SUBMISSIONS are currently be- 
ing accepted for 2D and 3D a 

work. $400 for 6 week period 
Call Linda (780) 963-2777. 








THERE will be a Literary Group 
forming in the Edmonton area 
Please telephone Brenda at 
485-0685 for more info. 


VERSATILE keyboard player 
required for pop/rock cover band 
Please cail Karen al 459-1353 








VOLUNTEERS are required at 
the Red Cross in our Abuse 
Prevention Services Program 
Call 423-2680 





YOU'RE a bass man with groove 
and feel rooted deep. and 
smooth. Can play anything 
Solid, Secure, Positive. Can you 
sing? 432-0262 or 433-6012 


Film/TV/Acting Classes 
Begining Spring 2001. Various 
groups Ages 7 through aduit 
(beginner and advanced jevels) 
Taught by talent agent, Elizabeth 
Ebbels (BFA B ED) Classes 
begin April 7, 2001. Cali Raeann 
at 466-5322. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


RECORD, CD, comic and Toy 
Fair. Sunday April 8, 10am- 
4pm at Edmonton Aviation 
Heritage Center 11410 
Kingsway. 1000's of 
collectibles. Fred 487-3195. 





MINDREADER! In the house 
Have a party your friends will 


never forget. Astonishing 
demonstrations of paranorma! 
phenomena-in your livingroom! 
Mindreading and metal bending 
for little more than the cost of a 
movie. Host pays nothing! Call 
Louis Schism- (780) 436-2053. 
wwew.schism.net, 



















HOTOGRAPHERS 


Professional Photography 
White Bird Ceremonial Release 





SCHOOLS/CLASSES — 


nities COL Ree 


ortraits 











(drawing 
Izabella O 

















lemy of Art 
DANCE SALSA! Cuban Style 
Beginner & Intermediate Rueda 
de Casino. Dance classes begin- 
ning’ Sunday, March 4 for 6 


weeks. Place: Integration Place 
(10565-114 St.) $60 per person 
or $ class. Call Criseida 
Usukuma. 457-6159/ 433-4582 to 
register 









MAMBC based Salsa classes 
Begin April 7 Free introductory 
class Merch 31. Beginner and 
Intermediate. Contact Paul at 
433-5148 


PERSONAL one-on-one art 
classes, | come to you. 15$/hr, 
any medium, all ages, call 429- 
9902. 





Travel-Teach English 
Job guaranteed. 5 day/ 40 hr 
May 2-6 TESOL teacher 
certification course (or by 
corresp).www.canadianglobal.net 
Free information package 
1-888-270-2941 


MASSAGE THERAPY 


DOWNTOWN Massage $35.00 
hour Discount rate, relax 
Certified 9 years. Lenora. No sex. 
Drop By lam to 7pm 
10350 121St. 


FOR YOUR orecious body! 
Gently relaxing and healing 
bodywork. (non-sexual) Rudite 
@ 439-1904. - 


IF IN NEED of relaxation 


massage 

call Julie 
@ 424-6146, 11-6, 
Monday- Saturday. 


MASSAGE for women cnly! 
Affordable rates. Also couples 
massage classes. Call Aaron 
474-7076. 


—_ RELAX & LET o * 
‘herapeutic massage Dee 
420-0097. 

















STRESSED OUT? 
Sore Back or Neck? 


Headaches to Tendiniiis 
an help YOU? 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. 
Mark VanderHorst 
Holistic Practitione 


(780) 486-2166 





Do you want a pr ofessional | 
looking web-page? 











House FoRRENT 


TTANY LANE 
O-OF 


HOUSING 





here tt entral 
ert area 





und non- 


BAND REHEARSAL SPACE | 


ATTENTION musiciar 












secure, warm, reh 

Variety of es Vy 
serious ans wanted Page 
Vine 1 Call Goodwin 
451-6542 

REHEARSAL SPACES for rent 
Clean, 24 hour access, excellent 
security Phone Brad @ 
439-1689. 

HELP WANTED : 
$300.00, $600.00 or wr 

week assembling jewe 

home nc 


Send a 2d 
envelope BUCCI 6- 295 papas 
Street East Suite 274 REF 647 
Brampton Ontario, L6W 4S6. 


$75 CASH PER HOUR! 
Female photographer seeking 


attractive female models Nudity 
required No experience 
necessary. Fun, safe, easy 


money. 424-2704 


C'MON environmentatists, put 
down your herb tea and canvas 
for the Western Canada Wilder- 
ness Committee Public 
perceptions will not change with- 
out more defenders of the 
environment! Please call Nick at 
420-1001 bemween 2:30-5:30 pm 


QUE TO great demand, Isis 
books requires a Tarot, Palm, 
Phycic, Tea Leaf, etc. Reader. 
Awesome income potential. 
Please call 433-9373 for more 


information. 


FULL TIME experienced 
Hairstylists, Estheticians, Nail 
Techs needed. Fax resume to 
(780) 481-3012. 


KNOWLEDGABLE in 
Metaphysics, Spirituality? New 
age bookstore on Whyte Ave. is 
searching for you. Full or Part 
time. Fax resume 477-2088 
asap. Attn: Maximus. 


PERSON required 














alec 








‘ 00.00 oF 
ycluding all design work, for 
ta information 
talusplanet,net/pudlic 








arkange 








HAVE fun 
Northern 








s excit 
Erika 











g. for Victims 
2 is recruting 
ug 19-24. Yo 
abie “to partic 


Cali 423-4102 








TWALKERS! needed for 
World championships. Con 
Randal) to learn more 
2265 & trfraser@oanet.com 
















STUDY HALL PUB Downtown 
Wanting to sponsor groups and 
teams. Slowpitch, Fastball, etc 

Ralph 428-4268 





THEATRE Network needs bingo 
volunteers Saturday march 24, 
5-10pm at the bingo hall in WEM 
ee food, Free tickets to see 
eDriver! (may 13) Call Kerri 
453-2440 





F 
F 


VOLUNTEERS needed. Ages 
13-24 for youth Theatre project 
Call Mike @ HIV Edmonton 
488-5742 


WE NEED YOU! Movies, 
parties, and lots of fun! Call 
Vanessa at local Heroes TODAY! 
421-4084 





WORKSHOP WEST THEATRE 
has great volunteer opportunities. 
Meet others, and have fun! Call 
Lynn et 477-5955 for detaits. 





YOUNG volunteer writers needed 
for youth oriented web site. Non- 
profit Contact Eva at 
youthone.com 


PHOTOGRAPHER requiers 
couples and/or females required 
for unique adult website. 

Shane (780) 709-2222 


MEN SEEKING WOMEN 


BLUE eyed athletically built Male 
seeks very attractive female. 
Call 953-4592. 





SINGLE male, 60 years young. 

Fair looking, EXTREMELY kind 

and lovable. looking for 

someone age 50-64. Call Ed 
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This is an 18+ section. Remember to use 


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BRITISH LADY 
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CHANEL 
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COWGIRLS 
Travelling through Grande 
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our web page at 
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person. 


DANIKA 
beautiful, Irish, red-head, green 
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‘DOMINIQUE **496-9878 
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i in 

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ASHLYN 
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5'5", Sexy 

36c-26-34 
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KRYSTINA 
Young 30 year old. Pretty 
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MARILYN*** 944-1682 
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MELODY 
Young and playful 
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gents. Call me @ 448-8994 
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SANDY AND TANYA 
Variety is the spice of life. Two 
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SHY-ANNE 414-1064 
I'm a 19 yr voluptuous busty 
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SYDNEY 
Beautiful petite natural redhead, 
green eyes, very sexy and 
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TANYA 413-9421 
Lots of fun with this young playful 
playmate. 20 years, 5'6" 110 
tbs, 34-26-34, sexy blonde, hazel 
eyes, #150583 


THE ORIGINAL SEXY 
GODDESS MUSIC ARTIST / 
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WANNA PLAY? 
Sexy, slim, blonde, 30. Hot, 
long legs. Megan 413-0288. 
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WELL ESTABLISHED since 
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operated. Busy agency is now 
hiring for Grande Prairie. 18+ 
over. Accepting applications of all 
nationalities. Ask for Lori and Val 
780-539-5725. 


WENDY 413-9613 
Ebony escort with long black hair, 
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French, handsome, muscular, 


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ADULT PERSONALS 


ALEXIS 
Best hands in 
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Magnificent hot oil, sensational 
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10592 109 St. 423-0292. 7 days 
a week. #110705 
CERTIFIED SEX ADDICTION 
THERAPIST 
dvtherapy.com 
488-9544 





FREE MASSAGE for fit guys 
490-5299 ext. 1725. 





LEENA 
OUTCALL MASSAGE 
718-6753 





SEX MACHINE 
Proven method to eliminate 
premature ejaculation and 
increase sexual stamina. Send 
$20 to P.O. Box 57242, 2020 
Sherwood Drive, Sherwood 
Park, Alberta, T8A 5L7. 


THE PERFECT PICK-UP LINE 
Local single, live connections 
Call (780) 490-2266 
Enter free trial code #4995 


ADULT MASSAGE 


CASSANDRA 
European beauty. Great sensual 
massage. 453-1593 #199174 


*SOUTHSIDE STUDIO* 
We are bigger, better, older and 
bolder and we take pride with 
over 18 years of quality service. 
10330-80 Ave. Specials. 
432-9203 
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THE SO 
cove 


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We'll blow 4o away! 
444-4048 


10107 - 181 St. #143864 


*Deja Vu 
Massage 


Ph. 444-4974 
16628 - 109 Ave. 
© Free whirlpool and 
body shampoo 
* Erotic Movies 
Oriental: Jade 
D.D.: Madison, Cierra, 
Kimber ’ 


Petite Blond: Kri 
ae Me ES 







































J 
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TRY SOMETHING NEW 


catering to 
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424-1510 


ORIGINAL STAFF 
SUNNY, LISA, BRITNAY 
ANNA, NIKOLETTE, 
CANDY & GIN 


MALES 
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10008 - 109 Street 
#205 N.E. Door 


www.9st-studio.com 


Hiring @esy #150092 


EXOTIC 
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At Its Best 


* $25 whirlpool 
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Courtesy, Respect & 
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FEATURING 
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in the comforts of our 
private deluxe rooms, 
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“ESCAPE*™ 
Attitude is everything and 
satisfaction is our guarantee 
Welcome new staff, DDD Club 
Natural wonders, Jean, Ella. 
Young & bubbly Sky & 
Samantha. Triple D hot Nichole 
tall and sexy brunette Molly, a 
sweet, sexy Sarah, Close to the 
Yellowhead & Wayne Gretsky Dr 


2 mins. from Coliseum, rear 
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118 Ave 


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TRANSGENDERED | 


ILLUSIONS' 
SOCIAL CLUB 
A Safe, Friendly & Discree 
Support & Social Club for t 
TS's and Their Supporte 
www. geocities.com/illusions, 
(780) 424-2685 
illusionsx42@ yahoo cor 
P.O. Box 356, Main Post Office 
Edmonton, AB 
T5J 26 





ADULT TALK 


GET IT TONIGHT: 
Instant live phone conversations 
with hot Edmonton gay mer All 
live, all the time. Call for your free 
membership. 413-7144 


ADULT ENTERTAINMENT:| 


MALE MODEL SEARCH 
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for seminude nude & Xxx 
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Toll Free 1-877-638. 









ADULT CLUBS 





TORONTO'S FINEST < 
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hiring Female Dancers 














training, air fare 
accommodations provided 
over $1000.00 a 





guaranteed, For more informatio 
please contact Jeannir 
(416)781-9317 between 6 
2:00 a.m. 














Pencils up! 


Take this Messy little quiz 


Pop quiz 


time, boys 
and girls: the 
time when I 
cull interest- 
ing and use- 


ful (or not so useful) factoids from all the lovely 
new books people send me, and from various other 
reputable sources, so you can test your sexual 
prowess. No peeking at the answers. 
1. According to Miss Abernathy’s Concise Slave 
eetans Mate when a slave's master com- 
to “Prostrate yourself,” the slave must 


mands 
what? 
a) his genitals. 
b) Finger his beirtiole 
c) Lie on his belly. 
d) Stand up straight. 
2. According 


Holistic Guide To Sensual Exploration by Nitya 
Lacroix (The New Life Library), the Anahat Pies 


to what? 


a) A fancy hat you wear during tantric sex. 
b) A space between your nipples. 


c) Your anal region. 
d) A sexual position. 


3) In Patricia Anderson’s book Passion Lost: 
Public Sex, Private Desire in the Twentieth Century 
(due out in April from Thomas ales hookae 


Charles’ Flesh Food” was: 


weight. 


to The Tantric Way of Loving: A | 
| 















































> 


a) A dietary. beg ah to help 


LITE ee mien 


c) A breast 





Pee DACKe= =~ 





ca 
—~§ Messy 
Continued from page 32 


6. According to the March issue of 
Stuff magazine, what percentage of 
men raised on farms have had a sex- 
ual encounter with an animal? 
a) 10; b) 23; c) 50; d) 78 
7. According to Inga Muscio in her 
book Cunt: A Declaration of 
tice I lndependence, which of the following 
items do not exist for men? 
a) Sanitary jock straps. 
’ b) Perfumed Hershey-Squirt pro- 
“@ tection pads. 
c) Hygienic ball wipes. 
Al d) All of the above. 
ur free 8. According to the April issue of 
Cosmopolitan magazine, if a woman 
finds a piece of whitish tissue hang- 
ing from her vagina, it might be: 

‘a) A piece of an old tampon that 
was stuck in her vagina. 

b) Asymptom of endometriosis, a 
condition in which tissue from the 
lining of your uterus migrates to 
other parts of your pelvic cavity. 

T c) A piece of her hymen. 
a d) That lost sock from the laun- 
gg dromat. 
3 fan 9. True or False? According to the 
‘book Everything You Never Wanted 
to Know About Sex by Larry 
Balsamo and Sandra Bergeson 
(Conversation Books), aside from 
the genitals and the breasts, the only 
other body part that swells during 
| intercourse is your tongue. 
> | 10. According to Deborah 
| § Addington in her book A Hand in 

the Bush: The Fine Art of Vaginal 
Fisting (Greenery Press), can your 

fist ever get stuck inside a woman? 
| a) Yes; b) No 
ANSWERS: 
1. c) Upon hearing the command, 
the slave should lie flat on his belly 
in front of the dominant, with his 
arms stretched forward and his fore- 
head touching the floor. This posture 
may be used for abasement, confes- 


sion or as a preltide to worship. 
2. b) This is the heart chakra, one 


CRUISIN’ 











Oo sa3 











with THE KID 
| ARIES (Marcu 21 - APRIL 19) 
k « mn 


park 0’ the should 


omethi 


passin’ j 
till a 


GEMINI 


Like 








MAKER SPACE PROBE / 








of seven points focussed on during 
tantric sex. The Anahat relates to 
love, empathy and the merging of 
male and female energies 
Apparently, it is green 

3. c) Sold to save women from 
having “hollow and scrawny” busts 
“Flesh Food” promised women “a 
new bosom with all the ‘natural con 
tour’ that sex appeal demanded.” 

4. d) For two years, gynecologist 
Tsuneo Akaeda has operated a free 
sex-counselling booth for young 
girls, located in the comer of a burg- 
er joint in the Roppongi district. 

5. d) As a young boy, he used it to 
cover his sick dog and when the dog 
died, they burned the blanket and 
Hef apparently vowed to create a 
“Bunny Empire.” 

6. c) 50 

7. d) The author rants about how 
none of these products is available to 
men while women are bombarded 
with a whack of “sanitary” and 


“eg 


THE COSMOS 


easier than you'd ever expect! 


LEO (JULY 23 - AUG. 22) 


VIRGO (Auc. 2 


A DELAYED BUT LONG DuE 
TRIGUTE TO THE BEAUTIFUL 
ENGINEERS AND SCIENTISTS 
OF THE NEAR/SHOEMAKER TEAM 


Lae /SHOEMAKEE. P ROBE 


SE 








deodorant” products for our cunts 
8. c) When the hymen tears the 
first time you have sex, a tissue ren 
nant can remain at the « pening 


(where you may not notice it) for 
years before falling off. It is not 
harmful but if it bothers you, a doc- 
tor can remove it through a simple 
in-office surgical procedure. See 
your gyno first to make sur 

9. False. It’s actually your inner 
nose that swells 

10. b) Apparently, not a chance. It 
may occasionally create a vacuum 
that makes it feel stuck but it you 
relax and take things slow, your 
hand will slide back out easily. That 
said, don’t go shoving your fist in 





doing. You can do some serious 
damage if you're not careful. 

Josey Vogels is the nationally syn- 
dicated author of Dating: A Survival 
Guide from the Front Lines. Visit 
www.mymessybedroom.com. 


SCORPIO (Oct. 
Y'know the 


thi 


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22 
If you think about it, t 


threshe 


AQUARIUS (j 





Dave Weckl 






there if you don’t know what you're 





Deas SeMeQuade td. || “Wenge MaRRerd 
Wiusical Instruments, : S$ 


Musical Insoruments; Sabian 
Cyrabals and 
Dram Workshop Drums 
ate pleased to present 
MASTER 
GROOVE 
DRUMMER 
IN PERFORMANCE IN PERFO 


NDA APRIL 9 2001 NDAY,. 


: Yamaha Drums, 
Gilda Eymbals, and 
Vic Birth Sricks 
are pleased to present 
- WORLD 
RENOWNED. 
DRUMMER 


mma 









RMA NCE 
ib 29, 2001 















R ACK CAFE 
Street, Edmoptoh —¥ [} 3 

e, $7at door 
d 2:30 p.m) 


vances $Mat door 
juffet Served Early) 





The Pain of Trees 
April 5 - May 5, 20014 







Fema ng 


VISIONS OF LOVE 
SWF 23. 55°, blonde f 

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MUST BE RESPECTFUL 
ma SWF, 29, attr 
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spending time w 
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dren and has a bright p 
FASCINATING LADY 





LOVING & FAITHFUL 
SWF,.27. 53", upbeat, cas lowes to laugh and have 
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CASUAL LIFE 
She's 2 sincere, honest. fir 
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IN FRONT OF A FIREPLACE 
Fnends say that m a spontaneous, sincere and trust- 
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VERY NICE LADY 
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‘ous, honest and sensitive. | love staying fit. movies 
dining out, concerts and spending time with my chil- 
dren. Looking for a SWM, 38-49. Ad# 8326 

HEART TO HEART 
Tall, slim, SWF, 46, calm, outgoing and personable. My 
interests include reading, writing and hiking. Searching 
for a SWM, 47-53, who truly cares for others and is 
outgoing, Ad#: 8531 

READY FOR LOVE 
|'ma humorous, outgoing. SWF, 50, who would lave to 
meet 2 compassionate, young-al-heart and profes- 
sional, SWM. 4! In my spare time. | enjoy sports. 
movies, reading. traveling and explonng new things. 
Ad# 8799 





GOOD COMMUNICATOR 
Quiet, shy, SWF. 47, 5'1” 103Ibs:, with brown 
haireyes, glasses, hobbies are reading, exercising 
and much more. \'m seeking a SWM, over 47, who is 
easygoing and considerate. Adé- 8931 
SOLID VALUES 
55, 5’5°, brown hair/eyed, happy-go-lucky, SWF. 
enjoys pattening. dancing and just having fun. 
Searching for an honest, SWM, 18-60, who loves to 
dance Ad#, 9494 
ROMANTIC AT HEART 
tam a happy-go-lucky. sincere and romantic, SWF. 56, 
5'4°, with blonde hair, brown eyes. wtio is hoping to 
meet a SWM, 18-65. My hobbies are horseback riding, 
traveling and the outdoors. Ad#- 9839 
HEAVEN SENT 
Blue eyed, 53°, SWF, 24. is shy at first and enjoys 
reading, walks. camping and being with friends. 
Looking for an open, honest. NS. Christian, SWM, 22- 
26, with good family values. Ad 7497 
A TRUE ROMANTIC 

This honest, trustworthy, 5° tall, NS. 43, SWF, with 
green eyes and red hair, enjoys hikang, swimming and 
camping, seeks a romantic, trustworthy, honest, N/S. 
SWIM, 40-48, for possible long-term relationship. Ad#- 
$828 


VERY SWEET 

lama 35. 54° 110lbs. with blonde hair and 
hazel eyes. Funny, easygoing and unique, some of my 
interests are horseback Camping. pia) pock 
Seeking a SM. 28-45, joyal and truswesthy ipratry 
: BEST FRIEND FOR LIFE 

‘un-oving, warm-hearted and intelligent, blue-eyed 
blonds, 3 S77. no dependents, seeking a genuine: 
nike with a sense of humor, who enjoys movies. 
traw togs and life in general. Ad#: 6358 

KIND & CARING 

‘SWF, 40, | am 5'5°, whose personality is honest, car- 
ing and down-lo-earth, My interests include bowlini 
camping, biking, golf, etc. Searching for a SWM, 37- 
45, attractive and has a great patsonality. Ad# 1311 

VOYAGE TO ETERNAL LOVE 

Honest, sincere, loving and romantic. SWF. 45, short, 

— with reddisr he eyes, enjoy 
teering, golfing, camping. !'m hoping lo meet a 

loyal WM over in epee bbe Ad 
8630 





COUNTRY GIRL 
Jama level-headed, responsible and honest. SWF, 34. 
56", medium built, with long hair, bie eyes. who enjoy 
horses, rodeos, Ine outdoors fm to meet a 
‘SWM, 30-45, with the same qualities. Ad 1609 


Click. 








4 TAR Z 
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A REAL ROMANTIC 
SWF 45, S10, 120ips., dark hair. on 







9 
nse of haimor. Ad 
SOFT-SPOKEN 















ight brown hair, extreme 
smoker, ccasional drinker s 
kes to take dives into the moun- 
sewing, seeking faithtul SWM 40- 
ure to the fullest. Ad# 9655 
PATIENCE IS A VIRTUE 

31, 54° blue eyes, compassionate, faithtul 
fing and fun-loving. I'm hoping to meet a 
nding and sponta- 
who likes to cuddle and be 









CHANGE OF PACE 
SWF, 51, 5'4°. blue eyes, brown hair, intelligent, posi- 
tive, a good fnend and non-judgemental. | enjoy walk- 
ing, working out, danicng, movies and more. I'm seek 
ing a SWM, 52-60. who is divorced or widowed 
healthy, and positive thinking. Ad# 2761 

NO NONSENSE 

Horiest. straightforward and dependable, SWF, 38. 
5S”, 120lbs.. with bive eyes, self-employed, enjoys 
reading, writing, ng for walks, etc. I'm looking for a 
fit, harawortang, SWM, 30-46, who wants to get ahead 
in ite. Ad#: 87. 





DELIGHTFUL 
SAF_ 30. | stand 53° and my personality is happy. 
friendly. caring, | enjoy singing, fishing, long walks, and 
| would like to meet a SWM, 32-35. Aas: 1455 
DREAM DATE 
SWF, 18, with blonde hair, brown eyes, fun-loving and 
she enjoys snnaing dancing and sports. Looking for 
@ SM, 27-37. Ad# 8425 
ROMANTIC AT HEART 
tam 5, 120ib., brown eyed, SWF. 42, with brown hair 
who is descnbed as being happy-go-lucky and life-lov- 
ng Seeking a compassionate, caring, honest, SWM, 
fe 56, and | can offer romance to the relationship. Ad# 
74 
EXTRA NICE LADY 
56°, SWF, 47, with blonde hair, green eyes, pretty. 
warm and intelligent. I'm interested in sports, golf and 
long walks. | am hoping to meet an open-mint up- 
front, SWM, 38-53. Ad® 4365 
NO PLAYERS! 
56", blonde, SWF, 18, who is humorous and loves 
dancing, horseback riding and cael Looking for an 
honest, sweet, SM, over 18. Ad# 
DOWN-TO-EARTH 
SWF, 49, 5'4°. 116lbs.. humorous, honest, open, sin- 
cere and passionate. | enjoy reading, music, garden- 
ing, animals and more. I'm seeking a SM, under 54. 
who is Kind, honest. caring, spontaneous, attractive 
who can be my bestfriend first. Ad# 1841 
SYMPHONY & OPERA 
| am a sim, 55”, green eyed, SWF, 45, with blondish 
hair, who is described ‘as being intelligent, interesting 
and energetic. I'm hoping find a fit, professionally 
employed, SWCM, 42-55, who is interested in the art 
Ade: 9010 
STUNNING 
I'm a SWF, 28, 5'3", blue eyes, andbrown hair. | enjoy 
dancing, going to the bar on occasion, camping, and 
relaxing at home. I'm looking for a SWM, 25-40. who 
has 2 great personality, share similar interestes, Ad¥. 
8733 


HUMOROUS 
I'm a SWF, 31, 57°, outgoing, fnendly, humorous and 
very active. | enjoy sports. music and more. I'm seek- 
ing a SWM, 27-39, who is funny, outgoing, honest, has 
a positive attitude. Ad# 8544 

TO THE POINT 
SNCF. 30, whose personality is straightforward with a 
great sense of humor. | like sports, Grd wag 
and more. Looking for an honest, SM, 28-55. 
8385 


DREAMS DO COME TRUE 
\'m an outgoing, fun-loving, SNCF, 19, who can olfer 
fun into a relationship with a fun, happy and outgoing, 
SNCM, over 18, who is into the native culture, 
6889 
UNFORGETTABLE 
ma nice, fun, loyal, hardworking, SWF, 47, 54° 


, Computers, romantic evenings. is 
ae , 27-37, wha is true to himself and hers, hd 
4 


keloosing and mich cre, is looking for a 
rvs, |, over 18, to gat to know, Ad#® 2730 









VISION OF LOVE 
|am acanng, attentive and fun to be around, SWF, 18 
516". with blonde hair, blue eyes, who is looking to 
meet 3 trustworthy, honest and open, SWM, 16-24. 
Ade 






LETS TALK OVER COFFEE 
Passionale, al SWF, 34, 5'5", blue/green eyes 
athlete keeping fit, and movies. 

v 2, honest. caning, fun-loving and 
feels good about themselves. Ad# 2525 

A RARE GEM 
SWF 54, blonde, brown eyed, outgoing. honest 
have fun. | eny 

















WE HAVE TO MEET 

te, good-hearted, honest and trust- 
enjoys yoga, walking and cocking, 
(im seeking a level-headed. smart sw 30-52. AdF: 
3244 





FRIENDS FIRST 
Hi, | am a. NS, SWF, 45, whovis 5'6", blonde, with 
green eyes. My personality is outgoing and very kind. 
Tlove things such as animals, horses, reading, movies 
and more. | am seeking a N/S. personable, SWM, 41 
55. Ad# 4362 
ROMANTIC AT HEART 
SWF, 35, considered shy, outgoing and easy to get 
along with. Hobbies are sports, camping, alg 14 
children. Seeking easygoing, even-tempered, 
33-40 Ad# 5514 
VIBRANT 

Very healthy, SWF, 52. loves to laugh, reading, movies, 
live theatre and old Southem biues music. | can bring 
‘humor and honesty into a relationship. Looking for an 
optimistic, retired, SWM, 55-66, to enjoy life with. Ad#- 
6760 

LIKES TO CUDDLE! 
Shy, humorous, trustworthy, SWF, 22, who enjoys 
spending time with her ‘the mountains and relax- 
ing. Looking for a SWM, 22-33, trustworthy and hon 
est. Ad# 8823 

ROMEO & JULIET 
| am an honest, sincere and open SWF, 52, 5'6 
130lbs , reasonably attractive, with blue eyes. Creative 
and intelligent, I'm hoping to find a confident and 
secure, SWM, 48-56, who looks after himself well 
Ad#, 9146 

GOOD-HEARTED 
SWF, 43, 5'6", medium built, with green eyes, 
descnbed as being funny, witty and fun to.be with, I'm 
hoping to find a well-rounded, employed, down-to- 
earth, SWM, 35-50, and ! can offer warmth to a rela- 
onship. Ad#: 7057 

CURIOUS ABOUT YOU 

Tall, beauty, 5'6", dirty blonde hair, SWF, 25. Honest. 
trustworthy and enjoys reading, writing and going for 
walks. Looking for an honest and trustworthy, single 
male, over 18. Ad#: 9217 

FABULOUS GAL 
SWF, 24, 5'5° and her personality js fun-! 
‘trustworthy Cty enjoys the Peas IOpping, 
movies, 1 dancing. Seeking a fun, out ) 
SWM. bat 1857 uEe 
; regen ad Petine b oer 
mM an out cai trustworthy 
dark iene rhabbies ae camp . fishing, the 
goa Fe stock, farms a the eee tm he 
ing for an honest. caring and good-hearted, SWM, 47- 
4 Ad#: 5493 


caring, 


SENSE OF FAIR PLAY 
Seeking a kind, caring, lovable, SWM, 40-55, l'm an 
For fnendly and interesting, SWF, 49, 5'4”, with 
blonde hair, green eyes. Hobbies are reading, plays 
and live music. Ad# 7749 


WHAT A DELIGHT!! 
Hi, | am a 39 year old, ST thd dl 
Articulate spontaneous, | like . oul 
and being adventurous. | am for a 


40-50, attractive, goal-onented and r-to- 
earth. Ad#; 3432 
TO THE POINT 
(have red hair, blue eyes, and | am an }, SWF. 
27, who likes having a good time. Offers honesty to a 
relationship, Im seeng 2S 25-35, who is outgo- 
ing. truthful and funny. 4602 
HERE'S A SWEET ONE 
Tall, full-figured, , SWF, 33, is funny and 
hep hl ae ete ee 
, crafts and \. ing for an ; 
romante, ‘SM, 33-40, Adt 8756 
A SWEETHEART 
Brown haired, green eyes, SWF. 48, is kind, caring and 
faithful. My include walks, drives, movies and 
shopping. 'm looking for = SWM, 44-48. Ad# 2010 
LET'S CUDDLE 
find an pleasure ob wih Enos ean Sg 
ind and a pleasure to 5 
out, movies and walks. in search a WN ae 
honest, sincere and loves to laugh! Adi: 2959 
COUNTRY LIFE 
Meet this kind, caring and humorous, SWF. 33, who 
will be fun and easygoing with @ : 


‘AGH. 3026 
STILL LOOKING 
SWF, 18, 5'6°, with brown hair, hazel 


i eyes. 
Bue eyed SM 162 who vests Ad Sse 


A GOOD FRIEND 






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GOOD-HEARTED 
SNCM, 59, | am 5'5", whose personality is considered 
to be very nice. Some ot my hobbies include fishin: 
hunting and long drives. | would like to meet a SF, 25- 
58. Ads: 1186 

COMPANIONSHIP 
62, 5'10", gentleman, seeking honest, slim, SWF, 45- 
60, NS, social drinker OK. Enjoys walking, golging, 
eating out and movies, Ad# 4604 

EXCLUSIVE AD 
SWM, 46, who is tall, with blond hair, a goatee. 
Humorous, enjoys life to the fullest. In search of a 
SWF. 35-45, who is outgoing and spontaneous. Ad# 
4637 
ATTENTION LADIES... 
Caring, outgoing and fun, SWM, 20, 5'11°, 170Ibs, 
with blond hair, with blue eyes, likes going to the 
en and hiking. I'm in search of an intelligent, SWF 
18-25, who knows what she is doing. Ad# 6152 
DESERVING 

62", SNCM, 30, with long hair, is honest, trustworthy 
and caring. Movies, playing pool and clubbing are a 
few of his interests. Looking for an easygoing and fun, 
SF, 21-30. Ad# 9540 

HEART OF GOLD 
Honest, SWM, 37, 5'10°, 180Ibs., with M.S. enjoys 
fishing, spending time with friends and family ing 
a SF, 18-40, who enjoys life, Ad#: 1273 

HONEST WITH INTEGRITY 

SNCM, 40, 5'9°, who is easygoing and very - 
minded. | would like to meet a SF, under 40, who likes 
cuddling. | love fishing, camping, movies and much 
more. Ad# 2831 

KIND & CARING 
Warm-hearted, gentle, caring, SWM, 26, who enjoys 
working out, movies and more. | would like to meet a 
similar, SWF, 25-29, Ad# 3308 

ON THE BALL 
Leosp there, he a6'4”, 32 year old, e 
enjoys , walks and sports. 
24-35, honest an score Ad#: 3750 
LET'S TAKE A WALK 
34, SWM, 57" brown hair and eyes. Friends say he’s 
honest and nice. Enjoys taking a walk, catching a 
move, ang conversation, of to music. 
Looking for SF, 25-37, who shares my interests and is 
caring and likes to be themself. Ad#: 4159 
LET'S GET TOGETHER 

‘SWM, 51, | am 5'10°, considered attractive and easy- 


irdberg cute pet ek 3 incor ade 


BROWN SKINNED GIRL 


, SWIM, 
i ga SWF, 


TRAVEL WITH ME 
21, SNCM. 5'11", with long dark hair. Fun and open- 
minded. Enjoys poetry walks and occasional 
movies. Offers commitment, 4 
who is trustworthy, open-minded and loves to travel 
Ade. 8078 


PATIENCE IS A VIRTUE . 
SWM, 37, 6) Spe NE ap Ee tek, Pace 


i 
E 


e 
faz 
Bf 
4 
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[ 


i 


CINDERELLA WHERE ARE YOU? 
a SWM, 60, 6'1", 210Ibs., who's in excellent health. 
ci honest, a. and | would like to 


af 


ii 





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ore 


LOVES TO LAUGH 
518", SWM, 54, who is physically fit, easygoing, loyal 
and very honest Senne and | enjoy motorcy- 
cles, movies, dancing, reading, etc. Searching for a 
SWF, 46-62, easygoing and fun-loving. Ad# 
A REAL GENTLEMAN 
Self employed SWM, 52, 6’, 230Ibs., level-headed 
good personality, enjoys cet dining out, movies, 
ntl honest, straightforward SF for companionship. 
Adz: 7188 
FREE TO GOOD HOME 
Affectionate, house-trained, SWM, 53, looks/acts 
much younger, 5'11°, slim, fit, considered attractive by 
friends, financially secure, N/S, social drinker, enjoys 
all aspects of life, Seeks Christian lady, 40-55, with 
similar attnbutes. Ad#: 2570 
NORTHEASTERN ALBERTA 
4 tes old, SWM, tall, attractive, reliable easygoing 
and sincere. My interests include outdoor activities, 
traveling, movies and more. | would like to meet a 
SWF, 34-42, active, honest and has similar interests, 
Ad#: 2751 
COUNTRY LIFE 
SWM, 48, 6'1°, 215Ibs., caring, ging and indepen- 
dent. | enjoy horseback riding, hiking, trips to the 
mountains, hunting and more. I'm seeking a SWF. 
under 48, who is fit, healthy, enjoys the outdoors and 
is a hardworker. Ad#: 7598 
CHASING A DREAM 
|'m a SWM, 66, who is told to be friendly and easy to 
A along with. In my spare time | enjoy spending time 
the lake, sports and more. I'm seeking a healthy. 
SWF, 55-65. Ad#: 5053 
GIVE MY ALL 
I'm a humorous, dedicated, SWM, 52, who would love 
to meet a good-looking, fit, SWF, 45-55, who enjoys 
the outdoors, dining, travel and sports. Ad# 1700 
r | WANT TO KNOW 
‘SWM, 42, 6, Ng, outgoing and fun-loving, I'd 
like to meet a fit, SF, 27-45, who enjoys the outdoors, 
children, animals and the country life. Ad#: 8025 
WHERE'S MY SOUL MATE 
I'ma SWM, 50, 6, honest, sincere and secure. | enj 
‘music, dancing, sports and fitness. I'm seeking a SWF, 
25-45, who Is well-educated, fit, ny | and enjoys 
socializing, dancing, dining out: Ad# 
HEART, MIND, BODY & SOUL 
('m a SWM, 43, confident, secure, and | have a good 
sense of humor. | like to hike, go for coffee or tea, 
movies and just hanging out at home. I'm seeking a 
SF, 32-42, whois at heart, has a sense of 
humor, and is. with herself 2618 
HEY, YOU NEVER KNOW 
SWM, 23, tall, with Drownish-blond hair, blue eyes, 


ing and fun to be around, seeking a compatible, 
, 19-28. | enjoy playing hockey, working out and 
ihe great outdoors. Aa#aab2 
COMMITMENT 
I'ma quiet, serous, |, SWM, 47, 58°, who 
would love to meet a SWF, 40-48, who enjoys the out- 


doors and horseback riding. Ad# 3956 
FRIENDSHIP FIRST 
SWCM, 43, 5'8°,175Ibs., loyal, sincere, romantic and 


taneous. | enjoy working out, ing, } 
racial inpebtipae attic tm aSWCF, 
39-46, who is attractive, fit, loves her faith, for mar- 
nage. Ad# 4855 


LET'S HAVE FUN 
18 year old, SWM, 6’ tall with brown hair/eyes, is out- 
Se 
f : etc. Fun: 
bet a ae 1820 Ae 4898 
MEANINGFUL 


SEIM, 50,57, and is friendly, easygo- 
Se es sence 
cs , 
44-48. Ad#: we 
HOMEBODY 


You must be 18 years of age or older and have a touchtone phone, 








EMPATHETIC 
Friendly, outgoing, SWF, senting’ wath brown ha 
enjoys running, reading and golfing, I'm in search of a 
honest, SWF 38-45, with similar interests. Ad# 358 
VERY CUTE & CARING 
Sane! adventurous, very feminine and h 
SWF, professional hale reales long 
een eyes, who enjoys skiing, hiking and ka 
tm seeking a ood ooking, SME 30-40 who is 
gent, creative, outgoing and imaginative. Ad# 10 
ALWAYS HONEST 

Meet this fun and outgoing, SWF, 23, who would lov 
to meet an honest, loyal, fit and attractive, SWF, 21-23 
Ad# 1741 








SOFT & SENSITIVE 
| am a 33 year old, SWF, with a wonderful sense of 
humor. | enjoy traveling, skiing, hiking and be 
adventurous. | would like to meet a SNCF, 36-48, for 3 
Caring ad loving relationship. Ad#: 3845 

FABULOUS 
SWF, 20, 5'9", blonde, green eyed, open-minded anc 
fun to be with. Enjoys playing guitar, martial arts ay 
nature, Seeking a trustworthy, attractive, SWF, 18-25 
Ad# 2178 
DREAMS DO COME TRUE 

I'm a fun-loving, humorous and personable, SWF 4 
57”, dark hair and’ eyes. Hobbies are shooting p 
golfing, curling, reading and board games. Seeks oy 
ing, personable, SF, over 35, who is very talkative 


Ad# 1481 
~ READY FOR LOVE 
tm &n, reek funny and laid-back, SWF, 18, 52 
rer 
SE 











who can res Unk Kemal add @ funny 
. 18-21, who enjoys Ii ving fun 
Poa aeern 
MEANT TO BE 


SWF, 43, 5'3° and people say | am cute, genuine and 
outgoing. | would like to meet a SWF, 45-49. Some 
things | enjoy are Lott walks, movies, dining oul 
and quiel times, Ad#: 624: 
VERY HONEST 
5'5, blonde, SWF. 26, who is open-minded and spon: 
taneous. | like cooking, camping, biking, long nalure 
walks, etc. Seeking a SF, 24-32, who would like to 
spend quality timertogether. Ad#: 8345 
LET’S MEET 
‘SWF, 18, 5'S", 118Ibs., with brown hair/eyes, nas 
Se fearteates oi 
. I'm. a 3, fo 
spend time with, Adi 
OUTGOING 
feo a 5'5", outgoing, pt pt Hcl and loyal 
enjoy walking, . gol, more. (mn 
seals SHE 24-30, who is honest, loyal, attractive 
and has similar interests. Ad# 8474 
VERY LOVING 
‘SBM, 29, 5'8°, whose personality is mature and tnend- 


1 tke traveling, good movies, and 0% 
als. tam ek SF, 26-50. MO 7 
TWISTED HUMOR 
|, kind and considerate, 


loving, SWM, 18-30. My 
ning and my computer. Ad# 3515 
OFFERS FRIENDSHIP... 
Funny, SNCM, 45, 5'9", 280lbs., with black hair, nob- 
bies are (ik i rigtel le t'm look 
ing for atin, SM 10 do things with. Adi 
FRIENDS 



















































= See THEBACK 
Your cheatin’ card 


A word to the wise: unfaithful mates have their uses 


Q:! am a 30-year-old male, married to 
awoman for five years. Our sex life is 
average, with sessions typically including 
alittle oral and mutual fondling, followed 
by missionary position intercourse. My 
wife has requested a spanking from time 
{o time, which I have reluctantly given her. 
Recently on our shared credit card bill | 
noticed a weird charge. | called the credit 
card company and they informed me it 
was for an adult website. When | looked at 
the website it was all about rape. | was 
horrified. My wife has mentioned fleeting 
fantasies about being raped, which | dis- 
missed because | can’t even think about it. 
To me this is disgusting non-sexual 
behavior. ! am even afraid to mention to 
her that | know she’s been looking at this 
stuff. Is this what she really wants? 

Can't Rape The Wife 


















Is this what your wife really wants? | 
don't know, let’s review the evidence: she's 
asked you to spank her, she’s told you she 
fantasizes about rape, she’s downloaded 
rape-fantasy porn from pay websites. You 
know what, Perry Mason? IT'S WHAT SHE 
REALLY WANTS. There's probably a good 
reason why your little oral/mutual- 
fondling/missionary-position sex life isn't 
exactly burning holes in your sheets. | sus- 
pect that your wife, having spent the last five 
years dropping hints, is in some despair 
over whether you, her lover, will ever help 
her realize these fantasies. Not only is she 
bored with her sex life, she’s probably come 
io resent your inability to take the fucking 
hint already. 

For the sake of your marriage you're 






















tnend 
id long 
0 


2 57 
al, fur 
1g, ful: 





going to have to drop the sensitive-new- 
age-guy crap (“My goodness, | couldn't!”) 
and come through every once in a while 
with an enthusiastic spanking and some 
rough sex. Rape fantasies are not uncom- 
mon, and so long as everyone involved has 
Qiven their consent it's not violence. It’s 


Cops and robbers, cowboys and Indians. It's 


play. And it’s love, too, if you're doing 
something that makes your wife happy 

It's no accident that she paid that fee with 
your shared credit card. Your wife wanted 
you to find that charge, and find your way to 
the website; it was one more goddamn hint 
Now it's time to ask your wife to share her 
fantasies with you. Don't make faces, don't 
judge, and don't tell her she’s disgusting 
Just listen. Then promise her you'll do 
you can to make her happy but for your ow 
Sanity and safety, you're going to have to 
take it slow. | doubt very much she wants 
you to beat the shit out of her or hold a knife 
to her throat; she probably just wants to be 
held down, fucked hard, and called names 
It may look a little like rape, it may sound a 
little like rape, but if it's what she wants then 
it's NOT rape 





Q: | want to stick a can of Ready Whip 
up my lover's ass. Well, not the whole 
can, just the nozzle, and then fill her full of 
yummy whipped dessert topping and have 





her crap it into my mouth 
Consider this delicious or 
question is this: Is it safe? | have heard 
that it is dangerous to blow air, even from 
one’s mouth, into the vagina. But what 
about the anus? It seems that there are 
naturally Occurring pressurized gasses in 
there anyway. There can't be any more 
pressure in a can of Ready Whip than 
there is in your average fart. | want to 
build the perfect dessert, but | want my 
lover to be safe. What's the best recipe? 
Crack Creamer 


Whether you 
disgusting, my 


Why not skip the Ready Whip and use an 
old-fashi try tube with a nozzh 





Ned pas 
ny 

whipped cree 
topping and you ca 


bubbles before 


le 









squeeze Out excess air 
Ou Squeeze ihe cream ror 

your sweetheart’s crack. You also wor 
Nave to worry about ga 
and your lover will knov 


ise only the freshest ingredi 


or chemic 





Q: I'ma healthy, sexually active college 
student in Wisconsin. About nine months 
ago, | cheated on my boyfriend of three 
years. This was bad of me, | know, and | 
have no excuse. | was manipulated into 
doing it by this guy. Anyway. | was tor- 
mented with guilt after the fact, worrying 
about what | should do. Should | say 
something to my boyfriend? Or just live 
with it? 

Alas, my boyfriend decided to read my 
e-mail while | was agonizing. | accidental- 
ly left a tew e-mails in my computer that 
the “other” guy had written to me, and my 
boyfriend found them. Now he doesn't 
want to see me anymore, or talk to me 

Two things, Dan: 1. He regularly reads 
your column, and if he is reading this, | 
want to tell him | love him and that | will 
do anything to make it up to him. 2. What 
do | de, Dan? My boyfriend is the most 


s 
1 spon 
fnalure 
fike to 
2s, has 
Wading, 
23, fo 
d loyal 
we. |m 
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important and wonderful person in my life 
and by fucking up once, | may have fucked 
up the rest of my life. 

Heartbroken In Wisconsir 


doing something you know you shouldn't 
When that happens, if HIW finds out about 
she can't very well dump you for cheating 
on her if you didn't dump her for cheating 
on you. Being with someone who's already 












the off chance that your ex-boytriend sheated on you is like having a get-out-of- 
ve got some advice for hin nfidelity-free card in your wallet. | would 
ith a woman who cheated on you urge you to consider the value of that card 
Is ha bad thing. If you decide to get before you walk away froma qguilt-ridden 





with HIW, a time may come 


manipulated” into 


easily-manipulatec 





ex-girlfriend 


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