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INSIDE 


October 31 - November 6, 2002 


UPFRONT ...................P4 





Mario Tellez: Mural artist from 
Nicaragua who has been 
involved in the international 
Painting Peace project, an initia- 
tive of the Edmonton-based 
Change for Children Association. 
He was part of the group (artists 
from El Salvador, Nicaragua and 
Canada) responsible for the 
mural on the downtown 
Salvation Army building. He is 
also a project leader with Funarte, 
a governmentrecognized mural- 
ist brigade in Nicaragua that 
teaches art to children. 


What is the importance of 
murals in your country? 
We used to have a bad dictator- 
ship period, and a time when the 
US government brought many 
bad memories. Much of our pop- 
ulation was living in poverty and 
uneducated. With the new popu- 
lar government, many artists 
from around the world came to 
p. It was through murals 
é that the government could 
: janicate with a mostly 

iterate population, For 
ple, to support a vacci- 
ition campaign they could 
murals. Now you see a 
of western influence in 
t culture such as female 
types and American 

ce. We tise murals 
sremind ourselves of our 
and our past. 





es 


How did you get involved? 

A group of international artists 
came to my home town and start- 
ed mural workshops for children, 
They challenged us to think 
about our rights and what was 
important to us through art. I 
was eleven when I started and it 
was amazing because art was 
only accessible to the very rich 
before. 


Any chance that one of your 
favourite artists might be Diego 
Rivera? 

Yes. Although he was a Mexican 
muralist, he and David Alfaro 
Siqueiros had the same ideals as 
us. With the murals they fight to 
make the people understand that 
it is not normal that they don’t 
have education and that it is not 
normal not to be able to own the 
land they work. They recognized 
that unlike paintings, w hich are 
made for people with money and 
kept privately, murals are seen 
on the streets by everyone. The 
teward of making murals is to 
see people on the streets stop and 
talk about the mural. 


Would you like to add anything 
else? 

I think that I was saved by the 
muralist project in Nicaragua. A 
lot of youth have taken up crime 
and drugs. This has changed my 
life. It has introduced me to peo- 
ple willing to think about peace 
and social justice. | want to work 
with children now and help 
them, to give them the opportu- 
nities that I got. 

CHUL-AHN JEONG 


Sales 
Barry Magee 
bmagee@see.greatwest.ca 
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ose” UPFRONT 2.2 ee Ee 





Brave New City 


“We can, at most, give you a seven: -dollar 
show. The rest is just pure charity.” — 
the Molestics’ Mike Soret 


IT'S SATURDAY NIGHT AT THE LIKWID 
Lounge, and it’s, what — hour twelve 
of this hangover? I really want to 

fully enjoy this, the final see-ya-later 
to this cozy club wherein so many 
200d /bad times have been had, but 
my full enjoyment is being hampered 
by the after-effects of last night's full 
enjoyment of the final see-ya-later to 
the Suburbs next door. 

Holy crap, that was a party... retro- 
style. Gin & tonic, double gin & tonic, 
triple gin & tonic and a couple dense- 
packed bowls out on the corner in the 
Telus Hotbox—a phone booth with 
the phone conveniently ripped out so 
that one additional, critical stoner can 
cram in and share the joy. A god- 
damn convention of zombies... the 
James T. Kirks back from the grave, 
the Brewtals back from the grave, the 
Molestics back from the grave 
Moronic mosh fun and the Ol’ 
Airplane Spin, a wet & drunken 
tongue-kiss from a girl I’ve never 
seen before, followed up 20 seconds 
later by a punch in the back of the 
head from a girl I’ve seen many 
times. Fuckin’ rock & roll. 

5 a.m. finds me “waking up” hud- 
dled and half-frozen in the backdoor 
mudroom of some friends’ suspi- 
ciously low-rent (there’s a ghost in 
the basement) downtown mansion, 
snuggled up to the recycling bin and 
the empties. I hope my friends are 
OK; one had an asthma attack, I 
think, and another disappeared into 
the coat-check with a bunch of out-of- 
town gangsters. They were pretty 
sneaky, didn’t look like a gang, but... 
matching shoes. I only noted this detail 
‘cause I was laying under the pool 
table and their feet were right at eye 
level. The “out-of-town” part is pure 
guesswork. So now I sip my charity 
Caesar and enjoy the Molestics, a 
band I’ve loved since I heard them 
thirty years ago at the Anza Club in 
Vancouver. What a slurring, groov- 
ing, and spectacularly hoser-classy 
way to give this room the sweet kiss- 
off, a hung-over farewell delicately 


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counterpointed by an empty wallet, a 
wrenched knee, a stick 6f pickled 
asparagus and a beautiful eribbage 
pariner. 

By the time you read this, the site 
of the New City Compound will be a 
silent and snow-blanketed ruin wait- 
ing for the bulldozers and subsequent 
office-conversion. But New City isn’t 
really a place, it was a people. Or 
maybe, an association of diverse peo- 
ples... a bunch of tribes. Yeah, tribes; 
like a music-loving drink-swilling 
Israel with a will to party — and the 
New Temple has already been raised 
up, just a short desert-trek down 
Jasper Ave. 

But I’ve got a good feeling about 
the new New City. The stage is built 
and quarterback-ready for its role as 
the rock-supporting centrepiece of 
628 million dollars of extravagant 
renovation and redecoration. That 
old Palladium space will never know 
what hit it, because the old Palladium 
space wasn’t sentient — unlike the 
revamped New City, which has four 
networked Cray supercomputers at 
the back of the beer cooler running 
the lights, handling security, and con- 
templating its own existence. The 
gilded go-go cages, imported from 
the ‘60s via time machine at enor- 
mous cost in human life, have been 
hung. The decadent private theme 
rooms ( Hawaiian”, “Greek”, and 
“Meat Lovers”) all with hot and cold 
running booze and panoramic views 
of the action below, are stocked & 
staffed and ready for rental at 
$500,000 a night. The Native burial 
ground underneath the property has 
been re-consecrated and exorcised, 
and the new establishment has the 
full support of the vengeful spirits, 
just as long as the tobacco keeps com- 
ing. 

As they say in Japan: “Wan, tu, 
sree, fo! Mazzafakka! Rokku ando 
roru!” 

mostfamous@drunkenbastards.com 


(Rare NIGRRD any lener-core 





The Righteous 


and the 





Righteous: The 65 scientists who 
set Ralph Klein straight on global 
warming Don’t confuse him with 
the facts: in his quest to dismantle 
the Kyoto Accord, Ralph Klein has 
made it clear that he doesn’t want to 
get into a debate about global warm- 
ing. Temperatures have always fluc 


| 


tuated, he says, just like when we 
came out of the ice age thousands of 
years ago, so why bother with the 
science? “Was it dinosaur farts? I 
don’t know,” a modest Klein said to 
laughter at a fundraiser earlier this 
month. That's why 65 Alberta scien- 
tists decided to, uh, clear the air. 
They’ ve written an open letter to 
Klein, explaining that, contrary to 
what's said in the press, there's over- 
whelming consensus about climate 
warming within the scientific com- 
munity. Their solution: implement 
Kyoto, warts and all, as a first step in 
reducing greenhouse gas emissions. 
They’ ve even offered to act as con- 
sultants on climate warming for 
Ralph Klein if he ever needs a sec- 
ond opinion. But that’s something 
they probably shouldn’t hold their 
breath for. 


Wicked: Council flying in a speak- 
er to tell us how we can bea “char- 
acter city” You know, it’s really 
hard to be sympathetic with City 
Hall’s budgetary woes when they * 
piddle away our money on little pro- 
jects like this. Last week Council 
approved Councillor Janice 
Melnychuk’s motion to spend five 
grand to fly up some woman from a 
daffy, feel-good coalition called 
Character Counts. The idea is that 
she would speak to community 
groups and councillors about how 
we can be a “character city” — what- 
ever that means. Character Counts, a 
non-profit collective made up of 
schools, charity groups and munici- 
palities, strives to “fortify” six thor- 
oughly Oprah-fied pillars of charac- 
ter: trustworthiness, citizenship, 
respect, responsibility, fairness, and 
caring. “Frugality” missed the final 
cut. If only departmental budgets 
could be so lucky. 





You hypocrites 


Last issue, your column The 
Righteous and the Wicked gave praise 
for city hall creating tougher smok- 
ing bylaws. Later in the magazine, I 
noticed a two-page pullout adver- 
tisement by du Maurier arts. While I 
understand and appreciate that SEE 
Magazine is a forum for various left- 
ist writers to voice their opinions, it 
seems rather hypocritical for you to 
accept funding from a tobacco com- 
pany while fighting against tobacco. 
Eric Bowling 


No-smoking bylaw tramples 
smokers’ rights 


Something happened down at City 
Hall in the last little while that has 
me a bit miffed. More than miffed 
really, more like pissed off and in the 
mood to grab a can of gas and a big 
box of Ivory snow flakes and start 
burning big ugly expletives in the 
front lawns of some of our elected 
officials. 

Bill Smith and company decided not 
to leave well enough alone and 
called a Citizen’s Non-Hearing on 
proposed changes to the city’s smok- 
ing bylaw. This hearing was imme- 
diately followed by a motion to 





drive the one third of the population 
that still smokes over a cliff and into 
the sea, So much for “proposed” 
changes. Anti-smoking activist Les 
Hagen and his merry band of body 
nazis have worked their evil magic, 
brainwashing city council into think- 
ing that it’s not good enough to 
usurp restaurant owner's freedom of 
choice on their own property. Now 
we need-to push the envelope and 
ban it any place where more than 
two people can gather in any sort of 
pur space. Bars, ne , bingo 
alls, even the neighborhood cigar 
store would be deemed a no-smok- 
ing-you-degenerate-bastards zone 
by the sheer fact that they’re a “pub- 
lic place.” 
I was recently in Vancouver, the 
home of overbearing no smoking 
ordinances, only to find a couple of 
restaurants where you couldn’t 
smoke cigarettes. But if you cared to, 
you could retire to a comfortable 
room in the back and smoke all the 
dope you wanted. Of course, this 
has a lot to do with the live-and-let- 
live attitude that the Vancouver City 


Police have with regards to dope 
smoking, but the point is that I'm 
way better off to spark up a big 
blunty in some Whyte Avenue 
eatery and wait for the cops to come 
than I would be smoking my Players 
light. The pure economics of it boil 
down to a $250.00 fine from the city 
bylaw guy for cigarette smoking, or 
a $100.00 fine for misdemeanor dope 
smoking in a public place. In San 
Diego (another fascist, no-smoking 
enclave) they actually had undercov- 
er vice cops sitting in bars trying to 
get people to light up just so they 
could take them down. Maybe that’s 
how the city cops could finance that 
fun new helicopter Bob Layton got 
for them. Sure the drug and prostitu- 
tion problem could run amuck, but 
hey, smokers are easier to spot and 
rarely shoot back. We smokers have" 
no backbone, so when the charities! 
start to complain about revenues 
being down and the comer pubs 
start declaring bankruptcy, we'll 
gladly take the blame. I just have to 
say that I hope all the Clockwork 
Orange no-smoking centers make up 
for the tax revenue lost by making 
this Orwellian nightmare a reality in 
our fair city. Thanks for giving us the 
business Bill! 

Ross Maitland 































100) 9 AS a a Se: A 3S 





What a waste 


Critics blast province for keeping 
Swan Hills toxic waste plant 


ALTHOUGH THE ALBERTA GOVER- 
nment has said they’re “out of the 
business of doing business,” they'll 
be running the Swan Hills toxic 
waste plant for years to come — to 
much opposition from critics. After 
trying to sell the plant outright, the 
province has decided to keep the 
facility, contracting out its operations 
to Earth Tech Inc. for the next ten 
years. 

New Democrat leader Raj Pannu 
says the decision is a waste of 
money. He points out that the plant 
has cost taxpayers over $440 million 
dollars since it opened in 1987. It 
was recently revealed that the plant 
lost $8.5 million in the year ending 
last March. 

“This government needs to recog- 
nize that it made a mistake and that 
they made a decision that was per- 


haps politically driven rather than 
based on environmental and finan- 
cial considerations. They need to 
take action and mothball this plant,” 
says Pannu. 

The plant was originally built to 
process large quantities of PCBs 
within Alberta. But by 1993, after the 
waste was processed, Alberta was 
considered to be PCB free. That's 
when the province lifted their non- 
importation policy and began to 
truck in toxic waste from other 
provinces and countries. 

“(The government] says it’s a ser- 
vice — but a service to whom? To 
Mexico, to the US, to whoever else 
around the world looking to send us 
their waste?” asks Pannu, “The plant 
has not been operating to capacity 
and is dependent on imports from 
other countries. When did the gov- 





Fight the no-fun bylaw 


DRUNK AS AN UNCLE, |ONCE GOT A 
fine for peeing through a fence, a 
colourless Ghostbusters stream into 
that toxic waste zone, right under 
the since-censored KKKokanee 
mural on Whyte Avenue, such a 
brazen act of fool drunkenness. The 
swine fast put me in Death Star 
binders, pushed me onto a bench, 
HARD, his system still beating with 
adrenaline from speeding up on his 
bike, my first brush with physical 
overkill from someone in uniform. 
Did I have a boner? Not telling, 
baby. 

But whatever, I got what I 
deserved, and MFGIT and I went 
and had a celebratory toke-laugh, no 
harm done. “Improper Disposal of 
Waste,” the ticket read: another gas- 
om totally empty lot saved from 

e tyranny of pee. 


He can seize your 
bike for up to 60 
days at his whim 
too. No argument. 
Or the handcuffs 
come out, trust me. 





But maybe the fine I paid went to 
pay for gas which fuelled a car 
which carried the who stopped 
some nut from smacking his wife 
around. I like to think so. Because I'd 
just as soon jizz blood onto the 
Gretzky statue than think it helped 
spawn the kind of bullshit the city is 





The first thing that really flicks 
your eyeball is the law about biking. 
Want to ride across the Hawrelak 
grass on your way home from the 
Blues Fest? Better get ready to pay a 
fine of $100 or more. Subject to the 
discretion of whatever cop is on 
your ass, of course, and whether or 
not he just might have an agenda to 
keep, you know, being paid or fly his 
chopper around or have a bigger 
gang of thugs to beat down Asians 
in the hellzone known as WEM’s 
upper parking lot on a weekend or... 

Oh, and he can seize your bike for 
up to 60 days at his own whim, too. 
No argument. Or the handcuffs 
come out, trust me. Other things you 
can be fined from $100 to $500 for 
(actually, up to $10,000), again 
depending on the firmly legal and 
logical standard of any random 
cop’s mood, are: peeing in the 
woods like his parents.could; mov- 
ing sand from one area of a play- 
ground to another; scaling a tree at 
the Leg; climbing any building; eat- 
ing berries; setting up a tent; gather- 
ing in groups of more than 50 ina 
park without a fucking ge pick- 
ing a flower; carrying a hunting 
knife; tossing a Frisbee in a non-des- 
ignated zone; spreading cremated 
remains (but you can drop ci 
ashes); walking onto the field at 
Commonwealth or the Trapper 
park; and chainsaw murder. Whi 
I'm all for the last one, and even the 
ee tariff for wrecking a 
tree, thi thing is so going to get pig- 





ernment of Alberta take on the 
responsibility and develop the social 
conscience to become the pollution 
cleaner of the world?” 

But David Bray, a spokesperson 
for Alberta Infrastructure, plays 
down the imports of toxic waste. 

“We consider Alberta to be nearly 

























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PCB free. That's not to say 
that it’s all gone. We do 
take PCBs from other 
provinces from time 
to time. We can 
charge more than we 
would charge within 
Alberta for PCB 
elimination. That 
goes back into the 
plant and subsidizes 
the treatment of the 
waste,” says Bray 
He also argues that 
opposition parties are 
missing the point 
when they complain 
about costs. 
‘ “There's a cost to clean- 
ing the environment as there 
is to city garbage collection and 
sewer treatment. | would argue that 
making money is net necessarily the 
point. It would be nice if it broke 
even, and it may eventually. But I 
think it’s a small cost to clean up the 
environment,” says Bray. 
Myles Kitagawa, from Toxics 









Watch Canada, argues that the Swan 
Hills facility is too | 
maintain. The facili 
tory of mishaps, including a couple 





rdous to 





of explosions and instances of PCB 


contamination 


The issue is that Swan Hill [is] 
designed to [handle] the worst of the 
worst. It’s not a sound ecological 


policy to be treating large volumes 
of persistent toxic substances in the 
same location, unless you're desig 
nating it a national sacrifice zone, 
says Kitagawa 

Debby Carlson, the Libera 
ronment critic, argues for smaller 
incineration devices that are portable 
and more safe. 

If we're importing toxic waste 
from the US or other countries, 
every mile it travels increases the 
chances of there being some sort of 
spill or a dump. We need to decom 
mission the plant, clean up the site 
and bring in portable technology 
that would be cheaper and more 
environmentally friendly.” 


MIKE WINTERS 


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NFL FOOTBAL 





GIVEN THE CIRCUMSTANTIAL EVI- 
dence we've all heard or read about 
in the arrest of the Persian Gulf War 
vet John Allen Muhammed and his 
“stepson” John Lee Malvo in con 
nection with the maniacal sniper 
killings, we apparently are faced 
with nother tragic case of chick 
ens coming home to roost 

Although most combat ve 
don’t turn into sociopaths upon 
completion of their tour of duty, I'd 
be a fool to think military training 
doesn’t come with terrible psycho- 
logical consequences for the combat 
survivor and harmful social conse 
quences for the rest of us 

Ever since I was a kid 
I've been extremely con- 
cerned about the violence 
in the world around me 
That, coupled with heavy 
doses of Jesus, Martin 
Luther King and Gandhi 
studies, I've been trying to penetrate 
the mysteries of peace and security 
for virtually all my life 

My study was aided by a book 
called On Killing, written by retired 
Lt. Col. Dave Grossman, a former 
Army Airborne Ranger infantry offi- 
cer and West Point Academy psy- 
chology and military science profes- 
sor. The book was a Pulitzer Prize 
nominee and is required reading at 
Wes* Point, the U.S. Air Force 
Acaclemy and in peace studies pro- 
grams in colleges and universities 
across the country 

As a scholar, lecturer and author 
considered to be one of the world’s 
foremost authorities on the roots of 
violence and violent crime, 
Grossman is also the director of the 





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Home to roost 


Washington sniper’s callousness 
reflects his military training 


Killology Research Group, whose 
mission is to highlight ‘the psycho 
logical cost of le aming to kill.” 

The other day I came across a 
news account of a talk Grossman 
gave in April 2001 in which he 
described the four “killing enabling, 
methods” used 
by the 


military that are mirrored in our 
mass media today — brutalization, 
classical conditioning, operant con- 
ditioning and role models. He said 
that brutalization and classical con- 
ditioning methods assaulting 
American minds everywhere are 
most evident in action-adventure 
movies where a horrible act is fol- 
lowed not by a quest for justice but 
for vengeance — “the evildoer’s 
death.” 

“The people who do just want jus- 
tice are seen as wishy-w vashy 
They're just in the way,” he said, 


exposing the foolishness of war 
hawks and their verbal attacks 

against so-called peaceniks and 
appeasers. 











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Edmonton's most anticipated restaurant is 


‘The result is we have become a 
nation full of people who are going 
to make others feel their pain 
Whenever you feed death and vio- 
lence and destruction to your chil- 
dren, you rez ap | what you sow in 
about 15 years,” he added 

This all swirls through my 





Only partially to blame... 


head when thinking about the sick 
heart-mind of the sniper and another 
Persian Gulf War vet, Timothy 
McVeigh, who referred to his vic- 
tims as “collateral damage.” 

When Colin Powell, a good and 
intelligent military leader by most 
accounts, was asked about the death 

toll of Iraqis following the Gulf War, 
he responded: “Tt’s not a number I'm 
particularly ly interested in.” Of course, 
Powell isn’t even in the same catego- 
ry as McVeigh or the sniper. But to 

talk about these things in te rms of 

“good guys” and “bad guys” is 
clearly overly simplistic. We're deal- 
ing with something much deeper 
here. 

Now, let's consider Sisters Jackie 
Hudson, Carol Gilbert and Ardeth 





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setting with a menu inspired by the American 
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for all tastes. Located @ 11304-104 Ave in the 

heart of Oliver, the Blue Iguana provides a 

= fantastic atmosphere and a truly individual 


experience. Call 424-7222 to hook reservations 


or come by and see what we are all about. 


| HAPPY HOUR 
f'1-78aifGas) 


OPEN FOR LUNCH 





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Kemer 


pilates and open space inc. 


elf aes Pilates studio 
personalized eed programs 
Mat classes: 

12 week sessions for Levels I- I 


call for schedule oo iba: 


ses Wh sie 


Platte — nuns affiliated with a peace 
group called Plowshares. Last week, 
they were arraigned ina federal 
courthouse in Denver, charged with 
obstruction of the national defense of 
the United States and injury of prop- 
erty of the United States. 

These are the same charges that 
Osama bin Laden and his cohorts 
were charged with in connection to 
the embassy bombings in Kenya a 
few years ago. 

The nuns’ crime? Recognizing 
that while wealth doesn’t always 
trickle down as supply-side econo- 
mists suppose, Values certainly do. 
So the Sisters took a pair 
of bolt cutters, cut 
through the fence of a 

missile silo in Well County, 
Colo. poured some of their own 
blood on top of the silo as a dramatic 
reminder of what these weapons are 
used for, and then prayed until they 
were arrested. Facing a possible 30 
years in prison for their nonviolent 
direct action, they refused an offer to 
be released on personal recog- 
nizance because the bond requires 
them not to participate in any fur- 
ther demonstrations. As a matter of 
conscience, they couldn’t accept the 
offer. A pretrial conference is set for 
Dec. 13. A support rally for them is 
being held in front of the 
Georgetown, Colo., jail on Nov. 10. 

It strikes me that there are only 
two kinds of religion in this world 
today — the religion of violence and 
the religion of nonviolence: Which 
religion do you adhere to? 


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BURNING 2, 
QUESTION 


Sometimes when I'm walking down 
certain city streets it really smells 
like poo. Why? ; 


Indeed, an assy, sulphuric smell 
assails the nostrils of citizens in such 
places as 74st Street and 86th 
Avenue, 109th and Jasper, and 
around the bridge over Mill Creek 
Ravine. When. shallow sewers from 
our homes dump. sewage, the goop 
drops almost.80 feet into a larger 
trunk sewer system, and gas gets 
trapped: When the foul vapours build 
up, they're released through the man- 
hole covers, befouling our proud city 
streets. It's a common problem to 
most cities, especially those with 
combined sewers, like ours that trap 
rushing rainwater. 

The good news is that we won't have 
to hold our noses forever. Kurt 
Sawatzky, manager of the city’s 
Drainage Services, says the city has 
already neutralized the stench in 
some sewers, with more to follow. As 
part of a pilot program, stench-killing 
carbon filters and giant fans have 
been. installed in the Kenilworth 
neighborhood to depressurize the 


- sewers: they Seem to have worked. 


Mill Creek sewers will get attention 
later this year, except that they will be 
treated with biofilters, a more ’envi- 
ronmentally friendly raaibon filter 


“made from: ives anton 
~ Sawatzky says the Carbon’ 


like “packets of coffee that you put in 
your coffee filter. Like water that drips 
through to make coffee, the air has to 
go through this carbon layer and get 
cleaned.” 

But if you thought a used, day-old 
coffee filter was nasty, show up early 
on the day when sewer workers have 
to dredge up the biofilter for its peri- 
odic cleaning. The smell will destroy 
your mind. 

It's a thankless job keeping our col- 
lective shit together and Sawatzky's 
drainage department never receives 
praise: “We only get to worry about 
complaints.” 

Such is the life of our waste gate- 
keepers. In our books, they can't ever 
be paid enough. 


What’s your burning question? 
E-mail mwinters@see.greatwest.ca 


Geta 






























NEKO CASE reinvented herself from a garage rock drummer 
(Vancouver’s Maow) to a critically acclaimed songstress. 





Case Study 


The many sides of Neko Case 





NEKO CASE 
Friday, November 1 
At the Rev 


NEKO CASE IS OF A RARE BREED. 


There are few musicians as multi- 

faceted and talented, who can hold 
their own across such a varied field 
of styles. She is a multi-tasking cre- 


ative force to be reckoned with — be 
it through her solo work (most often 
credited with Her Boyfriends), in the 
hayseed sing-song duo The Corn 
Sisters (with Carolyn Mark), her 
guest-star spot in Vancouver super 
group The New Pornographers or 
her strikingly distinctive pho- 
tographs. 





NEKO AS INTERPRETER 

With her first two solo albums 
(the spry The Virginian and near- 
masterpiece Furnace Room Lullabye), 
Case announced herself as a major 
interpreter of songs largely written 
by others. Few voices are capable of 
displaying enough depth and range 
(in Case's case, an equal ability to 
move mountains or lull sheep into 
slumber) to mark a new rendition as 
the version by which all others will 
be judged. Case is one of the few 
vocalists whose personal re-configu- 
rations stand equally as tall as the 
originals, whether by Ron Sexsmith 





(Furnace Room's “We've Never Met,” 


for which Case grabbed a co-writing, 
credit), Loretta Lynn (whose “Rated 
X” Case converted into a high- 
octane romper with The Sadies on a 
rare 7”) or Tom Waits (Case’s 
“Christmas Card From a Hooker in 
Minneapolis” very nearly steals the 
song out from under Waits’ feet) 

Shortly before the release of her 
newest album, Blacklisted, Case com- 
piled and recorded a short set of a 
few old and new favourites. 
Released as Canadian Amp, these 
ghostly “kitchen recordings” trans- 
formed works from sources as var- 
ied as Mike O'Neil (formerly of East 
Coast pop-smiths The Inbreds), Neil 
Young and Sook-Yin Lee. Case out- 
lines her intentions as primarily edu- 
cational. 

‘L wanted to learn how to proper- 
ly engineer a recording,” she says. “1 
had been making records for years 
and | thought it was ridiculous that 
it was still a mystery. | had a bunch 
of songs that I didn’t write that I 
wanted to record, so it was the per- 
fect time.” 

Besides moving Case behind the 
control console, Canadian Anip also 
serves as a mark of transition — the 
shift from translator toa genuine 
solo voice. 


NEKO AS ARTIST 

After cleaning the slates, Case 
started in on Blacklisted, her first 
release made up almost entirely of 
her own compositions. Left with a 
veritable pick of the litter, Case’s 
backing band (for the first time, not 
credited at all — Blacklisted is attrib- 
uted solely to Case herself) includes 
a list of luminaries as varied as 
Howe Gelb, Calexico and members 


of old compatriots The Sadies. As a 
personal statement, it’s a brave and 
attention-grabbing leap. From the 
sparse and fragile “Outro With 
Bees” (little more than piano, distant 
cello and breezy acoustic guitar 
astride a simple vocal hook so sim- 
ple and direct it’s ageless) to the 
rambling “Things That Scare Me,’ 
Blacklisted has all the beauty of 
Furnac n Lullabye, but comes 
from an entirely solitary source 








Case has always sounded slightly 
lovelorn, but Blacklisted gives the 
impression of a far deeper loneli- 
ness. Considering her workload, it’s 
not all that surprising. Balancing 
duties between The New 
Pornographers (currently in the stu- 
dio touching up the sequel to last 
year’s Mass Romantic), and 
Blacklisted’ s rigorous touring sched- 
ules, means little time is left over for 
a life away from the microphone 

“No boyfriend, family or home 
life. That sounds rather pathetic... 1 
guess I'll have to rethink that one.” 

Despite its dip in mood, don’t 
mistake Blacklisted for a note of 
defeat. 

“T think I just want it to comfort 
people,’ “It’s a hopeful 
record, even though it’s often quite 
sad. I personally had a gratifying 
experience making something with 
my friends that I felt proud of. That 
really is what it’s all about, as cliché 
as that may sound to jaded people 
like me.” 


NEKO ON HER OWN 

Touring full-time with a brand 
new band (‘The Boyfriends have 
never been one band and that seems 
to confuse people, so I dropped it 
The band I have now are full-time, 
and they didn’t care for it too 
much,..”), Case promises to keep up 
the hectic schedule she’s maintained 
the last few years for the enjoyment 
of nobody except herself. 

“T’m not going to choose (between 
projects),” she says. “I’m not looking 
for ‘stardom’ anyway. I’m in all 
those bands because I work hard 
and I want to do what I want with 
my free time — not that there's 
much of it. That sense of competition 
is what made me a musician and not 
a football player or a lawyer.” 


MARK HAMILTON 


Case adds. 





Maole Leaf Rag 
a a ae 
S Da DoDD % 


THE MONTH IN CAN-CON 


WHAT CAN | TELL YA; THANKS 
to the positioning of the earth, moon 
and sun, November is looking kinda 
dark and frigid. But, there’s a solid 
month of live stuff comin’ to keep us 
all warm and cozy in rooms that 
hold {ittle or no natural light, so relax 
and enjoy... and cuddle 

Tomorrow night (Nov 8th) Daisy 
Blue Groff of the Painting Daisies is 
doing a solo set at Tim’s Grill on 
109th street. 

On the 9th, Bill Henderson 
who's been busy piecing together a 
new live collection of Chilliwack 
tunes will be doing a rare solo show 
for the Northern Lights Folk Club at 
the Queen Alexandra Community 
Hall on University Ave. For a some 
sweet local sounds, on the 22nd 
Andrea House, who's working dili- 
gently on a new CD will be joined by 
Ben Sures and Confluence at the 
Uptown Folk Club at the Woodcroft 
Hall at 139th street and 115th Ave. 
You've gotta know, if Sures is 
involved, the night may not be nor- 
mal, but it will be fun and full of sur- 
prises. Eric Bibb’s latest album, A 
Family Affair, on which he collabo- 
rates with his dad Leon, is a trea- 
sure; he'll be here for the Full Moon 
Folk Club on the 29th, at St. Basil's 
Cultural Centre at 108th Street and 
71st Avenue. 

Two not to be missed shows are 
on at the U of A’s Power Plant: on 
Nov 26th, Ember Swift — whose 
latest disc Stilt Walking is funky, 
thoughtful, moving and eager 
— is on hand; then on the 30" 
Sarah Slean retums with a voice as 
haunting as it is lovely. 

As for your sitting at home and 
listening, if you wanna bounce 
around, might | suggest the Swollen 
Member's Monsters in the Closet 
— hip hop that’s hard to compare to 
any other “be-all-you-can-be” num- 
ber. For chilling out: Babe Gurr's lat- 
est, Fade To Bright, which she 
recorded before, during and after 
enduring five years of pain following 
a five-car pile up in Vancouver — 
not to mention the BC healthcare 
system. 

WARREN FOOTZ 





For grant information, call 1-800-398-1141 


AS SEEN BY 


du Maurier Arts 


9 SRI eS Remee 





R U experienced? 


CareersTV opens the doors to the music biz 


SO YOU WANNA BE A ROCK STAR? 

Or maybe you're looking to be the 
next Brian Epstein, Spike Jonez, or 
Bob Rock — keeping said rockers 
sounding crisper than a green salad, 
looking better than Keith ards’ 
re-animated corpse and refraining 
from ripping the living hell out of 
their dressing rooms over the pres- 
ence of brown M&Ms. 


‘I kicked pretty 
hard and I had 
friends who were 
also good at kick- 
ing, so eventually 
the door opened’ 
JOEY “SHITHEAD” KEITHLEY 


The music industry is filled with 
dog-eat-dog ar alogies, but if you're 
serious about trying to break in, this 
week's episode of CareersTV (airing 
on the Access Network, Sunday 
November 3 at 5:30 p.m. and 10:00 
p.m.) offers some helpful pointers 

Understandably, the episode 
plays up some of Canada’s more 
obvious success stories — the aspir- 
ing area bassist who’s still wiping 
down tables at the local A&W 
doesn’t have much to hold a view- 
er’s interest — but CareersTV pro- 
ducer Pam Lasuita emphasizes that 
the primary focus is on the behind- 
the-scenes jobs that don’t often see 
many accolades. 

“Of course, everyone wants to 


know how to be a rock star,” Lasuita 
explains. “1 think a lot of people 
interested in this industry are inter- 
ested in the glamour part of it, and I 
think they need to see the reality that 
it isn’t always that exciting.” 

Even the frontlines in the music 
industry can be pretty dismal, unless 
you use Barfly as a template for fur- 
thering your musical career. On the 
show, sing ongwriter Jann 
Arden, recalls one of her first paying 
gigs 

“1 was working at a place called 
Carmen’s Bistro (in Calgary), and | 
was so drunk that I fell off the stage 
and they threw me out. They literal 
ly picked me up and threw me out, 
and threw my guitar out.” She 
zh, that it was the one 
and only time she’ d been fired from 


claims, thous 


a job. 

Throughout the episode 
CareersTV offers insights from the 
likes of NATT alumnus Gabriel 
Napaul, who’s established himself 
as one of the hottest or 
in theo country. Also 


ic sini fect 
Guess Who, Alice 


re gphohead er broth 
that’s Mike to you), and 
founder and punk rock icon Joey 
“Shithead” Keithley 

Napaul, who has produced over 
100 videos for, among oth if 
Naked, Swollen Members 
Edwin, started 7 
$1,000 a mere three years ago. Now 
based in Vancouver, he operates on 
a less-is-more principle. 

“If you're working on a $5,000 
budget, you have to make it look 


Getting your feet wet 
Aninsider lowdown on making it big 
(or at least making it) in the industry 


IT SEEMS THERE'S AS MANY WAYS OF 
taking the plunge into the morass 
of the music industry as there are 
members of the Britney Spears Fan 
Club (says yours truly, #39784). 

SEE Magazine chatted with a few 
movers and shakers within the 
industry and culled some hints and 
tips for those aiming to elbow their 
way onto the scene. 


in “rock ‘n’ roll” (actually 
Recording Arts Management, 
courtesy of the Harris Institute in 
Toronto), Woods also spent a sig- 
nificant amount of time as an 
id intern doing publicity for 

Outside Music, a CD dis- 
tributor. z= 

She went idee acouple 
of years later, and became’ = 
licist for former Lowest of The — 
Low frontman Ron Hawkins. : 
When L.O.T.L. reunited in 2001, © 


they asked her to become their 


Triton Films’ star Bif takes a break 


like it’s worth $50,000,” he claims. 

Despite the differences in career 
trajectories, each of the subjects offer 
much the same advice: forge your 
own path 

In the words of Richardson, 
“You've got to have an active entre- 
preneurial spirit. If you're getting 
into this thing with the idea of it 
being a stable paycheque-every- 

pe of thing, my suggestion 


» Keithle *y is slightly more direct 
when reflecting on getting his foot in 
the door 

“Tt took a few kicks, but I kick 
pretty hard, and Thad a bunch of 
friends who were also good at kick- 
ing, so eventually the door opened.” 

RUSSELL GRAGG 


Edmonton’s now defunct Slur 
Magazine, staying on as a writer 
and editor until 1995. The next 
four years were split between 
Montreal and Vancouver, working 
for two different CD distributors. 
In 1999, he moved to Epitaph, 
when the stalwart punk label 
opened a Canadian office in 
Toronto, 

Advice: Idle hands are the devil's 
playthings (something to keep in 
mind if you're ever roadie-ing for 
Slayer) “Get involved in as many 

as you can, but you ain‘t __ 
oo get paid for along, long 


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BLUES FOR JESSE 

Featuring Rusty Reed & Guests 
Saturday, November 2 

At St. Basil's Cultural Centre 

Tickets available at Southside Sound, 
or call Colin at 984-3601 


BLUES FANS IN EDMONTON ARE 
well acquainted with Rusty Reed. 
Whether he’s ripping it up in a local 
club or working main stage at the 
Folk Festival as part of the house 
band, Edmonton’s premiere har- 
monica player has made his mark on 
the scene. 

Like a lot of musicians he has been 
called upon time and again to 
donate his talents to various worthy 






















Fri. Nov.8 - 5:30-9 
Sat. Nov.9 - 11-3 
Sun. Nov.10 - 11-3 


10545 - 87 Ave. 
(RL Wilkin Architects Ltd.) 
Info: 439-3614 / 435-7051 











|| Everyone welcome - Refreshments 
website: albertacraft.ab.ca 































A SHADY BACKGROUND: ONE OF THE 
unspoken prerequisites of authentic 
rock and roll stardom. The fact that 
wR #| you've graduated from college with 
Bt * | honours, or that you live at home 
f ° and get along really well with your 
If) the 4 OC ki es H sana sadtlety makes your career a 
SHB 2S RE far less interesting study in risk and 
2 ' : subversion. There's an innate attrac- 
Beales tion to that figure of the dangerous, 
streetjunkie /hard-knock life that 
responsible adults everywhere 
abhor and wannabe’s are always 
quick to emulate. 

As far as checkered pasts go, there 
aren’t many people more rock and 
roll than Hugh Dillon, the outspo- 
ken lead singer of the Headstones. 
Dillon has been around enough 
blocks to draw a detailed map of 
crime, addiction and transience. 
While most of his buddies were set- 
ting into jobs or going away to col- 
lege, Dillon was pushing drugs on 
the unglamorous streets of Kingston, 
Ontario, surviving on a busker’s 
wage while squatting in the ghettos 
of Brixton, England, or cultivating a 
persisting taste for heroin. 

: But, bP Those times are over, 
lone, and Dillon is to rt 
he’s recorded his pin Feedeiana 
album clean and sober in their 
almost 15 years as a band. It's led to 


Rockies joard VIA Rail's: 


encileleninepeos i 
and answer the question 
of the week: 

Contest closes 
November 17th. 


imanton fo our 














BLUESMAN Rusty Reed will be belting ‘em out for a good cause: pro- 
ceeds from Blues For Jesse will help cover its namesake’s medical bills. 


Blues for a Son 


Rusty Reed pulls friends together to benefit 
co-worker’s ailing teen 





endeavors. “Edmonton musicians 
are known to come together to bene- 
fit a cause,” Rusty told SEE last 
week, “In fact, I've probably played 
a hundred benefits over the years. A 
lot of musicians will tell you that’s 
part of being in the community, and 
I’m one of them.” 

Having said that, sometimes it gets 
personal. These days; Reed is work- 
ing full time pipefitting at the 
Scotford upgrader in Fort 
Saskatchewan to pay those bills that 
blowing harp just won't cover. “Jim 
Backewich is a guy I work with, and 
four months ago his 16 year old son, 
Jesse, was diagnosed with cancer 
and a respiratory disorder. It came 


Off his horse high 


Headstone discovers raw power of sobriety 





Dillon, center, and the Headstones 





a tangible improvement in his craft. 
“It’s been focus, focus, fuckin’ 
focus,” says Dillon, in direct contrast 
to previous experiences where work 
ona song would be waylaid as 
drinks were poured and dope was 
smoked. Contrary to some misguid- 
ed beliefs, kicking drugs may be the 
key to unleashing the true rock and 
roll spirit. 

“I find [have more edge now than 
lused to have,” says Dillon. 

jee get ee sense of satisfaction 
een yousttiehds to 

song and lyrics together is 












asa real blow to Jim, especially 
because Jesse was so active and out- 
going and really had everything 
going his way. I have a couple of 
kids myself and when I saw how 
messed up Jim was I decided to get 
involved. Putting on a fundraiser to ; 
cover uninsured medical costs, 
tutoring that Jesse will need because 
of missed school and other expenses 
seemed like a natural.” 

There was a lot of ground to 
cover. Recruiting a band, renting a 
hall, promoting the event, selling 
tickets, finding some sponsors and 
making sure that all the details that 
go into a successful show are looked 
after is one thing. Doing it while 
heading out to Fort Saskatchewan to 
work the night shift full time is quite 
another. 

Reed called on old friends Gary 
Bowman (keyboards), Dave 
Bjarnnson (drums), Fred LaRose 
(bass) and guitarist Jim Guiboche to 
make up the band. 

Rusty settled on St. Basil’s 
Cultural Centre (a non-smoking 
venue), at 108 Street and 71 Avenue, 
as the site for the show and got on 
the phone to contacts he’s made in 
over 25 years of playing to help get 
the word out. 

Lynn Wells of Atlynn Productions 
stepped up to provide sound and 
lights; Global TV and Labatt are pro- 
viding door prizes and now all that’s 
left is to sell the tickets. 

“We've sold about 200 tickets so 
far and we'd like to have 500 come 
to the show,” Reed says. “We need 
to sell about 280 to meet our expens- 
es. $25 gets you admission, roast 
beef on a bun, salad and dessert, and 
an evening of blues, dancing, and 
good times. 

“My trio, the Red Ants, will open 
the show and then The Rusty Reed 
band will take the stage. I’ll be call- 
ing on a bunch of players I know to 
drop by and you can bet there will 
be some special guests.” 

CAM HAYDEN 





explains. 

Dillon is ecstatic about the results 
of his sobriety, The Oracle of Hi-Fi, a 
refreshingly straightforward rock 
album recorded completely on the 
band’s own terms without any intru- 
sive major label record producers. 
“We know what we're doing, our 
demo tapes always rock before some 
producer gets a hold of them,” he 
says. “We had a mission of making a 
very tough rock record. No little 
string sections or chanting, or any- 
thing. It’s just a fucking rock record, 
and I don’t think there are enough of 
them.” 

The newfound energy and focus 
has kicked Dillon’s artistic drive in 
the ass beyond his musical projects 
— he’s continuing his acting career, 
recently landing roles on the new 
Degrassi, and one of his paintings is 
appearing this week in a Safe Haven 

hild benefit auction. “I've been 
doing this stuff forever,” he says, 
“but I didn’t do a whole lot of paint- 
ing when I was doing a whole lot of 
heroin.” F 


Has Dillon transformed into a 























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THE DEGREES OF SEPARATION 
between Carlos Santana and his 
Alberta fans are tightening up 
thanks to Nickelback. Santana just 
released Shaman, the eagerly antici- 
pated follow-up to Super rnatural, and 
NB’s Chad Kroeger wrote and sings 
lead vocal on “Why Don’t You 
Once again, Santana and Clive D. 
produced the album, Santana’s sec- 
ond Arista record. 

Shaman's release was preceded by 
the single (and video) “The Game Of 

aturing Michelle Branch. 
The tune came in as the number one 
most-added track in American top 
40, mainstream and adult contempo- 
rary categories. 

Besides Kroeger, Shaman’s list of 
luminary collaborators includes 
include Dido, Placido Domingo, 
Macy Gray, Musiq, Me’Shell 
Ndegeocello, Ozomatli, P.O.D., 
Alejandro Lerner, Seal and original 
Santana Band drummer Michael 
Shrieve. 

eae 

This past June HMV stores 
across Canada stopped carrying all 
music product released and distrib- 
uted by Warner Music Canada. 
HMV instigated a new policy of 
paying record companies less for 
CDs in order to increase their profit 
margin. Warner didn’t agree and 
were subsequently shut out of all 
HMV stores. Now, a truce has been 
declared in a battle that primarily 
scarred the artist and the consumer 
(HMY and Warner have not pub- 
licly released any details of the 
agreement). This unexpected resolu- 
tion is good news for musicians and 
customers. Everybody should gain 
from the settlement because product 
will be back in stores for the lucra- 
tive Christmas shopping season (the 
highest revenue-generating period 
of the year), Warner provides 16 per 
cent of HMV’s stock. With over 100 
stores in Canada, HMV makes 21 
per cent of the retail music market 
share, 


aan 
Touted as a funk and blues 


Pretty (Gaye Delorme, David Gog 
on drums, Charlotte Weibe on 
boards (Jenson Interceptor, Laura 
Vinson) and Doug Radford (Ne 
A4, Bobby Cameron) on bass (in 
addition, the band always rounds 
out with three horn players) 


shows, the t has really 
up quite nic ays McNab. “Plus, 
it’s Hallov and Jim Gray is a 
vampir 

Daddy-Long-Legs play the 
Sidetrack Café (10333-112 St) this 
Friday Nov 1 and Saturday Nov 2, 
the bands starts at 10 pm, the charge 
is $7 call 421-1326 for info. 

gE 

MTV Canada will be broadcasting 
the MTV Europe awards live on 
Nov 14. Us poor folk who only have 
MuchMusic will have to settle for a 
time delayed second feed. However, 
the good news is that we won't see 
Ed the Sock during the 90-minute 
pre-show extravaganza. The awards 
show is taking place in Barcelona, 
Spain, with P. Diddy hosting. 
Canadian artists nominated are 
Avril Lavigne for Best New Artist 
category and Nickelback for Best 
Song (“How You Remind Me”). 
Lavigne just won Best New 
International Artist at the first annu- 
al MTV Latin Video Awards last 
week. In the three international cate- 
gories featured at that award cere- 
mony, one didn’t have to be of 
Latino origin, sing in Spanish, etc. to 
win. Lavigne beat out Linkin Park, 
System Of A Down, Gorillaz and 
another female Canuck artist, Nelly 
Furtado. 

aan 

The CKUA fall fundraiser started 
on Oct 18 and wraps up November 
2 at midnight. The goal is pate ge 000 
and when the campaign was half 
over, the total came to $300,693 with 
a total of 2825 donors (896 of those 


are new). 
ae a prize package 


THE ROXY HORROR 
PICTURE SHOW 


November 162 ‘5 


Cash Prizes For 
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Sexiest Costume 
$5.00 Ticket 


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3 | & | 
Promises, promises, promises. 
Jean Chretien promised he 
would get rid of the GST, 
and CJSR promised 
to give out FM88 
18th Birthday CDs 
featuring CJSR’S favourite local 
bands to anyone who pledged 
and paid more than $25 during 
our recent Fund Drive. 
First the bad news: 
Canada still has the GST, 

rn the good news: 


The CJSR 18th 
Birthday CD’s are in! 
Just like we promised. 

If you paid a pledge over $25 
please come down to CJSR in the 
basement of SUB on 
the U of A campus during 
regular business hours 
to pick up your CJSR CD!! 
Supplies are limited so come 
early to avoid despondency. 





| 
| 















|B Saom 


Www.cjsr.com 


















_________MUSI 





ae ey 


EDMONTON’S BETH SCHULD never intended to become a musician, 


but she’s headlining a CD release at the Yardbird nonetheless. 





Math rock to rap 


An extremely eclectic week of music picks 


BETH SCHULD 

SINGER / SONGWRITER BETH 
Schuld still seems a little surprised at 
the path her life has taken her. “I 
never knew I wanted to be a musi- 
cian,” admits the classically trained 
pianist. “I quit lessons in high 

school, but ended up majoring in it 
at University.” 

After university, she entered into 
the Grant MacEwan program, where 
she picked up on jazz fundamentals 
— skills put to good use later when 
she led jazz workshops in South 
Africa. In the meantime she worked 
diligently on her own music, turning 
up for small shows at Second Fiddle 
Books, Scruffy Murphy’s and 
Rosebow] Pizza. 

The result of this eclectic training 
can be heard on her debut album 
Solo, a mix of originals and a few 
cover songs (Dar William's “Iowa,” 
Leonard Cohen’s “Bird on a Wire” 
and the Andy William's classic 
“Moon River’). Guitar, sparse per- 
cussion, and even a choir add a few 
strokes of colour to the songs, but 
the focus is squarely on Schuld’s 
striking vocals and unabashedly 
romantic piano. At the Yardbird ~ 
Suite this weekend, expect to see 
Schuld in an actual solo setting, 
joined by some mystery guests and a 
few surprises that show off Schuld’s 
impish sense of humor. 

“T take my music seriously, but I 
alg fe Pove tuts Llove it when I 

on’t know what's going to haj 
Ilove the cmenped tah Schuld at 
the Yardbird Suite, Sunday, November 
3, Performance starts at 7:00; admission 
by donation, 


HOLY GHOST 
IT’S BEEN A STRUGGLE FOR 
Edmonton’s own Holy Ghost. 
Working hard to promote his first 





Bi 


Demanding respect: The Rascalz 





album (Black Prince of Afrika) with 
appearances on Wired and the Big 
Breakfast, the Holy Ghost has run up 
against the usual wall of indifference 
typical for a local musician trying to 
break into the scene. “I’ve been try- 
ing to get gigs, but it’s hard,” he 
notes with frustration. “They don’t 
wanna support what's in their own 
backyard, they just wanna look over 
at the mainstream, and it’s hard to 
get into that.” 

Influenced by artists like Tupac, 
Crazy Bone and the Dogg Pound, 
eae ae sound is more in 

ing with the days of 
Death Row Rape een the sugary 
hip-hop played in the clubs. That 
hasn’t stopped him from trying to 
market his album, even if commer- 














hard edge to it, but they’re more into 
the r‘n’ b.” 

But there is support in the com- 
munity; CJSR has been playing the 
record, and he’s had a few shows at 
Caliente’s and the Cristal Lounge. 
He's recently returned to the studio 
to record some softer tracks for com- 
mercial airplay and plans are under- 
way for a CD release party in the 
near future, Black Prince of Afrika has 
been picked up for distribution by 
HMV; it’s been hard work, but the 
Holy Ghost is adamant about his 
future in the record industry. “I’m 
just gonna keep doing what I wanna 
do,” he stubbornly repeats. “You 
gotta be true to yourself.” 


KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS 
“APPARENTLY THERE'S BEEN 
this surge of math rock happening,” 
guitarist Phil Williams of Hamilton's 
Kitchens and Bathrooms relates 
bemusedly. “The bands that were 
doing stuff like this in the early ‘90s, 
like Slint, June of 44, those bands just 
kinda disappeared. And here we 
are, this small Canadian band, get- 
ting some attention.” 

Timing is everything, isn’t it? 
Comparisons to Drive Like Jehu and 
Don Caballero have certainly 
helped, and their incessant gigging 
(four tours in less then a year), to 
promote their first Sonic Unyon 
release, Utter a Sound, has gained the 
group a respectable fan base, espe- 
cially in these parts. 

“Out west it just seems a lot more 
positive; when you come out and 
play music that’s maybe a little dif- 
ferent, people get right into it,” effus- 
es the guitarist. “I’m a member of 
some on-line communities out west 
just because the attitude is so much 
more easygoing and friendly.” 

Kitchens and Bathrooms play at 
Listen Records (10649 124 St.) on 
Tuesday, November 5. Bands (Fractal 
Pattern opens) at 8:00 p.m.; admission 
by donation. 


JOHN REISCHMAN 

AND THE JAYBIRDS 
MANDOLINIST JOHN REISCHMAN 
is a bluegrass heavyweight, having 
served with the Tony Rice Unit, the 
happily irreverent Good Ol’ Persons 
and most notably appearing on the 
Grammy award winning True Life 
Blues: the songs of Bill Monroe. He's a 
remarkably fluid musician, equally 
at ease in country, jazz and Latin 
American music. 

But, even with his eclectic taste, he 
seems uninterested in the fusion of 
bluegrass and jazz exemplified by 
members of the so-called new-grass 
movement “That's great music and 
it was interesting to see what these 
great musicians who wanted to 
explore other types of music with 
bluegrass instruments came up 
with,” agrees the Vancouver native, 
“but there's always been the hard- 
ve players, the grassroots kind of 


SI 
Which brings us to the Jaybirds, 
Reischman’s crack outfit of veteran 
bluegrass traditionalists. Assembled 
in 1999 for Reischman’s instrumental 


























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What does life mean to me? A fine 
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the horn. (Wang Dang Doodle) 


lam, you are, we are pussy - 


the wind he's still alive, 
(Earthtones) 


Hallelujah baby, grab me by the 
ballz, celebrate the flesh, celebrate | 


whipped, everybody should just 
admit pussywhipped. (Pussywhipped) 


| God bless the spirit of the wild. In 


The Spirit Wild Wench Warblers 


a 
Got them hos on my arm, daddy. 


blazin. (Get Tho Dough) 


Ain't that amazin? ‘Specially when I'm 






lida 0 up 

Tena DY Sina adhe IN) 
Let us clap & sing tonight, let us clap | 
and sing. 


(We're Gonna Shine) 








“Vsoe you never close your eyes, 
I'll bang yo ho. 
Gongsta and Pimp) 


You can do it if you try. You can do 
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If hoppy little bluebirds fly beyond 
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Big Tigger, Big Tymers, Petey Pablo, 
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4 Corners, Danica Penner, Kendra 
Penner 








Edmonton Centre 








By Tom Murray Kingsway 





Continued from page 12 


rather then just play the usual Flatt 
and Scruggs, Stanley Brothers and 
Bill Monroe tunes,” explains 
Reischman. “Like old bluegrass 
numbers that haven't been covered 
to death by others, and more con- 
temporary songs, like the Welch and 
Rawlings number on the (second) 
album. We want to express our- 
selves within the framework of tra- 
ditional music.” 

Nov 15th at St Basil's Cultural 
Center 10819D71 Avenue 


RASCALZ 
IN A PERFECT WORLD, EYE- 
brows wouldn't be raise upon hear- 
ing Vancouver hip-hop veterans the 
Rascalz and maverick folk-icon 
Stompin’ Tom Connors mentioned 
in the same breath. Unfortunately, 
that world doesn’t exist, so we have 
to force the issue. 

Luckily, in this case, the two acts 
have more in common than you 
may think. The Rascalz (MC Red1, 
Fit and DJ Kemo) publicly refused 
their Best Rap Recording Juno in 
1998 as a protest against the lack of 
acknowledgement of urban music 
by the awards, while Connor with- 
drew his name from nomination and 
sent back six statuettes in 1978, 
releasing an open letter to the indus- 
try detailing his problems with a sys- 
tem that doesn’t support home 
grown talent. MC Red] of the 
Rascalz is momentarily thrown by 


NOTES 





the comparison, but quickly warms 
to the topic. “Canadian talent does 
need to be nurtured, and hip-hop 
acts especially were being ignored. 
In 1998 hip-hop was the biggest 
music around, and it was being 
ignored by the Junos. They didn’t 
allow hip-hop to be part of the show; 
it was just part of the pre-awards 
show.” 

Connor and the Rascalz had a 
hand in changing the system. P.E.I’s 
favorite son eventually went back to 
winning awards and the following 
year MC Red] and his crew were 
playing the nationally televised 
show, winning yet another Best Rap 
Recording. They're hoping the 
streak continues with the release.of 
Reloaded, which surrounds the 
groups’ edgy lyrics with some 
newer sounds — reggae and dance- 
hall riddims are all over the new 
record. “Yeah, I got bit by the reggae 
bug, I guess,” admits Red1 happily. 
As well, East Juvi, Ganja Kid and 
Jjahba, and Sugar Prince all lend 
vocal talents to the record, along 
with Kardinal Offishall and K-OS, 
both of whom are produced by DJ 
Kemo. 

Proef of the irresistibly danceable 
nature of the album can be had at the 
Urban Lounge (8111 105 St./ 439 3388) 
October 31. 

TOM MURRAY 


Garden Mall 
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Shopping Centre 
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Superstore 


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THE WORLD’S BEST MUSIC STORES 


LUKE DOUCET 

LUKE DOUCET HAS MADE A 
move. Perhaps as well known as a 
valuable sideman as he is for his 
work as a solo artist and with his 
other project, the band known as 
Veal, Doucet has pulled up roots 
he'd planted on the west coast and 
relocated to Toronto. 


HMV 


www.hmv.com 


‘Mostly it had to do with the shift 
in focus, from working on other peo- 
ple’s records and touring with other 
people, to trying to commit to work- 
ing on my own things. There’s more 
opportunity as far as gigs, there are 
more places to play in Southern 
Ontario,” he explains. 

Doucet's solo work is a tasty shift, 
as presented on his new album, 
Aloha Manitoba. Instead of the usual 
loud, proud and groovy, he’s found 
a place to present another side of his 
world. “There's a rootsy element, 
there’s a quieter kind of thing going 
on. I needed to leave a bunch of 
things behind and maybe do exactly 
what I wanted to do.” 

Playing along side and sort of 
behind will be former local yokel Jon 
Nordstrom on bass, who also relo- 
cated this past summer, due south 
to that place with the Husky Tower 
just east of Canmore. (Yeah! I mean 
Calgary). If reaction to Iris CD, Brick 
and Stone, and his few and too far 
between performances is anything to 
go by, his future looks bright — as a 
sideman, as a member of Captain 
Tractor and on his own. 

Catch them live at the Black Dog 
(10425 82 Ave.) Wednesday, November 6. 

WARREN FOOTZ 


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DIVISION OF LAURA LEE 
Black City 


(Burning Heart/Epitaph) 


WORD IN THE MUSIC PRESS HAS IT 
that the Swedes are coming to save 
rock and roll. Bands like the 
(International) Noise Conspiracy, the 
Hives, the Hellacopters and 
Turbonegro are taking rock back to 
its protopunk roots, bashing out . 
three-chord /eighth-note guitar rock 
in all its stripped-down glory, resur- 
recting wheezy pawn-shop key- 
boards and brandishing Ron Wood 
haircuts like badges of honour. 

Géteborg’s Division of Laura Lee 
(DOLL for short) fits this description 
pretty closely. 

On first listen Black City, their first 
North American release, bears the 
earmarks of the Swedish invasion — 
buzz saw distortion backed by a 
rhythm section with a penchant for 
bombast, catchy songs with singa- 
long choruses and, of course, the 
haircuts. 

Repeated listens, however, reveal 
a band already looking for ways to 
sneak off the path trodden by their 
colleagues. 

There are no shortage of high- 
energy rockers (“Need to Get 
Some,” “We've Been Planning This 
for Years”), but a couple of moodier 
songs (“I Walk on Broken Glass”) 
and sonic experiments (“I Guess I’m 
Healed”) make for more variety 
than some of the aforementioned 
bands can muster. 

And for those of you who find the 
Conspiracy’s anti-capitalist cant a lit- 
tle too strident, DOLL mouths off 
the man without getting all didactic 
on your ass. 

If all that isn’t enough for you, 
Black City contains a video for “Need 
to Get Some” which simultaneously 
dispels the twin myths that Swedes 


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rock bands are cute in one fell 
swoop. took 


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pee 2 A 
TOM PETTY 
The Last DJ 


(Warner) 


ON THE LAST D], TOM PETTY TAKES 
an entire album to talk about what 
he already managed to say in the 
three minutes and thirty-eight sec- 
onds of “Into the Great Wide Open.” 
Most Petty albums will have you 
belting out the choruses by your sec- 
ond listen; here, Tom gives us half- 
written, curmudgeonly rants about 
the state of the music business, with- 
out ever reminding us why his opin- 
ion matters in the first place. Despite 
some biting lyrics, these tunes are 
messy and unfocused, but worst of 
all, they just don’t rock. Tom, I agree 
with most of what you have to say. 
But, don’t you think the better way 
to make your point would be to lead 
by example and show the kids what 
rock ‘n roll is supposed to sound 
like? ** 

ADAM HOUSTON 





SPANISH HARLEM ORCHESTRA 
Un Gran Dia En El Barrio 


(Ropeadope/Ryko) 


THE “REDISCOVERY” OF LATIN AM- 
erican music continues unabated 
with these classic salsa grooves per- 
formed by a 13-piece New York 
combo led by sometime Rubén 
Blades sideman Oscar Hernandez 
on piano. Playing off the unexpected 
success of you-know-who from 
Cuba, the orchestra revisits the role 
Spanish Harlem played in popular- 






izing Latin music, throwing up 
bandleaders like Tito Puente and 
Mongo Santamaria when the 
Cubans were effectively shut out 
from North American audiences. 
This is seductive stuff, ranging from 
the sinuous bolero beat on 
“Obsesidn,” to the classic Tito 
Rodriguez rumba “Mama Guela”, 
masterfully performed by a crack 
outfit that includes, (along with 
Hernandez), percussionist Bobby 
Allende and trumpet player Ray 
Vega. The Spanish Harlem 
Orchestra may lack the exoticism 
and colorful history of the Buena 
Vista crew, but as a primer in salsa 
music you really can’t beat it. 
toto tok 

TOM MURRAY 





TORI AMOS 
Scarlet’s Walk 


(Epic) 


TORI AMOS MAY COME OFF AS A 
little flaky, self-obsessed, even alien, 
but at least she’s ambitious. Her latest 
effort, Scarlet’s Walk, is a 17-song opus 
written while touring comprehen- 
sively across the U.S. after September 
11. Ifhas the feel of a personal travel | 
diary brought to life by her trade- 
mark breathy, airy piano / vocal 
combo and pretentious...er...obtuse 
lyrics. ’ 
The effect is a soothing listen laden 
with elegance, much like her earlier, , 
less experimental diversions. But, 
lacking the stormy, hook-filled emo- 
tion that made Little Earthquakes so 
compelling, it seems as though Scarlet 
is still meandering around, lost in her 
own whimsy. *«* 1/2 


DAVE ALEXANDER 










__CDREVIEWS 





SPARTA 
Wiretap Scars 
Dreamworks Records 


WHEN A POPULAR BAND BREAKS UP 
and former members rush out new 
projects it usually feels like a messy 
act of desperation, but not always. 
When the mighty At The Drive-In 
called it quits in spring of 2001, co- 
founder Jim Ward (vocals), Paul 
Hinojos (guitar), and drummer Tony 
Hajjar formed Sparta almost immedi- 
ately. One EP and now the full- 
length Wiretap Scars show that the 
unmistakable vocals, electronic addi- 
tives, and catchy strings of At The 
Drive-In are still there, but the fiery, 
staccato delivery has made room for 
slower, spacier moments of intro- 
spection, . toto 

DAVE ALEXANDER 


Natalie Cole or Hank Williams Jr., or 
releasing an artist's work after 
they're dead, that’s ghoulish. And if 
a ‘friend’ gave you a mixed tape or 
CD consisting entirely of their 
favourite Frank Zappa songs, 
wouldn’t you have to ask what sort 
of friend they were? So, what's 
worse than either of these CDs? 
Both, packaged separately for maxi- 
mum profit. Who cares whether it’s 
Fishman choosing “Keep it Greasey’ 
and “Dog Breath” or LaLonde pick- 
ing “Dog Breath” and “Dumb All 
Over?” Shit like this is for suckers 
and Zappa’d be laughing his ass off 
about it, if he wasn’t dead and being 
whored so shamelessly. #*%* (total) 


CRAIG ELLIOTT 


BOY GEORGE 
A Night In With Boy George: 
A Chillout Mix 


Moonshine Music) 


BOY GEORGE IS SOMEONE WHO 
knows music; he grew up ina multi- 
cultural England, taking from all dif- 
ferent genres to create the tunes of 
the Culture Club. His latest compila- 
tion, A Night In With Boy George A 
Chillout Mix, represents those begin- 
nings. While most chillout mixes are 
straight techno with no vocals, 








































George includes big band sounds, as 
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world hit to close it all out (eclectic to 
say the least). Boy George may have 
evolved over the years, but he hasn't 
changed. He still knows his stuff. 
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FORMER NEW PORNOGRAPHER Dan Bejar assembles a menacing new 
crew of crazy rock and roll “mercenaries.” 





Shit-hot song-wreckers 


ON THIS NIGHT, DAN BEJAR 
and Destroyer steer into the accident 

For a musician so talented and 
charismatic, Daniel Bejar does his 
best to stay in the shadows. With the 
release of his fifth album under the 
moniker of Destroyer, Bejar remains 
an enigmatic figure whose songs are 
as mysterious and confounding as 
he is. 

Even for his most dedicated of 
fans, Bejar has long refused to make 
things easy. Released on the tiniest 
of no-name labels, Destroyers first 
four releases run the gamut from 
hungover four-track tomfoolery 
(1996’ s We'll Build Them A Golden 
Bridge) and Guided By Voices-style 
pastiches (1998's City of Daughters) 
to spot-on glam-heavy bombast 
(2000's Thief, 2001's Streethawk: A 
Seduction). 

This Night, Destroyer’s new behe- 
moth ofa record, is at first an almost 
impenetrable maze of pomp and cir- 
cumstance. Where tunes and song 
structures were once strictly regi- 


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mented (few pop songwr iters can 
make five minutes feel like two 
Bejar is one of the best), This Nights 
tunes form slowly out of messy gui- 
tar rambles, the thrust of a song 
tucked away somewhere in the back, 
saved up like a secret weapon. This 
Night is unafraid to make stubborn 
demands of its listeners. Whether at 
its most accessible (the anthemic 

“Crystal Country”) or its most per- 
fectly scattered (the separate move- 
ments of “Holly Going Lightly”) 
This Night holds sunken treasures 
for those willing to take the time to 
find them. Bejar agrees. 

“I think there’s a lot to dig, 
says. “I don’t think that any 
Destroyer record has ever been 
renowned for being an immediately 
engrossing listen — a lot of people 
have said that at first they really 
hated it, or at first they‘re neither 
here nor there, but then, usually all 
of a sudden, they come around. 

“This one is a creeper more than 
the others, and it’s going to take a 


est,” he 


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while for everything to sink in. It’s a 
marathon. The songs are so mean- 
dering and they just bleed into one 
another — I wasn’t planning to doa 
double album (at 68 minutes, This 
Night eats up four-sides of vinyl), 
but we just had all of these songs 
and it just kind of made sense. It’s 
got that double-album feel.” 

Following his short-lived song 
writing stint in The New 
Pornographers (in which band Bejar 
always looked particularly uncom- 
fortable, often suggesting photogra- 
phers shoot his photo with his back 
to the camera), Bejar fled from 
Vancouver in search of a break. 
After several months in Spain, he 
landed in Montreal 

“It’s cheap, it’s pretty, and people 
are talking French at you,” says 
Bejar. “It’s definitely different from 
Vancouver, which is what I was 
looking for.” 

In Montreal, the songs for This 
Night slowly began to take shape, 
but Bejar admits he’s not the song- 
writing machine that he once was 

“T don’t really write as fast as I 
used to. I used to really churn songs 
out. The process f 
ent and slowed-down now, partly 
because I can’t stand to play the gui- 
tar anymore,” 

Given that, Bejar also conscripted 
anew Jesirc d) eT meup, a lowing 
him to take a step back and, as he 
says, let the crazy rock mercenaries 
just do whatever they feel like. 

‘On the record, what you hear of 
me is the lead vocal and any kind of 
chintzy-sounding rhythm guitar, or 
any kind of synthesizer or keyboard 
or piano sound way super in the 
background. All the guitar craziness 
and percussion craziness and the six 
children’s violins were all someone 
else in the band. These players had a 
sound I was interested in aping, so 
essentially I just stole it.” 








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GLOBAL VISIONS FILM FESTIVAL 
Nov. 7-11 
Various downtown locations 


IF GLOBAL VISIONS FILM FESTIVAL 
director Shelaine Sparrow is stressed 
about the copious last-minute details 
that need her attention prior to the 
fest’s opening gala, she isn’t show- t- 
ing it. In the face of a gloomy, over- 
cast pre-w inter moming on Jasper 
Ave., Sparrow is almost suspiciously 
chipper, but it doesn’t take long to 
realize it takes more than cruddy 
weather or a deadline crunch to 
stanch her energy and enthusiasm, 
the very qualities that got her 
involved in Global Visions in the 
first place. 

After traveling and teaching 
English in Asia in the mid-1990s, 
Sparrow, who hails from the 
bustling metropolis of Sedgewick, 
AB, came home with her perspective 
on the world considerably broad- 
ened. She arrived in Edmonton 
intent on finding an outlet for her 
freshly raised consciousness and 
happened upon the Global Visions 
Film Festival, a series of documen- 
tary screenings and discussions on 
social justice issues presented by the 
Centre for International Alternatives. 
A lack of publicity and interest out- 
side the activist community threat- 
ened the festival’s existence when 
Sparrow, who had no experience 
organizing such an event, offered to 
help out. 

“T thought, ‘This is the perfect deal 
for raising awareness and building 
community,’ so, as is the case so 
often with non-profits, the willing- 
ness and the desire to do what it 
takes is what's most sought after and 
[had that.” 

Sparrow helped found the Global 
Visions Festival Society in 1998 and 
produced the 20th installment of the 
festival in 1999, which screened 30 
films over four days and attracted 
documentarians from across Canada 







GAZA STRIP 
| dooks at the 
bleak and 
perilous life 
of a 13-year-old 
Palestinian 








cold-hearted King Ralph is 
enthroned, where the citizenry is 
surveilled by helicopter, where 
inner-city squalor and luxury con- 
dos sit sunken cheek by overfed 
jowl? Sparrow’s not surprised. 

“There's a strong arts community 
[here], a strong film community and 
a strong social justice community 
and people have soul and I think 
Edmontonians genuinely care about 
the future of the planet and certainly 
love their arts and are intelligent and 
have a strong sense of community 
— that’s Global Visions, so why 
wouldn't it be a great place for the 
festival?” 


GLOBAL REACH 

Her optimismis borne out by the 
ever-increasing scope of Global 
Visions. This year’s festival features 
36 films from 14 countries (includ- 
ing three galas with the directors in 
attendance), a youth media arts 
program (already sold out), work- 
shops featuring the likes of Grass 
director Ron Mann, a free cinema, a 
marketplace with close to 30 
exhibitors and a couple of parties to 
top it all off. 

The festival opens Thursday, 
Nov. 7 at 7:30 p.m. at the 














F | 

SEEING IS BELIEVING examines the promise and perils of the “new 
video revolution” for activists 
a 
to come show their films. Paramount Theatre with the 

“It was so beautiful, but I had no screening of Blue Vinyl, an award- 
experience,” Sparrow says. "Forme winning doc by Judith Helfand and 
it was a miracle.” Daniel B. Gold that takes a 


Since then, the Global Visions humourous and fri tening look a 
Festival has moved downtown, the toxic erie of Helfand’s, 
sprouted a marketplace, inspired a arents’ decision to re-side their 
yearly benefit jam by local musicians _ house with blue PVC. Helfand and 
and attracted filmmakers from Gold, who won an award for the 
around the world. Last year, around _film’s cinematography at this year’s 
4,000 Edmontonians attended Sundance Festival, will be in atten- 
Global Visions events. Who would —_—_ dance. 
have expected it in the city where Saturday's gala, Joe Moulins’ A 


18 GEE Ocicter 31 Nowe 6 200? : = 


Let's do itagain 








Tribe of His Own: The Journalism of P 
Sainath, will have both the director 
and the film’s subject in attendance 
at Zeidler Hall. Indian journalist P. 
Sainath is the recipient of 13 inter- 
national journalism awards, includ- 
ing the very first Amnesty 
International Human Rights 
Journalism Prize in 2000, for his 
reportage on poverty in rural India 
and for his pointed editorial 
rebukes of government develop- 
mental policies. 

The closing gala at Zeidler Hall 
on Monday, Nov. 11 is The Art of 
Peacemaking, Peter Campbell's film 
about the creation of the Gun 
Sculpture by Edmonton artists 
Wallis Kendal and Sandra Bromley. 
Director and subjects will also 
attend this screening. 

The festival also makes cinématic 
stops in Iran, Afghanistan, 
Chechnya, Peru, Nepal, Brazil, 
Sierra Leone, Tanzania, Argentina, 
pig farms in Quebec, a shelter for 
schizophrenics in New York and 
other destinations, finding the 
human faces and glints of hope that 
belie the disaster-driven headlines 
of the daily news. 

Though it was initially the issues 
that attracted Sparrow to Global 
Visions, she says she has a new 
appreciation of filmmaking and 
that the tagline of this year’s festi- 
val — Cinema with Soul — has as 
much to do with the art as with the 
social conscience of the films the 
festival presents. 

“T think the soul is not only the 
stories, but also the storytellers. 
That's the reason this festival hap- 
pens. It’s not for money, it’s not for 
glamour. It’s all media that matters 
and the storytellers do it out of pas- 
sion and they do it because they 
care, Where does that come from? 
Could it be soul?” 


TOO MANY STORIES 

Sparrow says the meeting of 
diverse souls makes Global Visions 
special and it’s what gives her the 
energy to expand its parameters. 

“Mixing the film community 
with social justice, different cultur- 
al groups, students and non-stu- 
dents — that’s just amazing. That's 
why we keep doing it each year. 
It’s so much work to get there, then 
you go through it and it’s so damn 
euphoric you're like, ‘Let's do it 
again!’ Just gathering and that 
sharing of ideas and knowing 
that it has made a difference 
—and it has, you know, we 
get stories from people that 
the festival has been a cat- 
alyst forbig changesin 4 
ideology, changes in 
the life, the birth of 
new organizations, 
new projects, new 
filmmakers.” 

Global Visions 
isn’t even limit- 
ed to its five: 
day festival . | 
run in ; 


SHELAINE SPARROW I thought, ‘This 


perfect deal for r 


building comm 


ising aware 





Film festival organizer Shelaine Sparrow 
feeds the soul of a growing community 
that harbours global ambitions 








= 





ANOTHER WORLD IS POSSIBLE documents a meeting of 51,000 trying 


to work together at the 2002 Worid Social Forum 





November. The society now pre- 
sents monthly documentary 
screenings at Metro Cinema with 
discussions and guest speakers. 
Sparrow is characteristically enthu- 
siastic about the positive response 
and the potential for a night at the 
movies to bring people together. 

“There's too many great stories 
to be told that can’t all fit into a 
five-day showcase. I know more 
and more people are interested in 
‘Let's get back into the theatres’ — 
that’s community, let’s stop 
being isolated in our living 
room watching a good 
story being broken up by 
commercials, and get 
out of your house, 
come actually meet 
people and sit down 
together and watch 
a good story on the 
big screen the way 
it was intended to 
be seen.” 

Global Visions 
tickets are avail- 
able from 
Alterna-tive 
Video Spot on 
Whyte, Earth’s 
General Store, 
SUB Box Office, 
Mountain 
Equipment Co- 
op and TIX on. 


s the 
ess and 


the Square. A Festival Superpass 
gets you into all the screenings, 
workshops and receptions for $55. 
A Minipass get you into the open- 
ing gala and three other screenings 
for $25. For more information visit 
www. globalvisionsfestival.com. 
SCOTT LINGLEY 






















































foe ONSCREEN: = 





are fullalips . 


Halfway to paradise 


PHILLIPA AND FILLIPPO as played by Cate Blanchet 





eed 


Tykwer’s tinkering tactic ticks 


HEAVEN 

Directed by Tom Tykwer 

Starring Cate Blanchett, Giovanni 
Ribisi 

Opens Nov. 1 

** x (Out of five) 


BEFORE HE DIED IN 1996, KRZYSZTOF 
Kieslowski (most noted for his Three 
Colours trilogy (Blue, White, and Red) 
and for the Decalogue, 10 films about 
the Ten Commandments) had writ- 
ten the script for Heaven, the first of a 
conceived trilogy. Hell and 
Purgatory were to follow, but they 
rest in peace along with the author, 
in whatever afterlife he found for 


That is, until director Tom 
Tykwer, German wunderkind, was 


qolimpaio finieh this posthumous 
work. Tykwer will never live down 
his Run Lola Run reputation; he must 


cringe every time he hears the word 
“kinetic.” Yet Heaven opens with a 
flight simulator, an echo of the video 
game animation that prefaced the 
three optional endings to Lola’s 
dilemma. Henceforth, Kieslowski’s 
mournful undercurrent drives 
Heaven's runner not to multiple 
options, but toa singular inevitabili- 
ty. 

Phillipa (Cate Blanchett) is an 
English teacher living in Italy. We 
first see her as she sets the timer on a 
bomb, five minutes to detonation. 
She slips it into the trash of her 
intended target. Hurry. She gets 
away successfully, then notifies the 
authorities, making this an act of ter- 
rorism or vigilante justice. 

In a case of good intentions gone 
tragically wrong, the cleaning lady 
empties the trash into her cart and 
enters an elevator with two young 


and Giovanni Ribisi 


girls and their father 

Once in custody, Phil ipa insists on 
speaking in her native tongue and 
enlists the services of Filippo, a rook 
ie cop played by Giovanni Ribisi. 
Philippa is informed of this event, a 
twist of fate in an otherwise perfectly 
executed plan the man she was try 
ing to bump off was a drug dealer 
responsible for her husband’s deat} 
not to mention the schoolyard addic 
tions of her own students. 

So the assassin learns that being a 
premeditated killer isn’t all that it’s 
cracked up to be Filippo, observing 
ver grief and confusion, falls in love 





with her and decides to help. 

Their love is kind of a reverse 
Stockholm Syndrome. Filippo has 
ity on her: can nothing be worse 
than trying to help but e1 ding up a 
monster? 

They both get their heads shaved, 
ike soldiers or nuns. Stripped of 
identity, they become blank slates or 
innocents running from corruption 
while they seek divine punishment. 
They become twins, reunited halves, 

It's unnecessarily heavy-handed 
symbolism, given that the characters 
already have the same names and, as 
we learn later, shared birthdays 
Philippa even reveals that she had 
her first communion on the day 
Filippo, several years younger, was 
born. 

It ruins the film. Inconsolable 
tragedy is enough without mashing 
it with trite love stories of parables of 
missing halves and chattery symbol- 
ism. Blanchett is enough of an actor 
to carry it off: watch her react in the 
initial interrogations. In an instant 
she transforms herself from steely, 
self-righteous vigilante to repentant 
sinner just with her eyes. 

The road to Hell is paved with 
good intentions; the,road to Heaven 
with silence. 








MARI SASANO 





French braid 


Demme packs remake with twists and nods 


——— ee eee 
THE TRUTH ABOUT CHARLIE 
Directed by Jonathan Demme 

Starring Thandie Newton, Mark 
Wahlberg 

Now playing 

Cineplex Odeon 

** 1/2 (out of five) 


SINCE THE MID-'70S, JONATHAN 
Demme has covered plenty of 
ground. From early work for Roger 
Corman to Haitian human-rights 
documentaries, from Stop Making 
Sense to Silence of the Lambs, Demme 
not only writes and directs, but also 
produces — bankrolling projects as 
wide-ranging as That Thing You Do! 
and Ulee’s Gold. Unlike the unadven- 





















___ character named after Tom 


her of his multiple identities. Then, 
the commandant, three dubious 
cohorts, an American embassy offi- 
cial (Tim Robbins) who's shadowing 
Regina, and Joshua — now in Paris, 
trying to protect her — race to 
unravel the puzzle first. 

Set in the present, Demme’s film 
stays romantically faithful to the 
1963 original through rich reference 
to other things cinematically 
Parisiens, circa the early “60s. Though 
spiced with a few new-school 
sequences of digital editing, Charlie 
is an overwhelming homage to the 
French nouvelle vague. It is entirely, 
lunch-losingly hand-held, with vir- 
tually all sequences of dialogue 
tightly framed on each character's 
face. Not just stylistically New 
Wave, the movie includes musical 
cameos by French icons Anna 
Karina (Godard’s sweetheart and 
starlet) and Charles Aznavour, who 
manifests both through a clip from 
Shoot the Piano Player and a pair of 

i moments of croon- 


ing. For measure, there isia 





lykwe! 


protagonist in Run Lola 





Newton: Charming 





edited tango dance sequence, with 
each ad oanbeting characters 
forced in turn to become partners 
with the others. : 

Newton gives a charming perfor- 
mance as Regina, the sweetly naive 
moral compass, an island of idealis- 
tic honesty in a reeling play of 
appearances. Wahlberg, however, 
pleasantly surprising in Boogie Nights 
and Three Kings, is pure fromage 
speaking French in a beret. 
Although affectionately observed, 
Demme's reco do not have the 

istry of Hepburn and Grant; 
ieee A which is chased 
with breakneck energy. 


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Maximus 
Stupiditus 


Jackass introduces a new breed of idiocy 


JACKASS: THE MOVIE 

starring Jackasses 

Now Playing 

Cineplex Odeon/Famous Players 
Sober, alone, in a theatre: 

** (out of five) 

Wasted, with friends, at a party: 
* kk (out of five) 


AT THE VERY LEAST, JACKASS IS A 
heck of a lot better than The Extreme 
Adventures of Super Dave. And while 
I'm not sure that ninety minutes of 
people with top-notch medical cov- 
erage inflicting bafflingly random 
self-injuries with explosives, shop- 
ping carts and alligators can be con- 
sidered a movie, it is, in its own terri- 
fying way, pretty funny. 

It’s also obvious why this earned 
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1. Mr. Deeds 
2. Insomnia 
3. Windtalkers 

4. Enough 

5. Scooby-Doo 

6. Life or Something Like It 
7, Murder By Numbers 

8. Panic Room 

9. Changing Lanes ~- — 
10. Sorority Boys W 


List from Rogers Video 






isn’t counting on those kids out there 
who'd be interested in going “off- 
road tattooing,” in which you get 
your ink done in the back of a vio- 
lently shaking hummer driven by 
Henry Rollins, or who possess the 
desire to stuff shrimp in their undies 
as bait for whale sharks, And we 
won't get into the particulars of the 
man who defecates in a toilet on dis- 
play at a hardware store (and this is 
only after he craps his pants and pre- 
sents the consequences to the cam- 
era), or the urine snowcone, or any 
of the other reasons that the camera-» 
man has to set down his equipment 
so he can throw up. Twice. 

It’s just too bad the jackass crew 
aren’t particularly clever at being 
stupid; ninety minutes is way too 
long, especially when padded with 
brainless filler like roaming a golf 


course with an airhorn, tired schtick 
that would barely have made the cut 
on Candid Camera. At least FUBAR, a 
movie very much in the same spirit, 
had something tying all the anarchy 
together, whereas this replaces the 
ting convention “Advance plot” 
ori ‘Rupture pancreas. Repeat.” 

So can I recommend this? I 
laughed harder than | do at most 
comedies, but mostly nervous 
laughter, the kind that serves to fill 
space while waiting to find out 
whether or not the guy lying crum- 
pled in the wreckage of that golf cart 
is going to be okay. However, if you 
go into hysterics over the America’s 
Funniest Videos musical montages of 
people falling off swing-sets and yell 
at the screen when some god-awful 
clip of a toddler mangling the lyrics 
of “The Star-Spangled Banner” inex- 
plicably wins yet again, then, well, 
you ve probably already seen this. 
Everyone else, should either a) avoid 
it as you would affixing fireworks to 
your genitals (as happens here), or b) 
wait until you have two equally 
important amenities: fast-forward 
and rewind buttons. 

ADAM HOUSTON 


Jerry-rigged 


Seinfield’s Progress an uneven pleasure 


COMEDIAN 

Starring Jerry Seinfeld and many 
famous comics. 

Opens Nov. 1 

***1/2 (out of five) 


UPSTAGED? YOU BET. AND JERRY 
Seinfeld must be thankinghis lucky 
stars. 

Normally, his relief would be a 
triple oddity. He’s a comic, for 
starters: it’s a calling predicated on 
making oneself the centre of atten- 
tion. And this self-produced docu- 
mentary is, after all, Jerry’s vanity 
project, a record of his return to 
stand-up after walking away from 
the successful television series that 
bore his name. Worst of all, the guy 
who's stealing the scenes is beating 
Jerry at his own hyper-neurotic 
schtick. 

But it is schtick for Jerry — partly, 
at least — whereas up-and- -coming 
stand-up comedian Orny Adams is 
a tightly wrapped bundle of tension 
uncontaminated by self-awareness. 












It’s not that he doesn’t think about 
himself, mind you: indeed, all of his 
waking energy is devoted Becoming 
a Comedy Star. But his passion — or 
perhaps his predisposition — has 
robbed him of empathy: he consid- 
ers others only insofar as they stroke 


* ‘or bruise him» * eps ator te 


A virtual sociopath, Adams is so 
obnoxiously self-absorbed that he’s 
impervious even to help. When a 
dressing-room visitor praises Omy’s 
comedy but suggests that he stop 
bragging and let the act speak for 
itself, Adams bitches to his experi- 
enced mentor / manager at what he 
perceives as a slight, oblivious to the 
fact that his sage handler actually 
invited the guy to deliver the mes- 
sage in the first place. 

Violently unpleasant, Adams 
inspires a curious pleasure, a feeling 
of relief, whenever Jerry appears on 
the screen. Seinfeld comes across as 
sober, sage, deeply reflective. That’s 
undoubtedly no accident: his revi- 
sionist impulse, the one that fixes his 
eye on posterity, is behind this flick. 
Sure, this is a warts-and-all story, but 
the blemishes are of the forgivable 
variety: the emphasis is on Jerry’s 
paying homage to his seniors and, 
ipso facto, ascending to his place as 
an Elder Statesman of Comedy, for 
whatever that’s worth. 

As film producer, Jerry must feel 
doubly grateful to have been 
upstaged, because without our dis- 
tressing dumpster dive into Omy’s © 
egomania, there wouldn't have been 
enough material to extend this 
movie to feature length. The film has 
some appeal as a kind of comedy gig 
travelogue — it’s intri uptoa 
point, to journey into the inner sanc- 
tum of showbiz humour’s upper 
echelon. We also get to see some — 
funny stand up —and some painful 
misfires — as Seinfeld builds « 


































“Breathtdking! 


The Most Visually Dagzling vere of the Near!” 
Claudia Puig, Usa Toda. 
“A Personal grip 
for Salma Hay ek 


She seems certain to win at Osene ar® nomination.” 
Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun 


“A Brilliant ‘Spemele! J 


It honours Frida Kahlo’s brave spirit - in bursts of colour, 
imagination, music, sex, and@ver a top theatricality.” 


A. O. Scott; New York Yin 


J un ALFRED ANTONIO VALERIA ASHLEY MIA EDWARD |, GEOFFREY. 
ne ‘an BANDERAS GOLINO Ba bieersd NORTON RUSH 


weir pests A BRIDGNORTH FILMS PRODUCTION dil nian tn NUMAN 0M COMCOAN pues y GARY STREINER 
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IN THEATRES FRIDAY, NOVEMBER ¢ Pam 


"ONE OF THE MOST HAUNTING AND LYRICAL 
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-Geoff Pevere, Toronto Star 


CATE BLANCHETT 
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GOT ‘EM! Owen Wilson and Eddie Murphy make short work of vehicle 
containing Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker, Mel Gibson and Danny Glover. 





Easy to digest 


Buddy flick overcomes warmed-over cliches 





I SPY 

Directed by Betty Thomas 

Starring Eddie Murphy, Owen Wilson, 
Famke Janssen, and Malcolm 
McDowell 

Starts Friday 

*** 1/2 (out of five) 


WHAT DOES HOLLYWOOD CURRENTLY 
go apeshit for, even more than spy 
movies? Remakes, of course. So 
bringing an updated I Spy to the 
masses wasn’t probable: it was 
inevitable. 

And who better to direct it than 
Betty Thomas? With the sequel- 
spawning Dr, Dolittle and The Brady 
Bunch Movie on her resume, she 
nows a thing or two about 
remakes. And with the Sandra 
Bullock “classic” 28 Days poisoning 
ier Geuvre, you know she’s not 
above a buddy flick based on the 
semi-popular 1960s TV spy spoof 
originally starring Bill Cosby and 
Robert Culp. 

This time Eddie Murphy and 
Owen Wilson step in as the odd cou- 





































24 SEE October 31-Novenber 6, 


ple. Murphy plays Kelly Robinson, 
the mouthiest, proudest boxer since 
Ali. (The Cos was a pro tennis player 
in the original.) His opposite number 
is struggling agent Alexander Scott 
(Wilson), who has no guts when it 
comes to women, a symptom ofan 
inferiority complex caused by his 
always taking a back seat to the top 
agent Carlos, played by an unrecog- 
nizable Gary Cole. 

Scott’s shot at glory comes when 
arms dealer Arnold Gundars, played 
by habitual bad guy Malcolm 
McDowell, steals a deadly prototype 
jet that can turn invisible. Gundars 
also happens to be a huge boxing 
fan, so when he plans a match 
between Robinson and the top 
pugilist in Europe, it’s the perfect 
opportunity for the President him- 
self to team a pro Sports figure with 
a second-rate agent in order to save 
the free world. 

Also on the case is agent Rachel 
Wright (Famke Janssen), whose 
beauty and coy interest in Scott turns 
him into Don Juan Retardo. His 


love-starved angst in her presence is 
nearly crippling, but maybe, just 
maybe if he could craw! out from 
under Robinson’s skin, and vice 
versa, he could impress the boxer 
with spy know-how, while the mus 
cular ladies man can impart some 
social skills. All it will take is for the 
pair to be forced into a series of excit- 
ing tasks with harrowing near-death 
escapes Only then, dammit, will 
they realize they're not so different 
after all. 

It’s the usual buddy-flick stuff, but 
Thomas has a knack for recognizing 
the strongest elements of a formula 
and bringing them to the forefront. If 
you’re making a spy movie with an 
invisible jet and lots of other silly 
gadgets, why not run with it. Some 
of the best laughs come from insuffi- 
cient spy toys, like a clunky tracking 
device that won't stick, an unneces- 
sarily massive digital readout, or an 
“invisible” jet that distorts the heroes 
standing on the other side of it. 

Even better is that buddy-movie 
specialists Wilson and Murphy are 
able to riff off each other and make 
their improvisation flow and build. 
Murphy is the highlight: he’s as 
chatter-box funny as in his Beverly 
Hills Cop days. 

Some critics have cited the irony 
in his taking Cosby’s role, seeing 
that Cosby has been such a harsh 
critic of Murphy’s R-rated “minstrel 
show”-like shtick. But Murphy gives 
Robinson a larger-than-life presence 
as a man who’s (too) good at every- 
thing and takes shit from no one. It’s 
even more ironic considering 
Cosby’s role in the original has been 
criticized as one of a lackey to Culp’s 
character. 

But if old Bill is going i a his 
sweater in a knot over anything, it 
should be that the filmmakers took 
his show and made something quite 
different but well worth a watch. 

A remake of a lesser known TV 
show that's actually funny?!? 
What 'll they come up with next? 
Pudding pops? 

DAVE ALEXANDER 











1 EXPECT THAT THERE’LL BE AN EXPLOSION ABOUT HERE... Ghost 
ship crew waiting for the special effects to kick in and save the movie. 





Scuttled 


Powerhouse production team 
goes under for the third time 


GHOST SHIP 

Directed by Steve Beck 

Starring Gabriel Byrne, Julianna 
Margulies, Desmond Harrington, and 
Ron Eldard 

Now playing 

+ (out of five) 


IT’S QUITE A FEAT TO MAKE A GHOST 
story that’s pretty-decent right up 
until the ghosts appear, but the Dark 
Castle crew has done it again. 
Following in the missteps of 
Thirl3en Ghosts and House on 
Haunted Hill, Ghost Ship demon- 
strates again that the production 
team of Robert Zemeckis, Joel Silver 
and Gilbert Adler are incapable of 
making a great horror film. 

Their latest remake of a ’50s/’60s 
chiller has the usual nice touches 
and hopeless shortcomings. Top- 
notch set design, wonderfully gory 
special effects and a tension-filled 
set-up don’t stand a chance against a 
messy script oozing with shlocky 
clichés that lead to a laughably over- 
baked conclusion. 

It’s unfortunate, because the film 
begins with promise. In an unex- 
pectedly lush flashback, a dreamy 
Italian lounge singer croons for the 
slow-dancing passengers ona luxu- 
ry ocean liner. Bubbly pink credits 
and all, it’s one of those aforemen- 
tioned nice touches, which con- 
cludes with an implausible but eye- 
popping slice n’ dice. 

Sailing into the present, a rag-tag, 
yet talented, ocean-salvage crew 
completes another dangerous recla- 
mation. Gabriel Byrne leads the 
team as Captain Sean Murphy, 
whose incomprehensible accent may 
be intended to lend him some salty 
east-coast sailor cred, but doesn’t. 
Among his brood is Maureen Epps 
(Julianna Margulies), the daughter 
he never had, Dodge (Ron Eldard, 
her fellow ER alumnus), and various 
other stereotypes required for a 
movie collective to qualify for “rag- 
tag” status. 

While celebrating their latest haul, 
the group is approached by an aptly 
wee —as we find out later — 
pilot, Ferriman (Desmond 
Harriman). 


er’s fee. So off they go to discover a 
decrepit Italian luxury ship that 
went missing without a trace 40 
years earlier. 

Much like Keith Richards, the 
rusting vessel in none-too-good _ 
shape, but what the hell, at least it 
still kinda works and it’s worth a for- 
tune, as long as they can pump it out 
and repair it before it sinks. The 
stakes are raised when they find a 
suspicious cache of gold. 

__Hands down, the best part of the 
movie is the dank ship itself. aie 
with tremendous rot, strange noises, 
pungent water, and evidence of vio- 
lent destruction, it’s damn scary = 
again, much like the insides of'Keith 
Richards. It’s an ideal place'’to trap a 
bunch of suckers and terrorize them 
for 45 minutes or so. 

At least it is in theory, but at the 
halfway point the ghosts show up, 
bringing with them a whole lotta 
lame. Suddenly, the filmmakers 
throw everything at the wall to see 
what sticks, without regard to char- 
acter motivation, simple logic or 
even the rules they’ve set up within 
the world of the film. The idea seems 
to be that if it’s been done before and 
it'll look flashy in trailer, then do it. 

So, while crewmembers meet 
their ends in a variety of uninspired 
ways, the requisite innocent little girl 
ghost in a white dress explains why 
Epps has to get the remaining crew 
off the doomed ship ASAP before 
they suffer anymore otherwordly 
asskickings. It seems the boat's sor- 
did history revolves around a heist, 
mega-wicked murders, a traitor 
among the salvage crew, marked 
sinners, and a “soul quota” that’s 
almost full. 

Now what's scarier? Ghosts that 
want to put the fear of God into you, 
or ghosts that wanna talk and hang 
out and fill a “soul quota?” 

And why is it that solid objects 
pass through them in one scene, yet 
they can pour drinks in the next? 
And why, as in the production com: 
pany’s previous two efforts, isit 
always a case of “when a 
blow shit up in ano 
effects.” The endi 




























Seen IPSC ENG 2 





Stylishly far-fetched 


Argento fills in the holes with gore 





OPERA 

Directed by Dario Argento 
Score by Brian Eno 

Oct. 31- Nov. 3, 9 p.m. 
Metro Cinema 

Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre 
** 1/2 (out of five) 


IT’S A SURE BET THAT DIRECTOR 
Dario Argento’s twisted psy- 
chothriller plots grow around the 
grotesque set pieces he imagines, 
because the stories themselves gen- 
erally don’t make a lick of sense. 
With Suspiria, probably his best 
known film, Argento didn’t set out 
to make a movie about witchcraft at 
a spooky ballet conservatory; that’s 
the story he came up with so he 
could show someone's head sliced in 
half by a falling pane of stained 
glass. 

And so it is with Opera, Argento's 
1988 giallo film. Giallo means yel- 
low, the standard colour for covers 
of lurid Italian pulp novels. A true 
giallo aed dwells on a string 
of graphically violent murders per- 
petrated by a killer whose identity is 
concealed and whose homicidal rage 
stems from a traumatic experience. 
According to the Profondo Giallo 
website 
(http: / / home.swipnet.se / profondo- 
giallo/), “it doesn’t matter if the 
explanation is far-fetched.” 

Argento has made a number of 
movies that conform to this descrip- 
tion and Opera comes late enough in 
his career that he’s pretty much 
abandoned even a pretense of narra- 


tive logic or realism. It’s all about the 
spiraling, swooping camera, the 
comic-book washes of red and green 
light and the ludicrously contrived 
means by which the killer dispatches 
his victims. His status as Italy’s mas 
ter of horror apparently guarantees 
Argento substantial budgets for his 
films because you'll never see a 
North American slasher flick with 
the kind of production values evi- 
dent in Opera 

Betty (Cristina Marsillach) is the 
understudy to a bitchy diva in an 
avant-garde production of Verdi's 
Macbeth at Rome's opulent La Scala 
opera house. When the diva is hit by 
a car, Betty gets her big chance, but 
even as she’s onstage singing her 
heart out, her Number One Fan is in 
the balcony repeatedly impaling an 
usher’s head on a coathook. He 
starts killing Betty’s friends and co 
workers, binding her and taping 
straight pins under her eyes so she 
can’t close them (eye-violence is a 
key motif in many an Italian horror 
movie and I confess to being espe- 
cially susceptible to the repeated 
shots of Betty’s terrified eyes rolling 
around in their pointy prison). True 
to form, the killer’s identity is con- 
cealed, but since there’s really no one 
else to suspect, you pretty much fig- 
ure out right away who it is 

Argento's control of composition 
and colour is masterful, but he total- 
ly lacks restraint in deploying his 
stylistic flourishes — he seems most- 
ly concerned with what looks cool 
rather than what his elaborate visual 


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Tix on Sale Now! Rated 14A 


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concepts contribute to the mood and 
coherence of the story. It’s the cheesi 
ness and stupidity of Opera that 
make it watchable < 
for the ludicrous, 
plot, one-dimensional characters and 
bad dubbing, Opera’s sadistic vio- 
lence would be too disturbing to 
stand, espec ially because Argento 
delights in dragging the scenes out 
compounding brutality with ever- 
greater brutality. As it is 
ful of goofiness helps 


it all. If it weren't 


underexplained 





he spc ,OTL 
the giallo gx 
down and the dare-you-to-look 
quality of the gore will likely make 
you chuckle even as you're cringing, 
If that’s your idea of a good time at 
the movies, Metro Cinema definitely 
has your cup of poison this week 
end 


SCOTT LINGLEY 


Bewitched! 


HAXAN (WITCHCRAFT THROUGH 
THE AGES) 

Directed by Benjamin Christensen 
Oct. 31 — Nov. 3, 7 p.m 

Metro Cinema 

* x 1/2 (out of five) 


HAND: IT’S WHAT'S FOR DINNER! 

That's if you're a witch, of course. 
For the very most comprehensive 
array of witchy imagery, hasten thou 
to Haxan (Witchcraft Through the 
Ages). Get this: it’s a 1922 Gothic 
Horror movie from Denmark. To 
put this in perspective, it came out 
two years after The Cabinet of Dr. 
— and the same year as the 

Max Schreck Nosferatu. 

The Danish are not Germans, and 
Haxan ain't no classic German 
Expressionism. Instead, watching 
Haxan today is like watching a black- 


n-white school educational film 
that’s been punched in the face a few 
times so it’s sorta seeing things. In 
this case, witches 

You couldn’t get more historically 
Halloweeny than this movie, which 
goes right back to the grimy 
medieval history of witch lore. 
Originally 
crones who made evil potions (witl 
And on Sundays 


they'd head out into the wood, strip 


witches were nasty old 
hands, natch!). 


naked and party Black-Sabbath style 
with Satan and a bunch of devils. 
Riding their brooms bristle first, 
homeboys 

The real point of the movie is to 
condemn the Inquisition by showing 
the priests torturing 
for witches. So, from the filmmakers 
to all of you, if you're a cleric looking 
to burn somebody for being a witch, 
just remember that putting some- 
body in the thumb screws only 
makes them accuse their neighbors 
Plus, all these damned-if-you-do-or- 
don't tests are a lousy way 
actual witches. 

There’s no question the director, a 
Dane named Benjamin Christensen, 
wants to slam witch-hunting in this 
movie. But where his heart is, the 
thing that really jazzes him about his 
movie, are the parts where he gets to 
show demons floppin’ around and 
witches kissing warty Satan ass and 
puppet animated versions of Hell 
There's lots of crazy demon makeup, 
not the least of which is plastered all 
over Christensen himself as Satan, 
naked, prancing around these terri- 
ble old witches, horns, bat ears, flick- 
ing his tongue out like crazy 

So that’s the weirdness of the 
underlying film. Here in 2002 we see 
it through a couple of extra filters. 
For starters, the narrator is William 


around looking 


of finding 











Haxan: nun with non-dairy whip 








S. Burroughs. He reads out what 

used to be on title cards in his dead, 
not-this-shit-again voice, dryly com- 
menting on the ins and outs of 
medieval astrophysics. And there's a 
jazzy jazz score that leans heavily on 
the xylophone, working the la-la-la 
filmstrip tone as awful old women 
are hauled away and spend think 
time in the rack 

So: a weird little film from 1922, 
with bursts of crazy demon-on- 
witch scenes with stop-animated 
gags and lots of long-fingered 
demon costumes, and lots more 
scenes of monks grilling women for 
confessions. 

And some boring stuff at the end 
about how today, in 1920, we realize 
that witches were probably suffering 
from hysteria 

For Halloween relevance, Haxan 
can’t be beat. If there’s acid burning 
a hole in anybody’s pocket, it could 
be worse used than by taking a spin 
through old-school medieval myths 
about witches, presented by a crazy 
Dane who likes to dress up as Satan. 

STEPHEN NOTLEY 


PERRET ge 
PREVIEW SCREENING 


eer 


* 
ABYEX MOLD, 


pert to be seduced 


a wasstep NER 


104.9 Fe 


PRESENTS... 


Thursday, November 7 ¢ 7 pm 


Edmonton City Centre 
Limited Double Guest Passes available at: 


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After 3:00 pm Friday, Nov 1st 


THURSDAY 
am | & Kara 





$2" FIUMCAPS CC 





Please see our movie listings for complete 
location and showtime information. 


Abandon Abandonis basically a college 
drama with unnecessary crime thriller ele- 
ments. Charlie Hunnam plays orphan mil- 
lionaire Embry Langan. He’s been missing 
for about two years when Det. Wade 
Handler (Benjamin Bratt) is finally put on the 
case so Embry's estate can be dealt with. He 
sniffs around the university campus until he 
gets to Embry's brokenhearted girlfriend, 
Katie (Katie Holmes). The daily soap opera 
of dorm life would have provided enough 
material to keep this movie endlessly inter- 
esting. Unfortunately, the movie is cluttered 
up by too many subplots; it's jumpy struc- 
turally, too. It's like Abandon needs to 
choose a major. ** (MS) 


Barbershop You wouldn't think Ice Cube 
and an Olde Timey barbershop are compli- 
mentary, but the bad boy rapper is always 
more interesting to watch when he’s not in 
his element. In Barbershop he's the slightly 
less agitated version of his usual self playing 
a young family man suffering in what he 
feels is a dead-end trade. To their credit, the 
filmmakers never forget Barbershop is first 
and foremost a comedy, so the monologues 
and zingers are always in the forefront, and 
the film’s predictable plotting barely cuts 
through the overall warm communal experi- 
ence. *%&%& (DA) 


My Big Fat Greek Wedding In this respect- 
ful demonstration of love for her heritage 
and family, writer/actor Nia Vardalos comes 
across like a Greek Lucille Ball who some- 
how makes slapstick kind of sexy. She plays 
an unmarried middle child who feels defeat- 
ed by her own life. She meets the perfect 
guy (John Corbett), only to run up against 
her protective immigrant father. Anyhow, 
clash of cultures, blah blah, but every plot 
twist makes a difference here. Funny and 
surprisingly moving, the film makes not 
being Greek seem kind of sad. *e% 
(MS) 


Blue Crush It’s all in the surfing, you see 
Arty, wide-angle shots, crazy New Wave 
(haha!) zooms, insanely fast cuts of non-top 
surfing make the limp plot totally forgivable. 
It's exhilarating! Anne Marie (Kate 
Bosworth) is a surfer who's trying to over- 
come impossible odds going into the 
biggest competition that women have been 
allowed to participate in. Michelle Rodriguez 
(Girlfight) is great as her tough-love friend 
Eden, and hapa-girl Sanoe Lake is all 
sunned-out casual as her other best friend 
Lena. Among the plot's redeeming qualities 
iS. a Strong lesson for girls: don’t fuck a rock 
Star, BE a rock star. sk (MS) 


















Bollywood/HollywoodBollywood/Hollywood 
is like an Indian film primer for Americans. 
The situation is simple: Millionaire Rahul's 
fiance dies in a tragic accident. His mother 
insists his sister can’t get married until he’s 
engaged. He runs into super-smokin' Sue 
(Lisa Ray) in a bar. He hires her to be his 
new fiance. Love blooms. Complications set 
in when he worries if she’s Indian enough, 
or atall. Oh, and the people in it love to sing, 
sing, sing. | can’t actually say anybody 
should race out and see this movie, but it's 
not like there's anything else out there 
demanding your attention; as a date movie, 
you could go a lot wronger. *%&* (SN) 


Bowling for Columbine Why do so many 
Americans kill each other with guns? 
Michael Moore never finds the answer. But 
even if he doesn’t bring home a goose, 
Moore stirs up a hell of a lot of brush. He 
goes back into history, digs into the race 
problem, looks at violent video games and 
movies, ranges all over the defective culture, 
taking shots where he can. Moore has lots 
to show us in this film, plenty of pictures 
worth seeing — eerie footage of the 
Columbine massacre, crumbling cities — 
and a raw frustration that this problem 
exists but defies solution. #%%*% (SN) 


Brown Sugar Brown Sugar, is one of those 
romantic comedies that has a lot going for 
it. What elevates it above most is how it 
links all those relationship emotions to the 
lead characters’ love of hip-hop. Sidney 
Shaw (Lathan) is an upwardly mobile jour- 
nalist; her lifelong friend Dre Ellis (Diggs) is 
a successful executive at a rap label. They 
go way back, and their mutual musical inter- 
ests only serve to remind them they're as 
close and compatible as a Du's turntables. 
Brown Sugar doesn't try too hard to tinker 
with the romantic comedy formula. But with 
its original hip-hop take on love, and sharp 
characters, there's just enough sweetness 
to go around. ***1/2 (DA) 


Formula 51 Because of Snatch - where peo- 
ple get beat up but they all talk with English 
accents and call people “wankers” - setting 
your little thug comedy in Britain suddenly 
sounds like a pretty hot idea. Hence Formula 
57. Samuel Jackson plays Elmo McElroy, a 
chemist who invents the best dope ever. He 
hooks up with Robert Carlyle, his “wanker’- 
Saying partner, to sell it, but complications 
ensue when Carlyle’s ex-girlfriend attempts 
to blow them away via a contract hitman. 
Director Ronny Yu tries to fill Formula 51 
with as many Englishisms as possible; so, if 
you want to hear people say “fockin” and 
“bollocks” over and over again, this is your 
movie. Otherwise, it’s just your average for- 
gettable movie knockoff. ++ (SN) 


Jonah: A Veggietales Movie Children famil- 
iar with the video series will recognize many 
of their favourite flora-Christian characters: 
Larry the Cucumber (as Pirate Larry), Bob 
the Tomato (as himself), and uppity 
Archibald the Asparagus as the prophet 
Jonah. The tale, as Pirate Larry clearly spells 
out, teaches us the joint virtues of compas- 
sion and mercy. Two valuable lessons, 
indeed. Unfortunately this film won't be win- 
ning over any new veggiephiles. Jonah 
drags like a sermon that's gone on too Jong, 
and it may teach the odd lesson you'd just 
as soon your kids didn't learn. %*%* (JJ) 


Knockaround Guys Knockaround Guys is 
relatively subdued compared to the average, 
sometimes to the point of predictability, 
where it could've been a solid little gangster 
tale. Barry Pepper plays Matty, a wannabe 
tough guy who lacks the violent nature 
needed to follow in Dad’s footsteps. He's 
given one last chance to prove himself — 
the responsibility of retrieving an important 
package from Spokane. Inevitably, the pack- 
age is lost, and the noggins really start to 
roll. Although the filmmakers admirably 
keep the flashy clichés out of their coming- 
of-age meets gangster-out-of-water tale, 
they never make much of a case as to why 
all these people put so much at stake for 
such a small pay-off. %*%* 1/2 (DA) 


Pokemon 4 Ever The animation in 
Pokemon is noted for being pretty cheap, so 
4 Ever's smoothness and occasional 
moments of artistry might surprise an audi- 
ence expecting 80 minutes of three-frame 
walk cycles cut with lame strobe effects. 
Dynamic computer effects work makes the 
TV-level (i.e., bad) cel animation more bear- 
able, and there's a couple of really powerful 
and rather scary action scenes brought to 
you by the powers of CGI. In the final analy- 
sis, it's still a Pokemon movie. Edginess, 
darkness, intensity; these cool but scary val- 
ues must never triumph over the forces of 
blandness, light, and the fuzzy warmth of 
solid friendships. Never! ++ %& (WF) 


Punch-Drunk Love The beauty in this film 
has less to do with the comic genius of 
Adam Sandler than with the cinematic 
genius of director Paul Thomas Anderson, 
but — God help us all — the movie is beau- 
tiful. Sandler plays Barry Egan, a wholesaler 
of novelty toilet plungers. Lena (Emily 
Watson), is interested in getting to know 
him. Problem is, Barry doesn’t want to be 
known; he’s ashamed of his inner life. 
Sandler turns that funny-talking belligerent 
man-child caricature we've seen him play 
into a portrait of spiritual affliction, and his 
trademark comic rage is transformed into a 
symptom of his repression. Could this be an 


Adam Sandler film you might want to see 
more than once? *&*** (SL) 


Red Dragon The latest installment of the 
Hannibal Lecter saga is neither as bone- 
chilling as The Silence of the Lambs nor as 
wretchedly misanthropic as its sequel, 
Hannibal. Red Dragon is the prequel to 
Silence of the Lambs. Edward Norton stars 
as Will Graham, the man who put Lecter 
behind bars. After the ordeal, Graham 
retired, but he’s pressed back into action to 
help solve the Tooth Fairy killings — and he 
needs the twisted insight of his old foe 
Lecter to do it. It's a. good thing Hannibal 
Lecter is a fictional character or director 
Brett Ratner may already have been sea- 
soned with sage and roasted with winter 
vegetables in a casserole. ** (SL) 


The Ring As expected, the Hollywood 
remake is not quite as pants-crapular as its 
predecessor, but it does serve up some 
genuinely creepy, refreshingly non-ironic 
horror fare. At the heart of The Ring is an 
urban legend about a videocassette that 
makes you die when you watch it. Rachel 
(Naomi Watts) is a single mother whose 
investigation of the sinister video tape inad- 
vertently ensnares her son and her ex. 
Rachel's detective work is the best part of 
the film; it's nice to see a female character in 
a horror film who shows a little initiative 
when faced with death. %*%*%* 1/2 (SS) 


The Rules of Attraction James Van Der 
Beek is Sean, a self-described “emotional 
vampire”; Shannyn Sossamon is Lauren, a 
slender, virginal university chick; lan 
Somerhalder is Paul, a swimmer-type with a 
big boner for Sean. It’s a little love triangle, 
where Paul likes Sean and Sean likes 
Lauren, and it could almost be sweet if it 
wasn't for the endless scenes of dazed sex- 
ual encounters, emotional coldness and 
noseful after bloody, joyless noseful of coke. 
Nihilism and propulsive drinking can only 
go so far, though, and without nihilism’s 
Close partner violence, the movie starts to 
drag as it pulls into the last quarter. It's still 
harsh and real, butthe Humorlessness takes 
its toll. axe (SN) 


Signs M. Night Shyamalan removes clichéd 
dialogue, plot points and characters and 
replaces them with the suspense of not 
knowing, revealing the mystery one piece at 
atime, While Signs is about alien visitors 
coming to earth, it's also the backdrop for a 
sometimes cloying, Spielbergian melodra- 
ma about a former pastor's (Mel Gibson) 
loss of spiritual faith. What makes the film 
worth seeing, however, is the suspense cre- 
ated by the steady pacing and minimal 
effects. x &* (DA) 





EMINEM:SENSITIVE GUY? Keep 
your eye out for 8 Mile 





Sweet Home Alabama Fashion designer 
Melanie Carmichael is ascending one of the 
golden career staircases deemed acceptable 
by motion picture studios. And her 
boyfriend has just proposed. But Mel is still 
married to her childhood sweetheart, who 
refuses to sign divorce papers seven years 
on. So she has to jet down to her home. 
town in Alabama to straighten things out — 
which obliges her to deal with her rambunc- 
tious past, her newfound snobbery and her 
unresolved feelings about her not-yet-ex. 
You won't be troubled by surprises, except 
of the convenient and therefore under- 
whelming kind. But there are moments 
where actual feelings threaten to break 
through the sugary crust. * + 1/2 (KW) 
The Transporter Jason Statham, previously 
noted for his work in Guy Ritchie’s funny- 
accent flicks, makes his big move on action- 
movie stardom here under the direction of 
Corey Yuen. Statham plays Frank, an ex- 
Special Forces ballbreaker who pays the 
fent on -his,gorgeous,South-of-France villa 
by working as an underworld “transporter,” 
carting cargo and crew around Europe with 
fazor-sharp precision and three simple 
rules: no names, never change the planyi<! 
never open the package. But who cares 
about the plot? The Transporterisabout 
three things: fighting, driving and comedy, 
It's not brainy. It's not deep. It’s. not one for 
the film-history books. But it is a damn 
good time at the movies. *%%* «x (DS) 


Tuck Everlasting Tuck Everlasting is a little 
dissatisfying for both fans of the children's 
book it’s based on and those of us who 
spent our free-reading periods passing 
notes. The Tucks are a family of woods- 
dwelling folk who never age, thanks to the 
waters of a magic spring. One day, a young 
girl stumbles upon their hidden abode, and 
they have to confront the blessing-and-a- 
curse aspects of their immortality. There are 
some tough philosophical issues raised 
here, and Disney should be commended for 
that. It's the gap between ambiguity and 
under-exploration of an intriguing premise 
that's frustrating; too many ideas are only 
hinted at, leaving us with too little informa- 
tion to make up our minds. 4% (AH) 


White Oleander This movie has star power 
blazing out of it ike jet fuel: Michelle % 
Renée Zellweger, Robin Wright Penn, Noah — 
Wyle and newcomer Alison Lohman...it 
lays AS we ot a 








Creating a language 


Choreographer explores “the joys of wanting” 





VOLIO 

Choreographed by Lola MacLaughlin 
Lola Dance 

Presented by Brian Webb Dance Company 
Nov. 1&2, 8 p.m. 

John L. Haar Theatre (10045 — 156 St.) 
Tickets: $20, $15 Students/Seniors, 
497 - 4416 


DANCEMAKER LOLA MAC- 
Laughlin has garnered a reputation for 
trusting her own voice as a choreog- 
rapher, coming up with quirky 
movement combos and witty, 
organic phrases. 

For Lola Dance’s stint in 
Edmonton, MacLaughlin revisits her 
critically acclaimed Simon Fraser 
grad piece, 1980's Brain Drain 
punk inspired pogo dance piece — 
in the hopes of sparking a new gen- 
eration of dance creators. “It’s a very 
fun piece for young people. J was 
very young when I did it.” 

As part of a teaching mandate of 
Brian Webb’s Grant MacEwan’s 
Dance program and his affiliate 
dance company, Lola MacLaughlin 
will set the piece on the students of 
Victoria School of Performing Arts 
over an intense 4 day workshop. The 
mentoring process will culminate 
November 1 & 2 at Grant Mac’s John 
L. Haar, with eight Vic students per- 
forming the piece as a curtain raiser 
to Lola Dance‘s Volio. 

MacLaughlin is eager to get her 
feet wet with the process, “I’ve never 
done this before, never set choreog- 
raphy on a group of students while 





a 


on tour.” To have her work incorpo- 
rated into the repertoire of budding, 
young artists is a thrill she looks for- 
ward to. “It will be great to have 
another piece of my work sliding 
around out there.” 

Always fascinated by “what sort 
of invisible forces govern our lives,” 
MacLaughlin was “interested in 
speaking of the realm of human 
emotion,” in her most recent work 

In posters and press material 
Volio is defined as “the act of wanti 
ng something (from Novial, an artifi- 
cial language invented by linguist 
Otto Jespersen).” How actually did 
MacLaughlin come across this 
intriguing snipet from a manufac- 
tured language? She was mulling 
over Shakespeare’s Benvolio, a char- 
acter from the realm of feeling in 
Romeo & Juliet, and other emotional 
characters from Julius Caesar 
Punching Benvolio into a search 
engine on the Internet, Otto 
Jespersen’s word “volio” came up. 
Besides thinking it just sounded 
cool, uplifting and musical, 
MacLaughlin really liked the idea of 
a word from a made-up lexicon. “T 
just love that the title comes from an 
invented language!” 

She excitedly agrees that although 
dance is a non-verbal art and diffi- 
cult to translate into words, the art of 
dancemaking is similar to that of a 
linguist. “I certainly am an inventor 
of language.” 

The Lola Dance artistic director 
describes Volio as an exploration of 


Speak to me 


Blending movement and theatre, warming the genre 


FROM JULIA TO EMILE, 1949 
Montréal Danse 

choreography by Estelle Clareton 
Nov. 6 & 7, 8 p.m. 

Arden Theater, St. Albert 

Tickets: $22.50, $18.50 Youth/Senior, 
459-1542 


IRISH DANCE IS IN. RENEWED TAP IS 
cool. Even ballet is revamping and 
reaching wide audiences. What's the 
problem with contemporary dance? 
It’s not exactly a hot-seller because 
it’s hard to define, says Montréal 
Danse artistic director, Kathy Casey. 
For most people, it still evokes a 
yawn-provoking series of unappeal- 
ing twitches and extensions. Casey is 
ona mission to change that impres- 
sion. The company’s latest work, 
From Julia to Emile, 1949, is a result of 
this desire to be warmer and more _ 
user-friendly. belie. Sex 
Montréal Danse was founded in 
1986 by hotshots Paul-André Forcier _ 
and Daniel Jackson to provide space 
for y daring choreographers to. 
ives and limits. 



















believes in shorter, tighter morsels 
that get to the point and say it clear- 
ly. The result is a revitalized art form 
— hybridized, innovative and com- 
prehensible. We're not talking 
arabesques but feelings, stories, cine- 
matic staging — more “shows” than 
simply choreography. 

The work currently touring 
Canada is the latest result of this 
approach. French choreographer 
and talented dancer Estelle Clareton 
has been living in Montreal for 
almost ten years. Her new work is a 
natural development to follow the 
well-received duet she created for 
the company in 2000. Her 
humourous, sensitive outlook makes 
her work delightful and funny. She 


and Casey had been thinking of cre- 
ating a group piece. They started 


» working on it immediately after the 


duet show finished. _ 
Involving all seven of the compa- 
ny’s dancers, the work is built 











SOUND & FURY 
THEATRE 


Chrough 
CA Glass, 





IN VOLIO Lola Dance explores the relationships between visual art, new 
media, technology and performance. 





“the joys of wanting,” — not what 
MacLaughlin calls our current state 
in the age of wanting, the familiar 
consumer type of wanting, but the 
“sense of aspiring, yearning and 
longing.” The process of desire is 
manifested in movement form, and 
becomes a rhythm “like an anatomy 
of the ebb and flow of wanting.” 
One aspect of desire that has pre- 
occupied MacLaughlin in the mak- 
ing of Volio is the impact of time in 
growing the intensity of want. 
Building on MacLauglin’s latest 
body of work, like her Fuse from 
2001, Volio is “an offshoot of taking, 
more ordinary movements” outside 
the traditions of what trained 
dancers consider steps and to 
“develop it further, repeat, apply dif- 
ferent motivations. Ordinary move- 


expect entrechats and tuming 
points, or any technicalities: Casey 
and Clareton want the audience to 
leave feeling “it’s for me too.” 

The show premiered in Montreal 
in February 2002 and was a great 
success: it will be restaged this 
September, exceptional, given that 
programming is usually booked 
long in advance. 

Casey wants her company’s 
works to have long lives. Like most 
dancers, she’s a perfectionist: she 
says it takes five years for works to 
become mature — the company 
tours in part help them ripen. It 
makes everybody happier: the 
dancers dance, the choreographers 
create, the company flourishes — 
quite an achievement nowadays. 

Sadly, dance is still underfunded 
and poorly attended. Casey feels 
dance “can change the world,” but 
it’s essential, she says, that dance 
speak and come out of its Lycra 
Suits. 

ISABELLE ROUSSEAU 


ment repeats to create a rhythmically 
gripping structure for the dar to 
when we want some- 
thing, there’s an obsessive emotional 
residence.” 

Approaching Volio with her three 
dancers Susan Elliott, Andrea Keevil 
and Kathleen McDonagh in mind 
specifically — “dancers with very 
different styles but all excellent and 
strong dancers” — the company 
explores the relationships between 
visual art, new media, technology 
and performance. The idea of 
Gesamtkunstwerk — total artwork, 
where movement, music, sets, light- 
ing and costumes come together to 
portray themes and ideas — is para- 
mount to shaping MacLaughlin’s 
emotionally driven language. 


SALENA MCDOUGALL 


reflect how 


OCT. 24 - NOV. 3 
JEKYLL & HYDE PUB 
Giey arom (elem 34m) 


TICKETS: 420-1757 





a beautifully written story™ 





















WORKSHOP WEST 
THEATRE 


_____+ JONSTAG 





Sweet and sad 


Wedding destined to be Canadian classic? 


MARY’S WEDDING 

By Stephen Massicotte 

Directed by Ron Jenkins 

Starring Medina Hahn, Daniel Arnold 
Workshop West Theatre 

Kaasa Theatre, Jubilee Auditorium 
Until Nov. 9, 8 p.m. (except Nov. 2, 7 
p.m. with Celebrity Food Fight) 
Tickets: $16, $13 
Seniors/Students/Artists: 2-for-1 Nov. 5 
* %-% (out of five) 


DREAMS. THEY CAN BE A BITCH. 

Filled with symbolism, whacked- 
out like a David Lynch movie, terri- 
fying, arousing, hilarious, tragic. 
Rarely straightforward. 

Stephen Massicotte'’s new play, 
Mary's Wedding, is all those things. It 
begins at the end and ends at the 
beginning and is, without question, 
entertaining and moving. “Moving” 
may be an understatement. Sure, 
people tear up at plays. But 
Massicotte’s story of love and loyalty 
makes people cry, hard 

There's more to Mary's Wedding 
than wringing tears from an audi- 

», though. The play opens with 
Daniel Arnold) informing 
the audience that it is about to see a 
are transported to rural 


Alberta, in July of 1920, the night 








dream. We 


before Mary's wedding. She’s 
dreaming of how she met and fell in 


love with her Charlie 
And what a dream. Massicotte 
brushes stylishly through the cou- 








PEPPERS 


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All You Can Eat 
ajitas $13.99 


Grey Cup Tickets 
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ple's first meeting (it’s sweet — his 
fear of thunder and her desire to get 
out of a storm draw them to the 
same abandoned barn) and follows 
along as they fall in love. But this is a 
dream, and the unexpected is never 
far off. Jumping back and forth in 
time, the play follows the couple's 
romance and Charlie's misadven- 
tures in the First World War. 

In the trenches of Europe, 
Massicotte delivers scenes that are 
knee-deep in mud and blood, taint- 
ed by the green stench of death and 
chemical weapons. Poetic in literal 
and figurative terms, the play's 
descriptions of battles are vivid — a 





man gunned down in battle splashes 
down into a puddle then bobs up 
like a man frolicking ina lake. 

The script has equal strength in 
matters of the heart. Mary and 
Charlie have much in common — 
they’re both fans of Tennyson, and 
The Charge of the Light Brigade 
becomes, well, sort of their song. Not 
cheery, but meaningful. An immi- 
grant in a new land, Mary finds in 
Charlie the possibility of familiarity; 
he sees in her welcome relief from 
the routine of his own small world. 

Their first kiss is scary but nice. 

Massicotte, best known in these 
parts for his lightweight festival 
works Boy's Own Jedi Handbook and 
Farewel | to Kings, may surprise you 
with the strength of this work. It’s 
like when a band that's just OK 
cranks out a new disc that’s com- 
pletely different from anything it’s 


SEE MAGAZINE/MARCUS BENCE 








POETIC Charlie (Daniel Arnold) and Mary (Medina Hahn) ride toward 


their fateful meeting with The Great War. 








done before, and it’s great. ae 
Wedding could become one of the 
great Canadian plays. 

The play is also a history lesson of 
the Lord Strathcona’s Horses and 
introduces us to the senseless brutal- 
ity of “the war to end all wars” ata 
time when the world is thirsty for 
more. Workshop West Artistic 
Director Ron Jenkins’ choice for his 
season opener is brilliant. And he 
draws satisfying performances from 
Arnold and Hahn, who are in the 
moment in every scene. 

Narda McCarroll’s set, Chris 
Peters’ lighting and Peter Moller’s 
sound design create an atmosphere 
that is at turns stark and frightening 
or warm and inviting as a sunny day 
in July. 

RICHARD CAIRNEY 


Food Fight! 

The Nov. 2 performance of Mary's 
Wedding will be followed by a spectac- 
ular one-of-a-kind fund-raising event. 
Groove to tunes in the Kaasa theatre 
lobby while you consider such auction 
items as a week in Kelowna or a Robert 
Bateman print. 

But there's more — here's the scam: 
purveyors of fine yum yum — Fiore’s, 
Tasty Tom's The Dish and Gourmet 
Goodies, for example — will be paired 
up with A-list celebrities, including Nick 
Lees. Darrin Hagen, Shannon Tyler, 
Laurie Blakeman anda duo calling 
themselves “Mark and Steve.” You, the 
morsel-consuming public, will be 
entreated by the notable personages to 
purchase tasty hors d'oeuvres for $2. 
You'll get fed and the most persuasive 
chef/shilf match-up will become insuf- 
ferable for a year, 

Options? Certainly: go to the Food 
Fight for $5, or pay $20, see Mary's and 
then stick areund for La guerre alimen- 
taire. Pick up the phone. Enter these 
numbers: 477-5955. When someone 
answers, just say “hor d'oeuvres,” and 
you'll get help reserving tickets. 





Fiery reckoning 


Residential memories stir the ashes at Studio 


SISTERS 

By Wendy Lill 

Directed by Kim McCaw 

Studio Theatre 

Oct. 31 — Nov. 9, 8 p.m. 

(Thurs. matinee, 12:30 p.m.) 

Timms Centre (112 St, & 87 Ave.) 
Tickets: $15 (Mon.-Thurs.), $18 (Fri. & 


Sat.), $10 Thurs. matinee, 492 - 2495 


MEMORIES OF LIFE IN RESIDENTIAL 
schools are still open wounds. The 
stories they’ ve left behind centre on 
children, whisked away from their 
lives and parents and deposited in 
places where everything from lan- 
guage to religion was alien, and 
where the nuns and priests abused 
their power unthinkably. 

But Sisters tells the story froma 
different angle, through the eyes of a 
nun who began with the best of 
intentions. 

“It’s coming from a place of inno- 
cence,” says actor Scott Olynek. 
“None of it was premeditated on her 
part.” 

Told in a series of flashbacks, 
pieces of memory bleed together to 
create a picture of the life of Mary, 
who worked as a teacher in a resi- 


there,” explains actor Erik 
Hildebrand, who plays Joel Stein, a 
lawyer assigned to defend the eager- 
to-confess nun. He acts as a catalyst 
for the trip into Mary’s memories, 
which are then brought to life by the 
other actors. The stage is a sparse, 
wall-less dreamscape broken up into 
three segments: the jail where Mary 
tells her story, the school where she 
lived for many years, and a space for 
her youth, before she took her vows. 

“Erik and Marcia are the main- 
stays on the stage because the play 
revolves around the present of figur- 
ing the mystery of why she burnt 
down the school,” says Olynek. “But 
within that, memories of her past 
wisp in and out of her present and 
draw her back... sometimes she 
becomes a part of them, sometimes 
not so much. Sometimes memories 
mix together. Sometimes I end up as 
sd character talking to her in her 
other memory... .” 

What is most noticeably missin; 
from the memories, however, are 
faces of the children whose lives 





think you would be able to handle 
some of the things that are said to 
them if they were actually on stage,” 
he says. Yet amidst all the darkness, 
the two actors see a glimmer of hope. 
“In a way, it’s about understanding 
the past and understanding each 
other.,” says Hildebrand. 

“The play’s all based on reality,” 
says Olynek. “What it’s doing is 
shedding some light on what [the 
schools] were like for the children in 
there. It’s just one particular dramati- 
zation of a real time.” 

ERIKA THORKELSON 































Scare us! 


THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY 
Until November 3 

Jekyll & Hyde Pub (10610100 2+ 
Avenue) 

Tickets: $12, $10 Students/Seniors, 
420 - 1757 

** (out of five) 









SURE EDGAR ALLEN POE IS SCARY. 
He and his contemporaries had a 
way of making simple stories 
into unforgettable nightmares. So 
shouldn't a play based on those 
eerie tales be likewise frighten- 
ing? 

Sound and Fury Theatre’s pro- 
duction of Through a Glass Darkly 
tries very hard to be every bit as 
spine chilling as the masters it 
draws on but manages to send 
out only a few cursory chills that 
don’t quite stand up to the aver- 
age camp-fire ghost story. 

The play begins with a ques- 
tion, posed by the sinister-seem- 
ing Dr. Hessilius (Douglas 
Tokaryk): does the supernatural 
really exist? Hessilius presents a 
series of stories, told by madmen 
on display for the first time. The 
stage is nearly bare, set only with 
a few ancient-looking candle 
sticks and a wooden chair that 
features various straps to hold 
the madmen in place. The age of 
the Jekyll & Hyde Pub*would 
add a little much-needed ambi= 
ence but for the fact that the 
lighting is entirely too bright for 
most of the show, making it 
impossible to become really 
involved in what's happening on 
stage. 

Three actors perform six sto- 
ries, each one supposedly more 
terrifying than the next, starting 
with Reverend Jennings’ (James 
Hamilton) unusual encounter 
with a monkey spectre. The tales 
are delivered in their original 
form but don’t really have the 
expected impact; the actors stum- 
ble over the archaic phrasing, 
sometimes mispronouncing 
words while attempting to affect 
unnatural Irish or British accents. 

Perhaps the solution here 
would be to worry less about 
characterization and more about 
simple story-telling and allow 
the words to simply carry them- 
selves. 






































































ERIKA THORKELSON 












te) \[oy.\ 4 
Free Pool 
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exclusively canadian made and designed 2 
clothing and accessories bo FRIDAY & SATURDAY 
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And it’s 


healthy 


But taste alone will attract organo-refuseniks 


ORGANIC ROOTS FOOD MARKET 
8225 112St., 413 - 1730 
** x (out of five) 


ORGANIC, SHMORGA 
is an apple as far as I'm 
large intestine looks like 


1 APPLE 
erned and if my 
s been napalmed 


by the time I’m 40 because of all the pesti- 
cides and preservatives I’ve ingested, I'll 
reckon with the consequences then. 


Tasty, well-prepared food I have no prob- 
lem with. If that food comes at a reasonable 
price and just happens to be organic, then 
bully for my bowels and stomach-lining. 
Which makes Roots Organic Market a wel- 
come addition to Edmonton’s food scene for 
nutritional neurotics and oblivians alike — 
you can get good food at decent prices with 
the added bonus that none of it has been 
blasted with bug poison, dosed with experi- 
mental growth serum or afflicted with artifi- 
cial colours or flavours. The fact that healthy 
organic food is the exception that you gen- 
erally have to pay more for rather than the 
rule is an issue for an angry op-ed piece and 
certainly not a flippant food column. 

[had to go to Roots twice to feel like I'd 
even scratched the surface of their menu just 
because the pleasant, sunlit cafeteria-style 
restaurant offers so much choice. You pick 
up a “passport” on your way in and, once 


Beverly and Joanne Ashton 
Westem Canada 


Angela Belding, 

Easter Gena 
fs 
“f 3 


y 
ye 
¥ 


Gateway Rec. Centre 
Brew & Cues 





you've chosen from pizza, crepes, sushi, 
stirfries, panini sandwiches, roasted meats, 
soups, veggie burgers and dogs, salads, 
dips, juices, coffees and teas, you get your 
passport stamped at each station you 
patronize and your total is tallied by a 
cashier at the end. It’s all organic, with lots 
of vegetarian and vegan options. 

On my first visit I tried a Thai noodle stir- 
fry with chicken, carrots, zucchini, cabbage, 
red onion and celery, tossed with a mildly 
spicy curry sauce and sprinkled with grated 
coconut ($7.95). My lunch date, the fabulous 
Quebecois pop diva Avril Culottes, had her 
Mighty Miso soup and maki rolled with 
smoked tofu, pickled carrots, shiitake mush- 
rooms and brown rice. 

(As we waited in line to pay, Avril — 
who is, as the French say, enceinte — said, 
“Sacre bleu! Dis bebby of mine want out 
someting fierce. ‘Ere, feel it!” Before I could 
palpate her tumescent tummy, our cashier 
was in there with both hands experiencing 
the wonder of Avril’s restive fetus and 
shouting, “Oh my God! She has a little per- 
son in there!” We had to go outside just so I 
could have a turn. It’s a lucky thing Avril’s a 
good sport.) 

Though you may not get groped, the 
counter staff at Roots are helpful and per- 
sonable, which comes in handy when you're 


PLAY A PRO FOR PRIZES 
CATCH THE TRICK SHOTS 


406-3414 Gateway Blvd. 


navigating a selection as broad as theirs. 
The young woman at the coffee counter was 
even kind enough to replace a chai latte 
after Avril went overboard with the organic 
sugar. She also made me a terrific 
Americano with organic espresso ($1.50). 

On my next visit | ordered a panini sand- 
wich with smoked tofu, white cheddar and 
an array of vegetables on spelt bread ($5.95) 
and a bowl of spinach, white bean and 
tomato soup ($3), which the staff called 
Christmas soup for its festive colour 
scheme. The soup was hearty and featured 
plenty of the advertised components. The 
sandwich was quite sizeable, and the 
smoked tofu took on a creamy quality in 
combination with the cheese. A warning: 
bread made with spelt — a low-gluten, 
high-protein distant cousin of wheat — is 
nutty and filling, but it’s also dense and, 
when toasted, can be a bit hard on the roof 
of your mouth when you bite into it. Good 
sandwich, though. 

This meal I washed down with organic 
spearmint tea ($1.75). A different but no less 
friendly young woman behind the coffee 
counter even pulled out a book and looked 
up the health benefits of spearmint tea for 
my edification. 

Maybe all that organic eating had a salu- 
tary effect on my insides and maybe I'll live 
a little longer thanks to that pair of whole- 
some repasts. For a instant gratifier like 
myself, the sense of satisfaction I got from 
tasty, hot food was all the peace of mind I 
needed. 

SCOTT LINGLEY 












Edmonton (Oyo much E00 olen 
8130 Gateway Blvd. mol astoai ol Nov.1 7:00pm 
West Edmonton Mall Edmonton Nov. 1 9:30 prr 
11062 — 156 St Edmonton Nov. 2 7:00 pm 


10250 — 106 St 


Edmonton 


CANADIAN 


SEE MAGAZINE/KEVIN WILSON 


PEAR ESSENTIALS Emily keeps the supply 
of freshly sliced organic fruit topped up. 


SELF STORAGE 
DOWNTOWN 


Capital Self Storage 423-3500 












“ Pita Pit 
The Pita Pit has Grown. fn 

Come down & visit us 

at our new Westend & 
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& don't forget about our \ 
Oliver Square location!! © 
Enjoy one of our delicious 
Pita's or Salads. 


Fresh Thinking, Healthy Eating 
is what we're all about, 
and we're always open /ate. 


for our NOW IRI Square, & 


Castledowns locations. 
Drop off resumes at preferred 
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USES SR a el ae eC ded 





REVIEWS 


VEGETARIAN/HEALTH 


Café Mosaics 10844-82 Ave. 433-9702 
With a newly revamped menu, Mosaics 
makes its way to your heart with simple, 
unpretentious vegetarian fare at reasonable 
prices. New dishes include the Secret 
Burrito and the Teriyaki Portabello 
Mushroom Salad. You can only get their 
excellent Huevos Rancheros for Sunday 
brunch, but it’s definitely worth getting up 
for. we dea (SL) 

The King and! Edmonton's Thai restaurant 
of note lives up to its reputation with a 
broad, authentic menu redolent of the 
flavours of Southeast Asia. Pad Thai is a 
good place to start, but after that, dare to 
experiment. * 4% 

Savoy's Health Café 170710 - 51 Ave. 437- 
7718 Don't let the anglophile name fool 
you, this pillbox-sized diner near Southgate 
Mall specializes in revitalizing juices and 
Indian delights like the Masala Dossa. A |it- 
tle out of the way, but worth the trip. 
FOI 


BRUNCH & BREAKFAST FAVORITES 


Sidetrack Café 10333-112 St. 421-1326 
What can you say about Edmonton's origi- 
nal roadhouse that hasn't been said before? 
Edmonton's best lineup of live talent ina 
warm, friendly atmosphere. Kitchen fare 
perfect for late-night nibbling, and a very 
substantial brunch buffet every Sunday. 
woke 

Sweetwater Café 12427-102 Ave. This 
outlet outlasted the original Sweetwater 
location on Whyte Ave. Love the weekend 
brunch: huge portions and the whole-wheat 
pancakes are to die for. **«* 

Tasty Tom's 9965-82 Ave. 437-5761 Tasty 
Tom’s has got to be my favourite German 
restaurant. | love the funky diner feel, and 
also | appreciate the deft (and contempo- 
fary) take on continental (the goulash soup 
and the schnitzel burger especially). 
kkk 


ASIAN 


Mirama Dining & Lounge 9437 Jasper 
Ave. 425-3888 Scrumptious dim sum in a 
massive dining room that's usually packed. 
Look for excellent, plump shrimp rice flour 
wraps, pan-fried pork dumplings, curried 
squid and endless hot tea. **«* 1/2 
Tropika 6004 Calgary Trail S. 439-6699 
Malaysian cooking is the original infusion 
food — British, Indian, Chinese, Thai, 
Arabic and native Malay cooking. Excellent 
and well-prepared lunches at reasonable 
prices. We'll be back for dinner. ***&* 
Bul-Go-Gi House 8873-92 St. 466-2330 
For many Edmontonians, the Bul-Go-Gi 


House is their first taste of Korean cuisine 
Great place to start; the eponymous food- 
stuff is a meat-lover's delight. The Bee 
Beem Barp (Mountain Vegetables) ain't so 
bad either, And at the end of it all: Juicy 
Fruit. tek 

North China Restaurant 9920-82 Ave. 448- 
9999 What it utterly lacks in atmosphere 
and customer service chops, North China 
makes up with reliably tasty Chinese food 
Their hot and sour soup has salved many a 
southside hangover, but you should give 
their Szechuan beef, mushu vegetables and 
seafood dishes a try. Order the large pot 
stickers. k** 


CAJUN Segoe s 


Dadeo Restaurant 10548A-82 Ave. 433- 
0930 The menu has been tweaked a bit 
lately, but the stuff you've always loved 
about Dadeo's is still there. Combo platters 
salads, gumbos and the delicious po’ boys, 
on special every Monday and Tuesday 
Night. * kek 

Louisiana Purchase 10320-111 St. 420- 
6779 Way before Cajun cooking became 
mainstream, Louisiana Purchase was offer- 
ing a clever take on Creole and blackened 
dishes with a patented Crescent City ele 
gance. Ohhh baby, just gotta have that 
Smoked Alligator and Pork Boudin 
tk 


CENTRAL AMERICAN 


Los Comales 10824 - 97 St. 423-1213 
Offering authentic and unpretentious 
Guatemalan, Salvadoran and Mexican dish- 
es in a cheap and cheerful downtown 
eatery. Try the pupusas and quesadillas. 
nak 


INDIAN : 


New Asian Village 10143 Saskatchewan 
Or. 433-3804 Esteemed for its mouthwa- 
tering Indian fare and extensive beer selec- 
tion, New Asian Village puts up nice buffets 
Wednesday and Sunday nights. Pace your- 
Self. kkk 

Khazana Restaurant 10177-107 St. 702- 
0330 My only advice when you visit this 
million-dollar dining room is to arrive hun- 
ry and graze broadly so as to do justice to 
the wild assortment of naan breads, appe- 
tizers, entrees and signature Tandoori 
Offerings. * 


ITALIAN 


Tin Pan Alley 4804 Calgary Trail South 
702-2060 A wide variety of delectable pas- 
tas, succulent steaks, an assortment of 
delicious veal dishes and chicken dishes, 
plus wood-fired pizzas, capped by decadent 
desserts (the chocolate is Callebaut) made 
in-house. * 

Allegro Italian Kitchen 10011-109 St. 424- 
6644 Housed as it is in a faceless mod- 
ernist tower, Allegro is as endlessly com- 
fortable and gracious as its home is mono- 
lithic. A deft take on an uptown Italian 


Only Taiwanese 
Restaurant in Alberta 


menu served in postmodern elegance and 
seamless charm. **& 

East Side Mario's 2704-99 St. 988-8938 
You shouldn't let its grim South Edmonton 
Common surroundings and over-kitschy 
dining room blind you to the subtle charms 
of this energetic franchise. Way adept take 
on Italian cuisine and way slick service 
kk 

Chianti 10501-82 Ave. 439-9829 Not 
Edmonton's fanciest take on Italian cuisine 
but one of everybody's favourites for the 
obvious reasons: always affordable, always 
bustling, always spot-on consistent, always 
friendly and in one of the city’s most inter- 
esting historical buildings. x *« * 

ll Forno Ristorante 14987 Stony Plain Rd. 
455-0443 \f you visit this ever-popular 
eatery — famous for its oven-baked pizzas 
— go early. You may wait for a table, but a 
well-made meal here is worth the effort 
kek 

Sicilian Pasta Kitchen 17239 Jasper Ave 
488-3838 A big open dining room and 
inviting patio (however short the season) 
aren't the least of Sicilian Pasta Kitchen’s 
charms. The Penne Diavola and Mussels in 
Gorgonzola Sauce speak volumes. **&*&* 


MEDITERRANEAN 


Ziveli 12202 Jasper Ave. 453-3912 
Evincing Greek and Yugoslavian influences. 
this “Balkan Restorant” is a great place to 
linger over delicious appetizers like sagana- 
ki, calamari and olives with anchovies as 
you savour a bottle of Yugoslavian red. For 
$21.99 per person you can sample a dozen 
items off the menu, which includes souvia- 
ki, moussaka and Adriatic shrimp 

Attractive patio for summer dining 

ke 1/2 (SL) 

Grub Med 179 Street & 37 Ave. 436-1988 
A bit of a drive and slightly hidden, but 
worth the effort. Funky room, great service 
to boot. *&ke* 

Symposium 10439-82 Ave. 433-7912 You 
can never get enough Greek food, especial- 
ly when it’s this good. Named after the 
Greek word for party, this restaurant lives 
up to its name with a cool postmodern- 
influenced open design and mucho shar- 
ing-friendly dishes. **«* 

Yianni’s Taverna Restaurant 10444 - 82 
Ave. Reliably good Greek food in a nice 
character room smack-dab on Whyte, 
Yianni’s is also renowned for the exuberant 
atmosphere that sometimes spills into the 
street, and sometimes into your lap. 
kkk 


The Funky Pickle 10441-82 Ave. 433-3865 
A Funky Pickle pizza means whole-wheat 
dough, real cheese (including Asiago and 
Feta), fresh vegetables and ingredients and 
real attention to detail. xx *«* 

Parkallen Pizza 8424-109 St. 430-4777 
Sister outlet to the venerable Parkallen 
Restaurant, Parkallen Pizza lives up to an 








Edmonton's Best Korean Food 


oe El 
KOREAN VILLAGE 
RESTAURANT 


Come and Experience 
BBQ Buffet Cooked 
Right at your Table _ 
Call Now to Reserve 

your Christmas Party 
(Max 40 People) 


| Karaoke Upstairs 


enviable family reputation. This is how 
pizza should always be: golden perfect, 
thick and chewy, with really generous 

fresh ingredients. *** 

Pharo’s Pizza 8708 - 109 St. 433-5205 

|'m not going to commit the faux pas of 
saying that Pharo's is the best pizza in town 
(my god, that’s like choosing a favourite 
among your children), but will state that it's 
certainly in my personal top 10. The joint 
also has that retro-diner coolness and is 
perfectly situated beside the Garneau 
Theatre for pre- or post-show pigging out 
tok tk 


SUSHI AND TEPPAN te 


Kyoto Japanese Cuisine 0728-109 St. 
420-1750 One of two locations on 109 St., 
this Kyoto sports tatami rooms, a long 
sushi bar and the same menu as its south- 
side sister — lots of variety in appetizers, 
sushi, udon and entrees. The rainbow rall 
broiled scallop in misonaise and beef tataki 
are all worth a try. *#*& a 

Sushi Wasabi 5714-117 St. 433-0533 | 
miss their little take-out kiosk in the 
Strathcona Chinatown Mall, but the new 
digs suit the elegance and quality of the 
food. Good assortment of entrees but, real- 
ly, try the sushi. Or at least the avocado- 
shiitake roll, * *&&* 

Tokyo Noodle Shop & Sushi Bar 10736-82 
Ave. 430-0838 Modelled on Tokyo's ubig- 
uitous noodle shops, this ultra-hip Garneau 
Lofts restaurant instantly became a Whyte 
Ave. institution. | especially like the thick 
Udon noodles and lightly fried Salmon 
Karaage. * *& 


Fast Foop (Sit-Down) © ~ 


BURGERS 

Garage Bar & Grill 10242-106 St. 423- 
5014 Named for the fact it’s housed ina 
renovated garage, the Garage is one of 
those lunchtime secrets for downtown fast- 
food junkies in the know. A wonderful 
selection of diner-style entrees, sandwiches 
and finger foods and big ol’ burgers parked 
alongside a heap of award-winning fries. 
Good soup too. *** 


COFFEE HOUSES AND Puss 


Handy Bakery 8660 - 118 Ave. 477-8842 
Delicious Portuguese baked goods are the 
main fare at this unassuming Norwood gro- 
cery. Try the crusty cornbread, the dough- 
nut-like sonhos and the pasteis de nata, 
yummy flake-pastry cups filled with cus- 
tard. A good selection of Portuguese 

meats, cheeses, olives and pantry essen- 
tials too. The lineup takes a little while to 
get through. k*&*&* 

Alain Patisserie 9925 - Whyte Ave. 988- 
9312 A real French patisserie in Old 
Strathcona doing brisk business in pains au 
chocolat, meringues, petits fours and fruit 
tarts. Croissants are excellent; splendid 
sandwiches and quiches and priced right. 
kaw 1/2 













The Sugar Bow! 10922-88 Ave. 433-8369 
A totally mellow experience. Hanging out 
on the stoop of this late-Edwardian-era 
brick building come summertime is a long- 
standing southside tradition. Fresh snacks 
and always excellent coffees, teas and other 
drink, plus an extensive live music sched- 
ule. ek 

Two Rooms Café 10324-82 Ave. 439-8386 
Don't let the crowds on this Dominion Hotel 
eatery’s patio deter you. Even if you have to 
wait for a table, it’s worth it. If the food 
here was music it would be eclectic, world 
beat and danceable. k**x* 

Ceili’s trish Pub and Restaurant 10338- 
109 St. 426-5555 A mighty fine Celtic 
eatery across the street from the downtown 
GMCC. Fave dishes include the Five 
Counties Dip (home-made guacamole, 
salsa, black bean sauce, sour cream and 
aged cheddar) and the massive Corned 
Beef and Cabbage Boxty. *#**«* 


CASUAL ELEGANT | 


Turtle Creek Café 8404 - 109 St. 433- 
4202 Like Earl's, Chianti and other main- 
stream eateries before it, TCC deals in reli- 
ably prepared, efficiently presented middle- 
of-the-road food which, however, does 
nothing to surprise your palate. A 
respectable wine list and the availability of 
duck in some of the dishes are the main 
variant. Nice patio. x*** 

Café Select 10018-106 St. 423-0419 
Reviewing Café Select is like reviewing 
Shakespeare: what can you say about a 
classic? This cosy, homage-Renaissance 
room is all about balancing mood, service 
and deft cuisine to add up to a delightful 
evening Out. * 

Sorrentino’s in the Varscona Hotel 434- 
7607 | don't know if | go to the Varscona 
Sorrentino’s more for the brilliant food (a 
swell take on Continental/Italian offerings) 
or the decadently relaxing decor. All | can 
say for sure is that | keep going back 

Kk tok 

Characters Restaurant 10257-105 St. 421- 
4100 Blending traditional tea room ele- 
gance with postmodern panache and an 
uptown menu, Characters is a brilliant addi- 
tion to downtown's culinary culture. Loads 
of fresh ingredients, a deft kitchen and sub- 
lime service make for a memorable meal. 
tok ke 

Madison's Grill 10053 Jasper Ave. 421- 
7171 Looking for a surefire room to 
impress the boss or that special someone? 
Then Madison's is the place for you: an 
endlessly charming, elegant room, gracious 
service and a flawless continental menu 
with a fusion mentality. +e & 

Polos Café 9405-112 St. 432-1371 One of 
Edmonton's first and finest fusion restau- 
rants, Polos easily earns a top berth on any 
sophisticated diner's shortlist. Adept with 
each and every dish, the dining room nails 
down a cool, modern elegance. ** #3 





ROSE BOWL Pizza 


7, 


qT, 












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[ee 
7 y tar 
IN 


“al 


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WORKSEARCH 
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Do any of the following sound like you? 


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If you answered yes to any of these questions, we can help! 


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_____VISUALARTS_ 





ik 


SNOOPY RUG This “found object” is one of the exhibit’s low art items. Or 








is it? Pop icons are as important as the masters to today’s artist, says 


Carson. 





e 
Peanuts meet Picasso 
Happiness is a warm semiotics discussion 
in C.W. Carson's High & Low 


HIGH & LOW: REFLECTIONS 
By C.W. Carson 
Until November 30 


At Harcourt House Gallery 


HOOKED RUGS AND POP CULTURAL 
images (e.g. Papa Smurf) juxtaposed 
with digitally obscured collages of 
canonical paintings: such is the con- 
tent of C.W. Carson's High & Low: 
Reflections, now showing at Harcourt 
House Gallery until November 30. 
Visually stimulating, yes, but, is it 
art? 

“What constitutes art is one of the 
questions raised by the show,” 
explains Carson. “Context and 
placement divides high and low into 
a hierarchy, high art on the ceiling 
and low on the floor. Sometimes I 
reverse it, like with the sunflower 
rug or the giraffe kind of observing 
the scene. It’s very simple, really.” 

A plush Smurf doll, toys and rugs 
are the found-object centerpieces to 
the exhibit. Several kitschy do-it- 
yourself craft-kit-type rugs form a 
mosaic in the middle of the floor, 
with others placed along walls next 
to their high art companions. Carson 
himself has recreated many of the 
high art pieces using hardware store 
paints and craft glitter, often insert- 
ing cartoon characters like Bugs 
Bunny into them. 

Context creates meaning, with 
like-minded pieces set together in 
groupings. A digitally stretched 
image of Jacques-Louis David's 
Napoleon is matched with a 
Napoleon printed on a playing card 
with hooked rugs of an Indian, uni- 
corns and another of a horse and 
cowboy underneath. 

It becomes a bit of a game, guess- 
ing the high art references and the 
relationship they have to the toys, 
rugs and memorabilia surrounding 
them. 

“The vignettes are in an ; 
artist/ muse setup, like with the alien 
figure ee T bought at the dollar 
store ani accompanying image 
that I made. The Nabe e yak asad 
tionship with the Indian head, uni- 

igre Tugs. ; 





In the high category: “Klee Face” 





duction of the same painting lac- 
quered onto a rustic slice of a log, 
two plastic crucifixes and Carson’s 
own painting of an icon. The log 
slice da Vinci, hanging with the 
“high art’ components, is no less 
kitschy than the rug version. The 
mass production of these canonical 
works liberates them to mass expo- 
sure, unlike the transcendent origi- 
nals. 

“In our image-based culture, we 


~ most often see high works of art ina 


pop culture context, like on a T-shirt 
or coffee mug. In a museum, they're 
often protected by Plexiglas and 
alarms.” Would Van Gogh ever 
have imagined that one day Starry 
Nights would become a sereen 
saver? 

“Nostalgia and our own life refer- 
ences make up our own version of 
the canon.” : ‘ 















___LISTING 








SEEING. 


For club & pub addresses please see the Venue Index 


HURSDAY 


HAPPY HALOWEEN!!! 

ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL Goobies Junction 

BLUES ON WHYTE James Armstrong 

CROMDALE HOTEL Hugh Betcha 

FOUR ROOMS Don Berner Trio 

FOX & HOUNDS Axis Of Advance & Operation 
Wintermist, $8, doors 8 pm 

HONEST MUR'S Halloween Party: Mister Lucky 
(Blues/Roots), 9 pm, NC 

IRON HORSE Big Halloween Party w/ Exit 303 

J. J'S PUB The Jackdicky Band 

KINGSKNIGHT PUB Chunk 

LION'S HEAD PUB Doug Stroud 

NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE Grand Re-opening w/ DJs 
Nik Rofeelya & Bluejay, Famous $5 Halloween Party 
POWERPLANT Broken Nose w/ Lost Action Heroes & 
Uncas Old Boys, $8 adv (UASUS office or Powerplant), 
$10 at the door, doors 8 pm. 

RED'S (WEM) Las Vegas Crypt Keepers w/ King Ring 
Nancy, AA + licensed area 

THE REV Halloween Scream: Our Mercury, Tandum 
Vitalis, Drop Halo & Where Once Was Hope, 3 Clubs, 1 
Cover, $6 

ROSE & CROWN Tim Becker 

SHERLOCK HOLMES CAPILANO Lyle Hobbs 

{) SHERLOCK HOLMES DOWNTOWN Dave Hiebert 
SHERLOCK HOLMES WEM Allan Rock 

{) SIDETRACK CAFE Trevor Finlay Band, 9:30 pm, $4 
STARS Halloween No Cover Bash: Snak Pak & Fat Dave, 
doors 9 pm, show 9:30 pm 

URBAN LOUNGE Gold Club Series presents The Rascalz, 
$10 


ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL North West Passage 

BLUES AT THE HILL Harpdog Brown 

BLUES ON WHYTE James Armstrong 

BORDERLINE CLUB Stiff Richard, NC 

CASINO EDMONTON Looker (Pop) 

CASINO YELLOWHEAD Colleen Rae & Cornerstone 
CROMDALE HOTEL Hugh Betcha 

{) FOUR ROOMS 11 0’ Clock Songs 

FOUR ROOMS (ST. ALBERT) Don Berner Trio 

FOX & HOUNDS Half Cut, Metallica & Cassadiy 
GOODFELLOWS PUB KGB (Classic Rock) 

THE HIGH RUN Souled Out 
JHONEST MUR’S Halloween Party: Mister Lucky 
(Blues/Roots), 9 pm, NC 

J. J."S PUB Lo-Phonic Experience (Rock) 

KELLY’S Neil MacDonald 

KINGSKNIGHT PUB Stiff 

LION'S HEAD PUB Doug Stroud 

LONGRIDERS SALOON Millions 

RED'S (WEM) Tribute Band: Metallica 

THE REV Neko Case w/ Jim & Jennie & the Pinetops & 
Robin Hunter, $15 adv (adv tix from Blackbyrd, 
Freecloud, Listen & the Rev), $18 door, doors 9 pm 
ROSE & CROWN PUB Tim Becker 

SHERLOCK HOLMES CAPILANO Lyle Hobbs 

{) SHERLOCK HOLMES DOWNTOWN Dave Hiebert 
SHERLOCK HOLMES WEM Allan Rock 

SHERLOCK HOLMES WHYTE AVE Richard Blaze 

{) SIDETRACK CAFE Daddy Longlegs, 10 pm, $7 
STARS Never The Less, Falling Race & Kill, doors 9 pm, 
show 9:30 pm 

STRATHEARN PUB Halloween Bash: Experienced Math 
Debators, 9:30 pm, NC 

SUGAR BOWL SOUTHSIDE Bob Jahrig & Friends, $6, 
9:30 pm 
TIM'S GRILL The Ancestors w/ Tippy Agogo, Kim 
Glanville & Roger Duncan, $5, 9 pm 
URBAN LOUNGE Crush, $5 
YARDBIRD SUITE Brett Miles & Friends, $5 members, $9 
guests, doors 8 pm, show 9 pm 
ZENARI'S ON FIRST Dan Skakun 


SATURDAY 


ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL North West Passage 
BILLY BUDD'S The Boom Boom Kings, 9 pm 
BLACKDOG FREEHOUSE Hair of the Dog (4 to 6 p.m.): 








BLUES ON WHYTE House Party Blues Band 
{) SIDETRACK CAFE Sunday Night Live 


MONDAY 





BLUES ON WHYTE Brent Parkin 

ORUID Celtic Night Session w/ Yves Le GuEvel &the 
Dukes, 8 p.m. , 

{) SIDETRACK CAFE Glamourpuss 


TUESDAY 7 


BLUES ON WHYTE Brent Parkin 
{) SIDETRACK CAFE Glamourpuss 
URBAN LOUNGE Fubar — The Rock & Roll Road Show 


Wiaisiy ve 


BLACKDOG FREEHOUSE Glitter Gulch Wednesdays. 
BLUES ON WHYTE Brent Parkin 

NASHVILLE'S ELECTRIC ROADHOUSE Little River Band 
POWERPLANT Declaring War on Tuition: War Party & 
Warsaw Pact, 8:30 pm 

{) SIDETRACK CAFE Glamourpuss 

URBAN LOUNGE Kybosh 







THURSDAY 


BLUES ON WHYTE Brent Parkin 
KINGSKNIGHT PUB Connors Road 

POWERPLANT Directions: The Gravity Collection, JIF & 
DJ Big Daddy, 8:30 pm 

SIDETRACK CAFE Recipe From A Small Planet 

URBAN LOUNGE Granny Dynamite 





COMEDY CLUBS 


THE COMEDY FACTORY 3414 Calgary Trail North 469- 
4999 —Thurs Amateur Night followed by the headliner 
for the week. Thurs, Fri & Sat, Oct 31, Nov 1 & 2: 
Comedian Henry 0 Watson w/ special quests. Shows: 
Thurs & Fri 8:30 pm, Sat: 8:30 &10:30 pm 

FARGOS WHYTE AVE10307 82 Ave 433-4526 — Sun 9 
pm Laugh A Lot Comedy. 

J.J. °S PUB 13760 118 Ave — Wed Showcase Night 
offers live comedy by the Comedy Support Troup. 

{) SIDETRACK CAFE 10333 122 St, 421-1326 — Thurs 
7:30 pm What Happens Next? An improvisational come- 
dy show based on Whose Line /s It Anyway? Sun 10 pm 
Punchline Scramble Comedy Showw/ Live band & DJ. 





>a TIN 


UPDATE YOUR CLUB LISTING BY CONTACTING 
KIRSTIE @ 430-9003, FAX 432-1102 OR 
EMAIL kblackmore@see.greatwest.ca 


ALTERNATIVE 


CLUB ANASAZI 10525 Jasper Ave, 423-3232 — 
Urban/Caribbean, R&B/Hip Hop, Reggae/Calypse music 
Features Echo Tone & various DJs (local & nationwide). 
Fridays/Saturdays/Longweekends 
























ND 


a 
44 MAGNUM CLUB 8319 144 Ave, 475-8702 
preh RESTAURANT Provincial Museum of Alberta, 


cancion AND GILL 77 Ave & Calgary Trail S. 


‘BILLIARD CLUB 2nd Fi, 10505 82 Ave, 492-0895 
B ae aeiee ee net 


“ORIGINAL JOE'S RESTAURANT & BAR 12520 102 Ave, 


THE ATTIC 10407-82 Ave, 433-1969— Wed House 
Music Nite Thurs Student Nite. 

BACKROOM VODKA BAR 10324-82 Ave (upstairs), 436- 
4418— Mon Sense - Downtempo & Ambient w/ 
Whisper, Erin Eden & guests Wed Forum w/ DJ Calus & 
Robert Alan Thurs Fresh & Funky w/ DJ Deluxx & guests 
Fri Pilot Episode w/ Tripswitch & Simon Locke Sat Flava 
- Hip hop w/ guests 

BLACKDOG FREEHOUSE 10425-82 Ave, 439-1082 — 
Mon DJs Penny Jo & Tash Tues Digital Underdog - hip 
hop w/ Sonny Grimezzzzz & guests Sun What the Hell? - 
house, hip hop, downtempo w/ Tryptomene, Sat 4 to 6 
pm Hair of the Dog, NC (See Live Music Listings for fea- 
tured band), 

) BOOTS 10242-106 St, 423-5014 — Open7 
days/week. Happy Hour: 3 to 8 pm Fri Retro Disco Sat 
Flashback Saturdays w/ DJs Derrick & Manny Mulatto. 
Male Stripper @ 11 pm Private Gay Lounge 

{) BUDDY'S NIGHT CLUB 117258 Jasper Ave, 488-6636 
— Mon Amateur Strip Off (Midnight) Tues & Wed DJ 
Stephan Sun & Thurs Wet Underwear Contest Fri DJ 
Arrowchaser Sat DJ Code Red Sun Best Drag Show in 
the city, 

{) CALIENTE NIGHT CLUB 10815 Jasper Ave, 425-0850 
— Fri Function Fridays w/ DJ Invinceable Sun Ladies 
Night w/ DJ Invinceable Doors 10 pm $5 

{) CRISTAL LOUNGE 10336 Jasper Ave, 426-7521 — Fri 
Future Funk Fridays, drum ‘n’ bass w/ Deegree, Skoolee 
& Phatcat Sat DJ Invinceable & guests, doors 9 pm 
cover $8 

DEVLIN'S 10507-82 Ave, 437-7489 — Tues Cerveza 
Party by Corona, Happy Hour 5 to 7 pm Wed Seeing 
Double Martini Party, Happy Hour 5 to 7 pm Fri & Sat 
Happy Hour 3 to 7 pm Martini Party all night Sun DJ Dia- 
Bolic spins the In Sounds From Way Out, Happy Hour 5 
to7 pm 

FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10517 82 Ave (upstairs), 437-7489 
— Happy Hour Every Day 5 to 7 pm Mon Metal Mondays 
Tues Blues Tuesdays presented by Labatt Blues Wed 
Boogie Wednesday Retro-Dance Party w/ DJ Mr. B Fri & 
Sat Shake Your Ass Weekend w/ DJ Serial K (Dance, alt, 
rock, retro) Sun Free pool all night. 

{) FOX & HOUNDS PUB 10725 109 St, 423-2913 — 
Mon Punk Night w/ DJ Cory Tues Orgasmatron. 
Bloodcum Bob & DJ Cory Wed Hardcore w/DJ Bloodcum 
Bob Thurs Metal Night w/DJ Orgasmatron Fri & Sat Live 
bands Wed Singles Night 

HALO 10538 Jasper Ave, 423-4256 — Wed w/ Darren 
Pockett Thurs Sou! What? - soul, rare grooves & hip hop 
w/ DJ Tanner & DJ Echo Fri For Those Who Know - 
deep, sexy house w/ Ryan Mason & Amoretto Sat How 
Sweet It Is - soulful house w/ Junior Brown & guests 
Sun As Good As It Gets - funk & soul w/ DJ Deluxx & 
guests 

KINGSKNIGHT PUB 9227 34 Ave, 433-2599 — Wed 
Female Master Hypnotist Kelly Rae 9:30 pm $3 

{) LUSH 10030A 102 St, 424-2951 — Wed Classics 
(upstairs), Ariel & Roel (downstairs) Thurs Trauma 
Thursdays w/ residents Phatcat, Degree, Skoolee, 
MCDegree & weekly guest DJs Fri Remo Willams & 
Bobby Torpedo spin Booty Shakin’ House (upstairs), 
Underground w/ DU Eddie Lunchpail - retro & alternative 
(downstairs) Sat Turbo Saturdays house trance & pro- 
gressive w/ rotating resident DJs, Velvert Underground - 
forties & Nines w/ Rerun, Shortround & Sundog 

{DP MAJESTIK 10123 112 St, 423-3352 or 423-3646 — 
Mon ‘Skool’ House/Tech House Tues DJ Karaoke Wed 
‘Volume’ Drum & Bass, NC Thurs ‘Funky Sexy House 
Night’ Fri ‘Slammin’ Fridays’ Sat ‘Hard on Saturdays’ 
Sun ‘Breakfast At Tiffanys’ open 10 am to 6 pm 


NETWERKS INTERNET. NEW MEDIA CAFE 8128 163 St 
439-0393 

NEW CITY LIKWID LOUNGE/SUBURBS 10079 Jasper 
Ave (Paladium Building) 

NEWFIE BULLET BAR 15009 118 Ave, 4518555 

WU WAVE PUB 18228 89 Ave, 489-9627 

O'BYANE’S IRISH PUB 1061882 Ave, 414-6766 


452-3034 
-OTTEWELL NEIGHBORHOOD PUB 6104 90 Ave 
SSeS SIRO Power Plant, 492- 


POWER ROCK LOUNGE #77, 8103 127 Ave 
‘RED'S West Edmonton Mall, 481-6420. : 
-REOLA’S CAMPUS PUB eet 105 Ave, st nce 














PHONE: 430-9003 FAX: 432-1102 E-MAIL: info@see.greatwest.ca 








SEVEN 
DAY S ERLCXSL cg 


eePICK OFTHE AVERK. Ot 





ESO THE MASTERS Never mind Britney, 
Christina and all those other “teen” tramps; 
19 year-old violinist Jessica Linnebach is the 
type of prodigious musical talent that 
deserves attention (plus she’s actually a 
teen, not an approximate facsimile thereof). 
| And attention we shall provide: this wun- 
--derkind is currently studying with Pinchas 
Zukerman (of the National Arts Centre 
Orchesira) at the Manhattan School of 
Music in New York and she already has her 
Masters in Violin Performance. See her 
Friday, November 1 and/or Saturday, 
November 2 at the Winspear Centre, with 
the Da Camera Singers, conductor Victor 
Feldbull and the ESO, of course.. Tickets: 
$22 to $62 adults, $15 to $55 senior /stu- 
dents, from WIN. Show at 8 p.m 


= THURSDAY ee 


ART FOR LUNCH Skip the Halloween afternoon hi-balls (they’1l make 
the rest of the evening soooo much longer) and munch along to a slide- 
show and talk on Inuitart appreciation with Dr. William Lakey, a member 
of the Edmonton Inuit Art Enthusiasts. Dr. Lakey will give a collector's per- 
spective on the art of Inuit printmaking. Noon at the Edmonton Art Gallery 
(info: 422-6223 or www.edmontonartgallery.com). 

















= FDA = ee ee ee, 


THE DUCHESS OF MALFI Lust, jealousy, treachery and murder: does 
that sound like an evening with your significant other? Well, it could be, if 
you pair up to see John Webster's 400 year old revenge tragedy revived at 
the U of A’s Media Room (Fine Arts Building). Shows 8 p.m. nightly. 
Admission: Free, although capacity is limited, so call 989-0531 to reserve 
seats. 


——_ SATURDAY. 





THE ANCESTORS W/ TIPPY AGOGO 
When the former said that they’re a “tribal 
space jam fusion ” and that the latter (pic- 
tured here) “will be experimenting with flu- 
orescents and black light,” we said “kick out 
the fluorescent-blacklight-tribal-spacejams 
muthaf!” Plus anyone named Tippy is 
OK with us. With Kim Glanville & Roger 
Duncan at Tim’s Grill (7106 - 109 Street; tix 
$5, show 9 p.m.). 


——SUNDA 


SURSAUT The Arden Family Series presents this tender and animated 
dance-theatre production that celebrates and encourages creativity in all of 
us. At the Arden Theatre, St Albert — Nov 3 @7:30 pm: Tickets: 459-1542. 
Now back to the debauchery... 


——MONDA’ 


GREENWOOD SINGERS Um, OK, this one’s wholesome, too. 
Consider this Seven Days’ PG Week. This here's a CD release for Randall 
Thompson: Ode to the Virginian Voyage, Frostiana , 7:30 p.m. at All Saints 
Anglican Cathedral (10035 103 St). 


——JUESDA 














INDULGENCE: A FOOD AND WINE EPIC 
a an event worthy of true dionysians. 
sae ea will be partnering deli- 
exceptional VQA wines. 
Pacing tur Be aa Crowne 
Plaza-Chateau Lacombe, F 


_______LISTING 









CONTINUED 


NETWORKS INTERNET NEW MEDIA CAFE 8728 103 St, 
439-0393 — Not the Club Scene every second Fri 
Groove and funk in the most unique atmosphere on 
Whyte Ave w/ Marcus Bar w/ ID 18+ 

{JOVERTIME BROILER & TAPROOM 10304 111 St, 423- 
1643 — Thurs Extreme Thursdays feature cheap drinks 
& cool music 

PURE 10551 82 Ave, 995-PUIRE (7873) — Fri Break out 
the funky diva house w/ DJ Dragon Sat everything but 
Top 40 w/ DJ Dragon Rotating guest performers (flame 
jugglers, sumo shakers, razor eaters & much more) 
weekly 

THE REV 10030 102St, 424-2745 — Mon Monday Night 
Rinse, open mic hip-hop, $4, doors 9 pm Tues Trailer 
Trash Tut w/ DJ Whitebread, mullets, tanktops & 
beer, $5, doors 9 pm 

{QTHE ROOS 
Wet Contest w/ DJ Left Wed Amate: 











different y 
w/ DJs Sweatz, Tipswitch, Alvaro & Guests Upstairs OJ 
Jazzy & Female Stripper downstairs Sat DJ Jazzy 

upstairs, XTC downstairs Sun Betty Ford hangover Clinic 
Show w/ DJ Jazzy 









Rich Sat beats w/ Ariel & Roel Sun French pop w/ De 
{VSUBLIME 10147 104 St (Downstairs), 905-8 
(21 & up preferred) After hours club (doors a 
Fri Rotating guests, incl AKA Vass, J Rowley, Desolate 
Donovan, Geoffrey J Sat Resident Manny Mulato & 
Locks Garant plus rotating guests Solo, Ryan Mason & 
Lickety Split 
THE SUGARBOWL CAFE & BAR 10922 88 Ave, 43 9 
— Fri 10 pm, Songwriter Night (roots, folk, alt-country 











Inspirational Instrument: 
(Q)THERAPY 710028 102 
(afterhours: midnight to 
Cool Hand Luc Breaks 


ice), 903-7666 — 
Wynn, Trance, 
Tripswitch, House, 2nd 
Kk happy hard: 

















house Sat Main Floor — Dragon, progressive, Sweets 
Funky Beats, Alias Trance, The Shiva Space 
Bunker, Gundam & Bass/Jungle, Bobby Torpedo 



















A quick & easy 





ATLANTIC TAP & GRILL 
77 Ave. & Calgary Tr. 
432-4611 
BLACK DOG FREEHOUSE 
10425 Whyte Avenue 
439-1082 


14203 Stony Plain Rd. 
454-3063 


CASINO EDMONTON 
463-9467 
alf Cut, Metalicaa 
Cassadiy U of A Fund Razor 
honic Experience }Lo-Phonic Experience 
a — ite MacDonald |Neil MacDonald 
451-8825 


FOX & HOUNDS 
10125-109 Street 
423-2913 


'S PUB 
13160-118 Avenue 
451-9180 


KELLY’S 









KINGSKNIGHT PUB 
9221-34 / 


LONGRIDERS 
11733-78 Street 

Partelbel Grand Re-Opening 

ieee Nik Rofeelya & Blue J 












SIDETRACK CAFE 


STARS 


URBAN LOUNGE 


RDBIR 


uide to Live Music in Edmonton 
(see a comprehensive guide under Live Music in Listings) 


BLUES AT THE HILL 
a Harpdog Brown |Harpdog Brown 


BLUES ON WHYTE 
10829 Whyte Avenue James Armstrong |James Armstrong |James Armstrong 


Axis of Advance & 
Operation Wintermist 
The Jackdicky 
Band 


ipa (ur Mercury, Tandem Vitalis, Drop 
Halo & Where Once Was Hope 
Trevor Finlay Band 
Snak Pak & Fat Fractal Pattern, Hills 
Dave alling Race & Kill | Have Eyes & Pornada 
UITE 
oanciine fone 


Deep House, LP, House 
{PWOODY'S 117258 Jasper Ave (Upstairs), 488-6636 
— Sun & Mon & Tues Karaoke Tues Pasta Specials 
Sat & Sun Brunchs Fri & Sat DJ Arrowchaser. Mon 
Margarita Mondays Wed Game Show Wednesdays Sat 
Male Stripper @ 11 pm Hours Mon to Thurs 1 pm to 
Midnight Fri 1 pm to 3.am Sat Noon to 3 pm Sun Noon 
to Midnight 


ARMOURY DANCE LOUNGE 10370 85 

Mon Go-girl night - Girls get it on, guys take it off Thurs 
Lo-ball night - prices down, bottoms up all night Fri 
Heaven & Hell Fridays Long Weekends dance ~ lounge 
repeat, for 3 consecutive nights. Info: www.armoury: 
dancelounge.com 

BARRY T'S GRAND CENTRAL STATION 6771 104 St. 
438-2582 — Revolving dance floors, cage dancers, 

snow machines, bubble machines, 55 MPH fans on the 
main dance floor! Wed & Fri Ladies Night Sat Come on 
down & hear anything you request! Long Weekend Sun 
Wet-T & Hot Buns contest. New and classic house, R & 
B. old school & 80's music by Hi NRG Dg Damian. Info 
438-2582 or 418-9045 

BILLY BOB'S LOUNGE 16625 Stony Plain Rd, 474-7751 
— Sun Free Pool from 7-11 pm Mon Jug Night, 9 pm to 
2 am Wed to Sat Live Entertainment 

{)BRONZE ON STH 10345 105 St, 423-7864 — Fri 
Clandestine presents Expressions, David Lee & Darcy 
Ryan, $5, doors 9 pm 18+ ID, Casual Dress Code Sat DJ 
Crown Royal, $5 cover, doors 9 pm18+ ID, Casual Dress 
Code 

B-STREET BAR 11878 111 Ave, 414-0545 — Wed & 
Thurs Karaoke w/ Brad Scott Fri & Sat Brad Scott 
{PCEILI'S IRISH PUB 10338 109 St, 426-5555 — Mon 
Get Your Funk On w/ DJs Junior Brown & Quake Sat 
Various Fundraisers, Wed Golf Night Live music most 
days of the week. 

CLAREVIEW PUB 132 Ave & Victoria Tr, 414-1111 — 
Tues & Thurs Karaoke Wed & Fri & Sat Drink specials. 
Happy Hour Daily 11 am to 7 pm & all day Sun DJ Fiore 
plays today’s hottest hits & yesterday's classics NC ever! 
DARIEN'S COCKTAILS & FINE FOOD 9945 50 St, 440: 
5071 — Full menu. happy hour every day 4 to 7 pm, 
daily specials, games room, living room, big screen TV 
Mon Wing Night Sat Karaoke @ 9 pm 

THE ELEPHANT & CASTLE WHYTE AVE 103174 82 Ave, 
439-4545 — Mon Movie Mondays @ 9 pm Tues Method 
Tuesdays, 10 pm w/DJ Headspin & guests Fri Stupid 
Prize Fridays! 












Stiff 





ELEVATION LOUNGE 10309 81 Ave (upstairs), 439-0041 
— OJ 4Play playing the best of top 40 & Retro music all 
week long Wed Guest bartenders Thurs Salsa Night, 8 
pm NC 

FARGOS WHYTE AVE 10307 Whyte Ave, 433-4526 — 
Wed Name That Tune w/ DJ Shar Visit: www.fargos.ca 
FEEV 10812 Kingsway Ave — Top 40 Dance Bar Tues to 
Sat 

GALLERY LOUNGE Mayfield Inn, 16615 109 Ave, 484- 
0821 ext 6629 — Thurs to Sat CHOT’s Don Daniels Dus 
{)GAS PUMP 10166 114 St, 488-4841 — Mon Monday 
Night Football Tues & Wed Karaoke night Thurs Ladies 
night Happy Hour is 11 am to 7 pm daily 

GREENHOUSE NIGHTCLUB Neighborhood Inn 13103 
Fort Rd, 472-9898 — Wad Win Win Wednesday, host 
Chris Knight from Power 92 Thurs Ladies Night w/ hot 
male entertainment 

{) THE GRINDER BAR 10957 124 St, 453-1709 — Fri & 
Sal Live Music (Blues, Classic Rock, New Rock) Draft, 
Shooter specials, Prize Giveaways Sun Karaoke, Free 
Pool All Day 

H20 SPORTS BAR & LOUNGE 10044 82 Ave, 433-5794 
—Tues & Thurs & Sat & Sun Karaoke DJ Double Jack 
plays the best in dance, rock & pop 

THE HIGH RUN CLUB 4926 98 Ave, 440-2233 — Sports 
& billiards, 14 types of draught beer on tap Tues Name 
that Tune 9 pm Wed Loonie pool Night Sun Happy Hour 
all day 

IRON HORSE 8101 103 St, 438-1907 — Fri & Sat Alix 
DJ 

THE JOINT NICHTCLUB 2554 WEM 8882 170th St, 486- 
3013— Wed Ladies Nite {/ the “Men's Club”, “Male 
Impact”, & “International Men” Fri TGIF Fridays, drink 
specials Sat Rendezvous Saturdays, drink specials Nov 
1: Halloween Howler Crawler, prizes for best costume, 
$20 (includes no line, no cover), info call 722-5286 Nov 
10 Urban Metropolis Entertainment 4 Year Anniversary 
featuring DJ Baby Yu & MC RG, doors 8 pm, tix $10 adv 
from Underground, semi formal 

KELLY'S 71540 Jasper Ave, 451-8825— Mon Free Pool 
Fri & Sat Live Entertainment Wed & Sun Karaoke Happy 
Hour from 11 am to 7 pm Daily 

{)MEZZA LUNA 10238 104 St, 423-LUNA —Wed & 
Thurs Free Latin Dance Lessons, 9 to 11 pm Fri 
Advanced Salsa Lessons 

POWERPLANT U of A Campus — Sat, Nov 2 Rehab Med 
Halloween Party, 8:30 pm, prizes for costumes 

PUCKS 11845 Wayne Gretzky Dr S, 471-1231 — Fri Top 
40, 80's & Rock & Roll, Ladies specials, cool atmos- 
phere, The Newest Club on the Block Sat Hockey Night, 
closest club to the action, big screen TV's, drink specials 
Sun Pool Tournament, opens at 2 pm tournament start 3 
pm double knockout, cash prizes, drink specials all day 
RACK ‘EM BILLIARDS URBAN DANCE LOUNGE 10737 
97 St, 474-7322 — Fri & Sat House, trance, R & B 
beats, DJ Venus & guests 

THE ROXY ON WHYTE 10544 82 Ave, 439-7699 — 
Thurs Great Rock, Alternative, Metal Music Format, NC 
w/ student ID Fri Babylon Fridays, dance & retro music 
w/ Ou Extreme Sat Session Saturdays, dance & retro 
music w/ OJ Extreme Sun Wild 'N’ Wet Bikini Sundays: 
Be a contestant or be a judge. NC w/ student ID 

THE RUM JUNGLE Phase |! WEM, 486-9494 — Thurs 
Ladies Night live acts Fri & Sat Industry Sundays. 
RUMORS PUB 9006 132 Ave, 473-7410 — Mon Free 
Pool Tournament; Fri House DJ Sat House Band The 
Tomatoes Jam 2 - 5 pm Band 9 pm Sun Free Pool & 
Happy Hour All Day 

RUNWAY NIGHTSPOT Leduc Inn, 986-4018 — Wed - 
Sat DJ Vincenzio 

SCRUFFY MURPHY’S IRISH PUB Whitemud Crossing, 
485-1717 — Thurs Half price drinks from 9 pm to 
Midnight Tues Industry Night, 35% off your entire bill. 
Info: www.scruffymurphyspub.com. Nov 1: Pubcrawl 
From Hell, visit Scruffy Murphy's, O’Byrnes & the Druid, 
prizes for best & worst costumes, registration at the 
Druid 7:30 pm, bus leaves 8:30 pm. 

SMOK'N JOE'S 615 Hermitage Rd, 476-6122 — Wed 
Retro-nite; Thurs Ladies nite Fri Stop-watch nite Sat Free 
cash give-a-way, $100 six times a night Sun Industry 
nite 

SUITE 69 8232 103 St, 439-6969— Wed ~ Sat '70s & 
"BOs dance music 

TIN PAN ALLEY 4804 Calgary Tr, 702-2060 — Sat 80's 
for the Ladies! Drink specials 

TONIC AFTER DARK 9920 62 Ave, 408-2877 — 
Repackaged, Reformatted, Re-experience our new 
Format! Thurs Student Night, drink specials, cash give- 
aways Oct 31: Halloween Party, prizes for best costume. 


UNTRY. 


COOK COUNTY SALOON 8070 103 St. 432-COOK (2665) 
— Wed Kickin’ Karaoke Thurs Ladies Night, free dance 
lessons w/ Leon, drink specials Fri & Sat Dus Kenni Kixx 
& Gary. Take your chances on the mechanical bull! 
Thurs., Oct. 31: Halloween Bash 

COWBOYS COUNTRY SALOON 10780 180 St, 481-8739 
— Tues — Sat DJs Greg & Gary 

LONGRIDERS 11733 78 St. 479-7400 — Tues 
Traditional Tuesday w/ Bev Munro Wed Free Dance 
Lessons 7:30 to 9 pm Happy Hour all night Thurs 
Thursty Thursdays w/ various drink specials, DJ Doc Lou 
Fri & Sat Happy Hour 7 fo 9 pm Info: www.longriderssa- 
loon.com 

NASHVILLE'S ELECTRIC ROADHOUSE WEM, 489-1330 


RED MEAT 


! was just thinking, Honey...how would 
you like to try something new tonight? 





Itdepends, Ted, What 
do you have in mind? 






— Thurs Bull riding competitions, wet t-shirt contests, 
Ladies Nite featuring the men of “Men's Club", “Male 
Impact" & “International Men”, shooter specials every 
hour Fri & Sat Mechanical Bull riding all night Thurs, Oct 
31: Halloween Party, prizes for best costume Wed, Nov 6 
Little River Band, Tickets$17.95 adv from TM Sun, Nov 
10: Edmanton’s Premier Young Adult Party feat. Urban 
Metropolis Sound Crew DJ Ice & Kwake, doors 8 pm, 
ends at Midnight, $10 adv @ Underground & Colorblind 
Sun, Nov 24; Super Sunday Tallgate Party includes 
Orientation Party (11 am to 1;30 pm), Transportation to 
& trom Commonwealth Stadium, lower level seating, 
after game party w/ Hotter Than Hell (Kiss Tribute Band), 
tix $139.99 + gst New Years Eve April Wine, $39.95 adv, 
$49.95 day of 

RATTLESNAKE SALOON 9267 34 Ave, 438-8878 — Tues 
Happy Hour All Day Fri & Sat Drink Specials between 7 
&9pm 

WILD WEST SALOON 12912 50 St, 476-3388 — Wed 
Free Beginners Dance Lessons from 8 to 9:30 pm Thurs 
Free intermediate Dance Lessons from 7:30 to 9:30 pm 





“karaoke by Mr. Entertainment 


MONDAY 





“THE HORSESHUE SPORTS LOUNGE 13610 58 St, 457- 
5858— 9 pm to 1am 
“BO DIDDLEY'S Red Deer —9 pmto 1am 

{) MICHAEL'S 17730 Jasper Ave—w/ Jammin’ Jamie 
woOODY'S 1/7258 Jasper Ave (Upstairs), 488-6636 


TUESDAY 


{) "ANASAZI 10525 Jasper Ave, 423-3232 — 9 pm to 1 am 
“BOSTON PIZZA Fort Saskalchewan, 998-9999 — 9 pm 
to2am 

*CLAREVIEW PUB 104-550 Clareview Rd, 414-1171 — 
10 pm ta 2am 

{)GAS PUMP 10166 114 St, 488-4841 

H20 SPORTS BAR & LOUNGE 10044 82 Ave, 433-5794 
“KINGSKNIGHT PUB 9227 34 Ave, 433-2599 — 10 pm 
to 2 am. 

“YESTERDAY'S Boudreau Rd, St Albert, 459-0295—9 
pm to 1am 

“WISER'S Sherwood Park — 9 pm to 1 am 
{)WOODY'S 11725B Jasper Ave (Upstairs), 488-6636 


WEDNESDAY 


*BOSTON-PIZZA 118 Ave & 101 St— 8 pm to Midnight 
B-STREET BAR 11878 111 Ave, 414-0545 —w/ Brad 
Scott 

“COOK COUNTY SALOON 8070 103 St, 432-COOK—9 
pm to 1 am 

“COSSACK INN Spruce Grove, 962-3844 —9pmto1 





am 
{)GAS PUMP 10166 114 St, 488-4847 

KELLY'S 11540 Jasper Ave, 451-8825 

*KINGSKNIGHT PUB 9221-34 Ave, 433-2599 — 10 pm 
to2am 

*KOSMOS Leduc— 9 pm to 1 am 

“ORLANDO'S It 13509 127 St, 451-7799— 9 pm to 
1:30 am 


THURSDAY 


“BOSTON PIZZA Sherwood Park, 467-2223— 10 pm to 
2am 

B-STREET BAR 11818-111 Ave, 414-0545 — w/ Brad Scott 
“CLAREVIEW PUB 132 Ave & Victoria Trail, 414-1111 — 
Spmto 1am 

H20 SPORTS BAR & LOUNGE 10044 82 Ave, 433-5794 
“INGLEWOOD PUB 12402 118 Ave, 451-1390 — 9:30 
pm to 2 am 

“ORLANDO'S Il 13509 127 St, 451-7799—9 pm to 
1:30 am 

“KINGSKNIGHT PUB 9227 34 Ave, 433-2599 — 10 pm 
to2am 





“ARMY, NAVY, AIR FORCE VETERANS CLUB (ANAF) 
127 St & Yellowhead Tr— 8:30 pm to 12:30 am 
*BUD'S LOUNGE Londonderry Mall, 137 Ave & 66 St— 
9pm to tam 

“BUD'S LOUNGE Capilano Mall, 98 Ave & 50 St—9 pm 
to1am 

“BUD'S LOUNGE Grandin Mall, St Albert — 9 pmto1 
am 

“HILLVIEW PUB 311 Woodvale Rd W, Millwoods, 462- 
0468— 9 pm to 1 am 

“INGLEWOOD PUB 12402 118 Ave, 451-1390 — 9:30 
pm to 2am 

“LAST CHANCE SALOON Tofield —9 pm to 1 am 
eINgeRMlHY PUB 9221 34 Ave. 433-2599— 10 pm 
to2am 










peanuts on the poop deck 


Well, it occurred to me that in twelve years 
of marriage we've never given each other a 
spanking. Who knows...? It might be fun. 





SATURDAY 


BREWS & CUES 8130 Gateway Blvd, 433-2823 

*BUD'S LOUNGE Londonderry Mall, 137 Ave & 66 St— 
9 pm to 1am 

“BUD'S LOUNGE Capilano Mall, 98 Ave &30 St 9 pm 
to 1am 

“CHATEAU ON THE HILL Beaumont 

“THE CROWN & DERBY 13703 Fort Rd, 478-2971 
DARIEN'S LOUNGE 9945 50 St, 440-5071 —9 pm 
H20 SPORTS BAR & LOUNGE 10044 82 Ave, 433-5794 
*HORSESHU SPORTS LOUNGE 13610-58 St, 457-5858 
—9pm to 1am 

*INGLEWOOD PUB 12402-1718 Ave, 451-1390— 9 pm 
to1am 

*KOSMOS Leduc— 9 pmto 1 am 

*KINGSKNIGHT PUB 9221 34 Ave, 433-2599 — 10 pm 
to2am 


SUNDAY 


{DTHE GRINDER BAR 10957 124 St, 453-1709 

H20 SPORTS BAR & LOUNGE 10044 82 Ave, 433-5794 
KELLY'S 11540 Jasper Ave, 451-8825 

*ORLANDO'S 1 15763-121 St, 457-1195— 9 pmto1 


am 
*SHERLOCK HOLMES 10341-82 Ave, 433-9676 —9 pm 
to 1am 

{PWOODY'S 117258 Jasper Ave (Upstairs), 488-6636 





>t RIN 


LEGEND 

TM - Ticketmaster (451-8000) 

TIX - TIX on the Square (420-1757) 

WIN - Winspear Box Office (428-1414) 

NC - No Cover 

AA - All Ages 

AN ALL HALLOWS EVE ORGAN RECITAL, PART VI — 
Thurs, Oct 31, 8 pm, St Andrew's United Church (9915 
148 St), featuring organist Robin King. Admission: Free, 
donations welcome. Into: 452-4454. 

ESO THE MASTERS — Fri, Nov 1 & Sat, Nov 2, 8pm, 
Winspear Centre. featuring Jessica Linnebach, violin & 
Da Camera Singers; Victor Feldbull, conductor. Tickets: 
$22 to $62 adults, $15 0 $55 senior/students, from WIN. 
JOHN REISCHMAN & THE JAYBIRDS — Fri, Nov 1, 
doors 7 pm, show 8 pm, St Basil's Cultural Centre, pre- 
sented by the Full Moon Folk Club. Tickets: $14 adv 
(from TIX, Southside Sound), $16 door, Children under 
12 half price (door only). 

ADAM GREGORY & SUSAN AGLUKARK — Sat, Nov 2, 
doors 5 pm, show 7 pm, Peace River Kinsmen Arena, w/ 
guests Jennifer Waniandy & Crystal Anne, Tickets: $40 
after date & at the door, from Java Domain, Village 
Sound, Music City/Book World. Info: 624-1542. 

ANNA BEAUMONT W/ PIERIAN SPRING — Sat, Nov 2, 
doors 7 pm, show 8 pm, Bonnie Doon Hall (9240 93 St), 
presented by Alberta Roots Music Society. Tickets: $12 
adv, from TIX. re) 
DAVID GRAINGER BROWN — Sat, Nov 2, 8 pm, Muttart 
Hall (Alberta College), presents “Rite of the Orishas”, w/ 
guests Merrill Tanner-Semple & Tami Cooper. Tickets3< 
$14 general admission, $10 Edmonton Classical Guitar 
Society members (adv tix from TIX, Avenue Guitafs “at 
the door. Info: 489-9580 = 
CANADIAN WHITEWATER — Sun, Nov 3,-doors 7 pm, . 
show 8 pm, Pleasantview Community Hall (10860-57 
Ave), w/ Northern Bluegrass Band, presented by the 
Northern Bluegrass Circle Music Society. Tickets: $12 
members, $15 non-members, adv-tix from Myhre's 
Music & Southside Sound or at the door 

GREENWOOD SINGERS — Mon, Nov 4, 7:30 pm, All 
Saints Anglican Cathedral (10035 103 St), CD Release 
for Randafl Thompson: Ode to the Virginian Voyage, 
Frostiana. 

PAUL BRANDT — Mon, Nov 4, Francis Winspear Centre, 
w/ special quests. Tickets: $32.50 (incl gst) + s/c, from 
WIN, Sold Out! 

AN EVENING WITH IAN TYSON — Tues, Nov 5, 8 pm, 
Winspear Centre, presented by Global Country. Tickets: 
$35 orchestra/terrace/dress circle, $30 upper circle, $25 
gallery, from WIN. 

WORLD AT WINSPEAR — Fri, Nov 8, 8 pm, Winspear 
Centre, ‘Eastern Sounds' featuring Silk Road, Khac Chi & 
Safa. Tickets: from WIN. 

BILL HENDERSON — Sat, Nov 9, 8 pm, Queen Alexandra 
Hall, presented by the Northern Lights Folk Club, 
Tickets: From Acoustic Music Shop & Myhre’s Music. 
UKRAINIAN MALE CHORUS OF EDMONTON — Sat, Nov 
9, 7:30 pm, Winspear Centre, w/ John Stetch, Jazz 
Pianist & Luba & Ireneus Zuk, Piano Duo. Tickets: $20, 
from Ukrainian Bookstore, WIN & Choir members. 
PAVLO — Sun., Nov 10, 8 pm, Winspear Centre. Tickets: 
From WIN. 

BLUE RODEO — Mon, Nov 18 & Tues, Nov 19, doors 7 
pm. show 8 pm, Northern Alberta Jubilee Auditorium, w/ 
—_ . Tickets: $34.50 & $39.50 (incl gst) + s/c, 


from the secret f of 


als? aero lalate} a 










SURSAUT Colourful characters go about their daily lives, using their cre- 
ative talents to transform the simple and mundane into situations full of 


energy and excitement. Arden Theatre, Nov 3 @ 7:30 pm. 





MARTIN SEXTON — Sat, Nov 23, doors 7 pm, show 8 
pm, Dinwoodie Lounge, w/ special guests. Tickets: 
$27.50 (inc! gst) + s/c, from TM. 

JOHN PRINE — Sun, Nov 24, doors 7 pm, show 8:30 
pm, Jubilee Auditorium, w/ guest Todd Snider. Tickets: 
From TM. 


THURSDAY 


ATLANTIC TRAP & GILL 7704-104 St. 432-4611 — 
Open Mic every Thursday at 9 pm Hosted by John. 

THE BLIND DUCK 10416-118 Ave., 479-7193 — Every 
Thurs from 9;30 pm to Close, open stage hosted by 
Loren Burnstick. 

DUSTER'S PUB 6402-118 Ave, 474-5554 or 479-0997 — 
Open Stage every Thursday 9 pm hosted by Juke Joint 
FRANCO'S 14059-Victoria Trail 478-4636 — Woody's 
Karaoke from 9 pm to 1:30 am. 

NAKED CYBER CAFE & ESPRESSO BAR 10354 Jasper 
Ave. — Every Thurs open stage 9:30 pm, bring your own 
instruments, poetry, etc. 

SECOND CUP JASPER AVE. 10303 Jasper Ave 424-7468 
Be io ‘open mic 7:30-10:30 pm, hosted by Ron 


ST. THOMAS COFFEE HOUSE 44 St. Thomas St, St 
Albert, 458-8225 — Every Thurs open stage and jam 
7:30-10:30 pm Hosted by Jim & Penny. 





ve., 473-1961 — Every Fri 
230 an ce Kickin’ Karaoke w/ hostess 


Trail 478-4636 — Woody's 


SUNDAY 





FILTHY MCNASTY’S 10511-82 Ave. (upstairs), 437-7489 
— 9 pm: Free jam hosted by Mike Caton. 

O'BYRNES IRISH PUB 10676-82 Ave. 414-6766 —9 
pm: Open Stage hosted by Joe Bird. 

P & W ROADHOUSE 9912-82 Ave., 432-0188 —7 pm 
Open Stage hosted by Loren Burnstick Blues & Rock 
ROSEBOWL 10111-117 St. 482-2589 — 9:30 pm: 
Sunday night jam w/ Mike McDonald. 


MONDAY 





CLIFF CLAYVIN'S RESTAURANT & PUB 9770-105 St 
424-1614 — Every Mon from 8 pm to Midnight, open 
Stage hosted by Randy Smaliman, Pascal Lecours & 
Umberto Maderias 


TUESDAY 


BACKROOM VODKA BAR 10324-82 Ave. — Oct. 29@ 8 
pm: Dead Poets Night — an open stage with the Raving 
Poets Band & special guest Billeh Nickerson, who brings 
some (kinky) sex to the city. Vancouver author of Let Me 
Kiss It Better (Arsenal Pulp Press), Nickerson tells tales 
that might even make the women of Sex in the City 
blush. Admission: Free. Come early to sign up. Info.: 
www.ravingpoets.com 

THE DRUID 11606 Jasper Ave. 454-9928 — Chris 
Wynters hosts open stage at 9 p.m. 

YARDBIRD SUITE 10203-86 Ave.. 432-0428 —Tues 
Night Jam Sessions. Nov. 5- Jim Guiboche (blues); Nov. 


12: Martin Walters 


WEDNESDAY 
J.0°S PUB 13160-118 Ave,, 451-9180 — Every 


1999— 8 pm: Open stage hosted by Richard Monkman 
& Erroll Zastre. 

TIM'S GRILL 7106-10: 
stage hosted by Loren B 


413-9606 — 
stick 


9 pm: Open 






AGNES BUGERA GALLERY 12370 Jasper Ave, 48: 
— Until Nov 9: New Works, Watercolours by Jern 
Info: www.agnesbugeragallery.com 
ALBERTA AVIATION MUSEUM 17410 Kingsway Ave, 
451-1175 — Display of Edmonton's bush pilots, Second 
World War double-wide, double-long hangar. Daily, 10 
am to 4 pm. 
{DALBERTA CRAFT COUNCIL 10786 106 St, 488-5900 
— Hours: Mon — Sat. 10 am - 5:30 pm E-mail 
aco@albertacraft.ab.ca 
ALBERTA RAILWAY MUSEUM 24215 34 St, 472-6229 
— The Alberta Railway Museum operates both diesel and 
steam locomotives throughout the summer in addition to 
exhibiting one of the finest collections of railcars in North 
America. Ground Admission: Adults $4, Seniors $2.50. 
Students $2.50, Children $1.25. Train ticket prices are $3 
per person. 
ART BEAT GALLERY 8 Mission Ave, St Albert, 459-3679 
— Hours: Mon-Wed. Fri: 10 am - 6 pm, Thurs: 10 am -9 
pm, Sat: 10 am - 5 pm, Sun, Holidays: noon - 4 pm. E 
mail: artbeat@artbeat.ab.ca Website: www.artbeat.ab.ca 
ARTS & SCIENCE BY MARCE & MARCE — Featuring 
dimensional paintings by Brenda Marce. By appointment 
435-5838. 
BEARCLAW GALLERY 10403 124 St, 482-1204 — 
Hours: Mon 11 to 5 pm, Tues to Sat 10 to 5:30 pm. 
CAFE DABAR 10816-82 Ave. — Current exhibit: 12 
pieces on display by Bill Miller. Hours: Mon to Fri, 7 am 
to 1 am, and Sat 8:30 am to 1 am 
CAFE MOSAICS 10844 82 Ave— Explore pleasure in art 
with sensualist wunderkind Tony Baker 
CENTRE D'ARTS VISUELS DE L'ALBERTA # 20, 8627 91 
St, 461-3427 — Until Oct. 31: Group show featuring a 
selection of pieces among the 130 different artists mem 
bers of this gallery, including oil, watercolour or acrylic 
paintings, on glass, with clay and soapstone’s sculp- 
tures, woodworks pottery and also many crafts. Hours: 
Mon to Sat 10 am to 5 pm. 
{DCITY OF EDMONTON ARCHIVES 10440 108th Ave. 
496-8710 — More than 50,000 cataloged photographs 
and slides from the 1880s to the present. Two display 
galleries. Free Admission. Hours: Mon. to Fri., 8:30 am to 
4:30 pm. 
CRAFTMAN’S COVE Westmount Shopping Centre, 454- 
2656 — Tole Painting and Victorian Music Boxes by Bev 
Runolfson. 
CHRISTL BERGSTROM'S RED GALLERY 9621 82 Ave — 
Naked Stories - Art as Narrative This new show ot recent 
oil paintings, comprised of nudes, portraits and still lifes, 
explores personal storytelling in the context of historical 
art influences. Hours: Mon. through Fri. 11 am to 5 pm. 
Sat. by appointment, 439-8210, 
{)CYBERTOPIA INTERNET CAFE 11607 Jasper Ave — 
Until Nov 30: Women's tears; women's fears, expres- 
sionist paintings by Patricia Laing. 
{DIXON GALLERIES 10316124 St, 454-3352 — Inuit 
carving and drawings from Iqaluit, traditional Chinese 
scrolls by Professor Fan Yunan, Kui Liu and Xuelin Lio 
from China, nine works in from Russia, rare etchings by 
Norval Morriseau and more. Hours: Tues to Sat, 10 am 
to 5 pm, Thurs to 9 pm. 
{PDOUGLAS UDELL GALLERY 10332 124 St, 488-4445 — 
An exhibition of work by gallery artists featuring Caio 
Fonseca, Tony Scherman, David Thauberger, Les Thomas, 
Antonio Murado and others. Some Notes & Observations on 
V, new Sculptures by Joe Fafard. The first one-person exhi- 
bition of renown sculpture Joe Fafard. 
{EDMONTON ART GALLERY 2 Sir Winston Churchill 
Square, 422-6223 — Until Nov 17: silenus, by Max 
Streicher. Nov 3 from 1 to 4 pm: Opening of the newest 
Children’s Gallery exhibition Become, created by Don 
Moar who will be on hand to lead a special workshop 
where participants can create their own wind chimes. 
Hours: Mon to Wed and Fri 10:30 am to 5 pm; Thurs 
10:30 am to 8 pm; Sat, Sun and holiday 11 am to 5 pm. 
ELECTRUM DESIGN STUDIO AND GALLERY 12419 


























82-1402 — Hours 





Stony Piain 


EXTENSION CENTRE GALLERY'S ‘ond Flo 
o t Until No 
iN of waterco 


ension Ce: 










Flora’ 





iollbar — a graduating presentation for the 

if Fine Arts. Hours: Mor 
fo: 492-3034 

FAB GALLERY 1-7 Fine 


89 Ave, 492-2081 















2 to 5 pm. Closed Mond, 





ory Holidays 
FORT DOOR 10: Ave, 4 5— Month of 
October: Eskimo soapstone carvings inukshuk, hunters 
walrus by Tivi llistuk. Wood carvings by T. Klettle. West 








coast Indian and Eskimo gold and y by Pat 
Dixon. Month of November Eskime pstone carvings. 
loons, hiunters, inukshuk by J Eyaituk. Eskimo and 
Indian gold and silver | by P Whonnock, Hours 
Mon to Sat: 10 am to 6 pm: Thurs & Fri10 am to 9 pm: 
Sat: 10 am to 6 pm; Sun; 12 to 5 pm. 

FRAME OF MIND GALLERY 6750 90 Ave, Otte 
Shopping Center — Hours: 10 10 6 pm 
Sundays 

FRINGE GALLERY 7 
Oct 31: Sima Khorram 
Nov 4 to 30; Sacre 
Pierre Bataillard, Ho 
{) FRONT GALLERY 
Until Nov 3; E 
paintings by s 
5 pm. 
GENERATIONS GALLERY 5477 57 S 
Until Nov 18; Dave Chr 

















Daily ex 








4 pm daily 
{) HARCOURT HOUSE GALLERY 3rd floor, 1/ 
426-4180 — Until Nov 30; High & Low, C. W. Carson. In 


the Front Room Gallery: Fully Visible, Chris Gran. The 
opening reception will be held from 
Thurs, Nov 7. Info: harcourt@telusplanet 
4180. In the Art Education penis Sun, Nov 10 from 1 to 
5 pm: “Take Two" art show & sale of abstract landscape 
paintings & drawings by Annette Ayre & Jayne 
Willoughby Scott. Info: 435-4214. Hours: Mon to Fri, 10 
am to 5 pm, Sat. 12 pm to 4 pn 
JOHNSON ART GALLERY 7717 85 St— Until Noy 2: The 
Edmonton Art Club is holding an exhibition and sale of 
work. Gallery hours: Mon to Fri 9 am to 5:30 pm; Sat 9 
am to 5 pm. Closed Sundays & Holidays. 

KAMENA GALLERY & FRAMES 57/8 104 St, 944-9497 
— New watercolour by Willie Wong. Fabric art by Mary 
Anne Kilgannon, winner of numerous awards across 
Canada. Acrylic by Kee T. Wong. Poster art by Various 
international artists. Student s arts at 5 
()LATITUDE 53 10137 104 St io 
www.latitude53.org. Hours: Mon to Fi 10 am to 6 pm & 
Sat Noon to 5 pm Admission: Free, but donations grate- 
fully accepted 

MCMULLEN GALLERY East entrance, U of A Hospital, 
8440 112 St, 407-7152 — Until Nov 17: An exhibition of 
Textiles, Kalamkari: India By Design. Also on display out 
side of the gallery, Platinum prints of Sacred Places 
Around the World by Dr Allan W. King. In the “After 
Hours” space: Two large-scale waterscapes by Leslie 
Taillefer. Hours: Mon to Fri 10 am to 8 pm, Sat & Sun 1 
pm to 8 pm. 

MODERN EYES GALLERY St Albert, 459-9702 

MUSEE HERITAGE MUSEUM St Albert Place, 5 St Anne 

— Nov 1 10.30; Take Time To,Remember, an exhibit.to 

honour the men and women from St Albert and district 
whom served overseas during World War | & World War 
IL Until Nov 16: Cry of the Loon. Info: 459-1194, 
MUTTART CONSERVATORY 9626 96A St, 496-8755 — 
Hours: Weekdays 9 am to 6 pm, Tues. until 9 pm, week~ 
ends 11 am to 6 pm. 

{QNAKED CYBER CAFE & EXPRESSO BAR 10354 Jasper Ave 
THE ODYSSIUM (Edmonton's Space & Science Centre. 
Reborn) 11211-142 St. 451-3344 — \max Theatre: Jane 
Goodall's Wild Chimpanzees, BEARS, The Human Body, 
Margaret Zeidler Star Theatre: Climate Changes, Dance of 
Light, Alberta Skies ||, Colours of the World, Laser 
N'Sync with Britney, Laser U2. 5 permanent galleries to 
explore and enjoy: The Body Fantastic, Mystery Avenue, 
The Green House, Space Place, Discoveryland: For ages 
2 to 8 years, Waterworks, Construction Zone, Discovery 
Den and more. Feature exhibition until Jan 5, 2003: ZAP! 
Surgery Beyond the Cutting Edge. Plus much more 
including five science demonstrations. Info: 451-3344, 
www.odyssium.com. 

























(VPARIS MARKET 101 
Sun,10 am to 5 pm. Artisar 





furniture, curiosities and collectibl 


PROFIL ES PUBLIC ART GAL LERY 19 





profile: sroads.cor 
PROVINCIAL MUSEUM OF ALBERTA 1284 

$ Spotlight Gallery: L 
of Printmaking. 















SNAP! Twenty Y 
xhibition: The rude Gallery of Abc 
Permanent Exhibition: The Bug Room t 
Thurs: 9 am to 5 pm, Fri: 9 am to 9pm, A 
Weekends: Adult $12, Senior (65+) $10, You 
$6, Child (6 & under) Free, Family Pass $30 
ent off of Weekend prices. Friends of the 
incial Museum 50 per cent ¢ 
REMEDY CAFE 09 St— Nov 2 to 30: First solo 
exhibit for Mich ning night fe 
held Nov 9 at 8 ist in attenda! 
etallicaugh 





































MacDonald: A 
am to 5 pm; Sat, 12 pr 
SCOTT GALLERY 10471 
12: Where the Jungle Meet: 
new work resulting from paintin: 
the Alberta Rocky Mou! 1s by Jasper artis 
Wacko. Hours: Tues through Sat, 10: am to 5 
scottart@telusplanet.net cottgallery.coi 
Sess Srunio GALLERY #6044, 10030 107 St— 

s by David Seghers, Robert VonEschen 
fon Jeff Collins, Pamela How (Vilsec), Neil 
McClelland & Jacqui Rohac. Hours; Tues, Wed & Thurs 
5:30 to S pm or by appointment: 425-6885 
SERENDIPITY GALLERY 9860 90 Ave, 433-0388 — New 
Rhonda Harder-Epp, watercolours by Friedrich 
1.C.A., ceramic ma: y Maurice Lwambwa- 
Tshang, collages by Sylvia Grist and new ceramics by 
Debra Demers-Bryan. 

SNAP GALLERY Society of Northern Alberta Print Artists, 
10137 104 St, 423-1492 — Until Nov. 16: Tide, Eminent 
Japanese print-artist Koichi Kiyono. Hours: Tues to Sat, 
noon to 5 pm; snap@snapartists.com. 

SNOWBIRD GALLERY 8562 7 t, WEM, 444-1024 — 
Featuring works by J. Yardiey-Jones & Gregg Johnson. 
Acrylics by Jim Vest. Pottery by Noburo Kubo & 
Jacqueline Stenberg 

{) SPECTRUM ART GALLERY & STUDIO 6, 10867 96 St, 
424-8803 — New acrylic on canvas and board and 
watercolours by Christopher Lucas. Celebrate 
Edmonton's 100th Birthday with the purchase of an 
Edmonton Skyline Limited Edition Print. Also showing 
work by Patricia Young, Bridgit Tumer, Deanna Larsson 
and David Phillips. Misting fountains and hand-made 
fountains using natural slate, rocks, and gems. Wall 
sconces and a wide selection of unique gift ware. Hours: 
10 am to 6 pm daily. Info: 424-8803 

ST THOMAS COFFEE HOUSE #4, 44 St, St Albert — Until 
Dec 3; Equuessense, innovative views of the horse by 
Susanne Loutas. 

THE STUDIO GALLERY 143 Grandin Park Plaza, 22 Sir 
Winston Churchill Ave, St Albert, 460-5990 — Until Nov 
3: Jon the wet paint. Hours: Tues - Fri: 10 am - 5 pm, 
Sat: 10 am - 4 pm. 

SUSSEX GALLERIES 290 Saddleback Rd, 988-2266 — 
Inspiring landscapes, cityscapes, florals, nudes and sur- 
real paintings in oils, acrylic, watercolour and pastel by 
artists Joyce Bowerman and others. 

SUTTON ART 2 Aspen Heights, Sherwood Park — Sat, 
Nov 9 & Sun, Nov 10: Annual Open Studio, Show & Sale 
by Eileen Raucher-Sutton. Into: 449-5312 
SWEETWATER CAFE 102 Ave & 124 St—Until Feb 5, 
2003: Ice & Soleil, art of 9 different artists from 
Greenland's glaciers to Mediterranean bounty. 

QQ THEATRE FOYER GALLERY Lower Level, Stanley A 
Milner Library —— into: 454-5225 or www.epl.ca 
TIMOTHY'S WORLD CAFE8137 104 St— Until Dec 3: 












pm. E-mail 
























______ LISTINGS 





CONTINUED 


Body Graphic, drawings and paintings by 3 artists on the 
human figure. 

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION CENTRE GALLERY Second F/ 
University Extension Centre, 8303 112 St— Hours Mon 
to Fri 8 am to 4 pm. Into: 492-3034 

(DTHE VAAA GALLERY 3rd Floor, 10215 112 St, 421- 
1731 — Until Oct 31: Saskatchewan Road Map Series & 
Retrospective, by Ron Kostyniul. info visartaa@telus- 
planet.net. 

VANDERLEELIE GALLERY 10344 134 St, 452-0286 — 
Hours: Tues - Sat 11 am - 5:30 pm. 
vag@vanderleelie.ab.ca 

{) WEST END GALLERY 12308 Jasper Ave, 488-4892 — 
Hours: Tues to Sat, 10 am to S pm. www.west- 
endgalleryltd.com e-mail info@westendgalleryltd.com 

{) THE WORKS GALLERY Main Floor, Commerce Place, 
10185 102 St— Hours: Mon to Fri 11:30 am to Spm. 
ZIEGLER HUGHES GALLERY & SERENDIPITY FRAMING 
9860 90 Ave. 433-0388— Anahuacalli Mexican Jewelry 
and Art Works by Canadian and Mexican artists and arti- 
sans. Hours: Tues — Wed, 10 am to 6 pm, Thurs -Fri 10 
am to 8 pm, Sat 12-8 pm, Sun - Mon 12-5 pm. 

















THURSDAY 


AGAPE Room 7-774, Floor, Education North, U af A 
Campus — Noon to 1 pm: AGAPE is a focus group deal- 
ing with issues related to sex-and-gender differences and 
schooling. It is designed to meet the needs of lesbian, 
gay, bisexual and transgender undergraduate and gradu- 
ate students, faculty and staff in the Faculty of Education. 
Straight allies are also welcome. We welcome practicing 
teachers and other interested people. Meetings will be 
held on the third Thursday of the month starting Sept 19. 
Nov 16: Sex-and-Gender Differences, Education & 
Culture Conference featuring Jan Padgett, film maker of 
in other words and Sticks and Stones. 

GAYWIRE CJSA 88.5— 6 to 7 pm: Edmonton's only 
radio show about gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgen- 
dered lives. Featuring news, local and international fea- 
tures and community events. 

{) GLCCES'S WOMEN’S PROGRAMS ON THURSDAYS 


845, 9912-106 St — GLCCE's counselors and hosts pre- 


sent speakers, discussion topics, activities, movies, all 
aimed at creating a space for women at the centre. 
{PILLUSIONS SOCIAL CLUB 745, 9912-106 St— A 
social/support group for transgendered and crossdress- 
ing men. Meets the second Thursday of the month Info: 
424-2685 or illusionsx42@yahoo.com 


FRIDAY 
B.E.A.R.S. OF EDMONTON Boots ‘n’ Saddle Bar—9 to 


41 pm: Pub night the last Fri. of each month. Info: 1-877- 
882-2011, ext. 2027. 

EDMONTON RAINBOW BUSINESS ASSOCIATION 
Woody's, (Above Buddy's, 11725B Jasper Ave. —5:30 
pm: Join us on the Second Friday of the month for 
drinks, munchies and conversation. 


SATURDAY») 


ALTERNATIVE BEARS (ALT BEARS) — Low-attitude, 
hairy gay or bisexual guys get together every Sat night 
for late-night swimming and snacks. Info: http://alt- 
bears.8k.com 

NORTHERN CHAPS 8uday's Night Club — Edmonton's 
original leather-latex-fetish-uniform club meets the first 
and third Sat. of every month. Info: 
northernchaps@telusplanet. net. 

NORTHERN TITANS INTERNATIONAL BOWLING 
LEAGUE Gateway Lanes & Recreation Centre, #100, 
3414-Calgary Trail North— 4:45 to 7 pm; group supper 
each week after bowling. Cost is $12 per person, Info 
426-6311 

WOMONSPACE DANCES Womonspace dances for 
women only on the third Sat. of the month, Info; call 
482-1794 or womonspace@hotmail.com 

{) YOUTH UNDERSTANDING YOUTH 45, 9912-106 SI. 
— Every Sat from 7 to 9 pm; Providing a warm and 
friendly place where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgen- 
dered, straight and questioning youth, under the age of 
25, can gather together to have fun and leam about 
themselves and others in a safe, supportive and caring 
environment. Info; 488-3234, 


{PALBERTA P-FLAG FAITH SOCIETY Christ Church, 

12116-102 Ave. — 2 pm: Meets the last Sunday of every 
month. Family and friends from every background, faith 
and culture are welcome. 

ARCTIC FRONTRUNNERS — 11 am: A group of gay and 
lesbian runners meets Sunday momings and hits the 
iver valley trail system. Runners of all speeds are wel- 
come, Our runs are typically 7 to 10 km long and take 40 
to 60 minutes. Info: 436-7892. 

BRUNCH AT SECRETS Join your friends for brunch at 
Secrets, every second Sunday, 

FREEDOM METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF 
EDMONTON Call 429-2321 for location of meetings and 
Worship services. 

LAMBDA CHRISTIAN COMMUNITY CHURCH Chapol at 
Garneau United Place, 11148-84 Ave. — Lambda is a 
Christian church providing a safe and healing space with 
a Christ-centered social justice ministry for Edmonton's 
gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered Christians and 
their friends. info; 474-0753. 
SOUTHMINSTER-STEINHAUER UNITED CHURCH 
10740-19 Ave. — 10 am: Welcomes people of all sexual 
orientations. Info: 435-2028 or 987-4974 or 437-9732, 
‘SPIRITUAL LIVING CENTRE — Celebrating and embrac- 
ing the spiritual magnificence in all. www.spiritualliving- 
i com, 989-3752. 

BSt~7na30 pm Aad doce gap 
06 St.— pm: tated discussion group 

‘for men. Opento any age. Confidential and always inter- 


















BADMINTON LEAGUE The badminton season Is now fin- 
ished but will start up again in Sept. The group still 
meets on a monthly basis for social/sports. Into: 
cwbyteddy@shaw.ca or 918-4295 

FREE-TO-BE VOLLEYBALL Offers recreational and com- 
petitive play for all ages and skill levels. For more info. 
www.queerseek.convfreetobe or 
volleyball@queerseek.com. 


{) FREEDOM METROPGLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 
OF EDMONTON 10086-MacDonald Drive—7:15 pm: A 
Church for all people. Info: 429-2321 

GROUP MOVIE NIGHT Phone to find out what movie, 
when to meet and where, Join us for coffee afterwards, 
too. Cost: Free for 2 members plus theatre costs, Into: 
454-0313 

OUTREACH Heritage Room, Athabasca Hall, U of A 
Campus — 5 pm: U of A based group for gay, lesbian, 
bisexual, transgendered and straight but friendly stu- 
dents, staff and faculty. (Open to the community not just 
U of A) Info: www.ualberta.ca/~outreach, outreach@ual- 
berta.ca 

{)PFLAG/T #45, 9912-106 St. — 7:30 pm; Support meeting 
every ard Tuesday of the month for parents, families and 
friends, of lesbians and gays and transgendered people. 

Info: 462-5958 or 1-877-882-2011 ext. 2043. 
TRANSSEXUAL/TRANSGENDER SUPPORT GROUP #45, 
9912-106 St. — 7:30 to 10 pm: Meetings focus on pro- 
viding information and mutual support for transgendered 
people in an open, friendly and safe environment. 
Activities include discussions, movies, guest speakers. 
Info: 488-3234 or e-mail glcc@interbaun.com, (Meetings 
second and fourth Tues. of each month) 









BISEXUAL PRIDE GLOCE—7 pm: A social and support 
group that meets on the last Wednesday of every month, 
Friendly and accepting. Into: 488-3234 

NORTHERN LIGHTS SQUARE DANCE CLUB Grandin 
School, 9844-110 St. — Everyone Wed from 7 to 9 pm: 
Singles, couples, beginners & experienced dancers are 
all welcome. $5 per person. Into; 922-4355 or bflo- 
fapro@aol.com. 

YOURS, MINE, QURS AND US (YMOU) — A support 
group for LGBT parents, partners and their friends 
Meets 1st and 3rd Wed. of the month. Info; 426-6311 or 
415-5434 


BATHHOUSES 

{VDOWN UNDER 12224-Jasper Ave., 482-7960, 
www.gayedmonton.com 

()STEAMERS 9668-Jasper Ave., 422-2581 





aly 


CARNIVAL OF SOULS Northern Light Theatre, Various 
Locations — Oct. 31: House of Screams Haunted House, 
3rd Floor Edmonton City Centre East (Hours: Weekdays 5 
to 10:30 pm); Oct. 31 to Nov. 3: Horror Film Festival, 
Metro Cinema, @ 7 pm: Haxan & 9 pm: Opera. Tickets: 
Festival passes $45, from Northern Light Theatre 471- 
1586 or TIX. Info.; www.northernlighttheatre.com. 
CHIMPROV Aapid Fire Theatre, New Varscona Theatre 
(10329-83 Ave.) — Saturdays at 11 pm: A long-form 
improv show with no rules, no limits and no guarantees, 
except continuous laughs, Tickets: $8 adults, $7 stu- 
dents. To reserve seats: 448-0695. 

DAVID COPPERFIELD PORTAL TOUR Northern Alberta 
Jubilee Auditorium — Dec. 6, 7 & 8: From beginning to 
end, David Copperfield’s Portal offers audience members 
a mind-boggling, spell-binding experience that will keep 
ther on the edge of their seats, Dazzling new illusions 
include “Lottery,” one of the most incredible predictions 
in the history of magic. Shows @ Dec. 6 @ 8 pm, Dec 7 
@1,48&8pm & Dec. 8 @1 & 4 pm Tickets: From TM, 
not on sale yet. 

DON PASQUALE Edmonton Opera, Jubilee Auditorium — 
Sat, Nov 9, 8 pm, Tues, Nov 12, 7:30 pm & Thurs, Nov 
14, 7:30 pm: This entertaining story of trickery and deceit 
in the games of love, marriage and inheritance will 
amuse opera-goers from Start to finish. Sung in Italian 
with English supertitles. Tickets: $19 to $78, from TM or 
Edmonton Opera Box Office 429-1000 (Seniors/Students 
receive discounts on Tues & Thurs) 

THE DUCHESS OF MALFI Media Room, Fine Arts 
Building, U of A— Until Nov 2: John Webster's 400 year 
old revenge tragedy revived. Lust, jealousy, treachery 
and murder, just in time for Halloween. Shows 8 pm 
nightly. Admission: Free, capacity limited, call 989-0531 
ta reserve seats. 

THE GREAT ELECTRICAL REVOLUTION Mayfield Dinner 
Theatre, 16615-109 Ave. — Until Nov. 2: What do you do 
when the cost of electricity is too high and the power 
company disconnects you? Start the Great Electrical 
Revolution! Set in Saskatchewan during the depression 
and |s based on an actual incident in a time before televi- 
sion when radio provided joy and comfort in a harsh 
world. Tickets: Dinner & Show from $34, call 483-4051, 
HAPPY DAZE Jubilations Dinner Theatre, WEM— Until 
Nov. 3: Tickets: Wed., Thurs., & Sun.: $45.95 & Fri. & 
Sat. $55.95, from 484-2424 or 1-877-214-2424. 
IMPROV WORKSHOPS FOR THE FOOLHARDY Aapid Fire 
Theatre, 10920-88 Ave. — Join Rapid Fire Theatre's 
improvisers in an entertaining and educational improv 
theatre workshop. Classes offered weekly in one-month 
sessions. Beginner classes on Wednesdays from 7 to 
9:30 p.m., advanced classes on Tuesdays from 7 to 9:30 
pm Fee: $75 + gst. Info.: 448-0695 or www.rapidfirethe- 
atre.com. 

LOLA DANCE, VOLIO Brian Webb Dance Company, John 
L. Haar Theatre, 10045-156 St. — Nov. 1 & 2@ 8 pm: 
Volio, which premiered at the Canada Dance Festival in 





ding, when Mary dreams of her lover, Charlie, who is 
fighting with the Lord Strathcona’s Horse Regiment: 
Shows Tues. to Sun. 8 pm, no matinees. Tickets: $30 
opening night, $16 adults, $13 students/seniors, Oct. 29 
& Nov. 5 are 2 for 1, from TIX. 

QH SUSANNA Varscona Theatre, 10329-83 Ave. — Last 
Sat of every month @ 11 pm: Live Euro-style variety 
show fun & antics, Laughs, music, cocktails. Hosted by 
ultra-glamorous international uber-vabe Susanna 
Patchouli. Oct 26 — Halloween Special. 

ROCKMORE HIGH - CLASS OF ‘59 Celebrations Dinner 
Theatre, 13103-Fort Rd. — Until Nov. 2: By Randy 
Brososky & Stewart Burdett. Tickets: $43.95 reg. Sun., 
Wed., Thurs.; $49.95 reg. Fri., Sat.; $20 children under 
12, children under 2 free. 

RODEO & OTHER WORKS Alberta Ballet, Jubilee 
Auditorium — Fri, Nov 1 & Sat., Nov. 2@ 8 pm: Alberta 
Ballet rounds up the classic “western” of the dance 
world, Agnes de Mille’s popular Rodeo. A whimsical and 
amusing ballet, Rodeo follows the adventures of an awk- 
ward and tomboyish cowgirl, hopelessly in love with the 
head wrangler. Other works include The Winter Room 
and Celestial Themes by Alberta Ballet's new Artistic 
Director Jean Grand-Maitre, and Dominique Dumais’ 
sans detour. 

SISTER MARY JGNATIUS EXPLAINS IT ALL FOR YOU & 
THE ACTOR'S NIGHTMARE Citade/ Theatre— Until Nov. 
10; The evening begins with a sharp-witted curtain rais- 
ing one-act play, The Actor's Nightmare. Not only does 
the Woody Allen-like accountant not know his lines, he 
never knew he had any! In Sister Mary /gnatius Explains 
/t All For You, Durang presents a satire of the Catholic 
Church, as seen through the rigid dogma of Sister Mary. 
Shows: Thurs., Oct. 31 @ 8 pm: Opening Night; Fri. night 
Rush Option, Fri., Nov. 1 @ 8 pm; Exclusive $20 for 
Rush Pass Holders & their guest; Sun., Nov-3.@ 8 pm 
RBC Financial Pay-What-You-Can; Tues., Nov. 5 follow- 
ing 8 pm performance; Talk Back Tuesday; Thurs., Nov. 7 
@ 2 pm: Senior's Matinee. Tickets: $24 to $52, $69 
Opening Night, from Citadel Box Office 425-1820. Half 
price Rush Seats available one hour before each perfor- 
mance. 

SISTERS Studio Theatre, Timms Centre, 87 Ave. & 112 
St — Oct. 31 to Nov. 9: Sisters is the story of Mary, a 
nun who once taught at a Native residential school. When 
she receives a letter from a former student, she realizes 
the pain and suffering she caused during her years there. 
The best of intentions can be disastrous in the end. 
Shows 8 pm nightly, Thurs. matinee 12:30 pm. Tickets: 
$15 Mon, to Thurs., $10 Thurs. matinee, $18 Fri. & Sat 
Info.; 492-2495. 

SURSAUT Arden Theatre, St Albert — Nov 3 @ 7:30 pm: 
A tender and animated dance-theatre production that cel- 
ebrates and encourages the creativity in all of us. A cast 
of colourful characters go about their daily lives, using 
their eccentric creative talents to transform what may 
sometimes seem simple and mundane into situations full 
of energy, meaning, excitement and fun, Part of the 
Arden Family Series. Tickets; 459-1542, 

SURVIVAL: THE IMPROVISATIONAL GAME Jagged Edge 
Lunchbox Theatre, 3rd Floor, Edmonton Centre — Friday 
Nights at 9:15 pm Tickets: $5 at the door. Brand new sea- 
son starts on Fri., Sept. 13. Info.; 463-4237, 
THEATRESPORTS Rapid Fire Theatre, New Varscona 
Theatre (10329-83 Ave.) — Fridays at 11 pm: Teams of 
improvisers create comedy scenes in a pseudo-competi- 
tive setting. Tickets: $9 adults, $8 students. 

THROUGH A GLASS, DARKLY Sound & Fury Theatre, 
Jekyll & Hyde Pub, 10610-100 Ave, — Until Nov. 3: A 
sometimes funny, often frightful Halloween event that 
employs some of the greatest ghost stories ever written 
to create an evening of sheer storytelling terror, Shows 
Tues. to Sat. 8 pm, no performance on Oct. 30, matinees 
on Sunday @ 2 pm. Tickets: $12 adults, $10 
students/seniors, from TIX, 





Hix 


CANADIAN BLOOD SERVICES DONOR CLINICS 5249 
114 St, 431-8775 — Canadian Blood Services is asking 
donors to book appointments to donate over the coming 
days and weeks, Please call 431-8775. 


RSDAY 


{DART FOR LUNCH Edmonton Ant Gallery — Noon: 
Slide-show and talk on Inuit Art Appreciation w/ Dr 
William Lakey. As a member of the Edmonton Inuit Art 
Enthusiasts, Dr Lakey will give a collector's perspective 
‘on the art of Inuit printmaking. Info: 422-6223 or 
www.edmontonartgallery.com 

DROP-IN FRENCH CONVERSATION La Cifé francaise, 
Room 202, 8527 91 St, 469-0399 — Every Thurs, 7-9 


pm. 
GHOST TOURS Old Strathcona — 7 pm: Join us for a 
ghostly walk throughOld Strathcona to hear stories of 
ghosts, hauntings & the unknown. Tour lasts 1 hour, 
Departs from in front of the Rescuer Statue next to the 
Walterdale Playhouse, 10322 83 Ave. Until Oct 31. Info: 
www.edmontonghosttours.com 

{)METRO CINEMA Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828 
101A Ave, 425-9212 —7 pm: Haxan (Witchcraft 
Through the Ages) A curious hybrid of documentary, fic- 
tion and animation, Haxan Is a classic of Gothic imagery. 
The film begins as a primer on witchcraft folklore, but 
soon gives way to graphic and disturbing recreations of 
sacrilegious rituals. Director Bengamin Christensen stars 
in the lead roles of the tongue-wagging Devil and the 
psychiatrist. Metro will be screening the 1967 reissue 
featuring a voice-over by William S. Burroughs and jazz 
score by Jean-Luc Ponty, as opposed to the original 
silent version. 9 pm: Opera Set at the famous La Scala 
‘opera house, a radical director's production of “Macbeth” 
is disrupted when the lead diva is injured. The under- 
Study, Betty, steps into the role and triumphs. That night, 
Betty is brutally attacked, narrowly escaping with her life, 
A series of similar attacks follow, Betty escaping death 
each time until the final confrontation in the opera house, 
Brian Eno composad the striking score, rd 
with heavy metal. This director's cut of 


{VAFRICAN PERCUSSION WORKSHOP 12320 103 Ave 
— 7-30 to 9 pm: Taught by David Thiaw. Info: 460-1756 
or weww.davidthiaw.com 

{PALANO CLUB SOBER DANCE 9929 103 St, 423-1807 
— Every Friday, 9 pm: Sober Dance, DJ Jack plays 
oldies, country and rock, $5. 

{) COMMUNITY SHAMANIC DRUMMING GROUP Sacred 
Heart Church — Every Fri, Everyone Welcome. Info; 951- 
2324 (after 6 pr/weekends). 

HALLOWEEN PARTY La Cile, 8627 97 St— 8:30 pm: 
Prizes for best costume, best couple costume & most 
creative costume. Tickets: $10 (costumed), $20 (without 
costume), call 469-8400, 

INTUITIVE CARD READING /ndigo Books Music & Cafe, 
1837 99 St, 432-4488 — Every Friday, 5 to 9:30 pm: 
With intuitive card reader Brett Murray. A cost applies, 
THE JESUS SEMINAR Aobertson-Wesley United Church 
— 7:30 pm: Lloyd Geering, a writer & public figure in 
New Zealand & Stephen J. Patterson, Professor of New 
Testament at Eden Theological Seminary in St Louis will 
be speaking. (See Saturday's listings for workshop 
times) Registration: 482-1587 or 
www.westarinstitute.org. Cost: $75 for all three events, 
$60 additional family members, $15 just Fri evening, $40 
for Sat morning or afternoon sessions. 

{D METRO CINEMA Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828101A 
Ave, 425-9212 —7 pm: Haxan (Witchcraft Through The 
Ages); 9 pm: Opera, Please see Thursday's listings for more 
details. Admission: $6 adults, $4 students/seniors, 
{)OPPORTUNITIES UNLIMITED NETWORKING GROUP 
Edmonton Chamber of Commerce, #600, 10123 99 St— 
6:45 to 8:30 am: Come to develop new business relation- 
ships, and hear our keynote speaker Wendy Luther of 
Recycling Council of Alberta and the presentation 
"Business Waste Reduction Opportunities.” Admission: 
$2. Info: 426-4620. 


SATURDAY 


ALTERNATIVES TO CAPITALISM Orlando Books, 10123 
82 Ave — Every Sat at 3:30 pm: Share'vision and etforts 
to promote joyful, community-building alternatives to 
environmental devastation wage slavery and unemploy- 
ment. Info: www.geocities,com/alttocap 

ALANO CLUB SOBER DANCE 992103 St, 423-1807 — 
Every Sat 9 pm: Soher Dance. DJ Jack plays oldies, 
country and rock, $5. 

{)CITY FARMER'S MARKET 97 St &100 Ave— 7 am to 
2\pm. Always fresh, great selection, over 100 years of 
service, free parking. 

EDMONTON WEAVER'S GUILD ANNUAL SALE & SHOW 
Prince of Wales Armoury, 10440 108 Ave — 10 am to 4 
pm: A showcase/sale of members’ fibre arts products, 
particularly weaving, spinning & dyeing. Items include 
clothing & accessories, scarves, household linens & 
accessories; towels, blankets, gifts, stocking stuffers, 
Christmas decorations, toys, cards, yarn and more. 
Admission: $2 (or $1 plus Food Bank donation) Info: 
425-9580. 

THE JESUS SEMINAR Aobertson-Wesley United Church 
— 9:30 to Noon or 1:30 te 4 pm: Professors Geering 
Patterson will lead workshops. Registration: 482-1587 or 
www.westarinstitute.org. Cost: $75 for all three events, 
$60 additional amily members, $15 just Fri evening, $40 
for Sat morning or afternoon sessions, 

{) LATIN DANCE PARTY Helenic Centre, 10450-116 St—7 
pm: Change for Children Association is holding a latin dance 
party featuring Sonora Tropical & America Rosa in support 
of Change for Children’s projects in Latin America. Tickets: 
$16 adv (from Change for Children (448-1505), Earth's 
General Store, Sol Andino Travel, Panaderia Latina, 
Productos Latinos, $18 at the door 

{) METRO CINEMA Zeidler Hall, Citadel Theatre, 9828101A 
Ave, 425-9212—7 pm: Haxan (Witchcraft Through The 
Ages); 9 pm: Opera. Please see Thursday's listings for more 
details. Admission: $5 adults, $4 students/seniors. 
WOMEN IN BLACK Strathcona Farmer's Market, 83 Ave 
& 103 St— First Sat. of every month fram 10 to 11 am: 
An international women's peace & anti-racist group 
formed by Jewish & Arab women in 1988 opposes vio- 
lence in all its forms. We invite all women, men & chil- 
dren to attend a silent vigil. Info; 435-7051 


SUNDAY 


{)METRO CINEMA Zeidler Hall. Citadel Theatre, 9828101A 
Ave, 425-9212 —7 pm: Haxan (Witchcraft Through The 
Ages); 9 pm: Opera. Please see Thursday's listings for more 
details. Admission: $5 adults, $4 students/seniors. 





















WASKAHEGAN TRAIL ASSOCIATION FREE GUIDED HIKE 


— Today's hike is approximately 10km at Emily Murphy 
Park, meet at 10 am by the South end of Groat Bridge at 
Emily Murphy Park, bring lunch and a beverage. WTA is 
group of avid hikers that welcome non-members on their 
outings. Info: 478-5622. 


MONDAY 


{DEDMONTON FILM SOCIETY - ROMANTIC COMEDY 
Provincial Museum Auditorium, 102Ave & {28 St— 8 
pm: Bachelor Mother starring Gingef Rogers & David 
Niven. When a young shopgirl takes in an abandoned 
baby, everyone around her starts jumping to the wrong 
conclusion. A snappy, loose-jointed comedy that has the 
intelligence and irony to raise provocative questions 
about the role of women and male hypocrisy. Admission: 
$5 general, $4 seniors/students, $2 children (2 & under), 
‘SING FOR FUN The Lynne Singers 435-4836— Everyone 
welcome to jain Women's Chorus and Men's Chorus, No 
auditions necessary. Learn the basics of theory, sight 
reading, ear training, vocal technique in a fun and sup- 
portive atmosphere. Info: 435-4838, 

TOWN HALL MEETING St Andrews United Church, 9915 
148 Street — 7:30 pm: Kyoto: Questions & Concerns 
About Climate Change? Have your questions answered 
by the Expert Panel, which includes: Dr David Schindler, 
Dr Martin Sharp & Rob Macintosh. Info: www.edmon- 
tonriverview.com or 414-0719, 

WOMEN IN BLACK Orlando Books (upstairs), 10123 
Whyte Ave— 7:30 pm: An international women's peace 
& anti-racist group formed by Jewish & Arab women in 
1988 opposes violence in all its forms. New and old 
members welcome (Meeting takes place the Mon follow- 
ing the first Sat of the month). 


FEAR-FREE PUBLIC SPEAKING — Every Tues from 7 to 
9 pm: Learn practical skills you can use to enjoy speak- 
ing in public. Workshop with Barbara May. Cost: $17. 
Info; 460-9774. 

{PINDULGENCE: A FOOD AND WINE EPIC Crowne Plaza, 
Chateau Lacombe Hotel —7 pm: A night for Wine 
Enthusiasts, Edmonton's top chefs will be partnering 
delicious foods with exceptional VOA wines. Participating 
restaurants: Blue Iguana, Crowne Plaza-Chateau 
Lacombe, Fairmont Hotel MacDonald, Gourmet Goodies, 
Mise En Place, Packrat Louie's, Polo's, Ramada Mayfield 
Group & The Westin Edmonton, Presented by the Junior 
League of Edmonton. Cost: $40, info: 433-9739 or 
www,jledmonton.org 

KYOTO ROUNDTABLE Library Bar & Restaurant, 11133 
87 Ave — 6:30 to 8:30 pm; Canada 25's mission is to 
engage the perspectives of young Canadians in Canada’s 
public policy debates, Explore the question “Should 
Canada ratify the Kyoto Protocol?" A summary of round- 
table discussions and e-mail submissions will be con- 
densed into an Edmonton report, and will feed intoa 
national report within a month. Copies of this report will 
be shared with the city, province, the media and interest- 
ed parties. Info: magzilla@shaw,ca or 
pialid@hotmail.com or 495-6731. No Minors. 

WEST END TOASTMASTER CLUB “COMMUNICATION 
AND LEADERSHIP” 10457 170.St, Second Floor 4 
Boardroom — Every Tues trom 7 to 9 pm: 
Communication involves listening skills, giving appropri- 
ate feedback and public speaking. Friendly environment 
of personal progress and mutual support during two- 
hour weekly meetings. Info: 472-4911. 




















Building — 10 am: Chris Cran is a Galgary-based painter 
with an extensive exhibition record that includes solo 
shows throughout Canada. He has explored a wide ra 

of themes in his work including critical representation; 
Pop nostalgia and issues of illusion and ab jon. 

{DA TASTE OF THE WEST Hops Building, 10012 Jasper 
Ave— 11am to 2 pm or 4 to 8 pms A’Showease of west- 
erm food, western entertainment & a & 
tickets! 423-2822 or TIX. Admission; $9 sion, 


includes 12 coupons. (Continuesmntit Nov 9) 
CONNECTING TO THE EAE ROWER WITHIN 7 to 9 
pm: Learn how to release chronic pain, clear blockages 
to healing, and de-stress past and present trauma. $17, 
workshop with Barbara May. Into: 460-9774. 

{) FREE WEB-BASED E-MAIL Stanley A Milner Library, 
Sixth Floor — 6:30 pm: Edmonton Community Network 
offers this hands-on course that takes you through the, 
setup of a free e-mail account, sending messages, 
attaching files, assembling a contact list, reading & orga- 
nizing your email. Admission: $19 members, $29 non- 
members, register at 414-5656, Info: 
www.ecn.ab.ca/members/training 

HEART DANCE 10003 80 Ave — Every Wed from 8 to 
9:30 pm; A movement education experience — all levels 
dance and music background welcome. Into: 433-4752. 
Classes continue until mid-July. 

THE OUTSIDERS SUPPORT GROUP — 7 to 8:30 pm Every 
Wed A support group for families and friends of loved ones 
‘who are incarcerated or on parole. Providing emotional sup- 
port, info anda place to share. Info: 471-1122 or 484-0274 






















______ LISTING 





UPWARD BOUND TOASTMASTERS Canadian College 
International, 10th Floor, Baker Centre, 10025 106 St 
469-5816— 7 pm: Open House. Meets at 7 pm Info: 

469-5816 


THURSDAY 


20TH ANNUAL SPIRIT LIFTER BREAKFAST Fairmont 
Hotel Macdonald, Empire Ballroom — 7:30 am: Hosted . 
by the Support Network, with quest speaker Cam Tait, 


local journalist. Proceeds from the breakfast go to the 24 
Hour Distress Line and the no-fee Walk-In Counselling 
program. Tickets: $65 ($50 tax receipt), 10 for $600 
($450 tax receipt), call 482-0198 or e-mail lauriec@the- 
supportnetwork.com 

A TASTE OF THE WEST Hops Building, 10012 Jasper Ave 
—11am to 2 pm or 4 to 8 pm: A showcase of western 
food, western entertainment & western art. Info & tick- 
ets: 423-2822 or TIX. Admission: $9 per session, 






includes 12 coupons. (Continues until Nov 9) 
DROP-IN FRENCH CONVERSATION La Cité francaise, 
Room 202, 8527 91 St, 469-0399 — Every Thurs, 7-9 
pm. 


SHOWTIMES OCTOBER 31-NOVEMBER 7, 2002 
Pcanneay 


8712-109 STREET © 433-0728 


FIRST STEPS ON THE INTERNET Stanley A Milner 
Library, Sixth Floor-—7 pm: Edmonton Community 
Network offers this hands-on course introducing you to 
the common features of Internet Explorer, the too! that 
allows you to view and move through the World Wide 
Web. Admission: $19 members, $29 non-members, reg- 
ister at 414-5656. Info: www.ecn.ab.ca/members/training 


THURSDAY 


“START” PARENT & PRESCHOOL PROGRAM Profiles 
Public Art Gallery, 19 Perron St., St. Albert — 1:30 to 
2:30 pm: Myths & Legends, Oct 31; |s it fact or fiction? 
Learn about the myths of Greek & Roman people as well 
as some great Canadian legends. Create fanciful foam 





West 
Edmonton 
Mall 


@DISNEY ENTERPRISES, INC. 
@IMAX CORPORATION 


ABANDON PG 
Fri 7:00, 9:15; Sat to Sun 1:30, 4:00, 7:00, 9:15; Mon to Thurs 7:00. 
Violent scenes. 





BOWLING FOR COLUMBINE 
Nightly 7:00 & 9:20; Sot 8 Sun motinees 2:00, 


THE TRANSPORTER 14s 
Fri 6:45, 900; Sot to Sun 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:00; Mon to Thus 6:45 





ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW 
Nov. 2 Midnight — Tix on Sole Now 


10337 - 82 AVENUE © 433.0728 





HEAVEN 
Nightly 7:00 & 9:00; Sot & Sun motiness 2:00, 





BOLLYWOOD HOLLYWOOD 
Nightly 7:10 & 9:10; Sot & Sun matinee 2:10. 


9828-101A AVENUE (ZEIDLER HALL, CITADEL THEATRE) © 425-9212 





HAXAN: WITCHCRAFT THROUGH THE AGES 
Thurs to Sun., Oct. 31 to Nov. 3, 7 p.m. 


14A 





OPERA 
Thuts. 10 Sun,, Oct_31.to Nov.3, 9:9.m. Gory violence: 


GRANDIN THEATRES 


“T8A 


GRANDIN MALL, SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL AVE., ST. ALBERT # 458-9622 


1 MATINEE: CHILD (13 8 UNDER) $4, ADULT $6, SENIOR (65+) $4.50 


~ /sJEVENING: CHILD $4.50, ADULT $8, SENIOR $4.50; TUESDAYS ALL DAY $5 





NO SHOWTIMES AVAILABLE 


CINEPLEX ODEON 


JE 


CITY CENTRE CINEMAS 
SRD FLOOR PHASE Il, 101 st. & 102 AVE. © 421-7020 


E 





*HARRY POTTER ADVANCE TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE* 


SPY 
Fri to Thurs 1:20, 3:40, 7:00, 9:20. Violent scenes. No passes. 


PG 





THE TRUTH ABOUT CHARLIE 
Frito Thurs 1:40, 4:10, 7:20, 9:40. Violent scenes, 


PG 





PUNCHDRUNK LOVE 
Frito Thurs 2:00, 4:50, 7:40, 10:00. Coarse sexval diologue. 


14a 





JACKASS: THE MOVIE 
Frito Tues 1:10, 3:20, 5:20, 750, 10:15; Wed to Thus 1:10, 3:20, 
10:15. Crude content throughout. 





GHOST SHIP 
Frito Thurs 2:20, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10, Gory violence. 





THE RING 
Fri to Thurs 1:50, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50. Frightening scenes. 





WHITE OLEANDER 
Frito Thurs 1:30, 4:00, 6:50. Mature themes. 





RED DRAGON 

Fito Sun, Tues 1:00, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; Mon 1:00, 3:50, 9:30. 
Disturbing content, gory violence. 

ABANDON 


Frito Thurs 9:10. Violent scenes, 








MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING 
Frito Thues 2:10, 4:20, 6:30, 9:00. 


RED DRAGON ae) 18A 
Fri 6:45, 9:30; Sot to Sun 1:00, 4:00, 6:45, 9:30; Mon to Thurs 6:45. 
Disturbing content, gory violence, 
THE FOUR FEATHERS 14A 
Fri 6:30, 9:15; Sotto Sun 1:00, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; Mon to Thurs 6:30. _ 
MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING PG 
Ful 7:15, 9:30; Sot to Sun 1:45, 4:45, 7:15, 9:30; Mon to Thurs 7:15. 
BARBERSHOP PG 
Frito Sun 7:15, 9:45; Mon to Thurs 7:15. Coorse language. 

AUSTIN POWERS IN GOLDMEMBER 4A 
Fri 6:30, 8:45; Sot to Sun 1:15, 4:15, 6:30, 8:45; Mon to Thurs 6:30. 
Gude content, A, SSO 

THE MASTER OF DISGUISE G 
Fri6:30, 8:45; Sat to Sun 2:00, 4:30, 6:30, 8:45; Mon to Thurs 6:30. 
‘SPY KIDS 2: THE ISLAND OF LOST DREAMS G 
Sat to Sun 1:30, 4:30. i 


WEST EDMONTON MALL, PHASE Il ENTRANCE 2 © 444-1829 

OK OFFICE OPENS NIGHTLY 6:15 © OPEN MATINEES SAT/SUN 1:30 _ 
THE TRUTH ABOUT CHARLIE PG 
Fri, Mon to Thurs 7:10, 9:30; SatSun 1:40, 4:10, 7:10, 9:30. 
Violent scenes. 
THE TUXEDO 
Fri, Man to Thurs 6:35, 9:05; Sat to Sun 1:35, 4:05, 6:35, 9:05. 
Some violence. 
WHITE OLEANDER 
Fri, Mon to Thurs 6:30, 9:00; Sat fo Sun 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:00. 
‘Mature themes. 
TUCK EVERLASTING 
Fri, Mon t0 Thurs 6:50; Sot to Sun 1:20, 4:00, 6:50. 
BROWN SUGAR 
Frito Thurs 9:15. Coarse languoge. 
VIRGINIA’S RUN 
Fri, Man to Thurs 6:40; Sot to Sun 1:50, 4:20, 6:40. 
POKEMON 4EVER 
Fri, Mon to Thurs 7:00; Sot to Sun 1:05, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00. 
JONAH: A VEGGIETALES MOVIE 
Fri, Mon to Thurs 7:20; Sot to Sun 1:30, 3:30, 5:25, 7:20. 
THE BANGER SISTERS 
Frito Thurs 9:20, Semuol content. 


























PG 





14a 























XxX 
Frito Thurs 9:40, 


14a 





AUSTIN POWERS IN GOLDMEMBER 144 
Fri, Mon to Thurs 7:30, 9:45; Sat to Sun 1:00, 3:40, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45. 
Gude content, 





ONE HOUR PHOTO 
Frito Thurs 9:10. 


CLAREVIEW TOWN CENTRE 
421) = 137 AVENUE © 472-7600 


14k 








THE SANTA CLAUSE 2 «00 2 scxenes G 
Frito Thus 12:15, 1:30, 240, 4:10, 5:05, 6:45, 7:30, 9:15, 10-00. 


Masks and dramatic designer costumes based an ancient 
wardrobes. Dress up for the last class of the month for 
and have a spook-tacular good time at our annual Start 
Halloween Party. Pre-registration required, 460-4310. 
Start is an interactive program, which offers children 
ages 2 to 5 and their parents/caregivers fun opportunities 
to explore art and elements of art as a basis for learning 
and skill development. Cost $5 per child (caregivers 

free). To pre-register call 460-4310. 

YOUTH DROP-IN CENTRE Castle Downs YMCA, 11510 - 
153 Ave., 476-9622 — 6 to 9 pm: Pool; Ping-Pong 
Tournament; YMCA Members free. $3 Non-Members 


SATURDAY i : 


ART CLASSES Edmonton Art Gallery (99 St & 102A Ave) 
— Nov 16 to Dec 21; Now accepting registrations for art 
classes for kids aged 4 to 17. Inspiration for creations in 
sculpture, painting, drawing, printmaking and cartoon- 
ing. Info: 422-6223 

ART-VENTURES Profiles Public Art Gallery, 19 Perron 
St, St. Albert, 460-4310 — Drop-in to the gallery every 
Saturday between 1 and 4 pm and discover how much 





MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING 

Fo Thas 1240, 245,450,715, 940. 
FEMME FATALE 

Wed to Thurs 1:15, 3:50, 7:35, 10:05. 


PG 


18A 


WEST EDMONTON MALL, PHASE | ENTRANCE 44 © 444-133) 
BOX OFFICE OPENS NIGHTLY at 6:15 p.m. 
OPEN FOR MATINEES SATSUN AT 12:30 PAL 

FRI, MON-THURS. CINESAVE TUESDAY — ALL SEATS $1.50 
___SAT_8 SUN, CINESAVE TUESDAY — ALL SEATS $2.50 
MEN IN BLACK II PG 
Frito Sun 1:30, 4:00, 6:45, 9:20; Man Yo Thus 6:45, 9:20,_ 
CTY BY THE SEA 
Frito Sun 2°15, 4:45, 7:30, 9:50; Mon to Thurs 7:30, 9:50. 
Goose longooge. 
ROAD TO PERDITION 


14A 


BLUE CRUSH 

Frito Sun 1:45, 4:15, 7:10, 9:40; Mon to Thurs 7:10, 9:40. 

Not suitoble for younger children. 

LILO & STITCH G 
Frito Sun 1:00, 3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:10; Mon to Thurs 7:00, 9:10. 
THE BOURNE IDENTITY 

Frito Sun 1:15, 3:45, 6:30; Mon fo Thurs 6:30. 

MR. DEEDS 

Fri to Sun 2:00, 4:30, 7:20, 9:30; Mon to Thurs 7:20, 9:30. 
Coarse language 


SOUTH EDMONTON COMMON 
CALGARY TRAIL & 23RD AVENUE © 436-8585 
* HARRY POTTER ADVANCE TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE * 


THE SANTA CLAUSE 2 + ov 2 screws G 
Frito Thurs 1:00, 2:00,-3:45, 4:45, 6:30, 7:30, 9:15, 10:00. 








14A 





PG 








1sPY 

Frito Thurs 12:30, 3:10, 5:40, 8:10, 10:40. Violent scenes. No posses. 
1 SPY 

Frito Thrus 1:30, 4:10, 7:10, 9:40. Violent scenes. No passes. 
THE TRUTH ABOUT CHARLIE 

Frito Thurs 1:45, 4:40, 7:50, 10:25. Violent scenes. 
BOLLYWOOD /HOLLYWOOD 

Frito Thurs 2:15, 5:10, 8:00, 10:35. 

PUNCH-DRUNK LOVE « ov zscrsxs 14A 
Frito Thurs 12:40, 1:15, 3:00, 4:00, 5:20, 6:45, 7:45, 9:10, 10:10. 
Coarse sexual diologue. 

GHOST SHIP 

Frito Thurs 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 8:40, 9:50, 10:45. Gory violence, 
THE RING 

Frito Thurs 1:40, 4:30, 7:20, 10:20. Frightening scenes. 

THE TRANSPORTER 

Fri to Thurs 12:50, 3:20, 5:50, 8:15, 10:30. 

WHITE OLEANDER 

Frito Thurs 1:10, 3:50, 6:40. Mature themes, 

RED DRAGON 18A 
Frito Thurs 1:20, 4:20, 7:15, 10:15. Disturbing content, gory violence. 
JONAH: A VEGGIETALES MOVIE 

Frito Thurs 12:30, 2:40, 5:00. 

THE TUXEDO 

Frito Thurs 9:45, Some violence. 











PG 








18A 











14a 











fun art can be. Children, ages 5 to 12 Suggested dona- 
tion per child is $2. Parents required to stay with their 
children 

CRAFTS FOR KIDS /ndigo Books Music & Cafe, 1837-99 
St. 432-4488 — 2 pm: Designed for children aged 6 to 
11 years. 

WHO NEEDS CARTOONS? /ndigo Books Music & Cafe, 
1837-99 St. 432-4488 — 11:00 am: A unique alternative 
to Saturday morning cartoons. Join us for stories, crafts 
and a free cheese sandwich from the Indigo Cafe. 






STORY TIME Stanley A. Milner Library — 2 pm: Half 


hour of stories suitable for children 3 and up. Admission: 
Free. Into: 496-7000 or www.epl.ca. (Continues every 
Sun. until Dec. 8) 






TUESDAY 


“START” PARENT AND PRESCHOOLER PROGRAM 
Profiles Public Art Gallery, 19 Perron St., St. Albert — 
1:30 to 2:30 pm: Please see Thursday's listings for more 


T BLE P. AWN) DiA: 





details, Cost $5 per child (caregivers free).To pre-register 
call 460-4310. Takes place every Tuesday 

YOUTH DROP-IN CENTRE Castle Downs YMCA, 11510 - 
153 Ave., 476-9622 — 6 to 9 pm: Pool. Ping-Pong, Air 
Hockey, Foosball, and Shuffle board. YMCA Members 
free, $3 Non-Members. 






WEDNESDAY | 
ARMY CADET RECRUITMENT St. Luke's 1321, 





06 Ave, 





— Every Wednesday, 6:30 - 9 pm: Free sports, activities, 
camping, rifling, wall climbing and orienteering. For more 


information call Doug @ 483-7985. 






“START” PARENT AND PRESCHOOLER PROGRAM 
Profiles Public Art Gallery, 19 Perron St, St. Albert— 
1:30 to 2:30 pm: Cost $5 per child (caregivers free).To 
pre-register call 460-4310. 

YOUTH DROP-IN CENTRE Castle Downs YMCA, 11510- 
153 Ave., 476-9622 — 6 to 9 pm: Pool. Ping-Pong 
Tournament. YMCA Members free, $3 Non-Members 


ADVENTURE 


Join IMAX on an extraordinary journey into the heart of China 
to experience the wonder of the giant panda 


Based on an 


WEST EDMONTON ALL 
ABANDON 

Daily 1:10, 3:55, 6:55, 9:50. Violent scenes 

FEMME FATALE 

Wed Thu 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 1008. 

GHOST SHIP 

Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 9:55; Wed Thu 9:55. 
Gory violence. _ 

1 SPY 

Daily 1:00, 4:30, 7:20, 10:15. Violent scenes. 
JACKASS? THE MOVIE 

Daily 12:45, 1:15, 3:45, 4:15, 7:15, 7:45, 10:00, 10:30. 
Gude content throughout. 
MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING 
Fri Sot Sun Mon Tue 12:45, 3:30, 6:20, 9:15; Wed 6:30, 9:15; Thu 
12:45, 3:30, 9:15. 
PUNCH DRUNK LOVE 
Daly 12:10, 3:40, 6:50, 9:45. Course sexual dilogue._ 
RED DRAGON - 

Daily 12:40, 3:50;.7:20, 10:25. Disturbing content, gory violence: 


PG 





a) 4A 


18A 


incredible true story 


THE RING 

Fri Sot Sun 1:30, 4:00, 7:00, 9:30; Mon Tue Wed Thu 7:00, 9:30. 
Frightening scenes. 

SANTA CLAUSE 2: MRS. CLAUSE 

Fri Sat Sun 12:00, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45; Mon Tue Wed Thu 7:15, 
9:45, 


14A 


MOVIES CANADA 


$2.00 ALL SHOWS BEFORE 6 PM 
$2.50 SHOWS AFTER 6 PM * $1.50 ALi DAY TUESDAY! 
$3.00 FRIDAY/SATURDAY LATE SHOWS CINEMA CITY 12 ONLY 


MOVIES 12: 130 AVENUE & $0 STREET © 472.9779 

CINEMA CITY: 3638-99 STREET « 4635481 (FRESAT MIDNIGHT SHOWS) 
MEN IN BLACK 2 PG 
Sat/Sun 11:00; diy 1:30, 4:20, 7:35, 9:55, late ne Fi/Sot 12:00. _ 
CITY BY THE SEA 14a 
Sat/Sun 11:35; daly 2-10, 450, 7-00, 10:10; late site Fri/Sot 12:25 

Coorse language, _ 
BANGER SISTERS 


Sa1/Sun.11:45; daily 1:50, 4:35,.7:15, 9:35; late nite Fri/Sat 11:45. 
Sexual content. 





SWEET HOME ALABAMA 
Fri Sof Sun Mon Tue Wed 12:15, 4:10, 6:45, 9:30; Thu No showtimes 
avaiable. Course lonquoge. 


PG 


ROAD TO PERDITION 14A 
Sat/Sun 11-20; daily 1:45, 430, 7:10, 9:50; late rite Fi/Sot 12:20. 
Violent scenes. 





THE RING 





THE SANTA CLAUSE 2: MRS. CLAUSE 

Daily 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:40, 16:10. 

THE TRANSPORTER 

Fri Sot Sun Mon Tue 12°50, 4:20, 6:40, 9:20; Wed Tho 12:50, 4:20, 
6:40 





SILVERCITY IMAX 
WEST EDMONTON MALL 
CYBERWORLD - aur 0 
Mon Tue Wed Thu 1:00. 


STAR WARS: EPISODE fl ATTACK OF THE CLONES PG 
Fri Sat Sun 12:30, 3:00, 7:00, 9:40; Mon Tue Wed 3:00, 7:00, 9:40; 
Thu 3:00, 9:40, No passes. 


GATEWAY & 


‘29TH AVENUE & CALGARY TRAIL © 4366977 
$8.50 GENERAL ADMISSION 





PG 








ABANDON 

Fri Mon Tue Wed Thu 7:30, 9:50; Sot Sun 1:45, 4:00, 7:30, 9:50. 
Violent scenes. 

‘AUSTIN POWERS IN GOLDMEMBER 

Fri Mon Tue Wed Thu 7:15, 9:45; Sot Sun 1:40, 3:50, 7:15, 9:45. 
Goude content. 

BARBERSHOP 

FriMon Tue 6:55, 9:25; Sat Sun 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:25. 

Course language. 





14a 














Fri Mon Tue Wed Thu 7:20, 9:40; Sat Sun 1:00, 3:40, 7:20, 9:40, 
‘Grude content throughout, 





USPY ov 7scrcrs: PG 
Frito Thurs 12:30, 1:20, 2:50, 4:00, 5:0, 7:00, 7:45, 9:30, 10:15. 


JACKASS THE MOVIE +02 scams R 
Frito Thus 1245, 14, 300,420,535, 7:10, 7:50, 9:25, 10:20. 
Coude coment throughout 








GHOST SHR 
Fis 


‘SWEET HOME ALABAMA 
Frito Thurs 12:45, 3:30, 6:50, 9:30. Coarse languoge. 


POKEMON 4 EVER G 
Fai Mon Tue Wed Thy 7:10; Sat Sun 1:10, 3:20, 7:10. 





MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING 


SIGNS PG 
Fri Mon Tue 7:00, 9:30; Sat Sum 1:50, 4:20, 7:00, 9:30; Wed Thu 6:55, 
9:25. Frightening scenes, not suitoble for younger children, 
perl B 

Fri Mon Tue Wed Thu 6:45, 9400; Sot Sun 1:30, 3:30, 6:45, 9-00, 


Wed Th 6:50, 9:15; Sat 5. 











MASTER OF DISGUISE G 
Sat/Sun 11:15; daily 1:10, 3:05, 5:00, 7:10, 9:20; late nite Fi/Sat 
W215. 

AUSTIN POWERS 3: GOLDMEMBER 4A 
Sot/Sun 11-50; doity 2:15, 4:55, 7:45, 10:15; late nite Fri/Sat 12:15. 
Crude content. 

BLUE CRUSH PG 
Sot/Sun 11:05; daily 1:40, 4:25, 7:05, 9:30; late nite Fri/Sot 11:50. 
Not suitable for ‘younger children. 

BOURNE IDENTITY 14a 
Sat/Sun 11:30; daily 2:00, 4:40, 7:25, 10:00; late nite Fri/Sat 12:30, 
ULO & STITCH G 
Sat/Sun 11:25, daily 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:20, 9:25; late nite Fri/Sot 
11:30. 

SPIDERMAN PG 
Sat/Sun 11:10; daily 1:35, 4:15, 7:00, 9:40; late nite Fri/Sot 12:05. 
May frighten younger children 

SPIDERMAN 

Sat/Sun 11:40; daly 2:05, 4:45, 7:30, 10:05. 
‘Nay frighten younger chitdren. 

MINORITY REPORT 14 
Sat/Sun 10:30; daily 1:20, 4:10, 6:55, 9:45; late nite Fri/Sat 12:20. 




















PG 





GALAXY CINEMAS 

2020 SHERWOOD DR., SHERWOOD PARK © 416-0150. 
SANTA CLAUSE 2 
Fii to Sun 1-00,3:45,.6:50, 9:15. 
MY BIG FAT GREEK WEDDING 
Frito Sun 1:35, 4:00, 6:45, 9:00, 
SWEET HOME ALABAMA 
Frito Sun 1-10, 3:50, 7:00, 9:35. Coorse language, 
RED DRAGON 18A 
Frito Sun 1:20, 4:15, 7:10, 10:00. Disturbing content, gory violence. 
WHITE OLEANDER : 
Fa to Sun 1:00, 7:15. Mature themes. 
Frito Sun 3:30, 9:10. Gory violence. 
Fito 30, 


























—___ CLASSIF 


MEDIA DIRECTORY 











Music Stupios 


Short Run CO Duplication 
Digital mixing, mastering, 
restoration 
Prime Time Services 
456-7958, 920-0693 








BEST BARGAINS! 
BEST SAVINGS! 
BEST SALES! BEST PRICES! 
tn Edmonton! Visit us online! 
www.edmontonbargain.com 


CD's for sale for $10.00 each 
80's & 90's, 00's in great shape 
Call (780)487-0166. 


CD'S, DVD'S, BOOKS 
MUSIC MERCANTILE 
MOSTLY MUSIC MOSTLY 


8420-109 St. 
437-5860 


HILLBILLY BUDDA 


GUILD F-30R Beautiful, Never 
Played Acoustic Guitar with pick- 
up. Brand new. Value.$2500 Ask- 
ing $2100. Phone 431-0685. 


MUSICIANS AVAILABLE 7 


DRUMMER looking for band, re- 
ady to gig. Various influences 
Call Kelsey @ 475-4852 or email 
kelsey_ thomson @ hotmail.com. 








ELVIS TRIBUTE. 50's, 60's 
singer looking for work or serious 


team players. Call Nat 474-1732. 


EXPERIENCED DRUMMER 
looking to form Rush tribute band 
for future gigs, enjoyment. Other 
progressive bands as well. Ph 
475-7571 


FEMALE VOCALIST, stage ex- 
perience/relaxed 
presence,opportunity knocking? 
Will do back-up, front, production 
oriented stuff, process, jam 
style? Whitney, Ndegecello 
Faith Hill, Enya, let's play! 

Blue 488-0665 


FRONTMAN w/exp. Available for 
working hardrock/alternative 
project. READY TO GO! 430- 
8756. 


SICIANS WANTED 


ALT/PUNK/ROCK bands inter- 
ested in playing all ages gigs @ 
wareho call James for 
bookings 169-9309 or leave 











BAND seeks vocalist, aged 
8-25, for original rock project 
Call Mark @ 472-0541 or 721- 


7040 





BARITONE sax player wanted for 
SKA banw, Call Vance 461-1188, 





seeks 
mature, drug-free, like-minded 
nusicians for recreational jams 
Not interested in gigging. Cali 
Mike at 474-3740 


BASS PLAYER, 44 








www.albertamusic.com 


Alberta’ Foremost Independent Music store 
now accepting titles for inclusion to our online roster 
















Music Stupios 


WANNA BE A 
PROFESSIONAL 
RECORDING ARTIST? 
Check Baby-Jing Produktionz 
for high quality sound @ best 
rates specializing in HIP- 
HOP/R&B. Call 457-0086 tor 
a free consultation 


Musicians WANTED 


BASSIST: Unique challenge, 
writing/recording project requires 
innovative, experienced, fretless 
ideal, Dean @ 424-6796 




















CELLO: Empathic world music, 
acoustic/electric/experimental 
Dean @ 424-6796. 


CURBSTOMP looking for 
serious guitars & bass player 
Flakes need not apply. 436-3936. 


DARKSLIDE, original alt/punk 
band, needs a DRUMMER - fast 
& melodic ASAP! 18+ Call James 
469-9309 or Jared 903-8510. 


Drummer,32, with some guitar, 
b/u vox ability, INFL:Crue, 
Zepplin Seeking creative 
headbanger guitarists for garage 
band. Ambitious, dedicated. Todd 
416-1338 Lve. msg 


PHONE: 430-9003 FAX: 432-1102 E-MAIL: classified@see.greatwest.ca 


MusiciANs WANTED MusiciANs WANTED Artist To ARTIST WECSY.\e] al lead 


KEYBOARDIST/UTILITY 
musician wanted for heavy pop 
punk band. Various influences. 
475-4852 or 477-0840 Email 
kelsey_thomson@hotmail.com 


KICK ASS BASS player needed 
to complete “covers now, 
originals later" rock trio, Infl 
everything. Mike 464-0760 or 
mike @ dividedmind.ca 


LEAD GUITAR player wanted for 
established classic rock band 
We have full P.A. & rehearsal 
space. Brent, 438-3019 





LEAD SINGER NEEDED for high 
energy heavy rock band. Call 
Danny 486-5702 or Peter 990- 
9806. Leave a message. 


WANTED: Bass player & 
drummer for promising 
Blues/Rock project. Recording 
gigs. Rick 466-7632. 


WANTED ONE SOUL: diverse 
vocalist, progressive rock 
thoroughly addicted. Dan 474- 
1016 


ARTIST looking to purchase copy 
of "CONAN THE ROGUE" gra- 
phic novel by John Buscema, in 
any condition. Garett 487-9735. 


CHILDREN ages 3-9 yrs 
required for childrens T.V. show 
& educational T.V. commercials. 
Ph 701-0035 = or visit 
www.childreneducational.com 





LOCAL ROCK BAND looking for 
lead guitar back-up vocals 
Covers & originals, Kirk 818-8464 
or Brad 469-0593, 





LOOKING for a keyboardist inter- 
ested in playing funky jam- based 
music. Primary influences: Phish, 
Almonds, MMW, Grateful Dead 
Chris 434-7204(Leave Message) 


LOOKING FOR BASS player for 
original band. Influences include 
Radiohead, Coldplay, REM. Call 
474-1615 


LOOKING for drummer & bassist 
to start alternative band. Must be 
serious & interested in writing 
original music. 989-5673. 


LOST! FENDER BASS & flight 
case. You have my bass | have 
your instrument. 488-3416 





ESTABLISHED DEATH Metal 
band seeking experienced 
vocalist & bassist. Call Mark @ 
444-3684 


ESTABLISHED heavy-style band 
‘InTension"” seeks drummer 
w/talent, double-kick & excellent 
gear Aaron or Dan 474-7076. 


Experienced funky guitar player 
wanted. Band has demo & major 
record label interest. Experience 
a must. Call Chris 488-4730. 


FEMALE A CAPPELLA group 
searching for first soprano 
Trained voice, reading skills, 
commitment required, Contact 
Angela at 433-0886 for auditions 
& information. 


FEMALE VOCALIST, stage ex- 
perience, relaxed presence 
opportunity knocking? Will do 
backup, front, production oriented 
stuff, process, jam style? 
Whitney, Ndegecello, Faith Hill, 
Enya. Let's Play! Blue 488-0665 


FRESH BAIT promotions seeks 
fledgling alternative & punk acts 
in need of ruthless promotion & 
all that rot (780)469-9309 
freshbaitpromo @ hotmail.com 


FUNKY TYPE rock band looking 
for Hammond/Rhoads type 
keyboardist. Have demo serious 
inquiries only. Contact Chris 488- 
4730 


GUITAR PLAYER needed for 
classic Rock/Blues project, Other 
players are mature & experi- 
enced (over 50) Ph:483-5832 





GUITARIST & Voice looking for 
talented rhythm section for 
onginal rock band 444-7770. 


HoneyBeam - A Honeymoon 
Suite tribute band is looking for 
awesome local talent. Contact 
Pamela @ 990-0979 or 479- 
9599, v 


MATURE ELECTRIC bassist 
looking for instrumentalists to 
form jazz duo/trio for fun & profit 
Serious inquiries only. Ph:444- 
0355 


MUSICIANS wanted for record- 
ing projects. 463-0761 


NEWER DIGITAL 
RECORDING AND 
MASTERING COURSES. 
Pro, Equipment. Industry 
Experienced Tutors. 


Affordable 
Lear how to do it yourself. 
Don't get ripped off! 
TECHWERKS 479-3825. 
E-mail: ctcparip@ecn.ab.ca 


ORIGINAL HARD rock guitarist 
needed Commitment & 
creativity a must. Infl:Jane's 
Addiction, Faith No More. Jon 
438-7116. 


PLAY an instrument? Join Black 
Gold Community Bands, Leduc 
Based. Contact Ed 929-5974, 
Caro! 450-0437 or Graham 987- 
2883. blackgoldband@shaw.ca. 


RENATO & GOLD CITY is look- 
ing for Female singer for 
Southeast Asian tour. Style: Hip 
Hop, R&B, Pop. Call Renato 732- 
7819 
SINGER/SONGWRITER(30) 
seeks original band or players to 
form very motivated very serious 
INFL: S.T.P.,Chains,Sabbath, 
Floyd, Yardbirds, Deftones, Sloan 
Serious inquiries only Glen 718- 
9498/466-8520. 


TUBA PLAYER wanted for AA 
sound system. Call Marek 989- 
3342. 


Want to act in movies? We are 
holding film acting workshops, for 
new or experienced actors 
Launey 481-6090. 





CUTTING EDGE painters wanted 
for torrid warehouse art show 
Submit slides, photos, JPEGs to: 
10719-128 St. TSMOW1 or 
artgirlx @ hotmail.com 469-9309. 


FORMING TROUPE to visit 
schools to promote educational 
safety to children 3-9 yrs old 
through music/dance/art & 
theatre. (Paid)flexible hrs. Experi- 
enced only. Ph:701-0035 or visit 
www.childreneducational.com 


FUN & excitement in 
photography. Female Models 
needed, no exp. necessary. Adult 
content & privacy guaranteed 
Volunteers only. 690-7071 


Jubilations Dinner Theatre is 
always looking for new talent. If 
you are interested in booking an 
audition call 484-2424, & leave a 
message for Kelly Fanchi. 


NEED a place to do your Thing? 
NEED to Record it? 

NEED to Videotape it? 

NEED it on D.V.D.? 

Then you NEED to call: 

THE HAYLOFT 922-3968. 


Nokomis sells Canadian 
designed & made clothing, 
specializing in one of a kind 
pieces. We are always interested 
lon seeing samples & are open to 
wholesale & consignment 
arrangements. Contact Virginia 
on 432-7462 or leave message. 


PHOTOGRAPHER seeking 
female models over 18 for B&W 
photography, for upcoming ex- 
hibit. Free portfolio in exchange 
for posing. Phone 434-3438. 


RECEPTION & ADMIN 
volunteers required for Centre for 
Contemporary Visual Art. Contact 
Carole at Latitude 53 423-5353 
or email:info @ latitude53.org 


SOUND & FURY Theatre seeks 
original monologues & one- 
person scenes for "ONE'S A 
CROWD FESTIVAL". Submit to 
soundandfury @ martica.org or 
call 435-8542 for info. 


VOLUNTEER PHOTOGRAPHER 
required for Centre for Con- 
temporary Visual Art 
Documentation of exhibitions & 
special events. Contact Carole @ 
Latitude 53 @ 423-5353 ar 
email:info@ latitude53.org 











Fax 4 





Attn: 


Name _ 
Address 


Phone 430-9003 


Classifieds Order Form 


Musicians, Artists, Volunteers, 
Fill out and FAX to 432-1102 or e-mail it to it 





WE NEED access to an elevator 
for an indie film project. Will work 
around any schedule. Can you 
help us out? Call Reilly 439- 
5597 or 974-1965 or email re- 
illy@umyamedia.com 


MAKE YOUR OWN FILMS 


and videos easily and inexpensively 
at FAVA. Rent equipment at 
1/4 normal, and take courses 
covering every step of the process, 


429-1671 or fava.ca. 


FILM AND VIDEO ARTS: 








THE LOS ANGELAS 
STOPDREAMIN/ 
START ACTING STUDIO 
is coming to Edmonton 
Dec. 10 to 15 
"Give yourself or a child a 
Holiday gift!" 

Film & TV Workshop for 


Kids/Teens & Adults. Prepare 
yourself professionally for Film 
& TV. Learn to cold-read, audi- 
tion & act for the camera. See 
www.stopdreamin.com for com- 
plete details! Toll free 1-800- 
588-0037 or 780-465-7419. 





DITIONS E 


IMMEDIATELY SEEKING 
males/females of all ages for 
upcoming seasonal film work. 
Call 409-1130. Limited spaces 
available. 





INDEPENDANT SHORT FILM 
Sun. Nov. 3 - Noon to 4:00 

Mon. Nov. 4 - 4:30 to 7:30 

18-25 year old Males & Females 
NAIT Industrial Technical Build- 
ing Room V137 118 Ave-106 St. 
Contact: hestfilms @ hotmail.com 


Music INS CTION 


Art & Science of Guitar 
Leam in a comfortable 
studio just off Whyte Ave. 
Gary's Guitar Studio 
435-8819 
kalimyers @ hotmail.com 


Guitar Therapy 
438-2596 
Lear to play the 
music YOU enjoy! 
First lesson free!!! 


DANCE SALSA: 
CUBAN STYLE 
Sunday Eve. (from:Nov.10/02) 
Beginners 8 - 9 pm 
Intermediates 6 - 7 pm 
Rueda de Casino (Beg.) 7- 8 pm 
Rueda de Casino (Int.) 5-6 pm 


LOCATION: Integration Place 
(10565-114St) 

Instructors: Usukuma & Diane 
Information & Registration: 

Call 433-4582 or 433-8314 

$60 for 6 classes or 

$12 per class. 

E-mail; uekuera@shaw.ca 


ALEXIS & CASSANDRA 
Incomparable European 
therapeutic massage. 
453-1593. #199174 





ASIAN DEEP Tissue Massage 
combined with Swedish Relaxa- 
tion Massage (No-Sex). Call 405 
-8083. 





DOWNTOWN Massage $35.00 
hour. Discount rate, relax. 
Certified 9 years. Lenora. No sex. 
Phone 453-2848 1pm to 7pm, 
Get Pampered. 





MICRO-SPA THERAPY, INC. 
“*Therapeutic Massage 
W/Complimentary Steam. 
Detoxifying Marine and Algae 
Based Mud Body Wraps.** 
Facials (Skin Analysis and 
Extractions Included.) Gift 
Certificates Available. For 
Appt. 429-1957, Walk-ins 
Welcome. 


RELAX, RESTORE, 
REJUVENATE! 
Multi-disciplinary, non-sexual 
massage. Certified. $35/hr intro 

fate. 482-0990. 


SWEDISH MASSAGE. 15 years 
experience. Strathcona Area. 
9am - 9 pm. 7 days. (Strictly non- 
sexual). Almasta 405-8765. 













Body Sutegration / 
Tara Tremblett R.M.T. 
10704 - 82 Ave — Hialk-Ins Welcome 


438-3680 tor appr. 


HEALTH 


Friends of Medicare have a new 
website, For non-profit Health 
Care information visit 
www.keepmedicarepublic.ca 





Lose up to 20ibs in one month. 
With our incredible weight loss 


& nutritional products. 
www.newbody.net 
access code 2006. 

TOTAL TRANSFORMATION 


Fitness training w/emphasis on 
mind-body connection. Get the 
whole you going in the same 
direction! $25/hr plus gym fees. 
482-0990. 


Pink Ice Studio 
5858-111 Street, Edmonton 
Phone: (780)438-5568 
Is pleased to announce Henna 
Body Art by Artist Brenda 
Marce. Alluring & Sensual, 
henna body art is for individuals 
who enjoy the diversity of non- 
permanent, cutting-edge body 
art. Custom designs, free con- 

sultations available. 






Office Hours: Monday-Friday 8:30 am-5:00 pm 


32-1102 











phone us at 430-9003. Deadline Monday at 3:00 pm 








Daytime Phone 


Print your ad clearly in the spaces provided, 


Buy 6 weeks. 






-greatwest.ca with classified in the subject 





BLACK & WHITE Male Border 
collie. Goes by Pilsner. Lost in 
McCauley area. If found please 
call Aaron 474-7076 or turn in to 
pound. 


SHARED ACCOMM ile) 


FEMALE seeking clean 
roommate, between ages of 
20-30. $300.00 per month, 
inclusive. Shared bathroom, 
parking, washer & dryer 
References required, call 722- 
6527. 


LARGE 2 bdrm, util. & cable 
included. Capilano area. No pets. 
Avail. Nov 1. $350/mo. 485-0750. 


APARTMENT FOR RENT 


UNIQUE MANAGEMENT with 
fun style. Halloween treats, bats, 
ghosts, spiders oh my! Bachelor 
$450 avail. Dec. 1, 1 bdrm $615 
avail. immediately. Cats ok, non- 
smoker. Call April on 429-0450 
for further information. 


BAND REHEARSAL SPACE 


REHEARSAL SPACES for rent. 
Clean, 24 hour access, excellent - 
security. Phone Brad @ 
439-1889 


HELP WANTED 


Do you have the internet?. 
Put your PC to work from home. 
Full training provided 
www _fortuneathome.net 
1-800-631-0146 


ENVIRONMENTAL activists 
required by non-radical group to 
canvass Edmonton area. Learn 
and earn, fair pay. Call Nick at 
420-1001, Mon-Fri. between 
3:30-5:00pm. 





EXPERIENCED wooD 
WORKERS NEEDED. \¥! © 

Help is needed in.an innercity 
project employing persons with 
varying levels of disability . Most 
helpful skills would be from some 
experience in repair and/or finish- 
ing techniques. We currently 
have a large amount of donated 
wood furniture which requires 
restoration. Pls call 465-5080 if 
interested. 


Shopping for a 

REWARDING 

retail career? 
Excellent retail MANAGEMENT 
positions. Apply now with the 
best retail employers online: 
www.canadianretail.com, 

"The Retail Job Store". 


Want your foot in the door of 
the music Industry? Part-time 


position, 100% commission, set 
your own hrs. Call 457-0086, 









ONEFREE! 
























___CLASSIFIE 








HELP WANTED | 


BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY || 


WANTED: 
INDEPENDENT 
HAIRSTYLIST 
AND/OR 
ESTHETICIAN. 
VERY COOL 
ENVIRONMENT 
NEGOTIABLE RATE. 
GREAT LOCATION 
FREE PARKING 
CALL GILLIAN 
AT 413-0959 





Travel & Teach 
English Overseas 


SUPPORT GROUPS 


iravel the 
Globe 

Earn Great 
Money! 


Blo) o\-mClll-le-lajun-is| 


We train in 5 days... All ages 
No degree or Experience needed 


Study In-class or 
| Online or by Correspondence 
FREE Info Pack: 1-888-270-2941 
FREE Info Nite Tuesday @ 7 PM 


FREE PIZZA 
www.counterculture.ca/pizza 





Speak & Shine 
Learn thru 
Toastmasters 
Fast Track with Speech Craft 
Thurs PM - NE Area 
Irene 473-6626 
469-6183 
Charmaine: 484-1372 


N'Orators 





THE MANKIND PROJECT: A 
mens community for personal 
growth and healing. Contact 
Dave 469-7341 


VOLUNTEERS | 





ODYSSIUM(TM) has a wide 
variety of volunteer opportunities 
available Contact Sally @ 


10762-82 Ave 


Edmonton based institute 





Odyssium(TM) 452-9100 





fe} fo) or-| haar te] Moe) aa 


HELP WANTED © | 

















Open House: November 7th, 2 pm—6 pm 


* Market Research Interviewers Join us during our Open House for 


start at $8.00 per hour with presentations, tours and refreshments. 
an opportunity to earn up to Interviews will be scheduled on 
$12.00 an hour. the spot for qualified candidates. 


Successful candidates shall possess 
minimum 25 wpm keyboarding skills 
and have excellent communication 
and good English language skills. 


* You choose your schedule! 
We offer flexible scheduling which 
you choose on a monthly basis. 


¢ Minimum requirement is 3 shifts 
a week, where one is on the Friday, 
Saturday or Sunday. 


Submit application or resumé 

to the Recruitment Coordinator, 
Monday - Friday from 9 am -5 pm 
on the 6th floor, 

10044 -108 Street, 

Edmonton, AB. TS] 3S7. 


Email: ResumesEdm @ipsos-reid.com 
Recruitment line: 945-4805 
Web: www.ipsos-reid.com 


¢ Excellent Opportunities for 
Advancement in a people-oriented 
work environment. 


lpsos?Reid 


Ipsos 























A Great Match for Everyone! 






Advanis requires 


TELEPHONE RESEARCH 
INTERVIEWERS 


© State of the Art Call Centre located downtown Edmonton 














General Requirements: 
¢ Excellent English Communication Skills. 
¢ Bilingual in French or Spanish an Asset. 
© General Computer Knowledge. 


Z We Offer: 
© Flexible Full and Part-Time Shifts — you get to choose your hours. 
‘ A gene, bright, spacious and fun workplace. 
, Access to LRT and ETS 
; ; On the job training 
- $9.00/hour to start 














olunteers required 
anada Wilder 
man booths 








all Kelt 
SERVICE 








child 
puppets come alive? We provide 
training. Perform in 
schools & teach children about 
seizures. Auditions open to. youth 
& adults. Heather 488-9600 or 
heather @ edmontonepilepsy.org 


YOU make 











voluntee 








GOOD volunteer drivers are 
needed for the Seniors Driving 
Centre (C/O West Edmonton 
Seniors). Flexible hours, and a 
generous honorarium for each 
trip. Phone 732-1221, Mon-Fri 
10am-4pm, 





JINGLE BELL RUN for Arthritis 
needs volunteers to help with dis- 
tributing registration forms,setting 
up, handing out food/prizes, over- 
seeing race kit pick-up,clean 
up/taking down and cheering 
participants. Please contact The 
Arthritis Society 424-1740. 





Join a team of HOMEWORK 
CLUB volunteer tutors for 
immigrant youth! Help immigrant 
youth at Queen Elizabeth High 
with their homework Thursdays 
from 3:30-6:30, beginning in 
Sept. Call Suzanne at the 
Mennonite Centre for 
Newcomers, 423-9677 





MEDICAL appointments 
shopping, and banking are vital 
activities for Home Care clients 
We are flexible! You name the 
times, days & frequency you are 
available to volunteer. Orientation 
& insurance information 
available, Call Heather, 423- 
8288 


NORTHERN LIGHT Theatre's 
Carnival of Souls Theatrical 
Halloween Festival Celebration 
which runs Oct.24-Nov.3 needs 
volunteers. Call 471-1586 or 
www.northernlighttheatre.com 


RECEPTION & ADMIN 
volunteers required for Centre for 
Contemporary Visual Art. Contact 
Carole at Latitude 53 423-5353 
or emailinfo @ latitude53.org 


REMEMBER how good it feels to 
breathe in fresh air? Make that 
feeling twice as strong by walking 
with a Home Care client in the 
Oliver area, downtown. Call 
Heather @ 423-8288 for more 
info. 


SHARE YOUR Internet experi- 
ence skills with others. Volunteer. 
Edmonton Community Network 
needs you! Contact Candidia @ 
701-5070 or email 
volcoord @wcn.ab.ca 


The AISH Network of Alberta 
Society is seeking volunteers for 
various projects. If you are inter- 
ested please contact Mirella 
Sacco at 424-2374. 


THE ASSOCIATION of Adult Day 
support have volunteer 
opportunities in programs, crafts, 
woodwork & men's group 
assistants. 3-4 hrs/wk. Gwen 
434-4747. 


THE SEXUAL ASSAULT Centre 
of Edmonton is recruiting 
volunteers to take calls on our 
24-hour Crisis Line. If you are 
empathetic, responsible & would 








like to gain experience in the field 


of Human Services, this may be 
the volunteer opportunity for you! 
For more eels info. & to 











VOLUNTEER PHOTOGRAPHER 


i for Centre for Con 







Visual Art 
1 of exhibitions & 
act Carole @ 





VOLUNTEERS needed for 
MULTICULTURAL Rese ang 
Project. Participation C ja 
- 2nd Generation Indian Wo men. 
Between 25-35 yrs. 

- Currently in the process of com- 
pleting a university degree &/or 
working 

Contact Monica: (780)710-5688 





or (@) monicajustin@hotmail.com 





$$$ QUICK CASH $$$ Challenge 
your — fimits! Photographer 
requires amateur female models 
to pose for adult pix. Safety & 
privacy assured. NO GAMES! 
690-7071 





PHOTOGRAPHER - Seeking 
Female Models over 18. Bathing 
suits, Lingerie, Boudoir, Discreet, 
Semi-Full Figure Poses. Let's 
work together & put your talent 
on paper. Free portfolio in ex- 
change for posing. Please men- 
tion this ad when calling. Phone 
(780)604-4675. 


MEN SEEKING WOMEN 


ATTRACTIVE, SWM, 33, seeks 
slim, attractive, playful SWF 
(21-35)for, fun..&.. possible. 
relationship. Left handers 
preferred, no dependants, no 
32 Mic HOlWRK 4) 1) tess. 
Email:zciger@canada.com 





PHYSICALLY attractive, 30 years 
old, financially sound would like 
to meet friendly & attractive 
ladies for companionship. Phone 
695-9221 


Still waiting for Leonard Cohen to 
bring your groceries in? Let's talk 
mythology not T.V. or sports 
Let's explore world music & 
cuisine. You like a man who co- 
oks & is not a control freak. You 
don't subscribe to consumptive 
consumerism or banality. 49 
looks 39, 5'11", 220Ibs, of non- 
macho eclecticism. NS,SD 

E-mail: bagbye @shaw.ca 


MEN SEEKING MEN 


GUY seeks other guys for fun 
and friendship. 421-7996. 


Got something to say? Say it 
here!! $5 bucks, 15 words. 
SEE Classifieds 430-9003. 


PERSON ERVICES 


SAHARA DESERT Guy seeks 
guy or gay or girl for fun, love, 
Massage & more. Phone 604- 
4405. Seniors welcome. 


Ps 


LIFE TOO LOUD to hear your 
inner voice? Formally trained, 


PHONE: 430-9003 FAX: 432-1102 E-MAIL: classified@see.greatwest.ca 




































































CRUISIN 
SH cOsMos 


with THE KID 
SCORPIO (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22) 
You'd best remember that Scorpio metaphor: the iceberg, 
Whatever you see, there's a lot more under the surface. That's 
what the approachin" warship don’t know and won't, if you keep it 
on the down-low. You may lose a big chunk, but if that ship wants 
to tangle, they're gonna get sunk! 


OCTOBER 31 TO 
NOVEMBER 6 


SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23 - Dec. 21) 

You're gonna meet someone durin’ the week who's gonna hold the 
key to the opportunity you seek, Now just ’cause the key’s danglin’ 
in front of your face, don't sweat it and race to get it or you'll wind 
up with nothin’ and then really regret it. Give the process time to 
unfold and when you're ready to receive it, you will be told! 


CAPRICORN (Dec. 22 - Jan. 19) 

You're in danger of displayin’ the same self-destructive self-right- 
eousness as the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy 
Grail. If you do, you're doomed to fail. Which of the followin’ is 
really defeat? Stayin’ complete and lettin’ the other knight pass or 
bein’ chopped down 'til you're only a head, torso 'n’ ass? 


AQUARIUS (Jan. 20 - Feb. 19) 

Right now you're not sure what you oughtta do, so you listen to 
your pride and wait for em to come up to you. Well, you might be 
waitin’ much longer than you expect, if you don't find the guts to 
be more direct. This week it's time to swallow your pride and let 
‘em know how you really feel inside! 


PISCES (Feb. 20 - March 20) 

Right now-what you need is some drill sergeant action. Why? 
‘Cause you ain't gonna get no satisfaction ‘til you're truly motivat- 
ed, and right now, you're just sittin’ on your tush and could use a 
heckuva push. If you want it, get out there and grab it or you ain't 
gonna get anything, dagnabbit! 


ARIES (March 21 - April 19) 

Don’t worry. If you think all's lost and it's hopeless then you're 
gonna be happy to learn that come this Monday, with the help of 
the New Moon, the tide’s gonna turn. Don't expect results right 
away, but.by bringin’ your will and desire into play, your success'll 
swiftly build, day after day! 


TAURUS (April 20 - May 20) 
When it comes to the other side of the fence, it's one thing to think 
that the grass is greener and another to think that the yard should 
be cleaner. Who died and put you in charge of Cosmic Control? 
Don't stick your snout into other folks’ biz until after you've dealt 

h how messy your own yard is! 


GEMINI (May 21 - June 20) 

Sometimes, in worldly affairs or to save your own skin, you've 
gotta make some tough decisions. Of course, this won't always 
make you a popular person, but if you don't do it, the situation'll 

\ week, you've gotta step up to the plate and do what's 
best for you, even if it's somethin’ you'll hate! 


CANCER (June 21 - July 22) 
A caterpillar dies soa a butte but after it’s flyin’ high in 
mor 

ethin’s 
happy \v ‘ 


LEO (July 23 Aug 22) 
if life \ fR 














VIRGO (Aug 








ea oa 22) 













‘0 place your FREE ad and be matched 
instantly with area singles, call 


1-888-273-9615 


24 Hours A Day-Every Day-No Operator: 


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Females Seeking Males 


DOWN-TO-EARTH 
SWF, 40, with brown hair, enjoys sporting 
events, traveling, etc, In search of a SWM, 34- 
42, who has a zest for life. Ad#: 2519 
LOOKING FOR YOU 
SNGF, 25, 5'3°, enjoys parks, long walks, bicy- 
cling and sports. Looking for an open-hearted 
trustworthy SNCM, 24-35, non-drinker. Ad#: 
6558 
LOVE TO LAUGH 
SWF, 54, 51", with blonde hair and blue eyes: 
Enjoys photography, sunsets, reading, long 
walks, theatre, music and more. Looking for a 
real SWM, 53-59, with similar interests and 
qualifies. Ad# 4356 
SEEKING DANCE PARTNER 
Attractive, outgoing, fun-loving, thoughtful 
SWF, 56, 57°, slim, blue-eyed brunette. Enjoys 
tennis, skiing, symphony and live pertor- 
mances, Looking for a famity-onented, good- 
humored SWM. 46-58, WS. Ad#: 6920 


COUNTRY GIRL AT HEART 
\'m @ down-to-earth, honest, SWF, 48, who 
would ike to meet an honest, caring, affection- 
ale, considerate, SWM, 40-52, who does not 
believe 


chivalry is dead, Hobbies include 
m music, horses, bowling, 
e Ad# 7115 

SINCERE & HONEST 
SWF, 61, brown hair/eyes, described as friend- 
ly and easygoing. Hobbies include the out 
doors, traveling and dining out. Looking for a 
SWM, 61-67, who is sincere and honest with a 
good personality. Adé 4952 

KNOW WHAT YOU WANT? 

! am a 24 year old SBF, 5'9’, with black hair 
brown eyes and a light complexion. | am car- 
ing, outgoing and a great talker. | enjoy reli- 
gion, music and movies. | am seeking a SBM, 
26-34, who is honest, faithtul and who has sim- 
llar interests, Ad#: 2062 

VERY CARING LADY 
Here she |s..a 49 year old. SWF, who is 571" 
with brown hair and blue/grey eyes. 
Easygoing, pleasant and very kind-hearted, If 
you are a SWM, 47-56, let's meet soon. She 
bei walks, camping, movies, music, etc. Ad#: 


i Ve 


e . 2 

















9004 or 888% above, and enter option 1. 


the ad number you wish to respond to, 





Ta listen to your responses for free; Call the 800# or 888# above and enter 
| option 2. You can get your messages FREE once every 7 days. 
r responses on the 900#: Call the 900# above and enter option 3, 


* To respond to an ad; Call the 900# above, enter option | and then enter 








or older and have a touchtone phone. 





SEEKS BORN-AGAIN CHRISTIAN 
Bubbly, friendly, caring SNCF, 35, 5'6", 160\bs. 
Enjoys reading biographies and ‘theology: 
Looking for a kind, considerate SCM, 25-60, 
non-drinker. Ad#: 8225 

LOVES TO LIVE 
SWF, 28, 5'7", with brown hair and green eyes. 
Interests are traveling, cooking, animals. 
swimming, etc, In search of a SWM, 29-35. 
who is humorous, honest. intelligent, affection- 
ate and easygoing. Ad#: 8958 
WE ARE HIGHLY SELECTIVE 
Most attractive, green eyed, female, 67, nur- 
turing, creative, unconventional, seeks special 
lover of life, a positive man of wits and integn- 
fy, with an open heart, willing to embark on our 
grand ariventure, and be wowed by me! Ad# 
1605 
1 KNOW WHAT | WANT 
SWF, 53, with an average build. Interests are 
folk music, horseback riding, good conversa- 
tion, etc, In search of an independent, warm 
Spiritual, tall, fit SWM, 45-55, N/S, non-drinker, 
Ad# 1813 
FRIENDLY 
SWF, 50's, feminine & romantic, plus size 
modeblike figure, enjoys life and laughter, 
seeks 6'+ SWM to 60, who is well-groomed, 
honest, enjoys a quality lifestyle, movies, trav- 
el, home life and is financially secure. Ad#. 
5652 
NO HEAD GAMES 
SWF, 5'4”, blonde hair and brown eyes, 32. 
Very sincere and honest. Enjoys watching 
Movies, going for walks, being with friends and 
having a good time. Looking for a SWM, 30-40 
Who is outgoing and fun to be with. Ad# 4461 
COUNTRY GIRL 
Friendly, considerate SWF, 52, 5'3", medium 
build, brown hair/eyes. Enjoys gardening, fish- 
ing, camping, crafts and more, Looking for Mr 
Right: kind, caring, honest SWM, 50-56, Adi 
1726 
JUST A LITTLE WISH 
Truthful, outgoing SF, 49, 5'5°, brunette. 
Interests include psychology, children, animals 
and art. Looking for a gentle, understanding, 
open-minded, SM, N/S. Adi: 4691 


DID YOU KNOW? 


* To place a FREE Personal newspaper ad and voice greeting: Call the 


* If you are having trouble dialing the 900#: 
Check with your local phone company fora 
possible long distance of 900 block. 

+ If your ad is not in the paper: Please 5 
remember, ittakes 7-10 days to see the ad appear, 
+ For further inquiries: Please contact Customer 


ere 


LET'S GET TOGETHER 
SWF, 31, 5'7", slim, brown hair and eyes, out- 
going, funny and pleasant. | enjoy working out, 
fashion, music, movies, sports, camping and 
more, I'm seeking a SM, 25-48, who is honest, 
fun-loving, down-to-earth, committed, fit and 
pleasant. Ad# 6098 
SENSE OF HUMOR A MUST 
Attractive, happy, communicative SWF, 41 
515°, dark hair, blue eyes. Loves live theatre, 
book stores and flea markets, Looking for an 
honest, secure, personable, spontaneous 
SWM, 30-52. Ad#: 9160 
LOOKING FOR YOU 
511°, SAF, 20, with short hair is Inendly and 
easygoing. She enjoys dancing, cooking and 
going for walks. She would like to meet a cal- 
ing, loving, SWM, 28-47, for a possible rela- 
tionship, Ad#: 4634 
FAITHFUL & LOYAL 
SWF, 68, with graying blonde hair, blue eyes 
and a medium build, Interests are cooking, 
reading, the outdoors, gardening and more, 
Looking for a SWM, 60-75, who has a good 
sense of humor, with similar interests. Ad¥ 
1917 
MANY YEARS AHEAD 
I'm an athletic, genuine, honest, caring and 
fun-loving, SWF, 52, 5'3°, who enjoys golfing, 
biking, hiking; swimming, camping and more. 
I'd love to meet a compassionate, SWM, 45- 
56. Ad# 2589 
FUN& OUTGOING 
SWF, 35, 5'2", blonde hair, green eyes, fun 
outgoing and bubbly. | enjoy hiking, camping, 
boating, fishing, skiing and more. |'m seeking a 
SWM, 35-41, who is honest, loving, active, 
loyal, dedicated and communicative, Ad#: 
6401 
SINCERE 
SWF, 48, 5'. dark hair, green eyes, happy, 
secure and honest. | enjoy long walks, garden- 
ing, the outdoors, music, movies and more. I'm 
seeking a white male, 48-60, who is honest, 
mature, sincere, loving, humorous, down-to- 
earth and less than 5'10". Ad#: 3899 
SEARCHING FOR YOU 
Attractive and physically fit single white female, 
28, 5'4”, 125lbs, blonde hair, blue eyes. 
Hobbies include skiing, biking and traveling 
Looking for an attractive and honest SWM, 30- 
43 for a long term relationship. Ad#: 3370 
SEEKS A MAN WHO'S ALL HEART 
Outgoing, personable SNCF, 29, 5'4”, long 
dark hair, enjoys sports. Looking for an under- 
standing, caring, outgoing, fun SM. Ad#: 3449 
WILL TRY ANYTHING ONCE 
Kind, affectionate, reliable, SNCF, 48, 5'8", red 
hair, brown eyes. Interests include reading, 
singing and camping. Looking for a caring, 
spontaneous, communicative, SM, 38-54, Ad#. 
9630 
ARE YOU FAITHFUL? 
| am a SWF, 63, who is 5'3”, blonde/gray hair 
and | am fun-loving, compassionate and giv- 
ing, Music, candlelight dinners and cooking are 
a few of my interests. | would like to meet a 
SWM, 60-70, who is compatible. Ad#: 7202 
YOU ARE HIGHLY SELECTIVE 
And you are looking for a fit, attractive, educat- 
ed, charming, fun-loving and nurturing woman. 
You are between the ages of 52-60, Ad#: 9796 
EXCITING LADY 
SNCF, 40, 5'5°, 135Ibs. and her personality is 
described as outgoing and friendly. Enjoys 
playing pool, reading and relaxing. Seeking an 
open-minded, SM. Ad#: 9581 
TELL ME ABOUT YOU 
Energetic, funny SWF, 36, 519°, dark hair, 
green eyes. Enjoys camping, hiking, biking 
and fishing, Looking for an honest, trustworthy, 
caring SWM, under 48, Ad# 7054 
ONE OF THE FINEST 
SWF, 30, 5'5”, blue eyed blonde, fun, outgoing 
and secure. Hobbies are camping, running, 
dancing and dining out. Searching for a SWM, 
27-35, who is honest, ft, fun and easygoing, 
Adi: 6780 
LEVEL-HEADED 
| am a hardworking, friendly and optimistic, 
SWF, 33, 5'7°, with long blonde hair, blue eyes, 
hobbies are raising horses, cattle, dancing. I'm 
in search of a tall, focused, content, SWM, 30- 
45, with a long-term goal. Ad#: 2546 


Cosine Service 1-800-348-6384 


Hours: Mon. - Fri., 7 a.m. 





Presented by: SEE MAGAZINE AND 


Realene 


GOOD-HEARTED 
SWF, 43, 5'6", medium built, with green eyes, 
described as being funny, witty and fun to be 
with. I'm hoping to find a well-rounded, 
employed, down-to-earth, SWM, 35-50, and | 
can offer warmth to a relationship. Ad. 7057 
DANCE THE NIGHT AWAY 
Fun, friendly, honest, romantic SWF, 46, 5'3”, 
slim, brown-eyed blonde. Loves dancing, din- 
ing, camping and much more. Looking for a 
caring, loving, easygoing SWM, 40-50. Adi: 
6868 
LOYAL & ARTICULATE 
SWF, 40, 5'3", with blonde hair and blue eyes. 
Interests are time with friends, quiet nights at 
home, etc. Looking for an upbeat, fairly con- 
servative, SWM, 35-50, who enjoys animals 
and the outdoors, Ad# 5665 
WILLING TO LOVE 
Attractive SNCF, 5'8°, 34, slim, medium built, is 
spontaneous, outgoing and loves to laugh. 
She enjoys horseback riding, biking, swimming 
and going for long walks. She would love to 
meet a tall, humorous and straightforward 
SWM, over 36. Ad#: 5337 
LOOKING FOR A NICE GUY 
SWF, 59, 5'5 1/2”, slim, blonde hair, blue eyes, 
friendly, outgoing, loves dancing, dining out, 
country, 50's & 60's music, etc, Looking for a 
SWM, 59-62, who Is fall, slender, attractive, 
honest, caring, financially secure and knows 
how to treat a lady. Ad#: 2627 


Seeking Fema 





OUTGOING & ENTERTAINING 
This SWM Is searching for a fit SF, 25-34, who 
is energetic, active and enjoys the outdoors. 
He is 33, 6’, with blond hair and blue eyes, 
Enjoys time with his dog, camping, the lake, 
good conversation and more. Ad#: 1582 

== FUNNY & WITTY 
SWM, 23, 5'9”, 145lbs., brown hair, blue eyes, 
trustworthy, fun-loving and friendly. | enjoy time 
with fnands, going oul, art, computers and 
more. I'm seeking a SWF, 18-30, whois attrac- 
tive, fun, outgoing, open and passionate. Ad#: 
1815 
CRAZY FUN 
Handsome, outgoing, fun, caring, trustworthy 
SNCM, 18, enjoys playing cards, board 
games, biking, swimming and more, Looking 
for a personable, energetic, spontaneous, 
intelligent, SNCF, 18-29, Ad# 3802 
YOU & ME 
SWM, 32, 5'10", blond hair, blue eyes, humor- 
ous and outgoing, | enjoy the outdoors, fishing, 
skiing, dint biking, quadding and more, I'm 
seeking a SWF, 21-45, who is fun-loving, 
humorous, outgoing and honest. Ad#* 1200 








or e-mail us at poip Stn net SON ER ROI by | DMO 


i? 





Service Monday - Friday, Eastern Standard Time, 











SEE SINGLES 





Do Singles Using This 
Column Find Someone’... 


NEW TO THE ADS 
Calm, spontaneous, loving SM, 23, 5'9”, 
165lbs., brown hair, hazel eyes. Looking for a 
caring, dependable SWF, 18-25, non-drinker. 
to share special-times, Ad#: 3901 

~ SINGLE FATHER 
SWM, 46, 6'1", with a slim/muscular build, 
blond hair and blue eyes. Interests are the out- 
doors, sports, good movies, fine dining, etc. 
Looking for an attractive, fit SWF, 30-40, who is 
warm, caring, loving, with similar interests. 
Ad#: 4082 
A TRUE GENTLEMAN 

SWM, 19, 6'6”, blond hair, green eyes, funny, 
adventurous and sporty. | enjoy dancing, walk- 
ing, movies, cuddling, music, sports and more, 
I'm seeking a SWF, 18-25, who is healthy, lov- 
ing, honest, fit, humorous and considerate. 
Adit: 4336 





INTERESTING... 
Professional SWM, 37, 6'1°, 210Ibs., muscular, 
blue/green eyes. Enjoys golf, travel, camping, 
hunting, fishing and the mountains. Looking for 
an intelligent, educated, playtul, attractive SF, 
25-37. Ad#: 7476 

GO FOR IT! 
Funny, positive, outgoing SWM, 26, 5'11", 
180lbs., muscular, dark hair, brown eyes, 
good-looking, Enjoys music, swimming, biking 
and playing sports. Looking for a personable, 
attractive SF, 18-45, long hair preferred. Ad# 
7566 
LOOKING FOR YOU 
SWM, 62, who is 5'4”, with a medium build and 
gray hair. His personality is happy, sociable 
and he enjoys country life, being with others 
and home life. Waiting to meet a SNCF, over 
45. Ad#: 7831 
SIMILAR INTERESTS/QUALITIES 

This SWM is searching for an attractive, fit 
SWF, 20-28, who is active, intelligent and 
enjoys music. He is 24, 5'9°, 165lbs., with 
blond hair and blue eyes. Interests are the out- 
doors, working out, playing the guitar, etc, Ad# 
2393 

SOFT-SPOKEN 
SWM, 36, 6'1°, brown hair/eyes, quiet and shy. 
Some of his hobbies are working on cars, 
horseback riding and more. Searching for a 
SAF, 20-35, who is honest and caring, Adi: 
2452 

TM FOR REAL 


Funny SWM, 18, 6'2’, brown hair/eyes. Enjoys. 


racing, snowboarding, camping, hiking, jog- 
ging, the gym and more. Looking for a goal-ori- 
ented, independent, true, attractive, slender 
SWF. Ad#: 3789 
SOLID VALUES 

SWM, 39, 5'9”, black hair and brown eyes and 
is outgoing and fun-loving. Hobbies include 
community work, shopping, fishing, sporting 
events and spending time with my kids. 
Looking for a fit, attractive SWF, 30+, who is 
honest and caring. Ad#: 5123 

SHOW ME THE TOWN 
Easygoing, fun-loving, honest SWM, 26, 5'8”, 
150lbs,, brown hair, hazel ayes. Loves nature, 
air brushing, lounges and music. Looking for a 
down-to-earth, attractive SF, 18-36, with simi- 
Jar qualities, Ad#; 7094 


Seeking the Same 






HONEST & INTERESTING 
SWF, 35, 5'3", with blonde hair and blue eyes: 
Interests are gardening, traveling, reading, etc 
Looking for an haonest.and caring SWF, 45-65. 
Ad#: 3301 


HEY THERE! 
Easygoing, spontaneous, fun SWF, 23, 5'2", 
fed hair, blue eyes. Enjoys music, reading, 
playing pool, dancing, friends and family 
Looking for a caring, good-humored SWF, 25- 
30. Ad#: 8500 

LOVE TO LAUGH 
SWF, 26, 52”, with long brown hair and blue 
eyes. Interests are reading, writing, music, the 
outdoors, etc. Looking for a taller SF, 23-40, 
who is funny, to spend time with, Ad#: 3482 
LET S GO DANCING! 
Spontaneous, loyal, fun-loving SWF, 20, 5'10", 
blue-eyed brunette: Enjoys reading, poetry and 
dancing. Looking for an honest SWF, 21-25. 
Ad#: 9997 
CARING & COMPASSIONATE 

Outgoing, funny, honest SWF, 41, 5'2", slender, 
blue-eyed brunette. Enjoys gardening, walk- 
ing, biking and traveling. Looking for.a kind- 
hearted, down-to-earth SWF, 42-46. Ad#: 8715 

INTRIGUE MEI 
Fun, humorous SWF, 37, 5'1", 97lbs., brown 
hair, blue eyes, with an awesome smile, 
Enjoys reading, long walks, star gazing and 
sports, Looking for a SWF, 30-44, who can 
make me laugh. No games, Ad#: 3647 

ENERGETIC GUY 
Fun-loving, easygoing, 5'11", SWM, 43, is a 
professional who enjoys the outdoors, travel- 
ing and ranching. Seeking a SM, 25-50, to get 
together with. Ad: 9430 
OPEN & UP-FRONT 

Optimistic, honest, SWM, 39, who would like to 
meet a SM, 18-45, Hobbies include fishing, 
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Tell you what, Dan. IF DO YOUR JOB 
AND ANSWER SOME FUCKING QUES- 
TIONS, all of your readers promise to run 
out and buy your book and make it a best- 
seller. But if you keep BORING us with the 
details of your BORING book tour, NONE of 
us will buy your book! No more BULLSHIT 
about your BORING book tour. Do your job. 
Answer our questions. 

Finished Enduring Dan’s Useless 
Promotional Prose 


Was the book tour stuff boring you, 
FEDUPP? Gee, I’m sorry. | certainly don't 
want to bore people... so... | guess I'll answer 
some of your questions this week. 

Which is kind of a bummer, actually, 
because | had some great book tour stories 
to share. 

For instance, I’m writing this column sit- 
ting at the bar in the lobby of Milwaukee's 
Hotel Pfister (pronounced “fister,” i.e. just 
like the word used to describe someone who 
puts his arm up your ass). Being a homo, | 
naturally find staying at Hotel Pfister pretty 
hilarious. | could do an entire column about 
this place... but | wouldn't want to bore you, 
FEDUPP. 

Oh, and then there's this book tour story: 
Three very nice young people (including one 





very good looking guy) offered to get me 
high at a Harry W. Schwartz Bookshop in 
Milwaukee where | was doing a reading. 
Since | was on a book tour (far from my reg- 
ular responsibilities), and since the book I'm 
touring to promote includes a long chapter 
defending the recreational use of marijuana, | 
told the nice young people that, sure, | would 
get high with them after the reading. They 
told me that they had to get high with me 
right away, since they weren't sure they could 
stay until the end of the reading. They had 
class in the morning, they explained. 

“Oh,” | said, “are you guys are in college?” 

They laughed 

“We're sophomores,” said the cute boy. 
“High school sophomores.” 

That was the end of that. While | defend 
recreational drug use in my new book — 
have | mentioned that | have a new book out? 
—| didn’t think it would be wise to smoke 
pot with fifteen year olds. Heck, it might even 
be illegal. 


Anyway, | was going to relate these and 
other fascinating book tour stories, but | 
don’t want to bore FEDUPP... so I'll answer 

some questions instead, (| better see a big 
uptick in my ranking on Amazon.com this 
week, FEDUPP.) While | couldn't get high 
with high school students, | can answer a few 
of their questions... 


1am sexually attracted to my English 
teacher and | think she’s attracted to me. 
She spends more time “helping” me than 
anyone in the class and she also likes to 
touch my shoulders, rub her leg against 
mine, and give me little massages. Today 
she asked me to help her with her filing. | 
know where this is going — or where | 
would like it to go: | want to kiss her feet, 
perform sexual favors for her and basically 
be her sex slave. | am 18 years old, so | am 
barely legal. What are your thoughts? 
Should | keep this in the realm of fantasy? 

Virgin Slave In Michigan 


Even if you're technically above the age of 
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teacher could get in big trouble if your rela- 
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massages, and “filing.” Fucking your stu- 
dents is a career-ending offense these days 
(so is massaging your students), and God 
help the poor teacher who gets caught 
engaging in domination/submission games 
with a student (even if it was his idea). If your 
teacher makes you her sex slave and the two 
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My friends and | are always talking 
about sex and playing sexual games (spin 
the bottle and dumb shit like that). It’s frus- 
trating because | don’t know what | am sex- 
ually. | am underage and too young to 
experiment and | wouldn't feel comfortable 
experimenting anyway since | don’t know 
what | am. My mother keeps asking me if 
I'ma lesbian! | live in a liberal town with 
liberal parents, and so it wouldn’t be a 
problem if | was a lesbian but I’m not sure | 
am! | asked someone how to discover my 
true sexuality and this person told me to 
have sex because “that'll help you know.” 
ARRGHHH! That doesn’t help! I'm not 
ready! So my question is, do you know a 
safe surefire way to discover myself without 
having sex? 

Baby Is Terribly Confused, Help! 


You're in luck, BITCH, because | do know 
a surefire way to discover yourself without 
having sex. Forgive me for rhyming (it 
sounds so cheesy and patronizing), but all 
you need to do is wait, date, and masturbate. 
If you don’t feel that you're ready to have sex, 
wait. You can still date while you wait (liberal 
boys and liberal girls). Dating doesn’t oblig- 
ate you to have sex with anyone before you 
decide you're ready; if anyone you date tries 
to tell you otherwise, dump hinvher immedi- 
ately. While you wait and date, masturbate. 
Learn how to bring yourself to orgasm and 
pay strict attention to the mental images that 
flow through your head while you-get your- 
self off. Trust me on this, BITCH: Your body 
will let you know who you are, 


| ama mature teenage girl with a ques- 
tion for you. My brother was watching a 
porno site with one of his friends and 


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claims he saw a video clip of a man stick- 
ing his entire head up a woman’s pussy! | 
say it's impossible! The woman would die! 
My brother says that if a woman can give 
birth, she can get a man’s head up there. 
Set us straight, Dan! 

Can U Now Talk? 


If your brother wants to win this argu- 
ment, CUNT, all he has to do is take you to 
the porn site where he saw this video clip. If 
he can't, well, then he’s clearly lying. As for 
your brother's argument (if women can give 
birth, she can get a man’s head up there), 
anyone who's taken a single high-school 
health class should be able to see through it. 
Baby's skulls are small and soft, CUNT, while 
full-grown men’s skulls are big and hard. 

Still, I’m reluctant to tell you that it's 
impossible for a man to stuff his entire head 
into a woman's pussy. 

There may actually be a video clip out 
there somewhere of a tiny man sticking his 
teensy head into a big woman's huge vagina. 
(If someone out there has a video clip of this, 
please_DO NOT send it to me.) So let's just 
file this sex act under unlikely-bordering-on- 
impossible. 


Confidential to Ryan: On that first issue, 
go get a friggin’ HIV test already. As for that 
second issue, you're right: Jenn sounds like 
the kind of girl who would be cool about her 
boyfriend being a crossdresser. But there's 
only one way to find out for sure: You'll have 
to tell Jenn that you've been wearing her 
“missing” panties. 


Dan Savage's new book, Skipping Towards 
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Panty woman 


VAC-U-SEAL™ CHANGED ANGEL MAE'S LIFE. 

“| used Ziploc™ bags before and it’s not the 
same,” the Edmonton-based poet and online 
used-panty saleswoman tells me over tea at the 
synchronously named Naked Cyber Café and 
Espresso Bar. “Now | have a Vac-U-Seal™ and 
it’s beautiful, All the panty women use them.” 

They're designed to keep food fresh, of 
course, but Angel Mae instead slips her used 
panties in the special Vac-U-Seal™ bag and the 
machine sucks out all the air, guaranteeing the 
buyer will receive her panties as fresh as the 
day she masturbated in them. Oddly, they don't 
seem to advertise this brilliant application in 
their infomercials. And of course, once the 
client opens the bag, she has no idea how long 
they'll stay fresh. 

“It depends on what he does with them,” the 
straight-shooting yet demure Angel Mae 
explains. “Some of them are rubbers — that is, 
they use the panties to masturbate and, well, 
they're not going to last past his first orgasm. 
Other guys like to sniff them and then stick 
them ina plastic bag to save for reuse.” 

Hell, maybe some of these guys even have 
their own Vac-U-Seal™ systems. 


8 D 7 g 

Not that Angel Mae would know. Much to 
her disappointment, her clients rarely divulge 
exactly what they do with her soiled undergar- 
ments. 

“Though, | did recently get pictures of a guy 
in my slip with a hard-on,” she tells me. 

“That was awesome.” 

And, yes, it is usually men who go for the 
gitch. Though she did sell a pair of panties to a 
woman once. But they got returned to her 
because the woman was in the hospital when 
they arrived. “| had to refresh them and resend 
them,” Angel Mae tells me. 

What exactly makes for a good pair of 
“refreshed” used panties? | had to ask. 

They need be worn for at least two days and 
have been masturbated in a few times, Angel 
Mae explains matter-of-factly. 

“| sold my first pair about a year ago for US 


$25,” she wistfully recounts. “I must have mas- 
turbated about 10 times in those poor panties.” 

Obviously, Angel Mae's clients aren't the 
only ones getting aroused by these little trans- 
actions. “It totally tured my crank,” says Angel 
Mae, who admits she's an exhibitionist who got 
her start in BDSM. “I love being looked at and | 
love the idea of someone being turned on by 
my used underwear.” 

She doesn't just sell her underwear, though: 
slips, bras, body stockings, and socks are all 
hot sellers 

Wait a second...socks? 

“Yeah, for the foot fetishists,” she explains 
“But it’s hard to sell socks from Canada 
because it’s too cold up here and we don't 
sweat enough in them. It’s all about the sweat.” 

Angel Mae first got into this business a year 
ago, when she convinced a girlfriend to take 
some nude pictures of her. Someone suggest- 
ed that she post them online. “I started looking 
at adult sites and found all these women selling 
their panties and | thought I'd give it a shot,” 
Angel Mae explains. “And | loved it immediate- 
ly.” 

She now sells her ginch on a panty auction 
site (ebanned.net — search for Angel Mae), 
though she has her own Web site as well 
(angelmae.com) where she sells her undies in 
her “abUsed clothing delicatessen.” She also 
does live webcam shows three nights a week 
and has recently been getting into the custom 


video market. 

But at 27, Angel Mae is considered old in 
this industry. “It’s full of all these 18-year-old 
‘cheerleaders’ who are all virgins, of course, but 
they want to sell you their panties and let you 
look up their skirt.” 

And competition has stiffened since she first 
got into the biz. She now sells most of her 
items for US $15. “Some people put stuff up 
for $2,” she complains. “I'm sorry, but I'm not 
selling my underwear for $2.” 

Still, with so many panties available online, 
how does a panty gal make hers special? 

“Some girls show everything, some girls 
talk dirty, you know, ‘Put your one-eyed jack 
into my hot flaming cunt’ or something like 
that, but | could never do that,” says Angel 
Mae, who looks more like a shy, nerdy-girl type 
than a hot porn babe. 

The fact that her looks go against the con- 
vention seems to work in her favour. “Most of 
the hot girls are blond, long-legged, thin and 
over-tanned. Some people are looking for 
something outside of that. I’m one of the few 
bespectacled gals on the site. It's my little 
niche. Everyone considers me intelligent.” 

The photos she features are also always 
based on her fantasies, Angel Mae insists, not 
those of her clients. 

“This is all about pleasing me,” she insists. 

And not just physically. Angel Mae, who 
admits she was the geek in high school and is 








now truly enjoying her popularity online, says 
doing this has done wonders for her self- 
esteem. 

“You put up your pics and people say, 
‘You're great, you're gorgeous, blah, blah, 
blah,” she explains. “And you're like, ‘Oh, | 
thought my tits sucked before.’ Now I'm proud 
of my tits. They're huge, they lie down here, not 
up here like perky 32As, but they're mine and 
they're great.” 

It can be a very positive thing to see yourself 
the way others see you, she adds. 

‘| stand up straighter, | walk straighter and | 
feel sexier," Angel Mae proudly tells me 

She's even got the support of family. She 
admits, however, that although most of them 
know what she does for a living, they don't 

et it. But her stepmom thinks it’s cool 
eep telling her she can sell her panties 
too!” 

So is her poetry all about used underwear? 

Her poems rarely even deal with sex, Angel 
Mae insists, though she once did a semi-strip 
performance piece at a local poetry night. Hers 
is the usual stuff of poetry — darkness, 
despair, friends getting beaten up. Guess who 
she is at www.ravingpoets.com. (Duh: Angel 
Mae isn't her real name). 

Josey Vogels is Canada’s premiere sex-and- 
relationships columnist and author of the 
recent book The Secret Language of Girls 
(Thomas Allen). 








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44 SEE October 31- Noweniber 6, 2002