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Universite  d'Ottawa 


SESSIONAL  MM& 


GOVERNS 

University  of  Ottawa 


VOLUME    11 


THIRD    SESSION    of   the    FIFTH    PARLIAMENT 


OF    THE 


DOMINION  OF  CANADA. 


SESSION    1885 


VOL.  XVIII. 


Ottawa:  Printed  by  McLean,  Koger  &  Co.,  Wellington  Street. 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1885 


ALPHABETICAL   INDEX 

TO  THE 

SESSIONAL    PAPERS 

OF   THE 

PARLIAMENT   OF    CANADA. 


THIRD  SESSION,  FIFTH  PARLIAMENT,  1885. 


A 

A,  B  and   C   Batteries,   and  Cavalry  and 

Infantry  Schools 8lb 

Abolition  of  duty  on  grain,  flour  and  coal ..    42 

Accidents  on  the  C.P.R 1096,  109c 

Accidents  on  the  G.T.R 1096,  109c 

Agreement  between  Andrew  Allan  and  the 

Postmaster-General 55e 

Agriculture,  Annual  Report 8 

AW  to  Railways l59 

Alberta  and  Athabaska  Railway 976 

Algoma,  Customs  collection  in 124 

Allan  Steamship  Co.,  Claim  of  Government 

against #  1°2 

Allowances  to  Canadian  manufacturers  of 

goods  required  by  C.P.R 25a 

Amounts    collected    in    western    part    of 

Ontario 53^ 

Amounts  due  to  the  Supervisor  of  Cullers 

at  Quebec l^ 

Animal  charcoal l°5a 

Annual  Return,  C.P.R 256 

Antwerp  International  Exhibition 38a 

Applications  by  Local    Governments    for 

advances  on  debt  account 34a 

Apportionment  of  sea  lots  for  lobster  traps....    70 

Archives,  Report  on  Historical 8 

Articles  of  Agreement  of  Messrs.  Onderdonk 

and  Bacon  for  work  on  C.P.R 25 

Auditor-General,  Annual  Report 5 

Australian  and  Tasmanian  Colonies 39 

B 

Bacon,  John  Philip,  Agreement  for  work 
on  the  C.P.R 25 

Bank  of  Upper  Canada,  Memorandum  re- 
specting estate  of. ^a 

Bankruptcy,  Message  in  relation  to 43 

Banks,  Shareholders  of. 1? 

Baptisms,  Marriages  and  Burials 104 


816 

38a 
1076 

46a 
48 


Batteries  A,   B   and  C,   and  Cavalry  and 

Infantry  Schools 

Belgium  and  England,  Tariff  existing  be- 
tween   

Bird  Island  Light,  Victoria,  N.S 

Board    of   Examiners    for    Civil    Service, 

Report  of  the 

Bolduc,  Capt.  Ludger,  Resignation  of. 

Bonds  and  securities 62 

Bonuses  granted  to  railways 44,  44a,  446,  44c 

Boulton,  Claim  of  Staff  Commander 115 

Boundaries  of  Ontario,  Disputed  1236 

Boundary  line  between  British  Columbia 

and  Alaska m 

Bounty  on  fish  caught  in  Bras  D'or  Lakes...  101c 

Bounty  on  manufactures  of  iron 83 

Bradley,  W.  Ingles,  Amount  paid 157 

Branch  lines,  C.P.R.,  Expenditure  upon 25ss 

Brandon  to  Moose  Jaw,  C.P.R 25oo 

Bras  St.  Nicholas,  Deepening  of. 95 

Breach  of  Sawdust  Law  in  Nova  Scotia......  125 

Breakwater  at  Parsboro'  Lighthouse  Station     716 
Breakwater  at  Salmon  Point 7lc 


71 


and  Indian 


71a 
25qq 

92 
466 


Breakwater  at  Tracadie,  N.S. 
Breakwaters   at  New   Harbor 

Harbor 

Bridges  and  trestles  on  C.P.R 

British    Canadian    Loan    and   Investment 

Company 

British  Columbia,  Civil  Service  in 

British  Columbia  Dry  Dock 28 

British  Columbia,  Eastern  boundary  of 123a 

British  Columbia,  Indian  Reserve  Lands  in.  118a 

British  Columbia,  Indian  schools  in 158 

British  Columbia  railway  lands 53m 

British  Columbia,    Report  in   reference  to 

C.P.R.  in 25rc,    252 

British  Columbia  Penitentiary 15« 

British  Columbia,  Public  Reserves  of 161 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  188 


British  Columbia,  Timber  licenses  in 52# 

British  Mail  Service 55/ 

British  Medical  Act 63 

Burlington  Bay  Canal 114 

Burpee,  Stephen  G.,  Complaints  against 58 


Calgary  and    Rocky    Mountains,    Cost  of 

C.P.R.  between 25rr 

Callander  and  Port  Arthur,  Cost  of  C.P.R. 

between 25n" 

Callander  and  Port  Arthur,  C.P.R 25mm 

Canada  Agricultural  Insurance  Co 146 

Canada  Central  Railway 25^^ 

Canada  North-West  Land   Co.,  Stock  in- 
vested in  by  C.P.R 25rr,  25uu 

Canada  Southern  Railway 55# 

Canada  Temperance  Act 85  to  85& 

Medical  certificates  in  Nova  Scotia 85 

Supreme  Court  case S5a 

Votings  under  the  Act 856 

Quebec  License  Act 85c 

Revenue  derived  from  liquor  85 d,  85g 

Certificates  in  County  of  Halton 85h 

Liquor  License  Act  of  1883 85«,  85j 

Prohibitory  Liquor  Law  of  North-West 

Territories OOK 

Canadian  Agent  at  Paris 150 

Canadian  Pacific  Railway 25  to  25uu 

Agreements  with  Messrs.  Onderdonk  and 


Bacon. 


25 


Credit  Valley  Railway  certificate— land 
grant  bonds— credit  with  Bank  of  Mon- 
treal—construction of  Section  9 25a 

Annual  Return 256 

Fiscal  Returns 25c 

Grades  and  curves 25c? 

Lands  located  and  set  apart 25e,  2bjj 

St.  Martin's  Junction  to  Harbor  of  Que- 
bec—North  Shore  Railway 25/,  25kk 

Separate  report  of  Judge  Clarke— Section 

B 25$r 

Validity  of  award,  section  B 25h,  25/? 

Port  Arthur  and  Winnipeg 25i 

Plans,  profiles,  progress  estimates,  fares, 

&c 25/ 

Stock  sold 25£ 

Montreal  to  Atlantic  Ocean 25Z 

Port  Moody  to  English  Bay 25m 

British  Columbia  section 25n 

Claim  of  contractors,  Section  B 25o 

Allowances  to  Canadian  manufacturers...  25q 


Shareholders 


25r 


Re-measuring  work,  Section  B 25s 

Number  of  trains 25f 

Amounts  due  for  construction 25u 

Port  Arthur  to  Callander 25t> 


25, 

25. 
25 

2> 


Canadian  Pacific  Railway—  Continued. 

Land  grant  bonds 

Wharf  and  freight  shed  at  Port  Moody.... 

Work  done  near  Lytton 

Work  done  near  Maple  Ridge 

Rolling  stock  in  Eastern  Section,  Western 

Division 25aa, 

Profile  of  line  from  Winnipeg  to  summit 

of  Rocky  Mountains : 

Letter  and  statements  from  President 25 

Government  employes 

Estimated  cost  of  Eastern  Section,  west  of 

Callander : 

Survey  to  Atlantic  ports 25. 

Connecting  Ontario  railway  system 25 

Canada  Central  Railway  25: 

Earnings  

Callander  to  Port  Arthur,  Selkirk   and 

Kamloops 25j 

Winnipeg  to  615  miles  west ■ 

Brandon  to  Moose  Jaw,  Moose  Jaw  to  Cal- 
gary, Winnipeg  to  Brandon 25 

Grants  or  indemnity  to  Quebec 25 

Bridges  and  trestles 25 

Canada  North-West  Land  Co.— North 
American  Contracting  Co.— grades  and 
curves— Ontario  and  Quebec  Railway 
Co.— Callander  and  Port  Arthur— Cal- 
gary and    Rocky    Mountains— Selkirk 

and  Kamloops 25rr, 

Expenditure  upon  branch  lines 

Immigration  to  Manitoba  and  North-West 
Canal  from  Gravenhurst  Bay  to  the  Severn 

River 

Cape  Traverse  Branch  of  P.E.I.  Railway...99,  9f 

Capital  Account,  Sums  expended  on 

Caron,    Clovis,    Report    of    and    charges 

against Wl/,  « 

Casualties  on  the  C.P.R 1°9*>  10& 

Casualties  on  the  G.T.R 1096,  U 

to   trains   on   the  Intercolonial 


>- 


4S 


Casualties 
Railway 

Cavalry  and  Infantry  School 8 

Census 4U' 

Certificates  for  liquor  issued  in  County  of 

Halton 

Cherrier,  George  E.,  Dismissal  of 15£ 

Chinese  Commission,  Expenses  incurred  by 
Chinese  Immigration,  Report  of  Royal  Com- 
mission on 

Church  Point  and  Trout  Cove  Piers 

Civil  Service,   Appointments  and  promo- 
tions in  the 

Civil  Service,  British  Columbia 

Civil  Service,  Report  of  Board  of  Examiners 
Claim  by  contractors  of  Sec.  B,  C.P.R ~-\<7 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers 


A.  1885 


102 

W 

76/ 
115 

61 


log 


143 


Claim  of  Government  against   Allan  S.S. 
Co.,  for  services   rendered   by   steamer 

"Newfield" 

Claim  of  J.  B.  Plante  on  Intercolonial  Rail- 
way  

Claim  of  John  D.Robertson 

Claim  of  Staff  Commander  Boulton 

Claims  of  Manitoba,  Provisional  settlement 

of  the ;•• 

Claims     for     land,     Prince     Albert     Dis- 
trict  ....116Cr116d 

Clarke,  G.  M.  K.,  Sums  paid  to 122 

Clarke,  Judge,  Separate  report  of,  on  claims 
of  damages  by  contractors  on  Section 

B,  CP.R 

Clerks  of  Works 145 

Clover  Point,  B.C.,  to  Dungeness,  W.  T 

Telegraph  cable  from 

Coal 105tol05d 

Public  Buildings,  Ottawa 105 

Animal  charcoal 10^a 

Fog-whistles  and  lighthouses,  N.S 1056 

Entered  free  for  exportation 105c 

Spring  Hill  coal  mines lOorf 

Coal  for  exportation l°5c 

Coal  for  use  in  Public  Buildings,  Ottawa...  105 

Coal  from  Spring  Hill  Coal  Mines 105i 

Coal  lands,  Sale  of 53c 

Coal,   Supplying  fog-whistles    and    light- 
houses with 105i 

Colonization    companies,    Lands    allotted 

to 53Z.<  539 

Collins.  J.  E.,  Sums  paid  to 119 

Commissioner  North-West  Mounted  Police, 

Annual  Report l53a 

Commissioners,  Chinese  difficulty 54ft,  54c 

Commissioners,  Dominion  Police 18 

Commission,  Intercolonial  Railway 76A 

Commission     on     claims    in     the     Nortii- 

West 116,  116a,  1166 

Commutation  of  sentence  passed  on   mur- 
derer of  Mrs.  Yeomans 

Constitutionality   of    Canada    Temperance 

Act,  Correspondence  as  to 

Consignment  of  school  books 146,  146a,  1466 

Consolidated  Statutes,  Report  of  Commis- 
si 
sioners ~x 

Consolidated  Fund,  Receipts  and  Expendi- 
ture   26 

Constitution  of  the  Xorth-West  Council 31 

Construction  of  public  offices  at  St.  Thomas.  65 

Conveyance  of  mails 55e 

Cost  of  working  the  Intercolonial  Railway 

from  1874  to  1884 76c 

Cost  of  old  and  new  work3 141 

Credit  of  Government  of  Canada,  Money 

deposited  to 27 


Credit  Valley  Railway  Certificate,  C.P.R....     25a 

Credit  with  Bank  of  Montreal,  CP.R 25a 

Customs  collections  in  Algoma 124 


Debt  of  North  American  Contracting  Co. 

to  CP.R 25rri  25uu 

De  Chene,  Capt.  Alphonse  Miville,  Enquiry 

respecting 103 

Deepening  of  Bras  St.  Nicholas 95 

Delays  in  transmitting  newspapers  and  peri- 
odicals      36 

Depositors  in  Savings  Banks 154 

Digby  Pier.  Wharfage  collected  at 106a 

Disallowance  of  Provincial  Acts 29 

Dispute  between  Deputy  Minister  Tilton  and 

Staff  Commander  Boulton 11* 

Disputed  boundaries  of  Ontario 1-36 

Distribution  of  statutes 24 

Dominion  Police  Commissioners 13 

Dominion  subsidy  to  Provinces 346 

Double  track  on  Grand  Trunk  Railway 109 

Drawback  on  goods  manufactured  for  export 

Drawback  on  shipbuilding  materials 

Dredges,  tugs  and  dumping  scows  built  in 

United  States 

Drill  shed,  Quebec,  Construction  of 

Dry  dock,  British  Columbia 

Dummy  lighthouse,  Fog-horn  on 

Dundas  and  Waterloo  macadamized  road, 

Sale  of 

Durham  and  Walkerton  mail  service 

Duties  imposed  in  old  Province  of  Canada. 
Duties  on   imported   goods.    Imperial   Act 

respecting 

Duty.  Abolition  of.  on  grain,  flour  and  coal. 
Dutv  collected  on  wheat,  flour,  &c.  in  N.S. 


100 


85h 


toa 

75 

69 

113 

28 

1276 

93 

55 

426 

42  c 
42 
42  a 


Earnings  of  the  CP.R 

Earnings  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway 

Eastern  boundary  of  British  Columbia 

Eastern  Extension  Railway 

Eastern  Section, west  of  Callander,  CP.R., 

Estimated  cost  of 

Elections  since  1878 94 

Emerson,    Demands    and    claims    made   by 

town  of 

Estimates,    1885-86 

Eugene  Gosselin  versus  The  Queen 

Examination  of  masters  and  mates 

Exchequer  Court  of  Canada 

Expenses  incurred  by  Chinese  Commission. 

Expenses,  Unforeseen 

Exportation  of  coal ' 

Exports  and  imports 

Exports  from  Hudson  and  James  Bays 


2511 

76  k 

123  a 

98 

25/ 
,  94a 

144 
1 

120 

129 
776 
54c 
20 

105c 
60 

132 


48  Yictoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1885 


E 

Extension  of  railway  from  St.  Martin's  Junc- 
tion to  Harbor  of  Quebec 25/ 

Extradition 130,   130a 

F 

Fabre,  Hector,  Canadian  Agent  at  Paris 150 

Factories,  Number  of  operatives  employed  in    3*76 

Firewood,  Settlers'  52c? 

Fire  and  Inland   Marine  Insurance   Com- 
panies      14a 

Fiscal  Returns,  C.P.R 25c 

Fisheries 101  to  10U 

Miramichi  and  branches 101 

Fishery  question  101a 

Porpoise  fishery 1016 

Bras  d'Or  Lakes 101c 

Non-tidal  waters  in  New  Brunswick lOld 

Report  of  Jules  Gauvreau 101c 

Enquiry  against  Clovis  Caron 101/ 

Report  of  Clovis  Caron 101a 

Removal  of  J.  E.  Starr 101A 

Treaty  of  Washington 10U' 

Fish  taken  in  Miramichi  River 101 

Fisheries  and  Marine,  Annual  Report 9 

Fisheries  of  Canada,  Preliminary  Report.      9a 
Fisheries,   First  Annual  Report    of   the 

Department  of 96 

Fish-Breeding,  Report  on  the 9c 

Fish  caught  in  Bras  d'Or  Lakes,  Bounty  on.  101c 
Fish  Creek,  Plan  and  views  of  engagement 

at 116* 

Fishery  question 101a 

Fog-horns,  Tenders  for  127,  127a 

Fog-horn  on  Dummy  lighthouse 1276 

Foot  and   carriage  bridge  near  Frederic- 
ton 139,  139a 

Foreshore  rights  of  the  Dominion..'. 161 

Forestry  Commission 131,  131a 

Fort  William  reserve,  Licenses  to  cut  tim- 
ber on  the 506  (1884) 

France  and  Canada,  Steamships  between  ...     30c 
Free  passes  over  Intercolonial  Railway.  76  m,  iGn 
Freight  rates  over  the  Intercolonial  Rail- 
way      76e 

G 

Gaboury,  J.  E.,  Charges  against 56 

Gauvreau,  Jules,  Report  of 101c 

Gazette   Publishing    Co.,    Montreal,    Sums 

paid  to  the 23 

Geological  Report  for  1882-83  and  1884 90 

Goodwin,  George,  Contracts  with 966 

Gosselin,  Eugene,  versus  The  Queen 120 

Government  employes,  C.P.R... 25o*a* 

Government    officials    in    the    North-West 

Territories 126 


Government  properties  in  County  of  Riche- 
lieu      536  I 

Governor  General's  Warrants 19 

Grades  and  curves  on  C.P.R 25a*,  25rr.  2'mu 

Grand  Trunk  Railway 109  to  1094 

Double  track 109 

Stockholders 109a 

Casualties.. 1096,  109c 

Returns  under  Act  of  1879 1094 

Grant  of  Dominion  lands  to  various  rail- 
ways  976,  97c 

Grants  of  money  to  Province  of  Quebec 25/>/ 

Gratuities  and  pensions  to  Active  Militia, 

1885 81/ 

Gravenhurst  Bay  to  Severn  River,    Canal 

from 88 

Gravenhurst,  Railway  connecting  C.P.R.  at    2ohh 

Grazing  land  lessees 53; 

Great  American  and  European  Short  Line 

Railway  Co 1376 

Great  Village  River,  Improvements  of. 112 

Gregory,  J.  U.,  Reports  in  relation  to  por- 
poise fishery 1016 

Gregory,  J.  TJ.,  Report  of  enquiry  made  by.  101/ 

Grey,  Memorial  from  County  Council  of. 44 

Grist  and  sawmill,  Calgary,  Disposal  of. 51 


Half-breed  claims 116c,  116/  116^ 

Halifax  Steam  Navigation  Co 30/ 

Halton,    Certificates  for    liquor    issued    in 

County  of 85c 

Halton  County,  Indian  lands  unsold  in 534 

Harbor  of  refuge  at  Port  Rowan 64a 

Harbors  of  refuge  at  Port  Stanley  and  Port 

Burwell 64,  646 

Hardware  purchased  at  Hal  ifax  156 

Health  officers  in  New  Brunswick,  Instruc- 
tions to 142 

Heating  of  public  buildings 72 

High  Commissioner,  Payments  in  respect  to 

office  of 38,  38c 

High  Commissioner,  Position  or  salary  of 

the 386 

Historical  Archives,  Report  on 8 

Holland,  G.  and  A.,  Payments  to 68 

Hughes,  D.  J.,  Charges  against 84 

Hudson  Bay,  Exports  from 132 


Immigration  Office,  Quebec 54 

Immigration  to  Manitoba  and  North-West..     2ott 
Imperial  Act  respecting  duties  on  imported 

goods 42c 

Imports  and  exports  of  wheat,  flour,  &C....45,  45a 
Improvement  of  North  Saskatchewan  River  138 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1885 


i 

Improvements  of  entrance  into   Melsaac's 

Pond,  Inverness,  N.S, 67 

Improvements  of  Great  Village  River 112 

Indian  Affairs,  Annual  Report 3 

Indian  half-breed  schools 158a 

Indian  Harbor  breakwater 71a 

Indian  lands  unsold  in  County  of  Halton...    53d 

Indian  lands  unsold  in  County  of  Peel 53a 

Indian  reserve  at  Fort  William,   Making 

road  on 118 

Indian  reserve  lands  in  British  Columbia....  l'.8a 

Indian  schools  in  British  Columbia 158 

Indian  supplies  in  the  North-West 100a 

Inland  Revenue,  Annual  Report 4 

Intercolonial  Railway 76  to  76n 

Pullman  cars 76 

Appointment  of  L.  K.  Jones 76a 

Casualties  to  trains 766 

Cost  of  working 76c 

Revenue  and  working  expenses 76a" 

Through  rates  of  freight 76c 

Claim  of  J.  B.  Plante 76/ 

Rolling  stock  purchased 76,a 

Commission  on  claims iQh 

Interruption  of  traffic 76e 

Claim  of  John  D.  Robertson I6j 

Freight  earnings iQk 

"Wire  fences 76Z 

Free  passes 76m 

Reduced-fare  tickets iQn 

Interior,  Annual  Report 13 

International  Exhibition  at  Antwerp 38a 

Injuries  to  parties  in  the  Mounted  Police, 

Money  paid  for 153 

Inland  fisheries,  Rights  of  Provincial  Gov- 
ernments to  control  the 77 

Inspectors  or  clerks  of  works 145 

*  Instructions  to  health  officers  in  New  Bruns- 
wick   142 

Insurance,  Report  of  Superintendent  of 14 

Fire  and  Inland  Marine  Insurance  Com- 
panies...      14a 

Canada  Agricultural  Insurance  Co 146 

Interruption  of  traffic  between  St.  Jonn  and 

Portland 76i 

Iron,  Bounty  on  manufactures  of 83 

Islands  leased  in  St.  Lawrence  River 87 

J 

Jack  Head  River  timber  limits 52 

James  Bay,  Exports  from 132 

Joint  Commission  for  surveying  boundary 
line    between    British    Columbia    and 

Alaska 123 

Jones,  L.  K.,  Appointment  of,  as  secretary 
to  the  Intercolonial  Railway  Commis- 
sion      76a 


J 

Judge  Clark,  Separate  report  of,  on  claims 
for  damages  of  contractors  for  Section 

B,  C.P.R 25# 

Judgments  rendered  by  Supreme  Court 77c 

Justice,  Annual  Report  of  Minister  of 15 

K 

Kamloops  to  Spencer's  Bridge,  Mails  from....    55a 

Lake  of  the  Woods  timber  limits 52 

Lake  Temiscamingue,  Works  on 140 

Land  allotted  to  colonization  companies..53£,  53g 
Land    claims    in    the    Prince  Albert   Dis<- 

trict 116c,  116a* 

Land  grant  bonds,  C.P.R 25a,  25w 

Lands 53  to  53m 

County  of  Richelieu 53,  536 

County  of  Peel 53a 

Coal  lands 53c 

County  of  Halton 53o" 

New  Brunswick 53e 

Western  part  of  Ontario 53/ 

Colonization  and  railway  companies 53g 

Agricultural,  timber,  mineral,  &c 53h 

Manitoba  and  North-West 53i 

Grazing  land  lessees 53./ 

S.E.  %  section  2,  township  10,  range  19,  W    53k 

Colonization  companies 531 

Railway  lands,  British  Columbia 53m 

Lands,  Agricultural,  &c,  Sale  or  manage- 
ment of 53/i 

Lands,  Grants  of,  to  railway  companies  in 

the  North-West 53» 

Lands  in  County  of  Richelieu,  Disposal  of..    53 
Lease  of    Northern    and   Pacific  Junction 

Railway  Co HI 

Leasing  of  Tete  du  Pont  Barracks 79 

Leases  or  licenses  to  fish  in  non-tidal  waters 

of  New  Brunswick 101c? 

Letter  and   statements   from  President    of 

C.P.R • 25cc 

Letterbox  fronts,  Tenders  for 127,  127a 

Letter  postage,  Reduction  on 35 

Library  of  Parliament,  Annual  Report 16 

License  Act,  Quebec 85c 

Licenses  to  cut  timber 52a,  526,  52c 

Licenses  to  cut  timber  on  the  Fort  William 

Reserve 506(1884) 

Life  Association  of  Canada,  Annual  Report    91 

Life  Saving  Service,  Port  Rowan 128 

Lighthouse  at  Quaco 107a 

Lighthouses  known  as  "  Range  Lights  " 107 

"Lion,"  Seizure  of  schooner 117 

Lightship   at  Lower    Traverse,    Supplying 

wood  to 80 

Liquor  License  Act  of  1883 85»,  85/ 

5 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1885 


JL 

Liquor,  Medical  certificates  for  sale  of,   in 

NovaScotia 85 

Loan,  Prospectus  of,  recently  issued  in  Lon- 
don      416 

Loan,  Sums  advanced  by  way  of. 41 

Loans,  Names  of  newspapers  which  adver- 
tised      41a 

Local   Governments,    Applications   of,    for 

advances  on  Debt  Account 34a 

Local  Governments  in  North-West  Terri- 
tories, Establishment  of 160 

Local  Governments,  Subsidies  to 34 

Location    of,    and    lands    set    apart    for, 

C.P.R 25e,  25# 

Lotbiniere  County  mail  service 55a* 

Lytton,  B.C.,  Work  on  C.P.E.,  near 25# 

M 

Mails 55  to  55^ 

Durham  and  Walkerton 55 

Kamloops  to  Spencer's  Bridge,  B.C 55a 

St.  Stephen,  Woodstock  and  St.  George, 

N.B 556 

Port  Townsend,  W.T.,  and  Victoria,  B.C.     55c 

County  of  Lotbiniere 55o* 

Agreement  with  Andrew  Allan 55c 

Ocean  mail  service 55/ 

Canada  Southern  Railway 55^ 

Making  road  on  Indian  reserve  at  Fort  Wil- 
liam    118 

Manitoba,  Provisional  settlement  of  claims 

of 61 

Manitoba     and     North-Western     Railway 

Co 976,  97c,  9ld 

Manitoba  South-Western  Railway  Co....  976,  97c 
Manufacturing  industries,  Reports  relating 

to 37,  37a 

Marine  and  Fisheries,  Annual  Report 9 

Market  Battery,  Kingston,  Leasing  of 108 

Martin,  Joseph  Adhemar,  Money  received  by    33 
Martin,  John,  Continuation  of  pension  to 

widow  of  the  late 82 

Masters  and  mates,  Examination  of. 129 

Maple  Ridge,  Work  on  the  C.P.R.  at 252 

Medical  certificates  under  Canada  Temper- 
ance Act 85 

Memorandum  respecting  estate  of  Bank  of 

Upper  Canada y\a 

Meredith,  Hon.  Judge,  Resignation  of. 50 

Meteghan  River  Pier,  Wharfage  collected  at  106a 

Metlakatla,  Trouble  among  Indians  at 100 

Middleton,  Official  report  of  Major-General.  116A 

Militia 81  to  81/ 

Militiamen  of  1812 81 

Charges  against  Lieut.-Col.  O'Malley 81a 

A,  B  and  C  Batteries,  and  Cavalry  and 
Infantry  Schools 816 


M 

Militia — Continued. 

Students,  Royal  Military  College 81c 

Rifle  Associations 81<i 

Students,  Royal  Military  College 81e 

Gratuities  and  pensions,  1885 81/ 

Militia,  Annual  Report  .. 7 

Militia  pensions 81 

Miramichi  River,  Fish  taken  in 101 

Money  deposited  to  credit  of  Government  of 

Canada 27 

Money  paid  to  Ontario  Government 22 

Money  paid  to  A.  F.  Wood  and  J.  A.  Wil- 
kinson    78 

Montreal  to  Atlantic  Ocean,  Proposed  lines 

from 251 

Montreal  to  St.  John  and  Halifax,  Short  line 

railway  from 136 

Moose  Jaw  to  Calgary 25oo 

Morgan,  H.  J.,  Money  paid  to 89,  89a 

Morgan,  J.  H.,  Forestry  Commissioner.  131,  131a 
Mounted  Police,  Annual  Report  of  Comis- 

sioner 153a 

Mounted  Police,   Compensation  to  parties 

injured  in 153 

Murray  Canal,  Construction  of 133 

Mc 

Mclsaac's  Pond,  Inverness,  N.S.,  Improve- 
ments of  entrance  into 67 

Negotiations  between  Canada  and  British 

Columbia 28 

Nelson    &    Sons,    consignment    of   school 

books 146,   146c 

"Neptune,"  Supplies  furnished  the  steamer    30c 
New  Brunswick,  Properties  owned  for  mili- 
tary purposes  in 53c 

"Newfield,"  Claim  of  Government  for  ser- 
vices of  steamer 102 

New  Harbor  and  Indian  Harbor  breakwaters     71a 
Newspapers  and  periodicals,  Delays  in  trans- 
mitting      36 

Newspapers  in  which  loans  were  advertised.     41a 
Newspapers,  Sums  paid  to,  from  1874  to  1883    23 

Non-payment  of  amounts  due  by  C.P.R 25m 

Non-tidal  waters  of  New  Brunswick,  Licen- 
ses to  fish  on 101a" 

North  American  Contracting  Co.,  Debt  of, 

to  C.P.R 2orr,  25uu 

Northern   and    Pacific    Junction    Railway. 

Lease  of Ill 

Northern  and  Western  Railway,  N.B 151 

North  Saskatchewan  River,  Improvement  of  138 

North  Shore  Railway 25/.  25pp 

North-Western  Coal  and  Navigation  Co 97c 

North-West  Central  Railwav  Co 97e 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1885 


Horth-West      Commission      on        claims, 

&c 116,  116a,  1166 

North-West  Council.  Constitution  of 31 

North-West  Territories 116  t0  llQi 

Commission  in  re  extinguishment  of  In- 
dian title 116 

Commission  in  re    enumeration  of  half- 
breeds 116* 

Commission  to  adjudicate  upon  claims 1166 

Claims  in  Prince  Albert  District 116c,  116c? 

Half-breed  claims ; H6e,  116/  116.? 

Official  Report  of  Major-Gen.  Middleton....  116A 
Plan  and  views  of  engagement  at  Fish 

Creek UQi 

North-West  Territories,    Establishment    of 

Local  Governments  in  the 160 

North-West  Territories,  Prohibitory  liquor 

law  of. •»     85* 

North-West  Territories,   Representation  in 

Parliament  of  the 160 

Nova  Scotia,  Medical  certificates  for  sale  of 

liquor  in 85 

Nova  Scotia  railways,  Subsidies  to 97 

Number  of  operatives  employed  in  factories.     376 


Ocean  mail  service ••••  55/ 

Official  report    from    Major-General    Mid- 
dleton   UQh 

O'Malley,  Lieut.-Col.,  Charges  against 81a 

Onderdonk,  Andrew,  Agreement  for  work 

on  the  C.P.R 25 

Ontario  and  Quebec  Railway  Co.,    Bonds 

guaranteed  by  C.P.R 25rr 

Ontario  Government,  Moneys  paid  to 32 

Ontario  railway  system  connected  to  C.P.R.  25hh 

Ottawa  and  St.  Lawrence  Railway 25$ 

Ottawa  properties    and    rooms   leased  by 

Government H° 

Oxford  and  New  Glasgow,  Projected  rail- 
way between 137,  137a 


Parrsboro'  lighthouse  station  breakwater...  716 
Passenger,    freight    and    mixed   trains   on 

C.P.R 25t 

Payment  of  moneys,  C.P.R 25c 

Payments  in  respect  to  office  of  High  Com- 
missioner   38,  38c 

Peel  County,  Indian  lands  unsold  in 53a 

Penitentiaries,  Annual  Report 15 

Penitentiary  of  British  Columbia  15a 

Pension  of  late  John  Martin  continued  to 

widow 82 

Pensions  to  active  militia,  1885 81/ 

Pension  to  militiamen  of  1812 81 


.04, 


97c 


25* 

25v 

646 
64c 
25z 

25m 


55c 


Piers  at  Church  Point  and  Trout  Cove 66^ 

Plans  and  profiles,  C.P.R ••••     25i 

Plans  and  views  of  engagement  at  Fish 

Creek llQi 

Plante,  J.  B.,    Claim  of,    on  Intercolonial 

Railway lQf 

Point  aux  Trembles  wharf 1°6 

Porpoise  fishery,  Reports  in  relation  to 1016 

Portage,    Westbourne   and   North-Western 

Railway  Co 

Port  Arthur  and  Winnipeg,  Particulars  in 
reference    to    construction    of    C.P.R. 

between 

Port  Arthur  to  Callander,  C.P.R.,  Profile 

line  from 

Port  Burwell  harbor  of  refuge 

Port  Credit  Harbor  Co 

Port  Moody,  B.  C .,  Wharf  and  freight  shed  at. 
Port  Moody  to  English  Bay  or  Coal  Harbor, 

Proposed  route  of  C.P.R.  from 

Port  of  entry  at  Ridgetown,  Making  a 121 

Port  Rowan  harbor  of  refuge 64a 

Port  Rowan,  Life-saving  service  at 128 

Port  Stanley  harbor  of  refuge ...64,  646 

Port  Townsend  and  Victoria  mail  service.. 
Position  or  salary  of  the  High   Commis 

sioner 

Postal  revenue  at  Victoria,  B.C 57a 

Postmaster-General,  Annual  Report 6 

Post  office,  St.  Stephen,  N.B.,  Receipts  for 

1884  at 5t 

Potatoes  and   other  roots,  Weighing  and 

measuring  of. 

Presqu' Isle  Harbor,  Character  of 133 

Preliminary    report    on    the    Fisheries    of 

Canada  for  1884 ■•       9a 

Prince  Albert  District,  Claims  for  land  in 

the U6*. 

Printing  and  Publishing  Companies,  Sums 

paid  to 

Profile  line  from  Port  Arthur  to  Callander, 

C.P.R ; 

Profile  line  from  Winnipeg  to  summit  of 

Rocky  Mountains,  C.P.R 

Prohibitory     liquor    law    of     North-West 

Territories 

Projected  railway  between  Oxford  and  New 

Glasgow,  N.S 

Properties   or  rooms  in  Ottawa  leased  by 

Government ■••  llv 

Properties  owned  for  military  purposes  ir 

NB 

Provincial  Acts,  Disallowance  of. 29 

Provisional  settlement  of  claims  of  Manitoba    61 

Public  Accounts,  Annual  Report 1 

Public  Buildings,  Cost  of  heating 72 

Public  reserves  of  British  Columbia 161 


386 


1160* 


23a 


25v 


2566 


85& 


137 


53c 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1885 


p 

Public  Works,  Annual  Report 10 

Pullman    cars  running  over  Intercolonial 

Railway 7g 

Quaco  lighthouse 107a 

Quarantine  regulations    relating    to    New 

Brunswick 142 

Qu'Appelle,  Long  Lake  and  Saskatchewan 

Railway  and  Steamboat  Co 976,  97c 

Qu'Appelle  and  Wood  Mountain  Railway 

Co 97C 

Quebec,  Dominion  subsidy  to  Province  of...    346 

Quebec  drill  shed,  Construction  of. 113 

Quebec  immigration  office ■ 54 

Quebec  License  Act  85c 

R 

Railway    companies    in    the    North-West, 

Grants  of  lands  to 53e- 

Railway  lands,  British  Columbia 53™ 

Railway  statistics  of  Canada Ha 

Railway  tolls gg 

Railways,  Aid  to 259 

Railways  and  Canals,  Annual  Report ll 

Railways  other  than  C.P.R.,  Subsidies  to...    97a 

Range  Lights  lighthouses 107 

Receipts    and    expenditure    chargeable    to 

Consolidated  Fund 26 

Record  in  the  matter  of  Gosselin  vs.  The 

Queen 120 

Red  River,  Tug-barges,  dredges  and  ma- 
chinery used  on  the 69a 

Reduction  on  letter  postage 35 

Registrars  in  the  North-West  Territories 126 

Re-measuring  work  on  Section  B,  C.P.R 25s 

Rental  of  rivers  and  streams 149 

Report  of  Commissioners  appointed  to  con- 
solidate statutes  of  Canada 21 

Report  of  engineers  appointed  tore-measure 
and    re-classify   work    on    Section    B, 

CPK 25s 

Report  of  Government   engineers  on  pro- 
posed C.P.R.  line  from  Montreal  to  the 

Atlantic  Ocean 25£ 

Report  of  Mr.  Van  Home  with  reference  to 

C.P.R.  in  British  Columbia 25n 

Reports  of  Messrs.  Perley  and  Guerin 140 

Reports  relating  to  manufacturing  indus- 

tries- 37,  37a 

Representation  in  Parliament  of  North-West 

Territories 160 

Resignation  of  the  Hon.  Judge  Meredith 50 

Return  tickets  on  railways 134 

Revenue  and  working  expenses  of  the  Inter- 
colonial Railway  76(2 


8 


Revenue    derived    from    importation     and 

manufacture  of  liquor 85c?,  85a- 

Richelieu  County,  Disposal  of  lands  in 53 

Richelieu   County,   Government  properties 

in 536- 

Rideau  Canal,  Reports  of  engineers 47 

Rideau  Canal,  Extension  of. 47^ 

Ridgetown,  Making  a  port  of  entry  at 121 

Rifle  Associations  in  the  Dominion 81cf 

Robertson,  John  D.,  Claim  of 76/ 

Rogers'  patented  fish-ladder ^So- 
Rolling  stock,   Eastern    Section,    Western 

Division,  C.P.R 25aa,  25ec 

Rolling  stock,  Intercolonial  Railway 76^ 

Royal  Commission  on  Chinese  Immigration, 

Report  of. 54a 

Royal  Military  College,  Kingston 81c,  81c- 


Sale  of  coal  lands 53^ 

Sale  of  Dundas  and  Waterloo  macadamized 

road 93 

Sale  or  management  of  lands 53^ 

Salmon  Point  breakwater 7ic- 

Sawdust  law,  Breach  of,  in  Nova  Scotia 125 

School  books,  Seizure  of 146  to  146c 

Schools  for  Indian  half-breeds  1580 

Schooner  "Lion,"  Seizure  of. 117 

Sea  lots,  Apportionment  of,  for  lobster  traps     70 

Secretary  of  State,  Annual  Report 12 

Section  B,  C.P.R 25^,  25h,  25o,  25p,  25* 

Section  9,  Construction  of,  C.P.R 25a 

Selkirk  and  Kamloops,  C.P.R 25mm,  25rr 

Settlers'  fuel 520* 

S.E.  £  section  2,  township  10,  range  19,  W..     53/fc 

Seizures  at  ports  of  entry 73,  73a,  735,  73c 

Shareholders  in  C.P.R 25r 

Shareholders  of  banks 17 

Sheriffs    and  registrars  in  the  North-West 

Territories 126 

Shipbuilding  materials,  Drawback  on 75 

Short  Line  Railway 136,  136a 

Simcoe,  Memorial  from  County  Council  of..    446 
"Sir  James  Douglas,"  Steamer... 30,  30a,  306,  30i 

Small  savings,  System  to  encourage 135 

Smith,  Vernon,  Report  of  survey  by 25^ 

Spring  Hill  coal  mines,  Coal  from 105J 

Staff  Commander  Boulton,  Claim  of. 115 

Starr,  J.  E.,  Removal  of. 101A 

Statutes,  Distribution  of 24 

Statutes  of  Canada,  Report  of  commission- 
ers appointed  to  consolidate 21 

Steamer  "Newfield,"  Claim  of  Government 
against  Allan    S.S.    Co.     for  services 

rendered  by 102 

Steamships  between  France  and  Canada 30c 

St.  Lawrence  and  Ottawa  Railway 25u 


48  Victoria.  Alphabetical  Index  to  Sessional  Papers. 


A.  1885 


yt 


St 


141 


57 
65 

76* 

139a 

109a 

25& 


Lawrence  canals,   Particulars  concern- 
ing the 

Martin's  Junction  to  the  Harbor  of  Que- 
bec, Extension  of  C.P.R.  from 25/,  25kk 

St.  Stephen,  N.B.,  post  office,  Receipts  for 

1884  at 

St.  Thomas,  Construction  ot  public  offices  at 
St.  John  and  Portland,  Interruption  of  traffic 

between 

St.  John  River,  Foot  and  carriage  bridge 

over  the 139, 

Stockholders  in  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Co- 
Stock  sold,  C.P.R 

Students  at  Royal  Military  College,  King- 
ston  81c>81* 

Subsidies  to  Local  Governments 34 

Subsidies  to  railways  in  Nova  Scotia 97 

Subsidies  to  railways  other  than  C.P.R 97a 

Subsidy  to  Provinces 346 

Sugars  from  Jamaica 59;  59a 

Sums  paid  to  newspapers  from  1874  to  1883..    23 

Superannuation 22>  22a>  22b 

Supervisor  of  Cullers  at  Quebec,  amounts 

due  to  the —  147 

Supplying  fog-whistles  and  lighthouses  with 

coal • 1056 

Supreme  Court 77>  11a 

Supreme  Court  case,   Canada  Temperance 

Act 85a 

Supreme  Court,  Judgments  rendered  by 77c 


38a 

426 

143 

127a 

127a 

79 


Trestles  and  bridges  on  C.P.R 25?2 

Trout  Point  Pier 66 

Troubles  among  Indians  at  Metlakatla 100 

Tug-barges,  dredge  and  machinery  used  on 
Red  River 


69  a 


Undervaluation  entry  of  school  books,  146  to  146e 
Unforeseen  expenses 


20 


Tariff  existing  between  Belgium  and  Eng- 
land   

Tariff  in  British  Columbia  and  Manitoba  at 

time  of  Union 

Telegraph  cable  from  Clover  Point,  B.C., 

to  Dungeness,  W.T 

Tenders  for  fog-horns  127, 

Tenders  for  letter  box  fronts 127, 

Tete  du  Pont  barracks,  Leasing  of. 

Timber  licenses  or  permits    52a,   526,  52c, 

52e,  52/,  big 

Timber  limits  on  Jack  Head  River 52 

Timber  limits  on  Lake  of  the  Woods 52 

Tolls  on  various  railways 86 

Toronto  Township,  Indian  lands  unsold  in.     53a 

Tracadie  breakwater ?1 

Trade  and  Navigation,  Annual  Report 2 

Trains  on  the  C.P.R 25t 

Treaty  No.  1,  Manitoba  Indians 128  (1880) 

Treaty  of  Washington 101e 

Treaties  with  Indians  at  Forts  Carleton  and 

Pitt 127(1880) 

Trent  Valley  Canal  96,  96a 

Trent  Valley  Canal  navigation 966 

Trafalgar  Township,  Indian  lands  unsold  in 


Validity  of  award  to  contractors,  Section  B, 

C.P.R 25A>  25P 

Victoria,  B.C.,  Postal  revenue  at 57a 

Votings  under  provisions  of  Canada  Tem- 
perance Act 85i>  85/ 

W 

Warrants,  Governor  General's 19  ^ 

Washington  Treaty,  Fishery  clauses 101* 

Weighing  and  measuring  of  potatoes  and 

other  roots 

Welland  Canal,  Particulars  concerning 141 

Wellers'  Bay  Harbor,  Character  of. 133 

Western  part  of  Ontario,  Amounts  collected 

in 53/ 

Wharfage  collected  at  Digby  pier 106a 

Wharfage  collected  at  the  Meteghan  River 

pier 106« 

Wharf  at  Point  aux  Trembles 1°6 

Wheat,  flour,  &c,  Imports  and  exports  of. .45,  45a 
Wheat,  flour,  cornmeal  and  corn  in  Nova 

Scotia,  Duty  collected  on 42a 

Whitcher,  W.  F.,  Documents  referring  to...     22c 
Widow  of  late  John  Martin,  Pension  con- 


tinued to. 


82 

Windsor  Branch  Railway 148 

Winnipeg  and    Hudson  Bay  Railway  and 

Steamship  Co 

Winnipeg  and  Port  Arthur,  Particulars  in 
reference    to    construction    of    C.P.R. 

between 

Winnipeg  to  Brandon,  C.P.R • 

Winnipeg  to  615  miles  west  of  Winnipeg, 

C.P.R ;•- 

Winnipeg  to  summit  of  Rocky  Mountains, 

profile  line  of  C.P.R.  from 

Wire  fences  on  Intercolonial  Railway 76Z 

Wood,  A.  F.,  and  Wilkinson,  J.  A.,  Money 

paid  to iS 

Wood  supplied  to  lightship  at  the  Lower 

Traverse — 

Works  on  River  Ottawa  and  Lake  Temis- 
camingue 


53cZ 


97c 


25« 

25oo 


25nn 


2566 


80 


140 


Yellow  Quill,  Chief,  Treaty  in  connection 

with 128  (iyyu> 

Yeomans,  Mrs.,   Commutation   of  sentence 

passed  on  murderer  of 1°° 

York  Station,  P.E.I.  Railway 152 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


LIST  OF  SESSIONAL  PAPERS 

Arranged  in  Numerical  Order,  with  their  Titles  at  full  length  ;  the  Dates 
when  Ordered  and  when  Presented  to  both  Houses  of  Parliament ;  the 
Name  of  the  Member  who  moved  for  each  Sessional  Paper,  and  whether 
it  is  Ordered  to  be  Printed  or  Not  Printed. 


n. 


CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  A. 

General  Report  of  the  Census  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  for  1880-81— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sesssional  Pape 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  1. 

1.  Public  Accounts  of  Canada  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  30th  June,  1884.     Presented  to  the  House 

of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  Leonard  Tilley.  Estimates  of  the  sums  required  for 
the  service  of  the  Dominion,  for  the  year  ending  30th  June,  1886 ;  presented  27th  February. 
Supplementary  Estimates  of  Canada  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  30th  June,  1885 ;  presented  23rd 
June.  Supplementary  Estimates  for  the  financial  year  ending  30th  June,  1886  ;  presented  13th 
July.  Further  Supplementary  Estimates  of  Canada,  for  the  financial  year  ending  30th  June, 
1886 ■ Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  2. 

2.  Tables  of  the  Trade  and  Navigation  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  30th 

June,  1884,  compiled  from  official  returns.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  February, 
1885,  by  Hon.  M.  Bowell Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  3. 

3.  Report  of  the  Department  of  Indian  Affairs,  for  the  year  ended  31st  December,  1884.     Presented 

to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

4.  Annual  Report,  Returns  and  Statistics  of  the  Inland  Revenues  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for 

the  fiscal  year  ended  30th  June,  1884.  Supplement  No.  1— Canal  Statistics  for  season  of  navi- 
gation, 1884.  Supplement  No.  2— Eleventh  Report  on  Inspection  of  Weights,  Measures  and 
Gas,  1884.  Supplement  No.  3— Report  on  Adulteration  of  Food,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House 
of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  Costigan— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  4. 

5.  Annual  Report  of  the  Auditor-General  on  Appropriation  Accounts,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended 
30th  June,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  Leonard 
Tilley Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

6.  Annual  Report  of  the  Postmaster-General,  for  the  year  ended  30th  June,  1884.     Presented  to 

the  House  of  Commons,  11th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  Carling— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

10 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


7  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  the 
'    year  ended  31st  December,  1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  February,  1885,  by 

Hon  J  P   R  A.  Caron Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  5. 

8  Annual  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Agriculture  for  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ended 
'    31st  December,  1884.     Report  on  Historical  Archives.     Abstracts  of  the  Returns  of  Mortuary 

Statistics  for  the  year  1884,     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885,  by  Hon. 
J.  H.  Pope Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  6. 

9  Seventeenth  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  being  for  the  fiscal 

vear  ended  30th  June,  1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,   16th  February,  1885,  by 
Hon.  A.  W.  MeLelan Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

9a.  Preliminary  Report  on  the  Fisheries  of  Canada,  for  the  year  1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  27th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  A.  W.  MeLelan— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

9b  First  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  Fisheries,  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  the  year  1884. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885,  by  Hon.  A.  W.  MeLelan- 

Printed/or  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

9c  Report  of  the  Fish-breeding  in  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  for  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  14th  April,  1885,  by  Hon.  A.  W.  MeLelan- 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  t7. 

lO  Annual  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Public  Works  of  Canada,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  30th 
jtne,1884  on  the  works  under  his  control.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  February 
1885,  by  Sir  Hector  Langevin Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

11.  Annual  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Cabals,  for  the  fiscal  year  ended  30th  June, 

1884,  on  the  works  under  his  control.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons    11th  February, 

1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers 

Ua    Reports  of  the  Railway  Statistics  of  Canada,  and  capital,  traffic  and  working  expenditure 

of  the  railways  of  the  Dominion,  for  the  year  1883-84.      Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
15th  April,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

12  Annual  Report  of  the  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada,  for  the  year  ended  31st  December,  1884. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  17th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  A.  Chapleau- 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

13  Annual  Report  of  the  Department  of  the  Interior,  for  the  year  ended  31st  December,  1884. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th  January,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald- 

Printedfor  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  1  apers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  8. 

14  Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance,  for  the  year  ended  31st  December,  1884- 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

14a.  Abstract  of  Statements  of  Fire  and  Inland  Marine  Insurance  Companies  in  Canada,  for  the 
year  ended  31st  December,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th  March  1885  by 
Sir  Leonard  Tilley.  Report  of  the  Superintendent  of  Insurance,  for  the  year  ended  31st 
December  1884  Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 


48  Yictoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


146.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a  statement  showing 
the  receipts  and  expenditure  of  the  liquidators  of  the  Canada  Agricultural  Insurance  Company 
from  date,  of  appointment  up  to  this  day,  giving  in  detail  the  names  of  shareholders  who  have 
paid  instalments,  the  dates  and  amounts  of  payments  made,  the  balances  due,  the  amount  now 
owing  by  each  shareholder,  and  the  amounts  for  which  they  were  liable  when  the  company 
was  put  m  liquidation  ;  also  a  detailed  statement  of  the  sums  paid  by  the  said  liquidators,  the 
names  of  the  persons  to  whom  payments  were  made,  the  dates  thereof,  the  object  for  which 
such  payments  were  made,  and  all  other  information  necessary  to  show  precisely  the  financial 
condition  of  the  said  insolvent  company,  including  a  statement  of  the  affairs  of  the  company 
when  it  was  placed  in  liquidation.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  31st  March,  1885.— 
^ Not  -printed. 

15.  Annual  Report  of  the  Minister  of  Justice  as  to  Penitentiaries  in  Canada,  for  the  year  ended 
30th  June,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  Hector 
Langevm Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

15a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  30th  March,  1885,  for 'copies  of  all  cor- 
respondence between  the  Department  of  Justice  and  the  Inspectors  or  the  Warden  of  the  Peni- 
tentiary of  British  Columbia,  in  regard  to  the  suspension,  in  whole  or  in  part,  of  any  of  the 
rules  of  said  institution.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  April,  1885.—  Mr*  Shake  s- 
■  Not  printed. 

16.  Annual  Report  on  the  Library  of  Parliament.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  29th 
January,  1885,  by  Hon.  Mr.  Speaker Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  9. 

17.  Shareholders  in  the  Chartered  Banks  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  as  on  the  31st  of  December, 
1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885,  by  Sir  Leonard  Tilley— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

17a.  Memorandum  respecting  the  estate  of  the  Bank  of  Upper  Canada.  Presented  to  the  Senate 
25th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  Sir  Alexander  Campbell Not  printed. 

18.  Dominion  Police  Commissioners'  Return  to  Parliament,  1884,  required  by  31  Victoria,  chapter 
73.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  Hector  Langevi'n— 

Not  printed. 

19.  Return  of  Governor  General's  Warrants  issued  since  last  Session  of  Parliament  on  account 
of  1883-84  and  1884-85,  in  accordance  with  41  Victoria,  chapter  7,  section  32,  sub-section  2. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  Leonard  Tilley. 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

20  Statement  of  payments  charged  to  Unforeseen  Expenses,  by  Orders  in  Council,  from  1st  July, 
1884,  to  date,  in  conformity  with  Act  47  Victoria,  chapter  2,  schedule  B.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  2nd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  Leonard  Tilley Not  printed. 

21.  Report  of  the  Commissioners  appointed  to  consolidate  and  revise  the  Statutes  of  Canada, 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  3rd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald. 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

22.  Statement  of  name  and  rank  of  each  person  superannuated  or  retired,  his  salary,  age,  length 
of  service,  the  allowance  granted  him  on  retirement,  cause  of  his  superannuation,  and  whether 
the  vacancy  has  been  subsequently  filled,  and,  if  so,  whether  by  promotion  or  new  appoint- 
ment, and  the  salary  of  the  new  appointee,  under  46  Victoria,  chapter  8,  section  15,  from  1st 
January  to  31st  December,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  3rd  February,  1885, 
by  Sir  Leonard  Tilley Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

22a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  for  the  time  elapsed  since  the  period  covered  by  the  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons 

12 


48  Victoria  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


of  last  Session,  with  reference  to  the  Superannuation  Fund  :  1.  The  number  of  persons  on  the 
list  for  the  year  as  entitled  to  the  benefit  of  the  Act.  2.  The  number  superannuated  during  the 
year  under  the  Act.  3.  The  number  retired  during  the  year  on  a  gratuity  under  the  Act. 
4.  The  total  amount  paid  into  the  fund  from  the  beginning  by  those  who  were  during  the  year 
superannuated  or  retired  on  a  gratuity ;  distinguishing  between  those  whose  superannuation 
was  caused  by  the  abolition  of  office,  those  who  were  superannuated  otherwise,  and  those  who 
retired  on  a  gratuity.  5.  The  number  of  persons  on  the  list  for  the  year  who  died  in  the  service. 
6.  The  total  amount  paid  into  the  fund  from  the  beginning  by  those  who  during  the  year  died 
in  the  service.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.— Mr.  Blake— 

■     Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 


22b.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,    1885,  for  a  Return: 

1.  Showing  the  number  of  persons  on  the  list  of  Civil  Servants  on  the  1st  day  of  January,  in 
the  years  1879-80-81-82-83-84  and  '85,  separately,  contributing  to  the  Superannuation  Fund. 

2.  Showing  the  number  of  persons  on  the  list  of  Civil  Servants  on- the  1st  day  of  January,  1885, 
entitled  to  the  benefit  of  the  Superannuation  Act,  by  annuity  in  case  of  retirement.  3.  The 
total  amount  paid  into  the  fund  from  the  beginning  by  each  of  those  superannuated  during 
the  year  1884,  also  the  respective  amounts  paid  in  by  those  granted  a  gratuity  during  the  year 
1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885.— Mr.  McMullen Not  printed. 

22c.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  copies^  of 
all  Orders  in  Council,  correspondence,  complaints,  reports  or  other  documents  in  connection 
with  the  supension,  superannuation  or  retirement,  of  W.  F.  Whitcher  from  the  Public  Service. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  June,  1885.— Mr.  Casey Not  printed. 

23.  Return  (in  part)  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  14th  February,  1884,  for  return 
of  all  sums  paid  to  the  Gazette  Publishing  Company  of  Montreal,  and  other  newspapers, 
for  printing  and  advertising  during  the  years  1874  and  1883.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  4th  February,  1885.-J/K  McMullen Not  printed. 

23a.  Return  (in  part)  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a 
Return  showing  the  several  sums  paid  and  dates  of  payment  made  by  the  Government  between 
the  1st  day  of  January,  1884,  and  the  30th  day  of  June,  1884,  and  between  the  1st  day  of  July 
and  the  31st  day  of  December,  1884,  to  the  several  printing  and  publishing  companies  of  the 
Dominion,  or  to  editors,  agents  or  proprietors  of  newspapers,  or  publishers  of  any  kind,  for 
any  work 'done  or  material  furnished.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  29th  May,  1885.— 
Mr.  McMullen Not  printed. 

34.  Official  Return  of  the  distribution  of  the  Dominion  Statutes  of  Canada,  being  47  Victoria, 
2nd  Session,  5th  Parliament,  1884— Vols.  1  and  2  separately,  and  1  and  2  together ;  English 
and  French  versions.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  6th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  A. 
Chapleau Not  printed. 

35.  Articles  of  agreement  entered  into  between  Andrew  Onderdonk  and  Her  Majesty  Queen 
Victoria,  represented  by  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Canals  of  Canada,  to  furnish  and  erect 
a  combined  passenger  and  freight  building  at  each  of  the  following  places  on  the  line  of  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Railway  in  British  Columbia,  viz.  :— Yale,  Lytton  and  Ashcroft.  Also 
between  John  Philip  Bacon  and  Her  Majesty  Queen  Victoria,  &c,  to  construct  nine  water 
tanks  on  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  in  British  Columbia,  between  Emory's  Bar  and  Savona's 
Ferry.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  6th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope— 

Not  printed. 

35a.  Return  (in part)  under  resolution  of  the  House  of  Commons,  passed  on  the  20th  February, 
1882,  on  all  subjects  affecting  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  respecting  details  as  to  :  1.  The 
selection  of  the  route.  2.  The  progress  of  the  work.  3.  The  selection  or.  reservation  of  land. 
4.  The  payment  of  moneys.  5.  The  laying  out  of  branches.  6.  The  progress  thereon.  7.  The 
rates  of  tolls  for  passengers  and  freight.  8.  The  particulars  required  by  the  Consolidated  Rail- 
way Act  and  amendments  thereto,  up  to  the  end  of  the  previous  fiscal  year.  9.  Like  particulars 
up  to  the  latest  practicable  date  before  the  presentation  of  the  return.     10.  Copies  of  all 

13 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


Orders  in  Council  and  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the  Railway 
Company,  or  any  member  or  officer  of  either,  relating  to  the  affairs  of  the  company.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope— 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25b.  Annual  Return  in  re  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  1884-85,  under  resolution  of  the  House 
of  Commons,  passed  on  the  20th  February,  1882.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th 
February,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25c.  Supplementary  Return  to  a  Standing  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  20th  February, 
1882,  for  full  information  on  all  subjects  affecting  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  up  to  the 
latest  date,  and  particularly  all  details  as  to  :  1.  The  selection  of  the  route.  2.  The  progress 
of  the  work.  3.  The  selection  or  the  reservation  of  land.  4.  The  payment  of  moneys.  5. 
The  laying  out  of  branches.  6.  The  progress  thereon.  7.  The  rates  of  tolls  for  passengers 
and  freight.  8.  The  particulars  required  by  the  Consolidated  Railway  Act  and  amendments 
thereto,  "up  to  the  end  of  the  previous  fiscal  year.  9.  Like  particulars  up  to  the  latest  date 
before  the  presentation  of  the  return.  10.  Copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council  and  of  all  corres- 
pondence between  the  Government  and  the  Railway  Company,  or  any  member  or  officer  of 
either,  relating  to  the  affairs  of  the  company.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  17th 
February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  A.  Chapleau Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25<i.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
and  plan  showing  the  grades  and  curves  on  the  temporary  or  permanent  line  actually  con- 
structed by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  from  the  foot  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  as 
far  as  the  rails  are  laid  ;  and  the  proposed  grades  and  curves  on  the  continuation  to  Kam- 
loops  ;  showing  also  the  proposed  grades  and  curves  on  the  permanent  line  at  a  point  at  which 
a  temporary  line  of  about  nine  miles  has  been  constructed.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 5th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25c  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  map  or  maps 
showing:  1.  The  location  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  so  far  as  approved  of  or  con- 
structed. 2.  Its  location,  so  far  as  proposed  to  Government,  but  not  yet  approved.  3.  The 
location  of  any  branches  constructed  or  acquired  and  of  any  now  contemplated  by  the  com- 
pany, so  far  as  the  Government  is  advised.  4.  The  lands  set  apart  for  the  company,  but  not 
yet  granted.  5.  The  lands  granted.  6.  The  lands  applied  for,  but  not  yet  set  apart.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25/  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  to  His  Excellency 
the  Governor  General,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  House  a  copy  of: 
1.  Correspondence  between  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  and  the  North  Shore 
Railway  Company,  for  the  purchase,  by  the  said  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  of  the 
said  North  Shore  Railway  from  St.  Martin's  Junction  to  Quebec,  or  to  obtain  control  of  the 
same,  or  to  make  such  arrangements  as  would  allow  the  said  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  to 
extend  its  railway  to  Quebec.  2.  Of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the 
Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  concerning  the  extension  of  their  railway  from  St.  Martin's 
Junction  to  the  Harbor  of  Quebec.  3.  Of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  and  any 
other  persons  for  the  purpose  of  incorporating  such  persons  for  the  construction  of  a  railway 
from  the  terminus  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  at  St.  Martin's  Junction,  to  the  Harbor  of 
Quebec.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Laurier Not  printed. 

25g.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of 
separate  report  or  finding  of  JudgeClarke,  one  of  the  arbitrators  on  the  claims  for  damages  of 
contractors  for  Section  B,  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  in  regard  to  such  claims  or  to  the 
award  in  reference  thereto,  signed  by  Messrs.  Brydges  and  Light,  the  other  arbitrators. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Casey Not  printed. 

25  h.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  "of  the 
case  submitted  by  the  Government  to  counsel,  and  opinion  given  by  counsel  consulted  by  the 
Government,  as  to  the  validity  of  the  award  of  damages  to  contractors  for  Section  B,  Cana- 
dian Pacific  Railway,  and  as  to  the  action  that  should  be  taken  in  reference  to  such  award. 

Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Casey Not  printed. 

14 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


35e.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  of 
sums  paid  to  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  up  to  date,  for  constructions  on  those 
portions  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  between  Port  Arthur  and  Winnipeg,  the  contract 
for  which  has  been  transferred  to  them  from  the  original  contractors,  with  dates  of  payment; 
also,  copies  of  estimates  on  which  such  payments  have  been  made,  showing  quantities  and 
rates.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Casey Mot  printed. 

25j  Supplementary  Return,  under  resolution  of  the  House  of  Commons,  passed  on  the  20th  Feb- 
ruary 1882,  on  all  subjects  affecting  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  respecting  details  as  to: 
1  The  selection  of  the  route.  2.  The  progress  of  the  work.  3.  -  The  selection  or  reservation  of 
land  4  The  payment  of  money.  5.  The  laying  out  of  branches.  6.  The  progress  thereon. 
7.  The  rates  of  tolls  for  passengers  and  freight.  8.  The  particulars  required  by  the  Consoli- 
dated Railway  Act  and  amendments  thereto,  up  to  the  end  of  the  previous  fiscal  year.  9.  Like 
particulars  up  to  the  latest  practicable  date  before  the  presentation  of  the  Return.  10.  Copies 
of  all  Orders  in  Council,  and  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the  Railway 
Company,  or  any  member  or  officer  of  either,  relating  to  the  affairs  of  the  company.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  A.  Chapleau. 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25k.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 

showing  the  date  and  rate  at  which  the  ten  million  dollars  of  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  stock 

formerly  pledged  for  a  loan  of  about  $4,950,000  was  sold,  and  the  net  amount  received  by  the 

company  in  respect  of  such  sales.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  March,  1885.—  Mr. 

„,  f  '-  Mot  Printed. 

Blake 

25Z.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
reports  of  Government  engineers,  made  previous  to  and  on  this  day,  in  relation  to  the  survey 
of  the  several  proposed  lines  for  the  extension  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  from  Montreal 
to  a  port  on  the  Atlantic  Ocean.  Also  the  instructions  and  the  official  correspondence  which 
passed  between  the  several  engineers  and  the  Government.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 11th  March,  1885—Jfr.  Lesage Not  printed. 

25m.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  plan  of  the 
proposed  route  or  routes  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  from  Port  Moody,  or  the  neighbor- 
hood thereof,  to  English  Bay  or  Coal  Harbor,  showing  the  point  at  which  the  route  chosen 
diverges  from  the  main  line,  and  the  distance  thereof  from  the  present  terminus  at  Port  Moody ; 
also  an  estimate  of  the  cost  of  constructing  the  proposed  line  to  the  new  Pacific  terminus,  and 
of  the  cost  of  the  terminal  accommodations  there.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th 
March,  1885.-Jfr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25n  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
report  of  Mr.  Van  Home,  Vice-President  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company,  of  Sep- 
tember last,  and  of  Mr.  S.  B.  Read,  fl.E.,  of  the  same  month,  with  reference  to  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Railway  in  British  Columbia  ;  and  also  reports  of  engineers  of  high  standing,  as  to  the 
route  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  at  the  point  where  a  temporary  line  has  been  built 
referred  to  in  the  letter  from  Mr.  Van  Home  to  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Canals,  of  19th 
May,  1884,  and  for  any  report  of  Mr.  Fleming  on  the  subject,  in  the  possession  of  the  Railway 
Company  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Blake- 
Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25o  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
claim  put  in  by  the  contractors  of  Section  B,  on  which  the  awarfl  to  them  of  $395,600  was  based  ; 
and  of  Order  in  Council  of  2nd  April,  1883,  in  reference  to  submission  to  arbitrators  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  March,  1885.-Jfr.  Casey Not  printed. 

25p  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for 
a  copy  of  the  case  submitted  by  the  Government,  as  to  the  validity  of  the  award  of  damages  to 
contractors  for  Section  B,  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  and  as  to  the  action  that  should  be  taken 
in  reference  to  such  award.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  March    1885.-Jfr. 

„  Not  printed. 

Casey ;••• 

15 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


25g.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  reports  and  Orders  in  Council  not  covered  by  the  previous  Address,  relating 
to  the  allowances  proposed  to  be  paid  to  the  Canadian  manufacturers  of  certain  goods  required 
by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  ;  of  all  applications  for  such  allowances,  and  correspondence 
in  connection  therewith  ;  a  statement  of  the  calculations  on  which  the  allowances  have  been 
based,  and  an  estimate  in  detail  of  the  probable  sums  payable  out  of  the  Treasury  in  respect 
of  each  class  of  goods,  assuming  them  to  be  made  in  Canada,  to  the  extent  of  the  company's 
requirements,  and  of  the  ad  valorem  percentage  of  all  allowances  on  each  such  class.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  18th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25r.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  names  and  addresses  of  all  shareholders  in  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Com- 
pany, with  the  amount  of  stock  held  by  each,  as  of  the  date  of  16th  February,  1885.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  18th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25s.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
report  of  the  engineers  appointed  to  re-measure  and  re-classify  the  work  on  Section  B,  Canadian 
Pacific  Railway,  in  connection  with  the  claims  of  the  contractors  for  said  section  for  increased 
remuneration  for  such  work  and  for  damages.  Also  all  reports  of  the  engineers  in  charge  of 
said  section,  or  of  the  Engineer-in-Chief  or  any  other  Government  engineer,  in  reference  to  the 
questions  of  measurement,  classification  or  damages  at  issue  between  the  Government  and 
the  contractors.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885. — Mr.  Casey — 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  o?ih/. 

25t.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  number  of  passenger  trains,  freight  trains  and  mixed  trains,  distinguishing  each 
class,  run  daily,  or  weekly  in  cases  in  which  there  was  not  a  daily  train,  over  each  division  of 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  in  each  week  of  the  years  1883  and  1884  respectively.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25u.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
memorials,  letters  and  other  representations,  in  writing,  received  by  the  Government  on  the 
subject  Of  the  non-payment  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  of  amounts  due  to 
contractors,  sub-contractors  or  laborers  engaged  in  the  construction  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Charlton — 

Not  printed. 

25v.  Supplementary  Return  to  a  Standing  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  passed  on  the  20th 
February,  1882,  for  full  information  on  all  subjects  affecting  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  up 
to  the  latest  date,  and  particularly  all  details  as  to  :  1.  The  selection  of  the  route.  2.  The 
progress  of  the  work.  3.  The  selection  or  reservation  of  land.  4.  The  payment  of  the  moneys. 
5.  The  laying  out  of  branches.  6.  The  progress  thereon.  7.  The  rates  of  tolls  for  passengers 
and  freight.  8.  The  particulars  required  by  the  Consolidated  Railway  Act  and  amendments 
thereto  up  to  the  end  of  the  previous  fiscal  year.  9.  Like  particulars  up  to  the  latest 
practicable  date  before  the  presentation  of  the  return.  10.  Copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council 
and  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the  railway  company,  or  any  member 
or  officer  of  either,  relating  to  the  affairs  of  the  company.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons. 
23rd  April,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Not  printed. 

25w.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
in  detail  of  the  present®position  of  land  grant  and  the  land  grant  bonds  of  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Railway  Company,  showing,  by  the  number  of  the  section,  the  township  and  range  or 
other  description,  the  lots  granted  to  the  company.  Also  the  lots  sold  by  the  company. 
Also  the  amount  of  land  grant  bonds  in  the  hands  of  the  Government ;  the  amount  in  the 
hands  of  the  company  ;  the  amount  in  the  hands  of  the  public  ;  the  amount  pledged  by  the 
company  for  loans,  or  otherwise,  with  details,  and  the  amount  cancelled ;  showing  also  the 
sum  received  by  the  company  for  lands  sold  in  each  calendar  year  and  in  the  course  of  the 
present  year;  and  the  amount  now  due  to  the  company  in  respect  of  lands  sold,  with  a 
separate  statement  showing  the  amount  received  bv  the  company  from  sales  in  town  sites,  and 

16 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


the  amount  now  due  on  such  sales,  distinguishing  between  the  receipts  and  debts  on  account 
of  town  sites  comprised  in  the  land  grant,  or  in  any  arrangement  with  the  Government,  and 
the  receipts  and  debts  on  account  of  other  town  sites.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
23rd  April,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25z.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
reports,  plans,  specifications,  estimates,  contracts,  correspondence  and  other  papers  in  connec- 
tion with  the  construction  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  wharf  and  freight  shed  at  Port 
Moody,  B.C.,  and  relating  to  its  deterioration  and  repairs  or  reconstruction.  And  like  paper3 
as  to  the  bridge  on  the  railway  near  Spuzzum,  B.C.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
23rd  April,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25y.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  for  any  informa- 
tion in  the  possession  of  the  Department  as  to  the  character  of  the  work  done  near  Lytton, 
B.C.,  on  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  on  that  portion  of  the  road  for  which  Mr.  Hugh  J. 
Keefer  had  a  sub-contract,  and  which  was  under  the  inspection  of  his  brother,  Mr.  George 
Keefer,  Government  engineer  ;  also  copies  of  any  statements  as  to  the  character  of  the  material 
allowed  as  rock  or  as  other  than  earth,  in  this  part.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
24th  April,  1885. — Mr.  Blake Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  10. 

25z.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  all  reports, 
plans  and  other  information  in  the  possession  of  the  Department  in  reference  to  the  work  on 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  at  or  near  Maple  Ridge,  a  short  distance  above  Hammond,  on 
the  bank  of  the  Fraser,  B.C.  ;  for  all  reports  and  information  in  the  possession  of  the  Depart- 
ment as  to  the  condition  of  the  work  on  the  Government  sections  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  in  British  Columbia;  and  as  to  the  extent  of  work  remaining  to  be  done  before  the 
completion  of  the  contract ;  also  for  all  correspondence  with  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
Company  as  to  the  taking  over  by  them  of  these  sections  of  the  railway  ;  also  for  a  statement 
of  the  names,  salaries  and  period  of  service  in  that  region,  of  the  Government  engineers  who 
have  been  employed  on  the  Government  sections  in  British  Columbia  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway,  with  the  dates  at  which  any  of  them  were  relieved,  a  statement  of  the  cause  of  their 
removal,  and  of  their  present  occupation,  if  any,  under  the  Government.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25aa.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  of  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
applications,  statements,  estimates  or  letters  sent  from  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  to  the 
Government,  or  any  of  its  officials,  in  relation  to  the  change  made  by  the  Government  between 
7th  April,  1884,  and  16th  May,  1884,  in  the  dealing  with  rolling  stock  in  progress  estimates 
and  payments  in  the  Eastern  Section,  Western  Division,  and  copies  of  all  correspondence  and 
papers  upon  the  same  subject.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  1885.— Mr. 
Edgar Not  printed. 

25bb.  Supplementary  Return  to  a  Standing  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  passed  on  the  20th 
February,  1882,  for  full  information  on  all  subjects  affecting  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  up 
to  the  latest  date,  and  particularly  all  details  as  to  :  1.  The  selection  of  the  route.  2.  Progress 
of  the  work.  3.  The  selection  or  reservation  of  land.  4.  The  payment  of  moneys.  5.  The 
laying  out  of  branches.  6.  The  progress  thereon.  7.  The  rates  of  tolls  for  passengers  and 
freight.  8.  The  particulars  required  by  the  Consolidated  Railway  Act  and  amendments 
thereto,  up  to  the  end  of  the  previous  fiscal  year.  9.  Like  particulars  up  to  the  latest  practic- 
able date  before  the  presentation  of  the  Return.  10.  Copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council  and  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the  Railway  Company,  or  any  member  or  officer 
of  either,  relating  to  the  affairs  of  the  company.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th 
May,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Not  printed. 

25ce.  Letter  and  statements  from  George  Stephen,  Esq.,  President  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Rail- 
way Company,  to  the  Hon.  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Canals,  accompanied  by  Mr.  Miall's 
condensed  balance  sheet  on  the  affairs  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  on  the  1st 
January,    1885.      Presented   to   the   House   of  Commons,    7th    May,    1885.— Sir  J.   A.   Mac- 

donald  Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

2      17 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


25dd.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  of 
the  names  of  persons  in  the  employ  of  the  Government  along  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  during  the  year  1884,  the  date  of  their  engagement,  the  length  of  time  employed,  the 
work  assigned  them  and  the  salary,  fee  or  allowance  paid ;  also  the  amount  of  travelling 
expenses  paid  to  each.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Mc- 
Mullen Not  printed. 

25ee.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for 
copies  of  all  applications,  statements,  estimates  or  letters  sent  from  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  to  the  Government  or  any  of  its  officials,  in  relation  to  the  change  made  by  the  Gov- 
ernment between  7th  April,  1884,  and  16th  May,  1884,  in  the  dealing  with  rolling  stock,  in 
progress  estimates  and  payments  in  the  Eastern  Section,  Western  Division,  and  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  papers  upon  the  same  subject.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th 
May,  1885.—  Mr.  Edgar Not  printed. 

35/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all  the 
estimates,  in  detail,  furnished  to  the  Government  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company, 
and  by  the  Government  engineer,  upon  which  the  estimated  cost  of  $23,000  per  mile  was  based 
for  the  portion  of  the  Eastern  Section  from  the  100th  mile  to  the  120th  mile  west  o*  Callander, 
giving  quantities,  classification  and  prices;  also  for  a  statement  of  the  actual  quantities, 
description  and  classification  of  the  work  from  the  100th  mile  to  the  120th  mile  west  of  Callan- 
der on  the  12th  August,  1884,  when  the  subsidy  and  loan  were  paid  by  the  Government  as  a 
completed  line.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  May,  1885.— Mr. Edgar. ...Not  printed. 

25gg.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
report  of  survey  by  Vernon  Smith,  C.E.,  in  relation  to  the  extension  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  to  Canadian  ports  on  the  Atlantic.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  May. 
1885.-Mr.  Lesage Not  printed. 

35M.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copy  of  all 
offers  made  to  the  Government  for  the  construction  of  a  railway  connecting  the  Ontario  rail- 
way system,  at  or  near  to  Gravenhurst,  with  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  9th  June,  1885.—  Mr.  Mulock Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25n.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return 
showing  the  amounts  contributed  to  the  Canada  Central  Railway  between  Ottawa  and 
Brockville,  either  by  the  Government  of  Canada,  the  Provincial  Government  of  Ontario,  or 
by  the  municipalities  along  that  line  of  railway.  Also  showing  what  securities  were  taken  for 
the  amounts  so  advanced  to  the  said  railway  company,  and  what  disposition  has  been  made 
of  the  said  securities.  Also  for  similar  returns  concerning  the  St.  Lawrence  and  Ottawa 
Railway  from  Ottawa  to  Prescott,  together  with  the  conditions  upon  which  such  grants  were 
made  to  both  railways ;  also  statement  showing  the  present  train  service  on  both  lines  of 
railway.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  June,  1885.—  Mr.  Lander  kin...  Not  printed. 

2*ijj.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for 
map  or  maps  showing  :  1.  The  location  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  so  far  as  approved 
of  or  constructed.  2.  Its  location,  so  far  as  proposed  to  Government,  but  not  yet  approved. 
3.  The  location  of  any  branches  constructed  or  acquired,  and  of  any  now  contemplated  by 
the  company,  so  far  as  the  Government  is  advised.  4.  The  lands  set  apart  for  the  company, 
but  not  yet  granted.  5.  The  lands  granted.  6.  The  lands  applied  for,  but  not  yet  set  apart. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  June,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25kk.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Government  of  Quebec  and  the  Government  of  Canada  concern- 
ing the  application  of  the  sum  of  $960,000  reserved  by  the  statute  47  Victoria,  chapter  8,  for 
the  extension  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  from  its  terminus  at  St.  Martin's  Junction  to 
the  Harbor  of  Quebec.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  June,  1885.—  Mr.  Laurier— 

Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

2511.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  gross  earnings,  expenses  and  net  earnings  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  for 
each  month  of  the  years  1883  and  1884,  distinguishing  between  the  main  line  and  the  lines  now 

18 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


worked  under  the  lease  from  the  Ontario  and  Quebec  Railway  Company  ;  and  distinguishing 
also  between  the  main  line  east  of  Port  Arthur  or  Fort  William  and  the  main  line  west  of  that 
point,  giving  in  each  case  the  mileage  open  for  traffic  during  the  month  specified.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  June,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25mm.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  state- 
ment showing :  1.  The  expenditure  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  upon  its  main 
line  of  railway  between  Callander  and  Port  Arthur  and  between  Selkirk  and  Kamloops,  since 
the  expenditure  of  $23,078,950,  shown  by  the  letter  of  Mr.  Stephen  to  the  Minister  of  Railways 
and  Canals  on  the  15th  January,  1884.     2.  The  materials  on  hand  in  respect  of  the  described 
main  line  of  railway.    3.  The  receipts  by  the  company  since  the  account  given  in  the  said 
letter  in  respect  of— (a.)  Cash  subsidy;    (6.)  Government  loan;   (c.)  Land  grant   bonds  or 
land  sales,  or  from  the  pledging  of  land  grant  bonds.     4.  The  amount,  if  any,  due  by  the 
company  in  respect  of  construction  of  the  described  main  line.     5.  Estimates  of  the  cost  of  the 
work  of  construction  remaining  to  be  done  on  the  described  main  line,  showing  whether  the 
materials  on  hand  are  taken  into  account  in  such  estimates  or  not.     6.  An  estimate  of  the 
whole  cost  of  construction  of  the  described  main  line  when  completed.     7.  Statement  of  the 
cost  of  equipment  of  the  described  main  line  at  the  date  of  the  account  in  Mr.  Stephen's  letter. 
8.  Statement  of  the  cost  of  equipment  of  the  described  main  line  since  that  date.     9.  Estimate  of 
the  further  cost  of  equipment  of  the  described  main  line  when  completed.     10.  Estimate  of 
the  complete  cost  of  equipping  the  described  main  line.     All  such  statements  and  estimates 
being  separate  for  each  of  the  described  divisions,  viz.,  (a)  that  between  Callander  and  Port 
Arthur,  and  (6)  that  between  Selkirk  and  Kamloops.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
16th  June,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25nn.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
of  the  cost  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  from  Winnipeg  to  a  point  615  miles  west  of  Win- 
nipeg, divided  under  the  usual  sub-headings  of  cost  of  railway  construction ;  or  in  case  the 
company  has  not  recorded  the  expense  under  the  usual  sub-headings,  then  divided  in  such  a 
way  and  in  such  detail  as  the  company  has  recorded  it.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
16th  June,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25oo.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  date  of  completion  of  the  main  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  from  Winnipeg  to 
Brandon,  from  Brandon  to  Moose  Jaw,  from  Moose  Jaw  to  Calgary,  the  dates  on  which  each 
section  was  opened  for  traffic,  the  dates  on  which  such  section  was  inspected  by  the  Government 
engineer,  with  all  Orders  in  Council,  papers  and  correspondence  affecting  the  tariff  rates  for 
passengers  and  freight  upon  such  line,  not  already  brought  down.  Presented  to  the  House 
of  Commons,  15th  June,  1885.—  Mr.  Watson Not  printed. 

25pp.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  25th  February,  1885,  for  all  correspondence  had 
since  the  1st  January,  1884,  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  Government  of  the 
Province  of  Quebec,  concerning  all  sums  of  money  granted  by  the  Government  of  Canada  to 
the  Province  of  Quebec,  and  all  claims  of  the  Province  of  Quebec,  by  way  of  indemnity  on 
account  of  the  construction  of  the  North  Shore  Railway,  heretofore  called  the  Quebec,  Montreal, 
Ottawa  and  Occidental  Railway,  together  with  a  copy  of  all  memorials  presented  to  the  Federal 
Government  during  the  same  period  by  the  Government  of  Quebec,  respecting  all  claims  or 
demands  of  indemnity  for  the  same  cause.  Presented  to  the  Senate,  16th  April,  1885.—  Hon. 
Mr.  Trudel Printedfor  Sessional  Papers  only. 

25qq.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  13th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  :  1.  The  total  number  of  permanent  timber  trestles  and  the  total  number  of  wooden 
bridges  constructed,  or  under  contract  for  construction,  upon  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway.  2.  The  length,  in  feet,  and  the  maximum  height  of  each  of  said  trestles  and  of  each 
of  said  bridges.  Such  statement  to  identify  the  trestles  and  bridges  by  numbering  them  con- 
secutively from  Sudbury  westward.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885.— 

Mr.  Edgar Not  printed. 

25rr.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for :  1.  A 
statement  of  the  present  position  of  the  debt  of  six  hundred  thousand  dollars,  due  last  Session 
2*  ly 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


by  the  North  American  Contracting  Company  to  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  with  infor- 
mation as  to  whether  the  same  has  been  settled,  and  if  so,  when  and  upon  what  terms,  and  if 
unsettled,  what  steps  have  been  taken,  or  are  being  taken,  to  procure  a  settlement ;  also  a 
statement  of  the  present  position  of  a  sum  of  about  six  hundred  thousand  dollars  invested  by 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  in  stock  of  the  Canada  North-West  Land  Company, 
with  a  statement  of  its  value,  at  the  average  price  for  the  month  of  January,  1885.  2.  Also 
plan  and  statement  showing  the  grades  and  curves  on  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway 
as  far  as  constructed,  including  all  the  Government  sections,  but  exclusive  of  the  line  con- 
structed by  the  company  from  the  foot  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  to  Kamloops.  3.  Also  a  copy 
of  the  prospectus,  advertisement  and  other  papers  in  connection  with  the  recent  proposal  for 
the  issue  of  bonds  of  the  Ontario  and  Quebec  Railway  Company,  guaranteed  by  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Railway  Company,  with  a  statement  of  the  amount  sold  and  the  average  rate.  4. 
Also  an  estimate  of  the  cost  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  between  Callander  and  Port 
Arthur,  divided  under  the  usual  heads  of  sub-divisions  in  railway  construction,  with  separate 
estimate  for  equipment.  5.  Also  a  like  estimate,  in  similar  form,  of  the  cost  of  the  construc- 
tion of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  between  Calgary  and  the  summit  of  the  Rocky  Moun- 
tains, and  from  the  summit  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  to  the  junction  with  the  Government 
section,  each  separately,  with  a  statement  of  the  items  in  which  a  saving  of  four  million  dollars 
upon  the  estimate  of  last  Session  is  calculated  by  the  officers  of  the  company.  6.  Also  a  state- 
ment of  the  expenditure  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  on  any  account,  except 
the  construction  and  equipment  of  the  contracted  line  between  Callander  and  Port  Arthur, 
and  between  Selkirk  and  Kamloops.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885.— 
Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

2oss.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for :  1.  A 
statement  of  the  expenditure  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  since  the  account  in 
Mr.  Stephen's  letter  to  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Canals,  15th  January,  1884,  upon  branch 
lines,  specifying  each  line,  the  expenditure  thereon,  the  purpose  thereof,  and  the  additional 
mileage  beyond  269  miles  completed  at  the  date  of  Mr.  Stephen's  letter.  2.  Statement  of  the 
cost  of  equipment  of  such  branch  lines;  (a.)  At  the  date  of  said  letter;  (6.)  Since  that  time. 
3.  Estimate  for  any  further  cost  of  equipment  for  such  branch  lines  so  far  as  completed.  4. 
Statement  in  detail  of  the  further  sums  paid  in  respect  of  the  extensions  or  branches  east  of 
Callander,  since  the  date  of  said  letter,  when  they  amounted  to  $3,203,050.  5.  A  statement  of 
the  present  condition  of  the  account  for  advances  towards  acquiring  a  line  to  the  seaboard,  and 
for  other  purposes,  alleged  to  be  within  the  charter,  shown  by  the  said  letter  at  $3,482,251 ; 
with  a  detail  of  any  further  payments  of  a  like  character.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 18th  July,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

25  tf.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  agreements  between  the  Government  and  the  Cauadian  Pacific  Railway 
Company  on  the  subject  of  immigration  to  Manitoba  and  the  North-West,  together  with  a 
statement  showing  the  amount  expended  by  the  company  in  promoting  such  immigration, 
giving  amounts  paid,  with  dates,  to  whom  paid,  and  the  nature  of  service  rendered  ;  also 
estimate  of  the  company  of  number  of  persons  from  foreign  countries  who  have  actually  settled 
there  in  each  year  since  date  of  charter.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  18th  July,  1885. 
— Mr.  Paterson  {Brant) Not  printed. 

25uu.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885r 
for  :  1.  A  statement  of  the  present  position  of  the  debt  of  six  hundred  thousand  dollars  due 
last  Session  by  the  North  American  Contracting  Company  to  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway, 
with  information  as  to  whether  the  same  has  been  settled,  and,  if  so,  when  and  upon  what 
terms,  and  if  unsettled,  what  steps  have  been  taken,  or  are  being  taken,  to  procure  a  settle- 
ment ;  also  a  statement  of  the  present  position  of  a  sum  of  about  six  hundred  thousand  dollars 
invested  by  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company  in  stock  of  the  Canada  North-West  Land 
Company,  with  a  statement  of  its  value  at  the  average  price  for  the  month  of  January,  1S85. 
2.  Also  plan  and  statement  showing  the  grades  and  curves  on  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific 
Railway  as  far  as  constructed,  including  all  the  Government  sections,  but  exclusive  of  the  line 
constructed  by  the  company  from  the  foot  of  the  Rocky  Mountains  to  Kamloops.     Presented 

to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  July,  1885. — Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

20 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


36.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  the 
receipts  and  expenditure,  in  detail,  chargeable  to  the  Consolidated  Fund,  from  the  1st  July, 
1883,  to  the  31st  January,  1884,  and  from  1st  July,  1884,  to  31st  January,  1885.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  9th  February,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Cartwright— 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

37.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  amount  of  money  on  deposit  to  the  credit  of  the  Government  of  Canada  on  the 
1st  February,  1885,  whether  in  Canada  or  elsewhere,  together  with  the  names  of  the  banks 
wherein  the  said  moneys  are  deposited,  with  the  amount  in  each  bank  respectively  ;  also  the 
amount  at  interest  and  the  rate  of  interest  allowed  on  the  said  deposits  in  each  case.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  February,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Cartwright— 

Printed  for  Distribution  ot\ly. 

38.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  30th  January,  1884,  for  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council,  despatches,  correspondence  and  telegrams  relating  to  the  negotiations 
between  Canada  and  British  Columbia,  not  already  brought  down  ;  and  for  a  statement  of  the 
estimated  net  cost  to  Canada  of  the  dry  dock  in  British  Columbia.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  10th  February,  1885,— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

39.  Return  {in part)  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  January,  1884,  for  copies 
of  all  Orders  in  Council,  reports  and  correspondence,  not  already  brought  down,  in  reference 
to  the  exercise  or  non-exercise  of  the  power  of  disallowance  as  to  any  Provincial  Acts  ;  with  a 
statement  of  the  dates  of  prorogation  of  each  of  the  Provincial  Assemblies  ;  and  of  the  dates 
at  which  the  Acts  of  the  Session  were  received  at  Ottawa  ;  and  copy  of  the  despatches 
addressed  to  the  Lieutenant-Governors  on  the  subject  of  the  transmission  to  the  Government 
of  Canada  of  such  Acts.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  February,  1885.— Mr. 
Mulock Printedfor  Sessional  Papers  only. 

30.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  February,  1884,  for  a  detailed 
statement  of  all  moneys  expended  upon  the  Dominion  steamer  "Sir  James  Douglas,"  in 
connection  with  the  hauling  out,  lengthening  of,  repairs  to,  and  launching  of  said  vessel,  from 
1st  January,  1882,  to  31st  December,  1883.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  February, 
1885.—  Mr.  Baker  (  \  'ictoria) Not  printed. 

30a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  February,  1884,  for  a  statement 
showing  numbers  of  officers  and  crew  of  steamer  "  Sir  James  Douglas,"  their  names,  rank, 
pay  and  date  of  first  appointment,  the  average  cost  per  month  of  maintaining  said  vessel  for 
the  twelve  months  ending  31st  December,  1883,  nature  of  service  in  which  she  has  been  engaged 
for  the  period  mentioned,  increased  speed  obtained  by  lengthening,  date  on  which  she  was  last 
swung  for  adjustment  of  compasses  and  copy  of  deviation  table  made  therefrom.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  February,  1885.—  Mr.  Baker  {Victoria) Not  printed. 

SOb.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  all  correspondence 
of  a  date  subsequent  to  1st  January,  1883,  upon  the  subjects  of  repairs  to,  hauling  out,  and 
launching  of  the  steamer  "  Sir  James  Douglas,"  in  the  early  part  of  said  year,  between  the 
Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  and  their  agents  at  Victoria,  B.C.,  or  between  the  Depart- 
ment and  any  other  person  or  persons,  in  the  Province  of  British  Columbia,  upon  said  subject; 
also  copies  of  reports  sent  in  to  the  Department  by  the  agent  of  the  Department  in  British 
Columbia,  and  the  master  of  the  steamer  above  referred  to,  in  connection  with  the  serious  and 
unpleasant  difference  of  opinion  which  arose  between  them,  reflecting  discreditably  upon  them- 
selves and  the  Department.  Also  all  correspondence  upon  that  or  any  other  subject  between 
the  Department  and  any  British  Columbia  member  or  other  person,  in  any  way  reflecting  upon 
the  agent  of  the  Department  in  British  0  olumbia,  to  date.  Presented  to  the  House  of  C  ommons, 
10th  February,  1885.—  Mr.  Baker  (Victoria) Not  printed.     See  30d. 

30c.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  9th  April,  1884,  for  copies  of  all  documents  and 
correspondence  in  possession  of  the  Government  relating  to  the  establishment  of  a  line  of 
steamships  between  France  and  Canada.     Presented  to  the  Senate,  24th  February,  1885.  Hon. 

Mr  Pelletier  Printedfor  Sessional  Papers  only. 

21 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


30  /.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  all  correspondence 
of  a  date  subsequent  to  1st  January,  1883,  upon  the  subject  of  repairs  to,  hauling  out  and 
launching  of  the  steamer  "Sir  James  Douglas,"  in  the  early  part  of  said  year,  between 
the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  and  their  agent  at  Victoria,  B.C.,  and  between 
the  Department  and  any  other  person  or  persons  in  the  Province  of  British  Columbia,  upon 
said  subject ;  also  copies  of  reports  sent  in  to  the  Department  by  the  agent  in  British  Columbia, 
and  the  master  of  the  steamer  referred  to,  in  connection  with  the  serious  and  unpleasant 
difference  of  opinion  which  arose  between  them,  reflecting  discreditably  upon  themselves  and 
the  Department ;  also  all  correspondence  upon  that  or  any  other  subject  between  the  Depart- 
ment and  any  British  Columbia  member  or  other  person,  in  any  way  reflecting  on  the  agent 
of  the  Department  in  British  Columbia,  to  date.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th 
April,  1885.—  Mr.  Baker  (Victoria) Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

30e.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  for  copies  in  full 
of  the  accounts  and  vouchers  of  all  provisions,  coal  and  other  supplies  furnished  the  Hudson 
Bay  steamer  "  Neptune"  at  Halifax,  in  July  last,  and  copies  of  all  the  tenders  upon  which  all 
the  contracts  were  based.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  April,  1885.— Mr. 
Vail Not  printed. 

30/  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
reports,  correspondence,  contracts,  Orders  in  Council  and  other  papers,  in  connection  with 
the  arrangements  under  which  public  moneys  have  been  paid  by  the  Government  to  the  Halifax 
Steam  Navigation  Company.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th  April,  1885.— Mr. 
Blake Not  printed. 

31.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  present  constitution  of  the  North-West  Council,  the  number  of  elected  members, 
the  district  for  which  they  are  elected,  the  number  of  votes  polled,  the  names  of  the  candi- 
dates, and  the  qualifications  required  of  the  voters.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
19th  February,  1885.—  Mr.  Mills Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

32.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  a  statement  of  all 
moneys  paid  by  the  Dominion  Government  to  the  Local  Government  of  Ontario  since  Confeder- 
ation ;  stating  the  amounts  in  each  year  and  stating  on  what  account.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  10th  February,  1885.—  Mr.  Farrow Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

33.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for :  1.  Correspon- 
dence, papers,  draft,  notarial  transfer  and  telegram  respecting  Survey  Contract  No.  10,  of 
L.  J.  E.  Garon,  of  the  season  of  1881,  by  which  Joseph  Adhemar  Martin,  merchant,  of  Rimouski, 
has  received  the  sum  of  $800.  2.  Correspondence,  papers,  draft,  notarial  transfer  and  telegram, 
between  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  and  the  said  Joseph  Adhemar  Martin,  concerning  the 
balance  remaining  due  on  the  said  transfer  of  the  said  Survey  Contract  No.  10,  of  L.  J.  E. 
Garon,  of  the  said  season  of  1881.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  19th  February,  1885.— 
Mr.  Billy Not  printed. 

34.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  7th  February,  1884  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  several  Provincial  Governments  and  the  Dominion  Government, 
respecting  the  readjustment  or  increase  of  the  money  subsidies  paid,  or  to  be  paid,  by  the 
latter  to  the  former,  in  pursuance  of  the  confederation  agreement,  or  of  any  other  arrangements 
since  made.  Also  copies  of  all  petitions  from  the  several  Provincial  Legislatures  to  the  Gov- 
ernment, or  to  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  and  of  any  memorials  received  by  the  latter  from 
the  several  Provincial  Governments,  asking  for  aid  or  assistance  in  money  or  otherwise.  Also 
statement  showing  all  that  has  been  granted  in  money,  or  otherwise,  by  the  Government  of 
Canada  to  the  several  provinces  since  1867.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  Feb- 
ruary, 1885. — Mr.  Ouimet Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

34a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  to  His  Excellency 
the  Governor  General,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  House  any  correspond- 

22 


48  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


ence  or  papers  touching  applications  by  Local  Governments  for  advances  of  money  on  debt 
account,  and  for  any  papers  throwing  light  on  the  reasons  for  the  pending  Bill  on  that  subject. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th  February,  1885.— Mr.  Blake- 
Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

346  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  since  1st  January  last,  between  the  Dominion  Government  and  the  Govern- 
ment of  the  Province  of  Quebec,  in  relation  to  an  increase  or  readjustment  of  the  Dominion 
subsidy  to  the  province,  including  any  letter  written  to  that  end  by  one  of  the  said  Govern- 
ments  to  the  other,  or  by  any  of  the  Ministers  thereof  in  relation  to  the  subject ;  also  of  any 
such  correspondence  with  any  of  the  other  Provinces  of  the  Dominion  Presented  to  the  Hou  e 
of  Commons,  23rd  April,  1885.-*.  Amy* Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

35  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  darted  1st  February,  1884,  for  copies  of  all  cor- 
respondence and  papers  relating  to  any  proposed  or  suggested  reduction  m  letter  postage  in  the 
Dominion  of  Canada.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  Februar^^;-f2 
Charlton 

36.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  February  1884,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  or  complaints  to  the  Postmaster-General,  relative  to  delays  or  W$W*g£ 
masters  in  transmitting  newspapers  and  periodicals  to  the  office  of  destination,  since  1st  Janu- 
ary, 1883.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  February,  1885—ifr.  SProul^    ^ 

37.  Reports  relative  to  the  manufacturing  industries  in  existence  in  Canada,  submitted  to ^the 
House  of  Commons  for  its  information.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons  11th  February, 
1885,  by  Sir  Leonard  Tilley Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

37a  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  copy  of  the 
commission  or  other  authorization,  Order  in  Council,  correspondence  and  instructions  in  rela- 
tion to  the  commission  issued  for  the  investigation  of  certain  facts  as  to  the  condition  of  the 
industries  of  Canada  during  the  last  recess.  Copy  of  the  report  of  the  commissioners,  and 
the  evidence  and  data  obtained  by  them.  Statement  in  detail  of  all  moneys  paid  in  respect  of 
the  commission,  and  an  estimate  in  detail  of  all  moneys  payable,  but  as  yet  unpaid ;  dated  11th 
February   1885.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  12th  February,  1885.     Mr.  Blake— 

J '  Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

376    Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  all  returns, 
1        statements  or  correspondence  in  possession  of  the  Government,  showing  the  number  of  opera- 
tives employed  in  factories  in  the  Dominion  in  1878  and  in  1884,  together  with  the  amount  of 
capital  invested  and  wages  paid.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  February,  1885.- 

«.    r,-  t      i  si    *      ■  j.*  Notpnnted. 

Sir  Richard  Cartwright 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  11. 

38  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all  cor- 
respondence relative  to  any  payments,  claims  or  allowances  on  any  account  whatever,  in 
respect  to  the  office  of  High  Commissioner,  not  already  brought  down;  and  separate  state- 
ment in  detail,  with  dates  and  sums  of  all  payments  made  on  any  such  accounts  in  respect  to 
the  office,  during  its  tenure  by  the  present  incumbent ;  an  estimate  in  detail  of  all  sums  pay- 
able on  any  such  accounts  up  to  this  date  and  yet  unpaid  ;  also  copies  of  all  correspondence 
not  yet  brought  down,  as  to  the  letting  or  purchase  of  a  residence  for  the  High  Commissioner 
and  as  to  the  repairs  and  furnishing  thereof,  with  copies  of  all  accounts  in  connection  with 
the  same  ;  a  statement  in  detail  of  all  sums  paid  in  respect  of  such  letting  or  purchase  or  fur- 
nishing or  repairs  ;  and  an  estimate  of  all  sums  payable,  but  not  yet  paid,  in  respect  thereof. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  12th  February,  1885—Jfr.  Blake Notpnnted. 

38a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1884  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence  between  this  Government  and  the  High  Commissioner  in  England  or  the  repre- 
sentatives of  the  Belgian  Government  in  this  country,  or  from  the  Belgian  authorities  at  home, 

23 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


or  any  other  correspondence  and  papers  concerning  the  International  Exhibition  in  Antwerp  ■ 
and  also  copies  of  the  existing  tariff  between  Belgium  and  England.  Presented  to  the  House 
of  Commons,  12th  March,  1885.—  Messrs.  Bergeron  and  Amy ot Not  printed. 

386.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of 
any  further  commission  or  Order  in  Council,  or  correspondence  touching  the  position  or  salary 
of  the  High  Commissioner  of  Canada,  not  already  brought  down.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  13th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Blake .' Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

38c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885.  for  a  Return 
showing  amount  paid  out  on  account  of  High  Commissioner  to  London  since  the  creation  of 
the  office ;  showing  separately  the  amount  paid  on  account  of  residence,  furniture  and  all 
fittings  and  additions  thereto,  and  amount  of  salary  paid  to  1st  January,  1885,  and  all  items  or 
allowances  on  account  of  taxes,  light,  iiel,  travelling  and  other  expenses,  including  salaries 
of  private  secretary  and  other  servants  or  attendants,  each  item  separately  set  out  up  to 
1st  January,  1885.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  7th  April,  1885.— Mr.  McMullen— 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

39.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  copy  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  several  Governments"  of  the 
Australian  and  Tasmanian  colonies,  or  anyone  acting  on  their  behalf,  in  relation  to  the  estab- 
lishing of  a  more  direct  communication  and  extension  of  trade  between  these  colonies  and 
Canada  ;  also  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  British  Govern- 
ment on  the  same  subject.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  12th  February,  1885.—  Mr. 
Mitchell Not  printed. 

40.  Report  of  the  operations  and  money  expended,  since  the  report  of  last  Session,  for  the  vear 
1884,  with  respect  to  the  Census  of  1881,  in  accordance  with  the  provisions  of  section  25  of  the 
Census  and  Statistics  Act;  also  relating  to  mortuary  statistics.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  12th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Notprinted. 

40a.  A  form  of  Census  Return  for  the  year  1885.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th 
February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Notprinted. 

41.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  amount  of  sums 
advanced  to  the  Government  of  the  Dominion  by  way  of  loan  by  any  banks  or  persons  in 
Canada  or  England,  as  appearing  on  the  1st  February,  1885.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  13th  February,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Cartwright— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

41a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  giving 
names  of  all  newspapers  in  which  the  loans  of  1874,  1875,  1876,  1878  and  1884  were  advertised^ 
together  with  statement  of  length  of  time  during  which  the  said  advertisements  appeared. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  February,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Cartwright— 

Not  printed. 

415.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,.  1885,  for  copy  of  the 
prospectus  of  the  loan  recently  issued  in  London;  also  a  statement  showing  the  amounts  of 
the  commission  and  other  charges  paid  thereon,  and  to  whom  paid,  together  with  the  amount 
of  the  said  loan  subscribed  for  by  the  financial  agents  of  the  Dominion,  or  by  the  Bank  of 
Montreal,  with  the  dates  of  the  said  subscriptions,  and  copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council 
connected  with  the  said  loan.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  February,  1885.— Sir 
Richard  Cartwright Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

42.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  memorials,  petitions  or  other  documents  relating  to  the  abolition  of  the  duty 
on  grain,  flour  and  coal  during  1884  and  up  to  the  present  time.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  13th  February,  1885.— Mr.  Cameron  {Middlesex) Not  printed. 

4:2a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  the 
amount  of  duty  collected  on  wheat,  flour,  cornmeal  and  corn,  in  the  several  ports  of  the 
Province  of  Nova  Scotia,  between  the  30th  June,  1884,  and  31st  December,  1884.     Presented  to 

the  House  of  Commons,  18th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Vail Not  printed. 

24 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


426    Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,   dated   27th  April,    1885,    for:     1.  Duties 

~  imposed  on  various  articles  in  the  old  Province  of  Canada  and  duties  now  imposed.     2.  Tariff 

in  force  in  British  Columbia  and  in  Manitoba,  respectively,  at  the  time  of  Union.     3.  Length  of 

time  such  tariff  continued  in  force  after  Union.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th 

June,    l8S5.-3Ir.  Watson Not  printed. 

42c  Papers  and  telegrams  respecting  the  Imperial  Act  for  granting  to  Her  Majesty  certain  duties 
on  goods,  wares  and  merchandise  imported  into  this  colony  and  its  dependencies.  Presented 
to,  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  July,  1885,  by  Hon.  M.  Bowell Not  printed. 

43  Message  from  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General,  transmitting  to  the  House  of  Commons 
copies  of  all  petitions,  resolutions,  correspondence  and  memorials  on  the  matter  of  bankruptcy, 
which  have  been  submitted  to  His  Excellency  in  Council  for  consideration.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  13th  February,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald Not  printed. 

44  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  copy^  of 
memorial  from  the  county  council  of  Grey,  praying  for  a  refund  of  bonuses  paid  by  munici- 
palities of  that  county  in  aid  of  railways  which  are  now  used  for  Dominion  purposes  or  tributary 
to  such.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  February,  1885.-Jfr.  Landerkm- 

Not  printed. 

44a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  18th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  peti- 
tions from  the  county  council  of  the  county  of  Elgin,  presented  to  the  Governor  General  in 
Councilor  the  Minister  of  Railways  and  Canals,  praying  for  a  general  measure  of  relief  to 
municipalities  of  Ontario  which  have  aided  railways  declared  to  be  for  Dominion  purposes,  by 
granting  bonuses  to  them;  and  of  all  correspondence  in  reference  to  such  petitions.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  April,  1885.— Mr.  Wilson Not  printed. 


44  b.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  March,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
memorial  presented  to  the  Government  by  the  county  council  of  the  county  of  Simcoe, 
Ontario,  praying  for  a  refund  of  bonuses  granted  by  the  different  municipalities  of  that  county 
to  railways  that  have  been  declared  by  this  Parliament  to  be  works  for  the  general  advantage 
of  Canada,  together  with  copies  of  all  correspondence  and  other  papers  relating  thereto.  Pre- 
sented to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  April,  1885.— Mr.  Cook Not  printed. 

44c.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
memorials  presented  to  the  Government  by  the  delegates  who  waited  on  the  Government  m 
reference  to  the  bonuses  granted  to  railways  declared  to  be  for  the  general  advantage  of  Canada. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  May,  1885.-Jfr.  Watson Not  printed. 

45.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  quantity  and  value  of  wheat  and  flour  imported  into,  and  exported  from  the  Dominion,  by 
Provinces,  during  the  six  months  ending  31st  December,  1884-distinguishing,  in  the  imports, 
the  quantity  entered  for  home  consumption;  and,  in  the  exports,  the  product  of  Canada. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  24th  February,  1885.-i!fr.  Paterson  (Brant). ..Not printed. 

45 a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return 
showing  the  quantity  of  wheat,  flour,  corn  and  cornmeal  imported  into  and  exported  from  the 
various  Provinces,  from  the  1st  of  July  to  the  31st  December,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  24th  February,  1885.— Mr.  Cameron  (Middlesex) Not  printed. 

46.  Return  of  the  names  and  salaries,  &c,  of  all  persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the  Civil 
Service  during  the  year  ended  the  31st  December,  1884,  specifying  the  office  to  which  each  has 
been  appointed  or  promoted  under  the  Canada  Civil  Service  Act,  1882,  section  55,  sub-section  2. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  A.  Chapleau— 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

46a.  Report  of  the  proceedings  of  the  Board  of  Examiners  for  the  year  1884— presented  to  Parlia- 
ment in  terms  of  section  55  of  the  Canada  Civil  Service  Act,  1882,  45-46  Victoria,  chapters  4-7. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  A.  Chapleau— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 


48  Victoria  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1885 


466.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
officers  of  the  Civil  Service,  from  the  resident  Dominion  Government  agent  down  to  the  mes- 
senger, in  each  and  every  Department  (by  Departments)  in  British  Columbia,  giving  full 
Christian  and  surnames,  their  ages,  present  rank,  pay,  allowances,  dates  of  appointment  and 
promotion,  made  up  to  the  31st  December,  1884,  or  nearest  possible  date.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  15th  June,  1885.— Mr.  Baker  (Victoria) Not  printed. 

47.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  copies  of  all  corres- 
pondence, reports  of  engineers,  with  maps  and  plans,  relating  to  the  improvements  required  to 
be  made  in  order  to  secure  a  better  supply  of  water  to  the  Rideau  Canal,  as  well  as  to  open  up 
a  large  section  of  the  country  bordering  on  lakes  in  the  counties  of  Frontenac  and  Addington. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  17th  February,  1885.— Mr.  Bell Not  printed. 

47a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  reports  of  engineers,  with  maps  and  plans,  relating  to  the  extension  of  the 
Rideau  Canal  from  the  village  of  Morton  to  Charleston  Lake  and  the  village  of  Gananoque,  in 
the  county  of  Leeds.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  17th  February,  1885.—  Mr. 
McDougald Not  printed. 

48.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1885,  for  all  papers 
relating  to  the  resignation  of  Capt.  Ludger  Bolduc,  after  the  collision  which  occurred  on  the 
20th  May,  1884,  between  "La  Canadienne"  and  the  brig  "Alliance,"  of  Jersey;  covering 
complaint,  enquiry,  report,  &c,  and  all  correspondence  relating  to  the  matter.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  17th  February,  1885.— Mr.  Landry  Qlontmagny) Not  printed. 

49.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  sums  expended  on  capital  account,  from  the  1st  day  of  July,  1884,  to  the  1st  day  of 
February,  1885,  and  the  purposes  for  which  said  sums  were  expended.  Also  for  statement  of 
the  gross  amount  of  the  debt  of  the  Dominion  on  the  1st  day  of  February,  1885  ;  and  a  state- 
ment of  debts  and  assets  to  that  date,  as  given  in  Public  Accounts,  pages  13  and  14.  Pre- 
sented to  the  House  of  Commons,  17th  February,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Cartwright— 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

50.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
resignation  of  the  Hon.  Judge  Meredith  as  Chief  Justice  of  the  Superior  Court  of  the  Province 
of  Quebec,  and  of  the  correspondence  which  followed  that  resignation.     Presented  to  the  House 

of  Commons,  17th  February,  1885.—  Mr.  Laurier Not  printed. 

506,  1884.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  January,  1884,  for  copies 
of  all  Orders  in  Council,  correspondence  and  departmental  orders,  with  reference  to  the  grant- 
ing, cancellation  and  suspension  of  licenses  to  cut  timber  on  lands  of  the  Indians  near  Fort 
William,  on  the  Fort  William  reserve.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  April,  1884. 
Mr.  Blake Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

51.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  25th  February,  1884,  for:  1.  A  copy 
of  all  Orders  in  Council,  departmental  orders  and  correspondence,  respecting  the  sale,  lease  or 
other  disposal  of  the  grist  and  saw  mill  owned  by  the  Dominion  and  situate  south  of  Calgary, 
North-West  Territories,  to  whom  disposed,  when,  at  what  price,  and  how  paid  or  payable?  2. 
Statement  showing  the  original  costs  thereof,  the  costs  expended  thereon,  when  the  same  was 
erected,  including  working  expenses.  3.  Statement  showing  the  quantity  of  agricultural 
land  or  timber  limits  disposed  of  with  said  mill  or  mills,  or  to  the  person  who  purchased  or 
obtained  the  same.  4.  All  applications  for  the  purchase  or  leasing  of  said  farm,  lands  and 
limits.  5.  Statement  of  the  machinery  in  said  mill  or  mills,  and  the  cost  thereof.  6.  All  other 
correspondence  in  respect  to  said  mill  or  mills,  land  and  limits.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  17th  February,  1885.— Mr.  Cameron  (Huron) Not  printed. 

52.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  all  correspondence 
between  the  Hon.  P.  Mitchell  and  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  in  relation  to  a  timber  limit  or 
limits  on  Jack  Head  River,  with  the  plans  submitted  in  connection  therewith  ;  also  in  relation 
to  timber  limits  on  the  Lake  of  the  Woods.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  19th  Febru- 
ary, 1885.—  Mr.  Mitchell Not  printed. 

26 


43  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


53«    Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,   dated  30th  January,  1884,  for  a  Return 
showing-      1.    The  total  number  of  timber    licenses   or    permits  applied  for  and    granted 
or  refused,  since  1st  February,  1883;    the  estimated  area  covered  by  each  license  or  appli- 
cation  and  the  total  number  of  square  miles  estimated  to  be  covered  by  the  timber  licenses 
issued  during  the  period  named.     2.  The  amount  of  bonuses  or  premiums  per  square  mile,  and 
on  the  aggregate,  paid  to  and  received  by  the  Government  on  each  such  license,  and  the  total 
amount  oFbonuses  or  premiums  received.     3.  The  name  and  residence  of  each  applicant  for  a 
license.    4.  The  date  of  application  for  each  license  and  the  number  of  years  each  license  ,s 
granted  for.    5.  The  Crown  dues  or  stumpage  charged  or  chargeable  on  each  license  and  the 
kind  and  estimated  quantity  and  quality  of  timber  on  each  area  so  licensed     6.  Whether :  m 
each  case,  where  a  llense  or  permit  was  granted,  the  berth  was  put  np  at  public  auction  after 
publi     notL  inviting  tenders  was   given,  and  was  sold  to  the  highest  bidder,  or  whether 
granted  npon  application  or  tender  from  the  grantee  without  inviting  public  competition.     7_ 
Copies  of  all  claims  made  on  the  Government  for  any  such  area  or  timber  by  any  persons,  and 
al   petitions,  remonstrances  or  communications  sent  or  made  to  the  Government  respecting 
such  areas,  licenses  or  timber,  and  copies  of  all  correspondence  had  with  fcft— 
respecting  such  claims,  or  in  any  way  respecting  such  areas,  lauds,  *~^**£*f£ 
action  of  the  Government  therein;  also  a  copy  of  all  maps  and  plans  *OWhg_*b,e  *£>"« 
areas  of  such  licenses  or  permits.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  Wfl*™*}** 
— Mr.  Charlton 

52*.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February  1885,  for  a  Return 
showing  :  1.  The  total  number  of  applications  made,  and  not  granted,  for  licenses  or  permits 
to  cut  timber,  saw-logs,  cordwood,  ties  and  poles,  within  the  territory  ^£*£*»*^ 
the  Province  of  Manitoba  and  Ontario.  2.  The  date  of  each  rejected  application  and  the  name 
and  residence  of  each  applicant.  3.  The  geographical  location  of  the  area  applied  for .and  not 
granted  4.  The  offer  of  bonus,  and  of  Crown  dues  or  stumpage,  in  each  or  any  case  accom- 
panying such  application.  5.  The  reason  assigned  for  refusal  in  the  case  of  each  of  such 
rejected  applications.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  April,  1885  -Jfr.  Blake- 
J  i  F  Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

52c  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  Return 
showing  :  1.  The  total  number  of  timber  licenses  and  permits  to  cut  timber,  sawlogs,  cordwood, 
ties  or  poles,  on  lands  not  within  the  disputed  territory,  applied  for  and  refused  since  1st 
February,  1883.  2.  The  date  of  each  rejected  application,  and  the  name  and  residence  of  each 
applicant  3  The  geographical  location  of  the  area  applied  for  and  not  granted,  and  the  area 
of  the  same  4.  The  offer  of  bonus,  and  Crown  dues  or  stumpage  in  each  or  any  case  accom- 
panying such  application.  5.  The  reason  assigned  for  refusal  in  the  case  of  each  of  such 
rejected  applications.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  April,  1885-Jfr. .Blake- 
J  * l  Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

52d  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  regulations,  not  already  brought  down,  respecting  timber  for  settlers  fuel 
applicable  to  the  neighborhood  of  Moosomin,  N.W.T.  For  all  correspondence  as  to  the 
demands  made  during  the  winter  of  1882-83  by  the  Mounted  Police,  of  twenty-five  cents  a  load 
for  settlers'  firewood.  For  all  correspondence  concerning  the  demand  made  by  a  sub-agent  ot 
Mr.  Stephenson  during  the  winter  of  1883-84,  for  fifty  cents  for  a  permit,  in  addition  to  the 
charge  of  twenty-five  cents  a  cord.  For  all  correspondence  as  to  the  demands  made  during 
the  winter  of  1884-85,'  including  the  demands  of  the  present  sub-agent,  of  twenty-five  cents  tor 
affidavits  as  to  how  much  wood  each  settler  had  burned  since  he  first  came  to  the  locality  ;  and 
for  all  letters  and  instructions  from  the  Department  or  from  the  Winnipeg  office  upon  these 
ibiects.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  1885.-Jfr.  Blake- 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 


sal 


52,.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885  for  copies  of  all 
permits,  liberties  or  other  papers  given  to  any  person  or  persons  to  cut  timber  in  any  part  of 
the  territory  declared  by  the  Order  of  the  Queen  in  Council  to  be  within  the  Province  of 
Ontario;  and  of  all  Orders  in  Council,  departmental  regulations  or  orders  relating  to  the 
matter.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  July,  1885—ifr.  Mills Not  printed. 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


52/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
permits,  licenses  or  liberties  given  to  any  person  or  persons  to  cut  timber  in  any  part  of  the 
territory  declared  by  the  Order  of  the  Queen  in  Council  to  be  within  the  Province  of  Ontario. 
Also  the  name  or  names  of  the  person  or  persons  obtaining  such  permission,  the  extent  of  terri- 
tory embraced,  the  amount  received  by  the  Government,  and  the  amount,  if  any,  still  unpaid 
by  the  party  or  parties  for  such  permission.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  Julv 
1885.-Jfr.JBH. Notprinted. 

52g.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  Return 
showing  :  1.  The  total  number  of  applications  for  timber  licenses  or  berths  in  the  Province  of 
British  Columbia,  and  within  50  miles  of  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  ;  the  date  of 
such  application ;  the  place  from  which  it  was  made  ;  the  name  and  address  of  the  applicant ; 
the  area  applied  for  and  the  geographical  situation  of  the  same  ;  whether  the  application  was 
rejected  or  granted,  and,  if  rejected,  the  reasons  assigned  for  the  same.  2.  The  total  number 
of  applications  for  timber  licenses  or  berths  in  the  Province  of  British  Columbia  and  trans- 
mitted to  the  Department  of  the  Interior  at  Ottawa;  the  date  of  such  application;  the  place 
from  which  it  was  made  ;  the  name  and  address  of  the  applicant ;  the  area  applied  for  and  the 
geographical  situation  of  the  same  ;  whether  the  application  was  rejected  or  granted,  and,  if 
rejected,  the  reason  assigned  for  the  same.  3.  A  summary  statement  showing  the  number  of 
licenses  or  permits  granted  either  upon  applications  made  at  Ottawa  or  made  at  Victoria  and 
transmitted  to  Ottawa,  designating  when  the  application  was  made,  the  date  of  the  application, 
and  the  name  and  address  of  the  grantee.  4.  The  geographical  location  of  the  area  covered 
by  each  license  or  permit  issued,  and  the  number  of  square  miles  embraced  in  each,  and  the 
aggregate  amount  of  the  same.  5.  The  amount  of  bonuses  or  premiums  received  upon  each  and 
the  aggregate  amount  of  the  same.  6.  Full  particulars  as  to  the  Crown  dues  or  stumpage 
charged  or  chargeable  upon  each  license  or  permit  issued  as  to  whether  by  percentage  of 
values  or  specific  charges.  1.  A  statement  in  case  of  each  license  or  permit  issued  as  to  whether 
the  Government  had  caused  a  survey  to  be  made  of  the  same  and  was  in  possession  of  estimates 
made  by  its  own  surveyors,  woodsmen  or  bushrangers,  as  to  the  kinds,  the  quantity  and  the 
quality  of  timber  upon  each  area  covered  by  such  license  or  permit.  8.  Whether  in  each  case 
where  a  license  or  permit  was  granted,  the  berth  was  put  up  at  public  auction,  after  due  public 
notice  was  given  inviting  tenders,  and  was  sold  to  the  highest  bidder,  or  whether  granted  upon 
application  or  tender  from  the  grantee  without  inviting  public  competition.  9.  In  case  of  appli- 
cation by  two  or  more  parties  for  the  same  berth,  and  competition  between  them  for  the 
purchase  of  the  same,  the  name  and  residence  of  each  applicant  and  the  particulars  of  the 
tender  made  by  each.  10.  Copies  of  all  claims,  petitions,  remonstrances,  letters  or  communi- 
cations made  to  the  Government  respecting  such  permits  or  licenses  applied  for  or  granted,  also 
a  copy  of  all  maps  or  plans  showing  the  location  and  areas  of  such  licenses  or  permits.  11. 
A  minute  of  all  assignments  of  such  licenses  or  permits  recorded  with  the  Government,  with 
the  names  and  residence  of  the  assignor  and  the  assignee  and  the  consideration  in  each  case 
paid.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  July,  1885.— Mr.  Charlton Not  printed. 

53.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  March,  1884,  for  copies  of  all 
documents,  statements,  &c,  of  a  nature  to  afford  the  information  asked  for  by  the  following 
questions  :— Whether  the  Government  has,  by  sale,  grant,  location  or  otherwise,  disposed  of  the 
lands  belonging  to  it  in  the  county  of  Richelieu?  If  so,  what  are  the  lands ;  what  is  the  extent 
of  each  lot;  to  whom  was  it  disposed  ;  what  are  the  conditions  of  each  such  grant,  location  or 
sale ;  what  are  the  prices  paid  in  each  case,  and  when  and  how  were  the  amounts  paid  ?  Also 
of  all  documents  relating  to  the  subject  matter  of  the  said  questions,  and  of  those  evidencing 
the  said  transactions.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  19th  February,  1885.— Mr.  Amyot— 

Not  printed. 

53a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  list  of  all  the 
unsold  Indian  lands  in  the  township  of  Toronto,  in  the  county  of  Peel.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  9th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Pater  son  (Brant) Notprinted. 

536.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  stateiv. 
showing  all  properties,  islands  and  other  lands,  whether  built  upon  or  not,  belonging  to  the 
Dominion  Government,  and  situated  within  the  limits  of  the  county  of  Richelieu,  the  names  of 

26 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


the  parties  occupying  the  said  properties  as  tenants  or  otherwise ;  the  time  for  which  such 
properties  are  leased,  the  annual  rent  and  the  arrears  due,  if  any,  on  each  such  property,  up  to 
the  1st  January,  1885.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Massue— 

Not  printed. 

53c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  :  1.  All  sales  of  coal  lands  since  23rd  April,  1883  ;  the  name  and  residence  of  each  party 
to  whom  sales  have  been  made  ;  the  number  of  acres  sold  to  each ;  the  price  per  acre  received 
from  each  ;  the  location  of  the  land  sold ;  the  total  number  of  acres  sold,  and  the  total  amount 
received  from  such  sales.  2.  All  leases  of  coal  lands  made  since  23rd  April,  1883  ;  the  name  and 
residence  of  each  lessee ;  the  number  of  acres  leased  to  each  ;  the  payments  made  by  each ;  the 
location  of  each  leasehold  ;  the  total  number  of  acres  leased  ;  and  the  total  sum  derived  from 
such  leases,  the  considerations  paid  and  royalties  collected ;  and  also  from  all  other  charges,  if 
any.  3.  Copies  of  all  applications,  correspondence,  protests  and  written  communications,  in 
relation  to  coal  lands  sold  or  leased  since  23rd  April,  1883.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 31st  March,  1885.— Mr.  Charlton Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

53d.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  detailed  list  of 
all  the  unsold  Indian  lands  in  the  township  of  Trafalgar,  in  the  county  of  Halton.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  31st  March,  1885.— Mr.  McCraney Not  printed. 

53c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  18th  March,  1885,  for  a  return  of  all  pro- 
perties owned  by  the  Government  for  military  purposes  in  New  Brunswick  disposed  of  or 
leased  since  the  transfer  from  the  Imperial  Government ;  the  parties  to  whom  sold  and  at  what 
price,  and  as  to  leased  properties,  to  whom  leased,  for  what  period  and  at  what  rents.  Pre- 
sented to  the  House  of  Commons,  22nd  April,  1885.— Mr.  Weldon Not  printed. 

53/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  several  amounts  collected  by  the  Dominion  Government  for  lands  sold  or  leased ; 
for  timber,  logs  or  staves,  cordwood,  telegraph  poles  or  other  product  of  the  forest ;  with  the 
names  of  persons  making  such  payments,  within  the  bounds  and  limits  of  the  western  part  of 
Ontario,  as  determined  by  the  decision  of  the  Privy  Council  against  the  claim  of  the  Dominion 
Government.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  April,  1885.—  Mr.  Mackenzie- 
Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

53#.  Order  in  Council,  of  the  4th  June,  1883,  respecting  allotment  of  lands  of  various  colonization 
companies  under  the  land  regulations,  and  to  accord  to  railway  companies  the  privilege  of  pur- 
chasing land  south  of  the  54th  parallel  of  latitude,  &c.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
29th  April,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald Not  printed. 

53A.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  return  giving 
copies  of  all  regulations  or  orders  issued  by  the  Department  of  the  Interior  concerning  the  sale 
or  management  of  agricultural  lands,  timber  lands,  pasture  lands,  mineral  lands  and  town 
sites,  since  26th  February,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  1885.— Mr. 
Charlton Not  printed. 

53i.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  petitions  of  railway  companies  in  Manitoba  and  the  North-West,  praying 
for  grants  of  land,  or  modifications  in  the  condition  and  extent  of  the  grants  of  land  already 
conceded  to  them;  and  of  all  Orders  in  Council  or  agreements  or  letters,  not  already  brought 
down,  aftecting  or  in  any  wise  relating  to  any  railway  company  in  Manitoba  or  the  North- 
West  other  than  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  Company.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 5th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

53y.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  return  show- 
ing :  1.  The  names  of  grazing  land  lessees  who  have  cattle  upon  their  leaseholds,  the  number 
of  acres  in  each  leasehold,  the  date  of  the  lease,  the  geographical  position  of  the  area  covered 
by  each  lease,  the  number  of  the  lease,  the  number  of  cattle  reported  on  each  leasehold,  the 
date  when  the  leasehold  was  first  stocked  with  cattle,  and  the  aggregate  number  of  acres 

29 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


covered  by  such  leases.  2.  The  names  of  grazing  land  lessees  who  have  not  placed  cattle  upon 
their  leaseholds  ;  the  number  of  acres  in  each  leasehold  ;  the  geographical  position  of  the  area 
covered  by  each  lease  ;  the  number  of  the  lease  and  the  aggregate  number  of  acres  covered  by 
such  leases.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Charlton— 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

53&.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  March,  1885,  for:  1.  Copy  of  all 
Orders  in  Council  or  departmental  orders  respecting  south-east  £,  section  2,  township  10,  range 
19,  west.  2.  Copies  of  all  claims  made  to  said  land,  and  the  action  of  the  Government  thereon. 
3.  Copies  of  all  petitions,  papers  and  correspondence  with  the  Government  by  one  Joseph  Bell 
and  one  J.  E.  Kavanagh,  and  all  other  persons,  and  all  replies  thereto,  respecting  said  land. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Cameron  {Huron) Not  printed. 

53Z.  Copy  of  an  Order  in  Council,  under  date  the  4th  June,  1883,  respecting  an  area  of  land 
having  been  allotted  to  colonization  companies  under  the  land  regulations,  &c.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  12th  June,  1885,  by  Sir  Hector  Langevin Not  printed. 

53m.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council,  correspondence  and  papers,  not  already  brought  down,  touching  the 
surrender  or  definition  of  the  claims  of  Canada  upon  any  of  the  railway  lands  in  British 
Columbia,  or  touching  any  change  as  to  the  relations  of  Canada  and  British  Columbia  in 
reference  to  such  railway  lands.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885. — Mr. 
Blake Not  printed. 

54.£Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing:  1.  The  Christian  and  surnames  of  the  present  employes  of  the  Immigration  Office  at 
Quebec,  and  the  nature  of  their  employment.  2.  The  amount  of  the  yearly  salary  paid  to  each 
such  employe  on  31st  December,  1884.  3.  The  amount  of  the  yearly  salary  attached  to  the 
said  offices  on  31st  December,  1877.  Also  all  correspondence  respecting  the  increase  or  non- 
increase  of  the  salary  of  any  employe  of  the  said  office  between  the  two  dates  above  named. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  February,  1885. — Mr.  Landry  {Montmagny) — 

Not  printed. 

54a.  Message  transmitting  the  Report  of  the  Royal  Commission  on  Chinese  Immigration,  aDd  the 
evidence  taken  thereon.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  25th  February,  1885,  by  Hon. 
J.  A.  Chapleau Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  12. 

546.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
commission  and  the  names  of  the  commissioners  appointed  to  proceed  to  British  Columbia  to 
enquire  into  and  report  upon  the  Chinese  difficulty  in  that  country.  The  date  of  the  com- 
missioners' engagement,  the  salary  or  other  allowance  paid  them,  and  the  amount  of  travelling 
and  other  expenses  up  to  the  1st  February,  1885.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th 
April,  1885.—  Mr.  McMullen Not  printed. 

54Lc.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  26th  March,  1885,  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor 
General,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  this  House  a  detailed  statement  of  the 
expenditure  incurred  in  connection  with  :the  recent  visit  of  the  Hon.  the  Secretary  of  State 
to  British  Columbia  and  California.  Presented  to  the  Senate,  13th  April,  1885. — Hon.  Mr. 
Poioer Not  printed. 

55.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  February,  1883,  for  copies  of  all 
papers  and  correspondence  relating  to  the  change  of  mail  service  between  Durham  and  Walker- 
ton;  also  a  statement  showing  the  cost  of  the  old  and  new  service,  and  the  comparative 
efficiency  of  each.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  February,  1885.— Mr.  Lander- 
kin Not  printed. 

55a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  26th  March,  1884,  for  copies  of 
advertisement  calling  for  tenders  for  carrying  mails  from  Kamloops  to  Spencer's  Bridge,  B.C., 

30 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


dated  13th  June,  1883  ;  also  copies  of  tenders  received  for  such  service  ;  also  copy  of  contract 
based  on  such  tenders,  and  the  hours  of  arrival  and  departure  of  mails  from  both  places.  Pre- 
sented to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  February,  1885.— Mr.  Mackenzie Not  printed. 

55 b.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  30th  January,  1884,  for  copies  of  any 
correspondence,  memorial  or  other  documents  from  the  Board  of  Trade  in  the  city  of  St.  John, 
or  other  parties,  in  relation  to  the  conveyance  of  mails  on  the  night  train  on  the  St.  John  and 
Maine  Railway  to  St.  Stephen  and  Woodstock ;  also  as  to  the  conveyance  of  mails  over  the 
Grand  Southern  Railway  to  St.  George.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  February, 
1885.— Mr.  Gillmor Not  printed. 

55c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1884,  for  copies  of  petitions 
and  all  correspondence  between  the  Dominion  Government  and  any  person  or  persons,  upon  the 
subject  of  a  daily  mail  service  between  Port  Townsend,  in  Washington  Territory,  and  Victoria, 
in  the  Province  of  British  Columbia,  being  substituted  for  the  semi-weekly  service  at  present 
existing.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  February,  1885.— Mr.  Baker  (Vic- 
toria)  Not  printed. 

55c£  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  14th  February,  1884,  for  copies  of  all 
petitions,  correspondence,  returns  and  papers,  of  any  nature  whatsoever,  respecting  the  estab- 
lishing of  a  daily  mail  service  in  the  parishes  of  St.  Giles,  St.  Patrick  and  St.  Sylvester,  in  the 
county  of  Lotbiniere.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  February,  1885.—  Mr. 
Rinfret Not  printed. 

55e.  Agreement  made  15th  day  of  May,  1884,  between  Andrew  Allan,  Esq.,  of  the  city  of  Montreal, 
in  the  Province  of  Quebec,  in  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  shipowner,  and  Hon.  John  Carling,  Post- 
master-General of  the  said  Dominion;  and  an  Order  in  Council  in  relation  thereto,  respecting 
the  conveyance  of  mails.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  24th  April,  1885,  by  Hon.  J. 
Carling Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

55/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  in 
detail  of  the  annual  cost  in  connection  with  the  ocean  mail  service,  for  salaries,  allowances  of 
mail  clerks  and  conductors,  or  railway  post  office  clerks  in  charge  of  the  British  mails  ;  also 
for  all  correspondence  as  to  the  landing  of  the  post  office  bags  containing  the  British  mails 
outward  bound  from  Canada  at  Derry,  and  the  saving  of  loss  of  time  effected  thereby.  Pre- 
sented to  the  House  of  Commons,  7th  May,  1885.-ifr.  Blake Not  printed. 

55 g.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return 
showing  the  nature  of  the  mail  service  on  the  Canada  Southern  Railway  between  Essex  Centre 
and  Amherstburg ;  also  the  annual  amount  paid  to  the  Canada  Southern  Railway  for  mail 
service.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  7th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Wigle Not  printed. 

56.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  :  1.  Copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  papers  relating  to  certain  charges  or  complaints  made  against  J.  E. 
Gaboury,  Esquire,  as  postmaster  of  St.  Cesaire,  and  to  his  subsequent  dismissal  from  the  said 
office  of  postmaster.  2.  A  copy  of  the  instructions  given  to  the  person  who  investigated  the 
charges  against  said  J.  E.  Gaboury,  if  any  investigation  took  place,  and  a  copy  of  the  report 
made  by  such  person.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  February,  1885.- Mr. Bechard— 

Not  printed. 

57  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  of 
the  receipts  of  the  post  office  at  St.  Stephens,  N.B.,  for  the  calendar  year  1884;  also  a  state- 
ment of  the  value  of  postage  stamps  sold  at  the  said  office.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 23rd  February,  1885.—  Mr.  Burpee  (Sunbury) Not  printed. 

57a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  postal  revenue  at  Victoria,  B.C.,  from  all  sources,  specifying  the  amount  from  each  source, 
month  by  month,  for  the  eight  months  included  in  the  period  1st  July,  1884,  to  28th  February, 
1885      Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  \885.-Mr.  Baker  (Victoria). .Not printed. 

61 
• 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


58.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  April,  1883,  for  copies  of  all  letters, 
reports  and  other  documents  relating  to  any  complaint  preferred  against  Stephen  G.  Burpee, 
postmaster  at  Florenceville,  N.B.,  since  1st  January,  1879.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 23rd  February,  1885. — Mr.  Irvine Not  printed. 

59.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  a  return  of  all 
sugars  imported  at  Halifax  from  Jamaica  from  the  1st  of  January,  1883,  to  the  31st  of  Decem- 
ber, 1883 ;  also  a  return  of  all  sugars  from  Jamaica  entered  for  the  same  term  at  Montreal, 
either  direct  or  via  Halifax,  giving  name  of  vessel,  number  of  pounds  landed,  value  for  duty  of 
each  cargo,  and  rate  of  duty  per  100  lbs.  of  each  shipment.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 23rd  February,  1885. — Mr.  Vail Not  printed. 

59a.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  13th  March,  1885,  for  a 
Return  of  all  sugars  imported  at  Halifax  from  Jamaica,  from  the  1st  January,  1883,  to  the  31st 
December,  1883 ;  also  a  return  of  all  sugars  from  Jamaica  entered  for  the  same  term  at 
Montreal,  either  direct  or  via,  Halifax,  giving  the  name  of  vessel,  number  of  pounds  landed, 
value  for  duty  of  each  cargo,  and  rate  of  duty  per  100  lbs.  of  each  shipment.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  13th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Vail Not  printed. 

60.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  in  the 
form  used  in  the  statement  usually  published  in  the  Gazette,  of  the  exports  and  imports  from 
the  1st  day  of  July,  1883,  to  the  1st  day  of  January,  1884,  and  from  the  1st  day  of  July, 
1884  to  the  1st  day  of  January,  1885,  distinguishing  the  products  of  Canada  and  those  of  other 
countries.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  February,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Cart- 
wright Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

61.  The  Governor  General  transmits  to  the  House  of  Commons  two  approved  Minutes  in  Council, 
dated  respectively  the  20th  May,  1884,  and  the  23rd  January,  1885,  regarding  the  terms  of  the 
provisional  settlement  of  the  claims  of  the  Province  of  Manitoba.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  23rd  February,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald.— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

63.  A  detailed  statement  of  all  bonds  and  securities  registered  in  the  Department  of  the  Secretary 
of  State  of  Canada,  under  31  Victoria,  chapter  37,  section  15.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 24th  February,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  A.  Chapleau Not  printed. 

63.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  February,  1885,  to  His  Excellency 
the  Governor  General,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  House  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Federal  and  Ontario  Governments,  and  the  Imperial  Government, 
on  the  subject  of  the  Imperial  Act  21-22  Victoria,  chapter  90,  known  as  the  British  Medical  Act. 
1858 ;  the  Imperial  Act  31-32  Victoria,  chapter  29,  known  as  the  British  Medical  Amendment 
Act,  1868;  the  Imperial  Act  41-42  Victoria,  chapter  33,  known  as  the  Dentists  Act,  1878  ;  and 
the  amendments  proposed  to  be  made  thereto  during  the  present  Session  of  the  Imperial  Parlia- 
ment.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  February,  1885. — Mr.  Bergin — 

Printed  {condensed)  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

64.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
reports  of  Government  engineers  respecting  the  construction  of  a  harbor  of  refuge  at  Port 
Stanley  and  Port  Burwell,  on  the  north  shore  of  Lake  Erie,  together  with  the  estimated  cost  of 
each.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th  February,  1885. — Mr.  Wilson Not  printed. 

64a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  any 
memorials  that  may  have  been  addressed  to  the  Government  with  respect  to  the  construction 
of  a  harbor  of  refuge  at  Port  Rowan,  in  the  Province  of  Ontario.  Also  for  a  copy  of  Richard 
Stevens'  report  made  to  the  Department  of  Public  Works  on  the  same  subject.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  8th  April,  1885. — Mr.  Jackson Not  printed. 

646.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for 
a  Return  of  all  reports  of  Government  engineers  respecting  the  construction  of  a  harbor  of 
refuge  at  Port  Stanley  and  Port  Burwell,  on  the  north  shore  of  Lake  Erie,  together  with  the 
estimated  cost  of  each.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  April,  1885. — Mr.  Wilson — 

Not  printed. 
32 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers  A.  1835 


64c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
reports  and  communications  made  to  the  Government  by  the  Port  Credit  Harbor  Company ; 
and  all  memorials,  petitions,  reports  of  engineers  and  correspondence  in  reference  to  the  con- 
dition and  state  of  repair  of  the  said  harbor.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  July, 
1885.—  Mr.  Piatt Not  printed. 

65.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
reports  and  correspondence  not  already  brought  down,  relating  to  the  construction  of  the  post 
office,  Inland  Revenue  and  Custom  house  at  St.  Thomas,  giving  the  amount  expended  to  date; 
also  the  names  of  all  persons  to  whom  any  portion  of  the  expenditure  has  been  paid  ;  together 
with  the  amount  paid  to  each,  and  for  what.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th  Feb- 
ruary, 1885.—  Mr.  Wilson Not  printed. 

66.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
report  made  in  1884  by  the  chief  engineer  of  the  Department  of  Public  Works,  on  the  Church 
Point  and  Trout  Cove  piers.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  February,  1885.—  Mr. 
Vail Not  printed. 

67.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  documents  and  reports  of  engineers  relating  to  improvements  of  the  entrance 
into  Mclsaac's  Pond,  Inverness,  Nova  Scotia.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th 
February,  1885. — Mr.  Cameron  {Inverness) Not  printed. 

68-  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  of 
the  amounts  paid  by  the  Government  to  Messrs.  George  and  Andrew  Holland,  or  any  other 
persons,  for  services  as  official  reporters  of  the  Senate,  or  for  the  short-hand  work  of  any  kind 
outside  of  parliamentary  reporting,  since  1st  January,  1882.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 16th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Auger Not  printed. 

69.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  number  of  dredges,  tugs  and  dumping  scows  built  in  the  United  States  for  the  Government 
of  Canada  during  the  years  1883  and  1884,  showing  where  they  were  built,  giving  the  con- 
tractor's name,  and  the  price  paid  for  the  same.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th 
February,  1885.— Mr.  Jackson Not  printed. 

69a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  8th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all  corres- 
pondence and  contracts  entered  into  relative  to  the  purchases  of  tug-barges,  dredge  and 
machinery  used  on  Red  River ;  a  detailed  statement  of  the  cost  of  the  same,  the  time  when  the 
work  of  dredging  was  commenced  and  discontinued,  the  quantity  of  dredging  completed  and 
the  depth  of  water  drawn  by  the  Government  tug  "  Sir  Hector."  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  23rd  April,  1885. — Mr.  Watson Not  printed. 

70.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  depart- 
mental instructions  and  correspondence  on  the  subject  of  apportionment  of  sea  lots  to  indivi- 
duals desiring  to  place  lobster  traps  in  the  open  sea  off  the  coast  of  Prince  Edward  Island. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th  February,  1885. — Mr.  Blake — 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

71.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  of 
the  amount  expended  in  repairing  the  breakwater  at  Tracadie,  Nova  Scotia,  from  30th  June, 
1884,  to  31st  January,  1885,  giving  the  names  of  all  persons  to  whom  any  portion  of  the 
expenditure  has  been  paid,  together  with  the  amount  paid  to  each,  and  for  what.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Mclsaac Not  printed. 

71a-  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
report  made  by  the  engineer  since  January,  1884,  on  the  cost  of  erecting  breakwaters  at  New 
Harbor  and  Indian  Harbor,  in  the  county  of  Guysboro',  Nova  Scotia,  and  also  copy  of  report 
on  White  Haven  boat  canal.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885. — Mr. 
Kirk Not  printed. 

716.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
tenders  for  the  construction  of  breakwater  at  Parrsboro'  lighthouse  station,  in  the  county  of 
3  33 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


Cumberland,  N.S.  ;  copies  of  letter  from  Deputy  Minister  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  accepting 
the  tender  of  one  Neil  McRay,  and  of  telegram  postponing  the  work  ;  also  all  letters  objecting 
to  the  said  Neil  McRay  as  contractor  and  to  the  bondsmen  offered  by  him,  and  letters  tendering 
other  names  as  bondsmen  if  required,  and  all  other  correspondence  on  the  subject.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Robertson  {Shelbume) Not  printed. 

71c.  Return  to  Order,  correspondence,  reports  of  engineers  and  others,  in  reference  to  the  con- 
struction of  a  breakwater  at  Salmon  Point,  together  with  lists  of  tenders  and  amount  of  each, 
and  all  other  documents  in  the  possession  of  the  Government  relative  to  the  above  mentioned 
work.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885.— Mr.  Piatt Not  printed. 

73  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
for  the  last  fiscal  year  of  the  cost  connected  with  the  heating  of  public  buildings  (including 
wages  as  well  as  fuel)  now  paid  under  a  lump  vote,  such  statement  to  show  the  costs  under 
the  same  sub-headings  as  those  in  which  it  was  formerly  included  in  the  Public  Accounts 
before  the  change  in  the  system.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.—  Mr. 
Blake Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

73.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  number  of  seizures  made  at  each  port  of  entry  in  the  Dominion  during  the  last 
fiscal  year;  also  during  the  six  months  ending  the  31st  December  last;  the  amount  of  fines 
exacted  at  each  port  during  each  of  the  said  periods  ;  and  the  manner  in  which  the  said  fines 
were  disposed  of,  giving  the  names  of  the  officers  receiving  any  portion  thereof,  and  the  amount 
received  by  each  of  such  officers  out  of  the  said  fund.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
2nd  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

73a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885.  for  a  statement 
showing  the  seizures  made  at  the  port  of  Winnipeg  by  the  Department  of  Customs  or  any  of 
its  officers  or  officials,  between  1st  January,  1883,  and  1st  January,  1885  ;  giving  the  estimated 
value  of  each  of  such  seizures,  the  amount  of  fine  imposed  in  each  case  and  the  manner  in 
which  the  said  fines  were  disposed  of,  and  stating,  in  detail,  the  amount  paid  to  each  officer  or 
employe  of  the  Government,  the  name  of  such  officer  or  employe,  and  when  paid,  also  the 
salary  paid  to  each  such  officer  or  employe;  the  disposal  made  of  all  such  goods  seized,  and  if 
sold— when,  for  how  much,  and  how  the  proceeds  were  disposed  of.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  10th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Paterson  {Brant) Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

736.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  number  of  seizures  made  at  each  port  of  entry  in  Nova  Scotia  during  the  last  fiscal 
year;  also  during  the  six  months  ending  the  31st  December  last ;  and  the  names  of  the  parties 
from  whom  such  seizures  were  made,  the  amount  of  fines  exacted  at  each  port  during  each  of 
the  said  periods,  and  the  manner  in  which  the  said  fines  were  disposed  of,  giving  the  names  of 
the  officers  receiving  any  portion  thereof,  and  the  amount  received  by  each  of  such  officers  out 
of  the  said  fund.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  17th  April,  1885.—  Mr.  Stairs— 

Not  printed. 

73c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  show- 
ing seizures  made  at  the  Port  of  Winnipeg  by  the  Customs  officers  or  officials  between 
1st  January,  1883,  and  1st  January,  1885,  in  which  deposits  were  forfeited  or  goods  sold  after 
seizure  ;  giving  the  amount  of  each  sum  forfeited  and  the  amount  realized  in  each  case  in  which 
goods  were  sold ;  and  stating  in  detail  the  name  of  each  officer  to  whom  any  portion  of  the 
money  so  realized  was  paid,  and  the  amount  in  each  case  thus  paid  to  the  said  officer  ;  and 
also  stating  the  salary  paid  such  officer.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  18th  July,  1885. 
Mr.  Paterson  {Brant) Not  printed. 

74.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  reports,  &c,  in  connection  with  the  weighing  and  measuring  of  potatoes  and 
other  roots  in  the  Province  of  Prince  Edward  Island.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
2nd  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Macdonald  {King's) Not  printed. 

75.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
claims  presented  for  drawback  on  materials  used  for  shipbuilding,  for.  the  year  ending  30th 

34 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


June,  1884  ;  also  for  the  six  months  ending  31st  December,  1884;  giving  the  name  of  the  appli- 
cant, the  name  and  tonnage  of  the  vessel,  the  amount  claimed  and  the  amount  paid.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.— Mr.  Burpee  (Sunbury)— 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

75a,  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
claims  presented  up  to  the  1st  February,  1885,  for  drawbacks  on  goods  manufactured  for  export 
(since  the  date  of  the  last  return  made  to  that  House),  showing  the  names  of  all  applicants, 
their  place  of  business,  the  articles  on  which  the  drawback  was  claimed,  and  the  amount  of 
each  claim,  distinguishing  between  the  claims  which  have  been  allowed  and  those  which  have 
been  disallowed,  and  those  under  consideration  and  not  yet  decided,  and  giving  the  reason  for 
such  disallowance.  Also  copies  of  all  regulations  made  by  the  Department  with  reference  to 
such  claims,  together  with  a  copy  of  one  allowed  claim  and  the  sworn  declaration  thereto  of 
each  exporter.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  6th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Paterson  (Brant)—- 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

76.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  30th  January,  1884,  for  copies  of  any  cor- 
respondence, documents,  contracts  or  agreements  with  the  Pullman  Palace  Car  Company,  in 
relation  to  the  company's  cars  running  over  the  Intercolonial  Railway;  also  any  contract  or 
agreement  with  express  companies  as  to  conveyance  of  express  matter  over  the  said  railway. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.— Mr.  Weldon— 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

76a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  20th  February,  1885,  to  His  Excel- 
lency the  Governor  General,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  House  a  copy  of 
the  Order  in  Council  appointing  Mr.  L.  K.  Jones  secretary  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway  Com- 
mission, also  a  copy  of  the  recommendation  on  which  such  Order  in  Council  was  based.  Pre- 
sented to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1.885.— Mr.  Rykert Not  printed. 

766.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  return  of  the 
casualties  to  trains  on  the  Intercolonial  Railway  arising  from  collision,  broken  rails,  or  other- 
wise, for  the  calendar  year  1884;  the  respective  causes  and  dates;  the  amount  of  damages  (if 
any),  in  each  case,  to  property ;  the  amount  of  compensation  paid  to  owners  of  property 
destroyed  or  damaged,  as  well  as  amount  of  claims  for  loss  or  damage  to  property  (it  any) 
unsettled.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Burpee  (Sunbury)— 

Not  printed. 

76c  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  comparative 
statement  of  the  cost  of  working  the  Intercolonial  Railway  for  each  of  the  years  1874,  1875, 
1876,  1877,  1878,  1879,  1880,  1881,  1882,  1883  and  1884,  and  the  number  of  miles  operated  in  each 
year,  giving  for  each  year  the  cost  for  locomotive  power,  under  the  seven  sub-headings  given 
in  the  Minister's  report,  appendix,  page  37;  for  car  expenses,  under  the  seven  sub-headings 
given  in  the  same  report,  same  page ;  for  maintenance,  way  and  works,  under  the  ten  sub- 
headings given  in  the  same  report,  page  37 ;  for  station  expenses,  under  the  three  sub-headings 
given  in  the  same  report,  same  page  ;  and  for  general  charges,  under  the  seven  sub-headings 
given  in  the  same  report,  page  39.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  March,  1885. — 
Mr.  Blake Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

76o".  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  of 
the  revenue  and  working  expenses  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway,  accrued  for  the  six  months  of 
the  year  ending  31st  December,  1884,  under  the  several  divisions,  similar  to  Annual  Statement 
B,  Intercolonial  Railway,  in  the  Public  Accounts.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th 
March,  1885.—  Mr.  Burpee  (Sunbury) Not  printed. 

76e.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Intercolonial  officials  or  the  Government  and  the  Canada  Shipping 
Company,  or  the  Beaver  line  of  steamships,  with  reference  to  the  terms  for  through  rates  of 
freight  over  the  Intercolonial.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  March,  1885.— Mr. 
Blake Not  printed. 

76/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
claim  of  J.  B.  Plante,  of  St.  Charles,  Bellechasse,  in  relation  to  certain  horses  which  he  alleges 
3J  35 


48  Yictoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


have  been  killed  by  a  train  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway,  and  of  which  he  demands  the  value  ; 
copies  of  the  order  referring  the  said  claim  to  the  official  arbitrators,  and  of  their  enquiry, 
report  and  award ;  of  the  second  reference  to  the  said  arbitrators,  and  of  their  enquiry  and 
further  report ;  also  all  documents  and  papers  relating  to  the  matter  in  question.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Landry  (Montmagny) Not  printed. 

76#.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  return  show- 
ing the  quantity  of  rolling  stock  purchased  for  the  Intercolonial  Railway  during  the  six 
months  of  the  year  ending  31st  December,  1884,  giving  each  kind  of  rolling  stock,  and  whether 
purchased  under  contract  or  otherwise,  the  parties  from  whom  bought,  and  the  cost  of  each 
kind  ;  also  a  statement  showing  what  has  been  built  during  the  year  in  the  Government  work- 
shops, giving  each  kind.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885.— Mr.  Burpee 
(Sunbury) Not  printed. 


76 h.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council,  instructions  to  and  correspondence  with  the  commissioners  under  the  com- 
mission issued  in  connection  with  the  claims  arising  out  of  the  construction  of  the  Intercolonial 
Railway,  and  a  statement  of  the  matters  referred  to  them,  and  of  the  moneys  paid  to  them  and 
to  the  secretary,  and  of  the  number  of  days  during  which  the  commissioners  sat,  all  subsequent 
to  the  period  covered  by  the  return  to  the  Address  of  last  Session.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  31st  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Burpee  (Sunbury) Not  printed. 

76i.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
memorials  or  correspondence  presented  to  or  sent  the  Government  by  the  mayors  or  city 
councils  of  the  cities  of  St.  John  and  Portland,  relating  to  the  interruption  of  traffic  between 
these  cities  by  the  railway  crossing  on  Mill  Street,  and  for  the  erection  of  a  bridge  across  the 
said  street.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  June,  1885. — Mr.  Weldon.... Not  printed. 

76i-  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  all  papers,  docu- 
ments and  correspondence  respecting  the  claim  of  John  D.  Robertson  for  compensation  for 
taking  his  factory,  premises  and  land  for  the  Intercolonial  Railway,  last  May,  at  St.  John  : 
the  report  of  Alexander  Christie,  as  appraiser  ;  the  report  of  C.  W.  Fairweather,  and  others, 
as  valuators,  and  the  evidence  taken  before  Mr.  Compton,  or  any  other  arbitrator  before  whom 
the  claim  was  heard.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  June,  1885. — Mr.  Mills— 

Not  printed. 

76&.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  the 
freight  earnings  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway  for  the  year  ending  30th  June,  1884,  similar  to 
the  descriptive  statement  of  the  freight  earnings  of  the  Prince  Edward  Island  Railway,  to  be 
found  on  page  84  of  the  report  of  the  Minister  of  Railways,  with  the  addition  of  such  other 
articles  of  freight  not  contained  in  said  descriptive  statement  as  were  carried  on  the  Interco- 
lonial Railway.  Also  a  comparative  statement  of  the  operation  of  the  Intercolonial  Railway 
for  said  year,  showing:  1.  Passenger  earnings  per  mile  of  road  in  operation.  2.  Freight 
earnings  per  mile  of  road  in  operation.  3.  Gross  earnings  per  mile  of  road  in  operation. 
4.  Net  traffic  earnings  per  mile  of  road  in  operation.  5.  Percentage  of  expenses  to  earnings. 
6.  Passenger  earnings  per  passenger  train  per  mile.  7.  Freight  earnings  per  freight  train  per 
mile.  8.  Earnings  per  passenger  per  mile.  9.  Earnings  per  ton  per  mile.  10.  Average 
distance  per  passenger.  11.  Average  distance  per  ton.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons. 
11th  June,  1885. — Mr.  Davies Not  printed. 

76£.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
contracts  made  by  the  Government  for  the  erection  of  wire  fences  on  the  line  of  the  Interco- 
lonial Railway  and  the  names  of  the  contractors  and  the  number  of  miles  put  under  contract. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  June,  1885. — Mr.  Weldon Not  printed. 

76m.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  of 
all  free  passes  over  the  Intercolonial  Railway  issued  to  persons  not  actually  employed  as  officers 
or  workmen  on  this  road  during  the  year  1884,  distinguishing  between  annual  passes,  passe? 
for  a  more  limited  period,  and  single  or  return  trip  ;  with  the  names  of  the  persons  to  whom, 
the  dates  when,  and  the  occasion  for  which  the  same  was  issued.     Presented  to  the  House  of 

Commons,  14th  July,  1885. — Mr.  Gillmor Not p 

'66 


48  Yictoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


76«.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing : 
The  number  of  free  passes  or  reduced  fare  tickets  granted  to  parties  to  travel  on  or  over  the 
Intercolonial  Railway  from  the  1st  January,  18^4,  to  the  1st  February,  1885  ;  the  names  of  the 
parties  to  whom  granted  ;  the  date  of  issue  ;  the  length  of  time  to  remain  in  force,  and,  in  case 
of  a  reduced  fare,  the  reduction  made.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  July,  1885.— 
Mr.  McMullen  Not  printed. 

77.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  to  His  Excellency 
the  Governor  General,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  House  a  copy  of  the 
judgment  of  the  Supreme  Court  in  the  case  of  the  Queen  against  Robinson,  so  far  as  relates  to 
thenghts  of  the  Provincial  Governments  to  control  the  inland  fisheries  of  the  Dominion;  and 
also  for  copies  of  all  correspondence  between  the  Government  of  the  Dominion  and  that  of  the 
Province  of  Ontario  in  relation  thereto.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March, 
1885—Jfr.  OBrien Not  printed. 

77a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  Return: 
1.  Of  all  contested  cases  judged  upon  the  merits  in  the  Supreme  Court  of  Canada,  during  the 
twelve  months  ending  1st  February  instant.  2.  Of  the  dates  of  final  arguments.  3.  Of  the 
dates  of  final  judgment.  4.  Of  the  divisions,  when  such  have  been,  among  the  judges  at  the 
rendering  of  the  final  judgments.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  March,  1885.— 
Mr.  Curran Not  printed. 

77b.  General  Rule,  No.  265,  of  the  Exchequer  Court  of  Canada,  pursuant  to  section  79  of  the 
Supreme  and  Exchequer  Court  Act.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  April,  1885,  by 
Hon.  J.  Costigan Not  printed. 

77c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
judgments  rendered  by  the  Supreme  Court,  from  the  period  when  it  was  first  established  up  to 
this  date,  reversing  decisions  of  the  Court  of  Queen's  Bench  of  the  Province  of  Quebec,  with  a 
succinct  summary  of  the  reasons  given  by  the  judges.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
17th  July,  1885.— Mr.  Landry  (Montmagny) Not  printed. 

78.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  show- 
ing all  sums  of  money  paid  and  the  dates  of  payment  to  A.  F.  Wood  and  J.  A.  Wilkinson,  or 
either  of  them,  from  the  first  day  of  January,  1879,  to  the  first  day  of  January,  1885  ;  the  work 
done  or  services  rendered  as  valuators  or  otherwise  during  each  year,  showing  the  number  of 
days,  weeks  or  months  employed  and  the  number  of  valuations  made  on  the  Murray  Canal ; 
the  amount  paid  to  the  several  parties  on  the  recommendation  or  joint  recommendations  of 
them  or  either  of  them  ;  the  length  of  time  the  claims  had  been  in  existence ;  the  amount 
claimed  and  the  dates  of  payment,  and  the  amount  paid  and  the  travelling  and  all  other 
expenses  connected  therewith  and  paid  to  the  said  Wood  and  Wilkinson,  or  either  of  them,  or 
to  any  other  person  or  persons  on  their  or  either  of  their  accounts.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.— Mr.  McMullen Not  printed. 

79.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  to  His  Excellency 
the  Governor  General,  praying  that  he  will  cause  to  be  laid  before  the  House  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council,  leases,  correspondence  and  other  documents  in  possession  of  the  Govern- 
ment in  reference  to  the  leasing  of  the  piece  of  property  in  the  city  of  Kingston  known  as  the 
Tete  du  Pont  Barracks.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  March,  1885.— Mr.  Piatt— 

Not  printed. 

80.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
documents,  correspondence  and  contracts  between  the  Government  or  its  officers  and  the 
several  parties  tendering  for  the  supplying  of  wood  to  the  lightship  at  the  Lower  Traverse, 
for  the  years  1883  and  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  4th  March,  1885.—  Mr. 
Casgrain Not  printed. 

81.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  names  and  places  of  residence  of  all  militiamen  of  1812  who  received  their  pension 
during  the  last  fiscal  year,  and  the  amount  paid  to  each  of  them.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  5th  March.  1885.— Mr.  Bourassa Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

37 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


81«.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
charges  against  Lieut-Colonel  O'Malley,  of  the  25th  Battalion,  Ontario;  date  of  O'Malley' s 
suspension ;  date  of  the  court  of  enquiry  into  the  charges ;  also  a  copy  of  the  evidence  taken 
before  said  court  of  enquiry,  together  with  the  report  of  said  court  to  the  Major-General 
commanding  the  militia ;  also  copy  of  report  of  the  Major-General  commanding  the  militia 
in  reference  to  the  charges  against  Lieut.-Colonel  O'Malley,  25th  Battalion  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  12th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Wilson Not  printed. 

81&.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing  the 
number  of  officers,  non-commissioned  officers  and  men  comprising  "  A,"  "B"  "  C  "  Batteries, 
the  Cavalry  and  Infantry  Schools  ;  also  the  pay  and  allowances  of  the  commissioned  officers  of 
said  batteries  and  schools,  with  their  rank  and  names,  and  distinguishing  such  of  said  commis- 
sioned officers  as  are  graduates  of  the  Royal  Military  College,  the  date  of  appointment  of  all 
said  officers  to  the  schools  and  of  their  commissions  in  the  militia,  as  well  as  showing  their 
qualifications  and  the  Provinces  from  which  they  come ;  also  return  showing  the  expenditure 
on  account  of  "A,"  "B"  aC"  Batteries,  the  Cavalry  and  Infantry  Schools,  from  the  1st 
July,  1884,  to  1st  January,  1885,  distinguishing  the  disbursements  on  account  of  pay  and 
allowances,  and  the  names  of  the  parties  to  whom  payments  were  made.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  13th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Lister Not  printed. 

81c  Return  (in  part)  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a  return 
showing  :  1.  Number  and  names  of  the  students  having  passed  or  graduated  from  the  Royal 
Military  College,  Kingston,  in  each  year  to  date.  2.  Total  number  of  marks  received  by  each, 
together  with  the  total  number  possible  to  be  obtained  in  each  year,  respectively,  and  the  per- 
centage of  such  total  obtained  by  each  pupil.  3.  Number  and  names  of  those  cadets  who. 
after  passing  through  said  college,  are  now  employed  in  the  service  of  the  Dominion,  together 
with  statement  of  the  position  occupied  by  each.  4.  Number  and  names  of  cadets  who  have 
been  offered  employment  in  the  service  of  the  Dominion,  and  have  declined  the  offer,  together 
with  statement  of  the  position  offered  and  declined  by  each  respectively.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  16th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Blake — 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

81c?.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  a  return  of  all 
rifle  associations  in  the  Dominion,  their  headquarters,  the  annual  grant  to  each,  with  the 
names  of  the  members  of  each  of  such  associations.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th 
March,  1885. — Mr.  Bergin Not  printed. 

81e.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a 
Return  showing :  1.  Number  and  names  of  the  students  having  passed  or  graduated  from  the 
Royal  Military  College,  Kingston,  in  each  year  to  date.  2.  Total  number  of  marks  received 
by  each,  together  with  the  total  number  possible  to  be  obtained  in  each  year,  respectively,  and 
the  percentage  of  such  total  obtained  by  each  pupil.  3.  Number  and  names  of  those  cadets 
who,  after  passing  through  said  college,  are  now  employed  in  the  service  of  the  Dominion, 
together  with  statement  of  the  positions  occupied  by  each.  4.  Number  and  names  of  cadets 
who  have  been  offered  employment  in  the  service  of  the  Dominion,  and  have  declined  the  offer, 
together  with  statement  of  the  position  offered  and  declined  by  each,  respectively.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th  April,  1885. — Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

81/-  Copy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honorable  the  Privy  Council,  approved  by  His 
Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council,  dated  the  8th  July,  1885,  on  a  memorandum  of 
the  30th  June,  1885,  from  the  Minister  of  Militia  and  Defence,  submitting  certain  regulations 
relating  to  gratuities  and  pensions  to  be  granted  under  the  provisions  of  section  68  of  the 
Consolidated  Militia  Act  of  1883,  to  officers  and  men  of  the  active  militia  who  have  been  or 
may  be  killed  or  wounded  on  actual  service  after  the  20th  day  of  March,  1885,  or  who  have  died 
since  that  date,  or  may  die  hereafter,  from  illness  or  injuries  contracted  on  actual  service. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  July,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  P.  R.  A.  Caron — 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

82-  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  22nd  February.  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
petition  of  J.  Hickson,  Esq.,  and  others,  relative  to  the  continuation  of  the  pension  of  the  late 

38 


18  Victoria. 


List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


John  Martin  to  his  widow,  and  all  papers  in  connection  therewith.     Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  5th  March,  1886.-Jfr.  Curran JSot  printed. 

83.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Honse  of  Commons,  for  copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council  memorials 
and  representations,  on  the  subject  of  the  bounty  on  manufactures  of  iron  not  already  brought 
down,  together  with  all  letters,  accounts  and  vouchers  in  respect  of  claims  made  for  such 
bounty ;  and  statement  in  detail  of  all  sums  paid  or  allowed  in  respect  thereof.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  6th  March,  1885—Jfr.  Blake Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

84.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885  for  copies  of  all  papers 
and  correspondence  between  the  Government  and  D.  J.  Hughes,  county  judge  of  Elgin  or ny 
other  person  or  persons,  relating  to  charges  preferred  by  certain  petitioners  of  ^, 
asking  for  a  commission  of  enquiry  into  the  official  conduct  of  the  said  judge.  Presented  to 
?heHouseofCommons,6thMarch,1885.-ifr.^o, Not  printed. 

85    Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 

85'cfrtmC:te:  for  liquor  sold  under  section  99,  clause  4j  second  part  of  the  0.~da^em^»ace 

Act  of  1878,  by  the  physicians  of  the  several  counties  now  under  the  said  Act  in  Nova  bcotia, 

givng  the  names  of  each  physician  and  the  names  of  the  persons  to  whom  certificates  were 

granted,  and  the  quantity  supplied  in  each  case,  from  1st  January,  1884,  to  1st  January    1 885. 

Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  6th  March,  1885.-Jfr.  Kirk Not  printed. 

SSa  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  :  1.  A  copy 
oftheOrder  in  Council  respecting  the  submission  to  the  Supreme  Court  of  the  case  agreed  on 
oetween  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  Government  of  each  of  the  Provinces  under  he 
Liquor  License  Act  of  1883,  and  the  Act  to  amend  the  Liquor  License  Act  of  1883,  «  to  Vie 
competency  of  Parliament  to  pass  the  said  Acts  in  whole  or  in  part.  2  A  copy  of  the  ad 
case  of  the  factum  of  the  Government  of  Canada  and  of  the  factum  of  each  of  the  sa^ 
Provinces,  the  arguments  of  counsel  in  such  case  and  the  notes  of  the  shorthand  reporter  taken 
during  such  argument.  3.  A  copy  of  the  report  of  said  court  in  said  ^■>A£^"£ 
pondence  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  Government  of  each  of  said  Prov 
Inching  said  case,  and  the  submission  thereof,  and  the  report  thereon  ;  and  all  --espondenc 
between  said  Governments  before  and  since  said  report,  respecting  the  same .and  *££%£ 
in  dispute  and  so  referred.     Presented  to  the   House   of  Commons,   11th  March    1885.     Mr. 

in  oispuw  d  printed for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

Cameron  {Huron)  

*56    Return  (in  part)  to  an  Order  of  the  Honse  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  a 
statement  tarn  the  reeords  of  all  the  votings  held  iu  various  counties  and  crt.es  under  the 
pro"  o  the  Canada  Temperance  Act,  1878,  showing  by  electoral  districts  and  the  vanou 
soTd  visions  thereof,  the  total  number  of  names  on  the  electoral  lists  the  —  « 
polled  for  the  adoption  of  the  Act,  and  the  number  of  votes  polled  agarnst  the  adoption  of  the 
ic     with  the  number  of  the  population  of  each  snch  electoral  district  at  the  time  of    he 

working  of  the  License  Act.    Presented  to  the  Honse  °' Common  s,  13th  >^££j£ 

Bergeron 

85a  Eeturn  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  :  1.  The  amount 
of  revenue  derived  from  the  importation  of  wines,  spirits,  ale,  beer,  porter,  cordial,  and 
ler  liquors  durLg  the  last"  fiscal  year.  2.  The  amount  of  revenue  derived  from  the 
InufaTe  of  the  s'ame  for  the  same  period.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Co— ,» 
March,  1885.— Mr.  Bergin 

8B«.Utot«rn  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  «**»'*££££ 
certificates  for  liquor  under  section  ninety-nine,  clause  four,  second  part  of  the  Canada  Temper 
nc  Act  of  1878,*  the  physicians  of  the  county  of  Halton  ;  giving  the  name  of  each  physician 
and  the  name  of  each  person  to  whom  certificates  were  granted  from  ^J^  *****£ 
the  first  of  February,  1885.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  ™*^™^  J£ 
McCraney •"' 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


85/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
from  the  records  of  all  the  voting  held  in  various  counties  and  cities  under  the  provisions  of  the 
Canada  Temperance  Act,  1878,  showing  by  electoral  districts  and  the  various  sub-divisions 
thereof  the  total  number  of  names  on  the  electoral  lists,  the  number  of  votes  polled  for  the 
adoption  of  the  Act,  and  the  number  of  votes  polled  against  the  adoption  of  the  Act,  with  the 
number  of  the  population  of  each  such  electoral  district  at  the  time  of  the  taking  of  the  census 
next  preceding  the  vote  in  such  electoral  district.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Common.  23rd 
March,  m5.-Mr.Fisher Not  pHnted. 

85^.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  20th  February,  1885,  for  a  return  of  the  amounts 
of  revenue  received  from  duties  or  excise  on  wine,  beer  and  spirits,  for  the  year  ending  31st 
December,  1884.     Presented  to  the  Senate,  13th  March,  lS85.-ffon.  Mr.  Plumb  ....Not  printed. 

85A.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  Charles  H.  Lugrin  and  the  Secretary  of  State,  in  reference  to  an 
appeal  to  the  Supreme  Court  of  Canada  to  test  the  constitutionality  of  the  Canada  Temper- 
ance Act,  between  the  dates  of  31st  May,  1879,  and  31st  May,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  5th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Burpee  (Sunbury) Not  printed. 

85*.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  show- 
ing the  number  of  persons  who  applied  in  the  year  1884  for  licenses  under  the  Liquor  License 
Act  of  1883  ;  the  total  number  of  licenses  granted  in  Canada,  the  total  number  in  each  province 
and  in  each  electoral  district;  the  total  number  refused  a  license  and  the  reason  for  refusal  • 
the  total  number  in  each  province  who  paid  part  of  the  fee  but  did  not  take  out  a  license  ■  the 
total  amount  received  by  the  Government  for  such  licenses  in  Canada,  in  each  province  of 
Canada  and  also  in  each  electoral  division;  together  with  a  statement  showing  what  salarv 
was  paid  the  commissioners,  inspectors  and  sub-inspectors  under  the  Act,  and  giving;  the 
names  and  addresses  of  said  commissioners,  inspectors  and  sub-inspectors  in  every  electoral 
district  of  Canada.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  June,  1885.-Jfr.  Landerkin- 

Not  printed. 

85>  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  5th  February,  1885,  for  a  Rpturn  show- 
ing the  names  and  residences  of  all  officials  appointed  by  the  Government  or  the  Board  of 
License  Commissioners  under  the  Liquor  License  Act  of  1883,  and  amending  Act ;  the  salary, 
fees  and  emoluments  paid  to  each,  and  the  aggregate  costs  incurred  up  to  1st  January,  1885, 
under  the  said  Act,  and  for  carrying  out  and  enforcing  the  same.  2.  A  statement  of  the  name 
and  residence  of  each  person  who  obtained  a  license  under  the  said  Act,  as  well  as  under  any 
local  law.  3.  A  statement  of  all  sums  received  by  the  Government  or  any  persons  appointed 
under  the  said  Acts,  up  to  1st  January,  1885,  as  license  fees  or  otherwise,  and  the  name  and 
residence  of  the  person  from  whom  received,  and  the  disposal  made  by  the  Government  or  the 
officials  of  the  Government  of  such  sums.  4.  A  full  and  detailed  statement  of  all  costs,  charges 
and  expenses  paid  by  the  Government  up  to  1st  January,  1885,  under  the  said  Acts  or  in 
connection  therewith,  or  arising  therefrom  for  the  purpose  of  carrying  said  Acts  into  effect  and 
enforcing  the  same  and  testing  the  constitutionality  of  the  said  Acts.  Presented  to  the  House 
of  Commons,  23rd  June,  1885—  Mr.  Cameron  {Huron) Not  printed. 

85&.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  all 
correspondence  had  with  the  Government,  or  any  member  thereof,  in  relation  to  any  proposed 
alteration  or  relaxation  of  the  provisions  of  the  present  Prohibitory  Liquor  Law  of  the  North- 
West  Territories.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  July,  1885.— Mr.  Foster- 
Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

86.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for:  1.  A  state- 
ment showing  all  tolls  of  the  Northern  Railway  Company  of  Canada,  the  Hamilton  and 
North-Western  Railway  Company,  and  the  Northern  and  Pacific  Junction  Railway  Company, 
respectively.  2.  Copies  of  the  respective  by-laws  of  such  companies  fixing  and  regulating  such 
tolls.  3.  Copies  of  any  Orders  in  Council  approving  of  any  of  such  tolls.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  9th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Muloek Not  printed. 

87.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  number  of  islands  leased  in  the  river  St.  Lawrence,  the  names  of  such  islands,  the  party  or 

40 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


parties  to  whom  leased,  and  the  yearly  rental  payable  for  each  of  the  said  islands  respectively. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Wood  (Brockville)... .Not  printed. 

88-  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  relative  to  the  proposal  to  have  the  waters  of  the  Muskoka  lakes  connected 
with  the  proposed  Trent  Valley  Canal  system  by  the  construction  of  a  short  canal  from 
Gravenhurst  Bay  to  the  waters  of  the  Severn  River.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th 
March,  1885.— Mr.  Cockburn Not  printed. 

89.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  16th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
of  the  various  amounts  of  money  paid  by  the  Government  of  Canada,  or  any  of  the  public 
departments,  since  1882,  to  Henry  J.  Morgan,  for  services  of  any  kind,  or  for  copies  of  a  certain 
book,  called  the  "Annual  Register;"  together  with  copies  of  the  certificate  of  each  public 
official  to  whom  such  books  have  been  delivered.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th 
March,  1885.—  Mr.  McCraney Not  printed. 

89a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  statement  of  all 
payments  during  1882-83  and  1883-84  for  the  Dominion  Annual  Register  to  anyone  except 
H.  J.  Morgan,  with  the  names  of  the  persons  who  received  the  money,  and  a  statement  of  the 
manner  in  which  the  number  of  books  were  distributed.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
19th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  McCraney Not  printed. 

90.  Report  of  Progress  of  the  Geological  and  Natural  History  Survey  and  Museum  of  Canada, 
containing  reports  and  maps  of  investigation  and  surveys,  for  1882-83  and  1884.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  March,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald — 

Not  re-printed  for  Sessional  Papers. 

91.  The  Annual  Report  of  the  Life  Association  of  Canada,  for  year  ending  31st  December,  1883. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885 Not  printed. 

92.  A  statement  of  affairs  and  list  of  shareholders  of  the  British  Canadian  Loan  and  Investment 
Company,  on  the  31st  December,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885, 
by  Sir  Leonard  Tilley Not  printed. 

93.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
papers  connected  with  the  sale  of  the  Dundas  and  Waterloo  Macadamized  Road  by  the  Gov- 
ernment on  the  15th  day  of  March,  1884,  including  previous  applications  by  any  municipality 
or  private  parties  for  the  purchase  or  other  acquisition  of  the  road,  the  conditions  under 
which  the  road  was  offered  for  sale ;  statement,  in  detail,  of  the  expenses  incurred  in  connec- 
tion with  the  sale,  to  whom  sold,  the  amount  realized  and  the  amount  and  dates  of  the 
payments  made  by  the  purchaser,  and  the  balance,  if  any,  remaining  unpaid  at  the  date  of  this 
Order.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  12th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Pater  son  (Brant)— 

N  ot  printed. 

94.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  in  the  case  of  each  election  which  has  taken  place  since  the  general  election  of  1878  : 
1.  The  date  of  certificate  of  the  judge  or  court  showing  the  election  was  void,  or  of  the  com- 
munication from  members  that  there  was  a  vacancy,  or  of  the  member's  warrant  to  the  Clerk 
of  the  Crown  in  Chancery,  or  of  any  other  instrument  under  which  primary  action  was  taken 
towards  a  new  election,  specifying  in  each  case  the  nature  of  the  instrument.  2.  Date  of 
receipt  by  the  Speaker  or  Clerk,  as  the  case  may  be,  of  above  instrument.  3.  Date  of  the  issue 
of  Speaker's  warrant  to  the  Clerk  of  the  Crown  in  Chancery  to  make  out  a  new  writ.  4.  Date 
of  the  receipt  of  the  Speaker's  warrant  by  the  Clerk  of  the  Crown  in  Chancery.  5.  Date  of 
the  issue  of  new  writ  by  the  Clerk  of  the  Crown  in  Chancery.  6.  Date  of  despatch  of  new 
writ  to  Returning  Officer.  7.  Dates  named  in  new  writ  for  nomination  and  polling  respec- 
tively. 8.  Dates  on  which  nomination  and  polling  took  place.  9.  Date  of  return.  10  Date 
of  receipt  of  return  by  Clerk  of  the  Crown  in  Chancery.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
18th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

91a.  Return  {in  part)  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  a 
statement  respecting  each  election  which  has  taken  place  since  the  general  election  of  1878; 
dated  20th  March,  1885.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Blake— 

Not  Printed. 

41 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


95.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for:  1.  Copies  of  the 
petition  praying  for  the  deepening  of  Bras  St.  Nicholas,  in  the  county  of  Montmagny. 
2.  Statement  of  the  amount  expended  in  the  said  work,  the  names  of  the  persons  to  whom  the 
same  was  paid,  the  work  for  which  such  sum  was  paid,  the  date  of  payment,  and  the  report, 
estimate  or  account  upon  which  each  payment  was  made.  3.  Statement  of  the  amount  paid  to 
Jules  Belanger  in  connection  with  the  said  work.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th 
March,  1885. — Mr.  Laurier Not  printed. 

96.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  leases,  agreements  and  statements  of  payments  for  rent  or  taxes,  or  allow- 
ances to  any  Government  employe  for  the  same,  for  a  building  occupied  by  the  engineer  or 
assistant  engineers  of  the  Trent  Valley  Canal  on  part  of  lot  2  west  of  Colborne  Street  and 
north  of  Frances  Street,  in  the  village  of  Fenelon  Falls,  Ontario.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  13th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Cockburn Not  printed. 

96a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  conies  of 
all  correspondence,  reports  to  Council,  Orders  in  Council,  reports  of  engineers  on  the  ground, 
engineers  in  charge,  and  of  the  chief  engineer,  plans  and  estimates  of  cost,  in  connection 
with  the  proposed  Trent  Valley  Canal.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  May,  1885.— 
Mr.  Blake Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

966.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  30th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
advertisements,  tenders,  contracts,  specifications,  Orders  in  Council,  correspondence  and 
other  papers  in  connection  with  George  Goodwin's  contracts  in  respect  to  the  Trent  Valley 
Canal  navigation,  including  all  accounts  and  letters  with  reference  to  claims  for  extras  on 
such  contracts.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake. ..Not printed. 

97.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
of  subsidies  in  cash  and  subventions,  of  whatever  kind,  on  railways  in  the  Province  of  Nova 
Scotia,  including  the  island  of  Cape  Breton,  chargeable  to  capital  account,  since  the  date  of 
Confederation,  whether  in  aid  of  construction  or  acquiring  of  said  railways,  and  the  number 

of  miles  located  in  each  county.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  March,  1885. Mr. 

McDougall  {Cape  Breton) Not  printed. 

97a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council,  reports,  correspondence  and  papers  respecting  the  grant  or  payment  of  any 
subsidies  to  railways  other  than  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  not  already  brought  down  ; 
and  statements,  in  detail,  of  all  such  payments  to  date.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
31st  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

97^.  Orders  in  Council  recommending  the  grant  of  Dominion  lands  to  the  Alberta  and  Atha- 
basca Railway  Company,  to  the  Manitoba  South-Western  Colonization  Railway  Company, 
to  the  Qu  Appelle,  Long  Lake  and  Saskatchewan  Railroad  and  Steamboat  Company,  and  to 
the  Manitoba  and  North-Western  Railway  Company.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
15th  April,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Not  printed. 

97c.  Papers,  correspondence,  etc.,  relative  to  grants  of  Dominion  lands  to  the  following  rail- 
ways :— Manitoba  South-Western  Railway  Company,  Manitoba  North-Western  Railway  Com- 
pany, Qu' Appelle,  Long  Lake  and  Saskatchewan  Railway  and  Steamboat  Company,  Winnipeg 
and  Hudson  Bay  Railway  and  Steamship  Company,  North-Western  Coal  and  Navigation 
Company,  North-West  Central  Railway  Company,  Qu' Appelle  and  Wood  Mountain  Railway 
Company,  and  the  Portage,  Westbourne  and  North-Western  Railway  Company.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  22nd  April,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Not  printed. 

97d.  Copy  of  an  Order  in  Council,  under  date  the  6th  May,  1885,  respecting  the  Manitoba  and 
North-Western  Railway  Company.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  June,  1885,  by 
Sir  Hector  Langevin Not  printed. 

98.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March.  1885.  for  a  statement  showing 
the  earnings  and  working  expenses  of  the  Eastern  Extension  Railway,  from  New  Glasgow  to 
Port,Mulgrave,  Nova  Scotia,  for  each  month  of  the  calendar  year  1884,  respectively.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  March,  1885. — Mr.  Cameron  (Inverness) Not  printed. 

42 


48  Yictoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


99  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
petitions,  letters  and  other  correspondence  between  the  Government  and  any  other  parties, 
relating  to  the  payment  of  wages  due  the  laborers  employed  on  the  construction  of  the  Cape 
Traverse  Branch  of  the  Prince  Edward  Island  Railway.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
13th  March,  1885.-ifr.  Hackett Not  printed. 

99a  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  20th  March,  1885,  showing,  in  detail,  the  total 
cost  of  the  Cape  Traverse  Branch  Railway;  including  the  sums  paid  to  engineers  and  for 
superintending  its  construction,  the  rolling  stock,  stations  and  other  buildings.  Presented  to 
the  Senate,  20th  April,  1885.— Hon.  Mr.  Botsford Not  printed, 

100  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Government  of  British  Columbia  or  any  other  . person  and  he 
Dominion  Government,  in  reference  to  the  troubles  among  the  Indians  at  Metlakatla,  m  the 
vear  1884;  also  all  correspondence,  including  the  Order  of  Council,  referring  to  or  recom- 
mending the  commutation  of  the  sentence  passed  by  the  court  in  British  Columbia  upon  the 
murderer  of  Mrs.  Yeomans.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  18th  March,  1885.-ifr. 
Shakespeare  and  Mr.  Gordon's  amendment Not  print e  . 

100a  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for:  1.  Copy  of 
form  of  tender  for  Indian  supplies  in  the  North-West  for  the  year  1884,  2.  Copies  of  all  tenders 
received  by  the  Government  for  such  supplies  in  1884.  3.  The  action  or  decision  of  the  Gov- 
ernment on  such  tenders,  and  the  reasons  therefor.  4.  Copies  of  all  contracts  made  by  the 
Government  with  parties  whose  tenders  have  been  accepted.  5.  All  correspondence  with  the 
Government  respecting  all  tenders  and  contracts.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  29th 
April,  1885.-Jfr.  Paterson  {Brant) Printedfor  Sessional  Papers  only. 

CONTENTS  OF  VOLUME  No.  13. 

101  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
fish  taken  in  the  bay  and  river  of  Miramichi  and  its  branches  for  the  year  ending  1st  February, 
.  1885  defining  the  separate  quantities  of  each  kind  by  weight,  the  places  to  which  they  were 
exported,  and  the  route  of  transport  in  each  case,  and  the  average  price  received  for  each  kind 
offish;  together  with  an  estimate,  in  detail,  of  the  several  kinds  of  fish  taken  in  that  time. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Macmillan  (Middlesex)— 

Not  printed. 

10ta  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
minutes  of  Council,  reports  to  Council,  and  of  correspondence  between  the  Canadian  Govern- 
ment and  the  British  Government,  or  any  of  its  officers  or  members,  not  already  laid  before 
Parliament,  relating  to  the  so-called  fishery  question,  from  the  1st  of  July,  1867,  up  to  the  time 
of  the  signing  of  the  Washington  Treaty.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  22nd  April, 
1885—i/r.  Mulock Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

1016.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
documents,  plans  and  reports  furnished  to  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  by  J.  U. 
Gregory,  in  relation  to  the  porpoise  fishery  of  Ste.  Ann  la  Pocatiere.  Presented  to  the  House 
of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Blondeau Not  printed. 

101c.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  statement 
of  amounts  paid  in  bounty  in  the  years  1883  and  1884  on  fish  caught  in  Bras  d'  Or  Lakes,  in  the 
counties  of  Cape  Breton,  Inverness,  Richmond  and  Victoria,  and  number  of  boats  drawing 
such  bounty  in  each  county.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885.— .Mr.  Mc- 
Doug all  (Cape  Breton) Not  printed. 

101i  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  return  of  all 
leases  or  licenses  issued  by  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  to  fish  on  non-tidal  waters 
in  the  Province  of  New  Brunswick;  the  names  of  the  lessees  or  licensees,  and  the  respective 
territories  and  streams  leased  or  licensed,  and  the  respective  amounts  of  rent  paid  by  each 
lessee   or  licensee   annually.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,   28th  May,    1885.— if  r. 

Tir  77  Not  printed. 

yveldon * 

43 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


lOle.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
report  of  Mr.  Jules  Gauvreau,  fishery  overseer,  and  all  details  relating  thereto,  for  the  year 
1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885.— 3fr.  Blondeau Not  printed. 

lOl/.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  the  report 
of  the  enquiry  made  by  J.  U.  Gregory  against  Mr.  Clovis  Caron,  fishery  overseer,  and  of  all 
documents  relating  thereto.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Blon- 
deau   .,  .       .   .   , 

hot  printed. 

10 1#.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
report  of  Mr.  Clovis  Caron,  fishery  overseer,  and  all  details  therewith  connected,  for  the  year 

1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885— Mr.  Blondeau Not  printed. 

101A.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  Orders  in  Council,  reports  and  other  papers  in  connection  with  the  removal  of 
Mr.  J.  E.  Starr,  of  Port  Williams,  Nova  Scotia,  from  the  office  of  fishery  overseer,  and  the 
appointment  of  his  successor;  and  a  statement  of  the  distance  between  the  residence  of  Mr. 
Starr  and  that  of  his  successor,  and  of  the  length  of  the  coast  line  of  King's  County,  N.S. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  June,  1885.— Jfr.  Blake Not  printed. 

101?'.  Message  from  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General,  transmitting  to  the  House  of  Commons 
copies  of  despatches,  correspondence  and  papers  having  reference  to  the  negotiations  at  Wash- 
ington with  respect  to  the  termination  of  the  fishery  clauses  of  the  Treaty  of  Washington 
during  the  year  1884  and  to  the  present  date  in  1885.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th 
July,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

102.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1884,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  reports,  Orders  in  Council,  statements  of  accounts  and  other  documents  in  the 
possession  of  the  Government  relating  to  the  claim  of  the  Government  against  the  Allan 
Steamship  Company  for  services  rendered  by  the  steamer  "  Newfield,"  in  1881,  with  a  state- 
ment of  the  Government  claim  and  the  amount  received  in  liquidation  thereof.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Forbes Not  printed. 

103.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  the 
complaint,  correspondence,  documents  and  reports,  relating  to  the  enquiry  respecting  Captain 
Alphonse  Miville  DeChene  about  the  year  1879,  at  St.  Roch  des  Aulnets.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  20th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Casgrain Not  printed. 

104.  General  statements  and  returns  of  baptisms,  marriages  and  burials  for  certain  districts  of 
the  Province  of  Quebec,  for  the  year  1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  March, 

1885,  by  Hon.  J.  H.  Pope Not  printed. 

105.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a  statement  of 
the  quantity  and  value  of  coal  purchased  in  1883  and  1884  for  the  use  of  the  public  buildings 
at  Ottawa,  including  Rideau  Hall,  showing  from  whom  purchased,  the  price  paid  per  ton,  the 
kind  of  coal,  and  where  produced.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885.— 
Mr.  Kirk Not  printed. 

105a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
animal  charcoal  imported  into  the  Dominion,  whether  as  fertilizers  or  for  manufacturing  pur- 
poses, the  value  of  each  kind,  and  the  duties  collected  thereon  at  the  respective  ports  of  the 
Dominion,  for  the  last  fiscal  year  ending  30th  June,  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
27th  April,  1885— Mr.  Stairs Not  printed. 

1056.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
notices  asking  for  tenders  for  supplying  the  fog-whistles  and  lighthouses  in  the  Bay  of  Fundy 
and  on  the  south  shore  of  Nova  Scotia  with  coal ;  copies  of  tenders  submitted,  names  of  party 
or  parties  whose  tenders  were  accepted ;  copies  of  all  vouchers,  bills  of  lading  and  receipts 
upon  which  moneys  were  paid,  and  all  other  information  in  the  Department  in  reference  to  this 
service.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th  April,  1885. — 3Ir.  Robertson  {Shelburnc) — 

Not  printed. 
44 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


105c  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  a  return 
giving  a  full  statement  of  all  coal  entered  ex-warehouse,  free  for  exportation,  during  the  year 
ending  30th  June,  1884,  showing  the  quantity  so  entered  at  each  port ;  the  names  of  persons 
having  entered  ;  the  quantities  ex-warehoused  by  each  person,  and,  if  exported,  the  name  of 
the  vessel  or  railroad  by  which  exported  ;  the  place  to  which  exported,  and  copies  of  all  the 
cancelling  certificates,  showing  that  such  coal  had  been  landed  in  the  ports  to  which  exported. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  7th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Burpee  (Sunbury) Not  printed. 

105i.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  return  of 
the  quantity  of  coal  carried  from  the  Spring  Hill  Coal  Mines  by  the  Intercolonial  Railway  from 
1st  January,  1884,  to  31st  December,  1884,  showing  the  distance  carried,  the  several  places 
where  delivered,  and  the  rate  per  ton  or  per  car  for  the  carriage  thereof  from  the  mines  to  the 
several  points  of  delivery.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885.—  Mr.  Mc- 
Mullen Not  printed. 

106.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  exchanged  between  the  Department  of  Public  Works  and  any  person  whomso- 
ever, in  relation  to  the  construction  of  a  wharf  at  Pointe  aux  Trembles,  in  the  county  of 
Portneuf.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Be  St.  Georges— 

Not  printed. 

106a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  return  of  the 
wharfage  collected  at  the  Digby  Pier  from  the  1st  January,  1884,  to  the  31st  of  December, 
1884.     Also  a  return  of  the  wharfage  collected  at  the  Metaghan  River  Pier,  in  the  county  of 
Digby,  for  the  same  period.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  April,  1885.— Mr.  Vail- 
Not  printed. 

107.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  cor- 
respondence, petitions,  reports  of  engineers,  lighthouse  inspectors  and  others,  in  reference  to 
change  in  dimensions  of  location  of  the  lighthouses  known  as  "Range  Lights,"  at  Weller's 
Bay,  Ontario.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Piatt— 

Not  printed. 

107a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  return  of  any 
memorials  or  correspondence  with  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  in  reference  to  the 
site  of  the  new  lighthouse  at  Quaco,  built  in  place  of  a  former  one  destroyed  by  fire  ;  showing 
what  was  the  purchase  money  paid  for  the  present  site,  and  to  whom  paid  ;  and  showing  also 
who  is  the  present  keeper  of  the  light,  when  appointed,  and  at  what  salary.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  5th  June,  1885.— Mr.  Weldon Not  printed. 

1076.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  complaints  regarding  the  management  of  Bird  Island  Light,  Victoria, 
Nova  Scotia,  during  the  past  two  years.  Also  the  reports  of  the  several  superintendents  of 
lights  during  the  above  period,  and  the  evidence  taken  before  the  several  superintendents 
regarding  the  management  of  the  said  Bird  Island  Light.  And  also  the  name  of  the  person 
(if  any)  now  in  charge  of  said  light,  and  the  amount  of  salary  paid  to  such  keeper,  and  if  he 
is  permanently  engaged.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  June,  1885.—  Mr.  Campbell 
(Victoria) Not  printed. 

108-  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of 
all  Orders  in  Council,  leases,  correspondence  and  other  documents  in  possession  of  the  Govern- 
ment, in  reference  to  the  leasing  of  the  piece  of  property  in  the  city  of  Kingston  known  as  the 
Market  Battery.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885.— Mr.  Piatt— 

Not  printed. 

109.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  the 
document  or  instrument  containing  the  assurance  received  by  the  Government  on  or  about  the 
17th  day  of  April  last  from  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company,  referred  to  by  the  Right  Hon. 
Sir  John  A.  Macdonald  on  that  day  in  his  place  in  this  House,  to  the  effect  that  the  Grand 
Trunk  Railway  Company  would  set  aside  one  million  pounds  sterling  for  the  purpose  of  double 

45 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


tracking  the  line  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  between  Montreal  and  Toronto.  Also  copy  of 
the  report  of  the  denial  of  the  said  assurance  and  of  the  statements  alleged  to  have  been  made 
in  respect  of  it,  by  Sir  Henry  Tyler,  the  president  of  the  said  company,  at  the  meeting  thereof 
held  in  London,  England,  shortly  after  the  said  announcement;  and  copies  of  all  correspond- 
ence between  the  Government  and  any  official  of  the  said  company  respecting  the  said  assur- 
ance.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  March,  1885. — Mr. Mitchell Not  printed. 

109«.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  names  of  all  stockholders  in  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  of  Canada,  with  the 
amounts  of  stock  held  by  each  of  said  stockholders,  at  the  close  of  the  first  year  after  the 
charter  was  granted  or  operations  commenced.  Also  the  names  of  all  stockholders  in  said 
company  and  the  amounts  of  stock  held  by  each  on  the  first  day  of  the  current  year.  Pre- 
sented to  the  House  of  Commons,  31st  March,  1885. — Mr.  Mitchell Not  printed. 

1096.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
in  detail  of  the  several  casualties  or  accidents,  whereby  passengers  were  injured  or  killed, 
which  have  occurred  on  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  and  any  of  its  branches,  and  the  Canadian 
Pacific  Railway  and  any  of  its  branches,  from  the  1st  day  of  January,  1884,  to  the  1st  day  of 
January,  1885,  stating  in  detail  where  and  when  such  casualties  occurred,  the  number  of 
persons  killed  in  each  casualty,  also  number  injured,  stating  whether  seriously  or  otherwise, 
the  several  amounts  paid,  and  to  whom  paid,  as  damages  in  each  accident,  whether  any  law 
suits  for  recovery  of  damages  are  pending,  and  stating  in  detail  what  amounts  are  still 
claimed  thereon ;  also  the  causes  of  such  accidents.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
16th  April,  1885.—  Mr.  Mitchell Not  printed. 

109c  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885, 
for  a  statement,  in  detail,  of  the  several  casualties  or  accidents,  whereby  passengers  were 
injured  or  killed,  which  have  occurred  on  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  and  any  of  its  branches, 
and  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  any  of  its  branches,  from  the  1st  day  of  January,  1884, 
to  the  1st  day  of  January,  1885,  stating,  in  detail,  where  and  when  such  casualties  occurred, 
the  number  of  persons  killed  in  each  casualty,  also  number  injured,  stating  whether  seriously 
or  otherwise,  the  several  amounts  paid,  and  to  whom  paid,  as  damages  in  each  accident, 
whether  any  lawsuits  for  recovery  of  damages  are  pending,  and  stating,  in  detail,  what 
amounts  are  still  claimed  thereon  ;  also  the  causes  of  such  accidents.  Presented  to  the  House 
of  Commons,  20th  April,  1885. — Mr.  Mitchell Not  printed. 

109<i.  Return  {in part)  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  24th  February,  1885,  for 
copies  of  the  returns  as  required  to  be  made  under  the  Consolidated  Railway  Act  of  1879,  and 
the  Acts  in  amendment  thereof,  of  1881  and  1884,  by  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  Company,  for 
the  fiscal  year  1883-84,  in  each  year  separately  ;  and — 1.  The  number  of  miles  of  main  line  of 
Grand  Trunk,  with  statement  of  actual  total  cost  of  construction  and  equipment  thereof.  The 
separate  cost  per  mile  of  construction  thereof,  without  rolling  stock.  The  total  amount  of 
capital  account  now  standing  against  the  said  railway,  including  its  equipment.  2.  A  state- 
ment, in  detail,  showing  the  several  branches  or  side  lines  now  owned  by  the  said  company, 
including  the  number  of  miles  in  each,  with  the  amounts  severally  paid  for  each.  How  such 
amounts  were  paid ;  whether  paid  in  cash  or  securities,  and  the  statement  and  character 
thereof,  in  detail.  The  amount  for  which  each  of  such  securities  was  sold,  and  the  net  amounts 
which  were  realized  in  each.  3.  A  statement,  in  detail,  of  any  railway  line  or  lines  leased  by 
the  Grand  Trunk  Company  or  agreed  to  be  worked  by  them  on  a  percentage  of  earnings  or 
other  terms,  with  the  length  of  each  of  such  lines  and  the  conditions,  in  detail,  of  the  agree- 
ments in  relation  thereto.  4.  A  statement,  in  detail,  of  any  interest  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway 
may  have  in  any  other  railway  or  railways,  with  the  securities,  in  detail,  that  they  may  hold 
in  relation  thereto.  5.  A  statement  in  detail  of  the  net  earnings  of  each  of  the  railways  men- 
tioned in  the  four  preceding  clauses,  after  the  payment  of  working  expenses,  for  the  past 
financial  year,  of  each  of  the  said  railways,  with  a  statement,  in  detail,  of  the  percentage 
that  working  expenses  bear  in  each  case  to  the  gross  earnings.  6.  Whether  any  and  what  amounts 
were  paid  by  the  Grand  Trunk  Company  towards  the  construction  of  the  Toronto  and  Ottawa 
Railway,  and  the  amount  thereof,  with  the  statement  of  the  gross,  as  well  as  the  net,  earnings 
of  the  said  railway  for  the  past  financial  year  of  the  said  railway ;  and  a  statement  of  where 

46 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


these  funds  came  from  ;  also  a  statement  as  to  where  they  appear  in  the  accounts  of  the  Grand 
Trunk  Company's  accounts  or  returns.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  1885.— 
Mr.  Mitchell ; Not  printed. 

110.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
all  properties  or  rooms  leased  by  the  various  branches  of  the  Public  Service  from  private  parties 
or  companies  in  the  city  of  Ottawa,  stating  the  amount  of  rental  paid  in  each  case  ;  also  the 
purposes  for  which  such  properties  or  rooms  are  used.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
24th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Somerville  (Brant) Not  printed. 

111.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  6th  February,  1885,  for  copy  of  the 
lease  of  the  Northern  and  Pacific  Junction  Railway  Company  to  the  Northern  Railway 
Company  of  Canada  and  Hamilton  and  North-West  Railway  Company,  or  either  of  them. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  24th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Muloek— 

Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

112.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement  in 
detail  showing  amount  of  work  done,  contracts  made  and  with  whom,  moneys  paid  and  to 
whom,  and  all  expenditures  in  connection  with  the  improvements  of  Great  Village  River, 
in  the  county  of  Colchester,  Nova  Scotia.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  24th  March, 
1885.— ifr.  Robertson  (Shelburne) Not  printed. 

113.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  :  1.  The  names  of 
all  persons  who  tendered  for  the  construction  of  the  drill  shed  at  Quebec.  2.  The  amount 
asked  by  each  person  so  tendering.  3.  The  amount  of  the  cheque  deposited  by  each  such 
person  in  support  of  hte  tender,  with  the  names  of  the  signers  and  endorsers  of  each  cheque, 
and  the  names  of  the  several  banks  by  which  such  cheques  were  accepted.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  26th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Landry  (Montmagny) Not  printed. 

114.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  copy  of  report 
of  the  Superintendent  of  Burlington  Bay  Canal  of  the  soundings  taken  during  the  summer  of 
1884,  the  plottings  and  cross-sections  made,  showing  the  present  conformation  of  the  bottom 
of  the  said  canal,  together  with  a  statement  showing  the  depths  on  both  sides,  as  well  as  all 
plans  giving  information  in  reference  to  said  soundings.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
26th  March,  1885.— Mr.  Robertson  (Hamilton) Not  printed. 

115.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  report  of 
the  Auditor  General  and  also  one  McGee,  as  well  as  for  all  papers,  letters,  accounts,  cheques 
and  newspapers  connected  with  any  claim  of  Staff  Commander  Boulton  against  the  Depart- 
ment of  Marine  and  Fisheries  or  the  Government  for  any  amount  of  money  which  he  alleges  to 
be  due  him  for  salary  or  otherwise,  or  which  he  asserts  has  been  withheld  from  him,  or  in 
relation  to  any  dispute  between  said  Boulton  and  any  officer  of  the  Marine  and  Fisheries 
Department  in  regard  to  cheques  drawn  in  favor  of  said  Boulton.  Also  a  Return  to  an  Order 
of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  a  return  of  any  papers  or  letters  in  Ihe 
hands  of  the  Government  signed  by  Deputy  Minister  Smith,  bearing  on  the  subject  of  dispute 
or  irregularity  between  Deputy  Minister  Tilton  and  Staff  Commander  Boulton,  or  in  any  way 
relating  thereto  ;  also  copies  of  any  letters  addressed  to  Mr.  Tilton  by  Mr.  Smith,  as  Deputy 
Minister,  on  the  subject.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Mc- 
Mullen Not  printed. 

116.  Papers  and  correspondence,  up  to  the  present  time,  with  respect  to  the  commission  recently 
appointed  to  investigate  and  report  upon  the  claims  existing  in  connection  with  the  extinguish- 
ment of  the  Indian  title  preferred  by  half-breeds  resident  in  the  North-West  Territories  outside 
of  the  limits  of  the  Province  of  Manitoba,  previous  to  the  15th  day  of  July,  1870.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  April,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Printed  Jor  Sessional  Papers  only. 

116a.  Copy  of  commission  appointing  commissioners  to  make  enumeration  of  half-breeds  in  the 
North-West  Territories  previous  to  the  15th  July,  1870.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
22nd  April,  1885,  by  Sir  John  A.  Macdonald Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

1166.  Certified  copy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honorable  the  Privy  Council,  approved 
by  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council  on  the  19th  April,  1885,  for  instructions 

47 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


given  to  the  three  commissioners  appointed  to  proceed  to  the  North-West  to  enquire  into  and 
adjudicate  upon  the  claims  of  the  half-breeds  and  others  in  the  Saskatchewan  settlement. 
Presented  to  the  Senate,  20th  April,  1885.— Hon.  Mr.  Alexander— 

Not  printed.    See  116. 

116c.  Papers  and  correspondence  in  relation  to  claims  for  land  in  the  Prince  Albert  district, 
North-West  Territories.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  27th  April,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake. 

Not  printed. 

11 6a\  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  7th  March,  1883,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  memorials  relating  to  the  claims  of  the  inhabitants  of  Prince  Albert  and 
the  neighboring  districts,  in  the  North-West  Territories,  in  respect  of  the  lands  they  occupy, 
and  to  other  matters  affecting  their  condition.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons  5th  May 
188o.-Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

116e.  Papers  and  correspondence  in  connection  with  half-breed  claims  and  other  matters  relating 
to  the  North-West  Territories.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  June,  1885.— Mr. 
Blake Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

116/.  Papers  and  correspondence  in  connection  with  half-breed  claims  and  other  matters  relating 
to  the  North-West  Territories.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  22nd  June,  1885.— Mr. 
Blake Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

116,?.  Papers  and  correspondence  in  connection  with  half-breed  claims  and  other  matters  relating 
to  the  North-West  Territories.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th  June,  1885—1/° 
Blake Notprinted. 

116^.  Copy  of  the  Official  Report  from  Major-General  Middleton,  C.B.,  commanding  the  North- 
West  field  forces,  concerning  the  engagements  at  Fish  Creek  on  the  24th  April,  1885 ;  Pound- 
maker's  Camp  (near  Crees'  Reserve),  2nd  May,  1885;  and  Batoche,  9th,  10th,  11th 'and  12th 
May,  1885.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  6th  July,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  P.  R.  A.  Caron— 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

116?'.  Plan  and  Views  of  Engagement  at  Fish  Creek  on  the  24th  April,  1885.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  16th  July,  1885,  by  Hon.  J.  P.  R.  A.  Caron Notprinted. 

117.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
reports,  correspondence,  petitions,  &c,  in  reference  to  the  seizure  of  the  schooner  "Lion,"  of 
the  Port  of  Barrington,  in  Nova  Scotia,  in  December,  1883.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 31st  March,  1885.—  Mr.  Robertson  (Shelburne) Notprinted. 

118.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  all  corres- 
pondence with  reference  to  the  making  of  a  road  on  the  Indian  Reserve  at  Fort  William. 
Ontario,  and  the  expenditure  thereon  of  funds  belonging  to  the  Indians,  and  particularly  with 
reference  to  the  payments  to  be  made  to  the  licensees,  for  stumpage  or  otherwise,  for  the 
timber  required  in  the  construction  of  the  bridges  on  the  road.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  7th  April,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Notprinted. 

118a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  and  Orders  in  Council  in  any  way  bearing  upon  the  subject  of  purchase  or 
offers  of  purchase  of  Indian  reserve  lands  in  British  Columbia,  of  a  date  subsequent  to  1st 
June,  1882.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th  June,  1885.— Mr.  Baker  (Victoria)— 

Notprinted. 

119.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing, 
if  any,  and,  if  so,  what  sum  or  sums  of  money  have  been  paid  to  J.  E.  Collins  for  services 
rendered  to  the  Government ;  also  showing  travelling  and  other  expenses  paid  him,  if  any ; 
and  showing  in  what  position  or  capacity  he  is  employed.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 8th  April,  1885.—  Mr.  McMullen Not  printed. 

120.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  March,  1885,  for  copy  of  the  record 
in  the  matter  of  Eugene  Gosselin,  of  St.  Charles  de  Bellechasse,  versus  the  Queen,  as  it  standi 

48 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


in  the  office  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Canada,  including  the  proceedings  before  the  Exchequer 
Court  and  before  Dominion  Arbitrators.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  April,  1885. 
—Mr.  Amyot ? Not  printed. 

131.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of 
petitions  or  correspondence  in  reference  to  making  Ridge  town  a  port  of  entry.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  21st  April,  1885.—  Mr..  Casey Not  printed. 

133.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
sums  (apart  from  his  salary  as  county  judge)  which  have  been  paid  to  G.  M.  K.  Clarke  in 
each  of  the  years  1879,  1880,  1881,  1882,  1883  and  1884,  respectively,  and  for  what  services  in 
each  year ;  also  what  sums,  if  any,  have  been  paid  him  from  the  1st  January,  1884,  to  this 
date.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  April,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Cartwright— 

Not  printed. 

133.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of 
all  correspondence  having  reference  to  the  appointment  of  a  joint  commission  with  the  United 
States  Government  for  surveying  the  boundary  line  between  the  Province  of  British  Columbia 
and  the  United  States  Territory  of  Alaska.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  April, 
1885.— Mr.  Gordon Not  printed. 

133a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  with  the  Government  of  British  Columbia  and  Imperial  Government,  in  rela- 
tion to  the  eastern  boundary  of  that  province.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May, 
1885.— Mr.  Mills , Not  printed. 

1336.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  for  copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council, 
Imperial,  Canadian  or  provincial,  in  the  hands  of  the  Government,  and  not  already  laid 
before  Parliament,  relating  to  the  disputed  boundaries  of  Ontario.  Also  all  despatches  and 
correspondence  with  any  of  the  provinces  and  with  the  Imperial  Government  upon  the  same 
subject.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  June,  1885. — Mr.  Mills — 

Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

134.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885,  for  all  Customs 
collections  in  Algoma  during  the  six  months  ending  31st  December,  1884,  showing  the  amount 
collected  at  Port  Arthur  and  its  outports,  and  at  Sault  Ste.  Marie  and  its  outports,  respec- 
tively ;  also  the  amount  collected  at  Spanish  River  and  such  other  stations  in  Algoma  as 
report  to  Collingwood.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  13th  April,  1885.—  Mr.  Daw- 
son  Not  printed. 

135.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  all  correspond- 
ence from  1st  January,  1884,  to  1st  January,  1885,  between  W.  H.  Rogers,  inspector  of  fish- 
eries for  Nova  Scotia,  also  Mr.  Sellon,  overseer  of  river  fisheries  for  Liverpool,  Queen's  county, 
Nova  Scotia,  also  between  John  Millard,  J.  Newton  Freeman,  S.  J.  R.  Bill  and  others,  and  the 
Government  or  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  in  reference  to  a  breach  of  the  u  Sawdust 
Law,"  by  putting  mill  rubbish  and  shingle  shavings  into  the  Mersey  River;  showing  also 
what  fines  have  been  imposed  and  how  many  collected  ;  if  not  collected,  whether  remitted. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  April,  1885. — Mr.  Forbes Not  printed. 

135a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  1st  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all  cor- 
respondence and  reports  from  W.  H.  Rogers,  inspector  of  fisheries  for  Nova  Scotia,  to  the 
Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  relating  to  the  adoption  of  Rogers'  patented  fish  ladder, 
and  the  places  at  which  the  said  inspector  recommends  that  it  should  be  placed ;  also  any 
instructions  from  the  Department  concerning  the  same.  Also  a  statement  of  moneys  claimed 
or  paid,  as  a  royalty  or  otherwise,  on  account  of  patent  fishway,  stating  by  whom  and  to 
whom  such  moneys  were  paid,  together  with  an  account  of  any  other  moneys  paid  by  the 
Department,  and  to  whom,  towards  the  construction  of  Rogers'  fish  ladder,  the  Return  to 
cover  the  years  1880,  1881,  1882,  1883  and  1884.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th 
June,  1885.—  Mr.  Robertson  (Shelburne) Not  printed. 

136.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  the  names  of 
all  Government  officials  in  the  North-West  Territories,  the  date  of  their  appointment,  and  the 

4  49 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


date  upon  which  they  entered  upon  their  respective  duties  ;  the  salary,  fee  or  other  allowance 
granted  to  each,  including  travelling  or  other  expenses  ;  the  names  and  respective  locations 
of  sheriffs  and  registrars,  the  date  of  their  respective  appointments,  and  the  date  upon  which 
they  entered  upon  their  duties,  and  the  date  from  which  their  salary  commenced  to  run:  the 
receipts  of  their  respective  ofiiccs,  monthly  or  annually,  from  their  establishment  up  to 
the  1st  of  January,  1885.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  April,  1885.— Mr.  Mc- 
Mullen Not  printed. 

127.  Return  {in part)  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of 
all  advertisements  for  tenders,  of  all  specifications,  and  of  all  tenders  received  for  fog  horns 
and  letterbox  fronts,  from  1st  January,  1884,  to  31st  January,  1885;  also  of  all  correspondence, 
contracts,  accounts,  receipts  and  documents  relating  to  the  furnishing  of  such  fog  horns  and 
letter  box  fronts.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  10th  April,  1885.—  Mr.  Laurier— 

Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

127a.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for 
copies  of  all  advertisements  for  tenders,  of  all  specifications,  and  of  all  tenders  received  for 
fog  horns  and  letter  box  fronts,  from  1st  January,  1884,  to  31st  January,  1885;  also  of  all  cor- 
respondence, contracts,  accounts,  receipts  and  documents  relating  to  the  furnishing  of  such 
fog  horns  and  letter  box  fronts.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  22nd  April,  1885.— 
Mr.  Laurier Not  printed. 

1276.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Government  and  one  Captain  Conally,  or  any  other  person,  in 
regard  to  placing  a  fog  horn  or  fog  whistle  on  what  is  called  the  Dummy  Lighthouse,  near  the 
head  of  Lake  Erie.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  1885. — Mr.  Jackson— 

Not  printed. 

127,  1880.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1880,  for  a  copy  of 
any  Order  or  Orders  in  Council  approving  of  the  treaties  made  with  the  Indian  tribes  at  Forts 
Carlton  and  Pitt  in  the  year  1876,  and  of  all  despatches  from  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  or 
his  Deputy  to  the  Commissioners,  or  any  of  them,  communicating  the  same  to  them,  and 
having  reference  to  the  terms  embodied  in  such  treaties,  together  with  the  replies  of  the  said 
Commissioners,  or  any  of  them,  to  such  despatches.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th 
April,  1880.— Mr.  White  (Cardwell) Printed/or  Distribution  only. 

12§.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  January,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the  Captain  of  the  Life  Saving  Service  at  Port 
Rowan,  Province  of  Ontario,  not  already  brought  down.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
22nd  April,  1885.—  Mr.  Jackson Not  printed. 

128,  1880.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1880,  for  copies  of 
all  despatches  from  the  Lieutenant  Governor  of  Manitoba,  relating  to  the  reserve  promised 
under  the  provisions  of  Treaty  No.  1,  relating  to  the  reserve  stipulated  thereby  to  be  assigned 
to  the  band  of  Indians  in  Manitoba  of  whom  Yellow  Quill  was  Chief;  and  of  all  correspond- 
ence and  despatches  from  the  Secretary  of  State,  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  or  the  Deputy 
Minister  of  the  Interior,  addressed  to  the  said  Lieutenant  Governor  in  reply  or  in  relation 
thereto;  also  correspondence  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  the  Hudson  Bay  Com- 
pany on  the  subject.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  April,  1880.— Mr.  White 
(Cardwell) Not  printed. 

129,  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  March,  1S84,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  names,  rank,  present  positions  occupied,  length  of  service  at  sea,  of  each  individual  who 
has  received  a  certificate  of  either  competency  or  service  under  the  Act  passed  last  Session, 
makino-  provision  for  the  examination  of  masters  and  mates  of  coasters  and  inland  waters. 
from  the  passage  of  said  Act  to  the  nearest  possible  date,  for  each  and  every  province  of  the 
Dominion;  as  also  a  statement  giving  dates  and  names  of  applicants  who  have  been  refused 
certificates  of  service,  or  whose  certificates  have  been  for  some  reason  withheld,  and  the 
reasons  for  such  refusals  or  retentions.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  22nd  April.  1886. 
-Mr.  Baker  (Victoria) Not  printed. 

50 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


130.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17 th  February,  1885,  for  copies 
of  all  Orders  in  Council,  despatches  and  correspondence  between  the  Government  of  Canada 
and  the  United  Kingdom,  and  between  the  Government  of  Canada  and  Her  Majesty's  Ambas- 
sador at  Washington,  not  already  brought  down,  relating  to  the  subject  of  extradition  and 
extradition  arrangements.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  April,  1885.— Mr.  Blake- 
Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

130<i.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
with  reference  to  the  cases  in  which  demands  for  extradition  have  been  made  by  or  upon  the 
Government  of  Canada,  or  in  which  extradition  proceedings  have  been  taken  in  continuation 
of,  and  in  the  same  form  as,  the  statement  transmitted  by  the  Government  of  Canada  to  the 
Government  of  the  United  Kingdom,  in  or  about  the  year  1876.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  5th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

131.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  20th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of 
the  Order  in  Council  creating  the  Forestry  Commission,  and  appointing  Mr.  J.  H.  Morgan  as 
such  commissioner;  also  a  copy  of  the  recommendation  on  which  such  Order  in  Council  was 
based.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  23rd  April,  1885. — J/r.  Rykerl Not -printed. 

131a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  copy  of 
Order  in  Council  appointing  J.  H.  Morgan  as  Forestry  Commissioner ;  also  copy  of  instruc- 
tions accompanying  the  same  ;  also  date  of  report  from  the  said  J.  H.  Morgan  which  appears 
as  part  of  the  last  report  of  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  and  copies  of  any  subsequent  reports 
and  the  date  on  which  the  same  were  received  by  the  Department;  also  statement  of  any 
payments  made  to  the  said  J.  H.  Morgan  subsequent  to  those  appearing  in  the  Public  Accounts 
of  1884.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Paterson  (Brant)— 

Not  printed. 

132.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  6th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all  exports  from 
ports  on  Hudson  and  James  Bays,  other  than  York  Factory,  of  furs,  fish,  whale,  seal  or  porpoise 
oil.     Presented  to  the  Senate,  20th  April,  1885.—  Hon.  Mr.  Schultz Not  printed. 

133.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
correspondence  and  petitions  from  mariners,  vessel  owners  and  others,  not  already  brought 
down,  relative  to  the  selection  of  a  route  for  the  construction  of  the  Murray  Canal,  or  the 
character  of  the  harbors  afforded  by  Presqu'Isle  and  Weller's  Bay  respectively.  Also  all  offers 
made  by  tenders  or  otherwise  to  construct  said  canal  by  any  other  than  the  adopted  route, 
together  with  all  reports  as  to  progress  of  work  of  construction  in  possession  of  the  Govern- 
ment.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885.— Mr.  Cockburn Not  printed. 

134.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  any 
orders  or  instructions  of  the  Railway  Department  as  to  the  sale  of  return  tickets,  limiting 
the  periods  in  which  such  tickets  can  be  used  ;  also  of  any  claims  made  by  persons  holding 
such  tickets  for  damages  for  being  ejected  from  the  cars,  and  what  amounts,  if  any,  have  been 
paid  for  such  claims.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  5th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Weldon— 

Not  printed. 

135-  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of 
all  correspondence  and  petitions  to  the  Postmaster  General,  or  any  member  of  the  Govern- 
ment, with  reference  to  the  adoption  in  Canada  of  a  system  to  encourage  small  savings,  similar 
to  that  brought  in  by  the  late  Mr.  Fawcett  in  England.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons, 
7th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

136.  Return  to  an  Address  presented  by  the  Senate  to  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General, 
dated  17th  March,  1885,  praying  His  Excellency  to  cause  to  be  laid  before  this  House,  copies  of 
the  reports  of  the  various  surveys  made  by  engineers  under  the  direction  of  the  Government, 
for  a  line  of  railway  connecting  Montreal  with  the  harbors  of  St.  John  and  Halifax  by  the 
shortest  and  best  practicable  route  (including  the  reports  of  Messrs.  A.  L.  Light  and  Vernon 
Smith  on  the  lines  surveyed  by  them,  respectively,  running  up  the  valley  of  the  Etchemin 
River  and  from  Canterbury,  New  Brunswick,  to  the  northern  end  of  Chesuucook  Lake,  in  the 

51 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


State  of  Maine)  ;  together  with  a  statement  showing  the  height  of  the  summit  level,  the  maxi- 
mum grade  per  mile,  the  number  of  miles  with  a  grade  exceeding  42  feet,  the  average  grade 
per  mile,  and  the  number  and  position  of  the  curves  with  a  less  radius  than  1,910  feet,  upon 
each  of  such  surveyed  lines,  as  well  as  upon  any  existing  railway  proposed  to  be  used  in  con- 
nection with  any  such  surveyed  lines ;  and  also  a  detailed  statement  of  the  distances  from 
Montreal  to  St.  John  and  Halifax  by  each  of  such  surveyed  lines  and  the  existing  railways 
proposed  to  be  used  in  connection  therewith.  Presented  to  the  Senate,  5th  May,  1885. — Hon. 
Mr.  Power Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

136a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  3rd  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council,  instructions  given,  reports  of  engineers,  and  all  documents  whatsoever,  in 
relation  to  the  selection  of  the  shortest  and  best  line  for  a  railway  between  the  present  terminus 
of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  one  of  the  seaports  of  the  Maritime  Provinces.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  20th  July,  1885. — Mr.  Landry  (Montmayny) Not  printed. 

137.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  Orders  in  Council,  contracts,  and  other  papers  in  connection  with  the  pro- 
jected railway  between  Oxford  and  New  Glasgow,  in  Nova  Scotia,  or  in  relation  to  any  of  the 
companies  or  individuals  negotiating  for  the  construction  of  any  part  of  the  projected  short 
line  within  the  bounds  of  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia,  and  particularly  an  instrument  signed 
by  Sir  Charles  Tupper,  the  Minister  of  Railways,  about  the  9th  May,  1884,  whereby  he,  as 
representing  the  Crown,  entered  into  certain  engagements  with  Norvin  Green,  president  of 
the  Montreal  and  European  Short  Line  Company,  or  with  that  company  ;  and  of  all  Order3 
or  arrangements  cancelling  the  said  agreement ;  and  of  the  evidence  as  to  the  ability  of  the 
company  on  which  said  agreement  was  made  ;  and  of  all  Orders  and  authorities  under  which 
the  Oxford  Branch  Railway  was  completed  or  money  thereon  expended  out  of  the  Intercolonial 
appropriation;  and  of  all  agreements  in  connection  with  such  expenditure,  and  of  all  state- 
ments, representations  and  letters  made  by  or  on  behalf  of  contractors,  companies,  railway 
companies,  construction  companies,  laborers,  merchants  or  others,  who  have  been  concerned 
in  the  work,  and  of  all  reports  made  to  any  department  or  to  Council  upon  any  of  the  above 
subjects.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  8th  May,  1885. — Mr.  Blake — 

Printed/or  Sessional  Papers  only. 

137«.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885, 
for  copies  of  all  correspondence,  Orders  in  Council,  contracts  and  other  papers  in  connection 
with  the  projected  railway  between  Oxford  and  New  Glasgow,  in  Nova  Scotia,  or  in  relation 
to  any  of  the  companies  or  individuals  negotiating  for  the  construction  of  any  part  of  the 
projected  Short  Line  within  the  bounds  of  the  Province  of  Nova  Scotia ;  and  particularly  an 
instrument  signed  by  Sir  Charles  Tupper,  then  Minister  of  Railways,  about  9th  May,  1884, 
whereby  he,  as  representing  the  Crown,  entered  into  certain  engagements  with  Norvin  Green, 
president  of  the  Montreal  and  European  Short  Line  Company,  or  with  that  company  ;  and  of 
all  Orders  or  arrangements  cancelling  the  said  agreement,  and  of  the  evidence  as  to  the  ability 
of  the  company  on  which  said  agreement  was  made  ;  and  of  all  Orders  and  authorities  under 
which  the  Oxford  Branch  Railway  was  completed,  or  money  thereon  expended  out  of  the 
Intercolonial  appropriation,  and  of  all  agreements  in  connection  with  such  expenditure  ;  and  of 
all  statements,  representations  and  letters  made  by  or  on  behalf  of  contractors,  companies, 
railway  companies,  construction  companies,  laborers,  merchants  or  others,  who  have  been 
concerned  in  the  work ;  and  of  all  reports  made  to  any  department  or  to  Council  upon  any  of 
the  above  subjects.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885— Mr.  Mills — 

Not  printed. 

1376-  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of 
all  reports  made  by  engineers  employed  by  the  Great  American  and  European  Short  Line  Rail- 
way Company  in  Nova  Scotia  and  Cape  Breton,  with  the  plans,  papers  and  correspondence 
connected  therewith  ;  also  for  copies  of  all  correspondence  with  the  Dominion  Government  and 
the  Government  of  Nova  Scotia  on  the  same  subject ;  also  copies  of  all  contracts  by  and  between 
the  said  company  and  other  persons  ;  also  a  statement  of  all  moneys  paid  out  and  expended  on 
contracts  for  salaries,  wages  and  labor  ;  showing  also  the  amounts,  if  any,  still  due  and  owing 
by  the  said  company  to  their  contractors,  agents  or  workmen ;  and  also  a  statement  of  the 

52 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A,  1885 


number  of  miles  completed  and  graded  in  each  of  the  counties  of  Cumberland,  Colchester  and 
Pictou.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885. — Mr.  Paint Not  printed. 

13S.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
reports,  correspondence,  and  surveys,  if  any,  in  the  Department  of  Public  Works,  as  to  the 
improvement  of  the  North  Saskatchewan  River,  for  the  purpose  of  navigation.  Presented  to 
the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  McCallum—> 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

139.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  all  letters 
and  correspondence  had  between  the  Dominion  Government  or  any  of  its  members  and  the 
Local  Government  of  New  Brunswick  or  any  of  its  members,  on  the  subject  of  the  building 
of  a  foot  and  carriage  bridge  on  the  St.  John  River,  at  or  near  Fredericton.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  11th  May,  1885. — J/r.  Landry  {Kent) Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

139a.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for 
all  letters  and  correspondence  had  between  the  Dominion  Government  or  any  of  its  members 
and  the  Local  Government  of  New  BrunsAvick,  or  any  of  its  members,  on  the  subject  of  the 
building  of  a  foot  and  carriage  bridge  on  the  St.  John  River,  at  or  near  Fredericton.  Presented 
to  the  House  of  Commons,  9th  June,  1885.— Mr.  Landry  {Kent).. Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

HO.  Reports  of  Messrs.  Perley  and  Guerin  as  to  works  respecting  which  application  has  been 
made  on  the  River  Ottawa  and  Lake  Temiscaming ;  together  with  the  memorandum  of  the 
Reverend  Father  Paradis,  O.M.I.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  May,  1885,  by  Sir 
Hector  Langevin ...Printed  for  Distribution  only. 

141.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  28th  March,  1884,  showing  the  total 
cost  of  old  and  new  works,  with  expenditure  for  repairs  and  maintenance  in  each  year  since 
Confederation  :  1.  For  cost  of  Welland  Canal.  2.  For  new  works,  repairs,  and  all  incidental 
expenses  connected  therewith.  3.  For  maintenance.  4.  For  revenue  derived  therefrom.  5. 
For  return  similar  to  that  contained  in  1,  2,  3  and  4,  connected  with  the  St.  Lawrence  Canals. 
6.  For  estimated  cost  for  deepening  and  completing  the  St.  Lawrence  Canals  to  a  depth  of 
twelve  and  fourteen  feet,  separately.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  May,  1885. — 
Mr.  McCraney Not  printed. 

142.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  of 
instructions  to  the  health  officers  of  the  ports  in  the  Province  of  New  Brunswick,  and  quaran- 
tine regulations  issued  by  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  or  the  Department  of  Agri- 
culture relating  to  thes,e  ports.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  16th  May,  1885. — Mr. 
Weldon Not  printed. 

143.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  actual  cost  of  laying  the  telegraph  cable  from  Clover  Point,  Victoria,  British  Columbia, 
accross  the  Straits  of  Juan  de  Fuca  to  a  point  at  or  near  Dungeness,  W.T. ;  said  return  to  give 
the  names  of  persons  to  whom  sums  have  been  paid ;  the  nature  and  extent  of  services 
rendered,  entitling  them  to  such  payments ;  the  cost  of  the  cable,  time  occupied  in  laying  said 
cable,  and  its  length.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  18th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Baker 
{Victoria) Not  printed. 

144.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  March,  1885,  for  :  1.  Copies 
of  all  demands  and  claims  made  by  the  town  of  Emerson  on  the  Government  for  financial  or 
other  aid,  and  all  correspondence  respecting  the  same.  2.  Copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council  or 
departmental  orders  respecting  such  demands  or  claim,  and  the  action  or  decision  of  the 
Government  thereon.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  18th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Cameron 
{Huron) Not  printed. 

145.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  17th  February,  1885,  for  a  statement 
showing  the  names  of  all  persons  employed  by  the  Department  of  Public  Works  or  otner 
department  of  the  Government  as  inspectors  or  clerks  of  works  on  any  building  or  other 
public  work  since  1873-74  until  1883-84  inclusive,  with  statement  showing  the  amount  paid  to 

53 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


such  persons  for  services  as  such  officials,  and  the  rate  per  month  or  per  diem  to  each  ;  also  the 
gross  amount  expended  by  the  Government  in  each  year  on  such  works  under  the  inspection 
of  each  clerk  of  works  ;  also  a  statement  showing  the  actual  profession  or  calling  of  each  such 
clerk  of  works.   Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2Gth  May,  1885.— Sir  Richard  Carlwright— 

Not  printed. 

116.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  all  the  corres- 
pondence, papers  and  report  of  the  officers  of  Customs  at  the  port  of  Halifax  and  any  other 
port,  in  connection  with  the  entry  by  A.  &  W.  Mackinlay,  as  agents  of  Thomas  Nelson  &  Son, 
of  school  books  at  an  undervaluation.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  May,  1885. — 
Mr.  Eykert Not  printed. 

146a.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  all  papers, 
correspondence  and  reports  with  reference  to  Nelson  &  Son's  consignment  of  school  books  to 
the  late  firm  of  James  Campbell  &  Sons,  Toronto.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th 
May,  1885. — Mr.  Wallace  {York) Not  printed. 

1-106.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  all  the  corres- 
pondence, papers  and  report  of  the  officer  of  Customs  for  the  port  of  Toronto,  in  connection 
with  the  seizure  of  school  books  entered  at  an  undervaluation  by  Thomas  Nelson  &  Son. 
Edinburgh.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  May,  1885.— Mr.  Rykert... .Not  printed. 

116c.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for 
a  Return  of  all  papers,  correspondence  and  reports  with  reference  to  Nelson  &  Son's  consign- 
ments of  school  books  to  the  late  firm  of  James  Campbell  &  Sons,  Toronto.  Presented  to  the 
House  of  Commons,  26th  June,    1885.— J/r.  Wallace  {York) Notprinted. 

MOii.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for 
a  Return  of  all  the  correspondence,  papers  and  report  of  the  officer  of  Customs  at  the  port  of 
Halifax,  and  any  other  port,  in  connection  with  the  entry  by  A.  &  W.  Mackinlay,  as  agents  of 
Thos.  Nelson  &  Son,  of  school  books  at  an  undervaluation.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Com- 
mons, 26th  June,  1885. — Mr.  Rykert Not  printed. 

146e.  Supplementary  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885, 
for  a  Return  of  all  the  correspondence,  papers  and  report  of  the  officer  of  Customs  at  the  port 
of  Toronto,  in  connection  with  the  seizure  of  school  books  entered  at  an  undervaluation  by 
Thos.  Nelson  &  Son,  of  Edinburgh.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  26th  June,  1885.— 
Mr.  Rykert Not  printed. 

147.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing  : 
1.  The  detailed  amounts  actually  due  to  the  Supervisor  of  Cullers  at  Quebec  for  culling  and 
measuring.  2.  The  names  of  all  parties  indebted,  and  the  date  of  incurring  of  each  liability. 
Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885.—  Mr.  Be  St.  Georges .....Not  printed. 

148.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council,  agreements  and  correspondence  in  the  possession  of  the  Government  since 
1872,  respecting  the  Windsor  Branch  Railway;  also  copies  of  pleadings  and  verdicts  in  the 
various  suits  at  law  respecting  the  same  branch.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  Oth 
June,  1885.— Mr.  Kinney ■. Not  printed. 

149.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  Oth  March,  1885,  for  all  corres- 
pondence between  the  Auditor-General  and  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  relating 
to  an  Order  of  thi ■■;  House  made  on  the  28th  March  last,  for  a  return  showing  all  sums  received 
by  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  on  account  of  rental  of  rivers  and  streams,  &c.  ; 
or  in  any  way  relating  to  any  irregularity  or  inaccuracy  connected  witli  matters  of  the  said 
Department.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  28th  May,  1885.— Mr.  McMullen— 

Not  printed. 

150.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the   House  of  Commons,    dated  8th   April.    1885,  for  all  papers 
concerning  the  appointment,  instruction  and  salary  of  Mr.  Hector  Fabre.  as  Canadian  agent 
at  Paris,  France,  and  the  reports  from  that  gentleman  to  the  Government  since  his  appoint- 
ment.    Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  2nd  June,  1885.— Mr.  Bergeron- 
Printed  for  Distribution  onh>, 

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48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  A.  1885 


131.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence  which  has  taken  place  between  the  Dominion  Government  and  the  Local 
Government  of  New  Brunswick,  with  reference  to  the  Northern  and  Western  Railway,  since 
May,  1884,  up  to  February,  18S5.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  11th  June,  1885 — Mr. 
Temple Not  printed. 

152.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  Senate,  dated  20th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all  memorials, 
letters  or  telegrams  addressed  to  the  Railway  Department,  respecting  the  establishment  of  the 
York  station  on  the  Prince  Edward  Island  Railway,  and  the  answers  thereto;  also  copies  of 
any  memorials,  letters  or  telegrams,  which  may  have  been  received  by  that  Department,  having 
reference  to  the  abolition  of  the  said  station,  and  the  replies,  if  any,  made  thereto.  Presented 
to  the  Senate,  16th  June,  1885. — Hon.  Mr.  Haythorne Not  printed. 

153.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  amount  of  money  paid  for  injuries  to  parties  in  the  Mounted  Police  since  1878,  specifying 
the  names  of  the  parties  injured,  the  nature  of  the  injuries,  the  amount  of  money  paid,  and  to 
whom  paid.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  7th  April,  1885. — Mr.  Somerville  (Brant)— 

Not  printed. 

153a.  Annual  Report  of  the  Commissioner  of  the  North-West  Mounted  Police  Force  for  the  year 
1884.     Presented  to  t«he  House  of  Commons,  23rd  June,  1885.— Sir  John  A.  Macdonald— 

Printed  for  both  Distribution  and  Sessional  Papers. 

154.  Return  (in  two  parts)  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for 
a  return  showing  : — 1.  Total  number  of  depositors  in  the  Savings  Banks,  Post  Office,  or  other 
banks  holding  deposits  of  $1,000  or  upwards;  also  the  amount  so  held.  2.  Total  number  of 
depositors  having  deposits  of  less  than  $1,000  and  more  than  $500  each;  also  the  total  amount 
so  held.  3.  Total  number  of  said  depositors  holding  less  than  $500  each;  also  total  amount 
so  held.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th  June,  1885. — Sir  Richard  Cartwright  and 
Mr.  Fairbank Not  printed. 

155.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all  cor- 
respondence and  papers  relative  to  the  dismissal  of  George  E.  Chewier  from  the  Indian  Agency 
in  Caughnawaga;  also  of  the  reports  of  the  investigation  into  the  affairs  of  the  agency  held 
by  Mr.  de  Boucherville  in  1883,  and  by  A.  Dingman  in  1884,  with  copies  of  all  instructions  at 
any  time  given  by  the  Department  to  Mr.  Cherrier.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  30th 
June,  1885. — Mr.  Bain  (Wentworth) Not  printed. 

156-  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
hardware  purchased  at  Halifax  by  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries,  from  1st  July, 
1878,  to  31st  December,  1884;  the  names  of  the  firms  who  furnished  the  supplies,  amount 
supplied  by  each  firm  in  each  year;  the  names  of  the  firms  who  supplied  stoves,  galvanized 
and  tinware,  in  each  year  from  1st  October,  1878,  to  31st  December,  1884,  showing  if  by  tender, 
whose  tender  was  accepted,  and  if  tenders  asked  for  each  year.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  30th  June,  1885* — Mr.  Forbes Not  printed. 

157.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  11th  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing 
the  number  of  days  W.  Ingles  Bradley,  a  clerk  in  the  Department  of  Railways,  has  been  regis- 
tered on  the  Departmental  Attendance  Book  since  1st  July,  1884;  also  showing  the  number  of 
days'  attendance  for  which  he  has  received  payment,  and  the  total  amount  paid,  together 
with  the  name  of  the  departmental  officer  certifying  the  account.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  14th  July,  1885.—  Mr.  Somerville  (Brant)... Not  printed. 

158.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  copies  of  all  cor- 
respondence of  a  recent  date  between  the  Superintendent  General  of  Indian  Affairs  and  the 
agent  of  the  Department  in  British  Columbia,  or  any  other  person,  upon  the  subject  of  estab- 
lishing Indian  schools  in  said  province.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885. 
—  Mr.  Baker  (Victoria) Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 

55 


48  Victoria.  List  of  Sessional  Papers.  Aj  1885 


158a.  Return  to  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  27th  April,  1885,  for  a  Return  showing  : 

1.  How  many  industrial  schools  for  the  instruction  of  Indian  half-breed  youth  have  been 
established  in  the  Province  of  Manitoba  and  the  North-West  Territories  respectively,  under 
the  authority  and  by  permission  of  the  Government  of  Canada,  and  where  they  are  located. 

2.  At^what  places  lands  have  been  surveyed  and  set  apart  for  Indian  half-breed  schools  in 
1884,  and  what  quantity  at  each  place.  3.  Through  whose  representations  and  recommenda- 
tions these  half-breed  schools  are  established  from  time  to  time,  and  whether  any  request  from 
the  Indian  half-breeds  themselves  is  required  for  the  establishment  of  a  school.  4.  What 
subjects  of  instruction  are  provided  for  these  schools  in  regard  to  industrial  pursuits,  moral 
and  religious,  and  are  both  sexes  included  in  the  general  school  provisions.  5.  Whether  any 
of  the  Indian  half-breed  schools  are  placed  under  the  care  or  supervision  of  any  religious  body 
or  denomination ;  if  so,  what  are  the  conditions  upon  which  such  control  is  granted,  and 
what  is  the  extent  of  the  denominational  control,  and  is  it,  to  the  extent  granted,  a  temporary 
or  permanent  control ;  if  there  are  denominational  schools,  what  is  the  number  belonging  to 
each  denomination,  where  they  are  located,  and  what  quantity  of  land  is  owned  or  controlled 
by  each,  and  what  is  the  number  of  pupils.  6.  Whether,  when  the  moral  and  religious  instruc- 
tion of  an  Indian  half-breed  school  is  placed  under  the  supervision  or  control  of  any 
denomination,  i,t  gives  to  the  denomination  control  of  the  land  and  buildings  of  such  school. 
7.  At  whose  cost  the  Indian  half-breed  school  buildings  are  erected  and  furnished,  and  under 
whose  directions  the  text  books  are  selected  or  compiled,  and  by  whom  they  are  paid  for.  8. 
What  standing  of  attainment  is  required  of  teachers  in  these  schools  ;  how  and  from  whom 
they  receive  certificates  of  qualification,  and  whether  there  is  a  system  of  Governmental 
inspection  of  these  Indian  half-breed  schools.  9.  Whether  the  teachers  and  trustees  or 
managers  of  these  schools  are  required  to  make  any  periodical  returns  to  the  Government  of 
the  attendance,  general  condition,  progress  and  expenditure  of  each.  10.  Whether  any  of  the 
religious  denominations  have  obtained  lands  for  church  or  school  purposes  from  the  Govern- 
ment or  from  any  Indian  reservation  by  treaty  or  otherwise.  11.  Whether  any  of  the  religious 
bodies,  on  their  own  responsibility,  have  established  schools  among  the  Indians.or  half-breeds, 
and  if  they  have,  whether  they  receive  any  assistance  directly  or  indirectly  by  land  grant3>r 
otherwise  for  the  support  of  such  schools  from  the  Government.  Presented  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  18th  July,  1885.— Mr.  Kirk Notprinted. 

159.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  12th  February,  1885,  for  copies  of  all 
correspondence,  petitions  and  Orders  in  Council,  relating  to  any  applications  by  or  on  behalf 
of  any  railway  company  elsewhere  than  in  Manitoba  or  the  North-West,  for  aid  or  additional 
aid.     Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  14th  July,  1885.— Mr.  Blake Not  printed. 

160.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  2nd  March,  1885,  for :  1.  Copies  of  all 
correspondence  between  the  Government  and  the  North- West  Council  respecting  the  represen- 
tation of  the  Territories  in  this  Parliament.  2.  Copies  of  all  petitions,  representations  and 
correspondence  addressed  to  the  Government,  or  any  member  of  it,  on  the  same  subject,  and 
any  replies  thereto.  3.  Copies  of  all  petitions,  representations  and  correspondence  with  the 
Government,  or  any  member  of  it,  on  the  subject  of  the  establishment  of  Local  Governments 
in  the  Territories,  and  of  all  replies  thereto.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  July, 
1885.— Mr.  Cameron  {Huron) * Not  printed. 

101.  Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  March,  1885,  for  a  Return  of  all 
correspondence,  papers  and  documents  which  have  passed  between  the  Imperial  Government 
and  the  Dominion  Government  or  the  Dominion  Government  and  the  Government  of  British 
Columbia,  relative  to  the  public  reserves  of  British  Columbia  and  to  the  claim  of  the  Crown 
to  the  land  between  high  and  low  water  mark,  and  generally  all  information  as  to  "  fore  shore  ;' 
rights  of  the  Dominion.  Presented  to  the  House  of  Commons,  15th  July,  1885.— Mr.  Baker 
{Victoria) Printed  for  Sessional  Papers  only. 


56 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  38.)  A.  1885 


RETURN 

(386) 
To  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  the  23rd  February,  1'885  ; — 
For  a  copy  of  any  further  Commission  or  Order  in  Council  or  Corres- 
pondence touching  the  position  or  salary  of  the  High  Commissioner  of 
Canada,  not  already  brought  down. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  13th  March,U885. 


Certified  Copy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honorable  the  Privy  Council,  approved 
by  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council  on  the  28th  May,  1884. 

The  Committee  on  the  recommendation  of  the  Right  Honorable  Sir  John  Mac- 
diuald,  advise  that  the  present  commission  of  Sir  Charles  Tapper  as  High  Commis- 
sioner for  Canada  in  England  be  cancelled,  and  another  commission  be  given  him  as 
such  Commissioner,  granting  to  him  ^the  same  salary  and  allowances  as  his  prede- 
cessor, Sir  Alexander  T.  G-alt,  and  to  date  from  the  24th  May,  1884. 

JOHN  J.  McGEE. 
Honble.  Secretary  of  State. 


CANADA. 
Lansdowne. 

Victoria,  by  the  Grace  of  God,  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and 
Ireland,  Queen,  Defender  of  the  Faith,  &c,  &c,  &c. :  To  the  Honorable  Sir  Charles 
Tupper,  Knight,  Commander  of  Our  Most  Distinguished  Order  of  Saint  Michael  and 
Saint  George,  Companion  of  Our  Most  Honorable  Order  of  the  Bath, 

Greeting  : 

Whereas  it  is  in  by  an  Act  of  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  passed  in  the  forty  - 
third  year  of  Our  reign,  chaptered  eleven,  and  intituled :  "  An  Act  for  the  appoint- 
ment of  a  Eesident  Eepresentative  Agent  for  Canada  in  the  United  Kingdom," 
amongst  other  things  in  effect  enacted,  that  the  Governor  may,  under  the  Great  Seal 
of  Canada,  from  time  to  time  appoint  au  officer  to  be  called  "  The  High  Commissioner 
for  Canada,"  who  shall  hold  office  during  pleasure,  and  further,  that  it  shall  be  the 
duty  of  the  High  Commissioner  to  act  as  representative  and  resident  agent  of  the 
Dominion  in  the  United  Kingdom,  and  in  that  capacity  to  execute  8u<m  powers  and 
to  perform  such  duties  as  may,  from  time  to  time,  be  conferred  upon  and  assigned  to 
him  by  the  Governor  in  Council. 

To  take  the  charge,  supervision  and  control  of  the  immigration  offices  and 
agencies  in  the  United  Kingdom  under  the  Minister  of  Agriculture. 

To  carry  out  such  instructions  as  he  may  from  time  to  time  receive  from  the 
Governor  in  Council  respecting  the  commercial,  financial  and  general  interests  of 
the  Dominion  in  the  United  Kingdom,  and  elsewhere. 

Now  Know  Ye,  that  reposing  special  trust  and  confidence  in  your  loyalty, 
integrity  and  ability,  We  have  thought  fit  to  nominate,  constitute  and  appoint,  and 
386—1  1 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  38.)  A.  1885 


do  hereby  nominate,  constitute  and  appoint  you,  the  Honorable  Sir  Charles  Tupper, 
Knight,  to  be  "  The  High  Commissioner  for  Canada,"  on,  from  and  after  the  twenty- 
fourth  day  of  May,  in  the  year  of  Our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  eighty- 
four. 

To  have,  hold,  exercise  and  enjoy  the  said  office,  unto  you  the  said  the  Honor- 
able Sir  Charles  Tupper,  Knight,  with  all  and  every  the  duties,  powers,  rights, 
authority,  privileges,  profits,  emoluments  and  advantages  unto  the  said  office  of  right 
and  by  law  appertaining,  during  pleasure. 

In  Testimony  Whereof,  We  have  caused  these  Our  letters  to  be  made  patent  and 
the  Great  Seal  of  Canada  to  be  hereunto  affixed:  Witness,  Our  Eight  Trusty  and 
Entirely-Beloved  Cousin,  the  Must  Honorable  Sir  Henry  Charles  Keith,  Marquis  of 
Lansdowne,  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  Earl  of  Wycombe,  of  Chipping  Wycombe,  in 
the  County  of  Bucks,  Viscount  Calne  and  Calnestone,  in  the  County  of  Wilts,  and 
Lord  Wycombe,  Baron  of  Chipping  Wycombe,  in  the  County  of  Bucks,  in  the 
Peerage  of  Great  Britain ;  Earl  of  Kerry  and  Earl  of  Shelburne,  Viscount  Ulan- 
maurice  and  Fitzmaurice,  Baron  of  Kerry,  Lixnaw  and  Dunkerron,  in  the  Peerage  of 
Ireland  ;  Knight  Grand  Cross  of  Our  Most  Distinguished  Order  of  Saint  Michael  and 
Saint  George,  Governor  General  of  Canada  and  Vice  Admiral  of  the  same. 

At  Our  Government  House,  in  Our  City  of  Ottawa,  this  twenty-fourth  day  of  May, 
in  the  year  of  Our  Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  eighty-four,  and  in  the 
forty-seventh  year  of  Our  reign. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU,  Secretary  of  State. 

Department  of  the  Secretary  op  State,  Ottawa,  30th  June,  1884. 
Sir,— With  reference  to  my  letter  to  you  of  the  15th  June,  1883,  and  its  enclo- 
sure, I  have  now  the  honor  to  transmit  to  you  herewith  a  commission  under  the 
Great  Seal  of  Canada,  appointing  you  to  the  office  of  High  Commie sioner  for  Canada 
with  the  same  salary  and  allowances  as  your  predecessor,  which  said  commission 
will  take  the  place  of  the  commission  bearing  date  the  30th  day  of  May,  1883,  which 
has  been  cancelled  by  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council. 
'  I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

G*  POWELL,  Under  Secretary  of  State. 

Hon.  Sir  Charles  Tupper  K.C.M.G.,  C.B., 

High  Commissioner  for  Canada,  London,  Eng. 

9  Victoria  Chambers,  London,  S.W.,  31st  July,  1884. 

SiR) I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  30th 

ultimo,  transmitting  a  commission  under  the  Great  Seal  of  Canada,  appointing  me 
to  the  office  of  High  Commissioner  for  Canada,  with  the  same  salary  and  allowances 
as  my  predecessor,  which  said  commission  takes  the  place  of  the  one  bearing  date 
the  30th  May,  1883,  that  having  been  cancelled  by  His  Excellency  the  Governor 
General  in  Council. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

CHARLES  TUPPER,  Eigh  Commissioner. 
Under  Secretary  of  State,  Ottawa,  Canada. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (Xo.  38.)  A.  1885 


RETURN 

(38c) 
To  an  Order  of  the  House  uf  Commons,  dated  28rd  February,  1885  ; — For 

a  Keturn  showing  amount  paid  out  on  account  of  High  Commissioner 

to  London  since  the  creation  of  the  office,  showing  separately  the 

amount  paid  on  account  of  residence,  furniture,  and  all  fittings  and 

additions  thereto,  and  amount  of  salary  paid  to  January  1st,  1885,  and 

all  items  or  allowances  on  account  of  taxes,  light,  fuel,  travelling  and 

other  expenses,  including  salaries  of  Private  Secretary  and  other  servants 

or  attendants,  each  item  separately  set  out  up  to  January  1st,  1885. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  21st  March,  1885. 


Ottawa,  20th  March,  1885. 

Sir, — In  compliance  with  Order  No.  146  of  the  House  of  Commons,  of  the  23rd- 
25th  February,  1885,  1  have  the  honor  to  enclose  Eeturn  showing  amount  paid  out 
on  account  of  High  Commissioner  to  London,  since  the  creation  of  the  office  to  1st 
January,  1885,  in  the  terms'  set  forth  in  said  Order  with  the  exception  of  "  salaries 
of  Private  Secretary  and  other  servants  or  attendants,"  for  which  items  no  charges 
have  been  made  in  the  accounts  of  the  High  Commissioner. 
I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir, 

Your  most  obedient  servant, 

J.  L.  Mc  DOUG  ALL, 

Auditor-  General. 
G.  Powell,  Esq., 

Under  Secretary  of  State, 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  38. 


A.  1885 


Return  showing  amount  paid  out  on  account  of  High  Commissioner  to  London, 
since  the  creation  of  the  office,  showing  separately  the  amount  paid  out  on 
account  of  residence,  furniture,  and  all  fittings  and  additions  thereto,  and  amount 
of  salary  paid  to  January  1st,  1-85,  and  all  items  and  allowances  on  account  of 
taxes,  light,  fuel,  travelling  aid  other  expenses,  per  Order  No.  146  of  the  House 
of  Commons  of  February  23rd-25th,  1885;  transferred,  February  25th,  to  the 
At  ditor  General  for  report. 


Date. 


1884-85,.., 


1879-80.. 
18-J0-81.. 
1884-85., 


1879-80. 
1880-81. 
1881-8,'. 
1882-83. 
1883-8  I. 
1884-85. 


1880-81. 
1881-82. 

1881-82. 
1882-83. 

1880-81. 
1881-82. 

1880-81 , 
1881-82. 

1881-82. 

1882-83. 
1883-84. 

1894-85. 


1879-80. 
1880-81. 


Service. 


Residence. 

House  and  furniture  for  High  Commissioner,  per  statements  and 
vouchers  forwarded  in  compliance  with  Order  No.  24}  of  the, 
House  of  Commons,  of  the  5th-6th  February,  1885;—"  For  all 
particulars  not  already  brought  down  in  respect  to  the  office 
of  High  Commissioner." - 


Amount. 


$    cts. 


Furniture,  Fittings  and  additions  thereto. 

Hou-e  furnishing  and  establishment  of  office 

H'.>use  furnishiDg •■ 

House  furnishing — See  statement  and  vouchers  with  Return  per 
Order  No.  24}  of  House  of  Commons.... 


Salary  to  1st  January,  1885. 


Salary,    4  months 

do      12      do 

12      do 

1st  July,  1882.  to  31st  May,  1883 

24th  May  to  30th  June,  1884 

1st  July,  1884,  to  1st  January,  1885 


do 
do 
do 

do 


House  Rent,  Taxes,  Light  and  Fuel. 


House  rent, 
do 


$2,813  05 
.     .132  13 


Income  tax  to  5th  April,  1881 %    243  33 

do  do  1882.... 202  78 


Light... %    16?  5S 

dS     - 41_^ 

Fuel $    166  68 

do — 45  °2 

Allowance  in  lieu  of  house  rent,  fuel,  light  and  taxes, 

per  O.  C.  23rd  March,  1881 .$3,500  00 

Allowance  in  lieu  of  house  rent,  &c,  11  months 3,208  28 

Allowance  in  lieu  of  house  rent,  fuel,  light  and  taxes, 

perO.  C.  21st  September,  1883.... 3,500  00 

On  account  of  allowance  as  above 2,000  00 


1,259  85 

1,306  57 


Travelling  Expenses. 


Passage  of  High  Commissioner  and  family  from   Montreal  to 

Liverpool  vid  Halifax •••••••••"'••• 

Sir  Charles  Tupper,  travelling  expenses $     9"  33 

Sir  A.  T.  Gait  do  339  49 

J.  G.  Colmer  do  68  13 


Carried  forward. 


3,333  33 

10,000  oe 

10,000  00 
9,166  62 
1,048  38 
4,999  98 


2,945  18 
446  11 
209  14 
211  70 

12,208  28 


946  32 


504  95 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  38.) 


A.  1885 


Keturn  showing  amount  paid  out  on   account  of  High  Commissioner  to  London, 
since  the  creation  of  the  office,  &c — Concluded. 


Date. 


1881-82, 


1882-83. 
1883-84. 


1879-80. 
1879-80. 
1880-81. 
1881-82. 
1882-83. 

1880-81. 
1880-81. 
1881-82. 
1882-83. 

1880-81. 
1881-82. 

1880-81. 
1881-82. 
1882-83. 

1880-81. 
1881-83, 
1882-83. 

1881-82. 
1881-82 , 
1882-8 J. 

1882-83, 
1882-83. 
1883-84. 
1883-84. 


Service. 


Brought  forward 

Travelling  Expenses — Concluded. 

Sir  A.  T.  Gait,  travelling  expenses $    615  93 

Sir  A.  T.  Gait  and  J.  A.  Crowe,  on  n  iasion  to  Paris....      501  75 
Sir  A.  T.  Gait,  removal  of  family  to  Canada 761  63 


Less— Transferred  to  Dominion  Lands  Sales. 


$1,909  31 
973  33 


Sir  A.  T.  Gait,  travelliu^  expenses ■ 

Sir  Charles  Tupper,  removal  expenses ^836  00 

Sir  Charles  Tupper,  travelling  expenses 350  00 


Other  Expenses. 


Quarter's  rent  of  office,  in  advance. 
Exchange  on  drafts .... 

do  

do  

do 


22  22 
31  *9 
34  39 

23  93 


Hotel  bill  and  expenses  in  London  ,..„«.,. 

Cable  despatches  and  telegrams $203  8) 

do  do 403  34 

do  do 281  46 

Chequebooks $2  51 

do 1  01 


Subscription  to  Royal  Colonial  Institute. 
do  do 

do  do 


$9  73 
9  7'. 
9  73 


Colonial  Trade  Statistics ■      $U  33 

do  .... 73  0 

do  ..-  7.^00 

Subscription  to  Women's  Emigration  Society .- 

Miscellaneous  expenses  per  J.  G.  Colmer  . ... #131  40 

do  do 97  33 


Paris  negotiations,  per  J.  A.  Crowe 

Paper  and  printing,  Queen's  Printer,  Ottawa. 

Expenses,  per  Sir  Charles  Tupper 

Books  of  reference,  Stationery  Office,  Ottawa 


Total 


Amount. 


$    cts. 


935  98 
896  01 


1,186  00 


771  61 


112  23 

115  24 


61 


3  55 


29   19 


170  33 
24  33 


228  7.1 

102  20 

11  00 

497  50 

2  50 


Total. 


%    cts. 
101,288  91 


4,469 


2,957  02 
107  263  92 


Note.— No  charges  to    " Immigration— Salaries  in  London  (England)  office  "—are  included  in 
this  Return. 

Auditor  General's  Office, 

March  20th,  1885. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  41  )  A.  1885 


RETURN 

(41) 
To  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1835  ;— For 
amount  of  sums  advanced  to  the  Government  of  the  Dominion  by  way 
of  loan  by  any  banks  or  persons  in  Canada  or  England,  as  appearing 
on  the  1st  February,  1885. 

By  command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  13th  February,  1885. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  41.) 


A.  1885 


Statement  of  Loans  contracted  by  the  Government  of  Canada  in  England,  from 
March,  1884,  to  1st  February,  1885  (outstanding  1st  February,  1885). 


With  whom  Contracted. 


London  and  Westminster  Bank 

Glyn,  Mills,  Currie  &  Co ... 

Total * 

B.  &  0.  E 


Sterling. 


£ 

s. 

d. 

1,800,000 
167.500 

0 

0 

0 
0 

£1,967,500    0    0 


Currency. 


$      cts. 

8,760,000  00 
815,166  67 


$9,575,166  67 


Statement  of  Loans  contracted  by  the  Government  of  Canada  with  Inatitutions  in 
Canada,  from  November,  1884,  to  1st  February,  1885  (outstanding  1st  February 
18S5). 


With  what  Institutions. 


City  and  District  Sayings  Bank,  Montreal. 

Merchants'  Bank  of  Canada 

Imperial  Bank  of  Canada 


Total. 


Amount. 


$     cts. 

500,000  00 
500,000  00 
250,000  00 


$1,250,000  00 


E.  &  0.  E. 


Ottawa,  10th  February,  1885. 


JOHN  A.  TORRANCE, 

Dominion  Book-keeper. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  41.)  A.  1885 


RETURN 

(416) 

To  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  4th  February,  1885  ;— For 
Copy  of  the  Prospectus  of  the  Loan  recently  issued  in  London,  also  a 
Statement  showing  the  amounts  of  the  Commission  and  other  charges 
paid  thereon  and  to  whom  paid,  together  with  the  amount  of  the  said 
Loan  subscribed  for  by  the  Financial  Agents  of  the  Dominion  or  by  the 
Bank  of  Montreal,  with  the  dates  of  said  subscriptions  and  copies  of  all 
Orders  in  Council  connected  with  the  said  Loan. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  16th  February,  1885. 


Ottawa,  14th  February,  1885. 

Sir,— I  have  the  honor  to  enclose  herewith  Eoturn  to  an  Address  of  the  House 
of  Commons  dated  the  4th  instant  as  follows : — 

1.  Copy  o~f  prospectus  and  form  of  tender  of  the  loan  recently  issued  in  London; 

2.  Statement  showing  the  amounts  ot  the  Commission  and  other  charges  paid 
thereon,  and  to  whom  paid  ; 

3.  Copies  of  Order  in  Council,  dated  the  6th  of  May  last,  authorizing  the  Honorable 
the  Minister  of  Finance  to  go  to  England  to  negotiate  the  same  and  of  Order  in  Council 
dated  the  30th  of  September  last  appointing  the  trustees  for  the  Sinking  Fund  of  the 
said  Loan,  being  all  Orders  in  Council  connected  with  the  said  Loan. 

This  Department  has  no  means  of  giving  the  information  asked  for  as  to  the 
amounts  subscribed  for  by  the  financial  agents  of  the  Dominion  or  by  the  Bank  of 
Montreal  and  dates  thereof. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

J.  M.  COURTNEY,  Deputy  Minister  of  Finance. 
The  Under  Secretary  of  State,  Ottawa. 

Return  to  an  Address  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated    4tti  February,  1885, 

(Sir  Richard  Cartwrigut.) 

loan  of  1885. 

1.  Copy  of  prospectus  and  form  of  tender. 

2.  Statement  showing  the  amount  of  commission  and  other  charges  paid  there- 
on and  to  whom  paid. 

3.  Copies  of  all  Orders  in  Council  connected  therewith  being : — 

1.  Order  in  Council,  dated   6th  May,    1884,  authorizing   the  Honorable    the 
Minister  of  Finance  to  go  to  England  to  negotiate  the  loan. 

2.  Order  in  Council,  dated  30th  September,  1884,  appointing  trustees  for  the 
sinking  fund  of  the  said  loan. 

Finance  Department,  Ottawa,  14th  February,  1885. 
416—1 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  41. )  A..  1885 


Dominion  op   Canada  Loan  for  £5,000,000  3|  per  cent.  Sterling  Bonds   or 

Inscriptions. 


Messrs.  Baring  Brothers  &  Co.,  and  Messrs.  Glyn,  Mills,  Currie  &  Co.,  the 
Financial  Agents  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  are  authorized  by  the  MiDister  of 
Finance  of  the  Dominion,  to  receive  at  the  office  of  the  former  firm,  No.  8  Bishops- 
gate,  Within,  on  or  before  Wednesday  the  18th  inst,  at  3.  p.m.  (when  th^ey  will  be 
opened  in  the  presence  of  such  of  the  applicants  as  may  attend),  sealed  tenders  for 
£5,000,000  Dominion  of  Canada  3J  percent,  stock  or  bonds,  of  the  form  and  tender 
annexed,  bearing  interest  from  1st  June,  1884,  at  the  rate  of  3J-  per  cent,  per  annum, 
payable  half-yearly  on  the  1st  of  June,  and  1st  of  December,  of  each  year,  at  the 
offices  of  the  said  financial  agents  in  London. 

This  loan  is  issued  under  the  provisions  of  an  Act  of  the  Canadian  Parliament, 
passed  in  the  4*7 th  year  of  the  reign  of  Her  Majesty  Queen  Victoria,  Cap.  3,  setting 
forth  that  the  object  of  the  Loan  is : 

1st.  To  make  good  to  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund,  the  loans,  amounting  in 
all  to  £961,700  sterling,  which  have  already  been  paid;  and  also  the  other  loans, 
which  are  to  mature  before  the  1st  day  of  January,  1892  For  this  purpose  £2,000,000 
is  required. 

2nd.  To  meet  the  charges  placed  on  the  Consolidated  Kevenue  Fund,  by  the 
Act  passed  in  the  last  or  former  Sessions  of  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  relating  to 
the  Canadian  Pacific  Eailway,  or  for  the  granting  of  subsidies  for  railway  purposes, 
or  to  provide  for  the  construction  of  Public  Works ;  for  which  £3,000,000  is  required. 

Tenders  must  be  for  the  whole  or  part  of  £5,000,000,  at  a  price  not  less  than  9 1 
per  cent.,  and  the  bonds  will  be  allotted  to  the  highest  bidder  or  bidders,  pro  rata, 
according  to  the  price  offered ;  tenders  at  a  price  including  a  fraction  of  a  shilling 
other  than  sixpence  will  not  thereby  get  any  preference. 

Tenders  by  the  same  person,  at  various  prices,  must  be  made  out  and  delivered 
separately  at  the  counting-house  of  Messrs.  Baring  Brothers  &  Co.,  No.  8  Bishopsgate 
Within,  London. 

The  principal  of  the  loan  now  offered  is  to  be  repaid  in  London  at  any  time 
within  the  years  1909  and  1934,  upon  the  Government  giving  six  months'  notice  to 
that  effect.  A  cumulative  sinking  fund  of  not  less  than  one-half  per  cent,  per  annum 
will  be  employed  in  the  purchase  of  Dominion  3J-  per  cent,  bonds  or  stock  at  or 
below  par ;  but  the  Government  may  invest  the  sinking  fund  in  other  securities 
should  the  price  be  above  par. 

Messrs.  Baring  Brothers  &  Co.,  and  Messrs.  Glyn,  Mills,  Currie  &  Co.  reserve 
to  themselves  the  power  of  rejecting  any  tender  which  they  consider  unsatisfactory, 
although  they  may  be  above  the  price  fixed. 

Payment  will  be  required  as  follows : — 

Five  percent,  on  application,  and  on  allotment  the  remaining  difference  between 
70  per  cent,  and  the  price  tendered.  The  subsequent  instalments  must  be  paid  at 
the  office  of  Messrs.  Glyn,  Mills,  Currie  &  Co.  as  follows  : — 

Twenty  per  cent,  on  16th  July,  1884  ; 

Twenty  per  cent,  on  14th  August,  1884  ; 

Twenty  per  cent,  on  16th  September,  1884  ; 

Ten  per  cent,  on  16th  October,  1884. 

Payment  of  these  instalments  may  be  made  in  full  under  discount  at  the  rate  of 
3  per  cent,  per  annum,  on  any  Tuesday  or  Friday.  The  failure  to  pay  any  instalment 
when  due,  forfeits  all  previous  payments* 

Subscribers  will  have  the  option  of  receiving  bonds  to  bearer,  or  stock  registered 
in  their  names ;  and  by  virtue  of  an  arrangement  entered  into  by  the  Imperial  and 
Canadian  Governments  the  registered  stock  will  be  transferable  free  of  stamp  duty 
to  the  proprietors.  Bonds  to  bearer  may,  at  any  future  time,  be  converted  into 
registered  stock,  free  of  charge. 

Interest  warrants  will  be  forwarded  by  post  to  the  holders  of  inscribed  stock.  In 
the  case  of  joint  accounts,  the  warrants  will  be  forwarded  to  the  person  first  named 
in  the  accouut  unless  instructions  to  the  contrary  be  given, 

2 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No,  41.)  A.  1885 


The  allotment  of  the  loan  will  be  made  as  early  as  possible,  and  in  cases  where 
it  has  not  been  practicable  to  make  any  allotment  the  deposit  will  be  returned. 

Scrip  receipts  will  be  issued  without  delay,  and  bonds  of  £1,000,  £500,  or  £100 
will  be  delivered  in  exchange  when  ready. 

London,  13th  June,  1884. 

FORM  OF  DOMINION  OF  CANADA    THREE    AND  ONE-HALF  PER 

CENT.  BOND. 

The  Government  of  Canada  hereby  acknowledges  to  be  indebted  to  the-bearer  in 
the  sum  of  pounds  sterling,  beinp  part  of  the  sum  authorized  to  be  raised 

in  virtue  of  an  Act  of  Parliament  of  Canada,  passed  in  the  47th  year  of  the  reign  of 
Her  Majesty  Queen  Victoria,  Cap.  3,  which  sum  the  said  Government  undertakes  to 
pay  any  time  within  the  years  1909  and  1934,  upon  giving  six  months'  notice,  at  the 
office  of  Messrs.  Baring  Brothers  &  Co.,  and  Messrs.  Glyn,  Mills,  Currie  &  Co.,  in  the 
city  of  London  in  England,  with  interest  in  the  meantime  from  the  1st  June,  1884, 
at  the  rate  of  three  and  one-half  per  cent,  per  annum,  such  interest  being  payable 
half-yearly,  on  the  first  days  of  June  and  December  in  each  year,  at  the  same  place, 
on  presentation  of  the  proper  coupons  hereunto  annexed. 

The  principal  and  interest  of  the  above  sum  are  chargeable  upon  the  Consolidated 
Eevenue  Fund  of  Canada  under  authority  of  the  above  Act,  and  a  sum  equal  to  one- 
half  per  cent,  per  annum  of  the  principal  sum  of  such  portion  of  the  aforesaid  loan 
as  may  be  issued  will  be  set  apart  and  invested  for  the  redemption  thereof  in  three 
and  one-half  per  cent,  bonds  or  stock  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada,  if  the  price  is  at  or 
below  par,  the  Government  of  Canada  reserving  the  right  to  invest  the  amount  in 
other  securities  when  the  price  of  the  bonds  is  above  par. 

This  Bond  may  be  exchanged  for  a  certificate  of  inscription,  transferable  in 
London  at  the  office  of  Messrs.  Glyn,  Mills,  Currie  &  Co. 

FORM  OF  TENDER     i 

FOR 

£5,000,000  DOMINION  OF  CANADA  THREE  AND  ONE-HALF  PER  CENT 

LOAN. 


hereby  tender  for  a  sum  of 

£ , ,..,..,., in  bonds  to  bearer 

£ in  stock 

nominal  capital  in  the  above  mentioned  loan,  at  the  price  of  £ per  cent., 

and engage  to  accept  the  aoove  sum,  or  any  portion  thereof  which  may 

be  allotted  to ,  and  to  pay  the  subsequent  instalments  as  they  become 

due,  in  conformity  with  the  terms  of  your  circular  of  13th  inst. 

enclose  the  deposit  of  £ being  5  per  cent,  thereon. 

London June,  1884. 

Name 

Address , 

To  Messrs.  Baring  Brothers  &  Co., 

8  Bishopsgate  Street  Within,  B.C. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  41.) 


A.  1885 


Three  and  One-half  Per  Cent.  Loan  Account— Discount  and  Charges. 


Authority 

for 
Payment. 

To  Whom  Paid. 

Service. 

£       s.    d. 

$      cts. 

$       cts. 

46Vic.,c.3and 
47  Vic,  c.3. 

Glyn,  Mills,  Currie 
&  Co., and  Baring 
bros.   &  Co 

Glyn,  Mills,  Currie 
&Co,andBaring 
Bros.  &  Co....  ... 

For  discount  on  £5,000,000 
sterling,  amount  of  3$  per 
cent  loan  of  1884,    nego- 

445,870    0    0 

12,058    0    8 

457,928    0    8 

2,228,583  09 
[326,388  52 

For  discount  allowed  on  pay- 

For  1  per  cent,  commission 
on  £5, 000,000  sterling 

For  £  percent.  Brokerage  on 
j£5, 000,000  sterling 

50.C00    0    0 

12,500    0    0 

3,096    7    6 

991     1    2 

236    9    6 
122  14    6 

119  10    0 
67,066    2    8 

For  J  per  cent,  stamp  duty 

on  Jb2,477,100  sterling 

For  Printing  14,200  Bonds 

For  printing  prospectus,  let- 
ters   of  allotment,    scrip 

• 

For  advertising  Loans,  &c... 

For    receipt    stamps    upon 
scrip  certificates  and  in- 
stalments  

Total  discount  and  charges. 

2,554,971  61 

_. 

(copy'}  » .    „    ., 

Certified  Copy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honorable  the  Privy  Council, 
approved  by  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council  on  6th  May,  1884. 
On  a  report  dated  6th  May,  1884,  from  the  Minister  of  Finance,  stating  that  the 
Consolidated  Canadian  Loan  will  mature  in  London  upon  the  1st  January,  1885,  and 
in  anticipation  thereof,  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  during  the  Session  of  1883,  passed 
an  Act  (46  Vic,  cap.  3),  by  which  the  Governor  in  Council  was  authorized  to  raise, 
by  way  of  loan,  such  sum  or  sums  of  money  as  would  be  required  to  pay  the  said 
maturing  loan,  after  deducting  the  amount  held  as  a  sinking  fund   for  paying  off  the 

same.  ,    .  -    , 

The  Minister  observes  that  under  the  terms  of  the  existing  agreement  between 
the  Government  of  Canada  and  their  financial  agents  in  England,  it  was  amongst 
other  things  agreed,  that  for  the  small  loans  maturing  from  time  to  time  within  the 
present  decade,  and  which  approximate  to  the  sum  of  £2,000,000  sterling,  the 
Government  should  have  the  right  to  redeem  the  same  by  one  issue  of  that  amount, 
within  three  years  from  the  1st  January,  1882,  that  is  to  say,  on  or  before  the 
1st  January,  1885;  and  as  it  is  desirable  that  the  Government  should  take 
advantage  of  this  clause  of  the  agreement,  authority  was  obtained  from  the  Parlia- 
ment of  Canada  at  its  last  Session  (47  Vic,  cap.  3)  for  the  raising,  by  way  of  loan 
of  such  sum  or  sums  of  money  not  exceeding  in  the  whole  the  sum  oi  *,Z,UUU,uuij 
sterling,  as  may  be  required  for  the  purpose  of  making  good  to  the  Consolidated 

4 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No,  41.)  A.  1885 


Revenue  Fund  the  small  loans,  amounting  in  all  to  £961,700  sterling,  which  have 
already  been  paid,  and  also  the  other  small  loans  which  are  to  mature  before  the  1st 
day  of  January,  1892,  in  accordance  with  the  terms  of  the  said  agreement  with  the 
financial  agents. 

The  Minister  also  observes  that  by  the  Act  last  cited  (47  Vic,  cap.  3)  authority 
was  also  given  for  raising,  by  way  of  loan,  such  further  sum  or  sums  of  money,  not 
exceeding  in  the  whole  £3,000,000  sterling,  to  meet  the  charges  placed  on  the  Consoli- 
dated Kevenue  Fund  by  the  Acts  passed  in  the  last  or  former  Sessions, of  the  Parlia- 
ment of  Canada,  relating  to  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  or  for  granting  subsidies 
for  railway  purposes,  or  to^provide  for  the  construction  of  public  works. 

The  Minister,  after  carefully  considering  the  financial  requirements  of  the 
Dominion,  is  of  opinion  that  it  is  desirable,  in  the  public  interest,  that  the  borrowing 
powers  given  by  the  above  cited  Acts  should  be  taken  advantage  of,  and  he  therefore 
recommends  that  he  be  authorized  to  proceed  to  England  to  take  such  steps  as  he 
may  deem  necessary  to  negotiate  loans  for  the  foregoing  purposes,  that  is  to  say  : 

1.  To  meet  the  Consolidated  Canadian  Loan,  which  will  mature  on  the  1st  day  of 
January,  1885,  by  exchange  of  securities  or  otherwise. 

2.  To  redeem  in  one  issue,  in  accordance  with  the  terms  of  the  existing  agreement 
with  the  financial  agents,  the  small  loans  which  are  to  mature  before  the  1st  day  of 
January,  1892,  and  also  to  make  good  to  the  Consolidated  Revenue  Fund  the  amount 
(£961,700)  paid  in  meeting  the  small  loans  which  have  matured  and  been  paid  since 
the  1st  day  of  January,  1882. 

3.  To  raise,  by  way  of  loan,  such  sum  or  sums,  not  exceeding  £3,000,000  sterling, 
as  he  may  deem  advisable  to  meet  the  charges  placed  on  the  revenue  by  the 
Acts  passed  as  aforesaid  in  relation  to  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway  and  railway 
subsidies  and  public  works. 

Provided  always,  that  the  rate  of  interest  of  the  securities  to  be  issued  in  connec- 
tion with  any  of  the  above  loans  is  not  to  exceed  four  per  cent.  (4  °/0)  per  annum. 

The  Committee  concur  in  the  report  of  the  Minister  of  Finance,  and  they  submit 
the  same  for  Your  Excellency's  approval. 

JOHN  J.  McGEE,  Clerk,  Privy  Council. 

Certified  Copy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honorable  the  Privy  Council,  approved 
by  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council  on  the  SOth  September,  1884. 

On  a  memorandum  dated  26th  September,  1884,  from  the  Minister  of  Finance, 
representing  that  it  becomes  necessary  to  name  trustees  for  the  investment  and 
management  of  the  sinking  fund  of  the  3 J  per  cent,  loan  of  $5,000,000  sterling  issued 
by  the  Minister  of  Finance  in  London,  through  Messrs.  Baring  Bros.  &  Co.,  and  Messrs 
Glyn,  Mills,  Currie  &  Co.,  on  the  13th  June,  1884  : 

The  Minister  recommends  that  the  same  gentlemen  who  are  trustees  for  the 
other  sterling  loans,  viz.,  the  Right  Hon.  Lord  Wolverton  and  Sir  John  Rose, 
Bart.,  both  of  London,  be  appointed  trustees  for  the  sinking  fund  of  the  loan  in 
question. 

The  Committee  submit  the  above  recommendation  for  Your  Excellency's 
approval. 

JOHN  J,  McGEE,  Clerk,  Privy  Council. 


41&— 2 


48  Victoria,  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  188& 


RETURN 

(46) 
Of  the  Names  and  Salaries,  &c,  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in 
the  Civil  Service  during  the  Year  ended  31st  December,  1884,  specifying 
the  office  to  which  each  has  been  appointed  or  promoted  under  the 
Canada  Civil  Service  Act  1882,  Section  55,  Sub-Section  2. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Department  otf  the  Secretary  or  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  16th  February,  1885. 


46—1 


4S  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46«) 


k.  1885 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  year  1884,  specifying  the  office  to  which  each  has  been 
appointed  or  promoted.     (Sec.  55,  sub-sec.  2,  Canada  Civil  Service  Act,  1882.) 

DEPARTMENT  OP  SECRETARY   OP  STATE. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Name. 

6 
< 

Date  of  Ap- 
pointment 
and    Pro- 
motion. 

Inside 

or 
Outside. 

Inside- 
do    ... 

Rank 
or 

Office. 

Religion. 

National- 
ity. 

® 

.s 

© 

PL, 

Salary. 

36 
41 

1884. 

Jan.      7 
do       7 

3rd  Class.... 
Messenger ... 

Protestant... 
R.  Catholic. 

English.... 
F.  Can'dn 

Ont... 
Que... 

$    cts. 
400  00 

Elie,  Alfred  Casimir 

300  00 

PROMOTIONS.  \ 


Mousseau,  Albert  Olivier 
Pulford,  Ernest  George. 


37 


Jan. 
July 


Inside., 
do    .. 


2nd  Class  .. 
do      


R.  Catholic. 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 


P.  Can'dn 
English.... 


Que... 
Ont... 


1,100  00 
1,100  00 


DEPARTMENT  OF  INDIAN  AFFAIRS. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Kemp,  Alfred  E 

McKay,  Hiram 

Shore,  John  W 

Bray,  Samuel 

Simpson,  Wm 

Walton,  Thos.  S... 

Brosseau,  Alex 

McPhee,  Duncan  J. 

Tyre,  Robert 

Guay,  Rev.  Chas... 

Farrell,  James , 

Begg,  Magnus  


McKay,  J.  W. 


Feb.  1 
do  15 
Mar.  24 
June  14 
July  24 
April  1 
Sept.  11 
Oct.  25 
Sept.  6 
Oct.  1 
April  25 
Sept.  21 

1883. 
Nov.      1 


do 


Inside... 

3rd  Class.... 

do    ... 

do      

do    ... 

do      

do    ... 

do      

Outside. 

Land  Agent. 

do    ... 

Indian    do 

do    ... 

do        do 

do    ... 

do        do 

do    ... 

do        do 

do    ... 

do        do 

do    ... 

do    Supt. . 

do    ... 

do    Agent 

Methodist.... 
Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 

do 
Methodist.... 
Cath.  Apost. 
R.  Catholic. 
Methodist. ... 
Not  given  ... 

do 

do 

do 

do 


Canadian. 

Ont... 

do      ... 

Que.  . 

do      ... 

Ont... 

do      ... 

do- 

Irish  

do... 

English.... 

do... 

F.  Can'dn 

Que... 

Canadian. 

Ont... 

Not  given. 

Que... 

do      ... 

do... 

do      ... 

N.B... 

do      ... 

NWT 

do      ... 

B.C.. 

400  00 
480  00 
400  00 
800  00 

Commis'n 
900  00 
400  00 
500  00 

Commis'n 

200  00 

300  00 

1,200  00 

1.200  00 


PROMOTIONS— NONE. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  LIBRARY   OF  PARLIAMENT. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Thayne,  E.  Stewart. 


46 


1884. 
July      1 


Junior  Clerk  R.  Catholic. 


English.... 


Ont... 


PROMOTIONS— NONE. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  GOVERNOR  GENERAL'S  SECRETARY. 
APPOINTMENTS— NONE. 

PROMOTIONS. 


McDermott,  Peter  L. 


31 


May      1 


2nd  Class.... 


Ch.  of  Eng.. 


Irish 


1,000  00 


1,100  00 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.   46.) 


A.  1885 


"Return  of  the  Narues  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c. — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  PRIYY  COUNCIL. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


^Zi  2 

5 

Name. 

fee 

1  Date  of  A 
SS  pointnu 
g          and    P 

1     motion. 

Inside 
or 

Outside. 

Rank 

or 
Office. 

Religion. 

National- 
ity. 

8 

Salary. 

$    cts. 

May,  HenrylArthur 

*Lelievre,  Simeon  

Baudry,  P.  J.  Ubalde  ... 

18 
24 
41 

May      I 
do     15 
do     28 

Inside... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

3rd  Class.... 
do       ... 
As  f.   Clerk, 
P.C. 

Methodist.... 

Catholic 

do      

Canadian. 

F.  Can'dn 

do      ... 

Ont... 

Que... 

do... 

400  00 

650  00 

1,800  00 

PROMOTIONS. 


mm  ana,  pma 
Brennan,  P.  J. ..., 
Lelievre,  Simeon 

^-     *     — 


30    July      1  Inside... 
24      do      Ll     do    ... 


2nd  Class....  LCatholic. 
do       ...|      do 


Irish 

F.  Can'dn 


Que 
do 


1,100  00 
1,100  00 


DEPARTMENT  OF  HOUSE  OF  COMMONS. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Demers,  Francois  Xavier 

37 

Feb.      1 

Inside... 

Asst.  French 

Catholic 

F.  Can'dn 

Que... 

1,200  00 

!*•" — 

Translator 

Duveraay,Ludger  Denis 

48 

July      1 

do    ... 

Asst.    Clerk 
ofComit'es 

do      

do      ... 

do... 

1,000  00 

Clarke,  Charles  Edward 

34 

Dec.      1 

do     .A 

Asst.    Clerk 

Reformed  E 

English  ... 

Ont.. 

600  00 

«-._.. 

Stationery 
and    Asst. 

Church. 

Pro'fRe'dr 

PROMOTIONS. 


Frechette,  Achille, 


36 


Feb. 


Inside .. 


Asst.  French 
Translator 


Catholic. 


F.  Can'dn 


Ont... 


1,400  00 


fLeMoine,  J.  de  St.  D. 
Gibbs.  Charle3  T 


McCord,  Frederick  A. 
Pelletier.  Joseph  E.... 
Davis,  Thomas 


Feb.      9 
Mar.    10 


do      10 
do      10 

do     10 


SENATE. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Sergeant-at- 

Arms. 
Ast.  Acco'nt 

andJunior 

Clerk. 
Junior  Clerk 
Messenger... 
do 


Catholic 

Ch.  of  Eng.. 


Catholic, 
do  . 
do      . 


F.  Can'dn 
Canadian. 


do  ... 
F.  Can'dn 
Canadian. 


Ont... 
do... 


Que... 

do... 

Ont... 


1,200  00 
800  00 


800  00 
600  00 
600  00 


£*.     *  Transferred  from  Department  of  Militia  and  Defence.        f  Appointed  by  commission. 

The  appointment  of  Joeeph  Laro3e,  Permanent  Messenger,  by  report  of  Contingent  Committee, 
4ated  10th  March,1l884,  is  held  to  date  from  llth  May,  1882. 


3 


46-1J 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188S 


Eeturn  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
return      tne      ^  gervi^  daring  ^^  Year  1884>  &Qt_Continued. 

SEN  ATE — Concluded. 
PROMOTIONS. 


Boucher,  A.  A. 
Tache,  Lvanhoe 


Stephen,  R.  W. 

Gilbert,  F 

Dunne,  John  .. 


48 


45 


58 


45 


do      10 


do     10 


do     10 


do     10 


2nd  Clerk  & 
Ast.&Chf. 
F.  Trans- 
lator. 

Clerk  of  F. 
Journals 
&    Deputy 
Sergeant- 
at-Arms. 

2nd  E.  Clerk 
&  Clerk  of 
Routine  & 
Proceed' ns 

Wardrobe- 
Keeper    & 
Ast  Door- 
keeper. 

Bank  Mes- 
senger. 


Catholic. 


do 


Methodist. 


Congrega- 
tional. 


Can'dn 


do 


S.  Can'dn 


English 


Catholic 


Irish 


do 


Ont 


do 


do 


$         Ct3. 

2,200  00 
1,200  00 

1,400  00 
750  00 
750  00 


DEPARTMENT  OF  FINANCE, 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Brittain,  E.  L 

Foster,  Albert  B 

Hayes,  Wm.  H 

Morrison  Stuart 

Salter,  A.  C.A ..... 

MacLaughlin,  Jos.  H.... 

♦Nutting,  J.  P 

♦Black,  B.  A 


May 
Oct. 
do 
Mar. 
Oct. 
July 

1876. 
Oct. 

1879. 
Oct.      4 


Inside.... 

do    ... 

do    ... 
Outside. 

do    ... 

do    ... 

Inside . . 
do    ... 


3rd  ClasS. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 


Ch.  of  Eng  . 
Baptist 

Presbyterian 
Methodist.... 
Ch.  of  Eng 

do       ... 

do       ... 


English.... 

tf.B... 

450  00 

do      ... 

do... 

450  00 

do      ... 

do... 

500  00 

Scotch 

Ont... 

450  00 

English.... 
Irish 

N.B... 

800  00 

B.O  ... 

1,000  00 

English.... 

Que  .. 

800  00 

Scotch 

NS... 

650  00 

PROMOTIONS— NONE. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  RAILWAYS  AND  CANALS. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Muma,  Henry 


ICorbeil,  Francois. 


59 


34 


1883. 
Oct.      1 


I    1884. 
Aug.     1 


Outside. 


do    ... 


Official  Arbi- 
trator, vice 
Hon.  Isaac 
Buchanan, 
deceased. . 

Wharfinger . 


Ch.  of  Eng.. 


R.  Catholic 


Canadian. 


F.  Can'dn 


Ont... 


Que. 


1,000  CO- 


700  00- 


PROMOTIONS— NONE. 


•  Transferred  from  Post  Office  Department.  Giroux,   transferred  to  Inlan-4 

f  Transferred  from  Inland  Revenue   Department  m  place  or   a.  wrou  , 
Be  venue  Department. 


4g  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


"Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c— Continued. 
DEPAETMENT  OF  PUBLIC  WOEKS. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Name. 


JMacpherson,  James  P. 

Renaud,  Napoleon 

Belleau,  Antoine 


p-a  g 

v.  5      o 

Inside 

ZM-e'% 

or 

-ill 

Outside. 

< 

3 

1884. 

45 

Jan.     17 

Inside.. . 

32 

Aug.  10 

do    ... 

30 

Mar.    10 

do    ... 

Rank 

or 
Office. 


Religion. 


2nd  Class.... 
do      

3rd  Class... 


National- 
ity. 


Ch.  of  Eng.. 

R.  Catholic 

do 


Scotch 

P.  Can'dn 
do      ... 


Ont... 

Que.. 

do... 


Salary. 


1,400  00 

1,100  00 

500  00 


PROMOTIONS. 


Macpherson,  James  P 

Roy,  Elzebert 

Hennessy,  George 


Feb.    15 

Aug.     9 

do       9 


Inside, 
do  . 
do    . 


1st  Class. 
2nd  do  . 
3rd    do    . 


Ch.  of  Eng. 

R.  Catholic. 

do       ... 


Scotch: 

F.  Can'dn 
English.... 

Ont... 

Que  .. 

do... 

1,800  00 

1,100  00 

500  00 


DEPAETMENT  OF  MAEINE. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Hutchins,  Charles  A.... 
St  John,  Oliver  Phelps. 


Vigor,  Edward  Samuel 


Dick,  James. 


Steele,  Vivian  Henry.... 


42 
39 

38 

59 

37 


Feb.  15 

Apr.  19 

do  30 

do  22 

May  1 


Outside, 
do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 
Inside  .. 


Insp  of  Fish-  Presbyterian 
eries,  N.S. 

Insp.  of  Boil-j        do 
ers  and  Ma- 
chinery    of 
Steamboats 
W.  O.  Div. 

Inep.  of  Boil-  Episcopali'n 
ers  and  Ma 
chinery    of 
Steamboats 
B.C.  Div. 

fnsp.of  Hulls  Presbyterian 
&  of  Steam- 
boats,    To- 
ronto Div. 

3rd  Class....  Episcopali'n 


Canadian, 
do      ... 


N.S... 
Ont.. . 


English. 


Scotch 


Canadian. 


Que.. 


1,200  00 
1.000  00 


100,200 


800  00 


75©  00 


DEPAETMENT  OF  INLAND  EEYENUE. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Parks,  James  D 
Lawlor,  R.  A.... 


Jan. 
do 


Outside, 
do    ... 


Asst.  -  Inspt. 

W. and  M 

Insp.  of  Gas 


Methodist  ... 
R.  Catholic. 


Canadian, 
do    ... 


Ont. 
tf.B. 


500  00 
150  00 


No  promotions  in  Department  of  Marine  other  than  the  statutory  allowance  of  $50  per  annum  m 
the  Inside  Service,  and  some  small  increases  of  salary  to  several  Lighthouse-keepers. 

Notb.-Ou  the  1st  July,  1884,  the  Department  of  Marine  and  Fisheries  was  divided,  and  th follow 
ing  officers  transferred  to  the  Department  of  Fisheries,  viz.  :-Mes8rs.  John Jilton,  S.  P.  Bauset,  K.  «• 
Venning,  John  Makinson,  A.  H.  JBelliveau,  J.  A.  Murray,  J.  S.  Vebs  tei ;,T .  Aumond  and  S IB  Kent 

t  Appointed  to  the  Attorney-General's  Office,  Quebec,  1st  May,  1864;  Secretary  ^  Bowd  of  A^bj- 
trators  on  Public  Buildings,  Ottawa,  February,  1865;  to  Census  Branch,  Department  of  Agriculture, 
July,  1870;  to  House  of  cSmmons,  November,  1872;  to  Finance  Department,  November,  1874,  trana 
ferred  to  Public  Works  Department,  17th  January,  1884. 

5 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c. — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  INLAND  REVENUE.— Continued. 

APPOINTMENTS— Continued. 


Name. 


Fraser,  Geo.  J  

McCoy,  Win  

Gerald,  Walter  H 

Haun,  James  R 

Westman,  Thos 

Moreau,  Alfred  Jos  ... 
Lynch,  Patrick 

Costigan,  Henry  A  .... 
Costigan,  Henry  A... 
Huggard,  Richard  T. . 
Lane,  John 

Slattery,  Thomas 

Jones,  Richard 

Jones,  Richard 

Munro,  H.  D 

Fahey,  Owen 

Evans,  H.  Sugden 

Giroux,  A.  P 

Cox,  James  E 

Power,  R 

Cowley,  Walker 

Gray,  John 

Quinn,  J.  D 

Pennoyer,  H.  J 

Johnstone,  W.  J...  ..... 


<3 

1  Date  of  Ap- 
pointment 
and    Pro- 
mo tion. 

Inside 

or 
Outside 

1884. 

43 

July    10 

Outside. 

29 
27 
43 
21 
51 
57 

Mar.      1 
April  14 
Mar.    24 
May      3 
do        1 
April    1 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

24 
24 
50 

54 

do      22 
do      22 
do      22 
do       1 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

46 

June   21 

do    ... 

33 
33 
38 

Aug.     1 
do        1 

July      1 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

36 

do      31 

do    ... 

54 
37 
24 

Sept.     1 
Aug.     1 
Sept.    5 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

33 

22 

Oct.      1 
Not.    11 

do    ... 
do    ... 

42 
36 

do       1 
Jan.      1 

do    ... 
do    ... 

49 

do       1 

do    ... 

59 

July     1 

do    ... 

Rank 

or 
Office. 


Prob.  Excise- 
man, 
do       ... 

do       ... 

Clerk 

Messenger... 

Caretaker ... 

Asst.  -  Inspt 
W. and  M. 

Insp.W.&M. 

Insp.  of  Gas 

Prev.  Officer 

Dep.  Sup. 
Cullers. 

Mech.    Asst. 
W.  and  M. 

Insp.W.&M. 

Insp.  of  Gas 

Asst.  Inspct. 
of  Gas. 

Prob. Excise- 
man. 

Chi.  Analyst 

Clerk' 

Prob.  Excise- 
man. 

Clerk  

Asst.  Inspct 
W.  and  M. 

Dep.  Coll' tor 

Prob. Excise- 
man. 

3rd  Class  Ex- 
ciseman. 

Chf.  Inspct. 
W.  andM. 


Religion. 


Episcopalian 

Ch.  of  Eng. 

do 

do 
Methodist ... 
R.  Catholic. 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do  ... 
Methodist  ... 
R.  Catholic. 

do 

Ch.  of  Eng. 

do 
Presbyterian 

R.  Catholic. 

Episcopalian 

R.  Catholic. 

do       ... 

do  ... 
Christian 

R.  Catholic. 
do       ... 

Ch.  of  Eng.. 

Christian 


National- 
ity. 

<x> 
CI 

.2 

'> 

o 

M 

Cl, 

■ 

Irish 

Ont... 

do     

Canadian. 

do      ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 
Irish 

do... 
do... 
do... 
do  ... 
Que... 
do... 

Canadian. 
do     ... 

Irish 

do 

Man... 
do... 
NWT. 

Que... 

Ont... 

do 

Canadian, 
do     ... 
do     ... 

B.C.. 
do... 

N,S  ... 

do     ... 

Que... 

English  ... 
F.  Can'dn 
Irish 

Ont... 
Que... 

N.S... 

Canadian, 
do     ... 

Que... 
Man... 

Irish 

do 

Ont... 
Quo- 
do... 

Canadian. 

Scotch  .... 

Ont... 

PROMOTIONS. 


Robins,  Paul  M 

Humsworth,  Wm  . 

Heron,  W.  L 

Campeau,  F.  R.  E 

Blatch,  F.  K , 

Shaw,  J  F 

Chubbuck,  C.  E... 

Doyon,  J  A , 

Johnstone,  W.  J. . 

Brunei,  J 

Steen,  James , 

Redmond,  J 

Byrnes,  John 

Stewart,  Jamea 

Dixon,  R.  B 


42 

Jan. 

1 

Inside... 

37 

do 

1 

do    ... 

42 

do 

1 

do    ... 

40 

do 

1 

do    ... 

43 

do 

1 

do    ... 

28 

do 

1 

do    ... 

36 

do 

1 

do    ... 

33 

do 

1 

do    ... 

59 

do 

1 

do    ... 

36 

do 

1 

do    ... 

54 

do 

7 

Outside. 

51 

do 

7 

do    .... 

25 

Apr. 

1 

Inside... 

36 

do 

17 

Outside. 

44 

May 

1 

do    ... 

Stat.  Incr'se 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do        ... 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do       ... 

App't.  made 

permanent 

do 
Stat.  Incr'se 
App.confir'd 
Dep.  Coll'tr. 
6' 


Methodist  ... 
Episcopali'n 
R.  Catholic. 

do       .. 
Episcopali'n 

do 
Methodist  ... 
R.  Catholic. 
Christian.... 
Episcopalian 
Methodist.... 

R.  Catholic. 

do       ... 

Presbyterian 

Episcopalian 


English ... 

Ont... 

Canadian. 

do... 

Irish 

do... 

Canadian. 

do- 

do    ... 

do... 

do     ... 

do... 

do      ... 

do... 

do     ... 

do... 

Scotch  .... 

do  ... 

Canadian. 

do... 

do      ... 

do... 

Irish 

do- 

Canadian. 

do... 

do     ... 

do... 

do     ... 

Man... 

48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Tapers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885- 


Eeturn  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  year  1884,  &c.— Continued. 
DEPARTMENT  OF  INLAND  EEVENUE— Continued. 
PROMOTIONS  AND  INCREASE. 


Name. 


Toupin,  F.  X.  J.  A 


Outram,  J 

Pinsonnault,  A.  E.... 

Jack,  Wm 

Measam,  F 

Nettle,  R 

Ball,  C  R 

Valin,  J.  E 

Teakles,  B.  H 

Lusignan,  A . 

Brunei,  Geo 

LaMothe,  H.  G 

Walsh,  M.  F 

Brown,  J.  F 

Fowler,  John ..... 

Stewart,  Neil 


Munro,  H.  D 

M>ller,  A 

Hinsworth,  Wm 
James,  T.  C 


Byrne3,  John. 
Perry,  G.  L  . . 


Harney,  Thos 

Lawlor,  Henry 

Hamilton,  W.  L  .  ... 

Hanford,  T 

Beosley,  R 

O'Donnell,  J 

Ste.  Marie,  L.  0.  A. 
Farley,  J.  F 


Murphy,  D 

St.  Louis,  J.  . 
Arahill,  John 
Pirritte,  J 


Deschamps,  J.  B. 
Fournier,  J.  A... 


Campbell,  Thomas.. 

Lambert,  P 

Lavassenr,  Z 

Lyons,  John 


King,  T.  D 

Ironside,  G.  A.. 
McAllister,  A... 
Mulhern,M.  M. 

McLean,  D 

Fortier,  C.  G..., 
Rowland,  F...., 
Longley,  G.  C. 
Stratton,  W.  C. 


Hall,  C.  R '  30 


r  a*  s 


1884. 
May      1 


25 
58 

37 
31 

42 
71 
45 
42 

37 
52 

38 
29 
56 
51 

34 

54 

52 
37 
62 

59 

65 
45 
41 
29 
65 
66 
54 
57 
38 


do 
do 
do 

July 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

May 

July 
do 
do 
do 


July 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
July 
do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
do 

do 
do 
do 
do 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


Inside 

or 

Outside. 


Outside. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 
Inside... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 


1  Outside. 


May     19 


do  ... 

Inside... 
Outside. 

Inside... 

do  ... 

Outside. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  .., 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 


Rank 

or 
Office. 


3rd  Class  Ex. 
ciseman. 

do 

do       ... 

Increase 

Stat.  Incr'se 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

2nd       Class 

Clerkship 

Ast  Col.I.R 

Insp.  of  Gas 


Religion. 


Ohf.  Clerks' p 
2ndClassEx- 

ciseman. 
1st     Class 
Clerkship. 

Increase 

SrdClaes  Ex- 
ciseman. 
Messenger  . . 
Dep.  Coll'tr. 
Districtlnsp. 

do 
Accountant. 
Messenger... 
Book-keeper 
Collector  of 
Canal  Tolls 
do 

Clerk 

do    

Asst.  Coll.  of 
Canal  Tolls 

Clerk 

Asst.  Coll.  of 

Canal  Tolls 

Ferryman 

Clerk 

do    

Asst.    Insp., 
W.  &M. 

Clerk 

Coll.  I.  R.... 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
7 


R.  Catholic. 

Ch.  of  Eng. 
R.  Catholic. 
Presbyterian 
Episcopali'n 

do 
Presbyterian 
R.  Catholic. 
Baptist ....... 

R.  Catholic 
Episcopalian 
R.  Catholic 

do  .. 
Ch.  of  Eng 
Methodist  .. 
Presbyterian 

do       .. 

R.  Catholic 

Episcopalian 

Ch.  of  Eng 

Presbyterian 

R.  Catholic 
do       .. 

do 

Episcopalian 
Ch.  of  Eng 

do 
Episcopali'n 
R.  Catholic 

do 

do 

do 
do 
do 
Presbyterian 

R.  Catholic. 
do 

Episcopali'n 
R.  Catholic. 

do 
Methodist  ... 

Ch.  of  Eng. 
Presbyterian 
R.  Catholic. 
Ch.  of  Eag. 
Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 
Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 
Methodist  ... 


National- 
ity. 


Fr.Can'dn 


Scotch 

Canadian 
Scotch  .... 
English  ... 

do  ... 
Canadian 

do     ... 

do     .. 

do     ... 

do     .. 

do     .. 

Irish 

English  ... 

do  .. 
Canadian 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do     .. 

do     .. 
do     .. 

Ir.  Can'dn 
Canadian. 

do      ... 

do      ... 

do  ... 
Canadian.. 

do      ... 

do      ... 


do 
do 

Irish  ... 
Scotch 


Canadian, 
do      .. 

Irish 

Canadian 

do      .. 

Irish 


English"... 
Canadian. 

do      ... 

do      ... 

Scotch 

Canadian- 
English  ... 
Canadian 

do      .. 


Ont.. 

Que.. 

do.. 
N.S.. 
Ont.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do.. 

do., 

do.. 

do., 

N.S.. 
Que.. 
Ont., 

N.S.. 

Ont. 

do. 
Que. 

do. 

Ont., 

do. 

N.B. 
Ont. 
Ont. 
Que. 
Ont. 

Que. 
do. 
do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 

do. 
do. 

do. 
Ont. 

Que 

Ont. 
do. 
do, 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


Salary. 


$    cts. 
600  00 

600  00 

600  00 

900  00 

1,750  00 

1,250  00 

1,150  0O 

1,450  00 

1,250  OO 

1,150  0O 

800  00 

1,400  00 

1,200  00 

850  00 

850  00 


650  00 
1,200  00 
l,f09  00 

900  00 

1,400  0> 

€00  OO 
700  00 

500  00 

1,400  0O 

2,100  00 

2,000  0O 

900  0O 

400  0O 

800  0O 

1,200  0O 

600  0O 
800  0O 
700  0O 
800  OO 

650  0O 
500  OO 

400  00 

700  00 
650  00 
700  00 

700  OO 
700  00 
1,200  00 
700  00 
1,500  00 
1,550  00 
1,500  00 
1,500  00 
1,900  00 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46) 


A.  1885 


Heturn  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c. — Continued. 

DEPARTMENT  OF  INLAND  REVENUE— CbnftVwed. 

PROMOTIONS  AND  INCREASE. 


Name. 


Gow,  James 

Hegnier,  P 

Leprohon,  R.  M 

Yincent,  J.  L 

LaRue,  Geo 

Roy,  A 

Desroches,  D 

Hebert,  0.  D 

Boivin,  0.  A 

Perkins,  D.  C 

McDonald,  M.  A 

Grant,  H.  H 

Ross,  S.  F 

Bennett,  James 

Ramon,  P 

Perkins,  L.  A 

Dodd,  John 

Gosnell,  T.  S 

McSween,  James 

Schram,  B 

Craig,  J 

Crowe,  W ..... 

Fox,  T 

Kennedy,  J.  D 

Crawford,  W.  P 

Moore,  Wm 

Elwood,  G.  V 

Barker,  0 

Hart,  P.  D 

Browne,  G.  W 

Broodfoot,  S 

Rowland,  E 

Milliken,  E 

Barber,  J.  S 

Egener,  A. 

Murray,  A.  E 

Weyms,  C 

"Yates,  J.  M 

Girard,  J 

Oamyre.  J.  N 

Malo,  T 

Goron,  D 

Beauchamp,  J.  P 

Moore,  T 

Carroll,  D 

McHugh,  F.  J.  J 

Barrett,  T.  J 

Taylor,  J.  F 

Tansey,  J.  P.  F 

Atherton,  R 

Baby,  W.  A.  D 

Nichols,  J.  T 

Brougham,  M.  E 

•Ste.  Marie,  J.  B.  E 

McNamara,  M 

Manning,  J 


a,  "a  p 

Inside 

or 
Outside. 

Q 

— — 



1884. 

July      1 

Outside. 

do        1 

do    ... 

do        1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       I 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do   ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

do       1 

do    ... 

Rank 

or 
Office. 


Coll.  I.  R..,.. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Deputy  Coll. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
1st  Class  Ex- 
ciseman ... 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
2ndClassEx- 
ciseman. 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do   ... 

do 

do 

do   ... 

do 

do       ... 
3rd  Class  Ex- 
ciseman. 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do 

8 


Religion. 


Presbyterian 
R.  Catholic. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Ch.  of  Eng 
R.  Catholic 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 
Presbyterian 
Episcopali'n 
R.  Catholic. 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 

do 

Methodist  ... 

Presbyterian 

Episcopali'n 

Methodist  .. 

Presbyterian 

R.  Catholic. 

Presbyterian 

do  ... 
Episcopali'n 

do 
Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng 
Episcopalian 
Presbyterian 

do 
Methodist.... 
Episcopalian 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 

do 
Methodist  ... 
Episcopalian 
R.  Catholic. 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do  ... 
Methodist.... 
R.  Catholic 

do       ... 

do  ... 
Episcopalian 
R.  Catholic 

Baptist 

R.  Catholic 
Episcopalian 

R.  Catholic, 
do       ... 
do 
do       ... 


<a 

National- 

a 

ity. 

> 
o 

Oh 

Scotch  

Ont ... 

Canadian- 

Que.... 

do      ... 

do  ... 

do      ... 

do- 

do     ... 

do... 

do      ... 

do- 

do     ... 

do... 

do      ... 

do- 

do     ... 

do... 

do      ... 

N.B... 

do      ... 

N.S  ... 

do      ... 

do... 

English  ... 

Ont... 

do      ... 

do... 

Belgian.... 

do... 

Canadian. 

Que.  . 

English  ... 

do... 

Canadian 

Ont... 

Scotch..  ..- 

do- 

Canadian- 

do... 

Irish 

do  ... 

Canadian. 

do... 

Irish 

Que... 

do  

Ont... 

Canadian. 

do- 

Irish  

do... 

do 

do... 

Que- 

English  ... 

Canaiian. 

do... 

English  ... 

Ont ... 

Canadian. 

do- 

English ... 

do- 

Canadian. 

do... 

do      ... 

do... 

German ... 

do- 

English.— 

do- 

Canadian. 

do- 

English.... 

do- 

Canadian. 

do... 

do      ... 

Que... 

ao 

do- 

do     ... 

do... 

do      ... 

do... 

do      ... 

PE.I. 

Irish 

N.S... 

Canadian. 

Ont... 

do      ... 

do- 

do      ... 

do- 

do      ... 

Que- 

do      ... 

N  B.... 

do      ... 

Man... 

do      ... 

Ont ... 

Irish 

do- 

Canadian. 

Que... 

Irish 

do- 

do   

do- 

48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c.— Continued. 
DEPAKTMENT  OF  INLAND  REVENUE— Concluded. 

PROMOTIONS  AND  INCREASE.  


Name. 


Rouleau,  J. 


Frederick8on,  J 

Wainwright,  F.  G 

Brace,  G.  A 

Logan,  J 

Mackay,  G.  W 

Hobbs,  G.N 

Howie,  A.. >- 

Keogh,  P.  M 

Adams,  J.  S 

Falconer,  James 

Ferguson,  J 

Marshall,  F 

Girdlestone,  R.  J.  M... 

Robson,  James 

Lang,  V 

Mulligan,  J 

Wilson,  R 

Cosgrove,  J.  J 

Courtney,  J.  J....... 

Lee,  Ed 

Staudish,  J.  G 

Hesson,  C.  A 

Spence,  F.H 

Moson,  James 

Evans,  G.  T 

Harwood,  R.  U 

Tompkins,  P 

Lynes,  K 

Caven,  U 

Scullion,  J.  W 

Dick,  J.  W 

Henderson,  W 

Webster,  T 

Erl,  A 

Hanley,  A 

Stewart,  J 

Bedard,  W.  G 

iFahey,  Ed 

Henderson,  Thos 


Flynn,  Daniel 
Quinn,  J.  D.  .. 


Dawson,  W 

Miller,  J.  E 

O'Donnell,  J 

McCoy,  Wm 

Corter,  Wm 

HcPhie,  D 

Williams,  John. 
Browne,  J.  J..., 


Beauchamp,  J.  P 
Craig,  Joseph  . ... 


ftd  p 
<  °  J?    - 

%!  I 

vocg 


56 

71 

44 

50 

54 

43 

29 

48 

42 

54 

28 

56 

49 

41 

64 

43 

53 

64 

32 

28 

43 

36 

24 

21 

67 

30 

27 

38 

28 

25 

27 

27 

48 

48 

55 

38 

36 

40 

43 

43 

40 

36 

36 

25 
42 
29 
51 
48 
58 
30 

30 

44 


1884. 
July 


Gerald,  W.  H 27 

Dudley,  W  H 41 


do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do- 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 

do 

June 
July 

do 

Sept. 
Oct. 

do 

do 
July 

do 
Oct. 

Nov. 
July 


Inside 

or 
Outside. 


Outside 

do    .., 

do    ... 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do    ., 

do    ., 

do    ., 

do    ., 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do    . 

do   . 

do    , 


Rank 
or 

Office. 


Religion. 


do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

Inside... 
Outside. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 


3rdClassEx 
ciseman. 
do       .. 
do 

do       .. 
do 
do 

do       .. 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do       .. 
do 

do       .. 
do       .. 
do       .. 
do       .. 
do       .. 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do       . 
do 
do 
do 

do       . 
do       . 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do,       ... 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do       ... 

do 

Mechanical 

Ast.W.&M 

Ast.  Inspec 

W.  and  M 

3rd  Class  Ex 

ciseman .. 

do 

do       .. 
do 

do  .. 
2nd  Class... 
Insp.  of  Gas 

do 
1st  Class  Ex- 
ciseman, 
do       . 
SpecialClass 
Exciseman 
3rd      do    ... 
1st      do    ... 


R.  Catholic 


National- 
ity. 


Methodist... 

Episcopalian 

Presbyterian 

do        ... 

do       ... 

Episcopalian 

Methodist..- 

R   Catholic. 

Presbyterian 

do 

do       ... 

Methodist.... 

Oh.  of  Eng 

Presbyterian 

R.  Catholic. 

Episcopalian 

Congregati'l 

R.  Catholic. 

Presbyterian 

Ch.  of  Eng. 

iVew  Jerusal. 

Oh.  of  Eng. 

Episcopalian 

Methodist.... 

Ch   of  Eng. 

R.  Catholic. 

do 

do 

do 

do 

...  Presbyterian 

do 

Baptist 

Presbyterian 
R.  Catholic. 
Presbyterian 
do  .. 
R.  Catholic 
do       .. 


Canadian. 

do      ... 

do      ... 

Scotch  ... 

do      . 

Canadian 

do      .. 

Scotch.... 

Irish 

Scotch.... 

Canadian 
Irish  .  ...... 

Canadian. 

do      ... 

Scotch 

German  ... 

Irish 

English  ... 
Canadian. 

do      ... 

Irish  .  

Canadian 

do      ... 

do      ... 

Irish 

Canadian. 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do      ... 

Scotch 

I.  Cand'n. 
Canadian 

do     .., 

do     .., 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     .. 

do     .. 

do     .. 

do     .. 


Salary. 


Methodist. ...  Irish  . 

R.  Catholic.        do 

Episcopalian  Canadian. 

Presbyterian  Irish  . . 

R.  Catholic.  " 

Ch.  of  Eng 

Episcopalian 

Presbyterian 

Methodist.— 


Que ... 

N.B... 
N.S.... 

Ont-. 
do... 
do  ... 
do... 
do- 
do-, 
Ont... 
do., 
do- 
do .. 
do- 
do- 
do., 
do- 
do- 
do.. 
Que.. 
Ont.. 
do- 
do- 
do  . 
N.B. 
Ont. 
Que. 
S.  S... 
Ont... 
Que  — 
do... 
Ont... 
do- 
do- 
do  ... 
do... 
do..', 
do- 
do... 
do- 
do... 


Episcopahan 

R.  Catholic. 

Methodist.    , 

Ch.  of  Eng. 
Baptist 


Canadian. 

Irish 

English  ... 
Scotch  ... 
English.— 
Canadian. 


do 

Irish  . 


Canadian 
do     - 


Que. 

Ont. 
do. 
do  . 
do. 
do. 
do  . 
do  . 
do. 

Que, 
Ont, 

do 
do 


$    cts. 
750  00 

750  00s 
750  00 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
630  00 
660  0O 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
660  0O 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
660  00 
630  00 
630  0O 
630  00 
630  00 
630  00 
630  00 
630  00 

690  oo 

630  00 

630  Oft 
630  0O 
630  00 
630  00 
630  00 
690  00 
660  00- 
630  00 
730  00 
260  0O 
700  00 

600  00r 

600  00 


600  Ofr 

609  0O 

600  00 

600  00 

1,350  OO 

1,000  00 

1,000  00 

880  00 

1,000  OO 

1  200  0O 

600  00 

880  00 

18  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188* 


Beturn  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  th<* 

Civil  Service  during  the  year  1884,  &c— Continued. 

DEPAKTMENT  OF  CUSTOMS. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Name. 

6 
be 

< 

•  -<-»  • 

p*a  o 

*S  °      o 
S  S  a  2 

1884. 

Jan.      1 
do       1 

do     15 

do       1 

do       1 
Feb.      1 
Mar.      1 

do       1 

do       1 

do       1 

do       1 
do       1 
do       1 
do       1 

Feb.      1 

Jan.      1 

April    5 
do        1 

do       8 

Inside 
or 

Outside. 

Rank 

or 
Office. 

Religion. 

Nation  ali 
ity. 

<6 
o 

.s 

2 

Salary. 

Morin,  A 

Outside, 
do    ... 
do   ... 

do   ... 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do   ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

Clerk 

Que. .. 
do... 

Ont... 

N.B... 
do... 

Ont... 
Man... 

do.. 

do... 

do... 

N.S... 

do... 

N.B... 

N.S ... 

Que. .. 

Man... 
Que. .. 

do  ... 

Ont... 
Man... 

B.C  ... 
Ont... 

B.C.. 
N.B... 

Que. .. 

do  ... 

do  ... 
N.S... 
Ont... 

do  ... 
Que. .. 

Ont... 
N.S... 
Ont... 

do  ... 

do  ... 
P.E.I. 
Ont... 
Man... 
N.B... 
N.B.. 
Ont.. 

do... 
N.B.. 
Que... 

Ont.. 

$  eta. 

600  00 
600  00 

500  00 

<Jirard,  A. 

do    

Drouillard,  A ,  ,... 

Prob.  Laudg 
Waiter  and 
Searcher  ... 

Price,  George 

Boatman     & 
Tide  Waiter 
do 

600  00 

Fulton,  R 

600  00 
900  00 

Elliott,  George  M 

Thompson,  W.  H 

Collector.... 

Cashier.. 

1,200  00 

Allan,  F.  S 

Chief  Statis- 
tical Clerk. 

Chief  Check 
Clerk 

1,200  00 
1,000  oo 

McBratney,  R.  T... 

Heintz,  R.  M 

Asst.  Statis- 
tical Clerk. 
Tide  Waiter, 
do 

1,000  00 
500  00 

Ashwood,  J.  C 

O'DonnelljJ.  M 

500  00 

McGowan,  M 

Prev.  Officer 
0.  P.  Collctr 
Lndg  Waiter 
&  Searcher. 
Asst.  Appr. . 

500  00 

Dunn,  Miles  A 

150  00 

Boivin,  0 

600  00 

Osham,  W.  A , 

1,000  00 
500  00 

Matthieu,  Jos 

Collector .... 

Palois,  L.  J.  A 

Locker    and 

Tide  Waiter 

Collector.... 

500  00 

Peck,  Thomas 

750  00 

Bannerman,  W.E 

0.  P.  Collctr 

Lndg  Waiter 

&  Searcher. 

Clerk  

500  00 

Grant,  Peter 

April    1 

do       1 
do       8 

Mar.      1 

April  12 

Mar.      1 

do        1 

May       1 

April     1 

May       1 

do        1 

do        1 

do        1 
do        1 

June     1 
do       7 
do       1 
do      18 

July     1 
do       1 

July      1 
do      11 
do'       1 

Aug.     1 

May      1 
do       1 

1,000  00 
600  00 

BoTell,  H 

Franklin,  W.  A 

Lndg  Waiter 

&  Searcher. 

Appraiser  ... 

800  00 

Whittaker,  J.  E 

800  00 

Gray,  F.  W 

Prey.  Officer 
Storeman.... 



600  00 

Craven,  George 

550  00 

Porteous,  J 

Tide  Waiter. 
Prev.  Officer 
0.  P.  Collctr 
Prev.  Officer 
Tide  Waiter. 
Lndg  Waiter 
&  Searcher. 
Prev.  Officer 
do 

500  00 

Lent,  A.  S 

75  00 

JMooney,  J , 

400  00 

250  oe 

Hann,  Jamea  R 

Wilkes,  E.  T.' 

600  00 

Plunkett,  W 

600  00 

jGrant,  W 

60  00 

Johnston,  J,  T 

* 

500  0O 

Alexander,  A 

Clerk 

600  0O 

Cronk,  Asa 

O.P.  Collctr 
Prev.  Officer 
do 

Clerk 

Collector. ... 

500  0O 

McE&chern,S 

40  00 

Alcock,  James 

500  00 

1,000  00 

600  00 

Caldwell,  B.  McG 

Dobson,  W 

Boudrot,  A 

0.   P.   Coll. 

Collector 

Clerk 

400  00 

Thompson,  Wm 

Bishop,  Li.  S 

500  00 
600  00 

Connolly,  J 

Prev.  Officer 

500  00 

Richardson,  W.  H 

Tide  Waiter. 

Tide  Waiter 
and    Sub- 
Collector.  ' 

500  00 

S.  W.  Spilletto 

600  00. 

10 


4&  Victoria. 


Sessional  Tapers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885* 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c— Continued. 

DEPAKTMENT  OP  CUSTOMS— Concluded. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Name. 


Payne,  M 

Farrow,  A 

Beau  champ,  A. 

Bobbins,  A 

Young,  W 

Mclsaac,  A 

McDonald,  A  ... 
Brossard,  Denis. 


Tremaine,  A.  B.... 

Quinn,  M.  F 

Butler,  T 

Smith,  B  H 

Milne,  T.K 

Crowhurst,  W.  J. 

Eberts,  Jos.  M 

Keighbley,  B 

Brown,  J 


Flynn,  J.  P 

McKenzie,  C.  J. 
Cryster,  J.  A  ... 
Fourgere,  P.  T. 
Wilkins,  0.  F.... 


Martin,  Jos.  A , 

McDonald,  A 

Ken,  C.  E 

Mathews,  J 

Keeting,  M.  E.... 

Farrow,  R.  R 


Wood,  Z.  T..... 

Bays,  E.  C 

Ostrom,  W.  A. 


Simpson,  D 

Clementi,  C.  H. 


21 


SaSE 


1884. 


July 

do 

do 

do 
Aug. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
July 

do 
Sept. 

do 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 

do 

do 
do 
do 
do 
do 

do 
Nov. 

do 

do 
Dec. 
June 

Dec. 

do 
do 

Sept. 

July 
Dec. 


Inside 

or 
Outside. 


Outside. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

Inside... 

Outside, 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 


Rank 
or 

Office. 


0.  P.  Coll... 
Collector.... 
Messenger . . 
Prev.  Officer 
0.  P.  Coll... 
Prev.  Officer 

do 

Clerit  &  Ldg 
Waiter . 

Clerk 

Asst  Gauger 

Clerk  

Collector . 
0.  P.  Coll 
Ldg.  Waiter 

do 

Prev.  Officer 

Clerk  &  Ldg 

Waiter  . 

do 

do 

do 

Prev.  Officer 
Ldg.  Waiter 
and  Clerk 
Collector...., 
Prev.  Officer 
Sub-Coll'tor 

do 

Packer 

3rd     Class 

Clerk 

Ldg.  Waiter 

Locker 

Clerk  

Ldg.  Waiter 

and  Clerk 

Ldg.  Waiter 

do 
and  Clerk. 


Religion. 


National- 
ity. 


Ont.. 
do.. 

Que. 

N.S.. 
do., 
do- 
do.. 

Ont. 
N.S.. 
Que.. 

do.. 
B.C. 
Que.. 

do.. 
Ont. 

do.. 

do., 
do- 
do., 
do., 

N.S.. 

Ont. 

Que. 
N.S.. 
do. 
Ont. 
N.S.. 


Methodist. 


Canadian 


Ont. 
Man. 

do. 

do  . 

Ont 
do. 

do. 


Salary, 


$  cte» 

300  CO 
1,000  oo 
5f0  OO 
500  OO 
150  GO> 
100  OO 
100  oo< 

500  00 ' 
550  00 
600  OO' 
550  00' 
1,200  OO 
500  OO 
600  00 
550  00 
500  00 

600  0O 
600  00 
600  0O 
600  00' 
100  00' 

600  00 
400  OO 
4(0  00 
250  OO 
6C0  CO 
500  00 

700  0O 

1,000  00 

800  OO 

800  00 

700  0O 
600  0O 

600  OO 


PROMOTIONS  AND  INCREASE. 


Perchard,  H.  G. 
Banting,  C 


Gott,  George... 
O'Meara,  D.  D. 
Milne,  A.  R.  ... 

Hill,  W.  H 

Carter,  W.  H... 


Mar.  1 

July  1 

Aug.  1 

June  1 

do  1 

do  1 

do  1 


Outside, 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  .., 


Collector  .... 
Clerk  &  Ldg 

Waiter 

Collector.... 
Surveyor .... 
Appraiser  ... 
Inspector  .... 
Chief  Clerk. 


Episcopalian 

Congrega'lst 
Episcopalian 
R.  Catholic. 


Episcopalian 
do 


Canadian. 

I.    Can'dn 

do      ... 

Canadian. 


I.    Can'dn 
do      ... 


Que. .. 

Ont... 
do  ... 

Que... 
BO... 
N.S... 
Que.  . 


1,000  00 

600  0O 
1,000  00 
1,600  OO 
1,600  00 
2,000  00 
1,400  00 


11 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


■Beturn  of  the  Namss  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &s\ — Continued, 

POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Name. 


Hayues,  Edwin  C. 

Bradley,  John 

Hayes,  G.  H 

Alford.W 

Lockhart  J.  A 

Mahon,  M.  J... 

Elliott,  J.  D  

Pelton,  J.  E 

Breadner,  R.  W.  ... 

CJonroy,  J.  M  ....... 

Clenienti,  C.  H  .... 

Stevenson,  J.  8.... 

Robertson,  0.  R.... 

Weldon,  E.  D  

Sfcort,  S  

O'Hagan,  E.  J 


©.a  g 
o|     .2 

+>  O  B  a 
Q 


1884. 

Mar. 

do 

April 

Mda/ 

do 
Sept. 

do 

do 

do 
Oct. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Dec. 


Inside 

or 
Outside. 


rnside 
do 
do 
do    , 
do 

do    , 
do 
do 

do  , 
do  . 
do  , 
do  , 
do  , 
do 
do 
do 


Rank 

or 
Office. 


Clerk 

Packer 

Clerk  

do    

do    

Packer.... 
Clerk 

do     

do     

do    

do    

do    

do    

do     

Messenger 
Clerk 


© 

Religion. 

National- 
ity. 

.2 
p 

Baptist 

English  ... 
Irish  

N.B... 

Ch  of  Eng  . 

Ont... 

do       ... 

do    

N.B... 

Methodist  ... 

English  ... 
Irish  

Ont... 

PresbyteriaD 

do  ... 

R.  Catholic. 

do    

do  ... 

Methodist  ... 

do    

Que ... 

Presbyterian 

do    

Ont... 

do 

do    

Que ... 

R.  Catholic. 

do    

Ont... 

Ch  of  Eng 

English  ... 

do  ... 

Methodist  ... 

Irish 

do  ... 

Ch  of  Eng. 

English  ... 
do 

N.B... 

Episcopalian 

do  ... 

do 

do      ... 

Eng... 

R.  Catholic. 

Irish 

Ont... 

Salary. 


$   cts. 

450  00 
300  00 
400  00 
450  00 
400  00 
300  00 
400  00 
400  00 
450  00 
400  00 
450  00 
400  00 
400  00 
400  00 
300  00 
400  00 


PROMOTIONS. 


Harrington,  W.  H. 

McLennan,  A 

Sinks,  G.  J 


31 

Nov. 

24 

Inside ... 

1st  Class. 

44 

do 

21 

do    ... 

2nd  Class. 

36 

do 

24 

do    ... 

do      ... 

Protestant- 
Presbyterian 
Ch  of  Eng.. 


English  ... 

Scotch 

English  ... 


N.S... 
Ont... 
Eng... 


From 

1,150  00 
800  00 
800  00 


.Inspector's  Offices. 
PROMOTIONS. 


Bolduc,  A 

Madore,  J.  A  . 
Gervais,  J.  E  . 
LeSueur,  C.  P 
Moloney,  D. ... 
Fletcher,  E.  H 


25 

Jan.      1 

Outside. 

29 

Oct.    27 

do    ... 

31 

do      27 

do    ... 

36 

Feb.    15 

do    ... 

42 

do     16 

do    ... 

33 

July      1 

do    ... 

Asst.Tnsp 
2nd  Class 
do  ,.. 
1st  Class. 
2nd  Class. 
Inspector  . 


R.  Catholic. 

do 

do 
Methodist  ... 
R.  Catholic. 
Episcopalian 


French 

do 

do 
English  ... 

Irish 

English  ... 


Que... 

600  00 

do  ... 

800  00 

do  ... 

800  00 

N.B... 

1,020  00 

Irel'd. 

800  00 

Que... 

1,200  00 

Eailway  Mail  Clerks. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Houston,  Stewart.. 

Murray,  Alex 

.Freel,  E.   J 

Corcoran,  John 

Griffith,  John 

Blondeau,  A  .., 

O'Farrell,  John 

•Campbell,  John..... 

Smith,  F.  H  

Southall,  F 

Richardson,  W 

Harrison,  F.  E.  A. 

Gleeson,  C 

Chavot,  C 


Feb. 

15 

Mar. 

24 

Feb. 

15 

April 

22 

do 

30 

May 

2 

do 

8 

do 

8 

June 

2 

July 

21 

do 

6 

do 

1 

do 

1 

do 

1 

Outside, 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  .., 


Clerk 

do  ....  . 

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

12 


Ch.  of  Eng 
Presbyterian 
R.  Catholic. 

do 
Episcopalian 
R.  Catholic- 
do 
Presbvterian 
Ch.  of  Eng. 
R.  Catholic. 
Methodist  ... 
Episcopalian 
R.  Catholic. 
do 


English  ... 

Ont... 

480  00 

Scotch 

N.  B... 

480  00 

Irish 

Ontj... 

480  00 

do    

Irel'd. 

480  00 

do    

Ont... 

480  00 

French 

Que... 

480  00 

Irish 

Ont... 

480  00 

Scotch 

iV.B... 

480  00 

English  ... 

Ont ... 

600  00 

do      ... 

N.S... 

480  00 

Irish  

Ont... 

480  00 

English  ... 

do  ... 

480  00 

Irish 

do  ... 

480  00 

French .... 

Fra'ce 

480  00 

48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


-Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaiies  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 

Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c— Continued. 

POST   OFFICE   DEPARTMENT— Continued. 

Eailwat  Mail  Clerks— Concluded. 

APPOINTMENTS., 


Name. 

26 
25 

29 
30 
26 
24 
24 
27 

^2 

«i£p- 

Q 

1884. 

July      1 

Aug.     1 

Oct.    20 

Dec.      1 

do       1 

do       1 

do       4 

Nov.    24 

Inside 
or 

Outside. 

Outside. 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 
do    ... 

Rank 

or 
Office. 

Religion. 

National- 
ity- 

CD 

o 

04 

Salary. 

Jones,  WE.C 

Ramsey,  W.  J 

Humphrey,  W.  H.. 

TTnvt     J    W"    

Clerk 

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

do    

Episcopalian 
Methodist  ... 
Oh.  of  Eng 
Free  Baptist 
Oh.  of  Eng  . 

do 
Presbyterian 

do 

English  ... 
do 

Irish  

Scotch  

Irish 

English  ... 

Irish 

do    

Eng... 
Ont... 

do  ... 
N.B... 
Ont... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

$  cts. 

480  00 
480  00 
480  00 
480  00 
480  00 
480  00 
480  00 
600  00 

$  cts 

SwRTl      W     H          

Lpiidlev.  W 

Eagleson,  J   

McDonald,  H 

PROMOTIONS. 


Lachapelle,  A.. 
McLellan,  M.... 
Edgar,  W  ....... 

Yorick,  J ■ 

Mitchell,  W 

Cleary,  A 

Magee,  R.  G.... 

Jack,  R.  S 

Brittain,  A 

Gillessie,  J.  B  . 

Plumb,  0 

Farrow,  J.  M- .. 
Coulter,  A.  F . . 
McLean,  D.  J-. 
Dawaon,  J 


40 

May      8 

Outside. 

31 

April  30 

do    ... 

37 

Oct.    27 

do    ... 

25 

do      27 

do    ... 

32 

do     27 

do    ... 

36 

Jan.      7 

do    ... 

31 

May      8 

do    ... 

30 

do       8 

do    ... 

25 

do       8 

do    ... 

33 

Sept.  30 

do    ... 

29 

do      30 

do    ... 

22 

Nov.   24 

do    ... 

24 

do     24 

do    ... 

21 

do     24 

do    ... 

20 

do     24 

do    ... 

1st  Class  . 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 
2nd  Class. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 


R.  Catholic. 
Methodist^ ... 
Episcopalian 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 
R.  Catholic 

do 
Methodist  ... 
Presbyterian 
Episcopalian 
R.  Catholic- 
Episcopalian 
Methodist  ... 

do 
Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng. 


French 

Scotch 

do  .... 
Irish- 

do     

do      

do      

Scotch  ... 
English  .. 

Irish 

English  .. 

do      .. 

Scotch  .... 

do      ... 

Irish  


Que  ... 

do  ... 
Ont... 

do  ... 
U.S... 
Irel'd. 
N.B... 

do  ... 

do  ... 
Ont.., 

do  .., 

do  ... 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 


From 

800  00 
800  00 
800  00 
800  00 
800  00 
480  00 
480  00 
480  00 
520  00 
520  00 
520  00 
520  00 
480  00 
480  00 
480  00 


To 

960  00 
960  00 
960  00 
960  00 
960  00 
640  00 
640  00 
640  00 
640  00 
640  00 
640  00 
600  00 
600  00 
600  00 
600  00 


Citt  Post  Offices. 
PROMOTIONS. 


Lefebvre,  G.  J.  D 

Harding,  T 

Thompson,  A.  G.. 

Riddell,  R.  W 

Hassard,  R .. 

Hevey,  O -... 

Bennett,  W.  E 

Cairns,  A.  W 

Brough,  R.  R 


30 

April 

30 

36 

Nov. 

25 

30 

Jan. 

7 

23 

May 

8 

26 

do 

12 

29 

Sept. 

30 

29 

Oct. 

19 

30 

do 

19 

41 

do 

1 

Outside. 

2nd  Class. 

R.  Catholic 

do    ... 

do      ... 

do 

do    ... 

do      ... 

Ch.  of  Eng... 

do    ... 

do      ... 

Presbyterian 

do    ... 

do      ... 

Ch  of  Eng.. 

do    ... 

do      ... 

a.  Catholic- 

do    ... 

do      ... 

Methodist  ... 

do    ... 

do      ... 

do 

do    ... 

Asst.  P.M. 

Ch.  of  Eng.. 

French... 

Irish 

Scotch  . . 
Irish 

do      .... 

do  .... 
English . 

Irish 

English 


Que... 

760  0 

do  ... 

800  00 

Ont... 

800  00 

do  ... 

760  00 

do  ... 

560  00 

do  ... 

520  00 

do  ... 

760  00 

do  ... 

680  00 

do  ... 

800  00 

900  00 
900  00 
900  00 
900  00 
900  00 
900  00 
900  00 
900  00 
1,400  CO 


Mail  Transfer  Agents. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Chase,  C 

33 

27 

Sept.    6 

Aug.    9 

Outside, 
do    ... 

Transfer 
Agent, 
do 

Ch.ofEng. 
Methodist  ... 

English  ... 
do      ... 

Que  ... 
Ont  ... 

400  00 
400  00 

Harper,  J.  F 

13 

48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  460 


A.  1885 


Keturn  of  the  Narnos  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c— Continued. 


POST   OFFICE  DEPARTMBNT- 
Inspector's  Offices. 
.APPOINTMENTS. 


■Continued. 


Name. 


HcShane,  J.  A.... 
Sweetnam,  G.  H. 


p*ei  o 
-^  o  a  2 

«  p.  §  a 


1884. 

Sept.  30 
April  19 


Inside 

or 
Outside. 


Outside, 
do    ... 


Rank 

or 
Office. 


Clerk, 
do 


Religion. 

National- 
ity. 

u 

a 

'> 
p 

R.  Catholic. 
Methodist.... 

Irish 

do 

Que... 
Ont... 

Charlottetown  Post  Office. 

.Murphy,  M.  W 

23 

Sept.     6 

Outside. 

Clerk 

R.  Catholic. 

Irish 

P.E.I. 

400  00 

Halifax  Post  Office. 

Sullivan,  E.  A 

22 
20 
21 

Feb.     15 
do      15 
Aug.     2 

Outside, 
do    ... 
do    ... 

Clerk 

Methodist.... 

do      

do      

English... 

do      

Scotch  .... 

N.S... 
do  ... 
do  ... 

400  df 

Kaye,  Frank  C    

do    

400  00 

do    

400  00 

St.  John  Post  Office. 

Calhoun,  J.  A 

Morgan,  Arch. 

F&irweather,  E.  W.  H.. 
Ferguson,  P 

Eckhardt,  Wm.  H 

•O'Dowd,  F ..... 

Battle,  J.  J 


1883. 

20 

Nov.     5 
1884. 

Outside. 

35 

April  19 

do    ... 

33 

Oct.     20 

do    ... 

22 

Dec.      1 

do    ... 

Clerk 


Let.  Carrier. 

Clerk .... 

do     


Baptist. 


Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng  . 
Presbyterian 


Scotch.... 

English... 

do      

Irish 


N.B. 

N.S. 
N.B. 
do  . 


Quebec  Post  Office. 


27 

Jan.      7 
1883. 

Outside. 

28 

Feb.      6 
1884. 

do    ... 

21 

Oct.    30 

do    ... 

Clerk 

Let.  Carrier. 
Clerk 


Ch.  of  Eng.. 

English  ... 

Ont... 

R.  Catholic. 

Irish 

Que ... 

do 

do  

do  ... 

Montreal  Post  Office. 


Murphy,  Wm.  ., 

O'Oonohoe,  D 

fTheriault,  Edgar 

Nugent,  Jas 

L'Orauge,  Oscar 

Plouffe,  Frs 

Mcintosh,  A.  D.  D 

Chandler,  H 

Lamoureux,  Alph.  E.... 

Crowe,  Wm.  J 

Lamoureux,  Arthur  E. . 
Gaas,  W.  H 

*  Order  in  Council  2nd  May,  1884. 
f  Resigned  13th  May,  1884. 


28 

Jan.       1 

Outside. 

26 

Feb.    15 

do    ... 

do     15 

do    ... 

25 

do      15 

do    ... 

21 

do       1 

do    ... 

24 

Jan.      1 

do    ... 

21 

March  10 

do    ... 

19 

do     10 

do    ... 

19 

do     10 

do    ... 

21 

Nov.   24 

do    ... 

19 

April  19 

do    ... 

24 

do      19 

do    ... 

Clerk 

do    , 

Let.  Carrier. 

do       ... 

Clerk 

do    

do    

do    

do    

Let.  Carrier. 
Clerk 

do    


R.  Catholic. 

Irish 

Que... 

do 

do 

do  ... 

R.  Catholic. 

Trish 

Irel'd. 

do       ... 

F.  Can'dn. 

Que... 

do       ... 

do     ... 

do  ... 

do       ... 

Scotch-.... 

do  ... 

do       ... 

F.  Can'dn, 

do  ... 

do       ... 

do     ... 

do  ... 

do       ... 

Irish 

do  ... 

do       ... 

F.  Can'dn. 

do  ... 

Ch.  of  Eng.. 

frish 

do  ... 

14 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Bbturn  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 

Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c— Continued. 

POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT— Continued. 

Montreal  Post  Office— Concluded. 

APPOINTMENTS. __ 


Name. 


*Gaudette,  M.  H.  „ 

Giroux,  T.  A 

Giguere,  Jos 

Collard,  J.  G 

fDescarries,  A 

King,  J 

Trepannier,  V 

Dufort,  A 

Duboulav,  A 

Lepine,  M 

Ohartier,  J.  0.  A. 

Fauriol,  A 

Barbe,  W 

Pepin,  J 

ISauriol,  J.  B  

Clermont,  W 

Leclaire,  0.  J.  A, 
Gaudet,  M.  fl.  A.. 

Thouin,  Jos 

Cote,  A.  B 

Latimer,  T 


Bisson,  J.  L 

O'Mahony,  M 

Grondin,  A.  L...., 

Florence,  C 

Simard,  Maxime. 
Lortie,  Alphonse 


p,ci  o 


^flrCJ 


«  P. 


aI 


1884 

April  19 

do     22 

do      22 

do      30 

May    12 

do     15 

April  19 

June  21 

July    21 

Sept.     6 

do       6 


do 
do 
do 
Oct. 
do 
do 
do 


Inside 

or 
Outside. 


do     21 


do 
do 


Not.     1 


do  1 

Dec.  1 

do  1 

do  13 

do  16 


Outside. 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  - 

do  ... 

do  - 

do  - 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 

do  .. 


Rank 
or 

Office. 


Let.  Carrier. 

Clerk 

Let.  Carrier 
do  ... 
do 

do       ... 
do 

do       ... 
do 
do       ... 

Clerk 

do    

do    

Let.  Carrier, 
do       ... 

Clerk 

do    

do    

Let.  Carrier. 

Clerk 

Let.  Carrier, 
do  ... 
do       ... 

Clerk. 

do    

do    

Let.  Carrier. 


Religion. 


R. 


Catholic. 

do       .. 
XJatholic. 

do       .. 


do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 
do 


National- 
ity. 


F.  Can'dn. 

do      ... 
F.  Can'dn 

do     ... 


Que. 
do  . 
do  . 

do. 


Irish  .... 
F.  Can'dn 

do 
French .... 
F.  Can'dn 

do 

do 

do     ... 

do 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

Irish 

F.  Can'dn 

Irish 

F.  Can'dn 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 


Que... 
do- 
do... 
Fran.. 
Que.., 
do... 
do- 
do,., 
do- 
do... 
do- 
do- 
do., 
do- 
do- 
Irel'd 
Que.., 
irel'd, 
Que., 
do- 
do., 
do.. 


Salary. 


Ottawa  Post  Office. 


Brenot,  Honore 

Fagan,  Michael.... 
Bedard,  Theodore.. 

Noel,  Louis  E 

Matthewman,  E.  H 

Barrow,  John 

Garrett,  P.  L. 

Bruce,  D.  A 

Marion,  N 

Myers,  F.  L 

Pegg,  A 


27 

Feb.    15 

Outside. 

20 

do     15 

do    ... 

19 

Jan.      1 

do    ... 

20 

Feb.    15 

do    ... 

19 

Mar.    24 

do    ... 

33 

May      8 

do    ... 

22 

do     20 

do    ... 

23 

July    21 

do   ... 

20 

Sept.     8 

do    ... 

18 

do       8 

do    ... 

21 

Oct.      1 

do   ... 

Clerk 

Let.  Carrier. 

do       ... 

Clerk  

do    

Let.  Carrier, 
Clerk 

do    

Let.  Carrier 

Clerk .., 

Let.  Carrier 


R.  Catholic. 

French 

Fran.. 

do       ... 

Irish 

Ont... 

do       ... 

F.  Can'dn 

Que... 

do       ... 

do     ... 

Ont  .. 

Presbyterian 

English ... 

do... 

R.  Catholic 

do     ... 

Eng... 

Ch.  of  Eng. 

Irish 

Ont... 

do  .- 

do  ... 

R.  Catholic 

F.  Can'dn 

Que... 

do       ... 

German ... 

Ont... 

do       ... 

Irish 

Irel'd. 

$  cts. 
360  00 
400  00 
360  00 
300  00 
360  00 

360  oa 

300  00 
360  00 
360  00 
360  00 
400  00 
400  Off 
400  00 
360  00 
360  CO 
400  00 
400  00 
400  00 
360  0O 
400  00 
360  0O 
360  00 
360  00 
400  00 
400  0O 
400  00 
360  00 


400  00 
300  00 
300  0O 
400  0O 
400  00 
300  00 
500  00 
400  00 
360  0O 
400  00 
360  00 


*  Appointed  Clerk  10th  October,  1884. 


|  Services  dispensed  let  August; 
15 


Kingston  Post  Office. 

D'Arcy,  R.  J 

21 

April  19 

Outside   Clerk 

Methodist.... 

Irish 

Ont... 

400  00 

., 

Belleville  Post  Office. 

21 
21 
29 

June   27 
July      1 
Sept     8 

Outside. 
do    ... 

do    ... 

Clerk 

Methodist ... 
Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng. 

8cotch  . ... 
do    

English ... 

Ont ... 

do... 
do... 

400  00 

Walker,  W  B 

do    

400  00 

do    

400  00 

48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46>) 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &e. — Continued. 

POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT— Concluded. 


Toronto  Post  Office. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Name. 


Boddy,  James  S 

Swait,  C.  E„  .. 

Langstone,  W.  H 

Symons,  Alf. 

Smith,  Charles  E '. 

Woodcock,  W.  M.  B 

Durham,  Robert 

Dwyer,  H.  A 

Mitchell,  Geo.  (resigned 
May,  1884.) 

Pollock,  George 

Reid,  Samuel 

Spencer,  Edw..  ..... 

Briggs,  J.  R 

Sparks,  Walter 

Haycock,  Thomas.. 

Booth, G  

Dillon,  R 

Piatt,  W.  J 

Thompson,  C 

McOandless,  T.  H. 

Hynes,  W.  A 

Spencer,  E 


•  >»  i 

p*a  o 

«gl    .2 

Inside 

^.s^o 

or 

tic 

®  3  2  s 

as   ft*  B 

Outside. 

< 

Q 
1884. 

30 

Jan.      1 

Outside. 

27 

Mar.    10 

do    ... 

28 

do     24 

do    ... 

21 

Apr.    19 

do    ... 

30 

do      19 

do    ... 

20 

do     19 

do    ... 

21 

do     22 

do    ... 

19 

do     22 

do    ... 

do      30 

do    ... 

29 

do     30 

do    ... 

27 

do     30 

do    ... 

20 

do     30 

do    ... 

36 

do     30 

do    ... 

21 

do      30 

do    ... 

29 

May    15 

do    ... 

20 

June  21 

do    ... 

17 

Aug.  10 

do    ... 

23 

do      10 

do    ... 

18 

do      10 

do    ... 

26 

Oct.    21 

do    ... 

18 

do     21 

do    ... 

20 

July      1 

do    ... 

Rank 

or 
Office. 


Clerk 

Let.  Carrier. 

do       ... 

Clerk  

do    

Let.  Carrier. 
Clerk 

do    

Let.  Carrier. 

do  ... 
do  ... 
do       ... 

Clerk 

do    

Let.  Carrier. 
do       ... 

Clerk 

Let.  Carrier, 
do       ... 

Clerk 

do    

do    


Religion. 


Methodist  ... 
Ch.of  Eng. 

do 

do  ... 
Methodist  ... 
Ch.  of  Eng. 
Methodist  ... 
Ch.  of  Eng. 


Presbyterian 
Methodist  ... 

do       ... 

do       ... 
Ch.  of  Eng. 

do 
Methodist  ... 

Catholic 

Ch.  of  Eng. 

do 
Presbyterian 

Catholic 

Methodist  ... 


National- 
ity. 


Irish 

English ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

Irish 

do 


Scotch  .... 

Irish 

English  ... 

do      ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

do     ... 

Irish 

English  ... 

do     ... 

Irish  ., 

do 

English  ... 


Ont. 
Eng. 

do  . 

do. 

do. 

do. 
Que. 
Ont. 


Ont. 

do. 
Eng. 
Ont. 
Eng. 

do  . 
Ont. 

do. 
Eng. 
Ont. 

do. 

do. 
Encr. 


Hamilton  Post  Office. 


Levier,  E 

Echlin,  J.  (resigned  8th 
February,  1884.) 

Morden,  Joseph  R 

Mundy,  W  , * 


Jan. 
do 

Feb. 
Mar. 


Outside. 
do    ... 

do    ... 
do    ... 


Let.  Carrier. 
do       ... 


Clerk 

Let.  Carrier. 


Catholic. 

Methodist ... 

do       ... 
Catholic  .  ... 


English 
Irish  .... 


do  

English 


Irel'd. 

Ont ... 
do... 


London  Post  Office. 


Carrothers,  A. 
Maitland,  M.  J 

Gushing,  J 

Devinney,  F.  J 
Southcott,  F,... 


25 

Jan.       1 

Outside. 

21 

May       2 

do    ... 

22 

Aug.     9 

do    ... 

24 

Sept.     1 

do    ... 

24 

do       1 

do*... 

Clerk 

Let.  Carrier. 
do       ... 

Clerk 

Let.  Carrier. 


Ch.  of  Eng.. 

Irish 

Ont ... 

Presbyterian 

English  ... 
Irish 

do... 

Catholic  .... 

do... 

do      

do 

do... 

Ch.  of  Eng. 

English  ... 
1 

Eng... 

Victoria  Post  Office. 

Newberry,  C.  W 

18 

May    20 

Outside. 

Clerk 

Episcopalian 

English ... 

B.C  ... 

400  00 

OFFICE  OF  AUBITORrGENERAL. 


Bartlett,  Hudson  Arthur 


25 


Feb.    11 


Inside... 


3rd  Class. 


Baptist 


Canadian 


Que... 


PROMOTION. 

"Baldereon,  John  H 

25 

July     1 

Inside... 

2nd  Class.... 

Ch.  of  Eng- 

Canadian. 

Ont... 

1,100  00 

16 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  year  188  J,  &c. — Continued, 

DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  INTERIOR. 
APPOINTMENTS. 


Name. 


Capreol,  Fred.  Chase... 

Turner,  Henry  Hamish. 
Pereira,  Lyndwode  0... 


Lambart,  Octavius  Hy. 

Buchanan,  Pet.  Toronto 
Rothwell,  Thomas  G 


Hays,  James  Alex. 


McHugh,  John  Joseph. 


McTaggart,  John 


Smith,  Henry  Hall, 


McLean,  Thos.  Alex 

-Montgomery,  Geo.  Arch, 


22 


37 


»OB3 


1884. 
Feb.    15 

Mar.    24 

April    3 


June   21 

do      21 
do      30 


April  30 


do      30 


do      30 


May    15 


June   12 


May     19 
In     lieu 
of  Dr.  A. 
Jukes, 
resigned 


Inside 

or 

Outside. 


Inside 


do 
do 


do 

do 

do 


Outside, 


do    .., 


do 


do 


do 


do 


Rank 
or 

Office. 


Prob.  3rd  01. 
Clerk, 
do 

Priv.  Stc.  to 
Hon.  Min.of 
the  Interior, 
from  17th 
Oct.,  1883. 

Prob.  3rd  CI. 
Clerk. 
do 

Prob.2ndCl. 
Clerk,  from 
1st  July, '84 

Dom.  Lands 
A  gent,  from 
1st  May, '84, 
at  Turtle  M. 
Dist  ,NWT. 

Dom.  Lands 
Agent,  from 
l8tMay,'84, 
at  Coteau 
Dist.,NWT. 

Dom.  Lands 
Agent, from 
1st  May, '84, 
at  Touch- 
wood Dist., 
N  W.T. 

Inspector  of 
Dom  .Lands 
Agencies  & 
member  of 
L'nd  Board, 
vice  Pearce. 

Registrar, 
Cal gary 
District. 

Registrar  of 
District  of 
Touchwo'd, 
Re  gin  a  and 
Souris,  N.- 
W.T. 


Religion. 


Ch.  of  Bng. . 

do 
do 


do 

Presbyterian 
Ch.  of  Eng. 


National- 
ity. 


Canadian. 

Scotch 
English  ... 


do      ... 

S.  Can'dn 
Canadian . 


Ont. 

do  . 
Que. 


Ont.., 

do  .. 
do  .. 


Episcopalian 


Canadian 


Ont 


Salary. 


$  cts. 
550  00 

600  00 
400  00 


550  00 

1,000  00 
1,100  00 


1,200  00 
1,200  00 
1,200  00 

3,200  00 

1,200  00 
1,200  00 


CHANGE. 


Pearce,  William. 


May     15 


Outside. 


Spt  of  Mines 
in  Manitoba 
&  N.W.T. ; 
also  memb. 
of  Land  B'd 
(previously 
Inspector  of 
Dom.  Lands 
Agencies;. 


If 


Ch.  of  Eng. 


Canadian. 


Man... 


3,200  00 


46—2 


4:8  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.   46.) 


A.  1885 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &a. —Continued. 
DEPARTiMRNT  OF  THR  INTERIOR- Concluded. 

PROMOTIONS  AND  INCREASES  TO  PERMANENT  OFFICERS. 


Name. 

< 

29 

27 

Date  of  Ap- 
pointment 
and    Pro- 
motion. 

Inside 

or 
Outside. 

Rank 

or 
Office. 

Religion. 

National- 
ity. 

o 

a 

'> 

o 

H 

Salary. 

Gauvreau,  P.  Valmore. 

1884. 
April  30 

do      30 
do      30 

Outside. 

do    ... 
do    ... 

Agent  at  Ed- 
monton Dt 

fr.  1st  May, 
1884  (previ- 
ously Asst. 
Agt.  at  Pr 
Albert,     at 
$700  pr.  an. 

Assistant  at 
Dom.  Lands 
Agncy,  Cal- 
gary (previ- 
ously   paid 
at  $700  per 
annum). 

Assistant  at 
Swift    Cur- 
rent (previ- 
ously    act- 
ingAg'rit  at 
Gladstone, 
at  *700  per 
annum). 

$     Ct3. 

•  1,200  00 

1,095  00 

Sutherland,  J.  McP 

1,095  00 

DEPARTMENT  OF  AGRICULTURE. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


Morin,  Ed.,  M.D 

Desjardins,  Alfred.. 

Clay,  E.  McC 

McEachran,  D 

Baker,  M.  C 

Coutura,  J.  A 

Clement,  A.  W 

Coutlee,  Olivier  C  

Walsh,  Wm 

McGovern,  J.  M 

Lyster,  A.  F 

Fraser,  H.  L 

Farrow.  Robinson  R... 

Smith,  Frederick  H 

Verner,  James  W.  D..,.. 
Copping,  Edmond.    ... 

Garrett,  Lenox 

Brown,  Chas.  B 

Beaudoin,  Joseph 

Primeau,  Elector  F 

Miquelon,  Jos.  Z.  C 

Wood,  Albert  A.  F 

Layton,  John  G.  G 

Bailey,  Horace  H 

Macdonald,  Henry. 


Feb.  15 

Apr.  22 

May  12 

do  12 

do  12 

do  12 

do  12 

do  12 


May     15 
June     2 


June  21 
do  21 
do      21 


July  25 

Sept  30 

Oct.  19 

do  27 


Outside. 

Inside... 

Outside. 

do    ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 

do  ... 
Inside... 

do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 

do    .. 

do    .. 

do  .. 
Outside 
Inside .. 

do  .. 
Outside 
Inside  . , 

do    ... 

do    ... 

do    ... 


FT  1th  Officer 

Messenger... 

Img.  Agent. 

Chief     Vet. 

Inspector. 

Asst.     do    ... 

do       do    . 

do       do    . 

Constable ... 

Caretaker, 

Levis. 
Img.  Agent.. 
3rd  01. Clerk 

do        ... 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do       ... 

do 

do  m    ... 
Caretaker  ... 

Packer 

do 
Img.  Agent. 
3rd  01.  Clerk 
Statl.  Officer 
Pat.  Exam'er 
3rd  01.  Clerk 

~T8 


R.  Catholic. 

do       ... 

Baptist 

Protestant... 
Ch.  of  Eug. 
R.  Catholic. 
Protestant... 
R.  Catholic, 
do 

do 
Ch.  of  Eng. . 
R.  Catholic. 
Methodist.... 
Ch  of  Eng. . 

do 
R.  Catholic. 
Ch.  of  Eng.. 
Methodist.... 
R.  Catholic 

do 

do  ... 
C.  Apostoiic 
Oh.  of  Eng.. 

do  ... 
Presbyterian 


F.  Can'dn 
Canadian. 


Scotch 

Canadian. 
F.  do  ... 
American. 
F.  Can'dn 
Irish 


I.  Can'dn. 

do  ... 
F  Can'dn 
E.    do    ... 

do  ... 
I.  do  ... 
E.  do  ... 
I.     do    ... 

E.  do    ... 

F,  do  ... 
do  ... 
do    ... 

E.  do  ... 
English.... 
E.  Can'dn 
I.     do     ... 


Que.. 

N.S"„". 

Que., 
do  ... 
do  ... 
do  { 
do  ! 
do  1 
I 
do- 
do... 
do... 

Ont.... 
do... 
do... 

Que.. 

Ont... 


Ont 
do. 
Que 
Ont. 
N.B. 
Que. 
Ont. 


300  00 
1,000  00 

1,500  00 
800  00 
800  00 

At  Minis- 
ter's dis- 
cretion. 

1,000  00 
550  00 
400  00 
700  00 
600  00 
600  00 
600-00 
500  00 
400  00 
300  00 
300  00 


800  00 
1,550  00 
1,200  00 

600  00 


48*  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46«) 


A.  1885 


Return  of  the  Names  and  Salaries  of  all  Persons  appointed  to  or  promoted  in  the 
Civil  Service  during  the  Year  1884,  &c—  Concluded. 

DEPARTMENT   OF  MILITIA   AND    DEFENCE. 

APPOINTMENTS. 


%a  1 

| 

Name- 

Inside 
or 

Rank 
or 

Religion. 

National- 
ity. 

.2 

Salary. 

9> 

be 

••e  o  fl  d 

Outside. 

Office. 

o 

u 

< 

1884. 



PUi 

$    cts. 

Murray,Lt.-Col.  John  R. 

48 

Jan.    28 

Outside. 

Paym'ster  & 
Strk'pr,Dis. 
No.  9. 

Presbyterian 

Canadian. 

N.S... 

900  00 
per  ann., 
fr.  Feb.  1. 

Dawson,  Lt.-Col.  M.  de 

48 

Feb.     18 

do    ... 

Paym'ster  & 

Protestant... 

Irish  

N.B... 

600  00 

B. 

Strk'pr,Dis. 
No.  1. 

per  ann., 
fr.  Feb.  12. 

Mounsel,Lt.-Col.Oeo.  J. 

48 

April  30 

do    ... 

Dep.  Ad.-G., 
Dis.  No.  8. 

Anglican.... 

do  

Irel'd. 

1  00 

per  diem, 

in  add.  to 

pres.  pay 

Jones,  Rev.  K.  Leonard 

42 

May     17 

do    ... 

Prof.,  R.  Mil. 

do 

British  .... 

Ont... 

1,000  00 

B.D. 

College. 

per  ann. 

Middleton,  Maj.-Gen.  F. 
D.,  C.B. 

58 

do      23 

do    ... 

Comm'g  the 
Militia. 

do 

do    

Eng... 

4,000  00 

per  ann., 

fr.  July  12. 

Lemieux,  E.  Edmond... 

21 

June     7 

Inside... 

3rd  CI.  Clerk, 
Min.  Office. 

R.  Catholic. 

Canadian 

Que... 

550  00 
per  ann., 
fr.  July  1. 

Lessard,  Lt.  Louis 

24 

do      11 

Outside. 

Lt.,  Cavalry 
Schl.  Corps 

do 

do    

do  ... 

2  00 
per  diem. 

Genest,  J.  M.  Eusibe  ... 

23 

do      26 

Inside.. 

3rdCl.  Clerk, 
Accountant 
Branch. 

do 

do    

do  ... 

400  00 
per  ann., 
fr.  July  1. 

James,  Henry 

46 

do      30 

do    ... 

Architect  ... 

Anglican 

English  ... 

Eng... 

1,550  00 
per  ann., 
fr.  July  1. 

White  Fred.  Wm 

20 

do      30 

do    ... 

Draughtm'n, 
Engin'r  Br. 

do 

do    ...... 

Ont... 

800  00 

per  ann., 

fr.  July  1. 

Donaldson,  Capt.  J.  B. . 

42 

do      30 

do    ... 

2nd  CI.  Cl'k, 
Store  Br'ch. 

Presbyterian 

Scotch  .... 

Irel'd. 

1,100  00 
per  ann., 
fr.  July  1. 

Nash,  Capt.  Edward.... 

29 

Sept.     8 

Outside. 

Prof.,  Royal 
Mil.  College 

Protestant... 

English.... 

Eng... 

2,500  00 

per  ann., 

$300inlieu 

of  quarters 

Knight,  Francis  Ed 

34 

Oct.      3 

Inside... 

3rd  01.  Cl'k, 
Store  Br'ch. 

Anglican.... 

do    

Que... 

850  00 
per  ann  , 
fr.  Julyl. 

Wise,  Capt.  fl.  E 

25 

do      28 

Outside. 

A.  D.C.    to 

do 

do    

Ont.  . 

1,000  00 

Maj.-Gen. 
Prof.,  Royal 

per  ann. 

Rigg,  Capt.  Robert  A... 

31 

Nov.    15 

do 

do 

do 

Eng... 

2,500  00 

Mil.  College 

per  ann., 
$300inlieu 
of  quarters 

PROMOTIONS. 

Holt,  Edmond  B 

44 

June    21 

Inside... 

2nd  CI.  Cl'k, 

Presbyterian 

English  ... 

Que... 

1,100  00 

Acc't  Br'ch 

per  ann. 

IS 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46-)  *••  1885 


(46a) 
Report  of  the  Proceedings  of  the  Board  of  Examiners  for  the  year  1884, 
presented  to  Parliament  in  terms  of  Section  55  of  "  The  Canada   Civil 
Service  Act  of  1882."     (45-46  Victoria,  caps.  4-7). 
By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Department  of  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State, 

Ottawa,  16th  February,  1885. 


Ottawa,  10th  February,  1885. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honor  to  address  you  the  report  of  the  Board  of  Civil  Service 
Examiners  for  the  year  ended  31st  December,  1884,  together  with  copies  of  the 
question  papers  submitted  to  the  candidates  at  the  various  examinations,  as  specified 
in  statement  herewith,  and  lists  of  the  candidates  who  passed  the  entrance  examina* 
tions  successfully. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

P.  LeSUEUE,  Secretary* 

The  Hon.  J.  A.  Chapleau,  Secretary  of  State,  Ottawa. 


46a— 1 


48  Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


A. 
3. 
€. 
D. 
B. 
P. 
O. 
H. 
H.  (a) 
I. 
K. 


Examination 
u 

tt 

tt 

u 
u 
tt 
tt 


CONTENTS. 

REPORT  FOR  1884. 
APPENDIX. 

papers  May,  1884. 


Nov.  and  Dec.  1884, 


(Preliminary) 
(Qualifying) 
(Optional) 
(Promotion) 
(Preliminary) 
(Qualifying) 
(Optional) 
(Promotion) 
"  (Promotion,  duties  various)  " 
",  (Special  Finance)      " 

"  (Excise  Promotion)     u 

"    Lists  of  successful  men  &t  the  entrance  examinations  in  May  and 
November. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


EEPORT 

OF  THE  BOARD  OF  CIVIL  SERVICE  EXAMINERS,  FOR  THE  YEAR  ENDED 

31st  DECEMBER,  1884. 

To  the  Hon.  J.  A.  Ohapleau,  Secretary  of  State  :— 

Sir, — The  undersigned  Commissioners  under  the  Civil  Service  Act  of  1882, 
charged  with  the  duty  of  examining  candidates  desirous  of  finding  employment  in 
the  Civil  Service  of  Canada,  beg  respectfully  to  report  that  during  the  year  ended 
the  3 1st  of  December  last  they  held  and  personally  supervised  the  several  examina- 
tions required  by  the  Act,  at  Ottawa,  Montreal  and  Toronto,  and  by  employing  sub- 
examiners  caiised  similar  examinations  to  be  held  at  Halifax,  N.S.,  St.  John,  N.B., 
Charlottetown,  P.E.I.,  Quebec,  Kingston,  Hamilton,  London,  Winnipeg  and  Vic- 
toria, B.C. 

The  spring  examination  was  commenced  on  Tuesday  the  13th  day  of  May,  with 
thejpreliminary  or  lower  grade  examination,  and  occupied  one  day ;  then  followed 
the  qualifying,  or  higher  grade,  which  took  two  days,  and  lastly,  the  examination  in 
optional  subjects  of  the  candidates  who  desired  to  exhibit  their  competency  in  one 
•or  more  of  the  exercises. 

The  number  of  candidates  in  attendance  was  as  follows : — 

At  Halifax..... 36 

St.  John,  N.B 47 

Charlottetown ..•      3 

Quebec. 35 

Montreal. v * 150 

Ottawa •••    83 

Kingston 19 

Toronto.. 89 

Hamilton 41 

London 65 

Winnipeg 18 

Victoria,  B.C 8 

594 
Of  these,  203  came  up  for  the  preliminary  examination  only,  and  391  for  th« 
Qualifying.    Of  the  latter,  67  passed  in  one  or  two  or  more  optional  subjects. 

The  fall  examinations  were  begun  on  Tuesday  the  11th  day  of  November  ani 
occupied  precisely  the  same  time  as  those  of  the  spring.  They  were  also  held  in 
the  same  places  and  were  conducted  by  the  same  persons. 

The  number  of  candidates  on  this  occasion  was  as  under : — 

At  Halifax 24 

St.  John,  N.B 48 

Charlottetown 9 

Quebec 41 

Montreal 122 

Ottawa ♦ HO 

Kingston 22 

Toronto 80 

Hamilton • 26 

London 43 

Winnipeg 14 

Victoria,  B.C 6 

54& 
3 

46a— 1J 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.)  A.  1885 


It  is  to  be  noted  that  this  list  embraces  the  names  on  both  rolls  (the  preliminary 
and  qualifying),  the  latter  however  includiDg  29,  which  appear  on  the  former;  that 
number  of  preliminary  candidates  having  concluded  to  try  both  examinations,  so 
that  the  actual  number  in  attendance  was  516.  The  number  of  candidates  who 
passed  in  Optionals  was  50. 

Examinations  for  promotion]  of  persons  actually  employed  in  the  Civil  Service 
throughont  the  Dominion,  were  also  held  in  the  twelve  places  named.  Those  held 
in  the  spring,  commencing  on  the  18th  and  ending  on  the  19th  day  of  May,  and  those 
held  in  the  fall,  commencing  on  the  17th  and  ending  on  the  18th  of  December. 

A  special  examination  for  promotion  of  the  Outside  Division  of  the  officers  of 
the  Inland  Kevenue  (Excisemen)  was  also  held  in  November.  The  reason  why  a 
special  examination  is  needed  for  these  gentlemen  is,  that  their  duties  being  chiefly 
of  a  technical  nature,  the  papers  for  the  general  promotion  examinations  are  not 
calculated  to  test  their  qualifications.  Special  papers  for  this  examination  were  pre- 
pared in  the  Inland  Eevenue  Department,  and  the  work  done  by  the  candidates  was 
submitted  to  experts  in  the  several  branches  of  the  Excise  service,  for  inspection 
and  valuation—to  be  reported,  like  the  results  of  the  other  departmental  promotion 
examinations,  to  yourself. 

Then,  as  it  was  found  impracticable  by  the  Department  of  Finance  to  make  the 
necessary  preparations  for  the  May  promotion  examination,  it  was  Ordered  that  one 
should  be  held  in  the  fall,  and  a  special  examination  was  held  accordingly,  on  the 
5th  and  6th  of  December,  which  was  attended  by  8  candidates,  whose  perform- 
ances were  also  duly  reported,  as  required  by  the  Civil  Service  Act. 

An  Order  in  Council  was  also  issued  for  the  examination  for  promotion  of  the 
officer  at  the  head  of  the  stationery  branch  of  the  Department  of  the  Secretary  of 
State,  which  was  duly  held,  and  the  results  of  which  were  similarly  reported. 

Finally,  in  connection  with  the  general  fall  promotion  examinations,  4  candi- 
dates at  Halifax,  1  at  St.  John,  N.B.,  and  2  at  Ottawa,  were  examined,  each  in  one 
subject,  which,  owing  to  some  misapprehensions,  had*  been  dropped  in  May  ;  and,  as 
in  the  former  cases  specified,  the  work  done  by  the  candidates  and  valued  by  the 
examiners  was  duly  reported . 

These  recapitulations  exhibit  in  brief  the  operations  of  the  Commissioners  dur- 
ing the  year,  but  in  reality  only  give  a  faint  idea  of  the  large  amount  of  work 
accomplished. 

The  papers  prepared  by  the  Examiners  for  submission  to  the  candidates  at  the 
several  examinations  will  be  found  appended,  as  well  as  lists  of  the  entrance  candi- 
dates who  passed  in  the  preliminary  and  qualifying  examinations  at  the  twelve  places 
appointed,  together  with  the  names  of  those  who  took  optional  subjects,  and  were 
successful . 

The  Commissioners  think  it  well  to  add  that  the  rules  and  regulations  governing 
the  examinations  have  been  out  of  print  for  some  months,  awaiting  certain  modifica- 
tions, which  they  understand  will  probably  be  made  in  the  Civil  Service  Act,  at  the 
present  Session  of  Parliament. 

We  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servants, 

J.  THORBUEN,  LL.D.,  Chairman. 

A.  D.  DbCELLES. 

P.  LbSUEUR,  Secretary. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


APPENDIX    A. 


PAPEKS  TEEATEDfBY  THE)  CANDIDATES  AT   THE  ENTEANCE 
EXAMINATIONS  OF  MAY,  1884. 


Value  60. 


No.  1  (Preliminary,  Men.) 
CIYIL  SEEYICE  OF  CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY  EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday,  13th  May,  1884,  from  10  a.m.  to  10.30  a.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Mules  strictly. 

PENMANSHIP. 

Copy  the  subjoined  extract : 

In  the  management  of  conversation  avoid  disputes.  Arguments,  as 
they  are  usually  conducted,  seldom  end  in  anything  else.  If  we  have 
not  the  requisite  patience,  good  feeling  and  politeness  to  prevent  this, 
let  us  defer  arguing  altogether.  The  attitude  of  a  seeker  after  truth  is 
the  only  one  in  which  to  argue,  whereas  most  arguments  are  pursued 
simply  to  uphold  an  opinion  already  formed,  and  to  overthrow  an 
antagonist.  The  habit  of  talking  too  much  and  consuming  the  time 
that  should  in  fairness  be  given  to  another,  is  a  very  common  blot  on 
conversation ;  so  is  that  of  interruption  and  of  obtruding  matter  known 
to  only  two  or  three  into  a  larger  circle.  Good  taste  and  good  feeling 
alike  forbid  these. — Selected. 

No.  2  CPreliminary,  Men.) 
CIYIL  SEEYICE  OF  CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY  EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday^lSth  May,  1884,  from  10.30  a.  m.,  to  12  noon. 

Candidates  are  requested  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

OETHOGEAPHY. 

{For  Lower  Grade  Candidates  only.) 

Many  words  in  this  exercise  are  purposely  mis-spelled,  and  it  will, 
of  course,  be  the  duty  of  the  candidates  to  correct  the  errors,;and  jso 
prove  their  proficiency  in  orthography. 

5 


4S 


Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.   46.) 


A.  1885 


Value,  60. 

3  marks 

deducted 

ior  each 

error. 


Minimum, 

18. 


PERVERSE  RECOLECTIONS. 

It  is  kurios  ennough  tint  we  allways  remember  peopel  by  there 
worst  points,  and  still  more  kurios,  that  we  allways  supose  that  we  our- 
selfs  are  remembered  by  our  best.  I  once  new  a  hunchback  who  had  a 
welshaped  hand  and  was  continnualy  showing  it.  He  never  beleived 
that  annyboddy  notised  his  hump,  but  lived  and  dyed  in  the  convicshun 
that  the  wholl  town  spoak  of  him  no  otherwize  than  as  the  man  with 
the  beautifull  hand,  wereas,  in  fact  thay  onley  lookt  at  his  hump  and 
never  so  much  as  notised  wether  he  had  a  hand  or  nott. 


This  young  ladey,  so  prettey  and  clever,  is  simply  the  gurl  who 
had  that  aukwerd  hisstory  with  so  and  so.  That  man  who  has  some  ot 
the  verry  gratest  qualitties  is  nothink  more  then  the  won  whoo  bee- 
haved  so  baddley  on  sutch  an  ocasion.  It  is  a  teribel  thing  to  think 
that  we  are  always  at  wacth,  won  uppon  the  other,  to  catch  the  faulse 
stepp,  in  order  that  we  may  have  the  greatful  satisfaction  of  holding 
our  nabor  for  won  whoo  canot  wawk  strate.  If  St.  Peter  ware  alife  he 
wood  be  nown  as  the  man  who  denyed  his  Marster ;  St.  Paul  as  the  man 
whoo  stoned  Stephen,  and  St.  Thomas  as  the  constitootionnal  douter. 
Let  us  avoyd  this"  two  comon  fait. 

Flotsam  &  Jetsam. 

No.  1  (Qualifyirg,  Men.) 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY  EXAMINATION 


Value 
100. 


Tuesday,  13th  May,  1884,  from  10  to  10.30  a.m. 
PENMANSHIP  {for  Higher  Grade  Candidates.) 

Copy  the  following  extract  and  please  bear  in  mind  that  easy 
legibility  is  more  highly  valued  than  fanciful  ornamentation. 

"Matter  is  an  effluence  of  the  Divine  Nature,  and  so  is  all  finite 
mind."  "The  body  itself  and  all  other  subtances  we  call  matter  are  a  reve- 
lation of  Almighty  God.  Al  1  matter  as  surely  as  all  finite  mind  orginated 
in  him."  "  So  I  suppose  Almighty  God  evolves  the  seen  universe  of 
matter  and  the  unseen  of  finite  force  from  himself." 

— [Joseph  Cooke. 

All  that  is  needed  for  our  acceptance  of  such  a  consistent  origin  of 
the  visible  universe,  is,  first  and  foremost,  to  concede  the  J  substantial 
existence  of  an  infinite,  primordial,  personal  intelligence,  armed  with 
omnipotent  power.  Without  this  fundamental  conception  and  concession 
of  one  infinite  mystery,  incomprehensible  though  it  may  be,  and  is,  we 
are  involved  in  the  mazes  of  a  million  mysteries  equally  inexplicable. 
The  mind  can  more  easily  rest  upon  the  concession  of  one  mystery  which 
can  never  be  solved  or  comprehended,  than  in  undertaking  to  grapple 
with  a  million  equally  inexplicable.  There  is  but  one  safe  position, 
either  in  philosophy  or  religion,  where  the  soul  can  find  rest  from  the 
conflict  of  harrowing  doubt,  and  that  is  to  merge  all  the  mysteries  of 
Nature  back  into  the  one  mystery  of  Nature's  God. 

—\Wilford  Hall 
6 


4S  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188& 


Yalue 
100 


No.  2  (Qualifying,  Men.) 
CIYIL  SEEYICE  OF   CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY     EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday,  13th  May,  1884,  from  10.30  a,m.,  to  12  noon. 

The  Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly, 

ORTHOGRAPHY. 

This  exercise  is  purposely  mis-spelled  and  the  duty  of  the  candi- 
dates is  to  correct  the  Orthography.  Five  marks  will  be  deducted  for 
every  mistake.  This  paper  is  for  candidates  at  the  preliminary  examin- 
ation who  intend  to  go  on  to  the  qualifying. 

FRENCH  CANADIAN  COUNTRY  LIFE. 

Life  hear  is  full  off  a  sertain  charm  that  you  can  verey  selldom  find* 
It  is  a  calmn  successe  rather  than  the  chase  of  hapiness.  I  am  not  phil- 
losofer  enough  to  trase  this  successe  to  either  the  Cattholic  subjection  of 
the  peopel  or  the  sistem  of  a  limited  monarky  ;  but,  as  an  obsarver  of 
men  and  manors,  I  sea  that  this  ratttional  hapiness  comes  cheefly 
from  a  neerand  homeleysorce  quite  acessible  to  all  peopels,the  praktise 
of  purliteness.  Cortesy  is  the  comon  rule  of  conduck  hear  ;  no  matter 
how  intimmate  or  how  indiferent  the  relations  may  be  between  sarvants, 
freinds,  stranngers  or  rellatioDs,  yore  feelinks  are    as  safe  as  yore  life. 

French  Canadian  country  society  then  difers  from  ours  in  pressent- 
ing  grater  extreems— a  peasantrey  unenterprizing,contented  and  dovoutt, 
and  a  small  class  of  gentrey  edducated,  pollished  consarvetive.  And  all 
classes  unite  to  render  a  humdrumm  exisstense  agreeable  by  the  arts  of 
purlite  intercoorse.  The  peopel  are  all  reddy  talkers  in  a  manor  that  is 
simpatthetick  and  somewhat  drammatic.  Thay  make  it  a  habbit  to  be 
entertaineing  and  sosiable,  and  they  inherrit  the  cheariull  and  contented 
dissposittion  of  the  French.  I  am  surprized  to  sea  how  agreeable  a  com- 
mon-plaice exisstence  is  maid  simpely  by  the  arts  of  purlite  intercoorse,, 
without  mutch  dependense  on  litterature,   fine  arts,  siences  and  set 

amuzements.  _.  '  • 

—Harpers  Magazine* 

No.  3. 
CIYIL  SERYICE  OF  CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY   EXAMINATION. 


Yalue  60. 


Tuesday,  May  13th,  1884.  from  1.30  p.m.  to  3  p.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Mules  strictly. 

ARITHMETIC. 

Dibections.— Put  down  in  figures  and  add  together  the  following 
sums.  When  this  has  been  done  draw  a  line  under  the  4th  row  ot 
figures,  and  add  the  four  upper  rows  at  the  side,  then  do  the  same  with 
the  four  lower  rows,  and  the  two  sums  you  get  added  together  will 

7 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.) 


A.  188b 


bring  out  the  same  results  as  the  addition  of  the  eight  rows  at  the  foot, 
providing,  of  course, , the  work  has  been  correctly  done. 

1st  Row.  Two  hnndred  and  seventy-nine,  millions  seven  hundred 

and  seventy-three. 
2nd  How.  One  hundred  and  eleven   millions  eight  hundred  and 

eighty  thousand  seven  hundred  and  seventy-seven, 
3rd  Row.  Six  hundred  and  sixty-six  thousand* 
4th  Row.  One  million   five  hundred  and  fifty-five  thousand  nine 

hundred  and  ninety-nine. 
5th  Row.  Three  hundred  and  eighty-one. 
(5th  Row.  Seventy- seven. 
1th  Row.  Two  hundred  and  twenty  millions. 
8th  Row.  Five  hundred  and  twenty-one  thousand  five  hundred  and 

twenty-one. 
II.  Subtract  the  upper  line  of  figures  from  the  lower,  and  prove  the 
work  by  adding  the  upper  line  to  the  remainder. 

9,753,186,420,000 
10,864,275,319,753 


10 

for  Bta ting  the 
figures. 
5 
for  adding  tbe 
€    rows     to- 
gether. 

5 

for  adding 
them  in  sec- 
tions. 


Remainder 
Upper  line 

Proof 


9,753,186,420,000 


III.  Multiply  the  following  figures  by  9  and  then  divide  the   pro- 
duct by  7. 

1234567890 

9 


15  IV.  Multiply  77,889,966  by  5,432. 

15  V.  Take  the  product  of  the  above  multiplication,  multiply  it  again 

I  by  2,  and  then  divide  the  product  by  10,86*. 

No.  4. 

READING. 

This  embraced  print  and  manuscript,  and  of  course  the  results  only 
can  be  reported. 


Yalues. 


15 


No.  5. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING   EXAMINATION. 


Wednesday,  14th  May,  1884,  from  9.30  a.  m.  to  11  a.  m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 

ENGLISH  GRAMMAR. 

1.  Give  the  plural  of  hero,  folio,  wolf,  flagstaff,  penny,  valley,  and 
handful.     Give  six  nouns  which  are  alike  in  both  numbers. 

8 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


-36 


25 


100 


2.  When  the  singular  and  plural  are  alike  in  the  nominative,  how- 
is  the  possessive  case  formed  ?    Give  four  examples. 

3.  How  do  you  distinguish  between  a  common  and  a  proper  adjec- 
tive ?    Give  two  examples. 

4.  What  is  meant  by  a  compound  adjective?  Give  two  examples. 

5.  Adjectives  in  the  comparative  degree  are  sometimes  used  as 
nouns.    Give  two  examples. 

6.  Correct  thelbllowing  sentences,  where  neccessary,  giving  your 

reasons : — 

(a)  Which  of  these  two  dresses  are  the  handsomest  ? 

(b)  I  and  my  cousin  are  invited  to  attend  the  meeting. 

(c)  A  man  is  the  noblest  work  of  creation. 

(d)  The  doctor  affirmed  that  fever  always  produced  thirst. 

(e)  He  will  maintain  his  cause  though  he  lost  his  estate, 
(/)  Who  do  you  say  that  he  is  ? 

1.  Parse  the  following  couplet : — 

Doubt  not,  little  though  there  be, 
That  I'll  cast  a  crumb  to  thee. 


No.  6. 

TEANSCKIPTION. 

This  paper  was  a  lithographed  facsimile  of  a  manuscript  article  on 
Insurance,  purposely  interlined  and  defective  (in  fact,  a  rough  draft) 
which  was  to  be  copied  correctly  and  without  blemishes. 


Yalues. 
15 


15 


n 


No.  % 
CIYIL  SEE  VICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING  EXAMINATION. 

Wednesday,  14th  May,  1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  3.30  p.m. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 
Note.— The  full  work  of  each  question  must  be  given  by  candidates. 

AEITHMETIC. 

1.  If  you  had  to  distribute  £1,870  10s.  6Jd.  equally  among  311  per- 
sons,  how  much  would  each  receive  ? 

2.  A  gentleman  divided  $330  among  12  men,  16  women  and  30  boys; 
to  each  man  he  gave  twice  as  much  as  to  a  woman,  and  to  a  woman  three 
times  as  much  as  to  a  boy.     What  did  each  receive  ? 

3.  What  is  the  present  worth  of  a  note  for  Sl3647  due  11  months 
hence,  at  6  per  cent.  ? 

9 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885> 


17 

18 

18 
100 


4.  If  5  men  with  7  women  earn  $36.72  in  6  days,  and  2  men  with  2: 
women  earn  $15.12  in  the  same  time,  in  what  time  will  6  men  with  13 
women  earn  $288  ? 

5.  Sold  tea  at  90  cents  per  lb.,  having  gained  ^  of  the  cost;  find  the 
selling  price  per  lb.  if  he  had  lost  -^\. 

6.  Bought  a  quantity  of  goods  for  $227.92,  payable  12  months  hence, 
and  sold  them  at  once  for  $275.56,  payable  9  months  hence.  Find  the 
cash  gain,  allowing  discount  at  4J  per  cent. 

No.  8. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING  EXAMINATION. 


Values 
100 


10 
15 


10 
15 
10 
15 

15 
10 


Wednesday,  14th  May,  1884,  from  3.30  p.m.  to  4.30  p.m. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 
GEOGRAPHY. 

1.  Name  and  define  the  imaginary  lines  passing  around  the  globe, 
How  are  distances  geographically  computed  on  the  earth's  surface  ? 

2.  Name  the  three  principal  rivers  in  the  Province  of  Quebec  flow- 
ing into  the  St.  Lawrence  from  the  north.  What  strait  separates  Cape 
Breton  from  Nova  Scotia?    What  two  rivers  flow  into  Lake  Winnipeg? 

3.  What  are  the  capitals  and  the  approximate  population  of  each  of 
the  seven  Provinces  ? 

4.  Through  what  waters  would  a  vessel  pass  from  Thunder  Bay 
(Lake  Superior)  to  Halifax  ? 

5.  State  how  many  States  and  Territories  there  are  in  the  United 
States.     Give  the  boundaries  of  that  country. 

6.  What  are  the  principal  mountains  in  the  Province  of  Quebec,  the 
chief  manufacturing  cities  and  towns  of  Ontario,  the  chief  ports  of  Nova 
Scotia  and  New  Brunswick,  and  state  where  coal  mines  are  to  be  found 
in  Canada  ? 

7.  What  are  the  two  great  mountain  ranges  on  the  east  and  west 
coasts  of  North  America?  Name  the  large  islands  in  the  northern  part 
of  Lake  Huron  and  in  the  Gulf  of  St.  Lawrence.  What  straits  separate 
Newfoundland  from  Labrador,  and  Prince  Edward  Island  from  Nova 
Scotia  ? 

8.  Name  the  canals  of  Canada,  [and  state  why  each  of  them  has 
been  built. 


10 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885. 


15 

5 

10 


10 


No.  9. 
CIVIL  SEKVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING   EXAMINATION. 


Thursday,  15th  May,  1884,  from  9.30  to  10.30  a.  m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

BEITISH,  FEENCH  AND  CANADIAN  HISTOEY. 

(Meaning  the  United  Kingdom,  Franco  and  Canada.) 

BELTISH  HISTOEY. 

1.  Name  five  of  the  most  important  events  in  British  History, 
(3  marks  given  for  each  if  the  facts  are  correctly  stated.) 

2.  State  in  brief  what  you  know  about  St.  Patrick. 

3.  About  what  time  was  Christianity  introduced  into  Britain,  and 
and  by  whom  ? 

4.  Who  was  Cardinal  Wolsey  ?  Give  a  brief  account  of  his  career 
and  say  if  he  fostered  and  promoted  any  particular  national  interest. 

5.  Explain  what  is  mant  by  the  Long  Parliament,  and  state  how 
it  came  to  an  end  ? 

6.  In  what  year  did  the  United  States  assert  their  independence,, 
and  in  what  year  was  it  recognized  by  Great  Britain  ? 

FEANCE. 

7.  When  and  by  whom  was  Calais  wrenched  from  the  British 
Crown  ?    And  how  long  had  the  English  held  the  city  ? 

8.  Give  as  many  names  as  you  can  (not  however  exceeding  10) 
of  the  men  who  became  historically  conspicuous  through  the  French 
Eevolution  (1789  to  1794). 

9.  What  is  understood  in  France  by  a  "  coup  d'etat "  ? 

10.  When  and  how  did  Louis  Napoleon  become  Emperor  ? 
CANADA. 

11.  State  the  year  of  the  two  great  fires  in  Quebec,  and  also  whether 
I  any  pecuniary  aid  was  voted  to  the  sufferers  by  the  Imperial  Parliament. 

12.  In  what  year  was  Ottawa  chosen  as  the  seat  of  Government  of 
United  Canada  ?  And  who  was  the  personage  who  laid  the  foundation 
of  the  Parliamentary  Building  in  that  city  ? 

13.  At  what  date  was  the  Canadian  Confederation  established?  Say 
also  whether  any  one  of  the  British  North  American  Provinces  refused 
to  unite,  and  if  so  name  it. 

10  14.  When  did  the  Fenians  invade  Canada  ?    Was  there  any  fight- 

ing ?    Where  and  with  what  result  ? 
16  11 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  10. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING    EXAMINATION. 


Value3. 


20 


16 


16 
16 
32 


100 


Thursday,  15th  May,  1884,  from  10.30  a.m.  to  12  noon. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 
COMPOSITION. 

1.  Show  how  the  following  sentences  may  bo  improved : 

(a.)  Their  march  was  through  an  uncultivated  country,  whose 
savage  inhabitants  fared  hardly,  having  no  other  riches  than  a  breed  of 
wild  sheep,  whose  flesh  was  rank  and  unsavory  by  reason  of  their  con- 
tinual feeding  upon  fish. 

(b.)  The  scribes  taught  and  studied  the  law  of  Moses. 

(<?.)  Restlessness  of  mind  disqualifies  us  both  for  the  enjoyment  of 
peace  and  the  performance  of  our  duty. 

(d).  Whenever  I  go  he  always  meets  me,  and  gives  me  a  hearty 
greeting. 

2.  Write  the  following  quotation  from  Thompson  in  prose,  punctuating 
at  the  same  time : — 

The  stately  sailing  swan 
Gives  out  his  snowy  plumage  to  the  gale 
And  arching  proud  his  neck  with  oary  feet 
Bears  forward  fierce  and  guards  his  osier  isle 

3.  Explain  what  is  meant  by  a  hypothetical  and  a  causal  clause. 
Give  an  example  of  each . 

4.  How  do  you  distinguish  between  entire  and  complete,  and  between 
enough  and  sufficient  ?    Give  examples  to  illustrate. 

5.  Write  a  letter  to  a  friend  discussing  the  subject :  The  Freedom  of 
the  Press. 

No.  11. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


EXAMINATION   IN    OPTIONAL    SUBJECTS. 


Thursday,  15th  May,  1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  4  p.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Mules  strictly. 
BOOK-KEEPING. 

Journal  and  Ledger  only  required  in  working  out  this  paper.  It  may  be  done  in  three 
degrees  of  efficiency —1st,  by  showing  in  the  balance  sheet  the  fall  amount  of  both  the 
debits  and  credits  of  each  account ;  2nd,  by  balancing  the  accounts  and  showing  in  the 
balance  sheet  the  amount  at  debit  or  credit ;  3rd,  by  carrying  the  balances  of  the  merchan- 
dise accounts  to  the  debit  or  credit  of  u  Profit  and  Loss,*"  when  the  results  of  the  opera- 
tions will  be  seen.  For  the  1st  mode,  if  correctly  worked,  80  marks  will  be  given  ;  for  the 
2nd,  90  marks,  and  for  the  3rd,  100.  It  is  recommended  to  the  candidates  in  this  case  to 
make  every  entry  tell  (briefly)  the  nature  of  the  transaction. 

The  only  accounts  which  really  require  to  be  opened  are  cash,  capital,  wheat,  barley, 
corn,  oats,  bran,  Bank  of  Toronto,  bills  payable  and  bills  receivable.     A  Profit  and  Loss 

12 


48  Victoria,  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


account  may  be  opened  by  candidates  who  aim  at  exhibiting  the  highest  degree  of  effi- 
ciency. Everything  derived  from  the  estate  goes,  of  course,  to  capital,  and  may  do  so  in 
the  most  direct  manner. 

ESTATE. 

On  10th  May,  1883,  Frederick  Seymour  inherits  an  estate  which  con- 
sists of  cash,  $13,811.47  ;  50  shares  of  Bank  of  Montreal  stock;  150  railway 
bonds  (nominally  worth  $100  each)  ;  17,0i;0  acres  of  land  in  Manitoba,  and 
four  promissory  notes  falling  due  as  follows:  James  Thompson,  $1,350, 1st 
June;  Ei chard  White,  $2,265,  10th  June;  William  Quarles,  $783.50,  15th 
June,  and  Stephen  Foster,  $318.75,  25th  June— these  notes  he  places  in  the 
Bank  of  Toronto  for  collection. 

TEANSACTIONS. 

May  15,  Frederick  Seymour  commences  business  as  a  grain  merchant,  and  deposits 

to  his  credit  in  the  Bank  of  Toronto  $10,000. 
May  16,  He  buys  on  the  market   1,735  bushels  of  wheat  at  $1.30  ;  1,200  bushels  of 

barley  at  92  cents,  and  920  of  oats  at  38  cents,  for  all  oi  which  he  pays 

from  the  balance  of  cash  remaining  in  his  hands,  then  deposits  the  residue 

of  the  cash  in  the  Bank  of  Toronto. 
May  17,  Buys  15,000  bushels  of  corn  at  55  cents,  and  pays  for  it  by  cheque  (No.  1) 

on  the  bank  (Toronto  to  be  always  understood). 
May  18,  Sells  25  shares  of  his  Bank  of  Montreal  stock  at  $190  per  share,  less  J  per 

cent,  brokerage,  and  deposits  the  net  proceeds  in  the  bank,  as  before. 
May  20,  Buys  60  tons  of  bran  at  $13.75  per  ton,   and  pays  for  the  same  by  cheque 

(No.  2)  on  the  bank. 
May  21,  Sells  the  remaining  25  shares  Montreal  Bank  stock  at  $192.50,  less    J  per 

cent,  brokerage,  and  deposits  the  net  proceeds  in  the  bank. 
May  21,  Sells  his  railway  bonds  at  55  cents  in  the  dollar,  less  J  per  cent,  brokerage, 

and  deposits  the  net  proceeds  in  the  bank. 
May  24,  Buys  9,000  bushels  of  wheat  at  $1.40  per  bushel,  and  pays  therefor  by 

cheque  on  the  bank  (No.  3.) 
May  24,  Sells  $10,000  of  his  Manitoba  lands  at  $1.75  per  acre,  less  2J  per  cent,  com- 
mission, and  deposits  the  net  proceeds  in  bank. 
May  27,  Buys  15,000  bushels  barley  at  87  cents  per  bushel,  and  pays  for  it  by  cheque 

(No.  4)  on  the  bank. 
May  28,  Sells  5,000  acres  in  Manitoba  at  $2.50  and  the  remaining  2,000  for  a  round 

sum  of  $15,000  (this  being  a  town  block),  but  pays  no  commision   on 

either  sale.    The  proceeds  he  deposits,  like  all  previous  moneys,  in  the 

bank. 
June  3,  Buys  50,000  bushels  of  wheat  at  $1.41  J,  paying  half  cash  by  cheque  (No.  5) 

on  the  bank,  and  half  by  his  note  at  30  days  (bills  payable). 
Between  June  4th  and  18th  the  bank  collects  the  notes  specified  in  the 

assets  of  the  estate,  and  passes  the  amounts  to  the  credit  of  Mr.  Seymour. 
June  21,  Sells  30,000  bushels  of  wheat  for  cash  at  $1.50,  and  deposits  the  proceeds,  as 

before,  in  the  bank. 
June  22,  Sells  15,000  bushels  barley  at  90  cents  cash,  and  deposits  proceeds  as  usual. 
June  23,  Sells  to  James  Smith  2.9,000  bushels  of  wheat  at  $1.55,  taking  his  note  at  30 

days  in  payment  (bills  receivable). 
June  25,  Sells  15,000  bushels  corn  at  53  cents  cash,  and  deposits  proceeds. 
"      Sells  1,735  bushels  wheat  at  $1.60,  and  deposits  the  proceeds. 
Ci      Sells  1,200  bushels  barley  at  $1,  and  deposits  proceeds. 
"      Sells,  also,  920  bushels  of  oats  at  41  cents,  and  deposits  proceeds. 
**      Sells  60  tons  of  bran  at  $15  per  ton,  and  deposits  the  proceeds. 

13 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  12. 
OIYIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


EXAMINATION  ON  OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS, 


Values. 


100 


Thursday,  15th  May,  1884,  from  4  p.m.  to  4.15  p.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly, 

TYPE  WRITING. 

Note. — Fifteen  minutes  are  allowed  for  the  following  paper. 

MARKETS. 

Saturday,  22nd. — Considering  it  was  a  Saturday  the  market  to  day 
was  not  a  large  one,  although  the  upper  square  was  well  filled  and  a 
number  of  teams  were  on  the  lower  one.  The  hay  market  was  as  large 
as  ever,  the  loads  extending  down  almost  to  Dalhousie  street,  and  tasking 
the  efforts  of  the  weighmasters  at  the  hay  scales  to  the  utmost.  There 
was  a  considerable  amount  of  wood  in  and  of  better  quality  than  usual. 
The  moderate  days  have  lessened  the  demand,  and  although  prices  have 
not  been  up,  consumers  are  getting  a  better  article  for  their  money.  In 
fruit  nothing  is  being  done,  except  in  apples  and  imported  articles.  Dairy 
produce  still  looks  downward,  and  the  prospects  are  it  will  so  continue 
for  a  time,  especially  in  the  poorer  grades  of  butter.  There  was  a  con- 
siderable quantity  of  butter  in  of  better  quality  than  usual,  but  the 
demand  was  not  brisk.  Poultry  remains  almost  unchanged,  but  good 
birds,  either  fowls  or  turkeys,  command  high  figures.  Pork  remains  as 
before  but  drags.  The  price  of  hogs  in  the  west  has  dropped,  but  has 
not  affected  prices  here  more  than  to  make  buyers  shy.  Purchasers  for 
private  use  are  just  now  the  only  purchasers.  Ottawa  seems  to  be  pay- 
ing high  for  its  pork,  for<while  here  it  isjfrom  $8.50  to  $9.50,  in  Arnprior 
it  is  $7.50,  in  Portage  du  Fort  $5.50,  at  Bryson  $5.50,  and  at  Morris- 
burgh  $7.00.  In  other  articles  the  Ottawa  prices  do  not  seem  to  be  much 
in  advance  of  those  in  the  outlying  districts,  which  no  doubt  accounts  to 
a  great  extent  for  the  comparatively  small  markets  which  have  prevailed 
for  some  time  past.  The  demand  for  live  stock  is  still  lively,  especially 
for  horses,  milch  cows  and  lambs.  The  following  are,  as  nearly  as  can 
be  had,  the  correct  figures. 


14 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Yalues. 


25 


15 


20 


40 


100 


No.  13. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


EXAMINATION  ON   OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS. 

Friday,  16th,  May  1884,  from  9.30  a.m.  to  10.30  p.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 

COMPOSITION. 

* 

Note— This  paper  is  for  candidates  who  have  taken  composition  in 
French  in  the  qualifying  examination. 

1.  Correct  any  inelegancies  to  be  found  in  the  following  sentences  :— 
a.  I  have  not  seen  him  and  I  am  not  likely  to. 

h.  This  account  is  very  different  to  what  I  told  you. 

c.  Your  affairs  have  been  managed  in  a  different  manner  than  what 
I  advised. 

d.  I  have  labored  as  much  as  a  person  in  my  situation  can. 

2.  In  the  following  sentences  insert  in  the  blank  spaces  the  appro- 
priate prepositions : — 


things  which  we  seemed  sure  to 
things  which  before  possession 


a.  We  are  often  disappointed 
obtain . 

6.  We  are  often  disappointed 
promised  much  enjoymennt. 

c.  How  can  this  statement  be  reconciled  his  statements  ? 

3.  Show  how  the  following  sentences  may  be  improved:— 

a.  The  lad  cannot  leave  his  father;  for  if  he  should  leave  him,  he 
would  die* 

b.  A  friend  exaggerates  a  man's  virtue;  one  who  is  hostile  endea- 
vours to  magnify  his  crimes. 

4.  Write  a  letter  to  a  friend  on  the  importance  of  cultivating  habita 
of  observation. 


15 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


No.  14. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA, 


EXAMINATION  ON  OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS. 


Friday,  16th  May,  1884,  from  10.30  a.m.  to  11.30  am 
Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 
#  TRANSLATION.— ENGLISH  INTO  FRENCH. 

This  translation  is  for  candidates  who  have  taken  the  qualifying  examination  in 
English. 

Translate  into  French : — 

Charles  was  thirty  years  old  when,  after  sixteen  years  exile,  he  was  so  unex- 
pectedly placed  on  the  throne  of  his  ancestors.  He  had  a  good  figure,  and  though 
his  features  were  harsh,  there  was  something  agreeable  in  his  countenance  ;  and  his 
cheerful,  easy  and  graceful  deportment  made  him  altogether  a  very  engaging  per- 
son. He  had  a  great  deal  of  cleverness,  shrewdness  and  wit,  and  with  common  ap- 
plication, might  have  been  anything  he  pleased.  But  he  loved  amusement,  and 
hated  business,  and  to  live  idly  and  merrily  was  all  he  cared  for.  His  good  humor 
proceeded  merely  from  the  selfish  principle  of  driving  away  care ;  his  freedom  from 
ambition  was  only  the  love  of  ease.  He  had  no  wish  to  be  a  great  or  good  monarch, 
and  he  only  valued  his  country  because  he  found  it  an  agreeable  dwelling  place.  He 
had  a  good  head,  but  a  bad  heart,  or  rather  he  had  no  heart  at  all;  he  was  devoid  of 
feeling,  and  only  feared  foes  and  valued  friends  as  they  could  injure  or  save  him. 
This  constitutional  good  nature  was  all  he  had  to  recommend  him;  and  this  con- 
cealed, for  a  time,  his  entire  want  of  better  qualities. 

Mrs.  Markha3i, 

History  of  England. 

No.  15. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


EXAMINATION   ON    OPTIONAL    SUBJECTS. 


Value 
100. 


Friday,  16th  May,  1884,  from  11.30  a.m.,  to  12  noon. 

The  Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

SHORT-HAND. 

Note. — Five  minutes  will  be  allowed  to  dictate  the  following  passage,  and 
twenty-five  minutes  to  transcribe  it.  The  examiner  in  charge 
will  be  careful  to  send  to  the  Board  at  Ottawa  the  rough  notes 
of  the  candidates,  along  with  the  other  papers. 

THE   BRITISH  ASSOCIATION'S  VISIT   TO    CANADA. 

A  recent  number  of  the  London  Times  contained  a  long  article  on  the 
approaching  meeting  in  Montreal  of  the  British  Association  for  the 
Advancement  of  Science.    The  Times  speaks  in  glowing  terms  of  the 

16 


48  Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


liberal  provision  made  for  the  accommodation,  entertainment  and  plea- 
sure of  the  delegates  who  may  cross  the  ocean  to  attend.  Already,  the 
Times  says,  six  hundred  applications  have  been  received,  and  it  expresses 
the  opinion  that  "  at  least  a  thousand  members  and  associates  may  be 
crowding  next  August."  Of  the  members  who  propose  attending,  the 
Times 


"  So  far  at  least  as  the  officials  are  concerned,  the  Canada  meeting 
will  be  a  representative  one.  The  president  elect,  Lord  Kayleigh,  one 
of  the  most  solid  exponents  of  British  science,  will  certainly  prove  equal 
to  the  occasion.  The  vice-presidents  show  a  large  trans  atlantic  contin- 
gent; they  are,  His  Excellency  the  Governor  General,  Sir  John  A.  Mac- 
donald,  Sir  Lyon  Playfair,  Sir  Alexander  Gait,  Sir  Charles  Tupper,  Sir 
A.  A.  Dorion,  Hon.  Dr.  Chauveau,  Principal  Dawson,  Professor  Frank- 
land,  Dr.  L.  H.  Hingston,  and  Professor  Sterry  Hunt.  Sir  Joseph 
Hooker,  we  may  say,  has  also  been  nominated  by  the  council  a  vice- 
president  in  place  of  the  late  Sir  C.  W.  Siemens.  Perhaps  it  is  scarcely 
necessary  to  state  that  the  general  treasurer,  Professor  A.  W.  Williamson, 
and  the  general  secretaries,  Captain  Douglas  Galton  and  Mr.  A.  G. 
Yernon  Harcourt  will  be  present.  There  are  five  local  secretaries  and  a 
local  treasurer.  The  presidents  of  the  sections  are  all  men  of  the  highest 
standing  in  their  particular  departments ;  it  would  be  difficult,  indeed, 
to  suggest  abetter  selection.  In  section  A,  Mathematical  and  Physical 
Science,  it  is  a  great  thing  that  Professor  Sir  William  Thomson  has  D8en 
persuaded  to  preside.  No  more  representative  chemist  than  Professor 
Eoscoe  could  have  been  obtained  for  section  B ;  in  C,  Geology,  Mr.  W. 
T.  Blandford,  the  head  of  the  Indian  Geological  Survey,  is  sure  to  do 
honour  to  his  subject;  in  section  D,  Biology,  Professor  Moseley,  a  man 
of  thoroughly  Darwinian  type  of  mind,  will  preside ;  in  F,  Economic 
Science,  Sir  Ei chard  Temple  will  be  a  host  in  himself;  while  in  Gr 
Mechanical  Science,  Sir  F.  J.  Bramwell  is  sure  to  be  vigorous  and  origi- 
nal ;  finally,  in  the  new  section  H,  Anthropology,  Dr.  E.  B.  Taylor  is  the 
very  man  that  ought  to  have  been  selected.  Lord  Aberdare,  we  regret 
to  say,  has  been  compelled  to  retire  from  the  presidency  of  the  Geogra- 
phical Section  ;  but  for  a  Canadian  meeting  no  more  sensible  president 
could  be  obtained  than  the  veteran  Artie  explorer,  Sir  Leopold  M'Clin- 
tock,  who,  we  trust,  will  be  persuaded  to  take  the  place  of  Lord  Aberdare. 
All  the  vice-presidents  and  secretaries  of  sections  have  been  chosen 
with  equal  care ;  and  thus  the  Association  has  taken  the  very  best 
means  of  proving  to  the  Canadians  how  highly  they  appreciate  the 
honour  of  the  invitation,  and  in  what  respect  they  hold  their  prospective 
audiences. 

No.  16. 

CIVIL  SEBVICE  OF  CANADA. 


EXAMINATION   IN   OPTIONAL    SUBJECTS. 


Friday,  16th  May,   1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  3.30  p.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

PKECIS  WEITING.     {Value,  100.) 

The  meaning  of"  precis  may  be  taken  to  be  "  a  concise  but  comprehensive  digest"  of  the  docu- 
ments to  be  examined.  The  merits  of  a  good  precis  are  : — 1st.  The  embracing  of  all  that  is  important ; 
2nd.  The  presentation  of  it  in  a  clear,  intelligible  manner ;  and  3rd.  The  greatest  possible  brevity 
consistent  with  the  previous  two  conditions, 

tt 
46a— 2 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


Pr6cis  is  mostly  used  in  respect  of  correspondence,  but  may,  with  equal  propriety,  be  employed 
for  speeches.  An  interesting  precis  of  non-political  extracts  here  given  of  an  Hon.  Senator's  speech 
on  the  representation  of  tbe  North-West  in  Parliament  will  be  a  good  exercise.  This  precis  should  not 
cover  more  than  three  or,  at  most,  four  foolscap  pages. 

EEPKESENTATION  OF  THE  NOKTH-WEST  IN  PAKLIAMENT. 

EXTRACTS   FROM  A   RECENT   SPEECH   IN   THE    SENATE. 

No.  1.  I  have  heard  in  various  quarters  as  to  the  growth  of  Canada  compared  to 
that  of  the  great  country  which  lies  alongside  of  us.  At  the  time  that  this  Parlia- 
ment, of  which  I  speak,  first  met,  the  small  beginning  from  which  we  have  dated  the 
great  successes  which  now  characterise  this  country  were  such  that,  as  I  have  said 
before,  not  more  than  25,000  people  could  possibly  be  supposed  to  be  living  within 
the  limits  of  this  Province.  The  United  States,  at  the  close  of  the  Kovolution,  took 
its  first  census  in  1790.  It  had  at  that  time  a  population  of  3,929,214.  The  United 
States  showed  in  the  last  census,  that  of  1880,  a  population  of  50,000,000.  It  has 
been  said  that  the  growth  of  these  Provinces  in  round  numbers  has  not  been  in  the 
slightest  degree  comparable  to  the  growth  of  the  United  States  generally,  and  within 
the  past  week  we  have  heard  it  asserted  in  another  quarter  that  Canada  "  is  but  a 
fringe  on  the  United  States  border,  and  has  by  far  the  worst  hall  of  the  Continent." 
No.  2.  The  increase  of  population  in  the  United  States  has  been  within  a  frac- 
tion of  twelve  fold  and  a  half  in  the  time  betweeen  1790  and  1880.  That  proportion 
would  make  the  population  of  Ontario  to-day  about  312,000,  and  its  population  in 
1881  was  1,923,228.  The  conclusion  is  that  whereas  the  increase  there  has  been 
twelve  and  a  half  fold,  ours  in  Ontario  has  been  nearly  five  times  as  great,  and  that 
ought  to  be  a  decided  answer  to  those  who  claim  that  there  is  no  comparison  between 
the  prosperity  of  the  country  alongside  of  us  and  that  of  Canada,  which  is  favourable 
to  this  country.  It  may  be  sa'd  that  the  comparison  should  include  the  whole  of  Old 
Canada,  which  in  1790  was  estimated  to  have  a  population  of  150,000.  The  propor- 
tion of  increase  in  the  ratio  of  the  United  States  up  to  1880  would  give  1,875,000, 
but  Ontario  and  Quebec,  or  Old  Canada,  had  in  1880  a  population  of  3,281,000. 

No.  3.  In  connection  with  the  United  States,  it  is  perhaps  proper  to  say  the 
first  thing  that  strikes  us  as  having  any  resemblance  to  the  subject  which  I  have 
chosen  for  an  address  to  the  Senate  to-day  is  the  territorial  system  of  the  United 
States.  That  system  is  one  which  has  grown  out  of  the  peculiar  necessities  of  the 
case,  and  tbe  United  States  stand  precisely  in  the  position  in  respect  to  the  Terri- 
tories that  Canada  occupies  with  regard  to  her  North- West.  The  United  States  is  the 
owner  of  the  soil — the  absolute  owner— and  it  may  be  proper  to  say  at  this  moment 
that  the  United  States  never  has,  under  any  circumstances,  given  up  to  the  Terri- 
tories or  the  States  which  have  been  formed  out  of  them,  any  portion  of  the  public 
domain,  except  that  in  each  township  she  has  given  two  sections  of  land  for  school 
purposes  There  have  been  large  railway  grants,  but  they  have  been  made  to  cor- 
porations entirely  independent  of  the  State,  and  the  State  has  not  come  into  posses- 
sion in  any  way  of  the  public  lands,  but  they  form  the  domain  of  the  Republic  in 
all  the  States  and  Territories  west  of  the  Mississippi  to-day. 

No.  4.  It  was  the  policy  of  the  Government  as  rapidly  as  possible  to  form  the 
Territories  into  self-governing  communities.  The  older  Territories  on  the  east  of 
the  Mississippi,  it  is  scarcely  necessary  to  refer  to  now,  because  they  have  been  long 
formed  into  States,  have  grown  largely  in  population  and  lorm  important  member* 
of  the  great  Confederacy. 

The  first  Territory  at  which  we  may  think  it  worth  while  to  glance  is  that  oj 
Washington,  which  is  on  the  Pacific  Coast.  Washington  was  formed  into  a  Terri- 
tory in  1853.  There  was  no  census  taken  until  1860,  seven  years  afterwards,  whet 
the  population  was  1  1,624.  In  1870  it  had  grown  to  23,955,  and  in  1880  it  had 
reached  75,116,  but  in  that  population  were  4,400  Indians  and  3,187  Chinese.  Th< 
method  of  organizing  the  Territories  is  similar  in  many  respects  to  that  which  hat 
been  adopted  in  regard  to  the  North- West  Territories.  A  Governor  is  appointed  by  th< 
Executive  at  Washington ;  the  inhabitants  are  allowed  to  choose  a  Council  upon  a  has* 
of  universal  suffrage.     The  Council  is  usually  composed  of  seven  to  ten  member^  am 

18 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


they  are  elected  for  two  years.  There  is  a  House  of  Representatives,  which  also,  in  the 
beginning,  has  from  twelve  to  fourteen  members,  and  is  usually  increased  to  twenty- 
four,  after  which  the  increase  ceases ;  the  increase  is  according  to  the  growth  of  the 
population. 

No.  5.  In  the  first  created  Territories  there  are  provisions  that  any  Acts  passed 
should  be  referred  to  Washington  and  could  be  there  disallowed,  but^  since  the  war 
the  Territories  that  have  been  created  have  been  allowed  to  pass  their  own  laws  and 
they  are  subject  only  to  the  revision  of  the  Governor,  who  may  veto  them^but  if  his 
veto  is  not  accepted  and  the  Bills  passed  over  his  head  by  a  two-thirds  majority  they 
become  law. 

No.  6.  In  Washington  Territory  there  was  a  provision  which  it  may^  be  worth 
while  to  mention,  showing  the  practical  views  which  were  taken  of  legislation  on 
the  other  side  of  the  border,  which  was  that  the  first  session  of  the  Legislature  might 
last  one  hundred  days,  but  after  that  there  should  be  no  session  which  should  last  over 
sixty  days  under  any  circumstances.  The  executive  power  rests  with  the  Governor 
who  is  appointed  during  good  behaviour,  as  I  believe  is  the  case  with  the  North- 
West  Territories;  there  is  no  limit  to  the  term  of  his  appointment, 

No,  7.  In  the  case  of  Territories  which  have  been  formed  since  1860  there  is  a 
special  provision  that  there  shall  be  no  legislation  which  shall  permit  slavery.  It  is 
somewhat  instructive  to  look  at  the  position  of  those  Territories  at  the  time  they 
were  first  creatad  and  see  how  rapidly  they  have  grown  up  and  increased,  because 
I  think  wo  may  be  able,  in  glancing  at  them,  to  get  some  idea  as  to  the  prospects  of 
the  growth  of  the  great  country  which  belongs  to  us  and  the  supervision  of  which, 
I  am  very  glad  to  say,  has  fallen  into  the  hands  of  a  gentleman  who  sits  in  this 
House,  who  is  so  eminently  qualified,  both  by  the  industrious  application  by  which 
he  has  mastered  the  details  of  the  Department  over  which  ho  presides,  and  by  his 
general  practical  knowledge  and  wisdom,  to  administer  its  affairs. 

No.  8.  To  return  to  the  United  States,  the  judicial  powers  of  the  Territories  are 
usually  vested  in  three  Judges  of  the  Supreme  Court;  there  is  a  Probate  Court  and 
there  are  Justices  of  the  Peace  who  exercise  the  usual  duties  of  such  officers.  The  two 
Justices  and  the  Chief  Justice  are  usually  appointed  for  four  years.  They  divide  the 
Territory  into  three  districts  in  which  they  hold  their  courts.  I  do  not  suppose^  it 
can  possibly  be  unknown  to  my  hon.  friend,  the  Minister  of  Justice,  that  a  provision 
is  made  there  that  the  Judges  shall  reside  in  the  judicial  districts  for  which  they  are 
appointed  ;  because  that  question  has  been  lately  agitated  here,  but  perhaps  my  hon. 
friend  did  not  know  that  it  was  a  question  which  had  long  ago  been  settled  in  the 
United  States. 

Hon.  Sir  Alexander  Campbell  —The  same  thing  is  required  here  in  the  County 
Courts,  and  in  the  Superior  Courts  of  Lower  Canada. 

Hon.  Mr.  Plumb—Dakota  was  admitted  in  1861.  It  had  a  population  then  of 
4,839  only  ;  it  had  all  the  institutions  to  which  I  have  referred.  It  had  a  Council  of 
nine  with  permission  to  increase  to  thirteen,  serving  for  two  years,  and  thirteen 
representatives,  whose  members  could  be  increased  to  twenty-six  to  serve  for  ono 
year,  and  all  district  and  county  officers  are  appointed  or  elected,  as  the  case  may  be> 
in  such  manner  as  may  be  prescribed  by  the  Governor  and  the  Legislative  Assembly. 
The  copulation  in  1870  was  14,181-— it  had  more  than  doubled;  and  in  1830  it  had 
grown  to  135,177.  It  has  about  the  same  territorial  limits  as  one  of  the  districts 
that  were  created  in  the  North- West  Territory  in  1883  by  an  Order  in  Council,  which 
I  have  been  trying  to  find,  but  which,  so  far  as  I  know,  has  not  been  printed. 

No.  10.  Arizona  was  taken  in  in  1863.  The  population,  of  course,  was  not 
stated  then,  but  in  1870  it  was  9,568,  and  in  1880  it  had  increased  to  40,141.  It  hm 
temporarily  to  remain  a  Territory,  until  a  State  is  formed,  Eepublican  in  form,  and 
shall  apply  for  and  obtain  admission  on  an  equal  footing  with  the  original  States. 
The  provisions  with  reference  to  courts,  &c,  are  the  same  as  prevail  in  the  other 
Territories.  n       .        ■ 

Idaho  was  formed  in  1863.    In  1870  the  population  was  14,999  ;  in   1880   it  had 
increased  to  32,610.    Of  this  population  3,379  were  Chinese  and  165  Indians.    That 
46a  -2  J 

19 


48  Victoria,  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  *~  i5^ 


provides  especially  for  a  matter  in  which  I  think  the  United  States  might  have 
token  a  leaf  out  of  our  book— it  provides  for  the  proper  protection  of  the  rights  of 
person  or  property  pertaining  to  the  Indians,  and  it  is  the  only  Territory  where  that 
provision  is  made,  so  far  as  I  have  discovered.  _        p 

No  11.  Montana  was  erected  into  a  Territory  in  1864  ;  it  contained  in  18  <0  a 
population  of  20,596;  and  in  1880  a  population  of  39,159.  As  that  Territory  lies 
alongside  of  our  border  it  may  be  worth  mentioning  that  it  has  only  between  three 
and  four  millions  of  acres  of  arable  land  in  an  area  of  over  ninety  millions.  It  has 
great  wealth  in  mines,  and  it  has  very  extensive  grazing  lands,  but  that  it  can  ever 
be  a  rival  to  the  North-West  in  point  of  inducement  to  emigration  for  agricultural 
purposes  seems  quite  impossible,  for  I  think  I  state  the  fact,  within  the  limits  of  the 
truth  when  I  say  that  there  are  less  than  3,500,000  acres  of  arable  land  in  the  Terri- 
tory and  that  is  the  report  of  the  United  States  Commissioners  from  which  I  have 
taken  these  figures.  But  there  is  one  feature  about  Montana  which  must  not  be  lost 
sight  of.  It  is,  I  believe,  the  third  in  the  great  mining  districts  of  the  United  States. 
Up  to  the  end  of  last  year  it  had  produced  in  gold  and  silver  nearly  $65,000,000.  It 
is  exceeded  by  Nevada  and  California,  and  perhaps  it  may  be  equalled  by  Colorado, 
but  it  stands  on  a  level  with  those  great  precious  metal,  producing  States,  and  it  may 
be  fair  to  infer  that  lying  as  it  does,  alongside  of  our  border,  having  very  much  the 
same  configuration,  having  the  same  elevation  and  having  without  doubt  the  same 
geological  formation,  when  the  great  Pacific  Eailway  has  penetrated  the  mountains 
it  will  be  found  that  there  are  the  same  advantages  offered  to  the  prospector  and 
miner  in  our  country  that  there  are  in  a  territory  that  is  only  separated  from  ours 
by  an  imaginary  *line.  In  fact,  I  think  my  honorable  friend  the  Minister  ol  the 
Interior  knows  that  there  have  been  already  indications  that  my  theory  is  correct, 
for  I  understand  that  in  the  mountains  discoveries  have  been  made  which  indicate 
that  the  same  sort  of  wealth  will  be  found  north  of  the  boundary  that  is  found  m 
in  the  Territory  of  Montana. 

No.  12.  The  last  Territory  that  has  been  taken  in  is  Wyoming.  It  entered  the 
Union  as  a  Territory  in  1868.  In  1870  it  had  a  population  of  11,518,  and  in  1S80 
it  had  grown  to  20,789,  including  914  Chinese.  They  seem  to  have  penetrated 
everywhere;  in  Montana  there  were  1,765  of  them.  .     ' 

No.  13.  Now,  there  was  a  doubt  which,  I  believe,  was  generally  felt,  that  in  the 
British  North  America  Act  no  power  had  been  conferred  upon  the  Dominion  to  deal 
with  the  Territories  which  it  had  acquired  by  the  purchase  from  the  Hudson  .bay 
Company  Although  the  Act  had  been  passed,  which  created  Manitoba,  those  doubts 
were  so  strong  that  it  was  thought  expedient  to  get  an  Act  passed  by  the  Imperial 
Parliament  to  confirm  the  Act  which  created  the  Province  of  Manitoba^  and  also  to 
confer  upon  the  Dominion  the  absolute  power  of  creating  Provinces  in  the  lerri- 
tories,  and  defining  their  powers,  and  giving  them  the  right  of  representation.  _  Ihat 
Act  was  passed  in  34  and  35  Vic,  and  the  Dominion  Statutes  of  1872  contain  the 
Act  confirmirg  it.  That  legislation  gives  power  to  create  and  provide  for  the  adminis- 
tration of  such  Provinces,  and  sanctions  the  previous  legislation  m  regard  to  Mani- 
toba. Under  that  Act- it  probably  might  not  have  been  necessary,  however,  to 
refer  to  it— last  year  the  North- West  was  divided  into  four  Territories,  which  were 
called  I  believe,  Provisional  Districts.  One,  Assiniboia,  contains  95,000  square 
miles  Saskatchewan,  114,000  square  miles;  Alberta,  100,000  square  miles;  and 
Athabasca,  122,000  square  miles.  These  are  figures  which  cannot  be  grasped,  which 
convey  a  very  vague  and  inadequate  idea  of  the  vast  extent  of  territory  which 
has  come  into  the  possession  of  the  Dominion  through  the  purchase  of  the  JNortn- 
West  and  its  acquisition  by  Indian  treaties. 

No  14  The  arrangements  for  our  new  Territories  up  to  the  present  time  nave 
been  exceedingly  liberal.  I  think  there  has  been  a  disposition  to  recognize  the 
position  of  those  men  who  have  been  pioneers  in  the  wilderness,  and#I  think  they 
have  been  treated  with  great  consideration.  It  is  not  because  there  is  anything  to 
complain  of  in  that  respect  that  I  have  asked  the  question  which  appears  on  thai 
paper     It  is  not  that  I  suppose  the  Government  has  for  one  moment  been  indifferent 


4$  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 

to  the  position  of  the  North- West,  or  that  it  has  been  in  the  slightest  degree  neglect- 
ful  of  the  interests  of  those  who  have  gone  there,  or  that  I  can  venture  to  make  any 
soeeestion  which  has  not  occurred  to  the  statesmen  who  now  form  the  Privy  Coun- 
cil-but  there  is  no  doubt  a  decided  feeling  in  that  country,  among  those  from  the 
older  Provinces  who  have  been  accustomed  prior  to  their  emigration  to  being  m 
accord  en  rapport  and  in  immediate  communication  with  the  great  Council  ot  tne 
Dominion,  that  they  should  have  (even  though  it  be  in  a  very  small  degree)  some 
representation  at  Ottawa  which  could  make  known  their  wants  in  a  more  definite 
more  efficient,  and  perhaps  more  vigorous  way  than  can  possibly  be  attained  by  the 
formal  action  of  the  Governor  in  Council. 

No  15.  The  Governor  is  appointed  during  pleasure.  He  has  a,  Secretary,  and,  1 
think,  three  Stipendiary  Magistrates,  who,  with  three  others  appointed  by  him  form 
his  Council.  The  people  have  a  right,  after  they  have  been  formed  into  drstricts ,  to 
elect  members  of  the  Council.  Each  district  containing  1,000  inhabitants  elects  one 
member;  when  the  population  reaches  2,000,  two  members;  and  when  in  this  man- 
ner 21  are  elected  the  Council  shall  cease,  and  the  members  so  elected  shall  be  con- 
stituted and  designated  a  Legislative  Assembly,  shall  meet  once  a  year,  and  hold 
office  for  two  years.  Of  course,  in  a  new  country  like  that,  the  formation  of  muni- 
cipal institutions  is  attended  with  considerable  difficulties,  and  there  will  always  be 
the  difficulty,  as  in  the  case  in  Algoma,  and  in  other  of  our  sparsely  settled  I  ern- 
tories  or  districts,  of  forming  a  plan  by  which  the  proper  vote  can  be  brought  out 
and  proper  representation  obtained.  1  have  no  doubt  that  this  subject  will  engage 
the  attention  of  the  Government,  and  that  in  due  time  they  will  be  able  to  surmount 
that  trouble,  whatever  it  may  be.  , 

No.16.  For  the  present,  however,  the  Territories  of  the .North-West  are  not 
even  in  a.  free  or  as  favorable  a  position  as  are  those  of  the  United  States r  in  this 
respect.  There  is  a  provision  in  the  Acts  forming  those  Territories  by  which  they 
are  entitled  to  elect  delegates  to  Washington  ;  such  a  delegate  is  not  a  representa- 
tive, and  is  not  so  ealledfbut  he  is  sent  to  Washington  by  the  genera  vote  - rf  the 
people  of  the  Territory,  and  has  a  right  to  sit  in  the  House  of  .^P^^^ 
speak  upon  all  subjects,  but  not  the  right  to  vote ;  he  represents  the  people  in  such  a 
way  that,  though  he  is  not  permitted  to  take  part  in  deciding  questions  in  the  House 
he  has  the  right  to  advise,  and  I  have  no  doubt  his  presence  there  is  very  often 
exceedingly  useful  to  those  whom  he  represents.  Every  Territory-and  I  think  there 
are  seven  now  organized-has  a  right  to  send  one  delegate  I  do  not  suppose  that 
any  such  system  as  that  would  be  adopted  here,  although  the  framing  of  the  law  by 
which  the  Government  of  the  North-West  has  been  created  very  closely  resembles 
the  laws  which  have  been  adopted  on  the  other  side  ;  but  I  assume  that  when  repre- 
sentation  from  the  North-West  comes  into  Parliament,  it  will  come  with ^similar 
powers    and    stand    upon  a  footing  of  equality  with  representation    from  other 

°VNo.eiV.  Of  course,  there  always  will  bo  a  foeling  that  it  is  not  desirable  to  in- 
crease too  rapidly  the  number  of  representatives  in  the  Parliament  of  the  *™™V, 
ana  I  thick  it  was  with  that  view  that-at  the  time  of  Confederation -it  was  thought 
desirable  that  the  great  Province  which  is  alongside  of  us-which  was  remarkable 
on  account  of  its  steadiness  of  population-should  form  the  basis  upon  which  lepre- 
sentation  for  all  the  other  Provinces  should  be  calculated  I  believe  that  was  the 
reason  given  by  the  framers  of  Confederation,  during  the  Confederation  debates  and 
I  find  that  Sir  John  Macdonald  at  that  time  said :  "  Unless  some  definite  Principle 
was  adopted  to  keep  the  representation  within  a  certain  limit  the  House  ot  Ooni- 
mons  might  eventually  become  a  too  cumbrous,  unwieldy  body.  It  was  d ecided to 
accept  the  representation  of  Lower  Canada  as  a  fixed  standard-as  a  pivot  on  which 
the  whole  would  turn-since  that  Province  was  the  best  suited  for  the  Purpose,  on 
account  of  the  comparatively  permanent  character  of  its  population,  and  from  its 
having  neither  the  largest  nor  the  least  number  of  inhabitants.'  Hence  the-  da^c 
of  an  inconvenient  increase,  when  the  representation  is  reviewed  after  each  decennial 

£«.m««     l»«o   V««rt-r»   i"»»o/%f JnallTT  r»orl n r»/>r3    fn  R    minimum. 


census,  has  been  practically  reduced  to  a  minimum. 

21 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.   46.)  A.  1885 


In  reference  to  the  Senate  we  find  that,  in  order  to  prevent  that  body  being 
swamped  at  any  time  for  political  reasons,  the  constitution  expressly  limited  the 
number  that  can  sit  therein  to  seventy-eight. 

No.  18.  Special  regard  has  also  been  had  to  the  peculiar  situation  of  the  Prov- 
ince of  Quebec  where  the  electoral  divisions  that  existed  previous  to  186?  are  main- 
tained, and  a  senator  must  consequently  have  his  real  property  qualification,  or  be 
resident  in  the  district  for  which  he  is  appointed — a  provision  that  was  not  con- 
sidered necessary  for  the  other  Provinces.  Of  course,  in  discussing  these  principles, 
those  considerations  must  not  be  lost  sight  of,  and  I  think  they  are  pertinent  to  the 
Bubject  which  I  have  the  honor  to  bring  before  the  Senate. 

No.  19.  I  understand  that  there  is  a  strong  disposition  in  the  North -West  to 
erect  municipalities  under  the  Territorial  Act  as  soon  as  possible,  and  some  of  the 
districts  which  have  been  fortunate  enough  to  secure  a  considerable  accession  oi 
population  have  already  begun  to  adopt  such  measures.  In  Eegina  a  municipality 
is  organized,  and  so  it  is  in  Moose  Jaw,  while  Calgary  is  preparing  for  one,  as  is  also 
the  case  with  Medicine  Hat.  Prince  Albert  has  applied  to  the  council  for  organiza- 
tion, and  Broadview  has  applied  as  a  county  municipality ;  but  there  has  been  a 
difficulty  there,  inasmuch  as  there  is  no  provision  made  for  oganizing  a  county 
municipality,  and  the  Lieutenant-Governor  properly  hesitates  to  take  the  responsi- 
bility of  such  action.  I  have  no  doubt,  however,  that  at  the  next  meeting  of  the 
council  he  will  supply  the  omission  which  seems  to  have  been  accidentally  made  in 
the  provisions  which  were  enacted  for  the  admission  of  counties.  Of  course,  I  cannot 
expect  to  tell  the  Honorable  Minister  of  the  Interior  anything  new  in  regard  to  these 
matters,  but,  perhaps,  it  may  not  be  familiar  to  the  House  that  a  very  large  quantity 
of  land,  as  I  understand,  has  been  taken  up  in  the  Eegina  office,  and  that  the  land 
oificer  there  thinks  there  are  25,000  people  in  Assiniboia,  and  that  it  would  be  safe  to 
estimate  the  entire  population  of  the  districts  at  35,000  whites.  If  that  is  the  case, 
of  course  we  can  see  that  the  example  of  the  United  States  would  give  strength  to 
the  argument  that  there  should  be  at  least  three  organizations  of  a  territorial  char- 
acter, though  it  is  doubtful  whether  that  would  be  desirable  just  at  present,  when 
the  population  is  so  scattered ;  that,  however,  is  a  consideration  for  the  Government, 
and  not  for  any  one  who  cannot  speak  with  authority.  I  think  I  may  say  this,  how- 
ever, that  it  would  be  a  most  desirable  thing,  whenever  the  Government  can  fairly 
see  its  way  to  do  so,  that  there  should  be  in  the  House  of  Commons  some  one  who 
could  speak  with  authority  for  that  great  country,  who  would  be  elected  by  the  peo- 
ple, who  would  represent  them,  and  who  would  be  able  to  come  here  independently 
and  to  tell  his  story  without  fear,  favor  or  affection. 

No.  20.  The  Government  at  Ottawa  is  infinitely  more  liberal  in  respect  to  the 
granting  of  homesteads  and  pre-emptions  than  is  the  Government  at  Washington. 
The  United  States,  I  can  tell  the  hon.  gentlemen,  have  restricted  with  the  most 
jealous  care  the  intending  settler  to  eighty  acres  of  land  in  the  most  desirable  locali- 
ties— that  is  all  he  can  take  up.  He  can  only  take  up  one  homestead,  or  a  pre- 
emption of  eighty  acres ;  he  cannot  have  both,  nor  can  he  obtain  a  second  home- 
stead, and  no  one  can  take  up  or  settle  upon  land,  by  homestead  or  pre-emption, 
unless  he  is  of  the  full  age  of  21  years.  Under  our  laws  a  person  of  18  can  get  160 
acres  as  a  homestead,  and  he  can  get  a  further  160  acres  as  pre-emption — if  the  law 
has  not  already  expired-and  he  can  choose  a  second  and  third  homestead  after  perform- 
ing certain  settlement  duties.  Such  privileges  are  not  given  in  the  United  States, 
yet  we  are  told  by  the  papers  of  which  I  have  spoken  that  under  the  laws  of  the 
United  States  the  settler  has  greater  advantages  than  under  our  own.  That  is  what 
I  have  to  say  to  the  hon.  gentleman  in  regard  to  this  subject. 

No.  21.  Now,  I  desire  to  draw  the  attention  of  the  Government  to  the  rapid 
increase  of  population  in  the  North- West,  and  to  the  fact  that  a  statement  that  had 
been  made  on  the  floor  of  the  House  of  Commons,  by  the  leader  of  the  Government, 
three  or  four  years  ago,  in  respect  to  its  growth,  had  been  within  the  limit  and  not 
freyond  it,  and  that  it  was  fair  to  assume  that  within  the  next  year  or  two  the  popu- 
lation there  would  be  such  as  would  fairly  claim,  and,  I  think,  would  be  entitled  to 

99 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


«™;™  the  attention  of  the  Government  in  respect  to  having  it  represented  in  this 
thenNo  22   There  is  another  consideration  which  must  occur  to  every  one,  and  it  is 

retesenSs     K  would  he  undesirable  to  have  action  deferred  ^'g'fof 

fte^r;ri™o"";i>lo«lHh..tte«iion  of  th.  Hon..  "to  th.  .d.talility.  rf 
motXi  iltaXZr  »p?.»aftioo  to  th.  Inh.bllaot.  of  th.  Jmtond  d«fc»M 

take  the  same  under  consideration." 

No.  1?. 

CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 

EXAMINATION  ON  OPTIONAL    SUBJECTS. 

Friday,  May  16th,  1884,  from  3.30  p.  m.  to  4.30  p.  m. 
Candidates  are  requested  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 
TELEGEAPHY, 
To  be  transmitted : — 
Values.  THE  SOTJDAN. 

SCENES  OP  EL  MAHM,  THE  PALSE  PROPHET'S,  OPERATIONS. 

The  name  "  the  Soudan,"  bears  different  meanings,  according   as   it 
i8  used  byThe  Arabs  or  by' the  Egyptians.    The  former  apply  it  to 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


designate  the  interior  of  Africa  generally,  and  following  them,  the  geo- 
graphers of  Europe  have  given  this  name  to  all  the  countries  along  the 
southern  edge  of  the  great  Sahara,  from  Senegambia  and  Sierra  Leone 
on  the  west,  to  Darfur  on  the  east.  Etymologically,  Soudan  means 
simply  "  the  blacks,"  and  is  a  corruption  of  the  Arabic  name  Balud-us- 
Sudan,  "  the  country  of  the  blacks."  As  employed,  however,  by  the 
Egyptians,  "the  Soudan"  means  not  the  immense  tract  of  Africa  just 
described,  but  a  tract  to  the  east  of  it,  which  comprises  the  countries, 
except  Abyssinia,  on  both  sides  of  the  Nile,  south  of  the  second  cataract, 
which  have  during  the  last  sixty  years  been  formed  into  an  Egyptian 
province  bearing  that  name.  The  dependent  province  or  empire — for, 
be  it  understood,  the  Soudan  is  not  Egypt,  any  more  than  Algeria  is 
France — comprises  much  of  Nubia,  all  Sennaar,  all  Kordovan,  and  all 
Darfur. 

To  be  received: — 

A  report  recently  made  to  the  British  Foreign  Office  gave  its  length 
from  north  to  south,  or  from  Assouan  to  the  equator,  at  about  1,650 
miles,  but  this  makes  it  begin  at  the  first  and  not  at  the  second  cataract 
of  the  Nile ;  its  width,  on  the  same  authority,  from  Massowah,  on  the 
Bed  Sea,  to  the  western  limit  of  the  Darfur  province,  is  from  1,200  to 
1,400  miles.  It  probably,  therefore,  does  not  fall  far  short,  if  at  all,  of 
the  dimensions  of  India,  It  is  inhabited  by  two  totally  distinct  races. 
The  northern  half  by  almost  pure  Arabs,  most  of  them  nomad  tribes, 
professing  some  form  of  Mohammedanism,  and  the  southern  half  by 
negroes,  who,  though  officially  classed  among  the  Mussulmans,  are  really 
pagans,  and  are,  roughly  speaking,  all  sedentary  and  agricultural.  Up 
to  1819  the  Soudan  was  divided  into  a  number  of  petty  kingdoms  and 
chieftaincies ;  but  in  that  year  Muhammed  Ali,  the  then  Khedive,  sent 
his  son  Ismail  to  conquer  the  country.  From  that  time  to  the  present 
the  Egyptians  have  gone  on  extending  the  borders  of  their  nominal 
sovereignty,  but  have  never  yet  managed  to  obtain  an  undisturbed 
footing  in  any  part  of  the  vast  territory  they  claim.  The  seat  of  the 
provincial  government  is  at  Khartoum,  at  the  confluence  of  the  Blue 
and  White  Nile.  Khartoum  can  be  reached  from  Cairo,  from  which  it 
is  some  1,500  miles  distant,  by  the  Nile— the  railway  stopping  short  at 
Assiout,  less  than  300  miles  from  Cairo — but  the  quickest  route  is  by 
the  Red  Sea  from  Suez  to  Souakim,  which  may  be  regarded  as  the  sea- 
port of  the  Soudan,  and  thence  by  a  caravan  route  of  about  280  miles  to 
Berber,  where  the  Nile  is  touched,  and  from  that  point  southward  for 
100         about  the  same  distance  to  Khartoum. 


24 


Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


PAPERS  TREATED  BY  THE  CANDIDATES  AT  THE  PROMOTION  EXAM- 
INATION OF  MAY,  1884. 

No.  1. 

CIVIL   SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


Yalue. 


100 


PROMOTION    EXAMINATION. 


Monday,  19th  May,  1884,  from  10.00  a.m.  to  10.30  a.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

PENMANSHIP. 

Copy  the  following  extract:— 

A  SIMPLE  REMEDY. 

There  is  no  remedy  of  such  general  application,  and  none  so  easily 
attainable  as  water ;  and  yet  nine  persons  in  ten  will  pass  by  it  man 
emergency  to  seek  for  something  of  far  less  efficiency.  There  are  but 
few  cases  of  illness  where  water  should  not  occupy  the  highest  place  as  a 
remedial  agent.  A  strip  of  flannel  or  a  napkin  folded  lengthwise,  and 
dipped  in  hot  water  and  wrung  out,  and  then  applied  around  the  neck 
of  a  child  that  has  croup,  will  usually  bring  relief  m  ten  minutes.  A 
towel  folded  several  times,  and  dipped  in  hot  water  and  quickly  wrung 
and  applied  over  the  seat  of  the  pain  in  toothache  or  neuralgia,  will  gen- 
erally afford  prompt  relief.  This  treatment  in  colic  acts  almost  like 
magic.  I  have  seen  cases  that  have  resisted  other  treatment  for  hours 
yield  to  this  in  ten  minutes. 

There  is  nothing  that  will  so  promptly  cut  short  a  congestion  ot 
the  lungs,  sore  throat  or  rheumatism,  as  hot  water  when  applied  promptly 
and  thoroughly.  Pieces  of  cotton  batting,  dipped  in  hot  water  and  kept 
applied  to  old  sores  or  new,  cuts,  bruises  or  sprains,  is  the  treatment 
now  generally  adopted  in  hospitals.  I  have  seen  a  sprained  ankle  cured 
in  an  hour  by  showering  it  with  hot  water,  poured  from  a  height  ot 
three  feet 

Tepid  water  acts  promptly  as  an  emetic;  and  hot  water  taken 
freely  half  an  hour  before  bed  time  is  the  best  of  cathartics  in  the  caseot 
constipation;  while  it  has  a  most  soothing  effect  upon  the  stomach  and 
bowels.  This  treatment  continued  for  a  few  months,  with  proper  atten- 
tion to  the  diet,  will  cure  any  curable  case  of  dyspepsia.  Headache 
almost  always  yields  to  the  simultaneous  application  of  hot  water  totne 
feet  and  the  back  of  the  neck.  It  is  an  excellent  plan  to  record  tacts 
like  these  in  a  note  book,  which  should  always  be  at  hand  when  wanted. 
In  the  anxiety  caused  by  accident  or  sudden  illness  in  the  family, one 
becomes  confused  and  is  not  apt  to  remember  quickly  what  should  be 
done;  hence  there  may  be  prolonged  and  unnecessary  suffering  belore 
proper  remedies  are  applied. — Hall's  Journal  of  Health. 


25 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.) 


.A.  188& 


No.  2. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


Values. 


20 


20 


n 


48 


10G 


Monday,  19th  May,  1884,  from  10.30  a.m.  to  12  noon. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 

COMPOSITION. 

1.  Point  out  and  correct  whatever  inaccuracies  are  to  he  found  in  the 

following  sentences : 

(a)  Each  of  the  sexes  should  keep  within  its  proper  hounds,  and 
content  themselves  with  the  advantages  of  their  particular, 
spheres.    v 
(ft)  Six  months'  sojourn  among  the  mountains  have  restored  me 
to  perfect  health. 

(c)  I  am  engaged  in  a  great  work,  and  would  not  leave  it  for  one 

of  less  importance. 

(d)  This  hook  is  so  uninteresting  that  I  have  not  read  it  through 

and  never  expect  to. 

2.  In  the  following  sentences  insert  in  each  hlank  space   the  proper 
preposition : 

(a)  Confide, the  virtuous,  and  rely those  who 


your  professions. 

—  Homer. 

the  sun,  which 


have  not  deceived  you. 
(ft)  Let  your  actions  correspond 

(c)  Virgil  has  often  been  compared  — 

(d)  Good  humour  may  be  compared  — 

sheds  light all  around. 

3.  Punctuate  the  following  stanzas,  and  insert  capitals  where  they  are 
necessary : 

Keen  son  of  trade  with  eager  brow 

who  now  is  fluttering  in  thy  snare. 
thy  golden  fortunes  tower  they  now 

or  melt  the  glittering  spires  in  air 
some  famine  struck  shall  think  how  long 

the  cold  dark  hours  how  slow  the  light 
and  some  who  flaunt  amid  the  throng 

shall  hide  in  dens  of  shame  to-night 

4.  Write  an  official  letter,  setting  forth  the  advantages  of  allowing  credit 

for  optional  subjects  in  the  C.  S.  Examination. 


26 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Values. 


10 

20 

10 

15 

15 
15 

15 


100 


Values. 


No.  3. 
CIVIL  SEEVICE  OF  CANADA. 

PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


Monday,  19th  May,  1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  2.30  p.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

CONSTITUTION    OF   CANADA. 

{British  North  America  Act,  1867.) 

1.  Distinguish  between  the  powers  of  the  Federal  and  Provincial 
Governments,  with 'regard  to  the  administration  of  justice  and  the 
appointment  of  judges. 

2.  Can  the  Constitution  of  Canada  and  the  Provinces  he  amended, 
and  how  ? 

3.  Through  what  channel  must  local  governments  communicate 
with  foreign  powers  ? 

4.  What  constituted,  according  to  the  Act  of  1867,  the  Canada 
Consolidated  Eevenue  Fund,  and  what  expenses  were  charges  on  it  / 

5.  How  does  the  same  Act  deal  with  the  question  of  education? 

6.  What  was  the  amount  of  debt  belonging  to  the  four  Oonfeder- 
i  ated  Provinces  that  was  assumed  by  the  Government  of  Canada  m  1857  I 

■7,  What  legislatures,  Federal  or  Provincial,  have  the  authority  to 
legislate  on  the  allowing  subjects :  Quarantine,  marine  hospitals,  direct 
taxation,  navigation  and  shipping,  penitentiaries,  prisons,  reformatories, 
solemnization  of  marriage  and  divorce  ? 

No.  4. 
CIVIL  SEEVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


Mond  ay,  19th  May,  1884,  from  2.30  p.m.  to  4.00  p.m. 
C  andidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 
Note.  -Candidates  will  return  this  paper  to  the  extminer  in  charge   to 
be  transmitted  ty  him  to  the  Board  of  Civil  Service  Examiners 
at  Ottawa. 

DUTIES  OF  DEPAETMENTS. 

CUSTOMS  INSPECTOBS'   EXAMINATION. 

1  In  counting  the  cash  at  a  port— if  you  found  a  number  of  cheque© 
had  been  taken  for  duties-what  pi ecaution  would  you  satisfy  yourself 
had  been  taken  ty  the  collector  before  accepting  such  cheques  as  actual 

assets  ? 

27 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


2.  How  would  you  satisfy  yourself  as  to  the  cash  at  collector's 
credit  for  departmental  advances,  sight  entries,  or  other  matters  in  sus- 
pense, at  a  port  where  there  was  a  bank  agency,  supposing  such  amounts 
were  paid  to  collector  by  means  of  cheques,  and  not  accounted  for  in 
his  Cash  Book  ? 

3.  With  what  records  should  the  dates  in  Cash  Book,  as  to  receipt 
of  money  for  Customs  duties,  correspond  ? 

4.  How  often  should  deposits  be  made  to  credit  of  Keceiver-Gen 
eral  for  duties  collected  ? 

5.  What,  and  how  many,  vouchers  should  a  collector  receive  from 
the  bank  on  making  deposit  of  Customs  collections  ? 

6.  What  is  done  by  the  collector  on  receiving  such  vouchers  from 
the  bank  ? 

7.  If  you  reached  a  port  on  the  last  day  of  a  month  and  found  the 
collector— having  on  hand  more  than  sufficient  funds  from  duties  col- 
lected— had  paid  the  salaries  from  such  collections;  would  you  view  the 
matter  as  irregular  or  otherwise  ? 

3  8.  State  your  reasons  for  taking  such  a  view. 

9.  If  an  entry  is  made,  for  consumption  of  goods  in  bond,  what 
would  such  an  entry  be  called  ? 

10.  How  long  could  a  collector,  under  the  departmental  regulations, 
hold  over  an  importer's  cheque  (tendered  for  payment  of  duty),  suppos- 
ing such  importer  were  in  fairly  good  standing,  according  to  the  col- 
lector's belief,  and  the  cheque  had  not  been  accepted  by  the  bank  ? 

11.  To  what  documents  would  you  refer  in  order  to  assure  yourself 
that  all  the  goods  landed  at  a  port  had  been  duly  entered  as  required  by 
law? 

12.  State  the  various  ways  by  which  only  such  documents  to  be 
referred  to  as  above  mentioned  can  be  satisfactorily  cleared. 

13.  What  dues  are  payable  through  the  Collector  of  Customs  and 
accounted  for  by  the  Customs  Department,  by  the  owner,  master  or  con- 
signee of  a  foreign  sea-going  vessel  arriving  at  a  Canadian  port? 

14.  How  can  you  assure  yourself  that  such  dues  have  been  paid  at 
the  proper  time,  and  the  number  of  times  required  by  law  ? 

15.  What  must  be  produced  by  an  importer  or  his  agent  when 
entering  goods  for  consumption  besides  the  form  of  entry  and  the 
required  amount  of  money  to  pay  the  duties  ? 

3  16.  What  is  the  rate  per  ton  levied  for  sick  mariners'  due*  ? 

3  17.  Would  a  Canadian  coasting  vessel  arriving  at  Halifax,  N.S., 

from  Yarmouth,  N.S.,  have  to  pay  sick  mariners'  dues  ? 

18.  Where  would  such  payments  be  made — at  the  port  of  departure 
or  arrival  ? 

19.  What  classes  of  steamboats  are  entirely  exempted  from  the  pro- 
visions of  the  Steamboat  Inspection  Act  ? 

20.  What  tonnage  duty  is  payable  by  the  owner  or  master  of  every 
steamboat  coming  under  the  provisions  of  the  Steamboat  Inspection 
Act? 

21.  What  is  the  inspection  fee  payable  on  a  passenger  steamer 
exceeding  100  tons  under  the  provisions  of  the  Steamboat  Inspection 
Act? 

22.  Under  what  circumstances,  only,  can  a  locker  deliver  goods 
from  a  bonded  warehouse  to  the  owner  or  lessee  thereof? 

23.  If  an  importer  enters  20  packages  of  goods  for  consumption 
ex-ship,  on  a  single  entry,  how  many  at  least  of  such  packages  must  be 
held  back  for  examination  at  the  Custom  House,  supposing  the  importer 
wishes  a  portion  delivered  to  him  immediately  ? 


23 


#8  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46,) 


A.  1885 


24.  Would  the  remaining  packages,  so  delivered  as  above,  be  held 
by  the  importer  at  his  own  disposal  and  free  of  all  conditions,  supposing 
the  duty  had  been  paid  on  them  ? 

25.  How  would  you  ascertain  the  correctness  of  the  weight  or  gauge 
for  duty  of  sugar  or  molasses  entered  at  a  port  previous  to  your  arrival 
there,  and  which  had  been  delivered  to  the  importer  after  the  payment 
of  duty  by  him  ? 

26.  Supposing  an  invoice  of  sugar  shows  99,000  kilogrammes,  how 
would  you  find  the  equivalent  of  such  sugar  in  avoirdupois  weight, 
assuming  there  had  been  no  loss  of  weight  on  the  voyage  to  Canada  ? 

27.  Where  would  you  find  the  proper  equivalent  of  a  kilogramme,  as 
fixed  for  Canadian  Customs  purposes  ? 

28.  In  case  an  importer  pays  too  much  duty,  how  is  he  to  obtain 
redress  ? 

29.  In  the  event  of  increased  or  additional  duties  being  demanded, 
after  an  entry  has  been  passed,  if  such  additional  duties  are  paid  upon  a 
post  entry,  should  the  prime  or  additional  entry  be  dealt  with  in  any  way 
by  the  collector  ? 

30.  Under  what  conditions  only  should  bonded  merchandise  from 
warehouse  or  vessel  be  transferred  to  cars  or  other  vessels  for  trans- 
portation ? 

31.  How  should  be  manifested  which  are  to  be  removed  in  bonds 
ex-warehouse,  under  removal  entry,  when  the  transportation  is  intended 
to  be  made  partly  through  a  foreign  country  ? 

32.  Supposing  there  was  a  train  of,  say  tec  cars,  similarly  laden  with 
bonded  goods,  to  be  forwarded  in  like  manner,  how  might  the  procedure 
as  required  in  the  case  of  a  single  car,  be  modified,  for  convenience  and 
economizing  of  time— under  the  regulations  ? 

33.  What  numbers  (besides  those  upon  the  packages  transported  in 
bond  by  rail),  must  be  shown  on  the  separate  car  manifests,  or  train 
manifests  ? 

34.  How  are  Execise  goods  manifested,  when  removed  or  exported 
by  railway  under  Customs  supervision. 

35.  State  two  cases  mentioned  in  section  140  of  the  Customs  Act$ 
1883,  in  which  warehoused  goods  may  bo  delivered  (under  the  conditions 
therein  prescribed),  as  ship's  stores. 


3 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 


100 


NO.  4. 
C1YIL  SERVICE  OE  CANADA. 


Values. 


PROMOTION     EXAMINATION. 

Monday,  19th  May  1884,  from  2.30  p.  m.  to  4.00  p.  m. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 
DUTIES  OF  THE  DEPAETMENT. 

CUSTOMS — APPRAISERS. 
Note— This  paper  must  be  returned  to  the  examiner  in  charge  to  be  transmitted   hj 
him  to  the  Board  of  0.  S.  Examiners  at  Ottawa. 

1.  In  the  case  of  an  article  having  been  ordered  for  appraisement, 
and  having  been  inspected,  if  the  appraiser  is  in  doubt  as  to  the  quality 
or  denomination  of  such  article,  what  is  his  duty,  as  defined  in  the  hand- 
book of  instruction  of  officers  ? 

2.  In  the  event  of  disagreement  between  the  appraiser  and  col- 
lector as  to  the  course  to  be  pursued,  after  the  examination  as^  above 
stated,  what  ^ould  be  the  course  to  be  adopted  in  order  to  arrive  at  a 
proper  authoritative  decision  ? 

29 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


k2ct  5 
5 


3.  Under  ordinary  circumstances,  where  only  should  goods  be  ex- 
amined for  appraisement  ?  . 

4.  Under  what  circumstances,  only,  shall  an  Appraiser  authorize 
delivery  of  goods  referred  to  him  for   appraisement,— as  definedin  .the 
hand-book  of  instruction  to  officers  ?  p 

5.  In  the  case  of  a  non-enumerated  article  wnich  bears  a  simili- 
tude, either  in  material,  quality,  or  the  use  to  which  it  may  be  put,  to 
any  enumerated  article  chargeable  with  duty,  what  rate  of  duty  shall 

be  payable  ?  .  / 

6.  In  case  where  there  has  not  been  any  decision  as  to  what  rate 
of  duty  shall  be  payable  upon  particular  goods,  and  a  dispute  arises 
who  shall  declare  the  proper  rate  of  duty  payable,  if  any,  on  the  kind 
of  goods  in  question  ? 

7.  In  case  no  standard  value  has  been  fixed,  by  proper  authority, 
for  any  currency —what  certificate  of  comparative  value  shall  be  re- 
quired to  be  attached  to  the  invoice  presented  for  duty  ? 

8.  If  the  master  of  an  incoming  vessel  should  make  an  untrue 
report,  what  penalty  would  he  incur  ? 

9.  Within  what  time  after  the  arrival  of  goods,  by  sea,  from  any 
place  out  of  Canada,  must  entry  inwards  be  made  ? 

10  In  the  event  of  dutiable  goods  having  received  damage  (it  im- 
ported by  water)  during  the  voyage  of  importation— within  what  time 
must  the  examination  by  a  proper  Customs  officer  be  completed  and 
certificate  of  damages  granted,  in  order  to  secure  a  refund  of  duty  / 

11  Where  a  drawback  has  been  granted  by  the  Government  of  any 
foreign  country,  on  goods  manufactured  there  and  exported  therefrom, 
how  should  such   drawback   be  treated  when  entry  of  such  goods  is 

made  in  Canada  ?  ^  . 

12.  When  is  the  duty  collected  upon  hogsheads  or  other  packages 

containing  sugar  ?  iA     j    U  r        „« 

13  In  the  event  of  any  person  refusing  to  attend  before  an 
appraiser,  or  collector  as  provided  in  the  9th  section  of  the  Customs 
Act  of  1883— to  what  penalty  would  he  be  subject? 

14.  What  penalty  would  be  imposed  upon  a  person  who  might  be 
chosen  to  make  an  appraisement  under  the  Customs  Act,  1883,  and 
who,  having  been  notified  of  such  choice,  refuses  or  neglects  to  make 
such  appraisment,  without  good  and  sufficient  cause  ? 

15    What  number  of  lbs.  are  there  in  a  ton,  for  Customs  purposes  ? 
i      16.  Supposing  an  invoice  were  made  out  in  kilogrammes,  under 
what  statute  would  you  find  the  equivalent  in  English  weight  ? 

11  If  a  cargo  of  raisins  were  bought  in  Chicago  by  a  nrm  m 
Victoria  B.C.,  the  total  weight  of  which  was  70,000  lbs.,  the  first  being 
invoiced  at  five  cents  per  lb.,  supposing  it  were  shipped  ma  San 
Francisco,  and  freight  at  the  rate  of  one  cent  per  lb.  was  paid  by  the 
purchaser,  on  delivery  at  San  Francisco,  what  would  be  the  proper 
value  for  entry  at  Victoria,  BC?  ■ 

18  If  a  Canadian  dealer  buys  from  an  English  manufacturer,  at 
Stoke-on-Trent,  100  tons  Iron,  at  £10  per  ton,  and  such  iron  is  laden 
on  board  ship  at  Liverpool,  the  cost  of  laying  it  upon  the  dock  there 
being  £10      What  would  be  the  sterling  value  for  duty  in  Canada  I 

19  A  Canadian  buyer  purchased,  in  London,  England,  50  tons  bar 
iron  at  £5  per  ton,  which  purchase  was  made  from  an  agent,  in  London, 
of  a  factory  situated  at  Birmingham,  the  rate  per  ton  being  that  quoted 
at  the  works  ;  supposing  the  cost  of  transporting  the  iron  to  London 
f  the  port  of  shipment)  is  ten  shillings  per  ton,  what  would  be  the- 
proper  Customs  value  of  such  iron,  in  sterling  money,  when  entry  is 

tendered  in  Canada  ? 

30 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46) 


A.  1885 


100 


Value. 


10 


10 


10 


10 


20.  An  invoice  having  been  entered  for  duty,  and  then  sent  to  the 
appraiser  who  has  to  examine  the  goods  so  entered,  when  and  how, 
only,  is  such  invoice  to  leave  his  possession,  as  prescribed  by  instructions 
to  officers? 

NO.  4. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANDA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


NOTB.- 


Monday,  19th  May,  188 i,  from  2.30  p.m.  to  4.00  p.m. 

Candidates  are  requested  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

DUTIES  OF  THE  DEPARTMENT. 

CUSTOMS   SURVEYORS. 

-This  paper  must  be  returned  to  the  examiner,  in  charge  to  be  transmitted  by  him 
to  the  Board  of  C.  S.  Examiners  at  Ottawa. 


1.  State  briefly  what  would  be  the  duty  of  a  landing  surveyor,  in 
the  case  of  a  vessel  reaching  his  port  from  some  place  outside  of  Canada? 

2.  What  officers  (from  handbook  of  instructions)  are  specially  placed 
under  the  direction  of  the  landing  surveyor  ? 

3.  What  precaution  must  the  surveyor  assure  himself  has  been 
observed,  in  connection  with  reports  inwards,  before  they  are  finally 
disposed  of,  in  order  that  the  payment  of  duty,  or  free  entry,  as  the  case 
may  be,  shall  be  clearly  traced  ? 

4.  How  often  must  the  surveyor  inspect,  or  cause  to  be  inspected, 
the  state  of  the  bonded  warehouses  at  his  port,  and  what  are  the  most 
particular  points  to  be  looked  into  during  such  inspection  ? 

5.  In  the  event  of  his  noticing  any  defects  in  the  hasps,  doors,  hatches, 
staples,  or  other  fastenings,  of  such  bonded  warehouse,  what  is  his  proper 
course  of  action  ? 

6.  In  the  case  of  goods  having  to  be  removed  from  bonded  ware- 
house, for  exportation,  direct  by  sea,  what  would  be  the  proper  mode  of 
procedure  ?     State  it  succinctly,  from  the  beginning. 

7.  If  the  entry  be  for  removal  in  bond,  from  one  Canadian  port  to 
another,  in  what  particulars  would  the  procedure,  as  required  in  the 
foregoing  case,  be  varied  ? 

8.  If  the  entry  is  made  from  the  bonded  warehouse,  as  above,  for 
export,  but  the  goods  have  to  be  transported  by  land  and  water  in 
transit  through  Canada,  and  to  be  transhipped  previous  to  direct  expor- 
tation to  their  port  of  destination  out  of  Canada,  what  change  in  the 
procedure  (as  given  in  the  case  of  direct  exportation  from  the  original 
warehousing  port)  would  be  made  ? 

9.  In  the  returns  and  records  of  which  Canadian  port  will  the  goods 
removed  for  export,  as  instanced  in  question  No.  8,  be  included  ? 

10.  What  is  the  smallest  quantity  that  can  be  withdrawn  from  ware- 
house, for  transportation  from  one  port  in  Canada  to  another  ? 

11.  What  is  the  limit  of  time,  after  warehousing,  within  which  such 
removal  from  one  port  in  Canada  to  another,  can  be  made  ? 

12.  If  a  cash  discount  appears  on  an  invoice,  is  it  dutiable  or  not? 

13.  If  goods  were  imported  by  John  Smith  and  entered  by  him  for 
warehouse,  but  subsequently  sold  by  him  to  Kobert  Brown^who  ex- 
warehoused  and  paid  the  duty  upon  them— under  what  conditions  only 
could  a  refund  of  any  part  of  the  duty  so  paid  (assuming  there  existed 
reason  for  such  refund)  be  made  to  John  Smith  ? 

31 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46-) 


4.  1885 


100 


Value 


14.  If  a  cargo  of  sugar  were  shipped  from  Cuba,  and  consigned  to  a 
firm  in  New  York,  for  account  and  risk  of  a  Quebec  firm,  to  which  latter 
the  sugar  was  at  once  forwarded  from  New  York,  by  rail— what  would 
be  the  nature  of  such  an  importation— direct  or  indirect  ? 

lo.  If  the  cost  for  the  hhds.  of  sugar  as  above  was  $200,  Spanish 
gold  ;  and  the  total  charges,  including  hhds.,  amounted  to  $700,  Spanish 

gold which  of  the  two  amounts  indicated  would  be  added  to  the  actual 

value  of  the  sugar,  when  making  entry  for  duty  ? 

16.  If  goods  are  imported  and  entered,  but  afterwards  found  not  to 
be  according  to  order,— within  what  time  must  the  importer  give  notice 
of  such  fact,  to  the  coltector,  to  be  entitled  to  permission  to  re-export 
and  to  claim  refund  on  such  goods  ? 

17.  What  certificate,  besides  the  bill  of  lading,  and  copy  of  outward 
entry,  is  always  required  in  the  foregoing  case  of  exportation,  before 
claim  for  refund  will  be  paid  by  the  Department  ? 

18.  Within  what  period  from  the  date  of  the  order  given  by  the 
Minister  of  Customs,  granting  permission  to  re-export,  as  above  ex- 
plained, must  the  goods  have  been  actually  exported,  to  enable  the 
importer  to  claim  refund  ? 

19.  If  a  single  invoice  of  glass  or  china  were  entered  for  duty,  and 
■  such  entry  it  were  found  that  of  the  total  value,  say  $200,  there 


after 


was  a  certain  proportion  of  the  goods  broken  and  useless — what  propor- 
tion of  the  whole  $200  must  the  damage  exceed,  before  any  claim  for 
refund  would  be  entertained  ? 

20.  If  unclaimed  goods  are  offered  for  sale,  and  do  not  realize 
enough  to  cover  both  duties  and  charges  thereon— what  should  be  done  ? 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION     EXAMINATION. 


Monday,  19th  May,  from  3.30  p.m.  to  4.00  p.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

DUTIES  OF  THE  DEPAETMENT. 

customs  (General  Paper.) 

I  Note.— Candidates  must  return  this  paper  to  the  examiner  in  charge  to  be  transmitted 
|        by  him  to  the  Board  of  C.S.  Examiners  at  Ottawa. 

1.  What  section  of  the  Customs  Act  of  1883  provides  for  the  abso- 
lute forfeiture  of  enclosures  not  mentioned  in  the  invoice  or  entry  ? 

2.  If  unclaimed  goods,  when  offered  for  sale,  do  not  bring  enough  to 
defray  the  duties  and  charges  thereon,  what  should  ? 

3.'  If  goods  are  warehoused  when  the  duty  is  low,  and  ex-warehoused 
when  the  duty  on  such  goods  has  been  raised,  should  the  goods  pay  the 
higher  or  lower  rate  of  duty  ?  . 

4.  State  the  two  cases  mentioned  in  section  140  of  the  Customs  Act 
of  1883,  in  which  warehoused  goods  may  be  delivered  (under  the  condi- 
tions therein  prescribed)  as  "ship's  stores  ?" 

5.  What  penalty  is  prescribed  by  section  147  of  the  Customs  Act,  in 
the  case  of  exporters  who  refuse  or  neglect  to  make  report  and  entry 
outwards  of  goods  consigned  to  a  port  or  place  outside  of  Canada,  and  to 
be  transported  either  by  sea  or  land  conveyance? 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


6.  In  the  case  of  conviction  for  smuggling,  under  section  153  of  the 
Customs  Act  of  1883,  to  what  penalty,  besides  the  forfeitures  of  the 
goods,  shall  the  offender  be  subject  ? 

7.  If  a  person  knowingly  purchases  or  conceals  any  goods  illegally 
imported  into  Canada,  and  on  which  the  duties  have  not  been  paid, — to 
what  penalty  is  he  liable  ? 

8.  To  what  penalty  is  an  officer  of  Customs  liable,  who  makes  a  col- 
lusive seizure  under  the  Customs  Act  of  1883  ? 

9.  Within  what  period  may  suits  be  brought  for  the  recovery  of  pen- 
alties or  forfeitures  imposed  by  the  Customs  Act  of  1883,  or  any  other 
law  relating  to  the  Customs  ? 

10.  To  what  penalty  is  a  person  subject  who  shall  refuse  to  produce 
for  inspection  by  a  Customs  officer  (as  provided  by  section  214  of  the 
Customs  Act  of  1883)  any  books  of  accounts,  letter  books,  &c,  which 
may  havo  been  demanded  from  him  ? 

11.  What  vessels  are  entitled  to  participate  in  the  coasting  trade  of 
Canada  ? 

12.  What  entrance  or  clearance  fee  must  be  paid  by  a  vessel  not 
over  150  tons  navigating  the  inland  waters  of  Canada,  and  not  having  a 
coasting  license? 

13.  And  what  fee  shall  be  paid,  in  like  manner,  by  a  vessel  over  50 
tons? 

14.  After  what  time  shall  no  overcharge  for  Customs  duties  be  re- 
funded ? 

15.  After  what  time  shall  no  refund  of  Customs  duty,  because  of  any 
alleged  misdescription  of  goods  by  the  importer,  be  allowed? 

16.  Name  the  principal  revenues  which  are  accounted  for  through 
the  Customs  Department. 

IT.  As  a  general  rule,  is  the  whole  duty  paid  on  goods  manufac- 
tured and  exported,  refunded  by  way  of  drawback  ? 

18.  In  the  case  ot  goods  manufactured  and  exported,  what  proof  of 
exportation  is  necessary,  beyond  the  copy  of  entry  outwards  ? 

19.  When  goods  are  returned  to  the  shippers,  not  being  according 
to  order,  what  proof  of  exportation  is  always  required  to  be  produced  be- 
fore refund  of  duty  can  be  allowed  ? 

20.  What  commission  upon  the  proceeds  of  seizures  made  at  his 
port  does  a  collector  receive  whose  salary  is  $2,000  or  over  ? 

21.  What  number  of  pounds  are  there  in  a  ton,  for  Customs  pur- 
poses ? 

22.  How  long  must  a  settler,  before  removal  to  Canada,  have  had 
wearing  apparel  in  actual  use  tabe  entitled  to  free  entry  of  the  same  as 
settler's  effects  ? 

23.  How  long  must  live  stock  have  been  in  an  intending  settler's 
possession  to  be  entitled  to  free  entry  ? 

24.  Within  what  period  after  arrival  in  Canada  can  goods,  entered  as 
settlers'  effects,  not  legally  be  sold  ? 

25.  State  any  of  the  articles  prohibited  to  be  imported  into  the  Do- 
minion, under  schedule  "D"  of  the  tariff  now  in  force? 

26.  In  the  case  of  a  non-enumerated  article  which  bears  a  similitude, 
either  in  material,  quality,  or  the  use  to  which  it  may  be  put,  to  any 
enumerated  article  chargeable  with  duty,  what  rate  of  duty  shall  be 
payable  ? 

2T.  In  the  case  of  goods  unlawfully  imported,  by  means  of  a  vehicle 
drawn  by  horses,  if  a  seizure  were  made,  what  should  it  comprise  ? 

28.  To  what  persons,  other  than  the  importer  concerned,  or  an  officer 
of  Customs,  may  an  invoice  (upon  which  duty  has  been  paid)  be  shown,, 
or  a  copy  thereof  given  ? 
46a— 3 

33 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Values. 


10 
10 
10 

10 

10 

10 


10 


10 


10 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 

PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT.— OUTSIDE  SERVICE. 
(inspector's  branch.) 

Questions  on  departmental  duties  for  candidates  serving  in  the 
Inspector's  Branch,  including  Inspectors  and  Assistant  Inspectors  as 
well  as  Clerks,  for  the  Civil  Service  promotion  examination  of  19th 
May,  1884. 

1.  State  generally  what  are  the  duties  of  a  Post  Office  Inspector. 

2.  What  books  of  record  are  kept  in  a  Post  Office  Inspector's  office? 

3.  What  periodical  returns  is  an  inspector  required  to  make  to  the 
Department  at  Ottawa  ? 

4.  What  is  the  ordinary  routine  observed  in  entering  into  contract  for 
mail  service  ? 

5.  Under  what  circumstances  would  a  mail  contractor  have  any  ground 
tor  an  allowance  in  addition  to  amount  of  his  contract  ? 

6.  What  action  should  be  taken — 

(1)  In  the  event  of  any  irregularity  in  the  performance  of  a  mail 
service. 

(2)  In  the  event  of  continued  irregularities  by  same  contractor. 

(3)  In  the  event  of  the  contractor  failing  altogether  to  perform  his 
contract. 

?.  On  what  dates  should  Postmasters  transmit  to  the  Department  at 
Ottawa — 

(1)  Accounts  current  if  to  be  rendered  monthly. 

(2)  do  do  quarterly. 

(3)  Money  order  returns. 

(4)  Dead  letter  returns. 

(5)  Special  dead  letter  returns. 

8.  What  disposition  should  be  made  by  Postmasters  of  the  balance  due 
from  them  on  their  postal  revenue  and  money  order  accounts  ? 

9.  What  examination  is  made  of  the  time  bills  rsent  to  the  inspector's 
office  and  what  is  afterwards  done  with  them. 

10.  What  are  the  penalties  to  which  persons  found  guilty  of  the  follow- 
ing offences  are  liable — 

(1)  Theft  of  a  post  letter  containing  no  article  of  value. 

(2)  Theft  of  a  post  letter  containing  any  article  of  value— or  abstrac- 
tion of  any  article  of  value  from  a  post  letter. 

(3)  Obstruction  or  willful  delay  of  the  progress  of  the  mail. 

(4)  Use  by  any  officer  of  the  Post  Office  for  his  own  private  pur* 
poses  of  any  public  money  entrusted  to  him, 

34 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


(5)  Pretence  to  have  enclosed  or  sent  in  a  post  letter  any  money  or 
article  of  value  which  in  fact  was  not  so  enclosed  or  sent. 

(6)  Attempt  to  use,  in  repayment  of  postage,  stamps  which  have  been 
before  used  for  the  like  purpose. 


100 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SEBVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


Monday,  19th  May,  1884. 


Values, 


10 
10 
10 

10 
10 
10 

10 

10 

ie 

10 


100 


POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT— OUTSIDE  SERVICE. 

RAILWAY  MAIL   CLERKS. 

Questions  on  Departmental  duties,  for  Candidates  serving  in  the  Railway  Mail  Clerkg 
Branch,  for  the  Civil  Service  Promotion  Examinations  of  19th  May,  1884. 

1.  On  what  postal  car  route  are  you  employed?  State  name  of 
place  at  each  terminus. 

2.  State  in  geographical  order  the  names  of  the  office  for  which  you 
make  up  and  from  which  you  receive  mails. 

3.  Do  you  thoroughly  understand  the  distribution  on  any  other 
postal  car  routes?  If  so,  specify  those  routes, giving  the  name  of  the 
place  at  each  terminus  thereof. 

4.  In  what  way  do  you  charge  unpaid  postage  on  letters  and  other 
matter  for  the  delivery  of  offices  for  which  you  make  up  mails  ? 

5.  In  what  way  do  you  ascertain  that  all  registered  letters  you 
have  received  on  each  trip  have  been  duly  forwarded  ? 

6.  What  record  is  made  in  the  time  bill  of  mail  bags  conveyed  in 
a  postal  car  ? 

7.  In  what  way  do  you  ascertain  that  all  mail  bags  received  in  each 
trip  have  been  duly  forwarded  to  destination  ? 

8.  What  action  do  you  take  when  letters  are  missent  to  the  postal 
car  o  f  which  you  may  have  charge  ? 

9.  What  action  do  you  take  in  the  event  of  the  non-receipt  of  a  mail 
bag  which  in  ordinary  course  you  should  have  received,  or  in  the  event 
of  the  supposed  loss  of  a  mail,  or  of  a  registered  letter,  or  the  occur- 
rence of  any  other  irregularity  ? 

10.  What  officers  or  other  persons  are  allowed  admission  to  a 
postal  car  ? 


4<?a- -3 J 


S5 


48  Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


Monday,   19th   May,    1884. 


Values. 


10 


10 
10 

10 
10 
10 

10 
10 

10 
10 


POST  OFFICE  DEPAKTMENT— OUTSIDE  SERVICE. 

Questions  for  departmental  duties  for  candidates  serving  in  City  Post 
Offices,  for  the  Civil  Service  promotion  examination  of  19th  May,  1884. 

CITY  POST  OFFICES. 


City  Offices. — Assistant  Postmasters  and  Clerks. 


1. 


2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 
6, 


What  is  the  rate  of  postage  on  letters— 
1.  To  any  place  in  Canada? 

"        the  United  States  ? 
«  "        the  United  Kingdom  ? 

"  "         France  ? 

"  "        G-ermany  ? 

On  letters  intended  for  delivery  in  the  city  at  which  posted  ? 

2.  Are  letters  liable  to  any  additional  postage  on  re-direction  if  not 
taken  out  of  a  post  office  previous  to  such  re-direction  ? 

3.  What  should  be  done  with  a  letter  posted  for  transmission  to  a 
place  in  Canada  or  in  the  United  States 

1 .  On  which  no  postage  has  been  paid  ? 

2.  On  which  (though  liable  to  two  or  more  rates)  only  one 

rate  has  been  paid  ? 

4.  Can  a  letter  for  any  reason  be  delivered  back  to  the  writer  before 
being  forwarded  to  the  office  to  which  addressed  ? 

5.  What  letters  which  are  uncalled  for  at  a  post  office  to  which 
addressed  may  be  returned  direct  to  the  writers  ? 

6.  What  newspapers  and  periodicals  are  entitled  to  pass  free 
through  the  mails  to  any  part  of  Canada,  the  United  States  and  New- 
foundland ? 

7.  What  is  the  postage  on  newspapers  and  periodicals  to  above 
places  when  not  entitled  to  the  privilege  of  free  transmission  ? 

8.  What  is  the  rate  of  postage  on  book  packets,  patterns  and  sam- 
ples and  miscellaneous  matter  posted  for  transmission  to  any  place 
within  the  Dominion  ? 

9.  What  is  the  limit  of  weight  and  size  for — 

Limit  of  weight.     Limit  of  size. 

1.  Book  packets? 

2.  Patterns  and  samples  ? 

3.  Miscellaneous  matter  ? 
What  is  the  registration  fee  (payable  by  registration  stamp) 


10. 


on — 


100 


1  .^Letters  addressed  to  any  place  within  the  Dominion  ? 

2.  ^Patterns  and  samples  " 

3.*  Letters  addressed  to  the  United  States  ? 

4.  Letters  addressed  to  the  United  Kingdom|? 


36 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  460 


A.  188b 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SBEYICB  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


Values* 


10 

10 
10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 
100 


POST  OFFICE  DEPAKTMENT— INSIDE  SEEVICE. 
secretary's  branch. 

Questions  on  departmental  duties  for  candidates  serving  in  the 
Secretary's  Branch  for  the  Civil  Service  Promotion  Examination  of  19th 
May,  1884. 

1.  Name  some  of  the  instances  in  which  the  exclusive  privilege  of  the 

Postmaster-General,  as  regards  the  collection  and  conveyance  of 
letters,  does  not  apply. 

2.  When  a  letter  is  posted  in  Canada,  whose  property  does  it  become  ? 

3.  Can  a  toll-gate  keeper  or  a  ferryman  detain  or  delay  a  mail  on  pre- 

tense of  demanding  toll  or  ferriage  ? 

4.  If  the  writer  of  a  dead  letter  containg  money  cannot  be  found,  what 

is  done  with  the  contents  ? 

5.  What  should"a  Postmaster  do  with  letters  or  packets  supposed  to 

contain  dutiable  goods  ? 

6.  Within  what  period  may  a  suit  be  commenced  against  the  surety  of 

a  Postmaster  who  has  resigned,  removed,  or  otherwise  vacated  his 
office? 

7. 'Under  what  circumstances  may  the  Postmaster  General  decline  to 
accept  the  tender  of  the  lowest  bidder  for  a  mail  contract  ? 

8.  Under  what  circumstances  may  the  Postmaster-General  make  a  con- 

tract for  mail  service  without  asking  for  tenders  ? 

9.  What  are  "  request  letters,"  and  to  what  countries  do  the  instructions 

regarding  them  apply  ? 

10.  What  are  ship  letters  ? 


37 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Values. 


10 
10 

10 

10 

10 
10 

10 

10 
10 

10 

100 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


Monday,    19th    May,    1884. 


POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT— INSIDE  SERVICE. 

ACCOUNT   BRANCH. 

Questions  on  departmental  duties  for  candidates  serving  in  the  Account 
Branch  for  Civil  Service  promotion  examination  of  19th  May, 
1884. 

1.  How  do  Postmasters  account  for  their  postal  revenue  collections  ? 

2.  In  what  manner  are  the  Postmasters'  accounts  checked  ? 

3.  How  are  Postmasters  notified  of  errors  in  their  accounts,  and  how 
are  such  errors  adjusted  ? 

4.  How  should  Postmasters  remit  their  cash  halances,  and  how  are 
such  remittances  proved  ? 

5.  In  what  manner  are  postage  stamps  accounted  for  ? 

6.  How  are  the  postage  stamp  returns  checked  ? 

7.  When  the  accounts  from  Postmasters  have  heen  examined,  how 
are  they  compiled? 

8.  How  is  the  compilation  proved  to  he  correct? 

9.  How  are  claims  for  mail  service  and  other  services  paid,  and  how 
examined  and  checked  before  payment  ? 

10.  How  are  the  payments  for  mail  service  and  other  disbursements- 
subsequently  brought  into  the  accounts  of  the  Department  ? 


38 


Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.   46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SEEYICB  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION     EXAMINATION. 


Monday,  19th  May,  1884. 


10 
10 
10 
10 

10 

10 
10 

10 


10 


10 


100 


POST  OFFICE  DEPAKTME  NT— INSIDE  SERVICE. 

SAVINGS    BANK  BRANCH. 

1.  Name  the  books  and  blanks  forming  the  equipment  of  a  savings 
bank  post  office. 

2.  Enumerate  various  ways  in  which  detection  may  follow  the 
failure  of  a  Postmaster  to  report  a  deposit  entrusted  to  him,  and  state 
the  "  forms "  used  (in  each  case)  in  bringing  such  irregularities  to 
account. 

3.  How  is  the  true  total  of  outstanding  withdrawal  cheques  ascer- 
tained and  verified  ?  Are  any  steps  taken  to  secure  payment  of  such 
cheques  ;  if  so,  dscribe  them  ? 

4.  IJpon  what  principle  is  interest  calculated  in  ledger  accounts, 
and  how  is  the  gross  amount  of  interest  due  to  all  depositors  on  the  30th 
June  in  each  year  ascertained  ? 

5.  How  are  Postmasters  supplied  with  funds  to  meet  withdrawal 
cheques  drawn  upon  their  offices  by  the  head  office  ?  Are  all  Post- 
masters supplied  in  the  same  way  ?  If  not,  describe  wherein  lies  the 
difference  ? 

6.  What  is  the  function  of  the  "I>aily  Proof  Sheet;  "  specify  by 
diagram  its  columns,  and  give  an  illustration  of  a  regular  deposit  and  a 
"  cross  :'  deposit. 

7.  If  a  depositor  placed  the  following  sums  in  the  bank  during  the 
year,  1878,  what  would  be  the  balance  of  principal  to  his  credit  on  the 
1st  July,  1883? 

On  1st  January,  $50  ;  on  10th  March,  $68  ;  on  30th  April,  $25  ;  and  on 
4th  June,  $100. 

8.  State  the  annual  percentage  of  increase  in  the  following  balances 
standing  to  the  credit  of  depositors,  also  the  average  increase  year  by 
year : — 

1878 $2,754,484  00 

1879 3,105,190  00 

1880 3,945,669  00 

1881 6,208,2i!6  00 

9.  An  unmarried  man  dies,  leaving  the  sum  of  $150  in  the  post 
office  savings  bank.  A  sister  applies  for  the  money,  stating  that  the 
deceased  died  intestate,  but  giving  no  further  information.  Write  a 
letter  to  her,  in  reply,  pointing  out  the  proper  course  to  be  pursued. 

10.  Describe  the  relations  between  the  money  order  and  the  sav- 
ings bank  branches,  and  the  advantages  of  the  arrangements  under 
which  savings  bank  transactions  enter  into  the  money  order 
accounts. 


39 


4S  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Values. 


10 
15 
15 

15 

15 


100 


No.  5. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday,  20th  May,  1834,  from  9.30, a.m.  to  12  noon. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 
ARITHMETIC. 
Note. — The  full  work  of  each  question  must  be  given. 

1.  Divide  123456789J  by  29f . 

2.  Add  together  17|,  43f ,  168f  and  207  «&. 

3.  Divide  976,432  by  .00000096. 

4.  How  long  will  12  men  take  to  do  a  piece  of  work  which  8  men 
can  do  in  27  days  ? 

5.  Reduce  $2,111.81  to  sterling  money,  and  £2,864  10s.  6d.  sterling 
to  Canadian  currency,  (£1:=$4.86). 

6.  TV  hat  is  the  interest  on  a  note  for  $6,200  from  September  3rd, 
1883,  to  March  24,  1884,  at  6  per  cent. 

7.  If  a  merchant  mark  his  goods  on  credit  20  per  cent,  above  cash 
price,  what  ready  money  should  he  receive  for  an  article  marked  $26  ? 

8.  What  is  the  difference  in  the  gain  per  cent,  between  selling 
goods  at  $2.50  which  cost  $2.00,  and  selling  goods  at  $3.50  which  cost 
$3.00  ? 

9.  A  B  and  C  are  joint  owners  of  a  ship ;  C's  share  is  valued  at 
$2,000,  A's  share  is  J  of  B's,  and  the  sum  of  their  shares  f  the  value  of 
the  whole  ship;  find  the  value  of  the  shares  held  by  A  and  B  ? 

10.  I  invest  $230  for  3  years  at  7  per  cent.,  and  then  purchase  bank 
stock  12  per  cents,  at  114J.     How  much  stock  can  I  obtain  ? 

No.  6. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday,  20th  May,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  4.00  p.m. 

BOOK  KEEPING. 

Journal  and  Ledger  (or  Cash  Book  and  Ledger)  only  required  in  this  exercise. 

Statement  op  Assumed  Facts, 
John  Castor  takes  a  contract  from  the  Department  of  Public  Works  to  build  a 
lighthouse  for  the  sum  of  $33,750.    He  is  to  jeposit  5  per  cent,  of  this  amount  with 
the  Department  as  a  guarantee  for  the  performance  of  the  work,  and  is  to  receive 
payment  as  the  work  progresses. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46-)  *••  1885 


Thomas  Campbell  engages  to  supply  to  John  Castor  90  toise  stone  at  $11  per 
toise,  and  200,000  hard  bricks  at  $14  per  1,000,  as  wanted. 

Wm.  Wright  engages  to  deliver  to  John  Castor  150  barrels  of  cement  at  $3  per 
barrel,  as  wanted. 

Wm.  Wylie  engages  to  supply  all  the  wrought  iron  work  wanted  at  4£  cents. 

Der  lb 

James  Simpson  engages  to  do  the  wood  work  (supplying  all  materials)  for  the 

bulk  sum  of  $8,850 ;  and 

George  Shepherd  engages  to  do  the  plumbing,  glazing,  painting  and  roofing  for 

the  bulk  sum  of  $3,550. 

Transactions. 

1.  John  Castor  has  a  cash  capital  of  $20,000  and  deposits  this  sum  in  the  Federal 
Bank  to  his  credit,  from  which  to  draw  as  he  needs  money  for  the  prosecution  of  the 

2.  He  hands  his  cheque  on  the  above  bank  to  the  Department  of  Public  Works 
for  the' 5  per  cent,  he  has  agreed  to  place  there  as  a  guarantee.  (All  the  cheques 
drawn  will  be  against  his  current  account  in  the  Federal  Bank,  and  all  the  moneys 
deposited  will  be  to  the  credit  of  the  same  account.) 

3.  He  buys  an  invoice  of  provisions  for  his  men  from  Clarke,  Watson  &  Co.,  to 
the  amount  of  $1,338,  less  a  discount  of  5  per  cent,  for  cash,  and  pays  by  cheque 
(as  above  stated.) 

4.  He  pay  for  "  labour"  $755  and  draws  the  money  from  the    bank  for  that 

purpose. 

5.  He  pays  Thos.  Campbell  on  account  $1,000. 

6.  He  pays  Wm.  Wright  on  account  $  100. 

7.  He  receives  from  the  Department  on  account  of  work  done  $4,300,  and 
deposits  the  same  in  the  bank  (as  above  stated). 

8.  He  pays  for  Labour  $1,485. 

9.  He  pays  Thos.  Campbell  on  account  $1,100. 

10.  He  pays  James  Simpson  on  account  $300. 

11.  He  receives  from  the  Department  $5,700. 
14.  He  pays  labour  $1,508. 

13.  He  pays  Wm.  Wylie  on  account  $375. 

14.  He  pays  James  Simpson  on  account  $1,650. 

15.  He  pays  George  Shepherd  on  account  $275. 

16.  He  receives  from  the  Department  $5,000. 

17.  He  pays  labour  $1,620. 

18.  He  pays  Thos.  Campbell  on  account  $1,690. 

19.  He  buys  provisions  to  the  amount  of  $1,117,  less  5  per  cent,  discount  for 
cash. 

20.  He  pays  Wm.  Wright  $350. 

21.  He  pays  J.  Simpson  on  account  $2,050. 

22.  He  pays  labour  $1,375. 

23.  He  receives  from  the  Department  $10,000. 

24.  He  pays  Wylie  the  balance  due  him  on   19,736  lbs.  of  wrought  iron  at  4J 
cents  per  lb. 

25.  He  buys  provisions  for  $425,  less  5  per  cent,  discount  for  cash. 

26.  He  pays  G-eorge  Shepherd  on  account  $735. 

27.  He  pays  J.  Simpson  on  account  $2,000. 

28.  The  work  is  now  completed  and  he  sells  Jerry  Johnson  surplus  stores  for 
$115.75.     Sells  alto  to  Thos.  Turner  stone  and  brick  left  over  for  $603. 

2iJ.  Eeceives  from  the  Department  the  balance  due  him  and  also  the  sum  he  had 
deposited  as  a  guarantee. 

30.  Pays  the  balance  due  J.  Simpson. 

31.  Pays  George  Shepherd  the  balance  due  him. 

Show  the  state  of  the  bank  account  and  exhibit  the  profit  made  by  John  Castor 
on  the  contract. 

41 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46  ) 


A.  1885- 


NOVEMBER  EXAMINATIONS. 

No.  1. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OP  CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY  OB  LOWER  GRADE   EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday,  11th  November,  1884,  from  10  a.m.  to  11  a.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

PENMANSHIP. 

AN  IMPORTANT  DUTY. 

When  youDg  men  are  brought  to  ruin  by  extravagant  expenditure,  the  fault  is, 
often,  not  wholly  their  own — and  this  is  especially  true  of  those  who  are  living  with 
their  parents,  and  are  under  age.  The  father  and  mother,  if  they  do  their  duty,  and 
are  not  culpably  negligent,  will  know  the  amount  of  the  income  of  the  son,  and  the 
source  from  which  it  is  derived,  and  also  pretty  nearly  what  his  expenditures  are, 
and  the  knowledge  that  they  are  giving  attention  to  these  matters  will  be  a  strong 
check  against  wrong-doing,  if  any  check  is  required.  They  will  also  know  how  he 
spends  his  evenings,  and  what  his  associates  are,  and  if  he  is  spending  money  freely 
they  will  find  out  where  it  comes  from.  And  the  employers  of  the  boys,  and 
especially  of  those  holding  responsible  positions,  neglect  a  duty  they  owe  both  to 
themselves  and  to  those  in  their  employ,  if  they  do  not  inform  themselves  as  to  their 
habits,  that  they  may  grow  up  frugal,  industrious  and  honest. — Young  Ladies" 
Journal. 

No.  2. 

CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY   OR  LOWER  GRADE   EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday,  11th  November,  1884,  from  11  a.  m.  to  noon. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 
ORTHOGRAPHY. 

Note.— A  large  proportion  of  the  words  in  this  paper  are    purposely    mis-spelled 
Correct  the  errors  in  your  copy.    Three  marks  deducted  for  each  error. 

Readey  Advisors. 

We  are  usually  readey  to  otfer  good  advise ;  butt  what  are  we 
willing  to  do  ourselfs  ?  Men  whoo  never  smelt  pouder  know  exactly 
how  a  comander  should  have  acted  in  a  battel — probabley  they  wood 
themselfs  have  run  away  at  the  first  shott.  Safeley  on  land  the  wizeaker 
desides  most  positiveley  bow  the  pylot  shood  stear — wich  sale  shood  be 
hoysted,  and  wich  be  reafed.  If  he  ware  onbord  the  laboring  bark  he 
wood  be  lying  down  below,  forgoten  as  a  dead  man  out  of  mind.  It  is 
raither  awkward  wen  after  having  presscribed  for  others  we  fawl  sick 
ourselfs  and  then  refuze  our  own  remmedies  ;  yet  manny  have  dons  so. 
We  must  teech  more  by  our  exampel  than  our  advise,  or  else  we  shall 
be  poor  pleeders  for  the  rite. — C.  H.  Spurgeon. 

42 


[8  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


10 


10 


15 


15 


No.  3. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  EXAMINATION. 


PRELIMINARY  OR  LOWER  GRADE  EXAMINATION. 


Tuesday,  11th  November,  1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  3  p.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

ARITHMETIC. 

1,  State  and  properly  place  in  figures,  the  following  sums,  then  add 

them  up.  ,  xt_ 

(1.)  Three  hundred  and  thirty-three  thousand  and  three. 

(2.)  Five  millions  and  thirty  thousand. 

(3.)  Eighty-five  thousand  and  ninety-nine. 

(4.)  Seven  hundred  and  eight. 

(5.)  One  hundred  and  eighty  millions,  one  hundred  and  eighty 

thousand,  one  hundred  and  eighty. 
(6.)  Eleven  hundred  millions. 
(7.)  One  thousand  and  nine. 
(8.)  Twenty-seven. 
2.  Subtract  the  lower  from  the  upper  lines  of  figures  and  prove  by 
addine:  the  remainder  to  the  lower  line. 

987,654,321,012,345 
898,765,432,123,456 


3.  Multiply  this  line  by  8,  then  divide  product  by  7,  and  then  de- 
duct ^th  of  the  multiplicand  (the  line  multiplied),  and  if  the  work  is 
well'done  you  will  have  the  proof  that  it  is  so. 

918273645    multiplicand. 

8     multiplier. 


Divide  by  7) 


multiple  or  product. 


Deduct  |th  of  top  line 


Proof 


4.  Multiply  this  line  of  figures  by  345  :- 
7,788,996 


6     5     5 
3    4    5 


5.  Divide  2,687,203,845,975  by  345, 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OP  CANADA. 


PRELIMINARY  OR  LOWER  GRADE  EXAMINATION, 


Tuesday,  11th  November,  1884,  from  3  p.m.  to  4  p.m, 

READING  PRINT  AND  MANUSCRIPT. 
43 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.   46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  5. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING  OR  HIGHER  GRADE  EXAMINATION. 


Yalues. 


100 


Wednesday,  12th  November,  1884,  from  9.30  to  10.30  a.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly, 

PENMANSHIP. 
Copy  neatly. 

THE  REVISED   VERSION  OF  THE  NEW  TESTAMENT. 

"  By  all  means  let  the  Eevised  Version  be  preserved  for  reference, 
but  let  there  be  based  upon  it  another  version  for  public  reading  in  the 
churches ;  one  which,  while  adhering  faithfully  to  the  spirit  and  meaning 
of  the  Divine  Keveiation,  shall  embody  and  give  forth  that  meaning  in 
all  the  soul-stirring  music  and  rhythm  of  which  words  are  capable. 

On  the  reading  of  such  a  version,  blessed  by  the  Holy  Spirit  of  God, 
the  worshippers  would  tremble  under  the  rolling  thunder  of  its  awful 
denunciations  of  hypocrisy ;  melt  into  gushing  tearfulness  of  repentance 
beneath  its  gracious  offers  of  mercy ;  and  in  their  depths  of  godly  sor- 
row, would  hear  so  tender  a  voice  speaking  to  them  in  pitying  accents  of 
forgiveness  that,  influenced  by  those  wondrous  words  of  love,  they  would 
in  spirit  rise  as  on  angels'  wings  of  ecstaoy  to  heaven,  and  adoringly  bow 
in  unutterable  gratitude  before  the  Throne  of  the  Most  High." 

G.  Washington  Moon.] 

No.  6. 
CIVIL  SEEVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING    OR   HIGHER   GRADE    EXAMINATION. 


Value. 


100 


5  marks 

will  be 

deducted 

for  every 

error. 


Wednesday,  12th  November,  1884,  from  10.00  a.m.  to  noon. 
The  candidate  must  observe  tJie  Rules  strictly, 

OETHOGEAPHY. 

Correct  in  copying  all  the  words  mis-spelled. 

Paraffine. 

The  pezzanls  of  the  sonny  sowth  will  feed  upon  sallads  made  doubbly 
unctuous  and  nutetricious  by  the  abbundant  oil.  There  fried  meets, 
there  pastrey,  omeletts  and  sawces  will  be  so  much  better  than  hereto- 
fore (by  the  fact  that  the  olive  oil  they  are  now  obliged  to  use  for  lighting 
their  homes  will  be  replaced  by  the  cheaper  paraffine)  ;  and  the  Roosian 
(for  a  similar  reason)  will  enjoy  more  frealy  his  beloved  and  necessary 
tallo,  when  the  candle  is  maid  and  the  ingin  loobricated  with  the  fat 
extrackted  from  cole  and  stones,  witch  no  human  stommack  oan  ennvy. 
I  mite  travell  on  to  Chinar  and  tell  of  the  work  that  paraffine  has  yet  to 
do  there  and  in  other  coun treys  of  the  East.  The  great  waive  of  minneral 
lite  has  not  yet  farely  broken  upon  their  shores,  but  wen  it  has  once 
burst  throogh  the  outter  barreers,  it  will  without  daut  advance  with 
grate  rappidity  and  with  an  inliooence  whoose  benneficense  can  hardly 
be  eggsagerated.— W.  M.  Williams,  F.R.A.S.,  F.C.S. 

44 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46*) 


A.  1885 


Values. 


15 

15 

17 


17 


18 


18 


100 


Values. 


10 

20 


NO.  7. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING  OR  HIGHER   GRADE   EXAMINATION, 


Wednesday,  12th  November,  1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  3.30  p.m. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Begulations  strictly. 

Note. — The  work  of  each  question  must  be  fully  given. 

ARITHMETIC. 

1.  A  drover  bought  127  bullocks  at  $150  each,  and  93  others  at 
$125.  He  lost  one  of  the  former  and  two  of  the  latter  by  accident  in 
transporting  them,  but  sold  the  remainder  at  $190  a  head.  How  much 
did  he  gain  or  lose  ? 


2.  A  bankrupt  owes  A  $2,250.62,  B  1,648.24  and  C  $1,123.45 
estate  is  worth  $3,644.1 3 J-.     How  much  can  he  pay  in  the  dollar. 


his 


3.  The  following  summary  is  taken  from  a  sales  book. — April  3 
and  five  following  days  respectively,  sold  255  yds.  print  at  21  cts. ;  1,000 
yds.  at  18  cts. ;  500  yds.  at  19  cts;  3,000  yds.  at  18  cts. ;  1,500  yds.  at 
22  cts. ;  and  375  yds.  at  20  cts.  Find  (1)  the  average  selling  price  per 
yard.  (2)  the  average  number  of  yards  sold  daily,  and  (3)  the  average 
daily  cash  business  for  the  week. 

4.  Find  the  difference  between  true  and  bank  discount  on  a  note 
paid  on  the  18th  June,  due  on  the  27th  August  of  the  same  year,  inter- 
est at  8  percent.,  days  of  grace  allowed. 

5.  A  can  beat  B  5  \ards  in  a  100-yard  race,  and  B  can  beat  C  by 
10  yds.  in  a  200-yard  race.  By  how  many  yards  can  A  beat  C  in  a 
400-yard  race. 

.6.  If  5  oxen  or  7  horses  eat  up  the  grass  of  an  enclosure  in  74 
days,  in  what  time  could  5  horses  and  7  oxen  eat  up  the  grass  of  the 
same  enclosure. 


No.  8. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING    OR  HIGHER   GRADE   EXAMINATION. 


Wednesday,  12th  November,  1884,  from  3.30  p.m.  to  4.30  p.mi 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Begulations  strictly. 

GEOGRAPHY. 

1.  Define  the  following  term?,  viz. :  —Chief  meridiau,  zenith,  nadir? 
ecliptic  and  equator. 

2.  Give  the  number  of  counties  or  electoral  divisions  in  each  Pro- 
vince of  the  Dominion. 

45 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


3.  Give,  approximately,  the  population  of  the  United  States. 


6 
(3 

8 

10 

10 
10 
20 


100 


Value. 


10 


10 
10 

10 

10 
10 


4.  In  what  State  is  the  Erie  Canal  ?  Between  what  two  points  does 
it  run  ?    And  what  are  the  waters  it  connects  ? 

5.  Name  the  cities  and  principal  towns  in  close  proximity  to  the 
Grand  Trunk  and  Intercolonial  Railways. 

6.  State  briefly  what  you  know  about  the  trade  and  population  of 
the  cities  of  Halifax,  St.  John,  N.B.,  Gharlottetown,  Quebec,  Montreal, 
Ottawa,  Toronto,  Winnipeg  and  Victoria,  B.C. 

t.  Give  the  names  of  the  principal  cities  in  England,  Ireland  and 
Scotland. 

8.  Give  the  names  of  the  most  important  colonies  of  the  British 
Empire. 

9,  Describe  the  island  of  Jamaica  as  fully  as  you  can. 


No.  9. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING    OR  HIGHER    GRADE   EXAMINATION. 

Thursday,  13th  November,  from  9.30  a.m.  to  11  a.m. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 
HISTORY. 

BRITISH. 

1.  Who  was  Sir  Thomas  Moore?  In  whose  reign  did  he  live? 
What  office  did  he  hold?  What  noted  book  did  he  write?  How 
did  he  die  ? 

2.  Give  some  account  of  Francis,  Lord  Chancellor  Bacon. 

3.  State  some  of  the  events  in  the  reign  of  Queen  Elizabeth  which 
contributed  to  render  it  so  illustrious. 

4.  Briefly  state  what  you  know  of  the  great  South  Sea  Bubble— so 
called. 

5.  Tell  what  you  know  of  Sir  Isaac  Newton  and  his  discoveries. 

6.  What  was  the  cause  of  the  war  between  England  and  France  on 
the  one  side  and  Russia  on  the  other — known  as  the  Crimean  War  ? 

FRENCH. 

7.  Who  was  Cardinal  Richelieu  ?     Give  some  account  of  his  policy. 

8.  Give  some  of  the  particulars  in  the  life  of  the  "  great  Conde." 

9.  What  were  the  wars  of  the  Fronde  ? 

10.  How  long  did  Louis  XIV  reign  ?  What  is  the  title  by  which 
he  is  generally  known  ?  What  is  the  famous  saying  usually  attributed 
to  him  as  descriptive  of  his  power  ? 

46 


48  Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


100 


CANADIAN. 

What  were  the  results  of  the  battle  of  Queenston  Heights,  and  who 
was  the  British  General  ? 

Give  the  names  of  some  of  the  great  Indian  warriors  who  took  the 
side  of  England  in  the  war  of  1812. 

Who  were  the  leading  public  men  during  the  administration  of 
Lord  Elgin  ? 


No.  10. 
CEVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


Values. 


6 

16 

8 

6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

6 

22 

100 


QUALIFYING   OR  HIGHER   GRADE   EXAMINATION. 


Thursday,  13th  November,    1884,  trom    11   a.m.  to  noon. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 

ENGLISH  GRAMMAR. 

1.  Distinguish  between  a  simple  and  a  compound  sentence— giving 
an  example  of  each. 

2.  Give  a  list  of  the  different  kinds  of  pronouns  and  an  example  ot 

each.  ,  x         „ 

3.  Write  the  plural  of  the  following  :    negro,  solo,  duty,  valley, 

wolf,  chief,  brother,  die. 

4.  How  do  interrogative  pronouns  differ  from  relative  ? 

5.  Correct,  where  necessary,  the  following  sentences,  giving  your 
reasons: — 

(a)  Prudence,  and  not  pomp,  are  the  basis  of  his  fame. 

(p)  Nothing,  but  frivolous  amusements,  pleases  the  indolent. 

(c)  We  always  should  prefer  our  duty  to  our  pleasure. 

(d)  He  remarked  how  time  was  valuable. 

(e)  Sincerity  is  as  valuable,  and  even  more  so,  than  knowledge.  ^ 
(/)  It  is  to  the  learner  only,  and  he  that  is  in  doubt,  that  his  assist- 
ance is  recommended. 

(g)  Triumphant  Sylla  !  couidst  thou  then  divine, 

By  aught  than  Romans  Rome  should  thus  be  laid  ? 

6.  Parse  the  following  :— 

Nay,  weep  not,  gentle  Eros  ;  there  are  left  us  ourselves  to  end 
ourselves. 


47 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  11. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING   OR  HIGHER   GRADE   EXAMINATION. 


Values. 


20 

32 


48 


100 


Thursday,  13th  November,  1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  2  30  p.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 

COMPOSITION. 

1.  Write  the  following  sentence  in  as  many  ways  as  you  can  without 
changing  the  meaning : 

A  profusion  of  beautiful  objects  everywhere  surround  us. 

2.  Vary  the  expressions  in  italics  by  employing  equivalent  phrases 
or  words : 

(a.)  As  I  looked  over  the  paper,  I  saw  this  advertisement. 
(6)  If  this  point  is  admitted,  we  proceed  to  the  next  argument. 
(<?.)  It  is  a  great  secret  that  must  not  be  whispered  even  to  your  most 
intimate  friend. 

(d.)  The  period  when  the  mariner's  compass  was  discovered'^  uncertain . 

3.  "Write  a  letter  to  a  friend  on  the  advantages  of  a  good  education. 
Note— This  letter  to  contain  not  less  than  250  words. 

No.  12 

Was  an  exercise  in  transcription— a  lithographed  manuscript  paper 
purposely  interlined,  altered  from  which  neat  and  correct  copies  were  tc 
be  made.     Cannot,  of  course,  be  reproduced  in  print. 

No.  13. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 

OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS. 


Friday,  14th  November,  1884,  from  9.30  a.m.  to  10.30  a.m. 
Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  striclly. 
TEANSLATION  (English  into  French.) 

To  be  taken  by  Candidates  who  write  in  English. 

Translate  the  following  into  French:— 

Upon  the  intellectual  and  moral  qualities  of  the  Hindoos,  a  very  few  words  will 
suffice  The  more  educated  classes  (and  it  is  from  a  consideration  ot  the  character 
of  these  only,  that  any  fair  conclusion  can  be  drawn)  may  be  pronounced,  without 
hesitation,  to  be  a  shrewd,  wary  and  acute  people.  Subtlety,  perhaps,  more  than 
strength  is  the  prominent  character  of  their  intellect.  Though  good  imitators,  they 
have  hitherto  discovered  no  original  powers  of  invention  and  little  imagination.  In 
practical  good  sense,  they  are  decidedly  below  the  Chinese.  In  vigour  and  manliness 
of  mind  they  are  below  the  Arabs,  the  Persians  and  the  other  nations  which  have 
at  various  times  invaded  and  conquered  them.  We  make  no  comparison  with 
European  nations,  bucausethe  contrast  is  too  great  to  admit  of  any  parallel,  lne 
departments  of  industry  in  which  their  intellectual  faculties  appear  to  most  advantage, 
and  for  which  they  seem  best  fitted,  are  the  administration  of  justice  and  _  finance*. 
nd  such  branches  of  trade  as  do  not  imply  the  possession  of  comprehensive  know- 
ledge and  bold  enterprise. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Values. 


20 


20 


20 


40 


100 


No.  14. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


EXAMINATION   ON   OPTIONAL   SUBJECTS. 


Thursday,  13th  November,  1884,  from  3.30  p.m.  to  4.30  p.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 

COMPOSITION. 

Note.— This  paper  is  for  candidates  who  have  taken  composition  in  French  in  the 
qualifying  examination. 

1.  Show  how  the  following  sentences  may  be  improved,  and  state 
the  reason  for  any  corrections  you  make : — 

(a)  Dryden  makes  a  handsome  observation  on  Ovid's  writing  a 
letter  from  Dido  to  Aeneas,  in  the  following  words  : 

(b)  They  were  persons  of  moderate  intellects,  even  before  they 
were  impaired  by  their  passions. 

2.  In  the  following  sentences,  where  two  synonyms  are  given  within 

brackets,  select  the  proper  one  : — 

(a)  There  was  no  tenant  in  the  house ;  it  was  (vacant  or  empty  ?) 
(&)  Though  numerous  applications   were  made  for  the  prisoner's 

(forgiveness  or  pardon  ?),  they  were  all  (unsuccessful  or  ineffectual  ?) 

3.  Punctuate  the  following  passage,  and,  where  necessary,  use 
capital  letters : — An  old  man  being  on  the  point  of  death  called  his  sons 
to  his  bedside  and  ordered  them  to  break  a  bundle  of  arrows  strong  as 
they  were  they  were  unable  to  break  the  bundle  so  he  took  it  in  his 
turn  and  having  untied  it  easily  broke  each  arrow  singly  turning 
towards  his  sons  he  said  to  them  united  you  cannot  be  overpowered 
divided  you  will  be  broken  as  easily  as  reeds. 

4.  Write  a  letter  to  a  friend,  of  not  less  two  hundred  words, 
describing  a  visit  to  a  city . 


No.  15. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


EXAMINATION   ON   OPTIONAL    SUBJECTS. 


Values. 


100 


14th  November,  1884,  from  1.30  to  3.30  p.  m. 
PRECIS    WRITING. 

OTTAWA   SANITARY   CONVENTION,   llTH   MARCH,   1884. 

The  Ottawa  Sanitary  Convention  met  as  per  announcement  in  the^ 
City  Hall  shortly  after  11  o'clock.  The  Convention  was  well  repre- 
sented from  both  the  Provinces  of  Ontario  and  Quebec  bv  members  of 
the  Senate  and  Commons,  as  well  as  by  members  of  the  various  religious 
denominations  of  the  city.  In  addition  to  the  medical  gentlemen 
present,  a  number  of  other  gentlemen  interested  in  sanitary  measures 
were  also  present,  among  whom  were  several  of  the  best  known* 
engineers  and  scientists  of  the  place. 

49 


46a— 4 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


2.  Dr.  Sweetland,  on  opening  the  meeting,  said  lie  felt  somewhat 
embarrassed  at  taking  the  position,  not  expecting  to  be  called  upon  to 
occupy  the  chair.  The  object  of  the  association  was  to  disseminate 
sanitary  knowledge  among  the  masses  of  the  people,  and  he  knew  of  no 
other  subject  upon  which  it  was  so  necessary  for  the  people  to  be  informed. 

3.  The  Secretary  submitted  to  the  meeting  the  following  com- 
munication from  the  members  of  the  Women's  Christian  Temperance 
Union,  which  on  motion  was  referred  to  a  select  committee : 

Scaebobo',  6th  March,  1884. 
To  the  Ottawa  Sanitary  Convention : 

Gentlemen, — The  Executive  Committee  of  the  Ontario  Women's 
Christian  Temperance  Union  desires  most  respectfully  to  invite  your 
attention  to  the  consideration  of  the  following  questions : 

Is  the  beverage  use  of  alcoholic  liquors  by  persons  in  health  bene- 
ficial ? 

Is  the  indiscriminate  use  of  alcoholic  liquors  by  persons  not  in 
health,  on  their  own  prescription,  beneficial  ? 

Is  alcoholic  liquor,  as  obtained  in  common  sale,  necessary  in  medi- 
cal prescription  ;  if  so,  in  what  cases  particularly  ? 

What  ought  to  be  the  attitude  of  the  medical  profession  towards 
the  sale  of  intoxicants  ? 

Dr.  O.,  of  Toronto,  delivered  the  introductory  address,  in  which  he 
observed  that  one  of  the  objects  of  the  convention  was  hard  work.  The 
importance  of  hygiene  was  apt  to  be  overlooked.  As  it  was  in  the 
middle  ages,  so  it  is  now.  Although  we  are  surprised  at  the  seeming 
apathy  which  existed  during  plagues  of  olden  times,  yet  he  was  afraid 
there  was  a  great  deal  of  it  now.  A  good  deal  could  be  done  to  prevent 
disease  before  the  necessity  for  calling  in  the  doctor  arose.  To  consider 
the  best  means  of  doing  so  was  the  object  for  which  the  meeting  was 
assembled.  There  were  certain  sanitary  facts  which  it  was  necessary 
to  reiterate  in  order  to  keep  them  before  the  public.  In  a  paper  read 
by  Mr.  Chadwick  before  the  British  Science  Association,  he  stated  that 
certain  sanitary  reforms  had  effected  a  saving  of  life  of  one-third  per 
cent.  Dr.  Cascaden,  in  the  Ontario  Legislature,  had  taken  statistics  from 
the  "  Statesmen's  Year  Book"  for  the  six  years  previous  to  1875,  and  six 
years  after  1875,  and  showed  that  there  had  been  a  saving  of  life  of 
nearly  one  and  a-half  per  thousand.  This  applied  to  Ontario  would 
mean  a  saving  of  2,800  lives  a  year. 

5.  The  significance  of  the  change  after  the  year  1875  was  that  in 
that  year  the  British  Government  had  passed  an  Act  establishing  local 
boards  throughout  the  country  with  power  to  institute  sanitary  reform. 
These  boards  are  now  doing  more  valuable  work  in  Great  Britain  in  the 
direction  of  sanitary  reform.  He  referred  to  the  large  number  of  deaths 
in  Ontario  from  contagious  diseases,  and  contended  that  if  we  had  proper 
sanitary  boards  who  could  insist  on  proper  plumbing,  proper  sewerage, 
&c,  one-half  of  these  deaths  might  be  prevented. 

6.  A  large  number  of  deaths  from  consumption  he  believed  might 
also  be  prevented  by  proper  ventilation.  He  referred  to  the  different 
features  on  the  programme,  and  said  that  after  the  papers  were  read  he 
hoped  they  would  be  discussed,  and  he  trusted  the  citizens  of  Ottawa 
would  not  be  backward  in  discussing  these  subjects  and  making  them 
their  own.  He  knew  the  convention  would  be  able  to  show  that  by 
adopting  proper  precautions  thousands  of  lives  could  be  saved  in  every 
Province  in  the  Dominion,  and  it  behooved  us  one  and  all  to  take  hold 
of  the  matter.  The  rev.  gentleman  who  had  opened  the  meeting  had 
given  us  the  grandest  and  noblest  example  in  that  of  our  Saviour 
saving  life. 

8  50 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


7.  Some  people  said  sanitarians  were  riding  a  hobby,  but  if  they 
never  rode  any  worse  hobby  they  would  be  doing  very  well.  The  Dominion 
must  eventually  have  a  sanitary  board,  and  he  hoped  that  "  eventually" 
would  not  be  in  the  distant  future.  We  had  a  great  deal  of  disease  im- 
ported with  immigrants,  and  the  Dominion  Government  alone  could  pre- 
vent this. 

8.  The  adulteration  of  food  was  another  matter  which  came  within 
the  ken  of  the  Dominion  Government,  as  also  did  the  work  of  preventing 
so  far  as  possible  loss  of  life  in  factories. 

9.  There  was  also  much  that  should  be  done  by  the  joint  action  of 
the  Provincial  and  Municipal  Governments,  such  as  sewerage.  In  sanitary 
matters  much  of  the  work  has  to  be  done  by  the  municipal  organizations 
themselves,  and  they  are  so  closely  connected  in  their  work  and  relations 
with  the  Provincial  Governments  that  the  bulk  of  sanitary  legislation 
must  be  left  with  the  Provincial  Legislatures.     « 

10.  In  looking  through  the  Consolidated  Municipal  Act,  it  will  be 
seen  how  large  a  portion  deals  with  sewerage  drainage,  water  supply, 
and  a  host  of  other  subjects  in  which  this  close  relation  exists. 

11.  The  Provincial  Government  had  organized  a  sanitary  board  and 
handed  over  to  them  a  great  deal  of  work.  The  Government  had,  through 
the  board,  collected  and  diffused  a  great  deal  of  information.  They  had 
issued  a  number  of  pamphlets,  amongst  others  is  "  The  Disposal  of 
Sewage,"  which  contained  much  useful  information  to  householders, 
and  if  the  principles  laid  down  in  that  pamphlet  were  carried  out  there 
would  be  a  great  deal  less  disease. 

12.  They  had  also  issued  pamphlets  on  contagious  diseases,  the  pre- 
vention of  death  by  drowning,  and  other  subjects.  They  had  now  in 
press  a  pamphlet  giving  instruction  what  to  do  in  case  of  poisoning  be- 
fore the  doctor  arrives ;  and  here  he  might  say  that  they  were  very 
careful  to  discriminate  between  the  prevention  of  disease  and  the  cure  of 
it,  A  large  portion  of  the  work  that  had  to  be  taken  into  consideration 
by  the  board  was  the  investigation  into  outbreaks  of  disease. 

13.  An  effort  was  now  being  made  to  carry  out  what  had  been  done 
in  England  with  such  great  success.  They  were  urging  that  there  should 
be  local  boards  of  health  throughout  the  Province,  for  there  should  be 
some  organization  to  put  into  effect  any  sanitary  suggestions  that  may 
be  made. 

One  of  the  objects  of  such  convention  as  these  was  to  ask  the  people 
to  do  their  part  to  bring  about  this  state  of  affairs.  He  trusted  that  the 
outcome  of  this  convention  would  be  to  strengthen  the  hands  of  those 
who  were  endeavoring  to  bring  about  reforms  that  would  effect  a  saving 
of  life  throughout  this  Province. 

14.  Dr.  C,  of  Toronto,  drew  attention  to  some  farther  statistics 
concerning  the  decrease  of  the  death  rate  owing  to  the  spread  of  sanitary 
science. 

15.  Dr.  E.  expressed  his  pleasure  at  seeing  the  convention  held  in 
Ottawa,  and  of  seeing  such  a  diversified  programme.  The  object  of  the 
meeting  he  considered  a  noble  one,  and  hoped  that  it  would  result 
beneficially. 

16.  Dr.  B.,  of  Montreal,  said  last  year  31  per  cent,  of  the  deaths  in 
Montreal  were  from  zymotic  diseases,  and  in  almost  every  case  he  had 
investigated  the  drains  were  defective.  What  other  inference,  then, 
could  be  drawn  than  that  the  deaths  were  caused  by  gasses  or  germs  com- 
ing from  the  drains  ?  He  instanced  several  startling  cases  which  had 
come  to  his  observation  in  Montreal  of  deaths  which  were  directly  trace- 
able to  these  causes. 


51 


46a— 4& 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


17.  A  long  discussion  in  regard  to  the  value  of  water  in  air  took 
place,  and  as  to  how  it  should  be  supplied  if  it  was  really  necessary.  It 
was  contended  by  several  members  that  in  all  seasons  of  the  year  nature 
furnished  the  required  quantity. 

18.  In  connection  with  the  ventilation  of  public  buildings,  Dr.  C. 
and  other  gentlemen  strongly  advocated  the  use  of  machinery  or  other 
methods  which  would  introduce  into  a  chamber  pure  air  of  a  normal  tem- 
perature. 

19.  Dr.  C.  W.  C,  of  Toronto,  member  of  the  Provincial  Board  of 
Health,  read  an  exhaustive  paper  entitled:  "Abuse  of  Alcohol,  and 
increase  of  Nervous  Diseases  in  Modern  Times."  The  reader  favored  the 
moderate  use  of  good  wine,  and  instanced  the  thrift  of  the  peasantry  of 
France,  whose  common  beverage  was  the  pure  light  clarets.  He  stated 
that  the  drunkard  was  in  many  cases  entitled  to  pity,  sympathy  and 
assistance  ;  for  though  indubitably  drink  leads  to  poverty,  yet  the  pam- 
pered and  sometimes  fanatic  advocate  of  total  abstinence  must  not  for- 
get that  it  is  poverty  which  loads  to  drink.  The  appetite  for  drink  was 
nourished  and  grew  overpowering  from  the  want  of  wholesome  food. 

20.  u  School  Hygiene  "  was  the  next  paper  on  the  programme,  and 
a  vigorous  plain  spoken  dissertation  it  was,  from  the  pen  of  Mr.  S.  W., 
Principal  of  the  Ottawa  Ladies'  College.  He  spoke  of  the  uninviting 
character  of  school  houses  both  outside  and  inside— cheerless  and  unat- 
tractive and  often  repulsive.  The  furniture  of  schools  was  often  unnatural, 
the  lighting  injurious  and  unscientific.  In  closing,  Mr.  W.  stated  that 
close  application  never  injured  anyone,  the  injury  proceeded  from  other 
causes—from  two  to  three  hours  beyond  the  work  in  classes  was 
excessive. 

21.  The  next  session  was  opened  in  accordance  with  the  programme. 
Dr.  E.  P.,  editor  of  the  "Sanitary  Journal,"  read  an  exhaustive  paper  on 
"  Diet  in  relation  to  Disease."  He  said  that  he  had  noticed  among  other 
things  that  according  to  statistics  cancer  had  increased  greatly  in  the 
past  few  years,  and  he  attributed  it  to  the  too  free  use  of  animal  food. 
He  considered  that  many  [other  cases  of  disease  could  be  traced  to  the 
same  source,  notably  gout,  rheumatism  and  congestion  of  the  liver. ^  He 
had  observed  that  persons  who  drank  cider  and  used  fruit  plentifully 
were  comparatively  free  from  these  complaints.  He  also  thought  that 
animal  food  rendered  persons  sensitive  to  cold,  and  instanced  a  New  York 
medical  man,  who  for  two  years  had  tried  to  get  a  cold,  but  in  spite  of  all 
exposure,  failed  to  do  so  as  long  as  he  kept  away  from  meat  food. 

22.  He  also  considered  that  saline  drinks  were  conducive  to  long  life, 
and  that  people  of  old  age  should  have  distilled  water  to  drink.  Death 
from  old  age  was  caused  by  the  earthy  and  other  impurities  of  water  not 
assimilating  properly  with  the  system— hence  his  advice. 

Mr.  L.  corroborated  the  remarks  by  saying  that  he  had  known  a 
case  of  severe  cancer  cured  by  putting  the  patient  on  very  spare  diet. 

24.  Dr.  0.  said  he  would  like  to  know  if  the  increase  of  deaths  from 
cancer  mentioned  by  Dr.  P.  was  based  on  actual  increase  or  pro  rata,  for 
it  was  to  be  borne  in  mind  that  population  was  on  the  increase,  and  that 
it  was  only  natural  that  the  specific  number  of  deaths  from  any  one  cause 
would  increase  also.  As  regarded  the  use  of  animal  food,  he  pointed  to 
the  large  use  of  such  food  by  those  in  northern  latitudes.  Distilled  water 
might  be  good  in  some  cases,  but  not  as  a  rule.  It  h%,d  been  found  in  the 
French  service  that  recruits  from  districts  where  soft  water  was  mostly 
in  use  (and  that  was  the  nearest  to  distilled  water)  were  not  by  any  means 
a  hardy  lot. 

Dr.  B,  though  not  consenting  to  the  idea  of  avoiding  animal  food, 
thought  that  moderate  eating  and  regular  living  had  a  very  great  deal  to 

52 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 

8 


do  with  the  preservation  of  life.  He  knew  of  one  friend,  however,  who 
was  a  very  hearty  eater,  and  who  had  lived  to  the  age  of  94. 

Dr.  B.  remarked  that  cancer  was  prevalent  only  at  certain  ages,  and 
generally  among  females.    If  caused  by  animal  food,  how  was  that  ? 

Dr.  S.  did  not  think  that  the  use  of  animal  food  was  conducive  to 
cancer  and  instanced  the  nations  of  high  northern  latitudes  who  made  it 
their  almost  exclusive  diet,  and  who  were  almost  entirely  free  from  the 
disease.  He  thought  that  a  generous  diet  and  frequent  use  of  the  bath 
with  friction  of  a  flesh  brush  or  rough  towel  after,  were  the  best  health 
prescriptions  so  far  as  colds  were  concerned. 

26.  Mr.  G.,  C.E.,  of  the  Public  Works  Department,  chose  for  his 
text  "  Sewerage."  He  contended  that  brick  drains  should  be  egg-shaped 
with  tbe  big  end  up,  so  that  the  greatest  force  could  be  got  to  push  out 
the  smallest  amount  of  matter.  If  box  drains  were  used  they  should  be 
put  in  with  the  angle  down.  The  ordinary  "  traps  "  used  in  closets,  sinks 
and  other  places  were  not  good.  He  displayed  a  new  invention  in  the 
same  line,  which  he  claimed  would  remedy  the  defects  complained  of, 
and  which  had  been  working  successfully  for  a  year  past  in  the  Depart- 
ment of  Public  Works. 

27.  Dr.  B.,  of  Montreal,  read  the  first  paper  on  "  Hidden  Causes  of 
Disease."  Among  other  originators  of  disease  he  showed  that  wells  had 
much  to  do  with  it,  and  that  in  many  cases  they  were  only  filled  with,  or 
at  the  best,  contaminated  by  the  drainings  of  dwellings  and  their  out- 
houses. His  experience  in  regard  to  such  matters  in  Montreal  was  that 
in  many  cases  the  greediness  of  the  wealthy  was  more  to  blame  than  the 
ignorance  of  the  poor.  He  instanced  a  case  in  which  several  deaths  had 
taken  place  in  a  house  in  which  the  water  used  was  drawn  from  a  well 
several  hundred  feet  away,  and  it  was  thought  no  connection  could  exist 
between  the  well  and  the  nearest  cesspool.  He  had  the  cesspool  well 
cleaned  out  and  then  filled  with  salt  and  water.  In  a  short  time  the  well 
water  was  found  to  be  strongly  impregnated  with  salt.  In  another  case 
he  had  found  several  families  on  one  side  of  a  street  attacked  with  a  dis- 
ease and  tho&e  on  the  other  side  freo  from  it.  He  had  found  that  all 
those  who  had  been  taken  ill  had  been  using  water  from  the  same  well. 

28.  Defective  plumbing,  either  from  carelessness  of  workmen  or 
penurionsness  of  parties  building  was  another  great  cause  of  disease. 
Disease  germs  were  so  minute  and  easily  scattered  that  it  was  impossible 
to  be  too  careful  in  guarding  against  their  distribution.  He  was  not  in 
favor  of  sewerage  pipes  in  houses  being  concealed,  as  it  was  not  easy  to 
detect  any  leakage  in  them. 

29.  Dr.  R.  iurnished  the  final  paper,  entitled :  "  Prevention  better 
than  cure,  or  Ventilation  vs.  Quarantine."  In  this  Dr.  E.  dealt  entirely 
with  the  subject  of  contagious  diseases,  and  strongly  advocated  the  policy 
of  isolation.  He  pointed  out  that  in  a  case  of  small  pox,  although  a  red 
card  might  be  placed  in  front  of  the  building,  there  was  no  security  that 
that  disease  would  be  kept  from  spreading.  Friends  might  keep  away, 
but  there  were  tradesmen  who  had  to  come  in  contact  with  the  family  every 
day,  and  it  was  not  possible  to  avoid  the  risk  of  contamination.  Such 
patients  should  be  put   in   an   isolated   hospital   under  the  care  of  expe- 

I  rienced  nurses  where  they  could  be  properly  cared  for  and  run  no  risk  of 
spreading  the  disease  from  which  they  might  be  suffering.  # 

30.  On  motion  of  Dr.  W.  it  was  unanimously  resolved  that  in  the 
interest  of  sanitary  science  and  the  public  health,  local  boards  of  health 
should  be  invested  by  law  with  power  to  make  such  regulations  as  might 
be  deemed  judicious  by  them. 

53 


43  Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46  ) 


A.  1885 


31.  On  motion  of  Dr.  H.  P.  W.,  seconded  by  Dr.  P.,  it  was  resolved 
that  it  be  recommended  that  a  law  should  be  passed  forbidding  any  per- 
son laboring  under  or  recovering  from  a  contagious  disease,  from  enter- 
ing any  conveyance  without  first  informing  the  party  in  charge  of  it  of 
his  complaint. 

No.  16. 


Value. 
100 


CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS. 


Friday,  14th  November,  1884,  from  1.30  p.m.  to  i  p.m. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly, 

BOOK-KEEPING  EY  DOUBLE  ENTRY. 

Journalize,  post  and  balance.  The  candidate  taking  this  option 
will  proceed  as  if  he  were  himself  Philip  Smart,  the  agent  of  Jonathan 
Swift,  and  was  making  the  entries  in  his  own  books. 

No  marks  will  be  given  unless  the  work  is  finished.  Errors  will, 
of  couise,  reduce  the  number  of  marks,  but  will  not  preclude  success — 
unless  they  are  many — if  the  subject  be  treated  so  as  to  show  that  the 
principles  of  book-keeping  are  thoroughly  well  understood  by  the  candi- 
date. 


STATEMENT. 

Jonathan  Swift,  of  Jamaica,  consigns  to  his  agent,  Philip  Smart, 
of  Halifax,  N.S.,  a  cargo  of  sugar,  molasses,  rum,  tobacco,  coffee  and 
pimento,  which  said  agent  is  to  sell.  He  is  then  to  invest  so  much  of 
the  proceeds  as  may  be  necessary  for  purchasing  a  return  cargo,  con- 
sisting of  salmon,  herrings,  mackerel,  dried  codfish,  pork  and  flour.  A 
commission  of  10  per  cent,  is  to  be  allowed  Smart  upon  any  advances  of 
cash  he  may  have  to  make,  and  5  per  cent,  upon  the  bulk  amount  of  the 
sales  and  purchases. 


TRANSACTIONS. 

Smart  advances  $1,5*75  to  pay  wages,  port  dues,*  and  other  needful 
disbursements. 

Advances  also  $1,885.90  for  duties. 


Sells  to  H.  M.'s  officer  in  charge  of  Naval  Stores,  Halifax  : 

50  Puncheons  of  rum,  or  5,873  gallons,  @  $1.85  per  gallon. 
10  Hogsheads  sugar,  weighing  123J  cwt.,  @  $6.25  per  cwt. 
15  Puns,  molasses,  or  1,690  gallons,  @  45  cents  per  gallon  ;  and 
5  Bags  coffee,  or  430  lbs.,  @  13  cents  per  lb. 

In  payment  he  receives  bills  of  exchange  on  the  Admiralty  Office, 
London,  and  sells  them  to  the  Bank  of  Nova  Scotia  @  J  per  cent,  premium, 

54 


18  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188&. 


Sells  for  cash : 

40  Hogsheads  sugar,  or  46,360  lbs.,  @  6|  cents  per  lb. 

20  Puncheons  molasses,  or  2,133  gallons,  @  43  cents  per  gallon, 

15  Puncheons  rum,  or  1,622  gallons,  @  $1.87  per  gallon. 

40  Bags  coffee,  or  3,220  lbs.,  @  12 J  cents  per  lb. 


Sells  to  Gerald  &  Jones  for  notes  @  2,  3  and  4  mos.  (one-third  of  the 
whole  amount  at  each  term),  viz.: 

25  Puncheons  molasses,  or  2,5*70  gallons,  @  42J  cents  per  gallon,, 

25  Hogsheads  sugar,  or  262  cwt.,  @  $6.50  per  cwt. 

15  Puncheons  rum,  or  1,623  gallons,  @  $1.83  per  gallon. 

50  Bags  coffee,  or  4,035  lbs.,  @  15  cents  per  lb. 

20  Bags  pimento,  or  1,015  lbs.,  @  11  cents  per  lb. 

20  Hogsheads  tobacco,  or  8,733  lbs.,  @  9  cents  per  lb. 

Gets  the  notes  discounted  @  7  per  cent,  (calculate  the  interest  for 
months  and  without  days  of  grace). 


Sells  the  balance  of  the  merchandise  to  Thomas  Tuttle,  viz.: 

30  Puncheons  molafses,  or  3,073  gallons,  %  4i  cents  per  gallon, 

40  Hogsheads  sugar,  or  423  J  cwt.,  @  $6.35  per  cwt. 

35  Bags  coffee,  or  2,890  lbs.,  @  14  cents  per  lb. 

15  Hogsheads  tobacco,  or  6,111  lbs.,  @  8|  cents  per  lb. 

20  Bags  pimento,  or  1,035  lbs.,  @  9  cents  per  lb. 

For  this  sale  he  obtains  half  cash  and  half  in  a  note  at  3  months. 
Gets  the  note  discounted  @  7  per  cent,,  and  enters  the  proceeds,  with 
the  cash,  as  he  has  done  in  the  previous  cases. 


Purchases  for  cash  to  make  up  the  return  cargo : 

50  Barrels  salmon,  @ $19  00  per  bbl. 

300       "        herrings,  @  6  75  "     " 

200       "       mackerel,® 8  50  "     " 

500  Quintals  dried  codfish,  @ 3  75  "  quintal, 

120  Barrels  of  pork,  @  -     18  00  "  bbl. 

700       "       flour,  @ 6  25  "     " 


Charges  commission  on  his  advances  and  on  the  aggregate  amount 
of  sales  and  purchases,  as  per  agreement,  and  having  ascertained  the  bal- 
ance, remits  the  same  to  Swift  by  drafts  on  New  York,  which  he  obtains 
at  par. 


55 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.   46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  IT. 
CIVIL  SEEVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING  EXAMINATION — OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS. 


Value. 


Saturday  15th  November,  1884,  forenoon. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

PHONOGEAPHY  OE  SHOETHAND. 

Note. — The  examiner  in  charge  will  read  over  the  subjoined  extract  so  as  to  allow 
five  minutes  to  the  candidates  to  write  them  down.  The  rest  of  the  time  (twenty-five 
minutes)  to  be  given  for  transcribing  the  notes. 

THE  COEN  TEADE. 

During  the  past  week  the  weather  has  been  stormy,  and  a  consider- 
able quantity  of  rain  has  fallen.     The  temperature  has  been  variable,  and 
comparatively  low,  whilst  the  nights  have   been  cold,  and  one  or  two 
slight  frosts  have  occurred.    In  the  north,  and  in  Scotland,  the  weather 
has  been  leas  rainy  than  in  the  south,   and  the  later  harvest  in  those 
districts  has  not  as  yet  been  seriously  interrupted.     The  rain  has  been  of 
great  benefit  to  the  land,  and  in  the  earlier  districts  preparations  for 
autumn  sowings  are  being  made  early,  and  favorably.    The  rough  winds 
have  probably  caused  some  damage  to  unthatched  ricks,   and  unsecured 
crops,  but  as  yet  very  little  has   been  reported.     Atmospheric  conditions 
have  been  very  unfavourable  for  threshing,  and  farmers'  deliveries  have, 
in  consequence,  been  on  a  very  restricted  scale.     Nevertheless,  values  for 
English  wheat  appear  as  a  rule  to  have  lost  the  hardening  tendency 
which  was  apparent  during  the  previous  week,   actual  improvement  in 
values  having  occurred  only  in  a  few  provincial  markets,  whilst  trade  in 
London   on  Friday  was  decidedly  weaker.     English  wheats  are  proving 
to  be  of  exceptional  weight,   which   makes  the  present  range  of  values 
altogether  unparalleled.     At  this  juncture,   however,  it  seems  necessary 
to  call  attention  to  the  fact  that  the  weekly  imperial  averages  represent 
the  price  per  480  lb.,  60  lb.  per  bushel,  whereas  London  quotations  are 
per  504  lb,,  or  63  lb.  per  bushel.     Samples,  however,  come  to  hand  weigh- 
ing 64  lb.  to  65  lb.  per  bushel   as  a  regular  thing,  whilst  even  greater 
weights  are  not  at  all  uncommon  ;  consequently,  34s.  and  37s.   may   be 
taken  as  the  extreme  values  per  504  lb.  of  English  red  and  white  wheats 
respectively,  and  it  will  be  understood  that  higher  rates  refer  to  greater 
weights.     The  sales  of  English  wheat  noted  last  week  were  62,574  qrs.at 
34s.  3d.,against  54, 148  qrs.  at  41s.  8d.  in  the  corresponding  week  of  last  year. 
The  London  average  for  the  week  ended  Tuesday  was  37s.  6d.  on  1,678§  qrs. 
With  regard  to  barleys,   the  new  crop  was  being  sent  forward   rather 
freely  before  the  wet  weather  set  in,  but  values  are  scarcely  settled  for 
the  present.    An  extreme  rate  of  44s.  seems  to  be  a  fair  limit,   but  the 
bulk  of  the  samples  has  been  taken  somewhere  in  the   neighborhood  of 
35s.     Other  descriptions  of  English  grain  and   pulse  have  as   yet  been 
offered  but  sparingly. 


56 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Value. 


No.  18. 
CIYIL  SEKVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING  EXAMINATION — OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS. 


Saturday,  15th  November,  1884,  forenoon. 

Candidates  must  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

TELEGRAPHY. 


Transmit  the  following  : 


STOCKS. 


Miscellaneous  stocks  have  been  quiet.  British  America  sold  at  100 
on  Monday,  Tuesday  and  Wednesday,  and  closed  with  bids  advanced  3J. 
Western  Assurance  went  off  at  107£  on  Monday  and  107  on  Wednesday, 
bids  closing  unchanged.  Consumers'  Gas  sold  in  very  small  lots  at  150 
and  149}.°  North- West  Land  quiet  but  very  steady  ;  sales  at  50J  on 
Tuesday,  and  at  50  on  Wednesday  and  Thursday,  and  closed  with  bids 
declined  h-  Loan  and  Savings  stocks  still  offered  sparingly  and  sold 
slowly.  On  Monday  Huron  and  Erie  brought  157J ;  on  Tuesday  104  was 
paid  for  Building  and  Loan  ;  on  Wednesday  Union  changed  hands  at  130  \_ 
on  Thursday  Landed  Credit  sold  at  118J  ;  on  Friday  Canada  Permanent, 
new  stock,  brought  205.  There  is  very  little  change  noticeable  in  bids, 
and  but  little  stock  has  been  offered  for  sale.  Holders  seem  to  think 
that  they  have  got  into  a  safe  corner,  and  to  be  inclined  to  stay  there  if 
they  can. 

Eeceive  the  following : 

CRICKET. 

Surrey  v.  Sussex. — More  than  ordinary  interest  attached  to  the 
return  match  between  Surrey  and  Sussex,  which  commenced  yesterday 
at  Kennington  Oval,  as  both  sides  have  done  remarkably  well  this 
season.  "Unfortunately,  the  weather  was  wretchedly  wet  and  unsettled, 
and  the  rain,  after  causing  two  or  three  interruptions,  compelled  stumps 
to  be  drawn  at  five  o'clock.  The  wicket  was  soft  and  treacherous  in  the 
early  part  of  the  day,  and  the  Surrey  captain,  on  winning  the  toss, 
decided  to  put  Sussex  in  to  bat.  This  proceeding:,  though  seemingly  a 
risky  one,  was  attended  with  great  success.  The  Sussex  batsmen  offered 
a  very  feeble  resistance  to  the  bowling,  and  though  four  members  of 
that  team  got  into  double  figures,  the  total  only  reached  74.  Mr. 
Whitfield  was  in  an  hour  for  10,  and  Tester  hit  with  some  freedom. 
Lohmann  was  the  most  successful  bowler ;  but  Abel,  who  was  not  put  on 
till  late  in  the  innings,  took  two  wickets  for  two  runs.  Surrey  went  in 
at  a  quarter  past  four,  and  started  very  badly,  losing  Mr.  Diver,  Maurice 
Eead  and  Abel  for  16  runs.  Afterwards  Mr.  Shuter  was  missed  at  slip 
by  Jesse  Hide,  and  Mr.  Read  by  Humphreys  at  point,  or  matters  might 
have  been  even  worse.  There  is  now  every  prospect  of  a  good  game. 
Scores : — 


57 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


No.  19. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


QUALIFYING   EXAMINATION — OPTIONAL   SUBJECTS. 


Saturday,  15th  November,  1884,  forenoon. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

TYPE  WRITING. 

Note.— The  time  allowed  for  a  candidate  to  write  the  subjoined  passage  is  fifteen  minutes,  and  the 
examiners  will  not  permit  this  time  to  be  exceeded  in  any  case. 

STOCKS  FOR  THE  WEEK. 

The  local  market  duriDg  the  past  week  has  been  emphatically  quiet  and  steady. 
Sales  have  amounted  only  to  1,839  shares,  against  2,132  in  the  preceding  week.  Offer- 
ings have  been  very  small,  but  they  have  been  sufficient,  as  the  investment  demand 
has  been  slack,  and  there  is  no  disposition  in  favor  of  speculation  prevalent.  The 
advance  in  Federal  seems  to  have  killed  the  last  opening  at  present  available  in  that 
line;  whenever  it  touches  60  the  stock  comes  iorth  freely.  Toronto  and  Ontario 
appear  to  have  been  in  favor  with  buyers,  but  more  of  these  in  Montreal  than  in 
Toronto.  The  good  harvest,  of  course,  inspires  confidence  in  the  future ;  but  the 
prevalent  opinion  seems  to  be  that  in  regard  to  stocks  all  its  legitimate  influence  was 
discounted  some  time  since,  and  that  prices  are  quite  high  enough  at  present  divi- 
dends. There  is  no  symptom,  however,  of  either  investors,  or  holders  on  margin, 
wishing  to  push  sales  of  anything.  Montreal  has  sold  steadily  in  small  lots  and  at 
good  prices;  two  shares  brought  191 J  on  Monday;  but  190J  was  accepted  on  Tues- 
day, and  191f  paid  on  Wednesday,  with  191 J  and  191 J  on  Thursday  and  Friday,  bids 
closing  at  190J,  being  a  rise  of  J.  Ontario  opened  at  HI  for  14  shares  on  Monday, 
rose  to  112|  for  122  on  Thursday,  sold  at  112  for  10  on  Friday,  and  closed  with 
bids^  advanced  J.  Toronto  quiet;  sold  on  Wednesday  to  the  extent  of  30  shares  at 
177f  to  178,  but  closed  with  bids  advanced  J.  Merchants'  strong,  with  113f  paid  for 
30  shares  on  Friday,  and  closed  with  a  raise  of  1  \  on  bids.  Commerce  sold  steadily 
in  small  lots;  opened  at  120J  on  Tuesday  ;  reached  122  to  122J  for  168  shares  on 
Thursday,  and  122 J  for  24  shares  on  Friday,  bids  showing  an  advance  of  If  at  close. 
Federal  has  been  quiet  and  easier ;  it  opened  at  60  to  59J-  on  Monday ;  touched  58| 
on  Tuesday,  and  58  on  Wednesday,  recovering  to  58f  on  Thursday,  and  59  on  Friday, 
and  closed  as  before,  the  disposition  being  always  to  offer  freely  at  60.  Dominion 
sold  at  190  on  Monday  and  Wednesday,  closing  with  bids  unchanged  and  no  stock 
offered. 


No.  1. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


November,  1884. 

Candidates  are  requested  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly, 

PENMANSHIP  (Half  an  hour.) 

On /Wool  Supplies.— So  much  has  been  said  of  late,  especially  by  the  politicians, 
in  regard  to  the  "  wool  interests  "  and  the  need  of  protecting  them,  or  otherwise,  both 
in  the  United  States  and  Canada,  that  some  facts  relating  to  the  sources  of  wool 

58 


[%  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46*) 


k.  1885 


supply  may  not  be  inappropriate.  A  large  American  woollen  manufacturer  has  been 
recently  lecturing  in  Boston,  and  among  other  things  he  said:— "Those  parts  of  the 
world  which  grow  wool  in  excess  of  consumption  are  few.  Europe  has  66  sheep  to 
Bvery  100  inhabitants,  the  United  States  ?6,  and  Canada  W.  None  of  those  countries 
supply  their  own  needs.  Where  then  does  the  wool  come  from  ?  It  comes  first 
from  South  Africa,  which  has  980  sheep  to  every  100  inhabitants;  second  from 
Australia,  where  there  is  an  average  of  2,402  sheep  to  every  100  inhabitants ;  and 
thirdly  from  the  regions  of  the  Eiver  Plate,  which  has  2,580  sheep  to  every  100 
Inhabitants." 

No.  2. 

CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


Values. 


25 


25 


60 


100 


Value 
100. 


10 
10 


PROMOTION    EXAMINATION. 


November,  1884. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 

composition  (One   hour.) 

1.  Point  out  any  inaccuracies  in  the  following  sentences,  giving  your 
reasons : — 

(a.)  He  seemed  hardly  to  know  that  two  and  two  made  tour. 

(&.)  The  elderly  man,  he  that  came  in  late,  I  supposed  to  be  the 
superintendent.  . 

(c.)  He  may  be  said  to  have  saved  the  life  of  a  citizen,  and,  conse- 
quently, entitled  to  the  reward. 

2.  Punctuate  the  following,  inserting  capital  letters,  when  necessary. 
•    powerful  though  in  a  less   degree  than  the  associations   connected 

with  our  land  are  those  founded  on  general  history  or  the  lives  of  dis- 
tinguished persons  the  valley  of  vaucluse  is  celebrated  for  its  beauty  yet 
how  little  would  it  have  been  esteemed  had  it  not  been  the  residence  of 
petrarch  in  like  manner  there  are  many  landscapes  no  doubt  more 
beautiful  than  runnymede  yet  those  who  remember  that  this  paG® 
witnessed  the  granting  of  the  great  charter  which  has  guaranteed  the 
rights  and  liberties  of  millions  will  find  few  scenes  affect  their  imagina- 
tions more  strongly. 

3.  Write  a  letter,  describing  the  duties  pertaining  to  the  o&ce 
which  you  now  hold.     (This  letter  to  contain  not  less  than  300  words.) 


No.  3. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


promotion  examination. 


Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly. 
CONSTITUTION  OF  CANADA. 
(British  North  America  Act.) 

1.  How  are  the  Federal  and  Provincial  Legislatures  composed? 

2.  What  are  the  powers  of  the  Lieutenant-Governors  with  regard  to 
the  sanctioning  of  Bills  passed  by  the  Local  Legislatures  ? 

59 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


100 


Values. 


5 
5 

10 

15 


3.  By  whom  are  Senators  appointed  and  what  qualifications  must 
they  have  ?  . 

4.  How  many  Ministers  are  there  in  the  Ontario  and  Quebec 
Executive  Councils,  and  what  are  the  names  of  the  offices  they  fill  ? 

5.  To  what  power,  Federal  or  Provincial,  belongs  the  control  of 
civil  rights,  the  management  of  railways  and  canals,  Crown  lands, 
penitentiaries,  asylums,  prisons,  Customs,  fisheries,  navigation,  and  in- 
direct taxation? 

6.  Can  Bills  passed  by  the  Dominion  Parliament  be  disallowed  ?  If 
so,  by  whom,  and  within  what  time  ? 

7.  How  many  members  does  the  British  North  America  Act  assign 
to  the  Senate  ?  And  state  how  these  places  are  distributed  between  the 
four  Provinces  confederated  in  186*7. 

8.  How  many  members  does  the  same  Act  assign  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  and  how  distributed  between  the  said  four  Provinces? 

9.  Is  there  any  provision  for  the  increase  of  representation  in  the 
House  of  Commons  commensurate  with  the  increase  of  population ;  and 
if  so,  how  often  does  the  readjustment  take  place,  and  how  is  it  managed  ? 

10.  What  are  the  respective  quorums  of  the  Senate  and  the  House 
of  Commons  ? 

11.  How  often  must  Parliament  assemble  and  how  many  years  may 
it  last  ? 

12.  How  often  must  the  Provincial  Legislatures  assemble  and  how 
many  years  may  they  last  ? 


5 
10 

10 

10 

10 

10 
10 

5 
5 
5 


No.  4. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


1  mark 
for  each, 
or  34  in 

all. 


November,  1884. 
GEOGRAPHY. 

To  be  taken  by  the  candidates  of  the  Post  Office  Department  during  the  time  allotted 
to  Precis  (No.  4),  which  subject  is  not  required,  on  this  occasion,  by  that  Department. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

1.  Specify  the  geographical  boundaries  of  the  Dominion. 

2.  Give  the  population  of  each  Province  in  round  numbers,  accord- 
ing to  the  last  census. 

3.  State  approximately,  if  you  cannot  do  it  exactly,  the  number  of 
post  offices  in  the  Dominion,  according  to  the  last  Postal  Guide. 

4.  Commencing  at  the  extreme  east  of  Nova  Scotia  and  working 
westward,  state  the  names  of  all  the  counties  in  the  Dominion,  or  as 
many  as  you  can. 

5.  Give  the  names  of  the  counties  in  which  the  cities  of  the 
Dominion  (naming  them)  and  the  following  towns  and  villages  are 
situated : 

Sydney,  Pictou,  Liverpool,  Yarmouth,  Digby,  Windsor,  in  Nova 
Scotia;  St.  Andrews,  Woodstock,  Eichibucto,  Chatham,  Bathurst,  in 
New  Brunswick;  Eimouski,   Cacouna,  St.  Thomas,   Levis,   Sorel,  St. 

60 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.) 


A.  1886* 


2  marks 

for  each, 

or  26  in 

all. 


100 


Value. 


100 


John's,  Yaudreuil,  in  Quebec  ;  Cornwall,  Prescott,  Kemptville,  Carleton 
Place,  Pembroke,  Madoc,  Peterboro',  Cobourg,  Lindsay,  Barrie,  Guelph, 
Owen  Sound,  Kincardine,  Stratford,  Sarnia  and  Sandwich,  in  Ontario. 

State  the  distances  by  railway,  as  nearly  as  you  can,  between  : 

Halifax  and  St.  John,  N.B.  (Intercolonial.) 

Halifax  and  Quebec   (Intercolonial.) 

St.  John,  KB.,  and  Quebec,  (Intercolonial.) 

Quebec  and  Montreal  (by  G.  T.  K.  R.) 

Quebec  and  Sherbrooke  (by  G.  T.  R.  R) 

Quebec  and  Portland,  U.S.  (by  G.  T.  R.  R.) 

Montreal  and  Portland,  U.S.  (by  G.  T.  R.  R.) 

Montreal  and  Ottawa  (by  Atlantic  R.  R.) 

Montreal  and  Toronto  (by  G.  T.  R.  R.) 

Toronto  and  Sarnia  (shortest  R.  R.  route.) 

Toronto  and  Owen  Sound  (shortest  R.  R.  route.) 

Toronto  and  Suspension  Bridge  (shortest  R.  R.  route.) 

Halifax  to  Winnipeg  (air  line.) 

State  the  remotest  northern  points  to  which  mail  facilities  extend 
in  Quebec  and  Ontario. 


No.  5. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 

PROMOTION   EXAMINATION,    NOVEMBER,    1884. 


(Postponed  to  18th  December.) 

ORTHOGRAPHY. 

(For  Candidates  of  the  Post  Office  Department.) 

Copy  the  following  extract  and  correct  the  mis-spelt  words.    For  every 
error  5  marks  will  be  deducted. 

AN  OLD   REMEDY  REVIVED. 

At  the  preasent  time  no  remmedy  is  in  grater  faver  as  a  meens  of 
combatting  that  dred  mallady,  consomption,  than;millk  uzed  liberaly  as 
an  artikel  of  diett  eether  hott  or  cold,  but  in  as  grate  quantitty 
as  the  paishent  can  be  indused  to  take  it.  Probbably  there  is  no 
meddissinal  aigent  the  value  of  witch  can  be  compared  with  this 
diettetick  remmedy,  and  it  is  to  be  oped  that  it  may  soone  sooperseed 
intirely  the  nawsius  dozes  of  codliver  oyl  witch  have  so  long  ben  in 
vogue  in  the  treetment  of  thismaladdy. 

Likemoast  other  good  things  witch  are  disscovered  in  moddern 
I  times,  this  prooves  coo  bee  simpley  a  revival  of  a  remmedy  as  old,  at  leest, 
as  the  twelvth  sentuery,  as  it  is  as  highley  lawded   in  the  wurks  of 
Averroes  as  in  meddisinal  wurks  of  the  preasent  dey. 

The  adition  of  barly-water  to  milk,  in  propportion  of  won  part  of 
the  formar  to  too  of  the  lattar,  ads  grateley  too  its  dejestibillity.  This 
is  a  uzefull  hint  for  those  who  think  thimselfs  unabel  to  uze  milk. 

61 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.) 


A.  1885 


Values. 


10 

10 
10 

10 

10 
10 

10 


10 
10 

10 


100 


Values. 


10 
10 
10 


No.  6. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION   OF    NOVEMBER,    1884. 


(Postponed  to  18th  December.) 
POST  OFFICE  DEPARTMENT— DUTIES  OF  DEPARTMENT. 

(For  all  classes  of  Candidates,) 

1.  What  should  a  Postmaster  do  with  a  letter  received  at  his  office 
suspected  to  contain  contraband  goods  sent  by  mail  to  evade  payment 
of  duty? 

2.  Under  what  circumstances,  if  any,  is  a  Postmaster  authorized  to 
open  a  letter  posted  at  or  passing  through  his  office  ? 

3.  What  should  a  mail  courier  do  with  a  letter  handed  to  him  on 
his  journey  between  one  post  office  and  another — and  is  he  bound  to 
receive  it  ? 

4:  What  should  a  Postmaster  do  when  the  numbers  of  a  news- 
paper addressed  to  his  office  remain  uncalled  for  during  four  weeks  ? 

5.  What  is  the  meaning  of  the  term  "  newspaper  manuscript  ?" 

6.  What  precautions  are  required  to  be  taken  to  insure  the  correct 
delivery  of  registered  letters  ? 

1.  Mention  some  of  the  exceptions  to  the  exclusive  privilege  of  the 
Postmaster-General  as  respects  the  collection,  conveyance  and  delivery 
of  letters. 

8.  On  what  part  of  a  letter  should  the  postage  stamp  be  placed  ? 

9.  If  a  letter  be  forwarded  under  cover  to  a  Postmaster,  with  a 
request  that  he  will  report  it  at  his  office,  what  should  he  do  ? 

10.  When  a  new  post  office  is  required,  what  should  be  done  by  the 
parties  interested  in  its  establishment  ? 

'     No.  7. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


November,  1884, 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Begulationslstrictly. 

Note.  L— -The  full  work  of  each  question  must  be  given. 

Note  2. — Candidates  from  the  Finance  and  Auditor-General's  Department  will 
take  questions  Nos.  5,  6,  7,  8,  9,  10.  Candidates  from  other  Departments  will 
take  questions   Nos.  1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7. 

AEITHMETIC— (2  hours,) 

1.  Multiply  5  days,  11  hrs.  33  min.  11  sec.  by  288. 

2.  Divide  1  by  763.45  to  five  decimal  places. 

3.  How  many  cords  of  wood  are  there  in  a  pile  4  ft.  wide,  5  ft.  3  in. 
high  and  10  ft.  long, 

62 


Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


4.  Divide  $56.10  between  A,  B,  and  C,  so  that  for  every  10  cents 
which  A  receives,  B  may  receive  12  cents,  and  C  half  as  much  more  as 


15 

15 
20 

20 


20 


20 
20 


A  and  B  together  receive. 

5.  At  what  rate  per  cent,  will  $700  amount  to  $1,200  in  five 
years  ? 

6.  A  person  who  has  $10,000  of  the  7|  per  cent,  sells  out  at  175, 
and  with  the  proceeds  buys  bank  stock  at  125,  which  pays  half-yearly 
dividends  of  3§  per  cent.     Find  the  alteration  in  his  income. 

7.  A  man  engages  to  do  a  piece  of  work  in  20  days  for  $30 ;  after 
doing  §  of  it  in  15 J  days,  he  finds  he  cannot  complete  it  in  the  time, 
and  he  gets  the  assistance  of  another  workman,  and  they  together 
finish  it  in  the  allotted  time.  How  long  would  the  second  man  take  to 
do  the  whole  work,  and  how  ought  the  $30  be  divided  between   them  ? 

8.  The  recent  3^  per  cent.  Canadian  loan  of  £5,000,000  was 
placed  in  London,  say  at  the  average  rate  of  £91  2s.  6d.  for  each  £100 ; 
if  the  proceeds  were  placed  in  Canada  by  drafts  on  London,  drawn  at 
the  average  rate  of  8-J  per  cent,  premium  (over  old  par  of  exchange), 
what  was  the  total  amount  in  Canadian  currency  realized  from  the 
loan? 

9.  Eeduce  $241,388.89  to  sterling  money  at  the  rate  of  8f  per 
cent,  premium. 

10.  The  time  occupied  between  the  drawing  of  a  3-days'  sight  draft 
on  London  and  its  payment,  is  fifteen  days  ;  of  a  60  days'  sight  draft, 
is  72  days;  the  current  bank  rate  of  interest  is  2  per  cent.  Which 
would  be  the  most  profitable  transaction  for  the  Government  of  Canada, 
to  sell  cables  or  immediate  payment  drafts,  for  £200,000  at  $4.85,  the 
same  amount  of  3-days'  sight  drafts  at  $4.  84J-,  or  at  the  same 
amount  of  60-days'  sight  drafts  at  $4.81  ? 


No.  7. 

PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 

November,  1884. 


BOOK-KEEPING. 

ffF  There  being  only  one  candidate  required  to  take  this  paper,  one  of  those  used  for 
options  at  a  former  examination  was  utilized. 


63 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  7. 
CIVIL  SEE  VICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION— OPTIONAL    SUBJECTS. 


Value. 


November,  1884. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

STENOGEAPHY  OE  SHOETHAND— (Half  an  hour.) 

Note. — The  examiner  in  charge  will  read  over  the  subjoined  extract  so  as  to  allow  the 
candidate  five  minutes  to  take  it  down,  and  he  will  stop  the  note-taking  to  the 
second.  The  rest  of  the  time  (twenty -five  minutes)  to  bs  given  for  transcribing 
the  notes. 

FOEEIGN  BEEADSTUFFS. 

The  amount  of  wheat  and  flour  reduced  to  wheat  afloat  to  Europe 
shows  an  increase"  of  155,000  quarters  or  1,240,000  bushels  as  compared 
with  a  week  ago,  and  a  decrease  of  55,000  quarters  or  440,000  bushels  as 
compared  with  the  corresponding  date  last  year.  The  amount  of  corn 
afloat  to  Europe  shows  a  decrease  of  10,000  quarters  as  compared  with  a 
week  ago,  and  a  decrease  of  115,000  quarters  as  compared  with  the  same 
date  a  year  ago.  The  markets  in  Europe  to-day  were  quiet,  and  while 
not  specifically  changed,  had  a  steadier  tone.  There  were  few  bids  in 
the  market  for  cargoes  of  wheat  off  coast,  and  on  passage  or  for  ship- 
ment they  were  steady.  Corn  cargoes  on  passage  were  firm.  Eed 
winter  wheat  was  cabled  at  33s.  3d.  to  33s.  6d,  off  coasts  and  for  prompt 
shipment  or  for  shipment  during  the  present  month  at  33s.  6d.  California 
wheat  off  coast  was  quoted  at  34s.  6d.  to  35s.  At  Liverpool  there  was 
no  change.  Wheat  was  steadily  held,  and  corn  quiet  but  steady.  Wheat 
in  London  during  the  past  week  has  sold  at  a  lower  price  than  at  any 
time  in  a  hundred  years. 

The  London  Shipping  Gazette  of  October  12  says  the  weather  has- 
been  very  dry  for  some  time,  and  the  ground  has  become  hard,  so  that 
farmers  find  it  difficult  to  break  it  up.  Some  rain,  which  it  seems  likely 
we  may  now  have,  is  much  needed,  and  will  do  a  great  deal  of  good. 
Where  the  wheat  has  been  got  in  a  good  seed  bed  has  been  secured,  and 
a  little  moisture  will  cause  it  soon  to  germinate.  There  has  been  a  fair 
supply  of  home-grown  wheat  in  the  provincial  markets,  for  which  hold- 
ers have  asked  rather  more  money,  but  it  has  been  difficult  to  obtain,  and 
the  trade  has  therefore  been  slow,  though  firm  ;  indeed,  values  have  run 
down  to  such  a  level  that  wheat  is  intrinsically  one  of  the  cheapest 
articles  in  the  trade.  For  foreign  descriptions  there  has  also  been  more 
steadiness,  especially  in  London  and  Australian  qualities;  and  though 
millers  are  reluctant  buyers,  an  advance  of  fully  a  shiling  has  been 
obtained  on  many  descriptions  to  what  they  were  recently  sold  for.  The 
imports  into  the  United  Kingdom  continue  on  a  large  scale,  though  last 
week  they  were  not  so  heavy  as  in  the  week  before  ;  and  the  returns  now 
publishing  of  the  stocks  in  the  various  ports  show  a  considerable  accumu- 
lation since  the  summer,  but  they  again  are  not  so  large  as  at  this  time 
last  year ;  but  the  cause  of  the  improved  feeling  is  the  impossibility  of 
replacing  a  sale  on  the  same  terms. 

64 


18  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Yalue. 


No.  8. 
CIVIL  SEEYICE  OP  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


November,  1884. 

PEECIS  WRITING  (One  Hour  and  a  Half). 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Rules  strictly. 

Summarize  the  two  following  articles,  giving  the  substance  within 
half  of  the  space  they  occupy,  or  less  than  half,  if  you  can,  without 
omitting  anything  important. 

PEESERVE  SOME  FOREST. 


50  1.  There  are  reasons  altogether  independent  of  the  rationalities  of 

commerce  for  the  preservation,  here  and  there,  of  some  remains  of  our 
once  wide,  extending  woodlands ;  though  money  may  seem  to  be  th© 
main  chance,  and  you  and  I,  and  our  neighbor  alongside,  ride  what 
hobbies  we  may — thoroughbreds  with  silver  plated  stirrups  or  broken 
down  cobs  with  a  wheat  sack  across  'em,  whether  they  trot  over  the 
road  merrily,  or  drag  wearily  along  the  way — have  the  oddest  aptitude, 
come  we  suddenly  to  a  by-road  where  the  Temple  of  Riches  glitters 
golden  in  the  distance,  to  jerk  the  smart  bridle  or  the  rope  yarn  sub- 
stitute in  that  direction,  and  away  we  all  go,  helter  skelter — il  and  the 
dust  that  those  fellows  are  kicking  up  there  in  front  is  choking  me,  Sir ; 
but  I'll  get  there  if  I  die  for  it,"  grunts  the  old  fellow  on  the  donkey  — 
as  if  the  devil  was  after  us,  indeed  he  is  said  to  be  close  behind  all  who 
travel  that  road. 

2.  It  is  the  way  of  the  world,  and  the  way  they  travel  in  it.  But 
suppose  we  leave  it,  and  rest  ourselves  on  this  retired  and  shaded 
eminence,  where — for  I  observe  you  to  be  a  person  of  discrimination 
and  taste- we  will  quietly  consider  the  effect  on  communities  of  the 
loss  of  their  forests. 

3.  Many  experiments  by  scientific  m«n  have  given  the  reason,  and 
many  histories  of  the  decadence  of  nations  have  added  examples,  that 
where  the  forest  is  recklessly  cleared  from  the  surface  of  the  land,  the 
springs  ceasetheir  accustomed  flow,  the  rivers  fail  in  their  courses,  the  rain 
no  longer  descends  at  its  wonted  fertilizing  periods,  and  the  parched  and 
arid  earth  demands  from  the  wearied  husbandman  a  double  labour  for  a 
scant  return.  While  the  forests  held  the  hills  of  Palestine,  her  valleys 
were  the  lands  flowing  with  milk  and  honey.  The  nations  whose  chariots 
were  of  iron,  must  have  given  many  a  million  of  good  trees  to  tho 
furnace.  Egypt,  in  her  freshness  must  have  been,  with  her  soil,  the 
home  of  forests  dense  and  huge  as  many  an  African  region  yet  can 
show.  Observe  the  effects  on  the  people  of  a  once  powerful  nation,  and 
compare  her  timid  and  sand-blind  race  of  to-day,  with  the  stout  fellows 
who  kept  Israel  in  thraldom  for  so  long.  By  the  way,  what  a  loss  they 
suffered*  in  not  having  some  of  our  institutions !  What  a  reverberating 
anti-Israelite  boom  might  not  have  arisen  among  the  native  artizans ; 
and  what  crushing  orations  might  not  Pharoah's  Loyal  Opposition  kave 
levelled  at  the  "  astonishing  and  inconceivable  imbecility  of  the  gentle- 
men on  the  Treasury  Benches,"  as  the  successive  plagues  appeared. 

65 
46a— 5 


4  ft  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


4.  Of  course  there  is  still  the  Nile,  and  still  the  kind  of  fertility  it 
gives.  But  think  of  the  past  of  that  whole  great  region  around- 
African  and  European — the  mighty  cities  buried  in  sand — the  waste 
countries  once  rich  in  forest  and  field — the  scant  populations — the  forlorn 
harbors  now.  Think  of  one  incident  of  that  past—the  thronging 
laborers — the  hosts  of  armed  men— the  concourse  of  ships  which  once 
were  there.     Eemember  Byron  : — 

"  A  king  sat  on  bis  rocky  brow 

Which  looks  o'er  sea-born  Salamis  ; 
And  thips,  by  thousands,  lay  below, 
And  men  in  nations — all  were  hie?" 

5.  Look  round  for  a  moment — and  tell  mo  what  you  could  do  without 
WOod  ?— your  cradle  is  of  wood— your  floor,  your  door,  your  roof— nay, 
your  every  convenience— your  carriages,  yoar  stables,  your  sidewalks, 
your  counters,  your  furniture,  your  wharves,  your  shipping— it  is  wood 

it  is  forest.     Carry  then  your  mind  back  to  that  time  gone  by,  and 

think  of  the  concourse,  "flashing  with  steel  and  rough  with  gold,"  extend- 
ing right  and  left  to  the  distant  horizon,  bounded  in  front  by  the  blue  and 
rocking  waves  on  which  rose  and  sank  the  anchored  navies — the  myriad 
galleys -singly —doubly —trebly,  banked  with  oars— which  Xerxes  must 
have' viewed.  Consider  what  it  betokened— that  these  myriads  poured 
to  the  call  of  the  Emperor  from  forested  regions,  for  only  such  could  have 
supported  them— only  such  could  have  afforded  the  many  munitions 
necessary  to  each  a  host.  But  now  what  are  the  regions  which  then 
maintained  and  sent  them  ?— a  wilderness  of  soil,  partly  sterile,  and  of 
sandy  desert  wholly  so.  This  change  has  been  caused  by  the  destruction 
of  the  forests  which  maintained  the  life-giving  moisture  in  those  lands. 

6.  It  is  the  lesson  of  history.  Yet  nations,  it  is  said,  never  learn.  But, 
let  me  remark,  all  the  statement  declares  is  that  tha  nations  never  did 
learn.  But  shall  they  never?  Shall  you,  my  dear  Sir,  with  the  full  light 
of  modern  knowledge  beatiog  brightly  on  every  side— with  fiee  schools 
dotting  the  country  as  thick  as  mushrooms— with  great  colleges  anxious 
to  educate  you  by  State-aid,  and  denominational  colleges  extremely 
anxious  to  educate  you  likewise— with  learned  institutes  haranguing  you 
on  everything  from  catfish  upwards— with  free  libraries  also  emerging 
from  the  mist— shall  you,  uncompeiied,  follow,  where  your  ancestors,  by 
the  compulsion  of  ignorance,  were  led  ? 

7.  The  country  judge  wrote  to  his  bookseller,  "  Pleeze  send  me  the 
ax  of  a^ustus  pease/'  4'No  doubt,"  says  the  commentator,  "  when  the 
learned  justice  had  possessed  himself  of  the  axe,  he  hewed  the  laws  with 
it  to  some  purpose."  Not  to  a  more  reckless  purpose  than  we  on  our 
trees.  We  came  to  Canada,  like  the  ancient  Bersekars,  with  our  axes  on 
our  shoulders ;  and  like  the  enemies  of  those  heroes,  the  great  forest 
appears  to  have  fled  before  our  faces  across  the  length  and  breadth  of  the 
land,  till  over  great  sections  the  ground  is  almost  bare,  save  where,  in 
low  places  and  inaccessible  valleys,  patches  of  woodland  hide  themselves, 
their  topmost  branches  seeming  to  look  shiveringly  over  the  edge  in 
remembrance  of  the  desolating  storm  that  has  passed  them  by. 

All  Oiitario,  luckily,  is  not  yet  thus.  Every  here  and  there,  the 
farmer  holds  ten,  twenty,  forty  goodly  acres  of  the  ancient  forest.  But 
they  are  not  continuing  to  hold  them.  > 

8.  The  Ontario  Government  have  commenced  a  movement  in  torest 
preservation  which  is  destined  to  bear  good  fruits.  But  throughout 
settled  Ontario  it  needs  the  farmer's  co  operation,  for  he  holds  the  torest 
remainder.  In  all  directions  that  remainder  decreases.  The  axe,  which 
once  thinned,  now  extirpates.     It  is  full  time  that,  on  ten  or  twenty  acres 


Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.    46.) 


A.  1885 


of  every  farm,  the  chopper  should  stay  his  hand.  But  we  must  do  more 
— he  must  exclude  his  beasts;  where  hoof  and  horn  range,  down  go 
undergrowth  and  sapling— in  a  moment,  before  their  placidly  devouring 
jaws, .  vanishes  the  umbrageous  wealth  of  flexile  branch  and  delicately, 
pencilled  leaf— gone  is  the  promise  of  hardy  timber  yet  to  come. 
The  little  youngling  elm,  his  green  and  double  leaf  fresh  spring- 
ing from  the  soil— the  infant  cotyledon  of  the  future  oak — the 
maple  bud  and  the  sprouting  ash  are  no  more;  and  from 
tree  to  tree,  is  nothing  but  trampled  leaves.  The  forest  ground 
dries  and  shrinks;  far  above,  the  giant  masses  of  the  upper  foliage  alone 
oppose  the  rushing  wind  ;  the  undergrowth  below — the  natural  barrier  — 
is  gone ;  the  air  sweeps  through ;  some  stormy  morning  the  outward 
ranks  are  prone— the  beech  and  the  great  oak  lies  across ;  with  the  next 
tempest  more  will  follow.  Our  enemies  are  tho3e  of  our  own  stables ;  and 
our  farmers  may  say,  "  With  the  jaw  bone  of  an  ox,  heaps  upon  heaps 
have  I  slain  a  thousand  trees." 

9.  On  every  farm  some  forest  is  needed  to  break  the  winter  winds. 
It  is  needed  to  keep  level  the  drifting  snow.  It  is  needed  for  pleasure ;  he 
who  has  near  his  house  a  forest  walk  of  his  own,  where  he  may  for  a 
space  enjoy  the  health-giving  atmosphere,  and 

"  Under  the  shade  of  melancholy  bocghs 
Lose  and  neglect  the  creeping  hours  of  time," 

has  opportunities  many  would  give  much  for.  It  is  needed  to  aid  procuring 
rain  in  due  season.  It  is  needed  as  a  store  house  of  timber — soon  likely 
to  be  full  scarce  throughout  the  land. 

10.  We  found  here  the  wood— the  water— the  fertile  soil.  It  is  cer- 
tain that  the  deforesting  of  a  country  in  process  of  time  does  more  than 
withdraw  the  one ;  it  greatly  impairs  the  others,  eo  much  that  the  land 
may  not^then  support  one-tenth  of  those  it  now  could  maintain.  Proprietors, 
should  remember  that  no  one  can  possess  a  title  to  destroy  the  useful- 
ness of  the  soil,  lest  "the  land  cry  out  against  him,  and  the  furrows 
thereof  likewise  complain."  The  vast  concourse  of  humanity  continually 
emerges  from  the  unknown  past ;  it  travels  toilsomely  by ;  it  passes  mto 
the  clouds  of  the  future.  Be  sure  that  there  we  shall  meet  with  stern 
questioners ;  nor  will  those  pass  unchallenged  who  have,  to  serve  their 
temporary  greed,  rendered  pairful,  sterile  and  barren,  the  path  of  gener- 
ations yet  to  follow. 

THE  TOWN  OF  KHARTOUM. 


46a- 


1.  The  following  description  of  Khartoum  is  taken  from  some  notes 
by  Lieut.-Col.  Stewart,  in  February,  1883,  on  the  town,  its  population, 
position,  manufactures,  trade  and  education : — The  town  of  Khartoum, 
the  capital  of  the  Soudan,  and  chief  trade  emporium  for  tho  whole  country, 
is  built  on  a  barren,  stoneless,  wide  plain,  on  the  western  bank  of  tha 
Blue  Nile,  and  about  a  mile  above  its  junction  with  the  White  Nile.  Its 
river  frontage  is  about  one  and  a  half  miles  ;  its  depth  inward  from  the 
river  about  a  mile.  As  its  site  is  somewhat  lower  than  the  point  reached 
by  both  rivers  when  in  flood,  a  dike  fifteen  to  twenty  feet  in  height  has. 
been  made  along  the  banks  of  tho  Blue  Nile,  and  another,  somewhat 
lower,  immediately  at  the  back  of  the  town,  to  protect  it  against  the 
overflow  of  the  White  Nile.  When  at  their  lowest  point  both  stream* 
are  from  six  hundred  to  eight  hundred  yards  in  width,  and  have  several 
islands,  which  are  cultivated.  The  White  Nile  is  unfordable,  except  in 
one  or  two  places  iar  up  the  river,  but  the  Blue  can  be  forded  in  many 
places  above  the  town.     When   in  flood  the  White  Nile  increases  its, 

m 
5i 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


width  to  a  very  great  extent,  but  not  so  the  Blue  Nile,  as  its  banks  are 
much  steeper.  Around  Khartoum  are  several  small  villages.  Both  above 
and  below  the  town  are  small  plantations  of  date  palms  and  plantains, 
also  a  number  of  vegetable  gardens.  According  to  an  old  custom  or  privi- 
lege, none  of  those  gardens  pay  any  taxes ;  with  the  exception  of  the 
river  banks  the  conn  try  is  bare  and  treeless. 

2.  During  the  hot  season,  which  lasts  from  the  beginning  of  April 
till  the  middle  of  November,  the  heat  is  severe,  averaging  from  90  to  95- 
degrees  Fahrenheit.  The  rains  generally  begin  about  the  middle  of  July, 
and  last  till  September.  They  are,  however,  said  to  bo  very  irregular, 
and  sometimes  there  is  little  or  no  rainfall.  In  the  rainy  season  the  bar* 
ren  ground  stretching  between  the  two  rivers  is  covered  with  grass, 
affording  very  good  pasture.  The  rivers  begin  to  rise  on  the  1st  of  June, 
and  reach  their  highest  point,  about  the  beginning  of  September.  They 
remain  stationary  at  that  point  till  the  15th,  and  then  begin  to  fall.^  The 
cold  weather  begins  about  the  middle  of  December,  and  lasts  till  the 
middle  of  February.  From  November  to  March  high  north  winds  prevail, 
and  during  the  remainder  of  the  year  south.  In  winter,  the  thermometer 
sometimes  goes  down  as  low  as  46  degrees  Fahrenheit;  except  in  the 
regular  rainy  season  there  is  no  rain.  The  unhealthy  season  is  during 
the  months  of  June,  July,  October,  November,  when  typhoid  fevers  and 
dysentery  are  prevalent.    The  winter  is  the  healthy  season. 

3.  The  resident  population  is  generally  estimated  at  from  50,000  to 
55  000  souls,  of  which  two-thirds  are  slaves.  There  is  also  a  floating 
population,  estimated  at  from  1,500  to  2,000  souls  and  consisting  of 
Europeans,  Syrians,  Copts,  Turks,  Albanians,  and  a  few  Jews.  The  free 
resident  population  are  mostly  Malhass,  or  aborigines ;  Dongolawees, 
from  Dongola ;  Shaghiyes,  from  a  district  along  the  Nile,  north  of  Khar- 
toum, and  Kubatat,  a  district  north  of  Berber.  The  slaves  belong  mostlyr 
•to  the  Nuba,  Dinka,  Shulook,  Berta,  and  other  negro  tribes.  Both  the 
free  population  and  the  slaves  are  Mohammedans,  of  the  Maliki  school  of 
divinity,  and  are  followers  of  either  the  Kufai,  Kadri,  Hamdi,  or  Saadi 
sect  of  dervishes.  They  are  very  superstitious.  Their  political  creed  is 
to  side  with  whichever  side  is  the  strongest.  The  free  inhabitants  are 
mostly  engaged  in  trade  or  commerce,  and  the  slaves  in  agriculture,  or 
else  hired  out  as  daily  laborers  by  their  masters.  But  few  are  employed 
as  domestic  servants.  It  is  said  that  a  master  always  makes  a  point  of  j 
marrying  his  slave  as  soon  as  possible,  partly  to  attach  him  to  the  place, 
and  partly  from  the  profits  he  will  derive  from  the  children.  It  is  also 
reported  that  slaves  born  in  the  country  improve  greatly  in  appearance 
as  compared  with  the  parent  stock.  Of  the  floating  population,  the  Copts 
are  mostly  employed  in  Government  service  or  trade.  The  Turks, 
Albanians,  &c,  are  generally  irregular  soldiers  or  loafers.  The  European 
element  is  represented  by  about  one  hundred  individuals,  mostly  Greeks. 
There  are  also  some  Italians,  French,  Austrians  and  Germans.  The  chief 
export  and  import  trade  is  in  the  hands  of  the   Europeans,  Copts,   and- 

Syrians.  ,  ■  ,      - 

4.  Except  the  manufacture  of  mats,  cotton  cloths,  a  rope  made  of 
palm  ieaves*,  and  some  filigree  silver-work,  there  is  no  manufacture  worth 
speaking  of.  The  bazaar  is  of  considerable  size,  and  is  tolerably  well  sup- 
plied with  Manchester  goods,  cheap  cutlery,  &c.  The  export  and  import 
trade  is  considerable,  and,  besides  numerous  caravans,  is  said  to  employ 
over  three  hundred  boats  of  various  size.  A' considerable  trade  in  gram 
is  also  carried  on  with  Senaar  and  Karkotsch.  These  districts  are 
practically  the  granaries  of  the  Soudan. 

5.  In  shape  the  town  is  very  irregular.  Its  appearance  is  also  poor 
and  miserable.    Except  the  Government  House  and  one  or  two  other 

68 


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A.  1885 


buildings,  there  is  hardly  a  house  worthy  of  the  name.  The  houses  are 
mostly  built  of  sun-dried  brick,  generally  without  an  upper  story,  and 
nearly  all  surrounded  by  court-yards  with  sand  walls.  To  prevent  these 
houses  crumbling  away  during'the  rains  they  are  every  year  plastered 
over  with  dung  before  the  rainy  season  commences.  This  plastering 
process  is  doubtless  the  cause  of  a  good  deal  of  illness.  As  the  town  is 
low,  there  is  no  drainage,  and  the  consequence  is  that  during  the  rains 
the  whole  place  is  deep  in  water,  and  it  is  almost  impossible  to  move  about. 
As  there  is  no  stone  throughout  the  whole  district,  the  streets  are  full  of 
dust  during  the  summer  and  mud  during  the  rains.  The  chief  buildings- 
are :  (1)  Government  house  and  offices,  large  brick  buildings  on  the  banks: 
of  the  Blue  Nile;  (2)  arsenal,  with  smithy,  carpenter's  shop,  smelting 
furnaces,  stoves,  &c. ;  attached  to  this  arsenal,  are  fourteen  steamers  for 
the  navigation  of  the  rivers,  and  also  boats  of  various  kinds ;  (3)  a  large 
commodious  hospital  built  by  Col.  Gordon;  (4)  a  mosque  or  j ami  built 
by  Khurshid  Pasha;  (5)  a  sibil  or  small  mosque,  provided  with  a  well, 
and  some  rooms  for  the  convenience  of  travellers  and  poor  people;  (6)  a 
large  barrack  of  mud  without  an  upper  story,  and  large  barrack  square ; 
(7)  powder  magazine  and  workshop  for  the  re-filling  of  cartridges;  (8) 
a  large  Roman  Catholic  missionary  building,  established  in  1848 ;  stone 
building,  with  garden,  church,  &c. ;  (9)  a  small  Coptic  church. 

6  As  to  the  attitude  of  the  population,  Lieut.-Col.  Stewart  wrote  on 
16th  January,  1883:  Of  the  50,000  or  55,000  inhabitants  (including 
30,000  slaves)  of  Khartoum,  if  I  am  to  believe  what  I  hear,  1  must  con- 
siderthe  majority  as  unfriendly  to  the  Government.  I  have  been  assured 
that  many  Government  employees,  and  nearly  all  the  native  traders,  are 
secret  partisans  of  the  Mahdi,  in  hopes  that  he  will  re-establish  the  slave 
trade.  It  is  questionable  how  far  these  statements  are  justified,  but  per- 
haps I  shall  not  be  far  from  the  truth  in  saying,  that  the  majority  wilt 
.take  whichever  side  they  see  is  the  strongest. 


Value. 


50 


No.  9. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION    ON   OPTIONAL    SUBJECTS. 

November,  1884. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Begulations  strictly. 

TELEGRAPHY. 

To  be  tested  by  a  competent  operator,  who  will  send  the  report  to  the  Secretary  at 
Ottawa,  showing  the  value  of  the  work,  50  being  the  maximum  for  transmuting 
and  the  same  for  receiving. 


Transmit  the  following 


STOCKS. 


The  market  was  fairly  active  and  irregular  in  New  York,  with  a 
weak  undertone.  The  story  at  the  board  is  that  Vanderbilt  has  about 
$17,000,000  of  West  Shore  railway  bonds,  which  were  bought  for  him 
a  long  time  ago  by  Osborn,  formerly  President  of  the  Illinois  Central, 
besides  an  additional  amount  of  those  bought  through  other  people. 
There  are  rumours  also  that  large  capitalists  are  interested  in  a  scheme 
to  stop  the  cutting  of  rates  of  the  West  Shore  Company.    The  majority 


48  Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.     46.) 


A.  1885 


of  the  traders  say  that  they  are  generally  operating  mainly  upon  the 
long  side,  buying  stocks  on  the  slumps  and  realizing  on  the  moderate 
rallies.  Brokers  agree  that  the  market  shows  a  strong  undertone,  con- 
sidering the  general  dullness  in  business  circles.  It  is  said  that  Gould 
has  been  a  very  heavy  repurchaser  this  week  of  Western  Union  sold  at 
higher  figures  last  week.  There  is  now  a  short  interest  in  it  of  about 
30,000  shares.  The  street  is  quite  bullish  on  Jersey  Central,  which 
they  claim  is  selling  below  what  it  is  worth.  Strong  parties  are  buying 
St.  Paul  and  North-West  on  the  reactions  on  scale  orders,  and  it  is  said 
the  troubles  westward  are  less  serious  than  is  reported. 


Value. 


50 


Receive  the  following : — 

Referring  to  the  recent  advances  in  the  Bank  of  England  discount 
rate,  the  London  Times  of  10th  instant  says : — "  Were  it  not  for  the 
necessity  of  protecting  the  stock  of  bullion  from  a  too  rapid  foreign  drain 
there  would  have  been  no  reason  for  raising  the  rate,  as  there  is  hardly 
any  demand  for  money.  The  market,  however,  cannot  help  the  bank 
in  the  matter,  for  though  the  big  bill  brokers  and  discount  houses  would 
willingly  aid  it  in  keeping  up  the  value  of  money,  they  cannot  prevent 
the  smaller  brokers,  who  must  do  business  in  order  to  exist,  from  under- 
bidding them  and  one  another  in  the  bill  market.  It  is  possible,  of 
course,  that  the  present  market  rate  will  suffice  to  prevent  the  foreign 
drain  from  carrying  off  tco  much  gold  from  the  bank,  but  the  reserve 
has  been  allowed  to  get  too  low  to  make  this  a  certainty.  Of  course,  if 
the  drain  increases  and  the  open  market  gives  way,  the  bank  directors 
will  have  to  take  measures  to  check  both  movements  by  selling  consols, 
thus  sweeping  the  market  bare  of  money  and  making  their  rate  the 
real  rate." 


"DUTIES"  PAPERS  USED  AT  THE  NOVEMBER  (1884)  PROMO- 
TION EXAMINATION.  SUPPLIED  BY  THE  DEPUTY  HEADS* 
OF  THE  DEPARTMENTS  NAMED. 


CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


Value. 


DEPARTMENT  OF  MILITIA  AND  DEFENCE. 


(Store   Branch.) 


First  series  of  questions  : 


1.  Name  existing  Act  under  which  the  militia  of  the  Dominion  i* 
governed. 

2.  What  gives  statutory  effect  to  regulations  and  orders  issued; 
under  the  Act  ? 

3.  How  many  military  districts  are  ther*  ? 

4.  In  what  Provinces  are  they  severally  situated  ? 

5.  What  are  the  territorial  limits  of  Military  District  No.  10  ? 

6.  In  what  Provinces  are  the  brigade  divisions  ? 

7.  Name  the  hoad-quarters  of  the  several  military  districts. 

8.  What  district  staff  officers  are  there?  and  what  store  staff  officer 
is  stationed  in  the  district?  (give  the  office  only.) 

70 


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Sessional  Papers  (iNo.  46*) 


K.  1885 


9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
rank? 


How  is  the  militia  divided  ? 

How  is  the  land  force  divided  ? 

How  is  the  marine  force  divided  ? 

Of  what  is  the  active  militia  composed  ? 

Of  what  is  the  reserve  militia  composed  ? 

What  qualifies  an  active  militia  company  officer  for  substantive 


15.  What  qualifies  an  active  field  officer  for  substantive  rank  ? 

16.  What  is  the  limit  of  age  under  which  no  one  should  be  appointed 
an  officer  ? 

17.  What  is  the  limit  oi  age  over  which  no  one  can  he  promoted  or 
appointed  Lieutenant-Colonel  in  the  active  militia  ? 

18.  When  an  officer  qualifies  by  obtaining  a  certificate,  from  what 
date  does  he  take  rank? 

19.  What  is  the  rule  with  respect  to  the  value  of  old  certificates 
held  by  persons  not  officers,  but  recommended  for  appointment  ? 

20.  How  do  newly  appointed  officers  having  substantive  rank  stand 
with  respect  to  command  with  officers  of  the  same  grade  previously 
appointed,  but  holding  only  "  provisional  "  rank  ? 

21.  Under  what  authority  do  the  superintendents  of  stores  issue 
stores  ? 

22.  Under  what  authority  do  they  receive  articles  in  the  stores  ? 

23.  In  transferring  stores  from  one  district  to  another,  what  docu- 
ments are  required  ? 

24.  How  may  ammunition  (small-arm)  be  obtained,  at  the  various 
stations,  on  re-payment  ? 

25.  Before  clothing  is  issued  to  a  corps,  what  channel  must  the 
requisition  pass  through  ? 

26.  Under  what  authority  are  stores  ordered  to  issue  ? 

27.  To  what  officer  are  officers  in  charge  of  stores  at  out-stations 
directly  responsible  ? 

28.  In  "what  manner  is  the  inspection  of  clothing  and  stores  carried 

out? 

29.  When  stores  are  supplied  by  local  contractors,  what  proceedings 

are  observed  ? 

30.  What  are  the  duties  of  superintendents  of  stores,  and  what  books 
do  they  keep  ?  What  returns  are  they  required  to  submit  to  headquar- 
ters ?     Describe  the  books  and  forms  of  returns. 

31.  What  special  buildings  are  in  their  charge  ? 

32.  When  do  boards  of  survey  assemble  in  each  military  district  ; 
and  what  officers  compose  such  boards  ? 

33.  What  are  the  duties  of  boards  of  survey  ? 

34.  Whose  duty  is  it  to  fix  the  day  of  assembly  of  the  boards  of 

survey  ? 

£5.  When   do  boards  of  officers  for  inspection  of  barracks,  stores, 

&c,  assemble  ? 

36.  Name  the  officer  required  by  regulations  and  orders  to  com- 
pose  such  boards. 

37.  What  steps  are  required  to  be  taken  with  cases  of  inspection  of 
repairable  and  unserviceable  stores  in  possession  of  corps  ? 

38.  What  steps  are  to  be  taken  with  cases  of  obsolete  or  unservice- 
able stores  ? 

39.  What  is  the  duty  of  the  superintendent  of  stores  in  connec- 
tion with  these  boards  of  survey  ? 

40.  When  stores  are  required  to  be  purchased  at  the  several  sta- 
tions, or  any  service  involving  expenditure,  what  form  should  b© 
observed  by  the  local  officer  concerned  ? 

71 


48  Victoria. 


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A.  1885 


2  41.  In  what  manner  is  the  public  credited  with  the  value  of  stores 

[  issued  on  repayment  ?  or  the  rents  of  militia  properties  paid  ? 
2  42.  What  officers   are  authorized  to  sign  transport  requisition  for 

stores  ? 

43.  When  transfer  of  the  charge  of  stores  from  one  superintendent 
to  another  takes  place,  what  proceedings  are  required  to  be  observed  ? 

44.  When   a  transfer  of  stores  from  one  commanding  officer  to 
another  takes  place,  what  form  is  to  be  observed  ? 

45.  Upon  what  report  are  the  claims  for  deficiencies  in  the  case 
of  transfer  to  be  made  out  ? 

46.  At  what  periods  are  returns  required  to  be  furnished  for  the 
district  stores  and  military  educational  establishments  ? 


100 

Value. 


10 

15 

10 

10 

10 
15 

15 

15 


100 


Second  series  of  questions  : 

47.  What  number  of  buttons  would  be  required  for  565  tunics, 
alio  tying  two  buttons  for  the  back,  two  for  each  sleeve,  and  fifteen  for 
the  front  of  each  tunic  ?  and  what  would  be  the  cost  of  the  buttons  at 
12J  cents  per  dozen  ? 

48.  Allowing  one  pound  beef,  one  and  a-half  pound  bread,  one- 
quarter  ounce  tea,  one-third  ounce  coffee,  two  ounces  sugar  for  a  ration, 
how  many  pounds  of  each  would  be  required  to  supply  479  rations  ? 

49.  What  would  be  the  cost  of  transport  of  583  men  over  670  miles 
of  road  at  1 J  cent  per  mile  for  each  man  ? 

50.  Convert  £374  8s.  9d.  sterling  into  dollars  at  the  legal  rate  of 
exchange. 

51.  Convert  $1,275.50  into  sterling  at  the  legal  rates  of  exchange. 

52.  Divide  $900  amongst  A,  B,  C,  so  that  B  may  get  twice  as 
much  as  A,  and  C  twice  as  much  as  B. 

53.  What  amount  must  an  agent  collect  in  order  to  pay  over  $1,000 
after  retaining  8J  per  cent,  for  collection  ? 

54.  A  debt,  after  a  deduction  of  3  per  cent.,  becomes  $194,  what 
would  it  have  been  after  a  deduction  of  4  per  cent  ? 


DEPARTMENT  OF  AGRICULTURE. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


CONSTITUTION  OF  THE  DEPARTMENT. 

(I.)  By  what  Act  is  the  Department  of  Agriculture  constituted;  and  in  what  year 
was  it  passed  ? 

(2.)  Can  you  enumerate  the  several  functions  of  the  Department  of  Agriculture 
under  that  Act  ? 

(3.)  Into  what  branches  is  the  Department  of  Agriculture  divided  to  carry  into 
effect  its  functions  ? 

(4.)  Under  what  Act,  and  when  passed,  is  the  Immigration  Board  of  the  Depart-   r 
ment  administered  ? 

i        (6.)  The  subject  of  immigration  being  joint  between  the  Dominion  and  the  Prov- 
nces  under  the  British  North  America  Act,  can  you  state  what  is  the  nature  of  the 
duties  as  respects  immigration  which  pertain  to  the  Dominion  Government,  and  also 
to  the  Provincial  Governments  ? 

72 


48  Victoria,  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


(6.)  Can  you  state  in  what  manner  and  when  these  duties  came  to  be  agreed 
qipon  between  the  Dominion  Government  and  the  Provinces?  m  # 

(7  )  Can  you  describe  the  system  of  immigration  agencies  within  the  Dominion 
and  in  the  United  Kingdom  and  Europe,  and  give  generally  the  duties  of  agents? 

(8.)  Under  what  Acts  are  quarantine  and  public  health  administered  by  the 

^To  )  Can  you  say  at  what  ports  there  are  regular  quarantine  stations,  and  under 
what  regulations  quarantine  is  administered,  and  by  what  officers  at  those  porta 
where  there  are  no  quarantine  stations  ? 

CIO.)  What  are  cattle  quarantines,  and  how  are  they  administered  / 

(11  )  How  long  are  Deat  cattle  from  the  United  Kingdo  otf  detained  in  quarantine, 
and  on  what  conditions  are  cattle  admitted  to  the  old  Provinces  of  Canada  from  the 
United  States,  for  transit  or  otherwise.  . 

( 12.)  What  are  the  conditions  of  admitting  cattle  from  the  United  States  or  Terri- 
tories into  Manitoba  and  the  North- West  ? 

(13.)  On  what  condition  are  swine  from  the  United  States  admitted  into  the  old 
Provinces  of  Canada  ? 


DEPARTMENTAL   DUTIES. 


(1.)  Could  you  state  generally  about  how  many  letters  are  received  by  the 
Department  of  Agriculture  in  one  month? 

(2.)  Apart  from  the  distribution  of  these  letters,  which  are  specially  addressed 
to  the  several  branches,  if  you  had  to  deal  with  those  which  came  m  one  day, 
addressed  to  the  Minister  or  Secretary,  how  would  you  proceed  to  dispose  of  them? 

(3.)  In  the  case  of  those  letters  which  come  from  other  Departments  and  are 
marked  respectively,  "  Eeferred  "  and  "  Transferred,"  can  you  say  what  is  the  dis- 
tinctive conventional  meaning  attached  lo  these  terms  ?  m 

(4.)  Could  you  briefly  describe  the  system  of  filing  and  indexing  practised  by  the 
Department  of  Agriculture  in  the  general  correspondence  branch. 

(5.)  Could  you  give  the  names  of  the  immigration  agents  of  the  Department, 
and  also  the  names  of  the  quarantine  officers  and  veterinary  inspectors  ? 

(6.)  If  a  ship  were  reported  to  arrive  with  contagious  sickness  on  board,  at  a 
port  which  is  not  a  quarantine  station,  what  step  would  be  taken  ? 

(/.)  What  course  would  be  pursued  at  the  regular  quarantine  stations  in  case  ot 
a  vessel  arriving  with  contagious  disease  on  board  ? 

(8.)  If  an  application  should  be  made  to  admit  cattle  from  the  United  States,  at 
Prescott  or  the  Suspension  Bridge,  what  answer  would  you  give  ? 

(9.)  If  an  application  were  made  to  admit  sheep  at  those  ports,  what  answer 
would  you  give  ?  .  o 

(10.)  And  what  answer,  if  an  application  were  made  to  admit  swine  t  #  m 

(11.)  Could  you  say  what  steps  are  taken  for  protection  of  immigrants  arriving: 

in  Canada?  ,     .  T 

(12.)  Also,  what  is  done  to  guide  them  to  places  were  they  can  obtain  employ- 
ment ?  , 

(13.)  At  what  point  or  period,  after  arrival,  is  an  immigrant  supposed  to  pass 
from  the  care  of  the  Dominion  Government,  and  to  come  under  that  of  the  Provincial  I 

(14.)  Can  you  state  the  circumstances,  or  upon  what  principle  the  Dominion 
Government  gives  assistance  in  meals  or  transport  to  immigrants  after  their  arrival* 
and  how  long  has  this  system  continued  ? 

(15.)  What  classes  of  immigrants  does  the  Department  invite  to  come  to  Oanaoa, 
and  to  what  classes  does  it  give  cautions  ? 


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48  Victoria. 


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A.  1885 


DEPARTMENT  OF  THE  SECRETARY  OF  STATE. 


Value. 


PAPER  FOR  CANDIDATES   FROM   SECOND  TO   FIRST   CLASS. 

1.  State  what  are  the  duties  of  the  Queen's  Printer  ? 

2.  How  is  work  received,  checked  and  distributed,  and  the 
accounts  of  the  contractors  therefor  audited  ? 

3.  How  are  the  accounts  against  the  Departments  for  sums  so  paid 
charged  against  the  Depa)  tments,  the  accounts  rendered,  and  the  Queen's 
Printer  credited  therefor  ? 

4.  Give  similar  explanations  respecting  procuring  the  issue  of  the 
statutes,  the  Canada  Gazette  and  the  Government  advertising,  and  the 
securing  payment  and  passing  accounts  for  such? 

5.  What  are  the  kinds  of  type  and  paper  used  for  the  statutes 
and  for  the  Canada  Gazette  ? 

6.  What  are  the  kinds  of  type  most  in  use  for  Departmental  book 
and  job  work  ?  And  what  kinds  of  paper  ?  Give  make  and  sizes — the 
latter  from  the  smallest  to  the  largest  ? 

7.  Will  you  state  the  difference  between  plain  and  other  composi- 
tion, in  charging  and  auditing  printing  work  ? 

8.  What  difference  should  there  be  between  the  price  of  a  form 
with  a  heading  and  printer's  rules  to  the  bottom  of  the  page,  and  faint 
lining  or  ruling  instead  of  them  ? 

9.  Also,  how  should  a  form  be  measured  with  a  printed  heading,  a 
large  blank  and  printing  again  at  the  foot  ?  Why  should  the  blank 
space  be  measured  or  left  out  ? 

10.  What  is  the  difference  in  charge  for  printing  in  one  or  in  two 
or  more  colors,  and  why  ? 

11.  In  case  several  kinds  of  type  are  used  in  a  form  or  page,  how 
should  it  be  measured  ? 

12.  How  is  machine  ruling  calculated  ? 

13.  What  is  a  strike  and  stop ;  and  how  did  it  and  does  it  now  affect 
the  price  of  work  ? 

i3.  What  are  the  different  successive  operations  in  binding  a  book, 
after  the  reception  of  the  sheets  from  the  printer  ? 

15.  What  are  the  different  leathers  in  general  use  for  blank  books  ? 

16.  For  letter-press  binding  state  them  in  order  of  their  value  ? 


QUESTIONS  TO  BE  SUBSTITUTED  FOR  2,  3  AND  5  IN  EXAMINATION  PAPER 
ON  OFFICE  DUTIES  FOR  PROMOTION  TO  FIRST  CLASS  IN  THE  QUEEN'S 
PRINTER'S   OFFICE. 


20 

8 


2.  Please  measure  and  make  up  account  on  vouchers  marked  A, 
herewith. 

5.  Please  measure  and  make  up  account  on  vouchers  marked  C 
herewith. 


OFFICE  DUTIES — QUEEN'S  PRINTER'S  OFFICE,  FOR  PROMOTION  TO  SECOND  CLASS. 

1.  State  the  duties  of  the  Queen's  Printer  under  statute  and  Orders  in  Council. 

2.  By  what  means  are  the  printing  and  binding  work  for  the  several  Depart- 
ments of  the  Government  obtained,  and  the  paper  for  them  ? 

3.  How  are  requisitions  for  work  and  paper,  issued  by  the^Departments,  entered 
and  re-issued  by  the  Queen's  Printer  ? 

4.  How  is  worked  received,  checked  and  distributed,  and  the  accounts  of  the 
contractors  therefor  audited  ? 

n 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


5.  How  are  the  contractors  paid  ? 

6.  How  are  the  accounts  against  the  Departments  for  sums  so  paid  charged  up 
against  the  Departments,  the  accounts  rendered  and  the  Queen's  Printer  credited 
therefor  ? 

7.  Give  similar  explanations  respecting  the  printing,  issue  and  distribution  of 
the  statutes  and  the  Canada  Gazette  f 

8.  How  is  Government  advertising  issued  to  the  newspapers,  how  accounted  and 
paid  for  ? 

9.  What  are  the  kinds  of  type  and  paper  used  for  the  statutes  ?  For  the  Canada 
Gazette  ? 

10.  What  kinds  of  type  are  in  most  general  use  for  Departmental  book  and  job 
work  ? 

11.  What  kinds  of  paper— size,  surface,  color  and  make  ?  Sizes  from  smallest 
to  largest  ? 

12.  For  the  purpose  of  charging  up,  how  many  kir*  of  composition  are 
recognized,  and  what  difference  in  price? 

13.  In  how  many  forms  are  the  Acts  of  Parliament  printed  for  sale  and 
distribution  ? 

14.  How  are  they  bound  ?  State  varieties  of  binding  and  method  of  division  into 
volumes. 

15.  State,  as  nearly  as  you  can  from  memory,  the  official  persons  or  bodies 
entitled  to  receive  them  ? 


DEPARTMENT  OF  CUSTOMS. 


QUESTIONS  TO  BE  ASKED  CANDIDATES  FOR  PROMOTION  IN  THE  CUSTOMS  DEPARTMENT. 

1.  In  eases  where  there  has  been  no  decision  as  to  what  rate  of  duty  shall  be 
payable  upon  particular  goods,  and  a  dispute  arises,  who  shall  declare  the  proper 
rate  or  duty  payable,  if  any,  on  the  kind  of  goods  in  question  ? 

2.  By  what  means  shall  such  decision  be  made  public  ? 

3.  Can  duties  be  paid  by  means  of  sterling  silver  coin,  or  American  trade 
dollar  ;  if  not,  why  not  ? 

4.  In  what  currency  shall  invoices  of  goods  imported  be  made  out  ? 

5.  In  case  no  standard  value  has  been  fixed  by  proper  authority  for  any  currency, 
what  certificate  of  comparative  value  shall  be  required  to  be  attached  to  the  invoice 
presented  for  duty  ? 

6.  Of  what  fund  shall  moneys  received  from  Customs  duties  form  a  part  ? 

7.  Is  there  any  limit  as  to  the  time  within  which  a  debt  to  the  Crown,  for  the 
true  amount  of  Customs  duties  payable,  can  be  recovered  ? 

8.  If  bulk  be  broken,  contrary  to  the  Customs  Act  of  1883,  what  sum  shall  be 
forfeited  by  the  master  of  a  vessel  so  offending  ? 

9.  At  what  points  must  all  goods  imported  into  Canada  be  brought  in  ? 

10.  If  a  vessel  of  less  value  than  $800,  with  dutiable  goods  on  board,  entered 
any  place  other  than  a  port  of  entry  (except  in  cases  specially  provided  for),  what 
is  the  penalty  involved  as  regards  such  vessel  ? 

11.  In  the  case  of  a  vessel  worth  more  than  $800,  guilty  of  the  offence  above 
mentioned,  what  penalty  shall  be  incurred  by  the  master  thereof? 

12.  To  what  fine  is  a  railway  or  express  employee  liable,  who  aids  or  abets  the 
unlawful  importation  of  goods  by  rail  or  express  ? 

13.  If  the  master  of  an  incoming  vessel  should  make  an  untrue  report,  what 
penalty  would  he  incur  ? 

14.  Within  what  time  after  the  arrival  of  goods,  by  sea,  from  any  place  out  of 
Canada,  must  entry  inwards  be  made  ? 

15.  In  default  of  such  entry,  and  in  the  event  of  the  removal  of  the  goods  to 
warehouse,  after  what  time  may  they  be  sold  ? 

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48  Victoria. 


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A.  1885 


16.  In  the  event  of  dutiable  goods  having  received  damage  (if  imported  by 
water)  during  the  voyage  of  importation,  within  what  period  must  the  examination 
by  a  proper  Customs  officer  be  completed,  and  certificate  of  damage  granted,  in  order 
to  secure  a  refund  of  duty  ? 

17.  When  a  drawback  has  been  granted  by  the  Government  of  any  foreign 
country,  on  goods  manufactured  there  and  exported  therefrom,  how  should  such 
drawback  be  treated  when  entry  of  such  goods  is  made  in  Canada  ? 

18.  If  an  importer  should  present,  for  the  purpose  of  entry,  a  false  invoice,  to 
what  penalty  would  he  be  subject,  in  addition  to  the  forfeiture  of  the  goods 
imported  ? 

19.  In  the  event  of  any  person  refusing  to  attend  before  an  appraiser  or  col- 
lector, as  provided  in  the  96th  section  of  the  Customs  Act,  1883,  to  what  penalty 
would  he  be  subject  ? 

20.  What  penalty  would  be  imposed  on  a  person  who  might  be  chosen  to  make 
an  appraisement  under  the  Customs  Act,  1883,  and  who,  having  been  notified  of  such 
choice,  refuses  or  neglects  to  make  such  appraisement,  without  good  and  sufficient 
cause  ? 

The  above  questions  are  approved  by  me,  and  are  to  be  used  at  the  next  promo- 
tion examination,  for  all  grades  in  the  Customs  service  except  those  of  appraiser, 
surveyor  or  inspector. 

The  value  to  be  given  to  each  question  in  the  above  list  is  15. 

JAMBS  JOHNSON, 

Commissioner  of  Customs. 


(Signed  on  original.) 


DEPARTMENT  OF  FISHERIES. 


Values. 


PROMOTION  EXAMINATIONS—  QUESTIONS  FOR  FIRST  CLASS  CLERKS. 

1.  What  are  the  principal  commercial  fish  of  the  Dominion,  and  to 
what  markets  are  they  chiefly  exported  ? 

2.  Where  are  the  deep-sea  and  inland  fisheries  of  Canada  principally 
carried  on  ? 

3.  State  also  the  kinds  and  relative  value  of  the  fish  taken  ? 

4.  State  the  close  seasons,  including  those  for  shell  fish,  now  existing 
in  the  several  Provinces  of  the  Dominion? 

5.  Describe  the  several  modes  by  which,  for  commercial  purposes, 
fishing  is  carried  on  ? 

6.  State  the  basis  on  which  the  fishing  bounty  of  $150,000,  now  paid 
annually  to  fishermen  by  the  Dominion  Govern  men  t,  is  distributed? 

7.  Give  a  summary  of  the  clauses  of  the  Washington  Treaty  under 
which  Americans  have  the  right  to  fish  in  British  Waters  ? 

8.  State  what  compensation  Canada  received  and  what  rights  Cana- 
dians have  for  those  granted  the  United  States  under  the  treaty? 

9.  Whether  the  clauses  referred  to  grant  to  United  States  subjects 
any  privilege  other  than  that  of  taking  fish  in  British  waters  ? 

10.  By  what  means  are  the  above  clauses  terminable  ? 

11.  State  the  process  by  which  a  fishery  oflicer  would  proceed  to 
enforce  the  law  against  illegal  fishing,  and  by  what  authority  he  is 
empowered  so  to  do  ? 

12.  State  the  number  of  fish  hatcheries  in  the  Dominion,  where 
situate,  the  kinds  of  fish  propagated,  and  where  the  ova  is  principally 
procured  ? 

13.  What  rights  as  to  fishing  has  a  recent  decision  of  the  Supreme 
Court  of  Canada  conferred  upon  riparian  proprietors  ? 

14.  State  the  effect  of  such  decision  as  regards  the  power  of  the 
Federal  Government  to  deal  with  the  fisheries  where  such  rights  are 
recognized?  - 

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48  Victoria. 


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A.  1885 


100 


15.  How  would  an  official  communication,  addressed  by  the  Secretary 

Of  State  at  Washington  to  the  British  Minister  there,  complaining  of  an 

injustice  done  to  an  American  subject  fishing  in  Canada,  under  the  treaty, 

be  dealt  with  before  a  reply  could  reach  the  United  States  Government? 

JOHN  TILTON,  Deputy  Minister  of  Fisheries, 


DEPAETMENT   OF  INDIAN  AFFAIRS. 


QUESTIONS  SUBMITTED    TO    THE   CANDIDATES   OF   THE    DEPARTMENT   IN  CONNECTION  WITH 
THE  PAPERS  TREATED  BY  THEM  AT  THE  PROMOTION  EXAMINATION,  IN  MAY  LAST. 

Value. 


10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

10 
10 

10 

10 

10 


100 


Value 


100 


1.  Describe  the  various  branches  of  the  Department  and  the  duties 
of  each  branch. 

2.  Describe  the  method  followed  by  the  Department  in  dealing  with 
correspondence  received. 

3.  How  often  are  teachers  of  Indian  schools  required  to  forward  re- 
turns to  the  Department,  and  what  information  do  those  returns  embrace  ? 

4.  How  often  are  Indian  land  agents  required  to  send  to  the  Depart- 
ment returns  of  sales  and  receipts  on  account  thereof? 

5.  What  course  has  an  applicant,  who  has  been  advised  that  he  may 
become  a  purchaser  of  the  Indian  land  applied  for,  to  follow,  in  order  to 
have  his  name  entered  as  such  ? 

6.  When  are  licenses  covering  timber  on  Indian  lands  usually  ter- 
minable? 

7.  What  steps  has  an  applicant  whose  ofier  for  timber  on  Indian 
lands  has  been  accepted,  to  take,  in  order  to  secure  the  issue  to  him  of  a 
license  for  the  same  ? 

8.  State  generally  the  subject  upon  which  the  Indian  Superintendent 
or  agents  are  required  to  furnish  information  to  the  Department,  in  con- 
nection with  the  annual  report. 

9.  Describe  the  several  Indian  superintendencies  or  agencies  in  each 
of  the  Provinces  of  the  Dominion  and  in  the  District  of  Kewatin  and  in 
the  North-West  Territories  ? 

10.  Give  a  general  outline  of  the  duties  of  an  Indian  superintendent 
or  agent. 

No.  1. 
CIVIL  SEEVICE  OF  CANADA. 


SPECIAL   PROMOTION  EXAMINATION^ 


FINANCE  DEPAETMENT. 


5th  and  6  th  December,  1884. 

PENMANSHIP. 

Copy  the  following : 

The  Canada  Pacific  Eailway  Company  have, been  doing  good  practi- 
cal work  towards  inducing  agricultural  settlement  along  its  line  in  the 
North- West  Territory,  by  establishing  experimental  farms  here  and 
there,  where  the  various  kinds  of  grain  and  vegetables  are  being  culti- 
vated. Travellers  have  thus  an  opportunity  of  satisfying  themselves  in 
regard  to  the  adaptation  of  the  soil  and  climate  of  the  country,  such  as 
they  could  not  otherwise  have.    This  season  the  complaints  are  of  & 

n 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


great  scarcity  of  rain  in  many  parts  of  the  Territory,  and  there  is  some 
disappointment  in  consequence.  Especially  is  this  the  case  in  the 
vicinity  of  Moose  Jaw  and  Calgary,  but  yet  the  crops  on  the  experi- 
mental farms  are  reported  as  excellent.  It  is  estimated  that  there  will 
probably  be  a  surplus  of  five  million  bushels  of  wheat  in  the  North- West 
this  year.  By  some  the  estimate  is  made  larger  still.  The  railway 
will  soon  find  a  very  large  grain  trade  between  these  fertile  wheat  fields 
and  the  sea-board. 


No.  2. 

CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


Values. 


15 


20 

6 

60 


SPECIAL    PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 

5  th  and  6  th  December,  1884. 

FINANCE  DEPARTMENT. 

Candidates  are  required  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly, 

COMPOSITION. 

1.  Change  the  following  passage  from  a  direct  to  an  indirect 
statement : — 

"  I  have  often,"  said  Byron,  "left  my  childish  sports  to  ramble  in 
this  place ;  its  glories  and  its  solitude  had  a  mysterious  charm  for  my 
young  mind,  nurturing  within  me  that  love  of  quietness  and  lonely 
thinking  which  has  accompanied  me  to  maturer  years." 

2.  Supply  the  appropriate  words  in  the  blank  spaces  in  the  following 
sentences : — 

(a.)  It  is  our  duty  to the  distress  of  others  b/ 

their  sorrows their  fears,  and their  resentments. 

(6.)    It  gives  me  no to  have  the  private  affairs   of  my 

neighbor  overhauled  in  my  hearing. 

3.  Write  a  letter  of  not  less  than  300  words  to  the  financial  agents 
in  London — Messrs.  G-lyn,  Mills  &  Co.,  Messrs.  Baring  Bros.  &  Co. — on 
the  following  subjects : 

(1.)  Acknowledging  receipt  of  letter  of  1st  instant  with  statements 
of  ordinary  account,  Sinking  Fund  account  of  C.  C.  loan,  loans  of  1874, 
18*75,  1876,  1878-79, 1.  C.R.  loan,  and  also  statements  of  new  loan. 

(2.)  Call  their  attention  to  discrepancies  in  interest  on  overcharge 
of  £25  3s.  8d.  in  current  account,  caused  by  a  difference  of  one  day  in 
calculation  of  days.  Also  inquire  if,  as  bank  rate  was  increased  from  4 
per  cent,  to  5  per  cent,  during  currency  of  account  1  per  cent,  additional 
should  not  be  allowed  from  date  of  increase. 

(3.)  Advise  them  of  probability  of  having  to  draw  on  them  (half  on 
each  house)  in  following  month  for  £400,000  stg.,  say  £100,000  on  or 
about  the  1st,  £200,000  about  the  10th,  and  other  £100,000  on  or  about 
the  20th.     Request  them  to  note  and  honor  the  drafts. 

(4.)  Ask,  in  view  of  the  meeting  of  Parliament,  that  by  that  time  all 
accounts  up  to  date,  with  fall  particulars,  bo  sent  by  early  mail. 


78 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A>  188t> 


No.  3. 

CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


SPECIAL    PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


FINANCE  DEPARTMENT. 


Values. 


20 


20 


20 


20 

20 


100 


5th  and  6th  December,  1884. 
{Candidates  are  requested  to  observe  the  Regulations  strictly.) 

Note. — The  work  of  each  question  must  be  fully  given. 

ARITHMETIC. 

1.  A  tradesman  says  "  I  sell  it  for  $100  and  make  15  per  cent,  profit 
by  it,  for  it  cost  me  $85,"  was  he  correct?  If  not,  find  the  true  rale  of 
profit  and  also  the  cost  price  in  order  that  it  might  have  been  15  per 
cent. 

2.  One  company  guarantees  to  pay  5  per  cent,  on  shares  of  $100 
each,  and  another  guarantees  at  the  rate  of  if  per  cent,  shares  of  $7.50  ; 
the  price  of  the  former  is  $124  J,  and  of  the  latter  $8.50.  Compare  the 
rates  of  interest  which  they  return  to  the  purchaser. 

3.  The  recent  3J  per  cent.  Canadian  loan  of  £5,000,000  was  placed 
in  London,  say  at  the  average  rate  of  £91  2s  6d.  for  each  £100  ;  if  the 
proceeds  were  placed  in  Canada  by  drafts  on  London,  drawn  at  the 
average  rate  of  8£  per  cent,  premium  (over  old  par  of  exchange) 
what  was  the  total  amount  in  Canadian  currency  realized  from  the 

oan 

4.  Reduce  $241,388.89  to  sterling  money,  at  the  rate  of  8£  per  cent, 
premium. 

5.  The  time  occupied  between  the  drawing  of  a  3-days'  sight  draft 
on  London  and  its  payment,  is  15  days,  of  a  60-days'  sight  draft,  is  72 
days.  The  current  bank  rate  of  interest  is  2  per  cent.  Which  would 
bo  the  most  profitable  transaction  for  the  Government  of  Canada,  to  sell 
cables  or  immediate  payment  drafts,  for  £200,000  at  $1.85,  the  same 
amount  of  3-days' sight  drafts  at  $4.84J-,or  the  same  amount  of  60  days* 
sight  drafts  at  $4.81  ? 


?9 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.} 


A.  188& 


Values. 


13 
14 


10 
10 
10 
10 

13 
10 
10 


100 


Values. 


15 

15 
15 


No.  4. 
CIVIL   SERVICE    OF   CANADA. 


SPECIAL   PROMOTION   EXAMINATION. 


FINANCE  DEPARTMENT. 


5th  and  6th  December,  1884. 

ORGANIZATION,   PRACTICE  AND   DUTIES. 

1.  Under  what  circumstances  are  Governor  General's  warrants 
issued  ? 

2.  The  expenditure  made  by  the  Department  of  Railways  and  Canals 
is  voted  under  the  different  heads  :— 

Railways  and  Canals Capital. 

do  Consolidated  Fund. 

do  Charges  on  Revenue. 

Explain  the  difference,  and  give  an  example  under  each  heading. 

3.  What  is  required  by  the  Audit  Act  with  reference  to  securities 
representing  the  debt  of  the  Dominion,  and  which  have  been  redeemed  ? 

4.  Before  what  date  are  the  appropriation  accounts  of  the  year 
required  to  be  sent  to  the  Auditor  General  ? 

5.  In  case  of  a  disagreement  between  an  expending  Department 
and  the  Auditor-General,  to  what  body  is  an  appeal  to  be  made  ? 

6.  Monthly  returns  of  the  state  of  the  business  of  the  several  char- 
tered banks  are  rendered  to  the  Finance  Department.  State  what  bank 
officials  sign  these  returns. 

7.  State  the  nature  of  the  clauses  under  the  Banking  Act  by  virtue 
of  which  money  penalties  may  be  exacted  in  case  of  contravention. 

8.  In  the  event  of  the  insolvency  of  a  bank,  what  is  the  first  charge 
on  its  assets  ? 

9.  What  is  the  limit  of  deposit  allowed  in  the  savings  banks  con- 
trolled by  the  Finance  Department  ? 

No.  5. 
CIVIL  SERVICE  OF  CANADA. 


SPECIAL   PROMOTION  EXAMINATION. 


FINANCE  DEPARTMENT. 


December  5th  and  6th,  1884. 

CONSTITUTION  OF  CANADA. 

(British  Mrth  America  Act.) 

1.  What  is  the  amount  of  subsidy  paid  annually  by  the  Dominion 
of  Canada  to  each  of  the  Provinces  which  formed  part  of  the  Union 
in  1867  ? 

2.  Name  the  sources  of  the  revenue  of  the  Provincial  Governments 
(exclusive  of  the  Dominion  subsidies),  and  state  what  taxes  they  can  raise. 

3.  What  are  the  provisions  of  the  British  North  America  Act  with 
regard  to  education  ? 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


10 

10 

5 

5 

5 
6 


4.  Specify  some  of  the  legislative  powers  committed  by  the  British 
North  America  Act  of  1867  to  the  Federal  Parliament. 

5.  Specify  some  of  the  powers  exclusively  exercised  by  the  Provin- 
cial Legislatures. 

6.  How  are   the  Councils  of  the  Governor  General  and  of  the 
Lieutenant  Governors^styled  ? 

7.  To  what  power  belongs  the  organization  of  Canadian  courts,  and 
by  which  Government  or  Governments  are  the  judges  appointed  ? 

8.  How  are  money  grants  originated  in  the  different  Legislatures  f 

9.  Can  Bills  passed  by  the  Dominion  Parliament  be  disallowed  ?  If 
so,  by  whom  and  within  what  time  ? 

10.  How  many  members  does  the  British  North  America  Act  assign 
to  the  Senate?  State  how  distributed  between^the  four  Provinces  con- 
federated in  1867. 

11.  How  many  members  does  the  same  Act  assign  to  the  House  of 
Commons,  and  how  distributed  between  the  above  stated  Provinces  ? 


No.  1. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


Held  during  the  week  ended  the  22nd  November,  1884. 
BOOK-KEEPING. 


TIME— 3}  HOUES. 

Montreal,  1st  January,  1884. 

Wm,  Barton  and  Jas.  Eraser  have  this  day  entered  into  a  partnership,  to  con- 
tinue three  years,  unless  earlier  dissolved  by  mutual  consent.  Each  to  share  equally 
in  gains  and  losses,  but  Barton  to  receive  6  per  cent,  interest  per  annum  on  the 
amount  by  which  his  investment  exceeds  Fraser's.  The  firm  name  to  be  Barton^and 
Fraser. 


Wm.  Barton  puts  into  the  business :— Cash,  in  Bank  of  Montreal. 

Two  notes,  each  for  $1,600,  due  on  3rd  February  and  3rd  March, 
and  payable  at  Bank  of  Montreal,  here. 

Jas.  Eraser  puts  into  the  business: — Mdse.  worth  at  cost  price.. 

Ten  shares  of  Central  E.  E.  stock,  $150  per  share,  worth  at 
present  quotations  $120.  Besides  this  Fraser  has  a  lease  of 
No.  130  McGill  street,  having  three  years  to  run  from  date, 
for  which  the  firm  is  to  pay  him  $3,000  per  annum  rental. 


46a— 6 


81 


8 

25,000 


18,000 


cts» 
00 


00 


(8  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188b 


10th  January, 
Bot.  of  Simon  Finn,  Mdse 

Paid  §  of  same  by  cheque,  and  gave  our  note  at  3  mos.  for  balance. 


12,000 


12th  January. 
Sold  to  Thos.  Webster,  Mdse; 


To  be  paid  for  in  Manitoba  wheat  of  first  quality  by  inspection, 
delivered  in  Montreal  free  of  all  oharges  before  the  31st  March 
next,  and  for  which  we  agree  to  allow  Montreal  quotations 
on  date  of  arrival.  Any  balance  owing  by  Webster  on  31st 
March  to  be  paid  in  cash. 


27tA  January. 
Sold  to  McEwen  Bros.,  Mdse.  at  3  mos. 


31st  January. 

Paid  wages  as  per  Time  Book 

"    Insurance  on  Mdse 


5,000 


10,000 


3rd  February. 

Bank  of  Montreal  notified  us  that  note  due  to  us  this  day  has 
been  met 


125 

200 


Uh  February. 
Drew  cheque  to  meet  current  expenses, 


Sth  February. 

Eeceived  from  C.  P.  R.  notice  of  arrival  of  2,000  bushels  of  wheat 
from  Thos.  Webster.    Montreal  quotations  this  day  $1.07. 

Paid  cash  for  freight  8  cts.  per  bushel.    Stored  wheat  in  Cole's 
elevator.     Paid  cash  for  insurance  for  three  mos 


16th  February. 


Sold  Mdse.  for  cash. 
Deposited  in  Bank.. 


1,600 


400 


15 

•7,500 
7,000 


00 


00 
00 


82 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


23rd  February. 
Bot.  of  Wilbur  Jamieson,  Mdse.  for  which  we  paid  by  cheques. 


28th  February. 
Sold  to  Burns  &  Co.,  Mdse.  at  60  days. ... 
"        Ed.  King,  « 

"        P.Lyons,  " 


3rd  March. 


12,800 


1,500 
2,?50 
6,300 


Notified  by  Bank  of  Montreal  that  note  due  to  us  this  day  has 

been  met 1^00 


6th  March. 

Bot.  of  Spencer  &  Co.,  Mdse 

For  which  we  gave  McBwing  Bros',  note 
And  our  note  at  3  mos.  to  balance. 


15,000 
10,000 


ISth  March. 

Discounted  P.  Lewis'  note  of  28th  February.    Proceeds  placed1 

to  our  credit 6  236 


25th  March. 

C.  P.  K.  advised  us  of  arrival  of  2,500  bushels  of  wheat  from 
Thos.  Webster.  Montreal  quotations  $1.05.  Paid  freight  8 
cts.  per  bush,  in  cash.  Stored  in  Cole's  elevator.  Paid  cash 
for  insurance  1  month 


00 


00 
00 
00 


00 


00 
00 


50 


00 


46a— 8J 


83 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No,  46.) 


A.  188& 


31s/  March. 

Keceived  cheques  inpayment  of  Burns  &  Co.'s  note 

And  of  Ed.  King's 

"Which  we  deposited. 

Drew  on  T.  Webster  at  sight  for  balance  of  account,  and  deposited 
draft  with  Bank  of  Montreal  for  collection. 

Jas.  Fraser  died  yesterday,  and  his  heirs  desire  to  know  the 
extent  of  his  interest  in  the  firm.  For  this  purpose  the  books 
are  to  be  closed  and  stock  taken. 


*Jth  April 
Stock  taking  shows  value  of  Mdso.  on  hand  31st  March. 
Central  E.  E.  stock  at  same  date  was  quoted  at  $130. 


Journalize,  post  Ledger,  and  close  by  Journal  entries   Show  the  net  gain  orlose- 
the  state  of  each  partner's  account,  and  the  assets  and  liabilities  at  31st  March. 


Yalue  for  Journalizing 60  marks, 

"        Posting 

"       Closing 


100 


Total. 


200 


84 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  1  (a). 
EXCISE    EXAMINATIONS. 


Add  the  following  columns  of  figures  vertically  as  well  as  horizontally. 

TIME— 45    MINUTES. 


Maximum  number  of  Marks  obtainable,  25. 


36,785 
68,354 

28 


5,769  80 


71,586 

8,646 

212 

-99,670 

7,428 

5,842 

6,765 

103,840 

47,453 

6,568 

83,837 

44,906 

48,634 


i 

08 
72 
03 
95 
26 
06 
15 
24 
44 
74 
80 


56 

846 

1,764 

23,851 

643,786 

76,635 

5,784 

647 

32 


56,341  85 

I 

75,228  32 


86,45 

463  89 
! 
7,430:40 


5,763 
64,353 
48,225 

4,687 
53,006  60 
47,333  25 


55,55555 


4,736 

■8,321 

46 

64 


763  82 


.982 


35 


68,944  20 
525J30 

6,536,80 

i 

46,83417 

I  1 
563,21030! 

6,974  63! 

I 
46,383  20 


513 

432 

7,538 


9,422  30 
76,382  29 


6,623 
5,724 

56,834 
2,750 
6,534 

76,348 
5,957 

29,634 


96,347 


4,634 

59 

22,844 

6,742 

1,435 
45,834 
99,638 

4,683 
60,053 


7,856 

49,635 

136,64327 

59,58138 

22,686|71 

i 

13,463]  17 

9,876|54 
4,567*89' 


235 

46 
39  87 


55 


239,62330 
56,733  84 


126,388 

59,584 

463;28 

5,82433 


5,643 
46,349 

27 
29 

586 

85 


946 

6,383 

463 

5,824 

63,284 

9,573 

54,833 

638,234 

3,875 


434 

8,938 
85,654 
96,634 
55,893 

4,563 

68,634 

483 

5  20 
I 
89,634  80 

5,874  20 


47 
74 
22 
50) 
26 
80 
29 
90 


66,734 

234,654 

5,638 


68,463  20 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


1385 


No. 
1 

2 


8 
9 

10 
11 

12 
13 


No.  2. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


INLAND   REVENUE    LAWS. 


Time— ^2  hours. 

What  is  meant  by  "  subject  to  Excise,"  "  bonded  manufactory," 
"  cancellation  stamp  "  and  "rectifier?  " 

Of  what,  and  at  what  time,  does  the  law  require  notice  to  be 
given  ? 

Are  there  any  goods,  the  manufacture  of  which  is  permitted  by 
the  law,  that  may  not  be  placed  in  a  licensed  bonded  warehouse  ? 

If  an  action  is  brought  against  an  officer  of  Inland  Eevenue  for 
anything  done  in  the  exercise  of  his  duty  as  such  Officer,  when  and 
where  must  it  be  brought  ? 

What  is  a  valid  giving  or  making  of  any  notice,  list,  description, 
&c,  required  by  the  Act  to  be  given  or  made  to  any  person  ? 

What  is  a  collector's  duty  if  he  doubts  the  correctness  of  any 
statement,  account  or  return  which  the  Act  requires  to  be  made  to 
him? 

What  must  a  maltster's  notice  to  steep  show,  and  when  and  to 
whom  must  it  be  given  ? 

What  is  the  duty  on  imported  malt  ? 

Does  the  Act  make  any  special  provision  in  regard  to  the  beer 
reservoir  in  distilleries  ? 

Is  there  any  specified  diameter  for  a  closed  spirit  receiver  ? 

What  must  a  distiller's  monthly  return  show,  and  when  must  it 
be  made  ? 

By  whom  shall  or  may  an  Excise  bonding  warehouse  be  pro- 
vided, and  what  amount  shall  be  paid  for  the  use  of  it  ? 

How  will  you  determine  the  duty  chargeable  on  the  manufac- 
tures in  a  distillery,  a  brewery,  a  malthouse,  a  tobacco  manufactory, 
a  cigar  manufactory,  and  a  bonded  factory  where  both  methylated 
spirits  and  vinegar  are  made  ? 

Total 

No.  3. 

EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


ARITHMETIC. 

No 

1 

Simplify—    x    

.  1             2 

Time — 3  hours. 

.. 

A 

Values. 


Extract  the  square  root  of  .0006  to  four  places  of  decimals. 

On  taking  stock  in'a  cigar  factory  the  deficiency  on  raw  leaf  taken 
for  use  was  found  to  be  4  per  cent.,  or  2,944  pounds.  What  wasj 
the  number  of  pounds  taken  ? 

86 


150 


Value. 


12 

14 
14 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46-) 


A.  1885 


Among  candidates  who  presented  themselves  for  examination  :  One 
obtained  65  per  cent,  of  the  aggregate  marks  and  failed  to  pass 
Another  obtained  80  per  cent,  of  the  aggregate  marks,  and  thus 
obtained  120  marks  more  than  the  required  minimum.  If  the 
former  had  made  240  marks  more  he  would  have  just  reached 
the  minimum.  Find  the  aggregate  of  marks  and  the  percentage 
required  to  pass  ? 


Reduce 


I  pf  n 


of  a  pint  to  the  decimal  of  a  gallon. 


8 


A  person  rows  a  distance  of  1J  miles  down  a  stream  in  20  minutes, 
but  without  the  aid  of  the  stream  it  would  take  him  half  an 
hour.  What  is  the  rate  of  the  stream  per  hour  ?  And  how  long 
would  it  take  him  to  return  against  it  ? 

Spirits  having  a  strength  of  24*6  o.p.  are  reduced  to  10  u.p.  and  sold 
at  the  same  price  per  standard  gallon  for  which  they  were 
bought.     What  is  the  gain  per  cent  ? 


Total 


2X 


21 


15 


Find  the  cost  of  paper  for  covering  a  room  16  X  18  feet  and  11  feet  ' 
high.    The  paper  costing  80  cents  per  roll  of  12  yards  long,  and 
being  2  feet  one  inch  wide.    Allow  J  for  windows  and  doors.  18 

A  distiller's  mash  contains  corn,  rye,  oats  and  malt  in  the  following 
by  measure  respectively,  viz.:  6,  3,  2*5  and  1*5.  proportions. 
Find  the  total  number  of  bushels  in  the  mash,  supposing  the 
oats  to  equal  40  bushels;  also  the  number  of  bushels  of  corn, 
rye  and  malt.  22 


150 


No.  4. 
EXCISE   EXAMINATIONS. 


MENSURATION. 


Time — 2£  hours. 

What  is  the  length  of  the  longer  axis  of  an  ellipse,  whose  area  is 
equal  to  1,000  and  shorter  axis  25  ? 

The  chord  of  a  circle  is  equal  to  20,  and  the  perpendicular  from^the 
chord  to  the  centre  of  the  circle  is  10.  What  is  the  area  of  the 
circle  ? 

What  is  the  area  of  an  irregular  malt  floor,  the  length  being  21*5  feet, 
and  its  breadth  in  five  equi-distant  places,  15*6  ft.,  14'8  ft,  17*3  ft., 
204  ft.,  and  21  ft  ? 

The  area  of  a  right-angled  triangle  is  540,  and  the  length  of  the  base 
20.     What  is  the  length  of  the  hypothenuse  ? 

What  is  the  area  of  the  segment  of  a  circle,  the  chord  of  the  segment 
being  30,  and  diameter  of  circle  46  ? 

87 


Values. 


15 


20 


16 


18 


20 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


What  is  the  area  of  an  ellipse  whose  diameters  are  48  and  30  ? 

An  officer,  on  examining  and  comparing  the  plans  and  descriptions 
of  a  malt-house,  finds  one  of  the  floors  very  irregular,  its  sides 
not  being  parallel  nor  any  two  of  them  the  same  length.  How 
is  he  to  determine  proper  area,  and  what  measurements  must 
he  take  ? 


S 


A  cistern  is  to  be  erected  of  two-inch  plank,  having  the  top  outside 
diameter  5  feet,  and  bottom  diameter  6,  and  a  perpendicular 
height  of  5  feet.  The  cistern  is  to  have  a  head.  How  many  feet 
of  lumber,  reduced  to  board  measure,  or  inch  thick,  will  be 
required  ? 

Total 


■No.  5. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


No. 


MALT   GAUGING  AND   COMPUTATION   OF   COMMODITIES   IN   BULK; 

Time— 2f  hours.  Values. 


What  will  be  the  depth  of  a  hopper  to  hold  100  bushels  of  barley, 
the  top  being  6  feet  square,  and  outlet  3  inches  square  ? 

A  conical  steep  tub  having  a  diameter  at  bottom  of  7  feet  6  inches, 
and  at  top  of  7  feet,  the  depth  being  5  feet,  is  required  to  be 
"  inched."  What  is  the  capacity  of  the  first  inch  at  bottom,  also 
the  capacities  of  the  10th  and  20th  inches  from  the  bottom  ? 

A  bin  15*3  feet  long,  9*4  feet  wide,  8  feet  deep  at  front,  and  11*3  feet 
at  back,  is  filled  with  corn.  How  many  pounds  does  it  contain, 
supposing  one  M.M.  to  equal  242  lbs. ? 

On  proceeding  to  gauge  a  kiln  of  malt  before  weighing,  I  found  the 
kiln  was  not  rectangular.  I  therefore  took  a  diagonal  which 
measured  2 1  *7  feet  and  two  perpendiculars  from  the  opposite 
angles  to  this  diagonal,  and  found  them  respectively  8  6  and  9*4 
feet.  I  took  five  dips  which  were  4*8,  4'9,  5*,  4*3  and  5*2  inches. 
How  many  M.M.'s  were  supposed  to  be  placed  in  steep  ? 

A  maltster  has  a  cistern  in  which  he  can  steep  1,000  M.M.  of  barley ; 
he  wishes  to  make  one  in  which  he  can  steep  one-half  more,  the 
depth  to  be  72  inches.    What  must  the  diameter  be  ? 

Find  the  solidity  of  a  sphere  having  a  diameter  of  40  inches.  Give 
the  height  of  a  cone  having  the  same  solidity,  the  diameter  of 
base  being  equal  to  diameter  of  sphere, 

Grain  is  placed  in  a  granary  in  which  the  cylindrical  steep  tub  is 
situated,  but  the  tub  extends  24  inches  below  the  floor.  The 
granary  is  21  feet  by  16  feet  and  is  filled  to  the  top  of  the  steep 
cistern  which  is  5  feet  deep  and  65  feet  in  diameter.  How 
many  cubic  feet  of  grain  in  the  granary,  supposing  the  cistern 
to  be  empty  ? 


15 


22 


20 


Total. 


20 


25 


25 


23 

150 


88 


18  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188B 


No  6. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


USE  OF  HYDROMETER  AND  SACCHAROMETER. 


Time—  1 J  hours. 


What  is  the  standard  by  which  the  specific  gravities  of  spirits  and 
other  liquids  are  determined  ? 

How  is  spirits  affected  in  respect  of  weight  and  volume  by  change 
of  temperature  ? 

Does  a  change  in  temperature  affect  the  strength  of  spirits  ? 

What  was  the  original  gravity  of  a  liquid  which,  after  being  diluted 
with  5J  times  its  own  bulk  of  distilled  water,  indicated  a 
specific  gravity  of  1004  ? 

What  would  be  the  strength  resulting  from  the  following  mixtures, 
respectively : — 

1  gallon  65  O.P.  with  §  gallon  36  U.P. 
3  "  40  U.P.  "  2£  "  10  U.P. 
1      «      25  U.P,    "    1         "      50  O.P. 


What  would  be  the  gravity  of  a  mixture  composed  of  5  gallons  wood 
naphtha  of  a  specific  gravity  of  '814  and  40  gallons  of  alcohol  of 
a  specific  gravity  of  *8222  ? 


Total, 


No.  7. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


MALTING  AND   SUPERVISION  OP  MALTHOUSES, 


Values. 

10 
I<3 


Time — 2  Hours. 

What  is  malt,  and  from  what  is  it  usually  made  in  Canada  ? 
i  Describe  the  manufacture  of  malt,  specifying  the  various  processes 

through  which  the  article  used  passes,  the  changes   which  take 

place  in  it,  and  the  time  required  for  each  process. 
How  may  it  be  known,  by  the  condition  of  the  article  which  is 

being  malted,  when  each  process  is  completed  ? 
What  deceptions  might  be  practised  by  a   maltster  in    order  to 

defraud  the  revenue  ? 
How  would  you  detect  these  frauds  and  what  means  would  you  adopt 

to  prevent  them  ? 
What  do  you  consider  the  duties  of  an  officer  when  in  charge  of  a 

malt  house  ?    Give  answer  fully. 
When  a  maltster  wishes  to  hasten  the  process  of  malting,  wherein 

does  he  differ  from  his  usual  mode? 
What  is  meant  by  leguminous  seeds,  and  how  would  you  distinguish 

them  from  grain  in  malting  ? 


Total. 


12 


50 


Values. 


6 
30 


1% 
18 

m 

25 
6 

12& 


89 


48  Victoria* 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188$ 


No.  8. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


PROCESS   OF   TOBACCO   AND   CIGAR  MANUFACTURING  AND   SUPERVISION 
OF   TOBACCO   AND   CIGAR  MANUFACTORIES. 


No. 


3 


Time— 2  hours. 


Values. 


6 


8 
9 

19 


What  do  you  consider  the  duties  of  an  officer  when  in  charge  of  a 
tobacco  factory  ?    Answer  fully. 

What  do  you  consider  the  duties  of  an  officer  in  charge  of  a  cigar 
factory  ?    Answer  fully. 

What  would  be  the  result  as  regards  the  annual  stock  statement 
of,  including  stems,  in  the  quantity  in  process  of  manufacture 
in  a  cigar  factory  at  the  end  of  the  fiscal  year  ? 

In  a  tobacco  factory  the  actual  net  quantity  of   raw  material 
used    is     107,634    lbs.,   and    tobacco    produced   108,187   lbs.  " 
How  much  is  the  production  in  excess  of  the  standard,  and 
how  many  pounds  of  tobacco  were  produced  from  each   100 
lbs.  of  raw  material  actually  used  ? 

In  a  cigar  manufactory  the  quantity  of  raw  material  used  from 
which  cigars  were  produced  was  25,440  lbs.,  the  number  of 
cigars  produced  being  1,228,125.  How  many  pounds  of  raw 
material  were  used  to  produce  1,000  cigars,  and  how  many 
cigars  were  produced  from  each  25  lbs.  of  raw  material  used  ? 

By  what  means  is  the  Expn.  brand  to  be  placed  upon  tin  and 
wooden  caddies  of  tobacco  respectively,  and  what  information 
should  it  contain  ? 

What  is  the  smallest  denomination  of  package  of  tobacco  upon 
which  a  caution  notice  is  now  required  to  be  attached  ? 

What  is  the  object  of  the  bonded  removal  permit  stamps  ? 

To  what  persons  is  the  removal  of  imported  raw  leaf  tobacco 
restricted  ? 

What  is  the  object  of  re-sweating  leaf  tobacco  in  a  cigar  factory  ? 

Total ., 


20 


20 


10 


10 


12 

8 

8 

10 


125 


90 


18  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46») 


4.  1888 


No.  9. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


IKQFLATIONS  AS   TO   STAMPING,   MARKING,  WAREHOUSING  AND    REMOVAL    OF   EXCI8ABLK 

ARTICLES. 


Time — 2  hours. 

What  are  the  conditions  of  an  export  bond  ? 

What  is  the  least  quantity  of  excisable  goods  that  oan  be  ex-ware- 
housed for  removal  or  transfer,  in  bond  ? 

What  is  the  difference  in  the  removal  bond  given  when  goods  are 
consigned  to  the  order  of  the  Collector  of  Inland  Revenue,  and 
when  not  so  consigned  ? 

What  are  the  duties  of  a  Collector  of  Inland  Eevenue  upon  the 
receipt  of  excisable  goods  removed  to  his  division  in  bond  ? 

Are  there  any  conditions  as  to  the  removal  of  methylated  spirits 
from  warehouse  or  manufactory  ?    If  so,  state  them. 

What  is  the  nature  of  the  certificate  to  be  written  across  the  depart- 
mental copy  of  an  export  entry  by  the  officer  of  Excise  ? 

In  placing  excisable  goods  in  warehouse,  in  what  respect  do  cigars 
differ  from  other  articles  ? 

How  are  the  stamps  upon  caddies  or  boxes  of  tobacco  to  be  attached 
and  cancelled  ? 

What  are  the  conditions  under  which  excisable  goods  may  be 
removed  in  bond  to  a  person  not  having  a  licensed  bonding  ware- 
house ? 

Where  stamps  will  not  adhere  to  tin  foil  with  ordinary  gum  or  paste, 
what  is  to  be  done  ? 

Describe  a  coupon  stamp  and  how  it  is  used. 

How  is  Canada  Twist  required  to  be  stamped  ? 

What  are  the  provisions  of  the  regulations  respecting  the  removal  of 
scraps  and  cuttings  in  bulk  from  one  manufacturer  to  another  ? 

Total 


Values, 


10 

Id 

10' 
10 
10 

8- 
8 

10 

8> 
12 

15 
125 


91 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


No.  10. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 

PETROLEUM    INSPECTION. 


No. 


Time — 1  hour. 


What  are  petroleum  and  naphtha  as  defined  by  the  Act  ? 

What  is  meant  by  the  terms  "  specific  gravity,"  " flash-test"  and 
"  fire-test "  ? 

What  are  the  specific  gravity  and  fire-test  prescribed  by  law  for 
petroleum  sold  in  Canada  for  illuminating  purposes  ? 

What  marks  does  the  law  require  to  be  placed  on  packages  containing 
petroleum,  and  who  must  place  them  thereon  ? 

Where  and  when  must  petroleum  be  inspected,  and  what  is  to  be 
done  with  it  if  it  be  below  the  standard  ? 

You  are  required  to  inspect  80  packages  of  petroleum  and  12  pack- 
ages of  naphtha.    State  in  detail  how  you  would  proceed. 


Values. 


Total 


No.  11. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


DISTILLATION   AND    SUPERVISION   OP    DISTILLERIES. 


No. 


Time— 2J  Hours. 

What  information  and  papers  should  accompany  an  application  for 
a  distiller's  license,  and  what  are  the  duties  of  the  examining 
officer  before  granting  a  certificate  ? 

What  do  you  consider  the  ordinary  daily  duties  of  an  officer  en- 
gaged in  the  supervision  of  a  distillery  ? 

What  are  the  special  duties  of  officers  in  reference  to  fermenting 
tuns,  their  contents  and  registration  during  the  working  of 
distilleries  ? 

What  papers  are  required  to  be  prepared  by  the  distiller  when  about 
to  remove  a  quantity  of  spirits  in  bond  from  his  distillery 
warehouse  to  another  division  ? 


4 
4 

6 

6 

5 

25 


50 


Values. 


15 


20 


20 


10 


Under  what  circumstances  may  spirits  be  ex-warehoused  without  j       10 
either  weighing  or  testing  ? 

92 


8  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188^ 


Under  what  conditions  can  a  distiller  commencing  operations, 
having  no  spirits  on  hand,  either  in  bond  or  duty  paid,  remove 
duty  paid  spirits,  the  product  of  his  distillery,  during  the  cur- 
rency of  his  first  month's  operations  ? 


10 


What  particulars  should  be  shown  on  the  heads  of  packages  in 
which  spirits  are  removed  from  a  distillery,  in  bond  and  duty 
paid  respectively,  and  what  are  the  duties  of  the  officer  check- 
ing same  ? 

Give  the  meaning  of  the  term  "  low  wines  "  and  state  how  they  are 
separated  from  that  portion  of  the  product  of  intermittent  stills 
which  is  passed  direct  into  the  closed  spirit  receivers. 

In  what  way  may  the  "  test  still  "  be  utilized  in  anticipating  the 
probable  products  of  one  or  more  tuns  of  beer  or  wash  in  a 
distillery  ? 

When  about  to  take  a  special  test  of  a  tun,  say  No.  10,  it  was  found 
that  the  product  of  No.  9,  previously  distilled,  was  in  the 
closed  spirit  receiver,  viz.,  505  gallons  at  55  O.P.  After  tun  No. 
10  was  distilled  there  were  1,025  gallons  at  57.2  O.P.,  what  was 
the  strength  of  the  product  of  tun  No.  10  ?  Give  the  work 
in  full.  Total 


No.  12. 
EXCISE  EXAMINATIONS. 


10 


10 


10 


20 


25 


150 


VINEGAR. 


No. 


Time— 2 J  hours. 

What  is  meant  by  "  mix  "  in  a  vinegar  factory  ?  How  is  it  made, 
and  what  are  the  duties  of  the  officer  in  charge  when  it  is  being 
made? 

Describe  the  process  of  testing  vinegar  to  find  the  per  cent,  of  acetic 
acid? 

What  are  the  duties  of  an  officer  when  pure  spirit  is  required  by  the 
manufacturer  for  use  in  the  generators  ? 

What  is  the  gravity  of  the  ammonia  solution  used  by  the  Depart- 
ment, and  how  would  you  proceed  to  make  it  ? 

It  was  found  on  testing  a  sample  of  vinegar  that  it  required  90 
grains  of  the  standard  solution  of  ammonia  to  neutralize  75 
grains  of  it.     What  was  the  per  cent,  of  acetic  acid  and  the 
strength  ? 

Give  all  the  methods  you  can  think  of  by  which  the  revenue  might 
be  defrauded  by  adishonest  manufacturer  of  vinegar  and  methy- 
lated spirits  j  also  the  means  you  would  adopt  for  the  protection 
of  the  revenue. 

Total 


Values, 


6 

8 

10 

12 
50 


93 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


LIST  OF  CANDIDATES  WHO  PASSED  SUCCESSFULLY  THE  CIVIL 
SERVICE  PRELIMINARY  EXAMINATION. 

May,  1884. 


Barry,  Thomas. 
Gould,  William. 
Hurd,  McD.  Blair. 
Keating,  Michael  Edward. 
Keating,  Wm/Ahearn. 
Langenberg,  Albert. 
Morton,  John  Edward. 
Sheehan,  Joseph  Maurice. 

Cassily,  Patrick. 
Condon,  Thomas. 
Hill,  Robert. 
McMonagle,  James. 

Beaudry,  Auguste. 
Bolger,  Michael  J. 
Chouinard,  Camille. 
Damontier,  Felix. 
Dahig,  Patrick  H. 

Bisson,  Joseph  Louis. 
Brazeau,  Edmonde. 
Boudreau,  Louis  G. 
Belair,  Arthur. 
Clarke,  George. 
Chartrand,  Joseph. 
Curran,  Charles  K. 
Du  Rocher,  J.  B. 
Ermatinger,  P.  T.  H. 
Forget,  Melasippe. 
Godin,  Hermenegilde. 
Gauthier,  Oscar. 
Guilfoyle,  Wm.  D. 
Gauthier,  Antoine  P. 
Gorman,  William. 
Gaindon,  Magloire. 
Hogue,Napoleon  Jos. 
Le  Febvre  de  Villeneuve,  J 
La  Croix,  F.  X.  Joseph. 
Lepine,  Magloire. 
Robbe,  Vital. 

Barke,  Mary  E. 
Beahan,  Denis. 
Connell,  Daniel. 
Grafton,  S.  W. 
Lancaster,  John. 
Lawless.  Matthew. 
McKeever,  Jennie. 


At  Halifax. 

Smyth,  David  Spear. 
Smythe,  Joseph  Howe. 
Sullivan,  William  P. 
Sutherland,  George. 
Pace,  Robert  Thomas. 
Nicholson,  David  Alex. 
Thompson,  SamueL 
McCaffrey,  James  Edward. 

At  St.  John. 

Smith,  Rafus  R. 
Holden,  Geo.  W. 
Dixon,  John 
Hipwell,  Jno.  Parkinson. 

At  Quebec. 

Joanet,  Nap.  Ulric. 
Legare,  Etienne. 
Parent,  W.  V.  P. 

Samson,  J.  E.  Alfred. 

At  Montreal. 

Latimer,  Thomas. 
Legault,  David. 
Lescarbeau,  Edmond. 
Lortie,  Alphonse. 
Le  Blanc,  Edouard. 
Milne,  Thomas  K. 
Major,  Theophile. 
Murphy,  James. 
McCaffrey,  Wm.  J. 
Masse,  Arthur. 
O'Mahoney,  Myles. 
Pepin,  Felix. 
Pepin,  Joseph. 
Perrault,  Joseph. 
Pilon,  J.  D.  E. 
Bolland,  Frank  F. 
Sauriol,  Jean  Bpte. 
.Cajetan.  Thou  in,  Joseph. 
Tasee,  Charles  D. 
Vinet,  F.  R.  dit  la  Rente. 

At  Ottawa. 

Nolan,  Thomas. 

Pegg,  Alfred. 

Spence,  John. 

Short,  Samuel. 

Boucher  de  Grosbois,  Guillaume. 

Jackson,  James. 


94 


16  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46L) 


A-  1885 


Dugdale,  Alfred  H. 
Maguire,  John. 


Allen,  Wm.  E. 
Clewes,  John  Kalph. 
Ellis,  George. 
Giroux,  Octave. 
Hesson,  John  Henry 
Hollenrake,  Thomas. 
Meadows,  Edwin. 
Ellis,  J.  D. 
McEwan,  James. 
McGlashan,  Danl.  L. 


Charters,  James. 
Dingman,  Hy.  W. 
Harper,  James  P. 
Lawrence,  William. 
MeCandish,  Alired. 
Parkhill,  Andrew. 
Ross,  Dobbin  H. 


Bayley,  George. 
Cashing,  John. 
Cashing,  James. 
Dewson,  Wm.  W. 
Long,  William. 


Burrows,  William. 
Cuthbert,  Wm.  James* 
Cuthbert,  Wm.  James, 
Close,  Jarvis. 


Williams,  George, 


At  Kingston. 

Curry,  Adam  Hall. 
Sullivan,  Jos.  Edward. 

At  Toronto. 

Piatt,  William  J. 
Phillips,  Russell  M. 
Thompson,  George. 
Wallace,  Chas.  BE. 
Wallbridge,  Kobt.  John 
Butler,  John. 
Thompson,  Charles. 
Johnston,  Robert. 
Gimby,  Wm.  Edw. 
Baxter,  John. 

At  Hamilton. 

Scholfield,  Thomas. 
Springate,  John. 
Souter,  W.  M. 
Strongman,  William. 
Neehin,  James. 
Petti  t,  Wm.  Jonathan. 
Robinson,  J.  M. 

At  London. 

McKenna,  Wm.  Gordoa. 
Nicholson,  James. 
Southcott,  William  F. 
Johnstone,  Bolton  W. 

At  Winnipeg. 

Cowley,  Walter. 
Kuttner,  John  M. 
jun,  Lispett,  Wm.  S. 

Stevenson,  John. 

At  Victoria,  B.C. 

Broderick,  William. 

J.  THORBURN,  LL.D.,  Chairman. 

A.  D.  DeCELLES, 

P.  LeSUEUR,  Secretary. 


95 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


1 


i.IST  OF  CANDIDATES  WHO  PASSED  SUCCESSFULLY  THE  CIVIL  SEBVICB 

QUALIFYING  EXAMINATION. 

Mat,  1884. 


At  Halifax. 


Hill,  Gordon. 
Logan,  Alfred. 

McNeil,  Albert  Howard. 


Southall,  Frederick. 


At  Charlottetown. 


At  St  John. 


Burnett,  Bertram  F. 
Cadwallader,  John. 
Conley,  Edward. 
Connor,  Frank  E. 
Crocker,  Frederick  S. 
Ewing,  James  A. 
Fairweather,  Edmund  W, 
Ferguson,  Frederick. 
Hoyt,  John  Wesley. 
Jenkins,  George. 


Bolger,  Michael  J. 
Carolan,  John. 
BeChesne,  Emma  Miville. 


Barlee,  Wilfred. 
Brazeau,  Edmond. 
Brophy,  Thomas. 
Benoit,  Louis  Baymond. 
Breadner,  Eobert  W. 
Biron,  Napoleon. 
Clermont,  Ulderic. 
Clement,  J.  Edouard. 
Constantin,  Jos.  Edouard. 
De  Cotret,  Eaoul  Eene. 
De  Yaux,  Mo'ise. 
Desaulniers,  Ernest  L. 
Edward,  John  Thomas. 
Fox,  John  D. 
Godin,  Hermenegilde. 
Le Blanc,  Victor. 
L'Ecuyer,  Theodule. 
Legault,  David. 
Ladouceur,  Theophile. 
Leblanc,  Edouard. 


H. 


Hannington,  Thos.  Benjamin. 
Macintire,  James  A. 
Patterson,  Alfred  S. 
Eoberteon,  Charles  E. 
Schofield,  Isaac. 
Steen,  Jas.  Stewart 
Strang,  James. 
Strong,  J.  A. 
Weldon,  Edward  D. 


At  Quebec. 


Home,  William  A. 
Quinn,  Thos.  Wm. 
Fahey,  Owen. 


At  Montreal, 


96 


Monet,  Joseph  B.  dit. 
McCann,  J.  J.  J. 
Ouimet,  Eoche. 
Primeau,  Jean  Bte. 
Pilon,  J.  D.  E. 
Sennatt,  James. 
St.  Martin,  Albert. 
Simard,  Maxime. 
Stratton,  John  Frs. 
Chartier,  J.  O.  Avila. 
Dalton,  William. 
Florence,  Charles. 
Gaudet,  Mich.  H.  A; 

Le  Claire,  Chas.  Jos.  j 

Proulx,  Alphonsine. 

Sauriol,  Alphonse. 

Eobbe,  Vital. 

McShane,  Jas.  Anty. 

Norcross,  A. 

Cartier,  Jos.  Adelard. 


Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  188* 


Bruce,  David  A. 
Baldwin,  Miss  Harma  A. 
Barber,  Beatrice. 
Dow,  John  R. 
Eagleson,  John. 
Freeland,  Anthony. 
Gilbert,  Emml.  W. 
Jennings,  Edward. 
Greenfield,  E. 
Lyden,  Miss  Maggie. 
McMaster,  Kate. 
McEdward,  Wm.  George. 
McCann,  John  A. 

Lazier,  Jno.  Campbell. 
Martin,  Jno.  C. 
Newberry,  Isabella  Mary 
Nevins,  John  James. 


Goodman,  Arthur  W. 
Mackay,  Jane  E.  B. 
May,  James. 

Black,  Edward  H. 
Boys,  Thos.  Ross. 
Earl,  Fred.  E. 
Ferrie,  James. 
Fitton,  Cecil  H. 
Gleeson,  Cornelius. 
Grundy,  Henry. 
Gill,  Thos. 
Hynes,  William  A. 
Haggard,  Charles. 
Jackson,  John  A. 
Laird,  Harry  W. 
Lawson,  John  Thos. 
McCabe,  Frank  J. 
McLennan,  John  O. 
Mitchell,  George  S. 
Neagle,  Helen  F. 


Althouse,  Melmoth  W. 
Cullis,  John  M. 
Clarke,  Gertrude. 
Craig,  Calvin. 
Cameron,  John  A. 
Conroy,  Joseph  M. 
Dugit,  Peter  J.  E. 
Dinning,  Harry  F. 
Hunton,  Wm.  A. 
Higley,  Thos.  E. 
Hollo  way,  Francis  J. 
McDonell,  Ronald  EL. 


At  Ottawa. 

Mcintosh,  Donald  G. 
Provost,  Alphonse  A. 
Sheppard,  Daniel  E. 
Smith,  W.  H.  Chatterton. 
York,  Brown  L. 
Beianger,  Victor, 
Goulden,  William  Randolph, 
Fraser,  Annie. 
Harrison,  Edward. 
Humpheys,  Beauchamp. 
Elie,  A. 
Elliott,  Jas.  David. 

At  Kingston. 

Reid,  Chas.  McKenzie. 
Walker,  David  Jas.,  jun. 
Walker,  Wm.  B. 
Hailowell,  Wm.  Earl. 

At  Hamilton^ 

McCawley,  William 

Patrick. 
McRae,  Edgar  B. 

At  Toronto. 

Newman,  Frank. 
O'Donoghue,  Danl.  G. 
Pearson,  John. 
Walton,  Jesse  M. 
Watkins,  John  Lloyd. 
Wright,  Chas  R. 
Cochran,  Fredk.  S. 
Cheyne,  Andrew  J. 
Humphrey,  Wm.  H. 
Thompson,  Hedley  Vicars. 
Westman,  Thos. 
Fleming,  J. 
Agar,  Chas.  Jas. 
Phillpotts,  Caroline. 
Spencer,  Edward. 
Banting,  Charles. 
McMullen,  Thomas. 

At  Lonion, 

Mosgrove,  A.  H. 
McTaggart,  Jas.  Lr 
Mackenzie,  David. 
McKillop,  Duncan  A. 
McGregor,  Charles  J. 
Newman,  Robert  Ai 
Fatton,  Thos.  B. 
Robinson,  Lucy. 
Dawson,  James  H#  B. 
McYicar,  W.  W. 
Harrison,  Francis  E.  A . 


m 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


At  Winnipeg, 

Benoit,  Michel.  Webster,  Thos.  O. 

Murphy,  George.  Allan,  Robt.  K. 

At  Victoria,  B.  C. 

Goepel,  Philip  Dorset.  Gibbon,  Lister. 

Hughes,  Edward.  Newberry,  Cowper  Wm. 

Rabbitt,  Daniel. 

J.  THORBURN,  LL.D.,  Chairman. 
A.  D.  DeOELLES, 
P.LeSUEUR,  Secretary. 


Candidates  who  took  Optional    Subjects   at  the  Civil  Service  Examination 

held  in  May,  1884,  and  succeeded  in  one  or  more,  as  indicated  opposite  their  names, 

viz. : — 

Names.  Subjects.  Total  Options 

Gamed. 

AT  ST.  JOHN,  N.B. 

Burnett,  Bertram  F Book-keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

Connor,  Frank  R ..,  Book-keeping 1 

Croker,  Frank  S do J 

Ewing,  James  A. Telegraphy... • } 

Hoyt,  John  Wesley Book-keeping  and  Telegraphy ■--..  —  * 

Jenkins,  George Bookkeeping,. J- 

Strong,  J.  A Book-keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing.../...  2 

Harrison,  John  S Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 1 

Hayes,  Wm.  Hazen. ...Book-keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

AT  QUEBEC. 

Carolan,  John Book-keeping *■ 

AT  MONTREAL. 

Brophy,  Thomas Composition,  French,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing  2 

Breadner,  Robert  W Book-keeping, ...  •/•;-—•/•  l 

Constantino,  Jos.  E Composition,  English,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writ- 
ing  . 2 

Edward,  John  Thos Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 1 

LeBlanc,  Victor. Composition  in  English. I 

LeBlanc,  Edouard Bookkeeping 1 

McCann,  I.  I.  L. Tranhl&tion,  Book  keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis 

Writing.. 3 

St.  Martin,  Albert Bookkeeping,  Stenography..... 2 

McShane,  James  A Stenography....... 1 

Cartier,  Jos.  Adelard do * 

AT  OTTAWA. 

Bruce,  David  A Bookkeeping * 1 

Baldwin,  Miss  Harma Type-writing 1 

Eagleson,  John Bookkeeping * 

McEdward,  Wm.  George... Indexing  and  Precis  Writing I 

McCann,  John  A Book-keeping.. 1 

Provost,  Alphonee  A... ......Type-writing...*. ,.....,.  * 

98 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


Sheppard,  Daniel  E Book-keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis'  Writing 2 

Smith,  W. H.  Chatterton.... Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 1 

Harrison,  Edward Translation,  Book-keeping,  Stenography 3 

Anderson,  G.  C Book-keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

Bollard,  Joseph Book-keeping 1 

Brown,  J.  H Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 1 

Clarabut,  Daniel Bookkeeping 1 

Geddes,  Alfred do * 1 

Gouldthrite,  Frank  S do            Indexing  and  Precis  Writing.* 2 

Hume,  Herbert  E Stenography 1 

LaBochelle,  N Composition,  English,  Book-keeping,  Indexing  and 

Precis  Writing 3 

Little,  W.  C Bookkeeping,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

Mailleue,  Geo.  A.  D Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 1 

Rochester,  Francis  K do                   do                1 

Stewart,  W.  C.  E Stenography 1 

Heming,  A Book-keeping 1 

JRattey,  Jos.  N do            1 

Hudson,  Arthur  B do            Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

Code,  T.  J .Type-Writing 1 

Marsan,  Godfroi ..Composition,  English,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writ- 
ing  • 2 

AT  TOEONTO. 

Earl,  Frederick  E Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 1 

Ferrie,  James do                   do               1 

Gleeson,  Cornelius Telegraphy 1 

Jackson,  John  A Book-keeping 1 

Laird,  Harry  W do 1 

McCabe,  Frank  J do  «          1 

O'Donoghue,  Daniel  G Book-keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

Walton,  Jesse  M Book-keeping,  Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

Fleming,  J Book-keeping 1 

Agar,  Chas.  Jas Book-keeping  and  Telegraphy , 2 

Phillpotts,  Caroline Composition,  French 1 

AT  LONDON. 

Althouse,  M.  W , Book-keeping 1 

Dugit,  P.  I.  E do 1 

Holloway,  Francis  J. do <• 1 

McDonald,  Jos.  J do « 1 

McTaggart,  Jos.  L do 1 

Newman,  Eobt.  A do            Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 2 

Patton,  Thos.  B do            1 

AT  VICTOEIA,  B.C. 

Goepel,  Philip  Dorset.. Indexing  and  Precis  Writing 1 

Hnghes,  Edward do                   do               J 

Gibbon,  Lister ......Book-keeping 1 

J.  THOEBURN,  LL.D.,  Chairman. 

A.  DeCELLES, 

P.  LsSUEUE,  Secretary. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


UST    OF  CANDIDATES   WHO    PASSED   SUCCESSFULLY   THE  CIYIL 
SERVICE  PRELIMINARY  EXAMINATION. 


Bourinot,  John  C. 
DeCourcey,  John  H. 
Gleeson,  William. 

Brayley,  Robert. 
Buist,  Andrew . 
Brown,  Malcolm. 
Elston,  C.  H. 
Ferguson,  William  D 
Grant,  Oscar. 

McLeod,  Ebenezer 

Bedard,  Eodolphe. 
Bilodeau,  Edmond. 
Blackburn,  Eobert. 
Boldue,  A.  E.  H. 
Brousseau,  Joseph. 
Chamberland,  T. 
Hamel,  Jean  Bte. 


Aumais,  Edmond. 
Babineau,  Seraphin. 
Bertrand,  Joseph. 
Brunei,  Moise. 
Bolston,  John  Joseph 
Bowden,  Georgina  M.  M. 
Cadotte,  Alphonse. 
Colfer,  John. 
Crawford,  Lucinda. 
Coutlee,  Jos.  Alexr. 
Dubois,  J.  A.  E. 
Dantony,  Jean. 
D' Amour,  Joseph  E. 
Dusseault,  Jean  Bte. 
Drury,  James. 
Durack,  John  James. 
Dore,  L.  J.  S. 
Kane,  James  J. 
Laforest,  Louis. 
Laurin,  Joseph. 
Ledoux,  Joseph. 
Libert,  E.  Joseph. 
LaManque,  Thomas. 
LaPierre,  J.  T.  H. 
Marie,  Jean. 
Miggins,  Michel. 
Montvenoux,  Xavier. 
Moore,  Thomas. 
Moreau,  Hector. 
McKenna,  Edward. 


November,  1884; 

At  Halifax 

Hubley,  George  B. 
Lindsay,  Joseph  P. 
Walker,  J.  E. 

At  St.  John,  N.B. 

Gardiner,  Robinson. 
Magee,  James. 
McDermott,  Bernard. 
Ryan,  Jeremiah  J. 
Tabor,  Arthur  C. 
Whelpley,  Charles  B. 

At  Gharlottetown,  P.E.I. 

At  Quebec. 

Morin,  Onesime,  jun. 
Nollet,  Jean 
Panet,  John. 
Prendergrast,  Jeremie. 
Racine,  Arthur. 
Ryan,  Patrick  J. 
Traversy,  F.  X. 

At  Montreal. 

Deni court,  Joseph  G. 
Elliott,  Thomas  C. 
Faille,  Henri. 
Fenaughty,  Thomas. 
Friset,  Firmin. 
Gariepy,  J.  B. 
Gauthier,  J.  B. 
Gelinas,  Napoleon. 
Gervais,  Hector. 
Gosselin,  Wilfred. 
Guindon,  Carolus. 
Guay,  L.  A. 
Goyer,  Argenas. 
Hayes,  John. 
Heroux,  Blaise. 
Joly,  Francois. 
Kenna,  James. 
Niverville,  W.  G. 
Neveu,  Paul. 
Petit,  Joseph. 
Poirier,  Jos.  Signal. 
Palmer,  Guillaume. 
Payment,  Etienne. 
Prevost,  Ulric. 
Ratelle,  Leon. 
Smyth,  George. 
St.  Jean,  Joseph. 
Tellemosse,  J.  B. 
Valeur,  Albert. 
Wilson,  Arthur. 
100 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


Annand,  Katie  E. 
Bell,  Jennie. 
Cochrane,  Lilian. 
Cosgrove,  John. 
Copping,  Louis. 
Crouch,  E.  A. 
Caldwell,  F.  D.  J). 
Cote,  Yictoria. 
Code,  Abraham. 
Chevrier,  Louisa  D. 
Christie,  Jessie  B. 
Christie  Lilv. 
Dube,  Wilfred. 
Merrick,  Kathleen. 
O'Gready,  Sarah  M. 
O'Hagan,  John  C. 

Bower,  Thos.  Tofield. 
Comer,  George  W.  H. 
George,  Robert  E. 
Hitchins,  William. 

Atkinson,  Henry  E. 
Beeman,  Eobert  John. 
Brown,  Fredk. 
Cashen,  Michael  Joseph. 
Cummins,  William. 
Chapman,  Walter. 
Delaney,  John. 
Ellis,  Eobt.  J. 
Fleming,  W.  F. 
Funston,  Thomas. 
Gompertz,  A.  W.  L. 
Haggith,  Edmund. 
Hall,  M.  A.  C. 
King,  Henry  Thomas. 
Langstone,  Thos.  Walter. 
Spedding,  Wm.  A, 
Ternent,  D.  E. 
Waddell,  Josiah. 

Barron,  Alexander. 
Bucke,  Nicholas  A. 
Cummings,  John  P. 
Faulknor,  Joseph  H. 
Garner,  Mary  E. 
Garner,  Hannah  D. 
Holden,  George  C. 

Askin,  Jos.  F. 
Bradley,  Chas.  J. 
Buckner,  Urbin. 
Howes,  Wm.  K. 
Maguire,  Margt.  M. 
Parish,  G.  H. 
Wood,  Joseph. 


At  Ottawa. 

Edwards,  Louisa  D 
Edmond,  Maria. 
Foley,  Matthew  L . 
Fuller,  Thos.  Wm. 
Fitzgerald,  Geraldine . 
Greenshields,  E. 
Hickey,  William. 
Horan,  Arthur  John. 
Joly,  L.  C. 
Lecourt,  Anna. 
LaMontagne,  Leonie. 
Moore,  Charlotte. 
Maxwell,  W.  John. 
Piche,  Maggie. 
Webber,  Ellen. 
Wright,  Edward  C. 

At  Kingston. 

Howland,  Patk.  Joseph. 
Neill,  William. 
O'Eeilley,  Wm.  James. 
Shannon,  Abt.  Edward. 

At  Toronto. 

Mankey,  W.  J. 
Meadows,  W.  E.  C. 
Moore,  Wm.  D. 
Marshal],  Jacob. 
McKenzie,  Alexander. 
McNair,  Wm.  C. 
McMordie,  Alexander. 
Orr,  Benjamin. 
Eeid,  John. 
Eichards,  Fredk. 
Eodgers,  George. 
Smith,  Thomas. 
Spiers,  Henry. 
Sutton,  Joseph. 
Smith,  Theophilus. 
Weir,  Eobert. 
Westman,  Eldoo. 

At  Hamilton. 

Laird,  Thomas  W. 
McCullough,  Samuel. 
McCusker,  Frank. 
Eead,  Edward  Geo. 
Shaw,  John. 
Stevenson,  Hugh  H. 

At  London. 

Baker,  George. 
Brett,  William. 
Hiscott,  Wm.  Charles. 
Harragan,  Danl.  P. 
McKellar,  D.  Alexander. 
State,  Joseph. 

101 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885  ' 


At  Winnipeg. 
Cox,  Kobt.  S.  Chabot,  Alfred  F.  H. 

Farmer,  Spencer.  Mills,  R.  R. 

McPherson,  Wm.  Torrance.  Wallace,  Wm.  Samuel.  ■ 

Ramsay,  Eobt.  M.  A. 

lilST  OF  CANDIDATES  WHO  PASSED  THE  CIVIL  SERVICE  QUALIFYING 

EXAMINATION. 


Creighton,  H.  S 
McLeod,  John. 
McEchin,  Alex.  J.  G. 
O'Sullivan  Denis. 

Belding,  Herbert  W. 
Bennett,  Louisa. 
Black,  Charles  E. 
Colpitts,  B.  L. 
Edgecombe,  Arthur. 
Gardiner,  Robinson. 
Hip  well,  John  P. 
McAfee,  Robert. 
Phillips,  R.  B.  H: 


McDonald,  James  A 
McEwen,  Henry  E. 
Moran,  Michael  James. 

Bilodeau,  Edmond. 
Creighton,  James* 
Foley,  Lawrence. 
Goulet,  Irenee. 
Moissette,  Jos.  E„ 
O'Dowd,  Francis. 
Pelletier,  Wilfrid. 
Philbert,  Edouard. 
Simard,  L.  Eugene. 

Bel  anger,  Amddee. 
Carpenter  Geo.  A. 
Crowe,  Timothy  J. 
Descary,Ferdinand. 
Durack,  John  Jas. 
Ermatinger,  P.  T.  H. 
Gray,  Frs.  W. 
Guay,  L.  A. 
Hayes,BEdwd.  W. 
Lacroix,  E.  O.  Hi 
Jjeblanc,  Olivier. 
McGregor,  Wm.  Dawson. 
Michaud,  Jos.  A. 
Poirier,  Jos.  Signai. 
Terner,  Frangois. 


November,  1884. 

At  Halifax,  IS/.  S. 

Elliot,  Clarence  P. 
McCurdy,  James  F. 
Page,  William  W. 
Roche,  George. 

At  St.  John,  N.B. 

Belyea,  Theodore  H. 
Brown,  Malcolm  D: 
Carr,  A.  W. 
Copp,  John  R. 
Fenwick,  L.  A. 
Gildart,  Oliver  A. 
Ketchum,  John  P. 
Malcolm,  James. 
Rayworth  J.  S  . 

At  Gharlottetown,  P.E.I. 

McDonald,  John. 
Mclnnis,  Augustin  J. 


At  Quebec. 

Chamberland,  F. 
Drum  S.  W. 
Genest,  N.  R. 
Hannon,  Henry  M. 
LeVasseur,  Jos.  A.  T. 
Pelletier,  Maxime. 
Prendergast,  Jeremie. 
Scott,  Robt.  Chas. 

At  Montreal. 

Bennett,  Philip  L. 
Clarke,  George. 
Crowe,  William  Jas. 
Desrosiers,  B.  R. 
Dufresne,  Joseph/ 
Gervais,  Dasse  E. 
Grenier,  J.  A. 
Hall,  James  M. 
Hoolahan,  John. 
LaManque  Thomas* 
LeRoux,  Jos.  A. 
Masse,  Arthur. 
Morin,  Alcidas. 
Rochelau,  Wilbrod. 

102 


Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.) 


A.  1885 


At  Ottawa. 

Beatty  Robt.  A. 
Campbell,  Duncan  A. 
Code,  Abraham. 
Christie,  Lily. 
Cunningham,  F.  H. 
Dunne,  Joseph  P. 
Foley,  James. 
Geramell,  W.  X.  M. 
Goulden,  Danl.  H'y. 
Hannum,  Minnie. 
Label  le,  Leonce. 
E.  C.      Mason,  Wm,  T. 

Merrick,  .Kathleen. 
McElroy,  James. 
O'Hanly,  R.  E. 
Scott,  F. 
Scott,  Wm. 

At  Kingston. 

Clarke,  Mary  C. 
Doller,  Willett  J. 
Ferguson,  Archibald  M. 
Moore,  Thomas. 

At  Toronto. 

Cameron,  J.  D. 
Graham,  A.  C. 
Hanna,  David  E. 
Lindsay,  William. 
McCague,  Wm.  A. 
Martin,  Stephen. 
North,  John  A. 
Roberts,  C.  G.  D. 
Thompson,  Harry  P* 
Watson,  John  A. 
Whiteside,  James  A. 

At  Hamilton. 

Cummings,  John  P. 
Garner,  Mary  E. 
Harron,  Robert. 
McCulloch,  John  O. 
Read,  Edw.  Geo. 

London. 

Calton,  Robt.  W. 
Dillion,  Morris  A. 
Echlin,  Chas.  K. 
Ferguson,  Fred'k.  P. 
Kiernan,  Patrick. 
Mclntyre,  Hugh. 
Smyth,  James  Thos. 

At  Winnipeg, 
Broad,  Thos. 

At  Victoria,  B.C. 
Finlayson,  Chas.  Wm.  McLoughlin,  Wnu  B„ 

Lindsay,  Albert  Edward. 

103 


Binks,  James. 
Bliss,  L.  D.  C.  F. 
Co  burn,  Alex.  H.  Ji 
Christie,  Jessie  B. 
Chevrier,  Louisa  D. 
Duhamel,  Agnes. 
Fitzgerald,  Geraldine. 
Fuller,  Thos.  Wm. 
Glover,  W.  J. 
Grafton,  Wm.  Hy. 
Hardy,  Jessie  B. 
Lefebvre  dit  Yillemure,  J. 
Maxwell,  Wm.  John. 
Morrison,  Edward. 
O'Gready,  Sarah  M. 
Prentiss,  Jenny. 
Steele,  Evelyn. 
Wright,  Edward  C. 

Bower,  Thos.  T. 
Dolan,  Frank  M. 
Embury,  Wm.  J. 
Kennedy,  Mary. 

Anderson,  John. 
Francy,  James  G. 
Haig,  Thos.  R. 
Larkin,  Joseph. 
Liddy,  Wm.  Robt. 
McGill,  Alexander. 
Milligan,  Wm.  Geo. 
Patterson,  Thos. 
Sinon,  Eugene  H. 
Walker,  Robert. 
Westman,  Eidon, 
Wilson,  G.  D. 

Bucke,  Nicholas. 
Garner,  Hannah  D. 
Grant,  Mary  C. 
McCullough,  Samuel. 
McMahon,  Mary. 
Ruddy,  Joseph. 

Buckner,  Urbin. 
Cowan,  Thos.  C. 
Duff,  Thos.  Alexander. 
Elliott,  Geo.  B. 
Harragan,  Daniel  P. 
Mattheson,  Alex.  J. 
Percival,  James  H. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46.)  A.  1885 


CANDIDATES  WHO  PASSED  IN  OPTIONAL  SUBJECTS   AT  THE   CIVIL 
SERVICE  EXAMINATION  HELD  IN  NOVEMBER,  1884. 

At  Halifax,  N.S. 

Creighton,  H.  S Book-keeping  and  Precis. 

Elliott,  C.  P do.  do. 

McLeod  John, Precis. 

McCurdy,  J.  T do. 

Page,  W.  W... Book-keeping. 

Sullivan,  M.  M Telegraphy. 

At  St.  John,  N.B. 

Belyea,  Theodore Book-keeping. 

Bourque,  A.  P 1 do.  and  Composition. 

Copp,  John  R do. 

Harrison,  J.  S ....Stenography. 

Carr,  A.  W .Precis. 

At  Quebec. 

Chamberland,  F Book-keeping, 

Creighton,  James do. 

Drum,  S.  W Composition. 

Foley,  Lawrence Book-keeping. 

Levasseur,  J.  A.  T do.  and  Translation. 

Morin,  Onesime Telegraphy. 

Parent,  Alfred Stenography. 

Pelletier,  Maxime Book-keeping  and  Translation. 

Simard,  L.  Eugene Translation. 

At  Montreal. 

Bennett,  P.  L .Composition  and  Translation. 

Ermatinger,  P.  T,  II do. 

Grenier/j.  A do.  Book-keeping    and 

Precis. 

Godin,  Hermenegilde Book  keeping. 

LeBlanc,  Olier do. 

Morin,  Alcidas ....... Translation  and  Precis. 

McGregor,  Wm.  D Bookkeeping. 

At  Ottawa. 

Belangcr.  V Translation. 

Brenot,  Honore -        do        and  Composition. 

Brittain,  E.  L ..Precis. 

Campbell,  H.  S do 

ChriBtie,  Lily Type- writing. 

Cochran,  W.  C Precis. 

Foley,  James do 

Glover,  W.  J do 

Grafton,  W.  H do 

Gilbert,  E.  W do 

Hardy,  Jessie  B do 

Heming,  A do 

Hume,  H.  E Type-writing. 

Kemp,  A.  E... Book-keeping. 

Maxwell,  Wm.  J Precis. 

Scott,  Wm Book-keeping. 

Smith,  W.  H.  C - do 

Shore,  J.  W Precis, 

104 


* 


48  Victoria,  Sessional  Papers  (No.  46)  A.  1885 


At  Kingston, 

Bower,  Thos.  T Precis. 

I)olan,  Frank  M Book-keeping. 

Ferguson,  Arch.  M Precis. 

At  Toronto. 

Cameron,  J.  D   .» ...... Precis  and  Type-writing. 

Liddy,  Wm.  Robert Precis. 

Martin,  Stephen do    and  Book-keeping. 

Wilson,  G.  D Precis. 

At  Hamilton. 

Garner,  Hannah Piecis. 

Garner,  Mary  E,....«  do 

Grant,Mary  0.. do 

Harron,  Eobert Book  keeping. 

McMahon,  Mary ...Precis. 

Read,  Ed wd.  Geo. do 

Ruddy,  Joseph do    and  Book-keeping. 

At  London. 

Buckner,  TJrbin Book-keeping. 

Cowan,  Thoi*.  C *. Precis. 

Duff,  Thos.  A Stenography. 

Harragan,  D.  P ....Precis, 

J.  THORBURN,  LL.D.,  Chairman. 

A.  D.  DeCRLLBS, 

P.  LeSUEUR,  Secretary. 


105 
46a— 8 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (Xo.  52.) 


A.  1885 


RETURN 


(526) 


ro  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  the  23rd  February,  1885  :— 
For  a  Eeturn  showing : 

1.  The  total  number  of  Applications  made  and  not  granted  for  Licenses 

or  Permits  to  cut  Timber,  Saw-logs,  Cordwood,  Ties  and  Poles 
within  the  Territory  lately  in  dispute  between  the  Provinces  of 
Manitoba  and  Ontario. 

2.  The  date  of  each  rejected  Application,  and  the  name  and  residence 

of  each  Applicant. 

3.  The  geographical  location  of  the  one  applied  for  and  not  granted. 

4.  The  offer  of  Bonus  and  of  Crown  Dues  or  Stumpage  in  each  or  any 

case,  accompanying  such  Application. 

5.  The  reason  assigned  for  refusal  in  the  case  of  each  of  such  rejected 

Applications. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Apartment  of  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  21bt  April,  1885. 


'chedule  showing  those  Applications  for  License  to  cut  Timber  within  the  Territory 
lately  in  dispute  between  the  Provinces  of  Manitoba  and  Ontario,  which  have 
been  made  to  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  but  not  submitted  by  him  to  the 
favorable  consideration  of  Counoil. 


Name 

of 

Applicant. 

tlex.  Manning, 

[cDougall,  Browne 
&Co. 
do 
do 
do 
I  W.  Richards.... 
do 
do 
do 
do 
7.  H.  Carpenter... 

[.  Brandenburg  & 
Co. 

526-1 


Address. 

Date. 

Toronto,  Ont 

Apr.  10,  1872 

Barrie,  Ont 

Sept,  23, 1872 

do 

do   23,  1872 

do 

do    23,1872 

do 

do   23,1872 

Brockville,  Ont. 

June  7,  1876 

do 

do     7,  1876 

do 

do     7,  1876 

do 

do     7,  1876 

do 

do     7,  1876 

Orillia,  Ont 

Mar.  31,  1877 

Fargo, D.T.,  U.S. 

Apr.  11,  1879 

Location. 


On  the  shore  of  Lake  of 

the  Woods. 
West  side  of  Rainy  Lake. 


do 


South  side  of  Seine  River. 

North  do 

Tp.         3  S.,  Rge.  23  B... 


do  3  do 
do  3  do 
do  2  &  3  do 
do         2      do 

On  Eagle  Lake 


24  E.., 

25  E... 

26  E.., 

27  E.., 


On  Seine  River. 

1 


Remarks. 


Other  applications. 

do 
Invited  to  comp.te. 

do 
Other  applications. 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Partly  disposed  of; 

area  excessive 
Already  disposed  of. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.) 


A.  1885 


Schedule  showing  those  Applications  for  License  to  cut  Timber,  &c— Continued. 


Name 
of 

Applicant. 


Henry  Allison 


D.  B.  Woodworth. 


G.H.  Strevel., 


M.  Sinnott. 


Geo.  Harvey 


Address. 


Date. 


H.  A.  Bell 

C.  S.  Crysler 

Kennedy  &  Suther- 
land. 

H.  Stafford 

Thos.  Hanson.  *..... 

Thos.  Foley 

John  Schultz 

H.  R.  McDonald  ... 


Rogers  &  Co 

Wm.  Mitchell 

G.  Leprohon 

S.  B.  Cochrane 

Wm.  Shoulds 


Newport,  N.S.... 
Cornwallis,  N.S. 
Winnipeg,  Man. 

do 
do 

do 

Morri8burgb,Ont 
Winnipeg,  Man 

Almonte,  Ont.... 

Keewatin 

Almonte,  Ont  ... 
Winnipeg,  Man. 
Rat  Portage,  Ont 

Man, 


Location. 


Jos.  Zimmerman ... 
H.  McDougall  &  Co 
Thos.  Bpeace 


B.  M.  Rideout 


S.  Mcllvaine. 
R.  Doull 


F.  Rubichon... 
Geo.  Campbell. 


Winnipeg] 
do 
do 
do 
do 

RatPortage,Ont 
Colborne,  Ont... 
Winnipeg,  Man. 

Rat  Portage,  Ont 


Gait,  Ont 
Winnipeg, 


Junel8,il879 
July  5,  1879 
Sept.  8,  1879 

Oct.  29,  1879 

Feb.   3,  1880 

Sept.  20, 1880 
Not.  6,  1880 
A.pr.  4,  1881 

do  13,  1881 
do  13, 1881 
do  20,  1881 
Aug.10,  1881 
do  23,  1881 

Sept.  16, 1881 
do  21,  1881 
do  21,  1881 

Oct.  25,  1881 
do  31,  1881 

Nov.15,  1881 
Jan,  17,  1882 
Feb.  15,  1882 

Mar.   2,  1882 


Nine  miles  east  of  Seine 

River. 
On  Eagle  Lake 


On  C.P  R.  and  east  boun- 
dary Manitoba. 

On  Eagle  Lake 


On  Lake  of  the  Woods 


On  Section  14,  C.P.R 

In  vicinity  of  Eagle  Lake 
On  Seine  River , 


Remarks. 


Man. 


J.  T.  Horn 

J.  A.  Christie 

LordGeo.  Campbell 
do 


Rat  Portage,  Ont 
Care  J.  C  Patter- 
son,  M.P. 

do 

Brandon,  Man  ... 
Winnipeg,  Man. 

do 


Robinson  Pirie. 


H.  McDougall  &  Co 

Fras.  Jones 

T.  M.  Daley 

Donald  Cameron... 
A.  J.  Frazer 


do 
do 


10,  1882 
21,  1882 


Dundas,  Ont. 


B.  W.  Richards.. 
Hon.  P.  Mitchell. 
Hon.  P.  Mitchell ... 
Chas.  Bermingham 

Horace  O.  Snow 
J.  C.  Gough 


Colborne,  Ont... 

Ottawa,  Ont 

Brandon,  Man  ... 
Winnipeg,  Man., 
do 

Brockville,  Ont. 
Montreal,  Que... 
Montreal,  Que ... 
Kingston,  Ont ... 

Winnipeg,  Man., 
Port  Arthur,  Ont 


R.  A.  Mather. 
T.  C.  Bate 


H.  G.  Bate. 


do  23,  1882 
Apr.  19,  1882 

do  19,  1882 
May  30,  1882 
July  24,  1882 

do  24,  1882 

3ept.ll,  1882 

Oct.  15,  1882 
do  28, 1882 
do  28,  1882 
Nov.  7,  1882 
Dec.  19,  1882 

do  28,  1882 
Feb.  22,  1883 
Feb. 22,  1883 
Mar.  5,  1883 


On  Eagle  Lake 

do  ..... 

do  

Lake  of  the  Woods 

Turtle  Portage,  Whitefish 

Bay. 
In  vicinity  of  Rat  Portage 

Black  Sturgeon  Lake 

do  

Lake  of  the  Woods 

Along  C .  P.  R. ,  east  of  Rat 

Portage. 

Lake  of  the  Woods 

Wah-poos  &  Crow  Lakes. 
In  Tps.  1  and  2  S.,  Ranges 

23  and  24  G. 
Coney  Island,  Lake  of  the 

Woods. 

On  Eagle  River 

S.  of  0.  P.  R-  and  between 

93°  and  94°  W.  long. 

Lake  of  the  Woods 

Lac  des  Mille  Lacs 


Area  excessive. 

Partly  disposed  of; 
area  excessive. 

Area  excessive  ;  re- 
ceived permit  else- 
where. 

Received  permit 
elsewhere. 

Indefinite,  and  area 
excessive. 

Indefinite. 
do     . 
do 

do 

do 
Disposed  of. 
Indefinite. 
Disposed  of. 

Indefinite, 
do     - 
do 
do 


do 
Incited  to  compete. 
Other  applications. 


Ottawa,  Ont. 
do 

do         . 


do 
do 


7,  1883 
29,  1883 


do 

On  Eagle  Lake 

Islands  in  Shoal  Lake. 
South  shore  of  Sabaskong 

Bay. 
Lake  of  the  Woods,  or  old 

Dawson  road. 

Whitefish  Bay 

InTps.lS.,Rgs.23&24E 

do     2  do 

Eagle  Lake 

North  shore  Lake  of  the 

Woods. 

On  Rainy  River. 

Wah-poos  &  Crow  Lakes. 
South  side  Sabaskong  Bay 
Manitou  River  and  Lake 

(B  and  C). 

Sabaskong  Bay 

Pinafore  River 


Apr.  9,  1883 
do   18,  1883 

do  27,  1883 


265  00 


250 


Tp.  IS.,  Range C24E 

Height  of  land  and  Clear- 
water Lakes. 

Tps.  6  &  6  S.,  Ranges  28 
&29E. 

2 


Disposed  of. 

Indefinite, 
do 

No  description. 
Not  the  highest  ten- 
der. 
Invited  to  compete. 
Indefinite. 
Other  applications. 
Invited  to  compete. 

Indefinite. 

Disposed  of. 
Other  applications. 

do 
Partly  disposed  of. 


Invited  to  compete, 
do 

Invited  to  compete. 

Not  the  highest  ten- 
der. 

Partly  disposed  of. 

River  not  shown  ofl 
maps. 

Partly  disposed  of. 

Invited  to  compete. 

Area  excessive. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.) 


A.  1885 


Schedule  showing  those  Applications  for  License  to  cut  Timber,  &c. — Continued, 


Name 

of 

Applicant 


W.  W.  McMillan  . 

fas  B.  Eaton 

}.  H.  McMillan .... 

E.  B.  Harris. 

Robert  Hick 

ras.  Bardou 

fc.  J.  Short. 

do 
ifcDonald,        An 
drews  &  Go. 

Robert  Olapp 

3.  J.  McMillan.... 

P.  J..  Jephson.. 

P.  A.  Dawson:..:.. 

J.  P. -Dawson ..":.... 

rohn  Lewis.  

H.  M.  Nesbitt. 

do 

k.  McKnight 

E.  Mclntyre  ....... 

W.  J.  Murray 

D.  E.  Bellemare... 

J.  C.  Morrow. 

James  Thompson. 
William  Skead.... 
John  McKenna.... 

Jos.  R.  McKay 

Hugh  Grant 

John  McKenna 

0.  T.  Bate 

H.  N.  Bate 

John  Mather 

R.  A.  Mather 

R.  Fuller , 

W.  H.  Brouse 

W.  R.  Thistle 

William  Skead..., 
John  Phillips 

J.  0.  Roger 

Levi  Miller 

Louis  Bergeron  .. 
George  Boisvert., 
A.  J.  St.  Pierre.. 

L.  J.  Jodouin 

H.  Godson 

Geo.  H.  Grundy . 

P.  E.  Turner , 

A.  L.  Andrews.... 

E.  Colman 

T.  K.  Allan 

Donald  W.  Duff... 
C.  T.  Turner...... 

John  A .  Neilson  . 

T.  B.  Lefaivre 

John  C.  Hendrie.. 


Address. 


Date. 


Per  D.  B.  Wood- 
worth,  M.P. 
do  ... 

do       ,    ... 
do 

Ottawa,  Ont. 

Per     pin  hey, 

Christie  &  Co. 

Winnipeg,  Man.. 

do 
Port  Arthur,  Ont 


Picton,  Ont 

Ottawa*  Ont 

Winnipeg,  Man. 
Sombra,  Ont ..... 


May  14,  1883 

do  14,  1883 

do  14,  1883 

do   14,  1883 

Apr.   9,  1883 

July   7,  1883 

Aug.  9,  1883 

do     9,  1883 
May  16,  1883 

Aug.  16,  1883 

Sept.  4,'  1883 

do     4,  1883 

Oct.  10,  1883 


do 

Ottawa,  Ont 

Woodstock,  Ont. 

do 

La  Salette,  Ont. . 
Ottawa,  Ont...... 

St.  Catharines,  0. 
Ottawa,  Ont...... 

Fergus,  Ont  ..... 

Winnipeg,  Man. . 

do 
Ottawa,  Ont 


River  Desert,  Q . 
Pembroke,  Ont.. 
Ottawa,  Ont 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 

do 
Winnipeg,  Man.. 
Ottawa,  Ont 


do 

Roaches  Point,  0 


Ottawa,  Ont.. 

do 

do 

do 
Toronto,  Ont. 


do 
do 
do 
do 

Belleville,  Ont. 


Toronto,  Ont. 
do 


do 
Montreal,  Que  ... 
do 


do  10,  1883 

do  15,  1883 

do  18,  1883 

do  25,  1883 

Mar.  2,  1882 

Nov.  1,  1883 

do  1,  1883 

do  3,  1883 

Dec.  3,  1883 

do  20,  1883 

Oct.  8,  1883 

Jan.  7,  1884 

do  9,  1884 

do  14,  1884 

do  15,  1884 
Feb.  2, 1884 

do  2,  1884 

do  2,  1884 

do  2,  1884 

do  2,  1884 

do  2,  1884 

do  2, 1884 

do  9, 1884 

do  11,  1884 

Mar.  7,  1884 
do  18,  1884 

do  18,  1884 
do  18,  1884 
do  18,  1884 
do  18,  1884 
Apr.  18, 1884 

do  23, 1884 

do  23,  1884 

do  23,  1884 

do  23,  1884 

do  23,  1884 

do  23,  1884 
do  23,  1884 

do  23,  1884 
do  25,  1884 
do  25,  1884 


Location. 


Sand  Island  River. 

do 

do  

do 

Islands  in  Rainy  Lake., 
Hunter's  Island...... 


Sabaskong  and  Whitefish 

Bays. 
Wah-poOs  &  Crow  Lakes 
Lac  des  Mille  Lacs. 

South  side  SabaskongBay 
Winnipeg  River. ......... ... 

Lake  Lacrosse., 

Height  of  land  and  Clear- 
"  water  Lakes. 

do  do 

Islands  in  Rainy  Lake.... 

Whitefish  Bay...... 

Lake  of  the  Woods 

Whitefish  Bay 

Lake  Manitou 

Manitou  River  (B  and  C). 

do  do 

East  side  of  CrowLake... 

Winnipeg  River. .-. 

South  side  Sabaskong  B&y 
Near  Hunter's  Island 

Near  MessemcoishLake.. 

On  Quetico  River.. 

Seiganagan  River 

Rainy  Lake ... 

do  

do  

do  

do  

do  

do         

do  

Seiganagan  River 


Nameukan  Lake 
Rainy  Lake 


North  side  of  Seine  River 
South  do 

North  do 

Pa-ka-ko-se-we-gan  Lake 
South  shore  of  Lac  Seule 

South  side  of  Seine  River 

do 

do 

do 
Sturgeon  Lake,  Hunter's 

Island. 
South  side  of  Seine  River 

do 


do 
On  Rainy  Lake. 

do 
3 


Remarks. 


In  terrritory  within 
which  the  Rainy 
Lake  Lumber  Co. 
are  to  select 

Other  applications. 
do 

Already  disposed  of. 

do 

Invited  to  compete, 
do 

do 

Already  disposed  of. 
Invited  to  compete. 

do 
Other  applications. 
Invited  to  compete, 

do 

do 
Already  disposed  of. 
Invited  to  compete. 

do 
Already  disposed  of. 

Invited  to  compete. 
Partly  disposed  of; 
other  applications. 
Already  disposed  of. 
do 

Invited  to  compete, 
do 

do 

Other  applications. 

Invited  to  compete. 
Not  sufficiently  de- 
finite. 
Already  disposed  of. 
Rainy  Lake  Lumber 

Co.'i  reserve. 
Invited  to  compete. 

do 

do 

do 
Partly    covered    by 

Indian  reserve. 
Invited  to  compete. 

do 

do 

do 
Already  disposed  of. 

do 

Partly  disposed  of; 

other  applications. 

Alreadyidisposed  of. 

Invited  to  compete. 

do 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.] 


A.  1885 


Schedule  showing  those  Applications  for  Licenses  to  cut  Timber,  &c. — Concluded. 


Name 

of 

Applicant. 


Walter  Ross 

do  

P.  A.  Turner 

A.  A.  Jackson 

do 

F.  G.  Lear..  

James  A,  Macnab.. 

H.  J.  Friel 

John  Laird 

D.  F.  Burke 

Thos.  Squires 

Jas.  Bampfield 

Joseph  Cozens 

Donald  Stewart.... 

0.  A.  Camp 

R.  J.  Fleming 

N.  S.  Cornell 

Jno.  Hollinger 

Walker  &  Eberts... 

W.  H.  Plummer.... 

John  D.  Lewis 


Address. 


Ottawa,  Ont 

do 

Toronto,  Ont.  ... 
Winnipeg,  Man., 
do 

Ottawa,  Ont 

do  

do 
Port  Arthur,  Ont 
do 
do 

Ottawa,  Ont 

Sault  Ste.  Marie, 

Ont. 
St.Catharines,0. 

do 
Toronto,  Ont 

Winnipeg,  Man., 
do 
do 

Sault  Ste.  Marie, 

Ont 
Winnipeg,  Man.. 


Date. 

Apr 

29, 

1884 

do 

30, 

1884 

May 

1, 

1884 

do 

17, 

1884 

do 

17, 

1884 

do 

24, 

1884 

do 

24, 

1884 

June  16, 

1884 

July 

8, 

1884 

do 

8, 

1884 

do 

12, 

1884 

do 

23, 

1884 

Aug 

.6, 

1884 

do 

19, 

1884 

do 

19, 

1884 

do 

22, 

1884 

Oct.  23, 

1884 

do 

23, 

1884 

Nov.  28, 

1884 

Dec.  23, 

1884 

Mar. 

2, 

1885 

Location. 


Sand  Island  River 

Nameukan  River 

South  side  of  Seine  River 
North  do 

Pa-ka-ko-se-we-gan  Lake 

Mauitou  River 

do  

Nameukan  River 

Sandy  River 

do  

Lac  des  Mille  Lacs 

Manitou  River  and  Lake. 
Lac  des  Mille  Lacs. 


Hunter's  Island,  in  Rainy 
Lake. 

Turtle  Portage 

Islands  near  Hunter's  I'd 


Blast  of  Rainy  Lake 

North  of  Seine  River 

North  side  of  Shoal  Lake 

and  Islands. 
Lac  des  Mille  Lacs.. 


[slands  in  Shoal  Lake. ... 


Remarks. 


Invited  to  compete. 

do 
Already  disposed  of. 
Invited  to  compete. 

do 

do 

do 
Already  disposed  of. 
Indefinite. 

do 
Other  applications. 

do 

do 

Not  shown  on  plans. 

Other  applications. 
do  and 

partly  disposed  of. 

Already  disposed  of. 
Other     applications 

for  islands. 
Other  applications. 

do 


Certified  correct. 

G.  W.  RYLEY, 
Clerk  in  charge  of  Timber  and  Mines  Office,  Dept.  Interior. 
Ottawa,  9th  April,  1885. 


48jVictoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.) 


A.  1885 


Schedule  showing  those  Applications  for  Permits  to  cut  Timber,  Saw-logs,  Cord  wood, 
Ties  and  Poles  within  the  Territory  lately  in  dispute  between  the  Provinces  of 
Manitoba  and  Ontario,  which  have  been  made  to  the  Minister  of  the  Interior, 
but  not  favorably  entertained  by  him. 


Name 

of 

Applicant. 


John  Schultz 

G.  Leprohon 

Wm.  Shoulds 

R.  H.  Doull  

R.  Doull 

M.  A.  Gilbert 

Wm.  Skead 

J.  H.  Buhner 

Thompson  &  Co.... 

H.  Mcftae 

T.  Hanover ;. 

Mo  ran,    McKinnon 

&  Co. 
J.Lockie  Wilson... 

W.  H.  Nagle 

David  Douglas 

A.  P.  McDonald.... 

S,  L.  Gourlay 

0.  Bermingham.... 


Address. 


McLeod  &  Co. 


Winnipeg,  Man. 
do 
do 
do 


do 

St.  Thomas,  Ont. 
Winnipeg,  Man.. 
Montreal,  Que  ... 

Winnipeg,  Man. 

Ottawa,  Ont 

Winnipeg,  Man. 
do 


Date. 


Alexandria,  Man 
Ottawa,  Ont    .. 
Winnipeg,  Man., 
do 

Truro,  N.S 

Kingston,  Ont,.. 


Rat  Portage,  Ont 


Aug.  1, 

do  21, 

Oct.  31, 

Mar.  21, 


do  31, 

July  19, 

do  25, 

do   28, 

Sept.30, 
do  23, 
do  28, 

Jan.  30, 


1881 
1881 
1881 
1882 


1882 
1882 
1882 
1882 

1882 
1882 
1882 
1883 


Locality. 


Mar.  3,  1883 
do  12,  1883 
do  15,  1883 
do  21,  1883 

May    5,  1883 


Sept.  26, 1883 


On  Lake  of  the  Woods... 
Black  Sturgeon  Lake...... 

do  

Between  94°  20'  and  94° 

50!    west     longtitude, 

and  50°  north  latitude 

and  the  C.P.R. 
do  do 

Tp.  6,  Rgs.  27  &  28  East. 
Islands  in  Shoal  Lake.... 
South  shore    Sabaskong 

Bay. 

Winnipeg  River 

Whitefish  Bay 

Eagle  Lake 

Little  Grassy  River  .., 


Rainy  Lake , 

Wabigoon  River 

Rainy  River 

do         

Rainy  Lake. , , 

Manitou  River  and  Lake 


Lac  des  Mille  Lacs 


225 


325 


Remarks. 


'Indefinite. 

do 
Other  applications. 
Area  excessive. 


do 
Disposed  of. 
Other  applications. 


do 

Disposed  of. 
Indefinite. 
do 

do 

Other  applications. 

Indefinite, 
do 
do 

Invited  to  compete 
for  2  berths  of  50 
square  miles  each, 
for  which  he  offer- 
ed a  bonus,  but  his 
tender  was  not  the 
highest  received. 

Invited  to  compete 
for  a  berth  of  50 
square  miles,  for 
which  they  offer  a 
bonus,  but  their 
tender  was  not  the 
highest  received. 


Certified  correct, 

G.  W.  EYLBY, 
Clerk  in  charge  of  Timber  and  Mines,  Dept,  of  the  Interior. 


Ottawa,  9th  April,  1885(. 


526—2 


18  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (JNo.  52.)  A.  1885 


RETURN 

(52c) 
Co  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885  :— 
For  a  Return  showing : 

1st.  The  total  number  of  Timber  Licenses  and  Permits  to  cut  Timber* 
Saw-logs,  Cordwood,  Ties  or  Poles,  on  lands  not  within  the  dis- 
puted Territory,  applied  for  and  refused  since  1st  February,  1883. 

2nd.  The  date  of  each  rejected  Application,  and  the  name  and  residence 
of  each  Applicant. 

3rd.  The  geographical  location  of  the  area  applied  for  and  not  granted, 
and  the  area  of  the  same. 

4th.  The  offer  of  Bonus  and  Crown  Dues,  or  Stumpage,  in  each  or  any, 
accompanying  such  Application. 

5th.  The  reason  assigned  for  refusal  in  the  case  of  each  of  such  rejected 
Applications. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

Department  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

■  Ottawa,  21st  April,  1885. 


&2c— 1 


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RETURN 

(S2d) 

Co  an  Order  of  tke  House  of  Commons,  dated  9th  February,  1885  ;— For 
copies  of  all  correspondence  and  regulations  not  already  brought  down, 
respecting  timber  for  settlers'  fuel,  applicable  to  the  neighborhood  of 
Moosomin,  N.W.T. 

?or  all  correspondence  as  to  the  demands  made  during  the  winter  of 
1882-83  by  the  Mounted  Police  of  twenty -five  (25)  cents  a  load  for 
settlers'  firewood. 

?or  all  correspondence  concerning  the  demand  made  by  a  sub-Agent  of  Mr. 
Stephenson,  during  the  winter  of  1883-84,  for  fifty  (50)  cents  for  a  per- 
mit in  addition  to  the  charge  of  twenty-five  (25)  cents  a  cord. 

far  all  correspondence  as  to  the  demands  made  during  the  winter  of 
1884-85,  including  the  demands  of  the  present  sub-Agent,  of  twenty- 
five  (25)  cents  for  affidavits  as  to  how  much  wood  each  settler  had 
burned  since  he  first  came  to  the  locality,  and  for  all  letters  and 
instructions  from  the  Department  or  from  the  Winnipeg  office,  upon 
these  subjects. 

By  Command. 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

)epartment  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  21st  April,  1885. 


Lieutenant-Governor's  Office,  Regina,  28th  January,  1885. 
SIRj — I  enclose  extract  from  a  petition  which  was  presented  to  me  on  20th 
istant,  duping  my  visit  to  Moosomin,  with  reference  to  the  tax  imposed  upon  dry 
rood  used  as  fuel. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

B.  DEWDNEY,  Lieutenant-Governor. 
[on.  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa. 

Ixtract  from  Petition  presented  to  His  Honor  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  the  Mrth- 
West  Territories  by  a  Committee  of  citizens  of  Moosomin  and  vicinity,  on  20th  Janu- 
ary, 1885. 

We  desire  to  draw  Your  Honor's  attention  to  the  injustice  and  hardship  unneces- 
irily  imposed  on  the  settlers  by  the  taxation  of  the  dry  wood  used  as  fuel.  It  appears 
articularly  unjust  when  we  consider  the  fact  that  the  other  great  land  companies 
iise  no  objection  to  the  removal  of  such  timber,  but,  on  the  contrary,  express  them- 
)lves  as  anxious  to  have  the  same  removed,  for  the  better  preservation  of  the  living 
mber. 

52rf—  I  1 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


On  information  received  from  Ottawa,  we  understand  that  the  settlement  of  the 
above  question  was,  to  a  considerable  extent,  dependent  on  Your  Honor  s  advice  to 
the  authorities  at  Ottawa,  and  a  later  reply  from  Ottawa  stated  that  the  subject  of 
the  expediency  of  exacting  dues  on  dead  timber  was  under  consideration. 

We  therefore  pray  that  Your  Honor  may  be  enabled  to  place  the  matter  before  I 
the  Government  at  Ottawa  in  such  a  light  that  they  cannot  but  see  that  in  the  best 
interests  of  the  country,  in  the  interest  of  the  struggmg  settler  and  for  the  better! 
preservation  of  the  living  timber,  it  is  expedient  that  the  dead  wood  be  free  of  access  1 
to  all. 

Copy  of  a  Resolution  of  the  Council  of  the  North- West  Territories,  pouted  2nd  August,] 

1884. 
"Kesolved,  That  no   charge  be  made  for  any  wood  used  for  fuel  purposes  by., 
bond  fide  settlers,  and  not  cut  for  sale,  and  that  each   homesteader   be   allowed  fond 
thousand  lineal  feet  of  building  timber  on  free  permit. 

Certified. 

A.  E.  FORGET,  Clerk  of  Council 

Certified  Copy  of  o  Report  of  the  Honoroble  the  Privy  Council,   approved  oy   His 
Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council  on  the  60th  December,  18U4. 

On  a  report,  dated  11th  December,  1884,  from  the  Minister  of  tb«  Interior, 
stating,  with  further  reference  to  the  despatch  from  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Man* 
toba  of  the  8th  of  May  last,  coveiing  an  Address  of  the  Legislative  Assembly _  of  yafe 
Province,  respecting  certain  prosecutions  for  taking  timber  from  Townships  8  and  9 
B^geVeast. of  Principal  Meridian,  and  praying  that  settlers  m  all  portions  of 
Man! toba  be  allowed  to  tako  away  all  the  dead  timber  and  wind-fa  lien  trees  from  those 
lands  yet  in  the  possession  of  the  Government;  that  Mr.  Aqmla  Walsh  tne  Com. 
missioner  of  Dominion  Lands,  reports  that  in  the  cases  in  question  the.  timber  cut 
was  cedar,  which  had  died  owing  to  the  draining  of  the  swamps  in  which  it  glow, 
that  timber  of  that  description  will  remain  sound  for  years  after  it  has  ceased  to  grow, 
and  that  it  is  nearly,  if  not  quite,  as  valuable  a  merchandise  as  though  it  were  green 

The  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands  submits  that  it  is  a  duty  of  paramount  f 
importance  in  that  country  to  preserve  the  small  extent  of  forest  timer  now ^grow-  t 
ing,  and  that  it  is  entirely  in  the  public  interest  to  prevent  settlers  cutting  more,! 
timber  than  is  required  for  their  own  use.  v^Jf 

That  there  is  a  large  proportion  of  homesteaders  who  have  land  without  timber, 
and  their  wants  should  be  fully  considered  before  any  other  disposition  of  the  timbe« 

18  PeThetCodmmissioner  further  submits  that  if  any  persons  were  permitted  to  cut  an 
remove  dead  and  fallen  timber  without  authority,  it  would  increase  the  dangers  ot  bus 
firr  and  that  the  present  regulations,  whilst  enabling  settlers  to  obtain  a  free  suppl 
of  wood  and  timbe?  for  their  own  use,  tend  to  prevent  the  forest  and  wood  land  troi 
bein*  denuded,  and  he  is  therefore  of  the  opinion  that  those  regulations  shoula  be 
maintained  in  which  opinion  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  concurs. 
m     Th  ?Comm7tteTrecPommend  that  a  despatch  based  on  this  Minute    if  approved 
be  forwarded  to  the  Lieutenant-Governor  of  Manitoba,  in  answer  to  the  Aduress  <J 
the  Legislative  Assembly  of  that  Province.  ^^  ^  ^^  Q  p  Q 

Winnipeg,  10th  December,  1884. 
Sir -I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the >  4l| 
instant*'  11321   T.  &  M.,  in  further  reference  to  the  proposed  modification  of  timbJ 
rflonlations  in  the  Moose  Mountain  district.  ,     1 

g  In  Zly!l  beg  to  inform  yon  that  whilst  on  one  hand  there  is  an  apparent  har* 
ship  in  requiring  Settlers  to  obtain  permission  for  the  removal  of  A?«<4 
timber,  yet,  on  the  other  hand,  if  they  were  allowed  to  remove  timber  ot  th-t  d» 


8  Victoria  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


ription  without  permit,  it  is  to  be  feared  that  instances  would  occur  in  which  fires 
rould  be  set  out,  for  the  express  purpose  of  killing  the  wood,  in  order  to  its  removal 
ithout  application  to  the  Department. 

I  should  be  glad  if  a  scheme  could  be  devised  by  which  settlers  could  be  per- 
ritted  to  remove  dead  or  fallen  timber  without  permit,  provided  that  could  be  done 
ithout  endangering  the  preservation  of  the  growing  timber.  I  very  much  fear, 
owever,  that  such  permission  would  be  abused,  and  would  not,  in  ^  >  end,  prove  to 
3  in  the  interest  of  the  settlers  themselves. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

A.  WALSH,  Commissioner, 
[on.  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa. 

Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  4th  December,  1884. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  18th 
ctober  last,  B.  3687,  with  reference  to  the  petition  from  the  settlers  in  the  Moose 
[ountain  district,  asking  for  a  modification  of  the  timber  regulations,  and  to  say  that 
le  Minister,  while  concurring  in  yuur  recommendation,  would  like  to  know  whether 
ie  restrictions  you  recommend  apply  to  dry  (or  dead)  wood,  the  taking  away  of 
aich,  it  is  alleged  in  the  petition,  would  prevent  the  spread  of  fire  in  the  bush,  and 
lereby  save  the  growing  timber. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

P.  B.  DOUGLAS, 

for  the  Secretary. 
..  Walsh,  Esq.,  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands,  Winnipeg. 

Dominion  Lands  Office,  Moosomin,  1st  November,  1884. 

Sir, — I  have  the  honor  to  report  having  visited  the  Souris  River  timber  district 
a  the  20th  August  last,  where  I  was  pleased  to  find  on  the  bottom  lands  of  the 
ouris  some  very  good  specimens  of  elm,  oak  and  some  poplar  of  a  fair  average.  The 
Lm  is  much  used  by  the  settlers  for  building. 

I  also  visited  the  Moose  Mountain  timber  lands  on  the  16th  of  September  last. 
[ere  I  also  found  the  timber  a  good  specimen. 

You  will  please  see  my  report  to  you  of  the  11th  October  last,  B.  19,  where  I 
ave  explained  with  length  the  quality,  size  and  quantity  of  timber  in  both  places. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

J.  J.  McHUGH,  Agent  Dominion  Lands, 
i.  F.  Stephenson,  Esq.,  Crown  Timber  Agent,  Winnipeg,  Man* 

Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  3rd  November,  1884. 
Sir, — I  am  directed  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  18th  ultimo, 
i  which  you  report  on  the  petition  from  the  settlers  in  the  Moose  Mountain  district, 
sking  for  a  modification  of  the  timber  regulations,  and  recommending  that  the 
aanges  asked  for  in  the  said  petition  be  not  sanctioned. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

JOHN  E.  HALL,  Secretary. 
l.  V alsh,  Esq.,  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands,  Winnipeg. 

Winnipeg,  18th  October,  1884. 
Sir, — I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the    12th 
.ugust  last,  11321,  T.  &  M  ,  transmitting  copies  of  papers  filed  in   your  office,   con- 
arning  a  petition  from  settlers  in  Moose  Mountain  district,  asking  for  a  modification 
f  timber  regulations. 

25<J—  U  3 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


In  reply,  I  beg  to  say  that  the  application  submitted  in  reference  to  the  quan- 
titv  of  timber  which  should  be  covered  by  free  permits  to  homesteaders,  as  well  as 
the  diameter  of  trees  that  may  be  Cut  under  such  permits,  very  materially  affects  the 
preservation  of  the  very  limited  extent  of  wood  to  be  found  in  a  great  part  of  the 
prairie  country. 

I  have  discussed  this  matter  with  Mr.  Crown   Timber   Agent   Stephenson,   and 
herewith  enclose  a  letter  embodying  his  views  upon  the  subject;  for  the  reason  given    ( 
by  him,  as  well  as  from  the  information  and   experience   I   have  myself  acquired  in 
conversation  with  the  settlers,  I  cannot  recommend  that  the  changes  asked  for  in  the 
petition  of  the  settlers  in  the  Moose  Mountain  district  should  be  made. 
I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

A.  WALSH,  Commissioner. 
Secretary  Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa. 


Crown  Timber  Office,  Winnipeg,  15th  October,  1884. 

Sie, In  compliance  with  the  request  contained  in  your  letter  of  the   25th   ult:, 

J24j.i  for  an  expression  of  my  views  as  to  the  advisability  of  acceding  to  the  peti- 
tion of  the  settlers  in  the  Moose  Mountain  distiict,  Assiniboia,  in  which  they  ask 
that  the  regulations  governing  the  issue  of  free  permits  be  so  amended  as  to  allow 
homesteaders  to  cat  4,000  lineal  feet  of  building  timber,  instead  of  1,800  feet,  and 
also  to  be  allowed  to  take  dry  wood  without  charge,  I  have  the  honor  to  report  that 
for  various  reasons  it  would,  in  my  opinion,  be  unwise  to  interfere  with  the  existing 
regulations. 

Attached  hereto  you  will  find  the  reports  of  Forest  Eanger  Gunne  and  the 
Dominion  Lands  Agent  at  Carlyle,  on  the  character  and  extent  of  the  timber  on  the 
mountain.  m 

You  will  observe  from  these  reports  that  the  timber  is  of  excellent  quality,  and 
particularly  adapted  for  building  purposes,  being  straight  and  tall. 

In  Mr.  Gunne's  report,  in  speaking  of  the  size  of  the  timber,  he  says :—  I  found 
some  of  the  poplar  there  from  10  to  14  inches  in  diameter  12  feet  from  the  stump, 
and  a  very  large  proportion  of  the  timber  is  from  10  to  12  inches  in  diameter. 
Now,  if  this  is  the  case  a  settler  cutting  1,800  feet  of  10-inch  logs  could  build  a 
house  18  x  24,  ten  logs  high,  and  have  remaining  960  feet,  which,  in  my  opinion, 
is  enough  for  the  erection  of  other  buildings  required  by  the  average  home- 
steader.  In  fact,  from  observation  of  the  quantity  of  timber  cut  under  652  free 
permits  issued  by  this  agency,  and  returned  under  affidavit  during  the  present  year, 
only  16  homesteaders  cut  in  excess  of  the  present  free  allowance,  which,  I  think 
proves  that  the  grant  is  a  liberal  and  ample  one.  And  with  respect  to  allowing  the 
increase  from  1,800  to  4,000  lineal  feet,  on  condition  that  a  reduction  be  made  in  the 
diameter  of  the  logs,  I  may  say  that  I  do  not  think  it  would  be  consistent  with  the 
timber  policy  of  the  Department.  A  settler  in  cutting  1,800  lineal  feet  of  timber 
7  or  8  inches  in  diameter,  is  practically  denuding  the  area  of  as  much  timber 
as  if  he  cut  it  12  inches  or  larger.  It  is  growing  timber  that  should  be  protected.  ; 
The  settlers  on  the  prairie  lands  adjoining  the  mountain,  for  40  miles  to  the  east* 
west  and  south,  and  20  miles  to  the  north,  depend  on  obtaining  their  supply  of  timber 
and  fuel  from  this  mountain,  and  if  the  growing  timber  is  not  protected  the  conse- 
quences to  the  settlers  in  future  years  will  be  serious. 

But  apart  from  this,  should  a  homesteader  be  allowed  to   cut  4,000  feet  at  a : 
reduced  diameter,  what  assurance  have  we  that  logs  of  greater  diameter  would  not  j 
betaken?     It  has  been  my  experience  that  permitees  take  the   largest   and   best 
material  they  can  find.     From  the  annexed  report  it  would  appear  that  the  Moose 
Mountain  can  furnish  as  large  and  as  good  a  quantity  of  timber  as  there  is  to  be  found  I 
in  my  district.  .  , 

If  the  amendment  asked  for  were  made,  it  would  necessitate  the  appointment  0| 
an  increased  number  of  forest  rangers. 


4 


IB  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No,  52.)  A.  1885 


As  to  allowing  settlers  the  privilege  of  taking  dry  wood  without  paying  dues,  I 
rould  be  opposed  to  it,  but  it  might  be  well  to  consider  the  advisability  of  reducing 
le  dues  to  15  cents  a  cord  for  dry  and  fallen  wood,  when  cut  by  the  homesteaders 
>r  their  own  use,  and  not  for  speculative  purposes,  as  an  inducement  to  them  to  spare 
le  growing  timber,  thus  maintaining  control  and  supervision  over  the  forests,  which 
i  would  be  difficult  to  do  were  homesteaders  allowed  to  enter  and  cut  dry  wood  with- 
nt  restrictions. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

E.  F.  STEPHENSON,  Crown  Timber  Agent, 
l.  Walsh,  Esq.,  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands,  Winnipeg. 

Dominion  Lands  Office,  Moosomin,  11th  October,  1884. 

Sir, In  accordance  with  your  request  to  report  to  you  ou  the  timber  in  the 

loose  Mountain. 

I  have  the  honor  to  inform  you  that  I  visited  the  mountains  on  two  occasionsat 
ifferent  points  ;  and  I  must  say  I  was  agreeably  surprised  as  to  the  size  and  quality 
f  the  timber.  It  consists  principally  of  poplar  and  white  birch.  The  poplar  is  as 
ood  as  I  have  seen  in  the  country,  and  I  may  say  I  have  been  all  over  the  principal 
imber  lauds  in  the  Territory. 

The  birch  is  not  as  plentiful  as  the  poplar,  but  will  last  a  long  time,  as  the  settlers 
nly  use  it  for  making  sleighs,  waggon  frames,  hay  racks,  whiffletrees,  &c  ,  &c. ;  its 
verage  is  from  4  to  8  inches,  carrying  its  thickness  to  a  good  length. 

The  poplar  will  average  from  8  to  12  inches,  and  also  carries  its  thickness  to  a 
■ood  length.  Judging  from  the  size  of  some  of  the  farmers'  buildings,  I  should  say 
hat  buildings  30  x  36  could  be  easily  erected,  without  any  splicing  or  joining.  You 
aay  also  wish  to  know  something  about  the  timber  on  the  Souris  River.  I  have  been 
ip  and  down  the  Souris  for  a  distance  of  about  20  miles,  and  I  found  that  a  great 
nany  of  the  bottoms  along  the  river  are  thickly  covered  with  elm,  soft  maple,  oak 
>nd  some  poplar.  The  elm,  with  perhaps  some  logs  of  oak  and  poplar,  is  large  enough 
or  building  purposes. 

The  majority  of  the  settlers  in  the  Oxbow  settlement,  and  along  the  river,  have 
plendid  buildings,  built  with  elm.  It  does  not  carry  its  thickness  like  the  poplar, 
ibout  5  or  10  feet  from  the  stump  it  gets  branchy  and  crooked.  Its  average  thickness 
s  from  1  foot  to  2  feet,  and  some  of  it  is  3  feet,  or  more,  at  the  stump.  I  saw  some 
►f  the  buildings  16  x  ^0  feet,  very  straight  and  without  joinings. 
I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

J.  J.  McHUGH,  Agent  Dominion  Lands, 
S.  F.  Stephenson,  Esq.,  Crown  Timber  Agent,  Winnipeg. 

Crown  Timber  Office,  Winnipeg,  26th  September,  1884. 

SIR) I  have  the  honor  to  inform  you  that  in  the  month  of  August,  1883,  I  was 

instructed  by  the  Crown  Timber  Agent  to  go  to  the  Moose  Mountain  district,  in  the 
Province  of  Assiniboia,  and  examine  into  the  conditions  of  the  settlers,  take  applica- 
tions for  permits,  and  also  report  as  to  the  quality  and  extent  of  the  timbered  lands 
mi  Moose  Mountain,  from  which  the  settlers  in  that  large  and  extensive  district  oi 
country  get  their  supply  of  building  timber,  fencing  and  fuel. 

I  found,  on  careful  examination,  that  the  timbered  part  of  the  mourtain  was 
about  30  miles  in  length,  by  from  6  to  14  miles  in  width ;  the  timber  is  principally 
poplar,  with  a  little  balm  of  gilead  and  birch ;  there  are  several  small  lakes  on 
the  mountain  with  fringes  of  the  timber  along  the  sides,  I  found  some  or  the  poplar 
there  from  12  to  14  inches  in  diameter,  12  feet  from  the  stump,  and  a  very  large  pro- 
portion of  the  timber  is  from  10  to  12  inches  in  diameter. 

I  considered  at  that  time  that  the  timber  was  larger  and  of  better  quality  than 
any  I  had  seen  previously.    I  also   travelled   over  a.jout  thirty  townships,  taking 

5 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  o2.)  A.  1885- 


applications  for  permits,  and  I  found  that  the  houses  generally  were  very  comfort- 
able, and  the  logs  were  of  large  size,  and  well  hewed,  and  presented  a  very  nice 
appea-ance.  I  examined  several  of  the  houses  particularly,  and  found  them  from  1 0 
to  14  feet  high,  from  16  to  18  feet  wide,  and  from  20  to  25  feet  in  length ;  there  were 
irom  ten  to  twelve  logs  on  each  side  of  the  building. 

I  also  examined  some  logs  which  were  taken  out  for  buildings,  and  found  them 
from  10  to  12  inches  in  diameter,  well  hewed  and  excellent  timber.  Where  very 
small  logs  are  taken  out  it  must  be  from  choice,  not  being  so  heavy  and  much 
easier  to  put  into  a  building.  I  think,  for  the  ordinary  settler,  that  1,800  lineal  feet 
of  timber  is  a  fail-  supply,  but  to  those  who  have  a  good  deal  of  stock  this  quantity 
would  not  be  sufficient,  as  log  stables  would  be  required. 

I  think  it  would  not  be  good  policy  to  allow  the  settlers  to  take  dry  or  dead  wood 
without  authority,  that  is,  to  let  them  have  it  free;  if  this  is  permitted  there  is  no 
doubt  but  it  will  cause  waste,  and  the  settlers  who  reside  nearest  to  the  timber 
would  get  more  than  their  share.  The  settlers  take  out  their  wood  in  the  winter 
season,  when  it  would  be  almost  impossible  to  get  at  the  lying  timber,  on  account  of 
the  great  depth  of  snow.  As  the  timber  in  the  Moose  Mountain  district  is  princi- 
pally confined  to  one  locality,  I  think  it  would  be  well  to  protect  it  in  the  interest  of 
those  that  are  now  living  there  as  well  as  for  those  that  may  wish  to  become  residents 
in  that  district  of  country. 

I  have  travelled,  during  the  past  year,  through  the  Minnedosa  and  Birtle  districts, 
where  timber  is  more  abundant,  and  I  find  that  the  settlers  prefer  to  build  small 
houses,  as  they  are  much  easier  heated  and  made  comfortable  than  larger  buildings 
would  be. 

All  of  which  is  respectfully  submitted. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

KOBERT  GUNNE,  Forest  Ranger. 
E.  F.  Stephenson,  Esq.,  Crown  Timber  Agent,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  26th  September,  1884. 

Sir, — I  am  directed  to  request  that  you  will  be  so  good  as  to  report,  at  your 
earliest  convenience,  on  the  petition  from  the  settlers  in  the  Moose  Mountain  District, 
referred  to  you  from  this  Department  on  the  12th  August  last,  in  which  they  ask 
that  the  regulations  governing  the  issuing  of  free  permits  to  homesteaders  be 
amended. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

JOHN  E.  HAUj,  Secretary. 
A.  Walsh,  Esq.,  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  12th  August,  1884. 

Sir, — I  am  directed  by  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  to  acknowledge  the  receipt 
of  your  letter  of  the  28th  ultimo,  enclosing  a  petition  from  the  settlers  in  the  Moose 
Mountain  district,  in  the  Province  of  Assiniboia,  in  which  they  ask  for  certain 
amendments  to  the  regulations  governing  the  issuing  of  free  permits  to  homesteaders. 

In  reply,  I  am  to  say  that  the  matter  is  under  consideration. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

P.  B.  DOUGLAS,  for  the  Secretory. 
John  G.  Turriff,  Esq.,  Carlyle,  N.W.T. 

Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  12th  August,  1884. 

Sir,-— I  am  directed  by  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  to  transmit  herewith,  for 
your  consideration  and  report,  copies  of  all  papers  fyled  in  this  office,  concerning 
petition  from  the  settlers  in  the  Moose  Mountain  district,  in  the  Province  of 
Assiniboia,  in  which  they  ask  that  the  regulations  governing  the  issuing  of  free 

6  ^ 


18  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 

*—  —       —         ~   = 

)ermits  to  homesteaders  be  so  amended  as  to  allow  homesteaders  to  cut  4,000  feet  of 
wilding  timber  instead  of  1,800  feet,  and  also  that  no  charge  be  made  for  dry  wood. 
In  addition  to  the  above  request,  you  will  -otice  that  Mr.  Turriff  m  his  letter 
iccompanying  the  petition,  suggests  that  a  reduction  be  made  in  the  diameter  of  the 
ogs  which  the  settlers  are  allowed  to  cut,  as  the  trees  in  the  Moose  Mountains  are  of 

imall  dimensions,  ,       ,    _  .   .      ,,    ,  .,      .  v ,  i. 

The  Deputy  of  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  is  of  the  opinion  that  it  might  be 
veil  to  increase  the  number  of  feet  of  timber  allowed  to  each  settler  for  building 
rarposes,  and  that  the  diameter  of  the  trees  from  which  they  make  this  timber  might 
»  reduced,  but  he  is  strongly  opposed  to  allowing  settlers  to  take  the  dry  wood, 
without  paying  dues  for  the  same.  # 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

P.  B.  DOUGLAS,  for  the  Secretary. 
i.  Walsh,  Esq.,  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands,  Winnipeg. 

Department  oe  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  4th  August,  1884. 
Dear  Mr.  Burgess,— Annexed  hereto  is  a  letter  from  Mr.  John  G.  Turriff,  a 
nember  of  the  North- West  Council,  enclosing  a  petition  from  the  settlers  in  Moose 
Mountain  district,  in  which  they  ask  that  the  regulations  governing  the  issue  of 
I  free  permits  "  to  homesteaders  be  so  amended  as  to  allow  homesteaders  to  cut  4,000 
eet  of  building  timber,  instead  of  1,800  feet,  and  also  that  no  charge  be  made  for  dry 

tvood. 

Yours  respectfully,  &  ^  ^^ 

A.,  M.  Burgess,  Esq.,  Deputy  Minister  of  Interior. 

Council  Chamber,  Eegina,  28th  July,  1884. 

Sir  —I  have  the  honor  to  enclose  a  petition  from  the  settlers  in  the  Moose  Moun- 
tain district,  asking  for  two  changes  in  the  timber  laws,  and  to  submit  the  following 
reasons  why  the  changes  should  be  made  :  — 

With  reference  to  the  amount  of  building  timber  at  present  allowed,  it  is  found 
altogether  inadequate  to  put  up  the  buildings  that  it  is  absolutely  necessary  for  a 
farmer  to  have.  A  house  18x24  feet  takes  1,600  feet,  and  then  a  settler  has  either  to 
eo  without  stabling  and  granary  or  buy  timber,  and  in  many  cases  I  know  of  settlers 
*oing  without  outbuildings  on  account  of  the  charge  of  1  cent  per  foot  for  timber.  It 
[&  impossible  for  settlers  to  farm  successfully  unless  they  nave  suitable  outbuildings 
The  permit  allows  us  to  take  timber  up  to  12  inches  at  small  end.  In  our  district 
the  timber  is  about  6  inches  at  small  end,  so  that  we  only  get,  in-  reality,  about 
quarter  the  amount  intended.  .  .    „ 

With  reference  to  dry  timber  for  fuel,  there  is  more  destroyed  by  prairie  hres 
getting  into  the  bush  every  year  than  would  do  all  the  settlers.  The  dry  timber  is 
generally  found  around  the  outsides  of  bluffs  and  the  standing  bush,  having  been 
killed  by  fires  and  blown  down  by  storms.  The  using  up  of  this  timber  would  pre- 
vent, to  a  great  extent,  the  fire  from  spreading,  and  preserve  the  growing  timber. 

If  crrdwood  is  charged  for  to  settlers,  they  will  use  green  wood  instead  of  dry,  as 
it  will  be  much  cheaper,  one  cord  of  green  wood  cut  and  let  dry  for  one  year  being  as 
good  as  two  cords  of  dead  wood.  ■•    ,     j.    .,       „ 

I  understand  that  the  intention  of  the  Government  is  to  protect  the  timber  tor 
us  settlers,  but  am  of  opinion  that  if  these  changes  are  made  that  the  timber  will  be 
more  fully  protected.  It  seems  only  reasonable  that  a  settler  should  have  timber 
enough  on  a  free  permit  to  put  up  a  house,  stable  and  granary. 

Ii  these  changes  are  made,  one  of  the  greatest  causes  of  hard-feeling  towards  the 
Government,  in  my  district,  will  have  been  removed. 

I  hope  you  will  be  able  to  give  us  the  change  asked  for. 

Yours  respectfully, 
JOHN  G.  TURRIFF,  Member  North-  West  Council  for  Moose  Mountain. 

P. R,— Address  reply  to  Carlyle,  N.W.T. 
Hon.  Minister  of  Interior,  Ottawa. 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.) 


A.  1885 


Carlyle,  1st  July,  1882. 

We  the  undersigned  settlers  in  the  Moose  Mountain  district,  would  humbly  show- 
that  the  present  timber  laws  baar  hardly  on  us,  and  would  respectfully  ask  that  the 
following  changes  be  made : — 

1st.  That  4,000  feet  of  building  timber  be  allowed  on  "free  permit,"  instead  of 
1,800  feet,  as  it  takes  that  amount  to  put  up  house,  stable  and  granary. 

2nd.  That  no  charge  be  made  for  dry  wood,  as  by  taking  away  the  dead  wood 
fire  is  kept  out  of  the  bush  and  the  growing  timber  saved. 

In  many  cases  settlers  are  prevented  from  building  proper  outbuildings,  on 
account  of  having  to  pay  1  cent  per  foot  for  logs. 


Hon, 


D.  D.  McEwen, 
James  Pelfs, 
Eichard  Kisleey, 
Benjamin  Long, 
Claborn  Long, 
James  Millar, 

C.  Adamson, 

A.  A.  Campbell, 
W.  J.  Long, 
Charles  Eeed, 
.Ross  Davies, 
W.  B.  Anderson, 
Joseph  G-allaway, 
George  Perry, 
John  Jones, 
Wm,  Buchanan, 
Charles  Johnstone, 
John  Wilcox, 
Simon  Cameron, 
Lared  Black, 

D.  McEachen, 
Eev.  W.  G.  Wilcox, 
George  Keer, 

the  Minister  of  the  Interior, 


E.  E.  Nixon, 
J.  W.  Darby, 
J.  J.  Yold, 
Angus  Galbraith, 
C.  A.  Galloway, 
M.  Morrison, 
W.  Burley, 
Samuel  Hopper, 
Thomas  Eeid, 
Duncan  McLean, 
A.  Galloway, 
Douglas  Buchanan, 
Peter  Hay, 
Andrew  M.  Hislop, 

F.  L.  Thompson, 
W.  E.  Gilroy, 
Eobert  A.  Smythe, 

William (torn  off ) 

Thos.  A. do 

John  Beggs, 

Thomas  Hislop, 
Eobert  Kerr, 
Alexander  Kerr. 


€opy  of  a  Report  of  a  Committee  of  the  Honorable  the  Privy  Council,  approved  by  the 
Honorable  the  Deputy  of  Mis  Excellency  the  Governor  General  in  Council  on  the 
10th  October,  1881. 

On  a  report,  dated  27th  of  September,  1831,  from  the  Hon.  the  Minister  of  the 
Interior,  stating  that  there  are  at  present  in  force  separate  regulations  for  the  grant- 
ing of  permits  to  cut  timber  in  Manitoba,  Keewatin  and  the  North-West  Territory, 
embodied  in  four  Orders  in  Council  of  the  following  dates: — For  Manitoba,  13th  I 
January,  1873,  and  17th  January,  1876;  for  part  of  Keewatin,  25th  June,  1875,  and  * 
for  the  North- West  Territory,  20th  March,  1878  ;  moreover,  that  these  do  not  agree 
in  all  particulars — and  suggesting  that  the  accompanying  regulations,  which  are 
based  upon  and  are,  to  a  certain  extent,  a  consolidation  of  those  contained  in  the 
Orders  in  Council  above  mentioned,  be  substituted  therefor. 

The  Committee  submit  the  foregoing  suggestion  for  approval. 

Certified. 

J.  O.  COTE,  Clerk  Privy  Council 
Hon.  the  Minister  of  the  Interior. 


Begulations  for  Cutting  Timber  under  Permit  for  Manitoba,  Keewatin  and  the  North- 
West  Territory. 

homesteader's  free  permit. 

Any  occupant  of  a  homestead  quarter-section  having  no  timber  of  his  own,  may, 
Upon  application,  obtain  a  permit  to  cut  such  quantity  of  building  timber,  fencing 

8 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


imber  or  fuel,   as  he   may  require  for  use  on  his  homestead,   not  exceeding   the 

ollowing: —  .  ..       , 

1,800  lineal  feet  of  house  timber,  no  log  to  be  over  12  inches  at  the  small  end. 

400  roof  rails. 

30  cords  of  dry  wood. 

2,000  fence  rails. 

Should  the  house  timber  be  sawn  at  a  saw  mill,  payment  for  sawing  must  not  be 
nade  by  way  of  toll,  as  the  full  quantity  of  lumber  cut  from  logs  must  be  used  on 
he  permit-holder's  homestead.  In  order  that  mill  owners  may  be  able  to  give  satis- 
actory  evidence  that  saw-logs  or  lumber  found  in  their  possession  have  been  lawfully 
tot,  they  should  require  from  settlers  bringing  timber  to  be  sawn  proof  that  the 
ame  has  not  been  cut  on  the  Dominion  lands,  or  that  it  has  been  cut  under  a  permit, 
yhich  the  settler  should  produce  in  order  that  its  number,  date  and  name  of  per- 
uittee  may  be  noted  by  the  mill  owner ;  the  latter  should  also  record  the  amount  of 
uch  timber  sawn  by  him,  so  that  he  may  be  in  a  position  to  duly  protect  himself 
hould  account  or  return  thereof  be  demanded  by  agents  of  the  Department. 

The  applicant  will  require  to  pay  an  office  fee  of  50  cents  before  he  can  obtain  a 
>ermit,  but  no  dues  will  be  charged  for  the  timber  or  wood  cut  under  and  in  accord- 
ance with  it. 

Settlers  whose  farms  may  have  thereon  a  supply  of  timber,  or  who  are  in  posses- 
ion of  wood  lots,  or  other  timbered  lands,  will  not  be  granted  a  free  permit.  « 

PERMITS  SUBJECT  TO  DUES. 

Permits  under  payment  of  dues  may  be  granted  to  those  applying  for  them  to 
lut  timber  on  available  vacant  Dominion  lands,  on  paying  dues  at  the  rates  herem- 
ifter  specified: — 

Cordwood,  per  cord 25  cents. 

Fence  posts,  8  feet  6  inches  long 1   cent- 

Telegraph  poles,  22  feet  long 5  cents. 

Each  lineal  foot  over  22  feet  long 1   cent. 

Eailroad  ties,  8  feet  long 3  cents. 

Kails,  12  feet  long., $2.00  per  M. 

Stakes,  8  feet  long $2.00  per  M. 

Shingles «...  0.60  per  M. 

Square  timber  and  saw  logs  of  oak,  elm,  ash  or 

4    maple $3.00  per  M.B.M. 

Pine,  spruce,  tamarac,  cedar,  and  all  other  woods, 

with  the  exception  of  poplar 2.50  per  M.B.M. 

Poplar .. • 2.00  per  M.B.M. 

All  other  products  of  the  forest  not  enumerated,  10  per  cent,  ad  valorem. 

An  office  fee  of  50  cents  to  be  charged  for  each  permit. 

Issuers  of  permits  will  be  instructed  by  the  Minister  as  to  the  limit  of  quantity 
that  will  be  granted ;  also  what  proportion  of  dues  shall  be  deposited  on  issue  of 
permit,  as  guarantee  on  the  part  of  those  obtaining  the  same. 

Besides  the  dues  above  specified,  grantees  of  permits  may  be  called  upon  to  pay 
juch  addition  thereto  as  the  Minister  may  judge  necessary  to  meet  their  proportion 
3f  any  expense  that  may  be  incurred  by  the  Department  in  survey,  or  other  demarca- 
tion  on  the  ground  of  the  limits  within  which  such  permits  are  to  be  operative.  _ 

'Permits  shall  set  forth  that  those  obtaining  them  must  conform  to  the  conditions, 
terms  and  requirements  specified  in  the  same,  and  carefully  restrict  their  cutting  to 
the  limits  described  therein ;  and  that  any  breach  thereof  will  subject  the  offender 
to  all  the  pains  and  penalties  in  that  behalf  as  set  forth  in  the  Dominion  Lauds  Act. 

Winnipeg,  1th  January,  1885. 

Sib,— I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  29th 
ultimo,  enclosing  a  copy  of  a  letter  from  the  Kev.  Wm.  Nicholl,  Moosomm,  complam- 

9 


48  Yictoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


ing  of  the  manner  in  which  the  timber  regulations  are  administered  at  that  place, 
and  m liking  the  following  charges: — 

1.  That  one  of  the  Mounted  Police,  during  the  winter  of  1882-3,  demanded  25 
cents  a  load  for  all  wood  brought  by  settlers  into  Moosomin. 

2.  That  last  winter  (1883-4)  the  then  acting  sub-agent  (Mr.  Brokovski)  demanded 
50  cents  for  every  permit,  in  addition  to  25  cents  a  load  for  wood,  not  only  from 
townspeople,  but  also  from  the  settlers  in  that  vicinity. 

3.  That  Mr.  Stephenson  refused  to  pay  the  above  named  agent  $500  for  work 
done  last  winter. 

4.  That  this  winter  the  agent  (Mr.  McHugh)  demands  25  cents  for  taking  the 
affidavit  of  settlers  as  to  the  quantity  of  wood  already  obtained  by  them  from 
Dominion  lands,  and  then  charged  50  cents  for  a  permit  and  25  cents  a  cord  for  the 
wood. 

5.  That  sub-clause  4  of  clause  45  does  not  prohibit  settlers  selling  the  wool  off 
their  homesteads,  but  applies  only  to  sections  with  wood  reserves  attached. 

6.  That  settlers  have  a  right  to  enter  upon  Dominion  lands  and  take  dry  and 
fallen  wood  therefrom,  and  that  the  Act  does  not  give  the  Department  authority  to 
collect  dues  thereon. 

7.  That  the  Crown  solicitor,  acting  under  instructions  from  Mr.  Stephenson  and 
Mr.  McHugh,  wrote  Rev.'Wm.  Nicholl,  threatening  action  for  the  letter  published 

•  by  the  latter  in  the  Moosomin  Courier, 

I  will  reply  to  Mr.  Nicholl's  statements,  in  the  order  in  which  they  come,  and 
beg  to  say : — 

1.  No  Mounted  Policeman  was  authorized  by  me  to  collect  permit  fees,  but  I 
believe  Mr.  J.  McD.  Gordon,  who  was  then  agent  at  Eegina,  obtained  the  assistance 
of  a  policeman  stationed  at  Moosomin  to  take  applications  for  permits  and  report 
cases  of  trespass.  I  have  not  heard  that  any  irregularities  were  committed  during 
the  time  Mr.  Gordon  was  acting  Deputy  Crown  Timber  Agent,  nor  has  any  complaint 
reached  me  in  regard  to  unjust  exaction  of  dues. 

2.  During  last  winter  Mr.  E.  Brokovski  was  authorized  by  me  to  take  applica- 
tions for  permits,  and  make  seizures  in  cases  of  trespass.  He  had  no  authority  to 
issue  permits,  and  none  were  issued  by  him.  In  all  cases  applications  were  forwarded 
to  this  office,  and  no  homesteader  who  could  show  his  right  to  a  free  permit  wus 
refused  one. 

The  office  fee  of  50  cents  which  Mr.  Nicholl  mentions  was  exacted,  of  course, 
and  in  cases  of  those  who  were  not  entitled  to  a  free  permit,  a  further  charge  of  25 
cents  a  cord  was  made. 

3.  I  admit  having  refused  to  pay  Mr.  Brokovski  $500  for  services  performed 
last  winter,  presumably  in  connection  with  the  seizure  of  Shields  &  Co.'s  logs  at  the 
moulh  of  the  Shell  Eiver,  because  my  agreement  with  him  was  for  $2.00  per  day  and 
expenses,  at  which  rate  he  was  paid,  as  you  will  find  on  reference  to  my  account  of 
disbursements  for  the  month  of  April  last,  and  Mr.  Brokovski's  report  in  connection 
therewith.  It  is  possible  he  refers  to  an  account  of  one  George  McPhee  for  851, 
which  was  forwarded  to  you  and  reported  upon  in  our  letter  (of  N.  317)  of  24th 
September  last;  but  how  the  non-payment  of  this  account  can  be  made  a  grievance 
of  by  the  Moosomin  people  I  fail  to  see. 

4.  Mr.  Nicholl  does  not  show  any  cause  of  complaint  against  Mr.  McHugh,  who 
is  this  winter  acting  as  Deputy  Crown  Timber  Agent  at  Moosomin.  Mr.  McHugh 
simply  insists  that  applicants  for  free  permits  shall  satisfy  him  that  they  have  not 
already  taken  their  homesteader's  allowance  from  Dominion  lands  ;  and,  as  a  justice 
of  the  peace,  he  has  a  right  to  make  a  charge  for  taking  their  affidavit.  The  other 
charges,  of  50  cents  for  a  permit  and  25  cents  a  cord  for  wood,  are,  of  course,  simply 
in  accordance  with  the  permit  regulations.  Mr.  McHugh  is  a  zealous  and  efficient 
officer,  and  has  already  prevented  much  trespass  on  Dominion  lands,  and  been  the 
cause  of  a  large  number  of  permits  being  taken  out  since  his  arrival  in  Moosomin,  as 
will  be  seen  on  reference  to  his  returns  for  October  and  November— hence,  I  suppose> 
his  unpopularity* 

10 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


5.  Mr*  NichoH's  readiDg  of  this  part  of  tho  Act  is  so  obviously  erroneous  that 
jomment  seems  unnecessary. 

6.  The  same  remark  might  be  made  in  respect  of  this  statement.  It  will  be  for 
;he  Minister  to  decide,  from  the  reports  on  this  subject  submitted  by  Mr.  Walsh  and 
nyself.  whether  any  change  in  the  regulations  with  respect  to  dead  and  fallen 
;imber  can  advantageously  be  made.  This  is,  in  reality,  the  burden  of  the  grievance 
>f  the  people  whom  Mr.  Nicholl  represents. 

7.  It  is  not  true  that  the  Crown  solicitor,  acting  under  my  instructions,  wrote 
!ktr.  Nicholl  a  threatening  letter,  of  which  he  complains.  If  such  a  letter  was  written 
t  was  done  at  Mr.  McHugh's  request,  and  on  his  own  responsibility.  His  justifica- 
;ion  will  be  seen  on  reading  Mr.  Nicholl's  letter,  published  in  the  Moosomin  Courier, 
)f  27th  November  last,  a  copy  of  which  letter  is  herewith  enclosed.  You  will 
)bserve  that  Mr.  Nicholl  makes  a  very  serious  charge  against  Mr.  McHugh.  It 
appears  to  me,  in  the  face  of  the  explanations  previously  given,  that  Mr.  Nicholl's 
published  letter  was  contemptible  in  the  extreme. 

In  order  that  you  may  have  the  history  of  the  matter  from  the  beginning,  I  beg 
to  enclose  copies,  from  our  files,  of  the  following  letters  : — 

(1)  From  James  Hewgill  to  Crown  Timber  Agent,  dated  7th  November  j  (2) 
my  reply  thereto,  dated  13th  November  ;  and  (3)  letter  published  in  the  Courier, 
ibove  referred  to. 

I  might  mention  that  in  conversation  with  some  of  the  most  respected  farmers 
iround  Moosomin,  they  have  expressed  themselves  as  perfectly  satisfied  with  the 
existing  timber  regulations,  and  the  way  they  are  administered. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

E.  F.  STEPHENBON,  Agent. 
Secretary  Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa. 

Copy  of  Letter  from  Crown  Timber  Agent  to  J.  Rewgill,  Moosomin. 

Crown  Timber  Office,  Winnipeg,  13th  November,  1884. 

Sir,— I  have  the  honor  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  7th  inst., 
in  which  you  inform  me  that  at  a  mass  meeting  of  the  inhabitants  of  Moosomin  and 
vicinity,  you  were  instructed  to  communicate  with  me  in  respect  to  the  manner  in 
which  the  land  laws  affecting  the  timber  regulations  are  being  administered  by  Mr. 
McHugb,  agent  in  your  district  for  this  Department,  and  asking  for  answers  to  cer- 
tain questions  therein  put.     In  reply,  I  beg  to  state: — 

1.  Mr.  J.  J.  McHugh  is  the  duly  appointed  and  accredited  agent  of  this  Depart- 
ment, and  as  such  it  is  his  duty  to  see  that  the  timber  regulations  are  not  violated, 
and  that  no  trespass  be  committed  on  Dominion  lands.  He  is  also  authorized  to 
issue  permits  and  receives  the  fees. 

2.  The  dead  or  lying  timber  cannot  be  taken  from  Dominion  lands,  except  under 
authority  of  a  permit ;  nor  can  a  settler  dispose  of  such  timber  from  his  own  home- 
stead prior  to  the  issue  of  the  Crown  patent  (except  as  provided  in  sub-clause  4, 
clause  45,  of  the  Dominion  Lands  Act,  1883)  without  first  having  taken  out  a  permit, 
in  conformity  with  the  timber  regulations. 

3.  It  is  the  agent's  duty  to  satisfy  himself  that  an  applicant  for  a  free  permit  is 
entitled  to  timber  before  issuing  a  permit. 

4.  If  the  agent  has  reasonable  grounds  for  believing  that  wood  has  been  cut  in 
trespass  on  Crown  lands,  he  may  seize  it,  and  the  onus  of  proof  that  it  was  not  so 
cut  lies  with  the  claimant. 

The  agent  cannot  insist  that  an  affidavit  shall  be  made  before  him.  He  must 
accept  an  affidavit  taken  before  a  justice  of  the  peace,  or  before  any  commissioner 
qualified  to  take  affidavits.     This,  I  presume,  he  is  at  all  times  ready  to  do. 

I  send  you  herewith  the  timber  regulations,  and  also  a  copy  of  the  Dominion 
Lands  Act,  1883,  and  would  call  your  attention  to  clause  45,  commencing  on  page 
19,  but  particularly  to  subclause  4,  before  referred  to. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A,  1885 


I  would  inform  you,  further,  with  respect  to  question  two  (2)'of  your  letter,  that 
the  advisability  of  the  Department  allowing  settlers  to  enter  the  forests  and  take 
dead  and  lying  timber  without  restriction  has  already  been  the  subject  of  a  memorial  to 
the  Dominion  G-overnment  from  the  settlers  of  Moose  Mountain  district,  presented 
through  their  representative  in  the  North- West  Council,  Mr.  J.  Turriff,  and  that  the 
matter  has  been  reported  on  by  both  the  Commissioner  of  Dominion  Lands  and 
myself,  and  is  at  present  under  the  consideration  of  the  Government.  What  changes, 
if  any,  will  be  made,  I  am  unable  to  inform  you. 

Meanwhile,  I  would  urge  that  the  inhabitants  of  Moosomin  and  vicinity  conform 
to  the  existing  regulations,  and  throw  no  obstacles  in  the  way  of  the  officers  of  this 
Department  in  the  performance  of  their  duties. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

E.  F.  STEPHENSON,  Crown  Timber  Agent. 

■Copy  of  Letter  from  J.  Hewgill,  Secretary  of  Mass  Meeting,  Moosomin,  to  Crown  Timber 

Agent. 

Moosomin,  fth  November,  1884. 

Dear  Sir, — At  a  mass  meeting  of  the  inhabitants  of  Moosomin  and  vicinity,  I,  as 
secretary  of  the  meeting,  was  instructed  to  communicate  with  you  on  the  subject  of 
the  present  harsh  interpretation  of  the  existing  timber  laws  by  your  deputy,  J.  J. 
McHugh : 

1st.  Has  Mr.  M>Hugh  the  proper  authority  to  act  as  timber  agent  here? 

2nd.  Is  the  timber  1m  w  so  constructed  as  to  include  lying  poles,  and  is  it  impera- 
tive that  permit  must  be  obtained  for  picking  up  and  using  for  fuel  such  timber? 

3rd.  Has  Mr.  McHugh  your  authority,  or  has  he  any  right  to  refuse  to  grant  a 
permit,  when  applied  for,  because  the  party  applying  cannot  conscientiously  make 
affidavit  as  to  tho  quantity  he  has  used  in  the  past  ? 

4th.  Has  he  the  right  to  compel  people  to  make  affidavit  as  to  where  they  obtain 
the  wood,  when  assured  positively  that  the  same  was  not  picked  up  on  Government 
lands.  In  short,  has  he  the  power,  over  ordinary  British  law,  to  compel  a  man  to 
criminate  himself?  And  has  he  the  authority  to  compel  the  payment  of  25  cents  for 
an  affidavit  ? 

The  first  question  is  asked  because  we  have  been  deceived,  and  money  collected 
from  us  in  the  past  by  bogus  timber  agents. 

The  second,  because  it  is  a  well  known  fact  that  the  lying  timber  in  the  bluffs  is 
a  chief  cause  of  their  injury  when  prairie  fires  occur,  and  the  opinion  of  the  people 
that  the  preservation  of  the  bluffs  is  of  more  importance  than  the  protection  of  the 
rotten  poles. 

The  third  question  has  arisen  from  the  action  of  Mr.  McHugh  here. 

The  fourth  has  arisen  similarly.     Parties  whose  names  can  be  produced  have 
stated  positively  before  him  that  they  obtained  the  wood  on  a  H.  E.  section  ;  never- 
theless, they  were  compelled  to  make  affidavit,  and  to  pay  therefor  the  sum  of  25 
cents.     Is  it  possible  that  a  Deputy  Crown  Timber  Agent  can  thus  collect  25  cents  ' 
for  each  load,  no  matter  where  it  is  picked  up  ? 

la  conclusion,  we  beg  of  you  to  examine  into  the  manner  in  which  monies  are 
wrung  from  us,  an  already  overburdened  people,  and  to  state  clearly  your  answer  to  I 
the  above  questions. 

We  ask  you  to  consider  the  fact  that  there  are  no  unoccupied  Government  lands 
within  twelve  miles  of  us.  and  hence  the  absurdity  of  compelling  people  to  obtain 
permits,  as  no  one  goes  to  that  distance  for  wood. 

That  there  are  no  wood  lots  set  apart  in  our  neighborhood. 

That  the  wood  is  picked  up  out  of  the  bluffs,  not  one*  load  in  one  hundred  being 
cut. 

That  the  law  is  not  enforced  in  this  manner  elsewhere. 

In  Brandon,  for  instance,  any  townsman  can  go  to  the  market  and  buy  his  lo; 
of  wood,  without  being  first  compelled  to  obtain  a  permit. 

12 


18  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


And  lastly,  we  desire  to  say  that  we  are  law-abiding  citizens,  and  we  are  willing 
it  all  times  to  conform  to  the  spirit  of  the  law.  But  we  see  no  reason  why  we  should 
,hus  be  particularly  legislated  against. 

Your  reply  at  your  earliest  convenience. 

Yours  truly, 

F.  HEWGILL,  Secretary. 
3.  F.  Stephenson,  Crown  Timber  Agent,  Winnipeg. 

3opy  of  letter  of  Revd.  Wm.  Nicholl,  published  in  the  Moosomin  "  Courier  "  of  the  2*lth 

November  j  1884. 
To  the  Editor  of  the  Courier, — 

Sir, — I  have  read,  with  considerable  interest,  a  letter  to  E.  F.  Stephenson,  Esq.,  by 
Mr.  Hewgill,  and  the  reply  to  same  by  E.  F.  Stephenson,  Crown  Timber  Agent,  and  as 
:he  timber  question,  as  far  as  regards  firewood,  at  least,  is  a  matter  of  paramount 
interest  in  this  neighborhood  at  present,  I  have  taken  some  little  trouble  to  investi- 
gate the  law  on  the  subject,  suggested  by  the  above  named  letters.  The  following  is 
[he  result  of  my  reading  and  study  of  the  subject : — 

1st.  I  notice  that  Mr.  Stephenson  gives  a  very  evasive  answer,  or  rather  rone  at 
ill,  to  Mr.  Hewgill's  third  question,  viz. : — "Has  Mr.  McHugh  your  authority,  or  has 
be  any  right  to  refuse  to  grant  a  permit  when  applied  for,  because  the  party  apply- 
ing cannot  conscientiously  make  affidavit  as  to  the  quantity  he  has  used  in  the  past?" 
Now,  note  the  reply  vouchsafed  by  Mr.  Stephenson : — "  It  is  the  agent's  duty  to 
3atisfy  himself  that  an  applicant  for  a  free  permit  is  entitled  to  timber  before  issuing 
a  permit."  Is  this  a  fair,  full  and  honest  answer  ?  I  think  not.  It  looks  rather  liko 
burking  the  question,  for  reasons  1  shall  note  further  on.  The  4th  question  put  by 
Mr.  Hewgill  is  dealt  with  in  a  similar  manner.  In  it  Mr.  Hewgill  asks  :  "  Has  Mr. 
McHugh  the  right  to  compel  the  payment  of  25  cents  for  an  affidavit  ?"  To  this 
there  is  no  reply  given.  This  looks  like  business.  Then  Mr.  Hewgill  is  referred  to 
the  Dominion  Lands  Act,  1883,  and  particularly  to  sub-clause  4  of  clause  45.  This  is 
all  the  authority  Mr.  Stephenson  quotes,  and,  I  may  also  say,  all  that  he  has  to  quote. 
Let  us  hear  what  the  authority  says.  And  that  we  may  be  in  no  danger,  I  will  quote 
the  first  two  sub-clauses,  passing  over  the  third,  as  not  bearing  directly  on  the  ques- 
tion at  issue. 

Clause  45,  sub-clause  1.  "  The  Minister  of  the  Interior  may  direct  that  in  the  sub- 
division of  townships  which  consist  partly  of  prairie  and  partly  of  timber  land,  the  tim- 
ber land  shall  be  divided  into  wood  lots  of  not  less  than  10  and  not  more  than  20  acres 
each  in  such  manner  as  to  afford,  as  far  as  practicable,  one  such  wood  lot  to  each 
quarter-section  prairie  farm."  That  is  good  and  sensible.  Now  read  sub-clause  2  : 
"  Provided,  that  if  a  quarter-section  be  found  to  contain  timber  land,  not  exceeding  in 
extent  25  acres,  such  timber  land  shall  be  appurtenant  to  such  quarter-section,  and 
shall  not  be  divided  into  wood  lots."  Good  again.  Now  for  sub-clause  4,  which  is 
the  much  flaunted  authority:  "  Provided  that  any  holder  of  a  homestead  entry,  who, 
previously  to  the  issue  of  the  patent,  shall  sell  any  of  the  timber  on  either  his  home- 
stead or  pre-emption  quarter-sections,  or  on  the  appurtenant  wood  lot,  to  saw-mill 
proprietors  or  to  any  other  settlers  for  their  own  private  use,  without  having  pre- 
viously obtained  permission  so  to  do  from  the  Minister  of  the  Interior,  shall  be  guilty 
of  a  trespass,  and  ba  prosecuted  therefor  before  a  justice  of  the  peace,  and  upon  con- 
viction thereof  shall  be  subject  to  a  fine  not  exceeding  one  hundred  dollars,  or 
imprisonment  for  a  term  not  exceeding  six  months,  or  to  both  fine  and  imprison- 
ment, at  discretion  of  the  court;  and  further,  such  person  shall  forfeit  his  homestead 
and  preemption  rights,  and  the  timber  so  sold  shall  be  subject  to  seizure  and  confis- 
cation in  the  manner  provided  by  clause  64  of  this  Act."  This  is  excellent,  we  all  say 
"  ditto."  This  is  what  we  call  good  and  equitable  legislation,  as  regards  timber  lands 
and  wood  lots,  to  which  it  only  applies.  Bat  where  is  the  word  about  bits  of  bluffs 
on  the  prairie  in  all  this  ?  And  echo  answers,  where  ?  Need  I  say  more?  Com- 
ment seems  needless.     Any  one  who  will  read,  mark,  learn  and  inwardly  digest  the 

13 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


above  will  be  able  to  see  why  Mr.  Stephenson  was  so  careful,  cautious  and  evasive  in 
his  answers  to  Mr.  Hewgill's  questions.  Bat  what  of  Mr.  McHugh,  poor  man,  and  a 
justice  of  the  peace,  too,  coming  amongst  us  and  assuming  the  airs  of  a  demi-god, 
and  fleecing  the  unsuspecting  settlers  of  the  district  of  money  which  he  has  no  sem- 
blance of  a  right  to  ?  Does  he  know  the  law,  and,  notwithstanding,  insist  on  having 
the  money,  which  does  not  belong  to  him,  presuming  on  the  gullability  of  the  public  ? 
Or,  does  he  not  know  the  law,  and  only  acts  on  the  instructions  of  his  superiors  ? 
In  either  case  let  me  advise  him  to  seek  more  honest  and  honorable  employment. 

I  think,  however,  he  should  be  made  to  refund  the  monies  received  by  him,  other- 
wise he  lays  himself  open  to  suit  for  receiving  money  under  false  pretences,  and  I  have 
no  doubt  as  to  its  recovery,  provided  he  is  worth  as  much.  I  would  also  suggest  to 
Mr.  McSugh,  as  he  has  no  objection  to  penance,  that  h©  do  a  little  in  that  lino  ere  he 
leaves  us,  and  what  I  would  prescribe  would  be  that  on  next  Saturday  morning  he 
go  to  the  end  of  the  Moosomin  House,  where  he  pretended  to  seize  a  load  of  wood,  and 
there,  on  his  two  bare  knees,  and  with  tears  in  his  eyes,  beg  pardon  from  all  and 
sundry  whom  he  has  wronged,  and  on  our  part  we  will  get  a  photograph  of  him  in 
that  position  and  keep  the  same  in  loving  (?)  remembrance  of  him,  and  then  as  fast 
as  possible  pick  up  his  traps  and  be  off  to  some  more  congenial  clime,  Perhaps  west 
would  be  his  best  route. 

I  may  see  it  wise,  Sir,  with  your  permission,  to  refer  to  this  subject  again,  next 
week,  and,  possibly,  on  Sunday  night  in  the  church,  as  it  concerns  us  all  very 
materially  and  morally. 

I  am,  Sir,  truly  yours, 

WM.  NICHOLL. 

Department  of  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  29th  December,  1884. 

Sir, — 1  beg  to  enclose  herewith  a  copy  of  a  letter  dated  the  13th  instant,  from 
the  Kev.  Wm.  Nicholl,  Moosomin,  protesting  against  the  exaction  from  settlers  of 
dues  on  firewood  required  for  their  own  use. 

Please  report  on  this  matter  at  your  earliest  convenience. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

P.  B*  DOUGLAS,  for  the  Secretary, 
Crown  Timber  Agent,  Winnipeg,  Man. 

Department  op  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  29th  December,  1884. 

Sir, — I  am  directed  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter  of  the  13th  instant, 
protesting  against  the  exaction  from  settlers  of  dues  on  firewood  required  by  them 
for  their  own  use. 

A  copy  of  your  letter  has  this  day  been  forwarded  to  the  Crown  Timber  Agent 
at  Winnipeg,  to  report  thereon. 

I  am  to  enclose  herewith,  for  your  information,  a  copy  of  the  regulations  for 
cutting  timber  under  permit. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

P.  B.  DOUGLAS,  for  the  Secretary. 
Eev.  Wm.  Nicholl,  Presbt.  Minister,  Moosomin,  N.W.T. 

Moosomin,  N.W.T.,  13th  December,  1884. 

I  feel  that  we  have  been  imposed  upon  in  this  locality,  since  our  settlement  in 
it,  now  nearly  three  years  ago,  in  regard  to  the  fuel  we  require  so  much  in  the  long 
cold  winter.  Three  winters  ago  (viz.,  18:2  3)  one  of  the  Mounted  Police-demanded 
25  cents  per  load  for  every  load  of  firewood  brought  by  a  settler  to  our  then  infant 
village.  Last  winter  (1883-4)  an  agent,  under  Mr.  Stephenson,  Crown  Timber  Agent, 
Winnipeg,  demanded  50  cents  for  a  "  permit,"  not  only  from  every  townsman  who 
bought  a  load,  with  25  cents  per  load  for  same,  but  also  from  every  settler  around, 
in  cases  where  he  had  not  too  far  to  travel.    This  same  sub-agent  told  me  a  short 

14 


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18  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  52.)  A.  1885 


irne  since  that  Mr.  Stephenson  now  refuses  to  pay  him  $500  for  work  done  last 
vinter.  This  winter  things  are  much  worse  than  either  the  two  preceding  ones. 
Another  sub  agent  has  been  appointed,  who  at  first  demanded  25  cents  for  an  affidavit 
is  to  how  much  wood  a  settler  had  burned  since  he  came  into  the  country,  and  then 
lo  cents  per  cord  for  all  that,  telling  them  that  no  one  had  any  right  to  issue  permits 
before  he  came  himself,  and  he  charges  50  cents  per  permit.  We  all  felt  he  has 
jarried  the  business  too  far.  We  held  a  public  meeting,  where  our  feelings  were 
'reely  expressed.  Two  weeks  ago  a  copy  of  the  "  Dominion  Lands  Act "  fell  into 
ny  hands.  On  looking  over  this,  what  Mr.  Stephenson  quoted  as  his  authority  for 
sollectiog  the  dues,  viz.,  the  4th  sub-clause  of  45  of  the  "  Dominion  Lands  Act,"  had 
'eference  only  to  lands  where  there  are  wood  reserves,  divided  into  10  or  20  acre 
ots,  to  go  with  prairie  farms,  and  my  conclusion  was  that  as  this  is  a  prairie 
mtirely,  no  timber  reserve  being  nearer,  that  I  know  of,  than  the  Moose  Mountain, 
;vhich  is  about  50  miles  S.  W.  of  this  place,  we  have  no  wood  in  our  district,  save 
ivhat  are  called  a  bluffs."  Some  of  these  contain  one-quarter  of  an  acre,  and  few 
-each  four  acres  on  one  farm.  The  wood  on  these  has  been  burned  and  charred 
pears  ago  by  prairie  fires,  and  is  now  fallen  and  dry,  thus  endangering  the  remaining 
*reen  poles  the  next  fire  that  occurs.  This  dry  wood  is  what  we  have  been  thus 
Charged  for.  On  seeing  that  the  timber  law,  which  I  regard  as  good,  did  not  touch 
^his  at  all,  1  wrote  to  our  local  paper,  saying  so,  and  saying  some  pretty  plain,  strong 
things  as  to  treatment  received.  The  people  stopped  and  would  not  pay  the  dues 
iemanded,  and  the  sub-agent  seized  some  of  the  settlers'  piles  of  firewood.  He  then 
besought,  almost  begged,  some  of  these  to  call  at  his  ofiice,  and  he  would  settle  the 
matter  somehow,  but  those  asked  did  not  go. 

Yesterday  I  received  a  letter  from  the  solicitor  of  Mr.  Stephenson  and  his  sub- 
agent,  threatening  action  for  the  letter  I  published. 

Now,  honored  Sir,  I  beg  of  you,  as  "  the  man  for  the  people,"  to  get  to  the 
bottom  of  this  matter,  and  1  shall  feel  most  grateful  if  you  will  kindly  advise  me  as 
to  what  course  I  ought  to  pursue.  The  whole  business  seems  to  be  to  get  money 
out  of  the  poor  settlers,  some  of  whom  have  more  than  enough  to  do  to  get  bread 
for  their  families. 

I  am,  honored  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

WM.  NICHOLL,  Presbt.  Minister,  Moosomin. 
Hon.  the  Minister  of  the  Interior. 

Department  op  the  Interior,  Ottawa,  13th  December,  1884. 
Sir,— I  am  directed  to  acknowledge  the  receipt  of  your  letter,   without  date, 
received  here  on  the  24th  ultimo,  enclosing  a  petition  from  the  settlers  at  Moosomin 
and  in  that  vicinity,  praying  for  the  abolition' of  dues  on  dry  wood  used  as  fuel. 

In  reply,  I  am  to  say  that  the  subject  of  the  expediency  of  exacting  dues  on 
dry  wood  is  now  under  consideration. 

I  have  the  honor  to  be,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

P.  B.  DOUGLAS,  for  the  Secretary. 
J.  Hewgill,  Esq.,  Moosomin,  Assiniboia. 

Dear  Sir, — I  have  the  honor  to  enclose  herewith  a  petition  from  the  inhabitants 
of  Moosomin  and  vicinity,  praying  for  the  abolition  of  the  tax  on  dry  wood  used  as 
fuel. 

We  object  to  the  tax  on  this  dead,  down,  rotting  timber. 

We  object  to  the  law  which  compels  us  to  pay  25  cents  (afiidavit)  for  every  load 
of  wood  when  not  taken  from  Dominion  lands. 

We  object  to  the  harsh  and  obnoxious  manner  in  which  the  timbor  law  is  con- 
strued here. 

We  object  to  be  compelled  to  take  out  permits  when  there  are  no  wood  lots  or 
vacant  Dominion  lands  within  12  miles  of  us. 

15 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No-  52.) 


A.  1885 


Not  a  single  load  of  wood  has  been  taken  where  the  permits  call  for  viz.,  vacant 
Dominion  lands ;  yet  should  any  person  not  obtain  a  permit,  he  is  compelled  to  make 
affidavit,  at  a  cost  of  25  cents  for  every  load,  to  the  effect  that  the  wood  was  not  cut 
on  Dominion  lands. 

Hoping  that  this  petition  may  receive  your  early  consideration. 

I  have  the  honor  to  remain,  Sir,  your  obedient  servant, 

J.  HEWGILL,  Moosomin,  Assa. 
Hon.  the  Minister  of  the  Interior. 

To  Hon.  Sir  David  Louis  Macpherson,  K.C.M.G.,  Minister  of  the  Interior. 

The  petition  of  the  undersigned  inhabitants  of  Moosomin  and  vicinity,  humbly 
showeth: — 

1.  That  your  petitioners  approach  you  for  the  purpose  of  making  known  to  you 
their  unanimous  feeling  of  dissatisfaction  with  the  existing  laws  respecting  the  tax- 
ation of  decaying  logs  and  poles  lying  in  the  bluffs. 

2.  That  said  decayed  timber  is  the  cause  of  the  loss  by  prairie  fires  of  thousands 
of  acres  of  valuable  growing  timber  every  year  in  these  Territories. 

3.  That  such  taxation  is  discouraging  to  the  pioneer  settlers,  who  have  sufficient 
difficulties  to  encounter  in  a  new  country  like  this,  without  having  their  necessary 
fuel  taxed,  especially  when  it  is  lying  in  a  state  of  decay. 

4.  That  in  many  districts  in  these  Territories  the  Government  have  no  woodlands 
available  for  settlers,  who  are  consequently  compelled  by  necessity  to  have  recourse 
to  the  decaying  timber. 

5.  That  while  it  is  advisable  to  tax  the  growing  timber  to  preserve  it  for  future 
settlers'  use,  it  is  equally  advisable  to  grant  the  settlers  free  access  to  all  the  dead 
timber. 

Your  petitioners  therefore  pray  that  this  matter  be  taken  into  your  serious  con- 
sideration, and  that  you  will  grant  the  settlers  such  redress  in  the  premises  as  will, 
meet  their  reasonable  requirements  and  expectations. 

And  your  petitioners  will  ever  pray. 


N.  G.  McCallum, 
John  McGuirl, 
E.  G.  Daniels 
J.  L.  Berthelot, 
Henry  C.  Jacobsen, 
W.  H.  Miles, 
W.E.Hamilton, 

E.  Wyseman, 
Geo.  F.  Dunn, 

J.  Irving  Williamson, 

H.  Smith, 

J.  McCurdy, 

Jno.  Hind, 

P.  Cooke, 

H.  W.  Hughes, 

John  McKenzie, 

F.  G.  McPherson, 
E.  W.  Jones, 
Courtenay  A,  Saunders, 
William  Harris, 

M.  C.  Baugh, 
John  Barton, 
W.  J.  Machell, 
Thomas  Ewen, 
W.C.Clark, 
Sifford  W.  Smith, 


16 


WM.  THOMPSON,  J.  P. 
W.  B.  Dalton, 
G.  W.  Scott, 
J.  Kennedy, 
W.  G.  Williams, 

D.  M.  T.  Powell, 
A.  McArthur, 
Geo.  Parker, 
Amos  Kensev, 
J.  W.  White," 
John  Hyde, 

G.  E.  Stratton, 

H.  B.  Savin, 

W.  J.  Thompson,  # 

J.  W.  Cooper, 

Thomas  MaoEay, 

C.  E.  Baldwin, 

C.  D.  Bemrose, 

J.  J.  Heaslip, 

Charles  A.  Hayter, 

W.  J.  Judge, 

H.  B.  Turner, 

James  Harris, 

E.  D.  McNaughton, 
Neil  Dalglish, 

J.  H.  Williams, 
H.  H.  Anderson, 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional|Papers^(No.  52.) 


A.  1885 


Geo.  Campbell, 

J.  J.  Scott, 

John  B.  Robertson, 

William  Miller, 

Felix  H.  Mess, 

William  Anderson, 

Walter  Robertson, 

John  Anderson, 

Zachariah  McCallum, 

A .  York, 

J.  Daniel, 

J.  Macauley, 

J.  W.  Brown, 

H.  Holmes, 

H.  Cooke, 

H.  H.  Moulson, 

P.  A.  Clark. 

W.  J.  Ross, 

Henry  Smith, 

William  Houley, 

T.  B.  McAlpine, 

J.  A.  Reid, 

Forster  Morrow, 

John  McDonald, 

Daniel  J.  Ferguson, 

John  Wilson, 

D.  J.  Wiley,  (Editor  Courier) 

Thos.  Oreton, 

Robert  English, 

G.  H.  Gibson, 

W.  G.  Williams, 

C.  J.  Johnson, 

D.  S.  Carnaham, 
J.  Hewgill, 

W.  Hillis, 
B.  B.  Curry. 


Thos.  Carrol, 

J.  K.  Johnson, 

R.  Millar, 

John  Smithers, 

John  Daniel, 

R.  K.  Smith, 

Albert  P.  Murphey, 

William  E.  Gilroy, 

Joe  Buttler, 

Neil  Mclnnies, 

James  McKemmit, 

Andrew  McKemmitt, 

Isaiah  Hamel, 

F.  G.  Sewin, 

C.  McLean, 

H.  Ire  ton,  (Gentleman) 

John  McNab, 

A.  Harrison, 

Geo.  Cartwright, 

John  Douglas, 

Howard  Husband, 

Charley  Steinberg, 

A.  E    Hart, 

John  Campbell, 

W.  C.  Clark, 

Jas.  Inaalis,  (Butcher) 

W.  H.  B.  Heath, 

John.  C.  McArthur, 

Charles  Harrison, 

H.  W.  Jell, 

Thomas  Walker, 

Thomas  Cooper, 

John  Hyde,  (Cattle  Dealer) 

Geo.  S.  Bell, 

M.  McLeod, 

James  Harris. 


62d-2 


11 


I  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.)  A.  1885 


RETURN 

(53c) 
)  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885  ;— -For 
a  Statement  showing — 

(1)  All  sales  of  Coal  Lands  since  April  23rd,  1883,  the  name  and  residence 

of  each  party  to  whom  sales  have  been  made ;  the  number  of  acres 
sold  to  each  ;  the  price  per  acre  received  from  each  ;  the  location 
of  the  land  sold  ;  the  total  number  of  acres  sold,  and  the  total 
amount  received  from  such  sales. 

(2)  All  leases  of  Coal  Lands  made  since  April  23rd,  1883  ;  the  name  and 

residence  of  each  lessee  ;  the  number  of  acres  leased  to  each ;  the 
payments  made  by  each ;  the  location  of  each  leasehold ;  the  total 
number  of  acres  leased,  and  the  total  sum  derived  from  such  leases  ; 
the  considerations  paid  and  royalties  collected;  also  from  all 
other  charges,  if  any. 

(3)  Copies  of  all  applications,  correspondence,  protests  and  written  com- 

munications in  relation  to  Coal  Lands  sold  or  leased  since  April 
23rd,  1883. 

By  Command. 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

jpartment  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  30th  March,  1885. 


63c— 1 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  53. 


A.  1885. 


Statement  showing  all  Coal  locations  sold  subsequent  to  the  23rd  April,  1883;  the 
name  and  residence  of  each  party  to  whom  sales  have  been  made ;  the  number 
of  acres  sold  to  each  ;  the  price  per  acre  received  from  each  ;  the  location  of  the 
land  sold ;  the  total  number  of  acres  sold,  and  the  total  amounts  received  from 
such  sales,      v 


Name. 


Dan.  H.Macdonald 

J.  S.  McEwen 

G.  A.  Smith 


Address. 


Winnipeg,  Man 

Winnipeg,  Man 

Los  Angelos,  Cal., 
U.S 

Total 


Area, 
Acres. 


320 
320 

320 


960 


Rate 

per 

Acre. 


$    cts. 
10  00 

10  00 

10  00 


Description. 


The  west  half  of  section  6,  township 
22,  in  range  26,  west  of  the  4th 
meridian 

The  east  half  of  section  6,  township 
22,  in  range  20,  west  of  the  4th 
meridian 

The  east  half  of  section  4,  township 
13,  in  range  6,  west  of  4th  meridian 

Total 


Amounti  '- 


$    cts. 

192  00 
192  00 
600  00 


984  00 


Statement  showing  Coal  locations  for  which  leases  have  been  issued  subsequent  to 
the  23rd  April,  1883  ;  the  name  and  residence  of  each  lessee ;  the  number  of 
acres  leased  to  each ;  the  payments  made  by  each ;  the  location  of  each  lease- 
hold ;  the  total  number  of  acres  leased,  and  the  total  sum  derived  from  such 


Name. 

Residence. 

Area. 
A.cres. 

Description. 

Ground 
Rent. 

Royalty 

Total,  i 

J.  R.  Foster , 

St.  Hyacinthe,  Q 
St,  Hyacinthe,  Q 
Toronto,  Ont.... 
Oehawa,  Ont 

Oshawa,  Ont 

Total 

320 
320  ' 
320 
320 

320 

North  half  of  section  3,  in 
township  2,  in  range  6, 
west  of  the  2nd  meridian. 

North  half  of  section  1,  in 
township  2,  in  range  6, 
west  of  the  2nd  meridian. 

North  half  of  section  2,  in 
township  2,  in  range  8, 
west  of  the  2nd  meridian. 

Sonth  half  of  section  2,  in 
township  2,  in  range  8, 
west  of  the  2nd  meridian. 

South  half  of  section   12,  in 
township   2,  in   range  8, 
west  of  the  2nd  meridian . 

Total 

$    cts. 

89  70 
89  20 
80  00 
80  00 

80  00 
418  90 

$    cts. 

89  70 

89  20 

H.  C.  Gibbs , 

80  00 

Almira  Gibbs,  F.  E. 
Gibbs,  F.  W.  Gibbs, 
(Administrators  of 
the  estate  of  late  Hon 
T.  N.  Gibbs  ) 

F.  W.  Gibbs 

80  00 

80  00 



1,600 

418  90> 

Certified  correct. 


G.  U.  EYLEY, 

Clerk  Timber  and  Mineral  Lands, 


;8  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.)  A.  1885 


Note. — The  Indenture  of  Lease  heie  following  being  similar  to  the  several  Leases 
n  this  Return  (53c)  it  is  ordered  by  the  Joint  Committee  on  Printing  that  it  need  not  be 
epeatedfor  each  one  of  the  Leases  mentioned  in  the  preceding  tabular  statement  of  the 
nations  which  have  been  issued. 

?hts  Indenture,  made  in  duplicate  the  thirteenth  day  of  May,  in  the  year  of  Our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  ind  eighty  four,  between  Her  Majesty  the 
Queen,  represented  by  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  of  Canada,  of  the  first 
part,  and  Frederick  W.  Gibbs,  of  the  Town  of  Oshawa,  in  the  Province  of 
Ontario,   Gentleman,   hereinafter   called   the   lessee,   of  the  second  part ; 

Whereas  the   lands  hereinafter  described  are  "  Dominion  Lands  "  within  the 
meaning  of  the  "  Dominion  Lands  Act,  1879,"  and  its  amendments  ; 

And  whereas  the  said  Act,  as  amended,  provides, among  other  things, as  follows: 
jands  containing  coal  or  other  minerals,  whether  in  surveyed  or  un surveyed  terri- 
ory,  shall  not  be  subject  to  the  provisions  of  this  Act,  sale  or  homestead,  but  shall  be 
isposed  of  in  such  manner  and  on  such  terms  and  conditions  as  may,  from  time  to 
ime,  be  fixed  by  the  Governor  in  Council,  by  regulations  to  be  made  in  that  behalf, 
rhich  regulations  shall  noi  go  into  operation  until  after  they  shall  have  been  pub- 
ished  for  four  successive  weeks  in  the  Canada  Gazette,  and  laid  before  both  Houses 
f  Parliament  for  thirty  days  without  disapproval  by  either  House; 

And  whereas  such  regulations  have  been  duly  made,  published  and  laid  before 
oth  Houses  of  Parliament  lor  thirty  days  without  disapproval  by  either  House ;  and 
whereas  the  lessee  has,  in  accordance  with  the  said  regulations,  duly  satisfied  the  said 
linister  of  the  Interior  of  his  means  and  ability  to  work  efficiently  the  mines 
ontained  in  the  hereinafter  described/ract  of  land; 

Now  this  Indenture  witnesseth,  that  in  consideration  of  the  rents,  royalties, 
ovenants,  conditions  and  provisoes  hereinafter  reserved  and  contained,  and  on  the 
>art  of  the  lessee,  his  executors,  administrators  and  assigns,  to  be  paid,  observed  and 
lerformed,  Her  Majesty  doth  demise  and  lease  unto  the  lessee,  his  executors,  adminis- 
rators  and  assigns  all  that  tract  of  land  : 

The  south  halt  of  Section  twelve,  in  Township  two,  Eange  eight,  West  of  the 
econd  Principal  Meridian,  inthe  District  of  Assmiboia,  in  the  North- West  Territories, 
ontaining  three  hundred  and  twenty  acres,  more  or  less,  of  which  the  boundaries 
leneath  the  surface  shall  be  the  vertical  planes  or  lines  in  which  its  surface  boun- 
daries lie.  To  have  and  to  hold  the  said  tract  of  land,  and  all  and  singular  the  rights, 
iberties,  powers  and  privileges  hereby  appointed  and  demised  unto  the  said  lessee,  his 
ixecutors,  administrators  and  assigns,  from  the  fourth  day  of  October,  in  year  of  our 
jord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  eighty-two,  for  and  during  the  full  term  of 
wenty-one  years,  subject  to  the  rents,  royalties,  covenants,  conditions  and  provisoes 
tereinafter  reserved  or  mentioned,  rendering  and  paying  therefor  unto  Her  Majesty, 
ler  successors  and  assigns,  yearly,  and  each  year  during  the  said  term,  the  certain 
rearly  rent  or  sum  of  eighty  dollars,  to  be  paid  in  advance  by  two  equal  half  yearly 
>ayments  in  each  year,  that  is  to  say,  on  the  first  day  of  May  and  on  the  first  day  of 
November  in  each  year. 

And  also  rendering  and  paying  therefor  unto  Her  Majesty,  Her  successors  and 
assigns,  a  rcyalty  of  ten  cents  on  each  and  every  ton  of  coal  mined  under  the  pro- 
visions of  these  presents ;  such  royalty  to  become  due  and  be  paid  at  the  time  of 
naking  the  returns  hereinafter  mentioned.  And  the  lessee,  for  himself  and  his 
>xecutors,  administrators  and  assigns,  covenants  and  agrees  to  and  with  Her  Majesty, 
Eler  successors  and  asbigns  in  manner  following,  and  it  is  upon  these  express  coven- 
ants and  conditions  that  these  presents  are  made  and  issued : 

1.  That  the  lessee  may  search  for,  dig,  mine,  remove  and  carry  away  any  coal 
ying  or  being  in  or  under  the  tract  of  land  aforesaid. 

2.  That  the  lessee  will  abide  by,  perform,  fulfil  and  keep  all  the  provisoes,  terms 
ind  conditions  hereof,  and  that  upon  the  breach  of  any  of  the  provisoes,  terms  or 
;onditions  herein  contained,  whether  negative  or  positive  in  form,  the  term  hereby 

3 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.)  A.  1885 


granted  shall,  at  the  option  of  the  Governor  General  in  Council,  cease  and  deter- 
mine, and  Her  Majesty,  Her  successors  and  assigns,  may  thereupon  re-enter  upon 
the  demised  premises,  and  hold,  possess  and  enjoy  the  same,  as  if  these  presents  had 
never  been  made  and  issued. 

3.  That  no  waiver  on  behalf  of  Her  Majesty,  Her  successors  and  assigns,  of  any 
such  breach,  shall  take  place  or  be  binding  upon  Her  Majesty,  Her  successors  and 
assigns,  unless  the  same  be  expressed  in  writing,  under  the  authority  of  the  Gover- 
nor General  of  Canada  in  Council;  and  any  waiver  so  expressed  shall  extend  only  to 
the  particular  breach  so  waived,  and  shall  not  limit  or  affect  the  rights  of  Her 
Majesty,  Her  successors  and  assigns,  with  respect  to  any  other  or  future  breach. 

4.  That  the  lessee  pay  to  the  Receiver-General  of  Canada,  or  other  person  duly 
authorized  by  him  the  yearly  rent  hereby  reserved,  as  and  when  the  same  becomes 
due  and  payable. 

5.  That  the  lessee  will  not,  without  the  consent  in  writing  of  the  Minister  of  the 
Interior  of  Canada,  make  any  transfer  or  assignment  of  these  presents,  or  of  his 
interest  under  these  presents,  or  any  sub-lease  for  the  whole  or  part  of  the  term 
hereby  granted  of  the  lands  or  any  part  of  the  lands  hereby  leased. 

6.  That  if  any  such  transfer,  assignment  or  sub-lease  be  so  assented  to,  all  the 
provisoes  and  conditions  herein  contained  shall  extend  to  and  be  binding  upon  the 
transferee,  assignee  and  sublessee,  as  well  as  the  lessee  hereunder,  and  any  breach 
thereof  by  such  transferee,  assignee  or  sub-lessee  shall  have  the  same  effect  as  if 
such  breach  were  by  the  said  lessee. 

7.  That  the  lessee  will,  in  each  year  of  the  said  term,  furnish  the  Minister  of  the 
Interior  with  quarterly  returns  under  oath,  showing  truly,  and  according  to  the  facts, 
the  quantity  of  coal  taken  out,  and  will  pay  the  dues  thereon  at  the  time  of  making 
such  return. 

8.  That  the  lessee  will  commence  active  operations  within  one  year  from  the 
commencement  of  the  said  term,  and  will  work  the  mine  within  two  years  from  the 
commencement  of  the  said  term. 

9.  That  these  presents  may  be  renewed  for  further  periods  of  twenty-one  years, 
and  for  such  ground  rent  and  royalties  as  may,  at  the  time  of  renewal,  be  agreed 
upon  by  the  Governor  in  Council  and  the  lessee. 

10.  The  word  lessee,  in  these  presents,  includes  the  lessee  or  lessees,  as  the  case 
may  be,  and  his  or  their  executors,  administrators  or  assigns,  and  in  the  case  of  an 
incorporated  company,  their  successors  and  assigns. 

11.  That  no  implied  covenant  or  liability  of  any  kind,  on  the  part  of  Her  Majesty, 
Her  successors  and  assigns,  is  created  by  the  use  of  the  words  "  demise  or  lease  " 
herein,  or  by  the  use  of  any  other  word  or  words  herein. 

12.  That  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  shall  be  the  sole  judge  of  the  fact  in  regard 
to  the  breach  or  alleged  breach  of  any  of  the  covenants  or  conditions  of  this  lease  or 
license,  and  that  his  decision  in  relation  thereto  shall  be  binding  and  conclusive. 

In  witness  whereof,  the  Deputy  of  the  Minister  of  the  Interior  has  hereunto  set 
his  hand  and  seal,  and  the  lessee  has  hereunto  set  his  hand  and  seal,  the  day  and 
year  first  above  written. 

Signed,  sealed  and  delivered  in  the  presence  of: 

As  to  the  signature  of  A.  M.  Burgess.  I  A.  M.  BURGESS, 


G._U.  Ryley^  y  Deputy  of  the  Minister  of  the  Interior* 

FRED.  W.  GIBBS. 


As  to  the  signature  of  Frederick  W.  Gibbs. 


W.  E.  Gibbs. 


8   Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.)  A     1SS5 


RETURN 

(53/) 
o  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  the  4th  February,  1885  ;— 
For  a  Statement  showing  the  several  amounts  collected  by  the  Dominion 
Government  for  lands  sold  or  leased ;  for  timber,  logs  or  staves,  cord- 
wood,  telegraph  poles  or  other  product  of  the  forest ;  with  the  names 
of  persons  making  such  payments,  within  the  bounds  and  limits  of 
the  western  part  of  Ontario,  as  determined  by  the  decision  of  the  Privy 
Council  against  the  claim  of  the  Dominion  G-overnment. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

>epuitment  of  the  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State, 

Ottawa,  21st  April,  1885. 


48  Victoria, 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.) 


A.  1885 


Schedule  showing  the  names  of  parties  from  whom  cues  have  been  collected  for 
limber  cut  in  that  part  of  the  Dominion  of  Canada  lately  declared  by  the  Order 
ol  ihe  Queen  in  Council  to  be  within  the  Province  of  Ontario,  and  the  peveral 
amounts  collected,  in  compliance  with  an  Order  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated 
4th  February,  I8f>5,  and  numbered  19. 


Name. 


Fuller  &  Co.  (Keewatin  Lumber  Co.) 
S.  H.  Fowler  (Rainy  Lake  L limber  Co.) 

W.  J.  Macaulay 

John  Macdonald 

L.  Oliver 

Hugh  Macdonald 

Thomas  Shortiss . 

C.  J.  Campbell 

C.  0.  Small 

W.  B.  bcarth 

H.  Quetton  St.  George 

Alexander  Mclvor 

J.  S.  Aikens 

F.  C.  Campbell ....... 

David  Blain.i..J...... 

Henry  O'Brien . 

L.  R.  O'Brien ...;...... 

John  Ginty  . ...., 

Alex.  Moffatt 

Smith  &  Muir.... 

Thos.  Shortiss,  Assignee  of  Lontine 

&  Lecourt 

St.  Catharines  Milling  &  Lumber  Co. 

F.  T.  Buhner..; 

R.  T.  Sutton , 

John  J.  Macdonald  

John  Shields 

James  McKnight , 

T.  G.  Blackstock 

N.  R.  Paterson 

John  Bain 

Bain  &  Paterson 

Oliver,  Isbestor  &  Gibbons 

Geo.  F.  Hartt..... 

William  McCarthy 

Thomas  Birkett .'.     ... 

D.  E.  Sprague  ..„.,... 

J.  B.  Sprague 

H.  Bulmer,  jun 

A.  C.  Williamson 

Thos.  Marks 

John  Ross 

John  D.  Foreman 

Frank  Thomp3on 

H.  M.  Staunton .'.... 

J.  J.  Foster  

McArthur,  Boyle  &  Campbell 

P.  McRae  

N.  Tetreau  

Niccl  Kingsmill 

E   W.  Nesbitt 

W.  J.  Macaulay  

R.  J.  Short 

John  Lewis 

J.  W.  McDonald 

R.  J.  Short 

Costigan  &  Short 

H.  H.  Bailey 

H.  Bulmer,  jun 

John  Lewis 


Amount 

Paid. 

$   cts. 

20,887  17 

5,894  81 

4,364  50 

327  95 

250  00 

327  95 

327  95 

330  45 

327  95 

327  95 

332  12 

327  95 

327  95 

345  11 

332  12 

332  13 

332  13 

327  95 

250  00 

531  16 

393  54 

250  00 

204  83 

250  00 

932  90 

250  00 

250  00 

250  00 

250  00 

250  00 

250  00 

250  00 

1,000  00 

250  00 

250  00 

72  40 

750  00 

864  00 

250  00 

250  00 

200  37 

196  01 

255  00 

255  00 

2,500  00 

250  00 

50  00 

77  50 

250  00 

20  00 

189  00 

155  50 

1,539  45 

756  56 

275  50 

1,385  02 

550  50 

1,608  72 

John  Lewis 

H.  R.  Macdonald 

R.  J.  Short 

Clifford  Lewis 

W.L.  Baker 

Frank  Uardner 

Mrs.  J.  Geraghty 

P.  McDonald 

D.  Carmichael 

A.  D.  McDonald ,. 

James  Barton  

W.  D.  Coate 

John  Culbert 

John  Short , 

George  Munroe 

Geo.  Meyers 

Wm.  McKinnon , 

E.  A.  Sharp ...... 

C.  Kobold 

A.  Mulligan 

J.  Hennesy 

John  Ward 

E.  M.  Ridout 

John  A.  Miller 

Robt.  Bunting 

R.  J.  Short 

R.  J.  Short ........ 

Angus  McDonald. 

Jacob  Hose.... 

Dick,  Banning  &  Go.  ........ 

John  McLeod , 

C.  W.  Chadwick.. ..., 

Mrs.  McKenne 

St.  Catharines  Lumber  Co. 

Rainy  Lake  Lumber  Co 

Wm.  Cameron 

T.  W.  Dobbie 

Jacob  Smith 

John  W.  Colcleugh 

Robt.  Bunting 

C.  S.  Hoare 

Frank  Gardner 

Julius  Colombe 

Geo  Gagen 

Patrick  Fitzgerald  v 

Thomson  &  Palmer- 

J.  W   Philbin...... 

Charles  Ward .. 

Frank  Gardner 

James  McCracken  

Wm.  Zippel  

John  Ward 

A.  E.  Mulligan 

John  Thompson  

M.  Ritchie  

W.  J.  Macaulay 

Jacob  Hose 

G.  D.  Northgrave 

John  Thompson 

Frank  Gardner 


18  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.) 


k.  188ft 


Schedule  showing  the  names  of  parties  from  whom  dues  have  been  collected 
for  timber  cut,  &c. — Concluded. 


Name. 

Amount 
paid. 

Name. 

Amount 
paid. 

$     cts. 

25  00 

15  00 

2  50 

121  25 

12  50 
155  02 

61  50 

45  00 

45  44 

300  00 

13  00 
125  00 
442  55 
125  00 

3,650  00 

876  10 

40  38 

20  14 

Wm.  McCarthy  

Manning,  Macdonald  &  Co 

McDonald,  Andrews  &  McLeod 

H.  F.  Holmes 

$    cts. 
791  02 

3,627  01 

557  50 

8.  M   Ridout .... 

Valter  Oliver »..-« 

25  00 

Mrs.  McEwen 

6  00 

N.Montgomery 

Canada  Gold  Mining  Co .... 

7  00 

Jharles  Laverdure, 

V   McCarthv                   ». 

13  58 

Albert  Mulligan 

12  50 

V.  T.  Gibbins. «  

John  McCracken 

Capt.  Thos.  Wylie 

10  50 
209  60 

Jharles  McMurdie 

Robt.  Fitzgerald 

245  13 

H.  F.  Holmes 

22  50 

George  Walker 

5  00 

[cMillan,  McCan  &  Co 

Bell  Telephone  Co 

Manning,  Macdonald  &  Co. 

Total.......* 

41  60 

440  51 

'.  T.  Hooper 

93,801  59 

Certified  correct. 

G.  W.  KYLEY, 

Clerk  of  Timber  and  Mines  Office,  I)ept<  of  the  Interior. 


)ttawa,  14th  April,  1885. 


DEPARTMENT  OP  THE  I NTERIOR— PATENT  BRANCH. 


Statement  showing  Sales  of  Lands  within  the  District  of  Keewatin. 

Names  of  Purchasers. 

Parts  of  Sections 
or  Lots. 

Whole,  36,  37  and  38. 
Whole,  29,  30,  3i,  32, 

33,  34,  35  and  38. 
Part   of  E.  £  of  19  ; 

part  of  20. 
Part  of  20 

Township. 

Range. 

Area 

in 
Acres. 

Price 
Col- 
lected. 

lexander  Ralph  Lillie 

5  South... 
4     do    ... 

9  North... 

9     do    ... 
4  South... 
4    do    ... 

31  East... 
25    do  ... 

22    do  ... 

22    do  ... 
25    do  ... 
25    do  ... 

219dfe... 
533dfr... 

296 

27 

320 

320.. 

$    cts. 
219  10 
533  33 

[eewatin  Lumbering  and  Manufac- 
turing Co, 

296  00 
270  00 

N.  iof  22 

320  00 

N.  |of  21.. 

320  00 

Department  of  the  Interior, 

Ottawa,  17th  April,  1885. 


E.  M. 


]  Victoria,  Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.)  A.  1885 


RETURN 

(53/) 
o  an  Obder  of  the  House  of  Commons,  dated  23rd  February,  1885  ; — For 
a  Beturn  showing : — 

1st.  The  names  of  Grazing  Land  Lessees  who  have  Cattle  upon  their 
Leaseholds ;  the  date  of  the  Lease  ;  the  geographical  position  of  the 
area  covered  by  each  Lease  ;  the  number  of  the  Lease  ;  the  num- 
ber of  Cattle  reported  on  each  Leasehold  ;  the  date  when  the 
Leasehold  was  first  stocked  with  Cattle  ;  and  the  aggregate 
number  of  acres  covered  by  such  Leases. 

2nd.  The  names  of  Grazing  Land  Lessees  who  have  not  placed  Cattle 
upon  their  Leaseholds  ;  the  number  of  acres  in  each  Leasehold  ; 
the  geographical  position  of  the  area  covered  by  each  Lease  ;  the 
number  of  the  Lease  ;  and  the  aggregate  number  of  acres  covered 
by  such  Leases. 

By  Command, 

J.  A.  CHAPLEAU, 

•epartment  of  Secretary  of  State,  Secretary  of  State. 

Ottawa,  16th  May,  1885. 


S3;—  1 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  53.) 


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REPORT 


OF  THE 


ROYAL   COMMISSION 


ON 


CHINESE  IMMIGRATION 


REPORT   AND   EVIDENCE. 


4i  v> 


M 


••■■■ 


OTTAWA : 
PRINTED  BY  ORDER  OF  THE  COMMISSION. 


1885 


PEEFACE. 


Owing  to  the  limited  time  at  the  disposal  of  the  Commission  Mr. 
Jusice  Gray,  believing  that  thereby  the  work  would  be  expedited,  decided 
to  bring  out  and  personally  superintend  the  printing  of  his  Eeport  at  the 
same  time  as  that  of  the  other  Commissioner  was  being  printed.  As  a 
consequence,  each  report  is  paged  independently  in  Eoman  numerals. 
At  the  close  of  the  first  report,  (page  cxxxiv),  the  second  report  com- 
mences, and  at  the  close  of  the  second  report,  (page  cii),  the  Minutes  of 
Evidence  and  Appendices  will  be  found,  paged  with  Arabic  numerals.  In 
referring  to  the  volume,  therefore,  it  is  only  necessary  to  remember  that 
the  first  one  hundred  and  thirty-four  pages  are  devoted  to  that  portion  of 
the  Eeport  signed  by  the  Chairman,  (Mr.  Chapleau)  ;  that  one  hundred 
and  two  pages  follow  devoted  to  that  portion  signed  by  Mr.  Commissioner 
Gray,  and  that  the  Evidence,  Appendices  and  Index  are  paged  with 
ordinary  numerals. 

At  the  end  is  an  analytical  Index  to  the  Minutes  of  Evidence  and 
Appendices.    A  succinct  narrative  of  facts,  by  it  the  reader  may  learn  not. 
only  where  testimony  is  given  in  respect  of  any  subject,  but  also  all 
that  is  said  on  any  subject. 

To  the  Eeport  proper  of  the  Commissioners  there  is  no  index. 

It  is  usual  to  give  at  the  end  of  a  report  a  list  of  the  witnesses.    This 
course  is  not  adopted  because  the  names  of  all  the  Canadian  witnesses  are 
set  out  in  Mr.  Commissioner  Gray's  report  p.  li.     The  need  of  such  a  list, 
disappears  when  the  witness's  name  heads  the  page  as  in  the  present 
volume. 

In  the  enquiry  at  San  Francisco  in  1876,  evidence  was  taken  respecting 
the  Chinese  immigrant  in  all  parts  of   the  world,  from  San  Francisco 


to  Melbourne  ;  the  subject  was  literally  surveyed  "from  China  to  Peru ;" 
and  the  Commission  to  the  Canadian  Commissioners  called  for  all  infor- 
mation attainable  respecting  it.  When  the  page-heading  on  the  odd 
page  instead  of  "  Enquiry  at  San  Francisco  "  is  "  Chinese  in  Australia,"  or 
the  "Chinaman  in  China,"  &c,  the  general  heading  of  "Enquiry  at  San 
Trancisco  "  will  be  as  it  were  read  over  the  other — the  substituted  head- 
ings being  used  for  the  purpose  of  more  rapidly  guiding  the  eye  to  the 
matter  below.  Had  there  been  room  at  the  top  of  the  page,  and  were  it 
necessary  to  be  so  explicit,  the  general  heading  would  have  run :  Enquiry 
at  San  Francisco  into  Chinese  immigration  there  and  wherever  it  has 
gone,  with  the  view  of  obtaining  information  to  guide  in  forming  a 
judgment  respecting  that  immigration  in  British  Columbia. 


CONTENTS. 


3E  Commission ». v 

3MMISSIONEBS'  REPORTS  : 

Hon.  Mr.  Chapleau's vih 

Hon.  Mr.  Justice  Gray's page  1  follows  Enquiry  at  San  Francisco  p.    cxxxiv 

inutes  of  Evidence  : 

San  Francisco 1 —  41 

British  Columbia 42—151 

Return  of  Excise  Duty  collected  from  Chinese  on  cigars  manufactured 151 — 153 

Statements  put  in 153—170 

Portland 171—177 

List  of  Appendices  : 
.  Abstract  of  evidence  taken  before  a  Joint  Comimttee  of  the  Senate  and  House  ol 

Representatives  of  the  United  States  in  1876 179 — 36~ 

.  Communication  from  Rev.  Philip  Dwyer  AM.,  of  Victoria,  B.C.,  which  accompanied 

his  views  on  the  Chinese  question 361—36 

,  Numbers  and  occupations  of  Chinese  in  British  Columbia. 363—366 

.  Narrative  of  visit  to  Chinatown,  San  Francisco 366 — 370 

.  Narrative  of  visit  to  Chinatown,  Portland,  Oregon 370—371 

Text  of  the  Amendment  to  the  Restriction  Act  of  1882 ... 371—375 

,  Judgment  of  the  Hon.  Mr.  Justice  Gray  on  the  Chinese  Tax  Bill,  passed  by  the  British 

Columbia  Legislature  on  the  2nd  September,  1878 375—383 

.  Calendar  of  Chinese  cases  brought  before  the  Victoria  Police  Court 383—388 

Return  of  convicts  sentenced  to  the  British  Columbia  Penitentiary  from  1st  January, 

1880,  to  30th  June,  1884 389—393 

Statement  showing  amount  of  taxes  paid  by  Chinese  in  Victoria  from  1st  January, 

1879,  to  31st  December,  1883 , 394 

,  Number  of  Chinamen  who  have  paid  Provincial  Revenue  Tax. 395 

Number  of  Chinamen,  Indians  and  whites  employed  at  the  salmon  canneries 395 

.  Return  showing  the  number  of  immigrants  who  have  arrived  and  settled  on  the 

mainland. 396 

Statement  of  coal  exported  from  Victoria  and  Nanaimo,  British  Columbia 396 

Passengers  arriving  at  Victoria,  for  four  months  of  1884 396 

.  Summary  of  Customs'  Revenue  collected  from  Chinese  firms  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 

June  30th,  1883 397 

Summary  of  Customs'  Revenue  collected  from  Chinese  firms  for  the  fiscal  year  ending 

June  30th,  1884 398 

Imports  from  China  (direct)  into  British  Columbia 398 

Number  of  passengers  entering  Victoria,  B.C.,  whites  and  Chinese. , 398 

Number  of  persons  represented  by  goods  passed  free  of  duty  under  the  head  of 

settlers'  effects 399- 

Correspondence. 399—404 

Narrative  of  visit  to  Chinatown,  British  Columbia 404 

,  Report  of  a  decision  rendered  by  the  Hon.  George  Ogden  Hoffman,  of  the  United 

States  District  Court,  in  the  matter  of  Tung  Yeong  on  habeas  corpus 405—409 

i  Returns  showing  number,  occupation,  sex,  &c,  of  immigrants  recorded  at  the  Pro- 
vincial Immigration  office  at  New  Westminster 409—410 

Chinese  Immigration  in  the  Sandwich  Islands ► 411 

Answers  to  questions  by  Secretary  of  Foreign  Office,  Honolulu 411—412 

Foreign  Office  notice— regulations  respecting  Chinese  immigration 413 

Text  of  an  Act  to  regulate  the  landing  of  passengers  arriving  at  the  different  ports 

in  this  Kingdom , 41 

Postscript  to  Chief  Justice  Begbie's  evidence  given  on  page  71 4]  3 


COMMISSION; 


On  the  4th  of  July,  1884,  the  following  Commission  was  issued  :— 

CANADA. 
LANSDOWNE. 

Victoria,  by  the  Grace  of  God  of  the  United  Kingdom  of  Great  Britain  and  Ireland,  Queen, 
Defender  of  the  Faith,  etc.,  etc.,  etc. 
To  all  to  ivhom  these  presents  shall  come  or  whom  the  same  may  in  any  wise  concern  : 

Greeting  :-Whereas,  during  the  last  session  of  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  a  motion  was  made 
as  follows  :  "That  in  the  opinion  of  this  House  it  is  expedient  to  enact  a  law  prohibiting  tne 
incoming  of  Chinese  to  that  portion  of  Canada  known  as  British  Columbia  which  motion  was 
Srawn  on  a  promise  made  by  the  Right  Honorable  the  Premier  on  behalf  of  ^  Government 
that  a  Commission  should  be  issued  to  enquire  into  and  report  upon  the  whole  subject  of  Chinese 
Immigration  ; 

And  whereas  We  deem  it  expedient  in  the  interest  of,  and  as  connected  with,  the  good 
government  of  Canada  to  cause  such  enquiry  to  be  made ; 

Now,  know  ye  that  We,  by  and  with  the  advice  of  our  Privy  Council  for  C^™^bb 
presents  nominate,  constitute  and  appoint  the  Honorable  Joseph  f^^f^^Tt^l 
Laws,  one  of  our  counsel  learned  in  the  law,  and  our  Secretary  of  State  of  Canada  and Lthe 
Hono  able  John  Hamilton  Gray,  Doctor  of  Civil  Law,  a  Judge  of  ^f*^*^^£ 
Columbia,  Commissioners  to  make  enquiry  into  and  concerning  all  the  facts  and  matters 
connected  with  the  whole  subject  of  Chinese  Immigration,  its  trade  relations,  as  well  as  the  social 
and  moral  objections  taken  to  the  influx  of  the  Chinese  people  into  Canada. 

And  We  do  hereby  under  the  authority  of  an  Act  of  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  passed  in  the 
t^tX^^TouJ^,  chaptered  thirty-eight  and  intituled  "An  Act  Respecting  Inquiries 
fining Public  Matter^  confer  upon  the  said  Commissioners  the  power  of  summoning  before 
Sem n V™  or  witnesses,  and  of  requiring  them  to  give  evidence  on  oattvo^  £  ^ 
(or  on  solemn  affirmation,  if  they  be  parties  entitled  to  affirm  m  ^.^^'^^^ 
such  documents  and  things  as  such  Commissioners  deem  requisite  to  the  full  investigation  of  the 
matters  into  which  they  are  appointed  to  examine. 

And  We  do  order  and  direct  that  the  said  Commissioners  report  to  our  Privy  Council  for 
Canada  from  time  to  time,  or  in  one  report,  as  they  may  think  fit,  the  result  of  their  enquiry. 

In  testimony  whereof,  We  have  caused  these  our  Letters  to  be  made  Patent  and  the  Great 
Seal  of  Canada  to  be  hereunto  affixed  : 

Witness,  our  right  trusty  aud  eutirely  beloved  cousin,  the  Most  Honorable  Sir  Henry  Charles 
Keith  Petty  Fitzmauriee,  Marquis  of  Lansdowne,  in  the  County  of  Somerset,  Earl  of 
Wycombe  of  Chipping  Wycombe,  in  the  County  of  Bucks,  Viscount  Calne  and  Cain- 
Ine  m  the  CouSy  of  WUte,  and  Lord  Wycombe,  Baron  of  Chipping  Wycombe  in  the 
County  of  Bucks,  i/the  Peerage  of  Great  Britain,  Earl  of  Kerry  and  Earl  of  Shelburnc 
V^count  Clanmaurice  and  Fitzmauriee,  Baron  of  Kerry,  Lixnaw  and  Dunkerron  m  the 
Peera-e  of  Ireland,  Knight  Grand  Cross  of  our  most  distinguished  Order  of  St.  Michael 
aud  St.  George,  Governor-General  of  Canada  and  Vice-Admiral  of  the  same. 
At  our  Government  House,  in  our  city  of  Ottawa,  this  fourth  day  of  July,  in  the  year  of  our 
Lord  one  thousand  eight  hundred  and  eighty-four,  and  hi  the  forty-eighth  year  of  our 
reign. 

By  command, 

G.   POWELL, 

Under  Secretary  of  Slate. 

la 


REPORT 


OF    THE 


CHINESE      IMMIGRATION 

ROYAL    COMMISSION. 


To  His  Excellency  the  Governor-General  in  Council: 

We,  the  undersigned,  having  been  appointed  by  a  Royal  Commission 
dated  the  5th  July,  1884,  to  make  enquiry  into  and  concerning  all  the  ^  ^ 

facts  and  matters  connected  with  the  whole  subject  of  Chinese  immigra-  enquiry. 
tion  its  trade  relations  as  well  as  the  social  and  moral  objections  taken  to 
the  influx  of  the  Chinese  people  into  Canada,  and  to  report  to  the  Privy 
Council  for  Canada,  from  time  to  time,  or  in  one  report,  the  result  of  our 
enauirv  have  the  honor  to  report  as  follows  :—  ..... 

On  L  9th  of  August  we  met  at  Victoria,  B.C.,  when  the  Secretary  ™*g~to*  - 
submitted  all  papers   received   and   evidence   taken   at  San  Francisco 
Commissioner  Gray  approved  of  the  proceedings  at  San  Francisco,  and  it 
was  agreed  the  same  should  form  part  of  the  work  of  the  Commission. 

PRELIMINARY. 

The  first  sitting  for  the  reception  of  evidence  was  held  on  the  12th  of  *£$*£» 
August,  after  due  notice  had  been  given  in  the  newspapers. 

The  public  was  then  admitted  to  the  place  of  hearing.  Ample  arrange- 
ments had  been  made  for  the  accommodation  of  the  press.  Proceedings 
were  commenced  by  the  Secretary  reading  the  Commission,  after  which 

the  Chairman  said  : 

«  British  Columbia  has  repeatedly  by  her  Legislature,  as  well  as  by  her  ^^SPSSam 
representatives  in  Parliament,  solicited  the  Executive  and  Parliament  -g™*  of^ 
of   Canada   to   enact   a   law   prohibiting    the   incoming   of   Chinese   to  sion  arose. 
British  Columbia.     Nothing  was  done  in  that  direction  until  last  session 
of   Parliament,  when   Sir   John   Macdonald,  speaking   in    answer   to  a 
motion  asking  Parliament  to  enact  a  law  in  the  above  sense,  pledged 
Ms  Government  to  issue  a  Commission  to  look  into  the  whole  subject 
durinAhe  approaching  session,  and  to  consider  exhaustively  its  trade 
relations,  its  social  relations,  and  all  those  moral  considerations  which  it 
is  alleged  make  Chinese  immigration  undesirable,  with  the  view,  as  he 


Vll 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a. 


A.  1885. 


Points  on  which 

information 

asked. 


Government  in- 
tends to  legislate. 


All  classes  invited 
to  give  evidence. 


of  putting  the  Government  and  Parliament  in  a  better  position  to  deal  with 
the  subject.  It  will  also  be  a  part  of  the  duties  of  the  Commission  to 
examine  the  evidence  submitted  in  Australia,  California  and  Washington, 
and  to  condense  and  collate  it  and  to  submit  it  with  its  report  to 
Parliament,  so  that  the  Parliament  of  Canada  might  have,  in  a  con- 
venient shape,  together  with  the  researches  of  the  Commissioners,  all 
the  information  which  the  legislative  bodies  of  the  United  States  and 
Australia  had  when  they  undertook  the  work  of  legislating  on  this  ques- 
tion. This  proposition  of  the  Government  met  with  the  unanimous  con- 
sent of  Parliament.  The  Commission  has  been  named  in  fulfilment  of  that 
pledge.  The  scope  of  its  functions  is  the  same  as  the  pledge  of  the  Premier. 
It  has  made  researches  in  Washington,  and  is  in  possession  of  the  evidence 
and  papers  submitted  to  Congress.  I  visited  San  Prancisco  and  have 
carefully  examined  the  different  points  submitted  to  the  Commission 
by  the  light  of  what  is  to  be  seen  there,  and  have  taken  the  evidence  of 
those  who  should  be  well  informed.  The  Commission  is  now  opened  here 
for  the  purposes  indicated  in  the  Order  in  Council,  which  has  been  read, 
appointing  it.  The  Commissioners  wish  for  the  fullest  information  on  all 
matters  submitted  to  them,  viz  : — 

"  (1.)  The  advisability  of  passing  a  law  to  prohibit  the  incoming  or 
Chinese  into  British  Columbia  or  Canada. 

"  (2.)  The  advisability  of  restricting  the  numbers  coming  in  or  of  regulat 
ing  it,  and  the  best  manner  of  effectually  carrying  out  such  object. 

"  (3.)  The  social  and  trade  relations  between  the  people  of  British  Colum- 
bia and  Canada  generally  with  the  Chinese,  both  now  and  in  view  of  the 
anticipated  early  completion  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  as  well  as. 
the  effective  completion  of  the  other  public  works  about  to  be  under 
taken. 

"  (4.)  The  moral  considerations  which  arise  out  of  the  residence  and  con- 
tact of  the  white  people  with  Chinese  here  and  elsewhere. 

"  The  Commissioners  have  already,  by  letters,  invited  the  Executive 
Council  of  the  Province  and  the  Municipal  Council  of  this  city,  and 
other  representative  officials,  to  give  them  whatever  information  is 
within  their  control  on  this  important  subject. 

"  I  have  only  to  add  that  it  is  the  intention  of  the  Government  to  bring 
in  legislation  next  session;  'and  I  venture  to  express  the  hope  that  all 
classes  of  persons,  those  favorable  to  Chinese  immigration,  as  well  as 
those  opposed  to  it,  will  place  before  the  Commission  any  facts  or  observa 
tions  which  will  throw  light  upon  the  subjects  with  which  the  Commission 
has  to  deal. 

"  We  now  invite  all  those  who,  by  their  representative  character,  have  a 
right  to  speak  in  the  name  of  the  people  of  the  Province  or  in  the  name  of 
the  Municipal  Council,  to  aid  in  this  investigation.  We  also  invite  those 
who  are  connected  with  boards  of  trade,  or  who  are  engaged  in  large 
manufacturing,  mining,  or  other  industrial  enterprises,  to  put  their  views 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


*nd  any  facts  within  their  knowledge  before  the  Commission.  We  fur&*» 
invite  those  who  are  engaged  in  the  pursuit  of  agriculture  or  stock-rai^g 
to  give  us  such  information  as  will  enable  us  to  judge,  of  the  question  as  it 
affects  their  interest;  and  finally  any  information  upon  the  moral  questions 
from  all  sources  will  be  received  and  considered  by  the  Commission.  The 
Commissioners  propose  to  visit  as  many  of  the  leading  sections  of  the 
province  as  the  limited  time  at  their  disposal  will  permit,  and  will  be 
happy  to  receive  a  visit  from  any  persons  wishing  to  speak  with  them 

on  the  subject. 

«  The  Commissioners  wish  especially  for  facts,  and  invite  all  who  feel  dis-  Facts  specially 
posed  to  put  their  views  or  give  any  statistical  information  on  paper  to 
hand  it  into  the  Secretary  of  the  Commission." 

Hon.  Mr.  Justice  Gray:  "I  have  very  little  to  add  to  the  remarks 
made  by  my  brother  Commissioner,  the  Hon.  Mr.    Chapleau. 

« I  think  it  is  very  important  in  British  Columbia,  deeply  interested  as  Necegity  of  the 
we  are  in  this  question,  that  the  people  should  remember  that  many  mem- 
bers of  the  Dominion  Parliament  have  had  no  information  on  the  subject; 
and  that  it  is  essential  they  should  be  informed  in  a  shape  and  way  that 
would  justify  them  in  passing  a  prohibitive  or  restrictive  Act.  They  will 
have  also  to  be  put  in  possession  of  proof  that  would  justify  them  before 
their  constituents,  in  the  event  of  their  supporting  a  restrictive  measure 
-against  the  Chinese.  _ 

"  The  object  of  the  Commission  is  to  obtain  proof  that  the  principle  of  re-  object  of  the 
-stricting  Chinese  immigration  is  proper  and  in  the  interests  of  the  Province  Commwwn. 
and  the  Dominion.  Evidence  on  both  sides  is  required  to  arrive  at  a  just 
decision;  this  is  what  the  Dominion  Government  seeks  in  the  present 
oase,  and  it  ought  not  to  be  thought  unreasonable  in  British  Columbia  that 
a  Commission  should  be  appoint3d  to  collect  such  information  as  would 
lead  to  a  right  conclusion. 

»  Sitting  as  a  Commissioner  I  have  to  hear  the  evidence  on  both  sides, 
and  fairly°report  it  to  Ottawa,  feeling  assured  that  the  people  of  the  Pro- 
vince will  give  the  Commission  every  opportunity  to  obtain  evidence 
bearing  on  the  subject." 

We  then  proceeded  to  call  witnesses  in  British  Columbia. 

During  the  investigation  in  British  Columbia,  San  Francisco  and  else-  witnesses, 
where,  thirty-one  witnesses  were  examined  viva  voce,  and  thirty-nine  by 
sending  out  printed  questions,  which  are  set  out  in  the  Minutes  of  Evi- 
dence.      Many   to  whom  these   were  sent    did    not    reply,    but    among 
those  who  did  will  be  found  persons   of   all  classes. 

Statements  in  writing  were  received  from  those  who  preferred  thus  to  Statement  in 

record  their  testimony. 

An  elaborate  enquiry  was  made  by  a  Joint  Committee  of  the  Senate  Threat  enquiry 
and  House  of  Representatives  of  the  United  States  in  1876.     An  effort 
was  made  to  procure  copies  of  this  mine  of  information  on  the  subject, 
ior  the  use  of  Parliament,  but  as  will  be  seen  by  Appendix  [0]  without 


IX 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.] 


A.  1785. 


Guiding  aim  in 
making  the  con- 
densation. 


Documentary. 


All  the  literature 
on  the  question 
read. 


Commissioners 
investigate  for 
themselves. 


(Preparedness  of 
jmind  with  which 
Commissioners 
came  to  consider- 
ation of  this 
Question. 

Visits  to  Chinese 
quarters. 


Marginal  notes. 


success.  The  evidence  as  printed  extended  over  some  twelve  hundred 
pages.  This  has  been  condensed.  Counsel  or  managers  appeared  before 
the  Joint  Committee  and  the  witnesses  were  examined  and  cross- 
examined.  To  have  noted  the  transitions  from  direct  examination  to 
cross-examination  would  have  greatly  lengthened  without  adding  to  the 
value  of  the  condensation,  in  making  which  the  aim  has  been  to  give, 
as  much  as  practicable,  in  the  words  of  the  witnesses,  and  in  a  com- 
paratively few  pages  the  result  of  long  examinations. 

'  In  addition  to  the  evidence  we  have  described  we  have  availed  ourselves 
of  much  that  is  documentary.  Any  documents  which  we  deemed  of  suffi- 
cient importance  will  be  found  either  set  out  in  the  report  or  in  the 
Appendix.  We  have  further  read  all  the  literature  bearing  on  Chinese 
immigration,  and  the  issues  raised  in  connection  therewith,  which  the 
Library  of  Parliament  and  the  most  diligent  search  elsewhere  placed 
within  our  reach. 

As  the  California  Reports  are  not  found  in  the  Library  for  recent  years 
we  print  in  the  Appendix  a  judgment  of  the  Honorable  Judge  Hoffman, 
bearing  on  the  interpretation  of  the  Act  of  1882,  and  for  a  similar  reason 
we  produce  the  Act  of  1884,  amending  that  of  1882. 

In  British  Columbia,  in  San  Francisco  and  in  Portland,  the  Commis- 
sioners investigated  for  themselves  the  Chinese  question  as  presented  in 
each  locality ;  discussed  the  problem  with  leading  men  of  all  classes,  some 
of  whom,  while  expressing  themselves  freely  in  conversation,  did  not  wish 
to  put  their  opinions  on  record ;  others,  for  different  reasons,  could  not  be 
examined;  and  the  Commissioners  came  to  the  consideration  of  this 
question,  not  only  furnished  with  the  information  derived  from  the  evidence 
given,  but  with  the  advantage  of  having  discussed  it  with  judges, 
merchants,  statesmen,  mechanics  and  laborers,  amongst  the  whites,  and 
with  Chinese  officials.  In  British  Columbia  we  visited  Victoria,  Nan- 
aimo,  New  Westminster  and  Yale. 

A  brief  account  of  what  was  seen  among  the  Chinese  in  San  Francisco, 
Victoria  and  Portland  will  be  found  in  the  Appendix  [D,  E  and  PL 
His  Excellency  the  Consul  General  of  China  paid  a  visit  to  the  Commis- 
sion at  the  Palace  Hotel.  After  courtesies  were  interchanged,  he  en- 
quired particularly  respecting  the  Commission,  and  the  veto  powers  of 
the  Dominion  and  Imperial  Parliaments.  The  Consul  General  expressed 
a  hope  that  the  enquiry  would  be  impartial,  and  he  was  assured  it 
would  be. 

In  taking  evidence  on  large  questions  and  printing  it  as  given,  the 
same  subjects  will  again  and  again  recur,  but  as  seen  by  different  minds. 
The  mastery  of  the  whole  is  greatly  facilitated  by  marginal  notes,  and 
accordingly  marginal  notes  have  been  made. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  ^^ 


CHINESE  IMMIGRATION  ELSEWHERE  THAN  IN  CANADA. 

We  were  directed  by  our  Commission  to  enquire  into  all  facts  and 
matters  connected  with  the  whole  subject  of  Chinese  immigration.  We 
have  accordingly  made  ourselves-as  far  as  possible  through  books- 
acquainted  with  it  as  it  has  existed  in  various  countries.  . 

Happily  there  was  an  opportunity  of  studying  it  on  the  spot  m  that  Extent^ 
State  where  it  has  appeared  on  the  largest  scale  and  under  circumstances 
analogous  to  those  existing  in  British  Columbia.     And  not  only  so.     In 
the  State  in  question  there  had  been  as  a  consequence  of  agitation  a  great 
inquest  on  the  subject  nearly  eight  years  ago.    That  had  been  followed  by  An— n *£ 
still    more    violent    agitation.      The    Federal   Legislature    had    passed  «on*tW;t 
twosuccessive  Acts  dealing  with  it.   One  of  these  Acts  came  into  operation  =tand  the 
in  1882      The   other  was   passed   at  the  last  session  ot  Congress,     in 
California  for  some  time  there  had  been  railway   communication  with 
the  Eastern  States,  and  one  of  the  great  difficulties  in  the  way  of  procuring 
{white  labor  had  been  removed.    Here  was  an  opportunity  of  studying  the 
qnestion  in  British  Columbia  in  the  light  of  the  present,  the  past  and  the 
future-for  the  present  of  California  may  prove  the  likeness  of  the  future 
'of  British  Columbia;  of  studying  it,  as  we  have  said,  on  the  spot;   ot 
testing  the  depositions  of  1876  by  the  experience  of  eight  years;  of  talk- 
Wwith  and  examining  leading  men  who  had,  on  one  side  or  the  other, 
'tain partin the  agitation;  of  enquiring  into  the  effects  and  eftec riyeness 
of  the  several  Acts,  and  of  seeing,  so  far  as  the  opinion  of  the  deliberate 
and  passionate  advocacy  of  others  were  concerned,  what  had   been   .he 
influence  of  those  tests  of  truth-sober  second  thought  and  time. 

Accordingly  in  July  one  of  your  Commissioners  and  the  Secretary  pro- 
ceeded to  San  Francisco. 

THE  ENQUIRY  AT  SAN  FRANCISCO. 

On  arriving  at  San  Francisco  we  at  once  put  ourselves  in  communica- 
tion with  leading  men  and  persons  who  had  in  a  sense  made  a  special 
study  of  the  question.  A  few  who  could  speak  with  pecnhar  authority  San^nctaco 
were  asked  to  give  their  evidence.  They  readily  complied  and,  cribed. 
save  in  two  cases,  a  short-hand  writer  took  down  verhaUm  what  they 
deposed.  One  of  these  exceptions  was  Mr.  Babcock,  a  leading  merchant, 
a  man  of  great  wealth,  and  an  employer  of  Chinese  labor.  Mr  Babcock 
could  not  fail  to  impress  anyone  with  whom  he  might  be  brought  in  con- 
tact as  being  a  man  of  great  independence  of  character  and  scrupulous 
honor     His  evidence  was  summarized,  the  summary  submitted  to  him,  SeeM.E.,p.H. 


XI 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


and  he  endorsed  it.  The  President  cf  the  Immigration  Association  of 
California,  a  man  who  had  taken  part  in  the  agitation,  and  who  was  at  the 
moment  actively  engaged  in  bringing  in  white  immigrants,  was  a  most 
valuable  witness.  On  the  subject  of  the  relative  criminality  of  Chinese 
the  Chief  of  Police,  a  detective,  and  a  Police  Magistrate  were  examined! 
In  regard  to  charges  of  personation  a  late  collector  of  customs  was  seen. 
The  Chinese  side  of  the  question  was  given  by  His  Excellency  the  Consul 
General  for  China  at  the  port  of  San  Francisco,  and  by  Colonel  Bee,  the 
Consul,  while  on  the  general  question,  Mr.  Walcott  Brooks,  an  Asiatic 
scholar  and  traveller,  of  high  repute  in  San  Francisco,  was  heard 
ChSSqSfon  A  gWe  at  what  ma?  b*  caIled  the  progress  of  the  Chinese  question  in 
in  California.  California  will  be  useful.     At  first  the  Chinamen  were  welcomed.     In 

See  p.  339,  Ap.  A  1852,  said  a  witness  before  the  Joint  Committee,  they  marched  in  our 
fourth  of  July  processions  ;  in  1862,  they  dared  not  show  themselves;  in 
1872,  had  they  dared  to  appear  on.  the  scene,  they  would  have  been 
stoned.  The  Joint  Committee  mentioned  above  met  at  San  Francisco  to 
report  to  Congress  on  the  character,  extent,  and  effect  of  Chinese  immigra- 
tion. They  met  at  the  Palace  Hotel  in  October,  1876,  and  a  very  full 
enquiry  took  place. 

^oidseSP°able  °ne  feature  0f  the  ear1^  sta§'e  of  the  enquiry  is  worth  noting.  On  a 
•  wifetSafntyd  ?omt  Which  Was  caPable  of  bein§  syttled  t0  a  demonstration,  the  vaguest 
ideas,  even  in  the  case  of  eminent  men,  prevailed.  We  allude  to  the 
Chinese  popula-  number  of  the  Chinese  population  in  California.  One  put  it  down  at 
116,000;  another  at  150,000,  and  another  at  250,000.  Not  dissimilar 
were  the  estimates  formed  of  the  number  of  Chinese  in  British  Columbia. 
One  contractor  told  us  there  were  3,000  in  Victoria. 

sZ^T&i^        N°W'    there    were   two   dependent  sources    of    information    which 
mation.  yet,  when   compared,   tallied  and  thus  tested  each  other.     The  census 

showed  that  in  1870  the  Chinese  population  of  the  whole  of  the 
United  States  was  63,199.  Of  course,  there  may  have  been  an  enormous 
increase  in  six  years.  That  increase  was,  however,  know^n.  From  the 
records  of  the  Custom  House,  a  tabular  statement  had  been  made  of  the 
arrivals  and  departures  of  Chinese  from  1860  to  1876.  According  to  that 
statement  the  excess  of  arrivals  over  departures,  from  1870  to  1876,  was 
§on?n1hPe°u!s!"iB  54'595"  This'  Provided  none  had  died,  ™*ld  gwe  117,794.  If  we'esti- 
1876  mate  the  annual  death  rate  at  two  per  cent,  on  an  average  population  of 

90,000,  this  would  give  12,600  for  seven  years,  and  12,600  subtracted 
from  117,794  leave  the  result  of  105,194.  The  tabular  statement  between 
1870  and  1876  is  capable  of  being  tested.  If  that  statement  for  the  years 
from  1860  to  1869  inclusive  is  compared  with  the  census  for  the  period, 
we  find  a  substantial  agreement.  If  the  tabular  statement  was  right  for 
these  years,  it  was  likely  to  be  right  for  the  years  from  1870  to  1876.  No 
one,  indeed,  disputed  the  correctness  of  the  figures  for  these  years. 

This  105,194  has  to  be  spread  over  the  United  States.  The  bulk 
of  the  Chinese  population  is  on  the  Pacific  Coast;  but  not  nearly  all. 
In  1870,  according  to  the  census,  California  had  49,277  ;  Nevada,  3,152  , 


Xll 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


Oregon,  3,330  ;  Idaho,  4,274  ;  Montana,   1,949  ;  the  traction  remaining  gg|gjg£ 
ban-  distributed  among  the  other  States.     Did  the  same  proportion  hold  £U.CaWorma 
in  1876,  the  number  in  California  might  be  about.  80,000.     How  accurate 
is  this  reasoning  will  be  seen  by  the  number  of  Chinese  in  the  whole  of 
the  United  States  in  1880,  according   to  the  census  of  that  year,  viz. . 
105,465  ;  in  California,  75,132. 

Yet  language  of  panic  was  held  respecting  the  immense  number  of  these  Unreasonable^ 
people.     This  language  was  heard  in  the  hails  of  the  enquiry.     The  moral  SJ«<* 
of  this  as  it  strikes  ns  is  that  this  question  ean  be  discussed  with  calm-  bers  of  Chinese, 
ness  and  dignity,  and  certainly  without  that  excitement  winch  is  born  ot 
the  fears  of  a  rising  deluge.  ,  , 

Some  75,000  Chinese  in  a  State,  not  then  counting  a  million  inhabitants, 
may  have  been  a  danger,  may  have  menaced  the  interests  of  trade  and 
labor,  and  in  city  and  county  may  .have  had  a  degrading  and  demoralizing 
influence.     But  if  so,  the  proper  way  is  to  lay  the  finger  on  the  sore  place    The.proper  w& 
•  and  not  rave  about  imaginery  facts   nor  assail  with  wild  assertions  and  option;  get  at 
irrational  vituperation,  a  whole  class  which  like  other  classes  contains  good 

and  bad.  .  . 

Perhaps,  however,  a  deep  insight  may  discover  a  kind  of  justification 
for  a  sentiment  which  had  the  complexion  of  terror.  Loomng  at  the 
history  of  countries  where  two  races  have  existed  side  by  side  in  any  ratio  A  great  quest™, 
of  proportion  as  to  numbers,  are  there  possibilities  in  Chinese  immigration 
to  explain  this  panic-like  state  of  mind,  by  a  reference  to  an  instinctive 
appreciation  of  a  real  and  momentous  issue  unconsciously  veiled  under 
violent  accusation  and  trivial  controversies?  The  people  sometimes,  as 
it  were,  scent  danger  in  men  or  measures  or  movements,  without  being 
able  to  analyse  the  source  of  their  alarm.  They  conceive  violent  aver- 
sions or  apprehensions,  or  both,  and  their  causal  faculty  leads  them  to 
cast  about  for  reasons  for  their  sensations  to  satisfy  themselves  and  others, 
and  these  reasons  generally  partake  more  of  the  character  of  invective 
than  of  logical  deduction.   This  is  a  question  which  will  naturally  come 

up  hereafter.  - 

It  is  a  serious  step  to  take,  to  exclude  any  law-abiding  workers  from  A senous stept^ 
■your  country  as  a  field  to  win  a  living  in  or  even  to  hamper  their  ingress  ing  workers, 
save  on  sanitary  grounds  ;  it  may  be  quite  right,  however,  to  adopt  one  or  BuUhere  maybj 
other  course;  there   may   be  good   reasons   for  doing   so.     But  m  the  theseAonld  be 
interest  of  what  is  expedient  as  well  as  just,  these  are  the  reasons,  to  be 
•  found  out  and  produced,  and  not  rest  what  should  be  a  grave  act  of 
statesmanship,   and  what  might  prove  a  wise  and  far  seeing  course,  on 
indiscriminate  abuse. 

It  is  not  improper  to  say  that  the  Chinese  have  no  votes,  that  they  do  Aplea£or  fair 
not   speak  the  English  tongue,    that    they  do  not  belong  to  a  nation  P  ■* 
which,  when  her  subjects  are  insulted  or  damnified,  can  hold  high  lan- 
guage,   and  the  commonest  sentiments    of    manliness,   not  to  speak  ot 
chivalry,  suggest  the  reserve  of  expression  which  the  weak  may   claim 
from  the  strong. 

xiii 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.) 


A.  1885. 


Mistaken 
violence. 


Chinese  judged 
by  an  unfair 
standard. 


Sweeping 
generalizations. 


Things  innocent  in 
themselves  re- 
garded as  serious 
objections  if  not 
crimes* 


There  may  be  a 
strong  case  for 
Government  in- 
terference. 


A  Nevada  miner'; 
view  of  the  case. 


The  very  violence  with  which  the  Chinese  are  assailed  creates  in  many 
minds  a  prejudice  in  their  favor  and  in  any  case  is  unworthy  of  civilized 
men.  To  say  of  men  the  bulk  of  whom  are  marvels  of  frugality,  industry, 
and — save  for  the  use  of  opium — temperance,  that  they  are  all  thieves 
and  scoundrels  defeats  itself. 

The  truth  is  the  Chinese  are  judged  by  an  ideal  standard.  They  do  not 
get  the  benefit  of  the  doctrine  of  averages.  They  are  not  measured  by 
that  charitable  rule  which  justice  no  less  than  humanity  leads  us  to  apply 
to  all  other  men.  If  one  Chinaman  steals,  it  is  concluded  that  all  are 
thieves.  If  a  man  of  this  temper  were  to  read  the  tragedy  of  Tchao  Chi 
Con  Ell  he  would  at  once  cry  out :  "  What  a  depraved  people  these  Chinese 
are  !  Here  is  one  of  their  most  popular  plays  founded  on  treason  and 
murder  by  a  great  minister,  who  puts  his  master  to  death,  kills  all  the 
royal  family  except  the  daughter  of  the  King,  and  afterwards  determines; 
on  the  death  of  her  child,  born  subsequently  to  the  massacre  in  which  her. 
husband  perished."  He  would  work  himself  up  into  a  state  of  great- 
indignation,  and  give  vent  to  sweeping  ethnological  propositions,  forge  b- 
ing  the  plot  of  Hamlet,  of  Macbeth,  of  Richard  III,  and  oblivious  of  the 
daily  revelations  of  the  newspapers.  Not  merely  are  they  judged  by  an 
unfair  standard  and  painted  blacker  than  they  are,  things  innocent  in 
themselves,  because  different  from  what  we  are  used  to,  are  in  the  true 
spirit  of  barbarism,  treated  as  badges  of  degradation.  A  Chinaman  shaves 
the  front  part  of  his  head  and  wears  a  queue.  He  cuts  his  clothes  somewhat 
differently  from  western  peoples.  His  boots  are  made  on  a  different  plan 
from  ours.  To  that  tyrannical  and  narrow  judgment  ever  found  confident 
and  aggressive  where  ignorance  is  supreme,  the  pig-tail,  the  shaving  the 
front  part  of  the  head,  the  blowse  and  shoes,  are  all  so  many  marks  of 
inferiority.  Yet  the  laborers  of  one  of  the  most  civilized  of  nations  wear 
the  blowse  ;  and  as  to  shaving  the  front  part  of  the  head,  shaving  the  chin 
might,  from  an  absolute  stand-point,  appear  as  ridiculous,  while  amongst 
ourselves,  in  these  days  of  overstrained  nervous  energy,  nature  frequently 
imposes  a  denuded  front,  and  goes  even  farther  still,  without  the  aid  of  a 
scissors ;  nor  is  it  so  long  ago  since  queues  were  seen  in  the  drawing 
rooms  of  St.  James  and  Versailles. 

But  though  a  man's  logic  is  weak  what  he  advocates  may  be  sound,  and 
when  you  have  covered  some  or  all  of  his  arguments  with  ridicule  and 
discomfiture  it  does  not  follow  his  cause  lies  prostrate  with  himself. 
That  the  Chinese  immigration  is  a  bachelor  immigration  j  that  the  China- 
man can  live  in  a  space  and  on  food  wholly  inadequate  for  a  white  laborer ;. 
that  they  are  independent  of  and  indifferent  to  all  the  comforts  of  life 
as  they  are  understood  in  white  communities  ;  these,  which  are  admitted 
facts,  may  be  serious  not  merely  for  the  laborer  but  for  the  nation,  and 
it  is  our  duty  to  probe  the  facts  to  the  bottom.  Senator  Jones,  of  Nevada, 
tells  of  a  miner  who  put  it  this  way  to  him  : 

"  It  is  immaterial  to  you,  as  far  as  your  own  position  is  concerned,  who 
the  workmen   may  be  that  are  under  your  control ;  but  to  us  it  makes  a 


xiv 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


vast  difference.  1^«^**^JF^^*£2L 

work  hard  all  day  ior  ioui   uwi^.  forces    of    our 

tage  in    which   <nv   ^  -a     -   SX5^SJ&»  labor, 

SSTJS  S^S  S*  wife  and  ^^£££52 

and  comfort  in  which  you  see  them  now.     I  ^^f*^  does  not 

the  children  may  sleep;  my  wife  mn  t  be  drttod^ttat^ 

fed  ashamed  in  mixing  with  her  ne.gh Lors    the  cMdien £.  ^ 

as  heiits  decency  ^d  order  and  he  grade ,jt™to  ^  accustomed 

Srjr^T^fe^TfSSS*  beart  and 
S£5S£     ^  nfty  of  "^  ^  mh^eVno't^ 

rC0Xt  ftr^-j^J^« -*?-  -d 

make  him  contented  would  make  my  life  not  worth  living.  Christian. 

^ Youl^ve  got  some  thousands  of  -rkmen  here  in  --%^»    ^g~« 
position  I  am.  .  When  these  are  driven  out  what ,  will  bethe     ^  ^ 

tions,  hopes  and  teals  arc  common  ,  ^  ^^ 

and  whose  affection, .are  your  affections.     WhaW^y       ^.^ 
place?    In^ad   of  them  you   wUl  civilizatl0„,  yon  will  have 

»By  th%SrXsb^rlrlsftlffoT^ the  American  workman  to 
have  invented,  it  has  been  made ,  possiD  .g  ^^  larger 

?T  ^nvTtnerToli     "wtott  contributing  anything  toward  this  g-g-g--" 

than  m  any  other  coun™>  ,  vantaee  of  our  skill  and  of  our  toil  and  advaiU;    ■.  a  con. 

SfcSSK^  1^5*  of  industry  which  we  have  gg * » 

created  and  which  our  race  alone  could  create. 

This  language  is  clearly  not  the  language  actually  used  by  any  miner^ 
But  it.  none  the  less  expresses  the  miner's  sentiments.  We  have  heard 
fuch  sentiments,  and  Senator  Jones  here  condenses  many  a  haranguefrom 

"tir^heir  point  of  view,  an  nnfair  way  of  putting  the  case 
,^  if  th  re  is  danger"  anywhere  of  such  a  change  in  the  character  of  a 
population,  small  or  large,  who  would  say  it  is  a  thmg  of  which  a 
statesman  is  not  bound  to  take  note  1 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.) 


A.  1885. 


A  searching  and 
complete  examin- 
ation. 


tJnited  States 
legislation 
against  Chinese 
laborers. 


iCalifornia,  which 
had  no  existence 
thirty  years  ago, 
a  State  as  large  as 
France. 


Although  the  time  it  was  possible  to  remain  in  San  Francisco  was 
short,  a  very  searching  and  it  is  hoped  a  complete  examination  of  this 
question  was  made.  The  enquiry  of  the  Joint  Committee  of  the  Senate 
and  House  of  Representatives  of  the  TJnited  States,  already  alluded  to, 
had  been  carefully  studied,  as  had  been  much  other  literature  Eight  year3 
had  elapsed  since  that  enquiry  had  taken  place.  It  was  important  to 
know  whether  the  gentlemen  who  then  testified  still  adhered  to  their 
testimony.  Meanwhile,  as  will  be  more  particularly  referred  to  later  on, 
the  Treaty  relations  between  the  United  States  and  China  had  been 
modified.  The  date  of  the  new  Treaty,  is  November  17th,  1880;  of  its 
ratification,  July  18th,  1881.  An  Act  roughly  described  in  the  newspapers 
as  "  the  Exclusion  Act,"  but  which  might  more  accurately  be  described 
as  the  Chinese  Laborers  Exclusion  Act,  was  passed  May  6th,  1882.  More 
than  three  years  and  a  half,  therefore,  had  gone  by  since  the  first  decided 
step  towards  exclusion  was  taken,  and  more  than  two  years  since  a 
most  stringent  exclusion  Act,  so  far  as  laborers  were  concerned,  was 
placed  on  the  statute  book.  An  amendment  Act — which  is  reproduced 
in  the  Appendix  (F) — was  just  coming  into  operation. 

Here  it  should  seem  were  conditions  more  than  usually  favorable  for 
judging, in  the  light  of  experience,  the  whole  question,  as  it  presents  itself 
in  Canada. 

There  was  still  a  good  deal  of  feeling  on  the  subject  of  Chinese 
immigration. 

We  were  in  a  new  country,  a  State  as  large  as  France,  a  State  which 
had  no  existence  thirty  years  ago,  a  country,  moreover,  of  peculiar  climate 
and  peculiar  geographical  features,  and  we  first  directed  our  enquiry  to  the 
influence  of  Chinese  immigration  on 


THE  DEVELOPMENT  OF  THE  COUNTRY. 


Development  of 
country. 


The  forty-niners. 


A  railway  a 
necessity. 


The  Chinaman 
comes  forward 
a  laborer. 


California,  like  British  Columbia,  without  a  railway  must  have,  so 
far  as  direct  communication  was  concerned,  remained  isolated  from  the 
life  and  commerce  of  the  greater  portion  of  the  ( o  itinent.  Between  her 
and  all  that  is  meant  by  "  western  civilization,  "  rose  two  immense  chains 
of  mountains.  More  than  this  there  are  vast  tracts  of  but  partially  settled 
land  between  the  mountains  and  the  Missouri. 

Such  enterprising  spirits  as  the  Forty-Mners  could  not  but  early  con- 
ceive the  idea  of  overcoming  what  might  well  have  seemed  the  impass- 
able barriers  of  the  Sierra  Nevada.  In  the  absence  of  a  railway  the 
State  could  not  grow,  could  not  be  developed,  could  receive  no  immigra- 
tion, except  in  units.  The  practised  eye  discerned  at  a  glance  the  wealth 
of  her  soil,  her  mineral  wealth — but  what  were  these  if  there  were  no 
laborers  1  She  must  have  a  transcontinental  line  and,  again  like  British 
Columbia  in  this,  her  development  could  not  be  secured  by  a  trans- 
continental line  alone.  She  must  have  local  railways.  Transportation 
from  one  part  of  the  State  to  the  other  could  only  be  made  easy    for 


xvi 


48  Yictoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


commerce  and  travel  by  these.  As  it  were  to  illustrate  the  apothegm 
that  the  time  produces  the  man— the  Chinaman  who  had  come  to  California 
as  to  "the  land  of  gold,"  presents  himself  as  a  laborer.  As  we  have 
seen,  he  was  welcomed.  Friend  and  foe  bear  witness  to  his  faithfulness 
and  his  natient  industry. 

Mr  Low,  a  former  Governor  of  the  State  and  minister  to  China,  whose  c^esa^or^ 
evidence  is  summarized  in  this  volume,  said  that  -up  to  the  present  Chinese  ™«V 
labor  had  been  of  great  advantage  to  the  State,  looking  at  it  in  dollars  and        P-      ■    * 

cents     By  reason  of  our  isolation,  the  laboring  classes  of  the  Eastern 
States  and  of  Europe  could  not  get  here."    He  goes  on  to  testify  that  "on 
the  Central  Pacific  Railroad  four-fifths  of  the  labor  for  the  grading  was  4/5ofl  h      QV. 
performed  by  the  Chinese."     He  adds,  that  in  the  work   of  reclaiming  g^Se.7 
swamp  lands— the  tule-lands  as  they  are  called— much  the  larger  portion 
was  done  by  Chinese,   "for  two  reasons:   first,  the  labor  is  cheaper;  and, 
secondly,   it  is  an  unhealthy  sort  of  work,  because  it  is  in  malarious 
districts,  and  the  Chinese  seem  to  be  constituted  something  like  the  negro ; 
they  are  not  affected  by  malaria  as  Anglo-Saxons  are."   The  witness  then 
makes  a  statement  to  the  effect,  that  he  was  one  of  the  Commissioners 
when  the  Pacific  Railway  was  in  course  of  construction  on  the  western 
side  of  the  Sierra.     He  was  on  the  road  when  they  introduced  Chinese 
labor.     "  They  first  started  with  white  and  they  came  to  a  stand-still.  F^started^witli 
They  could  not  get  enough  to  prosecute  the  work."     They  were    then  they^came  to  a 
offering  $45  a  month  and  board  for  white  labor.    Things  came  to  a  stand- 
still.    The  foreman  unwillingly  consented  to  take  enough  Chinamen  to 
Ell  the  dump-carts  and  hold  the  drills,  while  white  men  held  the  horses  and 
struck  the  drills.     In  less  than  six  months  they  had  Chinese  doing  every-  ^Jjgt^n ^ 
thing,  and  the  foreman  said  that,  taken  together,  the  Chinese  did  eighty  per  Chinese  doing 
sent  as  much  as  the  whites,  while  the  wages  of  the  former  were  $31   a 
month  and  they  boarded  themselves.     To  the  white  laborers  they  gave 
$45  a  month  and  board. 

Mr.  Crocker,  one  of  the  five  proprietors  of  the  Central  Pacific  Railroad, 

isaid  thev  went  on  for  a  vear  and  a  half  with  white  labor.     They  adver-  Advertised  hut 
BtViU'         J  "  „~~  m1  j.  rcu*    conld  not  get  more 

bised  thoroughly  but  could  not  get  more  than  800  men.      lhey  got  Cni-  than  800  white 

nese  and  found  them  good  all  round  ;  "  and  to-day  if  I  had  a  big  job  of  ^  .^  ^  ^ 
work  that  I  wanted  to  get  through  quickly,  and  had  a  limited  time  to  do 
it  in,  I  should  take  Chinese  labor  to  do  it  with,  because  of  its  great  relia- 
bility, steadiness  and  aptitude  and  capacity  for  hard  labor."  He  goes  on 
to  say  that  their  powers  of  endurance  are  equal  to  those  of  the  best 
white  men,  and  that  they  proved  themselves  equal  to  the  best  Cornish 
miners  in  using  the  drill.  His  evidence  is  so  striking  we  give  an  extract 
from  the  original  report : 

"  Q.  How  long  have  you  been  in  the  State  ? — A.  I  have  been  here 
twenty-six  years. 

"Q.  What  has  been  your  business? — A.  For  the  last  fifteen  or  sixteen 
years  I  have  been  building  railroads. 

"  Q.  Did  you  commence  the  construction  of  the  Central  Pacific  with 
white  or  Chinese  labor  1 — A.   We  commenced  with  white  labor. 

xvii 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.) 


A.  1785. 


Nerer  could  get 
more  than  800 
white  men. 


[Efficiency  of 
KThinese  labor. 


"Q.  How  long  did  you  continue  it  1 — A.  We  never  discontinued  it; 

we  have  always  employed  white  labor. 

5af  Pacific  Sad  '  ^'  """  mean  now  l°nS  did  you  continue  with  that  kind  of  labor  exten- 

at  first  prejudiced  sively  ? — A.  We  continued  about  a  year  and  a  half,  when  we  found  we 

against  Chinese.     coui^  not  get  sufficient  labor  to  progress  with  the  road  as  fast   as  was 

necessary,  and  felt  driven  to  the  experiment  of  trying  Chinese  labor.     I 

believe  that  all  our  people  were  prejudiced  against  Chinese  labor,  and  that 

there  was  a  disposition  not  to  employ  them. 

"  Q.  You  mean  that  the  railroad  people  were  prejudiced  ? — A.  Yes, 
sir ;  especially  Mr.  Strobridge  and  myself,  who  had  charge  of  the  con- 
struction, more  particularly.  I  had  charge  of  the  construction,  and  Mr. 
Strobridge  was  under  me  as  superintendent.  He  thought  that  the  Chi- 
nese would  not  answer,  considering  what  they  eat,  and  other  things,  and 
from  what  he  had  seen  of  them ;  he  did  not  think  they  were  fit  laborers ; 
he  did  not  think  they  would  build  a  railroad.  We  advertised  very 
thoroughly,  and  sent  circulars  to  every  post  office  in  the  State,  inviting 
white  labor,  and  offering  large  prices  for  that  class  of  labor,  but  we  failed 
to  get  over  800  men.  Our  force  never  went  much  above  800  white 
laborers,  with  the  shovel  and  pick,  and  after  pay  day  it  would  run  down 
to  600  or  700  ;  then  before  the  next  pay  day  it  would  get  up  to  800  men 
again,  but  we  could  not  increase  beyond  that  amount.  Then  we  were 
compelled  to  try  Chinese  labor,  and  we  tried  them  on  the  light  work, 
thinking  they  would  not  do  for  heavy  work.  Gradually  we  found  that 
they  worked  well  there,  and  as  our  forces  spread  out  and  we  began  to 
occupy  more  ground,  and  felt  more  in  a  hurry,  we  put  them  into  the 
softer  cuts  and  finally  into  the  rock  cuts.  Wherever  we  put  them  we 
found  them  good,  and  they  worked  themselves  into  our  favor  to  such  an 
extent  that  if  we  found  we  were  in  a  hurry  for  a  job  of  work  it  was 
better  to  put  on  Chinese  at  once.  Previous  to  that  we  had  always  put  on 
white  men  ;  and  to-day,  if  I  had  a  big  job  of  work  that  I  wanted  to  get 
through  quickly,  and  had  a  limited  time  to  do  it  in,  I  should  take  Chinese 
labor  to  do  it  with,  because  of  its  greater  reliability  and  steadiness,  and 
their  aptitude  and  capacity  for  hard  work. 

This  is  surprising  enough  ;  but  what  follows  is  even  more  astonishing. 
Yet  that  the  small-boned  and  unmuscular  Chinamen  held  their  own 
against  the  best  miners  in  the  world,  if  they  did  not  beat  them,  is 
established  by  two  or  three  unimpeachable  witnesses. 

"  Q.  What  are  their  powers  of  endurance  ? — A.  They  are  equal  to  the 
best  white  men.  We  tested  that  in  the  summit  tunnel,  which  is  in  the 
very  hardest  granite.  We  had  a  shaft  down  in  the  centre.  We  were 
cutting  both  ways  from  the  bottom  of  that  shaft.  The  company  were  in 
a  very  great  hurry  for  that  tunnel,  as  it  was  the  key  to  the  position  across 
the  mountains,  and  they  urged  me  to  get  the  very  best  Cornish  miners  and 
put  them  into  the  tunnel  so  as  to  hurry  it,  and  we  did  so.  We  went  to 
Virginia  City  and  got  some  Cornish  miners  out  of  those  mines,  and  paid 
them  extra  wages.  We  put  them  into  one  side  of  the  shaft,  the  heading 
leading  from  one  side,  and  we  had  Chinamen  on  the  other  side.  We 
measured  the  work  every  Sunday  morning,  and  the  Chinamen,  without 
fail,  always  outmeasured  the  Cornish  miners  ;  that  is  to  say  they  would 
cut  more  rock  in  a  week  than  the  Cornish  miners,  and  it  was  hard  work, 
steady  pounding  on  the  rock,  bone-labor.  The  Chinese  were  skilled  in 
using  the  hammer  and  drill,  and  they  proved  .themselves  equal  to  the  very 
best  Cornish  miners  in  that  work.  They  are  very  trusty,  they  are  very 
intelligent,  and  they  live  up  to  their  contracts." 

xviii 


Chinese  power  of 
endurance  equal 
to  that  of  the 
best  Cornish 
miners. 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


Mr  Strobridge,the  superintendent,  who  is  described  by  Mr.  Low  as  a  gjJSfg^Cek 
«  smart  pushing  Irishman,"  and  who  utterly  refused  at  first  to  boss  Chi- 
nese, gave  testimony  similar  to  Mr.   Crocker's.     The  road  he  says™ 
built  virtually  by  Chinese  labor.     His  evidence  is  not  less  remarkable 
than  that  of  the  previous  witness,  and  we  extract  a  few  of  his  answers  : 

«Q    You  had  charge  of  the  work,  had  you  not,  pretty  much,  of  the 
whole'of  Central  Pacific  Railroad  ?-A.  I  was  superintendent  of  construc- 

*i0»  Q.  That  gave  you  the  supervision  of  all  the  labor  on  the  road  1-A. 
Ye"How  did   you   commence  that  road?- A.  We  commenced  it  with 
^"Q1  Did  you  change  to  any  other  ?-A.  Yes,  we  changed  to  Chinamen. 
I  ad^erLd^tensively  for  men,  wanted  fT^^^^X^Z  U— ntyo£ 
able  to  get  over  700  or  800  men  at  one  time.     We  increased  nnally  to  wWte  labor] 
10  000      A  large  number  of  men  would  go  on  the  work  under  the  ad- 
vertisements,  but  they  were   unsteady  men,  unreliable ;  some  of  them 
wouldTtayafewdaysfand  some  would  not  go  to  work  at  all .Some 
would  stay  until  pay  day,  get  a  little  money,  get  drunk  and  clear  o«£ 
Finally  we  resorted  to  Chinamen.     I  was  very  much  prejudiced  against 
Chinese  labor      I  did  not  believe  we  could  make  a  success  of  it.     I  be- 
Ue^Chnese  labor  in  this  country  on  that  kind  of  T»\™**^ 
a  success  until  we  put  them  on  there;  but  we  did  make  a  success  of 
them      We  worked^  great  many  of  them,  and  built  the  road _virtuaUy 
£th  Chinamen,  though  the  white  labor  increased  verj ' --h  -fter  i^ at™  ^ 

ducing  Chinese  labor  J^^^^£^SS<£  SaSSS?"4 
white  men,  teamsters  and  hostlers.      \umu^u,x      ^      ,         ,  laborer6. 

2,500  white  men.     At  that  time  we  were  working  fully    10,000    Chi- 

n^Qn*  Then  you  changed  your  views  as  to  the  Chinese  as  laborers  ?-A. 
Yery  much. 

Mr  Strobridge,  as  will  be  seen  in  reply  to  further  questions,  confirms 
what  Mr.  Crocker  says  as  to  the  Chinaman's  capacity  for  heavy  work  : 

«Q  How  did  you  find  them  to  compare  in  that  heavy ^  work _  on  the 
Sierra  Nevada  tunnels,  deep  cuts  and  rock-works,  with  the  white  labor 
you  had  2— A.  They  were  equal  to  the  white  men. 

'•'■J  i&lK£i-!3^T^-I^  -  the  time  in  ^S^g^ 

th^wZeg:^^ 

a  drift  as  they  sometimes  did,  if  there  was  any  difference  it  was  with  the  tunneltheChtaf' 
whnfmtn  •  but  the  key  of  the  situation  was  the  summri  tunnel,  which  came  out  ahead, 
was  very  hard  rock,  ana  we  undertook  to  stock  that  with  the ,  best  of 
white  men.     We  considered  them  to  be  at  that  time  superior  to  China- 
men but  we  were  unable  to  keep  the  work  filled  with  ^  me^dtho^h 
we  only  worked  eight  hours.     We  worked  in  eight  hour  shifts,  and  as  we 
could   not   keep   the  work  favorable  we  put  in  a  gang   of   Chinamen 
Finally,  before  the  work  was  half  done,  perhaps  I  do  not  recollect  at 
what  stage,  the  Chinamen  had  possession  of  the  whole  work      At  last  the 
white  men  swore  they  would  not  work  with  Chinamen  anyhow. 

»Q.cIn  that  particular  tunnel,  or  all  along ?-A.  In  that  particular 
tunnel,  not  on  the  other  work.  We  always  had  gangs  of  white  men  We 
employed  all  the  white  men  we  could  get  so  long  as  they  would  woi*. 


xix 


48  Victoria. 


(Sessional  Papers  No.  45a), 


A.  1885. 


No  white  man 
turned  away. 


Perhaps  a  case  in 
which  Chinese 
abor  provided 
work  for  white 
men. 


Do  white  laborers 
employed  on  rail- 
ways settle  along 
the  line? 


See  J.  C.  R.,  p.599, 
and  p.  304  Ap.  A. 

Southern  Pacific 
constructed  not 
altogether  by 
Chinese  labor. 


"  Q.   Would  you  always  give  white  men  labor  when,  asked  for  it  ? A.  I 

do  not  think  there  was  ever  a  white  man  turned  away  for  want  of  a  place, 
to  my  knowledge." 

Now,  here  was  a  case  in  which  work  was  probably  provided  by  Chinese 
labor  for  white  men — a  thing  not  at  all  inconsistent.  Mr.  Evans* 
evidence  given  below  proves  that  the  same  thing  occurred  iu  his  experi- 
ence. Every  hour  of  delay  in  completing  the  line  was  a  loss  in  wealth 
and  convenience  to  the  people  of  California,  and  to  workmen  or  others 
looking  to  a  home  on  the  shores  of  the  Pacific.  In  other  industries  we 
shall  see  that  the  contention  is  made  that  but  for  Chinese  labor  in  a 
given  branch  there  would  be  no  room  for  white  labor,  because  competi- 
tion with  the  East  would,  without  the  Chinese,  have  been  out  of  the 
question. 

Before  leaving  the  subject  of  railway  building  it  is  desirable  to  call 
attention  to  the  evidence  of  Mr.  David  D.  Colton,  the  Vice-President  of 
the  Southern  Pacific  Railroad.  His  evidence  is  specially  valuable,  because 
of  the  light  it  throws  on  the  effect  of  a  railway  built  partly  by  Chinese  in 
settling  up  the  country.  One  of  the  points  made  by  persons  opposed  to 
Chinese  is  that  their  employment  in  the  construction  of  a  railway  leaves 
the  country  without  the  advantages  of  a  certain  percentage  of  settlers 
sure  to  have  been  left  behind  by  white  laborers.  The  assumption  that 
white  laborers  employed  on  a  railway  settle  along  the  line  they  help  to 
construct  is  gratuitous.  The  army  of  men  employed  by  the  contractors 
in  the  construction  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  from  Moosomin  to  the 
Rockies,  went  back  like  a  returning  tide  when  the  contract  was  fulfilled. 
Mr.  Colton's  evidence  shows  what  we  might  expect,  that  the  moment  the 
railway  is  constructed  settlers  pour  in.  To  build  a  line  must  be  a  means 
of  settling  up  the  country  through  which  it  passes,  and  if  it  can  be  con- 
structed more  rapidly  by  Chinese  labor  than  would  be  the  case  were  they 
not  employed  their  employment  must  hasten  settlement.  A  portion  o£ 
Mr.  Colton's  evidence  is  as  follows  : — 

"  Q.  Are  you  the  vice-president  or  the  president  of  the  company  ?- 
A.   At  this  time  I  am  the  vice-president. 

"  Q.  You  have  constructed  it  by  Chinese  labor  I  believe  ? — A.  Not 
altogether.    . 

"  Q.  I  mean  principally  ? — A.  A  proportion  of  it ;  the  heads  of  the 
construction  departments  were  white  laborers. 

"  Q.  The  construction  of  this  road  gave  employment  to  a  great  many 
white  men  ? — A.  Yes,  sir. 

"  Q.  You  had  no  government  subsidy,  I  believe,  in  aid  of  the  construc- 
tion?— A.  No,  sir;  excepting  the  land  subsidy. 

"  Q.  What  is  the  length  of  the  road  from  Lathrop  ?— A.  From  Lathrop, 
or  rather  from  Goshen,  between  four  and  five  hundred  miles  of  the  Southern 
Pacific  line  proper  has  been  constructed. 

"  Q.  A  good  part  of  it  through  a  farming  country  ? — A.  A  great  por- 
tion of  it. 

"  Q.  It  has  opened  up  that  vast  country  for  settlement  1 — A.  It  ha,s. 

"  Q.  What  class  of  people  are  and  have  been  settling  there  since  the 


xx 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


rmd  to*  built  ?— A.  What  you  might  term  an  average  class  of  the  immi-  ^^S0 
oT&nts  who  settle  up  all  our  new  Territories  and  States.  the  building  of 

to   «  Q.  White  immigrants  %— A.  Pretty  much  all  white.     There  are  very  tnelmo* 
few  of  any  other  kind.     They  are  mostly  from  the  Western  States ;  some 
are  Europeans." 

The  North-West,  along  the  line  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway,  dupli- 
cates this  experience.  After  the  line  was  built  settlers  went  in,  and  now 
for  many  miles  on  either  side  it  would  be  hard  to  find  a  homestead. 

"  O    Could  vou  have  constructed  that  road  without  Chinese  labor  ? —  Without  Chinese 
v^.    v^uuiu.   juu   ii»»v  labor  neither  the 

A  I  do  not  think  it  could  have  been  constructed  so  quickly,  and  with  quickness  or  cer 
anything  like  the  same  amount  of  certainty  as  to  what  we  were  going  to  fainty  in  building 
accomplish  in  the  same  length  of  time. 

"  Q.  You  had  several  thousand  laborers  on  the  road  % — A.  Yes,  sir. 

"  Q.  Could  you  have  obtained  that  number  of  white  laborers  % — A.  I 

think  not.  .  .        - 

"  Q.  Has  it  not  been  your  experience  since  your  connection  with  t*ae 
Central  and  Southern  Pacific  Railroads  that  you  could  not  obtain  whito 

labor  ? A.  We  certainly  could  not  in  that  number. 

«  Q.  What  has  been  the  effect  of  the  construction  of  these  railroads  §P^g>of  ^^ 
uoon  the  settlement  and  building  up   of   the   country? — A.  Prom   my  0fland  that  would 
stand-point  I  stink  it  has  done  a  great  deal  for  this  State  and  coast.  It  ^ne™aenthave 
has  been  the  means  of  opening  up  thousands  of  acres  of  land  that  would 
otherwise  have  lain  vacant  for  a  long  time  to  come. 

"  Q.  Have  the  settlements  followed  the  railroads  ? — A.  Yes,  sir ;  and 
constantly  increasing.  Our  railroad  construction  is  the  reverse  in  this 
country  from  what  it  is  in  any  other.  They  are  built  in  other  countries 
to  take  people  out.  Here  we  build  a  railroad  so  that  people  may  go  into 
the  wilderness  and  settle  it  up. 

"  Q.  The  railroad  is  the  pioneer?— A.  Yes,  sir.  Many  districts  where  Railway  the 
there  were  twenty-five  and  thirty  miles  between  each  settlement,  or  farm  Pioneer- 
house,  are  now  being  settled  up.  Take  the  San  Joaquin  Yalley  railroad 
campared  with  three  or  four  years  ago.  One  car  would  then  go  up  the 
valley.  I  have  been  on  the  train  when  there  would  be  but  two  or  three 
passengers  for  the  last  twentyrfive  or  thirty  miles  of  the  road.  Now  it 
takes  four  cars  to  do  that  business. 

"  Q.  What  has  been  the  effect  upon  the  prosperity  of  the  State  of  the 
construction  of  lateral  roads  ? — A.  I  think  most  favorable  in  every  way. 
Lateral  roads  by  themselves  would    not  be  profitable  to  railroad  propri- 
etors, but  they  would  be  of  great  advantage  to  the  country  they  would  Lateral  roads  had 
open'up.     I  think  as  a  rule  they  have  advanced  the  value  of  lands  from  ^X^ollndW) 
200  to  1,000  per  cent.     Much  of  the  land  in  the  Salinas  Yalley,  for  to  1,000  per  cent, 
instance,  'was  offered  to  us  at  $2  an  acre,  for  which  they  are  charging  now 
$25  and  $35  an  acre  since  the  road  was  built  through  that  country. 

Mr.  Coltonis'as  unhesitating  as  Mr.  Crocker  and  Mr.  Strobridge  as 
to  the  Chinaman's  capacity  for  hard  work  and  as  a  laborer  generally. 

"  Q.  What  is  the  capacity  of  Chinese  and  their  inclination  to  do  hard  Capacity  for  hard 

work  1 A.  I  have  never  placed  them  in  a  position  where  they  did  not,  to  work. 

use  a  common  expression,  fill  the  bill.         » 

"  Q.  Did  you  see  the  work  done  on  the  Southern  Pacific  Railroad  after 
it  was  completed  ? — A.  Yes,  sir. 

"  Q.  Do  you  know  what  kind  of  men  were  employed  there  ? — A.  I  have  75  to  go  per  cent,  of 
stated  that  75  or  80  per  cent,  of  our  construction  force  were  Chinamen,  contraction  fore* 
I  think  it  is  proper  for  me  to  say  here,  that  so  far  as  my  knowledge  goes 
there  was  never  a  white  laborer  who  wanted  work  who  was  refused. 

-sr-vi  && 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


"  Q.  What  wages  did  you  pay  them :  the  same  as  you  paid  the  Chinamen  ? 

— A.  No,  sir  j  we  paid  them  as  a  rule  twice  what  we  paid  the  Chinamen. 

"  Q.  You  paid  them  twice  as  much  1  Did  they  do  twice  as  much  work  % 

— A.  No,  sir  j  but  they  did  teaming  and  certain  classes  of  work.    I  have 

Chinamen  cannot  never  seen  a  Chinaman  who  could  drive  a  team  much.     Teamsters  and 

drive  teams.  ^  tjjat  department  we  give  to  white  men.      When  we  are  building  a 

bridge,  or  trestle  work,   "  it  is  in  the  hands  of  white  laborers,  and  all  the 

labor  done  about  it,  outside  of  carpenter  work,  is  given  to  white  laborers.'- 

See  J.  C.  R.  p.  720,  Mr.  West  Evans  gave  evidence  just  as  emphatic,  just  as  clear  in  its 
rino-  of  certainty.  Guch  testimony  can  leave  no  doubt  of  the  efficiency  of 
Chinese  labor  on  railways. 

"  Q.  Have   you    been    extensively  engaged   in  building  Railroads  ?— 
A.  Somewhat  extensively. 

"  Q.  What  labor  have  you  used  on  your  works  generally  1 — A.  In  thi 
manufacture  of  railroad-ties  I  have  used  white  labor ;  in  building  railroads. 
I  use  mostly  Chinese  labor. 
White  labor  for  _        «  Q.  What  kind  of  labor  is  most  satisfactory  to  you  1 — A.  Chinamen- 
nesrSbofouild-  give  us  better  satisfaction  generally, 
ing roads.  .«  q    In  railroading  ? — A.  Yes,  sir;  in  railroad  building. 

"  Q.  How  extensively  have  you  been  engaged  in  getting  out  railroad-ties  ? 

A.  I  have  been  in  the  business  ever  since  the  Pacific  Railroad  was 

started.     I  think  that  was  in  1863. 

"  Q.  Supplying  that  company  and  others  1 — A.  Yes,  sir. 

"  Q.  How  many  white  men  do  you  employ  in  your  busiest  time  ?— 
A.  Probably  from  400  to  500. 

Here  again  is  a  case  where  Chinese  labor  provided  employment  for- 

whites,  for  if  the  building  of  the  road  were  not  going  forward  there 

would  be  no  necessity  for  ties. 

Hard  to  get  white       "  Q.  Are  you  the  West  Evans  who  advertised  evtensively  in  a  news- 
laborers,  paper  a  year  or  two  ago,  for  white  laborers  1 — A.  Yes,  sir. 

"  Q.  What  success  did  you  meet  with  ? — A.  I  got  very  few. 

"  Q.  How  many  did  you  advertise  for  1 — A.  I  wanted  a  hundred. 

"  Q.  How  many  did  you  get  1 — A.  Twenty  or  thirty,  I  guess.  I  sent 
more  than  a  hundred  up  to  the  work,  but  they  would  not  work  when  they 
got  there. 

"  Q.  For  what  reason  ? — A.  They  thought  it  was  too  hard  work. 

"  Q.  How  many  did  you  retain  1 — A.  From  twenty  to  thirty  ;  possibly 
thirty. 

"  Q.  Did  they  work  by  contract  or  stated  wages  ? — A.  They  worked  in 
building  the  railroad  by  the  month,  and  in  making  ties  they  worked  by 
the  piece. 

"  Q.  Which  road  was  that  ? — A.  The  Mendocino  road. 
If  surplus  of  white       "  Q.  Do  you  think  there  is  a  surplus  of  white  laborers  in  the  State  ?— 

ha^no^been*  able  A-  J  nave  not  been  able  to  emPloy  **.   *  want  men  now  and  cannot  get  tnem- 
to  employ  it.  «  Q.  What  wages  do  you  pay  men  for  labor  % — A.  In  building  the  road 

we  started  men  in  on  $40  a  month  and  board.     If  a  man  was  found  to  be 
worth  more,  we  paid  it  to  him. 

"  Q.  Do  you  think  the  Chinese  have  been  a  benefit  to  the  Stated 
A.  I  think  so. 

«  Q.  Greatly  so  ? — A.  I  do  not  see  how  we  could  do  the  work  we  have 
Shfeved^o^uch  done  here  without  them ;  at  least  I  have  done  work  that  would  not  have 
without  the  Chi-  been  done  jf  ft  na(j  nof;  been  f  or  Chinamen,  work  that  could  not  have  been 

done  without  them.  ..  _  „ 

xxii 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


«Q  White  men  can  do  any  work  that  the  Chinamen  could  do  I- 
A.  Oh,  yes;  but,  understand  me,  I  tried  to  get  white  men  to  do  this 
work  and  failed." 

Not  merely  did  railway  work  offer  itself  to  this  laborer;    millions  of  Tule-lands, 
sicres  of  tule-lands  were  in  the  state.     These  lands,  formed  by  the  delta 
of  the  Sacramento  and  St.  Joaquin  rivers,  and  tide-waters  are,  as  the  story 
of  Eo-ypt  shows,  the  most  productive  that  can  invite  the  farmer's  toil.   They 
^re  very  extensive.  Mr.  Brooks  calculates  that  there  are  5,000,000  acres  of 
such  lands     Forty  bushels  of  wheat  to  the  acre  is  an  average  yield  on  tho 
lands   formed   by   the    winter    freshets,   while    root  crops  of    all   kinds 
flourish  with  extraordinary  luxuriance  on  the  land  reclaimed  from  the 
overflowing  tide.     Mr.  Seward  tells  us  that  in  1876  only  5,500,000  acres 
of  land  had  been  brought  into  cultivation  of  all  kinds.     Much  of  this  is 
subject  to  total  failure  of  crops  in  consequence  of  droughts.     Redeemed 
swamp  land  is  liable  to  no  such  danger.  California  is  already  a  great  wheat- 
producing  State.     According  to  the  author  just  referred  to,  it  is  destined 
to  produce  at  an  early  day  far  more  wheat  than  any  other  State  m  the 
Union.     No  rain    falls    during   the   harvesting   season.     Gram  may  be 
stacked  with  impunity  in  the  open  field  or  piled  up  without  thatching  or 
^over  of  any  kind.     The  climate  and  the  fertility  of  the  land  reduce  the 
cost  of  production  to  a  minimum.  .  The  farmer  has,  moreover,  the  advan- 
tage of  safe  transportation.  The  reclamation  of  tule-lands  and  the  irriga- 
tion of  higher  lands— these   are  the    means  by  which  California  is  to 
attain   preeminence   in   agriculture.     150,000  acres   of    tule-land    were  fflflO**^ 
reclaimed    in    1876.     These    lands    are    reclaimed    by   building   dykes,  ed  in  one  year. 
Utes   and   ditches,    to   prevent    the   overflow.     The   plan  was    to    con-  Chme^emp^oyed 
tract  by  the  yard  with  some  Chinese  merchant,  who  supplied  the  men.  aheadman. 
Mr.  Roberts,  President  of  the  Tide  Land  Reclamation  Company,  testified 
as  follows : — 

«  Q    Could  you  reclaim  these  lands  with  white  labor  %— A.  Not  success-  Land  could  not 
iullv  at  this  time.     I  do  not  think  that  we  could  get  the  white  men  to  do  claimed  without 
the  work      It  is  a  class  of  work  that  white  men  do  not  like  _  We  have  the  Chinese, 
tried  them  to  a  certain  extent.     The  special  advantage  of  Chinese  labor 
in  work  of  that  kind  is  owing  to  the  contract  system.     They  form  little 
communities  among  themselves,  forty  or  fifty  or  a  hundred  and  they  are 
iointly  interested  in  the  contract.     We  could  not  get  white  men  to  do 
that      They  would  not  be  harmonious  and  agree  among  themselves,   but 
the  Chinese  form  little  families  among  themselves,  do  their  own  cooking, 
live  in  little  camps  together,  and  the  work  is  staked  off  for  them  sepa- 
rately     We  first  give  a  large  contract  to  one  or  tVo  Chinamen,  and  they 
sub-let  it  in  smaller  contracts ;  that  is  the  general  system.     White  labor 
could  not  be  worked  in  that  way  at  all." 

The  witness  created  some  surprise  by  stating  that  the  land  utterly  J**™^  tllle_ 
Vaste  before  becomes  worth  from  $20  to  $100  an  acre.    The  Chinese  had  £nd from**  to 
by  their  labor  in  all  directions  added  eighty  or  ninety  millions  a  year  to 
the  wealth  of  California. 

Mr.  Solomon  Heydenfeldt  also  gave  very  strong  testimony  as  to  the 


48  Yictoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.^54a.)  A.  1885. 

useful  part  played  by  Chinese  in  the  reclamation  of  tule-lands,  as  well  as 
in  every  field  of  labor  they  entered.  Mr.  Brooks  tells  us  that  a  former 
Surveyer-General  of  the  State  of  California  computed  the  wealth  for 
which  the  State  was  indebted  to  Chinese  labor  in  the  building  of  railways 
and  the  reclaiming  of  tule-lands  at  $289,700,000. 
'only  by  Chinese  It  is  established  by  incontrovertible  evidence — indeed  there  is  no  evi 

couMtule^fands     dence  on  the  other  side — that  only  by  Chinese  labor  could  these  tule-lands 
claimed?11  re"         have  been  reclaimed.     Whether  or  not  white  men  could  have  stood  the 
the  malarious  atmosphere,   while  working  up  to  the   middle  in  water, 
and  a  cloud  of  mosquitoes  round  their  heads,  they  could  not  have  been  got 
to  do  it.     Even  at  the  present  stage  of  Calif ornian  history  it  is  clear 
these  lands  can  be   reclaimed  only  by  Chinese.     That  a  day  will  come- 
when  white  men  shall  be  willing  to  do  that  work  there  can  be  equally 
[Chinese  specially  little   doubt.     But   the  Chinese,  as  one  of    the   witnesses  explained,  on 
land  reclamation,   physiological  principles  are  specially  fitted  for  such  employment,  because 
they   seem  less  affected  by  air  weighted  with  poison    than  white  men. 
Until  labor  has  become  a  drug  in  the  market  no  white  man  can  be  got 
to  go  into  this  work  of  tule-land  reclamation,  and,  therefore,  granting  for 
iMay  fairly  be         the  moment  that  in  the  case  of  work  white  men  will  do,  a  government 
wheeSthe?eadgovern-  should  step  in  and  exclude  Chinese  immigration  from  interfering  with  it, 
^ufbinese  labor  or  limit  the  interference,  it  may  fairly  be  questioned  whether  we  have 
being  available.     n0^  ^ere  a  case  in  which  Chinese  immigration  is  an  unqualified  benefit. 
Let  tule-lands  lie        For  if,  in  the  absence  of  Chinese,  these  tule-lands  would  be  left  to  the 
iSivCTsVnoss.11      mosquito  and  the  bull-frog,  this  would  be  a  great  loss  to  California,  and 
therefore,  a  gresst  loss  to  the  world,  and,  therefore,  also  a  loss  to  every 
working  man  on  the  heritable  globe.     At  a  glance  it  seems  as  if  it  was 
only  the  man  who  owned  these  tule-lands,  who  was  enriched  when,   for 
what  he  paid  a  f  1  an  acre  or  nothing,  he  gets  after  thoroughly  reclaiming 
it  an  average  of  f  75'  an  acre.    Seven  or  ten  million  dollars  in  reality  were 
So  much  added  to  *n  a  smglQ  vear  (1876)  brought  to  swell  the  wealth  of  mankind,  available 

the  bread  produc-  £       th     use  0f  t}ie  laborer  as  well  as  the  capitalist.     There  had  been 

ing  area  of  tne  x 

world.  added  150,000  acres  to  the  bread-producing  area  of  the  world. 

In  this  case  the  Chinese  laborer  can  in  no  way  come  into  competition 

with  white  labor. 

Th«  tnle-land  ^et  us  suPPose  then,  that  the  companies  engaged  in  the  reclamation  of 

hav?Cto!amenld  tule-lands  require  a  given  number  of  Chinese  laborers,  it  is  in  the  interest 

unless  moral  or     0f  every  white  man,  and  the  working  man,  no  less  than  the  rich  man,  that 

political  objec-  J  '  "  . 

tions.  they  should  have  them,  unless  there  are  countervailing  considerations   ot 

a  moral  or  political  character.     Moral  and  political  considerations  may 

far  outweigh  material  ones.     Most  important  are  these  aspects  of  the 

present  enquiry,  and  they  will  be  dealt  with  later  on. 

Their  onnonents  ^r-  Griggs,  wno  is  °PPosecl-  to  Chinese  immigration,  admits  that  the 

admit  they  have     Chinese  «  have  been  a  very  important  factor  in  the  development  of  the 

been  a  very  mi-  ^         x 

portant  element      -public  WOrks  of  California,  and  in  the  development  of  the  resources  of  the 

in  the  develop-         r  * 

ment  of  the  state  ur>  to  a  certain  period.     I  think,'"'  he  says,   "  the  time  was  wnen  tney 

country.  r  L  " 

were  greatly  needed  and  did  much  good." 


xxiv 


8  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


It  would  not  be  just  to  Mr.  Briggs  or  to  the  section  of  public  opinion 
ie  represents  to  leave  his  evidence  here. 

Q  « If  you  look  back  in  the  history  of  California  to  the  time  when  these  TUrigtt  would 
crreat  public  works  did  not  exist,  would  you  not  find  that  the  bringing  in  Chinese  had  never 
of  Chinamen,  for  some  time  any  way,  would  have  been  a  useful  plan*— 
A  I  cannot  say  that,  because  I  believe  if  the  Chinese  labor  had  not  been 
available,  that  labor  would  have  been  brought  here  from  other  sources.  1 
believe  our  public  works  would  have  been  carried  on  as  m  the  Eastern 
States  twenty-five  years  ago.  True,  it  would  have  been  more  difficult  and 
work  might  have  been  retarded,  but  future  development  of  the  country  by 
them  would  have  been  of  vast  importance  to  the  State,  whereas  with  the 
Chinese,  when  the  railroads  were  completed,  their  mission  was  ended. 

This  is  the  most  extreme  position  taken  up  by  the  anti-Chinese  party. 
In  answer  to  another  question  he  took  a  more  moderate  view : 

"I  think  the  Chinese  have  been  a  very  important  factor  in  the 
development  of  our  public  works,  and  in  the  development  of  the  resources 
of  the  state  up  to  a  certain  period.  We  have  outlived  that  day  I  he 
buildino-  of  the  overland  railroads,  and  the  interior  roads,  required  a  pe- 
culiar kind  of  labor ;  laborers  who  would  follow  up  the  work  and  live  m 
a  very  primitive  way,  board  themselves,  take  care  of  themselves,  without 
families  •  labor  that  was  always  to  be  relied  upon,  and  hence  I  believe  the 
Chinese  have  done  a  great  deal  of  good  to  the  State.  I  think  we  derived 
a  peculiar  advantage  from  their  presence  here  in  early  days;  but  we 
have  outlived  that  day;  we  have  finished  these  works,  and  now  this  Chmesenowm^ 
labor  must  go  into  other  channels,  other  industries,  into  agriculture,  boys  and  girls. 
viticulture,  factories,  etc.,  and  take  the  places  which  otherwise  would  be 
filled  with  white  laborers  in  the  towns  and  villages,  and  in  the  country, 
to  an  extent  that  almost  prevents  the  whites  from  finding  suitable  employ- 
ment They  now  take  the  place  of  boys  and  girls  that  are  growing  up  m 
this  country.  I  believe  that  the  peculiar  advantage  derived  from  this 
labor  has  been  outgrown." 

The. positions  it  will  be  seen  are  quite  distinct.  The  one  position  is  Wffi^t^rtaj 
that  the  Chinese  in  building  transcontinental  and  local  railways  were  pecting  Chinese, 
almost  indispensable,  but  that  now  they  are  injurious  ;  the  other  is  that 
the  country  would  have  been  ultimately  better  had  it  never  seen  them. 
There  are  those  who  think  the  Chinaman's  usefulness  is  gone,  if  he  was 
not  from  first  to  last  an  injury.  There  are  again  those  who  think  he  has 
been,  is  and  will  be  useful. 

Men,  like  Mr.  Babcock,  say  that  in  a  new  country  cheap  labor  is  a  l™™*™™** 
necessity,  and  a  witness  before  the  Joint  Committee  who  was  against  necessity. 
Chinese  immigration  argued  that  in  a  new  country  cheap  labor  was 
analogous  to  protection  to  infant  industries.  Indeed,  Mr.  Babcock 
goes  so  far  as  to  say  that  cheap  labor  instead  of  driving  out  labor  provides 
a  market  for  it,  and  we  shall  see  that  under  certain  conditions  this  pro- 
position is  sound,  though  there  is  a  lurking  fallacy  in  the  sense  attached  by 
some  parties  to  the  word  labor. 

The  mere  political  economist  might  ask  what  is  the  meaning  of  such 
evidence  taken  at  a  grave  enquiry  ? 

xxv 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


Has  a  govern-  The   theory  that  a  government   has   nothing  to  do  with  the  rate  of 

do  with  regulating  wages     may    be    good    political    economy,     but    it    is    not     calculated 

the  rate  of  wages?  to    commen(j    ftself    to    wage-earners,    and   is    not  likely   to   be    acted 

on  by  the  government  of  a  country  where  wage-earners  have  a  potent 

voice  in  the  constitution.    Nor,  indeed,  would  it  be  acted  on  by  a  wise 

statesman,  however  unchecked  his  power.     It  is,  however,  a  dangerous 

thing  to  encourage  the  idea  that  a  government  can  be  paternal  and  be 

useful.    But  there  is  a  wide  distance  between  the  conviction  that  govern- 

If  wages  are  ment  can  do  everything  and  that  it  can  do  nothing.     If  it  can  be  shown. 

naSSfcomp"-1111*  that  wages  are  lowered  not  by  a  healthy  and  fair  competition  between 

made  oNiTfor*3        fellow  citizens,  but  between  the  citizens  of  the  State  and  aliens  whose 

fnSerenc'ef1         standard  of  comfort  is  below  what  the  ordinary  decencies  of  life  require, 

who  have  thrown  aside  every  weight  which  could  impede  them  in  the 

race  of  competition,  then  a  case  would  be  made  out  for  the  consideration 

of  the  Government.     At  the  same  time  there  is  the  peril  of  the  delusion 

«Wages  cannot  be    taking  hold  of  the  mind  of  the  wage-earners,  that  wages  can  be  indefin- 

andefinitelyraised.  .^  raiged<     The  moment  wages  rise  to  that  height  which  sends  profits 

below  the  rate  of  interest  plus  a  fair  return  for  risk  and  exertion  on  the 

part  of  the  capitalist,  the  speculation  will  be  abandoned,  and  production 

in  that  particular  industry  ceases.    The  stoppage  of  production  diminishes 

the   general   wealth    of    mankind,    and  in  that  diminution  every  man, 

laborer   as   well    as    capitalist,    shares,    and    the    laborers    immediately 

thrown  out  of  employment  lose  in  addition  what  they  would  have  earned, 

at  current  rates,  during  the  time  they  are  out  of  employment,  had  they 

to  an  industry  can  been  employed.     If,  therefore,  an  industry  can  be   carried  on  at  a  profit 

plSSewhie^11  with  Chinese  labor  which  could  not  be  so  carried  on  with  white  labor, 

wo^dhavl  to  he    then  it  is  in  the  interest  of   the  working  man  and  in  the  interest  of 

abandoned-  the  whole  community  that  such  industry  should  be  worked  by  means  of 

not  an  advantage  ^  chines©,  unless,  as  we  have  said  before,  there  are  counterbalancing 

considerations.  The  character  of  the  labor,  whether  free  or  servile,  would  be 

But  moral  may       an  element  of  great  importance.     If  the  labor  employed  be  truly  servile, 

conSatio^1  in  the  end  it  can  only  be  attended  by  a  curse.     It   may  enrich  a  few 

Influence  of    '       individuals,  but  it  infuses  a  virus  into  labor  relations  and  the  community 

servile  labor.  generally  which  no  wealth  or  prosperity  can  outweigh. 

The   evidence  establishes   that    Chinese  are  as   a  rule  brought  under 

an  arrangement  something  like  this  :    the  money,  is  advanced  them  to 

cross  the  ocean  and  they  agree  to  pay  so  much   in  return.     Owing  to 

the  structure  of   Chinese  society  on  the   Coast  this  undoubtedly  looks 

Chinese  contracts  like  contract-labor,  but  it  is  not  ;  it  is  wholly  different  from  the  contract 

is  it  coolie  labor?    by.which  coolies  are  carried  to    Peru>     Jt  might  be  properly  described 

in  a   familiar  phrase— assisted  passage— only  that  the  assisted  passage 
in  this  case  is  a  private  arrangement.     The  objectionable  feature  about 
it  is  the  manner  in  which  the  repayment  is  enforced. 
An  ugly  feature.         Mr.  Frederick  F.  Low,  whom  we  have  before  quoted  (and  there  could 
he  no  higher  authority),  gives  evidence  as  follows  : 


xxvi 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


«Q    How  is  the  contract  enforced  herel     For  instance,  a  Chinaman  ge^y*"^ 
lands  on   our  shore;  there  is  no  law  here  to    enforce  a  contract  made 
abroad.     By  what  means  do  they  compel  the  Chinaman  to  pay  the  price 
per  month  to  the  Six  Companies.-A.  You  can  very  well  conceive  that 
Chinamen  coming  here,  ignorant  of  our  laws,  language  and  customs  with 
these  Six  Companies  or  any  one  firm  or  company  telling  tun  what  his 
duties  are  with  the  surveillance  that  they  exercise  over  him,  and  with  an 
arrangement  which  they  are  supposed  to  have,  in  fact  I  know  they  have    ^-f=^ 
with  the  steamship  companies,  that  no  Chinaman  can  purchase  a  ticket  compaJ1tP.s. 
to  return  home  unless  he  brings  a  certificate  from  the  heads  of  these  com- 
panies, that  he  is  free  from  debt ;  it  is  very  natural  that  he  will  pay  his 
pro  rata  per  month  until  he  works  out  his  debt.      ■  >  ^    _ 

"O    The  Pacific  Mail  Steamship  Co.,  a  common  carrier,  subsidized  by 

the  general  Government,  refuses  to  take  a  Chinaman  home  unless  his 

associates   say   he   has   paid   his    debts  ^-A.   Not   only   that  .company, 

but    all    companies— other     companies    aside    from    the   Pacmc    Mail. 

[There   was   a    company   here,    of    which   Macondray  &    Co.    were    the 

agents,  and  complaint  was  made  to  me   by   missionaries    on   behalt   ot 

the   Chinese.     I   remember   going   myself   to  Major  Otis,  who  was  the 

aead    of    the    house     of    Macondray    &    Co.      I    told    him   I   thought 

it   was   a   great    outrage   that   they     should    put    this    exaction    upon 

the  Chinese.     Otis   said  <  this  is  the  custom  ;  it  has  been  m  existence  tor 

Fears  ;  the  Pacific  Mail  Co.  do  it,  and  if  we  do  not  conform  to  the  custom 

kll  the  trade  will  go  over  their  vessels  and  we  will  not  get  any.     I  presume 

it  is  the  custom  that  exists  to-day." 

Then  on  all  the  large  works,  such  as  tule-land  reclamation  and  railway  Contacts  for^ 
building,  the  contract  is  not  between  employes  and  employed  but  between  works, 
the  employer  of  labor  and  some  "  merchant,'5— really,  of  course,  a  labor- 
broker.     On  tule-lands  the  contract  is  made  at  so  much  a  yard,  and  the  contract  as  to  Wto- 
employes  need  care  little  about  the  fitness  or  unfitness  of  individual  men;  a  yard. 
on  a  railway  it  is  different— so  much  a  month  being  paid  each  man— and 
one  witness,  a  railway  contractor  examined  at  Portland,  said  that  when  a  On^nwaysthe 
man  was  objected  to,  the  boss  Chinaman  instead  of  removing  hiin  from  the  adopted, 
road  transferred  him  to  another  gang,  and  they  were  all  so  much  alike 
that  the  deception  was  not  easily    discovered. 

A  great  deal  of  evidence  was  taken  in  1876,  and  some  by  ourselves,  on  Clmracter  of 
the  character  of  the  Chinaman  as  a  laborer,  and  in  his  praises— and  the  laborers, 
praises  were  well  deserved  for  many  humble  virtues— his  "docility"  is 
dwelt  on  and  his  «  reliability,"  and  one  of  the  reasons  given  why  the  labor  The^reUabmty^ 
was  so  reliable  was  that  the  contract  was  with  the  "boss"  and  not  with  on  ^1™^  may 
the  men.     Therefore,  if  the  boss  had  to  have  a  certain  number  of  men  at 
the  railway  the  fact  that  ten  of  his  men  might  be  sleeping  off  an  opium 
debauch  would  not  prevent  ten  others  being  in  their  places.     One  of  the 
witnesses,   a  railway    contractor,   who  said    he  never  saw   a  Chinaman 
drunk,  said  he  had  seen  them   on  his  line  under  the  influence  of  opium. 
The  staying  power  of  the  Chinaman  at  railway  work  may,  therefore,  have 
been  deceptive,  and  it  is  only  just  to  the  white  laboring  man  to  point  this 
out.1     Still  the  evidence  can  leave  no  doubt  that  the  majority  of  them  are 
capable  of  hard  toil.     At  heavy  work  as  well  as  at  the  lighter  labor  in 


XXVll 


48  Victoria.  Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


the  towns  it  is  proved  that  they  show  themselves  more  "  reliable  "  and 

more  "  docile"  than  white  men.     A  Government  cannot  look  at  a  citizen 

of  a  free  country  as  a  mere  tool  in  the  hand  of  capital.     The  jade  is  much 

more  docile  than  the  charger  and  each  is  useful  in  its  place. 

It  is  possible  for         A  country  is  not  developed  merely  by  work.     The  character  and  habits 
labor  to  be  useful  J  r  V,  •      • 

to  a  railway  and    of  the  workers  are  of  importance,  as  well  as  the  incidents  attaching  to  the 
detrimental  to  the  ,  ,  ,  .,,,«.  t»«-      -r*.    !  t     ,  i  i    ii  -i 

country.  labor,  and  men  like  Mr.  Briggs,  Mr.  Pixley  and  others  hold — as  a  railway 

sub-contractor  already  referred  to  as  examined  at  Portland  held — that 
though  the  railway  may  pay  more  for  white  labor  the  country  gains  in 
settlement.  This,  however,  is  stated  as  an  ct  priori  theory  not  as  a  pro- 
position established  by  facts,  and  we  have  seen  it  did  not  hold  good  in  the 
case  of  the  Canadian  Pacific  Railway.  And  if  the  railway  be  not  built 
there  will  be  no  settlers  with  characters  to  consider.  We  have  seen  above 
that  railways  built  by  Chinese  labor  led  to  the  settlement  of  whites  in  the 
country  through  which  the  railway  passed.  There  are  other  standpoints 
from  which  this  question  must  be  viewed,  which  command  a  more 
extensive  outlook,  and  one  more  fruitful  of  suggestion. 

•    MINING. 

Mr.  Seward  calcu-      Not  only  as  a  railway  builder  but  as  a  miner  the  Chinaman  has  plaved 

lates  that  the  . 

Chinese  miners  of  a  large  part  in  California.     So  early  as  1861,  mining  claims  had  been 

have  paid  the         bought  by  Chinese  miners  to  the  extent  of  $1,350,000,  and  $2,160,000  had 
state  SI  350  000  . 

been  paid  by  them  for  water  rates.     They  had  to  cope  with  great  difficulties. 

They  had  to  face  oppression  on  the  part  of  ruffians  and  submit  to  hostile 

taxation.    But  no  thought  of  receding  occurred  to  them.    An  Act  in  1852 

Partial  legislation  provided  that  a  license  of  $3  a  month  should  be  levied  on  foreigners  working 

CMnese.tlie  in  placer  and  quartz  mining.     It  also  provided  that  companies  employing 

foreigners  should  pay  the  tax,  and  that  foreigners  not  paying  the  license 

could  not  sue  or  defend  in  the  couits.   In  another  year  this  tax  was  raised 

to  $4  a  month.    The  next  year  it  was  augmented  $2  a  month.    The  tax  was 

clearly  intended  to  drive  the  Chinese  miner  away.     In  1861,  an  Act  was 

passed  which  was  so  worded  as  to  exclude  the  Chinese  miner  from  taking 

metals  from  the  mines  or  holding  a  mining  claim,  "  unless  he  shall  have  a 

license  therefor  of  $4  a  month."     Such  taxes  honestly  administered  would 

have  been  burdensome  enough,  but  it  would  seem  that  by  dating  licenses 

Even  the  laws        back  the   collectors  were   guilty   of   great  oppression.     Mr.    Speer,  the 

adml5ste^edfStly  author  of  "China  and  the  United  States,"  quoted  by  Mr.  Seward,  gives  a 

picture  of  still  worse  conduct.     The    collectors  made  the   most   illegal 

demands,  and  "if  the  men  refused  to  pay,   they  struck,  stabbed  or  shot 

Cruelty^ and  them ;  perhaps  tied  them  to  a  tree  and  whipped  them,"  or  drove  them 

forward,  the  collector  from  his  horse  laying  on  a  horsewhip  until  they 

reached  a  town  where  still  more  grinding  tyranny  could  be  exercised. 

But  still  worse  recitals  might  be  given,  and  a  Committee  of  the  two  houses 

of  California,  which  met  in  1862,  reported  that  eighty-eight  Chinamen  had 

Still  the  Chinese    been  murdered.     Notwithstanding,  with  the  pertinacity  of  their  race  and 

its  indifference  to  danger  when  in  pursuit  of  any  object,  they  held  on. 


miner  held  on, 


xxvm 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.)  A.  1885. 


They  are  admirable  miners  whether  at  digging  or  placer  mining.    For  the 

one  purpose  they  are  patient  in  toil,  as  all  the  evidence  proves ;  m  the 

other  case  there  is,  as  one  of  the  witnesses  explains,  a  similarity  between 

placer  mining  and  rice  culture,  in  each  case  the  workman  squats  on  his 

hams  and  is  exposed  to  the  sun.  Mr.  Sneath,  who  was  examined  before  the  £  certain = of 

Joint  Committee,  testified  that  in  certain  hydraulic  mining  where  a  mine  *»™  ^^^ 

will  not  pay  with  white  labor,  they  can  make  it  pay  with  Chinese     He  J^wfl^ 

gave  an  instance  in  which  two  hundred  Chinamen  were  employed  and 

where  without  such  labor  the  mine  would  have  to  go  unworked. 

Mr  Decrroot,  whose  evidence  will  be  found  summarized  on  p.  357, 
Appendix  A,  having  declared  his  belief  that  the  presence  of  Chinese  had 
been  detrimental  to  labor  interests  and  mining  industry,  says  : 

«  Mv  attention  was  first  called  to  this  fact  as  long  ago  as  1853-4  when  I  J™^?^ 
was  acting  as  collector  of  the  foreign  miners'  tax.  At  that  day  we  had ^agreat  chineso  to  placer 
deal  of  river-bar  mining,  and  placer  mining  of  every  character,  that  *  ould 
pav  from  $3  to  $6  ;  it  would  average  $4  or  $5  a  day  to  each  man  ;  but 
that  was  hardly  considered  white  wages  then,  and  the  community  gener- 
ally was  indifferent  as  to  the  presence  of  the  Chinese,  and  thought  it  was 
well  enough  to  let  these  people  come  in  and  work  that  character  ot  mines, 
believing^that  it  would  not  pay  white  labor  then  and  probably  never 
would      The  Chinese  went  on,  and  by  their  method  of  mining  they  co^- 
«red  up  a  great  deal  of  good  ground.     They  prevented  white  men  f rom 
coming  in  because  they  did  not  like  to  mine  near  them,  and  m  that  way 
r^d  deal  of  mining-ground  was  lost  which  we  will  never  be  able  to .work 
loui     Subsequently  they  began  to  increase  and  to  be  emPlo^^ht 
L  the  mines-that  is,  to  be  hired.     This  went  on  increasing.    >  We  thought 
!at  first  they  could  not  be  employed  to   advantage  in  certain  classes  of 
mimng,  o/in  any  class,  but  it  was  found  that  they  could.     They  were 
hired  first  in  placer  mines,  and  then  in  drift-digging  to  some  extent,  and 
finally  in  hydraulic  mining  to  very  good   ad  vantage  ™&  *™™rg 
stones  and  working  in  the  pit ;  and  as  they  became  educated  to  the  busi- 
nes^  they  ^eatly  displaced  white  labor,  and  now  we  have  them  employed 
Lever  "kid  o/minLg  as  laborers  at  good  wages.     This  ^^^£  ™— er 
«.+«■« +w\y™W  nn  and  disnlacino-  white  men.    The  result  is  that  the  country  empioyed  m  all 
WofgK  KernllvTfo  Shasta,  a  distance  of  five  hundred  miles,  £&&£*•■* 
is  Ml  o£  villages  in  a  state  of  decadence.     It  is  true  these  vdlages  were 
partially  depopulated  along  about  1857,  when  the  surface  P  ^  -P 
Lsiderably  exhausted  and  a  great  many  miners  left  and  wen t  to  Fox 
River  and  elsewhere.     Many  of  them  returned  afterwards,  but  in  the 
meantime  the  Chinese  labor  was  substituted  and  when  they  came  back 
X;  found  that  their  claims  were  occupied.     They  found  them  position  Mjg-J*™. 
as  laborers  occupied,  and  they  drifted  away  again ;  left  the  mines  instead  cUUm  flnd  them 
rf  working  them  staying  and  budding  np  homes.  In  that  way  the  Chinese  occuP1ed. 
have  come*  in  and  do  nearly  all  of  what  is  now  called  river-bed  washing 
turning  the  channels  of  rivers  and  washing  them.     There  is  a  class of      . 
white  men,  residing  in  the  mines  from  the  first  who  have  made  it  a  busi- 
ness to  take  np  claims  and  sell  them  to   the  Chinese   which  xs    n  contra- 
vention, of  course,  of  the  laws  of  the  country,  and  also  of  the  local  laws 
of  the  miners  ;  but  the  miners  leaving,  these  local  laws  have  not  been  ^  olassof  wWte 
enforced,  and  these  white  men  who  do  not  like  generally  to  W1*  ™J7  gSw'Sk^r* 
well  have  made  it  a  business  to  take  up  claims  and  sell  them  to  the  totow.^J^ 
Chinese      When  they  are  once  inducted  into  these  claims,  these  men  who  t0  Chinese. 


XXIX 


48  Victoria. 


Sessional  Papers  (No.  54a.) 


A.  1885. 


sell  them  remain  and  exercise  a  sort  of  protection  over  them.  In  some 
places  there  are  very  large  numbers  of  them-.  In  the  vicinity  of  Oroville 
there  are  between  three  and  four  thousand  Chinamen  mining  upon  the 
public  domain  who  have  obtained  their  claims  in  that  manner." 

It  seems  hard  and  unreasonable  to  complain  that  Chinamen  came  to 
work  abandoned  mines.  It  will  be  noted  how  they  made  progress.  From 
being  hired  first  in  placer  mining  they  go  on  "  to  be  hired  in  every  kind 
as  laborers  at  good  wages."  This  is  what  takes  place  in  every  branch 
of  industry,  and  experience  shows  they  gradually  gain  on  the  white  man, 
who  has  neither  their  temperance  nor  their  frugality. 

On  no  ground  of  political  economy  can  a  principle  be  found  for  ex- 
eluding  these  people  from  the  mines.  Does  it  not,  too,  seem  better  that 
abandoned  mines  should  be  worked  than  left  idle  ?     It  must  be  better — 


The  Chinaman 
once  he  gets  in 
goes  ahead. 


jls  it  hetter  that 
abandoned  mines 
should  be  worked 
by  Chinese  or  left 
idle? 


The  Chinaman 
does  not  break  up 
new  ground. 


certainly  for  the  time.  The  miner  would  answer,  for  we  have  met  the 
answer — "  That's  all  very  well,  but  I  regard  thab  abandoned  mine  as  a 
refuge  when  luck  is  low."  As  to  the  employer  of  labor,  when  the  laboi 
is  there,  has  he  not  a  right  to  utilize  it  ? 

It  will  be  well  for  the  reader  to  note  here,  because  it  will  come  up 
again,  this  peculiarity  of  the  Chinaman — he  does  not  break  up  new! 
ground,  and  on  this  hang  important  issues. 


THE    FIELD   AND   VINEYARD. 


It  is  because  of 
Chinese  labor 
that  California 
can  compete  with 
the  granaries  of 
the  world. 


The  Chinaman  not 
a  great  success  as 
an  agricultural 
laborer. 


Steadiness  of 
Chinese  labor. 


Col.  Bee,  the  advocate  of  the  Chinese,  before  the  Joint  Committee  says  . 
that  when  the  harvest  opens  the  Chinese  dot  the  fields  from  one  end  of 
the  State  to  the  other,  and  he  contends  that  it  is  because  of  this  that  Ca- 
lifornia can  compete  with  the  granaries  of  the  world.  This  last  argument 
is  a  two-edged  sword ;  for,  paradoxical  as  it  may  sound,  living  labor  by 
which  a  State  might  mount  as  on  wings  to  enormous  wealth  is  attended 
with  a  fearful  Nemesis  in  no  distant  future. 

It  is  not,  however,  as  an  agricultural  laborer  that  the  Chinaman  shines. 
Mr.  Easterby  tel