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ASBESTOS 








Vol. 2 APRIL, 1921 No. 10 








FURNISHING A COMMON 
VANTAGE GROUND WHERE 
THOSE INTERESTED IN 
ASBESTOS AND MAGNESIA 
MAY MEET FOR DISCUSSION 


Published by 


‘ SECRETARIAL SERVICE 
71 Bulletin Building Philadelphia, Pa. 





The Seal that Signifies “‘Asbestos Products of 
the Highest Quality’’ 


HE suecess of GARCO Asbestos Packings, Auto- 

mobile Specialties and Textiles is the result of a 

fixed policy to produce goods of the highest character 
only. 











Among the better known GARCO Asbestos products 
are: 


Asbestos Automo- 
bile Specialties 


Packings 
Locomotive, Throttle 
and Air Pump Pack- 











GENERAL ASBESTOS & RUBBER CO. 


ings 
High Pressure Piston 
Packings 

Valve Stem Packing 
Medium and Low 
Pressure Packings 
Perfect Valve Rings 
Flax Packings 

High, Low and Medi- 
um Pressure Sheet 
Packings 

Gaskets and Gasket- 
ing Material 
Asbestos Wick and 
Rope 


Brake Lining 
Transmission Lining 
for Ford's" Cone 
Clutch and Disc 
Clutch Facings 
Asbestos Spark Plug 
Yarn 


Asbestos Textiles 
Cloth Yarn Cord 
Carded Fibre 
Braided Tubing 


Main Office and Factories, Charleston, S. C. 


BRANCHES AND COMPLETE STOCK 


58 Warren St., New York 
311 Water St., Pittsburg 


14 North Franklin St. 





Chicago 











April 








———~ ASBESTOS 











Asbestos Products 


Asbestos Paper 

Asbestos Rollboard 

Asbestos Millboard 

Asbestos Cements 

Asbestos Roofings 

Asbestos Magnesia Pipe Coverings 
Asbestos Air Cell Pipe Coverings 


A pipe covering for every condition from the 
highest steam pressure to the coldest water line. 


Norristown Magnesia and 


Asbestos Co. 


Norristown -- -+- Pennsylvania 





















April, 1921 Page One 














ASBESTOS = 




















Asbestos and Mineral 
Corporation 


1819 Broadway 
NEW YORK CITY 





The only organization of its kind in existence, and the 
world’s largest dealers in Asbestos Crude and Fibre. 





Sole selling agents for 


CANADIAN CRUDE ASBESTOS & FIBRE 


CORPORATION Limited. 
Thetford Mines, Canada 


BRANCHES, in all large Cities 





Correspondence in any Language 


Write for our New Catalogue just issued 





We are now occupying our new quarters 12th floor, GOTHAM 
NATIONAL BANK Building. Our Museum, the finest in exist- 
ence, is well worth a visit. We would be pleased to welcome our 
friends. 


















Wi<acinoe 


Rectang a 








—— 








—— 








Page Two 






April, 19 





HAM 
exist- 
e our 





























ASBESTOS... 





A MONTHLY MARKET JOURNAL——" 


Devoted to the Interests of the Asbestos and 
Magnesia Industries 


Secretarial Service - - Publisher 
C. J. Stover - - - Editor 


Publishing Office 


721 Bulletin Building 
Philadelphia, - - Penna. 


London Office - 2nd Floor, 86-88 Wardour St., W. I. 








Vol. 2 APRIL 1921 No. 10 








CONTENTS 


Page 
The Asbestos Built Up Roof - - - 5 
Market Conditions - . - 11 
“Run As Fast As You Can to Stay Where You Are.” 12 
Bomb Wrecks Offices of Asbestos Plant - - 15 
Editorial Comment - + - 19 
Jacob A, Jacobs - * - - 23 


Stick-To-Itiveness Exercised by Big Men - - 
How Much Should Advertisers Spend? - - 
Contractors and Distributors Page - ° 
Ehret’s Plant Faces Isolation - - 
Canadian Asbestos Production for 1920 - 
Taxes or Tariff—Which? - - - 
Asbestos in Australia - . 
Asbestos Deposits on Indian Reservations May Now Be 


we CO CO CO CO COO 
© Mito 


- ¢ 


De veloped - 45 
Conditions in Various M:z arkets. - - - 47 
Asbestos Production in Canada 49 
More Facts About Russia and Her Asbestos Production - 51 
Diatomaceous Earth - 52 
Imports and Exports of As sbestos . - - 54 
News of General Interest - - - 57 
News of the Industry - - - - 59 
Afterthoughts - - - 66 























pril, 1921 








March. 1921 


SUBSCRIPTION PRICE 


U. S. anp CANADA . - - $1.00 per YEAR 
ForEIGN COUNTRIES - - 2.00 * » 
SINGLE CoPrIEes .20 Eacu 


Copyright 1921, Secretarial Service. 











Page Three 














ASBESTOS 










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Page Four 





————-ASBESTOS -—— 





yril, 192 











The Asbestos Built Up Roof 


By O. A. BIGLER 


Among the many fields in which the use of asbestos is 
increasing, the built-up roofing field is extremely important. 
In the first place, the roof is the most essential part of the 
building. Many shelters are constructed which do not re- 
quire side walls, but every building must have a roof. The 
roof is subject to much harder wear than any other exposed 
surface, and the average building owner gives it the least 
attention, as a rule. The reason is obvious; generally the 
roof is not thought of until it begins to leak. 

Since so much is expected of the roof and so little care 
is given it, it is not strange that roofing manufacturers are 
continually trying to produce roofings which will give the 
best results with the least attention. One of the compara- 
tively recent entries into the roofing field is the asbestos 
built-up roof. It consists of a number of layers of asphalt 
saturated asbestos paper, and the application is carried on 
in exactly the same manner as used with ordinary tarred 
felt and pitch built-up roofing, excepting that the layers 
are bonded together with hot asphalt instead of coal tar 
pitch. The felt is shipped to the job in rolls and the roof 
is generally applied by the same contractor who would 
apply built-up tarred roofing, or, as it is generally called, 
gravel or slag roofing. 

There are, however, many essential differences between 
asbestos built-up roofing and gravel or slag roofing and 
they all acerue to the advantage of the former. The as- 
phalt used to saturate the asbestos felt and the asphalt pitch 
used to combine the layers has a much higher melting 
point than the coal tar pitch used to saturate and combine 
the layers of built-up tarred roofing. Therefore, we find 
that the asbestos built-up roof is not affected by the sum- 
mer’s heat, because owing to the high melting point of the 
asphalt, the materials do not soften and run. On the other 
hand, the asphalt is far more flexible at low temperatures 
than is coal tar pitch ; consequently, the winter season does 
not have any tendency to make the asbestos built-up roof 
brittle and cause breaks. 

It will be seen from the foregoing that the asphalt is 


April, 1927 Page Five 














ASBESTOS 


a very important factor in determining the merit of any 
asbestos built-up roof. The truth of this is proved by the 
fact that nearly all of the manufacturers of asbestos built- 
up roofing materials were originally manufacturers of as- 
phalt roofings, many of them now producing both lines. 
These manufacturers have recognized the excellence of as- 
bestos as the foundation of the fabric used in built-up roofs 
and they have added to its merits the results of their years 
of experience in the production of roofing asphalts. 
Asbestos, being a mineral, is not affected by exposure 
and hence does not need a protective coating of gravel or 
slag to keep the elements from attacking it. Therefore, we 
do not find gravel or slag used on asbestos built-up roofing. 


MANCO ASPHALT FINISH 


CBE 


FIBEROCK 
FELT 











This euts down the cost of application, lessens the weight 
on the building, and largely eliminates stopped-up down 
spouts. The asbestos built-up roof is fire-retardant to a 
high degree. It is practically impossible for a building s0 
protected to be set afire by flames or burning brands coming 
in contact with the roof. In case of fire from within the 
building, the roof being practically a non-combustible 
blanket, retards the spread of the fire instead of feeding it. 

The fabric of any built-up roof is the strength of the 
roof. Therefore, if the fabric is affected in a detrimental 
way by outside influences, the roof is not only weakened, 
but frequently rendered useless. Asbestos is the one fabric 
which is least affected and therefore we find the asbests 
built-up roof giving satisfaction when exposed to cond: 
tions which would speedily result in the destruction of 
other materals. Acid fumes, gases and similar destructive 
agencies are best withstood by it, and that is why asbests 
April, 1921 








Page Sir 



























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il, 1921 & 











ASBESTOS 











AMERICAN ASBESTOS 
COMPANY 


Manufacturers of 


Asbestos Textiles 
NORRISTOWN, PA., U.S. A. 





Headquarters for 


YARNS, CLOTH, TAPES, FIBRES, BRAKE 
LININGS AND TEXTILES GENERALLY 














————_ 








April, 1921 





Page Seven 

















ASBESTOS — 


built-up roofing is particularly valuable for railroad round- 
houses, chemical plants and like structures. Finally, as- 
bestos roofing can be applied on steep surfaces as well as 
flat surfaces which is not true of tar built-up roofing. Many 
modern buildings use the saw-tooth form of roof construc- 
tion which means a succession of relatively short, steep roof 
surfaces, and while an asbestos built-up roof gives perfect 
satisfaction, a roof formed of low melting point bitumen 
coated with gravel or slag would not do so. 

So much, then, for the construction and advantages of 
the asbestos built-up roof. The next thing to consider is 
what steps are being taken to build up the latent demand 
for this material and what are the production facilities. 
On the latter point the situation is good. Several large 
manufacturers with plants located at strategic points in the 
United States are engaged in the production of asbestos 
saturated felts, and roofing asphalts. These manufacturers 
all have their individual specifications, most of which how- 
ever, are quite similar as to the number of plies, weights of 
felts, amount of asphalt, ete. There has been some discus- 
sion as to the advisability of adopting a standard specifica- 
tion, or several of them, to fit different types of construe- 
tion, and have all the producers recommend this specifica- 
tion and manufacture materials to fit it. This would no 
doubt be a forward step and one which would benefit the 
industry a great deal. However, the present manufactur- 
ing facilities are ample to take care of the development of 
the business for a considerable period to come. 

So far as developing the field is concerned, here again 
the manufacturers are working individually. It would seem 
that some co-operative work could be carried on to excel- 
lent advantage to acquaint the publie generally, as well a 
the architectural and contracting fields with the many aé- 
vantages of asbestos built-up roofing, and possibly some 
such effort will be made. The roofing field is one in whieh 
the ‘‘survival of the fittest’’ is the rule and just as wood 
shingles and metal roofings have been greatly encroached 
upon during the last decade by composition shingles and 
ready-to-lay roofings, so the opportunity is at hand for a 
bestos built-up roofing to take its rightful place. 








Page Eight April, 192 

























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1, 192! 








a————— ASBESTOS — — 





AAA AT 








HIGH GRADE 
ASBESTOS TEXTILES 


Da 























mr 


Asbestos Fibre Spinning 
Company 


North Wales, Penna. 





MAT 04: TN 














April, 1921 Page Nine 





=——=ASBES TOS 














ASBESTOS WORKS 


Magnesia Factory, Redwood City, Cal. 


85% Magnesia Pipe and Boiler Coverings. 
Asbestos Air Cell and Minoecel Pipe and Heater 


Asbestos and Magnesia Plastic Cements. 

High Temperature Furnace Linings. 

Asbestos High Pressure Rod Packings. 

Asbestos Braided or Twisted Valve Stem Pack- 


Aspestos Gaskets. 
Theatre Curtains—Gloves. 


Braiders of Square Flax Packings, and Makers 
of a general line of 


Ask for General Catalogue Number Six. 


PLANT RUBBER 


Main Office and Rubber Factory 


San Francisco, California 


Manufacturers of 


Coverings. 


ings. 


ALSO 


Hydraulic and Low Pressure Packings; 
Moulded Rubber Valves, Gaskets and Rings. 











Page Ten 






April, 1921 











abhen2 «ah «26 «as ao as. 


du 




















ASBESTOS 


Market Conditions 


Raw Materials. 

No worthwhile change in the mining fields can be 
noted. Production is going forward in a desultory way; 
at least one mine is shut down; and all the operators are 
fully aware of the futility of forcing production under 
present conditions. 

The uninformed labor under the delusion that to ob- 
tain Asbestos from Mother Earth, it is necessary only to 
dig it out and put it on the ears. On the contrary every 
bit of Asbestos is most painstakingly separated from the 
useless rock and the labor required is a very large part of 
the cost. Then the cost of grinding, screening and bagging 
plus warehousing and the cost of money (interest) runs 
the whole cost up to considerable proportions. 





Consolation is had by the operators from the fact 
that if the rock is left in the ground no harm comes to it 
and it can be taken out when there is a market for it. Of 
course, a certain amount of production must go on in or- 
der that mining labor will not drift away and be unavail- 
able when demand returns. 

The operators treat workers with full consideration 
and keep under way as actively as possible. 

Shipments have been in larger volume. Prices are 
firm and will doubtless stay so for the reason that, with 
one exception, the mines have all contracted for the 1921 
output. 

Rhodesian chrysotile has established a place in this 
country second only to Canadian in the manufacture of 
yarns. 

The supply of Rhodesian for 1921 is limited be- 
cause of reduced production and the fact that all pros- 
pective output is sold. 

The supply of Blue African seems plentiful but, as 
yet, the crocidolites have not been accepted on a parity 
with the chrysotiles. 

Manufactured Goods 

Markets for all classes of finished goods continue 

dull. The only exception to this may be in high pressure 


April, 1921 Page Eleven 








ASBESTOS 


steam packings where trade appears fairly good. 

Prices generally rule about as of the past several 
months, recessions of an unimportant amount being made 
by one or two manufacturers, doubtless due to a commen- 
dable desire to keep plants working, partially, at least. 

Reliable information from Detroit is to the effect that 
the automobile trade is resuming activity and expects a 
good season. The rubber industry is picking up fast and, 
while many complain of slackness in the building trades, 
a study of the figures of the past ten years, convinces us 
that building is far from inactive. 

Every underlying condition points to early indus- 
trial improvement and the Asbestos trades should be up 
and at it to get their full share. 

If every man in the Asbestos Industry would go out 
and dig for business, promote new uses and really hustle 
things would be different within ten days. 

We will never have good business if we are content 
to sit by and wait for other industries to do it. 

What are you doing? 








**Run As Fast As You Can To 
Stay Where You Are’”’ 


Mr. Curtis, of the Curtis Publishing Company, sug- 
gests the above as a title for an editorial at this time. 

‘*All my business life’’ he said, ‘‘I have spent more 
money for advertising whenever a business slump came 
along than in normal times, and if I didn’t get ahead in the 
race, | kept from slipping back and was in a position to 
shoot ahead of my competitors the moment conditions 
changed.’’ 

Logical? Of course it is. 

Strong men breast the current. Weak ones are ear- 
ried down the stream by it. 

If you have goods to sell, tell the people. They'll buy 
if the goods are right and the price right. 

‘*Run as fast as you can to stay where you are’’ will 
pay big even if it doesn’t pay immediate dividends. 

It pays to advertise. 


Page Twelve April, 1921 














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he 

to 
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vill 


921 











ASBESTOS 











== SS SS 





E. SCHAAF--REGELMAN 


220 Broadway 
New York, N. Y. 


American, Canadian, African 


Asbestos--Crude, Fibre 


Owning and operating the only 
producing mines in Arizona, not 
controlled by Textile Manufac- 


turers. 


Arizona Asbestos is entirely free from Iron 


European Headoffice: 


Y, WARMOESSTRAAT 76 & 
Y AMSTERDAM S 
? HoLuANb. y 














April, 1921 Page Thirteen 














ASBESTOS 













Canadian Crude Asbestos 
and Fibre Corporation 


LIMITED 


THETFORD MINES, CANADA 


CRUDES 
FIBRES 
SAND 


Sole Selling Agents For 
Maple Leaf Asbestos Co., Limited 
Thetford Mines, CANADA 


Asbestos Crude & Fibre Mining Corp., Limited 
Thetford Mines 


For prices, apply to 
ASBESTOS & MINERAL CORPORATION 


1819 Broadway 
NEW YORK 




















Page Fourteen 


ee 1. MTOR AS A rian 





April, 1921 





ee a or a 














‘ASBESTOS 


Bomb Wrecks Offices of 
Asbestos Plant 


On March 9th, about ten o’clock P. M., the inhabitants 
of Norristown, Penna., were startled by a heavy explosion. 
The explosion occurred in the office building, adjoining the 
plant of the Norristown Magnesia & Asbestos Company, 
shattered windows in houses several blocks away and was 
distinctly felt at a distance of five miles or more. 

The cause of the explosion, while not definitely known, 
is supposed to have been a bomb, planted on or near the 
desk of A. K. Burgstresser, Superintendent of the Plant. 
Fortunately no one was in the building, the watchman 
having made his rounds a short time before and finding 
everything in order. 

The officials of the Company are puzzled to know the 
reason for the planting of the bomb. They have had no 








labor troubles and while the plant has been partially shut 


April, 1921 Page Fifteen 





ASBESTOS 


Hrll 
Ashesios Mines 


THETFORD MINES 
Quebec, Canada 


MINES OFFICE at 
Thetford Mines, P. Q., Canada 


and 
SALES OFFICE at 
Ambler, Penna., U.S. A. 


























Miners and Shippers of 


Ashestus 


CRUDE AND FIBRE 
OWNERS 


The 
Keasbey 
& 
Mattison 
Company 


Ambler, Penna. 
U.S. A. 

















Page Sixteen April, 1921 





it, 1921 














ASBESTOS 





down for repairs and due to lack of business, no complaints 
have been heard. 

Other theories for the cause of the explosion aside 
from the bomb have been advanced but fail to hold water. 
It was thought possible that robbery of the safes had been 
contemplated and the thieves might have accidentally 
dropped the explosive. Since the safes are intact and no 
dead bodies found in the wreckage however, this theory 
has been given up. 

Another thought was that the steam testing device in 
the basement of the building might have caused the ex- 
plosion, but after the wreckage had been cleared away the 
device was found to be in perfect condition. 

Whatever the cause, the office is in a fine mess as will 
be seen by the pictures on pages four and _ fifteen. 
Office furniture has been practically demolished, files scat- 
tered, and all soaked with water from the sprinkler sys- 
tem. The loss is estimated at about $15,000. 

Temporary office quarters have been taken by the Com- 
pany in the business section of Norristown. 











WANTED—High Grade Salesman, live wire and thoroly 
experienced in Asbestos Textile line. Address N-2, “AS- 
BESTOS,” 721 Bulletin Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 











LESS THAN CARLOADS 


PROMPT SHIPMENTS 


PennsyLvaniA AssBestos Co. | 
John A. Hovey, President 


NORTH WALES, PA. | 














April, 1921 Page Seventeen 














ASBESTOS 











Page Fighteen 





NOAA 


SA A a 


The 


Asbestos Corporation 


of America 


BURLINGTON, VERMONT 


Chrysotile Asbestos 


American Mines 
Crudes 
Fibres 

Sand 


For Prices or Graded Samples 
Apply to Burlington Office 


NN ANAS OS aa 





April, 1921 
























1921 





ASBESTOS 








Editorial Comment 


Packing manufacturers and salesmen would do well to 
study the claims being made for certain types of metallic 
packings. 

In one case a pamphlet describing metallic packings 
says that the only way to prevent stuffing box friction is to 
have the box packed with a plentifully lubricated packing. 
Then, in the next few paragraphs, it is truly stated that 
suitable and efficient boxes have no friction. 

Next the statement is made that the packing must 
carry its own lubricant and then—that the only way to 
have a packing lubricated is to pass the lubrication 
through the packing. 

This particular metallic packing is claimed to have 
self lubricating qualities. 

On the other hand, it is generally admitted that no 
packing is made or can be made which, under the action of 
heat, can render lubrication of itself or its contents, after 
having been submitted to high temperature. 

The real lubrication of packing in a gland is supplied 
by the oil saturated steam which is fed into the cylinders. 

Fibre packings will absorb, as stated by our metallic 
friend, steam and oil; and, after all, this is exactly what is 
wanted above everything else. The great advantage of 
fibre packing is, that it contains more open spaces in 
which steam and oil may be absorbed and contained, than 
does any other type of packing, metallic or otherwise. 

Analysis of the specious arguments exployed by pat- 
ented or trademarked brands of metallic packings, will re- 
sult in the more intelligent selling of fibre packings by 
their manufacturers and handlers. 

Undoubtedly there is a logical market for metallic 
packings but where such packings undertake to encroach 
upon the equally logical market for fibre packings the fibre 
people should take notice. 





Doubtless every reader of this publication has been 
observing the work being done by the American Federation 
of Labor Bureau at Washington. 

The platform adopted by the American Federation of 


April, 1921 Page Nineteen 


















ASBESTOS 


Labor, and reproduced in all the newspapers and principal 
magazines, is one which every American citizen should 
make it his business to know something about. 

We have no quarrel with either labor or capital, but if 
any group or convention of business men had the temerity 
to undertake the putting thru of a bill of rights such as has 
been prepared by the American Federation of Labor, public 
opinion would annihilate the proposal. 

The good judgment and common horse sense of the 
American people will never permit any class, be it labor, 
agriculture, business, clergy, or whatnot, to dominate con- 
ditions to the disadvantage of all other classes 

It is interesting to note in this bill of rights that it is 
desired to exempt labor from all the anti-trust, conspiracy 
and other laws which the rest of the American Public 
must abide by. 

The American Federation of Labor has just as much 
chance of getting by with this latest piece of propaganda 
as had the celluloid dog that chased the Asbestos cat thru 
Hades. 


Judge Wilfred Bolster, of the Supreme Court of 
Massachusetts, was asked to act as an arbitrator between 
Publishers and Union Printers in Boston. 

Clearly stating his early leaning toward the Union 
eause, he sets forth in a written statement his reasons for 
declining to serve, closing with,— 

‘I will not arbitrate your demand for a minimum 
wage until you supplement it with an agreement for mini- 
mum production. I deny your right as against the public 
to set up half an issue for settlement. I deny the right of 
the publishers to join issue with you on your one-sided de- 
mand as you have formulated it. I will not stultify myself 
by saying what is a fair share for you to take out of the 
community wealth as wages when there is no stipulation as 
to what you will put back by your labor. I regret the de- 
lay which this conclusion will cause, but it is a delay of 
your own making. Since the conclusion rests upon funda- 
mentals which cannot be waived or altered, it is fairer to 
state it now than at the end of a protracted series of meet- 
ings.’’ 


Page Twenty April, 1921 









































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for 


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nini- 
ublic 
ht of 
d de- 
self 
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on as 
ie de- 
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il, 1921 























( 


ASBESTOS 


White Chrysotile. 


Fort Victoria, 


Blue Crocidolite 
White Tremolite 
Brown Amosite 


Kearsney Buildings, 
Durban, Natal. 


Ready to consider prompt 
contracts for several grades. 


promptly to cabled enquiries. 


a ~ 





ASBES TO 


The Victoria District Industries, Ltd. 


Southern Rhodesia. 
Are Mine Owners, operators, and dealers. 


Now open to consider “forward contracts.” 


African Base Metals Export Co., Ltd. 


Are Mine Owners, operators aad dealers. ‘ 


and 


CABLES:—Both companies use Broomhall’s Imperial 
Combination, and Bentley’s Codes, and will respond 





S 


Pe ee 
‘ 


FIBR 





for ward 





ie — 





April, 1921 





Page Twenty-one 





a——— A § BES TOS 


Jacob A. Jacobs 


Page Twenty-two April, 19! 











ril, 1921 











—— ASBESTOS — 


Jacob A. Jacobs 


Jacob A. Jacobs is well known in Asbestos Mining 
circles. 

His first experience in the mining industry, however, 
was connected with the Kerr Lake Silver Property, which 
he purchased in 1905. He tells us that he purchased this 
claim after personally inspecting it, that being the first 
mining claim he had ever visited. 

The price of the Kerr Lake property was $30,000, 
$5000 of which was paid in 30 days, the balance of $25,000 
being due in 90 days. The productiveness of this mine is 
shown by the fact that the $25,000 was paid at the end of 
ninety days from the earnings of the mine. In 1906 Mr. 
Jacobs sold this property for $3,000,000 and in 1908 pur- 
chased the Jacobs Mine (Asbestos). 

Mr. Jacobs was the original President and General Man- 
ager of the Jacobs Asbestos Mining Company of Thetford, 
but sold his interest in this Company in 1919 to Sir Mor- 
timer Davis, the operating company being known as Con- 
solidated Asbestos Limited. 

In 1920 Mr. Jacobs purchased the Boston Mine at East 
Broughton, operating it under the name Asbestos Mines 
Limited. An aerial tramway, described in previous issues 
of ASBESTOS is now being completed at this mine. 

While the Boston Mine gives promise of large produc- 
tion, it contains no Crude. It was therefore natural for 
Mr. Jacobs to look around for a property containing Crude 
and the Black Lake Asbestos & Chrome Company appealed 
to him as offering large possibilities for development. 

The recent struggle for control of the Black Lake As- 
bestos & Chrome Company has excited quite a bit of inter- 
est in Asbestos Mining and Manufacturing circles. 

Originally, it was Mr. Jacobs’ intention to purchase 
the Black Lake Asbestos & Chrome Company, acquiring 
control by the purchase of sufficient stock in the open mar- 
ket. He soon found however, that the Asbestos Corpora- 
tion of Canada had the same end in view. Naturally, the 
competition of the two for the stock increased the price 
and both buyers finally decided, very sensibly, to get to- 
gether and endeavor to make some basis of settlement. 

Consequently a contract was drawn up between Mr. 





April, 1921 Page Twenty-three 














ASBESTOS 





THE ORIGINATORS and 
LARGEST MANUFACTURERS of 





85% Magnesia 


Sectional Coverings 


Asbestos 
Textiles, Paper 
Millboards, etc. 


> 
=I 

£ 

oe 


VY 
1G 


y’ 


e 


“IF IT’S MADE OF ASBESTOS 
WE’ VE GOT IT’’ 


Keasbey & Mattison Company 
AMBLER, PENNA. 














Page Twenty-four April, 1921 

















— i 





921 

















ASBESTOS 


Jacobs and the Asbestos Corporation, in which each named 
the price at which they would sell. Finally, Mr. Jacobs 
purchased sufficient stock from the Asbestos Corporation to 
give him control, Messrs. Anado, Newman and Schinasi, 
of New York City, being associated with him in the trans- 
action. 

It is Mr. Jacobs’ intention to confine himself to the 
mining operations, and the New York interests will take 
eare of the distribution end. 

Naturally, there is the thought of the amalgamation of 
Asbestos Mines, Limited with the Black Lake Asbestos & 
Chrome Company. Plans for the development of these 
two mines, with the assistance of the engineers who have 
been employed, promise active development along construec- 
tive lines; in fact the program is a very ambitious one. 

The success previously attained by Mr. Jacobs indi- 
eates a promising future for the two properties. 











Canadian South African Russian 
and 
Crude Rhodesian Asbestos 
and Blue as soon as 
Fib and Railway Traffic 
1ores White will be 
Asbestos Asbestos Opened 











Nederlandsche Asbest Maatschappy 
-- ROTTERDAM -- 





Tel. Address Post Box 518 A. B. Pe Edition 
NEDAM ROTTERDAM Western Union 








Liebers Code 





April, 1921 Page Twenty-five 





ASBESTOS 








































Dominion Distribution 
of Asbestos Products and 
Mechanical Rubber Goods 


Covers the 


Industrial, Marine, Mill, 


Railroad, Mine, Automehite 


Trades 


throughout the United 
States and every country 
in the civilized world. 


-¢ 


Dominion Asbestos and Rubber 


Corporation 
154 Nassau Street, New York 
Albany Indianapolis Richmond 
Baltimore Los Angeles San Francisco 
Cincinnati Norfolk Seattle 
Detroit Philadelphia St. Louis 
Pittsburgh 


The Hague, Holland 














Page Twenty-six 





April, 1921 




















pr 
m¢ 


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Pr 
im 


pr 
hu 
me 


tw 
the 


as 
ful 
atti 








= 





= 
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ASBESTOS 
= ° ° 
Stick-To-Itiveness Exercised by 
Bio Men 
‘““We Shall Reap If We Faint Not’’ 
Reprinted from “Forbes.” 

Diamonds are chunks of coal that stuck to their job. 

If it has taken millions of years to develop mankind, 
must we fret if it takes us a few years to rise above the 
rank and file of mankind? 

Must we quit if we don’t get there quickly? 

Note this: There is not one major figure in American 
financial, industrial or commercial life today under forty. 
Not one. 

And what of the past? 

The original J. P. Morgan, though born rich and rear- 
ed as an international banker, was sixty before he did his 
greatest work and nearer seventy before Wall Street, in 
its hour of trouble, acknowledged him as its undisputed 
leader. 

Harriman at fifty was an obseure broker with a pen- 
chant for railroading. 

Hill’s hair was gray before he became Empire Build- 
er of the Northwest. 

At fifty Woodrow Wilson was a little-known college 
professor. 








Washington was no youngster when he won the im- 
mortal title of ‘‘Father of His Country.’’ 

Lineoln midway through life was in the coal, not the 
diamond class, and was fifty-two before he loomed up as 
Presidential calibre. He was fifty-four when he made his 
imperishable address at Gettysburg. 

But all were stickers. They conceived their goal and 
pressed on courageously, unflinchingly, unswervingly, 
hurdling more obstacles than you or I are ever likely to 
meet. 

Most people show more persistency in their _ first 
twelve months than they show later in twelve years; did 
they not, they never would have learned to walk. 

Robert the Bruce six times failed to free Scotland, but 
a struggling spider on the wall which climbed up success- 
fully after six falls revived his courage, and at the seventh 
attempt Bruce won a crown and undying glory. 

April, 1921 





Page Twenty-seven 














ASBESTOS 





Charles M. Schwab was president of the world’s first 
billion-dollar corporation before he was thirty-five, lost his 
steel throne, dropped from the limelight for a decade, but 
during this time he redoubled his efforts and he has done 
his greatest work since he crossed the half-century mark. 
He did not quit. He stuck. 

The three bankers who were the most influential in 
America, James Stillman, Jacob H. Schiff and George F. 
Baker, averaged seventy years of age, when the first two 
died; while the three leaders of the ‘‘ younger school,”’ 
Henry P. Davison, Frank A. Vanderlip and Otto H. Kahn, 
have all lived half-a-hundred years or more. 

There is not a leading railroad president in the whole 
land not old enough to be a grandfather. 

Ninety per cent. of America’s business leaders began 
at the bottom—of the fifty men voted the greatest business 
stalwarts in the country not half a score were born to lux- 
ury. 

At least forty of them sweated blood before they gain- 
ed a foothold on the ladder, sweated and toiled with brain 
and often with body from early morning to late at night, 
many times all night, tasting defeat but never despair. 

Employers today shun shifters. 

There is no market for rolling-stones. 

Life is so specialized that jack-of-all trades are want- 
ed by none. 

To last, a man must stick to his last—he cannot hope 
to be a good shoemaker today and a capable plumber to- 
morrow. 

The pace today calls for men of red blood, not of white 
livers, men of grit, not grouch. 

Stickers, not sticklers, are wanted. 

‘‘Tenacity is the only key that will open the door of 
success,’’ recently declared Daniel Guggenheim, head of 
the greatest mining and smelting family America has ever 
known. 

Even a postage stamp knows enough to stick till it 
gets there. 

It is stick-to-itiveness that has made both nations and 
individuals great. 


Page Twenty-eight April, 1921 




















pe 
‘0- 











ASBESTOS 











RANKLIN 
UEL SAVING 











| PRODUCTS 
L 





be 





Not Only Does 


One Ton of 85% Magnesia 


Save 


One Ton of Coal Per Day 


But it also prevents 
the condensation of 


EIGHT TONS OF STEAM PER DAY 








r And thereby increases 
: by that amount 


THE EFFECTIVE BOILER CAPACITY 


ANY A A 


The Franklin Mfg. Company 
FRANKLIN, PA. 












SLANT RMT 











April, 1921 Page Twenty-nine 

















ASBESTOS 


Decay and decline come only when nations or indi- 
viduals relax, when they become slack, slothful and shift- 
less. 

‘*The moment a man feels he ean rest on his laurels, 
that moment he begins to slide back; he must stick at it 
and at it,’’ says Thomas E. Wilson, the former penniless 
stockyard clerk who recently became a national figure 
through displacing by his own firm name that of Sulzber- 
ger & Sons Company after a career the very embodiment 
of stick-to-itiveness. 

Is it not the literal truth that America, as we know 
it, owed its discovery by Christopher Columbus to this very 
virtue of stick-to-itiveness ? 

Without stick-to-itiveness no man is likely to climb to 
the top of the ladder—and stick. 


How Much Should Advertisers Spend? 
As Answered by the Alexander Hamilton Institute 


Per Cent Per Cent 
of Gross Sales of Gross Sales 
Asrow CORIArS...ccccess 3% Northern Pacific R. R... 1.9 
Baker-Vawter System... 3% Old Dutch Cleanser..... 10 
Berry Brothers’ Varnish 4 Packard Automobile.... 1.1 
Cadillac Automobile.... 1 PROMOSTADAS .....c000% 5 
Champion Spark-Plugs.. 7 Reo Motor-Cars........ 1 
Cloth-craft Clothes..... 1% Ruud Heaters....2% to 3% 
Colgate’s Preparation... 2 Santa Fe Railroad...... 2% 
DePree Chemical Co.... 6 Saxon Automobile...... 2.6 
Evinrude Motors....... 8 Sears, Roebuck & Co....10 
Fatima Cigarettes...... 5 Sherwin-Williams Paint. 3% 
Globe-Wernicke Cabinets 3 Stromberg Carburetors. 3% 
Great Northern Railroad 1.83 Studebaker Automobiles.2 
Hudson Automobile..... 1.3 Union Pacific Railroad.. 2% 
eee 3 Universal Portland 
Kewanee Boilers....... 2% SER necnceesaeie 2 
I fired aa des eal 3 Velvet Tobacco......... 6 
McCray Refrigerators... 7% Welch’s Grape Juice....10 
Markham Air-Rifles..... 5 Wooltex Clothes........ 2 
Reprinted. 


The above figures are several years old. If such a 
table were compiled today, the figures would be much 
higher, for manufacturers are at present spending more 
for advertising than ever before, knowing that it will pay 
them big returns, and help bring their business back to 
normal. 


Page Thirty April, 1921 

















ASBESTOS 











_ ASBESTOS TEXTILE Co. 


INCORPORATED 
; MILLS GENERAL OFFICES 
NorkTH BROOKFIELD, Mass. 
AND WootwortH BUILDING 
REYNOLDSVILLE 
PENNA. NEW YORK. 


WE MANUFACTURE 


ASBESTOS 


Fibre 











Wick Rope 


Yarn 


Tape Plain Cloth Metallic Cloth Listing 


Bushings Sheet Packing Gaskets 














Theatre Curtains Gloves Clothing Packing 





*‘Quality and Service’’ 


ASBESTOS TEXTILE Co. 








INCORPORATED 
. MILLS GENERAL OFFICES 
NortH BROOKFIELD, Mass. 
AND Woo.twortH BUILDING 
REYNOLDSVILLE 
PENNA. NEW YORK 








April, 1921 Page Thirty-one 
















ASBESTOS 








Contractors and Distributors Page 


No greater problem confronts the building trades contract- 
or than that of labor. Unyielding and obstinate, labor refuses 
to accept wage reductions whether business will stand for the 
payroll or not. This attitude of labor will undoubtedly do much 
to prolong the period of readjustment. Ultimately, however, 
when Employers must pay labor with money not earned by 
their own production, wages will have a drastic revision. Indi- 
cations point to labor as exacting the last pound of flesh be 
fore yielding. 

Conspicuous in this point among the building trades in our 
large cities is the Union of pipe coverers. They profess to be 
skilled mechanics tho their work, in the main, is unskilled. A 
three year apprenticeship is supposed to be necessary for a 
mechanic's rating, but shifting from city to city and shop to 
shop under union regulations breeds so-called mechanics often 
much earlier than the allotted period. At any rate’ they take 
down skilled mechanic's pay and are most concerned with limit- 
ing production to the duration of the job. An overall National 
Organization of Employers would do a great deal toward rec- 
tifying the Union’s pet method of constantly exchanging men as 
between the different cities, often under the same Employer. 

The pipe covering union in Boston has been on strike since 
January 20th, refusing the Employer’s ninety cent offer. The 
dispute is being arbitrated and the Employers are NOW stand- 
ing on the EIGHTY cent level. 

Wage rates and dates of expiration of pipe covering agree- 
ments follow: 





























MECH- 

CIty ANICS HELPERS EXPIRATIONS OVERTIME 
Cleveland $1.1244'70—-80-90 May Ist, 1921 Time & half-time 
St. Louis . 1.00 60-60-65 Dec. 31st, 1921Time & half-time 
Buffalo ... 1.00 50-6244-70 Apr. 30th, 1921Double time 
Pittsburgh 1.00 °5.00-5.75-6.50 May 31st, 1921°Time & h2lf-time 
Boston... .90 60-60-60 Strike— Time & half-time 





no agreement 
New York 1.12%4874%4-871%4-87% Dec. 31st, 1921 Double time 








Phila’d’a. 1.00 60-60-60 May 3ist, 1921Double time 
‘Cincinnati .95 ........ On notice None 








1First, second and third year helpers respectively. 
*Per day. 

3Double time after twelve P. M. 
4*New agreement December Ist, 1920. 








Page Thirty-two April, 1921 








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Black Lake Asbestos and 
Chrome Company 


Jacobs Building, Montreal, Canada 


LIMITED 


Head Office 


Mines: Black Lake, Que. 


Crudes and Spinning Fibres 
Specializing in Shingle Stocks 


Miners of 


Controlling 
Union Asbestos Mines 
Southwark Mines 
Imperial Asbestos Mines 


Black Lake Chrome Mines 


Coleraine Chrome Mines 

























AWA ¢G/ 
PW) s 
SARs 

















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WT ARTA 
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4) Best 85% Magnesia 


i jm is made with 
A BLUE ASBESTOS 


The “Magnesia eAssociation of -America, on page IO 
of their latest booklet, ‘Defend Your Steam,” say— 


1. The following table showed the heat /oss 
from a pipe lagged with various materials 
each 13" thick, with steam at 400 degrees F., 
and an outside temperature of 68 degrees F.: 


2. MATERIAL 
B. T. U's per sq. ft. per hr. 







MAGNESIA........... 118 7 
BLUE ASBESTOS.... 121 a 
Mica (best only) ..... 12 i 

Wuire ASBESTOS...... 126 





Prastics, Ere. (best) .. 133 
Prastic, Ere. (inferior). 143 
















Therefore, Blue Asbestos is more effi- 
cient for insulation than White Asbes- 
tos. It also gives increased strength to 
the finished product and costs no more 
than White Asbestos. 


We specialize in preparing Blue Asbestos. 
ASBESTOS LIMITED 
S WEST 40TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY, Nw. Yeo 


1a Mines: Griqualand, South Africa 
Associated with 
Cape Asbestos Co., Ltd., London, England 
































































































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Mines Ltd. c 

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East Broughton, Que. wh 

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Mining all grades - 

of Asbestos Fibre | Me 

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Head Office, Jacobs Bldg & : 
Montreal, Canada. tim: 

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Apri 




















ASBESTOS 








Ehret’s Plant Faces Isolation 

Recently a bill was introduced into the Pennsylvania 
State Legislature, appropriating $500,000. for the purchase 
of properties within the boundaries of the original en- 
campment of the Revolutionary Army under Washington, 
at Valley Forge 

The State has in the past several years greatly im- 
proved the land surrounding Washington’s Headquarters 
at Valley Forge, making it into a Park with winding 
drives, observatory, monuments, ete. The additional ap- 
propriation is for the purchase of additional land. 

It is most praiseworthy of Pennsylvania to endeavor 
to preserve and beautify the scene of the great crisis in our 
history, but consideration should be given to the effect 
which the purchase of this additional land will have on a 
nearby industrial plant, that of the Ehret Magnesia Manu- 
facturing Company at Port Kennedy. 

If the purchase included the plant, the Ehret Com- 
pany would not object to enlargement of the Park, but the 
present idea seems to be the purchase of houses occupied by 
the employees of the Ehret Company, which would result 
in a seareity of labor for the Company, make it necessary 
for the employees to live at a considerable distance from 
the plant, and, in fact, reduce the value of the plant. 

Rey. Herbert W. Burk, rector of the Washington 
Memorial Chapel at Valley Forge, and a lifelong worker 
for the park, has characterized as ‘‘outrageous’’ the de- 
struction of about twenty-five houses in Port Kennedy 
which would be made necessary by the contemplated pur- 
chase. He does not mind stating his opinion that ‘‘the ul- 
timate object of the State Commission is to stifle the Ehret 
Company’s business by isolating them from their em- 
ployees, until the State can buy the plant for a song,’’ and 
adds that other land near the original site of the encamp- 
ment could be purchased at a very much lower price, has 
quite as much sentimental value and would in no way dis- 
turb the industrial development of Port Kennedy. 

The Governor of Pennsylvania has frankly stated that 
he is not in sympathy with the destruction of the work- 
men’s houses and does not feel justified in approving the 
appropriation. 


April, 192 Page Thirty-seven 


















ASBESTOS 
Canadian Asbestos Production for 1920 


The shipments of asbestos from the mines and mills 
of the Province of Quebee during the year 1920 amounted 
to 177,605 tons valued at $14,674,572. This is the highest 
production ever recorded, both in quantity and value, be- 
ing an increase of 30% in tonnage, and 34% in value, as 
compared with the previous year when the production 
amounted to 135,862 tons, valued at $10,932,289. See de- 
tailed figures below. 

PRODUCTION OF ASBESTOS IN THE PROVINCE OF QUEBEC FOR 1920. 
SHIPMENTS AND SALES AVERAGE STOCK ON HAND 
VALUE Dec. 31st 1920 

DESIGNATION OF GRADE! TONS | VALUE PER TON) ToNS VALUE 


Crude No. 1 ........ 1,026; $1,513,457, $1,475.10 446|$ 659,259 
Crude No. 2 ........ 2,830, 2,295,927| 811.28 854; 829,438 
Spinning Fibre ....) 13,983) 3,915,562) 280.02); 1,929) 653,115 
Shingle Fibre ..... 16,784) 1,852,210 110.36); 1,306; 172,476 


Paper Stocks 
and others ..'142,982| 5,097,416 35.65/|18,826; 118,060 


177,605) 14,674,572 82.62, 23,361) 2,432,348 
rrr ee 19,716 43,559 2.20 125 27 
DE araeess 197,321|/$14,718,131|........ 23,336 $2,432,622 


Quantity of rock mined during the year, 3,099,122 tons. 
Reprinted from Preliminary Statement of Bureau of Mines. 
P. Q., Canada. 














Paul Hammerich 


of Asbestos, Crude and 
Inspector Fibre. Reports on As- 
bestos Minesand Mills. 


THETFORD MINES - QUEBEC, CANADA 



































GOOD ASBESTOS FIBRE which now adheres to rock 
and is wasted can be reclaimed by the use of my patented 
machine. Will consider outright sale of machine and patent 
or will do business on royalty basis. Address P-l, “ASBES- 
TOS,” 721 Bulletin Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 















Page Thirty-eight April, 1921 














ae we = 


| 





it 




















ASBESTOS 


Taxes Or Tariff-Which? 


Last November the people of the United States, by an 
overwhelming vote, returned to power the Republican 
Party—the party of protection. 

Recent inquiry as to what is planned to be done to- 
ward giving the United States adequate protection against 
importation of foreign made, low priced goods elicits very 
little useful information. 

Much time is being used by legislators in wondering 
whether to take up first at the next session of Congress, 
which convenes on April 11th, the question of taxes or the 
question of tariff. 

In the meantime, tremendous quantities of raw ma- 
terial and manufactured goods from foreign sources are 
being brought into this country under the present low tar- 
iff laws, and high exchange rates, these goods to be held 
until American Industry revives somewhat, when they will 
be sold in competition with American products. 

We are not referring particularly to Asbestos-Mag- 
nesia products, because activity in those lines depends en- 
tirely upon the major industries—agriculture, steel and 
building trades. It is, nevertheless, the plain duty of every- 
body connected with this Industry to give serious thought 
to the effect on the Asbestos-Magnesia Industry which will 
follow if the major industries of the country are forced to 
compete with these extra low-priced foreign products. 

Every reader of this publication whose livelihood is 
wholly or partially dependent upon the Asbestos-Magnes- 
ia Industry, should, in justice to himself and to his coun- 
try, write his Congressmen and United States Senators urg- 
ing the importance of Congress giving first and immediate 
attention to the matter of tariff protection. 

It is obvious that unless American Industry can be 
revived to the point where profits can be made, there will 
be nothing for the Government to tax, except capital, and 
—what would follow if we were obliged to tax capital. 

Hence it would appear that as between taxes and tar- 
iff, there is no sense in the world of considering taxes until 
adequate tariffs have been imposed. 


April, 1921 





Page Thirty-nine 












ASBESTOS 

















SPINNING FIBRES 


OF 


Highest Grade 


——Sod pho 


Edward H. Garcin & Co. Inc. 


1819 Broadway 
NEW YORK 


BRANCH 
MERCER STREET 
Long Acre, W. C. 2 

LONDON 








Page Forty 






































<= A &S&BEs TOS5 


Asbestos In Australia 


Asbestos has been known to exist in Australia since the 
days of early exploration, but at that time the demand was 
for long fibre only and such fibre was found in regions dif- 
ficult to work, as for example in the hot Pilbarra district of 
West Australia. Of late years, however, new uses have de- 
veloped for the shorter fibres and with the increased de- 
mand for such grades there is a growing tendency to de- 
velop the domestic deposits rather than import material 
necessary for home consumption. 

In the November 1920 number of Aspestos a descrip- 
tion was given of the asbestos deposits of Tasmania. A brief 
review of the occurrences and operations in other parts of 
the Commonwealth follows: 


Queensland : 

Asbestos has been noted in many localities in Queens- 
land, mainly within the serpentine belt northeast and north 
of Rockhampton extending from Balnagowan near the Fitz- 
roy River to Marlborough. The deposits at Princhester 
and Marlborough appear to be the most important tho 
little is yet known either of their quality or extent. A 
small amount of asbestos has been mined, and it is reported 
that it sold for $25 per ton. On Marlborough Creek near 
its junction with the Fitzroy River, well-defined veins hav- 
ing a maximum fibre length of 14% inches are reported. 
For slates and sheeting Queensland asbestos is reported to 
be inferior as it lacks strength. It is however well adapted 
for asbestos magnesite flooring, boiler covering and as an 
ingredient in ground form in refrigerating paint. 

South Australia: 

Asbestos has been found in many localities in South 
Australia but few of them give promise of successful devel- 
opment. The most promising discoveries include that of 
erocidolite or blue asbestos occurring in limestone at Rob- 
ertstown, and chrysotile of good quality in Minbrie near 
Cowell. The latter deposit is said to contain about 14 of 
1 per cent crude, and about 15 or 20% of milling fibre. 
This is a content of fibre much higher than the average of 
- deposits now worked. 

21 





April, 1921 Page Forty-one 














ASBESTOS 





Western Australia: 

Two exposures of short fibre asbestos of good quality 
have been reported at Soanesville in the Pilbarra District. 
The asbestos occurs in cross-fibre veins in serpentine. In 
the early days of exploration long fibre of high quality was 
reported near Marble Bar in the same district. 

New South Wales: 

Asbestos has been worked at Gundagai, but the quality 
of the product does not seem to have justified development. 
The Durabestos Company of Sydney operated for some 
time in the Beaconsfield District of Tasmania, but found 
the deposits so pockety and uncertain, and so lacking in 
continuity that they were forced to suspend operations, and 
seek new deposits. The most promising deposits were 
found at Woodsreef about 10 miles east of Barraba in the 
New England District of New South Wales. Quarries had 
been opened by Messrs Wanderlich and Messrs. James 
Hardie & Co., of Sydney, and active operations were con- 
ducted during 1919 and 1920. The former company had an 
interest in the Durabestos Company and finally took full 
control of the company. The deposits at Woodsreef are 
similar to those of Tasmania, being irregular and of uncer- 
tain extent, but the fibre veins are more closely spaced and 
the deposit larger than in the Beaconsfield area. The as- 
bestos oceurs in fairly closely spaced veins having a maxi- 
mum thickness of about one inch. It is claimed that one 
difficulty with the New South Wales asbestos deposits is the 
presence of numerous faults, a fault being a geological 
term for the slipping of one mass of rock with respect to 
another along a fracture plane. Thus in following a good 
ore deposit the miner may suddenly come upon a wall of 
barren rock, and it is difficult to find the continuation of 
the ore body. To insure operation for a considerable 
period over a dozen quarries have been opened and con- 
nected by tram with the mill. As the fuel problem is diffi- 
cult a Diesel engine is employed to operate the mill. 

As in Canada the mill is equipped with crusher, rolls, 
disintegrators, screens and suction jars. Beaters as are used 
in Canada are found to be too severe with the Australian 
fibre causing an excessive loss of fines, and a machine lately 
built at Sydney has been installed with the expectation 


Page Forty-two April, 1921 











SS me CY CY 


| ie. eee 
ry ry > RR rR 

















ASBESTOS =“ 


SOMATA TAA ALAC RM | lta AN a ll! A ACM 


NATIONAL MAGNESIA 
MANUFACTURING COMPANY 


Manufacturers of 
“85 % Magnesia” Pipe 
and 
Boiler Coverings 





YALA, tO La 


Locomotive Lagging 





544 Market Street 


San Francisco. California 
a. 3 A. 


Cable Address, “Magnesia, San Francisco” 


z a 
= 2 
ss : 

DMNA ili HN, Hl i i NANA MN 





April, 1921 Page Forty-three 








ASBESTOS 





MEAN Ai AA AR it ‘A RN ee | 


Hobdell, Way & Co. 


LIMITED 
LONDON, ENGLAND 











RHODESIAN 
CRUDE 
ASBESTOS 
CAPE BLUE 
CRUDE 
ASBESTOS 





Address Enquiries to 
W. D. CRUMPTON & CO. 


Special Representatives 


Room 1010 #8-10 Bridge Street 
New York City - New York 











_ Re es! 








Page Forty-four 





April, 1921 

















—- ASBESTOS = om 
that a greater fibre recovery will result. South African 
erocidolite is mixed with the Barraba fibre in the manu- 
facture of sheets. It seems probable that operations will 
continue for some years at least, and may develop into a 
permanent industry which will supply Australia with a 
large share of necessary short fibre. 





Asbestos Deposits On Indian 
Reservations May Now Be 
Developed 


(Information supplied by courtesy of the Arizona Mining 
Journal) 

Frequent mention has been made in ASBESTOS con- 
cerning deposits of Asbestos on Indian Reservations. 
Many of these deposits were valuable but up until recently 
the legal right to work them could not be obtained. 

For years the director of the Arizona Bureau of 
Mines has been endeavoring to secure the passage of laws 
that would make it possible to develop the coal and mineral 
deposits existing on Indian Reservations. Almost two 
years ago legislation was secured that made it possible to 
lease deposits of metallic minerals on these reservations, 
but it was still impossible to mine coal or non-metallic 
minerals, such as potassium, asbestos, precious stones, ete. 

About a year ago bills were introduced into Congress 
reorganizing the Indian Service, and providing for the de- 
velopment of asbestos and other mines on Indian Reserva- 
tions. The bills were passed at the last session of Congress, 
are now laws, and will doubtless lead to much mining ac- 
tivity on Indian Reserves. We hope to print in the May 
issue the regulations of the Seeretary of the Interior rela- 
tive to prospecting in the Indian Reservations. 


“Ducky Oil Cans’’ are made of 22-gage cold-rolled 
steel with a brass cap, and a three-ply close-twisted steel 
cable, asbestos packed, flexible tube spout, and are so con- 
structed that liquids as light as gasoline can be used with- 
out leaking thru the tubing. This can is used to oil any 
place that is hard to get at or which an ordinary rigid 
spout will not reach. 

April, 1921 Page Forty-five 




















ASBESTOS 














Benjamin Franklin said, “A penny 
saved is a penny earned.” 


If it costs you $10,000 to put Carey pipe 
and beiler coverings in your plant, they 
will save you $10,000 in fuel in less than 
a year and make you a $10,000 yearly 
saving thereafter. 

Is that an expense or an investment? 
All your Building material and insulat- 
ing material requirements that call for 
asbestos can be met from the comprehen- 
sive line of 


ASBESTOS & ASPHALT PRODUCTS 


85% MAGNESIA 


THE PHILIP CAREY COMPANY 
Wayne Avenue, Lockland, Cincinnati 


U. S. A. 

















Page Forty-sia April, 1921 

















ASBESTOS 





Conditions In Various Markets 
Wire 

The Standard Underground Cable Company, in com- 
menting on the copper situation as affecting fine brass and 
copper wire, says: 

In anticipation of more drastic curtailment of mine 
operations, copper prices have advanced fractionally in the 
last ten days, the total gain thus far (to April Ist) being 
approximately three quarter cent per pound. 

Definite announcements of practically complete shut- 
down were made on March 29th by Utah, Ray, Chino, Ne- 
vada and Anaconda Copper Companies and partial shut- 
down by other producers, because of the low price and 
large stock of unsold copper in this country. It seems 
likely, therefore, that prices will have some further ad- 
vance rather than decline in the immediate future. 


Bands. 

The Ritter Can & Specialty Company have consented 
to give us each month information as to conditions in the 
pipe covering band market. Under date of March 10th, 
they say: 

In view of present market conditions in our industry, 
we would not advise the purchase of any great quantity of 
Pipe Covering Bands, since there is a possibility of a de- 
cline in the market price of tin plate and other sheet me- 
tals within the next thirty to sixty days. Buyers who are 
able to make purchases of quantities on a differential basis, 
however, are more or less protected. 

Later, on April 1st, we receive the following report: 

The market price of $7.00 per base box for tin plate 
still prevails. Just at present, the sentiment among the 
steel men is toward strengthening the market. Our opinion 
is that volume purchases should be made on a differential 
basis, as indications point to a decline in the market price 
the second half. 


April, 1921 Page Forty-seven 






















ASBESTOS 





















_ Asbestos Susman 
of Canada, Limited 


The Largest Producers of 
Raw Asbestos in the World 


Kings Mines, Thetford Mines, 


Beaver Mince, 


B. C. Mines, 


260 St. James St., Montreal 


1) 


0 


CRUDES 
SPINNING FIBRES 
SHINGLE STOCKS 
PAPER STOCKS 


Mines 


Black Lake, 
Fraser Mines, E. Broughton, 


Head Office 


General Office 


THETFORD MINES 
Quebec, Canada 


Quebec 








e Forty-eight 











April, 1921 





wn 
e) 
be 
7) 
od 
6 
7.) 
< 





1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 


Wigur 


Many 


Crude 


No. 1, 


Tons. 


1,087 
1,817 
1,400 
1,941 
2,140 
1,336 
2,734 
3,073 


es supplied by the 


Asbestos Production in Canada. 


FROM 


Mill 
Stock 
No. 1, 


Crude 
No. 2, 


Tons. 
5,757 
10,313 
6,340 
3,682 
2.870 | 14,056 
2,812 | 10,485 
2,631 12,502 
2,885 | 11,768 
3,603 | 13,197 
1,896 | 13,559 
2,991 13,764 


No. 
No. 


Mitt Stock 
Mitt STrock 
MILL rOCcK 


No. 


readers 


Mill 
Stock 
No. 2, 


Tons. 


19,029 
44 
35,991 
32,689 
29,525 
32,847 
36,945 
43,870 
54,072 
32,412 

| 69,868 | 


| 


may have them, 
ference at any 


Tons. 


36,620 
22,071 
55,111 
69,097 
88,018 
59,92 

58,303 
71,743 
64,609 
92,700 
48,136 


of our readers may have seen the figures 
we publish them so that all our 
you will have them for ready re 


time. 


Total 
Produc- 
tion 
Fibre 


0 
102,224 


133,33! 
137,242 
142,: 


135,862 


io 


1909 vo 1919 INCLUSIVE 


=< 


by 


and that 


Total 
of 
Value 
$ 
2,296,584 
7,829 


Ave. 
Value 
per 

ton, 


9,019,89° 


10,982,289 


1—Known as Long or Spinning Fibres. 


2—Known as Shingle and Magnesia 
8—Known 2aper Stock and Short Fibi 


Asbestos & Mineral 


as 
Cor por 


ation. 


Stocks. 


given in the following 


Total 
Rock 


Milled, 
Tons. 


977,452 


992 


1,813,961 
1,947,424 
2,239,249 
2,078,883 
2,502,436 


tabulation, but 
publication in ASBESTOS 


Rock 
Mined and 
Hoisted, 


Tons. 
1,163,634 | 
2,035,705 | 
1,759,064 
1,870,¢ 


} 


2,127,395 


2,134,078 | 


| 2 291,087 


2,634,410 | 
2,445,745 
3,061,6 


% 

Fibre, 
per ton 
Rock, 
\lilled. 


-nine 


Page Forty 


April, 1921 


























ASBESTOS 








CARD CLOTHING 


is one of the most important accessories in 
preparing your asbestos. 


Have you tried our special woven foundation 
that combines exceptional strength and dur- 


ability ? 


The mills using it say it is far superior to any 
they have ever had for carding asbestos. 


“HOWARD BROS. MEG. CO. | 


Manufacturers of Card Clothing since 1866 
44-46 VINE ST. 


Worcester, Mass. 
U. S. A. 

















Page Fifty April, 1921 








= 





— 


21 

















ASBESTOS 


More Facts About Russia and 
Her Asbestos Production 


The Russian Economie Bulletin, the official organ of 
the American Russian Chamber of Commerce, gives us a 
few very interesting facts concerning the Russian Asbes- 
tos Industry. 

Asbestos was discovered in Russia in 1720, and a fac- 
tory for the making of asbestos products was in operation 
in the Urals in the days of Peter the Great. Want of a 
market for its output, however, kept this venture from be- 
ing a success. With the beginning of Canada’s asbestos in- 
dustry, the industry revived in Russia, about 1800. Prac- 
tically the entire Russian asbestos output was exported to 
Germany. 

Comparison of Russia’s output with that of other as- 
bestos producing countries over a period of 17 years is 
very interesting. It follows: 

Output in Metric tons 
from 1902 to 1919 


Re rere ree 1,425,568 
ERE ne ere 170,856 
IN a aie oie 39,667 
ee MD no ck ccewrcase 34,626 
Cape of Good Hope ....... 25,182 
BMG SUOMUUEE oi ccccccsccs 3,378 
0 eee ere 2,542 
i stitcceiebcnwaheb eee 1,456 
DE. cewceeustcckeoueww ast 84 
I ee ee a oe eee 40 


this table showing that in normal times Russia ranked see- 
ond. 

With the beginning of the war Russia’s production 
decreased rapidly, her place as second in annual produe- 
tion being taken by Africa, and at present, under the Bol- 
shevik regime her industry is at a standstill. 

Competent observers are of the opinion that the treaty 
negotiated between England and the Lenines Russian Gov- 
ernment indicates that Russia will be back in the Asbestos 
market intelligently within a year or two. 

Mr. Fedor F. Foss of the Russian Embassy, Wash- 


April, 1921 Page Fifty-one 








ASBESTOS 


ington, has, at our request given us a few very interesting 
thoughts on the subject. He says: 

‘*Production of Asbestos in Russia was on the increase 
until 1913, when the export to foreign countries (mostly 
Germany and England) was available. In 1914 the export 
practically stopped and the mining decreased, as asbestos 
was not a first class essential for the war. 

‘*In 1915 and 1916 the mines were running to half 
capacity and in 1917 came to a standstill when the revolu- 
tion broke out. As far as I can see from the publications 
issued in Soviet Russia, about the economic and industrial 
life, there are no signs of the revival of the Industry. 

‘*To make it easier to understand such an outcome 
with this second class, so to speak, industry, I quote the 
figures of production: 

‘**For coal in 1920—about four million tons instead of 
forty-four million tons in 1913. 

**For pig iron 70,000 tons instead of 4,200,000 tons in 
1913. 

‘*For copper, none, instead of forty thousand tons in 
1913. 

‘‘New locomotives, none, instead of 1800 in 1912. 

**Salt, twenty-six thousand tons in 1920 instead of two 
million tons in 1914. 

‘‘These figures will show you that in the ‘socialistic 
paradise’ there is no time to think about such unessentials 
as asbestos.’’ 





Diatomaceous Earth 


Much is heard from time to time of the use 
of Diatomaceous Earth for heat insulation purposes. 

The United States Bureau of Mines describes Diatoma- 
ceous Earth in the following manner: It is a soft, white, 
porous rock, composed of the siliceous skeletons of small 
aquatic plants called diatoms. There are a very large num- 
ber of types and varieties of diatoms, over 4,000 distinct 
forms having been noted and described. These may vary 
in size from as much as the head of a pin to such minute 
proportions as to be distinguished only with the aid of the 
highest powered microscope. 

The chemical analysis of diatomaceous earth from the 


Page Fifty-two April, 1921 














Li 


he 








ASBESTOS 











ASBESTOS FIBRE 


FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF 


Asbestos Millboard 

Asbestos Paper 

High Temperature Cements 
Pipe Coverings 

Asbestos Shingles and Lumber 
Insulating Cements 

Fibrous Paints 

Filtration Packings 

Roofing Cements 


at 


THE QUEBEC ASBESTOS 
CORPORATION 
Office and Mines 
East Broughton, Province of Quebec 


Canada 


















April, 1921 Page Fifty-three 














Ome ASBESTOS 


Lompoc, California, district, is given as follows: 


Silica (SiO2) 88.78 
Alumina (Al2Qs3) 2.68 
Iron Oxide (Fe2Qs) trace 


Lime (CaQ) 1.61 
Potash (K20) a 4 
Soda (NazOQ) 


Magnesia (MgO) 1.30 
Titanium oxide (TiO:z) 0.10 
Water (He) 5.54 

100.01 


Imports and Exports of Asbestos 


Imports of Crude Asbestos for January, 1921 were 
as follows: 


England 121 tons $20,159 
Br. South Africa 152 tons 22.854 
Port. South Afriea 134 tons 72,162 





407 tons $115,175 
excluding, of course, those from Canada. 

Imports of manufactured goods amounted to $23,347, 
divided among the following countries: 


ee rere $1,029 
I so doeeiitginy Sartre 2,897 
Switzerland .......... 1,155 
er ee 14,455 
Pep Saar 3,811 


It is interesting to note that the imports of manufac- 
tured goods in January, 1920 amounted to $39,775, of 
which $39,397 came from England and $378 from Seotland. 

Exports of Manufactured Goods for January 1921 to- 
talled $367,247, as against $97,852, last year. An item of 
interest in this year’s January exports is $11,000 to Ger- 
many. England took $18,372, Belgium - $262, Sweden 
$10,112. Comparison of these figures with imports as 
given above shows some interesting contrasts. 


Page Fifty-four April, 1921 











Api 





re 








ASBESTOS 














a 


ASBESTOS 





Bonnett Martin 
fishestos and 
Chrome lines 


LIMITED 


ot 


Head Office 
Thetford Mines, P. Q. 
Canada 


General Sales Office 
220 Broadway, New York 


Mines Located at 


Thetford Mines and Vimy Ridge 








April, 1921 









Page Fifty-five 























STOS 





AS BE 

—_— ee 

| When you require 

Asbestos Machinery 
you should think of 


“SMITH & FURBUSH” 























We have built practically all the 
yarn-spinning equipment for Asbestos 
in this country. 


Circulars and further particulars on request. 


SMITH & FURBUSH 
MACHINE CoO. 





Philadelphia Penna. 





Page Fifty-six April, 1921 














ASBESTOS8B —""™ 











| News of General Interest 


























921 








The annual meeting of the Western Society of Engineers 
will be held in Chicago in June. 

The Proprietary Association, composed of more than 200 
manufacturers of proprietary medicines, are planning to drive 
from the market the manufacturers of medicines of such high 
alcoholic percentage that they are used as beverages. 





Paul M. Tyler of the U. S. Tariff Commission, sailed on 
March 10th for England, where he expects to spend about two 
months, thence going to France, Belgium and Germany. The 
main object of Mr. Tyler’s mission is in connection with various 
metal manufactures, but it is probable that he will devote 
some little time to investigation of the asbestos industry. 





Automobiles registered in the United States in 1920, ac- 
cording to the American Automobile Association, totalled 9,180,- 
316, an increase of 2,114,870 over 1919. Passenger cars number- 
ed 8.234.490 and motor trucks 945,826. 

Chief Justice White of the Supreme Court, under date of 
February 28th, ordered a reargument of the bill of the Ameri- 
can Hardwood Lumber Association from the lower court de- 
cree, which granted an injunction restraining certain activities 
in which the Association engaged. 





The American Bureau of Shipping states at the present 
time 445 ships having 1,742,590 gross tons, are under construct- 
ion divided as follows: 380 ships, 1,253,184 tons, on private ac- 
count, and 65 ships, 507,415 tons, on Government account. It is 
also encouraging to note that several of the leading steamship 
companies such as the Munson Steamship Lines, The Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine Company and the Pacific Steamship 
Company have plans already drawn for new passenger ships 
and it is expected that with the reorganization of the Shipping 
Board, March 4, and the consequent formation of a sane and 
farsighted policy, contracts for these ships as well as for 
others now contemplated, will be placed. 

Merchandising consists in selling people more than they 
think they want for more than they expect to pay. 

To Mr. Edison, who is trying to make an instrument so 
delicate and responsive that it may be manipulated by the 
Spirits of the departed, Fred Hirschfeld makes the helpful sug- 
gestion that it consist largely of asbestos. 


April, 1921 Page Fifty-seven 








































A 





SBES TOS 











ASBESTOS 
PROPDVUVCTsS 


SX @ V4 
S Sal-Mo osm 


PAPER 
PLAIN and CORRUGATED | Asbes tos P rod ucts 


SPECIAL GRADES 












MILL BOARD 
we - — pa are 
TUBES 
PACKINGS GASKETS D 
a4 x ependable Goods 
Y we 


SALMO 


PRooucTs 4 
Manufacturers of 
SAL-MO (flat) Asbestos Paper in Rolls 36 in. 
wide weighing approximately 100 Ibs. each. 
Also smaller rolls, and special widths. 


SAL-MO (corrugated) Aircell Asbestos Paper 
in Rolls 36 in. wide containing 250 sq. ft. each. 
SAL-MO Asbestos Millboard in sheets 42 in. by ¢ 
48 in. put up in crates weighing about 450 lbs. 


Also eut to size. t 





each. In various thicknesses 


Your inquiries will receive prompt 
and courteous attention 


Sall Niountain 


ce cD PIT FwX Arm yS 

305 So. La Salle Street ps 
CHICAGO 

NEW YORK CITY BOSTON, MASS. 


141 W. 20th. St. Scranton, Pa. 268 State St. q 


























April, 1921 





Page Fifty-eight 























ASBESTOS 











| News of the Industry 




















R. P. Doucet, General Sales Manager of the Asbestos Cor- 
poration of Canada, Limited, who recently suffered an attack of 
pleurisy, has recovered and has sailed for Europe. 

“ASBESTOS” recently had the pleasure of welcoming to its 
office, George C. Williamson of the National Magnesia Mfg. 
Company, San Francisco. 

Our readers will be glad to hear that Sir John W. Carson, 
is slowly but surely improving. 


The Sterling Asbestos Company, 406 Main St., Camden, N. 
J., is starting in the manufacture of a combination copper and 
asbestos gasket. C. Hettinger is manager of this Company. 


The Gillett Asbestos Company has been incorporated with 
$50,000 capital, offices at 2735 Prospect Ave., Cleveland, and will 
specialize in insulating materials. Harry Gillett is President of 
the Company. 





S. A. Halpern, formerly with the Binger Company, in charge 
of sales promotion, window trim department, is now with the 
National Asbestos Mfg. Company, Jersey City, having charge of 
sales promotion in the pipe covering division. 


Major N. E. Newman, President of Asbestos Limited, sailed 
on April 7th for a three month’s trip to Europe. 


John O. Bigelow of Newark, has been appointed receiver for 
the Asbestos Air Brake Company by Vice-Chancellor Buchanan 
of New Jersey. 





The American Insulation Company of Philadelphia, had a 
very attractive exhibit at the American Marine Exposition held 
in Philadelphia from March 14th to 19th. An attractive pamph- 
let under the title “The American Way—Supreme in Service” 
was given to inquirers, and would no doubt prove of interest to 
many of our readers. 

H. H. Robertson, President of the H. H. Robertson Company 
of Pittsburg, sailed on March 22nd, for England. Mr. Robertson 
expects to spend about six weeks in England and France. 


The Asbestos Corporation of Canada has declared the usual 
quarterly dividends of 1%% on the common and 1%% on the 
Preferred stocks, both payable April 15 to holders of record 
April 1st. 








Jacob A. Jacobs, President of Asbestos Mines Limited, has 
April, 1921 Page Fifty-nine 














ASBESTOS 


recovered from an attack of pneumonia and spent the Easter 
holidays in Atlantic City, N. J. 

Glenn R. Lassiter of the Conneross Yarn Mill, Anderson, §. 
C., recently visited the offices of “ASBESTOS”, but unfortun- 
ately, both the Editor and his Associates were out of the office 
at the time. We hope Mr. Lassiter will try again with better 
luck. ance 

“ASBESTOS” was honored a few days ago by a visit from 
A. S. Farmer, President of the Conneross Yarn Mill at Ander- 
son, S. C. 





The Black Lake Asbestos & Chrome Company is now con- 
trolled by Jacob A. Jacobs, his associates in the enterprise being 
Leon Schinasi, Maurice Amado and N. E. Newman, all of New 
York City. Further details concerning this arrangement will be 
found on page 23. 


Regular six per cent dividend, interest on Second Mortgage 
income bonds of the Black Lake Asbestos & Chrome Company, 
due for the six months ending December 31st, is reported ready 
for payment. 








A Canadian newspaper recently carried the following item: 
An important commercial case has been decided in the Superior 
Court by Mr. Justice Pouliot. C. H. Chouillou ordered asbestos 
from Johnson & Co. on an agreement that there should be 
prompt delivery. The asbestos was to have been shipped to 
France. Johnson & Co. found that there would be delay so con- 
sidered their contract annulled. The court ruled that the com- 
pany had taken too much responsibility on themselves. Judg- 
ment was given plaintiff with $22,280 damages. 


The Asbestos Installation Corporation, 24 Albany St., New 
York City, which Corporation was formed last November by the 
firm of Fowler & Martin of Brooklyn, reports a steady increase 
in business. Their operations at present are confined principally 
to shipyard work in the New York Harbor, but will probably 
branch out to other insulation work before long. Theo. V. Mar- 
tin is superintendent of the concern. 


The Sall Mountain Company of Chicago, will have an ex- 
hibit in the Home Beautiful Exposition, Mechanics Building, 
Boston, to be held from April 16th to 30th. The readers of 
“ASBESTOS” will be cordially welcomed. 


Paul J. Krez & Company, leading Chicago contractors and 
dealers in all kinds of insulating materials, pipe and boiler cov- 
erings, asbestos shingles, asbestos lumber, asbestos paper and 
millboards, etc., have reorganized under the name Paul J. Krez 
Company, under the charter laws of Illinois, with a large cap 
italization. Paul J. Krez is President and Treasurer of the new 
company, and John J. Krez, son of Paul J., is Secretary. The 


Page Sixty April, 1921 














ze 
LY; 
ly 


und 


ind 
rez 
‘ap 
ew 
The 


921 





ASBESTOS 











If You Were Asked to Pay $2.50: 


for This Book You Would 
Appreciate It. 


It is a practical, popular treatise on the proper insulat- 
ing of pipes, boilers, tanks, filters and all other high-pres- 
sure steam equipment. The book is freely illustrated 
with views of a great variety of applications, has numer- 
ous charts, tables, etc. Your request for a complimen- 
tary copy puts you under no obligation whatever, but the 
expense of preparing this practical volume has been such 
that a copy should be asked for only by those really in- 
terested in power and heating economy. 





SINAN EE EAE AAA AU AAPA 











George D. Crabbs 
Alvin M. Ehret 
J. R. Swift - 





April, 1921 


MAGNESIA ASSOCIATION of AMERICA 


721 Bulletin Bldg., Philadelphia, Penna. 


EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, Wm. A. Macan, Chairman 


The Philip Carey Co. - 
Ehret Magnesia Mfg. Co. - Valley Forge, Pa. 
The Sean 

R.V. Mattison, Jr. Keasbey & Mattison Co. - - - Ambler, Pa. 





~ “owes 4 


—af 






Cincinnati, Ohio 


lin Mfg.Co. - - Franklin, Pa. 


UU 


Magnesia Ass'n. of America 
721 Bulletin Bldg., Phila., Pa 


I am interested in the insu- 
lation of steam-heated pipes 
and surfaces and would like to 
have a copy of the latest edi- 
tion of “Defend Your Steam.” 


Name 


Position 


Address 


HE 


QUUEELEUOL ADE EL ANAL ENED OU ALON AU AU ADA AT AAA 


Page Sixty-one 

















ASBESTOS 


change was made in order to secure the advantages of the cor- 
porate entity, and will doubtless result in a more widely extend- 
ed business. 


U. G. Funk, Treasurer of the Keasbey & Mattison company, 
Ambler, Pa., has just recovered from a rather severe attack of 
erysipelas. 





The United Asbestos & Packing Company, Chicago, has 
been merged with the United States Asbestos Comwpany, the 
successful textile manufacturing institution at Lancaster pro- 
ducing the Usaco brand of Asbestos Textiles and Packings. The 
Chicago Branch will be operated as a separate corporation un- 
der the title United States Asbestos Company of Illinois. 

George L. Hammons, whose twenty years active experience 
in the marketing of Asbestos Products is well and favorably 
known, will be President and Treasurer of the new company. 
The board of Directors consists of S. R. Zimmerman, Chester 
L. Hill and George L. Hammons. 

The personnel of the company, James G. Ross, W. L. Griffin 
and A. F. Morrison, and other heads of departments, sales and 
office assistants, will continue their respective positions. 

The change is a notable one and primarily due to the fact 
that the Asbestos business of Chicago and the West has grown 
to such an extent that this amalgamation is necessary in order 
to better serve the trade and market the standard products of 
the United States Asbestos Company. 


The directors of Consolidated Asbestos Limited have de- 
clared the regular quarterly dividend of 1-%4%, payable April 
15th to holders of record March 31st. 


Announcement is made by the Asbestos Shingle, Slate & 
Sheathing Company, Ambler, Pa., to the effect that it has taken 
over the sale of its own products, viz: Ambler Asbestos “Cen- 
tury” Shingles, Asbestos Corrugated Sheathing, Asbestos Build- 
ing Lumber and Linabestos Wall Board, these materials having 
been previously marketed thru the Keasbey & Mattison Com: 
pany. 


The March issue neglected to state the name of the moving 
picture prepared by the pipe and boiler covering manufacturers. 
It is being shown under the title “A Dollar Saved is a Dollar 
Earned” and shows in a very attractive manner the saving 
which results from insulating pipes and boilers. 


The Asbestos Shingle, Slate & Sheathing Company of Am- 
bler, Pa., had a very attractive exhibit at the Real Estate & 
Building Exposition held in Philadelphia from Mar 28 to Apr. 2. 


Page Sizty-two 





April, 1921 




















ASBESTOS = 





oOo = = ot we 


oe ee es ~ 





| Consolidated Asbestos | 


Limited 


MINES AT 


THETFORD MINES, QUEBEC, CANADA 
ROBERTSONVILLE, QUEBEC, CANADA 








Miners of all Grades 


ASBESTOS 
CRUDE and 
FIBRE 








EXECUTIVE OFFICES 


Dominion Express Building 
145 St. James St. 
Montreal, Canada 




















Page Sixty-three 








ASBESTOS 


A very valuable little book has just been issued by the 
General Asbestos & Rubber Company of Charleston, S. C. The 
Garco Data Book on Brake Lining and Clutch Facing, after 
briefly describing Garco materials, gives explicit directions for 
relining brakes and two very useful tables, the first table listing 
alphabetically cars, trucks, tractors and motorcycles, and giv- 
ing brake and clutch facing specifications for models not over 
six years old, while the second one shows the various sizes of 
brake linings and disc clutch facings, and under each size lists 
cars, trucks, tractors and motorcycles which can be fitted with 
that size. The immense amount of work necessary to compile 
such a book will undoubtedly be repaid by the material apprec- 
iation of repairers, garagemen, dealers and jobbers, who will 
find it invaluable. 








W. E. Steelman Company, dealers in Asbestos and Magnes- 
ia materials, have just issued a very attractive pamphlet on 
“Wesco” Fireproof Products. 








A. S. Farmer, President of Conneross Yarn Mill at Ander- 
son, S. C., has returned to his business activities after a year 
and a half spent in Florida and California for the benefit of his 
health. 

The Quebec Asbestos Corporation at East Broughton has 
closed the No. 2 Mill, formerly the Asbestos Fibre Mining Com- 
pany property, but are operating the No. 1 Mill. 

Royal Mattison, Vice President of the Asbestos Shingle, 
Slate & Sheathing Company, Ambler, Pa., has returned after 
spending some time in Florida. 

The Asbestos Insulation & Roofing Company, Philadelphia, 
has been incorporated with a capital of $25,000 to manufacture 
asbestos products. W. G. Dickinson, 4229 North Sixth St., Phila- 
delphia, is treasurer. 


Johnson’s Asbestos Company has closed the Black Lake 
pit entirely, and is operating the Thetford mine under capacity. 

The marriage of Miss Beatrice Minor, Drexel Hill, Pa., to 
Maurice J. Hoover, on April 12th, is announced. Mr. Hoover is 
Secretary of Keasbey & Mattison Company, Ambler, Pa. 

The Martin-Bennett Company is still entirely closed down, 
Mr. Bennett having returned from Europe and Mr. Martin from 
his southern trip. 


Last minute reports from Thetford indicate that the Asbes- 
tos Corporation of Canada has ceased nightwork at the King’s, 
Beaver and British Canadian pits, while the Fraser Mine, which 
has been under repair since last November is closed down en- 
tirely. 


Page Sixty-four April, 1921 




















“ASBESTOS 




















ELWOOD J. WILSON 


Mining Engineer 








76 CORTLANDT STREET 
New York City 


Asbestos Crude and 
Fibre for Sale 


Thetford Crudes, Rhodesian Crudes 
Rhodesian Carded Crudes 


for immediate shipment, ex warehouse N. Y. 


CHRYSOTILE ASBESTOS ONLY 


Will Examine and Report on 
Asbestos Mines and Prospects 
Anywhere 


Correspondence desired with Owners of 
Asbestos Mines with a view of Purchase 








April, 





1921 Page Sixty-five 

















ASBESTOS 
Afterthoughts 


The other day a gentleman in sending his renewal to 
ASBESTOS and a dollar bill in payment, mentioned that he 
was sending ‘‘real money for a real magazine.”’ 

We get a little rose like that every once in a while and 
—confidentially, once in a greater while we get an egg. We 
appreciate both, however, altho perhaps we do not enthuse 
quite as much over the latter as the former. But if people do 
throw eggs once in a while, we have the satisfaction of 
knowing that they read Aspestos and are interested in it, 
else the complaint or criticism would not come. Send them 
along, friends, both eggs and roses—they both help. 

As we glance over the proof this month it seems to us 
that April’s issue is brimful of information, some merely 
interesting, other of importance. 

The article concerning Mr. Jacobs will, we know, be 
read with a great deal of interest. We would have liked to 
have had more information about Mr. Jacobs’ early life, 
but he seems to be unusually modest for it was impossible 
to learn even the name of his birthplace. A great many 
heads of Asbestos Companies are evidently afflicted with the 
same disease—modesty—for we have tried times without 
number to secure biographical information concerning cer- 
tain gentlemen who are prominent in the Industry but 
without success. A biographical sketch each month would be 
quite an improvement to the magazine; the next time we 
write you for such a sketch, please don’t turn us down. 

The short article on Russia will help us to better un- 
derstand conditions in that field. 

Next month we have a real treat for you. An engineer, 
well qualified for the task has prepared for us a most able 
paper on ‘‘ Past and Present Methods of Mining and Milling 
Asbestos.’’ Because of limited space it will be necessary to 
run the article in three sections, but it will be broken in 
such a way that each section will constitute an article in it- 
self. 

And finally, we hope you will enjoy reading the April 
issue as much as we have enjoyed preparing it. It is a con- 
stant source of pleasure to dig up facts and figures of in- 
terest—and every day we learn something about Asbestos 
or the Asbestos Industry which we never knew before. 





Page Sixty-sir April, 1921 
































ASBESTOS 



















QUALI” PACKINGS 





United States Ashestos Company 
General Office: Danraster, Pa. 
Mills at Manheim, Pa. 


Manufacturers of asbestos yarns and 
fabrics, also packings and friction fac- 
ings. 


Sold exclusively to manufacturers of 
rubber goods, packings, and brake lin- 
ings, and to distributors of asbestos 
materials on a quantity basis. 


WSLS 


My 


Branches 


Nem York Boston 






























April, 1921 Page Sixty-seven 











ASBESTOS 












— 


Lief BRas 
Se, 


1M PER! 















Asbestos 
Asbestos 
Asbestos 
Asbestos 
Asbestos 
Asbestos 
Asbestos 
Asbestos 
Asbestos 


Paper 

Roll Board 
Mill Board 
Packings 


Pipe Coverings 


Blocks 
Cements 
Roofings 


built-up-Roofing Felts 


Asphalt Roofings 
Asphalt Felts 


Slate Top Roofings 
Slate Top Shingles 
Coal Tar Felts 

Coal Tar Products 


H. F. WATSON CO. 


Main Office and Factories 


Erie, Pa. 319 N. Wetts St. 


79 Mik Sr. 
| CHICAGO 


Boston 














Page Sixty-eight 


April, 1921 








| 














Established 1897 


Ehret Magnesia Mfg. Co. 


Valley Forge - Pennsylvania 


Manufacturers 
of 
EHRET’S 
85% Magnesia Pipe & Boiler Coverings 
85‘« Magnesia Plastic 
Powdered Carbonate of Magnesia 


Plant and Executive Offices 
VALLEY ForaGe, Pa. 


Branches— 
New YorK — PHILADELPHIA — CHICAGO 


Representatives—In all principal cities 





































BAD YEARS. 


1820. 
(From an old tombstone). 
He died the year the locusts came— 
The land with blight was saddened ; 
He fell from th: roof of the old barn frame— 
He’d starved to death if he hadn’t. 


1920. 


(From Everybody’s Diary). 


He lived the year of reconstruction, 
Cancellations, slumps and general reduction— 
Over half he had went up the flue, 
But, thank the Lord—he did come through. 


—‘Empire Gazette.’’ 











Robinson P 
Hatboro, Pa.