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THE IRON TRADE 





EVIEW 














VoLUME XXIV. 


CLEVELAND, O., 


OCTOBER 1, 1891. NUMBER 40. 








Tue IRON TRADE REVIEW. 


A IOURNAL OF THE 
[RON AND STEEL INDUSTRY, THE MACHINERY TRADE AND KINDRED INTERESTS 
IS PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY 


THE IRON TRADE REVIEW CO., 
27, 29 and 31 Vincent Street, Cleveland, Ohio. 








TERMS, (strictly in advance): 








Three montha......... 


Advertising Rates Furnished on Application. 








ENTERED AT THE POST OFFICE AT CLEVELAND, O., AS SECOND CLASS MATTER. 








CLEVELAND, O., OCTOBER 1, I89QI. 


THE WEEK IN IRON CIRCLES. 











One of the best evidences of the growing strength of 
the money market is the fact that the recent heavy 
failures in New York have been quickly overcome by the strong 
wave of confidence which is sweeping the country. T'wo months 
ago the same influences might have been disastrous. The general 
business situation continues good, hot weather during the past ten 
days having carried the corn crop almost entirely out of danger from 
early frosts, and the need in many sections now is for bountiful rains 
‘to break the continued drouth. As the week closes the outlook is 
good for free selling of pig metal during balance of the year, but the 
evidence accumulating indicates that while prices might fluctuate 
somewhat there is likely to be but little materialchange. Some sur- 
prise is expressed that the current demand should be equal to the 
current rate of production, which is very near tothe top notch. The 
fact that this is the case, in spite of the very small consumption by 
railroads and allied industries, is deemed a strong argument for a 
better iron market. Consumption was never so large for miscel- 
laneous purposes in the history of the country as it is at present. 
Iron pipe, stoves, agricultural machinery, architectural work, etc., 
are calling for more iron than ever before in the history of those 
trades. At Cincinnati a good deal of business has been placed by all 
leading sellers since our last report. No material change is to be 
noted in prices. Concessions that were common a month ago are 
impossible to obtain, unless for occasional lots for spot delivery and 
cash. Grey forge is generally firmly held at $10 at Birmingham ; 
some sales for next year’s deliveries have been made on that basis ; 
none are reported at the advanced price for this year’s deliveries. 
Northern irons have not felt the improved spirit as much as Southern, 
perhaps because they were not as much depressed during the low 
prices. There is a disposition, however, not to take forward con- 
tracts unless at higher prices. Charcoal irons are not in improved 
demand, though better things are expected before long. Softeners 
are moving out more freely than for some time past. Old car wheels 
are becoming scarce and have advanced $2 per ton from lowest 
prices. Considerable activity in the way of sales of pig metal has 
characterized the Chicago market during the past week; a number 
of round deals have been closed on both Northern and Southern 
cokes, a noticeable degree of activity having existed on the latter. 
Grades sold have been mainly Nos. 2 and 3 Foundry and grey 
forge; prices have in nearly every case ranged below what has 
been considered as the bottom market—more than this some 


General Features 


exceptionally long deliveries have been made, one sale 
of 600 or 800 tons grey forge have been taken by a 
prominent Southern furmace for deliveries running twelve 


months beginning with October, and even this deal was put through 
on the basis of bottom figures, no advance in price being secured 
even for the long-scattered delivery. Transactions on Lake Superior 
charcoal iron have been light ; some deals, however, have been put 
through with car wheel manufacturers and car builders; prices made 
on these sales have been close. Southern charcoal is in better de- 
mand and inquiries are in for some round lots for deliveries running 





well into next year. Furnaces making metal of this class are, how- 
ever, conservative, and while willing to sell at close prices for deliv- 
ery during the next ninety days, are indisposed to book long running 
contracts unless at a fair price. The activity noted in our last 
Detroit report has not diminished during the week, and buyers have 
shown a willingness to make contracts extending as far into next 
year as they can at present prices. However, when furnaces ask a 
premium for deliveries beyond the first of the year they decline to 
pay it. While some furnaces are booking orders for deliveries ex- 
tending for six to mine months, others will not quote for delivery 
beyond the present year. More demand is being made- for strong 
Ohio irons than at any time within the past year. This may be par- 
tially accounted for by some furnaces, whose irons are well and 
favorably known to the trade, having again announced their inten- 
tions of entering the list of active competitors in this market. Lake 
Superior charcoal is active and firm. Southern furnaces willing 
to contract for early part of next year have had no trouble to close 
several large deals. Ohio soft irons are in good demand and an 
advance of twenty-five cents has been made on a few favorite brands. 
Orders for iron for delivery this year have been steady in the Louis- 
ville market during the week, and there has been quiet buying in 
quantities of 500 to 1,000 tons. No increase in price, however, has 
taken place, as the buying would not justify it, nor has any anxiety 
been expressed by buyers that purchases could not be made on basis 
of prices that have existed for some time. Car wheel irons have been 
quiet, and those sold have been at prices that are regarded by many 
as much below cost. Railroad buying has not increased to any 
extent and it is felt that until a strong movement from this source 
begins, prices will drag, when one considers the large amount of 
charcoal iron in stock. 

For a few days this week it looked as though there 
were a change in store for the pig iron market, and the 
possibilities are not wholly excluded that such might 
be the case; but for the present the excitement has died away, and 
things are practically unchanged. Early this week reports were re- 
ceived to the effect that the furnaces in the Mahoning and Shenango 
valleys had shut down, owing to the demand on the part of their em- 
ployes for a ten per cent. advance in the price of labor. As the pres- 
ent price of pig iron is about the lowest ever known—Bessemer sell- 
ing as low as $14.75 at the furnace—such a demand at this time was 
equivalent to a general shut-down, since it meant an increase in the cost 
of production of fifteen cents a ton. The general impression among 
local furnacemen was that the report was founded on fact, but at this 
writing it is learned that the only furnaces affected are six stacks in 
Sharpsville, having a total capacity of, say, five thousand tons of 
metal a week. The demand, it seems, is not general in the valley, but 
it is nevertheless reported that it was granted in Sharon, and some of 
the furnacemen are somewhat disturbed over the affair sinces it serves 
to foreshadow similar events ona larger scale. Yet they all agree that 
a month’s shut-down would benefit the furnace interests in more 
ways than one, and help the market immensely. Lake freights have 
taken a temporary tumble, owing to the customary accumulation in 
Chicago and at the head of the lakes of ore carriers, looking for grain 
charters. Thus these two commodities, ore and grain, continually 
play hide-and-seek with lake freights. When there is a call for grain 
boats, the wild tonnage leaves the ore trade, makes a rush for the 
grain bids, and breaks the market, while the scarcity of boats drives 
up the ore rate. Then the reverse action sets in, and back go the 
boats to the ore business. This week the plethora of grain boats has 
depressed the rate, and Escanaba charters were plenty at ninety-five 
cents. There is little doubt, however, that the market will recover, 
and the closing charters will be decidedly higher. The demand for 
non-Bessemer ores continues, but the producers are in no position to 
sell, for want of carriers as‘much as for any other reason. Moreover, 
the offers for ore are no better in price than the early sales of the 
season, the advance barely covering the higher freights, so that there 
is no inducement to sell at this time, and at the prices offered. 


The Local 


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‘Tem IRON TRADP REvIEw. 








RECORDS OF ORE-CARRYING RAILROADS. 

Instructive figures have been prepared by the Cleveland & Pitts- 
burgh Railroad Company for submission to the municipal authorities 
of Cleveland. They show the receipts of iron ore at Lake Erie ports 
for the past five years by each railroad engaged in the ore-carrying 
trade. The railroads so engaged are the Columbus, Hocking Valley 
& Toledo, the Ohio Central, the Wheeling & Lake Erie, the Balti- 
more & Ohio, the Cincinnati, Sandusky and Cleveland, the Cleve- 
land, Lorain & Wheeling, the New York, Pennsylvania & Ohio 
(Erie), the Cleveland & Pittsburgh, the Valley, the Cleveland, Cin- 
cinnati, Chicago & St. Louis, the Pittsburgh, Painesville & Fair- 
port, the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern, the Pittsburgh, Youngs- 
town & Ashtabula, the Erie & Pittsburgh,-the Philadelphia & Erie, 
the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, and the Lehigh Valley. To 
these is added the Cleveland Rolling Mill Company. These figures 
in the aggregate have already been collated by Zhe /ron Trade 
Review, but this is the first time the details by railroads have ap- 
peared in print. The table follows: 


























Port. Railroad. | 1886. 1887. 1888. 1889. | 1890. 
Toledo.......... 26,793 61,729 75,001 82 a 167,693 
Huron ......... WwW. s s E.. 45,372 21,288 4,351 680) 1,200 
Sandusky..... 157,970 160,00 159,924 186,052) 177,579 
Lorain ......... . 100,852 145,000 197,006 280,0C0} 2%4,230 
Cleveland......N. Y., P 614,642 529,409 512,953 816,812 855,855 
Cleveland.....C. & 283,114 374,674 402,419 578,332| 799,327 
Cleveland..... V y coches Von gebiniigngimenihbeinysisase 144,640 103,219 80,980 110,475) 97,306 
Ir 10 BR ER OU oo cas ccdanenenpaiine ecneneiue] ateneebenasecks 211,293 145,000 199,983) 225,934 
Cleveland.....C., C 5 SES evs leasegnanedieaes BIEEEE .cinsseneseten 6,863) 11,723 
Fairport....... ? 116,565 498,200 6'1,140 829,121) 1,077,483 
Ashiabula.... 252,624 523,414 578,832, 1 039,920) 1,177,626 
Ashtabula.... P 390,489 577,266 704,678 924 "480| 1,005,279 
| eae) a 91,257 210,431 240,000 291,455) 310,180 
|) Se PEE Mp ancinrebncntiasnivoansiuiestbiiswses opxeesy” Scvnsipuneleas | meseabeiibeowdh mxeaqents. ots 82,140} 177,303 
Bu ffalo......... D., L. & W. and Lehigh Valley. |...cccccc.....+| secccsesseesee 240,000 298,000} 516,296 

| — —_— 
SIU Six" Ui cate iii nt Gasisiehiuecdichon bebmaiehiehann sebennntaiics | 2,223,718 3,420,557] 3,952,898 5.757.314) 6,885,017 





From the above its appears that the per cent. of all ore handled 
at each port in 1890 was as follows: Toledo, 2.44; Huron, .o2; San- 
dusky, 2.59; Lorain, 4.13; Cleveland, 28.90; Fairport, 15.65; Ash- 
tabula, 31.70; Erie, 7.08; Buffalo, 7.49. 

From the same figures it seems that the per cent. of increase at 
Cleveland in five years has been 68.12, while the increase in five years 
of the Cleveland & Pittsburgh at Cleveland has been 182.33. 





MELTING IRON BY ELECTRICITY. 

If the claims of the inventor are to be credited a great revolution 
in iron melting is impending. It is related of the inventor, a Mil- 
waukee man, that several years ago he took notice of the great 
amount of coke used in melting iron by the present method. This 
set him to studying in an attempt to discover a method by which the 
cost of melting metal could be cheapened. At first his experiments 
were unsuccessful, but he persevered, and about a month ago he was 
delighted to find that after many tests one had proved successful. 
His method of melting the iron is described as follows by a local 
paper: The metal is placed in a cupola, to which electrical connec- 
tions are made. A switch is turned, which sends a strong current of 
electricity through the metal and forms arcs at each electrode. This 
produces a great heat, which melts the iron very rapidly. The 
molten metal then flows into a receptacle below the cupola, and from 
there it is drawn off for use. The new process saves one-half the 
time and one-half the cost of the present method. It also does away 
with the use of coke, lime and sand. Iron melted by electricity, he 
claims, will be at least 100 per cent. (s7c) purer than that rendered in 
the present way. 

But the inventor’s claims are not received without protest. In 
the first place, a new Richmond has appeared in the field, claiming, 
in a very vigorous newspaper card, that the whole idea was stolen 
from him; and, to cap the climax, still another correspondent comes 
to the front with a mathematical demonstration to show that “the 
melting of iron by electricity cannot be done economically, unless 
some one can produce electricity at less than one-seventieth of its 
present cost.”’ This for the following reasons: 

Thermal unit is the quantity of heat necessary to raise the temperature of 
one pound of water at 32 degrees, one degree—that is from 32 degrees to 33 
degrees. Dr. Ioule found that by the expenditure of one unit of heat, 772 
pounds of weight could be raised one foot high. The mechanical measure of 
heat is therefore taken at 772 pounds and is called Ioule’sunit. This standard 
is accepted by all scientists all over the world. Heat and mechanical energy 
are mutually convertible, and heat requires for its production, or produces by 
its disappearance mechanical energy in the proportion of 772 foot pounds for 
each unit. Specific heat of a body means its capacity for heat, or its power of 
storing heat, or the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of the 
body one degree compared with that required to raise the temperature of an 
equal weight of water one degree. The specific heat of iron is 0.1299, water 








being one. Therefore in order to melt one pound of iron—the iron being 
raised about 2,000 degrees in temperature—it will take 2,000 times 0.1299 units 
of heat or 269 units of heat. Those 260 units are equivalent to a mechanical 
energy of 260 times 772 foot-pouuds or 100,720 foot-pounds. As 33,000 foot- 
pounds are equal to one horse-power, it is evident it would take 100,720: 33,000 
horse-powers or about 3% horse-power of mechanical energy to melt one 
pound ofiron. The very best engines need about two pounds of coal per hour 
for horse-power, or seven pounds for 314 horse-power. In an ordinary cupola 
with one pound of coke ten pounds of iron can be melted, whereas, with elec- 
tricity, only one pound with seven pounds of coal or its 314 horse-power equiv- 
alent mechanical energy—or, in other words, it takes seventy times as much 
fuel to melt iron by electricity as it does by the present method. 


Up to the present writing the inventors have not picked up the 
gage of battle. 





THE SOUTH STANDING THE STRAIN. 

As was to be expected, the close financial times have had the 
effect of checking enterprise in the South, as, indeed, in all parts of 
the country. Nevertheless, the building up of that section has 
shown encouraging progress during the past nine months, as demon- 
strated by the following figures presented by the Manufacturer's 
Record: 

TOR Fe P RCO iicscces soc decccsvcsiecsosnsnccuesssccsncscsnedtassbenesesbwestayses cvbcnesson vevootestbeetsnbosee auvcncasasseseeseecee 6 


Machine shops and foundries... 
Agricultural pene factories 
















Flour nrills... i ose me 40 
Cotton mills . Geen 1 ine elie wae cntnnlix Ciukdgubsnaiouieecen ven ahounioghinen PTE RS PRE ONEIDA 58 
Furniture _e 38 
Ges works.. eoecoses 20 
Water works . eoees mesecesees seeseccceoce 77 
Carriage and wagon “factories... Gidaiaie cena’ okiguhsuetedsonctoareminagpgvedbet’ 26 
Flectric-light plamts...........:--sessssesseesssssssessesesessenennseeensnseneneeanes sencsrssseeaenerersesensssssescsaganssseeees 124 
Mining and quarrying enterprises... 413 
Wood-working factories, including. saw and planing mills, sash and door factories, 
TT a cass cicuns Sisouaraqn sen enibn tn Geni katasuee<Suons iseaueenictuebinseSyediadnbnaaendess speysas casestadeks 376 
BASS BONO 5.0.0, ns. cnsorssenveccvncssovoesonvscssvereses sovesesensadevoens oases evapo seusesnsooas cussenneneou ensectecadecnensd eves 58 
CRIEE TET OEIOG vi snccccvonsessors pucssscovesseessovonenestbepensaneorecnas soeseeseqesnsnbsueves penne <aqursostsvocnousacconessotess 48 
Stove foundries .................00+ . jagocdsatisswbuhihin’ <ubtui pecatteiedenbes 6 
IIIS... 1 ccs hacrieias's catenin snnmabiwantnsucenchiphiots oe sease encase senses cssnsessense reese 129 
Miscellaneous iron and steel wor rolling mills, pipe works, etc... oe 40 
ee BBG vnnicsscsccncouscvcnceschvibentarehoecseconcececconpeckorsiavestins: Sessebiawneseces 18 
Cottonseed-oil mills.. snipe aiaamlabadimadead ssessovavigadvunteiees 28 
Miscellaneous enterprises not included ‘in foregoing.. ap Sania as Che Usiethassinune tukicnaiieaobesienirniens 883 
Total . sonpase vorsestaces SANS 


This es some 700 eo ‘ie. ponurer penay ‘the inennanlle 
period of 1890, and is not so great a falling off as might be expected. 
How many of the enterprises in question were actualized does not 
appear, but no doubt a goodly proportion of them are in operation. 
Concerning the outlook the Record says: 

The manufacturing enterprises in operation have gone along steadily. 
Banking and general business operations, though somewhat restricted, in the 
volume, have stood the financial strain remarkably well. Despite the extreme 
depression in iron, Southern furnaces have generally been running to their 
full capacity and making some profit; cotton mills have been busy, and in 
nearly every line of manufacturing there has been a steady, substantial gain 
even during the great monetary stringency. The way in which the South has 
stood the strain hasssurprised the financial world, and has materially strength- 
ened the confidence of the capitalists of the North in the great future of this 
section. 

Certainly our contemporary has good reason for congratulation. 





MINING TAXES IN MICHIGAN, 

Iron-mining companies will be particularly interested in the 
work of the Michigan State Board of Equalization, just brought to a 
close. ‘The valuation of the State was equalized at $1,130,000,000, an 
increase of $184,550,000 over its value as equalized five years ago. 
This increase includes $75,000,000 worth of mining property which 
will this year be subjected to direct taxation for State purposes for 
the first time. After having adjusted the difficulties which they 
deemed existed between the valuation of the several counties, as 
equalized by the boards of supervisors, and State board added 15 per 
cent. to cover the material growth of the State during the last half 
decade. 

The books of the Auditor-General’s office show that the specific 
taxes received from mines for the past five years averaged $80,000 
per year, and this amount the mining counties as equalized will pay 
in direct taxes. It was also ascertained by the board that the non- 
producing mines valued at $10,000,000, paid nothing in State taxes 
under the old law. These will now pay their proportion of the State 
tax, being directly assessed therefor, on the same value at which they 
were assessed for local purposes. This is, in substance, the state- 
ment of the case, as we find it in a Michigan paper, and we give it as 
an item of general interest. 





Our vigilant contemporary, the Marine Review, figures out that 
the total iron ore shipments from Lake Superior mines up to Sep- 
tember 1, aggregated 3,954,510 tons, as against 5,459.510 tons up to 
September 3, 1890, a decrease during the present season of 1,505,000 
tons. The decrease is about equal to the shortage as compared with 
last year, caused by the delay in the ore movement this year, so that 
the shipments since June 1, of this year, are about equal to those 





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covering a corresponding period of 1890. That the shipments from 
now on to the close of navigation will begin to compare with those 
of last year nobody, of course, expects. 





NATURAL GAS IN INDIANA, 





The Terre Haute Apress sums up the recent agitation in Indiana, over 
the natural gas scare, as follows : 

The dispute as to whether the supply of natural gas in this State is getting 
low has reached that stage where the veracity and the motives of a reputable 
Indianapolis newspaper on one hand, and reputable citizens and newspapers 
of the gas territory on the other hand, are directly in question. The premises 
on which an opinion ought to be based would seem to be so plain that both 
sides could agree as to them, but they do not, and so the actual condition of 
the gas-bearing wells as well as the deductions and theories, are in controversy. 
It is an important matter, and not alone to the gas region, but to all the State. 
While we here at Terre Haute do not enjoy the advantage and luxury of a sup- 
ply of natural gas, we are indirectly benefited by the increased prosperity of 
any part of the State. 

The Indianapolis Vews asserts that its reports were the result of an ex- 
haustive investigation by competent and unbiased persons. These reports 
tell a story of steadily diminishing pressure and supply and steadily increasing 
demand. The News said: 

“There is an element of greater certainty in the estimate of the Indiana 
field, for, as set forth, it seems to be a lake, universal within its boundaries, 
and not a congeries of veins and pockets such as make up the Pennsylvania 
field. Consequently, there is a nearly uniform pressure in Indiana wells, 
lightest at the edges of the field or subterranean gas lake, heaviest toward the 
center, but grading equably—hardly a variation of more than 10 pounds in 
similar wells. 

“The developments have been in keeping with this condition, namely, a 
gradual and uniform decline in pressure ; no new wells spouting now at the 
initial pressure of the old wells, but at their first flow reaching only the aver- 
age to which the old ones have declined. The thing seems to be simply a 
matter of arithmetic. 

‘“‘ None the less interesting is the study of a map of this territory showing 
how the pipe lines are sucking the field all around and crawling yearly, 
monthly, daily, nearer its heart, the territory outside the field using more than 
that within. But no quest is long getting answer in one spot, and the com- 
munities within as well as without the field find it necessary to extend lines 
even toward the center of supply. Meantime the waste of this steadily failing 
fuel is indicated as still going on. It behooves the gas burning communities 
of Indiana to open their eyes and look the situation squarely in the face.” 

This statement met with a vigorous and emphatic denial at every point in 
the Indian Territory. Men of undoubted reputation for truthfulness say the 
fact is, there is no diminution in the pressure and that the Vews investigators 
did not consult the best authority when they visited the gas ficld. The news- 
papers of Marion, Munice, Anderson, Kokomo and other places in the field 
were unrestrained, not only in their denials, but in imputing a bad motive for 
causing the “scare.” The newspapers, which are supposed to be familiar 
with the ways of the big gas companies, said it was part of the scheme to 
form a monopoly of ownership of gas wells and pipe lines, and then creating 
the impression that the supply is falling off, find less resistance to higher 
rates to the consumers. The Indianapolis /ourna/ procured statements from 
prominent citizens in the leading gas towns, who have made the natural gas 
question a special study, and without exception, they say the supply is as 
great to-day as ever. President Jones, of the Normal College, at Marion, says: 

“T have given the natural gas question considerable attention, and, from 
the indications here, I have no fears of the early exhaustion of the supply. I 
base my faith on the records of the different wells as given by those who own 
them and use them.” 

J. F. Darnell, President of the Muncie Nail Works, and an authority on the 
gas question, says that the reports that the gas supply is running short and 
the pressure weakening are untrue and misleading. Everyone admits that in 
the days of the first discovery of the gas, many blunders were made and that 
there was a wastefulness. The blunders then made in drilling and controlling 
wells in some instances resulted in their abandonment within the past year, 
but wells properly developed alongside of these, and virtually at the same 
time, are to-day flowing as strong as the day the gas reservoir was tapped by 
the drills. 

Taken altogether the preponderance of testimony is against the Vews. 
We do not intend to say, by any means, that the conclusion is reached that it 
has willingly been a party to any scheme whose ulterior purpose is to profit 
by misrepresentation of the gas supply. If its investigation, honestly set on 
foot, was diverted by interested parties, more’s the pity, but the injury to the 
State is done. And in this connection it should be said that it is a mistake to 
suppose the people who are unfortunate in not having a home supply of the 
gas rejoice in the alarming story of the shortage of the fuel, as a few angry 
newspapers in the gas territory try to make their readers believe. 





The “ President’’ Comes to Grief. 

An accident occurred to the big engine “ President” at the Friedensville 
zinc mines on Tuesday, and to-day the builder, John West, is on the scene to 
decide whether it can be repaired or not. While the engine was working and 
connected with an extra pump, one of the two large walking-beams which 
connect the engine with the pumps broke in four pieces and the powerful 
piece of machinery came to a sudden halt. 

The broken walking beam weighs 24 tons and is the largest in the country. 
When the engine was set in position some years ago it required a team of 42 
mules to haul each of the walking beams from the Union depot over the 



































































mountain to Friedensville. This feat of transportation was watched by hun- 
dreds of people, who will readily recall it now. It is possible that Engineer 
West can repair the broken piece of machinery, in which case the pump will 
soon be working again. The mines are rapidly filling with water, and unless 
the pump is soon at work the miners will be forced to abandon their task. 
The accident is a serious one and the loss to the zinc company will be vast. 
Captain Eudy, who is traveling in the South, has been telegraphed for. 
—[Bethlehem (Pa.) Times. 


MICHIGAN IRON MINES IN i890. 








The report of the Commissioner of Mineral Statistics of Michigan for the 
yearending September 1, 1890, made to Gov. Winans, states that nearly one- 
half the iron ore produced in the United States was mined in Michigan, the 
amount being 7,185,175 tons, with a market value of $41,000,000, and was worth 
at the mines at least $20,000,000, and all of a superior quality. The average of 
the ore sent away from the Superior region in 1890 was above 62 per cent. 
metallic iron, while much of it ran much higher. About one-half of this ore 
was the Bessemer, which contains so small a percentage of phosphorus as to 
be manufactured into Bessemer steel. The ores of Lake Superior are far 
richer and far better than any other, and none have been found that will dis- 
place them in the market. Long before the opening of 1890 the season’s 
product of ore had been sold at an advance of from 50 cents to $1 25 per ton 
above the prices for 1889, and the outlook of the iron mining districts was most 
gratifying, but at the opening season of 1891 it was not encouraging. The 
amount of ore in Cleveland and other Lake Erie ports was reported at 3,800,000 
gross tons, 1,250,000 larger than ever before. 

The highest point secured for iron ore in 1890 was $7.25 per ton, hard 
ores, which were 66 per cent. iron. The best hard ores so)d $6.50 per ton, an 
advance of $1 over 1889. There were imported into the United States, chiefly 
from Spain and Cuba, in 1890, 2,800,000 tons of ore. 

A plan has been considered of establishing large plants at Marquette for 
the manufacture of pig iron, steel and machinery and bring coke there for the 
purposes, in the belief that fuel could be transported to the ores as cheaply 
as the ore to the fuel, and a large percentage of cheaper grade ores could be 
smelted that it does not pay to ship. 

Iron-laden vessels from Marquette to Cleveland could return coal-laden, 
and it could be coked at Marquette and other points. The outlook is that 
there will be a material falling off in ore production in 1891. The price of pig 
iron is now very low. Ore is supplied at 50 cents te $1 per ton less than 1890. 
The production of pig iron has multiplied three-fold in ten years, it having 
amounted to more than 9,500,000 tons in 1890. The average prices per ton in 
New York for 1890 were: 





Pig iron, WG. % GOMER... sccscisicctieiciocscetcccnse piceukacdindsgeccncieg eamibecetecssie ae 
BE TEs PO, BINGE os cnccocsiecene.s sqpatnresConacegpeuavertaciiptessteninissateosynetase veeee 16 65 
FOTRO...cesseeseereecreeeesescescnsensconscstneceesatsncesss sepeeauuaeees ensseterensaseneneeseessseseesanenes 15 9! 
BOSS CMe4? PIGZ...... ccccoccescccccercescccccsscsecces evevescssevescesecsseces coccoscocccces eceeessenceses 18 93 
GREE CER ioisrctes ocncas cxsinn” so -- Sobeneial tovcnacotageaisovbadoges sasdss desepeninverdaonaipaginn soars 28 93 
WELT MAMBRBSS!Y SO POT COME as cri cccrecsescoeseciccas» asdasenvonscncpabievarsosn see voseeseec 63 35 


The prices for charcoal pig iron on January 1, 1891, in New York, were: 


No.1 foundry 
BOs B POOR G os ccce coccsvyesentsens 
Cold blast.......... <i 
RE i bi cccnscaptes’. oo castvsceossy eniceunirsetatenesaneenes scissantmnvonihensvawadshiaasimanabtidaabeaied 
There were eighty-two ore-producing iron mines operated in Michigan in 
1890, producing 7,185,175 tons of ore, and seventeen blast furnaces producing 


225,537 tons of pig iron. 









The Channel Tubular Railroad, 

At the meeting of the British Association in Cardiff last month Sir Edward 
Reed presented a paper describing a proposition for constructing a railroad 
across the British Channel. It is, in brief, to lay tubes of steel oriron and 
cement concrete on the bottom of the sea. He showed that in no place on the 
line selected does the depth of water exceed 200 ft. and several miles out from 
the English coast it is less than 100 ft. deep. The grade would not necessarily 
exceed 1 in 40. The tubes could be towed out and sunk, and the method of 
laying them has been very carefully elaborated, “each length of tube as laid 
being made the instrument and means of bringing the next length into its 
position with unerring accuracy.” The two lines of tubes will be connected 
and probably will be 50 ft. apart. They will be approximately 20 ft. in diame- 
ter and each section 300 ft. long. The cost is estimated as between 412,000,000 
and 415,000,000, Ouse point made by Sir Edward is that the tubes cou d be 
easily destroyed in case of war. In the discussion which followed, Mr. J. H. 
Greathead held that a tunnel could be made through the chalk for one-quarter 
the estimated cost of this tube railroad, and he thought the money would 
never be subscribed for sucha scheme. He doubted if it would be possible to 
ventilate a tube 20 miles long. 

Sir Benjamin Baker said that the cost would be prohibitory. The cost of 
achannel bridge as proposed by Messrs. Schneider and Hersent would be 
£35,000,000, and he was of the opinion that that bridge wouid never be built. 
He did not concider the channel tubular railroad physical impossibility, but 
financially it is so. 





A New Coke Furnace. 

Continental engineers are just now discussing the merits of a new coke 
furnace which has been invented by one Martial Fremont, a Belgian engineer, 
which is said to produce results that will create nothing less than a revolu- 
tion in the coke-making industry. It is a reverberating furnace, capable of 
making coke from a coal very much inferior to that generally used, and the 
cost is, it is said, half a crown per ton cheaper than the cost of producing coke 
by ordinary means. One of the large colliery companies is at the present 
moment laying down some of these new furnaces with a view to trying their 
capabilities. If successful, the new method of coke manufacture must have a 
remarkable influence upon the colliery industry of Charleroi.—[Glasgow Engi- 
neer, 























4 “(THe IRON TRApDP Review. 








WORLD'S FAIR NOTES 





It is probable that the five territories—New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, Okla- 
homa and Alaska—will make their exhibit of their resources and products 
under one roof. 

Commissioner Shufeldt has cabled from Cape Town, South Africa, that an 
exhibit of diamonds and feathers worth $300,000 will be sent from Cape Town. 

W. B. Curtis has been chosen special agent of the Exposition to receive 
and transmit exhibits received at the port of New York. 

The Grounds and Buildings Committee decided to advertise for the con- 
struction of a building to accommodate four saw mill plants. The structure 
will be located south of the Agricultural Annex, on piles driven in what is 
now a natural lagoon. The building wil) be 130x200 feet and will cost $25,000. 

Nicaragua wants half an acre for the site ot its building at the Exposition. 

Secretary Batterworth, Major Handy, Commissioners Lindsay and Bullock, 
and Director Peck, comprisiug the Exposition’s European Commission, have 
returned to this couatry, having visited during the past nine weeks almost 
every European capital in the interest of the Exposition. This tour has 
resulted in awakening throughout all Europe very great interest and even 
enthusiasm in the Fair. It is now certain that Eagland, France, Germany, 
acd nearly all other European nations, will surpass at Chicago all previous 
efforts in making exhibits Sir Henry Wood and James Dredge, of the Eng- 
lish Royal Commission to the Ecposition, and Herr Wermouth, Imperial 
German Commissioner, accompanied Secretary Butterworth and party to this 
couatry to inform themselves personally conceraing the Exposition, the regu- 
lations governing exhibits, etc., and the situation generally, and to select space 
for their respective governments. They are now being given every facility to 
acquire the information they desire, aud are the recipients of many courtesies 
at the hands of the Exposition management. Commissioners from other Eu- 
ropean nations are expected soon on a similar mission. 

The Brazilian government intends to make a magnificent display at the 
Exposition and will invest not less than $500,000 in carrying out the plans for 
its representation. 

Two anchors that Columbus carried in his ships will be exh bited at the 
Fair, and already one of them is stored in Washington, waiting to be brought 
to Chicago. 

Lord Stanley has promised to do all he can to have the Dominion of 
Canada make a creditable exhibit at the Exposition. Many prominent Ca- 
nadians are equally interested, and have promised their aid. This result is 
due in a large measure to the exertions of J Allen H -rnsby, of the Depart- 
ment of Electricity of the Exposition, among the delegates to the recent Na- 
tional Electric Light Association at Montreal. 

k. T. Jeffrey, Chairman of the Grounds and Buildings Committee of the 
Exposition, made the following estimate of necessary I’xpusition expenses for 
submission to the recent meeting of the National Commission : 



















Buildings cccscsecceseceh 7;295,000 
Grading and filling... ces 450,000 
Tandscape..............+++ 323,490 
Viaducts and bridges pacbass dant 125,« 00 
Been acans Hulian us seecen stu Slbsnie siponduppee catddbonss<andeecetoonncsépnes snapinseases cae chsecheseeactedeseesssseene 70,000 
NT SIU III Con 5 nce. 04 ne srestesesconncsnsneeeceesons cvcnsescashvensseesecesvesesscssccorsssss BS COO 
RE CURIE GING DO TUEIIIE ooo ceinc.', carencvcrsscenneesccsravcenseeesaes esguceveds disteeed esate 600,000 
IID, cocnctcuscunhestausaidamneerecess Bs Ae eee ah AA Sy 8 500,000 
Steam plant. 800,000 
MRRSCUSICICY 200 00ccccce002s00 1,500,c 00 
Statuary on building 100,000 
Vases, lamps and posts Gasktbos 50.000 
Se er SR EE CMEMNNRGEN GE 5 555s ncnuv sv covssnncdsterdpasvnaes<nsestebacnses te” scaevecee . 20,000 
Te osc cn sd usp Sicoe Ube cadgna’ On vebeucessensin(phbcabined Sta sikica hasade 5,000 
NEN COIPONININGL (i. 5a cs cscs ebae bbnaneredngpeulehaeennances siupyectat=eascecsnn ancessech 210,000 
RUNNIN SON, IE BEING 550.50 is csncednveseganss sbendpennedénananecesenccenebonstsosncnectae.. osinceses 200,000 
General expenses of Construction Department................ccccccceeseeeeeesseeeeeeenes 500,000 
Organizaticn and administration..................... _ iccapepenecinn Sanaa 
PECs PRLS GIN, COREE SOT rc ccdain eins ccnicees veccvcctccscssossesetenscccesenenscesses  £5550/000 

IAL a 7 Was th cicada ty oth vices isnakeks ticpheass asaunacsseavsavses ted apecabbapeeyoneeseaeiiavensnecte $17,825,453 





THE OCTOBER MEETING OF THE MINING ENGI VEERS 





The sixtieth meeting of the American Institute of Mining Engineers will 
be held at Glen Summit, Luzerne county, Pa, beginning Tuesday evening, 
October 6, and continuing for three days. The opening session and Wednes- 
day morning and afternoon are given up tb the reading and discussion of 
papers, to be followed by acamp-fire in the evening, on the grounds of Gen. 
Paul A. Oliver, at Oliver Milis. Thursday is set aside for an excursion in the 
Wyoming region, luncheon at Harvey’s Lake, a session following in the even- 
ing. An excursion has been planned for Friday, including a visit to the iron 
breakers of Coke Brothers & Co, and to several cojleries in the vicinity. An 
opportunity will be offered on Saturday to those who desire to visit Glen 
Onoko and the Switchback, Mauch Chunk. The following papers are an- 
nounced, and special discussions are expected on “The Preparation and 
Utilization of Small Sizes of Anthracite Coal,” and ‘“‘ The Practical Uses of Con- 
centrated Iron Ores.” “ Electricity in Mining, as Applied by the Aspen Min- 
ing and Smelting Co.,” by M. B. Holt, Aspen, Cul ; “ Electric Locomotives in 
German Mines,” by Paul Eilers, Berlin, Germany; ‘‘ The Manufacture of 
Liquid Salphurous Acid iv Upper Silesia,” by Karl Eilers, Berlin, Germany; 
“A Chinese System of Gold Milling,” by Henry Louis, Singapore, Siraits 
Settlement; * Tne Ucil zitiono’ Puddle Slag tor Patnt Stock,” by Axel Sahlin, 
New Y rk City; “ Toe Fiorence Oi! Fields, Colorado,” by George H. Eldridge, 
U.3.G ©». Survey, Washington, D.C; “A Survey o' the Planches de Plata 
Maes Sonora.” by H-ory M Stanley and Henry O. Filpper, Nogales, Arizona; 


“ So-ordtaate Surveying,” oy H ary O Flipper, Nogales, Arizona; * Cord-wood 
in M: tag Bis Farnac-.” by H roert Liang, Miveral, Idaho; “Tne Ben- 
ds Gi F ds” by T A Reckerd, Allem> +, Isere, France; “ Apparatus tor 
th M aateno’ Irova-d S eel P ates Diri g the Process of F nishing,” 


ny Gan Curis Prs>urgh Po; “Toe Handling of Ingots and Molds in 
Besse mer S « 1 Works,” by Gam Cur is, Pittshurgh, Pa ; ‘Centrifugal Venti- 
lators,’, by R. Van A. Norris, Wiikesbarre, Pa,; ‘Tandem Tanks for Hoisting 





Water From Flooded Slopes,” by J. H. Bowden, Wilkesbarre, Pa.; “The Utili- 
zation of Anthracite Waste by Gasification in Producers,” by W. H. Blauvelt, 
Philadelphia, Pa ; “The Use of Magnetic Concentrates in the Port Henry 
Blast Furnaces,” by N. M. Langdon, Port Henry, N Y. 





SOME CURIOSITIES OF ELECTRICAL PROGRESS. 





SKULL AND CROSSBONES ON CABLE POLEs.—To prevent accidents from the 
Lauffen-Frankfort cable, which transmits a deadly current of 25,000 volts, all 
the poles for the 112 miles are adorned with skulls and crossbones surmounted 
with a warning notice. 


A NEw WATER INDUSTRY.—So numerous are the electric launches on the 
Thames that floating charging stations containing a dynamo plant ply up and 
down the river ready to charge the accummulators of six launches at once. 


A NEW SAFETY MINING CaABLE.—An electric wire breaking in a mine will 
frequently give forth a spark, thus exploding the dangerous gases.. A recent 
invention is a safety mining cable which can be torn apart without spark, arc 
or flame. 


NIAGARA POWER FOR CHICAGO —The successful transmission of a powerful 
current of electricity from Lautfen to Frankfort has revived interest in the 
suggestion to send a current of equal intensity from Niagara to Chicago. 


SIMPLIFICATION OF SWITCHBOARDS —A telephone system for use in large 
factories has been invented, in which each telephone has its own switchboard, 
so that any person can communicate with any telephone on the line by simply 
moving a switch. 


OLD ROME's NEW LIGHT —Rome is to be lighted by electricity by the first 
ofthe year. A motor at Tivoli, about twelve miles distant, will supply the 
power, while the Via Nazionali will be the street first lighted. 

ELECTRICAL Picnics —In Brockton, Mass., the festive inhabitants charter 
the electric cars for afternoon and supper parties. Boards for a table are 
place on the backs of the seats in the middle of the car. 


LONDON’sS ELECTRIC Matns —In London the electric mains are placed be- 
neath the sidewalks, and to avoid accidents the manholes are provided with 
two covers, each connected toearth. The outer cover is thus rendered harm- 
less. 


THE LATEST LIGHTHOUSE DEvicg—A novel lamp for lighthouses is a 
French invention. The regulation is exceedingly sensitive, being made by a 
beam of light refracted from the arc on a thermal regulator, by means of a 
special lens placed in the focal plane. 


THE ELECTRIC WELDING OF SAW TSETH.—Among the many applications 
of electric welding is that of welding broken teeth in bad saws, thus saving 
the cost and labor of resetting the saws. 


A SAFETY APPLIANCE FOR ELECTRIC CARS.—A Maine man has invented a 
device for preventing electric cars that have stopped while ascending a steep 
grade from running down grade before the brakes are applied. 


NEW PuSH-SWITCH FOR LaMps.—A push switch, similar to the push-buttons 
used in electric gas lighting, has been invented for electric lamps. There are 
two buttons, the white one lighting the lam» aad the black one putting it 
out. 


A NEw CARBON PENCIL, —To avold the hissing in the arc lamp there has 
been invented a carbon pencil containing a percentage of alkali silicate, which 
when burned, forms a conducting vapor that is said to prevent the trouble. 


AN ELECTRIC UNICYCLE ROAD —Chicago is to have an electric unicycle 
railroad to run from Lake street to Jackson Park The cars will be run at the 
rate of forty miles an hour, 


NEW COVERINGS FOR CONDUCTORS.—A recent iavention in coveriugs for 
electric conductors is one in which provision is mide to retain air or gas 
within the protective covering to increase the static capacity. 





lron For Telephone Wire, 

If the reported project of Mr. Gorham Gray for a telephone cable between 
America and England shall prove to be feasible and practicable it will cer- 
tainly mark a new and important step in the use of both the telephone and 
telegrapb. Mr. Gray’s plan is to make use o’an iron wire conductor of pecul- 
iar shape in place of acopper cable, and he claims that iron is as good as 
copper for this purpose. This idea is directly at variance with the best elec- 
trical practice of to-day, the tendency everywhere being toward the use of 
more copper in the form of heavier conductors and the use of a metallic cir- 
cuit of two copper wires for long distance telephone service Copper is also 
being used to a greater extent in telegraph lines. Should Mr Gray be able to 
carry out his plan, there would, of course, be an immense saving in the cost 
of constructing the line, owing to the greater relative cheapness of iron wire 
and its higher tensile strength —[Philadelphia Reco:d. 





Steam Power in Berlin 

The development in the minufacturing trades of Berlin durirg the past 
ten years is stown by the increased use of steam power, as given in a report 
just issued in Berlin. At the end of 1879 there were in that city 1.118 fixed 
boilers and 938 fixed steam engines, ot 19 378 horse power, and 93 portable 
boilers, of which 74 were combined boilers and engines, giving 548 horse- 
power. At the close of 1890 there were in use 1,627 fixed boilers and 1 363 
fixed engines, having 45 82 horse-power. and 285 moveble boilers of 2,229 
horse-power, of which 246 were combined with engines. 





THE Lidge & Davis Machine Tool Co.,so well known as builders and 
dealers in m«chine tools, have appointed M. P. Satterthwai'e, 173 Superior 
street, corner Bank, as their representative for Cleveland and vicinity.” 


Aen ee IT AI ANIA NS ea — —— —— ——— 





The ol 
force of fif 
It is re 
the Genev: 
insular Re 
The w 
York shaf 
sight.—[Pe 
At the 
with the di 
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with. The 
distance of 
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at right an 
but this di 
considered 
Ishpeming 
A. E. € 
manageme 
quarter of 
to operate 
The M 
amount es 
[Florence } 
The Cl 
of this city 
sunk for tl 
ern part of 
feet. Of tl 
being of al 
the drill w 
A standpip 
the first h 
being the 
[Iron Ore, 
Anothe 
that at leas 
ple of Flor 
cient testir 
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fully 100 fe 
Althou 
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interesting 


M 
In 


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employed. 
erty can be 
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The Li 
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Rumor 
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attention t 
arations fo: 


There : 
ploy a syste 
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It may 
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recorded w 
the largest 
F. & Jno. B 
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brings ther 
and notabl; 
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In view 
should be e 
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what worth 
do, say thre 
and form y: 
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all 


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Tem IRON TRapp Review. 5 








LAKE SUPERIOR MINING NOTES. 





The old Spurr mine, near Michigamme, has started to work again witha 
force of fifteen men. It has been idle for a long time.—[Peninsular Record. 

It is reported that a fine body of ore, at no great depth, has been struck at 
the Geneva, near the old First National property on the Gogebic range.— [Pen- 
insular Record. 

The work of opening up the find of ore at the bottom level of East New 
York shaft was commenced this week. A large body of ore is said to be in 
sight.—[Peninsular Record. 

At the U. S Grant property they have started a drift to find the ore struck 
with the diamond drill some time since, and for which the present shaft was 
sunk to tap. Much had been done to find the ore, but it has not yet been met 
with. The drill hole showed 47 feet of clean ore. The boring was made ata 
distance of 210 feet to the northwest of the shaft and the new drift has been 
started in this direction. If the ore is there they are bound to findit. The 
drift has been started from the second level. Heretofore drifts have been run 
at right angles to the shaft, north and south, the usual way of crosscutting, 
but this did not bring the desired result, hence the change. The property is 
considered a good one, and a mine is expected by those in charge.—(Iron Ore, 
Ishpeming. 

A. E. Guensburg, of this city, who has succeeded the “ Brown Pool” in the 
management of the promising exploration on the south half of the northwest 
quarter of section 24, 40 17, this county, is organizing a very strong company 
to operate the property.—[Iron Range, Iron Mountain. 

The Mansfeld will easily mine and ship 45 000 tons of ore this year—the 
amount estimated as her total output at the commencement of the season.— 
[Florence Mining News. 

The Cleveland Iron Mining Co. has been exploring its lands to the north 
of this city for the past two years with a diamond drill. In the second shaft 
sunk for this purpose, located near the residence of Mr. Anderson in the north- 
ern part of town, ledge was finally encountered at a depth from surface of 71 
feet. Of the overlying drift 51 feet was sand, the balance boulders, the latter 
being of all sizes, and very difficult to make way through. The ledge reached. 
the drill was placed in operation, cut 80 feet of diorite, when it was stopped. 
A standpipe is now beiag driven near the boiler house, 100 feet to the south of 
the first hole, and here work will be conducted for some time probably, it 
being the intention to give surrounding territory a thorough searching.— 
[Iron Ore, Ishpeming. 

Another visit to section 24, 40-17, more than ever convinced the writer 
that at least two valuable mines will be opened up there in time for the peo- 
ple of Florence to do double duty in celebrating next Fourth of July. Suffi 
cient testing has already been done on both the Webber-Peterson and Guens 
burg properties to demonstrate that the vein runs southeast by northwest, is 
fully 100 feet in width and probably miles in length.—[Florence Mining News. 

Although the Florence has only shipped about 30,000 tons of ore this sea- 
son, she has make an excellent output record, asis shown by the following 
interesting table: 

Fiorence. Eagle. Total. 




















We 80 TIES snc ccccemsatatitncocscinatowtscocaniiguiniaatiinns GAGSD 806 65,222 
Tat SEOCK TRMGRLY Toverccscccesecncnscssosceecsesovsee seccecece 10,521 36,933 47,754 
 TOtAL.....ecrrrrrcrererceeseeecrerncnessernerseneces 759177 37,799 112,976 
SHinMMemts LOG. .ncccccee.ccovececces scone cccccscsccosegecnenne 2,064 27,020 29,664 
NO BOE TING give casas saimses muses briuvsesccap enn 72,533 10,779 83,312 


The Florence is steadily mining ore and considerable new ground has been 
opened up during the current year, a force of about 150 men being constantly 
employed. With a half way prosperous season next year, this reliable prop- 
erty can be counted upon again taking her position as the second largest pro- 
ducer on the Menominee range.—[Florence Mining News. 

The Lincoln is a mine now, not a mere exploration. A drift north from 
the shaft cut a body of clean ore 15 feet thick, and a drift along the vein, west, 
proves its continuity. At 60 feet along the drift to the west the vein was 
cross-cut and its width found to be 25 feet.—[Florence Mining News. 

Rumors regarding the sinking of a new shaft by the Lake Superior Iron 
Co., in order to reach the large known body of ore joining the Winthrop on 
the north, are heard on every side. Some weeks ago the Democrat called 
attention to the existence of this ore, but it did not then suppose that prep- 
arations for its removal would so soon be made.—[Lake Superior Democrat. 





‘“ KEY YOUR ADS.” 





There are but few concerns doing business through advertising that em- 
ploy a system of “keying their ads.,” and the very few who do, find it is an 
essential and an unerring method through which can be ascertained what 
papers to stay out of and what mediums to continue to employ. 

It may be that there are many ways of doing this and, too, that many large 
a vertisers do so in their own way and say nothing of it; but very few can be 
recorded who employ street numbers in their address as their key. Among 
the largest trade journal advertisers, The Egan Co., of Cincinnati, O, and W. 
F. & Jno. Barnes Co., of Rockford, Ill., are almost alone in varying the street 
numbers they advertise so as to ascertain the number of inquiries each paper 
brings them. It is hardly necessary to say that these concerns are successful, 
and notably so; they advertise heavily and get their business entirely in tnis 
way. 

In view of the extraordinary amount of advertising done nowadays there 
should be every effort made to ascertain the value of the medium carrying 
your “ad.*” and by using the “ key” one is enabled to judge very carefully of 
what worth the “ad.” is to you. Give the paper a chance to show what it can 
do, say three to six months, and then watch the return. Look up the sales 
and form your decision. If inquiries come in and no sales, you can then rest 
assured that the paper does not reach the class of readers you want, and you 





therefore don’t renew. Those papers which bring you business are necessary, 
and it is only a matter of space inthem. Advertising at best is a lottery, and 
money has to be spent to find out whether you get a prize or not. There are 
lots of mediums, but wary and experienced advertising managers use shrewd 
ness in selection and are not often deceived. But how much better could they 
back up their judgment if they knew just what the paper was doing for them 
at any period during the life of the contract. 

Pablishers seem to be solicitous for the advertiser to find out circulation; 
but in many cases they don’t tell the character of circulation—it is so much, 
and positively certified and guaranteed. We know the magazine, from its 
literary and scientific attainments, reaches largely the people inclined to 
social, literary, scientific and political matters, and that class papers reach a 
certain class of readers, the larger the circulation the greater the amount of 
possibie customers; and if the key is used, how easy to note what each is 
doing. 

Give each paper its designated street number, and, as your mail is opened, 
watch the address and credit the paper accordingly. This is a simple plan, for 
most people will on addressing you for the first time use the street number. 
Then, again, the scheme cannot fail to make youa stronger adherent of adver- 
tising, as itis the most effective way of attaining the greatest success in the 
shortest time possible.—ITas. T. Brown, in “ Printer’s Ink.” 





OLD-TIME PROFITS IN THE MINING INDUSTRY. 





In these days of low prices and high freights for iron ore the following 
from the Negaunee (Mich.) H/era/d is rather interesting reading: Wm. L 
Wetmore, of Marquette, agent of the New York mine during the presperous 
days of the iron business, was in town Monday. “Speaking of profitable 
mining,” said he, “ the record of the New York for the year 1874, is probably 
without a parallel, It was this way: The year previous certain heavy consum 
ers, Carnegie among them, had been using the ore, it suited them, and the 
fear that they might be unable to secure a supply for the following year caused 
them to close a contract for the entire product of the year 1874, at an enorm- 
ously high figure prevailing during the closing months of 1873. This was 
from $13 to $14 per ton in Cleveland, based upon a lake and railroad freight of 
some $5. Not many weeks elapsed before there was a general reduction all along 
the line, ore went down, labor went down, transportation went down by more 
than half and every item entering into the cost of minirg was very materially 
reduced. The purchasing parties being financially strong !ulfilled the contract 
to the letter—bought and paid for every pound of the 70,000 tons mined and 
shipped that year—which resulted in a net profit of $364,000 to the company, 
lacking but $1,coo of affording a profit of $1,000 per day for all the days of the 
year. This handsome sum went to swell the ample fortune of the late Samuel J. 
Tilden, principal owner at thattime. It may be” continued Mr. Wetmore, 
“that larger mines have made more money than that in a single year, but I 
doubt if there is au instance in the mining world where so much money was 
made upon a similar product.” 

The Hera/d further says: While the ore deposits at the Negaunee mine 
are holding well—perhaps increasing in extent as the work of development 
goes forward—the conditions for profitable mining are not nearly as favorable 
as formerly. In some portions of the mine, until recently considered a relia- 
ble Bessemer ore, phosphorus has appeared to an extent that raises it out of 
the limit, and a vast deal of expense is incurred in making frequent analyses 
and in separating the grades. Originally the entire product of the mine was 
a Bessemer, carrying less than .o30. At this time we understand that less than 
one-half is sold for Bessemer purposes, and this is the increased expense noted. 





Large Metallurgical Order, 

A calculation made with respect tothe amount of metal which the con- 
struction of the Rhine-Wesser-Elbe Canal and the Dortmund-Ems Canal 
(work has just been commenced on the Olfen section of the latter) would call 
into requisition, shows that the iron and steel trade would receive orders to 
the extent of 200,0co tons. Of this quantity 100,000 tons would be placed with 
the rail rolling mills, 70,000 tons with bridge, switch, turntable, and engine 
builders, and 30,000 tons with shipbuilding firms. Taking the items specific- 
aliy, the following results are shown: On the whole length of the canal, be- 
tween the Rhine, Wesser and the Elbe, including the Ems waterway, it is pro- 
posed to construct 55 docks, in connection with which new railway lines and 
stations would be built. For these, some 600 kilometers (380 miles) of railway 
track would be wanted, which would necessitate the placing of orders for 9o,- 
voo tons of iron and steel. Further, 200 turntables and traversers of a total 
weight of 2,000 tons would be required; 150 cranes, coal shoots, elevators, etc., 
of 3,000 tons; 400 large and smal! tunnels and viaducts, and 600 road bridges 
with iron superstructure, of about 15,000 tons; 50 sluices, with iron gates, of 
1,500 tons; and 1,200 canal boats, steam tugs, chainships, etc., of a total weight 
of 30,000 tons. In addition, various iron warehouses, signals, hydraulic cranes, 
weighing machines, lamps, pipes, locomotives and wagons would be needed. 
Of the total quantity of material, the Dortmund-Ems Canal will take about 
two fifths.—[Glasgow Engineer. 





THE 19th volume of Ou/ing opens with the October issue, and never has 
a finer number left the presses. The contents include; “Saddle and Senti- 
ment,” by Wenona Gilman; “ Deer Stalking in the Indian Territory,” by Fran- 
cis J. Hagan; “ Yacht Clubs of the East,” by Capt. A. J Kenealy; “ Mississippi 
National Guard,” by Lieut. R. K. Evans, U. S. A.; “Goose Shooting in the 
Sacramento Valley,” by “ Parson”; “Ripples and Paddle Plashes,” by E. 
Pauline Johnson; “ How We Ride Oar Wheels,” by Grace E Denison; “ Horse- 
back Sketches,” by Jessie F. O'Donnell ; ‘‘ The Last Wild Horse of the Kanab 
Desert,” by “Honda”; “ Upper Peninsula Runways,” by Ed. W. Sandys, and 
the usual editorials, poems and records by the standard writers on sport, etc. 




































































































Tem Iron Trapp Revirw. 


: a7 








ANDERSON’S PATENT REVOLVING PURIFIER. 





The remarkable effect of metallic iron upon organic matter, and its 
property of removing color from peaty water, has long been known. Until 
recently, however, its practical application to large bodies of water has re- 
mained an insuperable difficulty, the metal having been used as a filtering 
medium, in which form it becomes rapidly caked together and loses its per- 
meability after a few months’ working. Anderson’s patent revolving purifier 
has been designed to overcome these difficulties, and its success has now been 






























































proved by a more or less extended experience of its applicativu on the large 
scale. At Antwerp, in Belgium; Dordrecht, Gouda, in Holland; at Paris, 
Nancy, and [jbourne, in France; at Baroda and Agra, in India, and at Monte- 
video, in the Uruguay Republic; in al! of which places, Parisand Nancy ex- 
cepted, the whole water supply is being purified by this process. 

The principle of the revolving purifier consists in the productlon of an in- 


; 








are used, as in the numerous systems employing alum. The purifying mater- 
ial is simply scrap iron, such as cast iron borings or plate punchings, 

This material is showered freely through the water and kept er 
clean and active by the rubbing of one particle against another. 

The process effects a great chemical and physiological improvement in 
the water or sewage purified by: (a) Removing all suspended matter and color ; 
(b) reducing from 65 to 90 per cent. of the dissolved organic matter ; (c) en- 
tirely removing free ammonia and nitrous acid, and reducing nitric acid to 
the faintest trace ; (d) entirely destroying all micro-organisms. 

The working cost of the process varies from $1 to $2 per million gallons, 
according to the nature of the water purified and the magnitude of the plant. 

It can be as easily applied for the purification of the whole water supply 
of a large city as for small industrial uses. 

The process has undergone several severe tests in this country. The Chi- 
cago Cold Storage Exchange erected a plant and made tests of its efficacy with 
the waters of the Chicago river, which are well known to be about the filthiest 
in the country. After a three- months’ satisfactory test the plant was turned 
over to the city officials to experiment with, and Professor Long says that the 
trial has been very successful thus far, and anyone showa the working of the 
entire system could hardly believe that the filthy, ill-smelling liquid they saw 
go into the cylinder and the clear, sparkling water which was filtered through 
a shallow layer of sand at the last stage of the process, could ever have had 
any relation to each other. 

Tests have also been made at Philadelphia, at Belmont pumping station 
on the Schuylkill river, by Professor Henry L:ffman; at St. Louis, from the 
muddy waters of the Mississippi River, and at Elizabeth, N. J. Ranson T. Scow- 
den, aclever engineer, has conducted these experiments, and the analyses of 
the water before and after the process have been mide by leading professors, 
all of whom ‘estify to the success of the experiments. 

Further particulars can be obtained by addressing the Revolving Purifier 
Co. of America, 50 Pullman Building, Chicago. 





Scribner's Magazine for O :tober is led by the fourth article in the series 
on “Great Streets of the World.” Mr. W. W. Story, the eminent’ American 
sculptor and writer, who has spent the most of his life in that city, writes of 
“The Corso of Rome,” recalling its medieval glories, and giving many per- 
sonal reminiscences of his sojourn there. There are also several very enter- 
taining out-of-door articles—Archibald Roger’s adventures in “Hunting 



































ANDERSON’S PATENT 
timate contact between the metallic iron and the water to be purified by the 
showering down of finely divided particles of the metal through a stream of 
the water. 

The apparatus consists of a horizontal cylinder supported by hollow trun- 
ions at each end, through which the water flows into and out of the cylinder ; 
within are a series of shelves which scoop up the particles of iron and shower 
them down through the water. The outlet pipe is fitted with an inverted bell 
mouth to prevent the smaller particles from being carried away by the current. 
The cylinder is caused to revolve by means of gearing driven by a belt from 
shafting, or by an independent motor. 

On issuing from the purifier the water or sewage under treatment is 
charged with a soluble ferrous salt which immediately begins to change into 
the insoluble ferric oxide by the process of oxidation due to its contact with 
the air. The ferric oxide or rust acts as a coagulant, and at the same time de. 
stroys the matter by rapidly oxidizing it. For drinking water the rust pre- 
cipitate is removed either by subsidence in a settling reservoir or by filtration 
through a shallow layer of sand. 

The advantages claimed for this system over others are: No chemicals 














REVOLVING PURIFIER. 


American Big Game,” and with it Dr. J. N. Hall’s short page on the “ Actions 
| of Wounded Animals,” which sportsmen will find of very practical interest ; 
Edward IL, Wilson's “ Biography of the Oyster,” from the planting of the seed 
to the market; and Major J. W. Powell’s account of the origin and probable 
effects of the new lake in the Colorado desert. The fiction of this issue 
includes a long and amusing installment of “ The Wrecker,” by Robert Louis 
Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne; a detective story, ‘Captain Black,” by Charles 
E Carryl; and atale of the classic days of Greece and Rome by Dr. Ernst 
Shottky, a German resident of Nw York, who originally wrote this tale in his 
mother tongue. A paper on “Carlyle’s Politics” as revealed in his essays— 
with poems and the Point of View—completes a strong number. 





THE World’s Fair Directors have appropriated $50,000 for the expense of 
reproducing at the Exposition the Convent of La Ribada, Palos, Spain, where 
Columbus lived while perfecting his plans for his voyage of discovery. The 
building will be used for housing an extensive collection of Columbus relics, 
and its ancient appearance, it is believed, will afford a pleasing contrast to 
that of the magnificent palaces by which it will be surrounded. 


















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Tem Iron Trapp Review. % 








26-INCH DOUBLE GEARED SHAPER, 





The annexed engraving represents an improved 26-inch double geared 
shaper. In designing this machine great care and attention has been given to 
those requirements and principles so essential to the perfect working ofa 
machine of this class. It is strong and substantial throughout, especially in 
parts affected by the strain of the cutting tool. The sliding surfaces, usually 





long and heavy, are provided with accurate adjustments and are well fitted by 
hand scraping. The driving pinion and intermediate gear are on the outside 
ofthe machine, permitting the use of an extra large gear, increased speed of 
pulleys and subsequent gain of power. The driving pinion makes 42 revolu. 
tions to one of rack wheel, giving a high belt vel- 
ocity, allowing the belts tomove easily and 
quickly. The double gearing consists of two 
steel racks, two rack wheel and one double pinion. 
The racks instead of having teeth placed opposite 
each other are so set that the tooth on one side 
is opposite the space ofthe other. This gives a 
steady, even stroke, equalizing the strain of the 
cut by applying the power direct on each side of 
the tool. It also obviates any lost motion. The 
belts are shifted by a circular plate having 
eccentrical slots which receive the studs on the 
shifter arms. These slots are constructed in such 
a manner as to move ore belt before the other. 
By this arrangement the shifters are always 
locked so that the belts cannot move them in 
case there is a tendency to travel. The machine 
runs silently and reverses without jar or shock. 
The stroke can be changed instantly while ma- 
chine is in motion or at rest. The screw and gears 
for raising and lowering the cross rail are on the 
inside of machine and protected from dirt and 
chips. The opening under the ram admits long 
lengths of iron being passed clear through; this 
adapts it for cutting key ways in shafting of any 
length and up to 3% inches diameter. The tool 
box can be detached and a tool inserted in the 
end of ram for cutting keyseats in pulleys, gears» 
etc., the feed being obtained by moving the table 
upward. The box table furnished wijh each = 

machine is slotted on top and both sides, and can 

readily be removed and work bolted to the slotted apron, to which table is 
attached. The manufacturers are John Steptoe & Co., Cincinnati, O. 





Stee! Revolution in South Statfordshire 


The development of the steel trade in South Staffordshire is making 
steady and even rapid strides, and it is becoming increasingly evident, diy by 
day, that the future fame of the Black Country as an industrial center, will 
rest rather upon its productions of steel than ofiron. It seems but the other 








duced might be counted upon the fingers of one’s hand, but now there is 
scarcely an ironmaster of any importance in the district who does not include 
steel in the list of his productions. Steel rails, steel girders, steel boilers and 
steel tubes have for some time past been steadily superseding the old-fash- 
ioned articles in iron, and more recently the application of steel to chains, 
cables and similar articles has been made with satisfactory results. That this 
new departure is on all grounds commendable, goes without saying. Com- 
mercially, it is a success, for steel is more durable, and therefore at present 
low prices it is in the long run cheaper than iron; while on humanitarian and 
general grounds, considering the great danger to life and limb which the use 
of faulty or inferior metal, for the purposes indicated, of necessity involves, 
the substitution of steel for iron cannot be too highly commended. There is 
just one danger attending the change which it may be worth while to point 
out. It is the fashion to conclude that steel will stand a heavy strain as com- 
pared with iron, and therefore to be less particular in the testing of it. But it 
cannot be too constantly borne in mind that there is bad steel as well as bad 
iron, and that often from some slight accident in the process of manufacture, 
metal, which is sound in itself, is faulty and unreliable. Of course in naval 
work, railway work, and such like products an efficient system of testing is 
organized and thoroughly carried out, but it is being felt that an all-round 
method of testing steel should be arranged. The cost of such a process would 
be amply covered by the additional value which the metal would possess 
when the stamp of a successful test had been placed upon it by some recog- 
nized aathority.—[Colliery Guardian, London. 





IMPROVED NO. | SELF-FEED RiP SAW. 





We present herewith illustration of an improved No. 1 self-feed ripping 
saw, intended to take the place of the hand-feed machine in planing mills, 
sash and door, furniture factories, etc., and will greatly increase the product 
of any establishment where it may be placed. It has a substantial iron frame, 
cast in one piece; the arbor is large and of special steel, runs in self-oiling 
boxes, and has three bearings ; the arbor is so arranged that several saws may 
be used at one time, if desired. The feed is strong, and is derived direct from 
the arbor, so as to be governed by the speed thereof at all times; the feed is 
a spur wheel made of steel, and arranged over the piece being ripped and in 
line with the saw. The feeding spur and frame can be raised or lowered to 
suit the thickness of material, or entirely thrown out of the way when it is de- 
sired to use the machine as an ordinary ripping saw. The table has a perpen- 
dicular movement of five inches, and always presents a level surface to the 
work. The saw can be taken out without raising the table. The table has two 
friction rolls, one each before and after the saw. The improved movable 
fence is quickly adjusted across the table to suit the operator. A spring hold- 
down and shield is placed over the saw, which serves as a guard and prevents 
accidents to the operator. It is attached to frame carrying feed works, and is 
adjustable to any position. The feed is also provided with a clutch, conven- 
ient to the operator, and the feed may be stopped or started instantly. There 
are three changes of feed, 60, 80 and 120 lineal feet per minute, and can be 
quickly chauged from one feed to the other. Any size saw from 12 to 22 
inches may be used. A 16-inch saw furnished unless otherwise ordered. Size 


IMPROVED NO. : SELF-FEED RIP SAW. 


of pulley on arbor is 8x8 inches and should make 2 400 revolutions per minute. 


| For further particulars address the Indiana Machine Works, Fort Wayne, Ind. 





A NEw tinplate syndicate has been formed among the heads of firms en- 


| gaged in that industry in the West of Germany. The object of the union is 


the limitation of the supply to the amount actually demanded, and to attain 
this a meeting will be held at the beginning of each month, when the amount 
of the production will be decided upon. It is thought that the South German 
and Silesian tinplate manufacturers will be admitted to the syndicate later on. 


day since the mills and forges in South Staffordshire at which steel was pro- | —({Iron and Steel Trades Journal, 








































































8 Texm IRON T'RapDP Review. 








Increase the Capacity of your Boilers. 


ee USERS Should Read this. 


Scale is a Non - conductor of Heat. 


SAVE YOUR FUEL AND PROTECT YOUR BOILERS FROM SCALE AND GALVANIC ACTION OF WATERS. WATERS ANALYZED FREE AND THE COMPOUNDS 
MADE TO SUIT EACH WATER. 


IIWTERNWATIONAL BOILER SOLVENT. 


PURELY VEGETABLE.) 


Dearborn Drug & Chemical Com ’y, 


Manufacturing and Analytical Chemists, W. H. EDGAR, Manager. 
Ohio Office, Canton, 0. ROBERT H. CREVOISE, Agent. 


WRITE FOR INFORMATION AND PRICES. BEWARE OF INFRINGEMENTS. 


Office, Room 29, Rialto Building; Works, 4246 Champ’ain Avenue; 


CEAICAGO, ILL. 











STEAM AND HOT WATER FOR HEATING PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 


The September number of the /“nginecring Magazine contains a most 
interesting article on the heating of houses and public buildings by hot water 
and steam. It enters in a scientific and exhaustive way intothe several points 
of difference between these two systems of heating, which are the subject of 
considerable discussion and sometimes ofcontroversy. The following extracts 
will serve to exemplify the tone and style of the article: 

“The amount of heat carried by a pound of steam, and the rapidity with 
which steam circulates through pipes are sometimes made to appear import- 
ant advantages as compared with the less heat carried by a pound of water 


and the slower circulation of the latter, effected solely by changes in specific | 


gravity. 

“While by virtue of its latent heat it forms in proportion to its weight 
the most admirable carrier of heat known to science; and by reason of its 
expansibility its rapid circulation in any direction is easily effected, yet the 
very fact that it is steam imposes a rigid limit of temperature that unfortu- 
nately cannot be passed. It never can be cooler than 212° under ordinary 
atmospheric pressure, this pressure being a condition of all practi¢al steam 
heating as applied to buildings. The necessity of some unbalanced pressure 
to secure circulation compels even a higher temperature than this, the tem- 
perature corresponding to the average low pressure maintained (5 lb. per 
square inch above that of the atmosphere) being almost exactly 228° F 

“Time and again attempts have been made to reduce the temperature in 
radiators, by means of pressure reducing valves, and regulating valves, but 
the fact that below 212° F. there can be no steam and circulation ceases has 
barred any useful progress in this direction. 

“ Within the last decade there has been a remarkable increase in the 
popularity of hot water heating, due to a combination of causes. There is a 
much larger proportion of our population possessed of means to purchase 
superior appliances than formerly. The extending taste for good solid read- 
ing has largely increased the stock of general information upon subjects per- 
taining to sanitation, among which the heating and ventilating of homes 
occupy a most important place. 

‘* While a pound of steam in condensing to water can give off 966.5 thermal 


uuits, and a pound of water in cooling from 180° to 70° can give off only 110 | 


thermal units, it has been shown above that a pound of steam as ordinarily 
used for steam heating occupies a space of 20 cubic feet, or a space that would 
hold over 1,200 lbs. of water heated to 180° F. A simple multiplication shows 
this volume of water to contain over 130,000 available units as compared with 
966 5 units in the steam filling the same space. It forms, therefore, a store- 
house for heat to which steam is in no way comparable, and the velocity of its 
circulation may be immensely lower than steam, and yet it is able to convey 
all and more than the radiators can extract from it. Hence it ig that while the 
temperature of a room heated by steam falls rapidly whenever the fire in the 
boiler gets low, the water continues its action for a long time without any per- 
ceptible diminution. The sudden and violent fluctuations to which tempera- 
ture produced by steam heating are liable are unknown in hot water heating. 
This is its crowning advantage. Uniform heating of buildings worthy the 
name ‘uniform’ has never been reached by any other means. 

“But there is this important and fundamental distinction between the 
action of a steam coil or radiator and one which takes its heat from hot water, 
that whereas, as has already been shown, the former can only operate at the 
temperature of 212° F., and higher than that of the air surrounding it. Thus 
if the air at 60° F. envelops the radiator and the apparatus is adjusted to heat 
water to 180° F. as its maximum, there is a range of 120° F., all through which 
the hot water radiator can work, and this range is perfectly controllable. In 
mild weather just the heat needed can be supplied and no more. As the 
weather gets colder the heating can be increased to meet the exact require- 
ments. Compare this with a low pressure steam apparatus adjusted to carry 
steam at 228° F. as its maximum. It cannot work below 212° F., hence the dif. 
ference between this and the maximum temperature, or 16° F., is the range 
through which any variation is possible. The hot water heating apparatus is 
therefore adapted to all climatic conditions, while the steam heating radiators» 
if proportion to the demand for extreme cold weather, are and must remain 


too powerful for any weather much warmer than the extreme. For mild | 


weather, when the steam heat becomes unbearable, the remedy is to open the 
windows and waste heat by these avenues to intersellar space, or to shut off 
the radiators and send the waste heat out of the chimney, while the room 
cools down. In steam heating a condition of health and comfort is exactly 
reversed. The range of temperature variation which should be confined to 
the heating apparatus alone, is trans‘erred to the apartments, which are now 
too cold and anon too warm, instead of being heated to a uniform, pleasant 
and wholesome temperature.” 

The entire article, together with Mr. Allen’s article on heating and ven- 





tilation, from the April number of the Engineering Magazine,is published in 
an attractive little volume with handsome illustrations. It is apparently de- 
signed for distribution rather than as a commercial venture, as itis announced 
to be sent free by mail on receipt of ten cents. It is to be had from the Sani- 
tary Publishing Co., P. O. Box 2202, New York. 





The tron and Steel Industry of Italy. 

From the industrial statistics of Italy for 1889, published by Signore 
Bodio, we learn that in that year the Italian production of pig iron was station- 
ary, amounting to only 13 437 tons, valued at $412,720. From the large quantity 
of pig irou imported, the following quantities of finished iron and steel were 
made from 1881 to 1889: F 

Production. 





Years. Finsihed Iron. Steel. Totals. Workmen 
Tons. Tons. Employed. 








157,899 339,522 14,518 
The production of finished iron and steel represented in 1889, a value of 


about $16 768,400. The total quantity of iron and steel manufactured in that 
year being 339522 tons. The industry has grown considerably during the 
nine years covered by the above table, the result being attributable to the 
development of steel manufacture at Terni, Savone, and other works. 





The Manufacturer of Lightweight Sheet Iron. 

A Pittsburgh dispatch (September 22) to the New York 7ribune says: It 
is now an assured fact that America will no longer need to import tinplated 
or lightweight sheets. The latter industry, a most important one, has been 
lost sight of in the immense mass of matter published on the subject of tin- 
plate. There never has been any difficulty in the manufacture in American 
rolling mills of this lightweight sheet, except an insufficient tariff, and this 
has been remedied by the McKinley act. One Pittsburgh firm, which im- 
ported all its light sheets, has agreed to buy them hereafter of a Pittsburgh 
company just as soon as itis ready to operate. There are two tinplate man- 
ufacturing companies in Western Pennsylvania, the United States Co., 
whose plant is at Demmler Station, on the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, ten 
miles from Pittsburgh, and Mr. Laufman’s establishment at Apollo, Armstrong 
County. The orders received by both companies have greatly exceeded ex- 
pectations, and both are at present engaged in greatly enlarging the capacity 
of their works. The United States Co. will double the size of its plant, and 
will complete the work late this Fall. 





$6 Chicago Excursion, October 3rd, via the Nickel Plate, 

Under the auspices of Erie Lodge No. 27, I. O. O. F., of Cleveland, O. Trains 
leave Cleveland 6:30 A. M. and 9:30 P.M. Tickets good seven days. The Chi- 
cago Exposition opens September 16th and closes October 26th. The Grant 
monument will be unveiled Tuesday, October 6th. The meeting of the So- 
ciety of the Army of the Tennessee takes place October 7th to 9th. Do not 
fail to see the World’s Fair buildings now under construction. Tickets for 
sale at following places; Larwood & Day, 259 Superior street; E. A. Cobb, 
1205 Cedar avenue ; C. H. Cobb, 1377 Cedar avenue ; G. W. H. Young, 903 Wood- 
land avenue; J. A. Robinson, room 4, 52 Public square; G. F. Bowman, Pearl 
and Detroit streets; A.T. Van Tassel, 250 Detroit stseets; P. Voelke, 1228 
Pearl street; H. Cohn, 778 Lorain street; J. Turk, 1118 St. Clair street; J. 
Damm, 2210 St. Clair street ; A. Sekeres, 193 Holton street; J. Sternischa, 101 
Wageman street; M. Kniola, 924 Tod street; F. Turek, 32 Bergen street, and 
Nickel Plate agents. For sleeping car berths and further information call at 
City Ticket office, 224 Bank streets. B. F. Horner, G. P. A. 





THE complete novel to the October number of Lippincoti’s Magazine is 
called “ Lady Patty,” and it is bright and breezy. Julien Gordon (Mrs. Van 
Rensselaer Cruger) contributes a thoughtful paper entitled “ Healthy Hero- 
ines.” “A Tiffin with a Taotai” is the curious title of an article by Edward 
Bedloe, United States Consul to Amoy, China. Mr. Bedloe gives an amusing 
description of a ceremonious lunch with a Chinese dignitary. John Gilmer 
Speed writes on “The Common Roads of Enrope.” He shows how far ahead 
of us the great nations of Europe are in the matter of roads and their admin- 
istration and maintenance. “With Washington and Wayne,” an article by 
Melville Philips, tells of the Chester Valley and vicinity, and of the many 
historic and interesting spots that that vicinity embraces. Among other arti- 
cles may be mentioned an important paper by William Agnew Paton, upon 
‘*The Lost ‘ Landfall’ of Columbus,” and a brilliant short story, “ The Belle 
of San Gabriel,” contributed by Gertrude Franklin Atherton. 








vay || 


















‘Toe IRON TRADP REvIEw. 9 











THE HACKY. POWER HAMMER- 


EDLDUORNYMOON 


No Rubbe Rubber + Cushions to wear out, 2 
-No Straps to break2 @ @ 2 22 
‘No Springs fo crystallize, 3 © © 
adjustments to be made, & 3 


‘No SS ns speed for Agae or. 
oro- heavy b Ow. *orQd- 


































THE HACKNEY HAMMER CO., CLEVELAND, O. 








CENTRAL THOMSON-HOUSTON COMPANY, 


48 ARCADE, CLEVELAND, O. 


S. D. NESMITH, - : . - - Manager. 


Motors from 1-12 h. p. to 100 h. p. 


ELECTRIC LIGHT PLANTS INSTALLED, 


Arc and Incandescent, Direct and Alternating, 





| ELECTRIC FANS! 


FANS FOR VENTILATINC! 
ELECTRIC SUPPLIES. 











INDUSTRIAL SUMMARY. 
New Enterprises :— 

The Montreal Metal Works has been incorporated at Montreal, Can., with 
a capital stock of $50,009, and will manufacture and deal in wires, rods, cables, 
etc. 

The Mills Improved Pceumatic Brake Co., of Chicago., Ill., was incorpor- 
ated in Illinois, last week, with a capital stock of $60,000, by W. B. Mills and 
O. A. Bogue. 

The Kremer Manufacturing Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., has been incorporated by 
David McK. Lloyd, Wm. E. Woodwell and J. W. Octh, all of that city. The 
capital is $25,000. 

J. W. Morrison, Jr., of Youngstown, O., and Samuel Luce, of Boston, have 
formed a partnership under the name of J. W. Morrison & Co., to engage in 
the foundry and machine business. 

The Champion Saw Co., Pittsburgh, Pa., has been incorporated by F. G. 
Rohrkaste, New Bceighton, Pa. J. D. MsAulis, New Galilee, Pa., and J. W. 
Forbes, Beaver Falls, Pa. The capital stock is $60,000. 

Pians have been prepared for a machine shop and office building to be 
erected at Charleston, Mass., for the Carson Trench Machine Co., of Boston, to 
be 22x115 feet, one story, with a boiler house wing 1ox14 feet. 

The Waukegan Iron & Steel Castings Co. has been organized at Wauke- 
gan, Ill., and is now preparing for business, and probably will be in operation 
by November 1. The company contemplates introducing the Bates process 
for steel castings. 

The Branch Tool Manufecturing Co., of Indianapolis, Ind., has been 
formed for the manufacture of machinery, tools, furnishing mative power for 
manufacturing same, etc. William E. Duthie, William H. Daggett and Frank 
B. Fowler are the directors of the company. 

The New Jersey Railroad Signal Co., of Newark, N. J., has been formed, 
with a capital stock of $53,000. J. Dawson, of Kzarney, N. J., and J. Wayland 
and W. H. Backley, of Newark, are the promotors of the company, which will 
manufacture and sell railroad signals of all descriptions. 

The Gennet Air Brake Co., of Chicago, Ill., has been incorporated with 
capital stock of $990,000, to manufacture and sell the Gennet patent air brake. 
The stockholders are Louis J. Gennett, Isaac Neuberger, Moses L. Rothschild, 
D. Wallach, Jacob Rothschild, Philip O »per and Moses L. Rothschild. 

A charter has been granted to the Lloyd’s Sons Co., of Pittsburgh, Pa., with 
acapltal stock of $200,000. The incorporators are Henry Lioyd, John W. 
Lioyd, Henry Balkan, Wm. F. Lioyd and Allen B. Wood. The new concern 
succeeds the oid firm of H. Lloyd’s Sons & Co., proprietors of the Kensington 
Iron Works, in Pittsburgh, Pa. 

4,The Salt Lake Stamping & Tinware Co. ha; been organized in Salt Lake 


City, Ucah, wth a capital stock of $100,000 to manufacture tinware. The offi- 
cers of the company are as follows: W. D. Woodbury, President; Joseph 
Jacobs, Vice president; Geo. Sherman, Treasurer; J. N. Simpson, Secretary 


and General Manager. The company will employ between 75 and 100 men. 

The following are among the new incorporations of Iilinois: Chicago 
Bicycle Co., Chicago; capital, $250,090; incorporators, L. J. Pierson, Hugh 
I, MeIndoe and R. M. Dean.—The Park Tower Co., Chicago; to construct and 
operate one or more towers in Chicago similar to the Eifel Tower in Paris; 
capital, $200,000; incorp»rators, M. M. Jamieson, G. A. Jacob and Wm. Doug- 
las.—The Madison Roofing C»>., of Madison; capital, $200,009; incorporators, 
E. W. M:Donald, W. J. Howe and H. C. Williams.—The Acme Railway Signal 
& Manufacturing Co., Chicago; capital, $52,000; incorporators, W. H. Miller, 
J. G. Bohl and E nil Linge.—The Cyclone Bicycle Manufacturing Co., Chicago; 
capital, $100,c02; incorporators, F. C. Foster, E. Erskine McMillan and J. H. 
Breese.—The Martin Car Coupler Co., Chicago; capital, $1,000,090; incorpor- 
ators, Alexander C. Martian, F. J. Barber and J. M. Corrigan.—The C. H. B. 
Sheet Milling Co., Chicago; capital, $102,000; incorporators, W. E. Stockton, 
James Buckley and A. R. Wagner. 





Additions, Enlargements, Removals, etc.:— 

The Valcan Iroa Works, at New Bvitain, Coan., will erect a new foundry 
278x78 feet in size. 

The Pitman Manufacturing Co., of Laconia, N. H., are to build new build- 
ings, at the expense of about $20,000. 

The L »well (Mass.) Steam Boiler Works, recently destroyed by fire, are to 
be rebuilt at once on a much larger scale. 

The Lorraine Manufacturing Co., Pawtucket, R. I., have begun to erect a 
new building, 40x36 feet, and two stories high. 

An addition of two pots is being made to the galvanizing department of 
the Falcon Iron & Nail Co., at Youngstown, O. 

The Riverside Iron Co., at Wheeling, is making some extensive improve- 
ments at its tube works at Benwood. A new building entirely of iron is being 





erected, and in it, among other things, will be a new heating furnace large 
enough to make 14-inch pipe. 

Work was begun on the new shop to be built at Florence, Mass., for the 
Ulrich Eagine Co. The building will be ready for occupancy by December. 

The Blake & Johnson Co., of Waterbury, Conn., are about completing a 
new machine shop, 200x45 feet, two stories high, with basement and storage 
rooms. 

At Williamsport, Pa., $100,000 has been subscribed for the purpose of secur- 
ing the works of the Backus Portable Steam Heater Co., now located at Phila- 
delphia. 

The Solid Steel Co., of Alliance, O., is reported to be preparing to double 
the capacity of its plant, on account of the increase in its orders for steel 
castings. 

The Belden Machine Co., of New Haven, Conn., is constructing a new four- 
story brick building, 190x93 feet. The new machine shop will be fitted with 
the latest improved machinery. 

St. Albans Foundry Co., St. Albans, Vt., report that their orders for gen- 
eral castings have increased to such an extent that they are now erecting an 
addition to their general foundry. 

The American Nat Lock Co. is enlarging its plant at St. Louis, Mo., so as 
to double the present capacity. The company will turn out 30,000 nut locks 
daily and expects to use oil under the furnaces. 

The Courtwright Manufacturing Co., of Detroit, manufacturer of railroad 
hand cars and other supplies, will soon remove its works to Benton Harbor, 
Mich., where land has been purchased for new works. 

The Sigourney Tool Co., Hartford, have just completed an addition to 
their works of a fine two-story brick building, 84x34 feet. They contemplate 
the erection of other buildings on their grounds very soon, 





Fires and Accidents:— 

The pattern foundry of Weir & Craigs, Chicago, Ill., was damaged by fire 
to the extent of $30,000 on the 24th ult. 

The Maumee Boiler Works at Toledo, O., have been entirely destroyed 
by fire at a loss of $20,000, fully covered by insurance. 

Qaite a serious accident occurred on the 19th ult. in the Bessemer convert- 
ing department of the Homestead Steel Works of Carnegie, Phipps & Co., 
Limited, at Homestead, Pa. The men were engaged in removing the slag that 
had accumulated during the week in one of the converters, and during the 
operation a link in the chain supporting the ladle broke and the boiling 
metal was thrown over the workmen. Six men were very badly burned, and 
two of them have since died. 


General Industrial Notes:— 


ealed proposals will be received at the office of the Supervising Archi- 
tect, Treasury Department, Washington, D. C., until 2 o'clock p.M., on the 12th 
day of October, 1891, for all the labor and materials required for putting in 
place complete the new low-pressure, return-circulation, steam-heating and 
ventilating apparatus for the United States Court House and Postoffice build- 
ing at Portland, Me. 

Furnace No. 2, owned by Junction Iron Co., located at Mingo Junction, 
O.,and managed by Geo. A. Dean, is having a very successful run. It has 
made in 80 successive days, since July 1st, 17,000 520-2268 tons Bessemer iron, 
averaging over 2 per cent. silicon and less than .035 sulphur. Furnace is 75 
feet high, 17 feet bosh; equipped with Gordon, Strobel & Laureau fire brick 
hot blasts. The full consumption is less than 1,900 pounds coke to the ton of 
iron made. 

The Totten & Hogg Iron & Steel Foundry Co., Pittsburgh, Pa, have, 
within the last few days, received an order from the San Diego Iron & Steel 
Co., of San Diego, California, for one of their large improved squeezers; also 
an order from the Griswold Linseed Oil Co., of Warren, O., for ten large chill 
rolls turned and complete for housings, bed plate, etc., for grinding flaxseed 
used in making oil. They are also filling orders from Pittsburgh, Scottdale, 
Towanda, Louisville and Minneapolis for rolls of all kinds and sizes. 

A favorable decision is looked for by the creditors of Brown, Bonnell & 
Co., of Youngstown, O.,in the case brought by T. C. Crawford, counsel for 
Herbert C. Ayer, to set aside the sale on the ground that the appraisal was too 
low. Evidence prepared by the creditors is said to show that there is no 
foundation for either claim. Counsel have been notified that a decision will 
be rendered in October. The plant has been in charge of Receiver Fayette 
Brown, of Cleveland, since February, 1883, and has run without intermission, 
except when necessary to make repairs. Following a favorable decision by 
the Supreme Court a company will be organized to operate it, and Receiver 
Brown will file his final report. 

The Pittsburgh Iron & Steel Engineering Co. has received a contract from 
the Shenango Valley Steel Co. for the erection of a new Bessemer plant at 




























































































TO ‘Term Iron TRaApDP Review. 











New Castle, Pa. The equipment will consist of two 7-ton Bessemer con- 
verters, with three 10-foot cupalos, atwo-high 36-inch blooming mill to be driven 
by a pair of 4260-inch engines. Also two blowing engines 60x42x50 inches in 
size ; 12 tubular boilers, 72 inches in diameter and 18 feet long, and two 5 hole 
soaking pit furnaces. The new plant will have a capacity of 700 tons of billets 
per day, and will probably be completed and in operation by July 1, 1892. The 
officers of the company are as follows: W. E. Reis, President; J. P. H. Cun- 
ningham, Vice-President; George E. Berger, Secretary and Treasurer, and 
Tohn Stevenson, Jr., General Manager. 





Tue World’s Fair power plant will be of 24,000 horse-power, and will 
require the services of 250 engineers, firemen and attendants. 





ee a 


THE STIRLING COMPANY 


MANUFACTURE 


The Safest, Most Economical, Compact and Durable High Pressure 


WATER TUBE BOILERS. 


All Wrought Steel. Large Mud Drum. Perfect Circulation. 





By removing four manhole covers access is gained to every part of the boiler. 
Dry steam and great economy of fuel guaranteed. 


NEW YORK OFFICE: 
74 Cortlandt St. 


PITTSBURGH OFFICE: 
Lewis Block. 


GENERAL OFFICE: 
Pullman Bldg., Chicago. 


Works: BARBERTON, SUMMIT COUNTY, OHIO. 





WT AI XE: DD. 
Good Hnergetic Solicitors for the 
COATES OIL BURNER. 


Must be practical in the matter of combustion and steam, and Theories in the building of 
Furmaces. State References and Territory prefered. 


A recom COATES OIL BURNER GO, TE*** "ABTS, 


EDISON GENERAL ELECTRIG COMPANY, 


EDISON BUILDING, BRVAD ST,, NEW YORK. 








Electric Lighting.| Electric Motors. | Electric Railways. | Electric Drills. 
INCANDESCENT |For ALL POWER| PASSENGER, | PERCUSSION 
a fest ger PURPOSES. TRAMWAYS. AND 
BESTLIGHT SAFE AND RE- MINE DIAMOND, 
IN USE. LIABLE. HAULAGE. FOR MINING. 








Address Nearest District Office. 
DISTRICT OFFICES: 


CANADIAN District, Bank of Commerce Building, Toronto, Ont. 
CENTRAL DISTRICT, 173-175 Adams St., Chicago, I11. 

EASTERN District, Edison Bldg.,; Broad St., New York. 

NEw ENGLAND DISTRICT, 25 Otis St., Boston, Mass. 

Paciric Coast District, Edison Bldg., 112 Bush St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Paciric NORTHWEST DIsTRICT, Fleischner Bldg., Portland, Ore. 

Rocky MounNTAIN District, Masonic Bldg., Denver Col. 

SOUTHERN District, Gould Bldg., 10 Decatur St., Atlanta, Ga. 


HAS YOUR WAREROOM 
BEEN ROBBED? 


Our corrugated or plain Iron or Steel SHUTTERS and DOORS 
will render it Fire and Burglar Proof. We also cover wooden 
shutters and doors with flat painted sheets, either plain or 
with corduroy corrugations. For prices, etc., address 


The Gincinnati Corrugating Company, 


PIQUA, O. 














BOX 320. 
of& WHAT'S TMAT? 
ihe g . 
a j a sa ary F 
P\ |" or good quality and bottom prices order 
ANS ae SOTO 


] your FACINGS, FIRE-BRICK, CLAY, 
| 
|. 


oak 
=r Founpry SupPties, 






oy 


MOULDING SAND and everything for a foundry, of 


F. B. STEVENS, 


DETROIT, MICH. 


That’s What! 














150 to'2000 H- 
FOR ROLLING MILLS AND ALL OTHER 


WORKS WHERE LARGE POWER AND 
CLOSE REGULATION IS REQUIRED 


CONTRACTS MADE FOR COMPLETE 
—— STEAM PLANTS = 


= P. ‘Latest Design® 


ol 


ENGINES ALWAYS IN STOCK, 





on ‘ . , > + * oe —¥ 
a a. oo a 
Se 


ble. 





THE AMERICAN 


WATCHMAN’S TIME DETECTOR. 


This Electrical instrument, which is operated b 
either battery or magneto generator as preferr 
is designed to, and does, keep an exact record of 
the doings of the Night Watchman in any estab- 
lishment whereit is in use. It is an active and 
faithful guardian of your premises during the 
night. It is simple, reliable and absolutely infalli- 


Cannot be tampered with without certain 


detection. 
Thousands of testimonials from the first concerns. 
in the land. Send for catalogue to 


The Cleveland Electrical Mfg. Co... 


44 and 46 Sheriff Street, 
CLEVELAND, O. 


ARTHUR B. FOSTER, GENL. MANAGER. 





THE GARFIELD 





SUPPLY 
The Garfield Double Jet injector. 


INJECTOR CO., 


WADSWORTH, O-.-; 


—MANUFACTURERS OF—- 
| Locomotive Injector, 
Automatic Injector, 
1 Double Jet Injector 

AND 
Ejector. 
Strong, Carlisle & Turney, 


General Agents, 


CLEVELAND, O. 


CARFIELD 








FOR SALE---BLOWING ENCINE. 


Vertical pattern, with balanced steam slide valve gear, steam cylinder 14-in. diameter, air 
cylinder 4o-in. diameter, stroke 24 in., 1 to 190 strokes per minute; engine new. For price and 


particulars address 


THE JAMES LEFFEL & CoO.. Springfield, O. 





TWO BOOKS 


—FOR— 


Foundrymen. 


AMERICAN FOUNDRY PRACTICE. 
BY THOS. D. WEST. 


Treating of Loam, Dry Sand and 
Green Sand Moulding, and contin- 
ing a Practical Treatise upon the 
management of Cupolas and 
the Melting of Iron. 


Wesi’s Moulder’s Text-Book 


Belug Part II of American Foundry Practice 


Presenting best methods and original rules 
for Shtein’te ¢208, sound, clean cvstings, and 
giviug detailed descriptionforms ing moulds 
reqriring skill and experience. 

Alsocontais.inga practicaltre ise upon the 
coustruction of cranes and cupe.as, and the 
raciting of iron and scrap steel in iro: 
fourdries. Hither of the above books wili be 
sent by mail, postage paid, $2.50. Address 


The Iron Trade Review Company, 
CLEVELAND. oO. 





Advertising. 





JF you wish to advertise anything anywhere 
at any time write toGEO. P. ROWELL & 
CU., No. 10 Spruce St., New York. 





| Age one in need of information on the 
subject of advertising will do well to ob- 
tain a copy of ‘Book for Advertisers,’ 368 
pages, price one dollar. Mailed, postage paid, 
on receipt of price. Contains a careful com- 
pilation from the American Newspaper Direct- 
ory of all the best papers and class journals ; 
gives the circulation rating of every one, and 
a good deal of information about rates and 
other matters pertaining to the business of 
advertising. Address ROWELL’S ADVER- 
TISING BUREAU, Io Spruce St., N. Y. 





GRANULATED RAW BONE 


For Case Hardening and Coloring 


For samples, prices, etc., apply to 
THE ROGERS & HUBBARD CO., Middletown, Ct. 


PORTABLE BOILERS. 


We have for sale one 20 H. P. 
and one 25 Hi. P. Portapie Boilers 
of the Oil Country Type. These 
Boilers are made from the very best 
material, are entirely new, and have 
been tested to 160 lbs. pressure. 
Smoke Stacks and Fittings, complete, 
will be furnished if desired. For de- 
scription and prices apply to 


Bassett, Presley & Train, 


COR. ELM & HEMLOCK STS., 








CLEVELAND, ~ OHIO. 








silt, I 








offers 





AM a 
that 
States, } 
great bo 
years—2 
Indiana 
one-six 
mileage 
talk abo 





Na 





ILLINO 
INDIAN 
MICHIC 


WIsco? 





To 





This 3 








than the 
5,000 as 
combine 


X 
Georgiz 
ippi cor 


YOU } 


end of L; 
north, in 
touched. 
than all 
and Ohic 
United § 
was 100, 
THE 0} 





"Texwm Iron “Rape ReEvIEw. 





It 











BE SEATED! 


YOU LOOK LIKE 





« 


















AMAN OF SENSE. lp. 
WE WISHTO TALK TO0¢ S127, econ! 
YOU ALITTLE ABOUT }% ia i 





MUSKEGO 


Wr We 
SED 


+) 

















YYZ 


a }) 


(ae ee VAG 














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I wish to say to you that for the Manufacturer or Investor 


THE CITY OF MUSKEGON, MICH., 


offers greater opportunities, has more real merit than ANY young 
City of the United States. 





| AM aware that this is a BoLp STATEMENT, but I am prepared to give Facts and Figures 

that will astonish you. Notice this map on the wall, the Lake Michigan District, four 
States, having a common center (Lake Michigan). These four States, bordering on the only 
great body of water lying wholly within the United States, have an average age as States—61 
years—and no district of the world ever made sucha recyrd. These four States: Illinois, 
Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin, had, by the census of 1890, 9,781,255 population, or nearly 
one-sixth of the entire population of the Union; they have over one-fifth of the railway 
mileage of the United States, and over one-tenth of the railway mileage of the world; and 
talk about rapid growth—Look at this table: 








- ,' ae 
NAME OF STATE. GAIN LAST 30 YEARS. PRESENT POPULATION—1890. 





= | oe 

















ILLINOIS. ...cccccoscccccvcccsccccees 2,106,585 3,818,536 

INDIANA. .....cccccscssccecocecseeses 1,514,117 sr "9,289,030 re 

ee ET immam  eey e 2,089,792 ae 

WISCONSIN ..cvsscscsseeeees sins i ae a 
tiesto Le) geil : 9,781,285 eigrid 


This 30 years gain—5,868,397—is MORE than the present ENTIRE POPULATION 
of the following FIFTEEN STATES, viz: 












NOTE = I Califormia.........0+00 ssieeanhseielabimananeii’ 1,204,002 
P| | re Replat ERA eames 410,975 

MICHIGAN, which is twenty Se) ONORINIEIIIINE ca cccdegasyackons+escastensasaes 745,861 

s me Fi cactncann vhaktntiniavtidsteanmenean €60,251 

years younger than Illinois or Ri, TPRIIIINE, | icuninidacnteicns debiieinaseceeieden e« 332,205 
Indiana, made nearly ©. -BUSe TEMUE POINT G Os, oossccecsesesanesesscnsss 375,227 
BRU RIES, Si. ce teansisithincoasenaeee’ 345,343 

23 PER CENT Os OEE, .ncscsncesscasncoessevstsiotianniens SEINE 

bd | 9 Montana.........ccccc wewsacsetoccescsceseces 131,769 

, E A DO. UMN sicns wesastaunssinunninlebtnensds bere scuian 44,327 

of the entire gain of this four- Rit RNID 6 an cca iacenaiten caepumanern 349,516 
state district for the last thirty | 1 Utah... 206,498 
ES COI ciciesdacenn seeevessesereses 312,490 

years. Be I Ca INITIO a dicccaccciasancussecuecossnsion 182,425 
SR Ge iss tacscectiaacossniciacts oe 327,848 

THE FOUR-STATE GAIN WAS 5,868,397. m ’ a eae 
Se Ss a as A 5,796,598 

16 West Virginia..... needitacencndiun aketse 760,448 

‘ : 17 Maryland... cnscccacesscorsccsccssescecensesd 040,432 

The present population of this | 18 Florida ......cccesesseesscecsecesesesseeeee 390,435 
four-state district is 9,781,255 or 19 mre onan eee eeeree eens recess seeeeseesess esses 84,229 
a BO FAS FOLGS Yn. cncsvesscnnecnsesssacessnsccsccee 1,441,017 

MORE than the 22 opposite: 54 aac NMR I oes cxeccssvnseesins 60,589 
Re Fe NO cred nas cenesevscivednceunsecees 144,862 

See U. S. Census 1890. = 
TA, tacinecoshakoaendanmananinbeiied 9,718,609 





NOTE.—Michigan gained more population in the last 30 years—see table above— 
than the present entire population of Connecticut, Vermont and Delaware combined, or within 
5,000 as much population as Oregon, Washington, Colorado, Montana and Nevada have 
combined. 


NOTE.—Michigan gained more population in the last 10 years than Virginia and 
Georgia together gained, or than Kentucky and Tennessee, or Alabama and Mississ- 


ippi combined gained. 
YOU ARE SURPRISED AT TH IS It was your impression that all the growth 

. and wealth of this district was at the south 
end of Lake Michigan, but let me tell you right here that the great intrinsic wealth is farther 
north, in the Iron, Copper, Salt and Timber district. The hardwood forests have scarcely been 
touched. Michigan puts out yearly over half the Iron Ore mined in the United States; more 
than all the Southern States combined. Nearly every pound of Steel made in Pennsylvania 
and Ohio is made from Ore coming from this district, (96.3 per cent of the Steel output of the 
United States for 1890 is accredited to six States lying along the Great Lakes) and this output 


was 100,000 tons more than that of Great Britain for 1889—-MICHIGAN FURNISHED 
THE ORE. 








When You Have Absorbed 


TME 


FOREGOING FACTS AND FIGURES 


You are beginning to reach a point where you will appreciate the 
location of the City of 


MUSKEGON. 


Notice on this Map on the wall, and in the Cut below, 


MUSKEGON’S CENTRAL LOCATION 


IN THIS GREAT 


TEN MILLION POPULATION DISTRICT. 


IT HAS THE BEST LOCATION IN MICHICAN. 


LOOK AT THIS! 


MICHIGAN CIRCLES. 
NAVIGATION CITIES. 





OBJECT LESSON. 








Radius of Each Circle, 125 Miles. 


POPULATION :—Each Circle has 
in round numbers in United 
States population as follows: 








SAGINAW CIRCLE, - : 
DETROIT CIRCLE, - - ‘e 
MUSKEGON CIRCLE, - ‘ 


1,725,000 
2,600,000 
2,725,000 


NOTE.—See Cram’s Atlas, Census 1890, by Counties. 





The great business centers of this Lake Michigan District are the Coast Cities. Muske- 
gon is third in size on this great body of water and has the finest natural inside Harbor on 
Lake Michigan, sixteen miles of water front, all available, deep water—114 miles from Chicago 
and 85 miles from Milwaukee, with which two cities navigation is open the year round. 
Only 175 miles by navigation from the greatest Bessemer Ore shipping docks in the world. 
Rare combination—Raw Materials, Best Shipping Facilities and Best Markets in the 
United States. 


IT IS AN ACTUAL FACT that cargoes of heavy merchandise can be carried from 
Muskegon to the business center of Chicago quicker and for less money than the same 
quantity can be brought in by rail from points 10 to1s5 miles outside the limits of Chicago. 
Noexperiment. Doing it now. 


These great advantages are beginning to be appreciated. Twenty-one factories hav 
been located in the last eighteen months. Among the factories secured are: The Alaska 
Refrigerator Co., Large Rolling Mill, New Steel Works, Chase Bros. Piano Co., 
Sargeant’s Invalid Chair Co., Nelson Piano Co., Mich. Washing Mach. Co., Malle- 
able Iron Works, Machine and Foundry Co., Electric Alarm Co., Shaw Electric 
Crane Co., Houck Furniture Co., Electrical Power Co., Muskegon Cracker Co., 
Standard Oil Co. Barreling Works, Morton Key Seating Co., Kelly Bros. Mfg. Co., 
Heaps Earth Closet Co., Gray Bros. Mfg. Co., Hartshorn Shade Eoller Co., New 
Flouring Mill—All just completed or now building. 


Why do you *“ CHASE RAINBOWS ” on the outskirts of the Country, 
and invest at high prices, when you can get property near the 
great business center of the “‘ Central West” for half the money, 
and having double the intrinsic worth? 


A GOLDEN OPPORTUNITY IS BEFORE YOU. *xncr co pores 


leading citizens, have just commenced their 2nd Great Lot Sale. 2,000 Lots at the uni- 
form price of $165 each, location to be determined by allotment as soon as 50 per. cent. is 
paidin. Terms of Subscription: $15 down, balance $10 each month. $165 secures you a 
good lot, sox125 feet, with rear, in the phenomenal addition ** MUSKEGON 
HEIGHTS,” which addition is pronounced by Real Estate Experts to be as fine an addition 
as any city in this country can show. It is less than one and one-half miles from the business 
center of the City of Muskegon, with which it is connected by handsome, paved streets and an 
Electric Street Railway. This addition has twelve large factories located upon it now ; has good 
Hotel, Brick Blocks and Stores, Depot, three paved streets, a large number of good residences 
Every lot is level and desirable. There is not a lot on the addition worth less than 
the price asked. The net avails of this sale to be used to locate ten more factories. All the 
factories on Muskegon Heights are solid,substantial brick structures, the smallest is 50x150 feet, 
2 stories ; the largest plant is two buildings, each 6ox400, one 2 stories, the other 3 stories high . 
the latter plant is owned by four Bank Presidents and is the largest factory of its kind in the 
world. DON’T MISS THIS OPPORTUNITY. Such chances for sure paying invest- 
ment are rare. 


THE MUSKEGON IMPROVE- 


alley in 


If you wish to subscribe, remit by Money Order, P. O. or Express, or Bank Draft, to 


F. H. HOLBROOK, Sec’y Board of Trade, or 


HOLBROOK & McDONALD, SALES ACGTS., 
MUSKEGON IMPROVEMENT CO. 


REFERENCES: Any Bank in the City of Muskegon. Send for Maps, Plats and Information, 




























































































I2 








Tes Iron TRApDP Review. 








Alphabetical List of Advertisers 


The star (*) indicates that the adv. appears 
alternate weeks ; the dagger (¢) once a month 
the double dagger (t) once in three weeks. 













Pace 
I CO aia, ccitiis cxonsecdevesesennsesaninne 15 
Aitchison, Rob’t Perforated Metal Co.......... 15 
eg Sie TE TOI i siittsecem scene: tiecwngenievonvupeesoenn 20 
Automatic Time sete & vital Céi.6:. 14 
Buckeye Engine Co. 5 hE LTS 
SL UE Rt CD vcasdsnsincipegnigaiinesbassbbousscsceees 14 


I iia: OE COP dncnce éamisseorapnnistl-esthtgcavivens 16 


Ball, Wood & Co.. an 30 
*Berger Mfg. Co..... os 19 
Babcock & Wilcox «ss 20 


Buffalo Specialty Mig Co.. ichpiaetans techie 
Bostwick Steel Lath Co.. cacieebiiiesessseusecs SP 
PE Fr NINO GOO oops cnteacher cots coseses eovedseen — 









DANSE, Preslcy & Traist..ccccicce.sscocesssccarscccce 8O 
Cambridge Iron & S eel Co........... cece vee 23 
Cleveland Electrical Mfg. Co............... . 10 
Cleveland City Fo ge & Iron Co. -++ 20 


Cleveland Twist Drill Co.. ‘ 
Cleveland Iron Mining ERIE” 13 
Cleveland Rolling Mill Co ... 
Cleveland Desk Co 
EE EE I cds vi ink se toknopececlec acebhvninheenepell 
*Copeland & Bacon.. 
Colliau, Victor. 

Canton Iron Foundry Co... 
Cambridge Roofing Co......... 

FB, is ME cc wpihcodecssecgnscecesacne 
Chester Steel Casting Co.. 

























Central Thomson-Houston Co........-... sss. 9 

“Cincinnati Corrugati g TDiisaieus diane OF ai 10 
“Chandler & Taylor Co. ‘ eo 
RE ke ORE 0 ook csi cctecccevsiensovenctecccs 10 
DOIN OO peters evs sscvevresssvecenctsvosvscevcoeervecesevece 18 
Dalliba, Corrigan & Co.. pened Saaneatiineene' San 
Dearborn Drug & Chemicai Co. lsfvnstsonets. a 
Dixon, Jos., Crucible Co.. o 15 
Mi Oy OE OO cnacstcesenckassvncssencncnedbpsneteanteeee 19 
Egan Co...... sobiedsdsepeute hes sivh tayovdvvpesece 15 
Enterprise Boiler Co... ddecnthins- givagtecenen 20 
Edison General Electric Co.. ; ee ae 
DES EE I ERE 20 
Eclipse Electrotype& Engraving Co........... 17 
es Oe Go vei prcce recive ~ascascctcsennnonounesoucaneebcscche 18 
PEs Sx BO. OE COW bncceicoccccscecsontntacccscetesbaad 16 
Fuller Bros......... - 2 
|) 1 a ae 16 
Fitzgerald, Milla: ©  eeinaabusepipdibass cbdiite abetcuhienandbies » 12 


Graham Twist Drill Co.. 
Garvin Machine Co ......... 
“Garfield Injector Co....... 
Garry Iron Koofing Co 
Graves, L. 8. & Son............ 


Gerlach, Peter & Co.. 


Hazelton Tripod walter’ Daiddieaahhasmccasnekaneds 18 
RS re spn nncagns 20 
Harrington & King Perforating Co........... 12 
SINE Ns MAE A Dare coccion so ces coumseconvctoacncs: Sevee -- 
Holton Iron Roofing Co.. ée ee 
Harford Steam Boi er insp. "& Ins. Co....... 16 
MCMC TERM CE CO. oo vice ccteiscesesscccenres vesesase 9 
Hartman Sliding Blind Co......................00e 16 


Hercules Powder Co ....... nae: ke -cawnemeeed 18 
“Holbrook & McDonald... 


“Indiana Machine Works..... Semiecunee ae 


Jones, E. H. & Co....... 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co 
II: SEMIS bcccocsevessess sevece-soccs 00s 
Kanneberg Roofing Co.. 
* Leffel, JAS. 8 CO ..---.scrcscsersrceesceees conscoes 
LaFountaine Mfg. Co. sbinndeees ane 
Lancaster, James Dies ie inet ati bialieaeanai. canta 
“Long Steel Se Se SO CD cn sepecsesrscnnncnes 
*Leffel Water Wheel & Engine Co.............. — 
I, SIO OO incccccccenccescxccasensovesectsreees 16 
Milton Mfg. Co........ .....+ ses a 
*Neracher Sprinkler Co... 
Outhwaite, J. H. & Co.. 





Ogieba ha oe & Co.. 13 
Oldfiel paaveseune y Id 
Pope, E. © vcwacesseesencccosece 13 
Bs Oe BE TOD, srenene ve casseenes sosevscsccncess cess — 
Parkin & Bosworth Co........cccsscees soseee a 
Palmer, Cunning ham & CoO ...........:ccssseeeeenee 14 
Pittsburgh & Wheeling Coal Cn... asus eke a 


Penberthy Inject-r Co 
Pollock, Wm. B. & Co.. 
Rogers & Hubbard Co. ihceiesigah dvinwioa 
Rowell, Geo. P. & Co.........---seeeeeres siiacinneiien ae 
Reynolds Bros.. cnet cineshchdaaieliasdee + weasace ae 
“Stan Alumin Co. ......... 








Schleicher, Schumm & Co.. Sfedicabesdioes cubuetenagleahos 18 
Sykes Iron Roofiag CO.........csceeeseeeseeeeees 19 
ON Se rere OPS SES 14 
Southwark Foundry & Machine Co pds enseians 19 
2S SORA eee ne Ee See ae 10 
Stilwell & Bierce Mfg. Co..........cccecsecsereccscees 20 
Spicer MEQ. CO.......cescresccecersessssessserereeceneees 12 
Shepard, BE, Teg PR BSCE.. ner socecccccccscemsccsnccncsee 16 
aulding & RMS Be ON 5 concn asco 12 
skinner Engine Co. eaaahuane  acemnaaee 19 
SR | UNI on coh ccenadnuesncceroneckoooontaeecocts enqesseer 10 

~» ie Dee Be TOG? C0 iin c dhetes ccndd covcssuesi 1§ 
RE I, Be OD sn canniseccaesisocces . 18 


Totten & Hogg Iron & Steel F oundry Co... 10 
Van Duzen Gas Engine Co.... 
TWpson Nut CO.......::seerreee-sseeereneenenerererenecsecss 
Union Electrotype oon a 
Universal Radial Drill Co.. 
* Wells Machine Works. . 
*Webster, Warren & Co.. 

Webster, Camp & Lane Machine Co.. 
West, Thos. D. Foundry Co.......ceee os 
Westinghouse Machine Co............ceccssreeeeeeee 









Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul Ry. Co. 
GENERAL OFFICE; 


160-172 Adams St., Chicago. 


INDUSTRIAL DEPARTMENT, 


The Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway 
Co invites manufacturers, wholesale houses 
and jobbers to sectle on its lines. 

Its industrial Department is conversant 
with the resources, water powers, advantages 
and facilities of the territory through which 
the lines run, and disseminates information 
concerning same, It co-operates with organ- 
izations seeking the advancement of cities and 
individuals interested in the develop -ment of 
natural resources. Eastern manufacturers 
contemplating a removal to Western points 
nearer the actual field of consumption of their 
product; or companies desiring to embark 
capital in Western industry, will be cheerfully 
sup ‘lied with informatioa relative to the 
adaptability of localities to their partic lar 
requirements. The inform tion furnished is 
absolutely reliable and has a practica! bearing 
on the nature of the particular industry. 

Inducements such as free sites, bonuses or 
removal expenses offered by active Western 
points, with the view of indu ing factories to 
locate, are becoming more and more rare. In 
the course of a few age they will altogether 
cease, because of the absolute merits of the 
West. 

The Ch’ cago Milwaukee & St Paul Railway 
Co , one of the greatest railway systems in the 
world operating over 6 000 miles of road), runs 
through a vast territory rich in ail the 
resources and advantages that insure indus- 
trial success. 

The tron interests on the line will bear im- 
mense development. Large tracts of Hem- 
lock bark will supply all the tanneries in the 
United States. carties owning forests of 
Hardwood offer concessions to furniture facto- 
ties that would locate ; the lumber interests 
are great. 

For further particulars relative to industrial 
advantages on the line, address, 


LUIS JACKSON, 


Industrial Commissioner, 


C.M & St. P. R’y 160 Adams St., Chicago, Ill 








\ A pamphlet of information and ab- 
stract of the laws, showing How to 
Obtain Patents, Caveats, Trade 
. Marks, Copyrights, sent Sree. 
Wa MUNN & CO. 
361 Broadway, 
New York. 











S. T. W. Ejector. 


piscnenee For Raising Water from 
i Deep Wells, Streams, 
Excavations, &c. 
The cheapest made. Send for 
prices 
JAMES JENKS, 
Manufacturer, 
DETROIT, MICH. 
M. P. SATTERTHWAITE, Agt., 
SuGTION Cleveland, 0. 








Plate Iron Washers 


A SPECIALTY ! 
Even in Gauge, 
smooth and well 
finished. 
Cut from new plate, roiled expressty for the pur- 
Address, 





pose. @@ Write for prices, 


MILTON MFG CO.. Milton, Pa. 


‘/PATENTS 


For INVENTORS. 4o-page Book Free. Address 
W.T. Fitzgerald, Att’y at Law. Washington, D.C. 








THE _PROCUNIER STEAM 





TRAP 


ON TOP. 


The only STEAM TRAP made 
that opens mechanically and 
drains itself when steam is shut 
off, 


Sent on Thirty Days Trial, 
SPAULDING & METCALF, 


63 &. Canal St., Chicago, Ill. 
5t N. Seventh St., Philadelphia, Pa. 





224 & 226 NORTH UNION St 
PEKFORaTLD BRASS. PERFORATED TIN. 


IARI 
J. 


OFFICE AND WORKS 


CHICAGO, I LL.U.S.A. 


284 Pearl st. cor. Beekman, 


NEW, YORK. 








OuUR I.INE OF UPRICHT 


Light Bench or No. 1 Drill Press. 


THE GARVIN MACHINE COMPANY 


Machinery and Machine _ Tools. 


Plants for Manufacturers of Sewing Machines and Electrical 


Laight & Canal Sts., 


ost Drill. 1 or 2 Spindles. 


No. 2 Drill Press. 


DRILL FP’RESSES. 





No. 4 Drill Press. 


No. 3 Drill Press. 


Manufacturers of, and Dealers in, all kinds of 


Universal and Plain Milling Machines, Drill Presses, Screw Machines, Hand and 
Engine Lathes, Planers, Profilers, Chucking Machines, Gear Cutters, Die 
and Cutter Grinders, Tapping Machines, Wire-Spring Coilers, Milling 
Cutters, etc. 


GEAR CUTTING AND MILLING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 


[Catalocue sent on Application.) 

















SS ad 
We 


SER Y oT, 


NEw York. “™ 





ADELPHIA 





e 
FY 
= 
= 
=. 
= 
= 
= 
= 
io) 





VICTOR COLLIAU, 


Sole Manufacturer of the 
Improved Patent 
HOT BLAST 


COLLIAU CUPOLA 


ADDRESS: 


287 Jefferson Ave.. 
DETROIT, - MICH. 








SPICER MANUFACTURING CO., 


New Philadelphia, O 


General Foundry and Machine Work, 
Heavy and Light Castings. 


Privilege to make estimates solicited. 


4 USE poor printing when you 
can get the best at the same 
rices, of the CLEVELAND 
RINTING & PUBLISHING Co., 

oO. 


Cleveland, 








Goods. 


NEW YORK. 








Shenar 
(00 00 ; 
soften 
very Ni 
No. 2, 

$18 50@ 
Southe 
ern S& 
Strong 
Strong 
Car Wk 
coal, $2 


19595 | 
Lake 8 
Str. L 
Meacha 
Southe: 
Coke N 
$3 75@: 
13 50; § 
Souther 
Charcos 
No. 2, | 
19 00, 
Lake 81 


ville Co 


Louis 
Co;: & 
1500; §& 
1425; § 
13 753 
Coke si 
coal Ne 
$18 50@: 

Pitts! 
No.1 F 
$15 00@1 
and Mo 
coal, $1§ 
@27 00 ; 









"Texm IRON “TRADP ReEvIEw. 


13 

















ss. 


re 











Printed in the Hig!.est Style of Art, by 
[ AT A il t lf ES The Cleveland Printing & Publishing Co., 
Cleveland, QO: 


CLEVELAND ROLLING MILL CO. 


MANUFACTURERS OF 


BESSEMER STEEL RAILS, 


Blooms and Billets, Steel Angles, Forgings, Bar and Spring Steel. Steel Street Rails, Stee) (i 
aA gles, gings Spring 8, 


rrel Hoops, wee of all 


inds, Iron and Steel Boiler Plates, Galvanized and 


eet Iron, Corrugated Iron Roofing. Sheet Steel. 





IRON AND STEEL MARKETS. 
Pic IRON. 


CLEVELAND (f. 0. b. cars, net cash) 
Bessemer, $17 30; No. 1 Foundry, $16 80; No.2 
Foundry, $15 80; No. 1 Gray Forge, red short, 
$14 80; No.2 Grhy Forge, neutral, $14 30; No. 
1 American Scotch, $1680; No. 2 American 
Sco.ch, $15 80. 


CHIcaeo (reported by Messrs. Rogers, Brown 
& Merwin): Southern Coke No.1.foundry,$16 25 
@17 00; Southern Coke No. 2 Foundry, 315 25 
@16 00; Southern Coke No.3 Foundry, $14 75 
@i5 0; Southern Coke Nor, Softeners, $15 25 
@16 oo; Southern Coke No. 2, Softeners, $14 50 
@t5 25; Ohio Silveries No. 1, $17 50@18 50; 
Ohio Silveries No. 2, $1650@ 1750; Ohio 
Strong Softeners No. 1, $15 00@190) ; Ohio 
Strong Softeners No. 2, $17 25@18 25; Lake 
Superior Charcoal Nos. 1 to 6, $17 75@18 50; 
Tennessee Charcoal No. 1, $18 00@1900; 
Tennessee Charcoal No. 2, $17 00@18 00; 
Southern Standard Car Wheel, $21 00@23 00; 
Tennessee Standard Car Wheel, $00 0o@o0 oo. 


CINCINNATI (fr rted by Rogers, Brown & 
Co.:; Founpry Irons—Southern Coke, No. 1 
foundry, $14 75@15 25; Southern coke, No. 2 
and No. 1 soft, $13 75@t4 00; Hanging Rock 
Coke, No. 1 rsp’ $16 50@17 50; Jackson Co. 
Stone Coal, No.1 foundry, $16 1700; Ten- 
nessee Charcoal, No.1 foundry, $16 50@17 50; 
Hanging Rock Charcoal, No. 1 foundry, $20 00 
@22 00. Mix Inons—Standard Southern Coke, 
grey forge, $12 50@1275; Standard Southern 
Coke, mottied, $12 25@12 3; Cold Short South- 
ern Coke, grey forge, 12 75@13 00; Strong 
Ohio Neutral ke, grey forge, $15 15 50. 
Car WHEEL AND MALLEABLE—Standar aia 
bama Car Wheel, $19 50@20 50; Tennessee Car 
Wheel, $18 oo@19 09; Lake Superior Car Wheel, 
$19 50@2o0 50. 

BUFFALO (reported by Rogers, Brown & 
Co.): Mahoning and Shenango Valley strong, 
No.1 vounery. $16 50@oo 00; Mahoning and 
Shenango Valley strong, No. 2 Foundry, $15 50 
@oo oo ; Vhio Softener No. 1, $16 50@o0 00 ; Ohio 
softener No. 2, $15 50@0000; Jackson Co., Sil- 
very No. 1, $:8 co@o00 00; Jackson Co. Silvery, 
No. 2, $17 0o@o00 00; Lake Superior Charcoal, 
$18 50@oo oo ; Tennessee Charcoal, $17 50@19 00; 
Southern Softener No. 1, $16 co@00 00; South- 
ern Softener No. 2, $15 25@o000; Southern 
Strong No. 1 Foundry, $16 75@oo 00; Southern 
Strong No. 2 Foundry, $16 c0o@o00 00° Alabama 
Car Wheel, $22 00@22 50; Hanging Rock Char- 
coal, $23 00@24 00. 

LOUISVILLE (reported by Hall Bros. & Co.) 
Hot BLast Founpry—Southern coke No. 1, 
$14 25@14 50; Southern coke No. 2, $13 50@14 00; 
Southern coke No. 3, $13 00@13 25 ; Mahoning 
Valley (Lake ore mixtures), $00 oo@eo 00 ; 
Southern charcoal, No. 1, $16 09@17 00 ; uth- 
ern charcoal, No. 2, $15 50@16 03; Missouri 
charcoal, No. 1, $17 00@17 50; Missouri char- 
coal, No. 2, $16 1700. FoRGE—Neutral coke, 
$12 9? 753 d short, $12 25@1250; Mot- 
tled, $11 75@1202. CaR WHEEL AND MALLE- 
ABLE—Southern (standard brands), $19 00@ 
1959; Southern (other brands), $17 00@18 oo; 
Lake Superior, $20 00@21 oo. 

St. Louis (reported by Rogers, Brown & 
Meacham): Hor BLast COKE AND CHARCOAL— 
Southern Coke No. 1, $15 50@15 75; Southern 
Coke No. 2, $14 50@14 75; Southern Coke No. 3, 
$:375@14 00; Southern Grey Forge, $13 25@ 
13 50; Southern Charcoal No.1, $17 25@17 75; 
Southern Charcoal No. 2, $1675@1 25; Missou 
Charcoal No. 1, $15 50@16 00; Missouri Charcoal 
No. 2, $15 CO@IS 50 5 Ohio Softeners, $18 0@ 
1900, CarR WHEEL AND MALLEABLE IRONS— 
Lake 8u or, $19 50@20 00 ; Southern, $19 50@ 
23 00. VILLE Coxs—Kast St. Louis, 
fo co; St. Louis, $5 65. 

DETROIT (reported by William F. Jarvis & 
Co): Lake Superior Charcoal, all Numbers, 
$18 o0@18 50; Lake Superior (coke) Bessemer, 
$17 75@18 50; Katahdin (Maine charcoal), $oo oo 
@0o0 00; Lake as Coke, Foundry, all 
ore, $17 50@18 oo ; Lake Superior Coke, Found- 
ry, all ore, $ooco@00o00; Standard Ohio 
Black Band, $1800@18s0; Southern No. 1 
$16 25@16 50; Southern Gray Forge, $14 00@ 
1450; Jackson wey {onic} Silvery, 8 25@ 
18 75; Old Car Wheel, oo. Connells- 
ville Coke, $0.00. 


LOUISVILLE (reported by Geo. H. Hull & 
Co;: Southern ke No. 1 Foundry $14 s0@ 
1500; Southern Coke No. 2 Foundry $13 75 
1425; Southern Coke No. 3 Foundry $13 25 
1375; Grey Forge, $12 75@1325; Southern 
Coke Silver Grey foo oo@oo oo ; Southern Char- 
coal No, 1 Foundry, $16 00o@17 00; Car Wheel, 
$18 50@20 oo. 


PITTSBURGH (reported by A. H.. Childs) : 
No.1 Foundry, $10 00@16 25; No.2 Foundry, 
$15 co@I5 25 ; Grey Forge, $13 75@14 00; White 
and Mottled, $13 2:@1 ; Warm Blast Char 
coal, $18 0o@20 00; Cold Blast Charcoal, $22 00 
@27 00 ; Bessemer, $15 50@16 oo. 


MERCHANT IRON AND STEEL. 






































Fiat Bar 
1% to 4 by &% to 1 inch..... 1 80 
4% to 6 by % to1 inch sick ae 
>| to 6 by T5G CO 8 AMCH..cccrccccccccccee coceeeevens® 20 
1% &1 4 £ lL € SRE I 90 
t &1% by % to & inch eevee OO 
HK, Mand % by & to & inch............... eubaheoss 2 20 
Round and Square. 
1 to +] inch 1 80 
2 to 2% inch 2 00 
4 to 3% inch +2 30 
8 2 ies: 2 80 
434 to 4% inch....... 3 3° 
im 5 inch. 3 5° 
Oval. 
OE OE EE... csnccainadatinn easensvasenntdoemiensiainn 2 20 
Oe 240 
rn 2 60 
n» +B 00 








Half Oval and Half Round. 

















1% to gs inch 290 
to rk inch 2 50 

Se inch 8 10 
% 2 20 
e 1 


Heavy Band. 
% to 6b ON §-16 1NCH.....0000.ceececececereseee2 OO 
4 4 mem 5-16 in 


y if WR scrviveriesemessiecstnD 80 
€ to % by M amd §-16 Inch...........ccccccesseeeeP 







































































































































































te =~ we emda rh iemaq gtk fle 3 
Hoops. 
1% to 4, Nos. 15 to 15. 2 60 
1% to 2, Nos. 16 to 18 2 70 
1% to 2, No. Ig. 2 80 
1% to 2, No. 20. 2 90 
1% to 2, No. a1 3 00 
1% to 2, No. 22 3 I0 
15-16, 1 and 1%, Nos. 13 to 15 2 80 
15-16, 1 and 1%, Nos. 16 to 1 2 90 
15-16, 1 and 1%, Nos. 19 and 20........ccssecceeee «3 00 
15-16, rand 1%, No. 21 3 I0 
15-16, rand 1%, No. 22 % 20 
» NOB. 13 £0 15.....ccrccrees coves +03 00 
, Nos. 16 to 1 3 Io 
» Nos. 19 and 20. .3 20 
» No. 21 3 30 
» No. 22 3 40 
19-16, NOG. 13 tO TS.ccccccccccceescoocccrccescccocccece eeree$ 20 
13-16, Nos. 16 to 18 3 30 
13-16, NOB. 19 ANA 20.........ceeeeeeeee spcdubtaatinasesiad 3 40 
EGBG; BNO. Blo. coocecrcccvecovevevocescoecooccsoseuvesoves cas «3 50 
13-16, No. 22 -3 60 
» Nos. 13 to 15 3 30 
» Nos. 16 to 18...... 3 3° 
» NOB. IQ AMA 2O.cccccrccccccccrersccccereeccosescecees 3 fo 
9 BNO. Bk ccccceecccese cccceceeeS FO 
> | Sa aeeeneee wecseoccocecersosecs sceeeses3 8O 
11-16, Nos. 13 to 15 3 50 
TEED, INGR. 1B OO Goccccccccvescocccscscccosccsossececeoses 3 70 
11-16, Nos. 19 and 20. 3 80 
11-16, No. a1 3 90 
ZEB, THO. BB..corccccce coccee soccesococe eresccecoee cceceereed OO 
, Nos. 13 to I5....... 3 80 
» NOS, 16 tO 18...... 0.006 4 00 
, Nos. 19 and 20. 4 10 
y BED, Bl vccececceccsesocéscbonensnsesoenenssovocecoscesesseoes 4 20 
5» BED. BRecesee 4 30 
» No. 23 450 
Light Band. 
1% to 6 by % to 3-16 in 2 20 
ii to 6 by Nos. 11 and 12 2 30 
1 to 1% by % to 3-16 in 2 40 
I to 1% by Nos. 11 and 12 2 50 
% and 13-16 by % to 3-16 in 2 
and) 3-16 by NOB. 11 ANG 12.....ccccceccceeseerers 2 
and 11-16 by % to 3-16 in 3 00 
and 11-16 by Nos. 11 and 12...... acccenccebocseons 3 10 
and 9-16 by % OD O56 BM. cccnccncccnessonnsesnceasie 3 3° 
and 9-16 by Nos. 11 and 12 3 40 
by % to 3-16 in 3 
% by Nos. 11 and 12 3 70 
Wagon Sox Iron. 
inch, beveled edge, by Nos. 11 and 12...... 2 80 
inch, ” ‘ me 13 and 14...... 3 00 
inch, bi - * II and 12...... 3 10 
inch, ' ” ” 1g and 14......g 30 
Sheet lLron: 
No. 10 to 14 2 65 
No. 15 to 17 275 
No. 18 to 21 299 
No. 22 to > seecceccocnsocewcssoeoecconssoosooecce 315 
No. 25 to 3 30 
No. 37 ercoseceececcoesensceses 3 4° 
No. 3 50 
Iron Boiler Pilates. 
Tank, % inch and heavier 2 60 
CNo. 1, - pe: 2 85 
cao I e- rs 3 10 
ange, 3 85 
Extra Flange, 64 435 
Solid Fire Box ” 5 10 


Steel Boiler Plates—1-4 in. and Heavier, 




















Tamk...cccccccccccesee 275 
Shell............ 3 15 
Flange 3 45 
Marine Flange...... 3 85 
WETS BOE <ccccsconcccss cvcccceneseccecensessooceee 455 
Above includes plates 90 inches wide. 

G0 to GG im. WIde............ceececereererene HBC D extra 
96 to 100 im, WIE.......cereressereereereees I sid 

100 to 104 in. wide........... coccescnsencsceeeE Ge | 

104 to 116 in. wide...... pecial 





American Cast Tool Steel. 
ROUND, SQUARE AND OCTAGON. cts. Ds 
































SCRAP IRON AND OLD METAL. 

Net Tons 
No. 1 R. R. wrought Scrap..........0000..-cceres$18 00 
No. 1 wrought scrap. 16 50 
No. 1 Machine cast Scrap. .........corvcesesees II 5? 
Iron axles. 235) 
MMS CUSEEMMB..ccccrcecccocssorosconese ecenneoeevecees 13 50 
Wrought turning (free from cast)........... 11 50 
Cast borings 8 oo 
Uncut wrought iron boilers...............+ « IT 5? 
Steel boiler plates «+. 16 00 
Grate Bars 8 oo 
Pipes and fiues (Clean) 12 6o 




















—_ a | —y 12 £@ 
an ron 

Sheet iron 3 4 

Wrought drillings. Ir 00 

Malleable iron 9 5° 





R ed Ff Messrs. BLACK & PoLLocg, Cin- 


nnati g 
Railroad Wrought. ......0..sscccrsscces-coseeeseereef@O 
No. 1 Country Wrought.....vrercccorcsssecveree I 
Stove Plate 





H and Sheet 
Casting Borings 
Wenaugket Terninges 





Machine Castings. ...........ccsccsssscesscesssssores | 
9 





s3s8suses 








THE CAMBRIDGE IRON & STEEL Co. 


MANUFACTURERS OF 


SHEET IRON avo SHEET STEEL 


r S anon ns Ln te > S ninity 
EPMBRIO Ge oquared Rooting Sheetsa dpe ally <pMBRIDG. 





Corr ste” 


posit @Y:0V0=15008)c) eNO) 5 OO) 





[RON CLAD PAINT CO. ironciaaPaintco. 


Factory, 75477 Central Way. Sec. & Treas., No. 3 Case Bulld’g, 


CLEVELAND, OHIO. 





And get the uine article, 
and save liability of suit for 
using an article made in viola 


tion of the patents issued to 
Wm. Green, and now owned 
by this Company. 


IRON CLAD PAINT is the 


FURNISHED both Dry snd 
Ground in Oil, 
USED BY NEARLY ALL 
THE RAILROADS 





DALLIBA, CORRIGAN & CO., 


DEALERS IN 


Iron Ore & Pig Iron, 


Rooms 716, 717, 718, 719 Perry-Payne Bid’g, 
CLEVELAND, O. 


OGLEBAY, NORTON & C0., 


Successors to Tuttle, Oglebay & Co., 
Commission Dealers in 


KIrom =- Ores, 


FROM MARQUETTE, GOGEBIC AND MENOM- 
INEE DISTRICTS, 


OLEVELAND, OHIO. 








Jj. H. OUTHWAITE. W. @. POLLOCK. 


J. H. OUTHWAITE & CO., 


Exclusive attention given to 
LAKE SUPERIOR AND MENOMINEE RANGE 


Krom Ores 


Perry-Payne B’ld’e. Uleveiand, O. 


THE CONDIT-FULLER C0, 









































ws 
1 to 2 im, IMClUSiVe...oesseesssessrnerereessesseesssseees 09 Pig and Bar iron, 
G16 tO Him  “ —caeecrrrrrvccerrserecceersreresesseenes 09 
ra % and 2% to gin 1036 
se io CLEVELAND, OHIO. 
WD 6 8Rcrccesesecscoseveccsesersesescoenecessooce 
to 9-32 and 6% to 7 in 12 
3-6 in 14 E a 
vite - C. 1 OPE, 
6 wide by 2 to % thick vical ° 
atog1 
Bessemer and O. H. Steel. Iron Ore Pig Iron 
Machinery... .corssceseeesesserees sssoseee Dase price, 275 9 
Tire... «295 AND METALS. 
rect nceeieon « $3 Cleveland, - Ohio. 
Gutter Shoes, iapered and burr. “ $00 | Sami L. Mater, Fred. A. Moree, 
English Tool Steel. Prest. & Treas. ay Sec’y. 
— iil we | Cleveland Iron Mining (o., 
onsen Choice™. = Dealers in Iron Ores 
vs from their own mines near Marquette, Lake 
Burden Boiler Rivets. Superior. 
. diameter...... aint Rooms 4 & § Mercantile Bank Building, 
Dh ae rahe rer) inch me | 4 CLEVELAND O. 





PITTSBURGH & WHEELING COAL C0., 


MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF 


Ohio Steam Coal and Coke. 


Mi the Cleveland, Lorain & Wheeling 
R. R. Capacity, 3,000 ue. daily. 


Office, 6 Mercantile Bank Buliding, 
OLEVELAND, OHIO. 


Lake Shipping Point, Lorain O. 
Jas. PATTERSON, Sales Agent. 





ESTABLISHED 1854. 


PETER GERLACH & CO., 


MAKERS OF 
Saws, Teels and Machinery. 
Office and Warerooms, 28 Columbus st. 
Factories on Columbus, Winter and Lec» 
ard streets. 


Cleveland, O., VU. @. A. 











BANK, RAILROAD 
AND 


OFFICE + PURNITURE. 


interior Work a Specialty. 
Send for lilustrated Catalogu. 


THE CLEVELAND DESK CO. 
97-99 Ontario St.. - + Cleveland, Ohie, 





































































14 


‘Tem Iron Trappe Review. 


shaitiabieied ae 








MACHINERY SUPPLY MARKET. 














Jacks screws, 
Illinois Bolt Co. list 








































































































































































































Drill and Drill Sockets. 


Anvils. Nuts and Washers. 
Ameri BDBo@re | Sise of - stcsmeeat 5-16 A 4 I 
Wrights......... 12 TG itapevaneecansten 4 
Bellows. eesesvccecccoee 506 11H 8 5 
Blacksmiths’ HUI"8 ve dis 42 | “En tots ices than 108 Be, BD : 
Moulders’ Bullock's... dis so&te | boxes add rc to to list. 
OUIAOTS soon. wnvevvseenseves ev aw : om abies. 
Belting. List Jul 
Boston Belting Co’s standard........--..u: dis ye Penny ay Salis, ny eaten 
~ ~ Pe dis 6o&s5 {gaz} than car 
as DeOSt....ccccsesceresvovees a s 
Hoyt’s Short Lap......-.cvssocssersressseeesseseens Oilers. 
Cleveland Rubber Co. extra standard.dis fokis Zinc and Tin dis 60 
Shults Raw Hide Leather Belting, sing] Brass and Copper dis 
sreteeeensens Malleablie (Hammer's), No. 1, $3.60; No. 
Gate Rew, ee Lanier Belting, double, MO. 3, $4.40 @ dos dis 
an uble 
Standard, oak tanned............c0cs0-0-09 dis s0&10 ae Steam. - 
Alexander Brothers’ pure oak tanned. ...dis 45 | Boston Belti ng = allie Go 
Blowers and Exhausters. Russia Packing ©. es 
B. F. Sturtevant’s dis 20 | Italian Packing §© seoccecsesecccseee Ge DIZOIG 
Boston Blower Co., dis Plumbago Pist 
Buffalo.........0..00-+. dis 35 Serre’ “ Bso 
uare Flax 
a bro | Sheet Rubber........ ies 
eeccccces seceee: -~ | 12 Excelsior Rubber ry 
whi 3 Picks. 

126 Railroads, 5 to 6 Ds 2 dis 6e 
vie CoC FOR sorccnccescccsces 8 gross 12@12 is 0 oads, ora = = 
BW WO. ccccccccccccccvccscsccscecscscccscscscccccssccoess soeee Ais Pulleys. 

Ohucks. ivee Futlers Pulleys, Walker List - 4s 
h m an , Ind A . a 55 
sa *d FB Rosman dis 3 Split Wood Hg a poonee ecsceseeessveccsesessGll® SOMSS 
* Geared Scroll is go Rivets. 
b oan”, Brass Workers d 53° | Iron, Thousand, list November 17, ie 
Wescott’s Scroll Mee = SN seeveeseeeee GS 33 
Indepemdent...c-ueeseren asad dis 40 Mitek November fyerrernesvsse a 
ws Little Slant Drill dis go “dis se@seki0 
Horton’s Ua iversal........... is 40 PP 
pend t is 45 Rope. 
Whiton’s I d dis 45 | Manilla, % inch and ovet...........0...00000.98 D 
Pations t Combination Kode Ses Ra eS dis 40 | Sisal, % ‘ach and over ....................... 3 >| 
s 
almond Drill pope a Sand Paper. 
Morse dis 1 A. 
’s Combination Lathe.........00...dis EX. HE. BArtOm’s...ccccccoccceccscccoceccseee secved dis4o 
a Independent Lathe............. dis go | New England Flint dis 
o Universal Lathe.........0..0s00e is 40 Barton’s Garnet 20 
" TEE cindsensddndbiesscsnacinebecoscscoesed 15 Saws. 

Cutters and Reamers. Disston’s Circular Ais 4o@r0 
Cleveland...........0.sseree cerveee sseseseresee lS IOWIS “ a ee Net 
Pratt & Whitney is 10@15 | Hack Saw Stubs dis 2° 
Standard dis 1 15 “ “ Ftureka nocesi® 20 
Brown & Sharpe, ae oo ptonsoand dis 15 “ “ Btar ais 2 

Gear Cutters......... eoseeeesGis 15 Saw Swa Disston’s dis 30 
yal era Atkins’ Gicular 
Cast Steel........ 4 Db . = Mulay > onl Drag Saws..dis 40&10 
Lron, steel points...........0++ peceecovococecee oe Ds Pa cocceceee ) 






























































































































































ustry File Works, er cut 
Hammers, 


cist drills dis so&10 ™ 
Mforse Taper and Straight shank to “« Diamond dis goc 
1%" dis so&r1o bi Tuttle Tooth Cross-cuts.dis asc | “‘ 
Morse om and Straight shank Larger * One-man amedhomenee gac “* 
s av eB 
thant 2) Bes ay dis ag¢ per pair 
Standard Twist Drills ..................+ auegs Hxcelsior Saw Tools ecole eonaneneee ne oente $6 
coccvecssococcoceoeth le dis egieas daseethegeenente ecees : 
Emery. Detroit Saw Works, Circular ..........nclis 50 
No. 4 to No. 54 to me Cc. B. “ “ “ Mulay ee oe o 
46 gr. — ef FF. Screws. 
4c © 
4c aye she Wood Screws—New List 1890. 
4c sic Flat head iron dis 72 
10 Deans,toincase 6 ¢ ; ¢ Round head iron vais 675% 
o Deans, lessthan Flat head brass. ..dis 72% 
I seveseesssnrersseeeers to ¢ te ¢ Tec Round head Drass.......ccerseeeses tiiminna an 
Emery Oloth and Paper. Square Cap Ais 65 
Hexagon Cap dis 60 
Soreet Adamson & iesescsudeosessscossses dis 45 -” Set C. H.C. dis 
H. Barton is 50@50 Machine, fiat head, iron dis 
Emery a Machine, round head, iron dis 6e 
Detroit dis Bench and hand— 
Norton’s dis Lag or coach dis 7S@73h10 
Grant sevecces dis 60 Coach, patent gimlet point... races ceccccocooccoes 73 
TT s 
Cellulota easseeseeeserecs dis 10&33% Shovels and Spades. 
Northampt dis 55 | Ames’ list November 1, 188s.. 

a A eae ay ™ 65@70 Dennis 25 
Viirified s6e | Hussey a Binns, TAL TORd...-sccccescereceeeedis 
Vulcanite dis 10&10 Taps. 

Files. Cards, Hand and Nut to 2in..........dis 50 
BICHOlSON.......00000s0eseeeeeeeeees dis Cois0@sok rok re Carpenters’ = = - in dis 
as $25 | Morse bad 
Kearney & Re Gicoscoveutnisl dis 60&1 aan Pratt & Whitney 
Black MONA... ccrre00+ 00000 dis 60&1 1o&1o | Machine Screw Taps 

posecccocenees: ecscenccssecereertll® 608C1 1o&1e | Pipe Taps to 2% in 

Disston’s dis Stay Bolt Taps... 
Wes 870 | Stove Bolt Taps. 
@tub’s : dis 25 | Pulley Taps............ 
@Grobet’s...... 8 30 

olds Bros.’ Hand Cut..........0ceceeesseees dis 50 














P. 8 

Atha pee liet, Jan. 15, 1 

Heavy hamasers ‘and oa 
over 5 Ds 14c, new list. 


0. 36 
di b 
ae | ey meee Ds 
under 5 Ds. 1 erly ad 
tton Wrap) 
































THE INDISPENSABLE LATHE DOG. 


THE INDISPENSABLE LATHE DOGS can be at- 
tached to work after the work is centered in the lathe. 
They can be used equally as well BETWEEN COLLARS as 
upon plain or straight work. 


DROP FORGED FROM BAR STEEL. 


No. : takes: from \% to1% inches, price, each... =o 50 
to 24% . : 4 


ry “ “ be 


3 to 3% 
Price, per set of three, to take from ¥ to 3¥ in. H 9 


PALMER, CUNNINGHAM & CO., L’t’d, 


607 Market St., PHILADEUPHIA, PA, 












IRON FOUNDRY CANTON IRON FOUNDRY CO., 
Canton, Ohio. 
Rb AND LIGHT CASTINGS. 


to make estimates soli 



































Vises. 
Solid Box. = dis 6 
Prentiss. a dis 28 
Barrett’s. noe 
Miller‘ Falls. - dis 40 
Howard pe 
Wire. 
Brass and copper peomotinaniansy 
Bright ond aooas annealed, a 0@18...dis 7o&1 
oe 5 
Noe, to& 5 


Soprered ons tosh, ma Mee ls GSS 


__ Lepneteat NOS, © £0 18......0rcec0e oveeed8 6734 


Fianed Broom Wire........ 

=| — Nos. 8 and g.... 
Annealed Swe. Nos. 10 to Stew ° 
Stub’s Steel regular............$6.00@D dis g 




















Wrenches. 

Coe’s juine, dis se 
G dar¢ cccsseresGli® FOSIC 
(| sevececerecsccccsereCl lS 75ST 
dis ssé&z1o x se 

Bemis & Call’s \ ng mpoemeneeraaa 
— En eeebeepesioccesooooond dis soate 

Engineers pcessone eovceresis 68 

Bling, & Spencer’s Drop Forged....... is as 


Sieur sd a - 











Webster, Camp & Lane Machine Co. 





Automatic or Slide Valve 
Cages, Buckets. Etc. 


134 N. Main St., AKRON, OHIO. 


@@ Send for Catalogue D. 


MANUFACTURERS OF 


Mining Machinery, 


impreved Band Friction 
Hoisting Machinery, Geared 
er Direct Acting, fer round er 
Gat repe. 
Wire BRope Haulage 
Machinery, 


Endless or Tail 
Systems.) 

CORNISH PLUNGER AND 

BUCKET LIFT PUMPS. 


Engines, Sheaves. 


Rope 


Steam 





IME: «1s 


WONEW 2 


SAVE TIME AND MONEY BY USING OUR Spee 


OUR 


Time Stamps 4 


Mark the hour and 
minute, the day, 
month and year, by 
one impression. 


Useful, Economical, 
Ornamental. 









PRINTED MATTER ON APPLI- 
CATION. 


THE AUTOMATIC TIME STAMP AND REGISTER COMPANY 


No. 71 Sudbury 8t,, Boston, Mass., U.S. A. 


E Tae 





CN 


Record ae hour and 
minute of the arrival and 
departure of employes 
by their own act, in their 
own handwriting. 


Indispensable for employ- 
ers and just to 
emp'oyes. 





THE THOS.D.WEST FOUNDRY, co. 


LAND. O. 


CLEVE 


IRON. CASTINGS 


CAPACITY C 


DAILY MELTING 


FA (LiTrtes FoR es 


SMOOTH CLEAN CASTINGS 
EWORKA SPECIALTY 


DUPLICAT 





t IAL 
NOMICALY Tt NING © 7 





F. A. SACKMANN, 


126 Champlain. Cleveland, 0. 
LL ALPHABETS 


ON Be 
OTEELNAME STAMPS 


Steel Name Stamps (1-16, 3-32 
or inch letters, 15c. per letter 


Kastlake Metallic Shingles, 


Unequaled for 
ROOFING AND SIDING. 


Manufactured by 


W.J. BURTON & C0,’s 


Galvanized Iron Cor- 
nice Works, 
Detroit, Mich. 


it Send for illustrated 
“| catalogue and prices. 










Mention pores paper. 





UNION 
ELECTROTYPE 


FOUNDRY 











SECTION OF CONVEYOR. 


Detachable Roller and Chain Belting, 
MADE IN ALL SIZES OF 


Malleable Iron 
and Steel, 


DESIGNED FOR 


Elevators, 
Conveyors, 
Drive Belts, ete. 


For handling materials of all 
kinds. 








Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 
Address 


The Jeffrey M'f'g Co., 


183 East Ist Ave., 
COLUMBUS. QO. 














CHAIN 


Chicago Office, 48 §. Canal St; 






©2060 


Ben? OHO aasaVCce 3  SOvue 2°°0° f tht wR 


3 


MPrepriddadrrrrressoed 


ROOOPr 


—<“4 FOOn HH 


Hq 8oe0 


; Tt 


eset OO bo 





a a th itn an 


‘Tum tron Trappe Review. is 


— sees = —s — 







































































HARDWARE MARKET. su 2 acetate 
nee Ausable, : DBR 24 25 26 2B eee veesns ‘iciiheninasiilian as 
Augers and Bits. Putnam, BW..15 19 20 21 2B-.-..rceccsccescesreeese Gis IS 
Common augers and DItS.......0c0cercceree conee ls a5&10 
ee a 9 dia sods Horse Shoes. 
Cook’s Douglass Mfg. 
Russell don Ta augers and bits.......... Gis 25 urten, ot etary Perkins’ Imp. 9g keg $4 0 
ve Bits, Clark’s small, $:8; factory ’ B ken 100 
nolree’ Spann SOO wiisisisccdiaddantbeeeead ie Moats Mule Shoes, at fActory......0s...sssseees 
ap niet cnt Bonney’s 3 Adjust. ae Knobs. 
Hollow Augers, Stearns’ Adjust. ® 4o&r10 we apanned...... BP gross ome dis 6o&r1e 
dis 20&10 ater deer tenken was tek Adis 4081 
Gimict ‘Sit, Soimaoa eusvee Diiiis gross $3 9° | Door mineral............ 2 ce aN 
Standard t Stock Drilis....... oceeee lis Door Por. japanned 
Ship Augers eels TSRIOMISHIONS | Door Por. Mickle.....cccsccomseressssescoseees 2 25 
Axes. Door Por. plated $2 25 
Makers’ and Special Brands— Locks, Bolts, Etc. 
a Sa dos $7 00 | P. & F. Corb and 
Full polished doz $8 co | Door locks, knobs and latches...........dis 60&10 
eens and ke dis 60&10 
Cast iron barrel bolts. dis 70 net pulls, m pecan ta ain and jet dis oo 
etc. ulis, uine br 8 10 
Gast 4 pm ay A pa cshpians thane fa > Lever bell pulls, Srrese.. bronse........ dis 608&10 
60 | Butts’, genuine dis 60&10 
bronze dis 60&10 
Store door locks and latches...............dis 60810 







































Buckets, Elevator. 
dis so&re 
Butte. 

Ww ‘ht brass. dis 
Sy ye eee” 
Fast } ~~—¥ narrow. dis 1 
Past Joint, broads rsc-ccrownle goa 

n Io 
Loose jap. dis 
Loose aint, jap. with acorns..............dis = 
Loose + nee a ~ yo&10 
— Lang japanned acornz....... eccceseesGis JOKIO 


Cd ee , acorns, gn pated tips.......dis yo&r10 
Prec bat} fast jc e narrow 














Oarbonized Felt and Building Papers, 


(POWERVILLE BRAND.) 
Per roll of 
Eberts Bros., Detroit. 500 sq. feet. 
ae ete are ve | $1.25 





“BR § (ringed = ae — iincteresienes 
Stringed, eoscenisthpesenspebensbecesapes 388 


Asphaltum, Trinidad Refined, § ton... te oo 


























dies di 
Shutter hinges&fia acre] bronze.dis +4 
Shutter hinges. on dis 70 

















Plumbs and Leve sg, 
Standard list.. dis yo&1c 











Pocket levels. dis Ie 
Davis’ inclinometers dis 1o&1¢ 
Pumps. 

Cistern, best makers.................000+ dis 50&1 


Pitcher spout, best makers em 10 
Pitcher spout,cheaper goods... ececeese Gis TO@IORS 


Pokes, Animal. 





























Bishop’s I. X. L doz $6 oo 
Bishop’s O K dos $5 25 
Bishop’s Pioneer dos $3 75 
Bishop’s American dos $2 75 
Rakes. 
it 
Malieable dis wareds 
Rasors. 
ideahclin 8 Bah sagg al 
os Cy MU ECHET......00000. Gis 16 
Rifle rasor oes; se net 
Rat Killers. 
Schuyler’s @ gross $15 ce 
Scales. 
Hatch, Counter, No. 171............0000.+ 8 doz $21 e 





Hatch, Tea, No. 162.......00.000c0000-% dos $6 7 







































































Famil Turabulls... eccccevcecsesocccccoeGle o@gokr 
Asphaltum, Fine Grade, Scale " ofjanuary 
Goal Lar Felt, 2 Ply, @ re “ se 
r 2 % 
Coal Tar Felt, ary, roll 108 sq ft Screw Drivers. 
Roofing Pitch 8 R. & L. Co.’s Varnished 
stanley &. “SL Gots Black Handiea Ais Caen 
Ohains. . ee Ie 
ean thin interchangeables...............% dos $18 dis 25 
pai ‘at 20508. teel ” 
na coon 10 
German our dis Nickel ple — eeeee coccececesesees eeeecee dis 75&10@80 
German Coil, list of — 188 8 sour ton’s try square and = 8....dis 45& 10 
Galvanised Pump Chain... we DskK@6 Winter bottom’s try and miter...........dis se&1 
Chain, Iron 10 
Chain, os Tacks, Brads, Etc. 
nae ohana’ caterer 
et ng and Fi vesonsel 75 American iron carpet tacks a nds nties 
Socket Framing and Firmer, Buck Bros.dis 30 | steel carpet tacks all kinds................ dis 75&10 
Bee hl = and Framing, L. & si Swedes iron carpet tacks, all kinds 
Tanged Firmers. 4e&1e | swedes iron tacks dis Ly a9 
Cutlery. Swedes iron Upholsterers’ tacks........dis Ware 
Tinned Swedes iron tacks............... dis 774%&10 
Table net Tinned Swedes iron Upholsterers’ Ka 
Excelsior Pocket net acks. .. dis 774%&10 
al American iron cut tacks................. dis 77%&10 
Fibre Ware—Standard. Copper nnn pn > 4¢ &10 
Copper nk nails...... s 16 
Nos.r §. 5X. Cigar box eatiae ma oe e 
1s, WALET, 12 Qtenrcececccccecsseees 00 $4 50 §...... Finishing nails. dis 60&10 
a hg 14 qt . ¥ 50 * 3 fron Hungarian nails and miners’ tacke, is 608&10 
Fire 12 qt I Sep onset Gimp and lace tacks........................ die 77¥6m10 
Sugar 2 6M wn nad tin ned.. wdensiaedilaabeal dis 
TIN -«- ccnicshnahauaatsocesantesebosniese. ebben) § OO cece Trunk iti clout nails............- oontaial a 7254810 
Bu Oy aides conien Tinned trunk&clout nails...............0+« 
Chamber sus Basket mails ......cccccccceccccssrscceeserseesesees dis 66810 
Blop ereccccesescccees 65e 750 8 se | Chair nails dis 66810 
Commode Common and pateu!t brede..................d48 66&re 
ara. alop, § ere 14 Qt......... 8 OO 9 OO Ie 68 
peer, —- 
SONI MINI tconickecrpessuteiatebeneonesen SO OS. aun Y | 
mel 2% 2% x | Keepa Record of Your Insurance 
13% inch 275 335 375 
pesis heii a -3% 8 a 4% By ordering one of our Improved 
Servers, 12 Sion coves BBB ccceee 8 ' ® 
Baskets, was paper, 13 oe caoranion 6 GD coceee 
Bpittons, « wpeiggP pressed xX ra 10 
8 inch 4 00 450 500 . 
10 ANA 11}G IMCH......0...000cereeees co 6 50 4:92 
No. 1 plain; No. § decorated ; No. 5X Whi Blanks for all the essential points of each 
decorated. i 
Gimlets. poucy. 
eae a : 
ashe er IY ONLY 50 CENTS (Postage paid). 





Barn agg “a ie oOnbaee 
Climax, (As eeeeeeeoeese eee . sae cols 














Scran — 
Kidders Ais 50&1 a 3s 
pesey’e Patent........§ im., $z2; 4in., $10, Spor 
Richard’s dis yo@go& 10 





Will last for years. Sample leaves sent on 
application. Address 


The Cleveland Printing & Publishing Co. 


27, 29 and 31 Vincent Street, 


CLEVELAND, 0. 





FREICHT AND PASSENCER 


ELEVATORS. 


L S. GRAVES & SON, 
Main Office and Works, ROCHESTER, N. Y. 


BRANCH OFFICES: 





NEW YORK, 92 and 94 Liberty St.; BOSTON, 113 Devonshire St.; $t. LOUIS, gor Roe Buildin 


DETROIT, Hodges Building. 
SEND FOR OATALOGUE. 











RUBBER COOD 


PACKING, BELTING, HOSE, GASKETS, ETC. 


Ss 











E*wllier Bros... 


AGENTS 


© |JRWELL LEATHER BELT, 


and REVERE RUBBER CO. 


Sia bh 2 6 ee 


ROBERT AITCHISON 


ERF2RATED:-METAL-(O- 


ee CHICAGO. ILL. 


148 SUPERIOR STREET, 


CLEVELAND. 





* Swe 


° S 4 sq. 
>PERFORATED METALS OF ALL KINDS 
-OFFICE 510---265 to 269 DEARBORN 3. 

WORKS AT SOUTH CHICAGO. 





HOSE who use it say that one pound will 
cover 2 to 3 times more surface and 
last 4 to 5 times longer than any lead, min- 
eral or metallic paint. A tin or iron roof 
well painted will not require repainting for 
10 to I5 years. 
JOS. DIXON CRUCIBLE CO., 


Jersey City, N. J. 


THE ECAN Co., 


Nos. 251 to 271 W. Front St., CINC:NNATI, OHIO. 
Builders and Originators, 


DIXON’S 


GRAPHITE 


PAINT 












Designers and Constructors. 


Wood-Working Machinery, 


For Every Purpese 
Meeting the requirements of 

PLANING MILLS, 
SASH, DOOR and BLIND FACTORIES, 

PATTERN SHOPS, 
General Wood-workers etc 


With the latest and most advanced 
type of machines for fast and per- 
fect work. 








New “Standard Molder, Four Sided. 


4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 and 12-inch. 


Geared feed rolls, two above and two in 
table. Slotted steel heads. 


AKRON CHEMICAL CoO., 


ps bay PAINTS. Black Asphaltum 


Paints. All grades, 
160 State Street, AKRON, O. 


Send for Catalogue and information. 

















































































16 


Trem IRON TrRapp Review. 

















Automatic Sprinklers— 
Neracher Sprinkler Co., Warren, O. 
Advertising Agencies— 
G. P. Rowell, New York. 
Belting— 
Fuller Bros., Cleveland. 
Bolts and Bolt Machinery — 
Upson Nut Co., Cleveland. 
Bollers and Boiler Attachments— 
Babcock & Wilcox Co., New York. 
Wm. B. Pollock & Co., Youngstown, OC. 
E. H. Jones & Co., Cleveland. 
Hazelton Tripod Boiler Co., Chicago. 
Enter Boiler Co., Youngstown, O. 
The Stirling Co., Barberton, O. : 
Chandler & Taylor Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Skiuner Engine Co., Erie, Pa. 
Southwark Foundry & Machine Co., Phila 
deiphia, Pa. . 
Leffel Water Wheel & Engine Co, Spring 
field, O. 
ee Leffel & Co., Springfield, O 
tt, Presley a Train, Cleveland. 
Blewers— 
LaFountaine Mfg. Co., Cleveland, © 
E. H. Jones & Co., Cleveland. 
Boiler Solvents— 
Dearborn Drug & Chemical Co., Chicago, IJ] 
Blowing Evgines— 
The James Leffel & Co., Springfield, O. _ 
Southwark Foundry & Machine Co., Phila- 
delphia, ra’ 
Voai and Coke— 
Pittsburgh & Wheeling Coal Co., Cl ve- 
Jand. 


Oranes and Derricks— 

Wm. Tod & Co., Youngstown. 0. : 

Southwark Foundry & Machine Co., Phils- 
delphia, Pa. 
Ohain Belting— 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co., Columbus O. 
Carpet Uleaning & Laundry Machines— 

LaFountaine Mfg. Co., Cleveland, O. 
Civil Engineers and Architects— 

F. Felkel, Cleveland, O. 
Cupolas— 

Victor Colliau, Detroit, Mich. 
Corrugated Steel— 

Cincinnati Corrugating Co., Piqua, O. 
Drilling Machines— 

Universal Radial Drill Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Drop Presses— 

Toledo Tool & Machine Co., Toledo, O. 
Desks— 

Cleveland Desk Co., Cleveland. 
@ievators— 

L,. 8. Graves & Co., Rochester, N.Y. 


Biectrical Manufactures— 


Cleveland Electrical Mfg. Co., Clevelan“. 
Central Thomson-Houston Co., Cleveland. 
Edison General Electrical Co., N. Y. 
Bmery Wheel Machinery— 
¥. Wendell Cole, M. E., Columbus, O., or 
mH 


Rageavers and Ejectrotypers— 
Eclipse Electrotype & Engraving Co., 


Onion Electrotype Foundry, Cleveland. 
Engines (Steam) 

Chandler & Taylor Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Wm Tod & Co., Youngstown, O. 

E. H. Jones & Co., Cleveland, 

Buckeye Engine Co., Salem, O. 

Skinner Engine Co., Erie, Pa. 

Westinghouse Machine co., Pittsburgh. 

Ball & Wood Co., Elizabeth, N. J. — ; 

Southwark Foundry & Machine Co, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa. > steak 

Leffel Water Wheel & Engine Co., Spring 
field, O. 

Totten & Hogg, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Webster, Camp, & Lane Machine Co., Akron. 

James Leffel & Co., Springfield, O. 
@ngines (Gas)— 

Schleleaer, Scnumm ‘& Co., Philadelphia, 
#a.and , Il. 

Van Dusen sngine Co., Cincinnrt, 0. 
Engineers and Contractors— 

B®. H. Jones & Co., Cleveland. 

F, Felkel, Cleveland. 


Tames Jenks, Detroit, Mich. 
Engineers’ Specialties— 

Butman Furnace Co., Chicago, II 

Spaulding & Metcalf, Chicago, I11. 
files, Makers of— 

Rayneide Bros., Columbus, O. 

A. & H. Gough, Cleveland. 

Parkin & Bosworth Co., Cleveland. 
Forges— 

Cleveland City Forge & Iron Co., Cleveland. 
Foundries— 

Thos. D. West. Foundry Co.. Cleveland. 

Canton Iron Foundry Co., Canton. O. 

Spicer Mtg. Co , New Philadelphia, O. 
For Sale, Wants, etc.— 

The James Leffel & Co., Springfield, O. 

B. M. Gardner, Cleveland. 

Coates Oil Burner Co., Terre Haute, Ind. 
Flue Cleaners— 

Butman Furnace Co., Chicago, I11. 
Fuel Oil Burners— 

Coates Oil Burner Co., Terre Haute, Ind. 
Fire Brick Clay— 

F. B. Stevens, Detroit, Mich. 
Foundry Supplies— 

F. B. Stevens, Detroit, Mich. 
Gear Outters— 


oom. Cunningham & Co., Philadelphia, 





BUYERS’ DIRECTORY OF IRON AND STEEL TRADES. 





Galvanizers, 

H. H, Hodell, Cleveland. 
Grapples, Excavators and Dredges— 

Jas. H. Lancaster, New Yor’. 
Graphite Paint— 

Jos. Dixon Crucible Co., Jersey City. 
Gravulated Raw Bone— 

The Rogers & Hubbard Co., Middletown. 
deating Apparatus— 

LaFountaine Mfg Co , Cleveland, 0. 
Heaters and Purifiers— 

Stilwell & Bierce Manufacturing Co, 
Dayton, O. 

. H. Jones & Co., Cleveland. 

Warren Webster & Co., Philadelphia Pa. 
Hangers— 

LaFountaine Mfg. Co.. Cleveland. O. 
Hammers (Powe r— 

Hackney Hammer Co., Cleveland. 
Harness Specialties— 

Buffalo Specialty Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Insurance Companies— 

Hartford Steam Boiler Co., Hartford, Ct. 
Investments— 

Mu-kegon Improvement Co., Muskegon. 
[ron and Steel Rooting— 

Sykes Iron & Steel Roofing Co., Niles, C. 

Cambridge Iron Roofing Co., Cambridge 0. 

Garry Iron Roofing Co., Cleveland. 

Berger Mfg. Co.. Canton, O. 

Eberts Bros., Detroit, Mich. 

Kanneberg Roofing Co., Canton, O. 

The Long Steel & Iron Roofing & 
Corrugating Co., Indinapolis. 

J. H. Eller & Co., Canton, O. 

W. J. Burton & Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Holton Iron Roofing co , New Lisbon, O. 
tron Ore, Bar and Pig lron— 

Dalliba, Corrigan & Co., Cleveland. 

Oglebay, Norton & Co., Cleveland. 

i . Outhwaite & Co., Cleveland 

ndit-Fuller Co., Cleveland, O. 

E. C. Pope, Cleveland. 

Cleveland Iron Mining Co., Cleveland. 
Injectors— 

Penberthy Injector Co., Detroit. Mich. 

Garfield Injector Co., Wadsworth, O. 
Lathes— 

H.L Shepard, Cincinnati. 0. 

Parkin & Bosworth Co., Cleveland. 
Lathe Dogs— 

Palmer, Cunningham & Co., Philadelphia. 
Mining Machinery— 

Webster, Camp & Lane Machine Co. 
Akron, OC. PA 

Copeland & Bacon. New York. 

Jas. H. Lancaster, New York. 
Machine Shops— : 


wehetes, Camp, & Lane Machine Co. 


m, O. 

Toledo Machine & Tool Co.. Toledo. 0. 

Spicer Mtg. Co., New Philadelphia, O. 
Machinisw’ Tools and Supplie:s— 

Parkin & Bosworth, Co., Cleveland. 

Garvin Machine Co., New York. 
Metal Ceilines— 

Fred F. Bischoff. Chicago, I11. 
Merchandise Brokers— 

L. H. Oldfield, Wichita, Kan. 
Metallic Shingles— 

W. J. Burton & Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Metallic Roofing— 

Stan Alumin Co., Canton, O. 
Manufacturing Sites— 

Muskegon Improvement Co., Muskegon. 

Luis Jackson, Chicago, I11. 
Moulding Sand— 

F. B. Stevens, Detroit, Mich. 
Natural Gas Specialties— 

A. Harvey’s Sons Mfg. Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Oil Burners— 

Coates Oil Burner Co., Terre Haute, 1nd. 
Patents— 

Munn & Co., New York. 

W. T. Fitzgearld, Washington, D. C. 
Pumps (Steam)— 


E. H. Jones & Co., Cleveland. 
Deming Co., Salem, O. 


Southwark Foundry & Machine Co., Phila- 


delphia, Pa. 
Paint— 


Iron Clad Paint Co., Cleveland. 

Akron Chemical Co., Akron O. 

Jos. Dixon Crucible Co., Jersey City. 
Perforated Sheet Metal— 


smertingtes & King Perforating Co., Chicago 


Aitchison Perforated Metal Co., Chicago. 
Pipe Cutting & Threading Machines— 

Wells Machine Works, Fostoria, O. 
Power Hammer— 

Hackney Hammer Co., Cleveland. 
Powder Mining Machinery— 

Hercules Powder Co., Cleveland. 
Portable Boilers 

Bassett, Presley & Train, Cleveland. 
Railway Suppiies— 
top rennt City Forge & Iron Co., Cleve- 


Rock Breakers and Ore Crushers— 
Jas. H. Lancaster, New York. 
Totten & Hogg, Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Rubber Goods— 

Fuller Bros., Cleveland. 

Rolls and Pinions— 


Totten & Hogg Iron & Steel Foundry Co., 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 


Steam Boiler lnspectors— 


Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection & In- 
surance Cos Hartford, Conn. 








Saws— 
Peter Gerlach & Co., Cleveland. 
Steel Stamps and Stencils— 


|. H. Fleharty & Co., Cleveland. 

PF, A. Sackman Cleveland, O. 

Jas. Murdock Jr., Cincinnati, O 
Sheet Iron— 


Cleveland Rolling Mill Co., Cleveland. 
Cambridge Iron & Stee) Co..Cambridge.“ . 


Steel Rails, Blooms and Billets— 
Cleveland Rolling Mill Co., Cleveland. 
Sheet Steel— 
Cambridge Iron & Steel Co.,Cambridge O 
Steel Laths— 
Bostwick Steel Lath Co., Niles, O. 
Steel Oastings— 
‘ Chester Steel Casting Co., Philadelphia, 
a 


Steam Traps— 
Spaulding & Metcalf, Chicago, Il. 
Steam, Gas and Piumbers Sapplies— 
A. Harvey’s Sons Mfg. Co., Detroit. Mich. 
Twist Drillse— 
Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Clevelan@. 
Graham Twist Drill Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Tarnbuckles— 
' Gpetes City Forge & Iron Co., Cleve: 
and. 
Time Registers— 
| The Automatic Time Stamp and Register 
Boston, Mass- 
| Ventilating Fans— 
| LaFountaine Mfg. Co., Cleveland, O. 
EK. H. Jones & Co., Cleveland: 
Water Gas Furnaces— 
W.8. Hutchinson, Chicago, Ii. 
Window Blinds— 
Hartman Sliding Blind Co., Wooster, C. 
Wood-Workiug Machinery— 
‘'ndiana Machine Work. Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
Frank & Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 
The Egan Co., Cincinnati, O. 
Wire Goods— 
F. Powell & Co., Toledo, O 
Wire Machinery— 
John Adt & Son, New Haven, Conn. 
Washers— 
Milton Mfg. Co., Milton, Pa. 














BOSTWICK PATENT. 


FIRE ~ PROOF 


A great saving in mortar, material and labor 
Write for Cataiogue and Sample. 
THE BOSTWICK STEEL Tatu co., 
38 Park Row, New York City. Niles, O 
Mention this Paper. 





J. M. ALLEN, President. 
WM. B. FRANKLIN, Vice-President. 
F. B. ALLEN, Second Vice-President. 
B. PIERCE, Secretary and Treasurer. 





| 
| 
| 
| 
} 
| 








A S. FERRY, Gen’l Agt., 208 Superior Street, 
Cleveland, O. 

Cc. A. BURWELL, Chief Inspector, 208 Superior 
St., Cleveland, O. 

R. D. BRIGGS, Special Agt., 208 Superior St., 
Cleveland, O. 

J. E. WOLCOTT Special Agent, 208 Superior 
St., Cleveland, O. 

L. C. BURWELL, Spe.ial Agent, 81 4th Ave 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 


FOR 
ARTISTIC 
PRINTING 
WRITE 
CLEVELAND 
PRINTING & 
PUBLISHING CO., 
CLEVELAND O. 

















CLEVELAND BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 


F. FELKEL, 


CIVIL ENGINEER AND ARCHITECT, 
166 ST. CLAIR ST., CLEVELAND, O. 
IRON BUILDINGS, LARGE SPAN ROOFS 


PLANS for Manufacturing Plants, Ware- 
houses andother Heavy Structuresa 
SPECIALTY. 


Soit and Nut Works. 


HE UPSON NUT CO, Manufacturers 0! 
Nuts, Washers, Carriage, Machine, Plow 
and Elevator Bolts, Coach Screws, etc. 

















Hardware and Iron. 


LEVELAND ROLLING MILL CO.,manu- 
y facturers of Steel and Iron Wireand Steel 
re. 











Machinists’ Supplies. 
| ey ae & BOSWORTH, 9 and 11 So. Wate: 
8t., dealers in Manufacturers’ Supplies, 
Machinery and Tools. 
Steel Stamps and Stencils. 
LEHARTY, J. H. &CO., Rubber Stamps, 


Seals, Stencils,Automatic Check Punches 
aud Numbering Machines. 92 Seneca St. 


BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 


Akron, U. 


W EBSTER,CAMP & LANE MACHINE Co., 
Founders and Machinists, 12 Main st. 
































Cw f—A chemist wants position in 
iron or steel works, or at ore munes. 
Address L P. N., Iron Trade Review. 


SHEPARD’S NEW $60 








2 SCREW CUTTING 

= Foot Lathe 
g Foot & Power Lathes- 
2 Drill Presses, 7 
x Saw Attachm’ts, Man 
a drels, Chucks, t 
y Drills > 
5 etc. Lathes on tria) 


- rn - - a. 
end tor catalogue of Outfits for Amateurs or 

Artisans Address H L. SHEPARD, Agt., 
124 East Second St., Cincinnati, O. 


Bischoff Metal Ceilings, 


(PATENTED.) 








It will pay to investigate 
and write for catalogue. 





Estimates submitted on ap- 
plication. 


Fred. F. Bischoff & Co. 


24 W. Lake St, 
CHICAGO, - ILL. 


SAS, MURDOCK, JR 


Manufacturer of 


STEEL STAMPS 
NAME PLATES, 


VeTIMHBHE 


& TOOL ROOM 


cEEorKs. 
52 Longworth St, Cincinnati. 6 


L. 4H. OLDFIELD. 
Merchandise Broker. 


















Correspondence Solicited. 


WICHITA, KANSAS. 





BLINDS WITH BURGLAR 
WAKENED ME.AND 
FOR HIM! 


Tens of thousands of these blinds are in use. 
Agents wanted ; Send 4-cent stamp for an 80- 
page illustrated catalogue to 


HARTMAN SLIDING BLIND CO., 
69 Beaver St., WOOSTER 0., U, S. A 





fi 
ri 
P 
h 
s 








Tem IRON TRaApDP Review. 






17 











The “ Lancaster” Rock Breaker and Ore Crusher 


The Strongest, Simplest, Cheapest and the Most Perfect Crusher Made. 


oS 
SS 





Instantly adjustable to yield any desired uniform grades of product. 
Half the power only required and is less liable to breakage, and less in 


first cost and also in subsequent wear and tear, and less weight than any 

For crushing rock for macadamizing and concreting pur- 
ores, these breakers are specially efficient. 

The “ Lancaster ” Crushers are also made in “ Sections” 


rival’s breaker. 
poses, and also for reducin 


rtation in mountainous regions. 


for easy trans- 


May be mounted on wheels, worked by 


and, horse gear and steam or other power, and also fitted with Ro 


Screens, Elevators and Conveyors. 


Correspondence and trial tests solicited. 








THE “LANCASTER” 


Will automatically dig, raise and discharge mud, clay, gravel, sand, hard pan 


ores, rock phosphates and fire-clay from 


their and 


banks, and also load and unload vessels or barges with 


sand, coal, ores, grain and other materials. 
ples are made of best forged steel, with four penetrating 
scoops, operated solely by compound leverage, thus dis- 
pensing with the inside sheaves, drums, catches, gears, 
chains and friction, found in all rival buckets. They 
may be worked by the “ Lancaster” hand or horse-power, 
hoisters, or by any maker’s double drum hoisting engines. 

Send for our new illustrated price list, agency terms 
and testimonials, and make appointment to see our Rock 
Breakers, Grapples, Hand, Horse and Steam Power 
Hoisters at work. Comparison of our prices, capacities 
val Grapples, Rock Breakers, 


and merits with all 
Hoisters, etc., earnestly solicited. 


These Grap- 





Self-Penetrating Grapple, Excavator & Dredger. 





Correspondence solicited. Manufactured and sold by the patentee. 





THE LANCASTER DIRECT STEEL PROCESS. 





JAMES H. LANCASTER. (P. O. BOX 3139) 202 BROADWAY. NEW YORK, U. &. A. 





GAS # GASOLINE ENGINES 


STATIONARY and PORTABLE. Ail Sizes. 


Dwarfs in Size, but 
Giants in Strength. 


Expense one cent an 
hour per horse wer 
and requires but little 
attention torun them. 

Every Engine 
Guaranteed, Full 
N _* lien trated free by mail 

: ention this paper. 


a a VAN DUZEN 
GAS & GASOLINE ENGINE CO. Cincinnati, 0. 












£VERYBODY WHO BUYS ONE BOX 
OF RAPID 


HARNESS MENDERS 


‘WANTS ANOTHER, SO DO YOU. 


They do the work Quickly, are 
Strong and Cheap, if you break 
your Harness when at work in 
the field you can mend it in half 
a minute and 


IT ONLY COSTS HALF A CENT, 


AND IT IS DONE BE'TTER 
THAN ANY HARNESS MAKER 
CAN DO IT. 


NO TOOLS REQUIRED. 


Just Drive Em tn and CLINCH En. 


HEY’LL DO THE REST, 





SHOWS HOW IT IS DONE. 


For Sale by Grocer and Hardware Dealer. 
Price, 25c per box of one gross, containing 
three sizes or sent to the Patentees and 
Manufacturers. 


BUFFALO SPECIALTY MFG. CO., 
BUFFALO, N. ¥. 


Wheeling & Lake Brie Railway. 


THE NEW THROUCH LINE 
BETWEEN 


TOLEDO 
—aND— 
Steubenville, Pittsburgh, Marietta. 


THROUGH COACHBRS 
BETWEEN 


Toledo & Marietta. 
Through Sleepers Between 
PITTSBURCH AND CHICACO. 
AND DAY COACHES BETWEEN 


Toledo and Pittsburgh, Via Akron, Ouy 
hoga Falls, Kent, venna, Leavitts- 
bares Warren, Niles, Girard, 
oungstown, New Castile 

and Allegheny. 





The Only Line running through 


“BEAUTIFUL ZOAR.” 


4. G. Bua, Tas. M. Hatt, 
Traffic Mauager. Gen’! Pass. Agent. 





TRAVELERS’ RECISTER. 
Standard Time. 
Erie Railway. 
Depot, South Water Street and Viaduct. 


Arri Depart. 
soem 8 25a m 


N Y. & Pitts. Express....... 

Fast N. Y..& Pitts. Express*io 55 a m sd $4 

Mahoning Accommo......... qoam 

Pittsburg: scscesees 76 25 PM 

Youngstown Local............. am 

Mahon’g div. & Pitts Local *1140am 
— } GER 430pm 

A ae Express............ Iz0pm Iriopm 

New York Expresz............. OO PM reveessereeres 
y. tDaily,except Sunday. {Daily ex- 

cept Monday. 


Cleveland & Canton Raliread. 
(Standard Gauge.) 

Depart for— 
Zanesville and Coshocton—6:50 a. m., g:00 p. m. 
Canton—6:50 a. m., 3:00 p. m., 6:20 p. 
Kent—6:50 a. m., 3:00 p. m., *5:45 p. m. 6:20 p. m. 
Bedford—6:50 a. m., 11:10 a. m., 1:30 p. 

Pp. M., 4:40 p. m., $5.45 Pp. m., 6:20 p. m. I 


m 

Newburgh—6:15 a. m., 6:50 &. m., II:10 @. m. 
P. M., 3:00 P. M., 4:40 p. m., %5:45 p. m., 6: 
M., 10:35 p. m. 

Arrive from— 

Zanesville and Coshocton —10:30 a. m.,6:30 p m. 

Canton, 10:30 a. m., 2:35 p. m., 6:30 p. m. 

Kent. :I0 8. m., _ M., 2:35 Pp. m., 6:30 p.m. 

Bedford—6:oo a. m., *8:10 a.m., 10:30 &.m., 1:05 p. 
M., 2:35 Pp. M., 4:15 Pp. M., 6:30 p.m., 7:10 p.m. 

Newburg —6:00 &. M., 7:15 a. m., "8:10 a. m., 

10:308. M., I.05 Pp. M., 2:35 P. M., 4:15 Pp. m., 

6:30 p. m., 7:10 p. m. 

Trains marked * run daily. 


Valley Raliway. 
Por AKRON, CANTON AND MARIETTA. 
Depot oot South Water Street. 


Depart. Arrive. 
Valley Junction Mail......... ~25am “%4opm 
Chicago Express .............. *8 35am *ooopm 
Marietta Express............... Ti1isam  {235pm 


Balto. & Wash. ress.... *400 pm *10 25 a m 
Cleve. ond Canton iepoecs 16 opm 78 20am 
*Daily. Daily, except Sun 4 

T. T. JOHNSON, J. B. CavEen, 
Gen. Supt. Gen. Pass. Agt. 





From Cleveland Union Station. 


PENNSYLVANIA LINES. 








Cleveland & Pittsburgh BR. R. 
Arrive. | Depart. 
ds25am| 745am 


more, Washington, Phil- 


dir 40am/| di 4opm 
adelphia and New York. 


For Washingtos Balti- 
635 pmidii iopm 


FT. WAYNE, CINCINNAT! & LOUISVILLE 
RAILROAD. 
The Popular Route Between the 


NORTH and SOUTH 


The Direct Route to or from 
Fort Wayne, indianapolis, Terre Haute, 
Evansville and St. Louls. 

13 res sHorter sETwEEN 13 
Fort Wayne and Indianapolis, 
Than any other Route. 

QD mimes shorter anv quicker DD 
BY THREE HOURS, BETWEEN 


Louisville and Fort Wayne. 


ASE FOR TICKETS VIA 


Ft. Wayne, Cincinnati & Louisville R. R. 


For sale by all Agents of connecting lines, 
East, West, North and South. 


GEO. W. SAUL W. H. FISHER, 
Gen’l Supt. Gen’l Pass. & Tk. Agt. 


FORT WAYNE, IND. 


PITTSBURGH AND LAKE ERIE 


RAILROAD. 
“Cleveland & rittsburgh Short Line.” 


Twenty (20) Miles Shorter than any other 
route between Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Wash- 
ington, Baltimore and the South East. 


5 Through Trains Daily 5 

















FAST TIME. NO DELAYS. 
“ For scen picturesque and varied, 
Through valleys green, ’mong mountains ser- 
The ey favorite route I ween, {ried, 
The P. & L. E. sits enthroned as queen.” 

See that your tickets read via 


THE PEOPLE'S FAVORITE ROUTE. 





Wellsville, Wheeling | '23°P™) 7 458m E. HoLsroox, CLarx 
and Beliaire. . _ £35 wan ~ 4 4 Gen’l Supt., G.P.& T. a. 
Alliance Accom............. | 1o1oam| 3 25pm Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Ravenna Accom............. 825am| 5 00pm 

d Daily. *Excen' Satnrdav Other trains 


except Sunday. Through Pullman Sleepers 
to New York on 1:40 p. m. train daily. 


From Oleveiand Univun station. 


MtVernon ee’ Pan Handle Route 


Cleveland & Pittsburgh R. R. 











For Cu 0; Falis,| Arrive. | Depart. 
Akron, Servite, Mill- 
ersburg, Gambier, Mt. 
Vernon, Columbus, Xe- a yooam| 8coam 


nia, Dayton, Cincinna- 

ti, Louisville Indiana 

olis, St. Louis, and all 
ints in the South and 
uthwest 


For Cu nome Falls, 
rrville, Mill- 


540 pmid 800pm 











Akron, 
ersburg, Gambier, Mt. {f '73°P™| '°5 pm 
Vernon and Columbus. 
For Cuyahoga Falls, 
Akron, Orrville, Chica- 540 pm| S8coam 
go, and all points in the loam) 325pm 
tand Northwest. | 
da Daily. Other trains except Sunday. 
Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars daily between 
Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati City 


ticket office, Weddell House corner. 





SCIOTO VALLEY 


RAILWAY. 


Direct route, Columbus, O., to Circle 
ville, Chillicothe, Waverly, Ports 
mouth, Ironton and Ashland, Ky. 
Three trains daily except Sunday. 
Favorite route, North and West, “a 
ing close connection at Ashland, Ky., 
with the Chesapeake & Ohio Ry., 
through the canons of New River, 
passing White Sulphur Springs and 
the many Summer resorts of the Alle- 
ghenies in Virginia. 





Shortest and Quickest Roxnte to Rich- 
mond, Lynchburg, Newport News, 
Old Point Comfort. 


j. Ronmmson, Receiver, 


Juno. J. ARCHER, 
Columbus, O, 


Gen’l Pass. Agt 





—THE— 


Cleveland «Marietta Ry. 


THROUGH TRAINS 


Toledo, Cleveland and the Ohio River. 
The shortest and best Route via Marietta to 


Washington, D. O., Charieston, W. Va., 


Parkersburg, W. Va., and the South. 


connections at Union with all 
great through lines to ai reiate 


WEST, NORTHWEST, SOUTH, SOUTH- 
WEST AND SOUTHEAST. 


Lowest Rates. Ouickest Time. 


Best Accommodations. 


Tickets sold and baggage checked through 
to Lg oy — nformation and best 
ra rn any agen 
Popular C. M. =o oo 
A.T. WIKOFP, Ww 

Pres, and Gen. Mgr. 





K. Ricwarps, 
@.P.&T. 4, 





THE FAVORITE 
—AND— 
PICTURESQUE ROUTE 
TO 
New York, Boston 








and the East. 
The shortest and 
quickest Route to Pitts 
burgh, Washington 
Bal & the South- 
east. 

New Central Depot So. Water St. and Viaduct. 
no - fon York & Pitts s.... fe an 
. 72, . Express.... a 
No. 70, Pittsburgh Accomn.............:00+« #11 pb = 


No. 64, New York & Pitts. Limited...* 250 pm 
No. 66, Mantua Accommo * 

No. 74, Youngst’n Ex 
No. 68, New York & Pitts. Ex............ 


Arrive. 
No. 61, N. ¥. & Pittsburgh Express...¢ 5 15a 
No. 71, Youngstown ‘aelem evocsercoeccose bbe 


seeeeseneees tenses 














No. 65, New York & Pitts. Lim........... bd a 

No. 67, Pittsburgh Accom ra S| + 
No. 73, Leavittsburgh Local..........s00«. *z10pm 
No. 63, New York & Pitts. Ex *65pm 
No, 75, Mantua Accom 72pm 
No. 69, Youngstown Express............. tgiopm 


Express 
*Daily. Daily, except Sunday. 
Baggage checked through to all points Fast. 
Through tickets and information segesiing 
the route can be obtained at office, 141 
street, and at Depot N. Y., P. & O. Rathroat, 
South Water street and Viaduct, 
A. M. TuckER, Gen. Mang., Cleveland, O. 
W.C Rovearson, Gen. Pass. Ag’t, New York. 
G. E. Fouts, C P. & T. A., Cl nd, 





eLIPSe&* 


LECTROTYPE 


jf EN Tel-F Wal Lemere 






























































‘Tex IRON TRapPp Review. 



















CLEVELAND REFERENCES. 


J. W. Britton, Esq.. 

Woods, Jenks & Co., 

w.§S. Tyler Wire Works Co., 
Cleveland Forge & Iron Co., 
Bishop & Babcock Co., . 
Cleveland Saw Mill & Lumber Co. 


Address: 





THE HAZELTON TRIPOD BOILER 


Furnishes more and dryer steam with less fuel, and generates steam more 
rapidly, than any other boiler in use. 


Cherry Valley Iron Works, Leetonia, 0., 

Federal St. & Pleasant Valley Pass. Ry., Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Anglo-American Provision Co., Chicago, 

Wellsville Plate & Sheet Iron Co., Wellsville, 0., 

Falcon Iron & Nail Co., Niles, 0. 


THE HAZELTON TRIPOD BOILER CO., 


GEO. A. HUMPHREYS, Ag’t, 723 Perry-Payne Bldg., CLEVELAND, 0. 


809 Monon Block, 324 Dearborn St., CHICAGO, ILL. 


Who also offer the Hazelton Purifier which we guarantee will remove 90 to 95 per cent. of the impurities from feed-water. 





WILLIAM TOD & CO.. YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO. 















The icaadensy: Haviniton Raine. 


Single Compound and Condensing-100 horse-power and upwards. 


THE HAMILTON BLOWING EFGINE, HYDRAULIC CRANES, 
ACCCUMULATORS AND SHEARS. 


“HEAVY SPECIAL MACHINERY CENERALLY. 


aa SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE. 





=. EX. TONES & Co., 
ENCINEERS «>» CONTRACTORS, 


223-245 River St., CLEVELAND, O. 


Steam Plants Complete. Engines, Boilers, Pumps, Heaters, Etc. 
Steam and Hot Water Heating. 


STURTEVANT’S BLOWERS, COILS, ETC., 
| FOR HOT BLAST HEATING, 





THE TOLEDO MACHINE TOOL CO., 


MANUFACTURERS OF 


PRESSES, DROP PRESSES, DIES, 


Special Machinery 


DESIGNED AND BUILT TO ORDER, 





Dies for all kinds of sheet metal goods, leather, paper, etc. In- 
ventors’ models and specialties. nd for circulars and prices. 


St. Clair and Washinaton Streets. 
TOLEDO, O 





Mention this paper. 





Otto Gas Engine Works, 


SCHLEICHER, SCHUMM & CO., { Efiladelphia. 


Horizontal OTT Gas Engines. 
Vertical UTTO Gas Engines. 
Twin Cylinder OTTO Gas Engines. 
Combined OTTO Gas Engive Pumps. 
Combined UTTO Gas Engine Dynamos. 


SIZES: 1, 2,4, 7, 10,16, 26 AND 560 HORSE-POWER. 


RSIS RASS OAM SAE A 









LaFountaine Manufacturing Co., 


MANUFACTURER OF 


VENTILATING FANS AND BLOWERS, HANGERS, 


Carpet Cleaning and Laundry Machinery and other 
eis ss Special “yet Mas 


1335 Lexington Ave.. = CLEVELAND, QO. 











THE DEMING CO,, 


SALEM, OHIO. 
Pumps, 


For HAND AND POWER. 


Adapted for BorLER FEEDING, FIRE 
PURPOSES, etc.; also ARTESIAN WELL 
=—— CYLINDERS and WorKING Hgaps for 

— FACTORIES, MILLS and FURNACES. 
HENION & HUBBELL, 55 & 57 N. Clinton St., Chicago, General Western Agents 
Send for illustrated catalogue and price list. Mention this paper. 


LERS 








LER: VWoRKC: S 
SSES, RAST Furnaces 


ee vieuin Nce-BS 


ES) ok 1 pus 
das TPYBERR F "ROLLING MILL WoRK. 


Lh ye)mnele.e KO. YOUNGS TOWN, on 








FRANK & CO., BFF: X. ¥. 


MANUFACTURERS OF 





a daira fanaa ORTISER 
SCROLL SAWS, 


BAND SAWS, SAW TABLES, BENCHES. 


TIPPING TABLE, 


LATHES, 
HORIZONTAL 
BORING 
MACHINES, 
















tmnown to the Arts. 


= POWDER, FUSE, CAPS, 
Electric Mining Goods, 


AND ALL as FOR STUMP BLASTING, 
SALE BY THE 
HERCULES SOwoEr COMPANY, 
Prospect Street, Cleveland, Chie, 


iW. WILLARD, Managers 


T 














7 


al» 



































Tem Iron Trapp Revirw. 19 








THE BALL & WOOD CoO., 


Owners of Ball Patents and Builders of 


Improved Automatic Cut-off Engines. 


Under the personal supervision of the inventor, F. H. Ball. 


Simple Engines, Electric Lighting Plants, 
Compound Engines, for Electric Railway Plants, 


Triple Expansion Engines, Manufacturing Engines, 


And all purposes requiring close regulation and economy. 
WORKS, ELIZABETH, N. J. OFFICE, 15 CORTLANDT ST., N. Y. 





The Long Steel & Iron Roofing & Corrugating Co., 


(Successors to O.S. KEELY & CO.) Manufacturers of 


STEEL AND IRON ROOFING, 


Corrugated Siding and Ceiling, Iron Ore 
Paint, Cement, Etc 


N. E. Cor. Illinois and Merrill Streets, INDIANAPOLIS, IND 
Write for Catalogue and Price List. 


The BERGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, CANTON, O. 


a make arrange- 

ments for ROOF- 

DON T ING until you 
have seen ours. 


It Excels all other Metal Roofs. 














A SAMPLE INSTALLATION. 


Standard Automatic Engine coupled direct to a Centrifugal Pump. 
Speed 280 Revolutions. 

















q 
hi 
i 





























Over 4000 Westinghouse Standard Engines in use. 














é ‘ Hulw: 


ry UJ 4 
















MANUFACTURERS OF 


, SS Sy i=) AUTOMATIC, STATIONARY & PORTABLE 


ENGINES # BOILERS 


=—— SEND FOR CATALOGUE, 


KIN OVER 4500 IN IN USE. 





SOUTHWARK FOUNDRY & MACHINE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 





SOLE MAKERS pe pas 
PORTER-ALLEN AUTOMATIC ENGINE. 
Blowing Engines, ro on. 

Centrifugal Pumps, Accumulators, 


Hydraulic Cranes, 
Boilers Tanks, ete. 





—CORRUGATED 
- ROOFING. “SIDING-8--CEILING= 


—-—-GLEVELAND- --OHIO.-~ 








THE KANNEBERC ROOFING CO., Canton, O. 
The Originators of Strictly Genuine Steel Roofing.) 
MANUFACTURERS OF THE 


Kanneberg Pat., Latest Improved, Folded Lock Seam Roofing, 


Made of STRICTLY GENUINE STEEL, 


CORRUGATED IRON (four sizes of corrugations), and Crimped 
Edge Iron eine and Siding, Beaded Iron Siding and Ceiling, 
Water Proof Building Paper, Dry and Ready Mixed Paints, Etc 


Write for Catalogues, Price Lists and Samples. 








OLTON [RON ROOFING/ 
ROOFING CEILING &c. 


NEW LISBON, o 


SIDI NG, AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE 








CAMBRIDGE ROOFING GO. Cambridge, 0. & Chatanooga, Tenn. 


Manufacturers of 
iy aoe, Crimpeda 
mage. Co rrugated and Beada- 
oofing, Siding and Ceil 
ing. 
PURE STEEL A SPECIALTY 


e@ Send for Descriptive 
Catalogue. 





MANUFACTURERS OF— 


Steel Footing, 


Corrugated Iron, 


Crimped Edge Roofing and Siding, Beaded Siding and 
Ceiling, Patent Slip Joint EKAVE TROUGHS, etc. 


WRITE US FOR PRICES. 
Agents’ Wanted. Address OFFICE NO. 223, CANTON, 0 








Ali my Iron 
and Steel is re 
rolled and box 
annealed, wel] 

ainte 4 ony 


SYKES’ 


IMPROVED 


classes of 
buildings. 
Easy put on. as di 
sYKus ZRON & SOTBEL ROOFING CO., 
Se Se ee ae NILES, O.. and CHICAGO, JILL. 


ana mention this neper 
60,000 CRANK SHAFTS and 50,000 GEAR WHEELS of 


7 this steel now running prove .his. 









FROM 1-4 TO 15,000 LBS. WEISHT. 
True to pattern, sound, solid, free from blow-holes and 
of unequaled strength. 
Stronger and more durable than iron forgings in any 
position, or for any service whatever. 





Crossheads, Rockers, Piston-Heads, etc., for Locomo- 
tives. STEEL CASTINGS of every description. 
Send for circulars and prices to 
Chester Stee! Castings Co., 
WORKS: OFFICE 
CHESTER, PA. }e07 LIBRARY ST., PHIADELPHIA, PA, 








































2o "Tem IRON Trapp Revitw. 











Sri. Ww EL.L.’s 


PATENT LIMB-EXTRACTING 


Heater and Filter 


COMBINED, 


Us the only lime-extracting Heater that will t scale in 
steam boilers, rs limpurities from the water before 
it enters the boiler. Thoroughly tested. 













OVER 3,000 OF THEM IN DAILY USE. 





This cut is the fac simile of the Sypeasnnee of the shelves o. 
‘a No. 5 Heater at work on ordinary lime-water when the door 
was removed after the Heater had been running two weeks. 


ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES. 


Stilwell & Bierce Mfg. Co., 


DAYTON, OHIO. 











25 to 1,000 H. P. 


NEW TANGYE BUCKEYE AUTOMATIC CUT-OFF ENGINES. 
a . “in Use, Over 2,600. 

These engines are the combined result ot 

f long expetience with automatic cut-off reg- 

f 7> ulation, and most careful revision of all de- 

¢ & tails. They are designed and constructed 

. for heavy and continuous duty at medium 


= ~ iG te ot high rotative speeds. Highest attainable 

f « Economy in Steam Consumption and Supe- 
. ai rior regulation guaranteed. Self-contained 
== Automatic Cut-off Engines 12 to 200 H. P. for 
driving Dynamo Machines a Specialty. Tllus- 
rated Circulars, with various data as to 
practical Steam Engine Construction and 

BUCKEYE ENCINE CO., Salem, O. 

SALES AGENTS: 
W. L. SIMPSON, 10 Telephone Building, 18 Cortlandt St., N. Y. 


W. N. ROBINSON, 154 Washington St., Chicago, Ill. ROBINSON & CARY CO., St. Paul, Minn. 


Water Gas Furnaces 


FOR LOCOMOTIVES, STEAMBOATS AND STATIONARY BOILERS. 


A Perfect Smoke Burner. 
6 Washineton-st., Chicago. 


performance, free by mail. Address 











W. S. HUTOHINSON. 








OLD 








waz )6W CLEVELAND TWIST DRILL CO., (ser 


RBLIABLR 


UNIVERSAL RADIAL 


RADIAL DRILLING MACHINES 


=—— — THREE DESIGNS. SIX SIZES 






—— : : : EMBODY ALL DESIRABLE FEATURE 


os 


wom, PRICES$450 2° UPWARD 





sen on camuocoe. Gop. Lake & Kirtland Sts,, Cleveland, 0, ware ox vscoorrs | MiMAaaten USS. 




























The Hart or Detroit 
Emery Corundum Wheels and Machinery. 
Write to J. WENDELL COLD, M. EB., 
District Manager, Box 152, Chicago, Il., or Box 84, Columbus, O. 
S@-N. B.—Also Agent for WM. SELLERS & Co.’s Spectat Toor G 


RIND- 
BR and Twist DRILL GRINDER WITH POINTER, for Pennsylvania, Ohio, 
Indiana, Illinois and Wisconsin. 








PEN BERN Tay 


> AUTOMATIC INJECTOR. 


Guaranteed 99 per cent. Efficiency 
AS A BOILER FEEDER. 


42,000 in actual use. 
Sent on 30 days’ trial. 


PENBERTHY INJECTOR COMPANY., 


Manufacturers, 


os DETROIT, - MICH. 








' ©. H. PRESLEY, Agent, Cleveland, O. 
BEL rinN G. 


For general work use only Shultz Fulled Belting, but 
for a main driving belt take Shultz Leather Link Belt. 
It will give you more power and last longer than any 
other belt now made. We will put one in for you under 
full guarantee and on 60 days’ trial For sale by 


THE PARKIN & BOSWORTH CO., °* Waters» os cvecann, o. 





PRESSED WROUCHT IRON OPEN TURN 
———— BEST aa 


The list retail price of this Buckle is less than one-half the 
wholesale price of inferior goods when we commenced to man- 
tacture, and dealers, even in small towns, find it profitable to carry a stock to sell with iron for tie rods 


CLEVELAND CITY FORGE & IRON CO.. CLEVELAND, OHnio. 


BUCKLES. 


ae 














REYNOLDS BROS., | INDUSTRY FILE WORKS, jg 


MANUFACTURERS OF 
A. & H. Geugh, Props., 


Hand Cot Files | _. ssc « 


ano rasps. | Files Rasps, 


We solicit the commercia 
trade only. Equal to the. pest English 
e. 


183 & 135 N. Water St, 


COLUMBUS, OHIO. 
Old Files Recut and 






OLD FILES RE-OUT. 


All Kinds of Job Grinding, 


w  Proneee OsFicge & Works, 
arrante uperior to 
any Machine Cut and | 48 COLUMBUS ST., 


Lead Tempered in the | CLEVELAND ,0 
market. Send for price C.GOUGH Manager. 
list. Mention this paper. 








Awarded the GRAND PRIZE at the Paris Exhibition. 


SEN FOR THs BOOK ———— 


I | } | 
we Ss 


fm oak. wrk cio! 
Y AUSTRIA.) 

















CRAHAM TWIST DRILL CO,, Detroit, Mich., 
Sole manufacturers of GRAHAM’S PATENT GROOVED SHANK TWIST DRILLS 
and CHUCKS, Endorsed by progressive mechanics everywhere. Send for Catalogue. 





JOHN ADT & SON, 
New Haven, Conn. 


Builders of Machinery for Hardware 
Manufacture. 


Automatic Wire Straightening and Cutting 
Machines, Butt Milling Machinery, 
Butt Drilling Machinery, Rivet- 
ing Machines, Foot Presses, 

Sprue Cutters, Ets. 


Enterprise Boiler Company, “°Sesro™ 


MANUFACTURERS OF 


BOILERS, AND TANKS, SHERT IRON AND PLATE WORK 


Of all Descriptions. 











Jobbers of all kinds of 
Roofing Materials. 
"ONIAZOOYU NOU! 
ded [low pus pedmri A 
'NVHS ONIGNVIS Gussuud 



























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