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PUBLISHED MONTHLY 


BULLETIN OF 
THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM 
OF ART 


Votume XXXII NEW YORK, JULY, 1937 NUMBER 7 





4 


LE CHAPEAU EPINGLE, A LITHOGRAPH BY RENO 


IN THE EXHIBITION OF 
PRINTS BY RENOIR AND HIS CONTEMI 


MPORARIES 














BULLETIN OI 
METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OI 





Pe 1Q 37 
E XxX I, N BEI 
COPYRIGH1 037, BY 
IHE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM F ARI 
I ‘ nder the directio 
etary p Museu Art 
| Ave ‘ ity md Stree Ne 
York, N. Howe, kditor 
Sent 1 " t Mi St I itt 
harge; to others upon receipt of the subscription 
rice Wo I vear gle opies twenty 
cents. Copies are for sale and subscriptions are 
iKel the Inform nn Desk. Mailorders should 
‘ lressed to the Secretary of the Museum 
entered is Second ¢ iss Matter lune 1027 
the Post Office, N York, N. Y., under A 
\ 24 IQ 


CONTENTS 


Front Cover Illustration: Le ¢ hapeau 


épingle Lithograph by Renoir i 


the Exhibition of Prints by Renon 


and His Contemporaries 103 
\ Loan of Persian Rugs « he So 

called Polish Tvpe 104 
lhe Bequestof Emma Townsend Gary — 106 
[he George C. Stone Bequest: Indian 

and Persian Arms and Armor 107 


\n Egyptian Headdress 173 


] 1) 
\ccessions of Greek and Roman An 
tiquities 175 
Reno 177 
— 
Note ISO 
Prints Kenoir and His ¢ ontempo 
raries— Membership— Gifts— Meeting 
of the American Library Associatior 
List of Accessions and Loans 
Exhibitions 1S] 


A LOAN OF PERSIAN RUGS OF 
THE SO-CALLED POLISH TYPE 


[hrough the generosity of John D. Rocke- 
feller, Jr., the Museum has received as a 
loan six Persian silk rugs of the so-called 
Polish type.' Such rugs represent the most 


luxurious products of Persian looms of the 


seventeenth century. It was thought for- 

| re on « in Gallery D 3. Vis 
itors to the Museum are already familiar with 
} y he r i¢ | | hibitior 











merly that they were in Poland, as a 


arms ol 


made 


1umber of them bore the coats of 


noble Polish famihes. But this theorv has 
now been completely discarded, and it 1s 
generally accepted that they were woven 


in Persian court manufactories during the 
century the 
and that, for the most part, thev were 


seventeenth chiefly in first 
halt 
woven specially for European sovereigns 
and nobles, either to their order or as gifts 
from the shahs 


Most ol the 


and pi 


Polish rugs are 
brocaded In silver or 


SO-¢ alled 
knotted irtly 


silver-gilt’ threads 
uncommon in other types of Persian rugs, 


Delicate pastel shades, 


are predominant in their color schemes. 
[he designs are floral, consisting of scrolling 
stems with large palmettes and lanceolate 
leaves, usually issuing from acentral motive 
In some of the rugs the field 1s divided into 
Various compartments of more or less Irregu- 
lar shape. Often there 
the field, except that certain 


\ 
lined by arabesques 


is no clear division of 
sections, out- 
ned and scrolls, show dif- 
ferent colors 

The rugs lent by Mr 
among the finest known examples, revealing 
splendor of rich color 


Rockefeller are 
all the decorative 
combinations enhanced by the lavish use of 
gold and silver. Four of them have fields 
divided into compartments, forming an all- 
pair shows four-sided 
salmon red, 
floral 
with palmettes in rich colors. The 
pair ol preal decorative 


has irregular compartments in vel- 


over pattern. One 


artments with dark blue 
gold grounds, 


comy 
silver, Or enclosing 
scrolls 
second rugs, of 
beaut\ 
low, salmon red, green, brown, silver, or 
gold 
wide range 
sian weavers, who followed purely decora- 


see illustration). This pair reveals the 


of colors employed by the Per- 


tive principles in order to achieve a rich 
polvchromatic effect. In another rug, which 
has several small central medallions, the 
variety of colors used 1s even greater. In 
many “Polish” rugs, however, certain hues 
predominate, as in the magnificent rug with 
the coat of arms of some noble European 
family, which exemplifies the sumptuous- 
ed by the royal looms 


he Great 


ness of the rugs produc 


established by Shah 








SO-CALLED 


OF THI 
POLISH TYPI 


IRS 


I 


< 
on 
4 
< 


ERSIAN, 


tr 4 


A a 
sa ORC 


KNOTTED 











BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 
IHE BEOUEST O] Chase (1849-1916) of his infant daughter 
it has not vet been determined which of 


EMMA TOWNSEND GARY 


Mrs. Emma Townsend Gary, the widow 
of Judge Elbert H. Gary, former chairman 
( the Board of the United States Steel 
Corporation, died on April 5, 1934. From 
her estate the Museum receives a generous 
contribution t s endowment funds and a 
number ot eresting dd ist S 
collections 

There ar Ir pall os, all show 
month in the Room of Recent Accessions 


The fourth 
1520- 


Chase's six daughters 1s shown 


painting is by Jean Jacques Henner 
a red-haired voung woman with 


ded in praver 


LQOS5 Oo 
hands fi 

The laces comprise a hundred pieces in 
both bobbin and needlepoint techniques, 
ranging in period from the seventeenth cen- 
tury to the present day. There are borders, 


wide and narrow, of Venetian needlepoint 
of the seventeenth century and Burano 
needlepoint a hundred vears later in date. 





BREAKFASI 


[he portrait of Judge Elbert H b\ 
Hubert Vos 
1924, only three vears before the 
\ brilliant pai 
Madrazo 


le Ball at the 


(yar 
yainted 
judge's 
nting by the Spaniard 
1O41 de- 
Ritz Hotel 


1555-1935 was | n 
death 
Raymundo de 


picts a Masquerac 


1QO20 


Paris (fig. 2). Easily recognizable among the 
gaily costumed PuUeSTS seated at 1 ibles are 
Judge Gary with Madame Madrazo in a 
rose and white court dress and Mrs. Gar 


in blue and white Gainsborough dress 
and at the adjoining table, Madrazo wear 
on of Honor. The 
LQOQ There 


William M 


ing the badge of the | eg 
picture is signed and dated 


Is 


also a charming rapid sketch b 


A nos 4 20.1 R25 


is 


SEVRES PORCELAIN 


Of the same period Is a group of interesting 
examples of point d’Alengon of varying de- 
sign. Outstanding among the more modern 
a beautiful length of bobbin lace 
splendid 


workman- 


laces are 
probably of Bru 
flounce 


ssels origin and a 


needlepoint of French 


ship, both of which illustrate the faithful 
continuance of eighteenth-century tradi- 
Lions 

Included in the Gary bequest was a group 
of two hundred and thirty-one pieces of 


Sevres porcelain with apple green borders 
enriched gilding and with floral de- 
in color. Five of the pieces comprised 


with 


Signs 
ly | { t 
i Dreaklast set 


g. 1); the rest were part of 
The of the pieces 


a dinner service majority 


: BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 





ie bear the double-L monogram of the Sévres = England. When Edward VII, then Prince of 
factory with date letters ranging from 1759 ~=Wales, visited India in 1875-1876, many 
oh to 1788, together with the marks of various — splendid specimens were presented to hin 
4 well-known painters and gilders, such as by the native princes, chiefs, and nobles, and 
‘ith Commelin, Cornailles, Mereaud, Vincent this collection was catalogued by Sir C. Pur 
Bulidon, Tandart, Thévenet, and Le Guay don Clarke, afterwards Director of The 
by \ representative selection of the lace and Metropolitan Museum of Art. Sir Richard 
an a selection comprising all the different types | Wallace, who collected outstanding objects 
toil , in both the breakfast set and the dinner in many fields, acquired many noteworthy 
ne service are exhibited this month in the examples of oriental arms and armor, and 
oe Room of Recent Accessions. these were bequeathed to the nation in 
() 
te. 
FIG. 2. MASQUERADE BALL BY RAYMUNDO DE MADRAZO 
LHE GEORGE C. STONE 1897 by Ladv Wallace. Henri Moser, who 
BEOUES] spent much of his life adventuring in the 
INDIAN AND Pt er ARMS AND ARMOR East, formed a great collection, which he b 
queathed tothe Historical Museum in Berne 
lhe fourth and final special exhibition of | Another important collection—the swords 
objects from the George C. Stone bequest and daggers sent by the shahs of Persia 
. will be held in Gallery E 15 from July 18 — the Russian sovereigns the seventeent! 
through September 26. This installment and eighteenth centuries— is in the Hern 
consists mainly of arms and armor from age in Leningrad. Now, for the first time 
India and Persia and is considered to be the — the Metropolitan Museum is able to exhibit 
most valuable section of the collection a collection of Indian and Persian arms and 


With the growth of the British Empire armor ranking with those mentioned abov 


interest in collecting oriental arms and armor Fighting, hunting, and ceremonial wi 
Was stimulated in Europe, and especially in ons are included. Of the one hundr 
See BULLETIN, vol. xxXXI! 1930 pp. 255 t} seventy odd Ind n and Pers n sword 
and vol. XXxX11 (1937), pp. 54 ff, 143 fl the Stone collection, on twenty-elgnt | 
rae 





BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 





r exl n. These are all Sultan Akbar Shah Hindi (emperor, 1356 
ly vorkmanship, with blades 1005). [he name of Shah Ismail of Persia 
WII Vari watered-steel patterns 1502-1524) appears on a sword signed by 
set wit! wels or inlaid in gold with insery Sadik and that of Ahmad Shah Durrdni on 
from the Woran. Oriental blades are a dagger. One of the swords (see fig. 2) is 
| hi by 1 el remarkable for having both sides of the blade 
" es are overed with inscriptions in a specialized 
\ ! t being most technique. The background was hollowed 
leaving the inscriptions in relief: gold 
1 Was then placed in the sunken areas so 
that the inscription in black stands out 
eainst the gold. The inscriptions are quo- 
tations trom the Koran, some of them refer- 
rit Solomy nd the Queen of Sheba 
\ her blade nscribed There is no 
hero besides CAMi » sword besides Dhu 
| Kal LN I Lyle po ed Oorious 
wordot fAli). One blade, comb 2 strength 
Wit! ohtness S exXtraordin rom. the 

viewpoint of its construction. Along its me 
d n line Detween the Dac nd e Culling 
edge, Is perforation with grooved sides 
which runs about three quarters ¢ e length 
tf the blade. In this perforation are numer- 
MUS eel beads wh I OTAN ( oward the 
pou nd thus e the weapor ided mo- 

mentum when a blow jis struc] 

Ihe sword accessories are ric deco- 
rated. One scabbard, covered with red velvet 

embroidered with gold, is accompanied b\ 


I 
belt of gold brocade. Another sword retains 


ts belt of woven silver wire with enameled 


Iver mounts 

Ot swords trom related CO Pact 
llows h mention here of onl WO ex 
mples both weapons of s ( The first 1s 


Singhalese, the hilt and scabbard of horn 





skillfully carved with dragons’ heads and 


{ tw . fio - the th < ymece 
HILT OF INDIAN KATAR oliation ee fig. 2); the other dames 


the grip of horn and the hilt and scabbard 





teemed. Otten the bladesmith signed his © mountings of embossed gold 
name and sometimes associated with it that Phe Stone collection includes an extraor- 
of h Vereign. Among the most valuabl dinary series of gauntlet swords with richly 
blades are those made by Asad Ullah of | decorated hilts. The blades are Furopean. 
Ispahan, and in the Stone collection there one bearing the name of Tesche, a well- 
are no less than eleven blades inscribed known Solingen bladesmith. The surface of 
with his name. Five of the blades by Asad — one is chased with all-over designs. showing 


Ullah bear the name of Shah ‘Abbas of fohhation and acrobats, and gilded; another 
Persia (1587-10629). Two of our blades, one s surmounted with a dragon’s head and or- 
signed by Asad Ullah, the other by Akhir = namented with numerous jingles: a third is 
\hmad Asdni, bear the name and title ot boldly embossed with a grotesque animal 
\ll the inscriptions mentioned in this artic swallowing an elephant, whose head, trunk, 


were translated by Dr. Richard Ettinghauser and front legs are still visible (fig. 3). Other 





BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 








0 techniques represented are piercing, dam- — by the British in 1818. Thereafter prepara 
sla ascening, and jewel setting. These swords — tions for aggression disappeared from Tat 
by appear to be awkward to use, but in the jore and the armory was neglected 
on hands of « practiced swordsman they were — ultimately dispersed. From this sources 
IS remarkably effective. Concerning their use comes an especially valuable collection of 
de Captain Mundy gives the following account — thrusting daggers (katars) with steel hilts 
ed in his Journal of a Tour in India (1827): — pierced and chased with foliation and inter 
ed “After a display of sundry sweeping and — twined griffins, cobras, and fishes. One not 
Md 4 rotary cuts that would have severed a bul- = worthy example has a guard pierced and 
sO lock’s neck, four small limes were placed on — chased to represent a cobra, with its hood 
ul the ground, equi-distant round the circle, extended, between two griffins. Another 
o- 
T- 
ra 
10 
1 
IS 
h 
1¢ 
h 
e 
is 
1 
FIG. 2. PERSIAN SWORD WITH INSCRIBED BLADI 
; PERSIAN MACE? SINGHALESE SWORD AND SCABBARD 
id the performer describing a variety of | fashioned as a peacock with its wins nd 
volutions not unlike an exaggerated waltz tail spread and two cobras’ tails in its beak 
approached them alternately and without fig. 4). Most of the blades are Europea 
pausing In his oidd\ careel divided each ot the s ened pec nclud one t Lhe eli 
them in two with a well atmed horizontal — brated Italian bladesmith Andrea Ferar 
cut \nother grout I e hilts of steel 
Many of our outstanding pieces are from — elaborately pierced (see f led, jew 
. the armory of the Maharaja Sivaji, the last eled, damascened, or encrusted with gold 
king of Tanjore (died 1855). Under Sivaj or with contrasted bla nd gold area 
Bhonsla (1627-1080) the Mahrattas had Jeweled court weapot see fig. 5 
united in a campaign which brought the — well represented. Many of them have carve 
greater part of northwestern India under jade hilts which show the great skill of tl 
their rule for a time. The Mahrattas were lapidaries emplo ed in the seventeent! 
efficient soldiers, but they were conquered — tury by the magnificent Mughal courts. [he 
jewels were inlaid by cutting out a pr 
Quoted by Lord Egerton of [atton 1 |) . . 
i ao PES |, A ay ee the jade somewhat larger than the jew 
lon, 1896), p. 140 self and hammeri ] 
1OQ 








BULLETIN OF THE MI 


the edge of the soft, 


Space 
over to secure the jewel. One of our 
lé 


in gold and seven flowers, 


turned 
hilt 
tern 
up of an emerald and six rubies. Others are 
of white jade with gold inlay and green jade 
all the metalwork having 


s is of White jade with a raised vine pat- 


each made 


with silver inlay, 


been ground off smooth to give the effect of 


, 
' 
’ 
' 
’ 
’ 





FIG. 3. HILT OF INDIAN GAUNTLET SWORD 


a damascened surface. One of these daggers 
has a jade hilt set with rubies and a pierced 
blade containing rolling rubies and emeralds. 
Another dagger, with hilt of ivory and tang 
of damascened gold, has a blade of watered 
steel half black and half vellow—a rare ex- 
ample. In one case are shown daggers with 
hilts of the finest workmanship, each carved 
in the form of an animal’s head 
camel, horse, ram—in ivory, 
horn, inlaid with gold and jewels. Another 
devoted with crvstal 
hilts. Some are plain; others are inlaid with 


see fig. 5 


or jade, or 


case 1S to daggers 


ductile gold being 


TFROPOLITAN Ml 


SEUM OF ARI 


jewels or gold, either by means of numerous 


small pegs or by tracks cut in the crystal. 
One crystal hilt 1s carved with sunken 


and 
the gold setting forming a vine 


lozenges and set with rubies, emeralds, 
diamonds, 
pattern. 
The mace of India is as varied in type as 
that of mediaeval Europe. In the Stone col- 
re examples which terminate 
animal's head a bull; 
several of the bladed type, one specimen 


lection there a 


In an a griffin or 





HILT OF INDIAN KATAR 


FIG. 4 


having ten blades side by side forming the 
head; a combination mace and pistol similar 
and 
a “‘morning star’ mace, the head of which ts 
a steel ball bristling with pyramidal spikes 


to contemporary European weapons; 


[hese are fighting models, and others which 
are not so strongly built are merely symbols 
of authority. The outstanding example (see 
fig. 2), which was formerly in the collection 
of the late Sir Guy Francis Laking, armorer 
of Edward VII, is Persian of the sixteenth 
century. Its pear-shaped steel head and shaft 
are paneled, the ridges retaining their crisp 
edges. It 1s decorated with palmettes over- 
laid with gold and has jingles on the inside 

On the walls are exhibited the first Indian 
lances to be acquired by the Museum. They 


DUS 
tal. 
cn 
ind 
ine 


ads 


BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 


are exceptionally fine in workmanship and 
were probably made for use on state occa- 
SIONS. Martial exercises Were often held at 
the courts of the Indian princes, and trained 
horsemen used such spears with remarkable 
dexterity. One of them is all steel, built of 
eight vertical strips which are swaged into 
transverse disks placed at regular intervals. 
The rectangular areas are filled with plaques 
with circular or keyhole perforations. In 
some of the divisions are small bells which 
jingle with the movement of the lance. There 


FIG. 5. HILTS OF PERSIAN AND INDIAN DAGGI 


are also three spendid lances with shafts of 
carved and polyvchromed ivory cylinders 
strung on a steel rod, and finally two lances 
with shafts of wood painted tn rich colors 
with hunting scenes and flowers 
Only a few guns are shown, most of them 
decorated with intricate patterns. One has a 
barrel square in section with a square bor 
the only such example in this Museum. Its 
stock is of carved wood covered with gesso 
and richly painted. The barrel is made of 
watered steel and damascened. An Afghan 
matchlock gun of the eighteenth century 
has a barrel carved with three monsters’ 
heads, the eves jeweled. Ihe onlv blunder- 
buss exhibited belonged to Tippoo Sahib 
Sultan of Mysore (1749-1799). The ham- 
mer is a tiger's head and the blued barrel 1s 
inlaid with gold tiger stripes, tigers pur- 





suing antelopes, foliation, and an inscrip- 
tion reading: “This matchless gun, which 
equals the flashing lightning, belongs to the 
King of Ind; it can decide the fate of the 
enemy if it finds its mark on his forehead 

lippoo Sahib, it is said, was in the habit 
of saying he would prefer to live two days 
as a tiger than two hundred years as a 
lamb. As state insignia and as a kind of 
heraldic arms he adopted the roval tiger 
using the head and claws to ornament his 
throne and almost every object which be 








longed to him. Most of his cannon wer 
ornamented with a representation of a tiger 
devouring a European. The firearms acces- 
sories, priming flasks, and powder gauges 
are unusual in quality, especially those of 
vorv carved with animals in high reliet 
Exhibited with the firearms are two com 
posite bows, one covered with inscriptions 
in black on a gold ground, the other deco 


rated with lac in colors 


Other typical Ine Weapol re rep! 
sented. The madu parrving shield, cor 
sists of two antelope horns armed at the 
tips with small daggerlike points and a 
small steel plate Which 1s att iched at the 
place where the butt ends are joined and 
which serves for defens« he armed horns 
are about to SUrke i blow lhe ha Y wari 
or tiger's claw in arrangement of smal 











I LLETIN Of [THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM Ol AR] 

d r| ed blades fixed to a plate riveted links of mail. A shirt of mail on the 
steel conceal nthe paln he hand, the wall shows the contrast of steel, brass, and 
blades fitting fe the fingers. It was w copper links, the latter two materials form- 
the tiger’sclawthat the MahrattachiefSiv; ng an inscription. The design typifies the 
Bhons|l t erousl slew Aftzul Khan onyjun on of the white waters of the 
peneral of the Muhammadan monarch of | Ganges withthe vellow waters of the Jumna, 
Bijapur. The war gq or throwing disk place of pilgrimage to which devout Hin- 
from the S ountryv of northwestern In dus repair. Among the arm guards an out- 
adi s cIrch metal, razor sh rp ol he standing example has been selected for llus- 
outer ed A swhirled with er ree tration (fig. 6 It is Indian, dated a.n 

theenemy. The Gurkha kukri, in commot loS1t (A.D. 1070), and made of steel covered 

se in Ney ; t ompared with the with hi n nd inscriptions in heavy 
Ww Greeks and t cata ot the — gold inlay. Its padded velvet gauntlet has 
berians. Its sheath ke th tf the falcata gilt studs arranged to form an inscription 
s provided with an arrangement for holding On the wall is a colorful panoply com- 
small knife. There SCT elephant prising Persian helmet, shield, and arm 
FIG. O. INDIAN ARM GUARD, DATED A.H. LOOT (A.D. 1070 

roads (ai o remind us of the part the euard of steel painted in lacquer with me 
elephant plaved in stat remonies and dallions showing festival scenes with music 
Wal id drinking. Another Persian steel shield is 

Iw armor { num el richly chiseled with medalhons showing 
ments of armor, helmets, arm guards, and © fighting animals and hunting scenes and an 
shield re exhibited. One su Ss composed elaborate figure border. It 1s inscribed witl 
ind is of Persian workmanship. The hel Persian verses and bears the date A.H. 1140 
met, body armor, and arm detenses are ol ADs 8727 nd the name Sultan son ot 
the seventeenth century, the period of the Sultan Nasir ad-Din Shah Khwaja. A third 
best Persian work. The tour corselet plates eel shield is chased with foliation, gilded 
buckle and are supported by shoulder straps nd set with many turquotses and red stones 
The plate defenses are of watered steel It also retains its gold-embroidered lining 
skillfully fluted and damascened in gold \ shield of translucent hide, painted in lac 
with pious inscriptions. On one arm defense — and gold and ornamented with chased and 
are the words for ‘‘Roval Guard.’’ The cen rtlded brass bosses and colored stones, 1s 
ter cartouches on the breast- and backplates — also shown 
contain chapters from the Koran. The other Phe Stone collection of oriental arms and 
suit, from the province of Sind, is of Indians armor is the first great collection in this 
workmanship of the eighteenth century. It field formed by an American. The finest 
IS homogeneous: some ol the elements are objects will be placed on exhibition in the 
made of rectangular plates of steel with © galleries of arms and armor, and the re- 
molded borders and chased ornaments in mainder will ultimately be available to the 
brass, and other elements consist of alter- public in a departmental study collection, 


nate ste el and brass scale S decorated W 
patterns in punch and joined 


worl 


ith 


which 1s being organized 

by STEPHEN V, GRANCSAY 
172 
172 


BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM 
AN EGYPTIAN HEADDRESS 


puzzled in an effort to retrie\ 


{ me ap 
proximation of their arrangement he 
For the past few vears there has been on Were Worn 1n antiquit 
exhibition in the Egyptian Jewelry Room a There are, for instance, 819 gold obje 
gold circlet Which was worn upon the brow % curious shapes, the di n ol « n col 





\N EGYPTIAN HEADDRI . Y) \B 500-1450 | 
Of a concubine in the king’s harim in ‘ \ \ | 
cient Thebes sometime between the vears carnelian and blue and gr | Py 
1500 and 1450 B.c.! It was acquired by th Iv all | e perist 
Museum on the recommendation of the nd few of the car n| | remain 
late \lbert M. 1 vthgoe, then Curator of the n the sockets pr | T Cl | n 
Eevptian Department, with other elements — jority of th ! s littl have 
Irom jewelry over which we have lo convex curve made | e To he t 
\ 26.8.90. See BULLETIN eXVIII and a concave curve t the bottom. Obr 
(10 Dp. 150, fig. 3 ously they fitted ( er I 








BULLETIN OF THE MI 


cal stripes, and when so laid out each stripe 
ing wider and 


Of just the right 


spread 


becomes a solid band 


wider toward the bottom 


size to fit into the bottoms of these stripes, 


there are 1o elements with large rosettes 
above and with crescent-shaped inlays be- 
low. Of the right size to fit at the top of the 


stripes there are 10 curiously shaped ele- 


ments, each with a carnelhan diamond above 


t 


the rosette and with a straight lop sloping 
b 


ot 


there are soldered two gold rings, and there 


liquely to the right or left. On each top 


are two similar rings on the sides of these 
and of all the other elements. The rings on 
the sides are staggered, so to speak, so that 
those on the left of one element can mesh 


nto those on the right of another when two 


similar elements are brought together, side 
by side 

Obviously we had here the making ot 
some flexible gold and inlaid object com- 


to the famous 
However, our 


construction 
fankh-Amiun 


parable in it 


Tut- 


corselet of 
ly tA lat 
object did not seem to be a corselet 

We had come to look upon rosettes such 


as we had here tt 


as the characteristic orna- 
and once this last 

had aclue to th 
purpose of a curious gold plate made up ol 
two sheets of had 
quired with the rosette elements. [ts curious 
is that of the top of 
Il 


‘Ss de SO 


ments for headdresses 


idea had occurred to us, we 


metal, which been ac- 


realized 
ead, and we noticed that 


shape, we 


person's h 1S 
slightly hollowed on its smooth under 
that it will fit naturally on the top of one’s 
hair. The 
very conventionalized palm pattern, the 
gold and in- 


upper side is decorated with a 
leaves alternately chased in the 
laid, but unfortunately no trace now remains 
of the 


every 


glass or stone which was once set into 
other leaf. The thickness of the plate 


is exactly that of the rosette elements 
Soldered around its edge are little rings 
identical with those on the latter, and we 


noticed how the oblique toy 
of rosettes, as we had arranged them, would 
fit neatly the plate, 


where they the rings 


s of the stripes 


the edge of 
attached by 


around 
could be 
on both plate and rosette elements 


Mace Tut 


> H. Carter and A.C The mi 
ink {men (London, 1923), vol. 1, pl. XXXVI 

H. E. Winlock, The Treasur Lahbin (New 
York, 1934), p. 28, note 21 


TROP 


> 


OLITAN MUSEUM Ol ARI 


Following this line of reasoning, we de- 
cided that we had before us the elements of 
an absolutely unique Egyptian headdress, 
but it was a long time before we could get 
all the pieces of the puzzle into what seemed 
to be their nght places. After innumerable 
combinations and recombinations we came 
to the conclusion that there must have been 
37 stripes of rosettes hanging down from the 
margin of the plate. As we only had 16 top 
elements for the stripes, and one of these 


was too damaged tor use, we made 22 imi- 


tations of such elements, leaving out the 
details in the rosettes, however, so that the 
imitations could be readily identified. Then 


came the task of sorting the rosettes so that 
they would fit as neatly as possible to those 
above and below them and on 
Excluding those trom the bot- 


ys of the stripes, there were 793 


which came 
either side 


1 
} 


elements, of Which 23 were too damaged for 
stringing. Further d that at 
least 6 of the smallest size were lac king en- 


toms and to 


we conclude 
for them we made substitutes. 
counting 


about 23 


and 
\s strung the available elements 


the top and bottom ones 


tirely, 


AVeETARL 
to each of the 37 stripes, those on either side 

and 
those behind the shoulder lhe 
longest stripes in front measure 40 cm. trom 


of the face containing 24 elements each 


”? 


S onli 


the middle of the forehead to the tips of the 
that 
been left 


terminal elements; but since we know 


ive 


at least 23 damaged elements h: 


out of the present arrangement, and we feel 


that possibly still others are missing en- 
tirely, we are confident the headdress orig- 
nally was somewhat longer than it Is now. 

With the rosette elements strung in bands, 
we discovered that between the rings on all 
the various elements the threads would be 
exposed and that therefore there must have 
been innumerable little gold beads of the 
same size as the rings themselves, threaded 
between them. Of these beads we had a few 


} 


1 
as samples, and we made a sufficient number 
to fill up all the gaps 

[he completed headdress was so large 
that was made for a woman 


whose natural hair was heavily padded with 


oby iousl\ if 


false tresses, or Was intended to be worn 
over one of the tvpically thick wigs so often 


shown in the portraits of Egyptian ladies of 


the Eighteenth Dynasty. Such a wig was 


BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 


fashioned to fit a cast of a very charming 
life-sized head from el ‘Amdarneh, and on 
it the headdress is now exhibited. 4 

We feel confident that the headdress as 
restored very closely approximates its origi- 
nal arrangement. However, as noted above, 
it was doubtless somewhat longer originally 
Furthermore on the forehead there probably 
were also some insignia denoting the rank 
of the wearer (like the gazelle heads on the 
circlet with which this headdress was ac- 
quired) or perhaps a row of decorative ele- 
ments across it. Of such elements we have 
no trace other than a ring in the middle of 
the front of the top plate, where we have 
strung a row of simple beads. And finall\ 
it should be remembered that since but 
little of the inlay remains, today the effect 
is of amass of gold, where formerly it was ot 
a mass of shimmering red, blue, and green 
rosettes merely outlined in gold 

H. E. WINLock 


ACCESSIONS OF GREEK AND 
ROMAN ANTIQUITIES 


\ terracotta bowl, a vase fragment, a 
gem, an inscribed faience polyhedron, and 
some painted glass have been added to the 
collection of Greek and Roman art and 
have been placed on exhibition in the gal 
leries in which they belong 

\ small bowl (fig. 5) of the Atheman 
geometric style, ninth toeighth century B.« 
Is interesting for its shape, which imitates a 
basket.! After it was turned on the wheel, 
its two sides were pressed 1n so as to make 
it oval in section; on the long sides of the 
oval, where the rim is broken away, there 
may have been an arching handle. Round 
the bowl is a band of checkers, carrving out 

I he cast was presented to the Museum by the 
tk gypt Exploration Society. The original is in the 
Cairo Museum. See The Journal Egyptian 
{rchaeology, vol. x1X (1933), p. 117, pls. XI 
Xviil, 3, 4. [he headdress (acc. no. 26.8.117) 1s 
shown this monthin the Recent Accessions Room 

Acc. no. 36.11.10. Fletcher Fund. H. 2%%¢ 1n 
(6.5 cm.). A similar vase in Athens, published by 
S. Wide, Jahrbuch des deutschen archdologischen 
In fituts, vol. xiv (1890), pp. 2131 fig 04 has 
two high loop handles which meet in the middle 


cf. also vases in Munich and the Hague, 4rcha 
gischer Anzetger, 1910, cols. 488 f., fig. 15; Cor- 


pus vasorum antiquorum: Pays-Bas, Musée Scheur 


leer, fasc. 1, II], H 8}, pl « ow J 


the suggestion of basketrv; above this is a 
lrieze of crouching antelopes, below it dot 
ted lozenges. The bowl is said to be from 
Greece. 

The fragment, of the mid-sixth century 
belongs to a vase fabric which has been as- 
It is broken 
from a dish cover on which the decoration 
Was arranged in concentric zones 
the zones, including (above) a long-legged 
long-necked waterfowl and (beneath) a sim- 
lar bird and a siren, appear on the frag 
ment. The figures are painted in glaze 


signed to Klazomenai (fig. 1 


>; two ol 


turned reddish in the fire; white ts used for 





FIG. I. FRAGMENT OF 


KLAZOMENIAN WARI 


the human skin of the siren, with 
drawn in diluted glaze over the white; ma 
red is used for her wing coverts: her wing 


and tail feathers are incised, and so are the 
breast feathers of the upper bird and th 
preserved portions of the lower. Klazo 
menal Was an important ceramic center 

s shown by its great terracotta sarcopha 
painted in the vase technique. Their clos 
relation to the widely distributed vase fabri 
Is one of the reasons for its assignment 
the Klazomenian workshops. The fact tl 
it has been found in the Delta in considet 


able quantities‘lends probability to the 


8.5 cm See R. Zal / Vf { 
XXII (1898), pp. 38 
Cf. |]. Sieveking and R. Hacl ) 
} I nsammiu ‘ Vl i Vi 
ol. 1, pl. 20 
At Daphr Defe eh). Cf Mo | 
Petrie, Tanis (London, 1888 
also E. Pful Vale t Zeichnu (i 
Mi h, 192 








at W 
| , 
ir 
\, 
\ 

re 

» | _ 
=P 

j 

CU 
Del] 

vmi 


AN Ml 





BULLETIN OIF THE METROPOLII 
nprovenance of our lragment some Vears ag 
re | not hitherto been represented — of bronze and 
' ‘ the tragn with its the arrangem 
reserved surface and finished draw ancient authe 
npse beaut | archan 
rch Graeco-Phoer in scarab ¢ 
per (f 2) has ighio Bés in 
I er ¢ master ¢ Deasts irl ne 
bac mn andin his hand a boar sus- 
d head downward by the tail Phe 
bald-l ded, snub-nosed, and long 
kk sav nd wears his headdress 
rl |! plumes. On scarabs produced 
{mixture of Greek and Phoenician 
FIG. 2. GRAECO-PHOENICIAN 
( RAB ENLARGED 
divil s olf frequent occurrence 
powertul against evil; his power ts 
lized by his dominion over savagt 
Is. Th ral fine example of its 
blue-green ence polvhedron = of 
t ces,® which 1 to be trom 
tt, is inscribed with the letters of the 


\\ te 
| it 


H 
Pp 





SEUM OF ARI 


go.? Other known examples are 


luding rock crvstal: 
No 


which 


Stone, nc 
1 
I tters Vari 


ent oO ie le eS 


allusion 


any 


rr makes 


ET ane 





Be FTF «A oe ae 


KAMN=02Z 
a: Y 


A 
o | 
object 


aving their 


ait Fletcher Fund. | in. (1.7 : 
Furtwar er, D 7 n ¢ j \ piece like 
1 Berlin. 1900), vol. 11, p o:H. | Acc. no 
[ ( l ky ra Cre hace 1 16 } 
1} London, 10206 D. XX | Acc. no. 2 
rd | 
170 


would throw ligh 


thev were throw 


7-tae.5. OULLETIN, VO 


PPTs. PEK be 


FRAGMENTS OF PAINTED GLASS 


t on the particular use ot 


reas ynnable lo SUPPOSE 


the lett 


s. It is 


n like d cx ers 
corresponding numerical values. 
ours, In Athens, has been dated 


Fletcher Fund. Side of each 


XXIV 


BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 


on epigraphic grounds in the early part of RENOIR 
the third century B.« 

some Important tragments of painted Pierre Auguste Renoir, whos 
glass from the later Roman occupation in can be seen throughout th ummer 
Eevpt have been recently placed with the maenificent exhibition a 
Roman glass; these will be fully described in) >Museumof Artin New York,! was the er 
1 future publication, pending which they — est of the French Impressionists, and o1 


ire here briefly noticed. A large conical the greatest artist that France | Cl 
beaker of which two adjacent fragments re produced. He was one of four painter 

main (fig. 4)° had scenes from the arena — others being Claude Monet, Alfred S 
irranged in several zones, of which the best ind Frédéric Bazille—who met 

preserved is nearly two and a half inches men in a Paris art school about 1860 
high. In this zone are pairs of gladiators in formed the nucleus of the Impr 
combat. Below are the wild beasts of the movement, which w to revolutiol 





F Ie 5. ATHENIAN GEOMETRIC BOW! 


arena—a lion bringing down one deer while ern painting throughout the world. | 


another flees, in the presence of a leopard — official French art of the day was Lar 
painted blue. The colors—blue, green, vel- — dull affair, with its frigid pseudocl 

low, brown, brownish red, and white—art jects and its highly polished photog1 
briliantly preserved; the glass is colorless stvle. Rebelling against it, these young me! 
and thin. In the same technique as the pre- turned to the evervd life around then 
ceding is another fragment (fig. 3 from lhev went outdoors and painted direct fron 


the Museum’s Egyptian excavations carried nature, rediscovering sunlight and air. T] 


ut in 1907-1908 at ‘Ain et Turbeh in the dark indoor tones of the old school t] r 
Khargeh Oasis, a site which is dated bi placed with such brilliant color | 
coins to the fourth century A.p. This shows had not known for generatior ly 
a tiger attacking an antelope. Four small =the unchanging light of thi 
fragments from the same source are also captured theever changing ef} 
shown CHRISTINE ALEXANDER 
| his re ) if | 
‘bk. Heinevetter, WH urfel- und Buchstabenora 1937, over Station W \ Be v Llovd Goo 
Griechenland und Kletnasien (19012). | owe the the Whitney Museum of American Art 
reference to Dr. R. Zahn printed here by permission of the ¢ nt 
Acc. nos. 22.2.36, 37. H. 3% 1n. (8.7 cm casting System and Mr. Goodrich. [he ¢ 
Acc. no. 15.1.1. 146 by 146. (2.7 cm s held in Gallery D 6 and w ren 
| he objects described above have dee! through September 2 n ex! 
placed as follows: the bowl in Gallery | 2, the by Renoir and H Cont pora4re 
fragment and the gem in | 3, the polyhedron 1 ranged in Galleries Kk { 
the Daily Life section of K 7, the glass in Kk 6 through the summer i 








BULLETIN OF THE MI 


So we find Monet, the most extreme of the 
Impressionists, painting twenty pictures of 


haystack, in different lights 


the same 
weathers, times of day 
[he public, the academic artists, the 
critics called them madmen, charlatans 
Visitors to their exhibitions were convulsed 
with laughter. Few were bold enough to buy 
their 


starved, 


work. [he voung innovators almost 
now the 


sold 
for food and rent. It 


and pictures which are 


museums and collectors wert 


pride of 
for a few francs to pay 
was many vears before the Impressionists 


were accepted as entirely sane and genuine 
artists 


Ot this group Renoir was the voungest 
Bornin 1841, sonota poor tailor, and brought 
he had ea 


the age of thirteen by painting porce- 


up in Paris rned his own living 
since 
finally saving 


His first sub- 


lain and decorative screens 
up enough money to study art 
jects were the life around him that he knew 
Paris, the gayest city in Europe 


so well 
her boulevards, cafés, dance halls, theaters 
boating parties on the Seine in the 
that 


French love and that they 


picnics 


| 


suburbs—all 
that the 
so gracefully 


semipublic life 


| 
SOC lable 


practice 


Always in Renoir’s pictures 


people Were enjoving themselves | here Was 


no note of tragedy or conflict. It was a time 


of great events—far-reaching scientific dis- 


coveries, growing industrialism, social un- 
nationalistic rivalries that in his voung 


manhood broke out in the Franco-Prussian 


rest, 


War, followed by the long-drawn-out agony 
of the Commune. None of this found its way 
\lthough he com- 
a modern, picturing the life of his 
own day, it 


into Renoir’s art 
pletely 


Was 


was everyday pleasures, the 
£06 rd things of life that g00n 1n spite ol War 
tyranny, social upheaval 
larly few 
literary element, 


[here were singu- 
ideas in Renoir’s painting, no 
no attempt to tell a story 
or express a creed. What he expressed was 
simply love of life as he found it. His was a 
happy art, delighting in the sensuous beauty 
of the world—in women, children, socia- 
bility, sunlight, nature. Sane and healthy 
it maintained a happy balance between the 
animal in man and the civilized human be- 
ing. It was a large and generous art, affirma- 
tive, saying yes to life. It had a sweetness 


that never became oversweet, because it 


175 


TROPOLITAN MUSEUM O}| 


ARI 


was always alive and fresh, with the fresh- 
ness of flowers and fruit and the things of 
nature 

In Renoir’s there 


temperament Was a 


Strain of naiveté, such as many great artists 
have possessed—a quality of perennial sensi- 
saved him from 
that 
kept him always voung and alive and per- 
mitted him to say elemental truths with a 
large simplicity. It was this glorious naiveté 
that enabled him to see the beauty in every- 
dav life 
like a picnic and create from it that eternally 


4 
tiveness and wonder that 
becoming too much used to things 


to take a commonplace occurrence 


vouthful masterpiece Le Déjeuner des cano- 
\long with 
this naiveté went an extreme sophistication 


tiers 


in the present exhibition 
n everything that concerned painting or 


matters of taste. Renoir once said of the 
French sculptor Jean Goujon: “What purity, 
what and at the 


It was 


naiveté, what elegance 


same time what solidity!” a precise 


summing up of his own stvle 

Renoir’s art was a deeply sensuous one 
founded on the delight that can be given by 
He was one of the 


This 


was the time of the discovery of oriental art 


color, line, and form 


greatest colorists in modern painting 


and one can see the influence of Japan, 


China, and Persia in the new splendor that 


he brought to painting. His color was at 


once rich and brilliant, extraordinary in its 
variety, ranging from the most subtle nu- 


ances of muted color to an almost barbari 
force. It reached the utmost in 
magnificence, but remained 


sensuous 
always deli- 
ciously fresh, never cloving. 

He was pre-eminently a painter of women, 
and in his pictures of them he combined a 
happy sensuousness with the utmost dell- 
cacy, reminiscent of such eighteenth-centur\ 
painters as Watteau or Fragonard. He was a 
master of flesh tones; flesh in his pictures 
was alive, sometimes with a porcelain-like 


refinement and transparency, sometimes 
with a ruddy, earthy glow. Few painters 


have had such a feeling for clothes. The 
feminine stvles of the 1870's and the 1880's 
seemed to be made to order for him—the 
tight waists, the leg-of-mutton sleeves, the 
enormous hats with their accumulation of 
and the general out- 


feathers and ribbons 


rageous overdecoration, judged by our mod- 


tresh- 
ngs of 
Was a 


artists 
Sensi- 
from 

that 
| per- 
vith a 
liveté 
very- 
rence 
nally 
-dno- 
with 
ation 
ig or 
the 
TIL, 


BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 


ern streamlined standards. All this frivolity 
he transformed into fantastic and captivat- 
ing structures of form and color, rivaling 
the creations of a Boucher or a Nattier. 

Renoir was an Impressionist of the Im- 
pressionists; but from the first he stood out 
from his fellows. Gifted with greater wit, 
subtlety, and sense of life, he was not long 
content to follow in the path that his friend 
Monet trod all his life. Primarily a figure 
painter, in his very earliest work he showed 
a sense of form that the others lacked. Even 
a landscape by him was not merely a record 
of a particular place in a particular light and 
weather but a fully composed work of art. 
This sense of design was with him from the 
first. Doubtless in the beginning it was in- 
stinctive rather than conscious, for Renoir 
never intellectualized about his work. When 
an academic triend once solemnly told him 
that he must force himself to draw, he re- 
plied: “Il am like a cork thrown into a stream 
and tossed about by the current. When | 
paint I let mvself go completely.” 

But when he was just past forty he came 
to a turning point in his career. As he later 
said to his friend Vollard: ‘| had wrung im- 
pressionism dry, and | finally came to the 
conclusion that | knew neither how to paint 
nor draw. In a word, impressionism was a 
blind alles 
had come to realize that painting was much 
more than the simple recording of impres 
sions or even the expression ot personal 


as far as | was concerned.” He 


emotion. So he returned to the old masters 
He had reached the realization that ever 
genuine artist ultimately does—that he can 
no more afford to neglect the art of the mu- 
seums than a musician can afford to be igno- 
rant of Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms. In a 
reaction Irom Impressionist Vagueness and 
momentariness, he sought art that was solid, 
precise, classic. For a time he went through 
what has been called his “‘dry”’ period, when 
he tried to paint like a fifteenth-century 
Italian fresco painter—as he said, ‘“‘on ac- 
count of my hatred of impressionism.” But 
Renoir could never remain dry, as is proved 
by the delicious absurdity of his Battledore 
and Shuttlecock in the present exhibition 
where the figures, painted with the precis 
hardness of a Masaccio, are set in the soft 
luxuriance of a typically Renoir landscape 


\fter this temporary reaction he returned 
to the sumptuousness of his earlier style 

but with a difference. His style had matured 
the 


from now on he paid less attention t 
temporary effect, to naturalistic light and 
shade, to all that Impressionism had stood 
for—more to the solid and permanent 
qualities 

In these later works Renoir’s sense of 
form reached its full development. His forms 
were large, ample, sculptural; one feels their 
roundness and volume; one realizes them 
from every side, as one does sculpture. The) 
were never static; they possessed movement 
they flowed with an ordered rhythm. Reno 
had that rarest of all artistic gifts—the 
emotional comprehension of form, the al 
to create form that is as moving as color and 
more satisfying. What he created wa 
pure form; it was not a dull copy of naturt 
but an original plastic creation, based on 
natural facts but using them with the ut 
most freedom. Out of all these element 
olors, textures, lines, forms—the art 
created a plastic whole which satisfies one 
sense of harmony and order as does a pi 
of music. In this quality of design Renou 
transcended impressionism, taking his plac 
in the long line of classic French artists th 
included Poussin, Watteau, Ingr Del 
CrOIx 

\s with every great artist, the older | 
erew the better his work became. [he torm 
grew fuller and more ample, the rhythn 
flowed more freely, the color was more luxu 
riant. He threw off naturalistic limitations 
and his later pictures blossomed out into 
extraordinary inventions of form and color 
[his later work is a poem in praise of th 
earth, of women and children, of trees and 
flowers, of the richness and fruitfulness ot 
nature, pervaded with a heavy, drowsy rip¢ 
ness like that of fruit on the sunny side of a 
wall. 

The man himself was 


tion of the popular fallacy that an artist's 


foot 


a complete refut 


life is all wine, women, and song. Happ) 
children, he led 


married, with a family of 
the most normal existence tmaginabl 
quiet, orderly, domestic—painting f1 
morning until night, going to bed earl 

that he might be fresh for the morning 


work. Painting was his gre 





BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 


‘ work W reserved for enjo 

rt. Whi ew elder mal ne Wher | X d the first of 
SD) \ ] | pel; gd on eries Ol S rneun Vihicl eT 
his wit t 1 et canvas and brushes contined him entirely to a wheel chair. His 
1 painted the tlowers fmends had sent hands became so twisted that he could not 
Was taken to the operating hold a brush, and he had to have his brushes 

roon tied to his fingers. But he never for a dav 
»} ( he w ender. sharp-eved ve up painting. Now there was nothine to 
lhe innate sweetness and gentle distract him; he said to a friend: “Really, | 
| disposition was balanced | am a lucky one!” A farm was found in the 
wd common sense and an clous Wil sunny climate of the South of France, and 
lis tastes were of t simplest, and he had here, amid his orange and olive trees, Reno 
rror DY! I s I H ssed ree old ( When e Was ove! 
models were | } el I sevel working n port! hat too 
Hy ry 1 review Wo! ndw m many s ngs, in hot weather, he said 
\ unde 1 amused \] ( I p lear for the pleasure tl | have 

I ! \\] 1 Iwa A | his p rr Du Lis Sc delic us TO Ve 

rid ed. “WI neself up to the sheer delight of paintis 
Litoyp G RICH 
NOTES 

PRINTS BY Reé I ) H C EM VMeErTI ( HI \MERK LIBRARY 
RARII The all I no over of tl A\SSOCIATIO The fiftv-ninth annual con- 
BULLETIN reproduced frot lithograpl erence of The American Library Associa- 


artist and his contemporaries in Galleries through June 26, and the Museum arranged 
K 37-40. This group of prints is shown in a program of lectures for members of the 
onnection with the exhibition of paintings ssociation who attended this conference. 
| Renoir, which will continue through lhe program included an address by Pro- 
September 12 fessor Frank Jewett Mather, |r., of Prince- 


ton University, on Art Bibliography 
MemBersHIP. At the meeting of the Some Needed Refinements, and the follow- 
Board of Trustees held June 14, 1937, the ng gallery tours conducted by Museum 
Vv of Instructors: Typical Paintings from Italy 
ohn Hudson Hall andthe Netherlands, by Miss Abbot; Mod- 
3d was authorized. Mrs. Flora E. Whiting 9 ern French Painting, by Mrs. Fansler; and 
was elected a SUSTAINING MEMBER. Seven- Phe Egvptian Collection, by Mr. Taggart 
teen ANNUAL MEMBERS were elected Fhe Museum also printed for association 
members a brief list of books on art with 
GIFI The Board of Governors of the annotations by members of the stat? and a 
\rt-in- Trades Club has presented the sum © list of sources of photographs of American 
of $533.82 to the Museum for the acquis painting, sculpture, architecture, and deco- 
tion of books on textiles to be deposited in — rative arts prepared by Miss Alice L. Fel 
the Library. The gift is made in memory of — ton, assistant in charge of the collection of 
Harry Wearne, and the works purchased photographs. An exhibition of Museum 
will bear a bookplate setting forth this fact publications was arranged at the Waldort- 
\ gift of money has been received from Astoria Hotel, the headquarters of the 
Mrs. Harry Harkness Flagler conferenc 


Rae) 








BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSI 


| IST OF ACCESSIONS AND 


accessions and loans fe 
LO 

list 

GREEK AND ROMAN 


lewelry, Purchases (10 


NEAR EASTERN 


Ceramics, Palestinian, Gif 


Ivories, Palestinian, Gift « 


Metalwork, Palestinian, Gift of Harris D. Colt 1S 
24 Urs / {mor Has!i 
cul Metalwork, Loan 
Sculpture, Indian, Persian. Loan of Mrs. John D {etalwork 
Rockefeller, Jr. (4 
Textiles, Persian, Loan of John D. Rockefeller, Jr PRINTS 
? Csifts o {le { 
FAR EASTERN 1), ge neal 

l throp Saltonstai 
Paintings, Chinese, Japanese, Loan of Mrs. John age ; 

l, } ; ather ran 
D. Rockefeller, |r. (5) u ' 1 : 
] “uv ir} 
‘hinese, Loan if Mrs : ‘ 


Sculpture, Cambodian, ¢ 
lohn D.R feller. Tr (2 


MEDIAEVAL 
Furniture, Italian, Gift of 
4 


Sculpture, Flemish, French, German, Gift low Sar Comhan 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr. (7), James J. Rorimer (3 i “a } 
extiles, French, Gift John D. Rock ler, |) Photographs, Gi 


a] 


RENAISSANCE AND Mopt 


Ceramics, English, Gift o 


Continued 
Continued 
Beginning July 18 


Continued 


rr the period May 1 


to June 1, 1937, are shown in the following 


PAINTINGS 


Miniature, Ameri 


Paintings, Ameri 


AMERICAN WING 
tof Harris D. Colt 3 


f Harris D. Colt (22) 
) Furniture, Loan 


lHE LIBRARY) 


Books, Gifts ( 


lohn D. Rock: ler, Jr Company Vl 


RN 


fR. Thornton Wilson (2 


Costumes, American, Gift of an anonymous donor 


EXHIBITIONS 


IN THE MUSEUM 


Loan Exhibition of Paintings by Renoi 

Prints by Renoir and His Contemporaries 

Persian and Indian Arms and Armor 
(George C. Stone Bequest 

Egyptian Acquisitions, 1935-19306 


CIRCULATING 


Ancient Greece ar Rome 


LoaANs. The Textiles, English 


Costume, Purcha 


OF ARI 


1} } i) { Zonor 
l I i l ny 
(? i 
i? ) 


Ha r Bas 
You Vemortal Museum 
Museum (7), M 
af rim Tru } 
j M.S { 
i } fey Par 
if 
‘ { , vil 
\f; { 
Vi ; r 








BULLETIN OF THE MI 





“ 
4 \ W W t 
} | } lL x 
( | ) LEI 
af 1 
uA ( \ 
Henry W. I t 
1 , 
: ; r) p 
I Part 
Pre , 
( I 0) t | 
( ( Hy \ 
Mua . SC. | { 
R.T.H.H | AN \\ 


A. R ( P 4 tH ER | PRATI 
M“ H. kre | A | EDM 
lu W. i NX A. | ' 
| ' A | | 
H Ma } iN GODFR 
PHom Wat 





irect Herpsert FE. WIN 
Assistant Dire WittiaM M. Iv R 
Egyptian Art, Curator Herspert FE. WintLock 
\ late ¢ at ind Wirector 
f kevptian Expedition AMBROSE LA 1 
\ ate Curator I ow | l 
Greek and Roman Art, Curator Giseta M.A. | 
Associate Curator CHR E ALEXANDER 
N I tern Art, ¢ Maurice S. Dima 
Far Eastern Art, ¢ al ALAN PRIEST 
Associate Curat i ORE Y. Hor 
Mediaeval Art, ¢ James J]. RorimMet 
Ker ance and Modern 
Curat PRESTON REM 
‘ l AVER 
e ( IoHN G. Pu 
FRANCES LITTLE 
tor loseepH Dows 


STEPHEN V. GRANCSA 
ve THEopoRE Y. Host 
ct HuGerR Et 
rector RicHarD F. Bacu 

WittramM ¢ FFOR 

Winipred EF. Howe 


FRANK M. Foster 
ts; ia 
BRADFORD BOARDMAN 
Henry | 


Conrap He t 


YER GREENWA 


DAVIDSON 








MBERSHIP 
| JEFACTORS, who contribute or devise 
FELLOWS IN Perpretuiry, who contribute 

Fettows For Lire, who contribute 

CONTRIBUTING MEMBERS, Who pay annua 250 
FELLOWSHIP MEMBERS, who pay annually 100 
SusTaAInING Members, who pay annuall 25 


ANNUAL MemBERS, who pay 


FROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ARI 














c Ww 
W 
| 
\le t 
‘ i 
( r W » ng Member ive 
ether er of tickets to the Museum 
\ M ‘ the nilic are included 
to a ener ( t and whenever 
the r regate al t to $1,000 they 
‘ elected Fe ws ft Life and t - 
e ( rat or fu r articular 
, ’ , 
\DMISSION 
\| MOA ee except on Monda 1a 
\A I C { exce 
New York City 1 cho and ¢ ee on 
( en t be accompanied by an adult 
F D 7 
HO )F OPENING 
( 
{ wat to on 
? m. too p.n 
( ma ) n. to p.t 
( ma 1p.n to pil 
\\ ‘ W f 
( f RIA 
Hee ] 7 2 vad Christma 12m. to 4:45 p.m 
| RAR (; except le 1 ind S j s 
\ FUM EXTEN Y OFF EF: 10a to 5 m., except sun- 
j | la 
PRIN R¢ M AN Tex e Stup Room 10 a.m. to 4°45 
except Saturday afternoons, Sundays, and holidays 
! te 
nt 
Oue 
LIONS ive 
I" Mt 





uld be made at the 


possible, in a¢ 


‘ i. 
age to the Director of Edu- 
o Members and to the teachers 
schools of New York City; for 


for from one to four persons 





and 25 cents a person for groups of five or more 


PRIVILEGES AND PERMITS 





For special privileges extended to teacher pils, and 
art studer t M and for use of brary, 
classroon lending collections, pecias 
cu t 

Re iest hotograph should 
be re are necessary [or 





ind cameras 


atternoons, 


s with | 
Sat irda 








indays, and legal holidays. See special leaflet 


ement of the building. Lunc 
except Sundays and 








tea served dé 





groups and schools bringing lunches a 
cation is given in advance 


TELEPHONI 


The Museun imber is Rhineland