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bers and 
pupils in 
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PUBLI 


THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM 


Heb 


MONTHI PRICE 


BULLETIN OF 


OF ART 


AXXY\ NEW YORK, FEBRUARY, 1940 





ees er ee | 

















; A lhe Hepnotsidble 


RIP VAN DAM.E, 


SREEOD RO, Va LYS Co ws Mh LROVIN CE of VEN } RA 
Wee ¢ Hthe 4 Dutch Churrl nast hurnb ly 


4 Wp Veter O° SLMG SF! 


‘Dedicated by vour- He 


NTY CENT 


NUMBER 


> 








() N MEMORIAM 
FOWARD STEPHEN HARKNESS 





x eB lt CES 
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\ Hat ak on esteem 
) 
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CVO ne | DIen ol the 
\ 
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ly nature hough 
r rl ( Was tirn his 
e@ | | N | | ape 
| ati \\ ( ] i i ( 
( | | ) ( It ( 
\ \ \ W i Lie 
\\ 4 \ Vas rdance 
| S ( A Tinh ( en ed 
HH p 
' 
) 1 t ( roi ( 
: . e Museum's 
\ | : 
X I pt nt and 
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express H . money were 
{ 
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\ he sh hen he 
() ( ( I ite ( n 
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I 
\ 
Phe ser endered by Mr. H ess Lo 
1 ' 
\ | \ 1 +4 \\ ( n wil iW Ye TEM ¢ ( ) 
\ p eT 
( 
. | ‘ \ , 
. bllk NEW DIRECTOR 
\ 
OF THE MUSEUM 
} 7 ) Kram e B | , 
i 
\\ ( I | I & ( ( 
l l )40 
Henry Lavlorw elected Dire 














2 
pl TICK Under 


er Museum has suc 


xtensive progran 
ind other forms 
1 


1 has obtained a 


sitions for its collections 


lt w [ire I he 
POSILL nce the foundin 
n S7O. Was bor! P | 
of the late Dr. Will Jol 
former Presider f the ( 
clans ) lso, Presidet 
Company of Philadelp! 
at the Went Scho I 
Penn ) Cl 
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Studies Universit 
Florence, the In I 
Barcelon e Amer 
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( Muse Feb 0 \ \ nd recently been on exhibi- 
}¢ C | \ lr Ut OutTgoI the Museum « the ¢ ot New 
( 40 Were re-t ( ( e ( \ Shown tl month in the Room of 
O47: Cit e Blum Horace Have Recent Accession t will subs ently be 


bers of the Executive Finance, and Audit ears a Trustee of this \l iseum and its 
y ( ' vyitt ’ ] ; 1 der th ' } nor lah n { t \ ' 
ng ommi ees Were erect ( ( iat Oral | rarian tor tort ears, Was a 
beginning March 1, 1940, as follow otable student and collector of Americana 
4 | ‘ 1 + 
| i865 he attended a sale containing, as 
1 } 1 
rT i number ot drawings and en 


Will ( () I part cular DD I start O Tide 1 ne 

Vice-P1 Elihu Root, | outset and from which | have never dis- 
Henry S. M { He wrote a number of books 

| é re \\ iT | | . them ¢ D4 ‘ relat n LO ¢ irl 
Secretar Henry W. Went \merican material, and published them in 
fine editions he illustrations were taken 

EE aS rom old prints or drawu nd ftrequenth 

(36 B] ( hal, 2? f reproduc { line eng Vil M1 um he 
William Cl h Osborn. | Pr hope » revive. In 1895 he nded th 
Elihu Root, |r., J P) Soc f Lconophil he object of which 
Henry S. Morgan, } ice-P? lent , was “the engraving and publication trom 


YU A 
Marshall Field, /» ‘rer time to time of views of New York, past 


Cornelius N. Bliss Horace Havemever and present, and of portraits of prominent 

Stephen ¢ Clar} [Thomas W Lamont persons connected with the cits Peren- 

R. T. Haines Halsey Robert A. Lovett nially surprised at the continued survival of 

Robert Mose the societv, he was its president until his 

leathn 1d live | Qa see i! SU le Tepro 

Sere cme eae fuctions of important New Yor ews and 

Robert A. Lovett, ¢ rma nvaluable records o insitorv landmarks 
George Blumenthal, 4/ternate Chairma In his book / Bradford Map, 18 


Cornelius N. Bliss }. P. Morgan Myr ndrews reters to the engraving of the 
Henrv S. Morgan Vanderbilt Webb Middle Dutch Church as one of “the cor 


Marshall Field, /reasurer (ko nerstones of a collection of prints relating to 


Arthur W. Pag Herbert L.. Pratt) 9 writer thirty vears ago in a book-hunting 


AN ENGRAVING OF THI found preserved in an old scrap-book which 
MIDDLE DUTCH CHURCH aes 1h Rea 3 irate 


One of the most important early New \ Oo 0.9 Reproduced p 26 
York views has recently been added to the Scribe I Hiv document 
Museum’s collection of prints of American as Nowy 
OKES ‘t Yor} 


historical interest. The Burgis engraving ol 


the New. o1 Vi ldle Dutch (Churcl Ss the ) 





1 en- 

the 
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BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ARI 


Ye engraving was published, and pre 


sumably drawn, by Willhlam Buregis, who 


had previously published some of the most 
famous. earl \merican prints—the big 
View of New York.? issued between 1719 


and 1721, the View of Boston, about 1723 
nt to England to be engraved), anc 
the View of Harvard College 1720 Lhe 
engraver of the Middle Dutch Church 
print is unknown. Burgis was for a time a 
resident of Boston, but, after a series of 
lawsuits, he had apparently skipped town 


by 1730. When he could not be tound bv the 


she | 1730 Nis Wile petit ned there tor 
| ’ " | 

1 divorcee iving tn her Husband, having 
Ld ‘ ] 

filchec 1] ( ould of her estate had let 


ner about tive Vears Delore and not returned 


This print is of especial interest becaus« 
' ; 
tis the earhest Known close-up View oO 


New York building. Houses and publi 


buildings had been shown earlier in general 


views from the harbor, but no previous 
print so tar as known had taken the ob 
server into the heart of the city to admire 
one ot late sights. [The view shows the 
handsome new chnurel 1UST completed 1 
rner. ¢ Nassau and Crown (now 
| er Stree Wil Is surrounding 
ne ed Stree he ele int coact in 
the passers-bv, the sidewalk fenced off tron 


du Saint-Espr built in 1704) in the bac 

eroul \lthough not ited it was prob 
}] | } ‘ t+ . { 
ably issued shortly after the completion ot 


the church in 1731 and, with timely politi- 
cal tact, was dedicated to Rip van Dam, 
“President of His Majesty’s Council for 
the Province of New Yor Van Dam, one 


of New York’s richest merchants, was act 





Ing governor ol the province alter the deat 
of Governor Montgomerie, from July, 1731 
to August, 1732. He was the leader of the 
popular party in the cit nd active in 
Oppos on powel H s 
propert Wa corner tron 
the churc! ind Maiden 
lane 

he Retormed Dutch( Collegiate) Churcl 


\msterdam, who continued to send out 


ministers from Holland to the subsidiat 


church in America until after the middle of 
the eighteenth centur \fter the ‘“‘mean 


barn,’ built in 1633, and the stone Churcl 
in the Fort, built in 1642, the first sizabl 
Dutch church in New York was built 

(;arden Street Exchange Place In 1O0Q2 
By 1726 its congregation had outgrown its 
seating room, and so lan 


on Nassau Street was bought Buildin 


{1 for a new churcl 





began in 1727 and was at first supported | 
church funds, but in) March 729, the 
Consistory resolved to apply to each men 
ber ol the congregation Tor IpOscriptl 
fterwards, however \ eemed be 
to del carrvin out, | iu ( he 
leneth of the winter, the ver eneral | 
ness prevailing nd mal 
Governor Montgomert ranted a pet 
of the Consistory to make a general colle 
tion tor funds in the <¢ Every de 
the construction of the buildin the size 
the number of window il or simulated 
Vas Te later and fre wad the Cor 
Lor who even resol ne Woodw 

Tne Wt Sti id l ( | it In 
at el | 1} Deen Show nen ) nN 
end of 1729 (or earl Y eS Wt 
probabl veing held eg Vel 
made tor sell ng pew n At f 
men and wome wert paratel 
A the custom Hol | \ 
changed Octobdet 73 low Or 
family pew lhe build > feet broad 
in 10 feet long { f li 
np ose " D | les 
| \\ ( ripe 14 1) \lex 
Hamiultor pre ree but he 
Stone { lk ne 1 ( 1) ‘ 
ice o : 
VANCE ( I \ | I 
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BULLETIN Ot Ltt METROPOLITAN MUSI M Qt 
probal bein corruption of hon Calle ries 
mark e name ol supposed inventor lemporal, then 
The characteristic of the colichemard Chur Bairn (orb), Sacl 
blade its great Dreadth al the base, o1 enbdur ep | 
forte, and its abrupt narrowing to the slet wig Lunneburg t 
der section, or foible. [his pronounced differ be assigned to the same 
ence facilitated the use of the sword without tors sword on loan in th 
weakening it at the forte, with which all is similar in design 
parries are made. Our blade is inscribed latter bears the me ¢ 
Vive Monseteneur Le Due De Savove, and it who became emperor in 
is believed that this wording was intended Dating from. ab 





FIG. 1. MORION, TTA 


to designate Charles Emmanuel II1, who sword, witl 
joined France and Spain in 1733 in a wat et with rows 
against Austria. Ihe colichemarde ev French sword o 
dently continued in use well after the mid dating from earl 
dle of the century, for there is a Frencl has It built uy 
dress sword in this Museum, the silver hilt brilliantl 
of which bears the Paris date letter 1708 knuckle ird 
Perhaps the most interesting sword in beads, which in 
our group is an Electors sword—of interest ntended rath 
when one recalls how often the history ot e swords art 
Europe depended on the decision of the ane 1d the 
Electors of the Holy Roman Empire. Its n have 1 
hilt mountings are of hollow silver, finel rlificial light o 
pierced, chased, and gilded. The blad Swor wert 
etched with figures of the emperor, in ols in. affair 
scribed Jhre Ketserliche Maistat; the three eral | 
Electors Spiritual, inscribed Chur Mantz () 








i > DETA 
CHILI iri ( CXCE 
orms the lox DI 
relief with flowers 
figures. It is inscribe 


cH. Thomas Mi 


ible gunsmith whose 


\ , 
lhe seventeenth 





Wort 
1 Victoria and Albert Mu 


ntur' 


1S 


ed 1n 
in nt 
] 
1 nict 
putt 
1 











il i ! ( 
\ 1 ‘ 1 
vin il 

used tor fi 
rlantacas 


na were used 

( the earliest 
| lippines 

( ting trom 
had strong 
with high walls 


LITAN MUS M OF ARI 
| 
1 Trek Isc ni 
1 IN Th 4 bitin) 
( Lh bras nnoi 
e Moro mat cture 
the Mor he mi 
' exple y F 7 
e Moros learned the at 
‘ \rab missionari | 
t rrounded bD Mats 
which cannon like this one 
( | ) sed them on Cll 
nit Cs \\ eal ) 
i pirate { rer the 
tor is i . 
STI  \ 


VIEW 


()} 


VAPRIO 


Nn cannon, the 
scourge Of the 
ers 

Cs RAN \ 


IPyADDA 


1D a ee Sr. a 
\bo 10 Bernardo Bell yh dy his 
! 
raime I he s ( Incle, Cana 
; , ) oy 1 4 
r ‘ ] Y vr? ' , \ 
| Vel ) ern ) 15 ( \\ S 
working in Munich and two rs later had 
ettled in Dresden wher court painter 
o the Elector « Saxon lL rederick Augus- 
' 
tus II, he spent a large part OF Nis tile ind 
| 1, ‘rhe | j j vee j 
where hls stvle developed and n ured 
During the course of his Italian. trip 
2 TT? T t vr ] | t » 
ellotto painted a number of landscapes 
whi I Ori in interestin ly I ween Nis 
' , 
rly Canaletto e Venetian scent nd 
' ; | 
| later nore Har CWS ¢ 1 re nN 
\oarsaw id Vier (ne ese land 
/ + \ 
cap view of Vaprio on the river Adda 
st been purcl {1 by the Museum 
‘ = 1 nrosnect with distant m eines 
road prospect with distant mountains 
ts cloudy sky and dark depths of wooded 
1 ' 
er Dank, call to mind the 1m nary land- 
‘ ‘ ‘ " ’ , ) ’ 
apes of the seventeenth centurl But S 
mpression S nstant! dispelled | Tne 
? ] ‘ th, 
ire ull CXE( ed arcl ( ral det | LT1¢ 
? t , ] { ‘ 
Wmdarum ICL ( ( at Havers Gow! 
) the river ind the ¢ | dressed Cl 
. ) | ' ; 
enteenth-centut | ( entlemen 
—_- " ard ° 
) } ), 
\ no 9.142 | ephn | roe ( 
mn invas H 25% In QO 4 
‘ine ey \\ Mars ’ 
M Eril, Mi 


BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ARI 


iched who are Imiring the scene. It is, in fact, a ( ipable Ol at elop | 1 ndependent ( 
, ’ ] ; ] 
firing precisely recorded view of a particular spo landscapes like our View of Vaprio clearl 





used record evoke for us the visual past as letto mannerisn remain icl the 
rliest can these lovingly conceived and meticu crescent-shaped flicks of paint that indicate 
Nes lously painted portraits of places which, in the ripple n the water, the technique on 
from the hands of an artist of abilit serve the the whol quite different—the color 
rong double purpose ol being aesthetically il larker and cooler LI} Nhandling broader 
walls fving and historically interesting. To th ind the drawing, while giving an impression 
ited: enjovment ot the beauties of our landscape of great deta le precise. [he greatest 
kor can be led the pleasure of an association lifference, however to be felt in- the 
the 


the ZT: 





Lrip 
Des 
nis 


m,t 
id 
1 rv, 1 ’ ? \ ’ ’ | 
la \ no less a person than Leonardo; for if the work. | Ol 
’ ; inf ’ ' - = 7 | 
Wm the handsome terraced villa seen across the sul pired by the scent ( | 
ns vel he center ft the picture Ne Lensitied | Le I l ] tr time 


he Bellotto prided himself on being a painter ron niferel 
wn of views, even appropriating the n Name nt H cr eSMUSeCul Dar 
! ot ¢ aletto. wl h his uncl had Mace l \ rip raw 
en lan ind which had become tnseparabl 
al rT 
associated with this typeof painting. Trained ( 
Iron Idhood in the art, the oun Ber { , 
nardgo w soon able topa nt Vene iInscens I \ 
n manner scarcely distinguishable trom ; +4 
nis master Phat his precocio cilit ) HH 
spran rom real talent nd that he was | 





METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ARI 





LIN LHI 
\ [he first of these new sculptures, pre- 
14 for ¢ . I \I ented he Museum by Miss G. Louise 
Viev \ Be lkkobinson, is a signed, dated, and numbered 
vork te ter the Museun I \ example of the Lion about to Strike a Ser- 
Februar the Roon pent.! This fine bronze, which is the third 
‘ \ nd will then be isting of a subject modeled in 1832, affords 
n | ( ) Wit lluminating comparison with an un- 
Viuseur Il but ex ent group o lated and unnumbered cast acquired in 
1 teenth centur 939 through the bequest of Colonel Jacob 
| ) Ruppert. [he two bronzes have been placed 
BR BN FROM MODEI DEI 
RYE | IO54 
SCULPTURES BY BARRY! side DY sid close proximity to emphasize 
the differences. The Robinson bronze is 


RECENT ACOUISIT'IONS | Tere , 
ybably the earlier of the two and retains 


In the last issue Bul nore of the directness anc ahi 
nouncement Was mad i t openings Nn I nal It | the Wupperlt bronze fine 
Januar 20 in Galler | 5 Of a Peg | tnougn l s the model has been worked 
exhibition consisting of all the work over and elaborated, thereby losing in 
Antoine Louis Bary g6-1875) in the pontaneity and = crispness whatever 1 
collections of the Metropolitan Museun eained in finisl Collectors of Barve, es 
Since that announcem« | been our pecially, will find much to interest them in 
good fortune to acquire X more bronzes | he JUXTAPOSITION O| these two bronzes 
Barve, one by gift and five by purchase. All lhe next three bronzes were all acquired 
these additional worl | | master have it the recent sale of the collection of the 
now been included in the special exhib e Clendenin |. Rvan. They are beautifu 
o which the 1gd con lerable Nlere } j 





BULLETIN. OF THE METROPO! 


casts of well-known subjects. The Ocelot an 


Devouring a Heron, once in the collection it 


of George Blumenthal, is signed but neither pa 

dated nor numbered It is a powertul 

bronze with a pleasant, dark-brown patina ma 
The expression Ol alertness on the orealt cal non 
as it begins to feast upon its prey, the ind! 

cation of tremendous strength in its crouch 

ng body, the contrasting limpness of thi dei 
dead heron are all characteristic of Barve tn 


1 | 


AN 





bie >, FORCI BRONZE CAST }t 


BARYE IN 1854 





at his best. Undated, but signed and nun ( ‘ 
s a rare bronze of a Sleeping Ipture 
I Ihe reposeful subject is rather < exampl 
I he col Ly Ve ones Tt \ 
i predilection. It indeed, to bi ng W 
red whether is not in simple sul \ 
wcts oO this t\ pe thal the sculptor { wns els 
his greatest distinction. The third bronze f r 
acquired at the Rvan sale represents a Lio 
Devouring a Dor s signed, dated 1837 | 


\ O. 40.22 Fdward C. Moor G 
Fund. | s 
rT | ( | ( 





CLE rem: THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OIF ARI 





, | e, f 1W leanin gainst the 
le n ¢ 12 figure ot a bi 
\ ed 3 vho rests | I n | hand he 
Marti ray ead of the | framed bv its luxuriant 
1 e new R | n liited in at titude o 
eer e P et watchfulness. Here the cast is a 
| | ( Cl Wi Ss resent pel I \ ( CT ] ( 1 the 
1s ‘ () | these s I ! ] 1 revealed 
re VoOre EXE 1 me \s ( t Ti re tT | } nit ol 
I rr Voce ay I { hese tw roups mpositions, the 
riginal heme ( { e pl mensel luable in emphas is 
' 1D , 
Vell OW ( Where DAT\ 4 | Wi ( CT yen 
| 15 eg 1¢ ppre ( Ol Since i 
I ‘ mial DY I | nowledyt ( peer imong 
it] I I CLE i lad } at ( er Deel corded the 
( 1¢ \ re ‘ mr Wit mn ( 1wsel thor on 
yt | 1 mar ben ‘ eT Set hut " naton | ped that the n- 
r | p res } SOs ( s Or these ext! rainat sculptures i 


Phe group svmt War w ef PRESTON REMINGTON 
o be com O Npositio 
Sens hee ’ nat hes ~ hares 


ure ol i Warrlol eated upon a recun NEWLY ACOUIRED 
bent horse. Upon | apa es, ATHENIAN VASES 

















] ] ] 9 + 
iuTeL eave H }T I ( 

Nee the W CT ri I 3 oeveral ew 1K I CT Otta Cire 
j | , , ) 
urned al rgn | vases are shown this n hin the Room o 
weeping ( I Ss fhe KO ‘ | Lo Recent \ccessions belore distribution to 

ly it} } eu ri vat hit vic } rr ry \ y lor hh ’ ] 
nshealhe \ ] CLOT ] s 1¢ ( esp Ve Palle ( ich iS a specldl 
the figure ot i bo blowin itr mp \ rere 1 ether the llustt ti idmir ib] 
the ve ful ener he in com! | the variet f Greek pottery withi elven 
\ | Ware Oo mpel n Ol an rs¢ lel Lh CAarile 5: a $s ra blac 
mans ever-laithtul ih | Var, raise IS I red Athenian | no or ou f 
head and pricks | i nticipatio It iso rare Shape not hitherto repre 
4 1 
I here is much that S ee e ot Miche ented in our collection the so-« 
ingelo n the vigorous contr ipposto of thi inelra type WITHOUT OTTSE shi ad 
nAcITIO’ a rT } ae +] +} Ee Lot t} 
COMPpoOsitl n : ter ifKa 1¢ is uN i K 4 D-T CLOW THe 
caught all the vibrar ind freshness of the rrest drops. This, the earliest form o 
culptor original 1 In contras ti Athe n | thos ppears about 000 B« 
th nt nally «7 th loaner sir Ya t 1, ¢ £f¢. — . TF > 
[tne conventionally MOO CU-UpP SUTTACeS O ana tasts tDOuU 1] Ca4rs .) eCXaAMmMpte 
t| f hed nt ' ’ , , ol 1 
the INnIsShe Sc ptlure, eve ( re nen nN re| ( rom neat le middie oO ak X 
this bronze ts alive with the ct e te entur he decoration confine 
lhe group mb oft rece eguall front p | Vhicl now 1 comba 
noble, though, owing to absence of move entaut { Greek and is edged OVE 
ment, necessarily less d! math \ powerll With a tongue pattern ne centaur 1s HDoul 
figure of a man 1s seated on the back ot a re fo throw a stone at his iversar while the 
] } } } ] ] j tot } | 
clining lion. He holds in his right hand a Gre lothe I Inic, culrass, and hel 
tatf, the point of which he rest pon the 
} J \ | her |} oe 
t nl + ( t ) t 
yrea beast S tlant His he { ’ ‘ 
ror SECU H > \ eT r 
i ly curled h bound wit fillet | , 
ive ‘ 
ling } r little nd | } Wed } 1; , 





i BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 





st the met, defends himself with spear and shield central figures, one t s round hy 
boy, 1 sheathed sword hangs by a baldric from companion, her hand raised in aston 

is he his shoulder. [he scene is drawn rapidly but ment. Clearly something unusual has hay 
The with a sure hand, well conveying thi pened. But who are the voung girl and the 

rlant Ssprrite ction tall w not fioure | ‘i , +] 

le of \ red-figured Athenian pvxis or kvlich stir? One might think of a soul being wel 

tisa nis, as we should now call such toilet comed by Thanatos, Death: but th 

t the boxes s remarkable for the scene painted ous vestures of the won } ‘ west 

the tomb. | ( hen p brick 

Ly ol welcomed by Eros, the fd 1] | 
are | ) e she is ler ' mpanion 
side Loby islv int led 4 i s% " a 

been Creek ieidex: lowes entaai 
= 

1Ong z : 


{ the 
Von 





In- 


bo in 
tion 
Ne 

Ct k 





ven FIG. 2. ATHENIA? LI 
| 
aiea ECOND ¢ \ |} I} ( | 
fio 
re sel | “ 
el- enes | | ré 
ind FIG. 1. ATHENIAN OIL JUG WITH CENTAU} OUNZ pers mw \ 

' hy welcome | ' \ , 
to AND GREEK, VI CENTURY B.¢ Lingly Welcome ( 
| WOotul re ( | X mel 


ple chiton and mation, Is runnin oward Nnerelore, 1s C INE 
th winged who stretches ¢ both arn | . bo Bi ( ne. At 
ya osup Welcome her. On ¢ thet ( . | t 
this central group are women. bringin \I vhere Aphi \ 
Vt shes perfume Vast a bDrancn na I \ CI 
ut chest | ole irticle I he ir Hi OF CX 
he citemel large-eved, running toward the \\ 
e| \ 141.8. Fletcher Fund. Said Mar 
r n Gyr ¢ Hi \ } es red j re 
¥ 118 1 ure S 2 I ( rn 
1, + 
ed M : 





= "6 eG = oS @ om : . © 
8 — = <A - . = : : ‘ 
=< 7 - — = : = 3 : 
fic “wie Ss : : a - =" 
7 7 = > - 4 





BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ARI 


lid larly fine is the Amazon queen mounted on represents a Greek and \n 
lee- her horse, spear in hand (see fig. 3 one the two figures are ere rendered wit 
nob reminds us of the horsemen on the Parth« ndividual toucl Phe Gree wearin 


Sing non [rleZe W th which se iS about con tun and helmet and oldin | I 


r1gl- temporal She too sits her horse with hield with a large eve a 1 ( 
vhile ease and grace; and though engaged in looking dow! t the An \ 
by a hattle. she has the aristocratic bearing tvp lay I ( 
the cal of Pheidian art. Her opponent ts draw1 tal 
ored 
ole 
ted 
Was 
Ol a 
han 
! 
rc ke 








I, 
Uw 
Ving 
th 
til 
( } Cl Ee REPRESS! ED IL I I 
oO 
, 
\ 
\ 
es 
| 
the 
] 
Na 
| 
los 
ict 
1, 
he 
re 
' 
it 
dT 
Vas hI 5 HI AN ( | 
| Ce ) | 
iC 
mn- 
' ‘ ‘ " thy hy ] 
Ive In three quartet back \ WW . Cl 
} ] ini + ] + 
ms crested helmet torming elle ve SII T 
I- against the background KI 
\ red-tigured Athenian si 
2 
fig. © must be tron Ibo | 
period 1 he deli ite] painte ( ( ( 
ri ‘ : 
S | he t ‘ I I ' 
fe) Dy Be var he 
he notos 
\ ) ir, eae r | | t 
from Sicily. H. 3%, in. (9.8 cm.). Ne 
numerous red pits in the blac] zx 
; been tinted black. but no restor 





LLEIIN O1 fHE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM Ol AR | 


re of love or the \ma IWO LATE MEDIAEVAI 
m hi tall giscqgaeige ITALIAN TEXTILES 


pr n extal 

| | ] ! X11] t} 
( I 1\ ( re Vi ( NU1I ne 
\ nown e Middle A n the 

rimist \\ 
; Vl ind 
, p ' ; ed palace 
{ { ( II » 
\tt I vell admit estment 

men an ear it 





| ( L THI 1A _ g | 1.1 FABRIC EN H 
[HIRD RIER | Cc} ( HRI | IN 
ecn Quire yy pur \ Xtur ( 
yout ltahan n I Mu- min tt e seen onl 
eun t bequest fr Mrs. A H e tex elves, | 
neton lt 1 exan ple ) an ‘ 1] ) ( e may vritten 
Gsnathian, one of the many Hellenist records tew actual examples have survive 
wares current in Italy during the fourth an WO rec | ym the 
hird centurit Cc. The ered W ol | H.A. I igh 
lack glaz vhich pattert ivy at ev ar 1 r rest 
Vave rr appli n re | ellow ( | ( | \ 1) by 
vhite Phe knott 1] \ s\ halt he 
Dod ¥ the influenct | Va4re ( ] Ve 
A; Il \ \ RICHTI ( I CS 
( \J | 1 ) y the ! 1) ' { pet navges 





BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 


raem was originally a solt brick red but brown and ereen silk. On this backgrot 
has now led evenly on the front to a light bastlist the crested creature half bird 
ocher. [The design is woven in gilt’ thread and half serpent, of the mediaeval bestiari 


ilded skin mounted on linen) running ire brocaded in gilt thread (gilded skin 


the from selvage to selvage. A larger piece ol mounted on linen). Parrotlike birds flank 
le the same fabric in the Kunstgewerbe Mu vases ornamented with simulated Arabi 
[s scum in Berlin shows the entire design of letters. Larger pieces of this fabric show 


again three towered castles with ferocious chained conventionalized plant torms growing trot 


laces jogs straining to escape from the two © the vase lhe m 


tive ot plant forms be 


illus- lower towers alternating in horizontal rows tween animals or birds i favorite one in 
nents with similar castles from which lions emerge Eastern design, which originated in_ the 
Below the first row of castles are confronted symbolic trees and their guardians of the 


yrittin nder palm fronds. Beneath the ancient Indo-Iranian religions. [his them 
] 


second row of cast 


es are paired basilisks became very popular in Western design 





FIG. 2 ILK FABRIC BROCADED WITH GI 


IHREAD 
PROBABLY NORTH ITALIAN, XV CENTURY 








I eatherlike motive || m I Phe flourish I cir ‘ ron 
I Gott nterpre 1 Ss ot the Kast to the We nad the on nt n I 
1Wagol na ( rin e der ed ms of the weavel explau Now piece ( 
Nhorne 1 iS ¢ Lie | tS Lhe Xl le wsien n Nest iT rel ted 
the little n istles are purely Goth and are sald Man cultures Sill Weaving OF I Led | 
nl to be related to the courtly castles of love the Orient and traveled slowly trom ther 
tu- sung of by the troubadours. Artichokes and Byzantium. The Muhammadans brought 
ten lotus motives fill the spaces under the cusped skilled weavers from Bvyzantiun Pers 
ed arches ol The centr | portals ot the castles ind even India to ther real | TOopye 
the and Gothic tendrils combine with the grace centers. Ot these S became the m 
igh ful vertical towers of the castles in unifvin famous for pattern weavin When Sicil 
st the design. The use o perspective and elab Wi nquere Ly ! r (nar 
ah orate detail In the castles and the liveline of Anjou in 1200 many of the weaver 
rhe t the mythical creatures contrast with the migrated to other countrh nd Sp. 
ive heraldic I CIty Of ¢ irlier textil desien Tne ities oF norther Ital part ilar 
es I he Ol K Warp ¢ The secon pT lca ( eat at 1 I W 
es f) ) patterned with wetts « le enter lhe we I ed with thet 
he ; oth their own 1 { ( wr | 1 
| 
. ; . 4 hy ’ j | } . \ 
VI Inthe countries to wl ( A | , 
| 





— = “= ~ u Y 
3 — ee Loe vee > is 
a << bof “3 - = - = © tex *% c y- Le a SS an ee - = . 
— f > i Jo fF + a - - = ~ mom | 3S = 
- = — fi 2 — ag 7 f 
, - = - = . = = f = ~ 
Pia Se ee me € — x - a Oe : — = ©. 
=~ 7 oa — oS = = Ae Ss ws 
- & ; o oe - i Ws © 
, = = r Suse = f = 8 «= —_- SS 
ae 3 0.2 - t= © Sw SS eR et € 6 wm S&S as 
3 - ~ ) 3° >_ = 5s A - 
4 = = = 5 4 a~ & r f “3 as 
— = + c c & a ~ 
~ e ~ fy —_— - —_— ~ - 


= S88 a oat omer HA ce She eRe | +35 ¢ eeser ¥2eE5 


- ae a. : . hee 20s) att 7 * 
: ~~ mt a= 





‘ Bike gy = 
om « ; ~- = oe - 
os b > ; = 
f is 
J = 
“A 
/ ey c 5 
~ 5 = 
— ‘4 ~ 
a = ~ 
- ~ ~ 
c= 
> on 
ES a Ce Pee 
— _) - < 
a = ms - - 





I! pic- 
SUT Ke 
Int 
she ad 
VOrK 
IStlc 
ob- 
lish 
SC\- 
34 
“(5 
can 


wi 1730 Was 


lor sale \ll SO) 


Canvas, for Tent Stick; the Patterns tr 


London, but 
than English dr 


( chappl Nt edle 


Over Zeal MUS 


he sub @ct oF 2 
the N, Y orl 
1755 m\ 
differs widel\ iT 


cileable enemy, 


every State of lit 


quired, by whic 
got or saved. In 
| 


Mrs. Condy, w 


| 
| 

A f Rp tiful Fieur 

ris of Deaulliul WUres 


drawn by her much che 


awing: All sorts of Cany 


x: also Silk Shades, Slac] 
| all Sorts the hye ‘| Wh 


S 


devotion to needlework 





patient husband's letter 
Ven i? for October 
Wife’s notion ot educat 


om mine. She is an irreco! 


to Idleness, and cons 


h she thinks money ma 


pursuance Of tTAls princely} 


she calls up her Daughters at a certa 


hour, and appo 
worl to be pert 
\bout a mont 


mts them a task OT nee 
med be 
h ago, Tent and tur 


stitch seemed at a stand; my Wite ki 


not what new 


tured to propose tha he Girls shoul 


Work to introduce; | 








BULLETIN OF THE METROPOLITAN Ml EUM Ot AR I 


somber effect of the tightly fitted black portant Worcester | 
dress ftened by a narrow white rufl with green ground 1 ex 
e high collar and by a thin white fallions. In view of 1 nterest rouse 





1 ; 1] ’ ' 
ip. Such becoming little caps, often with a the newly acguired Lockwo ollection 
: ; 
jrapet ging down at the back ppea t VE esp I pl t 
\ } 1 ] | rr ] 
n drawings of the ¢ louet school betore the prece to our now ! ! mpre ‘ fa) 
middle of the sixteenth centut ind con lection of Worcester. [here at Is ree 
' int ‘“ ve thine asacnel peree ; 
LIN With greatel elaboration ol reweled other examples of | ope } ‘ 
OF Tne embroidery, to about 1580 in French court Eenelish lustered earthenware 1 Lowe 
{ | j ‘ bens ] { P | P / , y } 
lelig l portraits Lhe are also. te be tound in Lott porcelain inkstand 1 l bren 


he 15508 and 1500s 


Phe simplicit ff Our portrait,! with 
town fluid, thin paint, and the rather large pro 
( Tews portion of the head to the panel point to 


native Flemish rather than a French origin. The 


smoothly modeled features and the still 
Kk mpersonal expression are particularly close 
to the work of Pieter Pourbus. Though 
1 con- born in Gouda, Pourbus may be counted as 
mo ol a Flemish painter since he spent tortyv-six 


tone vears of his life in Flanders. He arrived in 


new Bruges as a Voung man in 1538 and joined 
work the workshop of Lancelot Blondeel, whose 
hosen daughter he married. He formed a stvle 
Oo eX- however, Which was quite different trom 
| rh } Cat ] j : 
i Sul Ms father-in-law s and spent a ver SUK 
crest cesstul life in Bruges, carrving out mani 

he commissions tor the town and its wealthy 


ura- citizens, of whom this voung lady might 











1d ol \ Gu b CERAMK R. Thornton Wil 
| and son has vithin the pa few vears proved ;' ree ai 
S nimsel n interested and generous [riend 
the Museum. His gifts of English potter figure oO } ( vith t 
been have been distinct contributions to the Mu nd humor 
her seum’s collection; outstanding among them 1 | four 
Out are the little delftware commemorative bust Museum by Mr. W n Ww 
ive ot Charles | the inscribed date 1679 China for 1 lurop ! et dur tI 
QUITS nd the Tithe » group and the figure o econd half of the eighteenth centur 
e ol Diogenes made by Ralph Wood. Mr. Wil belong to that large class of porcela 
ure son’s numerous loans, especially his Whiel enient! but te erroneou 
don and Ralph Wood groups, materiall Chinese Lowestott. [The gre 
strengthen our display of English potter 7} the period offen ore nt home trom § 
[he From among these loans Mr. Wilson has ton porcelain which 
recently selected eight pieces for presenta fecorated in China for kur rA 


lhe tion to the Museum. [They are shown this can chents. [hough many 4 es were d 


“ month in the Room of Recent Accessions rated with stock 
HOT and thereafter will be returned to our gal things, such as armorial dinner set 
leries of European ceramics. The most im ommemorative ptec Wel re 
ndividual 
143. ' : 
Chines | 
. < te? ; 
Ko Rect Lecce ) 








° ”_- 
- s ~ - E 
- ; MW ays : [ 
/ 1: i 
- 5 — 
“a = —f. 





BULLETIN OI] THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM Ol] \R 1 


| LECTURES AND GALLERY TALKS FOR MEMBERS 
EXHIBITIONS 
IN THE Museum 
NEIGHBORHOOD EXHIBITION 





i \1 | ’ | 
() 1} Vi | ROPO]