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THE CATALOG 


The purpose of the catalog is to furnish prospective students and other 
interested persons with information about Stanly Technical College and its 
programs. Announcements contained in this catalog are subject to change 
without notice and may not be regarded as binding obligations on the Col- 
lege or the State. Changes will be kept to a minimum, but changes in policy 
by the State Board of Education, the Department of Community Colleges, or 
by the local Board of Trustees may require alterations periodically. 


Stanly Technical College is an equal opportunity educational institution 
and employer. The College does not practice or condone discrimination, in 
any form, against students, employees, or applicants on the ground of race, 
color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap, consistent with the 
Assurance of Compliance with Title VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 
1964, Executive Order 11246, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 
1973, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 


Stanly Technical College 
Route 4, Box 5 
Albemarle, North Carolina 28001 


GENERAL CATALOG 
1979-1981 


NolUrrie: 4). cnet eaeeeiae we ere Lee tals. 5o Ree wt 1 NY LE 


Fall Quarter 


October 1 

October 3 

October 9 
November 22 & 23 
December 6 
December 20 


Winter Quarter 


January 2 
January 3 
January 9 
March 5 

March 19 


Spring Quarter 
March 25 
March 27 

April 3 

April 4 & 7 

May 29 

June 2 

June 16 


Summer Quarter 
July 7 

July 8 

July 14 
September 1 
September 2 
September 16 
September 18 


Monday 
Wednesday 
Tuesday 
Thursday & Friday 
Thursday 
Thursday 


Wednesday 
Thursday 

Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 


Tuesday 
Thursday 
Thursday 
Friday & Monday 
Thursday 
Monday 
Monday 


Monday 
Tuesday 
Monday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Tuesday 
Thursday 


ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1979-80 
Technical And Vocational Programs 


Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Add a Course 
Thanksgiving Holidays 
Last Day to Drop a Course 
Last Day of Classes 


Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Add a Course 
Last Day to Drop a Course 
Last Day of Classes 


Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Add a Course 
Easter Holidays 

Activity Day 

Last Day to Drop a Course 
Last Day of Classes 


Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Add a Course 
Labor Day Holiday 

Last Day to Drop a Course 
Last Day of Classes 
Graduation 


ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1979-80 (PROPOSED) 
UNCC-STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 
GENERAL EDUCATION COLLEGE PROGRAM 


Fall Semester 


August 23 
August 27 
August 31 
September 3 
October 8 & 9 
November 21-23 
November 30 
December 7 
December 10-14 


Spring Semester 


January 10 
January 14 
January 18 
February 18& 19 
March 24-28 
April 24 

April 30 

May 1 

May 2-8 


Thursday 

Monday 

Friday 

Monday 

Monday & Tuesday 
Wednesday-Friday 
Friday 

Friday 
Monday-Friday 


Thursday 

Monday 

Friday 

Monday & Tuesday 
Monday-Friday 
Thursday 
Wednesday 
Thursday 
Friday-Thursday 


Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Add a Course 
Labor Day Holiday 

Fall Break (No Classes) 
Thanksgiving Holidays 
Last Day to Drop a Course 
Last Day of Classes 

Final Examinations 


Registration 

First Day of Classes 

Last Day to Add a Course 

No Classes 

Spring Holidays (No Classes) 
Last Day to Drop a Course 
Last Day of Classes 

Reading Day 

Final Examinations 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


ACADEMIG CALENDARS 25 ait rare ore eis) ins ela ee 2 
INTRODUCTION ro oe at arr ree rt cs tas aia a of ohare 5 
History... (Seth ae ae ere PUM. ci 6 
PUrpoSe «5: CREE, a Pane a Oe REP a es 6 
Administrative Office Hours) sarah a ernn Fee 6 
AcademicY ear vi.) cts iste oe tee et eee UE J Aid: § 6 
Class Schedule ::.c. Sky Pee ae ae 6 
Areas of Study sc2c oid Oe i ce Re eh 6 
ADMISSION: POLICIES 5 tec eet 20 2/00 ee ae ie en a ear ac 9 
EXPENSES,.FINANGIAL AID a. 2 csci ac): 2 teen eae ee eee aps! 
ACADEMIC POLICIES.) gtccccgs:. 0. s,s < eGR sec el 18 
STUDENTSERVICES, STUDENTSCIFE tye 2) te eee eee re ele 26 
PROGRAMS OF STUDY. oii i’... peiutalt , on Museeheenehes << Cnet i Meneame 83 
ACCOUNTING 315 wih se le tyeielly cc dip) eo do = oe) sagan «ey a 34 
Agricultural Business Technology .....: «.,..3508-4 -. +. | Aster 36 
Automotive: Body Repaini:. . .  - .le/becieeieriice 3) aie ae Faery 38 
Automotive Mechanics tise. 5. o/s chenetoueeeir ocean eee eee 40 
Biomedical Equipment Technology. . ....... .... . Peete ee 42 
Business Administrations... <2 ./ +. agente eee a eee 44 
Criminal Justice ds. a} ial. PA LS a ee er 46 
Electrical Installation and Maintenance. ..............020505- 48 
Electronic Servicinggsait.. votiae Te vanities 5. oo ee eee 50 
Electronics Engineering Teennolody SPI OE Clana, BEA oe 52 
Fashion Merchandising and Marketing Technology .............- 54 
General Education College Program............. pA 56 
General Office’ Technology... 2... .. Vem 5 ee 60 
Industrial Managements). =... MEPS ee i, Pana ee earn 62 
Occupational TherapyAssistamt:: 7 gant = eee re heen 64 
Practical: Nursing Educationsy 0.2 ae ee 66 
Respiratory Therapy Technician. % 2.20. uha. os se ee eee 68 
Secretarial Science eee. 0s A a 70 
Teacher Associate? a.) va bb) eee ie 
Vocational Instructors 22%. 5.00. 8. so lets eee eee 74 
ourveying ...6 Oe) oe er 76 
Welding . n.d Sas. ee er 78 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS)..." 0... 5 79 
LEARNING RESOURGES CENTER‘ .1) 3.2, ue ot) ce 115 
CONTINUING EDUCATION®. . . 2. i eer 118 
PEOPLE ie ek cic cds ve GUD ole 122 
State Administration... 4..a05 1G a 123 
Board of Trustees 2... sj. 5s) Le 123 
Administration Officers. .1: 2 sence e e 123 
Faculty and Statf .28.0).). is y 2 ee eee 124 
State Staff... ee souk, fe ele eeen  aeevan nee ee 1:27 
Office Personnel 2.3.0 ¢ 45.0 Fee la 127 
Maintenance © 2 i eo ES ee eet ere, 127 
INDEX ooo. oe vie ase ah Ot ic a ae tt 128 


INTRODUCTION ‘i 


INTRODUCTION 


HISTORY 


Stanly Technical Institute was established in July, 1971, under the 
authority of the 1963 Community College Act. However, the Institute did 
not officially open until December, 1971. Following the petitions of the 
County and City Boards of Education and the County Board of Com- 
missioners, the leadership of the late Senator Frank Patterson and the 
Honorable Richard Lane Brown, Ill was successful in gaining approval of 
the General Assembly to establish a technical institute in the county. Before 
the end of 1971, the Board of Trustees had been appointed, an organi- 
zational meeting held and Dr. Byrd was selected as the first President of the 
Institute. 


The Institute opened in the temporary headquarters previously oc- 
cupied by the South Albemarle High School. Presently the South Albemarle 
High School facilities serve as the East Campus for Continuing Education. 
Enrollment figures already tell a dramatic story of Stanly Tech. Starting with 
31 students in December, 1971, over 20,000 students have taken courses at 
the Institute to date. The Institute draws its enrollment principally from Stan- 
ly County. October, 1975, the Institute occupied the new campus on the 
West of Albemarle. Within the campus are two buildings surrounded by 
rolling hills and valleys. 


Stanly Tech has been highly successful in attracting a competent staff 
and faculty. Experienced faculty members with expertise bring preparation 
and dedication to teaching and helping the student to achieve. 


Today the Institute is a co-educational institution offering two-year 
general education, technical, vocational and general adult and extension 
courses. The Institute is governed by a twelve member Board of Trustees 
from Stanly County who give freely of their time and efforts for the 
operation of the institution. 


PURPOSE 


Stanly Technical Institute was established to provide appropriate 
economic and convenient learning opportunities for all citizens beyond the 
normal high school age. Flexible programs of the Institute are designed: 


1. To provide educational guidance to all who seek our help, by assist- 
ing them in choosing suitable courses and in setting realistic goals. 


2. To provide programs preparing students for jobs at the technician 
level in industry, business, and service occupations. 


3. To provide programs developing abilities and skills that will prepare 
students for jobs at the vocational level. 


4. To provide general education studies for students who seek personal 
growth and intellectual enrichment through course work not directly 
related to their vocational goals, and for students who want to earn 
an associate degree in General Education to serve as a basis for 
thoughtful living or further education. 


5. Provide continuing education based on community needs and in- 
terest with special emphasis on basic education courses for grades 1- 
8, high school diploma programs, high school equivalency cer- 
tificates, and cultural and community service programs. 


6. To accelerate the economic growth and development of Stanly Tech’s 
service areas through responsive and relevant business and industry 
training programs. 


7. To provide continuing articulation between the Institute and the 
public and private schools of the area. 


Stanly Technical Institute has a continuing concern for the welfare of 
each student. The school seeks to cultivate in each student healthy mental 
attitudes, development of abilities and talents, establishment of human 
relationships, and motivation for progress in intellectual understanding. 


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE HOURS 


Institute offices are open Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m. An evening director, student services personnel and security person- 
nel are on duty Monday through Thursday until 10:00 p.m. 


ACADEMIC YEAR 


The school year is divided into four (55 day) quarters for all instruc- 
tional activities, except the General Education College Program which 
operates on the traditional two semesters and summer sessions. Calendars 
for instructional programs are published in this catalog. 


CLASS SCHEDULE 


Stanly Technical Institute offers classes between the hours of 8:00 a.m. 
and 10:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday and to 5:00 p.m. on Friday. Oc- 
casionally, as required, some classes are scheduled on Saturdays. 


The availability of curricula credit courses during both day and evening 
sessions allows working students the opportunity to select curriculum 
courses applicable to a degree or a diploma. Any person, after completion 
of the appropriate admission procedures, may enroll for the day or evening 
classes. 


Non-Credit courses which are offered primarily for personal and com- 
munity improvement are also offered during day and evening sessions. 


Prior to the beginning of each quarter (and semester) schedules in- 
dicating types, location and times of classes to be offered are published by 
the Institute and also announced in local news media. 


AREAS OF STUDY 
Associate Degree Programs (Two Years) 


Accounting 

Agricultural Business Technology 

Biomedical Equipment Technology 

Business Administration 

Criminal Justice 

Electronics Engineering Technology 

Fashion Merchandising 

General Education (UNCC-STI Cooperative College Program) 
General Office Technology 


NOILINGOULNI 


INTRODUCTION 


Industrial Management 

Occupational Therapy Assistant (Proposed) 
Secretarial Science 

Teacher Associate 

Vocational Instructors 


Students completing the required hours in these curriculums are award- 
ed the Associate in Applied Science or the Associate in General Education 
Degrees. See the PROGRAMS OF STUDY section of this catalog for program 
descriptions and course offerings. Descriptions of courses offered in the 
above curriculums are listed alphabetically by course prefix in the COURSE 
DESCRIPTION section of this catalog. 


Diploma Programs (One Year) 


Automotive Body Repair 
Automotive Mechanics 

Electrical Installation & Maintenance 
Electronics Servicing 

Practical Nursing Education 
Respiratory Therapy Technician 


Students completing the requirements for these curriculums are award- 
ed a diploma. See the PROGRAMS OF STUDY section of this catalog for pro- 
gram descriptions and course offerings. Descriptions of courses offered in 
the above curriculums are listed alphabetically by course prefix in the 
COURSE DESCRIPTION section of this catalog. 


Certificate Programs 


Nurses Assistant 
Surveying 
Welding 


Students completing the requirements for these programs are awarded 
a certificate. See the PROGRAMS OF STUDY section of this catalog for 
program descriptions and course offerings. Descriptions of courses offered 
in the above curriculums are listed alphabetically by course prefix in the 
COURSE DESCRIPTION section of this catalog. 


Additional programs are described in the CONTINUING EDUCATION 
section of this catalog. 


ADMISSIONS POLICIES e 


ADMISSIONS POLICIES 


10 


ADMISSIONS POLICY 


Stanly Technical Institute, as do all other branches of the North Carolina 
Department of Community Colleges, operates under an “‘open door’’ ad- 
missions policy. This means that any person, whether a high school 
graduate or non-graduate, who is eighteen years of age or older, and who 
is able to profit from further formal education will be admitted to some 
phase of an educational program. Applicants between the ages of 16 and 
18 years may be admitted to appropriate courses and programs as persons 
with special needs as attested by appropriate public school superin- 
tendents. 


The open door policy does not mean that there are no restrictions on 
specific programs. It does mean that these restrictions are flexible enough 
to allow each student the opportunity to eliminate deficiencies through 
developmental work. 


ADMISSIONS REQUIREMENTS 


An applicant for an Associate in Applied Science Degree must have a 
high school diploma or the equivalent. Applicants submitting General Edu- 
cation Development (GED) scores must meet North Carolina high school 
equivalency requirements of a total score of 225 with no single test score 
below 35. 


In addition to general requirements, applicants applying for Electronics 
Engineering Technology, Biomedical Equipment Technology, and General 
Education College Program should have Algebra | and II. This requirement 
may be met by successfully completing MAT 100. 


Associate Degree, diploma and certificate students must be a minimum 
of eighteen years old or the applicant’s high school class must have been 
graduated. 


Applicants for a diploma program not having a high school diploma or 
the equivalent may be admitted by the Director of Admissions when suc- 
cessful completion seems likely. Individuals applying to the Practical Nurs- 
ing and Respiratory Therapy Programs must be high school graduates or the 
equivalent. 


ADMISSION PROCEDURE 


All correspondence concerning admissions should be addressed to the 
Director of Admissions. 


Applicants for admission should: 


1. APPLY — Obtain an application from the Admissions Office or high 
school counselor and arrange for a personal interview with a STI 
counselor. This is usually accomplished when the application is sub- 
mitted. 

2. REQUEST TRANSCRIPT(S) — Request that a transcript of all high 
school and post high school academic work be sent directly to the Ad- 
missions Office. (Transcript request forms may be obtained from the 
Admissions Office.) 

3. TAKE APTITUDE TEST — Arrange to take the Differential Aptitude Test 
(required for Associate in Applied Science Degree Programs) 


Scheduling is done through the Admissions Office. Students who have 
taken the Scholastic Aptitude Test and made an acceptable score will 
not have to take the DAT. Test scores will be evaluated during a per- 
sonal interview scheduled by the Counselor. 


4. REGISTER — Register for classes on published registration date. 


Letters of acceptance are mailed to applicants by the Director of Ad- 
missions as soon as all admissions requirements are met. Qualified students 
may enroll at the beginning of each term — except for Practical Nursing, 
Engineering Technologies and Respiratory Therapy students who normally 
begin the Fall term. 


Additional requirements for Practical Nursing, Respiratory Therapy and 
the General Education College Program are listed under those programs in 
the PROGRAMS OF STUDY division of this catalog. 


SPECIAL CREDIT ADMISSIONS 


Degree/Diploma — Applicants who have not completed admission 
procedures at the time of registration will be classified as Special Credit 
students. If working toward a degree or diploma, the Special Credit classi- 
fication may be retained through the term in which the student attempts 
twelve credit hours. Prior to registration for additional hours all admissions 
requirements must be completed. If the Special Credit Student is not 
working toward a degree or diploma, this classification can be retained in- 
definitely. 


TESTING 


Most applicants for technical and health-related programs are asked to 
take a multiple-aptitude test battery or a placement test. 


Currently enrolled students who wish to take aptitude tests or interest 
tests may do so by contacting the Counselor. 


After taking a test administered through the counselor's office, the ap- 
plicant is scheduled for a counseling session so that a valid interpretation of 
scores and performances on the test can be made. Test interpretation is 
oriented toward helping individuals realize their potential and make edv- 
cational plans in a realistic and objective manner. 

Occupational considerations are usually given more importance when 
discussing scores. Developmental studies programs are available and per- 
sons needing this assistance will be referred to this program in the Learning 
Laboratory. 

Special tests, such as interest inventories, reading tests, and others are 
available to individuals who wish to take them. There is no charge for these 
tests. 


VETERAN'S EDUCATIONAL BENEFITS 

Each incoming veteran is scheduled for a conference with the Veterans 
Coordinator who helps the vet learn more about the veteran's benefits and 
the purpose for which the benefits were designed. Upon selection of a 
program which suits the veteran’s educational goals, the Veterans Coordi- 
nator assists the veteran in completing the proper applications and securing 


$aIDI1Od SNOISSIWGV 


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ADMISSIONS POLICIES 


the documents necessary for certification. The Veterans Coordinator also 
helps veterans with special problems, contacting the Winston-Salem 
Regional Veteran's Office on a regular basis. The Counselor’s Office may 
be able to help veterans who need an official counseling review before 
being permitted to change programs or educational goals. 


The Student Services staff assists the veteran in making the transition 
from military life to school. Financial aid programs at STI may enable 
veterans to receive financial assistance if there are delays in receiving their 
educational benefits. 


TRANSFER CREDIT 


The Registrar will review applications for admission with advanced 
standing. When subject content and length of courses taken are com- 
parable to those in the curriculum applied for, credit may be allowed if a 
grade of C or higher was earned. Transfer credits will not influence the 
student's grade point average while attending Stanly Technical Institute. 


READMISSION 


All former students who left STI in good standing are encouraged to 
enroll for additional study. However, re-admission after withdrawal is not 
automatic. Students who have been out one term or longer should contact 
the Admissions Office so their files can be reactivated. If a conference with 
a counselor or an advisor is required, the student will be notified. Re- 
entering students who have attended other institutions since withdrawing 
from STI must have an official transcript sent to the Registrar’s Office at 
Stanly Tech from each institution attended. 


Former students desiring to re-enter who were withdrawn for academic 
or disciplinary reasons must request admission through the Vice President 
for Student Services and Personnel prior to registration. 


REGISTRATION 


Applicants who have been accepted will be notified of the date for 
registration. At registration, students will be assigned class schedules, pay 
fees, and purchase books. Each student is expected to matriculate ac- 
cording to schedule. Returning students registering later than the time ap- 
pointed for registration must pay a late fee of $5.00. 


GIV I1VIDNVNId ‘SSSN3dX3 


13 


EXPENSES, FINANCIAL AID 


TUITION (For Curriculum Students) 


Tuition and other charges are set by the North Carolina State Board of 
Education, and are subject to change. While it is the Board’s policy to keep 
all charges as low as possible, non-resident students are required under 
North Carolina law to pay a higher tuition rate than residents. The student is 
responsible for complying with regulations concerning declaration of 
residency. 


For tuition purposes full time students are those students taking twelve 
or more credit hours per quarter or semester. There is no additional tuition 
charge for those hours beyond twelve. Part time students (less than twelve 
credit hours) are charged by the credit hour. The following tuition and fees 
are payable each term. 


QUARTER SEMESTER 
Technical & General Education 
Vocational College Program 
Tuition — full-time $ 39.00 $ 58.50 
Tuition — full-time $198.00 $297.00 
(non-resident of NC) 
Tuition — part-time So 3.25 $ 4.88 
per qtr. hr. per sem. hr. 
Tuition — part-time $ 16.50 $ 24.75 
(non-resident of NC) per gtr. hr. per sem. hr. 
STUDENT ACTIVITY FEES 


Students taking 12 credit hours or more are required to pay a student 
activity fee. The student activity fee supports cultural, recreational, in- 
tramural and Student Government activities. The amount of student fees 
payable is as follows: 


QUARTER SEMESTER 
Technical & General Education 
Required Vocational College Program 
Full-time (12 or more $5.00 $10.00 
credit hours) 
Optional 
Part-time (6 to 11 $3.00 $ 6.00 
credit hours) 
Part-time (1 to 5 $2.00 $ 4.00 


credit hours) 


The maximum student activity fee charged per year is $20.00. 


ADDITIONAL EXPENSES 


Some programs require additional materials, uniforms, equipment, in- 
surance, and supplies. Nursing students should anticipate purchasing 


uniforms, shoes, and name tag (approximately $100 expenditure) prior to 
clinical practice beginning Winter Term. 


Book costs vary according to the courses taken. Usually the first term the 
student is enrolled, the expense will range from $50 to $100 depending on 
the curriculum. Students will be able to use some books for more than one 
term. 


LATE REGISTRATION FEE 


A $5 late registration fee is charged to returning students who register 
atter the official registration date as designated each term. 


RETURNED CHECKS 


A fee of $5 will be charged to students for each check that is returned 
for ‘insufficient funds’. 


REFUNDS 


Tuition refunds for students shall not be made unless the student is, in 
the judgement of the institution, compelled to withdraw for unavoidable 
reasons. In such cases two-thirds (2/3) of the student’s tuition may be 
refunded if the student withdraws within ten (10) calendar days after the 
first day of classes as published in the school calendar. Tuition refunds will 
not be considered after that time. Tuition refunds will not be considered for 
tuition of five dollars ($5) or less, except if a course or curriculum fails to 
materialize; then all the student's tuition shall be refunded. 


Where a student, having paid the required tuition and fees for a term, 
withdraws from the Institution before the end of the term and the reasons 
for the withdrawal are found excusable by the Institution’s administration, 
the student may be allowed credit for unrefunded tuition and fees if ap- 
plying for readmission during any of the next four quarters or two 
semesters. Written request for this arrangement must be made in the office 
of the Registrar. 


Veterans or war orphans who receive financial aid under U. S. Code, Ti- 
tle 38, Chapters 32, 34 and 35, can be refunded the pro rata portion of the 
tuition fee not used at the time of withdrawal. 


INSURANCE 


All students in vocational or technical programs involving shop or lab 
work must buy accident insurance or sign a waiver indicating that they al- 
ready have adequate accident coverage. The accident policy the Institute 
offers students is through Pilot Life Insurance Company. A fee of $4.00 per 
year covers the insured person while enroute to or from campus, while in 
classes, and while on any school-sponsored trip. Any student, regardless of 
program, or any staff and faculty member may purchase this insurance 
coverage. 

Liability insurance is required of all students in health-related programs 
for protection in the event of a liability claim of a personal or professional 
nature resulting from the performance of hospital duties. Premiums are 
payable at the time of registration for the term the student begins clinical 
practice. Coverage continues for any additional terms requiring the student 
to be in clinical practice to a maximum of twelve calendar months. 


GIV IVISNVNId ‘S3SN3dX3 


EXPENSES, FINANCIAL AID 


FINANCIAL AID 


The purpose in providing students with financial aid is to ensure that no 
student is denied the opportunity of attending or continuing at Stanly 
Technical Institute because of financial hardship. The tuition and fees at 
Stanly Technical Institute are low, but other related expenses and living ex- 
penses remain the same, a fact for which students must plan. Other related 
expenses include transportation to and from school, books, uniforms, 
lunches, personal expenses, and normal living expenses. Every student is 
encouraged to consider applying for financial aid when making plans to at- 
tend Stanly Technical Institute. 


There are three basic types of financial aid available at Stanly 
Technical Institute: Gift Aid (Grants and Scholarships), loans, and part-time 
employment (work-study). Grants and work-study are the most frequent 
types of aid awarded. Part-time employment opportunities are available in 
many areas, with the majority of jobs in either the Pre-School Day Care 
Center or clerical work. Students must submit proper applications for each 


type of financial aid desired. Applications may be obtained in the Financial 
Aid Office. 


Most student aid is based on financial need rather than academic 
record. However, once students are receiving financial aid they will be 
required to maintain satisfactory academic progress in their course work. 


Determination of the student’s financial need is made by a standard 
method approved by the Federal Government. This standard method of 
determining how much a student needs assumes several things. First, 
parents are responsible for contributing a reasonable amount to their 
children’s education, depending on income, number of dependents, 
allowable expenses and indebtedness, and assets. Second, the students 
should contribute to their education as their resources will allow. Third, 
student financial aid funds are used only for filling the gap between how 


much the student and parents are able to contribute and the actual ex- 
penses. 


If a student meets the criteria for an independent student status, that 
student's financial need will be determined by calculating only how much 
the student and spouse should contribute toward education. However, 
parents are usually considered to have a responsibility in helping their 
children in school, even though the children may be employed and tem- 
porarily on their own. A claim of financial independence cannot be con- 
sidered if it constitutes an evasion of parental responsibility. 


Stanly Technical Institute does not have the resources in student aid 
funds to provide all the expenses married students may incur while en- 
rolled. It is generally held that married students will have the normal ex- 
penses of family living regardless of whether they are in school or not. Nor- 
mally, Stanly Tech attempts to provide married students with assistance for 
only those expenses which are related directly to the pursuit of education. 


Stanly Technical Institute also believes in the principle of self-help. 
Students are expected through their summer employment to save a portion 


of their earnings for expenses. Most students’ needs, will usually be met by 
50% or more self-help, and the rest gift aid or loans. 


Grants and Scholarships available through the Financial Aid Office at 
Stanly Technical Institute include Basic Educational Opportunity Grants 
(BEOG), Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG), and North 
Carolina Incentive Grants. 


Loans available include the North Carolina Insured Student Loan 
Program, James E. and Mary Z. Bryan Foundation Loans, Veteran’s Edu- 
cational Loans, and the Stanly Technical Institute Emergency Loan Fund. 


Part-time employment includes the College Work-Study Program 
(CWSP), Plan Assuring College Education in North Carolina (PACE-INC), 
Vocational Work-Study, and Veterans Work-Study. 


For further information concerning financial assistance and applications 
to the various programs, contact the Financial Aid Office. 


For information about financial assistance provided by other agencies, 
such as Social Services, the Social Security Administration, N. C. Vocational 
Rehabilitation, C.E.T.A., and others, contact the Counselor for referral. 


SCHOLARSHIPS 


Various scholarships are made available through industry, civic, and 
social clubs. Students interested in these funds should contact the Financial 
Aid Officer. 


STUDENT RESIDENCE CLASSIFICATION 


Under North Carolina law, a person may qualify as a resident for tuition 
purposes in North Carolina, thereby being eligible for a tuition rate lower 
than that for non-residents. In essence, the controlling North Carolina statue 
(G.S. 116-143.1) requires that ’’To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, 
a person must have established legal residence (domicile) in North Caro- 
lina and maintained that legal residence for at least twelve (12) months 
immediately prior to his or her classification as a resident for tuition pur- 
poses.’’ Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the state of North 
Carolina does not automatically qualify one for the in-state tuition rate. 
Failure to provide requested information for residency classification can 
result in the student being classified as a nonresident for tuition purposes 
and disciplinary action. A student who believes that he or she has been 
erroneously classified shall be permitted to appeal the case in accordance 
with the procedure outlined by the State Residence Committee. 


Regulations concerning the classification of students by residence for 
purposes of applicable tuition differentials are set forth in detail in A 
Manual To Assist The Public Higher Education Institutions Of North 
Carolina In The Matter Of Student Residence Classification For Tuition 
Purposes. A copy of the manual is available for student inspection in the 
Student Services Office. 


GIV IWISNVNId ‘S3SN3dX3 


ACADEMIC POLICIES 


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REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 


The following requirements are established as a minimum for the Asso- 
ciate in Applied Science Degree, the Associate in General Education 
Degree and the Diploma. 


1. Complete all course requirements of the curriculum, earning at least 
a 2.0 grade point average in courses required for graduation. 

2. Pay a graduation fee at the time of registration for the last quarter. 

3. Earn at least one-fourth of the credits required for a degree from 
Stanly Technical Institute. 

4. Fulfill all financial obligations to the Institute. 

5. Be present for graduation exercises. Graduation exercises are held at 
the end of the summer term on the date published in the academic 
calendar. In cases of unavoidable circumstances exceptions to this re- 
quirement may be granted by the Vice President for Student Services 
and Personnel. During graduation exercises candidates must be 
dressed in proper academic attire, as determined by the President of 
the Institute. 


GRADING SYSTEM 


The following alphabetical system is used for reporting and recording 
all grades: 


Seo i ee hh rae 4 quality points per credit hour 

B os ls ee 3 quality points per credit hour 
VS. ce te es 2 quality points per credit hour 

D Soho le ky $e AS oe 1 quality point per credit hour 

F Pee eee Course must be repeated 

| Te IVES MRR 4 vis cy mos) Joe eye FO) > Incomplete must be removed by 


end of next term or the grade will 
be changed to an “’F” 


WY CeGWOl). wc OPTS: Hours not included in GPA. 
ME AUCIEd?...0). Siieiiiniie ats. aes No Credit 
S TET OIN os oi galls Fp nt oop D> Hours are not included in GPA 
Ger Unsatisfactoryis:. ..% feel ea Hours are not included in GPA 
. Credit received by passing a profi- 

RCN TEXENIN, sack titan cheer > acts Hours are not included in GPA 
SCHOLASTIC STANDARDS 


The minimum grade point average for graduation is 2.0 or a grade 
average of C. 


Quality Point Averages are determined by dividing the total number of 
quality points by the number of credit hours attempted. If a course is 
repeated, the last grade will be used in computing the student’s hour- 
quality point ratio. A ratio of 2.0 indicates that the student has an average 
of C: above 2.0 indicates that an average above C; below 2.0 indicates that 
an average below C. Grades of I, P, S, Y, W and F yield no quality points. 


$aIDI1Od DIWAGVIOV 


ACADEMIC POLICIES 


20 


GRADE REPORTS AND TRANSCRIPTS 


Shortly after the end of each term student grade reports are mailed to 
students. 


Transcripts of the student’s record will be sent to other schools, prospec- 
tive employers or to the student if an official written request is made by the 
student to the Registrar’s office. 


COURSE AUDITING 


Students who wish to audit courses must register through normal chan- 
nels. Auditors receive no credit and are encouraged to attend class 
regularly and participate in class discussions. Auditors will be charged the 
same fees as students taking courses for credit. 


CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 


Applicants who have reason to believe they are proficient in a subject 
may request credit by examination. The examination may be written, oral, 
performance, or all of these, and may be scheduled at any time mutually 
convenient to the examining Program Head and the student. The acodemic 
standards for credit by examination will be commensurate with the 
academic standards for the course; the minimum test to be similar to that 
which is administered at the conclusion of regularly scheduled courses. Stu- 
dents failing such an examination may not request a second examination 
until evidence of further study in the subject concerned is presented. No 
credit by examination will be allowed if the student has previously taken 
the course for credit and is now attempting to raise the course grade. 
Decision of the examining instructor will be final. 


Credits earned by examination will be entered on the student's per- 
manent record, but quality points will not be awarded for such credit. 


Procedures for Credit by Examination are as follows: 


A. Students are responsible for initiating a request to their instructor to take 
a proficiency exam in a specified course. 
B. The instructor evaluates the request to determine if: 
(1) Aneed for proficiency exam exists; 
(2) The student has demonstrated, or there is evidence, that the student 
possesses skill commensurate with the request. 


C. Instructor initiates a request to the Director of Faculty for approval or 
disapproval of proficiency exam. 


D. Student is notified as to approval or disapproval. 


E. Approved proficiency exams are processed as follows: 

(1) Students must pay for Proficiency Exams at the normal registration 
rate. The Registrar will initiate an appropriate registration bill and 
forward to the Business Office in cases where students are not en- 
rolled in the courses for which the exam is requested. 

(2) Copies of payment of tuition will be forwarded to the Director of 
Faculty and then the testing instructor. 

(3) The instructor, after verifying enrollment or payment, administers 


is rab and returns the completed request form to the Director of 
aculty. 


DROP/ADD AND WITHDRAWAL PROCEDURE 


A student may drop/add a course during the drop/add period 
published in the Academic Calendar. Forms are available in the Registrar’s 
Office. Courses dropped during the drop/add period will not be recorded 
on the students’ transcript. However, V.A. regulations require that all 
courses registered for by Veteran students be recorded on Veteran student 
transcripts. 


Withdrawal 


After the drop/add period students may withdraw from the Institute or a 
specific course without penalty through the last day to withdraw as 
published in the Academic Calendar. Students withdrawing by the last day 
will receive a grade of W (Withdrawn). The W grade will not be computed 
in the student's grade point average. 


Students withdrawing after the last day to withdraw as published in the 
Academic Calendar will receive a grade as determined by the instructor at 
the time the student withdraws. 


Students desiring to withdraw should consult with their instructor, ad- 
visor, and the counselor as many alternate learning opportunities are avail- 
able at Stanly Tech to assist students in reaching their goals. 


COURSE SUBSTITUTION 


Students may request to substitute a course required in their program of 
study based on particular occupational goals. Action upon such substitutions 
must be initiated by the student’s advisor/program head who in turn for- 
wards the request to the appropriate departmental chairperson and, ulti- 
mately, to the Director of Faculty. Consensus of these three Institutional of- 
ficials must be reached to finalize a course substitution. A maximum of five 
(5) courses may be credited for any student through the course substitution 
method. 


REPEATING A COURSE 


Students will be permitted to substitute the second grade made on any 
course in which they have previously made a grade below C. In computing 
the cumulative GPA for a student who has repeated a course, the hours and 
quality points earned the first time will be omitted from the computation 
and only the second earned grade, whether F or higher, will count. The first 
grade, F or higher, will still be recorded on the student's transcript. 


Students will not be allowed to repeat for credit, a course in which they 
have made a grade of C or above. 


DEAN'S LIST 

Soon after the end of each term the Registrar publishes a Dean’s List in 
order to honor students who have earned outstanding scholastic records. To 
be named to the Dean’s List a student must take a minimum of 12 credit 
hours of work and earn at least a 3.50 average with no grade lower than C, 
nor an incomplete. 


S3IDI1TOd DIWIGVIV 


2] 


ACADEMIC POLICIES 


Jaf) 


SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS POLICY 


All curriculum students must meet these minimum standards to be con- 
sidered progressing satisfactorily toward graduation. 


Credit Hours Attempted GPA Diploma GPA Degree 

1-30 1.60 1.50 
31-46 12/2 1.65 
47-62 1.90 ZS 
63-78 2.00 1.85 
79-94 [potde 
75. 2.00 

Definitions: 


Credit Hours Attempted — Total hours taken including courses with 
grades of F. 


GPA — Grade Point Average — Determined by dividing total quality 
points earned by total hours attempted. 


GPA Diploma — Average for curriculums awarding diplomas. 
GPA Degrees — Average for curriculums awarding Associate Degrees. 


Any term the student's GPA falls below the recommended standing, the 
student will be placed on academic probation for the next term enrolled. 
The student is notified of academic probation on the grade report. The 
student then has the next term enrolled to achieve the GPA standing for 
credit hours attempted. 


Failure to meet the minimum GPA during the probation term will result 
in the student being terminated for veteran’s benefits and other areas 
requiring evidence of satisfactory progress. A veteran student who is drop- 
ped or withdraws from all courses when taking two or more courses will be 
placed on academic probation the next term enrolled. 


Upon referral to Student Services for counseling, students making un- 
satisfactory progress may be provided other learning options or continue in 
a limited number of classes. 


ACADEMIC PROBATION PROCEDURES 


This first term the student is on academic probation, the student must 
earn the Grade Point Average (GPA) standard for total credit hours at- 
tempted. Failure to do so will result in the student being limited to no more 
than two courses or a maximum of eight credit hours during the next period 
of enrollment. Each term the student remains on academic probation, the 
student must earn better than a ‘’C’’ average until the GPA standard is met. 
Failure to earn this average will result in academic suspension for a period 
of at least one term. Upon re-establishing the GPA standing for credit hours 
attempted, the student will be removed from academic probation. The 
Grade Point Average will be recomputed each term and the student will be 
notified of the exact grade points needed. If a student is on academic 


probation and withdraws after payment of fees for the term, that term will 
be counted as one of academic probation. 


Example: At the end of the spring quarter, a student is placed on 
academic probation because the student has not earn- 
ed the necessary Grade Point Average. Summer quar- 
ter, the student enrolls and withdraws after payment of 
fees, fall quarter this student is limited to no more than 
two courses or a maximum of eight hours since this is 
considered as the second term of academic probation. 


REINSTATEMENT FROM ACADEMIC SUSPENSION 


The student must request in writing to the Vice President for Student Ser- 
vices and Personnel consideration for reinstatement after having been on 
suspension for a minimum of one term. The term following reinstatement, 
the student must enroll full time in a program of study and must earn a 
minimum of a 2.00 grade point average on that term’s work. Failure to do 
this will result in suspension for a period of one year. 


If after reinstatement to a program a determination is made through 
counseling with the student that a change of program would be to the best 
interest of the student, a recommendation will be made to the Vice 
President for Student Services and Personnel that the student be permitted 
to complete a Request for Change of Program. 


PROGRAM CHANGES 


Students wishing to enroll in a curriculum program other than the one 
in which they are currently enrolled are encouraged to discuss their ob- 
jectives with a counselor in Student Services. A change of program form 
must be completed by each student and returned to Student Services. 


Credits in the previous program(s) which can be applied to the new 
program will be carried forward including the quality points earned on the 
courses. 


CLASS ATTENDANCE 


Each student is expected to attend all classes for which registered. Ab- 
sences do not relieve the student’s responsibility of meeting the 
requirements of the class. Any student missing two consecutive weeks 
without contact or permission of the instructor will be withdrawn. Im- 
mediately following the first week of loss of contact with a student, the in- 
structor will determine the student's intent to continue or refer the student's 
name to Student Services for assistance in making this determination. 


After loss of contact with the student, the instructor will withdraw the 
student from class. 


BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 


It is the student’s responsibility to obtain the required textbooks and 
supplies prior to the first meeting of class. The Institute maintains a book- 
store from which the student may purchase the necessary books and sup- 


plies. 


$3IDI1Od DIWIGVIV 


23 


ACADEMIC POLICIES 


24 


BOOKSTORE OPERATING PROCEDURE 


The schedule for sale of books to students is as follows: 


1. First two days of classes 
8:30 a.m.-11:30.a.m. 
1:30 p.m.- 4:00 p.m. 
6:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m. 
2. After third day of classes 
10:30 a.m.-11:30 a.m. 
2:30 p.m.- 3:30 p.m. 
6:00 p.m.- 7:00 p.m. 
3. After the first week, students will check by the Business Office be- 
tween 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. 


The Director of Evening Programs is in charge of the bookstore during 
evening hours other than those scheduled above. 


ADVISORS 


Students will be assigned advisors upon their first registration at Stanly 
Technical Institute. Usually the advisor will be the head of each student's 
respective program and will be automatically assigned. Advisors will keep 
a record of their advisee’s progress and will be the person a student will 
seek when questions arise regarding their program or requirements for 
program completion. 


INCLEMENT WEATHER 


During periods of inclement weather, the Vice President for Student 
Services and Personnel will contact the news media and have them an- 
nounce whether or not classes will be held. The closing of day classes does 
not mean that evening classes will not be held. Separate announcements 
will be made for day and evening classes. Students are urged not to call the 
news media or members of the school staff. 


STUDENT RECORDS 


All currently enrolled students have the right to examine and challenge 
their official records. The student's official records consist of school ap- 
plication, transcripts of previous educational training, test scores if ap- 
plicable, grades and correspondence. 


Stanly Technical Institute will release routinely, when queried the 
following directory information: the student’s name, enrollment status, 
program of study, dates of attendance, degrees awarded, awards given, 
and participation in official activities. Any student objecting to the release 
of any or all of above directory information without appropriate consent 
must notify the registrar in writing within ten days after the initial 
registration. The objection must state what information the student does not 
want to be classified as directory information. 


Other than directory information, student records may not be released 
without written consent of the student except in the following situations: (a) 
a request trom a staff or faculty member of the Institute who has a 
legitimate educational interest in the information or administrative duties 


required in maintaining the records; (b) in compliance with a court order or 
subpoena, provided the student is notified in advance of the compliance; 
(c) requests from other departments, educational agencies, or accrediting 
agencies, which have a legitimate educational interest in the information; 
(d) requests from officials of other schools to which the student intends to 
transfer or enroll provided the student is furnished with a copy, if so 
desired; (e) requests from authorized representatives of the Comptroller 
General of the United States, the administrative head of a federal agency 
in connection with an order or evaluation of federally supported education 
programs; (f) requests in connection with a student's application for finan- 
cial aid; (g) requests from appropriate persons in connection with an 
emergency if the knowledge of such information is necessary to protect the 
health and safety of the student or other persons. 


Official records are those records maintained by any unit of the Institute 
except those created by an individual staff or faculty member for that mem- 
ber’s use and are not accessible to the student. 


Procedures for inspection of records: 
1. Students who wish to inspect and review records shall submit a request 
in writing to the custodian of the records. 
2. Access shall be provided as soon as possible but must be within 45 
days of the request. 
3. The record custodian must note in the permanent record the following 
information: 
a. Name and date the access occurred. 
b. Copies of materials made. 


Procedures for directory information: 

1. Once a year the Institute will provide to the student body the kind of 
directory information to be routinely released. 

2. The notification will specify what department to notify of objection to 
release of directory information and the deadline for such notification. 


$aIDI10d DIWIQVOV 


25 


sO 


2 


3411 LN3GNLS ‘SSDIAURS LNIGNLS 


COUNSELING 


A major role of the technical institute is to assist students in making the 
transition from high school and/or the world of work to the post high school 
institution. Individualized counseling sessions may be arranged to discuss a 
student's interests, aptitudes, vocational goals, or academic and personal 
problems. Such conferences are confidential. 


Also, upon acceptance at the Institute, each student is assigned a 
faculty advisor who is available for help with situations related to the 
student's academic work. The advisor serves as a direct link between the 
student and the successful completion of the student’s program of study. 


EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES 


Although STI does not have a formal recreational program, the students 
have been very active in organizing and carrying out tournaments and in- 
tramural games. Students have access to the equipment and facilities to 
play basketball, foosball, horseshoes, volleyball, softball, and football. 
Equipment may be checked out through the Student Services Office. 


Socials are planned periodically for day and evening students by the 
Student Government Association. Several dances are also sponsored in ad- 
dition to the quarterly activities. 


STUDENT GOVERNMENT 


The Student Government Association is composed of all activity fee- 
paying curriculum students who are enrolled at Stanly Technical Institute. 
Members are encouraged to be active participants in student affairs and to 
voice opinions and thoughts through their representatives. 


Officers and Senators of the SGA are elected in the Fall and provide 
leadership for the student body. The SGA sponsors activities that enhance 
student campus life. Students are involved in school affairs, with active par- 
ticipation on various school advisory and standing committees, to include 
the Instructional Affairs Committee, Learning Resources Committee, 
Student Affairs Committee, and Administrative Council. 


The President of the Student Government serves as a member of the 
Administrative Council of Stanly Technical Institute and as an ex-officio 
member of the Board of Trustees. The STI Student Government Association 
participates in the State Student Government Association (NCCCCSGA). 


VETERAN'S CLUB 


A Veteran’s Club has been chartered through the Student Government 
Association and endorsed by Stanly Technical Institute. Depending upon 
veteran students’ needs and interest, this club functions to bring together 
veterans from different programs and to help solve problems unique to 


veterans. 


PHI BETA LAMBDA 

Phi Beta Lambda is a business club for those students who plan to enter 
the business world. Students in the Business Administration, Accounting, 
Secretarial Science and Fashion Merchandising curriculums will especially 


4411 LNAGNLS ‘SADIAMIS LNSGNLS 


27 


STUDENT SERVICES, STUDENT LIFE 


28 


want to consider joining. The club’s aim is to better familiarize its members 
with business operations and functions. Meetings are held the third 
Wednesday of the month. 


FASHION MERCHANDISING ASSOCIATION 


The Fashion Merchandising Association was formed to strengthen 
relations between students and merchants in the community. Any student 
enrolled in a fashion-related curriculum is eligible for membership. An an- 
nual project will be a field trip to New York to gain insight and knowledge 
of the fashion and fashion-related industries. 


THE SOCIETY FOR BIOMEDICAL EQUIPMENT TECHNICIANS 


Those students planning to enter career areas such as electronic main- 
tenance or instrumentation specialist, biomedical safety engineering, or 
medical fields should benefit from membership in this organization. The 
club’s objective is to familiarize its members with medical operations and 
functions. 


UNCC-STI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION 


Any student enrolled in the UNCC-STl Cooperative College Program 
may be a member. The organization serves as an avenue for com- 
munications with other students, fosters exchange of information between 
students and faculty, and furthers interaction among UNCC-STI students. 


RESPIRATORY THERAPY CLUB 


An objective of the club is to provide a means of interaction between 
Respiratory Therapy students and those individuals currently practicing 
respiratory care. By encouraging attendance at and participation in various 
educational seminars, this club will also serve to further educate the 
student in the field of respiratory care. 


STUDENT LOUNGE 


Students are encouraged to use the lounge as a place to meet, talk, eat, 
and relax. The lounge provides an opportunity for students, faculty and staff 
to exchange ideas in an informal atmosphere. In order to assist the main- 


tenance staff in cleaning the lounge, the lounge is closed at 1:00 p.m. on 
Friday. 


Hot and cold foods and drinks are available from vending machines in 
the student lounge. 


SMOKING 


Smoking is allowed on the campus but is prohibited in all instructional 
areas. Ash trays and smoking stands are provided in those areas where 


smoking is allowed. Smoking is permitted in faculty-staff offices if there is 
no objection by the office occupant. 


CLASS RINGS 


Stanly Technical Institute class rings are available to all students. 


Students wishing to order rings should check with the Student Services Of- 
fice to find out when orders will be taken. A ring sales representative will 
be available during the year, and times will be announced in advance. 


A deposit is presently required when the order is placed, and rings are 
mailed C.O.D. to the students’ homes approximately 10 weeks from the 
date of order. 


ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 


Each Stanly Tech student receiving a diploma or degree is considered a 
member of the Alumni Association. The aim of the association is to keep 
former students apprised of STI’s activities, growth and services. Alumni are 
encouraged to take advantage of placement services. 


HEALTH SERVICES AND FIRST AID 


Limited first aid services are provided through the office of Student Ser- 
vices. First aid kits are maintained in the Student Services Office as well as 
each of the shop areas. Injuries requiring more than minor first aid will be 
referred to local physicians. In case of an emergency, physicians and/or 
ambulance service may be called at student expense to provide necessary 
medical services. 


HOUSING 


Since the Institute has no dormitory facilities, students who wish to live 
away from home must make their own housing arrangements. Lists of 
available off-campus housing may be obtained in the Admissions Office. 


PRESCHOOL-CHILD CARE CENTER 


In an effort to further expand the services of Stanly Technical Institute to 
the community, ST| operates a preschool-child care center. This allows 
students with children an opportunity to attend Stanly Technical Institute by 
providing an educational and care environment for their children. This cen- 
ter is also beneficial in giving practical experience to students enrolled in 
the Teacher Associate Program. 

Students wishing to place their children in the center may get in- 
formation and applications from the director of the center on the East Cam- 
pus. The children of students have first priority for placement in the center. 


JOB PLACEMENT 


The Student Services Office is responsible for assisting students and 
graduates of the Institute in finding employment in their chosen field. 
Student resumes will be filed in the Student Services Office. Placement ser- 
vice is also available to STI alumni seeking permanent employment. While 
there is no guarantee that students and alumni will be placed in a job of 
their choosing, many contacts with business and industry are maintained to 
help bring prospective employers and employees together. 


The Job Placement Service is located in the Student Services Office. 


4411 LNAGNLS ‘SADIAMAS LNAGNLS 


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STUDENT SERVICES, STUDENT LIFE 


30 


STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 


Students at STI are considered to be mature adults who enter classes 
voluntarily. By entering classes, students take upon themselves certain 
responsibilities and obligations which include an honest attempt at 
academic performance, and social behavior consistent with the lawful pur- 
pose of the Institution. Students maintain all legal rights of citizenship while 
enrolled and are expected to remember that they are living in a democratic 
situation. The reputation of the Institute rests upon the shoulders of students 
as well as on the staff and faculty, and it is hoped that each student will 
maintain high standards of responsible citizenship. The campus and in- 
stitute will not be a place of refuge or sanctuary for illegal or irresponsible 
behavior. Students, as all citizens, are subject to civil authority on and off 
the campus. Common courtesy and cooperation make the above suffice for 
a long list of rules and regulations. 


STUDENT DISCIPLINE 


Students causing minor infractions of rules and regulations in the class- 
room will be disciplined by the instructor in charge since the instructor has 
authority in defining proper classroom decorum. 


Other violations of conduct or regulations will be referred to the Vice 
President for Student Services and Personnel. Some types of misconduct 
which are subject to disciplinary action are cheating, plagarism, theft or 
damage to the Institute’s property. 


Intoxicants, including alcoholic beverages and hallucinatory drugs, are 
not allowed on the campus of Stanly Technical Institute under any cir- 
cumstances. 


The President, Vice President for Student Services and Personnel, and 
Evening Director are authorized to suspend immediately any student who 
impairs, impedes, or disrupts the legal mission, processes, or functions of 
the Institute. Students counseling, encouraging, instigating, or inciting 
others to impair, impede, or disrupt the educational and other lawful 
operations of the Institute shall also be subject to immediate suspension. 


STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE 


Differences in viewpoints are natural and essential for continuing 
growth and development as individuals. The approach taken by an in- 
dividual represents many aspects of character and maturity. 


Unresolved differences which affect students while enrolled may be 
classified as a grievance if the individuals involved have not, or cannot 
reach agreement. 


Grievances of students will be handled by the Vice President for 


Student Services and Personnel who is assigned the responsibility for stu- 
dent welfare. 


The Vice President for Student Services and Personnel will verify con- 
sultation between the parties involved. If, in the case of a student-instructor 
disagreement, such has not taken place, the Vice President for Student Ser- 
vices and Personnel and the Director of Faculty will assist in arranging a 
consultation. If there is not a resolution after consultation, the Vice Presi- 


dent for Student Services and Personnel and the Director of Faculty will 
jointly render a decision. If the decision of the division heads is not 
unanimous or if the division heads are unanimous and the decision is un- 
acceptable by the grievant, the matter will be referred to the President of 
the Institute. 


The President will then call a hearing of the parties involved to include 
the Division Heads of the departments in question. After review, the Presi- 
dent will submit a decision in writing to the grievant within five days of the 
hearing. Decisions of the President of the Institute may be appealed in 
writing through the President to the Personnel Committee of the Board of 
Trustees. 


The Personnel Committee shall hear appeals from officials and students 
in the Institution. No appeals will be heard unless the grievant has first ex- 
hausted the administrative procedures on appeals. 


3411 INSGNLS ‘S3DIAM3S LNIGNLS 


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3411 LNAGNLS ‘SADIANSS LNIGNLS 


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PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Accounting 


34 


ACCOUNTING 


Accounting is one of the fastest growing employment fields in America 
today, and the job outlook for good accountants seems bright for many 
years to come. These opportunities are the result of the tremendous 
business and industrial expansion in all parts of the country. Because of this 
emphasis, there is a growing need for trained people in the areas of ac- 
counting and finance. The Accounting Curriculum is designed to fill this 
need by offering students the necessary accounting theories and skills for 
entry into the accounting profession. 


The duties and responsibilities of an accountant are varied. Some of the 
things accountants do are: record and analyze business transactions, com- 
pile financial reports, determine operating costs, set-up and maintain bud- 
gets, prepare tax returns, audit financial records, and advise management 
in areas of financial affairs. 


The Graduates of the Accounting Curriculum can qualify for various 
jobs in business and industry leading to any of the following accounting 
positions: junior accountant, payroll clerk, auditor and cost accountant. This 
training, plus further experiences, should prepare them to become office 
managers, accounting supervisors, and to fill other responsible positions in 
a business firm. 


ACCOUNTING 
Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
BUS 102 Typewriting | (or elective)* 2 3 3 
MAT 110 Business Math 6 0 6 
BUS 10] Introduction to Business 3 0 3 
ECO 102 Economics | yr3e 8.0). whan 
17 3 18 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
BUS 120 Accounting | 6 0 6 
ECO 104 Economics II 3 0 3 
BUS i) Re Business Law | 3 0 3 
BUS 123 Business Finance | 3 0 3 
18 0 18 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
BUS 124 Business Finance II 3 0 3 
BUS 110 Office Machines ? 2 3 
BUS 12] Accounting II 6 0 6 
BUS 116 Business Law II 3 0 3 
a 2 18 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
BUS 122 Accounting III 6 0 6 
BUS 225 Cost Accounting | 3 0 3 
BUS 250 Payroll Accounting 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
18 0 18 
FIFTH QUARTER 
ENG 206 Business Communications 3 0 3 
BUS 222 Intermediate Accounting | 6 0 6 
BUS 226 Cost Accounting II 3 0 3 
EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective’ 3 0 3 
18 0 18 
SIXTH QUARTER 
BUS 223 Intermediate Accounting iI 6 0 6 
BUS 229 Income Taxes 6 0 6 
BUS 269 Auditing 5 0 5 
Elective** 3 eon 
20 0 20 
ee rite ert 1) eres Ton! —— 6 Oe 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 110 


*Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree cur- 


ricula. 
** Must be a course in supervision or management approved by the advisor. 


Buiyunod2yv/AGNLS 40 SWWYDONd 


35 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Agricultural Business Technology 


36 


AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY 


Rapid technological changes in farming and related agricultural 
businesses have given rise to the need for more technically educated peo- 
ple. A variety of agricultural businesses and industries employ persons to 
assist in marketing, processing, and distributing of farm products and pro- 
viding services to the farmer. Many responsible positions in agricultural 
businesses and industries require technical education not available in high 
schools or in four-year colleges. 


Agricultural production is undergoing tremendous changes. The trends 
are to larger, highly mechanized and specialized farms with huge capital 
investments. This means that there will be an increasing demand for 
capable farm managers to coordinate the purchasing, production, and 
marketing of these larger agricultural production operations. 


Farm managers of the future must possess greater technical com- 
petence to remain in the highly competitive production phase of agri- 
culture. They must be able to cope with present production problems and 
adapt to rapid technological changes. 


It is anticipated that changes in agriculture and the general economic 
environment will occur at a faster rate in the future. Profitable manage- 
ment of agricultural operations will demand successful adjustment to these 
changes. Decisions involved in these adjustments will require an individual 
with more education, knowledge, and ability. 


The Agricultural Business Technology curriculum is designed to help 
students acquire knowledge, understandings, and abilities in the broad 
field of agricultural business — including agricultural production. It com- 
bines knowledge of agriculture with business education to prepare the 
graduate for many of the varied employment opportunities in agribusiness. 
The specific objectives of this curriculum are to develop the following stu- 
dent competencies: 


1. Principles of organization and management in agricultural businesses 
and industries; 


2. Abilities essential to the management of an efficient well-organized 
farming operation; 
3. Basic principles of our economic system, marketing, credit, price con- 


cepts and governmental policies, and programs relating to agriculture; 
and 


4. Agricultural sciences most essential to the production and marketing of 
agricultural products — including knowledge of the animal, plant, and 
soil sciences and their relationships with ability to apply these 


educational experiences to practical problems of agricultural business 
and industry. 


Upon graduation from this curriculum, an individual should qualify for 
various jobs in agricultural business and industry — such as salesman or 
Store manager in farm supply stores; agricultural field serviceman; 
salesman; demonstrator, or plant manager of feed and food companies; 


farm products inspector; salesman or office manager of farm products 
marketing firms. 


The trend towards larger farming operations with increased non-farm 


control of production means there will be greater employment op- 
portunities for well prepared individuals who can efficiently and profitably 
supervise the production and marketing of agricultural products. 


AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY 
Class Lab Credit 


FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
MAT 110 Business Mathematics 6 0 6 
BUS 102 Typewriting 2 3 3 
AGR 125 Animal Science 3 4 5 
14 V4 17 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
CHM 101 Chemistry 4 2 5 
BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 0 3 
AGR 185 Soil Science & Fertilizer 3 4 5 
lis 6 16 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
BUS 120 Accounting 6 0 6 
AGR 104 Introduction to Agricultural Economics 3 2 4 
AGR 170 Plant Science 3 4 5 
fhe 6 18 
FOURTH QUARTER 
AGR 199 Cooperative Work Experience hh FePeenee |" OF ea 
40 4 
FIFTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 
BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 
BUS 12] Accounting 6 0 6 
BUS 123 Business Finance 3 0 3 
AGR 204 Farm Business Management 3 4 5 
17 6 20 


SIXTH QUARTER 


BUS 232 Sales Development 3 0 3 
AGR 201 Agricultural Chemicals 3 4 5 
AGR 205 Agricultural Marketing 3 4 5 
Free Elective* “ 

Social Science Elective* i ae ek 
9 8 18 


SEVENTH QUARTER 


AGR 218 Agricultural Mechanization 3 4 5 

AGR 228 Livestock Diseases & Parasites 3 4 be) 

AGR Agricultural Elective* 5 
Social Science Elective* es Bae ik 

6 8 18 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 111 
*Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree cur- 
ricula. 


ABojouyre, ssouisng jpunyjna1By/AGNLS JO SWVWADOUd 


37 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Automotive Body Repair 


38 


AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR 


The Automotive Body Repair curriculum provides training in the use of 
the equipment and materials of the auto body trade. The student studies the 
construction of the automobile body and techniques of auto body repairing, 
rebuilding, and refinishing. 


Repairing, metal straightening, aligning, and painting are typical jobs 
performed. Graduates of this program may qualify with experience for 
such jobs as shop foreman, metal repairman, paint refinisher and frame 
straightener. 


AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR 
(Day Curriculum) 


Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 


FIRST QUARTER 


AUT Ta) Auto Body Repair 6 7 10 
DFT 110] Schematics & Diagram 1 3 2 
WLD 1101 Basic Gas Welding ] 3 2 
MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 0 3 
1] 18 17 
SECOND QUARTER 
AUT 1112 Auto Body Repair 6 2 10 
WLD 1105 Auto Body Welding 2 6 4 
PSY. 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 
1] 18 17 
THIRD QUARTER 
AUT 1113 Metal Finishing & Painting 6 \2 10 
AUT 1115 Trim Glass & Radiator Repairs 2 6 4 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 
1] 18 AZ. 
FOURTH QUARTER 
AUT 1114 Body Shop Application 8 18 14 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operation 3 0 3 
1] 18 17 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 68 


AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR 
(Evening Curriculum) 


Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 

FIRST QUARTER 

AUT TIA Auto Body Repair 3 6 5 

WLD 1101 Basic Gas Welding 1 3 2 

DFT 1101 Schematics & Diagrams 1 3 2 
5 12 9 

SECOND QUARTER 

AUT 1111B Auto Body Repair 3 6 5 

WLD 1105 Auto Body Welding 2 6 4 
s i: 

THIRD QUARTER 

AUT 1112A Auto Body Repair 3 6 5 

AUT L115 Trim Glass & Radiator Repair 2 6 4 
5 12 9 

FOURTH QUARTER 

AUT 1112B Auto Body Repair 3 6 =) 

AUT 1113A Metal Finishing & Painting 3 6 =, 
6 12 10 

FIFTH QUARTER 

AUT 1113B Metal Finishing & Painting 3 6 S 

AUT 1114A Body Shop Application 3 6 5 
6 12 10 

SIXTH QUARTER 

AUT 1114B Body Shop Application 3 6 5 

PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 

MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics : 0 3 
9 6 1] 

SEVENTH QUARTER 

AUT 1114C Body Shop Application 2 6 4 

BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 0 3 

ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 _ Ss 
8 6 10 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 68 


y Apog aaljowioynyw/AGNLS 4O SWVYDOUd 


iipda 


39 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Automotive Mechanics 


40 


AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS 


This curriculum provides a training program for developing the basic 
knowledge and skills needed to inspect, diagnose, repair or adjust com- 
ponents of automotive vehicles. Manual skills are developed in practical 
shop work using components mounted on stands. Thorough understanding 
of the operating principles involved in the modern automobile comes in 
class assignments, discussion, and shop practice. Diagnosing and repair 
work is assigned on scheduled vehicles. 


Complexity in automotive vehicles increases each year because of 
scientific discovery and new engineering. These changes are reflected not 
only in passenger vehicles, but also in trucks and buses powered by a 
variety of internal combustion engines. This curriculum provides a basis for 
the student to compare and adapt to new techniques for servicing and 
repair as vehicles are changed year by year. 


AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS 
(Day Curriculum) 


Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
PME 1101 Automotive Gas Engines 3 9 6 
PME 1104 Diesel Engine Servicing 2 6 4 
MAT 110] Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 0 3 
WLD 1101 Basic Gas Welding 1 3 2 
9 18 15 
SECOND QUARTER 
PME 1102 Automotive Fuel Systems 2 6 4 
PME 1103 Automotive Electrical Systems 4 Ws 8 
PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 
DFT 1102 Schematics & Diagrams 3 0 3 
12 18 18 
THIRD QUARTER 
AUT 1124 Automotive Power Train Systems 2 6 4 
AUT 1128 Automatic Transmissions 3 9 6 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills a 0 3 
AUT 1130 Machine Shop Operation 1 3 2 
9 18 15 
FOURTH QUARTER 
AHR 110) Automotive Air Conditioning 3 3 4 
AUT 1123 Automotive Brakes, Chassis & 
Suspension Systems 3 9 6 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 0 3 
WLD 1102 Basic Arc Welding 1 3 2 
10 15 15 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 63 


AUTOMOTIVE MECHANICS 
(Evening Curriculum) 


Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 

PME 1101 Automotive Gas Engines 3 9 6 
MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3 0 3 


SECOND QUARTER 


PME 1104 Diesel Engine Servicing 2 6 4 
PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 
AUT 1130 Machine Shop Operations 1 3 2 

6 9 9 


THIRD QUARTER 


AUT 1124 Automotive Power Train Systems 2 6 4 
AHR 1101 Automotive Air Conditioning 3 3 4 
5 9 
FOURTH QUARTER 
AUT 1128 Automatic Transmissions 3 i 6 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 
6 9 9 
FIFTH QUARTER 
PME 1102 Automotive Fuel Systems 2 6 4 
WLD 1101 Basic Gas Welding 1 3 2 
3 9 6 
SIXTH QUARTER 
AUT 1123 Automotive Brakes, Chassis & 
Suspension Systems 3 9 6 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations ime: Od 
6 9 9 
SEVENTH QUARTER 
PME 1103A Automotive Electrical Systems (Part !) 2 6 4 
DFT 1102 Schematics & Diagrams Pel Lee ee rir = & 
5 6 i§ 
EIGHTH QUARTER 
PME 1103B Automotive Electrical Systems (Part II) 2 6 4 
WLD 1102 Basic Arc Welding l 3 2 
3 2 6 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 63 


SOJUBDYIOW SAHPoWOINYW/AGNLS JO SWVWADONd 


4] 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Biomedical Equipment Technology 


42 


BIOMEDICAL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY 


The fields of medicine and biology are on the verge of tremendous 
change. Physiological processes are being measured and in some cases 
even controlled by electronic machines. The philosophy of medicine is 
changing from one of curing to one of preventing disease. With the ad- 
vances in medical instrumentation, it will soon be possible to detect many 
diseases before they are harmful. Preventive medicine will require many 
electronic devices to gather data and many computers to store and analyze 
this information. Electronics will play such an important part in America’s 
health that in the near future the best in medical care will mean the best in 
medical electronics. 


Some of the typical positions available to Biomedical Equipment 
Technology graduates are as follows: 


1. Electronic maintenance specialist — maintain and repair electronic 
medical equipment. 


2. Instrument specialist — operate and calibrate delicate electronic in- 
struments used in the medical field. 


3. Technical representative — contact users of biomedical equipment, 
plan their needs and teach operation and care of equipment. 


4. Biomedical safety engineer — plan, design, and maintain safety elec- 
trical and electronic installations in medical facilities. 


BIOMEDICAL EQUIPMENT TECHNOLOGY 


Class Lab Credit 
Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 


FIRST QUARTER 


ELC ie es Electrical Fundamentals | 5 6 7 
MAT 101 Technical Mathematics* 5 0 5 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
MED 131 Human Anatomy & Physiology ge 4 gene aoe 
17 8 20 
SECOND QUARTER 
ELC 113 Electrical Fundamentals I! 3 6 5 
ELN 121 Electronics | 3 4 5 
MAT 102 Technical Mathematics 5 0 5 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
MED 132 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiology SES) REPS AREA As 
17 12 as 
THIRD QUARTER 
ELN 122 Electronics II 5 6 a 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
ELC 163 Laboratory Practices 1 Ms 3 
CHM 101 General Chemistry 4 2 i 
13 13 18 


“Algebra | and Il or MAT 100 must be completed prior to enrollment in this course. 


Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ELN 123 Electronics III 3 4 5 
PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 3 2 4 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
BUS 184 Medical Terminology De RE OE AE 
12 6 15 
FIFTH QUARTER 
PHY 233 Measuring Principles | 2 3 3 
BMT 213 Coupled Circuits 2 3 3 
BMT 224 Advanced Electronics: Feedback Systems, 
Signal Processing, Telemetry a 3 4 
BMT 244 Operation of Biomedical Instrumentation 3 4 > 
PHY 102 Physics: Work, Energy, Power 3 2 4 
13 15 19 
SIXTH QUARTER 
PHY 243 Measuring Principles || Z 3 3 
ELN 234 Pulse & Digital Circuits 2 4 4 
BMT 254 Biomedical Instrumentation | 2 3 3 
SOC 204 Social Psychology for the Health Services 5 0 5 
11 10 15 
SEVENTH QUARTER 
BMT 271 Biomedical Equipment: Selection & Design 2 3 4 
BMT 280 Biomedical Troubleshooting Techniques 2 3 4 
BMT 264 Biomedical Instrumentation II 2 4 4 
BMT 201 The BMET at Work: Visitation to Hospitals 
& Industries to Observe BMET’s at Work 2 0 2 
Social Science Elective* 3 ‘S0a, S53 _ 
11 10 17 
nena er) Seer ee Ca ey hy UN eee 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 126 


“Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree 
curricula. 


ABojouypse, juawdinby jp2!ipewoig/AGNLS 4O SWVADOUd 


43 


stration 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Business Adm 


44 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Persons with specialized education in business beyond the high school 
level are those who best meet the requirements of the employer in today’s 
business and this curriculum is designed to prepare the student in many 
phases of administrative work. Graduates of this program will have an un- 
derstanding of the following: 


1. Understand the principles of organization and management in busi- 
ness operations. 

2. Understand the economy through study and analysis of the role of 
production and marketing. 

3. Know specific elements of accounting, finance, and business law. 

4. Understand and have some skill in effective communication for 
business. 


5. Have an understanding of human relations as they apply to successful 
business operations in a rapidly expanding economy. 


Jobs are available for the business graduate in almost every area of 
business activity including advertising, banking, credit finance, retailing, 
wholesaling, hotel management, insurance, manufacturing. 


Most graduates can expect to enter business as management trainees 
and eventually move into higher positions as their qualifications warrant. 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
“Ns 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
US 102 Typewriting | (or elective) * 2 3 3 
—MAT 110 Business Math 6 0 6 
yvBUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 0 3 
yECO 102 Economics | 3 0 3 
17 3 18 
SECOND QUARTER 
IG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
_BUS 120 Accounting | 6 0 6 
CO 104 Economics II 3 0 3 
_BUS 11S Business Law | 3 0 3 
an 123 Business Finance | Ede i tO wedht 
18 0 18 
THIRD QUARTER 
eport Writin a 
ZENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 
BUS 124 Business Finance II 3 0 3 
“BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 
“ae 121 Accounting II 6 0 6 
S 116 Business Law II mals 10g 2 Oe 
17 ae 18 
FOURTH QUARTER 
Bs 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
ae 122 Accounting III 6 0 6 
US: 250 Payroll Accounting iS is 3 0 3 
~Business Elective” 25 )50° 3 0 3 
Asocial Science Elective* »: ui esti, - Oi) RSS 
| , 18 0 18 
FIFTH QUARTER 
Ay G 206 Business Communications 3 0 3 
ee 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 3 0 3 
US 239 peeing ‘ 6 0 6 
iness Elective* 190 20" 3 0 3 
Beal Science Elective* Soc 16 ah Boda: ana O shee oie3” 
18 0 18 
SIXTH QUARTER 
BUS 229 Income Taxes 6 0 6 
“BUS 272 Principles of Supervision Gus 2% | 3 0 3 
AUS 299 Business Decisions Agee 3 0 3 
“Business Elective* <2o 20\ oF A $1 j 3 0 3 
Aocial Science Elective* o\_ 2535S 3 0 _ 3s 
18 0 18 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 108 


*Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree 
curricula. 


Wi, 6/ 9 


UO! OAsiujUpY ssouIsNg/AGNLS JO SWVWYDONd 


45 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Criminal Justice-Protective Service Technology 


46 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE-PROTECTIVE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 
Law Enforcement Option 


Law enforcement today requires a variety of skills and special 
knowledge in criminal law, counseling, surveillance, psychology, sociology 
and tactics. STI’s Criminal Justice Program provides indepth instruction for 
those who wish to enter the Law Enforcement field. 


The curriculum is designed for flexibility providing the opportunity for 
students to gain skills in a wide range of law enforcement areas. Students 
can gain specialized knowledge in criminal law, investigation, traffic en- 
forcement, and a broad range of other specialized areas such as Juvenile 
Delinquency, Deviant Behavior and Patrol Prodedures. 


There is a demand for dedicated men and women in Law Enforcement. 
Graduates can find employment with law enforcement agencies as an of- 
ficer, administrator, laboratory technician, communication expert or in re- 
search. 


=~ ¢ 
‘ 


CRIMINAL JUSTICE-PROTECTIVE SERVICE TECHNOLOGY 
Law Enforcement Option 


Class Lab = Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 

ENG 10] Grammar 3 0 3 
BUS 102 Typewriting | 2 3 3 
CJC 115 Criminal Law | 3 0 3 
CHG 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice 5 0 5 
MAT 100 Algebra 6 0 5 


> e) 
w 
be) 


a ee ee eee ee 
SECOND QUARTER 


ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 3 0 3 
CJC 203 Introduction to Corrections 5 0 5 
CJC 216 Criminal Law II 3 0 3 
Elective* Peis Rae ese 
17, 0 17 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
IG 225 Criminal Procedure s 0 5 
CJC 238 Principles of Correctional Administration 3 0 3 
Ce 206 Community Relations 3 0 3 
CHM 101 Chemistry 4 2 5 
18 2 19 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
CIC 110 Juvenile Delinquency 5 0 5 
one 210 Criminal Investigation 5 0 be 
Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
16 0 16 
FIFTH QUARTER 
CJC 205 Criminal Evidence 5 0 - 
CJC 102 Introduction to Criminology = 0 5 
PSY 151 Principles of Psychology 3 0 3 
PSY 201 Human Growth & Development 4 0 3 
16 0 16 
SIXTH QUARTER 
iB 220 Police Organization & Administration 0 a 
cx 255 Deviant Behavior 5 0 5 
PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 3 
Technical Elective* 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
19 0 19 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 106 


*Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree 
curricula. 


ABojouyre] a21a1ag aAlj29401g-824SNF |OUIWIID/AGNLS 4O SWWADOUd 


47. 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Electrical Installation and Maintenance 


48 


ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE 


The Electrical Installation and Maintenance curriculum is designed to 
provide a training program in the basic knowledge, fundamentals, and 
practices involved in the electrical trades. A large portion of the program is 
laboratory and shop instruction designed to give the student practical 
knowledge and application experience in the fundamentals taught in class. 


The graduate of the Electrical Installation and Maintenance curriculum 
is qualified to enter an electrical trade as an on-the-job trainee or appren- 
tice, assisting in the layout, installation, check-out, and maintenance of 
systems in residential, commercial, or industrial plants. 


ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE 
(Day Curriculum) 


Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ELC 1112 Direct & Alternating Current 4 12 8 
ELC 15 Practical Math for Electricians 3 0 3 
ELC 1116 National Electrical Code | 6 0 6 
13 12 17 
SECOND QUARTER 
ELC 1113 Alternating & Direct Current Machines 
& Controls 4 12 8 
ELC LAL7: National Electrical Code II 6 0 6 
DFT 1110 Blueprint Reading & Building Trades 0 3 1 
PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 
13 15 18 
THIRD QUARTER 
ELC 1124 Residential Wiring 4 12 8 
ELN 1118 Industrial Electronics 3 3 4 
DFT Wis Blueprint Reading — Electrical 0 3 1 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 
10 18 16 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ELC 1125 Commercial & Industrial Wiring 4 12 8 
ELN 1119 Industrial Electronics 3 3 4 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 0 3 
10 15 15 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 66 


ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE 
(Evening Curriculum) 


Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ELC 1112A Direct & Alternating Current 2 6 4 
ELC 1115 Practical Math for Electricians 3 0 3 
5 6 7 
SECOND QUARTER 
ELG 1112B Direct & Alternating Current 2 6 4 
ELC 1116 National Electrical Code | 6 0 6 
8 6 10 
THIRD QUARTER 
ELC 1113A AC & DC Machines & Controls 3 6 5 
DFT 1110 Blueprint Reading-Building Trades 0 a 1 
3 9 6 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ELC 1113B AC & DC Machines & Controls 1 6 3 
ELC 1117 National Electrical Code II 6 0 6 
I, 6 9 
FIFTH QUARTER 
ELC 1124A Residential Wiring 2 6 4 
ELN 1118 Industrial Electronics a 3 4 
5 9 8 
SIXTH QUARTER 
ELG 1124B Residential Wiring *, 6 4 
DFT 1113 Blueprint Reading: Electrical 0 3 | 
PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 
5 9 8 
rr ef We a ee 
SEVENTH QUARTER 
ELC 1125A Commercial & Industrial Wiring Z 6 4 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 0 3 
8) 6 rs 
Dn Creer) oe ee ees 
EIGHTH QUARTER 
ELC 1125B Commercial & Industrial Wiring 2 6 4 
ELN 1119 Industrial Electronics 3 3 4 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 AC eee 
8 9 1] 
a ae ee eS 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 66 


SUDUSJUIDW PUD UOLD]|D}SUy |DI14492/9/AGNLS 4O SWWADOUd 


49 


BulsiAsas 21U01499]9/AGNLS JO SWWADOUd 


ELECTRONIC SERVICING 


The curriculum in Electronic Servicing is designed to provide the basic 
knowledge and skills involved in the installation, maintenance, and ser- 
vicing of radios, televisions, and sound amplifier systems. A large portion of 
time is spent in the laboratory verifying electronic principles and develop- 
ing servicing techniques. 


An Electronic Servicing Specialist may be required to install, maintain, 
and service amplitude modulated and frequency modulated home and 
auto radios; transistorized radios; monochrome and color television sets; 
intercommunication, public address, and paging systems; high fidelity and 
stereophonic amplifiers; record players and tape recorders. Work will 
require meeting the public in the repair shop and on service calls. Electronic 
Servicing Specialists who establish their own businesses will also need to 
know how to maintain business records and inventory. 


Electronic Servicing is currently a special off-campus program; 
however, it may be offered on campus upon sufficient student interest. 


ELECTRONIC SERVICING 
Class Lab Credit 
Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
- MAT L115 Electrical Mathematics 5 0 5 
ENG 1101 Reading Improvement Z 0 z 
ELN 1110 Basic Electronics 5 18 11 
TZ 18 18 
SECOND QUARTER 
MAT 1116 Electrical Mathematics 5 0 5 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 
ELN io wr. Vacuum Tubes & Solid State Devices 7 15 4 
15 TS 20 
THIRD QUARTER 
ELN 1125 Radio Receiver & Amplifier Servicing 4 12 8 
ELN 1113 Television Theory & Circuits 2 6 7 
PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 
Te2 18 18 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ELN 1127 Television Receiver Circuits & Servicing 9 18 15 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 0 3 
12 iB = wia? 
Pea Chto weth a ee 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 74 


§ 91404}99/9/AGNLS JO SWWADOUd 


Buldiaso 


5] 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Electronics Engineering Technology 


2 


ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 


The electronic curriculum provides an individual with a basic back- 
ground in the practical application of electronics and in electronics theory. 
Therefore, not only would the individual be qualified in the areas of testing, 
calibrating and repairing equipment, but also in the fields of designing, 
modifying and interpreting schematic diagrams. The courses have been 
designed in a fashion to present content in an order that will provide the 
student with progressive levels of job related skills and knowledge. For 
example: Upon successful completion of the second quarter of the 
curriculum, the student should be employable in positions requiring skill in 
electronics testing. Possible tasks that may be performed as an electronics 
tester include: 


1. Testing complete electronics systems in terms of input/output spec- 
ifications using electronics testing equipment. 


2. Recording and plotting test data in terms of conformance to test spec- 
ifications. 


3. Calibrating systems to obtain specific characteristics. 


4. lsolating system malfunctions which can be corrected by replacement 
of modules or plug-in assemblies or units. 


5. Demonstrating operating procedures for installed electronic system(s). 


6. Using basic hand tools and devices common to electronics installation 
and testing. 


7. Using installation wiring diagrams to insure proper operation. 

Upon successful completion of the entire curriculum, the student should 
be employable as an electronics engineering technician. The electronics 
engineering technician is primarily responsible for providing technical 
assistance to the engineer or as liaison between the engineer and the 
skilled craftsman. After appropriate orientation to specific projects and with 
normal supervision, the student should be able to perform the following 
tasks in addition to those identified for the electronics technician: 


1. Verifying engineering designs. 

Collecting and analyzing data. 

Assembling and testing prototype units. 

Modifying current designs. 

Writing technical reports. 

Providing liaison between the engineer and other departments. 
Serving as customer contact for the purpose of sales and service. 


SSE SSSA seats ea 


For career opportunities the electronics technician may start in one or 
more of the following areas: research, design, development, production, 
maintenance, or sales. The graduate may begin as an electronics engi- 
neering technician, electronics technician, engineering aide, laboratory 
technician, supervisor, or equipment specialist. 


ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY 
Class Lab = Credit 


FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
MAT 101 Technical Mathematics* 5 0 5 
ELC M2 Electrical Fundamentals | 5 6 7 
13 6 15 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
MAT 102 Technical Mathematics 5 0 5 
ELC 113 Electrical Fundamentals || 3 6 5 
ELN 121 Electronics | 3 4 5 
14 10 18 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
MAT 103 Technical Mathematics 5 0 5 
ELC 114 Electrical Fundamentals III 3 2 4 
ELN 122 Electronics || 5 6 Z 
16 8 19 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 3 2 4 
DFT 113 Electronic Drafting 2 6 4 
ELN 123 Electronics III 3 4 5 
ee et 
FIFTH QUARTER 
PHY 102 Physics: Work, Energy, Power 3 2 4 
ELN 241 Electronic Systems | 3 6 5 
ELN 218 Pulse, Logic & Digital Circuits 3 4 5 
Social Science Elective* * pokes 6 On Waa. 
12 12 17 


SIXTH QUARTER 


PHY 104 Physics: Light & Sound 3 2 4 
ELN 242 Electronic Systems II: 
(Specialized Elective) 5 4. 7 
ELN 219 Digital Fundamentals 3 4 5 
Social Science Elective** (Asie VE 7 Dae Boe 


SEVENTH QUARTER 


ELN 246 Electronics Design Project 0 6 3 
ELN 243 Electronic Systems III: 
(Specialized Elective) 5 4 7, 
Elective** ky ed ESE ae 
5 10 14 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 118 


* Algebra | and I] or MAT 100 must be completed prior fo enrollment in this course. 
**Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree 


curricula. 


ABojouyre, Bursaaulbug s21U01499/9/AGNLS JO SWVWADOUd 


53 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Fashion Merchandising and Marketing Technology 


54 


FASHION MERCHANDISING AND MARKETING TECHNOLOGY 


This curriculum is designed to prepare the individual to be a productive 
employee in an entry-level job and to provide the knowledge and skills 
necessary for career advancement in mid-management positions in various 
fashion merchandising and marketing businesses and industries. 


This two year program provides study and application in areas such as: 
fabric science, fundamentals of art and design, elements of fashion, sales- 
manship, fashion buying and merchandising, display design, merchandise 
planning and control, apparel fitting, credit procedures and problems. 


Completion of the program should prepare a student to enter jobs as a 
merchandise clerk, assistant to fashion coordinator, advertising or display 
assistant or a merchandise distributor in retail stores, wholesale or manu- 
facturing firms, buying offices and advertising agencies. 


FASHION MERCHANDISING AND MARKETING TECHNOLOGY 
Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 10] Grammar 3 0 3 
MAT 110 Business Mathematics 6 0 6 
BUS 101 Introduction to Business a 0 3 
FAS 101 Introduction to Fashion 
Merchandising/Marketing 3 0 3 
TEX 100 Fabric Science | 3 0 3 
18 0 18 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 d 
BUS mys Business Law | 3 0 o 
BUS 220 Personal Development 3 0 3 
ART 125 Fundamentals of Art & Design 2 2 3 
FAS 103 Fashion Accessories 3 0 3 
FAS 102 Elements & Coordination of Fashion bel Sor ides rh ea 3S 5) 
A Z 18 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 
FAS 108 Fashion Salesmanship 3 0 3 
HUM 110 History of Costume 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
Elective* OO Bodt ir One shedt 
17 2 18 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
DMK 260 Commercial Display Design 3 2 4 
DMK 249 Fashion Buying & Merchandising 3 0 3 
FAS 210 Fashion Sales Promotion | 3 - 4 
FAS 209 Fashion Modeling (or elective) * wea eta ls alld tnd 
L3 7 16 
FIFTH QUARTER 
DMK 240 Merchandise Planning & Control 4 0 4 
FAS 211 Fashion Sales Promotion II 3 2 4 
ENG 206 Business Communications 3 0 3 
Elective* 3 0 3 
Elective* ees Ti a 
16 2 17 


SIXTH QUARTER 


FAS 104 Fashion Sketching 2 2 3 
FAS 208 Applied Fashion Merchandising l 4 3 
CAT 116 Photography | 2 4 4 
BUS 219 Credit Procedures & Problems 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective” me ee 
1] 10 16 
ee ae eee a eee 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 103 


; ey iate degree 
*Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the assoc g 
curricula. 


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55 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/General Education College Program 


56 


UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHARLOTTE 
AND 
STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 
GENERAL EDUCATION COLLEGE PROGRAM 


A contractual agreement between Stanly Technical Institute and the 
University of North Carolina at Charlotte offers students an opportunity to 
gain two years of college credits on the Stanly Tech campus in Albemarle. 


After satisfactory completion of courses offered, students may transfer 
to the University of North Carolina at Charlotte or other colleges and uni- 
versities. In many cases, the student will be able to transfer as a junior and 
only be required to take remaining specialties and electives to qualify for 
the baccalaureate degree. 


Students wishing to transfer to other colleges and universities should 
consult with appropriate officials about their individual majors, class stand- 
ing and credits allowed to transfer. 


This program operates on the University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
semester and summer school calendar as published in this catalog. Courses 
are offered during both day and evening hours. 


The general regulations of both the University of North Carolina at 
Charlotte and Stanly Tech apply to students enrolled in this program. Liaison 
officers between institutions are the Director of Faculty at Stanly Technical 
Institute and the Director of Continuing Education at the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte. 


General Admission Requirements 


The minimum admission requirements are either an acceptable high 
school diploma or the high school equivalency certificate (GED). Can- 
didates are considered on an individual basis and on their own merits. Ad- 
mission policies are sufficiently flexible to permit the admission of any 
student with unusual or extenuating circumstances. Final decision will be 
based on judgment as to whether the applicant has a reasonable chance of 
successfully pursuing an academic program. The Admissions Committee for 
the University of North Carolina at Charlotte-Stanly Technical Institute Gen- 
eral Education College Program shall include but not necessarily be limited 
to the Dean of Admissions & Records of the University of North Carolina at 
Charlotte and the Director of Admissions at Stanly Technical Institute. 
Special credit students may attempt one semester of credit prior to meeting 
all the admission requirements, and will be registered through the normal 
procedures at Stanly Technical Institute. Prior to registering for subsequent 
semesters, special credit students must have met all admissions 
requirements and been approved by the Admissions Committee. 


Students planning to transfer to the University of North Carolina at 
Charlotte-Stanly Technical Institute General Education College Program af- 
ter attending one or more accredited colleges or universities must meet the 
following requirements: 


(1) must have an overall ‘’C’’ average; 


(2) must be eligible to return to the college or university at which last 
matriculated. 


Transcripts of transfer students will be jointly assessed by officials from 
both colleges prior to enrollment. 

Students normally must meet the following requirements if they desire 
to transfer to a University of North Carolina at Charlotte degree program on 
the basis of credits earned in the University of North Carolina at Charlotte- 
Stanly Technical Institute General Education College Program: 


(1) must have completed 30 semester hours of credit in the University 
of North Carolina at Charlotte-Stanly Technical Institute Co- 
operative College Program; 

(2) must meet the eligibility requirements of the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte; 

(3) must follow normal transfer procedures of the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte. 


Student Classification (Options) 


General Transfer 


Eligible students may take whatever courses for which they meet 
prerequisites in order to meet their personal goals and/or transfer 
requirements of other colleges and universities subject to advisor S 8 
proval. Insofar as possible, appropriate courses (elective or required) wi 
be scheduled to meet the majority requirements of various majors being 
pursued by enrolled students. 


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57 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/General Education College Program 


58 


Associate Degree in General Education 


The Associate Degree in General Education will be conferred by Stanly 
Technical Institute upon those students who complete all the specified 
curriculum requirements and other institute obligations. Substitution of 
courses from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte catalog recom- 
mended by the faculty advisor and approved by the Director of Faculty may 
be credited toward graduation. A minimum of 46 semester hours of 
required courses and 18 semester hours of approved electives (total 64 
semester hours) is required for graduation. 


GENERAL EDUCATION COLLEGE PROGRAM 


Semester 

Course Title Hrs. 
FALL SEMESTER 
ENG 101 English Composition* 3 
BIO 101 Principles of Biology* 4 
PSY 101 General Psychology 3 
SOC 15] Introduction to Sociology* 3 
GGY 102 World Regional Geography 3 
ES 102 Earth Science-Geology* 4 
PSC 110 Introduction to American Politics 3 
HDL 250 Processes of Growing |: Exploration of 

Human Potential 3 
ENG 203 Masterpieces of Modern Fiction* 3 
SOC PVs Sociology of the Family 3 
HIS 104 American History II (1865 to Present) * 3 
PSC 150 Introduction to International Politics 3 
MAT 101 Basic Concepts of Mathematics* 3 
SPRING SEMESTER 
ENG 102 English Composition* 3 
BIO 301 Natural History* 4 
PSY 220 Child Psychology 3 
SOC 27) Social Problems 3 
ENG 204 Masterpieces of American Literature* 3 
ANT 101 General Anthropology 3 
HIS 101 Early Modern Europe 3 
PHI 205 Deductive Logic* 3 
MAE 201 Mathematics for the Elementary School 

Teacher | 4 
MAT 120 Calculus or* 3 
MAT 122 Elements of Statistics* 3 
PSY 202 Educational Psychology 3 


TOTAL SEMESTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR 
ASSOCIATE DEGREE: 64 


“Required courses for an Associate Degree in General Education. Electives must be selected 
with advisor’s approval. 


Specific courses applicable to various program majors may be selected each semester 
from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte catalog as adapted to the needs of students 
enrolled. Subject to mathematics placement, a preparatory math may be offered non-credit. 


Course descriptions for most courses in the college program are listed in the University 
of North Carolina at Charlotte catalog. 


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PROGRAMS OF STUDY/General Office Technology 


60 


GENERAL OFFICE TECHNOLOGY 


More people are now employed in clerical occupations than in any 
other single job category. Automation and increased production will mean 
that these people will need more technical skills and a greater adaptability 
for diversified types of jobs. 


The General Office Technology curriculum is designed to develop the 
necessary variety of skills for employment in the business world. 
Specialized training in skill areas is supplemented by related courses in 
mathematics, accounting, business law, and applied psychology. 


The graduate of the General Office Technology curriculum may be em-. 
ployed as an administrative assistant, accounting clerk, assistant office 
manager, bookkeeper, file clerk, machine transcriptionist, or a variety of 
other clerical-related jobs. 


GENERAL OFFICE TECHNOLOGY 
Class Lab = Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
BUS 102 Typewriting | 2 3 3 
MAT 110 Business Math 6 0 6 
BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 0 3 
ECO 102 Economics | 3 0 3 
ememmerieiisiaisn oo vite il oni show 16! nullmoae a7 ni wea bivae: 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
BUS 103 Typewriting |! 2 3 3 
BUS sia te) Business Law | 3 0 3 
BUS 120 Accounting | 6 0 6 
ECO 104 Economics II 3 0 3 
17 3 18 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
BUS 104 Typewriting III 2 3 3 
BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 
BUS 121 Accounting II 6 0 6 
BUS 183 Business Vocabulary 3 0 3 
ENG 250 Reference Manual a 0 3 
19 5 21 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
BUS 205 Typewriting IV 2 3 3 
BUS 250 Payroll Accounting 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
14 3 iS 
FIFTH QUARTER 
ENG 206 Business Communications 3 0 3 
BUS 214 Secretarial Procedures 3 2 4 
BUS 211 Secretarial Machines 2 2 3 
EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 3 0 3 
BUS 112 Filing 3 0 s* 
14 4 16 
SIXTH QUARTER 
BUS 215 Office Application 2 3 3 
BUS 273 Word Processing 3 0 3 
BUS 272 Principles of Supervision 3 0 3 
BUS 229 Income Taxes 6 0 6 
Social Science Elective* mek. ea) 
Ws 3 18 
A Sy OR i ee ee ee ee ea eS 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 106 


"Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree 
curricula. 


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61 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Industrial Management 


62 


INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 
(Industry and Supervision) 


The Industrial Management curriculum is designed to prepare students 
for careers in industry. It features a broad introduction to and practical 
studies in the various phases of plant operation and supervision. Industries 
in the area have helped establish this curriculum by specifying the types of 
knowledge they look for in a graduate seeking a position with them. 
Therefore, each course is presented on the basis of what the students 
should know in preparation for working in industry as potential supervisors 
and managers. 


Studies are about equally divided among subjects on how an industry is 
organized, its operation, financing, the particulars on various departmental 
functions in which a student will likely start to work and how to work with 
people. This last area is particularly important and includes such subjects as 
human relations, techniques of supervision, and communications. 


Students who successfully complete and utilize these studies to build 
their knowledge and abilities will become valued and promotable em- 
ployees in industry. 


INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 


(Offered During Evening Only) 
Class Lab Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
See eee eee Peet rs. | rs, Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 101 Grammar | 0 3 
ECO 102 Economics | 3 0 3 
BUS 101 Introduction to Business 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
12 0 12 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
ECO 104 Economics II 3 0 3 
PSY 15] Principles of Psychology 3 0 3 
Business Elective* a 0 3 
12 0 12 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
BUS 272 Principles of Supervision 3 0 3 
DFT Lol Drafting & Design 2 4 4 
8 4 10 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
MEC 204 Manufacturing Processes 6 0 6 
Business Elective* 3 0 3 
12 0 12 
FIFTH QUARTER 
ENG 206 Business Communications 3 0 3 
MAT 152 Facts & Figures 6 0 6 
ISC 211 Work Measurement 3 0 =e 
12 0 12 
SIXTH QUARTER 
ISC 202 Quality Control 6 0 6 
ISC 102 Industrial Safety 3 0 3 
ECO 201 Labor Economics 3 0 3 
12 0 12 
SEVENTH QUARTER 
BUS 244 Purchasing 3 0 3 
MEC 213 Production Planning 3 0 3 
ISC 204 Value Analysis 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* a Cae 
12 0 12 


EIGHTH QUARTER 


BUS 120 Accounting | 6 0 ; 
ISC 210 Job Evaluation 4 0 
0 


NINTH QUARTER 


ISC 250 Manufacturing Costs & Budgets 3 : : 
BUS 299 Business Decisions 3 : : 
ISC 209 Plant Layout 5 oe 
11 0 11 
Soetoro 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 103 


*Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the associate degree 


curricula. 


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63 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Occupational Therapy Assistant 


64 


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT 


Occupational Therapy is a health profession concerned with factors 
which prevent individuals from functioning at their fullest potential in work, 
play and living. The Occupational Therapy Assistant Program prepares the 
graduate to work under the supervision of a Registered Occupational 
Therapist in developing, maintaining or restoring adaptive skills in in- 
dividuals whose abilities to cope with the tasks of living are threatened or 
impaired by developmental deficits, aging, poverty or cultural dis- 
advantage, or physical or psychosocial disability. 


The Occupational Therapy Assistant may be employed in hospitals, 
rehabilitation facilities, long-term and extended care facilities, sheltered 
workshops, schools, camps, homebound programs, and community centers. 


The program includes instruction in the basic concepts of occupational 
therapy, inter-personal skills, group dynamics and group leadership skills, 
and the use of activity techniques in teaching adaptive skills to the emo- 
tionally, physically and developmentally disabled. Supervised field ex- 
perience includes working with clients from these groups. 


To become a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA), the 
graduate must successfully saline this program and pass a national cer- 
tification examination. 


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT PROGRAM 
(Proposed Fall, 1980) 


Class Lab Clinical Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 0 3 
BUS 184 Medical Terminology 3 0 0 3 
REC 102 Recreation Skills and Techniques 2 3 0 3 
OTH 150 Orientation to Occupational Therapy 2 3 0 3 
OTH 102 Arts and Crafts | 2 3 0 2 
BUS 102 Typing | 2 3 0 3 
14 12 0 18 
SECOND QUARTER 
SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 3 0 0 3 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 0 3 
MED 131 Human Anatomy and Physiology 3 2 0 4 
REC 103 Recreation Skills and Techniques 2 3 0 3 
OTH 160 Medical Science | 5 0 0 = 
OTH 103 Arts and Crafts II Ble PISS Pas bri VO A 
it la ae 0 21 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 0 3 
MED 132 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology 4 2 0 5 
OTH 104 Arts and Crafts III 2 3 0 3 
OTH 16] Medical Science II 5 0 0 5 
OTH 184 Chronic Disease and Aging | 0 0 3 
PSY 15] Principles of Psychology 18 Thar DO aiggiecOe bogie 
20 5 0 2 
FOURTH QUARTER 
MED 134 Occupational Therapy Anatomy 
and Physiology 3 2 0 2 
ENG 206 Business Communications 3 0 0 3 
SOC 128 Community Resources 3 0 0 3 
OTH 292 Organization and Administration 2 2 0 3 
OTH 256 Physical Disabilities 3 0 0 3 
PSY 206 Applied Psychology ee ee 
17 4 0 19 


FIFTH QUARTER 


OTH 210 Therapeutic Techniques 2 2 0 3 
OTH 220 Physiology of Exercise f 3 0 3 
HED 120 First Aid 3 0 0 3 
OTH 305 Occupational Therapy Seminar 2 3 0 3 
OTH 253 Psychiatric Occupational Therapy 5 0 0 S 
HED 100 Perspectives of Healthful Living is ga eee eee 
16 8 0 19 


SIXTH QUARTER 


OTH 306 Field Supervision (general) 0 0 20 : 

OTH 307 Field Supervision (psychiatric) 0 0 20 
OTH 308 Occupational Therapy Seminar 1 0 0 

1 0 40 15 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 114 


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65 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Practical Nurse Education 


66 


PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION 


The accelerated growth of population in North Carolina and rapid ad- 
vancement in medical technology demand an increased number of well- 
trained personnel for health services. Realizing this need, Stanly Technical 
Institute administers a program of practical nurse education. Clinical ex- 
perience is received at Stanly County Hospital and North Carolina Lutheran 
Home. 


The aim of the Practical Nurse Education Program is to make available 
to qualified persons the opportunity to prepare for participation in care of 
patients of all ages, in various states of dependency, and with a variety of 
illness conditions. 


Students are selected on the basis of demonstrated aptitude for nursing 
as determined by pre-entrance tests, high school graduation, character 
references, medical examination, and an interview with the Nursing Selec- 
tion Committee. 


Throughout the one-year program, the student is expected to grow con- 
tinuously in acquisition of knowledge and understandings related to nurs- 
ing, the biological sciences, the social sciences and in skills related to nurs- 
ing practice, communications, interpersonal relations, and use of good 
judgment. Evaluation of student performance consists of tests on all phases 
of course content, evaluation of clinical performance and evaluation of ad- 
justment to the responsibilities of nursing. A passing score is required on all 
graded work, plus demonstrated progress in application of nursing skills to 
actual patient care. All Practical Nurse Education courses must be com- 
pleted in sequence. 


Graduates of accredited programs of practical nurse education are 
eligible to take the licensing examination given by the North Carolina State 
Board of Nursing. This examination is given twice each year, usually in 
April and October. A passing score entitles the individual to receive a li- 
cense and to use a legal title ““ Licensed Practical Nurse’’. The Licensed Prac- 
tical Nurse can apply for licensure in other states on the basis of a satisfac- 
tory examination score, without repeating the examination. 


PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION 
Class Lab Clinical Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
NUR 1101 Basic Science 6 2 0 7 
NUR 1102 Fundamentals of Practical Nursing 6 6 0 8 
NUR 1103 Human Relationships 3 0 0 3 
ENG 1104 Communication Skills 2 0 0 2 
NUR 1104 Vocational Adjustments 2 0 0 2 
19 8 0 2 
SECOND QUARTER 
NUR 1105 Medical-Surgical Nursing | 3 0 0 3 
NUR 1106 Maternity Nursing 3 0 0 3 
NUR 1107 Pediatric Nursing 3 2 0 4 
NUR 1109 Clinical Experience | 0 3 15 6 
9 5 15 16 


Class Lab Clinical Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
THIRD QUARTER 
NUR 1110 Medical-Surgical Nursing II 6 0 0 6 
NUR ia k,l Drug Therapy & Administration 3 0 0 3 
MAT 1105 Math for Nurses 3 0 0 3 
ENG 1105 Report Writing 3 0 0 3 
NUR 1112 Clinical Experience II 0 3 15 6 
15 3 15 21 
FOURTH QUARTER 
NUR Mi3 Medical-Surgical Nursing III 6 0 0 6 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 0 3 
NUR 1114 Vocational Relationship ? 0 0 2 
NUR WIS Clinical Experience III 0 3 21 8 
1] 3 2) 19 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 78 


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PROGRAMS OF STUDY /Respiratory Therapy Technician 


68 


RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNICIAN 


Often defined as the fastest growing allied health profession, 
Respiratory Therapy offers persons interested in caring for others an op- 
portunity to serve as vital members of the health care team. The purpose of 
the Respiratory Therapy Curriculum is to prepare individuals to meet the 
challenges and responsibilities of this profession. 


Students are selected on the basis of demonstrated aptitude for 
respiratory therapy as determined by pre-entrance tests, high school 
graduation, character references, reports of medical examinations, and an 
interview with the Respiratory Therapy Selection Committee. 


Respiratory Therapy is an allied health specialty employed under 
medical direction in the treatment, management, control, diagnostic 
evaluation and care of patients with deficiencies and abnormalities of the 
cardiopulmonary system. This shall mean the therapeutic use of medical 
gases and administration apparatus, environmental control systems, hu- 
midification, aerosols, medications, ventilatory support, bronchopulmonary 
drainage and exercises, respiratory rehabilitation, assistance with car- 
diopulmonary resuscitation and maintenance of natural, artificial and 
mechanical airways. Specific testing techniques are employed in Res- 
piratory Therapy to assist in diagnosis, monitoring, treatment research. 


Respiratory Therapy Technicians are trained with great emphasis on the 
technical aspects of therapy and can expect to occupy positions as staff 
members, providing a majority of respiratory therapy patient care. They 
may be expected to supervise other respiratory therapy personnel, ad- 
minister gas therapy, assist with long term continuous artificial ventilation, 
special therapeutic procedures and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. They 
are capable of performing many indispensable tasks related to patient 
care. 


Hospitals are the largest employers of Respiratory Therapy personnel. 
In addition, medical clinics and physicians’ offices are increasing their de- 
mand for qualified practitioners. Also, nursing homes, industry, and the 
armed forces are all becoming employers of Respiratory Therapy person- 
nel. With the ever increasing number of cardiopulmonary disorders and the 
advancement in respiratory technology, job opportunities are rapidly ex- 
panding. 


The Respiratory Therapy Program at Stanly Technical Institute is fully ac- 
credited by the American Medical Association and graduates are eligible to 
take the national credentialing examination given by the National Board 
for Respiratory Therapy. Successful completion of this examination qualifies 
an individual as a Certified Respiratory Therapy Technician or CRTT. This 
title is recognized in all fifty states and Canada. 


RESPIRATORY THERAPY TECHNICIAN 


ms 2 | 

Class Lab Clinical Credit rs) 

Serer led edt einriiile tavern We csi: MIS. 9 oHt8 ny) M8 ey) HES O 

FIRST QUARTER ®) 

BUS 184 Medical Terminology 3 0 0 3 a) 

MED 131 Human Anatomy & Physiology 4 2 0 5 > 

RTH 101 Introduction to Respiratory Therapy 2 0 0 2 = 

RTH 201 Medical Gas Therapy 4 2 0 5 N 

SCI 151 Basic Science | vi Sa ntireed -ieeliOh auaisAy oO 

16 6 0 19 es 

SECOND QUARTER 4 

RTH 150 Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Physiology 4 2 0 5 Cc 

RTH 202 Bronchial Hygiene & Pulmonary Diagnostics 4 2 0 5 we) 

RTH 250 Pharmacology a 0 0 2 = 

RTH 302 Clinical Practice | 0 0 9 3 P= 

SCI 152 Basic Science II vaenig 2A) rid baands ~ 
13 6 9 19 wH 

THIRD QUARTER | GC, 
RTH 203 Emergency Respiratory Therapy 3 3 0 4 a 
RTH 251 Clinical Medicine 3 0 0 3 ab 
RTH 252 Pediatrics 1 0 0 1 O 
RTH 303 Clinical Practice II tO LO Cea aoe ~< 

7 3 24 16 =] 

= 
FOURTH QUARTER @O 
RTH 204 Respiratory Therapy Seminar | 0 0 1 o 
RTH 304 Clinical Practice III 0 0 2 4 "gj 
RTH 305 Clinical Practice IV 0 0 24 8 we 

0 36 13 "% 

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 67 am 


uDIDIU 


69 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Secretarial Science 


70 


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 


In today’s society, there is a continued demand for stenographic and 
secretarial employees. Automation will never eliminate the need for a 
good secretary — particularly in the small, one-secretary office and in the 
executive type positions. 


Secretarial skills taught in this course are typewriting, shorthand, tran- 
scription, and general office procedures. Supplementary courses deal with 
various other features and activities of business as well as with personality 
development so that a graduating student should be well prepared for a 
secretarial position. 


Employment opportunities for the well trained secretary cover a wide 
area. Graduates of this program may enter the work force as 
stenographers, general secretaries or executive secretaries. Positions will 
depend upon the size of the employing agency. 


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE 
(Executive, Legal, and Medical) 


Class Lab = Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 re) 3 
BUS 102 Typewriting | 2 3 3 
MAT 110 Business Math 6 0 6 
BUS 10] Introduction to Business 3 0 3 
BUS 106 Shorthand | ABE 2 _ 4. 
17 5 19 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
BUS 103 Typewriting II 2 3 3 
BUS TS Business Law | 3 0 3 
BUS 120 Accounting | 6 0 6 
BUS 107 Shorthand II nS hurt esioiseeag 
17 5 19 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
BUS 104 Typewriting III 2 3 3 
BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 
BUS 108 Shorthand III 3 2 4 
BUS 183 Vocabulary 3 0 3 
ENG 250 Reference Manual wipe cu Dee we iy 
16 7 19 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
BUS 205 Typewriting IV 2 3 3 
BUS 206 Dictation & Transcription 3 2 4 
BUS 184M Medical Terminology 3 0 3 
MED 131M Human Anatomy & Physiology (Lecture only) 4 0 4 
EL Social Science Elective* 3 0 3 
EL Social Science Elective* ESBiat Naki. 2. 
i, Nomar Be 5 17 
EL 14 a 16 
FIFTH QUARTER 
EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 3 0 3 
ENG 206 Business Communications 3 0 3 
BUS 214 Secretarial Procedures 3 2 4 
BUS 211 Secretarial Machines 2 2 3 
BUS 207 Dictation & Transcription 3 2 4 
BUS 112 Filing 3 0 3 
M Social Science Elective* PSOE ys Se 
M 20 6 23 
EL iv 6 20 
SIXTH QUARTER 
BUS zto Office Application 2 3 3 
BUS 273 Word Processing 3 0 3 
BUS 208 Dictation & Transcription 3 2 4 
BUS 116L Business Law II 3 0 3 
Social Science Elective* ate CeO 3 
ME1 1 5 13 
L 14 > 16 
ical acetal at aa cet ee ald tht Sul Saini 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: _E (EXECUTIVE)........--.--: 106 
LALEGAL reer erase or 109 
UTIAEDICALY. cities ave 54 110 


“Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the Associate Degree 


Curricula. 


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7) 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Teacher Associate 


72 


TEACHER ASSOCIATE 


At one time, the educational process consisted of the child, the teacher, 
and the schoolhouse; however, today social scientists realize that critical 
learning takes place long before a child enters school. In an effort to give a 
continuum of education to the child, a program has been designed to train 
paraprofessionals to teach children from birth through the elementary 
school. To be fully effective, these people need training. They need to be 
understanding and have a background of knowledge at their fingertips. 


Paraprofessionals need to understand human growth and develop- 
ment. This is necessary in order to know and understand what, why, and 
how teachers are teaching children. 


Teacher assistants need to know language, mathematics, and science 
skills. Reading methods are especially important at this age, as noted by 
legislation providing additional funding for reading assistants. Teacher 
associates must learn to use audio-visual equipment to aid the teacher and 
help prepare instructional materials. They must gain knowledge of the dif- 
ferent kinds of children from the disabled to the academically gifted. 


In working with young children at Stanly Technical Institute’s Preschool 
Developmental laboratory and at public schools, the teacher associate 
would be capable of operating a program which would provide for the op- 
timal development of each child. 


There are numerous fields and areas in which paraprofessionals can be 
used. A graduate of this program would have the following job op- 
portunities. 


1. Primary reading aides in public schools; 
2. Kindergarten aides in elementary schools; 


3. Assistant or lead teachers in public or private child care centers or nur- 
sery schools; 


4. Assistant teachers in social service centers; 
Paraprofessionals working with exceptional children; 
6. Operators of their own child development centers. 


) 


TEACHER ASSOCIATE 
Class Lab Credit 

Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
FIRST QUARTER 

ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 

HED 120 First Aid 3 0 3 

PSY 151 Principles of Psychology 3 0 3 

EDU 150 Seminar Practicum 1 6 3 

EDU 230 Introduction to Education 3 0 3 

Elective” 3 0 3 

16 6 18 


Class Lab = Credit 


Course Title Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 
SECOND QUARTER 
ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
PSY 105 Human Growth & Development-Prenatal 
& Infant 0 3 
EDU 15] Seminar Practicum 1 6 3 
EDU 234 Audiovisual Instruction Through Creative 
Expression 3 0 3 
Elective* on Ol, patie 
13 6 15 
THIRD QUARTER 
ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
PSY 106 Human Growth & Development-Early 
Childhood 3 0 3 
SCI 101 General Science 3 2 4 
EDU 152 Seminar Practicum 1 6 a 
EDU 252 Physical Activities for Children 3 0 3 
13 8 16 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ENG 204 Oral Communications “| 0 3 
PSY. 201 Human Growth & Development-Middle 
Childhood & Adolescence 3 0 3 
EDU 202 Seminar Practicum 1 9 4 
RED 101 Introduction to Reading 3 2 4 
Elective* 3 0 3 
fe: 11 17 
FIFTH QUARTER 
MAT 153 Basic Math 3 0 3 
ENG 210 Children’s Literature 3 0 3 
SOC 128 Community Resources 3 0 3 
EDU 205 Seminar Practicum | 9 4 
RED 102 Methods, Materials & Techniques of 
Teaching Reading 3 4 
ih) 11 17 
SIXTH QUARTER 
MUS 210 Music for Children 3 0 3 
EDU 204 Parent Education . 3 0 3 
EDU 251 Seminar Practicum | 12 5 
RED 103 Methods, Materials & Techniques of 
Teaching Reading 3 2 > a 
10 14 its 


SUMMER QUARTER 


EDU 203 The Exceptional Child 3 0 3 
HEA 101 Personal Health & Physical Fitness 2 0 2 
EDU 252 Seminar Practicum 1 6 3 
EDU 206 Children in Crisis 2 0 2 
Sociology Elective* 3 0 a 

Elective* ag) a Va er ar 
14 6 16 
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 114 


*Elective courses must be selected with advisor’s approval from the Associate Degree 


Curricula. 


SyPpossy 1949D91/AGNLS JO SWWADOUd 


73 


ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM FOR VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTORS 


offers 


PROGRAMS OF STUDY/Vocational Instructors 


4. 


A 


areas. 


The Vocational Instructors Degree Program is unique in its design and 


the opportunity to earn an Associate in Applied Science Degree 


allowing credit for previous related educational and work experience. The 
program is designed for persons who have developed a skilled trade or 
technical specialty and desire to teach or pursue a degree. Successful 
graduates of the program may find employment as instructors in the public 
schools, community colleges, technical institutes, and in business and in- 
dustry. 


Credit will be awarded to skilled craftsmen based on the related edvu- 
cational and work experience of each individual. Credit wil! be awarded in 
the following manner: 


1. a. Twenty-four hours credit for full-time trade school, twelve months 


(1440 hours) in one special skilled area certified by diploma or 
letter by trade school officials, maximum twenty-four credit 
hours. 
and/or 
b. One hour credit per sixty hours of full-time trade instruction for 
programs of less than one year duration. Certified by diploma or 
letter by trade school officials, maximum eight credit hours. 
One hour credit per forty hours of related special short course in- 
struction or company sponsored school. Certified by diploma, cer- 
tificate or letter by company school. Maximum five credit hours. 
Five hours credit for each full year of employment in a teaching 
situation. Teaching must be the primary pespomsiolllty of employ- 
ment. Maximum ten credit hours. 
Two hours credit for each full year of employment in the specialty 
occupation qualified to teach. Maximum ten credit hours. 
maximum of 43 credit hours may be earned from the above 


In order to earn the Associate in Applied Science Degree for Vocational 
Instructors at Stanly Technical Institute, the following requirements must be 


met: 
k, 


Z 


3. 


4. 


3), 


A maximum of 43 hours credit may be awarded for related 
educational and work experience. 


A minimum of 26 hours credit must be earned at Stanly Technical In- 
stitute as residency requirement. 

The required core courses must be satisfied by earned credits at 
Stanly Technical Institute or by transfer. 

A total of 103 credits must be earned according to above 
requirements to be eligible for graduation. 


Satisfy other general graduation requirements as published in the 
catalog. 


A program of study will be prepared for each individual vocational in- 
Structor or potential instructor who makes application for the program. The 
Director of Faculty and Evening Director will serve as advisors. 


74 


ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAM FOR VOCATIONAL INSTRUCTORS 


Class Lab = Credit 


Required Core Courses Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 

English 

ENG 101 Grammar a 0 3 

ENG 102 Composition S, 0 3 

ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 

ENG 204 Oral Communications eee ee eee 
12 0 12 


Social Science 


SOC 102 Principles of Sociology 3 0 3 
PSY 151 or Principles of Psychology or 8 0 3 
PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 3 
POL 250 American Government sh indian ies sakaledd alent 
9 0 9 
Physics 
PHY 101 Physics: Properties of Matter 3 2 4 
PHY 102 Physics: Work, Energy & Power ig Oh, pee ie. Ae 
6 4 8 
Math 
MAT 100 or Algebra 6 0 5 
MAT 101 or Technical Math | 5 0 5 
MAT 102 Technical Math II es OA CVs O. 
10 0 10 
Science 
SCI 101 General Science 3 2 4 
Education 
History & Philosophy of Voc. Ed. 3 0 3 
Instructional Methods 2 4 4 
Audio Visual Media 2 4 4 
Education (Specified by advisor) 3 0 3 
Industrial Safety a peal ou 
13 8 17 
eee a eS 
CORE TOTAL CREDITS 60 


Related Educational & Work Experience Evaluation (Maximum 43 credit hours) 


Full-Time Trade (maximum 24 credit hours) 

Trade Instruction (maximum 8 credit hours) . 

Industry Sponsored Short Courses (maximum 5 credit hours) 

Teaching Employment (maximum 10 credit hours) 

Specialty Occupation Work Experience (maximum 10 credit hours) 
DESIGNATED COURSES (CREDIT HOURS) SPECIFIED BY ADVISOR 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR DEGREE 


S1OjINASU] [DUOHIDIOA/AGNLS JO SWWADOUd 


75 


CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS/Surveying 


76 


SURVEYING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 
(Offered During Evening Only) 


The Surveying Certificate Program is designed for persons who are in- 
terested in upgrading their skills to assist surveyors or engineers in land, 
forest, highway, marine, and other types of surveying. Students will gain a 
broad understanding of the basic principles, methods, techniques, and skills 
required for surveying. 


JOB DESCRIPTION 


The graduate of this program may engage in determining exact loca- 
tion and measurements of points, elevations, lines, areas, and contours of 
the surface of the earth for construction, mapmaking, land valuation, min- 
ing or other purposes. Graduates may calculate information needed to con- 
duct surveys from notes, maps, deeds, or other records. They will use sur- 
veying instruments and perform calculations to verify the accuracy of sur- 
vey data. 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 


CIV 101 Surveying | 2 6 4 
Theory and practice of plane surveying including taping, differential and 
profile leveling, cross sections, earthwork computations, transit, stadia and 


transit-tape surveys. 
Prerequisite: None 


MAT 101 Technical Mathematics 5 0 5 
The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. 
Number systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic 
operations, the rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental 
trigonometric concepts and operations are introduced. The application of 
these principles to practical problems is stressed. 

Prerequisite: Algebra | and II or Math 100 


SECOND QUARTER 


CIV 102 Surveying I 2 6 4 
Triangulation of ordinary precision; use of plane table; calculation of areas 
of land; land surveying; topographic surveys and mapping. 

Prerequisite: CIV 101 


DFT 101 Drafting | 0 6 2 
The field of drafting is introduced as the student begins study of drawing 
principles and practices for print reading and describing objects in the 
graphic language. Basic skills and techniques of drafting included are: use 
of drafting equipment, lettering, free-hand or thographic and pictorial 
sketching, geometric construction, orthographic instrument drawing of prin- 
cipal views, and standards and practices of dimensioning. The principles of 
isometric, oblique, and perspective are introduced. 

Prerequisite: None 


THIRD QUARTER 


CIV 103 Surveying Iil 2 6 4 
Route surveys by ground and aerial methods; simple, compound, reverse, 
parabolic and spiral curves; geometric design of highways; highway sur- 
veys and plants, including mass diagrams. 

Prerequisite: CIV 102 


MAT 102 Technical Mathematics 5 0 5 
A continuation of MAT 101. Advanced algebraic and trigonometric topics 
including quadratics, logarithms, determinants, progressions, the binomial 
expansion, complex numbers, solution of oblique triangles and graphs of 
the trigonometric functions are studied in depth. 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR CERTIFICATE 24 


S/SWV8DO0dd ILVDIFILYID 


BulAsain 


Wf 


CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS/Welding 


78 


WELDING CERTIFICATE PROGRAM 
(Offered During Evenings Only) 


The Welding Certificate Program provides the opportunity for students 
to develop the necessary skills for operation of a variety of types of welding 
equipment. The curriculum is designed to give students an understanding 
of the basic principles, methods, techniques, and skills required for 
welding. 


The Welding Certificate Program is one year in duration. A student can 
expect to attend class two evenings a week. Graduates of the Welding Cer- 
tificate Program will be competent in home and farm welding projects and 
entry level welding occupations. 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER Hrs. Hrs. Hrs. 


WLD 1141S Beginning Welding | 1 9 4 


Introduction to the history of oxyacetylene and arc welding. The principles 
of welding and cutting, nomenclature of the equipment, assembly of unit. 
The operation of various AC transformers, AC and DC rectifiers, and DC 
motor generator arc welding units. Welding procedures such as practice of 
puddling and carrying the puddle, running flat beads, butt welding in the 
flat, vertical and overhead positions, and the cutting of straight lines with 
the torch. Safety procedures are stressed throughout the program of instruc- 
tion. Testing appropriate to type welds will be performed. 


SECOND QUARTER 


WLD 1142S Intermediate Welding Il 1 9 4 


A review of basic oxyacetylene cutting and welding, preparation of metals, 
types of joints, welding procedures and testing of the welds. The operation 
of AC transformers and DC motor generator arc welding machines. Studies 
are made of welding heats, polarities, and electrodes for use in joining 
various metal alloys by the arc welding process. After the student is capable 
of running beads, butt and fillet welds in all positions are made and tested 
in order that the student may detect his weakness in welding. Safety pro- 
cedures are emphasized throughout the course. 


THIRD QUARTER 
WLD 1124S Advanced Welding III 1 9 4 


Designed to provide practice in welding or pressure piping in the horizon- 
tal, vertical and horizontal fixed position using shielded metal arc welding 
processes according to Sections VIII and IX of the ASME code. Testing ap- 
propriate to type welds will be performed. 


TOTAL CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR CERTIFICATE 12 


SNOILdIdDSAG ASUNOD 


79 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


80 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


The following is a listing of course descriptions arranged al- 
phabetically by prefix. Each course description lists the three-letter al- 
phabetical prefix followed by either three or four numbers. Courses with 
the four numbers are vocational level courses and are not designed for 
associate degree programs. 


Following the prefix and number is the course title. Titles that have 
roman numerals (I, Il, Ill, etc.) indicate series courses and indicate that | is 
prerequisite to Il, Il is prerequisite to Ill. Other course prerequisites will be 
listed at the end of the course description. 


There are three numbers to the right of the course title. The first number 
indicates the credit hours for the course. The numbers in parentheses in- 
dicate the class and lab hours per week. When three numbers are shown in 
parentheses the third number relates to clinical hours. 


AGR 104 Introduction to Agricultural Economics Credit 4 (3-2) 
An introduction to economics, the functions of the economic system, and 
agriculture’s role in the economy. A review of the functions of the manager, 
and an introduction to the principles used in making decisions to adjust to 
changing conditions. Analysis of the main sources of change which affect agri- 
cultural firms. 


AGR 125 Animal Science Credit 5 (3-4) 
An introductory animal science course covering the fundamental principles of 
livestock production. A study of the animal body and the basic principles of 
reproduction, genetics, growth, fattening, and digestion along with the selec- 
tion, feeding improvement, processing, and marketing of livestock. 


AGR 185 Soil Science and Fertilizer Credit 5 (3-4) 
A course dealing with the basic principles of efficient classification, 
evaluation, and management of soils; care, cultivation and fertilization of the 
soil, and conservation of soil fertility. 


AGR 170 Plant Science Credit 5 (3-4) 
An introductory general botany and crop science course covering the fun- 
damental principles of the reproduction, growth, functions, and development 
of seed bearing plants with application to certain commercially important 
plants in North Carolina. 


AGR 199 Cooperative Work Experience Credit 4 (0-40) 
This course consists of one quarter of supervised cooperative work experience 
of approximately 11 weeks at 40 hours each, or approximately 440 total hours 
awarding 4 quarter hours credit. The objective of this course is to provide the 
student with a real working practice in an environment which will be ex- 
perienced after graduation and upon employment. This period of time will 
enable the students to use the equipment and perform the processes and ser- 
vices required of this specialty under close supervision and with respon- 
sibilities commensurate with their capabilities. The cooperative work ex- 
perience period will be carefully planned and closely supervised by both the 
educational institution where the student is enrolled and the agency or 
business where the student is employed. An official agreement among the 
educational institution, the student, and the agency or business will provide for 
a programmed sequence of activities to be performed by the student with 


supervisory responsibilities for the educational elements of the work clearly 
defined. 


AGR 201 


AGR 204 


AGR 205 


AGR 218 


AGR 228 


AHR 1101 


ART 125 


AUT 1111 


AUT IIIA 


Agricultural Chemicals Credit 5 (3-4) 
A study of agricultural chemicals — their importance, ingredients, formulation, 
and application with emphasis upon the effective and safe utilization of 
chemicals in agricultural pest control. Major emphasis is placed upon weed 
identification and those chemicals utilized for weed control. Part of the course 
is devoted to those chemicals other than herbicides — such as insecticides, 
fungicides, and others. 


Farm Business Management Credit 5 (3-4) 
A review of the functions of the manager of a business firm and the problems 
faced. Development of the concept of planning by both partial and complete 
budgeting. Review of the concepts of costs and the length of run in production. 
Practice in preparing enterprise budgets as an aid in choosing what to 
produce. Use of partial budgeting to find the least cost production procedure. 
Analysis of production data to select the level of production that yields the 
most net revenue. Relationship between size, efficiency and income of a farm. 
Review of procedures for evaluating the efficiency of the manager. 


Agricultural Marketing Credit 5 (3-4) 
An analysis of the functions of marketing in the economy and a survey of the 
problems marketing faces. A review of the market structure and the relation- 
ship of local, terminal, wholesale, retail, and foreign markets. Problems in the 
operations of marketing firms including buying and selling, processing, 
standardization and grading, risk taking and storage, financing, efficiency, 
and cooperation. Discussion of procedures of marketing such commodities as 
grain, cotton, livestock, and tobacco. 


Agricultural Mechanization Credit 5 (3-4) 
A study of farm machinery management and labor-saving devices. The 
economics of selection and operation of farm machinery. Study and 
evaluation of feed grinders and mixers, storage facilities, materials handling 
systems, and other labor-saving devices. 


Livestock Diseases and Parasites Credit 5 (3-4) 
A course dealing with the common diseases and parasites of livestock; 
sanitation practices and procedures with emphasis upon the cause, damage, 
symptoms, prevention, and treatment of parasites and diseases; management 
factors relating to disease and parasite prevention and control. 


Automotive Air Conditioning Credit 4 (3-3) 
General introduction to the principles of refrigeration; study of the assembly of 
the components and connections necessary in the mechanisms, the methods 
of operation and control; proper handling of refrigerants in charging the 


system. Use of testing equipment in diagnosing trouble, conducting efficiency” 


tests and general maintenance work. 


Fundamentals of Art & Design Credit 3 (2-2) 
Includes fashion drawing, the study of color, line, design and motifs to develop 
ability to recognize style detail and trends. 


Automotive Body Repair Credit 10 (6-1 2) 
Basic principles of automobile construction, design and manufacturing. A 
thorough study of angles, crown, and forming of steel into the complex con- 
tour of the present day vehicles. The student applies the basic principles of 


straightening, aligning, and painting of damaged areas. 


Automotive Body Repair Credit 5 (3-6) 
Basic principles of automobile construction, design and manufacturing. 


thorough study of angles, crown, and forming of steel into complex contour of 
the present day vehicles. The student begins to apply the basic principles of 
straightening, aligning, and painting of damaged areas. 


SNOILdIdDS3AG ASYNOD 


8] 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


82 


AUT 1111B 


AUT 1112 


AUT 1112A 


AUT 1112B 


AUT 1113 


AUT 1113A 


AUT 1113B 


AUT 1114 


AUT 1114A 


AUT 1114B 


AUT 1114C 


AUT 1115 


Auto Body Repair Credit 5 (3-6) 
Review of AUT 1111A. The student finishes the application of the basic prin- 
ciples of straightening, aligning, and painting of damaged areas. 


Automotive Body Repair Credit 10 (6-12) 
A thorough study of the requirements for a metal worker, including the use of 
essential tools, forming fender flanges and beads, and straightening typical 
auto body damage. The student begins acquiring skills such as shaping angles, 
crowns, and contour of the metal of the body and fenders. Metal working and 
painting. 


Auto Body Repair Credit 5 (3-6) 
A thorough study of the requirements for a metal worker, including the use of 
essential tools, forming fender flanges and bends, and straightening typical 
auto body damage. 


Auto Body Repair Credit 5 (3-6) 
Review of AUT 1112A. The student begins to acquire skills such as shaping 
angles, crowns, and contour of the metal of the body and fenders, metal 
working and painting. 


Metal Finishing and Painting Credit 10 (6-12) 
Development of the skill to shrink stretched metal, soldering and leading, and 
preparation of the metal for painting. Straightening of doors, hoods, and deck 
lids; fitting and aligning. Painting fenders and panels, spot repairs, and com- 
plete vehicle painting; the use and application of power tools. 


Metal Finishing and Painting Credit 5 (3-6) 
Developing the skill of shrinking stretched metal, soldering and leading, and 
preparing the metal for painting. Straightening of doors, hoods, and deck lids. 


Metal Finishing and Painting Credit 5 (3-6) 
Fitting and aligning the parts to each other, painting fenders, panels and spot 
repair. Complete vehicle painting and the use and application of power tools. 


Body Shop Applications Credit 8 (8-18) 
General introduction and instruction in the automotive frame and front end 
suspension systems, the methods of operation and control, and the safety of 
the vehicle. Unit job application covers straightening of frames and front 
wheel alignment. The student applies all phases of training. Repair order 
writing, parts purchasing, estimates of damage, and developing the final set- 
tlement with the adjuster. 


Body Shop Application Credit 5 (3-6) 
General introduction and instruction in the automobile frame and front end 
suspension systems, the methods of operation and control, and the safety of 
the vehicle. 


Body Shop Application Credit 5 (3-6) 
Unit job application covers straightening of frames and front wheel alignment. 
The student applies all phases of training. 


Body Shop Application Credit 4 (2-6) 
The writing of repair orders, purchasing parts, estimating damage, and 
developing the final settlement with the adjuster. 


Trim, Glass and Radiator Repair Credit 4 (2-6) 
Methods of removing and installing interior trim; cutting, sewing and installing 
headlinings, seat covers, and door trim panels; painting of trim parts and ac- 
cessories. Glass removal, cutting, fitting, and installation. The student gains a 
thorough knowledge of the engine cooling system and repairs and replaces 
damaged cooling system components. Tests are made to insure normal engine 
cooling operation. 


AUT 1123 


AUT 1124 


AUT 1125 


AUT 1128 


AUT 1130 


BMT 201 


BMT 213 


BMT 224 


Automotive Brakes, Chassis and Suspension Systems Credit 6 (3-9) 
A complete study of various braking systems employed on automobiles and 
light weight trucks. Emphasis on how they operate, power adjustment, and 
repair. Principles and functions of the components of the automotive chassis. 
Practical job instruction in adjusting and repairing of suspension and steering 
systems. Units to be studied: shock absorbers, springs, steering systems, 
steering linkage, and front end alignment. 


Automotive Power Train Systems Credit 4 (2-6) 
Principles and functions of automotive power train systems: clutches and trans- 
mission gears, torque converters, drive shaft assemblies, rear axles and dif- 
ferentials, and automatic transmissions. Identification of troubles, servicing, 
and repair. 


Automotive Servicing | Credit 8 (2-18) 
Emphasis is on the shop procedures necessary in ‘trouble-shooting’ the 
various component systems of the automobile. “Trouble-shooting’’ of 
automotive systems provides a full range of experiences in testing, adjusting, 
repairing and replacing components. A close simulation to an actual 
automotive shop situation will be maintained. 


Automatic transmissions Credit 6 (3-9) 
The automobile has rapidly progressed during the past 20 years and the 
automatic transmission has taken the place of the dominant form of power 
transmission in the car. The automoatic transmission is studied in detail and lab 
work is performed on the various types of transmissions, both domestic and 
imported. Diagnosing and repairing malfunctions in the transmission by fac- 
tory approved methods and safe procedures are stressed. 


Machine Shop Operation Credit 2 (1-3) 
Many operations performed on the various parts of the automobile are per- 
formed in specialty shops. This course is designed to acquaint the student with 
the various machine shop operations. Some of the more numerous machinist 
operations include: boring, resurfacing, line-boring, crankshaft and camshaft 
grinding, reaming and sizing and value guide replacement. In this course the 
emphasis is placed on the simulation of these operations rather than actual 
hands-on operation. 


The BMET at Work: Visitation to Hospitals 

and Industries to Observe BMET's at Work Credit 2 (2-0) 
Students will visit hospitals and industries. The prospective BMET’s will be in- 
troduced to the existing regulator agencies which affect his work. Con- 
sideration will be given to the Association for the Advancement of Medical In- 
strumentation, which has introduced a BMET certification program. 


Coupled Circuits Credit 3 (2-3) 
This course provides the student with a knowledge of the design and ap- 
plication of small signal amplifiers. Emphasis is placed on the various types of 
coupling circuits used with standard, differential and DC amplifiers. The 
student will also gain a knowledge of the interface problems associated with 
connecting transducers and amplifiers. The student will design, construct and 
test the circuitry detailed above using appropriate schematics and test equip- 
ment. 

Prerequisite: ELN 134 


Advanced Electronics: Feedback Systems, 

Signal Processing, Telemetry . Credit 4 (3-3) 
A continuation of advanced electronics. It will include an introduction to the 
systems approach to biomedical data acquisition and processing. A study of 
the transmission and reception of physical and physiological data from its 
source to monitoring and recording instruments. A significant segment of this 
course will deal with an introduction to micro-wave theory and meca- 


surements. 
Prerequisite: ELN 134 


SNOILdINDSAG ISUNOD 


83 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


84 


BMT 244 


BMT 254 


BMT 264 


BMT 271 


BMT 280 


BUS 101 


BUS 102 


Operation of Biomedical Instrumentation Credit 5 (3-4) 
Students will learn to perform standardization and/or calibration checks on 
ECG machines, defibrillators, external pacemakers, and electrosurgical units. 
A step-by-step checklist for each instrument type will be developed. Other 
topic areas include electrical safety, preventive maintenance, and inventory 
control. Electrical safety emphasizes a study of electrical grounding, leakage 
and tension measurement techniques. Several clinical laboratory instruments 
will be properly demonstrated to provide the student with a thorough 
operational knowledge of each instrument, including the PH meter, spec- 
trophotometer, blood gas analyzer, and blood cell counter. 

Prerequisite: ELN 134 


Biomedical Instrumentation | Credit 3 (2-3) 
This course extends the student’s knowledge of the operation of several 
biomedical instruments by thoroughly introducing him to the electronic cir- 
cuitry of these instruments. Common electronic circuits will be pointed out to 
illustrate that circuits such as differential amplifiers and bridges are common 
building blocks for many instruments. Other important aspects of biomedical 
systems such as aspiration devices for automated sampling, indexing devices 
for sample changing and mixing or agitating components will be treated as 
they appear with their parent system. 

Prerequisite: BMT 244 


Biomedical Instrumentation Il Credit 4 (2-4) 
The course is designed to provide a technician with an understanding of the 
workings of the component parts of radiation producing equipment, detecting 
and measuring equipment, and to maintain, repair, and adjust this equipment. 
Each type of machine is broken down into its major components and each of 
these is dismantled, reassembled and adjusted so that the machine operates 
within the tolerances specified by the manufacturer. 

Prerequisite: BMT 254 


Biomedical Equipment: Selection and Design Credit 4 (2-3) 
Students will be required to research, propose, and carry to completion a 
suitable bioelectronic or electronic project. Other aspects of the course will in- 
clude a study of the basic concepts of what is considered to be equipment 
design of high quality. Some aspects to be considered are component location, 
chassis strength, anti-vibration components, operation simplicity, repair ac- 
cessibility, as well as equipment aesthetics. Electronic drafting, which includes 
the various methods of drawing schematics is also studied. 

Prerequisite: BMT 254 


Biomedical Troubleshooting Techniques Credit 4 (2-3) 
Basic problems involving tracking down and identifying problems frequently 
encountered with various types of medical instrumentation are to be covered 
in this course. Much time will be spent developing logical troubleshooting 
techniques such as back tracking and half split rule. Any clinical or monitoring 
devices may be used for laboratory exercises. Mechanical as well as electronic 
problems will be considered. 

Prerequisite: BMT 254 


Introduction to Business Credit 3 (3-0) 
A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the struc- 
ture of the various types of business organization, methods of financing, in- 
ternal organization, and management. 

Prerequisite: None 


Typewriting Credit 3 (2-3) 
The objective of this course is a foundation for speed with accuracy. Basic 
training on the following: position, touch operation, mastery of keyboard, 


skill-building drills, and problem typing of simple business letters and 
tabulations. 


Prerequisite: None 


BUS 103 


BUS 104 


BUS 106 


BUS 107 


BUS 108 


BUS 110 


BUS 112 


BUS 115 


BUS 116 


BUS 120 


BUS 121 


Typewriting Credit 3 (2-3) 
Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further 
mastery of correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are ap- 
plied in tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 
Prerequisite: BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per 
minute for five minutes. 


Typewriting Credit 3 (2-3) 
Emphasis on production typing problems and speed building. Attention to the 
development of the student's ability to function as an expert typist, producing 
mailable copies. The production units are tabulation, manuscript, correspon- 
dence, and business forms. 

Prerequisite: BUS 103 or the equivalent. Speed requirement: 40 words per 
minute for five minutes. 


Shorthand Credit 4 (3-2) 
A beginning course in the theory and practice of reading and writing short- 
hand. Emphasis on phonetics, penmanship, word families, brief forms, and 
phrases. 

Prerequisite: None 


Shorthand Credit 4 (3-2) 
Continued study of theory with greater emphasis on dictation and elementary 
transcription. 

Prerequisite: BUS 106 or the equivalent. 


Shorthand Credit 4 (3-2) 
Theory and speed building. Introduction to office style dictation. Emphasis on 
development of speed in dictation and accuracy in transcription. 

Prerequisite: BUS 107. 


Office Machines Credit 3 (2-2) 
A general survey of office machines. Students will receive training in the 
operation and application of both the ten-key and full-keyboard adding 
machines, printing calculator and electronic calculators. 

Prerequisite: None 


Filing Credit 3 (3-0) 
An introduction to the record systems used in business with emphasis on the 
management and control of those systems. Filing methods will also be studied. 
Prerequisite: None 


Business Law | . Credit 3 (3-0) 
A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals 
and principles of business law, including contracts, sales, and bailments. 
Prerequisite: None 


Business Law Il Credit 3 (3-0) 
Includes the study of laws pertaining to commercial paper, agency, part- 
nerships, corporations, and property rights. 

Prerequisite: None 


Accounting Credit 6 (6-0) 
A study of the principles and techniques of accounting centered around col- 
lecting, summarizing, and reporting information about service and mercantile 


enterprises. 
Prerequisite: None 


Accounting Il | Credit 6 (6-0) 
Principles, techniques and tools of accounting are applied to the partnership 
form of business, with emphasis placed on the special journals and reports 
used by a partnership. This course also includes a more in-depth look at some 
of the concepts introduced in BUS 120. 

Prerequisite: BUS 120 


SNOILdIYDSIG ASUNOD 


85 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


86 


BUS 122 


BUS 123 


BUS 124 


BUS 150 


BUS 183 


BUS 184 


BUS 205 


BUS 206 


BUS 207 


Accounting Ill Credit 6 (6-0) 
Principles, techniques, and tools of accounting are applied to the corporate 
form of business, with emphasis on the special journals and reports used by a 
corporation. This course also includes more in-depth look at some of the con- 
cepts introduced in BUS 120. 

Prerequisite: BUS 120 and 121. 


Business Finance | Credit 3 (3-0) 
Includes a study of the financing of business units, as individuals, partnerships, 
corporations, and trusts. A detailed study is made of short-term, long-term, and 
consumer financing. 

Prerequisite: None 


Business Finance Il Credit 3 (3-0) 
Financing federal, state and local governments and the ensuing effects upon 
the economy. Factors affecting supply funds, monetary and credit policies. 
Prerequisite: BUS 123 


Introduction to Advertising Credit 3 (3-0) 
A survey of the field of advertising with emphasis on media, consumer be- 
havior, market research, and the coordination of a total advertising campaign. 
Prerequisite: None 


Vocabulary Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to build vocabulary in both speaking and reading. Such general 
listings as medical, legal, and realty terms are covered. Emphasis is also 
placed on being able to identify names of people and places in order to build 
comprehension while reading newspapers and news magazines. Vocabulary 
study is required for secretarial students, but is open to enrollees in all 
curriculums. 

Prerequisite: None 


Medical Terminology Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course has been designed from an etymological point of view; that is, 
word roots are combined synthetically with prefixes and suffixes. This ap- 
proach enables students to understand words as they appear in medicine, 
surgery, urology, laboratory diagnosis, etc. The course will enable the student 
to better communicate verbally or in written form with professional workers in 
the health fields, with medical secretaries, nurses, hospital administrators, and 
medical or radiologic technologists. 

Prerequisite: None 


Advanced Typewriting Credit 3 (2-3) 
Emphasis is placed on the development of individual production rates. The 
student learns the techniques needed in planning and in typing projects that 
closely approximate the work appropriate to the field of study. These projects 
include review of letter forms, methods of duplication, statistical tabulation 
and the typing of reports, manuscripts and legal documents. 

Prerequisite: BUS 104 Speed requirement: 50 words per minute for five 
minutes. 


Dictation and Transcription Credit 4 (3-2) 
Develops the skill of taking dictation and of transcribing at the typewriter 
materials appropriate to the course of study which includes a review of the 
theory and the dictation of familiar and unfamiliar material at varying rates of 
speed. Minimum dictation rate of 100 words per minute required for- three 
minutes on new material. 

Prerequisite: BUS 108 


Dictation and Transcription Credit 4 (3-2) 
Covering materials appropriate to the course of study, students develop the ac- 
curacy, speed, and vocabulary that will enable them to meet the stenographic 


BUS 208 


BUS 211 


BUS 214 


BUS 215 


BUS 219 


BUS 220 


BUS 222 


BUS 223 


BUS 225 


BUS 226 


requirements of business and professional offices. Minimum dictation rate of 
110 words per minute required for three minutes on new material. 
Prerequisite: BUS 206 


Dictation and Transcription Credit 4 (3-2) 
Principally a speed building course, covering materials appropriate to the 
course of study with emphasis on speed as well as accuracy. Minimum dic- 
tation rate of 120 words per minute required for three minutes on new 
material. 

Prerequisite: BUS 207 


Secretarial Machines Credit 3 (2-2) 
An introduction of machines used in business. Emphasis will be placed on at- 
tainment of skill in using duplicating equipment, dictating and transcribing 
machines, and other office machines. 

Prerequisite: None 


Secretarial Procedures Credit 4 (3-2) 
Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a 
secretary during the work day. These include the following: receptionist 
duties, handling the mail, telephone techniques, travel information, tele- 
grams, office records, purchasing of supplies, office organization, interviewing 
for a job, grooming and office etiquette. 


Office Application Credit 3 (1-4) 
Designed to acquaint the student with on-the-job training, one hour is spent in 
the classroom with four hours per week in a lab-type situation at local 
businesses which are related to the area of specialization in which each 
student is studying. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 


Credit Procedures & Problems Credit 3 (3-0) 
Principles and practices in the extension of credit; collection procedures; laws 
pertaining to credit extension and collection are included. 


Personal Development Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to give the student expert knowledge of make-up, hair care, posture, 
figure control, and fashion, and to make the necessary changes in appearance 
so as to achieve the modern career look. 


Intermediate Accounting | Credit 6 (6-0) 
A comprehensive study of accounting principles introduced in earlier courses 
with special emphasis placed on the preparation of financial statements, cash 
and temporary investments, receivables and inventories. 

Prerequisite: BUS 122. 


Intermediate Accounting Ii Credit 6 (6-0) 
A comprehensive study of accounting principles introduced in earlier courses 
with special emphasis placed on long-lived assets, intangible assets, liabilities, 
owners equity accounts, and special accounting problems. 

Prerequisite: BUS 222. 


Cost Accounting | . Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of the nature and purpose of cost accounting with emphasis on ac- 
counting for direct labor, materials, factory overhead, and the job order system 


of cost accounting. 
Prerequisite: BUS 12] 


Cost Accounting Il Credit 3 ft 
A continuation of BUS 225 with emphasis on process cost accounting, standar 


costs, and managerial accounting. 
Prerequisite: BUS 225 


SNOILdidDS3A0d ISUNOD 


87 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


88 


BUS 229 


BUS 232 


BUS 233 


BUS 235 


BUS 239 


BUS 244 


BUS 245 


BUS 247 


BUS 250 


BUS 251 


BUS 252 


BUS 269 


Income Taxes Credit 6 (6-0) 
A study of federal income taxes with emphasis on the preparation of in- 
dividual tax returns. 


Sales Development Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of the sales process including mastering and applying the fun- 
damentals of selling, product knowledge, consumer attitudes and motivation. 


Personnel Management Credit 3 (3-0) 
Principles of organization and management of personnel, procurement, 
placement, training, performance checking, supervision, remuneration, labor 
relations, fringe benefits and security. 


Business Management Credit 3 (3-0) 
A detailed analysis of planning, organizing, directing, and controlling from a 
middle management point of view. 


Marketing Credit 6 (6-0) 
A general survey of the field of marketing with emphasis on marketing in- 
stitutions, promotion, pricing, marketing channels, and market research. 


Purchasing Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study in ordering form and procedure to obtain specified items and quan- 
tities of items on schedule at lowest cost consistent with quantity requirements. 


Retailing Credit 3 (3-0) 
The focus is on the operational problems of retailing centered around 
organization, location, buying, selling, promotion, service, and merchandise 
handling. 


Fundamentals of Risk and Insurance Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to help the student understand the nature of risk, the need for in- 
surance, and the basic features of some of the more common insurance 
policies. 


Payroll Accounting Credit 3 (3-0) 
A comprehensive study of accounting principles as applied to payroll records 
with particular emphasis placed on payroll computations, payroll taxes, and 
state and federal reports. 

Prerequisite: BUS 120 


Real Estate | Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course comprises the first half of a two-quarter program in Real Estate, 
directed toward qualifying a student for the N. C. Real Estate Licensing Board 
Examinations. It introduces the student to the broad subject of Real Estate, the 
various provisions affecting brokers and salesmen, the several laws applying 
to property, contract sales and other facets of the business. This course further 
explores the subjects of financing, mortgages, liens, zoning, ordinances, ap- 
praisals and leases among others. Upon satisfactory completion of this course, 
a student will be eligible to enroll in Real Estate Il. 


Real Estate Il Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course emphasizes the importance of mathematics in the Real Estate 
profession. Besides review and practice in basic math, it covers prorated ex- 
penses, calculation of land areas, scale drawings, financing and other essen- 
tials. The subject of closing statements is given special attention. It teaches use 
of the worksheet, classifying and entering transactions, practical problems and 
specific knowledge necessary for passing the state examination for licensing. 
Upon satisfactory completion of both Real Estate | and II, the student is given a 
certificate showing qualification to apply for the state board examination. 


Auditing Credit 5 (5-0) 
An analysis of accounting control systems and the independent auditor's 


BUS 271 


BUS 272 


BUS 273 


BUS 280 


BUS 299 


BUS 1103 


CAT 116 


CHM 101 


CIV 101 


CIV 102 


examination of the system and other evidence as a basis for expressing an 
opinion on financial statements. 
Prerequisite: BUS 122 


Office Management Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of the fundamental principles of office management with emphasis on 
office automation, planning, controlling, organizing and solving office prob- 
lems. 


Principles of Supervision Credit 3 (3-0) 
Introduces the basic responsibilities and duties of the supervisor's relationship 
to superiors, subordinates, and associates. Emphasis on securing an effective 
work force and the role of the supervisor. Methods of supervision are stressed. 


Word Processing Credit 3 (3-0) 
Since competent secretaries must have adequate language skills, word 
processing was designed as a final course to attack any grammar, composition 
or style problems of students. Emphasis of the class is on punctuation and com- 
posing letters. Students spend part of their class time working with secretaries 
of the institute to get first hand experience in answering phones, taking 
messages, and duplicating materials. Emphasis is given to modern word 
processing equipment and procedures. Also covered is how to take minutes of 
a meeting and the basic rules of parliamentary procedure. 


Small Business Management Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of how to start, staff, and finance a new business, as well as how to 
develop profit planning and adequate accounting records. Case studies are 
used to bring out some of the potential problems of operating a small 
business. 


Business Decisions Credit 3 (3-0) 
A comprehensive analysis of decision making from a total organization point 
of view. An investigation of decision tools, along with the use of case analysis 
and simulation games to develop decision making skills. 

Prerequisite: BUS 101, ECO 104, BUS 122, BUS 124, and BUS 239. 


Small Business Operations Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of starting and financing a small service type of business and also an 
introduction to financial record keeping, payroll forms, taxes, business law, 
and types of business organizations. 


Photography | Credit 4 (2-4) 
An introduction to the field of photography, photographic equipment and 
materials. A study of the fundamental techniques of the camera and its ex- 
pressive possibilities in relation to the field of design and visual com- 
munications. Assigned camera projects, darkroom procedures and equipment. 


Chemistry Credit 5 (4-2) 
Study of the physical and chemical properties of substances, chemical 
changes; elements, compounds, gases, chemical combinations; weights and 
measurements; theory of metals; acids, bases, salts, solvents, solutions, and 
emulsions. In addition, study of carbohydrates; electrochemistry, electrolytes, 
and electrolysis in their application of chemistry to industry. 


Credit 4 (2-6) 
g, differential and 
transit, stadia and 


Surveying | | . 
Theory and practice of plane surveying including tapin 
profile leveling, cross sections, earthwork computations, 


transit-tape surveys. 


Credit 4 (2-6) 


Surveying II . 
lat use of plane table; calculation of areas of 


Triangulation of ordinary precision; 
land; land surveying; topographic surveys and mapping. 
Prerequisite: CIV 101 


SNOILdI¥DSAG ASUNOD 


89 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


CIV 103 


CJC 101 


CJC 102 


CJC 110 


CIC 115 


CJC 203 


CJC 205 


CJC 206 


CJC 210 


CJC 216 


CJC 220 


Surveying Ill Credit 4 (2-6) 
Route surveys by ground and aerial methods; simple, compound, reverse, 
parabolic and spiral curves; geometric design of highways; highway surveys 
and plants, including mass diagrams. 

Prerequisite: CIV 102. 


Introduction to Criminal Justice Credit 5 (5-0) 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with a philosophy and history 
of law enforcement, its legal limitations in our society, the primary duties and 
responsibilities of the various agencies in the criminal justice field, the basic 
processes of justice, an evaluation of law enforcement’s current position, and 
an orientation relative to the profession as a career. 


Introduction to Criminology Credit 5 (5-0) 
A general course designed to introduce the student to the causation of crime 
and delinquency. The historical and contemporary aspects of crime, law en- 
forcement, punishment, and correctional administration will be discussed. 


Juvenile Delinquency Credit 5 (5-0) 
General survey of juvenile delinquency as an individual and social problem, 
theories of delinquency, causation, and methods of correction and prevention. 
The course will present a general overview of the juvenile court. 


Criminal Law | Credit 3 (3-0) 
A course designed to present a basic concept of criminal laws and to provide a 
legal groundwork for those who seek to enter the criminal justice field. 


Introduction to Corrections Credit 5 (5-0) 
An examination of the total correctional process from law enforcement 
through the administration of justice, probation, prisons and correctional in- 
stitutions, and parole. This course will provide a history and philosophy in the 
field of correction. 


Criminal Evidence Credit 5 (5-0) 
Instruction covers the kinds and degrees of evidence and the rules governing 
the admissibility of evidence in court. 


Community Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 
This course will provide the student with an understanding of community struc- 
tures as they relate to minority groups, peer groups, socioeconomic groups, 
leader groups, and group relations. Emphasis will be placed on the 
organization and function of these groups as they relate to the possession of 
criminal justice-protective service. 


Criminal Investigation Credit 5 (5-0) 
This course introduces the student to fundamentals of investigation; crime 
scene search; recording, collection, and preservation of evidence; sources of 


information; interview and interrogation, case preparation, and court presen- 
tation. 


Criminal Law Il Credit 3 (3-0) 
A continuation of Criminal Law | which presents a basic concept of criminal 
law and creates an appreciation of the rules under which one lives in our 


system of government. Primary emphasis will be placed on North Carolina 
law. 


Prerequisite: CJC 115. 


Police Organization & Administration Credit 5 (5-0) 
Introduction to principles of organization and administration, discussion of the 
service functions, e.g., personnel management, police management, training, 
communications, records, property maintenance, and miscellaneous services. 


CJC 225 


CJC 238 


CJC 255 


DFT 101 


DFT 102 


DFT 113 


DFT 151 


DFT 1101 


DFT 1102 


Criminal Procedure Credit 5 (5-0) 
This course is designed to provide the student with a review of court systems, 
procedures from incident to final disposition, principles of constitutional, 


federal, state, and civil laws as they apply to and affect law enforcement. 
Prerequisite: CJC 101 . 


Principles of Correctional Administration Credit 3 (3-0) 
Emphasis is placed on the principles of administration in the correctional set- 
ting, including budgeting and financial control, recruitment and development 
of staff, administrattive decision-making, public relations and other correc- 
tional administrative functions. 


Deviant Behavior Credit 5 (5-0) 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with human behavior and 
how it relates to the duties and responsibilities of the law enforcement officer. 


Drafting | Credit 2 (0-6) 
The field of drafting is introduced as the student begins study of drawing prin- 
ciples and practices for print reading and describing objects in the graphic 
language. Basic skills and techniques of drafting included are: use of drafting 
equipment, lettering, free-hand or thographic and pictorial sketching, 
geometric construction, orthographic instrument drawing of principal views, 
and standards and practices of dimensioning. The principles of isometric, 
oblique, and perspective are introduced. 


Drafting II Credit 2 (0-6) 
The application of orthographic projection principles to the more complex 
drafting problems, primary and secondary auxiliary views, simple and suc- 
cessive revolutions, and sections and conventions will be studied. Most im- 
portant is the introduction of the graphical analysis of space problems. 
Problems of practical design elements involving points, lines, planes, and a 
combination of these elements shall be studied. Dimensioning practices, ap- 
proved by the American Standards Association, will be included. Introduction 
is given to intersections and developments of various types of geometrical ob- 
jects. 

Prerequisite: DFT 101 


Electronic Drafting Credit 4 (2-6) 
The fundamentals of drafting are presented with an emphasis on applications 
in the electronics field. Basic skills and techniques are included such as the use 
of drafting instruments, types of drawings, construction of drawings both with 
instruments and freehand, lettering and dimensioning, and how to read prints. 
In addition to basic skills, specialized experience will be included which di- 
rectly relates to the electronics industry, such as types of drawings common to 
electronics, special symbols used, schematic diagrams, and layout diagrams 
with an emphasis on printed circuit work. 


Drafting-Design Credit 4 (2-4) 
Familiarization with and use of drafting equipment. Also the study of 
mechanical design fundamentals, dimensioning, principles of tolerancing, 
materials specifications and how to present views by accepted drawing pro- 


cedures. 


Schematics & Diagrams Credit 2 ro 
Interpretation and reading of schematics and diagrams. Development : 
ability to read and interpret blueprints, charts, instruction and service manuals, 
and writing diagrams. Information on the basic principles of lines, views, 


dimensioning procedures, and notes. 


Schematics and Diagrams: Automotive Credit 3 ae 
Interpretation and reading of schematic prints and diagrams. Making sketc es 
of electrical wiring and fuel system components for automotive engines and 


SNOILdIdDS3Ad ASYNOD 


91 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


92 


DFT 1110 


DFT 1113 


DMK 240 


DMK 249 


DMK 260 


ECO 102 


ECO 104 


ECO 108 


ECO 201 


EDP 104 


other internal combustion engines. Learning to identify the various com- 
ponents of the systems by sketching and labeling parts. Practice in tracing 
wiring systems and diagnosing trouble by using schematics and diagrams 
found in the automotive service manuals. 


Blueprint Reading: Building Trades Credit 1 (0-3) 
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the 
building trades. Development cf proficiency in making three-view and pic- 
torial sketches. 


Blueprint Reading: Electrical Credit 1 (0-3) 
Interpretation of schematics, diagrams and blueprints applicable to electrical 
installations with emphasis on electrical plans for domestic and commercial 
buildings. Sketching schematics, diagrams, and electrical plans for electrical 
installations using appropriate symbols and notes according to the applicable 
codes will be a part of this course. 


Merchandise Planning & Control Credit 4 (4-0) 
Concerns itself with the scientific use of numbers in merchandising, and the 
figures and mcthema'ical techniques thot are employed to translate fashions 
into the profit-making activities of planning, pricing, and controlling quan- 
tities. 


Fashion Buying & Merchandising Credit 3 (3-0) 
Analyzes the buying function and the career opportunities in different types of 
fashion retailing enterprises, and studies the merchandising techniques that 
are used to forecast fashions, plan assortments, determine sources of supply, 
select merchandise, negotiate buying arrangements, and follow through on 
the sale of merchandise. 


Commercial Display Design Credit 4 (3-2) 
Examines display as a visua! merchandising medium, and covers the principles 
of display design and their applications to fashion merchandising environs. 


Economics | Credit 3 (3-0) 
The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and prac- 
tices by which people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of sup- 
ply and demand and the principles bearing upon production, exchange, dis- 
tribution, and consumption both in relation to the individual enterprise and to 
society at large. 


Economics Il Credit 3 (3-0) 
Greater depth in principles of economics, including a penetration into the 
composition and pricing of national output, distribution of income, inter- 
national trade and finance, and current economic problems. 


Consumer Economics Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to help students use their resources of time, energy and money to 
get the most out of life. It gives students an opportunity to build useful skills in 
buying, managing finances, increasing resources, and understanding the 
economy in which they live. 


Labor Economics and Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 
The history of the labor movement in the United States, the development of 
methods and strategies by labor and management, applicable laws, the fac- 
tors of income and economic security, and the overall economic effects of the 
labor movement. 

Prerequisite: ECO 104 


Introduction to Data Processing Credit 3 (3-0) 
Systems 

A study of the fundamental concepts and operation principles of data 
processing systems to develop a basic understanding of computers. 


EDU 150 


EDU 151 


EDU 152 


EDU 202 


EDU 203 


EDU 204 


EDU 205 


Seminar Practicum Credit 3 (1-6) 
A vital part of the Teacher Associate Program is that each student will be 
assigned to an education setting for the number of hours prescribed each 
quarter. The laboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STI’s Preschool Developmental Laboratory, public schools, state and 
federal funded day care and centers for exceptional children. This experience 
provides an opportunity for students to develop further skill in working with 
young children in assisting with programming activities and in adapting to the 
needs of individual children. 


Seminar Practicum Credit 3 (1-6) 
A vital part of the Teacher Associate program is that each student will be 
assigned to an education setting for the number of hours prescribed each 
quarter. The laboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STI’s Preschool Developmental Laboratory, public schools, and state 
and federal funded day care and centers for exceptional children. This ex- 
perience provides an opportunity for students to develop further skill in 
working with young children in assisting with programming activities and in 
adapting to the needs of individual children. 


Seminar Practicum Credit 3 (1-6) 
A vital part of the Teacher Associate program is that each student will be as- 
signed to an education setting for the number of hours prescribed each quar- 
ter. The laboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STl’s Preschool Developmental Laboratory, public schools, state and 
federal funded day care and centers for exceptional children. This experience 
provides an opportunity for students to develop further skills in working with 
young children in assisting with programming activities and in adapting to the 
needs of individual children. 


Seminar Practicum Credit 4 (1-9) 
A vital part of the Teacher Associate program is that each student will be as- 
signed to an education setting for the number of hours prescribed each quar- 
ter. The laboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STI’s Preschool Developmental Laboratory, public schools, state and 
federal funded day care and centers for exceptional children. This experience 
provides an opportunity for students to develop further skills in working with 
young children in assisting with programming activities and in adapting to the 
needs of individual children. 


The Exceptional Child Credit 3 (3-0) 
Study of children with developmental variations requiring modifications in ac- 
tivities. Consideration is given to recognition of problems, community re- 
sources, and appropriate activities for the child with exceptional deviations in 


personality or physical development. 


Parent Education Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to provide the student with experiences that will enable them to 
communicate effectively with parents, plan for parent involvement, and 
develop a series of programs for presentation to the parents of children in their 


classroom. 


Seminar Practicum Credit 4 (1-9) 
A vital part of the Early Childhood Specialist program as each student will be 
assigned to an educational setting for the number of hours prescribed each 
quarter. The Icboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STI’s Preschool Developmental laboratory, private day care, private 
nursery school, kindergartens, public schools, public school kindergartens and 
state and federally funded day care. This experience provides an opportunity 
for students to develop further skill in working with young children in assisting 
with programming activities and in adapting to the needs of individual 


children. 


SNOILdIdDSAG ASUNOD 


93 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


94 


EDU 206 


EDU 210 


EDU 228 


EDU 229 


EDU 230 


EDU 231 


EDU 232 


EDU 234 


EDU 250 


EDU 251 


Children in Crisis Credit 2 (2-0) 
Study of crisis situations in the lives of children to include death, divorce, child 
abuse and illness. Problem solving situations will be given and methods 
analyzed. 


Curriculum Design and Application Credit 3 (3-0) 
To acquaint potential educators of children with the various aspects of the 
profession. Opportunities include establishing philosophy and policies, plan- 
ning an appropriate program, selecting materials and equipment, and im- 
plementing a workable budget. 


Methods and Techniques for the Credit 3 (3-0) 
Aide of the Exceptional Child 

Current practices and materials used in programs dealing with exceptional 
children are investigated and evaluated. Emphasis will be placed on a 
flexibility of programs to meet individual learning needs. 


Methods, Materials and Techniques Credit 3 (3-0) 
for Instructional Aides 

A course designed for the study of methods, materials, and techniques of im- 
proving instruction. The course is organized to give opportunities for the 
student to study in-depth areas of interest and need. 


Introduction to Education Credit 3 (0-3) 
Study of principles and practices of childhood education. The types of facilities 
and media which promote optimal development of each child. Demonstration 
of curriculum areas through planned activities and play suitable for promoting 
a more stimulating environment for children. 


Methods, Materials and Techniques of Credit 3 (2-2) 
Audio-Visual Production 

A course designed to provide training in audio-visual production including the 
making of transparencies, elementary photography, lettering, dry-mounting 
and laminating. 


Physical Activities for Children Credit 3 (3-0) 
Study of the physical development of children with emphasis on movement, 
rhythms, games, and other activities which promote optimal development. 
Each student will develop a series of activities appropriate for a specific level 
of development. 


Audiovisual Instruction Through Credit 3 (3-0) 
Creative Expression 

Individual and group exploration of activities and media for promoting op- 
timal overall development of children with emphasis on audio-visual instruc- 
tion. 


Seminar Practicum Credit 4 (1-9) 
A vital part of the Teacher Associate Program is that each student will be as- 
signed to an education setting for the number of hours prescribed each quar- 
ter. The laboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STI’s Preschool Developmental Laboratory, public schools, state and 
federal funded day care and centers for exceptional children. This experience 
provides an opportunity for students to develop further skills in working with 
young children in assisting with programming activities and in adapting to the 
needs of individual children. 


Seminar Practicum Credit 5 (1-12) 
A vital part of the Teacher Associate program is that each student will be 
assigned to an education setting for the number of hours prescribed each 
quarter. The laboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STI’s Preschool Developmental Laboratory, public schools, state and 
federal funded day care and centers for exceptional children. This experience 


EDU 252 


ELC 112 


ELC 113 


ELC 114 


ELC 163 


ELC 1112 


ELC 1112A 


provides an opportunity for students to develop further skills in working with 
young children in assisting with programming activities and in adapting to the 
needs of the individual children. 


Seminar Practicum Credit 3 (1-6) 
A vital part of the Teacher Associate program is that each student will be 
assigned to an education setting for the number of hours prescribed each 
quarter. The laboratory experience can come from a myriad of possibilities in- 
cluding STI’s Preschool Developmental Laboratory, public schools, state and 
federal funded day care and centers for exceptional children. This experience 
provides an opportunity for students to develop further skills in working with 
young children in assisting with programming activities and in adapting to the 
needs of individual children. 


Electrical Fundamentals | Credit 7 (5-6) 
A qualitative study of units of measurement, electrical quantities, simple cir- 
cuits, electromotive forces, current, power, laws, basic electrical instruments 
and measurements, resistance, impedance and basic circuit components. Con- 
cepts taught are generally limited to fundamentals with very little emphasis 
placed on quantitative aspects. Laboratory work will teach the proper use and 
care of basic hand tools and the basic manual skills used in working with elec- 
tricity. Measurement techniques and safety practices will be stressed 
throughout. 


Electrical Fundamentals Il Credit 5 (3-6) 
Additional electrical concepts and circuit analysis procedures as applied to 
more complex two terminal and simple two port networks are introduced. 
Laboratory work will include additional measurement techniques with em- 
phasis on verification of theoretical concepts. 

Prerequisites: ELC 112 (or equivalent), MAT 101 


Electrical Fundamentals Ill Credit 4 (3-2) 
Advanced circuit analysis techniques as applied to two port passive networks 
are introduced with emphasis on analysis and mathematical computations. 
Laboratory experiences are used to support analysis activities. 

Prerequisites: ELC 113, MAT 102 


Laboratory Practices Credit 3 (1-5) 
The objective of this course is to develop skill in the use of the various hand 
tools used by the technician. The student is trained to observe safety pre- 
cautions, use hand tools properly and safely, prepare and solder wire, com- 
ponents, and devices. The student is expected to construct a chassis for an 
electronic system, use fasteners, tubing and terminals where appropriate, 
using proper construction techniques, and produce a working system using 
printed circuit construction techniques. 


Direct & Alternating Current Credit 8 (4-1 2) 
A study of the electrical structure of matter and electron theory, the relation- 
ship between voltage, current, and resistance in series, parallel, and series- 
parallel circuits. An analysis of direct current circuits by Ohm's Law and Kirch- 
hoff’s law. A study of the source of direct current voltage potentials. Fun- 
damental concepts of alternating current flow, reactance, impedance, phase 
angle, power, and resonance. Analysis of alternating current circuits. 


Direct & Alternating Current Credit 4 (2-6) 
A study of the electrical structure of matter and electron theory, the relation- 
ship between voltage, current, and resistance in series, parallel, and series- 
parallel circuits. An analysis of direct currents by Ohm's law and Kirchhoff's 
law. A study of the source of direct current voltage potentials. Fundamental 
concepts of alternating current flow, reactance, impedance, phase angle, 
power, and resonance. Analysis of alternating current circults. 


SNOILdIdDSAG ASYNOD 


95 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


96 


ELC 1112B 


ELC 1113 


ELC 1113A 


ELC 1113B 


ELC 1115 


ELC 1116 


ELC 1117 


ELC 1124 


ELC 1124A 


Direct & Alternating Current Credit 4 (2-6) 
An advanced study of A/C circuits with their relationships to the analysis of in- 
ductive resistive and capacitive circuits used in the understanding of alter- 
nating current. 

Prerequisite: ELC 1112A 


Alternating Current & Direct Credit 8 (4-12) 
Current: Machines & Controls 

Provides fundamental concepts in single and polyphase alternating current cir- 
cuits, voltages, currents, power measurements, transformers, and motors. In- 
struction in the use of electrical test instruments in circuit analysis. The basic 
concepts of AC and DC machines and simple system controls. An introduction 
to the type control used in small appliances such as thermostats, times, or se- 
quencing switches. 

Prerequisites: ELC 1112, MAT 1115 


Alternating Current & Direct Current: Credit 5 (3-6) 
Machines & Controls 

Provides fundamental concepts in single and polyphase alternating current cir- 
cuits, voltages, currents, power measurements, transformers, and motors. In- 
struction in the use of electrical test instruments in circuit analysis. The basic 
concepts of AC and DC machines and simple system controls. An introduction 
to the type control used in small appliances such as thermostats, times, or se- 
quencing switches. 

Prerequisites: ELC 1112, MAT 1115 


Alternating Current & Direct Current: Credit 3 (1-6) 
Machines & Controls 
A study of AC-DC motors and controllers and AC transformer. Their use and ap- 


plication will be studied with respect to their power losses and measurements. 
Prerequisites: ELC 1113A 


Math for Electricians Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division of fractions and 
decimals, the use of percentages in practical problems, electrical applications 
of ratio and proportion, uses of electrical formulas, and the metric system. 


National Electrical Code | Credit 6 (6-0) 
Designed to assist electricians, and others in the field, in all phases of wiring, 
understanding the correct methods of wiring, and use of materials in ac- 
cordance with National Electric Code Standards. The Code contains provisions 
required for safety, which will be fully covered within the course. 


National Electrical Code Il Credit 6 (6-0) 
A more in-depth study of the principles and procedures outlined in NEC |. For 
further preparation of persons entering or working in the electrical field. 
Prerequisites: ELC 1116 or permission of instructor 


Residential Wiring Credit 8 (4-12) 
Provides instruction and application in the fundamentals of blue-print reading, 
planning, layout, and installation of wiring in residential applications such as: 
services, switchboards, lighting, fusing, wire sizes, branch circuits, conduits, 
National Electrical Code regulations in actual building mock-ups. 

Prerequisites: ELC 1113, DFT 1110 


Residential Wiring Credit 4 (2-6) 
Provides instruction and application in the fundamentals of blueprint reading, 
planning, layout, and installation of wiring in residential applications such as: 
services, switchboards, lighting, fusing, wire sizes, branch circuits, conduits, 
National Electrical Code regulations in actual building mock-ups. 

Prerequisites: ELC 1113, DFT 1110 


ELC 11124B Residential Wiring Credit 4 (2-6) 


ELC 1125 


ELC 1125A 


ELC 1125B 


ELN 121 


ELN 122 


ELN 123 


ELN 218 


Actual wiring of residential occupancies in classroom and in the field. A 
working knowledge will begin in the planning layout and power distribution 
to each part of the dwelling. 

Prerequisite: ELC 1124A 


Commercial and Industrial Wiring Credit 8 (4-12) 
Layout, planning, and installation of wiring systems in commercial and in- 
dustrial complexes, with emphasis upon blueprint reading and symbols, the 
related National Electrical Code, and the application of the fundamentals of 
practical experience in wiring, conduit preparation, and installation of simple 
systems. 

Prerequisites: ELN 1118, ELC 1124 


Commercial and Industrial Wiring Credit 4 (2-6) 
Layout, planning, and installation of wiring systems in commercial and in- 
dustrial complexes, with emphasis upon blueprint reading and symbols, the 
related National Electrical Code, and the application of the fundamentals of 
practical experience in wiring, conduit preparation, and installation of simple 
systems. 

Prerequisites: ELN 1118,ELC 1124 

Commercial and Industrial Wiring Credit 4 (2-6) 
Actual wiring of commercial industrial structures in classroom and in the field. 
A working knowledge of planning layout and power distribution to each 
phase of the job using approved method of wiring. 

Prerequisite: ELC 1125A 


Electronics | Credit 5 (3-4) 
Presents qualitative electronics concepts beginning with systems and networks 
and proceeding to devices. Typical networks such as power supplies, am- 
plifiers, oscillators, and feedback circuits are introduced. Solid state devices 
and vacuum tubes are introduced as idealized devices. Experience is provided 
in basic troubleshooting techniques. Instruments are introduced as needed for 
simple testing and measurements. : 

Corequisite: ELC 113 


Electronics Il Credit 7 (5-6) 
A quantitive study beginning with active control devices and proceeding to 
networks. A variety of equivalent circuit models are used to evaluate device 
and system parameters and predict circuit performance. Instruments are used 
in the laboratory to collect data, verify math predictions, and troubleshoot. 
Prerequisite: ELN 121 


Electronics Ill Credit 5 (3-4) 
Continues the study of active networks. Emphasis is on the analysis and design 
of both networks and active circuits. In addition fundamentals, design 
techniques, and typical applications of linear integrated circuits are in- 


troduced. 
Prerequisites: ELN 122, MAT 103 


Pulse, Logic and Digital Circuits 3 Credit 5 (3-4) 
Emphasizes the study of wave shaping and non-sinusoidal wave generating 
circuits using discrete and integrated components. Wave shaping topics in- 
clude simple passive wave shaping circuits and more complicated sais 
shaping circuits using active devices. Topics covered under eiestesini 
wave generating circuits include multivibrators, sweep generators, and ot < 
types of special purpose circuits using discrete and integrated components. 4 
introduction to Boolean algebra and its applications for the simplification o 


logic circuits is also included. 
Prerequisite: ELN 123 


SNOILdI4DSAG ISUNOD 


97 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


98 


ELN 219 


ELN 234 


ELN 241 


ELN 242 


ELN 243 


ELN 246 


ELN 1110 


ELN 1112 


ELN 1113 


Digital Fundamentals Credit 5 (3-4) 
Emphasizes the study of combinational and sequential logic circuits using 
discrete and integrated components. Topics include: binary arithmetic, num- 
bering systems, Boolean algebra, storing, timing, gating, and counting. Typical 
applications in industry will be presented. 

Prerequisite: ELN 123 


Pulse & Digital Circuits Credit 4 (2-4) 
This course emphasizes circuit design and analysis of nonsinusoidal wave- 
shaping circuitry, such as multivibrators, clampers, limiters and pulse 
generators. Equal emphasis is placed on logic circuitry which includes num- 
bering systems, codes, Boolean algebra, and basic logic circuits. The 
laboratory experiments emphasize the investigation and design of basic cir- 


cuits. 
Prerequisites: ELN 134, BMT 213, BMT 224, BMT 244 


Electronic Systems | Credit 5 (3-6) 
A general survey of electronic systems with emphasis on their description in 
block diagram format. Systems to be studied are those used in com- 
munications, computing, measurement, automatic control, and others of a 
specialized nature as appropriate. 

Prerequisite: ELN 123 


Electronic Systems Il: Communications Credit 7 (5-4) 
Introduction to fundamental aspects of electronic communication systems with 
special emphasis on need for modulation, types of modulation, frequency 
spectra and bandwidth requirements. Qualitative study of the principles of 
AM, SSB, and FM including the generation and detection of radio signals will 
be studied. 

Prerequisite: ELN 24] 


Electronic Systems III: Communications Credit 7 (5-4) 
Study of specialized electronic communication systems such as TV, microwave, 
radar, and optical communication systems. Discussion of sampling and pulse 
systems including techniques of multiplexing such as PAM, PDM, and PPM. 
Prerequisite: ELN 242 


Electronics Design Project Credit 3 (0-6) 
A laboratory class emphasizing independent research and design work by the 
student. The student will select a project in consultation with the instructor; 
perform the required research; compile data; formulate a theoretical model; 
and construct, test, and evaluate a working model of the selected project. 
Prerequisite: ELN 241 


Basic Electronics Credit 11 (5-18) 
A study of the electrical structure of matter and electron theory, the relation- 
ship between voltage, current, and resistance in series, parallel and series 
parallel circuits. An analysis of direct current circuits by Ohm's Law and Kirch- 
hoff’s Law. An introduction into AC circuits involving resistance, capacitance, 
and inductance, leading to a working knowledge of how these components 
respond in different types of electronic circuits. 


Vacuum Tubes and Solid State Devices Credit 12 (7-15) 
An introduction to vacuum tubes and their development; the theory, charac- 
teristics and operation of vacuum diodes, semi-conductor diodes, rectifier cir- 
cuits, filter circuits, triodes and simple voltage amplifier circuits. Transistor 
theory, operation, characteristics, and their application to audio and radio 
frequency amplifier and oscillator circuits. Troubleshooting and repair of solid 
state devices. 

Prerequisities: ELC 1112, MAT 1115. 


Television Theory and Circuits Credit 7 (5-6) 
This is a beginning theory course which introduces the study of the following: 


ELN 1118 


ELN 1119 


ELN 1125 


ELN 1127 


ENG 101 


ENG 102 


ENG 103 


Brightness control and DC re-insertation circuits, video detector stages, 
automatic gain control circuits, deflection oscillator and amplifier stages, 
automatic frequency control circuits, picture IF amplifier stages and RF tuner 
units. Shop work will include construction, analysis, testing, and simple 
troubleshooting of the stages studied in class. Visual alignment and ad- 
justments of control circuits are performed. 

Prerequisites: ELC 1112, ELN 1112, MAT 1115 


Industrial Electronics Credit 4 (3-3) 
Basic theory, operating characteristics, and application of vacuum tubes such 
as: diodes, triodes, tetrodes, pentodes, and gaseous control tubes. An in- 
troduction to amplifiers using triodes, power supplies using diodes, and other 
basic applications. 

Prerequisite: ELC 1113 


Industrial Electronics Credit 4 (3-3) 
Basic industrial electronic systems such as: motor controls, alarm systems, 
heating systems and controls, magnetic amplifier controls, welding control 
systems using thyratron tubes, and other basic types of systems commonly 
found in most industries. 

Prerequisite: ELN 1118 


Radio Receiver and Amplifier Credit 8 (4-12) 
Servicing 

An introduction of commonly used servicing techniques as applied to 
monophonic and stereophonic high fidelity amplifier systems and auxiliary 
equipment. The operation and servicing of inter-communication amplifiers 
and switching circuits will also be taught. Principles of radio reception and 
practices of servicing; included are block diagrams of radio receivers, ser- 
vicing techniques of AM and FM receivers by resistance measurements, signal 
injection, voltage analysis, oscilloscope methods of locating faculty stages and 
components and the alignment of AM and FM receivers. 

Prerequisites: MAT 1115, ELN 1112, ELC 1112 


Television Receiver Circuits Credit 15 (9-18) 
and Servicing 

A study of principles of television receivers, alignment of radio and in- 
termediate frequency amplifiers, adjustment of horizontal and vertical sweep 
circuits will be taught. Techniques of troubleshooting and rapair of TV re- 
ceivers with the proper use of associated test equipment will be stressed. Ad- 
ditional study of more specialized servicing techniques and oscilloscope wave- 
form analysis will be used in the adjustment, troubleshooting and repair of the 
color television circuits. 

Prerequisites: ELN 1113, ELN 1125 


Grammar Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of 
English grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Composition Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business 
and technical composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole 
composition. Correct word usage and punctuation is also covered. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101 


Report Writing Credit 3 (3-0) 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization 
and techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical re- 
ports, using writing techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the 
students. Practical application in the preparation of a full-length report is re- 


SNOILdIdDS3AG ISUNOD 


99 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


~ 100 


ENG 153 


ENG 156 


ENG 204 


ENG 206 


ENG 210 


ENG 250 


ENG 251 


ENG 252 


quired of each student at the end of the term. This report must have to do with 
something in the student’s curriculum. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101, ENG 102 


Reading Improvement Credit 2 (2-0) 
A concentrated effort to improve one’s ability to comprehend what is read by 
reading more rapidly and accurately. Reading faults of the individual are 
analyzed for improvement, and principles of vocabulary building are stressed. 
Library skills are included, as well as a unit on reading a newspaper. Students 
are exposed to a variety of reading materials. 


Pre-College English Credit 3 (3-0) 
Includes sentence structure, punctuation, easily confused words, introductory 
research skills, and difficult subject-verb agreements, verb tenses, pronoun 
cases, and adjective/adverb comparison. A vocabulary and spelling list espe- 
cially for college enrollees will be included. 


Oral Communications Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the 
student to communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker’s at- 
titude, improving diction, voice, and the application of particular techniques of 
theory to correct speaking habits and to produce effective oral presentation. 
Particular attention is given to conducting meetings, conferences, and inter- 
views. 

Prerequisite: ENG 101 


Business Communications Credit 3 (3-0) 
Develops skills in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on 
writing action — developing sales letters and prospectuses, business reports, 
summaries of business conferences, letters involving credit collections, ad- 
justments, complaints, orders, acknowledgements, remittances, and inquiry. 
Prerequisite: ENG 101, ENG 102 


Children’s Literature Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to familiarize students with the well-known authors and illustrators 
of children’s literature and to introduce them to the best quality books for 
young people. Stress is also placed on the use of these materials with the 
children in order to obtain maximum pleasure and learning. 


Reference Manual Credit 3 (3-0) 
Southwestern Publishing Company’s Reference Manual for Office Personnel, 
the style authority adopted by the institute, is thoroughly covered. The manual 
contains spelling, vocabulary, grammar review, letter make-up, use of num- 
bers, homonyms and abbreviations. 


Vocabulary Study Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to build vocabularly in both speaking and reading. Such general 
listings as medical, legal, and realty terms are covered. Emphasis is also 
placed on being able to identify names of people and places in order to build 
comprehension while reading newspapers and news magazines. Vocabulary 
study is required for secretarial students, but is open to enrollees in all cur- 
riculums. 


Secretarial Review Credit 3 (3-0) 
Since competent secretaries must have adequate language skills, secretarial 
review was designed as a final course to attack any grammar, composition or 
style problems of students. Emphasis of the class is on punctuation and com- 
posing letters. Students spend part of their class time working with secretaries 
of the institute to get first hand experience in answering phones, taking 
messages, and duplicating materials. Also covered is how to take minutes of a 
meeting and the basic rules of parliamentary procedure. 


ENG 1101 


ENG 1102 


ENG 1104 


ENG 1105 


FAS 101 


FAS 102 


FAS 103 


FAS 104 


FAS 108 


_ FAS 208 


FAS 210 


FAS 211 


Reading Improvement Credit 2 (2-0) 
Designed to improve the student's ability to read rapidly and accurately. Spe- 
cial machines are used for class drill to broaden the span of recognition, to in- 
crease eye coordination and word group recognition, and to train for compre- 
hension in larger units. 


Communication Skills Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to promote effective communication through correct language 
usage in speaking and writing. 


Communication Skills Credit 2 (2-0) 
Designed to improve the student's ability to read accurately and rapidly. Spe- 
cial techniques are used to increase word group recognition and to train for 
comprehension. Medical terminology is introduced to facilitate understanding 
of new terms used in the nursing texts. Use of learning resources in library is 
also included. 


Report Writing & Research Credit 3 (3-0) 
Designed to develop research skills and use of informational sources as well 
as reviewing standard writing skills (punctuation, word usage and sentence 
structure). 


Introduction to Fashion Credit 3 (3-0) 
Merchandising/Marketing 

Covers the nature of the business enterprises, and the industrial practices in- 
volved in the design, production, retailing and consumption of fashion prod- 
ucts, with major emphasis on marketing activities and interrelationships. 


Elements & Coordination of Fashion Credit 3 (3-0) 
Examines the dynamics, language and coordination of fashion and analyzes 
the basic styles, sizes, construction, and workmanship of apparel products. 


Fashion Accessories Credit 3 (3-0) 
Concerns itself with the properties, characteristics, and construction of leather, 
fur, hosiery, intimate apparel, belts, umbrellas, millinery, wigs, jewelry, and 
cosmetics as they affect the knowledgeable buying and selling of these 
products. 


Fashion Sketching Credit 3 (2-2) 
To help students develop fashion sketching techniques for promotion designs 
which are already complete, and also for illustrations in magazines, news- 
papers, poster design and display. Also, enables students to acquire knowl- 
edge of figure proportions. 


Fashion Salesmanship | Credit 3 (3-0) 
Covers the principles of salesmanship and their application to creative and ef- 
fective techniques for selling fashion products, by means of role-playing 


various selling situations. 


Applied Fashion Merchandising | Credit 3 (1-4) 
Provides students with opportunities to test and apply retail merchandising 
principles, practices and techniques, through the actual operation and man- 


agement of a retail store. 


e H oy 
Fashion Sales Promotion | | creda ) 
An introduction to sales promotion activities for all marketing levels wit con- 
centration on the specialized techniques and procedures employed to im- 


plement the activities of advertising and copywriting. 


Fashion Sales Promotion Il Credit 4 (32) 
Covers the types and objectives of the different sales promotion activities tha 
are used to sell fashion products, and the specialized techniques and pro- 


SNOILdIdDS3d 3SHYNOD 


101 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


102 


FAS 215 


HEA 101 


HED 200 


HED 120 


HUM 110 


ISC 102 


ISC 202 


ISC 204 


ISC 209 


ISC 210 


cedures that are employed to implement fashion shows, special events and 
publicity, culminating with the presentation of a fashion show. 


Fashion Merchandising Field Study Credit 3 (3-0) 
FAS 215 is a field study trip involving seminars with experts in the fashion mer- 
chandising field. Includes tours of major retail operations and showroom; 
seminars with designers and fashion specialists; and attendance at a Broad- 
way show followed by a tour of the costume department. 


Personal Health & Physical Fitness Credit 2 (2-0) 
Study of influences on physical and mental health, individual practices which 
aid in maintaining good physical fitness throughout the life span, and 
developing effective methods of educating children toward better health. 


Perspectives of Healthful Living Credit 2 (2-0) 
This course provides students with a comprehension of scientific knowledge 
that applies to the application and promotion of good health status for individ- 
vals and society. Current health findings are used to establish an awareness of 
various health problems in order to understand ourselves biologically, 
emotionally, and socially. Special emphasis is placed upon the removal of 
ecological hazards, developing a healthy personality, improving organic ef- 
ficiency and preparation for effective family living. 


First Aid Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of health and safety practices necessary for work with young children, 
and study of first aid practices leading to Red Cross First Aid card. 


History of Costume Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of the costumes of the ancient world, Europe and America and the ef 
fects of the social environment upon appearance and the evaluation of gar- 
ments with special emphasis on the influence of history on modern concepts of 
dress. 


Industrial Safety Credit 3 (3-0) 
Management and supervisory responsibility for fire and accident prevention, 
accident reports, good housekeeping, machine guarding, personnel protective 
equipment, industrial accident code and fire regulations, the first aid depart- 
ment, job instruction and safety instruction, company rules and enforcements 
are covered. This is all related to OSHA with exercises in the use and inter- 
pretation of the Federally published standards. 


Quality Control Credit 5 (5-0) 
Organization, techniques, and procedures for efficient quality control; func- 
tions, responsibilities, structure, costs reports, records, personnel and vendor- 
customer relationships in quality control. 

Prerequisite: MEC 204 


Value Analysis Credit 3 (3-0) 
An opportunity to study procedures, conditions and products with the purpose 
of identifying and removing unnecessary cost by the use of sound decisions 
through a common sense approach. 

Prerequisite: MEC 204 


Plant Layout Credit 5 (5-0) 
A practical study of factory planning with emphasis on efficient arrangements 
of work areas, layouts for small and medium-sized plants, selection of produc- 
tion and materials handling equipment. This includes a layout problem in 
small scale. 

Prerequisite: MEC 204 


Job Evaluation Credit 4 (4-0) 
How to determine and write job descriptions, evaluate and grade jobs and ar- 
rive at pay rates for production, clerical and supervisory positions. 


ISC 211 


ISC 250 


MAT 100 


MAT 101 


MAT 102 


MAT 103 


MAT 110 


MAT 150 


MAT 152 


MAT 153 


Work Measurement Credit 5 (5-0) 
Principles of work simplification, job methods improvement, motion study fun- 
damentals and time study techniques. Use of flow and process charts, multiple 


activity charts, operation charts, flow diagrams and methods evaluation. 
Prerequisite: ISC 210 


Manufacturing Costs and Budgets Credit 3 (3-0) 
Since all decisions in industry involve costs and plans involve budgets, this 
course is an introduction to the principles involved in this important area of 
plant management. 

Prerequisite: MEC 204, MAT 152S 


Algebra Credit 5 (6-0) 
This course is designed as a concentrated presentation of the fundamentals of 
high school algebra. This one-quarter course will emphasize basic algebraic 
principles and processes. 


Technical Mathematics Credit 5 (5-0) 
The real number system is developed as an extension of natural numbers. 
Number systems of various bases are introduced. Fundamental algebraic 
operations, the rectangular coordinate system, as well as fundamental 
trigonometric concepts and operations are introduced. The application of these 
principles to practical problems is stressed. 

Prerequisite: Algebra | and Il or MAT 100 


Technical Mathematics Credit 5 (5-0) 
A continuation of MAT 101. Advanced algebraic and trigonometric topics in- 
cluding quadratics, logarithms, determinants, progressions, the binomial ex- 
pansion, complex numbers, solution of oblique triangles and graphs of the 
trigonometric functions are studied in depth. 

Prerequisite: MAT 101 


Technical Mathematics Credit 5 (5-0) 
The fundamental concepts of analytical geometry, differential and integral 
calculus are introduced. Topics included are graphing techniques, geometric 
and algebraic interpretation of the derivative, differentials, rate of change, the 
integral and basic integration techniques. Applications of these concepts to 
practical situations are stressed. 

Prerequisite: MAT 102 


Business Mathematics Credit 6 (6-0) 
This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to 
business problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest 
and discount, commission, taxes, metric system, and pertinent uses of mathe- 
matics in the field of business. 


Pre-College Math ) Credit 3 (3-0) 
Covers such topics as review of fractions, decimals, percentages, exponents, 
radicals, basic algebra, linear equations, functions, graphs, trigonometric 


operations, and logarithms. 


Facts and Figures Credit 6 (6-0) 
A review of math fundamentals and the application of mathematics to the so- 
lutions of typical problems in business and industry. It includes learning and 
the use of common conversion tables, measuring devices, the slide rule and 


other essential abilities. 
Credit 3 (3-0) 


This course is designed to refresh the student on basic mathematical skills and 
introduce the student to aspects of modern mathematics, and the metric 
system including: sets, fractions, decimals, percent, basic Euclidean geometry, 
measurement, positive and negative numbers, ratio and proportion, consumer 


mathematics, discounts, and interest. 


Basic Math 


SNOILdIdDS3G ASYNOD 


103 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


104 


MAT 1101 


MAT 1105 


MEC 204 


MEC 213 


MUS 210 


MED 131 


MED 132 


MED 134 


NUR 1100 


NUR 1100 


Fundamentals of Mathematics Credit 3 (3-0) 
Practical number theory. Analysis of basic operations: addition, subtraction, 
multiplication and division, fractions, decimals, powers and roots, percent-. 
ages, ratio and proportion. Plane and solid geometric figures used in industry, 
measurement of surfaces and volumes. Introduction to algebra used in trades. 
Practice in depth. 


Math for Nurses Credit 3 (3-0) 
Safe and accurate administration of medications is a fundamental respon- 
sibility of the practical nurse. To this end knowledge of dosage calculation and 
the basic mathematical computations necessary to dosage calculation must be 
presented. This will include a review of fractions, decimals, Roman numerals, 
ratio and proportion, equations and formulae of dosage calculations. Also the — 
three (3) systems of measurement (household, Apothecaris and metric) in 
which medication orders are written will be presented. 


Manufacturing Processing Credit 5 (5-0) 
A study of various manufacturing processes, the equipment, tools ~and 
materials used, the principles involved and the products produced. Films and 
field trips further introduce the broad subjects of Manufacturing. 


Production Planning Credit 5 (5-0) 
Day-to-day plant direction, forecasting, product planning and control, 
scheduling, dispatching, routing, and inventory control. Actual layouts are 
utilized for planning and control. 

Prerequisite: Consent of Advisor. MAT 152S 


Music for Young Children Credit 3 (3-0) 
To provide the student with some understanding of music as a learning tool for 
the young child. Students participate in song, dance and rhythmic activities 
which are appropriate to the interest and muscular developmental level of 


-young children. 


Anatomy & Physiology 3 Credit 5 (4-2) 
A course dealing with a basic study of the cells and tissues, basic embryology, 
and the neuromuscular, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. 


Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology Credit 4 (3-2) 
This includes a study of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory and cir- 
culatory systems, pulmonary function testing, embryology of the car- 
diopulmonary systems, neonatal respiratory system and distress, airway 
management, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 

Prerequisite: MED 131 


Occupational Therapy Anatomy & Physiology Credit 4 (3-2) 
Continuation of MED 132. Physiology of the muscular and nervous systems will 
be stressed. Course also includes an introduction to splinting and bracing with 
emphasis on purpose, proper application and daily care. 


Nurse Aide Skills | Credit 7 (3-12-0) 
Upon completion of this course the student should be able to: (1) provide for 
the hygienic needs of patients; (2) provide a safe environment for patients; 
(3) utilize principles of body mechanics in giving patient care; (4) demonstrate 
the ability to perform basic nursing skills and procedures; (5) demonstrate ap- 
propriate behavior in patient care setting; (6) follow policies and procedures 
of the clinical agency. 


Nurse Aide Skills II Credit 7 (3-12-0) 
Upon completion of this course the student should be able to: (1) demonstrate 
effective working relationships in the clinical setting; (2) appreciate the role of 
the nurse aide as a member of the health team; (3) use appropriate ter- 
minology in reporting and recording; (4) accept responsibility for own actions; 


NUR 1101 


NUR 1102 


NUR 1103 


NUR 1104 


NUR 1105 


NUR 1106 


NUR 1107 


NUR 1109 


NUR 1110 


(5) recognize the special needs of geriatric patients; (6) communicate ap- 
propriately in the clinical setting. 


Basic Science Credit 7 (6-2-0) 
Designed to give the beginning student an understanding of basic science 
principles and their relationships to practical nursing. The course includes study 
of the structure and function of the human body, principles of nutrition and 
diet therapy, and basic bacteriology as related to nursing. 


Fundamentals of Practical Nursing Credit 8 (6-6-0) | 


Fundamentals of Practical Nursing provides the student with knowledge of the 
principles which are basic to effective and safe nursing care. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of skills essential for performing nursing measures 
that are the responsibility of the Licensed Practical Nurse. Lectures are 
followed by planned laboratory experience. 


Human Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of the basic principles of human behavior beginning with an un- 
derstanding of self which expands outward to include an understanding of 
others. Also included in the study are defense mechanisms, problem solving, 
common classifications of mental illness and basic principles of psychiatric 
nursing. 


Vocational Adjustments Credit 2 (2-0) 
Designed to improve the student’s ability to read accurately and rapidly. 
Special techniques are used to increase word group recognition and to train 
for comprehension. Medical terminology is introduced to facilitate un- 
derstanding of new terms used in the nursing texts. Use of learning resources 
in library is also included. 


Medical-Surgical Nursing | Credit 3 (3-0-0) 
An introduction to the nursing needs of adult medical and surgical patients. 
Prepares students for nursing care of patients with cancer, of surgical patients, 
both pre-operatively and post-operatively, of patients with communicable 
diseases, and of patients with chronic diseases. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104 


Maternity Nursing Credit 3 (3-0-0) 
Presents modern aspects of maternity nursing with emphasis on providing safe 
and effective care of the expectant mother and her baby. Detailed presen- 
tation of nursing care during the antepartum, labor and post-partum periods. 
Presentation of modern concepts of family planning. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104 


Pediatric Nursing Credit 4 (3-2-0) 
Presents normal growth and development from infancy to adolescence. 
Provides the student with knowledge and skills necessary to meet the needs of 
the hospitalized child and the parents. Emphasizes the nursing care of children 


with common disorders. 
Prerequisite: NUR 1 101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104 


Clinical Experience | Credit 6 (0-3-1 5) 
Eleven weeks experience in a general hospital under supervision of a clinical 
teacher. Provides experience in nursing care of the sick child, mothers and 
newborns, and medical-surgical patients. Opportunities for practicing skills 
learned in the laboratory. Experience in planning, meeting and charting some 
simple needs of hospitalized patients. Opportunity for developing attitudes 
and skills necessary for a successful career in practical nursing. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104 


Medical-Surgical Nursing II Credit 6 cae 
Continuation of NUR 1105. Designed to develop knowledge of common disor- 
ders of muscle-skeletal, gastro intestinal, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive 


SNOILdINDSAG ASYNOD 


105 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


106 


NUR 1111 


NUR 1112 


NUR 1113 


NUR 1114 


NUR 1115 


NUT 102 


OTH 102 


OTH 103 


systems as well as the nursing care involved. Includes rehabilitative nursing 
and meeting the needs of the elderly. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104, NUR 1105, NUR 
1106, NUR 1107, NUR 1109 


Drug Therapy and Administration Credit 5 (5-0-0) 
The study of safe techniques of drug administration and the responsibilities of 
the Licensed Practical Nurse in administering medications. Designed to 
provide the students with knowledge about drug action, side effects, and 
precautions. Review of mathematics involved in figuring drug dosage and 
preparation is included. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104, NUR 1105, NUR 
1106, NUR 1107, NUR 1109 


Clinical Experience Il Credit 6 (0-3-15) 
Continued experience in nursing care of adults, children, and mothers and 
their infants. Assignments to include nursing needs of patients with common 
disorders of body systems, operating and recovery room observation, and 
emergency room experience. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104, NUR 1105, NUR 
1106, NUR 1107, NUR 1109 


Medical-Surgical Nursing III Credit 6 (6-0-0) 
Continuation of study of common disorders of cardiovascular, endocrine, ner- 
vous, and integumentary body systems. Mental or emotional disorders, 
diseases of eye and ear, and first aid in emergency care are included. 
Prepares the student for care of the seriously ill patient. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104, NUR 1105, NUR 
1106, NUR 1107, NUR 1109, NUR 1110, NUR 1111, NUR 1112 


Vocational Relationships Credit 2 (2-0-0) 
Designed to orientate the student to the role of the Licensed Practical Nurse. In- 
cludes principles of job application and resignation, job opportunities, and 
relationships with other members of the health team to more fully achieve 
total patient care. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104, NUR 1105, NUR 
1106, NUR 1107, NUR 1109, NUR 1110, NUR 1111, NUR 1112 


Clinical Experience Ill Credit 8 (0-3-21) 
Continued experience in nursing care of adult medical-surgical patients, 
pediatric patients, obstetrical patients and the elderly. Emphasis is placed on 
more complicated nursing treatments, assuming the role of assistant to the 
doctor and the Registered Nurse, and the use of judgment in more com- 
plicated nursing situations for a larger group of patients. 

Prerequisite: NUR 1101, NUR 1102, NUR 1103, NUR 1104, NUR 1105, NUR 
1106, NUR 1107, NUR 1109, NUR 1110, NUR 11171, NUR 1112 


Nutrition for Young Children Credit 3 (3-0) 
Study of basic nutrition with emphasis on (1) methods of helping young 
children and their families learn nutritional concepts and (2) planning bal- 
anced diets for preschool children. , 


Arts and Crafts | Credit 3 (2-3) 
A survey of the field of arts and crafts as it pertains to recreational leadership, 
mental health programs, occupational therapy, and education students. 
Students will learn the use of power and hand tools and will create projects in 
clay, wood, leather, paper, fibers and metal. 


Arts and Crafts Il Credit 2 (0-5) 
The purpose of this course is to give students in-depth training in a limited 


number of materials and techniques for crafts according to the students’ in- 
dividual needs. 


OTH 104 


OTH 150 


OTH 160 


OTH 161 


OTH 184 


OTH 210 


OTH 220 


OTH 253 


OTH 256 


OTH 292 


OTH 305 


Arts & Crafts Ill— OT Application Credit 3 (2-3) 
This course will involve visitation to centers where students can apply arts and 
crafts and functional activities in clinical settings. Emphasis will be placed on 
goal oriented activities to enhance the patients’ psychological and phys- 
iological well-being. 


Orientation to Occupational Therapy Credit 3 (2-3) 
Background and development of occupational therapy; educational growth, 
establishment of schools and standards. National, State, Local and In- 
ternational organizations. Arranged trips to general, psychiatric, and extended 
care facilities, with discussion and interpretation period. 


Medical Science | Credit 5 (5-0) 
This course will familiarize the student with the etilogy, diagnosis, detection, 
medical management and prognosis of the traumatic, chronic and 
degenerative conditions commonly treated in physical medicine. 


Medical Science II Credit 5 (5-0) 
A continuation of Medical Science | with inclusion of a series of lectures con- 
cerned with medical and orthopedic conditions which are treated by the oc- 
cupational therapist. This course also includes familiarity with medical and oc- 
cupational therapy language and vocabulary pertinent to these conditions. 


Chronic Disease and Aging Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of physical, mental, emotional and social patterns of growth, develop- 
ment and aging. Aspects to be given special attention include: motor develop- 
ment, physiology of aging, growth deterrents, and functional pathology in any 
of the above aspects. 


Therapeutic Techniques Credit 3 (2-2) 
A lecture and lab course in pre-vocational evaluation, activities of daily living, 
orthotics, and home making for the handicapped. Also, the sheltered 
workshop activities will be presented. 


Physiology of Exercise Credit 3 (2-3) 
Principles of physiology applied to activity, including exercise, isometrics, 
isotonics, effort syndrome, fatigue, and reflex time. Also included are methods 
of relaxation. 


Psychiatric Occupational Therapy Credit 5 (5-0) 
A series of lectures and clinical demonstrations concerned with psychiatric and 
neurological disorders. Also, a study of the philosophy and applications of oc- 
cupational therapy in the psychiatric field, as well as the area of mental re- 
tardation. 


Physical Disabilities Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of general medical, neurological, and orthopedic conditions with em- 
phasis on methods of treatment used by occupational therapists. Precautions 
and limitations applied to the treatment of these conditions will be stressed. 
Muscle testing and joint range of motion measurements will be introduced. 
The student will be given instructions on methods of observations and how to 
effectively report these observations. 


Organization and Administration Credit 2 ae. 
Organization and administration of occupational therapy services, including 
duties and responsibilities of therapists, assistants; volunteers and others. 
Other topics include: ethical and legal responsibilities among professional and 
non-professional teams, public relations, forms, records, supplies, equipment 


and budget. 


Credit 3 (2-3) 


f experience through role playing and 
ded care facilities 


Occupational Therapy Seminar 
Review, re-emphasis, sharing 0 
discussions of situations and problems. Field tours to exten 


and other community agencies. 


SNOILdIdDSAd ASYNOD 


107 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


108 


OTH 306 


OTH 307 


OTH 308 


PHY 101 


PHY 102 


PHY 103 


PHY 104 


PHY 233 


PHY 243 


PHY 1101 


PHY 1102 


Field Supervision (General) Credit 7 (0-0-20) 
This course provides the student with an opportunity to apply occupational 
therapy techniques in a general hospital, nursing or rest home/rehabilitation 
centers. The student will be confronted with the responsibilities and decisions 
which they will be required to make as an OTA. 


Field Supervision (Psychiatric) Credit 7 (0-0-20) 
This course provides the student with an opportunity to apply occupational 
therapy techniques in a psychiatric hospital, nursing or rest homes/re- 
habilitation centers. The student will be confronted with the responsibilities 
and decisions which they will be required to make as an OTA. 


Occupational Therapy Seminar Credit 1 (1-0-0) 
This course allows the student to integrate the various types of therapy which 
were studied previously in the classroom and clinic. 


Physics: Properties of Matter Credit 4 (3-2) 
A fundamental course covering several basic principles of physics. The 
divisions included are solids and their characteristics, liquids at rest and in 
motion, gas laws and applications, Laboratory experiments and specialized 
problems dealing with these topics are part of this course. 


Physics: Work, Energy, Power Credit 4 (3-2) 
Major areas covered in this course are work, energy, and power. Instruction in- 
cludes such topics as statics, forces, center of gravity and dynamics. Units of 
measurement and their applications are vital parts of this course. A practical 
approach is used in teaching students the use of essential mathematical for- 
mulas. 

Prerequisites: PHY 101, MAT 101 


Physics: Electricity Credit 4 (3-2) 
Basic theories of electricity, types of electricity, methods of production, and 
transmission and transforming of electricity. Electron theory, electricity by 
chemical action, electricity by friction, electricity by magnetism, induction 
voltage, amperage, resistance, horsepower, wattage, and transformers are 
major parts of this course. 

Prerequisites: PHY 101, MAT 101 


Physics: Light & Sound Credit 4 (3-2) 
A survey of the concepts involving wave motion leads to a study of sound, its 
generation, transmission and detection. The principles of wave motion also 
serve as an introduction to a study of light, illumination and the principles in- 
volved in optical instruments. Application is stressed throughout. 

Prerequisites: MAT 101, PHY 101 


Measuring Principles | Credit 3 (2-3) 
This course covers the measurement of pressure, flow, level, and temperature 
by mechanical means. Principles are presented by analyzing the operation of 
typical commercial equipment as well as fundamental lab experiments. 
Prerequisite: ELN 134 


Measuring Principles II Credit 3 (2-3) 
This course is a continuation of measuring Principles | and covers the 


measurement of pressure, flow, level and temperature by electrical means. 
Prerequisite: PHY 233 | 


Applied Science Credit 4 (3-2) 
An introduction to physical principles and their application in industry. Topics 
in this course include measurement; properties of solids, liquids and gases; 
and basic electrical principles. 


Applied Science Credit 4 (3-2) 
The second in a series of two courses of applied physical principles. Topics in- 


PME 1101 


PME 1102 


PME 1103 


PME 1103A 


PME 1103B 


PME 1104 


POL 102 


POL 250 


PSY 105 


troduced in this course are heat and thermometry, and principles of force, 
motion, work, energy, and power. 
Prerequisite: PHY 1101 


Automotive Gas Engines Credit 6 (3-9) 


Development of a thorough knowledge and ability in using, maintaining, and | 


storing the various hand tools and measuring devices needed in engine repair 
work. Study of the construction and operation of components of internal com- 
bustion engines. Testing of engine performance; servicing and maintenance 
of pistons, valves, cams and camshafts, fuel and exhaust systems, cooling 
systems; proper lubrication; and methods of testing, diagnosing and repairing. 


Automotive Fuel Systems Credit 4 (2-6) 
A thorough study of the fuel system and emission control systems of the 
automobile including the fuel pump, fuel tank carburetor, air breather and the 
various components for the emission control systems. This includes a study of 
fuels, types of fuel systems, special tools and testing equipment for the fuel 
system. 

Automotive Electrical Systems Credit 8 (4-12) 
A study of the electrical systems of the automobile. Basic systems include bat- 
tery cranking system, alternator, regulator system, ignition systems, ac- 
cessories, and basic wiring systems. Emphasis is placed on diagnosis and 
testing of the various parts using special tools and test equipment. 


Electrical Systems (Part |) Credit 4 (2-6) 
This course is a study of the electrical systems of the automobile including the 
basic systems of the battery and cranking systems, charging system, ignition 
system, accessories and basic wiring. The student will study the basic electrical 
test equipment as well as the more sophisticated diagnostic equipment. Safety 
is stressed in the practical shop applications and factory approved methods of 
repair. 


Electrical Systems (Part Il) Credit 4 (2-6) 
This course will continue into the electrical systems on the material that was 
studied in the Electrical Systems (Part |). Emphasis is shifted from theory of 
operation of the various systems to diagnostic lab work and electrical trouble 
shooting. Using factory manuals, the student traces and troubleshoots prob- 
lems dealing with chassis and body wiring also. 

Prerequisite: PME 1103A 


Diesel Engines Credit 4 (2-6) 
This course is designed for the automotive student who will be confronted with 
the smaller versions of the diesel engine used in today’s automobile. This 
course deals with the diesel theory of operation, rebuilding and servicing the 
diesel engine and its components, and studying the fuel and injection systems. 
Safety and factory approved methods of servicing the automotive diesel will 
be stressed throughout the course. 


The National Government Credit 3 (3-0) 
English and colonial background, the articles of confederation and the framing 
of the federal constitution. The nature of the federal union; state rights, 
federal powers, political parties. The general organization and functioning of 


the national government. 


American Government Credit 3 (3-0) 
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the formal institutions 
of the American political system and their relationships with political parties, 
interest groups and individual citizens. 

Human Growth & Development: Credit 3 (3-0) 


Prenatal & Infant x 
A detailed study of the developmental sequence of the prenatal and infant 


SNOILdIdDSAG ASHNOD 


109 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


110 


PSY 106 


PSY 151 


PSY 201 


PSY 206 


PSY 1101 


REC 102 


REC 103 


RED 101 


RED 102 


periods with emphasis on influences on and conditions necessary for optimal 
development. 


Human Growth & Development: Credit 3 (3-0) 
Early Childhood 

A detailed study of the developmental sequence during the pre-school period 
ages 2 to 6. Emphasis is given to factors influencing development, the im- 
portance of experiences in establishing patterns of behavior, attitudes, in- 
terpersonal skills, language usage, and the relationship of early childhood to 
later realization of potential. 


Principles of Psychology Credit 3 (3-0) 
An introductory course in behavior which surveys the principles of learning, 
perception, thinking, biological and psychological motives, feelings and 
emotions, personality and adjustment. The objectives are to lay the foundation 
for advanced study in psychology, education, and sociology. 


Human Growth & Development: Credit 3 (3-0) 
Middle Childhood & Adolescence 
A detailed study of the developmental sequence during middle childhood and 
adolescence; emphasis is given to environmental and social factors which in- 
fluence developmental rates, formulation of behavior patterns, and 
establishing of value systems and interests. 

v 
Applied Psychology Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of the principles of psychology in the understanding of inter-personal 
relations on the job. Motivation, feelings, and emotions are considered with 
particular reference to on-the-job problems. 


Human Relations Credit 3 (3-0) 
A study of basic principles of human behavior. The problems of the individual 
are studied in relation to society, group membership, and relationships within 
the work situation. 


Recreation Skills and Techniques Credit 3 (2-3) 
Theory, selection, and teaching of games of low organization at various levels. 
Attention to leadership skills in games; active, social, lead-up stunts, contests, 
card and table games, musical and rhythm activities are included. Emphasis is 
placed on the psychological and physiological development of the child. 


Recreation Skills and Techniques Credit 3 (2-3) 
This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills in recreational ac- 
tivities for the ill, the aging, and the physically and mentally handicapped. 


Introduction to Reading Credit 4 (3-2) 
This course is designed to inform the students of the background of reading — 
the definition and history. Included will be the relationship between self con- 
cept and learning to read, the physiological aspects of reading, readiness for 
reading and phonics. Lab work for this course will consist of observation and 
assistance to the classroom teacher in public schools. 

Prerequisite: None 


Methods, Materials & Techniques Credit 4 (3-2) 
of Teaching Reading 

This course is designed to expose students to the mechanics of reading in word 
recognition and comprehension. In addition, major methods and techniques of 
teaching reading in the local system will be emphasized. Lab work for this 
course will consist of activities, working with individuals and small groups un- 
der the direction of the classroom teacher in public schools. 

Prerequisite: RED 101 


RED 103 


RED 104 


RTH 101 


RTH 150 


RTH 201 


RTH 202 


RTH 203 


RTH 204 


Methods, Materials & Techniques of Credit 4 (3-2) 
Teaching Reading 

Students will study and use diagnostic measures used in the local school 
system and informal methods of identifying reading needs. Emphasis will be 
placed on teacher-made materials and activities to be used independently for 
recreation and instruction. Lab work for this course will consist of making 
materials and working with individuals and small groups. 

Prerequisite: RED 101, RED 102 


Teaching Remedial Reading Credit 3 (3-0) 
A course designed for aides who assist in teaching pupils who cannot suc- 
cessfully participate in reading activities in a traditional pattern. Based on 
diagnosis, selection of appropriate materials and stimulating and maintaining 
interest. Includes appropriate word attack and comprehension skills. 
Prerequisite: None 


Introduction to Respiratory Therapy Credit 2 (2-0-0) 
This includes the routine care of hospitalized patients such as terminology, 
charting, vital signs, isolation procedures, and ethical and legal aspects of 
Respiratory Therapy. An overview of the profession including historical 
development, organization, relationships with other hospital departments is 
included. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Respiratory Therapy Program 


Cardiopulmonary Anatomy & Credit 5 (4-2-0) 
Physiology 

This includes a detailed study of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory 
and circulatory systems. Emphasis is placed on the mechanics and control of 
breathing, ventilation-perfusion relationships, and acid-base balance. 
Prerequisite: MED 131 or Advisor Approval 


Medical Gas Therapy Credit 5 (4-2-0) 
This is a course in the administration of medical gases, and aerosol and 
humidity therapy. Areas which are covered include the manufacture, trans- 
portation, storage, safety, delivery systems and devices used in the ad- 
ministration of medical gases, aerosols, and humanity. Emphasis is placed on 
equipment function. 

Prerequisite: Admission to Respiratory Therapy Program 


Bronchial Hygiene and Credit 5 (4-2-0) 
Pulmonary Diagnostics 

This course deals with the techniques for maintaining proper bronchial 
hygiene including the administration of intermittent positive pressure 
breathing, chest physical therapy, postural drainage, and methods of physical 
diagnosis of the chest with emphasis on auscultation. The techniques and 
procedures used in pulmonary function studies and arterial blood gas analysis 
are also included. 

Prerequisite: RTH 201 


Emergency Respiratory Therapy Credit 4 (3-3-0) 
An introduction to the theories and techniques of continuous ventilation. 
Topics include the maintenance of artificial airways including suctioning, in- 
dications, physiological considerations, care of ventilator patients including 
PEEP, CPAP, and IMV, and the functional characteristics of various ventilators, 
emergency cardiopulmonary resuscitation will be taught according to the stan- 
dards of the American Heart Association. 

Prerequisite: RTH 202 


Respiratory Therapy Seminar Credit | (1-0-0) 
This course allows the student to integrate the various types of therapy which 
were studied previously in the classroom and clinic. The student will have an 
opportunity to do independent research in an area of Respiratory Therapy. 


Prerequisite: RTH 203 


SNOILdI¥DSAG ASYNOD 


11] 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


112 


RTH 250 


RTH 251 


RTH 252 


RTH 302 


RTH 303 


RTH 304 


RTH 305 


Sci 101 


Sci 150 


Pharmacology Credit 2 (2-0-0) 
This course includes the effects, mechanisms of action, routes and methods of 
administration, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs with special 
emphasis on those administered by Respiratory Therapy Technicians. 
Prerequisite: MED 131 or Advisor Approval 


Clinical Medicine Credit 3 (3-0-0) 
Pathological processes which affect the body are discussed with special em- 
phasis on those which affect the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Prac- 
ticing physicians will lecture on their medical specialty and students will be 
encouraged to participate in discussion following the lectures. 

Prerequisite: RTH 150 or Advisor Approval, RTH 202 


Pediatrics Credit 1 (1-0-0) 
This course covers the specialized procedures and techniques of respiratory 
care as they apply to Pediatrics and Neonatology. Also included is fetal growth 
and development and extra-uterine growth and development. 

Prerequisite: RTH 150 or Advisor Approval, RTH 202 


Clinical Practice | Credit 3 (0-0-9) 
This course will provide the student with an opportunity to apply the 
techniques of aerosol, humidity and medical gas therapy in a clinical situation 
with proper supervision. 

Prerequisite: RTH 101 & RTH 201 


Clinical Practice Il Credit 8 (0-0-24) 
This course will provide the students an opportunity to apply the techniques of 
IPPB, chest physical therapy and postural drainage, pulmonary functions 
studies, and arterial blood gas analysis in a clinical situation with proper 
supervision. 

Prerequisite: RTH 202, RTH 302, RTH 250 


Clinical Practice Ill Credit 4 (0-0-12) 
This course provides the student an opportunity for an intensive application of 
respiratory therapy to specific areas of the hospital, such as Surgical Intensive 
Care, Medical Intensive Care, Pediatric Intensive Care, and Cardiac Care. 
Prerequisite: RTH 203, RTH 303 


Clinical Practice IV Credit 8 (0-0-24) 
During this course the student will function as a member of the Respiratory 
Therapy staff in the performance of the routine department duties. The student 
will be confronted with the responsibilities and decisions which they will be 
required to make as Respiratory Therapy Technicians. 


. Prerequisite: RTH 203, RTH 303 


General Science Credit 4 (3-2) 
Study of basic concepts from biological, physical, and natural sciences. 
Laboratory experiences provide opportunities to develop projects for demon- 
strating simple science concepts to young children, utilizing materials from 
nature and simple equipment. Each student will develop a series of projects 
appropriate for a specific level of development. 

Prerequisite: None 


Basic Science Credit 4 (3-2-1) 
This includes the mathematical concepts of the metric and English systems of 
measurement, percentage, fractions, logarithms, exponents, ratio and propor- 
tion, simple algebraic equations, and interpretation of statistical terms such as 
mean, normal distribution and standard deviation; chemical and physical con- 
cepts of atomic structure and its relation to the periodic table, chemical bond- 
ing, states of matter, gas laws and their application to inhalation therapy, ter- 
minology of heat, sound, magnetism and electricity, acids and bases, acid 
base balance in the body. Included also is a clinical orientation to respiratory 
therapy. 


Sci 151 


SCI 152 


SOC 102 


SOC 128 


SOC 204 


SSC 150 


TEX 100 


WLD 1101 


WLD 1102 


Basic Science | Credit 4 (3-2) 
This includes the mathematical concepts of the metric and English systems of 
measurement, percentage, fractions, logarithms, exponents, ratio and propor- 
tion, simple algebraic equations, and interpretation of statistical terms such as 
mean, normal distribution and standard deviation. Study of basic physics in- 
cluding mechanics, properties of matter, thermodynamics, gas laws, fluidics 
and their application to respiratory therapy. Terminology of heat, sound 
magnetism and electricity. 


Basic Science Il Credit 4 (3-2) 
This includes chemical and physical concepts of atomic structure and its 
relation to the periodic table, chemical bonding, states of matter, gas laws, 
acids and bases, acid base balance in the body. Formula writing for physiology 
of the human body. A basic approach with classification, morphology, iden- 
tification and physiology of microorganisms, and immunization with emphasis 
on the problems of cleaning and sterilization techniques as applied to 
respiratory therapy. 

Prerequisite: SCI 151 


Principles of Sociology Credit 3 (3-0) 
A consideration of the origins and development of culture, the structure of 
society, the nature of personality and its relation to society, forms of collective 
behavior, and community and social organization. 


Community Resources Credit 3 (3-0) 
An overall view of community, state and national resource and service agen- 
cies, designed to assist families, children or individuals within the community. 


Social Psychology for the Health Services Credit 5 (5-0) 
This course is designed to assist biomedical students in building meaningful! 
human relationships and to help them make the adjustments necessary to 
develop a satisfactory work situation. The fields of adjustment to be con- 
sidered are: work environment, group interpersonal relationships, and per- 
sonal involvement. Psychologically, students will be concerned with attitudes, 
frustrations, causation of behavior, motivation, individual differences, and job 
satisfaction. Sociologically, students will consider status, culture, role, com- 
munication, social systems, and the human relationship approach to others. 
They will be encouraged to see their own personalities in relation to our 
culture and society. 


Current Affairs Credit 3 (3-0) 
Building of understanding and knowledge of the events in the news, the 
people who influence world affairs, and the historical background for the 
trouble centers. Includes a map-reading and geography unit, as well as 
discussion of internationally-known landmarks. Review of sources of in- 
formation beneficial to studying current affairs and obtaining additional in- 
formation. 


Fabric Science | | Credit 3 (3-0) 
Analyzes textile fibers and the construction of fabrics, with emphasis on the 


properties that affect their hand, appearance, performance and end use. 


Basic Gas Welding Credit 2 (1-3) 
Welding demonstrations by the instructor and practice by students in the 
welding shop. Safe and correct methods of assembling and operating the 
welding equipment. Practice will be given for surface welding; bronze 
welding, silver-soldering, and flame cutting methods applicable to 


mechanical repair work. 


Credit 2 (1-3) 


Basic Arc Weldin 
larities and electrodes for uses 


Students are made aware of welding heats, po 


SNOILdIYDS3A0G ASYNOD 


113 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 


114 


WLD 1105 


WLD 1141S 


WLD 1142S 


WLD 1124S 


in joining various metal alloys by the arc welding process. Procedures such as 
welding different types of joints are practiced. Safety procedures are em- 
phasized throughout the course. 

Prerequisite: WLD 1101 


Automotive Body Welding Credit 4 (2-6) 
Welding practices on material applicable to the installation of body panels 
and repairs to doors, fenders, hoods, and deck lids. Student runs beads, does 
butt and fillet welding. Performs tests to detect strength and weaknesses of 
welded joints. Safety procedures are emphasized throughout the course. 
Prerequisite: WLD 1101 


Beginning Welding | Credit 4 (1-9) 
Introduction to the history of oxyacetylene and arc welding. The principles of 
welding and cutting, nomenclature of the equipment, assembly of unit. The 
operation of various AC transformers, AC and DC rectifiers, and DC motor 
generator arc welding units. Welding procedures such as practice of puddling 
and carrying the puddle, running flat beads, butt welding in the flat, vertical 
and overhead positions, and the cutting of straight lines with the torch. Safety 
procedures are stressed throughout the program of instruction. Testing ap- 
propriate to type welds will be performed. 


Intermediate Welding Il Credit 4 (1-9) 
A review of basic oxyacetylene cutting and welding, preparation of metals, 
types of joints, welding procedures and testing of the welds. The operation of 
AC transformers and DC motor generator arc welding machines. Studies are 
made of welding heats, polarities, and electrodes for use in joining various 
metal alloys by the arc welding process. After the student is capable of run- 
ning beads, butt and fillet welds in all positions are made and tested in order 
that the student may detect his weakness in welding. Safety procedures are 
emphasized throughout the course. 


Advanced Welding Ill Credit 4 (1-9) 
Designed to provide practice in welding or pressure piping in the horizontal, 
vertical and horizontal fixed position using shielded metal arc welding 
processes according to Sections VIII and IX of the ASME code. Testing ap- 
propriate to type welds will be performed. 


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LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 


116 


LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 


As a center for student learning and innovative teaching, the Learning 
Resources Center at Stanly Technical Institute includes the Library, Media 
Services Department and Learning Laboratory, each serving specific and 
unique functions. 


LIBRARY 


The library consists mainly of books and periodicals, and provides in- 
valuable service to the student body, faculty and community in comfortable 
and pleasant surroundings. A completely new and up-to-date reference 
section, combined with important volumes in the general and special 
areas, is housed in open stacks, readily accessible to readers. If a faculty 
member or student wishes to do in-depth study or research on a certain 
subject, a trained Librarian is ready to offer assistance in finding the 
materials which relate to the specific needs. 


Books, with exception of reserve reference books, are checked out for a 
period of two weeks. There is no limit to the number of books that may be 
checked out by a student; books may be renewed by bringing them to the 
library. A fine is charged for overdue material. 


MEDIA SERVICES 


The Learning Resources Center provides media services for the faculty, 
staff, and students. This includes the checking out of equipment, slides, 
films, filmstrips, tapes, etc. Television facilities are available for off-the-air 
viewing, video taping, local production, and in-house broadcasting. Ad- 
vance reservation is needed in order to set-up the equipment for faculty 
use. An orientation to the utilization of the equipment is also individually 
arranged. 


There is a photographic darkroom which is available for instruction and 
faculty use. Photographic and video taping services are also available by 
the Media Department to faculty and staff. 


LEARNING LABORATORY 


The Learning Laboratory is a center designed to provide learning op- 
portunities to students 18 years or older. Programmed materials in the sub- 
jects required for the Adult High School Program, Technical-Vocational cur- 
riculum courses, and a variety of self-improvement materials are available. 
Preparatory developmental experiences are arranged as needed to qualify 
for placement in other programs. 


ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA PROGRAM 


This program is designed for adults of all ages to enable them to com- 
plete their high school credits. 


Students between the ages of 16 and 18, who have been released by 
the Superintendent of their public school may enroll in the Adult High 
School Program. This program was designed by the Albemarle City/Stanly 


County Boards of Education with Stanly Technical Institute to provide the 
opportunity for citizens to complete their high school education. 


In order to determine the subjects needed for completing high school, a 
student's transcript is studied, and an individually prescribed curriculum is 
assigned. Study is accomplished with programmed materials; thus students 
may advance as rapidly as they master the materials. Upon completion of 
the individually prescribed subjects, the students are awarded their 
diplomas by Stanly Technical Institute and the Albemarle City or Stanly 
County Schools. 


There is a $5.00 registration fee per quarter. Adults may enroll at 
anytime by contacting the Learning Lab, or call 982-0121. 


HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY (GED) 


The age requirements for the GED Program are the same as for the 
Adult High School Program. Study materials are available in the Learning 
Lab to prepare to take the GED Exam. The Stanly Tech Bookstore also stocks 
a preparatory book which may be purchased. 


The GED Exam is given the first Wednesday and Thursday of each 
month from noon until 10:00 p.m. Those receiving an acceptable passing 
score of 225 points with no single test score below 35 will be awarded a 
high school equivalency certificate by the Department of Public Instruction. 


The GED tests students’ knowledge and skill in five separate areas: 
English, Social Studies, Science, Reading Skills, and Math. 


There is no cost for attending the Learning Lab and preparing for the 
GED or for taking the GED Exam. 


ALBEMARLE-STANLY COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS — STANLY TECH SUM- 
MER SCHOOL 


Each summer Stanly Technical Institute cooperating with the Albemarle 
and Stanly County Schools provides opportunities for appropriately re- 
leased students 16 years of age and older to earn high school credits. 
Courses to be taken are recommended by the student's high school prin- 
cipal or guidance counselor. Standards for these courses are developed and 
approved by the local Superintendents. Classes may be taken during day or 
evening hours. Progress and credits earned are reported to the student's 
high school principal. 


Y3LNID SADUNOSAY ONINAVI 


117 


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CONTINUING EDUCATION 


Rapid changes in our modern society have necessitated that in- 
dividuals, businesses, and other organizations take advantage of ongoing 
learning opportunities in order to successfully cope with the new chal- 
lenges and conditions of our times. Thus, education more and more must 
become a process of lifelong learning. At Stanly Technical Institute a wide 
variety of non-credit, continuing education courses are a response to this 
need. They are organized by the Continuing Education Department and 
provide opportunities for an adult to: 


(1) obtain pre-employment training in order to find a job; 

(2) upgrade and update skills, increase abilities and advancement op- 
portunities; 

(3) complete high school; 

(4) improve personal and family life; 

(5) learn new arts and skills for greater enjoyment of leisure time. 


The continuing education program of Stanly Technical Institute is 
designed to make all of these objectives easier to reach by offering a large 
selection of subjects taught at convenient hours in convenient locations as 
frequently as needed. 


ENROLLMENT 


All persons eighteen (18) years of age or older who are not currently in 
high school are eligible for continuing education classes. Since these 
courses are generally non-credit, a high school diploma is not required. 


Persons wishing to take an adult education class are urged to Pre- 
Register for the class. This can be done very simply by telephone, letter, or 
personal visit to the Continuing Education Department. Since many classes 
must be limited in size, students will be admitted on a ‘first come’’ basis so 
that persons who have pre-registered will be given first priority. If a class is 
not filled, a student may register for the course by attending the first or sec- 
ond class meeting. 


COST 


A $5 registration fee is required for each continuing education course. 
Students should plan to pay the registration fee at the first meeting of the 
class, as well as have their Social Security numbers. The registration fee will 
not be refunded except in the case of a class which is discontinued by ad- 
ministrative personnel of the institution. A few courses such as driver 
education (roadwork only), multimedia first aid, and guitar will have ad- 
ditional charges. Students also will be expected to purchase their own text- 
books, as well as personal supplies and materials. Students sixty-five years 
of age or older are exempt from the $5 registration fee. 


CLASS HOURS AND LOCATIONS 


The meeting times and places of different classes will vary greatly, but 
they usually meet once or twice weekly on weekday evenings for two or 


NOILVINGI ONINNILNOD 


119 


CONTINUING EDUCATION 


120 


three hours. However, courses can be provided at any time which is 
agreeable to the persons involved. 


Although numerous courses will be taught on the Stanly Tech East cam- 
pus, many others will be taught wherever adequate facilities and equip- 
ment can be provided. 


AWARDS AND PERMANENT RECORDS 


Although continuing education courses are normally non-credit, 
student achievement in class may be recognized by the awarding of an at- 
tractive certificate showing the student’s name, the course title, and total 
hours. General requirements for the earning of a certificate are 75 per cent 
attendance and the achievement of minimum class objectives set forth by 
the instructor. 


A permanent record is kept of all students who complete adult edu- 
cation programs. Continuing Education Units (CEU's) will be awarded those 
who successfully complete instructional programs which are approved for 
this purpose. CEU’s are becoming a widely recognized method for 
measuring and recording the amount of training which an adult completes 
by means of non-credit courses. 


CONTINUING EDUCATION OPPORTUNITIES 


(Courses shown here are for illustration purposes only. 
Others are offered as the need arises.) 


Electrical, Mechanical and Building Trade Courses 


Air Conditioning and Heating Bricklaying 

Basic Electricity Automobile Mechanics 
Architectural Drafting Small Engine Repair 
Blueprint Reading Motorcycle Repair 
Industrial Welding Automobile Transmissions 


Business Education and Related 


Fundamentals of Real Estate Bookkeeping 
Personal Investments in Stocks Typing 

and Bonds Shorthand 
Secretarial Refresher Income Tax 
Cashier Training Money Management 


Industrial Services 


New and Expanding Industry Human Relations 

Training Effective Communications 
Supervisory Training Apprenticeship Training 
OSHA Courses 


Law Enforcement 
Firearms 
Police/Community Relations 
Civil Procedures 
Criminal Investigation 
Photography 


Fire Service Training 
Introduction to Firefighting 
Fire Apparatus Practices 


Hospitality and Food Service Education 


Quantity Cooking and Baking 
School Food Service 


Health and Safety Education 
Nurses’ Assistant Training 
Patient Assistant Training 
Alcohol Rehabilitation 
Multimedia First Aid 
Emergency Medical Technician 


Liberal and Language Arts Education 
Creative Writing 
Oral Communications 
Themes in Modern Novels 


Family Life and Consumer Education 
Buying a Home 
Couples Communication 
Sex Education 


Creative Arts and Homemaking 
Interior Design 
Oil Painting 
Ceramics 


ADULT BASIC EDUCATION 


Introduction to Police Science 
Accident Investigation 

Jail and Detention Services 
Introduction to Criminal Law 


Rescue Practices 
Forcible Entry 


Nutrition and Diet Therapy 
Food Service Supervision 


Medical Terminology 
Pharmacology 

Mental Health in Education 
Driver Education 


Speed Reading 
Writing Local History 
Stanly County History 


Family Budgeting 
Preparing for Retirement 
How to Live with your Kids 


Clothing Construction 
Tailoring 
Furniture Refinishing 


Stanly Tech provides training in math, reading, writing, consumer 
education, and other subjects for those adults whose basic educational 
skills are on grade levels one through eight. No registration fee is required 
for these courses and instructional materials are provided free of charge to 


the student. 


COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS 


Stanly Tech seeks to sponsor and promote a variety of community me 
vices which contribute to the cultural, economic, and civic improvement o 
the community. The following are some examples: workshops, community 
forums, art exhibits, resident musicians and artists, speaker and film presen- 
tations, occupational training for the disadvantaged and handicapped. 


NOILVINGI ONINNILNOD 


121 


I1dOdd 


STATE ADMINISTRATION 


OIC BUTTON: 65 ies. ee ees 


TAOS Gein inline iwi!’ yin» 


.... Chairman, State Board of Education 


President, Department of Community Colleges 


BOARD OF TRUSTEES 


Annie Ruth Kelley, Chairman 
805 Montgomery Avenue 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Richard Lane Brown, III 
Drawer 400 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


H. Otha Carter 
Route 3 
New London, North Carolina 


C. B. Crook, Jr. 
1017 Belvedere Drive 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Roy E. Dellinger 
Wiscassett Mills Company 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Gene Dry 
P. O. Box 790 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Hazel Efird 
Route 2 
Stanfield, North Carolina 


W. Chester Lowder 
Rt. 3, Box 60 
Norwood, North Carolina 


James H. Nance, Jr. 
Route 3 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Eugene Pickler 
Route | 
New London, North Carolina 


Edward J. Snyder, Jr. 

E. J. Snyder Company, Inc. 
Albemarle, North Carolina 
Elbert L. Whitley, Jr. 


539 W. Main Street 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 


SrARiEO RA BYRD.......+--++- 


President 


A.B., M.A.Ed., East Carolina University; Ed.D., Duke University 


MOE UR. 3. ee ee ee 


Ny At ied aren ae Director of Faculty 


B.S., M.A., Appalachian State University 
Ph.D., Middle Tennessee State University 


MOIS LEPP i.) 2) cee ness 


a ee a ee 


Vice President of Fiscal Affairs 


B.S., Accountancy, University of Illinois 


C.P.A., North Carolina — Virginia 


ROBERT J. WASHER ....----- eect? 
A.A., Campbell College 
B.S., M.A.Ed., East Carolina University 


Vice President of Student Services 
and Personnel 


UOIJDIJSIUIWIPY ‘S89ajsni] JO P1DOgG/FZ1dOId 


123 


PEOPLE/Faculty and Staff 


124 


FACULTY AND STAFF 


WANDA ADKISSON D208 5 ERP Pe Te ie tein ek Cashier 
A.A.S., Kings College 
RONNIE BARRIER ........... Acting Chairman, Vocational Department/ 


Electronic Engineering and Biomedical 
Equipment Technician Instructor 
A.A.S., Rowan Technical Institute 
Advanced Study — UNC-Charlotte 


ROBERT BREWER :facter cs. aera eee Cn er, eine aeiats Meeieaeere ore ca Criminal Justice 
A.A.S., Central Piedmont Community College 
B.S., UNC-Charlotte 
M.C.J., University of South Carolina 


BARBARA BYRD bbws kico Sie) ee Se ee vo eee Secretarial Science 
B.S., Georgia State College For Women 
M.S., University of Tennessee 


ROBIN COATES Si sti cari faked eae oem Learning Lab Coordinator 
B.A., UNC-Charlotte 

WIELIAM COMBER Git 0c siere mani tewe te ree eee nee Industrial Management 
B.S./M.E., New York University 

CLARA COLE Aeneid 51 00s Sere tact oie een tnd oh a1. cern ae Preschool Teacher 
A.A.S., Stanly Technical Institute 

JAHALIAH COOK ein tr rte ce gece Ui ay, Preschool Teacher 
A.A.S., Stanly Technical Institute . 

ALICE DAV Stee 2 8 Sate er rn rae ey Jae 0 > brary do Preschool Teacher 
A.A.S., Stanly Technical Institute 

FERD JE EERRE Litre, fa ei oP ile ce ae Pre-Admissions Counselor 
B.S., Campbell College 

IRIS FISHERS rst as eats Sime Ue a eee Counselor/Placement Officer 


B.S., Pfeiffer College 
M.A., Appalachian State University 


DAELAS FULEE Reet) as oan Renee, ga ake amr: Business Administration 
A.B., M.A., East Carolina University 

VICKIE; FURR aeeta. soar eae Demi: v emewt cs cate, Licensed Practical Nursing 
R.N., Cabarrus Memorial Hospital 

RUTH GOODWIN jee seule aare La eeemeate, hae Phy eee English 
B.S., M.A., East Carolina University 

FRANK. GOULDING 22. ete, en, ae ie aii Electrical Installation and 


Maintenance 
A.A., Tampa Technical Institute 
JEAN-GRANTHAMES ile ee) CNM Calan aia ec] ie de ee Reading 
B.A., Atlantic Christian College 
M.A., Appalachian State University 


DIANE/HARILEY .-tistaate. niet rer rein wee mans Duplicating Technician 
A.A.S., Stanly Technical Institute 


SOS EL. SUS Jal od S SS ee ort ee eS English 
B.S., Concord College 
M.A., Marshall University 
Advanced Study, NCSU 


i SE I cr Learning Lab Coordinator 
B.A., UNC-Chapel Hill 
MIN. ce lh eee ns Chairman, Allied Health Programs/ 


Science Instructor 
B.S., Wake Forest College 
M.S., Appalachian State University 
OSes USO) Se Chairman, Business Education Department/ 
Business Administration Instructor 
B.S., Pfeiffer College 
M.A., Appalachian State University 


DR MPIEEMINV AAR) ose ks ke a ve be ee eee GO Records Technician 
Morgan Business College 
PeelrONEY CULT... 66.26 cee ve tae ae Assistant to the Vice President 


of Fiscal Affairs 
A.A.S., Central Piedmont Community College 
a NGS a Business Administration 


B.A., UNC-Charlotte 
M.A. Degree Candidate UNC-Charlotte 


OSES 6) a orc a ee Auto Mechanics 
Diploma, Central Piedmont Community College 

POR IN he ete ee ees opal Director of Special Projects — 

HRD and ABE 

B.A., Pfeiffer College 

PODS V EN QMS 0: et ee Fashion Merchandising & Marketing 
BSHE, UNC-Greensboro 

Me CE Res? css ss Gacreats Eadie EP La dyete dha Bookkeeper 

MEO YININLOVVDER «20 bib see eee RT PR ON we Preschool Teacher 
A.A.S., Stanly Technical Institute 

SL et UNV S20 a re ee ce Auto Mechanics 
Diploma, Stanly Technical Institute 

er CAIN eto cant nies, bons plese a ini we el Be Program Developer 


A.A., Central Piedmont Community College 
B.A., UNC-Charlotte, Advance Study, UNC-Charlotte 


POS Se0 S16]. 0 ee ea Director, Day Care Center/ 
Teacher Associate 


A.A.S., Wilkes Community College 
B.S., Appalachian State University 
M.Ed., UNC-Charlotte 


WARE EPA 27 See PhD ea es 
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
M.Ed., North Carolina State University 
Advanced Study, North Carolina State University 


Director of Evening Programs 


HDS pub Ayjn204/31dO3d 


125 


PEOPLE/Faculty and Staff 


126 


KATHYIPAGE | cc ee PE TN A Ae ee Mathematics 
B.A., UNC-Chapel Hill 
M.A., UNC-Charlotte 


JAMES'PRIGE #3ecin Sp teniee ens eres Director of Learning Resources Center 
& Media Specialist 
A.B., Catawba College 
M.A., Appalachian State University 


RUSSELL SHARPLES. ........ whe sah Financial Aid/Veteran’s Coordinator 
B.A., Pfeiffer College 
M.A., UNC-Greensboro 


GEOFEREY SIEGE CIR, goto ccrrt tes it eee aoe ee Respiratory Therapy 
A.A., Sandhills Community College 
A.A.S., Central Piedmont Community College 


DORCAS-SILVER 22 tlic s acupremeae yicnlas, cute ieee Cietn mle tien © nae args Librarian 
B.A., Eastern Nazarene College 
M.A., UNC-Greensboro 


NELSON SILVERS S rata. stn cests ent vege: od eee eer ee Program Developer 
B.A., M.A., Pasadena College 
Advance Study, UNC-Greensboro 


ROGER SAAN Flt ainrataus ake tcen nie Uren erties tikes aly ee teem ae Program Developer 
Diploma, King’s Business College 
Diploma, Charlotte Barber School 

PAUTAISTIY ROIN Gir af .a'® o/c s een aioe AE ek Roe eae ae Teacher Associate 
A.B.T., High Point 
M.A.Ed., East Carolina University 

LONNIESWAINNER: }fctt ay ares, 2k, Director of Continuing Education 


A.S., Greenville Technical Institute 
B.S., University of South Carolina 


DIANESALBER Tes. teva ccnigr, tainty eric: eA) Sot ie eee ete or ee aa Registrar 
Graduate, Evans Business College 
Associate Degree Candidate, Stanly Technical Institute 


EVA THALL ER rs alitery asters aeons me cle anemic Eaten Meee Artist-In-Residence 
B.F.A., University of Tennessee 

KENNETH TIDWELLE © 50g). pe es ol eee Respiratory Therapy 
A.A.S., Durham Technical Institute 

TERESA TREXLER e's sit at ee rai eee cee Assistant Bookkeeper 

DAISY WASHINGION: iui o6 ces hare aclu ee, es ene CETA Coordinator 
B.A., Pfeiffer College 

GAY: WELSH Rt Bove ee ie ee Mere Baa nee ee Practical Nursing 


BSN, Rutgers University 
RN, State of North Carolina 
GENE VIAL By eras ioc ine enn, eae eaoan es el ere ae Auto Body Repair 
General Motors Training, Charlotte 
Ford Motor Company Training Center, Charlotte 


MMM Se ke i kh Preschool Nutritionist 
A.A.S., Stanly Technical Institute 
Cee ee. ee Director of Admissions 


and Marketing 
A.B., Pfeiffer College 


Advanced Study, UNC-Charlotte 


STATE STAFF 


Alleen Blackwell. ....... Area Coordinator-Hospitality Training Specialist 
East Carolina University 
Graduate, Holiday Inn Hotel/Motel School, Memphis, Tennessee 


RM GOD, Ais, ode so we ee Area Coordinator-Fire Training Specialist 
A.A.S., Rowan Technical Institute 

ME EGCKSON ... 0... c ce ee ee Area Coordinator-Law Enforcement 
MMe’ CHES: fa ee. Area Coordinator-Chemical Tests 
for Alcohol Training 

al Ba ele ew wie Secretary, Area Coordinators 
Me DEMCOKES. wk. tc ee ee ee Secretary, Area Coordinators 

OFFICE PERSONNEL 

og elas voc nieces vce Evening Receptionist/Secretary 
Patricia Burleson........ Secretary, Director of Admissions and Marketing 
RM MM Me Tek ok ck ee ee ns Receptionist/Secretary to Faculty 
VETER Ais ee eek Secretary, Vice President of Student 
Services and Personnel 

Re EMS she ke es ps es vise cee om Secretary, President 
BaroaronvigyiOn............. Secretary, Director of Continuing Education 
aa.) 1 is el) aa a an rr Secretary, Business Office 
PeCMSINOOSON..... ........- Secretary, Director of Learning Resources Center 
BENT OKICINIOPG. «eos ee ee oe Records Secretary, Continuing Education 
Pera ieee ee Bree as ohh a PS Secretary, Director of Faculty 
mney Wotts so... Secretary, Director of Special Projects — ABE & HRD 

MAINTENANCE STAFF 

RVC ee cee ea Gre) se op ks vee eas Maintenance Coordinator 
on SA BE TS alia eee Oa ANE i ti Wa ine SNS Hane Oi ergy ern near Maintenance Staff 
oe OT ES Pale Et AEs ene ae ree mere ea eg Maintenance Staff 
BERTI IRO VERT oe fps ds. © gaan d Ann sao n,n, HES Be Maintenance Staff 
NUS 8 SR ae oe ee eC Maintenance Staff 


re er Doren nee sed ee wea Sat Pte Pes Maintenance Staff 


Se CCMDEIINC Etc orale asn ates Foe a ae ped oh eee a oh Maintenance Staff 


DiS pup AjjndD4/41dO3d 


127 


INDEX 


128 


Academic Calendars 29 37's # eo5 y knee Bek Se Pee ee ee eee ee 2 


Academic Probation... ucige Paton. oa bea « SARTRE SR, PERE, od ete 22 
Academic Suspensionp vices ss 25 vies etn Ha es a ns oe ae a am 23 
ACOGEMIC Y OG verre. 5 one 5 aise chase ee piste otolakd ht ce ant hS ot cure earn te ee, ee ye 
PECOUNTIAGQ core ate ahah Bidialinle, Ore hi oil aa toe pe SMe ies rae Hevea tna seamen ete Neier ter eetemeen 34 
Administrative Office Hours’) ic 65 2b fe. bak aie scetie tas iReie te tena eee ee cena a 7 
Administrative Officers? ts) 60028 2 <0 ..0... - RRR A i A, Eee 123 
Admission: Policies a iescts iets Goesnad 2 uk Hote alate 5 a ious ohne. ote bi att eos) @ ee poeenene eevee 10 
Adult High School Diploma Programing. «5-year etree orien tere 116 
Advisors. se. 3b shew aes sc pins sans oh tele ecm Ain dake 2 eg, eee yee eee 24 
Agricultural Business Technology. sacs «scr «sine csi aye eases eae eee ee Gel ereiene oat ee 36 
Albemarle-Stanly County Public Schools-Stanly Tech Summer School ............... HZ 
Alumni Association’ et Sen ne Sa ck wis fe 2c eta anh pee eee ere 29 
Areasiot Study sucm tet. uekhe A asaadet LacuB BW aa eR Coe 7 
Automotive Body Repaitivas sic jhilseccs cyne deo occa) tea tine enn Stcie oneness eee ane 37 
Automotive Mechanics SS." 35 SRFF Sita ia tld GUERIN vw aye do ce Siemens Salih adie wells, at Sham) Sp 40 
Biomedical Equipment’ Technology:'. 2. .'\. mae ki-leeh: (eit attinees ce eeeaneet oka ee: 42 
Boord GFT musteest oh isis oak ete cs oe ee cron hee en 123 
BOoKSIONd SUPPIIGST A pote ata eee Rds Contr hs oe bai as orn Ap ta ee ee Oe atc 23 
Bookstore Operating Procedure: caspadh «ica: «this et ote ates ee ee oe oe 24 
Business AdMinistrationy..- 4.2 2c gist eos oe eee) hie kis tee et tee ee ee 44 
Class Attendances: so iia... sc os pale cous ot ve 89 ele be aoe Gal ee 3 ae i rie 23 
Glass Ringsci0i, eG, AU, thie ccssn av epe e's ond tbs va ede ds Reed anne: 2 open ae 28 
Class Schecttsley cais x3. 54’ te toed Stag aheca eS, si ceccs ar eoauains soe Deven eck eet ce 7 
Continuing EGUCOHIOn« «hae «ae crea hee. ohne edt a eata a oRieciee oh chen 119 

Adult Basie Education: x ic seco ie + « doce in eoeeins alee aie sieve 6 enh ee 121 

Awards and Permanent Recordsie. 0. Ad tines ccs vce blanc ste cae eet eee 120 

Class:Hours.and kocations:... ses, eee aie eee head Sled oes aes eter eee 119 

Community Service Programm’... .1+ as sae ce ean wae © ek eee nae ee teen 121 

Continuing Education Opportunities: . 5.5 3.."5 tevets © ob eparb i house = cee 120 

COSte ERT TA EER, 1 PINE sae Eee: © hoe nes rene ALI SP 119 

Em rolirrieri tpt Reyes SPAR Ge EN, ccs toy ose So Se adie iallbv cs ota awe we ate We Oe 119 
Counselingn. task wait aad Clyro ad o> souls oa > Dake es aah oe 27 
Course AvuGiting rs: apa iinagitly's 6 8.4 tad want ACSL Rete Cie ieeat ee eee Ree 20 
Course Descriptions? 7... cat iagt ah rea IR > iv x Ss fd. ata ee eee 79 
Course: Substitutionwed.) ieee Met © weak ltatale 25 cue) cc, Sacls Rees su ae eee 21 
Credit’ Dy EXAMINGON Westnet. cry ere a SURE eye crater ce ey teas ie kane ane 20 
Criminal Justices 5% MNS ok ican Ya eats alates Rota eee eee eee 46 
Dean's Liste owas gasirniaies ste aed VEEP 5 es acces = = a 21 
Drop/Add and Withdrawal Procedures® 5 seK ts.» oo se so oe, oo ond 21 
Electrical Installatiomand Maintenance ta. 0.) sae a aie ee antenna ee ee 48 
Electron iG Servicing.) Acide ee coe ey ide pal et a clas seagate 50 
Electronics Engineering fechnology 1p seins 7 setae © ce a cael ae ee ee arene 52 
Expenses a giltrie dc, cet tis tia da sete ieee tere eae eH Fates ely eee ar 14 
Extra-CorriculariActivities i. 3:25). cue 2S, 3 2 Gi cote 01g Sn SA eae a7 
Faculty: and Sto ff cdi 1a) ths Susatadaca ee A MN WOES BPERTOMR, cs co sine ce pee 124 
Fashion Merchandising Association .............00 eee eeee Pee ier hoe, oe 28 
Fashion Merchandising and Marketing Technology. ... 2... 0... c cece scene ne eenes 54 
hi * SERN Meh entaareeieaie Mee Abram oda) gets Bela Muted Mean Loy Vos tith cyte 14 
Financial Aid terivires ats = 2.5. via Kg oe be deh gah so i oe. Eee eee 16 
General Education College Program... sc « oa:4s «seis Sonne Aa ne ee oe 56 
General Officeslechriology. 3s iius us pugs cern tes where alaareee eee teeny ae 60 
Grade Reports.and Transcripts: +. 4 se... + aston § GO 4 Miata) a pee 20 
Grading Systeniasier maha 9 ica bce vas cots legeck OE Ue ek ee a 19 
Graduation: Requirements et ecuabuame. occis «4 sola hba cic oats verse eee ne a ee 19 
Health Services and FirswAid etc <) c-fs0 tance ie alr is ainda ise gene 29 
High School'Equivalency (GED)! a) i503. AS ee ae 1417 
Histo rye vena oe! 255s! An ate RG ES Me AT RMR 2 | a a a 6 
Housitig 2aiscivaiene ai lancer Paidis ta. i naan Mirai! fre 2 te eee 29 


2s bie AP cag haa SE An ee et ga A a 62 
I en A Gee. yi ude Pon oso of cod tke hoe sce ce oa if) 
Re TOR ete Min HEA Pe le ola Soma es Don dS e J laoéd ove. fo ee. 29 
RON BEEP YS EG Bo ST area «ia ee 15 
a Pe ie enV Falta! (oa hihi ig Mu sls sede cca Be coed ok le. 116 
IIE eC OSREOGn er Mant (eters A ss ec ks akon le eeeeen.. 116 
UM CL HART rte 6.) take ee eee aid hon oe ak Cov ae cc ws 116 
PENIS TONE ES a (PE ta LAS ok Gg Eda < ck cov m bbw eo Ua baleen 127 
EMCEE Prac nee ee Se ere ee 116 
Tae) aT CEES (Tay HO ac 64 
ET a Bs CARD Ca TSI, A Soa ae ae a 12s 
UR PEG: Peres oem EPRI Lo. Vis be ind g Pc ce Been de aes 10 
RI NUMER eu eM DUS a Te sco wake ces aldcci sth’ i Lawn died eee e Ca 27 
IRE ECUCONGN te ye sn oreo. sal, alitadlv bes v catwaccaeceeea tu 66 
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RI Se eI PC Ne ea gs alardias bale wine che a ele eile a a 23 
a ae eel BINNS Ge aE eg 6 
Er etre Ts OER STN Ued Apis ss Glee Wig stile baevew sve ccnbawd 12 
PR nee ats ye Sis y's aialacelols go's sla bee basa wees 15 
IIE ea eee. ites fcvete sca ai hy J wis, O's wleialaieis sate dbs bana ee 12 
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RET HS OAD My ee elt, wad Vise toh tie ovis as We eRe N eves s wate eles hae 28 
IMICTCUDY TECHMICION «4s... cf oes lace ele os Sha mete eee ae ena wes 68 
MBO tr se URAL ee St Ay it ehiats vac ieia aisle ae bss alets odie este was 15 
EROTIC PEOOTESS 19. .ig) hea cs vgs eels bie shee ee ee hee 22 
II i ll ee ag 17 
a et ee es eg vip bel aih a, Wig eyiys in es ae else ble ve peels 19 
TO TON Veg)! Coe e igh eta ay 4h lane 5 aoe bye ale we ele eke eos ee wee 70 
pociety for Biomedical Equipment Technicians .... 2.25... ec cee teen 28 
ae GE ISU cil, Gd baie goo alte 6 a t's whee loies vw eweneee 28 
ENS ONS ie ey al Wieie wala os diye be Linen ie moe Wink ay 1] 
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eS a nS ee cine aie 30 
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RTE MO Peete ee lc yrs eigity slates c Mince at ee ee we ees Ree a as 27 
RPEEMIREE SIMUEEM FFOCGOUIC si.) cc dic 8 eee sale tee be ca ee vb eee eee eee. 30 
ee Saye ay LE SSO See ens cn ee 28 
MTC rLe PRT ey er NS Cho ei crats Dic) whee eicial no a eieis sels oF ae ele be 24 
BET IRGSIC@NCO GCIOSSITICOHION: 66 -c ss ae elecls ee ce cee we ee ee ew eed ae ae 17 
Student Rights and Responsibilities... 6.6... 6... cece eee eee eee tenes 30 
ies (ha) MS 8 RGN See ee ee ae ae 76 
a ee Sota Rrer PA a SEEN POTS OF EAE SES Sot On nec Urn ee nt ea ea 72 
ia nee TAN or oee) a pics nists niin ve dl a aielp Dove ss snes Hale ee a ee 11 
eee MMR RR EN A ic fet ce lowe al ce nl old hy aeyoes a Ae wh eee a Belg mln wig dale» 12 
Tuition (For Continuing Education Courses)... 2... 5... see resect tenets 119 
TIONA TOR CUITICUIUIM.COUISES) «0 5 ii eee ne re hee ete encore ree nas 14 
UNCC-STI Students Association. ..........--2+055 FO, a i BNE Dae eA a ye ee 28 
Cate ET. at eg a dl a rae a a eR a 27 
Veteran’s Educational Benefits. .......- es eee eee eee reer eer eter ener eeeeeee i, 
MOCOHIOnal INSITUCIO‘S...6 boise eee kee ee Rt eee wens Ber Cees ot ata es 


er Re ile ey ocak tale aa dha ene he nae en 


XIGNI 


Stanly Technical College SOR are 
Albemarle, North Carolina 28001 U.S. POSTAGE PAID 


ALBEMARLE, N.C. 28001 
Tel. 982-0121 PERMIT NO. 16