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STANLY isttitt 


CATALOG 
1973-1974 


THE CATALOG 


The purpose of the catalog is to furnish prospective students and other 
interested persons with information about Stanly Technical Institute and 
its programs. Announcements contained in this catalog are subject to 
change without notice and may not be regarded as binding obligations on 
the Institute or the State. Changes will be kept to a minimum, but 
changes in policy by the State Board of Education, the Department of 
Community Colleges, or by the local Board of Trustees may require 
alterations in curricula, fees, etc. 


STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


621 Wall Street 
ALBEMARLE, NORTH CAROLINA 28001 


GENERAL CATALOG 


1973-74 

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Lae nee ee EE TE 


VOLUME | January 1973 


LL 


FOREWORD 


Stanly Technical Institute is oriented toward the community it serves. 
The school offers opportunity to the human being who could become an 
outstanding contributor to the world, but who would never have been 
educated to do the job unless this institution existed in the community. 
Stanly Technical Institute opens its doors to any qualified resident. 
Geographic, social and economic barriers will not bar these doors of 
individual privilege, potential and opportunity. 

The individuals who operate Stanly Technical Institute believe the 
keystone of our democracy is the value placed on the human personality. 
This school will continue to make the democratic invitation to each in- 
dividual who seeks to live a meaningful life by reaching his full poten- 
tialities. 

ST! will always be the servant of the people by providing the highest 
quality in all educational programs. High individual performance, con- 
sistent with the standards established by the Board of Trustees and 
faculty, is encouraged. 

This catalog will give the reader an overview of Stanly Technica! In- 
stitute, a school that realizes the needs of people and attempts to meet 
those needs, a school built on ways to bring its students opportunities, a 
school interested in the welfare of its community. 


Charles H.’Byrd 
President 


TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 

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BES EE RAG TTA CTS Lami th eel fo Go ee A UAC RDS a sick cies Cy CMe cayman LZ 
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Srucenmrights and Responsibilities 23.2 we Sarg es tea ek ee 20 
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BT MCaTiLGGhieVaAnCe ProceGureS ieese tc sein ae eal ue cone err 21 


Student Appeal . 6.025)... aeieen pe eae eee ok Bg ee eee eric 21 


Technical DiviSion: . 2.6.5 2 8ee she On a ee ne) ae 24 
Admission Requirements..........--.2--2 esses terete treet ees 25 
Admission Procedure occ ic 2 ise foc sels Si ee 25 
CUICEITUIAS fi sid geese al eo Sk eas care ne 26 

ACCOUNTING 2. nba be es te) se aielhae hee iota 26 
Prisiness AGMInIStration wa: \ sep, +: cules fs te) ere ee itl 
Commercial Art & Advertising Design .............--..5-++555 38 
Early Childhood Specialist ............------ sss seewe esse 45 
General Office Technology... 4.4... 205. is ee 51 
industrial Management 6." so. S208 el ae eel ce a7! 
Secretarial Science — EXecutiVe | 7. fincim .. eee eee 64 
Sacretarial Science — L@gal 2.2 ie. ce ee rit 
Secretarial’Science-— Medical). en ee een ld, 

Vocational DiViSION: . -.seee nt eee eras © en cape eRe 84 
Admission Requirements 4.2.9 2s 2 eee eae ee ree 85 
Admission Procedure <8: ciciec8 ee an ee eee 85 
CUrricUlUums ak: 2 jcche eee eos eee eae re ee 86 

Auto: Body. Repalt'a: cask satis ee ae eee etna 86 
Electrical Installation & Maintenance ......................005. 89 
Electronic Servicing ui res. oat ila snes eee rege ee 92 
Masonry (2% eobiat tire eta! Lela, oa kn rl aie ee ae 95 
PracticaliNUrSinGaom cede ee ee ee Se EMEP 2 it 97 

Continuing EGUCaTION DIVISION ease cy enters are eye ee 102 
Basic: Philosophy and RUrpOSC seen ae niet ce eee eee 102 
Registration'and AdmISSION Vy). (eee eae ere eee rn ee 102 
Formation Of GlasSesicg ny sri eer nc as ge ee ee 102 
GlassHOUrs' andslOGatlonS set ele en 103 
Award and'Attendance ive sence ee ee 103 
Program. OtferingSige soto ee Oe arg Cash eer ec a erie ere 103 
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Adult BasiGEd UuCationimirce tase tien citrate ee 105 

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GIDrary he Bees oe ee iad A iat) ee oe 108 
Audio-Visual aboratory sac eee ee eee 108 
Eearning:aboratory. iti at oc ie ne eee ee eee oe 108 
HighschoolEquivalency GED) gre) a) gee eee 109 
Adult: High SchoolDiplomaie earns. ree 110 

Personnelotthelnstitute seen ck elt ee 111 
State Administhationecs screener. ice pica Ce Re eee eee TPZ 
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Maintenance iimctaek 25 ce ee re 114 


ETNIES 


SWS" 


RO a 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


ACADEMIC CALENDAR — 1973-74 


September 4 
September 5 
September 6, 7 


September 10 
September 21 
November 14 
November 22, 23 
November 26, 27, 28 


November 29, 30 
December 3 


December 4 

December 14 

December 19 

December 20 - January 1 
January 2 

February 13 

February 27, 28, March 1 


March 4 

March 5 

March 6 

March 15 

April 12 and 15 
April 16 

May 15 

May 22, 23, 24 


May 27, 28 
June 4 

June 5 

June 14 

July 4,5 
August 21, 22 
August 23 
August 23 


FALL QUARTER 
Tuesday Faculty Orientation 
Wednesday Registration 
Thurs. - Fri. Faculty Work Days and Schedule 
Adjustment 
Monday lst day classes—Fall Quarter 
Friday Last Day for Drop-Add 
Wednesday Pre-registration for Winter Quarter 
Thurs. - Fri. Thanksgiving Holidays 
Mon. - Wed. Exams 


WINTER QUARTER 


Thurss Fri 
Monday 


Tuesday 
Friday 
Wednesday 
Tuesday 
Wednesday 
Wednesday 
Wed. - Fri. 


Grade Averaging and Reporting 

Registration and Schedule 
Adjustment 

lst Day Classes—Winter Quarter 

Last Day Drop-Add 

Last Day Classes (Christmas) 

Christmas and New Year's Holidays 

Classes Resume 

Pre-registration for Spring Quarter 

Final Exams 


SPRING QUARTER 


Monday Grade Averaging and Reporting 
Tuesday Registration and Schedule Adjustment 
Wednesday lst Day Classes—Spring Quarter 
Friday Last Day Drop-Add 
Fri. and Mon. Easter Holidays 
Tuesday Classes Resume 
Wednesday Pre-registration for Summer Quarter 
Wed. - Fri. Final Exams 

SUMMER QUARTER 
Mon. - Tues. Grade Averaging and Reporting 
Tuesday Registration and Schedule Adjustment 
Wednesday lst Day of Classes—Summer Quarter 
Friday Last Day of Drop-Add 
Thurs, Fr, Independence Day Holiday 
Wed. - Thurs. Final Exams 
Friday Grade Averaging and Reporting 


Friday 


Graduation 


Pm ren Noe nai NO Cy 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


HISTORY 


Stanly Technical Institute was established in July, 1971, under the 
authority of the 1963 Community College Act. However, the College did 
not officially open until December, 1971. Following petitions by the 
county and city boards of education and the Stanly County Board of 
Commissioners, the late Senator Frank Patterson and the Honorable 
Richard Lane Brown III, were successful leaders in gaining approval by 
the North Carolina General Assembly to establish a technical institute. 
Before the end of 1971, a board of trustees was appointed, an 
organizational meeting held and a president chosen. 

The temporary instructional facilities and administrative space were 
previously occupied by South Albemarle High School. Enrollment figures 
tell a dramatic story of Stanly Tech. The cumulative number of students 
who have taken courses at the College has grown from 31 in December, 
1971, to over two thousand in December, 1972. The College enrollment 
is principally from Stanly County. 

Stanly Tech has been highly successful in attracting a competent Staff 
and faculty. Experienced faculty members with expertise bring 
preparation and dedication to their teaching. They see helping students 
as achieving their purpose. 

Today the College is a co-education institution offering two-year 
technical, vocational, extension and general adult courses. The College is 
governed by a twelve-member board of trustees. Each member Is a 
county resident and gives freely of his time to guide the operation of the 
institution. 


PURPOSE 


Stanly Technical Institute was established as a comprehensive two- 
year institution to provide appropriate, economic, and convenient 
learning opportunities for all citizens beyond the normal high school age. 
Flexible programs of the Institute are designed to: 

Provide two years of technical education appropriate to the needs of 
the individual and the community. 

Provide vocational education for persons who wish to prepare for a 
trade or increase their present skill. 

Provide adult education based on community needs and interest with 
special emphasis on basic education courses for grades 1-8, high school 
diploma programs, high school equivalency certificates, and cultural and 
community service programs. 

Stanly Technical Institute has a continuing concern for the total 
welfare of each student. The school seeks to cultivate in each student 
healthy mental attitudes, development of abilities and talents, establish- 


8 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


ment of human relationships, and motivation for progress in intellectual 
understanding. 


THE OPEN DOOR ADMISSION POLICY 


Stanly Technical Institute maintains the “‘open door” admissions policy 
adopted by the comprehensive Community College System of North 
Carolina. To the student who comes with a willingness to learn, an entry 
program at his level of capability will be provided. The Institute attempts 
to instill in each student a sense of worth as a participating, worthwhile, 
and dignified member of his community and the whole human family. 


THE ACADEMIC YEAR 


The school year is divided into four quarters of 55 school days. All 
credits are earned in quarter hours. The course description section of 
this catalog will indicate the number of credits required for graduation in 
each program. 


THE LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 


The Learning Resources Center for Stanly Technical Institute is 
located at the main campus. 

The purpose of the Learning Resources Center, which consists of the 
Learning Laboratory, Library and the Audio-Visual Laboratory, is to 
serve all the educational programs of the institution and other con - 
munity needs. The collection of 1,520 volumes and units available in the 
fall of 1972 included books, magazines, newspapers, A-V and 
programmed materials. 

The Institution has determined the Center to be a place where lear- 
ning occurs, not one in which printed and non-printed media are merely 
Stored. 

The Learning Resources Center is open from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
Monday through Friday, and from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Monday 
through Thursday evenings. 


AREAS OF STUDY 
Technical Curriculums 
Accounting 
Business Administration 
Commercial Art and Advertising Design 
Early Childhood Specialist 
General Office Technology 
Industrial Management 
Secretarial Science — Executive — Legal — Medical 
Students completing the required hours in these technical curriculums 


are awarded the Associate in Applied Science Degree. See the technical 
(yellow) section of this catalog for course descriptions. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 9 


Vocational Curriculums 

Auto Body Repair 

Electrical Installation and Maintenance 

Electronic Servicing 

Masonry 

Practical Nursing * 

Students completing the requirements for these vocational! 

curriculums are awarded a diploma. See the vocational (blue) division of 
this catalog for course descriptions. 


ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 


All correspondence concerning admissions should be addressed to the 
Director of Student Personnel. 

Stanly Technical Institute foilows the ‘‘open door” policy required by 
the State Board of Education. This policy provides for admission of any 
North Carolina citizen who has attained the age of eighteen, or whose 
high school class has been graduated. This policy implements the 
philosophy of the North Carolina Community College System that Stanly 
Technical Institute has educational opportunities open to all educational 
levels and that, through effective guidance, a person can find his place in 
a proper educational program. 

A high school diploma or its equivalent is desirable for admission to full 
time educational programs. Some exceptions may be made for tn- 
dividuais whose age and maturity make successful completion in a given 
program seem likely. 

See individual course descriptions in this catalog for specific admission 
requirements, prerequisites, etc., for each curriculum. 


ADMISSION CRITERIA 


An applicant to Stanly Technical Institute should request his high 
school to submit a transcript showing graduation. High school seniors 
should have their school submit a transcript showing work through the 
first semester of the senior year and a supplementary transcript upon 
graduation. 

An applicant holding the high school equivalency certificate should 
submit a copy of the certificate, and ask his high school to submit a 
transcript of all work done at the school. 

Transcripts of previous education in colleges and technical institutions 
should be submitted to this institution. All transcripts must come to the 
office of Student Personnel from schools involved, not from the applicant. 

In most cases students are required to take admission tests prior to 
entrance. These tests are designed for proper placement of the student 
in the curriculum in which he may excel. These tests are not designed to 
eliminate any student. There is no charge for the testing or counseling. 


ce Contingent upon approval by North Carolina Board of Nursing. 


10 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


All students are required to complete a statement regarding their 
physical condition. In some curriculums a physical examination by a 
physician is required. 

All students are required to have an interview with a counselor from 
the Office of Student Personnel. 


RESIDENT STATUS 


Out-of-state students are admitted under the same criteria as in-state 
students. Tuition and fees are established by the State Board of 
Education. Such tuition and fees approximate two and one half times the 
amount charged North Carolina residents. 

A legal resident of North Carolina is one who has his dwelling in this 
State. It is important that each applicant for admission and each enrolled 
Student understand the regulations and know his residence status for 
tuition payment. The following rules are guidelines. 


1. Aperson twenty-one years of age or older is not deemed eligible 
for the lower tuition rate unless he has maintained his legal 
residence in North Carolina for at least six months preceding the 
date of his first enrollment in an institution of higher education 
in this state. 

2. The legal residence of a person under twenty-one years of age at 
the time of his first enrollment in an institution of higher 
education in this state is that of his parents, surviving parent, or 
legai guardian. In cases where parents are divorced or legally 
separated the legal residence of the father will control unless 
custody of the minor was awarded by court order to the mother 
or to a legal guardian other than a parent. No claim of residence 
in North Carolina based upon residence of a guardian in North 
Carolina will be considered if either parent is still living unless 
the action of the court appointing the guardian antedates the 
Student's first enrollment in a North Carolina institution of 
higher education by at least twelve months. 

3. The residence status of any student is determined at the time of 
his first enrollment in an institution of higher education in North 
Carolina and may not thereafter be changed except (a) in the 
case of a nonresident minor student at the time of his first 
enrollment whose parents have since established legal 
residence in North Carolina, and (b) in the case of a resident 
who abandons his legal residence in North Carolina. In either 
case, the appropriate tuition rate will become effective at the 
beginning of the quarter or term next following the date of 
change of residence status. 

4. The legal residence of a wife follows that of her husband, except 
that a woman currently enrolled in the institution as a resident 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 11 


may continue as a resident even though she may marry a 
nonresident. 

9. Military personnel attached to military posts or installations in 
North Carolina are not considered eligible for the lower tuition 
rate unless they have maintained a legal residence in the state 
for six months preceding the date of his first enrollment in an 
institution of higher education in the state. 

6. Aliens lawfully admitted to the United States for permanent 
residence who have established a legal residence in North 
Carolina according to paragraphs 1, 2, or 4, above are eligible for 
the lower tuition rate. 

7. Ownership of property in or payment of taxes to the State of 
North Carolina apart from legal residence will not qualify one for 
the lower tuition rate. 

Any student or prospective student in doubt concerning his residence 
Status must bear the responsibility for securing a ruling by stating his 
case in writing to the Office of the Registrar. 

Incomplete or incorrect information regarding residence may result in 
the student's being dismissed from the institution. 


TRANSFER STUDENTS 


The Director of Student Personnel will review applications for ad- 
mission with advanced standing. Where subject content and length of 
course are comparable with those in the curriculum applied for, credit 
may be allowed for grades of C or above. Transfer credits will not in- 
fluence the student’s grade point average while attending Stanly 
Technical Institute. In cases where both school and student agree that an 
alternate course would be more beneficial to the student, such alternate 
course may be permitted. 


ADMISSION OF FORMER STUDENTS 
Any former student who left the school in good standing Is encouraged 
to enroll for additional study. 
REGISTRATION 


Applicants who have been admitted and have paid their admission 
deposit will be notified of the date for registration. At registration 
students will be assigned class schedules, pay their fees, and purchase 
their books. A fee of $5 is charged for late registration. 


TUITION 


Since the College receives financial support through local, state and 
federal sources, tuition is very low. Tuition charges are set by the North 
Carolina State Board of Education and are subject to change without 


re STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


notice. For in-state students registered for credit courses, tuition and 
fees are as follows: 
Students enrolled for 13 credit hours or more — $32 per quarter 
Students enrolled for fewer than 13 credit hours — $2.50 per credit 
hour 
Out-of-State students: 
Tuition for out-of-state students is computed at two and one half times 
the amount established for in-state students. 


FEES 


Student Publication and Activity Fee: 
Full-time student $5 per quarter 
Part-time student $3 per quarter 


BOOKS AND SUPPLIES 


It is the student's responsibility to obtain the required textbooks and 
supplies prior to the first meeting of a class. The College maintains a 
bookstore from which the student may purchase the necessary books 
and supplies. 


SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS 


Applicants are required to submit a deposit with the completed ap- 
plication form. A $5 deposit for application to technical and vocational 
curriculums is necessary. This deposit is non-refundable but is applied to 
the student’s tuition at time of enrollment. 

All tuition charges are to be paid in full on registration day. 

No student will be permitted to graduate, nor will a transcript be 
issued until all financial obligations to the business office are satisfied. 


REFUNDS 


Tuition refunds will only be considered during the first ten calendar 
days of the quarter. Two-thirds of a student’s tuition will be refunded if, 
in the judgment of Stanly Technical Institute officials, a student is 
compelled to withdraw for unavoidable reasons during that time. If a 
course or a curriculum fails to materialize all tuition will be refunded. 

If a student, having paid the required tuition and fees for a quarter, 
withdraws from the Institute with the permission of the administration, 
the student may be allowed credit for unrefunded tuition if he applies for 
readmission in any of the next four quarters. Written request for this 
arrangement must be made. 

Veterans or war orphans who receive financial aid under U. S. Code, 
Title 38, Chapters 33 and 35, can be refunded the pro rata portion of the 
tuition fee not used at the time of withdrawal. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 13 


ACADEMIC REGULATIONS 
DEGREES — DIPLOMAS 


Degree Programs Defined 


Stanly Technical Institute will confer the Associate in Applied Science 
Degree in all technical curriculums. This degree is conferred in the 
name of the North Carolina State Board of Education when all 
requirements for graduation have been satisfied. 


Diploma Programs Defined 


Stanly Technical Institute will award a State Diploma in all trade 
curriculums. This diploma will be awarded in the name of the North 
Carolina State Board of Education when all requirements for graduation 
have been satisfied. 


DEGREE AND DIPLOMA 
REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 


The following requirements are established as a minimum for the 
Associate in Applied Science Degree and State Diploma. 


1. Complete all course requirements of the curriculum, earning at 
least a 2.0 grade point average in courses required for 
graduation. 

2. Apply for graduation to the Director of Student Personnel one 
quarter prior to the quarter in which work is completed. 

3. Be recommended by the chairman of the curriculum in which 
work has been completed. 

4. Earn at least one-fourth of the credits required for a degree from 
this institution. 

5. Fulfill all financial obligations to the Institute. 

6. Be present for graduation exercises which are held during the 
last week of August. In cases of unavoidable circumstances 
exceptions to this requirement may be granted by the Director 
of Student Personnel. During graduation exercises candidates 
must be dressed in proper academic attire, as determined by the 
President of the Institution. 


SCHOLASTIC STANDARDS 


At the end of each academic quarter quality points are assigned by the 
following formula. (The minimum grade point average for graduation Is 
2.0 or a grade average of C.) 


A—4 quality points per credit hour 
B—3 quality points per credit hour 
C—2 quality points per credit hour 
D—1 quality point per credit hour 


14 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


Grades of F, W, AU, and | yield no quality points. Quality ratings are 
determined by dividing the total number of quality points by the number 
of credit hours attempted. If a course is repeated, the last grade will be 
used in computing the student’s hour-quality point ratio. A ratio of 2.0 
indicates that the student has an average of C; above 2.0 indicates that 
he has an average above; below 2.0 indicates that he has an average 
below C. 


GRADING SYSTEM 


A — 93-100 Superior 

B — 86-92 Above Average 
C — 78-85 Average 

D — 70-77 Passing 

F — Below 70 Unsatisfactory 
W — Withdrawal 

| — Incomplete 

AU — Audit 


Incomplete: Incomplete is assigned to a student who is unable to 
complete a course or take his final exam for unavoidable reasons. This 
grade must have the approval of the Director of Student Personnel. An 
incomplete must be removed within the next quarter the student is 
enrolled. Otherwise the incomplete becomes an F. 


COURSE AUDITING 


Students who wish to audit courses must register through normal 
channels. Auditors receive no credit and are encouraged to attend class 
regularly and participate in class discussions. Auditors will be charged 
the same fees as students taking courses for credit. 


GRADE REPORTS AND TRANSCRIPTS 


Shortly after the end of each quarter student grade reports are 
available to students in the Office of the Registrar. 


Transcripts of the student’s record will be sent to other schools, 
prospective employers or to the student himself if an official request Is 
made to the registrar’s office by the student. 

Grade reports and transcripts are withheld by the registrar until all 
Student obligations to the Institute have been met. 


DEANS LIST 


| Soon after the end of each quarter the Institute publishes a Deans List 
in order to honor students who have earned outstanding scholastic 
records. To be named to the Deans List, a student must take a minimum 


of 12 quarter hours of work and earn at least a B (3.0) average with no 
grade lower than C. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 15 


GRADUATION EXERCISES 


Graduation exercises are held at the end cf the Summer Quarter on 
the date published in the academic calendar. Degrees and diplomas are 
awarded at this time. 

Graduating students must fulfill all financial obligations to the In- 
stitute and be present for graduation exercises. 


CHANGES IN GRADES 


A grade may be changed only through mutual agreement of the 
Director of Occupational Education and the involved faculty member. 


PROFICIENCY EXAMINATIONS 


In some areas of instruction Proficiency Examinations will be available 
for those students who wish to demonstrate competency. 

To obtain the Proficiency Examination the steps below will be 
followed: 


1. The student should consult his advisor and the curriculum 
chairman concerning the possibility of a special examination in 
the area in which he excels. 

2. The curriculum chairman and /or advisor will consult with the 
Director of Occupational Education. Upon their consensus, the 
date of the examination will be set. The examination may be 
written, oral, or both. 

3. The student will appear at the designated time and place to take 
the proficiency examination. The course number and number of 
credit hours will be entered on the student’s record (upon 
successful completion of the examination.) No quality points will 
be given. 


CLASS ATTENDANCE 


Absences are a serious deterrent to good scholarship. It is impossible 
to receive instruction, obtain knowledge or gain skill when absent. As all 
Students are adults with many responsibilities, an occasional absence 
from class might be absolutely necessary. However, such absences in no 
way lessen the student’s responsibility of meeting the requirements of 
the class. There is always a direct relationship between the number of 
class absences and the final grade. It is the student’s responsibility to 
contact the instructor for any missed assignments. Explanation for 
missing a class will not be demanded, but as a matter of courtesy, the 
reason for an absence should be given to the instructor. 

Any student who accumulates five unexcused absences in a particular 
course will be dropped from that course. Students so dropped will be 
notified by the Student Personnel Office. This action does not constitute 


16 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


an official withdrawal. The student must complete the regular with- 
drawal procedures through the Student Personnel Office. 


WITHDRAWALS 


A student who transfers or withdraws from the Institute during the 
quarter must consult with the Director of Student Personnel and his 
faculty advisor. This will protect the student’s academic records, his right 
to re-enroll, and his right to transfer to another technical institute or 
college. No student’s record will be released until his financial account is 
cleared. 

Procedures for withdrawal are as follows: 

1. Obtain withdrawal form from the Office of Student Personnel. 


2. Complete the withdrawal form according to outlined procedures 
printed on the form and secure all signatures. 


A student who withdraws from the Institute will receive a grade of W 
(Withdrew). 

Any student who withdraws from the Institute at any time without 
completing the withdrawal procedures will receive a grade of F (Failing). 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 7 


STUDENT SERVICES 


GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING SERVICE 


The Office of Student Personnel maintains a staff of trained counselors 
whose services are available to students needing help with educational, 
vocational or personal problems. 

Each full-time student at the Institute is assigned a faculty advisor who 
is available for help with problems related to the student's course work. 
The advisor serves as a direct link between the student and the ad- 
ministrative staff of the Institute. 


HOUSING 


Since the Institute has no dormitory facilities, students who wish to 
live away from home must make their own housing arrangements. 
Suggestions of off-campus housing may be obtained in the Office of 
Student Personnel. 


HEALTH SERVICES 


Limited health services are provided through the Office of Student 
Personnel. Injuries requiring more than minor first aid treatment will be 
treated in the emergency room of a nearby hospital. 


STUDENT LOUNGE 


Students are encouraged to use the lounge as a place to meet, talk, eat 
and relax. The lounge is open from 8 a.m. until 10 p.m., Monday through 
Thursday, and from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. on Friday. 

Canteen service is available in the student lounge. Hot and cold foods 
and drinks are available from vending machines. 

Facilities in the gym are also available for students’ recreational ac- 
tivities. 


STUDENT ACTIVITIES 


Stanly Technical Institute will offer its students the opportunity and 
encourage their participation in a variety of activities. Student activities 
are considered an integral part of the total educational experience. 


JOB PLACEMENT 


The Director of Student Personnel and his staff will offer all possible 
assistance to graduates of the Institute to secure employment in their 
chosen field. This is not to be considered as a guarantee of employment. 
Close contact with business and industry in this area will be maintained 
(to bring employer and employee together. ) 


18 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


STUDENT FINANCIAL AID 


Financial aid on a limited basis is available to students. The require- 
ments for obtaining loans or grants-in-aid vary with the various funds. 
The student’s academic promise and financial needs are considered 
before financial aid is awarded. 


The financial aid program is as follows: 


1. Vocational Work-Study Program under the Vocational Act of 
1963 


Under this program an individual who needs financial aid in 
order to stay in school may apply for assistance. If assistance is 
awarded the student will be given part-time employment either by 
this institution or by another public agency or institution. 


The student must meet the following requirements: 

a. He must have been accepted as a full-time student in a 
vocational educational program that meets standards set 
by the state and local school districts under the act. If he 
is enrolled, he must have a record of good standing and 
full-time attendance. 

b. He must need the earning in order to remain in school. 

c.He must be at least sixteen (16), but no more than 
twenty (20) years of age when he enters the work-study 
program. 

d. He must be considered capable of maintaining good 
Standing in his vocational educational program while he is 
employed. 


2. The Educational Opportunity Grants Program 


The purpose of this program is to provide Educational Op- 
portunity Grants to students of exceptional financial need, who, for 
the lack of financial means of their own or their families, would be 
unable to enter or remain in an institution of higher education. 


The criteria on which the funds are awarded areas follows: 
a. Show evidence of academic or creative promise and 


capability of maintaining good standing in his course of 
Study. 


b. Have an exceptional financial need. 
c. Be able to show that he would not be able to attend an 


institution of higher education without such financial 
assistance. 


3. Work-Study under Title |, Part C, of the Economic Opportunity 
Act of 1964 


The purpose of these funds is to stimulate and promote part-time 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 19 


employment of students (especially those from low income 
families) in institutions of higher education. Students under this 
act are employed by the institution they attend or are placed off- 
campus in a public or private non-profit institution. 


4. Vocational Rehabilitation Act 


By act of Congress, any physically or mentally handicapped 
Student may be eligible for scholarship assistance under the 
provision of Public Law 565. Application for this assistance should 
be processed through the District Vocational Rehabilitation Office 
nearest the applicant. 


5. Veterans Administration Assistance 


Qualified veterans and children of deceased veterans may be 
admitted and approved to receive educational benefits if they 
meet the requirements established by the Veterans Ad- 
ministration. Stanly Technical Institute has been approved by the 
Veterans Administration. Veterans eligible to attend technical and 
vocational programs may do so under the Veterans Readjustment 
Act of 1966. 


6. Social Security Benefits 


Monthly cash benefits may be paid to a child when one of his 
parents begins receiving social security disability, retirement 
benefits, or when a parent dies after having worked under social 
security long enough to be insured. These benefits may be paid to 
an unmarried child until he has reached his twenty-second (22) 
birthday if he is a full-time student at an educational institution. 


These benefits terminate when a student: 


a. Reaches his twenty-second birthday 
b. Marries 
c. Withdraws from School. Benefits may continue during a 
vacation period of four months provided the student: (1) 
was a full-time student prior to the vacation period, and 
(2) intends to return to full-time student status following 
the vacation period. 
d. Reduces his class load below full-time status. 
e. Is adopted. (Only in certain cases.) 
7. Federal Programs 
Stanly Technical Institute is cooperating with various 
federal agencies to provide financial assistance to oc- 
cupational education trainees. Full information about such 
programs may be obtained from the Office of Student Per- 
sonnel. 


20 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


8. North Carolina College Foundation, Inc. State Board of 
Higher Education 
a. Types: 

1. Bryan Plan (Available only to students who are high 
school graduates.) 

2. Insured Student Loan Plan (Available to high school 
graduates who have been accepted by an educational 
institution prior to applying for loan.) 

b. Amount of Loan Restrictions 
1. Based on demonstrated need 
2. Maximum insured student loan is $1,500.00 


SCHOLARSHIPS 


Various scholarships are made available through industry, civic and 
social clubs. Students interested in these funds should contact the 
Director of Student Personnel. 


STUDENT CONDUCT 


College students are considered to be mature individuals. Their 
conduct, both in and out of college, is expected to be that of any 
respectable adult in a public place. Under these circumstances it is 
expected that the student will at all times remember he is living in a 
democratic situation and that the reputation of the Institution rests on 
his shoulders. Common courtesy and cooperation make the above suffice 
for a long list of rules and regulations. 


STUDENT RIGHTS AND RESPONSIBILITIES 


The rights of students as citizens are acknowledged and reaffirmed. 
Students rights include the privilege of education, the freedom to hear, 
to study, to write, and to exercise the right of citizenship. 

Stanly Technical Institute expects all students to conduct themselves 
with honor and to maintain high standards of responsible citizenship. 
The campus and Institute facilities are not places of refuge or sanctuary. 


Students, as all citizens, are subject to civil authority on and off the 
campus. 


STUDENT DISCIPLINE 


The President and the Director of Student Personnel are authorized to 
dismiss immediately any student who impairs, impedes, or disrupts the 
legal mission, processes, or functions of the Institute. Students coun- 
seling, encouraging, instigating, or inciting others to impair, impede, or 
disrupt the educational and other lawful operations of the Institute also 
shall be subject to immediate dismissal. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 21 


A student who has been dismissed may request a hearing with the 
Director of Student Personnel. At this time charges would be carefully 
described and examined. The student may be represented by legal 
counsel at this hearing. 


STUDENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES 


The following procedure is used by students for the resolution of 
complaints and grievances within Stanly Technical Institute. Complaints, 
(defined as claims of unfair or arbitrary treatment, and matters of in- 
terpretation and application other than dismissal) are to be adjusted 
through the Office of Student Personnel. 

If the matter is not settled at that level, a formal grievance may be 
instituted. Formal grievances may be initiated by filing a statement with 
the President of the Institute. The President will issue a written decision 
within five days after receiving the statement. 


STUDENT APPEAL 


The Board of Trustees of Stanly Technical Institute agrees that all 
Students have the right of due process of law as supported by the 
Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States and 
approves the following procedures: 

1. (At any time during the appeal process) Students may be 
represented by legal counsel. 

2. Students have the right to appeal any dismissal action of the 
Director of Student Personnel to the President of the Institute 
through the manner described in 3. 

3. The student shall submit a written appeal to the President. A 
meeting with the student will be called within five days of the 
appeal. 

4. The President of the Institute will issue a written decision within 
five days after meeting with the student. 

5. Should the student not wish to accept the decision of the 
President as final, he may appeal directly to the Board of 
Trustees through the manner described in 6. 

6. The student will state such wishes in writing to the President, 
who is secretary to the Board, indicating the number and 
identity of those persons who will accompany him to the appeal 
hearing. 

7. The President will notify the student in writing.at least two days 
prior to the meeting, as to the date, hour, and the place of 
meeting. 

8. The Chairman of the Board of Trustees may call a special 
meeting of the Personnel Committee of the Board of Trustees to 
hear the appeal if the next scheduled Committee meeting in as 


22 


STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


much as 30 days from the date of the letter requesting the 


hearing. 
9. The Committee, with the Secretary of the Board as the presiding 
official, will hear the student and the Director of Student Per- 


sonnel at different times and will render a decision to the 
Student in writing through the secretary of the board. 


ees 
WS 


Saneiye 


24 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


TECHNICAL DIVISION 


Technicians make up an increasingly large proportion of the work force 
in Our expanding economy. Technicians must not only have knowledge 
but must be able to impart it to others as they serve in a supervisory 


Capacity. 

Several technical curriculums are offered by Stanly Technical In- 
stitute. The courses offer instruction on the college level in specific 
technical areas as well as in general education. The curriculums are 
normally six quarters in length, each quarter composed of twenty to 


thirty classroom and laboratory work hours per week. Outside assign- 
ments require additional study at home or in the Learning Resources 


Center. 


The Associate in Applied Science Degree is awarded to students who 
complete the program. Students who complete less than the entire 
course of study are given certificates. 


Courses may be transferred to other institutions only as those in- 
stitutions determine that the course is applicable to their curriculum 
requirements. 


TECHNICAL CURRICULUMS 
Accounting 
Business Administration 
Commercial Art and Advertising Design 
Early Childhood Specialist 
General Office Technology 
Industrial Management 
Secretarial Science — Executive — Legal — Medical 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 


25 


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 


An applicant for the Associate in Applied Science Degree must meet 
the following requirements: 


1. 
2 


Have a high school diploma or the equivalent. 


Be eighteen years old or older or his high school class must have 
been graduated. 


. Demonstrate a level of achievement on the placement tests as 


determined by the Director of Student Personnel. Some 
curriculums may require a specific type of test in addition to the 
Standard placement test. 


. Have a personal interview with a counselor or the Director of 


Student Personnel. During this time the applicant’s test scores 
and previous scholastic records will be evaluated and interests 
and feelings about success appraised. 


. Be in good physical and mental health. All students are required 


to submit medical reports. 


. Provide a high school transcript along with all other post- 


secondary academic records. 


ADMISSION PROCEDURE 


Individuals who wish to enter a technical curriculum should: 


i 


Complete and return to the Director of Student Personnel an 
application form and a $5 deposit. These forms can be obtained 
by writing the Office of Student Personnel. 


_ Have transcripts of all previous education mailed to the Office of 


Student Personnel. 


. Satisfy all test requirements. 
_ Attend a personal interview. 


_ Provide all medical information requested. 


26 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


ACCOUNTING 


Accounting is one of the fastest growing employment fields in America 
today, and the job outlook for good accountants seems bright for many 
years to come. These opportunities are the result of the tremendous 
business and industrial expansion in all parts of the country. Because of 
this emphasis, there is a growing need for trained people in the area of 
accounting to help managers keep track of a firm’s operation. The Ac- 
counting Curriculum is designed to fill this need by offering students the 
necessary accounting theories and skills for entry into the accounting 
profession. 

The duties and responsibilities of an accountant vary somewhat in 
some of the things an accountant might do are: record 
transactions, render periodic. reports, maintain cost records, make 
special reports, complete tax returns, audit the books, and advise 
management in areas of financial affairs. 

The graduate of the Accounting Curriculum may qualify for various 
jobs in business and industry leading to any of the following accounting 
positions: accounting clerk, payroll clerk, accounting machine operator, 
auditor, and cost accountant. This training plus further experiences 
should prepare them to become office managers, accounting super- 
visors, and to fill other responsible positions in a business firm. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 


~ Course Title 


27 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


FIRST QUARTER 


ENG 101 
BUS - 101 
BUS 102 
BUS 110 
MAT 110 


Grammar 

Introduction to Business 
Typewriting (or elective) 
Office Machines 
Business Mathematics 


SECOND QUARTER 


ECO7102 
ENG 102 
DUS MO 
BUS 120 


Elective 
Economics 
Composition 


Business Law 


Accounting 


THIRD QUARTER 


ECO 104 
BUS 116 
BUS 121 
ENG 204 


Elective 

Economics 

Business Law 
Accounting 

Oral Communication 


FOURTH QUARTER 


ENG 103 
EDP 104 
BUS 123 
BUS 222 
BUS 225 


Report Writing 


Introduction to Data Processing 


Business Finance 
Accounting 
Cost Accounting 


FIFTH QUARTER 


BUS 124 
ENG 206 
BUS 223 
BUS 227 
BUS 235 


Business Finance 
Business Communication 
Accounting 

Accounting Theory 
Business Management 


SIXTH QUARTER 


BUS 226 
BUS 229 
BUS 269 


Elective 

Managerial Accounting 
Taxes 

Auditing 


Hours Per Week 


Class 


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28 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week prea: 
ours 
FIRST QUARTER Class Lab Credit 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression. The approach is func- 
tional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, and spelling. 
Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English grammar in their 
day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


BUS 101 _ Introduction to Business 5 0 5 

A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure of the 
various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal organization, and 
management. 

Prerequisite: None. 


BUS 102 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct techniques, mastery 
of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and manuscripts. 

Prerequisite: None. 


BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 

A general survey of business and office machines. Student will receive training techniques, 
processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, full keyboard adding 
machines, and calculator. 

Prerequisite: None. 


MAT 110 Business Mathematics 40 0 5 
This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business problems. 
Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, taxes, and 
pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 

Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 
The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 

Prerequisite: None. 

ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 

Prerequisite: ENG 101. 

BUS 115 Business Law 3 0 3 

A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals and principles 
of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and agencies. 

Prerequisite: None. 


BUS 120 Accounting 5 2 6 


Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the mechanics of ac- 
counting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting information about service and 
mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: MAT 110. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 29 


THIRD QUARTER 


ECO 104 Economics 3 0 3 


Greater depth in principles of economics, including a penetration into the composition and 
pricing of national output, distribution of income, international trade and finance, and 
current economic problems. 


Prerequisite: ECO 102. 


BUS 116 Business Law 3 0 3 
Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- 
corporation, mortgages, and property rights. 

Prerequisite: BUS 115. 


BUS 121 Accounting 5 2 6 

A study of partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, federal and 
state taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and interpreting data for 
management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Accounting services are shown as 
they contribute to the recognition and solution of management problems. 


Prerequisite: BUS 120. 


ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on improving diction, voice, and speaking 
habits and to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting 
meetings, conferences, and interviews. 


Prerequisite: ENG 101. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices, are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something in the student's curriculum. 

Prerequisite: ENG 102. 

EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 3 2 4 
Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an aid in 
developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study of particular 
computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming courses. 

Prerequisite: None. 


BUS 123 Business Finance 3 0 3 
Includes a study of the financing of business units, as individuals, partnerships, cor- 
porations, and trusts. A detailed study is made of short-term, long-term, and consumer 
financing. 

Prerequisite: None. 


BUS 222 Accounting 5 2 6 | 
Thorough treatment of the field of general accounting, providing the necessary foundation 
for specialized studies that follow. The course includes among other aspects, the balance 
sheet, income and surplus statements, fundamental processes of recording, cash and 
temporary investments, and analysis of working capital. 

Prerequisite: BUS 121. 


BUS 225 Cost Accounting 3 2 4 
Nature and purposes of cost accounting; accounting for direct labor, materials, and factory 
burden; job cost, and standard cost principles and procedures; selling and distribution 
cost; budgets, and executive use of cost figures are studied. 


Prerequisite: BUS 121. 


30 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


FIFTH QUARTER 


BUS 124 Business Finance 3 0 3 
Includes a study of the financing, federal, state, and local government and the ensuing ef- 
fects upon the economy. Factors affecting supply of funds, monetary and credit policies are 
studied. 

Prerequisite: BUS 123. 


ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 
Develops skills and techniques needed in writing business communications. Emphasis is 
placed on writing action — getting sales letters and business reports. 


Prerequisite: ENG 102. 


BUS 223 Accounting 5 2 6 
Additional study of intermediate accounting with emphasis on investments, plant and 
equipment, intangible assets and deferred charges, long-term liabilities, paid-in capital, 
retained earnings, and special analytical processes. 


Prerequisite: BUS 222. 


BUS 227 Accounting Theory 3 2 4 
Accounting Theory is designed to provide a frame of reference in the theory of income, in 
asset valuation, in the history of accounting thought, and as a general survey in the field of 
financial accounting. It is also designed to enable the student through the processes of in- 
ductive and deductive reasoning to obtain a better understanding of the many controversial 
topics in the area of accounting theory and to evaluate critically these abstract points of 
view. 


Prerequisite: BUS 121. 


BUS 235 Business Management 5 0 3 
Principles of business management including overview of major functions of management, 
such as planning, staffing, controlling, directing, and financing. Clarification of the decision- 
making function versus the operating function. Role of management in business — 
qualifications and requirements are studied. 


Prerequisite: None. 
SIXTH QUARTER 


BUS 269 Auditing 3 2 4 
Application of federal and state taxes to various businesses and business conditions. A study 
of the following taxes: income, payroll, intangible, capital gain, sales and use, excise, and 
inheritance. 


Prerequisite: BUS 121. 


BUS 226 Managerial Accounting 5 2 6 


Principles of conducting audits and investigations setting up accounts based upon audits: 
collecting data on working papers, arranging and systemizing the audit, and writing the audit 
report is studied. Emphasis placed on detailed audits, internal auditing, and internal control. 
Prerequisite: BUS 223. 


BUS 226 Managerial Accounting 5 2 6 


The course consists of the presentation, analysis, and interpretation of financial data, ac- 
counting and managerial control and planning. The objective is to explain how accounting 
data can be interpreted and used by management in planning and controlling business 
activities and to show how accounting can help to sdlve the problems that confront those 
who are directly responsible for the management of the enterprise. 


Prerequisite: BUS 121. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 31 


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 


Persons with specialized education in business beyond the high school 
_ level are those who best meet the requirements of the employer in 
today’s industry. This curriculum is designed to prepare the student in 
many phases of administrative work. Graduates of this program must 
meet these objectives: 
1. Understand the principles of organization and management in 
business operations. 
2. Understand the economy through study and analysis of the role 
of production and marketing. 
3. Know specific elements of accounting, finance and business law. 
4. Understand and have some skill in effective communication for 
business. 
5. Have an understanding of human relations as they apply to 
successful business operations in a rapidly expanding economy. 
Graduates of this program may enter a variety of positions from sales 
to office clerk to manager trainee. Duties will vary according to the 
position held. 


32 


Course Title 


STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


FIRST QUARTER 


T-ENG 101 
T-BUS 102 
T-MAT 110 
T-BUS 101 
T-ECO 102 


Grammar 

Typewriting (or Elective) 
Business Mathematics 
Introduction to Business 
Economics 


SECOND QUARTER 


‘T-ENG 102 
T-BUS 120 
T-ECO 104 
T-BUS 115 
T-BUS 123 


Composition 
Accounting 
Economics 
Business Law 
Business Finance 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 
T-BUS 124 
T-BUS 110 
T-BUS 121 
T-BUS 116 


Report Writing 
Business Finance 
Office Machines 
Accounting 
Business Law 


FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 
T-BUS. 232 
T-EDP 104 
T-BUSe239 


Oral Communication 

Sales Development 

Introduction to Data Processing Systems 
Marketing 

Elective 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 


T-BUS 243 
T-BUS 235 


Business Communication 
Social Science Elective 
Advertising 

Business Management 
Elective 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-BUS 229 
T-BUS 272 
T-BUS 271 


Social Science Elective 
Taxes 

Principles of Supervision 
Office Management 
Elective 


Quarter 


Hours Per Week Hours 


Class 


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CATALOG FOR 1973-74 33 
Sa een 8 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week Quarter 
Seucse Tifie FIRST QUARTER riPey ane at bi eee 
T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 102 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct techniques, mastery 
of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation and manuscripts. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 O 5 


This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business problems. 
Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, taxes, and 
pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 0 5 
A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure of the 


various types of business organization, methods of financing internal organization, and 
management. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 


The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 

Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 120 Accounting 5 2 6 
Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the mechanics of ac- 
counting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting information about service and 
mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of the principles learned. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-ECO 104 Economics 3 0 3 


Greater depth in principles of economics, including a penetration into the composition and 
pricing of national output, distribution of income, international trade and finance, and 


current economic problems. 
Prerequisite: T-ECO 102. 


34 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-BUS 115 Business Law 3 0 3 


A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals and principles 
of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and agencies. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 123 Business Finance 3 O 3 


Financing of business units, as individuals, partnerships, corporations, and trusts. A detailed 
study is made of short-term, long-term, and consumer financing. 


Prerequisite: None. 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 (0) 3 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something in his chosen curriculum. 

Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 124 Business Finance 3 0 3 
Financing, federal, state and local government and the ensuing effects upon the economy. 
Factors affecting supply funds, monetary and credit policies. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 123. 


T-BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 


A general survey of the business and office machines. Students will receive training in 
techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, full 
keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-BUS 121 Accounting 5 2 6 


Partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, federal and state 
taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and interpreting data for 
management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Accounting services are shown as 
they contribute to the recognition and solution of management problems. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 120. 
T-BUS 116 Business Law 3 0 3 


Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- 
corporation, mortgages, and property rights. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 115. 


FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 
A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, improving diction, 


voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 


to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences, and interviews. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 
T-BUS 232 Sales Development 3 0 3 


A study of retail, wholesale and specialty selling. Emphasis is placed upon mastering and 


abet the fundamentals of selling. Preparation for and execution of sales demonstrations 
required. 


Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 35 


T-EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing Systems 3 2 4 


Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an aid in 
developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detailed study of particular 
computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming courses. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 239 Marketing 5 0 3 


A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study of the functions, policies, and 
institutions involved in the marketing process. 


Prerequisite: None. 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 


Develops skills in techniques in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on 
writing action — getting sales letters and prospectuses. Business reports, summaries of 
business conferences, letters involving credit, collections, adjustments, complaints, orders, 
acknowledgements, remittances, and inquiry. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 143 Advertising 3 2 4 
The role of advertising in a free economy and its place in the media of mass communications. 
A study of advertising appeals; product and market research; selection of media; means of 
testing effectiveness of advertising. Theory and practice of writing advertising copy for 
various media. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 235 Business Management ies 0 3 


Principles of business management including overview of major functions of management, 
such as planning, staffing, controlling, directing, and financing. Clarification of the decision- 
making function versus the operating function. Role of management in business — 
qualifications and requirements. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-BUS 229 Taxes 3 2 4 
Application of federal and state taxes to various businesses and business conditions. A study 
of the following taxes: income, payroll, intangible, capital gain, sales and use, excise, and 
inheritance. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 121. 

T-BUS 272 Principles of Supervision 3 0 3 
Introduces the basic responsibilities and duties of the supervisor and his relationship to 


superiors, subordinates, and associates. Emphasis on securing an effective work force and 
the role of the supervisor. Methods of supervision are stressed. 


Prerequisite: None. 

T-BUS 271 Office Management 3 0 S 
Presents the fundamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role of office 
management including its function, office automation, planning, controlling, organizing and 
actuating office problems. 

Prerequisite: None. 


ELECTIVES 


T-BUS 247 Business Insurance s 0 3 

A presentation of the basic principles of risk insurance and their application. A survey of the 
various types of insurance is included. 

Prerequisite: None. 


36 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-BUS 219 Credit Procedures and Problems 3 0 3 
Principles and practices in the extension of credit; collection procedure, laws pertaining to 
credit extension and collection are included. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 120. 


T-BUS 255 Interpreting Accounting Records 3 0 3 
Designed to aid the student in developing a ‘‘use understanding” of accounting records, 
reports and financial statements. Interpretation, analysis, and utilization of accounting 
statements. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 121. 


T-BUS 233 Personnel Management 3 0 3 
Principles of organization and management of personnel, procurement, placement, training, 
performance checking, supervision, remuneration, labor relations, fringe benefits and 
security. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 245 Retailing 3 0 3 

A study of the role of retailing in the economy including development of present retail 
structure, functions performed, principles governing effective operation and managerial 
problems resulting from current economic and social trends. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 237 Wholesaling 3 0 3 
The development of wholesaling; present day trends in the United States. A study of the 
functions of wholesaling. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 266 Budget and Record Keeping 3 0 3 
The basic principles, methods, and procedures for preparation and operation of budgets. 
Special attention is given to the involvement of individual departments and the role they 
play. Emphasis on the necessity for accurate record keeping in order to evaluate the ef- 
fectiveness of budget planning. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 121. 


T-BUS 217 Business Law +3 0 3 

A study of the powers, policies, methods, and procedures used by the various federal, state 
and local administrative agencies in promoting and regulating business enterprises. It in- 
cludes consideration of the constitutional and statutory limitations on these bodies and 
judicial review of administrative action. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 116. 

T-SSC 201 Social Science 3 0 = 

An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropology, 
psychology, history, and sociology. 

Prerequisite: None. 

T-SSC 202 Social Science 3 0 3 

A further study of social sciences with emphasis on economics, political science, and social 
problems as they relate to the individual. 

Prerequisite: T-SSC 201. 


T-PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 3 


A Study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understanding of 
inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions are considered with 
particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investigated are: employee 
selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. Attention is also given to 
personal and group dynamics so that the student may learn to apply the principles of mental 
hygiene to his adjustment problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 
Prerequisite: None. 


a 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 B7 


T-SSC 205 American Institutions 3 0 3 


A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 
dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-POL 201 United States Government 3 0 3 


A study of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures and 
problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


38 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


COMMERCIAL ART AND ADVERTISING DESIGN 


The Commercial Art and Advertising Design curriculum provides the 
student with a sound, well-rounded background in the technical and 
creative areas which will be valuable to him throughout his professional 
life. Graduates of this curriculum will have the ability in illustration, 
layout, lettering, design, and production necessary for entry into one or 
more of the commercial art occupations. 

The commercial art and advertising artist creates and designs layouts 
and illustrations for printing, posters, signboards, billboards, and show 
cards. He may design and prepare charts, diagrams, sketches, and maps 
for publication and exhibition and perform responsible illustrative work 
for package design, photography, lettering and art work for the printing 
processes. Opportunities for graduates of this program may be with art 
and design studios, advertising agencies, newspapers and magazines, 
department stores, industrial advertising departments, government 
agencies, television studios, and printing and publishing houses. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 39 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Quarter 
Hours Per Week wours 


; Course Title Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER 


T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
T-DFT 101 Technical Drafting 0 6 2 
T-CAT 101 Advertising Principles 3 0 3 
T-CAT 105 Life Study 2 3 3 
T-CAT 121 Commercial Art & Adv. Des. s 9 6 
i] 18 17 

SECOND QUARTER 
T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
T-DFT 102 Technical Drafting ¢) 6 2 
T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 
T-CAT 106 Life Study 0 6 2 
_ T-CAT 122 Comm. Art & Adv. Des. 3 iS) 6 
i oan 18 

THIRD QUARTER 

T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
T-CAT 110 Industrial Illustration 2 6 4 
T-CAT 116 Photography 2 6 4 
T-CAT 123 Comm. Art & Adv. Des. 3 9 6 
Chie enh, 

FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 Oral Communications 3 0 3 
T-CAT 205 Advertising Copywriting 3 O 3 
T-CAT 212 Advertising Illustration 1 3 2 
T-CAT 224 Comm. Art & Adv. Des. 3 9 6 
Elective 4 ) 4 
14 12 18 

FIFTH QUARTER 

Social Science Elective 3 0 3 
T-CAT 213 Advertising Illustration 1 3 2 
T-CAT 217 Photography 2 6 4 
T-CAT 225 Comm. Art & Adv. Des. 3 9 6 
Elective Boe i a ae 
13h ans 19 


SIXTH QUARTER 


Social Science Elective 
T-CAT 214 Advertising Illustration 
T-CAT 226 Comm. Art & Adv. Des. 
T-CAT 235 Adv. Art Direction 
Elective 


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40 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week orga 

ours 

Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class Lab Credit 
T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-DFT 101 Technical Drafting 0 6 2 
The field of drafting is introduced as the student begins study of drawing principles and 
practices for print reading and describing objects in the graphic language. Basic skills and 
techniques of drafting included are: use of drafting equipment, lettering, free-hand or- 
thographic and pictorial sketching, geometric construction, orthographic instrument 
drawing of principal views, and standards and practices of dimensioning. The principles of 
isometric, oblique, and perspective are introduced. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-CAT 101 Advertising Principles 3 0 ma} 


A comprehensive survey of the history and development of advertising including a 
discussion of its economic and social values. An introduction to advertising media and 
current publications in the field. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-CAT 105 Life Study 2 3 3 

A study of the body structure with emphasis is on the skeletal and muscular systems, 
movement and the aging process. Graphical interpretation and response to live models with 
emphasis on proportioning, masses and movement. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-CAT 121 Commercial Art & Advertising Design 3 9 6 
An introduction to drawing and basic design fundamentals and principles. Emphasis is 
placed on line, two-and three-dimensional shapes, letter indication, sketching, perspective, 
light and shade, equipment and materials of the art and design profession. 
Prerequisite: None. 

SECOND QUARTER 
T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 
Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-DFT 102 Technical Drafting 10) 6 2 


The application of orthographic projection principles to the more complex drafting problems, 
primary and secondary auxiliary views, simple and successive revolutions, and sections and 
conventions will be studied. Most important is the introduction of the graphical analysis of 
space problems. Problems of practical design elements involving points, lines, planes, and a 
combination of these elements shall be studied. Dimensioning practices, approved by the 
American Standards Association will also be included. Introduction is given to intersections 
and developments of various types of geometrical objects. 

Prerequisite: T-DFT 101. 


T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 


This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business 
problems. Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, 
taxes, and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 

Prerequisite: None. 


eS 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 41 


T-CAT 106 Life Study 0 6 2 
Graphical interpretation and response to the model covering topics such as proportioning, 
the aging process, character, expression and draping the model. This course will deal with 
building of the figure and such ingredients as placement, balance, rhythm, turning, twisting, 
wedging, distribution of masses, perspective of form, planes of form, abdominal arch, hair 
forms and variations. 


Prerequisite: T-CAT 105. 


T-CAT 122 Commercial Art & Advertising Design 3 9 6 

Advanced material in drawing, basic design, lettering, equipment and materials. Emphasis is 
placed on two-and three-dimensional form, perspective, sketching, rough and finished 
lettering. Laboratory will consist of assigned graphical problems with critique and discussion 
by class participation. 

Prerequisite: T-CAT 121. 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something in his chosen curriculum. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-CAT 110 Industrial Illustration 2 6 4 

A comprehensive approach to the tools, equipment, materials and utilization of the 
illustration. Laboratory exercises and problems covering such topics as retouching 
photographs, product illustrations, production illustrations, renderings, preparation of 
visual charts, graphs and composites. 


Prerequisite: T-DFT 102. 


T-CAT 116 Photography 2 6 4 
An introduction to the field of photography, photographic equipment and materials. A 
study of the fundamental techniques of the camera and its expressive possibilities in 
relation to the field of design and visual communications. Assigned camera projects, 
darkroom procedures and equipment. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-CAT 123 Commercial Art & Advertising Design 3 9 6 
Introduction to layout and design for printing. Mechanics of layout, properties of type, and 
basic reproductive processes. Laboratory exercises will consist of preparation of com- 
prehensive art form for presentation on magazine covers, trademarks, book covers, textile 
designs, furniture designs, two-and three-dimensional display figures. Assigned graphical 
problems with critique and discussion by class members. 


Prerequisite: T-CAT 122, T-DFT 102. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, improving diction, 
voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 
to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences, and interviews. 

T-CAT 205 Advertising Copywriting 5 0 3 


A study of the techniques used in creating effective advertising copy for various types of 
media; purposes and duties of the copywriter and legal problems encountered in 


_ copywriting. Theory and practice will be given in writing copy for the various media including 


42 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


retail and fashion copy, mail order, direct mail, business publications, radio and television. 
Prerequisite: T-ENG 103. 


T-CAT 212 Advertising Illustration 1 3 2 
An introduction to advertising illustration through problems in shape, space, and light 
analysis. Laboratory exercises will explore the use of various media. 


Prerequisite: T-CAT 123. 


T-CAT 224 Commercial Art & Advertising Design 3 9 6 
An introduction to cartooning, intermediate layout and design techniques for printing. 
Laboratory assigned graphical problems will cover such topics as color separation, halftones, 
and materials for the development of posters, show cards, banners, hand-lettered 
documents, brochures and folders. 


Prerequisite: T-CAT 123. 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-CAT 213 Advertising Illustration 1 3 2 
Advanced work and assigned problems in advertising illustration. The student is urged to 
explore a variety of mediums. 

Prerequisite: T-CAT 212. 


T-CAT 217 Photography 2 6 4 
Advanced photographic techniques and materials. Participation in studio and laboratory 
procedures illustrating the various applications and creative possibilities of photography in 
advertising. 

Prerequisite: T-CAT 116. 


T-CAT 225 Commercial Art & Advertising Design 3 9 6 
Advanced problems in layout and design techniques for printing, illustration, cartooning, 
animation, display design and lettering. Laboratory and graphic problems dealing with 
magazine and book illustrations, the fashion figure, outdoor sign writing, displays and 
exhibits for business and industry. 

Prerequisite: T-CAT 224. 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-CAT 214 Advertising Illustration 1 3 2 
Assigned problems in advanced illustration. Emphasis is placed on originality and the 
readiness of the student to explore assigned graphical tasks and problems. 

Prerequisite: T-CAT 213. 


T-CAT 226 Commercial Art & Advertising Design 3 9 6 


A course providing similated professional working conditions utilizing advanced layout and 
design techniques for printing. Each student will explore a variety of problems and present 
his solutions for general class critique and discussion. This course will climax with the review 
and presentation of the student's individual portfolio of professional work. 


Prerequisite: T-CAT 225. 
T-CAT 235 Advertising Art Direction 5 0 5 


A study of the techniques used in creating effective advertising for various types of media. 
The physical consideration of the advertisement such as size, position, color, frequency of 
insertion, layout, coupons and inquiries. Analysis of techniques to cases in national, retail, 
mail order, industrial and professional advertising with consideration given to budgetary 
practices. 


Prerequisite: T-CAT 101, T-CAT 225. 


e 


a i ae ay 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 43 
emer eer siome a Sty Wyte eve 148 


ELECTIVES 


T-ART 105 History of Art 3 0 3 


A study of the origins and development of art forms from the beginning through con- 
~ temporary. Lecture discussion documented with paintings, sculpture, reproductions and 
films. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 232 Sales Development 3 0 3 


A study of retail, wholesale and specialty selling. Emphasis is placed upon mastering and 
applying the fundamentals of selling. Preparation for and execution of sales demonstrations 
required. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-CAT 231 Painting with Polymers 2 6 4 

An introduction to the medium: a study of the techniques used in painting and illustration 
with the relatively new acrylic polymer emulsions. Students may select projects or complete 
assigned projects. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 


Develops skills in techniques in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on 
writing action — getting sales letters and prospectuses. Business reports, summaries of 
business conferences, letters involving credit, collections, adjustments, complaints, orders, 
acknowledgements, remittances, and inquiry. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-PSY 221 Psychology of Color 3 0 3 

A study of color, the conscious and unconscious response to combinations of hues, tones and 
colors as applied to the field of commercial art. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 201 Social Science 3 0 3 

An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropology, 
psychology, history, and sociology. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 202 Social Science 3 0 3 

A further study of social sciences with emphasis on economics, political science, and social 
problems as they relate to the individual. 

Prerequisite: T-SSC 201. 


T-PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 3 

A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understanding of 
inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions are considered with 
particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investigated are: employee 
selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. Attention is also given to 
personal and group dynamics so that the student may learn to apply the principles of mental 
hygiene to his adjustment problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 
Prerequisite: None. 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 | 
The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 205 American Institutions 3 aie 0 3 | 
A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 


44 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-POL 201 United States Government 3 0 3 


A study of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures and 
problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 45 


EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIALIST 


The Early Childhood Specialist is a person trained in the care of infants 
and young children. This individual may choose to work with exceptional 
children, those children in rehabilitation clinics, in evaluation clinics, or 
in specialized day care centers. She may choose to work as a kin- 
dergarten aid functioning as an assistant to the certified teacher. A third 
of many job choices would be to organize and operate a private child care 
enterprise. The increasing emphasis on pre-school training for children 

combined with a growing number of working mothers is causing and will 
continue to cause a great demand for persons trained in this area. 


The objectives for a person entering this curriculum are to understand 
and be able to: 


1. Meet the physical and nutritional needs of preschool children. 
Provide activities which stimulate intellectual, emotional, and social 
growth of children. 

Guide children in the formation of acceptable habits and attitudes. 
Assist children in their learning to communicate effectively with 

others. 


N 


Sw 


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| 
; 


46 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Quarter 
Hours Per Week Hours 


Course Title Class Lab Credit 


FIRST QUARTER 


T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 fa 
T-PSY 104 TheDynamics of Human Behavior 3 2 4 
T-SOC 104 TheFamily: A Cross-Cultural Survey 3 O 3 
T-EDU 101 Child Growth & Development 5 e) 3 
T-SCI 101 General Science 3 4 fe) 
1 6 18 
SECOND QUARTER 
T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
T-PSY 105 Human Growth & Development: 
Prenatal & Infant 3 6) 3 
T-SOC 105 Families in the American Culture 3 0 3 
T-EDU 102 Programming for Young Children 3 6 a. 
T-NUT 102 Nutrition for Young Children i 3 3 
14 9 17 
THIRD QUARTER 
T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
T-PSY 106 Human Growth & Development: 
Early Childhood 3 0 3 
T-SOC 106 TheFamily in the Community 3 0) 3 
T-EDU 103 Working with Young Children S 9 6 
T-HEA 101 Personal Hygiene & Health 2 0 2 
14 9 17 
FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 OralCommunication S 0 3 
T-PSY 201 Human Growth & Development: 
Middle Childhood & Adolescence 3 0 is 
T-EDU 201 Activities for Young Children 3 9 6 
T-SOC 201 TheChild & Community Services 3 0 3 
T-ENG 210 Children’s Literature 3 O > 
oe) 9 18 
FIFTH QUARTER 
T-EDU 210 Organization & Administration of 
Child Development Centers 3 6) 3 
T-PSY 202 Human Growth & Development: 
Adulthood 3 0 | 
T-EDU 202 Seminar-Practicum in Early Childhood 4 12 8 
T-EDU 203 The Exceptional Child 3 6) 3 
T-MUS 210 Children’s Music 3 O 3 
16 LZ 20 
SIXTH QUARTER 
Social Science Elective 3 0 3 
Elective 3 O S| 
T-EDU 204 Parent Education 3 0 3 
T-EDU 205 Seminar-Practicum 2 15 7 
T-EDU 206 Special Problems in Early Childhood 2 O 2 
13 ike 18 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 47 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week Quarter 
courte Title FIRST QUARTER Classes | Cn maT 
T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-PSY 104 The Dynamics of Human Behavior 3 2 4 


Study of human behavior, with emphasis on developmental aspects, motivations, common 
behavioral patterns, and the role of defense mechanisms in human behavior. Laboratory 
experiences will demonstrate a variety of theories related to human behavior. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SOC 104 The Family: A Cross-Cultural Survey 3 0 3 
Study of the family as a social unit, with primary focus on the influences of family relation- 
ships during infancy and childhood. Historical patterns and the evolution of family roles in 
various types of cultures provide opportunities to analyze and interpret the influence of the 
culture and the family in relation to the larger society. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-EDU 101 Child Growth and Development 3 0 3 
Study of early growth and development, with emphasis on the principles and techniques for 
promoting the physical and mental health of the young child. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-SCI 101 General Science 3 4 5 
Study of basic concepts from biological, physical, and natural sciences. Laboratory ex- 
periences provide opportunities to develop projects for demonstrating simple science 
concepts to young children, utilizing materials from nature and simple equipment. Each 
student will develop a series of projects appropriate for a specific level of development. 


Prerequisite: None. 
SECOND QUARTER 

T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 oo 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technica! 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 
Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 
T-PSY 105 Human Growth and Development: 

Prenatal and Infant 3 0 | 3 | 
A detailed study of the development sequence of the prenatal and infant periods, with 
emphasis on developmental influences and conditions necessary for optimal development 
of individuals. 
Prerequisite: T-PSY 104. 


T-SOC 105 Families in the American Culture 3 0 3 
Study of the family in the American culture, changing patterns in family roles, the influence 
of socio-economic status on family relationships, factors associated with cultural 
deprivation, and the effects on children in such families. 

Prerequisite: T-SOC 104. 


T-EDU 102 Programming for Young Children 3 6 Me 
inci ion: f experiences, 
Study of principles and practices of early childhood education: the types of expel 
facilities, and media which will promote optimal development of each child. Guidelines we 
identifying, planning, organizing, and implementing appropriate programs for various levels 
of development are derived through group discussion and individual projects. Laboratory 


48 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


experience provides opportunities to participate in planning activities, in selecting equip- 
ment and materials, in defining the adult role, and in developing techniques for managing 
children in a group situation. 


Prerequisite: T-EDU 101. 


T-NUT 102 Nutrition for Young Children 2 3 3 


Study of basic nutrition, with emphasis on (1) methods of helping young children and their 
families learn nutritional concepts and (2) planning balanced diets for preschool children. 


Prerequisite: None. 
THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something in his chosen curriculum. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-PSY 106 Human Growth and Development: 

Early Childhood 3 0 3 
A detailed study of the developmental sequence during the preschool period, ages 2 to 6. 
Emphasis is given to factors influencing development; the importance of experiences in 
establishing patterns of behavior, attitudes, interpersonal skills; language usage; and the 
relationship of early childhood to later realization of potential. 


Prerequisite: T-PSY 105. 


T-SOC 106 The Family in the Community 3 0 3 


Study of community agencies concerned with physical and mental health in families, socio- 
economic problems, and education for child-rearing. 


Prerequisite: T-SOC 105. 


T-EDU 103 Working with Young Children 3 9 6 


Case presentations, films, observations, and group discussions are utilized to study 
characteristic behaviors of each level of development and to derive guidelines for promoting 
desirable behaviors and for coping with undesirable behaviors. Laboratory experiences will 
provide opportunities to develop observation skills, effective techniques, and beginning skill 
in adapting activities to the needs of individual children. Through coordination with T-PSY 
106, theories from behavioral science are identified as the foundation of techniques for 
working with young children. 


Prerequisite: T-EDU 102. 


T-HEA 101 Personal Hygiene and Health 2 0 2 
Study of influences on physical and mental health, individual practices which aid in main- 
taining good physical and mental health throughout the life span, and responsibilities of 
those working with young children to maintain personal health and to serve as models for 
health practices. 

FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 


A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, improving diction, 
voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 
to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences and interviews. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-PSY 201 Human Growth and Development: 
Middle Childhood and Adolescence 3 0 3 


A detailed study of the developmental sequence during middle childhood and adolescence; 


S 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 49 


emphasis is given to environmental and social factors which influence developmental rates, 
formulation of behavior patterns, and establishment of value systems and interests. 


Prerequisite: T-PSY 106. 


T-EDU 201 Activities for Young Children 3 9 6 
Individual and group exploration of activities and media for promoting optimal overall 
development of children, with special emphasis on music, art, science, and oral language 
development. Laboratory experiences provide opportunities to plan and implement a 
program which demonstrates the adaptability of specified activities and media to a variety of 
age levels. 


Prerequisite: T-EDU 103. 


T-SOC 201 TheChiid and Community Services 3 0 3 


Study of the types of facilities needed by a community concerned with the well-being of its 
children. Analysis of child needs which can be met through community planning, with 
identification of local, state, and national resources. 


Prerequisite: T-SOC 106. 


T-ENG 210 Children's Literature 3 0 3 


Designed to familiarize students with the well known authors and illustrators of children’s 
literature and to introduce them to the best quality books for young people. Stress is also 
placed on the use of these materials with the children in order to obtain maximum pleasure 
and learning. 

Prerequisite: None. 


FIFTH QUARTER 
T-EDU 210 Organization & Administration of Child 
Developmental Centers 3 0 3 
_ To acquaint potential administrators of Day Care and Child Development Centers with the 
various aspects of the profession. Readings, discussion, films, specialists, and trips to cen- 
ters to study facilities are utilized. 
T-PSY 202 Human Growth and Development: 
Adulthood 3 0 3 
A study of adulthood in terms of developmental tasks, life problems, crises, adjustment 
mechanisms, and problems related to intellectual, emotional, and social aspects of the in- 
dividual in relation to others and to society. © 


Prerequisite: T-PSY 201. 
T-EDU 202 Seminar-Practicum in Early 
Childhood 4 12 8 


Experience in a variety of child care settings to develop further skill in working with young 
children in assisting with programming activities, and in adapting to the needs of individual 
children. Analysis of individual problems encountered in working with specific age groups. 


Prerequisite: T-EDU 201. 


T-MUS 210 Children’s Music 3 0 3 

To provide the student with some understanding of music as a learning tool for the young 
child. Students participate in song, dance and rhythmic activities which are appropriate to 
the interest and muscular developmental level of the young child. 

T-EDU 203 The Exceptional Child 3 0 3 


Study of children with developmental variations requiring modification in activities. Con- 
sideration is given to recognition of problems, community resources, and appropriate ac- 
tivities for the child with exceptional deviations in personality or physical development. 


Prerequisite: T-EDU 201 and T-SOC 201. 
SIXTH QUARTER 


T-EDU 204 Parent Education 3 0 3 
Study of ways parents can be involved in the child development center, of the purposes and 


50 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


value of home visitation, and of techniques for reporting child progress to parents. The role 
of the early childhood specialist in aiding parents in guidance of the child’s development is 
emphasized. Each student will develop a series of programs appropriate for presentation to 
the parents of preschool children. 


Prerequisites: T-SOC 106 and T-PSY 202. 


T-EDU 205 Seminar-Practicum 2 15 7 
Seminar on child development problems. Continued experience in a variety of child care 
facilities. 

Prerequisite: T-EDU 202. 


T-EDU 207 Special Problems in Early Childhood 2 0 2 
Directed study of a specialized area of early childhood, appropriate to the individual career 
interests of students. 

Prerequisites: T-EDU 202 and T-EDU 203. 


ELECTIVES 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 


The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 205 American Institutions 3 0 3 


A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 
dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-POL 201 United States Government 3 0 3 

A study of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, power, procedures, and 
problems. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-SOC 207 Rural Society 3 0 3 

A study of selected elements of rural sociology with emphasis on current social changes. The 
course provides a sociological background for the understanding of rural social changes. 
Areas of study include rural culture, group relationships, social classes, rural and suburban 
communities, farm organizations, the communication of agricultural technology, rural social 
problems, agricultural adjustment and population change. 


Prerequisite: None. 


} 


| 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 id 


GENERAL OFFICE TECHNOLOGY 


More people are now employed in clerical occupations than in any 
other single job category. Automation and increased production will 
mean that these people will need more technical skills and a greater 
adaptability for diversified types of jobs. 

The General Office Occupations curriculum is designed to develop the 
necessary variety of skills for employment in the business world. 
Specialized training in skill areas is supplemented by related courses in 
mathematics, accounting, business law, and applied psychology. 

The graduate of the General Office Occupations curriculum may be 
employed as an administrative assistant, accounting clerk, assistant 
office manager, bookkeeper, file clerk, machine transcriptionist, or a 
variety of other clerical-related jobs. Positions are available in every type 


of business. 


Dz 


Course Tifle 


STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


FIRST QUARTER 


T-ENG 101 
T-BUS 102 
T-MAT 110 
T-BUS 101 
T-ECO 102 


Grammar 

Typewriting (or elective) 
Business Mathematics 
Introduction to Business 
Economics 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 
T-BUS 103 
T-BUS 110 
T-BUS 115 
T-BUS 120 


Composition 
Typewriting (or elective) 
Office Machines 
Business Law 
Accounting 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 
T-BUS 104 
BUS EZ 
T-BUS 116 
T-BUS 121 


Report Writing 
Typewriting 
Filing 
Business Law 
Accounting 


FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 
T-BUS 205 
V-BOSS211 
T-BUS 232 
T-BUSt2h2 


Oral Communication 

Advanced Typewriting 

Office Machines 

Sales Development 

Machine Transcription — Executive 
Elective 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 
F-BUSo213 
T-EDP 104 


Business Communication 
Office Procedures 
Introduction to DP Systems 
Social Science Elective 
Seat 


SIXTH QUARTER | 


T-BUS 271 
T-BUS 229 
T-BUS 210 


Taxes 
Typing Office Practice 

Social Science Elective 
Elective 


Office i nagement 


Quarter 
Hours Per Week Hours 


Class Lab Credit 
3 0 3 
2 | 3 
5 0 5 
5 0 5 
5 0 3 

18 3 19 
3 0 3 
2 3 3 
Me 2 5 
3 0 3 
5 2 6 

15 7 18 
3 0 3 
2 3 3 
3 0 3 
o 0 3 
5 2 6 

16 5 18 
J 0 5 
2 ‘SH 
2 2 3 
3 0 S 
T 2 2 
3 0 i) 

14 7 17. 
& 0 S| 
S Z 4 
3 2 4 
3 0 3 
6 0 6 

18 4 20 


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CATALOG FOR 1973-74 53 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week Quarter 
Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class Lab credit 
T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 102 Typewriting (or elective) 2 i! 3 


Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct techniques, mastery 
of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and manuscripts. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 


This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business problems. 
Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, taxes, and 
pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 101 Introduction to business 5 0 5 


A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure of the 
various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal organization, and 
management. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 


The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 


Prerequisite: None. 
SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 103 Typewriting (or elective) 2 3 3 
Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further mastery of 
correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are applied in tabulation, 
manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per minute for 
five minutes. 

T-BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 fe 
A general survey of the business and office machines. Students will receive training in 
_ techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, full 
keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 


Prerequisite: None. 

T-BUS 115 Business Law 3 0 3 

A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals and principles 
of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and agencies. 


Prerequisite: None. 


54 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-BUS 120 Accounting 5 2 6 
Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the mechanics of ac- 
counting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting information about service and 
mercantile enterprise, to include practical application of the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: None. 

THIRD QUARTER 
T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something in his chosen curriculum. 
Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 104 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Emphasis on production typing problems and speed building. Attention to the development 
of the student’s ability to function as an expert typist, producing mailabie copies. The 
production units are tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 
Prerequisite: T-BUS 103 or the equivalent. Speed requirement: 40 words per minute for 
five minutes. 


T-BUS 112 Filing 3 0 3 
Fundamentals of indexing and filing, combining theory and practice by the use of miniature 
letters, filing boxes and guides. Alphabetic, Triple Check, Automatic, Geographic, Subject, 
Soundex, and Dewey Decimal Filing. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 116 Business Law 3 0 3 
Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- 
corporation, mortgages, and property rights. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 115. 


T-BUS 121 Accounting 5 A" 6 
Partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, Federal and State 
Taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing, and interpreting data for 
management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Accounting services are shown as 
they contribute to the recognition and solution of management problems. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 120. 

FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 Pe = 
A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, improving diction, 
voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 
to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences, and interviews. 
Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 2 3 3 


Emphasis is placed on the development of individual production rates. The student learns 
the techniques needed in planning and in typing projects that closely approximate the work 
appropriate to the field of study. These projects include review of letter forms, methods of 
duplication, statistical tabulation, and the typing of reports, manuscripts and legal 
documents. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 104. Speed requirement: 50 words per minute for five minutes. 

T-BUS 211 Office Machines 2 2 3 


Instructions in the operation of the bookkeeping-accounting machines, duplicating equip- 
ment, and the dictating and transcribing machines. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 110. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 55 


T-BUS 232 Sales Development 3 0 3 


A Study of retail, wholesale and specialty selling. Emphasis is placed upon mastering and 
applying the fundamentals of selling. Preparation for and execution of sales demonstrations 
required. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 212 Machine Transcription — Executive 1 2 2 


A study and practice course in the use of transcribing machines in business dictation. 
Proficiency in word usage, correct grammar, and letter styles will be emphasized. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 103. 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 


Develops skills in techniques in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on 
writing action — getting sales letters and prospectuses. Business reports, summaries of 
business conferences, letters involving credit, collections, adjustments, complaints, orders, 
acknowledgements, remittances, and inquiry. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 213 Office Procedures 3 2 4 


Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a general office 
worker during the work day. These include the following: receptionist duties, handling the 
mail, telephone techniques, travel information, telegrams, office records, purchasing of 
supplies, office organization, and insurance claims. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-EDP 104 Introduction to DP Systems 3 2 4 


Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an aid in 
developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study of particular 
computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming courses. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-BUS 271 Office Management 3 0 Ss 


~ Presents the fundamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role of office 
management including its functions, office automation, planning, controlling, organizing and 
actuating office problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 229 Taxes 3 2 4 
Application of Federal and State taxes to various businesses and business conditions. A 
study of the following taxes: income, payroll, intangible, capital gain, sales and use, excise, 
and inheritance. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 121. 

T-BUS 210 Typing Office Practice 3 0 3 | 

A course designed to familiarize the student with the forms and routines found in a typical 
business. Emphasis is placed upon correct procedures and adaptability to varying office 
methods. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 205. 


ELECTIVES 


T-PSY 112 Personality Development 3 0 3 | 
Designed to help the student recognize the importance of the physical, intellectual, social, 
and emotional dimensions of personality. Emphasis is placed on grooming and methods of 
personality improvement. 


Prerequisite: None. 


56 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-BUS 183E Terminology and Vocabulary 3 0 3 

To develop an understanding of the terminology and vocabulary appropriate to the course of 
study, as it is used in business, technical, and professional offices. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 107. 


T-BUS 215E Office Application 6 0 6 


During the sixth quarter only, students are assigned to work in a business, technical, or 
professional office for six Hours per week. The objective is to provide actual work experience 
for secretarial students and an opportunity for the practical application of the skills and 
knowledge previously learned, according to the course of study. 


Prerequisites: T-BUS 214, T-BUS 205, T-BUS 208, T-BUS 211. 


T-ECO 108 Consumer Economics 3 0 Val aes 


Designed to help the student use his resources of time, energy, and money to get the most 
out of life. It gives the student an opportunity to build useful skills in buying managing his 
finances, increasing his resources, and to understand better the economy in which he lives. 


Prerequisite: None. 

T-SSC 201 Social Science 3 0 3 

An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropology, 
psychology, history, and sociology. 

Prerequisite: None. | 

T-SSC 202 Social Science 3 0 3 


A further study of social sciences with emphasis on economics, political science, and social 
problems as they relate to the individual. 


Prerequisite: T-SSC 201. 


T-PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 S 


A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understanding of 
inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions are considered with 
particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investigated are: employee 
selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. Attention is also given to 
personal and group dynamics so that the student may learn to apply the principles of mental 
hygiene to his adjustment problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 205 American Institutions 3 0 3 


A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 
dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-POL 201 United States Government 3 0 3 


A study of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures and 
problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 57 


INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT 


The Industrial Management curriculum is designed to develop the 
individual’s abilities in business and industrial management, psychology, 
production methods, and the general and social education that broadens 
one’s perspective. This training should provide one with the opportunity 
to advance in an industrial occupation and to assume the responsibilities 
that go with supervisory and mid-management positions in industry. 

The supervisor or foreman in industry coordinates the activities of 

workers. His duties may encompass the interpretation of company 
policies to workers, planning production schedules and estimating man- 
hour requirements for job completion, establishing or adjusting work 
procedures, analyzing and resolving work problems, and initiating or 
suggesting plans to motivate workers to achieve work goals. 


58 


Course Title 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


FIRST QUARTER 


E-ENG 101 
T-MAT 110 
T-BUS 101 
T-ECO 102 
T-ISC 120 


Grammar 

Business Mathematics 
Introduction to Business 
Economics or Consumer Economics 
Principles of Indus. Management 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 
T-ECO 104 
T-BUS 123 
T-PSY 206 
T-ISC 210 
T-BUS 115 


Composition 

Economics or Consumer Economics 
Business Finance 

Applied Psychology 

Job Analysis & Evaluation 

Business Law 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 
T-lSCe esi 
T-ISC 211 
T-ISC 102 
T-BUS 272 


Report Writing 
Manufacturing Cycles 
Work Measurement 
Industrial Safety 
Principles of Supervision 


FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 
T-ISC #1207 
T-BUS 233 
T-MEC 213 
T-BUS 239 


Oral Communication 
Foremanship Supervision 
Personnel Management 
Production Planning 
Marketing 


FIFTH QUARTER 


AASCme202 
T-ISC 209 
T-ECO 201 


Social Science Elective 

Quality Control 

Plant Layout 

Labor Economics & Labor Relations 
Elective 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-ISC 220 
T-ISC 204 


Social Science Elective 
Management Problems 
Value Analysis 
Elective 


STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


Quarter 


Hours Per Week Hours 


Class 


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CATALOG FOR 1973-74 59 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week art pai 
Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class peel Creait 
T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 


This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business problems. 
Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, taxes, and 
pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 0 5 


A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure of the 
various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal organization, and 
management. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 


The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ISC 120 Principles of Industrial Management 3 2 4 


The basic managerial decisions; organizational structure including plant location, building 
requirements, and internal factory organization; problems of factory operation and control, 
planning, scheduling, routing factory problems are utilized as lab experiments. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 ss 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 

Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-ECO 104 Economics 3 0 S| 
Greater depth in principles of economics, including a penetration into the composition and 
pricing of national output, distribution of income, international trade and finance, and 
current economic problems. 


Prerequisite: T-ECO 102. 
T-BUS 123 Business Finance 3 0 fe 


Financing of business units, as individuals, partnerships, corporations, and trusts. A detailed 
study is made of short-term, long-term, and consumer financing. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 a 


A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understanding of 
inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings, and emotions are considered 


60 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


with particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investigated are employee 
selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. Attention is also given to 
personal and group dynamics so that the student may learn to apply the principles of mental 
hygiene to his adjustment problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ISC 210 Job Analysis and Evaluation 3 2 4 


This study is based on product studies as well as personnel and wage program. The course 
utilizes the study of product design, value analysis, materials and processes as an intricate 
part of productive procedures. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 115 Business Law 3 0 3 


A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals and principles 
of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and agencies. 


Prerequisite: None. 


THIRD QUARTER 
T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 


The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something In his chosen curriculum. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-ISC 231 Manufacturing Cycles 5 0 5 


Purchasing and distribution costs; consumption patterns; channels of distribution: 
marketing of consumer goods; shopping, specialty, agricultural and industrial goods; ser- 
vice marketing; functional middlement; speculation and hedging; wholesaling; shipping, 
and warehousing; exporting and trade movements; standardization and grading; pricing, 
government regulation of competition; sales promotional activities; merchandising prac- 
tices. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ISC 211 Work Measurement 3 2 4 


Principles of work simplification including administration of job methods improvement, 
motion study fundamentals and time study techniques. Use of flow and process charts, 
multiple activity charts, operation charts, flow diagrams and methods evaluation. 
Prerequisite: T-ISC 210. 


T-ISC 102 Industrial Safety 3 0) 3 


Problems ot accidents and fire in industry. Management and supervisory responsibility tor 
fire and accident prevention. Additional topics cover accident reports and the supervisor: 
good housekeeping and fire prevention; machine guarding and personnel protective 
equipment; state industrial accident code and fire regulations; the first aid department and 
the line of supervisory responsibility; job instruction and safety instruction; company rules 
and enforcement; use of safety committees; insurance carrier and the insurance Rating 
Bureau, and advertising and promoting a good safety and fire prevention program. 
Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 272 Principles of Supervision 3 0 3 


Introduces the basic responsibilities and duties of the supervisor and his relationship to 
superiors, subordinates, and associates. Emphasis on securing an effective work force and 
the role of the supervisor. Methods of supervision are stressed. 

Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 61 


Sn a a CT eS 


FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 
A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, improving diction, 
voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 


to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences, and interviews. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-ISC 207 Foremanship Supervision 3 2 4 


The foreman’s responsibility for planning, organizing, directing, controlling, and coordinating 
supervisory activities. It teaches the supervisor the basic functions of an organization and 
his responsibility in carrying out the objectives in accordance with the organization’s plan. 
Included in the course are such topics as establishing lines of authority, functions of 
departments or units, duties and responsibilities, policies and procedures, and rules and 
regulations. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 272. 


T-BUS 233 Personnel Management 3 0 3 


Principles of organization and management of personnel, procurement, placement, training, 
performance checking, supervision, remuneration, labor relations, fringe benefits and 
security. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-MEC 213 Production Planning 3 3 4 


Day-to-day plant direction; forecasting, product planning and control, scheduling, dispat- 
ching, routing, and inventory control. Case histories are discussed in the classroom, and 
‘courses of corrective action are developed. Actual layouts are utilized for planning and 
control. 


Prerequisite: Consent of Advisor. 


T-BUS 239 Marketing 7 0 5 

A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study of the functions, policies, and 
institutions involved in the marketing process. 

Prerequisite: None. 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ISC 202 Quality Control 3 2 4 
Principles and techniques of quality control and cost saving. Organization and procedure for 
efficient quality control. Functions, responsibilities, structure, costs, reports, records, per- 
sonnel and vendor-customer relationships in quality control. Sampling inspections, process 
control and tests for significance. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-ISC 209 Plant Layout 3 2 4 

A practical study of factory planning with emphasis on the most efficient arrangements of 
work areas to achieve lower manufacturing costs. Layouts for small and medium-sized 
plants, layout fundamentals, selection of production equipment and materials handling 
equipment. Effective management of men, money and materials in a manufacturing 
operation. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-ECO 201 Labor Economics and Labor Relations 3 2 4 
Emphasis is placed on the history of the labor movement in the United States, the 
development of methods and strategies by labor organizations and by ma nagement, the shift 
in the means of public control; and the factors of income and economic security. 


Prerequisite: T-ECO 104. 


62 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE. 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-ISC 220 Management Problems 3 0 3 


A study of personnel and production problems from the standpoint of the executive. Includes 
selection and development of products, control problems and techniques, development of 
standards, employee-employer relations, developing the executive staff. Case studies are 
utilized. 


Prerequisites: T-BUS 233, T-BUS 272, T-ISC 120. 


T-ISC 204 Value Analysis 3 0 3 


The modern concept in the control of manufacturing production. This course will provide the 
students an opportunity to study a production system with the specific purpose of iden- 
tifying unnecessary costs. The objective of the Concepts and techniques of value analysis is 
to make possible a degree of effectiveness in identifying and removing unnecessary cost by 
the use of sound decisions through a common sense approach. 


Prerequisite: None. 


ELECTIVES 


T-BUS 232 Sales Development 3 0 3 | 


A study of retail, wholesale and specialty selling. Emphasis is placed upon mastering and 


applying the fundamentals of selling. Preparation for and execution of sales demonstrations 
required. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 243 Advertising 3 2 4 


The role of advertising in a free economy and its place in the media of mass communications. 
A study of advertising appeals; product and market research; selection of media; means of 
testing effectiveness of advertising. Theory and practice of writing advertising copy for 
various media. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 245 Retailing Sis 0 3 


A study of the role of retailing in the economy including the development of present retail 
structure, functions performed, principles governing effective operation and managerial 
problems resulting from current economic and social trends. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-BUS 239 Marketing 5 0 5 


A general survey of the field of marketing, with a detailed study of the functions, policies, and 
institutions involved in the marketing process. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-BUS 237 Wholesaling 3 0 3 


The development of wholesaling; present day trends in the United States. A study of the 
functions of wholesaling. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-BUS 244 Purchasing 3 0 3 
A study of procedure in obtaining the correct items and quantities of items to provide proper 


production. To inform the student in the proper procedure in acquiring a product at the 


lowest cost consistent with quality requirements and procedure of delivery of items to meet 
production schedules. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 234 Personnel Management 3 2 4 


Continued objectives, functions and organization of personnel programs; selection, training, 
placement, basic job analysis, classification and rating of employee’s wage incentive 
systems; discipline and techniques of supervision; elimination and reduction of em- 
ployment hazards; the collective bargaining process. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 233. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 63 
Ieee ee ee 8S 
T-SSC 201 Social Science 3 0 3 


An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropology, 
psychology, history, and sociology. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 202 Social Science 3 0 3 


A further study of social sciences with emphasis on economics, political science, and social 
problems as they relate to the individual. 


Prerequisite: T-SSC 201. 


T-SSC 205 American Institutions 3 0 3 


A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 
dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-POL 201 United States Government 3 0 3 


A study of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures and 
problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-ECO 108 Consumer Economics 3 0 3 


Designed to help the student use his resources of time, energy, and money to get the most 
out of life. It gives the student an opportunity to build useful skills in buying, managing his 
finances, increasing his resources, and to understand better the economy in which he lives. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-ECO 109 Consumer Economics 3 0 3 


A continuance of Consumer Economics (T-ECO 108) and its integral participation of 
business enterprise. 


Prerequisite: T-ECO 108. 


64 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE — EXECUTIVE 


In today’s society, there is a continued demand for stenographic and 
secretarial employees. Automation will never eliminate the need for a 
good secretary — particularly in the small, one-secretary office and in the 
executive type positions. 

Secretarial skills taught in this course are typewriting, shorthand, 
transcription, and general office procedures. Supplementary courses 
deal with mathematics, English, accounting, business law, business 
machines, and personality development. 

Employment opportunities for the well-trained secretary cover a wide 
area. Graduates of this program may enter the work force as 
stenographers, general secretaries or executive secretaries. Positions 
will depend upon the size of the employing company. 


a 


— 


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4 
| 
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| 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 65 
EE ese ee eS i a 89 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Quarter 
Hours Per Week Hours 


Course Title Class 


FIRST QUARTER 


T-ENG 101 
T-BUS 102 
T-MAT 110 
T-BUS 101 
T-BUS 106 


Grammar 

Typewriting (Or Elective) 
Business Mathematics 
Introduction to Business 
Shorthand (Or Elective) 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 
T-BUS 103 
T-BUS 107 
T-BUS 120 
T-BUS 115 


Composition 

Typewriting (Or Elective) 
Shorthand 

Accounting 

Business Law 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 
T-BUS 104 
T-BUS 108 
T-BUS 110 
T-BUS 112 


Report Writing 
Typewriting 
Shorthand 
Office Machines 
Filing 


FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 


T-BUS 206E Dictation and Transcription (Exec.) 


T-BUS 205 Advanced lypewriting 


ip-\e era! 


T-EDP 104 


Office Machines 


Introduction to DP Systems 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 Business Communication 
T-BUS 207E Dictation & Transcription (Exec.) 


— 214 Secretarial Procedures 


Social Science Elective 
Elective 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-BUS 208E Dictation and Transcription (Exec.) 


Social Science Elective 


T-BUS 271 Office Management 


Elective 


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66 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week Quarter 


Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class Lab Credit 
T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 102 Typewriting 2 3 3 


Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct techniques, mastery 
of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and manuscripts. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 


This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business problems. 
Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, taxes, and 
pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 101 _ Introduction to Business 5 0 5 


A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure of the 
various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal organization, and 
management. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-BUS 106 Shorthand 3 2 4 


A beginning course in the theory and practice of reading and writing shorthand. Emphasis on 
phonetics, penmanship, word families, brief forms, and phrases. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 
T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 
T-BUS 103 Typewriting 2 3 3 


Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further mastery of 
correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are applied in tabulation, 
manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per minute for five 
minutes. 


T-BUS 107 Shorthand 3 2 4 
Continued study of theory with greater emphasis on dictation and elementary transcription. 
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of ‘‘C’’ in T-BUS 106 or the equivalent. 

T-BUS 120 Accounting 5 2 6 


Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the mechanics of ac- 
counting. Collecting, summarizing, analysing, and reporting information about service and 
mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 67 


T-BUS 115 Business Law 3 QO. 3 

A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals and principles 
of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and agencies. 

Prerequisite: None. 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something in his chosen curriculum. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 104 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Emphasis on production typing problems and speed building. Attention to the development 
of the student's ability to function as an expert typist, producing mailable copies. The 
production units are tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 
Prerequisite: T-BUS 103 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 40 words per minute for five 
minutes. 

T-BUS 108 Shorthand 3 2 4 
Theory and speed building. Introduction to office style dictation. Emphasis on development 
of speed in dictation and accuracy in transcription. 

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of “C’”’ in T-BUS 107. 


T-BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 
_A general survey of the business and office machines. Students will receive training in 
techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, full 
keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 112 Filing 3 0 3 
Fundamentals of indexing and filing, combining theory and practice by the use of miniature 
letters, filing boxes and guides. Alphabetic, Triple Check, Automatic, Geographic, Subject, 
Soundex, and Dewey Decimal filing. 

Prerequisite: None. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 Oral Communication S) 0 3 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker's attitude, improving diction, 
voice, and the application of particular‘techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 
to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences, and interviews. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 206E Dictation and Transcription 3 2 4 
Develops the skill of taking dictation and of transcribing at the typewriter materials ap- 
propriate to the course of study, which includes a review of the theory and the dictation of 
familiar and unfamiliar material at varying rates of speed. Minimum dictation rate of 100 
words per minute required for five minutes on new material. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 108. 


T-BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 2 3 3 
Emphasis is placed on the development of individual production rates. The student learns 
the techniques needed in planning and in typing projects that closely approximate the work 


68 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


appropriate to the field of study. These projects include review of letter forms, methods of 
duplication, statistical tabulation, and the typing of reports, manuscripts, and legal 
documents. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 104. Speed requirement, 50 words per minute for five minutes. 


T-BUS 211 Office Machines 2 2 3 


Instruction in the operation of the bookkeeping-accounting machines, duplicating equip- 
ment, and the dictating and transcribing machines. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 110. 


T-EDP 104 _ Introduction to Data Processing Systems 5 2 4 


Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an aid in 
developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detailed study of particular 
computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming courses. 


Prerequisite: None. 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 


Develops skills in techniques in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on 
writing action — getting sales letters and prospectuses. Business reports, summaries of 
business conferences, letters involving credit, collections, adjustments, complaints, orders, 
acknowledgments, remittances, and inquiry. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 207E Dictationand Transcription 3 2 4 
Covering materials appropriate to the course of study, the student develops the accuracy, 
speed, and vocabulary that will enable her to meet the stenographic requirements of 
business and professional offices. Minimum dictation rate of 110 words per minute required 
for five minutes on new material. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 206. 


T-BUS 214 Secretarial Procedures 3 2 4 


Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a secretary 
during the work day. These include the following: receptionist duties, handling the mail, 
telephone techniques, travel information, telegrams, office records, purchasing of supplies, 
office organization, interviewing for a job, grooming, and office etiquette. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SIXTH QUARTER 
T-BUS 208E Dictation and Transcription 3 2 4 


Principally a speed building course, covering materials appropriate to the course of study, 
with emphasis On speed as well as accuracy. Minimum dictation rate of 120 words per 
minute required for five minutes on new material. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 207. 
T-BUS 271 Office Management 3 0 3 


Presents the fudamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role of office 


management including its functions, office automation, controlling, organizing and actuating 
office problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


ELECTIVES 
T-PSY 112 Personality Development 3 0 3 


Designed to help the student recognize the importance of the physical, intellectual, social, 
and emotional dimension of personality. Emphasis is placed on grooming and methods of 
personality improvement. 


Prerequisite: None. 


a 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 69 


T-BUS 183E Terminology and Vocabulary 3 0 3 

To develop an understanding of the terminology and vocabulary appropriate to the course of 
study, as it is used in business, technical and professional offices. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 107. 


T-BUS 121 Accounting 3 Z 6 


Partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, federal and state 
taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and interpreting date for 
management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Accounting services are shown as 
they contribute to the recognition and solution of management problems. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 120. 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 


The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 215E Office Application 6 0 6 


During the sixth quarter only, students are assigned to work in a business, technical, or 
professional office for six hours per week. The objective is to provide actual work experience 
for secretarial students and an opportunity for the practical application of the skills and 
knowledge previously learned, according to the course of study. 


Prerequisites: T-BUS 214, T-BUS 205, T-BUS 208, T-BUS 211. 


T-ECO 108 Consumer Economics 3 0 3 


Designed to help the student use his resources of time, energy, and money to get the most 
out of life. It gives the student an opportunity to build useful skills in buying, managing his 
finances, increasing his resources, and to understand better the economy in which he lives. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 116 Business Law 3 0 3 


Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- 
_ corporation, mortgages and property rights. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 115. 


T-SSC 201 Social Science 3 0 3 


An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropology, 
psychology, history and sociology. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 202 Social Science 3 0 3 


A further study of social sciences, with emphasis on economics, political science, and social 
problems as they relate to the individual. 


T-PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 3 

A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understanding of 
inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions are considered with 
particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investigated are: employee 
selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. Attention is also given to 
personal and group dynamics so that the student may learn to apply the principles of mental 
hygiene to his adjustment problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 205 AmericanInstitutions 3 0 3 


A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 
dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 


70 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-POL 201 United States Government 3 6) 3 
A study of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures and 


problems. 
Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 71 
0 a EEE, G15 dh iS REDON, aa ee Oe Eee en eT Te 


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE—LEGAL 


The demand for better qualified legal secretaries in our ever- 

expanding legal profession is becoming more acute. The purpose of the 
Legal Secretary Curriculum is to outline a training program that will 
provide specialized training in the accepted procedures required by the 
legal profession. 
_ The curriculum is designed to offer the students the necessary 
secretarial skills in typing, dictation, transcription, and terminology for 
employment in the legal profession. The special training in secretarial 
subjects is supplemented by related courses in mathematics, accounting, 
business law, and personality development. 

The graduate of the Legal Secretary Curriculum should have a 

nowledge of legal terminology, skill in dictation and accurate tran- 
scription of legal records, reports, letters, and documents. The duties of a 
legal secretary may consist of: taking dictation and transcribing letters, 
memoranda and reports, meeting office callers and screening telephone 
calls, filing, and scheduling appointments. Opportunities for employment 
of the graduate exist in a variety of secretarial positions in the legal 
profession such as in lawyers’ offices and state and government offices. 


OLR I Lye 


via STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Quarter 
Hours Per Week Hours 


Course Title Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER 


T-ENG 101 Grammar . 3 0 3 
T-BUS 102 Typewriting (Or Elective) Pe 3 3 
T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 
T-BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 0 5 
T-BUS 106 Shorthand (Or Elective) 3 2 4. 
18 5 20 
SECOND QUARTER | 
T-ENG 102 Composition | S 0 3 
T-BUS 103 Typewriting (Or Elective) 2 3 s 
T-BUS 107 Shorthand 3 2 4 
T-BUS 120 Accounting 5 2 6 
T-BUS 115 Business Law ies +0: 3 
16 ve 19 
THIRD QUARTER 
T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 O S 
T-BUS 104 Typewriting 2 3 3 
T-BUS 108 Shorthand 7 2 4 
T-BUS 110 Office Machines 2 Me 3 
T-BUS 112 Filing a 0 S 
T-BUS 183L Terminology and Vocabulary 
(Legal) Breese 
16 rs 19 
FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 

T-BUS 206L Dictation and Transcription 
(Legal) 

T-BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 

T-BUS 211 Office Machines. 

T-EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 
Systems 


— 

tol we MMW WwW 
wo |r MWh Oo 
Eels ww WwW 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 Business Communication = 0 © 

T-BUS 207L Dictation and Transcription 
(Legal) a 2 4 
T-BUS 214 Secretarial Procedures 3 2 4 
Social Science Elective 3 0 3 
Elective 3 0 3 
15 4 17 

SIXTH QUARTER 


Social Science Elective 


3 0 3 

T-BUS 208L Dictation and Transcription 
(Legal) 3 2 4 
T-BUS 271 Office Management 3 0 a 
Elective 6 0 6 
is 2 16 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 73 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week yarree 
FIRST QUARTER class Dab wie licredit 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 102 Typewriting 2 3 3 


Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct techniques, mastery 
of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and manuscripts. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 


This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business problems. 
Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, taxes, and 
pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 0 5 

A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure of the 
various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal organization, and 
management. 

Prerequisite: None. 

T-BUS 106 Shorthand 3 2 4 

A beginning course in the theory and practice of reading and writing shorthand. Emphasis on 
phonetics, penmanship, word families, brief forms, and phrases. 

Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 103 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further mastery of 
correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are applied in tabulation, 
manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per minute for five 
minutes. 

T-BUS 107 Shorthand 3 2 4 
Continued study of theory with greater emphasis on dictation and elementary transcription. 


Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C or above in T-BUS 106. 


T-BUS 120 Accounting 5 2 6 
Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the mechanics of ac- 
counting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting information about service and 
mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: T-MAT 110. 

T-BUS 115 Business Law 3 0 3 
A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals and principles 
of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and agencies. 


Prerequisite: None. 


74 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 

The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 


report must have to do with something in his chosen curriculum. 

Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 

T-BUS 104 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Emphasis on production typing problems and speed building. Attention to the development 


of the student’s ability to function as an expert typist, producing mailable copies. The 
production units are tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 103 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 40 words per minute for five 
minutes. 

T-BUS 108 Shorthand 3 2 4 
Theory and speed building. Introduction to office style dictation. Emphasis on development 
of speed in dictation and accuracy in transcription. 

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C or above in T-BUS 107. 

T-BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 

A general survey of the business and office machines. Students will receive training in 
techniques, processes, Operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, full 
keyboard adding machines, and calculator. ; 
Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 112 Filing 3 0 3 
Fundamentals of indexing and filing, combining theory and practices by the use of miniature 
letters, filing boxes and guides. Alphabetic, Triple Check, Automatic, Geographic, Subject, 
Soundex, and Dewey Decimal filing. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 183L Terminology and Vocabulary 3 0 3 

To develop an understanding of the terminology and vocabulary appropriate to the course of 
Study, as it is used in business, technical, and professional offices. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 107. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 


A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker’s attitude, improving diction, 
voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 
to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences, and interviews. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 206L Dictation and Transcription 3 2 4 


Develops the skill of taking dictation and of transcribing at the typewriter materials ap- 
propriate to the course of study, which includes a review of the theory and the dictation of 
familiar and unfamiliar material at varying rates of speed. Minimum dictation rate of 100 
words per minute required for five minutes on new material. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 108. 


T-BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 2 3 3 


Emphasis is placed on the development of individual production rates. The student learns 
the techniques needed in planning and in typing projects that closely approximate the work 
appropriate to the field of study. These projects include review of letter forms, methods of 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 75 
a  soeeeye be he cola TER Ag 


duplication, statistical tabulation, and the typing of reports, manuscripts and legal 
documents. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 104. Speed requirement, 50 words per minute for five minutes. 


_T-BUS 211 Office Machines 2 2 3 
Instructions in the operation of the bookkeeping-accounting machines, duplicating equip- 
ment, and the dictation and transcribing machines. 
Prerequisite: T-BUS 110. 
T-EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 

Systems 3 2 4 


Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an aid in 
developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study of particular 
computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming courses. 


Prerequisite: None. 


FIFTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 


Develops skills in techniques in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on 
writing action — getting sales letters and prospectuses. Business reports, summaries of 
business conferences, letters involving credit, collections, adjustments, complaints, orders, 
acknowledgments, remittances, and inquiry. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 207L Dictation and Transcription 3 2 4 


Covering materials appropriate to the course of study, the student develops the accuracy, 
speed, and vocabulary that will enable her to meet the stenographic requirements of 
business and professional offices. Minimum dictation rate of 110 words per minute required 
for five minutes on new material. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 206. 


T-BUS 214 Secretarial Procedures 3 2 4 


Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a secretary 
during the work day. These include the following: receptionist duties, handling the mail, 
telephone techniques, travel information, telegrams, office records, purchasing of supplies, 
office organization, and insurance claims. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-BUS 208L Dictation and Transcription 3 2 4 


Principally a speed building course, covering materials appropriate to the course of study, 
with emphasis on speed as well as accuracy. Minimum dictation rate of 120 words per 
minute required for five minutes on new material. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 207. 

T-BUS 271 Office Management 3 0 3 
Presents the fundamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role of office 
management including its functions, office automation, planning, controlling, organizing and 
actuating office problems. 

Prerequisite: None. 


ELECTIVES 


T-PSY 112 Personality Development 3 | 0 3 . 
Designed to help the student recognize the importance of the physical, intellectual, social, 
and emotional dimensions of personality. Emphasis is placed on grooming and methods of 


personality improvement. 
Prerequisite: None. 


76 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-BUS 121 Accounting 5 2 6 
Partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, federal and state 
taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and interpreting data for 
management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Accounting services are shown as 
they contribute to the recognition and solution of management problems. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 120. 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 @) 3 
The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 

Prerequisite: None. 

T-BUS 215L Office Application 6 0 6 
During the sixth quarter only, students are assigned to work in a business, technical, or 
professional office for six hours per week. The objective is to provide actual work experience 
for secretarial students and an opportunity for the practica! application of the skills and 
knowledge previously learned, according to the course of study. 


Prerequisites: T-BUS 214, T-BUS 205, T-BUS 208, T-BUS 211. 


T-ECO 108 Consumer Economics 3 @) 3 
Designed to help the student use his resources of time, energy, and money to get the most 
out Of life. It gives the student an opportunity to build useful skills in buying, managing his 
finances, increasing his resources, and to understand better the economy in which he lives. 
Prerequisite: None. 

T-BUS 116 Business Law 3 0 3 
Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- 
corporation, mortgages, and property rights. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 115. 

T-SSC 201 Social Science 3 0 3 

An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropology, 
psychology, history, and sociology. 

Prerequisite: None. 

T-SSC 202 Social Science 3 0 3 

A further study of social sciences with emphasis on economics, political science, and social 
problems as they relate to the individual. 

Prerequisite: T-SSC 201. 

T-PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 S 


A Study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understanding of 
inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings and emotions are considered with 
particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investigated are: employee 
selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. Attention is also given to 
personal and group dynamics so that the student may learn to apply the principles of mental 
hygiene to his adjustment problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 205 American Institutions 3 0 3 


A Study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 
dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-POL 201 United States Government 3 0 3 


A Pi of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures and 
proodlems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 7 


SECRETARIAL SCIENCE—MEDICAL 


The demand for better qualified medical secretaries in our ever- 
expanding medical profession is becoming more acute. The purpose of 
this curriculum is to outline a training program that will provide 
Specialized training in the accepted procedures required by the medical 
profession. 

The Medical Secretary Curriculum is designed to offer the students the 
necessary secretarial skills in typing, dictation, transcription, and ter- 
minology for employment in the medical profession. The special training 
in secretarial subjects is supplemented by related courses in 
mathematics, accounting, business law, and personality development. 

The graduate of the Medical Secretary Curriculum should have a 
knowledge of medical terminology, skill in dictation and accurate tran- 
scription of medical records, reports and letters. The duties of a medical 
secretary may consist of: taking dictation and transcribing letters, 
memoranda and reports, meeting office callers and screening telephone 
calls, filing, and scheduling appointments. The graduate may enter a 
secretarial position in a variety of offices such as physicans’, private and 
public hospitals, federal and state health programs, and the drug and 
pharmaceutical industry. 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Quarter 
Hours Per Week Hours 


Course Title Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER 


T-ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 
T-BUS 102 Typewriting (Or Elective) 2 3 3 
T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 3) 6) 5 
T-BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 0 5 
T-BUS 106 Shorthand (Or Elective) 3 2 4 

18 5 20 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 Composition 

T-BUS 103 Typewriting (Or Elective) 
T-BUS 107 Shorthand 

T-BUS 120 Accounting 

T-BUS 115 Business Law 


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THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 Report Writing 

T-BUS 104 Typewriting 

T-BUS 108 Shorthand 

T-BUS 110 Office Machines 

T-BUS 112 Filing 

T-BUS 183M Terminology and Vocabulary 
(Medical) 


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78 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


Soo Se 


FOURTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 204 OralCommunication = 3 0 3 
T-BUS 206M _ Dictation and Transcription 
(Medical) th 3 2 4 
T-BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting c 3 3 
T-BUS 211 Office Machines 2 2 3 
T-EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 
Systems 3 2 4 
T-BUS 284M Terminology and Vocabulary 
(Medical) 3 HO; 3 
16 9 20 
FIFTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 
T-BUS 207M _ Dictation and Transcription 
(Medical) 3 2 4 
T-BUS 214 Secretarial Procedures z 2 4 
Social Science Elective 3 0 Ba 
Elective 3 0 & 
15 4 17 
SIXTH QUARTER 


Social Science Elective 
T-BUS 208M _ Dictation and Transcription 
(Medical) 
T-BUS 271 Office Management 
Elective 


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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week bre 
FIRST QUARTER Chass Caphllt lcreait 
ENG 101 Grammar 3 0 3 


Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in grammar. The ap- 
proach is functional with emphasis on grammar, diction, sentence structure, punctuation, 
and spelling. Intended to stimulate students in applying the basic principles of English 
grammar in their day-to-day situations in industry and social life. 


Prerequisite: None. P 

T-BUS 102 Typewriting 2 bic! 3 
Introduction to the touch typewriting system with emphasis on correct techniques, mastery 
of the keyboard, simple business correspondence, tabulation, and manuscripts. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-MAT 110 Business Mathematics 5 0 5 


This course stresses the fundamental operations and their application to business problems. 
Topics covered include payrolls, price marking, interest and discount, commission, taxes, 
and pertinent uses of mathematics in the field of business. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 101 Introduction to Business 5 0 5 


A survey of the business world with particular attention devoted to the structure of the 
various types of business organization, methods of financing, internal organization, and 
management. 


Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 79 
Ea a 


T-BUS 106 Shorthand 3 2 4 

A beginning course in the theory and practice of reading and writing shorthand. Emphasis on 
phonetics, penmanship, word families, brief forms, and phrases. 
-Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


T-ENG 102 Composition 3 0 3 
Designed to aid the student in the improvement of self-expression in business and technical 
composition. Emphasis is on the sentence, paragraph and whole composition. 

Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 103 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Instruction emphasizes the development of speed and accuracy with further mastery of 
correct typewriting techniques. These skills and techniques are applied in tabulation, 
manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 102 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 30 words per minute for five 
minutes. 


~T-BUS 107 Shorthand 3 2 4 
Continued study of theory with greater emphasis on dictation and elementary transcription. 
Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in T-BUS 106. 


T-BUS 120 Accounting 5 2 6 
Principles, techniques and tools of accounting, for understanding of the mechanics of ac- 
counting. Collecting, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting information about service and 
mercantile enterprises, to include practical application of the principles learned. 
Prerequisite: T-MAT 110. 


T-BUS 115 Business Law 3 0 3 
A general course designed to acquaint the student with certain fundamentals and principles 
of business law, including contracts, negotiable instruments, and agencies. 
Prerequisite: None. 
: THIRD QUARTER 


T-ENG 103 Report Writing 3 0 3 
The fundamentals of English are utilized as a background for the organization and 
techniques of modern report writing. Exercises in developing typical reports, using writing 
techniques and graphic devices are completed by the students. Practical application in the 
preparation of a full-length report is required of each student at the end of the term. This 
report must have to do with something in his chosen curriculum. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


T-BUS 104 Typewriting 2 3 3 
Emphasis on production typing problems and speed building. Attention to the development 
of the student's ability to function as an expert typist, producing mailable copies. The 
production units are tabulation, manuscript, correspondence, and business forms. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 103 or the equivalent. Speed requirement, 40 words per minute for five 
minutes. 

T-BUS 108 Shorthand 3 2 4 
Theory and speed building. Introduction to office style dictation. Emphasis on development 
of speed in dictation and accuracy in transcription. 

Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in T-BUS 107. 

T-BUS 110 Office Machines 2 2 3 

A genera! survey of the business and office machines. Students will receive training in 
techniques, processes, operation and application of the ten-key adding machines, full 
keyboard adding machines, and calculator. 

Prerequisite: None. 


80 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-BUS 112 Filing 3 0 3 
Fundamentals of indexing and filing, combining theory and practice by the use of miniature 
letters, filing boxes and guides. Alphabetic, Triple Check, Automatic, Geographic, Subject, 
Soundex, and Dewey Decimal filing. 


Prerequisite: None. 


T-BUS 183M _ Terminology and Vocabulary 3 0 3 

To develop an understanding of the terminology and vocabulary appropriate to the course of 
study, as it is used in business, technical, and professional offices. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 107. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


T-ENG 204 Oral Communication 3 0 3 

A study of basic concepts and principles of oral communications to enable the student to 
communicate with others. Emphasis is placed on the speaker’s attitude, improving diction, 
voice, and the application of particular techniques of theory to correct speaking habits and 
to produce effective oral presentation. Particular attention given to conducting meetings, 
conferences, and interviews. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 101. 


T-BUS 206M _ Dictation and Transcription 3 2 Wink wea 


Develops the skill of taking dictation and of transcribing at the typewriter materials ap- 
propriate to the course of study, which includes a review of the theory and the dictation of 
familiar and unfamiliar material at varying rates of speed. Minimum dictation rate of 100 
words per minute required for five minutes on new material. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 108. 


T-BUS 205 Advanced Typewriting 2 3 3 


Emphasis is placed on the development of individual production rates. The student learns 
the techniques needed in planning and in typing projects that closely approximate the work 
appropriate to the field of study. These projects include review of letter forms, methods of 
duplication, statistical tabulation, and the typing of reports, manuscripts and legal 
documents. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 104. Speed requirement, 50 words per minute for five minutes. 


T-BUS 211 Office Machines 2 2 3 
Instructions in the operation of the bookkeeping-accounting machines, duplicating equip- 
ment, and the dictating and transcribing machines. 
Prerequisite: T-BUS 110. 
T-EDP 104 Introduction to Data Processing 

Systems 3 2 4 


Fundamental concepts and operational principles of data processing systems, as an aid in 
developing a basic knowledge of computers, prerequisite to the detail study of particular 
computer problems. This course is a prerequisite for all programming courses. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-BUS 284M _ Terminology and Vocabulary 3 0 3 


Greater emphasis on an understanding of the terminology and vocabulary appropriate to 
the course of study, as it is used in business, technical, and professional offices. 
Prerequisite: T-BUS 183M. 


FIFTH QUARTER 
T-ENG 206 Business Communication 3 0 3 


Develops Skills in techniques in writing business communications. Emphasis is placed on 
writing action — getting sales letters and prospectuses. Business reports, summaries of 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 81 
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business conferences, letters involving credit, collections, adjustments, complaints, orders, 
acknowledgments, remittances, and inquiry. 


Prerequisite: T-ENG 102. 


_T-BUS 207M _ Dictation and Transcription 3 2 4 


Covering materials appropriate to the course of study, the student develops the accuracy, 
speed, and vocabulary that will enable her to meet the stenographic requirements of 
business and professional offices. Minimum dictation rate of 110 words per minute required 
for five minutes on new material. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 206M. 


T-BUS 214 Secretarial Procedures 3 2 4 


Designed to acquaint the student with the responsibilities encountered by a secretary 
during the work day. These include the following: receptionist duties, handling the mail, 
telephone techniques, travel information, telegrams, office records, purchasing of supplies, 
office Organization, and insurance claims. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SIXTH QUARTER 


T-BUS 208M _ Dictation and Transcription 3 2 4 
Principally a speed building course, covering materials appropriate to the course of study, 
with emphasis on speed as well as accuracy. Minimum dictation rate of 120 words per 
minute required for five minutes on new material. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 207. 


T-BUS 271 Office Management 3 0 3 
Presents the fundamental principles of office management. Emphasis on the role of office 
management including its functions, office automation, planning, controlling, organizing and 
actuating office problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


ELECTIVES 


T-BUS 121 Accounting 5 2 6 
Partnership and corporation accounting including a study of payrolls, federal and state 
taxes. Emphasis is placed on the recording, summarizing and interpreting data for 
management control rather than on bookkeeping skills. Accounting services are shown as 
they contribute to the recognition and solution of management problems. 


Prerequisite: T-BUS 120. 


T-BUS 215M Office Application 6 0 6 
During the sixth quarter only, students are assigned to work in a business, technical, or 
professional office for six hours per week. The objective is to provide actual work experience 
for secretarial students and an opportunity for the practical application of the skills and 
knowledge previously learned, according to the course of study. 


Prerequisites: T-BUS 214, T-BUS 205, T-BUS 208, T-BUS 211. 


T-ECO 108 Consumer Economics 3 0 3 
Designed to help the student use his resources of time, energy, and money to get the most 
out of life. It gives the student an opportunity to build useful skills in buying, managing his 
finances, increasing his resources, and to understand better the economy in which he lives. 
Prerequisite: None. 


T-ECO 102 Economics 3 0 3 
The fundamental principles of economics including the institutions and practices by which 
people gain a livelihood. Included is a study of the laws of supply and demand and the 
principles bearing upon production, exchange, distribution, and consumption both in 
relation to the individual enterprise and to society at large. 


Prerequisite: None. 


82 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


T-PSY 112 Personality Development 3 0 3 


Designed to help the student recognize the importance of the physical, intellectual, social, 
and emotional dimensions of personality. Emphasis is placed on grooming and methods of 


personality improvement. 

Prerequisite: None. 

T-BUS 116 Business Law 3 0 3 
Includes the study of laws pertaining to bailments, sales, risk-bearing, partnership- 
corporation, mortgages, and property rights. 

Prerequisite: T-BUS 115. 


SOCIAL SCIENCE 


T-SSC 201 Social Science 3 0 3 
An integrated course in the social sciences, drawing from the fields of anthropology, 
psychology, history, and sociology. 

Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 202 Social Science 3 0 3 
A further study of social sciences with emphasis on economics, political science, and social 
problems as they relate to the individual. 


Prerequisite: T-SSC 201. 


T-PSY 206 Applied Psychology 3 0 3 

A study of the principles of psychology that will be of assistance in the understanding of 
inter-personal relations on the job. Motivation, feelings, and emotions are considered with 
particular reference to on-the-job problems. Other topics investigated are: employee 
selection, supervision, job satisfaction, and industrial conflicts. Attention is also given to 
personal and group dynamics so that the student may learn to apply the principles of mental 
hygiene to his adjustment problems as a worker and a member of the general community. 
Prerequisite: None. 


T-SSC 205 American Institutions 3 0 it) 


A study of the effect of American social, economic, and political institutions upon the in- 
dividual as a citizen and as a worker. The course dwells upon current local, national, and 
global problems viewed in the light of our political and economic heritage. 


Prerequisite: None. 
T-POL 201 United States Government 3 0 3 


A au of government with emphasis on basic concepts, structure, powers, procedures and 
problems. 


Prerequisite: None. 


VOCATIONAL DIVISION 


84 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


Bie ia NEL e Dede TOE UR A onc ne OCs EN Bi PMN Sm DPR eC Deh oe ENE Na A ee ae Pe MT UA A Tae 


VOCATIONAL DIVISION 


In every area of the country skilled tradesmen are in great demand. 
Any repair shop or industry needs a person trained to operate or repair 
equipment. Service agencies, one of the fastest growing industries, are 
constantly seeking additional employees. For these and many other 
reasons the person entering a vocational course can look forward to a 
future of increasing opportunities. 


Vocational courses at Stanly Technical Institute offer instruction in 
both the classroom and the shop in order to give the student both 
academic and practical instruction in his chosen curriculum. Instructors 
prepare students to enter the work force as highly skilled workers. 
Students spend from twenty-five to thirty hours per week either in the 
classroom or in the shop. Study at home or in the library is also required. 


Students who successfully complete the twelve month trade programs 
are awarded a diploma. This indicates that the student has maintained 
passing grades in both academic and shop work. Students who do not 
pass the entire course of study receive certificates on that work passed. 


VOCATIONAL CURRICULUMS 
Auto Body Repair 
Electrical Installation & Maintenance 
Electronic Servicing 


Masonry 


Practical Nursing * 


* Contingent upon approval by North Carolina Board of Nursing. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 


85 


ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 


An applicant for a diploma must meet the following requirements: 


ale 


Be a high school graduate or have the equivalent. Applicants 
who do not meet this requirement may be admitted by the 
Director of Student Personnel when age and maturity make 
successful completion in a given program seem likely. 


. Be eighteen years old or older or their high school class must 


have been graduated. 


. Have a personal interview with a counselor or with the Director 


of Student Personnel. During this time the applicant's interests, 
previous scholastic records, and feelings about success will be 
appraised. 


. Bein good physical and mental health. All students are required 


to submit medical reports. 


. Provide a transcript of all high school or other educational 


studies. 


ADMISSION PROCEDURE 


Individuals who wish to enter a diploma program should: 


1. Complete and return to the Director of Student Personnel an 


application form and a $5 deposit. These forms can be obtained 
by writing the Office of Student Personnel. 


2. Have transcripts of all previous education mailed to the Director 


of Student Personnel. 


3. Satisfy any test requirements. 


4. Attend a personal interview. 


5. Provide all medical information requested. 


86 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


AUTO BODY REPAIR 


The Automotive Body Repair curriculum provides training in the use of 
the equipment and materials of the auto body mechanic trade. The 
student studies the construction of the automobile body and techniques 
of auto body repairing, rebuilding, and refinishing. 

Repairing, metal straightening, aligning, and painting are typical jobs 
performed. Job titles include shop foreman, metal repairman, paint 
refinisher, frame straightener, and front end alignman. 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


varter 
Hours Per Week bp ple 


Course Title Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER 


AUT 1111 Auto Body Repair 3 12 7 
MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics 5 0 3. 
PHY 1101 Applied Science 3 2 4 
ENG 1101 Reading |lmprovement 2 0 2 
WLD 1101 Basic Gas Welding 0 3 1 

13 Le 19 


SECOND QUARTER 


AUT 1112 Auto Body Repair 

WLD 1105 Auto Body Welding 

DFT 1101 Schematics & Diagrams: 
‘Power Mechanics 

PHY 1102 Applied Science 

ENG 1102 Communication Skills 


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Cone Ww 


THIRD QUARTER 


AUT 1113 Metal Finishing & Painting 
PSY 1101 Human Relations 
AUT 1115 Trim, Glass & Radiator Repair 


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Sas 
Serine 


FOURTH QUARTER 


AUT 1114 Body Shop Applications 3 21 10 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 O 3 
Rey es ine 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 87 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week pyecter 
Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class Lab Credit 
AUT 1111 Auto Body Repair 3 12 7 


Basic principles of automobile construction design, and manufacturing. A thorough study of 
angles, crown, and forming of steel into the complex contour of the present day vehicles. The 
student applies the basic principles of straightening, aligning, and painting of damaged 
areas. 


Prerequisite: None. 


MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics 5 0 5 


Practical number theory. Analysis of basic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication 
and division. Fractions, decimals, powers and roots, percentages, ratio and proportion. Plane 
and solid geometric figures used in industry; measurement of surfaces and volumes. I|n- 
troduction to algebra used in trades. Practice in depth. 


Prerequisite: None. 


PHY 1101 Applied Science 3 2 4 

An introduction to physical principles and their application in industry. Topics in this course 
include measurement; properties of solids, liquids, and gases; basic electrical principles. 
Prerequisite: None. 


ENG 1101 Reading Improvement 2 0 2 


Designed to improve the student’s ability to read rapidly and accurately. Special machines 
are used for class drill to broaden the span of recognition, to increase eye coordination and 


word group recognition and to train for comprehension in larger units. 
Prerequisite: None. 


WLD 1101 Basic Gas Welding 0 3 1 
Welding demonstrations by the instructor and practice by students in the welding shop. Safe 
and correct methods of assembling and operating the welding equipment. Practice will be 
given for surface welding: bronze welding, silver-soldering, and flame-cutting methods 
applicable to mechanical repair work. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


AUT 1112 Auto Body Repair 3 12 7 

A thorough study of the requirements for a metal worker, including the use of essential 
tools, forming fender flanges and beads, and straightening typical auto body damage. The 
student begins acquiring skills such as shaping angles, crowns, and contour of the metal of 
the body and fenders. Metal working and painting. 

Prerequisites: AUT 1111,WLD 1101, PHY 1101, MAT 1101. 


WLD 1105 Auto Body Welding 0 3 1 
Welding practices on material applicable to the installation of body panels and repairs to 
doors, fenders, hoods, and deck lids. Student runs beads, does butt and fillet welding. Per- 
forms tests to detect strength and weaknesses of welded joints. Safety procedures are 
emphasized throughout the course. 


Prerequisite: WLD 1101. 


DFT 1101 Schematics & Diagrams: 

Power Mechanics 0 3 1 
Interpretation and reading of schematics and diagrams. Development of ability to read and 
interpret blueprints, charts, instruction and service manuals, and wiring diagrams. In- 
formation on the basic principles of lines, views, dimensioning procedures, and notes. 


Prerequisite: None. 


88 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


PHY 1102 Applied Science 3 2 4 
The second ina series of two courses of applied physical principles. Topics introduced in this 
course are heat and thermometry, and principles of force, motion, work, energy, and power. 


Prerequisite: PHY 1101. 


ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 
Designed to promote effective communication through correct language usage in speaking 
and writing. 

Prerequisite: None. 


THIRD QUARTER 


AUT 1113 Metal Finishing and Painting 3 12 re 
Development of the skill to shrink stretched metal, soldering and leading, and preparation of 
the metal for painting. Straightening of doors, hoods, and deck lids; fitting and aligning. 
Painting fenders and panels, spot repairs, and complete vehicle painting; the use and ap- 
plication of power tools. 


Prerequisite: AUT 1112, WLD 1105. 


PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 

A study of basic principles of human behavior. The problems of the individual are studied in 
relation to society, group membership, and relationships within the work situation. 
Prerequisite: None. 

AUT 1115 Trim, Glass and Radiator Repair 2 9 5 
Methods of removing and installing interior trim; cutting, sewing and installing headlinings, 
seat covers, and door trim panels; painting of trim parts and accessories. Glass removal, 
cutting, fitting, and installation. The student gains a thorough knowledge of the engine 
cooling system and repairs and replaces damaged cooling system components. Tests are 
made to insure normal engine cooling operation. 


Prerequisites: AUT 1112, WLD 1105. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


AUT 1114 Body Shop Applications 3 21 10 
General introduction and instruction in the automotive frame and front end suspension 
systems, the methods of operation and control, and the safety of the vehicle. Unit job ap- 
plication covers straightening of frames and front wheel alignment. The student applies all 
phases of training. Repair order writing, parts purchasing, estimates of damage, and 
developing the final settlement with the adjuster. 

Prerequisites: AUT 1115, PHY 1102, DFT 1101. 


BUS 1103 Small Business 3 0 3 


An introduction to the business world, problems of small business operation, basic business 
law, business forms and records, financial problems, ordering and inventorying, layout of 
equipment and offices, methods of improving business, and employer-employee relations. 


Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 89 


ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION AND MAINTENANCE 


The Electrical Installation and Maintenance curriculum is designed to 
provide a training program in the basic knowledge, fundamentals, and 
- practices involved in the electrical trades. A large portion of the program 
is laboratory and shop instruction designed to give the student practical 
knowledge and application experience in the fundamentals taught in 
class. 

The graduate of the electrical installation and maintenance curriculum 
is qualified to enter an electrical trade as an on-the-job trainee or ap- 
prentice, assisting in the layout, installation, check out, and maintenance 
of systems in residential, commercial, or industrial plants. 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Quarter 
Hours Per Week Hours 
Course Title Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER 
ELC 1112 Direct & Alternating Current 5 12 9 
ENG 1101 Reading !|mprovement 2 0 2 
MAT 1115 Electrical Math a 0 5 
PHY 1101 Applied Science i! 2 ord, 
15 14 20 
SECOND QUARTER 
ELC 1113 Alternating Current & Direct 
Current Machines & Controls Sea 9 
DFT 1110 Blueprint Reading: Building Trades 0 3 1 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 
PHY 1102 Appked Science eSiet Walqonh tate 
alg 17 17 


THIRD QUARTER 


ELC 1124 Residential Wiring 5 
ELN 1118 Industrial Electronics 3 
PSY 1101 Human Relations i! 
DFT 1113 Blueprint Reading: Electrical 0) 


— | 
| 


FOURTH QUARTER 


ELC 1125 Commercial & Industrial Wiring 5 
ELN 1119 Industrial Electronics — 3 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations ee 


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S| 

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90 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week bef 
ou 
Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class Lab Credit 
ELC 1112 Direct & Alternating Current 5 12 9 


A study of the electrical structure of matter and electron theory, the relationship between 
voltage, current, and resistance in series, parallel, and series-parallel circuits. An analysis of 
direct current circuits by Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Law. A study of the source of direct 
current voltage potentials. Fundamental concepts of alternating current flow, reactance, 
impedance, phase angle, power, and resonance. Analysis of alternating current circuits. 


Prerequisite: None. 


ENG 1101 Reading Improvement 2 0 2 
Designed to improve the student’s ability to read rapidly and accurately. Special machines 
are used for class drill to broaden the span of recognition, to increase eye coordination and 
word group recognition and to train for comprehension in larger units. 

Prerequisite: None. 


MAT 1115 Electrical Math 5 0 5 

A study of fundamental concepts of algebra; basic operations of addition, subtraction, 
multiplication, and division; solution of first order equations, use of letters and signs, 
grouping, factoring, exponents, ratios, and proportions; solution of equations, algebraically 
and graphically; a study of logarithms and use of tables; an introduction to trigonometric 
functions and their application to right angles; and a study of vectors for use in alternating 
current. 


phy 1101 Applied Science 3 ye 4 

An introduction to physical principles and their application in industry. Topics in this course 
include measurement; properties of solids, liquids, and gases; basic electrical principles. 
Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


ELC 1113 Alternating Current & Direct 

Current Machines & Controls 5 12 9 
Provides fundamental concepts in single and polyphase alternating current circuits, 
voltages, currents, power measurements, transformers, and motors. Instruction in the use of 
electrical test instruments in circuit analysis. The basic concepts of AC and DC machines and 
simple system controls. An introduction to the type control used in small appliances such as: 
thermostats, times, or sequencing switches. 


Prerequisites: ELC 1112, MAT 1115. 
DFT 1110 Blueprint Reading: 

Building Trades 0 3 1 
Principles of interpreting blueprints and trade specifications common to the building trades. 
Development of proficiency in making three view and pictorial sketches. 
Prerequisite: None. 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 


Designed to promote effective communication through correct language usage in speaking 
and writing. 


Prerequisite: ENG 1101. 
PHY 1102 Applied Science 3 2 4 


The second ina series of two courses of applied physical principles. Topics introduced in this 
course are heat and thermometry, and principles of force, motion, work, energy, and power. 
Prerequisite: PHY 1101. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 eu 


THIRD QUARTER 


ELC 1124 Residential Wiring 5 9 8 


Provides instruction and application in the fundamentals of blueprint reading, planning, 
layout, and installation of wiring in residential applications such as: services, switchboards, 
lighting, fusing, wire sizes, branch circuits, conduits, National Electrical Code regulations in 
ac tual building mock-ups. 


Prerequisites: ELC 1113, DFT 1110. 


ELC 1118 Industrial Electronics 3 6 5 


Basic theory, operating characteristics, and application of vacuum tubes such as: diodes, 
_ triodes, tetrodes, pentodes, and gaseous control tubes. An introduction to amplifiers using 
triodes, power supplies using diodes, and other basic applications. 


Prerequisite: ELC 1113. 


PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 
A study of basic principles of human behavior. The problems of the individual are studied in 
relation to society, group membership, and relationships within the work situation. 


Prerequisite: None. 


DFT 1113 Blueprint Reading: Electrical 0 3 1 
Interpretation of schematics, diagrams and blueprints applicable to electrical installations 
with emphasis on electrical plans for domestic and commercial buildings. Sketching 
schematics, diagrams, and electrical plans for electrical installations using appropriate 
symbols and notes according to the applicable codes will be a part of this course. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


ELC 1125 Commercial and Industrial Wiring 5 12 9 


Layout, planning, and installation of wiring systems in commercial and industrial complexes, 
with emphasis upon blueprint reading and symbols, the related National Electrical Codes, 
and the application of the fundamentals of practical experience in wiring, conduit 
preparation, and installation of simple systems. 


Prerequisites: ELN 1118, ELC 1124. 


ELN 1119 Industrial Electronics 3 6 5 


Basic industrial electronic systems such as: motor controls, alarm systems, heating systems 
and controls, magnetic amplifier controls, welding control systems using thyratron tubes, 
and other basic types of systems commonly found in most industries. 


Prerequisite: ELN 1118. 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations i 3 0 3 
An introduction to the business world, problems of small business operation, basic 


business law, business forms and records, financial problems, ordering and inventorying, 
layout of equipment and office, methods of improving business, and employer-employee 


relations. 
Prerequisite: None. 


92 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


ELECTRONIC SERVICING 


The curriculum in Electronic Servicing is designed to provide the basic 
knowledge and skills involved in the installation, maintenance, and 
servicing of radios, televisions, and sound amplifier systems. A large 
portion of time is spent in the laboratory verifying electronic principles 
and developing servicing techniques. 

A radio and television serviceman may be required to install maintain, 
and service amplitude modulated and frequency modulated home and 
auto radios; transistorized radios; monochrome and color television 
sets; intercommunication, public address, and paging systems; high 
fidelity and stereophonic amplifiers; record players and tape recorders. 
His work will require meeting the public in the repair shop and on service 
calls. A serviceman who establishes his own business will also need to 
know how to maintain business records and inventory. 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Quarter 

Hours Per Week Hours 

Course Title Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER 


MAT 1115 Electrical Math 


5 O 5 
ENG 1101 Reading |mprovement Pe O 2 
ELC 1112 Direct & Alternating Current 5 18 ll 
12 18 18 
SECOND QUARTER 
MAT 1116 Electrical Mathematics 5 O be 
ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 O ma 
ELN 1112 Vacuum Tubes & Solid State 
Devices iy 15 12 
15 15 2 
THIRD QUARTER : 
ELN 1125 Radio Receiver & Amplifier Servicing A de 8 
ELN 1113 Television Theory & Circuits 5 6 7 
PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 O 3 
12 18 18 
FOURTH QUARTER 
ELN 1127 Television Receiver Circuits 
& Servicing i] 18 VS 
BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 0 3 


12 18 18 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 23 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week tps 
Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class (aboot bcredit 
MAT 1115  Electricai Mathematics 5 0) 5 


An introductory algebra course with basic trigonometry and vectors needed in alternating 
current: algebraic operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, positive 
and negative numbers, use of exponents, square roots and powers of 10. 


Prerequisite: MAT 1101 or equivalent. 


ENG 1101 Reading Improvement 2 0 2 
Designed to improve the student’s ability to read rapidly and accurately. Special machiens 
are used for class drill to broaden the span of recognition, to increase eye coordination and 
word group recognition and to train for comprehension in larger units. 

Prerequisite: None. 


ELC 1112 Direct and Alternating Current 5 18 11 

A study of the structure of matter and the electron theory, the relationship between voltage, 
current and resistance in series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. Analysis of direct 
current circuits by Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff’s law: sources of direct current potentials. 
Fundamental concepts of alternating current flow; a study of reactance, impedance, phase 
angle, power and resonance and alternating current circuit analysis. 


Prerequisite: None. 
SECOND QUARTER 


MAT 1116 Electrical Mathematics 5 0 2 
In-depth treatment to give a working knowledge of the powers of 10, Ohm's law for series 
and parallel circuits, quadratic equations, Kirchhoff's laws, trigonometric functions, plane 
vectors, alternating currents, vector algebra and logarithms. 


Prerequisite: MAT 1115. 


ENG 1102 Communication Skills 3 0 3 

Designed to promote effective communication through correct language usage in speaking 
and writing. 

Prerequisite: ENG 1101. 


ELN 1112 Vacuum Tubes and Solid State 
Devices 7 15 12 

An introduction to vacuum tubes and their development; the theory, characteristics and 
operation of vacuum diodes, semi-conductor diodes, rectifier circuits, filter circuits, triodes 
and simple voltage amplifier circuits. Transistor theory, operation, cha racteristics, and their 
application to audio and radio frequency amplifier and oscillator circuits. Troubleshooting 
and repair of solid state devices. 

Prerequisites: ELC 1112, MAT 1115. 


THIRD QUARTER 


ELN 1125 Radio Receiver and Amplifier 

Servicing 4 12 8 
An introduction of commonly used servicing techniques as applied to monophonic and 
stereophonic high fidelity amplifier systems and auxiliary equipment. The operation and 
servicing of inter-communication amplifiers and switching circuits will also be taught. 
Principles of radio reception and practices of servicing; included are block diagrams of radio 
receivers, servicing techniques of AM and FM receivers by resistance measurements, signal 
injection, voltage analysis, oscilloscope methods of locating faulty stages and components 
and the alignment of AM and FM receivers. 


Prerequisites: MAT 1115, ELN 1112, ELC .1112. 


94 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


ELN 1113 Television Theory and Circuits 5 6 7 
This is a beginning theory course which introduces the study of the following: brightness 
control and DC re-insertation circuits, video detector stages, automatic gain control circuits, 
deflection oscillator and amplifier stages, automatic frequency control circuits, picture IF 
amplifier stages and RF tuner units, etc. Shop work will include construction, analysis, 
testing, and simple troubleshooting of the stages studied in class. Visual alignment and 
adjustments of control circuits are performed. 


Prerequisites: ELC 1112, ELN 1112, MAT 1115. 


PSY 1101 Human Relations 3 0 3 


A study of basic principles of human behavior. The problems of the individual are studied in 
relation to society, group membership, and relationships within the work situation. 


Prerequisite: None. 


FOURTH QUARTER 


ELN 1127 Television Receiver Circuits 
and Servicing 9 18 15 

A study of principles of television receivers, alignment of radio and intermediate frequency 
amplifiers, adjustment of horizontal and vertical sweep circuits will be taught. Techniques of 
troubleshooting and repair of TV receivers with the proper use of associated test equipment 
will be stressed. Additional study of more specialized servicing techniques and oscilloscope 
waveform analysis will be used in the adjustment, troubleshooting and repair of the color 
television circuits. 


Prerequisites: ELN 1113, ELN 1125. 


BUS 1103 Small Business Operations 3 0 3 


An introduction to the business world, problems of small business operation, basic business 
law, business forms and records, financial problems, ordering and inventorying, layout of 
equipment and offices, methods of improving business, and employer-employee relations. 


Prerequisite: None. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 95 


MASONRY 


The curriculum in Masonry is designed to train the individual to enter the 
trade with the knowledge and basic skills that will enable him to perform 
effectively. He must have a knowledge of basic mathematics, blueprint 
reading, and masonry technology. He must know the methods used in 
planning a masonry job, with specific reference to rigid insulation, 
refractories, and masonry units specified for residential, commercial, and 
industrial construction. 

Most masons are employed by contractors in the building construction 
field to lay brick and blocks made of tile, concrete, glass, gypsum, or terra 
cotta. Also, he constructs or repairs walls, partitions, arches, sewers, 
furnaces, and other masonry structures. 


SUGGESTED CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 


Hours Per Week ec 
Course Title Class Lab Credit 
FIRST QUARTER 
MAS 1101  Bricklaying 5 15 10 
MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics 3) 0 5 
DFT 1110 Blueprint Reading: Building Trades Oia 1 
10 18 16 
SECOND QUARTER 
MAS 1102. Bricklaying 5 15 10 
MAT 1112 Building Trades Mathematics 3 0 3 
DFT 1111 Blueprint Reading & Sketching O 3 1 
8 18 14 
THIRD QUARTER 
MAS 1103 General Masonry 4) LS 10 
MAS 1113 Masonry Estimating 3 3 4 
DFT 1112 Blueprint Reading & Sketching 0 3 1 
8 21 15 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 
Hours Per Week Quarter 
Hours 
Course Title FIRST QUARTER Class Lab Credit 
MAS 1101  Bricklaying 5 15 10 


The history of the bricklaying industry. Clay and shell brick, mortar, laying foundations, 
laying bricks to a line, bonding, and tools and their uses. Laboratory work will provide 
training in the basic manipulative skills. 

Prerequisite: None. 

MAT 1101 Fundamentals of Mathematics 5 0 2 
Practical number theory. Analysis of basic operations: addition, subtraction, multiplication 
and division. Fractions, decimals, powers and roots, percentages, ratio and proportion. Plane 


96 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


and solid geometric figures used in industry; measurement of surfaces and volumes. In- 
troduction to algebra used in trades. Practice in depth. 


Prerequisite: None. 


DFT 1110 Blueprint Reading: Building Trades 0 3 1 


Principles of interpreting blueprints and specifications common to the building trades. 
Development of proficiency in making three view and pictorial sketches. 


Prerequisite: None. 


SECOND QUARTER 


MAS 1102 Bricklaying 5 15 10 
Designed to give the student practice in selecting the proper mortars, layout, and con- 
struction of various building elements such as foundations, walls, chimneys, arches and 
cavity walls. The proper use of bonds, expansion strips, wall ties and caulking methods are 
stressed. 


Prerequisite: MAS 1102. 


MAT 1112 Building Trades Mathematics 3 0 3 
Practical problems dealing with volumes, weights, ratios; mensuration; and basic 
estimating practices for building materials. 

Prerequisite: MAT 1101. 


DFT 1111 Blueprint Reading & Sketching 6) 3 1 
Principles of interpreting blueprints and specifications common to the building trades. 
Practice in reading details for grades, foundations, walls elevations, chimneys, fireplaces, 
arches and cavity wall construction. Development of proficiency in making three view and 
pictorial sketches. 


Prerequisite: DFT 1110. 


THIRD QUARTER 
MAS 1103 General Masonry 5 15 10 


Layout and erection of reinforced grouted brick masonry lintels, fireplaces, glazed tile, 
panels, decorative stone, granite, marble, adhesive terra cotta and modular masonry con- 
struction theory and techniques. 


Prerequisite: MAS 1102. 
MAS 1113 Masonry Estimating 3 3 4 


This is a practical course in quantity ‘‘take off’ from prints of the more common type jobs for 
bricklayers and masons. Figuring the quantities of materials needed and costs of building 
various COmponents and structures. 


Prerequisite: MAS 1103. 


DFT 1112 Blueprint Reading & Sketching 0 3 1 
Designed to develop abilities in reading complex drawings in the masonry field. Blueprints of 


residential and commercial buildings will be studied with emphasis on the plot plan, floor 


plan, basement and or foundation plan, walls and various detailed drawings of masonry 
work. 


Prerequisite: DFT 1111. 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 97 
erence ee le ee ee a ae 


PRACTICAL NURSE EDUCATION * 


| The accelerated growth of population in North Carolina and rapid 
advancement in medical technology demand an increased number of 
well-trained personnel for health services. Realizing this need, Stanly 
Technical Institute, in conjunction with Stanly County Hospital, ad- 
ministers a program of practical nurse education. 

The aim of the Practical Nurse Education Program is to make available 
to qualified persons the opportunity to prepare for participation in care 
of patients of all ages, in various states of dependency, and with a variety 
of illness conditions. 

Students are selected on the basis of demonstrated aptitude for 
nursing as determined by pre-entrance tests, high school graduation, 
character references, reports of medical and dental examinations, and an 
interview with the nursing selection committee. In extenuating cir- 
cumstances and when the applicant can demonstrate sufficient 
knowledge and ability, the selection committee may consider for ad- 
mission those applicants with less than a high school diploma. 

Throughout the one-year program, the student is expected to grow 
continuously in acquisition of knowledge and understandings related to 
nursing, the biological sciences, the social sciences and in skills related to 
nursing practice, communications, interpersonal relations, and use of 
good judgment. Evaluation of student performance consists of tests on 
all phases of course content, evaluation of clinical performance, and 
evaluation of adjustment to the responsibilities of nursing. A passing 
score is required on all graded work, plus demonstrated progress in 
application of nursing skills to actual patient care. All Practical Nurse 
Education courses must be completed in sequence. 

Graduates of accredited programs of practical nurse education are 
eligible to take the licensing examination given by the North Carolina 
Board of Nursing. This examination is given twice each year, usually in 
April and September. A passing score entitles the individual to receive a 
license and to use a legal title ‘Licensed Practical Nurse.’ The Licensed 
Practical Nurse can apply for licensure in other states on the basis of a 
satisfactory examination score, without repeating the examination. 


* Contingent upon approval by the North Carolina Board of Nursing. 


98 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


CURRICULUM BY QUARTERS 

Course Title Hours Per Week Quarter 
Hours 

FIRST QUARTER Class Lab Clinic Credit 
Practical Nursing | 18 2 fe 20 
SECOND QUARTER 
Practical Nursing II 12 2 2a 20 
THIRD QUARTER 
Practical Nursing III 10 2 24 19 
FOURTH QUARTER 
Practical Nursing IV 10 2 24 19 


COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BY QUARTERS 
FIRST QUARTER 
PRACTICAL NURSING | 


Objectives: To assist beginning students in practical nursing to acquire basic knowledge 
from nursing and from related areas of learning and to begin to develop the skills needed for 
safe and effective bedside care of patients whose health deviation has created a state of 
dependency in matters of daily living. 


Course Material: 

Nursing — History; introduction to patient care. 

Health — Personal, physical and mental; family; community. 

Basic Science — Body structure and function; bacteriology; basic nutrition. 


Vocational Adjustments — Introduction to ethics and legal aspects of nursing. 


Communications and Human Relations. 

Classroom activities are planned to assist students in development of knowledge, un- 
derstanding appreciations, and attitudes basic to effective nursing of patients of all ages and 
backgrounds with nursing needs arising both from the individuality of the patient and from 
inability for self-care as a result of a health deviation. The student is encouraged to develop 
beginning skills in analysis of patient needs, both through classroom study of hypothetical 
patient situations and through planned patient experiences in the clinical environment. 
Beginning skills in nursing methods are developed through planned laboratory experiences, 
followed by related practice in actual patient care. 


Clinical activities provide introduction to actual patient care through selected clinical 
assignments requiring application of current classroom and laboratory learnings. 


Prerequisite: Admission requirements 


SECOND QUARTER 
PRACTICAL NURSING II 


Objectives: To assist practical nursing students to acquire further knowledge and un- 
derstanding and to develop further skills needed for rendering safe and effective nursing 
care to patients of all ages. 

Course Material: 


Medical-Surgical Nursing — Patient care; therapeutic methods, including administration of 
Oral medication. 


Introduction to Maternity Nursing. 
Introduction to Nursing the Sick Child. 
Communications and Human Relations 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 99 
CT EIT IE Ai SS ae al Ee eT ea RE AV 


Classroom activities center around analysis of nursing needs as viewed in perspective with 
the needs arising from the individuality of the patient and from the illness condition. Related 
information is presented as it is relevant to the student's understanding of and ability to 
-meet nursing needs of patients. 


Clinical activities provide selected experiences in patient care in order for the student to 
develop skill in applying classroom learnings to a variety of patient situations. 


Prerequisite: Practical Nursing | 


THIRD QUARTER 
PRACTICAL NURSING III 


Objectives: To assist practical nursing students to acquire knowledge of common disease 
conditions and to develop beginning skills in rendering safe and effective nursing care to 
patients of all ages with specific needs arising from the illness and / or therapy. 


Course Material: 

Common Medical-Surgical Conditions 

Care of the Subacutely-IIl Child. 

Care of Maternity Patient and Newborn Infant with Complications. 


Classroom activities center around analysis of nursing needs arising from the specific illness 
condition and the medical plan. 

Clinical activities consist of guided experiences in nursing patients with conditions which 
illustrate classroom learnings. 


Prerequisite: Practical Nursing II 


FOURTH QUARTER 
PRACTICAL NURSING IV 


Objectives: To assist advanced practical nursing students to acquire knowledge of needs of 
patients who are seriously ill, to develop beginning skills in assisting the registered nurse 
and / or physician in complex nursing situations, and to make the transition to the role of 
graduate practical nurse. 


Course Material: 

Needs of the Seriously-IIl Patient. 

Needs of Patients in Immediate Post-Operative Period. 
Needs of the Labor Patient. 

Needs of the Seriously-Ill Child. 

Assuming the Role of Graduate Practical Nurse. 


Classroom activities center around the needs of seriously-ill patients of all ages, of labor 
patients, and of patients immediately following surgery. 


Clinical activities consist of guided experiences in the care of seriously-ill patients, labor 
patients, and surgery patients, and is planned to parallel classroom learnings whenever 
possible. 


Prerequisite: Practical Nursing III 


100 STANLY TECHNICAL !NSTITUTE 


_ 


CLIIILTS 


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PMT TS. 


CONTINUING EDUCATION DIVISION 


102 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


CONTINUING EDUCATION DIVISION 


BASIC PHILOSOPHY AND PURPOSE 

The basic philosophy underlying the occupational extension adult 
education programs at Stanly Technical Institute is that education is a 
lifelong process. Education does not stop with the completion of formal 
schooling at an early age, but continues throughout life. Rapid changes in 
our modern society have necessitated a continuing education program. 
The scope of this program is determined only by the needs of the adult 
population it serves. 

Programs of continuing education offered by Stanly Technical Institute 
seek to provide occupational retraining and upgrading in vocational and 
professional areas, to help raise the basic educational level of adults, 
and to make readily accessible to persons of the community numerous 
opportunities for personal growth and enrichment by offering a wide 
variety of subjects from which to choose. 


ADMISSION, REGISTRATION, AND EXPENSE 


Persons who wish to enter any general adult, extension or non- 
curriculum course or the Learning Laboratory must meet the following 
requirements: 


1. Be 18 or their high school class must have been graduated. 

2. Meet any entrance requirements listed for individual classes. 
The requirements needed for any class will be listed in class 
publicity. 

At the beginning of each regular quarter, a registration day will be 
scheduled for the purpose of enrolling students in classes. Interested 
persons are encouraged to pre-register on or before this day so prior 
judgement can be made regarding which advertised courses can actually 
be provided. A prospective student may register by contacting the 
Department of Adult Education at Stanly Technical Institute by personal 
visit, mail, or telephone (982-0121). If a course is provided and not filled, 
individuals are allowed to register at the first or second meeting of the 
class. This same procedure of registration is used for classes which begin 
in the middle of the regular quarter, although there is no specific 
registration day. 

Normally there is no tuition for extension or general adult courses 
provided by Stanly Technical Institute, although students are expected 
to purchase their textbooks. In courses such as Multimedia First Aid or 
Driver Education a nominal fee is charged. 


FORMATION OF CLASSES 


Generally, extension and continuing education courses are established 
on a demand basis. Almost any course or program can be offered by 
Stanly Technical Institute provided: 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 103 


1. Aminimum of ten people register for the course. 

2. Asuitable classroom or shop can be provided on or off the Stanly 
Tech campus. 

3. A qualified instructor can be employed. 

4. The program in question has well defined aims, realistic goals, 
and effective methods to accomplish the class purpose. 


This means Stanly Technical Institute encourages the public to request 
courses. Often only one or two persons are able to recruit a group of 
friends and neighbors so that a particular course of interest to them can 
be provided. Similarly, several persons in the business or industrial 
community are frequently able to locate other individuals with similar 
occupational and training needs so that a course can be offered at a 
convenient place and time. An on-going ‘request file’ is kept in the Adult 
Education Department to help locate the needs and interest of the 
community. 


CLASS HOURS AND LOCATION 


Classes meet once or twice weekly on weekday evenings for two or 

three hours, although they can be provided at any hour which ts con- 
venient for interested persons. 
_ Stanly Technical Institute feels a definite commitment to extend its 
services to the local community, businesses and industries. Although 
classes are offered continually on campus, they can be offered in any 
area if a sufficient number of citizens indicate an interest in having a 
class brought to a particular location. 


AWARDS AND ATTENDANCE 


Adult continuing education courses are normally non-credit, but 
achievement in class may be recognized by the awarding of a certificate 
by the Institute. This certificate will show the course title and total hours. 
General requirements for a certificate are 75 per cent attendance and 
achievement of minimum class objectives as recommended by the in- 


Structor. 


PROGRAMS OF ADULT CONTINUING EDUCATION 


(Courses shown here are for illustration purposes only. Others are 
offered as the need arises.) 


A. Business Education and Office Skills 
Accounting Fundamentals of Real Estate 
Typing Legal Secretary Training 
Shorthand Dictaphone 
Office Machines 


104 


STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


B. Electrical, Mechanical and Building Trade Courses 


Automatic Transmission 
Drafting / Blueprint Reading 
Basic Electricity 

Industrial Electricity 


C. Management Development 


Principles of Supervision 
Human Relations 
Effective Communications 


Masonry 

Industrial Sewing Machine Repair 
Small Engine Repair 

National Electrical Code 


Safety and Accident Prevention 
Conference Leadership 


D. New and Expanding Industry Training 


One of the basic objectives of Stanly Technical Institute is to stimulate 
the creation of more challenging and rewarding Jobs for the people of the 
area by providing a customized training service to new and expanding 
industries. Subject to only minimal limitations, this institution, in 
cooperation with the Industrial Services Division of the State Depart- 
ment of Community Colleges, will design and administer a special 
program for training the production manpower required by any new or 
expanding industry creating new job opportunities in North Carolina. 

The program includes the following services: 


1. Consultation in determining job descriptions, defining areas of 
training, and prescribing appropriate course outlines, training 
schedules, and materials. 

2. Selecting and training of instructors. These instructors may be 
recruited from the company and from outside sources. 


The purpose of this service is to help a new or expanding industry meet 
its immediate manpower needs and to encourage each industry to 
develop a long-range training program of its own to satisfy its continuing 
replacement and retraining needs. 


E. Fire Service Training 


Introduction to Firefighting 
Fire Apparatus Practices 
Firefighting Procedures 


F. Hospitality and Tourism Education 


Quantity Cooking 
Waiter-Waitress Training 
Front Office Procedures 


G. Family Life Education 


Process of Conception and Birth 
Living with Children 
Family Relations 


Rescue Practices 
Forcible Entry 


School Food Service 
Sales Promotion 
Food and Beverage Purchasing 


Being Parents of Teenagers 
Retirement (Problems and Enjoyment) 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 105 


H. Liberal Arts and Citizenship Education 


Great Books of World Literature 
Researching and Writing Local 


_ History and Biography 
-Being an Informed Voter 


|. Health and Safety Education 
Understanding Mental Illness 
Driver Education 
Multimedia First Aid 


J. Creative Arts and Homemaking 
Oil Painting 
Cake Decorating 
Interior Decorating 


Introduction to American History 
Great Decisions of U. S. Foreign 


Policy 


Dressmaking 
Floral Arranging and Design 
Furniture Refinishing 


K. Language Arts Education 
Creative Writing 
Public Speaking 


Speed Reading 
Parliamentary Procedure 


L. Consumer Education 


Buying a Home 
Personal Income Tax Preparation 


COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS 


Stanly Technical Institute seeks to sponsor and promote a variety of 
community services which contribute to the cultural, economic, and civic 
improvement of the community. The following are illustrative types: 
seminars, workshops, conferences, speaker and lecture series, fine arts 
exhibits, musical concerts and special programs, and discussion groups. 


ADULT BASIC EDUCATION 


The program of Adult Basic Education is essentially designed to im- 
prove an adult’s ability to speak, read, and write the English language. 
Other areas such as arithmetic, science, and socia! studies are included 
in the instructional program. 

Specifically, the objectives of the Adult Basic Education program are: 

1. Provide instruction for those individuals who have attained age 18 
and whose inability to read and write the English language constitutes a 
substantial impairment of their real ability. 

2. Provide instruction in the basic education skills for those individuals 
who have attained age 18 and are in need of this training to enable them 
to function to the fullest of their realistic potentiality as citizens. 

3. Improve their ability to benefit from occupational training. 

4. Increase their opportunity for more productive and profitable 
employment. 

In accordance with the North Carolina plan for Adult Basic Education, 
first priority will be given to persons functioning at the fifth grade level or 


Investments 
Family Budgeting and Finances 


106 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


below. Second priority will be given to persons functioning above the fifth 
and through the eighth grade level. 

The program is based upon the philosophy that every indivudual, 
regardless of the status of his functional level, should have the op- 
portunity to participate in continuing educational activities. The 
philosophy further incorporates the belief that every individual is 
teachable, trainable, and can realize self-improvement. 

Through the cooperation of local community agencies and 
organizations, facilities should be available without cost. According to the 
policy of the State Board of Education no charge is made for adults 
enrolled in the Adult Basic Education program. 


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LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 


108 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


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LEARNING RESOURCES CENTER 


Asa center for student learning and innovative teaching, the Learning 
Resources Center at Stanly Technical Institute includes the College 
Library, Audio-Visual Laboratory and Learning Laboratory, each serving 
specific and unique functions. 


LIBRARY 


The library consists mainly of books and periodicals, and provides 
invaluable service to the student body, faculty and community in com- 
fortable and pleasant surroundings. A completely new and up-to-date 
reference section, combined with important volumes in the general and 
special areas, is housed in open stacks, readily accessible to readers. If a 
faculty member or student wishes to do in-depth study or research ona 
certain subject, a trained specialist is ready to offer assistance in finding 
the media which relates to the specific need. 

Books, with the exception of reserve reference books, are checked out 
for a period of two weeks. There is no limit to the number of books that 
may be checked out by a student; books may be renewed one time by 
bringing them to the library. 


AUDIO-VISUAL LABORATORY 


Stanly Technical Institute provides audio-visual services for the faculty 
and students. The laboratory maintains a library of filmstrips, cassettes, 
tape recordings, films, slides, etc. it also has on hand such audio-visual 
equipment as 8 & 16 mm motion picture projectors, filmstrip projectors, 
cassette players, reel to reel tape recorders and others. Students and 
faculty are welcome to use the AV services anytime the Center Is open. 


LEARNING LABORATORY 


The Learning Laboratory is designated to provide opportunities for 
Study, both to regular curriculum students in the Institute and for adults 
in Stanly County and surrounding areas. The programmed materials in 
the lab cover the entire educational range for non-reader through post- 
high school. 

A “learning laboratory” is an individual study situation in which a 
person 18 years of age or older may study many subjects at whatever 
level he or she requires. All materials in the lab are individualized to 
allow each student to progress at a pace dictated by his own ability. A 
coordinator is on duty to evaluate, advise, and aid the student in his 
progress. 

Students may use the learning lab to receive basic adult education; to 
work for a high school diploma; to prepare for the high school 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 109 


equivalency examination; to prepare for college; to keep pace in a 
selected trade, technical, industrial, vocational or college parallel 
curriculum; and to better themselves through selected courses of 
general interest. Adults who wish to enter the Learning Laboratory are 
first interviewed and placed according to their capabilities and goals. 

Many courses are offered both for credit (such as the high school 
program) and for enrichment. A selected list of programs available 
appears below: 


Basic Education Spelling 
English, reading, mathematics Spelling Improvement 
grade 1-8 

Grammar 
High School Program English Usage 
All courses required by the High Programmed College English 
Schooi Diploma Program or the 
GED Writing 

: Approaches to Writing 

Reading Improving Your Written Communications 
Reading Improvement 
Speed Reading Literature 

Poetry 
Vocabulary Adventures in Literature 
Vocabulary for College 
Vocabulary Builder Program Mathematics 

‘ Basic Mathematics 

Phonics Modern Algebra 
Plan Phonics Program Consumer Math 
Science Social Studies 
Chemistry American History 
Astronomy World Geography 
Biology 

Business 
Foreign Language Beginning Bookkeeping 
French Filing 
German Shorthand 
Spanish Secretarial Practice 


HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY (GED) 


Under the High School Equivalency Program, individuals 19 or older 
and those 18 who have been out of school at least six months may take a 
series of tests called the General Educational Development Tests (GED). 
Those receiving an acceptable passing score of 225 points with no single 
test score below 35 will be awarded a High School Equivalency Cer- 
tificate by the Department of Public Instruction. This certificate is 
generally accepted on a basis equal to a high school diploma for em- 
ployment, promotion, or further education. 

The GED tests the student’s knowledge and skill in five separate areas 
— English, social studies, science, literature, and math. An individualized 


110 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


program of study will be set in the Learning Lab to prepare each student 
for the GED. When the student has completed his program of study and 
feels confident, he is ready to take the GED. There is a fee of $3.00 for the 
initial testing and $1.00 for retest. 

In addition to the GED test, the Learning Laboratory also services the 
Adult High School Diploma Program jointly with the Continuing 
Education Division. 


ADULT HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA 


The Aduit High School Diploma Program is an individualized, unpaced 
educational opportunity designed for adults who have not completed 
their high school requirements. Any adult 18 or older may enroll in this 
program if the high school class in which the student was enrolled has 
been graduated. 

Four subjects — English, math, social studies, and science — may be 
Studied in the Adult High School Diploma Program. A student Is placed in 
the program on the basis of his school transcript and his own 
achievement. The student will take tests in the Learning Laboratory on 
the materials he studies. Upon successful completion of the High School 
Diploma Program, the student receives a dipioma from the adult division 
of the Albemarle City Schools or Stanly County Schools. 

There is no charge for entering the Adult High School Diploma 
Program, although there is a $2 fee when the student completes his work 
to help defray the cost of having his diploma printed. Interested adults 
may enroll in the program any time by contacting the Learning Lab. 
Likewise, the student may work toward the completion of his diploma at 
anytime the Learning Lab is open. 


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112 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


STATE ADMINISTRATION 


Wi Dallas Henning saii on ce noma Chairman, State Board of Education 
Beni Fountain eee President, Department of Community Colleges 
BOARD OF TRUSTEES 


Annie Ruth Kelley, Chairman 


805 Montgomery Avenue 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Lessie Lilly Parks 
1216 Lennox Avenue 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Guy Rushing 
St. Martin Road 
Oakboro, North Carolina 


David A. Lee 
Collins & Aikman Corporation 
Norwood, North Carolina 


Richard Lane Brown III 
Drawer 400 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Wallace Martin 
Pfeiffer College 
Misenheimer, North Carolina 


Roy E. Dellinger 
Wiscassett Mills Company 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Edward J. Snyder, Jr. 
E. J. Snyder Company, Inc. 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Charles T. Barger, Jr. 
425 N. 10th Street 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Dallas Durham 
Garrison Drive 
Albemarle, North Carolina 


Eugene B. Pickler 
Old Albemarle Road 
New London, North Carolina 


Hazel Efird 
Route 1 
Stanfield, North Carolina 


ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 


UAOMAStUBISMOD As ec tee ae Director of Occupational Education 
B.S., Northwest Missouri State College 
M.A., University of Missouri 
Ph.D., University of lowa 


Charles Byrd einai, ae ln! Pel i Oo al oe President 
A.B., MAEd., East Carolina University 
Ed.D., Duke University 


Oona lM air alt lia tnt on ice Director of General Adult Education 
B.A., Baylor University 


B.D., Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Ph.D., Duke University 


Diack (AGI aR i arnen tae athe al Cnty Immarla liiLaek an i nn Uae Business Manager 
B.A., John B. Stetson University 


Graduate Study N.. C. State University 
and UNC-Charlotte 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 £13 


POS TST EN O08 4 CAE to an Director of Learning Resources Center 
B.A. Law, Taiwan Provincial Chung-Hsing University 
M.A., Lib. Sc., University of Minnesota 
M.A., Ed., East Carolina University 
Ph.D., Duke University 


Paeemmevvasier. |. os ke el ee. Director of Student Personnel 
A.A., Campbell College 
B.S., East Carolina University 
M.A., Ed., East Carolina University 


FACULTY AND STAFF 


| Co ae TE Mathematics and Science 
B.A., Washington & Jefferson College 
M.S., University of Washington 
Ph.D., University of South Carolina 


MVM et Kung a. c.. y Sig RE RY alm 2 Secretarial Science 
B.S., West Virginia Institute of Technology 
M.A., Marshall University 


1 tien Gay tel a Ml) a rr or Electrical Installation & Maintenance 
BSE, Fitchburg State 


Oe eR a kod Resident Musician 
B.Mus., M.Mus., St. Louis Institute of Music 


lw yer Tacs Lay RIS SRA RT SE aaa SRE Tons ANG RO, a SRL English 
B.S., Concord College 
M.A., Marshall University 


Praseh MUNCYGULE . wo 2a us Registrar, Financial Aid & Inventory Officer 
A.A.S., Central Piedmont Community College 


Bri TCITTLG Vick. pun Siytetek bee oe Counselor-Student Personnel 


A.A.S., Central Piedmont Community College 
B.A., East Carolina University 
M.A., East Carolina University 


ETN RU Ud To ee a ee Part Time Learning Lab Coordinator 


A.B., Winthrop College 
Advance Education, Winthrop College 
Educational Work, UNC-Charlotte 


Andrew McPherson Business Administration 


A.B., Elon College 
M.B.A., Appalachian University 


PalmigdeeMOOSEis tics ken s Commercial Art and Advertising Design 
B.A., Richmond Professional Institute 


114 STANLY TECHNICAL INSTITUTE 


John MOrrisee rec te ce ls ene er, Cenc rer cae Evening Supervisor 


B.S., Appaiachian State Teachers 
M.A., Appalachian State University 


Keith: Morton ete! is 2 iss ITE leit teh ea a Masonry 


Lioyd Pendley: oii, 3). 3d RR Ro ap oie ne Auto Body Repair 
B.A., Hardin-Simmons University 
Professional Training — Texas Technological University 
Graduate Work, Appalachian University 


Sandra Sebring......... Pg nen) Early Childhood Specialist 
B.S., Western Carolina University 
M.S., East Carolina University 


Bob Smithiice ice lett cael bi cag acter ate Electronic Servicing 


Rebecca Snydehiw aie ee Part Time Learning Lab Coordinator 
B.A., UNC-Chapel Hill 


Janice StOKeGS See 6 ce se a ee Bookkeeper 
Pfeiffer College 


GaroliWeekley awit ae weed Ce ee Learning Lab Coordinator 
B.S., East Carolina University 
M.A., Ed., East Carolina University 


Aim andleve vel eh tit, Laat ke aan Evening Supervisor 
A.B., Pfeiffer College 
Graduate Study UNC-Charlotte 


OFFICE PERSONNEL 
Bonnie Bolen ........... Secretary, Director Learning Resources Center 
Candyik heawarn sme cer ay eile ye ae Secretary, Director of Student Personnel 
Susan Hudson Eee eas Oe Secretary, Director of Occupational Education 
Ann Kiser a mts Tene Ry, Che ae Secretary, President 
DODLIttle Nr ae ieee ek eee Secretary, Director of Adult Education 
MAINTENANCE 


James bs Galloway ih oceh aks) eee pee Maintenance Supervisor 
WIIG Ry ete oe ie ore Re ra ad ea Janitor 


CATALOG FOR 1973-74 115 
EE ESS cas a a ee ee as ee 
The faculty and staff of the Institute hold membership in the 
following societies and associations: 


AAIC 

Academy of Management 

Albemarle Jaycees 

Albemarle Lions Club 

American Association for Higher Education 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

American Vocational Association 

Association for Childhood Education International 

Chamber of Commerce 

Civitans 

Combined Charities 

Community Concert Association 

Educational Media Association, North Carolina 
Dept. of Community Colleges 

Kappa Delta Pi 

National Council on Family Relations 

National Fire Prevention Association - Electrical Association 

North Carolina Community College Adult 
Educator’s Association 

North Carolina Library Association 

North Carolina Literary Historical Association 

North Carolina Public Community College 
President's Association 

North Carolina Vocational Association 

Optimist Club of Albemarle 

Phi Delta Kappa 


Psi Sigma Tau 
Psi Chi 
Rotary Club 


Scouts, Explorers 

Stanly County Mental Health Association 

The North Carolina Association of Educators 

The North Carolina Community College Adult 
Educators Association 

The North Carolina Student Services Personnel 

The North Carolina Vocational Teachers Association 


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