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AND 


OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 


The  only  publication  in  Canada  devoted  to  the  Book,  Stationery  and  Kindred 
Trades,  and  for  thirty-one  years  the  recognized  authority  for  those   interests. 

MONTREAL,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  BankBldg.    TORONTO,  143-153  University  Ave.        WINNIPEG,  34  Royal  Bank  Bldg.       LONDON,  ENG.,88  Fleet  St.,  E.C. 


VOL.  XXXIII. 


PUBLICATION     OFFICE:     TORONTO,     JANUARY,      1917 


No.  1 


S.  &B. 

GRAVITY. 

STYLO 


FOUNTAIN 
INEX 


PENS 


THAT  ARE 
IVE 


Modern  life  makes  the  fountain  pen  a  necessity 
to  all  who  write.  And  the  cost  of  these  time-and- 
trouble  savers  should  be  kept  low.  in  order  to 
place  them  in  the  hands  of  the  many.  The  popu- 
lar fountain  pens  to-day  are  the  low-cost  pens 
that  give  perfect  service  and  long  satisfaction. 

That  is  the  reason  so  many  pen  users  prefer 

— Sanford  &  Bennett— 

FOUNTAIN  PENS-i 

These  pens  are  made  to  write,  and  there  are  no 
better  writing  pens  made.  Every  part  is  made  in 
our  own  factory — no  extra  cost  for  the  exclusive 
features  and  practical  improvements.  Each  pen 
is  fully  guaranteed.  They  never  leak  —  never 
sweat — seldom  get  out  of  order.  Put  new  life 
into  your  fountain  pen  counter  03^  selling  San 
ford  &  Bennett  Fountain  Pens.  They  make 
quick  sales  and  sure  profits. 

Write  to-day   for   prices   and  discounts. 

Sanford  &  Bennett  Co. 

51-53  MAIDEN   LANE,   NEW  YORK 

W.  E.  COUTTS,    Canadian  Sales  Agent 
266  King  Street  West,  Toronto,  Ont. 


S.  &B. 
AUTOPEN 

A  Self- 
Filler 


BOOK  8E  I,  LEE     A  N  l>     ST  A  TIO  N  E  R 


* 


* 


E3BH 


fffi'Youx  Bicycles,  Sir 


A1 


T  the  club,  on  the  train, 

in  the  home,  wherever 

nit-n   scefe    n  ■ 

(rom  business  circs  in  .1  friendly 

game  of  cards,  Bicycle  Cards  have 

f^         the  call    For  a  man  to  think  ol  cards 

1 .  (ur  lum  to  think  ol  "Bicycles"     When  he 

asks  for  a  deck  of  cards,  he  exjK-tts 

BICYCLE 

PLAYING  CARDS 

All  the  qualities  of  a  playing  card  that  help  make  card-playing  a  pleasure 
arc  liiry,  le  qualities.  Bicycle  Cards  have  the  feel,  the  finish  and.  above 
,11  the  ill  round  excellence  of  manufacture  that  makes  ilicm  asgood  on 
the  I.KI  deal  Ol  an  evening's  play  as  on  the  first  lor  general,  every  day. 
■  more  satisfactory  cards  cannot  be  made  or  bought,  yet  the 
regular  priced  Bicycles  is  very  reasonable.  Ivory  or  Air-Cushion  Finish. 
(  lub  Indexes.    Sold  everywhere. 

Congress  Cards— The  de  luxe  brand  for  social  pl.i>       Art  backs  of  fa- 
mous paintings  in  lull  color.    Gold  Edges.    Air-Cushion  rinish. 
Painc's  Card  Trays— For  all  duplicate  (pui 
gemousl)    designed.     Beautifully  finished. 
iinc«  h.iscr  1=  1111  it 
,n  Whist      If  yo 
will     Satisfactioi 
kI,  descriptive  circular. 

You  Need  This  Book— New  revised  edition  of 
•The  Ottii  ...I  Kules  ol  Card  Games ".  Ovc;  300 
games  250  pages  Substantially  bound.  Mailed 
postpaid  fur  1 5  tents  in  stamps. 

THE  U.  S.  PLAYING  CARD  CO. 
Dcpsrtxnent  w  Cincinnati.  U.S.  A.      Toronto,  Cauaita 


Cards  that: 
Help  "You 
Entertain 


HEN  successful  host- 


e  corresrmndence  cou 
tier  « annof  supply  you, 
antccd.     Write  for  illubti 


W! 
esses  give  a  progressii 
card   party,   they  are        ""^^ 
careful  to  provide  cards  that 
are  more  than  a  mere  means  for  tak- 
ing and    losing  tricks.    They  make 
everydeck  a  distinct  feature  of  the  occasion 
by  using  a  variety  of  the  newest  designs  in 

PLATING     CARDS 

Congress  Cards  are  worCs  of  art.  Their  backs  are  reproductions  in  full 
color  and  gold  of  the  latest  high  class  paintings.  They  have  gold  edges. 
They  are  made  in  the  regular  size  and  in  the  dainty  French  size.  They  are 
superbly  finished  in  Air-Cushiou  style.  They  come  in  special  telescoped 
boxes.  Money  cannot  produce  a  more  beautiful  card,  yet  Congress  Cards 
sell  regularly  at  a  price  within  the  means  of  all.  Ask  your  dealer  to  show 
you  the  newest  backs. 

Bicycle  Cards— For  Genera!  Play — Favorites  in  homes  and  clubs  the  world 
over.  Ivory  or  Air-Cushion  finish.  Club  indexes.  Very  reasonably  priced. 
Patne's.  Card  Trays— For  all  duplicate  games.  In- 
geniously designed.  Beautifully  finished.  Every  pur- 
chaser is  entitled  to  a  free  correspondence  course  in 
Whist.  If  your  dealer  cannot  supply  you,  we  will. 
Satisfaction  guaranteeed.  Write  for  descriptive,  illus- 
trated circular. 

You  Need  This  Book— New  revised  edition  of  "The  Offi- 
cial Rules  of  Card  Games".  Over  300  games.  250  pages. 
Substantially  bound.  Mailed  postpaid  for  15c  in  stamps. 
THE  U.  S.  PLAYING  CARD  CO. 
irtmeotW  Ciodanat..  U.S.A.       Torooi 


How  Many  People  in  Your  Town 

Play  Cards? 


IF  you  could  number  as  your  customers 
all  the  men  and  all  the  women  in  your 
town  who  play  cards,  there  probably 
would  be  few  worth-while  people  missing 
from  your  list. 

We  are  talking  to  all  these  people  every 
month  through  attractive  advertisements 
in  the  leading  magazines.     Miniature  re- 


productions of  the  January  advertise- 
ments are  shown  above.  Most  of  these 
people  use  Bicycle  and  Congress  Cards. 
The  advertisements  are  keeping  these 
brands  before  them  and  are  interesting 
them  in  the  new  backs.  They  very  likely 
will  buy  more  cards  than  ever,  and  when- 
ever they  buy,  they  will  go  where  they  can 
get  these  brands — 


BICYCLE  nmm 


CARDS 

PL£iTN6 
CARDS 


Whether  you  or  the  store  down  the  street  gets 
this  business  and  has  the  opportunity  to  sell  these 
customers  other  things  depend  upon  who  stocks  the 
cards  and  lets  people  know  it. 


If  no  one  in  your  town  is  selling  these  brand-, 
there  is  an  excellent  opportunity  for  you  to  make 
these  easily  carried  stocks  one  of  your  best  trade 
b  ringers  and  profit  makers. 


If  you  are  not  selling  Bicycle  and  Congress 
Cards,  and  your  competitors  are,  you  are  letting  live 
customers  pass  your  store  and  do  business  elsewhere. 
You  should  not  delay  another  day  to  put  in  these 
staple  lines. 


Let  us  tell  you  how  you  can  use  to  your  advan- 
tage and  with  nominal  investment  the  world-wide 
reputation  of  Bicycle  and  Congress  Cards  and  the 
forceful  national  advertising  that  is  keeping  these 
brands  in  the  mind  of  every  card  player. 

Sold  by  Jobbers  Everywhere 


THE   U.S.   PLAYING   CARD   COMPANY 

TORONTO,      CANADA 


BOO  K  S  EL  L  E  R     A  N  I)     ST  A  T  Id  N  K  U 


MORE 

NEW  LINES 

FOR  STATIONERS 


PHENOMENAL  success  attended  the 
expansion  of  our  business  last  year 
with  the  introduction  of  new  lines  with 
which  the  booksellers  and  stationers 
throughout  Canada  have  been  so  highly 
successful.  The  trade  will  be  interested 
to  learn  that  these  particular  lines  will 
be  shown  in  still  greater  variety  besides 
which  other  new  lines  of  good  saleable 
novelty  productions  will  be  submitted  to 
the  trade  by  our  travellers  this  year. 

We  take  advantage  of  this  occasion  to 
thank  the  retailers  throughout  the  Dom- 
inion for  the  orders  entrusted  to  our  care 
in  1916  and  to  wish  them  the  highest 
degree  of  prosperity  in  1917. 


Valentine  &  Sons  United  Publishing  Co. 


Montreal 


Limited 
Toronto 


Winnipeg 


BOO  K  8  E  .1.  I.  E  R     A  N  D     S  T  A  TIO  X  E  R 


Commencing 

for  the  year 


1917 


we  call  attention  to 

THREE 
SPECIALTIES 

Parts  of  our 
various  departments 

Stationery 

OFFICE  REQUIREMENTS 
Comprising  in  part: 

Inkstands,  Glassware,  Pens,  Pencils, 
Penholders,  Ink  (Stephen's,  and  all 
popular  makes).  Rubber  Bands,  En- 
velopes, Presses,  Files,  Everything. 

Blank  Books 

Not  mentioning  details — we  aim  to 
have  the  largest  and  most  complete 
stock  of  Account  Books,  Loose-Leaf 
Ledgers  and  Binders,  Memorandum 
Books.  Loose-Leaf  Price  and  Memo 
Books, — noted  for  their  exceedingly 
fine  quality. 

Leather  Goods 

A  department  of  Rare  Excellence — 
Comprising  every  variety  and  size  of 
Ladies'  Bags,  (ients'  Wallets,  Writing 
Portfolios,  Letter  and  Card  Cases. 
.    Bankers'  Oases,  DIAL  IKS.  1917. 

BROWN  BROS.,  limited 

Simcoe  and  Pearl  Streets,  TORONTO 


What  you  know 

and 

your  customer 

knows  ! 


UY.ING  a  VEXl^S 
PENCIL  is  like 
buying  a  government 
bond — you  know  for  a 
certainty  that  you  are 
getting  something  of  assured 
value.  Only  the  finest  of  ma- 
terials and  workmanship  go 
into  the  making  of  this  world- 
famous  pencil,  and  it  is  uni- 
form and  flawless  always. 

Venus 

lO*  PENCIL 

VENUS  is  a  necessity  for  artists, 
architects,  draftsman,  engineers,  and 
by  all  whose  requirements  are  severe. 
You  will  find  also  that  merchants, 
bankers,  brokers,  physicians,  railroad 
men,  students,  authors,  advertising 
men,  salesmen,  and  all  who  appreci- 
ate the  best  quality  in  what  they  use. 
select  VENUS.  They  look  for  the 
distinctive  water-mark  finish  and 
refuse  substitutes. 

Be  sure  you  have  in  stock  the  17  de- 
grees of  black  lead  from  6B  softest  to 
9H  hardest  and  the  hard  and  medium 
copying  for  billing  and  manifolding. 


AMERICAN  LEAD 
PENCILICOMPANY 

220  Fifth  Avenue,    New  York 

and   Clapton,   London,   Eng. 


Makers  also  of  the  popular  Blue-band  VELVET 
5c.  PENCIL,  VENUS  Eraser,  Milo  Rubber  Bands, 
and  a  complete  line  of  pencils,  penholders,  etc. 


BOOKS E L L E  R     AN  D     S T  A  T I 0 N  E R 

We  Specialize — That's  Why  We  Excel 


THE  FIRST  VOLUME  OF  SIR  ARTHUR 
CONAN   DOYLE'S  HISTORY  OF  THE  WAR 

THE 

BRITISH  CAMPAIGN 

IN  FRANCE  AND  FLANDERS,  1914 

BY  SIR  ARTHUR  CONAN  DOYLE 
With  Maps,  Diagrams  and  Plans.      $1.50  net. 

"A  classic.  .  .  .  His  book  will  never  be 
superseded.  If  must  be  read  by  everyone  and 
kept  at  hand  for  constant  consultation  by  all 
who  make  a  serious  study  of  the  War." — Sir 
W.  Robertson   Nicoll. 


BUY 

BOOKS 

MADE  IN 

BRITAIN 


LORD  NORTHCLIFFE'S  BOOK 
ON  THE  WAR. 

AT  THE  WAR 

BY  LORD  NORTHCLIFF<v 

All  Profits  from  the  Sale  of  tliis  book  will 
be  given  to  the  Joint  War  Committee  of  the 
British  Red  Cross  Society  and  the  Order  of 
St.  John  of  Jerusalem  in  England. 

With  Portrait,  $1 .50  net. 

"Lord  Northcliffe 's  blithe,  cheery,  kindly 
book.  A  more  encouraging  book  on  the  War 
has   never  been    written."     Claudius   Clear. 


WE 

GIVE  YOU 

SERVICE 


THE  BOOK  ABOUT  WHICH  THE  CANADIAN 
PRESS  HAS  GIVEN  WHOLE  PAGE  REVIEWS 

GREENMANTLE 

BY  JOHN  BUCHAN.         Cloth,  $1.25 
Third  Edition  Now  Ready. 

"It  is  curlOUS  that  he  Should  have  written  tin- 
best  war  novel  and  that  be  should  be  writing 
the  i>cst  war  history."— Sir  John  S.  Willison  in 
'I'lir    News. 

"A  glorious  yarn.  ...  A  triumphant  and 
distinguished  success." — Sir  \V.  Kobcrtsou  Nicoll 
iii  The  British  Weekly.  "The  most  exciting  of 
his  sensational  romances,  and  in  our  opinion  the 
best." — [Spectator.  "It  la  B  'hot  scent'  all  the  way 
through.  .  .  .  Mr.  Buchan  never  breaks  down 
f  i-  a  moment."— Pall  Mall  Gazette.  "A  grand 
yarn.  .  .  .  will  be  hugely  popular." — Daily 
Chronicle.  "A  gallant  book."— Punch.  "One  of 
the  most  WOttderful  mystery  adventures  of  the 
war.      The   tale   is   splendid." — Daily    Telegraph. 


WE 

GUARANTEE 

SATISFACTION 


THE  GIFT  BOOK  OF  THE  AGE 

THE 

LORD  KITCHENER 

MEMORIAL   BOOK 

CLOTH,  $1.50 

Published    on    behalf    of    the    Lord    Kitchener 
Memorial   Fund   for  Disabled  Soldiers. 

About  200  Pictures  Illustrating 
Lord   Kitchener's  Life. 

The  literary  contents  include  a  long'  intro- 
duction by  Lord  Derby,  an  intimate  sketch 
of  Lord  Kitchener's  life  by  Lord  Esher;  the 
full  story  of  advertising  for  an  Army  by 
Sir  Ilodley  ie  Bas:  A  wonderful  tribute  to 
Lord  Kitchener's  attitude  to  the  working 
man.  by  Arthur  Henderson;  also  contribu- 
tions from  General  Joffre,  General  Foch, 
General  Castelnau,  General  Haig,  etc.  etc. 


ALL 

BRITISH 

MANUFACTURE 


THE  SOLDIER   WHO   MADE  THE 
WORLD   LAUGH 

BRUCE  BAIRNSFATHER 

FRAGMENTS  FROM  HIS  LIFE 

Published  on  behalf  of  "The   Bystander" 

CLOTH,   $1.25 

Numerous    New    Sketches    and     Drawings     by 

Capt.   Bruce   Bairnsfather. 

Bairnsfather  has  been  the  unsolicited  and 
unexpected  laughter-maker  to  tin-  forces  of 

the  British  Empire  at  war— a  volunteer 
laughter-maker,  who  combined  laughter- 
making  with  fighting,  and  extracted  mirth 
and  drollery  from  the  most  horrible  situa- 
tions ever  endured  by  man.  situations  which 
I  a\  e  made  words  of  profanity,  for  the  dura- 
ii,  ii  of  the  war,  the  Bang's  English. 


HODDER  &  STOUGHTON  LIMITED 


London,   England 


Toronto,   Canada 


I'.OOKSKLLER     AN  I)     S  T  ATIONER 


w////////////////////w^^ 


BRITISH  FAIR  PLAY 


has  never  been  better  exemplified  than  in  the  case  of 
our  dealings  with  Messrs  Lyons  Limited,  of  Manchester 


MANUFACTURERS  OF 


Lyons  Bank 
Wax  Glucine 

Lyons  Ink        Ink  Pads 
Carbon  Paper,  Etc.,  Etc. 

They  have  kept  our  market 
supplied  at  practically  no  profit 
and  their  standard  has  not 
deteriorated    one   jot   or  tittle. 

Order  "  Lyons  Bank  Wax"  from 
our  present  stock  on  hand  at 
1916  prices. 

SPRING  DELIVERY 

We  can  fill  a  limited  number 
of  orders  for  Spring  delivery  of 
Glucine  from  present  stock  at 
1916  prices.  Mail  us  your 
order  please,  TO-DAY. 

Lyons  Ink  is  a  good  Fountain  Pen  Ink. 

Sole  Canadian  Agents  for  Lyons  Ink  Limited,  Manchester 

MENZIES  &  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

439  KING   STREET  WEST,    1  Door  West  of  Spadina  Ave.,    TORONTO,  ONT. 


GLUCINE  IS  GOOD 
STUFF 

The  most  satisfactory  adhesive 
ever  invented. 

Always  ready  for  use. 

Always  clean — never  dries  up. 

Not  affected  by  climate. 

Retails   2%    oz.,    10    cents 

5  oz.  with   cap  and  brush,   25   cents. 

10  oz.  with  cap  and  brush,  50  cents. 

30  oz.  for  refilling,  90  cents. 

Order  your  Spring 
Stock  Now. 

There    is   about   100%   profit   for   the 
Dealer   who   orders   in    gross  lots. 


4 


BOOKSELLER     A  N  I )     S T  A  T  [ON  E  I ! 

■,17777777/////////////////////////////////////////////// 


vs/sz/sss/ys/jsj/s/yssj/s/rsssssss^^^ 


The  Diamond  Series 


Christmas  Cards,  Calendars,  Tags,  Seals,- 
Post  Cards,  Cardboards,  Ball  Programs, 
Menus,  Wedding  Cards. 

Fancy  Card  Blanks,  red  and  gilt  bordered, 
hand  made  deckled  edge.  For  use  by 
manufacturers  of  Christmas  Cards, 
Engravers,  Embossers,  Printers,  Calen- 
dar   Manufacturers. 

Our  Canadian  Series  include  Soldiers, 
Post  Card  and  Folder  Designs,  Patriotic 
Christmas  Cards  and  Calendars. 

Local  View  Christmas  Booklets  for  every 
City  and  District  in  Canada. 

Our  Steel  Die  Cards  include  Coats-of- 
Arms  of  the  Provinces,  Cities,  and 
Dominion,  Emblematic  designs  suitable 
for  every  territory  in  Canada. 

Prices  are  more  popular  than  ever 


Remember  the  Trade  Mark  Diamond   K  &  co     ,  Series 


for  27  years  an  all  British  firm,  Dee  & 
Company,  London,  Eng. 


SOLE  CANADIAN  AGENTS 


MENZIES  &  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

439  KING  STREET  WEST,    1  Door  West  of  Spadina  Ave.,    TORONTO,   ONT. 


%g^ZZZ^^^%Z&^ZEZZZ&^^^&2^^^^^2Z^E&^^Z^^^^ZZ^ZZZ^Z^^&^^^^&SE&BEB&ZZE&E!ZZL 


m 


BOOKSELLER     AND     ST  A T IONER 


SELLING  DIRECT  FROM  FACTORIf 


ARMacDougall  6  Co. 


ARO-A\AC 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


Greeting  Cards,  Calendars 

and  Pictures 


Birn  Bros., 
London 


The  Rose  Company 
Philadelphia 

Celebrity  Art  Co., 
Boston 

Cosmopolitan 
Prints 


Holman  Albums 
and  Bibles 


We  will  carry  as  usual  a  complete  line  of  Christ- 
mas Greeting  Cards,  including  the  DOMIN- 
ION, GEM  and' HERALDIC  series  which 
have  became  so  popular  in  Canada.  The 
samples  are  now  on  the  way  l*rom  England. 

Calendars,  calendar  pads,  photo  mounts  and  art 
novelties. 

Calendars,  pictures,  mottoes  and  Art  Novelties. 


Popular  Selling  Pictures  to  retail  at  25c  and  40c 
each  including  an  immense  variety  of  produc- 
tions by  such  artists'  as  Harrison  Fisher,  Coles 
Phillips,  Howard  Chandler  Christy,  Jessie 
Wilcox  Smith,  Perkyn  Stanlaws  and  E.  Benson 
Knipe. 

Holman  Albums  for  photographs  touch  the 
highest  point  of  merit  in  every  particular.  The 
line  is  most  extensive.  The  prices  are  right  and 
the  profit  to  the  dealer  is  large.  The  Holman 
Bibles  are  available  in  bindings  and  illustration 
features  that  are  exclusive.  If  you  haven't  a 
catalogue  handv  send  for  one. 


As  we  are  separating  the  above  lines  from  our  stationery  sundries,  they  will  be  carried  by  special 
travelers  and  will  be  shown  from  coast  to  coast. 

We  are  pleased  to  announce  that  Mr.  E.  W.  Allen,  who  has  been  prominently  connected  with  the 
greeting  card  trade  in  Canada  for  the  past  five  yens  and  for  seven  years  previous  to  that,  in  the 
United  States,  is  now  in  charge  of  our  greeting  card,  picture  and  calendar  department. 

Our  travelers  will  shortly  be  leaving  to  show  you  these  goods — Many  novelties  to  help  you  make  more 
money  this  year. 


An       S  V  T\  II      O         /""l  1     •  #  ,  l  Canadian  Representatives : 

.  K.  MaCDOUgall  &  I/O.,   Limited,    266  King  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


15  O  < )  K  S  K  L  L  E  R     AND     STATU)  X  E  R 


p«iim«»iMi 


WE  have  a  full  line 
of  Stephens'  and 
Stafford's  Ink,  also 
Paste,  Mucilage,  Gloy, 
Cico  and  Grip. 

Playing  Cards,  Crib- 
bage  Boards,  Checkers 
and  Checker  Men, 
Scoring  Tablets. 


Large  stock  of  Sham- 
rock Pencils  just  to 
hand. 


SMITH.  DAVIDSON  &  WRIGHT 

LIMITED 

Manufacturing  Stationers  and  Paper  Dealers 

VANCOUVER  and  VICTORIA,  B.C. 


WjWimmwtWiWiWtWimwimwiMte 


Study  Your  Customers 

PENS  and  personality  are  Lnseparabh — 

The   more  fully   the  stationer  understands  each   man's 

Deeds,   the  more   fully   be  realizes  the   necessity  of  a 

pen    assortment    comprehensive    enough    to    meet    them 

all 

That's   why   more  and   more  stationers  are  displacing 

three  or  four  incomplete,   duplicating,   small    pen    lines 

tot  one  complete  effective  assortment. 

Bj   this   they   accomplish  five  hig  things: 

1st.      Tie    ui>    Ipsh    money    in    stock. 

\'n<\.     Save  counter    space. 

3rd.     Get   maximum    display. 

4th.     Offer   the   most   complete   asHortment. 

5th.  Make  it  easier  for  the  customers  to  huy. 
Tn  assist  in  concentrating  and  improving  their  Pen  Depart- 
ments there  are  10  different  sizes  of  Es-terbrook  Counter  Display 
i ":i  i         Write  us   about    these   to-day. 

ESTERBROOK  PEN  MFG.  CO. 
18-70  COOPER  STREET  CAMDEN.  N.J. 


He  is   SO   Happy    Modelling,   with  MODELLIT 

Every    book,   toy    store   and    schoc  1  furnisher 
in  the   Dominion  should  sell 

MODELLIT 


The 

Most  Cleanly 

Fictile 

Antiseptic 

and  Odorless 

Modelling  * 

Medium  on 

the  Market 


The  children's  favourite 
pastime 

MODELLIT 

will  attract  more  customers 
to  your  store  than  any  other 
modelling  medium. 


Made  in  Many 
Beautiful 
Colours  and 
Put  upin  Vari- 
ous Sizes  of 
Fancy  Boxes 
and  Refills 
1  lb.  Blocks 


Agents  for    the  Dominion  of  Canada: 
MENZ1ES&  COMPANY.  LIMITED  TORONTO.  CANADA. 

Write  Us  for  Samples  and  Particulars  TO-DAY 

MODELLIT  MFG.  CO.,  19  Brunswick  St.,  Bristol,  England 

Telegrams  :  "Modellit.  Bristol,"  England 


fhe  "Qyadro"  Frame 

(Patented  in  all  countries) 


SECTION 

S?fl  original  and  inexpensive  jrame  for 
Photographs  &    '-Pictures. 

permanent  Artistic 

3y  means  c  f  this  invention  which  consists  of 
a  simple  metal  edging  it  is  possible  to  lrame 
any  picture,  prtnt  or  photograph  in  a  permanent 
and  artistic  manner  in  a  minute. 
The  edging  is  made  in  lengths  of  2j",  3",  3|", 
5J"  S  upwards  by  4  inches  to  15J"  inches  and 
any  siae  within  these  limits  can  be  supplied 
with  Glass,  Strut  and  Suspender  rings  suitable 
for  upright  or  oblong  positions 

!No  tools,  glue  or  ace  vsories  necessary. 

Oull   art   enamel   finish   Brown,   Grey,    Black 

and  Green. 

(Samples  &,    Particulars  from 

BARTONS',  Cosway  Works. 
FincS  Road.  BIRMINGHAM,    lngland. 


BOOKSELL  E  R     A  N  I)     S  T  A  T  IONER 


ARO-yHAC 

'm  LINES 

SUNDRIES 


SELLING   DIRECT  FROM    FACTORIES' 


A.R  MacDqugall  6  Co 


ARO-AVAC 

'-j  LIMES         4 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


BETTER  SERVICE  TO  THE  TRADE 

Having  been  appointed  Canadian  Repre- 
sentatives for  the  following  manufacturers 


The  Automatic  Pencil  Sharpener  Co. 
The  Sengbusch  Self-Closing  Inkstand  Co. 
The  American  Vulcanized  Fibre  Co. 

(VUL-COT  WASTE   PAPER   BASKETS) 


See  Special 
Advertisements 
Below  and  on 
Opposite  Page 


We  are  separating  our  lines,  and  our  travellers  showing  Stationery  Sundries  will 
carry  stationery  lines  only.  We  will  have  other  travellers  who  will  carry  our 
Greeting  Cards,  Calendars,  Pictures,  Holman  Photo  Albums  and  Bibles,  and 
other    Associated    Art   Novelty    lines. 

SEE  SPECIAL   ANNOUNCEMENT  ON  PAGE  EIGHT. 


VUL-COT 

Why  You 
Should 
Sell  Them 


The  Vul-Cot  waste 
basket  is  the  retail  sta- 
tioner's basket.  It  is 
supplied  to  users,  only 
through  the  legitimate 
stationery  trade.  - 

Heavy   advertising    in 
mediums  of  general  cir- 
culation read  in  all  sec- 
tions    of     the     country, 
creates  sales  for  the  dealers. 

A  five-year  guarantee  goes  with  each  basket,  making  it 
easy  to  sell,  insures  satisfaction  and  additional  sales. 

There  are  free  dealer-helps  such  as  illustrated  printed 
matter  and  effective  window  displays. 

Vul-Cot  baskets  carry  a  liberal  profit  for  the  dealer. 
They  are  made  in  Wilmington,  Delaware,  by  the  American 
Vulcanized    Fibre   Co. 


CHICAGO 

Pencil  Sharpener 

STANDARD  MODEL,   $1.50 

sharpens  standard  pencils. 

GIANT  MODEL,   $2.00 

sharpens  any  pencil  or  crayon. 


Every  pen- 
c  i  1  user 
needs  a  de- 
li e  n  da  b  1  e 
[jencil  sharp- 
ener —  At 
the  right 
price  just 
about  every- 
body will 
buv. 

The 

"Chicago" 
Pencil 

Sharpener 
sells    at    the 
right    price. 


A¥\        Hit  T"\  11      O         f^  ¥     •  •  1         J  Manufacturers'  Representatives: 

.   K.   MaCUOUgall  &  tO.,  Limited,    266  King  St .W.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


HOOKS  E.L  I.  E  R     A  N  D     S  T  A  T  T  <  >  N  E  R 


SELLING  DIRECT  FROM  FACTORIES 


)ARO-A\AC 


SUNDRIES 


<jgj^ 


RMacDougallCCo 


ARO-jHAC 

LirslE-S 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


V 


riii: 

Artco  Paste) 


\*-*mhi  fnicoryus. 


TM  ST*«D**D  CBAVO*  MTO  O 


These    packages   are    two   of   the 
popular    selling    line    i  (   crayons 
tor  school   use. 

Crayel  is  put  up  in  a  Bve-ccnt 
bOX,   and    Is   the   most    s:il  isf.n-i  oi  J 

wax  crayou  made,  whetbei  foi 
school  or  general  use. 

Artco  Pastel  is  designed  for  use 
in  advanced  color  work  ou  paper 
and  can  be  used  with  water,  kU'- 
ing  delicate  water-color  effects. 
it  retails  al  five  rents  ,-i  package, 

Cresfllghl  Crayons  —  In  these 
crayons  all  the  old  objections  to 
hydraulic    pressed     crayons    are 

over.  uin,'.  The  colors  are  bril- 
liant   and    will    not    smear. 


SCHOOL  CHALKS 
AND  CRAYONS 

In  addition  to  wax  crayons  which 
they  have  been  manufacturing,  the 
STANDARD  CRAYON  COMPANY, 
of  Danvers,  Mass.,  are  now  making 
their  own  school  chalks,  including 
Enameled  and  Dnstless  Brands. 
They  are  using  high-grade  im- 
ported plaster  in  all  these  lines, 
assuring    the    highest    quality. 

We  have  a  very  special  proposi- 
tion for  the  Canadian  stationery 
trade  in   these  goods. 


SEE  THOSE 
PRONGS  ? 


lacerated 

kind. 


IMPROVED  SUPERIOR 
PAPER   FASTENERS 

Double  Prongs 

Two  piercing  points 

prevent  papers  from 

twisting 

Improved      Superior 

I'n /i'  r  I'n.si,  a,  r.<  have 
trademark       closed     ptfong     hous- 
ings   which     protecl 
fingers    from     being 
lis  i-  not  so  with  the  open  sleeve 


Recent  Improvements  (i.e.)  deeper  double 
prongs  and  prong  housings  and  the  new  cham- 
fered edges,  each  an  added  efficiency,  have  made 
t lie  Improved  Superior  Pape/r  Fastener^  Fit  the 
paper.    They  are  by  far  the  peer  of  all  other-. 

Made  by  the  Ideal  Specialties 
Mfg.  Corporation  of  New  York 


IxmON'S^S 0 VEREI GN    214 O-HB 


The  Five  Cent  Pencil  for  Canadian  Dealers  to  Push 

Made  in  3  Grades  Tipped  and  5  Grades  Untipped 

The  lead  in  this  pencil  is  so  absolutely  satisfactory  in  use  that,  being  available  in  practically  all  the 
grades  in  demand  by  general  pencil  users,  it  will  pay  the  alert  stationer  to  push  the  Sovereign  above 

all  other  five  cent  pencils.    A  special  advantage  to  the  dealer  is  the  liberal 

margin  of  profit. 

Two  other  good  specialties  in  the 
Dixon  line  are  illustrated,  here. 
These  are  High  Grade  Erasers 
that  can  he  sold  at  five  cents 
each,  yielding  a  good  Profit 
to  the  Dealer. 

ALL  DIXON  PRODUCTS  ARE  OF  HIGHEST  QUALITY  PRICE  WILL  PERMIT 
Made  in  Jersey  City,  N.J.,  U.S.A.,  by  the  Joseph  Dixon  Crucible  Company 

ESTABLISHED  IN  1827 


A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Limited, 


Canadian  Representatives : 

266  KING  ST.  W.,     TORONTO 


BOOK  S  EL  I-  E  R     AND     ST, A  T  ION  E  R 


Maclean's  Magazine 

for  February 

Just  suppose  you  were  made  Editor 
of  Maclean's  Magazine  for  one  issue! 

TT  THAT  would  you  provide  for  your  readers?  You  would  probably  want  some 
Y  Y  good  short  stories,  and  you  would  like  to  offer  chapters  of  a  good  serial.  You 
would  want  something  in  lighter  vein.  Perhaps  some  verse.  Certainly  some 
serious  articles  of  an  informative  and  critical  nature.  Probably  you  would  want  every- 
thing— contributions  and  illustrations — to  be  by  Canadians.  Good!  But  who  are  they? 
And  could  you  get  their  work? 

Look  at  what  the  regular  editor,  T.  B.  Costain,  has  provided  for  the  February  issue 
of  MACLEAN'S: 


c 


A  serial  story  by  Sir  Gilbert  Parker — "Jordan  is  a 
Hard    Road." 

A  abort   story   by   H.  G.   Wells — "Into   the  Abyss." 
A   complete  novelette  by  A.   C.  Allenson — "Danton   of 
tbe  Fleet." 

A  gripping  sketch  of  "The  Greatest  Hotelinan  in  the 
World" — a  Canadian,  by  name  John  McE.  Bowman, 
of  the  Hotel  Biltmore,  New  York;  and  the  man  be- 
hind the  Manhattan  Hotel,  New  York,  and  the  hotel 
now  building  in  the  same  city,  The  Commodore,  and 
the  new  Canadian  hotel,  The  Devonshire,  to  be  built 
tins  year  in  Toronto.  VV.  A.  Craick  gives  the  story 
of  this  remarkably  successful  and  interesting  man 
— a  veritable  romance  of  achievement. 
Stephen  Leaeock  is  in  the  February  MACLEAN'S 
with  mie  of  his  inimitable  sketches — this  one  en- 
titled— "In  Merry  Mexico."  What  a  fancy,  what  a 
humor  this  man  has!  He  roams  the  earth,  and  al- 
ways is  visiting  some  land  or  country  in  the  spot- 
light of  the  world's   history. 

Then  Editor  Costain  has  Miss  Agnes  C.  Laut  in  the 
February  issue  with  a  timely  and  thought-provok- 
ing    article,    "The    Elections    and     Canada."      She    is 


writing  of  the  American  elections/  of  last  November, 
and  in  her  virile  style  and  with  her  amazing  inside 
knowledge  of  things  political,  she  gives  ail  Cana- 
dians much  to  thiak  about,  and  a  wider  vision  of 
the  place  Canada  holds  in  world  affairs — dwelling 
especially  on  the  new  Anglo-Saxon  relations  which 
will  be  the  result  of  the  war  now  being  waged,  and 
which  gives  promise  of  involving  the  United  States. 
Miss   La  lit' s  contribution  is   well   worth   reading. 

H.  F.  Gadsby,  free  lance,  ever  a-tilting  at  politicians 
and  politics,  and  never  failing  to  get  under  the 
guard  of  parties  and  partisans,  writes  sparklingly 
on  "How  Premiers  Control  Their  Cabine.ts"  —  of 
piquant  interest  in  view  of  Sir  Sam  Hughes's  recent 
encounters  with  Premier  Borden.  Gadsby  studies 
other  Canadian  Cabinets  than  those  of  Premier  Bor- 
den's.    Good   reading,   this. 

Then  Editor  Costain  starts  in  this  February  issue 
of.  MACLEAN'S  a  new  department — snappy  biogra- 
phical sketches  and  zestful  stories  of  notable  ann 
interesting  Canadians.  You  will  enjoy  this  yourself 
and  so  will  all  others  to  whom  vou  may  introduce 
MACLEANS    MAGAZINE. 


The  usual  departments — Review  of  Revieivs  and  "Information  for  Investors" — 
are  present  as  usual;  and  illustrations  by  these  Canadian  artists,  C.  W.  Jefferys, 
Harry  0.  Edwards,  Lou  Skuce,  E.  J.  Dinsmore,  assist  to  give  the  February 
MacLean's  distinction  and  appeal. 

Now  if  you  have  been  keeping  in  mind  yourself — as  a  possible  editor  of  MACLEAN'S 
MAGAZINE  for  a  single  issue — do  you  think  you  could  excel  or  equal  what  the  regular 
editor  has  provided  for  MACLEAN'S  readers? 


Canadian  Booksellers 


THIS  announcement  of  the  February  MACLEAN'S  is  addressed  to  you.  The  pub- 
lishers ask  you  to  give  MACLEAN'S  its  due  place  among  all  magazines  shown 
by  you.  MacLean's  does  appeal  to  Canadians  who  know  it,  and  will  appeal  to  many  more  when 
they  know  it.  Help  all  to  know  it,  give  favor  to  a  good  Canadian  magazine.  Help  on  the  circulation  in 
Canada  of  Canadian  periodicals  of  worth,  remembering  that  when  we  build  up  our  own  country  in  national 
spirit,  aims  and  industry,  we  are  building  selfishly — for  our  own  individual  profit:  remembering,  also, 
that  what  profit  we  make  for  the  citizens  of  another  country  out  of  the  Canadian  people,  impoverishes 
Canada  without  compensation.  Since  we  are  giving  the  Canadian  people  a  first-class  and  clean,  all-Cana- 
dian magazine,  arc  we  asking  too  much  when  we  ask  your  co-operation  in  making  this  magazine  better 
known  and  sold? 

The  Publishers. 

01 


M<X)K  SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


M 
G 
& 

S 


M 
G 
& 

S 


M 
G 
& 

S 


M 
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& 

S 


M 
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& 
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M 
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I  Greetings 

|  To  the  Booksellers  of  Can- 

W  ada  we  tender  our  hearti- 

§§  est     Greetings     and     best 

=  wishes  for  1917. 


The  liope  expressed  in  our 
1916  greeting  message  has 
been  realized,  for  last 
year  has  proven  to  be  a 
record-breaker. 

This  encourages  us  to 
greater  efforts  and  we  are 
now  planning  still  bigger 
things  for  1917.  Our  ser- 
vice will  be  kept  right  up 
to  the  standard. 

Watch  cur  ads  for  the 
very  latest  books  anil  the 
very  best  sellers.  Read 
down  the  lisr  herewith  and 
m  a  k  e  y  o  u  r  selections 
therefrom.  They  are  de- 
pendable staple'  "bread 
and  butter"  books  and 
some  important  new   ones. 


Big  sellers  for  the 
New  Year 


HOW  THE  PRUSSIANS  CAME  TO  POLAND.  By  Madame 
Laura  de  Turczynowicz  (formerly  Miss  Laura  Black 
welL  of  St. -Catharines).     Now  ready.     Illustrated.   $1.25. 

THE  HILLMAN.     E.  Phillips  Oppenheim.     Illustrated.  $1.35. 

PICCADILLY  JIM.  P.  G.  Wodehouse,  author  of  "Uneasj 
Money,  "etc. $1.50 

LYDIA  OF  THE  PINES,  ffonore  Willsie,  author  of  "Still 
Jim."'      Illustrated $1.35 

OH,  MARY,  BE  CAREFUL.     By  George  Weston  $1.00 

UP  THE  HILL  AND  OVER.  By  Isabel  Ecclestone  Mackay, 
author   of   "House   of    Many    Windows."        -        -        $1.35 

JESSIE   ALEXANDER'S   PLATFORM   SKETCHES.      $1.00 

CANADIAN  POETS.  Chosen  and  edited  by  -lohn  W.  Gar- 
vin         -        $2.50 

THE  BOSTON  COOKING  SCHOOL  BOOK.  By  Fannie  M. 
Farmer '      $2.00   net 

THE  CARE  AND  FEEDING  OF  CHILDREN.  By  L.  Km 
mett  Holt,  D.D. 7.5c  net 

SEXOLOGY.     By  W.  11.  Walling,  D.I).       •       -       -       $2.00  net 

THE  MODEL  T  FORD  CAR,  1916  EDITION.  By  Victor  W. 
Page '      $1.00  net 

THE  MODERN  GASOLINE  AUTOMOBILE.  By  Victor  W. 
Page       ----- .'      $2.50  net 

QUESTIONS  and  ANSWERS.    By  Victor  W.  Page  -  $1.50  net 
AUTOMOBILE  REPAIR  MADE  EASY   (New).    By   Victor 

W.  Page $3.00  net 

MODERN    STARTING,    LIGHTING    and    IGNITION    SYS- 
TEM (New).     By  Victor  W.  Page       •       -       -       $1.50  net 
DYKE'S  AUTOMOBILE  ENCYCLOPAEDIA  $3.00 

THE  BEDTIME  STORIES,  14  vols.  By  Thornton  W. 
Burgess         -  ....  5Qc   each 

COMING  SOON 

THE  BATTLES  OF  THE  SOMME.      By   E.    Phillips  Gibbs, 

author  of  "The.  Soul  of  War" $1.50 

THE    SOUL    OF    THE    WAR.       By     Phillips    Gibfcs.      New 

Cheaper  Edition 75c 

MY     SECOND     YEAR     OF     THE     WAR.        By      Frederick 

Palmer         -         -         -         -    ' $1.50 

FROM   THE   ST.   LAWRENCE   TO   THE   YSER.      Hv   Capt. 

F.  C.  Curry,  of  Brookville,  Ont.  ...  -  $1.50 
PICTURES  OF  WAR  WORK  IN  ENGLAND.     Joseph   Pen- 

nell.     Illustrated  $1.5*0 

THE  ROYAL  NAVAL  AIR  SERVICE.      By   Harold    Kosher, 

with   Preface  by  Arnold  Bennett  -  $1.25 


Our  travellers  will  be  showing  samples  of  these  and  other  important  new 
hooks  on  their  first  1917  trip.  They  will  also  carry  a  full  line  of  import  samples, 
including  the  newest  Cambridge  Bibles,  Prayer  Books,  Poets,  Picture  ami  Toy 
Books,  ami  other  staple  lines. 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stewart,  Limited 


PUBLISHERS 


266-268  King  Street  West 


TORONTO 


M 
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& 
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M 
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M 
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M 
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M 
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MG&S 


MG&S 


MG&S 


li 


MG&S 


MG&S 


HOOKSELLEE  AND  STATIONER 


Let  * 'Standard"  Blotting 
Convince  You 


IT  has  convinced  other  dealers  of  its  unusual 
selling  qualities;  it  lias  proven  a  favorite 
everywhere  with  people  appreciating  supe- 
rior absorbency  and  durability.    It  is  bringing 
big   profits    to     quality     dealers    all    over   the 
country,  and  it  will  do  the  same  for  you. 

II  TK  solicit  a  trial,  knowing  that  once  you 
y  y    get  acquainted. with  the  splendid  popu- 
larity of  this  high-grade  blotting  you 
will  not  want  to  be  without  it.     Order  a  stock 
now. 

WE     manufacture     "Standard,"     "Im- 
perial,"     "Sterling,"      "Curi-Curl," 
"Prismatic,"  "Royal  Worcester"  and 
"Defender"       (enameled) — all      leaders,      all 
"repeaters." 

Standard  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

Largest   Producers  in   the   World  o, 
Fine  Blot  tings 

Richmond,  Va.,   U.S.A. 


The  New  Bump 


Two-in-One 

Twentieth 
Century 
Office 
Necessity 


Think  of  it — a  paper 
fastener  and  perfor- 
ator  all   in   one! 


A  fastener  that  will  neatly  and  automatically  fasLen 
from  two  to  tea  papers,  making  the  tie  out  of  the  paper 
itself. 

A  perforator  at  the  opposite  end  that  will  easily  punch 
a  round  hole  in  as  many  sheets  of  paper  as  can  be 
inserted  in   the  opening. 

Just    a    pressure    with    the    palm    of    the    hand    and    the 

work    is    done. 

Every    office     will     find     use    for   one   or    more   of   these 

simple   and    practical    little    devices* 

Retails    at    $2.50.      It's    a    sure    seller.      Order    one   to-day 

and    try    it    for   fastening:   your   letters. 

Bump  Paper  Fastener  Co. 

LACROSSE,  WIS.,  U.S.A. 
Canadian  Agents:    W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.,  Limited,  Toronto 


I 


Offer  fkese  First 


The  Stationer  occupies  an 
important  position  in  the  busi- 
ness community.  Not  only  is 
his  store,  as  a  business,  one  of 
the  important  factors  in  the 
city,  but  his  opportunity  to 
advance  the  interests  and 
raise  the  standards  of  effici- 
ency of  his  fellow  business 
men  is  great. 

Most  men  are  unfamiliar 
with  office  equipment,  the  use 
of  which  would  make  money 
for  them.  This  is  because 
their  minds  are  occupied  with  larger  matters,  and 
they  take  no  notice  of  details.  So  the  stationer  or 
office  supply  man  finds  a  splendid  field  for  his  ser- 
vices, as  "guide  to  efficiency." 

When  an  office  boy  or  *  clerk,  or  the  head  of  the 
ftouse,  himself,  asks  for  "An  inkstand,"  that  is  the 
stationer's  opportunity.  Offer  a  "Sengbusch''  lirst, 
and  stow  that,  because  it  automatically  closes  air 
tight  after  every  dip  of  the  pen,  making  it  absolutely 
dust-proof  and  non-evaporating,  it  is  more  economical 
for  him  to  pay  the  price  asked  for  a  really  efficient 
inkstand,  than  to  pay  less  and  waste  ink,  pens,  time 
and   worry. 

Write  us  to-day  for  our  profitable  proposition  on  this 
highly  efficient  office  specialty — ask  for  the  attractive 
circulars  and  "free  trial"  mailing  cards,  which  are  fur- 
nished gratis  with  your  imprint — window  display  cards, 
etc. 

SENGBUSCH  SELF-CLOSING   INKSTAND  CO. 

200  Stroh  Building,  Milwaukee,  Wis..  U.  S.  A. 


Xo.    51— $1.50.       The 

most  practical  and 
popular  single  ink- 
stand on  the  market 


I 


SPEDCERIAn 
STEEL-  PEPS 

Pen  Works,  Birmingham,  England 

Imported  by  the  leading  jobbers  of  stationery  in  Canada. 
The  Standard  Pen  in  the  United  States  tor  expert  and 
careful  writers.  Established   1860. 

Samples  on  Application  to  the  Trade. 

THE   SPENCERIAN    PEN    CO. 

NEW  YORK,  U.S.A. 


Pat.  and  reg'd. 


The 
TERRY 

Pen  or  Pencil  Clip 

appeals  to  every  user  of  pen  or 

pencil,  as  it  prevents  the  loss  of 

these  articles. 

Well  finished,  carded  to  attract 

— it  is  a  seller. 

Ask  for  sample  and  terms.     VVe  can 

supply  as  soon  as  war  is  over. 

British  made  too. 

Herbert  Terry  &  Sons,  Ltd, 

Spring  and  Presswork  Specialist 

REODITCH, 

ENGLAND 


Estabi  i  9  lied 
60  years,  we 
have  the 
Grip  of  the 
Spring"  trade 


12 


IJO  OK  SELL  Kit     AND     STATIONER 


I    ' 


urti.iwi  , 

1 
1 

ANOTHER 

NEW 

WRITING 

PAPER 


TABLETS 

Octavo  and  Quarto 

ENVELOPES 

AND 

PAPETERIES 


"RED 
WHITE 

AND 

BLUE" 


KEEPING  UP  OUR  LEAD  IN 
PATRIOTIC  NOVELTIES 

You  remember  the  big  success  scored  by  our  Khaki  Tablets  and  Papeteries  a  year 
ago.  This  year  we  have  another  new  trade  winner  for  you  in  a  line  of  patriotic 
stationery.  "Red,  White  and  Blue"  tablets  and  papeteries  can  be  depended  upon 
to  prove  record  sellers  in  the  stationery  stores  throughout  Canada. 

Handsomely  embossed  covers  adorn  both  the  tablets  and  the  papeteries.  The  stock 
is  our  excellent  "Silk- Velvet"  with  over-printing  in  delicate  shades  of  red  and  blue 
which  with  the  white  stripe  formed  by  the  stock  itself  gives  a  complete  surface  of  red, 
white  and  blue  stripes  running  diagonally  across  each  sheet.  These  shades  are  so 
lightly  printed  that  there  is  almost  as  much  contrast  when  written  upon  as  in  the 
case  of  white  paper  and  the  effect  is  so  thoroughly  pleasing  as  to  assure  sales  on 
sight  for  these  new  tablets  and  papeteries  when  you  show  them  to  your  customers. 
An  additional  point  of  merit  is  the  reproduction  of  a  maple  leaf  in  green  at  the  top 
of  each  sheet.     ■ 

This  will  be  a  great  line  for  effective  window  displays.  A  large  and  handsome 
window  card  goes  with  each  order. 

Trade  Prices  are  as  follows: — 

Octavo  Tablets— 10c  each—  $9  per  100. 
Quarto  Tablets— 20c  each— $18  per  100. 
Envelopes  packed  in  Vi  thousands  $3.50  per  1.000 
Papeteries $2  per  dozen. 


THE   COPP,    CLARK   CO.,   LIMITED 

517   WELLINGTON   STREET  WEST,   TORONTO   ONT. 


13 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  R     A  N  I )     8  T  ATK)  N  E  R 


To  everyone  who  uses  a  Loose 
Leaf   System  you  can  sell  the 

"F-B" 
Loose  Leaf  Holder 


Pat.   May   13,    1913 

Keeps  his  old  records  in  permanent  form  instead  of 
lying  around  in  disorderly  bundles. 

Pei mils  quick  and  easy  reference.  Practical  and  low- 
priced  Adjustable  to  fit  any  size  of  paper,  or  whatever 
the  location  of  punch  holes. 

Send  to-day  for  prices  and  particulars. 


ROCKHILL  &  VIETOR,  Sole  Agents,  Dep't  "F-B" 

(Branch:  180  N.  Market  St.,  Chicago)     22  Cliff  St.,  New  York 


ABOUT  STAMP  PADS 
MR.  STATIONER! 

Are  YOU  getting  your  full  share  of  this 
profitable  business?  Why  not  combine 
supreme  satisfaction  to  your  customers 
with  liberal  profits  for  yourself? 

The  "FULTON"  Self-Inking 
Stamp  Pad 

Seven  Sizes — Six  Colors 
STANDARD 

The  "FULTON"  Non-Blurring 
Wood  Pad 

Three  Sizes — Six  Colors 

The  Best  Pad  on  the  Market — Giving 
the  Highest  Percentage  of  Stamp  Pad 
Satisfaction. 

By   all  means  write   TO-DA  Y 
for  Price  List  No.  34. 

FULTON  SPECIALTY  COMPANY 

formerly  Fulton  Rubber  Type  Company 
128-142  Fulton   Street,       ELIZABETH,   N.J. 


V7"/^\TTT>      XXT  A  lVTT^O    are  many  here   below.     Use  the  want 
lUUK      W  AIM   1  3    ad.  paec  and  2 


get  rid  of  a  few  of  them. 


m 


IE  WASHBURNE  "O.K." 

PAPER  FASTENERS 

THREE 
SIZES 


N<?2B 

The  Washburne  "O.K."'  Paper  Fasteners  are 
easily  pat  on  or  taken  off  with  the  thumb  and 
finger;  can  be  used  repeatedly  and  "they  always 
work-  "  Brassin  brass  boxes  of  100  fasteners  each. 
Holds  with  a  Sleeve  Protected  Point  that  Pierces 
Attractive,  Compact,  Strong,  no  slipping  —  neoer  1 1 

On  in  a  flash  — :  "Bull  Dog"  grip 


THE  RIES  "O.K."  LETTER  OPENER 

75%  Time  Saved — Handy  —  Easy  to  Operate 

No  Adjustments — Always  in  Order 

Guaranteed  Two  Years 

Hand  and  Electric  Driven  Power  Machines 


Model  r3,„ 


The  Ries  "0.  K. "  Letter  Opener  has  the  advan- 
tage of  few  parts.  It  removes  only  ten  one  thou- 
sandths of  an  inch  from  the  envelope,  therefore, 
the  liability  of  cutting  enclosures  is  virtually  impos- 
sible. Made  in  3  sizes,  each  size  adapted  to  easy 
handling  for  desk  use,  average  weight  6  lbs. 


THE  SANITARY  "O.K."  ERASERS 

The  Most  Practical  Erasers  for  Everybody 


The  Sanitary  '  '0.  K. "  Eraser  includes  an  Adjust- 
able Metal  Holder  which  keeps  Rubber  Clean,  Finn 
and  Keen-edged;  works  better  and  lasts  longer. 
Two  Rubbers  are  made.one  for  Typewriter  and  Ink. 
one  for  Pencil.  By  slight  pressure  clean  Rubber  is 
fed  down  until  used;  its  narrow  edge  allows  a  letter 
or  a  line  to  be  erased  without  injuring  another. 


GOLD  MEDAL  AWARDS!     PANAMA-PACIFIC    INTERNATIONAL    EXPOSITION 

These  products  wherever  shown,  receive  the  highest  endorsement  whether  at  expositions  or  in  the  offices  or  business  men. 
"O.K."  Products  are  high  grade  and  universal  sellers— We  control  all  patent  rights.    f~~QX 

Full  particulars,  illustrative  and  descriptive  literature  on  request.     Liberal  Discounts 

THE  O.  K.  MFG.  CO.,  SYRACUSE,  N.Y.,  U.S.A.    sole  makers 


14 


COOK  S  I".  J.  I.  K  R     A  N  D     S  T  A  T  I  O  N  K  \i 


||,piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii<iiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiii!iuiiiiiiieiiiiiiiininniiiiiiiHiRfiniiiiittiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiij||» 

'lllkfiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiigiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiuiiiiininiiiiuuiiuuuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiUHiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii" 
6    CentS  Unique  War  Post  Cards       RACKS ALL  KINDS 


Sixpennies 

Think  of  il.  Six  cents — and  that 
in  the  lace  of  higher  prices. 
higher  freighl  rates,  higher 
costs  all  along  the  line.  We 
have  only  a  i'vw  thousand  at  this 
price.  Good  titles,  good  covers; 
extra  good  in  fact.  If  yon  want 
to  see  value  and  quality,  send  at 
once  for  samples.  This  lot  ccr- 
tainlv  won't  last  long. 


This  line  is  having  an  enormous 
sale  in  Canada  taken  by  the 
French  Government  ami  now  only 
released.  Price,  LOc  per  packet  of 
8;  sell  15c. 

Fragments  from  France 

This  very  clover  work  is  still  Strong 
—  I'arts  1  and  '1  in  stock.  You 
should  stock  this  line.  No.  ■'!  will 
be  issued  shortly. 

Daily  Mail  War  Maps 

A  bird's-eye  view  map.  This  is 
selling  well.  Have  you  seen  it? 
Price,  12  cents. 


IMPERIAL  NEWS  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

87  Queen  St.   E.,  Toronto,  Ontario 


Holds     Magazines    or     Books.     All     Metal     never 

wears    cull.      St;ui(ls    on    the    Counter    or    IliiliKS    on 

the  Wall.     This   magazine  and    book   rack   comes 
folded  up.    Price  $1.50. 


A  REAL  BARGAIN 


In  $1.25  and  $1.50  Fiction  Novels. 
(NOT  REPRINTS),  but  original  edi- 
tions. A  few  of  the  titles  given  be- 
low: "Gillespie,"  "Miracle  Man," 
"The  Plying  Inn,"  "You  Never 
Know  Your  Luck,"  "White  Pas- 
sion," "Vanguard,"  "Fortunate 
Youth,"  "Hour  of  Conflict,"  "  Argvle 
Case,"  "Carpenter  and  Rich  Man," 
"John  Ward,  M.D.,"  "On  With 
Torchy,"  and  about  40  others.  P)  ice 
35  cents  each. 

Remember  they  are  not  "REPRINTS." 

JUVENILE  BOOKS 

To  suit  all  tastes.  The  jump  in  prices  has  not 
affected  us,  consequently -we  are  able  to  offer  you 
at  the  old  rates  (and  which  are  now  Bargain 
Prices)  the  latest  issues  from  all  the  best  Pub- 
lishing Firms. 

Imperial  News  Company 

LIMITED 
254  Lagauchetiere  Street,  Montreal 


IMPERIAL  NEWS  COMPANY 

LIMITED 
WINNIPEG 

We  have  just  received  a  shipment  of  sixpenny, 
sevenpenny  and  shilling  novels,  by  Hie  following 

well-known  authors: 

Hall  Caine,  Robert  Chambers.  Conan  Doyle. 
Charles  Garvice,  Rider  Haggard,  W.  W.  Jacobs, 
Seaton  Merriman,  Le  Queux,  H.  de  Vere  Stacpoole, 
II.  (I.  Wells,  Stanley  Weyman.  Elinor  Glyn,  Booth 
Tarkington,  Bindloss,  Charles  Dickens.  Jack  Lon- 
don, Max  Pemberton,  Temple  Thurston,  Raror>ess 
Orczy,  (1.  K.  Chesterton,  Maurice  Hewlett  and 
R.  L.  Stevenson. 

Price:  Sixpennies,  IO'-m".  sevenpennies.  14c: 
shillings,  21c.     All  f.o.b.  Winnipeg. 

Prices  are  bound  to  advance  on  these  goods,  and 
many  of  the  titles  we  have  m  stock  will  not  be 
again  obtainable  until  alter  the  war. 

Sole  Canadian  Agents  for 

OFFICIAL  PHOTOGRAPHS  OF  THE  FRENCH 
ARMY. 

DAILY  MAIL  OFFICIAL  WAR  POST  CARDS. 

These  are  splendid  values  at  $10.00  pel'  thousand. 
Send  us  an  order  for  any  of  the  above  lines  and" 
you  will  find  them  quick  sellers. 

SOLE  AGENTS  FOR  JACK  CANUCK 


15 


KOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


WILLIAM 
o  a  I  G  C  5 


New  Year  Opportunities 

The  list  below  offers  splendid  opportunities  for  exceptional  New  Year 
business.    It  tells  its  own  story. 


Get  in  stock  the 
Antidote  for  the 


it 


Bairnsfather  Disease" 


Have  you  heard  of  the  "Bairnsfather  Disease?"  This  is  running  like  a  contagion  all  over 
Britain,  and  is  only  beginning  to  rind  its  way  in  Canada.  We  have  provided  for  the  money- 
making  opportunity  this  fondness  for  the  Bairnsfather  pictures  and  books  offers  by  securing  sole 
Canadian  rights  for  the  "Fragaments."  With  this  we  are  proud  to  announce  the  third  volume, 
of  which  five  hundred  thousand  copies  have  already  heen  sold  previous  to  publication  in  Great 
Britain.  Volume  III  is  expected  to  he  ready  for  Canadian  -ale  toward  the  end  of  January. 
Shouldn't  your  order  for  this  come  to  us  at  once?  It  will  he  shipped  to  us  hefore  publication 
in  London.     We  have  also  a  large  stock  of  Vols.  I  and  II  which  can  he  shipped  immediately. 

"Fragments"  are  also  supplied  on  a  splendid  range  of  postal  cards  which  only  need  to  lie  shown 
to  sell.     Our  travellers  will  be  glad  to  show  you  these. 

THE    STARS   IN    THEIR    COURSES.      By    H.    M. 

Sharp.  One  of  the  biggest  of  the  new  Brit- 
ish novels,  and  one  which  is  going  to  make  an 

unusual    hit    in    Canada        -  $1.25 

BINDLE.      By   Hubert   Jenkins.     Another   new   one 

which   is  having  an  enormous  success  in   Great 

Britain  ........  1.25 

BINDWEED.      By    Gabrielle    Vallings.      This    new 

novel,  depicting  French  life,  is  sure  to  provoke 

an  abundant  interest.  Six  editions  have  already 

been  exhausted  in  England  -  -  -  1-25 
THE   GIRLS   AT   HIS   BILLET.     By   Berta   Ruck. 

This    book,    by    the    author    of    "His    Official 

Fiancee, ' '  tells  its  story  in  its  title  -  1-25 
THE  HUNDREDTH  CHANCE.     By  Ethel  M.  Dell. 

This  new  one,  by  the  author  of  "The  Way  of 

an  Eagle ' '  and  other  best  sellers,  should  have 

a  most  successful  run  in  Canada  -  -  1.35 
IN  THE  WILDERNESS.  By  Robert  Hichens.  1.35 
MAGPIE.  By  Baroness  Von  Hutten  -  -  1.25 
THE  UNBROKEN  LINE.  By  H.  Warner  Allen.  1.35 
THE   PREACHER   OF   CEDAR  MOUNTAIN.     By 

Ernest  Thompson-Seton 1-50 

HOLLY    COURT.      By    Kathleen    Norris.      Another 

book   by   this   popular   author   which    is   certain 

to  be  a  good  seller 1-25 

ENCHANTMENT.    By  E.  Temple  Thurston,  author 

of  "The  City  of  Beautiful  Nonsense"  -  1.25 
THE    RISE    OF   LEDGAR   DUNSTAN.      By    A.   T. 

Sheppard \.25 

RAYMOND.  By  Sir  Oliver  Lodge.  In  this  won- 
derful  book  the  great   scientist-author  tells   of 


the  remarkable  results  of  his  attempt  to  com- 
municate" telepathetically  with  his  son  Ray- 
mond, who  gave  his  life  some  time  ago  in 
France.  The  subject  is  treated  not  only  seri- 
ously, but  scientifically,  and  will  interest  very 
many       -  2.50 

LORD  WILLIAM  BERESFORD.  By  Mrs.  Stuart 
Menzies 3.50 

IN  CANADA'S  WONDERFUL  NORTHLAND.  By 
W.   Tees   Curran  and   H.  A.   Calkins       -       2.50 

THE  MAKING  OF  MICKY  McGHEE.  By  R.  W. 
Campbell,  author  of  "Spud  Tamson. "  This 
writer  is  being  hailed  in  Great  Britain  as  ' '  the 
Scottish  Kipling,"  and  the  book  is  character- 
istic descriptive  verse  of  an  unusual  kind  1.00 

NEW  WAR  BOOKS 

'NEATH  VERDUN.     By  Maurice  Genevoix     -     1.25 
ECLIPSE  OR  EMPIRE?     By  H.  B.  Gray  1.00 

THE  BATTLE   OF  VERDUN.     By  M.  Henry   Du- 

gard 1.35 

WITH  CAVALRY  IN  1915.  By  Frederick  Coleman, 
author  of  "From  Mons  to  Ypres. "  -  1.50 
THE  NAVY  BOOK  OF  FAIRY  TALES.  By  Great 
Britain's  leading  Admirals.  This  is  a  most 
unique  volume  made  up  of  matter  contributed 
from  the  various  British  Admirals  and  other 
Naval  authorities.  It  is  one  which  will  be 
valued  for  its  contributors  as  much  as  for  its 
actual  articles.  An  interesting  incident  is  that 
the  proceeds  are  being  devoted  to  aid  the 
Naval  Orphan  Homes  under  a  Committee,  of 
which  Ladv  Jellicoe  is  President       -       -       1.50 


An  Unusual  Opportunity 


Two  pictures,  as   described  below,   which   have  stirred 
up  considerable  interest  and  enormous  sales  in  Britain 

have  been  largely  stocked  and  provide  excellent  opportunity  for  sales. 

"  The  Great  Sacrifice  "    Now  almost  world-famous,  bears  directly  on  the  War  theme. 

"The  Soldier's  Sacrifice"     another  picture   of  a  somewhat  similar  type. 

ARaPnrfl      RvAqI^^I'      Thirty  Thousand  in  Five  Weeks!    This  is  the  sales  historv  of  Robert 
IVCtUIU     L)I  CdKCI       W.  Service'  "RHYMES  OF  A  RED  CROSS  MAN.  "     This  eclipses 
any  previous  record  in  the  annals  of  Canadian  publishing.      Are   you   selling  your  share   of  this  and   is  your 
stock  sufficient? 
Be  sure  our  travellers  show  you  these. 


S 

s 


WILLIAM   BRIGGS,   Publisher 


Queen  and  John  Streets 


16 


TORONTO,  ONT. 


a 


Bookseller  &  Stationer 

AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 

Vol.  XXXIII.  JANUARY,  1917     ,  No.  1 


IN  THIS  ISSUE 

Co-operation  With  the  "Movies." 
The  Selling  of  Waste  Paper. 

1  Stock-Taking  Suggestions. 

I 

3  Store  Plans  That  Won  First  Prize. 

i 

Sales  Methods  and  Advertising  Suggestions. 
Cheerful  Books  as  a  National  Asset. 
The  Month's  Record  of  New  Books. 
Best  Selling  Books  of  the  Month. 
New  Goods  Described  and  Illustrated. 
Practical  Cardwriting  Course. 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President  H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-President 

I  H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager  T.  B.  COSTAIN,  General  Managing  Editor. 


S 

;$  Publishers    of    Hardware    and    Metal,    The    Financial    Post,    MaeLean's    Magazine,    Farmer's 

gi  Magazine,  Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  atid   Publisher, 

Bookseller  and  Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Manufacturing  News,  The  Power  House, 
The  Sanitary   Engineer,   Canadian   Foundryman,   Marine  Engineering   of  Canada. 
Cable  Address:  Macpubco,  Toronto;  Atabek,  London,  Eng. 

ESTABLISHED  1885. 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

FINDLAY  I.  WEAVER,  Manager 

CHIEF   OFFICES: 

CANADA — Montreal,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Building;  Toronto,  143-153  University   Ave.,   Telephone   Ma'n 
j3i  7324;    Winnipeg,   22   Royal   Bank   Building,   Telephone  Garry  2313. 

I  GREAT  BRITAIN— London,  The  MacLean  Company  of  Great   Britain,    Limited,    SS   Fleet   Street,   E.C.,   E.    J. 

Dodd,    Director.     Telephone    Central    12960.      Cable  Address:   Atabek,   London,   England. 

UNITED  STATES— New  York,  R.  B.  Huestis,  115  Broadway,  N.Y.,  Telephone  Rector  8971;  Boston.  C.  L 
Morton,  Room  733,  Old  South  Building,  Telephone  Main  1024.  A.  H.  Byrne,  1104-5-6-7,  Fort  Dearborn 
Bldg.,   105  West   Monroe   St.,   Chicago,   Telephone   Randolph    3234. 

SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE— Canada,  Great  Britain.  South  Africa  and  the  West  Indies.  Si  a  year;  United 
States,  $1.50  a  year;  other  countries,  $2  a  year;  Single   Copies,   10  cents.     Invariably    In    advance. 

1 


B 0 0 K S K L  L  K  R     AND     STATIONER 


Just 
Published 


By  the  author  of 
"Private  Spud  Tamson 


»» 


Brimming  with 

Laughter, 

Fearlessly  Truthful 


THE  MIXED  DIVISION 


BY  R.  W.  CAMPBELL 


The  racy,  rollicking  spirit  so  characteristic  of 
our  Army  to-day,  the  spirit  that  carries  men 
laughing  and  joking  through  unspeakable 
horrors  up  to  the  very  gates  of  death,  runs 
through  "The  Mixed  Division."  But  the 
Author  has  other  notes  to  strike  as  well — every 
human  feeling  that  War  has  roused  answers  to 
his  touch.  The  bright  side  and  the  grey,  the 
pathos  and  even  the  tenderness,  the  simple 
heroism  that  knows  but  Duty,  the  in.spiration  of 
esprit  de  corps  and  the  unforgettable  horrors  of 
Gallipoli,  he  reveals  them  all  with  sure  and 
sympathetic  touch.  And,  above  all,  his  book  is 
truthful — fearlessly,  discriminatingly  candid 
and  sincere. 

Booksellers: 

This  book  is  so  exceptionally  good  that  yov 
should  bring  it  to  the  attention  of  every 
customer. 


Ready  January  12 
Zane  Grey's  Masterpiece 

WILDFIRE 

Zane  Grey  has  written  many  fine  books,  but 
here  is  the  best  of  them  all.  He  has  written  of 
wonderful  horses  before,  but  Wildfire  outruns 
them  all.  He  has  written  often  of  men  and 
women  who  loved  adventure  and  had  their  fill 
of  it,  but  here  is  this  story  of  a  Centaur  com- 
munity. The  adventures  and  passions  of  his  char- 
acters are  as  natural  in  the  wild  country  in 
which  they  lived  as  the  adventures  and  passions 
told  by  primitive  peoples  in  fabled  Greece. 

In  literary  quality,  in  vivid  delineation  of  a  wild 
country  and  a  rugged  people  and  in  liig-h  dramatic 
power,  "WILDFIRE"  stands  out  as  an  indisputable 
masterpiece. 

Illustrated.     Cloth,  $1.35  net. 


THE  MUSSON  BOOK  CO.,  LIMITED 

Publishers  and  Wholesale  Booksellers  TORONTO 


18 


Editorial  Chronicle  and  Comment 


STOCK-TAKING 

CONSIDERING  the  question  of  the  annual  in- 
ventory, in  ordinary  years  there  was  always  a 
temptation  to  take  goods  at  the  cost  price  even  when 
it  was  felt  that  for  many  reasons  they  had  deterior- 
ated. Many  merchants  were  afraid  to  cut  down  the 
price  to  a  point  where  it  might  have  moved  the 
good's,  and  so  in  the  end  experienced  the  truth  of  one 
of  the  best  merchandising  maxims  in  existence,  "the 
first  loss  is  always  the  least." 

This  year  the  temptation  to  allow  stocks  to  re- 
main inflated  will  be  stronger  than  ever.  Indeed  the 
impulse  will  be  to  take  in  goods  at  a  price  far  higher 
often  than  the  invoice  cost  where  the  present  market 
quotations  are  at  a  much  higher  figure,  and  Book- 
seller and  Stationer  has  been  told  by  a  number  of 
merchants  that  they  intend  to  allow  for  the  apprecia- 
tion of  the  value  of  the  goods  between  the  time  they 
contracted  for  them  and  the  days  of  stock-taking. 

This  temptation  should  be  guarded  against.  Not 
only  will  it  mean  figuring  out  for  yourself  a  much 
higher  profit  for  the  present  year  than  rightly  be- 
longs to  it,  but  as  a  merchant  remarked,  you  haven't 
your  profit  until  you  sell  the  goods.  By  the  time  you 
are  selling  some  of  them  the  price  by  wholesale  may 
be  down  and  you  may  be  forced  to  meet  it  on  account 
of  competition.  In  any  case  it  is  far  better  to  use  a 
conservative  method  and  not  soothe  yourself  with  a 
fictitious  valuation  on  paper  that  may  never  be  real- 
ized. 

There  is  another  point  we  would  like  to  emphasize 
at  this  time,  and  that  is  the  advantage  in  taking  stock 
in  the  "double-barreled"  way,  by  recording  both  the 
cost  and  the  selling  price  of  the  goods  in  the  lists. 
This  may  seem  to  involve  much  extra  work  and 
indeed  it  does, — although  not  25  per  cent,  more,  tak- 
ing the  whole  process  into  account, — but  the  benefits 
are  quite  commensurate. 


EDITORIAL  NOTES 

A  POINT  that  booksellers  and  stationers  will  do  well 
to  remember  is  that  the  notice  has  been  sent  out  from 
Ottawa  to  the  effect  that  the  importation  and  sale  of 
calendars  issued  by  publications  forbidden  circula- 
tion in  Canada  is  prohibited. 


ON  WHIT  IN  (1  LETTERS 

T^VERYBODY  needs  to  be  reminded  occasionally 
•L'  of  the  importance  of  attention  to  detail,  whether 
they  be  details  of  business  or  home  management  or 
anything  else.  A  prominent  manufacturer  in  con- 
versation remarked  recently  that  he  had  found 
dealers  to  be  generally  poor  correspondents.  He 
amplified  this  by  saying  that  the  word  "poor"  meant 
irregular,  negligent  and  forgetful.  He  claimed  thai 
some  customers  of  his  never  bothered  to  reply 
to  any  letter  needing  an  answer,  and  that  often  re- 
minder after  reminder  was  sent  before  the  respond 
came.  We  do  not  think  it  is  a  fact  that  dealers  are 
belter  or  worse  than  any  other  body  of  men  in  answer- 
ing letters,  but  that  this  manufacturer  should  think 
so  is  evidently  the  result  of  experience. 

Negligence  in  attending  to  correspondence  is  to  be 
deplored.  The  dealer  who  forgets  or  delays  or  pro- 
crastinates in  this  regard  is  probably  just  as  slack  in 
some  other  details  of  conducting  his  business.  He 
creates  that  impression.  If  a  dealer  is  known  as  a 
poor  correspondent,  his  credit  is  very  often  injure, I 
in  consequence,  and  he  is  put  down  as  a  merchant 
who  is  not  progressive,  and  not  a  particularly  good 
business  man.  Often,  then,  manufacturers  ami 
wholesalers  pass  him  up,  materially  to  his  disadvan- 
tage. 

Letter  answering  could  be  methodic.  Set  a  time 
each  day  to  take  up  and  reply  to  all  correspondence. 
Keep  a  copy  of  what  replies  are  sent.  Get  a  type- 
writer, if  possible.  It  is  economical  in  the  end.  'File 
all  incoming  letters,  and  copies  of  all  outgoing.  Take 
time  and  plan  a  system  fitted  to  your  own  store. 


MATING  THE  UNMARRIED 

EUGENE  BMEUX.  the  French  dramatist,  figures 

-L'  that  there  were  1,878,265  single  men  and  1,664,- 

665  single  women,  above  the  age  of  twenty-five  in 
France  before  the  war.  It  is  his  theory  that  a  con- 
siderable number  of  happy  households  could  haw 
been  organized  out  of  these  vast  resources  had  there 
been  greater  facilities  for  bringing  eligibles  together. 
It  may  be.  But  when  it  comes  to  insuring  the  lasting 
happiness  of  the  couples  so  mated,  we  are  inclined  to 
think  that  a  knowledge  of  Charlotte  Perkins  Oilman's 
books,  especially  Women  and  Economics,  would  be 
an  imporatnt  asset.  . 
19 


Read  What  Nelles  of  Guelph  Has  to  Say 

About  the  Merit  of  the  Holiday  Gift  Book  Section  and  Features  That  Should  Distinguish 
It — Then  Decide  to  Do  Your  Share  to  Assure  Its  Success  for  1917 


All  members  of-  the  trade,  publishers  and  retailers 
alike,  will  read  with  interest  the  following:  letter  from 
('.  L.  Nelles,  of  Guelph,  Ontario,  dealing  with  the  Holiday 
(iift  Book  Section,  as  bound  in  the  November  issue  of 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  and  supplied  in  sep- 
arate form  with  retail  bookseller's  imprint  on  the  front 
page. 

Mr.  Nelles  scores  a  significant  point  in  dealing'  with 
the  advisability  on  the  part  of  publishers  of  having 
complete  lists  of  their  new  books  advertised  in  this  Gift 
Book  Section : — 

Guelph,   Ont,   Dec.   18,   1916. 
Editor,  Bookseller  and  Stationer: 

Dear  Sir, — In  regard  to  book  circular  sent  out  by  your  trade 
paper  with  lists  of  the  new  publications  for  the  holiday  trade 
would  say  that  it  was  very  satisfactory  indeed,  but  does  not  go 
far  enough  towards  the  object  you  aim  at.  The  publishers  are 
possibly  to  blame  for  this  as  they  do  not  advertise  anything  like 
a  complete  list  of  their  new  books,  in  fact  I  notice  that  some  of 
them  do  not  think  it  worth  while  to  use  your  pages  monthly, 
and  this  seems  to  be  a  mistake,  as  I  for  one  watch  each  month 
for  new  books  and  order  them  from  this  source.  We  have  been 
spending  each  year  quite  a  sum  to  procure  the  American  edition 
of  the  latest  books,  but  the  price  of  books  is  so  often  different 
from  the  Canadian  that  it  would  be  much  more  satisfactory  if 
one  could  have  each  November  a  list  on  the  same  lines  as  yours, 
but  more  complete  and  up-to-date.  I  find  this  means  of  adver- 
tising of  great  benefit  and  have  dozens  of  orders  from  customers 
whom  I  sent  this  and  other  things  with  Xmas  lines  specialized 
on.  It  is  one  of  the  best  advertising  mediums  I  use  and  will  be 
very  glad  to  have  you  notify  me  in  time,  that  you  will  repeat 
the  same  thing  in  1917,  only,  if  possible,  with  more  complete  lists 
from  the  publishers.  The  latter  should  realize  that  it  is  in 
their  intei-ests  to  have  it  up-to-date,  and  I  can  show  invoices  for 
at  least  a  dozen  books  ordered  from  New  York  as  they  were 
listed  in  my  American  catalogue  and  not  in  Bookseller  and 
Stationer,  and  it  is  very  difficult  to  remember  books  in  a  dozen 
different  Canadian  lists,  and  many  times  I  do  not  have  time 
to  do  it,  consequently  New  York  gets  the  order.  Keep  up  the 
good  work  and  I  for  one  will  be  glad  to  double  my  order  if 
you  make  up  a  book  list  for  1917. 

Yours  truly, 

(Signed)  C.  F.  Nelles. 

In  this  connection  it  may  be  stated  here  that  this  holi- 
day gift  book  section  will  again  be  a  strong  feature  of  the 
issue  for  November,  1917.  In  fact  advance  order  forms 
have  been  sent  out  to  the  retail  booksellers  and  already  a 
goodly  grist  of  orders  have  come  in,  some  of  these  dealers 
booking  larger  orders  than  they  placed  for  1916. 

Those  booksellers  who  have  not  responded  to  the  letter 
sent  to  them,  by  sending  in  the  order  card  filled  out, 
should  do  so.  As  pointed  out  in  the  letter  in  question, 
these  orders  are  subject  to  ratification  in  November,  1917, 
upon  receipt  of  further  notice  from  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER.  It  will  be  seen,  therefore,  that  the  retailer 
assumes  no  risk  whatever.  The  whole  idea  should  appeal 
to  these  dealers  as  it  does  to  Mr.  Nelles,  that  this  co- 
operative work  on.  the  part  of  BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER  deserves  the  earnest  support  of  the  trade. 

It  may  be  added  that  it  will  be  distinctly  helpful  to 
BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  in  its  effort  to  make 
this  feature  stronger  than  ever  for  the  1917  holiday  book 
trade  season,  to  have  this  advance  support  of  the  retailers. 
Those  who  did  not  have  a  supply  of  the  Holiday  Book 
section  in  the  season  just  past,  missed  a  most  effective 


means  of  creating  bigger  holiday  book  business  and  they 
should  not  make  the  same  mistake  again. 

This  is  only  one  of  the  effective  means  by  which  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  extends  co-operation  to  the 
retail  booksellers  and  the  hope  is  earnestly  expressed  that 
they  will  respond  in  constantly  increasing  measure  in 
order  to  advance  not  only  their  own  particular  interests 
but  by  very  reason  of  this  joint  action  with  the  trade 
paper,  promote  the  general  welfare  of  the  book  trade  in 
Canada. 

Let  the  retailers  and  the  publishers  decide  now,  in  deal- 
ing with  the  particular  subject  of  the  Holiday  Book  Sec- 
tion for  1917,  to  take  such  individual  action  as  to  assure 
its  being  an  unprecedented  success. 


COMMUNICATION 

Prince  Albert,  Sask. 
To  the  Editor  — 

I  would  like  through  your  paper  to  make  a  suggestion 
to  the  wholesale  trade  in  regard  to  shipping  goods  by 
Express. 

Should  we  send  for  a  rush  order  to  be  sent  by 
Express,  we  invariably  receive  the  goods  in  the  best 
of  time,  but  the  invoice  usually  is  sent  on  by  mail  and 
reaches  us  one,  two  or  sometimes  five  days  later,  thereby 
delaying  the  sale  of  the  goods  and  causing  great  annoy- 
ance to  the  purchaser. 

It  seems  to  me  a  simple  way  would  be  to  enclose  the 
invoice  in  the  express  parcel  and  then  send  one  on  by  mail 
if  they  wish. 

I  do  not  know  how  many  suffer  as  we  have  done  from 
this,  but  we  trust  this  hint  will  do  away  with  further 
trouble. 

Yours  truly, 

JOHN  R.  MERRITT, 


TRADE  NEWS 

H.  Scott,  well-known  dealer  of  Moose  Jaw,  was  married 
in  Winnipeg  recently,  his  wife  having  come  out  from 
England. 


Thomas  S.  Sinnott,  Winnipeg  manager  of  the  Imperial 
News  Co.,  Ltd.,  has  returned  from  a  business  trip  to 
Edmonton. 


The  Dodge  Publishing  Co.,  now  at  214  East  23rd  street, 
has  just  leased  the  entire  eighteenth  floor  in  the  Printing 
Crafts  Building,  New  York  City,  containing  over  20,000 
square  feet. 

*  *  * 

A.  Manby,  of  Manby  &  Co.,  stationers,  Dauphin.  Man.. 
has  returned  from  the  Front,  with  both  eyes  seriously 
damaged  as  a  result  of  wounds  received  in  action.  He  is 
home  on  four  months'  leave,  but  may  secure  his  discharge 
because  of  the  above  wound.  Mr.  Manby  is  an  officer  in  a 
Western  regiment. 


20 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


A  GOOD  TOY  ADVERTISEMENT 

A  reproduction  of  the  toy  advertisement  of  G.  A.  Hol- 
land &  Sons,  Company,  appearing'  herewith,  is  only  one  of 
a  number  of  very  effective  advertisements  which  this  con- 
cern has  had  in  the  past  season.  Many  other  dealers  have 
had  very  good  toy  advertisements,  but  they  were  the  ex- 
ception rather  than  the  rule.  The  preparation  of  news- 
paper advertisements  for  retailers  is  a  very  important  part 
of  the  merchant's  work,  but  it  is  only  too  evident  that  only 
a  small  proportion  of  the  merchants  engaged  in  the  book, 
stationery  and  associated  lines  have  as  yet  conn-  to  an 
appreciation  of  the  fact  that  the  preparation  of  their  ad- 
vertisements is  every  bit  as  important  as  any  other  work 
they  can  do  in  developing  their  business  in  order  to  achieve 
success. 


TRAINED  TO  KNOW  BOOKS 

There  is  food  for  reflection  for  all  booksellers  in  the 
follow  in-  extract   I  n.m  a  recenl  newspaper  advertisement 
of  Win,  Tyrrell  &  Co.,  of  Toronto: 
The  Convenient  Bookstore 

Those  whb  wait  upon  you  in  this  store  are  trained  to 
know  books  before  they  attempt  to  sell  them. 

They  are  qualified — to  draw  sound  comparisons— to 
make  recommendations  that  may  be  relied  upon — to  answer 
questions  dependably. 

Those  who  serve  yon  here  have  a*  feeling  for  books 
as  booksj  rather  than  as  mere  merchandise. 

All  bopks  are  classified  and  arranged  in  an  orderly  way 
on  tables.  In  this  helpful,  restful  atmosphere  you  can 
make  your  Christmas  purchases,  free  from  haste  and 
strain. 


Toys  of  Double  Usefulness 

'T*  HE  idea  that  toys  should  contribute  to  t lie  proper  development  of  the  child's  mind,  as  well  as  to  his 
■*-     amusement,  is  rapidly  gaining  ground. 

Many  of  the  season's  newest  toys  combine  these  two  requirements  to  a  remarkable  degree.  AD 
the  best  of  them  will  be  found  in  our  toy  department,  as  well  as  a  splendid  assortment  of  the  most  popular 
toys  intended   for  amusement  only. 


_ 


EXCLUSIVE  TOYS  DE  LUXE 

A    MODEL    KITCHEN    with    numberless   utensils, 

$25.00 

MODEL     STOVES,  perfectly  made,  fitted  with  the 

finest  nickel  utensils 
BUTCHER    SHOPS,  with  complete  stoek,- 

$2X0  to  $8.00 

ELECTRIC  TRAINS,  the  amusement  of  the  hour  for 

the  hoys $1 100  to  $30.00 

MECHANICAL    TRAINS $2.00  to  $7.50 


ANMALS  THAT  ARE  DIFFERENT 

A  Wonderful  Donkey  to  Ride  On $25.00 

ABeauti/ul  White  Lamb $  5  50 

The  New  Dark  Colored  Teddy  Bear $  6.00 

A  hundred  and  one  smaller  Horses,  Dogs.  Cats, 
Elephants,  Rabbits,  etc.,  from  the  best 
manufacturers    $2.00  up 


A  MONG  the  new  toys  are  "Pony  Bikes,"  strong,  attractive -looking  toys  of  wood,  with  horse's  head,  pedals,  ami  wheels, 
•**•     handsornely  enamelled,  $6  00  and  $7.50. 

Bucking  Horses,  Platform  Horses,  and  Hobby  Rockers    are  shown  in  pood  variety 

"Mind-builder"  Blocks,  $3.75,  extra  fine  hard-wood  blocks  in  a  variety  of  colors  and  shapes,  stone  blocks  in  attrac- 
tive colors,  $2.00  up,  and  other  blocks  from  15c  up.  • 


New  Military  Toys 


Metal  Soldiers,  Trenches,  Forts.  Uniforms.  Gun*.  Flags,  and  other  toys  of  a  military  nature,  th.il  will  delight  the  pair 
boy  or  girl,  and  afford  endless  amusement.  borne  of  the  military  toys  are  most  elaborate,  and  are  accurate  reproductions.  !□ 
of  actual  articles  used  In  the  war. 

OTHER  TOYS,   GAMES,   DOLLS,   ETC.,  IN  GREAT  VARIETY. 


^Sd^ajid&SonQ. 


Wendell  Holmes,  who  recently  opened  a  new  book  and 
stationery  store  in  London,  Ontario,  lias  been  doing  some 
very  good  newspaper  advertising.  With  one  of  these  large 
display  advertisements  the  following  was  set  forth  in  a 
panel  in  the  centre : 

"Give  hooks  instead  of  pearl  necklaces  this  year.  ■  A 
good  book  is  a  continuous  source  of  pleasure.  There  is  no 
more  appropriate  holiday  gift.  "To  learn  of  the  best  issued 
this  season,  look  over  our  display.  A  choice  selection  will 
be  found  to  satisfy  the  requirements  of  little  ones  and 
grown-ups.  This  is  a  book  Christmas— nothing  better  than 
a  book." 

sw 
DIARIES  AND  CALENDARS 

Now  is  the  time  to  actively  canvass  all  possible  pur- 
chasers of  office  diaries,  calendar  pads  and  stands  and 
other  lines  renewable  at  the  beginning  of  the  year. 


BUILDING  UP  CAMERA  DEPARTMENT 

A  Chicago  stationer  has  developed  a  really  important 
photograph  and  camera  supplies  department  by  advising 
customers  thereof  to  do  their  photo  shopping  by  mail. 
With  every  purchase  in  that  department  he  encloses  a 
mailing  envelope,  addressed  to  himself.  Across  the  top  is 
this  sentence:  "When  you  have  films  to  develop,  don't 
bother  to  call— mail  them."  Inside  the  envelope  is  a  small 
order  sheet,  on  which  developing  and  printing  directions 
can  be  written;  also  orders  for  new  supp 

The  mail  idea  is  further  emphasized  on  small  stickers, 
which  are  pasted  on  each  roll  of  film;  and  by  a  little  price 
list,  which,  in  addition  to  pricing  the  different  kinds  of 
work,  adds  a  note  about  the  convenience  of  ordering  by 
mail.  The  stationer's  efforts  in  this  direction  have  re- 
sulted in  a  very  profitable  and  growing  list  of  "come- 
back" customers. 


21 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


ADVERTISING  ON  BOOK  COVERS 

A  good  idea  in  connection  with  the  operation  of  a  eir- 
caiating  library  in  a  book  shop  is  to  have  special  covers 
tor  these  hooks,  the  covers  being  of  cheap  stock  and  hav- 
ing advertising  [natter  printed  on  front  and  back.  This 
idea  is  used  by  the  Express-Herald,  0f  Newmarket,  Ont., 
the  publishers  of  which  also  conduct  a  hook  and  station- 
ery store.  The  advertising  matter  appearing  on  the  back 
of  one  of  their  covers,  together  with  the  line  running 
along  the  back  of  the  book,  is  reproduced  herewith.  The 
idea  is  one  which  other  book  stores  could  advantageously 
adopt. 


games,     construction     toys,    Christmas     decorations     ami 

cameras. 

•         •         • 

In  the  issue  of  the  semi-weekly  Post,  Pembroke,  On- 
tario, The  Grigg  Book  and  Stationery  Company,  had  an 
advertisement  four  columns  wide  by  twelve  inches  deep, 
setting  forth  gift  suggestions,  featuring  prominently  foun- 
tain pens,  soldier's  diaries,  framed  pictures,  china  and 
leather  goods,  Christmas  papeteries,  Christmas  cards  and 
books  of  various  classes.  In  addition  to  that  the  same 
firm  had  an  advertisement  on  the  front  page  under  the 
heading  "Give  the  Children  Books."     The  wording  beinjr 


n 


================iiil 


EXPRESS -HERALD 


Qjircu 

Lih 


latJng 


vary 


'Date   taken 


HEADQUARTERS  FOR 

School  Sufifilies.  Stationery 

All  the  Latest  JYLagazines 


iu: 


:u 


One  of  the  firms  that  have  been  doing  especially  good 
holiday  advertising  is  the  Red  Cross  Company,  of  Leth- 
bridge,  Minn.,  who  have  an  extensive  toy  department  in 
the  basement.  One  of  their  recent  advertisements  occu- 
pied five  columns,  full  depth  of  page  in  the  Lethbridge 
Daily  Herald.  The  statement  was  prominently  set  forth 
that  their  toy  department  contained  the  largest  assortment 
of  toys  in  Southern  Alberta.  This  particular  advertise- 
ment featured,  very  prominently,  dolls,  doll  carriages,  war 


as  follows: — "Books  will  entertain  the  children  during 
the  year  better  than  any  other  gift  you  give  them.  Books 
also  instruct  them — give  children  a  reading  habit  which 
will  follow  them  all  through  life.  Books  for  children 
should  be  well  chosen.  With  that  in  mind  we  have  only 
placed  on  our  tables  books  which  will  mould  children 's 
minds  along  right  lines.  Do  not  leave  book  buying  for  the 
children  until  the  last  minute  and  be  compelled  to  take 
what  you  can  get  instead  of  choosing  for  the  individual 
child.'*' 
22 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


©0-OPERATION  WITH  MOVIES 

IN  his  book  entitled  "Advertising  by  Motion  Pictures," 
Ernest  A.  Dench,  devotes  a  chapter  to  telling  how  the 

book  dealer  can  take  advantage  of  the  "Movies" 
adaptation  "mania."  Mr.  Dench  says  that  the  saloon- 
keeper may  attribute  decreased  business  to  the  versatile 
motion  pictures,  but  to  the  average  book  dealer  the  indus- 
t  ry  can  be  most  beneficial. 

"It  is  what  might  be  called  the  adaptation  mania  from 
which  both  publishers  and  book  dealers  have  profited.  To 
prove  this,  you  have  only  to  take  into  account  "Les  Miser- 
ables,"  which,  when  released  at  the  picture  theatres, 
created  an  enormous  sale  of  cheap  reprints  of  the  popular 
book.  This  has  been  followed  up  by  many  other  adapta- 
tions from  novels  and  stage  plays,  and  in  every  case  it  has 
meant  extra  trade  for  the  book  dealer  who  has  been  keen 
enough  to  make  good  use  of  the  opportunity  presented. 
Many  Movie  'fans,'  after  seeing  the  photo-play  version  of 
a  popular  book  and  finding  it  to  their  liking,  have  a  desire 
for  reading  the  story.  Instead  of  borrowing  the  book 
from  the  local  library,  they  prefer  to  spend  up  to  a  quarter 
on  a  cheap  edition — and  this  is  precisely  where  the  book 
trade  comes  in. 

"Hardly  a  week  goes  by  without  some  popular  book 
or  play  being  produced  in  motion  picture  form. 

There  are  apparently  few  book  dealers  who  have  given 
this  new  field  of  business  activity  the  close  attention  it 
demands,  some  have  been  content  to  wait  until  the  demand 
came — a  most  short-sighted  policy  that  means  customers 
going  elsewhere,  while  others  have  sat  down  and  let  the 
exhibitor  reap  the  harvest. 

I  think  it  worth  while  for  every  book  dealer  to  make  a 
friend  of  the  local  motion  picture  showman.  The  benefit 
would  be  mutual.  The  exhibitor  could  inform  the  book 
dealer  well  in  advance  whether  he  had  any  adaptation 
books,  so  that  the  dealer  could  lay  in  a  stock  to  meet  the 
demand.  He  could  also  announce  outside  his  store  that 
the  picture  was  being  shown  at  the  theatre  in  question, 
while  all  could  obtain  the  book  of  the  film  from  him. 

"The  exhibitor  would  reciprocate  the  publicity  thus 
given  by  announcing  that  the  book  was  obtainable  at  the 
book  dealers'  or  by  allowing  the  latter  to  distribute  circu- 
lars to  the  audience. 

"These  are  but  suggestions.  Other  possible  schemes 
may  be  devised  by  the  wide-awake  book  dealer.  It  is, 
however,  well  to  know  that  herein  is  a  source  of  revenue 
to  be  had." 

This  book  has  many  other  suggestions  for  advertising 
in  Moving  Picture  Theatres,  both  by  means  of  the  screen 
and  by  the  use  of  slides  to  be  shown  between  the  operation 
of  the  reels.  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  acknow- 
ledges receipt  of  a  copy  of  this  interesting  volume  from  the 
publishers.   The    Standard   Publishing  Co.   of   Cincinnati. 

SI 

CELEBRATION  GOODS 

The  time  is  fast  approaching  for  the  trade  to  begin  the 
purchase  of  spring  lines  and  in  this  connection  goods  that 
should  be  given  more  attention  than  they  have  had  in  the 
past  at  the  hands  of  the  average -retailer,  are  those  which 
in  Canada  are  associated  with  May  24,  as  well  as  July  1 
and  other  celebration  days. 

Even  those  merchants  who  do  not  handle  the  "common 
or  garden  variety"  of  firecrackers,  has  a  very  large  range 
of  other  associated  goods  from  which  to  make  goodly 
selections  of  ready-selling  items,  such  as  flags,  and  bunt- 
ing, toy  balloons,  canes,  tissue  and  other  specialties  for 
decorating  and  noise-producers  of  all  sorts.  In  the  United 
States  owing  to  the  "sane  Fourth"  agitation,  many  new 


noise-producers  liave  been  successfully  introduced.  These, 
of  course,  are  equally  suitable  for  use  at  Canadian  cele 
brat  ions.  Among  these  specialties  may  be  mentioned  what 
is  known  as  the  "Pap-er-krak,"  coming  in  different  models 
including  one  for  use  at  the  end  of  a  cane,  being  exploded 
by  bringing  it  down  forcibly  on  the  sidewalk.  There  is 
noise  enough  for  any  boy  and  that  is  saying  a  lot!  The 
ammunition  used  is  "any  old  newspaper."  The  mechan- 
ism includes  a  ball-shaped  receptacle  which  in  the  models 
tor  hand  use  are  attached  to  handles  operated  on  the 
scissors  plan.  A  distinct  advantage  in  these  items  is  that 
there  is  no'fire,  no  smoke  and  no  danger.  They  arc;  highly 
approved  by  fire  underwriters  and  civic  authorities. 

The  various  models  of  exploding  pistols  are  other  good 
selling  items  and  this  suggests  air  rifles  and  larger  guns, 
among  which  may  be  mentioned  the  recently  introduced 
toy  models  of  machine  guns  as,  for  instance,  the  one  known 
as  "Big  Dick"  which  is  twenty-three  inches  long  and 
looks  and  shoots  like  a  regular  rapid-firer,  exploding  thirty- 
six  shots  without  reloading. 

There  are,  of  course,  hundreds  of  other  items  but  it  is 
not  the  intention  to  provide  here  a  catalogue  of  these,  but 
merely  to  refer  to  them  in  a  general  way  and  impress 
upon  the  retail  trade  the  fact  that  there  is  a  great  scope 
lor  doing  a  large  amount  of  extra  business  of  a  highly 
profitable  nature  by  adequately  preparing  for  this  par- 
ticular trade.  Those  dealers  who  handle  fireworks  in  the 
right  way  make  good  profit  and  while  Victoria  Day  and 
Dominion  Day  in  Canada  are  naturally  the  days  for  which 
most  of  these  goods  are  sold,  some  dealers  manage  to  make 
quite  a  large  number  of  additional  sales  for  other  celebra- 
tions. But  with  many  other  items,  including  some  which 
have  been  mentioned  in  the  foregoing,  there  is  an  almost 
constant  demand. 

The  whole  question  should  therefore  have  the  most 
earnest  consideration  of  the  retailers,  well  in  advance. 
Due  investigation  will  convince  any  dealer  who  has  not 
heretofore  featured  these  different  items,  that  here  is  a 
line  by  means  of  which  he  can  materially  increase  his 
volume  of  business  in  the  coming  year  and  make  a  most 
satisfactory  profit  because  the  margin  for  the  retailer 
in  the  selling  of  most  of  these  specialties,  is  well  above  the 
average  of  staple  lines  of  merchandise. 

EG! 

Theodore  F.  Pike,  for  two  years  the  Western  represen- 
tative of  the  Macmillan  Company  of  Canada,  has,  with 
great  regret,  decided  to  give  up  traveling  in  Canada.  He 
was  troubled  a  great  deal  with  bronchitis  and  found  the 
West  too  trying.  A  year  ago  he  had  decided  that  the  ex- 
treme cold  was  too  much  for  him,  but  was  persuaded  %to 
reconsider  his  decision  and  make  the  trip  again.  Unfor- 
tunately the  experience  of  his  first  year  was  repeated  last 
year  and  he  decided  to  travel  in  a  milder  climate. 

He  leaves  a  host  of  friends  in  the  trade  from  coast  to 
coast.  They  will  regret  his  going,  while  in  his  turn,  he  par- 
ticularly asks  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  to  ex- 
press his  gratitude  to  the  trade  for  the  courteous  and  kind- 
ly treatment  accorded  him  always. 

To  take  his  place  the  Macmillan  Company  has  been  for- 
tunate in  securing  the  services  of  Hugh  S.  Eayrs,  who  for 
some  time  was  asociated  with  BOOKSELLER  AND  STA- 
TIONER, and  has  an  intimate  acquaintance  with  the  trade 
from  the  outside.  Mr.  Eayrs  will  leave  for  the  Wesl 
shortlv. 

m 

F.  Jessop  had  a  full-page  advertisement  in  a  recent 
issue  of  the  Sudbury  Mining  News,  announcing  the  opening 
of  Toyland  at  Jessop 's,  with  special  attention  paid  to  list- 
ing of  dolls,  books  and  mechanical  toys. 


23 


Post  Car(te.rtrt  cards 

feeeffl    - 


Calendars 
GifrrNovelties  114 


VALENTINES 

WHILE  most  dealers  have  already  made  their  pur- 
chases of  valentines,  and   St.  Patrick  cards,  it  is 
well  to  keep  these  lines  well  in  mind  and  it  is  prob- 
able  that   there  are   some   dealers  who  have   not   as  yet 
bought  adequately  even  for  Valentine  trade. 

February  14  is  not  far  away.  There's. only  a  little  over 
a  month  to  prepare.  There  are  plenty  of  good  selling 
novelties  available  and  if  the  retailers   will  plan  ahead, 


first  making  sure  of  having-  the  goods  and  then  arranging 
to  prominently  bring  them  to  the  attention  of  prospective 
purchasers  by  means  of  window  displays  and  other  me- 
diums of  publicity,  it  will  be  found  that  a  really  big 
volume  of  business  can  be  done  with  these  goods  both  for 
St.  Valentine's  Day  and  St.  Patrick's  Day. 

Easter,  of  course,  comes  considerably  later  but  Easter 
lines  too  should  have  attention  at  this  time,  because  in 
the  wholesale  trade,  these  three  lines  are  always  linked  to- 
gether. 


THE   GREAT   SACRIFICE. 
The  .Must  Talkeii-of  Picture  of  the  Day. 

Postcards  for  all  three  of  these  seasons  continue  to  be 
popular  sellers  and  there  are  many  new  issues. 

It  would  be  a  good  idea  for  the  retailer  to  take  time 
this  month  to  work  out  definite  plans  covering  these 
three  special  seasons  so  as  to  assure  getting  the  best  possi- 
ble results.  These  plans  might  well  include  some  arrange- 
ment for  having  special  booths  so  as  to  attract  extra 
attention  and  thus  create  the  effect  of  impressing  people 
that  these  specialties  occupy  a  more  important  place  than 
ever  before.  It  is  wonderful  the  effect  that  creating  of 
such  an  impression  will  tend  to  increase  sales. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


SOME  FINE  PRODUCTS 

Father  Tuck's  Annual,  as  fat  as  ever  and  if  anything 
more  interesting,  came  in  a  Christmas  package  for  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER  from  Raphael'  Tuck  &  Sons 
along  with  excellent  specimens  of  this  firm's  artistic 
greeting  cards;  calendars  and  "zag-zaw"  puzzles  the 
latter  being  a  meritorious  new  line  to  delight  the  children. 

The  excellent  workmanship  of  the  greeting  cards  and 
calendars  is  a  high  tribute  to  the  degree  of  excellence 
which  British  workmanship  and  enterprise  has  attained  in 
producing  goods  which  before  the  war  had  been  consid- 
ered the  particular  province  of  the  Germans. 


E.  W.  Allen,  who  has  been  with  Raphael  Tuck  &  Sons 
for  twelve  years,  seven  years  in  the  United  States  and 
five  years  in  Canada,  has  been  engaged  by  A.  R.  Mac- 
Dougall  &  Co.,  to  take  charge  of  the  greeting  card,  picture 
and  calendar  department'.  He  will  cover  Montreal,  Ottawa 
and  some  of  the  other  larger  cities  in  Ontario  and  the  Wesl . 
to  the  Pacific  Coast. 

*  *  * 

MR.  DE  LAROSE  PROMOTED 

After  being  with  the  firm  of  Clark  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Winni- 
peg, for  the  past  fourteen  years,  working  his  way  right  up 
from  the  packing  room,  E.  W.  de  Baroque  has  been  ap- 
pointed sales  manager  of  the  stationery  department.    He  is 


•Well,   if   yon    knows 


if    a    better    'ole,    go    to    it." 

—A  Bairnsfatljer   Cartoon. 


WALLPAPER 

MORE  and  more  are  wall  paper  manufacturers  rea- 
lizing that  Canadians  are  good  judges  of  color. 
The  old  theory  that  makers  must  offer  goods  not 
designed  to  please  themselves,  but  to  sell  has  been  under 
strong  lire  I  his  last  two  years.  People  want  what  is  beau- 
tiful and  what  pleases.  A  few  years  ago  when  so  much  of 
inferior  goods  was  sold  it  was  only  the  price  that  attracted 
In  the  present-day  trend  towards  quality  the  old  hideous, 
cheap  goods  are  banished.  People's  taste  is  good,  and 
they  exercise  it   when  thev  come  to  gears  of  prosperity. 

Wallpaper  prices  on  the  whole  have  advanced  much 
less  than  most  other  commodities  and  no  douht  the  house- 
wife is  aware  of  the  fact  and  therefore  next  spring  she 
will  take  advantage  of  it  to  get  that  good  papering  done 
which'  she  has  waited  for  so  long. 

Plain  oatmeal  and  embossed  grasscloth  papers  with  the 
harmonizing  "cut-out"  floral  borders  are  still  popular 
Certain  stripes,  not  of  a  dazzling  variety  but  dignified  and 
delicate,  are  in  good  demand.  One  very  attractive  new  de- 
sign is  a  shadow  stripe  printed  in  oatmeal.  The  ready- 
cut  bonier  of  fruit  and  foliage  in  natural  colors  is  an 
artistic  development  which  must  surely  have  been  designed 
by  someone  acquainted  with  shadow  embroidery,  judging 
by  the  similarity  of  outline  between  the  wallpaper  and 
that  kind  of  embroidery. 

One  firm  is  making  what  they  call  a  "ready-trimmed" 
paper.  The  selvedge  is  perforated  for  tearing  off  and 
leaving  a  straight  edge  without  the  use  of  scissors  or 
knife  of  any  kind. 


Another    Bairnsfntlier   Cartoon. 

LISTS  RECEIVED 

The  Moore  Push-Pin  Company  has  just  issued  an  at- 
tractive and  interesting  booklet  by  P.  G.  Underwood,  en- 
titled "System  Simplified."  The  booklet  is  printed  in 
colors  and  shows  the  different  styles  of  the  Moore  Com- 
pany's well  known  Map-tacks.  Illustrations  are  given  of 
the  various  uses  to  which  these  tacks  are  put  by  the  vari- 
ous business  houses  and  city  governments,  and  explain  the 
many  purposes  of  these  tacks  in  mapping  out  a  campaign. 

From  the  Pugh  Specialty  Company,  .'is  Clifford  street. 
Toronto,  comes  a  list  of  their  calendars  in  Art  Pr< 
wink.  A  large  variety  of  these  calendars  are  illustrated 
and  described.  Another  list  received  from  the  same  firm 
sets  forth  a  large  number  of  new  issues  in  Emerson's 
seven-inch    double    disc    phonograph    records    featuring 


well  known  to  the  trade  in  Western  Canada,  having  been 
on  the  road  for  Clark  Bros,  until  recently.     Since  he  first 
went  on  the  road,  he  has  covered  territories  in  Manitoba,      popular  songs  of  the  month,  dance  records,  standard  instru 
Saskatchewan  and  Alberta.  mental  records,  sacred  songs  and  miscellaneous  selections 

25 


Waste  Paper  as  a  Financial  Asset 

How  the  Saving  of  Waste  Paper  May  be  Made   Distinctly   Profitable  —  Its   Method 
Grading  and  Shipment — How  the    Most  Satisfactory  Results  Maybe 
Obtained — A  Protection  against  the  Menace  of  Fire 


of 


ALMOST  daily  reports  are  being  received  of  news- 
papers cutting  down  their  pages,  or  in  some  in- 
stances, temporarily  discontinuing-  publication, 
through  the  inability  to  get  their  accustomed  supply  of 
paper.  The  raw  material  from  which  this  news  print  is 
made  is  usually  scarce,  and  consequently  even  the  greatly 
enhanced  prices  that  are  being  paid  by  all  users  of  paper 
are  not  sufficient  to  in  all  instances  assure  them  of  a  suffi- 
cient supply. 

So  serious  has  this  shortage  become  that  the  Dominion 
Department  of  Trade  and  Commerce  has  issued  the  cir- 
cular urging-  the  conservation  of  these  waste  products. 

It  would  appear,  therefore,  that  the  saving  of  avail- 
able supplies  of  paper  is  a  patriotic  duty,  as  well  as  being 
of  actual  value  to  the  individual  saving. 

In  what  does  this  value  to  the  individual  consist? 
Well,  to  begin  with,  paper,  even  waste  paper,  is  a  valu- 
able commodity  this  year.  The  waste  paper  that  you 
spend  so  much  time  in  destroying  has  an  actual  cash 
value,  and  a  very  considerable  value  of  recent  date.  Then 
there  is  to  be  considered  the  actual  saving  of  time  it  takes, 
because  paper  cannot  be  gathered  up  and  burnt  without 
a  very  considerable  expenditure  of  time  and  energy.  One 
paper  authority  estimates  that  the  paper  that  is  wasted 
by  the  average  merchant  has  an  actual  cash  value  to  him 
of  over  $100,  while  the  time  wasted  in  cleaning  up  and 
disposing  of  this  waste  causes  a  loss  of  upwards  of  $200 
annually.  In  addition  to  this,  waste  paper. is  the  greatest 
fire  menace  there  is;  it  cannot  be  left  around  even  for  a 
night  without  proving  a  very  serious  danger. 

Baled  Paper  Not  a  Fire  Menace 

How  will  the  saving  of  paper  prevent  this?  WTell, 
there  are  a  number  of  good  paper  balers  on  the  market, 
and  these  are  being  used  extensively,  and  have  proved  of 
great  value,  and  not  the  least  of  their  value  is  the  pro- 
tection that  they  give  against  fire.  It  is  not  always  pos- 
sible to  dispose  of  this  baled  paper  immediately  after 
baling,  and  some  people  have  held  that  it  continues  to  be 
a  menace.  This  is  not  the  ease,  however.  Paper  that  is 
une  of  the  most  inflammable  of  materials  in  its  loose  state, 
becomes  practically  unburnable  when  tightly  baled.  Even 
if  the  edges  should  catch  fire,  the  smoke  this  would  gener- 
ate would  itself  put  out  the  fire  almost  as  soon  as  it  had 
started. 

Some  Practical  Questions  Answered 

What  is  this  paper  worth,  and  where  can  we  dispose 
of  it,  and  how  should  it  be  shipped?  are  some  of  the  prac- 
tical questions  that  are  continually  being  asked.  First, 
then,  as  to  how  paper  should  be  prepared.  A  man  who  is 
baling  paper  for  sale  should  make  three  grades: 

1.  Magazines  and  books  and  all  bond  papers.  This 
raw  material  is  used  in  making  the  better  grades  of  papers 
and  consequently  it  brings  a  better  price.  This  grade  is 
worth  $25  a  ton. 

2.  Newspapers. 

3.  Scrap  paper.  This  consists  of  everything  in  the 
paper  line — torn  newspapers,  wrapping  paper,  contents  of 
waste  baskets,  cardboard — in  fact,  anything  that 
resembles  paper.  These  two  last  grades  are  at  present 
selling  at  $13  a  ton,  though,  as  a  rule,  there  is  about  $3 
difference  in  price  favoring  the  second  grade. 

Handle  Waste  String  Separately 
In   this  connection   there  is  a  caution  that   might    be 
added.     Do  not  include  string  or  any  type  of  cord  in  any 


of  these  grades  of  paper.  String  has  to  be  sorted  out  and 
entails  a  good  deal  of  loss  of  time.  Not  that  it  is  not 
saleable,  for  it  is  worth  $30  a  ton,  or  IV2C  a  pound. 

The  method  of  shipment  is  a  matter  of  great  import- 
ance, and  it  is  here  that  most  merchants  meet  the  greatest 
difficulty.  They  don't  know  where  to  ship  the  paper  when 
it  has  been  collected,  and  they  are  not  sure  if  the  amount 
they  will  receive  will  justify  the  attempt. 

We  have  mentioned  the  present  prices,  and  will  be 
glad  to  supply  the  names  of  reputable  paper  dealers  in 
different  districts  on  application,  as  anything  like  a  com- 
plete list  would  be  too  extensive  for  these  pages.  Regard- 
ing the  matter  of  freight  and  handling,  there  is  a  good 
deal  that  can  be  said.  It  is  impossible  to  give  a  complete 
list  of  rates,  for  these  vary  with  each  place,  but  some  in- 
stances may  be  given. 

A  Three  Grade  Freight  Rate  Illustrated 

Take  London,  Ontario,  as  an  example;  there  are  three 
rates  for  this  point  for  shipment  to  Toronto.  These  are 
8V2C,  20c,  28c  per  hundred  pounds.  The  first  of  these 
prices  is  for  straight  car  lots,  the  second  for  bales  in  less 
than  car  lots,  and  the  third  for  bags  in  less  than  car  lots. 

Or  take  another  instance:  from  North  Bay  the  rates 
to  Toronto  are  12c,  24c  and  33c;  in  small  shipments  this 
would  net  the  shipper  about  $8  per  ton  at  North  Bay,  as 
against  $10.60,  f.o.b.  the  cars  North  Bay,  for  a  full  ear 
load.  There  is  a  considerable  difference  here  that  is 
worth  considering.  To  get  the  advantage  of  the  better 
rate  on  ear  shipments  many  merchants  in  smaller  places 
have  been  combining  to  make  up  a  car  lot.  For  instance, 
11  merchants  in  Orillia  assisted  in  loading  a  car,  the  net 
return  was  $250,  to  be  divided  proportionately  among 
them.  In  Sudbury,  too,  there  has  been  formed  an  asso- 
ciation to  handle  the  supply  in  this  way.  This  is  a  plan 
that  might  very  well  be  adopted  by  many  other  places  to 
the  advantage  of  the  merchants. 

Shipping  Part  Cars  at  Car  Lot  Rate 

But  even  where  it  is  not  possible  to  make  up  a  straight 
car  load,  it  is  often  of  advantage  to  ship  a  car  light,  pay- 
ing for  the  required  12  tons,  which  is  less  than  the  part 
car  rate.  For  instance,  taking  the  North  Bay  figures,  for 
example,  a  straight  car  load  rate  would  amount  to  $28.80, 
a  part  car  shipment  of  six  tons  would  cost  exactly  the 
same  amount,  and  if  bagged  paper  was  included  the  six- 
ton  shipment  would  cost  $36.60.  It  is  evident,  therefore. 
that  in  a  case  like  this  any  shipment  over  a  half  car  could 
advantageously  be  billed  as  a  straight  ear  taking  advan- 
tage of  the  car  rate,  and  thus  enabling  the  shippers  to 
include  bagged  paper  if  necessary,  at  no  extra  cost. 
Waste  Paper  a  Debit  or  a  Credit? 

In  looking  into  the  matter  of  waste  paper,  it  becomes 
evident  that  it  is  something  that  a  merchant  cannot  afford 
to  overlook.  Loose  paper  is  an  outstanding  menace,  not 
only  to  the  individual  merchant,  but  to  the  community  in 
which  he  resides.  Methods  of  destroying  paper  are  waste- 
ful of  good  material,  of  time  that  might  be  better  em- 
ployed, and  are  also  a  danger.  In  other  words,  this  method 
of  handling  waste  paper  must  be  reckoned  as  a  debit  item. 
There  is  no  way  of  getting  away  from  the  force  of  this 
argument,  as  against  this  loss  there  is  the  possibility  of 
making  a  very  comfortable  profit,  with  a  less  waste  of 
time,  and  the  practical  avoidance  of  any  fire  risk.  Surely 
it  is  a  clear  enough  case  to  present  itself  to  the  careful 
consideration  of  every  wideawake  merchant. 
26 


iftmS^BKia«£»!9ffi9affitt^ 


and 

Sporting 
±4f  Goods 


«/ 


'^^Viswsw*- 


.-»'■; 


BRITISH  toy  makers  liave  thus  far  succeeded  in  put- 
ting on  the  market  about  1,500  different  items  in 
toys  formerly  imported  from  Germany  and  these  are 
being  sold  to  the  trade  at  the  same  prices  as  the  original 
German  toys.  They  will  doubtless  be  similarly  successful 
with  other  toys  formerly  coming  from  Germany.  This 
information  carries  a  great  measure  of  encouragement  for 
the  many  concerns  recently  organized  in  Canada  for  the 
manufacture  of  toys. 

Perhaps  no  single  industry  in  Germany  has  suffered  so 
much  from  the  war  as  that  of  toy-making.  In  the  last 
peace  year  Germany's  toy  trade  aggregated  140,000,000 
marks  ($35,000,000),  of  which  more  than  $25,000,000  was 
export  and  the  larger  part  to  America.  Since  the  war  this 
figure  has  dropped  nearly  two-thirds.  What  is  worse  still 
for  the  German  manufacturers  is  the  fact  that  other  coun- 
tries have  taken  up  this  industry  and  the  Germans1  will 
lind  it  very  hard  to  recover  their  lost  markets. 

In  1913  the  toy  exports  to  the  United  States  amounted 
to  nearly  $10,000,000,  but  since  then,  owing  to  the  British 
blockade,  the  volume  of  trade  has  sunk  to  perhaps  less 
than  one-fourth  of  this  sum.  The  neutral  states,  Holland, 
Denmark,  Sweden  and  Norway,  have  bought  more  toys, 
but  their  increased  trade  has  failed  to  make  up  the  loss  of 
the  transatlantic  business.  Austria-Hungary,  too,  has 
taken  more  toys  and  the  home  trade  has  been  much  better. 
But  in  spite  of  all  this  the  total  shrinkage  in  the  annual 
turnover  is  estimated  at  between  60  and  70  per  cent. 

In  France  the  trade  is  being  pushed  rapidly,  and  one 
factory  alone  has  already  made  over  $1,000,000  worth  of 
dolls.  A  French  bank  has  been  specially  organized  to 
promote  the  interests  of  the  toy  trade.  The  Japanese 
competition,  too,  is  greatly  feared,  especially  in  the  Amer- 
ican market. 

*        *        « 

IMPRESSIONISM 

Impressionism  in  art  has  made  itself  felt  in  children's 
toys.  This  shows  in  those  of  woed,  of  which  an  increased 
number  have  been  made  within  the  last  few  years.  There 
is  character  in  them  also.  The  little  men  and  women  are 
no  longer  expressionless  dolls.  They  represent  something 
and  look  it.  They  may  be  little  peasants  in  costume.  They 
drive  realistic  animals  drawing  gay-colored  carts.  These 
are  in  the  impressionistic  colors.  One  cart  may  be  of  a 
bright  blue,  while  the  inside  and  the  wheels  of  a  solid 
piece  of  wood  are  orange  or  yellow.  Another  bright  green 
cart  will  have  wheels  and  inside  of  bright  red  and  the  cos- 
tumes of  the  figures  equally  brilliant. 


THE  manner  in  which  the  big  stores  in  Montreal,  Tor- 
onto, and  other  large  cities  feature  the  opening  of 
the  Christmas  toy  selling  season  each  year  and 
the  fact  that  these  shows  are  getting  bigger  annually 
should  be  sufficient  inspiration  to  the  many  booksellers  and 
stationers  who  conduct  toy  departments,  to  exert  greater 
efforts  in  this  direction.  If  this  branch  of  the  business 
receives  adequate  attention  it  will  prove  a  good  money- 
maker as  more  dealers  are  finding  out  each  year. 

In  Toronto  the  T.  Eaton  Co.,  as  usual  advertised  the 
arrival  of  Santa  Claus  and  had  a  street  parade  with  Santa 
Claus  in  a  huge  automobile  accompanied  by     band   and 
gaily  bedecked  outriders.    A  similar  plan  was  adopted  by- 
A.  E.  Rea  &  Co.,  in  Ottawa  and  Almy's  in  Montreal. 

The  Robert  Simpson  Co.  had  a  novelty  in  the  form  of 
a  reproduction  of  the  Mother  Goose  rhymes.  The  toy  de- 
partment, as  a  result  of  the  removal  of  the  mail  order 
business  to  the  new  Mutual  Street  building,  was  able  to 
secure  the  whole  front  of  the  fifth  floor,  and  a  series  of 
continuous  booths,  with  overhanging  "roofing"  of  compo 
board  in  painted  cottage  effects,  ran  along  the  sides  and 
front.  Inside  were  dolls  and  various  toys,  while  the  rest 
were  arranged  in  long,  wide  sections,  in  the  central  space. 

At  one  side  was  arranged  a  grouping  of  stage  scenery 
in  front  of  which  "Mother  Goose"  appeared  in  typical 
dress,  red  checks,  and  glasses,  and  crinoline  skirt,  and  a 
board  rose  up  on  the  top  of  the  scenery  containing  in  turn 
various  of  the  Mother  Goose  rhymes,  "Sing  a  Song  of 
Sixpence,"  etc.  Then  a  section  of  the  scenery  slid  back, 
and  represented  the  heroes  and  heroines:  the  King,  .the 
Queen,  the  blackbirds  in  the  pie, — the  maid  hanging  out 
her  clothes, — and  along  came  a  blackbird,  and  snapped 
off  her  nose," — all  the  figures  worked  by  mechanical 
devices. 

The  children  were  delighted  and  one  little  tot — the 
proverbial  Question  Mark — asked  her  mother,  after  the 
tradegy  of  the  maid  and  her  Sflapped-off  nose,  "what  did 
she  do  then?" 

The  mother,  taken  aback,  made  this  reply:  "Oh — ah — 
she, — she — ah — oh,  what's  this  they  are  doing  over  here?" 

The  presentation,  although  a  trifle  crude  at  points,  and 
with  figures  too  small  for  a  large  crowd  to  see  easily, 
nevertheless  "caught  on"  and  was  a  distinct  success. 

Circulation  of  the  December  issue  of  Hearst's  Magazine 
in  Canada  has  been  prohibited  by  the  Canadian  Govern- 
ment on  account  of  an  article  on  the  recent  Irish  rebellion 
by  Charles  Edward  Russell. 
27 


CANADIANA 


Missionary  work  in  India  is  vividly  portrayed  in  a 
series  of  letters  written  by  Mrs.  Churchill,  widow  of  the 
late  Rev.  George  Churchill,  a  Baptist  minister,  of  Truro, 
Nova  Scotia,  and  published  by  McClelland,  Goodchild  & 
Stewart,  under  the  title  of  "Letters  from  My  Home  in 
India."  The  correspondence  covers  a  period  of  over  forty 
years  spent  at  Bobbilli  and  other  places  in  India,  inter- 
preting the  Word  of  God  to  the  heathen  there.  The  first 
letter  was  written  by  Mrs.  Churchill  in  1871,  while  she  was 
awaiting-  the  decision  of  the  Baptist  Mission  Board  re- 
garding her  offer  of  service  in  the  mission  fields  of  India ; 
the  last  letter  was  written  this  year  in  Toronto. 

The  correspondence  was  edited  and  arranged  by  Mrs. 
Grace  MeLeod  Rogers.  To  those  who  have  listened  to 
accounts  of  missionary  work  from  the  lips  of  returned 
missionaries,  Mrs.  Churchill's  book  will  come  as  a  revela- 
tion of  what  can  be  accomplished  in  this  field  of  work  by 
conscientious  workers.  The  trials  and  tribulations  of  the 
Gospel  worker  in  foreign  fields  are  set  forth  in  a  matter- 
of-fact  way,  as  expected  of  those  who  labor  in  the  service 
of  the  Master.  Tenderness,  compassion,  reverence  and 
faith  in  the  infallibility  of  the  Almighty  radiate  from  the 
soul  of  the  author  through  the  book,  which  love  of  her 
mission  in  life  inspired  her'to  pen. 

*  *  * 

Dr.  J.  L.  Hughes,  formerly  Chief  Inspector  of  the  To- 
ronto Public  Schools,  and  who  as  a  lecturer  has  an  inter- 
national reputation,  has  written  a  volume  of  verse  en- 
titled "Songs  of  Gladness  and  Growth,"  which  has  re- 
cently been  published.  These  poems  are  characterized  by 
a  most  refreshing  spirit  of  optimism. 

*  *  * 

Canadian  readers  will  be  interested  in  a  volume  of 
memoirs  of  Sir  Charles  Rivers  Wilson,  entitled  "Chap- 
ters From  My  Official  Life."  This  book  will  tell  of  the 
origin  of  the  Grand  Trunk  Railway  and  of  the  Grand 
Trunk   Pacific,  and  naturally  will  present   many  facts  of 

*  *  * 

vital  interest  to  Canadians. 

Ernest  Thompson  Seton  has  changed  from  his  usual 
topic  of  wild  animals  and  nature  for  his  new  new  book 
shortly  to  be  brought  out.  It  is  a  novel  entitled  "The 
Preacher  of  Cedar  Mountain. 

m 

"Slaves  of  Freedom,"  Coningsby  Dawson's  new  novel, 
which  was  to  have  come  out  in  December,  had  to  be  post- 
poned, but  will  be  published  this  month. 

*  *  * 

Rabindranath  Tagore's  latest  book  "Stray  Birds," 
published  late  in  November,  is  a  volume  of  selected  aphor- 
isms embodying  the  essence  of  the  Indian  poet's  philoso- 
phy. Willy  Pogany  has  supplied  a  frontispiece  in  colors 
and  the  decorative  borders. 


BEST  SELLING  BOOKS  IN 
CANADA 

Fiction.  Points 

-Mr.   Britliug    Sees    it    Through Wells  76 

The  Worn  Doorstep Sherwood  JO 

-The  Wonderful   year   Locke  K2 

-When  a  Man's  a  Man Wright  34 

-The    World    for    Sale Parker  30 

-Further    Foolishness     Leacock  ) 

Georgina  of  the  Rainbows   Johnston)  28 

The   Kingdom   of   the   Blind Oppenheim  ) 

NTon-Fi<'tion. 

-Rhymes  of  a   Red  Cross  Man Service  120 

-A   Sunny    Subaltern    20 

-The   Red   Watch    : 16 

INITED   STATES   SUMMARY. 

(From    Biker   &     Taylor's    Bulletin  I 

-When   a    Man's   a    Man    Wright 

-Mary    'Gusta     Lincoln 

-Mr.   Britling   Sees   it   Through    Wells 

-Penroil    and    Sam     Tarkington 

The    Wonderful    Year    Locke 

-Pollyanna     Porter 


"Vindication  of  Great  Britain,"  by  Harold  Begbie,  is 
a  war  book  which  discusses  some  points  of  vital  interest 
concerning  the  war  and  Canadians,  have  shown  so  much 
interest  in  it  that  it  has  gone  into  a  second  edition  for  this 

country. 

*  *  * 

Another  volume  which  includes  some  thoughtful  ess^rs 
on  war  topics  is  a  book  entitled  "A  Sheaf,"  by  John  Gals- 
worthy. 

*  *  * 

PACKAGE  LIBRARY 

The  Package  Library  idea  has  not  as  yet  been  very 
widely  adopted  in  Canada.  This  innovation  has  recently 
been  introduced  at  the  library  of  the  Manitoba  Agricul- 
tural College. 

The  library  consists  of  selected  magazine  articles,  bulle- 
tins and  other  pamphlets  according  to  subject.  Only  one 
subject  is  dealt  with  in  a  single  package.  The  cuttings 
include  material  from  all  the  Canadian  farming  papers, 
the  best  American  farming  papers,  the  best  of  women's 
magazines,  and  other  magazines  of  a  general  character. 

The  chief  purpose  of  this  library  is  to  provide  reading 
matter  on  subjects  of  interest  to  farmers  and  their  fami- 
lies. It  is  also  intended  to  supply  literature  for  debating 
purposes  in  communities  where  there  are  church  or  literary 
societies  in  need  of  such  help. 

The  literature  in  this  library  is  available  to  everyone 
in  the  province.  There  are,  of  course,  no  fees  in  connection 
with  the  use  of  the  library  except  that  the  borrower  pays 
the  return  postage  on  the  package. 

The  advantage  of  a  library  of  this  kind  is  that  it  can 
supply  in  a  condensed  and  convenient  form  the  informa- 
tion that  is  sought. 

*        *        » 

E.  P.  Oppenheim  has  written  a  new  novel,  entitled 
"The  Hillmen,"  which  is  down  for  early  publication.  It 
is  a  storv  written  in  the  characteristic  style  that  lias  given 
this  prolific  writer  so  large  a  following. 

28 


B  0  0  K  a  E  .LLER     AND     STA  T  IONER 


HELPING  THE  RETAILER 

A  certain  leather  goods  house  has  had  a  most  satis- 
factory experience  over  a  period  of  several  years  with 
the  publication  of  a  catalogue,  illustrating,  describing  and 
quoting  prices  on  items  suitable  for  holiday  gifts.  The 
scheme  had  its  beginning  with  the  issue  of  a  limited 
number  of  small  catalogues  especially  designed  and  illus- 
t  rated  for  the  holiday  gift  trade.  A  lai'ge  number  of 
leather  specials  appropriate  for  both  men  and  women  were 
shown.  These  were  mailed  out  to  a  number  of  customers 
and  the  response  was  so  generous  that  it  was  determined 
to  increase  the  number  the  following  year.  Dealers  were 
quick  to  take  advantage  of  this  service  as  a  means  of  in- 
creasing their  holiday  sales.  The  catalogues  bear  the  name 
and  address  of  the  local  dealer.  The  booklet  is  printed  in 
two  colors  on  calendered  paper  on  pages  measuring  4*4  x 
6^4  inches.  The  catalogues  was  a  veritable  shopping  list 
and  guide,  and  was  of  the  utmost  assistance  to  the  shopper. 
It  enabled  her  to  think  of  a  suitable  gift,  and  she  natur- 
laly  went  to  the  store  that  had  carried  out  this  idea  to 
make  her  purchase.  During  the  past  year  about  50,000 
copies  of  these  catalogues  were  ordered  from  the  house 
that  issues  them  to  local  dealers  in  the  United  States. 
While  this  plan  was  utilized  in  the  leather  goods  field,  it 
could  be  utilized  to  equal  advantage  by  manufacturers  in 
other  lines.  Large  retailers  could  afford  to  undertake  such 
a  move  on  their  own  responsibility,  merely  cataloguing  the 
numerous  articles  they  have  for  sale  which  make  appro- 
priate Christmas  gifts. 

THREE  ESSENTIALS 

The  absolute  necessity  for  having  a  thorough  grasp  of 
one's  business  in  order  to  succeed  is  pointedly  brought 
home  by  the  fact  that  a  certain  dry  goods  merchant  who 
was  burned  out  had  to  pay  $6,450.00  before  he  found  that 
lie  didn't  possess  the  facts  about  his  business.  After  the 
fire,  when  the  insurance  men  came,  he  couldn't  prove  his 
full  loss.  He  had  not  been  keeping  his  facts  up-to-date. 
He  never  knew  where  he  stood  until  stock-taking  time  was 
over  and  his  year's  business  a  matter  of  history.  What- 
ever line  a  merchant  may  be  engaged  in  there  are  three 
things  that  he  should  do,  and  these  are:  1.  Departmentize 
his  stock;  2.  Locate  the  rate  of  turnover  in  each  line;  .'!. 
Speed  up  the  rate  of  turnover  by  lines. 


ALPHABET  OF  SUCCESS 


Ambition 

Brains 

Control 

Determination 

Efficiency 

Fearlessness 

Grasp 

Health 

Interest 


Judgment 

Keenness 

Loyalty 

Manliness 

Nerve 

Optimism 

Perseverance 

Quality 

Reliability 


Sobriety 

Tenacity 

Usefulness 

Veracity 

Will 

Xperience 

Years 

Zeal 


NEW  INKWELL 

An  inkwell  with  new  and  interesting  features  called 
the  "Uhesson"  inkwell,  has  just  been  introduced  by  Har- 
old Chesson  &  Son,  West  Brookfield,  'Mass.  They  make  a 
claim  for  this  new  inkwell  that  it  is  non-spillable,  practi- 
cally air  tight  and  consequently  eliminates  ink  waste  en- 
tirely. It  is  made  in  two  sizes,  for  retailing  at  $1.50  and 
$3  in  the  United  States.  The  claim  is  made  for  it  that 
it  will  pay  for  itself  because  the  ink  can  be  used  to  the 
last  drop.  By  means  of  a  screw  at  the  back,  the  well  is 
adjustable  to  any  angle. 


A  HUMIDIFIER 

The  Eureka  Eumidifier  is  a  new  device  which  has  just 
been  introduced  by  the  Eureka  Blotter  Bath  Company,  of 
Chicago.  This  Humidifier  is  made  to  be  attached  to  a 
radiator  by  means  of  strong  hooks  which  hold  the  pans 
constantly  in  the  position  desired.  These  hooks  are  ad- 
just a  hie  and  may  be  folded  back  when  not  in  use  and  will 
tit  any  radiator.  The  Humidifier  is  made  of  a  so-called 
vapor  stone,  a  waterpan,  hooks  for  attaching  the  device  to 
the  radiator,  a  filling  funnel  and  a  frame.  The  pan  and 
frame  are  made  of  galvanized  iron,  painted  with  a  non- 
rusting  aluminum  paint.  The  vapor  stone  is  made  of 
ground  stone  and  charcoal  and  forms  an  evaporating  sur- 
face for  the  moisture  held  in  the  pan.  The  water  in  the 
pan  is  thus  gradually  passed  off  as  needed  in  the  room. 
The  importance  of  a  proper  degree  of  humidity  in  homes 
and  offices  during  the  winter  months  is  one  upon  which  all 
doctors  agree.  The  makers  are  confident  that  they  have 
introduced  a  new  item  which  will  prove  a  ready  seller  in 
stationery  stores. 

*  *  * 

A  KEY  PURSE 

A  new  device  for  carrying  keys  is  Evans'  key  purse. 
The  keys  are  held  by  a  regulation  key  ring,  ring  and  keys 
being  held  between  the  folds  of  the  leather  purse  by  means 
of  a  dome  fastener.  The  purse  protects  the  pocket  from 
wear  and  the  keys  held  between  the  leather  folds,  lie  flat 
so  that  they  will  not  seem  bulky  in  the  pocket.  It  is  made 
of  different  grades  of  leather.  This  new  specialty  has 
been  introduced  by  the  Elmar  Evans  Company,  Oshkosh, 
v\  is.  *  *  * 

POLITA  POLISH 

A  new  compound  for  erasing  rust  from  knives  and 
other  household  utensils  is  called  Polita  Polish  and  has 
just  been  put  on  the  market  by  the  Eberhard  Faber  Co. 
In  appearance  it  is  similar  to  an  ordinary  pencil  eraser. 

*  *  * 

NOVELTY  IN  LAMP  SHADES 

A  novelty  in  lamp  shades  which  is  particularly  good  in 
the  case  of  table  lamps  is  built  on  the  umbrella  plan.  The 
covering  is  of  fine  chintz  or  silk.  The  frame-work  operates 
just  the  same  as  an  umbrella,  but  turns  down  in  graceful 
curves  in  regular  lamp  shade  fashion.  With  this  new- 
adjustment  the  shade  may  be  closed  down  and  takes  up 
considerably  less  room  when  not  in  use. 

*  *  * 

LARGE  FOUNTAIN  PENS 

Following  are  some  arguments  that  stationers  can  use 
to  advantage  in  advocating  the  buying  of  fountain  pens 
of  the  larger  sizes: — 

Large  ink  capacity — refilling  required  but  infrequently. 
Holder  large,  restful,  comfortable  —  avoids  "writer's 
eramp"  or  tired  fingers  and  wrists.  Gold  pen  of  size  and 
weight  that  gives  maximum  action  in  writing  and  strength. 

A  highly  efficient  pen  for  general  use.  Also  performs 
many  functions  for  speciaj  usage — for  example: 

For  Bookkeepers — a  fine,  smooth  point  that  will  always 
write  uniform,  small,  neat  figures  that  require  no  blotting. 

For  Stenographers — a  smooth,  flexible  point  that  will 
immediately  respond  to  every  touch  and  shade  as  required. 

For  Manifold  Work — hard,  firm   (yet  smooth)   points 
that  write  like  a  pencil  and  make  perfect  copies. 
*         *         * 

"THE  OLD  BLOOD" 

In  Frederick  Palmer's  war  novel  "The  Old  Blood" 
there  is  an  American  hero  who  witli  two  beautiful  French 
girls  develops  a  love  theme  of  delicacy,  pathos  and  sym- 
pathy in  which  are  weighed  the  human  values  in  the  tur- 
moil of  the  European  conflict. 


29 


LITERATURE  OF  THE  WAR 


BILLY'S  LETTERS  FROM  FLANDERS 

Admirably  portraying'  the  spirit  of  Canadians  at  the 
front,  a  new  book  entitled,  "A  Sunny  Subaltern,  Billy's 
Letters  from  Flanders,"  is  a  highly  interesting  volume 
for  Canadian  readers  especially.  These  letters  were  ori- 
ginally written  by  a  Canadian  lieutenant  to  his  mother 
and  were  read  later  by  a  circle  of  friends,  who  enjoyed 
them  so  much  that  they  prevailed  upon  the  mother  to  au- 
thorize their  publication.  This  book  is  the  outcome.  (Mc- 
Clelland, Goodchild  &  Stewart).  In  the  grist  of  war  as 
brought  home  to  the  writer  and  his  friends,  tragic  occur- 
rences naturally  abound,  but  if  we  weep  with  them,  we 
laugh  with  them,  too,  for  there  is  a  buoyancy  about  what 
the  Sunny  Subaltern  has  to  say  that  makes  this  an  unusu- 
ally refreshing  book,  besides  being  of  untold  value  in  pic- 
turing for  those  at  home  the  actual  life  of  the  boys  of 

Canada  in  the  fighting  lines. 

*  *  * 

THROUGH  FRENCH  EYES 

Britain's  effort  in  the  great  war  is  described  in  a  book 
by  Henry  Davray,  entitled,  "Through  French  Eyes,"  pub- 
lished by  Constable  &  Co. 

Henry  Davray  is  a  Frenchman  exceptionally  well-fitted 
by  reason  of  his  knowledge  of  our  language  and  life  for 
the  study  and  appreciation  of  the  British  military  effort. 
His  first-hand  impressions  and  experiences  include  a  des- 
cription of  the  various  stages  by  which  Great  Britain  ar- 
rived at  compulsory  service,  a  picture  of  Lord  Kitchener 
reviewing  his  army  of  volunteers,  visits  to  munition  fac- 
tories, to  aviation' grounds,  to  the  Memorial  Service  for 
Miss  Cavell  at  St.  Paul's  Cathedral,  to  Sandhurst,  to  the 
camps  of  the  Canadian  and  of  the  Indian  contingents,  and, 
finally,  to  the  English  trenches.  In  his  last  chapter,  Mon- 
sieur Davray  describes  how  the  war  has  transformed  Eng- 
land and  the  English.  The  book  is  an  expression  of  Bri- 
tain's huge  efforts  and  an  appreciation  by  a  typical  20th 

century  Frenchman. 

*  *  * 

BECK'S  NEW  BOOK 

"The  War  and  Humanity,"  by  James  M.  Beck,  late 
assistant  Attorney-General  of  the  United  States,  and 
author  of  "The  Evidence  in  the  Case,"  is  a  further  dis- 
cussion of  the  world  war  and  the  attitude  and  duty  of  the 
United  States.  The  book  is  a  series  of  essays,  which,  in 
their  original  form,  were  public  addresses,  the  first,  "The 
Distress  of  Nations,"  having  been  delivered  in  Toronto; 
the  second,  "The  Submarine  Controversy,"  at  Boston,  a.t 
the  anniversary  of  the  sinking  of  the  Lusitania,  and  the 
third,  "The  Case  of  Edith  Cavell,"  having  been  delivered 
in  Montreal  at  a  Cavell  memorial  meeting.  There  are 
several  chapters  dealing  directly  with  responsibilities 
bearing  upon  the  United  States,  and  the  final  chapter  deals 
with  the  spirit  in  which  France  has  met,  and  every  nation 
should  meet,  the  problems  of  the  present  crisis  of  civili- 
zation. 

BUCHAN'S  WAR  HISTORY 

The  fourteenth  volume  in  John  Buchan's  "History  of 
the  War,"  tells  the  story  of  the  conflicts  on  all  fronts 
from  the  Fall  of  Kut  to  the  Second  Battle  of  Verdun.  One 
of  the  chapters  of  intense  interest  is  that  devoted  to  the 
great  naval  battle  of  Jutland,  with  significant  comments 
on  British  strategy  and  tactics,  and  the  fighting  qualities 
of  the  British  sailor. 


BULLETS  AND  BILLETS 

Bruce  Bairnsfather,  the  great  cartoonist  uncovered  by 
the  war,  has  been  in  the  spotlight  of  late  by  reason  of  his 
clever  work  in  "Fragments  From  France,"  which  made 
such  a  hit  that  further  collections  are  to  appear  in  addi- 
tion to  post  card  issues  of  the  same  pictures  and  now  from 
Gordon  &  Gotch,  comes  an  interesting  book  by  this  author 
entitled,  "Bullets  and  Billets"  which  is  a  book  of  over 
300  pages  demonstrating  that  Bairnsfather  is  deft  with  his 
pen  as*  well  as  with  his  pencil.  The  story  is  of  Captain 
Bairnsfather 's  own  experiences  in  the  war,  having  the 
same  elements  of  humor  as  his  drawings,  and  the  same 
quaint  attitude  toward  life  and  danger. 

There  are  numerous  reproductions  of  drawings  in  black 
and  white  and  twenty  full  page  pictures  of  the  kind  that 
have  endeared  Bairnsfather  to  millions  of  his  countrymen. 

*  *  * 

ECLIPSE  OR  EMPIRE? 

H.  B.  Gray  and  Samuel  Turner  are  the  joint  authors  of 
an  important  book  entitled  "Eclipse  or  Empire?"  This 
book  shows  the  way  to  increased  national  output,  indi- 
vidual capacity,  increased  wages  and  spurs  parents  on  to 
see  that  their  children  get  the  rightful  heritage.  The  book 
is  a  powerful  indictment  of  Britain's  failure  to  employ  and 
control  her  creative  brains  yet  it  is  a  constructive  book. 
It  does  not  argue,  but  proves.  Nor  does  it  mince  or  waste 
words.  The  mission  of  the  book  is  to  end  futile  argument 
and  lead  the  people  of  Britain  to  action,  so  that  the 
Empire  may  be  great  in  a  larger 'sense  than  it  has  ever 

been  before. 

*  *  * 

NEATH  VERDUN 

Maurice  Genevoix  in  his  book  "'Neath  Verdun,"  has 
produced  a  work  that  reveals  in  a  remarkable  manner  the 
true  spirit  of  the  French  soldier,  setting  forth  the  quali- 
ties  that  have  made  him  a  great  fighting  man  and  not  over- 
looking his  shortcomings. 

"The  Worn   Doorstep"  has  reached  its  tenth  edition. 

*  *  * 

Publication  of  Frederick  Palmer's  "My  Second  Yeur 
of  the  Great  War"*  has  been  deterred  until  February  1. 

*  *  * 

An  important  volume  to  appear  very  shortly  is  the 
third  volume  of  Count  Charles  de  Souza's  strategical  his- 
tory of  the  war,  entitled  "Germany  in  Defeat." 

*  *  * 

Notable  new  volumes  of  fiction  announced  for  early 
publication  are  "The  Hundredth  Chance,"  by  Ethel  M. 
Dell  and  "In  the  Wilderness."  by  Robert  Hiehens. 

*  -i=  * 

A  new  and  cheaper  edition  of  the  notable  book,  by 
Phillip  Gibbs,  "The  Soul  of  the  War,"  has  just  been 
brought  out,  and  to  follow  at  an  early  date  is  the  same 
author's  new  book,  "The  Battles  of  the  Somme." 

*  *  * 

"In   the   Royal   Naval   Air   Service"   is   a   new   book 
which    comprises    the    war     letters    of    the    late    Harold 
Rosher  written  to  the  members  of  his  family.    There  is  an 
introduction  by  Arnold  Bennett. 
30 


IM)  O  K  S  E  L  L  E  R     A  N  D     STATIONER 


DABNEY  TODD 

From  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.  comes  "Dabney  Todd,"  by 
F.  N.  Westcott,  brother  of  the  author  of  "David  Harutn. " 
The  chief  character  in  this  new  book  is  described  in  the 
sub-title  of  the  book  as  "a  blood  relation  to  David  Earum 
and  Hepsy  Burke."  Frank  Westcott,  it  will  be  remein- 
bered,  wrote  a  previous  book  entitled  "Ilepsy  Burke." 
Fdward  N.  Westcott  died  while  his  first  and  only  work  of 
(iction  was  going  through  the  press.  Frank  lived  to  see  the 
successful  publication  of  "Hepsy  Burke"  when  death 
called  him  also.  "Dabney  Todd"  is,  thus,  his  bequest  to 
a  large  circle  of  readers  whose  affection  he  won.  Its  wealth 
of  sympathy,  its  faithful  characterizations,  and  its  quaint 
aphorisms,  put  in  the  mouth  of  Dabney  Todd  and  others, 
are  typical  of  the  author's  richly  humorous  talent. 


Gazetteer,  Foreign  Words  and  Phrases,  Rules  for  Punctu- 
ation, Capitals,  Preparation  of  Copy  add  greatly  to  the 
practical  utility  of  the  volume. 


CAPTAIN  BRUCE  BAIKN'SFATHER, 
Whi  ae   war   cartoons   have   won   for   him   international    fame, 
has  also  written  a  book  just  published. 


He 


A  NEW  DICTIONARY 

A  new  issue  of  Webster's  Collegiate  Dictionary  lias 
come  from  G.  &  C.  Merriam  Company,  being  an  edition 
done  on  thin-paper  and  in  seal  binding.  This  third  edition 
while  succeeding  the  earlier  Collegiate  editions  is  based 
upon  and  abridged  from  Webster's  New  International 
Dictionary  and  has  slightly  larger  type  pages  than  the 
earlier  editions,  contains  1,248  pages  and  1,700  illustra- 
tions. The  book  comprises  over  100,000  words  and  phrases. 
The  publishers  explain  that  in  the  selection  of  this  large 
vocabulary,  the  editors  constantly  had  in  mind  the  needs 
of  the  everyday  user  of  English,  such  as  the  letter  writer 
and  the  advertising  man,  as  well  as  the  students  in  college 
and  university,  and  sought  to  record  answers  to  such  ques- 
tions as  would  be  likely  to  come  up  in  their  work  especi- 
ally those  pertaining  to  the  proper  forms  of  irregular 
verbs,  degrees  of  comparisons  of  adjectives  and  adverbs, 
use  of  prepositions,  the  exact  and  effective  choice  of  words, 
and  the  like. 

Various  supplemental  vocabularies,  as  a  Scottish 
Glossary,  Vocabulary  of  Rhymes,  Biographical  Dictionary. 


Book  Business  Good  in 
Britain 

Interesting  Letter  From  E.  W.  Walker  of  William 

Briggs— -Poularity  of  Bairnsfather's  Cartoons — 
English  Publishers  Now  Favoring  Attrac- 
tive Jackets  For  Books. 

E.  W.  Walker,  manager  of  the  wholesale  department  of 
William  Briggs,  has  been  in  England  since  the  early  pari 
of  November  and  in  the  course  of  a  letter  received  from 
him  by  the  editor  of  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER, 
he  gave  some  most  interesting  information  about  condi- 
tions in  the  old  land  as  follows: — 

"The  booksellers  of  England  have  had  a  big  business 
this  year  and  of  course  the  publishers  had  to  feed  the 
booksellers  with  books  and  must  of  necessity  have  been 
quite  busy  themselves — one  of  the  publishers  told  me  thai 
he  had  had  the  greatest  turnover  this  year  in  his  history- 
quite  true  his  largest  business  was  in  the  cheaper  lines  of 
books;  I  asked  him  how  he  accounted  for  this  and  he  told 
me  the  people  were  reading  more  because  of  the  dark 
nights — all  lights  are  out  or  so  dimmed  in  the  streets  as 
to  make  it  almost  impossible  to  go  out  of  doors  in  comfort 
and  all  blinds  must  be  drawn  at  5  p.m.  The  result  is  more 
reading  is  being  done.  Again  a  great  many  books  are 
given  to  the  soldiers  in  the  hospitals  and  sent  to  the  sol- 
diers at  the  front. 

"The  »-reat  hit  of  the  year  in  cartoon  drawing  is  the 
work  of  Bruce  Bairnsfather,  who  is  accredited  as  the  war's 
greatest  discovery  for  publishers.  His  "Fragments  from 
France"  sold  to  possibly  1,500,000  copies.  His  third  col- 
lection to  be  published  in  a  few  weeks  will  be  in  enormou> 
demand,  with  350,000  advance  orders  already  booked.  The 
post  cards  will  sell  by  the  million.  I  am  glad  to  say  that 
I  have  just  entered  into  an  agreement  with  The  Bystander 
people  to  control  the  Canadian  market  for  all  the  "Frag- 
ments from  France,"  the  post  cards  and  the  famous  pic- 
ture "The  Great  Sacrifice"  which  is  at  the  moment  the 
most  talked  of  picture  in  years. 

"I  am  having  go  forward  to  my  house  the  largest  ship- 
ment of  these  books,  etc.,  that  I  have  ever  placed. 

"I  understand  that  Bairnsfather  has  done  so  much  in- 
ward making  the  Tommies  in  the  trenches  cheerful,  that 
the  government  has  declared  he  can  do  the  country  better 
service  by  giving  his  talents  to  continuing  the  drawing  of 
his  cartoons,  than  by  remaining  at  the  front.  He  has  done 
much  to  cheer  the  soldiers  and  they  love  to  get  his  car- 
toons. Canada  will  take  hold  of  these  books  next  year  in 
a  big  way. 

"One  thing  that  impresses  me  is  the  fact  that  all  the 
big  publishers  over  here  are  putting  attractive,  jackets  on 
their  books  and  they  one  and  all  admit  these  'help  the  sale' 
of  the  books.  Sixteen  years  ago,  for  I  have  been  coming 
over  here  regularly  for  16  years.  1  well  remember  asking  .; 
well-known  publisher,  'Why  not  put  attractive  jackets  on 
your  books?'  His  reply  was  'The  English  public  does  not 
care  about  the  cover  or  jacket — the  English  people  want 
the  book  for  the  contents."  Now  I  find  the  British  pub- 
lisher agrees  that  the  wrapper  does  materially  help.  It  i< 
a  well-known  fact  that  the  British  manufacturer  is  rather 
slow  at  taking  up  a  new  idea  and  I  claim  has  lost  much 
trade  in  the  past  owing  to  failure  to  keep  up  with  tbesi 
changes  which  are  constantly  taking  place." 
Yours  sincerely, 

erxest'w.  walker. 


31 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Monthly   Record   of    New 
Books 

Published  by   Firms    Established  in  Canada 


THOMAS  ALLEN 

Life  of  Nelson,  Robert  Southey,  New  Edition,  Illus- 
trated by  A.  1).  McCormiek,  with  an  introduction,  by  Sir 
Henry  Newbolt,  cloth,  $2.00. 

Fiction 
RHYMES 

The  Girls  at  His  Billet,  Berta  Ruck,  cloth,  $1.25;  Maple 
Leaves  in  Flanders  Fields,  Herbert  Rae,  cloth,  $1.25. 
Non-Fiction 

Raymond  (Life  and  Death),  Sir  Oliver  Lodge,  cloth, 
$2.50;  Tales  of  the  Labrador,  Wilfred  T.  Grenfell,  cloth, 
$1.25;  Russian  Memories,  Olga  Novikoff,  cloth,  $3.25;  My 
Russian  and  Turkish  Journals,  Lady  Dufferin,  cloth,  $3.25; 
Lord  William  Beresford,  V.C.,  Mrs.  Stuart  Menzies,  with 
appreciations  by  Lord  Cromer  and  Lord  Beresford,  cloth, 

$350. 

Juvenile 
Mutt  and  Jeff  in  the  Trenches,  Bud  Fisher,  boards,  60c ; 
Wild  Animal  Ways,  No.  5,  Seton,  cloth,  $1.50. 

THE  COPP,  CLARK  CO. 
Fiction 

The  Last  Ditch,  Will  Levington  Comfort,  $1.35;  Ver- 
milion Box,  E.  V.  Lucas,  $1.25;  Tutor's  Story,  Charles 
Kingsley,  and  Lucas  Malet,  $1.25. 
Non-Fiction 

Vindication  of  Great  Britain,  Harold  Begbie,  $1.50; 
War  Bread,  Edward  Eyre  Hunt,  $2.00. 
Juvenile 

Black  Aroow,  By  Robert  Louis  Stevenson,  illustrated 
by  Wyeth,  $2.25;  Child's  Garden  of  Verse,  by  Stevenson, 
illustrated  by  Storer,  50  cents. 

S.  B.  GUNDY 
Fiction 

The  Klondike  Clan,  S.  Hall  Young,  cloth,  $1.35;  The 
Honest  Lawyer,  G.  V.  McFadden,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Bath- 
ing Man,  Agnes  Gwynne,  cloth,  $1.25;  Further  Foolish- 
ness, Stephen  Leacock,  cloth,  $1.25;  A  Mrs.  Jones,  Mrs. 
C.  S.  Peel,  cloth,  $1.25;  Jimmy's  Wife,  Jessie  Hainpion, 
cloth,  $1.25;  The  Dancing  Hours,  Harold  Olson,  cloth. 
$1.25. 

Non-Fiction 
The  Lamp  of  Poor  Souls  and  Other  Poems,  Marjorie 
L.  C.  Pickthall,  cloth,  $1.25  net;  An  O.  Henry  Biography, 
C.  Alphonso  Smith  (boxed),  cloth,  $2.50  net;  The  Life  and 
Letters  of  Sir  John  Henniker  Heaton,  by  his  daughter,  ■ 
Mrs.  Adrian  Porter,  cloth,  $3.50  net;  The  Magic  of  Malaya, 
Cuthbert  Woodville  Harrison,  cloth,  $1.25;  From  the  Heart 
of  the  Veld,  Madeline  Alston,  cloth,  $1.25;  Soldier  and 
Dramatist,  Harold  Chapin,  cloth,  $1.50;  Call  of  the  West, 
Capt.  Galloway,  R.M.R.E.,  cloth,  $3.50;  New  Belgian 
Poems,  Emile  Cammaerts,  cloth,  $1.25;  My  Man,  Letters 
from  a  Wife  to  a  Husband,  Somewhere  in  France,  C.E.L.. 
cloth,  50c. 

Juvenile 
Rule  Britannia,  picture  boards,  30c  net;  Soldiers  of  the 
King,  picture  boards,  30c  net ;  The  Red  Book  of  the  War, 
picture  boards,  75c  net;  The  Rose  Book  for  Girls,  picture 
hoards,  75c  net;  The  Blue  Book  for  Children,  picture 
boards  ,75c  net;  Through  Enemy's  Lines,  Herbert  Strang, 
cloth,  75c;  The  Old  Man  of  the  Mountain,  Herbert  Strang, 
cloth,  $1.00;  Burton  of  the  Flying  Corps,  Herbert  Strang, 
cloth,  $1.00;  The  Empire  in  Arms,  Herbert  Strang,  cloth, 


$2.00  net;  British  Army  in  War,  Herbert  Strang,  cloth, 
$1.50  net;  British  Navy  in  War,  Herbert  Strang,  cloth, 
$1.50  net;  Story  of  Lord  Kitchener,  Herbert  Strang,  pic- 
ture boards,  30c  net. 

THE  MACMILLAN  CO. 
Non-Fiction 
Are  You  Human?  W.  de  W.  Hyde,  cloth,  50  cents;  The 
Hope  of  the  Great  Community,  Josiah  Royce,  cloth,  $1.00; 
Slavery  of  Prostitution,  M.  E.  Miner,  cloth,  $1.50;   The 
Teaching  of  Government,  C.  G.  Haines,  cloth,  $1.10;  The 
Problem  of  Personality,  E.  N.  Merrington,  cloth,  $1.50; 
The   Soul   of  Russia,  Winnifred   Stephens,  cloth,  $3.00; 
The  Great  Valley   (Poems),  E.  L.  Masters,  cloth,  $1.50; 
Fruit-Gathering,  Bolpur  Ed.,  Rabin.  Tagore,  cloth,  $1.50; 
leather,     $2.00;     Hungry     Stones     and     Other     Stories, 
Rabin.    Tagore,    cloth,    $1.00;    leather,    $2.00;    It's    All 
in    the   Day's   Work,   Henry    C.    King,    cloth,   50    cents; 
The    Secret    Trails,    Charles    D.    Roberts,    cloth,    $1.35; 
Pilot    (Dog    Story),   and    Other    Stories,   H.    P.    Greene, 
cloth,  $2.00;  An  Apology  for  Old  Maids,  H.  D.  Sedgwick, 
cloth,  $1.50;  A  Handy  Guide  for  Beggars,  Vachel  Lind- 
say, cloth,  $1.25;  The  Medals  of  Our  Fighting  Men,  S.  C.' 
Johnson,  cloth,  $1.00;   New  Ideals  in  Business,  Ida  M. 
Tarbell,  cloth,  $1.75;  The  Early  History  of  Cuba   (1492- 
1586),  I.  A.  Wright,  cloth,  $2.00;  Multitude  and  Solitude, 
J.  Masefield,  cloth,  $1.35;  Captain  Margaret,  J.  Masefield, 
cloth,  $1.35;  Poems  of  the  Great  War,  J.  W.  Cunliffe,  cloth, 
$1.50;   The  Pruning  Manual   N/E,  L.   H.   Bailey,  cloth, 
$2.00;  Stray  Birds,  Tagore,  cloth,  $1.50;  Shantiniketan, 
the  Bolpur  School  of  Tagore,  W.  W.  Pearson,  cloth,  $1.50; 
What's  the  Matter  with  Mexico,  C.  Whitney,  cloth,  50 
cents;  Amateur  Circus  Life,  E.  Balch,  cloth,  $1.50;  The 
Knight  of  the  Lion,  A.  B.  Hopkins   (E'Childs  S),  cloth, 
40  cents;  The  Romance  of  Labour,  Twombly  and  Dana. 
cloth,   55    cents ;Storytelling,   Questioning   and    Studying, 
H.  H.  Home,  cloth,  $1.10;  Edmee,  Mrs.  Molesworth,  cloth, 
$1 .  00 ;  Picture  Stories  From  The  Great  Artists,  Cady  and 
Dewey,  cloth,  40c. 

THOMAS  NELSON  &  SONS 
Fiction 
Relentless  City,  E.  F.  Benson,  cloth,  25  cents;  Shandon 
Bells,  Wm.  Black,  cloth,  25  cents. 
Non-Fiction 
Atlas  of  the  War,  paper  boards,  50  cents. 

Juvenile 
Children's  Story  of  the  War,  Nos.  23  and  24,  Sir  Ed- 
ward Parrott,  paper,  12  cents  each. 


In  reproducing  in  a  recent  issue,  a  picture  of  Stephen 
Graham,  who  has  written  important  books  on  Russia  and 
the  Russians,  mention  should  have  been  made  that  his 
latest  book  "Through  Russian  Central  Asia,"  is  published 
in  Canada  by  the  House  of  Cassell. 


A  REMARKABLE  NOVEL 

Several  years  ago  in  quick  succession  two  novels  came 
from  Alfred  Tresidder  Sheppard  and  it  is  apparent  that 
the  author  in  the  long  space  of  time  that  has  intervened 
between  the  publishing  of  those  books  and  "The  Rise  of 
Ledger  Dunstan"  recently  issued  in  England  and  shortly 
to  appear  in  a  Canadian  edition,  that  Sheppard  has  been 
thinking  deeply  and  preparing  a  system  for  himself,  be- 
cause this  book  is  altogether  unlike  anything  that  has 
been  given  to  the  public  in  recent  years.  It  is  not  a  war 
novel  but  it  was  inspired  by  the  war.  The  story  itself  is 
brought  to  its  denouement  before  the  time  of  the  begin- 
ning of  the  great  war,  nevertheless  the  author,  through  his 
chief  character  and  others,  in  a  most  interesting  manner, 
eoes  deep  into  the  causes  of  such  a  cataclysm. 
32 


15  00  K  SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


A  NOVEL  OF  HAPPINESS 

"Miss  Thcodosia's  Heartstrings"  is  the  title  of  a  story 
written  in  a  most  happy  vein  by  Annie  Hamilton  Donnell 
(Wm.  Briggs).  Miss  Theodosia  wanders  up  and  down  the 
world  for  three  years  in  search  of  something  to  interest 
her,  only  to  come  home  and  find  it  on  the  upper  doorstep 
of  her  own  front  porch.  What  she  found  was  a  very  much 
surprised  child  who  was  holding  a  baby  on  her  knees.  The 
manner  in  which  these  children  who  lived  next  door, 
reached  the  heart  of  the  staid  and  travel-worn  woman, 
eventually  bringing  romance  into  her  life,  is  set  forth  in 
this  author's  characteristic  style. 

*  *  * 

POEMS  OF  DAVIES 

A  Canadian  edition  is  to  be  brought  out  of  the  "Col- 
lected Poems"  of  William  A.  Davies  who  has  been  aptly 
•called  "the  Poet  of  Joy."  The  critics  in  England  have 
.accepted  him  as  a  poetic  genius  of  first  magnitude  and 
one  of  them  dealing  with  the  edition  of  this  book  already 
issued  in  England  says:  "Here  are  at  least  fifty  poems 
of  the  first  lustre  and  final  perfection." 

*  *  * 

SIR  OLIVER  LODGE 

One  of  the  most  notable  books  of  the  month  is  "Ray- 
mond, or  Life  and  Death,"  by  Sir  Oliver  Lodge.  This 
volume  is  engaging  the  earnest  attention  of  thinking 
people.  The  book  is  named  after  the  author's  son  who 
was  killed  in  the  war.  It  tells  of  his  life  and  death  and 
communications  with  him  after  death,  the  last  part  of  the 
book  being  devoted  to  the  meaning  of  Life  and  Death,  on 
the  continuity  of  existence,  means  of  communication  and 
the  bearing  of  the  author's  own  experience  on  his  religious 
belief. 

An  Introduction  to  the  Study  of  Organized  Labor  in 
America.  By  George  Gorham  Groat,  Ph.D.,  Professor 
of  Economics  in  the  University  of  Vermont.  The  Mac- 
millan  Company,  Toronto  and  New  York.     494  pages. 

In  the  book  under  review  the  author  has  confined  hi9 
treatment  to  that  phase  of  the  labor  movement  which  is 
organized  labor.  His  material  is  concerned  chiefly  with  the 
activities  of  the  unions,  but  he  describes  also  the  back- 
ground of  the  labor  movement  and  the  current  forms  of 
association  and  gives  an  account  of  transitional  movements. 

Wage  Theories,  Modern  Industrialism,  The  Knights  of 
Labor,  The  American  Federation  of  Labor,  The  American 
Trade  Union,  Women  and  Unionism,  The  Strike,  Arbitra- 
tion, The  Boycott,  The  Closed  Shop,  The  Trade  Agreement, 
Restriction  of  Output,  Legislative  Methods,  Labor  Legis- 
lation, Political  Labor  Party — these  suggest  the  line  of 
study  and  treatment. 

The  war  has  revealed  the  power  of  organized  labor  in 
Great  Britain  as  nothing  else  ever  did,  showing  it  to  be  a 
force  to  be  reckoned  with  by  governments  and  statesmen ; 
and  when  the  war  is  over  organized  labor  is  bound  to  receive 
a  recognition  by  capital  not  willingly  accorded  it  in  the 
past.  The  enmity  between  capital  and  organized  labor  so 
long  continued,  so  bitter  in  its  expression,  so  calamitous  in 
its-  fruitage,  rests  to  some  extent  on  misunderstandings,  and 
to  a  larger  extent  on  the  failure  of  both  sides  to  recognize 
the  other  side's  point  of  view  and  right9.  That  there  is 
antagonism  of  interest  there  is  not  a  doubt,  but  at  bottom 
the  conflict  is  based  on  the  first  law  of  life — self-preserva- 
tion or  protection.  The  new  industrialism  which  will  follow 
the  war;  and  the  new  economic  conditions  brought  about  by 
trade  pacts,  man-shortage,  emigration,  and  consequent  new 
social  conditions,  call  for  a  coming  together  in  mutual  ac- 
cord and  purpose  of  capital  and  labor.  Better  relationships 
can  be  established  only  when  there  is  a  better  understand- 
ing of  the  organized  labor  movement,  and  a  closer  study  and 
analysis  of  social  mechanics.     Professor  Groat's  book  is  a 


timely  volume,  and  its  careful  reading  by  all  employers  of 
labor,  as  well  as  by  the  employed  classes,  will  be  produc- 
tive of  much  good. 

m 

BRIEF  NOTES  ABOUT  BOOKS 

Quite  a  long  list  of  Christmas  booklets  have  been  writ- 
ten by  Charles  E.  Jefferson,  I). I).,  the  latesj  being  "A  Fire 

in  the  Snow,"  in  which  the  spirit  of  <  'hrist  mas  is  likened 
In  a  fire  in  the  snow,  built  by  schoolboys,  [n  the  eold 
bleak  month  of  December  comes  Christmas  to  warm  the 
spirits  and  hearts  of  everyone. 

*  *  * 

"Peggy   Raymond's  Scl 1   Days,"  by   Harriet   Lum- 

Mis  Smith,  another  story  in  the  series  of  which  "The 
Girls  of  Friendly  Terrace"  was  t lie  first,  their  doings 
being  combined  in  the  second  hook,  "Peggy  Raymond's 
Vacation,"  and  now  this  third  book,  equally  interesting, 
and  told  in  the  same  delightful  manner. 

*  *  * 

"The  Graymouse  Family,"  by  Nellie  M.  Leonard,  pub- 
lished by  T.  Y.  Crowell  Co.,  New  York,  is  a  16  mo.  juvenile 
of  a  hundred  pages,  with  sixteen  black  and  white  illus- 
trations and  deals  entertainingly  with  the  doings  of 
Mother  Graymouse  and  her  six  children,  Limpy-toes,  Sil- 
ver Ears,  Buster,  Teenty,  Tiny,  and  Baby  Squealer. 

*  *         * 

"Betty's  Beautiful  Nights"  is  the  title  of  one  of  the 
particularly  attractive  juvenile  holiday  books  of  this  sea- 
son. The  book  was  written  by  Marian  Warner  Wildman 
with  illustrations  by  Clara  M.  Burd.  The  book  is  published 
by  the  Putnams. 

*  *         * 

A  new  text  book  of  Elementary  Chemistry,  by  F.  Moil- 
too  Perkin,  author  of  Practical   Elements  of  Inorganic 

Chemistry,  and  E.  M.  Jaggers,  comes  from   Consta & 

<  o.,  the  London  publishers. 

*  *         * 

Brewer  Corcoran 's  novel,  "The  Road  to  Le  Reve" 
comes  from  The  Page  Co.  It  is  a  story  of  society  and 
the  wilderness— not  the  wilderness  of  the  average  angler 
but  the  wilderness  de  luxe  of  the  multi-millionaire  fishing 
club— Mr.  Corcoran  deals  powerfully  with  the  vital  theme 
that  the  few  should  give  up  their  pleasures  for  the  good  of 
the  many.  Not  only  does  Betty  Norton  turn  rebel  to  en- 
"  vironment.  but  foe  to  her  father  and  the  rest  of  the 
[dywild  clique,  whose  interests  spread  out  like  the  web  of  a 
a  spider.  Her  fight  for  individuality,  her  loyalty  and  her 
charm  are  as  real  as  the  realities  of  which  she  is  the 
apostle.  And  fighting  at  her  side  is  Steve  Danforth,  not 
a  player  of  polo  or  a  hero  of  the  hotel  piazzas,  but  a  clean- 
cut,  red-blooded  young  engineer  who  not.  only  dreams  of  a 
road  to  Le  Reve,  but  makes  a  dream  come  true. 

*  *  * 
A  BUSINESS  BOOK 

"General  Cargo"  is  the  title  of  a  book  by  Richard  E 
Goddard.  published  by  Constable  &  Co.,  of  London.  The 
book  is  described  as  an  introduction  to  salesmanship,  and 
is  particularly  addressed  to  those  who  desire  to  make  an 
effort  to  get  back  losses  caused  by  the  war,  based  on  the 
author's  exceptional  opportunities  of  studying,  first-hand, 
the  manners,  customs  and  requirements  of  the  principal 
countries  of  the  world. 

*  *  * 

mr.  McClelland  wins 

John  McClelland,  of  the  publishing  house  of  McClel- 
land, Goodchild  &  Stewart,  was  elected  a  member  of  the 
Toronto  Board  of  Education,  heading  the  poll  in  Ward  4, 
with  2.1(i(i  votes,  as  against  1,244  for  candidate  Singer  and 
533  for  candidate  Bainbridge. 
33 


Cheerful  Books  as  a  National  Asset 


By  SPENCER  LEIGH   HUGHES,   M.P. 


Editor's    Note.    The     following    article     from     "Books   of   the 

Month,"    published    Id    England    by   Gordon   &   Goteb,    is   so    go  n 

iiK,i    U(.  feel   thai   it  will  do  good   to  have  the  wide  dissemination 

thus    afforded    by    its    publication    in    "Bookseller   and    Stationer." 

[tions  described  are  applicable  to  Canada  as  well  as  England 

us   regards  the  gloomy  forebodings  of  ninny,  in  the  early  months 

i    the  war.     Both    England   and   Canada    have  just  closed   a   yeai 

has    been   a    remarkably   good   one   for   t  lie  book   trade,   and 

tlie  spiiif   of  this  article  is  a  good   thing  to  embrace  at   this  time 

when   we  axe  on   the  threshold  of  the   New   Year. 

WHEN  the  war  broke  out  the  prophets  were  confident 
and  busy,  as  all  .through  history  they  have  been  at 
such  times.  Of  course,  they  indulged  in  crude  pre- 
dictions as  to  the  length  of  the  war  and  as  to  its  result. 
Such  forecast s  are  expected  from  those  who  pretend  they 
can  read  the  future.  But  there  were  many  other  directions 
in  which  the  prophets  made  confident  declarations  as  to 
what  would  happen.  One  of  these  assertions  repeated 
again  and  again  was  that  the  book  trade  would  be  heavily 
hit,  and  for  the  time  almost  ruined.  This  had  nothing  to 
do  with  the  enormous  increase  in  the  price  of  paper  and 
difficulty  in  getting  paper,  for  at  the  outset  and  during 
the  earlier  stages  of  the  war,  the  prophets  did  not  foresee 
these  difficulties.  What  they  insisted  on  was  that  men  and 
women  would  be  in  no  mood  for  reading  in  a  general  way, 
that  the  only  books  in  demand  would  be  serious,  not  to 
say  solemn,,  histories  of  the  war,  elaborately  technical 
military  tomes,  with  large  maps  and  professional  explana- 
tions of  campaigns,  which  incidentally  explain  nothing  to 
the  ordinary  reader,  and  merely  bewilder  him  at  first  and 
then  bore  him  profoundly. 

Nothing  could  have  been  wider  of  the  mark  than  those 
cocksure  anticipations  by  those  who  said  they  knew.  Let 
anyone  look  at  the  bookstalls  and  he  will  see  a  huge  supply 
of  bright  and  attractive  books,  most  of  them  short,  many 
amusing,  and  some  of  them  regretably  frivolous,  if  we  are 
to  accept  the  views  of  those  gloomy  folk  who  are  never 
happy  but  when  they  are  miserable  and  trying  to  depress 
others.  The  novelists  have  been  kept  busy,  and  the  writers 
of  short  stories  have  been  working  overtime  as  if  they 
were  in  munition  factories.  Many  of  the  tales  have  no 
doubt  been  inspired  by  the  war,  and  have  had  to  do  with 
military  life.  And,  of  course,  those  writers  who  deal  with 
international  intrigues,  with  plots  and  counterplots 
hatched  in  the  Chancelleries  of  Europe,  with  spying  vil- 
lanies  foiled  and  detectives  triumphant,  have  thrilled  us 
all  with  sinister  revelations.  But  altogether,  apart  from 
work  of  this  sort,  there  has  been  a  vast  and  increasing- 
output  of  wholesome  humor  and  of  healthy  fun,  as  well 
as  the  usual  supply  of  tender  tales  of  what  is  known  as 
the  Edwin  and  Angelina  type.  We  were  told  by  the  pro- 
phets to  whom  1  have  already  alluded  that  the  public 
would  not  stand  light  literature  during  the  war,  and  that 
such  work  would  be  resented  as  a  cruel  insult  to  our  boys 
at  the  front.  As  things  have  turned  out  those  same  boys 
have  demanded  books  that  cheer.  While  it  is  true  that 
never  before  in  the  history  of  mankind  has  there  been  so 
ghastly  and  horrible  a  war,  it  is  also  true  that  never  before 
has  there  been  so  cheery  and  even  merry  an  army  as  ours. 
I  believe  that  it  is  just  because  they  are  engaged  in  so 
terribly  serious  an  undertaking  that  they  have  yearned  for 
literature  that  is  light,  songs  that  appear  at  first  to  be 
grotesquely  inappropriate,  and  illustrated  papers  that 
show  the  quaint  and  even  ludicrous  side  of  their  own  life. 
'  And  so  with  the  people  at  home.  It  is  because  they 
work   hard,  or  what   is  far  more   trying,  quietly  endure 


anxiety,  that  they  turn  to  hooks  lor  relief,  and  buy  books 
more  than  ever.  There  were  some  persons,  well-meaning. 
I  daresay,  who  held  that  the  theatres  should  be  closed 
during  the  war,  but  the  theatres  have  been  welcomed  as 
eagerly  as  the  supply  of  books — and  as  in  the  one  world 
so  in  the  other,  the  cry  has  been  for  something  to  raise  an 
honest  laugh.  I  believe  it  is  the  fact  that  there  is  not 
much  demand  either  for  plays  or  books  of  what  is  called 
the  "problem"  type — those  rather  unwholesome  produc- 
tions about  a  woman  with  a  past,  or  a  man  whose  future 
is  likely  to  be  less  comfortable  than  his  present.  If  so  no 
great  harm  has  been  done.  But  in  spite  of  stern  prophets 
and  moralists,  and  all  those  who  tell  the  people  what  they 
will  do  and  what  they  ought  to  do,  there  has  been  and  still 
is  a  demand  for  amusement  both  in  reading  and  at  the 
theatre.  The  war  so  far  from  lessening  that  demand  has 
increased  it — and  yet  all  the  time  there  never  was  a 
people  more  in  earnest  than  this  people,  alike  those  in  the 
front  and  those  at  home.  For  we  have  discovered  that  it 
is  possible  to  laugh  and  to  be  in  earnest  at  the  same  time. 
No  doubt  the  authors  have  been  encouraged  to  write  by  the 
prospect,  or  at  any  rate  the  hope,  of  making  money.  There 
is  nothing  unworthy  in  this;  indeed,  Dr.  Johnson  has 
said  that  "No  man  but  a  blockhead  ever  wrote  except  for 
money."  But  while  authors  and  publishers  are  naturally 
anxious  to  make  their  transactions  pay,  I  am  certain  the 
recent  output  of  books  has  been  a  valuable  national  asset, 
quite  apart  from  any  money  that  may  have  been  made  out 
of  the  enterprise.  For  by  providing  books  that  are  really 
refreshing  to  the  mind  and  spirit,  they  have  saved  people 
from  moping  and  brooding  and,  above  all,  they  have  helped 
the  wounded  to  forget,  or  at  any  rate  more  cheerfully  to 
endure,  their  wounds  and  Aveariness. 

It  is,  of  course,  at  a  time  of  war,  and  therefore  of 
stress  and  strain,  that  the  solace  of  cheering  books  is  most 
apparent.  But  I  maintain  that  those  who  produce  and 
provide  light  literature  at  any  time  are  doing  good  ser- 
vice. The  phrase  "light  literature"  is  often  careles>]\ 
applied,  as  if  it  necessarily  meant  trash.  Nothing  could 
be  more  ridiculously  incorrect.  Take  for  example  some  of 
Lamb's  essays — they  are  not  only  light,  they  are  dainty, 
gay  and  buoyant,  and  they  are  at  the  same  time  among 
the  gems  of  our  literature.  And  the  same  may  be  said  of 
much  that  was  written  by  that  choice  humorist,  Oliver 
Wendell  Holmes,  and  by  many  another.  At  all  times  in 
war  and  peace  alike,  those  who  keep  up  our  spirits,  and. 
who  so  to  speak,  switch  the  mind  off  from  the  daily  grind 
to  fair  fields  of  thought,  to  "fresh  fields  and  pastures 
new"  of  the  imagination,  have  done  good  work.  The 
mind  demands  its  change  of  air  and  a  holiday  as  well  as 
the  hody,  and  one  thing  that  is  done  by  the  writer  and  the 
publisher  working  together  is  that  they  give  what  I  may 
call  a  mental  change  of  air  to  one  who  remains  at  home. 

*  *  * 

EDINBURGH 

"Edinburgh— An  Historical  Study,"  by  the  Hon.  Sir 
Herbert  Maxwell,  is  a  most  interesting  book  which  comes 
from  the  London  Publishers,  William  and  Norgate.  It 
deals  in  a  most  interesting  manner  with  the  story  of  this 
Ancient  Scottish  City  and  there  are  nearly  seventy  pages 
of  illustrations  including  two  very  fine  colored  plates. 
This  history  of  the  Scottish  Capital  is  from  the  earliest 
times  to  the  19th  Century. 


34 


Gardwriting  Made  &sy 


^RTDErdw&pds 


A  SERIES  of  articles  on  show  card 
writing  have  been  appearing  in 
this  paper  for  about  two  years, 
and  those  who  have  followed  them  faith- 
fully have  learned  many  of  the  letter 
formations  and  the  various  devices  used 
by  eardwriters  in  order  to  get  the  de- 
sired effect.  These  have  been  explained 
and  illustrated  to  such  an  extent  that, 
if  the  student  has  been  diligent  with 
brush  and  pen,  and  mastered  each  les- 
son, or  the  majority  of  them,  he  should 
be  able  to  accomplish  much  in  the  art 
of  show  card  writing. 

However,  there  is  something  more  to 
be  learned.  Something  that  has  here- 
tofore been  avoided  for  a  good  reason. 
In  the  present  day  retail  business,  every- 
thing must  move  fast*in  order  to  keep  up 
with  competition.  Every  member  of  the 
staff  feels  the  strain  of  speed.  The  win- 
dow trimmer  must  get  his  window  trim- 
med quickly  and  his  blinds  up  as  soon 
as,   or  sooner  than,  his  competitor,  the 


Uses  of  the  Index  Hand 

ad.  man  is  called  upon  to  write  larger 
and  brainier  advertisements,  and  the 
card  writer  must  write  more  and  better 
showcards.  It  is  to  aid  the  cardwriter 
to  have  better  speed,  so  he  may  meet 
the  demand  of  modern  retail  merchan- 
dising that  this  lesson  is  written. 

It  is  an  old  adage  in  card  writing  that 
a  person  can  do  just  so  many  cards  and 
no  more,  in  a  certain  length  of  time 
This  is  true  if  you  use  a  finished  letter, 
but  in  the  rush  season  the  more  particu- 
lar styles  can  be  avoided,  and  a  much 
quicker  and  simpler  form  of  lettering 
used.  If  the  card  is  neat  and  well  bal- 
anced, that  is  all  that  is  required.  It 
should  always  be  remembered  that  it  is 
far  better  to  have  a  plainly  lettered 
card  on  the  merchandise  doing  its  si- 
lent selling  than  a  perfectly  lettered 
card  on  your  desk  half  finished.  The 
former  is  getting  the  business,  while  the 
latter  will  likely  be  too  late  to  do  any 
effective  work.  So  it  is  advisable  that 
all  eardwriters  possess  the  knowledge  of 


a  quickly  formed  alphabet  and  numerals 
and  to  have  these  at  his  fingertips  ready 
to  be  used  at  a  moment's  notice. 

The  styles  that  are  most  advisable  for 
this  fast  form  o*  lettering  are  shown  in 
the  chart  of  this  lesson.  It  will  be  no- 
ticed the  first  alphabet  is  almost  a  slant 
block  letter.  It  can  be  made  very  quick- 
ly and  completed  with  the  brush  stroke 
method.  The  ends  of  the  strokes  are  un- 
finished. It  might  be  well  to  state  here, 
that  all  quickly  formed  alphabets  are 
made  with  strokes,  the  ends  of  which  do 
not  need  retouching,  as  that  is  where 
the  speed  comes  in.  The  second  alpha- 
bet is  one  of  the  speediest  types  that 
can  be  made.  Such  an  easy  swing  of  the 
brush  is  obtained  with  practice  that  it 
may  be  formed  almost  as  quickly  as  or- 
dinary writing.  In  this  alphabet  there 
will  be  noticed  more  curved  lines  than 
in  the  former.  These  give  more  of  a 
swing  to  the  brush  and  this  develops 
greater  speed. 

The   size  of   the   brush  used   for   this 


S/2^//sA 

/22fa 

2. 



3f25* 


HOOKS  E  LLER     AND     STATIONER 


a6<?de/z7Ai/&/s77aqprstuvii/xi/z  /2345G7890 

Chart  22.  ^&ss^ 


work  depends  entirely  upon  the  size  of 
the  cards  required.  All  brushes  do  not 
make  the  same  width  of  a  stroke,  even 
if  they  are  the  same  number.  The  width 
of  the  stroke  depends  largely  upon  the 
thickness  and  quantity  of  the  ink  car- 
ried in  the  brush.  A  brush  making  about 
a  three-sixteenth  of  an  inch  stroke  can 
be  used  for  nearly  all  large  card  pur- 
poses. Another  thing  of  importance  is 
to  have  the  ink  slightly  thinner  than 
when  used  for  slower  work.  The  faster 
one  works  the  faster  the  ink  has  to  flow, 
therefore  the  necessity. 


But,  after  all  is  said  and  done,  prac- 
tice is  the  main  thing,  and  one  must 
keep  on  practising  if  they  wish  to  ac- 
complish, with  any  degree  of  success,  the 
desired  result. 

THE  CHART 

First  Alphabet 
Take  particular  note  that  while  the 
formation  of  these  letters  and  numerals 
resembles  the  square  faced  brush  stroke 
block  published,  some  time  ago  in  this 
paper,  it  differs  in  the  method  of  hand- 
ling the  brush.     It  is  necessary  to  allow 


the  brush  to  roll  in  the  fingers  a  very 
little  bit  for  making  the  straight  hori- 
zontal lines,  but  for  all  other  strokes 
hold  the  brush  tightly. 

The  second  alphabet  is  one  that  can 
be  formed  very  rapidly.  The  greater 
speed  is  attributed  to  the  curved  na- 
ture of  the  lines,  which  gives  a  writing 
swing  to  the  brush.  All  upper  case  let- 
ters of  this  alphabet  should  not  be  used 
to  form  words.  Use  a  combination  of 
the  upper  and  lower. 

A  detailed  explanation  of  the  first  al- 
phabet is  unnecessary  on  account  of  the 


rrrrrrrrrrrrr  jj/jjjjjjjjjj  rrrrrrrrrr 

Stroke  I ,  Upper  <lz&<ik(?,rst/r/pj,aM)    Stroke  3,  Lower  Case  '6fe*'4>tai'J)  Stroke?  I.  and  2.  Upper  Case  L  (s*mmJ  J/fiAaie£) 

Stroke  4.  Upper  Case'M  ys««w  #tf*mhr*) 


Strokes  I  and  2,  Upper  Case.V  and  W 

(Seeond  /f/phateij 


Strokes  2.and  3.  Upper  Case  T. 

(Second  ff/pnabety 

Practice  Sxereises 
Fig.  2 . 


36 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


sameness  of  the  formation.  But  the 
second  requires  explanation. 

"A"  is  formed  with  throe  strokes. 
Nos.  1  and  2  combination  should  be 
practised  often,  "B"  is  a  five-stroke 
letter.  See  that  the  lower  section  of  tins 
letter  is  larger  than  the  top.  Much  prac- 
tice is  required  for  this  letter.  Stroke 
one  appears  many  times  throughout  the 
alphabet.  "C"  can  be  quickly  formed. 
Note  how  graceful  this  letter  is. 

It  takes  three  strokes  to  complete 
"D."    Practice  stroke  two  often. 

"E"  is  another  graceful  letter.  Note 
the   swing-  of  the  three  bottom  strokes. 

Stroke  2  of  "F"  needs  much  prac- 
tice. 

This  "G"  makes  a  good  capital  let- 
ter, but  must  be  practised  often  to  get 
it  perfectly  formed. 

Strokes  2  and  3  of  "H"  should  have 
the  same  swing  to  them.  Stroke  1  fol- 
lows the  upper  guide  line. 

Strokes  1  and  2  of  "J"  are  the  same 
as  those  of  "I."  Strokes  3  and  4  ap- 
pear many  times  throughout  the  alpha- 
bet and  need  much  practice. 

Strokes  1  and  2  of  "K"  are  also  the 
same  as  those  of  "I"  and  "J."  Note 
the  curve  on  stroke  4.  Combination 
stroke  1  and  2  of  "L"  are  good  ones  to 
practice. 

Stroke  3  and  4  of  "M"  show  some- 
thing new.  Both  these  strokes  start  at 
the  top  to  the  left  and  come  across  to 
the  right  and  turn  sharply  down  to  the 
lower  guide  line. 

Stroke  3  of  "N"  is  the  same. 

"0"  is  made  with  three  strokes.  Note 

the    slant    that    the    entire    letter    is    at. 

Practice    well    the    stroke    of    the    letter 
i ip  > > 

"Q"  is  the  same  formation  as  that  of 
"0,"  with  stroke  4  added. 

"R."  Note  how  the  lower  end  of 
stroke  3  and  the  loop  above  correspond. 

The  curved  lines  of  the  "S"  make  it 
a  good  one  for  practice  work.  This  let- 
ter is  used  frequently  and  should  be 
given  special  attention.  Practise  strokes 
2  and  3  together.  This  will  help  you 
in  the  formation  of  other  letters. 

Stroke  2  of  "U"  is  also  a  good  one 
to  practice  on  account  of  its  different 
curves.  Stroke  3  is  one  of  the  few 
straight  line  strokes  of  this  alphabet 
and  even  this  has  a  curved  finish. 

You  should  not  neglect  to  practice 
"V."  Note  the  angle  strokes  2  and  3 
are  at. 

"W"  is  also  a  letter  that  you1  will 
have  to  practise  well  before  you  can 
make  it  perfectly.  Note  the  swing  of 
stroke  4. 

You  do  not  have  to  use  "X"  often, 
but  it  is  as  well  to  memorize  its  forma- 
tion. 

Strokes  3  and  4  of  "Y"  are  good 
food  for  practice.  Note  where  stroke  2 
joins  stroke  3. 


It   takes  4  strokes  to  complete  "Z." 
Note  th.'it   they  are  all  slightly  curved. 

Practise  often. 


Lower  Case 

The  lower  case  is  one  of  the  best  for 
fast  lettering.  All  the  letters,  when 
formed,  tit  into  one  another  gracefully 
and  can  be  very  quickly  executed.  The 
small  alphabet  at  the  bottom  of  the 
chart  shows  a  good  speedy  type  made 
with  a  No.  2  round  writing  pen. 

Small  Cards 

For  small,  quickly  made  cards  these 
alphabets  are  excellent.  Note  the  collec- 
tion of  cards  shown  in  Fig.  1.  In  size 
Nos.  1.  2,  3  and  4  are  7  in.  x  5V2  in.  The 
remaining  two  are  51  '•>  x  .1 '  2  in.  They 
are  very  plain  cards,  being  white  card, 
lettered  in  black.  They  are  of  the 
quickest  kind  of  work.  The  time  taken 
for  the  execution  being,  No.  1,  9  sec- 
onds; No.  2,  16  seconds;  No.  3,  13  sec- 
onds; No.  4,  16  seconds,  and  each  of 
the  remaining  two  6  seconds  apiece.  This 
time  does  not  include  cutting  the  card- 
board or  the  ruling  of  the  borders.  This 
is  just  an  instance  to  show  what  speed 
can  be  developed  with  this  form  of  let- 
tering. 

Practice  Work 

It  will  be  noticed  that  we  continually 
emphasize  the  need  of  continual  prac- 
tice, and  that  is  the  only  way  to  obtain 
success.  The  '"'practice  exercise"  shows 
a  few  of  the  important  strokes  of  the 
chart.  These  should  be  practised  many 
times  more  than  is  here  illustrated. 

Time  Saving  Device 

Many  little  time  saving  devices  are 
used  by  card  writers.  Fig.  3  shows  a 
good  idea  for  a  drying  rack  for  cards 
after  they  are  written.  This  can  be 
made  from  a  piece  of  wood  two  and  a 
half  inches  square  and  aSout  two  and 
a  half  feet  long.  The  slots  are  first  cut 
in  the  width  with  a  saw  to  two-thirds 
the  depth  of  the  wood.  Then  the  slot 
37 


is  widened  at  the  mouth  by  another  cut 
in  at  an  angle  as  jhowa  in  the  illustra- 
tion.    These  sluts  can  be  made  about  an 

inch  apart.     Use  a   h I   '   at   will  not 

split.  It  is  best  to  gel  a  carpenter  to 
make  them  who  has  a  circular  or  band 
saw  at  his  disposal.  Brass  mirror  plates 
are  fastened  top  and  bottom,  so  that 
it  can  be  fastened  to  the  wall.  Three 
or  four  of  these  within  easy  reach  of 
the  card  writer's  desk  are  a  great  aid 
to  getting-  out   work  quickly. 

It  is  a  good  idea  to  have  a  lot  of  the 
different  size  cards  ready  ruled  with 
narrow  borders  such  as  these  are  ruled. 
It  is  a  great  time  saver  when  you  are 
busy. 


THE  UNBROKEN  LINE 

Among  volumes  dealing  with  the  war, 
one  of  the  most  interesting  and  most  im- 
portant is  II.  Werner  Allen's  "The  Un- 
broken Line,"  which  treats  of  the  war 
in  the  western  theatre  in  the  proper  as- 
pect of  a  single  front  from  the  Channel 
to  Switzerland.  This  writer  in  the 
capacity  of  a  war  correspondent  lias  had 
unusual  opportunities.  He  lias  visited 
all  the  bombarded  towns.  lie  has  pene- 
trated under  escort  to  remote  listening 
posts  in  No  Man's  Land  and  from  th£re 
watched  the  Germans  inside  Metz.  He 
has  had  first  hand  accounts  from  Freneli 
generals  of  big-  engagements  and  heard 
details  of  these  big  fights  at  mess  tables. 
He  has  followed  in  the  tracks  of  the  vic- 
torious Somme  armies,  seeing  at  close 
quarters  the  effect  of  French  gun  fire. 
The  spirit  of  national  rivalry  has  been 
completely  ignored  in  this  great  book, 
and  it  is  this  presentation  of  the  war 
with  the  Allies,  combating  the  Teutonic 
powers  as  one  great  fighting  organiza- 
tion, that  especially  commends  this  bonk 
to  the  public. 


STANDARDIZED  TEXT  BOOKS 

At  a  conference  of  the  four  Western 
provincial  departments  of  education  on 
the  subject  of  better  and  cheaper  text 
books  in  public  schools,  held  at  Edmon- 
ton, Alta.,  Dec.  20,  the  following  officials 
were  present:  Dr.  Thornton,  Minister  of 
Education  for  Manitoba:  D.  P.  Met  oil. 
superintendent  of  education  for  Sas- 
katchewan, and  Dr.  Alex.  Robinson, 
superintendent  for  British  Columbia. 
The  Alberta  representatives  were  the 
Hon.  J.  R.  Boyle.  Minister  of  Education  ; 
D.  S.  McKenzie,  Deputy  Minister,  an  1 
John  Ross,  chief  inspector  of  schools. 
The  Hon.  W.  M.  Martin.  Premier  of  Sas- 
katchewan and  Minister  of  Education, 
was  to  have  attended,  but  was  unable  to 
do  so.  The  visitors  were  entertained  at 
dinner  by  the  university  faculty. 

This  is  a  step  towards  standardizing 
text  books  for  all  four  provinces,  which 
many  believe  is  not  far  distant. 


Store  Plans  That  Won  First  Prize 

Contest  Conducted  in  Connection  With  Recent    Convention    of    Stationers    at    Atlanta, 

Georgia 


CANADIAN'  stationers  will  be  interested  in  reading 
the  following  descriptions  and  examining  the  a&- 
eompanying-  store  plan  as  prepared  by  K.  J.  \V. 
I  luff,  manager  of  the  H.  K.  Brewer  Co.'s  stationery  store 
in  New  York.  This  won  the- first  prize  in  the  store  plans 
contest  conducted  in  connection  with  the  recent  convention 
at  Atlanta,  Ga.,  of  the  National  Association  of  Stationers 
of  the  United  States:— 

The  plans  provide  for  a  double  store,  that  is,  47  feet  in 
width,  with  a  depth  of  98  feet  6  inches.  They  include  main 
floor,  mezzanine  or  balcony  and  basement.  The  plan  of  the 
main  floor  is  shown  on  the  opposite  page. 

Beginning  at  the  front  of  the  store  our  attention  is 
•called  to  the  show  windows.  The  two  main  windows,  Nos. 
1  and  2,  are  each  15  feet  wide  by  8  deep.  No.  1,  on  the 
left,  is  for  the  display  of  general  stationery,  and  No.  2  for 
office  furniture  and  filing  devices,  arranged  as  in  an  actual 
office.  Windows  should  be  changed  regularly  every  week 
for  best  results. 

Of  the  two  vestibule  windows,  3  and  4,  each  8  feet  wide 
by  2  deep,  one  can  be  used  for  the  display  of  brasses, 
leather  goods  and  novelties,  and  the  other  for  the  display 
of  engraving — business  and  social,  place  cards,  etc.,  and 
greeting  cards  for  all  occasions.  These  windows  can  be 
changed  to  meet  the  demands  of  various  occasions. 

On  each  side  of  the  front  of  the  store,  back  of  the  win- 
dows, is  a  room,  A  and  D  in  the  plan.  These  rooms  are 
provided  for  the  taking  of  orders  which  require  some  cal- 
culation. Thus  A  is  for  consulting  with  the  customer  con- 
cerning engraving  orders  and  D  for  manufacturing,  print- 
ing and  loose  leaf  orders.  Privacy  is  assured,  and  the 
various  samples  and  accessories  for  this  branch  of  the 
business  are  kept  handy.  These  rooms  are  10  feet  by  8 
feet  and  open  into  both  the  main  area  of  the  store  and  into 
the  passage  way  running  along  each  side  of  the  store. 

Immediately  back  of  these  rooms  are  two  divisions  of 
space,  one  for  the  fountain  pen  department  and  one  for 
the  greeting  card  department.  The  front  of  these  spaces 
are  formed  of  glass  show  cases.  One  side  is  the  partition 
of  the  adjoining  room  and  the  other  is  a  counter.  These 
spaces  are  6  feet  wide  by  10  deep.  A  glass  wall  case  is  a 
feature  of  each. 

•  It  will  be  seen  by  consulting  the  illustration  that  the 
interior  of  the  store  is  planned  to  obtain  not  only  the  best 
results  from  the  standpoint  of  merchandising,  but  at  the 
same  time  to  economize  in  floor  space  and  to  insure  a 
pleasing  effect  to  the  eye.  The  arrangement  of  the  display 
fixtures  (B)  and  (C)  is  made  to  permit  of  individual  de- 
partments, allowing  aisle  space  between  such  departments 
and  eliminating  congestion  in  main  aisles  through  the 
center  of  the  store. 

B,  formed  on  three  sides  by  a  two-foot  wide  counter,  is 
6  feet  wide  and  8  feet  deep  inside.  Each  is  equipped  with 
a  wrapping  table.  Bundles  are  wrapped  and  marked  here 
and  are  gathered  by  boys  who  take  them  to  the  shipping 
room.  C  is  an  open  space  8  feet  square  for  the  conveni- 
ence of  customers,  who  thus  escape  the  confusion  of  a 
crowded  store  and  are  in  comparative  seclusion  while 
transacting  business. 

In  general  it  may  be  stated  that  one  side  of  the  store 
can  be  given  over  to  social  stationery  and  the  othfr  to 
commercial.  By  the  above  arrangement  the  two  main 
divisions  are  separated  and  the  various  sub-divisions  of 
each  are  segregated  in  ?  partmcnts  by  themsel'    >. 


Down  the  center  of  the  store  and  arranged  around  the 
supporting  pillars  are  show  cases  (ET)  to  be  used  for  I  e 
display  of  any  kind  of  merchandise  in  the  store  and 
changed  as  often  a.s  desired.  By  the  use  of  these  and  the 
small  revolving  shov>  cases  on  the  counters  at  the  back  of 
the  individual  departments  (Z),  the  myriads  of  small 
articles  which  are  usually  hidden  in  the  shelves  and  which 
could  be  shown  in  no  other  way  can  be  brought  out  where 
the  public  can  view  them. 

Two  tables  for  displaying  merchandise  to  be  sold  at 
special  sales  occupy  the  spaces  between  the  columns. 

It  will  be  noted  that  there  are  plenty  of  tables,  and 
also  that  there  is  no  lack  of  stairs  to  the  mezzanine  or 
balcony,  eliminating  the  necessity  so  common  in  stores  of 
running  from  one  end  to  the  other  in  order  to  get  upstairs. 
It  may  be  that  the  article  desired  is  right  over  head,  but 
in  order  to  reach  it  one  often  has  to  go  diagonally  across 
the  entire  store,  climb  the  stairs  and  go  half  way  around 
the  balcony.    Mr.  Huff  does  away  with  this  in  his  plan. 

In  the  back  of  the  store  is  seen  the  shipping  room  (F) 
with  a  time  clock  and  an  outlet  to  the  rear  for  employees' 
entrance.  The  shipping  room  is  10  feet  wide  and  extends 
across  the  end  of  the  store. 

The  basement  in  Mr.  Huff's  plans  is  given  over  to 
the  office  furniture  department.  At  the  back  are  two 
rooms  fitted  up  as  offices.  One  of  these  may  contain 
mahogany  desk,  chairs  and  filing  devices  and  the  other  oak 
or  steel,  as  seems  desirable.  These  rooms  are  19  feet  by 
12  feet. 

Back  of  the  sample  offices  are  the  gentlemen's  and  the 
ladies'  retiring  rooms.  These  rooms  are  fitted  with  wash 
basins,  lockers  and  toilets,  and  are  accessible  from  base- 
ment and  also  from  the  main  store  by  way  of  staircases. 
They  are  12  feet  deep  and  divide  the  width  of  the  building 
equally. 

In  front  is  the  receiving  department,  and  alongside  of 
it  the  checking  and  marking  department.  All  goods  are 
received  through  the  basement,  either  through  the  front  or 
by  the  back,  according  to  the  conditions.  As  soon  as  the 
merchandise  is  received  it  is  checked,  marked,  priced,  etc., 
and  then  distributed  through  the  proper  departments.  The 
receiving  and  checking  rooms  are  each  22  feet  wide  by  14 
deep. 

The  area  between  the  receiving  and  checking  and  the 
sample  offices  departments  is  given  over  to  office  furniture, 
or  if  it  is  not  considered  desirable  to  give  so  much  space  to 
this,  a  part  may  be  utilized  for  storing  and  surplus  stock. 
At  the  back  of  the  balcony  on  one  side  of  the  central 
staircase  is  the  proprietor's  office,  with  desk  overlooking 
the  entire  store.  On  the  opposite  end  in  front  is  the 
manager's  desk,  also  overlooking  the  store. 

On  the  opposite  side  of  the  central  staircase  from  the 
proprietor's  office  is  the  bookkeeping  department,  and 
back  of  them  both  is  a  room  8  feet  deep  and  38  feet  wide. 
designated  as  the  salesmen's  instruction  room.  Here  new 
goods  are  explained,  inside  and  outside  salesmen  are  in- 
structed and  conferences  between  the  management  and  the 
staff  are  conducted. 

The  cashier's  office  is  in  front,  reached  by  carrier  sys- 
.tem  from  all  departments.  An  elaborate  filing  system  for 
the  firm's  personal  filing  and  for  steel  dies,  etc..  can  be 
installed  on  the  balcony  over  the  two  show  windows  in 
front. 
38 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


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39 


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New  Goods  Described  and  llustrated 


NEW  POST  CARDS 

An  English  bouse  lias  put  out  a  series  of  post  cards 
with  verses  by  Ella  Wheeler  Wilcox.  As  her  writings  are 
copyrighted  it  was  necessary  to  purchase  the  rights  for 
putting  them  to  this  use.  A  goodly  number  have  been 
issued  and  others  are  to  follow. 

NEW  ERASERS 

"Pink  Pearl"  is  the  name  given  to  the  latest  addi- 
tions to  the  Eberhard  Faber  line  of  erasers.  They  are 
pink  in  color  and  are  soft  and  pliable,  made  in  a  com- 
mercial shape,  double  bevel  and  in  two  sizes — medium  and 
large.  The  makers  claim  for  these  erasers  that  they  do 
perfect  work  for  erasures  on  sensitive  paper,  as  the  soft- 
ness of  the  rubber  prevents  tearing  or  marring  of  the 
surface  of  the  paper. 

RED,  WHITE  AND  BLUE  PAPER 

Arthur  Reed,  of  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  is  to  be  congratu- 
lated upon  his  latest  idea  in  patriotic  stationery,  which  has 
materialized  in  the  line  of  "Red,  white  and  blue"  corres- 
pondence paper  in  papetries  and  tablets,  the  paper  being 
the  firm's  "silk-velvet"  writing  paper,  with  overprinting 
in  delicate  shades  of  red,  white  and  blue  stripes  running 
diagonally  across  the  paper,  in  addition  to  which  there  is 
a  maple  leaf  at  the  top  fo  each  sheet,  while  the  covers  are 
handsomely  embossed. 

NEW  TYPEWRITER  BRUSH 

A  new  specialty  recently  introduced  is  a  typewriter 
brush  the  "bristles"  of  which  are  of  brass  wire.  It  has 
been  named  the  "stenographer's  friend."  Besides  doing 
the  duty  of  the  ordinary  typewriter  brush  it  obviates  the 
use  of  a  pin  for  cleaning  away  lint  and  ink  from  the  type. 
This  new  brush  is  made  by  J.  J.  Kenney,  177  21st  street, 
Milwaukee. 

TWO    NEW    DUPLICATING    MACHINES 

Two  duplicating  machines  introduced 
by  the  Beck  Duplicator  Co.,  476  Broad- 
way, New  York,  are  described  in  the 
following: — The  Oscillating  Duplicator 
will  make  fifty  to  seventy-five  copies  of 
handwriting  or  typewriting  in  a  very 
brief  time.  It  is  automatic  in  opera- 
tion and  other  advantages  claimed  for 
it  by  the  makers  are  that  no  stencil 
are  required;  it  registers  perfectly  and 
is  so  economical  that  each  set  of  copies 
costs  about  one  or  two  cents.  The  ma- 
chine is  operated  as  follows: — The 
original  is  placed  on  the  feed  table  and 
a  half  turn  of  the  handle  transfers  this 
original  to  the  film  which  is  twelve  feet 
long  and  may  he  used  from  fifteen  to 
twenty-five  times  over.  Another  half 
turn  in  the  opposite  direction  removes 
the  original.  Copies  may  then  be  run 
off  with  great  speed  by  feeding  blank 
sheets  of  paper  in  the  same  manner 
and  rotating  the  handle  back  and 
forward.  The  Ironclad  Duplicator 
is  also  a  new  one,  and  will  produce  fifty  to  a 
dred    of   hand-writing   or   typewriting   in    less    than 


minutes.  This  machine  consists  of  a  strong  iron  frame 
with  a  duplicating  film  stretched  across  the  steel  printing 
bed.    There  is  an  adjustable  gauge  to  register  copies  which 


Beck's   Oscillating   Duplicator. 

insures  accuracy  to  a  fraction  of  an  inch.  No  stencil 
sheets  are  needed  nor  printing  ink  and  the  cost  of  opera- 
tion is  about  two  cents  for  each  set  of  copies. 

ALL-YEAR  CALENDAR 

Parker's  All-Year  Ready  Reference  Calendar  is  a  new 
item  put  on  the  market  by  Clarke  &  Courts  of  Galveston, 
Texas.  This  calendar  carries  in  a  space  three  inches  by 
ten  inches,  a  calendar  for  the  entire  year  so  that  one  may 
turn  to  any  date  in  the  year  as  readily  as  he  now  refers 


hun- 
ten 


Beck's  Ironclad  Duplicator. 

to  any  date  of  the  current  month.    The  man  who  has  per- 
fected this  new  calendar  is  J.  F.  Parker,  Dallas,  Texas. 
40 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Weld  on  Roberts 

Rubber  Erasers 


WELDON  ROBERTS   RUBBER  CO.  office  &  works  NEWARK,  N.J.  U.S.A. 


MADE  IN  CANADA 


High  Grade  Papeteries 
for  your  holiday  trade 


That  telling  appeal  which 
distinctiveness  and  high  grade 
quality  give  to  any  line  is 
very  evident  in 

ROLLAND  PARCHMENT 

a  superior  correspondence 
paper  that  is  sure  to  make  a 
hit  with  the  holiday  trade. 

Holland  Parchment  is  put  up  in  a  neat,  attractive-look- 
ing box,  which  is  a  big  factor  in  securing  the  customer's 
interest  and  promoting  the  quick,  easy  sales  that  are 
characteristic  of  every  Rolland  product. 

Get  a  stock  of  these  quality  papers  displayed  for  better 
holiday  selling.     Results  will  please  you. 

The  Rolland  Paper  Co., 

High  Grade  Paper  Makers      Limited 


General    Offices: 
143    St.    Paul    St.    W., 
Montreal. 


Mills  at   St.  Jerome 
ami  St.  Holland,  P.Q 


GET  THE  BEST!  BLOTTING  PAPER 


MANUFACTURED  BY 


THEEATON-DIKEMAN  COMPANY,  Lee, Massachusetts,  U.S.A. 


THE  FOLLOWING  WELL-KNOWN  BRANDS  CARRIED  IN  STOCK 

Magnet  Columbian  Lenox  Arlington  Wavelet 

Matrix  and  Filter  Papers 

FOR  SALE  BY  THE  LEADING  JOBBERS  IN  PAPER 


Housatonic 


41 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


For  Quality,  Price  and 
Satisfaction  in 

Stationery  and 
Office  Supplies 

You  hit  the  mark  when  you 
buy  the  Dawson  line. 

Our  line  of 

BLANK  BOOKS 

ENVELOPES 

LOOSE    LEAF  BINDERS 

All  kinds  of  OFFICE  and 
STATIONERY  SUPPLIES 

is  complete. 

Large  or  small,  your  order 
will  have  immediate  and  best 
attention. 


^Dxw^dtv 


Montreal 


l^IMI'TDD 
Toronto 


Winnipeg 


Patented  Dec.  7,  19U9 
•No.   777   1V8   in.   wide,   and   only   1-16  in.   thick,   12   Inches  long. 

Very  flexible,  double  brass  edges,  ready  for  use  either  side 
up.     Sixteenth  scale  on  one  side,  millimeter  scale  on  the  other. 

You   are   overlooking   a    good    one   If  you   do   not   carrv   our 


School    Flexible 

WESTCOTT-JEWELL  CO.,  ^V 

RULER  MAKERS  EXCLUSIVELY 


FALLS. 
S.A. 


'TPIIE  following  books,  published  by  W.  S. 
■*■  Paine  &  Co.,  Hythe,  Kent,  are  recognized 
as  being  written  by  the  best  authorities  upon 
musketry,  etc. : 

MUSKETRY  NOTES,  by  Lieut.  A.  Raker,  C.E.F. 
FIELD  PRACTICES,  by  Major  Brandreth,  Hythe 

Staff. 
NOTES     ON    METHODS    of    GIVING    FIRE 

ORDERS,   by  Lieut.    G.    E.    Coffey,  Hythe 

Stall. 
HANDBOOK  of  the  COLT  GUN,  by  Capt.  D.  J. 

Johnston. 
INSTRUCTIONAL    HANDBOOK    of    the    .303 

LEWIS  GUN,  by  Hythe  Staff. 
THE    COLT    AUTOMATIC    MACHINE    GUN- 
NER'S   HANDBOOK,    with.   Machine    Gun 

Tactics  and  Problems. 
INDIRECT    FIRE    WITH    MACHINE    GUNS. 

Fully  illustrated. 
THE  HYTHE  SERIES  OF  AIDS  TO  TRAINING 

INFANTRY.      Nos.  1  to  12  already  issued, 

other  numbers  ready  shortly. 

TO  BE  OBTAINED  OF 

McClelland,  Goodchild  &  Stewart 

TORONTO  Limited 

AND  ALL  BOOKSELLERS 


HOLD  THE  LINE 


(Registered) 


London  ( Eng. ) 
Export  Agency, 
8  St.  Bride  St., 
LONDON,  E.C. 


Here's  the  line  to  hold — 
John    Heath's    Telephone 
Pen.    You  will  not  hold  it 
long    because    it    sells    so 
quickly.     There's  quality 
about     it.       It    writes 
smoothly,  never  corrodes, 
and  lasts  long.     Get  con 
nected  with  the  Telephone 
Pen  for  quick  sales. 
Supplied 
by  all  the 
leading 
xchole- 
sale 
houses   i» 
Toronto 

and 
Montreal 


42 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


ARTISTS  MATERIALS 


We  carry  a  complete  line  of  Artists  Materials 

Agents  for  Winsor  &  Newton.  London,  Eng. 

A.RAMSAY  &  SON    CQ 

EST'D.   18  42.    MONTREAL. 


CARTER  INX 

Quality  Products 

embrace  a  line  of  inks, 
mucilage  and  paste 
which  is  unequalled.  It 
insures  a  steady  profit 
from  your  best  trade, 
and  does  away  with  all 
dissatisfaction. 


MADE  IN  CANADA 

The  Carter's  Ink  Co. 

356   St.   Antoine  Street  Montreal,   Que. 


(.ingcr   up   your   sulrs   by    using   this   attractive  cabinet    on   your 
counter. 


Qlasa    Heads 

steel    Points 

This   assortment 


The      Hanger 

u  ii  h  i  be  i «  ibI 

Style    L 

Assortmi  u  I 

Order    from 

your     jobber 

Free     Samples 

sent   on    rrqnest 

Tlii.s  $15  assortment   (150— lOe   Pkts.)   on  yom   counter  will  sell 


including 
Window     Poster 

$10.25, 


Moore  Push-Pins 
Moore  Push-less  Hangers 

Moore    Posh-Pin   <  <>.,    117   Berkley    NtrtM-t 

I'hilaoVlpliiu,   l':t. 


Travellers  start  out  early  in  the  New 
Year  with  a  very  complete  line. 

Post  Cards  and  Booklets,    Easter;  Valentine, 
St.  Patrick. 

Post  Cards  Patriotic,  Birthday,  Comic,  etc., 
etc. 

Pennants,  Stencilled  and  Sewn  Letter. 

Biggest  Range  and  Best  Value  in  Canada. 

Battalion     Pennants,    Photo     Banners    and 
Cushions. 

Military  Specialties  and  Soldiers'  Supplies. 

Tigris  Ivory  Novelties  (Made  in  Canada). 

Special  lines  in  Toys  and  Novelties. 

Emerson  Records  to  retail 
at    15c.    and  35c.    each. 

If  you  are  on  our  mailing  list  you  get  interesting  and 
money-making  literature  once  a  month.  If  you  are  not 
on  send  us  your  name  on  a  post  card. 

PUGH  SPECIALTY  CO. 

LIMITED 

Specialists  in  Specialties 

38-42  Clifford  St.,  Toronto,  Canada 


STATIONERS 

will  make  no  mistake  by  recommending  to  their  customers 

THE  VAN  DYKE  DRAWING  PENCIL  NO.  600 

In  15  Degrees— 6B  Softest  to  7H  Hardest 

Winner  of  GOLD  MEDAL  at  Panama-Pacific  Exposition 
Acclaimed  by  many  noted  architects,  artists,  engi  neers, surveyors  and  draftsmen. 

EBERHARD  FABER  -  New  York 

Made  in  America  by  the  Oldest  Pencil  Factory  i-rt^4ra»ri<Kj-_,-»_^  «■■  -j '-'  ir*-  ;.  -»—-»,- — 

~~  43 


BO  0  K  S  E  L  L  int    and    stati  o  n  e  r 


BLANK  BOOKS 


»N<   BOO 


Under  its  folds  you  march 
to  bigger  business. 

An  army  of  dealers  the  country  over  have  found  the 
"Standard"  trade-mark  a  token  of  victory  in  the- "drive''" 
towards  better  business.  And  this  army  is  ever-growing, 
dealers  having  recognized  the  superiority  of  Standard 
Brand  Blank  Books  and  Loose-Leaf  Devices,  a  superiority 
that  brings  more  customers  to  the  store  and  puts  more  dollars 
in  the  cash  drawer. 

"Standard"  lines  will  give  your  customers  a  satisfactory 
service  such  as  will  react  favorably  on  other  lines  displayed. 
Try  out  a  few  of  this  family  of  quick  sellers. 


There's  a  good  profit  in  every  "Standard"  sale. 

BOORUM  &  PEASE  COMPANY 

Makers  of"  Standard  "  Blank  Books  and  Loose-Leaf  Devices 

Home    Offices:    Front    St.  and    Hudson  Ave.,  Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Factories :  Brooklyn,  N.Y.         St.  Louis,  Mo. 


ANfEVER  POPULAR   GIFT 


The  "A. A."  self-filling  feature  is  simple  and 
attractive.  That's  one  reason  why  this  pen  sells 
so  easily  and  quickly.  The  "A.A."  pen  is  an 
attractive  holiday  gift.  The  material  and  work- 
manship are  absolutely  guaranteed.  The  ex- 
quisite flexibility  of  the  gold  pen  point  is  pleas- 
ing to  customers. 

We  will  furnish  attractive  display  cases  free. 
Bach  case  contains  an  appropriate  holiday 
assortment  of  self-fillers,  lower  end  joint, 
middle  joint,   and   safety  fountain  pens. 

Write  to  your  local  jobber  or  to  us  for  prices, 
catalogue  and  trade  discounts  on  this 

PROFITABLE  LINE 

Arthur  A.  Waterman  &  Co. 

Established  1895 
36  THAMES  ST.  NEW  YORK  CITY 

Not  connected  with  the 
L.  E.  Waterman-  Co. 


h  Vh^H  *    ' 

A  WORD  TO  THE  WISE 

If  you  are  interested  in 

PICTURE  POST  CARDS 

of  any    kind,  please  state  your  require- 
ments. 

We  have  a  laree   variety   of  subjects   in 
every  direction* 

We    also     issue   about   30  designs      in 
STATUARY  PICTURES  in    three  sizes, 
the  most  perfect  ever  produced. 

The  "Alpha"  Publishing  Co. 

2  &  4   Scratton  Street 

Finsbury,    London, 

England 

■r^,   +2, 

Before  buying  a  fresh  stock  of  pens,  get 
samples  and  prices  of  the  famous 

99 


"Rob  Roy 
Pen 


It    is 

ra  a  rl  e 

of      fine    steei. 

w  rites     easily 

and   smoothly   and 

suits     almost     any 

hand.  "Rob   Roy"   Pens 

are    made    in    one    of    the 

best     equipped     factories     in 

Birmingham,    Eng. — the   home   of 

the   pen-making  industry. 


the  popular  and 
quick-sell- 
ing pen 


.Manufactured   by  the  proprieto  •: 

Hinks,  Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 


44 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Begin  the  New  Year  with 
a  good  start.  Be  prepared 
to  meet  the  needs  of  your 
most  exacting  customer, 
who  will  always  be  pleased 
with  a  box  of 

Qranes 

The  Correct  Writing  Paper 


Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co. 

Pittsfield,  Massachusetts 
Toronto  Office:  266-268  King  St.  W. 


inn 


lllllllll 


World  Blotting 

— a  favorite  everywhere 


Being  made  from  selected  cotton  rags,  "World"  Blotting 
lias  a  superior  absorbency  and  durability  that  pleases 
particular  people,  making  repeat  orders  certain  for  the 
dealer. 

The  many  attractive  colors  of  "World"  Blotting 
make  effective  displays  an  easy  matter. 

Our  two  cheaper  grades,  "Hollywood"  and  "Reliance," 
are  the  very  best  values  at   the  price. 

All  our  lines  are  sellers. 

Get  a  supply  and  be  convinced. 

The  Albemarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

RICHMOND,  VA.,  U.S.A. 

JiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii.il  iMiiiiiniii 


The  McKinley  Edition  of 
Ten-Cent  Music 

will  always  hold  first  place  as  an  Edition  of 
Standard,  Classic  and  Teaching  Music. 

An  established  demand  for  this  line  of  music 
exists  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  meets  the  requirements  of  the  Teacher,  Stu- 
dent and  the  Accomplished  Musician. 

It  has  proved  itself,  to  thousands  of  dealers,  to 
be  the  best  foundation  for  a  sheet  music  de- 
partment. 

Every  copy  of  The  McKinley  Edition  sold  means 
a  profit  of  over  200%  to  the  dealer. 
The    McKinley    Edition    (Revised    for    our    Can- 
adian   Trade)     conforms    in    every    detail    with 
Canadian  copyright  laws. 

A  great  advantage  to  the  merchant  as  a  "Trade 
Bringer"  is  the  catalogues  bearing  the  dealers' 
imprint  which  are  supplied  with  this  Edition. 
These  catalogues  will  attract  more  customers  to 
your  store  than  any  other  medium  you  could 
employ. 

Write  us  for  Samples  and  Particulars  to-day. 
Also   we  want  you   to   know  our  Jobbing  De- 
partment is  one  of  the  largest  and  most  complete 
in  the  country.    We  can  take  care  of  your  wants 
for  anything  in  Sheet  Music. 

McKINLEY  MUSIC  COMPANY 

The  Largest  "Exclusively  Sheet  Music  House" 

in  the  World. 

CHICAGO:     1501-15    EAST    FIFTY-FIFTH    STREET 


Fine  Inks  and  Adhesives 


FOR  THOSE 


WHO  KNOW 


Higgi 


ns 


Drawing  Inks 
Eternal  Writing  Ink 
Engrossing  Ink 
Taurine  Mucilage 
Photo  Mounter  Paste 
Drawing  Board  Paste 
Liquid  Paste 
Office  Paste 
Vegetable  Glue,  etc. 


Are   the  finest  and  best   Inks,  and  Adhesives 

These  manufactures  have  a  unique  standing 
among  discriminating  consumers,  the  ready- 
money  kind  who  know  what  they  want  and  are 
willing  to  pay  for  it.  They  are  worth  cater- 
ing to. 

CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO.,  Mfrs. 


Branches : 
Chicago.  London 


271   Ninth  St. 
BROOKLYN.  N.Y. 


45 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


BUYERS'   GUIDE 


MADE 


CANADA 

ADDING  MACHINE  ROLLS 

Mok    proti.l    I'ii    the  clf.iler 
Wnlewvlor   Mi.iplis   .mil    prices. 

MONARCH  PAPER  CO.,  Limited 

Manufacturers  419  Kins  St.  W..  Toronto 


MANUFACTURERS  OF 

Die   Stamped    and 

Engraved 

Greeting  Cards 

329    Craig    Street    West 
MONTREAL 


LOOSE-LEAF 
METALS 


De  Luxe  Line  Metals  are  used  in  every 
civilized  country  in  the  world.  We  make 
all  kinds.      Write  for  Catalogue  No.  32. 

WILSON-JONES  LOOSE  LEAF  CO. 


CHICAGO 


NEW  YORK 


Wycil  &  Company 

85  Fulton   Street,    New  York  City 

carry  a  large  stock  of 

German,  French,  Spanish 
and  Italian  Grammars 

of  the 

Gaspey-Otto-Sauer  Series 
Liberal  Discounts  to  the  Trade 


Wonder  Soap  Bubbler 

Blows  Double,  Chains,  Clusters,  Etc. 

INDESTRUCTIBLE.     PROFITS  80^  to   100°„ 

Write  for  Samples  and  Prices 

BRADWAY  NOVELTY  CO. 


1    West  Broadway, 


NEW  YORK  CITY 


ART    SUPPLIES. 

Artists'   Supply  Co.,  77   York  St.,  Toronto. 
A.   Kamsay  &  Son  Co.,  Montreal. 

BLOTTING    PAPERS. 
TLe    Albemarle  Paper  Co.,   Richmond,   Va. 
John  Dickinson  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Dawson  &  Sons,  W.  V.,  Montreal. 
K.itou-Dikeman    Co.,    Lee,    Mass. 
Standard    1'aper    Mfg.    Co.,    Richmond,    Va. 

BLANK     BOOKS. 
lioorum   &   Pease  Co.,   Brooklyn,   N.Y. 
Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
I'.untin,    Gillies    &    Co.,    Hamilton. 
IV.    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
National   Blank   Book   Co.,   Holyoke,   Mass. 
Menzies  &   Co.,   Limited,   Toronto. 
The  Copp,   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
CHRISTMAS    AND    PICTURE    POST    CARDS. 
Kirn    Bros.,   266   King   St.   W.,   Toronto. 
British-Canadian    Publishing    Co.,    35    Church 

St..   Toronto. 
J.  H.  Jost,  Halifax,  N.S. 
Menzies  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

Packard  Bros.,  329  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal,  Que. 
Ritchie  &   Sons,   Ltd.,   William. 
Valentine  &  Sons,  Toronto  and  Montreal. 

CODE   BOOKS. 
The    American    Code   Co.,   83    Nassau    St.,    New 
York. 

CRAYONS. 
Binney  &   Smith,   New  York. 

EYELETTING    MACHINES 

Kibe   File  and   Binder   Co.  New   York,    N.Y. 
Ideal    Specialties  Mfg.    Corporation,   552    Pearl 
St.,   N.Y.   City. 

ENVELOPES. 
Iirown   Bros.,   Limited,  Toronto. 
Iluntin,   Gillies   &   Co.,    Hamilton. 
Copp,   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
W..    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg:. 
Menzies   &    Co..    Limited,    Toronto. 

ERASERS. 

St.    Mungo   Mfg.   Co.,   Glasgow.   Scotland. 
Weldon   Roberts   Rubber  Co.,   Newark,   N.J. 

FANCY  PAPERS,  TISSUES  AND  BOXES. 

Dennlson   Mfg.   Co.,    Boston. 

Menzies   &   Co.,   Toronto. 

A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    266    King    St.    W., 

Toronto. 

FOUNTAIN     PENS. 
Arthur  A.  Waterman   Co.,   Ltd.,   New  York. 
Sanford    &    Bennett    Co.,    51-53    Maiden    Lane. 

New    York. 
A.     R.    McDougall    &    Co..     266    King     St.     W.. 

Toronto. 
Paul  E.  Wirt  Co.,  Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Toronto, 

Canadian    Agents. 

INKS,  MUCILAGE  AND  GUMS. 

Chas.  M.   Higgins  &  Co..   Brooklyn,  N.>. 

The  Carter's   Ink  Co.,   Montreal. 

W.,    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Mcntrenl,    Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
S.    R.    Stafford    Co.,    Toronto. 
"Gloy."    A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    2(56    King 

St.   W.,   Toronto. 
"Gluclne,"   Menzies   &   Co.,    Limited,   430   King 
St.  W„  Toronto. 

INDELIBLE     INK. 

Carter's    Ink   Co.,    Montreal. 

Payson's   Indelible   Ink. 

S.    S.   Stafford   Co..   Toronto. 

INKSTANDS. 
The   Sengbusch  Co.,  Milwaukee. 

LEAD   AND   COPYING   PENCILS. 
American   Pencil  Co.,   New   York. 
Eberhard    Faber   Co.,    New   York. 
A.    R.    McDougall    &    Co.,    266    King    St.    W., 

Toronto. 

LOOSE     LEAF     BOOKS.     BINDERS     AND 
HOLDERS. 
The   Brown   Bros.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Boorum   4   Pease   Co.,    Brooklyn. 
Buntin,   Gillies  A  Co.,    Hamilton. 
W.    Y.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto 

Winnipeg. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 
Luckett     Loose     Leaf,    Limited,    215    Victoria 

St.,  Toronto. 
National   Blank   Book   Co.,   Holyoke,   Mass. 
Rockhlll  &  Victor,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York  City. 
Smith,    Davidson    &    Wright,    Ltd.,    Vancouver. 


46 


THE  FAULTLESS  LINE 

OF  LOOSE  LEAF  METALS 

Most  complete  line  of  Ledger,  Sectional 
Post,  Solid  Post  and  other  Loose  Leaf 
Metals. 

On    request    to-day    our    Catalog    GC    and 
special    proposition. 

STATIONERS  LOOSE  LEAF  CO. 


342  Broadway 
203  Broadway 


Milwaukee,  Wis. 
New  York  City 


Your    Ad    in    this 
space  on  yearly 

contract 
$2.10  per  month 


CUSTOMS 
TARIFFS 

CUSTOMS 
FORMS 

INTEREST 
TABLES 


Order  your  supply  for 
beginning  of  1917. 


Morton.Phill.ps  &  Co. 


ruBUiaiM 


US  Notre  Dame  St.  West    ■      MONTREAL 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


BUYERS'  GUIDE 


SCHOOL  *£? 

RULERS 

Send   for  Samples  and 


Interesting  Prices 


Lucas-Tuttle  Mfg.  Co. 

Silver  Springs,  N.Y. 


HAVE  A  BETTER  BOOK  STORE 

We  make  show  cases,  counters, 
wall  eases,  shelving,  tables  and 
special  fixtures  for  all  lines  of 
retail  trade. 

Send    us    plans    and    spe- 
cifications   for    estimates. 

The  Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture 
Company,    Limited 

Kitchener,  Ontario 


The  1917  Issue  of 

Gale  &  Polden's 

BOOKS  OF  JOLLY  FUN 

for  the  Children 

will  be   sure   sellers. 
Send  for  Titles,  etc. 

2  Amen  Corner  -  London,  E.C. 


You  Ad  in  a 

Buyers' 

Guide 

Space 

2\  in.  by  lh  in. 

for 

$25  a  year. 


Stationers'  Loose  Leaf  Co.,  203  Broadway, 
N.Y.,  and  Milwaukee,  Wis. 

Wilson-Jones  Loose  Leaf  Company,  3021  Car- 
roll Ave.,  Chicago;  12U  Lafayette  St.,  New 
York. 

LEATHER    AND    FANCY    GOODS. 
Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
L).    Harper    &    Co,    258-262     HoHoway     Road, 
London,  Eng. 

MAP    PUBLISHERS. 

Hand,    MeNally    &   Co.,    Chicago, 
the  Copp,   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 

METAL    PARTS    FOR    LOOSE    LEAF 
BINDERS. 

Wilson-Jones  Loose  Leaf  Company,  3021  Car- 
roll Ave.,  Chicago ;  129  Lafayette  St.,  New 
York. 

MILITARY    SPECIALTIES 

Geo.  Clark,   Southam  Bldg.,  Montreal,  Que. 

NEWS    COMPANIES. 

Imperial    News    Co.,    Montreal,    Toronto,    Win- 
nipeg. 
Toronto    News   Co. 
Montreal  News  Co. 
Winnipeg    News    Co. 

PAPER    FASTENERS. 

Bump  Paper  Fastener  Co.,  La  Crosse,  Wis. 
Ideal    Specialties    Mfg.    Corp.,    552    Pearl    St., 

New   York   City. 
O.K.    Manufacturing  Co.,   Syracuse,   N.Y. 

PAPETERIES   AND    WRITING    PAPERS. 

\V.    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
The   Brown   Bros.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

PLAYING     CARDS. 

(ioodall's   English   Playing  Cards,  A.  O.  Hurst, 

Scott   St.,   Toronto. 
Menzies  &   Co.,   Limited,   Toronto. 
U.  S.  Playing  Card  Co.,  Cincinnati,  O. 

POST  CARDS,  GREETING  CARDS,  ETC. 

Hildesheimer,     Ltd.,     93,     Clerkenwell     Road, 

London,   E.C. 
Philip  G.   Hunt  &  Co.,  332  Balbam   High   Rd., 

London    Eng. 
Pugh  Specialty  Co.,  38-42  Clifford  St.,  Toronto. 
Ritchie  &   Sons,   Ltd..   William. 
Valentine  &   Sons  Publishing   Co.,  Montreal. 

SCHOOL    AND    OFFICE    RULERS 

Lucas-Tuttle  Mfg.  Co.,  Silver  Springs,  N.Y. 
Wescott-Jewell  Co.,  Seneca  Falls,  N.Y. 

SHEET    MUSIC. 

Anglo-Canadian  Music  Pub.  Assn.,  144  Vic- 
toria  St.,   Toronto. 

Chappell    Co.,   134S   Yonge  St.,    Toronto. 

Hawkes  &  Harris  Co.,  Toronto. 

McKinley  Music  Co.,  1501-15  East  Fifty-Fifth 
St.,  Chicago. 

STANDARD    COMMERCIAL   PUBLICATIONS. 

'nrton,   Phillips   &  Co.,  Montreal. 
The  Copp,   Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 
Buntin,   Gillies  &  Co.,   Hamilton. 
Eaton,  Crane  4  Pike,  Pittsfleld,  Mass. 
A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    266    King    St.    W., 
Toronto. 

STATIONERS'   SUNDRIES. 

Brown      Bros.,      Ltd.,      Wholesale      Stationers, 

Toronto. 
Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
l'l'p    Copp,    Clark    Co.,    Wholesale    Stationers, 

Toronto. 
Clark  Bros.  &   Co.,  Ltd.,  Winnipeg,  Man. 
W.    V.    Dawson,    Limited.    Montreal,    Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

STEEL     WRITING     PENS. 

John    Heath,    8    St.    Bride    St.,    E.C,    London. 
Hinks,   Wells  &  Co.,   Birmingham,   Eng. 
Esterbrook    Pen    Co.,    Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,    Tor 

onto,   Canadian   Representatives. 
A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    266    King    St.    W.. 

Toronto- 
Spencerian  Pen  Co.,  New  York,  N.Y. 


MORDEN  SWIVEL  RINGS 

>■»>.  The  rings  are  used  for  student 

^^^       note    books,    stenographers'    note 

m    ^      blooks,     eyeletted     covers,     metre 

■       W      render    books,    band    books,    cata- 

■    logs,   swatch    books,   all   aorta   of 

a  m    loose    leaf    books ;    and    all    loose 

|\   m        sheets,     charts,     drawings,     blue 

iLM         prints,  maps,  fashion  plates,  cllp- 

^~  pings,       pictures,       post       cards, 

samples,    etc.      Made    in    10    sizes 

from    Vi"    to  '2".     Liberal    discount    to    the 

trade.  Manufactured   Solely  by 

THE  MORDEN  MFG.  CORPORATION 
Waterbury,    Conn. 


PATRIOTIC  SONGS 

are  still  in  active  demand.  There  is 
good  profit  in  them.  We  supply  the 
following  at  8c. 

We'll  Never  Let  the  Old  Flag  Fall. 
The  most  successful  Canadian  song 
ever  published.  Over  100,000  copies 
sold  -  -  -  -  -  -     15c 

By  Order  of  the  King.  A  new  song 
by  the  same  composers.    16,000  sold     15c 

I'll  Not  Forget  You,  Soldier  Boy.  A 
very  popular  new  song.  -1th  thousand     15c 

Our  Own  Canadian  Boys.  3rd  thou- 
sand ------     15c 

Soldiers    of   the    King.     50,000    sold       -     15c 

Call  of  the  Motherland.  10th  thou- 
sand ------     16c 

There's  a  Fight  Going  On.  7th  thou- 
sand -  -  -  -  -  -     15c 

You  Bet  Your  Life,  We  All  Will  Go. 
2nd    thousand.      New         -         -         -15c 

NEW 

Canada,   Fall  In         -         -         -  -  15c 

On    to    Victory  -  15c 

There's  a   Corner  of  the  Flag  for   Y'ou 

to  Hold  15c 

Kiss   Your    Soldier   Boy    Good-bye  15c 

ANGLO-CANADIANIMUSIC  CO. 

144    Victoria    Street,    Toronto,    Ontario 


|  RELIABLE 
SERIES 


Christmas  Card  Buyers 

Should  not  fail  to  order 

WM.  RITCHIE  &  SONS 

Limited 

of    Edinburgh,     Scotland 

CANADIAN  SERIES 

Samples    in    the    hands     of     the 

principal  jobbers,  or  write  A.  O. 

HURST,    32   Front    Sreet     West 

Toronto 


McFarlane  Son  & 
Hodgson,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationers 
and    Paper  Dealers 

14  St.  Alexander  St.  -  Montreal 


TICKET   and  CONDUC- 
TOR PUNCHES 

thr  best  made 

The  Fred  J.  Meyers  Mfg.  Ce. 

HAMILTON.  OHIO,  U.S.A. 


47 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


BUYERS'  GUIDE 


RULERS 

"THE  UP-TO-DATE  LINE" 

A  complete  line  for  the  School  Supply  Dealer 
and  Stationer. 

Write  for  Samples  and  Prices. 

Up-To-Date  Advertising  Co. 

Dept.  C,  CANISTEO,  N.Y. 

T.  E.  Tuttle,  Met.  Ruler  Dept. 


TALLY  CARDS,  DANCE  PROGRAMMES, 

Verdler,  Ltd.,  18  Christophei  St..  London.  E.C. 
TOYS    AMI    GAMES 

A.  C.  Gilbert  Co.,  New  Haven,  Conu. 
Menziea  &    Co.,    Limited,   Toronto. 
|  Modellit   Mfg.   Co.,   19   Brunswick   St.,   Bristol, 
England. 

TYPEWRITER     RIBBONS     AND     CARBONS. 

Mittag  &  Volger,   Park   Ridge,   N.J. 

.1.    A.    Heale    *    Co.,    96    John    St.,    New    York, 


The  STANDARD 

Memorandum 

Calendar 

The  best  and  most  pop- 
ular on  the  market. 

Write  for  prices,  etc. 

Edward    Kimpton   Co. 

Wholesale  Stationers 
60  John  St.       New   York 


An  Advertisement 

in  the 

Buyers'  Guide 

Department 

will 

give    you    highly   effective 

publicity  at  minimum 

cost. 


The  Binder  of  Today 

Made  in  U.  S.  A. 

j£CBfe 

SPRING  BINDER 

Elbe  File  &  Binder  Co. 

97  Reade  St.,*      New  York 


Ink- 
stands 

of  all  styles 

Manufactured  by 

FRANK  A.  WEEKS  MFG.  CO. 

93  John  St.,  NEW  YORK  CITY,   N.Y. 
Canadian  Jobbers   handle  our  lines. 


CLASSIFIED  ADVERTISING 


Advertisements  under  this  heading,  2c  per 
word    per    insertion. 

Where  replies  come  to  our  care  to  be  for- 
warded, five  cents  must  be  added  to  cost  to 
cover  postage,  etc. 


BOOKSELLERS  AND  STATIONERS  OF 
Canada — The  best  paying  line  you  can  take 
up  is  an  agency  for  the  Castle  series  of  Pri- 
vate and  Autograph  Christmas  Cards.  Splen- 
did discounts  offered.  Samples  ready  June, 
sent  post  and  duty  free.  Write  at  once  to 
The  Castle  Publishing  Co.,  Cheapside,  Preston, 
England,  and  make  sure  of  samples  being  re- 
served for  you. 


PAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK.  TRADE  SUP- 
plied  by  all  Leading  Wholesale  Drug  Houses 
In  the  Dominion.  Received  Highest  Award 
Medal  and  Diploma  at  Centennial,  Philadel- 
phia, 1876;  World's  Pair,  Chicago,  1893,  and 
Province  of  Quebec  Exposition,  Montreal.  1897. 

DEALERS  WANTED.— BOOKSELLERS  AND 
stationers  can  add  a  profitable  new  line  by 
featuring  Japanese  prints.  -Get  further  par- 
ticulars by  communicating  with  "Jap-Art"  c/o 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  143  University  Ave., 
Toronto. 

BRITISH      FIRM      MAKING      GAMES      AND 

toys  at  popular  prices,  need  agent  to  sell 
wholesale  houses  in  Canada.  Goods  are  up- 
to-date  and  sell  readily.  Write:  Games,  c|o 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  University  Avenue, 
Toronto. 


BRITISH  FIRM  OF  ART  PRINTERS  AND 
Publishers  with  extensive  and  up-to-date  line, 
need  agent  or  traveler  for  Canada.  Goods  sell 
to  stationers,  art  dealers,  picture  frame  manu- 
facturers, etc.  Write:  Pictures,  e|o  Bookselier 
and   Stationer,  University  Avenue,  Toronto. 


POSITION  WANTED 


POSITION  WANTED  BY  EXPERIENCED 
traveller  acquainted  with  the  book,  sta- 
tionery and  fancy  goods  trade  of  Ontario. 
Have  good  knowledge  of  school  and  library 
work.  First-class  references.  Address  Travel- 
ler, care  of  Bookseller  and   Stationer. 


Winning  the  Buyer's  Favor 


The  best  possible  buyer  is  not  made  an' actual  buyer  at  a  single  step. 
It  is  one  thing  to  win  the  buyer's  favor  for  an  article  and  another  to  make  ad- 
justments incident  to  closing  the  sale.    Winning  the  buyer's  favor  is  the  work 
of  trade  paper  advertising. 

Under  ordinary  conditions  it  should  not  be  expected  to  do  more. 


48 


MOO  k  S  KJL  L  E  K     A  N  I)     S  T  A  T  J  O  N  E  K 


Tie  up  with  goods   backed   by   a 

selling  reputation 

IT'S  good  policy.     The  profit-making   "come-back"  sales  such  linos  produce 
will  pull  bigger  business  your  way,    giving  yon  that  most  important  of  all 
business  assets,  satisfied  customers. 

You  cannot  sell  a  more  dependable  or  a  more  satisfaction-giving  line  than 

Mittag&Volger  Typewriter  Ribbons  and  Carbons 

The  service  that  these  winners  give  puts  dollars  of  extra  profit  in  your  cash  drawer. 

The  M.  &  V.  Catalog  will  show  you  the  open  doo  r  to  better  customer-satisfaction.    Our  prices  are 
right.    Drop  us  a  card  to-day. 

MITTAG  &  VOLGER,  INC. 


SOLE  MANUFACTURERS  FOR  THE  TRADE 


Principal  Offices  and  Factories,  PARK  RIDGE,  N.  J.,  U.S.A. 

BRANCHES 

NEW  YORK.  N.Y.,  261  Broadway  CHICAGO.  ILL..  205  West  Monroe  St.  LONDON.  7  &.  8  Dyers  Bide..  Holbom.  E.C. 

AGENCIES  IN  EVERY  PART  OF  THE  WORLD;  IN  EVERY  CITY  OF  PROMINENCE 


NATIONAL 


PERMANENT 

DECEMBER,  1916 


TRANSFER   BINDER 

The  posts  being  sectional,  this  makes  a 
complete  transfer  volume,  from  y2  inch 
up  to  6.  Filled  binders  will  stack 
evenly,  saving  shelf  room.  Bound  in 
full  blue  slate  canvas,  over  heavy 
beveled  boards. 


NATIONAL  BLANK  BOOK  CO. 

HOLYOKE,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


Mucilages  and  Paste 
are  Made  in  Canada 


Catalogues  mailed  to  the  trade  on  request. 


Canadian  Factory  and  Offices    at 


9-11-13  Davenport  Road 


Toronto 
t 


BOOKSELLKR  AND  STATIONER 


Sanfin,  Gillies  6  Co. 


HAMILTON 


LlMITE   D 


CANADA 


UNTIN,    GILLIES    AND    COMPANY, 

Limited,  extend  to  the  trade  their  thanks  for 
liberal  patronage  and  generous  forbearance 
during  1916,  a  year  of  unprecedented  diffi- 
culties. They  sincerely  trust  that  the  coming 
year  may  mark  the  dawn  of  a  new  and 
greater  era  of  prosperity  in  which  the 
Stationery  Trade  may  share  to  the  fullest 
extent. 


> 


I 


1 


* 


! 


START  THE  YEAR  RIGHT 

Look  up  your  needs  in 

OFFICE  SUPPLIES 


Loose  Leaf  Ledgers 
Loose  Leaf  Binders 
Loose  Leaf  Price  Books 
Card  Index  Cabinets 
Card  Index  Supplies 


Archive  Files 
Archive  Binding  Cases 
Vertical  Filing  Cabinets 
Blank  Books  of  all  kinds 
Typewriting  Papers 


Carbon   Papers,  etc.,  etc. 


HAMILTON 


CANADA 


K 


I 


I 


liHH 


AND 


OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 


The  only  publication  in  Canada  devoted  to  the- Book,  Stationery  and  Kindred 
Trades,  and  for  thirty-one  years  the  recognized  authority  for  those   interests. 

MONTREAL,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Bank  Bldg.     TORONTO,  143-153  University  Ave.         WINNIPEG,  22  Royal  Bank  Bldg.       LONDON,  ENG.,  88  Fleet  St.,  E.C. 


VOL.  XXXIII. 


PUBLICATION     OFFICE:     TORONTO,     FEBRUARY,      1917 


No.  2 


Sanford  &  Bennett 
— FOUNTAIN  PENS— 


S.  &B. 
AUTOPEN 


So  Well  Made  They  Make  Trade 


Unless  the  fountain  pens  you  are  hand- 
ling, sell  and  re-sell  to  the  same  people. 
your  pen  department  is  losing  its  most 
productive  sales-aid:  the  mouth-to-mouth 
advertising  of  satisfied  users. 

Sanford  &  Bennett  Fountain  Pens  arc 
such  perfect  writing  instruments  that 
customers  who  use  one  are  sure  to  want 
another,  and  will  enthusiastically  tell 
others  to  get  the  same  kind. 


For   these   popular-prieed    pens   are   ex- 
pertly made  to  give  satisfaction. 


ELigh-grad< 


throughout,  with  no  extra 
cost  for  their  exclusive  and  practical 
improvements  which  give  them  their 
superior  writing  qualities. 

Positively  non-leakable — always  ready  to 
write.  Each  pen  fully  guaranteed.  Fast 
sellers  —  sure  re-sellers.  Return  you  a 
good  profit,  and  make  a  quick  turnover. 


Write  to-day  for  Prices  and  Discounts. 

Sanford  &  Bennett  Co.,  51-53  Maiden  Lane,  New  York 

W.  E.  COUTTS,  Canadian  Sales  Agent,  266  King  Street  West,  Toronto,  Ont. 

S.  &B. 
GRAVITY- 
STYLO 


B  0  0  K  SE  LLE  K     AND     STATIONER 


19  perfect  degrees 

Venus 

lO*  PENCIL 

for  every  possible  purpose 


the  whole  story 

17  black  decrees 

and  2  copying- 
all  purposes- 
all  perfect! 


The 

b  i   g 

pencil 

in    the 

artistic,    the 

technical,   the 

professional,    the 

business   and    the 

scholastic  world,  is 

VENUS. 


The  reason  for  this  is 
that    artists,    architects, 
draftsmen,  engineers,  doc- 
tors,   lawyers,    merchants, 
salesmen,   students    and    all 
who  require  the  very  highest 
quality    have   learned    by   trial 
that   of   all    pencils    VENUS    is 
peerless. 

Your  customers  kaow  VENUS  pencils. 
They   are   familiar   with    the    distinctive 
water  mark  finish  because  they  use  VENUS 
pencils  daily. 

VENUS    pencils  are   in   strong  demand.     We 
suggest  that  you  make  certain 
that  you  have  a  sufficient  supply 
on    hand  — and   remember  — you'll 
need  more  VENUS  in  1917  than  1916 
because  the  popularity  of  these  per- 
fect pencils  is  steadily  increasing. 

Samples,   Catalog,   Prices  and 
Dealer's  Helps  on  Application 


American  Lead  Pencil  Company 

220  Fifth  Ave.,  New  York  City   and  Clapton,  London,  Eng. 


BOO  KS  EL  L  E  R     A  N  D     ST  A  TIO  N  E  \l 


BRUCE  BAIRNSFATHER 

Bairnsfather  Cartoons 
on  Goodall's  Playing  Cards 

THE  LATEST  AND  MOST  POPULAR 
LINE  WE  HAVE  YET  PRODUCED. 

You  have  heard  of  Bairnsfather — the  war  cartoonist 
whose  humorous  war  skits  are  already  world-famous.  But 
do  you  know  that  Goodall  's,  ever  on  the  lookout  for  new 
ideas,  are  now  producing  a  series  of  playing  cards  with 
artistic  reproductions  of  some  of  Bairnsfather 's  best 
work? 

Price  in  England  Is.  9d.  (42c).  Jobbers  here  sell  them 
$4.00  doz. 

Here's  something  decidedly  novel,  something  to  catch 
the  popular  fancy,  Goodall  Quality  and  Bairnsfather 
Humor — a  selling  combination  Unequalled. 
Other  N'civ  Issues  include  8  new  designs  in  our  SOCIETY 
series  and  4  new  ideas  in  the  SALON  line. 
15  New  and  Attractive  Designs  in  the  "Society," 
' '  Salon ' '   and   ' '  Sultan ' '    Series. 

The  Patriotic  Series  is  one  of  Goodall's  best.     For  sheer 
artistic     merit,     correct     finish     and     unequalled     wearing 
qualities  the  Patriotic  line  stands  alone. 
Our  Patriotic  Series  are  having  a  big  sale. 

Make  OoodaWs  Playing  Cards  a  real  selling 
tine,  a  dependable  profit  maker  by  stocking, 
displaying  and  constantly  pushing  them  — 
the  playing  cards    the   people  prefer.     Ask 

your    inhhi  ,-. 

M  IDE    I\    i:\ui.  I  \  n. 

AUBREY  O.  HURST 

32   FRONT  STREET  WEST,  TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


For  The  Year  1917 


MADE  IN  CANADA 


We  call   special    attention 
of  our  department 

Account  Books 

We  manufacture  and  aim 

to  have  a  most  complete 

stock  of 

Blank  Books 

Memo,  Price  and  Address  Books. 

Loose  Leaf  Ledgers, 
Binders  and  Specialties. 

Column  Books  —  6, 8, 10, 16, 20, 24 

columns,  open  ends  and  sides. 

Memorandum  Books -Endless  variety. 


Our  Special  Line  1420 


Half  Russia, 
Green  Cloth  Sides 

All  Sizes  and  Rulings. 
Has  Big  Sale. 


SPECIAL  PATTERNS  MADE  TO  ORDER 

BROWN  BROS.,  limited 


Simcoe  and  Pearl  Streets 


TORONTO 


,.- . .  ...,,1 .  , — „  —, — .,......,,.....,..,. — ....._, .,„..,,„■. I,,  ,1 1.,., ,.,, .,,„... „ — „ 

ANTI-DUST 


COMPRESSED  CRAYON 

Your  stock  is  not 
complete  unless 
you  carry — 

GOLD  MEDAL 
CRAYONS 

"for  every  use" 


I 


Write  us  for  free 
sample  line  and 
illustrated  catalog. 


Binney&  Smith 
Company 

81-83  Fulton  Street 
New  York 


f   ^^  TRADE  ■'  1 


FZ°MM\$ 


Eig 


HT1U 


j.7  Colors 


SCHOOLT^nRAYONS 

F0RJ^cyrioNAL  coio^ORKj 


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BRITISH 

TOYS 


PISTOLS 
SOLDIERS 
MILITARY  TOYS 


DOLLS 

GAMES 

NOVELTIES 


Representing 

BRITISH  TOY  FACTORIES 


CORRESPONDENCE   TO 

CHARLES  W.  BAKER 

Northampton  St.,  Essex  Rd., 
London,  N.,  Eng. 

Showroom  : 

Armfield's  Hotel,  South  Place,  Moorgate,  E.C. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     S  T  A T I O  N  E R 


I 


For  Big  Spring  Business 

See  this  list  of  Big,  New,  Sell-able  Books.     They  pro 
vide  splendid  opportunity  for 


i 


THE  PREACHER 


CEDAR  MOUNTAIN 

ERMEST  .THOMPSON  SETON 


Big  Spring  Business  for  you. 


"'Gabricili  Yaujms 


V 


Zfce  Stars  in 
theirCburses 

<&  IfildaMSfarp 


New  Fiction 


BINDLE.     By  Herbert  Jenkins. 

You  can  recommend  this  as  being  as  humorous  as 
"David  Harum."  Twenty  thousand  co-plea  were  sold 
In  England  in  seven  weeks.  It  is  going  to  have  an 
enormous  run  in  Canada.  Better  stoek  up  on  it.  -  $1.25 
UNDERTOW.     Kathleen  Norris. 

Another  of  Mrs.  Norris'  popular  and  big-selling  novels. 
You  know  what  Kathleen  Norris'  name  means  to  your 
customers.  .......         $1.25 

BINDWEED.     By  Gabrielle  Tailings. 

This  is  one  of  the  strong  new  British  novels  which  has 
already  run  to  five  editions.  It  is  exceedingly  appeal- 
ing and  sihould  be  self-advertising.        -        -        -        $1.26 

THE  RISE  OF  LEDGAR  DUNSTAN. 

A.  T.   Sheppard. 

As  the  London  "Times"  says:  "This  volume  of  sur- 
prise has  swept  us  off  our  feet.  Exposition  is  power- 
less before  the  book."     An  unusual  novel.       -       -      $1.25 

THE  BALANCE.     By  Francis  R.  Bellamy. 

A  renlly-truly  love  story  which  will  strongly  recom- 
mend   itself.         -------         $1.35 

THE  HUNDREDTH  CHANCE.     Ethel  M.  Dell. 
A   new   long   novel    by    the   author   of    "The    Way    of   an 
Eagle,"    "Bars   of   Iron."  etc.         -  $1.35 

THE  STARS  IN  THEIR  COURSES.    H.  M.  Sharp. 

A    book    which    should    be   as    widely    read 
as    the    Ethel     M.     Dell    novels.        -        $1.25 

THE  PREACHER  OF  CEDAR 
MOUNTAIN.    Ernest  Thompson  Seton. 
Canadians   especially    will    be   interested    in 
Mr.    Seton's    new- 
est  novel.    This   is 
a      story      of     the 
open   country,   and 
h  i  s       experiences 
with    the    author's 
k  n  n  w  1  e  d  g  e     of 
nature     and      wild 
life. 
THE  BREATH 

OF 
THE    DRAGON. 

A.   H.    Fitch 
\  n     unusual     ro- 
mance   of   modern 
China. 


Ohe 

BALANCE 

PKANCIS  R.BELLAMY 


New  War  Books 

'NEATH  VERDUN.    By  Maurice  Genevoix. 

"Truly  a  wonderful  book,  showing  the  French  soldier 
in  his  weakness  as  well  as  in  bis  strength.  .  .  .  One 
of  the  comparatively  few  books  which  will  be  re-read 
and   handed  on   to  posterity."         -  $1.25 

THE  UNBROKEN  LINE.     H.  Warner  Allen. 

The  author  is  the  representative  of  the  British  Press 
with  the  French  Armies.  From  this  may  be  imagined 
the  opportunity  he  has  had.  He  has  been  over  every 
Section  of  "the  unbroken  line."  In  consequence  the 
bunk  contains  a  great  deal  of  material  that  is  exceed- 
ingly   out   of   the   ordinary.         ....         $1.35 


MAPLE  LEAVES  IN  FLANDERS'   FIELDS. 

By  Herbert  Rae. 

A  thrilling  and  interesting  recital  of  the  part  taken  by 
the  Canadians  in  the  Flanders  struggle.  The  author  is 
an    officer   with    the    Canadian   forces.         -         -         $1.25 

INSIDE  THE  GERMAN  EMPIRE. 

By  Herbert  Bayard  Swope. 

Can    Germany   make  peace  now? 

Are   the  Germans   losing   heart? 

How   goes   life  in   Germany? 

These  and  a  host  of  similar  questions  are 
answered  by  one  who  has  bad  unusual 
opportunities  to  deal  with   them.       -       $2.25 


These  are  only  a 
few  of  the  splen- 
did things  on 
our  Spring  List. 
If  a  copy  of  our 
semi-  annual 
folder  has  not 
yet  reached  you 
we  will  gladly 
send  one  on,  on 
h  ea  ring  from 
you. 


WILLIAM  BRIGGS,  Publisher 


Queen  and  John  Streets 


TORONTO,  ONT. 


B  R  i  GO S 


15  ()  ()  K  SELL  E  U     A  N  I )     S  T  A  T  IONER 


British  Bible  Makers  Supreme 

THE  BIBLE  SITUATION 

Over  90  per  cent,  of  the  Bibles  imported  into  Canada  arc  British-made. 

Just  as  certain  countries  or  certain  districts  in  those  countries,  have  pre- 
dominated the  trade  of  the  world  in  particular  lines  of  manufactured 
goods,  so  it  is  that  Britain  to-day  stands  supreme  in  the  making  of  Bibles. 
She  has  for  centuries  led  the  world  in  their  production  and  British  Char- 
acter, Spirit  and  Training  will  maintain  that  supremacy. 

The  situation  in  the  leather  market  as  well  as  other  causes,  have  necessi- 
tated advances  in  the  price  of  Bibles,  but  these  advances  are  not  so  great 
with  British  as  with  American  Bibles. 

If  any  American  Bible  publishers  or  their  representatives  say  to  you: 
"Buy  American  Bibles  because  Britain  is  short  of  Leather,"  consider 
these  facts:  The  British  Government  to-day  controls  the  leather  market 
of  the  world.  Consequently,  British  manufacturers  are  in  a  better  posi- 
tion than  foreign  makers. 

British  Bibles  have  always  sold  at  lower  prices  than  American  Bibles 
and  will  continue  .to  do  so. 

The  Canadian  public  knows  that  British  Bibles  are  superior  and  will  not 
buy  any  others. 

Cambridge  Bibles  are  the  Best 

NEW      MODERN      UP-TO-DATE 

Cambridge  Bibles  sales  in  Canada  have  increased  very  rapidly.  Our 
orders  sent  to  Britain  in  1916  amounted  to  twice  the  total  business  done 
in  1915,  and  three  times  the  total  of  any  previous  year's  sales  of  Cam- 
bridge Bibles  in  Canada. 

The  Cambridge  University  Press  have  a  sufficient  stock  of  leather  on 
hand  to  take  care  of  1917. 

George  Stewart  is  the  recognized  Bible  man  of  Canada.  He  looks  after 
our  Bible  trade  and  personally  looks  after  the  interests  of  each  individual 
customer. 

Hold  your  Bible  Orders  for  Our  Travellers. 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stewart,  Limited 

PUBLISHERS  .*.  266-268  King  Street  West  .\  TORONTO 


BOOKS  E  LLEH     AND     STATfo  N  E  li 


MG&S 


MG&S 


M 
G 
& 

S 


M 
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& 

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M 
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& 
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M 
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& 
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M 
G 
& 

S 


M 
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M 
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& 

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Ready 
February  24th 

A  second  brilliant  war  book  by 
Palmer,  more  remarkable  than 
the  first,  of  which  many  editions 
have  been  sold. 

MY  SECOND  YEAR 
OF  THE  WAR 

12mo,  Cloth,  $1.50  net 

Mr.  Palmer  has  devoted  three  chapters  to  the  Canadians  and 
every  Canadian  will  want  to  read  this  first-hand  account  of 
the  greatest  of  all  war  correspondents  of  the  part  taken  by 
Canada's  sons  in  the  recent  fighting  on  the  Somme. 


Palmer  now  gives  the  results  of  his  second 
year  on  the  Western  Front. 

Booksellers  will  recall  the  unprecedented 
record  of  sales  made  by  his  first  war  book 
and  should  see  to  it  that  they  get  an  ade- 
quate supply  of  the  first  edition  of  this 
new  book,  so  as  to  be  prepared  for  the 
big  demand  that  its  appearance  will  imme- 
diately create. 

Put  them  in  your  Show  Window  and  make 
this  Display  so  striking  that  all  will  see  it. 
Thus  you  will  create  Immediate  Sales. 
You  can  make  this  a  Big  Month  for  Book 
Sales  by  Pushing  this  Big  Book! 
AN  OPPORTUNITY  —  DON'T  MISS  IT! 


Mr. 

Pal 

mer 

emerging 

from 

a  (,' 

•rn 

an   dueout 

just 

cap 

ur 

rd 

by     the 

Engl 

th 

at 

Moquet 

Farm 

"  He 

ha 

,, 

en     more 

war 

the 

n 

a 

ly    other 

living   At 

ner 

lean   writ- 

er," 

ays 

Ro 

■zelt. 

Mr.  Palmer  is  recognized  the  world  over 
as  one  of  the  greatest  living  authorities  on 
war,  and  his  chapter  on  the  Somme   front 

will  be  photographed  upon  the  heart  of  every  reader.  He  makes 
clear  all  the  latest  processes  of  the  fighting  which  have  char- 
acterized the  decisive  effort  to  break  the  Western  front. 
For  those  who  are  following  the  war  closely  and  would  know 
what  the  method  of  procedure  will  be  in  the  next  great  attack 
this  is  the  book,  for  it  describes  in  detail  the  processes  of  the 
last  campaign,  which  will  be  those  of  the  next. 
Xo  other  observer  has  had  such  a  chance  to  see  what  has  gone 
on  along  the  battle  fronts  of  the  British  and  French  armies, 
and  the  inside  workings  of  their  forces. 

His  graphic  pen  pictures  of  the  armies  in  action  will  live  long 
in  memory.  No  matter  what  books  are  written  about  the  war, 
Frederick  Palmer  's  will  be  among  the  permanent  chronicles. 


The  Chapter  Headings  of  "My  Second  Year  of  the  War" 


T. 

Back  to  the  Front. 

XI. 

The      Brigade      That 

XXII. 

The      Mastery     of     the 

11. 

in. 

Verdun  and  its  Sequel. 
A     Canadian     Innova- 
tion. 

Ready  for  the  Blow. 

XII. 

Went  Through. 
The   Storming   of   Con- 
ta-maison. 

XXIII. 

Air. 
A     Patent    Curtain    of 
Fire. 

IV. 

XIII. 
XIV. 

A  Great  Attack. 
The  Cavalry  Goes  In. 

XXIV. 

XXV. 

Watching  a   Charge. 
Canada  is  Stubborn. 

v. 

VI. 

The  Blow. 

First     Results     of     the 
Somme. 

XV. 
XVI. 

Enter  the  Anzacs. 
The   Australians  and   a 
Windmill. 

XXVI. 
XXVII. 

The  Tank  Arrives. 
The    Tanks    in    Action. 

VII. 

Out   of   the    Hopper   of 

XVII. 

The  Hateful  Ridge. 

XXVIII. 

Canada  .s  Quick. 

Battle. 

XVIII. 

A  Truly   French   Affair. 

XXIX. 

The     Harvest     of     Vil- 

V III . 

Forward   the   Guns. 

XIX. 

On  the  Aerial  Ferry. 

lages. 

IX. 

When  the  French  Won. 

XX. 

The     Ever     Mighty 

XXX. 

Five  Generals  and  Ver- 

X. 

Along     the      Road      to 

Guns. 

dun. 

Victory. 

XXI. 

Bv  the  Wav. 

XXXI. 

An  Revoir,  Somme! 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stew  art,  Limited 

PUBLISHERS  V  266-268  King  Street  West  V  TORONTO 


M 
G 
& 

S 


M 
G 
& 
S 


M 
G 
& 

S 


M 
G 
& 
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M 
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& 

S 


MG&S 


MG&S 


MG&S 


MG&S 


MG&S 


P.  <  >  <  >  K  S  E  L  L  E  R     AND     STATIONER 


In  thanking  the  Trade  for  their  kindly  interest  in  our  publications, 
we  take  the  opportunity  to  advise  them  that 

Messrs.  McClelland,   Goodchild  &  Stewart 

are  now  acting  as  oiir  exclusive  travelling  representatives.  They  will  carry  samples  of 
our  standard  and  new  lines.  It  is  needless  I'm-  any  publisher  to  ask  that  the  Trade  of 
Canada  extend  consideration  and  courteous  attention  to  publishers'  representatives — 
this  is  given  readily  and  generously  without  solicitation. 

Theslightly  increased  costs — with  special  advantages  for  travellers'  orders — are  regret- 
led,  bul  essential,  owing  to  the  rapidly  increasing  costs  of  production,  scarcity  of  labour 
and  material,  especially  gold  and  leather.  Special  provision  is  heing  made  to  assure  the 
Trade  in  the  matter  of  "margins"  in  spite  of  the  conditions,  of  which  detail-  will  he 
given  by  the  travellers. 

Some  of  our  leaders:  "EVERYMAN'S  LIBRARY,"  721  titles,  in  4  styles  of  binding. 
"WAYFARER'S  LIBRARY,"  100  titles,  in  2  styles  of  binding,  including  the  famous 
Gardiner  Books,  over  50,000  of  which  have  been  sold  in  Canada  to  date.  "TEMPLE 
SHAKESPEARE,"  still  the  peer  of  them  all.  "EVERYMAN'S  ENCYCLOPAEDIA." 

100.01)0  sets  sold  to  date. 

J.  M.  DENT  &  SONS,  ULTM%ffsr  TORONTO 


Special 
Announcement 


1  will  shortly  be  calling  on  the  trade  in 
Canada  representing  the  following  English 
Manufacturers: — 

Thos.  De  La  Rue  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto 

J.  S.  Downing  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  Birmingham 

W.  Wood  &  Sons,  Ltd.,  London 

In  addition  T  have  been  appointed  Man- 
ager for  HAROLD  COPP,  33  Richmond  St, 
W.,  Toronto,  and  will  have  samples  of  the 

publications  of: — 

Messrs.  Blackie  &  Son,  Ltd.,  Glasgow 
Messrs.  Morgan  &  Scott,  Ltd.,  London 

All  communications  should  be  addressed  to 

HECTOR    PRENTER 

33  RICHMOND  STREET  W.,  TORONTO 


TERRY'S 

Patented  and   Registered 

Pen  or  Pencil  Clip 

clips  edge  of   pocket, 
pen  or  pencil  is  inserted 
into  an  expanding  spring. 
It's  a  wonderful  seller, 
and  it's  British.     Send  for 
samples — for  after  the  war. 


Herbert  Terry  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

The  Spring  and  Presswork  Specialists 
REDDITCH      ENGLAND 


We  have  had 
over  60  years' 
experience  in 
spring  making 


HOLD  THE  LINE 


(Registered) 


London  (  Eng.  J 
Export  Agency, 
8  St.  Bride  St., 
LONDON,  E.C. 


Here's  the  line  to  hold — 
John  Heath's  Telephone 
Pen.  You  will  not  hold  it 
long  because  it  sells  so 
quickly.  There's  quality 
about  it.  It  writes 
smoothly,  never  corrodes, 
and  lasts  long.  Get  con- 
nected with  the  Telephone 
Pen  for  quick  sales. 

S«ppl'ed 

61/  all  tin- 

leading 

u- hi  >lc 

sale 

houses    in 

Toronto 

and 
Montreal 


ISOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


For  Quality,  Price  and 
Satisfaction  in 

Stationery  and 
Office  Supplies 

You  hit  the  mark  when  you 
buy  the  Dawson  line. 

Our  line  of 

BLANK  BOOKS 

ENVELOPES 

LOOSE    LEAF  BINDERS 

All  kinds  of  OFFICE  and 
STATIONERY  SUPPLIES 

is  complete. 

Large  or  small,  your  order 
will  have  immediate  and  best 
attention. 


1\^DxM^tV 


Montreal 


Toronto 


Winnipeg 


He  Came  In  to  Buy  Pens— He  Went  Out  With 
Pens.    Paper,    Ink,    Blank   Books,    Etc. 

The  salesman  knew  Unit  if  lie  used  pens,  he  used 
ink,   paper,   pencils,  etc. 

One  suggestion  led  to  another,  and  the  salesman 
increased  his  order  from  75  cents  to  $4.15. 
Stationers  who  appreciate  the  possibilities  of  thus 
developing  one  sale  out  of  another  realize  what  a 
tremendous  influence  an  efficiently  conducted  pen 
department  has  on  their  entire  business. 
The  most  profitable  pen  departments  are  those  that 
concentrate  on  one  complete  line,  for  these  reasons: 
You  tie  up  less  money  In  stock,  save  counter  space, 
get  maximum  display,  and  make  it  easier  for  cus- 
tomers  to   buy. 

To  assist  dealers  in  concentrating,  there  are  ten 
different  sizes  of  Esterbrook  Counter  Display  Cases. 
Write   us  to-day  for  complete  information. 

Esterbrook  Pen   Manufacturing   Co. 
18-70   Cooper  Street  Camden,  N.J. 


"Easiest  to  sell ! " 


The  "Hythe"  Series  of  Aids  to  Training* 

(Being  a  Scries  of  Lectures  to  Young  officers) 

No.      1— INFANTRY. 

Drill   and  Attack. 

No.     2 — INFANTRY. 

Defence   and    Protection. 

No.     3 — INFANTRY. 

Night   Operations.      Inter-communication. 
Reconnaissance;    and    Questions    on    Infantry 
Training. 

>„.      i — MUSKETRY. 

Farts  of  Rifle  and  Artion  of  Mechanism.  Care 
of  Arms  and  Ammunition,  Daily  Cleaning  and 
Examination    of    Arms. 

No.     5 — MUSKETRY'. 

Aiming   Instruction    and    Trigger    Fressing. 

No.     (i— MUSKETRY. 

Firing  Instruction.  Landscape  Targets  and 
Yisua!    Training.      Fire    Control    and    Discipline. 

No.      7 — MUSKETRY. 

Range  Finding.  Observation  of  Fire.  Fire 
Control  and    Discipline  and    Sub-Target  Machine. 

>,,.      ? — MUSKETRY. 

Tests  of  Elementary  Training.  Range  Prac- 
tices,   etc. 

No.     !)— MUSKETRY. 

Barr    and    Stroud    Range    Finder. 

No.    10— MUSKETRY. 

Theory   of   Rifle  Fire. 

No.    11— HYGIENE    and    SANITATION. 

Disease.  Hygiene  of  the  Body.  Sanitation. 
Training.  Organization  of  Medical  Units.  First 
Aid. 

No.   12— FIELD   ENGINEERING. 

Explosives.  Arranging  for  Explosives.  Demoli- 
tions.     Bombs.      Gas    Attack.      Bridging:. 

25c.   EACH. 

All    Fully    Illustrated. 

Other     numbers     will     include     Discipline     and     Military 
Law.   Procedure  of  Courts    Martial,   etc. 

W.   S.   PAINE  &   CO.,   Military  Publishers 
HYTHE,  KENT 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stewart,  Ltd. 

266  King  Street  West.  TORONTO,  CANADA 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  K     .Wli     S  T  ATION  E  R  * 


The  finest  selling  line  of 
paper-bound  books  on 
S T REE  1       X  the  market  to-day. 

AND 

SMITH     l  TEN  CENTS  and 
NOVELS  /     FIFTEEN  CENTS 

Over  3,500  Titles 

A  good,  safe  purchase,  not  a  poor  seller  in  the  catalogue;  order  an  assort- 
ment.   Show  them,  and  they  will  sell  themselves. 

We  will  ship  orders  of  500  or  over,  assorted,  direct  from  the  Bindery  in  New 
York,  at  the  handsome  discount  of  50  per  cent.,  you  to  pay  duty  and  freight. 

The  cost  of  paper  is  increasing  daily,  this  discount  of  one  half  is  not  guar- 
anteed ;  it  may  be  cancelled  at  any  moment.    Get  your  order  in. 

Price   Schedule : 

Shipped  from  New  York:  Shipped  from  Toronto: 

Direct  from  Bindery—  Ten  Cent  Books 

Single  copies,       -     -     -     -     7c.  net 
In  lots  of  500  or  over,  assorted-  100  copies,     -----      6tfc.net 

250  copies,       -----    6>£c.  net 

Ten  Cent  Books,  5c.  net  Rfteen  Cent  Books 

rȣj_  n      j.  D       1        n\  Single  copies,     -     -     -     -      He.  net 

Fifteen  Cent  Books,  l\c.  net        100copies, iojic.net 

„   ,         •  250  copies, \0$4c.  net 

Non-returnable,   F.O.B.   New  York 

Non-returnable,  F.O.B.  Toronto 

Freight  and  Duty   Extra.  Freight  or  Express  Extra. 

Catalogues  and  full  information  supplied  on  request. 

WHOLESALE   AGENTS: 

THE  TORONTO  NEWS  COMPANY 

TORONTO  LIMITED 


15  ()  o  K  S  K  .1,  L  E  R     A  N  I)     S  T  A  T  I  0  N  E  R 


The  ALLEN  LINE  for  1917 

We  wish  to    call  the    attention    of    the    trade    to    the 
letters,  reproduced  on  the  succeeding  pages,  from 

Houghton,  Mifflin  &  Co.,        John  C.  Winston  Co., 

Boston.  Philadelphia. 


Rand,  McNally  &  Co., 

Chicago. 


M.  A.  Donohue  &  Co., 

Chicago. 


Our  representatives  will  be  calling  upon  you  with 
these  outstanding  lines  in  the  near  future,  and  we 
hope  you  will  give  them  the  same  hearty  support 
you  did  last  year. 


To  be  Published  February  24th 


a 


LIMPY 


»  THE  BOY  WHO 
FELT  NEGLECTED 


A  book  that  will  go  straight  to  your  heart 

By  WILLIAM  JOHNSTON 


gy  WILLIAM  JOHNSTON 


Irvin  S.  Cobb  says: 

"Somebody  might  have  written  a  truer, 
sweeter,  more  appealing,  more  convincing 
story  of  a  boy  than  'Limpy'  but  nobody  ever 
lias.'" 


Illustrated  by  Arthur  William  Brown. 


$1.35  Net. 


THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher 


BOOKS  OF  MERI 


215-219  VICTORIA    STREET,  TORONTO 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  R    AND     ST  A  Tin  X  E  \l 


IMPORTANT  ANNOUNCEMENT 


January  27,  1917. 

Thomas  Allen,  Esq., 

Toronto,  Canada, 

Dear  Mr.  Allen, 

It    gives    us    great    pleasure    to    have 
completed    arrangements    with   you   for   the    hand- 
ling of   our  Canadian   business,    and    for  the 
publication    in   Canada   of   our   books    under   a 
joint    imprint.  We    believe   that    booksellers 

and    librarians    throughout   the   Dominion   "/ill 
find   the    new  arrangement   decidedly   to    their 
advantage,    and    trust    they   will    give    you  their 
hearty    support . 

V.'ith  best    -riches    for   your   success, 
we    are 

Very    sincerely    yours, 

HOUGHTON   MIFFLIN   COMPANY. 


We  wish    to    advise    the   trade    that    the    above 

announcement  does  not  apply  to  the  Educational 

and    Subscription    Books. 


THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher 

215-219  VICTORIA    STREET,  TORONTO 


10 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


The  John  C.Winston  Co. 

BOOK  PUBLISHERS?PRINTERS  AND   BINDERS 
Winston  Building  I006~I0I6  Arch  St. 

PHILADELPHIA 

January 
19   17 

ANNOUNCEMENT     TO     THE     TRADE 


We  take  pleasure  in  announcing  that  hereafter 
our  line  of   BOOKS  and   INTERNATIONAL  BIBLES  will 
be  handled  EXCLUSIVELY  in  CANADA  by  MR.    THOMAS 
ALLEN  of    Toronto. 

This  arrangement  should  result  in  CLOSER  CON- 
TACT with  the  Canadian  trade  on  our  publications, 
for  which  there  has  been  a  steady  increase  in  de- 
mand,   and   in  more  EFFECTUALLY  MEETING  THE  REQUIRE- 
MENTS of    the  trade.        It  is   also  assurance  to  the 
trade  that  our  publications  will  be  furnished  to 
them  on  MORE  ADVANTAGEOUS  TERMS  than  heretofore. 

Having  the   representation  of   our  line  in  Mr. 
Allen's  competent  hands   is  regarded  by  us  with 
satisfaction  and  we  have  reason  to  believe  will 
be  accepted  in  the  same  spirit  by  the  trade. 

Vary   sincersiy  yours, 

THE  JOHN  C.   WINSTON  CO. 
JUST   PUBLISHED 


The   One   Book  that   Every   Auction   Player   Needs 


The   Authorized  Biography  of   Dr.   Conwell 


HIS 


AUCTION  DECLARATIONS     RUSSELL  H.  CONWELL  ^SS& 


BY  MILTON  C.  WORK 
Including  the  Laws  of  1917 

Based  on  the  new  laws.  Mr.  Work  gives  clearly  and 
concisely  the  exact  information  that  all  classes  of  Auction 
players  desire,  and  also  much  valuable  matter  for  the 
expert.  He  has  explained  the  principles  which  underlie 
every  declaration,  and  has  evolved  a  system  which  makes 
it  easy  to  determine  the  best  bid  to  make  with  any  given 
band.  The  book  contains  many  illustrative  hands,  and 
includes  a  thorough  digest  of  Mr.  Work's  principles  of 
bidding.  A  summary  of  penalties,  a  glossary  and  an  index 
will   also   be  found   useful. 

The     book     alao     contains     the     new     laws     of     Duplicate 
Auction    for   the   season   of   1916-1917. 
288  Pages  Cloth  $1.00  Net 

Edition   DeLuxe,   bound  in   Ooze   Leather, 
Silk   Marker,   Price   $2.00 


BY  AGNES  RUSH  BURR 

Including  the  World-Famous  Lecture, 

"Acres  of  Diamonds" 

The  official  and  authentic  biography  of  this  remarkable 
religious  leader,  educator  and  lecturer,  whose  "Acres  of 
Diamonds"  has  been  delivered  more  times,  and  to  a  greate 
number  of  people,  than  any  other  lecture  in  the  world. 
Full  of  inspiration  and  help  to  all  clergymen,  writers,  lec- 
turers and  church  workers.  The  story  of  the  romantic 
life  tremendous  activities,  and  wonderful  achievements  oi 
Dr.  Conwell  is  admirably  set  forth  by  Miss  Burr,  who 
naa  bad  Dr.  Conwell's  hearty  co-operation,  and  access  to 
many  of  his  private  records  and  papers.  Illustrated  with 
many  photographs,  some  of  which  have  never  been  pul»- 
lisheil    before. 

438   Pages  Cloth  $1.35   Net 


THOMAS   ALLEN,  Publisher 

215-219  VICTORIA   STREET,  TORONTO 


li 


JOOKSELLKK  AND  STATIONER 


wds 


Priaters  ato 


:n"c:o»o*'Oi*vi'Ei>  wits 


v.^.vi-j-r.  nxxxcuiGO" 


i- ii  m  :.« ;<»  •  :* rcw  tuhk- mktjxk* 

316  «j>ttm  Ci 

CfilCAOO  Jan.    23,    1917. 


an  Stiixzt 


ThonfS  Allen, 
21?  Victoria  St., 
Toronto ,  Ont.  , 
Canada 


I.ly  Ee^r  Mr.  Allen: 

We  have  just  closed  up  oar  records 
for  the  past  year  em3  are  more  than  pleased  with  the 
business  obtained  from  Canada,  and  wish  to  congratu- 
late you.  on  your  success  with  our  line.   It  is  also 
very   gratifying  to  know  thrtt  the  REAL  MOTHER  OOOSE 
was  the  best  selling  Juvenile  in  Canada.   From  such 
information  as  we  can  obtain  in  the  United  States  ,it 
was  also  the  best  selling  Juvenile. 

Samples  of  our  new  book  will  soon 
be  in  your  hands,  anr1  we  trust  .they  will  meet  with  the 
same  success  as  those  of  1916, 


year,    we   are 


Kith  best  wishes   for  a   loros^erous 


Yours  very   truly, 


RAIID  2LaHA'LLY  t:   CO. 


Per 


.<LkcJL&^  — 


&£&■ 


FLIicIl/PK 


THOMAS   ALLEN,  Publisher  £^ 

215-219  VICTORIA   STREET,  TORONTO 


(BOOKS  OF  MFRIT 


12 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


M.  A.  DONOHUE  &,  CO. 


D(ARaoR^ 


1  INI  D 

e  ".  ■» 

AND 

l»U 

BLUHERS 

:    a 

4  O 

EDIT 

WORK      A 

U'AC 

RERS      OF 

RN 

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3UPPLII* 

STREET 

CORNER 

OF     POLK 

PUBLISHING     DEPARTMENT 


Mr 


CHICAGO 


January 
27th 
19    17. 


Thomas   /.lien: 
Toronto,    Ont. 
Dear  Mr.    Allen: -- 


Can. 


Are  we  down-hearted?   No!   VJhen  we  review  the 
splendid  business  that  we 'had  throughout  the  entire 
Dominion  last  year,  we  are  not  only  not  down-hearted, 
but  we  are  most  gratified  and  filled  with  a  lively 
optimism  for  the  season  of  1917. 

Despite  the  trememdous  advances  in  the  cost 
of  paper,  press-work,  and  binding,  you  will  be  able 
to  offer  our  lines  of  publication:;  at  prices  that 
will  be  most  attractive  values  to  the  trade  in  the 
Dominion  of  Canada,   We  will  be  particularly  strong 
on  Boys'  and  Girls'  Cloth  Books,  Flexible,  Linen, 
and  Board  Bound  Books,  as  well  as  Quarto  Juveniles. 
We  also  have  a  number  of  Specialty  Gift  Books,  Cloth 
and  Leather. 

We  have  bought  out  the  old,  established  firm 
of  G.  W.  Dillingham  Co.  of  flew  York  City,  who 
published  many  attractive  and  fast-selling  copyrighted 
books.   We  v/ill  continue  their  lines,  enhancing  the 
material  beauty  of  the  books  where  we  can. 

In  addition  to  the  Dillingham  line,  we  are 
in  a  position  to  supply  the  trade  with  a  representative 
line  of  books  of  all  kinds  and  character,  and  at  prices 
that  will  pay  the  dealer  a  profit.   I  am  sure  you  will 
be  able  to  establish  a  business  for  us  in  the  Dominion 
this  year,  and  heartily  appreciating  the  results  of 
last  year,  and  thanking  you,  and  through  you,  the 
book  trade  of  Canada  for  their  loyal  patronage  and 
support,  and  assuring  the  Dominion  trade  of  our 
hearty  cooperation  in  every  way,  we  remain 


Very  cordially  yours, 


M.  A.  Donohue  &  Co 


ITD-ACM. 


^^ 


THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher 

215-219  VICTORIA   STREET,  TORONTO 


13 


I*,  ()  ()  K  S  E  L  L  E  R     A  N  I)     S  T  A  T  I  0  X  E  R 


7  he  Publishing  Event  of  the  Season 
On  March  24  we  will  issue 

The  Road  To 

Understanding 

By  Eleanor  H.  Porter 


A   novel    that   has    all   the   sweetness, 

inspiration  and   human  appeal  of 

"Just  David,"  and  is  in  addition 

a  real  love  story. 

Every  one  who  enjoyed  "Just  David"  will  find  even  greater 
enjoyment  in  this  tale  of  the  romantic  courtship  and  marriage  of 
a  poor  girl  and  a  wealthy  young  man,  of  their  estrangement,  and 
of  the  final  happy  ending  brought  about  by  their  daughter,  for  it 
is  a  story  of  everyday  men  and  women,  told  in  a  way  that  will 
bring  it  close  to  every  reader's  life. 

Airs.  Porter  in  "Pollyanna"  and  "Just  David"  created  two  of 
the  most  famous  child  characters  in  literature.  Now  she  has  turn- 
ed her  remarkable  talent  as  a  story-teller  into  new  fields,  and  we 
have  a  talc  that  will  be  hailed  as  her  greatest  triumph,  and  that 
will  win  to  Mrs.  Porter  an  army  of  new  readers  who  demand  above 
all  a  good  love  story,  and  who  will  find  it  in  this  book. 

Houghton   Mifflin   Company,   Boston 


THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher 

215-219  VICTORIA    STREET,  TORONTO 


14 


H0 OK SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Great       GETTING      U£«ed 

Br"2i5  TOGETHER  — 

By  IAN  HAY 

Author  of"  The  First  Hundred  Thousand'' 


The  author  of  this  notable  new  book,  so  timely  in  view  of  the 
present  situation  in  the  United  States,  was  commissioned  by 
the  British  Government  to  deliver  a  series  of  lectures  in  the 
United  States  to  promote  a  better  understanding  between 
these  two  great  English-speaking  nations. 

His  book  "Getting  Together"  forwards  the  same  cause. 

It  is  in  question  and  answer  form — a  Briton  and  an  American 
alternately  asking  and  answering  questions  raised  by  the  war, 
affecting  the  two  countries. 

Thus  they  come  to  a  better  understanding. 

Canadians  will  be  particularly  interested  in  reading  this  able 
presentation  of  vital  international  questions  and  their 
solution. 

THE   BOOK  OF  THE   HOUR 

Written  in  Ian  I  lav's  inimitable  style. 

50  Cents 

ALL   PROFITS  FROM  THE  SALE  OF  THIS  BOOK 
WILL  BE  DEVOTED    TO   PATRIOTIC  PURPOSES. 


Houghton   Mifflin   Company,   Boston 
»•  THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher     «p 

f>kS  OF  MERIT)  fBOOkS  OFMFHlfV 

_T^  215-219  VICTORIA   STREET,  TORONTO  {J ^P W 


BOOKSELLEB      \  N  I )     S  T  A  T  I  ()  N  E  R 


OP 

c  ) 


Ww**" 


STATEMENT  OK  THE 
BUSINESS   MANAGER 


FEBRUARY,  1917 


VOL    XXXIII  — No.  2 


STATISTICS  arc  now  available  regarding 
Canada's  trade  year  ending  with  Oc- 
tober, 1916,  and  these  significant  figures 

are  revealed: 

Total  exports $1,037,213,597 

Total  imports 716,929,813 

Favorable  trade  balance  .  .  .%    320,283,784 

Canada's  prosperity  is  increasing  as  the  war 
proceeds  and  these  trade  returns  form  a  strik- 
ing example  of  this  country's  strong  position 
despite  the  heavy  war  expenditures. 


Especially  valuable  will  be  a  scries  of  inter- 
views with  and  articles  by  traveling  salesmen 
and  sales  managers,  representing'  manufac- 
turing, publishing  and  jobbing  houses  whose 
goods  are  sold  to  Canadian  booksellers  and 
stationers. 

To  Advertisers 

Make  your  arrangements  early  for  sufficient 
space  in  the  ANNUAL  SPRING  SALES 
NUMBER,  to  ADEQUATELY  present  your 
proposition  to  Canada's  merchants  engaged 
in  the  BOOK,  STATIONERY,  FANCY 
GOODS,  TOY  and  NOVELTY  TRADES. 


In  every  section  of  Canada  booksellers  and 
stationers  had  an  exceptionally  good  year's 
trade  in  1916,  and  the  Northwest  Provinces 
have  overcome  the  depression  in  trade  from 
which  that  section  suffered  in  1914  and  1915. 


Last  year  wound  np  with  unusually  good  holi- 
day  business  throughout  Canada  and  trade 
buoyancy  has  been  maintained  by  reason  of 
good  January  business.    Universal  optimise 
prevails  regarding  1917. 


March  20 


is  the  date  to  remember.    All  copy  is  to  be  in 
l)v  that  date. 


No  Increase  Over  Regular  Rates : 

Full  page  $35.00         Half  page         $20.00 

Quarter  page      12.00         Eighth  page         8.00 

*         *         » 

Book   Your  Order  Now 

Clip  this  coupon,  sign  and  return  it  now  while 
the  question  is  np  and  let  us  know  when  copy 
for  vour  advertisement  will  follow. 


The  work  of  preparing  for  this  year's  Animal 
Spring  Sales  Number  of  BOOKSELLER  and 
STATIONER,  has  begun. 


Subscribers  may  look  forward  to  this  Spring 
number  for  a  rich  presentation  of  good  prac- 
tical articles  in  which  business-building  sug- 
gestions will  predominate,  many  of  them 
based  on  tried  and  proved  experiences  of 
highly  successful  merchants. 


)ate 


1917. 


Bookseller  and  Stationer, 

14:>  University  Ave.,  Toronto. 
Reserve page  space  in  your 

Full,  half,  quarter  or  eiirhth 

Annual  Spring  Sales  Number  for  $ ( Jopy 


will  follow  to  reach  yon  by 

Name 

Address 


(Final   date   March    20) 


14  b 


15  o  OK  SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


1917 

CHIEF  LINES: 

Toy  Books 

Juvenile  Books 

Book  Toys 

Book  Novelties 

Games 

Christmas  Booklets 

Calendars 

Tags  and  Seals 

Postcards 

Playing  Cards 

Children's  Blocks 

Dominoes 

Chess  and  Checkers 


THESE  INCLUDE  LINES  MADE  BY  SEVERAL  LEADING 
AMERICAN  MANUFACTURING  AND  PUBLISHING  CON- 
CERNS IN  ADDITION  TO  THE  EXTENSIVE  RANGE  OF 
GOODS  OF  OUR  OWN  MANUFACTURE. 

In  the  Valentine  book  toys  some  additional  novelties  are  being  added  to  the  line  this  year.  The  first 
samples  to  arrive  are  those  of  the  HOUSE  BOOK  SERIES  and  the  LUCY  ATWELL  BOOKS. 

The  House  Books  show  miniature  reproductions  of  the  homes  of  dogs,  rabbits,  farm  animals,  etc.,  and  to 
each  is  attached  a  toy  book  of  the  regulation  type,  but  having  to  do  particularly  with  the  animals  whose 
houses  are  thus  shown. 

The  trade  will   readily   appreciate  how  these   new  items  will  appeal  to  children. 

The  LUCY  ATWELL  series  can  be  depended  upon  to  be  equally  popular.  These  are  cut-out  toy  books,  the 
cover  page  representing  a  doll,  there  being  a  variety  of  different  ones.  The  distinctively  new  and  original 
idea  introduced  with  these  is  the  fact  that  some  of  these  dolls  wear  caps  and  muffs  of  the  actual  material 
of  which  such  articles  are  frequently  made,  while  others  wear  genuine  hair-ribbons.  This  series  gets  its 
name  from  the  artist  responsible  for  these  doll  designs. 

Other   new  ideas  will  be   shown,  as  well  as  the  fast-selling  book  toy  novelties  introduced  last  year. 

The  popularity  of  these  book  toys  make  them  decidedly  the  toy  books  that  retailers  should  feature  most 
strongly  next  holiday  season.  Our  travelers  will  be  showing  them  on  their  next  trip  along  with  an  even 
better  range  of  goods  for  holiday  selling  than  that  which  we  introduced  so  successfully  Fast  year. 

WAIT  FOR    THE   VALENTINE  MAN! 

Valentine  &  Sons  United  Publishing  Co.,  Limited 


TORONTO 


MONTREAL 


WINNIPEG 


15 


J 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Limited 

TORONTO 
Announce  the 

1917  EXHIBITION 

_ 0f 


Novelties  and  Holiday  Trade 
Specialties  for  Merchants  in 
the  Book,  Stationery  and 
Fancy   Goods    Business 


HIS  YEAR'S  EXHIBITION  opens  March 
15th  and  will  continue  for  six  weeks. 

The  Exhibition  will  again  be  held  on  the 
fifth  floor  of  the  warehouse  at  Wellington  and 
Portland  Streets,  and  will  be  rich  in  goods  that 
will  immediately  appeal  as  good  money-makers  for 
1917  Autumn  and  Holiday  Selling. 

Now,  while  this  subject  is  fresh  in  your  mind, 
drop  a  post  card  giving  a  definite  date  as  to  when 
you  can  arrange  to  attend. 


The  advantages  of  r  attend- 
ing this  Exhibition  are  many, 
but  our  travellers  will 
show  samples  from  Coast 
to  Coast.  If  you  cannot 
come,  wait   for   traveller. 


SEE 

SPECIAL 

ADVERTISE. 

MENT     OF 

SOME     OF 

THE 

,    LEADING 

LINES 

ON 

OPPOSITE 

PAGE 

16 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


C.CuCo. 


PREMIER  LINES 
FOR  HOLIDAY  SELLING 


1917 


Brief  Mention 
of  New  Lines 


A  MARKED  tendency  in 
Christmas  greeting  c  a  r  d 
styles  is  the  growing  prefer- 
ence for  Hat  cards.  This  is  dem- 
onstrated in  the  1917  collections 
of  the  productions  of  the  National 
Art  Co.  No  more  artistic  or  pleas- 
ing conceptions  have  ever  been 
shown  to  the  Canadian  trade. 


It  will  be  appreciated  by  the  trade 
that  these  are  productions  regard- 
ing which  the  sense  of  sight  and 
touch  are  required  in  order  to  con- 
vey adequately  their  points  of 
artistic  merit  and  by  the  same 
token,  their  trade  value.  This  is 
more  than  descriptions  in  cold 
type  can  accomplish. 

That  is  why  we  urge  retailers  to 
come  to  our  big  exhibition  next 
month  or  failing  that,  to  wait  for 
the  arrival  of  one  of  our  travelers 
to  show  them  these  samples,  before 
placing  any  orders  for  1917  Christ- 
mas greeting  cards  or  other  holi- 
day specialties. 


Some  new  ideas  that  you  will  see 
in  this  year's  cards  include  plate- 
sunk,  steel  die,  hand-colored  cards 
introducing  most  artistic  minia- 
ture designs  in  five  colors,  com- 
bined with  decorative  work  em- 
blematic of  Christmas. 

Small  folders,  with  accommoda- 
tion for  the  personal  card  of  the 
sender,  showing  similar  art  de- 
signs and  steel  die  stamped  mes- 
sages. 

Another  distinctively  pleasing  idea 
is  a  series  of  cards  of  pebbled  white 


stock,  exceptionally  heavy,  with  a 
plate-sunk  panel  at  the  left  bear- 
ing small  designs  in  several  colors 
and  with  brief  wording  below  in 
■old,  the  major  part  of  the  space 
being  occupied  by  the  greeting  in 
die-stamped  text  or  script.  These 
Hue  cards  have  beveled  edges. 

An  extensive  range  of  cards  are 
shown  introducing  overlapping 
triangular  Haps,  giving  an  envel- 
ope effect,  the  decorative  design  in 
colors  being  in  tbis  Hap  and  the 
greetings  die-stamped  in  black  on 
the  main  portion  of  the  card. 


Patrician,  Artistic,  Matchless, 
Ideal,  Imperial  and  Patriotic. 

These  collections  so  well  known  to 
the  trade  are  all  strong  this  year. 

Some  cards,  new  this  year,  that 
will  be  big  sellers  with  you,  in- 
clude a  Boxed  Line  of  Celluloids 
at  12V2c,  15c  and  221//2c  wholesale 
which  eclipse  anything  ever  shown 
in  German-made  cards  before  the 
war. 

You  will  want  also  the  Masonic 
greeting  cards  to  retail  at  10c  and 
15c  each. 

• 

Christmas  folders,  with  inserts  and 
cord  ties  costing  lc  EACH  in 
1,000  lots  or  $1.25  a  hundred- 
extraordinary  value ! 

Local  View  Christmas  cards  which 
can  be  had  in  different  shapes  and 
designs  by  ordering  one  gross  of 
one  sized  view. 


Post  Cards 


FOR  the  most  part  there  has 
been  NO  ADVANCE  this 
year  in  the  Cop)),  Clark  Co.'s 
post  cards.  Big  collections  for 
Christmas  and  New  Year's  as  well 
as  Thanksgiving.  Hallowe'en  and 
Birthday  post  cards  embossed  de- 
signs, at  60c  a  hundred  or  $5  a 
thousand. 

17 


Steel  die  post  cards  fur  Christmas 
and  New  Year  seasons  $1  per 
hundred.  $9  per  thousand. 

Birthday,  Christmas  and  New 
Years  post  cards — The  "Embroid- 
ery" Line — a  great  novelty—  en-t- 
ing the  trade  12 '-c.  each — a  line 
In  -ell  at  "25c. 


Other  Novelties 


SACHET  Handkerchief  Fold- 
ers with  Christmas  greeting 
message  on  front.  Trade  price  15c 
each. 

Narcissus  Bulbs,  attractively  boxed, 
at  $8.60  and  $7.20  doz.  boxes. 

Ilinoka  rope — (you  can  depend 
upon  delivery).  Tri-color  crepe 
ribbon,  also  plain  red  dfcd  green. 

Fancy  decorative  paper,  ribbon- 
zene,  tinsel  cord  for  tying,  candles 
and  candle  holders,  tinsel  and 
paper  garlands,  etc.,  garlands  and 
Christmas  tree  ornaments,  tag-, 
seals,  tally  and  place  cards,  etc. 

English  games,  a  great  25c  line; 
metal  photo  frames,  oblong  and 
oval;  manual  constructor,  popular 
sellers,  25c  and  50c  retail;  boxed 
calendars,  from  80c  to  $0  a  dozen, 
including  designs  by  Harrison 
Fisher  at  $6  a  dozen;  Pictur.es, 
from  25c  each  up ;  and  last  hilt 
not  least  a  great  range  and  big 
value  in 

HOLIDAY  PAPETERIES 


"Yours  for  record  1917  business," 

The  COPP 
CLARK  CO. 

LIMITED 

517  Wellington  Street   West 
TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


ARO-A\AC 

LI  NCS 


SELLING  DIRECT  FROM  FACTORIES 


A.R.MacDougall  & 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


Use  this  new  catalogue.    It 

will  help  you  to  sell 

more  pencils. 

It'  you  haven't  received  a  copy  ask  for  one. 

It  is  intended  for  use  with  customers.  It  contains  no 
prices. 

It  describes  the  full  line  of  pencils,  penholders,  lumber 
crayons  and  rubber  erasers. 

You  can  use  this  catalogue  to  advantage  in  selling  your 
customers  and  make  your  own  prices  foe  these  sales. 

We  positively  will  not  sell  consumers  except  through 
the  legitimate  trade.  We  want  to  co-operate  with  the 
dealers  in  marketing  these  goods. 

A  price  list  to  accompany  this  catalogue  will  be  sent 
on  request. 


CHIC AvjU  sharpener 


GIANT 
MODEL 

Sells  at 

$2.00 

Sharpens  any 
Pencil  or  Crayon 

Co-operation — the  sort  that  develops  ever- 
increasing  sales  for  you — is  our  1917  slogan.  Buy 
early — get  deliveries  when  needed.  By  actual 
machine  test  the  Chicago  sharpener  will  sharpen 
from  30,000  to  35,000  pencils.  Then  a  new  set 
of  cutters  for  the  machine  can  be  sold  to  the 
customer  for  75c  retail.  Wholesale  prices  make 
it  worth  your  while  to  vigorously  push  their 
sale. 
Standard  Model,  $1.50,  sharpens  Standard  Pencils 


Time  and  Material 
Saver,     Weighs 
about  4  lbs. 
Fully  nickel 
plated. 
100% 
fool- 
proof 


IDEAL, 
PORTABLE 


Eyeletting 
Machine  ^*>y 


Ideal  Specialties  Mfg.  Corp. 


New  York 


This  new  machine  has  a  "Trough  Maga- 
zine" for  the  reception  of  Ideal  Eyelets 
formed  into  strips  of  (15)  fifteen.  With 
but  one  stroke  of  the  handle  papers  are 
perforated,  eyelets  are  automatically  in- 
serted and  made  secure,  without  a  miss  or  a 
skip,  NOT  AN  EYELET  IS  LOST.  No 
other  portable  device  as  efficient,  none  so 
simple  or  sturdy  of  construction  as  the 
Ideal.     A  real  boon  to  the  busy  office. 


AID         HJf  T\  11      ©        C^  ¥     •  *  J_  Canadian  Representatives : 

•  K.  MaCUOllgall  &  LO.,  Limited,  266  king  st.w., Toronto 


18 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


IAROvHAC 


SUNDRIES 


8ELLING  DIRECT  FROM  FACTORIES' 


A  RMacDougall  &  Cq. 


ARO-;*\AC 

LINES 


SUNDRIES 


VUL-COT 

WASTE 
BASKETS 


TORONTO 


Every  Basket  Guaranteed  for  Five  Years 

that  goes  with  every  basket  leaving  the  'factory. 
„,^«™v  ADVANTAGES : 

ECONOMY 

The  first  cost  of  Vul-Cot  baskets  may  be  a  little  more  than  that  of  the 
ordinary  waste  basket,  but  their  final  cost  is  incomparably  less,  because 
of  their  long  life.  An  investment  in  Vul-Cot  baskets  is  a  permanent  in- 
vestment. In  comparison  with  ordinary  baskets  that  must  be  constantly 
renewed,  the  first  cost  is  insignificant. 

DURABILITY 

With  ordinary  use  Vul-Cot  baskets  should  last  from  ten  to  twenty  years. 
Vul-Cot  baskets  won't  dent,  rust,  corrode,  or  any  way  suffer  from 
service  which  quickly  destroys  other  material. 

CLEANLINESS   AND  APPEARANCE 

The  solid  sides  and  bottoms  of  Vul-Cot  waste  baskets  hold  the  small 
particles  which  sift  through  the  ordinary  waste  basket  to  make  litter  on 
the  floor.  In  addition,  they  screen  from  view  the  unsightly  contents. 
Vul-Cot  baskets  arc  ornamental  as  well  as  useful.  The  standard  color, 
Maroon  Brown,  harmonizes  perfectly  with  the  furnishings  of  offices, 
hotels,  residences,  etc. 

NON-INFLAMMABILITY 

Vul-Cot  baskets  are  not  absolutely  fire-proof,  but  they  are  fire-resisting 
to  an  unusual  degree.  Fire  started  in  the  contents  of  a  Vul-Cot  basket 
would  be  confined  to  the  basket  itself  until  the  flames  could  be  ex- 
tinguished. 

Retail  at  $1.35  to  $3.00  Each 


Sengbusch  Self -Closing  Inkstands 

10  Reasons  Why  They  Are  The  Best 


1 — Always  airtight,  like  cork  in  bottle,  ink  always  clean  and  fresh. 
2 — No  evaporation — saves  75%  of  ink  bills. 
3 — 8  oz.  of  ink  will  last  busiest  clerk  for  one  year — think  it  over. 
i — No  funnels  above  top  surface  of  well — ink  never  spurts. 
5 — Pen  is  dipped  to  uniform  depth — no  overloaded  pens — prevents  ink  blots. 
6- — Where  other  stands  require  weekly  refilling,  the  Sengbusch  needs  refilling 
in  only  two  to  six  months  of  actual  use. 
-Requires  cleaning  inside  only  once  a  year. 
8 — Saves  pen  points — no  corroded  ink. 
9 — Prevents  evaporation  of  red  ink  and  works  perfectly  with  copying  ink. 
10 — Saves  time  and  trouble. 

You  can  have  Canadian  illustrated  price  list  with  your  imprint  and  other  good 
selling  helps.  GOOD  PROFIT  FOR  THE  DEALER. 

The  Ideal  Moistener 

$1.75.   High  class  in  every   detail.      An  efficient  and  sanitary 
moistener  for  stamps,   envelopes,  labels,   etc. 

If  you   are   asked   for   something  to    "lick   the   stamps;'  moisten    fingers, 
gummed  labels,  envelope  flaps,  etc.,"  offer  the  Ideal  Sanitary  Moistener 
— explain    its    advantages    over    other    methods — how    it    applies    the 
lii^ht    amount    of    moisture    equally,    surely,    and    easily — how    the 
wheel  revolves  without  resistance  or  noise — nothing  to  wear  out — 
no  rubber  to  become  hardened  or  useless. 

AY\  It/I  I  1  ©  f^  *  *  J_  Canadian   Representatives: 

.    K.    lVlaCUOUgall    &    LO.,    Limited,      266  King  St .W.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


19 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


$MM 


THE  ONLY  BOOK  WRITTEN 
BY  BAIRNSFATHER 

Bullets 
&  Billets 

BY  BRUCE  BAIRNSFATHER 
Author  of  Fragments  from  France 


Captain  B.airnsfather's  Book,  "Bullets  and  Billet-,"  is  his  own  narrative  of  his  experiences  at  the 
Front.  It  has  the  same  character  as  his  drawings,  the  same  homely  humour,  the  same  quaint 
attitude  towards  life  and  danger.  Captain  Bairnsfather  has  not  written,  and  is  not  writing,  any 
other  book  about  the  tuar  or  about  anything  else. 

Not  a  Drawing  in  this  book  and  not  a  line  of  the  text  has  appeared  elsewhere.  There  are  eighteen 
full-page  illustrations  of  the  same  kind  that  has  endeared  the  artist  to  millions  of  his  countrymen, 
and  about  thirty  smaller  drawings  in  the  text. 

Price  $1.25  net. 

Fragments  From  France  No.  1,  More  Fragments  From  France  No.  2,  Still  More  Fragments  No.  3, 
can  also  be  supplied  along  with  orders  for  Bullets  and  Billets. 

GORDON  &  GOTCH  (CANADA)  LTD.,  TORONTO 


The  MACMILLAN 
COMPANY  desire 

rsa*  mm 

leaves  for  the  West 
very  shortly. 

to   announce    that 
their  representative, 
Mr.  Hugh  S.  Eayrs, 

jd  "^(^^1 

They  bespeak  for  him 
your  usual  courte- 
ous  consideration. 

Before  buying  a  fresh  stock  of  pens,  get 
samples  and  prices  of  the  famous 

"Rob  Roy" 
Pen 


It    is 

m  a  d  e 

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writes     easily 

and   smoothly   ami 

suits     almost     any 

hand.  "Rob   Roy"  Pens 

are    made    in    one    of    the 

best     equipped      factories     in 

Birmingham,    Eng. — the    home    of 

the   pen-making  industry. 


the  popular  and 
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Manufactured  by  the  proprietois  : 

Hinks,  Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 


Patented  Dec.  7.  1909 
•No.   777   iy8   in.   wide,  and   only   1-16  iu.   thick,  12  inches  long. 

Very  flexible,  double  brass  edges,   ready  for  use  either  side 
up.     Sixteenth  scale  on  one  side,  millimeter  scale  on  the  other. 

You   are   overlooking   a   good    one   if   you   do   not   carrv    our 
School    Flexible. 

WESTCOTT-JEWELL  CO.,  "g$?J£g?- 

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20 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


INTERESTING  NEWS  FOR 

STATIONERS  and  BOOKSELLERS 

You  have  already  experienced  the  very  marked  increase  in 
price  of  every  commodity  incidental  to  the  stationery  and 
book  business.  Every  article  that  enters  into  the  manufac- 
ture of  Blank  Books  or  Printed  Books  is  still  climbing 
upward  in  price. 

No  manufacturer  or  publisher  will  quote  prices  for  even  a 
month  in  advance,  and  paper  mills  accept  orders  only  at 
open  prices,  with  no  specified  date  of  delivery. 

PREPARE  NOW 

School  Opening  and  the   Holiday  Season 


August, 
1917 

Scribblers,  Exercise  Books, 
Note  Books,  Examination 
Paper  and  all  incidental  lines. 


November  and 
December,  1917 

Presentation  Books,  Bibles, 
Toy  Books,  Juvenile  Liter- 
ature, Books  for  Boys  and 
Girls,  etc.,  etc. 


We  have  prepared  very  large  stocks  of  School  goods  and 
Christmas  lines.  They  are  here  now,  and  are  yours  at 
present  prices  guaranteed  as  long  as  our  stock  lasts. 

Samples  are  on  display  right  now. 

A  completely  new  variety  of  Christmas  Cards  and  Books; 
not  a  single  one  a  duplicate  of  last  season. 

Our  traveller  in  your  territory  will  call  shortly  and  outline 
the  terms  on  which  these  may  be  bought.  If  you  are  inter- 
ested to  know  the  exact  date  of  his  visit,  please  write  us. 

CLARK  BROS.  &  CO.,  LIMITED 

WINNIPEG 


21 


sill 


m\\m 


mmm 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


RELIABLE 
SERIES 


This  Year's  Samples  of 

CHRISTMAS  CARDS 

Made  by 

WM.  RITCHIE  &  SONS,  Limited 
Edinburgh,  Scotland 

ARE  NOW  READY 

CANADIAN   SERIES  ESPECIALLY  STRONG 

\,rkim  including 

ALS0  ,arSe  va4ati «  of  *g™| j££J  g—  winter  scene. 
Patriotic,  Juveniles,  off-se  work  »  die.<lamped  numbers.  Cards  to 
bird,  hu_  g  >M*°4 jj* senp*  ^  P*         „  10c,  15c  and 

STa  taf  Thrill"  shown  by  principal  jobbing  house, 

A.  O.  HURST  itm38&"  TORONTO 


lilll 


v,  \ 


■/                        0-     —• • 

V 

1 

pX/        T*        S 

1 

I^Mfc  i 

1 

V 

&3I 1  ■■! 

1 

*.  JUtT^l^k     \j 

3k£»  • 

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x  1 

t&a  \ttojKEti  /i 

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flfcn  fmrrT^T  v 

1 

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4 

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9 ,  <-> 

Nature  Post  Cards 


New  and  exclusive  designs  that  will  prove  big  sellers  with  Canadian  Lovers  of  Nature.  There 
are  24  designs  in  the  series  reproduced  in  our  color  process  work.  "Best  Wishes,"  "Season's 
Greetings"  and  "Verses"  in  gold.  The  Birds  reproduced  in  their  natural  colors  of  plumage. 
These  Cards  assorted  24  designs  to  a  hundred,  packed  in  cartons  for  60c  per  100,  or  $5 .  00  per 
M.  assorted.  Should  you  prefer  to  see  a  sample  set  before  buying,  forward  25c  in  stamps  and  the 
set  of  24  subjects  complete  will  be  mailed  promptly.  Big  orders  already  placed  by  largest  houses 
in  United  States  and  Canada. 

We  ateo  specialize  in  Local  Views  of  One  Thousand 
per    subject    and     up.       Correspondence    solicited. 

GILBERT  POST  CARD  COMPANY 


309  River  Street 


CHICAGO,  111. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Wfr/M* 


of  GREETING 


Never  has  our  line  had  such  refinement, 
such    strength,  such   dignity.     We   are 

not  showing  colored  stocks,  freak  cuts  and 
shapes,  fancy  borderings  or  geegaws.  We 
are  showing,  however,  the  quintessence  of 
originality  and  excellence  from  a  large 
staff  of  artists,  engravers,  plate  printers 
and  die-stampers.  For  sentiments;  we 
chose  them  from  a  selection  of  thousands 
submitted  to  us  by  writers  from  all  parts 
of  the  country. 

Our  entire  energy  is  the  1917  line,  our 
supreme  effort. 

178  CONGRESS  ST.,  BOSTON,  Mass.,  U.S.A. 


23 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The  Three  Essentials  of 
Successful  Card  Parties 


some  seal    pattern    cases, 
nickel-trimmed.     The   favorite 
ot  leading   clubs  and   players. 
If  your  dealer  cannot   supply 
you,  write  us.  Circular  and  price-list  jree. 
The  Official  Rules  of  Card   Games— New 
^Cj  edition  revised  to  date.     All   the  latest    rules. 
Written  by  recognized  authorities..  300  games. 
250  pages.     Scttl-s  every  disputed  point.    Tells  you  how  to  play 
every  game  iron;  (-?ssinoto  Whist  including  games  for  the  young 
folks,  foreign  games,  round  table  games,  progressive  party  games, 
club  games.  Bound  for  service.  Sent  postpaid  for  IS  cenls  in  stamps. 


PLAYING 
CARDS 


A  delight  to  the  eye  and  the  hand.  Exquisite  backs  m  full  color 
and  gold,  reproducing  master  paintings.  Gold  edges  like  a  volume 
de  luxe.  Never  lose  their  snappy  strength  of  material.  Flexible 
but  not  flimsy.  Especially  distinguished  by  their  Air-Cushion 
Finish  which  defies  all  moist  atmospheres.  Prevents  gumming  and 
sticking.  Makes  misdeals  practically  impossible.  Docs  not  take 
up  perspiration  from  the  hands.  Congress  Cards  are  made  in  two 
sizes — Regular,  liked  best  by  men;  French,  the  new  small  dainty 
card  that  fits  milady's  hand.  Moderately  priced.  Many  different 
backs  for  your  selection.  Ask  your  dealer.  Sample  cards  and  cir- 
cu/ai  free. 

Send  today  tor  an"  of  the  free  matter  offered  above  and  by 
all  means,  get  your  copy  of  the  new  Official  Rule  Book  (15c). 

i.  PLAYING  CARD  COMPANY 


*.?' 


THE  1 

■dm 


Dept.  000 


Toronto,  Canada 


lis 


•£► 


(o  £**» 


can 


Shored,  Cards 

n"out     u       rrr>sanrl 
0Cards4o^     Se 


fet 


Make  your  store  the 
recognized  headquar- 
ters for  playing!  card 
supplies — 

It  will  pay  you  in  two  ways:  You  will  sell 
more  goods  of  this  kind.  You  will  attract  to 
your  store  practically  everybody  whom  you 
would  like  to  have  as  a  customer. 

You  can  give  your  store  this  reputation  by 
carrying  the  cards  and  the  supplies  that  people 
want.  They  want  the  brands  that  are  famous 
for  their  superiority  the  world  over  and  that 
they  know  by  name  through  continual  adver- 
tising.   These  products  are — 

BICYCLESffi? 


V-S.  D,_      "re^iv?;,^»ecli. 


;ce,Veirn   eWe(<i.  mi 


* 


Everybody   knows  them.     They  require 

no    time-taking'   introduction    from    you. 

To  sell  in  your  town  most  of  the  playing 

ty'         cards  used  by  men,  you  simply  must  have 

Bicycles. 


PLAYING 
CARDS 


Every  woman   wants   them   for  social   play. 

Their  art  backs  sell  themselves.  To  secure 
the  patronage  of  card  clubs  and  of  individuals 
who  want  the  best  of  everything,  you  need 
the  latest  designs  in  Congress. 

PAINE'S  TRAYS 

Every  player  prefers  them  for  duplicate  games. 

Known  everywhere  as  the  most  practical  and 
most  attractive  tray  on  the  market.  Stock  them 
and  you  will  sell  them. 

OFFICIAL  RULE  BOOK 

The  modern  Hoyle  that  every  player  and  every 
club  like  to  have  for  ready  reference.     The  new 

edition  is  in  immense  demand.     You  should  sell  it 

in  your  town. 

All  of  these  essentials  to  the  successful  handling  of 
playing  cards  are   being  advertised  in  the  leading 
magazines   this   month    (February)    with    announce- 
ments like  the  reproductions   to   the  left   but   much 
larger.     This  publicity  will  be  of  immediate  help  to 
dealers  who  have  the  goods  on  hand.     Order  at  once 
through    your  jobber. 


New  Catalog  Price-List  Free 

Will  show  you  how  to  increase  your  playing  card  business.     Every  dealer  who  sells  or  wants  to   sell 
playing  cards  should  have  a  copy.     Send  your  name  and  jobber's  name  to-day  to 

TheJJ.  S.  PLAYING  CARD  COMPANY,    •  Toronto,  Canada 

24 


Bookseller  &  Stationer 

AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 


Vol.  XXXII I. 


FEBRUARY,  1917 


No.  2 


IN  THIS  ISSUE 

Book  Prices  Still  Higher 

Weakness  of  Book  Advertising 

A  Lesson  on  Selling  Bibles 

Merchandising  Methods 

The  Ribbon  and  Carbon  Situation 

Development  of  the  Gift  Shop  Idea 

Building  Up  Sporting  Goods  Trade 

Month's  Record  of  New  Books 

The  Best  Selling  Books 

Literature  of  the  War 

New  Goods  Described  and  Illustrated 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-President 
T.  B.  COSTAIN,  General  Managing  Editor. 


JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President 
H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager 


Publishers    of    Hardware    and    Metal,    The    Financial    Post,    MaoLean's    Magazine,    Farmer's 
Magazine,  Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  and  Publisher, 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and  Manufacturing  News,  The  Power  House, 
The   Sanitary   Engineer,   Canadian   Foundryman,   Marine   Engineering   of  Canada. 
Cable  Address:  Macpubco,  Toronio;  Atabek,  London,  Eng. 

ESTABLISHED   1885. 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

FINDLAY  I.  WEAVER,   Manager 
CHIEF   OFFICES: 

CANADA— Montreal.  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Building,1  Telephone  Main  1004.  Toronto.  113-153  University 
Ave.,  Telephone  Main  7324.    Winnipeg,  22  Royal  Bnk   Building,   Telephone  Garry  2313. 

GREAT  BRITAIN— London.  The  MacLean  Company  of  Great  Britain,  Limited,  S8  Fleet  Street  EC  E  J 
Dodd,    Director.     Telephone   Central    12960.     Cable  Address:  Atabek,   London,  England. 

UNITED  STATES— New  York,  R.  B.  Huestis,  115  Broadway,  N.Y.,  Telephone  Rector  8971-  Boston  C  L 
Morton.  Room  733,  Old  South  Building.  Telephone  Main  1024.  A.  H.  Byrne,  1104-5-6-7'  Fort  Deirhorn 
Bldg.,   105  West   Monroe   St.,   Chicago,   Telephone    Randolph    3234. 

SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE— Canada,  Great  Britain.  South  Africa  and  the  West  Indies,  $1  a  year-  United 
States,  $1.50  a  year;  other  countries,  $2  a  year;  Single   Copies,  10  cents.     Invariably    in    advance. 


15  OOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Ready  in  February 

The  Best  Short  Stories 
of  1916 

And   The  Yearbook  of   the   American  Short  Story. 
Edited  by  EDWARD  J.  O'BRIEN 

This  is  the  second  of  Mr.  O'Brien's  annual  volumes 
on  the  year's  short  stories.  These  volumes  are 
the  only  authoritative  surrey  of  the  short  story 
published,  and  the  present  volume  is  based  on  the 
leading  of  2,700  short  stories  published  during  1!»1<> 
in   seventy   American   periodicals. 


All  of  these  stones  are  classified  in  a  very  complete  index  of 
authors  and  titles,  and  the  lit- 
eral? value  of  each  story  is 
indicated,  with  bibliographical 
notes.  The  volume  includes 
also  a  list  of  all  books  of  short 
stories  published  during  1916, 
a  Roll  of  Honor  of  the  beat 
one  hundred  and  ten  American 
stories,  a  Necrology,  a  critical 
analysis  of  the  fifty  best  Ameri- 
can short  stories,  and  a  critical 
essay  on  the  literary  tendencies 
if    the    year. 

These  chapters  are  based  on  Mr. 
O'Brien's  annual  articles  on  the 
American  short  story  in  The 
Boston  Transcript  and  The  Bunk 
man  which  are  accepted  nation- 
ally as  the  critical  norm  of  the 
American  short  story. 
The  greater  part  of  the  volume 
i.s  occupied  by  the  text  of  the 
twenty  stories  which  Mr.  O'Brien 
finds  to  be  the  best  by  American 
authors  published  in  American 
magazines  during  the  year. 
Uniform  in  size  and  binding 
with  The  Best  Short  Stories  of 
1915. 


Just  Published 

Wildfire 

By ZANE  GREY 

You  will  enjoy  reading  this  great  outdoor  Novel; 
please    pass    it    around    and    let    others    share    your 

enthusiasm. 

Zane  Grey  has  been  steadily  climbing — be  will  reach 
and  stay  at  the  top  of  the  best  sellers  with  this,  bis 
greatest   book,   "WILDFIRE." 

Zane  Grey  has  written  many  fine  books,  but  here  is 
the  best  of  tbem   all. 


12  mo.     Cloth.      Gilt  top. 
472  pages.     Si .50  net 


Just  Published 

The 
Unknown 
Mr.  Kent 

By  ROY  NORTON 


PUBLISHERS 


Readers  have  learned  long 
since  that  Zendaland  is  the 
home  of  romance,  the  dwell- 
ing-place o  f  beautiful, 
strong  -  willed  princesses, 
harrassed  kings,  resource- 
ful, cynical  intriguers,  and 
a  picturesque  citizenry  al- 
ways holiday-making.  Many 
of  these  familiar  characters         !^^^^^^^^^— 

are  to  be  found  in  "The 

Unknown  Mr.  Kent,"  but  the  role  generally  filled 
by  a  dashing,  fearless,  romantic  young  soldier  of 
fortune  falls  to  the  lot  of  a  practical,  hard-headed 
American  business  man.  It  is  not  to  be  understood 
that  the  personality  of  Mr.  Kent  is  merely  matter- 
of-fact,  nor  that  his  career  as  uncrowned  king  of 
mythical  Marken  is  without  romance  or  danger. 
Quite  the  contrary  !  But  Instead  of  winning  his  way 
in  high  boots  and  with  saber-rattling  and  duels 
every  15  minutes,  Kent  is  sure  of  victory,  because 
he  sees  farther  ahead  than  his  enemies,  and,  by 
anticipating  their  plots  and  laying  cleverer  counter- 
plots, allows  them  to  accomplish  their  own  downfall. 

Cloth,  $1.25 


Ready  in  February 

One  of  the  most  interesting  literary   finds  which  has 
appeared  in  recent  years. 

Casuals  of  the  Sea 

By  WILLIAM  McFEE 

Kipling,  we  think  it  was  who  said:  "Call  'Mac' 
down  to  the  engine  room  of  any  steamer  the 
world  over,  and  a  Scot  will  answer."  McFee 
was,  and  is  an  engineer.  He  has  written  a  novel 
of  life,  and  it  has  been  accepted  as  a  big  book. 

The  year  has  brought  us  acquaintance  with  a  notable 
new  writer,  the  author  of  "Casuals  of  the  Sea."  As 
his  aubtitle  tells  us.  William  McFee  has  essayed  no 
less  than  "the  voyage  of  a  soul,"  and  well  and  proud- 
ly has  he  succeeded  in  his  attempt.  The  Gooderich 
family  are  people  whom,  once  knowing,  we  cannot 
forget,  and  then  there  is  the  wonder  of  the  sea,  the 
greatness  of  the  men  who  drive  the  ship's  vast  en- 
gines, the  sense  alike  of  man's  helplessness  and  of 
his  power.  "Casuals  of  the  Sea"  is  literature. — 
"New   York   Times." 

England  now  has  discovered  suddenly  that  she  is  heir  to 
another  man  who  shows  the  stuff  of  which  genius  is  made: 
a  man  who  is  English  by  chance,  because  he  was  bom  at  sea 
of  English  parentage.  .  .  .  The  man  is  William  McFee.  He 
has  written  a  novel,  "Casuals  of  the  Sea."— "Baltimore  Even- 
ing   Sun." 

In  the  crowd  of  autumn  fiction  a  dozen  books,  perhaps,  have 
made  their  way  to  the  front;  some  by  reason  of  the  name  on 
the  title  page,  otheis  by  sheer  force  of  original  person- 
ality. Of  the  latter  class  is  "Casuals  of  the  Sea,"  by  William 
MoFee.  Its  distinction  lies  partly  in  the  theme,  but  par- 
ticularly in  the  style,  which  is  quite  out  of  the  ordinary. 
.  .  .  Some  of  it  is  delightfully  humorous,  some  of  it  is  calmiy 
sordid,  all  of  it  is  convincing  and  interesting. — "The  Inde- 
pendent." 

In  "Casuals  of  the  Sea,"  the  style  is  both  lucid  and  impelling, 
the  presentation  alike  of  human  beings  and  seascapes  is  re- 
markable, while  the  third  "book"  of  the  story,  "The  Sea," 
rises  to  magnificent  level.— "Chicago  Herald." 

"Both  drifters  here  and  there  upon  the  sea  of  life;  its  quiet 
humor,  leisurely  style,  and  realistic  characterization  proclaim 
the  author  a  keen  observer  of  humanity,  and  one  who  finds 
no  uninteresting  people  in  the  world."  Reminiscent  of  Conrad 
in    its    feeling    for   the   sea. — "Wisconsin    Library    Bulletin." 


He  has  written  of  wonderful 
horses  before,  but  Wild- 
fire outruns  them  all.  He 
has  written  often  of  men 
and  women  who  loved  ad- 
venture and  had  their  fill  of 
it,  but  here  in  this  story 
of  a  Centaur  community 
the  adventures  and  pas- 
sions of  his  characters  are 
as  natural  In  the  wild 
country  in  which  they  lived, 
as  the  adventures  and  pas- 
sions told  of  primitive 
peoples  in  fabled  Greece. 
In  literary  quality,  in  vivid 
delineation  of  wild  country 
and  a  rugged  people  and  in 
high  dramatic  power  "Wild- 
fire" stands  out  as  an  in- 
disputable  masterpiece. 

Illustrated, 

Cloth,    $1.35   net 


Cloth,  Si. 50 

THE  MUSSON  BOOK  CO.,  Ltd. 


TORONTO 


Third  Edition  Ready 

Pincher 
Martin,  0.  D. 

A  Story  of  the  Inner  Life  of 
the  Navy. 

By  "TAFFRAIL" 

"Taflfrail"  has  accomplished 
in  "Pincher  Martin"  what 
Captain  Marryat  failed  to 
do  in  writing  of  the  British 
Navy  of  a  former  genera- 
tion —  he  has  made  his 
story  realistic.  Y'ou  feel 
that  you  are  not  reading 
fiction,  fascinating  as  fiction 
may  be  in  the  hands  of 
a  true  artist,  but  that  you 
are  reading  a  true  story 
It  is  a  photograph  of  the  Royal 
but    with    the    difference — the 


from  start  to  finish 
Navy  as  it  is  to-day 
photograph  is  colored,  its  tints  are  reproduced  direct 
from  nature.  You  smell  the  tar  and  the  oil  and 
the  paint;  you  inhale  the  atmosphere  of  the  foc'sle, 
the  ward-room  and  the  " 'orrible  den,"  and  you  hear 
the  swish  of  the  waves,  and  your  face  is  moist  with 
the  spindrift.  As  a  faithful  picture  of  this  branch 
of  the  service  to-day,  this;  book  cannot  be  beaten. 
We  commend  it  to  all  who  wish  to  follow  the  Joys 
and  sorrows  of  our  sailors,  and  to  become  familiar 
with  their  glorious  work — from  the  security  of  their 
own  firesides,  for  by  doing  so  a  bond  of  sympathy 
will  be  formed  with  our  navy  men  that  can  be  se- 
cured by  no  other  means. 

Cloth,  Si. 25 


26 


Editorial  Chronicle  and  Comment 


ARE  YOU  GUILTY f 

DO  merchants  fully  appreciate  the  show  window 
as  a  potent  factor  in  successfully  conducting  a 
retail  business?  Window  displays  properly  arranged 
bring  more  people  into  a  store  and  actually  produce 
more  sales  than  the  highest  estimate  of  their  efficacy 
concedes. 

Why  should  the  waste  of  dollars  in  the  way  of 
neglect  of  this  phase  of  merchandising  be  permitted 
to  continue? 

Sometimes  the  merchant  depends  on  his  assist- 
ants to  completely  look  after  his  interests  in  this 
connection,  but  he  is  himself  to  blame  if  he  does  not 
exert  the  proper  supervision  that  will  assure  adequate 
attention  to  this  big  question  of  window  display. 

Some  merchants,  alas,  too  many,  are  still  blind  to 
the  potential  business-bringing  power  of  the  show 
window. 

Window  display  properly  conducted  is  advertis- 
ing of  the  livest  and  most  valuable  character. 

If  this  subject  has  not  had  the  thought  and  atten- 
tion it  deserves  in  the  past,  let' 1917  see  an  awakening 
on  the  part  of  those  retailers  who  have  been  negli- 
gent in  this  particular.  Then  a  bigger  business  and 
more  profits  will  inevitably  follow. 


the  war  and  consequently  poetical  volumes,  old  and 
new,  should  find  an  increasing  rather  than  decreas- 
ing sale  this  year. 


POPULARITY  OF  POETICAL  WORKS 

THERE  has  been  so  decided  an  increase  in  the 
number  of  volumes  of  poetry  in  the  past  two 
years,  in  which  connection  may  also  be  mentioned 
the  establishment  of  periodicals  devoted  exclusively 
to  matters  pertaining  to  poetical  works,  that  there 
seems  to  be  no  doubt  that  the  war  has  really  had  the 
effect  of  greatly  popularizing  poetry  if  it  has  not 
actually  inspired  poetical  expression  other  than 
actual  "war  verse." 

This  condition  is  true  of  both  England  and 
France,  despite  the  many  singers  that  have  died  the 
death  of  martyrs  in  fighting  for  the  cause  of  higher 
civilization  against  the  materialistic  "will  to  power" 
of  the  Germans. 

Canada  in  the  past  year  has  produced  a  most 
creditable  number  of  really  good  volumes  of  verse, 
to  such  an  extent  in  fact  as  to  make  these  books  the 
outstanding  feature  of  the  book  publishing  in  Can- 
ada in  1916. 

Applying  all  this  to  the  book  trade,  it  would  seem 
that  the  spirit  of  poetry  will  continue  to  thrive  during 

27 


BOOK  PRICES  STILL  HIGHER 

INCREASING  cost  of  production  in  the  making  of 
books  of  all  kinds  is  resulting  in  still  further  and 
decided  advances  in  many  classes  of  books,  particu- 
larly Bibles  and  other  leather  bound  volumes.  Paper 
has  continued  to  soar  in  the  market  and  consequently 
no  books  are  exempt  from  increasing  costs.  Here  is 
a  table  showing  how  the  principal  materials  which 
enter  into  the  making  of  a  book,  have  gone  up  since 
a  year  ago : — 

Old  Price  Present  Price 

Cloth    $     .06  per  yard  $     .12 

Ink  for  stamping   l.fiO  per  lb.  3.00  to  $3.50- 

Thread     1.00  per  spool  1.75 

Leaf    Gold    7.15  10.00 

Binder's   Board    24.00  per  ton.  .  !K).00 

('renin   Loaf  for  Stamping   ...  .03  per  sheet  .07 

Book  paper 03  4/5  per  lb.  .08% 

Glue  Increase  150% 

Oriental  Leaf  for  stamping   .  rnerease  25% 

Lining  and   end   papers    Increase  150% 

Crash    Increase  100% 

Labor   Increase  20% 

Ooze  Leather   Increase  200% 

Skiver  Leather Increase  175% 

Buffings    Increase  105% 

Marble   Paper    Increase  85% 

Those  quotations  deal  with  materials  entering 
into  the  cloth  bound  books  of  the  kind  that  are  most 
freely  sold. 

When  it  comes  to  Bibles,  the  quantity  of  high- 
grade  leather  required,  and  the  advance  of  over  125 
per  cent,  in  the  price  of  the  cheapest  Bible  paper, 
with  still  greater  advances  in  the  finer  grades  of  paper 
so  extensively  used,  calls  for  decided  advance.  A 
forty  per  cent,  advance  has  been  definitely  announced 
by  what  is  perhaps  the  largest  book  jobbing  house  in 
the  United  States.  Prices  in  Canada,  too,  will  be 
considerably  in  advance,  but  not  so  heavy  as  that, 
because  most  of  the  Bibles  sold  in  this  country  come 
from  England  and  conditions  are  somewhat  more 
favorable  in  the  case  of  British-made  Bibles. 


CANADA'S  BUSINESS 

THE  Statistics  of  the  trade  of  Canada  for  the 
twelve  months  ending  October  last  are  a  very 
fair  indication  of  the  prosperity  that  is  a  by-word  in 
this  country.  A  prosperity  too  that  is  increasing  as 
the  war  proceeds.  Canada  has  exported  to  the  United 
Kingdom  $678,796,960  to  the  United  States  $254,- 
000,000.  Imports  from  the  United  Kingdom  for  the 
same   period   amounted   to   $117,222,539,   from   the 


BOOKS E LLKR     AND     STATIONER 


United  States  $54Q,OOO.OO0>.  From  all  sources  Can- 
ada's exports  for  the  twelve  months  totalled  $1,037,- 
213,597  while  imports  totalled  $716,929,81:!  which 
leaves  a  favorable  trade  balance  of  $320,283,784. 

This  is  a  striking  example  of  Canada's  strong 
financial  position  despite'the  heavy  war  expenditures. 


WEAKNESS  OF  DEALER  ADVERTISING 
IN  THE  BOOK  TRADE 

THE    following    editorial    reprinted    from    "The 
Publishers'  Weekly,"  of  New  York,  is  reprinted 

here  because  it  applies  to  the  Canadian  hook  trade  to 
an  even  greater  degree  than  it  does  to  that  of  the 
United  States: — 

As  every  advertiser  knows,  there  is — or  should  be 
—a  difference  between'  advertising  copy  aimed  at  the 
consumer  and  copy  aimed  at  the  dealer.  The  former 
tells  what  an  article  is,  how  it  differs  from  competing 
articles,  what  people  say  about  it,  and  why  the  pros- 
pective buyer  should  have  it.  Dealer  copy,  however, 
should  not  only  tell  this  hut  in  addition  should  "sell" 
the  dealer  on  the,  to  him,  even  more  important  ques- 
tions: why  it  is  worth  the  dealer's  while  to  stock  the 
article  and  what  people  in  his  community  will  want 
it.  A  recent  issue  of  the  Saturday  Evening  Post  con- 
tained an  article  on  selling  on  the  road  in  which  an 
instance  was  cited  of  a  salesman's  going  into  a  new 
and  highly  competitive  territory  and  making  good 
on  the  following  fundamentally  sound  dealer  appeal : 
"1  realize  that  I  am  offering  you  a  new  article  and 
that  mine  is  only  one  among  hundreds  of  articles 
which  you  carrf ,  but  I  believe  in  this  article  for  such 
and  such  reasons  and  I  believe  you  can  sell  it  for  the 
following  reasons.  .  .  .  My  future  standing  in  this 
city  depends  on  my  dealing  fairly  by  you  now  and 
I  am  therefore  in  the  position  of  your  partner  in  ad- 
vising this  investment."  This  is  essentially  the  at- 
tack of  trade  paper  copy,  for  advertisements  in  a 
trade  paper  are  nothing  more  or  less  than  salesmen 
who  visit  dealers  fifty-two  times  each  year  and  go 
with  them  thru  their  stock  of  the  article  advertised 
—that  is,  they  do  if  they  are  good  dealer  copy ! 

.  It  is  of  interest  in  this  connection  to  thumb  the 
current  file  of  the  Publishers'  Weekly.  Surely 
hooks,  if  anything,  offer  an  opportunity  for  direct 
and  varied  dealer  talk!  And  yet,  judged  from  this 
angle,  well  over  half  the  advertising  in  our  columns 
fails  to  return  its  full  value.  Fully  two-thirds  of  it 
makes  no  pretence  at  making  a  special  dealer  appeal 
— it  is  nothing  hut  consumer  copy  off  the  same  spool 
as  the  copy  for  the  daily  press. 

It  is,  perhaps,  difficult  for  the  publisher,  whose 
own  books  bulk  so  large  to  him  in  the  literary  output 
of  the  year,  to  realize  that  after  all  many  of  his  fond- 
est offerings  are  to  the  retailer — the  man  to  whom  he 
looks  for  his  sales  outlet — little  more  than  names. 
Thus  the  description  of  "The  Syrian  Christ"  by 
Abraham  Mitrie  Rihhany  as  "of  unusual  signifi- 
cance,"   "a  study  and  interpretation-  of  Jesus  Christ 


by  a  Syrian."  leaves  or  is  apt  to  leave,  the  husy  dealer 
in  the  mid-t  of  a  busy  season  fairly  cold,  though  as  a 
fact  it  well  merit-  the  first  phrase.  At  best  an  appeal 
of  this  sort  will  have  to  he  reiterated  a  large  number 
of  times  before  it  will  get  the  results  of  Mime  such  line 
of  approach  a-  the  following:  "This  hook.  Mr.  Book- 
seller, is  by  one  oi  America's  most  prominent  Ini- 
tarian  ministers.  It  will  pay  you  therefore  to  call  it 
especially  to  the  attention  of  the  members  of  the 
Unitarian  church  in  your  community.  We  have 
prepared  special  circulars  written  from  this  particu- 
lar angle  of  appeal  which  will  lie  sent  you  upon 
request.  Tt  will  also  sell  to  other  ministers,  to  social 
workers,  to  all  Sunday  School  teachers  and  workers, 
to  those  who  have  purchased  Bihles  of  you,  Tetc.,]  be- 
cause it  supplements  the  Bible  and  all  commentaries 
on  the  Bible  in  its  authentic  interpretations  of  the 
native  Syrian  background  of  the  Bible  story." 

"Or  take  a  book  like  John  Muir's  .just  published 
"Thousand  Mile  Walk  to  the  Gulf";  suppose  the 
trade  advertising  copy  on  this  book,  instead  of  stop- 
ping with  the  statement  that  "John  Muir's  journal  of 
his  tramp  from  Indiana  to  Florida  in  1867  and  of  his 
trip  thence  to  Cuba  and  finally  to  California  will  he 
warmly  welcomed,  because  it  is  interesting  in  itself 
as  well  as  for  the  light  it  throws  on  the  development 
of  the  great  naturalist's  aims,"  leaving  the  publishers 
probably  to  circularize  the  membership  of  the  Appala- 
chian Mountain  Club  and  other  walking  and  moun- 
taineering organizations  by  whom  the  book  is  especi- 
ally likely  to  be  "warmly  welcomed,"  suppose  the 
publishers  had  pointed  out  to  the  trade  that  among 
many  other  bodies  and  classes  of  readers  this  hook 
would  interest  especially  the  members  of  the  Amer- 
ican Alpine  Club,  the  American  Geographical  Soci- 
ety, the  Appalachian  Mountain  Club,  the  Colorado 
Mountain  Club,  the  Geographic  Society  of  Chicago. 
Boy  Scout  leaders,  local  members  of  natural  history 
societies,  not  to  speak  of  the  innumerable  readers  of 
the  National  Geographic  Magazine,  etc..  etc..  and 
that  they  would  supply  the  trade  with  special  circu- 
lars with  which  to  reach  these  buyers.  The  same  line 
of  attack  could  be  incorporated  into  the  trade  adver- 
tisements of  nearly  every  non-fiction  book  published. 
It  is  not  that  we  advocate  the  omission  of  general 
descriptive  matter  from  dealer  advertisement-,  hut 
we  do  urge  that  the  incorporation  of  direct  dealer  ap- 
peal is  essential  if  full  efficiency  is  to  be  gained  from 
Publishers'  Weekly  advertisements.  There  are  scores 
of  mediums,  such  as  our  own  Book  Review,  through 
which  to  advertise  books  to  the  individual  ultimate 
consumer;  the  Publishers'  Weekly,  except  for  its  libr- 
ary clientele,  is  not  one  of  them.  Its  field  is  no  less 
important  but  it  is  distinctly  different. 

In  the  case  of  fiction  it  is  generally  more  difficult 
to  tell  why  people  will  buy  one  book  rather  than  an- 
other and  consequently  why  the  dealer  should  stock 
it.  but  even  here  there  is  room  for  more  direct  dealer 
appeal  than  frequently  appears  in  our  advertising 


2S 


P>  0  O  K  S  E  LLER     AND     STA  T  I  0  N  E  R 


pages.       Bold-face    announcements    that    a    I k    is 

"sweel  as  cherry  blossoms,"  "a  modern  'Quo  Vadis'," 
or  "the  biggest  novel  of  a  decade" — right  enough  for 
consumer  copy  perhaps  (although  we  doubl  it!)  — 
doesn'l  hit  the  bookseller  in  the  pocket  as  hard  as  the 
announcement  that  "this  hook  will  sell  to  the  same 
people  who  bought  'Pollyanna'  and  'Michael  O'Hall- 
oran'," — recent  big  money-makers  tor  him — or  "a 
book  which  makes  substantially  the  same  appeal  as 
The  Harbor'  and  which  although  by  a  new  author 
we  think  enough  of  to  risk  a  first  printing  of  10,000 
copies."  Or,  in  addition  to  advertising  "The  Spins- 
ter" as  "the  story  of  a  nineteenth  century  girl  who 
finds  her  place  in  the  twentieth  century,"  tell  the 
dealer  that  the  hook  will  sell  especially  to  the  femin- 
ist patrons,  to  suffragists,  to  unmarried  wage-earning 
women,  to  anti-vivisectionists,  bo  people  of  New  Eng- 
land extraction,  to  people  interested  in  socialism,  etc. 
Some  day  we  may  reach  a  sufficient  state  of  trade 
frankness  and  co-operation  for  the  publisher  to  tell 
his  sales  partner,  the  retailer,  before  asking  him  to 
risk  money  on  a  "cat  in  a  bag,"  just  how  much  faith 
he,  the  publisher,  has  in  a  hook  in  terms  of  copies 
printed  before  publication.  If  anybody  knows,  or  is 
prepared  to  guess,  at  a  book's  possibilities,  it  is  the 
publisher,  and  greater  frankness  in  this  regard  would 
go  far  toward  vitalizing  a  publisher's  trade  advertis- 
ing copy.  One  of  the  "Book  Supply  Company's 
strongest  appeals  to  the  trade  in  the  ca^e  of  the 
Harold  Bell  Wright  hooks  is  the  cold  figure  state- 


ments of  copies  <>f  previous  hooks  sold  and  copies 
printed  of  the  new  hook  before  publication.  The 
trade  is  almost  hypnotized  by  such  argument. 

The   easy   answer   to   a    plea    for   such    suggestive 
advertising  is  that  the  booksellers  would  not  adopt 

such  -ales  "leads"  even  if  (he  publisher  offered  them, 
that,  in  fact,  such  suggestions  in  the  past  have  not 
met  with  any  particular  response.  This  is  in  part 
true  bul  it  is  also  true  that  the  average  retailer  has 
not  in  the, past  been  accustomed  to  find  so  many 
definite  .-ales  tips  in  his  trade  advertisements  that  he 
has  come  to  look  there  for  them:  when  he  doe-,  the 
readiness  to  follow  them  up  will  inevitably  follow. 


With  white  paper  selling  as  "waste"  at  between 
two  or  three  cents  a  pound,  this  would  seem  to  he  the 
time  for  publishers  to  scrap  sheet  stock  of  old  "has 
beens"  which  they  are  carrying  in  their  own  or  their 
binders'  warehouses.  It  is  hard  for  the  manufactur- 
ing man  to  admit  to  the  man  higher  up  that  he  has 
"over-manufactured";  there  persists  a  hope  that 
something  may  happen  to  start  a  boom  and  clear  out 
a  few  of  those  cobwebby  sheets,  so  he  carries  them 
along  from  year  to  year  in  his  inventories.  But  with 
the  present  opporunity  to  realize  on  their  old  paper 
content. — an  opportunity  which  may  not  last  many 
months  longer — it  would  certainly  seem  the  wiser 
policy  to  write  a  number  of  the  more  flagrant  offend- 
ers off  the  books. 


A  Lesson  in  the  Selling  oFBibles 

Oood  Ideas  Brought  Out  in  an  Interview  With  George  Stewart  Methods  of  Some  Success- 
ful Retailers 


IT   is  a  fact   that    with   certain  staple  articles  of  mer- 
chandise coming  in  a  series  of  prices,  some  retailers 
are    vastly    more    successful    with    the    higher-priced 
numbers  than  are  other  merchants  who  are  just  as  favor- 
ably situated  in  every  particular. 

As  an  example,  let  us  take  Bibles.  Witli  some  dealers 
Kittles  retailing  at  $2  are  sold  almost  as  freely  as  .+  1 
Bibles,  and  some  merchants  sell  five  times  as  many  Bibles 
at  $5  as  do  others  whose  stores  are  located  in  similar 
sized  cities,  consequently  having1  equal  opportunities.  Why 
arc  they  not  doin»  as  well?  BOOKSELLER  AND  STA- 
TIONER asked  George  Stewart,  who  lias  been  sellinu 
Bibles  to  the  trade  throughout  Canada  for  lo,  these  many 
years,  to  throw  some  light  on  this  puzzle. 

ilr.  Stewart  said  the  explanation  rested  in  the  manner 
of  selling.  "For  instance,"'  he  said,  "a  man  comes  into 
the  store  and  says  he  wants  a  Bible." 

"About  what  price?"  asks  the  salesman. 

"Oh,  about  a  dollar." 

The  average  salesman  forthwith  brings  down  a  dollar 
Bible  and  the  sale  is  closed. 

"Now,  the  proper  way  to  handle  that  customer  is  to 
show  one  of  the  best  Bibles  in  stock.  If  he  cannot  afford 
the  price  he  will  soon  say  so,  but  the  quality  idea  will  be 
conveyed  to  his  mind  and  even  if  he  does  not  buy  one  of 
the  more  expensive  books,  the  chances  are  that  he  will  take 
a  two  dollar  rather  than  a  one  dollar  Bible. 


"You  see,  therefore,  that  the  volume  of  the  sale  over 
the  method  of  the  first  salesman,is  just  doubled  and  so  is 
the  margin  of  profit  on  the  sale." 

That  is  a  pretty  good  lesson  in  Bible  selling  isn't  it? 

Mr.  Stewart  cited  the  case  of  a  retailer  in  an  Ontario 
town,  who  after  going  carefully  into  such  questions  as 
type  and  binding,  increased  his  Bible  sales  more  than  25% 
over  the  previous  year.  A  good  plan,  he  said  was  to  carry 
a  well  assorted  stock  of  three  classes  of  Bibles  in  greatest 
demand:  "Text,"  "Reference"  and  "Teachers'  "  Bibles. 

Mr.  Stewart  instanced  another  bookseller  who  greatly 
increased  his  sales  of  Bibles  by  having  good  window  dis- 
plays at  Christmas,  Easter  and  Thanksgiving  Day.  This 
dealer  was  also  particularly  successful  in  selling  Bibles  as 
gifts  "to  mother,  sister  or  brother"  and  "from  mother  to 
son."  Another  dealer  made  a  hit  in  selling  pocket  testa- 
ments for  soldiers  at  the  front  by  advertising  them  and 
displaying  them  in  khaki  bindings  in  the  shop  window, 
with  a  display  card  bearing  the  wording:  "For  your 
soldier  brother  or  friend — has  saved  many  lives." 

Another  good  idea  that  results  in  increased  sales  of 
Bibles  is  to  push  the  sale  of  Bibles  on  India  paper  and 
witli  large  type,  as  being  especially  suitable  for  older 
people. 

Some  further  points  in  Bible  selling  will  appear  in  a 
later  issue  of  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER. 


29 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiiiyiiiiiiMiiii 


NEWS  OF  THE  TRADE 


lillll!!ll!iilillllililillll 


iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 


Thomas  Menzies,  of  Menzies  &  Co.,  was  in  New  York 
on  a  business  trip  last  month. 

Bert  Nash,  of  the  College  Bookstore,  Kingston,  Ont., 
was  a  trade  visitor  to  Toronto  last  month. 

Roy  Stiff  of  the  fancy  goods  department  of  the  Copp, 
Clark  Co.,  was  a  business  visitor  to  New  York  recently. 

Among  the  trade  visitors  in  Toronto  in  January  was 
George  Sully,  of  Sully  &  Kleinteich,  the  New  York  pub- 
lishers. 

A  Wilson,  who  has  been  in  the  book  and  stationery 
business  on  Barton  street,  Hamilton,  has  sold  out  to  B. 
Ackert. 

Theo.  Pike,  formerly  of  Toronto,  now  with  Longmans 
Green  &  Co.,  was  in  Montreal  and  Toronto  in  January  iti 
the  interests  of  that  house. 

M.  Ritchie,  who  formely  covered  Ontario  as  a  book 
salesman  for  the  Copp  Clark  Co.,  is  this  year  with  the 
Toronto  branch  of  the  Imperial  News  Co. 

The  Imperial  News  Co.  has  been  given  sole  agency  for 
"Jack  Canuck"  for  all  parts  of  Canada,  with  the  excep- 
tion of  a  few  accounts  in  certain  cities  and  towns. 

The  Robt.  Gillespie  Co.,  Maltese  Cross  Bldg.,  Winni- 
peg, have  been  appointed  representatives  for  Isaacs  and 
Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng.,  makers  of  mechanical  toys. 

The  American  Lace  Paper  Co.  is  the  name  of  a  newly 
incorporated  company,  with  headquarters  in  Milwaukee, 
Wis.  They  will  manufacture  lace  paper  products,  such  a  5 
shelf  paper,  doilies,  laces,  etc. 

C.  D.  Sutherland,  proprietor  of  the  Watrous  Drug  & 
Stationery  Co.,  Watrous,  Sask.,  recently  sold  out  his 
interests  to  Dr.  Mathieii  and  left  for  Winnipeg,  where 
he  will  spend  the  balance  of  the  winter. 

The  Dennison  Manufacturing  Company,  of  Framing- 
ham,  Mass.,  features  a  new  line  of  napkins.  The  bulletin 
describing  the  new  line  is  gotten  out  in  unusually  neat 
style,  a  sample  accompanying  each  bulletin. 

Messrs.  McClelland  &  Stewart,  of  McClelland,  Good- 
child  &  Stewart,  visited  New  York  and  other  United 
States  publishing  centres  last  month,  and  Mr.  Stewart, 
before  returning,  spent  a  brief  holiday  at  Atlantic  City. 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  of  Toronto  have  been  ap- 
pointed Canadian  selling  agents  for  the  Sengbusch  Self- 
Closing  Inkstand  Co.  of  Milwaukee,  Wis.  Also  for  the 
Automatic  Pencil  Sharpener  Co.,  Chicago  and  the  Celebrity 
Art  Companv,  Boston. 
NEW  STORE  IN  REGINA. 

G.  R.  Dring  formerly  a  member  of  the  traveling 
staff  of  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  opened  a  rplail  store  at 
1764  Hamilton  Street,  Regina,  Sask.,  recently.  In  a 
letter  extending  New  Year's  Greetings  to  "BOOK- 
SELLER &  STATIONER"  lie  stated  that  the  Christmas 
season  had  been  a  good  one. 


WITH  THE  COLORS 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  is  pleased  to  be 
able  to  present  herewith  a  half-tone  reproduction  of  the 
features  of  Sergt.  Clive  Hurst,  only  son  of  Aubrey  0. 
Hurst.  Clive  Hurst  is  a  graduate  of  the  University  of 
Toronto  School.  After  leaving  school  he  went  with  the 
Copp,  Clark  Co.,  where  he  was  when  he  enlisted  with  the 
208th  Battalion.  He  took  his  discharge  from  the  208th, 
taking  out  a  commission  in  the  Royal  Flying  Corps  (Mili- 
tary Wins).     He  is  now  in  England. 


SERGT.  CLIVE  HURST. 

ERASER  TIPS. 

Last  year  in  New  York  City  one  organization  sold 
three  hundred  and  fifty  million  lead  pencils  that  had 
rubbers  on  the  ends.  Why  was  it  profitable  to  put  the 
rubbers  on   the   ends   of  those   pencils  ? 

Because  people  make  mistakes. 

Now,  when  any  of  us  think  we  can  swell  up  and  point 
the  finger  of  scorn  at  a  co-worker,  let  him  take  out  his 
pencil  and  see  if  the  rubber  is  soiled  or  worn  down — 
then  you  will  realize  that  mistakes  are  universal. 

What  you  and  your  firm  do  with  your  mistakes  is  the 
most  crucial  problem  of  your  business. 

Nine  people  out  of  ten  make  the  same  mistake  twice. 

Millions  of  money  and  laurels  of  fame  are  not  made 
by  luck,  or  sweat,  or  inspiration;  they  are  always  made 
by  using  mistakes  as  stepping-stones  away  from  more 
mistakes. 

Don't  be  afraid  of  more  mistakes,  but  loathe  the 
same  old  mistake.  Then  success  darts  like  an  arrow  to 
its  bull's  eve. 


30 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Thomas  Allen,  accompanied  by  M.  G.  McLean,  of  his 
traveling  staff,  visited  New  York,  Philadelphia,  and  Chi- 
cago) in  January.  New  arrangements  made  included  ap- 
pointment as  Canadian  representatives  for  the  John  C. 
Winston  Co.,  of  Philadelphia. 

E.  J.  Boyd,  manager  of  the  Canadian  branch  of  the 
House  of  Cassell,  spent  ten  days  in  Montreal  in  January. 
He  found  the  book  business  good  in  the  eastern  metropo- 
lis, with  the  retailers  in  an  optimistic  mood  regarding  the 
prospects  of  the  ensuing  year's  trading. 

A  feature  in  a  fountain  pen  advertisement  in  Tor- 
onto papers  last  month  by  McAinsh  Company  was  the 
following  paragraph.  "We  pay  postage.  Any  of  the 
above  may  be  had  with  fine,  medium,  coarse  or  stub 
nibs.     Pens  may  be  exchanged  to  suit." 

J.  Basil  Reid,  stationer,  Ottawa,  sustained  a  loss  of 
$7,000  in  the  fire  on  Sparks  Street,  in  that  city  last 
month.  This  loss  was  only  partly  covered  by  insurance. 
In  the  same  fire  the  5,  10  and  15c  store  of  F.  W.  Wool- 
worth  &  Co.,  was  damaged  to  the  extent  of  about 
$25,000. 

By  arrangements  made  by  the  Dodge  Publishing  Co. 
of  New  York  for  the  ensuing  year,  Bert  Caldwell  will 
travel  in  Ontario  and  Eastern  Provinces  showing  this 
company's  line  of  books,  calendars  and  other  art  pub- 
lications, while  in  Western  Canada  the  line  will  be  shown 
by  W.  C.  Bell. 

Among  the  trade  visitors  to  Toronto  in  January  were 
Thomas  Swan,  manager  of  the  Imperial  News  Co.,  Mon- 
treal branch,  and  T.  J.  Sinnott,  who  has  charge  of  the 
same  company's  Winnipeg  branch.  They  came  to  confer 
with  Manager  Pattullo,  of  the  Toronto  branch,  relative  to 
1917  business.  All  three  spoke  optimistically  of  this  year's 
trade  outlook. 

J.  C.  Murrie,  of  George  J.  McLeod  Limited,  was  in 
Chicago  for  a  week  in  January  attending  a  convention  of 
the  salesmen  of  the  P.  F.  Volland  Co.  At  a  banquet 
unique  favors  were  distributed  and  Mr.  Murrie,  at  his 
place  at  the  table,  found  a  small  model  of  a  British  battle- 
ship as  a  compliment  to  the  Canadian  representative  and 
the  share  that  Canada  is  taking  in  assisting  the  Empire  in 
the  great  war. 

The  1917  trade  list  of  the  House  of  Cassell  is  a  most 
comprehensive  one  of  eighty-eight  pages,  featuring  late 
fiction,  important  works  of  history  and  politics,  biogra- 
phy, reminiscences  and  memories,  social  science,  travel, 
military  works,  gardening  handbooks,  natural  history, 
technical  books,  juveniles,  as  well  as  other  special  class 
volumes,  general  literature  and  the  many  well-known  lib- 
raries published  by  this  house.  The  list  is  a  most  com- 
prehensive one,  that  cannot  fail  to  prove  of  practical  value 
and  help  in  selling,  for  retail  booksellers. 


DOES  YOUR  TOWN  LACK  A  FIFTH  AVENUE? 

Every  city  should  have  its  Fifth  Avenue — a  section  de- 
voted exclusively  to  fine  shops.  Just  as  a  saloon  or  a  pawn- 
broker near  your  shop  would  hurt  trade  for  you,  so  would 
the  best  jeweler,  florist,  milliner  and  other  fine  deaiers  at- 
tract trade  for  the  art  dealer  if  located  in  the  same  block. 
Art  dealers  who  have  no  exclusive  section  in  their  citv 
at  present  would  do  well  to  get  a  group  of  such  dealers  to 
move  simultaneously  to  one  particular  section.  A  street 
right  off  the  main  thoroughfare,  preferably  near  the  auto- 
mobile row,  would  be  most  desirable. 

Incidentally,  this  would  prove  a  most  profitable  real 
estate  venture,  as  this  property  would  immediately  go  up 


in  value,  and  yet  you  would  be  secure  with  your  long-time 
leases.  It  is  hardly  necessary  to  add  that  the  real  estate 
dealers  should  know  nothing  of  this  concerted  movement 
until  your  leases  are  closed,  lest  they  increase  the  rates 
and,  for  this  reason,  it  might  be  well  to  act  jointly. — 
"Picture  and  Art  Trade  Journal." 


LIEUT.  HAROLD  COPP. 

Lieut.  Harold  W.  W.  Copp,  who  US  connected  with  To- 
ronto's >new  battalion,  the  255th,  is  one  of  the  best  known 
men  in  the  book  and  stationery  trade  in  Canada,  having 
been  connected  with  it  for  nearly  twenty  years,  since 
1913   as   a    publisher's   representative,   having   the   Cana- 


LIEUT.    HAROLD  COFP. 

dian  agency  for  the  publishing  houses  of  Blackie  &  Sons 
and  Morgan  &  Scott,  of  Edinburgh,  as  well  as  other  Bri- 
tish houses. 

Mr.  Copp  has  arranged  to  have  his  business  managed 
in  his  absence  by  Hector  Prentor,  who  is  favorably  known 
throughout  the  Canadian  trade  as  representative  in  Can- 
ada for  the  London  firm  of  De  La  Rue  &  Co.,  and  other 
British  houses. 


WASTE  PAPER  BALERS. 

Almonte,  Ont.,  Jan.  8,  1917. 
Bookseller  and  Stationer, 
Toronto, 
Dear   Sirs : 

Observe  article  on  waste  paper  in  January 
number.  Will  you  please  furnish  me  with  names  of  man- 
ufacturer of  a  paper  baling  press  where  I  can  purchase 
one. 

Yours   truly, 

O.  E.  Henderson. 
The   following  firms    in    Canada     manufacture    paper 
balers:— The  General  Sales  Co.,  203  Stair  Bldg.,  Toronto; 
Climax  Baler  Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont. 


31 


MERCHANDISING  METHODS 


103 


The  new  educational  director  of  the  National  Whole- 
sale Grocers'  Association  has  suggested  the  following  lis! 
nf  questions  to  his  members  as  possibly  offering  a  hint  of 
the  sources  of  danger,  due  to  carelessness  or  "leaky''  cus- 
toms. The  questions  were  drawn  up  for  grocers,  but  they 
apply  just  about  as  well  to  booksellers  and  stationers. 
(  heck-  them  over: 

1.  When  was  your  cash  on  hand  checked  last? 

2.  When  were  you  cash  book  footings  proved? 
'■',.  When   was  your  bank   account   reconciled? 

4.  Is  your  general  ledger  in  balance? 

5.  Is  your  sales  ledger  in  balance? 

6.  Are  you  sure  that  advantage  is  taken  of  all  dis- 
counts  for  cash  within  the  time  limit  fixed? 

7.  Have  you  a  statement  of  accounts  and  bills  receiv- 
able ? 

(a)  Are  the  past  due  noted? 

(b)  Are  the  accounts  in  check? 

(c)  When  were  they  verified? 

(d)  How  are  the  accounts  posted? 

(c)    Are    invoices    checked    against    the    goods    re- 
ceived? 

(g)  How  are  your  bills  drawn? 
S.  What  record  have  you  of  cash  sales? 
fl.  What  record  have  you  of  allowances  to  customers? 

10.  How  do  you  keep  your  register  of  orders? 

11.  How  are  the  receiving  books  kept? 

12.  Are  you  carrying  sufficient  merchandise  insurance 
to  cover  your  present  stock,  or  is  your  stock  over-insured? 

13.  Are  your  furniture  and  fixtures  covered  by  insur- 
ance? 

14.  Do  you  carry  liability  insurance? 

1.).  Are  your  salesmen  and  other  employees  handling 
cash  adequately  bonded? 

16.  Is  your  sprinkler  system  tested  regularly?  Are 
your  fire  buckets  filled,  your  extinguishers  workable,  and 
and  the  hose  usable? 

17.  What  precaution  do  you  take  to  see  that  your  in- 
surance policies  are  renewed  on  time? 

15.  Where  are  your  insurance  policies  kept? 
19.  Are  the  letters  of  your  subordinates  tactful? 


be 


20.  Are  letters  answered  promptly  and  courteously? 

21.  Are  your  tiles   kept   so  that   correspondence  can 
readily  located? 

22.  Is  your  filing  system  such  as  not  to  cripple  your 
work   in  your   tile  clerk's  absence? 

2.'i.  What  control  is  used  to  avoid  unnecessary  telephone 
and  telegraph  charges? 

'24.  What  are  the  physical  conditions  of  your  wan- 
house? 

25.  Is  the  stock  neatly  arranged  and  easily  accessible? 

26.  Is  the  arrangement  such  as  to  avoid  unnecessary  de- 
terioration, loss  or  damage? 

27.  Have  your  scales  been  tested  recently? 

28.  Are  your  employees  held  accountable  for  regular 
hours? 


GIVE  THE  BOOK  A  CHANCE  TO  SELL  ITSELF 

The  saleswoman  in  the  bookstore,  after  finding  out  tin- 
wants  of  the  customer,  selected  the  volume  asked  for  and 
held  it  out  before  him.  Then  she  ran  over  the  pages,  lin- 
gering on  those  illustrated  in  color.  All  this  time  she  was 
talking  to  the  customer  about  the  book. 

During  the  procedure  the  proprietor  was  watching  the 
main  floor  from  his  little  office  on  the  balcony,  as  was  his 
frequent  practice  during  the  day.  It  save  him  a  better 
view  of  things  than  he  could  get  from  the  store  floor,  and 
yet  he  did  not  take  the  place  of  mingling  with  the  cus- 
tomers. In  fact,  he  divided  a  good  portion  of  the  day 
between  working  around  among  the  clerks  and  customers, 
and  viewing  the  main  floor  from  the  balcony. 

This  particular  sale  interested  him  much.  The  custo- 
mer seemed  absorbed  in  what  the  salesperson  was  saying. 
Several  times  he  reached  out,  as  if  to  take  the  book.  Fin- 
ally, he  told  the  salesperson  he  would  come  in  again,  and 
left  the  store. 

But  why  did  the  sale  fail?  Of  course,  the  proprietor 
could  not  say  to.  a  certainty.  Yet  his  knowledge  of  the 
principles  of  salesmanship  led  him  to  a  very  safe  conclu- 
sion. The  customer  wanted  to  handle  the  book  and  didn't 
get  a  chance.  It  seems  of  small  importance.  Yet  the  ex- 
perienced retailer  knows  it  is  not.  In  such  a  case  as  this 
it  would  have  helped  much  in  closing  the  sale.  In  fact, 
it  is  such  a  little  thin°'  as  this  which  frequently  stands 
between  success  and  failure  in  retail  selling. — From  "Re- 
tail Helling,"  by  James  W.  Fisk. 


BOOKSELLER  OR  BLACKSMITH? 

An  English  bookseller,  retired  after  fifty  years'  of 
bookselling,  complains  to  the  Bookseller  that  horseshoeing 
is  a  better  profession  than  bookselling.  He  has  been  com- 
paring notes  with  a  contemporary,  who  has  also  retired 
after  active  work  for  about  the  same  period  as  a  black- 
smith. He  finds,  to  his  sorrow,  that  his  working  expenses 
as  a  bookseller  have  been  more  than  ten  tirne^  as  great  as 
those  of  his  friend,  while  his  anxieties  and  responsibilities 
have  been  proportionately  great.  Both,  it  appears  retired 
on  equal  fortunes,  both,  it  may  be  presumed,  worked 
equally  hard,  and  he  concludes  that  he  himself  has  been 
badly  used  bv  fortune, 


WHAT    MISS    FRASER     SAYS: 

Hamiota,  Man.,  Dec.  2S.  1916. 
Bookseller  and  Stationer, 
Toronto. 
Gentlemen,— Enclosed  find  order  for  $2.    it  is  simply 
impossible    lo   run    a    bookstore   without    The   Bookseller 
and  Stationer. 

Yours   truly, 

(Miss)   T.  T.  FRASKK. 


32 


ice  Equipment^ 


and 


Business  Systems 


Ribbon  and  Carbon  Men 
Convene 

The  Upward  Tendency  of  Prices — Pre-eminence  of 
United  States  and  Canadian  Makers 

Fifty  manufacturers  at  the  annual  convention  of  the 
Ribbon  and  Carbon  Association  held  at  the  Hotel  Astor 
New  York  City,  January  12,  were  practically  unanimous 
in  the  belief  that  before  the  present  year  ends  consumers 
would  be  paying  anywhere  from  33  1-3  to  50  per  cent,  more 
for  these  accessories  than  at  the  present  time. 

A.  L.  Foster,  of  Manifold  Supplies  Co.,  retiring  presi- 
dent of  the  association,  in  his  annual  report  devoted  con- 
siderable attention  to  the  abnormally  high  prices  prevail- 
ing in  1916  for  all  of  the  materials  entering  into  the  manu- 
facture of  the  finished  products.  He  also  noted  the  ex- 
pansion taking  place  in  export  business  as  a  result  of  the 
exclusion  of  Germany  from  the  world's  markets.  Manu- 
facturers of  typewriter  supplies,  it  was  stated,  had  done 
the  largest  and  most  profitable  business  in  1916  in  the 
history  of  the  trade. 

A  prominent  member  of  the  association,  in  discussing 
conditions  in  the  industry,  said: 

"During  the  year  just  closed  the  war  made  its  in- 
fluence increasingly  felt.  Prices  for  all  our  raw  materials 
continued  to  soar,  some  were  difficult  to  get  at  any  price, 
and  labor  cost  went  up  about  40  per  cent.  Cloth  for  rib- 
bons, to  take  a  striking-  example,  advanced  35  per  cent, 
in  the  last  three  months,  and  is  now  100  per  cent,  higher 
than  before  hostilities  began.  Paper  is  anywhere  from  50 
to  100  per  cent,  hiaher  than  a  vear  aan.  while  colors  since 
1914  have  soared  1,600  per  cent.  Blacks  are  hard  enough 
to  obtain,  but  when  it  comes  to  purple  or  other  colors  our 
troubles  reach  a  climax. 

"Another  material  sky-rocketing  is  cardboard  used  in 
making  boxes  and  covers.  Generally  speaking,  prices  for 
cardboard  are  300  per  cent,  higher  than  two  years  ago. 
With  the  cost  of  materials  and  manufacture  constantly 
increasing,  the  indications  are  that  before  the  end  of  the 
year  the  consuming  public  will  be  under  the  necessity  of 
paying-  possibly  50  per  cent,  more  for  typewriter  supplies 
than  at  the  present  time.  The  consensus  of  opinion  among 
the  manufacturers  at  the  convention  is  that  no  relief  is  in 
sight,  despite  peace  talk.  The  prospect  for  lower  prices 
is  dark.'" 

It  was  brought  out  at  the  two-days'  convention  that 
practicallv  the  entire  world  is  depending  upon  the  Ameri- 
can and  Canadian  manufacturers  to  furnish  much  needed 
supplies.  Up  to  the  outbreak  of  the  war  Germany  had  a 
big  hold  on  foreign  markets,  but  this  is  a  thins:  of  the  past. 
Orders  are  pouring  in  from  all  quarters  of  the  "lobe  for 
ribbon  and  carbons,  with  the  result  that  manufacturers 
are  hard  put  to  it  to  meet  both  domestic  and  foreign  de- 


mand. Members  said  they  had  no  idea  how  many  billions 
of  yards  of  ribbon  were  necessary  to  keep  the  world's 
typewriters  busy  for  a  year,  but  statistics  on  this  subject 
may  be  prepared  in  time  to  be  presented  at  the  1918 
meeting. 

George  F.  Malcolm,  of  Boston,  was  elected  president 
for  the  ensuing  year,  while  A.  B.  Holmes,  of  New  York, 
succeeded  E.  A.  Brecher  as  secretary-treasurer. 

MARKET  CONDITIONS 

One  good  effect  of  the  unusual  conditions  in  the  field 
of  typewriter  carbon  papers  and  ribbons  brought  about 
by  the  European  war  is  that  the  increased  prices  and  the 
difficulty  in  obtaining  colors,  necessarily  resulting  in  a  cur- 
tailment of  production  of  low  grade  papers  and  ribbons 
and  restriction  to  standard  has  had  the  effect  of  largely 
eliminating  the  peddler,  who  has  thrived  on  the  sale  of 
low  grades,  especially  inferior  carbon  papers,  sometimes 
put  out  under  special  imprints. 

The  sale  of  medium  and  higher  grades  through  lie 
legitimate  stationery  trade,  is  on  the  increase.  The  scar- 
city of  colors  has  had  the  effect  of  making  both  the  manu- 
facturers and  the  dealers  put  greater  effort  into  the  sellir._i 
of  black  carbon  paper  and  ribbons. 

As  pointed  out  by  the  committee  of  the  National  Asso- 
ciation of  Stationers  of  the  United  States  in  its  annua! 
report,  this  is  of  distinct  advantage  to  the  stationer  in  eli- 
minating the  "freak"  colors  of  ribbons  he  has  been  carry- 
ing and  has  helped  greatly  to  put  his  stock  on  a  quick- 
turning  basis. 

It  also  enables  him  to  carry,  with  the  same  investment, 
a  larger  quantity  of  the  more  popular  kinds,  resulting  i'i 
better  service  to  his  customers  and  greater  satisfaction 
to  himself. 

One  manufacturer  says  that  the  distribution  of  these 
goods  is  gradually  resolving  itself  into  three  main  distri- 
buting pointS: — 

"First,  through  the  stationer  who  will  continue  to  han- 
dle what  we  term  the  single  box  trade  to  the  small  con- 
sumer, at  a  price  affording  a  good  profit,  carbon  from  $2 
to  $3  per  box,  typewriter  ribbons  from  60  cents  to  75 
cents  each. 

"Second,  the  larger  consumer  business  will  be  done 
through  the  specialty  houses,  which  are  increasing  in  num- 
ber yearly.  This  trade  does  not  afford  as  large  a  profit 
but,  of  course,  a  far  greater  volume.  The  specialty  houses 
handle  almost  exclusively  imprint  goods. 

"Third,  the  manufacturer  himself  selling  his  own  stan- 
dard brands,  either  direct  or  through  branch  offices,  repre- 
senting- a  mixture  of  the  large  as  well  as  the  small  con- 
sumer." 

This  being  true,  the  stationer  has  the  call  on  the 
better  or  more  profitable  share  of  the  carbon  and  ribbon 
business  and  if  the  opportunity  is  fully  realized  by  him. 


33 


MOGKSELLEK     AND     STATIOJNEK 


should    continue    to    increase     his   sales     and    consequent 
profits. 

Another  manut'act urer  warns  against  trying  to  obtain 
excessive  profits  by  imprinting  low  grade  goods  and  re- 
tailing them  as  of  high  grade— thus  giving  just  the  open- 
ing for  which  the  peddler  seeks — an  opportunity  to  fur- 
nish equal  quality  at  -a  less  price,  establishing-  his  argu 
nient  that  there  is  no  use  paying  high  prices  to  get  quality 
— the  consumer  hasn't  had  good  quality  and  doesn't  know 
what  it  is,  but  the  impression  the  argument  has  made 
sticks  with  him.  That  committee  concluded  its  report  as 
follows: — 

' '  We  cannot  believe  there  is  any  large  number  of  sta- 
tioners  pursuing  this  policy  as  it  would  seem  to  lead,  as 
does  any  other  form  of  misrepresentation,  to  final  elimina- 
tion from  that  particular  field. 

"The  present  upward  tendency  of  prices,  if  continued, 
will,  of  necessity,  eradicate  this  evil  by  forcing  low  grade 
goods  from  the  market. 

"All  reputable  manufacturers  are  willing  and  anxious 
to  co-operate  with  the  stationer  to  enable  him  to  get  all 
this  business  possible  and  reports  indicate  that  he  is  be- 
ginning to  reap  the  benefits  of  such  co-operation. '' 


Inks  and  Mucilage 

Standardization    of    Packages    and    Elimination    of 

Some  Needless  Ones — The  Policy  Being  Carried 

Out  bv  Manufacturers 


FOLLOWING  the  decision  reached  by  the  committee 
on  inks  and  mucilage  at  the  recent  convention  of 
the  National  Association  of  Stationers  of  the  United 
States,  the  different  manufacturers  are  taking  action  to- 
ward the  elimination  of  needless  packages  and  the  better 
standardization  of  others. 

The  war  has  hit  ink  manufacturers  pretty  hard.  Al- 
most all  the  raw  material  used  in  the  business  comes  from 
abroad  and  the  supply  had  either  been  cut  off  entirely  or 
advanced  from  100  to  1,000  and  1,500  per  cent.  Heavy 
advances  have  also  been  made  in  all  domestic  supplies, 
with  notices  of  still  further  advances  to  be  made. 

The  result  of  this  standardization  will  be  about  as 
follows: — 

That  the  standard  assortment  of  sizes  for  the  combined 
ink  be  quarts,  pints,  y2  pints,  and  2  oz.  squares. 

That  the  standard  assortment  of  sizes  for  blue,  green 
and  violet  inks  be  quarts,  pints,  y2  pints,  3  oz.  squares,  2 
oz.  squares  and  1  oz. 

That  all  small  sizes  of  the  cheaper  red  ink  be  elimin- 
ated except  1  oz. 

That  the  1%  oz.  cone  and  cylinders  be  confined  to  black 
ink  and  mucilage. 

That  the  capacity  of  the  4  oz.  mucilage  be  reduced  to 
.'{  oz. 

That  the  standard  size  for  small  paste  be  l1/^  oz.  and 
3  oz. 

That  the  small  size  of  inks  and  adhesives  be  equipped 
with  standard  black  wood  tops,  not  enameled,  or  screw 
tops  embossed  and  decorated  in  one  color  only. 

That  no  liquid  glue  be  put  in  bottles  of  less  than  1  oz. 

The  decision  to  take  this  action  was  based  not  only 
upon  opinions  of  members  of  the  association's  speci.il 
committee,  hut  upon  replies  to  questions  sent  out  to  re- 
presentative retailers  throughout  the  membership  of  the 
association  which  includes  some  Canadian  stationers. 


NOVEL  FILING  SYSTEM  PERFECTED 

George  II.  Young,  a  real  estate  dealer  of  Ford  du  Lac, 
Wis.,  has  applied  for  a  patent  on  a  comprehensive  system 
of  filing  and  indexing  business  correspondence. 

According  to  a  description  in  the  "Reporter,"  a  local 
newspaper,  it  furnishes  a  most  convenient  and  speedy 
method  of  filing  away  correspondence  relating  to  unfin- 
ished business  where  it  can  be  procured  with  the  least  loss 
of  time.  It  consists  of  a  Hat  topped  desk  without  the 
usual  row  of  drawers  on  each  side.  In  their  place  are  two 
revolving  drums,  consisting-  of  thirty-one  compartments 
each.  These  compartments  have  sliding  covers  that  are 
provided  with  a  removable  label  for  indexing  the  contents 
and  files  in  each  compartment  just  the  size  of  a  sheet  of 
letter  paper  and  having  a  capacity  of  forty  or  fifty  letters. 
As  the  drum  is  fixed,  the  top  of  the  upper  compartment 
is  in  view,  as  it  is  the  same  size  as  a  slot  in  the  top  of  the 
desk.  The  label  can  be  read,  the  cover  raised,  and  the  file 
extracted  without  moving  from  the  chair.  If  a  man  has 
real  estate  and  insurance  or  loans  for  his  business,  he 
may  use  one  drum  for  the  real  estate  and  loans.  When 
he  comes  in  the  morning  and  has  his  mail  sorted,  any 
letters  relating  to  old  business  can  be  placed  with  the 
former  correspondence  by  turning  the  wheel  to  the  pro- 
per pocket  wjien  the  whole  matter  is  before  him  at  once. 
He  can  refresh  his  memory  on  all  business  under  way  by 
reading  the  labels  on  the  compartments  and  only  use  a 
few  minutes  of  his  time.  When  any  deal  has  been  com- 
pleted, the  file  can  be  removed  from  the  compartment  and 
a  new  one  started  in  its  place.  The  compartments  are  so 
arranged  that  the  partitions  can  be  moved  to  make  some 
larger  than  others. 

The  device  allows  a  busy  man  to  go  through  all  live 
matters  without  getting  up  from  his  desk  to  go  and  search 
for  some  letter  that  came  in  a  few  days  before. 


SOME  ACHIEVEMENTS  TO  EMULATE 

A  recent  review  of  the  work  of  the  Retail  Merchants* 
Board  of  the  Commerce  Club  of  Toledo,  Ohio,  revealed  a 
series  of  activities  in  behalf  of  the  dealer  which  is  not  only 
interesting,  but  which  should  be  seriously  considered  by 
the  various  trade  clubs  throughout  the  country.  The  re- 
cord of  the  Retail  Merchants'  Board  points  the  way  to  op- 
portunities for  general  co-operation.  In  part,  the  review 
reads : 

"Established  a  six-day  limit  on  the  return  of  merchan- 
dise, effective  Nov.  1,  1915.  This  rule  is  rigidly  enforced 
by  the  stores,  has  reduced  the  return  of  goods  nearly  50 
per  cent,  during  its  11  months'  operation,  has  stopped  the 
practice  of  returning  remnants,  and  has  been  very  bene- 
ficial to  all  concerned. 

"Effected  an  agreement  among  retail  stores  to  dis- 
continue the  practice  of  allowing  discounts  to  various 
professions  and  classes  of  people. 

"Compiled  and  published  8,000  copies  of  list  of  mer- 
chandise books  in  Toledo  Public  Library,  for  free  distribu- 
tion and  free  use  of  clerks  and  employees  in  retail  stores. 
This  action  of  the  Board  has  been  highly  commended  by 
leading  educators  and  merchants  all  over  this  country,  has 
resulted  in  widespread  publicity  in  national  magazines. 

EH 

JAP  TOY  NOVELTIES. 

The  nature-faking  rooster  that  is  wound  up  to  eat 
out  of  a  bucket,  and  the  hen  which  carries  realism  to  the 
point  of  laying  eggs,  were  two  of  the  most  unusual  of 
the  novelties,  during  the  toys  from  Japan  which  were 
prominent  during  the  toys  sold  in  America  in  the  Christ- 
mas season  of  1916. 


34 


Post  Cards.rtrt  cards 

flr*4yPllW         Calendars 
wEPSSi  ancl  Gift-Novelties 


SOME  NEW  GREETING  CARDS 

"Sampler''  designs  in  calendars  and  greeting  cards 
constitute  a  feature  of  the  new  Volland  line.  A  figure 
that  is  worked  into  some  of  these  new  designs  is  that 
of  a  little  girl  engaged  in  this  old  "Sampler"  method  of 
doing  "fancy  work"  and  this  in  itself  gives  a  clear 
conception  of  the  nature  of  this  new  idea  in  art  produc- 
tions. 

Another  novelty  introduced  in  this  line  this  year  is 
a  series  of  dance  programme  and  place  cards  with 
"Oriental  good  luck"  ring's.  Each  card  has  a  ring  at- 
tached to  it  by  means  of  ribbon,  these  rings,  made  of  a 
composition   and   in    different   colors,   being  of  a   size   to 


It  is  by  devising  selling  ideas  like  this,  or  others 
similarly  efficacious,  that  much  is  being  accomplished  in 
the  way  of  combating  the  adverse  effect  on  post  card 
sales  that  was  brought  about  by  the  ill-advised  action  of 
the  government  at  Ottawa  in  imposing  the  one  cent  war 
tax  on  post  cards,  the  result  of  which  was  that  the  post 
card  trade  for  months  after  that,  was  virtually 
paralyzed. 

m 

A  LITTLE  BIT  OF  HEAVEN 

A  notable  new  picture  introduced  this  season  is  en- 
titled "A  Little  Bit  of  Heaven,"  a  specimen  of  the  art 
of  Bessie  Pease  Guttman,  who  has  gained  fame  as  a  de- 


A  Little  Bit  of  Heaveu. 


slip  readily  over  the  thumb.  The  idea  has  already  caught 
on  for  dances  and  other  social  events,  in  large  cities 
across  the  border. 

As  a  means  of  popularizing  art  post  cards  for  use 
as  greetings,  Volland 's  have  put  them  up  in  neat  little 
boxes,  the  boxes  themselves  having  illuminated  designs 
on  the  lids,  each  box  containing  ten  or  twenty-four  cards 
in  series  of  similar  designs.  Considering  the  boxes  of 
twenty-four  cards,  these  retail  in  the  United  States  at 
20c  or  25c  a  box  but  in  Canada  of  course  with  the  22 V2 
per  cent,  duty  plus  7Y2  per  cent,  war  tax  the  price  will 
be  30c  or  35c  retail.  One  distinct  benefit  of  selling  cards 
in  this  manner  will  be  that  individual  customers  will 
frequently,  in  this  manner,  purchase  two  dozen  cards 
whereas  ordinarily  they  might  buy  only  two  or  three,  or 
at  most,  half  a  dozen  cards. 


lineator  of  babyhood.  This  half-tone  is  a  reduction  from 
the  picture  which  is  14  in.  x  22  in.  size  and  appears  here 
through  the  courtesy  of  Guttman  and  Guttman,  of  New 
York. 

m 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  acknowledges  re- 
ceipt of  a  series  of  Canadian  official  war  postcards  in  real 
photograph  form  from  the  Imperial  News  Co.  These  have 
been  published  by  arrangement  with  the  well-known  Lon- 
don pictorial  newspaper,  the  Daily  Mirror.  Among  the  in- 
teresting pictures  are  such  subjects  as  the  "Tank  in 
Action,"  post  cards  showing  different  views  of  these 
monsters  in  actually  fighting  action.  Another  most  inter- 
esting view  is  "First  Line  Hospital,"  showing  wounded 
soldiers  in  the  rear  of  advance  trenches.  "Some  of  Can- 
ada's 'Bag,'  "  shows  Canadian  soldiers  escorting  a  large 
body  of  captured  Boches. 


35 


BOOKSELLER     AN  D     S  T  A  T  I  O  N  fe R 


A  MYSTIFYING  NOVELTY 

The  accompanying  illustration  shows  the  "Wireless 
Pup,"  a  novelty  put  <>u!  by  the  National  Toy  Co.,  of  Bos- 
ton.    It  is  operated  at  a  distance  by  sound  waves.     Blow 


the  whistle,  or  call,  or  clap  your  hands,  and  on  "hearing" 
the  noise  the  dog-  will  come  out  ol'  his  kennel.  There  are 
no  wires  or  other  mechanical  contrivances  attached  to 
the  dog'. 

This  is  not  a  jim-crack  toy.  In  fact,  it  retails  in  the 
U.  S.  for  five  dollars,  but  in  addition  to  selling-  as  a  toy, 
it  is  reported  as  taking-  well  as  a  novelty  for  offices, 
dens,  etc. 

u 

NEW  IDEA  IN  GREETING  CARDS 

A  very  pleasing  effect  has  been  obtained  by  William 
Ritchie  &  Sons,  of  Edinburgh,  in  one  of  their  new  series 
of  Christmas  cards  samples  of  which  reached  their  Cana- 
dian representative,  Aubery  0.  Hurst  last  mont'h.  It  is 
obtained  by  having-  a  thin  covering;  of  very  fine  netting 
mounted  over  the  picture  itself  and  the  result  is  a  clever 
imitation  of  the  oil  painting  effect.  These  novel  cards 
are  shown  in  a  variety  of  designs. 

u 

"  'Pictures  add  another  window  to  the  home,'  is  the 
way  one  man  expressed  the  necessities  of  pictures." 


BLACK  CAT  NOVELTIES 

Two  specimens  of  the  unique  black  cat  gift 
shop  upvelties,  as  introduced  by  C.  A.  Russell 
&  Co.,  Flat  iron  Building,  New  York,  are  shown 
herewith.  It  will  be  observed  that  these  novel- 
ties are  useful,  as  well  as  ornamental,  serving, 
as  twine-holders,  candle  holders,  etc.  The  de- 
signs are  so  strikingly  humorous  that  they 
carry  an  immediate  appeal  and  consequently 
beiong-  to  the  class  of  novelties  that  are  easy 
to  sell. 

BOOKSELLER  AND 
STATIONER  will  con- 
tinue to  give  the  trade  ad- 
vance information  about 
new  items  in  the  class  of 
goods  that  have  become 
known  as  gift  shop  novel- 
ties. 


A 


NEW  "FAMILY" 
OF  TOYS 

"The  Happy  Rite' 


fam- 


ily are  newcomers  in  the 
toy  world,"  there  being 
"Daddy  Rite,"  "Mother 
Rite,"  "Brother  Rite," 
"Sister  Rite."  "Tige 
Rite,"  "Kitty  Rite."  and 
"Bunny  Rite,"  the  last 
three  named  being  the  dog, 
the  cat  and  the  rabbit. 
They  are  decidedly  origi- 
nal in  construction  as  well 
as  facial  expression. 


Wonderful  Development  of  the  GiftShopIdea 

Great  Expansion  Across  the  Border — A  Great   Opportunity  for   Canadian   Book   and 

Stationery  Merchants. 


ONE  of  the  notable  developments  in  merchandising 
in  the  United  States  in  the  past  two  years  has 
been  the  growth  of  the  gift  shop  idea.  In  New 
York  and  the  other  great  cities  and  in  many  of  the  com- 
paratively smaller  cities,  there  are  exclusive  "gift  shops" 
in  which  gift  novelties  embracing  a  great  variety  of 
articles  are  handled  to  the  exclusion  of  any  distinct  line 
of  merchandise  of  the  old  and  familiar  types.  These 
stored  in  most  cases  have  been  remarkably  successful. 

The  gift  novelty  trade  expansion,  however,  has  been 
shared  by  established  retail  stores  such  as  book,  art, 
and  stationeiy  shops  and  altogether  the  production  and 
sale  of  the  various  gift  novelties  has  gone  up  by  leaps 
and  bounds.-  0,  •" 

In  Canada  this  development  has  by  no  means  been 
absent  but  it  has  been  largely  restricted  to  the  big  cities. 

"BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER"  wishes  to  impress 


upon  the  minds  of  its  subscribers  the  absolute  necessity 
for  giving-  heed  to  this  trade  evolution. 

The  book  and  stationery  store  is  logically  the  medium 
through  which  this  development  should  find  expression. 
At  Christmas  time  these  stores,  perhaps  more  than  any 
other  retail  shops,  loom  in  the  minds  of  the  public  as 
"Santa  Claus  headquarters."  This  new  "gift  shop" 
development  accentuates  that  conception  but  enormously 
extends  it,  so  that  the  natural  consequence  is  an  infinitely 
greater  variety  of  gift  novelties,  carried  in  stock  and  sold 
and  "the  still  more  important  expansion,  extending  the 
gift  novelty  idea  to  a  year-round  proposition,  thereby 
gaining  for  these  dealers  a  far  greater  proposition  of 
sales  of  articles  intended  for  wedding  gifts,  birthday 
gifts  and  various  special  gifts,  making  for  repeated  sales 
from   day  to  day  throughout  the  whole  year. 

"Opportunity",  knocks  at  the  door .  of  every  book- 
seller and  stationer  in  Canada.  Do  not  neglect 
opportunity ! 


36 


mmm^m^mMimmm^m^iw^emmm 


and 
Sporting 
itf  Goods 


:7M 


How  to  Build   up  Sporting 
Goods  Trade 

Carefully  Laid  Plans  Are  Necessary — Requirements 

of   Prospective   Customers   Should   be    Diligently 

Investigated — Co-Operation  With  Organizations 

GETTING  a  good  start  is  a  mighty  good  way  to 
make  any  selling  campaign  successful.  It  is 
possible  to  do  business  in  a  restricted  selling 
season  by  waiting  until  just  before  it  opens,  allowing 
only  a  few  days  in  which  to  get  the  goods  and  to  put 
them  on  display,  but  that  isn't  good  merchandising  nor 
can  a  merchant  possibly  measure  up  to  possibilities  with- 
out much  greater  preparation. 

The  season  for  selling  baseball  goods,  tennis  goods 
and  other  kindred  sporting  lines  may  seem  far  off,  but 
the  winter  and  early  spring  months  will  soon  pass  and 
if  the  merchant  does  prepare  well  ahead  of  time  he 
will  run  the  risk  of  not  being  able  to  get  the  particular 
items  in  this  class  of  merchandise  which  people  will 
want.  It  must  be  borne  in  mind  that  baseball  devotees, 
those  who  play  the  game,  not  the  fans  who  are  satisfied 
to  sit  in  a  grandstand  and  watch  others  do  the  playing, 
are  posted  all  the  time.  They  know  what  is  going  on  in 
the  baseball  world  and  they  know  what  they  want  in  the 
way  of  baseball  goods.  Consequently  this  subject  of 
baseball  merchandise  is  one  that  demands  even  more  than 
ordinary  study  on  the  part  of  the  dealer  who  should 
keep  in  close  touch  with  the  different  organizations  such 
as  leagues  and  clubs  in  factories,  colleges,  schools  and 
churches,  so  as  to  work  in  harmony  with  them  and  put 
into  stock  the  very  class  of  goods  they  want.  A  very 
special  advantage  of  this  action  which  has  been  demon- 
strated by  many  an  alert  dealer,  is  that  this  interest 
shown  by  the  merchant  is  appreciated  by  the  men  and 
boys  who  form  these  different  organizations  and  con- 
sequently they  are  not  so  prone  to  send  orders  by  mail 
to  sporting  goods  houses  in  larger  centers. 

The  volume  of  business  to  be  done  is  so  great  that 
it  will  be  advisable  for  the  dealer  to  spend  as  much  time 
as  he  can  possibly  spare  in  thus  planning  to  make  the 
next  sporting  goods  selling  season  a  bigger  success  than 
ever  before. 

What  has  been  said  about  baseball  applies,  of  course, 
to  other  sports  such  as  lacrosse,  football,  cricket  and 
tennis. 

Fishing  tackle  constitutes  another  line  that  offers 
good  rewards  in  profits  to  the  retailer  who  will  devote  the 
necessary  time  to  a  study  of  this  subject  so  as  to  be 
able  to  stock  the  particular  goods  that  will  be  certain 
to  sell  in  his  locality. 


.-.".-Ym?. 


Not  only  should  these  preparations  include  study  of 
the  requirements  of  the  prospective  customer  who 
knows  what  he  wants  and  will  get  it  elsewhere  if  the 
first  dealer  he  goes  to,  hasn't  it  in  stock,  but  plans 
should  be  made  to  interest  new  customers  by  means  of 
effective  displays  of  the  goods  and  other  publicity  means. 

Does  the  merchant  reading  this  say  to  himself:  "I 
haven't  time  to  go  to  all  that  bother?"  Well,  before 
putting  the  subject  out  of  his  mind  in  that  brief  manner, 
he  should  bear  in  mind  that  his  competitor  is  likely  to 
adopt  the  other  course  of  action,  the  one  that  will  at- 
tract this  trade  to  his  store  so  to  ignore  the  question  is 
simply  to  play  into  the  competitor's  hand.  If  the  mer- 
chant cannot  himself  do  this  promotional  work  he  can 
depute  an  assistant  to  do  all  or  most  of  it,  in  which  case, 
all  that  will  be  required  of  the  merchant  himself  will 
be  the  necessary  time  for  supervision  of  the  assistant's 
work. 


Spring  and  Summer  Toys 

Good  Business  Can  be  Done  With  Large  Variety  of 

Items  and  Careful  Attention  to  These  Will 

Help  Year-Round  Toy  Selling. 

TOO  many  merchants  selling  toys  seem  to  think  that 
season  lines  other  than  those  intended  for  Christ- 
mas selling  are  not  worth-while. 

This  is  a  big  mistake  and  this  very  mistake  is  some- 
times made  by  a  merchant  in  a  small  town  in  which  there 
is  no  other  store  selling  toys.  This  is  a  very  short- 
sighted policy  and  one  thing  certain  is  that  such  a  dealer 
is  inviting  competition  by  reason  of  his  failure  to  give 
the  community  proper  service  in  this  particular.  • 

Now  let  us  just  glance  briefly  over  some  of  the  more 
familiar  toy  lines  that  are  particularly  associated  with 
the  spring  and  summer  seasons.  These  include  garden 
tools,  jack  stones,  marbles,  rolling  hoops,  skipping  ropes, 
boy  scout  supplies,  carts  and  barrows,  velocipedes,  side- 
walk sulkies,  roller  skates,  go-carts  and  doll  cabs,  toy 
pistols,  cap  canes  and  bombs,  fire-crackers,  safety  tor- 
pedoes and  many  other  items  besides  which  as  belonging 
to  the  same  department  must  be  considered  baseballs. 
baseball  bats,  gloves,  rubber  balls  and  other  sporting 
goods  lines  for  boys  and  girls. 

With  all  these  goods  for  children  are  closely  associ- 
ated such  goods  as  croquet  sets,  lawn  swings  and  ham- 
mocks. In  fact  the  range  of  merchandise  is  so  extensive 
that  it  is  almost  past  comprehension  that  so  many  dealers 
are  satisfied,  or  at  least  apparently  so,  with  a  hit  or  miss 
selling  method  as  applying  to  these  goods  while  many 
toys  left  over'  from  the  hdliday  trade  are  packed  away 
out  of  sight  in  an  almost" un-get-at-able  manner  whereas 
''37 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


many  <>!'  these  if  kepi  easily  accessible  along  with  the 
spring  and  summer  toy  lines  could  frequently  be  sold 
the  year  round. 

A  most  important  point  to  be  remembered  is  that  due 
attention  to  toy  lines  that  are  particularly  associated  with 
the  different  seasons  will  naurally  help  along  the  year- 
ro mid  Belling  of  toys  of  a  general  type  not  restricted  to 
any  season  but  which  by  custom  have  been  usually 
associated  with  the  Christmas  season. 

m 

WANTED,  A  GOOD,  QUIET  ELEPHANT  IN  EX- 
CHANGE FOR  A  SAND  DUMPER  IN  FINE 
WORKING  ORDER. 

(From  the  Estevan,  Sask.,  Progress.) 

Christmas  being  over  and  gone,  we  are  at  leisure  to 
look  around  and  survey  the  toys  that  Santa  Claus  brought 
the  kiddies.  There  is  a  great  array  of  them,  and  many 
are  fearfully  and  wonderfully  made. 

I  know  a  youngster  that  has  a  tiger,  a  terrible  beast 
on  wheels,  painted  a  real  yellow,  with  black  stripes  and 
every  time  he  moves,  he  opens  a  huge  cavernous  mouth, 
and  seeks  whom  he  may  devour. 

It  is  my  duty,  now  becoming  a  painful  one,  to  stimu- 
late and  register  fear  every  time  this  animal  approaches 
me,  I  am  suposed  to  climb  on  chairs,  get  under  the 
table,  and  yell  with  fright. 

This  brings  joy  to  the  heart  of  a  five-year-old,  being 
the  only  individual  in  the  house,  able  to  keep  the  yellow 
and  black  monster  under  control.  I  am  compelled  to  buy 
things  at  a  store,  and  to  be  the  motive  power  at  the  end 
of  a  street  car. 

All  this  is  nothing  to  a  device  called  a  Sandy  Andy. 
I  have  no  doubts  as  to  its  'andiness  in  distributing  sand 
all  over  the  place,  though  it  is  not  supposed  to. 

Its  chief  business  is  to  dump  sand  from  a  hopper 
into  a  tin  can,  and  when  the  can  is  full,  the  sand  is 
transferred  back  to  the  hopper,  and  so  the  game  goes 
an  infinitum.  In  some  way  the  sand  drifts  into  most 
uncomfortable  places,  such  as  the  butter,  the  sugar,  and 
on  the  bread  plate. 

It  seems  to  be  the  most  popular  toy  with  a  youngster 
that  I  have  struck  yet,  and  runs  all  day. 

I  often  wonder  whether  that  or  the  tin  horn  is  the 
worst. 

If  anyone  has  a  good  quiet  elephant  to  trade  for  the 
sand  business,  I  am  willing  to  make  a  deal. 

That  is  to  say,  if  I  can  get  hold  of  it.  I  understand 
that  the  Sandy  Andy  rests  at  night  in  the  same  bed  as 
the   owner. 

HI 

THE  NEW  AMERICAN  DOLL. 

The  day  of  the  old-fashioned  German  doll  has  gone, 
probably  forever.  She  was  always  an  unnatural,  artifi- 
cial product,  with  her  porcelain  face,  painted  like  a 
chorus  girl,  her  popping  blue  eyes,  her  mass  of  unvarying 
golden  hair,  her  highly-colored  "ruby"  lips.  No  single 
thing  in  the  nursery  was  the  cause  of  so  many  domestic 
tragedies,  says  "The  World's  Work."  Drop  her  on  the 
floor,  and  the  head  would  usually  go  flying  into  a  dozen 
parts,  and  legs  and  arms  constantly  bled  sawdust  so  pro- 
fusely as  to  suggest  the  carnage  of  a  European  battle- 
field. Little  girls  who  could  easily  manufacture  a  baby 
out  of  the  family  ragbag  had  no  difficult  in  mothering  one 
of  these  queer  products  of  the  Germanic  genius,  and  so 
millions  of  Americans  have  been  brought  up  on  them. 
But  their  day,  we  are  told,  is  over. 

The  European  war,  which  had  ended  most  kinds  of 
immigration,   has  shut  out   these  little  wanderers.     Am- 


erican genius,  which  is  now  being  called  upon  to  manu- 
facture coal  tar  dyes,  bexamythyline,  and  manicure  scis- 
sors, is  also  turning  its  attention  to  dolls.  Our  success 
has  been  so  great,  we  are  told,  that  not  only  shall  we  not, 
import  any  more  dolls  from  the  Fatherland,  but  that  we 
shall  probably  sell  them  in  Nuremberg  itself!  For  our 
doll-makers  have  turned  realists.  Their  products  are  in- 
dividualized like  a  real  baby.  No  more  unglazed  porce- 
lain faces;  these  American  dolls  are  really  flesh-color, 
and  their  heads  have  the  additional  value  of  durability. 
These  little  creatures  are  already  so  popular  that  our 
toy  factories  are  running  day  and  night  to  supply  the  de- 
mand.    It   is  one   of  the  pleasanter  aspects  of  the   war. 

02 
"A  B  C  OF  TOYLAND" 

The  accompanying  illustration  is  a  reproduction  of  a 
toy  advertisement  used  in  the  recent  holiday  trading  sea- 
son, and,  as  it  is  one  that  can  readily  be  used  by  any  toy- 
dealer,  though  it  may  be  necessary  to  substitute  articles 

n 


SOLDIER  SET 


Little    sketches  of   thingi    that 
Santa  Claus  ha*  «ent  lohi«  Hamilton 
Headquarter*    in    The   Right   House    j 
Basement    and  now  on  display  (here 


mm 


T 


TEDD\   BT  VJt 


■'"© 


CXTMBKl! 


;..~M 


tHirnoN  cm 


J' 


7F.BRA  BOOM 


*n 


in  some  cases  for  those  shown  in  this  advertisement,  it 
will  be  advisable  for  dealers  to  either  clip  and  file  away 
this  advertisement  or  keep  the  idea  definitely  in  mind  for 
use  in  the  next  holiday  season. 

m 

SOME  NEW  BRITISH  TOYS 

It  is  interesting  to  observe  that  that  lucky  mascot, 
"Fnms  Up,"  which  made  such  a  hit  as  a  postcard  when 
introduced,  has  now  appeared  in  doll  form. 

Other  new  toys  of  British  manufacture  include  un- 
breakable doll's  heads.  These  are  made  of  a  fine  com- 
position, and  are  said  to  be  better  than  the  best  of  pre- 
war German  goods,  in  form,  finish  and  color.  The  most 
noteworthy  is  a  baby  doll's  head,  but  several  lines  are 
made. 

Dogs  and  other  animals  which  at  a  touch  will  jump, 
skip,  hop,  dance,  sit  up  and  "do  things"  are  toy  novelties 
recently  offered. 


38 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


CAMERA  SALES  IN  WINTER. 

In  order  to  keep  up  the  sale  of  cameras  and  photo 
supplies  in  the  winter  months,  dealers  should  emphasize 
the  fact  in  conversing1  with  prospective  customers  that 
particularly  fine  pictures  can  be  obtained  in  winter  time 
and  consequently  there  is  no  reason  why  cameras  should 
be  neglected  at  that  season. 

As  a  writer  in  the  "Amateur  Photographers'  Weekly" 
says:  "Photography  is  one  of  the  finest  hobbies  for  a 
person  of  either  sex.  It  takes  the  mind  off  one's  troubles, 
and  demands  attention  in  itself.  It  afford  a  relaxation 
for  the  moment,  and  a  constant  reminder  of  many 
pleasant  moments  in  its  resulting-  prints.  It  takes  us 
often  far  afield  and  gives  us  a  knowledge  of  the  beauties 
of  Nature  that  many  of  us  would  never  even  dream  of, 
were  it  not  for  the  camera.  It  develops  our  faculties  of 
observation  and  concentration — in  short,  the  camera 
makes  David  Graysons  of  us  all.  And  why  shelve  such 
a  good  friend  merely  because  of  cold  weather?" 

PHOTOGRAPHIC  TIPS. 

Clean  developing  dishes  as  well  as  clean  graduates, 
are  aids  to  clean  negatives  and  prints.  A  piece  of  loofah 
is  a  very  convenient  thing  for  scrubbing  both  the  inside 
and  outside  of  developing  dishes.  A  rub  of  the  loofah 
on  a  cake  of  sapolio  will  generally  be  enough  to  clear 
any  developer  stains.  In  more  obstinate  cases  one  or 
other  of  the  above  mentioned  acid  cleansing  solutions 
may  be  needed.  In  that  case  we  may  save  the  fingers, 
and  make  a  mop  scrubber  with  a  bit  of  firewood  and  a 
piece  of  loofah  tied  to  its  end  with  fine  string. 

FLATTENING  PRINTS. 

A  good  method  of  flattening  prints — much  better  than 
running  them  under  a  ruler,  is  to  lay  them  one  by  one 
between  the  pages  of  an  old  magazine,  being  careful  to 
interleave  them  with  the  curl  all  the  same  way  up.  Then 
proceed  to  roll  up  the  magazine,  as  it  were,  in  the  op- 
posite direction.  A  few  stiff  rolls  suffice  to  take  all 
creases  and  curls  out,  leaving  them  comparatively  flat 
for   mounting.  — Amateur  Photographer's    Weekly. 

BIG  MARKET  FOR  PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Dealers  will  do  well  to  remind  their  camera  customers 
and  prospective  customers  that  millions  of  human  inter- 
est photographs  are  being  used  every  year  for  magazine 
and  newspaper  illustrations. 

Publishers  are  now  demanding  clean,  snappy  prints, 
well  defined  in  all  planes.  Contact  prints  made  with  the 
large  size  reflecting  cameras  fitted  with  long  focus  lenses 
which  produce  results  lacking  in  depth  of  definition,  are 
consequently  in  less  demand  than  sharp-in-every-plane 
enlargements  from  small  negatives.  By  impressing  upon 
amateur  photographers  the  big  market  there  is  from 
good  pictures  the  effect  will  be  that  more  pictures  will 
be  taken  consequently  more  supplies  will  be  used  and 
more  money  will  be  made  by  the  dealers. 

PERIODICAL  NEWS. 

To  the  February  Century,  George  Creel  contributes  a 
partial  solution  of  the  question  of  the  high  cost  of  living 
in  an  article  entitled  "Can  a  Democratic  Government 
Control  Prices?"  It  is  stated  that  Mr.  Creel's  discus-- 
sion,  is  based  on  an  interview  with  Joseph  E.  Davies  of 
the  Federal  Trade  Commission,  formerly  United  States 
Commissioner  of  Corporations.  While  dealing  specifically 
with  conditions  in  the  United  States,  there  is  so  much 
similarity  between  these  and  Canadian  conditions  that 
theoretically  is  of  as  much  interest  to  Canadians  as  to 
people  in  the  United  States. 


A  GOOD  ADVERTISEMENT. 

TIk-  advertisement  of  Wolfe's  Bookstore,  of  Welland, 
Out.,  as  reproduced  herewith  is  a  piece  of  copy  of  the 
sort  that  is  above  the  average  in  point  of  general  merit. 
The  typographical  arrangement  is  good  and  so  is  the 
matter  forming  the  message.  The  idea  of  running  a 
"store  news" — heading  and  a  date  line  is  of  course  not 
a  new  one  but  there  are  still  many  newspapers  in  which 
it  has  not  been  featured.  The  style  of  heading  however, 
is  of  secondary  importance,  the  essential  point  being  that 
the  heading  should  be  one  that  will  be  certain  to  arrest 
the  reader's  attention. 

:x*  xxxxxxxxxsxxxxxxxxxxxx: 

TO.  1.  Thonday.  J»n.  t.  Vtil.  .  No.  \i 

OFFICE  SUPPLIES:— 

This  is  the  time  of  year  when  you  require  Board  Filea, 
Box  Files,  Binding  Cases,  Blank  Books,  Diaries.  Desk  Calen- 
dars, Ink,  Typewriter  Ribbons,  Lead  Pencils,  etc.,  etc.  We 
have  a  good  .supply  and  await  your  orders.     Phone  14. 

FOUNTAIN  PENS:— 

The  MOORE  ORIGINAL  NON-LEAKABLE  Fountain 
Pen  is  in  a  class  by  itself.  Absolutely  satisfactory  and  fully 
guaranteed.     Let  us  explain  its  features  to  you. 

MUSICAL  INSTRUMENTS  AND  SUPPLIES:— 

We  are  headquarters  for  Violins,  Mandolins,  Autoharps, 
Mouth  Organs;  "also  Violin  and  other  strings  and  supplies. 

WOLFE'S  BOOKSTORE 


35  East  Main  St 


Phone  14 


WELLAND.  ONT. 


EXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX&XXXXXXXXX 

This  is  a  reduction  from  an  advertisement  in  a  two  column 
space  five  inches  deep,  taken  from  the  Welland  Telegraph. 

OUTLOOK  FOR  HANDBAGS 

In  the  small  leather  goods  trade  the  outlook  for  this 
year  is  favorable,  but  uncertain,  on  account  of  material 
markets.  Leathers,  both  staple  and  fancy,  are  bound  to 
1)0  higher,  and  this  will  naturally  emphasize  fabrics,  but 
the  trade  does  not  look  with  much  favor  on  these  diver- 
sions from  regular  lines.  They  are  of  value  chiefly  for 
novelty  purposes.  Leather  is  the  legitimate  field  for  such 
dress  accessories  and  dealers  should  encourage  its  use 
more  extensively  because  it  is  relevant  to  the  business 
and  gives  greater  satisfaction  to  the  public. 

Styles  of  1916  will  probably  continue  without  many 
radical  changes.  Flat  goods  are  popular,  while  for  larger 
bags  the  pleated  and  shirred  effects  will  continue  in  favor. 
Considerable  has  been  done  with  combinations  of  leather. 
Paisley  effects  had. quite  a  run,  and  will  probably  'be  good 
to  a  limited  extent  this  spring. 

SB! 

WRONG  PRICE  QUOTED 

An  unfortunate  error  occurred  in  the  advertisement  of 
the  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  last  month,  the  wrong  price  being 
printed  opposite  the  item  dealing  with  the  "Papeteries" 
containing  the  new  "Red,  White  and  Blue"  notepaper  and 
envelopes  in  the  advertisement  announcing  the  tablets, 
envelopes  and  papeteries,  in  which  this  new  patriotic  cor- 
respondence paper  is  available.  Instead  of  the  correct 
price  of  $2.40  a  dozen  for  the  papeteries,  the  price  was 
given  as  $2. 


39 


USIC  and 

mi 


Talking  Machines 
and  Records 


i 


RUSSIAN  MUSIC. 

The  following  is  from  the  preface  to  M.  Montagu- 
Nathan's  new  volume  "An  Introduction  to  Russian 
Music,"  published  by  Cecil  Palmer  and  Hay  ward,  of 
London : 

"It  will  quickly  become  obvious  to  those  who  com- 
pare the  recent  music  of  Russia  and  of  Prussia,  that 
while  the  latter  is  in  a  decline,  the  former  is  in  a  particu- 
larly flourishing  condition.  The  people  who  were  study- 
ing Russian  music  long  before  the  War  and  wondered  why 
the  Britain  musical  public  persisted  in  ignoring  all  the 
great  Russians  excepting  Tchaikovsky,  knew  that  Debussy 
was  saved  from  the  great  wave  of  Wagnerism  that  all 
but  engulfed  Europe  in  the  'eighties  through  his  good 
fortune  in  learning  of  the  existence  of  Moussorgsky's 
Boris  Godounof;  they  knew  that  while  there  is  much  that 
is  original  in  Pelleas  et  Melisande,  it  is  in  many  respects 
to  be  regarded  as  the  grandchild  of  Dargomijsky 's  some- 
what austere  opera,  "The  Stone  Guest,"  welcomed  by 
the  Russian  reformers  as  "the  keystone  of  the  modern 
Russian  opera;"  they  knew  that  in  leading  the  French 
movement  for  the  foundation  of  a  national  school  upon 
native  traditions,  Debussy  had  not  the  intention  of  copy- 
ing, but  of  emulating  the  Russians  who  had  succeeded  in 
achieving  this  for  their  own  music. 

It  is  because  Russia  has  made  a  national  music  for 
herself,  because  she  had  contrived  to  endow  Opera  with 
a  dignity  that  compels  people  to  think  of  Opera  as  Drama, 
and  not  as  a  "Concert  in  costume,"  because  her  musi- 
cians have  consistently  preached  nationalism  not  merely 
for  themselves  but  for  all  nations,  that  we  should  study 
Russian  music.  We  have  much  to  learn  from  it,  and, 
not  least,  how  to  be  ourselves." 

WESTERN  CONDITIONS 

Charles  Passmore,  of  Boosey  &  Co.,  is  back  at  his  desk 
at  Toronto  headquarters  after  a  trip  of  over  three  months 
through  the  Canadian  West  and  the  extreme  Western 
States. 

Mr.  Passmore  told  of  many  interesting  things  which 
indicate  the  return  of  prosperous  conditions  in  Western 
Canada.  For  example,  in  Trail,  B.C.,  the  large  smelting 
works  there,  which  has  a  monthly  pay-roll  of  $180,000,  is 
building  a  million  dollar  addition  to  their  plant. 

Mr.  Passmore  was  informed  by  a  financial  man  in  Van- 
couver that  business  in  that  city  had  improved  100%  in 
the  last  eight  months. 

Standing  on  the  verandah  of  a  hotel  in  Southern  Alberta 
was  a  farmer  with  a  sample  of  wheat  in  his  hand  saying 
to  himself,  "they've  offered  me  a  dollar  sixty-nine.  I 
guess  I'll  have  to  take  it.  It's  the  best  I  can  do."  When 
asked  how  much  wheat  he  had  for  sale,  the  farmer  re- 
plied, "8,000  bushels."     Mr.  Passmore  noted  that  scores 


of  farmers  who  had  had  substantial  returns  from  last  sea- 
son's crops  were  going  to  California  and  other  southern 
points  for  the  winter. 

Dealers  who  have  had  such  pronounced  success  in 
handling  Irene  Humble 's  "We're  From  Canada,"  will  be 
interested  to  know  that  there  has  been  published  another 
song  by  Miss  Humble,  entitled  "My  Little  Sweetheart, 
Marie."  This  is  a  song  of  the  semi-popular  ballad  type, 
and  its  worth  may  be  gathered  from  the  fact  that  a  large 
retail  concern  contracted  for  the  entire  first  edition,  prac- 
tically from  manuscript. 

A  music  trades  exhibition  is  to  be  held  in  Chicago  dur- 
ing the  trade  conventions  to  be  held  in  that  city  in  June. 
It  is  proposed  to  engage  the  foremost  orchestras,  choral 
organizations  and.  solo  artists  of  the  United  States  for  a 
series  of  festival  concerts.  The  idea  is  to  link  up  exhibition 
and  concerts  with  the  work  of  the  Music  Advancement 
Bureau. 

Miss  Dorothy  Jardon,  the  celebrated  American  artist, 
is  to  tour  Western  Canada  the  latter  part  of  January  and 
the  first  part  of  February,  appearing  at  Winnipeg,  Cal- 
gary and  Vancouver,  where  she  will  especially  feature  the 
song  success,  "Oh,  You  Haunting  Waltz." 

Morgan  Kingston,  the  eminent  tenor,  who  appeared  re- 
cently in  Toronto,  sang,  "Songs  of  the  Motherland,"  by 
Lionel  Monckton,  the  fine  words  of  which  are  by  Henry 
Hamilton;  also  the  famous  Ivor  Novello  number,  "Till  the 
Boys  Come  Home." 

A  music  dealer  revises  his  mailing  list  once  every  year 
in  order  to  keep  it  up-to-date.  He  offers  a  small  prize  to 
every  school  teacher  who  will  send  him  the  names  of 
fifty  or  more  school  children  who  are  taking  piano  lessons, 
or  are  interested  in  music.  When  he  receives  these  names 
he  circularizes  the  children 's  parents  for  the  sale  of  pianos, 
other  musical  instruments  and  music. 

AN  ADVERTISING  TIP. 

On  another  page  of  this  issue  in  connection  with  an 
article  on  retail  advertising  will  be  found  an  advertise- 
ment of  Wolfe's  Book  Store  of  Welland,  Ont.  Reference 
is  made  to  this  advertisement  here  because  it  contains 
a  special  paragraph  featuring  musical  instruments  and 
supplies.  This  plan  of  having  newspaper  advertising, 
take  the  form  of  store  news  is  not  a  new  idea  but  it  is 
a  good  one  and  enables  advertisers  to  work  in  mention 
of  different  departments  without  decreasing  the  effective- 
ness of  advertisement.  This  method  adopted  by  Wolfe's 
Bookstore  can  consequently  be  advantageously  adopted 
by  other  booksellers  and  stationers  and  just  here  comes 
the  point  of  this  particular  paragraph:  see  to  it  that 
due  attention  is  paid  to  the  advertising  of  the  stock  of 
musical  publications,  musical  instruments  and  supplies. 


40 


Gcirdwr  iting  Aade  &sg 


#RTDE:dw&pds 


Lesson  No.  24. 

IT  has  been  emphasized  many  times  in  this  series  of 
cardwriting  lessons  that  it  is  not  at  all  necessary  to 
be  an  artist  to  become  a  proficient  cardwriter.  Never- 
theless, it  is  necessary  to  be  able  to  draw,  to  a  certain  ex- 
tent, in  order  to  fulfill  all  the  requirements  of  a  card- 
writer. 

Among  the  many  little  bits  of  art  work  a  cardwriter 
is  called  upon  to  do  is  the  index  hand.  This  is  something 
a  cardwriter  in  a  large  store  may  have  to  draw  many 
times  during  a  week's  work.  A  cardwriter  of  a  smaller 
store  does  not  have  the  same  call  for  this  kind  of  work, 
but  should  be  able  to  do  it  as  well  as  his  more  experienced 
brother. 

Speed  and  effect  are  the  two  main  points  to  be  obtained. 
The  cardwriter  should  be  able  to  make  the  directory  or 
index  hand  very  rapidly,  for  this  style  of  card  should  be 
turned  out  just  as  quickly  as  the  other  style  of  cards. 

There  may  be  many  cardwriters  who  cannot  work 
quickly  because  of  non-practice.  For  the  benefit  of  these 
the  following  quick  method  of  obtaining  a  drawing  of  the 
index  hand  is  suggested : — Draw  very  carefully  and  lightly 
an  index  hand  on  tough  drawing  paper.  Have  it  well  pro- 
portioned and  full  of  life.  When  it  is  satisfactory,  trace 
heavily.  This  will  be  a  pattern  that  is  always  ready  for 
instant  use.  To  use,  place  a  piece  of  carbon  paper  under 
the  drawing  and  trace.  This  will  give  a  faint  outline  in 
the  desired  position  on  the  card.  This  should  then  be  re- 
traced with  pen  or  brush  as  the  case  may  be.  About  three 
different  sizes  should  be  made  and  kept  ready  for  instant 
use.     These  patterns  may  be  reversed  by  simply  using  the 


carbon  paper  with  the  black  side  up  and  under  the  draw- 
ing already  on.  This  will  give  a  drawing  of  a  hand  point- 
ing in  the  opposite  direction. 

One  thing  essential  is  to  have  the  drawing  beyond  re- 
proach, even  by  an  artist.  That  is,  have  the  proportions 
correct  and  make  it  appear  full  of  life  and  snap.  This 
must  be  done  entirely  by  outline.  Shading  of  the  drawing 
should  not  be  attempted.  Another  thing  to  be  avoided 
is  the  tendency  to  reproduce  the  human  hand  in  its 
natural  state.  It  should  only  be  made  as  an  outline  draw- 
ing that  will  give  at  a  glance  the  desired  result  of  acting 
as  a  directory. 

Some  cardwriting  courses  on  the  market  to-day  use  a 
method  for  hand  formation  which  should  be  commented 
upon.  This  style  is  the  using  of  angles,  etc.,  in  order  to 
get  the  hand  in  the  proper  proportions.  It  is  a  very  slow 
process,  and  all  one  can  say  about  it  is  that  it  is  not 
"modern  cardwriting."  It  is  more  of  a  draughtsman's 
or  designer's  method,  and  too  slow  for  rapid  cardwriting. 

It  is  well  to  have  various  styles  of  index  hands,  that 
can  he  used  for  variety's  sake.  If  one  keeps  their  eyes 
opened,  these  may  be  found  from  time  to  time  in  maga- 
zine  advertisements. 

Errors  in  Drawing 

In  Fig.  No.  2  we  have  an  object  lesson.  These  are  a 
few  of  the  many  errors  made  by  beginners,  who  will  not 
take  the  time  to  make  these  drawings  correct.  "A." 
Here  is  a  hand  that  is  too  narrow.  Note  how  narrow  the 
wrist  is.  This  mistake  is  often  made,  and  should  be 
avoided. 


Mad. 


41 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


"B."  Tli is  is  just  the  opposite  to  the  preceding  one. 
It  is  too 'short  and  thick  at  the  wrist.  Note  how  clumsy 
it  appears. 

'•('."  This  is  another  common  mistake.  The  wrist  is 
too  hum.  and  the  fingers  and  tluimh  arc  too  short  and 
stubby,     it  is  important  that  this  be  avoided. 

During  this  entire  series  of  "Cardwriting  Made  Easy" 
lessons  many  varieties  of  alphabets,  both  of  heavy  and 
light  formation,  have  been  taken  up — some  suitable  for 
large  show  cards  and  others  for  the  finer  kind  of  show 
cards.  All  of  these  are  important  to  the  eardwriter,  be- 
cause each  and  every  one  has  an  important  place  in  the 
show  card  world.  The  alphabet  this  month  shows  yet 
another  style.  This  one  is  called  by  sign  painters  "Thick 
and   thin."     Some  card  writers  call  it  a  single  and  double 


stroke  letter.  It  is  a  bold  faced  letter,  which  is  used  on 
large  signs  and  show  cards  alike  with  good  effect.  For 
the  finer  show  card  work  it  is  not  advisable,  because  a 
small  bold-faced  letter  has  not  the  appearance  that  a 
finely-spurred  pen  or  brush  stroke  Roman  letter  has.  So 
it  is  well  to  keep  this  letter  to  the  larger  cards  and  posters. 
Tor  any  card  or  sign  that  is  to  be  read  at  a  distance  this 
type  is  excellent. 

For  reference  sake  we  will  call  this  a  thick  and  thin 
type.  It  gets  this  name  because  one  stroke  of  the  letter  is 
thicker- than  the  other.  On  show  cards,  when  this  type  is 
used,  always  use  a  brush  that  makes  a  stroke  the  same 
width  as  the  narrow  stroke  of  the  letter.  That  means 
the  narrow  strokes  are  all  to  be  made  with  one  stroke  of 
the  brush,  the  wider  strokes  being  twice  as  broad  or  two 
strokes  wide.  This  type  when  executed  properly  does  not 
need  any  rilling  in,  because  the  outline  strokes  will  com- 
pletely cover  the  centre  of  the  letter. 

It  will  be  noticed  that  the  stroke  of  each  letter  has  not 
been  numbered  on  this  chart  as  on  previous  charts.  This 
is  more  difficult  to  illustrate  on  account  of  the  more 
numerous  strokes  than  the  brush  stroke  letters  have.  How- 
ever, with  the  previous  lessons  in  mind,  one  should  experi- 
ence no  difficulty  in  working-  out  this  formation.  The 
numerous  overlapping  of  strokes  also  makes  it  impossible 
to  number  them  correctly.  The  first  thing  is  to  have  the 
brush  working  properly.  It  must  have  a  good  chisel 
point  and  without  a  ragged  edge.  As  the  width  of  the 
fine  stroke  is  a  brush  stroke,  use  the  size  of  brush  that 
will  make  this  stroke  properly.  Have  the  color  working 
smoothly  and  work  the  brush  to  a  good  point  on  a  piece 
of  waste  card  before  attempting  the  work. 


An  individual  explanation  of  this  alphabet  is  not 
necessary,  as  the  same  method  applies  all  the  way  through. 
Some  of  the  curved  letters  are  marked  when  the  strokes 
join  or  overlap.  The  arrows  indicate  the  direction  in 
which  to  draw  the  brush.  Notice  that  the  ends  of  all 
strokes  are  finished  with  a  stroke  across  the  end. 


THE  TWENTY  BEST  STORIES 

The   twenty  best   short   stories   by   American   authors, 

published  in  American  magazines,  during  1916,  as  selected 

by  Edward  J.  O'Brien  out  of  2,700  short  stories  published 

in  seventy  periodicals  during  the  year,  are  these: — 

The  Sacrificial  Altar.  By  (Jertrude  Atherton.  (From  Harper's 
Magazine);  Miss  Willett.  By  Barry  Benefield.  (From  The  Century 
Magazine)  ;  Supers.  By  Frederick  Booth.  (From  The  Seven  Arts 
Magazine)  :  Fug.  By  Dana  Burnet.  (From  McBride's  Magazine)  \ 
Ma's  Pretties.  By  Francis  Buzzell.  (From  The  Pictorial  Review)  ; 
Tin-  Great  Auk.  By  Irvin  S.  Cobb.  (From  The  Saturday  Evening 
Post)  ;  Tlie  Lost  Phoebe.  By  Theodore  Dreiser.  (From  The  Century 
Magazine)  ;  Tlie  Silent  Jnfare.  By  Armistead  C.  Gordon.  (From 
Scribner's  Magazine)  ;  The  Cat  of  the  Cane-Brake.  By  Frederick 
Stuart  Greene.  (From  The  Metropolitan  Magazine)  ;  Making  Port. 
By  Kichard  Matthews  Hallett.  (From  Every  Week)  ;  "Ice  Water, 
PI — /"  By  Fannie  Hurst.  (From  Collier's  Weekly)  ;  Little  Selves. 
By  Mary  Derner.  (From  The  Atlantic  Monthly)  ;  The  Sun  Chaser. 
By  Jeanette  Marks.  (From  The  Pictorial  Review)  ;  At  the  End  of 
the  Road.  By  Walter  J.  Muilenburg.  (From  The  Forum)  ;  The 
Rig  Stranger  on  Dorehester  Heights.  By  Albert  Du  Verney  Pentz. 
(From  The  Boston  Evening  Transcript)  ;  The.  Menorah.  By  Benja- 
min Rosenblatt.  (From  The  Bellman)  ;  Penance.  By  Elsie  Sing- 
master.  (From  The  Pictorial  Review)  ;  Feet  of  Gold.  By  Gordon 
Arthur  Smith.  (From  Scribner's  Magazine)  ;  Down  on  Their  Knees. 
By  Wilbur  Daniel  Steele.  (From  Harper's  Magazine)  ;  Half-Past 
Ten.     By  Alice  L.  Tildesley.     (From  The  Black  Cat). 

The  volume  containing  these  stories  will  be  published  this 
month  under  the  title  of  The  Best  Short  Stories  of  1016. 

LIBRARY  FOR  THE  BLIND 

The  Canadian  Free'  Library  for  the  Blind  is  to  have 
new  quarters  on  College  street,  Toronto,  in  the  old  Worts 
home  on  the  north  side,  two  doors  west  of  University 
avenue.  The  house  has  been  bought  from  the  Toronto 
General  Trusts  Co.,  executors  for  the  Worts  Estate,  for 
about  $6,000,  and  it  is  understood  that  very  reasonable 
terms  have  been  secured  from  the  Toronto  University  for 
the  five-year  renewable  lease,  owing  to  the  library  being 
an  educational  institution. 


R.  F.  Foster,  the  well-known  writer  on  Bridge,  has 
written  a  new  book  on  "Pirate  Bridge,"  a  new  game 
showing  further  advance  in  this  absorbing  game.  This 
book  will  appear  about  March  1. 

Katherine  Keith's  new  book,  "The  Girl,"  is  being 
referred  to  as,  in  a  sense,  an  American  Marie-Claire,  with 
a  sure  choice  of  significant  incident  and  episode  it  reveals 
the  development  of  an  American  girl  of  to-day. 

In  his  book  "My  Wife,"  Edward  Burke  tells  the  story 
of  a  man  who  sets  out  to  write  the  story  of  his  own  life 
but  finds  in  the  spinning  of  his  yarn  that  he  has  really 
been  the  creature  of  wiles  of  his  wife  and  family.  This 
is  a  refreshing  humorous  book. 

In  addition  to  being  the  arbiter  of  the  American  short 
story,  Edward  J.  O'Brien  is  a  poet  of  distinction.  His 
volume  of  odes  and  lyrics,  to  be  published  this  month, 
under  the  title  of  White  Fountains,  is  evidence  that  his 
ability  is  creative  as  well  as  critical. 

From  Grossett  &  Dunlap  comes  a  new  list  of  book? 
added  to  the  reprint  list,  including  Jack  London's  novels, 
"The  Valley  of  the  Moon,"  "John  Barleycorn,"  "Com- 
mon Clay,"  by  Cleves  Kinkaid;  "The  Man  of  Iron."  by 
Richard  Dehan;  "The  Boomers,"  by  Ray  Norton;  "On 
Trial,"  by  Elmer  Reizenstein;  "Little  Sir  Galahad,"  by 
Phoebe  Gray;  "The  Right  Track,"  by  Clara  Louise  Burn- 
ham;  "I  Accuse!"  by  a  German,  and  "The  Right  Stuff," 
by  Ian  Hay. 


42 


TALES   OF  FISHERFOLK. 

"The  Shack  Locker"  is  the  title  of  a  book  of  tales 
by  Frank  W.  Wallace,  author  of  "Blue  Water,"  these 
stories  being  chiefly  of  the  fisherfolk  of  the  Maritime 
Provinces.  He  visualizes  the  home  life  of  these  people 
and  explains,  more  by  suggestion  than  direct  language, 
their  superstitions,  and  the  deep  religious  feeling  that 
underlies  their  every  action.  The  recklessness  of  their 
own  lives  and  their  tender  care  of  the  lives  of  others, 
make  the  fishermen  of  these  tales  very  dear  to  the  reader. 

TORONTO  COOK  BOOK 

From  Thomas  Allen  comes  a  copy  of  the  new  Toronto 
Cook  Book,  compiled  by  Mrs.  E.  J.  Powell,  with  the  assist- 
ance of  other  prominent  women  of  Toronto.  The  preface 
states  that  the  housewives  of  Toronto  have  for  some  years 
past  been  calling  for  a  cook  book  of  moderate  cost.  The 
volume  is  offered  with  the  assurance  that  the  recipes  are 
tested  and  proven  by  a  wide  circle  of  ladies  in  the  art  and 
domestic  science. 

A  JUST  COMPLAINT 

Stout  Red-faced  Lady  in  Stationery  Store — Do  you 
mean  to  say  you  won't  give  me  my  money  back  for  this 
book  just  because  I  have  read  it?  You  know  you  adver- 
tise that  it  is  your  aim  to  have  only  satisfied  customers. 

"Yes,  madam;  but  what  is  the  matter?  Is  the  print 
imperfect  or  anything  like  that?" 

"No." 

"Then  why  are  you  not  satisfied  with  the  novel?" 

"Why,  I  don't  like  the  way  it  ends." — Harper's 
Weekly. 

OFFERS  $100  PRIZE 

Doubleday,  Page  &  Co.,  publishers  of  the  American 
edition  of  '-Casuals  of  the  Sea,"  by  William  McFee,  of 
which  The  Mussnn  Book  Co.,  have  the  market  for  Can- 
ada, are  offering  a  prize  of  $100  for  the  most  interesting 
essay  on  "Casuals  of  the  Sea."  The  essay  must  be  not 
less  than  1,000  words  and  must  reach  Garden  City  by 
noon  on  March  31,  addressed  "Casuals  of  the  Sea," 
Doubleday,  Page  &  Co.,  Garden  City,  L.  I. 

The  prize  will  be  awarded  to  the  essay  which  is  marked 
by  the  qualities  which  distinguish  good  criticism :  clarity, 
insight,  and  understanding.  The  most  genuinely  value- 
able  and  original  comment  on  the  book  will  win  the  prize; 
undiscriminatino'  praise  is  not  desired. 


From  the  Putnam's  comes  Rose  Pastor  Stoke 's  play  in 
four  acts  entitled  "The  Women  Who  Wouldn't."  It  is 
not  an  imaginative  play  but  a  stern  picture  of  real  life — 
harsh,  brutal,  strong.  The  scene  is  a  mining  town,  and 
before  the  reader  passes  the  terrible  struggle  for  existence, 
of  a  typical  miner's  family.  In  the  development  of  her 
heroine — the  girl  who  is  big  enough  to  look  straight  at  the 
future — the  author  discloses  more  than  mere  talent. 


BEST  SELLING  BOOKS  IN 
CANADA    • 

Fiction  Points 

1— Mr.   Brttling   Sees  it   Through    Wells  108 

2— When  a  .Man's  a  Man   Wright  124 

3— The   World   For  Sale   Parker  102 

i — The  W6rn  Doorstep  Sherwood    68 

5— The    Wonderful    Year     Locke    52 

6 — (Kingdom   of  the  Blind    Oppenheini     50 

(.lust   David)    Porter     50 

Non-Fiction. 

1 — Rhymes   of  a    Ited    Cross   Man    Service  102 

2 — Northwest    Mounted   'Police    Deane     20 

3 — Action    Front    Cable     14 

UNITED  STATES  SUMMARY. 

I  From    MeClurg's    Bulletin) 

Fiction. 

When  a   Man's  a   Man   Harold  Bell  Wright 

Mr.  Britling  Sees  It  Through   H.  G.  Wells 

Cieorgina  of  the  Rainbows Ynnie  Fellows  Johnston 

Mary — 'Gusta    Joseph    C.    Lincoln 

I  enrod   and   Sam    Booth  Tarkintou 

Enoch   Crane F.   Hopkinson   Smith 


A  NEW  NOVELIST. 

' '  The  Stars  in  Their  Courses "  is  a  new  novel  by 
Hilda  M.  Sharp  a  young  Englishwoman's  first  work  of 
fiction  which  has 'scored  a  distinct  success  in  England. 
The  Canadian  edition  is  published  by  William  Briggs.  The 
story  is  of  a  fighter  against  odds,  who  is  also  a  gambler 
by  inherited  instinct.  Finding  himself,  at  twenty-two, 
disinherited  by  his  millionare  father,  and  being  deep  in 
debt  and  desperate,  he  seizes  the  one  visible  forlorn  hope 
— a  species  of  gamble  in  which  his  own  reputation  is  the 
stake.  He  plays  and  loses,  and  for  the  succeeding  eight 
years  pays  the  penalty  exacted  by  public  condemnation. 
His  life,  from  the  age  of  ten,  is  interwoven  with,  and 
trammelled  by,  that  of  his  cousin,  a  born  poseur  and 
egoist,  with  the  gift  for  making  society  in  general,  and 
women  in  particular,  believe  in  those  splendid  and  "in- 
teresting" qualities  which  he  flatters  himself  he  pos- 
sesses, and  to  guard  which  he  submits  to  paying  black- 
mail till  the  inevitable  climax  comes.  The  cousins,  in 
their  different  fashions,  both  love  the  same  woman,  and 
her  happiness  narrowly  escapes  shipwreck  between  the 
one  man's  weakness  and  the  other's  strength. 


"The  Thrush  and  the  Jay"  is  the  name  of  a  new 
volume  of  verse  and  prose  sketches  by  Sylvia  Lind,  which 
comes  from  Constable  &  Co.,  of  London.  Many  of  the  fine 
poems  which  it  contains  have  appeared  in  "The  Nation" 
and  of  the  prose  sketches  in  that  review  and  "The  New 
Statesman."  From  the  same  publishers  comes  a  new 
novel  entitled  "Out  of  the  House,"  by  M.  E.  F.  Irwin, 
author  of  "How  Many  Miles  to  Babvlon"  and  "Come 
Out  to  Plav." 


"There  is  a  great  difference  between  pictures  bought 
to  sell  at  low  prices  and  pictures  made  to  sell  at  low  prices. 
The  former  would  be  cheaper  at  any  price  less  than  the 
regular  price.  Our  stock  represents  the  latter,  fresh,  for 
this  season's  selling." — From  a  retailer's  advertisement. 


43 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


LIMPY 

William  .Johnston  has  in  his  new  book  "Limpy," 
written  a  story  of  a  boy  who  felt  neglected.  This  tale 
puts  into  words  what  a  boy  of  ten  felt  in  his  soul  upon 
coming  face  to  face  with  the  truer  values  of  life.  Irving 
Cobb,  in  speaking'  of'this  tale,  said  recently:  "Somebody 
might  have  written  a  truer,  sweeter,  more  appealing,  more 
convincing  story  of  a  boy  than  'Limpy,'  but  nobody  ever 
has.' ' 

THE  SPELL  OF  SCOTLAND 

Another  new  volume  in  the  "Spell"  series  published -by 
the  Page  Company  is  "The  Spell  of  Scotland,"  as  with 
previous  volumes  this  book  is  designed  to  convey  the 
charm  of  the  country  depicted  and  the  author  has  rambled 
leisurely  through  the  different  regions  of  Auld  Scotia  de- 
scribed, visiting  the  many  interesting  historical  spots, 
observing  the  every-day  intimate  life  of  the  people  and 
he  writes  in  such  a  fascinating  way  that  unconsciously  the 
spell  of  the  land  is  laid  on  the  reader.  The  book  is  bound 
in  decorated  cloth,  has  some  illustrations  in  color  and  ' 
others  in  duogravure.     It  is  a  $2.50  book. 

DICTIONARY  OF  SIMILES 

A  valuable  new  book  published  this  year  by  Thomas 
Allen  is  "A  Dictionary  of  Similes,"  by  Frank  J.  Wil- 
stach.  It  is  a  $2.50  book.  From  Chaucer  to  Shakespeare 
and  through  English  and  American  literature  to  0.  Henry 
and  Irvin  Cobb,  the  simile  has  a  favorite  figure  of  speech 
and  now  at  last  a  book  of  similes  is  available  for  refer- 
ence use. 

The  similes  presented  include  many  quaint  and  curious 
ones  of  other  than  English  authors.  This  book  will  be  a 
valuable  aid  to  writers,  speakers,  teachers  and  students. 
The  volume  includes  over  fifteen  thousand  similes,  alpha- 
betically arranged  under  subject  headings. 

MR.  BELL'S  AGENCIES 

W.  C.  Bell,  formerly  of  the  firm  of  Bell  &  Cockburn 
and  for  the  past  year  with  the  Oxford  University  Press, 
has  again  gone  in  business'on  his  own  account  and  is  now 
the  Canadian  selling  representative  of  the  following  pub- 
lishers: William  Heineman,  John  Murray,  T.  Fisher  Un- 
win,  T.  Werner  Laurie,  Cecil  Palmer  and  Hay  ward,  of 
London;  and  W.  B.  Huebseh,  of  New  York,  besides  which 
he  will  sell  the  publications  of  the  Dodge  Publishing  Co., 
New  York,  in  Western  Canada  and  the  lines  of  the  Ox- 
ford University  Press  in  the  cities  of  Montreal,  Ottawa, 
Toronto,  Hamilton  and  London.  Mr.  Bell  has  taken  quar- 
ters at  27  Richmond  street  West,  in  the  Oxford  Univer- 
sity Press  building. 

THE  STARS  IN  THEIR  COURSES 

A  novel  that  seems  destined  to  have  a  good  run  in 
Canada,  following  its  success  in  England,  is  "The  Stars 
in  Their  Courses,"  by  Hilda  M.  Sharp,  published  by 
William  Briggs. 

This  story,  the  author's  first  novel,  will  appeal  especi- 
ally to  the  people  who  so  enjoy  the  novels  of  Florence  M. 
Barclay. 

The  two  chief  characters  are  cousins.  One  of  these 
young  men  is  a  scion  of  an  ancient  house,  whose  mother 
had  married  a  self-made  man,  whose  rise  was  rapid  as  a 
parliamentarian,  following-  his  commercial  achievements. 
Eventually,  when  the  son  was  but  a  boy,  his  mother 
elopes  with  another  man  and  the  father  vents  the  vials  of 
his  wrath  upon  the  son,  and  by  a  diabolically  planned 
scheme,  seeks  to  thoroughly  ruin  the  boy  by  making  a  will 
in  favor  of  a  nephew,  encouraging  his  son  toward  spend- 


thrift habits  and  an  inherited  passion  for  gambling.  The 
lather's  object  is  to  have  this  millstone  of  debt  crush  the 
young  man  upon  learning  that  he  is  cut  off  in  his  father's 
will.  But  the  nephew  proves  a  disappointment  and  in  his 
last  moments  the  father  makes  a  new  will  reinstating  his 
son.  The  will,  by  a  well-devised  ruse,  does  not  come  to 
light  until  years  after  the  father's  death,  and  in  those 
years,  the  nephew  enjoys  the  full  fruits  of  the  wealth  and 
position  bequeathed  in  the  first  will.  In  those  years  events 
transpire  that  combine  to  bring  the  story  to  a  most 
dramatic  climax,  ending  in  the  exoneration  of  the  rightful 
heir  after  years  of  ilhrepute  as  the  result  of  machinations 
of  his  cousin.  The  interest  of  the  story  is  enhanced  by 
the  fact  that  the  cousins  loved  the  same  girl. 


W.  McLeod  Raine,  author  of  "Steve  Yaeger,"  has 
written  a  new  book  entitled,  "The  Yukon  Trail,"  which 
will  be  published  shortly. 

Mrs.  Patrick  McGill  in  a  new  book  called  "The  Rose 
of  Glenconnell,"  is  a  Yukon  story,  Glenconnell  being  a 
lumber  camp.     It  is  a  tale  of  love  and  stirring  adventure. 

The  Life  and  Letters  of  Reverend  Mother  Theresa 
Dease,"  foundress  and  Superior  General  of  the  Institute 
of  the  Blessed  Virgin  Mary  in  America  by  a  member  of 
the  community  is  to  be  published  this  season. 

"The  Boy  Settler"  by  Edwin  L.  Sabin,  is  a  new  book 
by  the  author  of  the  "Bar  B.  Boys"  which  comes  from 
the  Crowell  Company.  It  is  an  illustrated  book  of  304 
pages. 

Mr.  Sabin  has  a  quiet  vein  of  humor  and  a  keen  sense 
of  the  picturesque.  He  knows  how  to  tell  a  Western 
story  without  dwelling  on  the  "blood  and  thunder"  as- 
pects and  still  inject  plenty  of  excitement  of  the  right 
sort. 

A  new  volume  of  poems  comes  from  the  Crowell  Com-_ 
pany  being  the  work  of  Rossiter  W.  Raymond  entitled 
"Christus  Consolator,  and  other  Poems.''  Dr.  Raymond 
is  an  accomplished  Biblical  student  and  expositor,  author 
of  numerous  poems,  hymns,  and  stories,  many  written 
for  the  (Brooklyn)  Plymouth  Sunday  School,  of  which 
he  was  long  the  Superintendent. 

An  interesting  volume  which  has  just  come  to  the 
editor  from  Putnam's  is  "The  Seven  Wonders  of  the 
Ancient  World,"  by  Edgar  J.  Banks,  Ph.D. 

The  book  is  profusely  illustrated  and  is  a  thoroughly 
interesting  and  instructive  .volume.  Dr.  Banks  was  field 
director  of  the  recent  Babylonian  expedition  of  the  Uni- 
versity of  Chicago.  Despite  the  familiarity  of  the  term 
"the  seven  wonders  of  the  ancient  world,"  most  people, 
even  the  learned,  find  it  necessary  to  refer  to  some  "book 
of  knowledge"  in  order  to  name  the  seven.  The  list  is  as 
follows:  The  Pyramid  of  Khufu,  2900  B.C.,  or  earlier; 
The  Walls  of  Babylon,  605  to  562  B.C.;  the  Statute  of 
Olympus  Zeus,  470  to  462  B.C.;  the  Tomb  of  the  King  of 
Mausolus,  356  B.C.;  the  Colossus  of  Rhodes,  280  B.C.; 
the  Pharos  of  Alexandria,  247  B.C. 


Four  "chains"  of  five  and  ten-cent  stores  did  a  business 
last  year  of  $135,000,000,  which  meant  about  two  billions 
of  articles  sold.     In  so  big  a  country  nothing  is  small. 

"It  will  be  discovered  by  the  careful  investigator  that 
in  the  honest  advertisement  the  light  of  truth  dispels  the 
shadow  of  suspicion." 


44 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


"Lydia  of  the  Pines"  is  the  title  of  a  new  novel  by 
Honore  Willsie. 

Two  new  titles  in  Thornton  Burgess'  Bed-Time  Stories 
are  to  be  brought  out  this  season. 

Bella  K.  Maniates'  new  novel  "Our  Next  Door  Neigh- 
bor," will  be  published  next  month. 

A  new  nature  book  by  Comstock  is  "The  Handbook  of 
Nature  Study,"  published  at  $3.50. 

A  new  tale  of  Western  life  and  adventure  is  "The 
Lure  of  the  Desert,"  by  Kathlyn  Rhodes. 

"John  Webster  and  the  Elizabethan  Drama,"  by 
Rupert  Brook  is  to  be  published  very  shortly. 

Waldo  Frank  is  the  author  of  a  new  novel  entitled, 
"The  Unwelcome  Man."    It  is  a  story  of  modern  life. 

B.  M.  Croker  is  the  author  of  a  new  book  just  pub- 
lished entitled,  "Given  in  Marriage,"  an  Anglo-Indian 
tale. 

A  new  series  of  "Buster  Brown"  and  "Foxy  Grand- 
pa" books  are  being  introduced  this  year  with  eight 
titles. 

A  posthumous  humorous  novel  by  George  Fitch,  en- 
titled, "The  Twenty-Four,"  is  to  be  published  this 
season. 

A  new  novel  of  Canadian  life  is  being  written  by 
Isabel  Ecclestone  Mackay  and  will  be  published  in  the 
summer. 

"The  Alabaster  Box,"  by  Florence  Kingsley  and  A.  B. 
Freeman  is  a  new  religious  novel  announced  for  early 
publication. 

Constance  Lindsay  Skinner  is  the  author  of  a  lively 
new  novel  shortly  to  appear  entitled,  "Good  morning, 
Rosamond." 

W.  L.  George,  the  English  novelist,  has  written  a  new 
book  announced  for  early  publication,  entitled,  "The  In- 
telligence of  Woman." 

Mrs.  Belloc  Lowndes  who  will  be  recalled  for  her  read- 
able story  "Good  Old  Anna,"  has  written  a  new  novel 
entitled  "Lilla,"  just  published. 

"Piccadilly  Jim,"  the  serial  by  P.  G.  Wodehouse, 
which  has  been  running  in  the  "Saturday  Evening  Post" 
is  to  appear  in  book  form  very  shortly. 

Another  popular  writer  represented  in  the  new  fiction 
announced  for  this  season  is  B.  M.  Bower.  The  title  of 
this  book  will  be  "The  Star  of  the  Desert." 

Grace  S.  Richmond  has  many  admirers  who  will  be 
glad  to  know  that  a  new  book  by  this  writer  is  to  be  pub- 
lished this  season.     Its  title  will  be  "The  Brown  Study." 

W.  Wiley  will  be  remembered  by  many  for  his  fine  tale 
' '  Windyridge. ' '  He  has  a  new  book  out  this  season  en- 
titled "The  Way  of  the  Winepress."  It  is  a  Yorkshire 
tale. 

The  1917  list  of  popular  copyright  fiction,  received 
from  The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  shows  a  total  of  129  titles. 
Some  fine  books  having  been  added  to  this  library  since  a 
year  ago. 

In  a  new  novel  entitled  "The  Balance,"  by  Francis 
R.  Bellamy,  the  author  depicts  the  life  story  of  a  man  to 
whom  success  had  nearly  spelled  failure,  had  it  not  been 
for  a  woman. 


SONS  OF  CANADA 

Studies  of  characteristic  Canadians  by  Augustus 
Bridle.  Drawings  by  F.  S.  Challoner,  R.C.A.,  O.S.A., 
Toronto.  London  and  Paris,  J.  M.  Dent  &,Sons,  Ltd., 
pp.  280. 

"These  Studies,"  Mr.  Bridle  tells  us,  "Attempt  to  do 
some  amount  of  justice  to  the  patriotic  efforts  of  certain 
men  whose  names  are  well  known  through  the  medium  of 
the  pi*ess,  but  who  are  little  more  than  names  to  the  gen- 
eral public.  ...  In  all  cases  the  author  has  tried  to 
gei  down  to  first  principles  and  to  show  the  real  character 
of  the  man  "under  consideration,  leaving  the  reader  to 
form  his  own  judgment  of  that  character  from  the  facts 
supplied." 

The  book  contains  .'i4  sketches  with  16  illustrations — 
the  latter  of  unequal  merit,  although  of  a  high  average — 
and  the  political,  literary  and  musical  training  of  the 
author  enables  him  to  cover  a  wide  field  with  a  discrimin- 
ating insight.  One  of  the  outstanding  points  in  this  book 
— piquant,  informing,  interesting,  impartial,  and  combative 
only  in  the  case  of  Henri  Bourassa — is  the  picturesque 
phrasing,  which  is  revealed  in  concentrated  form  by  the 
author  in  sub-titles  to  his  characters:  Sir  Robert  Borden, 
"A  Gentleman  Premier";  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurier,  "The 
Chevalier  of  Quebec";  Sir  Clifford  Sifton,  "The  Sphinx 
of  Public  Life ' ' ;  Sir  John  Eaton, ' '  A  Capitalizer  of  Public 
Interest";  -Sir  Sam  Hughes,  "Hob-Nailed  Boots;"  Sir 
William  Van  Home,  "Prodigious!";  Col.  Sir  Henry 
Pellatt,  "Our  Unprofessional  Showman." 

From  first  to  last  the  character  studies  are  impression- 
istic,— in  one  sense  resembling  a  building-up  process, 
quality  upon  quality,  with  illustrative  incidents,  rather 
than  a  survey  from  different  angles.  Little  time  is  taken 
to  paint  in  the  local  environment,  save  in  the  case  of  Gen- 
eral Steele,  when  we  are  given  a  strongly  drawn  historical 
setting,  suggestive  of  rich,  imaginative  power  on  the 
writer's  part.  Indeed,  to  many  readers  this  may  prove 
the  favorite  in  the  whole  collection. 

A  few  quotations  will  serve  to  show  the  style  of  the 
skilfully  drawn  portraitures,  in  which  one  notes — perhaps 
as  a  type  of  some  pronounced  radical  views  of  the  author 
that  are  expressed  on  many  occasions — a  tendency  to  dis- 
dain Christian  names  or  titles,  the  more  noticeable  in  cases 
like  that  of  Rev.  J  A.  Macdonald  ("The  Gaelic  Orator"), 
for  whom  "the  cloth"  has  intervened  heretofore  between 
his  full  name  and  the  use  of  the  surname  alone. 

Sir  Edmund  Walker  is  described  as  the  "clearing- 
house of  civilization  in  Canada," — as  patron  of  art  music, 
literature,  as  well  as  banking.  "Ignorance  to  Sir  Edmund 
is  never  bliss;  he  must  always  make  knowledge  useful." 

One  of  his  earliest  descriptions  of  Sir  Wilfrid  Laurier 
is  this:  "I  know  of  no  other  inconsiderable  mixture  of 
great  qualities  and  opportunising"  melodrama  that  suggests 
the  great  French-Canadian  leader  so  well  as  Henry 
Irving. ' ' 

Sir  William  Mackenzie  is  the  psychic  link  between  all 
governments,  municipalities  and  plain  peoples.  He  is  the 
new  thought  applied  to  public  utilities,  a  cross  between  the 
man  with  a  club  and  the  hypnotist  whose  weapon  is  auto- 
suggestion.   He  is  incalculable,  baffling,  uncorralable. " 

Of  Sir  George  Foster's  aloofness:  "Foster,  kissing  a 
baby  on  the  platform  would  be  a  caricature.  Low-browed 
politicians  might  line  up  their  friends  at  the  bar.  Foster 
preferred  a  cold  jug  of  water  or  a  cup  of  weak  tea.  He 
has  often  seemed  to  be  a  sort  of  pinnacular  morality  built 
upon  complaint." 

So  he  goes  on,  with  hosts  of  metaphors,  in  a  refreshing 
series  of  sketches,  mostly  serious,  rarely  humorous;  mak- 
ing a  really  valuable  contribution  to  what  many  consider 
the  most  fascinating  of  vocations,  a  study  of  personalities. 


45 


I 


LITERATURE  OF  THE  WAR 


iiiii 


M 


THE  VINDICATION  OF  GREAT  BRITAIN 

This  remarkable  book,  published  by  the  Copp,  Clark 
Co.,  presents  an  eloquent  appeal  to  the  British  people  to 
develop  a  greater  intelligence  in  public  and  private  busi- 
ness to  determine  by  this  character  the  future  of  Euro- 
pean civilization.  The  book  is  a  history  of  period  before 
the  war,  being-  a  study  of  the  conditions  and  diplomatic 
opinions  that  led  eventually  to  the  present  conflict.  It 
is  an  attempt  to  truly  present  the  genuine  feelings  of  the 
peoples  involved  and  the  book  describes  in  full  the  efforts 
of  King'  Edward  VII  to  promote  peace.  It  deals  at  length 
also  with  Lord  Haldane's  missions  in  Germany  and  of  the 
rehabilitation  of  the  army  and  navy  under  Lord  Haldane 
and  Lord  Fisher. 

SIR  CONAN  DOYLE'S  WAR  HISTORY 

A  momentous  volume  that  is  most  valuable  by  reason 
of  the  evident  painstaking  care  and  thorough  investiga- 
tion on  the  part  of  the  author,  is  "The  British  Campaign 
in  France  and  Flanders,  1914,"  by  Sir  Arthur  Conan 
Doyle,  which  Plodder  &  Stonghton  have  just  published. 
The  author  states  in  the  preface,  that  from  the  first  days 
of  the  war  he  has  devoted  much  time  to  the  accumulation 
of  evidence  from  first  hand  sources  as  to  the  various  hap- 
penings of  those  great  days. 

The  result,  as  the  reader  finds,  is  a  history  of  the 
British  operations  in  the  first  six  months  of  the  war,  that 
bears  all  the  ear-marks  of  being-  a  record  that  will  stand 
the  test  of  time  so  far  as  actual  events  in  that  period  are 
concerned.  Of  course,  as  the  author  himself  states,  in 
so  far  as  points  of  larger  strategy  and  the  motives  back 
of  them  are  concerned,  these  must  wait  for  later  years  to " 
he  cleared  up.  This  book  will  be  followed  by  a  second 
volume  dealing  with  1915,  and  a  third  volume  devoted  to 
1916,  to  carry  on  this  contemporary  narrative  of  a  tre- 
mendous episode  in  the  world's  history. 

UNDER  FIRE 

"A  Soldier's  Sketches  ITnder  Fire,"  by  Harold  Harvey, 
is  a  dollar  volume  just  published  by  Thomas  Allen,  and  is 
a  really  strong  war  book  of  topical,  military  and  pictorial 
interest  by  an  author  who  is  his  own  artist.  He  had 
achieved  fame  as  an  artist  before  enlisting,  scoring  a 
success  with  his  picture,  "A  Market  Scene  in  Cairo,"  at 
the  Royal  Academy  Exhibition  in  1909.  Sailing-  for  France 
within  a  month  of  the  outbreak  of  hostilities,  Mr.  Harvey, 
after  a  brief  detainment  in  Malta,  served  in  the  trenches 
until  seriously  wounded  at  Ypres.  Invalided  home,  he 
brought  with  him  a  notebook  crammed  with  pencil 
sketches,  taken  by  him  in  face  of  the  enemy  and  under 
fire,  the  conditions'  of  trench  warfare  affording  him  many 
opportunities.  The  sketches  are  extraordinarily  vivid  and 
lifelike,  depicting  actual  happenings,  actual  scenes  and 
actual  scenery  of  which  everybody  has  heard,  but  which 
it  is  impossible  to  visualize  without  the  aid  of  just  such 
all  too  rare  illustrations,  which  are  in  marked  contrast 
with    the    faked    pictures    drawn    by    stay-at-homes    from 


imagination.  In  racy  and  realistic  style — and  more  at 
leisure — Private  Harvey  has  supplied  the  literary  matter 
that  accompanies  his  sketches. 

AUSTRIAN  REVELATIONS 

"Seven  Years  in  Vienna,  a  Record  of  Intrigue,  1907- 
1914,"  comes  from  Constable's,  of  London.  It  is  a  strik- 
ing revelation  of  court  and  political  life  in  the  capital  of 
Austria-Hungary  during-  the  seven  years  preceding  the 
present  European  conflict.  In  lively  and  informing  anec- 
dote and  description  the  author  deals  with  this  fateful 
period,  which  opens  with  the  visit  of  King  Edward  and 
closes  on  the  declaration  of  war.  In  these  pa^es  are  re- 
corded impressions  and  character  studies  of  the  Emperor, 
the  murdered  Archduke  and  his  wife,  the  present  heir  to 
the  throne,  the  Kaiser  and  his  family,  the  Kings  of  Bul- 
garia and  Montenegro,  the  Prince  of  Wied,  Prince  Furst- 
enberg,  Counts  Berehtold,  Tisza  and  Tehirsky,  and  Baron 
Aehrenthal.  The  intrigues  and  "underground"  influences 
at  work  in  the  capital  are  vividly  described  and  throw 
much  light  on  the  events  that  preceded  the  outbreak  of 
war. 


Palmer's  new  book  "My  Second  Year  of  the  Great 
War,"  is  announced  for  publication  on  Feb.  15. 

"Inside  the  German  Empire,"  by  Herbert  Bayard 
Swope,  an  American,  tells  of  Germany  in  the  third  year 
of  the  war  from  first  hand  observation  by  the  author. 

"Soldiers'  Song-s,"  by  Patrick  McGill,  author  of  "The 
Red  Horizon,"  presents  verses,  written,  almost  without 
exception,  under  fire.  They  are  after  the  style  of  Robert 
W.  Service's  poems. 

Frederic  Coleman's  new  war  book  "With  Cavalry  in 
1915,"  will  be  ready  soon.  It  presents  the  personal 
narrative  of  a  British  Trooper  in  the  French  Line,  through 
the  second  battle  of  Ypres. 

Fred  C.  Curry  of  Brockville,  Ontario,  who  is  with  the 
Canadian  forces  at  the  front  is  the  author  of  a  book 
entitled  "From  the  St.  Lawrence  to  the  Yser  that  will 
appeal  strongly  to  Canadian  readers. 

A  book  that  is  comparable  to  Mary  Shipman  Andrews' 
"Three  Things,"  is  "Of  water  and  the  Spirit,"  by  Mar- 
garet Prescott  Montague,  which  is  a  book  dealing  with 
questions  relating-  to  the  war  and  religion. 

A  book  that  has  reached  its  tenth  edition  in  England 
which  is  just  being  published  in  this  country  is  "A 
Student  in  Arms,"  by  Donald  Hankey,  who  was  killed  in 
one  of  the  Somme  battles. 

Among  the  many  war  books  announced  for  early  pub- 
lication by  English  houses,  two  stand  out  prominent : 
"At  the  "War,"  by  Lord  Northcliffe.  issued  on  behalf  of 
the  British  Red  Cross;  and  "My  Country,"  including  the 
article  by  the  Queen  of  Rumania  published  in  "The 
Times."  The  Queen's  book  is  issued  in  aid  of  the 
Red   Cross  in  Rumania. 


40 


PUBLIC  LIBRARY  NEWS 


y* 


TWENTY  POPULAR  NOVELS 

Following   is   the   "January   List   of  Twenty   Popular 
Novels."    as"  supplied    to    the    Kingston    Whig,    by    the 
Library  of  that  city : 

Rainbow's  End — Beach,  Rex. 

Lion's  Share — Bennett,  Arnold. 

Greenmantle — Buchan,   Jno. 

Matchmakers — Buckrose,  J.  E. 

Rising  Tide — Deland,  Margaret. 

Leather  face — Baroness  Orczy. 

Castaways — Jacobs,  W.  W. 

Malvina  of  Brittany — Jerome,  J.  K. 

Tutor's  Story — Kingsley,  Chas. 

Cappy  Ricks — Kyne,  P. 

Further  Foolishness — Leacock,  Stephen. 

Mary  Gusta — Lincoln,  Jos. 

Vermillion  Box — Lucas,  E.  V. 

I  Spy— Lincoln,  N.  S. 

Park  Wall — Mordannt,  Elinor. 

King-  of  Khyber  Rifles— Talbot  Munday. 

Heard  of  Rachel — Norris,  K*athleen. 

Leatherwood  God — Howells,  W.  D. 

Straight  Down  a  Crooked  Lane — Runkle,  B. 

Dark  Forest — Walpole,  Hugh. 

BRANTFORD  PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

At  the  annual  meeting-  of  the  Brantford  Public  Library 
it  was  stated  that  799  books  for  adults  and  140  juveniles 
had  been  added  during  the  past  year.  The  total  circulation 
of  books  during  the  year  was  89,240  as  compared  with 
85,593  in  1915.     Librarian  Henwood  in  his  report  said: — 

"I  am  extremely  pleased  to  make  special  mention  of 
the  excellent  work  accomplished  in  the  Juvenile  Depart- 
ment under  the  able  charge  of  Miss  Middlemiss.  The 
Story-Hour  conducted  by  Miss  Middlemiss  is  a  great  suc- 
cess and  the  attendance  has  been  very  large.  The  work 
beiim-  done  here  is  bound  to  produce  excellent  results, 
no(  only  creating  a  desire  in  the  children  for  good  read- 
ing, but  is  a  great  factor  in  their  education." 

LOUVAIN  LIBRARY. 

The  scheme  for  the  reconstruction  of  the  library  of 
the  University  of  Louvain,  destroyed  by  the  German  in- 
vaders, lias  led  already  to  the  accumulation  of  upwards 
of  8,000  volumes.  It  originated  with  the  resolution  of 
the  council  of  the  John  Rylands  Library,  Manchester,  to 
give  some  practical  expression  of  their  feelings  of  sym- 
pathy with  the  authorities  of  the  university  in  the 
irreparable  loss  they  had  sustained.  The  first  instalment 
was  a  gift  of  upwards  of  200  volumes  made  by  the  John 
Rylands  Library.  All  classes  of  the  community,  not  only 
in  this  country,  but  in  many  parts  of  the  English-speak- 
ing world,  have  responded  to  the  appeal.  Institutions 
have  made  liberal  donations  of  suitable  works  from  their 
stores  of  duplicates;  individual  book  collectors  have  given 
volumes  of  great  interest,  and  often  of  great  rarity;  and 
the  list  of  donors  also  includes  struggling  students  and 
working  men  who  have  parted  with  treasured  possessions 


acquired  through  the  exercise  of  economy  and  self-denial; 
but  as  the  books  destroyed  at  Louvain  numbered  nearly 
a  quarter  of  a  million,  much  remains  to  be  done  before 
the  work  of  replacement  is  accomplished. 

NEW  APPOINTMENTS. 

Dr.  D.  J.  Goggin,  formerly  general  editor  of  Ontario 
educational  text-books,  has  been  appointed  historio- 
grapher with  general  charge  of  the  department  library 
in  St.  James'  square,  Toronto.  The  position  of  general 
editor  of  text-books  is  taken  by  I.  E.  Wetherell,  M.A., 
high  school  inspector.  The  vacant  high  school  inspec- 
torship has  been  filled  by  the  appointment  of  I.  M. 
Levan,  B.A.,  specialist  in  classics,  moderns  and  English, 
principal  Woodstock  Collegiate  Institute.  The  position 
of  inspector  of  English-French  schools,  vacant  by  the 
resignation  of  V.  H.  Gaboury,  has  been  filled  by  the 
appointment  of  J.  S.  Gratton,  recently  principal  of  the 
Plantagenet  public  school.  All  the  above  appointments 
take  effect  at  once. 

THE  CHILDREN'S  LIBRARY 

Mothers  or  those  in  charge  of  children  should  arrange 
a  bookcase  purposely  for  the  little  ones,  either  in  school 
room  or  library,  and  having  done  this  the  parents  should 
wait  until  the  children  of  their  own  initiative  turn  to  the 
shelves  for  recreation.  Included  on  these  book  shelves 
should  be  books  of  biography,  of  history,  including  le- 
gendary lore;  of  fiction,  as  comprehensive  as  possible,  from 
Scott  to  Kipling,  and  not  forgetting  Gulliver  and  Grimm; 
of  poetry,  of  travel  and  of  nature;  also  on  the  shelves 
she  should  place  the  Bible,  a  good  dictionary  and  an  ency- 
clopedia. From  time  to  time  temporary  additions  of 
topical  interest  should  be  made,  but  such  additions  should 
not  be  made  permanent  inmates  of  the  "library."' 

Books  should  be  carefully  classified  and  their  sequence 
maintained  in  orderly  fashion,  and  children  should  be 
taught  to  respect  their  books  materially  and  treat*  them 
carefully.  Experience  of  homes  and  hoarding  schools 
where  such  arrangement  was  in  operation  has  proved  that 
children  soon  begin  to  ask  questions  about  the  hooks  and 
are  easily  led  on  to  an  interesting  discussion  of  them,  in 
which  the  seeds  of  a  sound  intellectual  life  could  be  laid. 

An  antagonistic  influence  to  reading  exists  in  some 
quarters  in  the  curiously  mistaken  idea  that  it  hinders 
the  development  of  individuality,  making  comers  instead 
of  originators.  Any  knowledge  of  the  history  of  great 
men  and  women  proves  the  absolute  falsity  of  this,  more- 
over, the  conscious  desire  to  be  original  which  such  an 
attitude  on  the  part  of  grown-ups  leads  to  in  children  is 
very  bad.  One  never  heard  of  great  men  being  preoccupied 
with  the  endeavor  to  be  original.  Observation,  again,  is 
increased  rather  than  the  reverse  by  the  habit  of  reading. 
Those  children  into  whose  lives  books  other  than  as  en- 
forced lessons  never  enter  are  as  a  rule  singularly  unob- 
servant— proof  that  the  brain  must  be  behind  the  eyes  in 
observation,  just  as  it  must  be  behind  the  hand  in  techni- 
cal work. 


47 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Librarian  Sykes  of  the  Carnegie  Library  in  Ottawa 
has  started  a  movement  looking  toward  the  erection  of 
an  addition  to  the  building  so  as  to  provide  a  reading 
room  of' adequate  size.  "If  a  small  city  like  Kitchener 
can  have  a  large  reading  room  in  their  Carnegie  Library 
why  not  Ottawa?"  he  said.  The  cost  would  run  between 
$10,000  and  $20,000.  The  present  reading  rooms  are  en- 
tin  lv  too  small.  It  has  been  announced  that  these  read- 
ing rooms  will  be  open  on  Sunday  afternoons  between 
2.30  and  5  o'clock. 

TORONTO  PUBLIC  LIBRARY 

DR.  GEORGE  H.  LOCKE,  Chief  Librarian,  in  his 
report  on  Toronto  public  libraries  for  1916,  tells  of 
the  opening  of  three  more  branch  libraries — Wych- 
wood,  High  Park,  and  Beaches — through  the  generosity  of 
the  Carnegie  Corporation  of  New  York. 

Won  Honor  at  Front 

Reference  was  made  to  a  member  of  the  staff,  Lieut. 
Zinovi  Pechkoff,  who  was  awarded  by  the  French  Govern- 
ment the  Croix  de  Guerre  with  the  palm  and  a  medal  for 
special  valor,  also  a  medal  for  special  valor  by  the  Em- 
peror of  Russia.  He  lost  his  right  arm  in  action  and  was 
for  a  short  time  back  in  Toronto  on  leave  of  absence, 
revisiting  his  friends  here. 

A  significant  event  of  the  year  was  the  establishment 
of  a  Provincial  Library  Training  School  for  those  who 
were  in  service  in  the  province,  but  who  had  not  been 
trained  for  that  service.  This  was  planned  by  W.  O. 
Carson,  the  lately  appointed  inspector  of  public  libraries 
for  the  Province. 

The  innovation  was  successful,  and  in  case  it  develops 
into  an  established  Library  School  witli  a  longer  term  "I 
would  recommend,"  says  Dr.  Locke,  "that  our  board  co- 
operate with  the  Provincial  Government,  so  that  candidates 
for  positions  in  our  libraries  would  be  accepted  only  after 
they  had  passed  the  examinations  of  this  provincial  school, 
as  well  as  our  own  examination. ' ' 

From  the  Reference  Department  was  issued  a  pamph- 
let of  76  pages  under  the  title,  "Books  and  Pamphlets 
Published  in  Canada  up  to  the  Year  1837,  copies  of  which 
are  in  the  Public  Reference  Library. ' ' 

This  is  but  one  of  a  series  which  it  is  hoped  will  be 
issued. 

Among  the  Children. 

In  1912  the  number  of  books  circulating  among  boys 
and -girls  was  90,958;  in  1913  it  was  108,495;  in  1914  it 
was  187,188;  in  1915  it  was  249,260;  and  in  1916  it  was 
287,351. 

As  a  result  of  the  "National  Story  Hours"  there  were 
told  to  15,000  children  in  the  children's  department  of  the. 
library  and  branches  stories  of  the  early  history  of  the 
country,  its  discoverers,  explorers,  etc. 

Use  of  Books 

The  use  of  books  during  1916  was  as  follows :  Chil- 
dren 's  Libraries,  287,351 ;  Reference  Library,  187,403 ; 
Municipal  Reference,  7,491;  College,  173,783;  Dovercourt, 
135,580;  Riverdale,  111,803;  Church,  90,293;  Yorkville, 
62,726;  Western,  62,149;  Queen  and  Lisgar,  60,102; 
Beaches,  58,392;  Earlscourt,  45,591;  Deer  Park,  43,067; 
Wychwood,  33,292;  Northern,  26,707;  Eastern,  19,728; 
High  Park  (two  months),  13,271.  The  total  use  of  books 
was  about  1,200,000,  of  which  936,844  were  for  home  circu- 
lation, an  increase  of  45,000  over  the  figures  of  1913. 

There  were  added  to  the  library  during  the  year  34,306 
books. 


A  VALUABLE  COLLECTION 

What  is  declared  by  experts  to  be  the  finest  ornithol- 
ogical (art)  collection  on  the  continent  has  been  presented 
to  the  eitj  of  Toronto  by  John  Ross  Robertson.  The  col- 
lection represents  the  lifework  of  the  late  William  Pope 
of  Port  Ryerse,  and  was  purchased  by  Mr.  Robertson  to 
prevent  it  being  shipped  out  of  the  Dominion.  The  pre- 
sentation was  made  at'  the  Reference  Library,  College 
street.  N.  B.  Gash,  K.C.,  Chairman  of  the  Toronto  Library 
Board,  presided. 

KIPLING 

"Sea  Warfare,"  by  Rudyard  Kipling,  which  volume 
also  includes  "The  Fringes  of  the  Fleet,"  "Tales  of  the 
Trade,"  and  "Destroyers  at  Jutland,"  is  to  appear  this 
month.  Some  remarkable  accounts  are  here  found  of  sub- 
marines in  frigid  seas,  accounts  so  filled  with  the  author's 
keen  understanding  and  with  his  delightful  knack  of  fitting 
world  upon  ideas  that  the  most  mechanical  details  become 
living  things. 

A  book  of  short  stories  and  poems  by  Rudyard  Kipling 
entitled  "A  Diversity  of  Creatures"  will  be  published  in 
the  early  spring. 


SHOW  CARD  WRITING 

"How  to  Make  Show  Cards"  is  the  title  of  a  little  vol- 
ume bound  in  red  paper  covers  recently  issued  by  the 
Spatula  Publishing  Company  of  Boston.  The  book  was 
written  by  Charles  A.  Miller,  with  an  appendix  by  W.  A. 
Thompson.  It  contains  seventeen  chapters,  giving  direc- 
tions as  to  the  tools  for  the  use  of  show  card  writers,  and 
different  practice  exercises,  diagrams,  forms,  directions, 
etc. 

SELLING  GOODS  BY  MAIL 

' '  Sales  Promotion  by  Mail,  Haw  to  Sell  and  How  to 
Advertise,"  a  handbook  of  business  building  with  illus- 
trative diagrams,  is  a  recent  work  which  has  been  issued 
from  the  press  of  G.  P.  Putnam's  Sons,  New  York  and 
London.  This  is  a  rather  important  and  formidable  vol- 
ume containing  360  pages.  It  covers  the  subject  of  mail 
sales  quite  thoroughly,  telling  how  to  compile  a  mailing 
list  and  give  ideas  with  regard  to  the  sources  from  which 
the  names  of  prospective  customers  can  be  obtained.  A 
chapter  on  how  to  compile  a  mailing  list  and  how  to  keep 
and  classify  the  names  is  one  of  the  features. 

The  second  division,  edited  by  James  Wallen,  give-; 
some  valuable  ideas  on  form  letters,  followed  by  a  chap-, 
ter  on  follow-up  letters  edited  by  Louis  Victor  Eytinge. 
Gridley  Adams  contributes  a  chapter  on  letter  enclosures. 
P.  J.  Wright  is  the  author  of  "Making  Collections  by 
Mail,"  while  Chas.  W.  Meers  contributes  chapter  six, 
"From  Inquiries  to  Sales."  Other  chapters  are  written 
by  Wm.  H.  Ingersoll.  W.  P.  Werheim,  Arthur  T.  Garrett 
and  A.  E.  Ashburner,  of  the  American  Multigraph  Sales 
Company,  whose  article,  "Building  Export  Business  by 
Mail,"  is  one  of  the  most  interesting  contributions  in  the 
book. 

m 

Hugh  de  Selincourt  is  the  author  of  a  new  war  book 
published  by  Constable's,  entitled  "A  Soldier's  Life." 
This  author  has  to  his  credit  nine  previous  novels  and 
three  books  of  letters. 

James  Norman  Hall,  author  of  "Kitchener's  Mob," 
who  last  year  returned  to  his  home  in  the  United  States 
with  the  intention  of  staying,  has  gone  back  to  England, 
re-entered  the  English  army  and  is  again  at  the  front  in 
France.     His  book  has  gone  into  its  ninth  printing. 


48 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Monthly   Record   of   New 
Books 

Published  by  Firms    Established  in  Canada 


THOMAS  ALLEN 
Non-Fiction 

A  Dictionary  of  Similes,  Wilstacli,  cloth,  $2.50;  A  Sol- 
dier's Sketches  Under  Fire,  Harold  Harvey,  cloth,  $1; 
Auction  Declarations,  Milton  C.  Work,  cloth,  $1. 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS 
Fiction 
The  Rise  of  Ledgar  Dunstan,  Alfred  T.  Sheppard, 
cloth,  $1.25;  Bindle,  Herbert  Jenkins,  cloth,  $1.25;  The 
Breath  of  the  Dragon,  A.  H.  Fitch,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Bal- 
ance, Frances  R.  Bellamy,  cloth,  $1.35;  The  Lure  of  the 
Desert,  Kathlyn  Rhodes,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Rose  of  Glen- 
connel,  Patrick  MaoGill,  cloth,  $1.25;  My  Wife  (Author 
Bachelor's  Buttons),  Edward  Burke,  cloth,  $1.25;  The 
Way  of  the  Winepress,  W.  Riley,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Pri- 
vate Secretary,  Edward  Jones  Kilduff,  cloth,  $1.25 ;  'Neath 
A7erdun,  Maurice  Genevoix,  cloth,  $1.25  Given  in  Mar- 
riage, B.  M.  Croker,  cloth,  $1.25;  Lila— A  Part  of  Her 
Life,  Mrs.  Belloc  Lowndes,  cloth,  $1.25. 

Non-Fiction 
Rhymes  of  a  Red  Cross  Man    (in  the  miniature  edi- 
tions),   Robert    W.    Service,   lambskin,   $1;    ooze   leather. 
$1.25. 

CASSELL  &  CO. 
Fiction 
The  Lion's  Share,  Arnold  Bennett,  cloth,  $1.25;  Mal- 
vina  of  Brit'.any,  Jerome  K.  Jerome,  cloth,  $1.25;  Mike,  E. 
F.  Benson,  cloth,  $1.25. 

Non-Fiction 

Imperial  Germany.  Prince  Von  Bulow,  cloth,  $1.50  net; 
The  Retreat  from  Mons,  Major  A.  Corbett-Smith,  cloth, 
$1  net;  Mounted  Police  Life  in  Canada,  Capt.  R.  Burton 
Deane,  cloth,  $1.50  net. 

Juvenile 

Princess  Marie-Jose's  Children's  Book  (vairous — 100 
contributors),  picture  boards,  $1  net;  My  Book  of 
Beautiful  Legends,  Christine  Chaundler  and  Eric  Wood, 
cloth,  $1.50  net;  My  Book  of  Best  Fairy  Tales,  edited  by 
Charles  S.  Bayne,  cloth,  $1.50  net. 

THE  COPP  CLARK  CO. 

Non-Fiction 
Canadian   Almanac,   cloth,  $1;    Shop   Notes   for  1917. 
cloth,  $1;  paper,  50c. 

THE  MACMILLAN  CO.,  OF  CANADA 
Non-Fiction 

The  Law  of  the  Sea,  G.  W.  T.  Omond,  cloth,  75c;  The 
Foundation  and  Growth  of  the  British  Empire,  J.  A.  Wil- 
liamson, cloth,  75c;  In  Far  North-east  Siberia,  I.  W.  Shk- 
lovsky,  cloth,  $3;  State  Government  in  U.  S.,  A.  N.  Hol- 
combe,  cloth,  $2.25;  Writers'  and  Artists'  Year  Book  for 
1917,  cloth,  50c;  Reveries  Over  Childhood  and  Youth,  W. 
B.  Yeats,  cloth,  $2;  A  Realistic  Universe,  J.  E.  Boodin, 
cloth,  $3.25;  He  Knew  Lincoln,  Ida  M.  Tarbell,  cloth, 
50c;  Father  Abraham,  Ida  M.  Tarbell,  cloth,  50c;  The  Cel- 
lar-house of  Pervyse,  T'Serclaes  &  Chisholm,  cloth,  $1.75; 
An  Intro,  to  Astronomy   (X.  Ed.),  F.  R.  Moulton,  cloth, 


$2.25;  Hist.  Intro,  to  the  Private  Law  of  Rome,  Muirhcad, 
cloth,  $6;  Dramatic. iPoems,  Lea.  Vol.  II.,  W.  B.  Yeats, 
leather,  $2.25;  Lyrical  Poems,  Lea.  Vol.  I.,  W.  H.  Yeats, 
leather,  $2.25;  An  Introduction  to  Kconomics,  F.  O'Hara. 
cloth,  $1;  Dairy  Farming',  Eckles  &   Warren,  cloth,  $1.10. 

Non-Fiction 

Profit  and  Wages,  G.  A.  Kleene,  cloth,  $1.25;  How  We 
Pay  Each  Other  (a  primer  of  pol.  economy),  S.  T.  Wood, 
cloth,  50c;  Modern  Currency  Reforms,  E.  W.  Kem  merer, 
cloth,  $2.40;  The  Empire  and  the  Future,  a  series  of  Im- 
perial studies,  cloth,  75c;  The  Forgiveness  of  Sins,  H.  B. 
Swetc,  cloth,  90c;  Sir  Walter  Raleigh,  F.  (*.  Ilersey,  cloth, 
50c;  Outline  of  Applied  Sociology,  II.  P.  Fairehild,  cloth, 
$1.75;  Defence  and  Foreign  Affairs,  Z.  A.  Lash,  cloth, 
50c;  Who's  Who  for  1917,  cloth,  $5;  Who's  Who  Year 
Book,  cloth,  35c. 

Juvenile 

English  Nursery  Rhymes,  L.  E.  Walter,  cloth,  $1.50. 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stew  art 

Fiction 
The    Hillman,    E.    Phillips    Oppenheim,    $1.35;     The 
Twenty-four,   George  Fitch,   $1.25;    The   Girl,   Katherine 
Keith,  $1.35;  The  Unwelcome  Man,  Waldo  Frank,  $1.50. 

Non-Fiction 
The   Intelligence   of  Woman,    W.    L.    George,   $1.25; 
Brazil,  J.  D.  McEwen,  $1.25;  A  Layman's  Handbook  of 
Medicine,  Richard  C.  Cabot,  $2.00. 

IH 
JOHN  COLLIS  SNAITH 

THE  steady  development  of  the  literary  genius  of 
John  Collis  Snaith  over  a  period  of  some  twenty 
years  is  one  of  the  remarkable  incidents  of  contem- 
porary English  literature.  Mr.  Snaith  is  a  young  English- 
man who  makes  his  home  now  in  London.  At  the  age  of 
eighteen  he  wrote  a  remarkable  novel  full  of  the  faults  of 
youth,  full  of  the  inspiration  of  a  really  imaginative  mind. 
It  had  a  marked  success  and  still  stands  in  a  distinguished 
place  among  English  modern  fiction.  He  then  produced  in 
regular  order  half  a  dozen  novels  of  different  types,  some 
historical,  some  contemporary,,  some  with  a  political 
flavor,  some  with  a  strong  romantic  character  development 
tone.  Each  book  was  different  from  the  last.  The  author, 
very  gradually  finding  himself,  was  too  original,  too  inde- 
pendent to  stick  to  his  last.  The  craftsman  in  him  instinct- 
ively rebelled  against  any  set  mold  for  his  work.  Mean- 
time the  author  himself,  who  is  a  quiet,  reserved  English- 
man, a  member  of  certain  established  literary  and  artistic 
clubs  in  London,  lived  his  own  life  partly  retired  from  the 
busy  whirl  of  the  great  city,  working  out  his  own  prob- 
lems and  the  development  of  his  art.  Many  times  review- 
ers have  noted  as  one  book  after  another  has  appeared, 
that  some  day  Snaith  would  come  into  his  own,  when  he 
found  the  proper  mediums  for  what  was  unquestionably 
the  real  genius.  After  "Broke  of  Covenden, "  in  1909, 
came  "Araminta,"  "Anne  Feversham,"  and  now  his 
latest  book,  "The  Sailor." 

It  looks  now  as  if  the  general  opinion  of  both  England 
and  America  was  justified,  and  that  the  promise  of  a  high 
order  of  literary  effort  was  being  fulfilled  in  "The  Sailor." 
Both  the  American  and  British  reviewers  of  this  long 
novel  have  been  quite  unstinted  in  their  praise  and  in  their 
acknowledgment  that  the  author  has  at  least  reached  the 
high  place  he  was  bound  to  occupy  eventually. 

Mr.  Snaith  is  still  a  young  man,  hardly  forty  years  old, 
and  his  great  work  is  still  ahead  of  him.  The  promise  of 
another  great  British  writer  of  the  Thomas  Hardy  type  is 
there. 


49 


New  Goods  Described  and  Illustrated 


NEW  IDEAS  IN  CREPE  TISSUES 

Aubrey  0.  Hurst  is  this  month,  introducing  some  new 
ideas  in  crepe  paper  in  the  "Tissue  Company"  line  includ- 
ing serviettes,  folded  and  packaged  forty  to  a  package 
(-1  retail  at  fifteen  cents  a  package.  In  colored  crepe  a 
new  departure  lias  this  year  been  developed  in  flat  pack- 
ages  instead  of  rolls.  A  large  triangular  opening  shows 
the  pat-tern  and  this  method  has  two  distinct  advantages. 
The  flat  packages  take  up  less  room  and  keep  the  ends 
from  tear.ri'j  or  fading.  A  similar  plan  is  followed  in 
packages  of  the  "Satino"  brand  of  cr.^ie  nnpcjs  in  plain 
colors. 

Some  sinking  new  designs  are  shown  in  colored  crepes, 
including  heavy  stripes  and  "checker  board''  effects. 

RE-INKING  DEVICE 

A  new  apparatus  for  re-inking  typewriter  ribbons  is 
the  Ree-Nu  Re-Inker,  which  has  been  introduced  by  the 
Re-Inker  Manufacturing  Company,  225  Fifth  Ave.,  New 
York.  It  is  a  compact  little  device,  hardly  larger  than  a 
fountain  pen  and  will  re-ink  a  typewriter  ribbon  in  a  few 
minutes.  It  contains  sufficient  ink  to  care  for  dozens  of 
machines.  It  is  packed  in  a  neat  ease  and  is  made  in 
several  sizes,  the  smallest  size  retailing  at  $2.50  in  the 
United  States. 

BIRD  POSTCARDS. 

From  tlie  Gilbert  Postcard  Company  of  Chicago, 
"BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER"  is  in  receipt  ^of 
a  set  of  their  new  bird  postcards.  These  include  repro- 
ductions in  actual  colors  of  many  of  the  best  known  birds 
of  all  parts  of  the  world  and  a  brief  description  of  the 


'            ■  *  "it 

i    f&e" 

1/"* 

I 

■ 

J 

i 

i 

Mil 

1      f 

111 

i  ^ 

bird  appears  on  the  face  of  the  postcard  just  above  the 
space  for  correspondence.  The  design  accompanying 
each  picture  contains  a  greeting  such  as  "Season's 
Greetings,"  "With  Best  Wishes"  or  a  poetical  quota- 
tion. These  cards  are  most  interesting  and,  combining 
beauty  with  information  about  the  many  different  birds 
featured,  they  will  doubtless  be  very  popular. 

JAPANESE  WATER-COLORS 

•Japanese  water-colors  are  very  popular.  One  large  job- 
bing house  is  showing  an  extensive  line  of  these.  They 
are  painted  on  wood,  each  one  an  original.  The  effect  of 
these  Japanese  water-colors  is  both  artistic  and  pleasing. 
They,  moreover,  frame  up  very  handsomely,  every  copy  de- 
manding a  good  frame  of  its  own. 


LOOSE-LEAF  RECIPE  BOOK 

A  new  item  introduced  by  the  Luckett  Loose  Leaf  Co., 
of  Toronto,  is  a  loose-leaf  recipe  book  illustrated  herewith. 
This  comes  in  #  substantial  cover  of  washable  material. 
The  blank  sheets  being  loose-leaf  may  be  changed  at  will, 
the  different  recipes  being  arranged  in  alphabetical  order 
according  to  the  names  on  the  index  tabs,  "bread." 
"cake,"  etc. 


Loose  Leaf  Recipe  Book. 

NEW  LIQUID  PASTE 

Phasta  is  the  name  of  the  new  liquid  paste  manufac- 
tured by  S.  S.  'Stafford,  Inc.  It  is  described  as  a  "differ- 
ent" liquid  paste  because  the  manufacturers  claim  it  does 
not  harden  or  crack,  form  a  scum  on  the  surface  nor  change 
its  consistency  and  is  also  ideally  adapted  for  mounting 
photographs. 

The  great  advantage  to  the  dealer  in  stocking  this 
product  lies  in  the  fact  that  it  may  be  used  for  every  pur- 
pose for  which  either  mucilage  or  hard  paste  is  adapted  and 
there  is  no  possibility  of  loss  through  drying  out  or  crack- 
ing as  is  so  often  the  case  with  hard  paste.  Phasta  is  mar- 
keted in  sizes  from  quart  jars  to  l1/!  oz.  cones,  including  5- 
oz.  and  8-oz.  desk  jars,  each  of  which  is  equipped  with  an 
ingenious  combination  screw  cap  and  wiper  for  brush,  also 
adjustable  brush  holder  which  prevents  soiling  of  fingers 
and  allows  use  of  all  the  paste. 


A  fleet  of  little  fighting  vessels  is  unique  and  interest- 
ing. Different  sizes  are  to  be  had  and  representations  of 
cruisers,  dreadnoughts,  torpedo  boats,  submarines,  armed 
liners,  and  in  fact  every  sort  of  boat  craft. 

A  British  Tank,  too,  has  arrived  in  toyland,  and  is 
being  very  warmly  received.    It  is  an  excellent  model. 

Remarkable  and  original  fabric  and  stuffed  dolls  are 
showing  continual  improvement  in  finish.  They  are  very 
life-like. 

Electric  toys  promise  to  be  more  prominent  than  ever 
for  next  season.  Motors,  telephones,  cooking  ranges,  heat- 
ers, and  many  other  lines,  are  nicely  finished  and  really 
"work." 


50 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Weldon  Roberts 

Rubber  Erasers 


"Another  just  like  it"  is  the  demand  of  those  who  have  used  these  erasers. 

The  Weldon   Roberts  Erasers  are  of  the  finest  quality.  They  give  the   utmost  satisfaction  to  all  users 

of  erasers— draughtsmen,  artists,  students,  the  library,  office,  factory. 

Also  Metal  Polishers  (No.  88) for  the  kitchen,  golfer,  factory,  typewriter  repairer,  piano  tuner  and  user  of   oo 

Styles  to  meet  every  need.  Write  for  samples. 


WELDON  ROBERTS   RUBBER  CO.  office  &  works  NEWARK,  N.J.  (ISA. 


Travellers  are  now  out 


Showing  Post  Cards,  Booklets  and  Novelties  for 

Easter,   Valentine   and   St.    Patrick's   Day 

Post    Cards,    Patriotic,    Birthday. 

Comic,  etc. 
Pennants  and  Textile  Novelties. 
Battalion  Pennants,  Cushions  and 

Photo  Banners. 
Military  Specialties  and  Soldiers' 

Supplies. 
Tigris  Ivory  Novelties   (Made  in 

Canada) . 
Specials    in    Toys,    Novelties    and 

Souvenir  Goods. 
Emerson  Records  to  retail  15  and 

35c  each. 

The  completest  Christmas  line 

we    have    ever    shown.       Don't 

fail  to  see  it. 

If  you  aie  on  our  mailing  list  you  get  in- 
teresting and  money-making  literature  once 
a  month.  If  you  are  not  on  send  us  your 
name  on  a  post  card. 

PUGH  SPECIALTY  CO. 

LIMITED 

Specialists  in  Specialties 

38-42  Clifford  St.,  Toronto,  Canada 


The 

Hoosier  File 


A   neat,  thorouj 

well  -  made     bo 

The  best  on  the 

low  a  price.     Covered  with 

hard-finished,   brown  fibre  paper,   has   good 

fastening  and  a  strong  Manila  index.  Leather 

pull  on  back.    Manila  index  held  in  place  by 

one  pin. 

Write  us  f"i'  guotation, 

.The  Slcbe^r»tekeeo.£t<>. 

STRATFORD.  ONT. 


GET  THE  BEST!  BLOTTING  PAPER 


MANUFACTURED  BY 


THEEATON-DIKEMAN  COMPANY,  Lee, Massachusetts,  U.S.A. 


THE  FOLLOWING  WELL-KNOWN  BRANDS  CARRIED  IN  STOCK 

Magnet  Columbian  Lenox  Arlington  Wavelet 

Matrix  and  Filter  Papers 

FOR  SALE  BY  THE  LEADING  JOBBERS  IN  PAPER 

51 


Housatonic 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


MADE 


.    CANADA 

ADDING  MACHINE  ROLLS 


Wii'i-   us  loi    s.imples  ,md   prices. 

MONARCH  PAPER  CO.,  Limited 

tnufacturers  419  Kin(f  St.  W..  Torontr 


MANUFACTURERS  OF 

Die   Stamped    and 

Engraved 

Greeting  Cards 

329    Craig    Street    West 
MONTREAL 


LOOSE-LEAF 
METALS 


De  Luxe  Line  Metals  are  used  in  every 
civili/ed  country  in  the  world.  We  make 
all  kinds.       Write  lor  Catalogue   No.  32. 

WILSON-JONES  LOOSE  LEAF  CO. 

CHICAGO  .'.  NEW  YQRK 


Wycil  &  Company 

85  Fulton  Street,   New  York  City 
carry  a  large  stock  of 

German,  French,  Spanish 
and  Italian  Grammars 


of  the 

Gaspey-Otto-Sauer  Series 
Liberal  Discount*  to  the  Trade 


Wonder  Soap  Bubbler 

Blows  Double.  Chains,   Clusters,   Etc. 

INDESTRUCTIBLE.     PROFITS  80 '/.  to   100*„ 

Write  for  Samples   and  Prices 

BRADWAY  NOVELTY  CO. 


1    Wast  Broadway, 


NEW  YORK  CITY 


ART    SUPPLIES*. 

Artists'   Supply  Co.,  77  York  St.,  Torouto. 
A.  Ramsay  &  Son  Co.,  Montreal. 

BLOTTING    PAPERS. 
The    Albemarle  Paper  Co.,   Richmond,   Va. 
John  Dickinson  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
Dawson  &  Sons,  W.  V.,  Montreal. 
Eaton-Dikeman    Co.,   Lee,   Mass. 
Standard   Paper   Mfg.   Co.,   Richmond,    Va. 

BLANK     BOOKS. 
Boorum  &  Pease  Co.,  Brooklyn,   N.Y. 
Brown    Bros.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Buntin,    Gillies    &   Co.,    Hamilton. 
\V..    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
National   Blank   Book   Co.,   Holyoke,   Mass. 
Menzies  &   Co.,   Limited,   Toronto. 
The  Copp,   Clark   Co.,  Toronto. 
CHRISTMAS    AND    PICTURE    POST    CARDS. 
Birn   Bros.,  266  King  St.  W.,  Toronto. 
British-Canadian    Publishing    Co.,    35    Church 

St..   Toronto. 
J.  H.  Jost,  Halifax,  N.S. 
Menzies  &  Co.,  Toronto. 

Packard  Bros.,  329  Craig  St.  W.,  Montreal,  Que. 
Ritchie  &   Sons,   Ltd.,   William. 
Valentine  &  Sons,  Toronto  and  Montreal. 

CODE  BOOKS. 
The   American    Code   Co.,   83    Nassau    St.,    New 
York. 

CRAYONS. 
Binney  A   Smith.   New  York. 

EYELETTING    MACHINES 
Elbe   File  and   Binder   Co.  New    York,    N.Y. 
Ideal    Specialties  Mfg.    Corporation,   552   Pearl 
St.,   N.Y.   City. 

ENVELOPES. 
Brown   Bros.,   Limited,  Toronto. 
Buntin,   Gillies   4  Co.,    Hamilton. 
Copp,   Clark  Co.,   Toronto. 
W..    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
Menzies  &   Co.,   Limited,   Toronto. 

ERASERS. 
St.   Mungo  Mfg.   Co.,  Glasgow,  Scotland. 
Weldon   Roberts   Rubber  Co.,   Newark,   N.J. 
FANCY  PAPERS,  TISSUES  AND  BOXES. 
Dennison    Mfg.   Co.,    Boston. 
Menzies   &   Co.,   Toronto. 

A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    266    King    St.    W„ 
Toronto. 

FOREIGN  TEXT  BOOKS. 
Wycil  &  Co.,  S3  Fulton  St.,  New  York. 

FOUNTAIN     PENS. 
Arthur  A.  Waterman   Co.,  Ltd.,   New   York. 
Sanford    A    Bennett    Co.,    51-53    Maiden    Lane, 

New    York. 
A.     R.    McDougall    &    Co.,     266    King    St.    W., 

Toronto. 
Paul  E.  Wirt  Co.,  Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Toronto, 
Canadian    Agents. 

INKS,  MUCILAGE  AND  GUMS. 
Chas.  M.   Higgins  A  Co.,  Brooklyn,   N.>. 
The  Carter's   Ink  Co..  Montreal. 
W„    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Mcntreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
S.    S.    Stafford    Co.,    Toronto. 
"Gloy,".A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    266    King 

St.    W..    Toronto. 
"Gluclne,"   Menzies   A   Co.,   Limited,   439    King 
St.  W.,  Toronto. 

INDELIBLE     INK. 
Carter's    Ink   Co.,    Montreal. 
Payson's   Indelible   Ink. 
S.    S.   Stafford   Co..   Toronto. 

INKSTANDS. 
The  Sengbusch  Co.,  Milwaukee. 

LANGUAGE    BOOKS. 
Wycil    &    Co.,   83   Fulton    Street,    New   York. 

LEAD   AND    COPYING   PENCILS. 
American   Pencil   Co.,   New   York. 
Eberhard    Faber   Co.,    New   York. 
A.    R.    McDougall    &    Co.,    266    King    St.    W., 
Toronto. 

LOOSE     LEAF     BOOKS.     BINDERS     AND 
HOLDERS. 
The   Brown   Bros.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Boorum   A    Pease   Co.,    Brooklyn. 
Buntin,   Gillies  &   Co.,    Hamilton. 
W.    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
The  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  Toronto. 
Luckett     Loose    Leaf,     Limited,    215    Victoria 

St.,  Toronto. 
National   Blank   Book   Co.,   Holyoke,   Mass. 
Rockhlll  A  Victor,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York  City. 
Smith,    Davidson    A    Wright,    Ltd.,    Vancouver. 


THE  FAULTLESS  LINE 

OF  LOOSE  LEAF  METALS 

Most  complete  line  of  Ledger,  Sectional 
Fost,  Solid  Po«t  and  other  Loose  Leaf 
Metals. 

On     request    to-day    our    Catalog    GC    and 
special    proposition. 

STATIONERS  LOOSE  LEAF  CO. 


342  Broadway 
203  Broadway 


Milwaukee,  Wit. 
New  York  City 


Your    Ad    in    this 
space  on  yearly 

contract 
$2.10  per  month 


CUSTOMS 
TARIFFS 

CUSTOMS 
FORMS 

INTEREST 
TABLES 


Order  your  supply  for 
beginning  of  1917. 


Morton.Phillips  &  Co. 


FUBLUHKR8 


115  Notre  Dame  St.   West     -      MONTREAL 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


BUYERS'  GUIDE 


SCHOOL  AuT" 

RULERS 

Send  for  Samples  and 


Interesting  Prices 


Lucas-Tuttle  Mfg.  Co. 

Silver  Springs,  N.Y. 


HAVE  A  BETTER  BOOK  STORE 

We  make  show  cases,  counters, 
wall  cases,  shelving,  tables  and 
special  fixtures  for  all  lines  of 
retail  trade. 

Send    us    plans    and    spe- 
cifications   for    estimates. 

The  Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture 
Company,    Limited 

Kitchener,  Ontario 


The  1917  Issue  of 

Gale  &  Polden's 

BOOKS  OF  JOLLY  FUN 

for  the  Children 

will  be   sure   sellers. 
Send  for  Titles,  etc. 

2  Amen  Corner  -  London,  E.C 


Your  Ad  in  a 

Buyers' 

Guide 

Space 

2\  in.  by  IH  in 

for 

$25  a  year. 


Stationers'  Loose  Leaf  Co.,  203  Broadway, 
N.Y.,  and   Milwaukee,   Wis. 

Wilson-Jones  Loose  Leaf  Company,  3021  Car- 
roll Ave.,  Chicago ;  129  Lafayette  St.,  New 
York. 

LEATHER  AND  FANCY  GOODS. 

Brown    Bros.,    Ltd.,   Toronto. 
D.    Harper    &    Co.,    25S-262     Holjoway     Road, 
London,  Eng. 

MAP    PUBLISHERS. 

Rand,    McNally    &   Co.,    Chicago. 
The   Copp,   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 

METAL    PARTS    FOR    LOOSE    LEAF 
BINDERS. 

Wilson-Jones  Loose  Leaf  Company,  3021  Oar- 
roll  Ave.,  Chicago;  128  Lafayette  St.,  New 
York. 

MILITARY    SPECIALTIES 

Geo.  Clark,  Southam  Bldg.,   Montreal,  Que. 
NEWS    COMPANIES. 

Imperial    News    Co.,    Montreal,    Toronto,    Win- 
nipeg. 
Toronto    News   Co. 
Montreal  News  Co. 
Winnipeg    News    Co. 

PAPER    FASTENERS. 

Bump  Paper  Fastener  Co.,  La  Crosse,  Wis. 
Ideal    Specialties    Mfg.    Corp.,    552    Pearl    St., 

New   York   City. 
O.K.   Manufacturing  Co.,   Syracuse,   N.Y. 

PAPETERIES   AND    WRITING    PAPERS. 

\V.    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
The  Brown   Bros..   Ltd.,  Toronto. 

PLAYING     CARDS. 

Goodall's   English   Playing  Cards,   A.  O.  Hurst, 

Scott   St.,  Toronto. 
Menzies  &   Co.,   Limited,   Toronto. 
U.  S.  Playing  Card  Co.,  Cincinnati.  O. 

POST  CARDS,  GREETING  CARDS,  ETC. 

Hildesheimer,     Ltd.,     93,     Clerkenwell     Road, 

London,   E.C. 
Philip  G.   Hunt  &  Co.,  332  Balham   High   Rd., 

London    Eng. 
Pug-h  Sperialty  Co.,  38-42  Clifford  St.,  Toronto. 
Ritchie  &   Sons,   Ltd.,   William. 
Valentine  &  Sons   Publishing  Co.,  Montreal. 

SCHOOL    AND    OFFICE    RULERS 

Lucas-Tuttle  Mfg.  Co.,  Silver  Springs,  N.Y. 
Wescott-Jewell  Co.,  Seneca  Falls,  N.Y. 

SHEET    MUSIC. 

Anglo-Canadian  Music  Pub.  Assn.,  144  Vic- 
toria  St..   Toronto. 

Chappell    Co.,    134S   Yonge   St.,    Toronto. 

Hawkes  &  Harris  Co.,  Toronto 

McKlnley  Music  Co.,  1501-15  East  Fifty-Fifth 
St.,   Chicago. 

STANDARD   COMMERCIAL   PUBLICATIONS. 

Morton,  Phillips  &  Co.,  Montreal. 
The  Copp.   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
Runtin,   Gillies   &  Co.,   Hamilton. 
Raton.  Crane  &  Pike.  Pittsfleld.  Mass. 
A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    26e    King    St.    W., 
Toronto. 

STATIONERS'  SUNDRIES. 

Brown      Bros.,      Ltd.,      Wholesale      Stationers, 

Toronto. 
Buntin.  Gillies  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
The     Copp,     Clark    Co.,     Wholesale     Stationers. 

Toronto. 
Clark  Bros.  &  Co.,   Ltd..  Winnipeg,  Man. 
W.    V.    Dawson,    Limited.    Montreal,    Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
Smith,  Davidson  &  Wright,  Vancouver,  B.C. 

STEEL     WRITING     PENS. 

Tohn    Heath,    8    St.    Bride    St.,    E.C,    London. 

Uinks.   Wells  &   Co.,   Birmingham,   Eng. 

Esterbrook  Pen  Co.,  Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Tor- 
onto,  Canadian    Representatives. 

\.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co..  266  King  St.  W.. 
Toronta 

Spencerian  Pen  Co.,  New  York,  N.Y. 


PICTURES  —  FRAMES  —  CBAYQN  AXIi 

Water   Color    Portrait    Enlargements  - 
Statuary.      Everything    in    picture    framing 
outfits.     $150.00  will   start  yon   in  a   profit 
able  line. 

Send  your  pictures  to  me.  I  will  frame 
them  at  low  prices  if  you  can't  do  so  your- 
self. 

Little   Wonder  S-tnch   Phonograph 
Records,  $20.00  gross. 

G.  L.  IRISH 

499  Queen  Street  West,   Toronto 


PATRIOTIC  SONGS 

are  still  in  active  demand.  There  is 
good  profit  in  them.  We  supply  the 
following  at  8c. 

We'll    Never    Let    the    Old    Flag    Fall. 

The  most  successful  Canadian  song 
ever  published.  Over  100,000  copies 
sold  ......     i5c 

By  Order  of  the  King.  A  new  song 
by   the  same  composers.    16,000  sold     16c 

I'll  Not  Forget  You,  Soldier  Boy.  A 
very  popular  new  song.  4th  thousand     15c 

Our  Own  Canadian  Boys.  3rd  thou- 
sand ......     ige 

Soldiers   of   the   King.     50,000    sold       -     15c 

Call  of  the  Motherland.  10th  thou- 
sand ......     igc 

There's  a  Fight  Going  On.  7th  thou- 
sand -  -  -  -  -     16c 

You  Bet  Your  Life,  We  All  Will  Go. 
2nd    thousand.      New         ...     i5e 

NEW 

Canada,  Fall  In  15c 

On    to    Victory  .....  15c 

There's  a   Corner  of  the  Flag  for   You 

to  Hold 15c 

Kiss   Your    Soldier   Boy    Good-bye  15c 

ANGLO -CANADIANI;MUSIC  CO. 

144   Victoria   Street,    Toronto,    Ontario 


One  dollar  a  year  is 
all  it  costs  to  have  this 
publication  mailed  to 
your  address. 

McFarlane  Son  & 
Hodgson,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationers 
and    Paper  Dealers 

14  St.  Alexander  St.  -  Montreal 


TICKET   and  CONDUC- 
TOR  PUNCHES 

the  best  made 

The  Fred  J.  Meyers  Mfg.  Co. 

HAMILTON.  OHIO.  U.S.*. 


53 


KOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


BUYERS'  GUIDE 


RULERS 

"THE  UP-TO-DATE  LINE" 

A  complete  line  for  the  School  Supply  Dealer 
and  Stationer. 

Write  for  Samples  and  Prices. 

Up-To-Date  Advertising  Co. 

Dept.  C,  CANISTEO.  N.Y. 

T.  E.  T uttle,  Mer.  Ruler  Dept. 


MAPS 

We  can  supply  the  trade  with  anything-  in 
the  map  line  as  well  as  undertake  any  kind  of 
Map-Making.  Road  Maps,  Motor  Guides, 
Commercial  Maps,  Atlases. 

The  Scarborough  Company, 
of  Canada,  Limited 


TALLY  CARDS.  DANCE  PROGRAMMES, 

Verdler,  Ltd.,  18  Christopher  St.,  London.  B.C. 

TOYS   AND   GAMES 

A.  C.  Gilbert  Co.,  New  Haven,  Conn. 
Menzies  &   Co.,   Limited,  Toronto. 
Modellit   Mfg.    Co.,   19   Brunswick   St.,   Bristol, 
England. 

TYPEWRITER     RIBBONS     AND     CARBONS. 

Uittag  &  Volger,  Park   Ridge,   N.J. 

T.    A.    Heale    &    Co..    96    John    St.,    New    York, 


An  Advertisement 

in  the 

Buyers'  Guide 

Department 

will 

give    you    highly   effective 

publicity  at  minimum 

cost. 


Kindly  Mention 

this  Paper 

when    Writing 

Advertisers 


Ink- 
stands 

of  all  styles 

Manufactured  by 

FRANK  A.  WEEKS  MFG.  CO. 

93  John  St..  NEW  YORK  CITY.  N.Y. 
Canadian  Jobbers   handle  our  lines. 


ARTISTS  MATERIALS 


We  carry  a  complete  line  of  Artists  Materials 
Agents  for  Winsor  &  Newton,  London,  Eng. 

A.RAMSAY  &  SON   C° 

EST'D.   184  2.    MONTREAL. 


Ginger   up   your   sales   by   using  this   attractive  cabinet   on   your 
counter. 


Glass    Heads 
Steel    Points 

This    assortment 
including 

Window     Poster 

$12.50 


The      Hanger 
with  the  twist 

Style    L 

Assortment. 

Order    from 

your    jobber. 


„       ,  This  Assortment  retails  for   $18.75 

Request  _  -       __,  Free  samples 

samples  on  Moore  rush-rins  ,„tm 

your  Moore  Push-less  Hangers  -"•""' 

etter-head        Moore    I'ush Tin    Co.,    117   Berkley    Street, 
Philadelphia,   Fa. 


CARTER  INX 

Quality  Products 

embrace  a  line  of  inks, 
mucilage  and  paste 
which  is  unequalled.  It 
insures  a  steady  profit 
from  your  best  trade, 
and  does  away  with  all 
dissatisfaction. 


MADE  IN  CANADA 

The  Carter's  Ink  Co. 

356   St.   Antoine  Street  Montreal,   Que. 


54 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


THIS  IS  THE  S«iM3  MEMO  BOOK 

MADE  IN  CANADA  and  Made  Right 


Construction 

Morocco  Binding 
Leather  Lining 
Gold  Imprint 
Standard  Sizes 
Universal  Punching 

Best  Canadian 

Paper 
Accurate  Trimming 
Careful  Ruling 
Real  Leather  Index 


Uses 

Pocket  Memo 
Desk  Co^t  Book 
Appointment  Book 
Perpetual  Diaries 
Price  Books 
Address  Books 
Sermon  Books 
Shopping  Lists 
Pocket  Check 

Books 
Etc.,  Etc.,  Etc. 


RING  BOOKS 


SLUCKITT'S      p-» 


Our  new  Diaries  are  good  for  any  year — they  are 
ideal  for  appointment  Books- — Get  a  supply  NOW. 

We  Also  Make 
LEDGERS  POST  BINDERS 

Manufactured  by  a  Strictly  Canadian  Company. 

Luckett  Loose  Leaf,  Limited 

215-219  Victoria  Street       Dept.  S.       Toronto,  Ontario 


NOTE  BOOKS 


™rnG 


l\ 


YOU    CAN     NOW 

BUY 

MADE  IN  CANADA 

*■     PENCILS    ■« 

/*lann  tortured    by 

The  Wm.  Cane  &  Sons  Company,  Limited 
Newmarket,  Canada 


Hang  this  card 
in  your  store 

and  let  your  customers  know  you  are 
handling  the  new 

Canadian-made 
Pencils 

Get  them  acquainted  with  the  splen- 
did money's  worth  represented  in 
every  Cane  Pencil,'  a  value  not  excell- 
ed hy  any  imported  line. 

Send  for  sample  card  of  pencils  to-day 
and  test  out  your  trade.  Then  when 
you  see  how  favorably  they  impress 
your  customers,  let  us  know  and  we 
will  make  arrangements  to  supply 
you  through  your  regular  channel. 

We  are  the  Pioneer  Canadian 
Manufacturers  of  Lead  Pencils 
for  Commercial,  Studio,  School, 
and  Advertising  Purposes. 

The  Wm.  Cane  &  Sons 
Co.,  Limited 

Newmarket,  Canada 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


The 

Most  Cleanly 

Fictile-. 

Antiseptic 

and  Odorless 

Modelling 

Medium  on 

the  Market 


The  children's  favourite 
pastime 

MODELLIT 

will  attract  more  customers 
to  your  store  than  any  other 
modelling  medium. 


Made  in  Many 
Beautiful 
Colours  and 
Putupin  Vari- 
ous Sizes  of 
Fancy  Boxes 
and  Refills 
1  lb.  Blocks 


Agents  for   the  Dominion  of  Canada; 
MENZ1ES  &  COMPANY.  LIMITED  TORONTO.  CANADA. 

Write  Us  for  Samples  and  Particulars  TO-DAY 

MODELLIT  MFG.  CO.,  19  Brun»wick  St.,  Bristol,  England 

Telegrams  :  "Modellit.  Bristol."  England 


ill 


He  is   SO   Happy   Modelling,   with  MODELLIT       1 


Every   book,   toy   store  and   school  furnisher 
in  the  Dominion  should  sell 

MODELLIT 


ABOUT  STAMP  PADS 
MR.  STATIONER! 

Are  YOU  getting  your  full  share  of  this 
profitable  business?  Why  not  combine 
supreme  satisfaction  to  your  customers 
with  liberal  profits  for  yourself? 

The  "FULTON"  Self-Inking 
Stamp  Pad 

Seven  Sizes — Six  Colors 
STANDARD 

The"FULTON"Nou-Blurring 
Wood  Pad 

Three  Sizes — Six  Colors 

The  Best  Pad  on  the  Market — Giving 
the  Highest  Percentage  of  Stamp  Pad 
Satisfaction. 

By  all  means  write  TO-DAY 
for  Price  List  No.  34. 

FULTON  SPECIALTY  COMPANY 

Formerly  Fulton  Rubber  Type  Company 

128-142  Fulton  Street,      ELIZABETH,  N.J. 


1  Simple 

s  Economical 

1  Efficient 


The  new 

BUMP 

Paper  Fastener 

Here  's  a  handy- 
little  d  e  v  i  ce 
that  will  in- 
stantly appeal 
to  the  busy  of- 
fice  man. 


Besides   fasten-  I| 

ing    from     two  M 

to     ten    papers  H 

neatly      and  M 

firmly  with  one  f§ 

pressure  of  the  = 

H        hand,  the  Perforator  in  the  opposite  end  punches  as  j|= 

M       many  sheets  of  paper  as  can  be  inserted  in  opening.  M 

H       The  one  movement  performs  both  operations  making  p_ 

^       an  important  saving  of  time — a  point  to  appeal  to  i| 

s       the  busy  executive.  W 

g        The  Bump  is  made  by  expert  workmen  from  a  high  §§ 
W       grade  of  Steel,  nickel-plated  and  polished. 

Order  one  for  your  own  use  and  see  how 

it  works.    It  sells  at  $2.50,  leaving  you  a 

H               flood  margin  of  profit.  M 

Bump  Paper  Fastener  Co. 

LA  CROSSE,  WIS. 

=        Canadian  Agents:    W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto  p 


56 


IK)  OK  SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


THE  BINDER  OF  TO-DAY.    Made  in  U.S.A. 


Spring  Binder 

SIMPLE  AND  DURABLE 
PRACTICAL   AND    INEXPENSIVE 


Be  your  own  bookbinder.     Bind  your  sheets 
like  a  book,  quickly. 


ELBE  FILE  &  BINDER  CO. 

97-99-101  Reade  Street 

NEW  YORK  CITY 


AN  ALWAYS  PROFITABLE  LINE 

of   Beautifully  Colored,  Perfectly  Finished 


American  Toy  Marbles 


"The  Christensen  Line" 

Made  in  nine  sizes  and  in  eight  beautiful  colors — National 
Onyx  (four  colors),  Royal  Blue,  American  Cornelian,  Per- 
sian, Turquoise   and   Oriental  Jade. 

We  also  make  Ballot  Balls,  Crystal  Glass  Castor  Balls, 
Glass  Balls  for  Pump  Valves,  Lithographic  Use,  etc. 

Write  for  Catalogue  and  Prices. 

The  M.  F.  Christensen  &  Son  Co.,     -    ?Akron,  Ohio 


m 


IIHIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIJIIMIIIIMHMIIIimilinmilllililHilMilil 


Keep  m     g 

Standard  |  | 
Blotting 

Well  Displayed  I 

Keep  it  out  where  1     g 

your    customers  g     g 

cannot  fail  to  see  1     g 

it.    Draw  their  at-  g     1 

tendon  to  it,  sug-  §     g 

gest  it  to  the  custo-  g     I 
mer  looking  for  a  blotting  of  superior  absorb- 

ency  and  durability.     And  be  assured  that  i 
repeat    sales    always    follow    first    sales    of 

"Standard" — which  means  bigger  profits  for  1 

the  Standard  dealer.  g     g 

Our  other  lines  include   "Imperial,"   "Ster-  I     j 

ling"    (plain  blottings)    "Prismatic,"  "Curi-  I     1 

Curl,"  "Banker's  Linen  Finish"   (Embossed  §     | 

blottings)  "Royal  Worcester"  and  "Defend-  §     m 

er"  (Enamelled  blottings).  1     g 

Order   your   supplies    to-day! 

Standard  Paper  Mfg.  Co.  | 

Richmond,  Va.,  U.S.A. 

Largest  Exclusive  Manufacturers  of  Blottings 

l!l!lllll!lllllllllil!ll|[|!l!lllltllll!lllllllll^  H||| 

57 


MODELLED   IN   PLASTICINE. 
Harhutfs     Plasticine — the     world's     unrivalled     modelling     paste 
clean   and   easy  to  work   with  and   ever  ready  for  instant  use 
can   buy   it   by    the  lb.    by  the  cwt.   by   the  ton. 


Yon        s 


PLASTICINE 


i>    also   packed   as  Home   Modelling   Outfits  in   most  attractive  boxes 
tn    retail   at  all   prices. 

We    have    over    30   different    styles    so    there    is    bound    to    be    one 
to  suit  TOUR  business. 


PLAY-WAX 


Then  there  is  the  new  PLAY  WAX.  this  is  a  most  attractive 
material  owing  to  its  complete  cleanliness,  brilliance  of  coloi^  and 
the  fact  that  in  its  normal  condition  it  is  hard.  Please  apply 
to  our  Canadian  agents  as  below  or  to  ourselves.  We  have  been 
making  modelling  materials  for  the  last  20  years.  Our  experience 
will    guarantee    your   satisfaction. 

Canadian  Agents:  THE  GEO.  M.  HENDRY  CO..  215-219 
Victoria  Street.  Toronto.  THE  COPP,  CLARK  CO..  495- 
517  Wellington  Street  West.  Toronto.     Or 

HARBUTTS  PLASTICINE  LIMITED 

17  Bathampton.  Bath.,  England 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Jost  "  Elite "  Cards  and 
Art  Calendars 

Private  Greeting  Cards. 

Xmas  Greeting  Cards. 

Hand-Colored  Photo  Art  Calendars. 

All  (aids   Photo-Engraved  and  Hand-Colored,  from 

Original  and  Exclusive  Designs. 
Correspondence   solicited    from    interested   parties. 


J.  H.  JOST, 


Halifax,  Canada 


KINDLY   MENTION   THIS   PAPER  WHEN 
CORRESPONDING     WITH     ADVERTISER. 


TOY  PROFIT 


There  is  good  profit  in  a  line  of  Toys — besides, 
it  attracts  the  family  trade  and  that  is  the  kind 
that  pays. 

Successful  toymen  keep  posted  on  trade  happen- 
ings, new  articles,  new  ideas  of  salesmanship, 
and   window   dressing,    where    to    buy    stock,   etc. 

"PLAYTHINGS" 

each  month  has  all  the  news  of  the  tov  trade. 
Subscription  price  OXE  DOLLAR  AND  FIFTY 
CENTS  a  year  postpaid. 

Subscribe  now  and  join  those  who  are  keeping 
up-to-date  and  in  the  swim. 

A  sample  copy  free  if  requested. 

McCREADY  PUBLISHING  CO., 


118  East  28th  Street 
NEW  YORK 


CLASSIFIED  ADVERTISING 


Advertisements  under  this  heading,  2c  pel 
word    per    insertion. 

Where  replies  come  to  our  care  to  be  for- 
warded, five  cents  must  be  added  to  cost  to 
cover  postage,  etc. 


PATSON'S  INDELIBLE)  INK.  TRADE  Sup- 
plied by  all  Leading  Wholesale  Drug  Houses 
in  the  Dominion.  Received  Highest  Award 
Medal  and  Diploma  at  Centennial,  Philadel- 
phia, 1876;  World's  Pair,  Chicago,  1893,  and 
Province  of  Quebec  Exposition,  Montreal,  1897 


DEALERS  WANTED.— BOOKSELLEKiS  AND 
stationers  can  add  a  profitable  new  line  by 
featuring  Japanese  prints.  Get  further  par- 
ticulars by  communicating  with  "Jap-Art"  c/o 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  143  University  Ave., 
Toronto. 


BRITISH  FIRM  MAKING  GAMES  AND 
toys  at  popular  prices,  need  agent  to  sell 
wholesale  houses  in  Canada.  Goods  are  up- 
to-date  and  sell  readily.  Write:  Games,  c|o 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  University  Avenue, 
Toronto. 


BRITISH  FIRM  OF  ART  PRINTERS  AND 
Publishers  with  extensive  and  up-to-date  line, 
need  agent  or  traveler  for  Canada.  Goods  sell 
to  stationers,  art  dealers,  picture  frame  manu- 
facturers, etc.  Write:  Pictures,  do  Bookseller 
and  Stationer,  University   Avenue,  Toronto. 


WANTED 


TJKITI.SH      OR      CANADIAN 
stationery     trade,     wanted 


LINE  FOR 
by  manufac- 
turers' agent  having  strong  connection  with 
trade  throughout  the  Dominion.  Would  de- 
vote whole  time  to  sufficiently  important  line 

as   straight  representative.     Box  ,   care  of 

Bookseller  aud  Stationer. 


CANADA  IN  A  NUTSHELL! 

Every  live  newsdealer  will  be  waiting 
for  the  new  1917  edition  of 

5,000 

Facts  About  Canada 

It  is  now  ready. 
Compiled  by  Frank   Yeigh 

Everything  about  Canada,  in  concrete 
form,  under  50  chapters  from  "Agriculture" 
to  "Yukon."  A  gold  mine  of  information 
about  our  wonderful  country.  Praised  by 
press  and  people. 

Order  through  your  News  Company, 


or  fr 


Canadian  Facts  Publishing  Co. 


588  Huron  Street 


Toronto,  Canada 


To  everyone  who  uses  a  Loose 
Leaf   System  you  can  sell  the 

"F-B" 
Loose  Leaf  Holder 


Pat.   May   13,    1913 

Keeps  his  old  records  in  permanent  form  instead  of 
lying  around  in  disorderly  bundles. 

Peimits  quick  and  easy  reference.  Practical  and  low- 
priced.  Adjustable  to  fit  any  size  of  paper,  or  whatever 
the  location  of  punch  holes. 

Send  to-day  for  prices  and  particulars. 


ROCKHILL  &  VIETOR,  Sole  Agents,  Dept  "F-B" 

(Branch:  180  N.  Market  St.,  Chicago)     22  Cliff  St.,  New  York 


5S 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Prosperity  and  pro- 
nounced business  activity 
stimulate  a  demand  for 
quality  goods.  You  can- 
not fill  this  demand  unless 
you  stock 


Q 


ranes 


The  Correct  Writing  Paper 


Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co. 

Pittsfleld,  Massachusetts 
Toronto  Office:  266-268  King  St.  W. 


Blotting 


Its  thirty  years  selling 

I*Pf*Orn     's  convincing     proof     of     "World" 

■    ^^"*  *■*    Blotting  superiority.    No  other  paper 

has  the  same  absorbency  ami  durability  of  this  high 

grade  blotting 

It   is   made    from    selected     cotton     rags,   hence   its 

quality  is  assured. 

We    produce     two     cheaper    grades — "Hollywood" 

and  "Eeliance" — the  very  best  value  at  the  price. 

The  attractive  colors  of  all  our  lines  make  displays 

easy  and  eye-catching. 

Try  their  selling  qualities.     Order  a  trial  supply. 

The  Albemarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

RICHMOND,  VA.,  U.S.A. 


Fine  Inks  and  Adhesives 


FOR  THOSE 


WHO  KNOW 


Higgins' 


Drawing  Inks 
Eternal  Writing  Ink 
Engrossing  Ink 
Taurine  Mucilage 
Photo  Mounter  Paste 
Drawing  Board  Paste 
Liquid  Paste 
Office  Paste 
Vegetable  Glue,  etc. 


Are   the  finest  and  best  Inks  and  Adhesives 

These  manufactures  have  a  unique  standing 
among  discriminating  consumers,  the  ready- 
money  kind  who  know  what  they  want  and  are 
willing  to  pay  for  it.  They  are  worth  cater- 
ing to. 

CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO.,  Mfrs. 


Branches : 
Chicago.   London 


271   Ninth  St. 
BROOKLYN.  N.Y. 


The  McKinley  Edition  of 
Ten-Cent  Music 

will  always  hold  first  place  as  an  Edition  of 
Standard,  Classic  and  Teaching  Music. 

An  established  demand  for  this  line  of  music 
exists  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  meets  the  requirements  of  the  Teacher,  Stu- 
dent and  the  Accomplished  Musician. 

It  has  proved  itself,  to  thousands  of  dealers,  to 
be  the  best  foundation  for  a  sheet  music  de- 
partment. 

Every  copy  of  The  McKinley  Edition  sold  means 
a  profit  of  over  200%  to  the  dealer. 
The    McKinley    Edition    (Eevised    for    our    Can- 
adian   Trade)     conforms    in    every    detail    with 
Canadian   copyright  laws. 

A  great  advantage  to  the  merchant  as  a  "Trade 
Bringer"  is  the  catalogues  bearing  the  dealers' 
imprint  which  are  supplied  with  this  Edition. 
These  catalogues  will  attract  more  customers  to 
your  store  than  any  other  medium  you  could 
employ. 

Write  us  for  Samples  and  Particulars  to-day. 
Also  we   want   you  to  know   our  Jobbing  De- 
partment is  one  of  the  largest  and  most  complete 
in  the  country.    We  can  take  care  of  your  wants 
for  anything  in  Sheet  Music. 

McKINLEY  MUSIC  COMPANY 

The  Largest  "Exclusively  Sheet  Music  House" 

in  the  World. 

CHICAGO:     1501-15    EAST    FIFTY-FIFTH    STREET 


59 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Maclean'sMagazine 

for  March 

(€~\  E  thankful  that  Canada  has  a  magazine  of  BIG 
I^Jjcalibre.  A  magazine  fit  to  be  placed  alongside 


Sir  Gilbert  Parker 
Robert  W.  Service 
Stephen  Leacock 
Alan  Sullivan 
Miss  Agnes  Laut 
H.  F„  Gadsby 
Erman  J.  Ridgeway 
Madge  MacBeth 
L.  M.  Montgomery 
Norman  Lambert 
Hopkins  Moorhouse 
H.  M.  Tandy 
Robson  Black 
Adam  Barnhart  Brown 
Arthur  William  Brown 
Peter  McArthur 


the  best  British  and  American  magazines — 
by  the  test  of  those  who  contribute  to  it 
regularly  and  of  ideals. 


Maclean's  Magazine 


carries  world-famous  names 
in  its  list  of  contributors — writ- 
ers who  have  an  open  sesame  to  any  magazine,  yet  writers  that  some 
magazines  cannot  get,  because  they  fail  to  measure  up  to  a  standard  set. 
Not  every  or  any  magazine  can  have  the  work  of  Sir  Gilbert  Parker, 
Miss  Laut,  Stephen  Leacock,  Arthur  Stringer,  Arthur  E.  McFarlane, 
Mrs.  Montgomery,  Nellie  McClung,  Robert  W.  Service,  Alan  Sullivan, 
and  others  whose  names  are  familiar  to  readers  of  MACLEAN'S 
MAGAZINE, 


Maclean's  Magazine  ly" 

fine  and 
high-priced  writers  because  they  are  Canadian-born  or 
bred  and  because  they  are  genuinely  interested  in  seeing 
the  land  of  their  birth  or  adoption  have  a  magazine 
worthy  of  the  land  of  their  love  and  of  their  work  and 
fame.  And  they  have  found  this  magazine  in 
MACLEAN'S.  MacLean's  gives  them  access  to  the  read- 
ership they  desire  to  reach— the  man  and  women  of  cul- 
ture and  position,  of  real  love  for  Canada  and  in  earnest 
to  see  its  nationality  enlarge  and  its  destiny  advanced. 

And  so  we  feel  that  we  have  a  right  to  ask  you  to  give 
MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE  a  first  place  in  your  favor. 
It  is  fruit/  Canadian,  doing  a  needed  service  for  Canada, 
and  doing  this  worthily.  Doing  all  that  it  is  doing  at  a 
.heavy  present  cost,  looking  to  the  future  for  its  larger 
reward. 

You  can  show  your  appreciation  of  what  the  publishers  of 
MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE  are  doing  by  making 
MACLEAN'S  an  elect  magazine  among  all  magazines 
enjoying  your  favor,  and  by  making  it  better  known  to 
others  who  have  your  spirit — your  sense  of  Canadian  na- 
tionality, your  purpose  to  advance  Canada  in  all  right 
and  high  ways. 

Booksellers  of  Canada: 

GIVE  MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE  a  bold  place 
in  your  displays  of  magazines.     Speak  to  your 

customers  and  callers  of  it.  Point  out  to  them  that  this  maga- 
zine, above  all  others,  is  Canadian  in  essence  and  in  purpose; 
that  it  18  giving  Canadian  writers  their  chance  to  find  their 
own;  that  it  is  the  equal  in  interest  and  worth-whileness  of  any 
Bntixlt  or  American  Mat/aziiK — in  proof  ivhereof  look  at  the 
mmmarij  of  contents  of  the  March  issue. 

GO 


Contents  of 

MARCH    MACLEAN'S 

(CONDENSED) 

Jordan    is    a    Hard    Road.      Serial    by    Sir    Gilbert 

Parker. 
The   Wings   of  Icarus.     By    Peter   McArthur. 
Fate   Up.     By   Hopkins   Moorhouse. 
The     Rabbit     Revolution.        By     Adam     Barnhart 

Brown,     with    illustrations     by     his     brother, 

Arthur   William   Brown. 

The  Above  are  Stcries 

Ten  Million  for  the  Asking.  By  Stephen  Leacock 
— a  serious  contribution  on  a  phase  of  na- 
tional finance. 

National  Policies — How  they  are  formulated  and 
exploited  by  Parties  aud  Cabinets.  By  H.  F. 
Gadsby. 

Prospects  for  Peace  and  Peace's  Problems.  By 
Agnes  C.  Laut.  A  stirring  and  thought- 
provoking  article  by  this  wonderful  woman 
writer   with   a   statesman's   mind. 

The  Above  are  Special  Articles 

W.  T.  Dewart.  Business  Manager  of  the  Munsey 
Publications.  By  Erman  J.  Ridgeway,  form- 
erly publisher  of  Everybody's  Magazine.  Mr. 
Dewart  holds  a  big  position  in  New  York. 
He  is  a  Canadian,  a  member  of  a  well-known 
Toronto  family. 

Mrs.  Ilayter  Reed — the  woman  who  is  respon- 
sible for  the  decorative  schemes  of  the  big 
C.P.R.  hotels.     By  Madge  MacBeth. 

H.  C.  Brewster — Premier  of  British  Columbia. 
By  Norman  Lambert.  A  timely  sketch  of  a 
man  of  interest  to  all  Canadians. 
These  are  brief  biographies  of  interesting 
Canadians — a  feature  of  every  issue  of 
MACLEAN'S  MAGAZINE. 

The  Review  of  Reviews  Department  condenses 
for  busy  readers  fhe  cream  of  the  best 
things  appearing  in  the  current  magazines  of 
the  world.  So  MACLEAN'S  becomes  many 
magazines  in  one. 

The  Business  Outlook  and  Information  for  In- 
vestors are  two  feature-;  of  MACLEAN'S 
greatly  liked  and  esteemed  by  many  of  its 
readers. 

These  are  Department  Features  found  in 
every  issue 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


B&P  STANDARD 

The  Line  of  10,001  Numbers 

Duplicating  Folding  Receipts 

(Used  with  Carbon  Sheet) 

f|            ,„_ 

r  i 

B 1     IJ»wlwrf  _ 

1 

Hj 

k  i 

M^^^^^^B^HH 

The  half  sheet  to  right  of  perforation,  when 
folded  to  left,  shows  the  same  printed  form, 
and  by  use  of  carbon  sheet  a  duplicate  copy 
is  made  which  is  retained  in  book. 

In  addition  to  the  form  shown  here,  we  have 
No.  5091 — Shipping  Receipts.    Size  of  book 
8%x3'%,   100   leaves,   bound   in  full  duck, 
heavy  board. 

Samples  and  prices  furnished  on  request. 

Boorum  &  Pease  Co. 

New  York  City,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 

B&P  STANDARD 

The  line  of  10,001    Numbers 

B&P  NEW  EMPIRE  TRANSFER 
AND  POST  BINDERS 


This  new  line  is  sure  to  find  great  favor 
everywhere,  as  they  combine  lightness  with 
great  strength  and  durability. 
Made  end  lock  with  key — top  lock  button 
fastener — and  end  lock  with  key  and  non- 
protruding  posts. 

Write  for  circular  describing  this  and  other 
new  Transfer  and  Post  Binders  that  we 
recently  brought  out. 

Boorum  &  Pease  Loose  Leaf 
Book  Company 

New  York  City,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 


KWW/W/'/W/W^^^^^ 


INDEX      TO     ADVERTISERS 


Albemarle    Paper    Co 59 

American   Pencil  Co Inside   front   cover 

Allen,   Thos 9,  10,   11,   12,   13,  14 

Anglo-Canadian    Music    Co 53 

Baker,   Chas.  W 2 

Bartons   56 

Binney   &    Smith    2 

Boorum   &   Pease    61 

Boorum  &  Pease  Loose  Leaf   61 

Boston    Line    23 

Bradway  Novelty  Co 52 

Brown    Bros 2 

Bump   Paper   Fastener    56 

Briggs,    Wm 3 

Bunttn   Gillies  &  Co ..Back  cover 

Canadian    Facts    Pub.    Co 58 

Cane,    Wm.,   &    Sons    55 

Carter's    Ink   Co 54 

Copp,    Harold    20 

Clark   Bros.   &  Co 21 

Christensen   &  Son    Co 57 

Copp,   Clark  Co 16,  17 

Dawson,    W.    V 20 

Dent,  J.  M.,  &  Sons   20 

Eaton,    Crane   &    Pike    59 

Eaton-Dikeman     51 

Elbe  File  &  Binder  Co 57 

Esterbrook   Pen   Mfg.    Co 7 

Fulton    Specialty   Co i...  56 

Gale   &    Polden    53 

Gilbert    Post    Card    Co 22 

Globe    Wernicke     

Goodali   &   Sons    1 

Gordon    &    Gotch    20 

llarbult's    Plasticine    57 

Heath,   John,    &    Co 20 

Higgins  &  Co 59 

Hinks,   Wells   &   Co 20 

Hurst,   A.   0 22 

Imperial  News  Co 

Irish,   G.   L 53 

Jost,   J.    H 58 

Luckett   Loose   Leaf  Co 55 

Lucas-Tuttle    5.3 


MacLean's   Magazine    60 

McClelland,   Goodchild   &   Stewart    4,   5,   7 

McCready   Pub.   Co 58 

McDougall,   A.   U.,   &  Co 18.  19 

MeFarlane    Son   &    Hodgson    53 

McKenzie    Engraving    Co 23 

McKinley    Music    Co 59 

Macmillan    Pub.   Co 20 

Mittag  &   Volger    Inside   back   cover 

Meyers,    Fred    J 53 

Monarch   Paper  Co .' 52 

Moore   Push    Pin    Co 54 

Modellit  Mfg.   Co 56 

Morton    Phillips   Co 52 

Musson   Book   Co 26 

National  Blank  Book   Co Inside   back   cover 

Non-iShine   Pad   Co 62 

Pacific   Pennant   &    Novelty   Co 62 

Packard    Bros 52 

Paine,  W.  S.,  &  Co 1 

Polar   Mfg.   Co <>2 

Pugh   Specialty   Co 51 

Ramsay   &   Co 54 

Ritchie,  Wm.,  &  Co 22 

Rockhill    &    Vietor 58 

Sanford   &   Bennett    Front    cover 

Scarborough   Co.   of   Canada    54 

Stafford,  S.   S.,  Inc Inside  back  cover 

Standard    Paper   Mfg.    Co 57 

Stationer's   Loose   Leaf  Co 52 


Terry,   Herbert  Co. 
Toronto    News    Co. 


20 
8 


U.S.    Playing   Card    Co 24 

Up-to-Date    54 

Valentine   &   Sons    15 

Waterman,   Arthur,   &   Co 62 

Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture  Co 53 

Weldon    Roberts   Rubber   Co 51 

Wescott-Jewell    20 

Willisten,    A.    L.    (Payson's    Ink)     

Wilson- Jones    Loose    Leaf    52 

Weeks    Mfg.    Co 54 

Wycil  &  Co 52 


$ 


61 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


POLAR  PRACTICAL  OFFICE  ARTICLES  SELL  QUICKLY 


GLASS   DESK   PAD 
No    0-15x18  No.  1 


18x24 


No.  2-20x34 


CENTER  DESK 
DRAWER  TRAY 


AT  LIBERAL   PROFITS 
Every  Dealer  Should  Keep  Posted  at  all  Time* 
About  Our  Entire   Line.     New  Items  Are  Being 
Added  Continually. 
Some  of  our  other  practical  office  articles 
which    all    dealers    should    know    about  : 
Polai  Desk   Calendar. 

Pocket    Index    Card   Cases. 
"      Cut      Glass      Paper      Weights      and 
Trays. 
Side   Desk    Drawer   Tray. 
Paper   Weight   and    Memo   Pad. 
Penknife    and    Ink    Eraser    Blade. 
Signature    Blotter    Book. 
Valuable    Paper    Wallet. 
Furniture    Top    Protectors. 
Typewriter    Shock    Absorber   Pad. 
"      Felt    Mats. 

A  Liberal  Discount   to  the  Trade. 
Dealers,   write  for   complete  information 


For   Assorting  Pins, 
Clips.  Rubber  Bands.   Etc. 


DESK  REMINDER 

Polar  Manufacturing  Co.,  g^StSttg*  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


pen  Profits 


AN   EVER  POPULAR   GIFT 

The  "A. A. "  self -filling  feature  is  simple  and 
attractive.  That's  one  reason  why  this  pen  sells 
so  easily  and  quickly.  The  "A.A."  pen  is  an 
attractive  holiday  gift.  The  material  and  work- 
manship are  absolutely  guaranteed.  The  ex- 
quisite flexibility  of  the  gold  pen  point  is  pleas- 
ing to  customers. 

We  will  furnish  attractive  display  eases  free. 
Each  case  contains  an  appropriate  holiday 
assortment  of  self-fillers,  lower  end  joint, 
middle  joint,  and  safety  fountain  pens. 

Write  to  your  local  jobber  or  to  us  for  prices, 
catalogue  and  trade  discounts  on  this 

PROFITABLE  LINE 

Arthur  A.  Waterman  &  Co. 

Established  1895 
36  THAMES  ST.  NEW  YORK  CITY 

Not  connected  with  the 
L.  E.  Waterman  Co. 


The  Non-Shine  Chair  Pad 


Dealers: 


Have  you  ever  realized  the  sell- 
ing possibilities  of  the  Non  Shine 
Chair  Pad?  Every  office  employee  in  your  town  is  a 
mighty  good  prospect  for  this  very  necessary  little  office 
article.  The  fact  that  500,000  were  sold  in  the  U.S.  is 
ample  evidence  of  their  popularity  and  selling  value. 

There  is  a  big  field  open  in 
Canada  to  push  the  Non-Shine 
Pad.  Live  dealers  are  going  to 
make  good  profits  on  its  sale. 

We  will  be 
glad  to  fur- 
nish you  with 
full  particulars 
of  the  Non- 
Shine  on  re- 
ceipt of  a  post 
card  request. 
Send  it  right 
away. 

Non-Shine 
Pad  Co. 

7039  Ridge  Ave. 

Philadelphia 
Pa. 


FELT  AND  LEATHER 


PACIFIC     PENMAN? 
&  NOVELTY  CO.    244-46  NEW  HI0HST 


PILLOW  TOPS 

VELTIES— SEWN  AND  REPRC 

PENNANTS 


NOVELTIES-SEWN  AND  REPRODUCTION. 


"  NEW- 
STUFFED  FELT 
BULLDOGS  AND  CATS 


UNBREAKABLE 

DRESSED  DOLLS 

ALL  SIZES-ALL  PRICES 


YOUR     WANTS    ^  pT/and^i' 


low.     Use  the  want 
id  of  a  few  of  them. 


62 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


•I 


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I  N6WS  Go.,L>imiteD 


.iWJl 


TORONTO,  CANADA 


■••••■•■]|f 


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IMPORTANT  ANNOUNCEMENT 


With  the  issue  of  Dec.  23rd,  we  assumed  the  agency  for  "Jack  Canuck"  throughout  Canada.  This  Cana- 
dian publication  is  well-known  everywhere  and  its  circulation  is  rapidly  increasing.  Tf  you  are  not  now 
selling  it  you' will  find  it  profitable  to  add  this  at  once  to  your  order. 


Unique  War  Post  Cards 

This  line  is  having  an  enormous  sale 
in  Canada — taken  by  the  French  Gov- 
ernment and  now  only  released.  Price, 
10c  per  packet  of  8;  sell  15c. 

Fragments  from  France 
This  very  clever  work  is  still  strong 
—Parts  i  and  2  in  stock.     You  should 
stock  this  line.     No.  3  will  be  issued 
shortly. 


American  Paper  Bound  Books 

We  positively  supply  fullest  range, 
best  authors,  titles  and  covers. 
ALGER  books  for  boys  at  7%e.  The 
ALERTS,  by  Garvice,  Clav  and  so 
Forth,  only  7%e.  The  JESSE  JAMES 
— all  titles  at  9c.  Modern  authors — 
100  titles  at  8y2c. 

Ward.  Lock's  6/,  remainder  sold  up 
to  $1.50.     Clearing  at  only  24c. 


Book  Counter  Racks 

These  are  essential  for  displays.  They 
pay  for  themselves  at  once.  These 
lacks  are  the  best  in  Canada.  Fitted 
to  hold  all  sizes  and  shapes  of  maga- 
zines and  made  of  solid  metal  that 
will  not  wear  out.  Write  for  illus- 
trated circulars,  prices,  etc. 


IMPERIAL  NEWS  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

87  Queen  Street  East,  Toronto,  Ontario 


LEASE  FORMS 

(Quebec) 

TO-LET  SIGNS 

ALL  KINDS  AT  LOW  PRICES 


A  new  list  of  10c  and  15c  paper- 
bound  novels  is  being  printed  and 
will  be  ready  within  two  weeks. 

We  will  l>e  pleased  to  co-operate 
with  any  dealer  who  has  not  sold  our 
cheap  paper  lines,  giving  the  best 
selection  of  novels  that  can  be  pro- 
cured. Ask  for  special  offer  to  new 
(halers. 

Imperial  News  Company 

LIMITED 
254  Lagauchetlere  Street,  Montreal 


IMPERIAL  NEWS  COMPANY 

LIMITED 
WINNIPEG 

We  have  just  received  a  shipment  of  sixpenny, 
sevenpenny  and  shilling  novels,  by  the  following 
well-known  authors: 

Hall  Caine,  Robert  Chambers,  Conan  Doyle, 
Charles  Garvice,  Rider  Haggard,  W.  W.  Jacobs, 
Seaton  Merriman,  Le  Queux,  H.  de  Vere  Stacpoole, 
H.  G.  Wells,  Stanley  Weyman,  Elinor  Glyn,  Booth 
Tarkington,  Bindloss,  Charles  Dickens,  Jack  Lon- 
don, Max  Pemberton,  Temple  Thurston,  Baroness 
Orczy,  G.  K.  Chesterton,  Maurice  Hewlett  and 
R.  L.  Stevenson. 

Price:  Sixpennies,  lOV^e;  sevenpennies,  14c; 
shillings,  21c.     All  f.o.b.  Winnipeg. 

Prices  are  bound  to  advance  on  these  goods,  and 
many  of  the  titles  we  have  in  stock  will  not  be 
again  obtainable  until  after  the  war. 

Sole  Canadian  Agents  for 

OFFICIAL  PHOTOGRAPHS  OF  THE  FRENCH 
ARMY. 

DAILY  MAIL  OFFICIAL  WAR  POST  CARDS. 

These  are  splendid  values  at  $10.00  per  thousand. 
Send  us  an  order  for  any  of  the  above  lines  and 
you  will  find  them  quick  sellers. 

SOLE  AGENTS  FOR  JACK  CANUCK 


63 


15  0  0  K  8  E3  J,  L  E  R     AND     STATIONER 


WAIT 


HOLYOKE. 

MASS. 


SEE  THE  1917  LINE  OF 

Whiting  &  Cook,  Inc., 

before  buying  your  supplies  of 
CHRISTMAS  and  NEW  YEAR'S  GREETING  CARDS 

Steel  Die  Engraved  Embossed  Hand  Colored 

NOTHING  FINER  PRODUCED 
This   line   includes   Easter  ami    Birthday  Cards  and 
greetings    for    various   other   occasions,   as    well   as 
Birth    Notices,    Funeral    Notices,    Wedding    kivila 
tinus,    Congratulations,    Condolences,   etc. 

A  Money  Making  Line  For  Retailers 

Geore-f  Ridotit  &  Cn       11  york  street 

ueor5c    IVIUUUl    Qt    V-O.,  TORO  NTO.  CANADA 


"What  ruined  your 
business?" 

"  Advertising." 

Howr' 

"I  let  it  all  be  done 
by  my  competitors." 

—  Boston  Transcript 


WINNING  THE 
BUYER'S  FAVOR 

THE  best  possible  buyer 
is  not  made  an  actual 
buyer  at  a  single  step. 
It  is  one  thing  to  win  the 
buyer's  favor  for  an  article 
and  another  to  make  adjust- 
ments incident  to  closing  the 
sale.  Winning  the  buyer's 
favor  is  the  work  of  trade 
paper  advertising.  Under 
ordinary  conditions  it  should 
not  be  expected  to  do  more. 


Advertising   a   Labor -Saver 


The  merchant's  greatest  labor-saver  is  not  necessarily  an  adding  machine. 
It  is  more  likely  to  be  advertising. 

A  great  factor  in  the  cost  of  goods  is  the  time  it  takes  to  move  them.  Adver- 
tising and  trade-marks,  working  together,  are  the  most  efficient  movers  of 
goods — consequently  the  greatest  reducers  of  selling  cost. 

The  producer  who  places  his  trade-mark  on  his  goods  and  advertises  it 
nationally,  is  so  sure  of  their  quality  that  he  is  willing  to  stand  the  full  force 
of  possible  complaints. 

The  whole  tendency  of  trade-marks  and  advertising  is  to  raise  qualities  and 
standardize  them,  while  reducing  prices  and  stabilizing  them. 


fi4 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  R     A  N  1)     ST  A  T  I  0  N  E  1 1 


The  service  that  satisfies 

Efficient  executives  demand  cleanliness,  durability  and  economy 
in  their  supplies  of  typewriter  ribbons  and  carbons.  That's  why 
there  is  such  a  biff  demand  for  the  reliable 

M.  and  V.  Brand 

Dealers  stocking  it  are  making  good,  increasing  their  sales,  their 
profits,  and  their  number  of  satisfied  customers.  You  can  do 
this,  too. 

Get  a  supply  of  M.  &  V.  Typewriter  Ribbons  and  Carbons  and 
recommend  them  to  your  people.  The  quality  of  the  goods  will 
do  the  rest. 

MITT  AG  &  VOLGER,  INC. 

SOLE  MANUFACTURERS  FOR  THE  TRADE 

Principal  Offices  and  Factories,  PARK  RIDGE,  N.  J.,  U.S.A. 

BRANCHES 

NEW  YORK,  N.Y..  261  Broadway        CHICAGO.  ILL..  205  West  Monroe  St.        LONDON,  7  &  8  Dyers  Bldg.,  Holborn,  E.C. 

AGENCIES  IN  EVERY  PART  OF  THE  WORLD;  IN  EVERY  CITY  OF  PROMINENCE 


NATIONAL 


EMERALD 


LOOSE-LEAF  LEDGER 

A  WONDERFUL  book  value.  Bound 
in  Imitation  Pigskin.  Back  and  Corn- 
ers gold-tooled :  with  Green  Corduroy  Sides. 
The  Buff  Linen  Ledger  Paper  Index  is 
linen  stayed  with  Green  Tabs  to  match 
binding.  Fly  leaves  and  Lining  Sheets 
lithographed.  The  frame  is  made  of  pressed 
steel.  The  mechanism  is  simple — detachable 
flat  key,  controls  the  expansion  which  is 
90%. 


NATIONAL  BLANK  BOOK  CO. 

HOLYOKE,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


Mucilages  and  Paste 
are  Made  in  Canada 


Catalogues  mailed  to  the  trade  on  request. 


Canadian  Factory  and  Offices    at 


9-11-13  Davenport  Road 


Toronto 


BOO  K  S  E  L  I.  ]•:  R     A  X  I)     ST  A  TIO  N  E  R 


Import  Samples 

for 
Christmas,  1917 

will  soon  be  in  our  travellers'  hands. 
They  will  carry,  in  addition  to  our 
line  of  Fine  Stationery,  "Made  in 
Canada,"  a  full  line  of  the  latest 
British  and  American-made  goods. 
It  will  pay  you  to  see  them  before 
ordering  Papeteries,  Greeting  Cards, 
Post  Cards,  Gift  Dressings,  etc. 


Why  you  should  stock 

Dutch  Fabrik 

It  is  known  from  coast  to  coast 
as  Canada's  most  popular,  me- 
dium-priced Stationery. 

Its  pure  white,  linen-grained 
surface  makes  writing  a 
pleasure. 

Supplied  in  the  most  popular 
styles  of  notepaper,  envelopes, 
papeteries  and  tablets. 

The  distinctive  packing  at- 
tracts attention  and  helps  to 
sell  the  goods. 

Display  rolls  supplied  on  re- 
quest. 

Made-in-Canada. 


antjp 

HAMILTON 


CANADA 


AND 


OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 


The  only  publication  in  Canada  devoted  to  the  -Book,  Stationery  and  Kindred 
Trades,  and  for  thirty-one  years  the  recognized  authority  for  those   interests. 

MONTREAL,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Bank  Bldg.     TORONTO,  143-153  University  Ave.         WINNIPEG,  22  Royal  Bank  Bide-       LONDON,  ENG.,  88  Fleet  S«.,  E.C. 


VOL.  XXXIII. 


PUBLICATION     OFFICE:     TORONTO,     MARCH,      1917 


No.  3 


rvice ! 


Beauty  of  finish  or  high-class 
materials  count  for  little  in 
fountain  pens,  unless  they  give 
satisfactory  service.  S.  &  B. 
Fountain  Pens  please  the  eye, 
and  are  the  last  word  in  quality 

— but  their  extraordinary  value  is  in  SERVICE 

to  the  user. 

SANFORD  &  BENNETT 

FOUNTAIN  PENS 

are  built  for  action.  All  working  parts  tested 
and  proved — mechanism  accurate — pens 
tipped  with  native  Russian  iridium  points  — 
writing  easy,  continuous,  perfect.  Seldom 
out  of  order — cannot  leak— always  ready  for 
service.  They  sell  on  reputa- 
tion— re-sell  on  merit. 


s.  &  B.  AUTOPEN 


S.&B.  GRAVITY-STYLO 


BOO  K  SELL  E  R     A  N  I >     s  T  ATIO'N  E  It 


DE  LUXE 

HOLIDAY 

PAPETERIES 

PAR    EXCELLENCE 


HHRULY  a  wonderful  collection 
of  unique  novelties  in  boxed 
stationery,  fully  up  to  the  high 
standard  of  quality  established  by 
a  long  line  of  successes;  many  new 
styles  of  paper,  the  latest  sizes  and 
shapes  of  envelopes,  and  always 
dependable  value  worthy  of  our 
factory. 

You  cannot  buy  wisely  unless  you 
see  the  De  Luxe  line. 


WARWICK  BROS.  & 
RUTTER,    LIMITED 

MANUFACTURING   STATIONERS 

TORONTO 


rtMSSiS 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


BRUCE  BAIRNSFATHER 

Bruce  Bairnst'ather  —  the  cartoonist  whose 
work  is  making  a  war-worn  world  laugh. 
We  are  reproducing  some  of  his  very  best 
wink  in  a  new  series  of  playing  cards — a  de- 
cidedly novel  idea  that  will  make  a  telling 
appeal  to  card  lovers.    6  Designs. 


TO  VICTORY 


ON  LEAVE 


Two   new  additions    to   our 
popular  Patriotic  Series 

This  line  is  haying  a  big  run,  the 
ideas  are  very  timely,  and  the  de- 
signs  are  artistic  in  the  extreme. 
A   line  worth   featuring. 


Goodall  Playing  ('aids  arc  always  timely  in 
design.  Their  selling  qualities  make  them 
favorites  with  dealers.  They  are  always 
popular   with   the  card-playing  public. 


■ 

x<  "%• 

H^^SHl 

^^^n 

Keep  Goodall's 
well  displayed 


Exclusive 
Designs 


It  will  pay  you.  Everybody  knows  the  quality 
of  Goodall  Playing  Cards.  Their  artistic  merit 
and  correct  finish  and  .splendid  wearing  qual- 
ities appeal  to  card  lovers  everywhere. 

To  still  further  enhance  the  popularity  of  the 

Goodall  lines  there  has  recently  been  added  a 
"Bairnsfather  Series,"  reproductions  of  some  of 
the  celebrated  cartoonist's  best  war  skits.  The 
growing  demand  for  this  new  idea  is  sufficient 
evidence  of  its  selling  value.  Make  this  one  of 
your  leaders. 

Other  New  Issues  include  15  New  and  Attrac- 
tive   designs    in     the    '"Society,"    '"Salon'''    and  , 
"Sultan"  Series. 

Imperial  Club  Series 

is  conceded  to  be  the  best  and  most  popular  25c 
card  on  the  market. 

* 

Order  Through  Your  Jobber 


Aubrey  O.  Hurst 

32  Front  St.  W.,  Toronto 


BO OK SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


BROWN  BROS.,  limited 

Wholesale  and  Manufacturing  Stationers,  TORONTO 

FOR   OVER   SEVENTY  YEARS  this   business   has   been   established 

in  Toronto  and  it  has  been  its  aim  to  keep  the  most 

complete  and  up-to-date  stock  of 

STATIONERY  AND  OFFICE  SUPPLIES 

BLANK  BOOKS,      MEMO  BOOKS,      LOOSE-LEAF 

SPECIALTIES,  LEATHER  GOODS,  Etc. 
NOTE  PAPER,  ENVELOPES,  CARDS  Visiting  and  Memorial. 

STEEL  PENS EsterbrOOks,  Our  Specialty.     Canadian  Agents,  GillottS,   Myers' 

Ball  Pointed,  Mitchell,  Russia  Moheta,  Brown  Bros. 
LEAD  PENCILS— Ophir,  Silco,  Royal  Academy,  Black  Watch,  Auditor. 
WRITING  INKS— Stephens,  Carters,  Underwoods,  Staffords,  Higgins. 

INKSTANDS Wood  Base  Own  Make,     GlaSS  Cut  and  Pressed, 

Bankers,  Metal,  Etc. 

PASTE— MUCILAGE — Staffords,    Carters,    Higgins,    Underwoods, 
Cico,  Chases  and  LePage  Glues,  Seccotine. 

Archive  Office  Files  and  Binding  Cases,  Clips,  Harp  and  Wire  Files. 

Rubber   Bands,   Pen   Holders,    Erasers,    Paper   Fasteners,    Rulers, 
Sealing  Wax. 

Waste  Paper  and  Document  Baskets,  Deed  Boxes,  Stationery  Cases, 
Rubber  Stamps. 

Shipping  and  Merchandise  Tags,  Notarial  Seals,  Etc. 

BROWN  BROS.,  limited 

Simcoe  and  Pearl  Streets,  TORONTO 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


STICK  with  GLUCINE 


The  Trade  Price  still  gives  you 
the  biggest  profit  of  any  adhesive 
on  the  market. 

Glucine  is  a  clean  adhesive  that 
never  dries  up — never  goes  bad — 
is  free  from  odor. 

It  is  economical.  Above  all,  it  is 
a  good  liquid  paste  that  does  all 
that  it  is  required  for. 

It  carries  our  guarantee ! 

We  have  a  good  stock  on  hand  at 
present  at  1916  prizes. 


2J  oz.  size  retails  at  10c. 

5  oz.  size,  with  cap  and  brush, 

retails  at  25c. 

10  oz.  size,  with  cap  and  brush, 

retails  at  SOc. 

30    nz.    size,    it's   for   re-filling, 

retails  at  90c. 

Gross  Prices  on  Application. 


LYONS  BANK  WAX 

is  the  standard  of  high  grade  wax. 

8    Canadian  Banks  have  used  it  consistently 
for  15  years  throughout  their  entire  system. 

Write  us  for  our  new  prices. 

MANUFACTURED    BY 

Lyons  Ink  Limited,  Manchester,  Eng. 

SOLE   CANADIAN  AGENTS: 

MENZIES  &  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

Manufacturers'  Agents  Importers  Blotting  Paper 

Publishers  of  Christmas   Cards,   Etc. 

439  King  Street  West,  Toronto,  Ont. 


bzzzz/w;z^/w^^^^^ 


I'.iki-KSMLLER     AND     STATION  K  I; 


s 

I 

S 


The  Season's 


The 
Undertow 


BIG  SELLERS 

Here  are  a  few  of  the  best  things  on  Our 
Spring  List — Real  Big  Sellers. 
Look  them  over. 


HERBERT  JENKINS 


s 


Bindle 

If  your  customer  wants  to  laugh,  recommend  "Bindle."     If 
he  wants  to  be  amused  for  a  few  hours,  recommend  "Bindle." 
The  adventures  of  this  characteristic  English  labor-philoso- 
pher will  stir  up  the  risibilities  of  anyone,  even 
under  the  tension  of  the  present  nerve-trying 
davs.  $1.25 


C^e  Stars  in 
their  Courses 

©" Hilda MSfarp 


H 


Mrs.  N  o  r  r  is  ' 

newest  novel 
deals  with  the 
perils  of  pros- 
perity, with  a 
couple     who 

lived  too  fast  and  too  hard  and 
who  could  not  enjoy  either 
their  children  or  each  other's 
company  in  consequence.  A 
sane  conclusion  brings  them 
back  to  a  natural  form  of  liv- 
ing. $1.25 

The  Stars 

in  Their  Courses 

A.  really  good  book  in  two  ways — a  splendid 
story  and.  as  well,  a  literary  achievement  of 
note.  One  British  authority  says  "This  is  one 
of  the  best  hooks  we  have  read  in  a  decade." 

$1 .  25 

Maple  Leaves 

on  Flanders'  Fields 

A  Canadian  Officer's  thrilling  story  of  the  part  taken  by  the 
Canadians  in  Flanders.  $1.2o 

Rhymes  of  a  Red  Cross  Man 

A  Record  Breaker 

Is  your  stock  of  this  good?  30,000  copies  were  sold  in  the 
first  five  weeks  in  Canada,  which  is  a  record  sale,  and  this  is 
still  keeping  up.     Have  you  sold  your  share? 

We  now  offer  miniature  editions.     Lambskin,  $1.00,  ooze,  $1  .  25,  cloth,  $1 .00 

WILLIAM  BRIGGS 

PUBLISHERS 
Queen  and  John  Streets      -      TORONTO,  ONT. 


Bindweed 

This  is  a  powerful  and  arresting  novel,  as  well 
as  being  a  wonderful  piece  of  word  painting. 
The  book  has  already  run  to  its  fifth  British 
edition  and  prospects  point  to  a  large  sale  in 
Canada.     Gabrielle  Vallings,   the  author,  is  a 
cousin  of  Lucas  Malet,  the  well- 
known     French     author,     and 
seems  to  have  some  of  the  lat- 
ter's  genius.  -$1.25 

The  Preacher  of 
Cedar    Mountain 


Ernest  Thomp- 
son Seton's  new- 
est book,  this 
time  a  novel,  in- 
culcating t  h  e 
author's  inti- 
mate knowledge 
of  wild  life. 
$1 .  50 


MAPilE  REAVES 
FLANDERS  FIELDS 


k 


CEDAR  M0UN1AIN 

ERNEST  THOMPSON  SETON 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


PUBLISHERS' 
REMAINDERS 

The  very  interesting  books  mentioned  below  are  all 
new  copies,  exactly  as  received  from  the  publishers, 
though  offered  at  greatly  reduced  prices. 

The  Best  of  the  Fun.     1891-1897.     By  Captain 

K  IVnnell-Klmhirst.  With  8  sporting  il- 
lustrations in  colour  by  G.  D.  Giles,  and  48 
others  by  J.  Sturgess  ami  G.  D.  Gib's.  Pub- 
lished 1(3/-  5/- 

My  Vagabondage:  The  Intimate  Autobiogra- 
phy of  a  Nature's  Nomad.  By  J.  E.  Pat- 
terson.   With   portrait.    Published   8/6 3/6 

How  I  Became  a  Governor.  By  Sir  Ralph 
Williams.  With  map  and  illustrations. 
Published   15/-   5/- 

British  Military  Prints.  By  Ralph  Nevill.  Full 
of  fine  coloured  and  other  plates.  Pub- 
lished  5  '-    2/- 

Personal  Reminiscences  of  Henry  Irving.    By 

Bram  Stoker.      Illustrated.    Published  6/-.  .      3/6 

Thomas  Stothard,  R.A.  An  Illustrated  Mono- 
graph.    By  A.  G.  Coxhead.    Published  16/-.      5/- 

Noted  Murder  Mysteries.     By   Philip   Curt  in. 

Published    7  6    '.  .  .      2/6 

Macdonald  of  the  Isles:  A  Romance  of  the 
Past  and  Present.  By  A.  M.  W.  Stirling. 
With   illustrations.    Published   12/-    5/- 

London  Clubs,  Their  History  and  Treasurers. 
By  Ralph  Nevill.  With  coloured  frontis- 
piece and  6  plates  in  monochrome.  Pub- 
lished  7,  6    4  6 

The  Great  Wall  of  China.  By  William  Edgar 
Geil.  With  numerous  illustrations.  Pub- 
lished 21/-    9/- 

Portuguese  East  Africa:  The  History,  Scenery, 
and  Great  Game  of  Manica  and  Sofala.  By 
R.  C.  F.  Maugham.  With  map  and  illus- 
trations.    Published    15/-    6/- 

Sterne,  A  Study.  By  Walter  Sichel,  to  which 
is  added  the  Journal  to  Eliza.  With  por- 
traits.     Published   8'6    3/9 

Manners  and  Customs  of  England.  A  Classi- 
fied Collection  of  the  Chief  Contents  of 
"The  Gentleman's  Magazine"  from  1731- 
1868.  Edited  by  George  Laurence  Gomme. 
Published  7/6    3/6 

Horace  Walpole's  World.  By  Alice  G.  Green- 
wood.    Published    12/6    5/- 

The  Temple  Dictionary  of  the  'Bible.  Written 
and  edited  by  the  Rev.  W.  Ewing  and  the 
Rev.  J.  E.  H.  Thomson.  With  8  Coloured 
Maps.     Published   10/6    5/6 

Many  Cargoes.  By  W.  W.  Jacobs.  With  16 
Illustrations  in  Colour  by  Maurice  Greiffen- 
hagen.     Published  7/6    4/6 

Servia  by  the  Servians.  Compiled  and  edited 
by  Alfred  Stead.  With  a  Map.  Published 
12/6    3/6 

Relics  and  Memorials  of  London  Town.  By 
J.  S.  Ogilvy.  With  52  Coloured  Plates  bv 
the   Author.      Published  £1   5s    ".    10/6 

Italian  Hours.     By  Henry  James.     Illustrated 

by  Joseph  Peunell.     Published  £1  5s 16- 

Thames-Side  in  the  Past:  Sketches  of  Litera- 
ture and  Society.  By  F.  C.  Hodgson.  With 
Illustrations.     Published  12/6    6  - 

Write  for  the  Complete  Catalogue. 

THE  TIMES  BOOK  CLUB 

380  Oxford  Street,  London,  W. 


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A  Story  of  Young  Womanhood  in  the 
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LYDIA  x°„FE  PINES 


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"  The  Heart  of  the  Desert  " 

RICHARD  LE  GALLIENNE  calls  this 
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Lydia,  the  heroine,  develops  in  just  the 
clean  sort  of  love  story  American  men  like. 
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Messrs.  BLACKIE  &  SON,  LTD. 

will  have  ready  early  this  year  another  grand  selection  of 
picture  board  books,  limp  toy  books,  untearables,  juveniles, 
etc.,  and  samples  are  being  carried  by  the  leading  Canadian 
Wholesale  Houses. 

Catalogues  and  particulars  may  be  had  from  oyr  represen- 
tative. Mr.  Harold  Copp,   33   Richmond  St.  W.,  Toronto. 


Some  New  War  Stories  of  Stirring  Interest 
that  You  Should  Stock: 


Captain  Brereton. 
ON  THE  ROAD  TO  BAGDAD : 

A  Story  of  the  British  Expeditionary  Force 
in  Mesopotamia.     Illus.  by  Wal.  Paget.        6s. 

WITH  OUR  RUSSIAN  ALLIES: 

A  Tale  of  Cossack  Fighting'  in  the  Eastern 
Campaign.    Illus.  by  Wal.  Paget.  6s. 

WITH  JOFFRE  AT  VERDUN: 

A  Story  of  the  Western  Front.  3s.  6d. 

WITH  FRENCH  AT  THE  FRONT: 

Down  to  the  Battle  of  the  Aisne.  3s.  6d. 

UNDER  FRENCH'S  COMMAND: 

From  Neuve  Chapelle  to  Loos.  3s.  6d. 

Fleet-Surgeon  T.  T.  Jeans,  R.N. 
A  NAVAL  VENTURE: 

The    War    Story    of    an    Armoured    Cruiser. 
Illus.  by  Frank  Gillett,  R.I.  6s. 

Lieut-Commander  Taprell  Dorling,  R.N. 
THE  SECRET  SUBMARINE: 

A  Story  of  Fighting  by  Sea  and  Land.    Illus. 
by  0.  M.  Padday.  5s. 


Captain  Charles  Gilson. 
ACROSS  THE  CAMEROONS: 

A  MOTOR-SCOUT  IN  FLANDERS: 

Or,  Held  by  the  Enemy. 


3s. 


3s. 


Percy  F.  Westerman. 
THE  DISPATCH-RIDERS: 

The  Adventures  of  Two  British  Motor  <  de- 
lists with  the  Belgian  Army.  3s.  6d. 

ROUNDING  UP  THE  RAIDER: 

A  Naval  Story  of  the  Great  War.  3s. 


THE  FIGHT  FOR  CONSTANTINOPLE: 

A  Story  of  the  Gallipoli  Peninsula. 


3s. 


Other  Good  Books: 

Lieut.-Col.  Cyril  Field,  R.M.L.I. 
THE  BRITISH  ARMY  BOOK: 

By  Paul  Danby  and  Lieut.-Col.  Field.  Illus. 
bv  34  plates  in  colour  and  black-and-white. 

3s.  6d. 

THE  BRITISH  NAVY  BOOK: 

By  Lieut.-Col.  Field.  Illus.  from  Drawings 
by  C.  M.  Padday  and  others  and  from  Photo- 
graphs. 3s.  6d. 


TWO   NEW   EDITIONS   BROUGHT 
UP-TO-DATE 

MODERN  WEAPONS  OF  WAR: 

Bv  Land,  Sea,  and  Air.     Bv  Cyril  Hall. 

2s.  6d.  net. 

THE  MASTERY  OF  THE  AIR: 

A  Full  Account  of  Aviation,  Aeroplanes,  and 
Zeppelins.    By  William  J.  Claxton.  2s.  6d.  net. 


BLACKIE  &  SON,  Limited 


LONDON 


GLASGOW 


BOMBAY 


10 


83 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

III 


THE 


Autumn  and  C 
FANCY  STA 


OLLOWING 

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11 


HOOKS  E L L  E R     A  N D     S  T  A  T I  0  N  E  R 


SELLING  DIRECT  FROM  FACTORIES" 


A.R  MacDougall  &  Ca 


IAROAVAC 


SUNDRIES 


TORONTO 


i 


DIXON'S 
SOVEREIGN 


The  5c.  Pencil  for  Canadian 
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The  Leads 

have  a  perfect  balance  of 
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Test 

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in  comparison  with  any  other 
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lead  will  not  crumble,  or  break, 
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sharp. 

Quality 

is  t  h  e  watchword  o  f  the 
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CO.,  and  you  can  absolutely 
depend  on  the  Sovereign  which 
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Tipped— HB,  F  and  H. 
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The  CHICAGO 

Pencil  Sharpener 

Standard  Model,  $1.50 

Just  about  everybody  will  buy  a  depend- 
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The     standard     model     sharpens     standard 
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The  Chicago  Giant  sharpens  any  pencil  or 
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BOTH  SELL  READILY 


Improved  Superior 
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Double  Prongs — Two  Piercing  Points  to  prevent 
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Improved  Swp<  rkir  Paper  Fasteners  have  closed 
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Recent  Improvements  (i.e.)  deeper  double 
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AT\        11  If  r\  11     f)       f%  I     •  •  .  Canadian  Representatives : 

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12 


HO OK  SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


TORONTO 


WHAT 

IS  YOUR 

OPINION 

WORTH  ? 


You  occupy  a  position  of  importance  in  the 
business  community. 

Your  opportunities  as  a  "guide  to  efficiency'' 
are  big.  The  average  man  is  so  busy  with 
matters  of  greater  import  that  he  gives 
little  thought  to  office  equipment. 

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Get  our  folders,  cards,  etc.,  with  your  imprint 
on  them,  to  be  enclosed  with  your  mail. 

Our  10  days'  free  trial  offer  makes  sales— 
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You  can  have  a  Canadian 
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for  the 
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#  X  7UL-C0T  Waste  Baskets  are 
f  y  ft'ood  for  you  to  sell  because 
they're  good  for  your  customers  to 
buy.  Their  fine  appearance  attracts 
the  eye.  Their  evident  utility  ap- 
peals to  the  business  sense.  Their 
clean-cut  shape  and  attractive  colors 
appeal  to  the  sense  of  harmony. 
Their  sturdiness  denotes  wear  and 
service  —  a  direct  appeal  to  the 
thought  of  economy.  Then  there's 
the 

VUL-COT 

FIVE  YEAR  GUARANTEE 

to  you  and  your  customers.  If  they  fail 
to  make  good  that  rive-year  warranty,  we 
replace  them.  You  can  sell  them  and  keep 
getting  repeat  profit  from  Vul-Cots.  Big 
concerns  are  using  them.  They  like  them 
because  they  are  strong,  fire-resisting,  prac- 
tically indestructible,  because  they  won 't 
dent  or  rust,  won  't  lose  their  shape,  won  't 
catch  on  clothes  nor  mar  furniture.  Write 
for  dealer  proposition. 

Extensive  Advertising  in  leading  magazines 
creates   a   demand   that    helps    the   dealer. 


A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Limited, 


Canadian  Representatives : 

266  King  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


13 


K  U  < )  K.  S  1',  J,  J,  1'.  K      A  IN  1J      B  1   A    1   1  U  iN  r,  1\ 


Here's  Line  You  Can  Sell 


— A  sensible  article  that 
will  appeal  at  once  when 
you  show  it. 

Think  of  the  hundreds  of  office  workers  in  your  tOWH 
who  would  appreciate  the  comfort  and  the  advantages 
embodied  in  the 

NON-SHINE  CHAIR  PAD 

There  are  over  600,000  satisfied  users  in  the  l\S.. 
ample  evidence  surely  of  Non-Shine  Tad  popularity. 
Full  particulars  will  show  you  what  a  big  field  there 
is  in  Canada  to  push  the  sales  of  Non-Shine  Chair 
Pads.  Just  drop  us  a  card  to-day  and  we'll  show  you 
why  you  should  connect  up  with  this  seller.  Send 
it  right  now. 


NON-SHINE  PAD  COMPANY 


PHILADELPHIA,  PA. 


Office:   101-103-105-107  No.  Marshall  St. 


Factory  :    7039  Ridge  Avenue 


v\ 

YOU    CAN     NOW 

MADE  IN  CANADA 
«-.    PENCILS     ^ 

Manufactured    by 

The  Wm.  Cane  &?  Sons  Company,  Limited 

INLWMARKET,    Canada 


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Suggest  Cane's 

Canadian  Made 

Pencils  to  Your 

Customers. 


The  attractive  card  here  shown  will  help 
you  introduce  this  splendid  new  line  to 
your  trade. 

Cane's  Pencils  will  win  favor  because  of 
their  sterling  merit  and  because,  too,  of 
the  fact  that  they  arc  entirely  Canadian- 
made. 

You  can  test  out  your  trade  with  one  of 
our  sample  cards.     Then,  if  they   make 

g I,   and   you   wish   to   sell   them   right 

along,  we'll  make  arrangements  to  supply 
you  through  your  regular  channel. 

We  are  the  Pioneer  Canadian 
Manufacturers  of  Lead  Pencils 
for  Commercial,  Studio,  School, 
and  Advertising  Purposes. 

The  Wm.  Cane  &  Sons 
Co.,  Limited 

Newmarket,  Canada 


14 


IJOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 

i    \  I         I     I 

J.    A  L  V^      I   1^1  **/  I  J,  %  ..^  J,  I  v.    I      v_->   1  vJI  >^vL 

,  IV  f 1 1 M  /    ) 

'"■■■■'■■...,„y  %     %ma,*' 

SBTuSN^°NFATaHEFR MARCH,  1917 VOL.  XXXIII -No.  3 

A  Message  to  Advertisers 

IF  your  special  representative  could  always  be  on  hand  when 
the  dealer  wants  to  buy,  how  much  would  your  sales  increase? 

YOUR  ADVERTISEMENT  IN  THE 

ANNUAL  SPRING  NUMBER 

of  BOOKSELLER  &  STATIONER 

will  be  a  salesman  right  on  the  job  when  Canadian  dealers  in 
Books,  Stationery  and  Toys  are  placing  their  biggest  orders  of 
the  year  both  for 

School  Opening  (September)  and  for 
Autumn  and  Christmas  Trade 

This  issue  will  reach  practically  all  the  really  worth-while 
accounts  among  the  merchants  throughout  Canada  who  sell  Books, 
Stationery  and  Toys. 

Send  in  copy  by  March  20  for  your  adver-  Date  1917 

tisement.    No  increase  in  rates.  Full  page      i  ^    ,     „  ,  „,  ,, 

.  TT   i/-  *         ^  4.  Bookseller  and  Stationer, 

$35;  Half  page  $20;  Quarter  page  $12;      '  . 

r>-    1  ,1  +Q  I         14d  university  Ave.,  Toronto. 

highth  page  $8.  • 

Reserve  .  . page  space  in  vour 

Book  Your  Order  Now  j  Annual 8p££'j££ %£& {oi$ Copv 

Clip  this  coupon,  sign  and  return  it  now      I     ...  .         . 

.  .        .  .  .  ,  1  will  follow  to  reach  von  bv 

while  the  question  is  up  and  let  us  know  (Final  date  March  20) 

when   copy   for   your   advertisement   will  Name 

follow.  ,  Address  . 

15 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


CUT  OUT  THE  ADVERTISEMENT  BELOW 

PASTE  IN  ON  YOUR  WINDOW 

Direct  Special  Attention  to  a  Window  Display  of  Thisp Canadian-made  Loose 
Leaf  Line.     Dealers  Who  Have  Nol  Received  Particulars  Aboul  How  to  Make 
-  Such  a  Display  Highly  Effective,  Should  Write  to  Luckett  Loose  Leaf.  Limited, 
for  full  information. 


I 


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THIS  IS  THE  EfflS&G  MEMO  BOOK 

MADE  IN  CANADA  and  Made  Right 


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RING  BOOKS 


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Our  new  Diaries  are  good  for  any  year — they  are 
ideal  for  appointment  Books — Get  a  supply  NOW. 

We   Also  Make 

LEDGERS  POST  BINDERS 

Manufactured  by  a  Strictly  Canadian  Company. 

Luckett  Loose  Leaf,  Limited 

215-219   Victoria  Street       Dept.  S.       Toronto,   Ontario 


NOTE  BOOKS 


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GET  THE  BEST!  BLOTTING  PAPER 


MANUFACTURED  BY 


THEEATON-DIKEMAN  COMPANY,  Lee, Massachusetts,  U.S.A. 


THE  FOLLOWING  WELL-KNOWN  BRANDS  CARRIED  IN  STOCK 

Magnet  Columbian  Lenox  Arlington  Wavelet 

Matrix  and  Filter  Papers 

FOR  SALE  BY  THE  LEADING  JOBBERS  IN  PAPER 


Housatonic 


16 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


IMPERIAL  RACKS 


The  Very 
Best 


Never  Wear 
Out 


UJ 


Ul 


CO 

C/i 
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No.  1— This  useful  Rack  holds 
from  twenty  to  forty  maga- 
zines or  books — every  one  in 
plain  view.    Price  $2.15. 

No.  2— A  handy  Rack 
for  newspapers,  etc. 
35  cents. 

No.  3 — This  Rack  is  essentia 
for  larger  publications,  like 
Ladies'  Home  Journal,  Sat- 
urday Evening  Post,  Illus- 
trated London  News,  etc. 
Price,  20  cents. 

Imperial  Racks  sell  more  books 
and  magazines  —  for  display 
they  are  essential. 


COUNTER  RACK,  $1.50 


No.  4 — -For  posts,  window 
corners,  etc.  Can  be  made 
to  hold  from  ten  to  thirty 
magazines  or  books.  It  dis- 
plays them  all.     Price  $1.10. 

No.  5— This  is  THE  Rack  — 
holds  from  thirty  to  sixty 
books  or  magazines  —  a 
silent-salesman  that  is  busy 
selling  all  the  time.  Price, 
$2.85. 

Imperial  Racks  are  scientifi- 
cally made — they  look  well  and 
easily  earn  their  cost  monthly. 


IMPERIAL  NEWS  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

TORONTO  MONTREAL  WINNIPEG 


17 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 
Valentines  Series 

_  POST  <m&!2^  CARDS  _ 


^THROUGHPUT, 


)RtP 


Introducing  some  of  the  lines  Our  Travelers  are  showing. 

You  will  be  given  an  early  opportunity  of  seeing 

them.     WHY  NOT  WAIT  ? 


Gibson  Art  Line 

Christmas  and  New 
Year  Booklets,  Tags, 
Seals,    Post   Cards. 


THE 


Boston  Line 


OF 


Greeting  Cards  for  Christ- 
mas and  New  Year's 


THE 

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Of  Correspondence  Cards,  Greeting 

Cards  and  Folders. 

Place  Cards  Post  Cards 


The    Classic   Series 

OF 

CHRISTMAS  BOOKLETS 

A  Large  and  High-class 
English  Line 


DEAN'S 

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SERIES 

OF 

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Christmas  Booklets. 

A  10  cent  Line 


THE 

Gabriel  Line 

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PICTURE  BOOKS 

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Milton  Bradley  Go's. 

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AND 

HOME 

AMUSEMENTS 


ROTARY 
COLORED 
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BOOKS  FOR  CHILDREN 

Juveniles  and 

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THE 

Embossing  Co's. 


BLOCKS 
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CHECKERS 
and  CHESS 


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Congress 

and  other 

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POST  CARDS 


FOR  EVERY  SEASON 
The  Most  Complete  Range  we  have  ever  shown. 


Valentine  &  Sons  United  Publishing  Co.,  Limited 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 


18 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


GETTING 
TOGETHER 


-  I- 
by  HAY 

-N- 


**/!     "* • 


IS  NOW  READY 

This  book  is  going  to  be  one  of  the  best 
selling  books  of  the  spring.  Thousands 
of  people  have  read  his  "The  First  Hun- 
dred Thousand,"  Thousands  more  have 
heard  him  lecture.  The  subject  he  deals 
with  is  of  supreme  interest  at  the  present 
time.  And  the  price  of  the  book  is  only  50c. 

Coming  This  Month: 

THE  ROAD  TO  UNDERSTANDING 

By  ELEANOR  H.    PORTER 

The  author  of  "Just  David''  and  "Pollyanna"  has  created  two  of  the  most  famous  child  characters 
in  fiction.  In  "The  Road  to  Understanding"  she  shows  equal  insight  into  the  hearts  of  children 
of  a  larger  growth. 

"A  good  love  story"  is  a  phrase  often  abused,  but  it  fits  "The  Road  to  Understanding"  perfectly. 

Illustrated  in  color  by  Mar;/  G.  Blumenschein.     $1.40.     (March  24.) 


An  Idea  for  Mother's  Day 


Feature  the  New  Book  Coming-  in  April,  Entitled 


TO  MOTHER 


An  Anthology  of  Mother  Verse,  with  an  introduction   by  Kate  Douglas  Wiggin. 
with  a  copy  of  Whistler's  famous  picture    of    his    mother  as  the  frontispiece. 

BOXED,  $1.00 


OBSTACLES  TO  PEACE,  by  S.  S.  McClure.  This 
great  book  presents  both  the  material  and  spir- 
itual obstacles  to  peace,  with  analyses  in  the  light 
of  first-hand  information  from  responsible  sources. 
Now  ready,  $2.00. 

THE  WAY  OF  THE  WIND,  by  Eugenia  Brooks  Foth- 
eringham.  A  fine  novel  of  New  England  life  and 
.character.     Now  ready,  $1.40. 

OUT  WHERE  THE  WEST  BEGINS,  by  Arthur  Chap- 
man. People  who  so  enjoy  the  writings  of  Robert 
W.  Service  and  the  poems  of  Bret  Harte  will  wel- 
come this  book.     Now  ready,  $1.25. 

AMBULANCE  NO.  10.  The  reading  of  this  notable 
War  Book  is  recommended  by  Ian  Hay  in  his  new 
book,  "Getting  Together."    $1.00. 


JERRY,  by  Arthur  Stanwood  Pier.  A  story  of  a  young 
American  of  the  best  type.     Now  ready,  $1.50. 

THE  PHOENIX,  by  Constance  M.  Warren.  A  most 
readable  society  novel  with  the  scene  laid  in  Bos- 
ton.    Now  ready,  $1.40. 

THE  TRIFLERS,  by  Frederick  Orin  Bartlett.  The 
story  of  an  American  heiress,  besieged  by  suitors, 
who  wants  to  see  the  world  without  let  or  hind- 
rance.    Coming  this  month,  $1.40. 

LINES  LONG  AND  SHORT,  by  Henry  B.  Fuller.  This 
book  is  in  essence  a  collection  of  short  stories  in 
verse,  done  with  a  satiric  edge.     Now  ready,  $1.25. 


THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher 

215-219  VICTORIA   STREET,   TORONTO 


is 


15  O  O  K  K  K  J.  L  E  R     AND     STATIONER 


PICCADILLY  JIM 


44 


the  sprightliest,  most  laugh-provoking  fellow, 
publishers  and  booksellers  have  met  in  many 
a  day,    has   just  made  his   bow  to   the  public. 

The    author    is    that    inimitable    humorist, 
PELHAM   GRENVILLE  WODEHOUSE 

AUTHOR  OF  "  UNEASY  MONEY",  Etc. 

His  is  a  story  by  a  real  humorist — a  genuinely  funny  farce,  alive  with 
excitement,  sentiment,  humor  and  mystery. 

Piccadilly  Jim  is  going  to  create  a  stir  and  a  big  one  among  book- 
buyers;  for  Wodehouse  has  produced  a  seller,  worth  plenty  of 
attractive  advertising,  and  we've  planned  a  lot  of  it. 

Illustrated  in  colors  by  May  Wilson  Preston.    $1.40  net. 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stewart 


266   KING   STREET  WEST,   TORONTO,   CANADA 


LIMITED 


NATURE  POST  CARDS 

New  and  exclusive  designs  that  will  prove  big 
sellers  with  Canadian  Lovers  of  Nature.  There 
are  24  designs  in  the  series  reproduced  in  our 
color  process  work.  "Best  Wishes,"  "Season's 
Greetings"  and  "Verses"  in  gold.  The  Birds  re- 
produced in  their  natural  colors  of  plumage.  These 
Cards  assorted  24  designs  to  a  hundred,  packed 
in  cartons  for  60c.  per  100,  or  $5  per  M.  assorted. 
Should  you  prefer  to  see  a  sample  set  before  buy- 
ing, forward  25c.  in  stamps  and  the  set  of  24  sub- 
jects complete  will  be  mailed  promptly.  Big 
orders  already  placed  by  largest  houses  in  United 
States  and  Canada. 

We  also  specialize  in  Local  Views  of  One   Thousand 
per  subject  and  up.     Correspondence  solicited. 

GILBERT  POST  CARD  COMPANY 

309   RIVER   STREET,  CHICAGO,    ILL. 


You'll  make  good 
profits  selling 

American  Toy 
Marbles 

The    Christensen    Line  " 


Hero's  a  neat  line  of  Beauti- 
fully  Colored,   Perfectly  Finished 

toy  marbles  that  will  make  a  hit 
"iiii  every  wide-awake  youngster 

in  your  community.  Made  in 
nine  sizes,  in  eight  attractive 
colors.  National  Onyx  (four 
colors)  Royal  Blue.  American 
Cornelian,  Persian.  Turquoise 
and   Oriental  Jade. 

We  also  make  Ballot  Balls.  Crys- 
tal Glass  Castor  Balls,  Glass 
Balls  for  Pump  Valves,  'Litho- 
graphic Use,  etc. 

May  we  send  you  our  free  cata- 
log and   price  list? 


The 

ML  F.  Christensen  &  Son  Co. 

Akron,   Ohio 


20 


mvqMIMIMIMlM!MIMF^Mm^m  MMMWMMMMMM-MWMj 


Bookseller  &  Stationer 

AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 


Vol.  XXXIII. 


MARCH,  1917 


No.  3 


IN  THIS  ISSUE 

A  Good  Plan  to  Increase  191 7  Trade 

Indian  Goods  a  Profitable  Line 

Featuring  Wedding  Gifts 

The  Telephone  and  the  Rainy  Day 

Plan  for  a  Children's  Week 

Charging  Interest  on  Accounts 

Second  Annual  Toy  Fair 

Are  Jobbers  Killing  the  Toy  Industry  in  Canada? 

The  Best  Selling  Books  of  the  Month 

The  Month's  Record  of  New  Books 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 


JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President 
H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager 


H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-President 
T.  B.  COSTAIN,  General  Managing  Editor. 


Publishers    of    Hardware    and    Metal,    The    Financial    Post,    MacLean's    Magazine,    Farmer's 
Magazine,  Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  and  Publisher, 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and   Manufacturing  News,  The  Power  House, 
The   Sanitary   Engineer,   Canadian   Foundryman,   Marine  Engineering   of  Canada. 
Cable  Address:  Macpubco,  Toronto;   Atabek,  London,  Eng. 

ESTABLISHED   1885. 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

FINDLAY  I.   WEAVER,   Manager 
CHIEF   OFFICES: 

CANADA— Montreal,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Building,  Telephi  ne  Main  1004.  Toronto.  143-153  University 
Ave..   Telephone  Main   7324.     Winnipeg,  22   Royal  Bnk   Building,   Telephone   Garry   2313. 

GREAT  BRITAIN— London,  The  MacLean  Company  of  Great  Britain,  Limited,  88  Fleet  Street  EC  E  J 
Dodd,    Director.     Telephone   Central    12960.      Cable  Address:  Atabek,   London,  England. 

UNITED  STATES— New  York,  R.  B.  Huestis,  115  Broadway,  N.Y.,  Telephone  Rector  8971-  Boston  C  L 
Morton.  Room  733,  Old  South  Building,  Teleph<  ne  Main  1024.  A.  H.  Byrne,  1104-5-6-7  Fort  Dearborn 
Bldg.,   105  West   Monroe   St.,   Chicago,   Telephone   Randolph   3234. 

SUBSCRIPTION  PRICE— Canada,  Great  Britain.  South  Africa  and  the  West  Indies,  $1  a  year;  United 
States,  $1.50  a  year;  other  countries,  $2  a  year;  Single   Copies,   10   cents.     Invariably    in    advance. 


fl"^^^^ 


21 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Musson's  Popular  60c.  Reprints 


KNOf 


THE 

TEMPLE  OF  DAWN 

Byl-A-R  WVUE 


1!)17  prices,  based  on  1916  cost.  Our  preparedness  is  your 
gain.  Dodge  the  exorbitant  prices  of  other  publishers. 
and  ORDER  TO-DAY  at  the  inside  price. 

Present  Prices  are :    37c  in  small  quantities 
36c  in  hundred  lots         35c  in  thousand  lots 

Order  Now,  Prices  Will  Advance  Later 

1.  Alone  in  the  Wildernes§    Joseph    Knowles 

2.  Captivating   Mary   Carstairs    Henry    Sj'dnor   Harrison 

3.  Beltane    the    Smith     Jeffrey    Farnol 

4.  Rich     Mrs.    Burgoyne     Kathleen    Norris 

5.  Behind  the  Scenes  at  the  Court  of  Vienna.  .  Weinilel   &  Sergeant 

6.  The  Adventures  of    Sherlock    Holmes    Conan    Doyle 

7.  The    Secret    Service    Submarine    Guy    Tliorne 

H.  Virginia     Ellen    Glasgow 

ft.  Counsel    for    the    Defence    LeRoy    Scott 

10.  Blue    Water    Frederick    Win.    Wallace 

11.  The  Place  Beyond  the   Winds    Harriet   T.    C&instock 

12.  In    Pastures    New    George   Ade 

13.  The  Competitive  Nephew    Montague   Glass 

14.  The    Golden    Silence    The  Williamsons 

15.  My    Friend    the    Chauffeur    " 

16.  The  Motor  Maid    " 

17.  Port    of    Adventure    " 

18.  Set    in    Silver    "  " 

19.  A    Soldier    of    the   Legion    ' 

20.  Secret    History     " 

21.  The  Albert  Gate  Mystery    Louis    Tracy 

22  The    Main    Trail    Henry   Oyen 

23.  At   the   Sign   of  the   Sword    William    Le    Queux 

24.  A   Sentimental   Dragon    Nina   Larry   Duryea 

25.  The    Amateur     Charles   G.    Norris 

2fi.  The   Least    Resistance    Kate   L.   McLaurin 

27.  The  Eagle  of  the  Empire    Cyrus  Town  send  Brady 

28.  The    Temple   of    Dawn    I.    A.    R.    Wy lie 

29.  Kings,    Queens   and    Pawns    Mary    Roberts    Rineli.iit 

30.  The  Happy  Irish    Haloid   Begbie 

31.  The   Thirty-nine    Steps    John    Buchan 

32.  You    Never   Know   Your   Luck    Gilbert   Parker 

33.  Boon     Introduction  by  H.  G.  Wells 

34  The   Adventures   of   Dr.    Witty    George  A.   Birmingham 

35.  Minnie's    Bishop     

36.  Gossamer     " 

37.  The   Seething  Pot,  2 . .    

38.  General  John  Regan    " 

39.  Spanish     Gold     "  " 

40.  Lalage's    Lovers    

41.  The    Search    Party    

42.  The  Simpkin's  Plot    

43.  The  Major's  Niece    

44.  Pris«illa's    Spies    

45.  The    Red    Hand    of    Ulster    .' "  " 

46.  The    Bad    Times     

47.  Hyacinth     

48.  The  Battle   Months    of   George   Daurella  .  .  .  .  Beulah    Marie    Hix 

SPECIALS 

101.  From    Dublin  to   Chicago    George  A.   Birmingham 

102.  Collected    Diplomatic    Documents    

103.  Punch    Cartoons    

104.  The  Soul   of  Germany    Tliomas   F.   A.   Smith 

105.  German  Atrocities    Professor   J.    H.    Morgan 

Tear  out  this  page,  use  it  as  an  order  form 


THE 

#/TRAIL 

itMj  oYpi 


JheTHIRTWINE  STEPS 

JOHN  BUCHAN 


The  Musson  Book  Co.,  Limited,  Publishers,  Toronto 


22 


Editorial  Chronicle  and  Comment 


SELLING  GIFT  NOVELTIES 

Ol'i;  readers  will  have  observed  that  we  are  giving 
prominence  this  year  to  Gift  Novelties  as  con- 
stituting a  line  of  merchandise  by  means  of  which 
retail  stationers  can  add  materially  to  their  volume 
of  business  and  net  profits.  While  this  is  a  particu- 
larly good  line  for  Christinas  selling  it  must  not  he 
thought  that  it  is  not  a  ready-selling  line  for.  year- 
round  selling  for  most  of  the  items  are  of  a  nature 
that  will  sell  to  people  for,  their  own  satisfaction  as 
well  as  for  presentation  purposes.  There  is  an  in- 
finite variety  of  suitable  goods  from  which  to  select 
Mich  a  stock  including  articles  for  young  people,  old 
people  and  children.  Careful  selection,  and  follow- 
ing that,  effective  display  of  the  goods  will  ensure 
steady  selling  throughout  the  year  with  a  "land 
office''  business  at  Christmas  time.  We  would  urge 
the  retail  stationers  throughout  Canada  to  look  into 
this  question  very  thoroughly.  The  result,  we  are 
satisfied,  will  be  that  they  will  take  up  the  sale  of 
these  on  as  extensive  a  plan  as  that  which  distin- 
guishes some  of  the  more  prominent  classes  of  goods 
now  freelv  sold  in  their  store. 


.1  BOOKSELLING  SUGGESTION 

THE  following  editorial  from  a  recent  issue  of 
The  Saturday  Evening  Post,  is  good  enough  for 
a,  bookseller  to  reproduce  in  leaflet  form  as  a  mail 
enclosure  and  for  effective  distribution  by  other 
means.  As  the  member  of  one  of  the  big  wholesale 
houses  said  in  referring  to  this  editorial:  "It's  the 
most  comfortable  position  of  the  pleasures  of  book 
reading  that  I've  seen  for  a  long  time.  It  just  makes 
you  hungry  for  all  the  things  named.  Especially 
the  book." 

The  retail  bookseller  can  promote  many  sales  and 
get  more  people  into  the  book-reading  habit  by  doing 
missionary  work  of  this  sort.  He  can  tell  people  they 
have  all  the  essentials  for  comfort  in  their  homes  but 
"the  book's  the  thing"  and  that's  where  the  book- 
seller should  come  in  with  suggestions  of  volumes 
most  likely  to  give  pleasure  to  the  particular  person 
who  happens  to  be  the  prospective  customer : 

"Below  are  the  rules  for  playing  the  greatest  in- 
door game  ever  invented.     Persons  of  either  sex  and 


of  any  age  from  six  to  ninety  may  engage  in  it  with 
slight  variations.  It  may  be  played  at  any  hour 
of  the  day  and  at  any  season  of  the  year;  but  it  is 
especially  appropriate  for  cold  and  stormy  winter 
evenings." 

"The  player  first  remove-  hi.-  -hoes  and  puts  on 
a  pair  of  loose  slippers.  He  then  places  a  comfort- 
able chair  two  feet  and  eight  inches  due  south  of  a 
good  lamp.  Next — if  a  gentleman — he  places  a  foot- 
stool or  -mailer  chair  two  feet  and  three  inches  due 
east  of  the  first  chair.  He  then  places  himself  in 
the  larger  chair  and  elevates  his  feet  to  the  smaller 
one — or  the  footstool,  as  the  ease  may  be.  His  next 
move — if  a  gentleman — is  to  fill  a  good  briar  pipe 
with  prime  tobacco,  apply  a  match,  and  draw  in  his 
breath  with  a  prolonged,  unhasty  action.  He  then 
takes  up  a  good  book,  settles  himself  in  the  chair,  and 
informs  whatever  members  of  his  household  that  may 
be  present  that  anybody  who  speaks  to  him  or  other- 
wise disturbs  him  before  eleven  o'clock  will  be  hit 
Over  the  bean.  Lady  players  and  children  should 
vary  the  above  rules  in  detail,  according  to  taste  and 
the  dictates  of  their  elders.  The  joy  of  this  game  will 
be  sensibly  enhanced  by  a  nice  open-grate  fire,  located 
anywhere  from  ten  to  fifteen  feet  northwest  of  the 
player. 

"For  cold  winter  evenings  this  game — measured 
by  the  yield  of  solid  satisfaction  in  proportion  to  the 
outlay  of  money  and  effort  involved — beats  any  other 
pastime  ever  invented  by  man.  If  you  are  not  al- 
ready addicted  to  it  get  the  habit  this  winter." 


WE  WANT  YOUR  HELP 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  would  like  to 
get  ALL  the  news  of  the  trade.  To  do  this  one 
Hundred  per  cent,  co-operation  on  the  part  of  the 
retailers  is  required.  Whether  it  is  a  trade  item,  an 
improvement,  a  good  window  display,  a  change  in 
ownership  or  partnership  or  anything  in  the  way  of 
news  of  interest,  pertaining  to  the  book,  stationery 
and  associated  trades,  we  want  that  news  and  will 
gladly  publish  it.  The  individual  retailer  should  see 
to  it  that  his  particular  district  is  adequately  repre- 
sented in  the  news  columns  of  the  trade  paper.  The 
familiar  "do  it  now"  appeal  applies  here  also.  "This 
Means  You." 


23 


- 


NEWS  OF  THE  TRADE 


iimron 


(CD 


D.  Campbell,  who  was  binned  out  in  the  fire  which 
destroyed  the  Scott-Bathgate  Building,  Winnipeg,  has 
moved  to  new  premises  on  Bannatyne  Avenue. 

S.  S.  Glass,  formerly  with  Small,  Maynard  &  Co.,  of 
Boston,  is  now  manager  of  the  book  sales  department  of 
the  Automobile  Blue  Book  Publishing  Co.  Mr.  Glass  was 
in  Toronto  last  month  in  connection  with  the  placing  of 
the  Canadian  sales  agency  with  McClelland,  Goodchild  & 
Stewart. 

Fire  did  considerable  damage  to  the  stock  of  the  Art 
Metropole,  Toronto,  on  Feb.  17.  The  loss  was  covered  by 
insurance. 


FIRE  IN  MONCTON,  N.B. 

In  a  fire  which  destroyed  the  Mintu  Hotel,  Moncton, 
X.B.,  on  February  (i.  Mis.-,  Hattie  Tweedie,  bookseller  and 
stationer,  had  a  narrow  escape  personally  and  as  regards 
her  bookstore  which  is  in  the  building  which  adjoined  the 
hotel.  Forunately  the  good  work  of  the  firemen  kept  the 
flames  from  spreading  and  the  damage  to  Miss  Tweedie 's 
store  was  restricted  to  that  caused  by  smoke  and  the  loss 
is  covered  by  insurance. 

Miss  Tweedie  was  a  guest  at  the  Minto  House  and 
lost  all  her  personal  effects  with  but  slight  insurance  eov- 
ering-  this  loss. 


If  the  Paper  Shortage  Continues   "Lemea  ,„  Sr.[pmspoit-j)isparcfi: 


Miss  Thompson,  manager  of  the  book  department  of 
the  Hudson's  Bay  Company's  Calgary  store,  and  G. 
Sew  ell,  of  the  same  concern's  store  in  Vancouver,  were 
in  Toronto  on  a  buying  trip  in  February. 

PENCIL  SHARPENERS 

In  reply  to  an  enquiry  as  to  firms  manufacturing  sharp- 
eners, the  following  list  is  submitted: — 

Automatic  Pencil  Sharpener  Co.,  Chicago;  Boston 
Specialty  Company,  2(51  Broadway,  New  York;  F.  H. 
Cook  Company,  Leominster,  Mass.;  New  Era  Manufactur- 
ing Company,  450  Fourth  avenue,  New  York;  A.  B.  Dick 
Company,  736  West  Jackson  boulevard,  Chicago,  111.; 
Searight  Manufacturing  Company,  143  Columbia  street, 
Detroit,  Mich.;  Specialty  Manufacturing  Company,  De- 
catur, 111.;  F.  S.  Webster  Company,  Boston,  Mass.;  Whit- 
acre-Gochert  Company,  Rockford,  Til.;  Traut  &  Heine, 
New    Britain,  Conn. 


II.  G.  Stanton,  vice-president  and  general  manager. 
R.  S.  Williams  &  Sons,  Co.,  Ltd.,  Toronto,  was  elected  to 
the  1917  Council  of  the  Toronto  Board  of  Trade. 

COULD  NOT  RESIST  ADS. 

Fred.  W.  Warren,  Trail,  B.C.,  who  has  for  many  years 
been  in  the  retail  book  and  stationery  business  is  retiring. 
In  a  letter  just  received  from  him  he  says: — 

''Kindly  erase  by  name  from  your  list,  as  I  am  going 
out  of  Retail  Stationery  business  and  I  find  it  so  much 
easier  to  resist  buying,  if  I  do  not  read  the  '"ads."  in 
your  paper. 

1  have  been  a  subscriber  now  for  about  twenty-five 
years,  and  have  found  the  Bookseller  and  Stationer  of  a 
great  deal  of  service  to  me,  especially  as  to  new  fiction, 
and  1  would  advise  every  person  in  the  'profess'  to  be  a 
subscriber  and  a  careful  reader. 

Wishing  vou  every  success  in  the  future." 

Yours  truly.  F.  W.  WARREN. 


24 


ice  Equipment^ 


and 


Business  Systems 


TAKING  THE  OFFICE  ALONG 

A  PLAN  by  which  a  traveling  man  may  have  all  the 
conveniences  of  Ins  office,  even  while  he  is  "on  the 
road,"  is  described  under  the  above  heading-  in 
System.  Correspondence  and  other  routine  duties  have  no 
chance  to  accumulate,  for  they  are  handled  as  they  come 
up.  All  the  facilities  are  ready  to  hand  in  the  "office 
trunk"  which  this  man  has  had  specially  built  for  him, 
says  the  magazine  just  named : 

"The    following   is   a   list   of  the   articles   the   trunk    is 
designed  to  hold  : 


The  Officp  He  Takes  in  His  Trunk 

(Courtesy  of  System) 


1  typewriter. 

1  portfolio  with  all  sample  forms  and  bulletins  required 
for  presenting  the  product  to  any  prospect. 

1  four-drawer  steel  card-index  (three  by  five)  for  pros- 
pects and  users.     Capacity  about  four  thousand  cards. 

4  pocket  rating-books. 

1  complete  sample  machine. 

2  sample  drawers. 

1  house  organ  binder  with,  house  organs. 
1  sales  and  commission  ledger. 
1  letter  portfolio  for  correspondence. 
Several  sales  manuals  and  bulletin-books 
Advertising  and  stationery. 

"The  trunk  is  made  of  three-ply  veneer  covered  inside 
and  out  with  fibre  and  strongly  reinforced  with  iron  cor- 


ners and  small  angles.  The  partitions  arc  made  of  veneer 
and  covered  with  thin  brass  at  the  front.  The  dimensions 
are  twenty-four  inches  by  twenty  inches  by  eighteen  in- 
ches. The  weight,  empty,  is  about  eighty  pounds;  filled  to 
capacity,  about  one  hundred  and  seventy  pounds." 

The  principal  advantages  of  the  trunk,  says  a  user, 
are : 

"1.  I  have  complete  office  facilities  with  me  at  all  times. 

"2.  My  prospect  files  are  always  up  to  date  and  I  have 
all  my  correspondence  records  with  me  wherever  I  go. 

"3.  I  can  keep  up  my  records  while  on  the  road  when 
time  is  heavy  on  my  hands. 

"4.  1  have  all  facilities  for  handling  any  sale  that  may 
arise.  " 

RUBBER  STAMPS 

Rubber  stamps  are  now  being  recognized  by  most  sta- 
tioners as  a  necessary  part  of  the  office  supply  business, 
And  they  are  accordingly  giving  more  attention  to  the 
line  and  using  it  to  assist  in  increasing  their  profits  in 
place  of  handling  it  just  as  the  accommodation  to  their 
customers. 

Reports  received  from  the  list  of  questions  sent  out 
by  the  special  committee  of  the  National  Association  of 
Stationers  of  the  United  States,  indicate  that  far  more 
harmony  now  exists  between  the  rubber  stamp  manufac- 
turers and  stationers  than  ever  before— no  doubt  brought 
about  through  a  better  understanding  between  them. 

This  committee  believes  from  reports  received  that 
there  is  a  universal  desire  on  the  part  of  the  stationers  to 
conform  to  any  scale  of  prices  that  may  be  adopted  by  the 
International  Stamp  Manufacturers'  Association,  and  will 
aid  in  every  reasonable  manner  to  assist  in  maintaining 
such  schedule  of  prices. 

"MOVIE"  RECORD  BOOK 

In  any  town  or  city  where  there  are  motion  picture 
iheitres  the  stationer  should  be  able  to  find  a  sale  for  the 
new  Motion  Picture  Record  which  the  Boorum  &  Pease 
Co.,  New  York,  have  placed  on  the  market. 

In  this  book  space  is  provided  for  recording  the  details 
of  receipts  and  disbursements,  and  also  listing  the  various 
attractions  shown,  making  it  .a  time-saving  and  valuable 
record  book  for  the  theatre  manager.  The  book  is  so  ar- 
ranged that  there  is  a  separate  page  for  each  week  and  a 
summary  for  each  month,  as  well  as  a  general  summary 
for  the  year.  When  these  records  are  kept  up  the  book 
becomes  a  complete  record  for  one  year's  business,  very 
valuable  for  reference. 

This  book  is  made  in  only  one  size,  ll1/^  x  14%  inches. 
It  has  back  and  corners  of  red  Fabri-hide  and  black  cloth 
sides.  Pages  of  Manhattan  ledger  paper  and  the  title  of 
the  book  is  stamped  in  gold  on  the  front  cover.  It  is  made 
in  only  one  thickness — 80  pages — and  retails  for  $2.75  in 
the  U.  S. 
25 


Post  Cards >rt#f  rards 

Jt^Siy-£ko/;rpf>tiny  „.,    Calendars 

i*LvV!i  arifl  Gift-Novelties 


Selling  Pictures 


Writer  in  a  Picture  Trade  Journal  Deals  With 
Business  as  a  Side  Line  for  Stationers 


This 


ON    the    subject    of   increasing   sales    of   pictures   in 
stationery  stores,  Henry  Lloyd  contributed  an  inter- 
esting   article    to    "The    Picture    and    Art    Trade 
.Journal."     After  remarking  that   it   is   usually  in  towns 
and    smaller   cities    where    stationers    are    art    dealers,    lie 
said : — 

"This   usually   applies   only  in   the   towns   and   smaller' 
cities,  but  it  is  sometimes  successful  in  large  cities. 

This  department  should  have  special  floor  and  wall 
space,  but  not  special  window  space.  Pictures  are  very 
artistically  shown  in  windows  along  with  a  few  choice 
books,  special  lines  of  fine  stationery,  etc.  (but  never 
too  much  of  anything),  and  make  about  as  attractive  a 
window  as  we  would  wish  to  see,  and  there  is  no  better 
increaser  of  sales  than  a  good  window. 

It  is  better  always  to  employ  a  framer,  in  a  business 
where  small  articles  are  sold  such  as  books  or  stationery. 
The  framer  in  some  cases  can  do  the  selling,  but  it  is  more 
satisfactory  for  the  proprietor  and  sales  clerks  to  attend 
to  that  part,  and  the  framer  only  attend  to  the  practical 
end. 

Now  the  question  arises  again:  "How  to  Increase 
Sales,"  and  I  will  deal  as  briefly  as  possible  with  these 
other  ways. 

First.  The  schools.  All  teachers  like  in  their  rooms 
good  pictures  suitable  to  the  lessons  they  teach.  It  is  a 
good  idea  to  get  in  touch  with  principals,  and  as  many  as 
possible  of  the  other  teachers,  and  have  them  arrange  for 
the  children  to  give  concerts  or  any  of  the  other  many 
ways  schools  have  for  raisins'  money  for  the  buying  of 
pictures;  then  have  a  good  picture  house  hold  an  exhibi- 
tion, either  at  your  store  or  the  school;  make  a  commis- 
sion on  the  pictures,  and  get  the  framing.  Now  this  is  not 
only  a  direct  profitable  sale,  but  a  large  one,  and  is  one 
of  the  best  means  of  getting  indirect  sales.  Suitable  pic-' 
tures,  properly  framed,  will  not  only  bring  you  before  the 
teachers  (who  are  usually  picture  lovers),  but  before  the 
parents  as  well,  as  the  scholars  will  talk  at  home  about 
the  pictures,  and  who  framed  them;  that  is,  if  you  have 
kept  yourself  and  your  name  before  them. 

Second.  Employ  reliable  canvassers  (and  they  must 
be  reliable),  and  if  the  right  men  are  employed  they  can 
do  wonders.  I  have  known  dealers  in  out-of-the-way  dis- 
tricts to  do  a  large  and  profitable  business  in  their  "out- 
of-the-way,"  "cheap  rent"  stores,  and  have  seen  them 
get  so  well  known  that  after  a  few  years  they  have  dis- 
continued canvassing,  and  still  kept  their  successful  busi- 
ness. (Many  dealers  consider  this  like  the  medical  man's 
advertising — unprofessional;  but  why  should  they?) 

Third.      Another  help  is   prompt   deliveries,   with   kept 


promises.     If  you  cannot  deliever  as  promised  it  is  often 
better   to   refuse   a   sale.      So   many   art    stores   regularly 
disappoint.     Keep  your  promises.     It  is  one  of  the  best, 
if  not  the  very  best  way  of  increasing  sales. 
This  cannot  be  impressed  too  strongly. 


Indian  Goods  Profitable  Line 

Some  Good  Suggestions    for    an    Effective  Window- 
Display  to  Boost  Sales 

FOR  retailers  in  the  West  and  in  any  part  of  Canada, 
for  that  matter,  an  occasional  window  of  Indian 
goods  will  be  found  a  good  business-bringer.  This  is 
a  line  that  is  not  sufficiently  featured  in  book  and  sta- 
tionery stores.  These  merchants  visiting  the  larger  cities 
cannot  fail  to  observe  the  stores  that  deal  almost  exclu- 
sively in  goods  of  this  nature  and  also  that  their  windows 
are  extraordinarily  attractive.  It  is  surprising  that  more 
stationers  have  not  appreciated  the  advantages  of  handling 
goods  of  this  nature. 

Here  is  a  suggestion  for  a  window  display,  try  it  out. 

Plan  an  Indian  camp  scene,  introducing  a  tiny  lake, 
with  trees  in  the  background.  On  the  lake  show  small 
birch-bark  canoes,  with,  miniature  Indians  standing  up- 
right in  them.  This  will  also  serve  to  show  toy  paddles. 
Papoose  dolls  niay  be  attached  to  the  lower  branches  of 
the  trees  and  tethered  to  the  trees  show  toy  ponies.  On 
the  margin  of  the  lake,  show  papier  mache  storks  of  the 
sort  that  are  much  used  for  table  decoration.  In  different 
parts  of  the  camp  show  Indians  and  squaws.  These  dolls 
in  their  variegated  attire  will  add  a  life-effect  to  the 
display. 

Demington  pictures  of  Indian  life  may  be  introduced 
but  it  would  be  better  to  have  these  shown  in  a  second 
window  along  with  leather  cushions  and  cushion  tops, 
leather  pennants,  articles  of  bead  work,  Indian  pottery, 
skookum  character  dolls,  etc. 

A  window  card  prominently  displayed  should  have 
some  such  wording  as  this: — 


TAKE    HOME    A     WARRIOR,    SQUAW. 

OR 

PAPOOSE 

AS  A  SOUVENIR 

FULL      LINE      OF 

INDIAN         GOODS 

INSIDE 

Those  stationers  who  have  not  as  yet  taken  up  the  sale 
of  these  goods  would  do  well  to  add  this  line  and  the  fore- 
going window  display  suggestions  will  be  a  good  way  to 
introduce  the  new  department. 
26 


A  Good  Plan  to  Increase  Your  1917  Trade 

Some  Further  Suggestions  About  Selling  Gift  Novelties  and  How  They  Help  to  Tone  Up 

a  Retail  Store. 


GIFT  simp  novelties  constitute  a  line  which  provides 
great  scope  for  retail  booksellers  and  stationers  to 
increase  trade  and  at  the  same  time  raise  the  aver- 
age ratio  of  profit  on  the  year's  turn-over  because  these 
-oods  carry  a  higher  percentage  of  profit  than  staple  lines. 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER  will  continue  to 
feature  these  goods  editorially,  and  it  is  hoped  that  with- 
in a  month  nr  twn  examples  will  lie  afforded  of  success  in 
this  line  attending  the  efforts  of  dealers  acting  on  these 
suggestions  put  forward  by  BOOKSELLER  AND  STA- 
TIONER. 

Specialties  of  the  variety  coming  within  the  scope  of 
these  gift  shop  goods  are  largely  the  outgrowth  of  the 
demand  originally  filled  by  the  Christmas  card  or  perhaps 
it  would  be  better  to  credit  the  originators  of  the  Christ- 
mas card  with  developing  an  entirely  new  market.  Easter 
cards,  birthday  cards,  etc.,  followed  the  introduction  of 
the  Christmas  card..  Then  came  Christmas  booklets,  art 
calendars,  until  to-day  the  recital  of  the  many  gift  speci- 
alties that  have  been  added  would  fill  pages  of  this 
journal. 

In  considering  more  particularly  the  gift  novelties, 
aside  from  the  art  productions  of  the  greeting  card  type 
or  very  closely  associated  with  them,  these  divide  them- 
selves into  two  general  classes — articles  of  the  utilitarian 
type  and  those  which  appeal  purely  for  their  beauty  or 
decorative  effect  as  an  ornament  as  well  as  those  introduc- 
ing a  certain  element  of  humor  of  which  the  "Billiken" 
was  a  good  example. 

A  gift  novelty  department  stimulates  curiosity.  It 
brightens  up  a  shop  and  draws  crowds.  Naturally  the  in- 
creased number  of  customers  thus  attracted  is  beneficial 
to  the  merchant  not  only  because  of  the  extra  business 
thus  done  in  selling  these  gift  specialties  but  because  it 
leads  to  more  sales  of  the  general  lines  stocked  in  the 
store.  Thus  for  example  a  customer  attracted  into  the 
store  to  buy  some  decided  novelty  shown  in  the  window 
will  be  reminded  by  seeing  boxed  stationery,  that  she 
needs  some  correspondence  paper;  or  the  tactful  introduc- 
tion of  some  other  items  by  the  clerk,  as  for  instance,  the 
latest  novels,  will  in  many  cases  result  in  extra  sales  that 
would  not  otherwise  be  made. 

This  is  a  subject  which  should  have  the  immediate  at- 
tention of  the  book  and  stationery  merchants  of  Canada. 
The  time  to  act  is  NOW.  Use  this  means  to  materially 
build  up  your  business  in  this  year  1917. 

.    m 

FEATURING  WEDDING  GIFTS 

A  RETAIL  stationery  concern,  Oakland,  California, 
decided  to  feature  wedding  gifts  and  the  initial  win- 
dow display  of  these  goods  had  for  its  background, 
dark  green  cloth  and  a  series  of  rolls  of  white  glazed 
paper  set  on  end  like  the  pipes  of  an  organ.  In  the  centre 
of  the  window  was  arranged  an  altar  of  white  crepe  paper. 
Leading  up  to  the  altar  was  a  series  of  steps  surmounted 
by  a  pair  of  tall  gold  candlesticks  and  wax  candles  and 
ivory  backed  prayer  books.  The  second  shelf  displayed 
correspondence  paper  in  willow  green,  orchid  and  dove 
grey.  The  third  shelf  exhibited  specimens  of  engraved 
wedding  invitations  and  announcements. 

Standinu1  at  either  corner  of  the  altar  was  a  life-sizo 
cut-out   of   the   bride   and   groom,  the  bride   wearing   an 


actual  veil.  On  the  floor  at  the  feet  of  the  bridal  couple 
were  wedding  books  in  white  and  gold  ami  white  and  silver. 
Nearby  on  a  little  stand  of  green  enamel  were  strewn  place 
cards  for  the  wedding  feast.  These  were  white  hearts  on 
which  were  pasted  little  figures  of  a  bi*ide,  or  of  a  pjroom. 
.  Still  another  stand  held  pear]  fountain  pens  and  gold  pen- 
cils. Placed  in  the  midst  of  the  wedding  stationery  was  a 
tall  silver  vase  filled  with  crimson  roses.  On  the  wall  were 
shown  kodaks,  prints  and  several  targe  pictures  and  a  card 
reading,  "Of  all  the  gifts  'that  lit  the  wedding  day  none 
is  so  timely  as  the  one  that  provides  the  means  for  telling 
the  picture  story  of  the  day — the  Kodak." 

Such  a  display  may  well  be  featured  at  times  of  the 
year  when  marriages  are  most  frequent,  as  in  June  and 
October.  Women  especially  are  always  interested  in  wed- 
dings or  in  anything  that  is  associated  with  weddings.  No 
better  proof  of  this  can  be  asked  than  the  practice  of  many 
women  who  faithfully  read  the  marriage  notices  published 
from  day  to  day  in  the  newspapers  even  in  large  cities 
where  it  is  only  occasionally  that  the  name  of  an  acquaint- 
ance appears  among  the  marriage  licenses.  This  perpetual 
interest  in  weddings  can  be  capitalized  by  the  merchant 
by  utilizing  the  plan  described  in  the  foregoing. 

LISTS  RECEIVED 

The  nature  of  a  new  list  just  received  from  the  Joseph 
Dixon  Crucible  Co.  induces  us  to  recommend  the  same 
idea  to  other  manufacturers.  This  list  catalogues  all  the 
pencils  in  the  Dixon  line,  but  prices  are  omitted.  Thus  it 
can  be  freely  used  by  retailers  in  making  sales  to  their 
customers,  which  is  not  always  deemed  advisable,  having 
in  mind  catalogues  in  which  prices  to  the  trade  are  set 
forth.  This  is  especially  true  of  catalogues  of  United 
States  firms,  because  the  great  margin  between  wholesale 
prices  and  the  retail  prices  which  Canadian  retailers  are 
obliged  to  get  makes  it  seem  to  the  prospective  customer 
that  the  retailers'  profits  are  excessive.  This  Dixon  cata- 
logue, with  prices  omitted  altogether,  obviates  any  such 
annoyance. 

Another  feature  worthy  of  special  mention  in  this 
new  list  is  a  vocational  index,  listing  alphabetically  dif- 
ferent trades  and  professions,  and  suggesting  the  differ- 
ent qualities  and  grades  of  pencils  suitable  for  each.( 

This  catalogue  is  profusely  illustrated,  and  in  man) 
respects  other  than  those  mentioned  in  the  foregoing  will 
prove  helpful  to  dealers.  There  is  a  supplement  for  the 
trade  giving  trade  prices  of  all  the  items  in  the  catalogue. 

GREETING  CARDS 

Some  fine  new  productions  and  original  ideas  are  in- 
cluded in  the  line  of  greeting  cards  being  introduced  this 
year  by  Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  known  as  the 
"H.L.W. "  line.  Steel  die  stamped  greetings  and  plate 
marked  cards  add  distinction,  and  there  are  novelties  in 
shape  and  treatment  that  strike  a  new  note  and  put  life 
into  the  line. 

NEW  SILK  FLAGS 

Notable  additions  to  the  Copp,  Clark  Company's  line 
of  flags  of  their  own  manufacture  are  silk  Union  Jacks 
and  Canadian  ensigns,  in  four  sizes — 2  in.  x  3  in.,  4  in.  s 
6  in..  6  in.  x  9  in.,  and  8  in.  x  12  in.  They  are  mounted 
on  black  enameled  sticks,  with  spear  points. 
27 


Slffl 


M 


MERCHANDISING  METHODS 


Telephone  and  the  Rainy  Day 

A    Good    Way    to    Sell    Goods    That    Will    Amuse 

Children  Indoors  and  Ease  the  Lives  of 

Harassed  Mothers 

WHAT    have    you    ever   done    in    way    of   rainy    day 
specialties  for  children. 

When  Spring-  comes  again  and  rainy  days  are 
plentiful  you  can  do  a  lot  to  ease  the  life  of  harassed 
parents  in  homes  blessed  with  kiddies. 

These,  rainy  days  are  usually  doleful  ones  in  the  store 
witli  customers  very  scarce.  This  is  a  good  time  to  use 
the  telephone  to  make  sales.  Call  up  the  homes  where  you 
know  children  to  be  fairly  numerous  and  tell  the  mother 
about  your  "rainy  day"  goods,  such  as  sets  of  modeling- 
clay,  transparent  glass  slates,  boxes  of  paints  and  crayons, 
blackboards,  picture  books,  and  especially  those  showing 
colored  pictures  on  one  page  and  a  reproduction  of  the 
same  picture  in  outline  only  on  the  opposite  page,  to  be 
completed  by  painting  in  the  colors  and  doing  this  by 
means  of  colored  crayons.  The  different  well-known  line's 
of'  toy  builders  and  toys  of  various  other  toys  and  games 
may  well  be  mentioned  in  this  connection  and  it  will  be 
found  that  the  telephone  will  make  many  sales  if  used  in 
this  way. 

Have  a  Children's  Week 

Good  Plan  i(»  Greatly  Boost  Sales  of  Toys  and  Other 
Goods  for  Children  in  Any  Season— Can  lie 
'  Made   to   Rival   Christmas  Trade 

AS  a  means  of  boosting  the  sale  of  toys  in  a  season  Ear 
removed  from  Christmas  time  or  any  season  other 
than  the  months  immediately  preceding  Christmas 
selling,  a  plan  that  has  been  successfully  tried  out  by 
stores  in  different  cities  is  to  have  a  "Children's  Week'"' 
which  is  an  easy  thing  for  any  store  carrying  toys  to 
arrange.  Throughout  the  whole  store,  including-  the  win- 
dows, children's  goods  should  predominate  during  that 
week  and  there  should  be  considerable  advance  publicity 
so  as  to  develop  curiosity,  interest  and  anticipation  in  the 
minds  of  children  and  parent*.  Special  decorations  should 
be  shown  on  the  store  front  and  store  interior,  all  designed 
especially  to  appeal  to  children. 

Just  as  at  Christmas  time,  Santa  Claus  is  the  conspicu- 
ous figure,  there  should  be  some  other  outstanding-  figure  in 
these  displays.  One  large  store  in  London,  England,  which 
adopted  this  plan,  had  a  mammoth  "Gulliver"  as  the 
central  figure.  Others  that  might  be  utilized  are  '-Jack 
the  Giant  Killer,"' "The  Old  Woman  Who  Lived  in  a 
Shoe,"  or  any  one  of  dozens  of  other  familiar  characters 
beloved  of  children. 

It  will  be  appreciated  that  a  unique  idea  of  this  nature 
well  worked  out  either  on  a  large  or  a  comparatively  small 
plan  will  bring  returns  that  will  warrant  many  times  over 
the  time  and  expense  which   it   will  entail. 


It  is  by  merchants  who  strike  out  energetically  in  some 
such  original  plan  as  this,  that  success  is  conspicuously 
achieved. 

A  "children's  week"  planned  along  the  lines  suggested 
can  be  made'  to  bring  business  to  a  store  that  will  rival 
the  volume  of  business  done  with  similar  goods  in  the 
best  week  of  the  Christmas  selling  season. 

MAGAZINE  SELLING  TIPS 

A  retail  concern  that  does  good  newspaper  advertising- 
is  the  Western  News  Agency  of  Winnipeg.  A  recent  ad- 
vertisement bore  the  prominent  heading: — 

TWO  BRITISH  MAILS  THIS  WEEK 
ALL  THE  LATEST  WAR  NEWS 

Then  followed  a  list  of  the  British  magazines  and  news- 
papers that  had  arrived  or  were  due  on  those  two  mails. 
This  is  a  good  plan  to  adopt  in  advertising  the  news  trade 
and  can,  of  course,  be  adapted  to  new  issues  whether 
British,  Canadian  or  United  States  publications. 

A  plan  that  is  more  generally  adopted  and  which  proves 
very  efficacious  too,  is  to  put  out  a  sign  prominently  dis- 
playing the  words  BRITISH  MAIL  JUST  IN,  together 
with  some  of  the  magazines. 

MAKE  YOUR  WINDOWS  PAY  YOUR  RENT 

Keep  after  your  windows.  Remember,  many  sales  are 
made  from  the  sidewalk.  Something  really  good  and  pro- 
fitable to  buy  is  the  recently  introduced  hanging  fixture 
for  stationery  windows.  You  can  now  get  some  good  out 
of  the  top  space  in  your  show  windows  that  is  now  not 
being  used.  You  can  hang  the  fixture  at  any  height  you 
desire.  End  brackets  are  made. of  %-inch  square  wood 
stock,  dove-tailed  and  doweled  joints.  Each  fixture  has  a 
six-foot  chain  with  strong-  ceiling  hooks.  The  shelf  is 
3/4-inch  thick  (wood),  with  cleated  ends.  Leading  sta- 
tioners are  buying  these  hanging  fixtures  freely  for  use  in 
their  show  windows,  and  a'.so  hanging-  over  show  cases 
inside  of  store. 

HOW  TO  ADVERTISE 

George  French,  editor  of  "The  Advertising  News,"  is 
author  of  "How  to  Advertise,"  a  practical  manual  and 
guide  for  the  advertiser  published  under  the  direction  of 
the  Associated  Advertising-  Clubs  of  the  World. 

The  potentiality  of  advertising  is  one  of  the  most  amaz- 
ing features  of  our  civilization,  according  to  Mr.  French, 
and  yet  the  waste,  in  this  field  is  appalling.  In  "How  to 
Advertise"  the  author  probes  the  causes  of  this  waste  and 
suggests  ways  to  build  advertisements  that  "get  results." 
Generalities  are  avoided  and  examples  are  given  of  con-, 
crete  cases  where  advertisements  have  made  or  missed 
their  mark.  Among  the  subjects  discussed  in  his  book 
by  Mr.  French  are:  The  Human  Interest  Appeal.  What 
Has  Art  Got  to  Do  with  Advertising?  What  is  Art?  The 
Decorative  Advertisement  and  Optics  and  the  Advertise- 
ment. 


28 


Charging  Interest  on  Accounts 

Can   a   Merchant   Charge   Interest   on  Accounts i  -     Whal    Per    Cent.    Can    jkegally    be 
Charged? — Under  What  Conditions  Can  He  Not  (Jet  the  Amount  Allowed 

Under  the  Law. 


Is  it  legal  for  a  merchant  to  charge  in- 
terest on  accounts?  If  so,  when  can  he 
start  to  add  interest?  And  how  much 
interest  can  he  charge  under  the  law? 

YOUR  question  is  simple  enough  as 
asked,  but  to  give  you  a  short, 
simple  answer  would  be  danger- 
ous. The  answer  to  the  above  question 
all  depends  upon  the  particular  circum- 
stances of  each  particular  case. 

Let  me  take  the  retail  merchant  Hrsl. 
A  customer  telephones  in  an  order  for 
goods.  The  merchant  delivers  the  goods. 
If  this  is  the  first  order  the  merchant  has 
received  from  the  customer,  and  if  the 
customer  has  not  asked  for  credit  for  any 
stated  period,  then  the  law  presumes 
that  the  customer  agreed  to  pay  cash  for 
the  goods,  either  on  delivery  or  upon  the 
receipt  of  an  invoice.  In  such  a  case,  if 
the  customer  does  not  pay  up  at  once, 
the  merchant  is  entitled  to  charge  b% 
interest  on  the  amount  so  overdue.  He 
cannot  charge  a  higher  rate  than  5%,  no  matter  how  his 
invoices  may  be  drawn.  Statements  printed  or  stamped 
on  invoices  to  the  effect  that  interest  will  he  charged  upon 
all  overdue  accounts  at  the  rate  of  S,  10  or  12%  have  n 


WALTER  E.  LEAR 


merchant  cannot  collect  a  higher  rate  of 

interest  on  overdue  accounts  than  the 
customer  has  agreed  fco  pay,  hut.  the  cus- 
tomer must  pay  at  least  5  per  cent,  in- 
terest on  his  overdue  accounts,  because 
the  law  presumes  that  he  will  pay  his 
bills  as  they  become  due,  according  to 
the  terms  of  credit  agreed  upon. 

There  is  one  exception  to  what  1  have 
just  been  saying  as  the  merchant's  right 
to  stipulate  for  and  recover  any  rate 
of  interest  on  his  overdue  accounts.  The 
albove  is  perfectly  good  law  so  long  as 
the  rate  of  interest  mentioned  is  so 
much  per  centum  per  annum,  but  for 
some  unknown  reason  merchants  have 
the  foolish  habit  of  printing  statements 
on  their  invoices  to  the  effect  that  in- 
terest at  the  rate  of  1  per  cent  per  month 
will  be  charged  on  all  overdue  accounts." 
If  such  statements  are  made  in  a  re- 
ply to  a  letter  asking  for  credit  or  on 
invoices,  etc.,  they  have  the  effect  of 
reducing  the  rate  of  interest  which  may  be  collected  to 
5  per  cent.,  because  by  section  4  of  the  above  Act  it  is 
provided:  "Whereby  the  terms  of  any  written  or  printed 
contract,    whether    under   seal   or   not,   if   any    interest    is 


effect  whatever  in  such  a  case,  because  the  customer  did      made    payable    at    a   rate    of   percentage   per    day,    week, 
not  agree  to  pay  any  such  rate  of  interest,  and  it  always      month,  or  at  any  rate  of  percentage  for  any  period  less 


takes  two  to  make  a  contract  which  the  law  will  enforce. 

Now,  supposing  the  customer  has  been  in  the  habit  of 
dealing  with  the  merchant  and  the  merchant  has  been  in 
the  habit  of  sending  out  monthly  statements.  Here  the 
law  presumes  that  the  customer  will  pay  the  account 
within  a  reasonable  time  after  it  is  received.  If  he  does 
not  do  so,  then  the  merchant  is  entitled  to  charge  5% 
interest  on  his  overdue  account,  but  no  more,  because  the 
customer  did  not  agree  to  pay  any  rate  of  interest  at  all, 
and  it  is  only  by  operation  of  the  law  that  the  merchant 
is  entitled  to  charge  the  5%.     The  law  permits  the  mer- 


than  a  year,  no  interest  exceeding  the  rate  or  percentage 
of  5  per  cent,  per  annum  shall  he  chargeable,  payable  or 
recoverable  on  any  part  of  the  principal  money  unless  the 
contract  contains  an  express  statement  of  the  yearly  rate 
or  percentage  of  interest  to  which  such  other  rate  of  per- 
centage is  equivalent." 

I  wish  to  particularly  warn  merchants  from  collecting 
interest,  upon  the  assumption  that  they  have  the  right  so 
to  do,  becuase  they  have  such  notices  printed  on  their  in- 
voices. The  rate  of  interest  sought  to  he  charged  must 
be   stated   at   so  much    per  centum   per  annum,  not    1   per 


,         cent,  per  month.    Tt     he  merchant  co  lects  1  per  cent,  ner 
chant  to  charge  the  legal  rate  of  5%   interest    from  the  '    .  ts  s  lcl  ltuu-  V1 

month    interest    from    anv    customer,    then    the    customei 


time  when  the  customer  should  have  paid  the  bill   until 
such   time  as  he  actually  does  pay   it. 

Again,  a  prospective  customer  writes  in  to  either,,  a 
wholesaler  or  retailer  and  asks  on  what  terms  goods  will 
lie  supplied  to  the  customer;  then  is  the  time  for  the  mer- 
chant to  mention  what  rate  of  interest  be  will  charge  on 
all  overdue  accounts.  He  can  thereafter  collect  any  rate  * 
he  mentions  in  his  reply,  because  the  Interest  Act,  Revised 
Statutes  of  Canada  (1906),  chapter  120,  section  2,  pro- 
vides: "Except  as  otherwise  provided  by  this  or  by  any 
other  Act  of  the  Parliament  of  Canada,  any  person  may 
stipulate,  for,  allow  and  exact,  on  any  contract  or  agree- 
ment whatsoever,  any  rate  of  interest  or  discount  which 
is  agreed  upon.'7     But,  if  the  merchant  fails  to  mention       been  paid  until  the  time  when  they  actually  are  paid 

interest,  on  overdue  accounts,  he  will  be  allowed  only  -V,  . . 

interest  from  the  time  when  they  should  have  been  paid  A  business  book  that  should  command  wide  attention 

until  the  time  when  the  accounts  are  actually  paid.  The  is  "The  Private  Secretary,  his  duties  and  opportunities  " 
letter  asking  for  credit  and  the  reply  by  the  merchant  by  Edward  Jones  Kilduff.  It  describes  in  detail  the  duties 
when  read  together  constitute  a  contract  or  agreement.  of  a  secretary  to  a  business  man  with  complete  instruc- 
provided   that   goods  are  ordered   by  the  customer.     The      tions  as  to  the  duties  to  he  performed. 

29 


has  a  right  of  action  against  the  merchant,  for  section  ."> 
of  the  Interest  Act,  provides:  "If  any  sum  is  paid  on  ac- 
count of  any  interest  not  chargeable,  payable  or  recover- 
able under  the  last  preceding  section,  such  sum  may  be 
recovered  or  deducted  from  any  principal  or  interesl  pay- 
able under  such  contract." 

My  answer  to  the  albdve  question  is,  that  a  merchant 
may  collect  any  rate  of  interest  on  overdue  accounts,  which 
the  customer  has  agreed  to  pay,  provided  that  the  rate  of 
interest  is  so  much  per  centum  per  annum;  and  in  case 
where  no  rate  of  interest  has  been  agreed  upon,  then  the 
merchant  is  entitled  to  collect  5  per  cent,  per  annum  on 
overdue  accounts,  from  the  time  when  they  ought  to  have 


«J$0^££ffi»ff^^ 


mmim 


and 

Sporting 
Goods 


Second  Annual  Toy  Fair 

Successful    Show    Held    in    Toronto   in    February — 
Many  Buyers  From  all  Parts  of  Canada 

OYER  a  score  of  toy  makers  of  Canada  were  present 
with  exhibits  at  the  Second  Annual  Toy  Fair,  which 
was  held  at  8  Colborne  street,  Toronto,  early  in 
February,  and  a  very  gratifying  number  of  buyers  were 
on  hand  from  toy  departments,  not  only  in  Ontario,  but 
from  Western  Canada  and  Quebec.  The  toy  makers,  as  a 
rule,  expressed  themselves  as  gratified  with  the  orders  or 
promises  of  orders  that  they  had  received  from  the 
buyers. 

In  some  respects  the  exhibit  was  not  as  large  as  the 
first  one  held  under  the  auspices  of  the  Department  of 
Trade  and  Commerce  one  year  ago.  where  importers 
showed  as  well  as  makers.  Some  of  the  toy  makers  who 
were  there  at  that  time  have  fallen  by  the  wayside,  but 
others  who  were  absent  have  built  up  a  good  steady  busi- 
ness in  their  lines,  but  were  unable  to  be  present  at  this 
time. 

Among  the  buyers  who  visited  Fair  were : — 
John  Taylor,  Hanover,  Ont,;  E.  Gariepy,  of  Granger 
Freres,  Montreal;  W.  J.  Binning,  of  Binning 's  Fair,  Moose 
Jaw,  Sask. ;  W.  F.  Moser,  of  J.  F.  Cairns  Co.,  Saskatoon; 
W.  L.  Walper,  of  the  Hudson 's  Bay  Co.,  Edmonton ;  M. 
Macpherson,  of  J.  Macpherson  &  Son,  Delhi,  Ont.;  F.  A.  E. 
Hamilton,  of  the  Consolidated  Sporting  Goods  and  Fancy 
Goods  Co.,  Winnipeg;  Mrs.  M.  Gogel,  173  Danforth  Ave., 
Toronto;  M.  Bernstein,  1484  Yonge  St.,  Toronto;  T.  C. 
Watson,  Newmarket,  Ont.;  Robert  Mills,  of  Stanley  Mills 
Co.,  Hamilton,  Ont.;  D.  Fontaine,  of  the  Syndicate  de 
Quebec,  Quebec;  W.  F.  Northcott,  Northcott 's  Bookstore, 
Niagara  Falls,  Ont.;  J.  E.  Dixon,  of  James  Ramsay  Co., 
Ltd.,  Edmonton,  Alta. ;  J.  G.  Holden,  of  Henry  Morgan  & 
Co.,  Montreal;  J.  J.  Joyce,  of  Almy's  Limited-,  Montreal; 
N.  C.  Smith,  of  T.  Eaton  Co.,  Winnipeg;  F.  N.  Slater,  of 
T.  Eaton  Co.,  Toronto;  E.  P.  Poulin,  of  Poulin,  Limited^ 
Ottawa,  Ont. ;  H.  W.  Angus,  North  Bay,  Ont. ;  Wm.  Bryce, 
Toronto;  H.  Parsons,  Parson's  Fair,  Orillia,  Ont.;  G.  Par- 
sons, Parson's  Fair,  Sarnia,  Ont.;  Frank  Blair,  Gait, 
Ontario;  Wm.  Tyrrell,  Toronto;  R.  A.  Beamish,  North 
Bay,  Ont. ;  R.  W.  0  'Neill,  of  Robert  Simpson  Co.,  Toronto; 
F.  W.  Chapman,  244  Church  St.,  Toronto;  T.  A.  Yellow- 
less,  of  Rumsey  &  Co.,  Toronto;  B.  McAulay,  291  Ronces- 
valles,  Ave.,  Toronto;  V.  S.  Josey,  Bell  Co.,  Halifax,  N.S.; 
Miss  Maddock,  of  Maddock's,  Tillsonburg,  Ont.;  M.  T. 
Armstrong,  of  Moore's  Bookstore,  Parry  Sound,  Ont.; 
A.  J.  Ridley,  of  David  Spencer  Ltd.,  Vancouver,  B.C. ; 
J.  L.  Gordon,  Kamloops,  B.C.;  J.  H.  Bodel,  of  Hudson's 
Bay  Co.,  Calgary;  Miss  Van  Nostrand,  of  Harold  A. 
Wilson  Co.,  Toronto;  G.  Buchner,  G31  Dundas  St.,  Toronto; 
W.  S.  Sterne,  Brantford,  Ont.;  W.  A.  Luke,  Oshawa,  Ont.; 


■!»y^i 


John  Dalton,  Deseronto,  Ont.;  A.  T.  Cooper,  Clinton,  Ont.; 
W.  A.  Smith,  Oakville,  Ont.;  J.  H.  Jackson,  Georgetown, 
Ont.;  A.  Hackborn,  of  Stedman  Bros.,  Brantford,  Ont.; 
Napoleon  E.  Godin,  Three  Rivers,  Quebec;  A.  J.  Wigmore. 
"I   Wigmore 's  Fair,  Swift  Current. 

New  Lines  in  Metal  Toys 

Among  those  that  attracted  much  favorable  attention 
was  an  extension  of  the  line  of  the  Newmarket'  Toy  Com- 
pany, now  the  Beaverton  Metal  Toy  Co.,  who  make  up 
iron  goods  of  a  finished  design,  including  trains,  engines, 
horses,  various  kinds  of  vehicles,  or  what  we  might  call 
the  regular  line  of  metal  toys.  While  the  prices  of  these 
goods  have  advanced  considerably,  from  25  to  50  per 
cent,  over  last  year,  owing  to  the  increase  in  cost  of  the 
metal  and  labor,  it  is  believed  by  most  of  the  toy  buyers 
that  these  goods  have  found  a  permanent  place  in  Can- 
ada, and  the  prices  that  are  charged,  particularly  those 
that  will  be  arranged  for  in  normal  times,  will  enable 
them  to  maintain  their  hold  against  imported  goods.  All 
the  toys  that  are  turned  out  are  strong  and  serviceable. 
So  great  has  been  the  demand  for  these  lines  that  the 
firm  reports  themselves  as  sold  out  for  the  whole  of  this 
year.  There  should  be  further  factories  along  this  line 
in  Canada. 

New  Firms  Making  Boats 

Several  new  firms  are  going  into  the  making  of  toy 
boats,  both  in  metal  and  in  wood.  Among  these  are  a 
Vancouver  firm  and  a  former  sailor,  Geo.  Hanratty,  of 
Toronto,  who  designs  the  models,  including  cruisers,  tor- 
pedo boats,  ordinary  sail  boats,  and  so  on,  which  operate' 
by  winding  up.     These  are  neat,  and  low-priced. 

A  new  steel  constructor  toy  is  being  shown  by  the 
Castle  Mfg.  Company,  after  the  Erector  or  Meccano  toys,, 
in  some  ingenious  designs.     They  also  show  a  sand  toy. 

Other  new  lines  are  a  rapid  fire  machine  gun,  which 
has  a  novel  method  of  loading  the  ammunition  in  the 
form  of  marbles;  the  use  of  animals'  heads,  including 
the  hen,  in  wooden  toys,  such  as  rocking  chairs,  rocking 
horses,  sulkies,  etc.,  made  by  the  Royalet  Mfg.  Co.  of 
London,  Ont.,  and  a  variety  of  childrens'  tinware,  such 
as  sand  pails,  tea  sets,  etc.,  by  the  Davidson  Mfg.  Com- 
pany. 

Large  Variety  of  Dolls 

The  Dominion  Toy  Co.  have  added  to  their  line  of  dolls 
an  odd  form  of  horse.  "Canada  Dolls"  include  nearly 
75  varieties  of  unbreakable  dolls.  The  Brophey  Doll  Co. 
have  a  number  of  new  designs  in  the  Madame  Hendren 
dolls,  inclnding  St.  Patrick's  Day  and  Hallowe'en  spe- 
cialties, and  the  famous  "Black  Cat." 

The  Victoria  Toy  Co.,  of  Victoriaville,  Que.,  are  to 
the  fore  with  an  increased  range  of  papier  mache  rock- 
ing horses,  dolls  furniture,  etc.,  and  the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 
have  a  large  variety  of  fla<rs  and  sanies. 

The  manager  is  E.  V.  Henderson,  of  Toronto,  and  the 
secretarv-treasurer,  Mr.  L.  G.  Beebe. 

ao 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Are  Jobbers  Killing  the  Toy  Industry  in  Canada? 

By  Fred.  G.  Holden,  Buyer  and  Manager,  Toy  Department,  Henry  Morgan  &  Co.,  Montreal. 

EDITORIAL  NOTE. — Bookseller  and  Stationer  feels  that  it  is  doing  a  service  to  the  young  toy  industry 
of  Canada  to  publish  the  statement  made  to  it  at  the  Toy  Fair  by  FredG.  Holden,  one  of  the  best  knoivn  buyers 
in  Canada,  Manager  for  the  Toys  and  Sporting  Goods  Sections  of  Henry  Morgan  &  Company,  a  big  department 
store  of  Montreal  This  toy  department  is  one  of  the  most  successful  in  Canada  and  is  in  active  running  order 
throughout  the  whole  year.  The  biggest  business  in  toys,  of  course,  is  done  during  the  Christmas  season,  but 
Mr.  Holden  says  that  toys  sell  well  during  all  seasons  of  the  year.  >  Dolls  are  a  staple  selling  line  and  other  kinds 
of  toys  as  well.  Of  course,  in  seasonable  times  carriages  for  babies  as  well  as  for  dolls,  and  other  wheeled 
vehicles  are  given  the  greatest  prominence. 

Mr.  Holden  after  covering  the  Toy  Fair  in  Toronto  will  go  on  to  the  British  Industries  Fair,  and  then  take 
in  the  Exhibition  at  Lyons,  France.  '.  .  .  The  dissatisfaction  of  the  big  retail  toy  buyers  referred  to  by  Mr. 
Holden  is  coming  to  a  head  and' the  subject,  we  learn,  is  likely  to  be  threshed  out  at  a  meeting  of  toy  manufac- 
turers this  week. 


IN  the  year  that  has  passed  since  the  first  exhibit 
of  the  toy  makers  of  Canada  was  held  in  Tor- 
onto I  notice  an  improvement  in  many  respects 
in  the  toys  that  are  being  turned  out  by  Canadian 
manufacturers.  This  applies  both  to  the  style  of 
the  goods  and  also  to  the  variety.  At  the  same  time 
I,  to  speak  frankly,  am  disappointed  in  the  lack  of 
development  that  I  had  expected  when  the  move- 
ment to  encourage  toy  making  was  inaugurated 
twelve  months  ago.  The  most  noticeable  defect  is 
still  in  the  dolls.  We  still  miss  the  finished  products 
that  we  secured  before  the  war.  The  lines  of  beauty 
in  the  faces  and  the  graceful  dresses  that  we  get 
now  on  the  French  dolls  have  not  been  tried  out  in 
this  country.  There  is  a  disappointing  uniformity 
too  about  the  dolls  that  leads  one  to  infer  that  one 
maker  has  followed  almost  exactly  the  models  of 
another,  as  if  he  had  picked  up  the  discarded  mould 
and  fashioned  his  products  upon  it.  Allowance  must 
of  course  be  made  by  the  fact  that  doll  making  is  a 
skilled  industry.  But  I  am  afraid  that  the  real 
trouble  is  that  our  toy  makers  in  Canada  are  fixing 
too  low  a  standard  of  prices  to  make  possible  any 
satisfactory  development. 

This,  to  my  mind,  is  the  kernel  of  the  whole 
matter,  the  cause  of  the  slow  progress  that  the  past 
two  years  have  shown. 

Keeping  Toys  Too  Small  and  Too  Cheap 
You  find  metal  toys  of  finished1  design  very  at- 
tractive in  themselves,  but  they  are  too  small  to 
suit  the  average  child.  He  wants  something  two  or 
three  times  as  big.  Bigger  horses,  bigger  railway 
trains,  bigger  automobiles,  bigger  fire  trucks  and  so 
on.  But  they  all  seem  working  to  a  price  and  the 
price  is  far  too  low." 

Best  Goods  Sold  First  For  Christmas 
What  class  of  goods  sold  first  in  our  Toy  Depart- 
ments last  Christmas?  What  I  am  saying  is  the 
experienc  of  everyone  to  whom  I  have  spoken,  and, 
that  is  that  it  was  the  best  class  of  goods  sold  first 
and  the  cheap  remained  to  the  last  and  then  very 
often  had  to  be  sold  at  a  reduction  in  order  to  clear 
them  out.  People  wanted  a  good  class  of  toy,  just 
as  they  wanted  a  good  class  of  merchandise  in  nearly 
every  department  and  they  were  willing  to  pay  the 
price. 

Making  Good  Class  in  England 
For  a  great  many  of  my  toys  for  next  Christmas 
I  will  have  to  go  out  of  Canada.     I  am  going  over 
to  the  British  Fair  now  and  will  go  on  to  Lyons.    My 


information  is  that  the  British  toy  makers  are  going 
after  a  higher  class  of  toy  and  are  not  attempting 
to  any  extent  to  turn  out  this  cheap  stuff  that  is  un- 
satisfactory to  the  manufacturer,  the  retailer  and 
the  customer  alike. 

Numbing  Influence  of  the  Jobber 
To  my  mind  the  real  trouble  lies  in  the  fact  that 
the  toy  trade  in  Canada  has  come  under  the  control 
of  the  jobber.  It  is  the  jobber  that  is  killing  it 
to-day,  and  until  it  gets  out  of  the  hands  of  the 
jobber  there  will  be  no  real  development  in  this  new 
industry.  As  soon  as  a  man,  working  perhaps  with 
small  resources  and  in  a  small  factory,  turns  out  a 
good  class  of  toy  the  jobber  gets  after  him  and  per- 
suades him  to  give  him  control  of  his  whole  output. 
The  argument,  of  course,  that  he  advances  is  that  the 
individual  maker  cannot  afford  the  expense  of  push- 
ing his  article  by  itself  among  the  retail  trade,  while 
he  with  a  large  number  of  lines,  is  able  to  keep 
travelers  out  and  bring  the  expense  for  handling 
the  one  line  down  to  a  minimum.  The  toy  maker 
falls  for  this  and  is  satisfied  if  he  gets  a  market  from 
the  one  source  for  his  output. 

Can  Job  Cheap  Goods  More  Easily 

There  is  another  point  that  comes  in  here.  The 
jobber  finds  as  a  rule  that  he  can  job  far  more  easily 
lines  of  cheap  goods  than  the  more  expensive  and 
the  margin  of  profit  on  the  cheaper  lines  is  far  higher 
than  on  the  dearer  ones.  Very  often  the  difference 
between  a  first-class  and  medium  toy  lies  in  the  un- 
willingness of  the  jobber  to  allow  the  five  cents  more 
expenditure  required  to  bring  it  up  to  a  high  standr 
ard. 

The  buyers  of  toys  in  Canada  are  numerous  and 
have  large  appropriations  each  year  for  securing 
stock,  and  if  the  individual  toy  maker  would  submit 
samples  to  a  number  of  the  largest  toy  departments 
in  the  stores  from  Victoria  and  Vancouver  in  the 
West  right  through  Calgary,  Regina,  Winnipeg  down 
through  Toronto,  Ottawa,  Montreal,  Quebec  and  on 
to  the  Maritime  Provinces,  he  would  secure  sufficient 
orders  to  keep  him  going  all  the  time.  In  dealing 
directly  with  the  toy  buyers  he  would  be  able  to  meet 
their  wishes  more  than  through  the  medium  of  a 
jobber  and  could  make  to  their  order  a  toy  that  they 
know  would  meet  with  the  approval  of  the  public. 
Until  something  like  this  is  done  I  do  not  think  the 
toy  industry  of  Canada  will  reach  any  great  propor- 
tion nor  will  be  anything  of  which  we  have  reason 
to  be  proud. 


31 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


PROMOTING  TOY  SALES 

Clip   the   following  poem  and  submit   it   to  the   loca^ 

newspaper.     Tile  chances  are  that   the  editor  will   publish 

it.  and  this  toy  buying  will  be  eneouraged: 

Give  me  the  house  where  the  toys  are  strewn 

Where  the  dolls  are  asleep  in  the  chairs, 
Where  the  building  blocks  and  the  toy  balloon, 

And  the  soldiers  guard  the  stairs; 
Let  me  step-in  the  house  where  the  tiny  cart 

With  its  horses  rules  the  floor, 
And  the  rest  comes  into  my  weary  heart. 

For  I  am  at  home  once  more. 

Give  me  the  house  with  the  toys  about, 

With  the  battered  old  train  of  cars, 
The  box  of  paints  and  books  left  out 

And  the  ship  with  her  broken  spars; 
Let  me  step  in  a  house  at  the  close  of  day 

That  is  littered  with  children's  toys, 
And  dwell  once  more  in  the  haunts  of  play 

With  the  echoes  of  bygone  noise. 

Give  me  the  house  where  the  toys  are  seen 

The  house  where  the  children  romp, 
And  I'll  happier  be  than  man  has  been 

'Neath  the  gilded  dome  of  pomp. 
Let  me  see  the  litter  of  bright-eyed  play 

Strewn  over  the  parlor  floor, 
And  the  joys  I  knew  in  a  far-off  day 

Will  gladden  my  heart  once  mare. 

Whoever  has  lived  in  a  toy-strewn  home 

Though  feeble  he  be  and  gray 
Will  yearn,  no  matter  how  far  he  roam, 

For  the  glorious  disarray. 
Of  the  little  home  with  its  littered  floor 

That  was  his  in  the  bygone  days. 
And  his  heart  will  throb  as  it  throbbed  before, 

When  he  rests  where  a  baby  plays. 

A  WAGE  COMPUTOR 

A  new  office  specialty  is  called  "The  Richmoor  Wage 
Computer,"  to  enable  quick  figuring  of  a  payroll  with 
accuracy.  It  takes  about  as  much  space  as  an  inkstand. 
This  is  an  innovation  introduced  by  the  F.  D.  Bassett  Co., 
of  'Chicago. 

ELECTRICAL  SPECIALTIES 

Manufacturers  of  electrical  specialties  are  finding  sta- 
tionery stores  valuable  outlets  for  these  goods.  These 
items 'include  flatirons,  toasters,  griddles,  heating  pads, 
electric  radiators,  coffee  urns,  coffee  percolators,  chafing 
dishes,  tea  kettles,  tea  samovars,  boiler  or  stew  pans, 
Commercial  disc  stoves,  egg  boilers,  hot  plates,  curling 
irons,  combs,  etc. 

Silent  Music  for  the  Sick— A  system  of  "silent  music,' 
installed   by  a   Chicago  firm  in  a  hospital  at  Ottawa, 
111.,  is  thus  described  in  "Hospital  Management   (Chi- 
cago) : 

"It  consists  of  a  spring-motor  cabinet  with  a  turn- 
table similar  to  the  ordinary  phonograph  without  a  horn. 
Attached  to  the  cabinet  is  our  special  music-transmitter, 
corresponding  to  the  tone-arm  and  reproducer  on  the 
ordinary  phonograph.  The  transmitter  is  energized  by 
the  vibrations  of  the  needle  travelling  on  the  record,  and 
transmits  these  electrical  vibrations  over  a  system  of 
wires  throughout  the  hospital.  The  wiring  terminates  at 
outlet  jacks  alongside  of  patients'  beds.  The  patient  can 
be  furnished  with  a  head  receiver  attached  to  a  cord  and 
plug.  When  the  plug  is  inserted  in  the  jack  alongside  of 
the  bed,  the  patient  may  hear  the  music  by  placing  the 
receiver  against  the  ear.  The  recorder  is  inaudible  unless 
the  receiver  is  held  close  to  the  ear.  and  consequently  one 


pal  lent    may  receive  entertainment   while  the  patient   in  an 
adjoining  bed  may  sleep  without  disturbance." 

RESCUING  THE  FOLK-SONGS 

• 

The  Kentucky  Mountains  are  being  ransacked  by  en- 
thusiastic folk-song  gatherers  of  these  lyric  remnants  of 
the  past.  Miss  Loraine  Wvman  is  one  of  the  "pickers- 
up  of  unconsidered  trifles,"  and  her  results  have  appeared 
in  a  volume  called  "Lonesome  Tunes."'  What  is  found 
in  these  remote  districts  are  the  songs  of  English  ped- 
ants, many  of  them  also  garnered  in  the  English  country- 
side by  the  late  Baring-Gould  and  Cecil  J.  Sharp.  In 
these  parts  of  the  Alleghanies  dwell  English,  Scotch,  and 
Irish,  more  untouched  by  other  European  influences  than 
any  other  people  living-  in  the  United  States.  They  are 
shy  of  giving  up  their  stories,  and  Miss  Wvman  tells  of 
all  sorts  of  ruses  employed  to  persuade  the  natives,  some 
of  them  children,  to  sing  for  even  an  audience  of  one.  The 
enthusiasm  for  collecting  old  songs  is  much  greater  in 
England,  where  probably  the  field  is  richer  and  the  pur- 
suit has  been  followed  Longer;  but  Mr.  Sharp  regards  this 
belatedness  in  investigation  as  something  of  an  advantage 
The  present-day  collector  goes  about  it  in  a  very  different 
way  from  the  eighteenth  century  musician,  having-  set  up 
quite  a  different  standard.  He  has  realized,  says  Mr. 
Sharp,  in  The  Musician  (Boston),  that  "his  first  and 
chief  obligation  is  to  record  just  what  he  hears,  no  more 
and  no  less,  and  that  the  esthetic  as  well  as  the  scientific 
value  of  his  work  depends  wholly  upon  the  truthfulness 
and  accuracy  of  his  transcriptions." 

FEBRUARY  COPYRIGHTS 

For  Me  and  My  Gal.  Words  by  Edgar  Leslie  and  E.  Ray 
Goetz.  Music  by  Geo.  W.  Meyer.  Waterson.  Berlin 
&  Snyder  Company,  New  York. 

We'll  Proudly  Greet  Them.  Woivds  and  music  by  W.  H. 
Bloye.  Arranged  by  E.  Williamson.  Empire  Music 
and  Travel  Club,  Limited,  Toronto,  Ont. 

The  Battle  of  the  Heart.  Words  and  music  by  E.  Wil- 
liamson.    F.  W.  Oates,  Toronto,  Ont. 

The  British  Way.  Words  by  F.  W.  Andrews.  Music  by 
Georgie  McFarline.  Georgie  McFarline,  Toronto,  Ont. 

Premieres  Semailles.  Par  Georges  Bouchard.  Preface 
de  M.  I 'Abbe  Camille  Roy.  (Livre. )  Georges  Bou- 
chard.   Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatiere,  Que. 

When  Our  Gallant  Boys  Come  Marching  Home  Again. 
Words  and  music  by  Dora  Carpenter  Kenyon.  Dora 
Carpenter  Kenyon,  London,  Ont. 

When  Those  Sweet  Hawaiian  Babies  Roll  Their  Eyes. 
Words  by  Edgar  Leslie.  Music  by  Harry  Ruby. 
Kalmar,  Puck  &  Abrahams  Consolidated,  Inc.,  Xew 
York,  N.Y. 

He's  Living  the  Life  of  Reilly.  Words  by  Alex.  Gerber. 
Music  by  Archie  Gottler.  Puck  &  Abrahams  Con- 
solidated, Inc.,  New  York,  N.Y. 

Three  Cheers  for  the  Lads  of  the  Navy.  Words  and  music 
by  Gordon  V.  Thompson.  Thompson  Publishing  Comf 
pany,  Toronto,  Ont. 

Adanac  March.  By  W.  Davis.  Arranged  by  W.  R.  M <•- 
Kanlass.     C.  Musgrove  &  Bros.,  Toronto,  Ont. 

A  Heart  Prayer.  Words  by  H.  W.  Barker.  Music  by 
Chas.  Curtis.  H.  W.  Baker  &  Chas.  Curtis.  Toronto. 
Ont. 

Canadian  Kilties.  By  J.  B.  Rainsford.  (Song  Poem.) 
J.  B.  Rainsford,  Cobourg.  Ont. 

There's  a   Canadian  Girl  Who's  Longins  for  Her   Own 
True  Soldier  Boy.      (Song  Poems.)     By  J.  B.  Rains- 
ford. Cobourg,  Ont. 
32 


Why  Canadian  Merchants  Fail  in  Business 

Lack  of  Capital  Continues  to  be  Chief  Cause,  Covering  Over  38  Per  Cent.  —  "War" 
Responsible  for  30.1  Per  Cent.— Incompetence  Blamed  for  Nearly  14  Per 
Cent.— Best  Relative  Year  Since  1912  -  -  Business  Life  Grows 
Safer — Some  Graphic,  Charts. 


IT  JS  gratifying  for  every  Canadian  to  learn,  although 
not  unexpected  in  view  of  the  wonderful  improvement 
in  business  conditions  in  this  country,  that  the  total 
failures  for  the  past  year  showed  a  decrease  as  compared 
with  the  year  1!>15  of  32. 5  per  cent.,  and  a  decrease  of  38 
per  cent,  when  compared  with  1914.  More  encouraging 
even  than  this,  and  unexpected  to  most  of  us,  is  the  fact  that 
the  year  1916  makes  a  better  showing  than  1913,  by  3  per 
cent. 

That  this  country  from  the  point  of  view  of  failures,  has 
reached  a  sounder  condition  than  in  1913,  in  spite  of  the 
war,  becomes  all  the  more  significant  when  we  compare  the 
figures  of  the  United  States.  There,  with  war  conditions 
that  never  dropped  to  the  level  that  they  did  in  Canada  in 
the  first  few  months,  the  decrease  in  failures  for  1916  over 
1915  was  13.3  per  cent.,  and  of  1916  over  1914,  1.6  per  cent. 
As  compared  with  1913,  however,  the  United  States  had  an 
increase  in  failures  of  13.3  per  cent.,  while  Canada's  de- 
creased. 

Slightly  Less  Than  1  in  Every  100  Fail. 
From    another    standpoint    the    figures    are    interesting. 
According  to  Bradstreet's,  to  whom  we  are  indebted  for  the 
statistics  in  this  article,  the  business  death  rate  fell  to 
92/100  of  1  per  cent,  last  year,  compared  with- 1.07  per 
cent,  in  1915,  and  95/100  in  1914.     That  is,  out  of  every 
10,000  in  business  in  Canada  last  year,  92  failed,  compared 
with  107  in  1915  and  95  in  1914.    This  is  a  heavy  toll,  how- 
ever, the  highest  of  any  year  since  1908,  the  "panic"  year, 
and  we  have  to  go  back  ten  years  more  to  equal  it.     Still, 
the  worst  record  was  1.5  per  cent.,  a  fact  which  proves 
that  the  ancient  tradition  that  the  larger  number  entering 
business  life  are  doomed  to  failure  ultimately,  lacks  a  well- 
founded  statistical  basis.     It  should  be  pointed  out  that 
the  statistics  used  in  these  conclusions  define  a  failure  as 
one  that  involves  loss  to  creditors,  and 
does  not  include  many  cases  involving 
physicians,  actors,  real  estate  men,  etc., 
where  others  were  not  concerned. 
Personal  Shortcomings  a  Fruitful  Cause 
AVhile  there   is   abundant  reason  for 
congratulations     from     a     comparative 
point  of  view,  there  are  many  elements 
involved   in    these    "mortuary"     statis- 
tics that  call  for  grave   consideration. 
Personal  shortcomings  bulk  so  largely 
that   one   is   tempted   to   suggest   that 
there  be  exercised  some  sort  of  a  Gov- 
ernment supervision  that  will  eliminate 
a  percentage  of  those  who  at  the  outset 
through  ignorance  or  incompetence,  or 
a  dangerous  lack  of  capital  seem  to  be 
foreordained    to    failure,    a    suggestion 
that  would  be  met  by  an  outcry  that  any 
restrictions  would  be  in  the  nature  of 
restraint  of  trade.    For  all  that,  we  be- 
lieve the  time  will  come  when  the  law 
will  require  a  minimum  in  the  matter  of 
competence  and  experience  and  perhaps 
of  capital — certainly  the  former  two  ele- 
ments being  the  best  asset — as  a  means 
of  defence  for  the  rest  of  the  business 
community. 


Why  do  men  fail  ?  Bradstreet's  have  made  a  double 
grouping  of  causes,  the  first  dealing  with  the  faults  of  the 
men  who  fail,- and  the  other,  external  reasons.  These  two 
classes  are  divided  as  follows: — 

A.— FAULTS   OF   THOSE    FAIL'.PG 

Incompetence, 

Inexperience, 

Lack   of  capital, 

Unwise   credits, 

Speculation    (outside    regular   business), 

Neglect  of  business   (due  to  doubtful  habits), 

Personal  extravagance, 

Fraudulent -disposition   of  property, 

B.     NOT   DUB   TO   FAULTS   OF  THOSE   FAILING— 
Specific   conditions    (disaster,   war,   floods), 
Failures   of  others    (of   apparently   solvent   debtors). 
Competition. 

Lack  of  Capital  Leads  in  Canada — Incompetence  in  States 

As  between  Canada  and  the  United  States  in  the  matter 
of  causes  of  failure,  there  is  a  curious  difference.  In  the 
former  case,  lack  of  capital  is  by  far  the  most  fruitful  of 
the  personal  reasons;  in  the  States,  incompetence  stands 
at  the  top.  Lack  of  capital  in  Canada  was  responsible  for 
38.8  per  cent,  of  the  failures  in  1916,  as  against  30.3  per 
cent,  in  1915.  Incompetence  was  the  cause  of  13.4  last 
year  and  17.9  in  1915.  In  the  United  States,  incompetence 
claimed  33.2  per  cent,  of  the  total  in  1916,  and  29  per  cent, 
in  1915,  while  lack  of  capital  was  only  30.3  in  1906  and  27.5 
in  1915.  However,  this  is  not  the  old  record  across  the 
border.  In  1914  and  1913,  lack  of  capital  stood  first,  as  it 
had  every  year  before  except  in  1912.  Indeed,  it  rose  as 
high  as  39.2  per  cent,  in  one  year. 

War  Conditions  Caused  30  Per  Cent. 

While  lack  of  capital  was  the  leading  cause  of  failure  ih 
Canada  last  year,  as  might  have  been  expected,  the  war 


FAILURES  IN  THE  UNITED  STATES  AND  CANADA, 

CLASSIFIED  ACCORDING  TO  CREDIT  RATINGS,  TO  LIABILITIES  AND  TO  CAPITAL  EMPLOYED 

■*■ 

16 

1915 

1914 

1913 

No. 

P.ct. 

No: 

P.ct. 

No. 

P.  ct. 

No. 

16,378 

•5.533 
723 

X22 

16,378 
9.287 
7,091 

5."43 

1,203 

409 

295 

41 

24 

16,378 

15.042 

933 

256 

76 

59 

12 

4 

P.  Ct.           , 
IOO. 

94.8 

4-4 
.8 

IOO. 

56.7 

43-3 
3i-4 

"•3 

2-5 

1.8 

•3 
.1 

IOO. 

91. 8 
5-7 
1.6 
•5 
•3 
.07 

.01 

Credit  Ratings  of  those  w/io  failed. 
Total  number  failures  U.  S.  and  Canada 
Number  failing  which  had   Very  Mod- 
erate or  No  Credit  rating 

18,268 

'7.843 
395 

3° 

18,268 

11,520 

6,748 

5.'44 

1,094 

294 

196 

20 

5 

18,268 

■7.372 

712 

126 

33 

24 

X 

z 

IOO. 

97-7 
2.1 

21,661 

20,890 
689 

82 

21,661 
12,640 
9,021 
6,676 
1,535 
455 

3'7 
38 
16 

21,661 

20,251 

1.046 

232 

69 
61 

2 
2 

IOO. 

96.4 

3-2 
•4 

IOO. 

58.4 

4T.6 

30.8 

7-1 

2.1 

1-4 

.2 

.07 

IOO. 

93-5 
4.8 

I.X 

•3 
•3 
■  ox 
.01 

19,659 

18,789 
752 

118 

19,659 

10,851 

8,808 

6,380 

1,511 

481 

352 

84 

52 

«9.°S9 
18,064 

«.»75 

252 

72 

83 

«3 

6 

IOO. 

95.6 

3-8 
6 

Number  failing  rated  in  Good  Credit  . . . 
Number    falling    rated    in   Very    Good 

Liabilities  of  l/iose  who  failed. 
Total  number  failures  C  S.  and  Canada 
Total  with  less  than  $5,000  liabilities     ,    , 
Total  with  $5,000  liabilities  and  over 

Total  with  $5,000  to  $20,000  liabilities 

Total  with  $20,000  to  $50,000  liabilities. . . . 
Total  with  $50,000  to  $100,000  liabilities. . . 
Total  with  $100,000  to  $500,000  liabilities. . 
Total  with  $500,000  liabilities  and  over. . . 
Total  with  $1,000,000  liabilitiesand  over. . 

Capital  employed  by  those  who  failed. 
Total  number  failures  U.  S.  and  Canada 

IOO 

63 
36 

28 

6 

I 
I 

IOO 

95 
3 

z 

9 

2 

6 

1 
°3 

9 

7 
2 

X 

005 

IOO 

55 

44 

32 

7 

2 

X 
IOO 

9' 

6 

1 

2 
8 
5 
7 

4 
3 
4 

3 

9 

3 

4 
4 

06 

Total  with  over  $5,000  and  less  than  $20,000 
Total  with  $20,000  and  less  than  $50,000. . . 
Total  with  $50,000  and  less  than  $100,000. . 
Total  with  $100,000  and  less  than  $500,000 
Total  with  $500,000  and  over 

Total  with  $1,000,000  and  over 

" 

33 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


itself  was  the  leader  in  the  preceding 
year-  In  1915,  lack  of  capital  was  only 
80J3  per  cent.,  while  "specific  condi- 
tions" rose  to  35.9  per  cent.  In  1916 
the  latter  had  fallen  again  to  30JL,  as 
compared  with  24.4  in  1914. 

Inexperience,  which  ranks  close  to  in- 
competence, was  responsible  for  3.4  per 
cent,  in  1916,  while  in  the  United  States 
it  was  the  cause  of  6  per  cent.  The 
only  other  fruitful  cause  of  failure  in 
either  country  is  fraud,  on  the  part  of 
others,  which  caused  7.5  per  cent,  in 
Canada,  and  6.6  across  the  border.  Com- 
petition stands  surprisingly  low  in  Can- 
ada, .2  per  cent.,  of  1/500,  compared 
with  4.2  per  cent,  in  the  States.  Neg- 
lect is  credited  with  1.9  per  cent,  in 
Canada,  as  against  1.4  per  cent,  the  year 
before,  and  2.4  and  1.9  per  cent,  in  the 
United  States  for  the  two  years. 

Individual   Cause   of   71    Per   Cent. 

To  sum  up  the  causes  of  failure:  In 
Canada,  the  individual  was  charged  with 
71  per  cent,  of  the  responsibility  com- 
pared with  64.7  per  cent,  the  previous 
year,  but  73.4  in  1914,  a  much  smaller 
record  than  in  the  States,  where  the 
percentages  were  79.5  and  74.4  respec- 
tively, for  1916  and  1915. 

95  Per  Cent.  With  Less  Than  $5,000 
Capital 

Lack  of  capital  as  a  cause  is  worth  a 
closer  study.  No  separate  figures  are 
available  at  the  moment  for  Canada, 
but  as  Bradstreet's  remarks,  "If  any 
confirmation  were  needed  of  the  idea 
that  the  small  trader's  path  was  a  dan- 
gerous one  in  1916,  it  would  be  afforded 
by  the  returns  of  capital  employed  by 
those  who  failed.  Of  18,268  failures  in 
the  two  countries  in  that  year,  17,372, 
or  exactly  85  per  cent.,  had  a  capital  of 
$5,000  or  less.  Search  through  the  re- 
cord of  twenty-six  past  years  fails  to 
reveal  so  high  a  percentage  as  this,  the 
nearest  approach  to  it  being  in  1900, 
when  the  proportion  was  94.2  per  cent. 
"The  proportions  failing  with  larger  capital  naturally 
showed  a  shrinkage  from  1915  and  all  preceding  periods. 
97  Per  Cent.  With  Poor  Credit  Ratings 

As  regards  credit  ratings,  it  is  shown  that  47,843,  or 
97.7  per  cent,  of  the  18,268  failing  in  the  United  States  and 
Canada,  had  very  moderate  or  no  credit  ratings,  as  against 
96.4  per  cent,  in  1915,  the  latter  being  the  highest  per- 
centage recorded  up  to  that  year.  Of  those  failing  in  the 
two  countries,  63.1  per  cent,  had  less  than  $5,000  of  liabili- 
ties, the  highest  percentage  recorded  since  1905,  when  it 
was  65.2,  and  comparing  with  58.4  per  cent,  in  1915  and  55.2 
in  1914,  the  latter  the  lowest  proportion  in  twenty-five 
years. 

In  respect  to  liabilities,  those  in  Canada  were  less  than 
one-half  the  total  of  1915,  being  $15,767,175,  compared  with 
$32,380,501.  In  the  United  States  the  liabilities  for  1916 
showed  a  drop  of  38.3  per  cent,  from  1915,  and  were  less 
than  half  those  of  1914,  and  indeed  the  smallest  of  any 
years  since  1909. 

Four  tables  are  reproduced  here  which  will  repay  a 
close  study. 


SUMMARY-UNITED     STATES 


I-'ailures 

Number 

ASSETS 

Liabilities 

due  to 

1916 

1915 

5,689 

•,057 

5,229 

448 

187 

119 

350 

1,082 

3,603 

80 

1,191 

1916 

$18,727,522 

3,784,910 

27,431,650 

2,270,465 

3,945,228 

517,323 

934,749 

2.170,347 

16,640,317 
3,33«.°66 
6,3'?-533 

1915 

19x6 

1915 

Incompetence 

Inexperience 

Lack  of  capital 

Unwise  credits. .   . 
Failures  of  others. 
Extravagance 

Competition 

Specific  conditions 

Fraud 

5,486 
990 

4,995 
308 
146 
108 
396 
701 

2,206 

59 
1,101 

$24,754,230 
3,380,950 

48,429,359 
6,702,516 

17,072,071 

8'7,793 

1,427,469 

4,273,106 

43,178,898 
',937,427 
8,794,140 

$39,268,997 
7,387,618 

58,223,655 
3,882,151 
6,540,905 
',597,527 
2,895,608 
4,672,317 

29,761,361 
5,849,093 

15,152,926 

$49>237,492 

6,777,646 

80,699,933 

«o,993,425 

26,184,034 

'.758,944 

2,831,286 

9,345,842 

70,206,329 

6,335,582 

19,756,616 

Total 

16,496 

'9-°35 

$86,071,050 

$160,767,959 

$»75,232,i58J$2^4,i27,i29 

SUMMARY— DOMINION  OF  CANADA,   NEWFOUNDLAND  AND 
ST.   PIERRE  AND  MIQUELON. 


Failures 

Number 

ASSETS 

Liabilities 

due  to 

1916 

1915 

1916 

1915 

1916 

1915 

Inexperience 

Unwise  credits ...   . 
Failures  of  others. . 
Extravagailce ...     . 

Specific  conditions . 
Speculation 

238 
60 

689 
28 
10 
10 
34 
3 

533 
35 

132 

470 
94 

796 
48 
41 
12 
37 
4 

942 
32 

150 

$713,555 
144,039 
2,368,147 
61,562 
153,825 
23,671 

134,273 

12,014 

1,694,281 

842,778 

232,543 

$1,424,010 

365,3'2 

4.575,240 

460,965 

408,400 

24,120 

86,085 

3,300 

5,73*550 

752,520 

5'5>'9o 

$1,751,840 

365.744 

6,146,253 

159.590 

340,985 

72,054 

258,870 

16,412 

3.652,750 

2,162,716 

819,961 

$4,065,450 

95',844 

10,145,325 

926,357 

',023,377 

58,526 

221,551 

7-075 

11,212,850 

1,581,008 

2,187,138 

Total 

«,772 

2,626 

$6,380,688 

$14,354.69* 

$'5.747.«75 

$32,380,501 

PERCENTAGES  OF  NUMBER  OF  FAILURES  AND  LIABILITIES 

IN   THE    UNITED   STATES    AND   CANADA    IN    1916    AND    1915.   CLASSIFIED    AS   TO  CAUSES. 


Failures 
due  to 


Incompetence 

Inexperience 

Lack  of  capital 

Unwise  credits 

Failures  of  others. . 

Extravagance 

Neglect 

Competition 

Specific  conditions . 

Speculation . . . ; 

Fraud  


United  States,  Per  Ct. 


Number 


1916 


33.2 

6.0 

30.3 

'•9 

■9 

.6 

2.4 

4-2 

'3-4 

•  4 

6.7 


«9'5 


29.9 
5-4 

27.5 
2.4 
1.0 
.6 
1-9 
5-7, 

'8.9 

4 

6-3 


Liabilities 


1916 


21.8 
4.4 

3'-9 
2.6 

4-6 

.6 

1.0 

2-5 

19.3 

3-9 
7-4' 


1915 


»7-3 

«.* 

28.4 

3-9 

9-.6 
1.0 

3-3 

24.7 

2.2 

7.0 


Canada,  Per  Cent. 


Number 


1916 


'3-4 

3-4 

38.9 

'  i.6 

•  5 

•  5 
1.9 

.2 

30.1 

2.0 

7-5 


17.9 
3-6 

3o.J 

1.8 

1.6 

•5 

'•4 


Liabilities 


1916 


11. o 
2.3 

390 

1.0 

2.2 

•5 

'•7 

.1 

23-3 

'3-7 
5-2 


1915 


12.5 

2-9 

3«-3 

2.0* 

3.2 

.2 

•  7 

.02 

34.6 

4-9 

6.8 


These  tables  from  Bradstreet's  provide  interesting  records  as  to 
Why  Merchants  Fail. 


Business   Life   Becoming   Safer 

Bradstreets  concludes  that  "business  life  is  safer  to-day 
than  it  ever  has  been,"  that  credit  granting  based  upon 
more  careful  credit  reporting  is  more  discriminating,  that 
other  important  improvements  have  been  made  in  crop  and 
business  reporting,  as  well  as  in  commercial  communica- 
tion and  in  transportation,  and  that  more  care  is  exercised 
to  prevent  solvent  debtors  from  entering  bankruptcy." 


THE  ROAD  TO  UNDERSTANDING 

A  new  book,  by  Eleanor  H.  Porter,  is  coming  out  tlii- 
month.  lis  title  will  he  "The  Road  to  Understanding." 
It  deals  with  the  did  theme  of  young  love,  a  poor  girl  he- 
coming  the  bride  of  a  rich  man.  Everybody  knows  the 
danger  of  misunderstanding  and  estrangement  in  such 
cases.  Burke  and  Helen  Denbv  in  this  story  begin 
bravely,  hut  they  find  in  their  own  characters  insidious. 
unlooked-for  traits,  which  threaten  to  destroy  their  hap- 
piness. They  eventually  win  out  to  true  happiness,  mak- 
ing an  intenselv  interesting  and  satisfying  story. 


34 


To  Eliminate  Direct  Selling 

Aim  of  Soberly  Undertaken   Campaign  of  the  Board 

of  Trade  of  the  American  Booksellers' 

Association 

DIRECT  selling  by  book  publishing  houses  is  occupy- 
ing the  attention  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  the 
American  Booksellers'  Association  which  is  soberly 
entering  upon  a  campaign  having  for  its  object  nothing 
less  than  the  complete  elimination  of  direct  sales  of  books 
by  publishers  and  jobbers.  This  campaign  is  not  being 
put  forth  as  "a  demand"  but  the  project  is  to  outline  the 
only  basis  on  which  enduring  book-trade  prosperity  is 
possible  and  to  present  this  so  clearly  and  forcibly  that 
publishers  cannot  fail  to  be  convinced  of  its  truth. 

The  present  situation  is  represented  as  being  like  unto 
the  proverbial  attempt  to  carry  water  on  both  shoulders. 
Direct  selling  by  publishers  and  jobbers,  the  Board  of 
Trade  maintains,  is  not  complementary  to  retail  booksell- 
ing as  has  been  maintained,  but  is  ' '  incompatible,  inimical 
and  indeed  mutually  destructive."  The  Board  of  Trade 
further  clinches  this  point  by  saying  that  the  publisher 
who  thinks  he  *an  swell  his  mailing  list  and  mail  order 
sales  and  at  the  same  time  assist  in  the  strengthening  and 
growth  of  an  efficient  and  comprehensive  retail  book-trade, 
is  living  in  a  fool's  paradise.  The  booksellers  believe  that 
every  sale  made  by  a  publisher  direct,  weakens  the  retail 
trade. 

"The  Publisher's  Weekly"  dealing  with  this  subject 
says : — 

"It  seems  difficult,  on  the  other  hand,  to  deny  the 
publisher  the  right  and  advisability  of  dealing  directly 
with  customers  in  certain  instances.  There  are  many  book- 
buyers  remote  from  local  bookstores.  There  are  other 
bookbuyers  whom  the  retail  bookseller,  try  as  he  may,  is 
unable  for  special  reasons,  to  handle.  Some  business  comes 
to  every  publisher  unsolicited  that  no  retailer  could  well 
have  secured;  what,  he  asks,  is  he  to  do  with  it?  Other 
direct  business  he  may,  legitimately  and  wisely,  seek,  of 
which  no  retailer  has  knowledge,  nor,  having  knowledge, 
could  secure  efficiently. 

Yet,  if  we  are  entirely  honest  with  ourselves,  we  have 
to  admit  probably  that  direct  selling,  however  excusable 
in  specific  instances,  does  tend  to  undermine  the  retail 
trade.  And,  if  we  are  sincere  in  our  belief  in  the  system 
of  selling  at  retail  upon  which  the  book-trade  is  founded, 
then  we  must  in  all  honesty  seek  for  practical  methods 
looking  eventually  toward  the  elimination  of  mail-order 
selling  rather  than  its  encouragement. 

Some  publishers,  and  among  them  houses  than  whom, 
we  believe,  the  book-trade  has  no  sincerer  friends,  sell  more- 
of  their  output  direct  than  through  the  trade;  many  other 
houses  for  obvious  reasons  reap  larger  net  profits  from  this 
business,  smaller  in  volume  though  it  be.  We  do  not  think 
that  it  is  the  sober  wish  of  the  retail  book-trade — to  sa\ 
nothing   of   its    expectation — that    these    book    publishers 


BEST  SELLING  BOOKS  IN 
CANADA 

Fiction. 

1— Mr.  Britling  Sees  !t  Through  Wells  129 

2— When  a   Man's  a  Man   Wright  64 

3 — The  Worn   Doorstep    Sherwood  4G 

■1 — Greenmantle    Buehan  co 

5— Bullets   and   Billets    Bairnsfather  28 

<; — Bindle     Jenkins  28 

Non-Flrtlon. 

1      Rhymes  of  a    RedCl'OSS   Man    Service 

Juvenile. 

1      Kertily   Fox  Series. 

UNITED  STATES  SUMMARY. 

(From  the  March  Bookman) 

FICTION 

T— Mr.   Britling  Sees   It  Through Wells  387 

2— When  a  Man's  a  Man Wright  229 

:! — Mary  'Gusta   Lincoln  129 

I     Wildfire    ...Grey  124 

5 — Penrod    and    Sam Tarkington  73 

i' — The  Wonderful  Year Locke  62 


shall  forthwith  give  up  at  the  trade's  request  the  larger 
or  more  profitable  portions  of  their  businesses.  The  sup- 
position is  absurd  on  its  face.  But  the  retail  trade,  ac- 
cording to  the  purport  of  the  resolution  just  adopted,  does 
ask  that  book  publishers  doing  an  increasing  mail  order 
business  consider  with  the  utmost  seriousness  whither  the 
emphasis  they  place  on  this  portion  of  their  business  is 
gradually  leading  them  and  the  trade  at  larae. 

The  booksellers  ask  in  short  that  this  whole  question  of 
retail  bookselling  be  looked  at  fairly  and  squarely;  they 
claim  that  either  it  is  a  system  to  be  honestly  and  whole- 
heartedly encouraged  and  built  up,  or  frankly  discarded 
for  something  better.  Not  that  we  ourselves  see  any  danger 
of  the  latter  alternative;  for  the  movement  to  hold  up  the 
hands  of  the  retailer  is  far  wider  than  the  book-trade.  In 
fact,  the  whole  tendency  of  selling  methods  in  the  last 
decade  in  every  line  of  merchandizing  has  been  to  strength- 
en the  retailer,  to  make  his  business  more  profitable  for 
him,  to  increase  the  number  of  retaH  stores.  More  and 
more  manufacturer  and  wholesaler  are  coming  to  see  that 
their  selling  problem  is  primarily  one  of  retail  distribution, 
that  if  their  products  have  an  adequate  number  of  pros- 
perous retail  outlets  their  merchandising  problem  is  sim- 
plified, if  not  completely  solved. 

SONGS  OF  UKRAINIA 

In  referring  to  Miss  Livesay's  creditable  volume, 
"Songs  of  Ukrainia,"  recently" published  by  Dent's,  it  is 
interesting  to  observe  that  there  are  in  the  Canadian 
West  over  a  quarter  of  a  million  of  people  of  this  race.  In 
Russia  there  are  30,000,000  Ukrainians,  besides  5,000,000 
who  are  subjects  of  Austria.  The  Ukrainians  are  a  dis- 
tinct race  of  the  Cossack  stock.  They  are  frequently 
spoken  of  as  Little  Russians.  They  furnish  the  flower  of 
the  Czar's  armies. 

Miss    Livesay's    books    provides    translations    of    Uk- 
rainian folk  songs  and  national  lyrics.     There  is  an  intro- 
duction by  Paul  Crath,  a  prominent  Ukrainian,  who  lives 
in  Winnipeg.    Miss  Livesay  is  also  a  resident  of  that  city. 
35 


I'nOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


WHEN  THE  PRUSSIANS  CAME  TO  POLAND 

Tli,.  Countess  de  Turczynowicz  was  Pormerlj  Miss 
Laura  Blackwell,  of  St.  Catharines,  Ontario,  and  she  is 
a  native  of  Georgetown,  Ont.  She  is  the  author  of  an 
Lmportanl  new  war  book,,  entitled  "When  the  Prussians 
Came  to  Poland."  Her  husband  was  at  that  time  and  is 
still  serving  in  the  Russian  army.  Their  chateau  was, 
occupied  l>\  Vim  Hindenburg  for  two  months  while  her 
children  were  ill.,  at  the  time  of  the  invasion  of  Poland. 
The  countess,  as  she  relates  in  her  hook,  owed  her  escape 
unharmed  at  that  time  to  elaiming  American  citizenship, 
and  her  means  of  convincing  von  Hindenburg  of  this  was 
her  singing  before  him  of  "The  Star  Spangled  Banner." 
Her  book  is  another  strong'  indictment  against  the 
Prussians  and  their  ruthless  methods  of  making'  war. 


Thoreau's  friend  and  fellow-townsman,  who  is  almost  the 
last  of  his  contemporaries.     This  hook  will  he  valuable 

lo  students  and  collectors,  while  for  the  general  reader 
it  will  stand  as  a  definite  biography  of  the  meat  phil- 
osopher-naturalist. 

NEW  AND  FORTHCOMING  BOOKS 

"The  Triflers,"  by  Frederick  Orin  Bartlett,  author  of 
"The  Wall  Street  Girl,"  tells  the  story  of  a  young  Am- 
erican heiress,  besieged  byr  suitors,  whose  one  aim  is  to 
see  the  world  without  let  or  hindrance,  and  the  author 
has  cleverly  shown  how  such  a  desire  ejin  he  fulfilled.  A 
marriage  of  convenience  brings  about  the  entertaining 
spectacle  of  a  man  and  wife  falling  in  love  with  each 
other. 


The  Countess  de  Turczynowiez  and  Her  Children 


ONE  YEAR  OF  PIERROT 

A  veritable  literary  triumph  is  how  discerning  critics 
who  have  read  "One  Year  of  Pierrot"  describe  this  novel, 
which  is  the  intimate  revelation  of  a  young  mother's 
thoughts  during  the  first  year  of  the  life  of  her  only  child 
and  of  the  reaction  of  those  thoughts  on  the  world  around 
her — the  man  from  Yale  who  painted  pictures,  the 
irascible  but  big-hearted  French  surgeon,  the  noble  coun- 
tess, and  all  the  quaint  characters  of  a  French  village. 
The  scene  is  laid  on  the  French  Riviera,  and  the  book  is 
all  the  more  appealing  by  reason  of  Leslie  Hornby's  fine 
pictures.  His  sketches  are  as  finely  wrought  as  the  story 
itself. 
AN  ANTHOLOGY  OF  MOTHER  VERSE 

A  suggestion  for  Mother's  Day  is  afforded  by  the  com- 
ing of  a  new  book  entitled  "To  Mother,"  which  is  an- 
thology of  mother  verse,  with  an  introduction  by  Kate 
Douglas  Wiggin.  .  The  book  is  to  have  a  copy  of 
Whistler's  famous  picture  of  his  mother  for  the  frontis- 
piece. 
THOREAU 

"A  Life  of  Henry  D.  Thoreau,"  by  Frank  B.  San- 
born, comes  in  this  year  of  the  centenary  of  Thoreau 's 
birth,  which  will  doubtless  witness  an  increased  interest 
in  his  life  and   writings.     The  author  of  this  book   was 


"Out  Where  the  West  Begins,"  by  Arthur  Chapman, 
is  a  remarkably  clever  book.  Vigor  and  freshness,  racy 
dialect  of  the  plains,  a  quality  of  "go"  and  humor,  make 
iiis  work  decidedly  refreshing.  It  will  appeal  strongly  to 
those  who  so  enjoy  the  poems  of  Bret  Harte  and  such 
contemporary  writers  as  Robert  W.  Service. 

"A  MAN'S  BOOK 

Ridgwell  Cullum's  new  novel.  "The  Son  of  His 
Father."  presents  a  Western  tale  that  is  distinctively 
above  the  ordinary.  It  is  a  man's  book  of  big  business. 
Father  and  son  unknowingly  oppose  eacli  other  in  a  big 
coal  deal,  and  a  fight  to  a  finish  ensues.  The  outcome  is 
suggested  by  the  book's  title.  Incidentally  the  son  figure* 
in  a  love  story  that  adds  measurably  to  the  interest  of  the 
book. 

E.  V.  Lucas'  "Vermillion  Box"  continues  to  hold 
first  place  in  point  of  sales  among  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.  's 
novels,  with  Comfort's  "The  Last  Ditch'*  second,  and 
"Tish"  third. 

Eleanor  Hallow-ell  Abbott,  who  scored  so  notably  with 
"Molly  Make-Believe"  and  other  captivating  stories,  has 
written  another  just  as  whimsical,  entitled  "The  Stingy- 
Receiver." 
36 


LITERATURE  OF  THE  WAR 


GETTING  TOGETHER 

' '  Tell  me, ' '  asks  the  average  American  of  the  average 
Briton  in  ''Getting  Together/'  by  Ian  Hay,  "what  is  back 
of  your  country's  resentful  attitude  towards  America?" 

The  Briton  ponders. 

"Didn't  some  one  once  say,"  he  replies  at  last,  "that 
he  that  is  not  for  us  is  against  us?"  That  seems  to  sum  up 
the  situation.  We  on  our  side  are  engaged  in  a  life  and 
deatli  struggle  for  the  freedom  of  the  world.  We  know 
that  you  are  not  against  us;  still,  considering  the  saered- 
ness  of  our  cause,  and  the  monstrous  means  by  which  the 
Boche  is  seeking  to  further  his,  we  feel  that  you  have  not 
stood  for  us  so  out  and  out  as  you  might." 

Through  the  medium  of  his  two  characters,  the  author 


IAX    HAY. 

takes  up  many  of  the  questions  at  issue  between  the  aver- 
age American  and  average  Briton  and  settles  them  in  a 
way  that  will  find  a  response  in  the  mind  of  both. 

GERMAN  METHODS  EXPOSED 

"Peaceful  Penetration,"  is  the  title  chosen  by  A.  D. 
McLaren  for  a  book,  published  by  Constables,  in  which  the 
author  lays  bare  the  whole  machinery  by  which  Germany 
has  obtained  such  great  influence  in  certain  neutral  states. 
Here  is  an  extract  from  the  first  chapter: — 

Germans  have  availed  themselves  of  the  hospitality 
of  a  friendly  nation  in  order  to  undermine  its  sove- 
reignty. It  is  a  campaign  carried  on  by  spbies,  traders, 
financial  organization,  missionaries,  schools,  having  for 
its  goal  the  weakening  politically  of  the  community  in 
which  its  agents  work.  It  has  used  the  right  of  free 
and  unrestricted  domicile  to  shatter  the  political  sta- 
bility of  a  prospective  rival  Power.  It  has  been  war- 
fare on  scientific  lines." 


WELLS'  NEW  WAR  BOOK 

A  new  book  by  H.  G.  Wells  is  entitled  "Italy,  France 
and  Britain  at  War." 

Mr.  Wells  firs^  discusses  the  changing  sentiment  as 
regards  the  war  in  the  different  countries  where  it  is  being 
waged.  He  then  takes  up  the  war  in  Italy — The  Isonzo 
Front,  The  Mountain  Warfare,  and  Behind  The  Front. 
After  this  comes  a  section  devoted  to  the  Western  war, 
with  chapters  on  Ruins,  Grades  of  War,  The  War  Land- 
scape, New  Arms  For  Old  Ones,  and  Tanks.  Finally  comes 
the  part  in  which  Mr.  Wells  asks,  "What  do  people  think 
about  the  war?"  Here  he  presents  such  problems  as  "Do 
they  reallv  think  at  all?,  The  Yielding  Pacifist,  and  The 
Conscientious  Objector,  The  Religious  Revival,  The  Riddle 
of  The  British,  The  Social  Changes  In  Progress  and  The 
Ending  of  The  War." 

"Only  a  Dog,"  tells  the  story  of  a  stray  dog,  an  Irish 
terrier  which  was  appropriated  by  a  Cockney  soldier, 
Private  Rice,  to  whom  the  dog  became  greatly  attached. 
.Rice  was  killed  in  battle  and  "Army,"  as  he  had  named 
the  dog,  took  up  his  position  at  his  master's  grave  in  No 
Man's  Land,  until  he  too  was  killed  by  a  shell.  Around 
"Army"  an  inspiring  and  most  readable  story  has  been 
woven  by  Bertha  Smith. 

A  new  and  enlarged  edition  of  Stephen  Graham's 
"Russia  and  the  World"  has  just  been  published.  This 
new  edition  reveals  a  fuller  conception  of  the  traits  of  the 
Russians,  Poles,  Bulgars,  Turks,  Germans,  Greeks;  Ruman- 
ians and  Jews  and  the  effect  of  the  war  on  these  peoples. 

Two  volumes  of  war  interest  that  have  just  come  from 
Constable's  are  "Sea  Power,"  by  Archibald  Hurd  and 
"To  Ruhleben  and  Back,"  by  Geoffrey  Pyke. 

OBSTACLES  TO  PEACE 

Booksellers  will  recall  that  not  so  many  months  ago 
the  noted  New  York  magazine  publisher,  S.  S.  McClure, 
was  looked  upon  as  being  anything  but  pro-ally  in  his 
utterances.  This  fact  makes  his  book,  "Obstacles  to 
Peace,"  all  the  more  impressive.  The  book  is  an  ex- 
haustive dealing  with  what  the  author  saw  and  heard 
during  several  months  spent  in  the  different  belligerent 
countries  in  which  he  was  received  as  an  American  pub- 
licist 'by  leading  statesmen  of  these  countries. 

The  truth  as  presented  in  this  book  is  a  justification 
of  the  cause  of  the  allies. 

"The  Heart  of  the  Balkans"  will  appear  shortly,  be- 
ing the  work  of  Demetra  Vaka,  whose  notable  book.  "The 
Grasp  of  the  Sultan,"  will  be  recalled. 

Two  new  lists  have  just  come  from  Thomas  Allen,  one 
heir.','  a  special  36-page  catalogue  of  the  Rand,  McNally 
Co. 's  juvenile  books,  a  distinctive  feature  of  which  are 
four  pages  giving  miniature  reproductions  in  actual  colors 
of  twenty-four  of  the  leading  books  for  children;  while 
the  other  is  a  thirty-six  page  illustrated  list  of  the  publi- 
cations of  the  John  C.  Winston  Co. 
37 


B  O  ()  K  SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


JERRY 

"Jerry,"  by  Arthur  Stanwood  Pier,  has  just  come 
from  Thomas  Allen,  being  a  $1.50  novel.  Jerry  is  a  clean- 
out,  clean-minded  and  ambitious  young  man,  who  began 
life  as  a  mill  hand  in  a  steel  works,  from  which  he  ousted 
himself  by  participation  in  a  strike;  then  became  a  police- 
man, where  he  met  corruption  and  vice  and  crime  anions; 
political  workers,  congressmen,  police  officials  and  de- 
generates. In  his  progress  as  a  "cop''  he  got  into  diffi- 
culties because  of  his  honesty  and  good-heartedness.  The 
while  he  studied  law,  and  in  the  end  had  the  recogni- 
tion his  talents  and  character  merited. 


Arthur  Stanwood   Pier. 

He  loved  a  girl — an  Irish  girl  of  beauty  and  physical 
■appeal,  who  preferred,  however,  another  man,  and  there- 
by got  herself  into  much  trouble.  In  the  end  she  saved 
Jerry  from  marrying  her,  now  a  widow,  'by  yielding  to  the 
ardent  wooings  of  a  ward  politician,  and  Jerry  found 
someone  better  in  a  girl  whom  he  and  his  mother  had  be- 
friended in  days  of  trial  and  poverty. 

The  story  has  a  vivid  murder  trial,  and  is  readable  in 
a  high  degree.  Several  superior  illustrations  add  to  the 
attractiveness  and  pleasure  of  the  book. 

SPIRITUAL  ASCENT  OF  MAN 

A  new  book  just  received  from  Putnam's  is  "The 
Spiritual  Ascent  of  Man,"  published  in  a  $1.50  edition 
being  the  work  of  Dr.  W.  Tudor  Jones,  who  deals  with 
argent  questions  of  science,  philosophy  and  religion. 

He  sets  aside  the  old  controversy,  and  maintains  that 
there  is  no  real  conflict  between  Science  and  Religion,  but 
that  science,  if  properly  scrutinized  and  understood,  must 
inevitably  lead  to  Religion. 

Bridge-building  as  a  subject  for  writers  of  fiction  has 
provided  some  good  novels  and  short  stories.  Louis 
Schneider,  who  has  contributed  some  good  stories  to  "The 
Black  Cat,"  has  a  story  called  "The  Hidden  Builders,"  in 
the  March  issue,  in  which  two  bridge-builders  who  were 
always  at  odds,  yet  co-operated  successfully  in  building  the 
greatest  bridge  of  their  time. 

In  planning  your  purchases  for  next  Christmas  trade 
keep  in  mind  gold  and  silver  cords,  red  and  gold  cords, 
green  and  gold  cords,  red  and  green  and  gold  cords,  red 
ribbonzene  and  green  ribbonzene.  They  come  on  wood 
spools,  paper  spools,  Santa  Claus  cards  and  novelty  cards. 

Musical  Instrument  Dealer  (to  new  boy) — Now,  if 
while  I  am  out  a  customer  wants  to  look  at  a  mandolin, 
flute  or  piccolo,  you  know  what  to  show  him? 

New  Boy — Yes,  sir. 

Dealer — And  suppose  he  should  want  to  see  a  lyre? 

Boy — I'd  ask  him  to  wait  until  you  came  in. 


nC   LJUt)   1MJI  I\.C  1U   DPOKS       1 

SI  «      "W„    ,1„,.„   „„<•   ~ ,1    U,..,!.^.         TJ„   !,,.„    _„., J„1..„J  S 


1 

^  ]\  " He  does  not  read  books.  He  has  never  delved 
^  into  the  records  of  what  men  have  accomplished.  $ 
He  lives  in  a  world  without  a  past.  Of  the  ^ 
heights  and  depths  to  which  men  have  climbed 
3      he  does  not  even  guess.     In  a  world  of  law  and 


~W77777777//W///W//W/W/WWWWW//MWM^^^ 


He  Does  Not  Read  Books 


order  he  sees  only  chaos  and  mystery.  Boxed  in 
by  hard,  thick  walls  he  never  glimpses  the  glories 
that  lie  beyond.     He  claims  for  himself  only  an 


insignificant  part  of  the  wonderful  and  alluring 


|      whole.     Life  to  him  is  a  fraction.     He  does  not      g 
$       read  books.  $ 

^       \  "Yet — he    has    cock-sure    opinions    on    every 


subject  that  can  be  broached — and  tags  every 
man  a  fool  who  does  not  match  his  own  particular 
brand  of  ignorance. ' ' 


-Glen  Buck  in  "Office  Appliances." 


fry^/^/wy/z*^^^^^ 


FRIEND  TO  FRIEND  GIFT  BOOKS 

New  books  originated  by  the  Longfellow  Co.,  of  Bos- 
ton, are  known  as  the  "Friend  to  Friend  Gift  Books," 
made  in  eleven  numbers.  Some  of  the  titles  being: 
"Best  Scores  at  Golf,"  "Birth  Dates  and  Wedding 
Days,"  "Greeting  List,"  "Hello  Book,"  "Friends  0' 
Mine,"  "Little  Book  of  Not  Forgot,"  "Shopping  Notes" 
and  "The  Twelve  Month."  These  little  books  which  are 
just  the  size  to  slip  into  milady's  shopping  bag,  are  tastily 
printed  in  two  colors  on  a  fine  quality  of  paper  and  bound 
in  four  beautiful  and  unusual  leathers.  The  fly-leaf  of 
each  book  gives  an  opportunity  to  inscribe  the  gift  and 
carries  a  rhymed  sentiment  appropriate  to  the  particular 
book. 

The  line  also  includes-  two  sizes  of  the  Business  Year 
Book.  This  is  a  man's  record  book  with  a  big  full  page 
for  each  day  in  the  year.  They  can  be  used  for  any  year 
or  started  at  any  time  of  year,  and  like  the  little  books 
mentioned  above  do  not  become  dead  stock  on  January  1. 

m 

"Memory's  Garden"  is  a  beautifully  printed  and 
bound  book  interspersed  with  exquisite  original  little 
poems  which  serve  as  headings  for  the  different  memories 
which  it  is  the  mission  of  the  book  to  preserve. 

A  new  "Life  of  Ulysses  S.  Grant,"  by  Louis  A.  Cool- 
idge,  has  just  appeared,  and  in  it  the  career  of  Grant  is 
told  with  vivacity  and  lucidity,  and  the  hook  suggests  new 
points  of  view  even  to  well-read  students  of  the  Civil  War 
and  Reconstruction  Periods  in  the  United  States. 

Constance  Warren's  new  book,  "The  Phoenix,"  is  al- 
most ready,  is  a  society  tale  with  Boston,  both  Back  Bay 
and  the  smart  summer  colony  of  the  North  Shore,  as  the 
background.  The  heroine  is  a  petted  American  girl,  un- 
used to  self-denial,  and  the  story  tells  how  she  met  a 
great  disappointment,  makes  a  great  mistake,  all  but  suc- 
cumbs to  a  great  temptation,  but  at  last  finds  a  solution 
of  her  problem  and  the  answer  to  her  questionings  in  a 
hospital  on  a  French  front. 

An  emotional  and  strongly  imaginative  novel,  entitled 
"Edith  Bonham,"  by  Mary  Hallock  Foote,  is  to  come 
this  month.  It  is  a  story  of  family  life  and  middle-aged 
romance. 

In  April  "The  Ford,"  by  Mary  Austin,  will  be  issued. 
It  is  a  tale  of  California,  and  it  is  said  that  she  does  for 
that  wonderful  land  what  Phillpotts  has  done  for  Corn- 
wall and  Devon. 
38 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


RICHARD  MARSH 

Richard  Marsh,  whose  picture  is  reproduced  herewith 
through  the  courtesy  of  Putnam's,  has  given  us  a  very 
line  tale  in  his  latest  book,  "The  Beetle,"  a  present-day 
novel,  but  connected,  through  a  sect  that  has  continued 
through  the  ages  to  perform  its  loathsome,  barbaric  rites 
in  the  obscurity  of  an  Eastern  village;  with  the  very  dawn 


RICHARD  MARSH 

of  history.  This  sect  uses  as  the  instrument  of  its  ven- 
geance, upon  one  who  has  for  an  unforgivable  offence 
been  singled  out  for  slow  and  cruel  destruction,  a  form 
of  torment  that  is  with  him  as  an  actual,  living  presence 
or  as  a  dreaded  intruder  by  night  and  iby  day,  at  his  ris- 
ing up  and  at  his  lying  down,  and  from  which  escape 
.-eems  impossible. 

WILDFIRE 

From  Musson's  comes  "Zane  Grey's"  new  novel 
•'Wildfire."  This  author  has  written  many  fine  novels 
but  nothing  that  excels  this  story.  In  literary  quality  and 
delineation  of  a  wild  country  and  rugged  people  this  book 
is  one  of  high  merit  as  it  is  for  its  high  dramatic  power. 

Zane  Grey  has  written  of  wonderful  horses  before,  but 
Wildfire  outruns  them  all.  He  has  written  often  of  men 
and  women  who  loved  adventure  and  had  their  fill  of  it, 
but  here  in  this  story  of  a  Centaur  community,  the  ad- 
ventures and  passions  of  his  characters  are  as  natural  in 
the  wild  country  in  which  they  lived  as  the  adventures  and 
passions  told  by  primitive  peoples  in  fabled  Greece. 

A  CHAPLIN  PAINTING  BOOK 

A  novelty  book  being  shown  this  season  by  Thomas 
Allen  is  "Charlie  Chaplin's  Comic  Papers,"  series  I,  being 
a  book  of  carricature  in  black  and  white  showing  the  only 
Charlie  in  a  multitudinous  variety  of  adventures.  The 
idea  is  to  have  the  child  complete  the  pictures  by  painting 
in  the  colors  and  the  instructions  include  points  about 
mixing  colors,  how  to  hold  the  brush,  clean  brushes  after 
using  and  other  helps  for  the  little  artist. 

PERIODICAL  NOTES 

"British  Supremacy,"  is  a  new  weekly  published  by 
the  Aldine  Publishing  Company,  London,  England,  which 
advocates  British  supremacy  at  sea,  on  land,  in  the  air, 
and  in  the  markets  of  the  world.  Its  retail  price  is  20c  an 
issue. 


WILLIAM  DE  MORGAN 

William  Frend  de  Morgan,  whose  death  occurred  on 
January  Hi,  at  his  late  home  in  Chelsea,  England,  was 
born  on  November  Hi,  18.'S9,  the  son  of  Augustus  and  Sophia 
Elizabeth  de  Morgan,  his  father  being  at  the  time  Profes- 
sor of  Mathematics  in  University  College,  T>ondon.  He 
was  educated  at  University  College  School  and  College. 
Gower  street,  and  married,  in  1888,  Evelyn  Pickering,  an 
artist,  daughter  of  Percival  Andree  Pickering,  Q.C.  He 
was  a  student  at  the  Royal  Academy  in  1859,  having 
adopted  art  as  a  profession.  After  spendirig  some  years  in 
stained  glass"  and  ceramic  work,  during  which  time  his  ex- 
periments attracted  some  attention  among  artists,  he  com- 
menced in  1905  as  a  writer  of  fiction,  when  he  was  sixty- 
six  years  of  age.  His  first  book,  "Joseph  Vance,"  which 
embodied  the  observations  of  almost  a  lifetime,  was  an 
instantaneous  success,  but  his  later  publications,  while 
well  received,  were  not  considered  to  have  the  high  literary 
merit  of  his  first  effort.  Among  these  were  ''Alice  for 
Short,"  "Somehow  Good"  and  "It  Can  Never  Happen 
Again." 

A  CORRESPONDENCE  HANDBOOK 

Eleanora  Banks  has  written  a  book  entitled  "Put- 
nam's Correspondence  Handbook,"  which  is  designated 
as  a  work  of  reference  designed  to  promote  efficiency  in 
business  correspondence.  The  book  contains  260  page-, 
and  is  bound  in  seal  grain  leather  with  gold  lettering  and 
red  edges.  It  opens  with  an  analysis  of  the  art  of  busi- 
ness letter  writing,  and  deals  with  the  various  steps  which 
must,  be  taken  in  the  construction  of  the  properly  made 
business  letter.  A  number  of  model  forms  are  given,  re- 
produced in  typewriter  type.  The  book  discusses  figures 
and  signs,  the  possessive  case,  plurals,  official  titles. 
Roman  Catholic  titles,  compound  words,  capitalization, 
punctuation,  abbreviations  and  contractions,  speeling  and 
other  pertinent  subjects,  including  the  making  of  certain 
familiar  legal  documents,  wills,  etc. 

BEST  SHORT  STORIES 

Edward  J.  O'Brien  does  good  work  each  year  in  com- 
piling a  volume  containing  his  selection  of  the 
best  short  stories  of  the  year  representing  the  work  of 
American  writers.  The  title  of  the  volume  just  published 
hy  the  Musson  Book  Co.,  is  "The  Best  Short  Stories  of 
1916  and  Year  Book  of  the  Anlerican  Short  Story. ' ' 

This  new  volume  contains  a  brief  critical  analysis  of 
the  best  fifty  American  short  stories  with  the  greater 
part  of  the  attention  paid  to  what  Mr.  O'Brien  considers 
the  twenty  best  stories  appearing  in  American  magazines 
last  year. 

NEW  FAIRY  TALES 

Typical  Norse  tales  of  witch,  ogre,  and  Troll,  those 
lineal  descendants  of  the  Frost  Giants,  who  are  perpetually 
scheming  mischief  against  the  race  of  men  are  included  in 
G.  W.  Dasent's  book  of  fairy  tales  entitled  "East  o'  the 
Sun  and  West  o'  the  Moon." 

Stories  are  told  of  the  lonely  princess  on  her  mountain 
of  glass  awaiting  him  who  dare  ride  up  its  glassy  slopes ; 
of  the  giant  who  had  hidden  his  heart  so  securely  that  he 
felt  confident  none  could  find  it  and  of  men  turned  through 
magic  into  bears,  ducks  or  stones.  It  is  a  great  book  to 
delight  the  imagination  of  children.  It  has  just  been  pub- 
lished by  the  Putnam's. 

READS  ALMOST  EVERY  WORD 

Moncton,  N.S.,  Feb.  19, 1917. 
Am  enclosing  the  dollar  for  another  year  of  BOOK- 
SELLER AND  STATIONER.     I  read  almost  every  word 
in  it  from  month  to  month  and  could  not  do  without  it-  - 
Success  to  you. 

Sincerely  yours,    HATTIE  TWEEDIE. 
39 


HOOKS  E  L  \.  E  K     AND     STATIONER 


LESLIE  MOORE 

The  author  of  "The  Peacock  Feather"  ;m<l  other  tine 
books  has  just  gives  us  a  new  novel  entitled,  "Antony 
Gray-Gardener,''  previously  announced  as  "Where 
There's  a  Will  There's. a  Way."  This  author  has  a  grow- 
ing following  of  Canadian  readers.  Through  the  courtesy 
of  the  Putnam's,  a  half-tone  reproduction  of  a  recent 
photograph  is  reproduced  herewith. 


LESLIE  MOORE 

A.  C.  BENSON 

It  has  just  been  announced  that  the  author  of  the  re- 
cently issued  book,  "Father  Payne,''  is  A.  C.  Benson, 
whose  photograph  is  reproduced  herewith,  through  the 
favor  of  his  publishers,  the  Putnam's.  In  explaining  his 
reason  for  publishing  the  book  anonvmouslv,  Mr.  Benson 


A.  C.   BENSON 

rays:  "I  have  myself  always  had  a  secret  inclination  to 
publish  my  books  anonymously,  and  I  have  published 
seven  of  my  books  so,  four  of  which  have  been,  from  the 
point  of  view  of  circulation,  the  most  successful  books  I 
have  written:  "The  Upton  Letters,"  "The  College  Win- 
dow,"  "The    House    of  Quiet."    and   "The    Thread    of 


did  "  The  advantage  ot  anonymous  publication  is  that 
tlie  hook  is  judged  on  its  own  merits,  and  owes  no  thins: 
to  the  writer's  position  or  friends. 

BPJEF  NOTES  ABOUT  BOOKS 

"Wilt  Thou  Torchy,"  is  the  title  of  still  another  book 
about  the  ubiquitous,  slangy,  red-headed  office  boy  by 
means  of  whom,  the  author,  Sewell  Ford,  has  entertained 
thousands  of  readers  who  will  welcome  these  further  ad- 
ventures of  Torchy. 

Elizabeth  Dejean 's  novel,  "The  Tiger's  Coat,"  which 
has  appeared  serially  in  an  American  magazine  will  be 
brought  out  in  book  form  shortly.  It  is  not  a  tale  of  the 
jungle  but  deals  with  modern  American  life  in  an  American 
Western  city. 

"Woman,"  by  Vance  Thompson  is  a  new  book  written 
in  this  author's  characteristic  vein  which  is  bound  to  occa- 
sion considerable  discussion  but  a  significant  point  in  con- 
sidering its  merits  is  the  fact  that  it  is  receiving  favorable 
comment,  even  from  ardent  feminists. 

A  Canadian  edition  of  Father  Ryan  's  Poems  has  just 
appeared. 

A  second  edition  of  Rev.  Professor  Law's  "The  Grand 
Adventure,"  has  been  published. 

George  Allen  &  Unwin  of  London,  have  established  a 
quarterly  to  be  called  "The  Polish  Review."  The  first 
number  contains  articles  on  the  Polish  situation  created 
by  the  recent  German  proclamation. 

From  Cecil  Palmer  and  Hayward  comes  a  new  edition 
of  Eden  Phillpotts'  "The  Girl  and  the  Faun,"  with  decor- 
ated pages  and  four  colored  plates  by  Frank  Brangwvn. 
A.R.A. 

Richard  C.  Cabot's  remarkable  volume  "What  Men 
Live  By,"  will  be  recalled  by  booksellers  because  of  the 
success  it  scored  and  this  adds  all  the  more  interest  to  his 
new  book  just  out  entitled:  "A  Layman's  Handbook  of 
Medicine."  It  is  a  book  for  everyone  interested  in  pre- 
serving his  health  and  highest  efficiency.  For  social  work- 
ers, teachers,  employers,  and  any  one  else  in  any  way 
responsible  for  the  health  of  others,  it  will  prove  invalu- 
able. 

A  new  book  by  Conrad  will  be  published  in  April,  under 
the  title  of  "The  Shadow  Line." 

Cleek  is  back  again.  The  title  of  Thomas  Hanshaw's 
posthumous  book  is  " Cleek 's  Government  Cases." 

It  is  announced  that  a  nine  volume  edition  of  Selma 
Lagerlof 's  works  which  will  be  issued  in  pocket  size,  bound 
in  green  limp  leather,  will  be  known  as  "The  Northland 
Edition." 

The  heroine  of  Sophie  Kerr's  new  novel  "The  Blue 
Envelope,"  was  "a  clinging  vine  sort  of  flapper  possessing 
the  initiative  of  a  jellyfish,  until  a  rude  awakening  took 
her  from  the  heights  of  a  social  career  to  the  depths  of  a 
struggling  stenographer's  life  in  New  York."  The  author 
takes  her  own  story  in  hand  and  leads  the  reader  through 
amazing  adventures  in  business,  in  the  boarding  house, 
with  international  spies  playing  a  conspicuous  part.  Ro- 
mance leavens  the  tale. 

The  first  book  by  Sir  Rabindranath  Tagore  since  his 
visit  to  America,  is  a  play,  entitled  "The  Cycle  of  Spring. " 
This  play  was  recently  performed  in  the  courtyard  of  the 
author's  Calcutta  home,  by  the  masters  and  boys  of 
Tauore's  school  at  Bolpur.  The  success  was  immense  and 
naturally,  for  the  spirit  of  the  play  is  the  spirit  of  uni- 
versal youth,  filled  with  laughter  and  lyric  fervor,  jest  and 
pathos  and  resurgence.  It  will  be  found  to  be  a  welcome 
addition  to  Mr.  Tagore 's  popular  series  of  volumes. 

Wilfrid  Wilson  Gibson,  the  English  poet,  who  came  to 
America  recently  on  a  lecture  tour,  has  published  a  new 
book  entitled,  "Livelihood."     This  is  a  volume  of  poems 
— "Dramatic  Reveries"  the  author  calls  them — the  sub- 
jects of  which  are  drawn  from  the  lives  of  working  people. 
40 


m 


PUBLIC  LIBRARY  NEWS 


f 


LIBRARY  WORK  AMONG  CHILDREN 

What  the  Public  Libraries  of  Toronto  Are  Accomplishing 

With  Incidental  Mention  of  a  "Bonne  Entente" 

REMARKABLY  good    work   is   done   by   the   Toronto 
Public  Library  in  connection  with  the  children's  de- 
partment and  an  idea  of  the  extent  of  activities  in 
this  connection  may  be  gathered  from  the  fact  that  ten 
members  of  the  staff  devoted  their  entire  attention  to  this 
branch  of  the  work. 

Dealing  with  this  subject  it  is  interesting  to  quote  the 
following  from  the  annual  report  of  the  chief  librarian, 
Dr.  Locke : — 

"The  work  among  Boys' and  Girls  continues  to  develop 
and  expand  beyond  even  my  sanguine  prophecies.  The 
figures  of  circulation  of  books  for  the  five-year  period  just 
closing  show  this  in  a  very  practical  form.  In  1912  the 
number-  of  books  circulating  among  boys  and  girls  was 
90,958;  in  1913  it  was  108,495;  in  1914  it  was  187,188;  in 
1915  it  was  249,260;  and  in  1916  it  was  287,351.  But  as 
far-reaching  and  in  some  respects  even  more  important 
in  the  present  unsettled  state  of  our  national  affairs  is  the 
great  National  Movement  which  we  have  undertaken  in 
our  children's  department  in  what  are  known  as  our  Na- 
tional story  hours,  where  to  15,000  children  during  the 
past  year  our  story-telling  staff  told  of  the  early  history 
of  our  country,  of  its  discoverers,  its  explorers,  its  settlers, 
its  early  rulers,  its  inhabitants;  indeed,  during  a  period  of 
now  three  years,  it  has  been  conducting  a  "Bonne  En- 
tente" with  boys  and  girls  of  our  city  to  whom  the  names 
and  work  of  Carticr,  Ohamplain,  Frontenac,  Radisson, 
La  Salle  and  their  compatriots  have  taken  on  a  new  signifi- 
cance, and  the  result  of  which  is  that  the  new  generation 
will  have  a  Canadian  historical  background  which  has  been 
so  sadly  lacking  in  the  generation  of  to-day.  This  is  real 
national  service,  the  results  of  which  are  not  so  obvious, 
apparent,  or  socially  distinctive  as  they  are  far-reaching, 
deep  and  abiding." 


At  the  annual  meeting  of  the  Sarnia  Public  Library 
Board,  the  librarian,  Miss  Harkness,  reported  the  total 
'issue  of  books  for  1916  as  44,419  volumes,  of  which  10,567 
were  in  the  juvenile  class.  The  number  of  readers  at  the 
close  of  the  year,  3,220,  an  increase  of  862. 

During  the  year  1,739  new  books  had  been  placed  on  the 
shelves,  of  which  707  were  fiction.  J.  B.  Dagan  is  chair- 
man for  1917. 

The  Walkerville  Public  Library  Board  elected  James 
S.  Evans,  chairman  for  1917.  Estimates  for  the  year  were 
passed  amounting  to  $3,486. 

.John  Turnbull  succeeds  N.  B.  Gash  as  chairman  of  the 
Toronto  Public  Library  Board.  At  the  first  board  meeting 
for  1917  estimates  placed  at  $147,100  were  passed  to  be 
submitted  for  the  approval  of  the  City  Council. 

J.  A.  MacFarlane  is  the  new  chairman  of  the  Hamilton 
Public  Library  for  the  ensuing  year. 

Lt.-Col.  Grafton  was  re-elected  chairman  of  the  Dundas 
Public  Library. 

Winnipeg  Public  Libraries  issued  fifty  per  cent,  more 


books  of  history  in  1916  than  in  the  previous  year  and 
there  was  a  large  decrease  in  the  reading  of  fiction.  Total 
issues  of  books  during  1916,  247,701.  Alderman  Gray  is 
library  chairman  for  1917. 

From  the  Windsor  Public  Library  comes  sixteen-page 
booklet,  giving  the  twenty-second  annual  report.  Some 
facts  gleaned  from  it  follow:  Total  number  of  books  in 
library,  27,267;  added  in  1916,  1,726;  books  issued  to 
readers  in  1916^  111,604;  borrowers'  cards  in  force,  3,838. 
The  1916-1917  chairman  is  J.  E.  D 'Avignon.; 

The  Toronto  city  council  has  been  requested  by  the 
London  city  council  to  join  in  an  application  for  legislation 
to  give  municipal  councils  full  control  over  the  appoint- 
ments of  members  to  the  Public  Library  Board  and  other 
municipal  bodies,  and  to  amend  the  estimates  of  outside 
bodies  so  that  the  expenditure  can  be  better  conserved. 

The  annual  meeting  of  the  Mimico  Public  Library 
Board  was  held  on  Feb.  6.  C.  Price-Green  was  elected 
chairman  of  the  board  for  1917.  The  annual  statement 
showed  800  readers,  and  a  circulation  of  1,800  books  dur- 
ing the  year. 

R.  J.  Fletcher  has  retired  from  the  Public  Library 
Board  of  Barrie,  Ont.,  after  serving  as  a  member  of  that 
body  for  twenty-five  years. 

At  the  Orillia  Public  Library's  annual  meeting  these 
officers  were  elected:  President,  Bruce  Murphy;  secre- 
tary, J.  B.  Henderson;  treasurer,  G.  A.  Cole;  librarian. 
Miss  Redpath.  Reports  showed  a  total  of  356,  volumes 
added  in  1917.  The  total  circulation  was  20,770  adult  and 
3,729  juvenile  books.  There  is  now  a  total  of  6,398  books 
in  this  library. 

The  Public  Library  of  Port  Credit,  Ont.,  now  has  2,757 
volumes.  At  the  annual  meeting  on  Jan.  12,  Mrs.  John 
McClelland   was  re-elected  president. 

A  new  branch  library  in  Toronto  was  opened  in  January 
at  Yonge  Street  and  Albertus  Ave.,  North  Toronto.  This 
branch  starts  with  3,00'0  books.  Miss  Marjorie  Grundy  is 
librarian. 

The  new  Carnegie  Library  at  Barrie,  Ont.,  was  opened 
without  ceremony  on  Tuesday,  Feb.  6. 

INCREASING  INTEREST  IN  CANADA 

As  an  evidence  of  the  increasing  interest  being  taken 
by  the  United  States  in  Canada,  consequent  perhaps  upon 
the  Dominion 's  participation  in  the  war,  Harvard  Univer- 
sity has  decided  to  devote  a  special  branch  of  its  library 
to  Canadian  history  and  literature.  Mr.  Clarence  M. 
Warner,  ex-president  of  the  Ontario  Historical  Society. 
has  been  appointed  an  officer  of  the  University  in  charge 
of  the  branch.  Mr.  Warner  removed  recently  from  Nap- 
anee,  Ont.,  to  Boston,  where  he  is  head  of  a  bond  business. 

LENDING  LIBRARY 

Gundy 's  Bookstore,  of  St.  Thomas,  advertised  their 
lending  library  in  newspaper  spa<je  recently,  the  message 
being:  "Fifty  cents  makes  you  a  member  of  our  Library. 
We  have  only  the  newest  and  best  fiction.  Why  pay  $1.50 
for  a  book  when  you  can  read  it  for  4c',  or  10c.  Think 
it  over. 


41 


BO OK SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


"The  Way  of  the  Wind"  is  a  strong  new  novel  by 
Kugenia  Brooks  Frothingham,  and,  like  her  previous 
stories,  is  a  New  England  tale.  New  England  character 
is   an    open   book   to   Miss  Frothingham,  and  this   under- 


Eugenia   Brooks   Frothingham. 

standing  enables  her  to  present  an  impressive  presenta- 
tion of  her  subject.  This  new  love  story  is  an  intensely 
appealing  one. 


PACKARD'S  NEW  NOVEL 

Frank  L.  Packard  has  a  new  novel  this  season,  entitled 
"The  Adventures. of  Jimmy  Dale,  or  the  Gray  Seal."  The 
chief  characters  are  a  millionaire  bachelor-about-town,  an 
Mast  Side  habitue,  a  benevolent  cracksman,  and  a  mysteri- 
ous woman.  It  is  a  detective  story,  and  the  claim  is  made 
tor  it  that  it  ranks  with  "The  Adventures  of  Sherlock 
Holmes." 

"A  Canadian  Farm  Mystery,  or  Pain,  the  Pioneer," 
is  the  title  of  Bessie  Marchmant's  latest  story.  Miss 
Marchmant  has  been  aptly  styled  "The  Girls'  Henty." 
The  book  has  fine  illustrations  by  Cyprus  Cuneo,  who  did 
the  pictures  for  the  same  author's  success  of  last  year, 
"Joyce  Harrington's  Trust." 

"Letters  to  a  Young  Housekeeper,"  by  Jane  Prince. 
gives  useful  instructions  on  household  economy,  the 
budget,  the  specific  duties  of  servants,  and  other  matters 
pertaining  to  home  management.  It  is  written  in  letter 
form,  and  is  full  of  practical  suggestions  of  value  and 
inspiration. 

"Lines  Long  and  Short,"  by  Henry  B.  Fuller,  is  in 
essence  a  collection  of  short  stories  in  verse,  brief  etch- 
ings, so  to  speak,  of  typical  American  careers  and  charac- 
ters, situations  and  events.  A  sort  of  Hogarthian  touch 
is  most  effective. 

Word  is  anxiously  being  awaited  by  McClelland,  Good- 
child  &  Stewart  regarding  the  arrival  of  the  ship  now  on 
the  Atlantic,  on  which  are  shipments,  including  second 
editions  of  two  war  books' — "The  Battles  of  the  Somme" 
and  "A  Student  in  Arms  '' 


The  Free  Use  of  a  Public  Library 

Some  of  the  Advantages  Set  Forth — Booksellers  Should  Actively  Support  This  Object 

Alymer  Public  Library  a  Good  Example 


THOMAS  HAMMOND,  of  Aylmer,  has  been  contri- 
buting some   very   fine   articles   to   the   St.    Thomas 
"Times"  and  one  of  the  most  recent  of  these  treats 
upon  the  advantages  of  the  free  use  of  a  public  library. 
In  this  article  he  deals  particularly  with  the  public  library 
of  Aylmer. 

For  a  small  town,  Aylmer  has  one  of  the  best  library 
buildings  in  the  country  and  it  comprises  about  7,000 
volumes.  The  building  was  completed  four  years  ago  at  a 
cost  of  $8,600,  of  which  $8,000  was  a  grant  from  the  Car- 
negie fund.  Mr.  Hammond  in  his  article  points  out  thai 
about  $400  a  year  is  spent  on  new  books  and  $80  in  maga- 
zines, by  the  Aylmer  Library  Board.  He  pays  a  fine  trib- 
ute to  the  librarian,  Mrs.  G.  H.  Haight,  who  has  filled  that 
position  since  the  new  library  was  established.  "Her  ad- 
vice in  directing  the  reading  of  the  less  experienced  is  of 
first  importance  in  the  success  of  this  institution." 

The  following  are  the  members  of  the  Library  Board: 
D.  R.  McGregor,  chairman;  W.  W.  Rutherford,  B.A.,  sec- 
retary; E.  W.  R.  Hill,  J.  J.  Nairn,  Dr.  F.  H.  Miller,  Dr. 
Chas.  Sinclair,  Mayor  H.  H.  Wright. 

Coming  to  the  general  features  of  Mr.  Hammond's 
article,  one  that  will  interest  educationists  particularly, 
is  his  reference  to  the  value  of  a  public  library  in  co- 
ordination with  public  and  high  schools.  This  ideal,  he 
states,  has  been  realized  in  Aylmer,  where  the  teachers 
make  free  use  of  the  public  library  by  directing  and  en- 
couraging pupils  to  supplement  the  work  of  the  teacher 
by  patronizing  the  library,  making  the  latter  an  integral 
part  of  the  educational  system. 

"The  two  fe&tures  of  a  teacher's  influence  that  are  of 
the  most  importance  to  the  child  usually  are  the  least  con- 


sidered by  the  parent,  namely:  the  teacher's  personal  in- 
fluence on  the  child's  character,  and  his  ability  to  inspire 
in  the  child  a  thirst  for  knowledge,  or  love  for  good  read- 
ing— himself  being  an  index  pointing  to  such  reading 
matter  as  will  be  uplifting  and  educative.  This  done,  the 
pupil  remains  still  a  student  after  he  has  delivered  his 
valedictory  to  his  school  and  during  life  he  is  not  only  a 
student  but  is  in  possession  of  those  higher  intellectual 
pleasures  that  make  life  worth  while." 

Booksellers  will  appreciate  that  such  influence  as  this, 
exerted  by  public  libraries,  will  tend  to  bring  about  a  wider 
demand  for  books  and,  if  for  no  more  lofty  motive  than 
the  benefit  to  the  book  trade  in  dollars  and  cents,  they 
should  be  most  active  in  promoting  results  such  as  those, 
being  realized  in  Aylmer.  \ 

The  writer  draws  special  attention  to  the  advantages 
to  the  general  public  of  the  free  use  of  a  public  library  and 
he  tells  of  books  covering  important  subjects  which  inter- 
ested persons  may  find  in  the  public  library,  thus  bringing 
to  their  aid  the  results  of  the  work  of  the  world's  greatest 
thinkers. 

"In  directing  the  reading  of  boys  and  girls,  biography 
should  have  a  prominent  place.  No  other  class  of  literature 
is  so  inspiring  to  the  young.  The  girl  that  reads  the  life  of 
Florence  Nightingale  may  not  want  to  become  a  nurse,  but 
she  will  have  an  inspiration  to  sacrifice  herself  for  others, 
and  the  boy  who  reads  the  biography  of  Lincoln,  or  the 
story  entitled  "Up  from  Slavery,"  which  is  the  auto- 
biography of  that  colored  man  Booker  T.  Washington,  the 
"Moses  of  the  South,"  will  be  inspired  with  an  ambition 

to  be  something  worth  while." 

42 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Monthly    Record   of   New 
Books 

Published  by  Firms    Established  in  Canada 


THOMAS  ALLEN 
Fiction 

The  Way  of  the  Wind,  Eugenia  Brooks  Frothingham, 
cloth,  $1.40;  The  Long-  Journey,  Elsie  Sing-master,  cloth, 
$1.25;  Limpy,  William  Johnston,  cloth,  $1.35. 
Non-Fiction 

Getting  Together,  Ian  Hay,  cloth,  50c;  Out  Where  the 
West  Begins,  Arthur  Chapman,  cloth,  $1.25. 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stewart 

Fiction 

Oh,  Mary,  Be  Careful !  George  Weston,  $1;  The  Un- 
welcome Man,  Waldo  Frank,  $1.50;  Fellow  Captives, 
Sarah  N.  Cleghorn,  $1.25;  Pelle,  the  Conqueror:  Day- 
break, Martin  Anderson  Nexo,  $1.50;  Lucile  Triumphant, 
Elizabeth  M.  Duffield,  $1;  Tom  Strong  Third,  Alfred 
Bishop  Mason,  $1.30;  Anne,  Princess  of  Everything, 
Blanche  Elizabeth  Wade,  $1. 

Non-Fiction 

John  Webster  and  the  Elizabethan  Drama,  Rupert 
Brooke,  $1.50;  The  Soul  of  the  War,  12th  edition,  Philip 
Gibbs,  $1;  From  the  St.  Lawrence  to  the  Yser,  Frederic 
C.  Curry,  $1.25;  The  Battles  of  the  Somme,  Philip  Gibbs, 
$1.50;  The  Grand  Adventure,  second  edition,  Rev.  Robert 
Law,  D.D.,  $1.25;  Official  Automobile  Blue  Book,  Vol.  6, 
Southern  States,  $3;  My  Second  Year  of  the  Great  War, 
Frederick  Palmer,  $1.50;  Father  Ryan's  Poems,  $1.50; 
The  War  and  Humanity,  James  M.  Beck,  LL.D.,  $1.50; 
Chapters  From  My  Official  Life,  Sir  C.  Rivers  Wilson, 
$3.50;  Of  Water  and  the  Spirit,  Margaret  Prescott  Mon- 
tague, 50c;  A  Student  in  Arms,  Donald  Hankey,  $1.50: 
Only  a  Dog,  Bertha  Whitridge  Smith,  $1;  Boy  Scout  New 
Testament,  khaki,  40e;  Y.M.C.A.  Testament,  khaki,  40c; 
Pocket  League  New  Testament,  khaki,  40c. 

CASSELL  &  CO.,  LTD. 

Fiction 
Frailty,  Olive  Wadsley,  cloth,  $1.25;  Martin  Valliant, 
Warwick  Deeping,  cloth,  $1.25.' 

Non-Fiction 
Nothing  Matters,  H.  Beerbohm  Tree,  cloth,  $1.50  net; 
Life  Story  of  Will  Crooks,  George  How,  cloth,  35c  net; 
Sir  William  Robertson,  G.  A.  Leask,  cloth,  35c  net. 

OXFORD   UNIVERSITY   PRESS 
Fiction 

The  Klondike  Clan,  S.  Hall  Young,  cloth,  $1.35  net; 
In  Spacious  Times,  J.  Huntley  McCarthy,  cloth,  $1.35 
net;  The  Honest  Lawyer,  V.  McFadden,  cloth,  $1.25;  The 
Invisible  Balance  Sheet,  Katrina  Trask,  cloth,  $1.40  net; 
The  Bathing  Man,  Agnes  Gwynne,  cloth,  $1.25;  The 
Dancing  Hours,  Harold  Ohlson,  cloth,  $1.25;  Jimmy's 
Wife,  Jessie  Champion,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Hampstead 
Mystery,  Watson  &  Rees,  cloth,  $1.25;  Afraid,  Sidnev 
Park,  cloth,  $1.25.. 

Non-Fiction 

Gallipoli,  John  Masefield,  cloth,  75c;  Canada  Chaps, 
J.  G.  Sime,  cloth,  50c ;  The  Battle  of  Jutland  Bank,  C.  S. 
Terry,  paper,  20c;  Poems,  Alan  Seeger,  cloth,  $1.25  net; 
The  Pol.  History  of  France,  M.  O.  Davis,  cloth,  85c  net; 
Democracy  and  Empire,  A.  E.  Duchesne,  cloth,  85c  net  • 
Br.  Col.  Policy,  1783-1915,  C.  H.  Currey,  cloth,  85c  net; 
An  Historical  Atlas  of  Modern  Europe,  1789-1914,  G.  G. 
Robertson     and    J.    G.     Bartholomew,   cloth,    $1.25;    The 


Human  Tragedy,  Anatole  France,  cloth,  $3.50;  A  Book  of 
Burlesques,  H.  L.  Mencken,  cloth,  $1.25  net;  Pencraft, 
Win.  Watson,  cloth,  $1  net;  Retrogression  and  Other 
Poems,  Wm.  Watson,  cloth,  $1.25  net;  A  Hoosier  Holi- 
day, Theodore  Dreiser,  cloth,  $3  net;  The  New  Hazell 
Annual  and  Almanac,  1917,  T.  A.  Ingram,  cloth,  $1.25  net; 
The  Shakespeare  Apocrypha,  C.  F.  T.  Brooke,  cloth,  $1.25; 
The  Rudiments  of  Criticism,  E.  A.  Greening  Lamborn, 
cloth,  75c  net. 

THE  MACMILLAN  COMPANY 
Fiction 
Sea   Warfare,   Rudyard   Kipling,   cloth,   $1.50;    Three 
Short  Plays,  Mary  S.  Watts,  cloth,  $1.25;  Highways  and 
Byways  in  Nottinghamshire,  cloth,  $1.75;  Plays  From  an 
Irish  Theatre,  W.  B.  Yeats,  cloth,  $3;  I  Sometimes  Think, 
Stephen   Paget,   cloth  $1.50 ;    Household   Accounting   and 
Economies,  W.  A.  Sheaffer,  cloth,  65c. 
Non-Fiction 
The   Principles   of  Insurance,   Vol.   I.,   Fire,  Vol.   II., 
Fire,  W.  F.  Gephaet,  cloth,  $1.50;  The  Celtic  Dawn,  L.  R. 
Morris,  cloth,  $1.50;  Fundamental  Questions,  H.  C.  King, 
cloth,  $1.50. 

Juvenile 
How  Man  Makes  Markets  (Everychild  Series),  W.  B. 
Werthner,  cloth,  40c;  Spanish  Reader  of  South  American 
History,  E.  W.  Supple,  cloth,  $1;  The  Home  and  the 
Family  (Home-making-  Series),  Kinne  and  Cooley,  cloth. 
80c;  Jim  and  Peggy  at  Meadow  Brook  Farm,  W.  C. 
O'Kane,  cloth,  60c. 

WM.    BRIGGS 
Fiction 
Little   Grey   Ships,   J.   J.   Bell,   cloth,   75e;   Beautiful 
Alien,  Silas  Hocking,  cloth,  $1.25. 
Non-Fiction 
The  Making  of  Micky  McGhee,  R.  W.  Campbell,  called 
"the  Scotch  Kipling,"  cloth,  $1. 

GEORGE  J.  McLEOD,  LTD. 
Fiction 
Brandon  of  the  Engineers,  Harold  Bindloss,  cloth, 
$1.35;  The  Thoroughbred,  Henry  Kitchell  Webster,  cloth. 
$1.35;  The  Postmaster's  Daughter,  Louis  Tracy,  cloth. 
$1.35;  Too  Much  Efficiency,  E.  J.  Rath,  cloth,  $1.35; 
Mountain  Madness,  Anna  Alice  Chapin,  cloth,  $1.35;  Wilt 
Thou  Torchy,  Sewill  Ford,  cloth,  $1.35;  The  Man  Next 
Door,  Emerson  Hough,  cloth,  $1.50. 

THE  COPP,  CLARK  CO. 
Fiction 
The  Adventures  of  Jimmie  Dale,  Frank  L.  Packard, 
cloth,  $1.35;  Dabney  Todd,  Frank  N.  Westcott,  cloth, 
$1.35  net;  The  Mark  of  Cain,  Carolyn  Wells,  cloth,  $1.35 
net;  The  Blue  Envelope,  Sophie  Kerr,  cloth,  $1.35  net"; 
Cleed's  Government  Cases,  Thomas  W.  Hanshaw,  cloth, 
$1.35  net. 

Non-Fiction 
A  Heap  o'  Livin',  Edgar  A.  Guest,  cloth,  $1.25. 
J.  M.  DENT  &  SONS 
Fiction 
Where  Runs  the  River,  Henrietta  Leslie,  cloth.  $1.50. 

Non-Fiction 
The   Necessity   of   Christ,   Dr.    W.   E.    Orchard,   cloth, 
75c;   Pebbles  on  the  Shore,  Aloha   of  the  Ploutrh,  Way- 
farers'  Library,  35c;   Across  France  in  War-time,  Fitz- 
water    Wray    (Kuklos),    Wayfarers'    Library,    35c;    The 
Judgment  of  the  Orient,  Kung  Yuan  Ku'suli,  cloth.  35c; 
Patriotism  and  the  Fellowship  of  the  Nations,  F.  Melian 
Stowell,  cloth,  35c;  Armenian  Legends  and  Poems.  Zabelle 
C.  Boyajian,  cloth,  $6 ;  Lucretius,  of  the  Nature  of  Things, 
translated  by  W.  E.  Leonard,  cloth,  $1.35. 
Juvenile 
The  Fairy  Gold   Stories,  paper  10c,  stiff  boards  25c; 
Poetry  for  Children,  Kenneth  Grahame.  cloth,  $1  05 
43 


DEVICE  TO  PROTECT  CHARGE  RECORDS 

After  years  of  experimenting,  the  National  Cash  Re- 
gister Co.  has -perfected  q  credil  file,  which  fnrnishes  a 
means  of  attaining  the  maximum  speed  in  handling  credit 
transactions,  and  provides  a  locked  compartment  for  the 
storage  of  sales  slips  until  the  accounts  are  settled.  Thus, 
the  proprietor  has  complete  control  over  his  charge  ac- 
counts. This  lucked  compartment  has  a  glass  cover,  con- 
stantly exposing  to  the  view  of  the  proprietor  and  em- 
ployees the  amount  owned  on  each  customer's  account, 
hut  the  records  covering  these  accounts  are  accessible  only 
to  the  one  who  has  the  key  to  the  locked  compartment. 

A  bell  rings  each  time  the  file  is  operated  and  a  num- 
ber counter  adds  one  each  time  the  glass  cover  is  closed. 

The  protective  features  are  as  nearly  complete  as 
pussihle.  The  sales  slip  are  placed  in  a  daily  file  by  the 
clerk  or  other  person  who  has'  to  do  with  the  original 
credit  transaction.  This  keeps  each  day's  credit  business 
separate  from  those  of  previous  days  and  furnishes  the 
proprietor  an  abolute  check  on  all  these  records. 

At  the  end  of  the  day  the  credit  slips  are  transferred 
to  the  locked  section  of  the  file,  where  they  are  accessible 
only  to  the  proprietor  of  the  business  or  someone  to  whom 
this  responsibility  has  been  delegated. 

NEW  GLASS  DESK  PAD 

A  new  glass  desk  pad  has  just  been  put  out  by  the 
Ravensword  Office  Specialty  Co.,  of  Chicago,  has  a  base 
made  of  heavy,  well  seasoned  board,  permitting  the  pad 
to  be  moved  about  without  disturbing  data  appearing 
under  the  glass.  The  board  is  covered  with  grained,  green 
colored  paper.  Attached  to  the  frame  or  pad  are  four 
corners,  made   from   genuine   brass,   with    brushed    finish. 


Placed  inside  the  frame  is  heavy  plate  glass,  the  edges 
of  which  are  ground  and  highly  polished.  To  permit  the 
ilass  to  he  raised  and  lowered,  with  little  effort,  for  the 
purpose  of  placing  or  removing  data,  a  half  circle  in  the 
centre  of  two  sides  of  the  pad  has  been  placed  in  order  to 
accomplish  this  purpose  without  removing  the  glass  desk 
pad. 

SOME  NEW  GAMES 

A  new  game  which  t he  Copp,  Clark  Co.  have  intro- 
duced this  year  includes  "Crack  the  Coon,*'  a  reproduc- 
tion of  the  familiar  midway  attraction,  wherein  those 
who  fancy  themselves  as  good  marksmen  with  baseballs 
are  permitted  to  heave  the  spheres  at  the  hard  cranium 
of  a  son  of  Ham.  Another  new  one  is  "Rolleo,"  "a 
Monte  Carlo  hall  game."  "Midway  Fun"  is  a  game  in 
which  celluloid  halls  are  used  to  knock  down  a  set  of 
pawns  similar  to  midway  outfit,  wherein  baseballs  are 
thrown  at  dolls  for  cigars.  The  same  firm  is  this  year 
making  a  new  line  of  criblbage  boards  in  eight  styles — 
some  in  leather  and  leatherette  cases  running  from  half  a 
dollar  to  .f2.50  retail.  They  have  been  designed  to  re- 
place the  German  productions  freely  sold  in  Canada  be- 
fore the  war. 


A  CHECK  SORTER 

An  illustration  is  shown  here  of  the  Kohlhaus  check 
sorter  which  is  an  efficient  new  office  specialty  introduced 
by  the  Kohlhaus  Co.,  of  Chicago.  This  device  measures 
4x0x8  inches,  and  accommodates  1,000  checks  in  this 
space.  It  is  portable,  so  that  it  can  be  carried  about 
wherever  one  wishes.  It  is  sectional,  and  can  be  ex- 
tended as  much  as  desired.  Its  self-locking  feature  makes 
it  possible  to  lock  the  sorter  at  any  point,  and  a  passing 


breeze  or  draft  cannot  disturb  your  eheeks.  It  may  he 
indexed  in  any  manner — by  letters,  numbers  or  words. 
Best  of  all,  it  does  away  with-  the  old  method  of  scatter- 
ing checks  all  over  desks  and  counters,  or  through  pigeon 
holes. 

FELT  PADS  FOR  INKWELLS 

The  Polar  Manufacturing  Company  of  Philadelphia, 
Pa.,  has  introduced  a  new  specialty  in  the  way  of  felt  pads 
in  green,  brown  and  maroon,  with  crinkled  edges,  for  use 
under  inkstand  bases,  desk  lamps,  letter  trays,  card  index- 
drawers,  etc.  These  range  in  size  from  4x4  to  10  x  14 
inches.  The  retail  prices  range  from  8c  to  70c  on  the  re- 
gular sizes. 

"TIPTAX" 

Buntin,  Gillies  &  Co.  have  introduced  a  new  line  of 
thumb  tacks  known  as  "Tiptax, "  as  shown  in  the  accom- 
panying illustration.     They  are  made  of  cold-rolled  steel. 

"51 


and  come  with  metal  or  enamel  finish.  There  are  a  dozen 
packages  in  a  carton,  the  packages  retailing  at  5  cents. 
They  will  appeal   strongly  for  use  in  mounting  cards  or 

photos. 


44 


I J  ( )  O K S E  L  L E  R     AND     STATIONER 


Weld  on  Roberts 

Rubber  Erasers 


A  flue  eraser  is  a  fine  tool.      The   constant   user  appreciates   an    eraser    that    will    neither    smear    nor    .stain;    that    wil 

erase  easily   and    perfectly;   that   will   All   his   particular   purpose:   that  will   retain  its  character.  , 

There   are   68   difference   styles    (degrees    of   hardness,    pliability,  texture,  shn<pe,  etc.)   of  WELD1IN   ROBERTS  erasers 

Gael)  is  better  fitted  for  some  particular  use  than  any   of  the  others.     The  varied   requirements  of  artists,  accountants 

draftsmen,   engineers,   librarians,   typists   and   students  are   met  exactly  by  some  one  of  them. 

It  will   well   repay   the  stationer  to   familiarize   himself  with    the   merits  of  every   style.      Fullest    details   ou    request. 


WELDON  ROBERTS    RUBBER  CO.  office  &  works  NEWARK,  N.J.  (ISA. 


t^u  &*/  *si%£ ' £& 


The  constantly  increasing  sale  of  "A.A." 
Fountain  Pens  in  Canada  is  the  best  proof 
of  their   popularity. 

Many  Canadian  dealers  stock  and  pusih 
these  pens  because  of  the  following 
FACTS : 

They   are   profitable,  to   handle. 
They  give  uniform  and  continued  satisfac- 
tion. 

They  are  made  in  such  a  range  and 
variety  of  styles  and  sizes  that  it  is  easy 
to  quickly  please  the  most  fastidious  cus- 
tomer. 

We  will  furnish  attractive  display  cases 
free.  Each  case  contains  an  assortment  of 
Self-fillers,  Lower  End  Joint,  Middle  Joint, 
and    Safety   Fountain    Pens. 

Write  to  your  local  jobber  ot    to  us  for 
prices,   catalogue  and  trade  discounts 

ARTHUR  A.  WATERMAN  &  CO. 


36  THAMES  ST. 


Established  1895 


NEW  YORK  CITY 


Not  connected  with  the 
L.  E.  WATERMAN  CO. 


To  everyone  who  uses  a  Loose 
Leaf   System  you  can  sell  the 

"F-B" 
Loose  Leaf  Holder 


Pat.   May   13,   1913 

Keeps  his  old  records  in  permanent  form  instead  of 
lying  around  in  disorderly  bundles. 

Permits  quick  and  easy  reference.  Practical  and  low- 
priced  Adjustable  to  fit  any  size  of  paper,  or  whatever 
the  location  of  punch  holes. 

Send  to-day  for  prices  and  particulars. 
ROCKHILL  &  VIETOR,  Sole  Agents,  Dep't  "F-B" 

(Branch:  180  N.  Market  St.,  Chicago)     22  Cliff  St.,  New  York 


CLASSIFIED  ADVERTISING 


Advertisements  under  this  heading,  2c  per 
word   per  insertion. 

Where  replies  come  to  our  care  to  be  for- 
warded, five  cents  must  be  added  to  cost_to 
cover  postage,  etc. 


PAYSON'S  INDELIBLE  INK,  TRADE  SUP- 
plied  by  all  Leading  Wholesale  Drug  Houses 
in  the  Dominion.  Received  Highest  Award 
Medal  and  Diploma  at  Centennial,  Philadel- 
phia, 18T6;  World's  Fair,  Chicago,  1S93,  and 
Province  of  Quebec  Exposition,  Montreal,  1897. 


DEALERS  WANTED.— BOOKSELLERS  AND 
stationers  can  add  a  profitable  new  line  by 
featuring  Japanese  prints.  Get  further  par- 
ticulars by  communicating  with  "Jap-Art"  c/o 
Bookseller  and  Stationer.  143  University  Ave., 
Toronto. 


BRITISH      FIRM     MAKING      GAMES      AND 

toys  at  popular  prices,  need  agent  to  sell 
wholesale  houses  in  Canada.  Goods  are  up- 
to-date  and  sell  readily.  Write:  Games,  c|o 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  University  Avenue, 
Toronto. 


BRITISH  FIRM  OF  ART  PRINTERS  AND 
Publishers  with  extensive  and  up-to-date  line, 
need  agent  or  traveler  for  Canada.  Goods  sell 
to  stationers,  art  dealers,  picture  frame  manu- 
facturers, etc.  Write:  Pictures,  c|o  Bookseller 
and  Stationer,  University  Avenue,  Toronto. 


WANTED 


T3RITISH      OR      CANADIAN 
XJ   stationery     trade,     wanted 


LINE  FOR 
by  manufac- 
turers' agent  having  strong  connection  with 
trade  throughout  the  Dominion.  Would  de- 
vote whole  time  to  sufficiently  important  line 

as  straight   representative.     Box  ,   care  of 

Bookseller  and  Stationer. 


45 


I'.OdKsKLL  E  R  AND  STATIONER 


HOLD  THE  LINE 


(Registered) 


London  ( Eng. ) 
Export  Agency, 
8  St.  Bride  St., 
LONDON,  E.C. 


Here's  the  line  to  hold — 
John    Heath's    Telephone 
Pen.    You  will  not  hold  it 
long    because    it    sells    so 
quickly.     There's  quality 
about     it.       It    writes 
smoothly,  never  corrodes, 
and  lasts  long.     Get  con- 
nected with  the  Telephone 
Pen  for  quick  sales. 
Supplied 
by  all  the 
leading 
whole- 
sale 
houses   in 
Toronto 

and 
Montreal 


CARTER  INX 


Quality  Products 


embrace  a  line  of  inks, 
mucilage  and  paste 
which  is  unequalled.  It 
insures  a  steady  profit 
from  your  best  trade, 
and  does  away  with  all 
dissatisfaction. 


MADE  IN  CANADA 

The  Carter's  Ink  Co. 

356   St.   Antoine  Street  Montreal,  Que. 


Before  buying  a  fresh  stork  of  pens,  get 
samples  and  prices  of  the  famous 

"Rob  Roy" 
Pen 


It    Is 

made 

of     fine    steel 

writes     easily 

and   smoothly   and 

suits     almost     an  y 

hand.  "Rob   Roy"  l'ens 

are    made    in    one    of    the 

best     equipped     factories     in 

Birmingham,    Eng. — the    home   of 

the   pen-making  industry. 


the  popular  and 
quick-sell- 
ing pen 


Manufactured  by  the  proprietors  : 

Hinks,  Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,  Eng. 


Patented  Dec.  7,  1909 
•No.  777  1%   in.   wide,  and   only   1-16  in.   thick,  12  inches  long. 

Very  flexible,  double  brass  edges,  ready  for  use  either  side 
up.     Sixteenth  scale  on  one  side,  millimeter  scale  on  the  other. 

You   are   overlooking   a    good   one   if  you   do   not   earrv   our 
School   Flexible. 

WESTCOTT-JEWELL  CO.,  SE$\CAJ.££S- 

RULER  MAKERS  EXCLUSIVELY 


Fine  Inks  and  Adhesives 


FOR  THOSE 


WHO  KNOW 


Higgi 


ns 


Drawing  Inks 
Eternal  Writing  Ink 
Engrossing  Ink 
Taurine  Mucilage 
Photo  Mounter  Paste 
Drawing  Board  Paste 
Liquid  Paste 
Office  Paste 
Vegetable  Glue,  etc. 


Are   the   finest  and  best  Inks  and  Adhesives 

These  manufactures  have  a  unique  standing 
among  discriminating  consumers,  the  ready- 
money  kind  who  know  what  they  want  and  are 
willing  to  pay  for  it.  They  are  worth  cater- 
ing to. 

CHAS.  M.  HIGGINS  &  CO.,  Mfrs. 


Branches : 
Chicago,   London 


271   Ninth  St. 
BROOKLYN.  N.Y. 


TOY  PROFIT 


There  is  good  profit  in  a  line  of  Toys — besides, 
it  attracts  the  family  trade  and  that  is  the  kind 
that  pays. 

Successful  toymen  keep  posted  on  trade  happen- 
ings, new  articles,  new  ideas  of  salesmanship, 
and   window   dressing,   where   to   buy   stock,   etc. 


"PLAYTHINGS" 


each  month  has  all  the  news  of  the  toy  trade. 
Subscription  price  ONE  DOLLAR  AND  FIFTY 
CENTS  a  year  postpaid. 

Subscribe  now  and  join  those  who  are  keeping 
up-to-date  and  in  the  swim. 

A  sample  copy  free  if  requested. 


McCREADY  PUBLISHING  CO., 


118  East  28th  Street 
NEW  YORK 


46 


BOOKSELLER. AND  STATIONER 


rMnH.KMM 


DEVON 


LOOSE   SHEET  HOLDER 

P  SPECIALLY  adapted  to  Order,  Cheek- 
inj;'  and  Shipping  Departments  where 
only  one  side  of  sheet  is  used.  The  bottom 
is  not  hinged,  permitting  quick  removal  of 
contents.  The  covers  are  hekvy  binders 
board,  lined  with  press  board  to  give  flat 
writing  surface.  Holds  one  sheet  up  to  full 
capacity  of  %  inches.  Special  sizes  can  be 
made  up  to  1%  inches.  Office  men  devise 
their  own  uses  for  this  handy  office 
appliance. 

See  Catalog  F  for  Complete 
Table  of  Sizes. 


NATIONAL  BLANK  BOOK  CO. 

HOLYOKE,  MASS.,  U.S.A. 


Are  You  Selling 

Standard  Blotting? 


'I'n  .secure  the  lasting  confidence  of  your  most  par- 
ticular customers  you  should  stock  this  high-grade 
blotting.  Its  absorbency  and  durability  have  made 
it  a  general  favorite  everywhere. 

Standard  Blotting  is  made  of  selected 
cotton  stock — a  pure,  high-grade  blot- 
ting in  every  respect. 

Our   other    lines   include    "Imperial,''    "Sterling" 
plain  Blottings;  "Prismatic,"  "Curi-Curl,"  "Bank- 
er's Linen  Finish,"  Embossed  Blottings. 
"Royal    Worcester"    and    "Defender"    Enameled 
Blottings. 

We  are  the  largest  exclusive  manufacturers 
of  fine  blottings. 

Standard  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

Richmond,  Va.,  U.S.A. 


c^ARO-MAG 


GREETING  CARDS 


Made  in  Canada 

T  N  announcing  this  new  line  we  would  emphasize  the  fact  that  Christmas  Booklets  Predom- 
-1  iimte,jind  the  price  at  which  we  offer  these  new  cards,  together  with  their  artistic  merit, 
will  mean  much  for  Canadian  dealers  this  year. 

In  addition  to  booklets,  there  are  flat  cards  (plate  sunk)  and  novelty  designs  as  well. 

There  are  numerous  patriotic  designs!  in  this  Hue  collection  and  throughout,  .the  greetings  on  the 
inserts  are  steel  die  engraved. 


The  greetings  themselves,  i.e.,  the  wording,  are  specially  selected  for  Can- 
adian trade  in  keeping  with  conditions  in  Canada. 


A^\         Hff  T\  11      0         £^  ¥     *  *  J.  Manufacturers'  Representatives : 

.  K.  MaCUOUgall  &  LO.,  Limited,  266  king  st.w.,  Toronto 


47 


B  O  O  K  S  E  L  h  E  R     AND.ST  A  T10NER 


RELIABLE 
SERIES 


Sell  more  Christmas  Cards 

MADE  IN  ENGLAND 

Plan  ahead  for  a  bigger  and  better  Christmas  1917  business 
by  investigating  the  unusually  attractive  offerings  pro- 
duced by  the  well-known  firm  of 

Wm.  Ritchie  &  Sons,  Ltd. 

Edinburgh,  Scotland 

and  now  being  shown  by  all  the  principal  jobbing  houses. 

Canadian  Souvenir  Series 

ARE    PARTICULARLY   GOOD. 

The  Assortment  also  includes  attractive  designs  in  other  lines,  including 
juveniles,  off -set  work,  hand-colored  gravures,  winter  scenes,  birds, 
humorous,  art  lettering  and  script  die-stamped  numbers.  Cards  to 
retail  from  3c  to  25c  each. 

Don't  miss  these  values.    They'll  make 
your  Christmas  card  trade  a  big  success. 

Aubrey  O.  Hurst,  32  Front  St.  W.,  Toronto 


FELT  AND  LEATHER 


PACIFIC     PENNANT 
&  NOVELTY  CO.   244-46  new  hichTt 


PILLOW  TOPS 

VELTIES— SEWN  AND  REPRO 

PENNANTS 


NOVELTIES— SEWN  AND  REPRODUCTION. 


"NEW- 
STUFFED  FELT 
BULLDOGS  AND  CATS 


UNBREAKABLE 

DRESSED  DOLLS 

ALL  SIZES-ALL  PRICES 


V7"/^VT     "Q      X\l  A  "MT^Q    are  many  nere   below.     Use  the  want 
1  V-r  tJ  -Lv      VV  i~\l\l   J.  C3    ad.  page  and  get  rid  of  a  few  of  them. 


Mil 


The 

TERRY 

Pen    or.  Pencil    Clip 

— a  practical  idea  with  a  con- 
stant growing  demand. 


Send  for 
and 


sample 
terms 


(British)    Patented 
and  Registered 


Herbert  Terry  &  Sons,  Ltd 

The   Spring    and    Presswork    Specialists 
KEDDITCH  ::  ENGLAND 


XF  YOU  WANT  SOME- 
THING AND  DON'T 
KNOW  WHERE  TO  GET 
IT— WRITE  US— WE'LL 
TELL  YOU. 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 
Special  Service    Department 


48 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


Let  the  Moore  Push- Pin 
Girl  Sell  For  You. 

This  clever  little  sales  girl,  appear- 
ing in  lending  'magazines,  is  creating 
,i  wonderful  demand  everywhere,  and 
Mj:  profits  for  yon. 

We   will  send   one  for  your  Counter  FRBE. 

Moore  Push-Pins 

fflass     Hearts,    Steel    Points 

Moore  Push-less  Hangers 

The  Hanger  with   the  Twist 
Our   advertising   appropriation   has   been    in- 
creafied     many      thousands     of     dollars     to 
quickly    move    these    popular    and    profitable 
Moore   l'usl.  devices. 

Sold  in  handy  10c.  packets. 
Free   samples,    Booklets,    Prices    on    Request. 

Moore  Push-Pin  Co.,  p^/d^.X 


The  "Hy the"  Series  of  Aids  to  Training" 

(Being  a  Series  of  Lectures  to  Young  Officers) 

No.      1-INFANTRV. 

Drill  and  Attack. 

No.      .'-IXFANTRY. 

Defe-nee   and    Protection. 

No.     3— INFANTRY. 

Night   Operations.      Inter-communication. 
Reconnaissance;   and   Questions   on   Infantry 
Training. 

Xo.     4 — MUSKETRY. 

Parts  of  Rifle  and  Action  of  Mechanism.  Care 
of  Arms  and  Ammunition,  Daily  Cleaning  and 
Examination    of    Arms. 

Xo.     5— MUSKETRY. 

Aiming  Instruction   and    Trigger   Pressing. 

No.     0— MUSKETRY. 

Firing  Instruction.  Landscape  Targets  and 
Visual    Training.      Fire    Control    and    Discipline. 

No.      7— MUSKETRY. 

Range  Finding.  Observation  of  Fire.  Fire 
Control  and   Discipline  and   Sub-Target  Machine. 

No.     8 — MUSKETRY. 

Tests  of  Elementary  Training.  Range  Prac- 
tices,   etc. 

Xo.     !) — MUSKETRY. 

Barr    and    Stroud    Range    Finder. 

No.    10— MUSKETRY. 

Theory   of   Rifle   Fire. 

No.    11— HYGIENE    and    SANITATION. 

Disease.  Hygiene  of  the  Body.  Sanitation. 
Training.  Organization  of  Medical  Units.  First 
-Aid. 

Xo.   13 — FIELD   ENGINEERING. 

Explosives.  Arranging  for  Explosives.  Demoli- 
tions.     Bombs.      Gas    Attack.      Bridging. 

25c.   EACH. 

Ail   Fully   Illustrated. 

other    numbers    will    include    Discipline    and     Military 
Law,    Procedure  of  Courts   Martial,   etc. 

W.   S.   PAINE  &  CO.,   Military  Publishers 
HYTHE.  KENT 

McClelland,  goodchild  &  stewart,  Ltd. 

266  King  Street  West.  TORONTO.  CANADA 


ARTISTS  MATERIALS 


We  carry  a  complete  line  of  Artists  Materials 
Agents  for  Winsor  &  Newton,  London,  Eng. 

A.  RAM  SAY  &  SON   C° 

ESTD.   1842.    MONTREAL. 


The  McKinley  Edition  of 
Ten-Cent  Music 

will  always  hold  first  place  as  an  Edition  of 
Standard,   Classic  and  Teaching  Music. 

An  established  demand  for  this  line  of  music 
exists  throughout  the  United  States  and  Canada. 
It  meets  the  requirements  of  the  Teacher,  Stu- 
dent and  the  Accomplished  Musician. 

It  has  proved  itself,  to  thousands  of  dealers,  to 
be-  the  best  foundation  for  a  sheet  music  de- 
partment. 

Every  copy  of  The  McKinley  Edition  sold  means 
a  profit  of  over  200%  to  the  dealer. 
The    McKinley    Edition    (Kevised    for    our    Can- 
adian   Trade)     conforms    in    every    detail    with 
Canadian   copyright  laws. 

A  great  advantage  to  the  merchant  as  a  "Trade 
Bringer"  is  the  catalogues  bearing  the  dealers' 
"imprint  which  are  supplied  with  this  Edition. 
These  catalogues  will  attract  more  customers  to 
your  store  than  any  other  medium  you  could 
employ. 

Write  us  for  Samples  and  Particulars  to-day. 
Also  we  want  you  to  know   our  Jobbing  De- 
partment is  one  of  the  largest  and  most  complete 
in  the  country.    We  can  take  care  of  your  wants 
for  anything  in  Sheet  Music. 

McKINLEY  MUSIC  COMPANY 

The  Largest  "Exclusively  Sheet  Music  House" 

in  the  World. 

CHICAGO:     1501-15    EAST    FIFTY-FIFTH    STREET 


POLAR  PRACTICAL  OFFICE  ARTICLES  SELL  QUICKLY 

AT  LIBERAL   PROFITS 

Every  Dealer  Should  Keep  Posted  at  all  Times 
About  Our  Entire   Line.     New  Items  Are  Being 
Added  Continually. 
Some  of  our  other  practical  office  articles 
which    all    dealers    should    know    about: 
Polar  Desk  Calendar. 

"      Pocket    Index    Card   Cases. 

"      Cut      Glass      Paper      Weights      and 

Trays. 
"      Side   Desk   Drawer  Tray. 

Paper   Weight   and    Memo    Pad. 
Penknife   and    Ink    Eraser   Blade. 
Signature    Blotter    Book. 
Valuable    Paper    Wallet. 
Furniture   Top   Protectors. 
Typewriter    Shock    Absorber   Pad. 
"      Felt    Mats. 

A   Liberal  Discount   to  the  Trade. 
Dealers,  write  for  complete  information 


GLASS  DESK   PAD 
No   0—15x18  No.  1 


18x24 


No.  2-20x34 


CENTER  DESK 
DRAWER  TRAY 


For  Assorting  Pins, 
Clips.  Rubber  Bands 


Polar  Manufacturing1  Co., 


101 

No.   ' 


DESK  REMINDER 

£ES%Si  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


49 


MOO  K  S  EL  I,  E  R      A  N  I)     ST  A  T  LONER 


Prosperity  and  pro- 
nounced business  activity 
stimulate  a  demand  for 
quality  goods.  You  can- 
not fill  this  demand  unless 
you  stock 


G 


ranes 


The  Correct  Writing  Paper 


Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike  Co. 

Pittsfield,  Massachusetts 
Toronto  Office:  266-268  King  St.  W. 


OPPORTUNITY 


For  an  aggressive 
man  to  handle  Can- 
adian business  of  a  well 
known  house  manu- 
facturing saleable 
stationery  specialties. 

Send  applications  to 
"  Opportunity,"  care 
of  Bookseller  &  Sta- 
tioner, 143  University 
Ave.,  Toronto,  Can. 


DO  NOT  MISS  THESE 


The  premier  liiie  of  America  in  CHRISTMAS  AND  NEW  YEAR'S  GREETING  CARDS,  is  that  of  WHITING  & 
COOK,  INC.,  of  Holyoke,  Mass.  Steel  Die  Engraved.  Embossed.  Hand  Colored.  A  money-making  line  for  Retailers. 
Nothing  Finer  Produced.  This  line  includes  Easter,  and  Birthday  Cards  and  greetings  for  various  other  occasions,  as 
well  as  Birth  Notices,  Funeral   Not  ires,   Wedding  Invitations,  Congratulations,  Condolences,  etc. 


GEORGE  RIDOUT  &   COMPANY, 


77  YORK   STREET,  TORONTO,  CANADA 


THE  WASHBURNE  "O.K." 

PAPER  FASTENERS 


00& 

UlP  N°2B 

The  Washburne  "O.K."'  Paper  Fasteners  are 
easily  put  on  or  taken  off  with  the  thumb  and 
finger;  can  be  used  repeatedly  and  '  'they  always 
Work.  "  Brassin  brass  boxes  of  100  fasteners  each. 
Holds  with  a  Sleeve  Protected  Point  that  Pierces 
Atlracl;cc,  Compact,  Strong,  no  slipping  —  never  I ! 

On  in  a  flash  —  "Bull  Dog"  grip 


THE  RIES  "O.K."  LETTER  OPENER 

75  $>  Time  Saved — Handy  —  Easy  to  Operate 

No  Adjustments  —  Always  in  Order 

Guaranteed  Two  Years 

Hand  and  Electric  Driven  Power  Machines 


THE  SANITARY  "O.K."  ERASERS 

The  Most  Practical  Erasers  for  Everybody 


Model  B.„ 


The  Ries  '  '0.  K.  "  Letter  Opener  has  the  advan- 
tage of  few  parts.  It  removes  only  ten  one  thou- 
sandths of  an  inch  from  the  envelope,  therefore, 
the  liability  of  cutting  enclosures  is  virtually  impos- 
sible. Made  in  3  sizes,  each  size  adapted  to  easy 
handling  for  desk  use,  average  weight  6  lbs. 


The  Sanitary  "O.K."  Eraser  includes  an  Adjust- 
able Metal  Holder  which  keeps  Rubber  Clean,  Firm 
and  Keen-edged;  works  belter  and  lasts  longer. 
Two  Rubbers  are  made.one  for  Typewriter  and  Ink, 
one  for  Pencil.  By  slight  pressure  clean  Rubber  is 
fed  down  until  used;  its  narrow  edge  allows  a  letter 
or  a  line  to  be  erased  without  injuring  another. 


GOLD  MEDAL  AWARDS!     PANAMA-PACIFIC    INTERNATIONAL    EXPOSITION 

These  products  wherever  shown,  receive  the  highest  endorsement  whether  at  expositions  or  in  the  offices  or  business  men 
"O.K."  Products  are  high  grade  and  universal  sellers  — We  control  all  patent  rights.    rJ~~Q^ 

Full  particulars,  illustrative  and  descriptive  literature  on  request.     Liberal  Discounts 

THE  O.  K.  MFG.  CO.,  SYRACUSE,  N.Y.,  U.S.A.    sole  makers  | 

50 


BOOKS  E LI E  R     A  NO     S T  A T  T  0 N E R 


Our  Travellers 


are  out  covering  Canada 
from  Ocean  to  Ocean  with 
the  Greatest  line  of  Fast 
Selling  Specialties  we  have 
ever  shown. 

See  them  when  they  call. 

A  New  Catalogue  just  off 
the  Press. 

A  copy  for  your  name  mi  a 
post  card. 

It's  well  worth  having. 


PUGH  SPECIALTY  CO. 

LIMITED 
Specialists  in  Specialties 


38-42  Clifford  St., 


Toronto,  Canada 


ABOUT  STAMP  PADS 
MR.  STATIONER! 

Are  YOU  getting  your  full  share  of  this 
profitable  business?  Why  not  combine 
supreme  satisfaction  to  your  customers 
with  liberal  profits  for  yourself? 

The  "FULTON"  Self-Inking 
Stamp  Pad 

Seven  Sizes — Six  Colors 
STANDARD. 

The  "FULTON"  Non-Blurring 
Wood  Pad 

Three  Sizes — Six  Colors 

The  Best  Pad  on  the  Market — Giving 
the  Highest  Percentage  of  Stamp  Pad 
Satisfaction. 

By   all  means  write   TO-DAY 
for  Price  List  No.  34. 

FULTON  SPECIALTY  COMPANY 

Formerly  Fulton  Rubber  Type  Company 
128-142  Fulton  Street,       ELIZABETH,  N.J. 


"Standard" 

—  the    brand    of    quality 
in    Bound    Blank    Books 


- 


The  most  critical  office 
executive  in  your  town 
will  recognize  in  the 
'  •  Standard  ' '  line  of  Hound 
Blank  Hooks  the  embodi 
incut  of  practical  effici 
eiicy,  just  the  right  idea 
lor  the  modern  up-to-the- 
minute  business  office. 

Dealers  handling  the  Standard  Hound  Books 
find  them  reliable  eustomer-satisfiers.    They 

know  that  the  Standard  brand  is  a  guaran- 
tee of  a  better  blank  book  business  and 
that  Standard  profits  are  well  worth  while. 

Try  them  in  your  own  store  and  note  their 
selling  value. 


Boorum   and   Pease  Co. 

Makers  of  " Standard"  Blank  Books 
and  Loose  Leaf  De-vices 

HOME  OFFICE  : 

Front  Street  and  Hudson  Avenue    Brooklyn,  N.Y. 
Factories:   Brooklyn,  NY.,  St.  Louis,  Mo. 


, ., './•.V,--.V„ii;  ■,!.,;..  ■■ 


ANTI-DUST 


.J.:;:,:.-: 


COMPRESSED  CRAYON 

Your  stock  is  not 
complete  unless 
you  carry — 

GOLD  MEDAL 
CRAYONS 

"for  every  use" 


Write  us  for  free 
sample  line  and 
illustrated  catalog. 


Binney&  Smith 
Company 

81-83  Fulton  Street 
New  York 


SCHOOLWCRAYONS 

FOR  EDucAT  C0L0Bjf0RK 


51 


lilHI    l\    ,>    i\    I,    l  j  l\   Ji.        i\   IN   U        >    1     .\     J     J    U    .N    I.    li 


BUYERS'   GUIDE 


MADE 


CANADA 

ADDING  MACHINE  ROLLS 

More  profit  for  the  dealer. 
Write  us  lor  samples  and  prices. 

MONARCH  PAPER  CO.,  Limited 

Manufacturers  419  King  St.  W.,"  Toronto 


T          ^ 

1  (L 

1  'KisHHflH 

1 

1 

L. 

MANUFACTURERS  OF 

Die   Stamped    and 

Engraved 

Greeting  Cards 

329    Craig    Street    West 
MONTREAL 


LOOSE-LEAF 
METALS 


De  Luxe  Line  Metals  are  used  in  everjv 
civilized  country  in  the  world.  We  make- 
all  kinds.      Write  for  Catalogue  No.  32. 

WILSON-JONES  LOOSE  LEAF  CO. 

CHICAGO  .*.  NEW  YORK 


Wycil  &  Company 

85  Fulton   Street,   New  York  City 

carry  a  large  stock  of 

German,  French,  Spanish 
and  Italian  Grammars 

of  the 

Gaspey-Otto-Sauer  Series 
Liberal  Discounts  to  the  Trade 


Wonder  Soap  Bubbler 

Blows   Double,   Chains,   Clusters,   Etc. 

INDESTRUCTIBLE.     PROFITS  80.  to   100 

Write  for  Samples   and  Prices 

BRADWAY  NOVELTY  CO. 

1    West  Broadway,       -        NEW  YORK  CITY 


ART    SUPPLIES. 

Artists'   Supply  Co.,   77   York  St.,  Toronto. 
A.   Hamsay   &  Son  Co.,  Montreal. 

BLOTTING    PAPERS. 
The    Albemarle  Paper  Co.,   Richmond,   Va. 
Eutou-Dikeman    Co.,   Lee,   Mass. 
Standard    Paper    Mfg.    Co.,    Richmond,    Va. 

BLANK     BOOKS. 
I'.oorum  &  Pease  Co.,  Brooklyn,   N.Y. 
Brown   Bros.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Buntin,    Gillies    &    Co.,    Hamilton. 
W.    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
National   Blank   Book   Co.,   Holyoke,   Mass. 
The  Copp,   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Toronto. 
CHRISTMAS    AND    PICTURE    POST    CARDS. 
JSirn  Bros.,  266  King  St.  W.,  Toronto. 
A.  O.  Hurst,  Canadian  representative,  32  Front 

St.  W.,  Toronto. 
J.  H.  Jost,  Halifax,  N.S. 
Menzies  &  Co.,  Toronto. 
Ritchie  &   Sons,   Ltd.,   William. 
Valentine  &  Sons,  Toronto  and  Montreal. 

CODE  BOOKS. 
The    American    Code   Co.,    83    Nassau    St.,    New 

York. 

CRAYONS. 
Binney  &  Smith.  New  York. 
A.    R.    MacDoiiuall    &    Co..    206    Kins    St.    W., 

Toronto. 

EYELETTING    MACHINES 
Elbe   File   and    Binder   Co.   New    York,    N.Y. 
Ideal    Specialties  Mfg.    Corporation,   552   Pearl 

St.,   N.Y.   City. 

ENVELOPES. 

Brown   Bros.,   Limited,  Toronto. 

Buntin,   Gillies   &   Co.,    Hamilton. 

Copp,   Clark  Co.,   Toronto. 

W..    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
Menzies   &    Co.,   Limited,   Toronto. 
Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Toronto. 

ERASERS. 
St.   Mungo   Mfg.   Co.,  Glasgow,   Scotland. 
Weldon   Roberts   Rubber  Co.,   Newark,   N.J. 

FANCY   PAPERS.   TISSUES  AND  BOXES. 
Beveridge  Paper  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 
Dennison    Mfg.    Co.,    Boston. 
Menzies   &   Co.,   Toronto. 
A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    266    King    St.    W., 

Toronto. 

FOREIGN   TEXT  BOOKS. 
Wycil  &  Co.,  83  Fulton  St..  New  York. 

FOUNTAIN     PENS. 
Arthur  A.   Waterman   Co.,   Ltd.,   New   York 
Sanford    &    Bennett    Co.,    51-53    Maiden     Lane 

New    York. 
A.     R.    McDougall    &    Co..     266     King     St.     W.. 

Toronto. 
Paul  E.  Wirt  Co.,  Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Toronto, 

Canadian    Agents. 

INKS,  MUCILAGE  AND  GUMS. 
('has.   M.    Higgins  &  Co.,   Brooklyn,   N.» 
i'he  Carter's  Ink  Co.,   Montreal. 
W..    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
S.    S.    Stafford    Co.,    Toronto. 
"Gloy,"    A.    R.    MacDougall    &    Co.,    266    Klne 

St.    W.,    Toronto. 
"GInclne,"   Menzies   &   Co.,    Limited,   439   Klne 

St.  W.,  Toronto. 

INDELIBLE     INK. 
farter's    Ink   Co.,    Montreal. 
Payson's    Indelible    Ink. 
S.    S.   Stafford   Co..   Toronto. 

INKSTANDS. 
The  Sengbusch  Co.,  Milwaukee. 

LANGUAGE    BOOKS. 
Wycil    &    Co.,    S3   Fulton    Street.    New    York. 

LEAD    AND    COPYING    PENCILS. 
American   Pencil   Co.,   New   York. 
Wm.  Cane  &  Sons,  Newmarket.  Out. 
A.     R.    McDougall    &    Co.,     266    King     St.     W. 

Toronto.  . 

LOOSE    LEAF    BOOKS,    BINDERS    AND 
HOLDERS. 
'I'he   Brown   Bros.,   Ltd.,  Toronto. 
Booruin   &   Pease   Co.,    Brooklyn. 
r.untin,   Gillies   &   Co.,    Hamilton. 
W..    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto 

Winnipeg. 
The  Copp,  Ciark  Co.,  Toronto. 
Luckett     Loose    Leaf,     Limited,    215     Victoria 

St.,  Toronto. 
National   Blank   Book   Co..    Holvoke,   Mass. 
Roekhill  &  Victor,  22  Cliff  St.,  New  York  City. 
Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Toronto. 


THE  FAULTLESS  LINE 

OF  LOOSE  LEAF  METALS 

Most  complete  line  of  Ledger,  Sectional 
Post,  Solid  Post  and  other  Loose  Leaf 
Metals. 

On    request    to-day    our    Catalog    GC    and 
special    proposition. 

STATIONERS  LOOSE  LEAF  CO. 


342  Broadway 
203  Broadway 


Milwaukee,  Wis. 
New  York  City 


Beveridge  Paper   Co. 


17  St.  Therese  St.     -     Montreal 


Everything  in  Paper 


Specialty : 

FIBRE   BASKETS 
and  RECEPTACLES 

One  dollar  a  year  is 
all  it  costs  to  have  this 
publication  mailed  to 
your  address. 

Importers' 

Sterling  Advance 

Tables 

Invaluable  for 

Importers. 

Shows 

Sterling 

Value 

Converted  to 

Dollars  and  Cents 

From  2l/2% 

100%. 


Morton, Phillips  &  Co. 


PUBLISHERS 


115  Notre  Dame  St.   West     -      MONTREAL 


52 


BOOKS  1<;  J.I.  E  R     A  N  I)     S  T  A  T  I  ( )  N  E  H 


BUYERS'  GUIDE 


SCHOOL  XS 

RULERS 

Send  for  Samples  and 
Interesting  Prices 

Lucas-Tuttle  Mfg.  Co. 

Silver  Springs,  N.Y.  * 


HAVE  A  BETTER  BOOK  STORE 

We  make  show  cases,  counters, 
wall  cases,  shelving,  tables  and 
special  fixtures  for  all  lines  of 
retail    trade. 

Send    us    plans    and    spe- 
cifications   for    estimates. 

The  Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture 
Company,    Limited 

Kitchener,  Ontario 


The  1917  Issue  of 

Gale  &  Polden's 

BOOKS  OF  JOLLY  FUN 

for  the  Children 

will  be   sure   sellers. 
Send  for  Titles,  etc. 

2  Amen  Corner  -  London,  E.C. 


GILT  EDGE  AND 
BORDERED  CARDS 

Gold,  Silver,  and  Colored  Borders,  Be- 
velled and  Deckle  Edged  Cards  for  every 
kind  of  work.  Gilding,  Bevelling  and 
Bordering  to  the  trade. 

Send  for  Price  List 

JOHN  BRADFORD 

Card  Manufacturer 
70  LOMBARD  STREET  ,    TORONTO 


WATERSTON'S 


BEE 


BRAND 


SEALING  WAX 


factory: 
Warriston  Works,  Edinburgh,  Scotland 


Stationers'  Loose  Leaf  Co.,  203  Broadway, 
N.Y.,  and   Milwaukee,   Wis. 

Wilson-Jones  Loose  Leaf  Company,  3021  Car- 
roll Ave.,  Chicago;  129  Lafayette  St.,  New 
York. 

LEATHER  AND  FANCY  GOODS. 

Brown    Bros.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 

MAP     PUBLISHERS. 

Rand,    McNally    &    Co.,    Chicago. 
The   Copp,   Clark   Co.,   Toronto. 
The  Scarborough  Co.,  of  Canada,  Hamilton,  Ont. 

METAL  PARTS  FOR  LOOSE  LEAF 
BINDERS. 

Wilson-Jones  Loose  Leaf  Company,  3021  Oar- 
roll  Are.,  Chicago;  129  Lafayette  St.,  New 
York. 

MILITARY    SPECIALTIES 

Geo.  Clark,   Southam   Bldg.,   Montreal,  Que. 
I'ugh  .Specialty  Co.,  Toronto. 

NEWS    COMPANIES. 


Montreal,    Toronto,    Win- 


Imperial    News    Co., 

nipeg. 
Toronto    News   Co. 
Montreal  News  Co. 
Winnipeg    News    Co. 


PAPER    FASTENERS. 

Bump  Paper  Fastener  Co.,  La  Crosse,  Wis. 
Ideal    Specialties    Mfg.    Corp.,    552    Pearl    St., 

New   York   City. 
O.K.   Manufacturing  Co.,   Syracuse,   N.Y. 

PAPETERIES   AND    WRITING    PAPERS. 

Beveridge  Paper  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 

W.    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto, 

Winnipeg. 
The   Brown   Bros.,   Ltd.,   Toronto. 
Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Toronto. 

PLAYING     CARDS. 

Goodall's   English   Playing  Cards,   A.   O.   Hurst, 

32  Front  St.  W.,  Toronto. 
Men"zies  &   Co.,   Limited.   Toronto. 
U.  S.  Playing  Card  Co..  Toronto.  Canada. 

POST  CARDS,  GREETING  CARDS,  ETC. 

Ililrlesheimer,     Ltd.,     03,     Clerkenwell     Road, 

London,  E.C. 
A.  O.  Hurst,  Canadian  representative,  32  Front 

St.  W.,  Toronto. 
Philip  G.   Hunt  &   Co.,  332  Balaam   High   Rd., 

London    Eng. 
Pugh  Specialty  Co..  38-12  Clifford  St.,  Toronto. 
Ritchie  &   Sons,   Ltd.,   William. 
Valentine  &   Sons   Publishing  Co.,  Montreal 

SCHOOL    AND    OFFICE    RULERS 

T.ueas-Tuttle  Mf£.   Co..   Silver  Springs,   N.Y. 
The  Up-to-Date  Co.*  Canister,  N.Y. 
Weseott-Jewell  Co.,  Seneca  Falls,  N.Y. 

SHEET     MUSIC. 

Anglo-Canadian    Music    Pub.    Assn.,     144    Vic- 
toria  St.,   Toronto. 
('happen  Co.,  .'MS  Yonge  St..  Toronto. 
Hawkes  &  Harris  Co.,  Toronto 
MeKlnley   Music   Co.,   1501-15   East    Fifty-Fifth 
St.,   Chicago. 

STANDARD    COMMERCIAL   PUBLICATIONS. 

Morton,   Phillips   &  Co.,  Montreal. 

STATIONERS'   SUNDRIES. 

Beveridge  Paper  Co.,  Montreal,  Que. 

Brown      Bros.,      Ltd.,      Wholesale      Stationers, 

Toronto. 
Buntin.  Gillies  &  Co.,  Hamilton. 
The    Copp,    Clark    Co.,    Wnolesale    Stationers, 

Toronto. 
Clark  Bros.  &   Co.,  Ltd..  Winnipeg,  Man. 
W.    V.    Dawson,    Limited,    Montreal,    Toronto. 

Winnipeg. 
Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter,  Toronto. 

STEEL     WRITING     PENS. 

John    Heath,    8    St.    Bride    St.,    E.C,    London, 

Ilinks,  Wells  &  Co.,  Birmingham,   Eng. 

Esterbrook  Pen  Co.,  Brown  Bros.,  Ltd.,  Tor- 
onto,  Canadian    Representatives. 

A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co..  266  King  St.  W.. 
Toronto. 

Spencerian  Pen  Co.,  New  York,  N.Y. 


PICTURES  —  FRAMES  —  CRAYON  AND 
*-  Water  Go  lor  Portrait  Bnlargeraents-r- 
Statuary.  Everything  in  picture  framing 
outfits.  '  llSO.OO  will  start  you  in  a  profit- 
able line. 

Send  your  pictures  to  me.  I  will  frame 
t  In  in  a1  low  prices  if  "you  can't  do  so  your- 
self. 

Little  Wonder  9-inch   I'liunmiraph 
Bi  cordBj  $20.00  gross. 

G.  L.  IRISH 

499  Queen  Street  West,   Toronto 

PATRIOTIC  SONGS 

are  still  in  active  demand.  There  is 
good  profit  in  them.  We  supply  the 
following  at  8c. 

We'll    Never    Let    the    Old    Flag    Fall. 

The  most  successful  Canadian  song 
ever  published.  Over  100,000  copies 
sold 16c 

By  Order  of  the  King.  A  new  song 
by   the  same  composers.    16,000  sold     15c 

I'll  Not  Forget  You,  Soldier  Boy.  A 
very  popular  new  song.  4th  thousand     15c 

Our  Own  Canadian  Boys.  3rd  thou- 
sand ..-  -  -     15c 

Soldiers    of    the    King.     50,000    sold       -     15c 

Call  of  the  Motherland.  10th  thou- 
sand -  -  -  -  -     15c 

There's  a  Fight  Going  On.  7th  thou- 
sand ------     16c 

You  Bet  Your  Life,  We  All  Will  Go. 
2nd    thousand.      New         -         -         -     15« 


NEW 

Canada,  Fall  In 

On    to    Victory  -  -  -  -  - 

There's  a   Corner  of  the  Flag  for   You 
to  Hold  -  -  -  -  -        - 

Kiss   Your   Soldier  Boy   Good  bye 


15c 
15c 


15c 
15c 


ANGLO-CANADIAN-MUSIC  CO. 

144    Victoria    Street,    Toronto,    Ontario 


Waste  Paper  Balers 


The  "CLIMAX" 

Steel  Fireproof  Baler 

turns   your  waste  into 
profit. 

Made  in  12  sizes. 

Send  for  Catalogue. 

CLIMAX  BALER  CO. 

HAMILTON,   ONT. 


McFarlane  Son  & 
Hodgson,  Limited 

Wholesale  Stationers 
and    Paper  Dealers 

14  St.  Alexander  St.  -  Montreal 


TICKET   and  CONDUC- 
TOR PUNCHES 

the  best  made 

The  Fred  J.  Meyers  Mfg.  Co.' 

HAMILTON.  OHIO.  U.S.A. 


53 


!»,  ()  0  K  S  E  J.  LER     AND     S  T  A  TIONER 


BUYERS'  GUIDE 


RULERS 

"THE  UP-TO-DATE  LINE" 

A  complete  line  for  the  School  Supply  Dealer 
and  Stationer. 

Write  for  Samples  and  Prices. 

Up-To-Date  Advertising  Co. 

Dept.  C,  CANISTEO,  N.Y. 

T.  E.  TuttU,  Mer.  Ruler  Dept. 


MAPS 

We  can  supply  the  trade  with  anything  in 
the  map  line  as  well  as  undertake  any  kind  of 
Map-Making.  Road  Maps,  Motor  Guides, 
Commercial  Maps,  Atlases. 

The  Scarborough  Company, 
of  Canada,  Limited 


TALLY  CARDS.  DANCE  PROGRAMMES, 

\erdler,  Ltd.,  18  Christophei  St.,  London,  E.C. 

TYPEWRITER     RIBBONS     AND     CARBONS. 

i  it  tag  &  Volger,  Park  Ridge,  N.J. 

WASTE    PAPER    BASKETS 

Beverldge  Paper  Co.,  Montreal,  Quo. 


An  Advertisement 

in  the 

Buyers'  Guide 

Department 

will 

give   you    highly   effective 

publicity  at  minimum 

cost. 


The  Binder  of  Today 

Made  in  U.S.A. 

SPRING  BINDER 

•  Elbe  File  &  Binder  Co. 
97  Reade  St.,      New  York 


Ink- 
stands 

of  all  styles 

Manufactured  by 

FRANK  A.  WEEKS  MFG.  CO. 

93  John  St.,  NEW  YORK  CITY.  N.Y. 
Canadian  Jobbers  handle  our  lines. 


BLOTTING 
— the  World's   standard 


When  you   sell  ;i   customer  a  supply  of  World  Blot     . 
ting    you    give    him    the    highest   grade    blotting    ob- 
tainable.     The   absorbenoy   and   durability   of  World 
Blotting  has  met  with  the  unstinted  approval   of  the 
public   during    the    past    thirty    years. 

•'Hollywood"    and    "Reliance"   are   two   cheaper    lines, 
but  the  very   best   values  at   the   prices. 

A    trial    supply    will    convince   you    that    all    our   blot- 
tings   are   unequalled   sellers. 

The  Albemarle  Paper  Mfg.  Co. 

RICHMOND,  VA.,rU.S.A. 


The 

Hoosier  File 


A  neat,  thoroughly 
well  -  made     box  -  file. 
The  best  on  the  market  at  so 
low  a  price.     Covered  with 
hard-finished,   brown   fibre  paper,   has   good 
fastening  and  a  strong  Manila  index.  Leather 
pull  on  back.    Manila  index  held  in  place  by 
one  pin. 

Write  us  for  quotation. 

.The  9lcbe?Wcrimke  Qo.Ztb. 

STRATFORD,  ONT. 


Kindly   Mention    This   Paper    When    Writing;  Advertisers 


54 


BOO K  S ELLER     AN  D     R  T  A  T I  0 N E & 


Two-in-One 


The  New  Bump 


Twentieth 
Century 
Office 
Necessity 


Think  of  it  —  a 
p  a  p  e  r  fastener 
B  11  il  perforator 
all    in    one! 


A  fastener  that  will   neatly  and  automatically  fasten   from 

two  to  ten  papers,  making  the  tie  out   of  the  paper  itself. 

A  perforator  at   the  opposite  end   that  "ill  easily  punch  a 

round    hole  in   as   many   sheets   of  paper  as   can   be  inserted 

in   the  opening. 

.lust   a   pressure   with   the   palm   of   the   hand    and   the  work 

is   done. 

Every   office  will   find   use  for  one  or  more  of  these  simple 

and   practical   little   devices. 

Ketuils  at   $2.50.      It's   a  sure   seller.      Order   one   to-day    and 
try  it  for   fastening  your  letters. 

Bump  Paper  Fastener  Co. 

LACROSSE,  WIS.,  U.S.A. 
Canadian  Agents:    W.  J.  Gage  &  Co.,  Limited,  Toronto 


The 

Utmost 

in 

Loose  Leaf  Efficiency 


When  your  particular  customer  asks 
for  something  superior  in  Loose  Leaf 
devices  you  can  unhesitatingly  suggest 
any  of  the  Standard  Brand  line.  Their 
superiority  is  so  marked  that  but  little 
selling  effort  is  necessary  to  pull  good 
results. 

And  the  splendid  service  they'll  give 
will  bear  out  and  back  up  your  very 
best  recommendation.  For  the  Standard 
is  a  family  of  quick  sellers,  any  mem- 
ber of  which  will  bring  profit  and  repu- 
tation to  the  dealer  stocking  them. 
Try  them  out. 


Boorum  and  Pease  Co, 

Makers  of  "Standard"  Blank  Books  and 
Loose  Leaf  Devices 

Home  Office  : 
Front  St.  and  Hudson   Ave.,  Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Factories:  Brooklyn.  N.Y..  St.  Louis.  Mo. 


fw/v//////////y's;;;;//s;//^^^^ 


INDEX      TO     ADVERTISERS 


Albemarle  Paper  Co 54 

American  Pencil  Co 5 

Allen.    Titos 1!) 

Anglo-Canadian   Music  Co 53 

Baker.  Chas.  W 7 

Bartons    7 

Beveridge  Paper  Co 52 

Binnev  &  Smith   51 

Blackie  &  Son,  Ltd 10 

Boorum  &  Pease   51-55 

Bradway  Novelty  Co .\     52 

Brown   Bros 2 

Bump  Paper  Fastener  55 

Briggs,  Wm 4 

Buntin  Gillies  &  Co Back  cover 

Bradford,  John ^.  . .  .     53 

Canadian   Facts  Pul>.  Co 

Inside  back  cover 

Cane,  Wm.,  &  Sons  1+ 

Carter's  Ink  Co 40 

Climax  Baler  Co 53 

Christensen   &    Son   Co 20 

Copp,  Clark  Co 10 

Eaton,  Crane  &  Pike   40 

Eaton-Pikeman   16 

Elbe  File  &  Binder  Co 54 

Esterbrook  Pen  Mfg.  Co 7 

Fulton  Specialty  Co 51 

Gale  &  Polden    53 

Gilbert   Post   Card  Co 20 

Globe-Wernieke  54 


Goodall  &   Sons   1 

Heath,  John,  &  Co 46 

Iliggins  &  Co 46 

Hinks,    Wells   &   Co 46 

Hurst,  A.  0 1,  47 

Imperial  News  Co 17 

Irish,  G.   L 53 

Luekett  Loose  Leaf  Co 16 

Lucas-Tuttle    53 

MacLean's  Magazine 56 

McClelland,  Goodchild  &  Stewart 

9   and   20 

McCreadv  Pub.  Co 46 

McDougall.  A.   B.,  &  Co.   ...12,   13,  14 

McFarlane  Son  &  Hodgson 53 

McKinley  Music  Co 49 

Mittag  &  Volger  ...Inside  back  cover 

Menzies  &  Co.,  Ltd 3 

Meyers.  Fred.  J..  Mfg.  Co 53 

Monarch  Paper  Co 52 

Moore  Push   Pin  Co.  ■ 49 

Modellit  Mfg.  Co 7 

Morton  Phillips  Co 52 

Musson   Book   Co 22 

1 

National  Blank  Book  Co 48 

National  Cash  Register  Co 6 

Non-Shine    Pad    Co 14 

O.  K.  Mfg.  Co 


Opportunity     3° 

Pacific  Pennant  &  Co 48 

Packard  Bros 52 

Paine,  W.  S„  &  Co 49 

Polar  Mfg.  Co -19 

Pugh  Specialty  Co 51 

Ramsay   &  Co 49 

Ridout  &  Co.,  Geo 50 

Rockhill   &    Victor    45 

Samford  &  Bennett  Front  cover 

Scarborough  Co.  of  Canada    54 

Stafford,  S.  S.,  Inc.. Inside  back  cover 

Standard   Paper  Mfg.  Co 48 

Stationer's  Loose  Leaf  Co 52 

Terry,  Herbert  Co 48 

Times  Book  Club 5 

U.S.  Playing  Card  Co 8 

I'p-to-Date    54 

Valentine   &   Sons    18 

Warwick  Bros.  &  Rutter 

Inside  Front  Cover 

Waterman,  Arthur,  &  Co 45 

Waterston's  Sealing  Wax  53 

Walker  Bin  &  Store  Fixture  Co...  53 

Weldon  Roberts  Rubber  Co 45 

Westcott-Jewell    46 

Wilson- Jones  Loose  Leaf 52 

Weeks  Mfg.  Co 54 

Wycll  &  Co 52 


55 


BO OK SELLER     AND     STATIONEE 


W.  A.  Fraser  has 

come  back 


Yoi 
Frj 


()  U  re  in  e  in  1)  e  r  \V.  A. 
tscr,  the  brilliant  Cana- 
dian author  of  ^Mooswa," 
"thoroughbreds,"  "  Blood 
Lilies,"  and  other  good  stories  of  India  and  Canada?  Latterly  Mr.  Fraser's  literary  activity 
has  been  in  repose,  but  now  he  has  arranged  to  provide  MacLean's  Magazine  with  a  brand  new 
seiies  of  short  stories,  the  first  of  which,  "A  WANDERING  MUMMY,"  is  a  fine  tale  of  the 
Canadian  West,  with  an  East  Indian  strand  woven  into  it.  It  appears  in  the  April  MacLean's. 

V_>3.I13.C13.  is  producing  some  very  good  short-story  writers 
— new  ones  that  is.  We  have  Stringer,  MeFarlane,  Sullivan, 
Leacock,  Miss  Laut,  Roberts,  Seton,  Parker,  O'Higgins,  Patullo, 
L.  M.  Montgomery,  et  al,  of  international  fame;  and  a  new  lot 
breaking  into  the  greater  light.    One  of  these  newer  writers  is 

X_I  f^f^\^\  r\  q  ^A r\r\tm\^\i~\MQlf^  w4°  's  "coming  strong."  Mr.  Moorhouse  is  a  Manitoban,  and 
riUpiVlll^  IVlfJUl  llUUaC,  to  the  April  MacLean's  he  contributes  The  Centre  of  Gravity. 
"corking  good  stuff,"  to  use  the  language  of  the  Editor.  This  is  the  first  of  a  series  of  stories  featuring 
Andy  Doolin,  a  "character,"  keeper  of  a  saloon.  These  stories  are  of  the  boom  days  in  British  Columbia's 
gold  mining  history,  days  when  Jim  Crotty,  Dutch  McGee,  and  The  Parson,  desperadoes  all,  made  life  a 
catchy  thing  and  stirring. 

~\/TqT"'\7'     C^  Q  1 1  Tl  f"        a  new  contributor  to  MacLean's,  has  in  the  April  Number  a  short  story,  At  the 
l»A^ll  j      VJ <X\A  11  L^     Arrow  Forks,  a  tale  of  the  Yukon.     Miss  Gaunt  is  a  British  woman  who  knows 
her  Canada  well — from  sojourn,  visit  and  study. 

Jq  fYl  PC     W.        \~\  f^W  (\  t*"\7"V     ^s  a  well-known  writer  whose  90,000-word  serial  story  begins  in  the 
dlllCd     13.      I  1C11UI  y  A       \pril  MacLean's,  The  Gun-Brand,  is  of  the  Peace  River  Country, 
and  is  of  gun-runners,  Indians,  whiskey,  a  Hudson's  Bay  Company  post,  voyageurs,  and  a  dream  of  a  girl. 

Agnes  C.  Laut,  H.  F.  Gadsby  and  W.  A.  Craick 

are  contributors  to  the  April  MacLean's.  Each  contributes  a  special  article  of  great  and  immediate  inter- 
est. For  example.  MISS  AGNES  C.  LAUT,  a  wonderful  woman,  writes  of  the  war  situation  as  found  in 
the  United  States,  and  in  its  relation  to  Canada.  H.  F.  GADSBY  writes  of  the  Canadian  Senate — a 
judicial  article  on  a  subject  of  ever-growing  political  interest.  W.  A.  CRAICK'S  contribution  is  Motor 
Roads  of  Canada,  and  is  concerned  with  motor-touring  in  Canada.     His  article  is  well  illustrated. 

Now.  these  are  just  a  part  of  the  contents  of 


MacLean's 


THEY  suffice,  however,  to 
give  you  a  good  idea  of 


„  ,,  ,    „  ,     for  April 

the      distinctive      Canadian  M. 

character  and  appeal  of  MacLean's.  and  to  let  you  and  others 
see  that  in  MacLean's  one  gets  his  money's  worth  and  more, 
whether  it  be  mere  entertainment  that  is  sought,  or  something 
informative,  stimulating  and  timely  concerning  Canada  life 
interests,  thought  and  politics. 

56 


Booksellers  of 
w1    k,  ;     Canada 

"  "    give   the   April 

MacLean's  the  display  in  your  windows, 
on  your  counters,  and  elsewhere,  that  its 
merit  and  Canadian  character  warrants. 
Give  MacLean's  a  boost. 

Let  us  build  up  our  own  country. 


llllllll 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 

llllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIUIIIIIi:illllllll!lllllllllllllllllilllllllllllll 


Dealers  stocking  M.  &  V. 
brand  Typewriter  Ribbons 
and  Carbons  are  increasing 
their  sales,  their  profits, 
and  their  number  of  satis- 
fied customers. 

You,  too,  can  do  it.  Get  a  trial  supply  of  M.  &  V.  Type- 
write]' Ribbons  and  Carbons.  Recommend  them  to 
your  people.  If  cleanliness,  durability  and  economy 
appeal  to  them,  they  will  become  firm  believers  in 
M.  &  V.  superiority. 

M.  &'  V .  gives  the  service  that  satisfies. 


Mittag  &  Volger,  inc. 


BRANCHES: 

NEW  YORK,   N.Y..  261    Broadway. 


Principal  Office  and  Factory 

Park  Ridge,  N.J.,  U.S.A. 


CHICAGO,   ILL.,   205  West  Monroe  St. 
LONDON.  7  and  8  Dyers  Bldg..  Holborn.  E.C. 

Agencies  in  every  part  of  the  ivorld;  in  every  city  of  prominence. 


n'lii  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  ij  ii  hi  ii  iii  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  in  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  iii  ii  1 1  u  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  ii  in  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  iii  1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1  tiii  ii  1 1  mil  1 1 , 


Alive?  or  Asleep?  or  Dead? 

The  Live  Newsdealer  will  get  his  order  in  early 
for  the  1917  edition  of 

5,000 

Facts  About  Canada 

Now  Out 

Compiled  by  Frank   Yeigh 


The  Asleep  One  will  sell  out  his  order,  and,  in 
forgetting  to  restock,  lose  business. 

The  Dead  One  comes  to  life  long  enough  to  say 
to  an  inquiring  customer,  "Wedon't  carry  it." 

A  hint  is  as  good  as  a  kick  to  an  Alberta  broncho. 

Canadian  Facts  Publishing  Co. 

588  Huron  Street  Toronto,  Canada 


Mucilages  and  Paste 
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VOL.  XXXIII. 


PUBLICATION     OFFICE:     TORONTO,     APRIL,      1917 


No.  4 


Up  or  Down 


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Memories 

My  Reminiscences 

Rt.  HON.  SIR  GEORGE  REID,  MP. 

Ex-High  Commissioner  for  Australia 

[Humiliating   chapters    include   "Early    Political   Prob- 
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round    the    Federal    Idea,"   "  'First    Day'    in    the   Com- 
monwealth,"    "The     Reins     put     into     My  Hands," 
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Cloth   gilt,   net  .$4.00. 

Political 

Germany  Under  Three 
Emperors 

PRINCESS  CATHERINE  RADZ1WILL 

in    this    distinctive    volume    the    Russian     Princess    tells 
the  inner  story  of   Prussia's  diplomacy   for  half  a  cen- 
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information  in  regard  to  William  1".  and  his  dominating 
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nurtured  until  the  crisis  in   1914. 

With  8  Photogravures.     Medium   Bvo,  '-'<M  pages. 
Cloth  gilt,  net  $4.00. 

Winnowed  Memories 

FIELD-MARSHAL  SIR  EVELYN   WOOD, 

V.C.,  G.C.B.,  G.C.M.G.,  LP.l). 

Our  veteran    Field-Marshal   has  produeed  a   hook   that 
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as  they  have  come  to  the  raconteur's  mind. 

s   Photogravures.     410   pages,     cloth   gilt,   net   $4.1111. 

General 

With  Kitchener  in  Cairo 

SYDNEY  A.  MOSELEY 

Author  of  "The  Truth  About  the  Dardanelles" 

Mr.  Moseley   is  frankly   outspoken,  and   much  that  he 
says  will   doubtless  shock  those  readers  who  imagined 
that    Egypt  under  the   dominating  influence  of  Britain 
was  well  governed,  after  allowance  had  been  made  for 
its  being  nominally  beneath  the  Suzerainty  of  the  Sul- 
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well  we  should  be  aware  of  certain  grave  anomalies  to 
which  Mr.  Moseley  forcibly  directs  attention. 

Large  crown  8oo,  280  pages,     cloth,  net  $1.50. 

Political 

The  Memoirs  of  a  Balkan 
Diplomatist 

COUNT  CHEDOMILLE  MIJATOVICH 

These    Memoirs   give    interesting   and   valuable    contri- 
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The    Count    occupied    important    political    positions    in 
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Kossovo-Macedonia   convention.      In   1900  he   was  Ser- 
-  bian  Minister  to  the  Sultan  of  Turkey. 

With   4   Photogravures.     Medium    810.     OlOth    i/ilt.   net  $4.00. 

Psychical  Investigations 

J.  ARTHUR  HILL 

The  author  is  acquainted  with  a  remarkable  sensitive 
or  "medium,"  who  gives  sittiugs  only  to  friends.    The 
present   volume  is  mostly  concerned  with  evidence  ob- 
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Lieutenant  Raymond  Lodge  and  Mr.  F.  W.  H.  Myers. 
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' '  Raymond. 

Large  crown  .Sro.     Cloth,  net  $1.50. 

The  Nation's  Health 

SIR  MALCOLM   MORRIS,  K.C.V.O. 

Until   recently   the   subject   of   venereal    disease   was 
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has   written   "The   Nation's   Health." 

Lorije   crown    8wo,   170   pages.     Cloth,   net   $1.00. 

Russia  in   1916 

STEPHEN  GRAHAM 

With   a  picturesquenes   of  detail,  a   quick  eye   for   the 
unusual,  a  perception  of  temperamental  characteristics 
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author   writes    of   his    experience    and    observations    in 
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of  the  Russian  Empire. 

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His  Own  Home  Town 

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The  Way  of  an  Eagle 

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The  Stingy  Receiver 

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or  if  by  any  chance  you  missed  seeing  the  line  on  the  road,  write 
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THESE  BOOKS  YOU  MUST 
HAVE 

The  Real  Mother 
Goose 

$1.50 

Fourth  edition,  177  illustrations  in  full  color.  Printed  on 
excellent  paper.  Size  9  x  12,  with  attractive  illuminated 
cover.    This  is  the  best  of  all  Mother  Goose  Books. 


The  Goosey-Goosey 
Gander  Series 

Illustrated    in    full    color    by    Blanch    Fisher 
Wright.    This  new  series  will  be  ready  Sept.  1st. 

4  TITLES 
Little  Jack  Horner 
Tommy  Tittlemouse 
Polly  Flinders 
Our  Child's  Favorites 
Size  9  x   12,  50  cents  each 


The  Jolly  Mother  Goose 
Annual 

Illustrated    with    full-page   color    pictures    and 
innumerable  text  drawings. 

NEW  EDITION,  $1.00 
READY  NOW 

Mother  Goose  Village 

By  Madge  L.  Bingham. 

A  charming  book  that  will  delight  all  children. 

196  pages,  Large  4to,  75c. 

READY  NOW 


A  WINDOW  DISPLAY  OF  THESE  BOOKS   WITH  THEIR   STRIKING  AND 
ATTRACTIVE  COVERS  WILL  BRING  YOU  BIG  BUSINESS 


A  Generous  Discount  is  allowed  to  the  Trade  which  adds  profit  to  the 
pleasure  of  selling  this  most  attractive  line  of  Juveniles.  Imprinted  cata- 
logues and  window  display  material  supplied.  It  will  pay  you  to  con- 
centrate on  this  line  and  increase  your  Christmas  business. 


li 


jr^nc 


THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher 

215-219  VICTORIA  STREET,  TORONTO 


22 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


A  New  Novel  by  the  Author  of  u. JUST  DA  VI D" 

The  Road  To 

Undcrsfanding 

By  Eleanor  HLPorfer 

This  book  will  be  an  even 
greater  popular  success  than 
JUST  DAVID,  of  which  150,- 
000  copies  were  sold  in  the 
United  States  and  Canada. 

WHY? 

Because  it  has  all  the  selling  qualities  of  Mrs,  Porter's  other  books,  and  is 
an  appealing  love  story  besides.    Illustrated  in  Full  Color,  $1.40. 

HAVE  YOU  ORDERED  YOUR  WINDOW  DISPLAY  MATERIAL? 


Obstacles  to  Peace 

By  S.  S.  McClure,  $2.00 

This  is  one  of  the  most  incisive  and  illumin- 
ating books  yet  called  forth  by  the  great  war. 
The  author  interviewed  the  leading  men  of  the 
belligerent  countries  who  put  him  in  possession 
of  hitherto  unpublished  documents  of  the 
utmost  importance. 

It  is  being  commented  upon  and  quoted 
extensively  in  the  press,  and  is  sure  of  a  large 
and  steady  demand. 

SEND   IN  YOUR   ORDER  IMMEDIATELY. 

The  Yukon  Trail 

By  William  MacLeod  Raine,  Illustrated.  $1.35 

Author  of  Steve  Yeager 

The  story  of  two  strong  men  in  the  wilds  of 
Alaska — one  a  sturdy  and  successful  miner, 
the  other  a  fine  type  of  college  graduate.  In 
quickness  of  action  and  incident  and  in  bold- 
ness of  adventure,  it  equals  the  most  thrilling. 
The  heroine  is  an  original  and  charming 
character. 
STRIKING  JACKET  AND  COVER  DESIGN. 


Getting  Together 

By  Ian  Hay,  50c 

Are  you  getting  your  share  of  the  business? 
Over  Five  Thousand  (5,000)  copies  sold  within 
a     month     of     publication     of     this     "BIG" 
LITTLE  BOOK. 
The  sale  is  keeping  up  unabated. 

ORDER  TO-DAY  FROM  YOUR  JOBBER  OR 
DIRECT. 

The  Triflers 

By  Frederick  Orin  Bartlett,  Illustrated,  $1.40 

Author  of  "The  Wall  Street  Girl" 

When  a  young  heiress  is  besieged  by  suitors; 
when  her  one  and  only  end  is  to  see  the  world 
without  let  or  hindrance — how  can  she  do  it? 
Mr.  Bartlett  has  cleverly  shown  that  such  a 
desire  can  be  fulfilled. 

After  many  difficulties  the  experiment  works 
out  to  a  happy  understanding  and  the  story 
ends  ideally. 

ATTRACTIVE  JACKET  AND  POSTERS. 


THE  HOUGHTON  MIFFLIN  COMPANY,  BOSTON,  Mass. 

THOMAS  ALLEN,  Publisher 

215-219  VICTORIA  STREET,  TORONTO 


23 


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SUNDRIES 


SELLING  DIHECT  FROM  FACTORIES-' 


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LIMITED 


TORONTO 


The 

Sengbusch 

Self-Closing 

Inkstand 


The  Sengbusch  Self-Closing 
Inkstand  and  the  Ideal 
Sanitary  Moistener  will 
make  profitable  friends 
for  you. 


And  this  is  the  kind  of  friends  it  pays 
to  make.  Every  one  of  these  articles 
you  sell  will  give  the  user  that  unstinted 
satisfaction  which  comes  from  perfect 
service  and  unequalled  money's  worth. 
Sales  like  these  are  sales  that  count — the 
customer  will  stick  to  you  and  extend 
his  confidence  to  other  lines  in  your 
store. 


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free.      Write  us   about  it. 


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Moistener 


The  Kind  of  Waste  Basket 

that  sells  itself 


THE  VUL-COT 

A   big  selling  success  everywhere 


You  don't  need  to  do  much  "Selling  Talk"  to  con- 
vince a  customer  of  the  manifold  advantages  of  the 
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tee which  accompanies  every  sale.  You  can  point  it 
out  on  the  bottom  of  every  Vul-Cot.  In  the  event  of 
the  Waste  Basket  not  living  up  to  the  terms  of  this 
guarantee,  we  will  willingly  replace  it. 

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24 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

Canadian  Stationers! 

You  should  get  this  profitable  business 


'SOMEWHERE  IN  DIXIE' 
Harrison  Fisher 


tfWMf 

p\i; 

I""'-.' 

-1 

"CRACK   SHOT 
AND  HIGH  GUN" 


Penrhyn  Stanlaws' 


"WATER  LILIES" 
Howard  Chandler  Christy 


EVERY  month  there  goas  from  Canada  to 
the   publishers   of   Cosmopolitan    Prints, 
a    large    .sum    of    money    in    the    shape 
of  direct  mail  orders  from  readers  of  Cosmopoli- 
tan, Hearst's,  and  Good  Housekeeping.     This 
money  is  paid  out  for 

COSMOPOLITAN  PRINTS 

which  are  advertised  in  every  issue  of  these 
magazines,  with  a  combined  Canadian  circula- 
tion of  about  60,000  copies. 


C 


A.NADIAN  Dealers  should  get  this  money. 
Our  co-operation  makes  it  possible. 


"SPRING" 
Emile   Benson   Knipe 


There  is  also  a  large  business  to  be  done 
with  this  line  for  summer  cottages  and  bunga- 
lows. These  prints  help  to  make  very  attractive 
rooms. 

Harrison  Fisher   and   Coles  Phillips    pictures, 

11  x  14.  Retail  for  20c.  each.  12  x  16,  35c. 
each.       Jessie    Willcox    Smith,    new   pictures, 

12  x  16,  75c.  each.  Mother  Goose  Rhymes,  set 
of  18  retail  for  $6.00  or  35c.  each.  A  particu- 
larly good  s-et  for  school  trade. 

Ask  for  Our  New  Illustrated  Catalog 


AUTUMN'S   BEAUTY 
Harrison  Fisher 


'RAIN,  RAIN,  GO  AWAY" 
Jessie  Wilcox   Smith 


"THE  NIGHT  NURSE" 
E.   Coles   Phillips 


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.    K.     lVlaCUOUgall    &    I/O.,    Limited,    266  King  St.  West,  Toronto,  Ont 


25 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


TORONTO 


TRUSSELL 

Loose-Leaf 
Memorandums 

STYLE  F. 

Black   Cloth — Imitation 
Leather. 

Most  amazing  value  ever 
offered  to  the  Canadian 
trade  in  low-price  memos. 

Good     enough     for     any 
man   at   a  price  within  the 
To  close — simply   pinch  rings    reach   of   every   man. 

Sheets  lie  perfectly  flat  and  can  be  written  on  from 
edge  to  edge.  Rings  fit  closely,  eliminating  unneces- 
sary wear  on  sheets. 


open— simply  bend  back 


Size  of 

Binding- 

Covers  w: 

th 

Linen 

tab 

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No. 

sheet 

edge 

40  sheets 

indexes 

per  40 

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6 

.TO 

.25 

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Refills  packed  20  in  a  box. 

Refills   ruled   Quad,   or  faint. 

Refills   punched  3  holes  open   end.  6  holes  side  open,   to  fit 

any   standard   memos. 


CRAYON*.: 


1  Mfg-  Co. 


SCHOOL  CHALK 

White  and  Yellow  EnameLed 

These  chalks  are  made  from  Nova  Scotia  Plaster,  the 
highest  grada  known  for  the  purpose. 

ORDER  YOUR  SUPPLY  NOW  FOR 

SEPTEMBER  SCHOOL  OPENING  TRADE. 

DO  NOT  PUT  THIS  OFF. 

These  are  all  the  High-Grade  Products  of  the  Standard 
Crayon  Co.,  of  Danvers,  Mass. 

WAX   CRAYONS 

TO  RETAIL   AT 

lc,  3c,  5c,  7c,  ,10c.  and  15c. 


Time     and    Material 
Saver,     Weighs 
about   4   lbs. 
Fully    nickel 


IDEAL, 
PORTABLE 


Eyeletting 
Machine  Made  Dy 


Ideal  Specialties  Mfg.  Corp. 
New  York 


This  new  machine  has  a  "Trough  Magazine" 
for  the  reception  of  Ideal  Eyelets  formed  into 
strips  of  (15)  fifteen.  With  but  one  stroke  of 
the  handle  papers  are  perforated,  eyelets  are 
automatically  inserted  and  made  secure,  with- 
out a  miss  or  a  skip,  NOT  AN  EYELET  IS 
LOST.  No  other  portable  device  as  efficient, 
none  so  simple  or  sturdy  of  construction  as 
the  Ideal.     A  real  boon  to  the  busy  office. 


The  Best 
Of  All 
Pencil 
Sharpeners 

The  DEXTER 

Retails  at  $5.00 

You  can  sell  this  high-grade  machine.  Have 
you  tried?  If  not,  get  busy  and  get  your  share 
of  this  profitable  business.  Lower-priced  pencil 
sharpeners,  the  best  in  their  class. 

The  CHICAGO  The  CHICAGO  GIANT 


Standard   Model 

$1.50 


Sharpens  any  pencil  or  crayon 


—  Retail 


$2.00 


A.  R.  MacDougall  &  Co.,  Limited, 


Canadian  Representatives  : 

266  King  St.  W.,  Toronto,  Ont. 


26 


BOOK  8  E  L  L  E  R    A  N  I)    S  T  A  TION  E  It 


DIXON'S  SOVEREIGN    2140-HB 


-s-t3Tffl~rrfifififi-]'r*  ■! 


DIXON'S  5c  SPECIALS 

"For  Canadian  School  Trade" 


rDlXON'SPTLE  PARSTORY  ¥2 3 07 


lllli    FIRST    U:llt    FREE    II  AM)    DIIAHIM, 


FOR   SECOND    \KAK   WRITING   AM)    DRAWING. 


l-'OR    1  KKi:    HAM)    DUAW1M.    AM)    SKETCHING. 


-U  -B^KOJSfcSKJ^taasriC&Hi  -iCRaSJs^SaSSi 


llll!   DRAUGHTING   AND    DRAWING— 10   DEGREES. 


TTJTX07TTS^7»s7rScHOor^§ 


FOB    ADVANCED    l)KA\VIN(i — 7    DEGREES. 


Mil!   GENERAL   SCHOOL   DRAWING — 7   DEGREES. 


mm;   GENERAL   ■>(  iiool.   llilltK — t   iikckkk 


0\         DIIPS 
oo  PENCII^fep 


S?3Ws;&ixffW.Jl3f5S™*J- 


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)us(-i>roof    Eraser    Assortment. 


Place  your  orders  early  to  ensure  delivery  of  these 
goods  in  time  for  school  opening. 

AT%        Hit  T\  11      O        iO  ¥     •  •  A.         J  Canadian  Representatives 

.  K.   MaCLlOUgall   &  1/0.,    Limited,    266  King  St  .West,  Toronto,  Ont. 


27 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Let  Us  Remind  You 


That  this  advertisement  contains  only  a  small  portion  of  the  important  new  titles  in 
our  illustrated,  descriptive  Spring  Catalogue  which  is  now  ready. 

Allow  us  to  call  your  special  attention  to  : 


Miss  Haroun  al-Raschid 


BY  JESSIE   DOUGLAS    KERRU1SH.     CLOTH,  $1.25 

What  a  pleasure  it  is  to  break  away  from  "well-known"  writers  and  discover  a  new 
author  whose  viewpoint  is  decidedly  refreshing. 

This  story  stood  first  in  the  hundreds  of  MSS.  sent  in  for  our  One  Thousand  Guineas  Prize  Novel  Compel  i- 
tion.  It  may  he  described  as  the  story  of  a  beautiful  girl's  daring  adventures  in  that  adventureful  region. 
Asiatic  Turkey.  As  a  vivid  description  of  Oriental  life,  it  is  of  vast  intrinsic  interest;  viewed  simply  as  a 
story,  it  is  splendid. 

Mr.  Harold  Begbie,  after  an  interview  with  Miss  Kerruish,  has  written  a  lengthy  description  of  the  author  and  her  book, 
comprising  an   eight-page   booklet   which    we   will   gladly   send   you   free. 

OTHER  NEW  NOVELS 

CLOTH,  $1.25 

McGlusky's   Great   Adventure         -         A.   G.   Hales 
In  the  Northern  Mists       -         Grand  Fleet  Chaplain 
Myola      ------         H.  Musgrave 

The  New  Order  -  Morice  Gerard 

The  Amazing  Years      -        -        -        W.  Pett  Ridge 
Love  the  Adventurous        -         -         Charles  Garviee 

CLOTH,  75c. 

Doodle  McClink  of  the  "Sardine  Castle" 

David  McCulloch 
The  Beginnings  of  P.  J.  Davenant 

Lord  Frederick  Hamilton 
Young  Blood    -----        Annie  Swan 


SMudt-CWo-aWi 

peter 


;  F.HORACE  ROSE 

AUTHOR    OF- 

"GOLDEN  GLORY" 


WAR  BOOKS 

The  British  Campaign. 

Sir  Arthur  Conan  Doyle $1.50  net 

At  the  War. 

Lord  Northcliffe $1.50 

Hurrah  and  Hallelujah. 

(The  spirit  of  New  Germanism) 
■     J.  P.  Bang $1.25 

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Thomas  Curtin $1.75 

The  White  Road  to  Verdun. 

Kathleen  Burke $1.00 

The  Flaming  Sword:   In   Serbia   and   Else- 
where. 
Mrs.  St.  Clair  Stobart $1.50  net 

Lord  Kitchener's  Memorial  Book. 

About  150  illustrations $1.50 

My  Country. 

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Treatment  of  the  Armenians. 

Viscount  Bryce $1.50 


This  powerful  romance  of  the 
Great  War  is  founded  on  the 
Navy  League's  p  a  t  r  i  o  tie 
photo-play,  which  has  great- 
ly helped  recruiting  iu  Eng- 
land. 

A  strong  recruiting  appeal 
served  up  as  a  delightful 
novel 

To    start    is    to    finish    —    you 
can't  break  away. 
Rousing,     sensational,     patri- 
otic—"It    is    for    England." 


GENERAL      . 

Men  of  Letters. 

Dixon  Scott   $1.50  net 

Mary  Slessor  of  Calabar. 

The  Missionary  Book  of  the  Times. 

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The  White  Queen  of  Okoyong. 

Mary  Slessor  for  Children. 
W.  P.  Livingstone 75c 

Stand  Up,  Ye  Dead! 

Rev.  Norman  Maclean $1.00  net 

A  Bookman's  Letters. 

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100  titles 
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COMPLETE    LIST    ON   APPLICATION. 


Hodder  &  Stoughton  Limited 

LONDON  Publishers  TORONTO 

1  7  Wilton  Avenue  -  -  Toronto,  Ontario 


28 


BOOKSELLER    AND    STATIONER 


■ 


CANADA  IN 

V.FLANDERS 


NOW 

READY 


Volume   2 


This  contempor 
ary  history 
issued  by  the 
Canadian 
L.  o  v  ernment  -»» 
is  official,  and 
Lord  Beaver- 
Is  r  o  o  k,  as 
Canadian  Re- 
cords Officer, 
has  had  full 
access  to  all 
the  reports  of 
the  Co  m- 
manding  Offi- 
cers  engaged. 


■r^^. 


sifii 


I 

in  in i 


NOW 
READY 


In  this  vol- 
ume Cana- 
dians will  fol- 
low the  for- 
tunes of  their 
own  regi- 

ments and 
read  the 
s  t  o  r  i  es  of 
their  own 
friends  and 
C  ommanding 
Officers. 


HODDEjL 

Stoughton 

JUMHED 

/>VBL/SJSr£RS 

TORONTO 


UNIFORM  WITH 
VOLUME  I 
NOW  IN  ITS  14  ™  EDITION 


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BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


MADE  IN  CANADA  and  made  RIGHT 


MEMO  BOOKS,  RING  BOOKS,  NOTE  BOOKS, 

RECIPE  BOOKS,  PERPETUAL  DIARIES, 

LEDGERS,  SECTIONAL  POST  BINDERS, 

SOLID  POST  BINDERS,  LOOSE  SHEET  HOLDERS. 

A  COMPLETE  LOOSE  LEAF  LINE 

We  Sell  Through  the  Trade 

On  account  of  UNUSUAL  CONDITIONS  of  the  raw  material  market  we  urge  all  dealers  to 
place  orders  NOW  for  Immediate,  Summer  or  Fall  shipment,  By  doing  this  you  will  help  us 
to  anticipate  our  requirements,  you  will  be  assured  of  having  the  goods  when  they  are  needed, 
and  you  will  be  taking  advantage  of  prevailing  prices  which  are  very  likely  to  advance. 

When  you  sell  our  line  you  are  helping  to  build  up 

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215-219  Victoria  St. 


Dept.  S 


TORONTO 


SLUCKETT'S     m^ 
TERRNG 


Winnipeg  Cook  Book 

We  have  the  agency  for  Western  Canada  for  the 
Winnipeg  Cook  Book,  by  Mrs.  E.  J.  Powell.  It 
gives  352  Canadian  recipes,  and  has  a  special 
department  devoted  to  Toilet  Talk  and  Sick  Room. 
It  differs  from  British  and  American  cook  books 
in  that  the  recipes  are  purely  Canadian.  Your 
customers  demand  a  Canadian  cook  book,  and 
have  hitherto  been  compelled  to  put  up  with 
imported  ones.  The  Winnipeg  Cook  Book  caters 
to  small  families. 

Price  55c:  comes  in  neat  box  readv  to  mail,  and 
retails  at  $1.00. 

Hodder  &  Stough  on's 

well-known  shilling  novels  at  24c.  This  line  in- 
cludes titles  by  the  best  authors,  some  of  which 
have  not  been  published  in  shilling  form  hereto- 
fore. 

S1XPENNIES 

We  have  in  stock  a  shipment  of  sixpennies  by 
the  best  authors,  at  $11.00  per  hundred. 

IMPERIAL  NEWS  COMPANY 

LIMITED 
WINNIPEG 


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(Quebec) 


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A  new  list  of  10c  and  loc  paper- 
bound  novels  is  being  printed  and 
will  be  ready  within  two  weeks. 

We  will  he  pleased  to  co-operate 
with  any  dealer  who  has  not  sold  our 
cheap  paper  lines,  giving  the  best 
selection  of  novels  that  can  be  pro- 
cured. Ask  for  special  offer  to  new 
dealers. 

Imperial  News  Company 

LIMITED 
254  Lagauchetiere  Street,  Montreal 


30 


BOOKS  E  L  L  E  R    A  N  I)    S  T  A  TION  E  R 


TOLD  IN  THE  HUTS 

The  Y.M.C.A. 
Gift    Book 

Published  for  the  benefit  of  the  Y.M.C.A.  Active 
Service  Campaign  amongst  our  Soldiers,  Sailors 
and  Munition  Workers. 

Contributed  by  Soldiers  and  War  Workers. 

The  Book  contains  six  full-page  illustrations  in  colour,  depicting  stirring-  inci- 
dents of  war,  and  about  100  pencil  sketches  in  the  margins.  These  were  prepared 
under  somewhat  tragic  circumstances  by  the  well-known  military  artist,  Cyrus 
Cuneo,  who  died  soon  after  they  were  finished. 

This  Book  forms  a  beautiful  gift,  besides  helping  a  worthy  cause,  and  should  be 
in  every  home  as  a  souvenir  of  the  Great  War. 

PRICE  $1.25  NET 

GORDON  &  GOTCH,  Publishers,  TORONTO 


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:ii 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


POEMS 


BY    ALAN    SEEGER 

WITH  AN  INTRODUCTION  BY 
WILLIAM  ARCHER 

Cloth,  $1.25    Net 

"To  England  the  war  gave,  as  its  poet-hero, 
Rupert  Brooke;  as  token  of  the  love  of  two 
great  republics  it  gave  to  America  and  France 
this  other  soldier-poet,  eternally,  divinely 
young;  his  life  and  death  made  poetry,  too. 
Tf  there  is  tragedy  in  such  a  loss,  we  joyfully 
remember  that  in  tragedy  also  there  may  be 
pure  beauty." — Collier's  Weekly. 


TO   HIS   MOTHER 

"Vou  must  not  be  anxious  about  my  not  coin- 
ing back.  The  chances  are  about  ten  to  one  that 
I  will.  But  if  I  should  not,  you  must  be  proud, 
like  a  Spartan  mother,  and  feel  that  it  is  your 
contribution  to  the  triumph  of  the  cause  whose 
righteousness  you  feel  so  keenly.  EVERYBODY 
SHOULD  TAKE  PART  IN  THIS  STRUGGLE 
WHICH  IS  TO  HAVE  SO  DECISIVE  AN  EF- 
FECT, NOT  ONLY  ON  THE  NATIONS  EN- 
GAGED BUT  ON  ALL  HUMANITY.  There 
should  be  no  neutrals,  but-  every  one  should  bear 
some  part  of  the  burden.  If  so  large  a  part 
should  fall  to  your  share,  you  would  be  in  so 
far  superior  to  other  women  and  should  be  cor- 
respondingly proud.  There  would  be  nothing  to 
regret,  for  I  could  not  have  done  otherwise  than 
what  I  did,  and  I  think  I  could  not  have  done 
better.  Death  is  nothing  terrible  after  all.  It 
may  mean  something  even  more  wonderful  than 
life.  It  cannot  possibly  mean  anything  worse  to 
the  good  soldier." 


THE  INVISIBLE  BALANCE  SHEET 

By   Katrina   Trask    $1.40   net 

A  modern,  up-to-date  novel.  In  it  one  finds  de- 
licious humor,  all  the  sparkle  of  "In  the  Vanguard," 
the  philosophy  of  "The  Mighty  and  the  Lowly,"  and 
the  poetic  quality  of  "King  Alfred's  Jewel."  The 
story  is  of  a  young  man  of  complex  nature,  who  is 
given  the  choice  between  relinquishing  the  girl  he 
loves  and  inheriting  sixty  million  dollars.  The 
author  knows  her  world  and  etohes  it  with  no  un- 
certain hand.  Life,  as  lived  in  that  glittering  circle 
known  as  New  York  Society,  is  presented  in  all  its 
dazzling  allurerneut. 

THE  MAGPIE'S  NEST 

By  Isabel  Paterson,  Author  of  "The  Shadow  Rivers." 
Cloth  $1.40  net. 
At  the  op-i»osite  poles  of  humanity  there  are  two 
kinds  of  .people — those  who  live  by  the  head  and 
those  who  live  by  the  heart.  The  middle  course  is 
the  way  of  wisdom,  but  the  heroine  of  this  novel, 
Hope  Fielding,  rather  ignored  the  middle  course. 
She  lived  by  the  heart,  which  is  the  dangerous  way. 
The  fairies  who  came  to  her  christening  gave  her 
an  instinct  for  action,  a  craving  for  affection,  and  a 
habit  of  letting  to-morrow  look  out  for  itself.  The 
best  of  the  fairies  bestowed  upon  her  the  gift  of 
courage;  it  was  all  she  had  to  give,  so  she  made  it  a 
double  portion. 

All  that  Hope  wanted  in  the  world  was  to  be 
happy.  But  in  the  beginning  she  knew  nothing  of 
the  world,  therefore,  it  was  necessary  for  her  to  find 
a  way  of  her  own,  and  her  way  went  in  a  circle,  so 
that  presently  she  found  herself  back  where  she 
began.  Then  she  sat  down  and  laughed',  and  while 
she  was  laughing,  happiness  had  time  to  catch  up 
with    her. 


S.  B.  GUNDY 


PUBLISHER 

TORONTO 


Lucrative  Profits 
for  you 

By  commanding  the  trade  of  the 
larger  consumers  in  your  com- 
munity you  will  swing  real,  worth- 
while business  your  way  with  cor- 
responding big  profits. 

Dealers  representing  the  Globe- 
Wernlcke  office  supply  lines  are  in 
a  position  to  cater  to  every  require- 
ment of  the  trade,  large  or  small. 
We  have  the  facilities  necessary  to 
the  maintenance  of  our  well-estab- 
lished prestige. 

We  make  everything  for  the  up- 
to-date  office:  Filing  Cabinets, 
Binding  Cases,  Document  Boxes, 
Legal  Blank  Cases,  etc.  Let  us 
send  you  our  price  lists  showing 
you  the  profit  possibilities  of 
Globe-Wernicke    Office    Supplies. 

STRATFORD,  ONT 


CHARLES  W.  BAKER 

KEEN  EXPORT  AND 
COMMISSION  BUYER 

OF 

GENERAL  MERCHANDISE 
AND    PRODUCTS 

OF  THE 

UNITED   KINGDOM 


Indents  and  Enquiries  Invited. 

Selling  Agencies  and 
Commissions  Undertaken. 


NORTHAMPTON  ST.,  ISLINGTON 
LONDON,   N. 

CITY   OFFICE   (Permanent): 

Armfield's  Hotel,  South  Place 
Moorgate,  London,  E.C. 


32 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Oh,  Can  ADA! 


:. 


A  Xtufytf  of  Sfcr/i*  Pictures 

^SvAWWttERS  of 

,  T«*  C^WJiWf'tjnreBfTHJNARy  Force. 


-  -  -•    ■ 


THE  BYNG  BOYS 
ARE  HERE 

OH,  CANADA! 

$1.25    A  Medley  of    $L25 
Poetry,  Pictures  and  Music 

Written,  Drawn  and  Composed  by 
MEMBERS  OF  CANADIAN  EXPEDITIONARY  FORCE 

For  Canadian  War  Funds  and  Patriotic  Objects 


OH,  CANADA !  is  a  Living  Book,  throbbing  with  patriotic  vigor  from  begin- 
ning to  end,  and  showing  in  every  line  and  every  picture  the  spirit  of  the  men 
who  have  gone  from  the  Dominion  to  fight,  and,  if  need  be,  die  for  the  Old 
Country.  OH,  CANADA !  deserves  a  hearty  welcome,  not  only  for  its  patriotic 
aims  but  for  its  own  intrinsic  value.  A  Book  which  will  be  talked  about  for 
many  a  day. 

Price  $1.25  Net.     Usual  terms  to  the  Trade. 

GORDON  &  GOTCH,  Publishers,  TORONTO 


B.  &  P.  STANDARD 

Sales  Record  for  Six  Years 


Every    Executive, 
should  have  a  reco 

Sales 
rd  o 

Manager 

f  this  kind 

or   Department 

Head 

! 

JANUARY   SALES 

Inventory  and  Balance  sheet                  ■  ■ 

3j 

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MontMv  Cuh  Sals 

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MEMORANDA 

No.    1414 


Space    is     provided     for    entering     Daily,     Monthly   and 
Yearly    Sales;     Cash,    Credit     and     Total;    Monthly    and 
Yearly    Purchases,     Inventory:     Assets     and    Liabilities; 
Profits  or   Losses,   and   Miscellaneous   Expense. 
Size  of   book   9   x   10.     Full    Green    Cloth,  Stiff  Cover. 
Retails   in   the   States   for   $1.50   each. 


BOORUM  &  PEASE  COMPANY 

Makers  of  "  Standard  "  Blank  Books 
and  Loose  Leaf  Devices 

Home  Office  : 

Front  St.  and  Hudson  Ave., 

Brooklyn,  N.Y. 

Factories;:  Brooklyn,  N.Y. 
St.  Louis,  Mo. 


STANDS    THE    TEST   OF  SERVICE 

The  Buff  Buckram  Binding  of 

Websters'  New  International 

Dictionary.  It  is  now  recommended  in  preference 
to  the  sheep  binding  for  use  in  Schools,  Public 
Libraries,  Offices,  Homes,  or  wherever  subjected  to 
hard  and  constant  service. 

Tests      prove      that      thi 
Buckram     excels     other 
binding    materials    in 
strength,    resistance    to       A 
rubbing     wear,     to      JE& 
stretching,   to   mois-     AWA 
ture,    to    the    fad 
ing  effect  of  sun- 
light, etc.  Since 
1907    the    Unit- 
ed  States   Gov- 
ernment     has 
used     it    for 
p  e  rmanent 
publicat  ions. 
Many     librarians     in 
sist    upon    the    Buckram 
binding.       For     more     than 
two    years    this    binding    of    the 
New  International  has  successfully 
of  actual   constant. use. 

400,000  Words.  2,700  Pages.  6,000  Illustrations. 
Regular  Edition:  Buff' Buckram,  $12.00  net;  Sheep, 
$14.00  net;  India-Paper  Edition,  Library  Buckram, 
$15.00  net;   Seal,  $20.00  net. 

Also    WEBSTER'S    COLLEGIATE    DICTIONARY, 

Third  Edition.  Just  issued.  Regular  and  Thin- 
Paper  Editions. 

Write  to  your  jobber  for  terms,  etc.,  or  address 

G.  &  C.  MERRIAM  CO.  S.^a: 


met   the   severe  tests 


33 


BOOKSE L L  E  E    AND    STATIONER 


Each  Line  The  Leader  In  Its  Glass 


Valentines  5erie© 

TOST  ^Cta  CARDS 


aHROaCHOUT^ 


THE  GIBSON  LINE  Christmas  and  New  Year  book- 
lets, Tags,  Seals,  Post   Cards. 

THE  WHITNEY  LINE  Correspondence  Cards, 
Greeting  Cards  and  Folders,  Place  Cards,  Post 
Cards. 

THE  CLASSIC  SERIES,  a  high  class  English  line  of 
( 'hristmas  booklets. 

THE  CANADIAN  SERIES,  a  10c  line  of  Real  Photo 
Local    View,  Christmas  booklets. 

THE  GABRIEL  LINE,  the  World's  Leading  Line  of 
Children's  Picture  Books. 

ROTARY  COLORED  REAL  PHOTO  POST  CARDS. 


LOOK  OVER  THIS  LIST.  In  the 
aggregate  it  makes  up  a  remarkable 
range  of  ready-selling  goods,  assuring 
quick  turnover  and  consequently  the 
highest  measure  of  profits. 

THE  BOSTON  LINE,  a  most  distinctive  showing  of 
Greeting  Cards  for  Christmas  and  New  Years. 

MILTON  BRADLEY  CO.'S  famous  games  and  home 
amusements. 

THE      EMBOSSING      CO.'S      Blocks,      Dominoes, 
Checkers  and  Chess. 

DONOHUE'S  books  for  children. 

THE  WINSTON  Juvenile  Books. 

PLAYING  CARDS..  Bicycle,  Congress,  etc.,  made  in 
the  Canadian  factory  of  the  U.  S.  Playing  Card  Co. 

DEAN'S     RAG     BOOKS. 


Valentine  &  Sons  United  Publishing  Co.,  Limited 

MONTREAL  TORONTO  WINNIPEG 


/\ 


YOU    CAN     NOW 


BUY 

MADE  IN  CANADA 

»■     PENCILS     ■« 

Manufactured    by 

The  Wm.  Cane  £?  Sons  Company,  Limited 
Newmarket,  Canada     ' 


Cci^-hrV> 


•  CANt'SitiJUS*    NELSON  MB 


"      m* 


L 


<— w- 


I     II  ■■!■■  Hill  HPI     .«lll  I  MUM. 


To  remind  your  cus- 
tomers that  you  are 
selling 

CANE'S 

CANADIAN-MADE 

PENCILS 

A  sample  card  like  that  here  shown  will 
show  you  whether  Cane's  Pencils  are 
worth  featuring  or  not.  Write  for  one 
to-day.  Hang  it  up  where  it  will  meet 
your  customer's  eye  and  watch  how  well 
this  new  line  will  take  with  your  trade. 

Cane's  Pencils  are  tip-top,  every  one  of 
them,  and  they  are  strictly  Canadian- 
made. 

We  are  the  Pioneer  Canadian 
Manufacturers  of  Lead  Pencils 
for  Commercial,  Studio,  School 
and    Advertising   Purposes. 

Be  sure  to  get  one  of  the  display  cards. 

The  Wm.  Cane  &  Sons 
Co.,  Limited 

Newmarket,  Canada 


:i4 


BOOKSELL E R    AND    STATIONER 

PIRQOM 

ValliOUlN 

ART  COMPANY'S 

CHRISTMAS    AND    NEW  YEAR 

GREETING  CARDS  and  BOOKLETS 

TAGS,  SEALS,  POSTCARDS 

A   Line  of  the  Very  Highest  Value 

Art    Productions    that    will 

add  distinction  to  your  shop, 

select  and   unusual   designs 

without    resort    to    freakish 

ideas — in    short,    the    most 

pleasing   and    best   selling 

Greeting    Cards    for   every 

season  and  for  all  occasions. 

You  will  be  given  an  early  opport- 

unity  of    seeing   these    exceptional 

productions. 

. 

Wait  for  a  Valentine  Traveller. 

- 

Valer 

itine  &  Sons  United  Publishing  Co.,  Lii 

nited 

TORONTO                         MONTREAL                         WINNIPEG 

35 


BOO  K  S E LLER    AND    S T  A  T I O  N  E  R 


W'"W,"''-\ 


mmm 


fill 


§ 


STATEMENT   OF   THE 
BUSINESS    MANAGER 


!  /'""/j 


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^         '"%. 


i   Ul  *«#  1  1  \....J  A  I  \„„    1     \_,, 


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APRIL,  1917 


VOL.  XXXIII  — No.  4 


TWO  IMPORTANT  BUYING 

MONTHS 


MAY  and  June  are  among  the  most  important  buying  months  in  the  book  and  station- 
ery trade,  and  consequently  the  May  issue  of  "Bookseller  and  Stationer"  will  be 
one  of  big  interest  for  the  retailers. 


Qr»K/-vrv!   TVi»/l**    will  receive  special  attention 
Ol^IKJUl    I  I  dUC    in  this  numDer  with  a  survey 

of  the  situation  that  will  be  of  the  most  practical  value 
to  the  dealers.  The  editorial  pages  will  provide  sugges- 
tions that  may  be  adopted  toward  making  the  school 
opening  business  (September)  a  more  than  usually 
profitable  one,  and  the  advertising  pages  will  contain 
especially  important  announcements  by  various  manu- 
facturers and  wholesalers  of  school  goods. 


Vacation  Trade 


is  another  subject  that 
will  have  special  treat- 
ment in  the  May  number  with  a  fund  of  ideas  and  plans 
for  scotching  the  "dog  days"  bogey. 


Sporting  Goods  Trade  fh'To?L0l 

branches  of  the  business  which  will  come  in  for  special- 
ization in  this  number,  and  there  will  be  many  other 
editorial  features  of  seasonable  interest  that,  working  in 
conjunction  with  buying  preparedness  in  May  and  June, 
will  show  the  way  to  Canadian  booksellers  to  bigger  and 
better  business  in  the  Spring  and  Summer  months. 

Now  a  Word 

to  Advertisers 

The  May  Number  of  Bookseller  and  Stationer  will 
be  such  alive  one  that  every  manufacturing,  publishing 
or  jobbing  concern  selling  to  the  trade,  should  have 
strong  presentation  of  its  proposition  with  special  refer- 
ence to  Spring  and  Summer  selling  and  September 
School  Trade. 

36 


Depend  upon  it,  the  retailers  will  be  in  a  highly  recep- 
tive mood  to  listen.  The  country  was  never  more  pros- 
perous. The  people  have  money  to  spend  and  are  spend- 
ing it  and  the  retail  merchants  selling  books,  stationery 
and  kindred  lines  are  naturally  on  the  qui  vive  for 
suggestions  to  help  them  do  more  business. 

Be  represented  in  this  number.  Send  copy  for  your 
advertisement  by  April  25. 

RATES: 
Full  Page     $35.00       Quarter  Page  $12.00 
Half  Page     $20.00       Eighth  Page     $  8.00 

Clip  tin.-  coupon  now  while  the  subject  is  in  your  mind 
and  tell  us  when  copy  will  follow. 


Date 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER, 

143-153  University  Ave.,  Toronto. 

Reserve page  space  in  your  Mav  issue 

(Full.    Half,   Quarter   or   Eighth) 

for  $ Copy  will  follow  to  reach  you 

by 

(Final   date   April   25) 

Name 

Address 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


.  >" 


Astra*/) 


MAKE  YOUR  NEWS  STAND 

PAY  MORE  MONEY 


You  are  live,  alert,  resourceful.  You  don't  over- 
look any  real  chance  to  GET  AHEAD.  You  want 
to  make  more  money  on  your  magazines. 
It  CAN  BE  DONE.  BLAKE'S  "HANDY 
NEWS  STAND  RECORD"  does  the  trick. 
It  will  cut  down  the  work,  stop  the  leaks  and 
make  it  pay.  It  is  a  very  simple  method  any 
one  can  use. 

It  shows  when  magazines  are  due,  date  received, 
and  time  limit  for  returns 

It  keeps  an  accurate  check  on  all  magazines  re- 
ceived and  sold. 

It  will  show  errors  in  credit  memos  for  magazines 
returned. 

It  keeps  tab  on  re-orders,  and  regulates  standing 
orders,  and  will  keep  you  posted  in  cutting  down, 
or  increasing  same. 

It  shows  the  monthly  and  yearly  sales  of  all  maga- 
zines and  subscriptions. 

It  is  a  daily  reminder  to  hold,  or  deliver  maga- 
zines for  customers. 


ARTHUR  J.  BLAKE 


Jt  keeps  tab  on  your  profits  from  the  News  Stand. 

it  makes  all  magazine  information  instantly 
available. 

The  "Record"  consists  of  a  Special  Loose-Lea  I' 
Binder,  Leather  Tab  Division  Index,  and  250 
Sheets  ruled  and  printed.  The  outfit  is  of  extra 
fine  quality  and  workmanship.  It  will  hold  sev- 
eral hundred  sheets,  and  will  take  care  of  either  a 
few  magazines  and  newspapers,  or  as  many  as 
may  be  found  on  any  News  Stand.  As  new  sheets 
may  be  inserted  as  required  it  will  last  for  years. 
It  'is  one  of  the  FEW  things  that  cost  LITTLE 
and  worth  a  whole  LOT — and  there's  manv  a 
JINGLING  DOLLAR  in  it  for  YOU. 

It's  GOOD  for  your  Balance  over  at  the  Bank. 
Sent  complete  with  "Supplement"  postpaid  on 
receipt  of  $4.50. 

Whether  you  buy  the  "Record"  or  not,  write 
TO-DAY  for  full  particulars.  It  simply  gives  me 
a  chance  to  put  before  vou  MORE  CONVINCING 
PROOFS. 


MARSHALL,  TEXAS 


OPPORTUNITY 


For  an  aggressive 
man  to  handle  Can- 
adian business  of  a  well 
known  house  manu- 
facturing saleable 
stationery  specialties. 

Send  applications  to 
"  Opportunity,"  care 
of  Bookseller  &  Sta- 
tioner, 143  University 
Ave.,  Toronto,  Can. 


Q 


Alive?  or  Asleep?  or  Dead? 

The  Live  Newsdealer  will  get  his  order  in  early 
for  the  1917  edition  of 

5,000 

Facts  About  Canada 

Now  Out 

Compiled  by  Frank   Yeigh 


The  Asleep  One  will  sell  out  his  order,  and,  in 
forgetting  to  restock,  lose  business. 

The  Dead  One  comes  to  life  long  enough  to  say 
to  an  inquiring  customer,  "We  don't  carry  it." 

A  hint  is  as  good  as  a  kick  to  an  Alberta  broncho. 

Canadian  Facts  Publishing  Co. 


588  Huron  Street 


Toronto,  Canada 


37 


§>x 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


I 


6 


A  Little  Bit  of  Heaven 


Hand  colored  photogravure — size   14  x   21".     List   Price   $1.50.  » 

EVERY  retailer  is  interested  in  pictures  that  move,  and 
the  quicker  they  move  the  better  he  likes  it.  Well — here 
is  a  picture  that  moves  so  fast  that  many  retailers  find  it 
necessary  to  reorder  by  telegraph. 

Art  and  stationery  stores,  after  small  initial  orders,  reorder 
in  one  and  two-dozen  lots  at  short  intervals,  and  one  New 
York  store  sold  over  300  copies  within  10  days  on  displaying 
only  6  copies  in  the  window. 

Order  and  display  this  picture  at  once!  The  reorders  will 
take  care  of  themselves.  Dealers'  discount:  40 %  off  the 
quoted  list  price.    F.O.B.  New  York. 

Gutmann  &  Gutmann 


116  West  32nd  Street, 


New  York  City,  N.  Y. 


hi 


1 


I 


! 


38 


gyiMlMIMlMl^JiMIM^ 


Bookseller  &  Stationer 

AND  OFFICE  EQUIPMENT  JOURNAL 

Vol.  XXXIII.  APRIL,  1917  No.  4 

IN  THIS  ISSUE 

How  to  Meet  Rising  Costs 

Should  Manufacturers  Make  Prices? 

Co-Operating  With  Moving  Pictures 

Selling  Gardening  and  Outdoor  Books 

Toy  Making  in  Canada 

Increasing  Sale  of  Art  Goods 

Higher  Cost  of  Wallpapers 

New  Styles  in  Leather  Handbags 

New  Ideas  for  Cardwriting 

Figuring  Out  Picture  Framing  Costs 

A  Plea  For  Phonographs 

The  News  Trade 

Stationery  "Fall  Style  Week" 


THE  MACLEAN  PUBLISHING  COMPANY,  LIMITED 

JOHN  BAYNE  MACLEAN,  President  H.  T.  HUNTER,  Vice-President 

H.  V.  TYRRELL,  General  Manager  T.  B.  COSTAIN,  General  Managing  Editor. 

Publishers    of    Hardware    and    Metal,    The    Financial    Post,    MacLean's    Magazine     Farmer's 
Magazine,  Canadian  Grocer,  Dry  Goods  Review,  Men's  Wear  Review,  Printer  and' Publisher 
Bookseller  and  Stationer,  Canadian  Machinery  and   Manufacturing  News,  The  Power  House' 
The  Sanitary   Engineer,   Canadian   Foundryman,   Marine  Engineering   of'  Canada. 
Cable  Address:  Macpubco,  Toromo;  Atabek,  London,  Eng. 

ESTABLISHED   1885. 

BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 

FINDLAY  I.  WEAVER,   Manager 
CHIEF   OFFICES: 

CANADA— Montreal,  701-702  Eastern  Townships  Building,   Telephnne   Main   1004.    Toronto    143-15*   T,n|vpr,,t. 
Ave.,  Telephone  Main  7324.    Winnipeg,  22  Royal  Bnk  Building,   Telephone  Garry  2313.  ' 

GREAT  BRITAIN— London.  The  MacLean  Company  of  Great   Britain,    Limited     88   Fleet   Strw»r     vc      t?     i 
Dodd,    Director.     Telephone    Central    12960.      Cable  Address:  Atabek,   London,   England 

UNITED  STATES— New  York,  R.  B.   Huestis,  115  Broadway,    N.Y.,    Telephone    Rector    8971-    Bostnn     r     r 
Morton,    Room    733,    Old    South    Building,    Telephone  Main  1024.     A.  H.  Byrne,  1104-5-6-7    Fort  Dearborn 
Bldg.,   105  West  Monroe   St.,   Chicago,   Telephone   Randolph   3234.  '  uearDorn 

SUBSCRIPTION    PRICE— Canada,   Great   Britain.   South    Africa    and     the    West    Indies     $1    a    vear  •    United 
States,  $1.50  a  year;  other  countries,  $2  a  year;  Single   Copies,   10   cents.     Invariably    in    advance. 


•.iiinwftirniiiniiHftirnWAWrftifi^^ 


39 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


PEN  PROFITS 


Always  Ready  For  Service 

Dip  in  the  Ink,  Twist  the  Button,  It's  Filled 

The  constantly  increasing  sale  of  "A.A."  Fountain  Pens  in  Canada 
is  the  best  proof  of  their  popularity. 

Many  Canadian  dealers  stock  and  push  these  pens  because  of  tbe 
following  FACTS : 

They  are  profitable  to  handle. 

They  give  uniform, and  continued  satisfaction. 

They  are  made  in  such  a  range  and  variety  of  styles  and  sizes  that 
it  is  easy  to  quickly  please  the  most  fastidious  customer. 

We  will  furnish  attractive  display  cases  free.  Each  case  contains 
an  attractive  assortment  of  Self-fillers,  Lower  End  Joint,  Middle 
Joint,  and  Safety  Fountain  Pens. 

Write  to  your  local  jobber  or  to  us  for 
prices,  catalogue  and  trade  discounts 

Arthur  A.  Waterman  &  Co. 

Established  1895 
36  Thames  Street  NewYork  City 

Not  connected  with  the^L.  E.  Waterman  Company 


=         mm^m  o 


40 


Editorial  Chronicle  and  Comment 


TOY  MAKING  IN  CANADA 

ONE  of  the  Toronto  toy  and  doll  manufacturing 
concerns  now  employs  nearly  two  hundred 
hands  and  its  annual  output  amounts  to  between 
$300,000  and  $400,000  a  year.  This  is  probably  the 
record  for  this  country  but  there  are  others  doing  a 
large  and  growing  business.  There  are  in  all  nearly 
a  hundred  concerns  in  Canada  making  toys  but  many 
of  these  are  small  and  not  all  of  them  will  weather  the 
storm  of  the  sea  of  business. 

What  has  been  accomplished,  however,  is  suffici- 
ent to  show  that  toy  manufacturing  has  become  one 
of  the  permanent  industries  of  Canada. 

One  of  the  leading  jobbers  in  conversation  with 
Bookseller  and  Stationer  expressed  the  opinion 
that  after  the  war  Canada  will  to  a  greater  extent  than 
ever  before  import  toys  from  Britain. 

Toy  manufacturing  concerns  in  Britain,  like  prac- 
tically all  other  factories,  are,  of  course,  handicapped 
by  conditions  brought  about  by  war.  Many  plants 
have  been  requisitioned  for  the  manufacture  of  muni- 
tions and  available  labor,  naturally,  is  scarce. 

The  average  Canadian,  including  toy  dealers, 
does  not  appreciate  even  yet  to  what  extent  Canada 
bought  toys  from  Britain,  before  the  war. 

The  buyer  for  one  of  the  biggest  wholesale  toy 
and  fancy  goods  houses  of  Canada  on  the  occasion 
of  his  last  buying  trip  to  Europe  in  1913  bought 
fully  twenty-five  per  cent,  more  heavily  in  Britain 
than  in  Germany  and  Austria.  Since  that  time  new 
plant  has  been  laid  down  most  extensively  in  Great 
Britain  for  making  all  those  particular  types  of  toys 
and  dolls  previously  made  almost  exclusively  by  Ger- 
many and  Austria  which  countries  dominated  the 
markets  of  the  world  in  these  lines.  The  British 
makers  have  succeeded  in  replacing,  to  the  satisfac- 
tion of  the  trade,  these  lines  with  the  exception  of  very 
few  items,  making  up  in  improved  quality  for  their 
inability  to  produce  certain  items  at  prices  quite  so 
low  as  the  prices  at  which  they  were  formerly  laid 
down  by  the  Teutons. 

From  this  it  may  be  gathered  that  when  the  war 
is  over  British  makers  will  export  far  more  extensive- 
ly than  ever  to  Canada. 

Japan  is  at  present  enjoying  a  great  harvest  of 
trade  in  toys,  dolls  and  various  fancy  goods,  captur- 

41 


ing  markets  formerly  controlled  by  Germany  and 
Austria.  These  Japanese  goods  are  being  imported 
into  Canada  very  largely  and  this  trade  with  Japan 
is  bound  to  grow  by  reason  of  the  satisfactory  man- 
ner in  which  the  goods  are  being  delivered.  In  the 
one  example  afforded  by  dolls,  Canadian,  and  all 
other  makers,  will  have  to  look  to  their  laurels  and 
keep  improving  their  product,  giving  better  prices  to 
the  trade,  if  they  are  to  successfully  meet  this  Japan- 
ese competition. 

Another  circumstance  that  must  not  be  over- 
looked by  Canadian  makers  is  the  probability  that 
Belgium  will  be  a  strong  contender  for  Canada's  im- 
port trade  in  toys  and  dolls  after  the  close  of  the  war 
and  it  is  pretty  well  understood  that  Great  Britain  is 
going  to  do  a  great  deal  in  helping  Belgium  to  realize 
this  object.  Belgians  are  acknowledged  to  have  the 
characteristics  that  will  enable  them  to  successfully 
compete  with  the  Germans  as  toy  and  doll  makers. 

All  these  considerations  must  be  kept  fully  in 
mind  by  present  and  prospective  Canadian  manufac- 
turers of  these  goods. 

It  is  not  to  be  understood  that  this  is  written  in 
any  pessimistic  mood  as  to  the  ability  of  Canadians  to 
successfully  engage  in  the  manufacture  of  toys  and 
dolls.  As  stated  in  the  foregoing  it  has  already  been 
conclusively  established  that  toy-making  has  been 
added  to  the  permanent  industries  of  Canada  but 
there  have  been  more  failures  than  successes  among 
the  concerns  that  have  taken  up  toy-making  in  Can- 
ada and  others  still  in  business  will  likewise  sink  by 
the  wayside.  It  is  most  important  in  the  interests  of 
the  country  as  a  whole,  that  toy  factories  should 
build  their  business  on  a  sure  foundation  and  what 
has  been  brought  out  in  this  article  presents  only  a 
few  of  the  essential  considerations. 


THE  NEWS  TRADE 

ONE  of  the  very  best  methods  for  booksellers  and 
stationers  to  gain  increased  patronage  is  to 
thoroughly  feature  the  news  and  magazine  end  of  the 
business,  which  is  epitomized  in  the  term  "the  news 
trade." 

There  is  no  merchandise  in  the  business  that  is 
more  alive  than  this  particular  line.     Constant  and 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


painstaking  attention  to  the  several  branches — dail- 
ies, weeklies,  monthly  magazines,  and  the  different 
special  class  periodicals,  will  bring  more  than  satis- 
factory returns.  It  will,  in  fact,  prove  one  of  the 
most  profitable  departments  in  the  store,  and  perhaps 
even  more  than  the  total  returns  in  the  way  of  direct 
profits  from  the  sale  of  these  periodicals,  will  be  the 
results  in  the  way  of  extended  trade  by  reason  of  an 
increased  number  of  customers  and  sales  of  other 
goods  to  regular  customers  through  attracting  them 
to  come  to  the  store  more  frequently  for  periodicals. 

The  subject  is  a  big  one  and  it  is  not  our  object  to 
treat  it  comprehensively  at  this  time,  but  rather  to 
advise  the  trade  that  this  big  question  is  going  to  be 
given  more  attention  than  ever  in  Bookseller  and 
Stationer  in  following  issues  and  to  invite  members 
of  the  trade  to  co-operate  with  the  editor  with  this 
object  in  view. 

We  would  ask  also  that  the  dealers  themselves 
urge  their  assistants  to  take  special  interest  in  this 
question,  encouraging  them  to  send  in  suggestions 
relative  to  effective  sales  methods,  display  ideas  and 
other  schemes  for  increasing  the  news  trade.  We 
invite  them  also  to  ask  questions  along  these  lines 
with  a  view  to  publishing  these  questions  and  the 
answers  so  as  to  afford  practical  information  that  will 
be  a  benefit  to  the  whole  Canadian  trade. 

Let  this  be  considered  a  personal  invitation  to 
every  subscriber  to  join  in  this  plan  to  promote  the 
news  trade  in  the  bookstores  of  Canada. 

We  want  a  good  grist  of  suggestions  and  ques- 
tions for  the  actual  inauguration  of  the  news  trade 
department  in  our  next  issue — the  Annual  Spring 
Number. 


GARDENING  BOOKS 

\\f IT^  the  arrival  of  %>rmg>  booksellers  should 
*  »  feature  gardening  and  outdoor  books  very 
strongly  and  the  close  association  of  these  with 
home-making  in  general,  brings  into  the  same  class, 
books  on  house-building,  furnishing,  sanitation  and 
in  fact  all  the  problems  of  the  modern  home. 

Think  of  the  scope  of  these  subjects!  It  not  only 
makes  every  family  a  good  live  prospect  for  the 
bookseller  for  the  sale  of  books  coming  in  this  general 
class,  but  each  member  of  every  family  may  be 
appealed  to  with  books  meeting  their  individual 
tastes  and  requirements. 

In  introducing  these  books  to  householders  em- 
phasis should  be  laid  on  the  fact  that  in  this  man- 
ner absolute  good  taste  is  assured,  the  authors  of  the 
different  books,  naturally,  being  experts  on  the  re- 
spective subjects  treated  upon. 

There  are  books  to  suit  the  house  with  a  thou- 
sand dollars  a  year  or  ten  times  that  sum  available 
for  house  expenditure  and  by  giving  heed  to  such 
books,  mistakes  will  be  avoided  and  much  money 
saved.     Practically  every  family  head  is  witness  to 

42 


the   fact  that  house   mistakes   are   frequently   very 

costly. 

It  is  no  exaggeration  to  say,  in  the  average  case, 
tiiat  books  on  these  associated  subjects  will  double 
the  value  received  from  present  expenditure  on  the 
home  and  its  upkeep,  if  the  advice  and  information 
which  they  afford  are  carefully  heeded. 

There  are  literally  hundred-  of  different  volumes 
available  that  come  within  the  scope  of  this  subject 
and  in  price  they  run  from  ten  cents  up  to  as  many 
dollars  as  even  the  enormously  wealthy  man  is  will- 
ing to  spend  for  such  a  purpose.  Therefore  there  is 
no  limit  to  the  possibilities  of  this  branch  of  book- 
selling. 

The  alert  bookseller  will  pay  particular  attention 
to  those  families  who  are  going  into  new  homes  or 
who  are  remodeling  their  present  homes.  Lists  of 
such  prospects  should  be  made  up  so  that  they  may 
be  followed  up  systematically.  One  good  way  to  find 
out  who  is  interested  is  to  put  in  attractive  window 
displays  and  to  adopt  other  good  publicity  means  of 
drawing  attention  to  such  publications.  Many  im- 
mediate sales  will  result  and  they  alone  will  make 
this  special  effort  profitable  but  the  "leads"  for  sub- 
sequent sales  that  will  in  this  manner  be  uncovered 
will  be  of  still  greater  benefit  to  the  bookseller  in  in- 
creasing his  business. 

Think  of  the  vast  variety  of  volumes  that  can  be 
sold  to  garden  enthusiasts,  farmers,  (including  the 
town-lot  amateur),  home  builders,  home  decorators, 
town-dwellers,  suburbanites,  estate  owners  and  such 
prospects  as  dog-owners,  pet  stock  fanciers,  ponltry 
enthusiasts,  collectors,  craftsmen  and  artists. 

Getting  back  to  where  we  started,  this  is  the  par- 
ticular time  to  play  up  gardening  books  most  aggres- 
sively. For  the  beginner  there  are  many  many 
books  of  the  more  elementary  kind  and  the  book- 
seller must  not  lose  sight  of  the  fact  that  this  specializ- 
ation will  have  the  effect  of  increasing  the  ranks  of 
the  beginners,  thus  creating  new  customers  who  will 
buy  the  primary  books  this  year  and  the  more  ad- 
vanced treatises  in  future  years. 

Let  people  know  about  books  that  tell  of  garden 
planning,  planting,  forcing  and  other  essentials  of 
successful  vegetable  gardening.  In  floriculture  alone 
there  are  numerous  books  and  many  of  them  so  de- 
lightfully attractive  as  to  really  class  them  with  the 
desirable  form  of  merchandise  that  "  sells  on  sight." 

Then  there  is  landscape-gardening  and  book.-  on 
outdoor  life,  the  summer  home  and  camp  life.  The 
subject  really  is  inexhaustible  and  so  are  its  possi- 
bilities for  the  retail  bookseller  even  in  the  smallest 
town,  if  he  will  only  start  something  instead  of  croak- 
ing about  the  slow  town  in  which  his  lot  is  cast  mak- 
ing it  impossible  for  him  to  do  a  profitable  book 
business.  It  is  never  the  town  that  is  at  fault  if  a 
book  business  does  not  approximate  to  the  average  of 
what  is  done  in  other  towns  of  like  population.  The 
fault  is  really  attributable  to  the  "slow"  bookseller. 


Bookstore  Motion  Picture  Window  Displays 

Oood  Business  Promoting  Ideas  Put  Forth   by  a  Moving  Picture  Specialist  for  Co-opera- 
tion bv  Booksellers  and  Stationers  With  the  "Movies" 


(Author  of 


By  Ernest  H.  Dench 
'Advertising  by  Motion  Pictures'  ) 


HAVE  you  noticed  how  effectively  the  enterprising 
photoplay  exhibitor  uses  photographs,  or  stills,  as 
they  are  called  in  the  studio,  of  scenes  from  forth- 
coming attractions  for  lobby  display  purposes'?  How 
about  adapting  the  idea  to  a  window  display  of  your  own? 
These  photographs  attract  a  good  deal  of  attention  and 
serve  as  an  appetiser  for  the  production  in  question.  But 
you  will  be  cheating  yourself  if  you  permit  the  exhibitor 
to  attract  all  the  publicity,  relying  upon  people  stopping 
to  look  at  your  windows  as  sufficient  recompense.  It  is 
therefore  up  to  you  to  run  only  pictures  relating  in  some 
way  to  the  bookselling  and  stationery  business.  Suppose 
one  of  the  scenes  shows  the  interior  of  a  book  and  sta- 
tionery store  with  a  heroine  as  a  clerk.  The  star's  press 
agent  may  have  circulated  a  story  to  the  effect  that  the 
player  spent  several  days  in  a  bookseller's,  learning  the 
business. 

"There  are  books  full  of  anecdotes  concerning  the  play- 
ers and  the  making  of  photoplays  which  can  he  done  over 
to  fit  in  witli  the  pictures  you  obtain  from  the  local  ex- 
hibitor. 

Stage  Settings  in  Your  Window 

The  flat,  white  screen  is  fast  disappearing  from  the 
motion  picture  theatre.  The  modern  exhibitor  prefers  to 
enclose  it  in  an  artistic  stage  setting  of  a  permanent 
character,  with  special  color  and  lighting'  effects. 

This  suggests  possibilities,  one  of  which  has  already- 
been  capitalized  by  an  exhibitor  in  co-operation  with  a 
book  and  stationery  store.  The  exhibitor  supplied  the 
stationer  with  a  miniature  model  of  his  stage  setting  for 
■  window  display  purposes.  Tn  the  setting  were  costumed 
dolls  to  represent  the  principal  actors  appearing  in  photo 
plays  at  the  threatre  in  question.  The  dolls  are  changed 
with  new  programme  and  passersby  stop  to  admire  the 
clever  miniature  models  of  the  stars. 

If  you  desire  to  carry  out  this  stunt,  why  not  inaugu- 
rate a  contest  among  children  for  the  best  dressed  doll 
of  Mary  Pickford,  or  any  other  favorite  they  may  care  to 
choose? 

Another   plan   involving  less   trouble   and   expense  is 
to  purchase  a  Charlie  Chaplin  statue  for  about  fifty  cents. 
Place  it  in  the  window,  attach  a  tiny  fishing  cane  to  his 
arm  and  place  the  line  in  a  gold  fish  bowl.     Behind  the 
whole  display  a  card,  worded  somewhat  as  follows: — 
"Charlie  is  not  Fooling  This  Time.    He  is  Fishing 
for  Good  Value,  Which   He  Knows  He  Can   Obtain 
at  This  Store." 

The  "Prop"  Window 

"Props"  in  motion  pictures  are  not  always  what  they 
seem.  Fix  up  a  display  with  the  following  description : — 
"When  the  movie  villain  brings  down  a  large 
bottle  of  ink  or  some  similar  fragile  article  he  is 
not  hurt  as  he  pretends  he  is.  The  bottle  is  only  paper 
mache,  the  ink,  colored  water.  This  may  be  all  right 
for  reel  purposes,  but  for  real  use  you  want  the  genu- 
ine kind,  which  we  sell." 


•Booksellers  desiring  specific  information  should  write 
to  the  Special  Service  Department  of  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER. 

43 


Co-operative  Lobby  Displays 

The  motion  picture  theatre's  window  is  the  lobby  dis- 
play. Many  exhibitors  deem  a  few  photographs  and 
posters  sufficient;  others  differ.  The  enterprising  show- 
man devises  all  kinds  of  stunts  l'or  a  feature  production, 
from  dressing  up  wax  models  to  represent  certain  char- 
acters, to  making  the  entrance  look  like  the  approach  to 
Kades.  What  kind  of  exhibitor  is,  he  who  owns  the  play- 
house on  the  corner  of  the  next  block?  Is  he  partial  tn 
out-of-the-ordinary  displays?  If  so,  he  is  your  friend, 
for  he  will  need  your  co-operation  every  now  and  then. 

An  exhibitor  of  my  acquaintance  wished  to  have  a 
miniature  book  and  stationery  store  presided  over  by  .1 
Charlie  Chaplin  model.  He  asked  the  stationer  for  the 
loan  of  the  necessary  stock  and  equipment.  The  sta- 
tioner agreed,  on  the  understanding  that  a  card  Ibe  dis- 
played as  follows:  "This  Stationery  Store  Equipped  by 
Blank." 

And  it  is  worth  while  recording  that  the  stationer  did 
more  business  while  the  lobby  display  was  on  exhibition. 
Therefore,  if  the  opportunity  comes  your  way,  be  satis- 
fied with   the  publicity  that  accompanies  it. 

Capitalizing  the  Thirst  for  Movie  Information 

The  popularity  of  the  motion  picture  is  not  a  fad; 
it  is  as  deeply  rooted  as  a  sturdy  tree,  and,  like  one,  will 
continue  to  gain  in  strength  from  year  to  year.  The  col- 
lecting of  photographs  by  the  fans  is  only  equalled  by 
their  thirst  for  information  on  movie  topics.  It  pays 
to  appease  it,  however  insignificant  your  efforts  may  ap- 
pear alongside  those  of  the  producers,  exhibitors  and 
publishers. 

Maybe  you  indulge  in  newspaper  advertising,  so  why 
not  incorporate  some  photoplay  material  into  your  an- 
nouncements? What  about  your  store  window?  That 
is  a  dandy  place  for  announcements,  while  you  can  place 
a  bulletin  board  inside  your  store.  When  putting  over 
a  house-to-house  circularizing  stunt,  why  not  head  the 
sheet  as  though  it  were  a  motion  picture  publication?  It 
will,  at  least,  ensure  same  being  read.  Think,  too,  what 
valuable  information  it  would  prove  if  distributed  to 
patrons  of  the  local  movie  show. 

An  occasional  perusal  of  a  motion  picture  trade  jour- 
nal will  yield  more  than  enough  material  for  your  pur- 
pose.   As  it  is  news,  there  is  no  copyright. 

A  Photoplay  Sale 

Some  photoplays  lend  themselves  especially  well  to 
publicity  exploitation. 

When  "The  Little  (Shepherd  of  Bargain  Row,"  for 
instance,  was  announced  for  public  exhibition,  I  know  of 
at  least  one  stationer  who  sensed  its  capitalizing  possi- 
bilities. What  he  did  was  this:  He  inaugurated  a  "Little 
Shepherd"  sale,  reducing  the  prices  on  goods  that  showed 
a  good  profit.  Placed  between  each  reduced  article  was  a 
picture  from  the  film  with  an  appropriate  caption  calling 
attention  to  the  event.  As  a  special  inducement,  he  ar- 
ranged for  a  girl  shopper  to  dress  up  as  the  Little  Shep- 
herd and  visit  the  store  to  make  purchases.  But  wait — 
the  man,  woman,  or  child  who  recognized  her  was  pre- 
sented with  some  article  of  stationery  and  a  month's 
complimentary  ticket   to  the  local   photoplay   theatre. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


For  a  photoplay  sale  the  exhibitor's  co-operation  is 
necessary.  Ask  him  to  keep  you  in  touch  with  his  book 
ings  so  that  you  may  introduce  an  occasional  timely  sale. 
Not  all  pictures  can  be  boosted  in  this  manner,  but  a 
study  of  the  plot  of  the  play  will  reveal  opportunities,  if 
any.  It  is  not  a  stunt  with  the  benefit  on  one  side — the 
exhibitor  boosts  yon  and  you  boost  him,  so  the  arrange- 
ment generally  works  out  highly  satisfactorily  to  both 
parties. 


MAKY    PICKFORD, 

Who   is   to    retire   after   the   Moving   Picture   Production   of 

"Rebecca  of  Sunnybrook   Farm." 

MARY  PICKFORD  AS  REBECCA 

The  important  announcement  has  been  made  that  the 
famous  story,  "Rebecca,  of  Sunnybrook  Farm,"  is  to  be 
produced  in  moving  pictures,  with  Mary  Pickford  as 
star,  and  it  is  further  stated  that  when  this  is  finished 
Mary  Pickford  will  retire  from  the  world  of  the  theatre. 
She  is  now  in  Los  Angeles  in  connection  with  the  produc- 
tion. The  foregoing  announcement  will  have  special  in- 
terest for  booksellers,  because  it  will  naturally  mean  a 
greatly  increased  demand  for  this  book. 

"RUBBER  MUSEUM"   FOR  WINDOW  DISPLAY 

Cards  Explaining  Rubber  Manufacture  Responsible    for 
Stimulating  Interest  and  Sales 

IN  order  to  satisfy  a  demand  among  schools  and  educa- 
tional institutions  in  general,  for  a  good  means  of  ex- 
plaining the  manufacture  of  rubber  erasers,  Mr. 
Roberts,  president  of  the  Weldon  Roberts  Rubber  Com- 
pany of  Newark,  had  a  series  of  explanatory  cards  made. 
These  cards  constituted  the  basis  of  a  sort  of  educational 
campaign  among  the  school  children,  and,  despite  the  fact 
that  no  publicity  was  ever  given  to  the  matter,  requests 
came  from  all  parts  of  the  country  for  sets  of  these  cards, 

44 


and  it  was  soon  found  advisable  to  prepare  a  number  ot 
sets  in  Spanish  for  distribution  in  South  American  Re- 
publics. 

Although  this  is  the  first  time  that  the  "Rubber 
Museum,"  as  it  has  become  known,  has  ever  been  ex- 
ploited in  any  way,  many  stationers  have  already  secured 
sets  for  their  windows.  And  what  is  more,  it  is  stated 
that  some  of  the  largest  retail  dealers  in  the  country  have 
pronounced  them  as  splendid  to  aid  in  "pulling  a  crowd" 
and  in  selling  the  goods.  The  public  has  always  been  in- 
terested in  the  methods  of  manufacture  of  various  articles 
in  common  use,  which,  of  course,  accounts  for  the  recep- 
tion given  to  the  cards  wherever  they  have  been  exhibited. 
It  will  be  interesting  to  note  that  the  requests,  in  recent 
months,  have  become  so  numerous,  that  the  company  has 
been  obliged  to  limit  its  "free  offer-'  to  stationers  and 
school  officials,  asking  a  charge  of  fifty  cents  per  set  from 
others.  This  has  been  a  guarantee  against  merely  curious 
private  inquirers. 

To  stationers,  however,  this  set  will  be  furnished 
gratis,  upon  request. 

The  cards  in  question  are  admirably  adapted  to  the 
purpose  in  view.  There  are  five  of  them.  Each  is  S 
inches  by  6  inches,  and  has  a  substantial  process  speci- 
men attached.  The  reading  matter  on  each  is  self-ex- 
planatory, and  very  much  to  the  point,  viz.: 

I. 
CRUDE  FINE  PARA  RUBBER 
A  slice  of  the  finest  rubber  in  the  world.     It 
comes  from  trees  which  grow  in  the  district  of 
the.  Amazon,  in  Brazil. 

The  trees  are  tapped  and  the  "Milk"  (latex) 
is  gathered  by  somewlfat  the  same  method  as 
maple  syrup  is  procured.  The  "Milk"  is  then 
smoked  (cured)  and  formed  into  large  rounded 
"Biscuits." 

IL 
WASHED  AND  DRIED  RUBBER 
The  crude  rubber  "Biscuits"  are  crushed  be- 
tween powerful  corrugated  rolls,  under  running 
water,  and  all  impurities  are  washed  out.  The 
rubber  is  rolled  out  into  thin  sheets  and  hung  up 
to  dry  and  season. 

III. 
REFINED  FINE  PARA  RUBBER 
When  the  rubber  is  thoroughly  seasoned  it  is 
worked  on  heavy  friction  rolls  until,  when  under 
heat,  it  is  somewhat  plastic.  It  is  then  in  condi- 
tion to  be  manufactured  into  the  various  articles 
which  enter  so  largely  into  our  daily  life  and 
needs. 

IV. 
WELDON    ROBERTS    FINE    ERASER 

COMPOUNDS 
The  refined  rubber  is  again  run  on  the  heavy 
roll's  and  into  it  are  worked  chemicals  and  pig- 
ments of  qualities  and  proportions  that,  in  com- 
bination with  rubber,  produce  in  the  Weldon 
Roberts  products  the  finest  erosive  and  lasting 
properties. 

V. 
WELDON    ROBERTS    ERASERS    BEFORE 
CLEANING   AND   FINISHING 
The  Weldon  Roberts  Specially  Prepared  Rub- 
ber is  sheeted,  pressed  and  vulcanized,  and  then 
cut  into  the  various  shapes  and  sizes  best  adapt- 
ed to  erasive  work. 

The  samples  shown  are  ready  for  finishing. 
The  wide-awake  stationer  should  secure  a  set  for  win- 
dow display  in  connection  with  high  quality  products. 


How  to  Meet  Rising  Costs 

Some  Results  of  an  Investigation  Among  Forty-three   Representative   Booksellers   of 

America. 


THERE  is  an  article,  by  John  McCulloagh,  in  the 
March  issue  of  System,  that  is  worthy  of  the  close 
attention  of  Canadian  booksellers,  because  it  deals 
with  their  own  particular  trade.  The  article  represents 
an  investigation  in  person  and  by  mail  among  several 
hundred  of  the  leading  book  stores  of  the  United  States 
and  analyses  the  policies  of  the  43  of  these  concerns  which 
the  investigation  showed  to  be  most  effectively  meeting 
competition  and  rising  costs. 

Following  are  some  extracts  from  this  valuable  article: 
In  the  first  place,  the  various  titles  and  editions  of 
books — literally  thousands  of  items  on  their  shelves. 
Each  item  has  to  be  bought  on  its  merits.  Otherwise  it 
may  become  a  shelf-clinger  and  cause  a  direct  loss  in 
profit?. 

In  the  second  place,  after  these  items  are  selected, 
they  must  be  watched  with  particular  care  if  they  are  to 
move  rapidly.  With  so  many  items  it  is  easy  for  dead 
stock  to  accumulate.  Definite  steps  must  be  taken,  there- 
fore, to  keep  each  item  selling. 

In  the  third  place,  the  sales  of  the  average  salesman 
in  a  book  store  are  comparatively  small,  yet  the  salesman 
must  be  well  trained  and  pretty  thoroughly  acquainted 
with  a  large  and  varied  stock.  Unusual  methods  of  train- 
ing are,  therefore,  often  found  necessary. 

First  of  all  comes  the  problem  of  buying.  In  this  con- 
nection it  is  interesting  to  note  the  five  general  rules 
which  an  Indiana  merchant  has  worked  out  for  li is  guid- 
ance.   He  says: 

"1.  We  place  no  stock  order  without  having  at  hand 
every  possible  amount  of  data  to  help  us  foreshadow  the 
coming  demand.  We  always  check  our  orders  against 
the  orders  for  the. same  season  of  the  previous  year. 

"2.  In  placing  orders  for  new  hooks,  we  get  every 
possible  bit  of  advance  information  we  can  lay  our  hands 
on.  If  we  are  not  satisfied  with  what  we  learn,  we  do  not 
jump  too  far. 

"3.  We  make  a  special  point  of  getting  the  suggestions 
of  our  salesmen  when  we  are  placing  our  orders.  Not 
only  is  the  added  information  which  they  can  give  us 
valuable,  but  also  they  sell  more  readily  those  items  they 
have  had  a  share  in  buying. 

"4.  News  items  and  all  sources  that  will  give  us  a  line 
on  public  demand  are  followed  very  closely.  Often  we 
can  anticipate  a  coniino-  demand.  For  instance,  just  at 
present  there  is  a  keen  interest  in  the  study  of  Spanish. 
By  getting  wind  of  this  demand  early,  we  were  able  to 
line  up  the  best  books,  put  them  on  our  shelves,  and  make 
some  extremely  rapid  turns. 

"5.  We  always  try  to  be  well  stocked  on  the  common- 
place but  staple  articles  that  practically  sell  themselves. 
I  refer  to  books  on  cooking,  etiquette,  letter-writing,  and 
the  like." 

Close  observance  of  these  five  general  rules  is  in  good 
part  responsible  for  the  fact  that  this  merchant  turns  his 
stock  4.6  times  a  year.  The  average  rate  of  turnover 
anion?  book  stores,  as  the  figures  on  page  260  show,  is 
only  2.65.  Two  extra  turns  a  year  are  well  worth  the  best 
efforts  of  any  merchant,  no  matter  what  line  of  business 
he  is  in. 

Buying  Methods    That    are  Partly    Responsible  for  an 
Unusual  Rate  of  Turnover 
Here  is  what  another  merchant,  who  makes  the  even 

45 


better  record  of  five  turns  a  year,  says  about  his  buying 
methods: 

"We  -buy  our  books  for  the  public,  and  district  lib- 
raries and  schools  largely  on  record.  These  classes  of 
books  are  fairly  well  standardized,  and  the  demand  runs 
pretty  even.  Our  records  on  the  purchases  and  sales  of 
previous  years  serve  as  our  guide. 

"One  point  that  we  especially  watch  in  connection 
with  this  type  of  books  is  the  popular  text  books  that  are 
going  out  of  print  in  one  or  all  editions.  When  books  of 
this  type  are  about  to  be  exhausted,  we  often  buy  to 
satisfy  the  demand  which  arises  later.  This  we  can  do 
safely  when  the  buyer  is  in  possession  of  the  full  facts — 
when  he  knows  why  the  book  is  going  out  of  print,  for 
what  purpose  it  has  been  used,  its  popularity,  and  what 
is  to  take  its  place.  In  a  number  of  instances  we  have 
thus  anticipated  the  demand  for  a  book,  and  have  made  a 
nice  margin  of  profit  which  we  otherwise  might  not  have 
secured. 

Some  Ways  to  Judge  How  Well  a  Book  Will  Probably 

Sell 

"The  real  test  in  buying  books  comes,  however,  in  the 
'miscellaneous'  classes.  This  includes  popular  fiction. 
Here,  what  the  buyer  practically  has  to  do  is  to  judge  in 
advance  the  probable  vagaries  of  the  reading  public's 
fancy. 

"Of  course,  no  buyer  can  guess  right  all  the  time,  but 
there  are  a  few  simple  methods  by  which  in  part  we  judge 
such  a  book.  These  methods  are  negative,  rather  than 
positive.  We  discard,  for  instance,  what  we  are  pretty 
sure  will  not  sell.  A  publisher  may  bring  out  what  we 
call  a  'padded  book.'  This  may  be  built  with  extra  wide 
margins,  and  be  printed  on  heavy  paper  stock,  with  the 
pages  deckle-edged.  The  type  perhaps  is  large  and  there 
is  little  of  it  on  a  page.  Usually  such  a  book  is  beauti- 
fully illustrated.  In  appearance  it  is  splendid.  But  get 
into  the  real  meat  of  the  story,  and  you  may  find  only  a 
fifty-cent  pot-boiler,  for  which  the  publisher  asks  $1.35. 
Our  experience  has  been  that  such  books  die  quickly  in 
public  favor. 

"I  have  saved  myself  and  our  firm,  or  rather  have  'been 
saved  in  a  number  of  instances  by  cultivating  the  friend- 
ship of  the  travelling  representatives  of  the  publishers. 
It  pays  to  know  these  men  more  than  commonly  well. 
Their  business  is  to  sell  books.  The  larger  your  order,  the 
larger  your  discount  will  be  with  a  number  of  publishers; 
and,  of  course,  the  more  is  the  profit  for  the  publishing 
house  and  the  travelling  man.  But  the  really  good  sales- 
man, after  all,  wants  your  business  on  'the  long  pull.'  If 
you  have  proved  friendly  to  him  as  a  buyer,  it  is  very 
much  to  his  interest  to  protect  you  whenever  he  can.  He 
wants  your  business  next  year,  and  five  years  from  now. 
and  he  wants  a  lot  of  it  exclusively  on  standard  mer- 
chandise. Therefore,  we  find  that  if  he  knows  of  a  tip 
which  may  help  us,  he  is  pretty  sure  to  slip  it  along; 
especially  when  we  have  been  friendly  with  him. 

"Every  year  there  are  from  ten  to  fifteen  new  books 
brought  out  which  are  bound  to  be  more  or  less  successful, 
and  these  are  the  books  on  which  a  buyer  may  mildly 
plunge  with  some  feeling  of  security.  They  are  books  by 
the  most  popular  authors.  They  not  only  have  the  adver- 
tising of  the  publisher  behind  them,  but  they  have  the 
reputation  of  an  author  whose  other  work  has  been  tested 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


against  public  opinion.  Even  so  there  is  the  danger  that 
public  opinion  has  charmed.  There  is  but  one  safe  rule. 
That  is,  don't  overbuy. 

"In  my  experience-  it  does  not  pay  to  work  on  a 
quantity  theory.  Extra  discounts  look  pretty  fine  on  the 
priilit  side  of  the  ledger;  but  they  don't  kelp  out  if  the 
books  will  not  sell.  We  rely  on  small  quantity  buying. 
By  following  .this  method  carefully  we  have  saved  our- 
selves from  many  losses,  and  we  have  had  little  trouble 
in  getting  books  when  we  needed  them." 

The  experience  and  methods  of  these  two  merchants 
are  typical  of  the  attitude  on  buying  taken  by  many  of 
the  more  successful  booksellers.  Most  of  them  agree  that 
it  is  unwise  to  bank  heavily  on  "picking  the  winners'" 
ahead  of  time,  but  it  is  a  mighty  good  policy  to  get  in 
early  when  the  demand  is  coming.  It  is  better  in  the  long 
run  to  buy  in  fairly  small  quantities,  most  of  the  mer- 
chants agree,  and  order  often;  keep  the  stock  moving; 
and  if  it  is  necessary  to  take  a  loss  it  is  better  to  take  it 
early,  when  it  will  represent  a  minimum  amount  of  actual 
loss  and  will  not  keep  money  tied  up  permanently  in  stock 
that  is  not  selling  well. 

Some  of  the  Methods  That  Improve  Rate  of  Turnover 
This  brings   up  the  second   problem  which  merchants 
tind  it  important  to  keep  always  in  mind — what  methods 
they  can  use  to  make  the  hundreds  of  items  in  stock  mow. 
rapidly. 

One  merchant  finds,  in  this  connection,  that  it  is  im- 
perative for  him  to  know  regularly  just  what  he  is  ac- 
tually doing  in  his  store.  In  order  that  he  may  have  this 
information  regularly  and  in  convenient  shape,  he  has 
made  out  a  monthly  report  sheet.  It  shows  the  estimated 
stock  on  hand,  the  purchases  for  the  month,  the  actual 
expenses,  the  gross  sales,  the  cost  of  sales,  and  the  kind 
of  sales,  classified  in  three  groups. 

The  first  of  these  groups  represents  the  regular  book 
sales;  the  second  consists  of  library  sales;  and  the  third 
consists  of  "discount"  and  school  book  sales.  Through 
years  of  experience,  this  merchant  has  ascertained  his 
average  eross  profit  on  each  group  of  sales  and  with  these 
percent  a  res  as  guides,  he  can  tell  pretty  accurately  in  any 
month  just  what  is  his  net  profit  on  any  particular  class 
of  goods  and  where  his  inventory  stands. 

One  little  method  which  this  merchant  uses  has  proved 
quite  effective  in  advertising  the  store  at  almost  no  cost. 
He  sells  extensively  to  libraries  in  the  state  in  which  he 
does  business.  In  each  book  sold  to  a  library  he  lias  the 
shippers  paste  a  small  slip  bearing  the  trade  mark  of  the 
"company.     This  furnishes  quite  a  little  publicity. 

"I  have  found  it  important,"  says  this  merchant,  "to 
have  easily  approached  shelves,  so  that  the  classified  stock 
may  turn  rapidly.  We  used  to  have  regular  counters,  be- 
hind which  the.  salesmen  stayed;  and  if  a  customer  by 
some  chance  wandered  behind  the  counter  to  look  at  some 
title  on  the  shelves,  he  probably  found  himself  apologiz- 
ing to  a  salesman  for  being  behind  there.  Now  we  have 
changed  the  arrangement  of  the  aisles  and  anybody  is  at 
liberty  to  walk  straight  up  to  any  shelf  in  the  store,  and 
to  examine  as  many  books  as  he  likes.  Many  customers 
come  in  and  'browse,.'  and  sell  themselves. 

"We  also  take  particular  care  to  change  our  displays 
as  often  as  possible,  so  that  no  line  may  become  stagnant. 
A  frequent  change  in  displays  has  the  effect  of  keeping 
customers  coming  They  see  something  new  almost  every 
time  thev  are  in  the  store,  and  naturally  they  get  the  im- 
prssion  that  we  are  thoroughly  up-to-date." 

How  One  Merchant  Keeps  Slow-Moving  Books  Off  His 
Shelves 
The  value  'of  frequent  special  sales  seems  doubtful  to 
many   of   the   merchants,   although   some   find   occasional 

46 


sales  extremely  helpful  as  a  means  of  keeping  the  stock 
fresh.  A  Minnesota  merchant  regularly  holds  one  big 
sale  in  January.  This  is  well  advertised  in  the  local 
papers;  and,  as  the  concern  has  quite  a  number  of  out- 
of-town  customers,  lists  of  the  books  offered  for  sale  are 
sent  to  them. 

Previous  to  this  sale  the  merchant  goes  through  his 
entire  stock.  Every  book  for  which  the  demand  has 
slackened  is  included  at  a  price  which  is  sure  to  move  it 
Of  course,  there  are  some  staples  which  are  always  good ; 
they  are  much  the  same  as  the  sugar  and  flour  of  the 
grocery.  These  books  are  not  included.  Everything  else 
goes. 

During  the  sale  all  of  the  books  are  placed  on  tables. 
Each  table  is  marked  with  a  single  price  only.  Two-dollar 
books  which  have  not  proved  good  sellers  may  go  as  low 
as  fifty  cents,  or  even  a  quarter.  Others,  which  are  merely 
slowing  up,  are  reduced  just  enough  to  move  them  during 
tlie  sale.  These  tables  are  placed  well  toward  the  back  of 
the  store,  and  special  care  is  taken  to  display  new  books 
and  standard  works  where  people  can  not  help  but  notice 
them  as  they  pass  down  the  aisles  to  the  sale  section. 

When  his  sale  is  over,  this  merchant  does  not  send 
back  to  the  stock  rooms  the  books  left  on  the  tables.  The 
stock  rooms  have  in  the  meantime  been  cleaned  out  and 
are  ready  to  receive  new  merchandise.  So  the  merchant 
calls  in  a  number  of  second-hand  book  store  men  and  gets 
them  to  bid  on  whatever  is  left  at  the  best  price  he  can 
get.  Last  year  the  merchant  cleared  out  more  than  $500 
worth  of  books  left  from  the  January  sale,  at  fifteen  cents 
a  copy.  His  worries  on  dead  stock  were  over.  And,  as  a 
matter  of  fact,  he  did  not  lose  any  money  on  the  books 
that  went  to  the  second-hand  man.  Those  books  cost  an 
average  of  121  ^  cents  each,  and  he  sold  them  at  15  cents. 
Still  another  merchant  has  a  table  on  which  he  regularly 
places  all  items  which  appear  to  be  moving  slowly.  He 
calls  this  his  "bargain  table.'"  The  bargains  are  never 
advertised.  Customers  come  into  the  store  and  find  the 
table  for  themselves,  note  the  prices,  and  often  will  sell 
the  goods  to  themselves  without  requiring  the  attention  of 
a  salesman  except  to  take  the  money. 

The  merchant  selects  the  books  for  this  table  by  goins 
through  his  stock  constantly,  and  watching  for  the  slow 
items.  If  he  is  in  doubt  about  how  long  any  book  has 
been  in  the  store,  he  can  inform  himself  immediately  by 
referring  to  the  fly-leaf.  He  has  a  method  of  dating 
which  tells  the  year  and  month  when  the  book  was  re- 
ceived. A  book  marked  1411,  for  instance,  was  placed  in 
stock  November,  1914.  The  year  is  placed  first,  simply 
because  it  is  easier  that  way  to  tell  at  a  glance  whether 
or  not  a  book  has  been  on  hand  a  long  time. 

"During  the  summer  months,  when  business  is  in- 
clined to  slow  up,"  says  another  merchant,  "we  help 
sales  along  by  going  over  our  mailing  lists.  We  check  up 
the  names  of  all  customers  from  whom  we  have  not  re- 
ceived orders  for  some  time.  We  write  a  personal  letter 
to  each  one  to  find  out,  if  possible,  the  reason  for  the  lack 
of  orders.  These  letters  are  pretty  sure  to  bring  attrac- 
tive results,  either  in  actual  sales,  or  in  inquiries  regard- 
in?  our  merchandise;  and  at  times  we  receive  complaints 
which  we  had  not  known  existed.  The  opportunity  to  set 
a  dissatisfied  customer  right  is  worth  quite  a  bit,  we  be- 
lieve." 

To  Get  Business  by  Mail 
This  merchant  finds  his  mailing  list  an  important 
source  of  sales.  He  gets  many  orders  by  mail,  by  means 
of  the  catalogue  which  he  regularly  mails  out.  The  lists 
are  carefully  prepared.  For  instance,  he  buvs  lists  of 
teachers  each  fall  from  the  county  superintendents.  Other 
lists  are  made  up  of  customers,  or  are  purchased  from 
various  sources. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Each  name  is  kept  on  a  separate  card.  All  sales  are 
recorded,  together  with  the  date  and  the  amount.  If  a 
name  remains  inactive  for  some  time,  an  effort  is  made 
even  before  the  slack  summer  season  to  find  out  the 
reason.  If  no  reason  is  forthcoming,  and  there  are  no 
further  orders,  the  name  is  removed  from  the  list. 

This  merchant  finds  it  well  worth  his  while  to  keep 
a  few  special  classified  lists,  containing  the  names  of  cus- 
tomers whose  tastes  as  book  buyers  are  well  known.  He 
says  that  the  need  of  such  lists  was  brought  home  to  him 
a  few  years  ago  by  a  customer.  This  customer  was  in- 
terested in  ceramics.  She  was  eager  to  buy  every  book 
that  was  published  on  the  subject.  She  made  her  tastes 
known  to  the  salesmen  in  all  the  book  stores  of  her  home 
city,  but  in  the  course  of  several  years  she  had  never 
received  notice  from  one  of  the  stores  about  the  appear- 
ance of  new  books  dealing  with  the  subject  in  which  she- 
was  interested.  This  in  spite  of  the  fact  that  she  was  an 
excellent  customer,  and  bought  heavily. 

As  a  result  of  his  talk  with  this  customer  and  his  per- 
ception of  the  need,  the  merchant  started  his  classified 
lists.  He  kept  these  lists  small  at  first,  building  them  up 
slowly  as  he  learned  the  tastes  of  various  customers.  He 
now  is  able,  when  he  gets  a  shipment  of  books,  to  select 
several  which  are  almost  certain  to  appeal  to  some  of 
these  customers.  Letters  telling  of  the  arrival  of  the 
books  usually  bring  personal  calls  or  mail  orders. 

Closely  allied  with  the  problems  of  moving  the  stock 
is  the  general  question  of  training  salesmen.  In  spite  of 
the  thousands  of  titles  on  the  shelves  the  salesmen  must 
be  able  to  help  the  customer  who  does  not  know  just  what 
he  wants;  he  must  be  familiar,  in  a  general  way,  with  the 
contents  of  the  new  books,  and  know  a  good  deal  about 
literary  history;  and  he  must  have  a  certain  taste  of  his 
own  in  books.  Otherwise,  he  may  be  merely  an  order 
taker. 

Meetings  Help  Train  Employees 

In  order  to  train  his  men,  one  merchant  holds  regular 
meetings.  He  has  three  distinct  puqxises  in  holding 
meetings,  and  three  kinds  of  meetings.  One,  at  which  all 
the  salespeople  are  present,  takes  place  every  two  weeks. 
This  meeting  is  for  purely  educational  purposes.  The 
merchant  gives  talks  about  specific  books,  or  certain  classes 
of  books,  which  the  salespeople  are  selling  every  day.  For 
instance,  he  devoted  three  meetings  to  the  novel.  In  the 
course  of  these  three  meetings  he  mentioned  specific  books 
which  stood  on  the  shelves  of  the  store,  and  which  repre- 
sented tendencies  in  the  development  of  the  novel.  At 
another  time  he  devoted  several  meetings  to  a  book  on 
salesmanship,  with  the  idea  of  helping  the  salespeople 
sell  that  particular  book,  and  also  to  give  them  some  idea 
of  the  fundamental  principles  behind  successful  selling. 

A  second  kind  of  meeting  is  held  by  this  merchant 
every  Tuesday  morning.  The  merchant  has  keenly  felt 
that  he,  as  the  buyer,  gets  a  lot  of  information  about 
current  news  in  the  book  trade  which  would  probably  sift 
down  to  the  salespeople  only  after  weeks  or  months,  if  it 
were  to  reach  them  indirectly.  So  he  started  the  Tuesday 
morning  meetings.  He  takes  the  part  of  the  salespeople 
from  the  floor  at  one  time,  and  part  at  another  time,  in 
order  not  to  interrupt  business.  During  the  week,  in  the 
course  of  his  talks  with  travelling  salesmen  and  from 
other  sources  open  to  him,  he  has  collected  in  a  folder  the 
various  facts  he  wants  to  pass  alone:.  The  meeting  is 
taken  up  with  a  discussion  of  these  bits  of  news. 

The  third  kind  of  meeting  which  this  merchant  holds 
is  less  of  an  educational  nature.  It  is  held  on  the  last  day 
of  each  month,  and  in  the  half  hour  after  closing.  At  this 
meeting,  which  is  attended  by  every  employee,  the  mer- 
chant reviews  the  plans  which  he  made  at  the  first  of  the 

47 


month  just  past,  and  discusses  how  far  these  plans  have 
been  carried  out.  He  also  outlines  new  plans  for  the 
coming  month — tells  which  lines  he  wants  to  push,  what 
volume  of  sales  he  is  anxious  to  secure,  and  the  like. 

As  a  supplement  to  these  meetings,  the  merchant  keeps 
a  record  which  shows  him  just  what  each  of  the  sales- 
people is  doing.  The  book  gives  the  salesman's  record 
not  only  for  the  month  just  past,  but  also  for  the  corres- 
ponding months  of  the  previous  years.  In  this  way  the 
merchant  can  see  how  the  various  individuals  and  depart- 
ments afe  progressing.  Increased  sales  totals,  plus  in- 
creased conscientiousness  in  the  details  of  store  work, 
plus  increased  ability  to  work  together  with  the  whole  or- 
ganization taken  together,  make  for  increased  value  to 
the  firm. 

The  merchant  frequently  calls  the  salesmen  to  his  desk 
and  shows  them  their  records.  In  fact,  they  quite  often 
come  without  being  called,  because  they  are  eager  to  make 
the  best  possible  showing. 

So  much  for  some  of  the  methods  which  the  merchants 
are  using  to  buy  and  sell,  and  to  train  their  men.  The 
figures  on  this  page  indicate  the  average  costs  from  the 
43  more  efficient  book  stores  included  in  this  investiga- 
tion. The  total  cost  of  doing  business,  you  will  notice, 
averages  26.9  per  cent.  This  is  a  fairly  high  figure  com- 
pared with  the  costs  in  some  other  lines,  and  the  experi- 
ence of  quite  a  number  of  the  stores  indicated  that  it  can 
be  lowered  effectively  if  the  proper  steps  are  taken. 

For  instance,  one  merchant  is  doing  a  business  of  more 
than  $100,000  on  the  basis  of  23.8  per  cent.,  and  is  making 
a  very  satisfactory  profit.  Another  is  doing  an  even 
larger  volume  of  business  than  this  on  the  basis  of  19.2 
per  cent.  Still  another,  with  a  volume  of  $34,000  in  an- 
nual sales,  uses  only  18  per  cent,  of  this  amount  as  his 
cost  of  doing  business.  Several  stores  are  operating  on  a 
basis  around  23  per  cent.,  and  this  seems  to  be  a  clearly 
attainable  standard.  From  these  figures  it  seems  evident 
that  it  is  necessary  for  the  bookseller  to  watch  the 
corners  on  expense,  as  well  as  to  develop  the  best  methods 
of  buying  and  selling. 

Plans  for  Cutting  Expenses  Carefully 

It  may  be  interesting  here  to  tell  you  just  what  one 
merchant  is  doing  in  this  direction — his  cost  of  doing 
business  is  below  20  per  cent.,  so  his  methods  are  of 
especial  interest.     He  says: 

"Our  shipping  department  is  located  on  our  third 
floor.  Handling  small  freight  by  elevator  required  more 
time  and  trucking  than  seemed  right  to  us.  Our  handling 
charges  were  high.  We  began  looking  for  another  method 
of  handling  small  packages  which  did  not  require  so  much 
labor. 

"Simply  by  installing  a  steel  spiral  chute  we  have  re- 
duced materially  our  costs  in  this  department.  This 
chute  takes  a  box  weighing  up  to  350  pounds  and  delivers 
it  from  the  shipping  department  to  the  shipping  floor 
without  the  need  for  any  trucking.  If  will  pay  for  itself 
this  year.  The  freight  elevators  are  now  used  very  little- 
only  for  heavy,  bulky  boxes. 

"Another  saving  in  handling  charges  came  in  the  ar- 
rangement of  the  shipping  floor  itself.  Before  we  had  a 
new  addition — which  we  have  recently  built — completed, 
our  shipping  floor  was  below  the  floor  used  by  our  trucks 
and  wagons.  This  required  the  lifting  of  all  freight.  By 
raising  this  floor  to  a  level  with  trucks  and  wasrons, 
freiuht  can  now  be  moved  more  rapidly  and  with  con- 
siderably less  labor. 

"A  sprinkler  system  throughout  the  building  reduced 
our  insurance  rates  on  merchandise  from  $1.32  to  45  cents 
per  thousand,  and  saved  us  50'  per  cent,  on  our  building 
rates.  This  automatic  system  will  pay  for  itself  in  six 
vears. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


"Another  big  saving  comes  in  having  men  work  in 
their  own  departments  only  after  they  have  mastered  the 
general  run  of  our  business.  They  increase  their  own 
efficiency  as  they  go  along.  We  keep  periodical  checks 
on  the  accuracy  and  speed  of  our  book  'pickers'  in  the 
stock  rooms,  as  well  as  on  our  stenographers.  They 
know  they  are  being  watched  in  a  friendly  way  and  they 
make  every  effort  to  increase  their  efficiency  between 
checking  periods. 

"Other  savings  worth  while  come  through  the  loyalty 
and  interest  which  all  our  employees  have  in  our  business. 
You  will  see  them  turning  off  lights  which  are  not  needed, 
being  careful  of  supplies,  and  in  reporting  anything  about 
the  building  which  needs  attention.  These  are  only  little 
things,  but  they  count. 

"Last  summer  some  of  our  employees  made  new  book 
trucks  out  of  old  packing  boxes  and  a  set  of  four  revolv- 
ing castors.  These  are  used  for  assembling  orders  in  the 
stuck  rooms  and  conveying  them  to  the  shipping  room. 
These  trucks  are  as  good  as  any  that  could  have  been 
purchased,  and  the  cost  is  covered  by  the  price  of  the 
castors. 

"Another  saving  comes  in  the  way  of  taking  addi- 
tional discounts.  Many  publishers  will  allow  us  extra 
discounts  for  cash  in  advance.  In  September  we  dis- 
counted our  bills  with  a  number  of  publishers  in  advance 
up  to  February  of  next  year.  On  one  bill  this  netted  us 
an  additional  discount  of  5  per  cent.,  which  amounted  to 
$157.50  extra  saving  on  an  order  of  $7,000. 

"It  is  often  the  little  savings  that  turn  the  balance 
at  the  end  of  the  year,  when  the  profit  and  loss  statement 
is  being  figured.  It  pays  to  watch  these  'tag-ends.'  as 
well  as  the  larger  problems  of  merchandising." 


THE   PROBLEM   OF   QUICK   TURNOVER 

Retail  Merchants  Interested  in  Merchandise  and  Labor 
Turnover— Importance  of  Quick  Turnover 

TWO  distinct  kinds  of  turnover  which  are  extemely 
interesting  to  the  retail  merchant  are:  Merchandise 
turnover  and  Labor  turnover.  The  former  is  the 
process  of  selling  a  volume  of  goods  at  small  profits  often 
repeated.  The  old  idea  in  retailing  was  to  get  the  greatest 
possible  profit  on  each  transaction,  depending  on  the  size 
of  that  profit  on  each  sale  to  bring  the  total  to  a  satisfac- 
tory point.  The  new  idea  is  simply  to  sell  more  articles 
at  a  small  profit  to  accomplish  the' same  end. 

The  word  "turnover"  lias  been  given  a  very  wide 
usage  owing  to  the  strong  tendency  of  progressive  mer- 
chants to  seek  a  frequent  shifting  of  stock  through  a 
large  number  of  individual  sales,  and  many  merchant? 
have  become  so  thoroughly  impressed  with  the  possibili- 
ties in  frequent  turnover  that  they  will  not  permit  mer- 
chandise to  remain  on  their  shelves  which  does  not  show 
"signs  of  life."  Tf  they  find  that  they  have  bought  a 
"sticker"  they  will  have  a  special  sale  on  the  item,  cut 
the  price  to  a  point  where  there  is  practically  no  profit 
left,  and  then  take  a  mental  oath  not  to  get  caught  with 
that  particular  item  again.  The  merchant  quite  frequently 
goes  to  extremes  in  his  desire  for  a  turnover,  but  that  ten- 
dency is  much  less  dangerous  than  the  temptation  to  look 
for  larger  profit  lines. 

Importance  of  Quick  Turnover 

All  authorities  agree  that  the  biggest  truth  in  retail 
merchandising  is  that  of  quick  turnover,  and  is  the  one 
straight  road  to  mercantile  success.  Slow  moving  stock 
is,  a  liability,  while  healthy,  active  stock  is  an  asset.  You 
probably  admit  this  without  argument,  but  it  is  not  al- 
ways so  simple  to  determine  which   line  of  merchandise 


or  which  article  is  going  to  fall  in  the  asset  class  after 
you  have  paid  freight  and  put  it  on  your  shelf.  Every 
manufacturer,  no  matter  what  advertising  plan  he  follows, 
is  bound  to  claim  that  his  goods  will  move  faster  from 
your  shelves  than  those  of  his  competitors.  He  knows 
that  you  want  quick  turnover.  He  realizes  perfectly  that 
the  well  advertised  merchandise  sells  faster  and  with 
less  effort  on  the  part  of  yourself  and  your  sales  people. 

The  surest  way  to  tell  which  merchandise  moves  well, 
and  which  develops  into  a  "sticker,"  is  to  watch  your  re- 
orders on  certain  lines  and  observe  what  goods  are  asked 
for  by  the  customers.  Some  very  successful  retailers  have 
a  system  of  colored  labels.  When  the  merchandise  comes 
in  fresh  and  clean,  a  green  label  is  put  on  each  of  the 
boxes;  at  the  end  of  thirty  days  a  yellow  label  is  planted 
on  top  of  the  green  label ;  at  the  end  of  sixty  days  a  red 
label  is  put  on  those  boxes  remaining,  and  the  merchant 
knows  immediately  that  goods  in  these  boxes  like  his 
society  to  the  extent  of  staying  with  him  for  sixty  days 
at  least. 

Slow  Moving  Merchandise 

Needless  to  say  there  are  some  lines  of  merchandise 
that  move  slowly  naturally,  but  if  this  test  is  made  on 
competing  lines,  the  merchant  will  have  little  difficulty 
deciding  which  of  the  two  gives  him  the  quickest  turn- 
over. A  well-kept  inventory  will,  of  course,  give  th« 
same  result,  and  its  use  has  so  many  other  advantages 
that  no  progressive  merchant  will  be  without  it.  Guessing 
at  the  turnover  on  any  line  of  goods  should  never  be 
guessed  at,  but  should  be  known  absolutely. 

The  other  kind  of  turnover  is  commonly  called  Labor 
turnover,  and  lias  to  do  with  the  human  element  instead 
of  the  merchandise.  When  you  employ  a  bookkeeper,  a 
stenographer  or  a  salesman,  and  give  up  a  certain  amount 
of  time  in  order  to  teach  him  your  ways,  the  kind  of 
goods  you  sell  and  the  way  you  treat  your  customers,  you 
have  an  investment  in  that  mdn  which  is  not  always  in 
direct  proportion  to  his  salary.  It  has  cost  you  some- 
thing to  teach  him  these  things,  and  that  expenditure  can 
only  be  repaid  by  conscientious  effort  on  his  part.  If  you 
don't  believe  that  this  is  true,  stop  and  think  what  would 
happen  if  your  whole  staff  of  well  trained  employees 
should  suddenly  depart  and  leave  you  to  train  those  suc- 
ceeding to  their  positions.  Your  imagination  will  readily 
tell  you  that  every  employee  in  your  organization  is  an 
investment  and  should  be  treated  as  such. 

Many  employers  seem  to  feel  that  one  of  the  chief 
joys  of  proprietorship  is  the  authority  which  enables 
them  to  fire  their  employees  or  treat  them  in  such  a  way 
that  they  don't  wait  to  be  fired.  If  such  men  would  stop 
and  consider  the  amount  of  money  they  were  taking  out 
of  their  plants  every  time  they  discharged  someone,  their 
profits  would  be  larger  and  their  pay  roll  mortality  less. 

Labor  Turnover  a  Big  Factor  in  Profits 
The  importance  of  Labor  turnover  is  recognized  not 
only  by  successful  managers  of  ljrge  institutions,  but  by 
banks  who  are  called  upon  to  make  loans.  In  these  days 
of  scientific  business,  it  is  not  at  all  uncommon  for  in- 
vestigators to  find  a  cause  for  other  irregularities  through 
the  fact  that  an  institution  is  unable  to  hold  its  people. 
One  of  the  biggest  steel  companies  in  the  country  points 
with  the  greatest  pride  possible  to  a  large  decrease  in 
labor  turnover  in  the  last  five  years,  and  they  are  quite 
willing  to  admit  that  their  large  dividend  showing  is 
largely  due  to  the  greater  efficiency  obtained  by  holdim; 
the  employees  who  have  cost  them  good  money  to  educate. 
When  there  is  personal  contact  between  employer  ami 
employee,  it  should  be  a  comparatively  simple  matter  to 
keep  down  Labor  turnover  and  the  same  things  which 
produce  this  result  have  a  tendency  to  make  more  loyalt\ 
and  better  working  spirit  in  your  organization. 


48 


^wmssmimttmsmmsssmmfs^^smsim^s^s^t 


mmmtmmmmmsmmmmsm 


and 
Sporting 
Goods 


•0 


New  British  Toys 

Large   Exhibit   at   Manchester — Adjustable   Velocipede — 

Soldiers  at  Military  Tactics — Traveling  Rockers — 

All  Except  Old  Dolls'   Heads 

TOYS  now  on  exhibition  in  Manchester,  England, 
are  interesting'  with  regard  to  offerings  for  the 
1917  trade.  While  the  range  is  tremendous,  models 
are  for  the  most  part  old  ideas  worked  over  again  re- 
painted and  frequently  improved.  The  big  business  done 
last  year  is  expected  to  be  equalled  this  year.  Dolls  seem 
to  be  the  aim  of  almost  every  toy  maker  and  a  vast  and 
varied  collection  might  be  made  by  selecting  even  one 
model  from  each  firm.  As  a  result,  dolls  are  improving 
and  are  selling  rapidly.  Some  Italian  dolls  are  shown 
with  closing  eyes;  plush  animals  of  various  types  are 
shown  despite  the  high  price  of  plush.  Construction  toys, 
mechanical  and  wooden  toys,  with  dolls,  constitute  the 
leading  lines. 

Indoor  games  and  wooden  articles  are  remarkably 
fine  this  year.  Indeed  the  exhibitors  are  of  the  opinion 
that  practically  every  line  formerly  imported  from  Ger- 
many is  now  made  in  England,  better  and  more  attractive 
than  any  of  those  ever  turned  out  by  Germany  and  not- 
withstanding the  high  cost  of  materials,  at  remarkably 
low  prices.  Perhaps  dolls'  heads  are  not  yet  up  to  the 
best  German-made  heads,  but  they  bid  fair  to  place  the 
British-made  article  in  the  premier  position  in  the  very 
near  future.  i 

Electrical  toys  are  better  than  ever  and  demonstrate 
clearly  to  the  small  child  the  principle  upon  which  the 
bulk  of  everyday  industry  is  based. 

Among  the  latest  toy  inventions  patented  is  a  new 
velocipede,  adjustable  for  different-sized  children;  there 
is  also  a  rocking  horse  which  really  travels;  the  rockers 
are  in  two  sections,  one  being  secured  to  the  horse's  hind 


MADONNA   AND   CHILD. 

A  new  production  by  the  capable  American  artist, 
Jessie  Willeox  Smith. 


49 


.-.7r*:m 


legs,  the  other  to  the  front,  so  that  when  the  horse  rocks 
forward  the  hind  part  slides  forward  on  the  rockers  and 
in  the  reverse  movement  a  spring-  causes  the  rockers  to 
slide  forward,  by  means  of  a  latch  these  travels  may  be 
prevented.  A  skipping  doll;  a  dancing  doll;  soldiers'  per- 
forming military  tactics  race  games,  puzzles,  new  guns, 
swords,  etc.,  are  also  among  the  latest  inventions  re- 
corded. 

NEW  JAPANESE  TOYS 

The  Japanese  toy  output  continues  in  a  vast  variety 
of  small,  cheap  articles.  This  year  the  range  of  mechani- 
cal toys  shows  a  number  of  additions  since  last  season. 
One  novelty  is  a  set  of  tiny  racing  autos.  They  are  about 
three  inches  in  length,  made  of  painted  tin.  One  push-pin 
starts  the  set  of  four  off  at  once. 

Many  other  Japanese  articles  are  shown  imitative  of 
pre-war  German  goods  such  as  lithographed  tin  pails, 
basins,  shovels,  wash  sets,  etc.  Novelty  games  played  with 
wooden  rings,  celluloid  balls,  nets,  etc.,  are  also  offered. 

New  York  Toy  Fair 

Real  Chemical  Wagon  to  Put  Out  Fires  —  Based  on  Bed- 
Time  Stories  —  Demand  for  Larger  and 
More  Realistic  Toys 

TOY  makers  are  working  with  greater  vigor  than 
ever  before  to  turn  out  such  toys  as  will  secure  a 
big  home  market  as  well  as  increase  the  foreign 
market  for  their  goods  regardless  of  war  conditions.  In 
many  new  lines  of  novelties,  improvement  is  evident  at 
the  Toy  Fair,  held  last  month  in  New  York.  Construc- 
tion toys  have  met  with  such  decided  success  that  every 
exhibit  brings  out  something  new  in  that  line.  Such  ar- 
ticles as  automobiles,  trains,  war  vessels  of  all  sorts,  and 
war  toys  for  "land"  fighting  are  attracting  very  great 
interest.  One  new  model  is  an  artillery  wagon  with  a 
driver,  team  and  detachable  gun  carriage.  A  new  pas- 
senger and  freight  station  for  the  "American  Flyer"  is 
the  pride  of  the  firm  which  makes  it.  There  is  a  real 
motor  boat  of  finely  finished  mahogany  with  electric  mo- 
tor and  screw  propeller,  also  electric  war  vessels  which 
retail  from  $6.75  to  $25.00  each. 

Then  a  chemical  wagon  is  capable  of  putting  out  a 
real  fire  if  it  is  still  at  its  beginning,  the  wagon  has  a 
5-gallon  tank,  force  pump,  hose,  and  scaling  ladder  and 
retails  at  about  $20. 

Makers  say  there  is  a  market  open  for  larger  and 
more  expensive  toys  generally  than  have  been  produced  so 
far.  Such  "moving"  models  as  a  compound  merry-go- 
round;  machine  shop  with  trip  hammer,  and  Ferris  wheel 
built  to  revolve  by  air  pressure,  are  new. 

Other  novelties  include  a  Charlie  Chaplin  doll  and 
book;  a  Ford  wheelbarrow,  a  hydroproof  racket;  five  sizes 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


of  kitchen  cabinet,  complete  with  utensils  and  groceries: 
150  styles  of  moving-eye  composition  dolls;  musical 
games;  cars,  wagons,  puzzles,  etc. 

The  "20th  'Century  Crusader"  is  a  horseman  on  an 
18-inch  grooved  wood  base  projected  from  back  to  front 
by  rubber  springs;  he  spears  a  swinging  hoop  in  front  of 
him. 

Playthings  hased  on  the  well-known  "bed-time 
stories'"  are  original  and  well  made;  they  include  all  the 
characters  known  through  the  stories. 

Articles  made  of  California  red-wood  are  interesting 
and  do  much  to  advertise  the  resources  of  their  birth- 
place. 

LEGISLATORS  FROWN  ON  ELECTRIC  TOYS 

Winnipeg. — The  law  amendments  committee  took  the 
joy  out  of  life  to-day  from  hundreds  of  Manitoba  kiddies 
who  have  been  having  fun  with  electrically-operated  toys. 

The  committee  considered  a  suggestion  to  restrict  the 
sale  of  certain  electrical  appliances,  such  as  transformers 
which  modified  the  electric  current  that  runs  through  the 


wires  so  that  the  voltage  is  low  enough  to  run  the  tiny 
motors  in  toy  trains  and  other  similar  devices. 

These  contrivances,  it  was  declared,  are  dangerous. 

Their  sale,  therefore,  will  be  restricted.  The  committee, 
however,  arranged  for  an  appeal,  in  any  case  of  this  kind, 
to  the  public  utilities  commissioner. 

A  NEW  ERASER 

An  illustration  is  shown  here  of  an  attractive  new 
eraser  .just  brought  out  by  Waldon  Roberts  called  "Cora- 


line,"  a  specimen  of  which  has  reached  ye  editor.  The 
material  is  soft  and  pliable  and  the  eraser  does  eleaft 
work. 


Should  Manufacturers  Make  Prices? 

Opinions  on  a  Live  Subject — Knowles  Bill  Being  Opposed  in  Many  Quarters — How  it 
Affects  the  Retailer — Opinions  Wanted  from  Readers. 


THE  great  majority  of  men  in  Canada  are  not  able  to 
talk  intelligently  on  the  Subject  of  price  maintenance 
— for  the  good  and  simple  reason  that  this  is  a  semi- 
technical  subject,  and  one  that  has  not  commonly  or  acute- 
ly come  up  for  study.  Among  advertising  men,  especially 
advertising  managers  of  firms  making  a  standardized, 
identified  product,  marketed  with  the  aid  of  advertising; 
and  among  manufacturers  of  a  trade-marked  product  of 
high  quality,  the  subject  of  fixed  re-sale  prices  has  for  a 
long  time  been  one  of  prime  concern.  But  for  the  general 
run  of  men,  price  maintenance  as  a  name  and  proposition 
is  without  significance. 

Because  of  all  this,  BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 
proposes  to  provide  here  and  now  some  information  and 
opinion  on  the  matter  of  price  maintenance  of  the  manu- 
facturer's claimed  right  to  fix  and  enforce  the  price  at 
which  his  product  shall  be  retailed. 

Some  Illustrative  Examples 

The  subject  of  price  maintenance  will  take  on  greater 
clarity  for  many  minds  if  we  make  its  applications  and 
relations  specific.  Examples  of  fixed  re-sale  prices — fixed, 
that  is,  by  the  manufacturer — are: — 

Several  brands  of  collars,  two  for  30  cents. 

Columbia  Grafonplas,  $15  to  $350. 

Waterman  fountain  pens,  $2.50. 

Belding's  silk  fabrics,  $1.25  to  $2.50. 

Jiffy-Jell,  two  packages  for  25c. 

Palmolive  specialties,  25c  and  50c. 

Overland  motor  cars,  $665. 

Pears'  Soap,  15c. 

And  so  on,  and  so  on. 

The  prices  indicated  in  the  above  examples  are  adver- 
tised prices — prices  stated  in  the  makers'  advertisements. 
But  it  does  not  follow,  in  every  instance,  that  these  fixed 
prices  are  enforced  prices. 

A  familiar  example  of  a  fixed  and  enforced  price  is  the 
Waterman  Fountain  Pen,  $2.50.  This  pen  is  sold  to  dealers 
only  on  specific  agreement  that  it  shall  be  retailed  at  the 
price  or  prices  fixed  by  the  makers.  Similarly  many  other 
advertised  lines  are  sold  to  dealers  with  an  agreement  by 

50 


which  the  dealer  contracts  to  sell  at  the  prices  fixed  by 
manufacturers.  In  many  other  cases,  the  price  fixed  and 
advertised  by  the  manufacturer  is  cut  by  the  dealer — not 
by  all  dealers,  but  by  some  who  hope  by  this  price-cutting 
to  attract  and  divert  trade. 

The  price  fixed  and  advertised  by  the  maker,  when  not 
enforced,  is  intended  to  assist  the  retailer  to  sell  the  price- 
fixed  article  with  greater  ease,  and  to  obtain  a  full  profit. 
It  is  intended  to  protect  the  consumer  against  an  exorbit- 
ant price— this  by  making  him  familiar  with  a  right  price. 
The  advertised  fixed  price  is  also  designed  to  facilitate  the 
sale  of  the  article  universally — by  making  the  price  uni- 
form in  all  parts  of  the  country. 

Many  advertised  trade-marked  or  identified  commodi- 
ties have  no  prices  fixed  by  the  maker;  their  re-sale  price 
is  left  entirely  to  the  dealer.  For  example,  the  resale 
prices  of  Old  Dutch  Cleanser,  Sunkist  Oranges,  Yale  Locks 
and  Grape  Nuts  are  not  indicated  in  the  public  advertising; 
and  the  inference  is  that  the  dealer  may  set  his  own  price, 
being  governed  always  by  the  commonly  prevailing  price 
and  by  local  competition. 

In  some  cases,  from  the  nature  of  the  goods,  the  retail- 
ers of  advertised  identified  goods  are  in  reality  the  special 
agents  of  manufacturers.  Thus  pianos,  phonographs,  type- 
writers, adding  machines,  motor  cars,  agricultural  imple- 
ments, are  commonly  sold  through  designated  dealers  or 
agents,  in  which  case  retail  price  control  is  comparatively 
simple,  for  the  relation  between  agent  and  maker  is  a 
direct  one.  But  in  the  case  of  those  commodities  sold  com- 
monly through  jobbers — trade-marked  grocery  specialties, 
men's  wear  specialties,  drug  specialties,  and  so  on — it  is 
obviously  much  more  difficult  to  enforce  or  control  resale 
prices. 

The  Question  of  Public  Interest 
The  query  will  have  arisen  in  many  minds — is  it  in  the 
interests  of  consumers   to  have  re-sale   prices  fixed   and 
enforced  ? 

The  natural  quick  conclusion  is  that  it  is  a  good  thing 
for  the  consumer  to  be  able  to  buy  wThat  he  wants  at  the 
lowest  possible  price — at  prices  fixed  by  competition.  Also, 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


many  will  be  inclined  to  say  at  the  beginning  of  their  think- 
ing on  this  subject,  that  for  a  maker  to  fix  and  enforce  the 
re-sale  price  of  his  product  is  a  "trust"  or  "combine"  pro- 
cedure, that  it  is  taking  away  from  the  liberty  of  the 
dealer,  that  it  is  a  sort  of  mug's  game  by  which  the  maker 
can  set  any  old  price  on  his  product  and  get  away  with  it. 
But  one  runs  up  very  early  in  his  honest  thinking 
against  the  price-cutting  practice  with  its  long  train  of 
evil  consequences;  and  one  is  compelled  in  fairness  to  ask 
the  question:  Whether  it  is  better,  in  the  public  interest, 
and  in  the  interest  of  the  consumer,  for  price-cutting  to 
flourish;  or  for  there  to  be  universal  uniformity  of  price 
on  standard,  identified  goods?  Or  to  put  the  question  in 
concrete  terms:  Whether  it  is  better,  in  the  public  inter- 
ests, and  in  the  interests  of  the  consumer,  to  have  Kodaks 
sold  at  maker-fixed  or  at  dealer-made  prices  ?  or  to  have 
Hoosier  Kitchen  Cabinets  sold  at  maker-fixed  or  at  dealer- 
made  prices?  or  to  have  Ford  Motor  Cars  sold  at  maker- 
fixed  prices  or  at  dealer-made  prices  ?  and  so  on.  When  one 
puts  the  question  in  specific  terms  to  the  intelligent  con- 
sumer, the  probability  is  that  he  will  reply — "I  prefer  a 
maker-fixed  and  enforced  price  to  dealer-made  prices." 
And  in  saying  this  the  consumer  says  in  effect:  "I  have 
more  faith  in  the  justice  and  fairness  of  the  price  fixed  by 
the  maker  than  in  the  price  any  dealer  would  charge  me 
if  the  retail  price  were  left  entirely  to  him." 

Makers'  Versus  Dealers'  Price 

Right  here  one  begins  to  get  at  the  kernel  of  the  nut; 
and  the  whole  question  of  price  maintenance  begins  to  take 
on  an  added  luminosity. 

Dealer-made  prices  are  decidedly  less  trustworthy, 
taking  them  by  and  large,  than  are  maker-fixed  prices.  In 
the  case  of  a  standardized,  identified  product,  it  is  difficult 
for  the  dealer  to  get  an  excessive  profit — difficult  because 
of  the  public's  knowledge  of  the  retail  value  of  the  adver- 
tised, standardized,  identified  product.  Such  products,  as  a 
rule,  have  a  fairly  level  maximum  retail  price.  Any  varia- 
tion from  this  commonly  known,  recognized,  and  accepted 
price,  is  downward  rather  than  upward.  And  dealers  after 
big  profits  prefer,  as  a  rule,  to  sell  unadvertised,  unstand- 
ardized,  unidentified  goods — merchandize  which  the  public 
cannot  accurately  value  or  make  price  comparisons  on.  On 
such  goods  dealers  rely  on  making  a  generous,  if  not  an 
excessive,  profit. 

Just  here  it  may  be  well  to  define  what  is  meant  by 
"standardized,  identified,"  as  applied  to  merchandise.  By 
"standardized"  is  meant  goods  that  have  a  known  and 
maintained  standard  of  quality.  By  "identified"  is  meant 
goods  branded  or  trade-marked  and  maker-acknowledged. 
The  two  terms  taken  together  usually  imply  extensive 
advertising,  and  accepted  responsibility  for  the  high  qual- 
ity and  all-round  satisfactoriness  of  the  goods. 

The  question  arises — Is  it  better  for  the  community  at 
large,  and  for  individuals  and  families  in  particular,  to  be 
supplied  with  standardized,  identified  goods  or  with  goods 
of  no  established  or  declared  quality,  made  by  no  revealed 
maker,  and  for  which  no  responsibility  is  accepted  or  re- 
dress possible,  should  the  goods  prove  unsatisfactory?  The 
question  carries  its  own  answer. 

Where  Price-Cutting  Occurs 

Price-cutting,  from  the  nature  of  things,  takes  place 
commonly  on  standardized,  identified  goods.  There  is 
little  significance  or  conviction  in  an  advertisement  which 
reads : — 

Moirette  Petticoats,  regular  value  $10;  special  price, 
Thursday,  $5. 

Every  woman  of  common-sense  knows  that  both  of 
these  prices  are  arbitrary — dealer-made.  The  very  gulf 
between  the  "regular"  price  and  the  special  price  suggests 
original  and  tremendous  price-inflation. 


But  should  a  dealer  advertise: — 

Quaker  Puffed  Wheat,  regular  15c,  special,  10c, 
then  the  consumer  knows  that  a  genuine  reduction  or  bar- 
gain is  offered. 

Price-Cutting  as  it  Affects  the  Retailer 

Let  us  look  at  price-cutting  from  the  point  of  view  of 
the  retailer  of  an  advertised,  standardized,  identified  com- 
modity— say,  Ingersoll  Dollar  Watch. 

This  watch  is  admittedly  excellent  value  and  is  in 
great  demand.  Suppose  that  some  big  sto're  in  a  populous 
community  cuts  the  price  to  79  cents,  and  advertises  this 
price  extensively.  The  instant  local  effect  will  be  that 
smaller  dealers — 

Will  have  to  meet  the  cut  price; 

Or  struggle  to  maintain  the  regular  price; 

Or  quit  selling  the  Ingersoll  watch. 

If  they  meet  the  cut  price  they  will  be  selling  at  a 
clear  loss.  If  they  struggle  to  maintain  the  regular  price, 
this  in  the  face  of  the  known  fact  that  the  watch  can  be 
obtained  elsewhere  for  79  cents,  they  run  the  risk  of  losing 
a  customer  permanently,  and  they  are  under  the  necessity 
of  putting  energy  and  time  into  the  sales  process,  to 
overcome  the  buyer's  resistance. 

If  they  cease  handling  the  Ingersoll  Watch,  their  cus- 
tomers who  ask  for  this  watch  are  disappointed,  and  per- 
haps offended,  affirming  that  the  dealer  is  a  "back  num- 
ber." In  any  case,  the  small  dealer  suffers.  There  are 
two  points  to  be  noted  in  connection  with  the  above  illus- 
tration: one  is  that  it  takes  a  minimum  of  time  and  energy 
on  the  part  of  the  dealer  or  his  staff  to  sell  a  widely- 
advertised,  standardized,  identified  article  whose  price  is 
maintained  universally,  for  it  is  already  fully  sold  in  a 
very  real  sense  to  the  customer;  the  other  is  that  it  is  of 
advantage  to  the  public  to  be  able  to  get  widely-advertised 
and  desired  goods  everywhere  —  without  the  effort  of 
search. 

Also,  there  is  an  economic  question  involved  in  this 
illustration;  it  is  in  the  public  interest  that  the  distribu- 
tion of  the  merchandise  of  general  consumption  shall  be 
widespread  and  in  many  hands  rather  than  centralized  in 
a  few  big  stores.  Also,  it  is  far  better  for  community 
growth  and  prosperity  that  there  shall  be  many  retailers 
of  the  commodities  of  common  consumption  rather  than 
few  retailers.  What  is  wanted  is  not  so  much  fewer 
retailers,  but  more  efficient  retailers. 

Price-Cutting  Hurts  the  Manufacturer 

In  the  Ingersoll  Watch  illustration,  as  above,  is  in- 
volved the  manufacturer's  interest.  Is  it  a  good  thing  for 
a  manufacturer's  product  to  be  sold  only  by  a  few  big 
dealers  ?  or  is  it  better  from  his  point  of  view  to  have-  a 
multitude  of  small  dealers  distributing  his  merchandise? 
Perhaps  the  answer  to  this  question  is  to  be  given  by 
each  individual  manufacturer  concerned.  Some  manu- 
facturers openly  declared  that  they  prefer  to  have  the  big 
distributors — the  department  stores  and  big  local  retailers 
— as  customers  rather  than  multitudes  of  little  shops.  They 
say  that  their  selling  expense  is  greatly  reduced  when 
they  sell  to  a  few  big  distributors.  This  is  admitted  be- 
cause it  is  obvious.  But,  generally  speaking,  the  makers 
who  prefer  to  sell  to  a  few  big  distributors  are  making 
unidentified  merchandise,  and,  therefore,  unadvertised  mer- 
chandise— that  is,  nationally  advertised  merchandise.  As 
for  the  makers  of  nationally  advertised  merchandise,  they, 
as  a  rule,  seek  and  desire  the  greatest  possible  number  of 
distributors,  because  thus  are  maximum  sales  achieved. 

Coming  back  to  the  Ingersoll  Watch  case;  if  the  dis- 
tribution were  confined  to  a  few  big  stores,  the  total  sales 
would  of  a  certainty  be  less  than  if  10,000  dealers  in  Canada 
were  selling  this  watch.  As  a  matter  of  fact,  the  Inger- 
soll Dollar  Watch  is  sold  by  100,000  dealers  on  this  con- 


51 


15  ()  OK  SELLER     AND     STATIONER 


tinerit,  and  it  is  an  inevitable  conclusion  to  draw  that  it  is 
this  very  fact  of  widespread  distribution,  joined  to  exten- 
sive and  long-maintained  advertising,  that  has  built  up 
the  vast  business  of  the  makers  of  this  watch. 

Go  one  more  step  in  the  consideration  of  this  case: 
suppose  that  the  distribution  of  the  Ingersoll  Watch  fell 
into  the  hands  of  a  few  big  dealers — the  result  of  price- 
cutting,  there  would  probably  be  an  eventual  inclination  to 
subordinate  this  line,  and  perhaps  an  elimination  of  it 
altogether;  this  for  two  plain  reasons:  When  they  had 
secured  a  practical  monopoly  of  sale,  the  advertising  and 
trade-attracting  value  of  the  line  offered  at  a  cut  price 
would  cease,  for  there  would  be  no  trade-revision ;  also,  the 
very  fact  that  the  watch  was  being  sold  at  a  cut,  and  pre- 
sumably non-profit-yielding  price,  the  desire  to  sell  it 
would  decline  to  the  disappearing  point;  at  which  time  the 
Ingersoll  Watch  makers  would  be  without  a  business. 

The  economic  fact  is  that  cutting  the  price  of  a  stand- 
ardized, identified  and  nationally  advertised  commodity, 
while  it  may  temporarily  speed  up  local  and  individual  de- 
mand, tends  to  reduce  distribution;  and  this  in  time  leads 
to  reduced  consumption;  and  in  turn  leads  to  the  practical 
ruin  of  a  business,  and  to  the  wiping  out  of  the  value  of 
of  the  trade-mark  built  up  by  years  of  sedulous  effort  and 
extensive  advertising. 

One  asks,  therefore:  Is  price-cutting,  in  its  conse- 
quences, good  for  retailers,  manufacturers  and  consumers  ? 
For  let  it  be  remembered  that  consumers  are  related  di- 
rectly or  indirectly  to  manufacturing  prosperity. 

Competition  of  the  unfair  kind — the  competition  de- 
veloped and  fostered  by  price-cutting — is  unhealthy,  bane- 
ful and  ruinous. 

Price-Cutting  and  the  Consumer 

In  the  last  analysis  it  is  the  consumer's  interest  that 
must  be  considered  in  arriving  at  an  answer  to  the  ques- 
tion: Is  the  principle  of  price  maintenance — the  right  of 
the  manufacturer  to  fix  and  enforce  the  re-sale  price  of 
his  goods — good  for  the  consumer,  and  desired  by  the  con- 
sumer ? 

Some  contend  that  price  maintenance  raises  the  cost  of 
living;  that  it  is  an  effort  to  obtain  higher  than  fair  or 
reasonable  prices  from  the  consumer;  that  it  is  an  ex- 
pedient to  enrich  the  manufacturer.  But  those  who  argue 
thus  have  not,  as  a  rule,  given  the  whole  broad  matter  any 
serious,  deep,  wide  and  prolonged  consideration.  Their 
judgments  and  conclusions,  as  a  rule,  are  of  the  "snap" 
variety,  superficial  and  feathery.  These  good  people,  who 
may  be  very  honest,  see  in  price  maintenance  a  foe  to 
open  competition,  and  a  studied,  calculated  effort  to  en- 
hance the  final  price — the  price  to  be  paid  by  the  con- 
sumer. 

What  Happens  When  Re-Sale  Prices  Are  Too  High 

It  is  to  be  admitted,  frankly,  that  in  regard  to  certain 
specific  articles  or  products  of  the  identified,  standardized 
kind,  the  consumer  price  is  excessively  high — altogether 
out  of  relation  to  the  cost  of  production.  But  the  articles 
of  this  nature  are,  as  a  general  thing,  patented,  and  so  are 
monopolies. 

A  well-known  product,  selling  retail  at  $5,  is  a  much- 
quoted  example  of  a  standardized,  identified  product  in 
which  the  re-sale  price  is  many  times  its  production  price. 
Yet  in  spite  of  this  fact  and  knowledge,  the  article  con- 
tinues to  be  the  most  largely  consumed  of  its  class.  There 
is  no  compulsion  of  the  public  to  make  them  buy  this 
particular  article;  it  is  bought  out  of  free-will,  and  this 
in  face  of  the  fact  that  other  articles  of  the  same  type  can 
be  purchased  at  from  25c  up.  Incidentally,  it  may  be 
stated,  as  a  reply  to  the  argument  that  price  maintenance 
reduces  competition,  that  since  this  produce  was  put  on  the 
market,  at  least  40  others  of  the  same  general  type  have 


appeared;  and  they  have  appeared  because  of  the  very 
high  price  of  the  original  product;  which  means  that  any 
maker  who  puts  a  high  re-sale  price  on  his  product,  away 
above  the  costs  of  production  and  selling;  and  who,  by  ad- 
vertising, ereates  a  great  demand  for  his  product  and  type 
of  product,  merely  invites  competition  instead  of  sup- 
pressing it. 

Here  it  may  be  remarked  that  the  majority  of  price- 
fixed,  price-enforced,  standardized,  identified  and  adver- 
tised goods  are  more  or  less  luxuries;  that  is,  they  can  be 
done  without  or  replaced  with  something  very  much 
cheaper.  So  that  price-maintenance,  even  if  it  does  mean 
an  unreasonably  high  consumer's  price,  does  not  neces- 
sarily work  any  injury  to  the  individual  consumer;  he  or 
she  may  always  refuse  to  buy,  or  may  choose  some 
cheaper  substitute  or  equivalent.  If  consumers  elect  of 
their  own  free-will  to  buy  the  high-priced  trade-marked 
and  advertised  article,  when  they  are  free  and  able  to  buy 
a  cheaper,  even  if  less  satisfactory  and  acceptable,  sub- 
stitute article,  is  the  blame  for  the  seeming  extravagance 
to  be  charged  up  to  the  manufacturer  or  to  the  retailer? 
The  higher  cost  of  living  is  not  to  be  charged  to  the  mak- 
ers of  advertised,  standardized,  identified  articles  of  food, 
dress,  convenience,  indulgence  or  luxury;  but  to  the  freely- 
exercised  will  of  the  people  who  choose  to  buy  the  high- 
est-priced goods,  and  to  the  inexorable  laws  of  supply  and 
demand.  Yet  there  are  those  who  argue  that  if  the  right 
to  fix  and  enforce  re-sale  prices  be  taken  away  from  manu- 
facturers, be  refused  them,  or  taken  from  them,  the  cost 
of  living  will  fall.  It  is  rather  muddy  argument  and  not 
at  all  convincing.  Probably  what  the  foes  of  the  price- 
maintenance  principle  have  in  mind  is  combines  of  makers 
or  producers  to  corner  and  control  the  price  of  commodi- 
ties, and  they  confuse  this  with  the  admitted  freedom  of  a 
maker  of  an  article  of  which  he  has  no  monopoly  to  sell  to 
the  dealer  at  any  price  he  likes.* 

The  Maker's  Right  to  Fix  the  Dealer-Price 

Please  note  this  carefully:  it  is  granted  by  the  foes  of 
price  maintenance  that  the  manufacturer  may  fix  the 
price  to  the  dealer  at  what  he  wills,  but  they  deny  him  the 
equal  privilege  or  right  to  take  a  further  step  and  fix  the 
re-sale  price — the  price  the  consumer  must  pay;  they  leave 
this  re-sale  price  to  the  dealer  to  fix,  knowing  full  well  that 
if  the  dealer  has  liberty  to  fix  the  price  to  consumers,  he 
will  exact  more  from  them,  if  competition  permits  him  to 
do  so,  than  will  be  required  of  them  if  the  maker  fixes  the 
re-sale  price! 

As  proof  of  this  point,  it  suffices  to  say  that  retailers 
complain  that  the  makers  of  advertised,  standardized, 
identified,  price-fixed  goods  rarely  or  never  allow  them 
a  sufficient  profit;  which  means  that  they  fix  the  re-sale 
price  too  low!  So  one  asks  again — Is  it  a  bad  thing  for 
consumers  to  allow  the  manufacturer  to  fix  and  enforce 
the  re-sale  price? 

The  Knowles  Bill  Ill-Considered, 

The  bill  proposed  by  Mr.  Knowles  would  appear  to  be 
an  ill-considered  one.  To  make  it  achieve  the  ends  it 
aims  at,  he  ought  to  make  provision  in  it  for  a  limitation 
of  the  manufacturer  in  fixing  the  price  to  the  dealer — this 
first  of  all.  Then  having  fixed  this,  the  fixed  re-sale  price 
— to  the  consumer — can  safely  be  left  to  the  manufacturer 
and  dealer  to  settle. 

If,  however,  the  law  of  the  land  shall  undertake  to 
meddle  with  a  manufacturer's  production  and  selling  costs, 
the  new  state  of  things  will  be  worse  than  that  which  now 
obtains.  Costs  of  raw  materials,  labor,  manufacturing, 
overhead,  distribution,  merchandising  and  advertising,  will 
all  have  to  come  under  regulation;  and  what  manufac- 
turer will  stand  for  such  a  supervision  and  interference 
with  his  business? 


CANADIANA 


M.  0.  Hammond,  the  well-known  Toronto  journalist  has 
written  a  book  entitled,  "The  Confederation  of  Canada," 
the  appearance  of  which  coincides  with  the  50th  Anni- 
versary of  Confederation,  the  birth  of  the  Dominion  of 
Canada.  The  writer,  while  telling:  a  story  of  that  great 
political  struggle,  in  a  compact  and  partial  manner,  has 
revealed  as  never  before  related,  the  real  and  relative 
part  in  the  accomplishment  of  this  great  drama  by  the 
various  leading  men  of  the  several  Provinces,  including 
Sir  John  A.  Macdonald,  George  Brown,  Sir  George  Cartier, 
D'Arcy  McGee,  Sir  Leonard  Tilley,  Sir  Charles  Tupper, 
Joseph  Howe,  and  several  others.  It  is  history  and  bi- 
ography blended  in  a  fresh  and  enlightening  manner  tell- 
ing anew  the  story  of  the  birth  of  our  Nation. 

A  NEW  CANADIAN  NOVEL 

Isobel  Ecclestone  Mackay,  the  Canadian  author,  who 
has  several  fine  novels  to  her  credit,  has  written  a  new 
story  entitled,  "Up  the  Hill  and  Over,"  which  is  meri- 
torious not  only  for  its  action,  but  for  the  delightful  strain 
of  humor  running  through  it. 

FACTS  ABOUT  CANADA 

Frank  Yeigh's  popular  hand-book,  "Five  Thousand 
Facts  About  Canada,"  has  been  issued  for  1917.  This 
new  edition  is  a  most  valuable  and  up-to-date  compilation 
of  Canadian  data  and  information  on  a  wide  range  of 
topics,  covering  the  alphabet  from  Agriculture  to  Year 
Facts,  and  also  including  a  striking  table  of  Confederation 
contrasts,  showing  Canada's  wonderful  expansion  in  the 
half-century. 

AN  IMPORTANT  BIOGRAPHY 

"The  Life  of  James  J.  Hill"  is  an  important  new 
biography  issued  in  two  volumes,  being  the  work  of  Joseph 
Gilpin  Pyle. 

No  biography  of  recent  years  touches  Canadian  hearts 
more  deeply  than  this  remarkable  story  of  a  Canadian  boy 
who  rose  from  a  humble  Ontario  town  to  be  a  famous 
figure  in  the  vast  West.  His  boyhood  dream  of  empire 
brought  him  to  the  dizzy  heights  of  fame  and  fortune, 
yet  he  retained  the  kindly  and  gentlemanly  nature  which 
marked  him  as  a  boy.  He  broke  down  innumerable 
obstacles  to  open  the  Western  Empire  to  the  hands  of  men. 

"Make  it  plain  and  simple  and  true.  I  hate  these 
biographies  that  smear  molasses  all  over  a  man." 

These  were  Mr.  Hill's  instructions  to  his  biographer, 


BEST  SELLING  BOOKS  IN 
CANADA 

Fiction.  Points 

-Mr.   Brittllng  Sees   it  Through Wells  71 

-The   Kingdom   of  the   Blind Oppenhelm  53 

-Wildfire    (Jrey  47 

-The  Greenmautle    Buchan  26 

•When    a    Mali's   a    Man Wright  24 

-Bullets  and  Billets  Bairnsfather  22 

Non-Fiction.    .  . 

Khymes   of  a    Ited    Cross   Man Service  60 

My   Second   Year  of  the  Great   War Palmer  50 

Juvenile. 
-Children's  Books   Thornton   Barges 


selected  by  him  personally  and  given  exclusive  access  to 
Mr.  Hill 's  personal  papers. 

No  fiction  holds  more  of  romance  or  interest  than  does 
the  life  history  of  this  man,  whose  influence  was  doubtless 
the  most  potent  factor  in  the  development  of  the  wealth 
of  the  great  Northwest,  and  who  developed  railroad  inter- 
ests that  are  among  the  most  extensive  and  most  valuable 
in  the  world. 

Many  extracts  from  personal  letters  to  and  from  busi- 
ness associates,  and  Mr.  Hill's  own  descriptions  of  the 
Hill-Harriman  fight,  lend  unusual  interest  to  this  work. 


53 


FRANK   PACKARD, 
Author   of  "The  Adventures   of  Jimmy    Dale. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


GO  TO  BOOKSTORES  FOR  BOOKS! 

A  recent  number  of  A.  B.  A.  Bulletin,  which  is  pub- 
lished in  the  interest  of  the  American  Booksellers'  Asso- 
ciation, asks : 

"Ought  not  publishers  and  booksellers  to  co-operate  in 
the  closest  possible  manner  to  the  end  that  more  books  be 
sold  in  and  through  bookstores?" 

That  one  publisher  at  least  believes  in  co-operation, 
with  this  purpose  definitely  in  mind,  is  shown  by  the  notice 
which  Small,  Maynard  &  Company  print  in  their  new  com- 
plete catalogue: 

"The  net  prices  of  all  books  shown  in  this  catalogue 
are  the  prices  at  which  the  books  may  be  obtained  at  any 
bookstore.  When  ordering  from  us,  carriage  charges  on 
all  books,  excepting  those  shown  as  postpaid,  should  be 
added.  These  average  about  10%  of  the  net  price  of  the 
books. 

"We  urge  the  purchase  of  our  books,  wherever  possible, 
through  your  bookseller  saving  you  carriage  charges.  If 
he  does  not  happen  to  have  in  stock  the  book  or  books  you 
want  he  will  be  glad  to  get  them  for  you.'' 

Walter  Dill  Scott,  author  of  "The  Theory  and  Practice 
of  Advertising  and  The  Psychology  of  Advertising,"  has 
taken  on  new  duties  in  addition  to  those  of  professor  of 
psychology  and  education  and  director  of  the  psychological 
laboratory  in  Nor-thwestern  University.  He  is  now  director 
of  the  bureau  of  salesmanship  research  in  the  Carnegie 
Institute  of  Technology. 

THE  CASSELL  CENTENARY 

The  John  Cassell  Centenary,  celebrated  a  few  weeks 
ago  by  the  great  London  publishing  house  bearing  his  name, 
recalls  some  of  the  good  old  books  issued  under  the  Cassell 
imprint  and  endeared  by  their  sterling  worth  to  thousands 
of  readers,  says  a  writer  in  "The  Dial."  Founders  of 
great  publishing  houses,  such  men,  for  example,  as  Archi- 
bald Constable,  John  Murray,  Daniel  Appleton,  James 
Harper,  and  Charles  Scribner,  commonly  leave  an  enduring 
stamp  on  the  enterprises  started  by  them.  Thus  the  Cassell 
methods  and  policies  show  to-day  the  influence  of  him 
whose  boyhood  was  spent  in  the  cotton  mills  of  Manchester, 
and  who  there  acquired  a  familiarity  with  the  working- 
man's  literary  needs  that  governed  him  later,  to  a  great 
extent,  in  determining  the  kind  of  books  he  should  offer 
to  the  public.  From  his  press,  accordingly,  came  the  pi- 
oneer series  of  inexpensive  reprints,  retailed  at  sevenpence 
the  volume  and  including  standard  works  in  history,  bio- 
graphy and  science.  "John  Cassell 's  Library"  has  had  a 
very  wide  sale,  as  has  also  " Cassell 's  Popular  Educator," 
a  penny  encyclopedia,  in  serial  form,  adapted  to  the  hum- 
bler reader's  needs  and  comprehension.  "The  Magazine 
of  Art,"  established  in  1851,  has  done  much  to  popularize 
what  is  best  in  the  fine  arts.  ' '  Cassell 's  National  Library," 
edited  by  Professor  Henry  Morley,  comprised  214  volumes, 
sold  at  threepence  each,  a.  record  never  since  equalled  in 
good  and  cheap  book  production,  and  attained  a  circulation 
of  nearly  eight  million  volumes.  From  La  Belle  Sauvage 
(as  the  house  of  Cassell  fantastically  calls  itself)  have  ap- 
peared such  masterpieces  as  Stevenson's  "Treasure 
Island,"  Quiller  Couch's  "Dead  Man's  Rock,"  Rider 
Haggard's  "King  Solomon's  Mines,"  Traill's  "Social 
.  England,"  Farrar's  "Life  of  Christ,"  and  notable  works 


l\    Barrie,   Cnnan   Doyle,  Grant   Allen,  Stanley    \Vevi>:;m. 
and  other  eminent  authors. 

.Many  a  snap  may  be  picked  up  among  hargain  lots  of 
books  in  Toronto  bookshops.  I  do  not  mean  in  the  way 
of  rare  books  worth  dollars  found  among  lots  marked 
"pick  them  out  at  ten  cents  each,"  but  odd  volumes.  As 
an  instance  let  me  cite  a  book  I  bought  recently  myself 
at  10c.  This  was  Henry  C.  Taylor's  practical  volume 
"What  a  salesman  ought  to  know."  This  book  was  pub- 
lished in  L913  but  it  should  not  be  selling  at  ten  cents! 
It  should  be  a  steady  seller  at  its  full  price.  Not  that 
there  are  no  other  good  books  published  at  a  moderate 
price  that  deal  with  the  same  subject,  but  Taylor's  book 
lias  the  merit  of  brevity  and  "meatiness"  if  I  may  be 
permitted  to  use  that  term. 

First  of  all  it  gives  some  good  sound  advice  to  begin- 
ners and  then  proceeds  to  deal  with  such  elements  as 
"approaching  the  customer,"  "making  a  sample  display." 
"entertaining  customers  and  use  of  expense  account,  etc.." 
"keeping  appointments,"  "using  spare  time,"  and  other 
equally  practical  chapters. 

Now  why  should  not  the  retail  bookseller  sell  such 
volumes  to  travelers  and  those  desirous  of  becoming  trave- 
ing  salesmen? 

Because  I  have  particularly  mentioned  Taylor's  book- 
in  this  connection  it  is  not  to  be  understood  that  I  offer 
this  advice  having  that  particular  book  alone  in  mind.  It 
simply  served  to  bring  out  the  point  in  bookselling  which 
I  wished  to  make.  I  hope  that  at  least  some  booksellers 
will  act  on  this  tip.  There  are  travelers  in  the  various 
mercantile  fields  continually  coming  into  your  town.  If 
you  have  a  good  live  bookshop  they  will  find  you  and  the 
average  traveling  salesman  is  exceptionally  bright  minded 
consequently  commercial  men  as  a  class  are  good  pros- 
pective customers  for  booksellers. —  The  Bookivorm. 

AMERICAN  BOOKSELLERS'  ASSOCIATION 

The  annual  meeting  of  the  American  Booksellers' 
Association  will  be  held  in  Boston,  Tuesday.  Wednesday 
and  Thursday,  May  15,  16  and  17. 

The  book  trade  of  Boston  is  making  active  preparation 
for  the  visiting  booksellers.  Several  meetings  of  the  re- 
tailers of  Boston  and  vicinity  have  already  been  held,  and 
committees  have  heen  selected  to  as>ist  in  making  the 
forthcoming  Convention  a  noteworthy  event. 

The  Executive  Committee  consists  of  Charles  E.  Lauriat, 
Jr.,  of  Charles  E.  Lauriat  &  Company,  Richard  F.  Fuller. 
of  the  Old  Corner  Book  Store,  and  Roger  L.  Scaife,  of 
Houghton  Mifflin  Company.  This  Committee  will  also  act 
as  the  Finance  Committee. 

The  Chairman  of  the  Banquet  Committee  is  Hillings  C. 
Brown,  of  Little,  Brown  &  Company.  Benjamin  H.  Tick- 
nor,  of  Houghton  Mifflin  Company  is  Chairman  of  the 
Reception  and  Entertainment  Committee,  and  Herbert  F. 
Jenkins  of  Little,  Brown  &  Company  is  Chairman  of  the 
Publicity  Committee. 

The  Program  Committee  appointed  by  President  Ward 
Macauley,  is  composed  of  men  who  know  the  book  busi- 
ness and  who  will  present  papers  and  addresses  of  vital 
moment  to  the  book  trade. 


54 


LITERATURE  OF  THE  WAR 


llllllllllllllllllllllHllllllTPTlilllllllllllllll IIHIHIIIH II 


SIR  WILLIAM  THE  SILENT 

"Sir  William  Robertson:  The  Life  Story  of  the  Chief 
of  the  Imperial  General  Staff,"  by  G.  A.  Leask,  is  an- 
nounced for  immediate  issue.  The  life  story  of  one  who 
is  known  in  military  circles  as  "Sir  William  the  Silent," 
forms  one  of  the  most  thrilling  chapters  in  the  "romance 
of  self-help."  Having  enlisted  at  17,  he  worked  up  his 
way  from  the  ranks,  and  it  is  to  the  hitherto  unpublished 
story  of  his  career  that  the  author  devotes  this  interesting- 
book. 

Edward  Noble,  the  distinguished  novelist  of  the  sea, 
has  a  new  volume  entitled  "Outposts  of  the  Fleet."  It 
consists  of  a  series  of  entirely  new  sketches  and  stories 
dealing  with  the  work  of  the  auxiliary  services,  the  mine 
sweepers,  trawlers,  etc. 

NEW  GERMANISM  . 

Hurrah  and  Hallelujah  is  the  remarkable  title  of  Dr. 
J.  P.  Bang's  book  on  the  spirit  of  New  Germanism,  re- 
cently published  by  Hodder  &  Houghton.  Regarding  this 
book  the  author  says : 

"My  purpose  in  writing  this  book  is  to  describe  a 
movement  in  Germany  which  has  been  active  for  a  long 
time,  but  which  during  the  war  has  recklessly  east  aside  all 
considerations.  This  movement  is  two-fold:  New  Ger- 
many's view  of  other  Nations,  and  her  valuation  of  her- 
self and  her  supposed  mission  in  the  world.  My  book  takes 
the  form  of  a  comprehensive  documentation,  showing  the 
manifold  forms,  the  wide  scope,  and  the  strength  of  this 
movement,  which,  if  its  ideas  prevail,  will  be  of  the  most 
fatal  importance  for  Germanism  and  to  the  world  at 
large." 

PHILIP  GIBBS 

Newspaper  readers  who  have  followed  the  war  corres- 
pondence of  Philip  Gibbs  know  him  to  be  a  most  capable 
writer  whose  work  is  worth  following  closely.  His  book 
"The  Soul  of  the  War,"  met  with  such  a  demand  that  a 
new  and  cheaper  edition  was  brought  out  this  year  and 
now  we  have  his  second  war  book,  "The  Battles  of  the 
Somme, "  published  by  McClelland,  Goodchild  &  Stewart, 
from  whom  a  review  copy  has  come  to  BOOKSELLER 
AND  STATIONER.  This  book  explains  the  meaning  and 
the  real  progress  of  the  great  British  offensive,  beginning 
July  1  last  year. 

Dr.  Edward  Steiner  has  written  "The  Confessions  of  a 
Hyphenated  American,"  in  which  he  says  that  the  hyphen 
should  be  regarded  as  a  wedding-ring  and  not  as  a  symbol 
of  divorce.  Dr.  Steiner,  for  instance,  is  an  Austro-Ameri- 
can;  that  is  to  say,  he  was  born  in  Austria, — an  unescap- 
able  fact ;  but  he  has  been  an  American  by  choice  and 
adoption  for  some  thirty  years  and,  having  worked  his 
way  up  from  alien  to  citizen,  he  gives  this  country  his 
undivided  allegiance.  A  visit  to  Vienna  arouses  no  patri- 
otic thrill  in  his «breast.  "I  have,"  he  says,  "nothing 
but  loathing  for  this  foul  and  unthinkable  war,  for  I  have 
lived  where  it  was  bred,  and  I  have  watched  the  dastardly 


and  damnable  process.  A  generation  of  men  was  begotten 
and  trained  to  be  fodder  for  cannon  and  to  walk  joyously 
into  that  hell." 

WAR  CARTOONS 

There  is  in  preparation  a  notable  volume  comprising  a 
collection  of  pro-Ally  cartoons  by  some  of  the  most  emi- 
nent European  artists  of  the  day.  An  appropriate  preface 
has  been  contributed  by  M.  Charles  Geniaux,  whose  work- 
on  "Le  Revue  des  Deux  Mondes"  is  so  well  known.  Char- 
acteristic w7ork  by  the  following  artists  will  be  included  in 
the  book  which  will  be  published  at  a  nominal  price: 
Frank  Brangwyn,  Will  Dyson,  W.  K.  Haseldon,  Edmund 
J.  Sullivan,  Jack  Walker,  L.  Raemaekers,  L.  Berings, 
Boby,  Ricardo  Flores,  Abel  Faivre,  Albert  Guillaume,  H. 
G.  Ibels,  P.  Iribe,  Lucien  Jenas,  Koister,  C.  Leandre,  Man- 
fredini,  Lucien  Metivet,  Jacques  Nam,  R.  de  la  Neziere, 
Rey  Ordner,  A.  Roubille,  Jean  Veber,  A.  Willette,  G. 
Buffa,  Capiello,  Cesar  Giris,  Alberto  Martini,  Oehs,  P. 
Chatillon,  D'Ostoya,  Nic.  Jeremitch,  etc. 

Under  the  title  of  "The  History  of  the  Hun,"  there 
will  be  published  a  series  of  humorous  drawings  by  Arthur 
Moreland,  whose  "Humours  of  History"  achieved  such  a 
great  success.  Mr.  Moreland  makes  inimitable  fun  of  the 
enemy  throughout  the  ages  to  'the  present  day,  and  his  sa- 
tire is  all  the  more  potent  through  being  restrained.  There 
will  be  two  editions  of  "The  History  of  the  Hun,"  one  at 
a  shilling,  with  100  drawings,  and  a  cloth  bound  edition  at 
half-a-crown,  with  120  drawings.  A  pungently  written 
legend  describes  each  drawing;  and  the  publishers  antici- 
pate a  big  demand  for  the  volume. 

REVEALS  THE  NEW  SPIRIT  OF  BRITAIN 

Donald  Hankey,  author  of  the  remarkable  new  war 
book,  "A  Student  in  Arms,"  which  has  had  a  stupendous 
sale  in  England,  was  formerly  a  sergeant  and  latterly  a 
second  lieutenant  in  the  British  forces.  He  brought  to  his 
duties  a  spiritual  outlook  that  raised  the  commonplace 
details  of  army  life  and  discipline  to  the  essential  work- 
ings of  a  great  cause. 

With  regard  to  the  enemy,  he  was  a  persistent  and 
relentless  fighter;  with  regard  to  his  men,  he  was  a  fellow- 
man,  who  uplifted  them  by  the  beauty  of  his  character  and 
his  insistence  on  the  spiritual  in  every  circumstance  of 
life.  There  was  no  sad-faced  melancholy  pietist  about 
_  this  man,  and  yet  as  a  religious  influence  he  was  probably 
up  to  his  death,  the  strongest  standard  bearer  for  right- 
eousness in  the  ranks  of  the  army. 

To  those  who  wish  to  understand  the  new  spirit  in 
which  this  war  is  being  fought  by  the  civilian  fighters  of 
the  British  Empire,  this  book  shoidd  be  recommended. 

A  person  should  carefully  guard  his  conversation  if  he 
is  at  all  given  to  exaggeration  whenever  he  is  relating  the 
remarks  or  sayings  of  any  individual,  or  vainly  boasting' 
of  his  own  experiences.  Before  he  is  aware  of  it,  he  has 
established  the  reputation  of  being  an  accomplished  LIAR. 
— Successsful  Selling. 


55 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


Monthly    Record    of    New 
Books 

Published  by   Firms    Established  in  Canada 


McClelland,  goodchild  &  stew  art 

Fiction 

Lydia  of  the  Pines,  Honore  Willsie,  $1.40;  Our  Next- 
Door  Neighbors,  Belle  K.  Mandates,  $1.35 ;  Up  the  Hill  and 
Over,  Isabel  Ecclestone  Maekay,  $1.35;  The  Brown  Study, 
Grace  S.  Richmond,  $1.25;  Only  a  Dog.  Beitha  Whitridge 
Smith,  $1.00. 

Non-Fiction 

Woman,  Vance  Thompson,  $1.25;  Foster's  Pirate 
Bridge,  R.  F.  Foster,  $1.50;  Thirty  Years  in  the  North- 
west, Rev.  Jas.  Woodsworth,  D.D.,  $1.35;  Hart:  The  Mis- 
sionary, E.  I.  Hart,  D.D.,  $1.35;  Statesman  of  the  Yang-tse  : 
The  Life  of  Virgil  C.  Hart,  of  China;  The  Life  of  James 
J.  Hill,  Joseph  Gilpin  Pyle,  2  vols.,  $5.00;  A  Student  in 
Arms,  Donald  Hankey,  $1.50;  Grapes  of  Wrath,  Boyd 
Cable,  $1.50;  From  the  St.  Lawrence  to  the  Yser,  Capt. 
Frederic  C.  Curry,  $1.35;  Insect  Adventures,  J.  Henri 
Fabre,  $1.50;  The  Life  of  the  Grasshopper,  J.  Henri 
Fabre,  $1.50. 

Juvenile 
The  Adventures  of  Paddy,  Thornton  W.  Burgess,  50c ; 
The  Adventures  of  Poor  Mrs.  Quack.  Thornton  W.  Bur- 
gess, 50c. 

THE  MACMILLAN  COMPANY 
Fiction 
A   Soldier  of  Life,  Hugh   de   Selincourt,  cloth,  $1.50; 
Regiment  of  Women,  Clemence  Dane,  cloth,  $1.50;  Lost 
Endeavor,  John  Masefield,  cloth,  $1.50. 

Non-Fiction 
Italy,  France  and  Britain  at  War,  H.  G.  Wells,  cloth, 
$1.50;  The  Apostles'  Creed  To-day,  E.  S.  Drown,  cloth, 
$1.00;  Manual  Training— Play  Problems  (Educ),  W.  S. 
Marten,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Pacific  Ocean  in  History,  Steph- 
ens &  Bolton,  cloth,  $4.00;  The  Vitalized  School  (Educ), 
F.  B.  Pearson,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Cycle  of  Spring— A  Play, 
Rabindranath  Tagore,  cloth,  $1.25;  The  Human  Drift,  Jack 
London,  cloth,  $1.25;  A  Virginian  Village,  E.  S.  Nadal, 
•cloth,  $1.75;  The  Road  to  Castaly,  Alice  Brown,  cloth, 
$1.50;  A  Second  Book  of  Operas,  H.  E.  Krehbiel,  cloth, 
$2.00;  A  Year  of  Costa  Rican  Natural  History,  A.  S.  Cal- 
vert, cloth,  $3.00;  American  World  Policies,  Walter  E. 
Weyl,  cloth,  $2.25;  The  Theory  of  Evolution,  W.  B.  Scott, 
cloth,  $1.00;  French  of  To-Day,  Bacourt  &  Cunliffe,  doth. 
$1.50;  The  Breeding  of  Animals,  F.  B.  Mumford,  cloth, 
$1.75;  The  Soldier's  First  Aid,  R,  C.  Wood,  cloth,  35c. 

THOMAS  LANGTON 

Fiction 

Dabney   Todd,    Frank    N.    YVestcott,   cloth,   $1.35   net: 

The  Mark  of  Cain,  Carolyn  Wells,  cloth,  $1.35  net;   The 

Blue    Envelope,    Sophie    Kerr,    cloth,   $1.35    net;    Cleed's 

Government  Cases,  Thomas  W.  Hanshaw,  cloth,  $1.35  net. 

S.  B.  GUNDY 
Fiction 
To  Verdun  from  the  Somme,  Harry  E.  Brittain,  cloth, 
75c  net;  Magpies  Nest,  Isabel  Paterson,  cloth,  $1.40  net; 
The  Gay  Life,  Keble  Haward,  cloth,  $1.30  net;  Autumn, 
Muriel  Hine,  cloth,  $1.40  net;  The  War  After  the  War, 
Isaac  F.  Marcosson,  cloth,  $1.25  net;  Country  Chronicle, 
Grant    Showerman,   cloth,    $1.50    net;    Invisible    Balance 


56 


Sheet,  Katrina  Trask,  cloth,  $1.40  net;  Hampstead  Mys- 
tery, Watson  &  Rees,  cloth.  $1.25  net;  War  Phases  Accord- 
ing to  Maria,  Mrs.  John  Lane,  cloth,  75c  net. 
Poetry 
Oxford  Book  of  English,  chosen  by  D.  H.  S.;  Mystical 
Verse,  Nicholson  &  A.  H.  E.  Lee,  cloth,  $2.00  net;  Poems 
by  Alan  Seeger,  cloth,  $1.25  net. 

Miscellaneous 
Shakespear  Criticism,  cloth,  35c  net;  The  Cow  and  Milk 
Book,  the  Hon.  Mrs.  Lionel  Guest,  paper  bds.,  35c  net. 
Additional  to  Poetry  List 
Stars  and  Fishes,  by  George  Rostrevor,  cloth,  $1.25  net; 
A    Highland    Regiment,   Lieut.    F.    A.    Mackintosh,    cloth. 
$1.25  net. 

J.  M.  DENT  &  SONS,  LTD. 
Non-Fiction 
The  Psychology  of  Sound,  Henry  J.  Watt,  cloth,  $3.15; 
Domestic  Economy,  Part  I  and'  II,  M.  G.  Bidder  and  F. 
Baddeley,  cloth,  each  75c;  Plants  Poisonous  to  Live  Stock, 
Harold  C.  Long,  cloth,  $1.75;  Science  and  the  Nation,  A. 
C.  Seward,  cloth,  $1.50;  The  Increase  of  True  Religion, 
Cunningham,  cloth,  60c. 

THE  COPP,  CLARK  CO.,  LTD. 
Fiction 
The  Stingy  Receiver,  Eleanor  Hallowell  Abbott,  cloth, 
$1.00;   The  Son  of  His  Father,  Ridg-well   Cullum,   cloth, 
$1.35. 

CASSELL  &  CO.,  LTD. 
Fiction 
Martin     Valliant,     Warwick     Deeping,     cloth,     $1.25; 
Frailty,  Olive  Wadsley,  cloth,  $1.25;  Crucifixion,  Newman 
Flower,  cloth,  $1.25. 

Non-Fiction 
An  Introduction  to  a  Biology,  A.  D.  Darbishire,  cloth, 
$2.25  net ;  Nothing  Matters,  Sjr  H.  Beerbohm  Tree,  cloth, 
$1.50  net;  The  Nation's  Health,  Sir  Malcolm  Morris,  cloth, 
$1.00  net. 

Juvenile 
The   Scarlet   Scouts,  D.  H.   Parry,  cloth,  $1.00;   With 
Jellicoe  in   North   Sea,  Capt.   Frank   Shaw,  cloth,  $1.00; 
Boys'  Book  of  Heroes,  Eric  Wood,  cloth,  $1.00. 
MUSSON  BOOK  COMPANY 
Fiction 
The  Unknown  Mr.  Kent,  Roy  Norton,  cloth,  $1.25;  The 
Lifted  Veil,  Basil  King,  cloth,  $1.40;  The  White  People, 
Frances   Hodgson    Burnett,    cloth,    $1.20;    Wildfire,    Zane 
Grey,  cloth,  $1.35;  They  of  the  High  Trails,  Hamlin  Gar- 
land, cloth,  $1.35;  The  Best  Short  Stories  of  1916,  Edward 
J.  O'Brien,  doth,  $1.50;  Casuals  of  the  Sea,  William  Mo- 
Fee,  cloth,  $1.50;  The  Confessions  of  a  Social  Secretary. 
Corinne  Lowe,  cloth,  $1.25. 

Non-Fiction 
The  War  of  Democracy,  Viscount  Bryce,  cloth,  $2.00; 
Flying  for  France,  James  R.  McConnell,  cloth,  $1.00;  The 
New  Life,  Dr.  Samuel  McComb,  cloth,  50c;  How  to  Adver- 
tise, George  French,  cloth,  $2.00;  Awakening  of  Business, 
Edward  J.  Hurley,  cloth,  $2.00;  Benjamin  Franklin, 
Printer,  John  Clyde  Oswald,  cloth.  $2.00. 

THOMAS  NELSON  &  SONS,  LTD. 
Fiction 
The  Black  Bag,  Louis  Vance,  cloth,  25c;  The  Country 
House,  John  Galsworthy,  cloth,  25c;  The  Last  Galley,  Sir 
A.  Conan  Doyle,  cloth,  25c. 

Non-Fiction 
History  of  the  War,   Volume  15,  John  Buchan,  cloth, 
45c. 

Juvenile 
Children's  Story  of  the  War,  No.  25,  Sir  Edward  Par- 
rot t,  paper,  12c. 


BOOKSELLER  AND  STATIONER 


MUSSON  BOOK  STORE 
Fiction 

Much  Ado  About  Peter,  Jean  Webster,  cloth,  $1.25; 
Greenmantle,  5th  Edition,  John  Buchan,  cloth,  $1.25; 
Young  Blood,  Annie  Swan,  cloth,  75c;  It  Is  For  England, 
Laurence  Cowen,  cloth,  75c;  Fragments  From  His  Life, 
Bairnsfather,  cloth,  $1.25;  Somme  Battle  Stories,  Capt.  A. 
J.  Dawson,  cloth,  75c.  (Both  illustrated  by  Bruce  Bairns- 
father). The  Smiler  Bunn  Brigade,  Bertram  Atkey,  cloth. 
60c;  Arundel,  E.  F.  Benson,  cloth,  60c;  Dead  Men's  Gold, 
Eoy  Bridges,  cloth,  60c;  The  Matchmakers,  J.  E.  Buckrose, 
cloth,  60c;  The  Valley  of  Fear,  Arthur  Conan  Doyle,  cloth, 
60c;  With  the  Immortal  7th  Division,  E.  J.  Kennedy,  cloth, 
60c;  The  Bronze  Eagle,  Baroness  Orczy,  cloth,  60c;  The 
Black  Sheep,  Ruby  M.  Ayres,  cloth,  35c;  Richard  Chatter- 
ton,  V.C.,  Ruby  M.  Ayres,  cloth,  35c;  The  Uphill  Road, 
Ruby  M.  Ayres,  cloth,  35c;  The  Littl'st  Lover,  Ruby  M. 
Ayres,  cloth,  35c;  Secret  Service,  Cryus  Townsend  Brady, 
cloth,  35c;  Doing  Their  Bit,  W.  Boyd  Cable,  cloth,  35c; 
A  Fair  Refugee,  Morice  Gerard,  cloth,  35e;  The  Outlaw, 
David  Hennessey,  cloth,  35c ;  A  Spur  to  Smite,  G.  B.  Lan- 
caster, cloth,  35e;  The  Soul  of  a  Ranker,  E.  G.  Miles,  cloth, 
35c;  At  Bay,  Page  Philips,  cloth,  35c;  Disarm!  Disarm!, 
Baroness  Von  Suttner,  cloth,  35c;  Sea  Patrols,  Patrick 
Vaux,  cloth,  35c. 

Non-Fiction 
The  Lord  Kitchener  Memorial  Book,  cloth,  $1.50;  The 
Stealers  of  Light,  Queen  of  Roumania,  cloth,  $1.50;  Mr. 
Poilu,  Herbert  Ward,  cloth,  $2.50;  My  Country,  Queen  of 
Roumania,  cloth,  $1.25 ;  The  British  Campaign  in  France 
and  Flanders,  1914,  Sir  A.  C.  Doyle,  cloth,  $1.50;  The 
White  Road  to  Verdun,  Kathleen  Burke,  cloth,  $1.00  and 
50c;  At  the  War,  Lord  Northcliffe,  cloth',  $1.50;  Hurrah 
and  Hallelujah,  Prof.  J.  P.  Bang,  cloth,  $1.25;  Scraps  of 
Paper,  paper,  35c;  The  Flaming  Sword — In  Serbia  and 
Elsewhere,  Mrs.  St.  Clair  Stobart,  cloth,  $1.50;  In  the 
Northern  Mists,  Grand  Fleet  Chaplain,  cloth,  $1.25;  One 
Young  Man,  J.  E.  Hodd.er  Williams,  cloth,  35c;  Men  of 
Letters,  Dixon  Scott,  cloth,  $1.50;  Mary  Slessor,  8th  Edi- 
tion, W.  P.  Livingstone,  cloth,  $1.25;  War  and  the  Fear  of 
God,  James  Denney,  cloth,  75c;  Faithful  Stewardship  and 
Other  Sermons,  Father  Stanton,  cloth,  $1;  The  Evangel  of 
the  Strait  Gate,  Rev.  W.  M.  Clow,  cloth,  $1.50;  Soul  Atti- 
tudes, Late  Rev.  E.  J.  Kennedy,  cloth,  75c;  Stand  Up,  Ye 
Dead!  2nd  Edition,  Rev.  Norman  Maclean,  cloth,  $1.00. 
Juvenile 
Child's  History  of  the  Anzac,  E.  C.  Buley,  cloth,  75c; 
White  Queen  of  Okoyong;  The  Children's  Mary  Slessor, 
W.  P.  Livingstone,  cloth,  75c. 

EDITOR'S  NOTE— By  an  error  in  the  March  issue,  the 
new  fiction  as  reported  above  for  Thomas  Langton,  was 
included  with  last  month's  report  of  the  Copp,  Clark 
Company's  new  books. 

WILL  L.  COMFORT 

Will  L.  Comfort  has 
added  greatly  to  his  pres- 
tige as  an  author  with 
"The  Last  Ditch,"  which 
has  been  out  several 
months,  but  which  is  still 
in  strong  demand.  It  is  a 
novel  that  not  only  pre- 
sents a  strong  story,  but  is 
meritorious  for  its  excel- 
lent descriptive  passages 
and  its  excellent  interpre- 
tation of  the  spirit  of  the 
Far  East. 

57 


FORREST  REID, 
whose  picture  is  presented  here- 
with, is  the  author  of  a  new  book 
entitled  "The  Spring  Song."  One 
of  his  previous  successes  was 
"At  the  Door  of  the  Gate." 


WILiL    L.    COMFORT, 
Author  of  "The  Last  Ditch. 


A  NEW  BIRD  BOOK 

Timely  with  the  advent  of  spring  comes  a  new  bird 
book  by  Gene  Stratton-Porter,  telling  about  how  she  made 
friends  with  birds.  This  is  a  revised  and  greatly  enlarged 
edition  of  "What  I  Have  Done  With  Birds"  with  some 
of  the  author's  newest  and  best  photographs.  She  has 
called  it  "Friends  in  Feathers." 

"This  is  the  record  of 
how  I  made  friends  with 
the  birds  until  T  could 
picture  them."  says 
Mrs.  Porter  of  her  lat- 
est book.  "Many  of 
the  birds  here  shown 
never  have  been  photo- 
graphed in  their  natural 
positions  by  any  one 
else. 

"Here  are  birds, 
playing,  singing,  court- 
ing, nestbuilding,  show- 
ing fear,  anger  and 
greed  plainly  on  their 
faces.  These  are  not 
coast  and  sea  birds  that 
can  be  pictured  in 
flocks;  they  are  for  the 
greater  part,  shy,  wild 
song  birds,  that  must  be 
taken  singly  and  cen  be 
reproduced     only     after 

days  of  patient  work  and  waiting  among  them,  until  they 
become  so  friendly  that  it  is  possible  to  enter  the  bird 
family  and  cause  no  disturbance.  This  volume  represents 
the  hardest  and  most  difficult  field  work  I  have  done." 

BIRD  STUDY  FOR  BEGINNERS 

•In  "The  Bird  Study  Book,"  Gilbert  Pearson  has  writ- 
ten a  book  about  birds  for  the  beginner  or  child. 

Mr.  Pearson,  as  secretary  of  the  National  Association 
of  Audubon  Societies,  is  one  of  the  best  informed  writers 
on  birds  in  America.  The  fundamental  facts  about  bird 
study  are  found  in  Mr.  Pearson 's  book,  told  in  simple 
language  and  illustrated  with  pen  and  ink  drawings  and  a 
number  of  photographs. 

MISPRONOUNCED  WORDS 

A  valuable  new  volume  which  has  just  reached  us 
from  Funk  and  Wagnalls,  of  New  York,  is  "A  Desk- 
book  of  25,000  Words  Frequently  Mispronounced."  It 
is  the  work  of  Frank  H.  Vizetelly,  and  some  idea  as  to 
the  extent  of  his  labors  may  be  judged  by  the  fact  that 
the  book  indicated  the  correct  pronunciation  of  the  25,000 
words  it  contains  as  recorded  by  the  eight  accepted  stan- 
dard authorities  of  the  day;  traces  English  pronunciation 
from  its  first  record  to  the  present;  gives  concise  defini- 
tions of  the  less  familiar  words  and  of  proper  names; 
contains  the  pronunciation  of  all  Bible  names  as  recorded 
by  the  Authorized  Version,  the  Douai  Version,  the  Re- 
vised Version,  and  the  Apocryphal  Books;  records  of 
pronunciation  of  such  simple  words  as  may  prove  stumb- 
ling-hlocks  to  immigrants  of  continental  birth  who  are 
unfamiliar  with  the  sound  values  of  the  letters  used  in 
forming  English  words,  and  includes  in  their  correct  al- 
phabetical places,  the  names  of  those  persons,  cities, 
towns,  rivers,  etc.,  that  have  become  prominent  through 
the  European  war.  The  book  contains  910  pages,  and  is 
published  in  a  $1.50  edition. 


BOOKSELLER     AND     STATIONER 


"UNDERTOW" 

Kathleen  Xurris's  new  novel  to  be  published  March 
twenty-third  by  Doubleday,  Page  &  Co.,  under  the  title  of 
"Undertow,"  is  a  much  smaller  book  than  her  previous 
novels,  "The  Story  of  Julia  Page"  and  "The  Heart  of 
Rachael."  In  it,  however,  Mrs.  Norris  analyzes  with  her 
accustomed  keenness  for  cause  and  effect  within  the  do- 
tnestic  circle,. some  of  the  most  insidious  influences  in 
American  life. 

OH,  MARY,  BE  CAREFUL! 

George  Weston  has  written  a  delightfully  witty  story 
in  his  book  with  the  odd  title,  "Oh,  Mary,  Be  Careful," 
which  comes  from  McClelland,  Goodchild  &  Stewart.  Just 
;i  hint  as  to  its  nature  is  afforded  by  this  extract  from  the 
foreword:  "Suppose  at  your  demise  you  leave  a  daughter 
with  fifty  thousand  dollars  and  you  know  she  will  lose 
every  cent  of  it  if  she  marries.  Knowing  mankind  as  well 
as  you  do,  would  you  advise  your  daughter  to  give  up 
that  $50,000  for  a  husband?" 

HUMOR  IN  TRAGEDY 

"I  think  it  may  be  broadly  stated  that  men  of  action, 
the  great  destroyers,  the  men  who  take,  are  as  a  rule  de- 
void of  humor,  while  men  of  imagination  and  contempla- 
tion, those  who  create,  who  give,  have  the  gift  of  humor," 
says  Sir  Herbert  Tree,  in  "Humor  in  Tragedy,"  an 
address  which  appears  in  his  book,  "Nothing  Matters," 
just  published.  "I  take  it,"  he  says,  "that  the  greatness 
of  a  man  must  be  gauged  by  his  output  for  good, — the 
measure  of  his  greatness  is  in  proportion  to  what  he  gives 
to  the  world;  his  lack  of  greatness  by  what  he  takes  or 
destroys.  Shakespeare  (who  had  humor),  enriched 
the  world;  Napoleon  (who  was  without  humor),  impov- 
erished it.  Napoleon  was  sane  to  the  core,  but  he  lacked 
humor.  He  may  have  had  the  imagination  to  visualize 
the  terrors  of  the  war  and  the  suffering  he  inflicted  on 
mankind — he  did  not  possess  the  humor  to  ask  himself, 
'Is  this  worth  while?'.  "  In  this  connection,  Sir  Herbert 
compares  Emperor  William  to  Napoleon, — their  likeness, 
he  says,  is  in  their  monstrous  ambition.  "What  is  it?" 
he  asks,  "that  enables  the  Kaiser  to  pose  as  the  vice- 
regent  of  God?  Is  it  the  calm  of  a  madman.  It  is  the 
negation  of  humor.  The  Kaiser  lacked  the  divine  humor 
— that  humor  which  divine  right  cannot  confer — to  know 
the  spirit  of  England." 

THE  OTHER  WOMAN 

Octavus  Roy  Cohen  has  written  a  readable  story  about 
a  couple  of  newlyweds  in  this  book  just  published  by  the 
Macaulay  Co.,  of  New  York.  The  young  couple  find  them- 
selves suddenly  involved  in  an  unexpected  entanglement 
which  appears  so  serious  as  to  menace  their  idyllic  union. 
Indeed,  what  young  bride  would  relish  the  appearance  on 
the  scene  of  a  chorus  girl  who  claims  the  young  bride's 
husband  as  her  own  by  right  of  conquest? 

That  Maud  Leveridge,  blondined  and  painted,  came  so 
near  to  breaking  up  a  happy  home  was  really  no  fault 
of  hers.  And  if  the  whole  situation  arose  from  a  prac- 
tical joke,  its  results  came  close  to  being  no  joke  at  all 
for  at  least  four  people  involved. 

GOOD  MORNING,  ROSAMOND! 

Constance  Skinner's  new  book  "Good  Morning,  Rosa- 
mond!" is  similar  to  that  delightful  book  "Bambi. "  It 
is  a  lightsome  romance  carried  along  in  a  sparkling  sum- 
mer sea  of  dialogue.  The  author  of  this  book  is  a  suc- 
cessful English  playwright,  but  this  is  her  first  novel  and 
the  book  has  been  dramatized. 


ANOTHER  "DO  SOMETHING"  BOOK 

Helen  Beecher  Long,  of  the  "Do  Something"  Books 
fame,  has  added  another  to  the  series  this  year  in  "The 
Mission  of  Janice  Day,"  which  is  full  of  humor,  of  love, 
and  of  scenes  in  quaint  old  Polktown,  on  the  Rio  Grande, 
and  in  the  camps  of  the  Mexican  soldiers.  Wherever  Janice 
goes  she  makes  friends,  and  no  matter  how  perilous  the 
situation,  the  brave,  trusting  girl  invariably  finds  a  way 
out. 

THE  STINGY  RECEIVER 

Eleanor  Hallowell  Abbott's  new  book,  "The  Stingy- 
Receiver,"  just  published  by  the  Copp,  Clark  Co.,  is  the 
story  of  a  tremendously  wealthy,  keen-minded,  sharp- 
tongued,  bed-ridden  woman,  who  is  always  sending  pres- 
ents broadcast,  and  whose  dearest  wisli  is  this:  "That  the 
last  mail  of  the  day  may  never  leave  me  utterly  letter- 
less— and  that  I  may  always  be  expecting  a  package  by 
express. ' ' 

It  is  also  the  story  of  Solvei  Kjelland,  who  says  herself 
that  she  is  "young,  and  strong,  and  very  laughing,"  and 
who  has  just  come  from  Norway  to  America  to  learn 
about  the  Montessori  method.  But,  by  a  joyful  twist  of 
fortune,  she  learns  most  about  the  aforesaid  wealthy  wo- 
man and  about  Dr.  Sam  Kendrue,  who  is  as  tall  and  young 
and  handsome  as  Solvei,  as  brunette  as  she  is  blonde,  as 
grim  as  she  is  effervescent  and  vivid.  This  story  is  in  the 
same  sparkling  and  whimsical  strain  as  endeared  this 
author's  other  books  to  so  many  readers. 

ARISTOCRATS  OF  THE  GARDEN 

For  the  lover  of  a  beautiful  garden  with  rare,  exotic 
and  "diffeient  sort"  of  growing  things  therein,  Ernest  H. 
Wilson  has  written  "Aristocrats  of  the  Garden,"  just 
published. 

Few  men  are  better  able  to  talk  of  these  "garden  aris- 
tocrats" than  Mr.  Wilson,  who  has  traveled  in  China  and 
Japan  in  collecting  garden  rarities  and  worked  in  the  im- 
portant gardens  and  nurseries  of  Europe  and  America. 

In  this  new  book,  Mr.  Wilson  tells  of  the  wonderful 
and  beautiful  material  in  hardy  plants  and  shrubs  now 
made  available  for  American  gardens  and,  at  the  same 
time,  focuses  attention  on  the  most  worth-while  plants 
known  and  tried  out  but  unfortunately  not  yet  really  pop- 
ularized. There  is  a  pleasing  personal  atmosphere  also 
given  to  the  book  by  occasional  accounts  of  Mr.  Wilson's 
own  experiences  in  plant  hunting-  and  travel,  which  in- 
cludes an  account  of  exploring  for  the  Dove  tree. 

THE  LADY  OF  MYSTERY  HOUSE 

This  book  comes  from  the  Macaulay  Company,  of  New 
York.  It  is  a  swift-moving  tale  of  mystery  and  romance, 
with  a  pretty  plot  to  puzzle  the  reader's  wits,  seasoned 
with  the  spice  of  danger  and  just  enough  love-making  to 
suit  everyone  from  sixteen  to  sixty — and  older. 

THE  BROWN  STUDY 

Human  people,  people  of  the  everyday  walks  of  life, 
and  a  preacher-hero  who  seeks  to  "find"  himself,  are  the 
characters  one  meets  in  Grace  S.  Richmond's  new  novel, 
"The  Brown  Study." 

"The  Brown  Study,"  where  Donald  Brown  had  chosen 
to  live,  looked  out  upon  scenes  of  squalor  and  poverty.  In 
the  house  next  door  lived  Mrs.  Kelcey  and  her  "five,"  and 
there  were  old  Mr.  Benson,  the  "  full  jeweled ' '  watchmaker 
and  Jennings  the  clerk,  all  playing  important  roles  in  the 
drama  of  Brown  's  own  life,  a  life  of  stern  realism  that  had. 
been  chosen  in  the  place  of  a  life  of  luxury  in  wealthy  St. 
Timothy's  parish.  How  this  man  faced  the  greatest  crisis 
of  his  career  and  won  a  partner  to  a  life  of  love  and  use- 
fulness is  Mrs.  Richmond's  storv. 


58 


BOOKSELLER 


AND  STATIONER 


MISTRESS  ANNE 

The  eternal  trio — this  time  a  charming-  woman  and  two 
men — one,. the  drone,  a  wealthy  dilettante — the  other  the 
worker,  the  physician.  The  question  of  the  heroine 
"Mistress  Anne"  is — which?  Around  this  situation 
Temple  Bailey  has  written  another  engrossing-  love  story 
with  the  Eastern  Shore  of  Maryland  its  scene. 

PERIODICAL  NOTES 

The  "Popular  Magazine""  will  advance  its  subscription 
rate  to  $4  a  year. 

The  "Business  Philosopher"  has  reduced  its  annual 
subscription  rate  from  $3.60  to  $2.00. 

"Vaudeville"  lias  advanced  its  subscription  rate  from 
$2  to  $4  per  year. 

In  presenting  the  picture  of  A.  C.  Benson  last  month 
and  acknowledging  that  it  was  published  through  the 
courtesy  of  the  Putnam's  who  have  published  some  of 
Benson's  books  in  the  United  States  it  should  have  been 
mentioned  that  in  Canada  Benson's  works  are  published 
by  the  Copp,  Clark  Co. 

A  recent  publication  "Treasure,"  by  Gertrude  S. 
Matthews,  which  is  described  as  "a  hybrid  between  travel 
and  novel." 

The  "Manual  for  Girls"  and  the  "Manual  for  Boys" 
have  been  issued  recently  for  the  Woodcraft  League  of 
America. 

The  best  of  the  work  of  the  late  Luther  D.  Bradley, 
eartoonist  for  the  last  seventeen  years  on  the  "Chicago 
Daily  News,"  has  been  issued  in  an  attractive  book. 

The  story  of  the  remarkable  weaver  girl,  Mary  Slessor, 
is  told  in  "The  White  Queen  of  Okoyong." 

"The  Little  Book  Publisher"  announces  "Winning- 
Out,"  by  Charles  H.  Stewart,  and  "Brown-Eyed  Susan," 
by  Grace  Irwin,  as  the  first  two  publications  of  this  new 
company,  whose  purpose  is  "to  bring  out  a  line  of  little 
books  to  sell  for  under  a  dollar — novels,  poetry,  religion, 
everything,  in  fact." 

Rudvard  Kinlins'  is  also  accorded  a  literary  hobby — and 
an  unusual  one  it  is,  too — he  finds  recreation  in  the  dic- 
tionarv.  London  Answers  says:  "Rudvard  Kin!in<?  fpds 
both  pleasure  and  profit  in  reading  the  dictionary  and  this 
habit  largely  accounts  for  his  wonderful  knowledge  of 
words,  his  rich  vocabulary  and  his  newness  in  the  use  of 
words.  He  does  not  confine  himself  to  the  ordinary  dic- 
tionary. He  likes  to  look  at  a  slang  edition  or  a  dictionary 
of  dialect." 

Francis  R.  Bellamy,  author  of  "The  Balance,"  is 
twenty-nine  years  old.  He  has  been  farmer,  playwright 
and  book  salesman — the  latter  while  he  worked  upon  his 
novel,  which  has  just  been  published.  -«t^ 

Greensboro,  N.C.,  the  birth-place  of  0.  Henry,  has  just 
paid  tribute  to  the  great  short  story  writer  by  naming 
the  new  hotel  to  be  built  there  the  0.  Henry  Hotel. 

A  new  English  firm  of  publishers  is  that  of  Westall 
and  Company,  8  Adam  St.,  Adelphi,  London,  W.C.  In  this 
connection  it  may  be  added  that  a  notable  book  to  come 
from  this  house  is  a  novel  by  the  noted  critic  W.  H. 
Chesson. 

Larry  Evan's  new  novel,  "His  Own  Home  Town,"  to 
come  this  month  is  an  intense  story  of  a  man  fighting  back 
against  great  odds  in  his  home  town;  which  has  reviled 
him,  and  who  lives  to  see  it  grovelling  at  his  feet  in  the 
end.  There  is  the  love  story  of  a  woman  who  dared  to  love 
where  her  heart  bade  her. 


"Russia  in  1916,"  by  Stephen  Graham,  describes  a 
tramping  trip  made  in-  the  summer  of  1916  and  embodies 
his  very  latesl   ideas  on  the  country  and  its  people. 

Jack  London's  "The  Human  Drift"  has  a  frontispiece 
portrait  of  the  author  and  is  written  out  of  Mr.  London's 
many  and  unusual  experiences  in  all  parts  of  the  world. 

"Business  Competition  and  the  Law"  is  the  title  of  a 
book  just  put  out  by  the  Putnam's,  the  work  of  Gilbert  H. 
Montague.  It  deals  with  everyday  trade  conditions  affected 
by  the  United  States  anti-trust  law. 

The  widespread  desire  for  wholesome  humor  that  exists 
in  these  troublous  days  is  proved  by  the  warm  reception 
accorded  to  "A  Book  of  Laughter,"  by  Edwin  Pugh,  re- 
cently published  in  England.  It  has  a  specially  designed 
attractive  wrapper  by  Fred  Gardner. 

An  unusual  new  volume  is  "The  Book  of  Job"  with  a 
long  and  characteristic  introduction  by  G.  K.  Chesterton 
and  original  illustrations  by  C.  M.  Tongue. 

Sir  W.  B.  Richmond  is  perhaps  best  known  to  the  world 
at  large  as  the  eminent  artist  who  was  responsible  for  the 
interior  decorative  work  in  connection  with  St.  Paul's 
Cathedral.  In  his  seventy-fifth  year,  he  turned  his  atten- 
tion to  fiction,  and  his  first  novel,  "The  Silver  Chain"  has 
attracted  a  great  deal  of  attention  in  English  literary 
circles.  Now  that  William  de  Morgan  is  dead,  Sir  William 
Richmond  is  the  oldest  living  novelist. 

The  Putnams  published  in  March  "The  Man  in  Court" 
by  Frederic  D.  Wells,  a  work  of  humorous  visualization  of 
the  trial  of  court  actions.  The  desire  of  every  one  to  un- 
derstand the  real  meaning  of  court  proceedings  should 
ma